Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00244

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)

Full Text

: THEWIRE
PAGE 1








jI4I
AN EDITION OF THE SUN -
VOL. 122 NO.37


POPE UNDER PRESSURE
Pope Francis came under new pressure Wednesday to
punish bishops who covered up for pedophile priests.


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


arlotte Sun


CVS SNUFFS OUT TOBACCO
CVS Caremark Corp. is removing tobacco products in an
effort to focus more on being a health care provider.


www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00


PUBLISHER'S INBOX


Electronic


edition

i T read your Publisher's Inbox
Column this morning. Just to
let you know, I am one of those
people who reads the newspaper
every day. My
husband teases
me if I can't read
the paper, I am
'out of sorts.'
"A year or so
ago, there was
an item in the
Charlotte Sun
that the newspa-
Dvid per was working
Davi on making it
DUNN-RANKIN available to
people who want
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER people who want
to read the elec-
tronic edition on an iPad, or iPhone.
As yet, that has not happened. Can
you explain why? I know you have
an explanation on the home page of
the electronic edition that it needs a
flash drive in order to read.
"Since I travel a fair amount, I
prefer to take my iPad with me,
rather than the MacBook as it is
lighter, smaller and easier to deal
with. Since iPads are becoming so
popular and used more often by
more and more people, isn't there an
answer to this? When away, I miss
not reading the Sun each day. And
as my family will tell you, when I
can't read my newspaper, I can get
grouchy." NJ
NJ, if a reader is grouchy, it is
usually my fault. Never more true
than in this case.
When the Southwest Florida
economy started freefalling in 2007,
we stopped spending money on
discretionary items. We knew we
had 27 very old computer servers
hosting our software. In 2007, it was
either replace the servers or keep
more employees on staff. We chose
the employees.
Not replacing the servers in 2007
meant we could not upgrade many
of our software packages because
the servers could not handle the
demands of the newer software -
including our electronic edition
software. We also were patching
the computers with duct tape and
paper clips because Dell no longer
supported anything that old.
We watched the economy hit bot-
tom in 2009 and gradually begin to
struggle upward. We kept our wallet
firmly in our pocket. Our servers
became 10 and 12 years old. The
duct tape was wearing thin and we
had to double up on the paper clips
holding the computers together.
About six months ago, we finally felt
confident enough to make a major
investment in new servers.
We are replacing our 27 servers
with just two very large computer
servers. They are not physically
large but cost-wise large enough
to buy a house in North Port,
Englewood and Port Charlotte and
have money left over to buy a nice
used car for each house.
The new servers will be installed
by the end of February. We will
begin porting our existing software
over the month of March. In April,
we will begin upgrading our soft-
ware, with the e-edition leading the
pack.
Unfortunately, last week the paper
clip holding our 12-year-old server
hosting our e-edition failed. The
e-edition was down for two days.
We hope you will be able to enjoy
the e-edition on your plane trips
very soon. You were more gentle
with your question as to why we
waited so long than perhaps some
of my employees might have been.
David Dunn-Rankin is president
and publisher of the Sun. Email him
at daviddr@sun-herald.com.


IND XI THE SUN: Police Beat 3,7 Obituaries 5
IND X I THE WIRE: Nation 21 State 3 World 51


Daily Edition $1.00

7105121011110251 8
1 05252 00025 8


High Low
76 57


20 percent chance of rain


Five teachers fall ill

Sarasota can't find cause of sickness at Lamarque


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER
NORTH PORT Sarasota County
School District officials confirmed
that five teachers at Lamarque
Elementary School called 911
Wednesday to report they had fallen
ill, with two of the teachers transport-
ed by ambulance to the North Port
ER, and one driven in a car to an area
facility for treatment.
Although two of the instructors


\05:






107582 1


annual re

By BRIAN GLEASON fifth annua
STAFF WRITER Racing is
Friday, and
More than 100 sailors, many of whom race circles
have been shivering through a bitter Saturday ai
northern winter, will converge on Charlotte
Harbor this weekend to participate in the


Contractor


mauls mangroves


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER
PUNTAGORDA- A
city contractor hired to do
drainage improvements
along the Harborwalk, east
of the downtown, mistakenly
chopped hundreds of feet of
mature mangroves in an area
officials say was clearly off
limits.


At a City Council meeting
Wednesday, City Engineer
Mark Gering told council
members some 1,680 square
feet of wetlands had been
virtually wiped of trees over
the weekend after workers
from Quality Enterprise USA,
the Naples-based contractor
awarded the $1.47 million
MAULS 110


SUN PHOTO BY BRENDA BARBOSA
Workers are clearing away a swath of mangroves along the Harbor-
walk east path in Punta Gorda, in preparation for the city's downtown
flood-mitigation project. Monday, officials discovered the city contractor
hired to do the work chopped down a section of trees it shouldn't have.


I Legals 61 Viewpoint 81 Opinion 9


returned to the classroom, all five
teachers were lightheaded and dizzy,
according to North Port Fire Marshal
Michael Frantz, who added that all
five calls came within an hour and
a half of one another. Frantz added
that the teachers were experiencing
symptoms similar to those who suffer
from high blood pressure.
Frantz said city and county emer-
gency personnel attempted to locate
the source of a reported odor in the
school using specialized equipment,


B()R )ON


but came up with nothing during their
search.
"We know there's some ongoing
issues at the school ... but our meters
have stayed nice and steady so far,"
Frantz said.
North Port and Sarasota County
emergency personnel were joined
by school district officials and North
Port police at Lamarque Elementary
Wednesday, with as many as six
LAMARQUE 110


1050loso08


96464


PHOTO PROVIDED BY
CHARLOTTE HARBOR REGATTA
Hobie 16 sailors start a race during the 2013
Charlotte Harbor Regatta. The Hobie 16 class
is one of 11 competing in the fifth annual
regatta, which will involve more than
120 racers on 80 boats on Friday, Saturday
and Sunday. For information, go to
www.charlotteharborregatta.com.

WHERE TO WATCH
Racing begins at 11 a.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.
Saturday and 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Best onshore vantage points will be Fishermen's
Village, Gilchrist Park or Bayshore Park.
Port Charlotte Beach Park is a popular place to
watch boats launched prior to racing.


a


a Charlotte Harbor Regatta.
Asset to begin for several classes
Sthe regatta will expand to three
stretching across several miles
nd Sunday.
REGATTA 110


Veterans pay


respects to wolf

By ADAM KREGER Wednesday more than 50
STAFF WRITER some in tears gathered
at Douglas T. Jacobson State
PORT CHARLOTTE For Veterans Nursing Home in
more than a decade, Lobo Port Charlotte to pay their re-
a friendly Mexican gray wolf aspects to Lobo,
much of Charlotte County who was put i .
would come to love was down Jan. 23
busy most days visiting due to illness.
schools, veterans events, He was 15.
nursing homes, fundraisers W 11
and other community WOLF110
gatherings >IL


________':-,II 'H,_, -l--, I I-I- I F F- I-
A crowd of more than 50 gathered Wednesday at the Douglas T.
Jacobson State Veterans Nursing Home in Port Charlotte to pay their
respects to Lobo, a 15-year-old Mexican gray wolf who was put down
Jan. 23 due to illness. Vietnam veteran Tom McCarthy took in the wolf
13 years ago, and has been taking him around Port Charlotte for more
than a decade, visiting other veterans, schools, nursing homes and
other community events.

CLASSIFIED: Comics 11-141 Dear Abby 14 1 TV Listings 15


v lPick of the Day
Fender acoustic guitar
Sand case, $400
AND WEEKLY In Today's
Classifieds!
HERALD


THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6, 2014


Sails up for


Science 5,8 Business 6-7 Weather 8 SPORTS: Lotto2 CHARLIE SAYS
:''-- Look inside for valuable coupons -- -. i B s Ca Sa
SUN COUPON CALL US AT Ya gotta regatta.
:1 VALUE METER 14P2 4 941-206-1000
SL 1






Our Town Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, February 6, 2014


Homeless help to



headline joint meeting


By SCOTT LOCKWOOD
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY
- A regional discussion
on homeless issues; a
potential bus route con-
necting Port Charlotte,
Englewood and North
Port; River Road and an
update on the RESTORE
Act all headline Friday's
joint meeting of the
Sarasota and Charlotte
County commissions in
Venice.
Dr. Robert Marbut
of Texas, a national
expert on homelessness
brought to the area last
year by Sarasota County
and the city of Sarasota
to help come up with
a plan to combat one
of the region's growing
problems, will lead a
presentation on his
50-plus-page report
to the boards. Marbut
said that Englewood
leads Sarasota County
in homeless families, fol-
lowed closely by North
Port and Nokomis.
According to his report,
there are 348 homeless
families and 637 home-
less children in the
county.
Marbut has said the
best way to deal with
homeless issues is to
use a regional approach,
which is why, Sarasota
County Commissioner
Christine Robinson said,
the item was placed on
Friday's agenda.
"The homeless issue
knows no boundaries,"
Robinson said. "The
homeless problem for
families in particular
has been identified as

SUBSCRIPTIONS
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delivered 1 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
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Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
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Subscribers residing in outlying
areas may incur additional
delivery charge.

DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.................... ...... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
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Unclaimed account balances
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newspapers for classroom use.

CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-
Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.
to noon. To subscribe or to report
any problems with your service,
please call orvisit your local office.

Englewood: 941-681-3000
120W. Dearborn St.
Charlotte: 941-206-1300
23170 Harborview Rd.,
Port Charlotte
North Port: 941-429-3000
13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port
DeSoto: 863-494-0300
or toll-free at 877-818-6204
108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia


specifically problematic
in the most southern
areas of our county...
Obviously, that would
cross over into Charlotte
County."
Last fall, Robinson
moderated a discussion
at the South County
Tiger Bay Club where
Marbut was giving a
presentation on his
findings about a month
prior to the release of
his report. Robinson
invited Charlotte County
Commission Chairman
Ken Doherty, who had
indicated that Charlotte
wanted to be involved
in the conversation and
kept up-to-date with
the issue, to that meet-
ing. Doherty, who was
unavailable for com-
ment Wednesday, said in
October that Englewood
provides a great oppor-
tunity for both boards to
work together.
"It's amazing how this
is all integrating and
we're finding all these
families with children
are having a rough time
... and it's growing,"
Doherty said. "We've got
a lot of work to do and
the counties and cities
need to get together.
That joint meeting gives
our staffs enough time
to look at this and get
together and see what
we can do."
In other business
Friday, commissioners
will receive an update
on the progress of
the RESTORE Act and
discuss the potential
for joint projects that
would be funded
from fines levied


FAIR SCHEDULE
The Charlotte County Fair runs
through Sunday at the Charlotte
County Fairgrounds, 2333 El
Jobean Road (State Road 776),
Port Charlotte.

Showtimes
Tricky Dogs Show:
5:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m.
Friday; 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
and 7:15 p.m. Saturday; and
12:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. Sunday.
Great American Frontier
Show: 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.
today; 6:30 p.m., 9 p.m. and
10 p.m. Friday; 2:30 p.m.,
5:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Saturday;
and 1:15 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.
Sunday.
Wolves of the World Show:
6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. today;
5:30,7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
Friday; 3:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. and
9:30 p.m. Saturday; and 2:30 p.m.
and 5 p.m. Sunday.

Fair schedule and ride
promotions
*Today: Open 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Ride all rides from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
for $15, admission not included.


against BP following
its 2010 oil spill in
the Gulf of Mexico off
Florida's west coast.
The federal Resources
and Ecosystem
Sustainability, Tourist
Opportunities and
Revived Economies Act
directs a share of the
fines resulting from the
Deepwater Horizon
disaster to the affected
areas. Officials estimate
anywhere from $5 bil-
lion to $20 billion in
RESTORE funds could
be coming to the state.
Sarasota County
Commissioner Nora
Patterson and Charlotte
County Commissioner
Chris Constance repre-
sent the two counties
on the Gulf Consortium,
which represents
Florida as a watchdog
for RESTORE. Sarasota,
Charlotte and Manatee
counties are among
the 23 Florida counties
affected by the BP oil
spill.
Also on Friday, com-
missioners will discuss
two transportation is-
sues impacting the area,
including a proposed
public transit bus system
that would link North
Port, Port Charlotte and
Englewood. Future River
Road improvements also
will be discussed.
The joint meeting
of the Sarasota and
Charlotte County com-
missions gets underway
at 1 p.m. Friday at the
Robert L. Anderson
Administration Center,
4000 S. Tamiami Trail,
South Venice.
Email: slockwood@sun-herald.com


Friday: Open 5 p.m. to
1 a.m. Ride all rides from 5 p.m.
to 1 a.m. for $20, admission
included. No-ride general
admission is $5.
Saturday: Open noon to
11p.m. 4-H/FFA day free
admission with 4-H/FFA card,
pin and shirt; others: ride all
rides from noon to 6p.m. for
$20, admission not included.
Sunday: Open noon to
6 p.m. Student day- free
admission for all students and
school employees with a valid
ID; others: ride all rides from
noon to 6 p.m. for $15, and
regular adult admission is $5.

Regular gate admission
Adults, $7; students, $5;
children 5 and younger, free.
Parking: $5

Agriculture shows
Open breed show: 7 p.m.
Friday.

Auctions/sales all
Saturday
*Small animal auction: noon.
*Buyers'barbecue: 2 p.m.
*Large animal auction: 4 p.m.


SUN NEWSPAPERS 4
Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation 3
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-205-6400
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero .................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor .........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
Arcadian Publisher.................... Joe Gallimore .............................. 863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray ................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar.............................. 941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000

J^^'7Ze,72o1-7a71 112 -/"/e CSun^E12
I _. Honor your passed
\ rT loved ........ aym ......th a i/m
\/ ') J personalized memorial tribute i
( .ii y -- Call (941) 206-1028 for rates ._




Find The Perfect

Companion

In the CLASSIFIED!

SU NEWPPR


CHARLOTTE
EVENTS

*GOVERNMENT

* TODAY
Marine Advisory, Committee
Pre-Agenda meeting, 9:30 a.m., 18500
Murdock Circle, Bldg. B, Rm. 106-B, PC.
764-4909.
Charlotte Ranchettes,
Street and Drainage Unit Advisory
Committee meeting, 10 a.m., 7000
Florida St., PG. 575-3613.
Board of County,
Commissioners Pre-Agenda meeting,
1:30 p.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Bldg.
B, Rm. 106-B, PC. 743-1944.
Tropical Gulf Acres, Street and
Drainage Advisory Committee meeting,
3:15 p.m., 7000 Florida St, PG. 575-3613.
Construction, Industry
Licensing Board meeting, 6 p.m., 18500
Murdock Circle, Room 119, PC. 743-1245.

* EVENTS

* TODAY
American Legion Cafe,
Now serving b'fast/lunch 7a-2p.
Thu-Sun. Public welcomed. Thanks
for supporting our vets & community
2101 Taylor Rd 639-6337
Project Linus, Quilt blankets
for kids every Thurs. 9-11am Hucky's
Softball Training 17426 Abbott Ave
9-11am Nancy 627-4364
Sierra Club Paddle, Sierra
Deep Creek Paddle 9-3 led by Master
Naturalist. Reserve req. 941-637-8805
Deep Creek Elks 2763, Lunch
With Kathy 11-2:30, Initiation @ 7pm
FOE Eagles #3296, Eagles
offers Lunch Mon-Fri 11lam-2pm.
DinnerTue-Sat 5-8pm. Music
6:30-9:30pm.23111 Harborview Rd,
941-629-1645


I ENGLEWOOD EVENTS


* EVENTS

* TODAY
Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted
items every Thursday 9-11:30am
(except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove
UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533
Ewd Country Liners, 9:30-
11:30AM, Christ Lutheran Church, 701 N
Indiana Ave. Begin/intermed. line dances.
Public welcome. Nancy 474-6027
Line Dancing (Beg),
9:30 to 11:30 American Legion Post
113 3436 Indiana Rd Rotonda West
Phone Eve at 941-697-8733
Parkinson's Exercise,
Increase strength & coordination. Improve
speech & clarity. $5. Sports Complex 10Oam
call Carol 475-2123 for info.
Plant Clinic, 10-Noon, Got a
plant/tree problem? Bring in a sample
to be identified @ New Englewood
Library, 3450 S McCall 475-6903
Lemon Bay Fest, Englewood
Beach next to the playground story and
craft 2/6/1410:30 am 941-681-3736
Story Time, Thursdays 11 am
Stories, rhymes, music & play for
children of all ages. Elsie Quirk Library,
100W Dearborn 861-5000
Entertainment, V.F.W.
Englewood, Music by Dick Rivers
and Suzy 5-8 p.m.! Baby Back Ribs
5-7 p.m.!, Public Welcome. 474-7516
Post Game Night, Indoor
Corn-hole games 5-10 pm, food 5-8 pm,
3436 Indiana Rd., 697-3616 AL Post 113.


Golden Girl Play, Billery
Dean Mystery Play, tkts: 2/$10, 1/$8
7pm Green St. Church, 4743764 reserve

* FRIDAY
Crafting Cuties, Love to
Craft? Join us at Rotonda W Comm Ctr,
3754 Cape Haze Dr, Rotonda,Fridays
@9:30 am. Call Elaine at 697-0212
Line Dancing (Intr),
9:30 to 11:30 American Legion Post
113 3436 Indiana Road Rotonda West
Phone Eve at 941-697-8733
Lemon Bay Fest, The Roaring
20's in Charlotte County- Elsie Quirk
Library 2/7/1410:30 am 941-861-1200.
Seafood Dinner, Mike &
Carol's famous Seafood Dinners and
meatloaf dinners. 4:30-7:30 pm 3436
Indiana Rd, 697-3616. AL Post 113.
Ukrainian Dinners, Friday
4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call
about takeout. St. Mary's Church at
Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00 423-2427.
Entertainment, V.F.W.
Englewood, Music by Kenny Rose 5-8 p.m.!
Fish Fry or Wings 5-7 p.m.! Public is,
Welcome to come enjoy! 474-7516
VFW Seafood Night, VFW
10476 3725 Cape Haze Dr 5-8 The best
fresh haddock shrimp or scallops in
the area $10+ 697-1123
VFW Karaoka, Karaoke w/
DJ Ray after dinner service 6:30-10
VFW Post 10476, 3725 Cape Haze Dr,
Rotonda 697-1123
Golden Girl Play, Billery


Dean Mystery Play, tkts: 2/$10, 1/$8
7pm Green St. Church, 4743764 reserve
Post Dance Night, Dance with
JustDuet 7-10pm,AL Post113,3436
Indiana Rd. 697-3616 a smoke free Post.

* SATURDAY
Huge Rummage Sale,
Huge Rummage Sale at Holiday Estates
l&ll, 1445 Seagull, Englewood. 7:30am-
Noon, Sat. Feb.8th. Open Kitchen too.
Pancakes and More!,
7:30-11:30 am, egg & sausage/
biscuits & gravy/or quiche & fruit;
$5/$3 kids. EUM Church, 700 E.
Dearborn, 474-5588
Legion Breakfast, AL Post
113,3436 Indiana Rd. 697-3616 offers
$5 Breakfast 8-12 noon.
Tarpon Ecology, 830-11am
3120 Gasp Pines Blvd No reser 276 233
6364 Guided walk to Lemon Creek seining
EUMC Farmer's Market,
9 am-1 pm Farmers'Market. EUMC,
700 E. Dearborn, 474-5588. Organic
produce, natural foods, art, crafts, more!
Lemon Bay Fest, Cracker Fair-
Pioneer Plaza 2/8/1410 am 4 pmVendors,
music, food and more. 941-473-8491.
Art with Carolyn, Create
an art project, ages 5-11 registration
required scgov.net/library Elsie Quirk
Library 100 W Dearborn 861-5000
Lemon Bay Fest, Florida
Birds of a Feather crafts Elsie Quirk
Library 2/8/1410:30 am 941-861-
1200 online registration required.


I NORTH PORT EVENTS


*GOVERNMENT

* TODAY
DRC meeting, Development
Review Committee, 9am, Conference
Room 7,1001 Sarasota Center Blvd.,
Sarasota. 861-5000
Planning & Zoning,
Advisory Board meeting, 9am, North
Port City Hall chambers, 4970 City Hall
Blvd., off Sumter Blvd. 429-7000
ESLOC meeting, Enviro
Sensitive Lands Oversight, 2:30pm,
County Admin Center, Think Tank, 1660
Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. 539-4083
Planning Commission,
meeting, 6:30pm, Robert L. Anderson
Admin Center, 4000 S. Tamiami Trail,
South Venice. 861-5000

* EVENTS

* TODAY
Free Tax Help, 9am-1pm,
every Thurs., AARP Tax-Aide, San
Pedro Catholic Church Activity Center,
14380 Tamiami Tr., NP
Jazzercise, 9-10am at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more information.
Table tennis, 9-11 am, North Port
Senior Center, 4940 Pan American Blvd.,
equipment, provided, $2.00,426-6276.
Turbo Kick, Turbo Kick
9:30-10:30am at the Morgan Family
Community Center, call 941-429-7275
for more information.


Current Events Cony,
10-11:30am NP Senior Center 4940
Pan American Blvd 426-2204 bring a
topic or joke or just come & discuss
Discussion Group, 10 AM,
North Port Library, 941-861-1307, Every
Thursday bring a news article to share.
Zumba Gold,11-11:45am at
the Morgan Family Community Center,
call 941-429-7275 for more information.
AMVETS 312 Euchre,
Euchre starts at 11:30am 7050
Chancellor Blvd. 941-429-5403
NARFE Chapter 1713,
11:30 AM speaker at each meeting.,
Call 240-6127 for more info
Mexican Dominoes,
12-3pm NP Senior Center 4940 Pan
American Blvd 426-2204 Come learn
the game &join all the fun
Rummage Sale, Early Bird
Sale $1 admission 3-6pm NPCUCC 3450S
Biscayne Dr NP 426-5580 All welcome!
AMVETS 2000 Dinner,
LAUX Roast Pork Tenderloin 4-7pm
$7. Members/Guests welcome. QOH @
7pm. 401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999
Bingo VFW 8203, Bingo
is fun for all ages, come and enjoy
excitement of the game. Come try your
luck, you mite even WIN a game or two
Aux Chicken Parm, On 2/6
@ 6pm 6648 Taneytown st 941-423-
7311 Serving Fresh Homemade
Chicken Parm heros, $6 w/dessert
Zumba, 6:30-7:30pm at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more information.


* FRIDAY
Basic Exercise, $40/8wks or
$2/class 9-10am NP Senior Center 4940
Pan American Blvd Marcelle 235-0346
Join today & start to feel better
Take Out, Pierogies/Kielbasa,
Every Fri. lOam-6pm Sat. lOam-1pm.
St. Andrew Ukr. Ctr. 4100 S. Biscayne
Blvd. North Port. 941-786-5256
Free Tax Help,
10:30am-2:30pm, every Fri., AARP Tax
Aide, North Port Senior Center, 4940
Pan American Blvd., NP
Tai Chi, 10:30am-12pm NP
Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd
Call for cost Jerry 496-4932 Helps with
balance
Lunch VFW Post 8203,
Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues, Sat,
Sun, Take out & Public welcome sit enjoy
Enjoy great food & special in canteen
Book Discussion, Discuss
Heart a Lonely Hunter, C. mccullers.
no.port Library 13800 STamiami Trl.
Fri Feb.7, 3-4:30pm 861-1300 All
Welcome
Ukrainian Dinners, Friday
4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call
about takeout. St. Mary's Church at
Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00 423-2427.
Elks 2153 fish fry, AYCE
FISH+full menu-5-8pm. Just Friends
Karaoke. Members & Guests 625-7571
Kenilworth, Port Charlotte Elks
Fish Fry Post 8203, Come
and enjoy the best Fish Fry in town,
your choice of Bake, Fried or Chicken,
Shrimp and all the fixings


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS

Featured Events
8th Annual Harbour Heights 5K Run/Walk, Run/Walk
event to raise funds for Autism Speaks and SEC classes at5 CC Schools. Event date
is Feb. 22; preregistration is 7am, race starts at 8am. 27420 Voyageur Dr., PG. Price:
$15 in advance until 2/8, $20 day of the event Awards in 20 age groups, raffles,
giveaway gifts, refreshments. 258-2890.
The Best Valentine Gift Ever, On Feb. 12 through Feb. 14, The
Suncoast Statesmen Barbershoppers will provide a quartet to sing two love songs,
present a rose and take a photo for a unique singing Valentine. Surprise your
sweetheart at homework or at whatever time & place you choose in Charlotte
County for only $40.625-1128.
San Antonio Trash and Treasure Sale, San Antonio Annual
Trash and Treasure Sale, 8 a.m. to 12 noon, Sat, Feb. 8,24445 Rampart Blvd., PG.
Largest rummage sale of the county! Under one roof. All are welcome. For info, call
941-613-5909.
Photo Scavenger Hunt, Scavenger Hunt, 9-11:30am, Sat, Feb. 8,
New Hope Christian Fellowship (Liberty Elementary), 370 Atwater St, PC. Support
military families in need. Proceeds benefit Operation Homefront Clues given event
day. Individuals $7; Teams $25/car (5 people). Prizes top 3 teams-back by deadline.
916-5239.
Gifted Gator Lunch Fashion Show, 10:30 a.m.,Thurs., March 6,
Mardi Gras Fashion Show Luncheon at the PGI Civic Ass'n, 2001 Shreve St., PG.
This unique event has live models presenting artisans' hand-crafted wearable art;
home decor art and gifts. Open to the public. Purchase $20 ticket at the PGICA;
www.pgica.org; 941-637-1655.
Diana's Wire Wrapped Jewels, From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tues.,
Feb. 11, Diana Reinhart, celebrated artist, will demonstrate how she creates her
beautiful wire wrapped jewels. Free and open to the public at the PGICA, 2001
Shreve St., PG. www.pgica.org; 941-637-1655.
40th Anniversary Concert, Charlotte County Concert Band
celebrates 40 years of making music at an anniversary concert on Sun., Feb. 9, at
2 p.m., at the Cultural Center of Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St, PC, featuring
guestvocalist 14-year-old Hannah Jae. $11 CC members; $12 others; $13 day of
show. 941-625-4175.
FOE Eagles #3296, We invite you to stop in for dinner Feb. 6 & listen
to the greatduo sounds of'ItTakes 2"If busy, then come in Fri., Feb. 7, for a fish
fry dinner & listen to the one man show by Bill Bower. Dinner 5-8pm; music 6:30-
9:30pm. Accepting member applications. 23111 Harborview Rd., PC. 629-1645.
Irish Club Meeting & Open House, Meeting and potluck dinner
will be held at 5 p.m.,Tues., Feb. 11, at 4500 Harbor Blvd., PC. Irish Club free open
house will be held from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Sat, Feb. 15, at 4500 Harbor Blvd., PC.
Music by Stephen's Green. For info, call 941-204-2088.
Tea Party General Meeting, PG Tea Party Monthly meeting Thurs.,
Feb. 6. Doors open 6 PM; Meeting starts 6:30 PM, Charlotte Park Civic Association
Bldg., 420 PompanoTerrace, Punta Gorda. John Stahl speaks on Immigration.
Open to Public. No Charge. 941-655-8627.


OurTown Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014










Authorities: Guns stolen from pawn shop


ENGLEWOOD -
Authorities need help to
catch a pair of suspects
who reportedly broke
into Kings Pawn early
Tuesday and stole guns.
Two suspects wearing
hoods and gloves entered
the shop, at 2485 S.
McCall Road, around
3 a.m., according to
the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office. Several
firearms were missing
from a smashed display
case. The glass front door
was broken out. The
suspects were caught on
camera pulling up in a
dark vehicle.
Anyone with informa-
tion is asked to call the
CCSO at 941-639-2101,
or Crime Stoppers at
800-780-TIPS (8477).

Man's
Harley stolen
PORT CHARLOTTE -
Somebody stole a man's
1986 Harley-Davidson
FXRS motorcycle when
he left it on the side
of the road Saturday
afternoon after it had
broken down, according
to the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office.
The victim was riding
from North Port to Port
Charlotte when his bike
broke down around
1 p.m. near Biscayne
Boulevard and Ellington
Street in Port Charlotte.
The man left it to get
his truck and trailer to
retrieve his ride, only to
come back and find it
missing.
The motorcycle is
black with a one-piece
carbon seat with black
flame stitching and a
short passenger backrest.
The mirrors had skele-
ton-hand frames. The
bike's tag is 18896L.
Anyone with informa-
tion can call the CCSO at


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


941-639-2101, or Crime
Stoppers at 800-780-TIPS
(8477).

Report: Woman
uses scissors to
threaten man
SOUTH VENICE- A
51-year-old woman was
arrested Tuesday after
she allegedly employed
scissors to threaten a
man.
According to a Sarasota
County Sheriff's Office
report, the 32-year-old
victim was talking on the
phone in the kitchen of
a home on Osage Road
in South Venice just
before 1 p.m. When he
put the phone down, the
report states Melodie
Gay Gradert, 51, grabbed
a pair of black-handled
scissors and put them
up in the air like she was
going to stab the victim.
The man told deputies
that Gradert also pushed
him and said, "I'll kill
you." The report doesn't
state what spurred
Gradert's actions toward
the victim.
Gradert was charged
with aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon.
She was held at the
Sarasota County Jail
without bond.

Report:
15-year-old broke
into homes, fled
PORT CHARLOTTE -
A 15-year-old breaking
into a neighbor's home
Tuesday on Laramore
Avenue was seen by a
young boy who reported
the incident, according
to a Charlotte County


Sheriff's report.
When deputies
responded to the area
around noon, the
suspect was spotted on
LaSalle Road, the report
shows, and he fled.
The teen was able
to duck authorities for
more than three hours
by jumping fences and
running between houses,
but he eventually was
caught near Midway
Boulevard and Page
Street around 3:30 p.m.,
the report shows.
Detectives reportedly
were able to link the
suspect to three previous
burglaries on Laramore
Avenue. In all, the teen
was charged with four
counts of burglary of an
unoccupied dwelling,
two counts of petty theft,
and one count each of
burglary of an occupied
dwelling, grand theft,
dealing in stolen prop-
erty, criminal mischief
over $1,000, giving a false
name to law enforce-
ment and resisting an
officer. He was turned
over to the Department
of Juvenile Justice on
Wednesday.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Kristina Dawn Jongsma, 37,
11900 block of Casandra Ave.,
Englewood. Charge: DUI. Bond: none.
Priscilla Lin Stryder, 41,300
block of Fairhaven St., Port Charlotte.
Charges: taken off bond on three
counts. Bond: none.
Jonathan Robert Powers, 37,
1600 block of Inverness St., Port
Charlotte. Charges: grand theft,
fleeing to elude and resisting arrest.
Bond: $12,500.
Danny Lee Coleman, 24,23300


block of Abrade Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: out-of-county warrant.
Bond: $5,000.
Robert Dominic Sirangelo,
30,18100 block of Charter Ave.,
Port Charlotte. Charge: violation of
probation (original charge: DUI).
Bond:none.
Calvin Antonio Cornelius, 21,
2400 block of Achilles St., Port
Charlotte. Charge: violation of
probation (original charge: driving
without a valid license). Bond: none.
John Joseph Sury, 28, 5200 block
of Johnson Terrace, Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of pretrial-release
conditions. Bond: none.
Brian Randall Frost, 39, 400
block of Pennsylvania Ave., Osprey.
Charge: out-of-county warrant.
Bond:$500.
David Anthony Williams, 24,
5600 block of Spearman Drive, North
Port. Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
none.
Richard Allen Charette, 60, 8500
block of Bumford Ave., North Port.
Charges: possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription, and
possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana. Bond: $3,000.
Jesus Gonzalez, 48, of North
Fort Myers. Charges: driving with a
revoked license, possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $10,000.
Kenneth Arthur Shelton, 72,
homeless in Englewood. Charge:
trespassing. Bond: $2,500.
Hashem Brown, 20,100 block of
Green St., Englewood. Charge: failure
to appear. Bond: $15,000.
Juan Manuel Nava-Aquino, 30, of
N.E. Oak St., Arcadia. Charge: driving
without a valid license. Bond: $1,000.
Tyler Ray Carlan, 22, 600 block of


S. Orange Ave., Arcadia. Charges: two
counts of possession of drug para-
phernalia, possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana and possession
of a controlled substance without a
prescription. Bond: $12,500.
Richard Lee Patterson III, 17,
1200 block of Slash Pine Circle,
Punta Gorda. Charges: grand theft
and violation of probation. He was
released into home detention.
Tyler Jay Brugman, 22, Colony
Court, Punta Gorda. Charge: petty
theft. Bond: $2,500.
Jennifer Motta-Guedes, 32,
homeless in Punta Gorda. Charge:
violation of probation (original
charge: petty theft). Bond: none.
Stephen Maurice Barnes, 38, of
Hollywood, Fla. Charge: DUI. Bond:
none.
Johnnie Kaye Parker, 35, 9200
block of Mandy St., Punta Gorda.
Charge: burglary with assault or
battery. Bond: $30,000.
Kara Anne White, 23, 200
block of Corumba St., Punta Gorda.
Charges: possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription, and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $7,500.
Rashad Rasheem Meynard,
21,1100 block of Rio de Janeiro
Ave., Deep Creek. Charge: violation
of probation (original charges:
possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia). Bond: $1,000.
Venecia Demek, 61,17100 block
of Sarong Lane, Punta Gorda. Charge:
battery. Bond: none.


Robert Allen Parker, 15100
block of Richmond St., Punta Gorda.
Charges: possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription,
possession of methamphetamine
with the intent to sell and possession
of drug paraphernalia. Bond: none.
Brandy Nicole Gibson, 29, 6400
block of Scott St., Punta Gorda.
Charges: four counts of giving
worthless checks. Bond: $40,000.
Donald Lee McLucas III, 24, 500
block of Corto Andra St., Punta Gorda.
Charges: possession of more than 20
grams of marijuana, possession of
marijuana with the intent to sell and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond:none.
Patrick Charles DeRoche, 23,
2400 block of Sunshine Blvd., Punta
Gorda. Charges: possession of
more than 20 grams of marijuana,
possession of marijuana with the
intent to sell and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond: $12,500.
Richard Raul Rendon, 28,
11900 block of Gretchen Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon,
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, possession
of drug paraphernalia and violation
of probation (original charge:
petty theft third or subsequent
offense). Bond: none.
Fernando Arturo Frometa, 32,
2300 block of Redstone Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana,

ARRESTS 17


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Anthony Feroce (941) 258-9527
Port Charlotte, South of Harbor Blvd. & Punta Gorda
Bibi Gafoor (941) 258-9528
Port Charlotte, North of Harbor Blvd.
Punta Gordi,:i rj(941) '58 640O
Englewood (941) 681-3000
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America's BEST Community Daily Venice (941) 207 1000


I


:The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 3


I


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





:OurTown Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014


SCSO hopes new'Jane Doe' images spur leads


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY
- It was seven years ago
Thursday that the re-
mains of a white female
were found in a shallow
grave near an industrial
area in Sarasota, and
she is still the Sarasota
County Sheriff's Office's
only unidentified body,
or "Jane Doe."
Investigators hope
new technology and
computer-related imag-
es will yield new clues,
and will lead them to a
crucial piece of informa-
tion to finally give Jane
Doe her real name and
lay her to rest.
"Maybe it will ring a
bell for someone, jar a
memory" said Maxine
Miller, the SCSO crime
scene technician who
was the first to examine
the body. "It's important


for us to figure out who
she is."
While that crucial
piece of information
still escapes them, what
investigators do know is
the woman was in her
30s or 40s at the time of
her death, weighed 145
to 165 pounds, stood
roughly 5 feet 4 inches
to 5 feet 9 inches tall,
and had long brown
hair with blond streaks.
Her cause of death
has not been released,
but she may have had a
broken nose and a frac-
tured right wrist at some
point in her life. She also
had breast implants that
were manufactured prior
to the issuance of serial
numbers.
Kids discovered her
body on Feb. 6, 2007,
on the 4300 block of
Ashton Court, near
Clark Road, according
to SCSO spokeswoman


Wendy Rose, and
authorities believe she
had been dead for up to
a year at that point.
The new images
released Wednesday
were created by the
Palm Beach County
Sheriff's Office, using
craniofacial reconstruc-
tion software, updating
the original sketches
created by the FBI in
2007.
Miller said several
nationwide missing
persons databases exist,
with some being run
by both authorities
and the general public,
many of whom are using
the databases to share
information about their
missing loved ones.
The new images will be
shared on those data-
bases, she added.
Miller also said a
"stable isotope analysis"
of the victim's teeth


is being conducted to
determine where Jane
Doe was raised, and
where she may have
been living in the last
seven to 10 years.
Miller believes that at
the time of her death,
the victim had been
in Sarasota County for
a "recent amount of
time," and likely came
from another area.
SCSO Sgt. Kevin
Pingle, the lead detec-
tive on the case, said it
was hard to determine
the amount of man
hours put into the
investigation so far, but
like Miller, he's hoping
the new information
will shake loose some
much-needed leads.
If Jane Doe's family is
out there, and they're
hoping to find out what
happened to her, Pingle
wants these new images
to help authorities


PHOTO PROVIDED


The Sarasota County Sheriff's Office on Wednesday released
new, computer-generated images of a woman whose remains
were found in a shallow grave in Sarasota in February 2007.
Detectives hope the release will help them identify the
woman, known only as "Jane Doe.":'


reunite her with her
family.
"I'm always hopeful
someone will recognize
the picture and come
forward," he said.
Anyone with infor-
mation is asked to


call SCSO Criminal
Investigations at 941-
861-4900, or Crime
Stoppers at 941-366-
TIPS (8477); or go to
www.sarasotacrime
stoppers.com.
Email: dwinchester@sun-herald.com


'Honor Flight' showing at Lemon Bay High School


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER

PLACIDA -How do
you make history real for
high school students?
Lemon Bay High
School plans to do so by
inviting local veterans to
share their experiences
after a showing of the
movie "Honor Flight."
"It's bringing (in)
history, making it real.
(Students) have studied
and read about it, but
(this will) bring in a
human element," said
Michelle Wier, assistant


principal at the school.
The movie, released in
2012, is a documentary
following four World War
II veterans as a Midwest
community honors
them by flying them to
Washington, D.C., so they
can see, for the first time,
the monument dedicated
to their service.
"I'm glad I saw it in
advance because now
I know I will cry like a
baby," Wier said. "It's very
touching."
The showing, spon-
sored by Tidewell
Hospice at 5955 Rand


Blvd., Sarasota, is free
and open to the public
and will take place from
9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Feb. 13 at the Lemon Bay
Performing Arts Center,
2201 Placida Road,
Englewood.
According to Dave
Glaser, Tidewell's director
of communications,
the movie was offered
to it by the National
Hospice Organization,
which partnered with the
filmmakers to offer the
movie throughout the
country.
"We've gotten great


reviews on the film and
thought it would be a
great movie to show in
Charlotte County," Glaser
said.
Tidewell chose the
high school as a venue
because of the oppor-
tunity to bring veterans
and students together.
"We're really excited
about (the showing), and
I know (the school was)
excited for us to bring
it there. I think it'll be a
really good partnership
and a lot of students will
be there at the screen-
ing," he said.


Following the movie,
there will be a question-
and-answer session so
students can ask veterans
about their personal
experiences.
Wier said the school
has prepared questions


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


National Art
Exhibition set
The Ninth Biennial
National Art Exhibition
will be held from now
through March 9 at the
Visual Arts Center, 210
Maud St., Punta Gorda.
A total of 130 works were
selected from hundreds
of artist entries from
across the country.
During the exhibit, the
VAC will be open seven
days a week.


The arts center will
"Toast the Winners" of the
exhibition at 7 p.m. today.
The 130 entries will vie for
more than $7,000 in prize
money, including $2,000
for Best of Show, based
on judge Carl Samson's
selections. The public is
encouraged to attend the
champagne reception to
mingle with the artists
and watch the winners re-
ceive their awards. Tickets
to the awards ceremony
cost $5, and may be


purchased at the VAC. For
more information, call
941-639-8810.

Senior Center
Chili Cook-off
A Chili Cook-off contest
will be held from 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Feb. 15 at the
North Port Senior Center,
located in the Community
Educational Center
at 4940 Pan American
Blvd. Chili, beverages
and condiments will be


SUN4
NEWSPAPERS
Mid-Winter Open House

& Collector Car Show

Saturday, February 8, 2014
9 AM to 1 PM at the
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte
ADMISSION IS FREE!

Tours of Sun Newspapers office and plant
10:00am Noon

See how your AWARD-WINNING NEWSPAPER operates!
Live Music from "Power Outage Continues"
Guest Appearance by Las Vegas Performer Jimmy Mazz
Enjoy the vehicles that represent transportation of YESTERYEAR, including
antinha clasics nnrtf cnavial interet mntnrinvlI and trucks that will hb nn riknlav.


I I11 eVenlt I UCII LU Uly IIUII-IIIUUII I c s V lll.lCr elll LII IC I IIU I strtiILIUII IonTee.
Owners that will exhibit at the newspaper must pre-register with
Veteran Motor Car Club of America
941-235-7701 or 941-575-0202
(For Registration Only) (For Information Only)
24+ Trophies to be awarded One Trophy is over 4' Tall!
Space restrictions allow for a total of 100 entries Vehicles must be 23 years old
Sun Newspapers 23170 Harborview Road Port Charlotte
Cmrvr 8 ai &


available. Chili will be
prepared by Senior Center
members and members
of the community. Cost is
$1 for each bowl of chili
you want to sample. For
more information, call
941-426-2204.

Gourmet
pasta dinner
Knights of Columbus
plans its second gourmet
pasta dinner of the year
on Feb. 21 in the St.
Raphael Church Parish
Center, 770 Kilbourne
Ave., Englewood. Tickets
are $8 in advance and
$9 at the door. Dinner
will be served from 4 to
7 p.m. Attendees are
urged to get their tickets
early. The sale of tickets
by members of the K of C
will be conducted around
the church the weekend
of Feb. 16-17. Tickets will


also be available in the
church office until noon
on Friday, Feb. 21. Tickets
at the door will be limit-
ed. Contact Jim LeClaire
at 941-475-2155.

Pop Warner
registrations set
Pop Warner will hold
registrations for football
and cheer from 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. today, and
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday, at the Charlotte
Warriors home field,
2610 Carmalita St., Punta
Gorda. The league's
season runs from
August to December. It
is for boys and girls 5 to
15 years old. Football and
cheer registrations cost
$200. Additional times
and dates for registration
will be announced. For
more information, call
941-347-7200.


to get the ball rolling,
and Tidewell is provid-
ing an emcee to direct
the event. She antic-
ipates the forum will
run from 10:30 a.m. to
11:45 a.m.
Email: iross@sun-herald.com

RUBYTUESDAY
GIVEBACK EVENTS
Ruby Tuesday restaurant in
the Port Charlotte Town Center
mall offers a Community
GiveBack Program for area
nonprofits, churches, schools
and others. This is a great way
to raise money for your cause
while enjoying lunch or dinner,
organizers say. Ruby Tuesday
gives back 20 percent of net
sales to each organization.
The following organizations
have GiveBack events sched-
uled for this month. If you are
interested in supporting any of
these, visit the organization's
website for a flier or contact
the group/individual and
request a flier to attend.
SWednesday-- Char-
lotte Desoto Building
Industry Association
The mission of the Future
Builders of America -
"Learning Today, Building
Tomorrow"- is to help
students pursue careers in the
building industry by providing
education and technical
training by awarding scholar-
ships, assisting in apprentice-
ships and job placement.
Contact: Rick llmberger at
suncoast-glass@yahoo.com.
Feb. 15- Interna-
tional Angelman Day:
Foundation for Angelman
Syndrome Therapeutics
Contact: Kat Rankins at
630-852-3278 or kmrankins1@
gmail.com.
Feb. 17- Port
Charlotte Jewish Communi-
ty-Temple Shalom
Temple Shalom is
a welcoming reform Jewish
congregation that strives to
meet the spiritual, educa-
tional, cultural and social
needs of its members.
Contact: Joyce Gelfand at
jteachu@yahoo.com.
Feb. 21 Habitat for
Humanity Women Build
Contact: Doreen Stoquert at
dstoquert@centurylink.net or
941-276-6892.
Feb. 26- American
Cancer Society Relay for
Life
Relay for Life raises much-
needed funds and awareness
to save lives from cancer. Relay
for Life of Port Charlotte will
be held April 12-13 at Port
Charlotte High School.
Contact: Ken Johnson at
941-625-1167, or visit www.
relayforlife.org/portcharlottefl.


IF YOU GO
What: Honor Flight (2012) a documentary that follows four
WWII veterans and a Midwest community's efforts to bring them to
the Washington D.C. memorial created for them in 2004 followed
by a question and answer forum.
When: 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. (including Q&A) on Feb. 13.
Where: Lemon Bay High School Performing Arts Center at 2201
Placida Rd., Englewood.
Free admission.


CiMcCarHtney Dental


D Jonathan McCartney D.M.D.
New Patient Exam & X-rays
^ Not valid with use of Insurance or other discounts/
coupons. "7D7 e Codes that may apply for new
patient exams" D40 DO 1050is, D 0 180, D0210,
SD0220, D0230, D024, D0330. Exp. 4/30/2014
"Classic" Complete Denture
('f3 Not vald wuith use of Insurance or other
discounts/coupons. "7VD7\ Codes that may
apply" D5 0, D5120. Exp. 4/30/2014
Removable Partial "Cast Framework"
(^ \Q^ ^ Not val d w lthi use of Insurance or other
dicounts/coupons. "74Dae Codes that may
Supply" D52o3, D5214. Exp. 4/30/2014
2569 N. Toledo Blade Blvd. Office: 941-423-4334
S North Port, FL 34289





The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES


CHARLOTTE


Richard C. Day
Richard C. Day 77,
passed away Monday,
Feb. 3, 2014, in Port
Charlotte, Fla.
He was born June 25,
1936, in West Palm
Beach, Fla., and moved
to Punta Gorda, Fla., in
1938.
Richard is survived
by his daughters, Susan
DayWells and Holly
Day Smith; grandsons,
Dalton Smith and Hunter
Wells; great-grandson,
Levi Smith; many nieces
and nephews; along with
special cousins, Gary
Day, Ros Day, Warner
Day, Jerry McLendon,
Lucia Ann Ridlehoover
and many others. He
was preceded in death
by his wife, Ruth Kidd
Day; parents, George and
Grace Day; sister, Billy
Jean Bourgeault; broth-
er, George J. Day; and
great-grandson, Jared
Ross Nieberg.
A celebration of
Richard's life will be
held at 1 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 8, 2014, at Charlotte
Memorial Funeral Home
and Cemetery, 9400
Indian Springs Cemetery
Road, Punta Gorda.
Following the service, his
cremated remains will be
carried on horseback to
their final resting place
next to his loving wife at
Indian Springs Cemetery.
Friends and family then
will return to Charlotte
Memorial for food,
fellowship and fun.
In lieu of flowers,
the family asks that
donations be made
to: Tidewell Hospice,
1158 Veronica St., Port
Charlotte, FL 33952;
Charlotte County Cows
n' Plows, 30275 Beech
Road, Punta Gorda,
FL 33982; or Charlotte
Senior FSA, 1250 Cooper
St., Punta Gorda, FL
33950.
Arrangements are
by Charlotte Memorial
Funeral Home, Cemetery
and Crematory.

Jack P. Gilbert
Jack P Gilbert, 88,
of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
died Tuesday, Feb. 4,
2014, at his residence,


under the care of hos-
pice. Arrangements are
by Charlotte Memorial
Funeral Home,
Crematory and Cemetery.

Laszlo Kolody
Laszlo Kolody, 81,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Monday,
Feb.3, 2014.
He was born Sept. 26,
1932, in Hungary.
Laszlo immigrated to
the United States from
Hungary in 1972, to have
a better life. He was a
member of and very in-
volved in the Hungarian
Club of Venice, Fla.
Laszlo loved his friends,
and enjoyed dancing and
fishing.
He is survived by his
daughter, Maria Gal of
Passaic, N.J.; stepsons,
Peter (Janet) Ancsin and
George Ancsin, both
of San Diego, Calif:
grandsons, Laszlo (Kinga)
Lenart of Chicago, Ill.,
and Tomas Lenart of
Hungary; granddaughter,
Maya Gal of Chicago;
step-granddaughter,
Elise Ancsin of San
Diego; companion,
Kristina Pingiczer of
Port Charlotte; and two
sisters of Hungary. Laszlo
was preceded in death
by his wife of 30 years,
Elizabeth.
A celebration of his
life will be held at 1 p.m.
Thursday Feb. 13, 2014,
at the Hungarian Club,
165 Jackson Road, Venice,
FL 34292.
Arrangements were
made in Port Charlotte.

ENGLEWOOD


Marvin Demanzuk
Marvin Demanzuk,
94, of Englewood, Fla.,
died Monday, Feb. 3,
2014. Arrangements are
by Lemon Bay Funeral
Home and Cremation
Services.

Richard 0. Joslyn
Richard 0. Joslyn,
86, of Overland Park,
Kan., died Wednesday,
March 13, 2013, in
Englewood, Fla.
Arrangements are by
Lemon Bay Funeral
Home and Cremation
Services.


Richard C.
Lohman

Richard C. "Dick"
Lohman, 90, a 40-year
resident of Englewood,
S Fla., and for-
.. merly of North
'", .. Royalton,
Ohio, passed
away Sunday,
Feb. 2, 2014, at his
home.
He was born May 8,
1923, in Cleveland, Ohio.
Dick was a World
War II Veteran, serving
in the Pacific, with
the Army Medical
Corps. He had a long,
distinguished career in
elementary education
as a teacher, guidance
counselor, principal
and assistant superin-
tendent in Ohio and in
Englewood. Dick was a
graduate of Kent State
University in Kent,
Ohio. He had a life of
dedicated service to
the communities of
North Royalton and
Englewood, with lead-
ership in numerous
professional education
associations. Dick was
an active member of the
Kiwanis, The Salvation
Army and the United
Methodist Church.
Grateful for having
shared his life are
his wife of 70 years,
Dorothy; brother,
David (Alta) Lohman;
children, Rick Lohman
and Lynn (Thomas)
Lohman-Balamut;
grandchildren, Melissa
Lohman, Amanda
(David) Yeu and Lesley
Balamut; great-grand-
children, Evelyn and
Annie Yeu; and many
nieces and nephews.
He was preceded in
death by parents, Joseph
and Berniece Lohman;
sisters, Joyce Hardy
and Jeanne Wyman;
and brother, Joseph
Lohman Jr.
A memorial service
will be held at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014,
at Englewood United
Methodist Church in
Englewood. Interment
is private. In lieu of
flowers, donations may
be made to the United
Methodist Men's College


Scholarship Fund,
Englewood United
Methodist Church,
700 E. Dearborn St.,
Englewood, FL 34223.
Arrangements are
by Lemon Bay Funeral
Home and Cremation
Services.

NORTH PORT


Virginia Latham
Virginia Latham,
81, of North Port,
Fla., and formerly of
St. Louis, Mo., died
Monday, Feb. 3, 2014.
Arrangements are by
Farley Funeral Home.

Thomas Vito
Armando
Christopher
Paladino
Thomas Vito Armando
Christopher "Tom"
Paladino, 84, of North
Port, Fla., passed away
Monday, Dec. 30, 2013,
in the loving arms of
family in Denver, Colo.
He was born June 15,
1929, in New Rochelle,
N.Y., the 10th child of
13, to Guiseppe and
Giovannia (nee Avallone)
Paladino.
Thomas met his wife
Maureen Riley on a golf
course in Hollywood,
Fla. They married
Dec. 28, 1957, and
were married 53 years
until Maureen's death
in 2011. Thomas was
a parishioner at San
Pedro Catholic Church,
he was a 50-year PGA
cardholder, and was an
avid reader who enjoyed
philosophy, literature,
history, music and all
sports. He was also
closely attached to his
grandchildren, and in
his last weeks, he visited
and spent individual
time with each one.
Thomas is survived
by three children, Lisa
Fortier of Aspen, Colo.,
Thomas J. Paladino
of Sarasota, Fla., and
James Paladino of
Fairfield, Conn.; and six
grandchildren.
There will be a Mass
of Christian Burial for
Thomas at 10 a.m.


Nancy Jean Albertson
The "Queen" Angel has gone to Heaven. While
her time here was short, December 6, 1949 to
February 3, 2014 (age 64) we are forever grateful
for the time she gave us. Nancy
-, proudly lived in Charlotte County
: ,.. ^ for 45 years alongside the love of her
life, Reece.
i Nancy was best known for her
family values and her commitment
to her husband, daughters and
granddaughters. She will be remem-
bered for her attention to detail
and making everything she did so unique and
over-the top. Nancy was the definition of a classy,
glamorous lady. With an amazing sense of humor
and a personality that was truly bigger than life,
she made everyone around her feel so special. Her
strong will and determination was admired by
all. Nancy certainly accomplished anything and
everything she set her mind to. To know Nancy,
was to love Nancy ... for sure!
With accomplishments and achievements
too numerous to mention, Nancy's career
as an Executive Assistant began at General
Development where she spent 18 years before
moving on to United Telephone (Sprint), where
she retired after 15 years of service. Her dedication
and strong work ethic will be part of her legacy.
Although she enjoyed her work family, she truly
enjoyed retirement with her husband, children,
and grandchildren.
Nancy is survived by her husband Maurice
Albertson (Reece) of 40 years, whom she loved
so dearly Not "The" Boss of her. She is also
survived by two daughters, Lori Albertson Smith
- "The" First Born (Larry Smith), Kristen
Albertson- 'The" Favorite, two granddaughters,
Courtney Peterson "The" Princess and Blayklee
Peterson "The" Shining Star, two furry, four-
legged boys, Baylee and Bo. She is also survived by
two brothers, Thomas Galbraith (Penny Galbraith)
and Donald Deeder (Patricia Deeder) along with
countless other family members she loved so
dearly.
Celebration of Life Memorial will be held
Saturday February 8, 2014 at 1 l:30am at Kays-
Ponger & Uselton 2405 Harbor Blvd. Port
Charlotte, Fl 33952.
In lieu of flowers, charitable arrangements are
being made and will be posted in Friday's Edition.


Monday, Feb. 17, 2014,
at San Pedro Catholic
Church. Please send any
contributions to the St.
Jude Children's Research
Hospital, in Tom's
memory.
Dad, we know that you
are not gone, just gone
ahead, and someday we
will all be together.


Donald H.
Thomas Jr.
Donald H. Thomas Jr.,
76, of North Port, Fla.,
passed away Friday, Jan. 31,
2014, at TideWell Hospice
House. Arrangements are
by National Cremation
Society of Port Charlotte,
Fla.


Jasper Brouwer
Jasper "Jay" Brouwer, 85, of Lake Suzy, Fla., and
formerly of Sioux City, Iowa, passed away Monday,
Feb. 3, 2014, at Charlotte Harbor Healthcare.
Jay was born Nov. 9,1928, in
Inwood, Iowa, to Peter and Marie
^ (nee Schuurman) Brouwer.
He attended schools and farmed
in Lyon County, Iowa, until joining
the U.S. Air Force in 1950, where he
met his wife Marilyn "Jill" Galbrecht.
They were married Oct. 26, 1951.
After an honorable discharge in 1954,
^|c. he returned to Rock Rapids, Iowa, to
Sfarm, until a farming accident in 1960.
Never straying far from his agricultural
"roots," he accepted a job with Quaker
Oats as a feed salesman. Jay then was recruited by
Nutra Flo Chemical Company of Sioux City, where
he enjoyed working for many years. He later was
recruited by Con Agra. Upon retirement from the
feed and fertilizer business, he formed Better Life
Homes, a land-development company. He was
involved in many developments within Woodbury
and Plymouth counties in Iowa, and built many
homes in the Sioux City area.
In 1994, Jay and Jill retired to Florida. Jay was a
member of First Presbyterian Churches of Sioux
City and Port Charlotte, Fla., where he held vari-
ous offices and positions. He donated much time
to his church, and was involved in the creation
of a Memorial Garden. Jay was also a member of
Shriners of North America, as well as the Elks and
American Legion. Jay and Jill thoroughly enjoyed
dancing together, and their last dance was in
November on his 85th birthday, where they were
treated to a standing ovation.
He will be lovingly remembered by his wife, Jill
of Lake Suzy; daughter, Jan (Dennis) Heimgartner
of Hinton, Iowa; two grandchildren, Jeffrey
(Jasmine) Heimgartner of Lincoln, Neb., and
Melissa (Chad Guzinski) Heimgartner of Erie,
Colo.; two great-grandsons, Jayden and Jonah
Heimgartner; sister, Dorothy Gransow Sidles of
Milford, Iowa; sister-in-law, Nettie Brouwer of
Rock Rapids; two brothers-in-law, Pete Hoff of
Hills, Minn., and Fred Galbrecht of Milwaukee,
Wis.; and several nieces and nephews. He was
preceded in death by his parents; brother, John
Brouwer; and sisters, Pearl Hoff, Henrietta Top
and Jennie deKoning.
Services are pending.
Arrangements are by National Cremation
Society of Port Charlotte.


Martyn Albert Reichle
Martyn Albert "Marty" Reichle, 81, of Punta
Gorda, Fla., passed away peacefully Friday, Jan. 31,
2014, at his home, surrounded by his loving family.
He was born and raised in Buffalo, N.Y.,
and the surrounding areas, the only child
... of Albert H. Reichle and Laura L. Ahrens.
Marty graduated in 1955 from
Allegheny College in Meadville, Pa., with
a degree in Economics. He was a member of Phi
Delta Theta Fraternity, and played Varsity Soccer.
While attending Allegheny, Marty won the heart of
Nancy Jane Fullerton; on Sept. 22, 1956, they were
married, as he was serving as an officer in the U.S.
Armed Forces.
After his discharge in 1958, they relocated to
South Florida to raise a family and begin his
civilian career with Dunn & Bradstreet in Miami,
Fla. In 1960, he joined the Fort Lauderdale News as
their Credit Manager, and worked his way up the
ladder, ending his career there in 1978 as Business
Manager. He and Nancy purchased the Peace River
KOA in Arcadia, Fla. After running the business
with his son for 15 years, they retired and moved to
Emerald Pointe in Punta Gorda.
During his career he stayed active in business
and civic associations. He was President of the
Advertising Media Credit Executives International.
Marty was an officer in the Broward Credit
Executive Association. He was an Advisor for
Junior Achievement and Junior Naval Cadets.
In retirement, he stayed active as a member of
the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks and
the Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club. Marty served
many years on the Emerald Pointe Board of
Directors, and held various positions. Throughout
the years he and Nancy spent time traveling with
family in their boat and motor home. They were
able to explore the U.S., Canada and the Bahama
Islands.
He is survived by his daughter, Sandra L. Moser
of Sarasota, Fla.; three grandchildren, Christopher
S. Reichle of Charleston, S.C., Caitlin A. Reichle of
Gulf Breeze, Fla., and LarryA. Moser of Sarasota;
daughter-in-law, Paula A. Reichle of Lafayette, La.;
and sister-in-law, Sally A. Riemer of Petersburg,
Alaska. Marty was preceded in death by his loving
wife of 53 years, Nancy Jane Reichle; his adored
son, Scott A. Reichle; and his parents.
A Celebration of Marty's Life will be held at
11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, at First United
Methodist Church of Punta Gorda, 507 W Marion
Ave., Punta Gorda, FL 33950. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that memorial contributions be
made to Tidewell Hospice, First United Methodist
Church, or a Charity of your choice. Inurnment
will be held at a future time at Sarasota National
Cemetery.


Walter R. Schlicht
Mr. Walter R. Schlicht, 82, of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
and Pittsburg, N.H., passed away Monday, Feb. 3,
2014, at his home in Florida, after a long period of
failing health.
He was born May 30, 1931, in
Union City, N.J., the only child
of Walter M. and Matilda A. (nee
Luhmann) Schlicht.
Walter was a 1949 graduate of
SCliffside Park High School. From
-- 1948 to '50, he served with honor in
the U.S. Marine Corps, and he later
served for eight years in the Air Force as
",1:\ a navigator and radar operator. His duty
" stations took him around the world and
included England, Bermuda, Hawaii,
and the Marshall Islands during the Korean
conflict.
After his military service, Walter began working
in the banking industry. In 1962, he was hired by
the U.S. Treasury in the office of the Comptroller
of the Currency, and he rose to become a widely
respected national bank examiner in the federal
government. He later returned to community
banking after 35 years as a federal examiner, and
retired from the National Community Bank of NJ
as executive vice president in 1992.
Both Walter and his wife Margaret were mem-
bers of Faith Lutheran Church in Punta Gorda,
and enjoyed singing in the choir. They were
also members of the PGI Civic Association, the
Cruising Club, and the Mariners of PGI. In the
north country, Walter was a member of Farnham
Memorial United Methodist Church. He also en-
joyed fishing and boating, and loved traveling with
his wife. Walter was a member of American Legion
Post 110 in Port Charlotte, Fla., a life member of
VFW 337 in Fairview, N.J., and the Benevolent &
Protective Order of Elks 2606 in Punta Gorda.
Walter leaves behind his sister-in-law, Lois
Gebhardt of Charlottesville, Va. He was preceded
in death by his beloved wife, Margaret, in 2013;
and his parents.
Calling hours will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, at Jenkins & Newman
Funeral Home in Colebrook, N.H. A graveside
service with military honors will take place later
in the spring at the Pittsburg Hollow Cemetery.
Expressions of sympathy in memory of Mr.
Schlicht may be sent to Faith Lutheran Church,
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda, FL 33950.
Condolences may be offered to the family online
by going to www.jenkinsnewman.com.
Arrangements are by direction of Jenkins &
Newman Funeral Home, Colebrook.







Our Town Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, February 6, 2014


3100








LEGALS



|FICTITIOUS NAME
L 3112 ^


2/6/2014
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to
Section 865.09,
Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of AT HOME SENIOR
ASSISTANCE located at SW Egret
Circle, in the County of DeSoto, in
the City of Lake Suzy, Florida
Carvl A. Sprague intends to regis-
ter the said name with the Divi-
sion of Corporations of the Flori-
da Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Lake Suzv, Florida, this
31st day of January, 2014.
/s/ Carvl A. Sprague
Publish: February 6, 2014
110833 2998567
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to
Section 865.09,
Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Heart & Sole
Dance located at Lyle St., in the
County of Charlotte, in the City of
Port Charlotte, Florida 33952
intends to register the said name
with the Division of Corporations
of the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, Florida.
Dated at Port Charlotte, Florida,
this 3 day of February, 2014.
/s/ Liza Daniels
Publish: February 6, 2014
110833 2998580
S INVITATION
TO BID
^^ 0114

PRAIRIE CREEK PARK
Property Owners Association is
requesting bids for the mowing
and maintenance of the park
roadsides and greenbelts. Inter-
ested
contractors should contact Star
at 941-575-6764 or s.danko@
starhospitalitymanagement.com for
more info & a Request for Pro-
posal packet. Proposals will be
due no later than March 4,
2014.

NOTICE OF ACTION
: ^ 3116


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
CASE NO. 08-2013-CA001627
REVERSE MORTGAGE
SOLUTIONS, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALAN R. CLARK A/K/A
ALAN RICHARD CLARK, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s):
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, CREDI-
TORS, DEVISEES, BENEFICIA-
RIES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH UNDER
OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF
LORRAINE B. CLARK A/K/A LOR-
RAINE BERTHA CLARK
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on
the following described property:
LOT 16, BLOCK F, HOLIDAY
MOBILE ESTATES, THIRD
ADDITION, A SUBDIVISION AS
PER PLAT THEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 13,
PAGE(S) 30A THROUGH 30E,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA. TOGETHER WITH A
MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A PERMANENT
FIXTURE AND APPURTE-
NANCE THERETO,
DESCRIBED AS A 1978 DOU-
BLE-WIDE FLEETWOOD SUN-
CREST HOME- SUNCOASTER
MOBILE HOME RP TAGS
#191937 AND 191938
VIN#FLFL2A823320811 AND
FLFL2B823320811, TITLE
#15829284 AND 15829285
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of you written defenses, if any, to
it, on McCalla Raymer, LLC,
Andrew L. Denzer, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is 225
East Robinson Street, Suite 660,
Orlando, FL 32801 on or before
3/5/14, a date which is within
thirty (30) days after the first pub-
lication of this Notice in the The
Sun and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before


service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demand in the
complaint.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true
and correct copy of the foregoing
Notice of Filing was mailed to all
the parties in the attached mailing
list.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court this 28th day of Janu-
ary, 2014.
Clerk of the Court


NOTICE OF ACTION

Z 3116 ^

By C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: February 6 and 13, 2014
338116 2998817
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:
08-2013-CA-003479
DIVISION:
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE
LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JUAN MORONI, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
To:
JUAN MORONI
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JUAN MORONI
Last Known Address:
4581 Weston Rd
Weston, FL 33331-3141
Current Address: Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH,UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage
on the following property in Char-
lotte County, Florida:
UNIT 221, BUILDING 2, OF
MAGDALENA GARDENS, A
CONDOMINIUM ACCORD-
ING TO THE DECLARATION
THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 3037, PAGE 1668,
ET SEQ., AND THE CON-
DOMINIUM PLAT AS
RECORDED IN CONDO-
MINIUM BOOK 15, PAGES
18A THROUGH 181, ALL OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
FLORIDA., TOGETHER
WITH AN UNDIVIDED
SHARE IN THE COMMON
ELEMENTS APPURTENANT
THERETO, AND THE RIGHT
TO USE GARAGE SPACE
221, AND PARKING SPACE
221 AS LIMITED COMMON
ELEMENTS APPURTENANT
THERETO, TOGETHER
WITH ANY AMENDMENTS
THERETO.
A/K/A 240 W END DR
UNIT 221 PUNTA GORDA
FL 33950-0301
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, if
any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623,
and file the original with this Court
either before 3/7/14 service on
Plaintiff's attorney, or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once a week for two consecutive
weeks in the Charlotte Sun-Her-
ald.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on this 31st day of
January, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
**See the Americans
with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are enti-
tied, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 and
whose telephone number is
(941)637-2281, within two (2)
working days of receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
To file response please contact
Charlotte County Clerk of Court,
350 E. Marion Street, Punta
Gorda, FL 33651-1687, Tel:
(941) 637-2238; Fax: (941) 637-
2216.
Publish: February 6 and 13, 2014
272484 2998785

I NOTICE OF
AUCTION



The following vehicle/vessel(s)
will be auctioned for unpaid mini-
warehouse self-storage charges
only per FS 83.806 sale date
02/17/2014 @ 9:00am @ 36
Shannon Rd Sarasota FL. Storage
@ $26.75 per day inc tax;
EdCote M3 lien amt $636.65
1999 SIERRA 28' 5TH WHEEL TV
WHI 4X4FSE2D4XA022325 lienor
Ed Cote RV Storage & Repair, Inc
36 Shannon Rd Sarasota FL
34240-9092 MV-62950 941
377-6220
Publish: February 1 and 6, 2014
366164 2997031
NOTICE OF AUCTION
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN THAT SS
OSPREY, LLC D/B/A SIMPLY SELF STOR-
AGE LOCATED AT 660 SOUTH TAMIAMI


TRAIL, OSPREY, FL 34229 INTENDS TO
SELL OR OTHERWISE DISPOSE OF THE
PERSONAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW TO ENFORCE A LIEN IMPOSED
ON SAID PROPERTY UNDER THE FLORI-
DA SELF DISPOSITION OF THE FOLLOW-
ING PROPERTY WILL TAKE PLACE
(UNLESS OTHERWISE WITHDRAWN) VIA
AN ON-LINE AUCTION AT
WWW.STORAGEBATTLES.COM ON
2/13/14 BEGINNING AT APPROXIMATELY
1:00 P.M. AND CONCLUDING ON
2/24/14 AT APPROXIMATELY 1:00 P.M.
THIS PUBLIC SALE WILL RESULT IN THE
GOODS BEING SOLD TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDER. CERTAIN TERMS AND CONDI-
TIONS APPLY:


I NOTICE OF NOTICE TO
AUCTION CREDITORS
W4 3119^ L 3120


1003 Brandon Bruge
2025 DeAnne Owen
Publish: Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 2014
361847 2994180

L NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
^33120O

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BARBARA J. FARIS
a/k/a BARBARA JOAN FARIS
Deceased.
File No. 14-0063-CP
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate
of Barbara J. Faris a/k/a Barbara
Joan Faris, deceased, whose
date of death was October 17,
2013, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Charlotte County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address
of which is 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950. The
names and addresses of the Per-
sonal Representatives and the
Personal Representatives' attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is February 6, 2014.
Attorney for
Personal Representatives:
TINA M. MAYS
Attorney for Alfred L. Plew
and Robert D. Plew
Florida Bar Number: 726044
Mizell Law Firm, PA
331 Sullivan Street
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Telephone: (941) 575-9291
Fax: (941) 575-9296
E-Mail: tmays@mizell-law.com
Personal Representative:
ALFRED L. PLEW
211 Queen Palm Dr.
Naples, Florida 34114
ROBERT D. PLEW
9674 East 150 South
Pierceton, Indiana 46562
Publish: February 6 and 13, 2014
243045 2998620
ADVERTISED!]

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
MARY A. MACKEWICH,
Deceased.
Probate No. 14-50-CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMAND
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an
Order of Summary Administration
has been entered in the estate of
MARY A. MACKEWICH,
deceased, on January 17, 2014
having File Number 14-50-CP by
the Circuit Court for Charlotte
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 350 East
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950 that the total value
of the estate approximately
$40.000.00 and that the names
and addresses of those to whom
it has been assigned by such
order are:
JOSEPH C. MACKEWICH,
4368 E. Barlind Dr.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15227
JAMES M. MACKEWICH
5815 Wallace Ave.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15102
JEFFREY MACKEWICH
45 Owendale Ave,
Pittsburgh, PA 15227
JANE C. COLLLINS
2408 Academy Ave,
Holmes, PA 19043
All persons are required to file
with the Clerk of said Court
WITHIN 3 CALENDAR
MONTHS FROM TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE all claims against the
estate in the form and manner
prescribed by Section 733.703
of the Florida Statutes and Rule
5.490 of the Florida Rules of Pro-
bate and Guardianship Procedure.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 30, 2014.
J. MICHAEL ROONEY. ESQ.
Attorneys for Petitioner
Post Office Box 510400
Punta Gorda, FL 33951-0400
Fla. Bar No. 157880
(941) 639-2591


trabuelaw@yahoo.com
Publish: 1/30/14 and 2/6/14
121501 2993678
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM J. VITIELLO
a/k/a WILLIAM VITIELLO
Deceased.
File No. 14000103CP
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of William J. Vitiello a/k/a William
Vitiello, deceased, whose date of
death was November 22, 2012,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Charlotte County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
350 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda,
FL 33950. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is January 30, 2014.
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Fletcher H. Rush
Florida Bar Number: 100586
Farr, Farr, Emerich, Hackett
and Carr, P.A.
99 Nesbit Street
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Telephone: (941) 639-1158
Fax: (941) 639-0028
E-Mail: frush@farr.com
Secondary E-Mail:
brussell@farr.com and
probate@farr.com
Personal Representative:
Kenneth Klose
17 Van Ethel Drive
Matawan, New Jersey 07747
Publish: 1/30/14 and 2/6/14
114849 2995632

I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122 ^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 10001751CA
REVERSE MORTGAGE
SOLUTIONS, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIA-
RIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES. AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF
ANN B. WILSON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ANN B. WILSON;
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE
SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND
URBAN DEVELOPMENT; MARI-
ANN WILSON PUSZKAR; ANNIE
M. WILSON; UNKNOWN TENANT
#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Charlotte County, Flori-
da, will on the 21 day of February,
2014, at 11:00 a.m. on
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, offer for sale and sell at public
outcry to the highest and best
bidder for cash, the following-
described property situate in
Charlotte County, Florida:
LOT 10, BLOCK 2202,
PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDI-
VISION, SECTION 37,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
41A THROUGH 41H, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
pursuant to the Final Judgment
entered in a case pending in said
Court, the style of which is indi-
cated above.
Any person or entity claiming an
interest in the surplus, if any,
resulting from the foreclosure
sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens, must file a claim on
same with the Clerk of Court with-
in 60 days after the foreclosure
sale.
WITNESS my hand and official
seal of said Court this 31 day of
January, 2014.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT. If you are a person with a
disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision
of certain assistance. Please con-
tact Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida


33950, and whose telephone
number is (941) 637-2110, at
least 7 days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less


L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^

than 7 days; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call 711
Barbara T. Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
Publish: February 6 and 13, 2014
109392 2998712
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 2013-CA-000085
CitiMortgage, Inc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Mary Myers; et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated October 14, 2013,
entered in Case No. 2013-CA-
000085 of the Circuit Court of
the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, in and
for DeSoto County, Florida,
wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. is the
Plaintiff and Mary Myers;
Unknown Spouse of Mary Myers;
HSBC Bank Nevada, N.A. as suc-
cessor in interest to Direct Mer-
chants Credit Card Bank, N.A.;
HSBC Bank Nevada, N.A. FKA
Household Bank (SB), N.A.; Unit-
ed States of America on behalf of
the Secretary of Housing and
Urban Development; Unknown
Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2
are the Defendants, that the Clerk
of Courts will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at, the
south door of the courthouse at
115 East Oak Street, Arcadia, FL
34266, beginning at 11:00 on
the 20th day of February, 2014,
the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT 7 OF ELLER AND HURST
SECOND ADDITION, AN
UNRECORDED PLAT, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 37
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
40' WEST ALONG NORTH
LINE OF SAID TRACT, 245.0
FEET; THENCE SOUTH AND
PARALLEL TO EAST LINE OF
SAID TRACT, 149.0 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SAME
LINE, 75.0 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 40'
WEST, 248.67 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 75.0 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 40'
EAST; 248.67 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING, IN
PUBLIC RECORDS OF DESO-
TO COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH 1987
FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME
VIN #AFLWE1AG347500465
Dated this 27 day of January,
2014.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
Attorney for Plaintiff
1501 N.W. 49th Street,
Suite 200
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309
Phone: (954) 618-6955,
ext. 6209
Fax: (954) 618-6954
FLCourtDocs@brockandscott.co
m
By Jimmy Edwards. Esq.
Florida Bar No. 81855
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in a court proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance: Please contact
DeSoto County Jury Office,
115 East Oak Street, Arcadia,
Florida 34266. Telephone:
(863) 993-4876. If you are
hearing or voice impaired,
please call 711.
Publish: 1/30/14 and 2/6/14
349911 2995765

S NOTICE OF
MEETING
LW 3126

CHARLOTTE COUNTY
HEALTHY START COALITION
GENERAL MEMBERSHIP
MEETING
Charlotte County Healthy Start
Coalition, Inc., General Member-
ship Meeting will be held at the
Early Learning Coalition Office,
2886 Tamiami Trail, Suite 3, Port
Charlotte 8:30 am. on Wednes-
day, February 12, 2014. The
meeting is open to the public.
Phone 764-9700 for more infor-
mation.
Publish: February 6, 2014
128405 2998563
RIVERWOOD
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
The Board of Supervisors of the
Riverwood Community Develop-
ment District will hold their Long
Range Planning Committee meet-
ing on Thursday, February 20,
2014 at 10:00 a.m. in the
Meeting Room of the Riverwood
Activity Center, 4250 Riverwood
Drive, Port Charlotte, Florida.
The originally scheduled Long
Range Planning Committee meet-


ing which was to take place on
Thursday, February 13, 2014 at
10:00 a.m. has been cancelled.
Calvin Teague
District Manager
Publish: February 6, 2014
115047 2998117
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District
(SWFWMD) announces the fol-
lowing public meetings to
which all interested persons
are invited:
Southern Water Use Caution


MEETING
W4 3126^

Area (SWUCA) Most Impacted
Area (MIA) Stakeholder Work-
group Meeting. Discussion is
focused on how to meet the
minimum level set for the
Upper Floridan aquifer to
reduce the rate of saltwater
intrusion. All or part of this
meeting may be conducted by
means of communications
media technology in order to
permit maximum participa-
tion of Governing Board mem-
bers.
DATE/TIME:
February 21, 2014 at 10:00 a.m.
April 14, 2014 at 10:00 a.m.
June 9, 2014 at 10:00 a.m.
August 18, 2014 at 10:00 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Sarasota Ser-
vice Office, 6750 Fruitville Road,
Sarasota FL 34240
Pursuant to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring special
accommodations to participate in
these meetings is asked to advise
the agency at least five (5) days
prior by contacting the SWFWMD
Human Resources Bureau Chief
at 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899;
352-796-7211 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4703; TDD
(FL only) 1 800 231 6103; or
email ADACoordinator@swfw-
md.state.fl.us.
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter con-
sidered at these meetings,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Agendas are available seven days
prior to the meeting from the
SWFWMD website: WaterMat-
ters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar; or contact Melis-
sa.dickens@watermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211, x4422
(Ad Order EXE0304).
Publish: February 6, 2014
112958 2998650



IN THE
CLASSiiI-ED
YOU CAN.....

/Find a Pet

/Find a Car

/Find a Job
VFind Garage Sales

/Find A New Employee

/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service


Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


NOTICE OF SALE
Z^ 3130i


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
CHARLOTTE COUNTY SELF
STORAGE at 4201 Whidden Blvd,
Pt Charlotte, FL 33980 will sell or
otherwise dispose of the contents
of the following units to satisfy
delinquent amounts due and
enforce a lien imposed under the
FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILI-
TY ACT (Section 83.801-83.809).
Sale will be conducted at the
above address on February 21,
2014 At 3:30 pm on said premis-
es.
All property sold is CASH ONLY, in
"as is" condition and must be
removed at time of sale.
We reserve the right to reject any
and all bids and to cancel the sale
in event of settlement with oblig-
ated party (ies).
B55 John Abreau
Furniture & Misc.
B99 John Abreau
Furniture & Misc.
Publish: February 6 and 13, 2014
121140 2998823

| OTHER NOTICES



PUBLIC NOTICE
Holiday Park, Park and Recreation Dis-
trict has scheduled a Regular Meeting
for February 13, 2014, at 7:00pm at
Phase 1, in the Main Hall, located at
5401 Holiday Park Blvd., North Port,
FL 34287.
PUBLISH: February 6, 2014
150177 2988148

Turn your


trash into


cash!


Advertise


your yard


sale!


OurTown Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014





The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014


Potential mooring stirs



waters in Charlotte


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER

PORT CHARLOTTE
-A discussion about
Charlotte County creat-
ing regulated mooring
in Lemon Bay stirred
emotions Wednesday at
a joint meeting of the
county's Marine Advisory,
and Beaches and Shores
advisory committees, and
the Parks and Recreation
Advisory Board, at the
Mid-County Regional
Library.
"What's the advantage
to this?" Englewood
resident Jack Copeland
asked. He was among a
group of boaters who told
the Sun they saw no need
for a county-managed
mooring field in Lemon
Bay.
Dennis Young, a live-
aboard in Chadwick Cove,
said, "We're environmen-
talists who are out there
helping and now you
are trying to get rid of
us?"
County coastal projects
manager Chuck Mopps
reviewed the highlights
of the county's 2007
study that evaluated
creating a mooring field
in Lemon Bay's Chadwick
Cove, south of the Emil
R. Swepston Bridge on


Beach Road. The study
showed the county could
create 10 moorings for
40-foot vessels, or the
mooring field could be
designed for 11 vessels up
to 20 feet, eight vessels
up to 30 feet, and five
moorings for vessels up
to 40 feet.
The study also suggest-
ed the county would have
to develop amenities for
the boaters anchoring in
the mooring field.
In answer to Copeland's
question, Mopps said,
"The advantage to this is
that it would keep boats
off (environmentally)
sensitive bottoms, we
have mangroves in there,
and we've had derelict
vessels."
Tommy Brock, a
Manasota Key resident
and a Beaches and Shores
committee member, tried
to quell the worries of
the boaters in Chadwick
Cove.
"No one here is trying
to kick you off your
boats," Brock said. He re-
called an incident where
boaters were injured after
sunset by hitting a vessel's
anchor line. "People got
hurt."
Brock said, "I know you
all don't want to anchor a
boat and leave it forever."


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Patsy Cline
tribute offered
The Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280
Aaron St., Port Charlotte,
will present a Tribute
to Patsy Cline at 7 p.m.
Sunday. More than
50 years after the death of
the legendary Cline, this
musical tribute is an ode
to the brash, pioneering
queen of county music
who stands among the
greatest innovators of the
crossover from country to
pop music.
A full cash bar will be
available. Tickets are
$14 for Cultural Center
members; they are $15 for
nonmembers and for all



ARRESTS

FROM PAGE 3

possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription and possession
of drug paraphernalia. Bond:
$10,000.
Brian William Fredwest, 39,
1700 block of Royalview Drive,
Port Charlotte. Charge: violation of
probation (original charge: driving
with a suspended license). Bond:
$1,277.50.
Marianne Alice Smith-Lovering,
37, 2100 block of Abscott St., Port
Charlotte. Charges: two counts of
aggravated battery with a deadly
weapon.Bond:none.
Kayla Marie Lovering, 21, 2100
block of Abscott St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: aggravated battery with a
deadly weapon. Bond: none.
Steven Michael Whiteaker, 28,
21100 block of Bersell Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: grand theft and
resisting a retail merchant. Bond:
none.
Jacob Robert James Leininger,
21,700 block of Floral Lane, Port
Charlotte. Charges: aggravated
battery with a deadly weapon and
resisting an officer. Bond: none.
James Thomas Wetherington,
27, Griggs Road, Port Charlotte.
Charges: possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription, and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $7,500.
Aurelio Maldonado Jr., 22, 8600
block of Agress Ave., North Port.
Charges: burglary and grand theft.
Bond:none.
Daniel Angel Douglas Valencia,
34, 4100 block of Worchester Ave.,
North Port. Charges: two out-of-
county warrants. Bond: $31,500.
Ronald Gary Sweeris, 60,
of Grand Rapids, Mich. Charges:
contempt of courtand violation of
probation (original charge: battery).
Bond:none.
Gabriel Angel Martinez, 25,
of Fort Myers. Charge: violation of


the day of the show. They
may be purchased at the
Cultural Center's informa-
tion desk or the theater box
office. For more informa-
tion, call 941-625-4175.

Eat at Beefs
tonight, help
Cub Scouts
Help support Cub
Scout Pack 257 from
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. today at
Beef'O'Brady's in North
Port. At least 10 percent
of sales that evening will
go to help the pack with
camping, pack activities
and supplies for the boys.
Beef 'O'Brady's is located at
1037 Sumter Blvd., North
Port. For more information,

probation (original charge: possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana).
Bond: $1,275.
Stuart Ray Middleton, 36, 7100
block of Regina Drive, Englewood.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
$10,000.
John Dalton, 69, 700 block of S.
Indiana Ave., Englewood. Charges:
grand theft, dealing in stolen
property and altering identification to
a metals recycler. Bond: none.
Georgios Galanopoulos, 43,100
block of Natures Way, Rotonda West.
Charge: DUI. Bond: none.
Theresa Lynn Jones, 28,1300
block of Hemlock Ave., Punta Gorda.
Charges: four counts of violation
of probation (original charge: two
counts of trespassing, tampering with
utilities and driving with a suspended
license). Bond: none.
Matthew Peter Vacca, 27, 22300
block of Elmira Blvd., Port Charlotte.
Charges: two counts of violation of
probation. Bond: none.
Cole Hudson Manes, 22,21100
block of Glendale Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana). Bond:
none

The Punta Gorda Police
Department reported the
following arrests:
William Dale Henderson,51,
1800 block of Scotch Pine Court,
Punta Gorda. Charges: disorderly
intoxication and trespassing. Bond:
none.
Annjeannette Laurel Wilson,
36,1600 block of Yellow Pine Court,
Punta Gorda. Charge: DUI. Bond:
none.
Joshua Charles Legrand, 33,
11400 block ofTamiami Trail, Punta
Gorda. Charges: driving with a
suspended license, possession of
methamphetamine with the intent
to sell and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond: none.
Amanda Lee Grinnell, 21,
homeless in Punta Gorda. Charge:
trespassing. Bond: none.


Other jurisdictions
with established mooring
fields, Mopps said, also
have seen a reduction in
the number of derelict
vessels.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission is undertak-
ing a pilot program for
anchoring and mooring
with several jurisdictions.
However the results of that
pilot program might not
be known for three years.
If the county did decide
to establish its own moor-
ing field, Mopps said, the
county could move ahead
with its own plans, and
wouldn't be held up by
the state study.
However no boater
should expect any
mooring field in Lemon
Bay anytime soon.
Although that 2007
study identified the areas
that wouldn't impact sea
grasses and have other
environmental impacts,
Mopps said an updated
study would be necessary.
Mopps and Community
Services Director Tommy
Scott said the county has
no funding now identified
for an updated study or
any other funding for the
creation of a mooring
field.
Email: reilly@sun-heraldx.com


visit www.facebook.com/
NorthPortBeefs.

Pancake breakfast
Knights of Columbus,
Father Stanley S. Kromer,
OCARM, Council 11553
will be holding a pan-
cake breakfast from
8-11 a.m. on Feb. 9 in
the St, Raphael Parish
Center, 770 Kilbourne
Ave., Englewood. The $5
donation (children 12 and
under are free) includes
pancakes, scrambled eggs
and sausage. Coffee, tea,
milk and juice will be
served. Tickets will be sold
at the door. For more in-
formation call Steve West,
941-473-4987 or John
Trush at 941-445-9125.

The North Port Police
Department reported the
following arrest:
Brent Madison Eutsler, 28,
5600 block of Reistertown Road,
North Port. Charge: theft. Bond:
$1,500.

The Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
SKevin Allen Vietts Jr., 27, 22100
block of Voltaire Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: four counts of violation
of probation (original charges: two
counts each of trafficking in stolen
property and carrying a concealed
firearm). Bond: none.
Joshua Edward Garrett, 27,
18400 block of Evenglow Ave.,
Port Charlotte. Charge: violation of
probation (original charge: battery).
Bond: $25,000.
Marianne Dolleman, 40,300
block of Foxglove Road, Venice.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: dealing with stolen
property). Bond: none.
Christopher George Mattingly,
37,100 block of Natures Way,
Rotonda West. Charge: theft. Bond:
$1,000.
Casandra Lynn Jones, 29, 28100
block of Altadena Drive, Punta Gorda.
Charge: Lee County warrant for failure
to appear (original charge: petty
theft). Bond: $3,600.
David Michael Kilpatrick, 33, of
Sarasota. Charge: Charlotte County
warrant for violation of probation
(original charge: possession of drug
paraphernalia). Bond: none.
Ashley Dahl, 22,1600 block
ofYellow Pine Court, Punta Gorda.
Charges: two Charlotte County
warrants for writing a worthless
check and failure to appear (original
charge: writing a worthless check).
Bond: $10,000.
Richard Edward Jones, 49,1600
block of Maple St., Nokomis. Charge:
possession of cocaine. Bond: $1,500.

Compiled byAdam Kreger and
Anne Klockenkemper


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 7


e Cros wr I


ACROSS
1 La Boheme
heroine
5 Box lightly
9 Sword part
13 Shangri-la
14 No longer
edible
15 Poet's
"shortly"
16 Some
boulevard
liners
17 Made an effort
18 Connery, by
birth
19 Words of
encouragement
22 Babysitter,
perhaps
23 Diary excerpt
24 Zilch
29 Go along
30 Off-the-neck
hairstyle
31 Prank
34 Herbal drinks
35 Acquires
37 With 40 Across,
diner orders
38 Museum
piece
39 Christmas
song
40 See 37 Across
41 Show disdain
44 Pacific island
nation
47 Lickety-split
48 "We have to
get cracking!"
54 Bike
accessory
55 Accolade
56 One logging in


57 Planetary
path
58 Be theatrical
59 Tolerate
60 Mrs. Truman
61 Manuscript
encld.
62 Sushi fare

DOWN
1 Overly
submissive
2 At leisure
3 Viral Web
phenomenon
4 Extremely
5 Walks
proudly
6 Couple
7 Actor
Baldwin
8 Carrottops


9
(!
10/

11 E
12
rr
14 N
20Y
S(


FAUX WORKOUT by Clive Probert
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com
a clue 33 Catch one's
is lost) breath
acquire 35 Opaque
as debt watercolors
Eccentric 36 Prefix like atm-
Blasting 37 Lab glassware
material 39 PFC superiors
Merciless 40 Fit together
(Year-end 42 Significant
season 43 Mother-of-pearl


21 Fascinated by
24 Contents of
some banks
25 Disney head
26 "Confound it!"
27 Quaint pen
28 Network
merged into
the CW
31 Shore bird
32 Prefix for
social


Lookfora third


crossword in

Ithe Sun Classified:

I section.
.. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .


44 Holey utensil
45 Mythical Titan
46 Textile
factories
49 Tomato
variety
50 Some: Sp.
51 "Got it!"
52 Caterer's
creation
53 Slips up
54 Jerky motion


Answer to previous puzzle
PATS KIWI BPLUS
ATOP IRAN ELENA
ROAR TI LTHLUCID
I N S I DLESIT R\ I G H TU


NIDOS A AHN
Dsooc OAITES PACE
INTER YALAFALIRS

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ITIYIKIEIS DIEIEIDE NIEISISI
2/6/14


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 E2F3 F 456 7 1 9
1 Easter season:
Abbr. 1 12 13
4 62-Across coat i 1 415 i i


7 Interest fig.
10 Long, on
Molokai
11 Experience with
enthusiasm
13 Pi follower
14 "Out" crier
15 Chic "Bye"
16 Charged
particle
17 Detox place
19 Bridal
emanations
21 Reminiscent of
venison
22 Dweeb
23 Red state?
26 Easy gaits
29 Given a hand
30 Annabella of
"The Sopranos"
31 Chased (after)
32 Whirling
34 Farm feed
35 Computer that
once came in
"flavors"
37 Biscuit, maybe
38 Strokes a 62-
Across
39 Greek cheese
40 First name in
one-liners
41 Actress
Charlotte et al.
42 Fountain near
the Spanish
Steps
44 Buddy
45 'acte
48 Flute part
50 Big enchilada
57 Babysitter's
handful
58 New evidence
may lead to one
59 Fawn spawner
60 With 62-Across,
a hint to the
starts of this
puzzle's four
longest Down
answers


By Jill Denny and Jeff Chen 2/6/14


61 Slogan sites
62 See
60-Across

DOWN
1 Bit of
mudslinging
2 Fruit of ancient
Persia
3 Vatican Palace
painter
4 Pet rocks, e.g.
5 News agcy.
since 1958
6 Regret bitterly
7 Preceding
8 Numbskull
9 Bunches
11 Daedalus'
creation
12 Combativeness
18 Cremona
artisan
20 Red Square
honoree
23 Lacking
purpose
24 Juice extractor
25 Grab, as a line
drive
26 D.C. network


Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
ADDLE MOIDNE USMA
CRE S TIRI NEAT
CH MiNNI CINE I NID A N K E
MS -A L AN GEHET
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(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


27 Like most
bawdy films
28 Lays down the
law
33 Fig. on 26-
Down
36 Gave in
38 Groom with
care
43 Unmoving
44 Hull stabilizers
46" bien!"


2/6/14


47 Big name in
IRAs
48 Rustle
49 "Take !"
50 Aflame
51 Angst-filled genre
52 Killer Birds, e.g.
53 Calendar abbr.
54 Recipe
instruction
55 Soft murmur
56 Barrel at a bash


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


7ArDIOIR-
ICILIOIU


I


ISIEITITIOI ;


EI






Our Town Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, February 6, 2014


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Lawmakers

embrace sales

tax holidays

he Florida Legislature
will consider three sales
tax holidays this year, a
number that some might argue
is overkill of a popular gimmick.
But, the no-tax shopping days
that have become so popular un-
der Republican administrations
offer numerous benefits not
the least of which is lowering
the cost of clothes and supplies
needed for school and items
needed to prepare for potential
hurricanes.
Gov. Rick School has proposed
a 15-day period in June for a
number of hurricane-related
items to be tax free. Senate bill
sponsor Rob Bradley, R-Fleming
County, wants to limit that to
12 days but characterized the
difference as "minor details that
need to be worked out." In other
words, it is not a big deal.
Scott is also asking lawmakers
to expand the back-to-school
sales tax holiday from three days
to 10 this year.
That would be a welcome
relief for families who must plan
their spending and line up their
budgets to coincide with that
single long weekend each year.
A third no-tax holiday, in
October, has been proposed
by Rep. Michelle Vasilinda,
D-Tallahassee and Sen. Eleanor
Sobel, D-Hollywood, that would
temporarily eliminate the tax
on certain energy-efficient
appliances.
That's another good idea that
could help drive spending on
such items that in turn will lower
our overall energy dependency.
All of these sales tax holi-
days provide real benefits for
hard-working families middle
class and working poor who
need it the most.
While three may seem ex-
treme, and siphon tax money
from state coffers, we believe the
benefits outweigh any negative
impact.


Scott finally

fills position

of Lt. Governor

hen Carlos Lopez-
Cantera was sworn in
Monday as Florida's
new lieutenant governor, it was
a proud day for him and Gov.
Rick Scott, who appointed him.
But, other than filling a
state-mandated position, and
reaching out to Hispanic voters,
the naming of Lopez-Cantera
will have little if any impact on
the state or Scott's policies.
Evidence of that is prominent.
The post had been vacant
since March 2013, when Lt. Gov.
Jennifer Carroll resigned over a
scandal involving her consulting
company and a company under
investigation for gambling
racketeering.
Scott gave low priority to
filling the position.
Twice, Scott tried to give
the job away. Twice, he was
rebuffed.
The constitution requires the
position be filled before the
election, so Scott had to make a
decision on the mostly ceremo-
nial position soon.
Lopez-Canatera, a former state
legislator and ally of U.S. Sen.
Marco Rubio, will be the first
Hispanic to hold the position.
Scott said he is counting on
the new lieutenant governor to
help push his agenda during the
annual session.
While it's likely no coinci-
dence that the new appointee
is Hispanic with an election
looming and Republicans eager
to make inroads there, we are
pleased that Lopez-Cantera has
broken a barrier in being named
lieutenant governor. And, we're


glad there is no longer a need
to wonder when the position
would be filled.


SOBO"L XLVIII


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

More than little
hypocrisy here
Editor:
There is an 8,500 acre, mostly
cotton, farm in Belzoni, Miss.,
that has received $4 million in
federal farm subsidies over the
last seven years-or $571,000
a year. We are talking just one
farm in the entire universe of
American farms. On a larger
scale the government gives
farmers an average of $11 billion
a year. Yes, the government gives
farmers money, just like it gives
the unfortunate among us food
stamps.
Here is the hypocrisy. Why is
it capitalism to subsidize crops
but socialism to subsidize food?
Why is H.E.A.P (Home Energy
Assistance Program) denounced
as socialism but Big Oil
20 percent Revenue Exclusion
and $5 a barrel tax credit praised
as capitalism? And why is health
care for all a vice and health care
for some a virtue?
On a larger scale, just how
much loyalty can you expect
from a citizen when he or she
has to constantly juggle food,
heat, health and rent just to get
by? Can we reasonably continue
to expect A+ citizenship from
our people while providing them
with D+ support? There is cold
comfort in that future scenario.
To sum up, we have crop sub-
sidies vs. food subsidies, HEAP
vs. the oil allowances and health
care for all vs. for some. Wow, I
think we should appeal to an au-
thority other than Republicans
for some clarification. Let us just
ask the Pope what he thinks.
What would Francis say?
Michael Deignan
Punta Gorda

Whittaker's policy
costly, wrong
Editor:
I was appalled at
SuperintendentWhittaker stating
that a funds reduction prevented
training 35 new principals,
assistant principals, and regional
directors. HadWhittaker added
only 15 to his already top heavy
organization, he might have had
funds to train. With the funding
cut, how did he find funds to hire
35 administrators?
Why did he want to train new
administrators to teach the test
instead of training teachers?Why
train to teach the test instead of
training to teach subject matter
so students can pass the test?
Apparently his belief is hire and
train more administrators and
all will get better. Seems to me
teachers in the classroom are
more important than teachers
in the office. It is nice he set a
goal of 90 percent pass by 2015.
If setting a goal is all it takes, I am


setting a goal to be 6' 10" and play
in the NBA Let's wait and see
which goal is accomplished first.
Dr. Deming teaches us that a
goal without an achievable plan
is simply a wish. Mr. Whittaker,
where is a solid plan along with
checks, data points and correc-
tions along the way to assure
achievement of the goal? You sir,
and your costly non-teaching
staff soak up funds like a sponge
and you deserve no more
funding so you can waste it As
that great philosopher Pogo once
said, "we have met the enemy
and it is us." Or in this case, it is
you, sir.
Bill Hempel
Lake Suzy

We need to bring
back good ol' days

Editor:
Once upon a time and not
that long ago, unemployment
was around 5 percent. The work
week for most Americans was
at least 40 hours. Gas was under
$2 a gallon. Government assis-
tance wasn't needed so much for
a high percentage of American
families to survive on.
Of those still working
Americans, now half are living
paycheck to paycheck
Six million more people had
better health insurance plans.
The list goes on an on.
Reality check. the present
policies and "the blame game"
are not working.
Stimulus packages, bailouts
and divisive rhetoric are not
working either.
What is needed is real honesty
and a workable plan that can
bring some of the good old days
back again.
The new strategy must come
from the top. Maybe, just try a
few free-market economic ideas;
they worked in the past. Now it's
the radical Saul Alinsky ideas vs.
economist Milton Friedman's.
Tom Pinder
Punta Gorda

Writer, Alinsky
not using facts

Editor:
I read with interest the letter
headed "Obama Presidency
Carefully Planned," in the Sun
Feb. 1. In it the writer cites
Saul Alinsky's book "Rules for
Radicals" as the inspiration for
"eight levels of control" which
he asserts the Obama admin-
istration is imposing on the
American people.
I wonder if the writer ever
bothered to read Alinsky's book.
The "eight levels of control" the
writer cites sound more like
the kind of conditions Alinsky
spoke against. His 12 "Rules for
Radicals" are tactics for politi-
cally empowering the poor and
the powerless. Some of them are
pretty ruthless, and I'm certainly


not endorsing them in totality,
but there are truths in them that
anyone with a political agenda
(left or right) would do well to
absorb.
In particular, the right might
consider this one: "The price of
a successful attack is a construc-
tive alternative." In other words,
to successfully oppose a policy
or practice, you need to offer
a constructive alternative to it.
You can easily find Alinsky's
complete list for that matter,
the whole book- online for
free from a myriad of sources.
I'm tempted to dissect the
assertions in the "Obama
Presidency" letter but I can't do
it in 250 words. Suffice to say the
writer is entitled to his opinion,
but like the rest of us, he ought
to stick to real facts.
Barry Kean
Englewood

Lack of knowledge
bothers this reader
Editor:
I thought I had better con-
fidence in fellow citizens and
readers than I've come to real-
ize. I am not one to disparage
every opinion or idea I see in
the newspaper by contributing
readers and writers. However,
I cannot bite my tongue when
it comes to gross negligence of
the basic understanding of the
branches of government.
The biggest blunder I have
noticed many times already
is people's misunderstanding
of how many branches there
are. There are three: Executive,
Legislative and Judicial. The
executive is the presidential
office, the legislative is Senate
and House of Representatives
and the judicial is the Supreme
Courts. I know everyone could
not have had the great teachers
I had in NewYork City public
schools, but there is no excuse
for not retaining the basic
understanding of government,
which we were all taught.
Salvatore Vitiello
Port Charlotte

Young people set
example to follow

Editor:
"60 Minutes" aired stories
on Feb. 2 about young people
inspired to change the world or
be the best they can be.
A story about a high school
scientist doing research on a
detection for a cancer, a story
of a young man moved by child
labor, and a chess player.
We can all learn from these
examples.
An important point is that
they were inspired to think they
could do something about it. The
high school student approached
scientists about his idea. He was
turned down by all but one, who
had the curiosity to see if there


was any merit to his idea.
Why did the others turn
him down? Many people with
experience and knowledge think
they know all the answers. They
don't think "outside the box," i.e.,
good actors who were originally
turned down later proved that
wrong.
A young man read about
mistreatment of kids because
of poverty and ignorance. His
inspiration led him to start a pro-
gram called "Children helping
children," which is helping those
children get an education while
other children build schools.
The chess champion was
endowed with a special gift, from
childhood, to learn and play the
game at the highest level.
The main point here is that
each of them have achieved
great success. They have not
changed. There is no ego. They
are deeply committed to serving
others and to improve the world.
Maybe our politicians should
take a page out of their book!
James Lane
Englewood

Sheriffs show
little compassion

Editor:
The Feb. 3 article chronicling
the opposition of two sheriffs to
the medical marijuana initiative
is a sad commentary on the
politicization of compassionate
care options in our state. As
someone who has been a
caregiver for a spouse going
through intense chemother-
apy, and watching her suffer
endlessly as medical science
did not have a legal means to
quell the nausea, I am offended.
Every time she would undergo
chemotherapy, hospitalization
would be required for three or
four days afterward to rehydrate
her, since none of the medica-
tions available could stop the
sickness.
This is something that should
not be politicized. This is about
compassion. My spouse of
42 years passed away nearly
three years ago. She's resting
peacefully now. It's a shame she
had to suffer as much as she did
when she was here.
I would ask the sheriffs to
reconsider. Don't be so presump-
tuous as to think your amateur
hypothetical medical ideas have
any validity. Don't just say you
have compassion, show it. Don't
politicize this issue. Stick to what
you know: law enforcement.
Mackie McNamara
Punta Gorda

When did Prummell
become a doctor?
Editor:
Ben Pollara does indeed make
an excellent point. Why synthe-
size THC if marijuana has no
medical use?
There is a simple answer: The
pharmaceutical kingdom/med-
ical profession has for many
decades preferred to exercise
control over manufactured
drugs which might otherwise
be available in natural form,
without the side effects.
And if certain drugs are illegal,
the law enforcement complex
comes into play. Enter our
esteemed Sheriff Prummel. And
I voted for the guy!
I did not know that Prummel
also had a medical degree, to
whit: "There are plenty of other
drugs on the market to help
people, and we don't need to be
adding to that list."
I shudder every time I read a
story about law-enforcement
officers seizing a cache of mari-
juana or any other "illegal" drug,
accompanied by a parroting
press inanely quoting estimates
of the "street value" of the seized
drug. The net result is not a
decrease in use of the drug, but
a rise in the street price of the
drug.
Irwin Wolfe
Port Charlotte


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014






The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014 VIEWPOINT www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C Our Town Page 9


Keep calm


and gossip on


We have official-
ly reached the
take-a-step-
back moment in the un-
folding or unraveling
- of the Chris Christie
alleged bridge/political
retribution/Sandy funds
political scandal.
It always happens in
any story these days.
News stampedes through
the ether, trampling
context and nuance,
oblivious to potholes and
fissures. And then correc-
tions must be made.
This isn't finger-point-
ing at my colleagues.
Columnists have the
luxury of taking their
time with facts, while
reporters are expected
to update news by the
minute, or less. In our
amped-up, bloglodyte
world, stories are chug-
ging 5-hour Energy shots
just to keep up with
reporters and, it must be
said, gossips.
Thus on Tuesday,
Mika Brzezinski said the
necessary on MSNBC's
"Morning Joe": "Be
calm." Later she added,
"It's time to step back," a


sentiment with which all
present were in accord.
For the past several
days on most news
shows, the dominant
buzz has centered on a
New York Times story,
subsequently adjusted,
that came close to
accusing Christie of
lying when he has
insisted repeatedly that
he knew nothing about
the George Washington
Bridge lane closings that
resulted in a four-day
traffic jam and that have
been characterized as
political retribution.
The Times story
cited a letter from Alan
L. Zegas, attorney for
David Wildstein, the
former Port Authority
executive and one-time
Christie ally who, after an


infamous email exchange
with Christie aide Bridget
Anne Kelly ("Time for
some traffic problems in
Fort Lee"), ordered the
lane closings.
In the Times story,
Wildstein was said to
have "had the evidence"
to prove that Christie
knew contemporane-
ously about the lane
closings. Later, the Times
story was tweaked to
reflect what the letter ac-
tually said: that "evidence
exists" that Christie knew
at the time of the lane
closings. Thank you for
the clarification. What
evidence? Whose? Where?
The voice knows.
And then she heard it
again, the same chilling
voice whispering as the
curtains fluttered on a
still night. "It exists... it
exists... it exists."
But seriously, with-
out confirmation or
corroboration of such
damning evidence,
what, really, was this
latest chapter? The letter
was essentially a plea
to the Port Authority
that it payWildstein's


legal expenses, which it
previously had denied
to do.
To be fair, the Times
story was not without
basis the letter does
exist and its contents
are of interest. News.
But it is also damning
of Christie's character
without substantiation,
otherwise known as
one man's word against
another and that's not
good for journalism.
Before you could say
heywaitaminute, the
Drudge Report led with
the scurrilous headline
"He Knew." Though
Drudge clearly isn't a
Christie fan (this must
be terribly painful for
the governor), the result
has been a circling of
conservative wagons
by those who hate the
media more than they
dislike a moderate
Republican as foretold
by a certain columnist
weeks ago. Thus, Christie
has been invited to
speak at the annual
Conservative Political
Action Conference
next month, where he


was conspicuously not
invited a year ago.
Meanwhile, Christie's
office has fired back,
impugning Wildstein's
character, even going
back to his high-school
days and calling him
"tumultuous." One can
only imagine his year-
book inscription: "Dude,
stay as tumultuous as
you are and bridges will
fear you!"
In a parallel saga,
CNN recently issued a
report poking holes in
Hoboken Mayor Dawn
Zimmer's story claiming
that Christie's office
threatened to withhold
Hurricane Sandy recov-
ery funds if she didn't
support a development
project the governor
favored.
CNN cited not only
contradictions and dis-
crepancies but evidence
that Zimmer may have
practiced the same tactics
of which she has accused
Christie. The executive
director of the Hoboken
Housing Authority had
sued Zimmer, claiming
that the mayor had


"an unwritten policy of
political patronage or
'pay to play' to reward...
political supporters."
Shocking.
As the Christie scandal
machine grinds on,
his polling numbers
un-shockingly are plum-
meting. Once in the lead
in a fantasy presidential
race, he now trails Hillary
Clinton 39 percent to
55 percent. In the race
for the GOP nomination,
he trails Mike Huckabee
and Rand Paul, tying
with Jeb Bush.
But, the night is young.
It remains entirely possi-
ble that Christie is telling
the truth. And evidence
may or may not exist.
Which means a new nar-
rative must fill the void. It
goes like this: Even if he's
telling the truth, Christie
created the culture in
which his people felt free
to abuse power.
Stay tuned ... and stay
calm.
Kathleen Parker is a
columnist for the Orlando
Sentinel. Readers may
reach her at kathleen
parker@washpost.com.


Presidential lawlessness? Hardly


house Budget
Committee
Chairman Paul
Ryan calls President
Obama's tenure "an
increasingly lawless
presidency." Texas Sen.
Ted Cruz cites "the pres-
ident's persistent pattern
of lawlessness."
House Judiciary
Committee Chairman
Bob Goodlatte called
a hearing to examine
how Obama "has bla-
tantly disregarded the
Constitution's mandate
to faithfully execute the
laws."
And first-term Texas
Rep. RandyWeber amped
up the rhetoric an ugly
notch, with pre-State of
the Union tweets from
the House floor, no less
- denouncing Obama as
"Kommandant-In-Chief"
and a "Socialist dictator."
These assessments are
overwrought, veering
on unhinged with the
exception of Weber's,
whose hinges seem to
have fallen off entirely.
But overwrought
doesn't equal unimport-
ant. Presidential power
tends to be a one-way
ratchet; few presidents
voluntarily cede power
that a predecessor has
accumulated.
So it's worth turning
down the partisan
volume and assessing
Obama's edgiest actions:
Suspending certain
deportations in the face
of congressional refusal
to take that step; delay-
ing and revising parts of
the Affordable Care Act;
effectively rewriting the
No Child Left Behind
law through sweeping
waivers; and, most
recently, unilaterally


Ruth
Marcus



ordering an increase in
the minimum wage for
federal contractors.
These are push-the-
envelope moves but
strike me as within the
bounds of the modern
presidency. Some
historical perspective:
First, the constitution-
al tug-of-war between
the president and
Congress is as old as the
republic indeed, an
essential element in the
constitutional design.
The framers were wary
not only of creating
a monarchical chief
executive but also one
hobbled by congressio-
nal interference.
Second, there is
a robust history of
presidents pushing
ambiguous constitu-
tional boundaries to
engage in unilateral
action. Jefferson ex-
ecuted the Louisiana
Purchase despite his
own doubts about its
constitutionality. Lincoln
issued the Emancipation
Proclamation, not-
withstanding the
Constitution's recogni-
tion of slavery and his
own concerns about the
proclamation's suscepti-
bility to legal challenge.
Third, this trend
toward broad presiden-
tial power has acceler-
ated in recent decades,
under presidents of


both parties even
before George W Bush's
aggressive use of signing
statements, and his war
on terror.
In a 2001 Harvard Law
Review article, Elena
Kagan, a veteran of the
Clinton White House,
traced the growth of
presidential power over
regulatory agencies to
Ronald Reagan (in pur-
suit of efforts to loosen
regulations) through
Bill Clinton (in pursuit
of more activist gov-
ernment, a way around
a balky Congress, and
political credit).
Clinton's unprecedent-
ed interventions, she
wrote, represented a "sig-
nificant enhancement of
presidential power over
regulatory matters."
Fourth, assessments
of presidential overreach
are inherently matters
of situational ethics:
How you judge whether
a president is overstep-
ping his authority is
inevitably colored by
whether you agree with
the substance of that
exercise.
Put more bluntly,
much of the hoopla
about presidential
imperialism is politics
dressed up in constitu-
tional clothing, to be put
on and off depending on
which party holds the
White House.
Thus, Democrats
condemned what they
saw as Bush's unilat-
eral excesses, while
Republicans remained
largely silent and uncon-
cerned. Now, the roles
are precisely reversed.
Immigration offers one
particularly inflammato-
ry example. Republicans


denounce Obama for
having evaded congres-
sional refusal to pass the
DREAM Act by unilat-
erally declaring that
some children of undoc-
umented immigrants
will not be subject to
deportation. Meanwhile,
some on the left com-
plain that he has not
taken more aggressive
action by suspending all
deportations.
"A lot of people having
been saying this lately
on every problem...
just sign an executive
order and we can
pretty much do anything
and basically nullify
Congress," Obama said
in November. "That's
not how it works. We got
this Constitution. We got
this whole thing about
separation of powers and
branches."
So where does Obama
fit on the spectrum of
presidential power-
grabbing? Johns Hopkins
political scientist
Benjamin Ginsberg, co-
author of "Presidential
Power: Unchecked and
Unbalanced," is, as that
title suggests, a fierce
critic of presidential
overreach. But he places
Obama on the mild end

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of such abuses.
"There has been an
onward march toward
presidential unilateral-
ism," Ginsberg told me.
"Obama has been the
least aggressive, least
unilateral, of our recent
presidents."
By contrast, University
of Chicago political
scientist William Howell,
author of "Thinking
about the Presidency:
The Primacy of Power,"
is less wary of presiden-
tial muscle-flexing. Yet
he sees Obama's behav-
ior as largely in line with
that of his predecessors.


"The dominant theme
is one of continuity
across presidents,"
Howell told me. "What's
striking to me are the
ways in which Obama's
behaving a lot like Bush,
who was behaving a lot
like Clinton."
Worth keeping in
mind as Obama wields
the pen and the phone,
and Republicans work
to paint him as a lawless
autocrat.
Ruth Marcus is a
columnist for The
Washington Post.
Readers may reach her at
marcusr@washpost.com.


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The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 9


VIEWPOINT





:OurTown Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014


Rotonda II: The sewer-saga sequel?


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER

While commissioners
expressed surprise at the
recent legal judgment
against Charlotte County
in the lawsuit brought by
developers for Rotonda
Villas, the plaintiffs'
legal counsel had no such
misconceptions, saying the
rule of law prevailed.
"The law was in our
favor," attorney Thomas
Dougherty said. "Charlotte
County, by its own admis-
sion, caused a substantial
deprivation of the plain-
tiffs' properties."
At issue is whether the
county failed to provide
water and sewer service
for more than 1,000 lots in
RotondaVillas, preventing
property owners from de-
veloping their properties.


Circuit Judge Joseph Foster
last month ruled in favor
of the property owners,
known as Andress Family
Florida, which included
Rotonda Lakes II LP,
RotondaWest LLC and the
Cape Cave Corp.
"It was only after the
Feb. 13, 2006, meeting that
the plaintiffs understood
for the first time that
the defendant Charlotte
County would not issue
building permits in the
RotondaVillas area," the
judge wrote in his Jan. 24
order, citing the trial
testimony of the county's
own witness.
In announcing his rul-
ing, Foster determined the
facts in the case were the
same as presented during
a first lawsuit, filed in 2009,
that also found the county
at fault. In the initial case,


the county ended up pay-
ing $13 million for failing
to maintain an existing
sewer system that led to
the foreclosure of 150 lots
in RotondaVillas.
"When Charlotte County
purchased the sewer
system (in 2000), they were
required to follow through
with due diligence to know
the working order of the
system. They chose not to,"
Dougherty said. "Now they
want to play dumb."
During the second
trial, attorneys for the
county attempted to point
out factual distinctions
between the two suits,
said county attorney
Janette Knowlton. Defense
attorneys also argued that
one plaintiff was shown
to have prior knowledge
that the water and sewer
system was inoperable.


Another difference is that
the county has since built
new water and sewer
systems to serve Rotonda
Villas, allowing the
plaintiffs to develop their
property.
However, while these
arguments swayed some
county officials to expect
a favorable decision, the
judge was not convinced.
"I was flabbergasted at
the result," Commissioner
Stephen R. Deutsch said.
"I thought the facts were
substantially different from
the first case. It seems like
the court looked at the
similarities and didn't look
at the differences."
Ken Doherty, county
chairman, also was caught
off guard by the judge's
order.
'A better word would
be shocked, extremely


disappointed," said
Doherty, who attended
most of the liability trial.
"I came to the conclusion
that we had a pretty good
chance. We'll see how it
plays out."
If the case goes to the
compensatory damages
phase, Doherty said the
impact could be significant.
"I haven't seen anything
yet, but through the
rumor mill I've heard
that the number could
be from $60 million to
$100 million," he said.
That amount could have
a devastating effect on the
county and its residents.
"This isn't a suit against
the county," Deutsch said.
"This is literally a lawsuit
against the taxpayers."
The next step in the
process will likely be
the county filing for a


rehearing, hoping that the
judge reverses himself.
But even Knowlton isn't
counting on this.
"They're not ordinarily
granted," she said.
If denied a rehearing,
the suit would proceed to
the damages phase, with
Foster establishing a meth-
odology for determining
financial compensation.
This formula would then
be presented to a jury to
come up with an award
amount.
County Administrator
Ray Sandrock said officials
are currently reviewing
potential scenarios as to
how such an award would
be funded, saying the
county has overcome sub-
stantial losses in the past
stemming from Hurricane
Charley and the recession.
Email: groberts@sun-heraldxom


WOLF

FROM PAGE 1

"I'm proud so many
people accepted
him," said Tom "Wolf"
McCarthy, Lobo's owner
and friend. "Lobo was
such a help to people."
McCarthy rescued
Lobo 13 years ago in
Louisiana. The wolf had
been beaten, starved
and shot. McCarthy
moved to Port Charlotte
a couple years later and
had been taking Lobo
around town with him
ever since.
"He was the most
special, loving animal,"
said Sharon McCarthy,
Tom's wife. "It's like he
was God's instrument."
Tom McCarthy, 65, is a
Vietnam veteran. Many
of his comrades came
to know Lobo just as
well and spoke highly
of him at Wednesday's
45-minute funeral cer-
emony. A military-style




SUN FILE
PHOTO
Chris
Colangelo,
with his
friend Lobo,
an 85-pound,
domesticated
Mexican gray
wolf, in 2011.
After years as a
service animal,
Lobo recently
passed away.


MAULS
FROM PAGE 1

job, went beyond the area
marked for clearing.
"They didn't read
the plans correctly and
they went outside their
boundaries," Gering said.
"They cut plants that they
weren't supposed to."
Three varieties of
mangroves red, white
and black, many of which
were believed to be 25
years old were mauled.
The canopies were lopped
off completely. Only the
roots remain.
"The environmental
scientist that was here
(Tuesday) said the red
mangroves will grow back,
no problem," Gering said.
"The white mangroves
and black mangroves will
probably not grow back."
City officials contacted
the project's permitting
agencies, including the
state Department of
Environmental Protection,
the Southwest Florida
Water Management
District and the Army
Corps of Engineers, to
discuss remediation and
what steps to take next.
Quality Enterprises did


procession led the fallen
wolf's ashes into the
packed activity room at
the nursing home. An
American flag accompa-
nied him. The ceremony
was moved outside for a
rendition of taps.
Kays-Ponger &
Uselton Funeral Home
and Cremation Services
handled the service. Dee
Roberts, director of pet
passing, spoke at the
ceremony about the an-
imal she came to know
and love from her days
of work for the local
American Red Cross.
"I've never fallen in
love so fast," Roberts
said to those gathered to
pay their respects. "I was
madly in love with Lobo.
... Our eyes met and the
rest was history."
Roberts said she and
Lobo even sealed their
relationship with a kiss.
"Just his presence gave
you strength," she said.
"I'm sure he's running
free in peace."
Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


not respond to calls for
comment.
"The contractor has
some remedial work to
do first to appease the
state for its permitting
violations, and then to
appease us for all the
loss of vegetation that we
have," Gering said.
Mayor Rachel Keesling
asked Gering what, if
anything, the contractor
could do to replace the
lost trees.
"Stuff will grow back, but
we have lost quite a bit of
vegetation," he said. "We
will be working with the
contractor to figure out
what is the best we can do,
because we are never going
to replace 4- to 6-inch (cal-
iper) Buttonwood (trees)
there, and the mangroves
that were 15 feet tall."
"That's very disappoint-
ing," said City Councilman
Tom Cavanaugh, shaking
his head.
It's the first time the
city has worked directly
with Quality Enterprises,
which, in addition to
its Naples office, has
locations in Louisiana,
Mississippi andVirginia.
The company worked
directly with Charlotte
County on the widening
ofAqui Esta Drive.


LAMARQUE

FROM PAGE 1

North Port police
officers on scene in
the afternoon prior to
student dismissal.
School district
spokesman Scott
Ferguson said roughly
15 students reported
they were sick the same
day, but added the
district could not tie
those issues to those of
the teachers. Students
were not dismissed
Wednesday, although
all after-school activi-
ties were canceled.
According to Jody
Dumas, director of
facilities services,
district officials were at
the school Wednesday
morning to try to track
down a smell that was
reported last week.
They traced the smell
to a second-floor
classroom, where they
found a rotten orange
in a student desk.
Dumas said the or-
ange was not in a room
where any of the five
teachers who became
ill taught, and all of
those instructors' class-
rooms are in various
locations throughout
the school.
Dumas said the
presence of the police
officers was to help
facilitate an evacuation
if necessary, but since
neither emergency
personnel, nor school
district staff, could
pinpoint a reason that
teachers were falling ill,
an evacuation was not
needed.

The downtown
flood-mitigation project,
which will be funded in
large part by a grant from
the Federal Emergency
Management Agency,
is a two-part project
meant to stem flooding in
older, low-lying residential
neighborhoods in the city's
downtown by improving
the overall stormwa-
ter-drainage system.
Phase 1 consisted main-
ly of drainage improve-
ments to the areas around
Shreve, Berry, McGregor
and Chasteen streets in
the city's Historic District.
Phase 2 will concentrate
on the neighborhood
around Harvey and
Durrance streets, as well
as the Harborwalk East
area near Bayfront Health
Punta Gorda (formerly
Charlotte Regional Medical
Center), according to City
Manager Howard Kunik.
In all, Gering said, the
city is permitted to remove
two sections of man-
groves, totaling roughly
18,700 square feet.
The contractor likely
will have to pay fines to
the state as a result of the
errant clearing; if it were
found that the action had
been intentional, those
fines would be substantial.
Email: bbarbosa@sun-heraldxom


Dumas added that
the classrooms of the
teachers who called
911 Wednesday have
not been tested previ-
ously for the presence
of tainted American
or Chinese drywall
which can cause
ill health effects -
although many class-
rooms in the school
have been tested and
posted negative results.

Flummoxed
While Dumas did not
discount the symptoms
the teachers were
exhibiting Wednesday,
he said the district still
was vexed as to the
cause.
"I can't doubt the
symptoms they're
having," he said.
Lamarque has been
plagued with an odd,
sulfur-type odor since
it opened in 2006,
causing staff and stu-
dents to complain of
allergy-like symptoms
like coughing, scratchy
throats and headaches.
District officials have
spent hundreds of
thousands of dollars
since then in an effort
to track down the
smell, and they stand
by the results of their
testing, which most
recently was conduct-
ed by Tampa-based
OHC Environmental
Engineering. The
district spent $250,000
in 2013 alone to try to
seek the source of the
stench.
The school district
also is waiting on the
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention


REGATTA

FROM PAGE 1

"We're excited to be in
our fifth year," said Martin
Holland, vice chairman of
Charlotte Harbor Regatta,
the nonprofit organization
that stages the regatta.
"The regatta has been a
shot of adrenaline for sail-
ing on Charlotte Harbor."
Sailors from as far away
as California, Canada and
the Cayman Islands are
registered to race in 11
boat classes, including
seven multihull designs,
which will launch at Port
Charlotte Beach Park each
morning.
"The beach complex is a
great facility for multihulls
and small one-design
boats," Holland said. "The
county parks folks have
been great to work with,
and our competitors love
the venue and the enthusi-
asm of this community."
Bruce Krupke of
Syracuse, N.Y., will be glad
to leave behind "a cold,
hard winter" for a few days.
"We're really looking
forward to heading down
south," said Krupke, a
Hobie 16 catamaran sailor.
"I personally really love


North Port Fire Rescue personnel wait outside Lamarque
Elementary School Wednesday after five teachers called
911 to report they had fallen ill. Two of the instructors were
transported to the North Port ER on Toledo Blade Boulevard


for treatment.
to decide if it will
lend a hand in the
investigation, after the
district reached out to
the federal agency last
month. Dumas said the
CDC was reviewing the
material sent by the
district, but officials
had not made up their
minds yet.
The district
also awaits a full
report from Dr.
James McCluskey, a
University of South
Florida professor and
toxicologist whom
the district hired to
perform examinations
of nine Lamarque staff
members who previ-
ously have reported
ill health effects. A
preliminary report
from McCluskey stated
he could not link their
issues directly to the
school. McCluskey
could garner as much
as $215,500 for his
work.
Parents, meanwhile,

the Port Charlotte/Punta
Gorda area. It's a great
sailing venue and a real
nice area of Florida to sail
in. The location and how
(they) run the event is
top-notch and first class.
When we come down, I'm
looking at the houses and
thinking maybe I want
to buy a house and retire
there."
Competitors will launch
from three sites, including
the beach complex,
Charlotte Harbor Yacht
Club and the Bayfront
Center in Punta Gorda.
Racing begins at 11 a.m.
Friday and continues
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday
and 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Registration is open online
and competitors can
sign up as late as Friday
for multihull classes and
Saturday for monohull
classes, including the
Sunfish, 2.4mR, Laser and
Flying Scot.
The regatta will feature
the inauguralWill White
Cup, named for the author
of "The Sunfish Book," who
is a founding director of the
Charlotte County Regatta.
Spectators who want
to catch the action will
get the best vantage
points from Fishermen's
Village, Gilchrist Park and


continue to weigh
their options for their
children who attend
Lamarque, as the
number of kids report-
ing ill health concerns
has risen in the last
year.
Troy Seymour's
7-year-old son attends
Lamarque, and he
said Wednesday that
he had no idea five
teachers had fallen
ill that day, saying he
was "caught off guard"
when he learned of the
news.
Seymour said he and
his wife were planning
on removing their son
from Lamarque prior
to the end of the year,
but that will depend
on whether the dis-
trict can place him in
another school.
"He's been sick a
couple of times. We're
definitely trying to pull
him out of the school,"
Seymour said.
Email: dwinchester@sun-herald.com

Bayshore Park. Spectators
watching from boats on
the water will be advised
by regatta officials and
volunteers from the U.S.
Coast Guard Auxiliary
Flotilla 98 about how to
steer clear of the racers.
The launch and retrieval
of the multihull fleets from
the beach has proven to
be a popular attraction for
curious locals and visitors.
Boats leave the beach
about an hour before
racing each day and return
in the early afternoon.
"It's a major regatta,"
Holland said. 'And it takes
a lot of people to put it
together."
More than 50 local
volunteers on the water
and onshore staff race
committee boats, register
and assist competitors
and judge and score the
races. Major sponsors for
the regatta include Mosaic,
Sun Newspapers, Kitson
& Partners, the Punta
Gorda Boaters Alliance,
Fishermen's Village Resort
& Marina and Dr. Mark
Asperilla.
For results, registration
and information about
the regatta, go to www.
charlotteharborregatta.
com.
Email: bgleason@suni-heraldxom






INSIDE

Noises traced to rare
'frost quakes'


"Frost quake" happens when
moisture in the ground
suddenly freezes and expands.
Page 2 -


UN: 'Unspeakable
suffering'for
Syria's children


A report to the U.N. Security
Council by Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon highlights the
plight of children in the conflict.
Page 5 -

10 things to know


1. Pope pressured
to act on abuse
In a scathing report, a U.N. panel
calls on the Vatican to immediately
remove all priests known or
suspected to be child molesters.
Seepage 1.

2. Wobbly planet has
strange seasons
Gas giant Kepler-413b is about
2,300 light years away and has a
spin axis that can vary as much as
30 degrees in an 11-year period.
See page 5.

3. Airlines flying to
Russia urged to beware
The Department of Homeland
Security warns that terrorists may
try to smuggle explosives onto
planes in toothpaste tubes.
See page 5.

4. Texas carries out
execution of female
Convicted killer Suzanne Basso
is the 14th woman executed in
the U.S. since the Supreme Court
allowed capital punishment to
resume in 1976. Seepage 2.

5. Northeast residents
socked again
The second winter storm of
the week cancels classes, closes
government and business offices,
and causes more than 1 million
power outages. Seepage 1.

6. CVS snuffing
out smokes
The U.S. drugstore chain says
it won't sell cigarettes, cigars or
chewing tobacco after Oct. 1.
Seepage 1.

7. A bionic hand with
better sense of touch
With the prototype prosthetic, an
amputee is able to feel differences
between a bottle, a baseball and
an orange. Seepage 1.

8. Clay Aiken to run
The former "American Idol"
contestant says he's running
for Congress in his native North
Carolina. Seepage 1.

9. Blasts rock
Baghdad, killing 34
The attacks come as al-Qaida-led
militants battle for control of
mainly Sunni areas, in the first test
for the Shiite-led government to
maintain security. Seepage s.

10. Who's expanding
its NFL coverage
CBS has won the rights to air eight
Thursday night games next season.
See Sports page 2.


h e^ 1ir e www.sunnewspapers.net
THURSDAY FEBRUARY 6, 2014




CVS shuns tobacco


Drugstore chain will cease cigarette sales by Oct. 1


By TOM MURPHY
and MICHAEL FELBERBAUM
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

CVS, the nation's second-largest
drugstore chain, is kicking the habit
of selling tobacco products as it con-
tinues to shift its focus toward being
more of a health care provider.
The company said Wednesday that
it will phase out cigarettes, cigars and
chewing tobacco by Oct. 1 in its 7,600
stores nationwide, in a move that
will help grow its business that works
with doctors, hospitals and others to
improve customers' health.
The move is the latest evidence of


a big push in the drugstore industry
that has been taking place over
several years. Major drugstore chains
have been adding in-store clinics and
expanding their health care offerings.
Their pharmacists deliver flu shots
and other immunizations, and their
clinics now manage chronic illnesses
like high blood pressure and diabetes
and treat relatively minor problems
like sinus infections.
Among other things, they're
preparing for increased health care
demand. That's in part due to an
aging U.S. population that will need
more care in future years. It's also the
CVS 14


51'
AP FILE PHOTO
In this July 17, 2013, file photo, Marlboro cigarettes are on
display in a CVS store in Pittsburgh. The nation's second-
largest drugstore chain says it will phase out cigarettes,
cigars and chewing tobacco by Oct. 1.


Lights out for 1 million


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

More than a million
homes and businesses
were left in darkness and
cold Wednesday after
snow, sleet and freezing
rain moved into the
Northeast. The region's
second winter storm
of the week canceled
classes, closed govern-
ment and business offices
and sent cars and trucks
sliding on slippery roads
and highways. Around a
foot of snow fell in some
states. Moving in over-
night from the Midwest,
where it wreaked similar
havoc, the storm tested
the region already bat-
tered by a series of heavy
snows and below-freezing
temperatures this winter.

Pennsylvania
Ice and snow brought
down trees and limbs
and knocked out power
to some 750,000 cus-
tomers. Most of the
outages were in the
Philadelphia suburbs,
and PECO, the major
utility company, warned
it could be the weekend
before some people get
their lights back on. The
Pennsylvania Turnpike
was closed around
Harrisburg, the state
capital, for more than 13
hours after a fatal crash
Tuesday night. Many
schools were closed.

NewYork
Up to a foot of snow fell
in places upstate; hun-
dreds of schools upstate
were closed. Four inches
of snow and a quar-
ter-inch of ice covered
New York City. The state
deployed 3,500 tons of
stockpiled road salt to
New York City, where
supplies were running
LIGHTS 14


AP PHOTOS


A bird perches next to ice covered sneakers hanging from utility lines after a winter storm Wednesday, in Philadelphia.
Icy conditions have knocked out power to more than 200,000 electric customers in southeastern Pennsylvania and
prompted school and legislative delays as well as speed reductions on major roadways.


A man inspects an ice covered downed tree that took out a utility line and landed atop a minivan, after a winter storm
Wednesday in Philadelphia.


New bionic hand adds touch


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP MEDICAL WRITER
WASHINGTON (AP) -
To feel what you touch
- that's the holy grail
for artificial limbs. In a
step toward that goal,
European researchers
created a robotic hand
that let an amputee feel
differences between a
bottle, a baseball and a
mandarin orange.
The patient only got
to experiment with the
bulky prototype for a
week, and it's far from the
BIONIC|4


AP FILE PHOTO


This March 2013 handout photo provided by Science
Translational Medicine shows amputee Dennis Aabo
Serensen, right, wearing sensory feedback enabled
prosthesis in Rome.


UN panel blasts

Vatican on sex

abuse, abortion
By NICOLE WINFIELD
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
VATICAN CITY-The Vatican "systematically"
adopted policies that allowed priests to rape
and molest tens of thousands of children over
decades, a U.N. human rights committee said
Wednesday, urging the Holy See to open its files
on pedophiles and bishops who concealed their
crimes.
In a devastating report hailed by abuse victims,

VATICAN 14





-Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014


ST. LOUIS (AP) -
Chuck Herron heard the
loud thud, then another
and another. It sounded
like someone was drop-
ping big snowballs on the
roof of his home.
The house is more than
100 years old and creaks,
Herron said, but he had
"never heard anything
like that before."
As his neighbors in
tiny Paris, Mo., huddled
around televisions
Sunday for the Super
Bowl, many were startled
by similar strange noises.
Some even saw flashes of
light and called 911.
Scientists say the
community experienced
a rare natural phenom-
enon known as a "frost
quake," which happens
when moisture in the
ground suddenly freezes
and expands. If condi-
tions are just right, the
soil or bedrock breaks
like a brittle frozen pipe,
generating mysterious
noises that range from an
earthquake-like rumble
to sharp cracking sounds
sometimes mistaken for
falling trees.
This winter has been
ripe for frost quakes,
known technically as
cryoseism. Temperatures
have been frigid, but
occasional warm-ups


In this Jan. 11 photo, Dennis Olsen measures a fissi
he said was about an inch wide and at least eight 1
inches deep, in his rural driveway following a frost
Waupun, Wis.


have allowed for thawing.
And the temperature
swings have sometimes
been abrupt.
That was the case last
weekend in Missouri,
where temperatures in
the 40s on Saturday gave
way to single-digit read-
ings by Sunday night.
In Mark Twain's
hometown of Hannibal,
Mo., 100 miles north
of St. Louis, police and
emergency dispatches
received several calls
within about two hours.
Facebook feeds were
filled with worries.
Some people com-
pared the noise to a sonic
boom that rattles win-
dows, said Michael Hall,


executive direct
911 center that
Hannibal area.
described it ass
like "somebody
on their house.'
Missouri isn't
Frost quakes we
reported last m
Canada and ins
other states I
Michigan, Ohio
Wisconsin.
In DeKalb, Ill.
Kammes and h(
were getting rea
bed earlier this
when the loud ]
noises began.
"The louder o
sounded like sot
was throwing sn
the house," Kam


4 arrested on drug charges after Hoffman death


(LA Times) -Four
people have been
arrested on drug charges
after the death of Philip
Seymour Hoffman in
an apparent heroin
overdose, although
whether the suspects


were involved with the
actor remained unclear
on Tuesday.
"The four have been
arrested for drug charges.
That's all we can tell
you," a New York Police
Department spokesman


told the Los Angeles
Times. RobertVineberg,
57, and Thomas
Cushman, 48, were both
charged with felony
criminal possession of
a controlled substance.
Vineberg was also


For Valentine's Day, Dr. Phil and his wife Robin McGraw

share their best advice for long-lasting relationships.


charged with criminal
use of drug parapherna-
lia. Max Rosenbloom and
Juliana Luchkiw, both
22, were charged with
criminal use of drug par-
aphernalia, criminal use
of controlled substance,
and unlawful possession
of marijuana. All are from
NewYork.
Police refused to
discuss what, if any, was
the relationship between
the arrests and Hoffman's
death over the weekend.
But local media re-
ports, based on unnamed
police sources, said the
arrests came after raids
based on information
gathered from the
Hoffman investigation.
Several reports said
police had recovered
heroin packaged in the
same way as the drugs
found in Hoffman's
West Village apartment.
Dealers often brand their
products, and in this case
the drugs carried the
brands identifying them
as Ace of Spades or Ace of
Hearts.
Hoffman's body was
found at his home on
Sunday with a syringe
in his arm, police said.
Investigators recovered
more than 50 bags of
heroin, along with other
syringes, a charred spoon
and various prescription
medications, including
a blood pressure drug
and a muscle relaxant,
law enforcement officials
have said.
Hoffman's death has
led to an outpouring
of grief by entertainers
and fans alike, calls for
police to investigate the
death and for officials to
address the growing use
of heroin. While heroin
has never gone away
- despite enforcement
efforts that include
destroying poppy fields,
paying farmers outside
the United States to grow
other crops and police
crackdowns on street
dealers its use has
surged in recent years.
New York City and
other urban areas have
long been major mar-
ketplaces, but the use of
heroin has spread. The
governor of Vermont
recently warned that his
small state faced a heroin
epidemic.


Mysterious noises traced to



rare 'frost quakes'


Agency surveillance and
frustrated with what
they consider outdated
digital privacy laws, state
lawmakers around the
nation are proposing bills
to curtail the powers of
law enforcement to moni-
tor and track citizens.
Their efforts in at least


SNeighbors heard noises
too, and several contact-
edpolice.
"It wasn't the regular
noise you hear when
your house is creaking,
blowing in the wind or
ice is breaking," Kammes
said.
The light flashes
reported by some people
are believed to come
from electrical changes
----- that occur when the
AP PHOTO freezing compresses
ure which rocks.
to ten Robert Herrmann
t quake in of the Saint Louis
University Earthquake
Center said frost quakes
tor of the are far different from
covers the real earthquakes.
Others Tremors typically occur
sounding a mile or two under-
banging ground. Frost quakes
are near the surface
Alone, and do not show up on
ere seismographs.
onth in "People nearby will
several probably notice them
Indiana, a lot because they are
shallow, but because
they do not penetrate
., Lisa deep within the earth,
er family the magnitude will not
idy for be large," Herrmann
winter said. "But the process
popping is the same. There is
something that is causing
nes rock to move, and as the
mebody rock moves, it generates
lowballs at sound waves and the
imes said. ground motion."


why he left the business at
his peak.
Jones, 72, died Friday
at Los Alamitos Medical
Center. He had been
diagnosed in December
with gallbladder cancer,
said his partner, Paula
McKenna.


I NATION

Woman executed
in Texas for 1998
torture killing
HUNTSVILLE, Texas
(AP) -A woman convicted
of torturing and killing a
mentally impaired man
she lured to Texas with the
promise of marriage was
put to deathWednesday
evening in a rare execution
of a female prisoner.
The lethal injection of
Suzanne Basso, 59, made
the NewYork native only
the 14th woman executed
in the U.S. since the
Supreme Court in 1976
allowed capital punish-
ment to resume. Almost
1,400 men have been put
to death during that time.
Before being put to death,
Basso told a warden who
stood near her, "No sir,"
when asked to make a final
statement. She appeared
to be holding back tears,
then smiled at two friends
watching through a
window.
As the lethal dose of
pentobarbital took effect,
Basso, dressed in a white
prison uniform, began to
snore. Her deep snoring
became less audible and
eventually stopped.

Clay Aiken makes
it official: He will
run for Congress
RALEIGH, N.C. (The
News & Observer) -
Singer Clay Aiken will
officially announce his
campaign for Congress
on Wednesday, injecting a
nationally known person-
ality into what has been a
quiet Democratic primary
to produce
a challenger
to U.S.
Rep. Renee
Ellmers.
Aiken's
decision
has already
AIKEN reshaped
the field.
Houston Barnes, a young
attorney who lives in
Durham, plans to an-
nounce Wednesday that
he is withdrawing from
the race and supporting
Aiken.
That leaves former state
Commerce Secretary
Keith Crisco of Asheboro
and licensed professional
counselor Toni Morris
of Fayetteville as Aiken's
primary opponents.

Target security
breach longer
than thought
WASHINGTON (MCT)
A Target Corp. official
told a Senate committee
that a massive security
breach affecting up to
S10 million holiday shop-
pers lasted three days
longer than previously
thought.
Chief Financial Officer
John Mulligan disclosed the
latest information in writ-
ten testimony at a hearing
Tuesday before the Senate
Judiciary Committee,
which is considering ways
to protect consumers'
personal information.
The malicious software
that enabled hackers to
steal information from
credit and debit cards
from Nov. 27 to Dec. 15
was later found on 25
additional checkout ma-
chines and continued to
collect shoppers' infor-
mation for three more
days, Mulligan wrote.

States look to rein
in government
surveillance

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP)
--Angry over revelations
of National Security


14 states are a direct
message to the federal
government: If you don't
take action to strengthen
privacy, we will.
"We need to stand up
and protect our liberty,"
said Republican Missouri
state Sen. Rob Schaaf,
author of a digital privacy
bill.
Police groups, however,
say the moves will in
some cases hinder efforts
to deter or solve crimes.
"It would cripple law en-
forcement's ability to do
investigations," said Bart
Johnson, executive direc-
tor of the International
Association of Chiefs of
Police.
Proponents say the
measures will overhaul
the definition of digital
privacy and help increase
oversight of specific
surveillance tools that
law enforcement agencies
have been using in the
states that critics say mir-
rors federal surveillance
technology.

Parents of teen
found in gym mat
sue funeral home
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP)
The parents of a south
Georgia teenager found
dead last year at school
inside a rolled-up gym
mat have sued the funeral
home that handled his
body, saying its owner
and his employees
wrongfully disposed of
their son's internal organs
and replaced them with
wadded newspaper.
Attorneys for the family
of 17-year-old Kendrick
Johnson ofValdosta
accuse Harrington
Funeral Home of fraud,
negligence and inten-
tional mishandling of a
corpse in the civil lawsuit
filed Jan. 31 in Lowndes
County State Court. They
are seeking unspecified
compensatory and
punitive damages.
Johnson was found
dead Jan. 11, 2013, inside
a rolled up mat in the cor-
ner of a gymnasium at his
high school. Detectives
for the Lowndes County
sheriff concluded he
died in a freak accident,
having gotten stuck
upside down in the mat
while reaching for a gym
shoe. But Johnson's family
believes he was slain and
had the body exhumed
for a second autopsy last
summer.

'Wild in the
Streets' actor
Christopher Jones
dead at 72
LOS ANGELES (LA
Times) As far back
as 1968, rising star
Christopher Jones who
seemed to have everything
at 26, including sensitive
good looks, adoring fans
and a steady stream of film
offers said he wasn't
much devoted to acting.
"I think of acting as
only a means to an end,"
Jones, who was often
compared to James Dean,
said in a Los Angeles Times
interview. 'Acting's just my
work."
Later that year Jones
starred in the youth
rebellion film "Wild in the
Streets" and had a major
role as a British officer in
David Lean's 1970 epic
"Ryan's Daughter."
But he meant what he
said. Except for a cameo
in a friend's movie, Jones
turned his back on
Hollywood after the Lean
film.
Jones, who continued
to live in Southern
California, was not much
interested in explaining









Police: Lab analyst said he knew he was in trouble


STATE NEWS


WIRE Page 3


PENSACOLA (AP)
- A former Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement crime lab
analyst told investigators
he had problems with his
back and knew he was in
trouble when confronted
in late January about
hundreds of painkillers
and other pills missing
from sealed evidence
containers, according
to police documents
released Wednesday.
Joseph Graves, 32, was
arrested late Tuesday
on charges of stealing
and selling drugs he was
supposed to be testing as
evidence. The affidavit does
not specify whether Graves
used any of the pills himself.


He was released from
the Escambia County
Jail on a $290,000 bond
Tuesday night. Graves
and his attorney have
declined numerous
interview requests from
The Associated Press.
Graves was arrested
a day after he resigned
from the position he
held since December
2005 at the crime lab
in Pensacola. In 2009,
he was promoted to
supervisor at the lab,
which processes crim-
inal evidence for law
enforcement agencies
throughout Florida. He is
charged with grand theft
of a controlled substance,
12 counts of tampering


with or fabricating
physical evidence, and
nine counts of trafficking
in illegal drugs.
He's accused of selling
oxycodone, morphine
and hydromorphone.
The


released
Wednesday
details
numerous
cases
GRAVES dating from
February
2013 through January
in which Graves is
accused of replacing
hundreds of narcotic pills
with over-the-counter
allergy, laxative, aspirin,


homeopathic and other
pills.
Investigators have said
Graves handled 2,600
cases, most of which
are drug-related. The
compromised cases could
possibly affect 80 law
enforcement agencies in
35 counties.
The department is
using agents from each
of its offices to review
all the cases handled by
Graves and has contacted
state attorneys and law
enforcement agencies
across the state that have
pending cases that could
be compromised.
Prosecutors and
defense attorneys have
said the thefts could


create massive prob-
lems for courts and law
enforcement agencies
throughout Florida and
could result in some con-
victions being thrown out
and sentences reduced.
The department is
reviewing its drug-testing
program to try to prevent
something similar from
happening again.
According to the
affidavit, investigators
first unearthed discrep-
ancies between evidence
logs and the contents
of sealed evidence
containers during a
Jan. 21 inventory of
drug evidence. In one
instance, investigators
were reviewing evidence


from a Feb. 16, 2013, case
in which 147 Oxycontin
pills were logged into
evidence.
"The quantity of pills
appeared to be consider-
ably less than 147. Upon
closer examination the
count of pills in item
#9 was found to be 47
round blue pills that were
imprinted with L49,"
Investigators wrote. The
pills were discovered to
be an over-the-counter
anti-inflammatory drug.
Investigators found
problems after reviewing
evidence containers in
about a dozen other cases
from 2013 and authorities
confronted Graves with
the evidence on Jan. 31.


I HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE STATE


Baby in critical
condition after
beating
ST. PETERSBURG (AP)
- A St. Petersburg man
is accused of beating and
cutting a baby in his care.
The Tampa Bay Times
reports the baby was
taken to All Children's
Hospital on Saturday,
suffering from breathing
problems.
Deputies say the baby
had lacerations on the
abdomen, a broken rib
and bruises. The incident
report did not indicate
the baby's gender.
According to an arrest
affidavit, a 24-year-old
man was looking after
the baby on Friday night
while the child's mother
was working. He told
deputies he pushed the
child's knees into its
stomach to relieve gas
and didn't mean to hurt
the baby.
The baby was placed on
a ventilator and under-
went several surgeries.
The baby was in critical
condition on Tuesday.
The man is charged
with aggravated child
abuse.

Fatal fire classified
as homicide
HUDSON (AP) Pasco
County officials say two
women who were found
inside a burning home
died from "homicidal
violence."
The bodies of Jessica
Keith and Amber Lynn
Jordan were found
Monday morning in
Hudson.
Officials say they
believe the fire was
intentionally set to cover
up the crime.
During a news confer-
ence on Tuesday, Sheriff
Chris Nocco referred
to the women as "high
probability victims" who
put themselves in harm's
way by associating with
drug dealers.
Investigators are track-
ing leads and are looking
into persons of interest.
The case remains under
investigation.

Magistrate weighs
costs of Dunn's
jail calls
JACKSONVILLE (AP)
-Journalists are argu-
ing that fees the State
Attorney's Office wants
to charge for the release
of jailhouse calls made
by a software developer
charged with fatally
shooting a 17-year-old are
exorbitant.
Prosecutors say the
shooting happened over
an argument over loud
music.
Journalists are going
before a magistrate
in Jacksonville on
Wednesday to argue the
jailhouse calls should
be released before the
start of Michael Dunn's
trial on charges for fatally
shooting Jordan Davis
of Marietta, Ga., outside
a convenience store in


Jacksonville in November
2012.
Jury selection already
is underway in Dunn's
first-degree murder
trial. Opening statements
could begin later this
week.
An appellate court
ruled that the jailhouse
recordings must be
released.
But the State Attorney's
Office wants to charge
more than $6,000.

Friends testify at
theater shooting
hearing
NEW PORT RICHEY
(AP) -Family and
friends of a retired Tampa
police captain accused of
fatally shooting a man at a
movie theater told a judge
Wednesday that the former
officer is an honorable,
even-tempered man who
should be released on bail.
Curtis Reeves, 71, is
charged with second-de-
gree murder in the
killing of 43-year-old Chad
Oulson. OnWednesday, he
formally entered a plea of
not guilty.
Police said Reeves
became upset when
Oulson was texting during
the movie previews. The
two men got into a verbal
argument and witnesses
told officers that Oulson
threw popcorn at Reeves,
authorities have said.
The eight-hour hearing
was supposed to deter-
mine whether Judge Pat
Siracusa would grant bail
for Reeves, who has been
in jail since the Jan. 13
shooting.
Driver faces
citation in fatal
accident
BRADENTON (AP)-
A 79-year-old woman
who killed three people
and injured four others
in a parking lot accident
has been cited with
improper backing.
The Florida Highway
Patrol reported on
Wednesday that
Doreene Landstra of
Palmetto must appear


in court next month.
Florida law requires
a hearing for any
non-criminal infraction
that results in a fatal
crash.
The accident hap-
pened Sunday at a mo-
bile home community
called the Sugar Creek
Country Club, about 45
miles south of Tampa.
Residents had gathered
for church services
inside a clubhouse
building.
An accident report
says Landstra backed
out of a parking
spot, pulled her 2009
Chevrolet Tahoe SUV
forward and needed
more room to clear
another parked vehicle.
At that point, Landstra's
SUV began backing up
again and struck seven
people. The report
doesn't make clear why
she failed to stop before
hitting people.


Police: Attacking nude man shot


DELRAY BEACH
(AP) A6-foot-3,
250-pound naked man
died after being shot by
a Palm Beach County
Sheriff's sergeant when
he attacked a former
New York City police
officer, chased a man
and his young son and
bit a man on the face.
Sheriff Ric Bradshaw
said at a Tuesday night
news conference that
the man later died
at a hospital but it
wasn't immediately
clear whether he died
from gunshot wounds
or from a medical
condition.
According to
Bradshaw, the man was
walking on a street in
Delray Beach when, for
no apparent reason, he
attacked the 66-year-
old retired officer. The
man continued down
the street, where he
chased a man and his
10-year-old son near
the entrance to a gated
community.
Bradshaw said the
man then started fight-
ing with an 18-year-old
man, who defended
himself with a box
cutter. The man bit the
18-year-old on the face.
"The 18-year-old
thought he was trying
to eat his face off,"
Bradshaw said.
"The people that
he assaulted, starting
with the retired NYPD
guy, the people that
he chased and then
the 18-year-old, said
this guy had like su-
per human strength,"
the sheriff said. "But
he's a big guy to start
with. He's not fat,
he looks like an NFL
linebacker. And he
basically was terroriz-
ing people all up and


Dr.lWilli=TT.MMceenzie, Jr,







Willia T.M Snnzes.,lc
DMM lasr umhea


^^gMff~mgTCT9 implantsB


629.3443
3443 Tamiami Tr., Suite D,
Located in Professional Gardens


down this street."
Deputies arrived and
tried to calm the man
down. They used a stun
gun, but the man kept
going.
"He takes a fighting
stance. They're trying to
get him on the ground.
He starts charging
them," Bradshaw said.
That's when a ser-
geant fired three times,
once to the torso and
twice on the lower part
of the body. The man
was taken to Delray
Medical Center, where
he died.
The injured police
officer and the teen
were also taken to
the hospital. Their
conditions were not
available. Bradshaw
said the 10-year-old
boy injured himself
trying to go under the
gate to get away from
the man.
The sheriff said
investigators are trying
to figure out the man's
identity and to get


some background
information about him.
Bradshaw said the
man was "obviously on
some kind of narcotics
to act like this."
"The deputies had to
do what they had to do
to disable this guy so
he didn't get into this
gated community and
wreak havoc in there,"
Bradshaw said.
The incident is remi-
niscent of a 2012 attack
in Miami in which a
naked man attacked
a homeless man and
chewed off much of his
face. The man, Rudy
Eugene, was shot and
killed by a Miami police
officer. Witnesses said
he had been swinging
from a light pole
minutes before the
attack. Lab tests found
only marijuana in his
system.
The victim in the
Miami attack, Ronald
Poppo, lost his left eye,
his nose and most of
the surrounding skin.


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AP PHOTO

Past meets future
People work at a site in downtown Miami, Tuesday,
which is likely to be of the most significant prehistoric
sites in the United States. Over the past several months,
archaeologists have dug up eight large circles consisting
of uniformly carved holes in the limestone, which are
believed to be the foundation holes for Tequesta Indians
dwellings as far back as 2,000 years. The MDM Develop-
ment Group plans to build movie theaters, restaurants,
and a 34-story building on the site.


Single Visit Crowns
- Using the Latest in 3D CAD-CAM
-- J- Dr. Farah
brought state c


I I


o The Sun/Thursday, February 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net


g has
of the
,% Ce jr






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, February 6,2014 FROM PAGE ONE


FROM PAGE 1

result of the millions of
people expected to gain
health insurance under
the health care overhaul.
As CVS has been
working to team up with
hospital groups and
doctor practices to help



LIGHTS

FROM PAGE 1

low, while plows and
other heavy equipment
aimed to keep roads
clear. A 65-mile stretch
of Interstate 84 between
the Pennsylvania and
Connecticut borders
was closed to all vehicles
until mid-afternoon.
The Metropolitan
Transit Authority said
Metro-North Railroad
service was reduced by
18 percent on morning
trains.

New Jersey
Gov. Chris Christie
declared a state of
emergency and state
offices were closed for
non-essential employees,
as the state got snow in
northern parts, sleet and
freezing rain in some
areas, and all rain in
southern counties. Tens
of thousands of custom-
ers were without power,
and schools were closed
or delayed. NJ Transit
operated on a storm
schedule. Buses and
trains were cross-honor-
ing tickets.

Michigan
The state received
more than 6 inches of
snow in some areas,
snarling traffic and
keeping towing operators
busy. AAA Michigan
got at least 1,100 calls
for service Wednesday
morning. Authorities re-
ported several multi-ve-
hicle crashes after snow
fell along Interstate 94 in
the Jackson area; traffic
accidents closed parts
of Interstate 69 around
Flint.

Ohio
Most of Ohio was hit
with heavy snow and
freezing rain, closing
hundreds schools and
creating extremely
hazardous driving
conditions. Four to
8 inches of snow fell
overnight Tuesday.
Many counties declared
snow emergencies. "I



BIONIC
FROM PAGE 1

bionics of science fiction
movies. But the research
released Wednesday is
part of a major effort to
create more lifelike, and
usable, prosthetics.
"It was just amaz-
ing," said Dennis Aabo
Sorensen of Aalborg,
Denmark, who lost his
left hand in a fireworks
accident a decade ago
and volunteered to
pilot-test the new pros-
thetic. "It was the closest


VATICAN

FROM PAGE 1

the U.N. committee
severely criticized the
Holy See for its attitudes
toward homosexuality
contraception and abortion
and said it should change
its own canon law to ensure


children's rights and their
access to health care are
guaranteed.
The Vatican promptly
objected and its U.N.
ambassador accused
the committee of having
betrayed the international


deliver and monitor pa-
tient care, Chief Medical
Officer Dr. Troyen A.
Brennan said the presence
of tobacco in its stores has
made for some awkward
conversations.
"One of the first ques-
tions they ask us is, 'Well,
if you're going to be part
of the health care system,
how can you continue to
sell tobacco products?'"


he said. "There's really
no good answer to that
at all."
CVS Caremark Corp.,
which has 7,600 stores
nationwide, said it will
lose about $2 billion
in annual revenue by
phasing out tobacco,
but the move will not
affect its 2014 earnings
forecast. CVS notches
about $1.5 billion


annually in tobacco sales,
but it expects a bigger hit
because smokers often
buy other products when
they visit their stores.
The company brought in
more than $123 billion in
total revenue in 2012.
The company declined
to say what will take
tobacco's prominent
shelf place behind cash
registers at the front of its


Traffic is sparse and the sidewalks impassable as a heavy snow falls in Pembroke, Mass
Wednesday morning.


wish that groundhog
would have stayed in its
hole," said Geoff Dunn,
who took the bus to his
downtown Columbus
office. "Finding us six
more weeks of winter
was not the smart move."
The National Weather
Service said most Ohio
cities already have seen
anywhere from 15 to 30
inches more snow than
is normal at this stage
of winter because of the
frequent winter storms.

Illinois
A Chicago runner was
credited with helping
save a man who fell
into icy Lake Michigan
with his dog. Adam
Dominik says he found
twine and anchored it
around himself while
throwing the other end
in the water, pulling the
man onto nearby rocks.
Meanwhile, a skier called
911. Rescuers pulled the
man the rest of the way
to safety. He was taken to
a hospital. Both he and
his dog were expected to
recover.

Kentucky
Freezing rain and ice
that moved through
Kentucky overnight
Tuesday and into
Wednesday left thou-
sands without power,
mostly in Jefferson


I have had to feeling like
a normal hand."
This isn't the first
time scientists have
tried to give some sense
of touch to artificial
hands; a few other
pilot projects have been
reported in the U.S. and
Europe. But this newest
experiment, published
in the journal Science
Translational Medicine,
shows Sorensen not only
could tell differences in
the shape and hardness
of objects, he also could
quickly react and adjust
his grasp.
"It was interesting

body's own objectives by
allowing itself to be swayed
by pro-gay ideologues.
He said it appeared the
committee simply hadn't
listened when the Holy See
outlined all the measures
it has taken to protect
children.
The report, which took
the Vatican by surprise
in its harsh tone, puts
renewed pressure on
Pope Francis to move
decisively on the abuse
front and make good on
pledges to create aVatican
commission to study sex
abuse and recommend
best practices to fight


County, where about
10,000 customers had no
power earlyWednesday.
The National Weather
Service said the winter
storm left about a quar-
ter-inch of ice over much
of central and northern
Kentucky.

Massachusetts
The storm dropped
nearly a foot of snow in
parts of Massachusetts.
In Boston, Worcester,
Springfield and else-
where, schools and
colleges canceled classes.
The state's trial courts
also closed for the day.
Gov. Deval Patrick told
all non-essential state
employees working in
the executive branch to
stay home.

Rhode island
Nearly all schools
in Rhode Island were
closed, and state police
responded to several
traffic accidents. The
General Assembly
canceled its sessions.
The Rhode Island Public
Transit Authority warned
of delays. Snow turned
to sleet and rain in some
parts of the state.

Connecticut
The start of the
General Assembly's
annual session was


to see how fast he was
able to master this," said
neuroengineer Silvestro
Micera of Switzerland's
Ecole Polytechnique
Federal de Lausanne,
who led the Swiss and
Italian research team.
"He was able to use this
information immediately
in a quite sophisticated
way."
Scientists have made
great strides in recent
years in improving the
dexterity of prosthetics.
But the sense of touch
has been a much more
difficult challenge, and
is one reason that many

it. The commission was
announced in December,
but few details have been
released since then.
The committee issued
its recommendations after
subjecting the Holy See to
a daylong interrogation
last month on its imple-
mentation of the U.N.
Convention on the Rights
of the Child, the key U.N.
treaty on child protection,
which the Holy See ratified
in 1990.
Critically, the committee
rejected the Vatican's long-
standing argument that it
doesn't control bishops or
their abusive priests, saying


stores. CVS will test some
items and may expand
smoking cessation prod-
ucts that are sometimes
sold near cigarettes.
Its drugstores do not
sell electronic cigarettes,
devices that heat a liquid
nicotine solution and
create a water vapor
that users inhale. CVS
also plans to expand its
smoking cessation efforts.


weather, homeowners in
far northern Wisconsin
were urged to leave their
faucets running 24 hours
a day to prevent water
pipes and sewer lines
from freezing. The 9,000
Rhinelander residents
won't be charged for
using the extra water.
Temperatures in the
area were expected to be
below zero for much of
the week.

New Hampshire

|At the Mount Sunapee
Resort ski area, the
..... : lot was filling up with
Skiers undeterred by a
trek through the snow.
In Newport, the snow
AP PHOTO helped pick up the pace
of ticket sales for an
S., outdoor "Yankee Luau"
on the town common
Wednesday as part of


delayed from Wednesday
to Thursday because of
the snow. Gov. Dannel
P. Malloy also ordered a
delayed opening for state
offices on Wednesday.
Many schools were
closed. Ridership was cut
in half as thousands of
commuters stayed home.

Iowa
Authorities said snowy
road conditions may
have contributed to a
vehicle collision in Des
Moines that killed one
person.

Oklahoma
Classes were canceled
at many Oklahoma
schools, including
Oklahoma City, because
of subzero wind chills
that reached 10 degrees
below zero.

Missouri
A Southwest Airlines
jet arriving from Denver
got stuck in a snow bank
Tuesday evening at
Kansas City International
Airport. A Southwest
spokesman said all 55
passengers on Flight
305 were placed on
buses and taken to the
terminal.

Wisconsin
With the severe


patients don't use their
prosthetic hands as
much as they'd like.
Consider: Grab some-
thing and your own hand
naturally grasps with just
enough force to hang on.
Users of prosthetic hands
have to carefully watch
every motion, judging by
eye instead of touch how
tightly to squeeze. The
results can be clumsy,
with dropped dishes or
crushed objects.
"You always have to
look and see what's going
on, so that's what is so
much different from this
new hand that I tried,"

the Holy See was respon-
sible for implementing the
treaty not just in the Vatican
City State but around the
world "as the supreme
power of the Catholic
Church through individuals
and institutions placed
under its authority."
In its report, the com-
mittee blasted the "code
of silence" that has long
been used to keep victims
quiet, saying the Holy See
had "systematically placed
preservation of the reputa-
tion of the church and the
alleged offender over the
protection of child victims."
It called on the Holy See to


the town's 98th Winter
Carnival.

Indiana
Indiana was socked
with up to a foot of snow.
Several major highways
were closed for a time,
including Interstate 65
north of Lafayette and
south of Indianapolis,
and Interstate 74 in
southeastern Indiana.

Washington, D.C.
The Maryland Transit
Administration re-
duced the number of
afternoon trains out
of Washington on the
MARC Brunswick line.
Two morning trains
hit fallen trees on the
tracks; no one was hurt.
Passengers on the first
disabled train were put
on a later train that also
hit a fallen tree about a
mile down the line, and
the passengers were
transferred again.

Power outages:
ByWednesday evening,
power outages remained
above 1 million. They
included: Pennsylvania,
750,000; Maryland,
140,000; New Jersey,
44,000; Arkansas, 48,000;
Kentucky, 10,000; New
York, 8,000; Delaware,
6,000; Indiana, 2,500;
Connecticut, 300.


Sorensen, 36, said in a
telephone interview.
First, doctors at Rome's
Gemelli Hospital im-
planted tiny electrodes
inside two nerves the
ulnar and median
nerves in the stump of
Sorensen's arm.
Those nerves nor-
mally would allow for
certain sensations in a
hand. When researchers
zapped them with a
weak electrical signal,
Sorensen said it felt like
his missing fingers were
moving, showing the
nerves still could relay
information.

provide compensation to
victims and hold account-
able not just the abusers,
but also those who covered
up their crimes.
"The committee is
gravely concerned that
the Holy See has not
acknowledged the extent
of the crimes committed,
has not taken the necessary
measures to address cases
of child sexual abuse and
to protect children, and
has adopted policies and
practices which have led
to the continuation of the
abuse by, and the impunity
of, the perpetrators," the
report said.


ALMANAC

Today is Thursday, Feb. 6, the
37th day of 2014. There are 328
days left in the year.
Today in history
On Feb. 6,1952, Britain's King
George VI died at Sandringham
House in Norfolk, England; he
was succeeded as monarch by
his elder daughter, who became
Queen Elizabeth II.
On this date
In 1778, the United States won
official recognition from France
with the signing of a Treaty of
Alliance in Paris.
In 1788, Massachusetts became
the sixth state to ratify the U.S.
Constitution.
In 1899, a peace treaty
between the United States and
Spain was ratified by the U.S.
Senate.
In 1911, Ronald Wilson Reagan,
the 40th president of the United
States, was born in Tampico, III.
In 1922, Cardinal Archille Ratti
was elected pope; he took the
name Pius Xl.
In 1933, the 20th Amendment
to the U.S. Constitution, the
so-called "lame duck"amend-
ment, was proclaimed in effect by
Secretary of State Henry Stimson.
In 1943, a Los Angeles jury
acquitted actor Errol Flynn of
three counts of statutory rape.
In 1959, the United States
successfully test-fired for the
first time a Titan intercontinental
ballistic missile from Cape
Canaveral.
In 1973, Dixy Lee Ray was
appointed by President Richard
Nixon to be the first woman
to head the Atomic Energy
Commission.
In 1992,16 people were killed
when a C-130 military transport
plane crashed in Evansville, Ind.
In 1994, actor Joseph Cotten
died in Los Angeles at age 88.
In 1998, President Bill Clinton
signed a bill changing the name
of Washington National Airport
to Ronald Reagan Washington
National Airport. Pop music star
Falco, who'd had a 1986 hit with
"Rock Me Amadeus/,"died in a
traffic accident in the Dominican
Republic; he was 40.
Today's birthdays
Actress Zsa Zsa Gabor is 97.
Actor Patrick Macnee is 92.
Actor Rip Torn is 83. Actress
Mamie Van Doren is 83. Actor
Mike Farrell is 75. Former NBC
News anchorman Tom Brokaw
is 74. Singer Fabian is 71.
Singer Natalie Cole is 64. Rock
musician Simon Phillips (Toto)
is 57. Actor Barry Miller is
56. Actress Megan Gallagher
is 54. Rock singer Axl Rose
(Guns N' Roses) is 52. Country
singer Richie McDonald is 52.
Singer Rick Astley is 48. Rock
musician Tim Brown (Boo
Radleys) is 45. Actor Brandon
Hammond is 30. Actress Alice
Greczyn is 28.


Couple charged
after toddler
calls 911
LOWVILLE, N.Y. (AP)
-Authorities have
charged a northern
New York woman and
her boyfriend because
the woman's 2-year-old
daughter used their
cellphones to dial 911
a total of 15 times last
month.
Village of Lowville
Police Officer Matthew
Martin says the
23-year-old mother
and her 33-year-old
boyfriend told him
they tried to keep their
phones away from the
persistent toddler, but
the girl kept getting
them and dialing 911.
Martin spoke to the
couple Wednesday
after Lewis County 911
dispatchers reported
that a child had called
14 times in January.
Martin says the child
called 911 a 15th time
later that night.
He charged the
couple the next day
with obstructing
governmental
administration.
Martin says the girl
called 911 three more
times Friday but hasn't
made an emergency
call since then.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014


FROM PAGE ONE





The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014


WORLD/SCIENCE NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page5


f(
BEIRUT (AP)-
Children in Syria have
been tortured, sexually
abused and subjected to
"indiscriminate" attacks
by President Bashar
Assad's forces, and
recruited for combat and
terror operations by the
rebels fighting to topple
him during the coun-
try's nearly 3-year-old
conflict, a new United
Nations report said.
The report to the
U.N. Security Council
by Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon highlights
the plight of children
in the conflict from the
beginning of the uprising
against Assad in March
2011 until Nov. 15, 2013.
It was given to the coun-
cil this week and posted
on the U.N. website
Tuesday.
Ban said Syrian chil-
dren have been subjected
to "unspeakable and
unacceptable" suffer-
ing during that time.
"Violations must come to
an end now," he said.
Meanwhile, the Syrian
government missed
another deadline for
destroying its chemical
weapons Wednesday,
but pledged to complete
the process by June 30 as
promised.
Under a timetable set
up by the Organization
for the Prohibition of
Chemical Weapons,
Syria was to have given
up its entire stockpile
of chemical weapons by
Wednesday. Last week,
a U.S. diplomat said


wr Syria's children


In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, residents of the besieged
Yarmouk Palestinian refugee camp wait to leave the camp on the southern edge of the Syrian
capital Damascus, Syria, Tuesday.


Syria had only removed
4 percent of its most
deadly chemicals so far.
All should have been re-
moved by Dec. 31 under
the framework.
Syrian Deputy Foreign
Minister Faisal al-Mikdad
said the U.S. is fully com-
mitted to the process.
"Difficulties facing
Syria, particularly in
the framework of the
country's war on ter-
rorism, could hinder
the implementation of
some commitments from
time to time," he said
Wednesday, according to
SANA.
A day earlier, he
rejected U.S. criticism for
its slow pace in moving
the chemicals out of


the country, calling the
accusations "baseless
and unfair."
The uprising against
Assad's rule began
with largely peaceful
protests in 2011 but
evolved in time into a
bloody civil war that has
killed more than 10,000
children according to
U.N. estimates and more
than 130,000 people,
according to activists.
Millions of Syrians have
been driven from their
homes, seeking shelter
in neighboring countries
or in safer parts of their
homeland.
Ban said the U.N.
task force in Syria was
able to independently
monitor and report on


a limited number of
cases inside Syria and
the information in the
report is based largely
on interviews conducted
by the United Nations,
including numerous
accounts from refugees.
The conflict has hit the
country's children hard.
In the early stages, Ban
said, violations against
children were committed
largely by Syria's armed
forces, intelligence forces
and allied Shabiha militia
but as the conflict inten-
sified and the opposition
became more organized,
an increasing number
of violations committed
by Free Syrian Army-
affiliated groups were
documented.


Blasts rock Baghdad, killing at least 34


BAGHDAD (AP) -
Multiple explosions
rocked Baghdad, killing
at least 34 people and
sending plumes of
smoke into the sky
across the street from
a major government
building in a brazen
reminder of the ability of
insurgents to penetrate
the heart of the capital.
The attacks come as
al-Qaida-led militants
are battling for control
of mainly Sunni areas
to the west in the first
test of the Shiite-led
government to maintain
security in the country
more than two years
after the withdrawal of
U.S. troops.
The deadliest of
Wednesday's attacks
took place across the
street from the high-rise
building housing the
Foreign Ministry, shat-
tering the windows of
nearby apartment build-
ings. Two car bombs
went off simultaneously


Smoke rises after a car bomb went off at a commer
in Khilani Square in central Baghdad, Iraq, Wednes


in different parking lots,
killing at least 12 people,
including three police-
men, and wounding 22,
a police officer said.
Shortly afterward, a
suicide bomber blew
himself up in a near-
by falafel restaurant
frequented by officials
or visitors waiting for
security escorts to take
them inside the Green
Zone, a walled-off area


Another car bomb
exploded in Khilani
Square, a busy com-
mercial area in central
Baghdad, killing five
people and wounding
11, another police offi-
cer said. Security forces
sealed off the area as
firefighters struggled
to put out the blaze
ignited by the bombing.
Smoke billowed from
several stores and stalls
AP PHOTO as vendors hurriedly
stuffed their goods into
cial center big bags and carried
day. them away on their


that houses the prime
minister's office and the
U.S. and other foreign
embassies.
Five people were killed
and 12 wounded in that
attack, the officer said.
All the roads leading
to the blast sites place
were sealed off by
police as workers cleared
debris and washed away
bloodstains from the
sidewalks.


backs.
Shortly before sunset,
a triple car bombing
struck an outdoor mar-
ket in the mainly Shiite
suburb of Jisr Diyala in
southeastern Baghdad,
killing nine people and
wounding 24. Minutes
later, a rocket landed
near the western gate
of the green zone,
killing one passerby and
wounding seven others,
police said.


Kepler-413b: Wobbly planet, strange seasons


(LA Times)-
Astronomers using data
from the planet-hunting
Kepler Space Telescope
have found a wild card
of a world: a planet so
wobbly that its "seasons"
could be in constant flux.
This planet, called
Kepler-413b, is about
2,300 light-years away in
the constellation Cygnus,
and it orbits a binary pair
of stars that are circling
each other. This gas giant
weighing roughly 65 Earth
masses orbits every 66
days, too close to the stars
to be habitable.
But here's the unusual
bit about this planet,
described in an upcoming
issue of the Astrophysical
Journal: It's so wobbly that
its spin axis could vary
by as much as 30 degrees
over 11 years a pretty
extreme swing, given
that the Earth, tilted at
23.5 degrees, completes


one round of its own "wob-
ble" every 26,000 years.
The team discovered
this strange system while
looking for planets cross-
ing in front of binary stars,
said lead author Veselin
Kostov, an astrophysicist
with Johns Hopkins
University and the
Space Telescope Science
Institute in Baltimore.
NASAs Kepler telescope,
which was retired after it
suffered a major injury
last year, would stare at a
patch of sky and wait for
a planet to pass in front
of a star and block a little
light. When those dips in
brightness occur a few
times at regular intervals,
astronomers know it must
be an orbiting planet.
But Kepler-413b was
anything but regular.
The dips in brightness
occurred in weird fits and
starts: three times in the
first 180 days, then not at


all for the next 800 days,
then five more times
before it stopped again
(and then Kepler ceased
functioning).
The scientists realized
that the planet's orbit was
off by 2.5 degrees it
didn't travel in the same
plane as its host stars, a
red dwarf and a slightly
larger orange dwarf The
scientists think that,
as this uneven pair of
stars dance around each
other at the center, their
different gravitational
pulls constantly warp
the planet's orbit. It also
causes the planet to
wobble on its axis, like a
spinning top does a
phenomenon known as
rotational precession.
The seasons on this gas-
sy planet, such as they are,
would be in constant flux,
Kostov said. And this has
implications for a detailed
definition of habitability.


Just because a planet lies
in the habitable zone,
where liquid water can
exist, doesn't mean it's an
especially friendly place to
live -particularly if, say,
it's constantly swinging
from hot humid summers
to icy winters. It's another
factor to consider as
astronomers search for
Earth-like exoplanets.
"If you have an Earth-
sized planet in the
habitable zone of a binary
star, you have to take into
account this precession,"
Kostov said. "It tells us
about the architecture
of extrasolar planets in
general."
This planet may not
be all that unusual; there
could be many more like
it. After all, Kepler could
only see planets regularly
transiting at just the right
angle; and such wobbly
planets are less likely to
cross our line of sight.


WORLD

Storms wash International court
rail line into sea, weighs Kenya
isolate W. England president's case


LONDON (Bloomberg)
- Storms that lashed
Britain on Wednesday
washed a 260-foot stretch
of the Great Western rail
route into the sea, leaving
tracks dangling above
the waves and severing
the counties of Devon
and Cornwall from the
network.
The section of the
Dawlish sea wall, which
has protected the
line between London
Paddington and Penzance
for more than 150
years, collapsed under
the weight of crashing
waves, with ballast and
foundations falling into
the sea. Network Rail said
the route beyond Exeter
is closed "until further
notice."
FirstGroup's First
Great Western franchise,
which operates 125-mph
expresses on the route,
halted trains beyond
Exeter and said it was
struggling to provide a
replacement bus service
after the extreme weather
blocked roads.

US warns of
explosives in
toothpaste tubes
WASHINGTON (AP)
-The U.S. Homeland
Security Department is
warning airlines flying to
Russia that terrorists may
try to smuggle explosives
on board hidden in tooth-
paste tubes.
The threat was passed
onto airlines that have
direct flights to Russia,
including some that orig-
inate in the United States,
according to a law enforce-
ment official speaking
Wednesday on condition
of anonymity because
he was not authorized
to discuss details of the
warning.
The official said the
airlines were warned that
explosive devices could
be assembled in flight
or upon arrival at the
Olympics.
The department said in
a statement that the U.S.
"isn't aware of a specific
threat to the homeland
at this time." It said the
department "regularly
shares information with
domestic and interna-
tional partners, including
those associated with
international events such
as the Sochi Olympics."
Delta Airlines is the
only U.S. carrier with
a direct flight from the
United States to Moscow.
Russian airlines Aeroflot
and Transaero both
operate several nonstop
flights from the U.S.

Aston Martin
recalls more than
17,000 luxury cars
LONDON (AP)-
British luxury carmaker
Aston Martin says it is
recalling 17,590 sports
cars because of a prob-
lem with the accelerator
pedal molding.
The company said
Wednesday there had
not been any accidents
or injuries stemming
from the fault, which
can cause the engine to
idle unexpectedly.
The global recall will
affect all of the compa-
ny's left-hand drive cars
made between late 2007
and the end of 2013.
Right-hand drive cars
made between May 2012
and December 2013 also
will be recalled.
The new Vanquish
model is not affected.
The company says
molding from a Chinese
supplier was found to be
defective.
The Aston Martin is
regarded as one of the


world's finest sports car
and has long benefited
from its association with
the James Bond films.


AMSTERDAM (AP)
- Prosecutors at the
International Criminal
Court have asked judges
not to reject their falter-
ing case against Kenyan
President Uhuru Kenyatta
entirely, despite acknowl-
edging they do not have
enough evidence to
convict him.
Defense lawyers have
demanded acquittal.
In a hearing on how
the case should proceed,
prosecutor Benjamin
Gumpert told judges that
Kenya's government is
intimidating witnesses
and obstructing access to
information, particularly
about Kenyatta's finances,
which could prove vital to
the case. He asked for an
indefinite delay.
Kenyatta has pleaded
innocent to charges of
crimes against humanity
for his alleged role in
organizing violence that
left more than 1,000
people dead after Kenya's
2007 elections.

9 missing after
South Africa gold
mine fire
JOHANNESBURG (AP)
- A gold-mining com-
pany in South Africa says
nine employees are miss-
ing after an underground
fire broke out at a mine
west of Johannesburg.
The Harmony company
said Wednesday that the
fire reportedly started
about 1.7 kilometers
(1 mile) underground
around 6 p.m. Tuesday,
and that rescue teams
were hampered by smoke
and an earthfall.
Harmony says rescue
workers reached eight
miners who had taken
refuge from the fire at
Doornkop mine, and they
are now trying to locate
the missing workers.
Operations at the mine
have been suspended.

Mexico to invest
$3.4 billion in
Michoacan state
MEXICO CITY (LA Times)
- President Enrique Pena
Nieto said Tuesday that his
government would invest
the equivalent of about
$3.4 billion in social and
infrastructure programs for
the beleaguered Mexican
state of Michoacan, where
armed vigilante groups have
been clashing with a drug
gang.
The program, which
Pena Nieto announced in
Morelia, the state capital,
represents a significantly
larger investment in
Michoacan than the one
unveiled last month by
his social development
secretary, Rosario Robles,
who promised to spend
about $225 million.
The funding will go to
scholarships for students,
pensions for the elderly
and credits for small
business owners, as well as
for infrastructure projects
such as highways and a
new hospital.
The plan, Pena Nieto
said, was meant "to
recover security, establish
conditions of social
order and spur economic
development."
Trouble in Michoacan
boiled over last month as
vigilante "self-defense"
groups went on the
offensive. They took over
communities around the
city of Apatzingan, a key
stronghold of the Knights
Templar drug cartel, and
threatened to march on
the city. That forced Pena
Nieto to send in thousands
of troops and police, who
continue to patrol many
rural communities.
The spending is the
federal government's most


significant acknowledg-
ment that a long-term
strategy is required in
Michoacan.


UN: 'Unspeakable suffering'






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014


slightlI

NEWYORK (AP) -Wall
Street took a step back-
ward Wednesday. Then a
tiny step forward. Then
back.
The tentative dance
amounted to little change
for major U.S. stock
indexes, which ended the
day just below their prior
day's levels.
For the week, stocks
remained down, extending
the sharp downturn for the
year.
"We're seeing some
buyers coming in on the
weakness, but not enough
to push the market
higher," said Joe Bell,
senior equity analyst with
Schaeffer's Investment
Research.
Stocks were down in
premarket trading and
continued to slide for
much of the day. A survey
on U.S. hiring did little to
ease uncertainty over the
health of the American
economy.


Many investors remain
leery, waiting to see if
upcoming economic
reports and company
earnings will show that the
U.S. economic recovery is
on track.
"This is about as flat as
it gets," said Rex Macey,
chief investment officer
of Wilmington Trust
Investment Advisors.
"It's a market looking for
direction."
The Dow Jones industri-
al average fell 5.01 points,
or 0.03 percent, to close
at 15,440.23 Wednesday.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index slipped 3.56 points,
or 0.2 percent, to 1,751.64.
The Nasdaq composite
dropped 19.97 points, or
0.5 percent, to 4,011.55.
Six of the 10 sectors in
the S&P 500 finished lower.
Telecoms and energy
stocks registered the big-
gest industry declines.
Investors hammered
trucking company C.H.


Robinson Worldwide,
which a day earlier
reported fourth-quarter
results that missed Wall
Street estimates. Its shares
fell $5.48, or 9 percent, to
$53.16, to lead the S&P
500's decliners.
Cerner, a health care
information technology
provider, and cosmetics
maker Estee Lauder were
also among the stocks
posting large losses. Cerner
shares fell $3.39, or nearly
6 percent, to $53.21. Estee
Lauder slumped $3.83, or
5.5 percent, to $65.36.
Markets started the
week with a 326-point
drop in the Dow, trig-
gered by disappointing
news about the U.S.
manufacturing.
The Dow, which fell
as much as 104 points
Wednesday, ended the day
down 6.9 percent for this
year. The S&P 500 closed
down 5.2 percent so far
in 2014.


Finding uninsured Americans


WASHINGTON (AP
-Wanted: Millions o
insured Americans w
to give President Bar
Obama's health careI
chance.
With time running
it may not be so hard
the administration ai
allies to find them. A
for The Associated Pi
finds that the uninsu
aren't scattered even
across the country: h
them live in just 116
nation's 3,143 county(
That means outrea
targeted to select are
can pay off big, reach
millions of prospect
customers needed to


by the numbers

P) stabilize the law's new Enr(
f un- insurance markets. Mar. 3
killing The pattern also holds private
ack true for the younger able to
law a uninsured, the health care have c
overhaul's most coveted many
out, demographic. The study are pn
I for found that half of unin- people
nd its sured people ages 19-39 new la
study live in 108 counties. Their they
press premiums are needed to "Ou
red offset the cost of care for at ma
ly older adults, raise
alf of With most of the bugs areas
of the out of the healthcare. conce
es. gov website, the Obama insure
ch administration is using the Julie I
as geography of the unin- nicati
ling sured to write a playbook the ro
ve for its closing sign-up eral H
campaign. Service


ollment ends
1 for subsidized
e insurance, avail-
) people who don't
overage at work. But
who could benefit
ocrastinating. Some
e are confused by the
.w. Others don't think
ill qualify for help.
r efforts are aimed
king sure we can
awareness in
with the largest
ntration of un-
ed people," said
Bataille, commu-
ons director for
llout at the fed-
tealth and Human
:es Department.


Shape up at home


but cut losses


f exercise were a pill, it would
be one of the most powerful
drugs ever invented, according
to Consumer Reports.
Chances are, you've heard many
variations of that sentiment.
It's not hype. A 2010 review of
40 studies in the International
Journal of Clinical Practice, for
example, found that being active
can help prevent about 25 con-
ditions. Other research suggests
that exercise can cut the risk
of colon cancer by 60 percent,
Type 2 diabetes by 58 percent,
heart disease by 40 percent and
Alzheimer's disease by 40 percent.
Another study, which compared
regular exercisers with couch
potatoes, concluded that each
minute of physical activity added
an average of 7 minutes of life
span.
Yet powerful evidence isn't
powerful enough: Just 20 percent
of Americans say they get the
recommended amount of aerobic
and strength exercise.
"Convenience and proximity are
key predictors of exercise," says
Dr. Carol Ewing Garber, associate
professor of movement sciences
at Columbia University and
president elect of the American
College of Sports Medicine. So it
makes sense that working out at
home ups the odds not only that
you'll become active but also that
you'll stick with a routine.
Consumer Reports consulted
with experts to help you pick the
machine that will best help you
reach your health goals.
Goal: Just start. Because every-
one knows how to walk, a tread-
mill may be the least intimidating
machine for a beginner. But if you
have hip, knee or back problems,
consider an elliptical trainer,
which is easier on your joints.
Or think about activities that
gave you pleasure earlier in life.
If you liked bicycling as a child,
consider indoor cycling. If you
remember fond days paddling
on a lake, maybe give rowing a
chance.
Goal: Weight loss. Losing
weight requires more exercise
than getting fit does about
3 1/2 to 5 hours a week (plus diet
changes). So it's important to get


MutualFunds


3-yr
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
AQR
MaFtStrl 10.01 -.06
Advance Capital I
Balanced b 19.10 -.06 +7.3
EqGrow b 24.16 -.11 +8.9
Retinc b 8.70 -.01 +4.8
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 7.44 -.07 +9.5
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 49.90 -.34 +17.1
AllianzGI
WellnessD b 30.40 -.17 +17.7
Alpine
DynBal d 12.37 -.02 +6.2
DynDiv d 3.61 ... +1.0
Amana
Growth b 30.66 +.04 +7.6
Income b 40.97 -.03 +9.9
American Beacon
LgCpVlls 27.22 -.02 +12.5
American Century
CapVallv 8.35 -.01 +11.9
Eqlnclnv 8.24 -.01 +9.0
HiYIdMu 8.92 ... +7.6
InTTxFBInv 11.26 +.01 +4.8
InvGrlnv 31.08 -.07 +10.0
Ultralnv 32.49 -.11 +12.8
American Funds
AMCAPA m 26.55 -.10 +14.0
BalA m 23.54 -.05 +10.5
BondA m 12.56 -.02 +4.1
CaplncBuA m 55.88 -.14 +7.7
CapWldBdA m 20.28 +.03 +3.0
CpWdGrIA m 43.10 -.14 +8.6
EurPacGrA m 46.36 +.01 +4.8
FnlnvA m 49.17 -.09 +11.3
GIbBalA m 29.50 -.04 +8.1
GrthAmA m 41.42 -.14 +12.6
HilncA m 11.35 +.01 +6.8
IncAmerA m 20.03 -.05 +9.8
IntBdAmA m 13.51 -.01 +2.2
InvCoAmA m 34.97 -.15 +11.5
MutualA m 33.03 -.05 +11.6
NewEconA m 37.09 -.18 +16.1
NewPerspA m 35.63 +.03 +9.5
NwWrldA m 55.26 -.09 +2.7
SmCpWdA m 47.54 -.12 +9.1
TaxEBdAmA m 12.60 ... +6.6
WAMutlnvA m 37.41 -.06 +13.5
Artisan
Intl d 28.54 +.06 +9.7
IntlVal d 35.02 +.02 +11.6
MdCpVal 25.35 +.01 +12.4
MidCap 46.62 -.24 +15.0
BBH
TaxEffEq d 20.42 ... +13.9
Baron
Asset b 59.22 -.25 +12.8
Growth b 67.81 -.42 +14.1
Partners b 31.67 -.18 +14.0
Berkshire
Focus d 18.25 -.11 +14.9
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 14.18 -.07 -5.2
EqDivA m 22.86 -.03 +10.2
EqDivl 22.91 -.03 +10.5
GlobAIcA m 20.70 ... +4.9
GlobAlcC m 19.17 ... +4.1
GlobAlcl 20.80 ... +5.2
HiYIdBdls 8.21 ... +8.9
HiYldSvc b 8.21 ... +8.5
Bruce
Bruce 452.52 -.82 +9.8
CGM
Focus 37.81 -.02 +3.2


Clipper
Clipper 86.20 -.17 +11.6
Cohen & Steers
Realty 64.67 -.05 +8.1
Columbia
AcornlntZ 44.25 -.07 +6.6
AcornZ 35.21 -.19 +10.8
DivlncZ 17.29 -.02 +11.9
IntlVIB m 14.00 -.01 +3.0
Mar21CB m 16.68 -.10 +8.1
MarGrlA m 23.84 -.10 +11.5
DFA
1YrFixlnl 10.32 +.7
2YrGIbFII 10.02 +.8
5YrGIbFII 10.96 -.01 +3.6
EmMkCrEql 18.00 -.03 -4.2
EmMktVall 25.28 -.07 -7.4
IntCorEql 12.23 +.03 +4.3
IntSmCapl 19.74 +.08 +7.5
IntlSCol 18.60 +.05 +6.2
IntlValul 18.87 +.06 +2.2
RelEstScI 26.85 -.04 +9.2
USCorEqll 15.64 -.04 +12.9
USCorEq21 15.42 -.04 +12.9
USLgCo 13.82 -.02 +12.5
USLgVall 29.78 -.06 +13.9
USMicrol 18.61 -.15 +14.8
USSmVall 32.60 -.22 +12.8
USSmalll 28.81 -.17 +13.9
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.35 +.01 +2.7
EqDivB m 40.44 -.11 +7.0
GIbOA m 43.29 -.22 +9.6
GIbOB m 37.86 -.20 +8.8
GIbOC m 38.15 -.20 +8.8
GIbOS d 44.79 -.23 +9.9
GrlncS 22.06 -.07 +12.7
HlthCareS d 36.21 -.21 +22.9
LAEqS d 24.07 -.14 -9.5
LC2020S 14.83 -.02 +6.0
StrHiYIdTxFS 12.04 ... +7.1
Davis
NYVentA m 38.99 -.06 +9.8
NYVentY 39.47 -.05 +10.1
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.41 -.01 +4.5
Dodge & Cox
Bal 95.53 -.15 +11.6
Income 13.71 -.02 +4.9
IntlStk 40.53 +.09 +5.6
Stock 160.79 -.23 +14.0
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 10.99 ... +6.5
Dreyfus
Apprecialnv 48.73 +.03 +9.3
MidCapldx 34.98 -.09 +11.6
MuniBd 11.32 ... +5.9
NYTaxEBd 14.46 -.01 +4.9
ShTrmlncD 10.64 ... +2.0
SmCoVal 33.45 -.26 +11.6
Driehaus
Activelnc 10.77 ... +1.3
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 12.75 -.03 +10.1
TMSmCaB m 19.51 -.15 +8.1
FMI
CommStk 27.12 -.01 +11.7
LgCap 19.70 +.02 +11.3
FPA
Capital d 43.11 -.24 +7.5
Cres d 32.10 -.01 +9.7
Newlnc d 10.31 -.01 +1.7
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 37.47 +.03 +5.7
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.84 ... +7.8
IntSmMCoA m 41.27 -.07 +6.5
KaufmanA m 6.01 -.03 +11.7
MDTMdCpGrStB m 34.77-.10 +8.4


StrVall 5.60 -.01 +12.5
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.27 -.02 +4.5
AstMgr50 17.22 -.03 +6.7
Bal 22.14 -.05 +9.5
BIChGrow 61.24 -.24 +14.0
Canada d 55.89 +.18 -1.2
CapApr 35.08 -.19 +15.0
Caplnc d 9.80 ... +6.4
Contra 92.32 -.21 +13.2
DivGrow 33.53 -.04 +9.1
Divrlntl d 34.79 +.01 +5.8
EmergAsia d 28.46 -.14 -1.1
EmgMkt d 22.11 -.02 -4.3
Eqlnc 55.74 -.12 +9.0
Eqlnc ll 23.17 -.02 +9.0
FF2015 12.44 -.01 +5.7
FF2035 12.86 -.02 +6.8
FF2040 9.08 -.02 +6.9
Fidelity 40.95 -.05 +10.5
FItRtHiln d 9.98 ... +3.8
FocStk 19.65 -.06 +15.2
FourlnOne 34.16 -.04 +9.4
Free2000 12.36 -.01 +3.8
Free2010 15.00 -.02 +5.6
Free2020 15.17 -.02 +5.9
Free2025 12.86 -.02 +6.5
Free2030 15.59 -.03 +6.5
GNMA 11.41 -.02 +3.7
GrowGo 116.75 -.64 +15.3
Growlnc 26.25 ... +13.3
Hilnc d 9.35 ... +7.3
Indepndnc 36.15 -.14 +13.1
IntRelEst d 9.84 -.01 +6.4
IntlDisc d 37.94 +.05 +5.8
InvGrdBd 7.77 -.01 +4.7
JapanSmCo d 12.22 -.06 +10.5
LatinAm d 27.62 -.13 -12.2
LevCoSt d 40.98 -.15 +12.0
LowPriStk d 46.89 -.03 +13.4
Magellan 88.94 -.23 +9.4
MeCpSto 14.57 +.01 +13.4
MidGap d 38.27 -.05 +13.5
Munilnc d 12.91 ... +6.3
NewMille 38.12 -.09 +14.9
OTC 77.01 -.42 +14.7
Overseas d 38.19 +.06 +7.0
Puritan 20.77 -.05 +9.5
ShTmBond 8.60 ... +1.7
SmCapDisc d 28.98 -.07 +15.7
Stratinc 10.88 ... +5.0
TaxFrB d 11.19 ... +6.5
TotalBd 10.56 -.01 +4.8
USBdldx 11.51 -.03 NA
USBdldxlnv 11.51 -.03 +3.8
Value 99.58 -.37 +12.7
ValueDis 20.68 +.02 +12.3
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 73.10 -.38 +12.3
IntlCapAB m 12.34 +.02 +6.5
LmtdTermBondA m 11.50-.01 +3.6
LmtdTermBondB m 11.49... +2.9
LrgCapA m 25.61 +.01 +14.3
LrgCapB m 23.94 +.01 +13.4
NewlnsA m 25.53 -.12 +12.6
Newlnsl 25.96 -.13 +12.9
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 196.91 -4.98 +41.9
Electron d 62.06 -.18 +5.2
Energy d 52.34 -.42 +1.8
Gold d 20.23 -.19 -24.3
HealtCar d 196.35 -2.19 +26.5
Leisure d 125.36 -.79 +16.6
Materials d 80.16 +.14 +7.2
MedDeliv d 72.05 -.02 +14.7
MedEqSys d 35.99 +.01 +15.5
NatGas d 36.53 -.19 +2.8
NatRes d 35.17 -.25 -.6
Pharm d 19.32 ... +21.6
Wireless d 10.04 -.04 +9.5
Fidelity Spartan
5001cdxbAdvtg 62.14 -.11 +12.5
5001dxlnstl 62.14 -.11 NA
5001dxlnv 62.14 -.10 +12.5


ExtMktIdAg d 51.07 -.24 +13.2
IntllcbdxAdg d 38.42 +.09 +4.8
TotMktldAg d 51.43 -.12 +12.7
First Eagle
GIbA m 52.08 +.19 +7.4
OverseasA m 22.59 +.15 +5.3
First Investors
GlobalA m 8.07 +.01 +6.3
TotalRetA m 18.46 -.04 +10.0
Firsthand
e-Comm 7.68 -.01 +7.9
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 11.94 ... +6.7
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 7.09 ... +7.7
EqlnA m 21.62 -.04 +10.6
FLTFA m 10.91 +.01 +4.6
GrOppA m 28.51 -.19 +11.4
GrowthA m 62.78 -.12 +11.1
HYTFA m 10.01 ... +6.9
Income C m 2.39 ... +7.7
IncomeA m 2.36 -.01 +8.1
IncomeAdv 2.35 ... +8.5
NYTFA m 11.26 ... +5.1
RisDvA m 45.61 +.15 +12.4
StrlncA m 10.44 +.01 +5.7
TotalRetA m 9.93 -.01 +4.7
USGovA m 6.54 ... +3.0
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 32.39 +.01 +8.9
DiscovA m 31.91 ... +8.5
SharesZ 27.04 -.01 +10.1
SharesA m 26.83 ... +9.8
FrankTemp-Templeton
FgnA m 7.84 +.01 +5.1
GIBondC m 12.85 +.02 +3.7
GIBondA m 12.82 +.02 +4.1
GIBondAdv 12.78 +.02 +4.4
GrowthA m 23.75 -.01 +10.2
WorldA m 18.32 ... +9.5
GE
S&SUSEq 52.28 -.07 +12.0
GMO
EmgMktsVI d 9.82 -.01 -6.5
IntltVIIV 24.47 +.06 +5.3
Quill 23.66 +.02 +13.2
QuVI 23.66 +.02 +13.3
USCorEqVI 16.29 +.02 +13.3
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 61.28 -.09 +11.5
EqlncomeAAA m 26.90-.04 +10.9
Value m 18.43 ... +11.8


Glenmede
SmCapEqAd 24.29
Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.13
MidCpVals 42.59
ShDuGovA m 10.19
Harbor
Bond 12.11
CapAplnst 55.34
Intllnstl 67.04
Intllnv b 66.37
Hartford
CapAprA m 44.19
CpApHLSIA 56.68
SmallCoB m 18.74
Heartland
ValuePlus m 32.95
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 15.91
Hodges
Hodges m 34.10
INVESCO
ComstockA m 22.49
Divlnclnv b 18.07
EnergyA m 42.41
Energylnv b 42.25
EqlncomeA m 10.34
EuroGrA m 37.65
GIbGrB m 26.31
GrowlncA m 25.74


-.13 +15.0
-.01 +7.9
-.09 +10.7
... +.6
-.01 +4.3
-.02 +14.7
+.24 +4.9
+.24 +4.5
-.11 +9.6
-.10 +9.8
-.12 +11.6
-.25 +8.7
-.11 +13.2
-.06 +14.3
-.06 +12.4
-.01 +11.1
-.29 -1.4
-.30 -1.4
... +9.2
+.05 +9.7
-.02 +7.5
+.02 +10.8


GrwthAIIA m 13.11 ... +7.3
PacGrowB m 20.95 +.06 -2.1
SmCapEqA m 15.82 -.07 +11.3
Techlnv b 37.17 -.13 +6.6
USMortA m 12.47 -.02 +3.3
Ivy
AssetSTrB m 29.55 -.14 +8.0
AssetStrA m 30.55 -.14 +8.9
AssetStrC m 29.69 -.14 +8.1
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.63 -.02 +4.3
CoreBondA m 11.62 -.02 +3.9
CoreBondSelect11.61 -.02 +4.1
HighYldSel 8.00 +.01 +7.1
LgCapGrA m 30.75 -.14 +12.7
LgCapGrSelect 30.76 -.14 +12.9
MidCpVall 33.59 -.01 +14.9
ShDurBndSel 10.91 -.01 +1.2
USLCpCrPS 26.29 -.02 +12.4
Janus
BalC m 29.03 -.03 +8.2
ContrT 20.63 +.03 +11.7
EntrprsT 78.98 -.18 +11.8
RexBdS b 10.47 -.02 +4.9
GIbValT d 13.54 +.02 +9.1
HiYldT 9.18 ... +7.5
OverseasT 33.79 +.11 -9.1
PerkinsMCVL 22.50 -.06 +7.8
PerkinsMCVT 22.27 -.05 +7.6
PerkinsSCVL 24.83 -.02 +8.4
ShTmBdT 3.07 ... +2.0
T 39.10 -.03 +9.8
USCrT 19.01 -.01 +14.1
VentureT 60.75 -.46 +15.1
John Hancock
UfBal b 14.92 -.02 +7.3
UfGrl b 15.48 -.02 +8.0
Lazard
EmgMkEqlnst d 16.89 -.05 -1.9
Legg Mason
CBAggressGrthA m 17805-104+175
WAManagedMuniA m 1612 +76
Litman Gregory
MaslntllntI 17.14 +.02 +3.8
Long leaf Partners
LongPart 31.98 +.01 +10.7
Loomis Sayles
BdlnstI 15.11 ... +7.7
BdR b 15.05 +.01 +7.3
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 14.72 -.03 +8.5
BondDebA m 8.13 -.01 +7.4
ShDurlncA m 4.56 ... +3.8
ShDurlncC m 4.59 ... +3.1
MFS
IntlValA m 31.96 +.03 +10.1
IslntlEq 21.00 -.01 +6.3
MAInvB m 25.76 -.03 +11.5
TotRetA m 17.05 -.03 +8.7
ValueA m 31.17 -.01 +12.4
Valuel 31.32 -.02 +12.7
MainStay
HiYIdGorA m 6.06 ... +7.8
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 104.40 -.13 +14.9
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.50 -.02 +5.8
PBMaxTrmS 19.20 -.06 +8.1
WrIdOppA 8.60 +.02 +2.7
Marsico
21stCent b 19.22 -.12 +8.9
RexCap b 17.26 -.07 +13.6
Merger
Merger b 15.86 -.03 +2.2
Meridian
MeridnGr d 34.91 -.15 +9.7
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.68 -.02 +6.2
TotRtBd b 10.68 -.02 +6.0
Midas Funds
Magic m 22.37 -.02 +15.2


Midas m 1.40 -.01 -35.7
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 44.61 -.08 +14.2
MdCpGrl 44.38 -.17 +10.2
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkrp 62.65 -.49 +8.7
Natixis
LSInvBdY 11.92 +.01 +6.3
LSStratlncA m 16.20 +.02 +8.3
LSStratlncC m 16.30 +.02 +7.5
Needham
Growth m 44.14 -.42 +7.9
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 57.52 -.11 +12.8
SmCpGrlnv 27.05 -.20 +13.9
Northeast Investors
Growth 16.41 -.07 +6.1
Northern
HYFixInc d 7.49 ... +8.0
Stkldx 21.69 -.04 +12.4
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.63 ... +5.6
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.81 -.04 +5.2
HlthSinces 18.78 ... +18.4
PinOakEq 43.11 -.14 +13.1
RedOakTec 14.32 -.02 +14.2
Oakmark
EqlncI 31.29 -.04 +8.7
Global I 28.57 -.01 +9.2
Intll 25.03 +.15 +9.3
OalTnark I 60.12 +.02 +15.1
Select I 38.21 ... +15.4
Old Westbury
GIbOppo 7.70 +.01 +3.9
GIbSmMdCp 16.32 +.01 +7.8
LgCpStr 11.83 ... +3.4
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 34.66 -.01 +.8
DevMktY 34.25 -.02 +1.1
GlobA m 75.04 +.10 +8.4
IntlGrY 35.87 +.05 +9.3
MainStrA m 46.27 +.01 +12.6
SrFItRatA m 8.42 ... +5.2
StrlncA m 4.12 ... +4.3
Oppenheimer Rocheste
FdMuniA m 14.69 -.01 +6.6
Osterweis
OsterStrlnc d 11.89 +.01 +6.0
PIMCO
AIIAssetl 11.91 +.01 +5.3
AIIAuthIn 9.85 +.01 +4.6
ComRIRStI 5.62 -.01 -5.7
Divlnclnst 11.49 +.01 +5.9
EMktCurl 9.96 +.01 -.5
EmMktslns 10.54 +.02 +5.0
ForBdlnstl 10.62 +.01 +6.6
HiYIdls 9.60 ... +7.3
LowDrls 10.38 +.01 +2.8
RealRet 11.18 -.03 +4.5
ShtTermls 9.87 ... +1.6
TotRetA m 10.83 -.01 +4.3
TotRetAdm b 10.83 -.01 +4.4
TotRetC m 10.83 -.01 +3.5
TotRetIs 10.83 -.01 +4.7
TotRetrnD b 10.83 -.01 +4.4
TotlRetnP 10.83 -.01 +4.6
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 29.56 -.22 +21.8
Growth 23.18 -.17 +14.5
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 34.90 -.17 +12.9
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Portfolio 42.91 +.03 +2.3
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LCGrllnst 12.22 -.05 +13.3
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Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 21.18 -.06 +9.9
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JenMidCapGrZ 38.81 -.13 +12.1


Putnam
GIbUtilB m 11.20
GrowlncA m 18.92
IntlNewB m 16.87
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Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 30.78
Reynolds
BueChip b 70.43
Royce
PAMutlnv d 13.72
Premierlnv d 20.70
ValueSvc m 12.46
Rydex
Electrlnv 61.58
HlthCrAdv b 24.44
NsdqlOOlv 20.52
Schwab
1000l1nv d 46.26
S&P500Sel d 27.38
Scout
Internal 34.84
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 40.49
Sequoia
Sequoia 220.43
State Farm
Growth 64.73
Stratton
SmCapVal d 70.18
T Rowe Price
Balanced 22.60
BIChpGr 61.84
CapApprec 25.12
Corplnc 9.61
EmMktStk d 29.26
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GrowStk 50.64
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HiYield d 7.15
InsLgCpGr 26.47
IntlBnd d 9.57
IntlEqldx d 12.76
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IntlStk d 15.28
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MidCpGr 71.41
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NewAsia d 14.92
NewHoriz 44.80
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OrseaStk d 9.58
R2015 13.95
R2025 14.87
R2035 15.65
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Rtmt2020 19.79
Rtmt2030 21.78
Rtmt2040 22.46
SciTech 38.08
ShTmBond 4.80
SmCpStk 42.32
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Speclnc 12.73
SumGNMA 9.66
SumMulnc 11.38
TaxEfMult d 19.47
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Value 32.38
TCW
TotRetBdl 10.15
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 13.42
Target
SmCapVal 25.06


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Templeton
InFEqSeS 21.46 -.01 +4.4
Third Avenue
Value d 53.91 -.10 +3.1
Thompson
LargeCap 44.82 -.01 +11.3
Thornburg
IncBldA m 20.09 -.02 +6.9
IncBldC m 20.08 -.02 +6.1
IntlValA m 28.88 +.12 +1.3
IntlVall 29.52 +.13 +1.7
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.12 -.01 +5.7
MidCapGrA m 18.75 -.08 +7.6
Tocqueville
Gold m 37.03 -.17 -22.8
Turner
SmCapGr 36.75 -.33 +10.2
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.65 +.07 +8.7
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 6.60 +.02 -24.4
GlobRes m 8.84 -.01 -7.8
USAA
CorstnMod 14.63 -.02 +5.2
GNMA 9.97 -.01 +2.7
Growlnc 20.68 -.05 +10.7
HYOpp d 8.73 ... +8.5
PrcMtlMin 14.40 -.12 -25.3
SciTech 19.22 -.08 +15.9
TaxELgTm 13.34 ... +8.1
TgtRt2040 12.42 -.01 +6.6
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WorldGro 25.41 +.04 +11.6
Unified
Winlnv m 16.52 +.02 +5.7
Value Line
PremGro b 32.16 -.08 +12.8
Vanguard
500Adml 161.66 -.28 +12.5
5001nv 161.65 -.28 +12.4
BalldxAdm 26.88 -.05 +9.5
Balldxlns 26.88 -.06 +9.5
CAITAdml 11.47 ... +6.4
CapOp 45.60 -.20 +14.2
CapOpAdml 105.30 -.45 +14.3
Convert 13.61 -.01 +6.8
DevMktsldxlP 112.73 +31 +4.8
DivGr 20.08 ... +13.0
EmMktlAdm 31.07 -.13 -5.2
EnergyAdm 118.57 -.56 +1.3
Eqlnc 28.01 -.04 +14.1
EqlncAdml 58.71 -.09 +14.2
ExplAdml 91.05 -.45 +14.1
Explr 97.90 -.48 +13.9
ExtdldAdm 59.99 -.29 +13.4
Extdldlst 59.99 -.28 +13.4
ExtdMktldxlP 148.04 -.70 +13.4
FAWeUSIns 93.33 +.14 +2.1
FAWeUSInv 18.68 +.02 +1.9
GNMA 10.61 -.02 +3.5
GNMAAdml 10.61 -.02 +3.6
GIbEq 22.26 ... +8.3
Grolnc 37.48 -.04 +13.0
GrthldAdm 45.81 -.08 +13.3
Grthlstld 45.80 -.09 +13.3
HYCorAdml 6.03 -.01 +8.0
HItCrAdml 79.59 -.12 +21.4
HlthCare 188.68 -.27 +21.4
ITBondAdm 11.30 -.03 +5.7
ITGradeAd 9.80 -.02 +5.8
InfPrtAdm 25.97 -.09 +4.4
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InflaPro 13.23 -.05 +4.4
Instldxl 160.64 -.28 +12.5
InstPlus 160.65 -.28 +12.5
InstTStPI 40.24 -.09 +12.8
IntlGr 21.73 +.03 +5.2
IntlGrAdm 69.11 +.12 +5.4
IntlStkldxAdm 26.38 +.05 +2.2
IntlStkldxl 105.49 +.19 +2.2
IntlStkldxlPIs 105.50 +.18 +2.2


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 12.01 -0- 20.19 18.62 -.69 -3.6 V A A +2.5 +34.4 dd Pembina Pipeline PBA 27.75 --- 35.36 34.87 +.93 +2.7 A A V -1.0 +22.2 43 1.68
Arkansas Bst ABFS 9.62 0 35.96 30.97 -1.38 -4.3 V V V -8.0 +216.1 52 0.12 Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.04 -0-- 22.72 18.99 -.13 -0.7 V A V -0.7 +4.3 18 1.08
Bank of America BAC 10.98 -0- 17.42 16.40 +.05 +0.3 V V A +5.3 +42.7 16 0.04 Phoenix Cos PNX 24.26 61.54 42.72 -1.17 -2.7 V V V -30.4 +63.4 dd
Beam Inc BEAM 59.66 84.00 83.25 +.10 +0.1 A A A +22.3 +39.4 34 0.90 hen PNX 24.26 61.54 42.72-1.17 -2.7 -30.4 +63 dd .
Carnival Corp CCL 31.44 -0- 41.89 38.62 -.43 -1.1 V V V -3.9 +4.1 28 1.00 Raymond James Fncl RJF 39.31 O 56.31 48.29 -.73 -1.5 V V V -7.5 +10.7 17 0.64f
Chicos FAS CHS 15.27 0- 19.95 16.34 +.14 +0.9 V V V -13.3 -8.7 16 0.30f Reliance Steel Alu RS 59.44 76.78 67.59 -.13 -0.2 V V V -10.9 +7.7 15 1.32
Cracker Barrel CBRL 64.53 118.63 94.63 -1.11 -1.2 V V V -14.0 +51.6 19 3.00 Ryder R 52.58 -0 75.2068.81 -.71 -1.0 T TV -6.7 +24.8 15 1.36
Disney D1S 53.41 76.84 71.76 +.71 +1.0 V V V -6.1 +33.4 21 0.86f
Eaton CorppIc ETN 55.41 0 78.19 69.10 +.45 +0.7 V V V -9.2 +24.3 17 1.68 St Joe Co JOE 16.82 -0- 23.86 18.18 +.22 +1.2 A V V -5.3 -23.3 dd ...
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 32.10 -0- 47.92 43.36 +.23 +0.5 V v v -5.1 +33.9 29 0.48f Sally Beauty Hid SBH 25.00 31.86 27.95 +.09 +0.3 V V V -7.5 +4.6 19
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 0- 5.18 3.95 +.01 +0.3 V V A +5.6 +16.2 dd Simon Property Gp SPG 142.47 0-- 182.45 153.93 +.52 +0.3 V V A +1.2 -2.7 36 5.00f
Harris Corp HRS 41.08 72.33 67.97 +.64 +1.0 V A V -2.6 +50.9 18 1.68 Stein Mart SMRT 7.44 16.17 12.29 +.59 +5.0 V V V -8.6 +41.4 0.20
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 36.63 --- 41.09 37.74 +.01 A A A +2.5 +0.5 q 2.37e
KC Southern KSU 92.50 0-- 125.96 99.92 -1.15 -1.1 V V V -19.3 +8.6 31 1.12f Suntrust Bks STI 26.93 -0- 40.21 36.88 -.01 ... V V A +0.2 +29.8 13 0.40
Lennar Corp A LEN 30.90 -0- 44.40 39.58 -.27 -0.7 V A A +0.1 -1.3 18 0.16 Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 -0- 16.97 14.48 -1.19 -7.6 V V V -6.5 +39.1 18 0.54
McClatchy Co MNI 2.13 5.18 4.20 -.16 -3.7 V V A +23.5 +43.4 dd TECO Energy TE 16.15 0- 19.22 16.18 -.13 -0.8 V V v -6.1 -1.3 17 0.88
NextEra Energy NEE 71.42 92.75 89.36 -.78 -0.9 V A A +4.4 +28.9 21 2.64 Tech Data TECD 43.02 55.36 51.51 +.24 +0.5 V A V -0.2 +0.1 9
Office Depot ODP 3.55 6.10 4.86 -.02 -0.4 V V v -8.1 +11.4 37
PGTInc PGTI 4.40 11.69 10.43 -.43 -4.0 V V A +3.1 +125.3 22 Wendys Co WEN 4.97 9.51 8.87 +.04 +0.5 V A A +1.7 +76.3 89 0.20
Panera Bread Co PNRA 150.33 -0-- 194.77 167.40 -.44 -0.3 V V V -5.3 +2.7 25 ... World Fuel Svcs INT 34.57 -0- 45.71 42.81 +.57 +1.3 A V V -0.8 +0.1 16 0.15


US stocks end down


Consumer


Reports


a comfortable machine. A tread-
mill can be a good choice. People
tend to workout harder than they
realize, so they end up burning
more calories, research suggests.
But for people who are heavy or
have back, knee or hip problems,
a non-impact elliptical might be
better. And competitive or easily
bored types might opt for a spin
bike or rowing machine.
Goal: Kick it up a notch.
Interval training, which involves
alternating intense bouts of activ-
ity with slower recovery periods
in the same workout, is the top
fitness trend for 2014, according
to the American College of Sports
Medicine survey of 3,815 fitness
professionals. The workouts can
be challenging, but they also
let you cut exercise time while
maintaining or even increasing
the health benefits. During the
intense period, get your heart
rate to at least 80 percent of your
maximum (to calculate your
maximum, subtract your age from
220). You can do intervals on any
cardio machine, but spin bikes -
which have a weighted flywheel
directly linked to the pedals are
well-suited to the technique.
Goal: Total body toning. No
piece of cardiovascular equip-
ment builds as much strength or
muscle as weight machines, free
weights or exercises like squats
or pushups. But if you want a
little toning with your cardio,
Consumer Reports notes that
an elliptical is a good choice.
Pushing the handlebars works
your triceps and chest and pulling
works your back and biceps.
Goal: Cross-training. It can
make sense to balance your
workouts by pairing exercises that
involve different muscles groups.
That's especially relevant for run-
ners. Cross-training can also help
prevent sport-specific injuries.
Any machine that complements
your normal activity can be a
good choice for cross-training.


IntlStkldxlSgn 31.64
IntlVal 35.16
LTGradeAd 9.97
LgCpldxlnv 32.54
UfeCon 17.84
UfeGro 26.55
UfeMod 22.53
MdGrlxlnv 34.16
MidCapldxlP 142.22
MidCp 28.77
MidCpAdml 130.54
MidCplst 28.84
MidCpSgl 41.19
Morg 24.63
MorgAdml 76.32
MuHYAdml 10.74
Mulnt 13.92
MulntAdml 13.92
MuLTAdml 11.25
MuLtdAdml 11.07
MuShtAdml 15.87
Prmcp 89.70
PrmcpAdml 93.02
PrmcpCorl 18.83
REITIdxAd 94.77
STBondAdm 10.53
STBondSgl 10.53
STCor 10.74
STGradeAd 10.74
STIGradel 10.74
STsryAdml 10.71
SelValu 26.69
SmCapldx 50.16
SmCpldAdm 50.19
SmCpldlst 50.19
SmCplndxSgnl 45.22
SmVlldlst 22.11
Star 23.31
StratgcEq 28.64
TgtRe2010 25.28
TgtRe2015 14.47
TgtRe2020 26.40
TgtRe2030 26.63
TgtRe2035 16.28
TgtRe2040 27.03
TgtRe2045 16.96
TgtRe2050 26.91
TgtRetlnc 12.41
Tgtet2025 15.26
TotBdAdml 10.70
TotBdlnst 10.70
TotBdMklnv 10.70
TotBdMkSig 10.70
Totlntl 15.77
TotStlAdm 44.39
TotStllns 44.40
TotStlSig 42.84
TotStldx 44.37
TxMCapAdm 89.15
VallcbdxAdm 28.14
ValldxIns 28.14
Wellsl 24.57
WellslAdm 59.53
Welltn 36.94
WelltnAdm 63.79
WndsllAdm 61.88
Wndsr 19.37
WndsrAdml 65.34
Wndsrll 34.87
Victory
SpecValA m 19.83
Virtus
EmgMktsls 8.85
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 11.57
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 31.86
Growlnv 48.95
Outk2010OAdm 13.21
Yacktman
Focused d 24.03
Yacktman d 22.52


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-.02 +6.1
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-.01 +3.9
+.02 +11.4
+.01 +11.9






The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper, symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.



S&P 500 4 -356 NASDAQ W -19.97 DOW -5.01 6-MO T-BILLS 30-YR T-BONDS A +.05 CRUDE OIL +19 EURO A +.018 GOLD +5.60
1,751.64 V 4,011.55 V 15,440.23 .06% '" 3.65% $97.38 $1.3535 $1,257.30



Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange


and the Nasdaq.

Tkr Name Last Chg
A-B-C
ABB ABB Ltd 24.76 +.25
ACE ACE Ltd 93.25 +.41
ADT ADTCorp 29.75 -.45
AES AESCorp 13.84 +.01
AFL AFLAC 61.76 +.29
AGCOAGCO 50.45 -1.47
GAS AGLRes 46.40 -.61
AKS AK Steel 6.43 -.25
AOL AOL 47.57 -1.92
ASMI ASM Intl 32.96 +.07
T AT&T Inc 32.08 -.37
ATMI ATMIInc 33.77 -.02
ABT AbbottLab 36.35 +.10
ABBV AbbVie 47.73 -.22
ANF AberFitc 32.72 -.44
ACN Accenture 77.57 -.51
ARAY Accuray 10.07 -.24
ACT Actavis 183.82 -1.24
ATVI ActivsBliz 16.89 -.01
ADBE AdobeSy 61.00 +1.28
AEIS AdvEnld 27.48 +.80
AMD AMD 3.31 -.06
ABCO AdvisoryBd 58.99 -1.20
ACM AecomTch 28.10 -.53
ARC Aeropostl 6.40 -.19
AVAV AeroViron 27.51 -.71
AET Aetna 68.27 +1.01
AGEN Agenus 2.72 -.18
A Agilent 57.43 -.38
AYR Aircastle 18.25 -.27
ARG Airgas 101.00 +.03
AKAM AkamaiT 47.42 +.93
ALSK AlaskCom 2.10 -.02
ALU AlcatelLuc 4.15 +.04
AA Alcoa 11.04 -.38
ALXN Alexion 154.49 -1.72
ATI AllegTch 30.33 -.04
AGN Allergan 115.20 +.51
ALE Allete 48.27 -.33
ARLP AllnceRes 80.57 -.98
ACG AlliBInco 7.38
AB AlliBern 21.68 +.04
LNT AlliantEgy 50.60 -.43
ANV AlldNevG 4.68 -.19
ALL Allstate 49.55 -.35
ANR AlphaNRs 5.09 -.27
AOD AlpToDv rs 7.95 -.01
ALTR AlteraCp If 32.34 -.17
MO Altria 34.00 -.43
AMRNAmarin 1.83 -.10
AMZN Amazon 346.45 -1.50
AMBAAmbarella 27.09 -2.45
ABEV Ambev n 6.41 +.03
AEE Ameren 36.93 -.29
AMX AMovilL 20.69 -.42
AAL AmAirI n 33.80 -.25
AALCPAmAirl pf 26.76 -.04
AGNCACapAgy 21.77 +.44
ACAS AmCapLtd 15.28 +.05
MTGEACapMtg 19.68 +.04
AEO AEagleOut 13.24 +.21
AEP AEP 47.95 -.55
AXP AmExp 83.72 -.28
AIG AmlntlGrp 47.64 +.02
ARCP ARItCapPr 13.83 -.01
AWR AmStWtrs 27.15 -.59
AWK AmWtrWks 41.16 -.60
APU Amerigas 42.39 -.44
AMP Ameriprise 103.43 -.11
ABC AmeriBrgn 64.72 -.29
AME Ametek 47.94 -.15
AMGNAmgen 115.07 -.71
APH Amphenol 85.33 +.37
APC Anadarko 79.13 -.90
ADI AnalogDev 47.85 +.16
ANEN Anaren 27.96 -.01
AU AnglogldA 14.48 -.16
BUD ABInBev 94.17 -.09
NLY Annaly 10.99 +.20
ANH Anworth 4.81 +.09
APA Apache 78.02 -.48
AINV Apollolnv 8.21 -.01
AAPL Apple Inc 512.59 +3.80
AMAT ApldMatI 16.89 +.11
WTR AquaAms 23.31 -.06
ARMKAramarkn 26.10 +1.11
MT ArcelorMit 16.53 +.19
ACI ArchCoal 3.92 -.31
ADM ArchDan 38.66 +.43
ARNA ArenaPhm 5.99 -.08
ARCC AresCap 17.77 -.08
ARIA AriadP 7.10 +.10
ABFS ArkBest 30.97 -1.38
ARMHArmHId 44.44 +.64
ARR ArmourRsd 4.20 +.02
ARRY ArrayBio 4.49 -.21
ARW ArrowEl 48.94 -.57
ASH Ashland 90.15 +.69
AGO AssuredG 21.88 +.77
AZN AstraZen 63.50 +.52
APL AtlasPpln 32.57 +.09
ATML Atmel 8.19 -.01
ATO ATMOS 46.28 -.52
ASPX AuspexP n 15.66
ADP AutoData 73.53 -1.42
AVY AveryD 46.99 -.59
CAR AvisBudg 37.63 -.18
AVA Avista 28.12 -.15
AVP Avon 14.54 +.06
AXS AXIS Cap 42.39 -1.94
BBT BB&TCp 36.65 -.12
BCE BCEg 40.94 -.14
BEAV B/E Aero 76.57 -.31
BGCP BGC Ptrs 6.28
BHP BHPBilILt 63.56 -.17
BBL BHPBiIlplc 57.67 -.15
BP BP PLC 46.04 -.23
BPT BP Pru 78.66 +1.01
BIDU Baidu 152.10 -3.72
BHI BakrHu 57.01 -.04
BLL BallCorp 51.65 +.46
BLDP BallardPw 2.02 -.11
BBD BcoBradpf 10.65 -.06
SAN BcoSantSA 8.65 +.11
BSBR BcoSBrasil 4.60 -.10
BKMU BankMutl 6.36 -.13
BAC BkofAm 16.40 +.05
BMO BkMontg 61.43 +.63
BK BkNYMel 30.93 -.26
BNS BkNovag 54.96 +.60
VXX B iPVix rs 53.87 +2.04
BCR Bard 129.14 +1.03
BKS BarnesNob 13.70 -.23
ABX BarrickG 18.56 -.59
BAX Baxter 67.30 +.35
BEAM Beam Inc 83.25 +.10
BZH BeazerHm 20.77 -.57
BBBY BedBath 63.05 -.68
BMS Bemis 37.71 +.24
BRK/B BerkH B 108.78 -.35
BBY BestBuy 23.12 +.34


BIG BigLots 25.71 -.18
BBG BBarrett 23.00 -4.69
BCRX Biocryst 9.17 -.32
BIIB Biogenldc 299.93 -8.25
BBRY BlackBerry 9.69 +.08
BME BIkHIthSci 35.02 +.78
BX Blackstone 31.75 -.17
BOBE BobEvans 49.16 -.20
BA Boeing 121.40 -.64
BWA BorgWrns 52.44 +.26
SAM BostBeer 204.41 -1.86
BSX BostonSci 12.76 -.09
BYD BoydGm 9.73 -.32
BGG BrigStrat 20.53 +.01
EAT Brinker 47.42 +.12
BMY BrMySq 48.54 -.40
BTI BritATob 94.68 -.53
BRCM Broadcom 28.99 -.21
BRCD BrcdeCm 9.18 -.05
BIP Brkflnfra 35.72 -.41
BRO BrwnBm 28.81 +.53
BPL Buckeye 71.00 -.34
BVN Buenavent 11.39 -.06
BWLD BuffaloWW127.12-13.63
CBL CBLAsc 16.50 -.86
CBG CBREGrp 26.72 -.06
CBS CBS B 58.94 +1.07
CHRWCH Robins 53.16 -5.48
CMS CMSEng 26.86 -.14
CNHI CNH Indl 10.36 +.09
CSX CSX 26.51 +.16
CVRR CVR Rfng 21.34 -.59
CVS CVSCare 65.44 -.67
CYS CYS Invest 8.31 +.09
COG CabotOG s 40.42 -1.19
CALM Cal-Maine 49.85 -.06
CHY CalaCvHi 12.98 +.01
CCC Calgon 19.85 -.09
CWT CalifWtr 21.93 -.66
CPN Calpine 18.72 -.11
CLMT CalumetSp 27.47 -.32
CARI CamcoF 6.30 +.02
CPT CamdenPT 63.51 +.80
CAM Cameron 58.59 -.80
CPB CampSp 39.84 -.21
CNI CdnNRgs 53.60 +.05
CNQ CdnNRsgs 33.94 +.53
CSIQ CdnSolar 37.39 +.11
COF CapOne 68.66 -.06
CSU CapSenL 21.61 -.45
CMO CapsteadM 12.56 -.03
CPST CpstnTurb 1.46 -.08
CAH CardnlHIth 65.37 -.19
CFN CareFusion 38.52 -.12
CKEC Carmike 27.00 +.10
CCL Carnival 38.62 -.43
CRS CarpTech 56.10 -.34
CRZO Carrizo 40.13 -.60
CAT Caterpillar 91.96 -.54
FUN CedarF 47.99 -.37
CELG Celgene 150.85 -.66
CTIC CellThera 2.84 -.22
CLDX CelldexTh 24.21 -1.05
CX Cemex 12.61 +.31
CIG Cemigpfs 5.40 -.24
CNP CenterPnt 23.04 -.02
CTL CntryUink 28.27 +.18
CVO Cenveo 3.07 -.09
CERN Cerner s 53.21 -3.39
CKP Checkpnt 12.77 -.17
CHFC ChemFinl 28.32 -.38
LNG CheniereEn 41.62 -1.12
CHK ChesEng 26.21 -.33
CVX Chevron 109.52 -1.31
CBI ChicB&l 74.46 -.88
CIM Chimera 3.10
CHD ChurchDwt 63.05 -.70
CIEN CienaCorp 21.93 -.20
Cl Cigna 85.07 +.12
CBB CinciBell 3.35 -.04
CINF CinnFin 47.10 -.15
CRUS Cirrus 17.51 -.09
CSCO Cisco 21.98 +.18
C Citigroup 47.06 +.28
CTXS CitrixSys 53.97 +.35
CLNE CleanEngy 9.90 -1.60
CLF CliffsNRs 19.23 +.41
CLX Clorox 84.56 -1.25
CLD CloudPeak 18.74 -.57
COH Coach 45.41 -.22
CIE CobaltlEn 16.14 +.25
KO CocaCola 37.61 +.13
CCE CocaCE 43.44 +.49
CTSH CognizTech 92.85 -4.16
RQI CohStQIR 9.70 +.01
PSF CohStSelPf 24.10 -.02
CL ColgPalms 60.42 +.07
COBK ColonialFS 12.02 -.17
CMCSAComcast 53.38 -.14
CMA Comerica 44.89 +.06
CYHHZCmtyHIt rt .05 -.01
CTG CmpTask 15.67 -.10
CPWRCompuwre 9.82 -.01
CMTL Comtech 30.00 -.10
CAG ConAgra 30.72 -.10
CTWS ConnWtrSv 32.04 -.58
COP ConocoPhil 63.46 -.25
CNX ConsolEngy 36.67 -1.08
CNSL ConsolCom 18.58 -.20
ED ConEd 53.39 -.20
CBPX CntlBldg n 15.19
CLR ContlRes 106.09 -2.44
CTB CooperTire 22.27 -.08
COCO CorinthC 1.30 -.11
CSOD CorOnDem 54.44 -1.61
GLW Corning 17.55 +.36
OFC CorpOffP 24.49 -.17
COST Costco 110.51 -.38
COT Cot0Cp 7.97 +.01
COTYCotyn 13.36 -.06
DGAZ CSVInvNG 3.38 +.25
UGAZ CSVLgNGs 32.61 -4.02
XIV CSVeIIVST 26.10 -.92
TVIX CSVxShtrs11.23 +.77
CREE CreeInc 57.11 -.88
CEQP CrestwdEq 12.97 +.08
CROX Crocs 14.79 -.14
XTEX CrosstxLP 27.47 +.52
CCI CrwnCstle 69.12 +.04
CCK CrownHold 40.45 -.62
CTRP Ctrip.com 38.65 -.43
CMI Cummins 126.67 +.27
CYBE CybrOpt 6.26 -.32
CY CypSemi 9.28 -.38
CYTR CvtRx 6.86 +.29
D-E-F
DCT DCTIndl 7.30 -.06
DDR DDRCorp 15.06 -.25
DNP DNP Selct 9.45 -.02
DHI DRHorton 22.69 -.38
DTE DTE 67.05 -.41
DTZ DTEEn61 24.83 -.03
DAN DanaHldg 18.34 -.12


1,720 ........ 10 DAYS ....


S&P 500
Close: 1,751.64
Change: -3.56 (-0.2%)


1 ,8 5 0 .. ............. .. . . .............. .. . . ....... ".".
1,80 0 ............ ,............ ............ .. . ... . . .


1 7 0 . . ... ..... ... .. ......... i............. i..............




1 ,65 0 ..... .- -' -" ........... .. ............ i.l........... )"............ .... .......


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD

Vol. (in mil.) 3,889 2,115
Pvs. Volume 3,972 2,109
Advanced 1277 798
Declined 1787 1802
New Highs 22 26
New Lows 81 72


DHR Danaher 72.49
DRI Darden 47.32
DV DeVryEd 34.41
DF DeanFdsrs 14.84
DE Deere 84.70
DLPH DelphiAuto 60.97
DAL DeltaAir 30.02
DNR DenburyR 15.70
DNDN Dndreon 2.67
DVN DevonE 59.08
DEC Diageo 116.84
DO DiaOffs 46.51
DBD Diebold 32.69
DGII Digilnt0 9.90
DLR DigitalRlt 51.93
DDS Dillards 85.76
SPXS DirSPBrrs 38.47
NUGT DxGIdBII rs 35.13
FAZ DxFinBr rs 24.62
TZA DxSCBrrs 19.85
EDC DxEMBIIs 20.70
FAS DxFnBulls 76.77
DUST DirDGdBr s 30.84
TNA DxSCBull s 63.79
DFS Discover 52.73
DISH DishNetwh 57.26
DIS Disney 71.76
DG DollarGen 56.14
DLTR DollarTree 49.81
D DomRescs 65.70
DPZ Dominos 67.17
RRD DonlleyRR 17.20
DOW DowChm 44.85
LEO DryStrt 7.98
DRYS DryShips 3.23
DD DuPont 61.90
DUC DufPUC 10.55
DUK DukeEngy 69.62
DRE DukeRlty 15.65
DVAX Dynavax 1.69
EJ E-House 11.74
ETFC E-Trade 19.23
EBAY eBay 53.52
EMC EMC Cp 23.88
EOG EOGRes 167.49
EQT EQT Corp 94.11
ETN Eaton 69.10
EOS EV EEq2 12.57
EXG EVTxMGIo 9.75
ECL Ecolab 99.16
EW EdwLfSci 66.53
EGO EldorGldg 6.17
EA ElectArts 26.16
EMR EmersonEI 63.76
EDE EmpDist 22.38
EEP EnbrdgEPt 28.63
ENB Enbridge 41.37
ECA EnCanag 18.80
ENDP EndoPhrm 68.65
ENR Energizer 94.11
ETP EngyTsfr 53.51
EBF Ennis Inc 13.87
ESV ENSCO 48.58
ENTG Entegris 11.54
ETR Entergy 62.58
EPD EntPrPt 64.64
EPZM Epizyme n 29.59
EQR EqtyRsd 55.78
EAC EricksnAC 19.33
EL EsteeLdr 65.36
XCO ExcoRes 5.11
EXEL Exelixis 6.54
EXC Exelon 28.86
ESRX ExpScripts 73.29
EXTR ExtrmNet 5.92
XOM ExxonMbI 89.58
FTI FMC Tech 49.40
FNB FNBCpPA 11.64
FB Facebook 62.19
FDO FamilyDIr 61.74
FAST Fastenal 44.27
FDX FedExCp 129.97
FNHC FedNatHId 12.37
FGP Ferrellgs 24.46
FNF RdlNFin 30.70
FIS RdNatlnfo 51.38
FSC FifthStFin 9.41
FITB FifthThird 20.65
FNSR Finisar 21.69
FHN FstHorizon 11.22
FNFG FstNiagara 8.37
FSLR FstSolar 47.73
FE RrstEngy 30.22
FMER FstMerit 19.86
FLEX Flextrn 8.19
FLO RowrsFds 19.79
FLR Ruor 74.86
F FordM 14.73
FRX ForestLab 66.78
FST ForestOil 2.96
FBHS FBHmSec 43.36
FCX FMCG 31.09
FTR FrontierCm 4.46
FRO Frontline 3.95
G-H-I
GOM GMAC44 25.43
GTAT GT AdvTc 9.18
GDV GabDvInc 20.35
GGT GabMuItT 10.41
GUT GabUtil 6.49
GALE GalenaBio 4.15
GME GameStop 34.76
GLPI Gam&Lsrn 34.52
GCI Gannett 26.98
GPS Gap 38.28
GRMNGarmin 44.04
GKNT Geeknet 17.26


3-month T-bill .05 0.05 .. 06
6-month T-bill .06 0.06 .. 11
52-wk T-bill .10 0.10 .. 14
2-year T-note .32 0.32 .. .26
5-year T-note 1.49 1.47 +0.02 .86
10-year T-note 2.67 2.63 +0.04 2.00
30-year T-bond 3.65 3.60 +0.05 3.21


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.45 3.39 +0.06 2.81
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.89 4.89 ... 4.03
Barclays USAggregate 2.31 2.29 +0.02 1.90
Barclays US High Yield 5.70 5.65 +0.05 5.89
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.42 4.35 +0.07 3.90
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.72 1.70 +0.02 1.14
Barclays US Corp 3.08 3.05 +0.03 2.82


4 ,2 4 0- .......................... .



C",[, 10 DAYS


Nasdaq composite
Close: 4,011.55
Change:-19.97 (-0.5%)


4 ,4 0 0 ............ ............ ............ ... . . . . . . . . . .
4 ,2 0 0 .......... ................. ................. ... ....... ... .



4 ,0 0 0 ........................ ...... ........ .. ...... ........ ....
3 8 0 . . . .. . .. ....... ........................... ..............



3 ,6 0 0 ..... ............ ...........d .. .......... ........... 5 ............ 5........


SHLD SearsHIdgs 34.35 +.36
SRE SempraEn 90.48 -.67
SNH SenHous 21.74 -.31
SHW Sherwin 175.60 -2.35
SFL ShipFin 16.55 -.01
SID SiderurNac 4.58 -.03
SLW SilvWhtng 21.74 -.03
SPG SimonProp 153.93 +.52
SINA Sina 64.89 -.79
SIRI SiriusXM 3.43 -.09
SKUL Skullcandy 7.21 -.08
SWKS SkywksSol 29.86 +.15
SMSI SmithMicr 1.54 -.01
SJM Smucker 92.82 -.89
SNA SnapOn 97.56 -.52
SODA SodaStrm 35.79 -.46
SLRC SolarCap 21.81 -.04
SCTY SolarCity 69.48 -2.73
SWI SolarWinds 42.59 +2.13
SON SonocoP 40.26 +.20
SNE SonyCp 15.90 -.20
SFUN SouFun 72.26 -7.08
SOR SourcC 63.50 -.27
SJI SoJerlnd 52.01 -.53
SO SouthnCo 40.82 -.18
LUV SwstAirl 20.61 -.04
SWN SwstnEngy 42.20 +.23
SSS SovranSS 68.09 -.06
CODE Spansion 15.02 +.60
SE SpectraEn 35.81 -.79
S Sprint n 8.50 +.66
XLB SP Malls 43.44 +.05
XLV SP HlthC 55.09 -.31
XLP SP CnSt 40.12 +.03
XLY SP Consum 62.00 +.08
XLE SP Engy 81.92 -.81
XLF SPDRFncl 20.71 -.02
XLI SPInds 48.93 -.02
XLK SPTech 34.25 +.03
XLU SP Util 38.39 -.17
SPF StdPac 8.59 +.01
SWK StanBIkDk 75.65 -.46
SPLS Staples 12.89 +.01
SGU StarGas 5.64 -.25
STSI StarScient .69 +.12
SBUX Starbucks 70.49 -.16
STWD StarwdPT 24.00 -.03
S7r StateStr 64.34 -1.12
STLD StODynam 16.11 +.15
SSYS Stratasys 110.75 -7.28
SPH SubPpne 43.80 +.45
SUBK SuffolkBcp 18.56 -.37
SMFG SumitMitsu 9.35 +.27
SNHY SunHydrl 35.23 -.31
SU Suncorgs 31.78 +.13
SUNE SunEdison 14.22 +.20
SPWRSunPower 29.85 +.33
STI SunTrst 36.88 -.01
SPN SupEnrgy 23.25 +.02
SVU Supvalu 5.52 -.02
SWFT SwiftTrans 21.14 +.41
SYMC Symantec 20.54 +.13
SNV Synovus 3.30 +.01
SYY Sysco 34.76 +.17
TMUS T-MoblUS n 31.75 +1.62
TCP TC PpLn 45.52 -.02
AMTD TD Ameritr 30.56 +.04
TE TECO 16.18 -.13
TJX TJX 57.79 +1.76
DATA TableauA n 89.61+10.18
TSM TaiwSemi 16.46 -.28
TTWOTakeTwo 18.00 +.94
TLM TalismEg 10.66 +.06
TGT Target 55.07 -.05
TCO Taubmn 66.38 +1.08
VIV TelefBrasil 18.79 +.16
TEN Tenneco 54.77 -.10
TDC Teradata 41.06 +.50
TER Teradyn 18.72 +.31
TEX Terex 39.57 -1.92
TNH TerraNitro 157.51 +4.39
TSLA TeslaMot 174.42 -4.31
TSO Tesoro 49.95 -.50
TEVA TevaPhrm 45.39 +.95
TXN TexInst 40.97 +.08
TXRH TexRdhse 23.22 -.07
TGH Textainer 35.80 -1.20
TXT Textron 34.83 -.27
TMO ThermoFis 113.20 +.24
DDD 3DSyss 64.10-11.66
MMM 3M Co 127.36 +.64
TDW Tidwtr 46.89 -3.60
THI THortong 51.31 -.24
TWX TimeWarn 63.09 +.69
TKR Timken 54.66 -1.11
TRU TorchEngy .45
TMK Torchmark 73.11 +.15
TD TorDBkgs 43.19 +.22
TOT Total SA 56.75 +.16
TWGP TowerGp If 2.44 -.05
RIG Transocn 41.61 -.81
TRV Travelers 80.44 +.09
TY TriContl 18.99 -.05
TYp TriCntlpf 44.10 -.05
TSL TrinaSolar 14.09 -.14
TRN Trinity 56.21 -.44
TQNT TriQuint 8.07 -.23
TRST TrstNY 6.30 -.07
TUP Tuppwre 75.92 -.87
TRQ TurqHilIRs 3.24 -.15
FOXA 21stCFoxA 31.72 +.16
FOX 21stCFoxB 31.15 +.10
TWTR Twitter n 65.97 -.35
TWO TwoHrblnv 9.79 +.05
TYC Tycolntl 40.26 +.33
TSN Tyson 35.59 +.12
UBS UBSAG 20.22 -.14
UDR UDR 24.74 +.53
UGI UGICorp 41.86 +.27


UIL UIL Hold 37.59
UNS UNSEngy 59.88
USG USG 29.44
UPL UltraPt g 24.42
UA UnderArmr 104.87
UNF UniFirst 102.58
UNP UnionPac 172.63
UNT Unit 49.80
UAL UtdContl 43.61
UPS UPS B 93.76
URI UtdRentals 76.81
USB US Bancrp 39.11
UNG USNGas 25.31
USO US OilFd 34.71
X USSteel 24.82
UTX UtdTech 107.91
UNH UtdhlthGp 70.82
UVV UnvslCp 50.31
UEC UraniumEn 1.64

V-W-X-Y-Z
VFC VF Corp s 55.99
VALE Vale SA 14.02
VALEJP Vale SA pf 12.49
VLO ValeroE 46.37
VLY VlyNBcp 9.55
VVTV ValVis A 5.86
VTI VangTSM 91.25
VNQ VangREIT 66.91
VIG VangDivAp 70.19
VWO VangEmg 37.39
VGK VangEur 55.79
VEA VangFTSE 39.19
VVC Vectren 35.33
VTR Ventas 61.54
VE VeoliaEnv 16.02
VRSN Verisign 55.52
VZ VerizonCm 46.69
VIAB ViacomB 79.95
VVI ViadCorp 23.97
V Visa 215.61
VSH VishayInt 13.19
VMW VMware 89.60
VOD Vodafone 35.40
VMC VulcanM 60.19
WDFCWD 40 67.21
WPC WP Carey 59.26
WPX WPXEngy 19.03
WMT WalMari 72.87
WAG Walgrn 57.85
WLT WalterEn 10.36
WRE WREIT 22.73
WM WsteMInc 41.50
WAT Waters 105.31
WFT Weathflnt0 13.44
WBS WebsterFn 29.30
WRI WeinRlt 28.75
WLP WellPoint 85.65
WFC WellsFargo 44.23
WEN Wendys Co 8.87
WR WestarEn 32.38
EMD WAstEMkt 11.57
WIA WAstlnfSc 11.50
WU WstnUnion 15.21
WBK Westpac s 27.00
WY Weyerhsr 29.07
WHR Whrlpl 130.38
WWAV WhiteWave 23.51
WFM WholeFds 52.96
WMB WmsCos 39.85
WIN Windstrm 7.32
WEC WiscEngy 41.99
WETF WisdomTr 14.25
DXJ WTJpHedg 45.35
EPI WT India 16.08
WWD Woodward 40.82
WWE WIdW Ent 22.86
WYNNWynn 209.55
XEL XcelEngy 28.27
XRX Xerox 10.30
XOOM Xoom n 27.14
YPF YPF Soc 23.24
YHOO Yahoo 35.49
AUY Yamanag 9.03
YNDX Yandex 36.67
YELP Yelp 75.23
YGE YingliGrn 5.57
YONG Yongye n 6.62
YORWYorkWater 19.76
YOKU YoukuTud 27.68
YUM YumBrnds 70.54
ZAGG Zagg 4.02
ZMH Zimmer 92.18
ZION ZionBcp 28.73
ZTS Zoetis 30.13
ZF ZweigFd 13.79
ZNGA Zynga 4.46
QURE UniQuren 14.61


HIGH LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


15478.21
7097.34
498.30
9826.21
4026.28
1755.79
1280.60
18785.20
1098.67


15340.69
7009.98
494.93
9738.04
3968.19
1737.92
1264.57
18575.20
1082.72


15440.23
7075.79
496.53
9809.03
4011.55
1751.64
1277.06
18738.25
1093.59


GAM GAInv 32.53 -.04
GD GenDynam 98.88 -.80
GE GenElec 24.52 -.05
GGP GenGrPrp 20.17 +.14
GIS GenMills 47.36 +.27
GM GenMotors 35.24 -.58
GEL GenesisEn 54.20 -.19
GNTX Gentex 30.59 -.06
GNW Genworth 14.93 +.40
GGB Gerdau 6.77 -.04
GERN GeronCp 4.51 -.22
GILD GileadSci 78.15 -3.87
GSK GlaxoSKIn 51.69 +.79
GRT GlimchRt 8.91 -.21
GLUU GluMobile 3.87 -.09
GOGOGogo n 19.22 -.10
GFI GoldFLtd 3.46 -.04
GG Goldcrpg 24.81 -.31
GS GoldmanS 160.42 -1.34
GT Goodyear 22.86 -.05
GOOGGoogle 1143.20 +5.04
GRA vjGrace 96.87 +.85
GPT GramrcyP 5.76 -.07
GPK GraphPkg 9.45 +.02
GNI GNIron 20.80 -.40
GXP GtPlalnEn 24.07 -.16
GMCRGreenMtC 80.88 +.74
GEF GreifA 48.19 -.28
GRIF Griffin h 27.36 -.91
GRPN Groupon 10.46 -.05
BSMX GpFnSnMx 10.40 +.02
TV GpTelevisa 28.35
GSH GuangRy 20.87 -.12
HCA HCAHIdg 47.97 -.55
HCP HCP Inc 38.60 -.42
HAIN HainCel 85.44 -5.55
HK HalconRes 3.39 -.06
HAL Hallibrtn 49.27 -.09
HALO Halozyme 13.14 -.64
HBI Hanesbrds 68.68 +.53
THG Hanoverlns 53.37 +.01
HOG HarleyD 62.15 -.18
HMY HarmonyG 2.67 -.15
HSC Harsco 24.07 +.20
HIG HarffdFn 33.54 +.72
HTS HatterasF 18.33 +.12
HE HawaiiEl 25.19 +.08
HCN HItCrREIT 56.91 -.72
HCSG HlthCSvc 25.89 -.03
HL HeclaM 3.09 -.02
HLF Herbalife 67.90 +.63
HERO HercOffsh 4.55 -.39
HSY Hershey 100.71 +.71
HTZ Hertz 25.34 -.20
HES Hess 74.66 -.10
HPQ HewlettP 28.01 -.32
HSH Hillshire 35.43 +.33
HTH HilltopH 23.30 -.10
HIMX HimaxTch 13.86 -.35
HFC HollyFront 43.68 -.50
HOLX Hologic 20.68 +.57
HD HomeDp 75.26 +.29
HMC Honda 35.97 +.05
HON HonwlllntI 89.59 -.17
HRL Hormel 43.10 -.04
HPT HospPT 25.01 +.11
HST HostHotls 18.05 -.19
HNP HuanPwr 35.35 -1.45
HUB/BHubbelB 114.51 +1.39
HCBK HudsCity 9.05 +.03
HUM Humana 95.71 -1.76
HBAN HuntBncsh 8.84 -.02
HII HuntgtnIng 90.56 -.14
IACI IAC Inter 65.04 -3.81
IAG IAMGId g 3.54 -.15
IGTE iGateCorp 31.32 -.57
ING ING 13.51 +.36
IAU iShGold 12.21 +.04
EWZ iShBrazil 39.08 -.08
EZU iShEMU 39.05 +.13
EWH iSh HK 18.77 -.30
EWJ iShJapan 11.13 +.02
EWY iShSKor 58.03 +.12
EWW iShMexico 61.73 -.02
EWT iSTaiwn 13.38 -.07
EWU iShUK 19.73 +.06
SLV iShSilver 19.07 +.32
DVY iShSelDiv 67.69 -.28
FXI iShChinaLC 33.71 -.43
IVV iSCorSP500176.14 -.23
EEM iShEMkts 37.72 -.14
LQD iShiBoxlG 115.81 -.37
TLT iSh20yrT 107.16 -1.00
SHY iSh1-3yTB 84.52 -.04
EFA iS Eafe 63.16 +.13
HYG iShiBxHYB 92.62
REM iShMtgRE 12.25 +.09
IWD iSR1KVal 89.26 -.12
IWF iSR1KGr 81.92 -.25
IWM iShR2K 108.65 -.82
HDV iShHiDiv 66.35 -.15
PFF iShUSPfd 37.74 +.01
IYR iShREst 64.95 -.02
ITB iShHmCnst 24.07 -.27
IEV iShEurope 44.93 +.18
IDA Idacorp 50.77 -.13
IDRA IderaPhm 4.56 +.36
IKAN Ikanos .83 -.08
ITW ITW 77.59 +.16
INCY Incyte 62.26 -.67
IBCP IndBkMI 12.81 -.16
IR IngerRd 57.69 +.41
INGR Ingredion 58.95 -.63
IRC InlandRE 10.19 -.07
INO InovioPhm 2.51 +.01
TEG IntegrysE 52.28 -.36
INTC Intel 23.52 -.07
ICPT InterceptP 297.46 -5.08


InterMune
InterNAP
IBM
IntlGame
IntPap
Interpublic
Intersectns
IntSurg
Invesco
ItauUnibH


11.63
7.81
174.24
14.32
46.84
16.27
6.87
415.10
31.77
12.94


-.85
-.11
+1.40
+.05
+1.02
-.10
-.30
+6.00
-.69
-.02

-.11
+.26
-.64
-.11
+.66
-.12
+.02
-.40
-.22
-.12
+.17
-1.15
+.11
-.29
-.10
+.04
+.06
+.11
-.42
-.19
-.04
-.21
+.74
+.06
-.23
+.19
-.02
-.09
+.48
+.63
-.28
+.01
-.96
-1.23
-1.05
-.92
-.09
-.27
+3.14
-.01
+.43
-.36
+.01
-.38
+.25
+.15
+2.21
-1.14
+.22
+.63
+.16
-.43

+.51
+.41
-.05
-.82
-.24
+.09
+.21
-.53
+.38
-.14
-.49
-.05
+.16
-.24
-.94
-.38
-.56
+.32
-.01
+1.10
-.01
+.86
+.10
-.16
-.28
-.29

+.49
-1.17
-.04
-.10
-.22
+1.13
-.69
+.02
-.23
-.09
-.04
-.10
+1.43
+.31
-.52
-.02
-3.21
-.16
-.53
+.13
+.01
+.08
+.50
+.16
-.26
+.58


MYL Mylan 43.44 -.21
MYGN MyriadG 31.29 +4.11
NIHD NII Hldg 3.13 -.22
NPSP NPS Phm 32.84 -1.19
NO NO Mobile 16.59 -.31
NRG NRGEgy 27.36 -.03
DCM N7rDOCO 15.53 +.18
NXPI NXP Semi 47.00
NBR Nabors 16.59 -.25
NBG NBGrcers 4.70 +.23
NFG NatFuGas 74.08 -.16
NGG NatGrid 63.65 -.31
NHI NtHlthlnv 62.11 -.79
NOV NOilVarco 73.30 -1.21
NAV Navistar 33.23 +.42
NKTR NektarTh 12.43 -.28
NEOG Neogen s 39.44 -.09
NTAP NetApp 41.57 -.53
NFLX Netflix 404.42 -1.49
NGD NwGoldg 5.77 -.09
NJR NJ Rscs 44.18 -.18
EDU NewOriEd 29.45 +.75
NYCB NYCmtyB 15.63 +.01
NYMT NYMtgTr 7.12 +.03
NCT Newcastle 5.56 +.03
NEM NewmtM 20.87 -.31
NWSANewsCpA n 15.61 +.09
NWS NewsCpBn 15.31 +.24
NEE NextEraEn 89.36 -.78
NI NiSource 33.75 +.01
NLSN NielsenH 42.48 +.37
NKE NikeB 70.60 +.09
N7r NipponTr 25.94 +.24
NE NobleCorp 30.49 -.62
NBL NobleEns 61.19 -1.15
NOK NokiaCp 6.69 -.09
NAT NordicAm 10.03 -.09
JWN Nordstrm 57.10 +1.72
NSC NordkSo 91.76 +.51
PAL NAPallg .40 -.01
NU NoestUt 43.11 -.37
NTI NthnTEn 24.25 -.40
NOC NorthropG 111.40 +.60
NRF NStarRlt 14.20 -.12
NWBI NwstBcsh 13.88 -.01
NWN NwstNG 40.42 +.06
NVS Novariis 78.55 +.35
NVAX Novavax 5.38 -.01
NVO NovoNord s 41.05 +1.47
NUS NuSkin 73.68 -5.02
NUAN NuanceCm 15.25 -.03
NUE Nucor 47.19 +.41
NS NustarEn 51.25 +2.64
NAD NuvDivA 13.34 -.06
JPZ NuvEqtP 12.18 +.02
NIO NuvMuOpp 13.64 +.01
NQM NvlQI 14.15 -.05
NMA NvMAd 12.73 -.07
NUW NvAMT-Fr 16.02 -.03
NNP NvNYP 13.76 -.05
NPP NuvPP 14.18 +.02
JPC NvPfdlnco 8.96 -.03
NPF NvPMI 13.23 -.01
NPI NuvPI 13.01 -.06
NPM NuvPI2 13.27 +.02
NPT NuvPI4 12.40 -.01
NQU NuvQInc 12.97 -.03
NVDA Nvidia 15.44 -.14
NXTM NxStageMd 12.74 -.12
OGE OGEEgys 33.32 +.14
OAS OasisPet 39.51 +.42
OXY OcciPet 87.29 +.15
OCFC OceanFst 17.40 +.08
ODP OfficeDpt 4.86 -.02
OIBR OiSA 1.57 -.05
ONB OldNBcp 13.44 -.01
ORI OldRepub 14.78 +.06
OLN Olin 25.29 +.17
OHI OmegaHlt 30.89 -.61
OME OmegaP 10.26 -.31
ONNN OnSmcnd 8.11 -.10
OGXI OncoGenex 10.59 -.05
OKS OneokPtrs 52.76 +.05
OPK OpkoHlth 7.58 -.02
OPLK OplinkC 16.19 -.25
ORCL Oracle 35.95 -.01
ORBK Orbotch 13.24 -.04
OREX Orexigen 6.57 -.30
ONVO Organovo 9.10 -.19
OFIX Orthfx 20.61 +.11
OSK OshkoshCp 51.08 -.77
o07R OtterTail 27.06 -.22
P-Q-R
PDLI PDL Bio 7.46 -.92
PCG PG&ECp 41.11 -.17
PNC PNC 78.81 -.07
PNM PNM Res 23.89 -.06
PKX POSCO 66.96 -.02
PPG PPG 177.22 -.02
PPL PPLCorp 30.11 -.19
PCAR Paccar 56.90 +1.84
P Pandora 35.83 +.03
PNRA PaneraBrd 167.40 -.44
PAMT ParametS 14.42 -1.02
PKD ParkDrl 6.93 -.23
PH ParkerHan 112.62 +1.73
PTEN PattUTI 24.58 -.17
PAYX Paychex 40.74 -.09
BTU PeabdyE 16.03 -.57
PBA Pembinag 34.87 +.93
PGH Pengrthg 6.44 +.11
PENN PnnNGm 11.30 -.10
PVA PennVa 12.13 -.31
PWE PennWstg 7.67 +.29
PNNT PennantPk 11.13 +.07
JCP Penney 5.22 +.14
PAG Penske 41.10 -.14


PNR Pentair 74.81 +.96
PBCT PeopUtdF 13.86 -.02
PBY PepBoy 11.42 -.16
POM PepcoHold 18.99 -.13
PEP PepsiCo 79.42 +.60
PTX PernixTher 3.53 +1.44
PRGO Perrigo 153.28 -2.51
PETM PetSmari 62.94 +.13
PBR/A PetrbrsA 11.38 -.24
PBR Petrobras 10.78 -.25
PFE Pfizer 30.65 -.53
PCYC Pharmacyc 126.81 -2.23
PM PhilipMor 76.90 +.02
PHG PhilipsNV 34.04 -.57
PSX Phillips66 70.67 -.47
PNX PhoenxCos 42.72 -1.17
PNY PiedNG 32.21 -.23
PFN PimlncStr2 10.40 +.04
PNW PinWst 51.41 -.22
PXD PioNtrl 174.95 +3.04
PBI PitnyBw 24.69 -.35
PAA PlainsAAP 51.22 +.52
PLUG PlugPowrh 3.07 -.20
PCL PlumCrk 41.85 -.30
PII Polaris 119.98 -3.06
POT Potash 32.29 +.64
BKLN PSSrLoan 24.89 +.04
COO PwShs QQQ84.69 -.22
PX Praxalr 122.71 +.33
PCP PrecCastpt 249.62 +2.73
PCLN priceline 1124.01 -2.11
PFG PrinFncl 42.38 +.12
PRA ProAssur 44.95 -.46
PLD ProLogis 39.12 +.37
SH ProShtS&P 26.54 +.03
OLD ProUltQQQ 92.00 -.48
SSO ProUItSP 91.90 -.21
UVXY PUVixST rs1 02.83 +7.26
SVXY PrShtVixs 51.18 -1.89
PG ProctGam 76.45 +.36
PGR ProgsvCp 22.60 -.02
SDS ProUShSP 32.79 +.07
QID PUShQQQrs64.15 +.33
TBT ProUShL20 70.75 +1.30
TWM PUSR2Krs 53.66 +.89
SPXU PUShSPX rs69.98 +.35
PSEC ProspctCap 10.98 -.09
PRU Prudent0 82.72 +.20
PEG PSEG 33.01 -.11
PSA PubStrg 157.90 -.67
PHM PulteGrp 19.49 -.38
PMM PMMI 7.03 +.01
QEP QEPRes 29.87 -.89
QIHU Qihoo360 91.83 -4.60
QCOMQualcom 72.37 -.14
DGX QstDiag 51.10 -.12
STR Questar 22.94 -.14
KWK QksilvRes 3.35 +.03
RFMD RFMicD 5.41 +.01
RDN RadianGrp 15.19 +.86
RSH RadioShk 2.22 -.14
RL RLauren 148.71 -5.47
RRC RangeRs 86.13 -1.52
RAVN Ravenlnds 35.20 -.68
RYN Rayonier 43.53 +.01
RTN Raytheon 92.75 +1.77
RWT RedwdTr 18.31 -.26
RGP RegncyEn 26.38 +.27
RF RegionsFn 9.90 -.07
RS RelStOAI 67.59 -.13
RGEN RepIgn 14.03 -.40
RSG RepubSvc 31.55 +.02
RSO ResrceCap 5.87 -.03
MKTG Responsys 26.99
ROIC RetailOpp 14.06 -.20
RNN RexahnPh 1.03 -.05
RAI ReynAmer 47.14 -.36
RAD RiteAid 5.45 +.11
ROK RockwIAut 109.91 -1.27
COL RockColl 74.91 +.09
ROG Rogers 58.05 +.17
ROP Roper 131.92 -.07
ROST RossStrs 66.29 +.51
RY RoyalBk g 62.29 +.87
RCL RylCarb 48.69 +.14
RDS/BRoyDShlIB 71.97 +.36
RYL Ryland 43.29 -.24
S-T-U
STBA S&T Bcp 21.84 -.23
SCG SCANA 45.94 -.34
SLM SLM Cp 22.00 +.09
SM SM Energy 81.95 -.71
DIA SpdrDJIA 154.18 +.10
GLD SpdrGold 121.29 +.30
FEZ SpdrEuro50 39.36 +.07
MDY SP Mid 232.26 -1.03
SPY S&P500ETF175.17 -.22
XHB SpdrHome 30.87 -.09
JNK SpdrLehHY 40.42 +.01
XRT SpdrRetl 78.12 +.25
XOP SpdrOGEx 64.32 -.79
SBS SABESPs 8.74 -.09
SBR SabnR 51.18 -.31
SAIA Sala Inc s 30.66 -.84
JOE StJoe 18.18 +.22
CRM Salesforcs 61.63 +.67
SLXP SalixPhm 96.44 +.28
SBH SallyBty 27.95 +.09
SJT SJuanB 17.68 +.15
SNDK SanDisk 68.78 +.54
SD SandRdge 6.17 -.11
SNY Sanofi 48.29 -.29
SRPT SareptaTh 25.13 +2.17
SLB Schlmbrg 86.16 -1.03
SCHW Schwab 23.86 -.21
SDRL SeadrillUd 35.49 -.68
STX SeagateT 49.11 -.88


J-K-L
JDSU JDS Uniph 12.68
JPM JPMorgCh 55.21
JEC JacobsEng 58.65
JBLU JetBlue 8.61
JNJ JohnJn 87.28
JCI JohnsnCll 44.63
JNPR JnprNtwk 26.78
KBH KB Home 18.29
KKR KKR 23.21
KFN KKR Fn 11.67
KFH KKRFn 41 27.37
KSU KCSouthn 99.92
K Kellogg 57.37
KERX KeryxBio 14.76
KEY Keycorp 12.38
KMB KimbCIk 105.60
KIM Kimco 20.52
KMP KindME 78.95
KMI KindMorg 33.24
KMIWSKindrMwt 2.51
KGC Kinross g 4.57
KOG KodiakOg 10.26
KSS Kohls 49.83
KRFT KraftFGp 51.12
KTOS KratosDef 7.27
KKD KrispKrm 16.34
KR Kroger 35.45
KLIC Kulicke 11.34
LB L Brands 51.79
LLL L-3Com 108.96
LKQ LKQ Corp 26.18
LSI LSI Corp 11.04
LTC LTC Prp 36.95
LSTR Landstar 56.07
LVS LVSands 73.98
LHO LaSalleH 28.99
LEG LeggPlat 29.35
LEN LennarA 39.58
LVLT Level3 34.55
USA LbtyASE 5.54
LBTYA UbGIobA 80.52
LRY UbtProp 35.12
LFVN Ufevantge 1.30
LLY UllyEli 52.72
LNC UncNat 47.11
LINE UnnEngy 33.05
LMT LockhdM 150.39
LO Lorillard 47.76
LPX LaPac 16.68
LOW Lowes 45.53
LUX Luxottica 51.92
LYB LyonBasA 77.61
M-N-0
MTB M&TBk 111.35
MBI MBIA 11.47
MCGC MCG Cap 4.36
MDC MDC 29.29
MDU MDU Res 31.88
MFA MFA Fncl 7.40
MTG MAGIC Inv 8.32
MGM MGM Rsts 23.67
M Macys 51.35
MHR MagHRes 7.89
MTW Manitowoc 27.35
MNKD MannKd 5.11
MFC Manulifeg 18.00
MRO MarathnO 32.10
MPC MarathPet 82.31
GDX MktVGold 23.21
OIH MV OilSvc 44.71
RSX MktVRus 25.37
PRB MVPreRMu 24.57
MWE MarkWest 68.49
MMC MarshM 44.56
MMLP MariinMid 42.61
MRVL MarvellT 14.53
MAS Masco 20.74
MA MasterCd s 72.84
MAT Mattel 36.46
MDR McDrmInt 8.22
MCD McDnlds 93.58
MJN MeadJohn 73.66
MWV MeadWvco 34.15
MDGN Medgenics 8.20
MPW MedProp 12.75
MDT Medtrnic 54.73
MPEL MelcoCrwn 38.98
MRK Merck 53.53
MCY MercGn 44.82
MDP Meredith 43.56
MTOR Meritor 10.39
MET MetLife 47.68
KORS MKors 91.34
MU MicronT 23.31
MSFT Microsoft 35.82
MVIS Microvis h 1.17
MIDD Middleby 238.45
MSEX MdsxWatr 19.51
MM MillenMda 6.98
MBT MobileTele 17.63
MCP Molycorp 4.66
MDLZ Mondelez 32.09
MON Monsanto 107.15
MS MorgStan 29.18
MOS Mosaic 44.86
MWA MuellerWat 8.93


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cld Issue has been called for
redemption by company, d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pf Preferred stock
issue, pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price, rt Right to buy security at a specdfed price, rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued, wd When distnb-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vI Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included, b Annual rate plus
stock, c Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement, i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred, k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears, m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement, p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown, r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend, t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distnbution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown, cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering
market costs is paid from fund assets, d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available, p previous day's net asset value, s fund
split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar was
mixed against
other major
currencies
Wednesday. It
rose against the
British pound
and Canadian
dollar, but fell
against the euro
and the
Japanese yen.





k 03


L40


1YR.
AGO
1.5663
.9960
1.3584
93.36
12.6220

3.6854
5.4747
8.8258
6.3210
.9083


.9604
6.2340
7.7542
53.139
1.2364
1085.89
29.55


Commodities
Coffee prices
rose for a
seventh straight
day on concern
that dry weather
in Brazil will
harm this year's
crop. Most
metals also
gained. Gold,
silver, platinum
and palladium
all rose.


FUELS
Crude Oil (bbl)
Ethanol (gal)
Heating Oil (gal)
Natural Gas (mm btu)
Unleaded Gas (gal)

METALS (
Gold (oz)
Silver (oz)
Platinum (oz)
Copper (Ib)
Palladium (oz)

AGRICULTURE
Cattle (Ib)
Coffee (Ib)
Corn (bu)
Cotton (Ib)
Lumber (1,000 bd ft)
Orange Juice (Ib)
Soybeans(bu)
Wheat (bu)


CLOSE PVS. %CHG %YTD


NET 1YR
CHG AGO


MAJORS CLOSE
USD per British Pound 1.6312
Canadian Dollar 1.1077
USD per Euro 1.3535
Japanese Yen 101.31
Mexican Peso 13.2818


CHG
-.0009
+.0003
+.0018
-.33
-.0673


TREASURIES YEST PVS


97.38
1.95
3.00
5.03
2.64

CLOSE
1257.30
19.79
1379.30
3.21
706.90

CLOSE
1.40
1.43
4.43
0.86
355.10
1.46
13.16
5.88


97.19
1.95
2.98
5.38
2.60

PVS.
1251.70
19.40
1373.40
3.22
699.90

PVS.
1.40
1.36
4.42
0.85
351.20
1.43
13.13
5.85


+0.20
-1.03
+0.47
-6.42
+1.47

%CHG
+0.45
+1.97
+0.43
-0.08
+1.00

%CHG
+0.07
+5.03
+0.34
+0.14
+1.11
+1.64
+0.23
+0.51


-1.1
+2.0
-2.6
+18.9
-5.2

%YTD
+4.6
+2.3
+0.6
-6.6
-1.5

%YTD
+3.9
+29.3
+5.0
+1.0
-1.4
+6.9
+0.3
-2.9


EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel 3.5358 -.0000
Norwegian Krone 6.2321 +.0015
South African Rand 11.1446 -.0005
Swedish Krona 6.5258 -.0000
Swiss Franc .9034 +.0011


ASINPACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.1225
6.0605
7.7619
62.590
1.2683
1077.66
30.38


+.0031
-.0000
-.0026
+.045
-.0000
-2.15
+.04


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MO AGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


Interestrates





HEB
The yield on the
1 0-year Trea-
sury rose to
2.67 percent
Wednesday.
Yields affect
rates on mort-
gages and other
consumer loans.






-Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/SCIENCE NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014


TODAY




Partly cloudy by the
afternoon

760 / 570
20% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature9 Today



f1 2 3 2 1 0

R6 70 75 78 73 67


FRIDAY


Partly cloudy


780 / 620
20% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 80/62 part cldy afternoon
Sarasota 71/56 cloudy afternoon

SUN AND MOON


Si i i 1 The Sun Rise Set
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4p.m. 6p.m. TheSun Rse Set
The highertheAccuWeather.com UV Index number, Today 7:11 a.m. 6:14 p.m.
the greaterthe need foreye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; Friday 7:11 a.m. 6:15 p.m.
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme. The Moon Rise Set
RealFeelTemperatureistheexclusive Today 11:48a.m. 12:27a.m.
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature day 1: .m. 1:2a.m.
based on eight weather factors. Friday 12:31 p.m. 1:22 a.m.
AIR QUALITY INDEX First Full Last New
Air Quality Index readings as of Wednesday
21 0015020 300 F
09 1 .. .. Feb 6 Feb 14 Feb 22 Marl
0 50 100 150 200 300 50


0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: particulates
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees
Grass 4
Weeds *"* X
Molds' '. /
absent low moderate high veryhig
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 85/670
Normal High/Low 76/530
Record High 880 (1982)
Record Low 270 (1996)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Wednesday Trace
Month to date 0.01"
Normal month to date 0.40"
Year to date 3.68"
Normal year to date 2.20"
Record 1.97" (1997)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2014 2013 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 3.67 0.43 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 0.01 2.12 2.52 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 0.97 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 3.68 53.10 50.74 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 11:23a 5:lla 11:48p 5:35p
Fri. 12:12p 6:00a --- 6:24p
Sat. 12:34a 6:46a 12:58p 7:10p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 8:53a
Fri. 11:15a
Englewood
Today 7:30a
Fri. 9:52a
Boca Grande
Today 6:35a
Fri. 8:57a
El Jobean
Today 9:25a
Fri. 11:47a
Venice
Today 5:45a
Fri. 8:07a


Low High Low

2:49a 7:43p 1:20p
4:12a 8:40p 1:56p

1:05a 6:20p 11:36a
2:28a 7:17p 12:12p

9:57a 5:25p ---
12:49a 6:22p 10:33a

3:18a 8:15p 1:49p
4:41a 9:12p 2:25p

10:15a 4:35p ---
1:07a 5:32p 10:51a


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
57 41 c
71 56 c
67 54 c
81 66 sh
64 55 c
80 69 pc
80 62 pc
75 62 pc
61 45 sh
61 47 c
80 68 pc


Fri.
Hi Lo W
60 48 sh
72 61 c
70 61 c
81 68 pc
66 62 sh
80 71 pc
80 64 pc
77 63 pc
60 54 sh
60 54 sh
80 71 s


SATURDAY




Clouds and sun, a
shower possible

790 / 620
50% chance of rain

:learwater1
67/54pw

"r Tampa
67/59


St. Peters
68/56


Longboat K
71/59


A
.L.ir


SUNDAY
,:,,'.,;,



Clearing, less humid


780 / 540
20% chance of rain

Plant Cityi
'71' 55

0Brandun I
71 56


flurI ApolloBeach ,
Beach 1 Ft. Meade
69 53 I 71/58

-Ab ^t .* ..

Wauchula
*Bradenton 73 55
71/56
Myakka City imestone
;ey --- i/ 0* Limestone
'74/56 j5 6 __

Sarasota* j
71/56 *l ..
Osprey m' !: Arcadia "
72/56* 76 59 J
Venice .. .. aHull


Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Gulf Water
Temperature

660


% 7/56


Enlgkerud A.- ;'


74o57 .; ,-

Placidab
75/57.
Boca Grande(
77/65


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 02014

Publication date: 2/6/14
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
SSW 3-6 0-1 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
NNE 10-20 2-4 Moderate


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
80 70 pc
70 58 c
71 57 c
72 61 c
82 69 pc
81 64 pc
63 48 c
75 62 pc
70 55 c
56 40 c
51 34 c


Fri.
Lo W
71 s
60 c
59 c
65 c
71 pc
65 pc
56 sh
63 pc
61 c
50 sh
45 c


rortnPolft 77/57
76/57 77/57
" Port Charlutte
] 476/57


Punta Gorda
78/57


Fort Myers
80/62

Cape Coral
79/60


4"-"



Lehigh Acres
80/60


a
Winter Haven
72, 54


High ...................... 86 at Orlando, FL


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford


j Helena
Sanibel f Honolulu
79/66 Houston
Bonita Springs Indianapolis
81/62 ...
*- WORLD CI

AccuWeather.com :ln


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
80 66 pc 80 70 pc
61 51 sh 61 59 sh
68 56 c 72 61 c
68 55 c 70 61 c
71 56 c 72 60 c
59 39 c 61 47 sh
67 59 c 71 61 c
69 57 c 71 64 c
75 60 pc 76 64 c
79 66 sh 80 68 pc
72 54 c 73 61 c


uiy
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
41 28 c 47 28 c
26 16 sf 25 14 c
49 31 pc 55 40 pc
32 17 s 36 24 s
7 -1 pc 17 4 c
44 25 pc 53 36 pc
29 27 sn 28 27 sn
27 15 pc 28 12 pc
16 7 sf 15 5 pc
16 5 pc 22 5 sf
31 18 pc 33 20 s
48 31 pc 54 35 pc
6 -6 s 14 1 pc
20 1 s 17 10 s
18 -1 pc 14 0 pc
53 32 pc 57 39 c
20 -1 pc 17 9 pc
24 -4 pc 23 -2 pc
30 15 sf 36 26 c
16 5 sf 33 24 c
8 -6 s 16 5 pc
18 -2 pc 13 1 pc
2 -12 s 11-12 pc
22 -13 sn 2-20 s
1 -9 s 4-18 pc
24 6 pc 25 5 pc
5 -2 pc 12 2 sn
81 70 sh 80 68 r
42 32 r 43 35 c
11 -6 s 14 6 s


TIES
Toda
il 1


Hi LO W
46 43 r
58 37 s
36 23 c
44 33 c
75 63 sh
66 51 pc
11 3 s
85 72 sh
46 35 r
10 -9 s
20 16 c
34 29 c
50 41 r
56 37 r


Fri.
Hi Lo W
47 38 r
59 39 s
31 23 sn
46 34 c
77 70 r
67 50 pc
12 -9 s
85 70 pc
44 40 pc
4-15 pc
31 16 pc
35 30 c
45 43 pc
48 42 pc


*Atlanta
49/31
37J ,\\ ,s




*Miam.
'82M6

precipitation

Flurries Snow Ice


Low ......................... -33 at Utica, MT


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today
Hi Lo W
41 24 c
10 -5 c
40 25 pc
55 41 pc
61 50 sh
25 6 pc
29 16 pc
6 -5 s
6 -8 s
51 27 r
31 15 pc
45 33 r
29 17 pc
39 29 s
14 9 sn


Fri.
Hi Lo W
50 30 pc
17 10 pc
45 30 s
59 43 pc
64 51 pc
24 17 s
38 24 pc
14 4 pc
12 -1 pc
57 36 pc
37 25 s
54 43 c
30 19 pc
44 32 s
30 18 sf
17 6 pc
32 19 s
65 47 c
20 6 pc
25 7 pc
35 28 sn
28 10 pc
52 34 pc
37 31 sn
20 14 s
42 31 i
64 53 pc


r 59 50 pc
pc 32 24 pc
s 4026s


Today
Hi Lo W
75 48 pc
15 9 pc
14 5 pc
48 46 sh
1 -16 sf
93 78 s


Fri.
Hi Lo W
73 44 pc
19 9 sf
19 6 sf
49 40 pc
2-19 s
90 77 s
59 49 s
24 15 pc
84 72 sh
81 64 s
43 34 pc
18 6 pc
31 19 pc
2 -24 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Remembrance or revision? Brain study shows


(LA Times) Memory
can be altered by new
experience, and isn't nearly
as accurate as courtroom
testimony might have
us believe, a new study
suggests.
The results suggest
a cheeky answer to the


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question posed by come-
dian Richard Pryor: "Who
you gonna believe: me, or
your lyin' eyes?"
Turns out, Pryor was
onto something. The
brain behind our eyes can
distort reality or verify
it, based on subsequent


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experience. And somewhat
paradoxically, the same
area of the brain appears
to be strongly involved in
both activities, according
to a study published online
Tuesday in the Journal of
Neuroscience.
Northwestern University


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6o 6: ww .Chrlo6e outy amb 6 or


cognitive neuroscientist
Donna J. Bridge was test-
ing how memory is either
consolidated or altered,
by giving 17 subjects a
deceptively simple task.
They studied the location
of dozens of objects briefly
flashed at varied locations
on a standard computer
screen, then were asked
to recall the objects
original location on a new
screen with a different
background.
When subjects were told
to use a mouse to drag
the re-presented object
from the center of the
new screen to the place
where they recalled it had
been located, 16 of 17 got
it wrong, by an average of
about 3 inches.
When the same subjects
then were given three
choices the original
location, the wrong guess
and a neutral spot between
them they almost un-
failingly dragged the object
to the incorrectly recalled
location, regardless of the
background screen. Their
new memory was false.
But it gets trickier still.
When subjects were


(LA Times) Up and
down the West Coast,
starfish are dying.
Casualties of a myste-
rious disease known as
seastar wasting syndrome,
they are dying in Alaska,
deteriorating in San Diego
and disappearing from long
stretches in between.
Death from the disease
is quick and not pretty. It
begins with a small lesion
on a starfish's body that
rapidly develops into an
infection the animal cannot
fight.
Over the course of the
disease the starfish's legs
might drop off, or even


instead told to drag the
object from center screen
to a pre-selected spot
on the new background,
then were asked to move
it from a central spot to
where they recalled seeing
it originally, they got the
original position right at an
uncanny rate. (They were
not told the pre-selected
spot was wrong, and its
misplacement distance
roughly matched that of
errors measured in the
previous trials.)
Faced with the three po-
sition choices, these same
subjects also matched the
correct original position,
regardless of screen
background.
All the while, measures
of brain activity showed
that the same area of
the hippocampus was
highly active both for
maintaining the "correct"
memory and confirming
a newly associated "false"
memory.
"That overlapping brain
activity was pretty shock-
ing to us," said Bridge, a
postdoctoral student at
the university's Feinberg
School of Medicine. "The


separate from the body and
start to crawl away.
Pete Raimondi, a
professor at the University
of California, Santa Cruz
who has been tracking
the seastar crisis, said a
starfish's leg moving away
from its central disk is akin
to a lizard's tail continuing
to wriggle even after it has
snapped off the lizard's
body.
"Starfish don't have a
central nervous system, so
it's not like if you chopped
off your arm," he said. "The
arms can still be mobile
and operate on their
own for a period of time


idea is that whatever is
most important to you
right now, the hippo-
campus is responsible to
either maintain a stable
representation or change
it."
The results seem to
contradict common
notions that we are prone
to altering accounts of the
past when prompted with
false information. On the
contrary, the hippocam-
pus' well-documented
ability to sort between
present reality and a
stored memory held up.
Yet a similar calcu-
lation could underlie
the error. The new, but
wrong, position became
associated with the new
background, and when
the background changed,
the hippocampus seemed
to sort through a false
database.
There could be good
reason for our brains to
act this way, Bridge said.
Life requires us to update
aspects of our memory
on a constant basis. In
some sense, the benefits
of that function outweigh
the pitfalls.


- longer than you think."
"I think it is almost
entirely impossible to be
related to Fukushima,"
Raimondi told the Los
Angeles Times. "We haven't
ruled it out, but there are
so many more likely things
going on. And there is no
evidence that radiation has
gotten to California."
A more likely culprit
is a pathogen. Either a
virus, parasite or bacteria
infects the animal and
compromises the immune
system, which leads to
a secondary bacterial
infection that ultimately
kills the animal.


MONDAY THE NATION
.;.-10s I -Os I I 10s I 20s I30s 40sI s I 60s I 70s 80 sI90s
!. 'Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Mostly sunny and 8-1e ,O--a""Pgo
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770/540 1 ,inneapolis Toomn
77 /a54 1716
3% chance of rain' ." Dco.i NowYork
S. 4F c Cn-cago 'a8&2 2QM7
S r.SFanclsCor W 6i-6on29'
"*AT Denve Washington '


Kamnsas City
*Los Angeles
,61M0
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"h3 \ 4202
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.~50/39,
Fronts Pi
=-
Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


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Something is killing starfish


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SPORTS


Thursday, February 6,2014


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


NFL awards Thursday
contract to CBS,
*Page 2

Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


AREA SIGNING
Sly Augustyn, North Port
football, Ellsworth CC (JUCO)
lan Bush, Port Charlotte
football, Ga. Southern (NCAA FCS)
Calvin Collins, Port Charlotte
football, Southeastern (NAIA)
Taylor Doeble, Charlotte soccer,
Barton College (NCAA Div. II)
Julia Fowlie, Charlotte track,
Central Florida (Division I)
Traige McClary, Port Charlotte
football, Warner (NAIA)
Greg Patton, Port Charlotte
football, Ellsworth CC (JUCO)
Shaquille Williams,
Port Charlotte, football,
Ellsworth CC (JUCO)

A COLLEGE
CONVERSATION
Port Charlotte's Traige
McClary and Calvin Collins
talk about playing against
each other in college today at
suncoastsportsblog.com


* PREP SPORTS: Signing day


0
sl
t
t
1
t


Pirate quintet highlights signing day

By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER INSIDE
The three members National signing day roundup
of Port Charlotte High with lists of state team recruits,
School's defensive line PAGE 5
that led the Pirates to
their first regional final lights that would help
had one final chance parents take pictures of
to be in the spotlight the athletes' big moment.
-_ literaf1 A... .. ..A--


Ian Bush, Calvin Collins
and Greg Patton sat at
a table at the front of
the school's auditorium
along with quarterback
Traige McClary and tackle
Shaquille Williams on
national signing day, as
athletic director James
Vernon scrambled to find
the controls for the stage


Alter me signing -
first ceremonial, then
actual the athletes took
pictures with friends and
family, reveling in their
big day.
Then Vernon an-
nounced that he had
some paperwork to finish.
'All right," he said.
SIGNING 16


From left, Port Charlotte High School's Shaquille Williams, Greg Patton, lan Bush, Traige McClary
and Calvin Collins smile during their signing ceremony at the school on Wednesday morning.


* BOYS BASKETBALL: District tournaments


j


.11.....V..




IL1


SUN PHOTO BY KATHERINE GODINA
Port Charlotte's Matt Washington ties to break through the Ida Baker defense during Wednesday's District 6A-11 semifinal in Port Charlotte.




BIGGER FISH TO FRY


Pirates eye title after

dismantling Bulldogs
By GARY BROWN
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PORT CHARLOTTE Port
Charlotte High School coach Bill
Specht wrote one statement on the
blackboard in the locker-room before
Wednesday night's District 6A-11
semifinal game against Ida Baker.
After the Pirates routed the visitors 71-
24, Specht wrote another statement
on the board.
"Before the game, I wrote 'make the
state playoffs,'" Specht said. 'After we
won, I wrote 'Win the district champi-
onship.' That's our
U NET ~goal now."
UP N EXT The Pirates' easy
Port Charlotte: victory gained them
vs. Venice, Friday, a berth in regionals
7 p.m. next week regardless
of how they do in
the district final they
host Friday night.
Port Charlotte (21-7) came out firing,
outscoring Ida Baker 21-5 in the first
quarter and stretching its lead to 47-13
at halftime. A running clock was imple-
mented in the first 10 seconds of the


S.Bobcats pull away

from Braden River
By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
NORTH PORT -At one point
during the season, some of the North
Port High School veterans pulled
Brandon Gonzalez aside and suggest-
ed the sharpshooter improve his shot
selection.
Whatever shot selection the soph-
omore used on Wednesday night was
fine with the Bobcats.
Gonzalez scored a game-high 27
points, hitting four of six 3-point
attempts as North Port overpowered
Braden River 58-36 in a District 7A-10


semifinal.
"He's shooting the
same amount, if not
more," North Port
coach Travis Slanger
said. "He's just taking
better shots."
Gonzalez scored


North Port's Zefen Bruno finds a hole in the Braden River
PIRATES 16 defense to put up a shot during Wednesday's game.


UP NEXT
North Port: vs.
Palmetto, Friday,
7p.m.


six of his points in a decisive 10-0 run
in the third quarter, stretching the
Bobcats' tenuous six-point lead to an
overwhelming 41-25 advantage. He
converted a 4-point play in the middle
of the stretch to give North Port a
BOBCATS|6


* OLYMPICS: Slopestyle

TODAY ON TV
NBC
8-11 p.m.: Figure skating
(team event: men's
short program, pairs'short
program); men's and women's
snowboarding (slopestyle
competition); women's freestyle
skiing (moguls competition)
1:35-4:30 a.m.: Primetime
encore

INSIDE
Team figure skating debuts
today, PAGE 3



White


pulls


out of


event
By EDDIE PELLS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
KRASNAYA POLYANA,
Russia Shaun White
jammed his wrist on
one jump and watched
the world's best snow-
boarders join him in
tumbling down the
supersized, super-scary
Olympic slopestyle
course.
Quickly, his choice
became clear: Time
to step away from the
danger, and give himself a
better chance in the event
he knows he can win.
The world's most
famous snowboarder
pulled out of the
new Olympic event
Wednesday, saying that
after much deliberation,
he has decided to bypass
a chance at winning two
gold medals at these
games and instead
concentrate on the
halfpipe, where he'll have
a chance to win his third
straight title next week.
"With the practice runs
I have taken, even after
course modifications and
watching fellow athletes
get hurt, the potential risk
of injury is a bit too much
for me to gamble my
other Olympics goals on,"
White said in a statement.
The world's most
decorated rider in a sport
known for its risk-takers,
White's decision was a
stunner that dealt yet
another blow to the
still-to-start Sochi Games.
They have been wracked
by security threats and
political dust-ups, along
WHITE 13


INDEX I Lottery 21 Community Calendar 2 | Golf 21 NFL 21 MLB 2 | Olympics 3 | NBA 4 1 College basketball 41 Quick Hits 4 1 Scoreboard 4 | College football 5 1 Preps 6






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, February 6,2014


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.comrn
* CASH 3
Feb. 5N.................................. .. 8-4-5
Feb. 5D ...................................... 9-8-2
Feb. 4N ....................................... 6-3-8
Feb. 4D ...................................... 1-9-4
Feb. 3N ....................................... 6-3-3
Feb. 3D....................................... 4-0-9
D-Day,N-Night
* PLAY
Feb. 5N....................................2-5-2-4
Feb. 5D ...................................0-4-0-3
Feb. 4N....................................4-4-8-1
Feb. 4D ...................................6-5-7-4
Feb. 3N....................................9-1-6-4
Feb. 3D....................................6-8-4-5
D-Day,N-Night
* FANTASY 5
Feb. 5 .......................11-19-25-30-31
Feb. 4.............................. 6-8-9-25-32
Feb. 3 ..........................2-11-13-30-33
PAYOFF FOR FEB. 4
0 5-digit winners .......................... $0
290 4-digit winners .................. $555
10,116 3-digit winners................ $19
* MEGA MONEY
Feb. 4..............................12-20-22-43
M egaBall......................................... 21

Jan.31 ....................4.........4-8-14-34
M egaBall...........................................5
PAYOFF FOR FEB. 4
0 4-of-4MB.........................$500,000
6 4-of-4...................................$1,006
32 3-of-4 MB ..........................$413.50
721 3-of-4................................ $54.50
1,060 2-of-4MB........................$25.50
* LOTTO
Feb.1 ...................11-12-20-23-33-44
Jan.29 ....................6-13-20-27-29-51
Jan.25 .......................2-3-7-21-36-43
PAYOFF FOR FEB. 1
0 6-digit winners .............M........$5M
52 5-digit winners............. $3,021.50
1,952 4-digit winners...................$59
37,974 3-digit winners ...................$5
* POWERBALL
Feb. 1 ..........................5-12-15-27-38
Pow erball.........................................17

Jan.29 ......................11-23-28-32-47
Powerball........................................20
PAYOFF FOR FEB. 1
0 5 of5 + PB............................$194M
2 5 of5.............................$1,000,000
2 4of5 + PB.........................$10,000
109 4of 5 ..................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$215 million
MEGAA MILLIONS
Feb. 4........................ 25-44-49-60-73
M egaBall...........................................9

Jan.31 .......................... 3-9-13-47-52
M egaBall...........................................8
PAYOFF FOR FEB. 4
0 5 of5 + MB.............................$94M
0 5 of5.............................$1,000,000
3 4of5 + MB.......................... $5,000
21 4of5 ....................................$500


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.
Submit local golf scores: Email
scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.


SunCoast Sports Now
Get the latest local sports news:
www.suncoastsportsblog.com


Like us on
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Contact us

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mlawrence@sun-herald.com

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mbambach@sun-herald.com
Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com

Rob Shore. Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
Zach Miller Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* MLB NOTEBOOK



Schilling says he's



battling cancer


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARTFORD, Conn.
- Former star pitcher
turned television analyst
Curt Schilling announced
Wednesday that he is
battling cancer.
The 47-year-old
Schilling, who spent
20 years in the major
leagues before retiring in
2009, divulged the news
in a statement released
through his employer,
Bristol-based ESPN. It did
not indicate what type of
cancer Schilling has, when
he was diagnosed or what
his prognosis might be.
"With my incredibly
talented medical team
I'm ready to try and win
another big game," he
said. "I've been so very
blessed and I feel grateful
for what God has allowed
my family to have and ex-
perience, and I'll embrace
this fight just like the rest
of them, with resolute
faith and head on."
ESPN spokesman Mike
Soltys said Schilling is
taking a leave of absence.


SPRING TRAINING
COUNTDOWN



8
Days until Tampa Bay Rays
pitchers and catchers report
for spring training on Feb. 14
at Charlotte Sports Park


He recently signed a mul-
tiyear contract extension
with the network and was
to be part of the "Sunday
Night Baseball" broadcast
team, as well as contribute
to the network's studio
coverage, including its
spring training coverage,
Soltys said.
Schilling played for five
teams during his Major
League career. He won
three world champion-
ships, with the Arizona
Diamondbacks (2001) and
Boston Red Sox (2004,
2007), sharing the World
Series MVP award with
teammate Randy Johnson
in 2001.


* GOLF:


New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, right, and Denver
Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning look over the fourth
green of Pebble Beach Golf Links during Wednesday's practice
round. The tournament starts today.


A happy return



for McDowell


By DOUG FERGUSON
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif.
- Graeme McDowell
twisted his back and
swung a club to loosen
his joints in the morning
chill of February at Pebble
Beach, a course that
looked nothing like he
remembered it.
"I was a little more
warmed up the last time I
played here," he said.
The first fairway, once
lined with thousands of
fans, was empty on this
day. The putting surfaces
were emerald green.
McDowell recalls them
being closer to brown.
That was the U.S. Open,
his first major. This is
the AT&T Pebble Beach
National Pro-am.
For three years,
McDowell had little incen-
tive to return to the scene
of his greatest individual
feat.
He found two good
reasons to return, starting
with the silver-haired man
who joined him on the tee.
Kenny McDowell walked
at least 108 holes the week
of the 2010 U.S. Open,
which included two prac-
tice rounds. McDowell's
father was on the 18th
green after the final shot,
embracing him as he said
"You're something, kid."
They are partners this
week, a treat for both of
them.
"Emotionally, I don't
think that moment will
be beaten in my career,"
McDowell said. "But I'm
not going to put Pebble up
there on a pedestal and


PEBBLE BEACH
NATIONAL PRO-AM
WHEN: Today-Sunday
WHERE: Pebble Beach Golf
Links (6,816 yards, par 72),
Monterey Peninsula Country
Club, Shore Course (6,838 yards,
par 70) and Spyglass Hill Golf
Club (6,953 yards, par 72),
Pebble Beach, Calif.
TV: Golf Channel (Today-Friday,
3-6 p.m., 6:30 p.m.-1i2:30
a.m.; Saturday, 1-2:30 p.m.,
6:30-11 p.m.; Sunday, 1-2:30
p.m., 7 p.m.-midnight) and CBS
(Saturday, 3-6 p.m.; Sunday,
3-6:30 p.m.)
ONLINE: www.pgatour.com

say, 'That is the highlight
of my career,' because I
want more. I want more
Pebbles, I want more
major championships, I
want more things."
The McDowells are
playing with Jason Bohn
and actor Chris O'Donnell.
Right behind them will be
two-time Pebble winner
Dustin Johnson with
Wayne Gretzky (his future
father-in-law), and John
Daly with Kid Rock. In
front of them will be actor
Lucas Black and Kansas
City Chiefs quarterback
Alex Smith.
Peyton Manning was a
late entry into the field,
just a few days after a
Super Bowl loss to Seattle.
He played a practice
round Wednesday with
New England Patriots
coach Bill Belichick, who
will be playing with his
own quarterback (Tom
Brady) when the tourna-
ment starts today.


He won 216 games and
struck out 3,116 batters
during his career, but is
perhaps best known for
pitching in the 2004 ALCS
and World Series after
having stitches to mend
an ankle injury. His bloody
sock was later put on
display in Cooperstown.
Schilling has been in the
news after the failure of
38 Studios, a video game
company he owned in
Rhode Island, with the
help of a $75 million state
loan.

Around the majors: The
San Diego Padres said left-hander Cory
Luebke will need a second reconstruc-
tive elbow surgery and will miss the
2014 season. Luebke missed all of last
season while rehabbing after having
his first surgery in May 2012 ...
The Texas Rangers reached a 10-year
deal to immediately change the name
of their 20-year-old stadium to Globe
Life Park in Arlington ...
The Arizona Diamondbacks and Los
Angeles Dodgers, who open the 2014
season on March 22-23 in Sydney,
report today for spring training in
Arizona.


* NFL NOTEBOOK



CBS


gets



NFLs



'TNF'

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK -The
NFL will shift eight of its
Thursday night games
to CBS, which won the
bidding to showcase
more of television's
hottest property, the
league announced on
Wednesday.
CBS will air the games
during the first eight
weeks of the season with
its top broadcast team of
Jim Nantz and Phil Simms,
simulcasting them with
the NFL Network. The
league's cable network will
show six Thursday night
games alone later in the
season, produced by CBS
with Nantz and Simms
also in the booth.
Two Saturday games are
included in the deal, but
it is unclear whether they
will be on CBS or the NFL
Network. The NFL said the
contract is for one year.
Financial terms were not
disclosed.
CBS, NBC, ABC, Fox and
Turner were all interested
in the Thursday night
package. Football games
are the most dependable
ratings-grabbers. Sunday's
Super Bowl, with 112.2
million viewers, set a
record as the most-
watched program in U.S.
television history.

Around the league: After
more than two hours winding his way
in front of a parade through Seattle,
Pete Carroll was ready for the offseason
to arrive. 'I don't see anything that we
need to add," the Seahawks coach said.
"We just have to get better!'...
The attorney investigating the
Miami Dolphins bullying case said his
report will be issued late next week or
early the following week....
Larry Fitzgerald said he restructured
his contract with the Arizona Cardinals,
reducing a salary-cap hit and creating
room for signing other players....
Minnesota Vikings quarterback Matt
Cassel will void the 2014 option on his
contract and become a free agent....
Houston Texans coach Bill O'Brien
completed his coaching staff, hiring 16
coaches led by defensive coordinator
Romeo Crennel.


I RAYS SPRING TRAINING SCHEDULE


Date Game
Feb. 28 Orioles at Rays
March I Rays at Pirates
March 2 Twins at Rays
March 3 Phillies at Rays
March 4 Rays at Red Sox
March 5 Yankees at Rays
March 6 Rays at Orioles
March 7 Rays at Blue Jays
March 8 Pirates at Rays
March 9 Rays atYankees
March 10 Rays at Red Sox
March 11 Twins at Rays
March 12 Rays at Blue Jays
March 13 Pirates at Rays
March 14 Rays at Braves
March 15 Blue Jays at Rays


Time
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.
1:05 p.m.


Date Game Time
March 15 Rays at Pirates 1:05 p.m.
March 16 Red Soxat Rays 1:05 p.m.
March 18 Rays at Twins 7:05 p.m.
March 19 Rays at Orioles 1:05 p.m.
March 20 Twins at Rays 7:05 p.m.
March 21 Blue Jays at Rays 1:05 p.m.
March 22 Orioles at Rays 1:05 p.m.
March 23 Rays at Red Sox 1:05 p.m.
March 24 Rays at Twins 1:05 p.m.
March 25 Red Soxat Rays 1:05 p.m.
March 26 Orioles at Rays 7:05 p.m.
March 27 Rays at Orioles 7:05 p.m.
March 28 Rays at Tigers 1:05 p.m.
March 29 Rays at
Montgomery, Ala. 3:05 p.m.


TICKET INFORMATION
Single-game tickets are on sale in person at the Charlotte Sports Park ticket
office, via phone at 888-FAN-RAYS or 1-800-745-3000, or online at raysbase-
ball.com. Ticket prices range from $10 to $29. The Charlotte Sports Park ticket
office is open Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
until training camp begins.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


TODAY
Charlotte Warriors: Pop
Warner registration, 6-8 p.m. for
August-December season, Charlotte
Field, 2610 Carmalita St., Punta Gorda.
Fees: $200 for football, $200 for cheer.
Free clinics: May-July. Call 941-347-
7200 or email info@charlottewarriors.
com.

SATURDAY
Charlotte Warriors: Pop
Warner registration, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. for
August-December season, Charlotte
Field, 2610 Carmalita St., Punta Gorda.
Fees: $200 for football, $200 for cheer.
Free clinics: May-July. Call 941-347-
7200 or email info@charlottewarriors.
com.

Charlotte Warriors
benefit dinner: Noon, Punta
Gorda First Baptist Church, 459 Gill St.,
Punta Gorda. Cost: $5 plate includes
freshly prepared spaghetti, bread and
drink. Open to the public. All proceeds
will be donated to the Charlotte
Warriors FSYFL Pee Wee team. For
information, call 941-286-5082.

Port Charlotte Bandits:
Pop Warner registration for spring, 10
a.m.-2 p.m. at Franz Ross Park. Cost:
$100. Registration for fall Feb. 15,10
a.m.-noon for returning players and
cheerleaders, and 12-2 p.m. open
registration. Cost: $200 There is a
sibling discount.

SUNDAY
Team Tennis Junior
League: Registration deadline for
beginning, intermediate and advanced
players through age 18. Nine weeks of
Saturday play. Register online at www.
teamtennisjuniorleague.com. Call Sue,
941-475-4489.

BASEBALL
Game Day Heat: 12U travel
team looking for players. Practices
Tuesday and Thursdays, 6 p.m. at
North Charlotte Regional Park. Call
Scott, 941-421-8378.

Red Sox dinner and
auction: Feb. 24,5:30 p.m., JetBlue
Park, 11500 Fenway South Drive, Fort
Myers. Silent and live auction items
include a trip to watch the Boston Red
Sox on Fenway Park's Green Monster.
Proceeds benefitthe Boys & Girls Clubs
of Lee County. Contact Shannon Lane at
239-334-1886 or slane@bgclc.net, or
visit www.bgclc.net.

Snowbird Classic: Seeking
volunteers to help with admissions,
scorekeeping, public address
announcing, concessions, program
selling and parking. Event held at South
County and North County parks from
Feb.14-March 22. Call 941-876-3226 or
email steve@snowbirdbaseball.com or
Shannon@snowbirdbaseball.com.

FOOTBALL
Port Charlotte Bandits:
Pop Warner registration for fall, Feb.
15,10 a.m.-noon for returning players
and cheerleaders, and 12-2 p.m. open
registration. Cost: $200 There is a
sibling discount.

Flag football: Franz Ross
ParkYMCA's flag football for ages 7-9
& 10-13 begins March 17. Register
at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com, or call
941-629-9622.

PRESCHOOLERS
Franz Ross Park YMCA:
All Sport, Soccer andT-ball. Register in
person, online at CharlotteCountyYMCA.
corn or call 941-629-9622.


RUNNING
Foot Landing Running
Academy: Go from walker to
runner in six-week training program.
Cost: $35. Contact Scott and Krissy,
239-216-1355 or scottgobucks@aol.
com.

Harbour Heights 5K Run/
Walk: Feb. 22,8 a.m., at Harbour
Heights park. Entry fee: $15 (on or
before Feb. 8), $20 (Feb. 8 to race day).
Call 941-258-2890 or logon to www.
active.com.

SAILING
Charlotte Harbor
Multihull Association: For
multihull owners or those interested in
them. No dues. Meets first Monday of
each month 6 p.m. at Harpoon Harry's.
Visit http://groups.yahoo.com/group/
CHMA/or call Ron, 941-876-6667.

Punta Gorda Sailing
Club: Racing and cruising programs
for all ages. Call Bill, 781-910-3217 or
visit pgscweb.com.

SOCCER
Franz Ross Park YMCA:
Spring soccer for ages 7-9 and 9-13
starts March 18. Register in person or
online at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com.
For information, call 941-629-9622.

TOPSoccer: North Port
Youth Soccer program for ages 4
to 19 with disabilities. Eight-week
season starts March 8. Players receive
a uniform shirt and soccer ball as
well as a trophy celebration at the
end of the season. Middle and high
volunteers also needed to work with
the athletes. Register online at www.
northportyouthsoccer.org. Call Jennifer,
941-266-8454.

SOFTBALL
Carmalita Commercial
Softball League: Meets
Monday, 7 p.m., Celtic Ray Irish Pub,
145 E. Marion Ave, Punta Gorda. Call
Wayne, 941-916-6440.

SWIMMING
Charlotte County
Swimming:Year-round USA
Swimming team provides instruction
and competition ages 5 and up.
Visit www.ccswim.org or call Susan,
941-628-1510.

TENNIS
Free tennis clinic: Three-part
clinic on "doubles strategy" Feb. 15,
10 a.m., Rotonda Community Park
tennis courts. For information, email
Pete Zeeh at pete@zeeh.com or call
941-548-2447.

Instruction: Age 5 to adult,
at Franz Ross ParkYMCA. Register at
CharlotteCountyYMCA.com or call
941-629-9622.

Rotonda QuickStart: Free
lessons for parents and kids (12-under),
10-11 a.m. Saturday, Rotonda Park.
Rackets and balls provided. Call
941-698-9480.

VOLUNTEERS
Charlotte County Family
YMCA: Coaches, instructors and
referees needed for soccer, T-ball,
cheerleading and flag football. Contact
Dan, 941-629-9622 ext.108, or
dcormier@charlottecountyymca.com.
The Community Calendarappears daily
as space permits. To have your activity
published, fax (941-629-2085) ore-mail
(sports@sun-herald.com) event details to
the Sports Department at least one week in
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.


I


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014


pq






The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


OLYMPIC WATCH
American athletes to watch in Sochi: COUNTDOWN MILESTONE
YOUNG FACES GOING PLACES
Sarah Hendrickson, 19, ski
jumping: The 95- pound dynamo
already has won 22 World Cup medals 3 6
and was gold medalist at the 2013
and was gold medalistatthe 2013 Day until the opening ceremony in Sochi, Russia; the Age ofTodd Lodwick, who will be the U.S. flagbearer at
World Championships. She will be Olympic flame reached Sochi on Wednesday following a SOCHI 2014 Friday's opening ceremony; he's the first American to
competing just five months after 39,000-mile route, the longest in the history of the games compete in sixWinter Games (Nordic combined)
undergoing reconstructive knee surgery O 0
following a training crash.
Emery Lehman, 17,
speedskating: The high school senior
opened eyes when he caught and -, "!s .
passed 2010 Olympian Jonathan Kuck
to win the 10,000 meters at the U.S.
Olympic trials.Lehman alsoqualifiedr A. '
in the 5,000. Voisi er ed --
Mikaela Shiffrin, 18, alpine '_
skiing: The teen sensation is the
reigning world champion and World ,
Cup title- holder in slalom and also a B
medal contender in giant slalom In
five World Cup slalom races this season ,.
Shiffrin has won three times and 21 -
finished second once.
Maggie Voisin, 15, freeski
slopestyle: She's the youngest ..
member ofa U.S. Olympic team, winter
or summer, since 1996. Voisin earned
a silver medal during her first- ever X
Games last month and was named to
Team USA as a discretionary pick in the
new slopestyle event.
Gracie Gold, 18, figure skating:
The 2014 U.S. champion has the perfect
name for the top of the podium. NBC
has been promoting her as the face of
these Games, but can she deliver? New AP PHOTO
coach Frank Carroll helped Evan Lysacek
ci Fnk Crol he Canada's Patrick Chan goes through his routine during an Olympic figure skating practice Wednesday in Sochi, Russia.
win gold in 2010. as s t o e i
MARK THEM DOWN FOR A MEDAL
Ted Ligety: The 29- year- old Alpine
skier is a favorite to win gold in giant
slalom and "Ted Shred"should be a
contender in several other disciplines e s s o e n
as well. He had an outstanding 2013 s s e to in
season, winning three gold medals at Host Russia- with one opportunity to just go there representing
thee w oldchampionships. m skating medal contenders in the win a medal at the last Team USA but really
Shani Davis: The long- track team event women's, pairs and ice Olympics, we certainly actually be part of a
speedskater is the two-time defending itdance events- could cherish the opportunity team, because we never
Olympic champion in the 1,000 meters m akes its challenge if Evgeni to walk away with more get to experience that,"
and has won silver twice in the 1,500. Plushenko looks more than one." said Abbott, who is at his
He'll be the man to beat in those races debut like the skater who won The U.S. can likely second Olympics.
and could add a medal in the team silver at the 2010 Games count on a big score The national federa-
pursuit. By RACHEL COHEN than the one who fin- fromWhite and partner tions can wait to make
Shaun White: With Lindsey Vonn ASSOCIATED PRESS ished second at his own Meryl Davis, the reigning their picks for each
sidelined by a knee injury, the snow-
boarder is arguably the biggest name SOCHI, Russia national championships world champs, with good program, so injuries,
at the Winter Games. a e's the tw time AshleyWagner, a this year. balance in the other illness and momentum
defend intg Olympic gld m edalist in self-described vicious Plushenko, coming disciplines, could change preliminary
haltipe and hast on medal tint competitor, concedes it off back surgery, earned That will prove key plans. On Wednesday, Fthe
p an ha Won 1 G ames. will be a little strange to Russia's only men's spot because of a twist in Americans announced
SteWint Xmas fr cheer on fellow Americanc despite finishing behind the rules: Each country their selections for
Heather Richardson: Barring Gracie Gold. Maxim Kovtun at nation- can use a different entry Thursday's men's and
a huge upset, she'll be the first US Team figure skating als. The 2006 Olympic for the short and long pairs short programs,
woman to win a medal in long-track makes its debut today at champion was selected program in two of the with U.S. champions
speedskating since 2002. Richardson
steese 2 a ti03sworld.sprintchampison a the Olympics, one of the after impressing Russian disciplines. So strategy Marissa Castelli and









Olmias th:03wrdsritcapon
o the 50,100 ad 10 ath TV-friendly events held officials at a closed-door comes into play, as na- Simon Shnapir joining
won the 500, 1,000 and 1,500 at the
U.S. Olympic trials, a day before the opening performance. He already tional federations weigh Abbott.
U.SteveyHicomtr Hansbe ceremony. Ten coun- owns three medals, also the potential for high Wagner, a two-time











SteeHocm:| Heul cours raesconme
the first American since Billy Fiske










thefrsetiAmerOymica spincerBilly Fisk tri S SCAE will sen-ou-on-winin-siverin200. mrksagansttheriso UeS. championa whonc
(1928,1932) to win consecutive entry in each of the four American ice dancer wearing out top skaters struggled at nationals
gd medals in furman bobsled disciplines: men, women, Charlie White, who before individual events, this year, acknowledged
a impairs and ice dance. could leave Sochi with That's a particularly Wednesday that she was
and the first American in 78 years to The nation with the two more medals to go vexing problem for planning to skate the
win tw manold ad. H yucmb is an highest total score after with the silver he won in the men, whose short short program. Gold,
outstanding pilot and has one ofthe the short and long pro- Vancouver, said skaters program in singles is four this year's champ, could
best push crews in the world.
grams winsa- suddenly used to joke about how days after their team free replace her for the free
TEAM USA BYTHE NUMBERS giving figure skaters the athletes in other sports skate. U.S. champion skate.
230: U.S. team members, including chance at two medals at could win so many Jeremy Abbott will rep- But ifWagner performs
105 women and 125 men. It is the one Winter Games. medals. resent the Americans in brilliantly, that could
largest athlete delegation for any Canada is the favorite "Obviously that was the team short program make for an interesting
nation in the history ofthe Winter with three-time world something we grew up Thursday, but runner-up decision for U.S. Figure
Games. champion Patrick Chan with and part of what Jason Brown can replace Skating officials, since
106: Returning Olympians for and reigning ice dance made figure skating him in the free skate. the women's individual
the U.S., including one five-time Olympic gold medalists so special," he said. "It's really cool to be short program isn't until
Olympian, two four-timeOlympians, 10 TessaVirtue and Scott "But having only had part ofTeam USA, not Feb. 19.
three- time Olympians hceand 23 two- tec sxp sin. xctvdtimee
Olympians.
9 and 10: Women's bobsled push 0 OLYMPIC NOTEBOOK
athletes Lolo Jones and Lauryn Williams
become the ninth and 10th Americans
to compete in both the Winter and
Summer Games. Jones is a two-time

three-time Olympic sprinter. BY TH ASSOCIATED PRESS week. There's a chance
38: States represented. California the course's rough edges
claims the most Olympians with 20. KRASNAYA POLYANA, will have been smoothed
26: Average age of Team USA Russia- The ambitious ou y hn
members. The oldest and youngest slopestyle course that -The women begin qual-
Olympians are curler Ann Swisshelm, sent Shaun White sprint- ifying today. American
45, and freestyle skier Maggie Voisin, ing for the serenity and 2-. {Heidi Kloser, making her
15. apparent safety of the Olympic debut, called the
22: Members of Team USA who are halfpipe isn't the only core"calnin, u
parents; there are 19 fathers and three Olympic event at Sochi's pointed at improvements
mothers. Extreme Park turning .during three days of
6-5: Height of hockey forwa rd Blake heads and sending training
Wheeler, the tallest member of Team riders tumbling down the / I
USA. mountain. / Around the rings: Tampa
5-0: Height of figure skater Marissa Things have been Bay Lightning star Steven Stamkos
Castelli and short-track speedskater nearly as dicey in moguls. ,- will not play for Canada's hockey team
Jessica Smith, the shortest team The U.S. was among / -',- ....-in Sochi because he hasn't recovered
members. several countries to un- P ufcetyfo rknrgtlg
7: Sets of siblings on the team, successfully ask officials "sufiientlye fzroman broen rightnleg,
including twins Jocelyne and Monique Wednesday to tweak A PHOO general manager and Team Canada's
Lamoureux in women's hockey. Other the course, expressing APPOO executive director. ....


siblings are cross-country skiers Sadie concerns about unusual Canada's moguls skier Mikael Kingsbury flies over a jump during Billie Jean King will not attend
and Erik Bjornsen, curlers Erika and sequencing along the a training run on Wednesday in Krasnaya Polyna, Russia. Friday's opening ceremony because
Craig Brown, Nordic combined athletes 700-foot sprint across her mother is ill. King, selected to help
Bryan and Taylor Fletcher, snow- bumps and jumps that Still, Deneen admitted Things didn't go so well. lead the U.S. delegation to the Games,
boarders Arielle and Taylor Gold, hockey make for a unique mix- it was a "battle" when the During practice Tuesday has been outspoken in her opposition
players Amanda and Phil Kessel and ture of daredevil downhill U.S. team arrived for its the 26-year-old Deneen to Russia's anti-gay law....
figure skaters Maia and Alex Shibutani. racing and aerials, first practice earlier this caught an edge entering Protesters in cities around the
15: The United States will be "There's a lot of is- week. The course had the second of the course's world targeted major Olympic spon-
represented in all 15 disciplines across sues with the course," barely been completed two jumps and slammed sors, urging them to speak out against
seven sports and its athletes will American Patrick Deneen when the Americans into it. He underwent Russia's law restricting gay-rights
compete in as manyas94of the 98 said. popped on their skis and X-rays for an unspecified activities. Two more sponsors of the
medal events. Deneen, however, cau- went careening down the injury and plans to be U.S. Olympic team condemned the
-GaryD'Amato, tioned against confusing hill at speeds of up to 35 ready when the men's law, but leading global sponsors did
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel "issues" with "danger." mph. competition begins next not join them.


WHITE
FROM PAGE 1
with the loss of at least
one other headliner,
injured American skier
LindseyVonn.
White isn't leaving,
but his departure from
an event that was essen-
tially introduced at the
Olympics this year to
take advantage of his
star power certainly can't
make the folks at the IOC
or NBC too happy.
"He's a notable person
and he probably would
have brought more
viewers to slopestyle,"
said Nick Goepper, an
American who competes
in the skiing version of
the event.
IOC spokesman Mark
Adams downplayed the
idea that the course is too
dangerous.
"I don't think that's an
issue," he said. "A lot of
the athletes have said
they're very happy, they
like the venue."
Slopestyle qualifying
starts Thursday, the
day before the opening
ceremony.
Snowboarding's newest
and most-hyped Olympic
event is a judged sport -
a speed-packed trip down
the mountain, filled with
rails, bumps and, most
notably, steeply angled
jumps that allow riders to
flip two, sometimes three
times, before landing.
White hurt his wrist on
one of the takeoff ramps,
which were built "kind
of obnoxiously tall,"
according to one top
rider, Canadian Mark
McMorris.
White, who had already
hurt his shoulder and
ankle in the lead-up to
the Olympics, deemed his
latest injury the jammed
wrist as nothing serious
and said reports about
it were overblown. But
he said there remained
serious issues with the
slopestyle course.
"There are definitely
concerns about the
course," he said. "It's been
interesting to see how it's
developed and changed
over the past couple days.
The big question is if it
will continue to change.
Because every day, they
have riders meetings
and they give feedback.
Sometimes there's
changes, sometimes
there's not."
Reaction to White's
decision came from
several corners, not all of
it positive.
"Mr. White... It's easy to
find excuses to pull out
of a contest when you
think you can't win," said
Canadian rider Sebastian
Toutant in a tweet that
was later deleted.
Maybe so, butWhite
certainly wasn't alone in
questioning the course.
Australian Torah Bright,
the defending women's
halfpipe champion who
is trying to compete in
three events this year -
halfpipe, slopestyle and
a racer's version called
snowboardcross also
described an overly
treacherous few days of
training.
"We're here as the
world's best snow-
boarders," she told The
Associated Press. "Too
bad we don't have a
world-class course. The
craftsmanship doesn't
match the world-class
athletes that are here."
Out of slopestyle, White
will now focus solely on
next Tuesday's contest
in the halfpipe, which is
essentially a hollowed-out
ice shell with 22-foot


(7-meter) sidewalls.
There is danger there,
but unlike slopestyle, it's
based mostly on the types
of head-over-heels tricks
the riders try and not the
setup of the pipe.
"For me, I definitely feel
the halfpipe carries a bit
more weight, a bit more
pressure. I guess that's fair
enough to say," he said.


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3







Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, February 6,2014


I QUICK HITS

BECKHAM SEEKING
INVESTORS FOR MLS
TEAM, STADIUM

MIAMI -David
Beckham is bringing
the gift of Major League
Soccer to Miami.
Now he must deliver a
place for his team to play.
If there was a surprise
amid the festival atmo-
sphere of Wednesday's
announcement that the
British soccer legend has
exercised an option to
purchase an expansion
franchise to play in
Miami, it was how much
has to be done before the
yet-to-be-named team
plays its first game.
Beckham doesn't know
when it will begin play or
where it will be based. He
promised that construc-
tion of the stadium will be


privately funded, but said
he is still recruiting inves-
tors to make it happen.
"I think people maybe
were hoping we were
going to have the team
name (Wednesday), hop-
ing we were going to have
the stadium locked down.
Those things take time,"
he said. "The first big
decision we have to make,
which we'll make in the
next couple of months, is
the right investors."...
In Madrid, Real Madrid and


AUTO RACING

Force to be reckoned
with: John Force will try and add to
his record 138 career victories in the
season-opening NHRA WinterNationals
in Pomona, Calif. Courtney Force, who
topped the Funny Car field in last
year's race, is among the 64-year-old's
competitors. Qualifying starts today....
Morgan Shepherd will attempt
to become the oldest driver to race
in the Daytona 500 when he tries to
qualify later this month. Shepherd, 72,
became the oldest driver to compete
in a NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race last
..... ...... h i-. I, . .. L .-k i


* NHL TODAY

MAPLE LEAFS
AT LIGHTNING

WHO: Toronto (30-22-6) at
Tampa Bay (32-19-5)
WHEN: 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Tampa Bay Times
Forum, Tampa
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 103.9 FM, 970 AM,
1220 AM
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com
Da n uAII klrC


Barcelona had comfortable victories summer at new nampsnire. n LU vv IINuj
in the first legs of their Copa del Rey AT PANTHERS
semifinals. Real beatdefendingcham- HOCKEY WHO: Detroit (25-19-12)at
pion Atletico Madrid 3-0, extending F rid -2 -
its unbeaten streak to 22 games, and Crosby leads Penguins Florida (22-27-7)
Barcelona beat Real Sociedad 20.. to win: In Buffalo, N.Y., Sidney WHEN: 7:30 p.m.
Real Madrid forward Cristiano Crosby scored a highlight-reel goal, WHERE: BB&T Center,
Ronaldo has been suspended for three leading Pittsburgh to a 5-1 win over Sunrise

Spanish league games for receiving a the Sabres in a pre-Oympic tuneup TV: Fox Sports Florida
red card and then making a mocking against goalie Ryan Miller. RADIO: No local affiliate
gesture toward the match officials Contributing -Associated Press, TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com
during a game at Athletic Bilbao. South Florida Sun Sentinel


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
GOLF
11a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Joburg Open,
first round, at Johannesburg (same-day
tape)
3p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Pebble Beach National
Pro-Am,first round, at Pebble Beach, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7p.m.
ESPN Connecticut at Cincinnati
ESPN2 -LSU at Georgia
ESPNU -Robert Morris at LIU
9p.m.
ESPN -Oregon at Arizona
ESPN2 Penn St. at Michigan St.
ESPNU Murray St. at Belmont
FS1 -UTEP at East Carolina
11 p.m.
ESPNU- Santa Clara at BYU
FS1 -Oregon St. at Arizona St.
NBA BASKETBALL
8p.m.
TNT- San Antonio at Brooklyn
10:30 p.m.
TNT Chicago at Golden State
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
SUN -Toronto at Tampa Bay
FSFL-Detroit at Florida
WINTER OLYMPICS
At Sochi, Russia
All events taped unless noted as Live
NBC
8p.m.
Figure Skating (Team Event: Men's Short
Program, Pairs' Short Program); Men's and
Women's Snowboarding (Slopestyle Com-
petition); Women's Freestyle Skiing (Moguls
Competition)

Glantz-Culver Line
NCAA BASKETBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
atVCU 15 Rhode Island
at Cincinnati 7 UConn
Cleveland St. 1 at Oakland
UAB 21/2 at FlU
MiddleTenn. 21/2 at FAU
LSU 1 at Georgia
at Old Dominion 1112 UTSA
at Loyola of Chicago 3 Bradley
atTexas St. 5 La.-Monroe
NorthTexas 1 at Rice
Georgia St. 5 at UALR
atSMU 14 Temple
atTroy 1 South Alabama
atTexas-Arlington 1 La.-Lafayette
at LouisianaTech 10 Tulsa
UTEP 3 at East Carolina
at Utah 10 Washington
at Arizona 10 Oregon
at Michigan St. 12 Penn St.
at UC Davis 1 CS Northridge
at Pepperdine 2 Pacific
at UC Irvine 6 Long Beach St.
at UC Riverside 3 Cal St.-Fullerton
at San Diego 21/2 San Francisco
Saint Mary's (Cal) 4 at Loyola Mary.
at BYU 151/2 Santa Clara
at Arizona St. 81/2 Oregon St.
at Hawaii 51/2 UC Santa Barbara
at Appalachian St. 101/2 TheCitadel
atWofford 81/2 Georgia Southern
atElon 12 UNC Greensboro
Davidson 7 at Samford
SE Missouri 1 at SlU-Edwardsville
at E. Illinois 5 UT-Martin
atTennesseeSt. 11/2 Austin Peay
at S. Dakota St. 31/2 IPFW
at N. Dakota St. 23 IUPUI
at Rider 5 Marist
N. Colorado 11/2 at Idaho St.
at Belmont 8 Murray St.
at Montana St. 11/2 E.Washington
at Montana 11 Portland St.
atWeber St. 6 North Dakota
at Sacramento St. 11/2 N.Arizona
New Mexico St. 81/2 at Idaho
atLIU 1 Robert Morris
NBA
FAVORITE LINEO/U UNDERDOG
San Antonio 31/2(1961/2) at Brooklyn
atGolden State 71/2 (191) Chicago
NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at N.Y. Islanders-160 Calgary +140
atWashington -120 Winnipeg +100
at N.Y. Rangers -220 Edmonton +180
atPhiladelphia -115 Colorado -105
at Montreal -150 Vancouver +130
Detroit -120 at Florida +100
atTampa Bay -160 Toronto +140
at Ottawa -220 Buffalo +180
at St. Louis -150 Boston +130
atMinnesota -155 Nashville +135
atLosAngeles -155 Columbus +135

College basketball
MEN
Wednesday's results
SOUTH
Auburn 79, South Carolina 74
Chowan 80, Bluefield St. 66
Dayton 84, George Mason 67
High Point 77, Coastal Carolina 74
King (Tenn.)86, Erskine 49
Montevallo 77, Georgia College 66
Pittsburgh 59, Miami 55, OT
Presbyterian 77, Longwood 62
Radford 82, Charleston Southern 76
Randolph-Macon 76, Bridgewater (Va.) 60
Richmond 64, St. Bonaventure 62
South Florida 79, UCF 78, OT
Tusculum 80, Anderson (SC) 73
UNC Asheville 86, Campbell 73
Union (Ky.) 101, Point (Ga.) 74
VMI 108,Gardner-Webb 104,40T
Vanderbilt 64,Tennessee 60
Virginia 77, Boston College 67
Virginia St. 60, St. Augustine's 56
William &Mary 54, UNC Wilmington 50
EAST
Albany (NY) 73, Mass.-Lowell 56


Army70,Lehigh51
Boston U. 61, Navy 48
Buffalo 69, Ball St. 48
Delaware 67, Coll. of Charleston 64
GeorgeWashington 71, Duquesne 57
Lafayette 66, Bucknell 58
Loyola (Md.) 62, American U. 58
Northeastern 81, Hofstra 73
Saint Louis 65, Saint Joseph's 49
Susquehanna 100,Goucher 97,20T
UMBC 68, New Hampshire 57
UMass 79, La Salle 67
West Virginia 91, Oklahoma 86, OT
MIDWEST
Akron 52, E. Michigan 48
Beloit 69, Lake Forest 60
Cent. Michigan 78, Kent St. 73, OT
Green Bay81, Ill.-Chicago 70
Illinois St. 76, N. Iowa 65
Michigan 79, Nebraska 50
Missouri St. 66, Evansville 54
Nebraska-Omaha 86, Peru St. 62
St. Norbert 79, Lawrence 69
Toledo 83, Bowling Green 76
W. Michigan 90, Ohio 74
Wright St. 77,Youngstown St. 67
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas 65, Alabama 58
WEST
No scores reported
WOMEN
Wednesday's results
SOUTH
Bluefield St. 72,Chowan 62
Bryan 81, Columbia (SC) 70
Clayton St. 62,GRU Augusta 42
East Carolina 66, Marshall 52
Georgia College 87, Montevallo 52
King (Tenn.) 64, Erskine 49
Lenoir-Rhyne 69, Coker 60
Lincoln Memorial 73, Carson-Newman 68
Maryville (Tenn.) 99, Covenant 47
Milligan 61,Truett-McConnell 44
Old Dominion 65,Tulsa 53
Point (Ga.) 73, Union (Ky.) 67
South Florida 71, Memphis 58
Southern Miss. 68, MiddleTennessee 56
Tulane 56, North Texas 55
UAB94,FAU91,OT
Virginia St. 69, St. Augustine's 68
EAST
American U. 63, Loyola (Md.) 38
Armyat Lehigh, ppd.
George Washington 80, Duquesne68
Holy Cross 79, Colgate 56
La Salle 66, George Mason 60
Lafayette 87, Bucknell 64
Maine 69,Vermont 52
Navy 68, Boston U. 57
Philadelphia 82,Wilmington (Del.) 73
Rhode Island 73, UMass 64
St. Bonaventure 73, Saint Joseph's 67
Stony Brook 62, Binghamton 42
Susquehanna 69, Goucher 52
Villanova 72, Providence 66
MIDWEST
Akron 71, N. Illinois 67
Alma atTrine,ppd.
Aquinas 78, Cornerstone 64
Bowling Green 72,W. Michigan 50
Concordia (Moor.) 58, St. Olaf 49
Creighton 75, Georgetown 61
Davenport 90, Michigan-Dearborn 52
Dayton 73,VCU 69
DePaul78, Xavier 49
Doane 65, Hastings62
Ford ham 56, Saint Louis 45
Hope 96, Kalamazoo 54
Madonna 99, LawrenceTech 84
Marquette 62, Seton Hall 60
Michigan St. 69, lllinois53
Nebraska 71,Wisconsin 70, OT
Olivet 77, Albion 66
Siena Heights at Lourdes, ppd.
St. John's 58, Butler 55
TCU 61, Iowa St. 60
Wright St. 93, Youngstown St. 81
SOUTHWEST
FlU 53, UTSA40
Oklahoma St. 76, Kansas 74
Texas 88, Texas Tech 51
Texas St. 75, Louisiana-Monroe 70
WestTexas A&M 95, Angelo St. 56
WEST
No scores reported

Pro basketball
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic W L Pet GB
Toronto 26 22 .542 -
Brooklyn 21 25 .457 4
NewYork 19 30 .388 712
Boston 17 33 .340 10
Philadelphia 15 35 .300 12
Southeast W L Pet GB
HEAT 34 13 .723 -
Atlanta 25 23 .521 91/2
Washington 24 24 .500 101/2
Charlotte 22 28 .440 131/2
MAGIC 14 37 .275 22
Central W L Pet GB
Indiana 38 10 .792 -
Chicago 24 24 .500 14
Detroit 19 29 .396 19
Cleveland 16 33 .327 221/2
Milwaukee 9 39 .188 29
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest W L Pet GB
San Antonio 36 13 .735 -
Houston 33 17 .660 31/2
Dallas 29 21 .580 71/2
Memphis 26 22 .542 91/2
NewOrleans 21 27 .438 141/2
Northwest W L Pet GB
Oklahoma City 40 11 .784 -
Portland 35 14 .714 4
Denver 23 23 .500 141/2
Minnesota 24 25 .490 15
Utah 16 32 .333 221/2
Pacific W L Pet GB
L.A. Clippers 34 17 .667 -
Golden State 29 20 .592 4
Phoenix 29 20 .592 4
LA Lakers 17 32 .347 16
Sacramento 16 32 .333 1612
Tuesday's results


Indiana 89, Atlanta 85
Minnesota 109, L.A. Lakers99
Chicago 101, Phoenix 92
Charlotte91,Golden State 75
Wednesday's results
MAGIC 112, Detroit 98
Boston 114, Philadelphia 108
San Antonio 125,Washington 118,20T
LA. Lakers 119,Cleveland 108
Houston 122, Phoenix 108
Oklahoma City 106, Minnesota 97
Dallas 110, Memphis 96
New Orleans 105, Atlanta 100
Portland 94, New York90
Milwaukee at Denver, late
Toronto at Sacramento, late
HEATat L.A. Clippers, late
Today's games
San Antonio at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
SFriday's games
Oklahoma City at MAGIC, 7p.m.
Portland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Cleveland atWashington, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Brooklyn at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Denver at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at New Orleans, 9:30 p.m.
Toronto at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

Pro hockey


Charlotte at Abbotsford, late
Today's games
No games scheduled
Friday's games
Syracuse at Springfield, 7 p.m.
Grand Rapids atToronto, 7 p.m.
Hershey at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Portland atW-B/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.
Hartford at Norfolk, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Lake Erie, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.
Utica at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Iowa, 8:05 p.m.

Tennis
ATP ROYAL GUARD OPEN
At Club Naval de Campo Las Salinas,
Vina del Mar, Chile
Purse: $467,800 (WT250)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
First Round
HoracioZeballos, Argentina,def.Gonzalo
Lama, Chile, 6-3,6-3.
Second Round
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Tommy
Robredo (2), Spain, 3-6,7-6 (8), 6-4A
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (7), Spain, def.
Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 3-6,7-5,6-4.
Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Marcel
Granollers (4), Spain, 7-6 (7), 7-6 (2).


ATP OPEN SUD DE FRANCE
NHL At Arena Montpellier,
EASTERN CONFERENCE UC:
EASTERN CONFERENCE Montpellier, France
Atlantic Division Purse: $654,900 (WT250)
GP W LOT Pts GF GA Surface:Hard-Indoor
Boston 55 36 16 3 75 167 120 Singles
LIGHTNING 56 3219 5 69163 139 FirstRound
Montreal 57 30 21 6 66 139 139 Joao Sousa, Portugal, def.Tobias Kamke,
Toronto 58 30 22 6 66 171 180 Germany,3-6,6-1,6-4.
Detroit 56 25 19 12 62 146 158 Jarkko Nieminen (6), Finland, def. Alek-
Ottawa 57 25 21 11 61164 182 sandr Nedovyesov, Kazakhstan, 4-6, 6-2,
PANTHERS 56 2227 7 51137 175 64
Buffalo 56 15 33 8 38 108 169
Buffalo 56 15 33 8 38 108 Gael Monfils (5), France, def. Lukasz
Metropolitan Division Kubot, Poland, 6-4,4-6,6-3.
GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dustin Brown, Germany, def. Teymuraz
Pittsburgh 57 40 15 2 82 183 134 Gabashvili, Russia,4-6,6-1,7-6(1).
N.Y Rangers 57 31 23 3 65 150 141 Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, def. Julien
Columbus 56 29 23 4 62 167 156 Benneteau(8),France,7-(6), 7-5
^^ ^M~^Ben neteau (8), France, 7-6(6), 7-5.
Philadelphia 57 28 23 6 62 157 165 Edouard Roger-Vasselin (7), France, def.
Carolina 55 25 21 9 59 138 153 MichalPrzysiezny, Poland,7-6 (3),6-3.
NewJersey 57 23 21 13 59 133 142
Washington 57 25 23 9 59 164 173
^"T ^ l^}}7^ ATP PBZ ZAGREB INDOORS
NY Islanders 58 22 28 8 52 160 191
WESTERN CONFERENCE At Dom Sportova, Zagreb, Croatia
Central DvPurse: $654,900 (WT250)
CentralDvson Surface: Hard-Indoor
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Singles
Chicago 58 34 10 14 82 205 161 FirstRound
St. Louis 55 37 12 6 80 189 130
Colorado 56 36 15 5 77 168 148 Daniel Evans, Britain, def. Jan Hajek,
Minnesota 58 30 21 7 67 142 145 Czech Republic,6-3,6 1
Dallas 56 26 21 9 61161 161 Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Lukas Rosol (6),
Dallas 56 26 21 9 61 161 161 ul T ()
Winnipeg 58 28 25 5 61163 167 Czech Republic,6-3,7-6 (2).
Nashville 57 25 23 9 59 142 172 AndreyGolubev, Kazakhstan, def Victor
Pacific Division Hanescu, Romania, 7-6 (6), 4-6,7-6 (5).
GP W L OT Pts GF GA Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, def. Sergiy
Anaheim 58 40 13 5 85 191 143 Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-4,7-6 (8)
San Jose 57 35 16 6 76 170 139 Igor Sijsling (8), Netherlands, def. BlazKa-
Los Angeles 58 30 22 6 66 137 127 vcic, Slovenia, 6-7 (4), 63,64
Vancouver 58 2722 9 63 143 152 Second Round
Phoenix 56 26 20 10 62 160 167 Manrin Cilic (5), Croatia, def. Dusan Lajovic,
Calgary 56 21 28 7 49 132 175 Serbia,6-4,7-5.
Edmonton 58 19 33 6 44 150 196
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for Transactions
overtime loss.
Tuesday's results BASEBALL
Ottawa 5, St. Louis 4, SO American League
Boston 3,Vancouver 1 BALTIMORE ORIOLES Named Dave
N.Y Rangers 5, Colorado 1 Machemer special assignment scout, Jeff
Winnipeg 2, Carolina 1 Stevens ad Dan Durst amateur scouts, Ray
Montreal 2,CalgaryO Naimoli senior manager of corporate part-
PANTHERS 4,Toronto 1 nership sales, Cathy Jerome senior manag-
N.Y Islanders 1,Washington 0 er of partnership marketing and Bill Marri-
Minnesota 2, LIGHTNING 1 ott manager ofcoporate partnership sales.
Dallas3,Phoenixl CLEVELAND INDIANS Agreed to
Wednesday's results terms with 1 B/OF Bryan LaHair on a minor
Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 1 league contract.
ChicagoatAnaheim, late TEXAS RANGERS Announced RHP
Dallas at San Jose, late Chaz Roe rejected outright assignment and
Today's games elected free agency
Calgary at N.Y Islanders, 7 p.m. National League
Edmonton at N.Y. Rangers, 7p.m. LOS ANGELES DODGERS Agreed
Colorado at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ io
Colorado at Philadelphia, 7 p~m. to terms with INF Justin Turner on a minor
Winnipeg atWashington, 7p.m. league contract
Vancouver at Montreal, 7:30 p.m. NEW YORKMETS -Named Haeda Mi-
Buffalo at Ottawa, 7:30p.m. haltses executive director, external affairs.
Toronto at LIGHTNING, 7:30 p.m. WASHINGTON NATIONALS Agreed
nrf~* > DAMMPR 7.i nmWASHINGTON NATIONALS Agreed
Detroit at PANTHERS, 7:30 p.m. to termswith C Koyie Hill on a minor league
Boston at St Louis, 8pm contract.
Nashville at Minnesota, 8 p.m. cnTA
Columbus at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. National BasKETBAssociation
NainlBasketball Association
Friday's games
EdmontonatNewJersey, 7p.m. PHILADELPHIA76ERS- Recalled G Lo
N.Y Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. renzo Brown from Delaware (NBADL).
PANTHERS at Carolina, 7 p.m. FOOTBALL
Chicago at Phoenix 9pm National Football League
Columbus at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. ATLANTA FALCONS Released CB As-
C. .u....Imb.__1e_ i___ ,_lp


ECHL
Wednesday's results
Kalamazoo 3, Elmira 2, SO
Utah at Idaho, late
Stockton at Ontario, late
Colorado at LasVegas, late
Today's game
Gwinnett at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Friday's games
Greenville at South Carolina, 7 p.m.
Gwinnett at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Toledo at Cincinnati, 7:35 p.m.
Kalamazoo at Fort Wayne, 8:05 p.m.
Elmira at Evansville,8:15 p.m.
Colorado at Idaho, 9:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Ontario, Cancelled
Bakersfield at Ontario, 10 p.m.
Utah at LasVegas, 10:05 p.m.
Stockton at Alaska, 11:15 p.m.
AHL
Wednesday's results
Toronto 5, San Antonio 4, SO
St. John's 4, Providence 3, SO
Lake Erie 4, Grand Rapids 0
Syracuse 4, Rochester 1
Portland 5, Binghamton 1
Hamilton at Milwaukee, late
Utica at Iowa, late


ante Samuel ana LD Stepnen Nicnolas.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS-- Named Mike
Neu quarterbacks coach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
MINNESOTA WILD Traded C Chad
Rau to San Jose for RW Curt Gogol.
American Hockey League
NORFOLK ADMIRALS Returned F
Chad Painchaud to South Carolina (ECHL).
TORONTO MARLIES Signed F Kory
Nagy to a professional tryout contract. Re-
called F Mike Duco from Orlando (ECHL).
COLLEGE
AMERICAN ATHLETIC CONFERENCE -
Named Carlos Padilla II executive directorof
the Miami Beach Bowl.
FLORIDA STATE- Named Charles Kelly
defensive coordinator.
IOWA STATE Named Mark Mangino
tight ends coach and offensive coordinator,
Tommy Mangino wide receivers coach and
Brandon Blaney offensive line coach. Pro-
moted wide receivers coach Todd Sturdyto
quarterbacks coach.
RPI Named Joe Schoenleber strength
and conditioning coach.
WISCONSIN Announced the resigna-
tion of running backs coach and recruiting
coordinatorThomas Hammock.


* NBA ROUNDUP




Oladipo spurs




Magic to win


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORLANDO Rookie
Victor Oladipo came off
the bench to score 20
points and Glen Davis had
18, leading the Orlando
Magic to a 112-98 victory
against the Detroit Pistons
on Wednesday night.
Josh Smith scored 25
points for the Pistons, who
fell behind by 20 points in
the third quarter.
Maurice Harkless' nine
rebounds led the Magic
to a 44-36 advantage over
the NBAs top rebounding
team.
Kyle O'Quinn blocked
six shots for Orlando,
including two straight by
Brandon Jennings when
the Pistons were attempt-
ing to come back in the
third quarter.

MAGIC 112, PISTONS 98
DETROIT (98)
Smith 11-19 3-9 25, Monroe 6-11 0-0 12,
Drummond 6-10 3-5 15, Jennings 5-23 3-4
15, Singler3-52-2 11,Stuckey6-13 1-1 14,
Jerebko 1-1 2-2 4, Bynum 0-2 0-0 0, Cald-
well-Pope 0-0 0-0 0, Datome 1-1 0-0 2. To-
tals 39-85 14-23 98.
ORLANDO (112)
Harris 3-6 3-4 9, Davis 8-122-2 18,Vucevic
6-13 2-2 14, Nelson 2-6 2-2 7, Afflalo 5-14
2-2 15, Harkless 5-11 3-3 15, O'Quinn 4-8
0-0 8, Oladipo 8-10 4-4 20, Moore 2-5 0-1
4,Lamb 1-4 0-0 2.Totals44-89 18-20112.
Detroit 26 17 31 24 98
Orlando 26 31 31 24-112
3-Point Goals-Detroit 6-20 (Singler 3-4,
Jennings 2-10, Stuckey 1-2, Smith 04), Or-
lando6-18 (Afflalo3-6, Harkless 2-4, Nelson
1-2, Moore 0-1,Oladipo 0-1, Lamb 0-2, Har-
ris 0-2). Fouled Out-None. Rebounds-
Detroit 46 (Drummond 14), Orlando 56
(Harkless 9). Assists-Detroit 19 (Jennings
10), Orlando 29 (Nelson 11). Total Fouls-
Detroit 20, Orlando 20. Technicals-Or-
lando defensive three second. A-15,166
(18,500).


THUNDER
AT MAGIC
WHO: Oklahoma City (40-11)
at Orlando (14-37)
WHEN: Friday, 7 p.m.
WHERE: Amway Center, Orlando
TV: Fox Sports Florida
RADIO: 1010 AM, 1280 AM,
1480 AM
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com

HEAT AT JAZZ
WHO: Miami (34-13) at Utah
(16-32)
WHEN: Saturday, 9 p.m.
WHERE: EnergySolutions Arena,
Salt Lake City
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 99.3 FM


12th time in their last 13 games with a
victory over a Minnesota team without
Kevin Love and two other starters.

Celtics 114, 76ers 108:
In Philadelphia, Jeff Green scored 17
of his 36 points in the third quarter in
Boston's victory over the 76ers.

Lakers 119, Cavaliers
108: In Cleveland, depleted Los
Angeles had to keep Robert Sacre on
the court after he fouled out, drawing
a technical, but the Lakers still won for
the first time in two weeks.

Spurs 125, Wizards 118,
20T: In Washington, Tim Duncan
scored a season-high 31 points, and
San Antonio beat the Wizards for an
NBA-high 16th time in a row.


Thunder 106, T'wolves Pelicans 105, Hawks 100:
97: In Oklahoma City, Kevin Durant In New Orleans, Anthony Davis had 27
had 26 points, nine rebounds and seven points and 10 rebounds as the Pelicans
assists and the Thunder won for the beat Atlanta.



* COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP



No. 25 Pitt tips




Miami in OT


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CORAL GABLES-
Lamar Patterson came
up with a big basket to
help send the game to
overtime. When overtime
came, he took over.
Patterson scored 10 of
his 25 points in overtime
to help No. 25 Pittsburgh
end a two-game losing
streak with a 59-55 victory
over Miami on Wednesday
night.
"Being a senior leader I
didn't want to just become
a ghost when it came to
overtime," he said.
Patterson knocked
down a 3-pointer, made a
layup, and converted 5 of
6 from the free throw line
in the extra 5 minutes for
Pitt (19-4, 7-2 ACC).
Miami (11-11, 2-7)
appeared to have momen-
tum, but went just 1 for 6
from the free throw line in
the closing minutes.

PITTSBURGH 59, MIAMI 55, OT
PITTSBURGH (19-4,7-3 ACC)
Robinson 2-71-2 5,Young 2-6 0-0 4,Wright
4-11 4-4 12, Patterson 6-14 9-12 25, Zanna
3-7 4-6 10, Artis 0-3 1-21, Randall 0-0 0-0 0,
Jones 0-2 0-0 0, Newkirk 1-4 0-0 2.Totals 18-
5419-2659.
MIAMI (11-11, 2-7 ACC)
Reed 1-9 1-2 4, Lecomte 2-7 4-6 8, Kirk
0-4 0-0 0, Jekiri 1-3 1-2 3, Adams 4-11 2-5
10, Akpejiori 0-0 2-2 2, Brown 7-143-5 21,
Swoope3-3 1-37, KellyO -100) O.Totals 18-
5214-2555.
Halftime-Pittsburgh 29-28. End Of Reg-
ulation-Tied 46. 3-Point Goals-Pitts-
burgh 4-14 (Patterson 4-7,Jones 0-1,Young
0-1,Wright 0-1, Robinson 0-1, Newkirk 0-1,
Artis 0-2), Miami 5-20 (Brown 4-9, Reed 1-3,
Kirk 0-1, Kelly 0-1, Lecomte 0-3, Adams 0-3).
Fouled Out-None. Rebounds-Pitts-
burgh 37 (Wright 9), Miami 43 (Adams 6).
Assists-Pittsburgh 9 (Patterson 4), Miami
9 (Brown 3). Total Fouls-Pittsburgh 20,
Miami 20. A-NA.


STATE SCHEDULE
TODAY
North Florida at Stetson, 7 p.m.
Alabama-Birmimgham at
Florida International, 7 p.m.
Middle Tennessee at Florida
Atlantic, 7 p.m.
Jacksonville at Florida Gulf
Coast, 7:05 p.m.

EAGLES PERCH
Check out Zach Miller's FGCU
pregame report today at
suncoastsportsblog.com

0-0 0, Heath 0-0 0-0 0, Hawkins 0-1 0-0 0,
Perry4-82-5 10.Totals34-679-1879.
UCF(9-11)
Spurlock 2-8 0-0 5, Blair 3-4 2-3 8, Sykes
10-20 4-9 24, Newell 4-9 1-1 9, Goodwin
2-2 0-0 5,Walker 1-2 0-0 2,Williams 4-6 0-0
12,Karell 1-10-1 2,HaneyO-00-00,Wilson
4-8 2-4 11, McBride 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-60
9-1878.
Halftime-South Florida 37-36. End Of
Regulation-Tied 70. 3-Point Goals-
South Florida 2-6 (Rudd 1-1, Allen Jr. 1-2,
Hawkins 0-1, McLendon 0-1, Abdul-Aleem
0-1), UCF 7-20 (Williams 4-6, Goodwin 1-1,
Spurlock 1-4, Wilson 1-4, Sykes 0-2, Newell
0-3). Fouled Out-Perry Rebounds-
South Florida 41 (Rudd 10), UCF 32 (Sykes
12). Assists-South Florida 16 (McLendon
6), UCF 14 (Sykes 5). Total Fouls-South
Florida 20, UCF 16. A-6,108.

No. 10 Michigan 79,
Nebraska 50: In Ann Arbor, Mich.,
freshman Zak Irvin scored all 16 of his
points in the first half, and Michigan
(17-5,9-1 Big Ten) breezed past
Nebraska (11-10,3-6).

No. 13 Saint Louis
65, Saint Joseph's 49: In
Philadelphia, Rob Loe scored 17 points
to help Saint Louis (21-2,8-0 Atlantic
10) beat Saint Joseph's (15-7,5-3) for a
team-record 15th consecutive victory.

No. 20Virainia 77.


South Florid 79, Boston College 67: In
South F lorida 79, Central Charlottesville, Va., Malcolm Brogdon
Florida 78, OT: In rlando, had17pointsacareer-best11
Shemiye McLendon made a free throw had 1 points, a career best II
with 0.8 seconds left in overtime rebounds and seven assists and Virginia
togive South Florida (1211,3 (18-5,9-1 ACC) beat BC (6-16,2-7).
to give South Florida (1 2-11, 3-7
American) a victory over rival Central West Virginia 91, No.
Florida (9-11,1-8). 21 Oklahoma 86, OT: In

USF 79, UCF 78, OT Morgantown,W.Va., Eron Harris scored
SOUTH FLORIDA (12-11) 26 of his 28 points after halftime
Rudd 11-192-425,LeDay4-40-08,Egbunu andWestVirinia (14-9 6-4Bi 1)
4-6 1-2 9, Allen Jr. 3-8 0-0 7, McLendon 1-6 an WesVirginia (14 9,6 4Big 12)
1-2 3, Brock 7-13 3-5 17, Abdul-Aleem 0-2 outlasted Oklahoma (17-6,6-4).


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014






The Sun /Thursday, February 6,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


National Signing Day


AROUND THE STATE

Florida State
TALLAHASSEE (AP) National champion Florida
State added two highly touted receivers and one of the
top running backs in the country on national signing
day. The Seminoles put together another highly ranked
recruiting class and brought in plenty of offensive talent
to surround Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston.
Both Rivals.com and Scout.com ranked the 28-man
class No. 4 in the country while ESPN ranked it No. 3.
Receivers Ermon Lane (6-foot-3,200 pounds) and Travis
Rudolph (6-2,190), will join already enrolled running back
Dalvin Cook, Florida's 2013 Mr. Football, as the next wave o
offensive skill players at Florida State. Rudolph is ranked thE
No. 1 receiver by Rivals.com while Lane is rated a five-star
recruit by both Rivals.com and Scout.com.
Strong-armed quarterback J.J. Cosentino was the lone
signal-caller. Fisher needed at least one more quarterback
after Jacob Coker transferred to Alabama.

NATIONAL RANKINGS (RIVALS 4; SCOUT 4)
Best in class: Dalvin Cook, RB, Miami Central HS
Best of the rest: Ermon Lane, WR, Homestead HS;
Travis Rudolph, WR, Cardinal Newman HS
Late addition: Ja'Von Harrison, WR, Kathleen HS, hai
been committed to Virginia Tech.
One that got away: Malik McDowell, DE, Southfield
(Mich.) HS.


Florida
GAINESVILLE (AP) Florida's first losing season since
1979 did little, if anything, to affect recruiting.
Coach Will Muschamp put the finishing touches on
another top-10 signing class of 24 players who could help
the program rebound after going 4-8 in 2013. It includes
nine players already on campus who will contribute during
spring practice. CornerbackJalen Tabor from Washington,
D.C., and quarterbackWill Grier from Davison, N.C., are the
most decorated of the early enrollees.
Muschamp added 15 players, highlighted by
quarterback Treon Harris from Miami, cornerbackJ.C.
Jackson from Immokalee and defensive lineman Gerald
Willis from New Orleans. The class includes six offensive
linemen, five defensive linemen and three tight ends.
Florida signed one running back and two receivers.

NATIONAL RANKINGS (RIVALS 7; SCOUT 10)
Best in class: Jalen Tabor, CB, Washington, D.C.
Already enrolled in school, Tabor is a significant addition
since starting CBs Loucheiz Purifoy and Marcus Roberson
left school early for the NFL.
Best of the rest: David Sharpe, OL, Jacksonville.
Sharpe should help fill the team's biggest need.
Late addition: Treon Harris, QB, Miami. Coach Will
Muschamp convinced Harris to switch from FSU to Florida
One that got away: Adoree'Jackson, ATH, Gardena,
Calif. A budding track star, Jackson probably would have
given Florida a top-five class. But he chose USC.


Miami
CORAL GABLES (AP)- Miami's 26-player recruiting
class is widely touted as its best since Al Golden became
coach. The group is notable for the depth of talent
rather than for elite recruits. Golden did overcome stiff
competition to land several players, but he also missed out
on some of South Florida's best prospects.
The Hurricanes added two highly regarded quarter-
backs in Brad Kaaya and Malik Rosier, addressed thin
depth on defense and bulked up in the offensive line.

NATIONAL RANKINGS (RIVALS 12; SCOUT 11)
Best in class: Brad Kaaya, QB, West Hills, Calif.
Best of the rest: Malik Rosier, QB, Mobile, Ala.;
Trevor Darling, OL, Miami; Joseph Yearby, RB, Miami; KC
McDermott, OT, Wellington; Chad Thomas, DE, Miami;
Michael Wyche, DT, East L.A. College.
Late addition: David Njoku, a 215-pound wide
receiver and tight end from Cedar Grove, N.J.
One that got away: Travonte Valentine, a 335-pounc
defensive tackle from Hialeah, signed with LSU.


South Florida
TAMPA (AP) Quarterback Quinton Flowers is the
centerpiece of a recruiting class that coach Willie Taggart
is counting on to help South Florida get back on track.
The Bulls finished at the bottom of the American
Athletic Conference in total offense and scoring.
A class of 28 recruits also includes highly regarded
running backs Marion Mack and D'Ernest Johnson, as well
as receiver Tyre McCants and defensive end Vincent Jackson

NATIONAL RANKINGS: (RIVALS 39; SCOUT 46)
Best in class: Quinton Flowers, QB, Miami.
Best of the rest: Marion Mack, RB, 6-0,195, Sarasota;
Vincent Jackson, DE, Tampa; Tyre McCants, WR, Niceville;
D'Ernest Johnson, RB, Immokalee; Jimmy Bayes, LB,
Immokalee.
Late addition: Jackson, who didn't announce his
decision until signing day.
One that got away: Denzel Ward, ot, Chicago, who
selected Syracuse over the Bulls.


Central Florida
ORLANDO (AP)-- Hoping to maintain the momentum
coming off a record-breaking 12-win season and Fiesta Bowl
victory, UCF signed 17 players for its 2014 recruiting class.
Knights coach George O'Leary said he is pleased with
the defensive-heavy group overall, calling it the best he's
had at UCF from a height, weight and speed standpoint.
Nine of the new recruits are on defense. Nine players
come from Georgia, with seven hailing from Florida.

NATIONAL RANKINGS (RIVALS 74; SCOUT 73)
Best in class: Kyle Gibson, DB, Tampa. Gibson was


given a four-star rating by Rivals.com, which also ranked
him as the No. 16 cornerback in the nation.
Best of the rest: Mike Rogers, DB, Smyrna (Ga.-
Rogers was the No. 32 ranked ATH in the nation by Rivals,
Late addition: Chris Williams, DB, St. Mary's (Ga.). He
originally committed to Alabama in March.
One that got away: Chris Nelson, DT, Lakeland.
Nelson wound up choosing to play for the Longhorns.


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Evans dons an Alabama cap as he commits to play football for the Crimson Tih
signing day Wednesday in Auburn, Ala.




ama rules aga


e lead in 5-star recruits; USC su


RALPH D. RUSSO
SOCIATED PRESS
fring day,
ia is still No. 1.
on without a na-
hampionship on
Didn't slow down
ick Saban on the
ig trail. The five-
ispects flocked to
osa, including one
int to high school
rn.
hal signing day
ches up at the
dawn and fax
es beeping on
campuses around
entry though
d more recruits
eir national letter
t these days.
were donned, a
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mand mostly the
richer: National
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rks.
s usual, most
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None better
bama. The
i Tide sat atop the


rankings for Rivals, Scout,
247sports and ESPN.
Alabama signed six of
33 players given five-star
ratings by Rivals, includ-
ing Rashaan Evans, a
linebacker from Auburn
High School who didn't
decide to roll with the
Tide until Wednesday,
passing joining his
hometown Tigers.
No other school
had more than three
five-stars.
"He kind of lapped the
field," Tom Lemming of
CBS Sports Network said
about Saban.
This marks the third
straight year and fifth
time in the last six years
Alabama has Rivals' top-
ranked class.

SARK ATTACK: Southern
California's first signing day with Steve
Sarkisian as coach could not have
gone much better. Three of the high-
est-rated players that entered the day
undecided picked the Trojans, starting
with 360-pound offensive lineman
Damien Mama from Bellflower, Calif.
Next up was Adoree'Jackson
from Gardena, Calif. The five-star
cornerback put his own spin on the
pick-a-hat announcement ceremony
by digging through a shopping
bag for his choice. He pulled out a
sports drink, a sneaker, some other


stuff, before slapping or
The theatrics fell a bit fil
doubt Trojans coaches a
entertained in the end.
Finally, it was John S
known as Juju, from Lor
Calif., picking USC over
Dame and UCLA.
The strong finish hac
10th in the nation by Ri

ODDS AND ENDS: N
State coach James Frank
signing a top-25 class thi
five players who had be
to Vanderbilt when Fran
there. ...
Franklin's departure i
Vanderbilt's class. NewC
coach Derek Mason did
lure one stud recruit, de
Nifae Lealao from Sacra
to Vandy. Lealalo had w
Stanford....
Charlie Strong's first
was not quite up to the
top-10 standards. More
Strong's ties to SEC count
the Longhorns hope wil
reach in the near future
defensive tackle Poona F
Hilton Head, S.C. Mean
A&M's class drew consei
grades. ...
D.J. Law, a three-star
could end up at receiver
back, submitted signed
intent to both Utah and
schools are trying to sor
fix this problem.


C stays on top of recruit


FTEVE MEGARGEE
SOCIATED PRESS


southeastern
nce dominates
ng as thoroughly
es the rest of
football.
schools filled seven
p nine spots in
Sports Composite
ig rankings,
equally weigh the
of all the major
ig services. Last
ven SEC programs
imong the top 13

na led the way by
g atop the team
gs for a fourth
tive year.
he nature of our
ice," Tennessee
utch Jones said.
vhy it's the most
tive conference in
entry "
WC landed most
p talent in its
*itory and made
ct across the


According to the
247Sports Composite,
SEC schools landed the
No. 1 prospect in the
state in such non-SEC
areas as Arizona (Texas
A&M quarterback Kyle
Allen), Iowa (Alabama
offensive tackle Ross
Pierschbacher), Illinois
(LSU linebacker Clifton
Garrett), Oklahoma
(Alabama quarterback
David Cornwell), Virginia
(Alabama defensive end
Da'Shawn Hand) and
Wyoming (Florida offen-
sive tackle Taven Bryan).
Six of the top eight
pro-style quarterbacks in
the 247Sports Composite
signed with SEC schools:
Allen, Will Grier (Florida),
Cornwell, Jacob Park
(Georgia), Drew Barker
(Kentucky) and Sean
White (Auburn).

BIGGEST SURPRISES: Tennessee
had its fourth straight losing season
last fall and Kentucky went 2-10, yet
both teams signed their top classes
in recent memory. Tennessee kept


the state's top players al
something that had bee
in recent years. Kentuck
prize quarterback prosp
- a home-state produ
also made plenty of inrc
Ohio.

IMPACT PLAYER: L
Fournette should step ir
the Tigers replace 1,400
Jeremy Hill. Georgia's To
and Keith Marshall and
TJ.Yeldon have shown r
SEC running backs can r
impacts as freshmen. Fc
rated as the nation's No.
prospect in the 247Spor

PLAYERS TO WATCH
A&M has a couple of the
and defensive end Myle
Allen already has enroll
participate in spring pra
legitimate shot at replay
the 2012 Heisman Troph
Defensive end Myles Ga
nation's No. 2 overall pnro
247Sports Composite, shi
the pass rush of a Texas
that allowed the most p
yards per game of any S
season.


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points and
EC team last


AROUND THE NATION

Big Ten
Ohio State signed the best recruiting class in the Big
Ten. Michigan signed the best player. And Michigan State
parlayed its conference championship and Rose Bowl
victory into its best letter-of-intent signing day in five years.
The Buckeyes unveiled the third-best recruiting class
in the nation, according to Rivals.com, with only Alabama
and LSU ranked higher. The Buckeyes landed eight of Rivals.
come's top 100. The rest of the league combined for six.
About the only thing Urban Meyer didn't do was
reel in the Big Ten's highest-ranked recruit. Michigan
accomplished that, signing cornerback Jabrill Peppers out
of Paramus (N.J.) Catholic High.
Michigan State edged out Penn State for second-best
class in the Big Ten. The Spartans are ranked no higher
than 21st nationally by the analysts, but it's still their best
finish since 2009.
MSU coach Mark Dantonio's biggest victory might have
been hanging on to defensive lineman Malik McDowell of
Southfield, Mich. His parents told reporters this week that
they wanted their son to go out of state, and he visited
Ohio State.
The Spartans did lose a lower-ranked defensive
lineman in Darius Slade of Montclair, N.J. He switched his
pledge from Nebraska to Michigan State two weeks ago
and ended up signing with the Buckeyes.
Big Ten teams continued to increase the number of
recruits signed from the Southeast. According to BTN,
Big Ten schools signed 158 players from the conference's
footprint and 80 from SEC states.
-Associated Press


ACC
The top recruiter in the Atlantic Coast Conference this
offseason might have been Jameis Winston.
Coach Jimbo Fisher said recruits lined up for the
chance to play with the Heisman Trophy winner.
That's a big reason why the defending national
champion Seminoles signed one of the nation's best
classes a group that includes two five-star receivers
and a four-star wideout.
Fisher said Wednesday, "They want to play with him
and know he can get them the ball."
ACC coaches also used the league's success as a pitch to
recruits. Not every coach can say the Heisman winner and
defending BCS champ are in their league this year.
The tactic worked. The league's schools turned Florida
State's victory in the BCS title game into 14 individual
wins on Signing Day.
According to recruiting service Scout.com, four ACC
schools No. 3 Florida State, No. 10 Miami, No. 26 North
Carolina State and No. 28 Clemson had top-30 classes,
with North Carolina and Virginia Tech close behind.
Louisville had an extra perk to offer recruits: Being
part of the Cardinals'first ACC recruiting class. Scout had
coach Bob Petrino's class ranked 45th nationally while
Rivals had the Cardinals at No. 46. Both services had
Louisville in the middle of the pack in its new conference.
Now, the challenge for all ACC coaches is to keep the
momentum going in 2014 and beyond.
-Associated Press


Big 12
Oklahoma is off and running with another highly
touted recruiting class. Baylor added a quartet of players
to keep throwing.
Texas put together another strong class after a
coaching change, and Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy
again had a good signing day.
Scout.com listed the Big 12 as the second-best among
all conferences behind only the powerhouse SEC.
TCU signed a school-record five four-star recruits, all of
them on offense as the Horned Frogs make changes with
two new co-offensive coordinators.
West Virginia keeps restocking with players from the
small western Pennsylvania town of Aliquippa, in the
shadow of longtime rival Pittsburgh. Already with a
running back from Aliquippa who transferred from Pitt
last summer, the Mountaineers signed a cornerback and
defensive lineman from the town.
After the departure of three quarterbacks, Texas Tech
signed Texas APSE player of the year Patrick Mahomes,
the son of a former pro baseball player who had 50 TDs
pass and four interceptions as a senior.
For the second year in a row, Oklahoma gets top billing
in the Big 12. Even coach Bob Stoops called this one of his
best classes. "Hard to compare when you're looking at 15
years of doing it, but I feel this ranks right up there with
any of them"he said. Running back Joe Mixon is listed as
Rivals.com's No. 1 running back and 247sports.com's No. 1
all-purpose back.
-Associated Press


Pac-12
UCLA had made some inroads on USC for recruiting
dominance in Southern California and the Pac-12 in
recent years, finishing ahead of the Trojans each of the
past two seasons.
With a new coach in place, USC is back at the top of
the heap in the Pac-12 and in its own backyard.
Landing three of the highest-rated players who had yet to
pick a school before signing day, USC coach Steve Sarkisian got
his tenure in Troy off to a superb start by bringing in a 2014
class that was ranked 10th by both Rivals and Scout.
The Trojans were rated best in the Pac-12 by both
services, while UCLA was ranked third by Rivals (18th
overall) and fourth by Scout (19th).
Stanford coach David Shaw has become an adept
recruiter since taking over as the Cardinal's coach and had
another stellar class in 2014.
Bolstered by a late decision by defensive lineman
Solomon Thomas, the two-time conference champion
Cardinal pulled in a recruiting class that was ranked 14th
by Rivals and 15th by Scout.
Stanford's class also includes quarterback Keller Chryst,


considered one of best pocket-passers in the country and
the son of San Francisco 49ers quarterbacks coach Geep
Chryst, and running back Christian McCaffrey, the son of
former Stanford and NFL wide receiver Ed McCaffrey.
Cal had a rough first season under coach Sonny
Dykes, finishing 1-11. But Dykes managed to land a solid
recruiting class, ranked 43rd by Scout and 45th by Rivals.
-Associated Press


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5







* GIRLS BASKETBALL: Regional previews



Senior duos pace Pirates, Mantas


By DAWN KLEMISH
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PORT CHARLOTTE -Three
district championships, 91
wins, two home losses in four
seasons and 2,400-plus com-
bined points makes for quite
an impressive resume. But Port
Charlotte High School seniors
Courtney Robertson and Taylor
Lindsey won't be satisfied
until they reel in a regional
championship.
"We've been through dis-
tricts and we've been through
regionals before, now we want
to move on to states," Lindsey
said. "Winning states would
be awesome, and I think if we
keep playing together like we
have been, we have a good
chance to get there."
The District 6A-11 cham-
pion Pirates continue on the
title road tonight at 7 p.m.,


when they host District 6A-12
runner-up Lehigh at 7 p.m. in
the Region 6A-8 quarterfinal.
Port Charlotte (24-5) has not
seen the Lightning this season,
but has had similar opponents
- North Fort Myers and Lely
- and beaten them by similar
margins.
The Pirates have also de-
feated Barron Collier, which
downed Lehigh by 28 points for
the district title.
Both seniors earned a spot in
the 1,000-point club during the
regular season, and Robertson
is second on the school career
scoring record list with more
than 1,400 points. The record
of 1,690 was set by Sara Barton
in 2008.
It lends heavily to a playoff
advantage because at this point
in the postseason, Lindsey
said, it's less about scouting the


TONIGHT'S GAMES
Region 6A-8 quarterfinal
Port Charlotte vs. Lehigh, 7 p.m.
Region 5A-8 quarterfinal
Lemon Bay vs. Cypress Lake, 7 p.m.
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opponent and more about the
Pirates playing up to their full
potential.


"We have been working hard
all year for this, practicing hard
and we're ready to see how far
we can go," she added. "I'm
excited about our chances."
Should it defeat Lely, Port
Charlotte may earn a rematch
with Venice, against which it
won a hotly-contested district
championship, 56-54, last
week. The Indians first must
get past Barron Collier in their
regional opener.
Robertson said playing
Venice would be a good game,
but for now the Pirates are fo-
cused solely on the Lightning.
"I don't think we'll see (the
Indians) again, but if we do, it
will be fun," she said.

REGION 5A-8 QUARTERFINAL: Port
Charlotte isn't the only team to brag two
players in the 1,000-point club; Lemon Bay's
Hayley Smith and Kayla Reid also earned the


honor this season. Smith also is the school's
career assist leader, and Reid has collected
more than 1,000 rebounds in her four years.
It is a senior leadership the Manta Rays
(1 7-8) will ride as they host District 5A-12
runner up Cypress Lake (16-11) in tonight's
7 p.m. regional opener. Lemon Bay won the
District 5A-11 championship last week, its first
since 2001.
The teams had two common opponents,
Port Charlotte and Dunbar, which each went
4-0 against Lemon Bay and the Panthers in
double-digit wins this season. Cypress Lake
boasts tall forwards, and Manta Rays coach
Mike Young said the key to today's matchup is
controlling the big girls.
"Our guards have to get out and pressure
the balli'Young said. "But outside of that, to
succeed really depends on how well we can
continue to play. It's taking care of our team,
making sure we're in the spots we need to
beat.
"Everybody's really excited and ready to
play, so it seems like this week has dragged
by.'


* PREPSOFTBALL: BOCT B CATS L
Charlotte 1, Mariner 0 BI '0 BCAT
FROM PAGE 1
UP NEXT boost.
Charlotte: at DeSoto County, "I felt it, yeah I was
tonight, 7 p.m. hot," Gonzalez said. "I 4, 1
was just playing smart. ._
*After a while, putting in,
the hard work before the- S ,. B R S.
T r o s game really sets it off./
That's what I was doing."I- .





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By CHUCK BALLARO him. Fowlie smile at a signing ceremony at the school on Wednesday.
SUN CORRESPONDENT "Pray," Nesser said. Fowlie committed to Central Florida, and Doeble will attend
nBarton College (N.C.).
CAPE CORAL- "Seriously, some of them 4
Courtney Sunnarborg were contested threes, S came from wide receiver
allowed three hits as she and he was knocking "NINU Sly Augustyn, who will
pitched into the seventh them down." join Patton and Williams
inning, and Jessica Teddy Deas also had FROM PAGE 1 at Ellsworth.s
Valerius drove in the 12 points for North Port MWe've got some faxin Fowlie's signing at
games only run as the (22-4). Zechariah Kendaill"evsl m to doin" Central Florida culmi-at
Charlotte High School scored 11 points to lead B "wasPrt nated what has been at
downed Mariner 1-0 in a Braden River (14-11). Charlotte's spotlight meteoric career, winning
nondistrict contest. The victory sends Caltessolgtmtoi aer inn
Sunnarborgnstruck out North Port into the SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO athlete, signing a commit- the state championship
dr c i ho oASunnarborgiotoriPt cainsthe ment to play for Division in the pole vault title one
three, walked one and hit district championship North Port's Justyn Miller dribbles around Braden River's Austen oyear after her first appear-
two batters in 63 innings, game, which it will host Henderson during Wednesday's game. ria the er at he fis me
and got great defensive on Friday night against plays in the same confer- dance at the FHSAA meet.
help to get her out of Palmetto. The Bobcats face.Kendallhiton ence as FCS powerhouse She shared the state
game's nly runas the 22-4). echaria Kendall hitve otsomefaon




several jams. defeated the Tigers twice PREP SCHEDULE two free throws Appalachian State and title with Pine Forest's
But the senior tired in during the regular season. TODAY flagrant foul, cutting the frd, where Pirates Christina Wiggins ien heavy
the seventh as Mariner got North Port has never Girls basketball leadto31-25. coach Jordan Ingman rain in Jacksonville last
runners at the corners with won a district boys Region 6A-8 quarterfinals But Gonzalez hit a thet esho a om t to he ste arponshI
two out. Tarpons coach basketball title. LehighatPortCharlotte, 7p.m. 15-footer along the right "(The best part of today S he owns the Tarpeons'
Greg Higgins brought in "I can't go a day since Venice at Barron Collier, 7 p.m. baseline and Zefen Bruno S y the, wh choarerliothe s entr
freshman Julie Dedrick to I' ve got the job without Region 5A-8 quarterfinals added a layup off a steal id"Seeing all these ace a rtte sen i
face Tritons leadoff hitter hearing it," Slanger said. Cypress Lake at Lemon Bay, 7 Then Gonzalez made his players go somewhere." acknowledged the rise has
Taylor Henderson, who But they got the job p.m. 4-pointplay M.arne dt pa eas
e tothrt done on Wednesday, SebringatCapeCoral,7p.m. "There was a lot of or Warner Univ ersity in "It's really quick and
seondee oamut todefethirdthtiortwofESoftreLake Wales and Collins tit hits you and you don't
end the igame. overcoming a bit of s s oftbal things (going against us)t ninth eWs od t r realize it's happening,"
"Courtney did a great adversity to do it. Charlotte at DeSoto County,u Gonzalez said. "Buht awe'e consercra Fowlie said. "Is some-
job, but she got a little Ballhandlers Vic 7p m got to play through that. rival tin sazi. "t's sou
tiredTandbtse freshmantgotytohplaynthroughathat."



tired and the freshman Sopoli and Deas were North Port atVenice, 7p.m. oase a r Southeastern University thing amazing that you
came on and she got it both in foul trouble Tennis shore@sun-heralid.coim Patton each comrni ted Doeble committed
done," Higgins said. early, each picking up Port Charlotte at North Port, to play for Ellsworth to play at Barton aftter
Charlotte (1-1) scored theirthird personal fouls 3 p~m.NORTH PORT 58, BRADEN RIVER 36topafrElsrhtolyatBtnate
Charlotte (1-1) scored their third personal fouls p.m. BradenRiver 9 14 4 9-36 Community College in visiting the campus last
its only run in the third before halftime. North North Port 16 13 17 12-58f Wa U r
Kaylee Brannon had an Portwas already without BRADEN RIVER (36): Bacon 2, Owsianka l Fadlls, Iowa. weekend.
indte saingle. an overeacn itou e td n t 2, Braxton 5, Zechariah Kendall 11, Lans- It's very, very special," "I loved the campus,
infield single and reached junior forward Maiek ter when an errant elbow downe5,Garrett Mancer 2. Totals 11 (4) ingman said. "It gives loved the team, loved
secndona troin Barber, who missed the 10-2336.
error by sh ortstop Brittany contest with anillness. caught Braden River's NORTH PORT (58): Teddy Deas 12, Bruno them an opportunity to the coach (Chris Shaw),"
e hrs an on th at enie 2, Miller 7, Sinopoli 5, Brandon Gonzalez 27, be successful when they Doeble said. "It was a
Bohn. Marissa Stack hada Justyn Miller was Matt Lansdowne in the Silva3,Hogan2.Totals24(7)3-1458. leave here and that's all we really good fit for me. I
bunt single to put runners .................................................................................................want for them. This is an was his No. 1 recruit and
on the corners beforewatfrte.Tiisa wahsNoIrcutan
one ri ns sae ee points, getting eight of "But we had three or opportunity to do that." he told me I'd play right
brought Brannon homez e IrATES them in the second quar- four days of really good The day wasn't just away.
Higugins said t he Tarpon s FROM- PAGE1ter. Price also finished practices and that helped about football. Elsewhere Augustyn's signing with
Higginsier 914i4 9-the CoTuniyoColegein v siting h aps sig igwth




is o e tr oM PAGE 1 with four steals and made us a lot. We came out and around the area, Charlotte Ellsworth had special
BRAENdIVEt(3):gaco 2,OwsanktIoa FllstIoa.geeknd





"We need to string hits third quarter as the Pirates two 3-point field goals., played very well. pole-vaulter Julia Fowlie meaning. He's been
together and we're fast on took a 36-point lead. Specht emptied his All 15 of our play ers signed a letter of intent to looking forward to it since
the bases, but also need to ThePirates' athleticism bench in the second half did a great job, both attend Central Florida, the watching former team-
be more careful," Higgins was the big difference in. as 11 of the Pirates made when they played and fruits of winning the state mates Ro'Derick Spears
orrsaid. Port Charlotte's size and the scoring column. when they were on the championship last spring, and Cody Janski on their
Valerius and Brannon strength on the boards Phillip had 12 points bench cheering on their Tarpons soccer player signing ceremony
had two hits for Charlotte overwhelmed the the and pulled down eight teammates." 1 l Doeble comn ite Its very exciting, he
The defense helped Bulldogs. Senior Nicksen rebounds. He scored eight The Pirates will play to attend Barton College, said. "I' m thefirst one to
Sunnarborg escape a Blanc, a husky 6-foot-6 of his points in the first Venice, which beat Island
second-and-third, no-out post, scored 17 points quarter to help the Pirates Coast 42-26, at 7 p.m.. It's a big deal for us."
Norh or'slon cm-ornaeRorhreat94efo-r17eo






jam in thethird by erasing for the Pirates, getting II gain their fast start. Friday for the district title. oPortm onsi on da shonrldomea941'206'1174r
the lead runners on a of them in the first half Nick Benvie led theua fu dy oresinodaaywntjustw ay.
double play. A diving as he and Sean Phillip Bulldogs (4-21) with 10 PORTCHARLOTTE71,IDABAKER 24
Ida Baker 5 8 4 7- 24
stop by Stack on a hard controlled the boards. points, including two PortCharlotte 21 26 14 10e o 71
grounder in the sixth from Both players had sever- 3-point field goals. IDA BAKER (24): Nick Benvie 10 Cahill 7, i sb
Madi McClennan, resulted al dunks in the contest. When we played them Snyder 3, Hanley 2, Loza 2, Totals: 8(3) -9 t
in a force at second to end Freshman Sean Price earlier (this season) they PORTCHARLOTTE(71):NicksenBlanc17, J k o ti
the inning, again showed his im- played us tough for the Sean Phillip 12, Sean Price 10, Washington Iscce p e
Mariner (0-1) pitcher proved player the last first half in both games," 7, Collins 4, Rains 4, Legget 4, Caldwell 2 o
overSmarjesse 4, Todd 2, Mcloud 2, Delisca 3
Kaylynn Friday went the month. He scored 10 Specht said of Ida Baker. Totals:29(2)11- 15,71. wl pa toh n
distance allowing seven
hits on the unearned run, I
strikeout.
CHARLOTTEr1,MARINER 1 MANTAS BEAT BISHOP loss to Venice with a 7-0 LEMONBAYi7,BISHOPVEROTO aN O NA D Tv I g t cl
C on otte d -thir, no-out pot sco 17j poin quarr tohlp the irntes C Jsic Lown(LB)d.GianaDrayert(BV) """"ln is N.. Itsa bigdeaforus.
Charlote 0010000 sweep of Bishop Verot (0-2) 6_1,6-1, Linda tonova (LB) d.oNicohete Cer2
Mariner 000 0000- 03 2 FORT MYERS -The on Wednesday. vone (BV) 6- 4,6-2;sarah Lown(LB) d. MadisonH o niGH lu-edo
Courtney SunnarborgJulie Dedrick(7) and Peroakis(BV)in3,6e1,sMaddieaCasadNi(LB)dBJeni e
Jessica Valerius; Kaylynn Friday and Abby Lemon Bay High School The Manta Rays (1-1) niferBertrand(BV)6-0,6-0;AshleyTormey(LB) North Port's SlyAuustyn signsacommitment to play at
Love WP: Sunnarborgn LP: Friday.SoDed g r ols e thea bo und, host id n on dTaraCardle (BV) 6-0, 6-0; Doubles: J.Lown
rick Leading hitters: Kaylee Brannon 2 3 s tennis team rebound- host DeSoto County on drae Ellsworth Community College in Iowa Falls, Iowa, flanked by
run,Valerius 2-2,RBI ed from its season-opening Monday at 4 p.m. Lown/Casad(LB)d.Pergaks/Bertrand(BV)8-2. principal David Jones, left, and football coach Billy Huthman.


-Page 6 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014










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A weekly publication of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. i_&_, Serving Southwest Florida outdoor enthusiasts


MARINE INC


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HOURS:
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Sunday 10 am -4 pm
3415 Tamiami Trail
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
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I FREE FISHING SEMINAR
Join Captain Justin Cauffman at Laishley Marine
Tuesday, February 11th at 6:00 PM
Florida native, Capt. Justin has spent
countless hours fishing our local waters.
See store for our schedule of future seminars.


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23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-276-9657
Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com

EDITOR
LEEANDERSON
239-292-9230
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com

MARKETING
Advertising Director
Leslee Peth
941-205-6400
LPeth@sun-herald.com
Advertising Manager
Mike Ruiz
941-205-6402
MRuiz@sun-herald.com
Advertising Sales
Chris Beckett
941-205-6405
CBeckett@sun-herald.com
Boaters'Bargains
941-429-3110

CUSTOMER SERVICE
& SUBSCRIPTIONS
941-206-1300

CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Allen
Dr. Mark Asperilla, MD
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Jared Brimer
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Ryan Ingle
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Jeff Kincaid
Dawn Klemish
Robert Lugiewicz
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi
Capt. Mike Myers
Capt. Dan Sansiveri
Betty Staugler
Matt Stevens
Bryan Stockbridge
Tony Towns
Capt. Cayle Wills
Walter W. Wilt

Produced & printed by
Sun Coast Media Group
Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.

MU@M
Photo provided
Sometimes it's just relaxing to
dip your feet into the water.


0 t / '
a-O~/^i


Call to captains


If you've never heard of the Southwest Florida
Council of the Blind Fishing Tournament, you soon
will. It means a heck of a lot to a bunch of people
out there. Just ask Jim Ray Evans.
Fishing means just about everything to Jim, a
Port Charlotte resident. For more than 70 years,
the Army veteran made it a priority to have a rod
and reel by his side whenever possible. Fishing
was his guiding light. That light turned to darkness
five years ago after he completely lost his vision.
Not knowing what to do, he turned to his son, also
named Jim. The two quickly got educated on the
pros and cons of blindness. Together, they found


out what worked, and what didn't. They found
agencies that offered assistance to the blind. They
found various activities that catered to the blind.
But there was still a void. Jim missed fishing.
One of the agencies the father and son discov-
ered was the Southwest Florida Council of the
Blind. Sure, the SWFCB offered many services, but
it offered one activity in particular that proved to
be priceless a blind fishing tournament.
Fishing it for the first time last year, Jim and Jim
Jr., had no idea what to expect. Twenty-one boats
were entered, with each blind angler teamed up
with a volunteer captain. The disabled Army veteran


brought in a big enough redfish and trout to the
weigh-in table to earn bragging rights as champion.
He was on cloud nine, and probably still is!
I was grateful to write the story, and always look
for ways to write about the good there's too much
bad out there already. So when Jim Jr., stopped by the
WaterLine office last week, I sat down and listened to
what he had to say. He told me that this year's tourna-
ment slated for March 22 was going to be bigger than
last year's a lot bigger. And that they may be short
on captains a lot short!
CALL 123


If you have a comment or question for
WaterLine editor Lee Anderson, email a Tt --rT I -- -
him at Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com. r


LEE:
Thank you so much for the "Return the boat"
column last week on page 2.1 owned her for 16
years prior to the theft. Many memories were
created during that time and more were to
come. She was even used to spread my brother-
in-law's ashes in the Harbor. Your article will be
added to the many pictures of family, friends
and events associated with her. I've owned
other boats, but this one was special to me.
-Steven Trombley, Port Charlotte
STEVEN:
It is unfortunate that your boat was stolen. I hope the
person or people who committed the crime step up and
take responsibility. Most of all, I hope your boat finds
you again.
-Lee Anderson, WaterLine Editor
LEE:
I enjoyed Greg Bartz' article "A day with
the Kid" in last week's WaterLine, page 21.
I especially enjoyed the picture, as that is
my 10-year-old granddaughter who lives in
Jacksonville. She was saying goodbye to the
little snapper before returning it to the water


to grow up. Articles and pictures like this create NICK:
lifelong memories. I love WaterLine. Thanks I/like to hear ,-u i ?..I o-/ui E;Ts ." .,n/.. isE',i i cj
again. each year. OLw ,.,, liniss d,0i?. Li."'.i?"l.ph dE:A.'ln
Bob Shirk, Punta6 Gorda Isles how to catch .o' til s vEc.ils in/I. ii 1 ht luiEsnd
bait to use. url iill s \ ioi s. i ihi, .w n hi.t
BOB: pompano and 5hEEa ht1t and il? lu: ,2 at: ,.n.ht
Can't tellyou how many times Reader Photos come in them. Just let us A noi i. torI1 L,\ inEi hat l ulsEiiE
handy. The photo of your granddaughter complement- send your woi


ed breg's column. Keep on sending in tnose photos.
-Lee Anderson, WaterLine Editor
LEE:
I spend three months a year in Venice. I fish
off the beach and the jetty. I would love to see
some typical lure rigs and bait setups pictured
in WaterLine recommended for some of the fish
that hang out along the shore. I'd love to fish
for pompano and other fish. I always purchase
a yearly license, but always release the fish.
Nick DeJay, Venice


- LEE 1E ,I s.," II IldE'I IIC fi&',.


Letters are wEi. h 1 i- i 1 llV iniv iiii r-r,-i i ,-i, I ll-, [ 'iil
we do have s,.ni, r.iliH Fi -1. [I. I ,- I -i it I, ii-.. l hii ii
words. Letter, liiv ,-,it -l hI r liilthi I i,-ll .,r ii ii ir
and spelling. All i-i-r, i ii I i i i-ili i w liii ll ii m -
- not initial,' .i '-d l rI ,. I, r hl,,i-h II, ii i l, n wiwl Il i.,I l,,-
published. Th I- il, -r i II- i i iir ,-, h,,i.. i-.ij, ii-l %
a public four I r ,,. ii .nav ,.i, ,r iii'h- ,, ,i _1l
state ents n r II 1 i ,-t r I ri l ii-iv liii. iii h- ii- iiiii ii
writers. W ate-li. n III, I'.. r i Mh l i .i rii l [ i i- iiii
responsibility ir Oi 1I til ,I Ii. i i ri- ir


Around Charlotte Harbor CAPT. RALPH ALLEN We'll have the Fish
W eird w inter .................................................................................................. Page 8 JA C OB A N D RA C H EL
The Gear in Review JOSH OLIVE Stress-free at
Fishing the Penn Conflict .............................................................................. Page 10 B im ini B ar & G rill


It was a hectic week. More so
than usual, so we decided a
little day trip was in order. We
headed north to Casey Key, but
to be honest, location wasn't
top on our priority list. We
simply wanted to relax and let
the stress of the previous week
melt away.


Expert fishing tips ........................................................................................Page 14 Slack Tides.................................................


Angling 201 CAPT. MIKE MYERS
It's all about the w iggle ................................................................................ Page 15
Charlotte Harbor Regatta readyto set sail Friday......................................... Page 19
Birding -ABBIE BANKS
M eddling around M yakka ............................................................................. Page 20
House backs ban on insurers discriminating against gun owners ................Page 22
Boating Safety. BILL HEMPEL
Lay off the grass............................................................................................ Page 24
Tournament Bassin'* GREG BARTZ
W hat it's like to w in ...................................................................................... Page 25
Ladies First DAWN KLEMISH
Trout tourney w as a blast.............................................................................. Page 26
Florida Fauna JOSH OLIVE
W hen is a snake not a snake?....................................................................... Page 29


WaterLine's Heels and Reels Ladyfish Tour-ianert reQitration
From the Publisher's Desk JOSH OLIVE
The one-legged heron ..............................


, -- [iH I IQ lB--


TIDE CHARTS I Page 4

MAP OF LOCAL WATERS I Page 5

FISH FINDER I Page 6


FISH PROFILE I Faqe 1:

SEAFOOD RECIPES | ',e. 12 1: : ]: '

READER PHOTOS I i. I,:.


FISHING REGULATIONS I Page 7 BOATING CLASSES I ae


BULLETIN BOARD I Page 79


,*anflnnflnl fl, n 1r',,klnn earn
SUMUEtflUUnME EtDiiUUEa~U.MOEEI


Angling 101 ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
Can't fish? Go outdoors anyway ...................................................................Page 11
Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS, DVM
Playing opossum ..........................................................................................Page 12
A Life on the Water CAPT. VAN HUBBARD
Books take us back........................................................................................ Page 13
SUP Fun NICOLE MIERS-PANDOLFI
Destination: Don Pedro ................................................................................Page 14


F-, 3').
3,a'I" ,.1
FaQ, 3.'

FaQI 3,I2


I-- ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


BB i


SOLUNAR TABLES I Pae.




,/,^pK Page 3 *February 6,2014


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j./H4 fp. Page 4 *February 6,2014


*aam6~..u U .e.UFie~Imi.eeu E~~hUi
aa~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


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II1


THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
VENICE INLET 27.1117 N,82.4633': W


MONDAY


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY


t--16 37 17 28 1830 1940 20 43 2133 22 15
1.69 1.67 1.65 1207 1.65 1152 1.68 1201 1.71 1212 1.73
7505 27 -- 2 07 11 52212 0 1 12
0.77 0.70 0.92 0.98 1.02 1.06


,' 6 6 -- o -
fl-i 1 10 0927 1249 1437 1543 1634
1000 .501 08_.0:70 0231 03.38-0.92.. 0428-0.92. 0507-0.84_ 0538-0.74-
0.56 -0.04 -0.14 -0.24 -0.33 -0.38 -0.39
MHHW 2 201, MHW 1932, MSL 1.172, MTL 1152, MLW 0 371, MLLW 0.000 All measurements in feet, for more info seeTidesAndCurrents noaa gov

THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
PUNTAGORDA 26.9283' N,82.0650 W (ADD 32 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES)
1948 2038 2137 2243 2347 0039
' 0827-- 1.55 1.54 1.52- 15 261-51-- 15 32-1.53-- 15 41-156-- 15 45--
0.70 / \ / 0.87 \ 092 /\ 94 0.95


f185


02U4/ U.54 0406 0524 0628 0719 0759
0.02 -0.05 -0.14 -0.23 -07 9 0759
MHHW 1 %2, MHW 1 703, MTL1 076, MSL1 070, MLW 0 149, MLLW 0.000 -0.31 -0.35
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY
PLACIDA, GASPARILLA SOUND 26.8333' N, 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES)


0833
-0.36


WEDNESDAY


1 t- 17 09 1807 1915 2024 2124 22 13 -22
0620 1.26 . 1.25 1040 1.25 1127 1.26 1157 1.28 1221 1.31 1240. 3


0.02 -0.04 -0.12 -0.21
MHHW 1407, MHW 1175, MSL 0 784, MTL 0 7o8, MLW 0 358, MLLW 0 000
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
MATLACHA PASS (BASCULE BRIDGE) 26.6333 N, 82.0667" W
1919 2017 2125
!,t----1-49 ....--1-49--....1-48-- 11-1-


.. .. U....... 4 305 00633
0.03 -0.05 -0.15 -0.24
MHHW N/A, MHW N/A, MSL N/A, MTL N/A, MLW N/A, MLLW 0 000


VENICE INLET
Thursday 05:27 0.77 feet
10:00 0.56 feet
16:37 1.69 feet
01:08 -0.04 feet
Friday 08:22 0.70 feet
09:27 0.70 feet
17:28 1.67 feet


i*i Saturday 02:31 -0.14feet L
18:30 1.65 feet H


Sunday 03:38
12:07
12:49
19:40
Monday 04:28
11:52
14:37
20:43
Tuesday 05:07
12:01
15:43
21:33
Weds. 05:38
12:12
16:34
22:15


-0.24 feet
0.92 feet
0.92 feet
1.65 feet
-0.33 feet
0.98 feet
0.92 feet
1.68 feet
-0.38 feet
1.02 feet
0.84 feet
1.71 feet
-0.39 feet
1.06 feet
0.74 feet
1.73 feet


PUNTA GORDA


Thursday 02:47
08:27
12:56
19:48
Friday 04:06
20:38


0.02 feet
0.70feet
0.54 feet
1.55 feet
-0.05 feet
1.54 feet


Saturday 05:24 -0.14 feet L
21:37 1.52 feet H


Sunday 06:28
15:26
16:28
22:43
Monday 07:19
15:32
17:52
23:47
Tuesday 07:59
15:41
18:51

Weds. 00:39
08:33
15:45
19:40


-0.23 feet
0.87 feet
0.87 feet
1.51 feet
-0.31 feet
0.92 feet
0.85 feet
1.53 feet
-0.35 feet
0.94 feet
0.78 feet

1.56feet
-0.36 feet
0.95 feet
0.68 feet


0456
-0.27

MONDAY


0537 0611
-0.30 -0.31
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY


2234 23 34 0023
7-1-50-- 14 07-1-52--14 31-1-55-14


0723
-0.32


PLACIDA
Thursday 00:23
06:20
10:54
17:09
Friday 01:46
08:42
11:29
18:07
Saturday 03:03
10:40
12:34
19:15
Sunday 04:06
11:27
14:14
20:24
Monday 04:56
11:57
15:34
21:24
Tuesday 05:37
12:21
16:33
22:13
Weds. 06:11
12:40
17:19
22:55


0.02 feet
0.62 feet
0.44 feet
1.26feet
-0.04 feet
0.59feet
0.56feet
1.25 feet
-0.12 feet
0.67 feet
0.66 feet
1.25 feet
-0.21 feet
0.74 feet
0.71 feet
1.26feet
-0.27 feet
0.80 feet
0.69 feet
1.28 feet
-0.30feet
0.83 feet
0.64 feet
1.31 feet
-0.31 feet
0.85 feet
0.56feet
1.32 feet


0838
-0.36


MATLACHA PASS


Thursday 02:50
08:30
13:21
19:19
Friday 04:13
10:52
13:56
20:17
Saturday 05:30
12:50
15:01
21:25
Sunday 06:33
13:37
16:41
22:34
Monday 07:23
14:07
18:01
23:34
Tuesday 08:04
14:31
19:00

Weds. 00:23
08:38
14:50
19:46


0.03 feet
0.73 feet
0.53 feet
1.49 feet
-0.05 feet
0.70 feet
0.67 feet
1.49 feet
-0.15 feet
0.79 feet
0.78 feet
1.48 feet
-0.24 feet
0.88 feet
0.84 feet
1.50 feet
-0.32 feet
0.94 feet
0.82 feet
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(-M A RINA-7!^ ,,

15001 GASPARILLA RD
PLACIDA, FL 941-697-2280

GASPARILLAMARINA.COM


MARKER 20 |

ON THE ICW W


1628 \ /1752 \


I I Iop




SJ' // n,,*,. n iin,-H -'iiik;,-,...A,-
jjmn.cersq.ve Page 5 February 6,2014 .bmmunums- w ,msumm .nu.




IntelVI MARINATE
\ SARASOTA COUNTY FRIENDLY FUN FESTIVE
Blackburn Pt Boat Launch -800 Blackburn Pt Rd, Osprey
DallasWhite Park 5900tGreenwood Ave, North Port
SHigel Park. 1330 Tarpon Center Dr,Venice rn--rr n /
Indian Mound Park. 210 Winson Ave, Englewoode L[ j u L'
.e ~ Loreto Bay Access 800 Loreto Court, Nokomis '
lb Manasota Beach Park. 8570 Manasota Key Bd F
*!^ % -Marine BoatBamp Park.301E.VeniceAveVenice a
0 Marina Park 7030 Chancellor Blvd, North Port
% ^\ .~~~~~~~~~Nokomis Beach Park 901 Casey Key Rd ^ | / / f J | J1 '1[ .* J @n
.-Snook Park. 5000 E. Venice Ave, Venice
@ 1 \^" DESOTO COUNTY
r\ J ^ Brownyville Park. 1885 NE Brownville St '
S-. Deep (reek Park. 9695 SW Peace River St
-\ .C *DesotoPark.2195lNWAmerican LegionDr Br "
fi ~. V -Liverpool Park -9211 Liverpool Rd
Nocatee. 3701 SW County Road 760
I' I ,.~ i I I .Lettuce Lake. 8801 SW Reese St CA LT CU T _,
Alk u--- 11 F1S- -Aii ^^ r^^W MIQ
Jill V CHARLOTTE COUNTY Bay~ ? ^I -i^ 11*' ^
oo"T i:'. .H a Ainger(reekPark.2011PlacidaBRd, Englewood Par k.2 72
[,:II : ".; a~t / ButterfordWaterwayPark. 13555 f %
i .i ,. ',, eMarathon BldPortCharlotte r da
'" -^ ^ V^ '^ ^*'1 .DarstPark.537DarstAve,.PuntaGorda ', J.. P %- '
l k" El .ElJobean Boat Ramp .4224 P EACE
N ^; S~ft1^^'^El Jobean Rd, Port Charlotte 49q 1 v R IVER
^V?^^ ^ .~~Harbour Heights Park- 27420 ^ -f
^ ^^n ^T ... ~~~~Voyageur Dr, PuntatGorda Sit>^7n( SR ^%'
%j ^ \j'J'e m Hathaway Park .35461 Washington Loop, Punta Gorda 1/
Placida Park. 6499 Gasparilla Rd, Placida
^ .,^, D T Port Charlotte Beach 4500 Harbor Blvd, Port Charlotte .
-- Se .South Gulf Cove Park. 10150 Amicola St, PortCharlotte I4 A0
S 4 CapeHaz Spring Lake Park.3520 Lakeview Blvd, Port Charlotte 4 4
S Marina..eo X r T.f ;
Iw'#8 '\
-0.50 0.5 1 2 5 .-3
"=";%aHe GE
o._.o o,-- : o. ff p ^ ..,

NAUTICAL MILES ARM V
09 LwiN^ 0^ >^ U 'iL" l ^X

FRIENDLY GBasDdiI P. ,BVSnC
GaspalUll as Habor ,sg a-bo -"
*FUN *r r -
F N Sandfly A Tr l e, !
r~~~Ky i 11 Turtle^ n. j^., ^^
FESTIVE Devilfish BBay
Come for a lesson or rental... K e Burnt
TLStore
hang at our pool & cabana
for a true 'destination paddle* z
Rent a GoPro video camera
Free Launching tI ,^te
Free Deliveru on all daw local rentals oo s0 Two s
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uour excursion awesome! a pe, Part
Cabbage Islandn
(941) 504-1699 I hookedonsup.com Iedia)t\
Like us on Facebook for event updates o S
facebook.com/hookedonsup Co %
S\ \
Captive a ^ Litl -u
Captive Pass 0 '

6950 Placida Road
Englewood. FL 34224 1-1"-
CapeHazeo arinacor t
DirectlU across the ICW fromTi sva
Palm Island Resort & Rum BauI
This map is not ii,0.
intended for
navigational
purposes.
Refer to a o
~~~nautical Chart ,.
w for navigation o
'4,. -. information. ,Es(

i ?T.l3-,.





j ujmnetp.ovu *Page 6 *February 6,2014


I*-a*n.nn U neflklmnn ann
aatesta** niui EtDiUEU.MiOEEia


LAISHLEY MARINE
Punta Gorda
941-639-3949





D&D BAIT AND
TACKLE
Matlacha
239-282-9122




OLD PINE ISLAND
MARINA
St. James City
239-283-2548


Redfish have been reported on the inside and outside
of the Harbor's bars. Snook are slow, but patience is
a virtue. Sheepshead, pompano and flounder can
be found along the beaches, passes and bars. Alligator
i.t:1:. iR -I -Ii.1 i lriii -,I i..I cobia Spanish mack-
erel' in i llIiii- l l Iriii l 4I 1 liriil, I- 'i] l l'I
P- i i, r iln f'i


Redfish iri l inr ir, i lir 1 Ihiili in f h ll ,I lrI
h i., f'Pinr, I_ I. hir l h,- Iii,],]i-r ,,r.,- ir i n l-,- ,,-r li, -
S.,,n,, cobia I ii- l, I-,- 1 iii,]h[ i- ifr Ow,- H irl.,r |i ir
Sheepshead irt- lhir, ] 1inii ] iii ,i v vI'- ,I lrii. h.ri, -
l11,,, ,,V I,-r li,-Il iiiil liiiililt- it,-,il,,,,,iIi,1lit- I'' llrl
I I i iI t [-i I Iii i i ii' i iii[ ivll ir ii[
11l, --,v [,-r 1, lr 1.,1, -- ,r iiin111,- r l,



Smaller mangrove snapper are swimming in the
canals around the area also. A few flounder reports
have come from the passes and beaches, as well as
pompano. A lot ofsheepshead are around docks and
pilings near Matlacha and Pine Island Sound.


Amberjack, sheepshead and mangrove
snapper can be found a close as five miles
offshore. You'll have to travel out to at least
100 feet of water for a chance at bigger red
grouper



li/ n [i,- l i- ji- ll iI-r i,] ii, I v,m, in li nr l
amberjacks red grouper big sheeps-
head mangrove snapper iinI gruntsiH
[i,- wir,-i




For larger red grouper and mangrove
snapper, fish in at least 100 feet of water
offshore. Especially around reefs and wrecks.


Trout are scattered
everywhere. Artificial
shrimp under a popping cork
does the trick. Look for some
i,, w, r iw ir ow. ..ilq iiii
,,I o it- ,r1 1 [ii



Trout r- illir-i,-il ll ,.,-r
ow, rl 1 r ,111ii ,ri i It h I- i
r.III]iii l A r i l,,,,riI ,r \iv .
i. nrl.




Trout have been hanging
around Bokeelia. All you
have to do is look for sand-
holes in the grassflats. Toss
outa shrimp under a bobber
and wait.


Gotta have one?
Send in this coupon
with a check or money
order, or stop by the
Charlotte Sun office at
23170 Harborview Road.

Hats are priced at $14.02 each plus tax, which
conveniently comes to $15 (we planned it that
way). Shipping is $7 anywhere in the U.S., whether
you buy one or 100. Mail to WaterLine Hat, 23170
Harborview Road, Port Charlotte FL, 33980.


SNanr
Addi



City

Stat


ie


ress


e ___ ZIP _____





j ujmncerut. Page 7* February 6,2014


flan lnnfl n,.r-'fn .,n.,..
int I1etUllILIIIunItaE hili lliiqm II u i i snEEU ibl I I


, 7 j fA ,


'Mite and federal requlationri for '.outrhvet
Fhloriida ivaerc ac of r1o :5S111 3 All baq
limiil are per harvecler per day otherr limit
niay applv rli ,:hiJar i:, nd o t in: lu:e
everv rule an anriqlier rinedr r: o rn i for
n i:t urrenrit rule i'it[Mvy W( ,::,ni hfirinq
Iqnran,: j :f p r ri,'e'erla n in .:uo e

LICENSES
Resident saltwater or freshwater:
Annual $17,5-year $79. If you fish from
shore only, a license is required but is free.
Resident license for both freshwater and
saltwater fishing: $32.50 annually.
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3
days $17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore
fishing license not available for nonresidents.
Fishing permits: Snook $10/year, lobster
$5/year, tarpon $51.50 per fish

SALTWATER FISH
ALMACOJACK
Bag limit 100 pounds in state waters (includ-
ed in aggregate bag of 20 reef fish in federal
waters); notes: 9,11
AMBERJACK, GREATER
30"min. size; bag limit 1 season closed June
1-July 31 (subject to additional closure if
quota met); notes: 1,3,4,5,9
AMBERJACK, LESSER& BANDED
RUDDERFISH
Slot 14"to 22"; aggregate bag limit 5; notes:
1,4,5,9
BLACK DRUM
Slot 14"to 24" (may possess one over 24");
bag limit 5; notes: 5,7,8
BLACK SEA BASS
10"min. size; bag limit 100 pounds; notes:
2,4,5,9
BLUEFISH
12"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 1,5
BLUE RUNNER
Bag limit 100
BONEFISH
Harvest prohibited; may be possessed tem-
porarily at capture site for photos, measuring
and weighing.
COBIA
33"min. size; bag limit in state waters, 1 per
harvester or 6 per vessel, whichever is less;
limit in federal waters, 2; notes: 1,5
DOLPHIN (MAHI MAHI)
Bag limit 10 per harvester or 60 per vessel,
whichever is less; notes: 5
FLOUNDER, ALL SPECIES
12"min. size; bag limit 10; harvest by gig or
spear OK; notes: 2,5,8
GROUPER, BLACK
22"min. size; bag limit 4; notes:
2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, GAG
22"min. size; bag limit 2; season scheduled
to open July 1 in state and federal waters;
notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, GOLIATH
Harvest prohibited. Legal to target for catch
and release in state but not in federal waters
GROUPER, RED
20"min. size; bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, SCAMP
16"min. size; bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, SNOWY&YELLOWEDGE
Bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, WARSAW & SPECKLED HIND
Bag limit 1 per vessel; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, YELLOWFIN &YELLOWMOUTH
20"min. size; bag limit 4; notes:
2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, CONEY, GRAYSBY, RED HIND,
ROCK HIND &TIGER
Bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
HOGFISH
12"min. size; bag limit 5; notes: 1,4,5,9
MACKEREL, KING (KINGFISH)
24"min. size; bag limit 2 (reduced to 1 in
some state waters when federal waters are
closed to harvest; see MyFWC.com/Fishing
for current regulations); notes: 1,5


"TT1T"flIiTiTFi


MACKEREL. SPANISH
12 nun -I ailg lbnim I.t lraru'fercf
'ipru.nf nmaderel c.:. ocher net'el' ar 'ea
r:,r,:,hu tled rn.:.[e I ,
MULLET. STRIPED & SILVER
aiq limit Feb I-Auq 31 alqqlreiqlate o per
riar'etler or I1"0)per wecel ivh herieer r le i
'.e I-Jan 31 ar iiregate soper hriaret ler
:,r per weccel iaq limit l al: ap lie t ':, miullel
u'ed ac taitl ruaret i o:r :po,:ei ,:,n ,:,r f o trip:edI
miullel pr,:itbled in 'unt ud Corijda ti eienr
6 p.m. and 6 a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb. 29. See
http://bit.ly/urExej.
PERMIT
Slot 11"to 20" (may possess one over 20";
maximum of 2 over 20" per vessel); bag
limit 2; hook and line gear only in state
waters; spearing legal in federal waters;
notes: 1,5,7
POMPANO, FLORIDA
11"min. size; bag limit 6; notes: 1,5,7
POMPANO, AFRICAN
24"min. size; bag limit 2 per harvester or per
vessel; spear fishing prohibited; notes: 1,5,7
PORGY, RED
Bag limit 100 pounds; notes: 4,5,9
REDFISH
Slot 18"to 27"; bag limit 1 per harvester or 8
per vessel, whichever is less; transport limit
6 per person; gigging, spearing or snatching
prohibited; illegal to harvest or possess in
federal water; notes: 2,5,7
SAILFISH
63" min. size from tip of lower jaw to center
of fork; bag limit 1 any billfish (sailfish and
marlin); Highly Migratory Species permit
required to harvest in federal waters and all
harvested fish must be reported to NOAA
within 24 hours; notes: 5
SEA TROUT, SPOTTED
Slot 15"to 20" (may possess one over 20");
bag limit 4; notes: 2,5,7
SHARK, ALL SPECIES
54" min. size except Atlantic sharpnose, blac-
knose, blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and
smooth dogfish (only exceptions to 54"min.
in federal waters are Atlantic sharpnose and
bonnethead; bag limit in state waters 1 per
harvester or 2 per vessel, whichever is less;
bag limit in federal waters, 1 per vessel; may
be harvested by hook and line only; Highly
Migratory Species permit required to harvest
in federal waters; lemon and hammerhead
sharks prohibited; notes: 1,5,7
SHEEPSHEAD
12"min. size; bag limit 15; notes: 2,5,7
SNAPPER, CUBERA
Slot 12"to 30"(may possess 2 over 30" per
harvester or per vessel); bag limit 10 if under
30"; fish over 30"not included in aggregate
limit; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, GRAY (MANGROVE)
10"min. size in state waters; 12"min. in
federal waters; bag limit 5; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, LANE
8"min. size; bag limit 100 pounds in state
waters; not included in aggregate limit;
notes: 2,4,5,9,11
SNAPPER, MUTTON
16"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER,RED
16"min. size; bag limit 2; season scheduled
to open June 1 in state and federal waters;
notes: 2,3,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, SCHOOLMASTER
10"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, VERMILION (BEELINER)
10"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,11
SNAPPER, BLACKFIN, DOG, QUEEN,
MAHOGANY, SILK &YELLOWTAIL
12"min. size; limit 10 per harvester; notes:
2,4,5,9,13
SNOOK
Slot 28"to 33"; bag limit 1; season closed
Dec. 1-Feb. 29 & May 1-Aug. 31; $10 snook
permit required to harvest when license
is required, including free resident shore fish-
ing license; state regulations apply in federal
waters; notes: 2,5,6,7,8
TARPON
Bag limit 1 per harvester per year; $51.50 tar-
pon tag required to harvest or possess, which


I lelal a :rilv in pursuit fan IFA re:,:,rd for
cea'ornal :,:a ranrjie P:'a rules >pee r.cp
bIl Iv h:l,:r0l rn let i:, :
TRIGGERFISH. GRAY
14 nun iceinra tre alert 12 nmn i-:e in
federal jialerl tial li nm it 2 ea ,:,n i:li:,ei:i
June I- Julv .31. rnotle 14 1 II
TRIPLETAIL
IS nmn i-:e a hliminl 2t niav tibe riareeid
tv ri,:,: and irid i nrilv rn:,lec 2 5 :S
WAHOO
Bag limit 2; notes: 1,5
LIONFISH
Invasive exotic; kill all specimens on sight.
Fins have venomous spines.
NO-HARVEST SPECIES
Zero bag limit for Bonefish, Goliath Grouper
(Jewfish), Nassau Grouper, Sawfish, Spotted
Eagle Rays, Lemon Sharks, Hammerhead
Sharks. Go to the website listed below for a
full list of no-harvest species.
Visit http://bit.ly/lOnYDlz for full rules.
NOTES
1. Measured fork length. Fork length is
the straight line distance from the most
forward part of the head with the mouth
closed to the center of the tail.
2. Measured total length. Total length is
the straight line distance from the most
forward part of the head with the mouth
closed to the farthest tip of the tail with
the tail compressed orsqueezed together
while the fish is lying on its side.
3. Bag limit zero for captain and crew of
for-hire vessels on a paid trip.
4. Reef fish gear rules apply. Anglers must
use non-stainless steel circle hooks when
using natural baits, and must possess a
dehooking device.
5. Must remain in whole condition (head
and tail intact) until landed ashore.
Removal of gills and internal organs OK.
6. Harvest byspearfishing prohibited.
7. Use of multiple ortreble hooks in con-
junction with natural bait prohibited.
8. Harvest by snatching prohibited.
9. Except for sand perch and dwarf sand
perch, fish designated as reef fish are
illegal to use as bait in federal waters or
aboard a vessel with a federal reef fish
permit. In state waters, legal-size reef
fish may be used as bait but must remain
in whole condition and must be counted
against bag limit.
10. Included in aggregate grouper bag
limit of 4fish.
11. Included in 20-fish reef fish aggregate
bag in federal waters (vermilion snapper,
lane snapper, almaco jack, grey triggerfish,
all tilefishes).
12. Closed Feb. 1-March 31 ONLY in federal
waters outside 20-fathom break.
13: Included in aggregate snapper bag
limit of 10 fish.

FRESHWATER FISH
LARGEMOUTH BASS
South of State Road 80; max. size 14", bag
limit 5 (may possess one over 14") North
of State Road 80; slot 14"-22", bag limit
(may possess one over 22")
SUNFISH (excluding crappie)
Aggregate limit 50
CRAPPIE
Limit 25
BUTTERFLY PEACOCK BASS
Max. size 17", limit 2 (may possess one over 17")
GRASS CARP
Must be released immediately
OTHER EXOTIC FISHES
Please keep and eat or otherwise destroy; do
not use as live bait.
UNREGULATED SPECIES
No bag or size limits on gar (except alligator
gar; possession of this species is illegal),
bowfin, pickerel and all catfish.
Visit http://bit.ly/lOnYJQr for full rules,
including special management areas.


a'


Ever have one of those

"WHIEiIE

rNF $%*t

Isuy

WArEPLIMEY'

Thursday mornings?




If this ever

happens to you,





-V I Iw







Just call


customer

service at


941-206-1300


and they'll


take care


of you.





'* flK/ * Page 8 9 February 6,2014








. .I


"- --ae ~- --


n*,aaflnnfl nen -knn, earn
SUMSUEalUUnME EtDImEU.MiOEEia


WNal-rune ph.:.l.:.
b, Lee- ne.3rs,:.n
This winter has
been a little bit
unpredictable.


t C -


a"* -


a' .d-


Afs -


t.


Every'yeabr~rgsMfferent patterns of
weather. For example, the weather during
January of last year was really nice, then
February and March saw unusually windy,
cold and rainy weather, much to the chagrin
of visitors to the area who found that those
peak-season months included few beach-
friendly days. Fast forward to this year,
and the pattern appears to be starting out
just the opposite of that seen last year. As
any of you who were trying to enjoy the
outdoors probably noticed, the weather in
Southwest Florida during much of January
was cold, windy and wet. The wind blew so
hard that we put extra lines on boats in the
marina three or four different times, and
there were three different cold fronts that
dropped the temperature enough to create
early-morning frost on my windshield.
When cold rain fell for three days at the end
of last week, it provided a fitting close to a
generally gloomy month.
Now it's February. The weather so far
this month has been great, and people are


enjoying all the outdoor activities that our
area is renowned for. February is usually
somewhat warmer than January anyway,
but here's some really good news our
overall winter weather is largely controlled
by the jet stream, and advance predictions
for the remainder of the month indicate
that the jet stream should give us a warm-
er-than-normal February. We will almost
certainly be irritated by cold fronts that will
bring brief periods of unpleasant weather,
but the pattern appears to be setting up in
such a way that the fronts will be infre-
quent, and not overly harsh. Let's hope that
the meteorologists who study the jet stream
know what they're talking about, because
I prefer their forecast to that of some
groundhog in Pennsylvania that predicted
winter will linger for six more weeks.
One fear that was voiced by many local
anglers was that the cold January weather
might kill some of our fish. The prolonged
chilly weather did push the water tempera-
ture in Charlotte Harbor into the upper 50s


- a temperature at which it's possible for
snook to perish, but there were no reports
of any fish mortality. Rapidly changing
water temperature stresses snook and other
fish, but it's possible that since the water
temperature during January went fairly low
and stayed fairly low, most of the month
the fish in Charlotte Harbor fared better
than they might have fared had the weather
been more up-and-down. Even more
surprising than the fact that there were no
reports of dead snook is that some snook
have been caught in shallow water on the
flats something that's usually rare when
it's cold.
The fishing in recent weeks has been a bit
unusual in other ways especially given
the weather. For example, there are quite
a few Spanish mackerel in the Harbor and
offshore along the coast right now. These
fish usually disappear when the water
temperature goes into the low-60s. But
many of them stuck around this winter and
have been caught as far inland as the mouth


of the Peace River, perhaps attracted by the
abundance of glass minnows in the Harbor
this year. Another oddity, especially during
a cold winter, is that there have been sight-
ings of multiple tarpon rolling in the rivers
in recent weeks. There are always a few
tarpon that over-winter in the rivers, but
they're seldom seen rolling during the chilly
weather. On the other hand, the sheepshead
run has been going like gangbusters, which
is just what we'd expect during a chilly
winter. These scrappy fish are generally
unfazed by cold, blustery weather and seem
to wait until the depth of winter to start
their spawn, which is now underway.
Let's go fishing!
G'pt RlIpth 4l/EIi 1iuins te h'IIIq FistEi
flEEt of s ltlsftEE iI. Ia'11d flShi/ntl chtiti tel
oatis locwtEd a>t tfishtEiEc mn s V/i/Ia.E A Iai, ma
in Puntai Go dai HE is l id > if-il inning
O1'tdooi 1 iitif and photociiiphEl anod #is>
p[ast piEsiEntt Of thE F/oiida O0d00ooi 1111'ItEis
4ssoi0tion C(till hi at 9-11-639-2628 Ot
Eia110l C'pti.'hinlsnhE FlEEt (otll1


PitrinbuitJd b\ L&, Raillt Co Inc., 141 LaRt Ras Dri.L., Largoi FL -` "1" 2 S4 "011


L.wso- -


amlk


.*.faff '*'





jEa4&c.r.&vh.l Page 9 *February 6,2014


n.eu...lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


I y have a meeitii tournament o ther t yo t ildd inthe OutT o Bullei Bod il it t WateLinagne@gmil.
ifven have a meeting; tournaments, fesfival or other event you want inicludedidiin h Otor Hews Bulletin Board, email 1110 oWatierLin-eMa-gazinFe@ gmail.com


2014 CHARLOTTE HARBOR REGATTA
The 2014 Charlotte Harbor Regatta is set for Feb. 6th-9th. The
regatta will be run out of the regatta desk at Port Charlotte
Beach Park. This is the fifth annual regatta. More than 100 boats
in 12 classes are expected. Competitors from multiple states
(California, New York, Michigan, Ohio, Florida, etc.), Canada
and the Caribbean are expected to participate. Charlotte Harbor
Regatta Inc. is the regatta's organizing authority. It is a 501(c)(3)
not-for-profit organization whose mission is to promote sailing
on Charlotte Harbor. Racing will take place Feb. 7th, Feb. 8th
and Feb. 9th. Racing begins at 11a.m. on Feb. 7th and 10a.m.
on Feb. 8th and 9th. Racing will end around 2 to 3 p.m. all days.
Race results will be available each day around 5 p.m. Regatta re-
sults are available on the CHR website at CharlotteHarborRegatta.
com. Call 941-661-6415 for more information.

LEMON BAY CONSERVANCY
TARPON SAMPLING
Meet in the parking lot at 3120 Gasparilla Pines Blvd.,
south of Englewood, east of Placida Road. On Feb. 8th
from 8:30 to 11 a.m. For further information call 276-233-
6364 or email wdunson@comcast.net.

MOTE MARINE PADDLE
Join us as we kayak through Sarasota Bay and discover the
marine animals and plants that thrive in Florida's coastal
waters on Feb. 8th at 10 a.m. at Mote Marine Laboratory
(1600 Ken Thompson Pkwy., Sarasota.) You'll learn how
Mote's scientists study this unique environment during our
hour and a half leisurely paddle. All kayaking equipment is
provided and class begins with basic kayaking instruction.
The cost is free. Visit Mote.org or call 941-302-4997 for
more information.

CHARLOTTE CHAPTER CCA MEETING
The Charlotte chapter of the Coastal Conservation
Association will hold a meeting on Feb. 10th at 6 p.m. at


SEMINAR SERIES IS BACK!
Capt. Mike Myers will speak at the next
installment ofWaterLine's seminar series. The
seminar will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 8th, at Gasparilla Marina (15001 Gasparilla
Road, Placida). Capt. Mike will discuss the secrets
of fishing docks for sheepshead and black drum,
and will also be answering questions from the
audience. There is no cost to attend, and you do
not need to register. Door prizes will be given out,
and refreshments will be available. So stop by
what's better than spending a Saturday night
talking about fishing, drinking beverages and
having a chance to win free stuff? For additional
information, call 941-276-9657.

Laishley Crab House (150 Laishley Ct., Punta Gorda). CCA is
a grassroots organization that is committed to protecting
and conserving Florida's marine resources. Call Pete Herber
at 941-258-0771 or CCA Charlotte president Capt. Josh
Greer at 863-781-1373.
WILDFLOWER AND AMBERJACK WALK
A Walk through Wildflower & Amberjack" will be the topic
presented by David Clayton at the Native Plant Society monthly
meeting Feb. 11th from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Lemon Bay Park (570
Bay Park Blvd., Englewood). We will take an "easy chair" walk
through the parks, looking at and discussing the two areas and
some of the plants and animals found there. David is a volunteer

BULLETIN BOARD 127


IIJ Al


vvrliA 3 irlAi Dmn l.: vU i UIIU mIItDia i t)ltep te1
share their expertise on ID and behavior of raptors,
shorebirds, waterfowl and other avian visitors at
Myakka River State Park (13208 S.R. 72, Sarasota).
Volunteers set up scopes and help people identify
birds from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every day of the week.
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB: We are a scuba dive
club that meets on the third Tuesday of each month.
Club is based out of Punta Gorda. Call 941-740-4245
or contact BottomTimeDiveClub.net.
BIRD WALK AT LAKES PARK: A bird patrol guide
will lead an easy walk along clear paths of Lakes
Regional Park (7330 Gladiolus Dr., Fort Myers)
at 8:30 a.m. on the first Saturday of each month.
This free walk offers an opportunity to see birds
in natural vegetation as your guide points out the
many species in what is a birding hot spot and
crucial nesting area for many birds. Arrive at 8 a.m.
at Shelter A7 for a brief intro and sign-in. Wear
comfortable shoes and dress for outdoors. Bring
water, hat, sunscreen, binoculars and camera. Call
239-533-7580 for more info.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASS'N:
Members of this club for multihull owners, sailors or
those who are interested in the exchange of ideas
about equipping and sailing boats, share informa-
tion about anchorages and cruising destinations,
hold informal races that help to improve their
sailing ability, and have local raft-ups. No dues. The
club meets at the Celtic Ray (145 E Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda) on the first Monday of each month
at 6 p.m. For more info, visit Yhoo.it/XV96fO or call
941-876-6667.
KORESHAN STATE HISTORIC SITE STROLL:
Walk or bike the historic site (3800 Corkscrew
Road, Estero). Park fee is $2 for walk or bike; $4
for single-occupant vehicle; $5 for two to eight
occupants vehicle and $2 for each additional person
over eight per vehicle. Call 239-992-0311 for more
information.
SARASOTA FITNESS WALKS: Join Sarasota County
Parks staff each Friday for a fitness walk through
Rothenbach Park (8650 Bee Ridge Road, Sarasota)
from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. The pace will be geared to-
ward fitness, aiming for a 20-minute-mile pace. The
walk will cover approximately three miles in one
hour of brisk walking. Enjoy the beautiful scenery
and wildlife, but keep up the pace. Wear appropri-
ate workout clothing, including good walking shoes,
and bring your water bottle. Meet in the pavilion
near the playground. Call 941-861-5000.
FREE SAFETY CHECKS IN VENICE: The Coast
Guard Auxiliary conducts free vessel safety checks
every Saturday morning from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
at the Venice boat ramp (200 N. Seaboard Ave.,
Venice). They'll make sure the safety equipment
mandated by federal and state regulations is on
board. If an inspected vessel is found to be safe, a
"Seal of Safety" is affixed to it. For more info or to
schedule an appointment, call Patrick Wheeler at
941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER:
Year-round, ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek
are offered each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State
Park (1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register
at 8:30 a.m., tour at 9 a.m. Cost is park fee plus
canoe or kayak rental fee. Bird walks are also


uIiiIu eveiy Iiiuuayd dt / ,.3u d.Ill., daiiu yuiluu
scrub jay walks every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. For more
info on any of these programs, call 941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH:
Listed as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail.
Meet your volunteer guides (weather permitting)
at 8:30 a.m. Monday through Friday at the kiosk at
Tigertail Beach. Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail)
to 951 South to Marco Island. Turn right on Kendall
Court, the fifth light after crossing the bridge to
Marco Island. Turn left at four-way stop sign at
Hernando Court to Tigertail Beach. Water shoes and
binoculars are also suggested. The following walks
in the Naples area are offered at no cost through the
Conservancy of Southwest Florida (1450 Merrihue
Dr., Naples). For more info, call 239-262-0304 or
visit Conservancy.org.
BOATERS GATHERING AT NAV-A-GATOR: A
boaters'get-together is held from 1 to 2 p.m. the
second Sunday of each month at the waterfront
chickee hut at Nav-A-Gator Grill/DeSoto Marina
(9700 S.W. Riverview Circle, Lake Suzy). This infor-
mal gathering is open to the public to discuss boats,
fishing, the Peace River and other topics. For more
information, call the Nav-A-Gator at 941-627-3474.
GULF COVE FISHING CLUB MEETINGS: The Gulf
Cove Fishing Club meets on the second Monday
of the month October through May. The meetings
are held at the Hope Lutheran Church in Gulf Cove
(14200 Hopewell Ave., Port Charlotte) at 7 p.m.
where speakers talk on timely topics. In addition
to the meetings the Club holds a monthly fishing
tournament and a monthly picnic. For more
information call 941-698-8607.
HANG OUT WITH SCRUB JAYS: Spend the
morning with the scrub jays at Oscar Scherer State
Park (1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) from 8:30 to
10:30 a.m. every Sunday. This unique Central Florida
experience includes a nature walk to see the park's
diverse ecosystems, native flora and fauna. Call
941-483-5956 for more information.
SIX MILE CYPRESS SLOUGH PRESERVE: Take a
leisurely stroll on our fully accessible boardwalk
trail anytime dawn to dusk (7791 Penzance Blvd.,
Fort Myers). Visit our Interpretive Center to learn
more about the plants and animals that live in
the Slough or just talk to a friendly volunteer. The
center is open Tuesdays through Sundays from
10a.m. to 4p.m. Parking is $1 per hour per vehicle.
Reservations not required. No groups of eight or
more. For more info call 239-533-7550 or visit
LeeParks.org/SixMile.
VOLUNTEER AT SHAMROCK PARK: Shamrock Park
Nature Center (3900 Shamrock Dr., Venice) holds its
monthly volunteer work mornings from 8 to 10 a.m.
on the third Friday of each month. As abilities and
interests allow, volunteer tasks may include trash
collection along trails and within vegetated areas
of the park, light trimming along paved multi-use
trail, organization of storage areas, exotic plant
removal and other maintenance tasks. Long pants,
closed-toe shoes, sun protection, and plenty of
drinking water are recommended. Park staff will
provide trash collection buckets/bags, pickers,
gloves, and other tools as necessary. Meet at the
Shamrock Park Environmental Center. For more
information, call Jennifer Rogers at 941-861-5000
or email her at jrogers@scgov.net.


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Paddle participants must provide their own pfd,
watercraft and be able to swim. Voluntary
donations to the Charlotte Sierra Club are always
gratefully accepted. Reservations are required.
Visit: bit.ly/lbSHFgx.
FEB. 6TH, DEEP CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. with Master Naturalist Rick Fried through side
channels of the lower Peace River to the Nav-A-
Gator for lunch and back a different route. Reserve:
941-637-8805.
FEB. 10TH, MORGAN PARK, ARCADIA HIKE: From
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through live oaks, cypress
and unusual vegetation. Reserve: 941-639-7468.
FEB. 13TH, SHELL CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Rick Fried.
Participants must provide pfd, watercraft and be able
to swim. Reserve: 941-637-8805.
FEB. 17TH, PRAIRIE CREEK PADDLE: From
8:30 a.m. to noon with Florida Master Naturalist Jamie
Reynolds through cypress wetlands. Participants must
provide pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-637-8284.
FEB. 19TH, MYRTLE CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Jim Story through
freshwater jungle to tidal Shell Creek and waterfall over
the Punta Gorda water supply dam. Participants must
provide pfd, water craft, and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-505-8904.
FEB. 20TH, OLD DATSUN TRAIL HIKE: From 8:30 to
11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John Phillips
and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods, saltwater
and freshwater marshes with unusual plant species.
Reserve: 941-639-7468.
FEB. 24TH, DEEP CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
wetland marshes and hardwood hammocks. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
FEB, 27TH, DON PEDRO ISLAND STATE PARK
PADDLE/HIKE: From 9 a.m. to noon with Islanders
and Florida Master Naturalist Merrill & Bob Horswill
from park mainland launch to island for hike and lunch


a.. ...... Pai ll l......... .... ....... ... fl ', ... . .
and be able to swim. Reserve: 941-445-6181.
FEB. 28TH, PRAIRIE CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists, John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
palmetto prairies, marshes and wetlands. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
MARCH 5TH, LOWER PEACE RIVER BIRD
WATCHING PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with
Master Naturalist Rick Fried to an active rookery,
to the Nav-A-Gator for lunch. Participants must
provide pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-637-8805.
MARCH 5TH, PRAIRIE SHELL CREEK PRESERVE
HIKE: From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master
Naturalists John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through
pine flatwoods, scrub and hardwood hammock.
Reserve: 941-639-7468.
MARCH 12TH, WEBB LAKE PADDLE: From
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists
Jamie Reynolds and John Phillips through wetlands
identifying native plants and birds. Participants must
provide pfd, water craft, and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-637-8284.
MARCH 15TH, SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
scrub and hardwood hammock. Reserve: 941-639-7468.
MARCH 18TH, CHARLOTTE FLATWOODS PRESERVE
HIKE: From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds in the pine flatwoods, marshes
and freshwater habitats. Reserve: 941-639-7468.
MARCH 19TH, MYRTLE CREEK PADDLE: From
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist
Jim Story through freshwater jungle to tidal Shell
Creek waterfall and Punta Gorda water supply dam.
Participants must provide pfd, watercraft and be able
to swim. Reserve: 941-505-8904.
MARCH 20TH, DON PEDRO ISLAND STATE PARK
PADDLE/HIKE: From 9 a.m. to noon with Islanders
and Florida Master Naturalist Merrill & Bob Horswill
from park mainland launch to island for a hike and
lunch at beach pavilion. Bring lunch, water, pdf, water-
craft and be able to swim. Reserve: 941-445-6181.


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,,M ,l "* Page I0 February 6,2014

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SUMSUEllUUnME EtDImEU.M~iOEEI


Fishing the Penn Conflict


Sometimes, the need for a new product is
obvious and immediate. When that is the case,
there's no question why the manufacturer is
updating their lineup. But other times, you
look at the latest and greatest and wonder
why it exists. If the company is already making
something great, why try to improve on it?
That was my first thought when I picked
up Penn's new Conflict spinning reel. The
Conflict is the new top dog in the reel family
that includes the Fierce and Battle (but no
longer the Sargus, which was dropped for
2014). When it was still just a rumor, I'd heard
that the Conflict was going to be significantly
lighter than the Battle, which made a lot
of sense. When I held one for the first time,
though, it was obvious that wasn't the case.
The Conflict 3000 is a mere 0.3 ounces lighter
than the Battle 3000 not really enough
to matter. One significant advantage in the
Conflict lineup is a new 2500 size, which is
large enough for most of our inshore fishing
and shaves 1.5 ounces off the 3000, which
actually does make a difference.
Still, other than a new size available, what's
the advantage to upgrading? I was skeptical
when I started fishing with it, but soon it
made a lot of sense: It's much smoother, both
while you're simply reeling in a bait and while
you're fighting a fish. Some of that smoothness
comes from two bearings in the handle (the
Battle has none); some comes from the better
balance of the rotor, which needs no counter-
weight like the Battle has. (If you're counting
bearings, you'll notice that the Conflict has
only one more than the Battle. That's because
the line roller bearing has been replaced with
a bushing in the Conflict.)
The drag is what really makes this reel,
though. The Battle's drag is no slouch, but the
Conflict's is significantly upgraded. The two
metal washers in the drag stay stationary on
the main shaft and the two HT-100 (carbon
fiber) washers are keyed to the spool. The
washers being keyed to the spool effectively
doubles their surface area because both the
upper and lower surfaces are being used to
generate friction. That means that the Conflict
3000 can generate 15 pounds of drag, versus
just 10 for the Battle.
OK, wait a minute: For most inshore fishing,
you won't use more than 3 or 4 pounds of drag,
so why does having 15 on tap matter? Think
about cars. If your car tops out at 100 miles
an hour, driving it at 80 on the interstate is
pushing everything to near-capacity. But if
it can reach 150 miles an hour, 80 is nothing.
In other words, a Ford Festiva is working a
lot harder at highway speed than a Mustang
GT. Your reel's drag works the same way.
Drags that are working hard get notchy, and
notchy drags are a problem. It's the extra
drag capacity that makes the Conflict so much
smoother than the Battle.
Now, using both sides of the HT-100
washers means they generate more heat


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for a given amount of resistance. Penn has
thought this through and designed the
drag to hold a generous amount of grease,
which distributes the heat to the spool and
ultimately the air. The drag knob also has a
rubber gasket on the back side, which does a
very good job of keeping water out. And yes,
this reel got dunked a few times since a
lot of my fishing is done while standing in the
water, dunkings are more or less inevitable
for my equipment. I usually pre-treat reels
with anti-corrosives before using them, but
after talking with Penn factory reps I opted
to skip that step. Because it's a tester, I give it
only a very cursory spritz of fresh water after
each use. Water gets in, but the bearings
are sealed with rubber so it can't get to the
parts that it might damage. The inside of
the reel still looks great, but a bit of rust has
developed on the inside of the "cage"on the
handle. It affects nothing.
Penn says the handle is an upgrade, but I
don't know if everyone will agree with that.
The hard EVA foam knob doesn't feel as natural
to me as the Battle's paddle-shaped rubberized
knob. On the larger sizes (5000 to 8000), the
knob is a large foam ball that feels terrific in


r HEGOOD:Allthe virtues ote proven PennBattleexceptforte r-iirilire roller biaririv plus a
much-improved drag and an overall bump up in smoothness.
THE BAD: Why is the line roller bearing gone? Could be lighter, espeoallv for thire iqrhifarnv rhiqier pric,:e
THE VERDICT: The new top dog in what is already a great family of reei crind nv ,:urrir tq,:,-t,:, reel ifor ariv
type of light-tackle saltwater or freshwater fishing. I'm giving it 4.5 out r:, a ,picble i, ri


*4 04 ,4,,4 4,


my palm. In any event, the trade-off of added
smoothness is more than worth a slightly
awkward handle knob.
The general goodness of the Battle carries
over into the Conflict: The all-metal body
feels substantial and solid, and helps keep
the gear train aligned under stress. The spool
has a rubber insert designed to keep braided
line from spinning on the spool (I still use
mono backing, just to be sure). All the reels in
this series have share a great line-lay system,
which keeps wind knots and tangles at bay.
And corrosion has not been a problem with
any of my Fierce, Sargus or Battle reels (I


' 1


have seven altogether).
Naturally, the conflict carries a higher price
tag than the Battle. A Battle 3000 retails
for $99.95. The Conflict 3000 runs 5139.95.
It's a significant jump, but the Conflict is
better-built and more enjoyable to fish with.
By dropping down to the 2500, you can save
$10. If your Battle is still in like-new shape,
I wouldn't throw it away just yet. But if it's
time for a new reel anyway, the Penn Conflict
has useful upgrades over the Battle that
make it worth a look. Be sure you like the
way the handle knob feels, but that's really
the only worry you'll have.


*S|
| BaB II


America; now found in most bo:,-(it
canals throughout South Florida (south :of the
Caloosahatchee River).
LEGAL GEAR: Hook and line, bush hook,
setline, trotline, gig, snatch hook, bow and
arrow, manually operated spear, castnet
(stretched mesh not greater than I inch),
minnow dip net, seine (stretched mesh not
greater than 1 inch, maximum size 20 by 4 feet).
FOOD VALUE: Excellent. One of the most
values food fishes in its native range.
FISHING METHODS: As with other cichlids,


'(J glapote
are hard fighters.
< much tougher than a bass or
bluegill of similar size. Will take
worms or crickets occasionally, but feeds on
small fish by preference. Also readily attacks
small artificial (Beetle Spins and small orange
flies are top picks). Illegal to release, except if
done immediately in the same waters where
caught. The state would prefer you to eat every
one you catch.
NOTES: May not be used as live bait, although
use as cutbait is acceptable.


SCU-STOM

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320 CROSS STREET rili
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33950
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4&ueP~&I Page 11 February 6,2014


If you are a regular reader of my column,
you probably love to fish as much as I do. But
sometimes, the weather just won't cooperate
with us. Cold drives fish off the flats, or sends
them off in search of warmer waters. Wind
creates conditions that are uncomfortable or
even dangerous. Post-frontal high pressure
shuts fishes' appetites down. When conditions
aren't good for fishing, you can stay indoors
with a book or the TV. But I think it's a better
plan to find something else to do outside.
When I was young, my parents used to take
me and my brother to nearby parks or out
to our grandparents' property. We had huge
fun just exploring, which is something most
adults have forgotten how to do. If you start
with open eyes and a curious mindset, even
smaller acreages can be magical places.
My father used to take me deer hunting
when I was 7 or 8 years old. Although hunting
was what he called it, I realize now that he
was really teaching me patience and how to
enjoy the outdoors. It worked maybe even
a little too well. I would spend hours and
hours outside with my BB gun, catching bugs,
snakes and frogs. Like a Dennis the Menace
cartoon come to life, my mom would have to
frisk me and empty my pockets before I could
come back in the house.
I don't think I'm the only fisherman who
enjoys other aspects of the outdoors. I
would say most of the anglers I've met over
the years also had a passion for hunting,
birdwatching, hiking, photography, animals,
beachcombing or something else that gets
them outside. Whatever gets you off the
couch, go for it. It's better than vegging out
with a "30 Rock" marathon on Netflix.
There are so many places around here
where you can go to enjoy the outdoors. One
of my favorites is Myakka River State Park
(13208 State Road 72, Sarasota). The park is
huge almost 60 square miles. Much of it
is wilderness, and exploring the depths of
the park is only for the hardcore. But there
are miles of biking and hiking trails that offer
relatively easy access to beautiful forest and
prairie areas. My wife and I prefer pedaling
to walking. There are two lakes and the river
itself for kayaking and canoeing, and you can
take an airboat tour of one of the lakes. The
park is only an hour away, but if you want
to make a weekend of it there are campsites


(both primitive and full-facility) and even a
few 1930s-vintage cabins available for rent.
We always see so much cool stuff when
we go there. The landscape itself is incred-
ible it's hard to find places where there's
still some of the original wild Florida left.
We've seen and photographed deer, turkeys,
hogs, owls, wading birds, lizards, strange and
beautiful insects and other wildlife. The plant
life is also something else, with rare native
species that you probably won't find growing
anywhere in Charlotte County anymore. For
great photo opportunities to impress (or
scare) family and friends up north, the lake is
home to hundreds of alligators, which often
bask along the shore on colder days.
Closer to home, you can visit the Charlotte
Harbor Environmental Center's Alligator
Creek Preserve (10941 Burnt Store Road,
Punta Gorda). This park is much smaller than
Myakka, but it's got four miles of trails and
plenty of interesting things to see. This park
is well-known for large numbers of birds,
so you'll probably see folks with binoculars
and field guides. Actually, it wouldn't be a
bad idea for you to bring binoculars and a
field guide. Alligator Creek Preserve is also
dog-friendly (though Rover does have to stay
on a leash).
These are only two options. For a full list
of Charlotte County parks, go to http://bit.
ly/lc0bO8Q (in Sarasota County, check out
SCGov.net/parks). And there are lots of other
places where you can wander around. River
Road in North Port has all sorts of places to
walk and enjoy the outdoors. The trails on
Flamingo and behind the baseball stadium
are great. Just be sure you don't trespass on
private property, or you're asking for trouble.
Fishing is my favorite outdoor activity,
but there are some times when it just isn't
worth going out on the water. Fortunately,
we happen to live in an area that offers much
more than just fishing. So the next time your
fishing plans get busted by the weather,
making other plans outdoors should be easy.
Happy trails.
Robert Lugiewicz is the manager of Fishin'
Frank's Bait & Tackle, located at 4425-D
Tamiami Trail in Charlotte Harbor. Call
941-625-3888 for more information about
the shop or for local fishing info, or visit them
online at FishinFranks.com.


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5a,&/e,<.&I, Page 12. February 6, 2014







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Nothing strikes fear into the hearts of
men more than a Virginia opossum. I don't
completely understand why. Most women
I know are not so terrified of the furry little
fanged ones. But they can be intimidating. An
opossum will bear a mouth full its pointy teeth
and hiss. And then... well, nothing. That's
pretty much all its got. It won't normally lunge
at you, throw quills in your face, spit poison
across the room to blind you or crack your ribs
by whipping its tail at you. The most action you
will generally see, if you persist in disturbing
an opossum, is that it will roll onto its side and
fake death. Hence the term "playing possum;'
which can last up to four hours. Oh, and there
is the green anal discharge that helps sell the
whole "dead" act by making the "carcass" smell
like it has started to rot. Good stuff.
The Virginia opossum is sometimes simply
called the possum, although technically
possums are completely different species of
animals in Australia and Asia. The opossum
is North America's only marsupial. The babies
are"born" a mere two weeks after conception,
and are the size of a bumblebee. They crawl up
into the mother's pouch, where they latch onto
one of her 13 nipples and stay attached for
the next two to three months. After that time,
they crawl onto mom's back for another month
or so and cling to her fur as she travels around
looking for food. This way she doesn't have to
waste time going back to a nest to care for her
young, since they are always with her.
A normal litter is six or seven. We sometimes
receive orphaned pouch young (babies that
were still attached to mother's nipples) at
Peace River Wildlife Center, and if we have a
lactating female on hand, we will place the
orphans in the foster mother's pouch and she
will raise the new babies as her own. If the
babies are older, from about 30 days on, we
can raise them on formula. Since the baby is a
marsupial, it does not have a suckling instinct,
and we have to tube feed the formula straight
into the baby's stomach.
The opossum is one of the oldest living
mammals, dating back as far as 70 million
years. It has a very small brain the raccoon's
brain is five times larger, although the animals
are roughly the same size. This comes in handy
to make more room for teeth, of which the
opossum has 50 more than any other North
American mammal. It has opposable thumbs
on the rear feet, and a prehensile tail that can
help steady it while climbing and carrying small
objects. Opossums do not hang by their tails,
and it is not advisable to hold one up by its tail.
The lifespan of an opossum is two years in
the wild and only up to four years in captivity.
It is thought that since it lacks natural
defense against predators, the opossum never
successfully adapted genes for longer life. It is
amazingly resistant to rabies and many of the
other diseases that plaque most mammals, due
in part to the fact that its body temperature


is too low to form a hospitable environment
for viruses and other pathogens. The opossum
not only doesn't serve as a reservoir for Lyme's
disease, it actually limits the spread by killing
most of the disease-spreading ticks that harbor
the infectious bacteria.
The opossum is an omnivore it eats
anything and everything. It will eat grubs, bugs,
plants, fruit and especially carrion. It is this
habit that often gets the slow moving opossum
in trouble. It finds dead animals on or near the
road and gets hit by a passing car while eating.
This is why it is imperative that if you see a dead
or injured opossum, roll it over using gloves or
a towel, and check to see if it is a female and
if there are any babies in the pouch. Ideally,
if mom is dead, remove the babies from the
pouch, keep them warm, and bring them to
PRWC as soon as possible. If mom is still alive or
you are unable to remove the babies, bring the
whole family to PRWC quickly. The pouch young
can get septic (a life-threatening body-wide
infection) if they continue to feed on a dead
mother. If you find a small furry older baby near
or on a dead mother's body, please check the
pouch, but also look around the area for siblings,
as the older ones may have wandered off a short
distance.
Most opossum rescues are done by children,
often boys. I suppose their innate curiosity
gets the better of them. The next largest
group of rescuers is women. Their nurturing
spirits extend to all forms of life. Men, for
some reason, always seem to have the same
response when the subject of opossums comes
up Eewww! Come on, guys. Tough it up.
Let's show those women and children how
brave you can be.
You can also show your support for PRWC
this weekend by attending one of our outreach
events. Our 2nd Annual Eagle Open Golf Tour-
nament is at Twin Isles Country Club in Punta
Gorda on Feb. 8th. A limited number of spots
are still available for golfers, and a buffet lunch
and silent auction are available for non-golfers.
For more info check out our website or call
PRWC at 941-637-3830. We will also be at the
North Port Nature Fest on Feb, 8th at Myakka-
hatchee Park with Luna from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Without your support, PRWC would not be able
to fulfill our mission to keep our wildlife safe
and healthy and educate our community about
the wonders of our native wildlife.
Peace River Wildlife Center is a nonprofit
organization, dedicated to the care, preser-
vation and protection of Charlotte County's
native wildlife since 1978. They are open seven
days a week year-round, including holidays.
Tours are offered from 11 a.m. to 4p.m. PRWC
receives no government funding and relies
entirely on private donations. For more info,
or ifyou would like to volunteer or make a
donation, visit PeaceRiverWildlifeCenter.com,
email PeaceRiverWildlife@yahoo.com or call
941-637-3830.


I l I Aiclip-n-savetsea-u


4 whole trout, about 1/2 pound each
3/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
1 small yellow onion, peeled and finely chopped
2 large cucumbers, peeled
2 tbsp snipped fresh dill (or 1/2 tsp dried dill weed)
2 tbsp butter
1/2 cup heavy cream


A clip-n-save seafood
recipe provided by

//WP~ V.t.,


Dress trout by removing fins, entrails and heads. Preheat oven to 375F. Wash trout, dry with
paper toweling and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place fish in a buttered 13x9x 2-inch baking
dish and cover with the onion. Slice cucumbers in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds with a
spoon, then cut the halves into 1/2-inch slices and scatter around fish. Sprinkle fish and cucum-
bers with dill, and dot with butter. Bake, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Pour the cream around the
fish, and continue to bake, uncovered, for 10 more minutes, or until done. To check for doneness,
run a knife along the backbone at the thickest part of the fish. When the flesh separates easily
from the bone, it is done. Remove the fish to a warm platter, surround with cucumbers and pour
sauce over both. Serve with buttered rice. Serves 4.

Recipe from www.all-fish-seafood-recipes.com


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Oh, how time can change you or at least
the way you think.
Recently, I've been noticing that many of
my current core beliefs were shared by great
fisherman a half-century ago.
So I want to take this opportunity to share
a couple of interesting books you might want
to read. They may help you understand more
about Florida's outdoors, heritage and our Gulf
of Mexico fishing.

A LAND REMEMBERED
Patrick D. Smith, who just passed last week,
was a significant loss to us all. His book,"A
Land Remembered; offers detailed insight
into old Florida. It's a must-read if you want
to grasp anything about the Sunshine State's
interior rancher lifestyle. Not everybody
knows that the cowboy actually started here
in Florida because the cattle were brought in
by the Spanish. This book is fiction, but it gives
you a real-life idea what Florida ranching was
about, and how challenging it was to settlers
of our state. The interior of our state is also
important because our waters run downstream
to support our estuaries on the coast. This
book will help you understand the old-Florida
"tough but sacred" love of our land.

GLORY OF THE SILVER KING:
THE GOLDEN AGE OF TARPON FISHING
Now, to grasp a much better understanding
of our local fishing before fame, money and
ego took over in the form of competitive tour-
naments, try reading "Glory of the Silver King:
The Golden Age of Tarpon Fishing.":'
The author, Hart Stilwell, was a Texas
sportswriter and avid fisherman, with under-
standing, perspective and observation skills.
He enjoyed the good ol' days, and the book
points out many challenges and contradictions
in addition to offering excellent suggestions
that all of us could learn from today. He was
able to see the glory days, and observe the
rapid changes when hot spots were discov-
ered and exploited problems very similar
to those like we are dealing with today. My
personal experiences here along Florida's Gulf
Coast have convinced me he is point on, to
many of our challenges today. We share many
similar conclusions. I highly recommend that
you invest the time to enjoy these adventures,
which were skillfully edited and assembled by
Brandon Shuler.
I received permission from Shuler to write
about some of the highlights of the book. I
selected the last paragraph of his introduction,
because it captures many feelings shared by
yours truly about fish, fishermen and life. In
it, Stilwell is reluctant to relinquish his faith in
his fellow human to stop the decline of tarpon,
and protect our environment domain. Stilwell's
belief in humankind's ability to do the right
thing doesn't stop him from warning that if
something is not done to limit the negative
effects that people cause the environment,
we'll never experience the world as he did.
The book begins by taking you back to the
mid-1930s during the depression. Although
the book primarily talks about tarpon in Texas,
it translates to our area perfectly. Anglers from
Texas and early anglers from Boca Grande Pass
probably went through the same experiences.


Fishing gear and fishing methods were likely
very similar all around the Gulf.
Stillwell points out that tarpon would not
put up with crowding by anglers; "He either
takes off or learns how to ignore them'." When
I first moved down to Boca Grande in 1981, I
remember that the fish on our beaches weren't
spooked when I eased close enough to cast
baits to them. The Big Pass was crowded but
everything had a system, it worked efficiently
and most caught fish without scaring them
away from normal patterns. Today is different.
Back then, in Boca Grande Pass, the fish came
in from the Gulf and were relaxed. They went
about their business as they've done for many
centuries. Today is different. Today, the fish
are chased by anglers from the moment they
come in from the Gulf until they run back out.
They seem to be stressed by all the distractions
out, in and around the Pass today. It sure is
different today. If you took too long to play a
tarpon you got chewed out on the radio; we
respected the fish.
Life was slower back in Stillwell's time. People
had the opportunity to observe so much more
natural behavior of the tarpon by walking the
beaches and by using slower boats. They had
time to observe what the fish's natural behav-
iors, and what they wanted to do. Today, I try to
find happy fish and hook up before some impa-
tient crew rushes in and scares the schools away.
It's simple to grasp that nothing is comfortable
being chased and harassed!
While this book is mostly about tarpon, it
has many observations that can help us better
understand the fish we pursue. It has a lot of
useful information that I could have read and
saved me a lot of time. Instead, I learned the
hard way. Tips about fish habits, movements,
and much more are buried deep within these
entertaining pages. Plus, it always helps to
take your current views of things to compare
and contrast them to the views back in the old
days. It's valuable information that just might
change the way you think about our environ-
ment, and the way you fish.
In the narrative,"Stilwell attempts to pass
on the beauty of his experiences and give to
us the gifts of the silver king in all its glory.
Yet, Stilwell did this knowing that it would be
his last book. So, in reverence and respect for
the greatest fish alive, and for one of the most
interesting characters in Texas literature, I can
only hope I did Stilwell's words justice'." Like
I said earlier, Stillwell and Schuler created a
powerful story with just as powerful a message
that we all can learn from we could all take
several pages from this book. Read carefully, but
let the stories transport you back in time with
Stillwell during his adventures of the silver king
in all their glory. P.S., there's a dandy quote for
next week that accurately shares both Stilwell's
and my personal opinions about money tourna-
ments. You're going to love the quote, or hate it.
Until next week, as the "old man" used to
say, if you're too busy to go fishing, you're just
too busy!
Capt. Van Hubbard is a highly respected
outdoor writer and fishing guide. He has been
a professional USCG-licensedyear-round guide
since 1976, and has been fishing the South-
west Florida coast since 1981. Contact him at
941-740-4665 or VanHubbard@CaptVan.com.


LotMATIEEWSI I
S PORT ARANSAS TEXAS.


~7~ I I / I p


6 6-ounce pompano fillets, skin on A clip-n-save seafood
1/2 tsD salt recipe provided by


1/4 tsp pepper
2 tbsp butter, melted
1/8 tsp dried dill weed
Dash of dried thyme leaves
Dash of onion powder


;&

Sprinkle both sides of pompano fillets with salt and pepper. Place skin sides up on rack in broiler
pan. Mix butter, herbs and onion powder; brush the fillets with half the butter mixture. Broil with
tops 2 to 3 inches from heat until light brown, about 5 minutes. Brush the pompano fillets with
butter mixture; turn carefully and brush other sides. Broil until fish flakes easily with fork, 5 to 8
minutes longer. Serves 6.
Recipe from www.all-fish-seafood-recipes.com


L...


a--

























































Englewood offers diverse paddling
locations along the barrier islands and
our Gulf Coast. I consider it my job to
find the best paddling locations, and to
bring people out to them. One of the
most amazing places to paddle is the
Don Pedro Island State Park. Many have
been to Don Pedro Island by boat. Most
people just visit the beach and have no
idea about the hidden treasures that are
concealed within the island. Launching
from the land base on Placida Road
provides the quickest paddling route to
the island.
Located a short paddle away, directly
across from the land base, is a very
small passage into the mangroves. This
natural mangrove tunnel leads to a
hidden lagoon inside Don Pedro Island.
A unique estuary can be found here,
with sea stars and live soft coral. This
is the only paddleboarding location in
Englewood where I have seen a colony


of sea stars. Other marine life can be
found throughout the tunnel: blue crabs,
various fish, live shells and sponges. The
trip through the tunnel is fascinating
every time I go.
The Don Pedro Island mangrove tunnel
is different from other locations. There's
more marine life and other elements
to explore. I advise my clients to sit
down on the paddleboards while going
through the tunnel. There are a few
low-hanging branches, which make this
location a bit adventurous.
Standing on the paddleboard is a bit
trickier, but provides better visibility
into the water. I love to stop and spot
the sea stars and live shells that I'm
paddling over. The seagrass throughout
the tunnel is very healthy, allowing for
small marine life to thrive in its nursery.
Dwarf seahorses can be found on occasion
in the seagrass here. One thing to keep in
mind is that the dwarf seahorses mate for


life, and they only swim within a square
foot of where they are born. Always place
a dwarf seahorse back where you found
them to help prevent them from being
separated from their mate.
The mangrove tunnel and hidden
lagoon part of the island is very private,
and rarely traveled. The hidden lagoon is
located inside Don Pedro Island and can
only be reached by traveling through the
narrow mangrove tunnel. The first time
I went through the tunnel and entered
the lagoon was breathtaking. The tunnel
opens up into the coastal lagoon. I would
consider this lagoon an ideal fishing
location, but I'd better leave that to
Lee or Josh to find out. Check the tides
before taking a paddling trip out here.
On a low tide, it's almost impossible to
get all the way through the tunnel. Due
to the narrow passageway, low tides and
precious marine life, this trip is recom-
mended for non-motorized vessels only.


Marine life is abundant here, and in
the warmer months, manatees can be
seen frequenting the area. Dolphins are
abundant. After exploring the inside
of the barrier island, take a break on
the beach of Don Pedro Island. Docks
are located only a short paddle away
from the mangrove tunnel. Land access
for kayaks and paddleboards is located
behind the docks. There are also walking
trails on Don Pedro Island. Explore one of
the most scenic locations Englewood has
to offer. Paddling this location makes for
perfect a day trip.
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi is owner of
SUP Englewood, a touring paddle-
board company servicing Sarasota and
Charlotte counties. Explore our gulf
coast islands with SUP Englewood. Call
941-234-4311 or visit SUPEnglewood.
corn for paddleboard rental and tour
reservations.


I-)
r


How much do fish hear, and how much
attention do they pay to sounds? A lot, and a
lot. It's amazing that fishermen will use lures
that are built to attract fish with sound (Rat-L-
Traps, buzzbaits, popping corks, etc.) and yet
seem unconcerned about the noise they make
aboard the boat. Fish don't have ears they
detect sound vibrations using their lateral
lines. This system is highly sensitive and allows
fish to visualize what's going on in their often-
murky underwater home. The sound of a slam-
ming hatch or stomping feet is transmitted
clearly by your boat's hull, and fish will pick up
on it from a hundred feet away or more. Ever
do any diving? With your head underwater
and yours ears full of water, sounds are louder
and seem closer than they are. That's the world
fish live in, and their sound-detection organs
are much more attuned to it than yours. But
not all sound matters. The sounds you really


want to avoid are the ones that are amplified
by the boat itself. Voices, for example, can't
be heard well underwater because sound
waves that are carried by air don't transmit
easily into the water. There's generally no
problem with talking while fishing, unless you
happen to have a very deep voice that sets
up a vibration in your boat's hull. The worst
offenders are hatches, cooler lids, hard-soled
shoes, engines, anchors and anchor chains,
and water slapping against the boat's hull.
Don't assume that trolling motors are silent
underwater. They're not, and fish that have
been chased by anglers learn quickly that
trolling motor hum is the sound of a predator.
In general, the deeper the water, the less
sound matters. But on the flats, the sound of
gentle wavelets lapping against your boat can
be enough to put spooky reds off their feed.
This is why wade fishing was invented.


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jlL .ptl* Page 15 *February 6,2014


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L KNOWLEDGEABLE CAPTAINS,


I would think that the first bait most fishermen
would remember using is the wiggly old worm
- I know it's the first bait I can remember using.
When I was just a young angler in the making
- around 5 or 6 years old one of my favorite
things to do was to dig up night crawlers with my
brother Scott. I think that kids by nature at
least most kids that I know love catching
things that are creepy and crawly. There are
plenty of critters scurrying around our backyards,
but worms have got to be on the top of the list
for the coolest slimy critter out there. Not only do
they wiggle and squirm around when you hold
them, but they're also cold and covered in goo.
But the greatest thing about them is that they
make great fishing bait.
Dad would always take us to grandma's house
the afternoon before our fishing trips to Lake
Manatee. When we got there, we knew our job
was to head out back and start digging up worms
out of the compost piles in her backyard. Believe
me, that was one job we really looked forward to.
He would always tell us,"get as many as you can
so we don't run out, and only keep the lively ones.
If they don't wiggle right, we won't get a bite.":'
Once we got out on the lake, he would start
picking through what we had collected the night
before. The ones that were sluggish, well, he
would just toss them overboard. He was a firm
believer that your bait has to be lively, at least if
you want to catch fish. This philosophy holds as
true today as it did 500 years ago.
Some of you may have noticed that I comment
a lot about the use of soft plastics in my articles.
The reason I mention them so much is simple -
they catch a lot offish. So, I was looking back over
some of my past articles recently and I noticed
that I've put very little emphasis on the actual
rigging of these baits. I'd like to fix that now.
When you're using paddle tail type baits, like


the D.O.A Paddle Tail Grub, your goal should be to
make the paddle tail part as wiggly as possible.
When I attach a jig head to the grub, I bring the
hook out just before the tail, because that's where
it seems to give the tail the best action. Rule of
thumb with paddle tail baits is this: the more
action the tail has, the more action you'll have.
Another soft plastic I'm very fond of is the Lil
John by MirrOlure. This straight-tailed jerk bait is
somewhat harder to work then paddle tail baits,
but there are certain times of the year spring
and fall that this type of bait can be deadly on
redfish and trout, so it's really worth your while
to learn to use them. This lure should always be
rigged so that the tail has as much movement as
possible. When you jerk or twitch it, you want it
to mimic a wounded bait fish fish like an easy
meal. I like to bring the hook out about 1/3 of the
way down the body, but that's just me. Work with
it until it's comfortable.
All artificial baits are designed to wiggle in a
certain way. Top waters plugs, stick shads, jerk
baits or soft plastics, it doesn't matter. Without
the right action, none of them will catch fish.
Sometimes the action is built right into the lure,
and sometimes you have to make the magic
happen, so really take the time to learn how to
work your baits of choice. It will pay off. As for live
bait guys, keep those baits fresh and lively, and
chum with the lazybones. Always remember,"lf
the wiggle ain't right, you won't get a bite.":'
Tight lines!
Capt. Mike Myers, owner and operator of
Reelshark Charters, is a full-time Charlotte Harbor
guide. Having fished the waters all along the
Southwest Florida coast for more than 35years, he
has the experience to put anglers on the fish they
want. His specialties are sharks, tarpon and Goliath
grouper. For more info, visit ReelShark.com or call
Capt. Mike at 941-416-8047.


From fuel drops to discounts at the pump, a Sea Tow'
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"!V
The Van Herwynen fishing team I
from Ontario, Canada: Savannah,
Jordan, Amber and Sydney display
some of their catch after a day on
the Harbor with their grandpa John.
M IIF 1 -


Richard Miller, a
snowbird from
Illinois, with
his first-ever
Florida fish a
34-inch black
drum. Richard,
you are color-
coordinated!


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aMPK,,I, Page 19 February 6,2014


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Charlotte Harbor Regatta




readY to set sail Friday


By BRIAN GLEASON
Staff Writer
More than 120 sailors in 70 boats will compete in the 5th annual
Charlotte Harbor Regatta Friday through Sunday. The regatta will feature
12 classes of boats competing on three race circles.
The bulk of the onshore activity will take place at Port Charlotte Beach
Park, the launch site of some four dozen multihull sailboats. Other classes
will launch from Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club and the Bayfront Center in
Punta Gorda. Sailors will be arriving from across the country and abroad,
coming from as far away as California, Canada and the Cayman Islands.
Racing begins at 11 a.m. Friday and continues at 10:30 a.m. Saturday
and 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Registration is open online and competitors can
sign up as late as Saturday morning at the beach complex.
Classes expected to compete in the regatta include the Hobie 16,
Wave, F16 and F18 catamarans, Weta and WindRider trimarans, Flying
Scot, 2.4mR, Sunfish and Laser. The regatta will feature the inaugural
Will White Cup, named for the author of"The Sunfish Book.'The Will
White Cup will be given to the winner in the Sunfish class to honor White,
one of only 16 honorary lifetime members of the International Sunfish
Class Association. White signed over the rights to his book to the class
association, which republished it, along with two other instructional
books, into "The Sunfish Bible'."
'"Will is a legend is the Sunfish world'said regatta director Sarah Buck.
"He is a founding director of the Charlotte Harbor Regatta and we're
thrilled to be able to recognize his contributions to the Sunfish class and
sailing in general with this award'."
The regatta has grown from eight classes in 2010 to 11 classes this
year. A big selling point has been its midwinter schedule that draws
racers from colder climates.
"We're shut down up here. It's just too cold.said Bruce Krupke, who
travels to the regatta each year with several Hobie 16 teams from Syra-
cuse, N.Y. "It gives us a great opportunity to stay competitive throughout
the year. It helps you keep your skill level up and continue to learn and be
more competitive'."
For information, go to CharlotteHarborRegatta.com.





























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The Sunfish is one of 11
classes included in the 5th
annual Charlotte Harbor
Regatta. The Sunfish class
will compete this year for
the Inaugural Will White
Cup, named for the local
author of "The Sunfish
Book:' The regatta begins
Friday and continues
through Sunday. Visit
ChadiotteHarborRegatta.com.


10


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_______________________/_P, Page 20 February 6, 2014

BIDN eABE AK


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peddling around Myakka


Three vehicles of Venice Area Birding
Association members braved the unusually
cold Florida weather to attend a field trip to
Myakka State Park it was one of those
mornings that you just wanted to stay buried
under a feather quilt in your nice warm bed.
However, this is one of my favorite area trips,
so I burrowed into my plastic storage bins and
pulled out warm winter clothing that I have
not worn in years. I even found my fluffy ski
hat. I was ready to brave the cold with wool
socks, turtleneck sweater and muffler.
We met at St. Margaret's Church on the
way to Myakka. This is always a regular stop,
as we usually pick up a few meadowlarks,
eastern phoebes, loggerhead shrikes and
sandhill cranes. Our leader for this trip,
Margaret Dunson, gave the signal that
we were moving on to our destination -
Myakka State Park.
We drove into the park and stopped at a
bridge on a wetland area to observe what
birds were feeding in the shallow water.
We were not disappointed. We were thrilled
to see spoonbills, mottled ducks, killdeer,
egrets, heron and more. We stayed for quite a
while, scanning the area with birding scopes
and binoculars. A huge alligator snout was
protruding from the water just under the
bridge. I am sure he was eyeing the great
egret that was foraging along the bank of the
water, hoping for breakfast.
Every time we started to leave, another
bird flew over and landed, or another huge
line of white pelicans sailed overhead.
Everyone would be looking up,"oohing and
aahing.'They area beautiful sight to see.
This extreme cold weather is not good for
the pelicans, as they can get frostbite, and
that can be a disaster for them. As we were
leaving, a night heron and limpkin were
spotted in the jungle of bushes right along
the bridge.
Finally, we tore ourselves away from this
productive stop and drove to the notorious
power line road. Sometimes this stop is very
productive, and sometimes not. There were
many palm warblers flying around, with a few
myrtle warblers and a phoebe. The highlight
of this site was the mature bald eagle sitting
on top of one of the power line poles.
We were all tugging at our jackets and hats
and pulling them a bit tighter around us at


this point. We were preparing to drive to the
boardwalk that extends out over the Myakka
- just the thought was giving me the chills.
We made a quick stop along the way
because there were quite a number of sand-
hill cranes foraging along the Myakka shore-
line. Several American avocets were spotted.
They were not in their breeding plumage, so
that was indeed a good sighting. We finally
arrived at the boardwalk. We hiked out to
the end and started looking for some new
sightings. Redwing blackbirds were noisily
flying in and out of the reeds. Another large
group of sandhill cranes seemed to be trying
to keep out of the wind as they were foraging
in a small cove.
Several members of the group became
hungry and left for the restaurant or picnic
tables. We stayed on for a bit, still searching
for a few new sightings. We did get some
good looks at a male indigo bunting.
We left to catch up with Margaret and
group at the restaurant and gift shop at
Myakka. It is always a pleasure having lunch
at Myakka, as the food is fresh and quite
good. This is a nice break and gave us a
chance to warm up, chat and prepare for our
final little jaunt to the dam. I always look
forward to this last area, as I anticipate limp-
kins, lots of gators and a few other waders.
It did not disappoint. We had some great
views of a green heron, great blue heron,
little blue heron and tri-color heron just a
few feet away. They were too busy feeding
to be bothered with our presence. Spoonbills
and limpkin were gathered across the creek.
Several tourist type people arrived, and I did
get a kick out of their exclamations regarding
the huge alligators one gets to see. I am quite
sure those gators were looking right at us,
mentally licking their chops.
Despite the cold, nobody wanted the trip to
end, but it was time to leave this wonderful,
beautiful park. Thank you, Margaret Dunson,
for leading this excellent trip.
Abbie Banks is a member of the Venice
Area Birding Association, a group of folks who
want to enjoy the environment and nature
without the cumbersome politics of an orga-
nized group. For more info on VABA or to be
notified of upcoming birding trips, visit www.
A bbies World.org/references.html or email her
atAmberina@aol.com.


---~----~-
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k.


Myakka State
Park offers -'


birding .: 3
p^let of^ **^
memories.



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CHARLOTTE COUNTY'S
#1 GUN SHOP

A eI,,

230I Tamiami Trail
Port Charlotte FL 33952
Phone: 941.889.7065
Fax: 941.889.7068
www.aandhgunsocfswfl.om

We Buy & Trade Guns!
OVER 100 YEARS OF WEAPON EXPERIENCE!


Doggy Daycare & Boarding

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r Free Web Cams
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PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33954
WWW.CAMPBOWWOW.COM/PORTCHARLOTTE
FACEBOOK.COM/CAMPBOWWOWPORTCHARLOT.TE


/^ \*-^ ^ --^ .



Myakkahatchee Cre!k Environmental Park
6968 Reisterstown Road, North Port

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 u
A&, .on 10AM-3PM sfbr
Let nature be your teacher!
Reconnect with the outdoors and discover the wonders
of nature at this free educational event.
For more information, visit
www.cityofnorthport.com and click on
the Parks and Recreation tab or call 429-PARK.
J7 MOMO< KS DIC
$TON TcK P RKS


If you suspect a
wildlife or boating law
violation, report it to
the FWC's Wildlife
Alert Reward Program.
If your information
results in an arrest, you
may be eligible for
a reward of up to $1,000.
Call 888-404-FWCC.
or dial *FWC or
#FWC on your cell.
MAKE A DIFFERENCE.





j#tJafle/& Page 21 *February 6,2014


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int~rSetUaillnh~aEl~sI i~ll m~mu~snEEU


* Gated Secured 7i1.J V ote
* Camera Monitored Clean-- BEST
RV&
Hurricane Rated Covered Storage Boat
*Sate Access 24/7 S storage
U-HAUL 150 Rio Villa Drive, Punta Gorda, Florida
AUTHORIZED DEALE 941-575-7473 www.charlotteRVStorage.com

PiRINE CONThACTING GROUP
C&D MARINE
Seawalls Caps Docks
Boat Lifts Dredging
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It was a hectic week. More so than usual, so we decided a
little day trip was in order. We headed north to Casey Key, but
to be honest, location wasn't top on our priority list. We simply
wanted to relax and let the stress of the previous week melt
away.
As we were headed to Casey Key, we noticed a little bar and
grill nestled in the Osprey Harbor Marina just off Blackburn Point
Road. What seemed from the outside to be a laid-back outdoor
patio turned out to be much more.
The restaurant is called the Bimini Bar and Grill. We found
ourselves a table on the outdoor patio overlooking the marina,
and like we always do when visiting a restaurant for the first
time, we scoped the rest of the place out.
There's a nautical-themed bar located on the first floor of
the establishment. Nothing too fancy. But I noticed an elevator
in the entrance of the bar, and asked where it led. Jerome, the
bartender, told us that it went up to the top floor, where casual
dining is offered. There were also stairs, so I went up and stuck
my head in the door and took a gander around. Of course, the
nautical theme remained, and the atmosphere was a bit on the
cosmopolitan side. Whether you want an outdoors, bar or fancier
atmosphere, the place gives you some options. Although we
would have been content dining upstairs, we were anxious to let
the sun start melting the stress away.
After a couple of refreshing beverages, we were ready to
order. Reading the dinner menu made our mouths water. The
only problem? The Bimini Bar and Grill only serves supper after
4 p.m. No worries. Their starters, salads and sandwiches menu
was equally mouth-watering.
We are big bouillabaisse fans. Who isn't? Bimini's version
includes sea scallops (not the tiny ones), white fish, salmon,
crab, shrimp and mussels simmered in a tomato lobster broth
complete with fresh herbs and rice. But what bouillabaisse
would be truly complete without dipping bread? For around $10,
we will be back for the Bimini Bouillabaisse again. The shrimp
and mussels were plump, the scallops rich and the broth and
rice served as a hearty filler. We also ordered the Baja Fish Tacos,
which were stuffed with grilled basa, cilantro cabbage slaw, pico
de gallo and drizzled with a sauce made from chipotle and aioli.
The bouillabaisse was a tough act to follow, but the fish tacos
held their own, with a big help from the homemade slaw. For
around $10, we enjoyed three decent-sized tacos, along with
homemade chips. They also had pork and authentic cheesesteak
sandwiches, gyros and a variety of baskets.
As we enjoyed our meal, we watched as charter boats and
tour boats came in and out of the marina, many venturing into
the Bimini Bar and Grill for a drink and a meal. As for us, we left
satisfied, and stress-free.
The Bimini Bar and Grill is located at 576 Blackburn Point Road
in Osprey. Come by boat and look for Channel Marker 30. Call
941-966-4816 or visit BiminiBarandGrill.com for more informa-
tion. You can also check them out on Facebook at facebook.com/
BiminiBarAndGnrill.


941.661.40770 "d
www.Bayviewanvas.com





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vour comm~~unit6!

Sh~p O/


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zJ~


A picture is worth a
thousand words.


O*unnn (manD at Dimini'" """"!
stressfree at Bim ini h Marine Custom Canvas + Upholstery
Custom Canvas Canvas Repair Mobile Service
SI,. I BAYVIEW CANVAS
Ri ....:n..:,,-.-..... 2 0Ja e \ 4210 I ,nnic Sr Poir (hnlch'je. Fl


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uEuUnalunnful nfn*n*n non.n


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14 1997 Natico cat Hull, 40hp Johnson with trailer. $5990. 17 2007 Carolina Skill 512,50
SVery Dry and stable ride for it's size. New Floor and transom. Call Richard Rosano 203-912-95
Bimini Top, Brand NewTrolling Motor, and CMC Jack Plate McCallMarineSales.com
Draft's 8 Inches. By appointment only
Drafts 8 Inches. Licensed Yacht Broker -
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com Located at BEAUTIFUL (M,- RI
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Single AxleTrailer w/ New Wheels & Tires! $1,695.
CrVstal Cay Center
0 T 41-630-6603
t WWW.CRYSTALCAY.COIVI
4225 Taylor Road, PC.


Mercury EFI 2011 Lowe Custom Trailer
Minn Kota wireless trolling motor, Lowrance GPS &
Fish Finder Boat is like new -Only 34 Hours
Just Serviced turn key See full details & water test
video @ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835
REDUCED'


House backs


han nn ineuravre


16 1987 SlarCrail Spori boal w'lrailer $1500
Motor does not work. $1,200 for boat alone.
C,,rstal Gay Centr,
941-639-6603
- WWW.CRYSTALCAY.COMWi
4225 Taylor Road, PS


UUHI Ull IIIEUEE UIE U



discriminating i%&
every Thursda.y,


against gun owners OminInthe


Just Serviced Ready to go! $3,060. $3,395.
C0,xstal Cay Center
941-639-6603
/ WWW CRYSTALCAY.COIM,4C
4225 Taylor Road, PG


17' SUNCATS 2004, 2006 & 2014 Available
Please call for pricing!
Punta Gorda's Com-Pac Dealer
941-833-0099


The News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE Insurance companies could
face tougher penalties if they impose higher
rates, refuse to issue or cancel auto or home-
owner policies due to gun ownership, under a
measure backed by a House committee.
Florida law already prohibits such action,
but Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach,
said his proposal (HB 255) would provide a
remedy other than with the state Office of
Insurance Regulation by allowing a
policyholder to sue if an insurer took such
an action.
"It just gives greater access to courts;'
Gaetz said. "It's unlawful now, but the only
entity that has the ability to enforce it right
now is OIR.":'
A staff analysis of the bill notes that"an
issue with the current law is that it lacks
specific authority to take action against
any insurers which violate the proscribed
behavior.":'
Gaetz added that while such actions by
insurers haven't been seen in Florida, cases
have been tracked in Ohio, Indiana and
Pennsylvania.
"In Florida that has not been a circum-
stance, but this is a prophylactic in the event
that events we've seen in other parts of the
country proliferate here;'" Gaetz said.
Rep. Kevin Rader, D-Delray Beach, an
insurance agent, cast the lone vote on
the Insurance and Banking Subcommittee
against the measure. He called the measure
"unnecessary."
"If an insurance company wants to
exclude assault-type weapons, it seems to
me that it is good to exclude if they desire
to;' Rader said. "Certainly I know on animal
exclusions they exclude Doberman pinschers
and rottweilers."
Gaetz said insurance companies wouldn't
be prohibited from asking potential policy
holders about gun ownership, nor would


they face state scrutiny if they lowered
rates for a gun owner based on an actuarial
determination that gun ownership reduced
the risk of burglaries.
Insurers also wouldn't be prohibited from
charging a supplemental premium, as long
as it's not deemed unfairly discriminatory, to
insure a firearm or firearm collection.
National Rifle Association lobbyist Marion
Hammer said the issue was raise due as Citi-
zens Property Insurance Corp. had included
a question in its new policy clearinghouse
regarding gun ownership.
"The only reason for insurance companies
to start asking you about what guns you
want is so they can discriminate against gun
owners;'" Hammer said. "They have no right
to ask those questions.":'
A spokesman for Citizens said the ques-
tion is no longer a part of the clearinghouse
questionnaire.
The question was included in early testing
of the site, as one of the four private compa-
nies currently set up to potentially receive
new policies, United Property & Casualty
Insurance Co., has been allowed by OIR since
2005 to consider firearms when under-
writing policies.
Sandra Starnes, OIR director of property
and casualty product review, said United is
allowed to exclude homeowners if they are
"in possession of dangerous firearms.":'
Assault and rapid fire weapons could be
classified as "dangerous;'" but game hunting
rifles and shot guns would be excluded from
the prohibition, she said.
The measure must still get through the
Civil Justice Subcommittee and Regulatory
Affairs Committee.
The Senate companion (SB 424) has
already been backed by the Banking and
Insurance and the Criminal Justice commit-
tees, and has only to clear the Appropria-
tions Committee before reaching the Senate
floor.


S-v f: 'e& (TC- r-rum-v r


WHERE: Gasparilla Marina =
(15000 Gasparilla Road, Placida)
WHAT: The second installment of the WaterLine GP
Seminar Series is all about catching sheepshead,
black drum and redfish from underneath docks and piers. Capt. Mike will
also be answering any and all fishing questions from the audience.
COST: Free, plus there will be cool door prizes and refreshments.
MORE INFO: You don't need to register just show up and follow the signs for
parking. If you have questions, call 941-276-9657.


The Senate Banking and Insurance
Committee passed a bill to prohibit
insurance companies from discrimi-
nating against gun owners by charging
them more, or canceling their policies,
because they own a gun.





El E~himbOjugeUK .IF.emUu..u Mhi~ue
uamusa~umm~uu..u. E~DIIIEE!U.DUDUUE


SECOND ANNUAL
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA COUNCIL OF ?HE BUNt

t$Srn4^
\^ dt


SCall 941-429-311
Sto list your oat ay ___NU


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dib


18'2006 C HawK Bay Boat w/ 90lp iour
Asking $13,990. Very Low hrs almost like
SS Propeller, Garmin Color Chart Plotter GF
trailer. Bimni top, Live Well, Coast Guard
Ready For the Water!
RAYSHORF MARINF 941-627-5777 havuhnr


I PER


Stroke Merc. 19' 2000 Seaswirl Center Console: Good shape,
e a new boat! 115HP Johnson. New VHF, Garmin fishfinder/chartplot-
PS. Comes with ter combo, battery and bilge pump. Bimini and console
SEquipment. cover included. Asking $11,500. n n'
rmarinmfl .nm Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 urz itr


CALL
FROM PAGE 2
I assumed that because of last year's media
coverage, many more people learned of the
event, and wanted in. That may be true, but
a mailing error is likely the bigger cause of
this year's popularity. Turns out that fliers are
normally sent out to individuals and businesses
in Lee and Charlotte counties to promote the
event. However, somewhere down the line an
error was made, and promotional fliers were
sent throughout our Sunshine State.
The tournament was organized by SWFCB
member Mike Ulrich. In just its third year, the
field has grown from nine boats to well over


25. But like organizing any fishing tournament,
it has not been easy. Never mind trying to fish
blind try rounding up sponsors, a venue,
transportation and captains.
With sponsors such as Bass Pro Shops and
Walmart, Mike will be able to dish out door
prizes, hire a band and provide pulled-pork
sandwiches and other food and beverages. He
just needs a little assistance from any captains
willing to lend a helping hand.
Last year, the event was held at Old Pine Island
Marina in St. James City. Due to the increased
popularity, this year's event will be held at the
Cape Coral Yacht Club (5819 Driftwood Pkwy.,
Cape Coral). For more information about the
SWFCB or their fishing tournament, email
mulrich@centurylink.net or call 239-565-5845.


18'2006 Sea Hunt 186 115Yamaha 4-Stroke 2012 Magic
tilt Aluminum Trailer-Swing tongue-Garage Friendly
Removable T-Top, Leaning Post, Color GPS/Fish Find-
er, Stereo and VHF. Super nice condition. Just serv-
iced turn key. See full details and virtual water test
video @ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835
,11 T 11111111111111


18' 2008 SEA FOX BF 185 BAY
140 HP Suzuki 4 stroke, power pole,
trolling motor, trim tabs, trailer and more!
$16,900 941-916-9874


19 2008 SEA HUNT BX 19 VI i ,- ;,.:.[.- ,ai lri,
$23,900. Call Meagan McCall at 941-269-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt. ONLY i B I
Licensed Yacht Broker
I ncatd at RFABJTIFUJI . . ^ S .


s, 2010 MagicTilt Alum Trailer. Great family/fishing boat.
Color GPS/Fish Finder, shallow water anchor. Like new
w/only 81 hours. Yamaha Warranty through 11/16. Just
Serviced Turn Key package. See full details and virtual
water test video@ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


Sale price @ $11,990. Very Low Hrs Since New. Lower Unit Very Nice clean boat in Excellent Condition! $16,900
just completely redone. Full cover. Engine is spotless. Runs a C
Exc.needs nothing!. Very solid boat with a great ride and fast. C 9Vta41-e3BGY- 8o3C ro.
V" WWW.CRYSTALCAY.COM .%A -
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com 4225s Taylor Road, PG


18' GLASTRON 183CC with VERY low hr
Johnson 2004 at $13,900 with nice trailer.
Call Tod 941-457-0131
Or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


18" HEWES BONEFISHER FLATS BOAT,
'88 Evinrude Special,
24 Volt Trolling Motor, Aluminum Trailer.
Must See!
$6,000. 941-697-3894


zu .zuuov ,Jea ilum zu.z .iou rihr. lamlalla 4--,uvn
Wesco Aluminum Trailer, T-Top, Color GPS/Fish
Finder ,VHF and Stereo. Super nice family fishing
boat. Boat just serviced turn key. See full details and
virtual water test video
@ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835
IL -.A-





20' BOSTON WHALER 1 ':"l:' iil ,i:- ,
1999- 150 HP Mercury Optimax Fuel injected
Motor. Approx. 600 hrs. Foruno GPS & Depth
Sounder, VHF Radio, 2005 aluminum trailer,
Cover and Bimini excellent condition
$12,500. Call 941-474-7830


4 cloves garlic, minced A clip-n-save seafood
1 small onion, finely chopped recipe provided by


1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 pound medium raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 head of broccoli, cut into florets
8 button mushrooms, thinly sliced
6 tbsp oyster sauce
3 tbsp soy sauce
3 tbsp water


A.k
- Recipe from www.
all-fish-seafood-redipes.com


In a large wok, saute garlic and onion in oil until fragrant. Add shrimp and stir fry for 3-5 minutes.
Add the mushroom and saute for 3 minutes. Add the broccoli and saute for 2 minutes. Mix the
oyster sauce, soy sauce and water and add to the wok; simmer for 1 minute. Serve hot over
steamed rice. Serves 4.


18' SEA PRO WITH 2006 115HP
YAMAHA 4 STROKE, GARMIN 451 GPS,
SS PROP & ALUM TRAILER, EXC. COND.
$8,500 207-350-0431


19' 1996 Wellcrall Cenler Console. Johnson 112HP
$7,990. Fish Finder, CD Player, Fishing Chair,
Life Jackets, Bimini Top & Swim Ladder. Fresh Water
Boat Very Good Condition! Has Trailer. This boat
Needs nothing ready for fun in the sun today!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


20 leam SailTisn, 1996b, with trailer. Center console, live
well, motor Yamaha 130,2 stroke, w/ SS prop, recently
tuned up trailer. New hubs, brakes, buddy bearings, and
tires, excellent condition, ready to launch and go fishing.
Was $7,900 REDUCED To: $6,900
941-626-4571 or 941-627-5777


Boat & Trailer. Ready to ride! $4,85. $3,480.
G,,tal Cay Cen
041-639-6603
S WWW.CRYSTALCAY.COIV
^ 4 422S Taylar R"Cad, PIG


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21 Y1998WII.,raIl Dual C.:.n,'.:.I,1 vlh a IAfhp Mor~urV VrV
Clie3rn' l1 I 0u 3rmirn C .S Color Cn3ri fi'loIller ub Alum
Trailr Full W nd',.hIld L,,I'- :1 '- alirg Much 3,.'y I: r..
lain hen a da ck b,:,al R m1.I .abIl Clj,:hi.:.r.. I ,ilh Ml, uILh
belier ride Turn K y' A3cly I.:.r Ih, wv3l r I.:.3y'
BAYSM':ilE MAlIrIE 4-41 62 '. -;h;r-.r r.r I byll :,:oCn-,r


...... ... ...




21 2001 MONTERAY 220 Sporl NOW ONLY S12.900!
Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
j, Tll,:.|:. .:. n .-l :, r'l, X A R I N IA
I.,L .i- ,rdi,: I .i-.i ,-i:4,.-i SiSnfR d
I.,:,," 1,-,3 al I.?E- I.IT|II.Il. ^ ['.M ,A KI N X ) :'


23' 1993 SEA RAY SUNDANCER L.-i I-hi .:.I r,.:.l.:'
,.; 1.2...:,:,,:, ~,.W I, l-~r 1e i')i r 1,:C ll l,:,, I:',-I ai,1l '. .: 4 1. "* !.' ":* 1'. !
McCallMarineSales.com
Lx .i:i iEITIF. 1I:, ,.Ai RIN A
1.:," al.,. I.I-" I^ IT Ii.il R^ K Ilf


150 h.p. Saliwaler series II Full ransom .Hard Top.
Windless, Lowrance 7 Color GPS'F.Finder.
Boal recently refurbished Lo almost new condition.
See full details and virtual waler lesi video ,
WWW.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


Every boater and fisherman knows the
importance of sea grass when they're
heading out on the water. You'll find those
tailing beauties feeding over the grass
beds not over bare sand or muck. One
of the few benefits from Hurricane Charley
was a cleansing of the sea grass as the
agitated waters washed the sediment
off the blades of grass. It's ironic that a
hurricane helped, and the degradation of
those sea grass beds is being caused by
the people who enjoy the aquatic benefits
the most.
Studies have cited the damage done
by fertilizer, prop scarring and insecticide
run-off. It's common sense that chemicals
formulated to kill vegetation and living
organisms will also kill sea grass and fish.
That's why we should take great care in
the dispersal of these chemicals near
our waterfront properties, and only use
time-release fertilizers. Overspray and
run-off will wash residue into the water
and impact our precious water resource.
The far-reaching effect of these chemicals
was demonstrated in a study that found
chemicals in the Caloosahatchee and the
Harbor that are only used in the sugar
industry. These chemicals had to run
off into irrigation ditches, back to Lake
Okeechobee and down the river to the
Harbor. So the cumulative effect of all of
these chemicals can be damaging and far
reaching.
Past studies done by the Florida Wildlife
Research Institute found that during the last
10 years, the damage done to sea grass by
propeller scarring has continued to increase.
These low winter tides increase the expo-
sure of sea grasses to prop scarring. When
boats travel through shallow water, the
propellers can tear away at the sea grasses
below. Sometimes, the blades simply cut off
the tips of the grass. Other times, they'll rip
the grass up by the roots. This leaves a path
of bare sediment where the boat has passed
by known as prop scarring. In many
shallow flats, these low tides enable you to
see the streaks across the bottom, where
a passing boat has torn out the sea grass.
At low tides you can see this in the Peace
River flats when passing northbound on the
1-75 Bridge. In other locations, the frequent
passing of boats has torn out all of the sea
grass, leaving only exposed bare shoals of
sediment.
The recovery time of propeller scar
damage varies for the different species of
sea grasses that exist in the Harbor and
in the rivers. Research has shown that the


shoal grasses can recover and close a bare
spot within one to two years. However,
turtle grass will need three to seven years
for the same level of recovery. Of course,
all of these recovery times are depen-
dent on maintaining the same level of
water quality and the absence of boaters
running back over the same areas again.
Charlotte Harbor is one of the most
productive estuaries in the United States.
It not only provides great fishing and
boating to the local residents, but its
waters are the breeding grounds for salt-
water fish for the entire West Coast. When
we destroy the natural grasses that are
nature's breeding grounds, we do damage
far beyond our local waters. That's why
the National Estuary Program has done
studies to provide these findings. To date,
the study has been informative and done
hand in hand with the local community.
Obvious next steps in the program would
be the recommendation of steps to be
taken to remedy the situation. Logical
considerations are increased boater
education, additional or improved channel
markers, increased enforcement and
creation of limited motoring zones.
I think most of us will agree that
limited motoring zones and increased
enforcement are not very palatable
solutions. However, when we see the
continued degradation of the sea grass
beds, it's apparent something must be
done. As CHNEP has done in their recent
Harbor Happenings magazine, I suggest
we focus on boater education. Is it really
necessary to run 35 miles per hour
across the flats to get from one point
to another? Can't we use the deeper
water to get from one spot to another
and trim up and motor slowly when we
are in shallow water? Did you ever hear
the old adage about "fouling ones own
nest? Let's all be responsible boaters and
respect the sea grass beds that are home
to our aquatic wildlife. Your speeding
boat does the same thing to the fish that
Hurricane Charley did to us when it blew
through our homes. You know how cata-
strophic that was to you, so take it easy
on the fish. They need a home also.
For more information on the Charlotte
Harbor Estuary program, check out their
website atCHNEP.org.
Bill Hempel is the Assistant Safety Officer
for the Peace River Power Squadron and a
member of the LISPS national marketing
committee. Contact him at billmarl@
comcast.net.


21'2013 HURRICANE SUNDECK Fun in Ihe Sun! 23 2005 TROPHY 2352wa S27.500
FuIt i iii-l , l- ', il I I.-i i r r .:, ili .-41 .?: Richard Horsle 941-548-6070
McCallAlarineSales.com McCallAlarineSales.com
I.'d, at 1 EAU:T',1I FU,, l ,MRI N L0&a at.l,:i I,1,,, l BEAU.TIFL RIC, N,
L. ,', ,; ,atlB.:Ei- .:.h-i -UL i4.Ri',:,.4, Li, l'd Ii- .i l
LOCaLed aL BEAUTIFUL |i i-. R I N ."] I- LOCaLed aL BEAUTIFUL {*'(M ,-RI NA.-1 -


Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I
Licensed Yacht Broker ____
Located at BEAUTIFUL :IM A H I


23" 2006 CLEARWATER BAYBOAT,
Trailer, Motor & Boat, 150HPYamaha
4-Stroke. T-Top, GPS/ Fish Finder.
$18,000. 941-626-6868

f lj _.-. L~.~iiii
.- ,, .... .....
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21' 2013 SEA HUNT ESCAPE 211 LE 23 2006 SHEARWATER 2200z $34,900
$32,750 W/ warranty Meagan McCall 941-269-3198 Ultimate Fishing Boat! Richard Horste 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
ByAppt ONLY! By appointment only I
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL I" Q A = %I .. Located at BEAUTIFUL M AARINA^..


21' STRIPER 2007, CC with tandem
alum trailer. Yamaha 200HP warr
until 1/8/15. Exc. cond. $28,000
609-519-1177


22 2005 SHAMROCK 220 PREDATOR Walk-Arc
$39,900 Call Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only ,I M
Licensed Yacht Broker _____
Located at BEAUTIFUL IG M .RINA.I


, ~ '.




24'2000 Crownline, In Excellent Condtion! 5.7 Mercrusier
EFI Only $16,990. Garmin GPS Sounder, Sleeps 4
Comfortably. Was Dry rack Stored and she shows!
Very Low Hrs Always maintained. Great Price!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com







24' 2000 Sea Ray SUNDECK with 5.7 Bravo 3 Dual Prop.
Only $15990. Plenty of seating. Porta Potty Room. Garmin
GPS, Stainless BiminiTop. New oil pan, oil exchanger &
shift cable just replaced.Turn key!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


199 nPr.:.l.n.ll WAC II'. H VYmihi:" t HuIbuI 1 LOW Hr"
Just Serviced! Alum. Tandem Axle Trailer. Must See! $7,995.


cIjstal Cay COmflt
941-639-6603
ZWWW.CRYSTARaCA,.COV,7!
4.y 225 Taylor Road, PG Si~ t


24' 2002 SHAMROCK Cuddy cabin
all maintenance records
$27,000. OBO 661-964-9282





El aafmlBn m',nfl ne lren sU Banna nun.
uatusatum---mnnuusau- EMIIunnmml


Call 941-42k3iG- -
to list your boattodavY! __


r


VI


SClean with rasied console.T-Top Rocket launcehers, w/ Float in 8"
of water & can run way offshore. Best of both worlds. Rare Find!
Two live wells, fish boxes, hydrolic steering & more!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


IF4



24 2005 SHAMROCK'- '- ... 'l,.l rni'rn,.,g ,:,,
hours. Call Richard Rosano 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only gmb, i
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL .. ..rr r .,rr I


W



Winter Haven angler Van Ii
Soles captured the first leg of
the Southern Open profes-
sional trail out of Lake Toho.
Along with prize money and a
new boat for the win, the real
prize is an entry into the 2015
Bassmaster Classic.
Every bass anglers'dream
is to fish with the big boys,
the guys we see on ESPN for
months on end when their
season is in full swing. To
be part of the touring trail
is one thing-- to win a
tournament that grants you
entry into the Bassmaster
Classic is truly a great accomplishment.
Now, Soles simply needs to complete his
other two Southern Open tournaments
and he will be on his way to the Classic at
Lake Hartwell in 2015.
I met Van some 12 or 13 years ago when
he joined the Lakeland Bassmasters. Then, he
was an 18 or 19 year old kid that simply knew
how to get it done on the lake. The only ones
I had seen better up until then were the Lane
brothers. Soles quickly found himself near the
top of the tournament results on a regular
basis, and before long, he was buying bigger
boats to make bigger runs and fish bigger
tournaments.
His fishing career took an interesting turn
a few years back when he decided to get his
insurance license. He had pretty much quit
fishing, got rid of the boat and focused on
learning the insurance business. Today, he
has his own agency and handles insurance for
business of all types. Once he got his business
up and going, he got back into something that
he has always loved and always had a passion
for bass fishing.
I had a chance to talk to Van the other night
and ask him how he felt about the whole
experience, and where he has gotten himself
to. He said,"You know, sitting in the weigh-in
line between guys like Terry Scroggins and
Gerald Swindle, you realize where you are at
in a hurry, but it is really exciting. These are
the guys we watch on TV and now I am in the
running fishing against them'."
You could still hear the excitement in his
voice three days after the event had ended.
He told me that his phone hasn't stopped
ringing since. Deals from boat manufac-
turers, motor companies, bait companies
and rod and reel makers have been coming


26' 1996 CHRISCRAFT CROWN
With new engine and trailer $15,000
Call Mike at 941-412-6430 or
the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


a i t s ^ ^ 24 2008 Bay ScouL 240 ."::' ,'.-5l H-.ii-.i. i'.- 26 2002 Four Winns 268 VisLa: Su[
boat!! Call Megan McCall at 941-268-3198 and out, just waxed, 5.7 Volvo
I McCallMarineSales.com generator w/86 hrs, full camped
By appointment only Recent survey rated above average.
Licensed Yacht Broker Call Ray Mason f
Located at BEAUTIFUL NM ARIN. 941-505-7269. '


(810 _REDUCED'


in almost daily. That's when you know the
dream has become reality.
But there's still work for Soles to do. Staying
focused heading into this once in a lifetime
chance is a year away. There are two Southern
Opens to fish, plans to get up to Lake Hart-
well and view the lake, as well as maintain
his business, and hopefully, a shot at fishing
professionally. A little matter of finding that
key sponsor to assist with expenses and
wrapping the boat wouldn't be bad, either, but
that'll come before he needs to head off to the
big event.
On a personal note, I have to take my hat off
to Vanny and give him his due. From the first
time I met him, I knew he could fish. There was
no obstacle that would get in his way if he kept
his mind on what he really wanted to do. He
was always the little brother you looked out for
when we fished in the Lakeland Bassmasters,
and one of the guys that you just loved to have
around. Being a few years older than him,
almost 20, was never an issue when it came
to hanging out or getting together with wives
and/or girlfriends. We all share the same type
of passion, and fishing was something that
bonded us over the years.
So, here's to you big man. Go out there and
make the local anglers proud. I promise you we
are behind you every step of the way. Every
one of us from Doc Swango, all the way down
to my daughter wishes you the best of luck
in your journey. I couldn't be happier for you,
unless I was in the Classic myself.
Good luck!
Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fisherman
based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes throughout
Florida's Heartland with his wife and tourna-
ment partner, Missy Snapp. Contact him at
Greg.Bartz@SummitHoldings.com.


Stereo, Furuno Radar, GPS, plotter, much more! $12,000.
c, i tal Cay Cent
'" 941-639-6603 '
WWW.CRYSTALCAY.CO M i
4225 Taylor Road, PG


A ........ ..LD



25 2001 PRO SPORTS CENTER CONSOLE 2003
SUZUKI TWIN 140 H.P. 4-STROKES. Serious fishing
machine Deluxe T-Top outriggers, downriggers,
color GPS, fish finder, Radar. Just serviced turn key
boat. See Full details and virtual water test video @
WWW.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835







25' BAYLINER TROPHY Walk Around,
1997. MERC. 225 EFI, CHART PLOTTER,
DEPTH GAUGE, VHF, FULL COCKPIT ENCLOSURE,
RUNS GREAT. $9,700
941-637-6443 OR 773-717-0919






251" 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter GPS with Sonar. Hard
Top, A/C! Comes w/Aluminum trailer.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.corn






26' 1989 BOCA GRANDE V .i- rII t ,nn ,.-,i -;,' : ,,
Call Richard Rosano for Details! 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt. ONLY A i I A
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL NIMARINA,-)


w/289 hrs,
r enclosure.
Asking $34,000.
,rOOe-
YlRirSnfi


Call Richard Rosano at 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only 1
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL iM A RI NA.J


26' GRADY WHITE 263 CHASE WITH TWINS
With trailer. $19,900
Call Ed at 941-628-0167
Or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


26' Pursuit Denali 2670: Excellenl condilion,T-200 Yamaha
four strokes w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure, windlass,
elec. head, Garmin GPS and fishfinder. Asking $68,500.
Call Cpt. Bob Babineau, Ti r OnKe-
941-626-1329 fl'w Srs


$39,900 Call Meagan McCall 941-26E
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only .L l
Licensed Yacht Broker ____
Located at BEAUTIFUL I G ,. W I


Like new condition, twinYamaha 4 strokes, generator,
AC, radar, hardtop, all the amenities.
This boat has it all. Asking $65,000. ..
Call Ray Mason Litr Owt
941-505-7269 YufluNaL1





utustum-mnnnuun- EMI5unnmiumn


I'd like first and foremost i |
to declare that team No Trout |
About It did not live up to its
name; In fact, we caught five I
of our eight-fish limit in the
inaugural WaterLine trout
tournament last month.
That being said, I'm sure
looking back there are things
we all would have done differ-
ently the second time around.
Now that we have our first
tournament behind us, we feel
most of the kinks were minor.
The captain's meeting the
night before, the food and the
goodie bags that ensued were
all sure signs that we had done
the right thing by signing up.
We each got shirts, artificial
lures for days and a load of
other fun stuff in our bag, and
the folks at The Fishery made
sure we ate well.
The four of us were plenty excited the
morning of. The boys headed out to grab bait
and get us a spot at the dock while Nicole and I
went shopping for lunch, snacks and beer, and
met them at the launch.
My first impression upon arrival was shock at
how many boats there were! Around 40 entries
had crowded the launch point, and since I was
pretty sure we had no shot at the top spots, I
spent my energy instead being happy for the
friends who had organized the event for such a
great turnout.
My attitude changed after about 10 minutes
on the water when we landed our first keeper
trout. Bam!
Thanks to Capt. Mike, we had two more
keepers in great time. Three down, five to go,
and suddenly the four of us were certain we
would beat everyone back to the dock with
plenty of time to spare.
That's the fun thing about competition,
right?
Let's take a little detour at this point. There
is an old adage that says you can learn a lot
about a person by the way they treat their
mother. I learned the same is true, and maybe
even more so, about men and fishing tourna-
ments. I learned this about 15 minutes after
we caught the last trout we'd see for a couple
of hours.
The boys sniped at the girls. We weren't
baiting hooks fast enough. We weren't casting
in exactly the right spots. When I was allowed
to cast on my own, twice I lost my bait off the
hook, and got firm reminders that our livewell
was depleting rapidly.
I switched to a Gulp! for bait and pouted a
while, secretly smug because the boys weren't
catching anything, either. Then, I got a hit, and
a hard one.
Matt was sure it was a snook, which excited
me because they love to fight. The fish
launched itself out of the water a few times in


Irw"^^"


28 1991 Sea Ray Weekender:Two rebuilt
Mercs with low hours, large cockpit for
fishing, new interior
upholstery. Ask $23,900.Tjie rO-)
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269. "- ff

REDUCED"





28' 2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin,
310 dual prop AC, GPS, bridge enclosure,
electric head, full galley, 45 mph, only 125 hrs.
lift kept. Excellent condition.
$28,560. $22,500 941-639-7890.







28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000, T/250HPYamaha's,
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000,
941-966-5400


28' CruiserYacht 1998,5.7 Twin Merc engines,
Full canvas covers, Many extras. $6,000. $23,900.
cystal Cay Cente.
S 941-639-6603 .
422S Taylor Roadl, PG -


spectacular fashion, putting on a great show as
I reeled it closer and closer to the boat.
Finally, it was in, and it was the biggest
ladyfish I have ever seen in my life. It was 10
feet if it was an inch, no exaggeration at all,
and since I'm the one writing the column,
you'll just have to take my word for it.
I unhooked it and fumbled with my camera
with my free hand, eager to get a photo with
my trophy beast. Until a sharp voice cut short
my glory. Not a trout, back in the water, throw
another shrimp on and quit messing around.
Sigh.
Around that time, we realized we were out
of bait, and booked it across the clearing to
re-up. It was a rookie mistake, and it cost us
about 30 minutes.
Turns out, that 30 minutes didn't matter.
When we limped in just 10 minutes before
our 4 p.m. cutoff time with five keepers, we
learned the winning boat had limited out and
made it back in just 61 minutes. Thanks, Fishin'
Franks.
But hey, we had fun, and we didn't get
skunked! There were plenty of alcoholic
beverages on land to ease the pain of defeat
and that, coupled with live music, sunshine
and a good crowd made a great end to our first
competition.
There was a lot of talk about what we
would do different next time: Pre-fish more
seriously, grab more bait, teach the ladies
how to bait up faster and maybe even spot
out more than just a few places in case ours
were occupied.
Everyone has to start somewhere, and I
think we held our own. Next time, team No
Trout About It will make even bigger waves.
Either that, or we'll sink trying.
Dawn Klemish is an award-winning
sports writer and avid fisher(wo)man. She
is the author of an online blog, Snarkin-
fested Waters. wordpress. com. Reach her at
Sun25rise@aoLcom.


O lM IVlMUr opuoti ri-iiemanidii, 1O
(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler I/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, encl. head.
$26,000 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales


30' Checkmate 300SX, 1986, with tri-axle trailer
2 MerCruiser 600HP motors, bimini, & more. $34,500
0< tal Cay Cent-e
g4 -. e'* ,-e6aeeo -
--.UVWA/CV.CYSTAI CAV.COEVIJ^t.
;V^j 4225 Taylor Road, PG3 sS8


30 CRUISER IND 1988,Twin 350s, 10 beam.
Full cabin, bimini top & more. 648,00. $16,900.
,cryst.al Cay Center,,
041-639-6603
-^L UWWW.CRYSTALCAY.COPAJrA
-Q JA 4225 Taylor Road, PS -G


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only l
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [G N I N A ..


30' LUHRS ALURA PILOT 1989
Yanmar diesel $39,995
Call Mike 941-412-6430
Or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


-w-* -"--rn

31' 2005 Chaparral 310 Signature: Loaded w/options,
T-Mercs w/300 hrs, Bravo III outdrives, well main-
tained, lift kept. Owner open to a trade for 24'-26'
walkaround. Asking $98,000.
Ray Mason,941-505-7269 Zp. 2 rf
Pier One Yacht Sales A Unar ine


S31 Sporlcra[I 2002 3150: Lill kepl,T- Mercruiser MPI
29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10, 5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers. w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator. $69,000. u2.' *
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600. ,. Q... .A.700 U-.n-(n.


29" Larson Cruiser, 2007 EFI 4.3 s Only $29,900.00
New seals in the outdrives. Radar Depth finder GPS
Marine Stereo, Bimini Tops, SS Prop. Full stand up
head w/ shower. Aft cabin with plenty of room. LOADED!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com
IftZk.^ki~ll'^I^ II^^


clean inside & out, 5212 Garmin chartplotter, lift
kept & serviced on a regular basis. Trade an
option. Ask $75,000.
Ray Mason, 74m t On "
941-505-7269 9oiP RIr


REDUCED


I


Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198 Call Orion for details at 941-249-0177
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only M By appointment only l A
Licensed Yacht Broker S Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL '[M .- I- N- Located at BEAUTIFUL MA RI N ,].





El Eimb jug--K-.IF 5mlui-- Mhi--



BULLETIN BOARD
FROM PAGE 9

for the US Fish & Wildlife Service, conducts guided walks for
Lemon Bay Conservancy & the Mangrove Chapter of the Native
Plant Society. Light refreshments provided. Everyone is welcome.
Mangrove.FnpsChapters.org.

ENGLEWOOD FISHING CLUB MEETING
The Englewood Fishing Club will hold its monthly meeting on
Feb. 13th at 6:30 p.m. at the Lemon Bay Park Environmental
Center (570 Bay Park Blvd., Englewood). Featured will be a
presentation by Capt. Mike Myers of Reel Shark Charters about
"Tarpon and Shark fishing" Admission is free and open to the
public. Further info can be found at EnglewoodFishingcClub.net.

FULL MOON TRAM TOURS
AT FAKAHATCHEE STATE PARK
Ride the new"Ghost Rider"tram, named in honor of the
famous Ghost Orchid found in the park. The Fakahatchee is
home to more orchid species than any other place on the
North American continent. Only three Full Moon tours will
be offered this season. All tours start as the sun is setting.
A naturalist will lead each tour. The Full Moon tours leave
from the ranger station (137 Coastline Drive, Copeland, off
Janes Scenic Drive). Please arrive early as the tram leaves
promptly according to the following schedule: Feb. 14th,
depart at 5 p.m., return 7:15 p.m.; March 15th, depart at
6 p.m., return 8:15 p.m. Reservations for the Full Moon
tours are $25 per person and can be made by visiting
OrchidSwamp.org.

MOTE MARINE FULL MOON KAYAK PADDLE
Kayaking doesn't get much cooler than this. Take a break from
the sun and join us for an evening paddle as we explore Florida's
coastal waters at dusk on Feb. 14th at 6:30 p.m. at Mote Marine
Laboratory (1600 Ken Thompson Pkwy., Sarasota). Discover the
animals that bring Sarasota Bay to life at night while taking a
relaxing paddle on the moonlit water. All kayaking equipment
is provided and class begins with basic kayaking instruction.
The cost is free. Visit Mote.org or call 941-302-4997 for more
information.

MIAMI BOAT SHOW TRIP
LEAVES FROM CAPE CORAL
Sit back, relax and enjoy a trip to the Miami Boat Show that
departs on Feb. 15th at 7 a.m. from the Cape Coral Yacht Club
Community Park (5819 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape Coral) and
returns at 9 p.m. The trip includes transportation, entry fee,
parking, tolls, snacks and soft drinks. Call 239-574-0806 or
visit CapeParks.com for more information.

SELBY BOTANICAL GARDENS
RAINFOREST FRIENDS
The Rainforest Friends is a new program at the Marie Selby
Botanical Gardens (811 S Palm Ave., Sarasota) designed
for children ages 3 to 11 and their families. On February
15th at 1 p.m., tropical Conservationist Bruce Segal leads
youngsters on a virtual expedition through the rainforest.
Registration is required. Call 941-366-5731 or contact
education@selby.org.

TWO GUYS GUN SHOW
On Feb. 15th starting at 9 a.m. at the Sarasota Fairgrounds
(3000 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota) you can check out nearly
300 available tables of guns, knives and accessories such
as ammunition, hunting and fishing equipment, military
surplus, gun safes and many more unique items (from the
latest technology to the hard-to-find items, collectibles and
antiques). The cost is free. Visit NextGunShow.com for more
information.


GREATER CHARLOTTE HARBOR S
SIERRA CLUB MEETING 2 -
The Greater Charlotte Harbor Sierra Club will be holding its C a ll 941- 42 :3I l-
monthly meeting on Feb. 18th at 7 p.m. at the Unitarian ali
Universalist Fellowship (1532 Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port to lS your h bo a yo. -
Charlotte). The guest speaker will be Stephanie Green, Senior U--
Land Management Specialist, Southwest Florida Water
Management District. Ms. Green's topic will be, "Management
of Conservation Land,";' with an emphasis on the Greater l
Charlotte Harbor area. For more information contact
chgscpr@gmail.com.


LEARN ALL ABOUT MANGROVES
The University of Florida/IFAS Extension, Charlotte County
and Florida Sea Grant are pleased to announce their
upcoming program, a 2014 Mangrove Symposium, which will
be held on Feb. 20th from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Charlotte
County Eastport Environmental Campus (25550 Harborview
Road, Port Charlotte). This program is intended for landscape
professionals, master gardeners, homeowner associations,
and residents living on the water who wish to enhance or in-
corporate mangroves in their landscape. Symposium speakers
will discuss the role and value of mangroves rules and
laws that govern mangrove trimming and mangrove pruning
and growing techniques. The cost to attend is $25 which
includes lunch. Register at http://bit.ly/lhwFcb3. Space is
limited so pre-registration is required. For more information,
please contact Betty Staugler at 941-764-4346 or Tom Becker
at 941-764-4351.4.25 ISA and 4 FNGLA CEUs are being
offered for professional mangrove trimmers who attend the
symposium.

LEMON BAY CONSERVANCY
TARPON SAMPLING
Meet in the parking lot at 3120 Gasparilla Pines Blvd., south
of Englewood, east of Placida Road. On Feb. 21st from 9 a.m.
to noon. For further information call 276-233-6364 or email
wdunson@comcast.net.

SHERIFF'S OFFICE'S CIVILIAN
GUN SAFETY COURSE
The next class is scheduled for Feb. 22nd from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. at the Charlotte County Sheriff's Office Training
Building (25500 Airport Road, Punta Gorda). You will learn
about the laws concerning firearms and how to safely handle
your handgun. The course includes both classroom work
and practical gun range experience. Completion of this gun
safety course can qualify to meet one of the requirements
for obtaining a concealed weapons permit. To apply, go to
bit.ly/liniKBX to fill out the registration form for the course
or call 941-833-6281 for more information. You will receive
a confirmation of your successful registration after the
application process is completed. The cost is $35 per person,
payable by check or money order to the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office. You will need to bring your firearm along
with 50 rounds of ammunition (no reloads). Hearing and eye
protections will be provided.

PLANT NATIVE DAY
The 12th Annual"Plant Native Day"of the Florida Native
Plant Society on Feb. 22nd starting at 9:30 a.m. at the Cedar
Point Environmental Park (2300 Placida Rd., Englewood)
will focus on attracting wildlife to Your backyard. Lectures
include: "Plants for the Back Ten Feet by Laurel Schiller,
Florida Native Plants, Inc. and "The Back Ten Feet" by Sue
Scott, who encourages people to use the back ten feet of
their yard for native plantings. Afterward, a garden tour, trail
walk and plant sale is available. Everyone is welcome. For
more information contact 941.475.0769 or visit Mangrove.
FnpsChapters.org.


SARASOTA POWER SQUADRON 941-400-6467
Basic Coastal Navigation Sem inar............................................................................................... 7 to 9 p.m Feb. 6
ABC Boating Course (2 days) ............................................................................................... 9 a.m to 1 p.m Feb. 8

VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-408-8591
Call for information

PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-637-0766
Charting Local Waters Seminar ........................................................................................... 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 22
G PS Sem inar ....................................................................................................................... 1 to 3:30 p.m Feb. 22

CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
Call for information

Provided by Greg Scotten




PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb. 11 .................................. Punta Gorda ................941-639-3811
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb. 12..................................North Port...................941-223-9064
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb. 15..................................Fort Myers...................239-322-7089
How to read a navigational chart.................. Feb.25..................................Punta Gorda ................941-639-3811
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb.28..................................Rotonda West..............973-934-0321

Provided by Dave Nielsen


32' 2008 Century Offshore Twin 350's outboards 35 1999 CARVER MARINER SPORT CRUISER
$114,900 Call Orion Wholean 941-249-0177 Listed for $59,900. Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I A l i By appointment only ilAW
LicensedYacht Broker I LicensedYacht Broker G -,M
Located at BEAUTIFUL MARI NA .] Located at BEAUTIFUL M .R I N.. j


,* -"


32' CATALINA 2003, 30 hp Yamnar,
AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
asking $77,000. 941-505-2787
email irvina32@centurylink.net


34' 2000 LEGACY 34 EXPRESS i ,..
Call Richard Horst 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY! A ii H I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL *-MN RI NA-,-

REDUCED!


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A l i
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL I.M AR IA.I1


22 2012 BENNINGTON PonLoon SSL ;,:,,- ri ,
w/50 hrs.Wrnty. $27,990 Richard Horste 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A BH
Licensed Yacht Broker G i
Located at BEAUTIFUL [-M A RI N ..J


34' Catalina mkl, 1989, diesel, new canvas,
$39.9K Call Jim at 941-740-0389 or the
office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
and Redfish Yachts
J I At ... ..


34't uise15CI t ExfllCpress, sqq9,quu
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A i
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL "MARINA-,







34' Sea Ray 340 Sportsman 2006
This is the upscale package with lots of
standard gear and over 700hp total $116,900
ContactTommy Head at 941-769-2594 Punta Gorda
Yacht Brokers & Redfish Yachts 941-639-9400


35 CRUISERS 3570 ESPRIT 1995 at
$46,900 Genset and much more!
Call Tommy 941-769-2594
Or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
REDUCED





36' 1998 CARVER Mariner 350,
Twin Merc Cruisers, All Electronics,
Shows Like New!
$69,900. 941-255-5311

. A p y fg m


-a-2

36' 2000 Carver Mariner Diesels: (PRICED BELOW GAS
ENGINE MODELS)Twin Cummins diesels, Westerbeke
diesel gen set, radar, autopilot, much more. Just detailed
and serviced. Asking $79,900. Call T7ier, Ow-
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 ffl(4I iLB


36' TROJAN TRI CABIN
New gas, fully equipped! $54,995
Call Ed at 941-628-0167
Or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


JUST REDUCED!


Cakk Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.corn
By appointment only I A i
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL G (., A RI N'A.J


9' IVIAINI'MII I TAWLEI 199
with single diesel, AC. $94,500
Call Jim at 941-740-0389 Or at the office
941-833-0099 Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
& Redfish Yachts


40 1972 TRAWLER EAGLE E- : i '
Completely refurbished. Orion Wholean 941-249-0177
McCallMarinesales.com
By appointment only k i
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL G I .A K, 1NA .J





El Eimbjug--K-.IF5mlui-- Mhi--


ANNUAL HARBOUR HEIGHTS RUN/WALK
The eight annual Harbour Heights 5K run/walk is a
community event on Feb. 22nd that benefits Autism Speaks
and exceptional students at four Charlotte County elementary
schools. Through this race we hope to raise awareness about
autism and help the classrooms for developmentally disabled
children. We appreciate your support! The race starts at
8 a.m. at Harbour Heights Park (27420 Voyageur Dr., Punta
Gorda). Call 941-258-2891 for more information.
BEGINNING SALTWATER FISHING
On Feb 22nd from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Cape Coral Yacht
Club Community Park (5819 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape Coral).
The class is designed for the new and novice angler. The
course will cover all the basics. Topics include: rod and reel
selection, line leader and hook selection, rigging, casting
and live, dead and artificial bait. Visit CapeParks.com or call
239-574-0806 for more information. Cost is $35 for Cape
Coral residents and $45 for nonresidents.

EARLY PADDLE WITH MOTE MARINE
Early risers welcome! Join us as we kayak Sarasota Bay and
discover the animals that rise at the crack of dawn at 7:30
a.m. at Mote Marine Laboratory (1600 Ken Thompson Pkwy.,
Sarasota). All kayaking equipment is provided and class
begins with basic kayaking instruction. The cost is free. Visit
Mote.org or call 941-302-4997 for more information.

TARPON FISHING
On March 4th from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Cape Coral Yacht
Club Community Park (5819 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape
Coral). Capt. George Wowell explains the methods
for catching the fish of a lifetime. Learn live, cut and
artificial baits along with seasonal migration patterns
and specific areas in our local waters to find, catch
and reel in the silver king. Visit CapeParks.com or call
239-574-0806 for more information. Cost is $20 for
Cape Coral residents and $30 for nonresidents.


rile M COAe iivei iirliUUnUiimitviwi t tireT ^ inIiipmiit dr inirl il L piit 7.11m.;it


NIIIC IlkciLia II1VCI' /nuuuuuII )uu~l Willl IlUalI tllIC
following field trips and walkabouts. These trips are
free and open to the public.
CELERY FIELDS FIELD TRIP: At Celery Fields (100
Coburn Road, Sarasota) on Feb. 22nd. Meet at
7 a.m. at the north car pool location. Call Eleanor
Marr at 941-624-4182 for more information.
DEEP CREEK PRESERVE WALKABOUT: At Deep
Creek Preserve (10797 SW Peace River St., Arcadia)
on March 4th. Call Shannon McGinnis at 941-268-
0429 for more information.
BABCOCK FIELD TRIP: At Babcock-Webb Wildlife


CHARLOTTE CHAPTER CCA BANQUET
The Charlotte chapter of the Coastal Conservation
Association will hold its annual banquet at
6 p.m. March 6th at the Charlotte Harbor Event &
Conference Center (75 Taylor St., Punta Gorda). The
banquet is a fundraiser for CCA Florida and will
feature silent auctions and raffles. CCA is a grass-
roots organization that is committed to protecting
and conserving Florida's marine resources. Tickets
are $95 for a single or $145 for a couple; the cost
includes a one-year CCA membership. To purchase
tickets or for more information, call Pete Herber at
941-258-0771 or CCA Charlotte president Capt. Josh
Greerat 863-781-1373.


ADVANCED SALTWATER FISHING
On March 15th from 9a.m. to3 p.m. at the Cape Coral
Yacht Club Community Park (5819 Driftwood Pkwy.,
Cape Coral). The class is designed for the experienced
saltwater anglers and students who have completed the
beginning class. Topics include: where to catch live bait,
fishing structures, chumming and fighting techniques.
You will have the opportunity to learn how to choose
and use a cast net to catch live bait. Visit CapeParks.com
or call 239-574-0806 for more information. Cost is $40
for Cape Coral residents and $50 for nonresidents.

LEMON BAY CONSERVANCY TARPON TAG
Meet in the parking lot at 3120 Gasparilla Pines Blvd.,
south of Englewood, east of Placida Road. On March
15th from 8:30 to 11 a.m. For further information call
276-233-6364 or email wdunson@comcast.net.


ivaInag ementAreaoL n ll UI I zIll m llu. iv''t aIt / a.m. at
the Babcock-Webb entrance. Call Dave Lancaster at
586-214-0203 for more information.
SHELL CREEK WALKABOUT: At Shell Creek
Preserve (3081 Duncan Road., Punta Gorda)
on April 1st at 8 a.m. Call Dave Lancaster at 586-
214-0203 for more information.
FORT DESOTO FIELD TRIP: At Fort DeSoto Park
(3500 Pinellas Bayway S., Tierra Verde) on April
19th. Call Eleanor Marr at 941-624-4182 and
Stu and Louise Lewis at 603-742-2874 for more
information.


hL


-rV CArLC4I,. i i n Ivv-IZni &-
Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull.
Full NewTanks. Asking $84,999
Call 941-408-9572 or 941-249-0177

I I


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only d aC
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL .M1 A RI NAlJ
MWm


45' BLUEWATER GREAT LIVABOARD
$38,900
Tod Sullivan 941-457-0131
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


EDDYLINE SANDPIPER
Only 381bs and 12' long with 3501b capacity.
Anyone can paddle this boat and
take the dog along! $1,299.
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter



*.o'. -



Elie Gulf 120XE 12 foot long, 350 Ib capacity
Stable fishing Ergoflex Seating system,
Bow and Center hatches
$729 Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


Feel Free Moken 12 Angler Kayak. New kayak:
127" long, 56 Ibs, unit-track quick release
system for custom fishing accessories. Kingfisher
seat, Wheel in the keel for easy transport.
$1099. 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


REDUCED!!


3 pounds trout fillets A clip-n-save seafood
1/2 cup sour cream recipe provided by


1/4 tsp peppercorns
1 Bermuda onion, sliced
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/4 tsp allspice


Aftn- &9.^ &rlw.
-Recipe adapted from
all-fish-seafood-redipes.com


Place bluefish fillets in a shallow ceramic or enameled baking dish. Combine vinegar, onions, pepper-
corns, and allspice. Pour over bluefish fillets, turning to coat. Marinate, skin side up, at room tempera-
ture, for 1 hour. Pour off vinegar, but not onions or spices. Turn skin side down and spread top with sour
cream. Bake bluefish fillets at 350F for 20 minutes, until fish flakes easily with a fork. Serves 6 to 8.


Whatisasolunar THURSDAY FRIDAY
table?The sun Sunrise: 7:12 a.m. Sunrise: 7:12 a
and moon, even Sunset: 6:15 p.m. Sunset: 6:15 p
when they are out Moonrise: 11:48 a.m. Moonrise: 12:32
of sight, exertforces Moonset: 12:27 a.m. Moonset: 1:22
wild creatures can Moon Phase Moon Phas
feel.These forces 50% First quarter 59 Waxing gil
affect when fish 50)Fisqure 59 Wxngb
and otheranimals Major Times Major Time
feed.Weatherand 6:10 a.m.- 8:10 a.m. 6:59 a.m.- 8:59
tidealso play a role, 6:35 p.m.-8:35 p.m. 7:23 p.m.-9:23
but expect fish to be Minor Times Minor Time
more active during 12:27 a.m.- 1:27 a.m. 1:22 a.m. 2:22
the majorand minor 11:48a.m -1214..pm 12:32pm 1?32
S.-iII I..... li ..ii| |


':IlllJ II i j 111Illl .

SUNDAY
nuririi;e 7 113 a ni
u rin et i:, 1 7 p ni
M,:,,~nr:,ne "' 0, p i
Moonset: 3:05 a.m.
Moon Phase
77% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
8:36 a.m.- 10:36 a.m.
9:00 p.m.- 11:00 p.m.
Minor Times
3:05 a.m. 4:05 a.m.
2:05 p.m.-3:05 p.m.
Prediction: Average


rreaiction: Average

MONDAY
nuriri, e 7 113 a ni
,urinel :, 1:.' p ni
MNI ,nri2e 54 p mi
Moonset: 3:53 a.m.
Moon Phase
84% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
9:24 a.m.-11:24 a.m.
9:48 p.m.- 11:48 p.m.
Minor Times
3:53 a.m.-4:53 a.m.
2:54 p.m. 3:54 p.m.
Prediction: Average


i.m.
i.m.
p.m.
a.m.
e
bbous
es
a.m.
p.m.
is
a.m.
pm


rreaic ion: Average

TUESDAY
.uriri;,e 7 '1 a 3 ni
nr et ,:, 1:. p ni
M,:,:,nri e ." 4, p nfi
Moonset: 4:37 a.m.
Moon Phase
90% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
10:11 a.m.-12:11 p.m.
10:34 p.m.- 12:34a.m.
Minor Times
4:37 a.m. 5:37 a.m.
3:45 p.m.-4:45 p.m.
Prediction: Good


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 7:11 a.m.
Sunset: 6:16 p.m.
Moonrise: 1:18 p.m.
Moonset: 2:15 a.m.
Moon Phase
68% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
7:48 a.m. 9:48 a.m.
8:12 p.m.- 10:12 p.m.
MinorTimes
2:15 a.m. 3:15 a.m.
1:18 p.m -2-18pm
Prediction: Average+

WEDNESDAY
..unriir e I O:.: 3 ni
Sujnel 1'i: p ni
M i::rir i,;e 4 ?i:. p ni
Moonset: 5:20 a.m.
Moon Phase
95% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
10:57 a.m.- 12:57 p.m.
11:20 p.m. -1:20 a.m.
MinorTimes
5:20 a.m. 6:20 a.m.
4:36 p.m.-5:36 p.m.
Prediction: Better


45' Gulfstar Hirsch Center Cockpit: Great for liveaboarding or
chartering (Bahamas here you come). Two staterooms (cen-
terline queen in aft), two heads, large living area refrigera-
tion, AC and spare sails. Asking it
$65,000. Call Ray Mason, 941-505-7269Tir a'x


liiuiu rlUIW e 9 IO54-OUIU
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I A M Ii
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [*.MN.. RI NA-l


52'2007 BLUEWATER YACHT S297,000 H: : -'.'-P.
THING you need to cruise!! Dick Horste 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A i A
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL NI A RI | N A j







Big Tuna by Jackson Kayaks
It's an angler's dream.
The "elite" seating is super comfortable and rotate
to face fishing buddy.
Live bait well, rod holders, stagers
$1599 Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


JACKSON ORION KAYAK
Great little kayak for fishing, birding,
photography. 10' long, only 521bs 3001b capacity
Save $100 on year end sale! $799.
Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


KC Fishing Kayak Thermoformed ABS for
light weight only 631bs. 12 foot long
With mount can add a motor. $1,399.
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter



L

W ''-,Maii.. 10k

OCEAN KAYAKTRIDENT 11 $949
CENTRAL COMMAND CENTER FOR ROD MOUNTS
MODULAR FISHING POD, BATTERY BAG,
TRANSDUCER COMPATIBLE
STABLE (400LB CAPACITY) AND QUICK. ONLY 54LBS
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Old Town Predator 13
Award winning new fishing kayak.
13'2" long, 15" adjustable seat,
425# capacity. $1,299
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


f!<


Cuda 12 From Jackson Kayak
New little brother to the Cuda 14.12'6" long 31"
wide 3501b cap. High/low comfortable seat
rod holders and stagers everywhere. $1199
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Santa Cruz Sit On Top Fishing Kayak New 2013
$999
Very Stable, Easy to paddle
Optional Live bait tank
Rod Holders, Storage
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter




EuUanfl~nnflnefn U~nn nnon.n
uatumtimmn*ta-HI5*l~ EM11E.tm-~


It's easy to tell lizards nd snakes apart:
Lizards have legs. Actually, that's not always
true. The animal pictured above is very much
a lizard, but it has no legs. Not even nubs. And
it was not in a horrible accident it's meant
to be legless.
The eastern glass lizard is one of about
15 species of glass lizards found worldwide.
With their glossy scales, they resemble skinks,
but are actually related to alligator lizards.
In addition to the glass lizards, there are
hundreds of other lizard species with reduced
or absent limbs. The question, then: What
advantage does being legless have?
Plenty, actually, if you live in an area where
there's open sandy ground. Unlike most snakes,
which typically crawl across the surface of the
ground, legless lizards tend to be burrowers.
Their bodies are adapted to this lifestyle and


have limited flexibility, which makes them
great at pushing their way through sandy soil
but not so good at reaching around to (just
an example) bite me when I capture them. A
stiff, slick body allows them to"swim"through
loose sand with ease. This allows them to take
advantage of a particular type of habitat where
legs only get in the way, so natural selection
has pruned them away.
When I was a kid, I thought glass lizards
were snakes because I was always told they
were. In fact, we just called them glass snakes.
But despite them being legless, there are many
characteristics that point to glass lizards not
being snakes. The easiest to see is their eyelids.
Snakes have unblinking eyes protected by
clear scales. Another fairly obvious trait is their
tongue. Snakes flick their forked tongues about
frequently, especially when they're trying to


When is a snake.



not asnakeP


figure out what sort of creature you are. A glass
lizard's tongue rarely protrudes from its mouth
unless it is actively swallowing prey.
Glass lizards grow to a much larger size than
most other lizards in this area. Eastern glass
lizards can reach about 3 feet in length, and
they have close relatives that can grow to 5 feet
long. Despite their relatively large size, they are
completely harmless. Even if you pick one up,
its first defense is to drop its tail rather than
bite (which is how they got their name they
break when you handle them roughly). This
tail-dropping trait is one it shares with many
other lizards, but not a single snake. If the glass
lizard survives whatever has attacked it, the


tail will regrow over time.
Glass lizards eat mostly insects and worms,
but have been known to take small verte-
brates if they can catch them. In turn, they
are preyed upon by many types of birds (espe-
cially hawks and white ibis) and mammals.
They are also commonly seen killed on
roadways, where their smooth bodies make
rapid movement almost impossible.
Most glass lizard species live in desert
areas. We have them in Florida as a holdover
from our ancient desert past (along with
gopher tortoises, scrub jays and prickly pear
cactus). They're just one small part of what
makes Florida's fauna so amazing.


visit www.Flatsmasters.com for more information






__ t fl CP .o Page 30 February 6,2014 -, SUE,:nUME E IIU U .MEuI




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STATE SEEKS CROC WRANGLER










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a4&^MP &I Page 31 February 6,2014


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LAD ETf


TOU2 wNT


r1 for Humanity


SWomen



Build


National Partner


The WaterLine Heels & Reels fishing
tournament entry fee is $275 plus
sales tax (S294.25) [or a team of
two or three anglers. At least one
team member must attend the
team party at 5:30 p.m. March
7, 2014, at the PGI Civic Associ-
ation building. All participating
anglers must be at least 6 years of age
on March 7,2014. All team captains
must be at least 18 years of age on
March 7,2014. Any minor wishing to
participate must provide tournament
organizers with an affidavit signed by
his or her legal guardian.


P----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------*
Team name T-SHIRT SIZE
Captain S M L XL XXL
Mate(optional) S M L XL XXL
Angler#1 S M L XL XXL
Angler#2 S M L XL XXL
Angler#3 S M L XL XXL
Mail this slip along with your check or money order for $294.25 to Heels & Reels, 23170
Harborview Road, Port Charlotte, FL 33980. To register online, go to HeelsAndReels.net.
L------------------------------------------------ A


On Saturday, March 8,50 all-female fishing teams
will take to the water. Their goal: The heaviest
bag of 10 ladyfish. The reason: To raise money for
a Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity Women
Build project.
The fun actually gets started the night before at
the big Heels & Reels team party, which starts at
5:30 p.m. Friday, March 7, at the Punta Gorda Isles
Civic Association building. The party will be catered
by Luigi's Family Restaurant of Port Charlotte and
will feature some great raffles and silent auctions.
Some of our local firefighters will be making an
appearance to help with the raffles, and rumor has
it they might not remember to bring their shirts.
Since no one wants to get up too early after the
party, the tournament itself will get started at 9
a.m. the next morning at Burnt Store Marina. Each
team will be responsible for rounding up their own
boat and fishing tackle. After a brief inspection (just
to make sure there are no sneaky ladyfish already on
the boat), the teams will be off and fishing.
Angling teams will consist of two to three women
from age 6 to 106. Because we know the ladies will
want to focus on the fun, they can choose to round
out their teams with a captain and a mate, which
can be male or female. The captain and mate can
drive the boat, bait hooks, take fish off the lines -
everything but fish. For you true angling women,
fear not: You don't have to have the guys on the boat
if you don't want them.
All the fish will need to be kept on ice, because
they're going for a good cause as well: The Center
for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) on Sanibel
will be taking them to use as food for their pelicans,
herons and other birds on the mend.
With the fish in the bag, our teams will return
to Burnt Store Marina for the weigh-in and awards
ceremony, where some awesome (and very girly)
prizes will be given out. After that, it's time to
party yet again this time with a cookout and
live music on the marina grounds.
All in all, it's going to be yet another Water-
Line tournament where we'll have some fun and
do some good. Ladies, start getting your teams
together it's gonna be a good one.


More info online at HeelsAndReels.net, or call 941-276-9657
















"Hey, Josh, there's a hurt bird
out front by the pond.":' As the Sun
newspaper office's naturalist in resi-
dence, anytime there's an unusual or
interesting animal sighting someone
comes looking for me. I suppose
that's good thing. This time one of
the front desk girls had noticed a
great blue heron that wasn't acting
quite right. So out I went, camera in
hand, to take a look.
The bird looked a bit disheveled
but otherwise OK. I took a few photos
and then tried to get in for a closer
look. Not liking me so close, the bird
took off and that's when I saw
that one of its legs was broken off
and dangling by a thread of tissue.
I watched it fly across Harborview
Road, narrowly missing a collision
with a truck. I figured that's probably
what had happened in the first place
and made a mental note to keep a
watch in case the heron came back.
The injured heron actually became
a fixture around the pond for several
days. I approached it multiple times
to try to get a better assessment of
its condition, but each time it took
off. The leg was in bad shape, but
the wings were just fine. The bird
seems to be getting weaker, and
I wondered if the leg had become
infected. I knew it needed treatment
if it was going to survive, but I also
knew catching it was going to take
big piles of luck.
Then it vanished, and I didn't see
it at all for almost a week. I assumed


it had either succumbed to the injury
or been captured by a predator.
That's the way it goes life in the
wild is rough.
And then it came back. And of
course, someone in the office found
me and told me the injured bird had
returned. Once again, I went out to
see if anything could be done. It was
immediately apparent the bird had
taken a turn for the much worse.
It stood at the water's edge, head
tucked beneath one wing. I walked
to within 15 feet of it, and it never
stirred. I figured this was my best
shot, but I also assumed I wouldn't
get another chance. Fishin' Frank's is
a half-mile from the Sun, so I hopped
in my car and headed that way. For
whatever reason, they trusted me
with the loan of an extensible-han-
dled landing net. Back at the office,
I grabbed a towel from my car (yes,
I always have a towel in the car -
don't you?), enlisted the help of a
coworker (Charlotte Czaja) and went
back to the pond.
Naturally, the bird was now awake
and watchful. But it didn't seem to
have the strength to just fly away. I
played it cool for 15 minutes, hoping
the heron would tuck its head again
and let me sneak up. Nope it just
stared at me, eyes full of mistrust.
New plan: Charlotte would walk
casually by and distract the bird's
attention, hopefully for just long
enough that I could net the bird. A
long shot, but it was our only shot.
Just by dumb luck, it worked. The
net, extended out to 15 feet long,


I


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_____________ 4 P i Page 32 February 6,2014






The one-leggi
. .;ash_ 4ill" tw q lr i.. .


was very unwieldy, but I managed to
get it over the bird as it was taking
off, basically knocking it into the
water. It wasn't graceful at all, but
the job was done. I scooped the bird
out of the pond, and put the towel
over its head. It barely struggled.
Charlotte was good enough to
volunteer to drive us to Peace River
Wildlife Center, where rehabber Amy
gave the heron a quick once-over.
That's when we learned what had
actually happened to this bird. There
was a hook buried in one thigh,
with a length of monofilament
line connecting it to the foot of the
broken-off leg. We're still not sure
exactly how the leg was broken, but
it was tangled in the fishing line
and bound to the bird's good leg.
The broken leg was infected and hot
to the touch, and the bird was too
weak to even protest when Amy put
it in a cage.
If you fish long enough here in
Southwest Florida, chances are
you're going to hook a bird of some
kind. And if you're an average angler,
chances are that your first inclina-
tion is going to be to cut the line.
Don't. What you're actually doing
is sentencing the hooked bird to a
painfully drawn-out death. The hook
itself is bad, but the line is much
worse. Even a few inches of attached
line is enough to tangle in a branch
or around some other part of the
bird, and it will have absolutely no
way to free itself. It's your hook and
your line, so you're responsible for it.
The good news here is that birds


U

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than a catfish or stingray, and I'm
sure you've dealt with those before.
If the hook is deep or in the bird's
throat, take it to PRWC or another
rehab facility. That will cut into your
fishing time, but it's your responsi-
bilityto make it right if you can.
As for our one-legged heron, the
fisherman who hooked it didn't
care enough to take responsibility
for his actions. As a result, that
bird suffered for at least 10 days
and then died in a cage at PRWC. It
wouldn't have taken much effort to
remove the hook; it wasn't buried
deep. But because of someone's "not
my problem anymore" attitude, this
story has a much less happy ending.


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are actually a lot easier to deal with
than you might think. Reel it in and
put some sort of opaque cloth over
its head (a towel works great, but
your shirt will do the job). I've used
this procedure with pelicans, herons,
gulls and cormorants, and it's almost
like a magic trick for calming them
right down. Ideally, one person will
hold the wrapped head and a second
will get the hook and line free,
but I've done the job solo before.
It pays to be wary of the beak's
pointy end, because it really can
do some damage, but when a bird
is hooked because of your actions,
it's only right for you to try to undo
the damage. It's no more dangerous


L


m1 -^


www.BoatHouseCC.com






Thursday, February 6, 2014 ads.yoursun.net EINIC The Sun Classified Page 1


Florida's Largest Classified Section


SUNd -classifieds
America's BEST Community DailyP Arcadia Englewood North Port Port Charlotte Punta Gorda Venice
America's BS Comnmunity Daily" Arcadia Englewood N/orfth Port Port Charlotte Punta Gordao Venice


I 0 0 -A Otio Sellers04 Ways0To Place an0Ad Classifications I


FREE ADS! Go to sun-classifieds.com BSN SO
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' S '* *A A
TOLLFRE CAL 1866463163



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REAL ESTATE
1010- 1650
1010 Open House
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For Sale
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BUSINESS
1600 Business For Sale
1610 Business Rentals
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Open Sunday, l-4pmn-
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Call Adam Banka
941-284-5656
LISTING SERVICES DIRECT


Listing Price $148,500 Sold


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OPEN HOUSE
L 1010 J


25 OAKLAND HILLS CT.
ROTONDA WEST
low


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newer roof, remodeled
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$1000.00 Buyer rebate if
purchased through
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Please Call for
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L OPEN HOUSE
L 1010 J


Open Sat 12-3pm
15 Bunker Circle
Rotonda West
Il. __ _


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Punta Gorda, Fl
3398"

Single Family Horm
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for $142,500



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Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 1





The Sun Classified Page 2 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, February 6, 2014


OPEN HOUSE
L 1010 ^


OPEN HOUSE R.E. AUCTION
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OPEN SAT.-SUN. 1-3 1015
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Entire Home Totally Renovat-
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19757 COBBLESTONE CIR.
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941-497-2228


lvrivvwuL unI. i.-j
4151 Herons Pt., P.C.
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$325,901 Priv. appts. avail.
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13167 SW PEMBROKE Cl N.
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LANDSCAPE & 4" IRRIGATION
WELL. VERY NICE MUST SEE!
$241,900. 616-690-1875
GET RESULTS--\
USE CLASSIFIED!
Rotonda SUN. 12-3PM
288 Rotonda Circle





3 Bed 2 Bath Golf
Course home with
breathtaking views
and open floor plan
perfect for entertain-
ing. Great curb appeal
with majestic palms
$179,900.00
$1500 Buyer Rebate if pur-
chased through
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653


V r"IH ,. A nun. .-,pII
442 Sunset Lake Blvd #102
Fully furnished, mint condition
w/new lanai in newly renovat-
ed Ramblers' Rest Resort
on Myakka River. High end
amenities, docks available.
Just reduced to $23,000!
941-497-0703
SR.E.AUCTION








SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 8TH






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FEBRUARY 28, 2014.
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DECLASSIFIED ^
2:00 i PM:g-]I '
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FEBRUARY 2S, 2014.




PHLIPISNEDAuCJOBR.O
44S5ECK iTRAIL


CLASSIFIEDS!


13 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HOME'
'TO BE SOLD MARCH 9TH,SUN'
I JUSTSTEPSTOTHE BEACH I
I ON THE ISLAND OF VENICEI
PAULAVANDEREEI
(941) 488-1500 1
VANDEREE AUCTIONEERS
IREALTORS SINCE 19341
IWWW.VANDEREE.COMI
L J----------J
HOMES FOR SALE

:Z^ 020 ^







10 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
"Gated Private PRAIRIE
CREEK EQUINE ESTATE"
2008 Exquisite Custom 6847
SF home (5034 SF underAir).
4 bedrooms, 2/2 BathsFabu-
lous Kitchen & Home has
Extra Ordinary Features
Throughout. 3 car attached
(1100 SF) garage + detached
(2068 SF) 5 Stall garage.
Exceptional "1448 SF CBS"
Deluxe Equine Barn, Box
Stalls, Air Conditioned Tack
& Feed Rooms. Vinyl
Fenced 10 acres, paddocks,
pasture. Pond. New Listing
Virtual Tour Available!
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
\, 941-456-8304 I



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CLASSIFIED
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RAMBLING RANCH
5/3.5/2+ Pool Home
6500 SF (4400 under air)
OBSERVATORY!!
&
FLEX USE "BARN"
(2500 SF under air)
$734,500
17901 Wood Path Ct.
Punta Gorda, FL 33982
visualtour.com/show.asp?T=3101917
Michael Saunders & Co.
Debra Gurin 941-875-3242







SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
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Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
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Charlotte Sarasota, &
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Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


zAL~o fIvenicI jriz~aJ
home. County water possible
owner financing or best offer.
Cash Offers Pay Less!
QA41-A48824 1 ,r AQC-Q6-c


I -


2007 BUILT-EXTRA LOT/RV
PAD! 3/2/2 1850 sqft GREAT
ROOM + DEN, Separate
dining and breakfast room
$179,000 C7048826
Mary McKinley
"Selling With Integrity"
941-629-2100
AGGRESIVE


5 Acre Prairie Creek Park
Home with Caged Pool
Punta Gorda 3 bdrm 2
bath Gem 2100 SQ FT,
Beautiful Setting Pond &
Very Private Fenced &
Gated 2 stall Attached +
Detached garage Horses
Welcome, Black top Rds,&
miles of riding trails. New
Listing $295,000 Hurry!
Judy Petkewicz
941-456-8304
Allison James Estates &
Homes

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!


RARE FIND! CANAL FRONT
GULF ACCESS 2003 HOME
2000 SF -DocK+2 LIFTS ON
WIDE CANAL. SWIM SPA
POOL NO FLOOD INSURANCE
NEEDED! 3/2+ BONUS ROOM
& SCREENED LANAI -ATT
GARAGE PRIVATE FENCED
YARD, NICE NEIGHBORHOOD
NEW LISTING $245,000.
JUDY K PETKEWICZ GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES &
HOMES 941456-8304


.J/ ./ 1 L^UV W UU~d
Grande in Wildflower sub-
division. House has been
totally remolded and in
move in condition. Asking
$124,900 MLS # R4600577
Revis Flowers
M & M Realty 941-539-9078


5-30 ACRES Starting @
$49,900
Punta Gordas's
BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcomeblack
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community'!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Propertiesforsale.com


6127 Bennington St. 3/2/2
Immaculate pool home on
corner lot with many
upgrades. Built in 2004,
hurricane shutters, propane
back-up generator, 1746 SF.
Turnkey Possible.
By Owner. Appointment Only
$195,000. 815-228-6801


GULF- CUVE 4/2/3 custom
pool home. 2300 sq.ft with
volume ceilings, open floor
plan, granite counters, cherry
cabinets plus more upgrades!
Must see! Con. No flood ins.
$350K 941-286-0612






510 Dalton Blvd., PC
$79,000
30064 Balsam Blvd.,
PG $79,000
450 Dalton Blvd., PC,
$89,900
661 Kellstdadt St NW,
PC $89,900
7248 Sablon Rd, NP
$134,900
26164 Harborview Rd,
CH $139,000
57 Allworthy, PC
$149,000
29412 Taralane Dr. PG
$219,000
5235 Blackjack Cir, PG
$299,000
For more information
contact Bobbi Bevis
941-815-1176 or
www.thebevisgroup.com
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!.

lqm.'


S129,900yu 495b Cartagena st.
P very nice 3/2/2 very quiet
area. 1200 sf. with tile and
wood laminates, fenced back
S yard. pictures and info at:
KLJ30.com Sale Pending
941-677-8550.


UDIEE UKbb HUMlb
26220 Chesterfield Rd.
Immaculate Tim Towles Built
3/2.5/2 1920 Sq.Ft.
Split Floor Plan, Upgrades,
Elec. Hurricane Shutters
BY OWNER
$167,000 941-979-5785


uh,,r'rr ,^f E i,", -' I' F l
home Granite counters in
kitchen & baths, lots of
upgrades. S/S appls. Over-
looks Irg greenbelt. $189,900.
A CLEAR CHOICE REALTY
941-979-9396


UhhC' RK:hr: 6b Japura
Street. Custom home, 2156
sq ft with pool, built in
2002, spectacular large
park-like yard with lake view,
cul de sac. FABULOUS!
Don't Miss this ONE!!!
REDUCED!! $275,000
Pat Walker RE/MAX Anchor
Realty 941-276-4674


broke, Circle. 3/2/2, 1964sf.
Beautiful Split Plan w/ Sepa-
rate Living & Family Rooms!
$249,900. MLS# C7048798
Linda 941-457-7245 or Jill
Brouwer 941-276-4459 Jill
Brouwer Realty



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I







Thursday, February 6, 2014 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


HOMES FOR SALE


Z 0 20











I T I,
Iuu~ 3BR12BA CONDO$INi1P



I g 'An

NEW 2/2 + DEN,
DR, CARPORT 1480 sf
Wind Mill Village 55+
31 Copenhagen PG
Community pool, marina
and club house.
SAFE HARBOR HOMES,
JACOBSEN DEALER,
863-658-2228 info


Great Deals in
the Classifieds!


NEW 2BR/2BA + DEN,
dr, carport 1480 sf Wind
Mill Village 55+
31 Copenhagen PG
Community Pool, Marina
and Club house.
SAFE HARBOR HOMES,
JACOBSEN DEALER,
863-658-2228 info







North Port $888/MTI-rY
*LIKE NEW* *
Total Owner Financing
3BR/2BA/2CG, Fenced
$139k 941-716-0040
Er arot 18 fWn


minv, 1in runii
1237 Rice Terrace, Beautiful
3-bd/2ba, 1267 SF move-in
ready home w/2-car garage,
ully fenced back yard & large
screened lanai. $135,000.
Patty Gillespie Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755


IruiII ru' Ri
2300 Jasmine Way
Beautifully Remodeled 2005
Pool Home 3/2/2 Plus den,
1946 SF Under Air, New SS
Appliances, tropically Land-
scaped in gated Community
of Charleston Park. Asking
$259,900
Bay Bridge Homes
941-626-8200


3463 Narcissus Ter.,
BEAUTIFUL '05-BUILT 3/2/2
WITH FULLY FENCED BACK
YARD IN A PRIME QUIET
AREA AT THE EDGE OF
NORTH PORT ESTATES. NO
CARPET (tile and laminate
thruout). A WHOLE LOTTA
HOUSE FOR JUST A LITTLE!
$149,900
PATTY GILLESPIE Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755


HOMES FOR SALE
S1020


I H l" K I n r In 'I I -' L i', I-'1 i
St. Totally updated 1344 Sf
2/2/2 carport in upscale
Gated 55+ Comm. Gourmet
Kitchen, Granite, all new
appliances. $117,000
PATTY GILLESPIE, Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755

I A


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2.5/2 in Gated Community
of Pepper Tree Estates!
Open Concept! 2,218 SF.
New Energy Efficient AC Unit
& Newer Water Heater!
$198,900.
Jeff Runyan, Re/Max
Palm. 941-979-2843


,UK InH ruKni PORT CHARLOTTE 16165
3885 N.Cranberry Blvd. Ohara Dr. Cute 2/1/2 house
A Gardner's Dream. Custom OaaD.Ct 11 os
A Ga rs Dexamo. CUtot that's been freshly painted
2/2/2 with extra lot. Utility inside & out, new floor tiles,
shed, city water, Fruit Trees. & two sheds. $135,000
$149,900 June Poliachik Sun Realty
Patty Gillespie Remax 941-916-0100
Anchor 941-875-2755

NORTHteaj PORT
BANK ~ ~ lkML '-M
FORECLOSURES^AJE


2/2 Mongite $52,900
3/2 Music $119,900
3/2 Vizza la $149,900
3/2 Petronia $119,900
3/3 pool Deer Run
$192,000
COMING SOON
3/2 Ripley St. TBD
3/2 Orchard Cir TBD
OTHER LISTINGS of Interest
3/2/2 lots Blackbird $154900
3/2/2100 sf Pinstar $169900


RF/AM
ANCHOR REALTY
Call for FREE list of
surrounding area
Foreclosures
Call "The Estill Team"
941-228-2849


Beautiful 3/z/z 'ool Home,
2063 SF, lots of upgrades, Tile
Floors, S/S apple & Granite in
Kitchen. Walk-in Showers in
baths, corner lot.
$229,000 neg. 941-993-5909


NOURTH ru '--.- -:? Lri':.
Terrace, 3/2/2 Pool home
on corner lot, sprinkler sys-
tem, utility shed, Newer A/C.
GORGEGEOUS Curb Appeal.
$195,000
PATTY GILLESPIE Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755





NORTH PORT- -'"0'
Beautiful Private 3/2/2 on 3
Lots! 1550+ SF. New A/C &
Well! Freshly Painted. Granite
Counter Tops. Must See!
$149,900. 941-451-4274
Employ Classified!

I rVUJI


runI UnHrLU I I -
12285 Tranter Ave., Lovingly
maintained 3/3 w/over 2000
SF under air. Double corner
lot. Close to all amenities!
$165,000
Patty Gillespie Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755


run i ICAi LOLuI I
2007 3/2/2 Custom
designed heated pool home.
Lots of upgrades! Must see!
$174,900
A Clear Choice Realty
Henry Gustaf 941-204-8213

m...m -


PORT CHARLOTTE
23204 Rountree Ave.,
Flawless! Beautiful 2/2,
totally new kitchen, incl apple
and cabinets. New Tile &
electrical panel. Freshly
painted inside & out. DON'T
MISS THIS EXCEPTIONAL
BUY! $84,900
PATTY GILLESPIE REMAX
ANCHOR 941-875-2755


hIDUCEDi

PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2.5/2 Like New POOL Home
w/Extra Lot Open Floor Plan!
Lush Landscaping
$249,900.
Jeff Runyan, Re/Max Palm.
941-979-2843


. .... ....... . . / -/
Nice pool home,1528 Sq.Ft.
includes lot next door. New
paint & resurfaced pool deck.
Eat in Kit,LR FM, Corner lot.
Murdock Area. $129,900 941-
628-9030


Beautiful 3/2/2 located in
great neighborhood, within 2
miles of schools. Home fea-
tures New A/C, appliances &
flooring. Oversized corner lot.
$122,500 941-628-3984


Sailboat, mins. to Harbor. Ship-
shape 3/2/2 +2 lanais, hot
tub. "Country quiet." Great
neighbors! Owner financing
avail. (No Flood Ins. rqd.) Make
Offer! $205K 941-753-7433


HOMES FOR SALE


: Z 1020 I


run uiid[IULLt, 221,3
Bahama Lane across from
Presby. Church. Move In ready,
immaculate older 2/1. Florida
Room, Carport, Workshop,
CHA, City Water & Sewer, Not
in Flood Zone. All up-graded.
$59,900. Excellent investment
property. 941-391-2022


PT CHARLOTTE
2/2/1.5 OVER 1500SQFT.
(BLOCK HOUSE) W/
BONUS RM & POOL
JUST RESURFACED, NEW
TILE, GRANITE & POOL
EQUIP. NEW ELECTRIC
PANEL $89K BY OWNER
941.268.8794


FUlir4 i A[tL,/rA
Harbour Oaks Gated Com-
munity. 3 Bedrm/2.5 Bath
POOL Home. 2,401 SF on
Oversized Lot. $279,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty


PUNTA GORDA, 2/2/1 Deed
Restricted Charlotte Park! Boat
Ramp & Amenities! Newly Redec-
orated & Landscaped. SS
Appl. Granite Counters. Turn-
Key! $149,900. 941-505-2324


HOMES FOR SALE

:Z^ 020 ^

DEEP CREEK By Owner
3/2/2 New counter tops,
appliances, hurricane shut-
ters. Quiet cul-de-sac.
$145,900 220 BOA VISTA DR.
Call 941-766-0649





ROTONDA BRAND NEW
CONSTRUCTION
LUXURIOUS 3/2/3 w/ POOL @
17 MEDALIST CT, WHITE MARSH.
AND IT'S NEW! $339,900.
CALL 941-769-0200 OR EMAIL:
ROTONDAREALESTATE@COMCAST. NET


ROTONDA WEST
157 COUGAR WAY
Beautifully Remodeled 2001
Pool Home, 3 bd/2ba/2car,
Granite & New SS Appls.,
Park Like Setting, On DIb
Lot, Asking $199,900
BAY BRIDGE HOMES
941-626-8200





ROTONDA WEST, FSBO
253 Mariner Ln, 3/2/2 Solar
heated Pool, Built 2005,
New A/C, Low Insurance, 7K
in hurricane shutters.
Furnished. Buyers agent 3%.
$184,000 941-698-4776
CLASSkkIFIEDl
ADS SELLB


Incredible Park like setting!
Beautiful Custom 3/2.5/2+CG
Estate Home. Amenities:
Granite, Custom Cabinets,
Fireplace, 18" tile throughout,
Electronic Gated entrance,
Board Fencing, Barn, RV pad,
+++. BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
HomeServices Florida Realty
941-585-9599
www.CarolWade.com


HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 ^

PORT CHARLOTTE Newer
Home! 4+/2/2 Owner Finance.
Nice Area! Rent $1300. mo or
Sell $225,000. 941-763-9315


Im ri n r Im I 1 I liuue iue
3/2/2 with Granite counters,
wood cabinets, upgraded
tile, new A/C w/warranty.
$154,900
A Clear Choice Realty
Henry Gustaf 941-204-8213

| WOW^I
j wow]




NOKOMIS-WALK TO BEACH
3/2.5/2 + off/4thBR Pool,
Granite, new SS appl. 2
lanais. $475k 941-504-1578
WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


water Front 2U12 Burnt
Store Isles 2408 SF
Custom Canal Home!
Seawall Dock & BoatLift
Nice locationPrivacy
Viewing Nature Preserve.
New Listing! Was $4990- K
Now $479,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES
ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304


POOL $249,900
SOLAR POWERED HOME, 5
MIN TO OPEN WATER.
DOCK/LIFT.
CALL TO SEE TODAY!
CAPT. BOB & KELLY DAVIES
941-468-4485
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES &
HOMES
WWW.BUYHOMESBYBOAT.COM


Need




a




Friend?





Look in the


Classified





SUN NEWSPAPERS


Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3





The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, February 6, 2014


WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


.I'LEL.WUUU/LAPE MAZE
SAILBOAT WATERFRONT
2BR/1BA WITH LG. ENCLOSED
LANAI OR FAMILY ROOM, ALL TILE,
LOTS & LOTS OF UPGRADES
ROOF, AC, MORE. 90x110'
SEAWALLED LOT.
$250,000 920-737-9159
OR 941-441-7648






PUNTA GORDA
424 Panarea Ave. Custom
built home in Burnt Store
Isles with 80 ft seawall
sailboat access. $374,775
June Poliachik
Realtor CDPE, SFR Sun Realty
941-916-0100

nwffiqvffT^^^


fJUl I UnHntLU I I h.
3/2/2 Pool home on Spring
Lake waterway, gulf access.
Large LOT- 17.193 sq.ft!
Completely remodeled &
updated! $259,900
A Clear Choice Realty
Henry Gustaf 941-204-8213


PORT CHARLOTTE : _::
Built 2007, vaulted ceiling in
great room, dining/kitchen,
custom cabinets, jetted tub.
100' sailboat water, 10 min to
harbor. Great area! $369,000
Rich Hulet 941-815-7588
I[mI


r"ul' I t^n/4rLuI I --
Waterfront Beauty, Furn'd
+ Boat! Dock, Lift, Pool.
Views Galore! $395,500.
Marianne Lilly, RE/VAX Harbor
941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com

1%



PT CHARLOTTE WATERFRONT
3/2/2 POOL HOME WITH LG
CORNER LOT AND SEAWALLED,
WITH DAVITS & DOCK.
ALL TILE, NEW KITCHEN.
ONLY $215,000
920-737-9159 OR
941-441-7648


I WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030











PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2.5 POOL w/Waterfall-
Home on Canal. Fabulous
Kitchen and Master Suite.
Exquisite Gardens. $675,000
Sharon Kerr 941-286-7315
Coldwell Banker Sunstar
&L REDUCED!.


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
4BD/3BA/3CG with 2810SF.
Loads of Extras & Upgrades
On 2 Full Size Sailboat Lots.
16OFt On Water.
$699,500 Now $649,900.
John Littlejohn 941-380-5354
Coldwell Banker Residential RE
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
Sailboat Water- 3 Bd. Pool
home w. Ig. lanai, about 10
min. to Harbor. Great Rm.
plan, 2 car garage + work-
shop. Granite counters,
hurricane shutters, gas stove
+dock & 10,0001b vertilift.
$477,700 Adele Bourcier
Coldwell Banker
941-468-2571


Masterbuilders Showplace.
3Bd+Office With 2565sf. Like-
New/Extras & Upgrades!Quick
Boating Access! $525,000
John Littlejohn 941-380-5354
Coldwell Banker Residential RE

find your Best
Friend in the
Classifieds!




tesiiM -- _,,,.. ..
PUNTA GORDA
Lazy Lagoon Waterview
Lot #34. 55+ Resident
Owned Park, 2005 Fleetwood.
Furnished 2/2 w/ Sun room,
living room, kitchen, dining
room. Carport. Excl. cond.
$67,900 941-505-0758
1_


GOLF COURSE
COMMUNITY
1035


COMMUNITY
1^ 035^ ^


REDUCD



LAKE SUZY
12981 Kingsway Circle
4/2/2 POOL w/ Hot Tub!
Outside Kitchen Located on
the 15th Holed MUST SEE!
$2955 0 $289,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty


LAKE SUZY 3/2/3
12539 SW KINGSWAY CIR.
Newer S/S Appliances,
Granite Countertops, All Tile
except one guest bdrm, walk
in closets in master bdrm,
beautiful view of Kingsway
Country Club on 17th
Fairway, oversize garage,
New pool screen.
Jill Brouwer Realty,
Jill Brouwer 941-766-1606
or 941-276-4459 or
Call Linda 941-457-7245

REDUCEDD!_ -




LAKE SUZY
11971 SW Kingsway Cir
Exec. Home. Golf Course &
Lake View. 3/2.5/2, Updated
Kitchen. Metal Roof,
EIc. Shutters, Workshop.
4237 sf. with Additional
Buildable Lot Available.
Must See! $299,999.
Lolly Lopinski, South East
Realty (941)-628-0941


Kingsway Cir. 2 Bdrm/2Bath
w/ Family Room. (Possible
3rd Bedrm.) LakevieW. MustSeed
$239,950. Linda 941-457-
7245 or Jill Brouwer 941-
276-4459 Jill Brouwer Realty
ADVERTISE!





NORTH PORT, 1840 Silver
Palm Rd., 3/2/3 Pool Home
in Gated Golf Community.
New A/C, Push Button Hurri-
cane Shutters. Mins to Shop-
ping, Beaches & Restaurants.
PATTY GILLESPIE Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755
'* ^ *


rUNIA LiUKUA - -
Seminole Lakes 24 Hr. Gated
Community. Updated Home!
Granite Countertops Hurricane
Shutters, ALL New Hunter
Douglas Window Treaments.
$179,900 715-533-2611

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
^^ 1040


ICONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
z10404


VILLA, MODEL LAKEFRONT
1718' 2BR/2BA/2CG + DEN,
LOTS OF EXTRAS
FOR SALE BY OWNER
$239,900. 941-681-2424
774-810-0094


LAKE SUZY, 11335 SW
Essex Dr. Located in
Kingsway Golf Course Area.
2+Bed/Den, 2 Bath, 2CG
Single Unit! Meticulas!
MLS#C7047973 $209,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-276-
4459 Jill Brouwer Realty
A-?


NORTH PORT
Short sale. 2/2/2 built 2006
Cypress Falls villa in the
Woodlands with community
heated pool, and many more
amenities. Call June Poliachik,
Sun Realty 941-916-0100

I9EI 1


PORT CHARLOTTEUII
Juniper Model in Riverwood
Brand New 2 Bedroom Villa
with Den, 2 Car Garage.
Never Been Lived in!
Carl Anderson, Real Estate
Broker 941-629-9586


PRICE REDUCED 10K I
PORT CHARLOTTE Oaks III,
E206, 2/2 Totally renovated,
Partially furnished, heated
Pool, Active Clubhouse,
Beautiful Grounds.
$58,500 OBO
Owner 423-343-6349





PT CHARLOTTE CONDO
PROMENADES EAST 2/2
ALL UPDATED APPLIANCES, AC,
& FURNITURE. COMM POOL,
ELEVATOR & INSIDE PARKING
$69,900 941-255-5252


Fmid it in the

ICassifieds!


rumi I IA .lUlU.r IJLL.J
3/2/1 w/ Deeded Dock!
Sailboat Access to Harbor.
Top Floor Corner Unit.
$27 4,000. $259,000.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Village Realty. 941-661-4800


ICONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
^i^1040


rUNI IT lAU"UR ISLLE
Water Front-Gateway
Point. Ground floor, Lanai,
Tile, Stainless Appl., club-
house, large pool, walk to
Fisherman's 2/2/2
Owner 419-863-9358
Ir m i


I killlf II 1 l,/llI. 1~ I^I ,I l
FURNISHED TURNKEY
Waterfront Condo
2 Bed/2 Bath Updated
Kitchen. Low Condo Fees -
$120,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net




NEW PORT CONDOS BUILDING
11, PORT CHARLOTTE
S2BR/2BA WITH CAR PORT.
TOTALLY RENOVATED, NEW
KITCHEN, ALL NEW CERAMIC
TILE FLOORING AND NEW AC.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
SOLD IN 1 DAY!


Great Deals in
the Classifieds!


PUNTIA UUGORDUA- ':.p:,J
3/2.5/2 in Gated Calusa
Creek. Lots of Amenities!
Short Distance to Historic
Punta Gorda! $169,900.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Village Realty. 941-661-4800

MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE



PALM HARBOR HOMES
4/2 Fleetwood 2,200
sq ft $12K OFF!
Starting at $499/month
Call John Lyons for details
1-800-622-2832 ext 210

i --zI


m vmm .nmmr-ml. r- ae-1e-
$25,900! Priced Below Mkt
For Immediate Sale! No pets,
Adult Community. Fishing
Pier On Charlotte Harbor.
Immaculate & updated 2/2
double. Better hurry & call
Mike @ 941-356-5308


MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
1090


VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com
MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
S1095


HPUN IA LUKUA
RIVERSIDE!
$39,995
2/2, FURNISHED.
UPDATED & VERY CLEAN!
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


1$49,985 Well kept, 2/2
Sectional, 2 Lanai's,
Drywall, Fully Furnished.
Oversized, Beautiful!!
"WHERE WE LEFT THE TREES"
Call Mike, 941-356-5308
RWW.RIVERSIDEOAKSFLORIDA.COM
ARCADIA, Nearly New
3BR/2BA Manufactured
Home on 1/2 Acre.
Financing Available! $69,995
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122




IOIc
PUNTA GORDA Buttonwood
Village 2/2, Lanai, Carport,
Furn $35,000 810-841-6735
Punta Gorda saltwater front
boat mooring allowed, 2
large BR w/walk in closets,
2 baths, new fixtures & tile,
cathedral ceiling, beautiful
sun room overlooking
ocean 96K. 941-629-3261
^mi'//^


PUNTA GORDA
Unbeatable Pricing on
Turn-Key Package!
Model on Display.
Resales. Active Community!
Call Greg 941-626-7829

PUNTA GORDA-
Newer Home! 2BD/2BA/CP.
Large Raised Screen Room,
Utility Room & Lake View!
$39,900.
Call Greg 941-626-7829


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
Spectacular Water View!
3/2/2 w/POOL! Well
maintained on Oversized
Sailboat Lot! $374,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty


55+ Active Community
Affordable Manufactured
Homes!!! 1 Year FREE
Golf Membership With
New Home Purchase!
Call Ted @
800-538-2590
for details or please
visit our website
www.arcadiavillage.com


6i$U lVV&UU UiOLt6 rO uil IAM U UM I01-0
2/2/2 Almost 1700 SF, 3/2/2 w/ Deeded Dock! Par-
Single Detached Condo tial Harbor View. 2nd Building
Home, Private Area W/Pool, From Harbor! Walk to Fisher-
Deep Water, No Bridges To man's Village $419,000.
Intercoastal. $279,500 Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Jerri King 941-374-2562 Village Realty. 941-661-4800


VENICEII.i ruii, [uiriirrij, niminI[
condition w/new lanai in newly
renovated Ramblers' Rest
Resort on Myakka River.
High end amenities, docks
available. Just reduced to
$23,000! 941-497-0703


Punta Gorda. 3 Bedroom.
Immaculate. Pergo. 1500
sqft. Private Lanai with
Serene View!
$59,900
Riverside Oaks
"WHERE WE LEFT THE TREES"
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com





Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
i 10


IMMACULATE
ADULT COMMUNITY.
Immediate possession.
Conveniently located near
town. Immaculate all drywall
2/2 sectional. All new &
updated.
CALL Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com

WANTED TO BUY
^^ 1120 ^


MAX THE GAIN
WANTED: House or Rental
Property Owner Wanting to
Trade/Exchange for
Larger, Smaller, or Just
Something Different.
Learn about Exchanging.
Call Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586

HOMES FOR RENT
1210


PORT CHARLOTTE
2/1.5/2 CORNER LOT
3/2/2 BONUS ROOM
3/2/2 LARGE LANAI
PUNTA GORDA
2/2/2 HERITAGE LAKES


$800
$900
$925

$1000


WE NEED RENTAL LISTINGS
FULL PROPERTY LIST ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE YOUR PROPERTY

ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!
ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-0333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com




* 2/2/2 Rotonda lanai
den, golf course $900
* 2/2 lanai 55+ mobile
$525

West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
-A-ABring your pets!-A-A
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME


HOMES FOR RENT
L 1210 J




ARCADIA 2 Bedroom,
1 Bath & Carport
$550/mo + Security.
941-624-0355 or
941-875-5253
0 NEED A RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT
NORTH PORT 3/2 w/carport,
W/D, pets OK, Fenced Yard.
Clean & nice $950/mo Appli-
cation rqd. 941-740-0761
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/1/1
Newly renovated, granite kitch,
spa, nice fenced yard. 1st/last
& sec. $795 561-351-5390
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2,
Pool, Lanai, Shed, 2200 SF,
$1350/mo 941-628-1203
I NEED CASH? I
PUNTA GORDA Large
3/2/2 waterfront pool home
with 1 br apt. $1650 (Inc.
discount for prompt payment).
Realty Mgmt. 941-625-3131
or flarentals.net





WE Investment RENTA 492-5050
Reduced Mgmt Fees
www.allfloridarealty.com
(941)629-1121
VENICE JACARANDA
River Oaks Ct. 2/2/2
pool home. $1500/mo
incids pool & lawn svc.
Investment RE 492-5050

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
~1240~

PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2
Condo 55+, 1000sf, Com-
pletely updated, New appls,
paint, carpet, etc... Turnkey
furnished. $725/mo +
deposits 941-979-0317
PUNTA GORDA 2/2 2nd
floor in BS Meadows. Unit
Looks brand new $775 Inc.
h20. Call Realty Management
941-625-3131or flarentals.net
PUNTA GORDA-BS Meadows,
2/2, Pool, new tile, no pets,
$750/mo annual, unfurnished
941-456-7899

L TOWNHOUSES
FOR RENT
^ 12SO0 ^

VENICE- Stonywood Cove.
Immaculate 3/2.5 Beautiful
Lake View! No Smoking, No
Pets. $1,200. mo. 1st & Last.
Credit Refs. Reqd. 941-378-7851

FOR RENT
^^, 1300 ^

EAST ENGLEWOOD, 2/1
W/W Carpet, W/D Hook-Up,
Lawn Care. No Pets $600 mo.
941-769-6548 Days or 941-
639-8829 evenings.
PORT CHARLOTTE 55+
1BR Duplex, fully fur-
nished, clean, conve-
nient, close to Harbor.
Util paid except phone &
cable. 941-629-5486 or
317-919-1566

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT





PORT CHARLOTTE
VILLA SAN CARLOS II
AFFORDABLE
Income Based Apartments
for 62 or Older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
1^ 320^ ^









LOOK
VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$475 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
Seize the sales
with Classified!
Venice Studio & 1 .
Bedroom Accepting l
941-488-7766 .......
VILLA SAN eCeARLOs 255

Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1-800-955-8771



WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apari-nents. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!
t 941429-24022

EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT


HARBOUR HEIGHTS close to
river, newly renovated efficien-
cies w cable & internet, Sunny-
brookMotel 941-625-6400
RENTALSS TO SHAREI




VENICE: private home share.
Retired businesswoman wants
year round person. Lovely
home. $$ neg. 941-497-4262

| VACATION/
SEASONAL RENTALS
^1390 3

ENGLEWOOD-Encore RV
35' Trailer, sleeps 6, pets ok.
Incl. pool, tennis. Close to fish-
ing! $3500/mo 941-467-8769
VENICE MARCH
3/2/2 on Lemon Bay
$3200.
Investment RE 492-5050

LOTS & ACREAGE
^^ 1500 ^









SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
AdverLtise your home,
condo, or lot with us
and reach over
175,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.

Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtomrs Welcome!


LOTS & ACREAGE
L Z 500 ^






ARCADIA: Private Country
Living: 2.5 Acres, Includes
3/2 MH & Carport Near 1-75,
Walmart & Peace River Boat
Ramp. $145k Cash.
941-743-6601

**RV LOTS**
WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN
OWN. SITES AVAILABLE:
FISHING LAKE
*FREE GOLF *BOAT LAUNCH
*PARK MODELS
*NEAR BEACHES.
Low MAINTENANCE FEES,
ACTIVITIES, 55+ PARKS!!
CALL KATHY 810-444-3044
OR ARLENE 810-919-4000
CHARLOITTECOUNTYREALTY.COM


33661 Serene Dr. 10 Acres
Zn AE, Partly Cleared 40/80
steel bldg, w/elec, slab, 2
12X12 OH drs $139,000
941-505-7272
WATERFRONT
L Zl 1515


3/4 AC +/- ESTATE LOT, 1600
NEW POINT COMFORT RD., ENGLE-
WOOD. CAN BE SPLIT INTO 2 LOTS.
90 FT. DOCK. OWNER FINANCING POSS
$529,900 941-769-0200
CARUBANEWS@COMCAST. NET
ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
NORTHPORT: Fresh water
canal lots; various sizes, some
up to 5 adjacent lots; buy one
or the whole trac; well located;
$5,900/$13,900; standard
size lots; singles, doubles
triples; $ 4000/$6900; many
cleared; no scrub jays; call or
e-mail for showing or direc-
tions; 941-286-7003; e-mail;
lotsites@hotmail.com


PEACE RIVER Frontage 20+
acres over 537 feet on the
River. Multimillion dollar estate
adjoining property. Build your
dream home or hide-away.
Near historic Arcadia. Bring all
offers. BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
HomeServices Florida Realty
941-585-9599
www.CarolWade.com

TRADE/ EXCHANGE
L :1540


OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS!
Exchange Possibility.
Brand New Villa in
Riverwood for your Unwanted
House or Rental Property,
Trade Up Down Out.
Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586


L BUSINESS
w FOR SALE
4i^ 1600 i


SUCCESSFUL
WATERFRONT
RESTAURANT, ARCADIA
90 SEATS INSIDE/100 OUTSIDE
I 7 COP LICENSEINCLUDES
40 SLIPS MARINA. OPTION-
AL: HOME AND 3 COTTAGES
OWNER FINANCING. OVER
10% CAPRATE. SIMPLY
MARINAS: 305-439-9581

BUSINESS RENTALS
1610


Professional & Retail
Space in Several
Punta Gorda & Port
Charlotte Locations.
Call 941-815-2199
For Availability & Prices.

COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP


AKLAuiAn 4T.4 ac^ by uwvviic
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585
/ GET RESULTS

( USE CLASSIFIED! )
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992
PUNTA GORDA Airport area,
2000 SqFt, Modern Commer-
cial Building w/office & ware-
house. Incls Water, Sewer &
Trash. Zoned Cl, multiply units
avail. $700 + tax 203-6444732

L WAREHOUSE
& STORAGE
^^,^1640 ^

CHARLOTTE HARBOR
20X40 warehouse/small busi-
ness, AC office, dumpster,
23250 Harper Ave #3. $475
mo. tax incl. 715-367-8236
NORTH PORT 800SF WH
$450/mo. 400 SF, $220/mo
400SF Office, $295/mo, All +
Tax 941-661-6720

2000


EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

CLERICAL/OFFICE
Z^ 2020

ASSISTANT F/1 in tast
paced Real Estate Office in
Engl. Organized, energetic,
exp in real estate desirable.
Computer/word processing
knowledge a must. Email to:
gillaspylisa@comcast.net


CLERICAL/OFFICE
L 2020 ^


CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda
FULL TIME POSITION
Available for Busy
Swimming Pool
Construction Service Office.
Must be an
Organized Person that Can
Multi-Task. Must Have
Computer Skills &
Be a Quick Learner.
Non Smokers Only. DFWP
Fax Resume to:
941-624-0263
No Phones Calls Please
SECRETARIAL/
BOOKKEEPING POSITION
Proficient with Quick Books,
Excel, Word. F/T or P/T.
donna.brundermanbuilding@
comcast.net

SECRETARY
SKILLS
CONSULTING FIRM IS LOOK-
ING FOR AN EXPERIENCED
SECRETARY WITH WRITING
SKILLS, PHOTO SHOP EXPE-
RIENCE, REPORT WRITING &
WORD/EXCEL. TO WORK 3
DAYS AWEEKTO START.
CALL MON FRI 8AM4PM
AND PLEASE ASK FOR LIZ
941-475-5716

MEDICAL /
W4'a 2030 ^


ACTIVITY DIRECTOR &
CAREGIVERS
Needed for ALF. Experience
preferred, F/T positions.
APPLY AT:
2901 JACARANDA BLVD
VENICE

DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
"PT, OT & ST for
PT/PRN
*RN, LPN & CNA
for all shifts
*Dietary Manager F/T
*Office Assistant F/T
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766

MEDICAL BILLING
MANAGER
Must have 5+ experience
in billing incl. eclinical.
SEND RESUME TO:
medbillingpc@gmail.com
MEDICAL OFFICE In
Englewood seeking a versatile
Front Office person with
supervisory experience.
Full Benefits, reply with CV to
sunclassifiedsl@gmail.com
include dept 4110 in subject.
OFFICE SPECIALIST
FT position with benefits.
Physician office exp req'd.
Please fax resume to
941-625-2751
PART-TIME NURSE
PRACTIONER NEEDED!
For Mon & Thurs only. Gyn
experience necessary.
Fax resume: 941-625-7123
PORT CHARLOTTE REHAB
is looking for:
RNA/LPN Full Time
3PM-11PM & 11PM-7AM
At least 1 year experience
in Long Term Care.
Apply in person at
25325 Rampart Blvd
Port Charlotte Fl 33983






The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, February 6, 2014


L MEDICAL
low4:2030 ^


RN/LPN/MA, Needed For
Busy Dermatology Office. Full
Time/Part Time. Experience
a Plus Fax Resume to:
941-627-4389



U.
Nil


SIGNATURE
HEATHCARE LLC
IS SEEKING DEPENDABLE &
COMPASSIONATE PEOPLE TO
JOIN OUR TEAM:

RN/SUPERVISOR
FULL TIME
3-11 SHIFT

RN/SUPERVISOR
WEEKENDS

RN's and LPN's
3-11 and 11-7

PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON:
SIGNATURE
HEALTHCARE LLC
4033 Beaver Lane,
Port Charlotte.
EOE/DFWP
('-NEED A JOB?---
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIEDS!2

HORIZON
.AHEALTHICARE
INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN within
11 months. Enrollment ongoing.
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Mar 3 '14
LPN-next class starts
Feb 17th '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506

MUSICAL
LW 2035 ^


Do you have a heart for
serving the Lord? Englewood
East Church of Christ is
looking for a VOLUNTEER
PIANO PLAYER. Contact
Church Office @ 941-468-5520

RESTAURANT/
HOTEL
LwaZ204P0






1814 Tamiami Trail, P.C.
(941)-766-6106
HIS IS A GREAT OPPORTUNITY
FOR PEOPLE OF ALL AGES &
BACKGROUNDS. NO EXPERI-
ENCE IS NECESSARY, BUT A
STRONG WORK ETHIC & A POS-
TIVE ATTITUDE ARE A MUST.
BENEFITS INCLUDE:
Sunday off, Free Meals,
Flexible Hours &
Competitive Pay.
We are Currently Seeking
Part Time & Full Time
KITCHEN TEAM MEMBERS.
We Will Be Holding Open
Interviews from
9am-5pm Thurs. Fri.
Monday & Tuesday and
9am-3pm on Saturday.
SE HABLA ESPANOL


L RESTAURANT/
HOTEL
mmj Z2040TUi


UUSbK & UISHWASHbK
NEEDED 6 Days a Week.
No Experience Necessary.
Apply in Person:
Smoke House
415 Cooper St, PG
EXP. SERVER apply within
between 2-4 Jimmy's Grill
2665 Tamiami TrI., Port. Char
EXPERIENCED SERVERS/
BARTENDER NEEDED
P/F Position Sundays are a
Must! Great Perks.
Employee & Spouse Golf
Free when Available.
Apply in Person Mon.-Sat.
266 Rotonda Circle
Ask for Cathy

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!

OFFICE MGR/HEAD
HOUSEKEEPER
Tues-Sat 9-5. Office & clean-
ing skills rqd. Email resume:
jalmoslino@comcast.net
WAITRESS NEEDED,
No Sunday, Apply Within:
Wee Blew Inn, Venice

| SKILLED TRADES /
L 2050 J


AC TECH
Who can Service, Sell, &
Install. Plumbing exp. a plus.
Permanent position w/well
established company. Top Pay
& Benefits. Exp. only need
apply. Call 941-628-0433 or
Fax Resume to 941-637-4683



EXPERIENCED TIRE
TECH with light mechani-
cal exp. DL Required!
Starting pay $400-
$600/wk 941-639-5681
P***********I
Positions Available for
BACKHOE OPERATORS
with CDL. Apply:
SOS Septic Inc.
941-662-0095
MECHANIC-EXPERIENCED
NEEDED FOR BUSY
MOWER SHOP TO REPAIR
AND SERVICE LAWN TRAC-
TORS / Z-TURN MOWERS
CALL 941-662-7321



EXPERIENCED, with all
phases of plumbing
including Experienced
BACKHOE OPERATOR
DFWP, references, clear
driving record.
PLEASE CALL Jimmy @
941-625-9981


SSKILLED TRADES
L2050 ^


RV DETAILER,

FT 40 hours +, looking
for an experienced
detailer with clean dri-
ving record. Job includes
cleaning RV's interiors
and exteriors. Drug Free,
Non-Smoker.
Call Ed Davidson (941)
966-2182 or email
jobs@rvworldinc.com

WRECKER DRIVER, Must
have experience & be able to
work nights & weekends.
Live in Englewood area.
Clean Drivers License.
Apply in person:
Sterns Auto Service, 1590
S. McCall Rd., Englewood.

MANAGEMENT
2060


ARCADIA CHEVROLET BUICK
AND CHEVROLET TRUCKS
We are currently seeking
motivated salespersons.
BUSINESS IS GREAT!
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR:
Sales Manager
Secondary F & I Manager
Internet Sales Manager
All parts and service person-
nel for an expanding dealership
Call or email Jimmie Tucker:
863-494-3838
jtucker@plattnerautomotivegroup.com
Or Doug Plattner:
dougplattner@aol.com

Classifie = Sales





ADVERTISI G
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.

DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
E-MAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


SALES 1
L ^ 2070 ^


Advertising Sales
Executive

The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
Training
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:
Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.


READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?

SALES/NEW BUSINESS
S DEVELOPER
Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
SSales, New Business
S Developer team
located in
S North Port Florida.
SWe are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
Outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
S looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
Steam. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
Loves learning new skills and
enjoys working in a positive
S team environment.

We offer:
je Training
.0 Stable company that
is very Community
Minded and involved.
:0 Opportunity to expand
Your business skills

Please email your resume
to:
SJobs@sunletter.com

S Equal Opportunity
Employer/Drug & Nicotine
: Free Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.
NEED!CASH?
Have A Garage
S a le __


SALES
Lwow 2070 ^


BOCA GRANDE GOURMET &
GIFT STORE Seasonal mid-Oct
mid-July. Varied hours, 5-days
per week Gourmet food knowl.
req'd+retail exp pref. Bridge
paid. Call 1-5pm 941-964-0614

OUTSIDE ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE/FULL TIME

We are looking for a
Self-starter who is
efficient, experienced,
well organized and
effective in developing
strong business
relationships.
You will be on the front
line growing new revenue
opportunities through
display advertising in the
Nokomis, Osprey, and
South Sarasota area.
A key initiative is to drive
success and an ROI for
your customer base.
We are a well-established,
high-production,
successful community
business. The dress code
is business casual.

If you determine you are
the right fit for this
exciting sales opportunity,
please send your resume
to bobw@smartshopg.com
SALES & MARKETING
ASSISTANT
Entry Level Marketing/
Entry Level Advertising
We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. We are
located in North Port Florida.
Duties Include, but are
not limited to:
Executing sales and
marketing functions to
company standards
Assists customers with any
questions they may have in
regards to our products
Gains knowledge on
all new clients the
company acquires
Ensure highest level of
customer service resulting in
increased productivity and
achieving sales goals
Knowledge of our
systems follow through of
advertising copy
Growth opportunities may be
available for those who
qualify.This position is entry
level, previous experience in
sales and marketing helpful.
We look for candidates with
the following:
Some college or
degree preferred
S* Outstanding
interpersonal skills
Student Mentality
Leadership Experience
Experience in retail, sales,
advertising & marketing
Ability to work in a high
energy environment
Please email resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com
Sun Classifieds attention:
Geri Kotz EOE, DFWP
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.


CHILD/ADULT
CARE NEEDED



LIVE IN HOME CARE GIVER
For growing company
Assist 2 developmentally
challenged individuals with
daily living needs in a beau-
tiful Cape Coral home.
Great pay, long term, very
rewarding work. Great Job.
Call 239-770-5668
239-945-6241 Office


CARE NEEDED
2* .090 i


PRESCHOOL TEACHER
Apply within: Educare
3028 Caring Way, PC
PRESCHOOL TEACHER
Apply within: Our Little World
1603 Castlerock Ln,
Port Charlotte
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!

GENERAL
ava 2100 ^


BOAT WASHER/DOCK
MASTER, Part Time,
Cleaning, Scrubbing and
light maintenance for
medium sized boats.
Pine Island & Punta Gorda
area. Two Days per week,
weekends are expected.
Friendly customer service
required. Email Resume &
phone number
spitser@freedomboatclub.com
CASHIERS, WANTED, F/T &
P/T for Produce Market. No
exp. nec. $9/hr. to start. Pio-
neer Farmers Mkt. 312 S.
Tamiami Trail, Venice Island
941-484-8655
DRIVERS
MEDICAL TRANSPORT
COMPANY LOOKING FOR DRI-
VERS. NO EXPERIENCE NECES-
SARY. MUST HAVE CLEAN DRI-
VING RECORD AND BE ABLE TO
PASS A BACKGROUND CHECK.
APPLY AT
WWW.AMEDITRANS.COM
EARN WHILE YOU LEARN
Get great pay, benefits &
training as a HVAC
TECHNICIAN. Growing
contractor in Englewood
needs you to join our well
paid team. DFWP. Please
call Abbott Air Inc at
941-600-2591

F/T POOL ATTENDANT
NEEDED FOR A PRIVATE CLUB
ON BOCA GRANDE. MUST
BE ABLE TO WORK FLEXIBLE
HOURS, WEEKENDS & HOLI-
DAYS. WILL BE REQUIRED TO
MOVE POOL FURNITURE.
EOE, DRUG FREE, BACK-
GROUND CHECK. EMAIL
OPS@BOCAGRANDECLUB.COM OR
941-964-2211, EXT. 4410.
HANDYMAN/MGR. needed
to serve small condo co. Exp.
w/pools, landscaping &
repairs. Resident mgr, free
apt. 941-637-7808

INDEPENDENT
NEWSPAPER
CARRIERS NEEDED:
The ENGLEWOOD SUN
has home delivery
routes available.
Supplement your income
with this great business
opportunity.
Earn $200-$300/week
for a few early morning
hours of delivery. Reliable
transportation, a valid
Florida driver's license
and proof of insurance
are required.
Apply in person at the
Englewood Sun
120 W. Dearborn St,
Englewood Florida,
or online at
www.yoursun.com

PART TIME
"AMBASSADORS" Needed,
to solicit "Free Subscriptions"
for the Smart Shopper.
A 20 year old weekly shopper.
Contact Jim DeFalle
941-786-7676
RainSoft at Home Depot
Winning personalities.
PT with AMAZING rewards!
Seniors welcome!
Mike G. 941-625-1000 xt 217





Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


L GENERAL
wow 2100 ^

DOCK HAND needed at
Marina on Boca Grande.
Call 941-964-0154
RAINSOFT needs Salt
Delivery Driver. Good License
& able to pass backgrd chk.
Call David at 941-629-3905
VET TECH FT for Busy Clinic.
EXP. NECESSARY. Apply:
Lemon Bay Animal Hospital,
3060 S. McCall Rd. Englewood
WAREHOUSE/
MAILROOM
THE CHARLOTTE SUN
NEWSPAPER

NOW HIRING
Part-time, must be produc-
tion oriented, able to lift at
least 20 Ibs. and willing to
work flexible hours.
To fill out an Application
Apply in person
Mon.-Fri. 8-5
The Charlotte Sun
Newspaper
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Please, no phone calls
We are a drug and
nicotine free workplace
Pre-employment drug
and nicotine testing
required
YMCA ACTIVE OLDER ADULT
PROGRAM COORDINATOR.
PC/NP/PG AREA. P/T
30 HRS/WK, EXP WORKING WITH
SENIORS PREFERRED. DUTIES PLAN
& EXECUTE EVENTS & ACTIVITIES
TO ENGAGE OUR ACTIVE OLDER
ADULT MEMBERS. DRUG TESTING &
BACKGRD CHECKS REQUIRED.
NO PHONE CALLS. EMAIL
RESUME TO wschumacher@
charlottecountvvmca.com
PART TIME/
TEMPORARY
2110 ^
SEEKING SEASONAL PT
Employees To Work Stone
Crab Games At Charlotte
Sports Park. Work Days &
Hours Dependent Upon The
Stone Crab Game Schedule.
Mostly Nights Starting At
5:00 PM. Some Baseball
Knowledge & Heavy Lifting
Required. Starting Pay Is
$8.00 Per Hour. Please send
resumes to: P.O. Box 13307
St. Petersburg, FL 33733
Attention Human Resources.
SEEKING
EMPLOYMENT


RETIRED CHRISTIAN Man,
looking for small jobs piddling
around. Call 757-506-4730 PC
3000








NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS
L 3010 ^


**** ADOPTION: *
Entertainment &
Marketing Execs long for
1st baby to LOVE.
Laughter, Sports, Music
await. Expenses Paid
1-800-552-0045
FLBar42311
**** Rita & Greg****


ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010





FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**

SUNV




WHISTLE KLEEN SERVICES
office and condo
941-979-2334

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!

HAPPY ADS
S3015


I NEED CASH? I


S HAPPY ADS





Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
:3020

ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
BODY RUBS BY
BRANDI 941-600-4317
SNOWBIRD SPECIALS
LONELY SR. MALE looking
for female companionship,
possibly more. 239-297-5351
PASSAGE AND RELAXATION
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520


SENSATIONS
STRESS RELEASE
941- 766-7995
3860 RT. 41, 2 Mi. NORTH
OF PUNTA GORDA BRIDGE.
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR
941-483-0701 North Port
WEALTHY WHITE Widower
seeking a Punta Gorda
Princess. 941-575-7013
CARD OF THANKS

L ^ 3040 ^

MAY THE SACRED heart of
Jesus be praised, adorded,
glorified and loved throughout
the world now and forever.
Thank you, St Jude. PXM
SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
L4 ^3060 ^


CNA Training, HHA, MED
ASST, CPR. Onsite testing
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
TRADITIONAL SHAOLIN
KUNG FU CLASSES for
Adults & children. FREE
classes available. All areas.
Call for more info.
941-204-2826
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 or 941-347-7445
BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
L 3065

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
I Employ Classified!I


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.


CLUES ACROSS
1. Reverberation
5. Sonny's ex wife
9. Drives elephant
11. High-spirited tomboy
13. Plans
15. Gather materials together
16. Brew
17. Discovery child star
19. Stalk of a moss capsule
21. Capital of Yemen
22. Local area network
23. Belgrade River
25. Straight or bobby
26. Tennis player rank
28. Helped (archaic)
30. Lounges
32. Dove sounds


CLUES DOWN
1. Birds of prey
2. Fastest land animal
3. Judge's moniker (abbr.)
4. Part of Uttar Pradesh
5. Italian crooner Perry
6. Syringe
7. Articles fit to eat
8. Replace spent bullets
9. International metal polish
10. New Mexico artist town
11. Elf (Brit.)
12. Glowing gas element
14. Break suddenly
15. Blue colored
18. Br. children's author Blyton
20. Limicoline bird
24. Burn plants
26. Gulf of, Aegean Sea inlet


E H


A ]


34. Int'l relief organization
35. Planted crops
37. Gobblers
39. Animal companions
40. Firth of Clyde city & river
42. Korean writer Mogeum
44. 007's creator Flemming
45. Ursine animal
47. Voyage
49. Pageant title
54. A woman's undergarment
55. A treeless grassy plain
56. Anarchic
58. Gun dog
59. Coat of wool
60. These (old English)
61. Somalian shilling


27. Clysters
29. Leguminous fruit
31. Large tub
33. Member of U.S. Navy
35. Having physical sensation
36. Colors clothes
38. Plural of 33 down
39. Grouped by twos
41. Fence bar
43. Cherry brandy
44. Pixies
46. Canadian flyers
48. Emit coherent radiation
50. Lot
51. Area units
52. Russian space station
53. Tools for holes
57. 5th sign of the zodiac


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The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, February 6, 2014


& CHURCHES
1111111 3065^ i

COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
EDGAR CAYCE A.R.E.
Search for God Study Group
6 PM 7 PM each Tuesday at
Venice Public Library
More Info call 941-966-1964.
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
Bible Study on the Book of
Romans will be on Thursdays
starting on Feb. 6th at 6:30
pm at 1460 S. McCall Rd.
Suite 1C Englewood. Dr. Ken
Lindow, PHD. will be teaching
a 6 week topical study of prin-
ciples taught in the Book of
Romans. For more info.
Call church office at
(941)475-7447 or log on to
fcenglewood.com
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
Seize the sales
with Classified!
GULF COAST
HEALING ROOMS
If you need healing, we want
to pray with you!
Our prayer teams are
available to minister to
you by appointment.
Thursday 10 am-12:30 pm
For apt. call p.863.558.7455
1538 Rio de Janeiro Blvd.
Punta Gorda, Fl 33983
Jesus Still Heals Today!
r LOOKING FORAFFRD-
ABLE COUNSELING?
LIC. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING
WITH OVER 40YRS EXP.
941-876-4416
Liberty Community
Church
SNorth Port Charlotte

L LOST & FOUND
L ::3090 ^


FOUND HOUSE KEYS on
Conway Blvd in Port Charlotte.
701-238-9988
LOST FEMALE MINIATURE
SCHNAUZER in the Vicinity of
Placida Rd. Englewood on
1/31, Gray, No Collar. Muched
Loved Pet!! Please Call 941-
662-8642
LOST MALE Choc Lab on
02/1 please help941-391-
6362 Lv Mess
LOST WATCH ROLEX
Port Char. Sam Clubs Area
Reward 941-426-5955
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face, ear & back.
Missing from North Port
5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909
ARTS CLASSES
L ^ 3091 ^


ACRYLIC PAINTING CLASSES
Beginners on Tuesday, All other
Levels On Saturday At Hobby
Lobby, North Port. Call Barb
For Info 941-497-1395
ACRYLIC PAINTING-VENICE
Friday's 10-lpm
$30.00 per session
Call Vickie Lucas, 941485-8150
email: vlucas0509@hotmail.com
BEACH GLASS & Shell
Jewelry @ Creative Classes.
New Designs!
Home Classes Available
Call Susan for info, Venice:
941-492-2150.


S ARTS CLASSES
L 3091 J


FUSED GLASS & STAINED
GLASS CLASSES at Creative
Classes in Venice. For info &
scheduling, Call Gayle Haynie
941-830-8448
Shell Craft Classes
Saturday's 10-3
Make Gorgeous Shell
Art Decor.
Award Winning Designs.
Call Linda (941)-493-2276
|COMPUTER CLASSES

Z 3092 J


Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org
EDUCATION
L 3094 J


MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.
| EXERCISE CLASSES/

L z 3095 J

GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
RELIGION CLASSES

L Z 3096 J

BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
BIBLE STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
Wednesday 10AM-11AM.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
Advertise Today!

OTHER CLASSES

LZ 3097 ^

CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.

S APPLIANCE
I SERVICE/REPAIR I
%a 5020 _.0

DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596


APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR
^^ 5020^ ^

DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lie 990010103532/Ins
STAY ALIVE FOR $25!
DRYER VENT CLEANING
Fact:15,000 house fires a
year caused directly from
clogged dryer vents!
Avg. price is $40 Our
"No Excuse" price is $25!
Call, before I change my
mind! 941-249-1161

ADULT CARE
Lle :5050C


A LENDING HAND, INC.
Caregivers/Companions,
Hourly or 24/7 Care
941-809-3725
SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483
CHILD CARE
Lo L 50 5 1


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
| COMPUTER SERVICE



*1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR &
TUTOR... IN YOUR HOME
Reasonable & Prompt!
Sr. Disc. 941-451-3186
EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./lns.
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS!!
941-764-3400 or
941-276-5011
CONTRACTORS
L Z 505C4

TEDDY'S HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ilns.
CRC 1327653

COURIER/TAXI
LZ 0 505T I^


AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE
ALWAYS RELIABLE
TRANSPORTATION
PROVIDING SAFE, RELIABLE,
COURTEOUS & AFFORDABLE
TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM
ALL AIRPORTS!
941-626-5226
RSW-$55 SRQ-$60
TPA-$125 MIA-$225
*ALL RATES ARE FROM PC SEE
WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL RATES
WWW.ALWAYSRELIABLETRANSPORTATION.COM

941-763-2388
24 Hour Service-
All Occasions
ANYWHERE!
Airport Service
Ft. Myers $49.
Tampa $119.
Door to Door Service
LClean A/C'd Cars


L CONCRETE
L 50C57 ^


CONCRETE
Driveways Patios
Sidewalks Pads
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES
L4445060~

A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658


CHRIS RABY'S
CLEANING SERVICE
Servicing Venice to
Northern Sarasota.
941-623-3601
MAJESTIC CLEANING
PROFESSIONAL CLEANING AT
AFFORDABLE RATES! HAPPY TO
ACCOMMODATE YOUR NEEDS!
941-268-3075 LIC/INS

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

ELECTRICAL
oom 50T70 ^

DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
'Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
^^ 5080


BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing *
*Bush Hogging *
*ALL Mulching *
*Selective Clearing
*Tree & Stump Removal
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
Lic./Ins
DUMP TRUCK SERVICES
A DIVISION OF
TREMENDOUS TREE
Bobcat Services, Fill Dirt,
Grading, Driveways Installed
(Shell/Rock), Private Roads,
Tri Axle Dump Truck
Free Estimates
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983

HANDYMAN/
GENERAL REPAIR I


"HONEY DO" Handyman
& Odd Jobs
Kitchen & Bath Tune Ups
Faucets, counters,
windows, doors and more!
..related electrical &
plumbing work.
Experienced &
References Available
941-275-0712


I HANDYMAN/
I GENERAL REPAIR I
^^ 5089^^

HANDYMAN NOW
Roofing, drywall, windows,
doors, painting, pressure
washing Lic. Ins. tradesmen
941-505-2441,941-623-5789
/ HEATING & AIR
Z '^5090 ^


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738
S.O.S.

A/C & Heat
941-468-4956
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2995 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY!
ST. LIC #CAC1816023

HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT


5100 Basic Gutter
Cleaning & Handyman
Services Call: Mike
240-925-6806
TOPP'S FENCE INC.
941-429-0800
PVC
ALUMINUM
CHAIN LINK
"NOW HIRING"

LICENSE #AAA0010261
ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244




Commercial/Residential
County Red Tag Problems
New & Remodel Drawings
Owner/Builder Supervision
HARLEY DESIGN
Accurate Detailed Construction Drawings
Paul Yarusso
941-741-1126
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
fans, lights, faucets, toilets &
washer/dryer repair, etc...
(941)-661-8585 lic.
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
DAVID BECK
The Handyman, LLC.
Kitchen Bath Remodels .
Ceramic Tile *
941-766-1767 Lic# 1327942
Ins. Member BBB
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227


I HOME / COMM.
5100IMPROVEMENT


GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#060662/Ins.
HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694

J & J HANDYMAN
941-525-7967, 941-493-6736
Painting, Pressure Washing &
Much More!
Over 30Years Experience &
Satisified Customers
Serving Venice & Sarasota Areas
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR ODD
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
LICENSED & FULLY INSURED
J. BONANNO COMPLETE
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Pressure Washing, Gutter
Cleaning, Mowing, Yard Work
& More 35 years exp.
Call John 941-286-5940
JJ's RESCREENING &
Handyman Services.
941-875-8296
Lic and Insured.
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
RAINSCAPE INC A Full
Service Irrigation Company
Monthly Maintenance starts at
$40. 941-888-2988
Ray Tippins
Seawall Erosion
Repair: Repair Sink-
holes & Sodding, Tree
Service, Shrub & Weed-
ing. Owner Operated,
Lic./Ins. 941-625-2124
SIDING, Soffit, Facia, Seamless
Gutters & Pressure Washing
Jenkins Home Improvement
941497-2728


SLIDING
GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs.
Free Estimates Lic/Ins.
Bob @ 941-706-6445


EPZ5IDER
SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
and Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
Susanne's Cleaning
Residential Cleaning
Free Estimates
941-223-9289
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
The Stucco Guy
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/Ins.
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#WAAAO006387
VENICE ISLAND PAINTING
Island Residents receive 20%
off. Interior Doors $25. Over
21 years of experience. Call
Wes Smith 941-266-8901
JADVERIE

PROTECT YOUR FAMILY
WITH CLEAN WATER!
OXIDIZES HOME _
INLINE WATER 30-DAY
BACTERIA & I MONEY BACK
CHLORIDE GUARANTEE
RESIDUE
WATER CREEK INLINE SOLUTIONS
FLOW-BITE IS A SUPPLEMENTAL
DEFENSE SYSTEM THAT TAKES A
BITE OUT OF INLINE WATER BACTERIA
BUILD-UP & RESIDUE.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE
VISIT US ON OUR WEBSITE:
WWW.WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
INFO@WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
"FEED THE BEAR"





Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


I HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
^^ 5100^^

WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing, Concrete, Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

&TREE
LLAWN/GARDEN


AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune,
install, design, removal,
stump grinding.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com

AMERICAN IRRIGATION
Call 941-587-2027
FREE ESTIMATES!!!
Licensed & Insured
Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-11-
00010. Serving Charlotte
and Sarasota Counties
C&D TRACTOR & TREE Services
One call for all your tree &
home services!
All your lawn & landscaping
needs including pressure
washing, tree removal,
mulching, more! 15 yrs exp.
941-276-6979
Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages. Scr. lanais. etc...
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding .
*Lawn Service e
*Bucket Service e
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./Ins.
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
ISLAND BREEZE
LAWN SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
14 years experience
Owner operated. Lic&
Ins.Venice & surrounding
areas. For free estimate
call Keith 941-445-2982
J RIZ TREE SERVICES
Complete Tree Services
Servicing Charlotte & Sarasota
941-306-7532 Lic & Ins
JOHN EDWARDS LAWN
SERVICE Mowing MOST
Lawns $25. As Often As You
Like. Mo. Service, Low Rates,
Free Estimates. 941-483-
0138 Serving Sarasota County


I - IOF FLORJDA INC. )
LAKE & POND SERVICES
INCREASE PROPERTY VALUES
CREATE AN AESTHETICALLY
PLEASING AMENITY
SERVICES TO FIT YOUR
SPECIFIC LAKE & POND NEEDS
FREE QUOTE
Call To Schedule An
Appointment With One Of
Our Licensed & Insured
Technicians.
941-378-2700
WWW.APOPFL.COM
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
PROFESSIONAL Tree Ser-
vice. Stump Removal, Palm &
Hedge Trimming. Free Esti-
mates! 941-624-4204 Lic
#001053


& TREE
LLAWN/GARD)EN
^^5ll0 ^"

ROMAN'S LAWN PRO
RESIDENTIAL & COMM.
LICENSED & INSURED
941-380-LAWN
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/lnsured941-484-6042
STEVE'S TREE & HAULING
Tree Removal & Trimming
29 Years Exp. Lic/Insd
Free Estimates 941-866-6979
TJ MILAZZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
MILAZZO'S LANDSCAPING
941-830-1005
ALL PHASES OF RESIDENTIAL
LANDSCAPING, INSTALLATIONS,
PLANTING, PEPPER BERRY CON-
TROL & CONCRETE CURBING.
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035


|LEGAL SERVICES|
L 5115 J


NON-LAWYER SERVICES
Wills, Divorces, Taxes, Living
Trusts. Call 941-629-0770

L MARINE REPAIR /
Z ^5121 J




MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329

MASONRY
5129


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
5130


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service!
24 Hrs. a Day!
941-764-0982 or
941-883-1231
MOVE IT!
Delivery & Transport
No Item Too Small
MoveltSuncoast@gmail.com

MOVING HELP
$$$ Save $$$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870

PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
*^Z 5140



BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10%/o Off With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
11Z 5140^

STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINTING
Res/Comm. Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834
Colin's Painting
3rd Generation Painter.
Interior & Exterior Painting,
Carpentry & Pressure Washing.
Free Estimates. Ask About
Senior Discounts.
Serving Sarasota & Charlotte
Counties. (941) 468-7082
SERVING ENGLEWOOD, NORTH
PORT, PORT CHARLOTTE, VENICE
DANNY MILLER PAINTING, LLC
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING
941-830-0360
FREE ESTIMATES
danspainting4602@comcast.net
LICENSED & INSURED AAO09886
LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do lt!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MARK HUNTER PAINTING
34 YRS IN BUSINESS
PREFECT WORK PROMPT SER-
VICE. PAY NOTHING UNTIL
WORK IS COMPLETE. FREE EST.
BONDED INS. Lic 90000092534
SERVING SARASOTA Co.
941-475-2695

MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764
Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates ~ Prompt Service
941-484-4576

PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet!
Family Owned and Operated.
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-00015
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lie # AAA009837



SWEENEYS PAINTING
Pressure Cleaning *
MildewTreatment Painting I
Interior & Exterior *
SFree Est. Sr. Discounts *
941-916-1024
Lic#WAO010702 I
We Do It A Shade Better!
LARRY BATES PAINTING
Free Estimates
Locally Owned & Operated
941-625-1226
Lic/Ins #RRR002261

L PET CARE
W44: 5155 ^

DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853
7 PLUMBING
Lw mZ5160 ^


DO ALL PLUMBING LLC
A Full Service Company for
ALL Your Plumbing Needs.
Call for Our Monthly Specials.
941-626-9353 Lic#CFC1428884
LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lc.#CFC1425943
THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lc. RF11067393


S POOL SERVICES
Z ^5165 ^


ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Repairs & Service
FREE WATER TESTING
941-426-6500
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps
*Weekly Maintenance e
941-809-5121 cPc1458222/lns.
Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
YOUR LAST POOL GUY
Complete Residential
Pool Care.
22 Yrs. Naval Service.
Hire a Vet! 941-961-5532
Serving Venice & Sur-
rounding Areas. Lic./lns.
PRESSURE
CLEANING


A-ZRESPRESSR
ACKERS A-Z PRESSURE
CLEANING & MORE
Roofs, Homes, Docks,
pool decks & cages,
Mobile detailing etc... No
job too small. Free Est.
Sr. Disc. 941-929-6775
BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
BENSON'S QUALITY
CLEANING
Pool Cages, Lanais,
Driveways, ETC!
941-697-1749
or 941-587-5007
www.BensonsQualityCleaning.com
PRESSURE WASHING
SERVICE
941-766-0902
PRESENTTHIS AD
WORTH $20 OFF WHOLE HOUSE
FREE ESTIMATES
Pest Eliminators Inc.
LICENSE STATE OF FL #JF138591
LOCAL BUSINESS TAX LICENSE
CHARLOTTE CO. #4998
FL TAX CERTIFICATE #18-8015280394-1

SCREENING
LollOZ 5184


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779
wescreenflorida.com-
Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/lns.
ROOFING
5185



ROME TIWN
c3T1g*
Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30 Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors &Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE C C C #1325731 & INSURED

JAMES WEAVER ROOFING
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1984. FREE ESTIMATE
941-426-8946
UC#1325995


/ ROOFING 6000
L4115185 I


LEONARD'S ROOFING &
INSULATION INC.
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187
R.L. TEEL ROOFING
Reroofs & Repairs
Insurance Inspections
Veterns Discounts
941-473-7781
RC29027453 Lic/Ins
ROOF REPAIRS
Lic. Ins. 21 yrs in business
941-505-2441 941-623-5789
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838

WATE: RCO'
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
Old Roof Removal Our Specialty
Full Carpentry
Free Estimates
LiC #CCC 068184
FULLY INSURED
| ^TAuthorce*


WINDOW CLEANING
Z^ 5225

CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting. Also available
Wallpaper Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845
Serving Sarasota County
WE DO WINDOWS &
PRESSURE WASHING.
New Customers e
*Specials Package Deals *
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates. Lic./Ins.
(941)-661-5281
| WINDOW REPAIR

Z 5226 ^



E75LfDER
SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
and Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579

MISCELLANEOUS
LZ 5230


South Florida Backwaters
Redfish, Tarpon,
Speckled Sea Trout,
Snook & More.
Sight Fishing, Tours & More.
john@snowbirdcharters.com
lori@snowbirdcharters.com
855-567-SNOW (7669)


Fimditinthe

assifieds!


MERCHANDISE



Make Your


House a



HOME!


Adopt an

animal from

your local

animal

shelter.

Call

941.625.6720

SUN t

J I NEWSPAPERS

ARCADIA AREA
GARAGE SALES
^ 6001 ^

Fm SAT. 8TH 8-1 Grace
IILutheran Church, Hwy. 70
W, opposite Lake Katherine.
Something for everyone.
Light breakfast available, as
well as luncheon.

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!

ENGLEWOOD
GARAGE SALES


m-FRI. 8-3 SAT. 8-12 1015
lI Oleander Street. Off Old
Englewood rd. Tools, books,
Vera Bradley purses, & More!
[-] FRI. AND SAT. 8AM-?
II 9350 Casa Grande Ave.
off Gulfstream.
ESTATE SALE
1992 MUSTANG CONVERT.,
2010 GOLF CART, GOLF STAT-
UES, LAMINET FLOORING 150SF,
RATTAN CHAIRS, CROCK, FOOD
PROC, IRON SKILLETS, CONCRETE
BICYCLE STAND, WASHER RISER,
BOOKS, AUSSIE OL SKIN HATS,
KING MATTRESS! MORE





The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, February 6, 2014


GARAGE SALES
i 6002^ i

r-IFRI. SAT SUN. 8am-5pm
I-1920 Greenlawn Drive.
MOVING SALE tools, furni-
ture, elect, wheel chair, com-
pressor Much more.
[-FRI.-SAT 8-12 7514
LESCONDIDO ST LARGE
SALE! ANTIQUES, COLLEC-
TABLES, HOUSEHOLD ETC.
FRI.-SAT. 8-1
ED 170 Broadway.
Heron Cove
Annual Rummage Sale
[-]FRI.-SAT. 8-2
15441 Farley St. Gulf Cove
Something for Everybody
Lots of Misc.
S FRI.-SAT. 8-2
-1 6131 Manasota Key Rd.
ESTATE SALE!! Grand Piano,
Sterling, Books, taxidermy,
power and hand tools, ext.
Ladder, bikes, rugs, antiques,
housewares, glass tiffany
lamps, Patio furn.
MUCH MUCH MORE
m-iFRI.-SAT. 8-3 490 Viridi-
1an St.. Best Yard Sale!
Downsizing! Starting with the
holidays, a 10' Mountain King
tree will be assembled. Many
other items too much to list.
mFRI.-SAT. 8AM-3PM
2715 N Beach Rd.
Refridgerator, Tools, Furniture,
& misc household.
[ FRI.-SAT. 9-1
D 9129 Bensonhurst In.
Lots of tools,
some household
[-FRI.-SAT. 9-2 2751 Ave
lof America. Storage Sale!
Tools, HH, furn., tv, dog sup.,
appl., sink, cab. doors, etc...
[-]FRI.-SAT. 9-2
S5031 North Beach Rd
Everything must go!
IrnFRI.-SAT. 9-4-2971
Holly Ave. LARGEST SALE
YET! ALL Antiques! Rare 1860
Arm Chair, 1840 Blanket
Chest, Over 100 Small Items
from 1840-1900, Grandfather
1910 Clock, Large Regulato
Clock, Oak Serpentine Desk,
Oak 1 Door Bookcase, Wicke
Desk, Chinese Blanket Box,
Mahogany Desk, Many Victori-
an Chairs (New Upholstery)
Mahogany Eterge w/ Drawers,
Empty Commode 1860, Ear
Dropleaf Table, Neon Signs,
Harley, Sinclair, Int Harvester
& MORE! Metal Signs Coke &
More! Several Hanging Lamps
Kerosene & Electric), French
Setee, 1840 Dry Sink & PB
Early Stand & More. OVER
200 ITEMS!!!
m-iFRIDAY FEB 7TH 8-2PM
12000 BAY VIEW BLVD-
MANASOTA KEY
GARAGE & BAKE SALE -
m-ISAT. 8-4 6246 Braun St.
IIE. Engl. Antique Furniture,
Pictures, Vintage Jewelry,
Refridge & misc items.
[- SAT. ONLY 8-1 1261
Lincoln Drive.
MOVING IN SALE Elect,
clothes, furn, collect. Misc
m SAT. ONLY 8-1 9260
IISpring Circle. Quality
Fishing Gear, Boating, Tools, &
Misc. Household!




IM~ I
S SAT. ONLY 8-2
14200 Hopewell Ave.


ii


I Over 70 Vendors!
I Boutique and baked I
.goods. (941)-697-2345 i
m SAT. Only 8-3 6206
iiBerkeley Street. MOVING
SALE! BR set, Vacuum, House-
hold goods, furn, decorations
-]THU-SAT 8-4 111 Via
BeMadonna Bikes, Tools,
Antiques, Household, Plants,
Records, Comics, 60s ca


SENGLEWOOD
GARAGE SALES


i-IWED-THUR 8-? 1481 Blue
IHeron Dr. 2 FAMILY Tools,
Fishing, Boating, Furn Design-
er Purses, Jewelry & Hshld

SNOKOMIS/OSPREY
GARAGE SALES
^^ 6004 ^

[F] FRI. 4PM-7PM
200 Estil Dr.
HUGE GARAGE CRAFT
FAIR Lots of handmade
items, Call Tony 488-
5775 for information or
to reserve table space.
NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES


m- FRI & SAT 8-? 5460 Ken-
IIwood Drive. Furn., car,
costume jewelry, household
items, lawn mowers & more!
i-iFRI.-SAT. 8AM-5PM
18287 Alam Ave.. MOVING
SALE, ALL MUST GO! Furn &
household etc.
[-FRI.-SAT. 9-? 3451 S.
Salford Blvd. Baby Boy &
Adult Clothes, Ladies Formals,
Home Goods, Nice Items!
= FRI.-SAT. 9-4
El 4695 West Price Blvd. All
Proceeds go to Relay For Life!
Something for Everyone!!
All MUST Go!
[-]FRI.-SAT. 9A-1P 1275
Gillespie Ave. NP. MOVING
SALE! Some furn, & house-
hold. Something for Everyone!
-iSAT. 8-2 2374 Yalta Terr.
W/D, Patio set, grill, tools
, Salon hair color products &
equip, furniture, household, etc
SPT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
m 6006



50 P6 L.



8-2 SAT., FEB. 8,
2614 JOLLIVETTE RD.
OFF HABERLAND,
NORTH PORT.
APPLIANCES INCLUDING STOVE,
DISHWASHER, PANCAKE GRID-
DLE, COFFEE MAKER, KNIFE
SET, OTHER KITCHEN ITEMS;
32-INCH TV; GREEN PATIO
TABLE W/ 4 CHAIRS; COMPUT-
ER SCANNER; DOG ITEMS;
BOOKS; JEWELRY; WOMEN'S
CLOTHES SIZES 8-10, SHOES
SIZES 9-10.
NO EARLY BIRDS PLEASE
m-FRI-SAT 8-2 18441 Drig-
iigers Ave. Household &
Lots of Misc.
[ FRI-SAT. 9-2
E LIGHTHOUSE BAPTIST
CHURCH 14251 CHANCEL-
LOR BLVD Sale for Missionar-
ies (Under Tent) Furniture,
clothing, lawn mower, plants,
antiques, sewing machine, sm.
fridge, household & much more!
S FRI-SAT. 9-3
El 1154 Barbour Ave.
Fishing gear, electronics, etc
jt1AuMA6




FRI. FEB. 7 9-? Huge
Rummage Sale @ Maria
Manor Rec Hall 4158 Tamia-
mi Tr. Things for the whole
family! Lunch & Baked Goods!!
-]FRI.&SAT. 8-1 18282
LKoala Ave. (Off Edgewater)
HD rain suits, bookcases, qn.
comforter set, & misc. items
I Classifie = Sales
m FRI.-SAT. 8-1 12062
L-Helios Ave. (David Rd to
Helios) FURNITURE, house-
hold, xmas, books, bed linens
& MUCH MUCH MORE!


I PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
^ii, 6006 ^

[FRI.-SAT. 8-2
12255 Hamburg Ln.
HUGE MULTIFAMILY SALE
DEEP CREEK PRICED TO SELL
rIFRI.-SAT. 8-2 273 Bahia
L-Blanca Drive. Deep Creek,
household, jewelry, toys,
books, clothes, tools, & dolls.
F- FRI.-SAT. 8-3 21533
S DAWSON AVE. 33952
PT CHARLOTTE GARDEN
CLUB PRESENTS our
Bi-Annual Rummage
sale GREAT ITEMS INCLUDING
PATIO SET, HOUSEHOLD,
MORE. NO EARLY BIRDS PLS
-IFRI.-SAT. 8-4
l4333 Ewing Circle.
HUGE GARAGE SALE House-
hold, garage, fishing, more.


FRI.-SAT. 8-4
954 Red Bay Terr.
Tools, Household, Kid's Toys
[-IFRI.-SAT. 8AM-2PM
12505 Elkcam Blvd. House-
hold, Health and Fitness, Tod-
dlers Toys and some Furniture.
Many items like New!
F-iFRI.-SAT. 9-3 23281
lAbrade Ave. MOVING
SALE! Furniture & Misc. Items!
Come & See!
I- FRIDAY.-SATURDAY 8-3
113494 Driscoll Ave.
33953 HUGE MOVING SALE!
Generations of Collectibles,
Antiques, LOTS of Coins &
Currency, Furniture, Knick-
Knacks, Househlold Items
Clothes & MUCH MORE!!
S SAT. 7AM-1PM
D 17295 Robinson Ave. Off
Collingswood & Edgewater.
Everything Must GO!
r-BSAT. 8-1 21011 Baffin
IIAve. Furniture, pictures,
custom made draperies and
household items & more!
r-ISAT. 8-2 2113 Nurem-
1berg Blvd. Ladies bike, vin-
tage VHS, records, and cas-
sattes. Franklin Mint Dolls!
Royal dalton & collectable fig-
urens, household items & toys.
SSAT. 8-2
ANNUAL PARK SALE
Port Charlotte Village
1000 Kings Hwy.
Tanner Hall (Clubhouse)
Community Tag (Garage Sale)
Household, antique dishes,
tools, furn., dolls, collectibles
and something for everyone.
Great prices! Bakes Goods &
lunch served at a great price!
m-]SAT. 8AM. 1000 Kings
lHwy. Port Charlotte Village
at Clubhouse. TAG SALE.
Entire Doll Collection.
-ITHU.-FRI. 8-3 18531
LHottelet Ci Craftsman tool
box, tools, clothes, antiques,
power chair, travel oxygen

GARAGE SALES
^ 6007 ^

I] ALLIGATOR PARK
ANNUAL CRAFT FAIR
6400 Taylor Rd. Feb 8th 9am-
1pm. Lunch served 11-1 (35
vendors) 941-639-7222.
i-i Annual Pirate Harbor
Community Garage Sale
Sat. Feb. 8 8AM to 1PM
Burnt Store Rd.
Near Zemel Rd.
Many houses-Many treasures!


FRI & SAT. 9-1 16170 Trad-
ing Post Rd. in Burnt Store
Lakes. No early birds please.
Furniture, household goods,
Some Antiques, collectibles, &
other misc items.
iFIFRI. 1-6 SAT. 8-2 24197
I-Treasure Island Blvd.
(Pirate Harbor) Sales rep gift
samples, exercise equipment,
& house hold items!
r-mFRI.-SAT. 8-1 2000 Aqui
lEsta Dr. Household items,
clothes, fishing & hunting
items and tools, etc.


IPUNTA GORDA ]
GARAGE SALES


i-mFRI.-SAT. 8-2 25191
East Olympia Ave. (5 Oaks
Industrial Park) Furn., Pictures,
Kitchen, Linens, Yard Tools &
Deco, Small Dog Supplies &
lots of jewelry and MUCH
MORE" GREAT Condition!
m-]FRI.-SAT. 8-3 22550
lEIlmira Blvd. Bikes, golf
clubs, patio, household, CD's,
nic nacks, clothes, tools more
ISLES YACHT CLUB
TAG & BAKE SALE
Sat. Feb. 8. 9AM-1PM
1780 W. Marion Ave.
Books, Cookbooks, CD's,
prints/pictures, home decor,
bedding, window treatments,
jewelry & access., home
office, holiday/seasonal,
kitchen & dinnerware, Villeroy
& Boch tureen, soup bowls,
Fitz & Floyd desert plates &
mugs, party supplies, outdoor
& garden, bikes, bike carriers,
Escuda scooter, nautical &
marine equip., fresh baked
goodies & more! No furn., no
clothes, NO EARLY Parking
Marion Ave. Side lot.

I HUGE FLEA MARKET
Burnt Store Colony I
15550 Burnt Store Rd
(across from Pirate Harbor)
TWO BUILDINGS FULL
Household, Furniture, Tools,
Jewelry, Kitchen, Books,
Sm Appliances, Clothes,
and Collectibles.
$$$$ 50/50 $$$$
Delicious Lunch Available
I Awesome Homemade BakeI
I Table. Coffee is on, I
L - Come Early! !!


GARAGE SALES
i 6007^ i

S FRI.-SAT. 8-3
F Cedar Road. RIDGE
HARBOR COMMUNITY
SALE 941-637-0310
Lunch and Bake sale,
Inside and out! Great items!


SAT. FEB8TH 8AM-1PM
27110 JONES LOOP RD
VENTURA LAKES
COMMUNITY SALE
HOUSEHOLD, TOOLS,
FURNITURE, & MORE.
BAKE SALE & LUNCH
i-]THU. 8-4 & SAT. 8-12
1340 Casey Key Dr.
Multi-Family Sale! Tools,
Storage, and More!
[THUR-SAT 8-5 411 VIA
CINTIA, W. Marion, L on
Bal Harbor, L Columbian. Multi-
family. Too Much to List.


GARAGE SALES


I-iFRI.-SAT. 9-2 219 Broad-
-jmoor Ln. INSIDE MOVING
SALE! Furniture, Freezer, X-
Mas, Hshld. & MUCH MORE!!
F-FRI.-SAT. 9-3 167 Roton-
Lda Blvd E. Household &
Yard items, lawn cart, power
washer, Aubusson rug, & more
I Employ Classified!


GARAGE SALES


m-]FRI.-SAT. 9-3 42 MEDAL-
IIIST LN. High end clothes,
jewelry, household and child
items, stroller, bikes, decor
I S. VENICE AREA
GARAGE SALES
^ 6010 n

[-THURS FEB 6 8AM 564
LShamrock Blvd. Venice
Gardens. China, Garden, furn,
clothing, jewelry, music, more
Advertise Today!

VENICE AREA
GARAGE SALES
~6O 1

[-FRI.-SUN. 8-? 10229
Euston Ave. Furniture,
Knick-Knacks, Baby Clothes &
Toys, Craft Magazines & MORE!!!
AUCTIONS
LwaZ 0 62 0


I JACK ROBILLARD,
Auctioneers & Appraisers
Robillardauctioneers.com
(941)-575-9758

ARTS AND CRAFTS
^^ 6025 ^


BOAT PICTURE
Artist:D.Adams53"x41" can-
vas $75 941-875-4020


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.




SUDOKUA ~
SAD K A--- ~Fun By The

6 9 3 4 Numbers

1 8 2 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
7 4 sudoku. This
mind-bending
6 2 5 4 9 7 puzzle will have
I you hooked from
1 7 3 the moment you
S ___ square off, so

4 8Q 9 6 sharpen your
S- pencil and put
6 4 your sudoku
S4 savvy to the test!

37 2 6

17685
1 7 6 2 d
Level: Beginner
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Z 899 _. L 1 64V
Il. i 9 6 Z 9__L 8
L 6 8 9 6. t Z 9 S


9S 1. 6 9 C L


C V9LZ8:UMSNV6
8 L 6 L t, 6 9Z9
t, 9 L Z9 .6 9
6 gZ C 8L 9 9 1 9 1


:H3MSNV






Thursday, February 6, 2014 ads .you rsun net EINIC The Sun Classified Page 11


Challenger


DIRECTIONS:
Fill each square with a number, one through nine.
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right.
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to
toa in u i nner a P nd lowr riaht.


THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge
Time 5 Minutes
9 Seconds
Your Working
Time Minutes
Seconds


2-6
m~


1 15
5 9
2 9
3 11
12 19 9 4 13


2014 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

Yesterday's [2 54 L
Challenger 5/f
Answers 17 13

Cryptoquip 2011 by King Features Syndicate

2-6

HOITD O'F LHOIB FJ ZDBH

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RUMD, JUL FOBGA HPJ AGPA'H

RLHA PI PXFZDHH NXPIM.
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: I GUESS THE MEN WHO
INTRODUCED A COMMUNAL MELTED-CHEESE
DISH TO AMERICA WERE FONDUING FATHERS.
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: A equals T


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker
WE'LL PRETENPTO THEN PIVIPE OUR FORCES
ATTACK HERE, THEN ANP ATTACK THEM FROM
0 HERE TO CONFUSE BOTH SIDES, SURPRISING
THEM... THEM!


I HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne


OF ID By Brant Parker and Johnny Hart


MARMAD


T,


MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters
HIt STANLE4 I'VE WT TO OH1 LIKE IOsKEPIN0
TI'AFISH. eGET HOME, TU5OF UP WrH E 4E
ww AR6 FAVOR" i KARWHIANS
o UPO? (CABLE SHOW H..OIA.ELARPAS
IL____ "Dm 1 OWN7ON ...
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"Stops by every afternoon for a
water on the rocks."

SPORTS WINTER
SLEUTH OLYMPIC SITES
V I GDBXZXVVS QSoD
MK E I GE I GA C A A Y I W
UN S L I I NN S B RUC KY
QP I H BAC ZOANAL R J
H F C RGOTE J M L CAAO
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NMEGOKO J KRAS HC F P
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B T(L I LL E HAMMER) Z A
S YXYT I C EKAL T LA S
Wednesday's unlisted clue: HANDBAG
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: 2014 SITE IN RUSSIA
Calgary Lake Placid Pyeongchang St. Moritz
Chamonix Lillehammer Salt Lake City Turin
Grenoble Nagano Sapporo Vancouver
Innsbruck Oslo Sarajevo
2014 King Features, Inc. 2/6


MORE AMQ MOKE, VOHEt4 1 6o ANYU0WER-,
nI M9(WELF KEEPING TRACK OF (AHMERSE
I114F- MEAREST RESIROOM IS,. ;


Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11






The un lassfie Pae 12 EINC IF ~ ':.u i 0


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii


;reat deals in the Business & Service

blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and

i the Classified Section of the Sun!


0-1N-N1m14IIOtA[1a 63 1ON WI


Humming may be daughter's

own form of treatment


DEAR DR. ROACH: My
married daughter, now 52
years of age, has for the
past two years become
psychotic and is on anti-
psychotic medication.
She makes a humming
sound, which seems
to be involuntary and
over which she has no
control. She will begin
speaking, and then this
sound comes from her.
Did you ever hear of such
a thing? Could it be her
medication creating this
sound? J.T.
ANSWER: The medical
term "psychosis" has
a specific meaning: "a
grossly distorted sense of
reality." It's a symptom,
not a diagnosis, and
severe psychosis most
commonly comes from
schizophrenia, although
bipolar disease and, to
a much lesser extent,
depression both can
cause psychosis. Given
the time course and her
age, schizophrenia is the
most likely diagnosis.
Schizophrenia is a com-
mon condition (affecting
almost 1 percent of the
world's population) and
is highly variable, with
different subtypes and
degrees of impairment.
Repetitive speaking,
singing and humming
all are behaviors associ-
ated with schizophrenia.
Recent studies have
shown that humming can
reduce the unpleasant
auditory hallucinations
that frequently occur in
schizophrenia. It's possi-
ble that your daughter is
using the humming as a
way of dealing with this
symptom.
Medications for schizo-
phrenia have many side
effects, and it's always
wise to consider medica-
tions for new symptoms.
In this case, I think it's
more likely to be her
disease causing the symp-
tom, or her way of dealing
with the disease. I would
certainly not stop her
antipsychotic medication
without careful discussion
with her psychiatrist.
DEAR DR. ROACH:
My question is regarding
time. I don't mind waiting
an excessive amount
of time on an average
follow-up visit with my
PCP, providing that some
of that time is listening to
me and discussing more
than one issue. But I do
mind waiting, to the point
of considering dumping
my primary for another
doctor, when I'm told "I'm
pressed for time you
have three minutes" after
waiting an hour or more
past my appointment
time. My last visit in and


Dr. Roach

out took two and half
hours, and I wasn't the
least upset because I
felt she listened to me,
gave me my referral and
told me her future plan
of action regarding my
issues.
I would like your
opinion on what is a fair
amount of time in and
out for a visit. To wait to
see your doctor and after
you talk she goes to her
office to process your
information (enter it into
her computer, write a
referral and or RX), and
she's on her way to her
next patient. M.S.
ANSWER: You are
absolutely right to be
upset about the way you
were treated. Your doctor
was disrespectful. You
could consider discussing
why you are considering
changing doctors, but I
wouldn't blame you for
just switching.
In the United States
and Canada, the average
time a doctor spends with
a patient is around 15 to
18 minutes, depending
on what study you read.
The average wait time to
see the doctor is about
20 minutes. So your
waiting longer than an
hour and having three
minutes with the doctor
is inexcusable.
I have practiced pri-
mary care for more than
20 years, and I know that
sometimes emergencies
occur. Some patients
require a long time,
and that means longer
waits or shorter visits
for others. However, the
way your doctor handles
it is critical, and should
include an apology, an
explanation and a plan to
get you the care you need
and deserve.
TO READERS: The
booklet on colon cancer
provides useful informa-
tion on the causes and
cures of this common
malady. Readers can
obtain a copy by writing:
Dr. Roach No. 505,
P. 0. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475. Enclose a
check or money order (no
cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6
Can. with the recipient's
printed name and
address. Please allow four
weeks for delivery.


REX MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Terry Beatty
T PONT WANT PORIS TO HERE1 6A QLAESTION: IF I SEE WHERE YOU'RE
&O TO JAIL, REX... THERE. A MAN INTENTIONALLY. GOING WITH T4IS, BLJT...
MUST BE ANOTHER WAY! SHOOTS A WOMAN, I
--SHOULP HE- GO TO JAIL? '


ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman


WR9N6G, FAOIzFPINNNF9, (
4EIEM1?T T'M H MF-WOgK IS
TOTALIXr N-.ANP
.n .. \T&ONLYf_.B-EN.-IIIIl T' i,.,.


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein
NAE'' INS BEP, THE WHAT A
PIIHE. ARE PONE, THE
HOUSE 16 I-.IKP UP. ur
LET'S WATCH A MOVIE. F

//p


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella


DILBERT By Scott Adams


TAI.WA-^MAKP
HIA4LUUZN ANP
HE WUWINTHAVE
[I-Iv 9:4T I-AV
ANM'iINGGTOFE
GU.LLN ANP
L IE--NTRJL.ABOU


The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


,: :,: .:. u r. -r, r", t





Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463. 1638


SSUNAEWSP


BUSNS &1IIII*! A1[ SR ICE DIRECTOR]


j k7 R1U M THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
1J xvl by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurekr I T
AkIA ^OUET -W | RS IT (AU5Et> MY S1tE
Unscramble these four Jumbles, fDCNTION WE E COCTOK. e EFFECTS'7
one letter to each square,- .-- i"
to form four ordinary words. I -- -

LUWAF I L "
It IW .. i ,. ^ L' ,^.. j 9


- m Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.



(Answers tomorrow)


Yesterday's Jumbles: ADAGE FLUID PEANUT OBJECT
Answer: After the horse's girlfriend broke up with him,
he had a LONG FACE

Get the grunge from the sponge


Dear Heloise: It seems
that there is always a
report or article discuss-
ing how a kitchen sponge
is loaded with bacteria.
What is the best way to
clean these sponges? -
Stephanie L. in Ohio
Ah, yes the sponge dis-
cussion! Most households
use foam sponges. The U.S.
Department of Agriculture
recommends two methods
to rid the sponge of nearly
100 percent of the bac-
teria: Microwave a wet
sponge for 60 seconds,
or run it through the
dishwasher during a
normal cycle.
Try to remember to
clean sponges daily, let
them dry out as much as
possible between uses
and replace frequently
(especially if they start to
smell). Heloise
P.S.: Vinegar also works!
Put the sponge in a bowl.
Pour vinegar over the
sponge and let it sit for
five to 10 minutes.
This kills more than
99 percent of germs!

Bridal feast
Dear Heloise: When
I got married, it was an
all-day event for me
(as most brides know).
It started early in the
morning, with hair and
makeup, etc. And then I
had to be hidden at the
venue when guests started
arriving. I hadn't planned
to bring any snacks. My
soon-to-be sister-in-law
brought finger sandwiches
to me and the bridal party.
It was so great, because


,-
ID: 4


John Marshall


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott


Hints from Heloise

we were all starving! They
were easy to eat and did
not mess up our dresses
and makeup. -A Reader,
via email

Table troubles
Dear Heloise: I've been
blessed with a beautiful,
8-foot dining-room table.
Tablecloths to fit it are very
expensive. I found that you
can use a twin-size sheet,
and it fits perfectly. They
are available in fashionable
colors for any season.
Because those sheets
can slide around on
the table, I use 1-inch
glue strips, found in the
scrapbook section of
a crafts store, on each
corner of the table. I press
the cloth onto the strip,
and it doesn't move. The
strips are removable and
do not damage the wood.
- Marlene in Ohio

Cayenne pepper
Dear Heloise: My cat
hates the smell of cay-
enne pepper. I sprinkle
it in my houseplants to
keep the cats away. Works
great. Darlene T. in
Georgia


OtAlku WIkEK L


PILLq


1=


Print your
answer here:





The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, February 6, 2014


Kids' handheld electronics may MALLARD FILLMORE By Bruce Tinsley


be more than fun and games

DEAR ABBY: I am
writing about the letter .
from "Holding My Tongue"
(Nov. 8), the woman who f
was upset because many
children were playing M A _
with electronic devices ,
during her grandchildren's
school concerts and
recitals. While I agree that
most children should pay Dear Abby
attention to the event at ___ __
hand, as the mother of two
children on the autism decency and respect for
spectrum, I have a differ- others. I not only notice
ent perspective, this in children, but adults
There are apps and as well. I have seen people
games designed to keep check their emails while
these children occupied they are in church, or
and help them deal with couples sitting together at
the stress and anxiety of a restaurant, both fixated
being in a large group on their electronic devices
of people. I should not and not speaking a word to
have to leave my sons at each other.
home because they are It's sad to imagine what
on the spectrum, so a the next generation will
harmless, quiet game that be like if we don't start
allows them to participate putting the devices down
without being disruptive is and interacting with each
a godsend to me. other again like human
Sometimes it is not beings. I raised all three of
obvious why someone is my kids this way, so I know
doing something; so as it's not impossible. -
long as it isn't disrupting MAINTAINING HUMAN
the event, please try to CONTACT
be tolerant. LAURA IN DEAR ABBY: When my
PENNSYLVANIA precious mother passed
DEAR LAURA: Your away last summer, my
point is well-stated, sister-in-law brought two
and was one made by a handheld games to the
number of parents of chil- funeral. My niece and
dren with special needs, nephew played and played
Readers had interesting while the pastor spoke
comments on this topic, so about my mother.
I'm sharing a few: It was the last straw for
DEAR ABBY: If there's a me in a series of incredibly
possibility young children rude actions over the years.
could be unruly during a My children were also
performance, I think they appalled. When respect is
should be allowed to use no longer taught at home,
a tablet or something to we sink to the lowest level
keep them occupied, as a society. DEBRA ON
Sometimes it's hard to THE EAST COAST
find a sitter or afford one. DEAR ABBY: I have
When children get dragged stopped attending my
to programs they have friends' grandchildren's
no interest in, they lose recitals because I, too,
patience and become fid- cannot tolerate rudeness.
gety. If given something to Many parents today just
occupy their attention, as don't want to bother with
long as it has headphones, their children. If there
then I don't see a problem, is a toy that can keep
I'd rather have that than them busy, their parents
kids shouting, screaming "enable" them to grow
and crying because they're up as idiots who can't
unhappy being there. appreciate the world and
UNDERSTANDING IN its beauty because their
LOUISIANA world is lived entirely
DEAR ABBY: In this on an electronic screen.
digital age, we have lost GEORGE IN SOUTH
touch with basic common CAROLINA



"Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the
light of the world: he thatfolloweth me shall not walk in
darkness, but shall have the light of life."-John 8:12.
There is no way of finding our way without the "light
of the world." Let Jesus light up your life! You will
never re-live today, make it a good one with God's
help!


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz
LIOU TtINK OF CWkRJEE I'M /T N
/( O1E THE"Af I I THE MAI" IE V ,
D rWR HTL CInAAP EATEN FE 'v E eC-..
\ PON'T O? ] iAR(WND HERE: -- r


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers
l... I F i i '* A- e A


SHOE By Gary Brookins & Susie


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


[ H O RO SC O PE_ I keep it in your mind. Rest assured, you are further
H O R O SCO PE I along than you thinkyou are. Don't give up now!
ARIES (March 21-April 19).Your success lies in CANCER (June 22-July 22). Success will depend on
realizing how foolish it is to try to obtain talents you the verbal connections you make. Be forthcoming
don't possess when you could be using your time with excellent topics. Make it easy for other people
and energy to polish the ones you do possess.
to talk with you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Do whatyou can, and O l you
don't bother with what you don't believe in. You are O (July23Aug. 22).he one you love needs to
not underestimating yourtalents by refraining from be able to mix and mingle with your other loved
doing certain tasks. Your inner wisdom dictates that ones. Such an effort is one way a person can show
some things are simply not worth doing, devotion, and you will appreciate this.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Regarding a creative VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).There was a time when
project, the end is not in sight, and so you'll have to you didn't know how to brush your own teeth, and


the person who did that foryou taughtyou how to
do it. Now you'll take on a daunting task.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).The Greek goddess Charis
was beautiful and charitable by nature. From her


they actually are. But a person who can't admit fault to commitor make a decision.This is the time to put
or weakness is unlikely to improve, your feelers out and explore what is possible.
CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan. 19).You're ready to take TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (Feb. 6).You're tough
a project to the next level, but you have to get more and mature. You take criticism well without


name comes the word"charisma,"which is the people on board to make this happen. Jump into
quality you possess in great quantity now. the social swirl and charm them.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Define your vision and AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Relationships will im-
purpose. Ifyou leave it to chance, human nature will prove with betterorganization.You'll carve out time
take over to help you serve selfish purposes. Think it to give your undivided attention to a loved one, and
through first, and you'll come up with the best plan. the connection will make both ofyou stronger.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). A tendency of PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).You'll lay the ground-
humans is to rate their skills and traits as better than work for a landmark agreement.This is not the time


getting offended, and because of this, you will
improve in every area ofyour life. The right
mentors and role models are key. Your best
months for love and relationships are now, May
and December. Big financial opportunities come
in March and October. Capricorn and Pisces people
adore you.Your lucky numbers are: 18,24,13,7
and 9.


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

1 8 4 2 Rating: BRONZE
7 6 9 Solution to 2/5/14
394285167
3 8 6 685147392 1

3 8 5 6 1 9 27193845
738519426
9 8 456832719

4 2 1 7 6 8 7 912693476583
-- ----- 5 54 3972163

9163958274

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2 32/6/14
2/6/14






Thursday, February 6, 2014


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E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORT CHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


FEB. 6 E_ fk PRIME TIME
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ABC7 News World News To Be a To Be a The Taste: The Sweetest Thing (N) (HD) Shark Tank Customizable ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC N 7 7 10 7 7 @6pmr(N) Diane Sawyer Millionaire? Millionaire? accessories. (R (HD) @11pm((N) KimmelLive
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Access Cleveland Family Guy Family Guy House: Known Unknowns Lies House: Teamwork Adult film Law & Order. Special Victims Seinfeld Seinfeld
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AM (5:00) Pulp Fiction ('94) In Los Angeles, two eccentric hit men Mission: Impossible III ('06, Thriller) *** Tom Cruise. A former secret agent's (:01) Die Hard ('88) Bruce
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FX 511 511 51 511 584953 (H1) ) (HD)) Cooper. Four friends travel to Thailand. (R) twin. Cooper. Four friends travel to Thailand. (R)
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HALL 5 5 5 17 73240 Prairie (TV G) Waltons Waltons Waltons: The Pledge Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
HGTV 41414141 5342 165 Love It Home business. Hunters Hunters Addict Addict Addict Addict Now? (N) Hunters Project (R) Project ()
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QVC 141414 9 1413150 Susan Graver Style Gardening Made Easy Handbag & Shoe Shopping with Jane Handbags and shoes. Vicenza Style
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665 169230M ,Wait Until Dark A blind woman alone in her apartment is Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? ('66) ***%2 An alcoholic professor Georgy Girl ('66, Comedy) ***1/2 A
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USA 34 34 34 34 2252 50 SVU: Choice (1V14) SVU Killer minister. I, Robot ('04, Science Fiction) Robot may be guilty of murder. The Day After Tomorrow ('04) **1/2
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WGN 16616 1941 11 9 Home Videos (VPG) Home Videos (IVPG) How I Met How I Met Howl Met Howl Met How I Met HowlMet How I Met IHowlMet
CNBC 39393939 137102 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Greed (R) Greed $400 million. (R) Greed (R) Mad Money (N)
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a a a a a a


Today's Live Sports

3 p.m. GOLF PGA TOUR Golf
AT&T Pebble Beach National
Pro-Am: First Round. (L)
7 p.m. CSS Women's College
Basketball Duke at Clemson. (L)
ESPN College Basketball
Connecticut at Cincinnati. (L)
ESPN2 College Basketball
LSU at Georgia. (L)
7:30 p.m. FSN NHL Hockey
Detroit Red Wings at Florida
Panthers from BB&T Center. (L)
SUN NHL Hockey Toronto
Maple Leafs at Tampa Bay
Lightning. (L)
8 p.m. TNT NBA Basketball
San Antonio Spurs at Brooklyn
Nets from Barclays Center. (L)
9 p.m. CSS Women's College
Basketball Tennessee at Ole
Miss. (L)
ESPN College Basketball
Oregon at Arizona. (L)
ESPN2 College Basketball
Penn State at Michigan State. (L)
FS1 College Basketball UTEP
at East Carolina. (L)
10:30 p.m. TNT NBA Basketball
Chicago Bulls at Golden State
Warriors from Oracle Arena. (L)
11 p.m. FS1 College Basket-
ball Oregon State at Arizona
State. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morning
America Scheduled: actor George
Clooney; actor Chris Pratt; "Steals
and Deals". (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
television host Ronan Farrow; Chris
Pratt from "The Lego Movie." (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: actor
George Clooney; musical duo
Karmin performs. (N)
10:00 a.m. CBS Rachael Ray
Scheduled: Tara Lipinski and Chad
Hedrick compete; Peter Walsh on
closets. (N)
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Sched-
uled: Ana Navarro guest co-hosts;
wife of a man fatally shot for
texting. (N)
11:00 a.m. CW The Queen Latifah
Show Scheduled: Bradley Whitford
from "Saving Mr. Banks"; actress
Sarah Paulson. (N)
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Sched-
uled: chef Curtis Stone shows the
Chew crew his restaurant. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Scheduled:
"The Big Bang Theory" actor Kunal
Nayyar; chef Edward Lee. (N)
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Williams
Show Scheduled: from "Almost
Human" actor Michael Ealy dis-
cusses the show. (N)
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors
Scheduled: Dr. Travis shares his
top weight loss tips; tales from the
E.R. (N)
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey Sched-
uled: love questions solved; second
graders share a 24-step guide to
love. (N)
11:00 p.m. TBS Conan Scheduled:
Andrew Lincoln; Norman Reedus;
Lauren Cohan; Steven Yeun. (N)
11:30 p.m. FOX The Arsenic Hall
Show Scheduled: musician will.
i.am visits to talk about the i.am.
angel Foundation. (N)
11:35 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel
Live Scheduled: the cast from "The
Monuments Men" visits the show.
(N)
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled:
"RoboCop" star Michael Keaton;
musical guests The Flaming Lips.
(N)
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno Scheduled: Jay's
final show as host; Billy Crystal;
Garth Brooks performs. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv






The Sun Classified Page 16 EINIC ads.yoursun.net Thursday, February 6, 2014


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GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH & BOB JONES
(2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
TOO ACTIVE?


North-South vulnerable. South deals.


NORTH
*A652
?AK983
0 Void
468743


WEST
*874
V72
0 AQ98743
45


EAST
* Void
%QJ54
0 J 10 6 5 2
4 K 10 96


SOUTH
AKQJ 1093
- 106
0 K
*AQJ2


The bidding:
SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST
1* 30 40* 50
Pass Pass 5% 60
64 70 Pass** Pass
7A Pass Pass Pass
*Game forcing spade raise, good
values
**First-round diamond control
Opening lead: Ace of 0
East held some side assets that
might have annoyed the opponents in
a high-level spade contract, but not
enough to think he could buy it in
five diamonds. An immediate six-
diamond bid would have been better.
Over five diamonds, North was able
to make a slam try with his five-heart
bid. East's six-diamond bid was


irrelevant, as South was accepting
partner's slam try anyway. West's
seven-diamond bid allowed East to
show his void in that suit, and South
was willing to bid seven. Was it a
good grand slam? An old bridge
slogan says: "A good grand slam is
one that makes!"
South ruffed the opening diamond
lead and drew trumps in three rounds,
ending in dummy. The winning club
finesse was next, followed by a heart
to dummy to repeat the finesse. Had
clubs split 3-2, South would have had
13 tricks. The 4-1 split left him with
some work to do, but not much. West
had promised seven diamonds in the
auction, and showed up with three
spades and a club in the play, so he
could not hold more than two hearts.
South ran all of his trumps, coming
down to one heart and one club in his
hand and the king-nine of hearts in
dummy. East had to find a discard
from the queen-jack of hearts and the
king of clubs. Regretting that he had
ever entered this auction, he threw his
cards in and conceded the grand
slam! Well bid by North-South, but
they had help!
(Tannah Hirsch and Bob Jones
welcome readers' responses sent in
care of this newspaper or to Tribune
Content Agency, LLC., 16650
Westgrove Dr., Suite 175, Addison,
TX 75001. E-mail responses may be
sent to tcaeditors@tribune.com.)


7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter -
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

CLUES SOLUTIONS .>

1 beanie propulsion, perhaps (10)

2 nestling up close (8) ______

3 Van Dykes (6) ______

4 city in Miami-Dade County (7) _______
5 constant talkers (11) _______

6 seedy hangout (4) _____

7 moves like sludge (5) _____


ooz


HIA


DI


DLI


Wednesday's Answers: 1. SCALOPPINE 2. ELEVATES 3. MINERALOGY
4. BILLY 5. BENTLEY 6. GIBE 7. CELEBRANT 2/6


PR


OU


ELL


NG


CUD ORM


ES


LE


MOT


VE


OP


RDS


BEA


ERS


AH


THS


ACROSS
1 Driftwood
bringer
5 Hold tightly
9 Emerging
magma
13 Golf star Sam-
15 Subscription
length
16 Winged god
17 Tonto's Scout,
for one
18 Gamblers'
mecca
19 Grass droplets
20 Farm enclosure
21 Strong fervor
23 Lodestone
25 "Daily Planet"
reporter
26 Mustard or mayo
27 Humongous
30 Slugger Mel-
31 Realizes,
as profit
32 "Good gad!"
(2 wds.)
37 Con
38 Bonkers
40 "Watermark"
singer
41 Doubt
43 Cloud
formations
44 Dip in gravy
45 Damsel's locks
47 Pyramid
builders


Drama prize
Bwana's trek
Ump's call
Narcissus' flaw
Cornfield
menace
Zorro's marks
Take down a
tent
Chills and fever
Right, on a map
Motif
Lay down cards
Obligation
- -majeste
DOWN
Recipe amts.
Put a sock -
Not admit to
Chow down
Move in a circle
Walk unsteadily
Mr. Fleming
On time
Narrow shelf
Basketball
venue
Pledged
Exec. aide
Egg purchases
Jr. naval officer
Bohemian
French Legion
headgear
In a jiffy
Kuwait neighbor
What's cooking


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
SCARF AJVEICEBEAM
LANAIPENA ERACEU
EVITA PROPER ASEA
DELECA BLE VEST
R HELS HIOIE
OATMEAL OADHOG
S Lo0PSi RIK|A H S
TAN ICLON FRAU
I I I SIAM C P R I


ROPELOWPRF I LE
U R ALNWR APL E V E L
MANEIACME EMA I L
P LED ARIA IN DE N S E
2-6-14 2014 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclickfor UFS


29 Chess win
32 Sweetie-pie
33 Desist's partner
34 Landers and
Miller
35 Youngster
36 Back talk
38 Gave celebrity
status
39 Fumbler's word
42 Romanov title
43 Lebanon's
capital
45 Nice and warm
46 Sports fig.


47 Simpson mom
48 Run of the
law
49 Swung off-
course
51 Ripoff
52 Gala
53 Fencing sword
54 Ruby and
garnet
55 Curved molding
58 Perfume label
word
60 Sports org.


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, February 6, 2014





Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

z :^ 6030 ^

EXERZIER BIKE exercise bike
$65 941-426-7240
FAN WORKFORCE STAND
Fan Like New.21"wide on Ex
$25 941-421-9984
FILTER QUEEN Vacuum
Canaster type.plus at $40
941-629-3921
GRAND FATHER clock.
howard miller make offer
862-812-0995 o/b
HAND PAINTED antique win-
dow with wire $125
941-716-3259
HEATER PROPANE Portable
120 Volts heats Ig $75
941-979-5187
HUTCH, TWO Piece 62 x 18 x
72 Good Cond $45 941-
473-1026
IVY SPRAY Bright colorful
decoration $20 717-829-6525
JEWEL BOX cherrywood mir-
row front $40 941-227-0676
LAMP FLOOR brass w/ glass
table, pastel shade $25 941-
639-0838
LAMP WHITE w/flowers $7
406-679-6388
LAMPS 2 TABLE : urn design,
dark tan, 3' tall, $50
941-639-0838
LAWN MOWER sit down
mower $165 941-426-7240



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HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 J

LENOX CHINA MANSFIELD
(8) 5 pc place set $250
941-426-0760
LIGHT Tiffany Nice Pendant;
Deep Creek $60 941-276-
2411
LT FIXTURE Dining Area-Brn
Metal-Have Pic $60
618-910-2262
MASTER LOCKS 8 in tool
$24 941-575-0690
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New-Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS 2 Magnet pads
Twin $395 941-496-9252
MATTRESS SERTA QUEEN
mattress & spring set. Rarely
Used $100 941-486-8388
METAL SHELVING Heavy
duty 6'x2'x8' 17 shelves $75
941-766-7545
MICROWAVE GE SPACEMAK-
ER XL1400, OVER $50
941-764-9212
MIRROR 48" x 57-1/2" x
1/4" $30 941-625-4731
NUWAVE OVEN new nuwave
oven never used $65 941-
629-0806
PLASTIC SETTEE for lanai
Never used-like new $10
941-426-6748
QUILT FULL Colorful IncI all
bedding. $50 717-829-6525
RANGE HOOD Light almond
new in box never used $45
941-629-9939
RECLYNER LEATHER (2)
Love Seat New 999.00 $150
941-613-3520
REFRIGATOR REFRIGERA-
TOR nickel/ blackKLEAN
$147 941-743-7295
1 ADVERTISe"!I
REFRIGERATOR DBL door
ice maker whirlpool bisqu
$500 863-258-3077
REFRIGERATOR, GE
Stainless Steel, 2 door 36"
Water & Ice, excellent cond.
$500, OBO 941-347-7955
SEWING MACHINE & Cabinet
Singer, works well $45
941-894-4115
SHEETS, FLANNEL beige
very soft x.cond kingsize $20
770-546-2131
STOVE NEEDS power cord
and oven element. $25 941-
460-6669
TABLE BANQUET Folding
table 72 X 30" $15
941-697-4426
TEDDY BEAR 1930'S Excl.
cond. $125 941-426-6748


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

TROPICAL BATH Picturessilk
plant,linens,etcl16pcs $125
941-276-1881
USED CARPET 12'6"X14'6"
Great for rental $50 816-752-
3288
VACUUM CLEANER Bissell
Bagless Upright, Runs great
$20 618-910-2262
VACUUM HOOVER Runabout
with attachments. $20 941-
629-4973
VACUUM NEWLY recondi-
tioned. $80 new $40
941-894-4115
VINTAGE COCKTAIL MIXER
WIND-UP $18 941-764-7971
WASHER AND dryer Sears
like new $400 770-394-0117
WASHING MACHINE
Whirlpool Duet front load $350
941-629-3760
WINE COOLER Fridgidaire,
$125 269-303-0261
WORX TOOLS 3 piece $165
941-426-7240
WREATH IN/OUTDOOR
Colorful decoration $20
717-829-6525
HOLIDAY ITEMS
L 6031 ^


XMAS LIGHTS Xmas Lights
New In Box $2 941-624-0928

FURNITURE
Lw wa6035 ^


2 SOFAS Broyhill, Like New,
Olivegreen/brown $499 941-
235-0120
2 VINTAGE Rocking chairs
Beautiful 1930's $199
941-875-9296
5 PC bedroom set 5 pc.bed-
room set good cond $200
941-629-0806
7 PC Patio Set Glass table & 6
arm chairs $250 231-557-
3141
ANNIE SLOAN sofa table
GORGEOUS $425
941-716-3259
ANTIQUE SEWING table
black $50 406-679-6388
BAR STOOLS SolidWood-
HiBackSwvl 24" Two For $45
941-475-8379
BARSTOOLS (3) IVORY Rat-
tan 24" w/backs +cushioned
$90 941-460-0996
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED BRASS FULL Must see
design. $300 717-829-6525
BED HEAD foot board dark
wood like new $150
941-764-8777
BED QUEEN and Jamieson
mattress clean $275
941-764-8777
BEDROOM 4 PC bedroom
set good cond $200
941-629-0806
BEDROOM BEIGE Formica 2
night stands, dresser $100
941-575-6217
BEDROOM DRESSER bed-
room dresser & mirr $275
941-249-8288
BEDROOM SET (Child's) Bed
w/ Mattress, Chest & Night-
stand. $290, 941-223-7244
BEDROOM SET 6 pc. tan
laquer $250. Dinette Set w/6
chairs, blonde/white $185.
Desk, white laquer w/chair
$50. Call 941-625-6737.
BEDS TWIN /W BEDDING
TWO TWIN BEDS, BOX $135
860-388-7614
BEIGE LACQUER Bedroom
Set 5 Piece set $300 941-
628-0941
BLACK WODEN TV Stand
31x19x19 2 Shelves $25
617-230-3845


S FURNITURE 1
Z ^6035 ^


BLACK,LEATHER LOVE seat
& couch nice shap $499
812-320-1820
BOOKCASE ETH Allen sld
map, base w/doors $150
941-493-6502
BOX SPRING & matress twin
never used seal $200
941-629-0447
BREAKFAST NOOK, L-
Shaped w/ Extra Bench. Only
1 Yr. Old. Excellent Condition!
$150 941-275-0636
CHAIR 2 counter height,
swivel & tilt chairs, $95
941-697-8377
CHEST 5 drawer, Sumpter,
solid wood, like new $125
941-493-6502
CHILDS BISTRO Set 3 pcs
metal. RARE $225
941-716-3259
COCKTAIL/COFFEE TABLE
Designer,was $200 941-894-
4115
COFFEE TABLE Rattan,
19x48", painted beige, glass
top $12 941-485-9185
COFFEE/2 END tables Bev.
gls tops/white ba $250 941-
624-0364
CORNER CABINET Like new,
Oak, 5 shelves, 64" $60 2 dr
storage 941-698-9979
COUCH & LOVESEAT dark
forrest green, leather, exc
cond. $200 OBO 218464-3071
COUCH & LOVESEAT wicker,
cream color w/It.floral. $225
for both. Coffee table $125 &
end tables $60/each. OR
$450 FOR ALL! 440-371-5306
COUCH SOUTHWEST earth
tone color EX. COND. $125,
OBO 862-812-0995
DAY BED Opens to queen
size. Like new $100 941-
474-7030
DESK ROLL TOP Oak finish,
good cond. $300 941-698-
9787
DESK solid cherry wood 41
3/4"w x 22 $399
941-412-5283
DINETTE SET dinette set
glass top w/swivel c $300
941-786-1905
DINETTE SET Honey color
rattan round tbl w/e $80
941-255-9787
DINETTE SET wood dining
room table with leaf 4 $250
941-786-1905
DINETTE SET Wood, 40 in.
Round, 15 in Leaf $290
941-743-4742
DINING ROOM SET 5 Piece
42" Round GREAT COND $375
941-626-5468
DINING ROOM Set Bras table
w/4 chairs $150
941-662-0020
DINING ROOM SET Oak table
6 chairs, hutch and Buffet
$300 941-564-8938
DINING ROOM set Oak table,
6 chairs, hutch & buffet. Good
Cond $300 941-564-8938
DINING ROOM table and 6
chairs, solid oak, oval, 44-66"
$250 OBO 941-505-1396
DINING TABLE & chairs din-
ing glass table & $175 941-
249-8288
DINING TABLE Rattan 42"
glass table w/4 chairs $125
941-460-0996
DRESSER OAK finish with 8
drawers and large $75
941-763-2847
DRESSER OAK with two side
by side mirrors. $175 941-
639-8245
END TABLE BASES white
plaster w/ dolphin, each $10
941-639-0838
END TABLE lamp solid amish
red oak/magazi $69
941-697-9485
ENT. CENTER, Incl. 2 Towers
& Bridge $200. OAK CHEST
$200. 941-223-7244


S FURNITURE /
L OZ6035 ^


DINNING ROOM Table/6
chairs $250 941-830-0816
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Oak color,59H X 61W, $75
941-268-5227
HEADBOARD POLISHED
Chrome Queen $40
618-910-2262
HEADBOARDS (2) twin head-
boards bookcase style solid
wood $40 406-679-6388
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
JEWELRY ARMOIRE table-
top $65 941-624-0364
LANAI SET: 3x5 table, 4
chair, 2 chaise, peach $250
941-639-0838
LEATHER LIVINGROOM set
Soft yellow, $500
941-764-7957
LOVE SEAT & Matching Chair
Gently used 1 1/2 $350 941-
916-4474
LOVE SEAT By Norwalk, 62",
excl cond, It brown $125
941-697-4991
MATTRESS & BOX.
New- Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS & Box spring king
size $165 941-460-9698
MATTRESS BOX spring and
frame queen $150
941-764-8777
MATTRESS QUEEN size like
new. $75 606-219-2900
MATTRESS with boxspring
like new $150 941-629-0447
OAK DINNING Room Set
60"Ob tab 2 x leafs $400
941-628-3718
OIL PAINTING 30"x60", Mod-
ern, mauves/blues. Ve $25
941-485-9185
ORIENTAL MIRROR & Chest
Beautiful Picture $400
941-575-4364





PATIO SET, P,:.[, C:,i
Green Wicker + Cushions &
Covers. $650 941-486-1146
QN MATTRESS Set & Frame.
Like new $150 941-698-0121
QUEEN SOFA Sleeper & Love
Seat sofa $100
607-760-7833
RATTAN SOFABED & recliner
beige $50 941-456-1837
RECLINER DANISH style
recliner w/foot stool Med.
$100 941-460-0996
RECLINER ROSE velour very
nice clean Deep $85
941-743-2326
RECLINER Tan, Leather, exc
cond. $100 941-743-4697
RECLINER/ROCKER BEIGE
cloth, excellent cond. Ve $79
941-485-9185
ROLLTOP DESK and Chair set
(childs) CA1920 $225
941-266-6718
ROUND TOP 4 shelf glass,
brass, finnish 72Hx33Wx12D,
$90 718-986-3608
SIMMONS MAPLE Crib Used
for 1 child. $125
941-426-1205
SLEEPER SOFA queen match-
ing loveseat dual recliners,
green micro fiber, very good
cond. $400. 941-575-6454.
SOFA & Loveseat Grey-blue,
pillowtop, wicker $125 941-
485-9185
SOFA & Loveseat Grey/blue,
pillow top, wicker $125 941-
485-9185
SOFA & LOVESEAT, tan
microfiber, exc cond. $450
941-698-0121
SOFA 100% LEATHER,
87",PICS VIA E-MAIL $200
941-828-8871


FURNITURE
L ^ 6035 ^


ROUNDED ARM chair newlig
$85 941-624-0928
SOFA BED with matching
chair sleeper sofa $399 941-
412-5283
SOFA By Braxton, 83", soft
floral print, excl cond $150
941-697-4991
SOFA Excellent condition.
Light blue/green color $300
941-460-8777
SOFA MICROFIBER 82L x
39W 36H new cond. $280
718-986-3608
SOFA olive micro fiber $100
443-844-5836
SOFA SLEEPER Excellent
condition $65 941-391-6163
SOFA, LOVESEAT, Chair
Ottoman & End tables, great
cond $400 OBO 302-530-5038
STORAGE BED, new,twin,
white wicker/rattan, incl.
nightstand/vanity $450 828-777-
5610
TABLE & 6 CHAIRS white
3'x5' cream cushions $150
941-639-0838
TABLE COFFEE Wood/sta-
tionery wheels. Ex. cond. $45
941-979-6362
TABLE DECORATOR ROUND
Wood Table custom glass top
$22 941-276-1881
TABLE DROP leaf dining table
4 leaves 4 chair $200
406-679-6388
TABLE KITCHEN 4 chairs, 1
leaf solid set $75
406-679-6388
TABLES COFFEE & 2 End
Tables Modern Like New $75
941-697-0822
TABLES GLASS TOPCOFFEE,
END, DRUM PERFECT $125
941-460-8777
TV CREDENZA Modern ex
cond 24dX21X61 $150
941-894-4115
VINTAGE BAR stools x 2
swivel $225 941-716-3259
WALL UNIT 5 section 1/2
glass $150 941-575-6217
WROUGHT IRON DINING SET
Antique;Glass Top $175 941-
276-2411
L ELECTRONICS
mmm::60308


24 HR. dial time switch T101
like new condition $35
419-973-7514
ASSORT. ELECTRONICS
VHS-DVD-TV $20
941-473-9269
CELL PHONE LG CU400
(AT&T) Excl. Cond. $20
941-626-5468
COMPUTER DELL laptop ex.
cond. $100 770-546-2131
COMPUTER SPEAKERS New
computer speakers 14a $25
941-423-2580
LAPTOP COMPUTER
HPdv9000 good cond.works
grt. $75 941-743-3022
LG TRACFONE 840G 2292
min left.SD/6/22/14. Wi-F
$60 941-475-2727
NINTENDO 2DS Bundle
2DS,Case,Pokemon X,Lugi
$180 941-585-5331
SONY VIDEO camera is in
excellent cond $90 941-423-
2580
TURN TABLE B&O Linear
Tracking Arm As New $325
941-575-7822I
WIRELESS HEADPHONES
$50 new at Radio Shack $25
941-639-0838
STV/STEREO/RADIO
L7^ 6040 ^

SAMSUNG 46" TV w/Power
Antenna SAM $225 941-681-
6228


SUN



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Thursday, February 6, 2014


L TV/STEREO/RADIO

: 6040 ^

SATELLITE RADIO house/car
Boom box or car $55
812-320-1820
SPEAKERS Olin Ross New
NIB 3 way floor $400
941-539-4967
TV 27" SANSUI, 2 Years Old.
Excellent Condition! $85 941-
697-2796
TV 42" LG 1080P surround
sound still in box $300
941-759-1576
1 Classified = Sales
TV 55" Philips wide screen in
good cond. $75
941-763-2847
TV ANALOG converter box for
TV antenna system $35
941-474-7387

EQUIPMENT
WO 6060^^

CHAIR OFFICE High Back
Swivel w/Arms BIkFabric $25
941-475-8379
COMPUTER KEYBOARD
works good $10
941-228-1745
COMPUTER WORK STATION
30"w 19"d, 3 S $40 941-627-
6780
COMPUTER WORK Station
Like new. 56"Wx35"Hx36"D
New. $50. 941-429-2980
INK CART 9 HP 02 Ink cart
2blk lpnk 2yellXI 21t cyan
2ma $65 941-629-5931
MONITOR LCD 17" Thin flat
panel great condition $30
941-697-4355
PC SPEAKERS (3) Harman-
good sounding speaker $25
941-629-3921
SONY 19" LCD Monitor SDM-
X95F This item $120
773-322-8383
WIN 7 3800+cpu 2GB ram
120GB hd cd/dvd rw $90
941-697-4355
WIN XP 512 mb Ram 80gb
Drive CD Burner, more $40
941-697-4355
CLOTHING / JEWELRY4
ACCESSORIES


HATS 5 MEN'S Bowler Derby
Hats Colorful Lg $100 941-
764-6123
LEATHER JACKET $50. &
Leather Coat $65. Very Good
Condition! 941-575-0970
MENS SPORTCOAT, It. blue,
42 short & like new. $20 941-
875-2285
MENS SPORTCOAT, tan, size
42 short & like new. $20 941-
875-2285


MINKS:
BLOND MINK CAPE LARGE
SIZE & DARK MINK COAT
LARGE SIZE GREAT COND.
$250/EA 941-204-3734
SHOES Size 12 Excl. Cond. +
sz L shirts $5 941-575-9393
WOMEN LEATHER jacket
blk.med.like new. $35 941-
235-2203
I ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
^ 6 6070


COLLECTIBLES
6* (070 i

1985 NINTENDO & Player's
Guide w/ 3 Games & 3 Con-
trols. $350obo 941-467-4075


ACTIVELY BUYING!
Antiques, Paintings; All Sub-
jects, Silver, Ivory, Jewelry, Ori-
ental Rugs, New England
Items. Anything Unusual or of
Quality! Local 941-306-8937
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
AUTOGRAPHED BOOKS by
famous authors Asking $15
540-383-1655
BASEBALLS METS; Players
$50 941-456-0936
BICYCLE SCHWINN 1963
ladies 26" $50 941-625-2779
BOHEMIAN CHINA Set miss-
ing one cup $350 941-875-
4020
BOWLS 11 VTG PYREX
BOWLS VERY GOOD $85
941-486-8388


Buying Pre-1965
Silver Coins
Top Prices Paid!
Call 941-759-0274
CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
CLOCK ANSONIA ANTIQUE
CLOCK 100 years old $169
941-764-7971
COIN 1801 LARGE CENT
VERY NICE MUST C $90
941-457-0155
COIN 1865 anacs certified
ms-62 rb penny $140
941-457-0155
COIN 1880OS pcgs ms-63
morgan dollar $65 941-457-
0155
COIN 1881S PCGS MS-63
MORGAN DOLLARBLAST $65
941-457-0155
COIN 1925 STONE MOUNTAIN
$75 941-457-9155
COINS US 1955 BOX PROOF
SET NICE COIN $165 941-
268-9029
COINS US 95 PRESTIGE
PROOF SET NICE $125
941-268-9029
DEPRESSION GLASS sher-
berts "patrician".4.ye $52
941-235-2203
DRESSER 1930's Matched
Dresser 42x34 Vanity 3 Mirror
$275 941-629-6502
ELVIS 2 SETS of Elvis Presley
1st day covers each $10
941-623-0346
FRANCISCAN DESERT ROSE
cup/saucer, each set $5
941-639-0838

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!
HUMMELS 3" Asst. Hummels
Excl. Cond. $15
941-625-6053
HUMMELS 4" Asst. Hummels
Excl. Cond. $20 each
941-625-6053
JAR 200 YR. OLD NIPON JAR
Before 1885, Lost art s $355
941-639-7766
LAMP ANTIQUE CERAMIC
Very stylish la $110
773-322-8383
MAGNUS CHILDS tabletop
organ very old $50 941-423-
2585


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6^(070^ ^

MAJOR KIRA nerys plate of
star trek 1994 $20 941-423-
2585
MILKGLASS WESTMORE-
LAND: RARE PIECE, PERF
$35 941-575-8881
MIRROR 17X37 mirror beau-
tiful frame $30 941-486-8388
MONET VINTAGE print
Boats/Stone Drawbridge $39
989-790-0638
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
PLATE APPLE BLOSSOM
footed cake plate Sovereign
$15 941-764-7971
STONEWARE JUG "1800's".
ex.cond. $85 941-235-2203
TOY GUN Johnny Eagle Red
River toy gun, like new $85
941-624-0928
VANGOGH VINTAGE print
Stone Drawbridge in Arie $39
989-790-0638
VANITY & DRESSER 1930's
match 42x34 dre $275 pic on
internet 941-629-6502
VHS 39 ORIG. Star Trek VHS
tapes Mostly sealed $50
941-423-2585
VICTORIAN EAST Lake Table
30" x 20"x 30" $225 941-
639-9134
WALNUT DRESSER 5 draw-
ers.some marble.ex. $350
941-235-2203
WANTED: OLD POST cards
pre 1940, stamp collections,
old photographs and paper
items
Collector pas highest prices
207-712-6216 or 9414934714
WASHSTAND SET Vintage
Napcoware C-7108 $50
941-426-0760
WORLD WAR II Books 39
Volumes- "Time Life" $175
941-661-0990
| FRUITS &
VEGETABLES
^ 60'75^ ^

WET"COASTAQUA'"
S FARMS
75% LOCAL PRODUCE GMO
FREE! FRESH SEAFOOD
MENTION THIS AD FOR 10%
OFF YOUR PURCHASE!.
:2189 TAMIAMI TRAIL, VENICE:
... 941-426-7921
S MUSICAL



ACCORDIAN Very good cond.
full keys $125 941-743-3022
ACORDIAN OLD Cellini Made
in Italy $50 941-423-9371
ARCHTOP ELECTRIC Guitar
Ibanez AF105, case $500
941-493-3050
IBANEZ ELECTRIC GUITAR
beautiful white with ca $160
941-575-8229
KEYBORD casio electronic
NIB $75 941-697-9485
ORGAN LOWRY, Model
#0575, Incl. Sheet Music &
Bench. 350 Watts. $95 941-
474-5330
| MEDICAL

LW40:6095 ^


2003 FORD WINDSTAR
WHEELCHAIR Van, "Ramp
Van By IMS", vehicle kneels,
Flat floor, ALL seats remov-
able, w/tie downs in ALL
$8,900. OBO 941-575-2317
BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296


MEDICAL
L ^ 6095 ^


AUTO-GO SCOOTER Electric
foldable like new $275
941-473-4923
COMMODE 3 in 1 bedside
commode $20 941-451-3958
LIFT CHAIR Lt. Brown in
color, Good condition! Works
well. $300 *SOLD in 1 DAY*
MEDICAL TOILET seat 4" ele-
vation with arms $26
941-474-7387
NEBULIZER TELEFLEX Opti
Neb Pro Compressor. $25
941-426-0760
NEBULIZER TELEFLEX Opti
Neb Pro Compressor. $25
941-426-0760
POWER CHAIR Pride Jazzy
600 excl. cond. $499 941-
426-7598
QUAD CANE for Right or Left
Hand, Great Shape $20
941-268-8951
SCOOTER BOB CAT Scooter
4 wheel Like new w/ charger
$275 941-698-0793
SCOOTER, 3YRS OLD. BARE-
LY USED. BRAND NEW BAT-
TERIES. $650 989-415-4893
SHOWER CHAIR NICE $30
941-268-8951
WALKER 3 and 4 wheels with
access, both for $125
941-474-7387
WALKER 3 wheel like new
$100 941-227-0676
WALKER 4 WHEEL W/Hand
Brakes, Basket, NICE $70
941-268-8951
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!.
WALKER STANDARD 2-But-
ton folding & 5" wheels $15
941-426-0760
WALKER WITH SEAT $45
610-905-7757
WHEEL CHAIR Wheel chair
w/ foot rests folds fre $85
941-474-6523
WHEELCHAIR BY Jazzy, elec-
tric 4wheel, with charger $350
941-627-4075
WHEELCHAIR TRANS-
PORTER,HAND BRAKES $80
941-268-5227
| HEALTH/BEAUTY1

Z ^6100 ^

GROOMING KIT 9 peice nail
grooming kit $5
941-227-0676
TREES & PLANTS

LZ:66110 ^


CANNAS PALE green striped
leaves, gal pots, $6
770-546-2131
ELEPHANT EARS x-lg bulbs,
gal pots $6 770-546-2131
FLOWER POT RACK'S
MEDAL, 3 SHELF'S 2 $120
941-627-6780
GARDENIA 2 Gallon Pot
Flowering $10 941-204-9100
KEY LIME Tree Fruiting 2-3'
Tall $25 941-204-9100
ORCHID LARGE Plants Purple
Flowers $35 941-698-9798


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL, SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMY PALMS & MORE
Sui'sNusuRy 941-488-7291
PAPAYA RED Flesh Fruiting
Tree $15 941-204-9100
RED HIBISCUS Flowering
Giant Hearty Hibiscus $10
941-204-9100
SILK TREE nice 7 3/4 high
tree in pot $40 941-697-9485
SNOW QUEEN Hibiscus Red
Flower Varig Leaves $15
941-204-9100


TREES & PLANTS
Z:^6110 ^


TOMATO PLANTS 12-14"
HEALTHY BLOOMING $2
941-258-2016
L BABY ITEMS
'01 61'20 ^


CAR SEAT EVENFLO 20-50
Ibs LIKE NEW $45
603-486-6287
IKEA TODDLER BED new
with mattress $100 941-575-
8229
| GOLF ACCESSORIES

L: 6125 ^

2003 CLUB CAR DS 4 pas-
senger. 48volt, new paint &
windshield. Batteries (7/2012)
Like New! $2650
941-830-5312
2004 CLUB CAR
New batteries, 48V Speed-
ster, Excl. Cond. w/Charger
$2,000 941-697-3283
2014 STAR Golf Carts
Starting at $5195!
The CART GUYS
941-575-8181
'97 CLUB CAR golf cart.
Good Trojan batteries. New
service & lights. $1275
941-716-6792
CLUB CAR '99 golf cart.
Brand new batteries & lights.
$1895 941-716-6792
DRIVER COBRA AMP Driver
10.5 Senior Flex $75
941-625-7563
GOLF BAG new ladies Wilson
blk w Burberry trim $40 941-
488-7774
GOLF BALL monogramer
park avenue its new $10
941-228-1745
GOLF BALLS, like new, no
scuffs logos marks. Doz $5
941-488-7774
GOLF CLUBS WITH BAG
GRAPHITE IRONS & BAG $50
941-497-0409
GOLF PULL cart, good
condition two wheel $15
941-681-6874
IRONS TAYLOR MADE burn-
er irons 3-gap wedge, r $190
941-475-7781
MENS GOLF SHOES
NEW,SIZE SMALL, BLAC $20
941-627-6780
PUTTER RIFE 400 mallet RH
400 Mallet Rife Pu $55
941-625-7563
PUTTER-3 3 PUTTERS $25
941-497-0409
SOLUS WEDGES 56 & 60
exc condition $50
941-625-7563
WARRIOR GOLF clubs 3-gap
wedge, graphite s $100 941-
475-7781
WOODS 3-5-7 LADIES
GRAPHITE WOOD SET $25
941-497-0409

S EXERCISE/
FITNESS
^WWM 6128

ELLIPTICAL PRO-FORM 350
12 LEVELS $249
941-764-7971
ELYPTICAL TRAINER w/
Electronics, Nice $100
941-268-8951
EXERCISE BIKE VitaMaster,
NO Electronics, Nice $60
941-268-8951
SEmploy Classified!
FITNESS BALL, pump,2
videos,manuals.As new. $18
941-276-1881
STATIONARY BIKE Stamina
450 Air Resistance $40 941-
625-2779
TREADMILL PRO Form
Crosswalk Sport 390 barely
used. $250 941-698-9787


EXERCISE/
1 FITNESS
ws4 6128SI

TREADMILL SEARS Pro Form
speed & incline control. Many
options. $100 941-575-7528
TREADMILL-NORDIC
TRACK C2420 PROGRAMMA
$260 941-268-5227
I NEED CASH? I

SPORTING GOODS
^^ 6130 ^

2 GUYSGUN
SHOW
Feb 15th & 16th
Robards Arena
3000 Ringling Blvd
Sarasota, Fl
(4 miles west of 175,
Exit 210 Fruitville Rd)
Buy-Sell-Trade
New-Used
FREE Parking
CWP Classes Avail.
Sat 9-5 and Sun 9-4
727-776-3442
www.nextgunshow.com
BAIT TANK 20 gal. kodiak
proflo.911, plum $50 860-
388-7614
BILLARD SET set of 16 balls,
racks, chalk, redball, set $35
941-505-1663
BOAT CHAIR HD ALUMINUM
CHAIR W/GIMBEL. $40
860-388-7614
BOWLING BALL EXTREME
Weighs 10 Lbs. $10 941-475-
8379
COOLER LIME green with
wheels $16 941-423-9371
CQR BOAT Anchor 35 Ibs
LIKE NEW $175
603-486-6287
DOWNRIGGER WEIGHTS 11
Ib Fish shaped $20
941-539-4967
FIDDLER CRABS $3.00 DOZ.
941-441-5213
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
FISHING RODS & reels Fish-
ing Rods & Reels, 5,50,75
$50 941-629-0806
FISHING TACKLE 5 boxes
assorted lures assorted $125
941-474-6523
FISHING TACKLE SALTH20
ALL FOR $100 714-599-2137
GOLF SET 13 PIECE with BAG
Right hand set. $25
773-322-8383
GPS GARMIN HAND held
GPS GarminLegend GPS $45
419-389-2472
GRILL MAGMA A10-703 Grill
LIKE NEW $119
603-486-6287
OLD PAL ANTIQUE METAL
FISHING TACKLE B $30
714-599-2137
RAWLING CATCHERS Mitt
$75 941-624-0928
SCUBA GEAR regs, tank, wet-
suit, computer $250
941-697-8377
SENTRY GUN safe Like new
condition $400 941-204-9415
WADING BOOTS Sting ray
proof size 11new $75 941-
639-9134

L FIREARMS
W : 6131 ^


22 SUPERSHOT Iver John-
son 7-shot 22 revolver Excl.
Cond. $250 (941) 697-2163
454 CASULL Raging Bull 8.5
barr,blk chrome,Nikon scope
+ammo $875. 941-258-6304
9 MM Ruger $485, 22 Revolver
$355, 38 2" barrel $485, 380
Bersa $435, 22 Goldenboy Rifle
mag $685 440-289-1595







Thursday. February 6, 2014 ads.yoursun.net E/NIC The Sun Classified Page 19


L FIREARMS
Z ^6131 _

BERETTA 40 cal., extra clip,
$475. Sig. Sauer 9mm P6,
extra clip 5475 423-871-0047


Lfl
COLT 38 4"BARREL
old but tight, $375
(941) 661-2547



GUN & KNIFE SHOW
LaBelle Civic Center
481 W. Hickpochee Ave
(SR80) LaBelle, Fl.
Sat 2/8 9-5pmn and
Sun 2/9 9-4pm.
Admission $5.00 under 12
FREE & FREE PARKING CWP
Classes $49.95 11an & 1pm
daly. Lee County Gun
Colectors LLC.
(239)-223-3370
BUY-SELL-TRADE
www.eunshowsflorida.com
KIMBER .45 AUTO SS bone
handle grips, factory installed
adj sites, .22 conversion kit
SS brand new, holsters for
ammo/pistol, 4 extra clips, 11
boxes of ammo. $1200 Firm.
Must have CWP sold sold
S&W 38 SPC
BLUE 2" BBL 5 shot, E/C,
$450. Call 941-6244244.


SUNCOAST GUN
SHOW
February 8th & 9th
SAT. 9-5, SUN. 9-4
Lee Civic Center
Bayshore Rd.
N. Ft. Myers
BUY SELL TRADE
Concealed Weapon Class
$49
10AM & 2PM daily

BICYCLES/
S TRICYCLES
wl6135~

ADULT TRICYCLE Brand new,
still in box, nice! $260 941-
524-1025
Seize the sales
with Classified!
ADULT TRIKE Clean w/ Lg
Seat Basket & Mags $150
941-544-0042
BIKE BOYS 20" BMX, like
new $50 941423-9888
BIKE HUFFY 26" low-bar
w/25cc gas helper motor
$325 941-629-1560
BIKE MEN 26" Mikes Hard
Lemonade $150
941-875-5168
BIKE MEN'S 26" 12 speed
mountain bike $50
941-875-5168
BIKE SUN classic adult 3
wheeler light blue great $175
941474-0109
BIKE VINTAGE SCHWINN
Cruiser 7. $85 941-214-8168
BIKE, GAZELLE Dutch 26"
Ladies, almost new, $125
941-697-8430
FUJI CAPE May Aluminum
Men's Beach Cruiser $85
941-544-0042
PINK ladies Busetti elec. bike,
too tall for rider, loaded, USA
made $2550. 941456-9238
TOYSIGANWS
L 6138 _

MEGA BLOKS Halo 22
pounds of assorted pieces.
$65 941-979-6362
SWING SET with slide and
glider good cond $75
941585-8739


S VIDEO
* 6140 ^

LCD PROJECTOR Sharp XG-
NV2SB IQ good cond $50
989-790-0638
PROJECTION SCREEN Wall
Mount 62 in wide good cond
$49 989-790-0638

find your Bet
Friend in the
Classifieds!

POOLISPA/
& SUPPLIES


Local Manufacturer
offering to sell direct
to public 0 5 PE RSON
SPA $ 1895.* SWIM SPA
LOADED $S7995.0 FIBIH-
[aA x-L I020$6700
LOCAL: 941-421 0395





**SPAS &MORE**
MARQUIS SPAS and
VIKING 4PAS
TREWs IN WELCOME
WE BUYw USED & MOVE ss
www.spasandmoreflorida.com
941-625-6600
POOL COVER roller $25
941-575-6217
[ LAWN& GARDEN
L 6160 ^


3 WORKING HOMELITE GAS


LAWN & GARDEN
^^ 6160 ^

Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
9414684372
ECHO SHRED & Vac ES250
Used once. Gas power $75
941421-9984
FIREWOOD ALL Oak $50
941-456-0936
GARDEN FOUNTAIN con-
crete 48" high x 36" wide $86
941-575-8229
GARDEN NOME JOE MAD-
DON new in the box $50
941-228-1745
LAWN MOWER 1986
Grasshopper, diesel, 52" cut.
51,200 OBO 941-716-0693
PLANT BUCKETS Large
$100 941-6240928
TOP SOIL For Sale! Please
call: 941-4684372
TRANSMISSION FOR TORO
w/b s/p mower $35
207-319-6141
| STORAGE SHEDS/
BUILDINGS
'^ 165165

HURRICANESHED.COM
FENCED YARD....
TIGHT SPACES...NO PROBLEM!
941-626-4957
LICENSE# CBC1259336
SHED 10X16 INSULATED,
wired and is air condi-
tioned. New $9000. Asking
$3000 518-925-7303
S BUtILDING
S SUPPLIES
Lra 6170 ^


AMPROB HOOK type geat
buy $40 941-575-0690
BAMBOO POLES 1.5"-
2.5"dia x 8' 9.5' long $3
941-426-6759
CARPET PADS 2 full rolls
6x45 covers 540 sqft $100
941-493-0672
JANUS GARAGE door new
roll up 10x7 $500. Sun Earth
solar hot water heater, used.
10'x4' $500. 941 2585969.
KELLER LADDER 8 ft exten-
dens to 16 ft exc. $75 941-
575-8229
PLYWOOD RETIRED 1/2" ply-
wood shutters 5 $25
9416974426
SCREEN ENTRY door new
36' x 80" $95 941-575-8229
STEEL SHED door 36 x 80
steel door &frame. $50 724-
674-5240
STEELCASE DRAFTING
CHAIR vinyl arms adj $150
941-391-0042
VINYL WINDOWS frames
Frames, (2) 40x67, $325
941 525-6472
WANTED: Bathroom VANITY
TOP (2) 31wx22d min.
Venice area Please call 847-
5674634 1
WINDOW DBL pane, half cir-
cle, vinyl $15 941-629-8650
TOOLS/ MACH RY
6190 ^

AIR COMPRESSOR 4HP
Honda Const. Type $399
941628-2311
AIR COMPRESSOR Sears-
7.2CFM 179 Q41 -53q4Qfi7


WEEDWACKERS EA 580 714- ..-. ... -. . .
599-2137 12 GALVANIZE panels 8'h ANGLE GRINDER 9inch h.d
6' REMINGTON Hedge Wiz- 26"w $100 941-875-5168 like new $40 9416244244
ard Electric HD $50 f--GE- RElSU 3--\ BOLT CUTTER 24 inch Han-
q941-69Q7.-S22 USE CLASSIFIED! ) dies $30 941-575-0690


TOOLS/I LACFIINERY

z 6190 ^
BRASS TOOLS Brand new
Condition $75 941-456-0936
CHAIN SAW blade fits most
14 in. saws new $10
9416979485
COMALONG REACHED Type
$30 941-575-0690
CRAFTSMAN WOOD lathe
with chisels & grinder $100
941-697-4135
DEWALT TABLE saw Model
744 on stand. $150
941-6974135
DRILL 18V cordless 3/8 NIB
$25 941-6244089
GENERATOR POWERMATE
4000 Runs $235 941815-
0575
IMPACT WRENCH by Milwau-
kee electronic $25 941624-
4244
LADDER 20' Werner rated
3001b. $60 941-763-0442
1 Advertise Today!
LADDER 66" black & white,
like new $22 941-423-9371
LADDER FOLDING 16' Can
be used as scaffold. $125
941-575-7822
NEW AIR compressor crafts-
man professioL $450 941-
268-9029
POWER WASHER Electric
1500 PSI works great $50
941-687-4355
POWER WASHER GAS
Sears companion 800ISOOpsi
$120 941-625-7153
PRECISION MACHINIST
Tools 2 tool boxes of preci
$500 941-423-9888
RADIAL ARM Saw Sears
Radial Arm SawlO $125
941408-7609
RYOBI 10" COMPOUND
miter pics $60 941-661-2547
RYOBI 10" TABLESAW with
leg table, pics $75
941-661-2547


TOOLSMIACHINERY

Z ^ 6190 _

SAW MITER 9 inch Delta $45
941-629-8650
SAW RADIAL ARM Dewalt old
$150 941-473-4923
TOOL BOX p/u truck diamond
plate tool box for small p/u
truck $80 815-871-5181
TOOLS BODY WORK Tools
Old Body work. $25
941-625-2408
TOOLS: SHOP SMITH, band
saw, scroll saw, latche, tool
vest, joiner planer & extras
$500 OBO 941-639-0133
VACUUM 10 GALLON
Wet/Dry Vac 4 HP New $35
941-697-0822
VACUUM FEIN hose and bags
$150 941-255-3241
WOOD PLANE Plane Stanley
old, Baileys etc. $45
941875-5391
| QOFFICE/USINESS
EQLUIP./SLtIPLUES
S 6220O

OFFICE OUTFITrERS
Preowned & new office iurniture.
VENICE 941485-7015
CANON PRINTER PIXMA-
MP150 $20 941 -766-0857
HP PRINT Cartridge (3) new,
74XL for HP print $30
941-766-0857
TYPEWRITER SWINTEC
4000 ofc good cond $49
989-790-0638
CATS
^^ 6232 ^

NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.


Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19





The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, February 6, 2014


DOGS
Lwow 60233S ^


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.





AKC GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES AvI. 2/6/14 w/Cert.
$600 863-452-9770
PUPPIES SHIH TZUS
Now taking deposits $50
941-391-5969
SHIH-TZU
Female, 11 weeks, $600
941-875-1689

& SERVICES
waz 6236^ i

A & R Aqua Pros Inc
Aquarium Services
Installation-Maintenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
941-441-8658 Lic/Ins
DOG CRATE small size. $25
941-255-3446
DOG KENNEL W 17" L24" H
19.5" good condition $40
941-629-5931
DOG KENNEL W 19" L 30" H
21" Good condition $50
941-629-5931
PET CARRIER Hard sided,
large $25 941-451-3958
PET CARRIER hard sided,
small $8.00 941-451-3958
PET FOLDING CRATE with
tray 36x22x24 $50.00
941-451-3958
SKY KENNEL Medium $12
941-451-3958
L APPLIANCES
o : 6250 ^


APPLIANCES FRIDGE stove
micro d/w $499
201-675-0160
APPLIANCES FRIDGE stove
micro d/w 499 20167 $499
201-675-0160
BLACK GE Range 3 months
old. Great Cond. $475
941-257-8839
DISHWASHER BLACK works
good $20 941-228-1745
DRYER Maytag. $100
614-271-4701
DRYER-GE 240VOLT,WHITE
HD,GOOD COND $100 941-
268-5227
ELECTRIC RANGE G.E. White
Elec. Range Glass top $150
201-458-2912
FREEZER 23 cubic feet.
Works good! $50
989-415-4893
FREEZER CHEST 5.0 Cu. Ft.
W-Westinghous $45 941-493-
0672
FREEZER FRIGIDAIRE
upright 11cuft. Excel. cond.
$120 201-452-6449
GE 18 cubic ft Bisque
Refrig,top/bottom Pleas $125
330-842-2913
MICROWAVE GE Advantium
wh 220v works good $350
941-391-6570
OVEN ELECTRIC DBL
GLASS RANGE AS IS $30
714-599-2137
RAHEEM WATER Heater New
gas 50 gal $275 941-698-
0793
RANGE Kitchen Aide, ceramic
top, stainless, convection
oven, $325 941-625-7135
RANGE, GE electric Range,
GE electric, w $125
609-618-2082


APPLIANCES
L ^ 6250 J


REFRIGERATOR KENMORE
25cf white SbyS $175 941-
625-2779
SHARP MICROWAVE/
CONVECTION oven Sharp
$300 812-320-1820
STOVE White GE stove every-
thing works $90
705-304-3700
STOVE/OVEN FRIGADAIRE
DROP-IN,EXC COND $150
941-268-5227
MISCELLANEOUS

L Z 6260 J

2 AFGANS Mint or Ivory
80x80 Queen size $25 941-
681-2433
2 SIDE BY SIDE ROYAL PALM
CRYPTS Eyelevel,serene
$5,950 562-279-3839
3 BURNER RV Cooktop Used
once $110 941-457-5589
AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
ToP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
ANCHOR WITH 8' chain &
90' 1/2 rope $70
941-575-0690
AVON CAPE COD 1876 Vin-
tage Collection-Cruet Candle-
stick etc $25 941-426-0760
BISSELL PROHEAT/CAR-
PET/FLOOR/CLEANER Pet
Wand $105 941-681-2433
BOX OF 700 baseball cards
1990 $10 941-423-2585
BRASS ANIMALS: 2 giraffe,
2 deer, 36"-49" tall $500
941-639-0838
BUYING & SELLING ARCADE
& PINBALL MACHINES cash
paid working or not! Will pick
up. Please call 863-558-0198
CHEST SET glass pieces and
board $75 941-697-7717
CHEST SET hand made 3 feet
needle point board 6" ceramic
pieces $200 941-697-7717
CLOCK & BAROMETER
CHROME, SHIP'S WHEEL
$100 941-575-8881
COFFEE PERK-POT 12 cup
Farberware $22
941-496-9252
COMPUTER MOUSE golf
club it looks like driver its n
$5 228-1745
COOLER LIME green
w/wheels $16 941-423-9371
DEHUMIDIFIERS $15
941-496-9252
FIREWOOD SEASONED split
oak 1/2 facecord FREE DELY
$120 941-526-7589
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
FLAG US Plaque 12"x18"
aluminum NEW $29.95
941-496-9252
FREON 22 30 Ib container
$360 941-539-4967
GRILL STAINLESS expresso
color genesis w cover
8628120995 exel cond $500
HONEY BEE HIVES NO BEES!
$120 ea Call for details.
585-369-2958 North Port
JUMBO SHRIMP and
STONE CRAB
ARRIVING Now FREE DELIVERY
941-249-4665
LAVA LAMP Classic Retro
16.3" Light $15
941-426-0760
LAVA LAMP Classic Retro
16.3" Light $15
941-426-0760


MISCELLANEOUS

Z 6260 ^

JEEP BRA for Jeep Grand
Cherokee $35 941-697-4426
LIGHTHOUSES 44 in tall for
yard/garden el/solar $105
941-627-9159
MATADOR CAPE Authentic
from spain $100 obo
941-979-5187
METAL DETECTOR 18" Coil
White's LN Ewd $75
440-655-2727
MOVING BOXES 40 clean
boxes, assorted sizes $20
941-258-0472
NFL POSTER- Chad Green-
way, Super Bowl XLIV $8
941-629-8650
ORECK XLS700 Carpet &
Floor Cleaner/Steemer $200
941-575-2001
PLATE GLASS 24Wx43L +
Lots of Plate Shelfing, $10
941-979-9589/941-625-6099
QUICK SHADE Pop Up Tent
10xl0.silver w/black f $50
941-421-9984
RAMPS 7' STEL Car Ramps
Brand New Drive Up $50
941-697-0822
SHOP VAC 12 gal Excl. Cond.
W/ attachments. $35
941-421-9984
SILK PLANTS; floral & green-
ery + containers $5- $25
941-639-0838
SQUARE-D LIGHTING con-
tactor like new cond $500
941-875-9886
STEEL DVDS, CDs RACK
Steel iron 9 shelves bla $5
773-322-8383
TOPPER FOR a small pickup
truck white 76" $150
989-366-4557
TOW CAR shield for ford
explorer $50 941-697-4426
WINE JUG ANTIQUE Italian
Woven Wicker Wrap $30
941-426-0760
WINE JUG ANTIQUE Italian
Woven Wicker Wrap $30
941-426-0760
WOOD CIGAR BOXES 20
new, 6.5x4.5x4.25 $40
941-258-0472
L WANTED TO
I BUY/TRADE


BUYING gold, silver
and vintage costume
jewelry. 941-769-8561


Cash paid FOR WWI WWII
Korean Vietnam,German,
Japanese, etc Military items
(941)416-3280
GRILL NON WORKING SS BBQ
grill eng. area. $1
941-475-2727
WANTED: Vintage Marbles &
Costume Jewelry. Please call
585-365-2034

7000






TRANSPORTATION
| BUICK

L 7020 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

LE/'JC OF S TS


BUICK
L ^ 7020 ^


1998 BUICK PARK AVENUE
Low Mi! Lthr! Well Maintained!
$3,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
2010 BUICK ENCLAVE
48,343 mi, $24,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 BUICK REGAL
10K $23,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 BUICK LACROSSE
NAVI, 14K $28,990
877-211-8054 DLR
SAdvertise Today!.
2014 BUICK ENCORE
328 MILES $28,988
877-211-8054 DLR
7 CADILLAC
L ^ 7030 ^


Z.. U J',' L',I i I.. L.LV ILLL-
DHS 48k miles, Senior Owner
New tires/ shocks, Well main-
tained, $7950. 941-613-
9596
2004 CADILLAC CTS
Loaded, 52K, red, garage
kept. $10,800 941-766-8856


2005 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
40k, black pristine, 1 sr owner,
1st $10,695. 828-777-5610 Cell
2006 CADILLAC DTS
55K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!
2007 CADILLAC DTS
74,148 mi, $12,784
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CADILLAC CTS
19,567 mi, $22,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CADILLAC SRX
39K $27,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 CADILLAC ESCALADE
NAVI, 40K $49,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 CADILLAC CTS
2463 MILES $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 CADILLAC XTS
14K, $34,990
877-211-8054 DLR
CHEVY
L ^ 7040 ^


2003 CHEVROLET BLAZER
126,343 mi, $6,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2003 CHEVY BLAZER,
Only 90K Miles! Extra Clean!
$4,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2007 CHEVY CORVETTE
8,866 MILES, $45,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ,
Leather! Loaded!
$13,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
2010 CHEVROLET COBALT
40,799 mi, $12,584
877-219-9139 DIr


I CHEVY
L 7040Y ^


2010 CHEVY COBALT
41K $9,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 CHEVROLET AVEO
22,542 mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CHEVY CORVETTE
13K, $36,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 CHEVY EQUINOX LT,
4 cyl, Mocha, 38,945 mi,
$18,250 863-494-1870
SCHRYSLER



2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
CONW., $7,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
| DODGE
LmvZ7060 ^


2006 DODGE STRATUS
Only $6995!! Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 GRAND CARAVAN
Was $6987 Now $5987!!!
941-916-9222 DIr.
2010 DODGE AVENGER RT,
Loaded! $11,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2010 DODGE CHALLENGER
BLK, 45K, $27,989
855-242-9258 DLR
2012 DODGE JOURNEY
23,925 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 DODGE CARAVAN
40,799 mi, $19,874
877-219-9139 DIr
FORD
/0 /
L r 7070 ^


2007 FORD EDGE, Leather! All
Power Opt! $13,988. 941-
625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2007 FORD MUSTANG
CONV, Blue Beauty! $12,988.
941-639-1601, DIr P.G.
2008 FORD FOCUS 79,771
mi, $11,474
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EXPLORER
47,024 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EXPLORER
85409 mi, $16875
877-219-9139 DIr
JADVERTIWE!

2010 FORD FUSION
37,962 mi, $14,754
877-219-9139 DIr



FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
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I FORD
L ^ 7070 ^


2011 FORD EXPLORER
14,046 mi, $27,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 FORD FUSION
18K $21,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 FORD TAURUS
NAVI, 24K, $24,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 FORD E350
41,628 mi, $20,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD EDGE LTD
AWD, Looks ABSOLUTELY new.!
Save thousands over new.
$27,895 941-916-9222 DIr.
2012 FORD FUSION SEL
6cyl Blk/ Biege leather,
23,000 mil $17,000 941-
697-1557I
2013 FORD E350
36,369 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 FORD FOCUS
14K, $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2014 FORD MUSTANG
ROUSH STAGE 3, 4820 Ml,
$51,990 877-211-8054 DLR

| GMC
Lo 7075



1989 GMC SIERRA 1500
SLE V8 Cloth Inter, 62k miles,
Senior Owned, Excl. Cond.
$5100 OB 330-842-2913
2005 GMC CANYON CREW
CAB Exceptionally clean!!
$8,995 941-916-9222 DIr.
2011 GMC ACADIA
51,357 mi, $34,574
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 GMC SIERRA1500
53,557 mi, $30,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 GMC VAN
14,708 mi, $48,795
877-219-9139 DIr

| JEEP
7 07
L ^ 7080P ^


2002 JEEP LIBERTY
127,883 mi, $5,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 JEEP comanche
22,869 mi, $11,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 JEEP WRANGLER
46,384 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 JEEP CHEROKEE
33,908 mi, $24,575
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 JEEP WRANGLER
52,935 mi, $27,854
877-219-9139 DIr
LINCOLN
L 70C90 ^


1995 LINCOLN SIG. cold ac,
New tires Owned by a mechan-
ic $2600 941-268-8794
2000 LINCOLN TOWN-CAR
clean, beige and tan, $3,995
941-587-2896
MERCURY
L444: 7100 0


1997 MERCURY COUGAR
XR7, V8, orig. 58K, $1800
941-488-8866 btwn.9am-9pm
2003 MERC. GR.MARQUIS
Only $6995!! Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 MERCURY GRAND
MARQ 42,698 mi, $9,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 MERCURY
57,049 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 MERCURY BASE
57,049 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr





Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 21


OLDSMOBILE
L M 11 0


2001 OLDSMOBILE AURORA
3.5, great condition, loaded,
leather. $3500 941-637-9637
PONTIAC
Lmowa713'0


2007 PONTIAC SOLSTICE
BLACK, ONLY 11,600 MILES!
$15,600. 231-330-1200
/ SATURN
L 71U35 ^


1997 SATURN SL1 4 cycl. 5
spd. manual transmission.
$1000 941-474-8939
2007 SATURN AURA, Loaded,
Moonroof! Black Beauty!
$11,988 941-639-1601 DIr.
2009 SATURN VUE
74,485 mi, $12,897
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USED CAR DEALERS

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MISC.DOMESTIC
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127 Carmalita St.
941-637-0131

* 1990 DODGE RAM
1500 4X4 Lifted, 154k Mi,
$4900
* 2003 SANTE FE Light
blue, cloth AC, V6, 107k'
I Miles $4950 I
1* 2000 HONDA CIVIC
I HATCHBACK. BLACK. GREYI
|CLOTH. COLD AIR. AWESOME1
RUNNING VEHICLE. 159K MILES.
MANUAL. $3200
1* 2001 Jeep Cherokeel
I Sport. 4 Door. Yellow. Cold I
lAir. Cloth. Inline 6 Motor. I
1$2200 |
I* 1997 Nissan Maxima.
115k Miles. Cloth. "CREAM
1PUFF" Immaculate! $3950
1* 1998 Sebring ConvertI
I white, black top 85k, $29951
1* 1999 Honda Odysseyl
IVan 91k miles, $3895I
I* 2004 Pontiac Sunfire
1109k mi, Nice cond. $4495
'* 2002 PT Cruiser 98k
IiCream. Very clean $4495
I* 2003 Honda Accord
I Green, Cloth, 4 cyl All power 1
1$57951
1* 2000 BMW 528i
ILoaded 116k miles, Black,
$5995.g
www.PgUsedCars.com


S ACURA HONDA
L 7145 1 J 10


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
RWAFAmLJ"JE
EWILO E
LEXUSEJ OF gAtA30TA
2008 ACURA 3.2LT
68,538 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr

Eind your Best
Friend In the
Classified!
2010 ACURA TSX5
58,257 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr
S AUDI
L 71U47 J


2002 AUDIT CONVERTIBLE
AWD!! $10,988. 941-625-2141
#1 Used Car Dealer
2013 AUDI A4
BLK, 17K, $33,989
855-242-9258 DLR
BMW
Low 7148 J


1997 BMW Z3ROADSTER
65,203 mi, $8,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2002 BMW Z3 3.0, 5spd, Dk
Grn, tan top, 101k miles, Ex.
cond. Adult driven. $8900.
757-753-4131 Punta Gorda
2008 BMW 3351
CONVT., 34K, $25,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 BMW 3351
66,655 mi, $24,575
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 BMW COOPER
BLK COUPE, 21K, $21,989
855-242-9258 DLR
2011 BMWM3
BLK COUPE, 19K, $52,989
855-242-9258 DLR
2013 BMW 3281S
16K $29,911
877-211-8054 DLR
S HONDA
7160


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
W/SILJsIE
LEXUS OF SARASOTA


A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!
1998 HONDA CIVIC
40,807 mi, $6,987
877-219-9139 DIr
1999 HONDA ACCORD EX,
auto, leather, good cond. new
tires $3,195 SOLD in 2 DAYS


2004 HONDA ACCORD
103,607 mi, $8,575
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 HONDA ACCORD
80,742 mi, $9,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 HONDA ACCORD
89,636 mi, $9,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA ACCORD
69,837 mi, $11,454
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD
85,625 mi, $11,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CR-V
70,340 mi, $10,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CR-V
80,918 mi, $12,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA FIT
5,849 mi, $12,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
61,212 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
69,461 mi, $12,574
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC
66,573 mi, $11,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC LX, 4 dr,
5spd, 45K, excl. cond. Fun to
drive! $11,500 941-741-1126
2008 HONDA ELEMENT
60,360 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA PILOT
112,564 mi, $14,995
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
68,330 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA RIDGELINE
47,939 mi, $24,577
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
35,321 mi, $14,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
27,122 mi, $12,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V,
15,399 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V,
26,153 mi, $22,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
15,746 mi, $20,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
31,645 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
48,158 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
34,844 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
41,559 mi, $16,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 32,720 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 35,081 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
24,873 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
I Classified = Sales I
2011 HONDA CR-V
28,736 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
30170 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
36,474 mi, $21,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA cr-v
41,075 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT,. 16,055 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr


HONDA
LW444 7160 ^


2011 HONDA CR-Z
CERT,. 35,594 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
21,761 mi, $26,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA RIDGELINE
56128 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
29K, $19,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 26,966 mi, $19,742
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
EXL, 63K $20,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 HONDA CIVIC
10,287 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
10,308 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 12,017 mi, $15,487
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 16,112 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 28,792 mi, $16,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 5,071 mi, $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 6,964 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
32,500 mi, $24,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
CERT,. 35,334 mi, $23,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CRV
21K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, DVD, 31K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 HONDA PILOT
16,372 mi, $33,978
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
45273 mi, $19,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
62,639 mi, $17,995
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
8,989 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 6,155 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA FIT
28,575 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA FIT
CERT,. 2,285 mi, $17,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT,.5,436 mi, $32,978
877-219-9139 DIr

L HYUNDAI
WWO:7163





GB CARS
11 Kia Soul Plus $11,495
10 Nissan Cube $7495
08 Dodge Nitro $8895
07 Hyundai SantaFe $9995
06 Kia Spectra5 $5995
07 Toy Camry Hyd $8995
04 PTCrusier $3995
07 Saturn Vue $6995
07 Chev HHR $7795
03 Suzuki XL 7 $4595
TRADES WE BUY CARS
BY APPT.
CALL TODAY
941-347-7500
OR VISIT US
6640 TAYLOR RD
PUNTA GORDA FL


L HYUNDAI
44OZ 7163 ^


2007 HYUNDAI ACCENT
86,475 mi, $6,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HYUNDAI SONATA LTD,
Loaded! $9,988. 941-625-2141
#1 Used Car Dealer
2011 HYUNDAI SANTAFE
41K $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
20K, $15,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
3,950 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
L INFINITI
aw4:77165 IT


2011 INFINITI EX35
18K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR
S JAGUAR
L 7175 ^


2003 JAGUAR X
SEDAN, 113K, $4,911
855-242-9258 DLR
2009 JAGUAR XF
SEDAN, 31K, $29,911
SELECT CERTIFIED
855-242-9258 DLR
2010 JAGUAR XF
SEDAN, 25K, $29,911
SELECT CERTIFIED
855-242-9258 DLR
2011 JAGUAR XJ
SEDAN, 34K, $51,989
SELECT CERTIFIED
855-242-9258 DLR
2012 JAGUAR XK
CONVT., 25K, $69,989
SELECT CERTIFIED
855-242-9258 DLR
2012 JAGUAR XKR
CONVT., 10K, $79,989
SELECT CERTIFIED
855-242-9258 DLR
2012 JAGUAR XKR
CONVT., 15K, $76,911
SELECT CERTIFIED
855-242-9258 DLR



2012 JAGUAR XL
SEDAN, 16K, $62,989
SELECT CERTIFIED
855-242-9258 DLR
2014 JAGUAR F
WHT., 4,448 MILES $74,911
SELECT CERTIFIED
855-242-9258 DLR
/ LEXUS
Lem 7178S ^


2006 LEXUS GX470
112,686 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 LEXUS RX350
46K $18,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 LEXUS LS460
30,074 mi, $64,700
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 LEXUS LS460
RED, 44K, $35,988
855-242-9258 DLR
2009 LEXUS RX350
55K $24,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 LEXUS GX460
NAVI 40K $44,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 LEXUS IS250
26K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR

LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

LEJUSI OF SARA'OTA


I LEXUS
7178S


2012 LEXUS CT200H
30K $24,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 LEXUS GS350
NAVI 39K $37,911
877-211-8054 DLR
7~i~TI
L MASERATI
o ^ 7179 T'


2012 MASERATI
GRANTURISMO
CONVT. 2,187 Ml, $115,888
855-242-9258 DLR
/ MAZDA

7180


2003 MAZDA PROTEGE
48,166 mi, $8,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 MAZDA MX-5
20K $18,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 MAZDA MAZDA3
33,652 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
SMERCEDES
7190


1988 MERCEDES-BENZ 300E
4dr, 98K mi, Garage-Kept,
$2700. 941-697-3660
1999 MERCEDES-BENZ
SLK 230, hard top conv, white,
very nice condition. 68K miles,
$8200 OBO 218-348-0338
2006 MERCEDES CLK3500, 2
Dr Coupe! Must See! $14,988.
941-625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2011 MERCEDES E350W
14K $37,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 MERCEDES E350W
BLK., 37K, $34,777
855-242-9258 DLR
2011 MERCEDES GLK350
50K $28,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 MERCEDES C250
SEDAN, 4,759 Ml, $33,989
855-242-9258 DLR
MINI COOPER
7192


2007 MINI COOPER, Red!
Double Moon Roof! $12,988
941-639-1601 P.G. DIr
S MITSUBISHI
7195


2010 MITSUBISHI LANDER
48,216 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE
SILVER, 31K, $14,988
855-242-9258 DLR
S NISSAN
L ^ 7200 ^


2006 NISSAN 350Z, 6 Speed!
Must See! $12,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2007 NISSAN MURANO
79,077 mi, $13,974
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN FRONTIER
63,890 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN MURANO
83,646 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN MURANO
90,562 mi, $16,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 NISSAN MURANO
16K $22,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 NISSAN SENTRA
11,090 mi, $14,975
877-219-9139 DIr





The Sun Classified Page 22 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, February 6, 2014


S SPORTS CARS
L :7205 ^


1996 VETTE C4, .:., ErL.u:i
GRN, NEW: 4 TIRES, WP, TRANS,
SERPT. BLT, PSP, R&P w/ FE ALIG.
VG AC, NEWER BR & EXH.
$14,900 716-628-0947
1999 CHEVY CORVETTE
Targa top, Auto, VGC $15,000
Accept trade! 941-698-0637
| SAAB
Low 7206 ^

2005 SAAB 9-3
60,533 mi, $8,957
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 SAAB 9.3, Sports Turbo!
$8,988. 941-625-2141 #1 Used
Car Dealer
7]SUBARU
L 7207 ^

2008 SUBARU LEGACY
80,946 mi, $13,547
877-219-9139 DIr

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!
2010 SUBARU OUTBACK
40K $21,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| TOYOTA
L :7Y210 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
WSLDE~
.LEXUS OF SAkRAsOTAk
2006 TOYOTA AVALON
83,345 mi, $12,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 TOYOTA COROLLA
124,768 mi, $6,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 TOYOTA CAMRY
52,087 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA TUNDRA
51,006 mi, $32,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA VAN
55,590 mi, $21,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY
48,973 mi, $14,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 TOYOTA CAMERY
18K $21,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 TOYOTA MATRIX
9,670 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
7VOLKSWAGEN
L 71220 ^

2006 VOLKSWAGEN BEE-
TLE 31,550 mi, $10,844
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 VOLKSWAGEN GTI
71,565 mi, $12,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
46,396 mi, $17,458
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 VW JETTA,, Wolfsberg Ed-
tiori Turbo! $12,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used CarDealer
2010 VOLKSWAGEN CC
brown 15,875
877-219-9139 DIr


L VOLVO
L 72300 ^

2006 VOLVO C70 Hardtop
Cony! Red! $13,988 941-
639-1601 P.G. DIr.

C ANTIQUES/ I
COLLECTIBLES
^^ 7250^


SUN NEWSPAPERS
OPEN HOUSE &
MID WINTER
COLLECTOR
CAR SHOW
Hosted by:
The Sun Newspapers,
23170 Harborview Rd.
Charlotte Harbor, P.C.
24 Trophies will
be awarded.
1 over 4' high
FREE Coffee,
Doughnuts, Orange
Juice to Antique
Car Owners for
the first hour.

TOUR OF THE
PAPER OFFICE
& PLANT
See first hand
how the Best
Community
Newspaper in the
Country operates!.
Music begins at lOAM by
"Power Outage Continues"
playing hits from the
50's, 60's & 70's!
And Guest Appearance
by Las Vegas performer
Jimmy Mazz.
FOOD & BEVERAGES
AVAILABLE
SEE THE NEW
2014 AUTOS!
Open Only to Non Modified
Cars/Trucks/Motorcycles
at least 23 years old.
NO REGISTRATION FEE.
Owners that will exhibit
at this fun EVENT must
Pre-Register to the
Veteran Motor Car Club
of America with Ozzie
Osborne at 941-235-7701.
Regretfully space allows for
only 100 vehicles.
CALL NOW!
PUBLIC INVITED FREE!!


BUDGET BUYS/
L 72T52





1997 PLYMOUTH VOY-
AGER, Loaded! $988. 941-
639-1601 DIr. P.G
2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT
2dr, hatchback, cold AC, Auto
93k mi $1800 614-783-5597
| AUTOS WANTED
L 7260 ^


Available 24/7
941-623-5550, 286-3122
AUTO PARTS/
ACCESSORIES


69 BELVEDERE Bumpers,
$100 941-883-1463
HUB CAPS $40
941-474-7387
NISSAN PICKUP transmis-
sion $175 941-473-4923
STEERING WHEEL LOCK
$10 941-661-0990
TIRE Ex. Tread 215/60 $45
941-575-9393
TIRES 4 Kumho 285/50/20
$450 Paid 850, less than
5,000 miles. 941-505-1396
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TOOL BOX ALUM for p/u
truck $80 815-871-5181
TOYOTA COROLLA 14" Hub-
caps (3) $25 941-627-9466
WHEEL COVERS $35
941-474-7387
VANS
L ^ 7290 ^

1996 DODGE VAN 7 PASSEN-
GER 146k miles, Good cond.
$1200 **SOLD in 1 Day!**


Great Deals in

the Classifieds!

2007 CHRYSLER T & C,
Stow & Go! Only 70K Miles!
$9,988. 941-639-1601 DIr
2007 HONDA ODYSSEY
57,262 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ODYSSEY
85,857 mi, $16,745
877-219-9139 DIr


1926 MODEL-T FORD
SHOWCASE $10,000/obo
941-473-7359


VANS
L ^ 7290 ^

2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
82,285 mi, $18,474
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 VWROUTAN, Loaded!
HAS ITALLI' $16,988. 941-
625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-870-4325
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
32,177 mi, $23,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
40,607 mi, $25,781
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
15,292 mi, $35,787
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
45,503 mi, $24,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
53,050 mi, $28,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
CERT,. 30,781 mi, $28,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT,. 5,329 mi, $37,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2014 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT,. 5,678 mi, $37,985
877-219-9139 DIr
TRUCKS/PICK-UPS
7300

2001 DODGE LARAMIE,
117K, ext cab, 8' bed, V10,
new a/c$4995 941-627-9191
2011 FORD F150
RED, 27K, $27,889
855-242-9258 DLR
2012 TOYOTA TACOMA
WHT., 26K, $26,777
855-242-9258 DLR


DON'T WAIT. DRIVE TODAY
GUARANTEED CREDIT
S APPROVAL I
941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com

WE BUY CARS '
STop Dollar for your car
or truck Call us today
941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com
L---------JE
WE FINANCE
EVERYONE
MUST HAVE INCOME
& DOWN PAYMENT
941-473-2277
I www.pctcars2.com I
f--------- J
SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
^ ^ 7305 ^

2000 MERC. MOUNTAINEER
113K, good cond., new tires,
$3,600 941-627-0187
2002 CHEVY BLAZER
Exceptionally Clean! $5195
941-916-9222 DIr.




aTm
2005 FORD EXPLORER
LTD, Advance Trac-RSC, Only
35K Miles. Service Records.
$12,500 obo *Sold in 1 Day!!*





2006 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
Blue, 47K Miles! Garage Kept!
$10,400. 941-475-3047
2007 TOYOTA RAV4
49,796 mi $14,987
877-219-9139 DLR


04 Saturn Vue
04 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
07 Chevy HHR
08 Saturn Vue XE
08 Saturn Vue XR


$2,999
$4,200
$5,299
$5,899
$6,099
$6,600
$7,800
$11,500


941-627-8822

BOATS-POWERED
7330


16' 1999 PALM-BEACH
50HP Force, 2007 Trailer! SS
Prop, CC, Bimini, FF. All Equip-
ment! $5,000 941-493-8440




EM
16' WELLCRAFT CC, 50HP
Johnson, Low Hrs! Trailer. Must
Sell! $3,900. 941-716-3011





18' SEA PRO with 2006
Yamaha 4 stroke, 451 GPS,
Alum trailer, Exc. Cond.
$8,500 207-350-0431

o1


1999, 90HP 2 STROKE MERC.
SS PROP, CENTER CONSOLE,
BIMINI, FF, GALV. TRAILER. PLUS
EXTRAS. $4,500/OBO SOLD
SOLD SOLD SOLD


ZU 199670 inurnlE.,Yi L1rrLH,
W/A cuddy Runs great trailer
$7200 obo. 941-979-0465.





21' FIBERGLASS DECK
BOAT Fast & Economical
Plaining. Haul Evinrude Fuel
Injected 175 HP. Lots of
Extras! $9,475 Tony 941-661-
7044 acceptmail@yahoo.com
WE-




21'WELLCRAFT Dual
Console 2004 200HP Yamaha
with trailer $17,500
732-241-3024


SSPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
i 7305^ i

2009 DODGE JOURNEY
3rd Row! Low Miles!
$13,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
yWILPE
LEXUS OF AAOTA
2013 CHEVY TAHOE
BLK., 4,005 MILES, $46,911
855-242-9258 DLR

PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


22' 2007 BENNINGTON Tri-
Toon, 150 Yamaha, Loaded!
Low Hours. Like New! Trailer.
$22,700 obo 941-423-3717


1988 FORD MUSTANG
Convertible, 61k original mi.,
everything original, full power. W BU CA
$5,600. 41-575-9023 WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Fmd it Inthe Frank 941-276-0204




SAVE THIS DATE:
SAT., 2/8/14
9:00AM-1 :00PM CPWAM


BOATS-POWERED
L 7330 ^

14' MCRAY FIBERGLASS
1999, 25hp Yamaha, Galv.
trailer, $2,950 941-445-4338
19' 1988 BAYLINER,
125hp Force motor & trailer
$3,200 816-315-3539


25' D/ LIne= rrTROPT
Walk Around, 1997. MERC.
225 EFI, CHART PLOTTER,
DEPTH GAUGE, VHF, FULL COCK-
PIT ENCLOSURE, RUNS GREAT.
$9,700 941-637-6443 OR
773-717-0919
SSAILBOATS
L 7331 ^

22' 1987 CATALINA 6hp
stroke motor, 2 sails, bimini.
$3,400 205-907-0928
L PERSONAL
WATER VEHICLES
^ 7332^^

1996 GSX SeaDoo 1997
GTI Bombardier SeaDoo,
double waverunner trailer.
Hand loading trailer. ALL for
$3000!! 812-354-7777 PC.

OUTBOARD/
MARINE ENGINES


3OHP EVINRUDE, low hrs.
Runs great! $8 -$750. 25HP
YAMAHA. 4 cyl, electric start.
Like new! $424 $1850. 941-
650-1258
MERCRUISER ENGINE 3.7
1988 fr barl carb elec ign altn
325 hrs $600. 941-258-5969.
MOTOR EVINRUDE 5OHP
Complete Motor For Parts
$495, 941-423-835
BOAT STORAGE/
DOCKING
^^, 7336^

SLIP, Water & Elec. 5 Min. to
Stump Pass. Up to 36' Boat.
Call for Details 941-460-9698

I MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
L 7338

03 AQUA-DUTCH inflatable
boat. 9' w/8hp Yahama. Used
5hrs. $1500 941-639-1630
BIMINI TOP blue with boot,
aluminum suppo $120 941-
828-1866
BIRD REPELLERS SCARE
EYE BALLOONS: PKG OF $25
941-575-8881
BOAT COVER blue, snaps, 2
poles, fits 16' $130 941-828-
1866
BOAT SEAT with clamp,
padded, New $90
941-423-9371
BOAT SEATS Back to back
lounge, white, $130 941-828-
1866
BOAT/MOTOR COVER Carv-
er USA 22' Skiff NEW $160
941-423-9371
CRUISAIR CARRY On A/C
unit Perfect, complete $395
941-676-0254
DOWNRIGGERS Walker -
SwivelBase- 24"Arms $200
941-539-4967





Thursday, February 6, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 23


MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
Z ,7338 ^
ELEC COOKTOP SEAWARD
RECESSED $45
941-637-7567
GARMIN 3006-C with arial
and chip Garmin $375 513-
368-7874
GAS TANK BRAND NEW 6
GALLON $40 941-828-1866
LADDER ARMSTRONG
BOARDING Ladder SL3-40
New $100 941-676-0254
LIFE JACKETS BRAND NEW,
type 1, 4 available $25 941-
828-1866
| CANOES/KAYAKS

Z 7339 ^

15' CHESAPEAKE
Kayak Light craft.
37 Ibs, epoxy ply $300
989-306-8110
SEVYLOR/KAYAK Inflatiable
10'. Incl. skeg, paddle $75
941-698-4103
O/B MARINE
ENGINE REPAIR
^^ 7340 ^

ENGINE 2-9.9 Mercury OBs
Parts Motors, not Running
$80.00 OBO 941-764-1524
F TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
^^ 7341 ^




/*isout
CARGO TRAILER 2014 Haul-
mark, 16' Dual Wheel, Cham-
pagne Color. Used Once. Incl.
Trailer Hitch & Sway Bar
$4000. Firm (860)-536-9563


TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
7341 i








| CYCLES/MOPEDS/
I SCOOTERS
4^7360 TalrRdPG


2004 HD H. rIV *rti,
21,000 mi, built motor, many
extras $9,000 941-639-0766


ed, 6000 Miles, Loaded with
Options, Englewood $20,500
810-845-7590
ATV/MOTORCYCLE JACK
Craftsman, aluminum jack.
$50 941-460-8338
BOOTS HARLEY-DAVIDSON
Womens boots 9 1/2 Excl.
Cond. $35 941-993-9856
[S HARBOR
SCOOTERS
FOR ALL YOUR
SCOOTER
NEEDS...


3315 Tamiami THI. PG
We Repair Scooters too!
941-347-8705
MOTORCYCLE HELMET Ful-
mer af 20 very good cond
black $40.00 941-993-9856


SCYCLESMOPEDS/
I SCOOTERS I
^^ 7360^^

SOLD



URAL 750CC w/ Fact. side
car. Fun Ride! 2170. mi, Like
new. Health causes sale.
$5,900 sold sold sold

TRAVEL TRAILERS
^^ 7370 t


200UU4 u30' bth Wneel, good
cond., 2 slides, new carpet,
slider seals, awning & steps.
Roof/AC warranty. No mold.
Everything works. Hitch incl
$9750 863494-0471
2007 LINX FLEETWOOD
2007 5th wheel, all upgrades!
Incl. 1 Shed, Lot 178 @
Toby's, Lot Rent Pd. thru 8/14
$10,000 obo 863-444-1631
2011 COUGAR Extra lite 5th
whl, loaded, 1 ownr, must see!
$19,500 OBO 941-258-6519
2012 34' SABAR, 3 slides,
pwr jacks & awning, fireplace.
Non smoking, no pets. Like
new! Book price $38K, asking
$26,700!!! 731-740-2666 PC




-I
2013 5TH WHEEL, Losing
Thousands! 2 ACs, 2 Slides.
Many Extras! 813-699-2262
2014 44' Premier Elite 5th
Wheel, 2bd/2ba, fiberglass, all
options. Must See! $47,500
OBO 941-894-5219


L MOTOR HOMES/
I RVs
^^ 7380 ^

2004 GULFSTREAM CON-
QUEST Imtd. 31k, tires lyr
old, Prestine cond. 26' Class C
$24,995 OBO 941-423-7771


38, 4 siaeoul, Every
Upgrade, Excl. Cond., Must
Sell $31,000 616-813-9227





I LOVE MY
RV SALE
6 D^^s ONLY


* Motor Homes
* Trailers
* 5th Wheels
* Van Campers
Bring your Trade,
Title & Payment Book!
$AVE
BIG NOW

R.V. World Inc. of
Nokomis
2110 Rt 41, Nokomis,
FL 1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com


L MOTOR HOMES/
I RVs
Zi^ 7380^i

2007 Holiday Rambler 5th
wheel, 3 slides, 32 ft. Priced
to sell $15,500. 518-260-
3016
2012 MASTER TOW car
dolly, rarely used. $850.
Venice 413-530-4692
2014 WINNEBAGOS
2013 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld Inc.of Nokomis
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

HOLIDAY RAMBLER
A MUST SEE MOTOR HOME
MANY MODELS
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182







LUXURY MOTOR HOMES
2014 MODELS UP TO 45
COME SEE........LETS TRADE!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

RV Collision Repairs
Customer and Insurance
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182


MOTOR HOMES/
I RVs
7380 ^i






RV SERVICE SPECIALS
Factory Warranty
All models
RV Wash
Wash & Hand Wax
Brake Flush
New Tires & Balance
Roof Reseal
RV Propane & Bottles
Water Leak Test
Lg. Parts Showroom
RV WORLD INC. of Nokomis
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182

RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/rADE
CALL: MARK
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY ONNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
SATURN TOW-CARS
Starting at $2,500. Blue-Ox
Tow hitches sold & installed.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980
(941) 627-8822.
WANTED All Motor
Homes, TT's, 5th whls, Pop-
Ups, Vans conversion & pas-
senger, cars & trucks. CASH
paid on the spot for quick
sale. 941-347-7171
|RV/CAMPER PARTS
L 7382 ^

RV HEADSETS $45 910-
713-9909
1 Employ Classified!


J/)


Want to know what's going on out on the

water? Then you need to read Southwest Florida's


# ., ,


WZLE&i





The Sun Classified P,:J:J& 2-1 I I' ILiji ~:1:~ F~LrIj,:Jr ilL' I-I


VISIT OUR INVENTORY ELIMINATION SALE ON THE FAIRGROUNDS
JANUARY 31 THRU FEBRUARY 9 10AM 7PM DAILY


"_ SALE PRICE PLUS TAX. TAG. TITLE AND S599 DEALER FEE. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.

10% OVER 150
^. IU /u ^W^'^ Pre-Owned andl
SFINANCING 2013, Newinvenuory
I souR GOAL!o. ON SITE!


i-i-i-i-i- i -


jU Enter to Win a 5 day / 4 night Caribbean Cruise
NAME


ADDRESS


PHONE


AUTO MALL


* E-MAIL
.ii i i i ,'i--{\ i i J


Pal AutoMal t he haloteContyFarrond
RT#76/S233ElJobanRdin or halot *94-39115* www.PElamutgalo


- i


moos..^.
SEDONA^^^


The Sun Classified P :,JJ+ 2J ,i: 1 i


Thur .,.:J,:J, F-t;,n,.j,:", ,:, 201-j


,.,. ', -._jr, r"e t


2003 FQRD
EXPEDITION .1




Full Text

PAGE 1

Charlotte SunAND WEEKLY HERALDCLASSIFIED: Comics 11-14 | Dear Abby 14 | TV Listings 15 THE SUN: Police Beat 3,7 | Obituaries 5 | Legals 6 | Viewpoint 8 | Opinion 9 VOL. 122 NO. 37 AN EDITION OF THE SUN AMERICAS BEST COMMUNITY DAILYTHURSDAY FEBRUARY 6, 2014www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00 20 percent chance of rain76 57 High Low Look inside for valuable couponsThis years savings to date ...S UN COUPON VALUE METER CHARLIE SAYS ...Ya gotta regatta.INDEX | 705252000258 Daily Edition $1.00 $14,274 POPE UNDER PRESSURE CVS SNUFFS OUT TOBACCOCVS Caremark Corp. is removing tobacco products in an effort to focus more on being a health care provider. Pope Francis came under new pressure Wednesday to punish bishops who covered up for pedophile priests.THE WIRE PAGE 1 Pick of the DayFender acoustic guitar and case, $400In Todays Classifieds!SPORTS: Lotto 2 THE WIRE: Nation 2 | State 3 | World 5 | Science 5,8 | Business 6-7 | Weather 8 CALL US AT 941-206-1000 THE WIRE PAGE 1 THE WIRE PAGE 1 I read your Publishers Inbox column this morning. Just to let you know, I am one of those people who reads the newspaper every day. My husband teases me if I cant read the paper, I am out of sorts. A year or so ago, there was an item in the Charlotte Sun that the newspaper was working on making it available to people who want to read the electronic edition on an iPad, or iPhone. As yet, that has not happened. Can you explain why? I know you have an explanation on the home page of the electronic edition that it needs a flash drive in order to read. Since I travel a fair amount, I prefer to take my iPad with me, rather than the MacBook as it is lighter, smaller and easier to deal with. Since iPads are becoming so popular and used more often by more and more people, isnt there an answer to this? When away, I miss not reading the Sun each day. And as my family will tell you, when I cant read my newspaper, I can get grouchy. NJ NJ, if a reader is grouchy, it is usually my fault. Never more true than in this case. When the Southwest Florida economy started freefalling in 2007, we stopped spending money on discretionary items. We knew we had 27 very old computer servers hosting our software. In 2007, it was either replace the servers or keep more employees on staff. We chose the employees. Not replacing the servers in 2007 meant we could not upgrade many of our software packages because the servers could not handle the demands of the newer software including our electronic edition software. We also were patching the computers with duct tape and paper clips because Dell no longer supported anything that old. We watched the economy hit bottom in 2009 and gradually begin to struggle upward. We kept our wallet firmly in our pocket. Our servers became 10 and 12 years old. The duct tape was wearing thin and we had to double up on the paper clips holding the computers together. About six months ago, we finally felt confident enough to make a major investment in new servers. We are replacing our 27 servers with just two very large computer servers. They are not physically large but cost-wise large enough to buy a house in North Port, Englewood and Port Charlotte and have money left over to buy a nice used car for each house. The new servers will be installed by the end of February. We will begin porting our existing software over the month of March. In April, we will begin upgrading our software, with the e-edition leading the pack. Unfortunately, last week the paper clip holding our 12-year-old server hosting our e-edition failed. The e-edition was down for two days. We hope you will be able to enjoy the e-edition on your plane trips very soon. You were more gentle with your question as to why we waited so long than perhaps some of my employees might have been. David Dunn-Rankin is president and publisher of the Sun. Email him at daviddr@sun-herald.com.Electronic edition DavidDUNNRANKINPRESIDENT AND PUBLISHERPUBLISHERS INBOX Sails up for annual regatta More than 100 sailors, many of whom have been shivering through a bitter northern winter, will converge on Charlotte Harbor this weekend to participate in the fth annual Charlotte Harbor Regatta. Racing is set to begin for several classes Friday, and the regatta will expand to three race circles stretching across several miles Saturday and Sunday.By BRIAN GLEASONSTAFF WRITER Sails up for PHOTO PROVIDED BY CHARLOTTE HARBOR REGATTAHobie 16 sailors start a race during the 2013 Charlotte Harbor Regatta. The Hobie 16 class is one of 11 competing in the fthannual regatta, which will involve more than 120racers on 80boats on Friday, Saturday andSunday. For information, go to www.charlotteharborregatta.com. WHERE TO WATCHRacing begins at 11 a.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m. Saturday and 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Best onshore vantage points will be Fishermens Village, Gilchrist Park or Bayshore Park. Port Charlotte Beach Park is a popular place to watch boats launched prior to racing.REGATTA | 10PORT CHARLOTTE For more than a decade, Lobo a friendly Mexican gray wolf much of Charlotte County would come to love was busy most days visiting schools, veterans events, nursing homes, fundraisers and other community gatherings. Wednesday, more than 50 some in tears gathered at Douglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Nursing Home in Port Charlotte to pay their re spects to Lobo, who was put down Jan. 23 due to illness. He was 15.Veterans pay respects to wolfBy ADAM KREGERSTAFF WRITERSUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGERA crowd of more than 50 gathered Wednesday at the Douglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Nursing Home in Port Charlotte to pay their respects to Lobo, a 15-year-old Mexican gray wolf who was put down Jan. 23 due to illness. Vietnam veteran Tom McCarthy took in the wolf 13 years ago, and has been taking him around Port Charlotte for more than a decade, visiting other veterans, schools, nursing homes and other community events. PUNTA GORDA A city contractor hired to do drainage improvements along the Harborwalk, east of the downtown, mistakenly chopped hundreds of feet of mature mangroves in an area ofcials say was clearly off limits. At a City Council meeting Wednesday, City Engineer Mark Gering told council members some 1,680 square feet of wetlands had been virtually wiped of trees over the weekend after workers from Quality Enterprise USA, the Naples-based contractor awarded the $1.47 million Contractor mauls mangrovesBy BRENDA BARBOSASTAFF WRITER SUN PHOTO BY BRENDA BARBOSAWorkers are clearing away a swath of mangroves along the Harbor walk east path in Punta Gorda, in preparation for the citys downtown ood-mitigation project. Monday, ocials discovered the city contractor hired to do the work chopped down a section of trees it shouldnt have.MAULS | 10 WOLF | 10NORTH PORT Sarasota County School District officials confirmed that five teachers at Lamarque Elementary School called 911 Wednesday to report they had fallen ill, with two of the teachers transported by ambulance to the North Port ER, and one driven in a car to an area facility for treatment. Although two of the instructors returned to the classroom, all five teachers were lightheaded and dizzy, according to North Port Fire Marshal Michael Frantz, who added that all five calls came within an hour and a half of one another. Frantz added that the teachers were experiencing symptoms similar to those who suffer from high blood pressure. Frantz said city and county emer gency personnel attempted to locate the source of a reported odor in the school using specialized equipment, but came up with nothing during their search. We know theres some ongoing issues at the school but our meters have stayed nice and steady so far, Frantz said. North Port and Sarasota County emergency personnel were joined by school district officials and North Port police at Lamarque Elementary Wednesday, with as many as six Five teachers fall illBy DREW WINCHESTERSTAFF WRITERSarasota cant find cause of sickness at LamarqueLAMARQUE | 10 JK`3"^876107582fl1S1! 13OI21S $g427EO5OO8 96464Wt -gL: ` ''$3 7.>_ -mac_.r-xr+-y ,.._...-r. T ... sue' .-,s,. --+r_ _AY{X,r f, !. "IJ Cam' 'a _liii IIII II 1111111

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Our Town Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014 The SUN (USPS 743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin .....................941-206-1001 Publisher ................................... David Dunn-Rankin .....................941-206-1003 Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter .................................941-206-1134 Advertising Director .................. Leslee Peth ..................................941-205-6400 Circulation Director ................... Mark Yero ....................................941-206-1300 Arcadian Editor ......................... Susan E. Hoffman ........................863-494-0300 Arcadian Publisher .................... Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300 Charlotte Sun Editor .................. Rusty Pray ...................................941-206-1168 North Port Sun Publisher .......... Steve Sachkar ..............................941-429-3001 North Port Sun Editor ................ Lorraine Schneeberger ................941-429-3003 Englewood Sun Publisher ......... Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031 Englewood Sun Editor ............... Clinton Burton ............................941-681-3000 SUN NEWSPAPERSMember of the Audit Bureau of Circulation SUBSCRIPTIONS Home Delivery Rates: Newspaper designated market: City ZoneCarrier home delivered 7 days. Rates as follows plus 7% Florida Sales Tax: Monthly Bank/ Credit Card .........................$16.47 3 Months ............................$66.51 6 Months ..........................$113.05 1 Year ...............................$197.69Does not include Waterline and TV Times. Above rates do not include sales tax.Subscribers residing in outlying areas may incur additional delivery charge. DESOTO COUNTY RATES Monthly Bank/ Credit Card .......................$16.40 3 Months ..........................$74.09 6 Months .......................$119.54 1 Year .............................$196.70 Arcadian home delivery $29.99 per year. Mail subscription rates: Rates as follows (advance payment required): 7 Days 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $120.88 $216.81 $386.10 Sunday Only 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $58.81 $110.56 $186.19 Single Copy rates Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00 Unclaimed account balances under $10, inactive for 15 months, will be used to purchase newspapers for classroom use. CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe or to report any problems with your service, please call or visit your local office. Englewood: 941-681-3000 120 W. Dearborn St. Charlotte: 941-206-1300 23170 Harborview Rd., Port Charlotte North Port: 941-429-3000 13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port DeSoto: 863-494-0300 or toll-free at 877-818-6204 108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia GOVERNMENT TODAYMarine Advisory, Committee Pre-Agenda meeting, 9:30 a.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Bldg. B, Rm. 106-B, PC. 764-4909. Charlotte Ranchettes, Street and Drainage Unit Advisory Committee meeting, 10 a.m., 7000 Florida St., PG. 575-3613. Board of County, Commissioners Pre-Agenda meeting, 1:30 p.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Bldg. B, Rm. 106-B, PC. 743-1944. Tropical Gulf Acres, Street and Drainage Advisory Committee meeting, 3:15 p.m., 7000 Florida St., PG. 575-3613. Construction, Industry Licensing Board meeting, 6 p.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Room 119, PC. 743-1245. EVENTS TODAYAmerican Legion Cafe, Now serving bfast/lunch 7a-2p. Thu-Sun. Public welcomed. Thanks for supporting our vets & community 2101 Taylor Rd 639-6337 Project Linus, Quilt blankets for kids every Thurs. 9-11am Huckys Softball Training 17426 Abbott Ave 9-11am Nancy 627-4364 Sierra Club Paddle, Sierra Deep Creek Paddle 9-3 led by Master Naturalist. Reserve req. 941-637-8805 Deep Creek Elks 2763, Lunch With Kathy 11-2:30, Initiation @ 7pm FOE Eagles #3296, Eagles offers Lunch Mon-Fri 11am-2pm. Dinner Tue-Sat 5-8pm. Music 6:30-9:30pm.23111 Harborview Rd, 941-629-1645 8th Annual Harbour Heights 5K Run/Walk, Run/Walk event to raise funds for Autism Speaks and SEC classes at 5 CC Schools. Event date is Feb. 22; preregistration is 7am, race starts at 8am. 27420 Voyageur Dr., PG. Price: $15 in advance until 2/8, $20 day of the event. Awards in 20 age groups, raffles, giveaway gifts, refreshments. 258-2890. The Best Valentine Gift Ever, On Feb. 12 through Feb. 14, The Suncoast Statesmen Barbershoppers will provide a quartet to sing two love songs, present a rose and take a photo for a unique singing Valentine. Surprise your sweetheart at home/work or at whatever time & place you choose in Charlotte County for only $40. 625-1128. San Antonio Trash and Treasure Sale, San Antonio Annual Trash and Treasure Sale, 8 a.m. to 12 noon, Sat., Feb. 8, 24445 Rampart Blvd., PG. Largest rummage sale of the county! Under one roof. All are welcome. For info, call 941-613-5909. Photo Scavenger Hunt, Scavenger Hunt, 9-11:30am, Sat., Feb. 8, New Hope Christian Fellowship (Liberty Elementary), 370 Atwater St., PC. Support military families in need. Proceeds benefit Operation Homefront. Clues given event day. Individuals $7; Teams $25/car (5 people). Prizes top 3 teams-back by deadline. 916-5239. Gifted Gator Lunch Fashion Show, 10:30 a.m., Thurs., March6, Mardi Gras Fashion Show Luncheon at the PGI Civic Assn, 2001 Shreve St., PG. This unique event has live models presenting artisans hand-crafted wearable art; home dcor art; and gifts. Open to the public. Purchase $20 ticket at the PGICA; www.pgica.org; 941-637-1655. Dianas Wire Wrapped Jewels, From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tues., Feb. 11, Diana Reinhart, celebrated artist, will demonstrate how she creates her beautiful wire wrapped jewels. Free and open to the public at the PGICA, 2001 Shreve St., PG. www.pgica.org; 941-637-1655. 40th Anniversary Concert, Charlotte County Concert Band celebrates 40 years of making music at an anniversary concert on Sun., Feb. 9, at 2p.m., at the Cultural Center of Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St., PC, featuring guest vocalist 14-year-old Hannah Jae. $11 CC members; $12 others; $13 day of show. 941-625-4175. FOE Eagles #3296, We invite you to stop in for dinner Feb. 6 & listen to the great duo sounds of It Takes 2. If busy, then come in Fri., Feb. 7, for a fish fry dinner & listen to the one man show by Bill Bower. Dinner 5-8pm; music 6:309:30pm. Accepting member applications. 23111 Harborview Rd., PC. 629-1645. Irish Club Meeting & Open House, Meeting and potluck dinner will be held at 5 p.m., Tues., Feb. 11, at 4500 Harbor Blvd., PC. Irish Club free open house will be held from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Sat., Feb. 15, at 4500 Harbor Blvd., PC. Music by Stephens Green. For info, call 941-204-2088. Tea Party General Meeting, PG Tea Party Monthly meeting Thurs., Feb. 6. Doors open 6 PM; Meeting starts 6:30 PM, Charlotte Park Civic Association Bldg., 420 Pompano Terrace, Punta Gorda. John Stahl speaks on Immigration. Open to Public. No Charge. 941-655-8627. Featured EventsPAID ADVERTISEMENTS EVENTS TODAYCrafty Ladies, Handcrafted items every Thursday 9-11:30am (except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533 Ewd Country Liners, 9:3011:30 AM, Christ Lutheran Church, 701 N Indiana Ave. Begin/intermed. line dances. Public welcome. Nancy 474-6027 Line Dancing (Beg), 9:30to 11:30 American Legion Post 113 3436 Indiana Rd Rotonda West Phone Eve at 941-697-8733 Parkinsons Exercise, Increase strength & coordination. Improve speech & clarity. $5. Sports Complex 10am call Carol 475-2123 for info. Plant Clinic, 10-Noon, Got a plant/tree problem? Bring in a sample to be identified @ New Englewood Library, 3450 S McCall 475-6903 Lemon Bay Fest, Englewood Beach next to the playground story and craft 2/6/14 10:30 am 941-681-3736 Story Time, Thursdays 11am Stories, rhymes, music & play for children of all ages. Elsie Quirk Library, 100 W Dearborn 861-5000 Entertainment, V.F.W. Englewood, Music by Dick Rivers and Suzy 5-8 p.m.! Baby Back Ribs 5-7p.m.!, Public Welcome. 474-7516 Post Game Night, Indoor Corn-hole games 5-10 pm, food 5-8 pm, 3436 Indiana Rd., 697-3616 AL Post 113. Golden Girl Play, Billery Dean Mystery Play, tkts: 2/$10, 1/$8 7pm Green St. Church, 4743764 reserv FRIDAY Crafting Cuties, Love to Craft? Join us at Rotonda W Comm Ctr, 3754 Cape Haze Dr, Rotonda,Fridays @9:30 am. Call Elaine at 697-0212 Line Dancing (Intr ), 9:30to 11:30 American Legion Post 113 3436 Indiana Road Rotonda West Phone Eve at 941-697-8733 Lemon Bay Fest, The Roaring 20s in Charlotte County Elsie Quirk Library 2/7/14 10:30 am 941-861-1200. Seafood Dinner, Mike & Carols famous Seafood Dinners and meatloaf dinners. 4:30-7:30 pm 3436 Indiana Rd, 697-3616. AL Post 113. Ukrainian Dinners, Friday 4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call about takeout. St. Marys Church at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00 423-2427. Entertainment, V.F.W. Englewood, Music by Kenny Rose 5-8p.m.! Fish Fry or Wings 5-7 p.m.! Public is, Welcome to come enjoy! 474-7516 VFW Seafood Night, VFW 10476 3725 Cape Haze Dr 5-8 The best fresh haddock shrimp or scallops in the area $10+ 697-1123 VFW Karaoka, Karaoke w/ DJ Ray after dinner service 6:30-10 VFW Post 10476, 3725 Cape Haze Dr, Rotonda 697-1123 Golden Girl Play, Billery Dean Mystery Play, tkts: 2/$10, 1/$8 7pm Green St. Church, 4743764 reserv Post Dance Night, Dance with Just Duet 7-10 pm, AL Post 113, 3436 Indiana Rd. 697-3616 a smoke free Post. SATURDAYHuge Rummage Sale, Huge Rummage Sale at Holiday Estates I&II, 1445 Seagull, Englewood. 7:30amNoon, Sat. Feb.8th. Open Kitchen too. Pancakes and More!, 7:30-11:30 am, egg & sausage/ biscuits & gravy/or quiche & fruit; $5/$3 kids. EUM Church, 700 E. Dearborn, 474-5588 Legion Breakfast, AL Post 113, 3436 Indiana Rd. 697-3616 offers $5 Breakfast 8-12 noon. Tarpon Ecology, 830-11am 3120 Gasp Pines Blvd No reser 276 233 6364 Guided walk to Lemon Creek seining EUMC Farmers Market, 9am-1 pm Farmers Market. EUMC, 700 E. Dearborn, 474-5588. Organic produce, natural foods, art, crafts, more! Lemon Bay Fest, Cracker Fair Pioneer Plaza 2/8/14 10 am 4 pm Vendors, music, food and more. 941-473-8491. Art with Carolyn, Create an art project, ages 5-11 registration required scgov.net/library Elsie Quirk Library 100 W Dearborn 861-5000 Lemon Bay Fest, Florida Birds of a Feather crafts Elsie Quirk Library 2/8/14 10:30 am 941-8611200 online registration required. | NORTH PORT EVENTS GOVERNMENT TODAYDRC meeting, Development Review Committee, 9am, Conference Room 7, 1001 Sarasota Center Blvd., Sarasota. 861-5000 Planning & Zoning, Advisory Board meeting, 9am, North Port City Hall chambers, 4970 City Hall Blvd., off Sumter Blvd. 429-7000 ESLOC meeting, Enviro Sensitive Lands Oversight, 2:30pm, County Admin Center, Think Tank, 1660 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota. 539-4083 Planning Commission, meeting, 6:30pm, Robert L. Anderson Admin Center, 4000 S. Tamiami Trail, South Venice. 861-5000 EVENTS TODAYFree Tax Help, 9am-1pm, every Thurs., AARP Tax-Aide, San Pedro Catholic Church Activity Center, 14380 Tamiami Tr., NP Jazzercise, 9-10am at the Morgan Family Community Center, call 941-429-7275 for more information. Table tennis, 9-11 am, North Port Senior Center, 4940 Pan American Blvd., equipment, provided, $2.00, 426-6276. Turbo Kick, Turbo Kick 9:30-10:30am at the Morgan Family Community Center, call 941-429-7275 for more information. Current Events Conv, 10-11:30am NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd 426-2204 bring a topic or joke or just come & discuss Discussion Group, 10 AM, North Port Library, 941-861-1307, Every Thursday bring a news article to share. Zumba Gold, 11-11:45am at the Morgan Family Community Center, call 941-429-7275 for more information. AMVETS 312 Euchre, Euchre starts at 11:30am 7050 Chancellor Blvd. 941-429-5403 NARFE Chapter 1713, 11:30 AM speaker at each meeting., Call 240-6127 for more info Mexican Dominoes, 12-3pm NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd 426-2204 Come learn the game & join all the fun Rummage Sale, Early Bird Sale $1 admission 3-6pm NPCUCC 3450S Biscayne Dr NP 426-5580 All welcome! AMVETS 2000 Dinner, LAUX Roast Pork Tenderloin 4-7pm $7. Members/Guests welcome. QOH @ 7pm. 401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999 Bingo VFW 8203, Bingo is fun for all ages, come and enjoy excitement of the game. Come try your luck, you mite even WIN a game or two Aux Chicken Parm, On 2/6 @ 6pm 6648 Taneytown st 941-4237311 Serving Fresh Homemade Chicken Parm heros, $6 w/dessert Zumba, 6:30-7:30pm at the Morgan Family Community Center, call 941-429-7275 for more information. FRIDAY Basic Exercise, $40/8wks or $2/class 9-10am NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd Marcelle 235-0346 Join today & start to feel better Take Out, Pierogies/Kielbasa, Every Fri. 10am-6pm Sat. 10am-1pm. St. Andrew Ukr. Ctr. 4100 S. Biscayne Blvd. North Port. 941-786-5256 Free Tax Help, 10:30am-2:30pm, every Fri., AARP Tax Aide, North Port Senior Center, 4940 Pan American Blvd., NP Tai Chi, 10:30am-12pm NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd Call for cost Jerry 496-4932 Helps with balance Lunch VFW Post 8203, Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues, Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special in canteen Book Discussion, Discuss Heart a Lonely Hunter, C. mccullers. no.port Library 13800 S Tamiami Trl. Fri Feb.7, 3-4:30pm 861-1300 All Welcome Ukrainian Dinners, Friday 4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call about takeout. St. Marys Church at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00 423-2427. Elks 2153 fish fry, AYCE FISH+full menu-5-8pm. Just Friends Karaoke. Members & Guests 625-7571 Kenilworth, Port Charlotte Elks Fish Fry Post 8203, Come and enjoy the best Fish Fry in town, your choice of Bake, Fried or Chicken, Shrimp and all the fixings | ENGLEWOOD EVENTS | CHARLOTTE | EVENTS FAIR SCHEDULEThe Charlotte County Fair runs through Sunday at the Charlotte County Fairgrounds, 2333 El Jobean Road (State Road 776), Port Charlotte. Showtimes Tricky Dogs Show: 5:15p.m., 7:30p.m. and 9p.m. Friday; 1:30p.m., 4:30p.m. and 7:15p.m. Saturday; and 12:30p.m. and 3p.m. Sunday. Great American Frontier Show: 5:30p.m. and 8p.m. today; 6:30p.m., 9p.m. and 10p.m. Friday; 2:30p.m., 5:30p.m. and 9p.m. Saturday; and 1:15p.m. and 4:30p.m. Sunday. Wolves of the World Show: 6:30p.m. and 8:30p.m. today; 5:30, 7p.m. and 9:30p.m. Friday; 3:30p.m., 6:30p.m. and 9:30p.m. Saturday; and 2:30p.m. and 5p.m. Sunday. Fair schedule and ride promotions Today: Open 5p.m. to 10p.m. Ride all rides from 5p.m. to 10p.m. for $15, admission not included. Friday: Open 5p.m. to 1a.m. Ride all rides from 5p.m. to 1a.m. for $20, admission included. No-ride general admission is $5. Saturday: Open noon to 11p.m. 4-H/FFA day free admission with 4-H/FFA card, pin and shirt; others: ride all rides from noon to 6p.m. for $20, admission not included. Sunday: Open noon to 6p.m. Student day free admission for all students and school employees with a valid ID; others: ride all rides from noon to 6p.m. for $15, and regular adult admission is $5. Regular gate admission Adults, $7; students, $5; children 5 and younger, free. Parking: $5 Agriculture shows Open breed show: 7p.m. Friday. Auctions/sales all Saturday Small animal auction: noon. Buyers barbecue: 2p.m. Large animal auction: 4p.m. SARASOTA COUNTY A regional discussion on homeless issues; a potential bus route connecting Port Charlotte, Englewood and North Port; River Road and an update on the RESTORE Act all headline Fridays joint meeting of the Sarasota and Charlotte County commissions in Venice. Dr. Robert Marbut of Texas, a national expert on homelessness brought to the area last year by Sarasota County and the city of Sarasota to help come up with a plan to combat one of the regions growing problems, will lead a presentation on his 50-plus-page report to the boards. Marbut said that Englewood leads Sarasota County in homeless families, fol lowed closely by North Port and Nokomis. According to his report, there are 348 homeless families and 637 homeless children in the county. Marbut has said the best way to deal with homeless issues is to use a regional approach, which is why, Sarasota County Commissioner Christine Robinson said, the item was placed on Fridays agenda. The homeless issue knows no boundaries, Robinson said. The homeless problem for families in particular has been identied as specically problematic in the most southern areas of our county ... Obviously, that would cross over into Charlotte County. Last fall, Robinson moderated a discussion at the South County Tiger Bay Club where Marbut was giving a presentation on his ndings about a month prior to the release of his report. Robinson invited Charlotte County Commission Chairman Ken Doherty, who had indicated that Charlotte wanted to be involved in the conversation and kept up-to-date with the issue, to that meeting. Doherty, who was unavailable for comment Wednesday, said in October that Englewood provides a great oppor tunity for both boards to work together. Its amazing how this is all integrating and were nding all these families with children are having a rough time ... and its growing, Doherty said. Weve got a lot of work to do and the counties and cities need to get together. That joint meeting gives our staffs enough time to look at this and get together and see what we can do. In other business Friday, commissioners will receive an update on the progress of the RESTORE Act and discuss the potential for joint projects that would be funded from nes levied against BP following its 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico off Floridas west coast. The federal Resources and Ecosystem Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities and Revived Economies Act directs a share of the nes resulting from the Deepwater Horizon disaster to the affected areas. Ofcials estimate anywhere from $5 billion to $20 billion in RESTORE funds could be coming to the state. Sarasota County Commissioner Nora Patterson and Charlotte County Commissioner Chris Constance represent the two counties on the Gulf Consortium, which represents Florida as a watchdog for RESTORE. Sarasota, Charlotte and Manatee counties are among the 23 Florida counties affected by the BP oil spill. Also on Friday, commissioners will discuss two transportation issues impacting the area, including a proposed public transit bus system that would link North Port, Port Charlotte and Englewood. Future River Road improvements also will be discussed. The joint meeting of the Sarasota and Charlotte County commissions gets underway at 1 p.m. Friday at the Robert L. Anderson Administration Center, 4000 S. Tamiami Trail, South Venice.Email: slockwood@sun-herald.comHomeless help to headline joint meetingBy SCOTT LOCKWOODSTAFF WRITER In the CLASSIFIEDS! Find The Perfect Companion Honor your passed loved ones anytime with a personalized memorial tribute. Call (941) 206-1028 for rates. Memorials in the Sun 110SUN4\ IFW,SPAPt:)

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The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C Our Town Page 3 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS ENGLEWOOD Authorities need help to catch a pair of suspects who reportedly broke into Kings Pawn early Tuesday and stole guns. Two suspects wearing hoods and gloves entered the shop, at 2485 S. McCall Road, around 3 a.m., according to the Charlotte County Sheriffs Ofce. Several rearms were missing from a smashed display case. The glass front door was broken out. The suspects were caught on camera pulling up in a dark vehicle. Anyone with information is asked to call the CCSO at 941-639-2101, or Crime Stoppers at 800-780-TIPS (8477).Mans Harley stolenPORT CHARLOTTE Somebody stole a mans 1986 Harley-Davidson FXRS motorcycle when he left it on the side of the road Saturday afternoon after it had broken down, according to the Charlotte County Sheriffs Ofce. The victim was riding from North Port to Port Charlotte when his bike broke down around 1 p.m. near Biscayne Boulevard and Ellington Street in Port Charlotte. The man left it to get his truck and trailer to retrieve his ride, only to come back and nd it missing. The motorcycle is black with a one-piece carbon seat with black ame stitching and a short passenger backrest. The mirrors had skeleton-hand frames. The bikes tag is 18896L. Anyone with information can call the CCSO at 941-639-2101, or Crime Stoppers at 800-780-TIPS (8477).Report: Woman uses scissors to threaten manSOUTH VENICE A 51-year-old woman was arrested Tuesday after she allegedly employed scissors to threaten a man. According to a Sarasota County Sheriffs Ofce report, the 32-year-old victim was talking on the phone in the kitchen of a home on Osage Road in South Venice just before 1 p.m. When he put the phone down, the report states Melodie Gay Gradert, 51, grabbed a pair of black-handled scissors and put them up in the air like she was going to stab the victim. The man told deputies that Gradert also pushed him and said, Ill kill you. The report doesnt state what spurred Graderts actions toward the victim. Gradert was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. She was held at the Sarasota County Jail without bond.Report: 15-year-old broke into homes, fledPORT CHARLOTTE A 15-year-old breaking into a neighbors home Tuesday on Laramore Avenue was seen by a young boy who reported the incident, according to a Charlotte County Sheriffs report. When deputies responded to the area around noon, the suspect was spotted on LaSalle Road, the report shows, and he ed. The teen was able to duck authorities for more than three hours by jumping fences and running between houses, but he eventually was caught near Midway Boulevard and Page Street around 3:30 p.m., the report shows. Detectives reportedly were able to link the suspect to three previous burglaries on Laramore Avenue. In all, the teen was charged with four counts of burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, two counts of petty theft, and one count each of burglary of an occupied dwelling, grand theft, dealing in stolen property, criminal mischief over $1,000, giving a false name to law enforcement and resisting an ofcer. He was turned over to the Department of Juvenile Justice on Wednesday. The Charlotte County Sheriffs Office reported the following arrests: Kristina Dawn Jongsma, 37, 11900 block of Casandra Ave., Englewood. Charge: DUI. Bond: none. Priscilla Lin Stryder, 41, 300 block of Fairhaven St., Port Charlotte. Charges: taken off bond on three counts. Bond: none. Jonathan Robert Powers, 37, 1600 block of Inverness St., Port Charlotte. Charges: grand theft, fleeing to elude and resisting arrest. Bond: $12,500. Danny Lee Coleman, 24, 23300 block of Abrade Ave., Port Charlotte. Charges: out-of-county warrant. Bond: $5,000. Robert Dominic Sirangelo, 30, 18100 block of Charter Ave., Port Charlotte. Charge: violation of probation (original charge: DUI). Bond: none. Calvin Antonio Cornelius, 21, 2400 block of Achilles St., Port Charlotte. Charge: violation of probation (original charge: driving without a valid license). Bond: none. John Joseph Sury, 28, 5200 block of Johnson Terrace, Port Charlotte. Charge: violation of pretrial-release conditions. Bond: none. Brian Randall Frost, 39, 400 block of Pennsylvania Ave., Osprey. Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond: $500. David Anthony Williams, 24, 5600 block of Spearman Drive, North Port. Charge: failure to appear. Bond: none. Richard Allen Charette, 60, 8500 block of Bumford Ave., North Port. Charges: possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Bond: $3,000. Jesus Gonzalez, 48, of North Fort Myers. Charges: driving with a revoked license, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $10,000. Kenneth Arthur Shelton, 72, homeless in Englewood. Charge: trespassing. Bond: $2,500. Hashem Brown, 20, 100 block of Green St., Englewood. Charge: failure to appear. Bond: $15,000. Juan Manuel Nava-Aquino, 30, of N.E. Oak St., Arcadia. Charge: driving without a valid license. Bond: $1,000. Tyler Ray Carlan, 22, 600 block of S. Orange Ave., Arcadia. Charges: two counts of possession of drug para phernalia, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of a controlled substance without a prescription. Bond: $12,500. Richard Lee Patterson III, 17, 1200 block of Slash Pine Circle, Punta Gorda. Charges: grand theft and violation of probation. He was released into home detention. Tyler Jay Brugman, 22, Colony Court, Punta Gorda. Charge: petty theft. Bond: $2,500. Jennifer Motta-Guedes, 32, homeless in Punta Gorda. Charge: violation of probation (original charge: petty theft). Bond: none. Stephen Maurice Barnes, 38, of Hollywood, Fla. Charge: DUI. Bond: none. Johnnie Kaye Parker, 35, 9200 block of Mandy St., Punta Gorda. Charge: burglary with assault or battery. Bond: $30,000. Kara Anne White, 23, 200 block of Corumba St., Punta Gorda. Charges: possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $7,500. Rashad Rasheem Meynard, 21, 1100 block of Rio de Janeiro Ave., Deep Creek. Charge: violation of probation (original charges: possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia). Bond: $1,000. Venecia Demek, 61, 17100 block of Sarong Lane, Punta Gorda. Charge: battery. Bond: none. Robert Allen Parker, 15100 block of Richmond St., Punta Gorda. Charges: possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, possession of methamphetamine with the intent to sell and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: none. Brandy Nicole Gibson, 29, 6400 block of Scott St., Punta Gorda. Charges: four counts of giving worthless checks. Bond: $40,000. Donald Lee McLucas III, 24, 500 block of Corto Andra St., Punta Gorda. Charges: possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana, possession of marijuana with the intent to sell and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: none. Patrick Charles DeRoche, 23, 2400 block of Sunshine Blvd., Punta Gorda. Charges: possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana, possession of marijuana with the intent to sell and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $12,500. Richard Raul Rendon, 28, 11900 block of Gretchen Ave., Port Charlotte. Charges: aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription, possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of probation (original charge: petty theft third or subsequent offense). Bond: none. Fernando Arturo Frometa, 32, 2300 block of Redstone Ave., Port Charlotte. Charges: possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, Authorities: Guns stolen from pawn shop | POLICE BEATThe information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriffs office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is determined by the court system.ARRESTS | 7 50462141 Afraid Of The Dentist? Have all your dental work completed and not remember a thing! (941) 429-5771 13801 S. Tamiami Tr., Unit B, North Port, FL 34287 www.celebritysmilesdentalcare.com *The fee advertised is the minimum fee charged. 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Our Town Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS PLACIDA How do you make history real for high school students? Lemon Bay High School plans to do so by inviting local veterans to share their experiences after a showing of the movie Honor Flight. Its bringing (in) history, making it real. (Students) have studied and read about it, but (this will) bring in a human element, said Michelle Wier, assistant principal at the school. The movie, released in 2012, is a documentary following four World War II veterans as a Midwest community honors them by ying them to Washington, D.C., so they can see, for the rst time, the monument dedicated to their service. Im glad I saw it in advance because now I know I will cry like a baby, Wier said. Its very touching. The showing, sponsored by Tidewell Hospice at 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota, is free and open to the public and will take place from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Feb. 13 at the Lemon Bay Performing Arts Center, 2201 Placida Road, Englewood. According to Dave Glaser, Tidewells director of communications, the movie was offered to it by the National Hospice Organization, which partnered with the lmmakers to offer the movie throughout the country. Weve gotten great reviews on the lm and thought it would be a great movie to show in Charlotte County, Glaser said. Tidewell chose the high school as a venue because of the oppor tunity to bring veterans and students together. Were really excited about (the showing), and I know (the school was) excited for us to bring it there. I think itll be a really good partnership and a lot of students will be there at the screening, he said. Following the movie, there will be a questionand-answer session so students can ask veterans about their personal experiences. Wier said the school has prepared questions to get the ball rolling, and Tidewell is providing an emcee to direct the event. She anticipates the forum will run from 10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.Email: iross@sun-herald.comHonor Flight showing at Lemon Bay High SchoolBy IAN ROSSSTAFF WRITERIF YOU GOWhat: Honor Flight (2012) a documentary that follows four WWII veterans and a Midwest communitys efforts to bring them to the Washington D.C. memorial created for them in 2004 followed by a question and answer forum. When: 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. (including Q&A) on Feb. 13. Where: Lemon Bay High School Performing Arts Center at 2201 Placida Rd., Englewood. Free admission. SARASOTA COUNTY It was seven years ago Thursday that the remains of a white female were found in a shallow grave near an industrial area in Sarasota, and she is still the Sarasota County Sheriffs Ofces only unidentied body, or Jane Doe. Investigators hope new technology and computer-related images will yield new clues, and will lead them to a crucial piece of information to nally give Jane Doe her real name and lay her to rest. Maybe it will ring a bell for someone, jar a memory said Maxine Miller, the SCSO crime scene technician who was the first to examine the body. Its important for us to figure out who she is. While that crucial piece of information still escapes them, what investigators do know is the woman was in her 30s or 40s at the time of her death, weighed 145 to 165 pounds, stood roughly 5 feet 4 inches to 5 feet 9 inches tall, and had long brown hair with blond streaks. Her cause of death has not been released, but she may have had a broken nose and a fractured right wrist at some point in her life. She also had breast implants that were manufactured prior to the issuance of serial numbers. Kids discovered her body on Feb. 6, 2007, on the 4300 block of Ashton Court, near Clark Road, according to SCSO spokeswoman Wendy Rose, and authorities believe she had been dead for up to a year at that point. The new images released Wednesday were created by the Palm Beach County Sheriffs Office, using craniofacial reconstruction software, updating the original sketches created by the FBI in 2007. Miller said several nationwide missing persons databases exist, with some being run by both authorities and the general public, many of whom are using the databases to share information about their missing loved ones. The new images will be shared on those databases, she added. Miller also said a stable isotope analysis of the victims teeth is being conducted to determine where Jane Doe was raised, and where she may have been living in the last seven to 10 years. Miller believes that at the time of her death, the victim had been in Sarasota County for a recent amount of time, and likely came from another area. SCSO Sgt. Kevin Pingle, the lead detective on the case, said it was hard to determine the amount of man hours put into the investigation so far, but like Miller, hes hoping the new information will shake loose some much-needed leads. If Jane Does family is out there, and theyre hoping to nd out what happened to her, Pingle wants these new images to help authorities reunite her with her family. Im always hopeful someone will recognize the picture and come forward, he said. Anyone with infor mation is asked to call SCSO Criminal Investigations at 941861-4900, or Crime Stoppers at 941-366TIPS (8477); or go to www.sarasotacrime stoppers.com.Email: dwinchester@sun-herald.comSCSO hopes new Jane Doe images spur leadsBy DREW WINCHESTERSTAFF WRITER PHOTO PROVIDEDThe Sarasota County Sheris Oce on Wednesday released new, computer-generated images of a woman whose remains were found in a shallow grave in Sarasota in February 2007. Detectives hope the release will help them identify the woman, known only as Jane Doe.RUBY TUESDAY GIVEBACK EVENTSRuby Tuesday restaurant in the Port Charlotte Town Center mall offers a Community GiveBack Program for area nonprofits, churches, schools and others. This is a great way to raise money for your cause while enjoying lunch or dinner, organizers say. Ruby Tuesday gives back 20percent of net sales to each organization. The following organizations have GiveBack events sched uled for this month. If you are interested in supporting any of these, visit the organizations website for a flier or contact the group/individual and request a flier to attend. Wednesday Charlotte Desoto Building Industry Association The mission of the Future Builders of America Learning Today, Building Tomorrow is to help students pursue careers in the building industry by providing education and technical training by awarding scholar ships, assisting in apprentice ships and job placement. Contact: Rick Ilmberger at suncoast_glass@yahoo.com. Feb. 15 Interna tional Angelman Day: Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics Contact: Kat Rankins at 630-852-3278 or kmrankins1@ gmail.com. Feb. 17 Port Charlotte Jewish Community-Temple Shalom Temple Shalom is awelcoming reform Jewish congregation that strives to meet the spiritual, educa tional, cultural and social needs of its members. Contact: Joyce Gelfand at jteachu@yahoo.com. Feb. 21 Habitat for Humanity Women Build Contact: Doreen Stoquert at dstoquert@centurylink.net or 941-276-6892. Feb. 26 American Cancer Society Relay for Life Relay for Life raises muchneeded funds and awareness to save lives from cancer. Relay for Life of Port Charlotte will be held April 12-13 at Port Charlotte High School. Contact: Ken Johnson at 941-625-1167, or visit www. relayforlife.org/portcharlottefl. National Art Exhibition setThe Ninth Biennial National Art Exhibition will be held from now through March 9 at the Visual Arts Center, 210 Maud St., Punta Gorda. A total of 130 works were selected from hundreds of artist entries from across the country. During the exhibit, the VAC will be open seven days a week. The arts center will Toast the Winners of the exhibition at 7 p.m. today. The 130 entries will vie for more than $7,000 in prize money, including $2,000 for Best of Show, based on judge Carl Samsons selections. The public is encouraged to attend the champagne reception to mingle with the artists and watch the winners re ceive their awards. Tickets to the awards ceremony cost $5, and may be purchased at the VAC. For more information, call 941-639-8810.Senior Center Chili Cook-offA Chili Cook-off contest will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 15 at the North Port Senior Center, located in the Community Educational Center at 4940 Pan American Blvd. Chili, beverages and condiments will be available. Chili will be prepared by Senior Center members and members of the community. Cost is $1 for each bowl of chili you want to sample. For more information, call 941-426-2204.Gourmet pasta dinnerKnights of Columbus plans its second gourmet pasta dinner of the year on Feb. 21 in the St. Raphael Church Parish Center, 770 Kilbourne Ave., Englewood. Tickets are $8 in advance and $9 at the door. Dinner will be served from 4 to 7 p.m. Attendees are urged to get their tickets early. The sale of tickets by members of the K of C will be conducted around the church the weekend of Feb. 16-17. Tickets will also be available in the church ofce until noon on Friday, Feb. 21. Tickets at the door will be limited. Contact Jim LeClaire at 941-475-2155.Pop Warner registrations setPop Warner will hold registrations for football and cheer from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. today, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, at the Charlotte Warriors home eld, 2610 Carmalita St., Punta Gorda. The leagues season runs from August to December. It is for boys and girls 5 to 15 years old. Football and cheer registrations cost $200. Additional times and dates for registration will be announced. For more information, call 941-347-7200. | COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS 50462290 This event is open to only non-modified vehicles and there is no registration fee. Owners that will exhibit at the newspaper must pre-register with Veteran Motor Car Club of America 941-235-7701 or 941-575-0202 (For Registration Only) (For Information Only) 24+ Trophies to be awarded One Trophy is over 4 Tall! Space restrictions allow for a total of 100 entries Vehicles must be 23 years old Sun Newspapers 23170 Harborview Road Port Charlotte Mid-Winter Open House & Collector Car Show Live Music from Power Outage Continues Guest Appearance by Las Vegas Performer Jimmy Mazz Saturday, February 8, 2014 9 AM to 1 PM at the Charlotte Sun 23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte ADMISSION IS FREE! Enjoy the vehicles that represent transportation of YESTERYEAR, including antique classics, sports, special interest, motorcycles and trucks that will be on display. Tours of Sun Newspapers office and plant 10:00am Noon See how your AWARD-WINNING NEWSPAPER operates! FOOD AND BEVERAGES AVAILABLE! 50466181 Jonathan McCartney D.M.D. 2569 N. 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The Sun /Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C Our Town Page 5 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS CHARLOTTE Richard C. DayRichard C. Day, 77, passed away Monday, Feb. 3, 2014, in Port Charlotte, Fla. He was born June 25, 1936, in West Palm Beach, Fla., and moved to Punta Gorda, Fla., in 1938. Richard is survived by his daughters, Susan Day Wells and Holly Day Smith; grandsons, Dalton Smith and Hunter Wells; great-grandson, Levi Smith; many nieces and nephews; along with special cousins, Gary Day, Ros Day, Warner Day, Jerry McLendon, Lucia Ann Ridlehoover and many others. He was preceded in death by his wife, Ruth Kidd Day; parents, George and Grace Day; sister, Billy Jean Bourgeault; brother, George J. Day; and great-grandson, Jared Ross Nieberg. A celebration of Richards life will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, at Charlotte Memorial Funeral Home and Cemetery, 9400 Indian Springs Cemetery Road, Punta Gorda. Following the service, his cremated remains will be carried on horseback to their nal resting place next to his loving wife at Indian Springs Cemetery. Friends and family then will return to Charlotte Memorial for food, fellowship and fun. In lieu of owers, the family asks that donations be made to: Tidewell Hospice, 1158 Veronica St., Port Charlotte, FL 33952; Charlotte County Cows n Plows, 30275 Beech Road, Punta Gorda, FL 33982; or Charlotte Senior FSA, 1250 Cooper St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950. Arrangements are by Charlotte Memorial Funeral Home, Cemetery and Crematory.Jack P. GilbertJack P. Gilbert, 88, of Punta Gorda, Fla., died Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, at his residence, under the care of hospice. Arrangements are by Charlotte Memorial Funeral Home, Crematory and Cemetery.Laszlo KolodyLaszlo Kolody, 81, of Port Charlotte, Fla., passed away Monday, Feb. 3, 2014. He was born Sept. 26, 1932, in Hungary. Laszlo immigrated to the United States from Hungary in 1972, to have a better life. He was a member of and very involved in the Hungarian Club of Venice, Fla. Laszlo loved his friends, and enjoyed dancing and shing. He is survived by his daughter, Maria Gal of Passaic, N.J.; stepsons, Peter (Janet) Ancsin and George Ancsin, both of San Diego, Calif.: grandsons, Laszlo (Kinga) Lenart of Chicago, Ill., and Tomas Lenart of Hungary; granddaughter, Maya Gal of Chicago; step-granddaughter, Elise Ancsin of San Diego; companion, Kristina Pingiczer of Port Charlotte; and two sisters of Hungary. Laszlo was preceded in death by his wife of 30 years, Elizabeth. A celebration of his life will be held at 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, at the Hungarian Club, 165 Jackson Road, Venice, FL 34292. Arrangements were made in Port Charlotte.ENGLEWOOD Marvin DemanzukMarvin Demanzuk, 94, of Englewood, Fla., died Monday, Feb. 3, 2014. Arrangements are by Lemon Bay Funeral Home and Cremation Services.Richard O. JoslynRichard O. Joslyn, 86, of Overland Park, Kan., died Wednesday, March 13, 2013, in Englewood, Fla. Arrangements are by Lemon Bay Funeral Home and Cremation Services.Richard C. LohmanRichard C. Dick Lohman, 90, a 40-year resident of Englewood, Fla., and for merly of North Royalton, Ohio, passed away Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014, at his home. He was born May 8, 1923, in Cleveland, Ohio. Dick was a World War II Veteran, serving in the Pacic, with the Army Medical Corps. He had a long, distinguished career in elementary education as a teacher, guidance counselor, principal and assistant superintendent in Ohio and in Englewood. Dick was a graduate of Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. He had a life of dedicated service to the communities of North Royalton and Englewood, with leadership in numerous professional education associations. Dick was an active member of the Kiwanis, The Salvation Army and the United Methodist Church. Grateful for having shared his life are his wife of 70 years, Dorothy; brother, David (Alta) Lohman; children, Rick Lohman and Lynn (Thomas) Lohman-Balamut; grandchildren, Melissa Lohman, Amanda (David) Yeu and Lesley Balamut; great-grandchildren, Evelyn and Annie Yeu; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by parents, Joseph and Berniece Lohman; sisters, Joyce Hardy and Jeanne Wyman; and brother, Joseph Lohman Jr. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014, at Englewood United Methodist Church in Englewood. Interment is private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the United Methodist Mens College Scholarship Fund, Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., Englewood, FL 34223. Arrangements are by Lemon Bay Funeral Home and Cremation Services.NORTH PORT Virginia LathamVirginia Latham, 81, of North Port, Fla., and formerly of St. Louis, Mo., died Monday, Feb. 3, 2014. Arrangements are by Farley Funeral Home.Thomas Vito Armando Christopher PaladinoThomas Vito Armando Christopher Tom Paladino, 84, of North Port, Fla., passed away Monday, Dec. 30, 2013, in the loving arms of family in Denver, Colo. He was born June 15, 1929, in New Rochelle, N.Y., the 10th child of 13, to Guiseppe and Giovannia (nee Avallone) Paladino. Thomas met his wife Maureen Riley on a golf course in Hollywood, Fla. They married Dec. 28, 1957, and were married 53 years until Maureens death in 2011. Thomas was a parishioner at San Pedro Catholic Church, he was a 50-year PGA cardholder, and was an avid reader who enjoyed philosophy, literature, history, music and all sports. He was also closely attached to his grandchildren, and in his last weeks, he visited and spent individual time with each one. Thomas is survived by three children, Lisa Fortier of Aspen, Colo., Thomas J. Paladino of Sarasota, Fla., and James Paladino of Faireld, Conn.; and six grandchildren. There will be a Mass of Christian Burial for Thomas at 10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 17, 2014, at San Pedro Catholic Church. Please send any contributions to the St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, in Toms memory. Dad, we know that you are not gone, just gone ahead, and someday we will all be together.Donald H. Thomas Jr.Donald H. Thomas Jr., 76, of North Port, Fla., passed away Friday, Jan. 31, 2014, at TideWell Hospice House. Arrangements are by National Cremation Society of Port Charlotte, Fla. | OBITUARIESNancy Jean AlbertsonThe Queen Angel has gone to Heaven. While her time here was short, December 6, 1949 to February 3, 2014 (age 64) we are forever grateful for the time she gave us. Nancy proudly lived in Charlotte County for 45 years alongside the love of her life, Reece. Nancy was best known for her family values and her commitment to her husband, daughters and granddaughters. She will be remembered for her attention to detail and making everything she did so unique and over-the top. Nancy was the denition of a classy, glamorous lady. With an amazing sense of humor and a personality that was truly bigger than life, she made everyone around her feel so special. Her strong will and determination was admired by all. Nancy certainly accomplished anything and everything she set her mind to. To know Nancy, was to love Nancy for sure! With accomplishments and achievements too numerous to mention, Na