Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00240

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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h arlotte Sun
i' Af i .V


VPick of the Day
S Foreman grill, $20
In Today's
Classifieds!
AND WEEKLY
HERALD


SPRING PREVIEWS EVIDENCE COMPROMISED THEIR
Softball and tennis kick off the high school spring The FDLE is investigating a lab after discovering
sports season this week. SPORTS PAGES 10-11 cases where pain pills were swapped [or O1( pills. __. ,


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


SUNDAY FEBRUARY 2, 2014


RE PAGE 1


www.sunnewspapers.ne


GOOD MORNING


Looking for sunshine
in State of Union

It was an hour and five minutes,
including lots of applause time. The
president delivered his State of the Union
speech Tuesday.
For delivery style, I rated it close to Bill
Clinton or Ronald
iReagan. What impact
it will have on life
3 here in Southwest
Florida was my
H ~ parochial interest.
The speech
was upbeat and
conciliatory in
tone, and may set
the stage for some
Derek modest compromise
legislation, includ-
DUNN-RANKIN ing immigration
CHAIRMAN reform. But recent
history suggests not
much will change during the rest of his
administration.
The president announced that on new
government contracts there would be a
requirement that the minimum wage be
$10.10 an hour. This is not likely to have
a very big impact. When I was an Army
private, a week or two peeling potatoes
or picking up cigarette butts was part of
the package. These days, government
contractors are likely to be performing
the kitchen police duties. Some of their
employees may be making less than
$10 an hour. A number of states have
increased the minimum wage beyond
the federal mandate of $7.25 an hour. In
Florida it is $7.79. Arguments against an
increase in the minimum wage suggest
it will eliminate many entry-level jobs,
particularly for teenagers. As employee
costs go up, employers invest in ways to
lower labor requirements.
The current federal rate, when adjust-
ed for inflation, has changed little since it
first was introduced at 25 cents an hour
in 1939.
My first salaried job as a teenager
was at a Miami auto parts supplier,
Patten Sales Co. It paid 35 cents an hour.
Adjusted for inflation, that would be
$4.53 an hour today.
Seven years later, when I went to
work for the St. Pete Times in 1951, my
$35-a-week pay was about 87 cents an
hour. Adjusted for inflation, it is within
a few cents of today's federal minimum
wage.
Adding a new position of cub reporter
in the newsroom was not a big risk at
that rate. I rented a room for a summer
rate of $10 a week. Not much has
changed over the years. Many of the
minimum-wage jobs go to teenagers
or those just entering the workforce.
Until group insurance became such a
big expense, it was not very risky to add
another employee.
The president called for reinstatement
of lapsed long-term unemployment
benefits. There are many breadwinners
in need of help, but there is a flaw in
the unemployment insurance system. If
you were earning $25 an hour, and find
yourself getting by on unemployment
at the equivalent of $6.50 an hour, you
are likely to pass up $9- or $10-an-hour
jobs. That is only a plus of $3 an hour,
and involves transportation and other
expenses. It is no wonder many are still
out of work after months of looking for a
position similar to the one they lost. On
the other hand, there are families that are
in desperate shape when the unemploy-
ment checks stop.
The president promised to work with
Congress on the tax code to bring jobs
back from overseas. It seemed to be one
suggestion that might garner bipartisan
support and really help our economy.
Leaders of the Senate and House, Vice
President Joe Biden and Speaker John
Boehner made an interesting on-camera
pair seated behind the president. If you
didn't see it, Boehner was not a happy
camper. He expressed his disapproval
with an immobile frown or scowl during
much of the delivery. The vice president
resembled a college cheerleader clap-
ping and leaping to his feet to lead the
applause breaks.
Derek Dunn-Rankin is chairman of
the Sun Coast Media Group. He can be
reached at derekdr@sun-herald.com.


'Super' experience for NFL vets


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
Like millions, the chairman and
CEO of Kitson & Partners
-which owns Babcock
Ranch, east of Punta
Gorda plans to watch
the Super Bowl XLVIII in
the comfort of his home.
However, Syd Kitson,
55, will watch in a way
KITSON only a handful can.
"I'm very proud to
have played in the National Football


INSIDE
Estero High School and University of Central
Florida graduate Matt Prater is Southwest Florida's
lone representative in the Super Bowl; plus an
expanded game preview
See Sports, page 1
League," he said recently.
Kitson played on the offensive line
for the Green Bay Packers from 1980 to
1984, and was briefly with the Dallas
Cowboys in 1984. Playing in the NFL
is a rare experience, and one that


afforded Kitson the chance to view
games in a distinctive light.
"When you look at the game, you
certainly have a different perspective,
because you've had a chance to be on
that football field and understand it,"
he said. 'And I really like to look at the
offensive line play, probably more than
most people."
But watching the Super Bowl brings
up mixed emotions for Kitson.
"For those of us who didn't play in a
Super Bowl, you always wish you had,"
NFL113


A day at the fair


SUN PHOTO BYTAMI GARCIA
Alisa Moore and her 2 1/2-year-old son, Walter, prepare to take a ride on the merry-go-round during opening night Friday of the Charlotte County
Fair in Port Charlotte. The fair continues through Feb. 9. See the remaining schedule, page 16.


Annual event brings new memories and old


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE Surrounded
by rides on all sides, it didn't take long
Saturday for Jennifer and Darling Hale
to have their stomachs churning, heads
swimming and eyes popping out. And
they aren't even taking in the rides at
the Charlotte County Fair.


But the Englewood couple are trying
to keep track of the six children they
brought, including three of their own,
who are. Two are riding the Himalaya,
another two are on the Dragon Wagon
and ... here come the others.
"This is family fun. It doesn't get any
better than this," Jennifer said.
The Hales come to the fair every
year, deciding to attend Saturday to


Driver damages


train tracks


By ANNE KLOCKENKEMPER
STAFF WRITER
DESOTO COUNTY- A
20-year old North Port man
lost control of his vehicle
and struck railroad tracks
in the early hours Saturday,
causing a track to come out
of alignment.
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report,
Joseph Franks III was driving
east on County Road 760A
at about 2 a.m. As he ap-
proached a slight curve in the
road before the train tracks
just east of U.S. 17, he failed
to negotiate the curve, hitting
the steel railroad tracks with
the front and undercarriage


of his 2010 Nissan Altima.
The car came to rest on
the east side of the road,
after also running through a
ditch.
Seminole Gulf Railway,
based in Fort Myers, was
advised that one of the tracks
was out of alignment, and
told FHP it would have some-
one out to repair the damage
later Saturday morning.
Seminole Gulf Railway's
corporate office was closed
Saturday, and no one could
be reached for comment.
Franks wasn't injured, and
alcohol was not a factor in
the crash, the report states.
Charges are pending.
Email: aninek@sun-herald.com


take advantage of the special $20 price
for unlimited rides. Again, not for
themselves.
"It's all about the kids," Jennifer said.
"The parents care about the food, but
the kids like the rides."
Ah, yes, the food.
Funnel cakes, elephant ears,
FAIR 116


Mooring stirs waters

on Lemon Bay


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
ENGLEWOOD -
Dennis Young and Mike
Dodds enjoy living
aboard their vessels
in Chadwick Cove on
Lemon Bay.
Young and Dodds -
and other boaters who
do not live aboard their
vessels but moor them
in Chadwick Cove see
no need for Charlotte
County to establish a
managed mooring field
there in Lemon Bay.
But the county's
Beaches and Shores, and
MOORING 113


JOINT MEETING
TO DISCUSS
MARINE ISSUES
The Charlotte County
Beaches and Shores, and
Marine advisory committees;
and the Parks and Recreation
Advisory Board are scheduled
to meet and discuss Stump
Pass, a managed mooring field
in Lemon Bay, Bay Heights
and other issues at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at the Mid-County
Regional Library, Room C,
2050 Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port
Charlotte. For more informa-
tion, call Pam Alexander at
941-764-4909.


INDEX I THE SUN: Police Beat 4 Obituaries 5,71 Viewpoint81 Opinion 9-10
I THE WIRE: State 21 Nation 3,5,71 Science 61 Travel 61 World 7,9-101 Weather 10


Sunday Edition $2.00

7 052520007li i i
7105252 00075 3


Partly c


:"-" Look inside for valuable coupons --"'"
High Low This year's savings to date 1
82,62 coupo $12P514 '
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CLASSIFIED: Comics 161 Dear Abby 17-181 TV Listings 19
SPORTS: Lotto 2
CHARLIE SAYS...
CALL US AT Go team! Do the thing! Score
941-206-1000 the points! Yay!


AN EDITION OF THE
VOL. 122 NO.33


S $2.00
*t $2.00










February is PC month at Renaissance Academy


ith the rapid
advances in
technology of
the last couple of de-
cades, personal comput-
ers became a ubiquitous
and, yes, an essential
part of life.
By 2011, 75.6 percent
of American house-
holds reported owning
a PC, compared with
just 8.2 percent in
1984, according to the
U.S. Census Bureau.
Sometime in 2014, the
2 billionth PC will be
installed somewhere
in the world, with the
growth rate for new
installations expected to


FGCU
Herald
Court
Centre
Rick Ramos




continue at 12 percent
per year, according to the
technology research firm
Gartner Inc.
Whether you jumped
into PCs with a 1984
128K Macintosh, or
you're a newcomer with
a brand-new Dell Intel
Quad Core Processor,


Florida Gulf Coast
University's Renaissance
Academy in downtown
Punta Gorda has a
hands-on computer class
for you in February.
For advanced PC users
interested in Adobe
Photoshop image-editing
software, Spencer Pullen
will facilitate "Photoshop
Elements I," a short
course slated from
10 a.m. to noon Monday,
from Monday through
Feb. 24. Participants
will learn how to use
the Organizer to file
photos for fast and easy
retrieval, and Adobe
Camera Raw to gain


access to a variety of raw
image formats. They'll
also learn how to crop,
straighten and resize
images, adjust levels of
brightness and contrast,
and compensate for "red
eye" in portraits.
Novices and begin-
ners alike will find Lisa
Ashley's "Computers 101"
a useful primer to the
world of PCs from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. Thursday,
from Thursday through
Feb. 27. Participants
will learn the basics of
starting up, setting up
and making the com-
puter work for them.
Despite today's more


user-friendly operating
systems, some people
remain intimidated by
computers.
"They're afraid of
messing something up,"
Ashley said. "I'm going to
try to get people com-
fortable setting up their
computer and using it.
We're also going to show
them what areas not to
go into."
Participants will
learn how to set up the
desktop background
with a picture of choice.
Laptop owners will learn
how to adjust the power
settings so "the computer
isn't going to sleep every


five minutes or running
its battery down," she
said. Ashley wraps up
the course with a class
devoted to "fun things on
the computer," such as
downloading and playing
games, and writing effec-
tive Internet searches.
For fees or other
information about
these courses, call
941-505-0130.
Rick Ramos is a
program coordinator
at FGCU's down-
town Punta Gorda
Herald Court Centre
Renaissance Academy.
He can be reached at
rramos@fgcu.edu.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* TODAY

American Legion Cafe,
2101 Taylor Road, serving breakfast/
lunch 7 am-2 pm,Thu-Sun. Public
welcome. Thanks for supporting our
veterans and community. 639-6337
Marketplace @ 103,
7 am-2 pm, local fruits, vegs, plants,
crafts, books, fishing supplies and

SUBSCRIPTIONS
Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $16.47
3 Months............................ $66.51
6 Months.......................... $113.05
1 Year ............................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.................... ...... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates as
follows (advance payment required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months IYear
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5p.m.
Monday- Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204.You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


more! 2101 Taylor Road. 639-6337
Farmers Market, History
Park, open every Sunday 9am-
2 pm, 501 Shreve St., between
Virginia Avenue and Henry Street.
941-380-6814.
FOE Eagles 3296, Lunch
Mon-Fri 11 am-2 pm; Dinner Tue-Sat
5-8 pm; Music Wed-Sat 6:30-9:30 pm;
23111 Harborview Road, Charlotte
Harbor. 941-629-1645
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Celebrate Super Sunday with us.
Buffet of very tasty food, party starts
at 6 pm
Punta Gorda Elks, noon
Bar open; 2-5pm wings and rings;
1 pm Tiki bar open; music by Island
Vibe; 6pm Super Bowl Party
American Legion 103,
Dart Tournament 1-4 pm. 501 Soft
Tip $3 per rd. Win cash and meet new
friends! All skill levels. 2101 Taylor
Road, PG. 639-6337
Happy Hips, 1-3 pm, $35.
TheYoga Sanctuary, 112 Sullivan St.,


PG. Open to public
Garden Tour, Guided tour
at History Park, 501 Shreve St., PG,
2 pm, $5 suggested donation; Q&A.
380-6814.
Two-piano Concert,
concert of classical two-piano music
at 3 pm, Conference Center, Cultural
Center. $10. 625-4175.

* MONDAY

Fungi & Mushrooms,
Free program by Bruce Kuechmann @
CHEC, 10941 Burnt Store Road, PG,
9 am, 941-575-5435.
FOE Eagles 3296, Lunch
Mon-Fri 11 am-2 pm; Dinner Tue-Sat
5-8 pm; Music Wed-Sat 6:30-
9:30 pm; 23111 Harborview Road,
Charlotte Harbor. 941-629-1645
Punta Gorda Elks, 11 am-
2 pm light lunch; 4:30-8 pm chicken
night; 6:30-10:30 pm Karaoke with
Billy G; 4 pm Tiki bar open
Four Leaf strummers,


SUN NEWSPAPERS
---Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation J6
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................Chris Porter .................................941-206-1134
Advertising Director .................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-205-6400
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero .................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor .........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
Arcadian Publisher.................... Joe Gallimore .............................. 863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray ................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher.........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................941-681-3000

CONTACT US WITH YOUR NEWS: Email Charlotte Sun Editor Rusty
Pray at rpray@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1168, or email Deputy
Charlotte Editor Garry Overbey at overbey@sun-herald.com or call
941-206-1143. Fax to 941-629-2085. On Saturdays, contact Assistant
Charlotte Editor Marion Putman at mputman@sun-herald.com or
941-206-1183, or the newsroom at 941-206-1100. On Sundays, contact
Garry Overbey or call the newsroom. Circulation director MarkYero,
941-206-1317. Business news email business@sun-herald.com or call
941-206-1121. Consumer advocacy email dmorris@sun-herald.com or
call 941-206-1114. Obituaries call 941-206-1028 or email obitu-
aries@sunletter.com. Religion/church news or events mputman@
sun-herald.com. Editorial letters- email letters@sun-herald.com or
write: Letter to the Editor, c/o Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road,
Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. Puzzles- 941-206-1128. Classified ads -
866-463-1638. Subscriptions For missed papers, or to put your paper on
hold, call 941-206-1300. Display advertising 941-206-1214


performs at Fishermen's Village, center
Stage, 11:30am-1pm. 639-8721
Fun with Music, an
afternoon of music, dancing and fun,
I pm, Centennial Hall, Cultural Center.
$2.625-4175.
Monday Night Dance
Party, an evening of music and fun,
7 pm, Centennial Hall, Cultural Center.
$5.625-4175.
Photo Arts Group, of
Charlotte County, 7 pm, Public
is welcome to share photos and
knowledge. Free. Visual Arts Center,
210 Maude St., PG

* TUESDAY

Men's Club, Gulf Cove Methodist
Men, 8am, Stefano's Restaurant, 401 S.
Indiana, Englewood. 697-8373
Charlotte Woodcarvers,
and woodburning, Punta Gorda Boat
Club, W. Retta Boulevard, 8 am-noon.
Call Bob 391-5064 or stop by.
African-American Disc,
lOam, Mid-Cty Library. Join us in
discussion about search for African-
American roots. Register: www.
ccgsi.org or 613-3162
FOE Eagles 3296,
Lunch Mon-Fri 11 am-2 pm;
Dinner Tue-Sat 5-8 pm; Music
Wed-Sat 6:30-8:30 pm; 23111
Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor.
941-629-1645


Guided Nature Walk,
on one of the nature trails at CHEC's
Alligator Creek Preserve, 10 am. Call
941-575-5435.
Punta Gorda Elks, 11 am-
2 pm Lunch; 6 pm LBOD; 7 pm Lodge
Meeting
Elks Italian Night, Chef
Jeff's Italian Special @ Elks 2153,
5-8 pm. Happy hour until close.
Kenilworth Boulevard, PC. 625-7571
American Legion 103,
Bar Bingo @ 6 pm; 75% payout; 100%
on coverall! Public welcome. Help
us support our veterans! 2101 Taylor
Road.639-6337
Barbershop Rehearsal,
Chorus rehearsal every Tues., 6:30-


9 pm, Burnt Store Presbyterian
Church, 11330 Burnt Store Road, PG.
625-1128.
PGICA Beyond PGI,
Heleen Schouten presents her trip to
Spain, 7 pm, PGICA, 2001 Shreve St.,
PG. 637-1655. Free to public.

* WEDNESDAY

Woodcarving, and
woodburning, 8 am-noon, Cultural
Center. Come and enjoy with us. Bev
764-6452
Sierra Club Hike, at
Charlotte Flatwoods Preserve Hike,
8:30-11 am, led by Master Naturalists.
Reservations required. 941-639-7468.


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event;and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the"Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title," as that will be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the"Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the"Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


LIVE MUSIC & HORS D'OEUVRES


At Royal Palm Retirement Centre, our residents love living in our community.
They love not having to cook, clean or worry about who will help them if they
need an extra hand. We invite you to stop by and enjoy a sweet treat while
visiting with some of our residents to see what they love most!


Royal Palm Retirement Centre
Independent Living Assisted Living Memory Care
2500 Aaron Street, Port Charlotte, FL 33952
941-787-5142 I royalpalmseniorliving.com
ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY 3915


RMYAKKA RIVER

OYSTER BAR
Sfo Rand

Seafood Restaurant


Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday


Friday
Saturday
Sunday


All You Can Eat Fried Fish
Jumbo Beer Batter Shrimp
Crab Cake Dinner
Frog Legs Fried
Caribbean Chicken &
Coconut Shrimp
Lobster Stuff Fish
Ribs & Shrimp Dinner
All You Can Eat Mussel Pasta
Fried Waleye


$11.99
$11.99
$12.99
$10.99

$10.99
$11.99
$12.99
$10.99
$14.99


BMargaritas

Saturdaty1w/Meal Purchase






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Staring t 2IVi~~I Oe ody Tusa -


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The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS

Featured Events
Share the Love for the Kids Home Tour, Tour seven
PGI homes Feb. 15,10 a.m.-4 p.m. Begin tour and view raffle items at
Isles Yacht Club, 1780 W. Marion Ave., PG. Advanced $20 tickets at PGICA,
2001 Shreve St.; $25 day of tour. Lunch tickets available. Sponsored by
Beyond Ourselves. Proceeds: New Operation Cooper Street; Back Pack
Kidz. 916-9338.
Live and Silent Auction, to benefit Homeless Coalition of
Charlotte County and Unitarian Universalists of Charlotte County. Sat.,
Feb. 8,4-8 p.m. Food, beverages, fun, for a good cause. Entry fee $5,
1532 Forrest Nelson Blvd., PC. Contact: Herb Levin, 941-627-1557.
An Elixir of Love, The Charlotte Chorale "An Elixir of Love"
concert, followed by welcome reception for William Dederer, new artistic
director, and silent auction to benefit our H.S. scholarship fund.
Sat., Feb. 15,4 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 507 W. Marion Ave.,
PG. $20 adults; $10 students. 204-0033.


@
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The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


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:The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


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15 Florida Locations Featuring The Finest Quality Home Furnishings & Interior Design


PORT CHARLOTTE
4200 Tamiami Trail
(North of Kings Hwy.)
941-624-3377


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:Our Town Page 4 C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


Carlie Brucia remembered 10 years later


Provided by MAX WINTIZ
ABC-7

SARASOTA Saturday
marked the 10-year anni-
versary of one of the most







by Joseph S uph ner Bway
SCounty
history.
Feb. 1, 2004
Super Bowl
Sunday-
CARLIE 11-year-old
Carlie Brucia
BRUCIA was abducted
by Joseph Smith on her way
home from a friend's house.
The abduction was caught


on a surveillance camera
from the Evie's CarWash on
Bee Ridge Road. Smith later
would rape and kill Brucia,
strangling her and leaving
her body in a field behind a
church.
Smith, now 47, was con-
victed of Brucia's murder
and remains on Death Row.
The area in which her body
was found is now a garden
at Central Church of Christ
on Proctor Road in Sarasota.
"Because she has been
an inspiration to me of
what happened here, I
now recognize there are a
lot of vulnerable children
in our community," said


Rod Myers, the minister
at the church. "It's hard
to believe it has been 10
years.
Joy Most is now 21
years old, and was one
of Brucia's best friends
growing up.
"Me and my mom burst
out crying when we found
out," Most said. "I miss her,
and I'm always thinking
about her."
Also thinking about
her all the time is Brucia's
stepfather, Steven Kansler.
"I'll always have my
memories of her. No one
will take that away. You live
one day at a time," he said.


Four keys to life after 50- positively


By BILL JONES
SUN CORRESPONDENT

PUNTAGORDA- If
you're over 50 and worried
about your finances,
health, finding community
resources or staying active
in the community, Edison
State College is riding to
your rescue.
Edison, in partnership
with UnitedWay of Charlotte
County and the Friendship
Centers, will play host to a
Positive Aging Symposium
from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday at the college's
Charlotte campus, 26300
Airport Road, Punta Gorda.
Its theme: Four Keys to a
Healthy and Fulfilling Life
After 50.
According to Kathy
Silverberg, chairwoman
of the Friendship Centers
.... ==.MA


S4-H/FFA Day
Sat. Feb 8th
r Free Gate w/ 4H
FFA card, shirt, pin


r-

rl


1 ~ r 1 .


board of governors, the
symposium is planned
to be an "enlightening
day of programs aimed at
engaging older adults and
those who concentrate their
efforts on them.
"It's goal is to focus
attention on the older adult
population in Charlotte
County, and to showcase
the assets and resources
that can help local residents
make the most out of this
life journey"
The daywill be high-
lighted by four panel
presentations "in a relaxed
atmosphere where the
emphasis is on conversation
rather than presentations,"
according to Silverberg.
They are:
Financial Health &
Readiness, focusing on
special financial issues
facing older adults and


strategies to consider, 9 a.m.
to 9:45 a.m.
Health &Wellness After
50, advising how seniors
can be more proactive with
their physical and mental
well-being, 10 a.m. to
10:45 a.m.
Positive Preparation -
Knowing and Navigating
Community Resources,
promoting awareness of lo-
cal resources and supports,
11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Fulfillment After 50-
Community Opportunities,
dealing with the importance
of staying active and the
value of social and econom-
ic engagement, 12:30 p.m.
to 1:15 p.m.
Agencies taking part in-
dclude Senior Connections/
Area Agency on Aging,
Charlotte County Elder
Services, Tidewell Hospice,
OCEAN (Our Charlotte


VWhat an-
gers Kansler
is that Smith
remains on
Death Row.
b "When he
i is executed
and I get to
SMITH go up there
and watch
them, that will be my
closure. I'll feel she has
been set free. Right now,
I feel like she is floating
around up there and stuck
in limbo," Kansler said.
A candlelight vigil in
Carlie's honor was planned
Saturday night at Central
Church of Christ.


IF YOU GO
What: Positive Aging
Symposium
Where: Edison State College
Charlotte Campus, 26300
Airport Road, Punta Gorda
When: 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Friday
Cost: $10; must register by
Wednesday
RSVP/more info: Karen
Amador, 941-276-4075

Elder Affairs Network), the
Arts & Humanities Council
of Charlotte County, the
Cultural Center of Charlotte
County, VITA (Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance), the
Edison Lifelong Learning
Program and AARP
A registration fee of $10
will cover a continental
breakfast and a boxed
lunch. Registrations, due by
Wednesday, may be made
by calling Karen Amador at
941-276-4075.


Senior Day ,,$2oo
Sunday, Feb 2nd ADMITTANCE
ENTERTAINMENT PROVIDED BY: 4
BROWN SUGAR 2-4PM
Playing the best of Motown and the Oldies (


RIDE PROMOTIONS
Sun. Feb.2 Ride All Rides S15 Admission Not Included 12N-6PM Fli. Feb.7 Ride All Rides S20 Admission Included 5PM-1AM
Mon. Feb. 352Pei Rides S2... S2 Admission 5PM-1OPM 55 "NO RIDE" Gen. Admission
eTue. Feb. 4 RideAllRides $15 Admission FREE 5PM-1OPM Sat. Feb.8 Ride All Rides $20 Admission Not Included 12N-6PM
Wed. Feb.5 Ride All Rides $15 Admission Not Included 5PM-10OPM Sun. Feb.9 Ride All Rides $15 Admission Not Included 12N-6PM
Thurs. Feb. 6 Ride All Rides $15 Admission Not Included 5PM-10PM Siud.n, F,-BAdm,ion. Adult, $ 500

Show's Daily Free Shows with "
Paid Admission
isSun. Feb. 2
The Trickey Dogs Show 12:30,3:00 Mon. Feb. 3 Thurs. Feb. 6
Great American Frontier Show 1:30, 4:00 Great American Frontier Show 5:30,8:00
Wolves of the World Show 2:30,5:00 Wolves of the World Show 6:30, 8:30
Fri. Feb. 7 Sat. Feb. 8 Sun. Feb. 9
The Trickey Dogs Show 5:15,7:30,9:00 1:30,4:30,7:15 12:30, 3:00
Great American Frontier Show 6:00, 8:00,10:00 2:30, 5:30, 9:00 1:30, 4:00
Wolves of the World Show 5:30, 7:00, 9:30 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 2:30, 5:00
\ /i


AGRICULTURE SHOWS
Fri. Feb. 7 Open Breed Show 7:00PM
AUCTION/SALE
at. Feb. 8 Small Animal Auction 12:00PM
Buyers BBQ 2:00PM
Large Animal Auction 4:00PM

SPONSORED BY


AUTO MALL


FREE ADMISSION
to-tli FAIR.!
jjuesdy fbi y 5-0Opgo
Sponsored By:
-si -^ One
--, owze


AUTO MALL
CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN
CONCERT /
MUSIC PROVIDED BY; ,
tsCh Iott l- d ElVtind .|- v


Traffic enforcement

locations set


CHARLOTTE COUNTY
- Beginning Monday, the
Charlotte County Sheriffs
Office will increase
traffic enforcement at the
following locations:
Speed enforcement:
Kings Highway, Port
Charlotte.
Boca Grande
Causeway, Englewood.
Traffic light/stop sign
enforcement:
U.S. 41 and Port
Charlotte Boulevard, Port
Charlotte.
State Road 776
(McCall Road) and
San Casa Boulevard,
Englewood.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Byron Lenier Harris, 26, of
West Palm Beach, Fla. Charge:
failure to appear (original charges:
counterfeiting a pay instrument with
the intent to defraud, and fraud by
uttering a false bank note, check or
draft). Bond: none.
Steven Christopher Grandi, 32,
ofVineland, N.J. Charge: disorderly
intoxication. Bond: $500.
Ronald Joseph Grandi Jr., 33, of
Fort Lauderdale. Charge: disorderly
intoxication. Bond: $500.
Keshav Narotam Patel, 56,1500
block of Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda.
Charge: violation of probation (original
charge: DUI). Bond: none.
Shaun Clifford Johnson, 29,2200
block of Ednor St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: habitually driving with a
revoked license. Bond: $2,500.
Ciara LynneMatusik,18,20300
block of Gentry Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charges: grand theft and
fraud presenting false ID in regard
to regulated metals). Bond: none.
Ryan Anthony Signore, 27,900
block of Jarvis Terrace, Port Charlotte.
Charges: violation of probation and
petty theft (original charge: petty
theft). Bond: none.
Christopher Duncan Spangler, 47,
400 block of N.W. Cypress Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: resisting an officer
and failure to appear (original charge:
driving with a suspended license).
Bond. $5,000.
Randall Scott Redmond, 48,2200
block of Picnic St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of probation (original
charge: petty theft). Bond: $1,175.
Christian Marie Ricewick, 33,
21100 block of Bersell Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: grand theft,
organizing theft and dealing in stolen
property, and presenting a false
verification statement to secondhand
dealer. Bond: $30,000.
James Wayne Ellingsworth,


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gath-
ered from police, sheriff's office, Florida
Highway Patrol, jail and fire records. Not
every arrest leads to a conviction and
guilt or innocence is determined by the
courtsystem.
56,1100 block of Harbor Blvd.,
Port Charlotte. Charge: disorderly
intoxication. Bond: $1,000.
Scott Loyd Perry, 42,21000
block of Jerome Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: aggravated battery causing
great bodily harm, aggravated battery
with a deadly weapon and battery.
Bond:none.
Peter Adrian Martiuk, 58,23100
block of Maclellan Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: interfering with the custody of
a minor. Bond: $2,500.
Nancy Elizabeth Canfield, 51,
2400 block of Elkcam Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Charges: resisting an officer
and disorderly intoxication. Bond:
$1,500.
Jesse Alexander Inlow, 20,400
block of Fountain St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Carleen Rose Tom, 34, homeless
in Port Charlotte. Charge: trespassing.
Bond: $1,000.
Howard Eli Williams Jr., 28, of
Palmetto, Fla. Charge: out-of-county
warrant Bond: none.
Jamie Michelle Potter, 24, of Fort
Lauderdale. Charge: violation of proba-
tion (original charges: hit-and-run/
leaving the scene of an accident
involving damage and driving with a
suspended license). Bond: $950.
Richard David Meiners, 35,
11100 block of Willmington Blvd.,
Englewood. Charge: DUI. Bond:
$2,500.
William Randy Miller, 48,200
block of Langsner St., Englewood.
Charges: violation of probation,
presenting noncurrentvehicle insur-
ance and driving with a suspended
license third or subsequent
offense. Bond: none.
Bruce Edward McCullough, 46,
700 block of Orchard Lane, Englewood.
Charges: two counts of possession
of a controlled substance without a
prescription, and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond: $6,000.
Rachel Veronica Hauser, 24,400
block of Fountain St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond:
$120.
Brad Alison Cumberledge, 50,
21100 block of Edgewater Drive, Port
Charlotte. Charges: DUI and driving
with a suspended or revoked license.
Bond: $1,750.
Lynne Michele lies, 61,400 block
of Orduna Ave., North Port. Charges:
possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond information was
unavailable Saturday.
Compiled by GaryRoberts


PAFIKIG
DUA -N SU January 31 February 9, 2014
jLocated on St. Rt. 776 (Across from Charlotte County
.^ Sports Park at the Charlotte County Fair Grounds) K ('



MIDNGHT AGICFRIDY Fe. 7t


FAIR HOURS
Sun. Feb. 2......................................... ....12N-6PM
Mon. Feb. 3 thru Thurs. Feb. 6............. 5PM-10PM
Fri. Feb. 7............................................ 5PM-1AM
Sat. Feb. 8...........................................12N-1 1PM
Sun. Feb. 9......................................... ....12N-6PM


Student Day -
Sunday, Feb 9th
Free Gate
Admission to all students
& Teachers w/ID Free
Admission


U SOUTI WEST FLORIDA
I ANKLE & FOOT
CARE SPECIALISTS


FREE FOOT & ANKLE


MEDICAL EXAM

Monday, Feb. 3rd -

Friday, Feb. 7th

Call and Come In for a Complete

Medical Exam with one of our Board

Certified Foot &Ankle Doctors.

Our Pod/atricPhysiciafns will be available to
answer any questions you may have.












JOSEPH KUKLA, DPM SOORENA SADRI, DPM

Call Today 941-624-2141
18308 MURDOCK CIRCLE UNIT 102
PORT CHARLOTTE

www.anklefootfl.com


:OurTown Page 4


C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


9


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES

Elizabeth Anne Meneely
Elizabeth Anne Meneely, 50, of Port Charlotte,
Fla., went to be with the Lord, Wednesday,
Jan. 29, 2014, under the care of Tidewell Hospice,
S surrounded by her loving family.
She was born Jan. 11, 1964, in
Brooklyn, N.Y., to her parents,
Ralph and Marie (nee Regolizio)
-. Colontonio.
Elizabeth moved to Port Charlotte
when she was 9. She graduated
j from Charlotte High School in
1982, and received, from Eckerd
College, her Bachelor's degree in 2005. She taught
at Keiser University, and worked for Charlotte
County, Fla., as IT Help Desk Support, and moved
into the position of Information Technology
Director for the City of Punta Gorda, Fla.
Elizabeth worked until her passing.
She so enjoyed life with her family, along with
pottery, painting, kayaking, photography, making
jewelry and traveling. Elizabeth will be missed by
all who love and know her.
She is survived by her father, Ralph (Mary)
Colontonio; mother, Marie Colontonio; her loving
husband of 23 years, John; daughter, Adrianne
Butwell; son, Donald Meneely; granddaughter,
Angelita Butwell, all of Port Charlotte; brother,
Frank (Bridget) Colontonio of Port Charlotte; and
sisters, Monica Macho of Fort Myers, Fla., and
Diane (Joe) Van Gyzen of Punta Gorda.
The family will receive friends and neighbors
from 2 p.m. until a funeral service to celebrate
Elizabeth's life at 4 p.m. Friday Feb. 7, 2014, at the
Charlotte Memorial Funeral Home Chapel, 9400
Indian Springs Cemetery Road, Punta Gorda.
In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made
in memory of Elizabeth Anne Meneely to Lung
Cancer Research, P.O. Box 495505, Port Charlotte,
FL 33949-5505.
Arrangements are by Charlotte Memorial
Funeral Home, Cemetery and Crematory.


CHARLOTTE


Sharon L. Cohn
Sharon L. Cohn, 74,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Monday,
Jan.27, 2014.
She was born April 16,
1939, in Brighton, Mich.,
to Orville and Anna Lois
Opperman.
Sharon is lovingly
remembered by her son,
David L. Cohn of Port
Charlotte; and her broth-
er, Gary E. Opperman of
Oklahoma City, Okla.
There will be a me-
morial service at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, at
Peace Lutheran Church,
21500 Gibralter Drive,
Port Charlotte. In lieu
of flowers, the family
suggests donations to
Tidewell Hospice Inc.,
1158 Veronica St., Port
Charlotte, FL 33952.

Leslie Correll Sr.

Leslie Correll Sr., 86, of
Punta Gorda, Fla., passed
away peacefully at home,
Wednesday
Jan. 29,
2014.
He
was born
2March 19,
1927, in
Valparaiso,
Ind., to
Edward
andVera
Correll.
n Leslie
served in
the U.S.
Air Force
during
World
B :..d War II and the
gre ;t-raKorean War.
He was the
owner of Les's
Radio and TV Service for
21 years. Leslie worked
for the Charlotte County,
Fla., School Board as a
school bus driver and
Inspector Mechanic of
the buses. He enjoyed
flying his airplane. Leslie
flew Civil Air Patrol
Sundown on weekends.
He is survived by his
wife of 66 years, Evelyn;
sons, Larry (Alice), Leslie
Jr. (Linda) and Jerry
(Kim); daughter-in-law,
Brenda; and numerous
grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
Leslie was preceded in
death by his son, Terry;
two grandsons, Tommy
and Billy; two brothers;
two sisters; and his
parents.
The family will receive
friends from 10 a.m. until


the funeral service at
noonWednesday, Feb. 5,
2014, at Kays-Ponger &
Uselton Funeral Home,
635 E. Marion Ave., Punta
Gorda. Burial will follow
at Royal Palm Memorial
Gardens in Punta
Gorda. Please visit www.
kays-ponger.com to sign
the online guestbook.
Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home.

James C.
Drummond
James C. Drummond,
88, of Port Charlotte,
Fla., went
to be with
Sthe Lord,
Saturday,
Jan. 25,
S2014, under
the care of
STidewell
Hospice,
and surrounded by his
loving family.
He was born March 31,
1925, in Cave Mountain,
West Moreland, Jamaica,
West Indies, to Zechariah
and Ellen Drummond.
Coming to the U.S.
in the mid-'50s, as a
farmworker in Florida,
moving to Brooklyn, N.Y.,
he worked in a steel and
wire company, until he
retired to Port Charlotte
in 1997. James was a
devoted member of the
Brooklyn Faith Seventh-
day Adventist Church,
as he faithfully served
as head Deacon. He was
also a member of the
Seventh-day Adventist
Church of Port Charlotte.
James is survived by
his loving wife of 23
years, Inez; sons, Earl
(Ada) Drummond, Leon
(Cynthia) Drummond
and Eldon (Patricia)
Drummond; daughters,
Reana (Todd) Jackson,
Lenna (Derrick)
Miligan and Valerie
(Ed) Washington; 19
grandchildren, 22 great-
grandchildren; two
great-great-grandchil-
dren; and many cousins,
nieces, nephews and
dear friends.
The family will receive
friends and neighbors
from 10 a.m. until the
service time of 11 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014, at
Seventh-day Adventist
Church, 2036 Loveland
Blvd, Port Charlotte.
Burial will follow at
Charlotte Memorial
Cemetery, 9400 Indian
Springs Cemetery Road,
Punta Gorda, Fla., with
Final Rest in the garden
Section Three Lawn
Crypt.


C.L. Earwood
C.L. "Charlie" Earwood,
89, passed away peace-
fully Tuesday, Jan. 28,
2014, at
his home
in Punta
Gorda,



S F along with his
his wife of



71and cyearegiver,



Tammy Ferran.
i Ann Allen



Charlie was bornwood,
i -- by his side,
.,-...::. along with his
granddaughter
and caregiver,
Tammy Ferran.
Charlie was born
March 4, 1924, in
Atlanta, Ga., where he
attended Commercial
High. After retiring as
Executive Vice President
from Life of Georgia in
1986, he relocated to
Punta Gorda to pursue
his passion for sports
car racing, boating and
fishing. He became in-
ternationally renowned
as a premier Road
Racing official through-
out the U.S., Canada
and the Bahamas, and
was inducted in both
the Sports Car Club of
America and Sebring
International Raceway
Halls of Fame as an offi-
cial, track manager and
ambassador to the sport.
Charlie was decorated
with four Bronze Medals
while serving with the
U.S. Army during World
War II.
He is survived by his
wife, Ann; sons, Terry
and Steve, who are also
in the racing industry;
three grandchildren;
five great-grand-
children; and one
great- great- grandchild.
A memorial service
will be held at 1 p.m.,
followed by a celebration
of his life, Saturday,
March 1, 2014, at Burnt
Store Presbyterian
Church in Punta Gorda.
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that you
make someone smile
today, as Charlie would
have.

Jennifer L.
Mathieu
Jennifer L. Mathieu,
40, of Port Charlotte, Fla.,


passed away peacefully
Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014,
in Port Charlotte.
She was born Sept. 2,
1973, in Milford, Mass.,
to Dean B. and Darlene
(nee Britt) Mathieu.
Jennifer, a former
Healthcare Medical
Assistant, moved to
Port Charlotte from
Northbridge, Mass., in
1986, as a young teen,
with her parents. She at-
tended Lemon Bay High
School, but transferred
to and graduated from
what was then Charlotte
Vocational-Technical
Center. Jennifer later
earned her Medical
Assistant certification.
She is survived by her
loving family, including
her son, Brian Dean
Mathieu; mother,
Darlene M. Mathieu;
maternal grandmother,
Yvonne Britt; aunt,
Wanda Boggs, all of
Port Charlotte; uncles,
Donald Britt of New
York, and Allan Mathieu
of California; several
cousins; and close friend,
GaryWasielewski of Port
Charlotte. Jennifer was
preceded in death by
her father, Dean; and
paternal grandmother,
Constance B. Mathieu.
A Memorial gathering
with a service will be
held from 1 p.m. to
3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8,
2014, at Roberson
Funeral Home's Port
Charlotte Chapel.
Friends may visit www.
robersonfh.com to sign
the memory book and
extend condolences to
the family.
Arrangements are
by Roberson Funeral
Home & Crematory, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Nina Pittock
Nina (nee Teal) Pittock
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
went to be with the Lord,
Tuesday Dec. 17, 2013.
She was a resident of
Willowick, Ohio, for 40
years. Nina was em-
ployed as a bus aide for
the Deepwood Center
of Mental Retardation
in Mentor, Ohio. After
retirement, Nina and her
husband enjoyed taking
cruises with her sisters,


or with their friends. After
moving to Port Charlotte,
one of Nina's loves was
being an active volunteer
usher at the Cultural
Center of Charlotte
County, Fla., Theater. She
volunteered along with
her sisters and friends,
and cared passionately for
all her friends there, where
she was truly loved.
Nina was the beloved
wife of Ronald; dear
mother of JeffreyW
(Tracy) and Lisa M.
(Scott) Duke; grand-
mother of Russell and
Clare Pittock, and
Danielle Duke; and sister
of Arline (her twin) (Don)
Chample, Donna (Frank)
Noewer and Glenice
(Robert) DiDio. She was
preceded in death by
her son, Ronald; and her
brother, Arthur Teal.
She loved all and all
loved Nina. She will be
dearly missed.
Services were held
in December in Ohio,
and there are no further
services planned. She was
laid to rest in Twinsburg,
Ohio, beside her beloved
son, Ronnie Ray. In
memory of Nina, memo-
rial contributions maybe
made to Susan G. Komen
Research at ww5.komen.
org.


Robert G. Plotz
Robert G. Plotz,
97, of Punta Gorda,
Fla., passed away
Wednesday, Jan. 22,
2014.
He was born Aug. 30,
1916, in Cleveland,
Ohio, and moved to
this area in 1995 from
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Mr. Plotz was retired
from an Engineer/
Sales role in the
Manufacturing Industry.
He was a member of
the Isles Yacht Club, the
Punta Gorda Isles Civic
Association and the
Elks.
Survivors include his
granddaughter, Wendy
(Joseph) Whitten of
Huntington Beach, Calif.
Memorial services
will be held from 2 p.m.
until 4 p.m. Thursday,
Feb. 6, 2014, at the Isles
Yacht Club in Punta
Gorda. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made
to Tidewell Hospice
Inc., Philanthropy
Department, 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, FL
34238.
Arrangements were
made in Port Charlotte,
Fla.

DEATHS|7


i| J"emorials i I/e Su1
B Honor your passed loved ones anytime
-J~lS "with a personalized memorial tribute.
y Call (941) 206-1028 for rates.


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Frank Ossmann Jr.
Frank Ossmann Jr., 90, of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
joined, in a peaceful manner, his wife of 64 years,
Irene, in heaven, Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, at his
S home, surrounded by his loving family.
.... He was born July 24, 1923, in New
'",A-> York City, N.Y., to Frank and Harriet
(neeWoebse) Ossmann.
His parents were both deaf and mute,
and Frank helped support his family through the
Depression years. Frank joined the U.S. Navy on
Aug. 7, 1941, right before the start of WorldWar
II. During his six-year Naval career, Frank was an
Aircraft Mechanic, and a Tail Gunner on B-17s.
He landed with the U.S. Marines on numerous
Pacific Islands, where he saw intense fighting and
was wounded on one such landing. He also had
the dubious distinction of surviving the sinking of
three Aircraft Carriers to which he was assigned,
the last being the USS Lexington at the battle of
the Coral Sea. Frank was honorably discharged
following the war. Shortly afterward, he married
Irene Rudowski and began work as an Aircraft
Mechanic.
During the years that followed, Frank was pro-
moted to lead Aircraft Mechanic for the official
Aircraft of the President of the United States,
which were designated '"Air Force One" after 1953.
At the same time, he bought a dry-cleaning store,
had two children with Irene, and bought a home
on Long Island, N.Y Frank retired and moved to
Port Charlotte in 1986. He cared for his wife Irene
until she passed away May 31, 2011.
Frank is survived by his children, son, Frank K.
Ossmann III; and daughter, Susan Ciambrone;
along with five grandchildren, Frank J. Ossmann
IV, Lauren Ciambrone, Devin C. Ossmann,
Brandon N. Ossmann and Chelsea Ciambrone;
and two great-grandchildren, Christian and
Benjamin Ossmann. Rest in peace, Dad, Grandpa
and Pop-Pop.
A Memorial service will be celebrated at noon
Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, at Holy Trinity Lutheran
Church in Port Charlotte, with Committal and
Military Honors to follow at Restlawn Memorial
Gardens cemetery, also in Port Charlotte. In lieu of
flowers, memorial donations in Frank's name are
suggested to Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 2565
Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte, FL 33952. Friends
may visit www.robersonfhfi.com to sign the memo-
ry book and extend condolences to the family.
Arrangements are by Roberson Funeral Home
& Crematory, Port Charlotte Chapel.


Myrtle Whittle Brown
Myrtle Whittle Brown, 90, had her own
"home-going" when she passed awayWednesday,
Jan. 29, 2014, three days after the church
I* .- homecoming.
She was born Feb. 23, 1923, in
SNocatee, Fla., in the house her
father built 100 years ago, lived
r E, .. there all her life, and died there.
-' Myrtle worked at Carlstrom Field
S during World War II, in the canteen
and commissary, and fueling
airplanes for cadets in training,
and at one time at the Nocatee-Manatee Crate
Company in Nocatee. She worked at the former
G. Pierce Wood Memorial Hospital for 31 years,
and she loved to sew, crochet, bake, cook, garden
and quilt.
At the homecoming and final service Sunday,
Jan. 26, 2014, for the red brick First Baptist
Church of Nocatee, she shared how her mother
brought her to church in a basket when she was
but a week old, and how she still had the basket.
Myrtle also recalled how she and others played
in the church balcony and would sneak upstairs
to ring the bell when they weren't supposed to.
Following the homecoming service, that same
bell was rung for the last time, as the building will
be razed soon to make way for the widening of
U.S. 17.
Myrtle attended Nocatee School for grades
one through eight, DeSoto County High School
for grades nine through 11, and spent her senior
year at Saluda High School in South Carolina. She
married Verner "Preacher" Brown and had two
children, Buford and Lucille. She was the eldest
member of First Baptist Church of Nocatee,
which her father and grandfather helped to
build 99 years ago, and her parents were charter
members there. Myrtle read her Bible daily, and
yearly, cover-to-cover. She had the gift of fairness
and peace with all, and loved all her neighbors
and friends.
She is survived by her children, Buford L.
Brown and Lucille B. "Lucy" Brown of Nocatee;
and grandchildren, Rebecca Bowen Miller of
Orlando, Fla., and Ernest Joshua Bowen of
Tallahassee, Fla. Myrtle was preceded in death
by her husband, Verner Brown, in 1969; her
parents, Buford FarrellWhittle Sr. and Carrie
Lucille Whittle of South Carolina; second mother,
Virginia Speed Whittle of Kentucky; and siblings,
Buford Farrell Whittle Jr., Levi David Whittle and
Catherine Lucille McCormick, all of Nocatee.
A time of family visitation will be from noon
until 2 p.m. Monday, Feb. 3, 2014, at Ponger-
Kays-Grady Funeral Home in Arcadia, Fla., with
a celebration of her life immediately afterward.
Interment will follow at Oak Ridge Cemetery
in Arcadia. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the First Baptist Church of Nocatee
building fund, 4610 S.W Highway 17, Arcadia, FL
34268. Online condolences may be made at www.
pongerkaysgrady.com.
Arrangements are by Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Arcadia.





OurTown Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


I BIRTHDAYS


Happy 87th birthday to
Marjorie Rhodes on her special
day Feb. 7.


Happy 102nd birthday to
Myrtle Pringle on her special
day Jan. 31.


Happy 73rd birthday to John
Carswell on his special day
Feb.2.

CONTACT FOR
BIRTHDAYS
Each week in Sunday's Charlotte
Sun, we run free birthday announce-
ments along with a photo. Email
your.jpg photo of the birthday boy
or girl of any age, along with the
person's name, age, and birthday
month and date, to Marion Putman,
assistant Charlotte editor, at marion
mputman@gmail.com. Deadline
is noon Thursday. Note: If you bring
or mail in a hard-copy photo (to
23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte
Harbor, FL33980), we will try to
accommodate you, but we CANNOT
guarantee the ability to return it
to you. For more information, call
Marion at 941-206-1183.


I WINNERS CIRCLE


American Legion
Post 103
SSunday Darts winners
Jan. 26: Round 1:1-Ron Hickson,
Henry Tropea; 2-Harriet Ratynski,
Stan Smith; 3-Judy and Bill Tilley.
Round 2:1-Fern Tropea, Bruce
Buzzell; 2-Harriet Ratynski, Christy
Buzzell; 3-Marion Goodman, Bill
Shepherd.

Charlotte Harbor
Yacht Club
Partners Bridge winners
Jan. 23:1-Louise and Lyle Rea;
2-Cleta Clark, Winnie Dignam;
3-Lois and Bob Buckholder.
Ladies Bridge winners
Jan. 28:1-Nancy Gest; 2-Cleta
Clark; 3-Phoebe McMillan.
Slam Bridge winners
Jan. 29:1-Jerry Shoemaker, 3540;
2-LaQuita Morris, 3360; 3-Cleta
Clark, 3080; 4-Chuck Floramo,
3060.
Mahjong winners
Jan. 28:1-Bette Albarran;
2-Bobbye Waksler; 3-Jan Martin.

Chubbyz Tavern
Big Dog's Live Trivia
Challenge winners Jan. 29:1-The
Cat's Meow, $50; 2-It's Only A Game,
$25; 3-The Irish Elephants, $25.


Cultural Center of
Charlotte County
Duplicate Bridge Club winners
Jan. 21: Section A: N/S: 1-Ginger
Smith, John Avery; 2/3-Jackie
Papineau, Denis Leduc; 2/3-Jackie
Forslund, Robert Rancourt. E/W:
1-Rachel Cavanaugh, Pat DeNapoli;
2-Patty and Ken Earl; 3-Judy Foster,
Bruce Baurer. Section B: N/S: 1-Judith
Parker, Robin Worcester; 2-Marlene
OtteJudy Schindler; 3-Mary and
David Atwood. Ef/W: 1-Doug Brenner,
Ken Facer; 2-Linda and Fred Andreas;
3-Joan and Ted Walbourn. Jan. 23
(a.m.): 1-Jim Vail, Tom Kirk; 2-Richard
Locker, Bert Rockower; 3-Bob Bonjean,
Jim Fraser. Jan. 23 (p.m.): Section
A: N/S: 1-Paul St. Laurent, Polly
Hollenback; 2-Evelyn Palmer, Rachel
Cavanaugh; 3-Ted and Joan Walbourn.
E/W: 1-Richard Petes, Albert Shuki;
2-Ken and Patty Earl; 3-Helen Sullivan,
Sharron Nichols. Section B: N/S: 1-Rob
Colton, Jan McLuhan; 2-Tom Ohlgart,
Bonnie Elliott; 3-Bud Baker,Wade
Greer. E/W: 1-Ernie Bourque, Mary Ann
Baird; 2-Carol Campbell, Kathy Olson;
3-Joanne Fuoti, Dottie Burns.
Sunday Double Deck Pinochle
winners Jan. 26: Linda Boczylo, 1698;
Gordon Byer, 1653; Kathy Garbowicz,
1609.
Monday Night Pinochle
winners Jan. 27: 1-Jan Howard, 757;
2-Mitch Mitchell, 670; 3-Paul Day, 645.
Wednesday Double Deck
Pinochle winners Jan. 22:1-George


Speidell, 1676; 2-Lavaun Berkland,
1637; 3-Paul Day, 1635; 4-Gordon Byer,
1622. Jan. 29:1-Bob Paulson, 1612;
2-Jerry Filar, 1599; 3-Pete Shopa, 1564;
4-Betty Gowan, 1529.
Thursday Night Double Deck
Pinochle winners Jan. 23:1 Paul
Day,1742;2-DougHarkey,1727;3-Jan
Howard, 1667.
Friday Evening Bridge winners
Jan. 24:1-Mid Noble, 4610;2-Trudy
Riley, 4270; 3-Fred Jameson, 4180;
4-Colleen Shoemaker, 4020.
Friday Night Euchre winners
Jan. 24:1-Dorothy Reynells, 78;
2-1sabell Johnson, 77; 3-Tony Norcross,
75.
Pinochle winners Jan. 25:
1-Mary Lavine, 732; 2-Lavaun
Berkland, 718; 3-Terry Lions, 704.
Jan. 28:1 -Paul Day, 699; 2-Chuck
VanCamp, 686; 3-Alice Trautman, 668.

Deep Creek Elks
Lodge
Monday Bridge winners
Jan. 27:1-Lucia Kelly, 5490; 2-Rick
McAdam, 4990; 3-Ken Kidneigh, 3920;
4-Judy Gilbert, 3730.

Isles Yacht Club
Scrabble winners Jan. 24: Judith
Howell, 302; Diana Lehr,151;Jackie
Michaud,185; PatNiles,191; Liane
Riley, 176.
Duplicate Bridge winners
Jan. 29: N/S: 1 -Adden Wagner, Joe
DeShazo; 2-Arlene and Ray Rothhaar;
3-Bobbie Fischer, Sherry Lane. F/W:


1-Gail and Mike Fortier; 2-Jan Savino,
Pat Slaughter; 3-Frank Betz, Diane Truby.

Kingsway
Country Club
Ladies Bridge winners Jan.
24:1 -Betty Worthington; 2-Allene
Croy; 3-Nancy Anderson. Jan. 29:
1 -Dee Nutt; 2-Carol Niemann.
Partners Bridge winners Jan.
29:1-Rodger and Colette Dowdell;
2-Bob and Carol Niemann; 3-Dave
Baker, Norma Block.

PGI
Duplicate Bridge Club winners
Jan. 20: N/S: 1-Mary and David
Atwood: 2-Bob Mohrbacher,Yoshi
Lapo; 3-Mary and Stephen Chupak.
E/Wf: 1 -David and Jan Atkinson;
2-Chuck Skarvan, Earl Lewis; 3-Mary
and Stephen Chupak. Jan. 22:
1 -Bonnie Elliott, Mary Ann Baird;
2-Jarmila Taud, Peter Hannak; 3-Evelyn
Palmer, Leslie Clugston. Jan. 24: N/S:
1-Paul St. Laurent, Polly Hollenback;
2-Dave Valliant, George Doeren;
3-James Kioski, Polly Engebrecht.
E/W: 1-Chuck Skarvan, Marilyn Grant;
2-Joan and Ted Walbourn; 3-Ken and
Patty Earl.

Port Charlotte
Golf Club
Monday Bridge winners
Jan. 27:1-Jo Brumfield; 2-Doris
Schmitendorf; 3-Peg Darland.


[ BUSINESS Journal


Absolute Blinds Has AWindow Treatment For You


Absolute Blinds has been in
business in Charlotte County and
the surrounding area for over ten
years and has become one of the
largest and most successful
licensed window treatment
companies in Southwest Florida.
With unbeatable pricing, blinds
made while you wait, free advice
from a professional decorator, and


the best selection available,
Absolute Blinds can fulfill all
your window treatment needs.
An array of verticals, a selection
of wood plantation shutters,
horizontals, mini-blinds, pleated
shades, top treatments, cornices,
draperies and more is among
their offering. Absolute Blinds is
a Graber dealer and estimates are
free. If you need window


coverings for home or office,
Absolute Blinds is there to
assist you. The store is located at
2842 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte and the phone number
is 941-627-5444. Past and present
customers can like Absolute
Blinds' Facebook page. For
more information, visit their
website athttp://
www.absoluteblinds.com/


A"ABSOLUrE IkLdD mm~D 1 RM f
"S-Lur" ILI7 I,-RETMFNTS


--: ., :H-- \ ,



Absolute Blinds
2842 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte,
call 941-627-5444


lackie's Auto Body-Where Local Dealers

Go For Auto Body Work


Jackie's Auto Body 19888
Veterans Highway, Port
Charlotte


One of the best auto body
shops in this area is Jackie's
Auto Body. With over 35
years of experience, Jack


D'Amico is second to
none. Many local car
dealers and car collectors
bring their cars to Jackie's
Auto Body for first class
auto bodywork, or a
custom paint job. Jack
repairs everything from
minor dents to major
collision damage, and will
put your car in like-new
condition. All types of
insurance claims are
accepted and Jackie's is
on the Preferred
Insurance List. Jackie's


Auto Body repairs, paints
and services almost any
vehicle and uses the
finest PTG paint products
and materials as well as
state of the art
equipment. Stop by and
meet Jack and Regina
and receive a free
estimate. Jackie's Auto
Body is located at 19888
Veterans Hwy., in Port
Charlotte, and the phone
number is 941-255-5967.
Trust the pros to make
your vehicle like new
again.


QUESTIONS & ANSWERS


Do you have qualified
technicians that can help
me? Where can I get a
brand name TV at a
competitive price?
A. Quality TV is a factory
repair service center for
most TV brands including
Samsung, Sony,
Mitsubishi, Toshiba,
Zenith & LG. This means
we deal with the
manufactures and their
problems. Our experts are
trained factory
technicians who can tell
you who has the best
customer service, and
whose technology is
better. We are here to help
you. Quality TV will
match the price of any
other big box retailer on
any television. Our
showroom is open come
and say hello. Quality TV
is located at 14212W.
Tamiami Trail, North Port,
call at 941-426-1773, or


for more information,
please visit their website
at http://
www.qualitytv.com

Q. Are pleated filters
the best to buy for your
air conditioner? How
often should I change
them?
A. John and Carrie Gable
at Dale's Air Conditioning
& Heating, recommend
pleated filters, where the
pleats/apex of the pleat is
spaced about IH apart, are
the best. The
hypoallergenic filters-
where the pleats/apex are
oi apart are generally itoo
good. They are highly
restrictive for airflow. They
load and get dirty very
quickly. As a general rule
of thumb, you should
inspect & change your
filter, no matter what type,
every 30 days. John and
Carrie strive to educate


their customers on how to
keep their home heated
and cooled in the winter
and summer, and what to
do to extend the life of the
unit. You can count on the
service, advice and fair
pricing that you receive
and a thorough and
complete check at each
service visit. Call Dale's Air
Conditioning & Heating
941-629-1712, located at
18260 Paulson Drive, Port
Charlotte. Business hours
are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday,
with 24 hours emergency
service to their customers.

Q. I have some estate
jewelry pieces and gold
that I would like to sell.
Is there a local store
who can appraise them
and give me a fair
purchase price?
A. Westchester Gold &
Diamonds, 4200-F


Dr. D's Auto Repair Provides

Professional Service And

Affordable Rates

For all your auto
repairs give Dr. D's
2Auto Repair a call. Dr.
D's repairs all types of
vehicles including
l motor homes and four
Swheelers. At Dr. D's
Dr. D'sAvenue in you can count on the
the Whidden Industrial Park best service,
ain Charlotte Harbor, diagnostics, repairs,
23415 Janice Avenue
231 Jin t Aenue replacement parts, etc.
Only superior quality replacement parts are used
and rates are very reasonable. Owner, Mike True,
and his staff are all ASE certified and they offer the
finest full service repair in this area. With the
computerized engine analysis, you can be assured
that the service required on your vehicle is
necessary. True is well known as an excellent auto
mechanic and the business enjoys an excellent
reputation. Dr. D's is located at 23415 Janice
Avenue in the Whidden Industrial Park in Charlotte
Harbor and the phone number is 941-743-3677. For
the best service at a reasonable price, call or stop by
Dr. D's Auto Repair.


Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte, is known for
unsurpassed quality,
variety and pricing when
buying or selling gold,
silver, diamonds, Rolex
watches and fine
collectibles. Owner, Steve
Duke, is on site to assist
you with jewelry purchases
and appraisals, or the sale
of your old gold and other
valuables. Specializing in
pre-loved Rolex watches,
new and estate jewelry
pieces, oriental rugs,
unusual gifts, paintings,
rare collectibles, and more,
Westchester should be
your destination. The


selection is amazing. This
business is a community
staple and is known for its
generosity in giving back.
Listen to Steve Duke's
Friday morning show on
1580 AM radio each week
9 a.m. to 10 a.m. It is
interesting, fun and
always topical. The store
is located in Baer's Plaza,
and the phone number is
941-625-0666. Visit their
website at http://}{\rtlch\
fcsl \af0 \ltrch\fcs0 \f25\
insrsidl522422\
charrsid3540245
www.westchestergold.co
m}{\rtlch\fcsl \af0 \ltrch\
fcs0 \f25\insrsidl522422


DOES OR UIES ULIY ALL91-0-60





The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 7


DEATHS
FROM PAGE 5

Arthur Poole
Arthur "A.C." Poole, 77,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
and formerly of Yuma,
S Ariz., passed
-... away Tuesday,
',-..,. Jan. 21, 2014.
He was born
in Chicago, Ill.
Arthur was in the U.S.
Navy from 1954 to 1957,
then joined the U.S.
Army the same year,
until his retirement in
1974. He served in the
Korean and the Vietnam
wars, and was honorably
discharged as a Staff
Sergeant in 1974. Arthur
then became a Civil
Servant, and retired
in 2001 as the Safety
Manager of the Marine
Air Station of Yuma.
He is survived by his
wife, Jacqueline; his
sister, Paula; nephews;
nieces; and grandnieces.
Family and friends will
gather from 9:30 a.m.
until a celebration of
life service at 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, at
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home, 2405
Harbor Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Burial will be
held at Sarasota National
Cemetery in Sarasota,
Fla., with Full Military
Honors. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made
to a charity of the donor's
choice.
Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Douglas S.
Swinamer Sr.
Douglas S. "Doug"
Swinamer Sr., 83, of Port
Charlotte, Fla., passed
away
Thursday,
_Jan 30,
2014, at
Some.
He
was born
May 24,
1930, in
Nova Scotia, Canada.
Doug worked for
NS Light and Power,
until he and his family
moved to the U.S. in
1964. He worked for
Boston Edison as a
linesman, and retired
as an Overhead Line
supervisor. Doug and
his wife moved to Port
Charlotte in 1997. He
was a dedicated member
of Moose Lodge 2121
of Port Charlotte since
2000. He was honored
with a past Governor
award in recognition of
his Loyalty, meritorious
service and commit-
ment. Doug was also
a Moose Legionnaire,
and was honored with a
Fellowship Degree.
He is survived by his
wife of 62 years, Vie
of Port Charlotte; his
children, Judith (Michael)
Saffelle and Douglas Jr.
(Karen); his grandchil-
dren, Sarah (Robert)
Gillis, Megan Swinamer
and Bryan Saffelle; his
brother, Clark Swinamer;
and sister, Juanita
Swinamer of Nova Scotia.
Visitation will be
held from noon until
the Funeral Services at
1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 3,
2014, at Kays-Ponger &


FINALLY

IN PORT

CHARLOTTI

LOW COST


DENTURES


Uselton Funeral Home,
2405 Harbor Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Entombment
will follow at Restlawn
Memorial Gardens' mau-
soleum in Port Charlotte.
Please visit the online
tribute for Douglas S.
Swinamer Sr. to sign the
guestbook and offer con-
dolences to the family at
www.kays-ponger.com.
The family has requested
that, in lieu of flowers,
donations be made to
Tidewell Hospice, 5955
Rand Blvd. Sarasota, FL
34238.

A special thanks to Dr
S. Bhat and staff at Port
Charlotte Rehab, and
the dedicated support of
Helen Kramer and Jean
Wydra.

Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Lucy E.Visceglia
Lucy E. (nee
Larotonda) Visceglia,
103, of Punta Gorda,

away
^^^_-_Fla., passed

Thursday,
1Jan. 30,
2014,after a
long illness.
She
was born
Nov. 20,
1910, in Greenwich
Village, New York City,
N.Y.
After graduating from
High School with a
commercial diploma, she
worked at various clerical
jobs until she married
her beloved husband
JosephVisceglia in 1936.
She enjoyed writing
poetry, and many have
enjoyed reading her po-
ems. Lucy was outgoing
and made friends easily.
She was a good cook and
an outstanding baker.
Lucy loved her children
and her granddaughter.
She will be greatly
missed by her loving,
loyal and devoted daugh-
ter, Mariann Milner; her
lovely granddaughter,
TanyaVisceglia; her car-
ing son-in-law, William
Milner; and many
longtime friends. Lucy
was preceded in death by
her husband, Joseph; her
cherished son, Robert
Visceglia; and her four
siblings, Peter Larotonda,
Lena Caracappa, Bessie
Monroe and Antoinette
Knezevich.
A memorial service will
be held at a later date. In
lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be sent
to Tidewell Hospice of
Port Charlotte, Fla., and
Arcadia, Fla.

Robert G. Weigner
Sr.
Robert G. Weigner
Sr., 88, formerly of Port
Charlotte, Fla., went
to be with
-. his Lord and
.',, -,2. Savior, Tuesday
"Jan. 14, 2014,
at Tidewell
Hospice in Bradenton,
Fla.
He was born Nov. 10,
1925, in Oreland, Pa.
Robert was a World
War II Navy veteran,
and graduated from
Penn State University.
He and his wife raised
their family on a small
farm in Sellersville, Pa.



I,,

E:.'."l


DR. SUSAN R. BROOKS

629-4311 -
New Palel ''1 www.susanrbrooksdds.com
WelcOre General Dentistry
Implants Cosmetic Nitrous Oxide
Dentures & One Day Repair
Laser Periodontal Therapy
3440 Conway Blvd. 92A ii:-iii: 1:,:,: irr,:- Porl Charlolle


He enjoyed bowling, NORTI
fighting, hunting and
outdoor activities. They Doug
were active members GoI
of First Baptist Church
of Perkasie, Pa. After Douglas E.
retiring from CIGNA as a Gordon, 86,
Systems Design Analyst, Fla., passed
Robert and Eleanor Jan. 27, 2014
moved to Port Charlotte He was bo
in 1993. Robert was a 1927, in East
deacon, treasurer and Pa.
choir member at Victory Doug was
Baptist Church. Charlotte Co
He is survived by a for 10 years.
in the music
sister, Florence; sons, Charlotte muansc
Robert Jr. (Debra), Charlotte ans.
Mark (Suzanne) and Dountg is su
James (Judy); daughter, by three chi
Karen (Ray) Myers; nine abndchildre
grandchildren; and 14 grandchildre
great-grandc
great-grandchildren. A memory;
Robert was preceded in be held at co
death by his loving wife, his children
Eleanor; four sisters; Arrangeme
three brothers; and a National Crei
great-granddaughter. of Port Charl
A memorial service
will be held at 1 p.m. DES
Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, at
Victory Baptist Church, Dovi(
1538 Nash Terrace, Port West
Charlotte, FL 33953. In
lieu of flowers, donations Dovie "Cle
can be made to the 90, of Arcadia
church; or the Gideon away Friday
Bible Society at www. in Arcadia.
gideons.org.

Eleanor B. Winger
Eleanor B. Winger, 77,
of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
and formerly of Mount
Prospect, Ill., passed
away Thursday, Jan. 30,
2014, at her home. Cleo was a
She was born Oct. 8, many years a
1936, in Cleveland, people. She a
Ohio, to Joseph and for the forme
Elizabeth Markovics. Wood Memo
Eleanor worked as and Sorrels
a secretary at various Packing Hou
n-~~qdrQ C\II"Ilioin o


companies, and in retail
for Carson Pirie Scott &
Co. in Mount Prospect.
She was a member of
Sacred Heart Catholic
Church, and enjoyed
doing ceramics. She will
be remembered as a
loving wife, mother and
grandmother.
Eleanor will be greatly
missed by her loving
husband of 56 years,
Carl; daughters, Barbara
Wexler and Kathleen
(Michael) Bakko; son,
Carl (Lisa) Winger; and
grandchildren, Brian,
Matthew, Courtney,
Lauren, Stephen,
Amanda, Michelle and
David.
The family will receive
friends from 6 p.m. to
8 p.m., with a prayer
service at 7:30 p.m.,
Monday, Feb. 3, 2014,
at Larry Taylor Funeral
and Cremation Services.
A funeral Mass will be
held at 2 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 4, 2014, at Sacred
Heart Catholic Church
in Punta Gorda, with
Father Jerry Kaywell
officiating. Memorial
donations may be made
to Sacred Heart Catholic
Church. To express
condolences to the
family, please visit www.
Ltaylorfuneral.com and
sign the online guest
book.
Arrangements are by
Larry Taylor Funeral and
Cremation Services.

ENGLEWOOD
There were no deaths
reported in Englewood
Saturday


H PORT

|las E.
rdon
"Doug"
of North Port,
iway Monday,

rn Sept. 18,
Stroudsburg,

a former
unty resident
He was active
ministry of
d Sarasota

rvived
dren; five
n; and five
children.
il service will
nvenience of
in Tennessee.
rnts are by
nation Society
)tte, Fla.

SOTO
e Cleo
berry
o" Westberry,
a, Fla., passed
Jan. 31, 2014,

She
was bom
April 25,
1923, in
Nashville,
Ga., moving
to Nocatee,
Fla., around
1926.
caregiver for
nd to many
also worked
er G. Pierce
rial Hospital,
Brothers'
se as a fruit
0-trliItodr1


ilgotuer1. vUlet/o otuuoLttu
from DeSoto County High
School in the Class of 1941.
She enjoyed gardening,
and spoiling her two
grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren. Cleo's
love for children was so
great that she would not
let a small child walk past
her without giving them "a
little something for their
pocket." She was a mem-
ber of North Hillsborough
Baptist Church in Arcadia.
Survivors include her
daughter, Judy (John
"Jacky") Schaefer Sr. of
Arcadia; two grandchil-
dren, John (Jinny) Schaefer
Jr. and Jodi Schaefer, all of
Arcadia; two great-grand-
children; and one sister,
Doris Beard of Nocatee.
She was preceded in death
by her beloved husband,
IrvinWestberry; parents,
Thomas Alsie Brown and
Judy Irene (nee Drawdy)
Brown; and two brothers,
William Harold "Bill"
Brown and Roy D. "Snake"
Brown.
Visitation will be
conducted from 9:30 a.m.
until the graveside funeral
services and burial at
10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 3,
2014, at Oak Ridge
Cemetery in Arcadia.
The Rev. Ellis Cross will
officiate. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made
to North Hillsborough
Baptist Church, Building
Fund, 416 N. Brevard Ave.,
Arcadia, FL 34266. Online
condolences maybe made
at www.pongerkaysgrady.
com.
Arrangements are
by Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services,
Arcadia.


Emily Lewis applies a Jamberry nail wrap on Sandra
Dixon's fingernail, during the expo.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Breakfast for
New Hampshire
residents
The Loyal Order of
the Moose 2121, 3462
Loveland Blvd., Port
Charlotte, will hold
the 17th Annual New
Hampshire Breakfast at
8 a.m. Feb. 24 at the lodge.
All past and current resi-
dents of New Hampshire
are invited. Breakfast
will be buffet-style with
scrambled eggs, pan-
cakes, biscuits, bacon,
sausage, coffee and tea.
The cost is $8 per person.
This event features a
speaker and a prize
drawing. Reservations
maybe made by calling
941-625-5679, 941-743-
3106, 941-426-7644 or
941-743-2783 -no later
than Feb. 17.

Local writers
to meet
A group of local
writers from the area
bounded by Sarasota
to Fort Myers and
Englewood to Arcadia
will meet at 11 a.m.
Tuesday at the Punta
Gorda Library, 424 W.
Henry St. This group will
meet from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. the first Tuesday
of each month at the
library. This meeting
will give the writers an
opportunity to read
their work to their
fellow writers, and to
socialize with them at
a "Writer's Lunch" in a
local restaurant. Any
local author or anyone
interested in listening
to local authors read
their work is welcome.


This is a free event. For
more information, call
941-833-3337.

Elks to hold
fundraiser
The Punta Gorda
Elks Lodge will present
Memories & Dreams
VIII at 7 p.m. Thursday
through Saturday in the
theater of the Cultural
Center of Charlotte
County, 2280 Aaron
St., Port Charlotte. All
proceeds will benefit the
Florida Elks Children's
Therapy Service, which
provides physical therapy
and occupational therapy
to Florida children who
do not have access to
these services. These
services are provided in
the patient's home at no
cost to the families.
Tickets cost $13 and
are available at the Punta
Gorda Elks Lodge and
the Cultural Center box
office. For more infor-
mation, call Bob Hahn at
941-661-1775.

'Paint & Petals'
event offered
The Florida Suncoast
Watercolor Society will
present the Third Annual
Paint & Petals event from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
at the Sarasota Garden
Club, 1131 Boulevard of
the Arts, Sarasota. There
will be original artwork
and floral designs for
sale. Lunch will be
offered by the garden
club. This event is free
and open to the public.
For more information,
call 941-955-0875 or
941-735-4075.


(I PROFESSIONAL Profile


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SUN PHOTOS BY ROBERT NELSON


Some attention


for the ladies

Sharon Graham rests her chin in a facial scanner while
Teressa Lorenz starts the system to run a scan that
will check for age spots, wrinkles, bacteria and sun
damage. Joyce Vein & Aesthetic Institute in Punta
Gorda was among several vendors at the 2014 Bayfront
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F






Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun ISunday, February 2, 2014


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Englewood

becomes a

festive place

OUR POSITION: The Lemon
Bay Fest and the Dearborn Street
Book Festival bring something
special to Englewood.

t's time again for an an-
nual event that has grown
in 12 years to become one
of the highlights of the winter
season.
The Lemon Bay Fest will
begin Saturday and run through
Feb. 8. The weekend after the
festival wraps up comes anoth-
er event that is a must-go in the
area: The Englewood Dearborn
Street Book Festival.
The Lemon Bay Fest began
12 years ago with a handful
of programs at the Elsie Quirk
Library focused on local history.
It has gained steam since then.
The cross-town Englewood
Charlotte Library became in-
volved. The Lemon Bay Historical
Society dovetailed with its annual
Cracker Fair, which takes place
on the final day.
Organizers bill the festival as
"History With Zest!" and they've
done a wonderful job of offering
programs that are interesting
and, yes, zesty. It's local history,
and the injection of local people
into the programs helps make
the history relevant.
For instance, on Saturday,
Feb. 1, there will be guided tours
of the historic 1928 Lampp
home in Olde Englewood. On
Monday, Feb. 3, local residents
Eunice Albritton and Nancy
Wille discuss the Fishery and
the history of Placida. The
Lemon Bay Woman's Club holds
an open house that day with
quilting and craft demonstra-
tions at the historic clubhouse.
Singer Bill Schustik performs a
program called, "Pirates, Rogues
and Broadsides!"
The following day Steve
Noll discusses the historical
relationship of humans to the
landscape in Florida. The Turn
Back Time Band will tell stories
and sing historical Florida
songs.
Jackie Brown will discuss
the Roaring '20s in Charlotte
County (Feb. 7). Participants
will be shown how to make
pine needle baskets (Feb. 7,
with $15 fee) and Boondoggles,
a small palm leaf wall dec-
oration (Feb. 7, $6 fee.) The
Englewood Shell Club will give
a presentation on what else?
- seashells.
The festival culminates
Saturday, Feb. 8, with the
Cracker Fair at Pioneer Park
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There
will be music all day long,
vendors and booths. We're
particularly interested in the
whip-cracking demonstration,
the cast net-throwing demon-
stration and the musket-loading
demonstration. And, of course,
the lemon dessert contest,
which is always a highlight.
(Samples are sold for $1 per
plate.)
One more program of note:
The sixth Billery Dean Murder
Mystery a series written by
local historian lean Airey will
be presented during the week
at the historic Green Street
Church. The theater program
has become a four-star favorite
over the years. (Call 941-474-
3764 for times and ticket
information.)
Schedules for all programs
can be found at the public
libraries in Englewood or
online at www.lemonbayfest.
comn. Keep an eye out for more
details in this newspaper too.
Coming on Saturday, Feb. 15,
is the annual Book Festival on
Dearborn Street, featuring mu-
sic, food, children's story time
and local authors discussing
and selling their books.
Again, both festivals have
become highlights of the winter
season in Englewood. They are


driven by volunteers, accentu-
ating the distinctive features,
talents and flavors of our area.
Both are well worth your time.


THE SERIOUS SUPER BOWL F/IN:


wrILLYOU TwO PLERSE

BE QUIET?! WE'RE

TRYINGTO WfTCH THE E

PJFYCOMMERCIRL


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Keep 'best friend'
in the back seat
Editor:
You can't drive one day
without seeing multiple cases
of animal abuse perpetuated by
so-called animal lovers.
They have their little dogs
sitting on their lap some hang-
ing their little heads out the
side window. Mommy or daddy
talking away to them.
It offends me as a driver that
their minds are distracted as
they play with their pets. It is as
dangerous as texting or talking
on a cellphone.
But what really offends me
is the lack of common sense in
the name of love. It does not
take a huge accident for an
air bag to deploy. If an air bag
deployed with your pet on your
lap what would happen to your
supposed "best friend"? Your
little friend would be dead.
Play with your friend at
home, not in the car. People,
when driving keep your mind
where it belongs, on the road.
People keep your "best friend"
where she or he belongs, in the
back seat.
Do we really need another
common sense law?
Irene Gargiulo
Punta Gorda

Republicans left
sitting on hands

Editor:
What were the applause
lines in the State of the Union
speech where Democrats stood
and cheered while Republicans
sat on their hands?
Ending poverty.
Equal pay for equal work.
Affordable health care for all
Americans.
Raising the minimum wage.
Ending war.
These visuals are worth
a million words. I need not
write more.
Sunny Ingersoll
Port Charlotte

WW II bombers
at the PG Airport
Editor:
I would just like to take
this opportunity to remind
everyone, especiallyWorld
War II veterans and young
aspiring pilots, as well as those
folks that oppose our airport,
that until Jan. 31 there will be
three World War II era planes


on display and available for
tours and flights at our airport.
A B-17 Flying Fortress, a B-24
Liberator and a P-51 Mustang.
This is an amazing opportuni-
ty for us to gain some historical
perspective on just a few of the
American machines that stifled
Hitler, Tojo and Mussolini's
quest for world domination in
the 1930s and 1940s.
Please visit the Collings
Foundation at www.cfdn.org
or call them at 800-568-8924
for more information. Or just
go to our airport and take a
tour of the aircraft and maybe
take a flight. According to their
website there are some serious
perks for World War II veterans.
Paul St. Germain
Punta Gorda

Whut do ya
say to this?

Editor:
Whall I bin a-thankin' on
things a mite o'late, an' I thank
I got it figgered.
Whut with thet Springs setting'
fer so long thet one fence is fell
an' gave me the purfect salto-
lution. Why not jes' open up a
other hole so's them cayutes
kin get in an' have a home t'
thareselves, drinking' water an'
all. Then ayr naybors in the
Ee-States won't have ter worry;
thar pups'll be fine a-roamin'
roun' on th' loose.
A-tother saltolution come
t'me whilst I was a rocking' on th'
porch. Them building thar ain't
no good, but they'd be right
fine indoor gardens fer mer-
ry-ji-wanna oncet Mr. Morgan,
Esq. gits his way. Thank 'bout
the doh-ray-me thet cud brang
in! An' them cayutes cud ern
thar keep by doing' guard duty.
Thet orta make them "green"
folks happy on two er three
counts.
Whatcha say, folks?
Anna M. Lambert
North Port

Sound level,
taxes are up
Editor:
A recent writer said he loves
the airport noise, but doesn't
live in Punta Gorda to hear the
noise.
He loves that the airport
keeps his taxes low. My taxes
went up this year and so has
the sound level.
I wonder how many of the
passengers stay in Charlotte
County to help the economy. I
bet most go to Lee.
Living in Punta Gorda
used to be great, when it was
old-Florida style, but two


many people want Punta
Gorda to be like Naples or
Sarasota.
So Mr. Ear Plugs, slide the
ear plugs over the holes in
your head and see what the
airport is doing to home
values in the flight path.
John Parylak
Punta Gorda

Words come
back to bite you

Editor:
"The fact that we are here
today to debate raising
America's debt limit is a sign
of leadership failure. It is a
sign that the U.S. government
cannot pay its own bills. It is
a sign that we now depend on
ongoing financial assistance
from foreign countries to fi-
nance our government's reck-
less fiscal policies. Increasing
America's debt weakens us
domestically and internation-
ally. Leadership means that,
'the buck stops here.' Instead,
Washington is shifting the
burden of bad choices today
onto the backs of our children
and grandchildren. America
has a debt problem and a fail-
ure of leadership. Americans
deserve better." (Sen. Barack
H. Obama, March 2006). Yes,
we do.
Bob Reichert
Punta Gorda

Liked new
grill-raw bar

Editor:
Hurricane Charley's Grill/
Raw Bar: We were fortunate
enough to be invited to one
of the "soft openings" at HC
and I must say, Punta Gorda,
you are in for a delicious
experience.
If what we were served on
Tuesday evening is an exam-
ple of what to look forward
to, you are in for a culinary
delight. The food's delicious,
presentation excellent and the
desserts amazing. Trust me, I
know desserts. There are some
very familiar looking bartend-
ers and it's nice to see them
again. Everyone looked happy
to be there.
The staff was very attentive
while the managers kept an
eye on everything and in-
volved themselves as needed.
Dean was there overseeing his
"new" project. This is a nice
addition to our list of restau-
rants in town, and please
check it out for yourself. Good
job, Dean and Sandy.
Ellie Powell
Punta Gorda


Welfare, health care
at taxpayer expense
Editor:
The president is going
to use executive orders for
several issues, bypassing the
Senate, Congress and House of
Representatives. We are moving
toward a dictatorship every day.
Whether the branches are at
a stalemate, the answer is not
going around these branches
but to work through those
disagreements. We live in a free
country, lets keep it that way.
They should continue to work
out issues through the consti-
tutional method.
We want to keep government
by the people not one individ-
ual. Other countries have the
dictators. Ask Cubans how that
is going.
If we allow this president
to bypass the system, he will
continue to do so. I just can't
believe this is happening in the
United States. He continues
to spend, spend, spend. How
much will immigration reform
cost? Billions, More welfare,
food stamps and health care at
the expense of taxpayers.
Ronald Schaefer
Arcadia

Gifts should
come from heart

Editor:
Giving a gift, any time of year,
is something that should be
done from the heart and the
intent is to enhance another per-
son's day and let them know they
are special for various reasons.
I don't remember ever
receiving a "thank you" card
for a Christmas gift, nor do I
send them out, as the gift was a
persons way of saying, "This is
something special for you."
The paper person did not
ask for the gift and having the
address was your choice to
send a card or send a token
of your appreciation for his/
her dedication 365 days a year
delivering your paper (always
wrapped in plastic to protect it
from the weather).
My husband and I look for-
ward to having the opportunity
to say "thanks" by recognizing
great service and hopefully the
gift was used to make their day
a little nicer.
Take a moment and imagine
the smile this person probably
had upon receiving your gift.
There's your "thank you!"
Nancy Sprague
Englewood

Newfangled diet:
Consume less food

Editor:
News flash, the Mystery Diet
plan that seems lost to modern
man that the Egyptians, Greeks,
Romans, Vikings, American
Indians all knew can be yours.
For only $39.99 the secret
plan that is 100 percent effec-
tive can be revealed to you. But
wait! Wait! For the next four
hours and first 5,000 readers,
it's free!
Eat less! Eat less! If you eat
enough for two or three people,
you may weigh what two or
three people weigh. Now stop
lying to yourself and others.
Is a good diet and exercise
best? Of course. But I propose
that even junk food, if eaten
less, you will lose weight. One
doughnut and a can of soda
a day and you will starve to
death. Fifty doughnuts and 24
cans of soda and guess what?
Maybe obesity.
Stop the denial and use the
Mystery Diet-- eat less. Just
make believe you are stranded
on a deserted island and your
excuses for why you can't lose
weight will fall away like the
pounds.
John Vacha
Port Charlotte


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014





The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 9


Paranoia of the Plutocrats


ising inequality
has obvious eco-
nomic costs: stag-
nant wages despite rising
productivity, rising debt
that makes us more vul-
nerable to financial crisis.
It also has big social and
human costs. There is, for
example, strong evidence
that high inequality leads
to worse health and high-
er mortality.
But there's more.
Extreme inequality, it
turns out, creates a class
of people who are alarm-
ingly detached from
reality and simultane-
ously gives these people
great power.
The example many are
buzzing about right now
is the billionaire investor
Tom Perkins, a founding
member of the venture
capital firm Kleiner
Perkins Caufield & Byers.
In a letter to the editor of
The Wall Street Journal,
Perkins lamented public
criticism of the "one per-
cent" and compared
such criticism to Nazi
attacks on the Jews,
suggesting that we are
on the road to another
Kristallnacht.


You may say that this
is just one crazy guy and
wonder why The Journal
would publish such a
thing. But Perkins isn't
that much of an outlier.
He isn't even the first
finance titan to compare
advocates of progres-
sive taxation to Nazis.
Back in 2010 Stephen
Schwarzman, chairman
and chief executive of
the Blackstone Group,
declared that proposals
to eliminate tax loop-
holes for hedge fund and
private-equity managers
were "like when Hitler
invaded Poland in 1939."
And there are a
number of other plu-
tocrats who manage
to keep Hitler out of
their remarks but who
nonetheless hold, and
loudly express, political


and economic views that
combine paranoia and
megalomania in equal
measure.
I know that sounds
strong. But look at
all the speeches and
opinion pieces byWall
Streeters accusing
President Barack Obama
- who has never done
anything more than
say the obvious, that
some bankers behaved
badly of demonizing
and persecuting the
rich. And look at how
many of those making
these accusations also
made the ludicrously
self-centered claim
that their hurt feelings
(as opposed to things
like household debt
and premature fiscal
austerity) were the
main thing holding the
economy back.
Now, just to be clear,
the very rich, and those
on Wall Street in partic-
ular, are in fact doing
worse under Obama
than they would have if
Mitt Romney had won
in 2012. Between the
partial rollback of the
Bush tax cuts and the tax


hike that partly pays for
health reform, tax rates
on the 1 percent have
gone more or less back
to pre-Reagan levels.
Also, financial reformers
have won some surpris-
ing victories over the
past year, and this is bad
news for wheeler-dealers
whose wealth comes
largely from exploiting
weak regulation. So you
can make the case that
the 1 percent have lost
some important policy
battles.
But every group finds
itself facing criticism,
and ends up on the
losing side of policy
disputes, somewhere
along the way; that's
democracy. The question
is what happens next.
Normal people take it
in stride; even if they're
angry and bitter over
political setbacks, they
don't cry persecution,
compare their critics to
Nazis and insist that the
world revolves around
their hurt feelings. But
the rich are different
from you and me.
And yes, that's partly
because they have more


money, and the power
that goes with it. They
can and all too often do
surround themselves
with courtiers who tell
them what they want to
hear and never, ever, tell
them they're being fool-
ish. They're accustomed
to being treated with
deference, not just by
the people they hire but
by politicians who want
their campaign contri-
butions. And so they
are shocked to discover
that money can't buy
everything, can't insulate
them from all adversity.
I also suspect that
today's Masters of the
Universe are insecure
about the nature of
their success. We're
not talking captains
of industry here, men
who make stuff. We
are, instead, talking
about wheeler-dealers,
men who push money
around and get rich by
skimming some off the
top as it sloshes by. They
may boast that they are
job creators, the people
who make the economy
work, but are they really
adding value? Many of


us doubt it and so, I
suspect, do some of the
wealthy themselves, a
form of self-doubt that
causes them to lash out
even more furiously at
their critics.
Anyway, we've been
here before. It's impos-
sible to read screeds
like those of Perkins or
Schwarzman without
thinking of FDR's famous
1936 Madison Square
Garden speech, in which
he spoke of the hatred
he faced from the forces
of "organized money,"
and declared, "I welcome
their hatred."
Obama has not, unfor-
tunately, done nearly as
much as FDR to earn the
hatred of the undeserv-
ing rich. But he has done
more than many pro-
gressives give him credit
for and like FDR, both
he and progressives in
general should welcome
that hatred, because it's
a sign that they're doing
something right.
Paul Krugman is a
columnist for the New
York Times. He can be
reached via www.new
yorktimes.com.


Lou Holtz


Blindsiding the GOP base


egendary football
coach Lou Holtz
gives motivational
lectures about "overcom-
ing seemingly impossible
challenges," according to
his page on the Wash-
ington Speakers Bureau
website.
So it would seem that
Holtz found an ideal
client for his services:
He was scheduled to
deliver a keynote address
Wednesday night to
the House Republican
Conference, meeting in
Cambridge, Md.
The retired Notre Dame
coach, whose bio says he
has a "sterling reputation
for turning pretenders
into contenders," had
his work cut out for him
with this GOP squad. The
night before, Republicans
sat in the House chamber
and listened to President
Obama inform them in
his State of the Union ad-
dress that, because they
had refused to work with
him, he would find ways
to govern without them.
Then, after no fewer than
four Republicans gave
televised responses to
the president's speech,


a more memorable (if
unplanned) response
came from Rep. Michael
Grimm, R-N.Y., who
threatened to break a
reporter in half and throw
him off the [expletive]
balcony of the Cannon
House Office Building
rotunda for asking
unwanted questions.
Grimm apologized
Wednesday morning
for his unsportsmanlike
conduct.
The larger problem for
Republicans is a series of
losses on key issues for
the party's conservative
fan base. First, GOP
lawmakers ignored com-
plaints from conservative
groups when they passed
a 2014 appropriations bill
this month that raised
spending above previ-
ously set levels. Then,


before leaving town
Wednesday morning
for their private retreat
on Maryland's Eastern
Shore, they passed a
compromise farm bill
that abandoned conser-
vatives' effort to make
deep cuts in food stamps.
Now come reports that
the Republicans will
abandon plans to fight
over the next debt-limit
increase. In addition,
House GOP leaders
will reportedly outline
immigration legislation at
the retreat that includes
a path to legal status for
illegal immigrants.
These developments
are good news for House
Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, who has been
struggling for three years
to corral his caucus. And
they are good news for
the country because
they hint at the possi-
bility that Washington
is beginning to function
again. But it's a deli-
cate spot to be in for
Republican lawmakers
because the conservative
activists who brought
them to power and
who still dominate the


party's grass roots feel
betrayed.
Coach Holtz's chal-
lenge: Is it possible for
Republicans to play ball
with Senate Democrats
and the White House
without losing their fan
base and the groups that
essentially own the team?
The farm bill shows the
conundrum. The legisla-
tion has been three years
in the making, and it
was delayed last year by
conservatives' attempts
to remove the food-
stamp program from
the legislation, to give
food-stamp recipients
work requirements and
to cut the program by
$40 billion over 10 years.
But in the end, food
stamps stayed in the
farm bill, the work
requirements became a
work-training pilot pro-
gram, and the $40 billion
cut was eased to $8 billion
- and that was achieved
by eliminating a loophole
involving home-heating
assistance that would
have allowed states to
game the food-stamp pro-
gram in ways even some
liberals found dubious.


On top of that, the
959-page compromise
was made public late
Monday night and the
vote was held Wednesday
morning, well short of
the 72 hours Republicans
promised in 2010 so that
lawmakers could read
legislation before voting
on it. The House devoted
all of an hour to debating
the bill before dashing
off to the Hyatt Regency
Chesapeake Bay.
Groups affiliated
with the tea party were
furious. Heritage Action
complained that "it
means more unnecessary
government dependence
for wealthy farmers and
food-stamp recipients."
The Club for Growth
called it a "'Christmas
tree' bill where there's
a gift for practically
every special-interest
group out there with a
well-connected lobbyist,
including the fresh-cut-
Christmas-tree industry."
But during floor
debate Wednesday
morning, I heard only
one Republican voice
opposition, and that was
in a one-minute speech


by Rep. Marlin Stutzman
of Indiana before the
debate technically began.
"Business as usual fought
back and here we are
today," he complained.
"This is exactly the kind
of logrolling that we
fought to prevent."
Sixty-two Republicans
sided with Stutzman,
Heritage Action and the
Club for Growth.
But 161 Republicans
sided with Agriculture
Committee Chairman
Frank Lucas, R-Okla.,
who said the bill "may
not have exactly ev-
erything my friends on
the right would want or
my friends on the left
would want. It represents
making the process work,
achieving consensus."
The problem for
Republicans is that the
people who brought
them to power didn't
ask for consensus and
smooth processes. They
wanted blocking and
tackling.
Dana Milbank is a
Washington Post colum-
nist. Readers may reach
him at danamilbank@
washpost.com.


President Obama's era of limits


he rap against
President Obama's
State of the Union
address on Tuesday was
that his agenda, once
ambitious and transfor-
mational, has suddenly
turned modest.
Instead of grand
bargains and sweeping
change, the president
proposed holding a
summit meeting on
working families and
extracting a promise
from colleges to admit
more low-income
students not exactly
sweeping solutions to
middle-class stagnation
and college debt.
What happened to the
visionary politician who
promised that his inau-
guration would mark the


Doyle
MMalnuS


moment the rise of the
oceans began to slow?
Simple: Reality has
sunk in.
In year six of Obama's
presidency, modest
proposals are the most
appropriate offering. At
the moment, the pres-
ident has much to be
modest about and no
real alternative.
Any ability Obama
might have had to


navigate Washington's
poisonous political
culture to forge con-
sensus on sweeping
initiatives vanished
when Republicans
took over the House of
Representatives in 2010.
And the president's
sway has ebbed even
further since his re-elec-
tion in 2012, thanks to
the chaotic launch of
his health insurance
program and the econ-
omy's stubborn failure
to produce enough new
jobs.


With Obama's job-
approval rating stuck
well below 50 percent,
Republicans in Congress
see plenty of reasons
to oppose him but only
danger in helping him.
Obama still has big
goals, of course, which
he listed in his speech:
immigration reform,
early childhood edu-
cation, infrastructure
spending, raising the
minimum wage, even
the lost cause of gun

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The picayune president


hat a waste
of pomp and
circumstance.
The State of the Union
had all the customary
dignitaries, ritualistic
applause, prime-time
pre-emptions on broad-
cast TV and even less
interest than usual.
The checklist of the
Obama presidency is
clear enough: We've got
the august trappings of
imperial power. We've
got the smack talk of
ruling through "pen and
phone." We've got the
distaste for the niceties
of inconvenient laws
and impatience with
institutional checks and
balances.
Yes, this imperial pres-
ident has it all, except
new or big ideas.
The fight against
inequality, which was
supposed to be a gener-
ation-defining struggle
and consume the rest
of President Barack
Obama's presidency as


of a couple of weeks
ago, barely rated in the
State of the Union. The
president used the word
"inequality" all of three
times.
His pollsters must
have let him in on the
fact that Americans don't
naturally resent other
people's good fortune.
So he shifted ground on
Tuesday night to empha-
size opportunity instead
of inequality. This is a
welcome change, but
it robbed the speech of
any ideological charge.
Instead, it was a lumpy
bag full of hoary chest-
nuts, leftover proposals
from prior State of the


Union addresses, and
microinitiatives so small
they are barely visible to
the naked eye.
It often felt like the
interminable in the
service of the insipid, but
Obama was conversa-
tional and upbeat. It may
be that pointlessness
suits him.
Arguably, the big-ticket
items were extending
unemployment benefits
and raising the mini-
mum wage. Those aren't
exactly towering policy
proposals, although they
loomed large compared
with the president's
other items.
He announced that
he's launching six more
hubs for high-tech
manufacturing. This was
a bold doubling down
on his announcement of
the launch of three more
manufacturing hubs in
last year's State of the
Union.
He unveiled to the
world the awkwardly


named MyRA savings
bonds, another re-
tirement vehicle that
may, as Yuval Levin of
National Affairs writes,
be difficult to distinguish
from the already existing
ones.
He made a pro forma
nod to gun control,
last year's failed crusade.
He declared, "I'm
reaching out to some of
America's leading foun-
dations and corporations
on a new initiative to
help more young men of
color facing especially
tough odds stay on
track and reach their
full potential." Good for
him, but this smacks of
community organizing
writ large.
He said he was en-
trusting Vice President
Joe Biden with the
reform of job-training
programs. These pro-
grams have existed for
decades, and billions of
dollars have been spent
on them. Yet the vice


president of the United
States has to be assigned
to see that they "train
Americans with the skills
employers need, and
match them to good jobs
that need to be filled
right now"?
After all the windup
about how the president
was going to hurtle thun-
derbolts of executive
orders down at Congress
from on high, the pres-
ident's headline unilat-
eral act was imposing a
minimum wage of $10.10
... on federal contractors
... making new hires.
Even his thunderbolts
are trifling.
It may be that the
president isn't tipping
his hand and will be
sorely tempted to
effectively legislate on
his own, especially on
immigration and climate
change, as time passes.
Certainly his base wants
him to break whatever
procedural eggs are
necessary. It is always


strange to hear Nancy
Pelosi, a former speaker
of the House, implore
the president to trample
on her coequal branch of
government, so long as
it's in a good cause.
The content of the
president's speech re-
called the vintage "small
ball" of Bill Clinton
in the mid-1990s. But
Clinton's microinitiatives
were part of a broad feint
to the center and a larger
project to associate him-
self with middle-class
values, both of which
were meant to get him
re-elected. It worked.
Obama's resort to the
picayune feels less like
a strategy and more
like a tacit admission
of exhaustion. It's good
to be king, although it's
even better if you aren't
out of gas.
Rich Lowry is the editor
of the National Review.
Readers may reach him
at comments.lowry@
nationalreview. com.


The ACAs four-word Waterloo?


someone you proba-
bly are not familiar
with has filed a suit
you probably have not
heard about concern-
ing a four-word phrase
you should know about.
The suit could blow to
smithereens something
everyone has heard alto-
gether too much about,
the Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act
(hereafter, ACA).
Scott Pruitt and some
kindred spirits might
accelerate the ACA's
collapse by blocking
another of the Obama
administration's lawless
uses of the Internal
Revenue Service. Pruitt
was elected Oklahoma's
attorney general by
promising to defend
states' prerogatives
against federal encroach-
ments and today he and
some properly litigious
people elsewhere are
defending a state pre-
rogative that the ACA
explicitly created. If they
succeed, the ACA's disin-
tegration will accelerate.
Because under the
ACA, insurance com-
panies cannot refuse


MCMANUS
FROM PAGE 9

control. But he listed
all of those in his
speech last year and
achieved none of them.
That's why the
president's embrace of
things he can do with-
out Congress makes
sense. Expect to see
more executive orders,
more White House sum-
mits and more private
sector arm-twisting.
Obama's chief image
maker, Dan Pfeiffer,

I Charlotte Hearing
Center, Inc.


coverage because of an
individual's pre-existing
condition. Because many
people might therefore
wait to purchase insur-
ance after they become
sick, the ACA requires
a mandate to compel
people to buy insurance.
And because many
people cannot afford the
insurance that satisfies
the ACA's criteria, the
ACA mandate makes it
necessary to provide sub-
sidies for those people.
The four words that
threaten disaster for the
ACA say the subsidies
shall be available to
persons who purchase
health insurance in an
exchange "established
by the state." But 34
states have chosen not to
establish exchanges.
So the IRS, which is

deployed two phrases
to dramatize this new
strategy. The president
"has a pen," he said,
meaning the power to
issue executive orders,
and he "has a phone,"
meaning the ability to
persuade corporate
CEOs, college presi-
dents and others to do
the right thing.
This will be "a year of
action," Pfeiffer added
- as opposed, presum-
ably, to a year of stalled
initiatives on Capitol
Hill.
Obama offered insight
into how he has accept-
ed his newfound limits
in a recent interview
with David Remnick of
the New Yorker.
"We cannot remake
the world entirely
during this little stretch


charged with enforcing
the ACA, has ridden to
the rescue of Barack
Obama's pride and joy.
Taking time off from
writing regulations to re-
strict the political speech
of Obama's critics, the
IRS has said, with its
breezy indifference to
legality, that subsidies
shall also be dispensed to
those who purchase in-
surance through federal
exchanges the govern-
ment has established in
those 34 states. Pruitt is
challenging the IRS in
the U.S. District Court
for the Eastern District
of Oklahoma, and there
are similar challenges
in Indiana, Virginia, and
Washington, D.C.
The IRS says its "inter-
pretation" it actually
is a revision of the law
is "consistent with," and
justified by, the "struc-
ture of" the ACA. The
IRS means that without
its rule, the ACA would
be unworkable and that
Congress could not have
meant to allow this. The
ACAs legislative history,
however, demonstrates
that Congress clearly

that we have," the
president said. "At the
end of the day, we're
part of a long-running
story. We just try to get
our paragraph right."
That doesn't mean
he'll quit trying, and
bipartisan legislation
on one big issue
might still be possible:
immigration reform.
House Speaker John A.
Boehner, R-Ohio, has
said he wants to try to
pass a series of immi-
gration bills this year,
and Obama says he's
willing to make a deal.
But expect downsized
ambition to be the
order of the day. Obama
might still like to see a
federal minimum wage
of $10.10 an hour. But
because that seems
unlikely to pass the


- and, one might say,
with malice aforethought
- wanted subsidies
available only through
state exchanges.
Some have suggested
that the language limit-
ing subsidies to state-run
exchanges is a drafting
error. Well.
Some of the ACAs
myriad defects do reflect
its slapdash enactment,
which presaged its cha-
otic implementation. But
the four potentially lethal
words were carefully
considered and express
Congress' intent.
Congress made
subsidies available only
through state exchanges
as a means of coercing
states into setting up
exchanges.
In Senate Finance
Committee deliberations
on the ACA, Chairman
Max Baucus, D-Mont.,
one of the bill's primary
authors, suggested the
possibility of making
state-run exchanges the
sole source of subsidies
because only by doing so
could the federal govern-
ment induce state co-
operation with the ACA.

Republican House, it
looks as if he'll have to
settle for the far more
modest change he
announced Tuesday:
raising the minimum
wage by executive order
to $10.10 for federal
contract workers.
That may be frus-
trating for a president
who lamented in his
speech that "corporate
profits and stock prices
have rarely been higher,
and those at the top
have never done better.
But average wages
have barely budged.
Inequality has deep-
ened. Upward mobility
has stalled.
"Our job is to reverse
these trends," he
declared.
But failing in that, as
he seems likely to do,


Then the law's insurance
requirements could
be imposed on states
without running afoul
of constitutional law
precedents that prevent
the federal government
from commandeering
state governments. The
pertinent language orig-
inated in the committee
and was clarified in the
Senate. (See "Taxation
Without Representation:
The Illegal IRS Rule
To Expand Tax Credits
Under The PPACA," by
Jonathan H. Adler and
Michael F. Cannon in
Health Matrix: Journal of
Law-Medicine.)
Also, passage of the
ACA required the vote
of every Democratic
senator. One, Nebraska's
Ben Nelson, admirably
opposed a federal ex-
change lest this become
a steppingstone toward a
single-payer system.
If courts, perhaps
ultimately including the
Supreme Court, disallow
the IRS' "interpretation"
of the law, the ACA will
not function as intend-
ed in 34 states with
65 percent of the nation's

the president promised
Tuesday to look for
incremental ways to
chip away at the gap
between rich and poor.
And he will console
himself with earlier
victories. Already, at the
White House, there's
a sense that the main
work of the Obama ad-
ministration is mostly
complete.
"If you look at the
whole eight years the
biggest and most im-
portant thing is coming
back from the brink of
economic disaster," one
of Obama's aides told
me this week. "And then
health care. Those are
the biggest changes we
will see if we look back
10 years from now.
"Immigration will fall
into that category, if we


population. If courts
allow the IRS' demarche,
they will validate this:
By dispensing sub-
sidies through federal
exchanges, the IRS will
spend tax revenues
without congressional
authorization. And by
enforcing the employer
mandate in states that
have only federal ex-
changes, it will collect
taxes remember, Chief
Justice John Roberts
saved the ACA by de-
claring that the penalty
enforcing the mandate is
really just a tax on the act
of not purchasing insur-
ance without congres-
sional authorization.
If the IRS can do
neither, it cannot impose
penalties on employers
who fail to offer ACA-
approved insurance to
employees.
If the IRS can do both,
Congress can disband
because it has become
peripheral to American
governance.
George Will is a colum-
nist for The Washington
Post. Readers may reach
him at georgewill@
washpost.com.

get it," the aide added.
But other priorities
such as preschool edu-
cation and job training
programs aren't likely
to grow beyond a few
micro-initiatives.
Still, if Obama can
make his health care
program work, avoid
new economic or inter-
national problems and
help his party retain
control of the Senate -
no small tasks he'll
count 2014 as a success.
So yes, it's a modest
agenda. But gauged
by what's doable in
the second term of an
eight-year presidency, it
is also a realistic one.
Doyle McManus is a
columnist for The Los
Angeles Times. Readers
may reach him at doyle.
mcmanus@latimes. com.


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Our Town Page 10 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


VIEWPOINT





The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 11


Disc golf charity tourney a good idea


ax Doyle has a
good idea.
That's not
surprising. You can look
around the Celtic Ray in
Punta Gorda and find
some of Max's good ideas.
The original idea for the
pub was his dad Kevin's
idea, but I bet at least some
of the recent innovations
have come from the son.
It was Max's idea to put
a steel disc golf goal out
in back of the pub. He
actually had to put two out
there, because someone
stole the first one. (Not a
good idea.) The new one is
mounted in cement.
The fact that he bought
and planted a second goal
testifies to Max's belief that
if more people around
here knew about disc golf,
more would play.
What's not to like? Max
ticked off the benefits:
It's fairly easy to learn. It's
free to play, and cheap
to get started with a disc
that's under $20. It's a


social game. Courses are
low-maintenance. You can
play almost anytime, and
even make up your own
"urban" practice course
in your neighborhood
by designating trees and
mailboxes as goals.
But why would you have
to, since Charlotte County
has its own regulation
course at North County
Regional Park in northern
Port Charlotte?
And that's where Max
has planned the Celtic
Ray's First Charity Disc
Golf Tournament, set for
Feb. 16.
"The idea is to get
people to play and see how


SUN PHOTO BY CHRIS PORTER
Max Doyle, co-owner of the Celtic Ray, is planning the Ray's
first Charity Disc Golf Tournament for Feb. 16 at North County


Regional Park in Port Charlotte.
cool it is," he said.
Max said he's hoping
90 players will come out.
They'll play 18 "holes" and
break for pizza. Then there
will be a second round of
18 for anyone who wants
to stick around. It's only
$10 to enter, and all the
proceeds go to AMIKids
Crossroads, a home for
at-risk teenage boys east of


Punta Gorda.
"We want families to
play, so the charity and the
event are a good match,"
he said.
Max has got Tony Taylor
helping to set up and run
the tourney. Tony is vice
president of Southwest
Florida Disc Golf, which
played host to last month's
13th annual Southwest


IF YOU GO
What: Celtic Ray's Charity
Disc Golf Tournament
When: Signups, 9a.m.;
start, 10a.m.- Feb. 16
Where: North County
Regional Park, 1185 O'Donnell
Blvd., Port Charlotte
Cost: $10 for 18 holes, two
rounds
Event/sponsorship info:
Tony Taylor, tonytaylor124@
gmail.com or 813-833-9573; for
updates, find the Celtic Ray on
Facebook.
Disc golf info: www.
swfdga.org/contactinfo.htm

Florida Open, right here
in Port Charlotte.
Tony said he plans
to match the beginners
with more experienced
players, to make
45 twosomes. The players,
his club and sponsors
will donate discs to the
beginners. They'll explain
the rules and how to
shoot.
Sounds good.


Now, here's another idea
from Max: How about
another disc golf course
somewhere near Punta
Gorda?
I ran the idea by City
Manager Howard Kunik,
who thought it sounded
interesting, but doesn't see
anyplace within the city
limits that would lend itself
to nine goals, let alone 18.
But Tony said he thinks
the county property just
outside the city limits near
the Carmalita Athletic
Complex at Florida Street
maybe a good spot.
There's some work to be
done here before anything
official can be proposed.
But it all starts with a good
idea, right?
Chris Porter is exec-
utive editor of the Sun
Newspapers, and writes
about good ideas that
improve the community.
If you have a good idea,
e-mail him at porter@
sun-herald.com, or call
941-206-1134.


A 'Swining' good time



for Crossroads


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER

PUNTA GORDA-
Despite threatening
clouds and persistent
sprinkles, more than a
hundred people turned
out Friday night for the
Wine and Swine fundrais-
er downtown to support
AMIKids Crossroads'
group foster home for
teenage boys.
Supporters mixed and
mingled under tents as
they drank wine and ate
roasted Spanish-style pig
that was slow-cooked in a
"caja china," a handmade
wooden roaster common-
ly used in Cuban cooking.
All the while, jazz music
played in the background.
The fundraising
event was sponsored by
Landmark Realty and
The Orange House wine
bar both on Sullivan
Street in downtown
Punta Gorda. Originally
scheduled for Thursday,
the event, which was held
at The Orange House, was
moved to Friday because
of the weather.
But soggy conditions
didn't deter party-goers
from enjoying themselves
as they listened to live
jazz music and participat-
ed in a number of raffles.
"We're having a great
time," said Dawn Olsen,
who attended the event
with her husband Craig.
"I've worked with some
foster kids in the past,
and I think it's important
to support causes like
this."
The group foster
home, which opened
last year after decades


SUN PHOTOS BY BRENDA BARBOSA
Debbie Origlio (left) and Heather Kline (right) were all laughs
at the Wine and Swine fundraiser for AMIKids Crossroads
Friday night at The Orange House in downtown Punta Gorda.
The women joked how, between them, they bought dozens of
raffles tickets and came up empty-handed. "Can you believe it,"
Origlio said. "We didn't win anything!"


Party-goers enjoyed live jazz music at the Wine and Swine
fundraiser Friday night to benefit the AMIKids Crossroads group
foster home for boys, east of Punta Gorda.


FEELING CRAMPED?
Get rid of the clutter.


I el I ITel ssif .i94iij


Irene and Jerry Haus said they purchased tickets to the Wine
and Swine fundraiser Friday night at The Orange House to
support AMIKids Crossroads' group foster home for boys. "It's a
good cause, and this is a great event,";' Irene said.


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4 Financing provided by third-party lenders. Interest will be charged to your account (at the standard, variable APR) from the purchase date if the
Spurchasebalance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. Minimum monthly payments are required for this
plan during the promotional period. Required minimum purchase of $1,000 for an 18-month deferred plan. At no time will the minimum payment
due be less than $25. Minimum Interest Charge is $2 per credit plan. DentalFirst Credit Accounts are offered by Comenity Capital Bank who determines
qualifications for credit and promotion eligibility. Standard variable APR of 26.99%, based on Prime Rate. Offer expires 7/31/14.


CHARLOTTE COUNTY COMMISSION HOW THEY VOTED TUESDAY









KEN CHRIS BILL STEPHEN R. TRICIA
DOHERTY CONSTANCE TRUEX DEUTSCH DUFFY
District 1 District 2 District 3 District 4 District 5
Approved a change order in the amount of $1,121,470 for the Sunshine Lake/Sunrise Waterway cleanup
project, and adding 154 calendar days for completion. This is for additional algae removal by ProLime Corp.,
the contractor hired to dredge the algae-infested lake. The commission originally allocated $2.5 million for the
project.

YES NO YES YES YES

Approved a budget adjustment in the amount of $3,268,000 for Charlotte County Utilities as part of a
$19 million project awarded to Gibbs & Register Inc. of Winter Garden, Fla., for the widening of Burnt Store
Road. This is for complete reconstruction of 2.6 miles of Burnt Store, expanding the two-lane corridor to a four-
lane highway from the Lee County line to north of Zemel Road.


YES YES YES YES YES

Approved a total of about $1 million for software, hardware and upgrades for the Charlotte County Utilities
billing system, Ventyx Banner, which has been in place since 2004, and provides critical support to the
operations of that department. This system requires specialized hardware and software that both have reached
the end of their life and no longer are supported, officials said. Funding comes from the CCU operations and
maintenance fund.

YES YES YES YES YES

Approved an amendment to the Stump Pass 10-Year Management Plan with Coastal Engineering
Consultants Inc. of Naples, for an increase of $139,851 to the existing contract, for a total of $1,481,661. This
expenditure is for the government-mandated monitoring program for 2014 of the beach and inlet manage-
ment plan. Funding is from the Stump Pass Beach Renourishment MSBU/TU.

YES YES YES YES YES

Amended the Charlotte County Zoning Atlas for 77 acres located at 202 Tamiami Trail, in the North Port
Charlotte area, near the Sarasota County line. The applicant requested a rezoning from commercial general
to planned development, in order to allow a car dealership with full service and repair capabilities, a rental
car agency, temporary customer and inventory parking areas, and outdoor entertainment associated with
promotional events. The planned Kia dealership would be bigger in size than the existing dealership in Cape
Coral, which is currently the largest Kia dealership in the world, with 155 employees.

YES YES YES YES YES


NEW
DENTURE NO INTEREST IF
MONEYBACK PAID IN FULL
GUARANTEE' WITHIN 18 MONTHS'





OurTown Page 12 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


I NOTICE OF NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE II FORECLOSURE I I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^ ^ 3122^ ^ 3122^^


3100








LEGALS


FICTITIOUS NAME

2/2/2 01412

2/2/2014


PRAIRIE CREEK PARK
Property Owners Association is
requesting bids for the mowing
and maintenance of the park
roadsides and greenbelts. Inter-
ested
contractors should contact Star
at 941-575-6764 or s.danko@
starhospitalitvmanagement.com for
more info & a Request for Pro-
posal packet. Proposals will be
due no later than March 4,
2014.

L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
k 3122^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-2011-CA-003390
U.S. BANK
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff.
v.
IRINA MERESHKO; SERGEY
MERESHKO A/K/A S.
MERESHKO; UNKNOWN TENANT
1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS, WHO (IS/ARE)
NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUS-
ES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on January
24, 2014, in the Circuit Court of
Charlotte County, Florida, the
clerk shall sell the property situat-
ed in Charlotte County, Florida,
described as:
LOT 36, BLOCK 3531, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION
SECTION 64, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
78A THROUGH 78F, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY FLORIDA.
a/k/a 6943 BEARDSLEY
STREET, ENGLEWOOD, FL
34224-8267
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, on Feb. 24, 2014, beginning at
11:00 A.M.
If you are a person claiming a
right to funds remaining after the
sale, you must file a claim with
the clerk no later than 60 days
after the sale. If you fail to file a
claim you will not be entitled to
any remaining funds.
Dated this 29 day of Jan.,
2014.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: J. Miles
Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTI-
TLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CER-
TAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT JON EMBURY,
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
MANAGER, WHOSE OFFICE IS
LOCATED AT 350 E. MARION
AVENUE, PUNTA GORDA,
FLORIDA 33950, AND WHOSE
TELEPHONE NUMBER IS
(941)637-2110, AT LEAST 7
DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHED-
ULED COURT APPEARANCE,
OR IMMEDIATELY UPON
RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICA-
TION IF THE TIME BEFORE
THE SCHEDULE APPEARANCE
IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU
ARE HEARING OR VOCE
IMPAIRED, CALL 711.
Publish: February 2 and 9, 2014
146641 2997161
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12003104CA
DIVISION:
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSO-
CIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUC-
CESSOR IN INTEREST TO
BANK OF AMERICA, NATION-
AL ASSOCIATION AS
TRUSTEE AS SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO LASALLE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS
TRUSTEE FOR WAMU MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CER-
TIFICATES SERIES 2007-HY3
TRUST,
Plaintiff,
vs,
DONA NEWMAN, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pur


suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated Jan. 24, 2014, and
entered in Case No.
12003104CA of the Circuit Court
of the Twentieth Judicial Circuit in
and for Charlotte County, Florida
in which U.S. Bank National Asso-
ciation, as Trustee, successor in
interest to Bank of America,
National Association as Trustee
as successor by merger to
Lasalle Bank, National Associa-
tion as Trustee for WaMu Mort-
gage Pass-Through Certificates
Series 2007-HY3 Trust, is the
Plaintiff and Dona Newman,
Stephan J. Newman, are defen-
dants, the Charlotte County Clerk
of the Circuit Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
in/on at www.charlotte.realfore-
close.com, Charlotte County,
Florida at 11:00 AM on te 24 dy
of February, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure:
PARCEL 1: A PARCEL OF
LAND LYING IN THE N 1 /2 OF
THE NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4
AND ALSO THE S 1/2 OF THE
NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF
SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 40
SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST,
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE NW CORNER
OF THE N 1/2 OF THE NW 1/4
OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION
26; THENCE N 88 DEGREES
03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE NORTH
LINE OF SAID SECTION 26,
150.07 FEET TO A POINT
LYING 150.00 FEET EAST AND
PERPENDICULAR TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID TRACT;
THENCE S 01 DEGREES 04
MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST
AND PARALLEL TO SAID WEST
LINE 102.00 FEET; THENCE N
88 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30
SECONDS EAST AND PARAL-
LEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SECTION 26, 577.99
FEET TO POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE S 00 DEGREES
29 MINUTES 32 SECONDS
EAST, 692.00 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE SOUTH LINE
OF THE NORTH 125.00 FEET
OF THE S 1/2 OF THE NW 1/4
OF THE NE 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 26; THENCE N 88
DEGREES 19 MINUTES 24
SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE 644.58 FEET TO
THE SE CORNER OF THE
NORTH 125.00 FEET OF THE
S 1/2 OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE
NE 1/4 OF SECTION 26;
THENCE N 00 DEGREES 32
MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF NW
1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SAID
SECTION 26, 694.87 FEET;
THENCE S 88 DEGREES 03
MINUTES 30 SECONDS W
AND PARALLEL TO THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 26, 644.14 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING. PAR-
CEL 2: A PARCEL OF LAND
LYING IN THE N 1/2 OF THE
NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 AND
ALSO THE S 1/2 OF THE NW
1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 26, TOWNSHIP 40
SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST,
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:BEGIN AT THE NW COR-
NER OF THE N 1 /2 OF THE
NW 114 OF THE NE 1/4 OF
SECTION 26; THENCE N 88
DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30
SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 26, 150.07 FEET TO A
POINT LYING 150.00 FEET
EAST AND PERPENDICULAR
TO THE WEST LINE OF SAID
TRACT; THENCE S 01
DEGREES 04 MINUTES 41
SECONDS EAST AND PARAL-
LEL TO SAID WEST LINE,
102.00 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE SAME LINE,
426.50 FEET; THENCE S 88
DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30
SECONDS W AND PARALLEL
TO NORTH LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 26, 139.45 FEET;
THENCE N 46 DEGREES 39
MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST,
15.00 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE WEST LINE OF SAID
TRACT; S 01 DEGREES 04
MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID WEST LINE
272.77 FEET TO THE SW
CORNER OF THE NORTH
125.00 FEET OF THE S 1/2
OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NE
1/4 OF SECTION 26; THENCE
N 88 DEGREES 19 MINUTES
24 SECONDS EAST ALONG
SOUTH LINE OF NORTH
125.00 FEET OF S 1/2 OF
THE NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4
OF SECTION 26, 72.0.92
FEET; THENCE N 00 DEGREES
29 MINUTES 32 SECONDS
WEST, 692.00 FEET; THENCE
S 88 DEGREES 03 MINUTES
30 SECONDS WEST AND PAR-
ALLEL TO NORTH LINE OF
SAID SECTION 26.577.99
FEET TO POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
A/K/A
34745 TRAILS END DR,
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33982-
8708
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated in Charlotte County, Florida
this 29 day of January, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Charlotte County, Florida
By: J. Miles


Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are enti-
tled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Administrative
Services Manager, whose office


is located at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 and
whose telephone number is
(941)637-2281, within two (2)
working days of receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
To file response please contact
Charlotte County Clerk of Court,
350 E. Marion Street, Punta
Gorda, FL 33651-1687, Tel:
(941) 637.2233; Fax: (941) 637-
2216.
Publish: February 2 and 9, 2014
272484 2997145
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:
08-2012-CA-003453
DIVISION:
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSO-
CIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUC-
CESSOR IN INTEREST TO
WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., AS
TRUSTEE, FOR J.P. MORGAN
MORTGAGE TRUST 2005-A7,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LOREE S. MONKS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pur
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated Jan. 24, 2014, and
entered in Case No. 08-2012-CA-
003453 of the Circuit Court of
the Twentieth Judicial Circuit in
and for Charlotte County, Florida
in which U.S. Bank National Asso-
ciation, as Trustee, Successor in
interest to Wachovia Bank, N.A.,
as Trustee, for J.P. Morgan Mort-
gage Trust 2005-A7, is the Plain-
tiff and Loree S. Monks, Reed J.
Monks, Regions Bank, successor
in interest to AmSouth Bank, Any
And All Unknown Parties Claiming
by, Through. Under, And Against
The Herein named Individual
Defendants) Who are not Known
To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether
Said Unknown Parties May Claim
An Interest in Spouses, Heirs,
Devisees, Grantees, Or Other
Claimants are defendants, the
Charlotte County Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash in/on at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, Charlotte County, Florida at
11:00 AM on the 24 day of Feb-
ruary, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure:
LOT 365, BLOCK 2148, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 37, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGES 41-A THRU 41-H, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
A/K/A 4654 HERMAN CIR,
PORT CHARLOTTE; FL*
33948
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated in Charlotte County, Florida
this 29 day of Jan., 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Charlotte County, Florida
By: J. Miles
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are enti-
tled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance,
Please contact the Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 and
whose telephone number is
(941)637-2281, within two (2)
working days of receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, can 1-800-955-8771.
To file response please contact
Charlotte County Clerk of Court.
350 E. Marion Street, Punta
Gorda, FL 33651-1687, Tel:
(941) 637-2238; Fax: (941) 637-
2216.
Publish: February 2 and 9, 2014
272484 2997131
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 2013-CA-000423
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff.
vs,
MELISSA S. CASEY A/K/A MELIS-
SA SUE CASEY, UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT IN POSSESSION 1,
UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES-
SION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
MELISSA S. CASEY A/K/A MELIS-
SA SUE CASEY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered June
11, 2013 in Civil Case No. 2013-
CA-000423 of the Circuit Court of
the TWENTIETH Judicial Circuit in
and for Charlotte County, Punta
Gorda. Florida, wherein SUN-
TRUST MORTGAGE, INC, is Plain-
tiff and MELISSA S. CASEY A/K/A
MELISSA SUE CASEY. UNKNOWN
TENANT IN POSSESSION 1,
UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES-
SION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
MELISSA S. CASEY A/K/A MELIS-
SA SUE CASEY, are Defendants,
the Clerk of Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com


in accordance with Chapter 45,
Florida Statutes on the 20 day of

To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


Feb., 2014 at 11:00 AM on the
following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to-wit:
Lot 7, Block 68, PORT CHAR-
LOTTE SUBDIVISION, SEC-
TION 5, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 4, Pages 1A through IF,
inclusive, of the Public
records of Charlotte County,
Florida.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
60 day after the sale.
Dated this 29 day of Jan.,
2014.
Deputy Clerk
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
BY: J. Miles
If you area person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida
33950, and whose telephone
number is (941) 637-2110, at
least 7 days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call 711.
Publish: February 2 and 9, 2014
338038 2997105

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 13001695CA
DIVISION:
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE
LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CAMILLE PUCCIO, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pur
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated Jan. 24, 2014, and
entered in Case No.
13001695CA of the Circuit Court
of the Twentieth Judicial Circuit in
and for Charlotte County, Florida
in which Nationstar Mortgage
LLC, is the Plaintiff and Camille
Puccio, Simone Puccio. Tenant #
1, Tenant # 2, The Unknown
Spouse of Camille Puccio, The
Unknown Spouse of Simone Puc-
cio, are defendants, the Charlotte
County Clerk of the Circuit Court
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash in/on at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
Charlotte County, Florida at
11:00 AM on the 26 day of Feb-
ruary, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure:
LOT 2, BLOCK 1538, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 15, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGES 4A
THROUGH 4E, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 23352 KIM AVE PORT
CHARLOTTE FL 33954-3655
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated in Charlotte County, Florida
this 29 day of January, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Charlotte County, Florida
By: J. Miles
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are enti-
tled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 and
whose telephone number is
(941)637-2281, within two (2)
working days of receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
To file response please contact
Charlotte County Clerk of Court,
350 E. Marion Street, Punta
Gorda, FL 33651-1687, Tel:
(941) 637.2233; Fax: (941) 637-
2216.
Publish: February 2 and 9, 2014
272484 2997206


Eh


I WEEKLY RECORD


Charlotte County
births

Anthony Henry Boothe,
to Janice Roberts and Ricardo
Boothe of North Port, at 8:47 a.m.
Jan. 27. He weighed 7 pounds,
9 ounces.
*Twin girls Jamie and Emily
Morris, to Christine Morris and
Tom Brister of Port Charlotte,
at 12:50 p.m. and 12:51 p.m.,
respectively, Jan. 27. Jamie weighed
4 pounds, 14 ounces, while Emily
weighed 5 pounds, 14 ounces.

Charlotte County
marriages

Fabio Elermi Carrion of North
Port, and Cristina Nicole Manna of
North Port
Lawrence James Strejcek of
North Port, and Mika Robinette
Shearer of North Port
Roopdeo Persaud of Port
Charlotte, and Nemisha Petronella
Gibbons of Port Charlotte
Gary Linn Shuler of Punta
Gorda, and Nancy Ellen Engblom of
Punta Gorda
Michal Mikus ofJablonica,
Slovakia, and Lucia Strizova of
Krakovany, Slovakia
Adam Colin Wolff of Port
Charlotte, and Lovely Kesterline
Francois of Port Charlotte
Harold Roger Starcher of
Englewood, and Marilyn Ann
Manno of Punta Gorda
Kelly Antonio Colome of
Kissimmee, Fla., and Aracelis Maria
Gutierrez of North Port
Alan Drew Katrenya Sr. of
Oxford, Conn., and Darlene Marie
Reiner of Oxford, Conn.
Michael Ernest Bollin Sr. of
Port Charlotte, and Nancy Ruth Ann
Lambert of Port Charlotte
Brandon Lee Jordan of Punta
Gorda, and Jolie Frances Schanck of
Port Charlotte


Michael Wayne Barrett Jr. of
Port Charlotte, and Arveel Kasha
Clemons of Port Charlotte
Ralph T. Palmer of Port
Charlotte, and Dorothea D. Daringer
of Port Charlotte
Roger Frederick Sheldrake of
Punta Gorda, and Sarah Rose Vella
of Punta Gorda
*Travis Lee Heaxt of Port
Charlotte, and Brookney Lynn
McCurdy of Port Charlotte
*Wayne Russell Muttart Jr. of
North Port, and Catherine Ann
Lockhart of North Port
*Daniel Joseph Mossey of Port
Charlotte, and Nancy Trude Meister
of Port Charlotte
Jorge Arreola of Port Charlotte,
and Rosalind Marlen Flores of Port
Charlotte
*Ashley David Vanderloop of
Punta Gorda, and Shona Ranae
Brown of Port Charlotte
*Richard Carter Caruthers Jr. of
Pomeroy, Ohio, and Julia Ann King
of Pomeroy, Ohio

Charlotte County
divorces

Whitney H. Andreu v. Douglas
Keith Andreu
*Jorge Martin Caballero v.
Carmin Morales Caballero
*Oneil Theophilus Campbell v.
Shakenya Marki Obair
Rebecca Lynn Trueman
Ebrahimi v. Donald Ebrahimi
Kristy Ann Hanlon v. Scot
William Hanlon
Stephen J. Murphy v. Donna J.
Scarlatelli
Ngocngan Thi Nguyen v. Viet
Quoc K. Ngo
Santiago M. Martin Ocampos v.
Gisela Gomez Boada
Jorge Simo v. Maritza Simo
Christina Marie Twombly v.
Ricky Dean Twombly
Linda Jane Tyler v. Jerry Lee
Tyler


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Instrumentalist
to perform

Award-winning
composer and instru-
mentalist Matt Veuti
will perform at 7 p.m.
Feb. 10 at theYoga
Sanctuary, 112 Sullivan
St., Punta Gorda. Veuti
will play three rare
instruments from the
Swiss-based PANArt
company, makers of the
Hang and the Gubal. He
is touring with the two
Hangs, and debuting the
Gubal. Tickets cost $20
per person. For more
information, call 941-
505-9642, or visit www.


theyogasanctuary.biz.

'Shrek The
Musical' comes
to Fishville

DreamWorks theatri-
cals and the Charlotte
High School Drama
Club will present a
preview of their up-
coming "Shrek The
Musical" performance
at 6 p.m. Wednesday
at Fishermen's Village,
1200 W. Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda. The
performance will last
30 minutes to an hour.
For more information,
call 941-575-3007.





:The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


FROM PAGE ONE


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 13


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Awards
ceremony
planned
The Charlotte Local
Education Foundation
Inc. will present its
annual Teacher and
Support Employee of
the Year Reception
and Awards Ceremony
from 4:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Feb. 12 at
the Charlotte Harbor
and Event Conference
Center, 75 Taylor St.,
Punta Gorda. Miriam
Zamorano of "FOX 4
Rising" will join Mike
Riley as a master of
ceremonies for the
evening.
Tickets cost $20 in
advance, or $25 at the
door. Tickets may be
purchased at www.
charlotteschool
foundation.org. For
more information, call
Mary Fred Clemmons at
941-255-7500, ext. 294.

NAACP to hold
breakfast
The NAACP will hold
a Woman to Woman


Breakfast at 7:30 a.m.
Feb. 22 at the Captain's
Table at Fishermen's
Village, 1200W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta
Gorda. Doors will
open at 7:30 a.m., and
breakfast will be served
at 8:15 a.m. Guest
speakers and much
more are planned. The
WIN Group, or Women
in NAACP, will play
host to the breakfast.
This event is open to
the public; men are
welcome also. Tickets
cost $20 per person.
For more information,
call 941-833-9242,
or email hollyd501@
hotmail.com.

DAV partners
with county fair
Disabled American
Veterans Chapter 82
will partner with the
Charlotte County Fair
on Tuesday. All veterans
with a picture ID will
receive $2 off beer
products at the fair. For
more information, call
Mike at 941-204-4212.


SUN PHOTO BY STEVE REILLY, reilly@sun-herald.com
A dozen boaters and live-aboards who moor their vessels
in Lemon Bay's Chadwick Cove see no reason why Charlotte
County needs to create an official mooring field. Pictured
here are: Dennis Young, Sheri Kempton, Mike Dodds, Bud
Williams, Jack Copeland, Andy Paine, Joanne Williams, Ron
Brewer, John Newman, Michale Zarzano, Don Wynia and
Capt. Bill Armiger.


MOORING
FROM PAGE 1

Marine advisory com-
mittees; and the Parks
and Recreation Advisory
Board are scheduled to
discuss mooring fields
in Lemon Bay during a
joint meeting at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at the Mid-
County Regional Library
in Port Charlotte.
"I suggested bring-
ing up the topic,"
Commissioner Stephen
R. Deutsch said. He
brought up the idea
of a mooring field in
Lemon Bay for improving
boating safety and the
environmental preser-
vation of the "integrity
of the bay." Over the
years, Deutsch suggest-
ed, unattended boats
have sunk creating a
potential environmental
and boating hazard.
The consensus among
a dozen boaters mooring
in Chadwick Cove is that
nothing is "broken," there
are no problems, so what
is there for Charlotte
County to fix?
"They just want the
money in their pockets,"
Young said. Other boaters
agreed, but Deutsch said
there's been no talk of
fees.
"This is a transient
harbor," Dodds said.
"There could be 100 or
more boats out there on
the weekends. There's
only five live-aboards.
"And if you want to
enforce the law, the way
it really is maritime
law we are due reason-
able access," he said. "We
are just simple people
living out there. I'm
retired and can't afford a
condominium, and I like
my lifestyle.
"And most of us care
about (water quality) be-
cause we live out there,"
he said.
The idea is not new for


the county.
In 2007, the county
undertook a feasibility
study that determined
Chadwick Cove has
sufficient depths for
a mooring field to
accommodate 20- to
40-foot vessels. One
option would allow for
10 moorings for 40-foot
vessels. A second option
recommended a mooring
field be designed for
11 vessels up to 20 feet,
eight vessels up to
30 feet, and five moorings
for vessels up to 40 feet.
The study also
concluded the public
Chadwick Park, across
Lemon Bay from where
boats now moor in
Chadwick Cove, could
be incorporated into a
site for the management
of the mooring field.
The study noted how
the Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection generally
requires that restrooms,
showers, garbage dispos-
al and sewage pump-
outs be provided to the
boaters.
The county also will
have to address the
environmental per-
mitting, since the state
recognizes Lemon Bay as
an aquatic preserve and
Florida water, and federal
wildlife officials might
call for an "essential fish
habitat" review, the study
suggested.
Dodds, Young and oth-
er boaters said the idea of
a managed mooring area
might be more palatable
if the county would
be willing to provide a
dinghy dock and other
amenities. However they
agreed official mooring
areas generally charge
boaters $20 daily, $300
a month or more and
end up half full or less.
Boaters often will anchor
elsewhere, wherever they
don't face charges to
moor.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


NFL
FROM PAGE 1
he said. "I have a lot of
friends who played in the
Super Bowl and said it
was a great experience.
And it was one I, unfor-
tunately, wasn't able to
partake in. I always wish
I had played in the Big
Game."
Active NFL players are
offered two Super Bowl
tickets each season.
Kitson never took advan-
tage of the perk.
"I was determined that
if I was going to go to
that game, I was going to
be playing on the field,"
he said.
In 2007, Kitson gave
in when a friend invited
him to go to Super Bowl
XLI in Miami.
"It was pretty fun," he
said. "I actually enjoyed
going to the game."
This year, Kitson will
opt for a small gathering
at his home in West Palm
Beach. He's excited to
watch tonight's game
between the Seattle
Seahawks and the
Denver Broncos with
someone else who knows
a thing or two about
football.
"One of the great joys
for me is my high school
football coach will be
there," Kitson said.
Frank Bottone coached
for about five decades
at New Providence High
School in New Jersey
before retiring recently.
He's the fifth-winningest
coach in New Jersey high
school history, and has


330 wins and seven state
championships, accord-
ing to www.NJ.com. He
comes down to South
Florida for the winter.
"He's still sharp as a
tack," Kitson said. "He'll
be calling offenses and
defenses. It's really a lot
of fun."

Former Buc
always watches
Big Game
Another local former
NFL player who never
played on Super Bowl
Sunday still appreciates
watching the game too.
RhondyWeston, 47,
played defensive end
for the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers in 1989. Now,
he coaches Pop Warner
football in Englewood.
"Ultimately, I wanted
to get there (to the Super
Bowl)," Weston said. "But
at the same time, it's fun
watching everyone on


PRESENTED BY



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the big stage."
Although he played on
the other side of the ball
than Kitson, he sees the
game through the same
rare perspective.
"I probably understand
the game more than
other people who haven't
been in that situation or
environment," Weston
said.
The ex-Buc watches
the Big Game every year.
For Super Bowl XLVIII, he
plans to watch from home
with his wife and two kids.
"We kind of do our
own little Super Bowl
with chips and dip,
and wings and things,"
Weston said. "I enjoy it."
Every once in a while,
Weston says, he'll catch
himself analyzing the
game maybe a little too
much.
"I try look at it as a
fan," he said. "But at the
same time, being that
I know what's going on


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SUN PHOTO BY
CHRIS PORTER
Englewood Tigers
S coach Rhondy
S Weston, former
*; defensive end
with the Tampa
Bay Bucs, gives his
team a pep talk
before their game
with the Venice
Vikings Danes in
V enice in 2010.
S Weston is able to
S watch the Super
CA Bowl tonight
through the eyes
of someone who
knows the game of
football more than
the average fan.
and I know when a guy
is out of place and not
doing his responsibility,
I'll notice those things."
Tonight, Seattle
plays Denver at
MetLife Stadium in the
Meadowlands to see
which will be the NFL
champion.
Weston said he'd like
to see the Seahawks win
because they haven't
won before, but he'd
also like to see Denver's
quarterback, Peyton
Manning, win to cap off
a record-setting season.
Kitson who played
in plenty of freezing
temperatures in Green
Bay thinks it will
be interesting to see
a cold-weather Super
Bowl. But he's on the
fence about who to
cheer for too.
But the Big Game
won't get by them.
Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


Macular Degeneration Symposia.,

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# Archery Instruction-12:00pm


Make & Take Crafts Over 30 Vendors
Free Swag Bags to first 250 attendees e Food Available for Purchase
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It' fii D 7mar Charlotte Sun ol "A
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Congratulations to All of The 2013 Reader's Choice Winners
1st Place & Finalist Winners can advertise in FUTURE SECTIONS like this by calling 941-258-9520


:OurTown Page 14 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014




:The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


I ,. Charlotte Sun __ v
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LEADER'S CHC
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C OurTown Page 15






:OurTownPagel6 C www.sunnewspapers.net FROM PAGE ONE The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


SUN PHOTO BY GARY ROBERTS
SUN PHOTO BY GARY ROBERTS


I The Rahe family of Punta Gorda Teresa, Steve and their kids Ethan and Jacob order up
SUNPHOTO BY GARIA lunch Saturday at the 26th Annual Charlotte County Fair, which continues until Feb. 9.
SUN PHOTO BY TAMI GARCIA


Hailey Owens, 6, raises her hands in the air as she rides on the NASCAR ride during the Charlotte
County Fair Friday evening.


SUN PHOTO BYTAMI GARCIA


SUN PHO ITO BY BET I SY WILLIAMS
Grand Champion of the Charlotte County Fair 2014 Steer Show is 16-month-old Oliver, entered
by Victoria Baker, 18, a Future Farmers of America member and a senior at Charlotte High School
in Punta Gorda. They stand here with this year's judge from Arcadia, James Selph, during the
competition Friday evening.


Sharon Sandlofer, director of the Wolf Pack Project
from South Carolina, receives a kiss from one of
her Eastern timber wolves Friday evening at the
fair. Sandlofer hosts the Wolves of the World Show
- an educational demonstration program where
the trained wolves also will perform various feats
throughout the fair's run.


SUN PHOTO BY GARY ROBERTS
Chyanne Eller, 17, of Punta Gorda trims the
hair of her 224-pound hog, Busta Swine,
before Saturday's showing at the Charlotte
County Fair.


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11


FAIR
FROM PAGE 1

corn dogs and cotton
candy all within arm's
reach. At the Famous
Daytona Belly Buster
stand, Eric Lewis of
Punta Gorda chomps
down on the Best Burger.
His verdict: "The best."
Over at the Ravenous
Rhino gourmet food
truck, the menu presents
HogZilla Sliders and
Rhino Balls, touted as
big and round, the best
in town. Sheryl Unwin of
North Port opted for the
gyro.
"It's nice and fresh,
very good," she said.
The photorealism artist
lives only a mile from
the Charlotte County
Fairgrounds, but this is
her first visit to the fair.
"I enjoy the agricultural
part of it," she said.
So does Chyanne
Eller, 17, a senior at


6:30pm, March 1, 2014
at Holy Trinity Banquet Hall
24411 Rampart Blvd., Pt Charlotte

Tickets are $75 p/p
To purchase tables or tickets,
please contact
sboon@volunteercare.org or call
Susan at 941-766-9570 Ext. 4.
Purchase tickets/sponsorships online
www.VolunteerCare.org.


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Charlotte High School,
who is trimming the
hair of her 224-pound
hog, Busta Swine, for the
evening's Hog Show. It
will take everything she
has to contain Busta's
enthusiasm.
"He's crazy," she said.
"He loves running as soon
as he gets out of the pen."
This will be the third
year that Eller will be
showing. In her sopho-
more year, she prepped
and primped another
pig to become Grand
Champion.
"It's fun to compete
and just be around here,"
the Future Farmers
of America member
said. "It's a really good
experience, and I learn
responsibility."


FAIR SCHEDULE
The Charlotte County Fair runs
through Feb. 9 at the Charlotte
County Fairgrounds, 2333
El Jobean Road (State Road 776),
Port Charlotte.

Showtimes
Tricky Dogs Show: 12:30 p.m.
and 3 p.m. today and Feb. 9;
5:15 p.m., 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m.
Friday; and 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m.
and 7:15 p.m. Saturday.
Great American Frontier
Show: 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m.
today; 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Monday through Thursday;
6:30 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10 p.m.
Friday; 2:30 p.m., 5:30 p.m. and
9 p.m. Saturday; and 1:15 p.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Feb. 9.
Wolves of the World Show:
2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. today and
Feb. 9; 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Monday through Thursday;
5:30,7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Friday;
and 3:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. and
9:30 p.m. Saturday.

Fair schedule and ride
promotions
Today: Open noon to 6 p.m.
Seniors'day- $2 admission;
others: ride all rides from noon
to 6 p.m. for $15, admission not
included.
Monday: Open 5 p.m. to
10 p.m. Ride all rides for $2
per ride from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Admission is $2.
Tuesday: Open 5 p.m. to
10 p.m. Free admission day-
Ride all rides from 5p.m. to
10 p.m. for $15. The free admis-
sion is sponsored by Palm Auto


Nine-year-old
Mackenzie Jackson
and her brother, Gage,
also will be showing.
Gage has two chickens,
and Mackenzie has her
rabbit, Ashes.
"I like her fur," she
said. "She's nice, but
sometimes she'll bite.
And she likes digging into
your clothes."
Meanwhile, the Hales
continue to follow the
kids from ride to ride,
still not tempted to try
one themselves. Those
days may be over, but the
memories remain. Now,
the joy on their children's
faces is enough.
"It reminds me of when
I was a kid going to the
fair," Jennifer said.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com

Mall. Contemporary Christian
Concert offered, with music
provided by Port Charlotte United
Methodist and First Alliance
churches.
Wednesday and Thursday:
Open 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Ride all
rides from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. for
$15, admission not included.
Friday: Open 5 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Ride all rides from 5p.m. to
1 a.m. for $20, admission
included. No-ride general admis-
sion is $5.
Saturday: Open noon to
11p.m. 4-H/FFA day free
admission with 4-H/FFA card, pin
and shirt; others: ride all rides
from noon to 6 p.m. for $20,
admission not included.
Feb. 9: Open noon to 6 p.m.
Student day- free admission
for all students and school
employees with a valid ID; others:
ride all rides from noon to
6 p.m. for $15, and regular adult
admission is $5.
Regular gate admission
Adults, $7; students, $5;
children 5 and younger, free.
Parking: $5

Agriculture shows
Rabbit/cavy show:
12:30 p.m. today.
Goat show: 6:30 p.m.
Monday.
Open breed show: 7 p.m.
Friday.

Auctions/sales all
Saturday
*Small animal auction: noon.
*Buyers'barbecue: 2 p.m.
*Large animal auction: 4 p.m.


I


PLANTATION SHUU
$...95 -
S 10"395 ::


You


re Invited
S Join us for an evening of hula dancers,
fire jugglers, tropical music and live
S/ auction. Tropical attire encouraged.


9


I


:OurTown Page 16 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


NO '' III


FROM PAGE ONE


v.-"






INSIDE

Fla. law allows
backyard
shooting ranges


It has been a month since
friends first fired their guns in
this makeshift shooting area
- surrounded by a chain-link
fence, a shiny RV and the canal.
The shots sent shockwaves
through the neighborhood.
Page 2 -


Differing
perspectives fuel
debate over Knox case


To some Americans, especially
those in her hometown of
Seattle, Amanda Knox seems a
victim, unfairly hounded by a
capricious legal system in Italy
that convicted her this week
in the death of a 21-year-old
British woman.
Page 3 -


Clashes grip Thai
capital on eve of vote


Gunfire rang out across a busy
intersection in Thailand's capital
for more than an hour Saturday
as government supporters
clashed with protesters trying
to derail tense nationwide
elections.
Page 7 -


Indonesia
volcano erupts


An Indonesian volcano that
has been rumbling for months
unleased a major eruption
Saturday, killing 14 people just
a day after authorities allowed
thousands of villagers who had
been evacuated to return to its
slopes, saying that activity was
decreasing, officials said.
Page 9 -


Communists stage
1st Sochi protest


In the shadows of an elevated
highway, inside an out-of-
the-way park, a hardy band of
local Communist Party members
staged the first formal protest of
the Sochi Olympics.
Page 10 -


I' I



h eWr ewww.sunnewspapers.net

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 2, 2014 ----w-----


Drug evidence compromised



Florida law agency chemist may have stolen pain pills


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -The
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement announced
Saturday it is investigating
2,600 cases handled by a
Pensacola-based agency
chemist after discovering
dozens of instances where


prescription pain pills that
were seized by police and
tested as evidence were
swapped with over-the-
counter pills.
FDLE Commissioner Gerald
Bailey said the chemist han-
dled cases involving 80 law
enforcement agencies from 35
counties since he was hired in
2006. Most, but not all, of the


cases involved testing drug
evidence, though it was not
immediately clear how many
cases might be compromised.
The situation was discov-
ered after Escambia County
investigators realized evi-
dence was missing and later
found other evidence pack-
ages where prescription pills
had been substituted with


non-prescription pills.
It potentially means
drug charges will have to
be dropped and prisoners
released if it's determined
the chemist tampered with
evidence, Bailey said.
"This has the potential of
impacting hundreds of drug


By MARY CLARE JALONICK
and STEVE KARNOWSKI
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
MINNEAPOLIS Farm subsi-
dies that have guided agriculture
through record profits in recent
years are going away in the five-
year farm bill that could become
law in the coming week. But new
subsidies in the legislation could
be just as generous, and farmers
aren't complaining.
Gone are direct payments, a po-
litically untenable system in which
landowners got fixed amounts per
acre, whether crop prices were
high or low or even if they didn't


plant at all. Those will be replaced --.. : .. 1--- .
by a choice of one of two different .- "
subsidy approaches that require
producers to suffer losses before -.
they can get payouts. The bill also
contains a new insurance-based
program for cotton farmers.
"We loved the old farm bill," said
Woody Anderson, who grows 3,500
acres of cotton in west-central
Texas near Colorado City. But
farmers knew political support for
direct payments was fading, he
said. Dow Brantley discusses his plans for the upcoming growing
"We felt like this insurance-type season at one of his fields near England, Ark., Friday. Farm
program was innovative. It was subsidies that have guided agriculture through record profits in
recent years are going away in the five-year farm bill that could
FARM 14 become law as soon as next week.


Keystone XL pipeline foes undaunted by report


Department report released
Friday, which raised no major
objections to the pipeline. The
oil industry, some union groups
and congressional Republicans
called on the Obama admin-
istration to move forward with
the project, while a coalition of
landowners and environmen-
talists say there is still cause
for denying a federal permit.
The project would ship 830,000
barrels of oil a day from Canada
to Texas Gulf Coast refineries.


By GRANT SCHULTE
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrITER
LINCOLN, Neb. -With yet
another obstacle removed for
the Keystone XL pipeline, op-
ponents were pressing forward
with a lawsuit to challenge the
project, public protests and an
effort to inject the issue into the
November elections.
Supporters and opponents
both were quick to claim
victories with the U.S. State


*A 1


Ukraine's opposition leader Vitali Klitschko joins a de
station to support the opposition during the 50th Se
Conference in Munich, Germany, Saturday.


Meanwhile, farmers and
ranchers in Nebraska who op-
pose the pipeline are planning
to run for seats on a state board
that regulates power stations
that are needed along the proj-
ect route. And national activists
say they have recruited more
than 75,000 volunteers willing to
participate in civil disobedience,
should President Barack Obama
approve the Keystone project.
The project now goes to a
30-day comment period and a


review by U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry and other agencies.
Obama has 90 days to make the
decision on the pipeline, but the
White House on Friday disputed
the notion that the report is
headed to a fast approval. Oil
began flowing last week through
an Oklahoma-to-Texas section
already approved by Obama.
"There's no question, if the
president approves this permit,
KEYSTONE14


Russia slams West's support

for Ukraine opposition


By DAVID RISING
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
MUNICH Russia's foreign
minister slammed Western
support of Ukraine's opposition,
suggesting Saturday that it is help-
ing fuel the escalation of violence.
Ukraine has faced two months
of major protests that started
after President Viktor Yanukovych
backed off an agreement to deep-
APPHOTOen ties with the European Union
in favor of relations with Moscow.
mon- The protests had been mostly
security peaceful until mid-January,
when demonstrators angered by


new anti-protest laws launched
violent clashes with police. Three
protesters died in the clashes, two
of them from gunshot wounds.
Police insist they didn't fire the
fatal shots.
At a gathering of the world's top
diplomats and defense officials in
Munich, Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov took issue with what
he said were "prominent European
politicians actually encouraging
such actions."
"What does incitement of
increasingly violent street protests
RUSSIA 14


Farm bill plows under direct payments


AP PHOTOS
In this photo taken Aug. 7,2013, farmer Ben Burgess examines a rice field near Coy, Ark. A new five-year farm bill could become law as soon as next week.

New five-year program could

become law as soon as next week .. .. .










Law allows backyard shooting ranges


BIG PINE KEY (AP)
- Near the National
Key Deer Refuge in the
Lower Keys, on a sleepy
street called Mango Lane,
retired sheriff's deputy
Huey Gordon checked the
waterway behind neigh-
bor DougVarrieur's home
for boat traffic.
'All clear?" asked
Varrieur, an author of diet
cookbooks and owner of
rental properties.
"Yes, sir, you are,"
Gordon said.
To whichVarrieur
replied: "The range is hot."
He put on earmuffs and,
within a few seconds, the
peace of the residential
neighborhood was
replaced with the burst
of small-caliber gunfire.
Varrieur fired seven shots
that traveled 21 feet to a
target that had three cans
inside a box and a picture
of a zombie holding a
screaming woman.
'All right, one dead can,"
said Varrieur, 57.
It has been a month


WELLINGTON (AP) -
A former New York City
assistant district attorney
and philanthropist
died after falling in a
Florida horse jumping
competition.
Anne Heyman, 52, died
inWellington, Fla., on
Friday after a fall at the
Palm Beach International
Equestrian Center at
about 10:30 a.m. She
was flown to Delray
Medical Center, where
she died three hours
later, the Palm Beach Post
reported.
Heyman was born
in South Africa and
attended the George


since the friends first
fired their guns in this
makeshift shooting area -
surrounded by a chain-
link fence, a shiny RV and
the canal. The shots sent
shockwaves through the
neighborhood.
It became even scar-
ier once the neighbors
learned that onVarrieur's
side was a state law on the
books since 1987. Varrieur
said most gun owners like
himself had just assumed
they couldn't shoot in
residential neighborhoods.
"I honestly had hoped
no one would catch wind
of it and it would become
public knowledge,"
Monroe County Sheriff
Rick Ramsay said of the
state law that pre-empts
local ordinances. "I'm
concerned now that
people know. This isn't
about the right to own and
bear arms. My concern is
public safety and quality
of life."
Ramsay is not the
only one who is worried.


Washington School of
Law. She went on to work
for the Manhattan district
attorney's office and later
led the creation of the
Agahozo-Shalom Youth
Village, a community
for children orphaned
during the 1994 Rwandan
genocide.
"Each of us grieves not
only for the passing of
a tremendous woman
and a true visionary, but
also for the loss suffered
by her family," the
organization said in an
announcement posted
on its website. "She has
made a remarkable
impact on this world and


Since word got out about
the legality ofVarrieur's
"Gun Day" he shoots
from 3 to 4 p.m. every
Wednesday- citizens
and lawmakers up and
down the island chain
have become concerned
that gun owners less
responsible thanVarrieur
will begin shooting in their
own yards.
"Without any oversight,
somebody's neighbor
could set up a gun range
and invite his friends
over and have a good
old time shooting," said
longtime Monroe County
Commissioner George
Neugent. "That's a little
scary situation, and I say
that as a gun owner and
somebody who believes in
the Second Amendment."
Even Varrieur said he
was surprised to discover
that he could shoot with
few restrictions and with
no mandatory safety
requirements.
If people want to shoot
on private property next


we will continue to work
to uphold her legacy."
Rwandan officials also
mourned her loss.
"Deeply saddened
by sudden passing of
Anne Heyman," wrote
Rwandan Foreign
Minister Louise
Mushikiwabo in a mes-
sage on Twitter. "I know
she lives on in many
vibrant Rwandan girls she
worked hard for."
Heyman and her hus-
band, Seth Merrin, were
inspired to help Rwandan
orphans after hearing
about their struggles at a
talk about the genocide
in 2005.


to a day care center, they
can. Just last month, Ernie
Vasiliou threatened to put
a private gun range on a
one-acre lot on Ranches
Road west of Boynton
Beach if a proposed day
care center were approved
on land next to his.
Vasiliou said noisy kids
would ruin his dream-
home plans.
When Monroe County
commissioners asked
whether noise ordinances
could be invoked to stop
shooting at private homes,
County Attorney Bob
Shillinger said no.
Varrieur, a snowbird,
said he did not set out to
create the firestorm. For
years, he had been content
shooting his gun at the
range he built at his rural
home on 61/2 acres near
the Smoky Mountains in
North Carolina.
"I was complaining to
my gun shop owner that
the nearest range from
here is in Big Coppitt
Key, which is 50 miles

I STATE BRIEFS

Bok Tower Gardens
to receive $12
million makeover
LAKE WALES (AP) -
Bok Tower Gardens, a
central Florida landmark,
is aiming for a $12 million
renovation.
The cost will pay for the
creation of new gardens
and restoration of existing
ones, all tethered by a
new, hard-surface path,
giving full access to the
disabled and parents with
strollers. Annual mem-
bers have raised all but
$4.3 million of the needed
funds.
Other projects include
a children's discovery gar-
den, an outdoor kitchen
for private parties, a new
Florida wild garden, an
enhanced shuttle route
and new exhibits detail-
ing park history.

Court rules
against judge in
Facebook case
DAYTONA BEACH
(AP) -An appellate court
has ruled that a judge
was wrong to "friend" on
Facebook a woman whose
divorce case the judge


AP PHOTO
This photo taken Jan. 22, shows Doug Varrieur circling every
bullet hole to account for every bullet that was fired at the
target he built at his canal front home on Big Pine Key, Fla.


round trip, costs $45 an
hour and is enclosed in
a building with people
shooting around you that
you don't know," Varrieur
said. "I told him in North
Carolina, I could just go
out to the gun range in my
yard and fire my weapons,
and it's too bad you can't
do that in Florida, too."
The gun shop owner
told him that there were
"rumors" that you could.
It didn't take Varrieur long



presided over.
The 5th District Court of
Appeal in Daytona Beach
last week ruled that Judge
Linda Schoonover should
not have sent a Facebook
friend request to Sandra
Chace when the judge was
still presiding over Chace's
divorce case.
Chace didn't respond to
the request on the advice
of her attorney. Chace
claims the judge retaliated
against her by ordering
her to pay her ex-husband
a high amount of alimony
and assume most of the
marital debt.
Chace had requested
that Schoonover disqualify
herself from the case, and
the appellate court agreed.
The appellate court
said such actions by a
judge can undermine the
judge's appearance of
impartiality.

Meth lab catches
fire while girl left
home alone
ORANGE CITY (AP)-
Authorities say a meth lab
caught fire while a 9-year-
old girl was left home
alone.
The Volusia County


to lookup Florida statute
790.15, and he was sur-
prised by what he found.
"I said to my wife: 'Do
you know the only rules
to discharging firearms on
residential property are
that you can't fire over a
right of way of any paved
public road, highway or
street, you can't fire over
any occupied dwelling and
you can't fire recklessly
or negligently?' "Varrieur
said. "That's it."


Sheriff's Office has charged
Melissa Berry and Jonathan
Cobum with child neglect,
manufacturing meth, arson
and cultivation of cannabis.
Deputies were called to
the home near Orange City
Friday at about 3:45 p.m.
A neighbor reported
seeing white smoke coming
from the garage and said it
was getting worse.
When deputies arrived, a
girl came out of the house
and said she had been
inside alone. She was taken
to a nearby hospital as a
precaution but did not
sustain any injuries.

More than dozen
displaced in Tampa
apartment fire
TAMPA (AP) More
than a dozen people have
been displaced after a fire
at a Tampa apartment
complex.
Hillsborough County
Fire Rescue was alerted
to the blaze Saturday at
about 3 a.m.
Firefighters found
heavy flames billowing
through the roof. A team
went through the building
searching for residents. All
were safely evacuated.


obraie'M V&-6 ^ 412orn asstow ^^^r^"<^ w


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Mid-Winter Open House

& Collector Car Show
Saturday, February 8, 2014
9 AM to 1 PM at the
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte
ADMISSION IS FREE!

Tours of Sun Newspapers office and plant
10:00am Noon
See how your AWARD-WINNING NEWSPAPER operates!
Live Music from "Power Outage Continues"
Guest Appearance by Las Vegas Performer Jimmy Mazz
Enjoy the vehicles that represent transportation of YESTERYEAR, including
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Space restrictions allow for a total of 100 entries Vehicles must be 23 years old
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Philanthropist dies


after fall from horse


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-Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


STATE NEWS









Differing perspectives fuel debate over Knox case


SEATTLE (AP)-To
some Americans, especial-
ly those in her hometown
of Seattle, Amanda Knox
seems a victim, unfairly
hounded by a capricious
legal system in Italy that
convicted her this week in
the death of a 21-year-old
British woman.
But in Europe, some
see her as a privileged
American who is getting
away with murder,
embroiled in a case that
continues to make global
headlines and reinforces
a negative image of U.S.
citizens behaving badly -
even criminally abroad
without any punishment.
As she remains free in
the U.S., the perceptions
will likely fuel not only the
debate about who killed
Meredith Kercher in 2007
and what role, if any, Knox
played in her death, but
complicate how the U.S.
and Italian governments


resolve whether she should
be sent to Italy to face
prison.
"It's been a polarizing
case, and that polarization
will remain," said Anne
Bremner, a Seattle attorney
and Knox supporter.
The divergent views
on who killed Kercher
are rooted not just in
the typical dynamics of
a legal case in which the
two sides hold opposing
narratives, but also in the
differences between the
justice systems in the U.S.
and Italy, and examples of
Americans avoiding Italian
justice.
After being first con-
victed and then acquitted,
Knox and her one-time
boyfriend, Raffaele
Sollecito, were convicted
again Thursday, following
their third trial. Knox was
sentenced to 28 12 years,
Sollecito to 25 years. The
court's reasoning isn't


expected to be released for
three months.
The tone of some British
newspaper coverage
reflected skepticism about
Knox's protestations of
innocence. "Shameless in
Seattle" was the front-page
headline on Saturday's
Daily Mail, which referred
to Knox's "brazen TV
charm offensive to escape
extradition."
Any decision on whether
to return Knox to Italy will
ultimately be made by the
U.S. State Department.
There have been other
high-profile cases in which
Italians hoped in vain
to have Americans face
justice there, notably the
case of a U.S. Marine jet
that sliced a gondola cable
in the Italian Alps in 1998,
killing 20 people.
Under NATO rules, the
U.S. military retained juris-
diction, and the pilot was
acquitted of manslaughter.


More recently, in 2009
Italian courts convicted -
in absentia 26 CIA and
U.S. government employ-
ees in the kidnapping of an
Egyptian cleric suspected
of recruiting terrorists in
Milan.
Some lawyers familiar
with the process say Knox
has little hope of avoiding
extradition under the terms
of the U.S.-Italy treaty,
but that won't stop her
supporters from mounting
a campaign to keep her in
the U.S.
They're appealing to
American principles about
trying someone multiple
times for the same crime,
even though under Italian
law her earlier conviction
and subsequent acquittal
were never finalized, and
even her third trial was
considered part of the first
prosecution against her.
They're also asking
how one appellate court


could find her actually
innocent, while another
court convicts her beyond
a reasonable doubt.
Kercher, 21, was found
dead in the bedroom of
the apartment she and
Knox shared in the town of
Perugia, where they were
studying. Kercher had been
sexually assaulted and her
throat slashed.
Investigators claimed
it had been a drug-fueled
sex game gone awry an
accusation that made the
case a tabloid sensation.
Knox, now 26, and
Sollecito, now 29, denied
any involvement. After ini-
tially giving confused alibis,
they insisted they were at
Sollecito's apartment that
night, smoking marijuana,
watching a movie and
having sex.
But police and news
media focused on what
was described as Knox's
bizarre behavior afterward


AP PHOTO


Amanda Knox prepares to leave
the set following a television
interview, Friday, in New York.
- shopping for underwear,
embracing Sollecito and
turning cartwheels for
police as she became a
suspect.
Meanwhile, a third de-
fendant was arrested and
convicted separately: Ivory
Coast-born Rudy Guede,
a drug dealer whose DNA
was found in the room
where Kercher was killed,
and who acknowledged
being there the night of the
murder.


Christie critics seize

on ex-loyalist's claims


TRENTON, N.J. (AP)
- As New Jersey law-
makers last year began
investigating lane closures
that caused four days of
brutal traffic jams near
the George Washington
Bridge, Gov. Chris Christie
was insistent about one
thing: He did not know
about the tie-ups until
they were over.
His critics had doubts
but not proof, even as
emails made public in
January showed that one
of Christie's aides called
for "some traffic problems
in Fort Lee," apparently
as political retribution
against the Democratic
mayor of the town for
not supporting Christie's
re-election campaign.
Friday, the lawyer for
a former Christie loyalist
said in a letter that
"evidence exists" that
Christie knew about the
closures as they were
happening, although
he did not accuse the
Republican governor and
possible 2016 presidential
candidate of knowing
about it beforehand. In a
statement, Christie's office
denied the allegation
made on behalf of former
Port Authority of New York
and New Jersey executive
David Wildstein.
But even without
detailing any evidence, the
claim gave Christie's critics


something new to seize
on as they bashed the
governor as he appeared
at events leading up to
Sunday's Super Bowl in his
state.
"I know it's Super
Bowl weekend and Chris
Christie doesn't want to
talk about anything but the
game, but it looks like he's
going to need to change
his plans," Democratic
National Committee
spokesman Michael Czin
said in a statement.
Attorney Alan Zegas
laid out Wildstein's claim
that Christie was not
being truthful in a letter
Friday asking the Port
Authority, the entity that
runs the bridge, to pay his
legal fees. He also says in
the letter that Wildstein
"contests the accuracy of
various statements that
the governor made about
him and he can prove the
inaccuracy of some."
Documents released
Jan. 8 showed that
Wildstein, as Christie's No.
2 man at the Port Authority,
ordered the lane closures
starting Sept. 9, about a
month after getting a text
message from a Christie
administration aide calling
for the "traffic problems."
By then, Wildstein, who
attended Livingston High
School with Christie, had
already resigned amid the
growing scandal.


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WIRE Page 3


www.sunnewspapers.net


verlB^Z*on


NATIONAL NEWS






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014 FROM PAGE ONE


(LA Times) It took
20 million years of wind
and water erosion to
form an eye-catching,
mushroom-shaped boul-
der in a Utah state park.
Heaving the stone off its
perch took a man just
10 seconds, and the
action sparked interna-
tional disgust.
A pair of former Boy
Scout leaders who
said they destroyed
the rock formation to
protect people from
being crushed by it were
charged with felony
mischief this past week,
Utah state parks officials
announced.
In October, David
Benjamin Hall, 42, taped



RUSSIA
FROM PAGE 1

have to do with promot-
ing democracy?" Lavrov
said. "Why don't we
hear condemnations of
those who seize and hold
government buildings,
burn, torch the police,
use racist and anti-Semit-
ic and Nazi slogans?"
Speaking before Lavrov,
NATO Secretary-General
Anders Fogh Rasmussen
blamed security forces
in Ukraine for using ex-
cessive force, and added



KEYSTONE

FROM PAGE 1

that there will be civil
disobedience," said Jane
Kleeb, executive director of
the group Bold Nebraska,
which has helped organize
opposition in the state.
"We've said from the
beginning that we will sup-
port the landowners and
what they want to do and
what they think is best for
their property. I think you'll
see some landowners
driving really slow on their
county roads to block the
(pipeline) trucks."
Project backers said the
report the latest in a
five-year review by state
and federal agencies -
bolsters their case for the
pipeline and eliminates
the need for further
delays.
The Keystone XL is "not
about energy versus the
environment. It's about



FARM
FROM PAGE 1

reform, if you will, and
it was the best we could
get in the time that we're
trying to operate in and
get a new farm bill," he
said.
The farm bill's authors
tout the changes as
reform, particularly the
elimination of direct
payments, which cost
$4.5 billion annually. The
legislation also caps how
much money an individ-
ual farmer can receive -
$125,000 annually for all
payments and loans. But
that maximum is more
generous than versions
that passed the House
and Senate earlier.
"We don't pay people
unless there's actually a
reason, because we've
got a price loss or a



DRUG
FROM PAGE 1

cases across our state,"
Bailey told reporters.
"This is a total shock and
a disappointment."
The department is using


agents from each of its of-
fices to review all the cases
handled by the chemist,
who is on paid leave while
under criminal investi-
gation. He is not being
identified while under
investigation, but Bailey


Glenn Tuck Taylor, 45,
pushing the stone to the
ground. They posted the
video on Facebook and
quickly drew outrage,
and even death threats.
"We have now mod-
ified Goblin Valley"
Hall says in the video,
referring to the name
of the state park, after
Hall heaves the large,
wind-eroded sandstone
off its pedestal. "A new
Goblin Valley now exists
with this boulder down
here."
The Utah National
Parks Council of Boy
Scouts America expelled
both men from scouting,
citing violation of the
organization's "Leave no


that "Ukraine must have
the freedom to choose
its own path without
external pressure."
One of Ukraine's top
opposition leaders,
ArseniyYatsenyuk, said
his country needs more
than "vocal support"
from the West.
Yatsenyuk, along with
fellow opposition poli-
ticians Vitali Klitschko
and Petro Poroshenko,
met U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry on the
sidelines of the Munich
Security Conference.
The State Department
said Kerry encouraged


where Americans want
to get their oil," said Russ
Girling, CEO of pipeline
developer TransCanada.
"Keystone XL will displace
heavy oil from such places
as the Middle East and
Venezuela, and of the
top five regions the U.S.
imports oil from, only
Canada has substantial
greenhouse gas regula-
tions in place."
Opponents were
planning to host vigils
throughout the nation
Monday and "pipeline
meet-ups" throughout
February to encourage
people to raise the issue
with candidates in the
2014 election. They
also were waiting for a
Nebraska judge to rule
on a lawsuit challenging
a state law that allowed
the project to proceed. A
ruling is expected by late
March, and whatever the
outcome an appeal to the
Nebraska Supreme Court
is a near certainty.

crop loss," said U.S.
Rep. Collin Peterson, a
Minnesota Democrat
who was instrumental in
crafting the final package.
"Under the direct pay-
ments you got payments
whether you needed
them or not."
But most of the savings
are redirected into the
new insurance-based
subsides one for losses
not covered by crop
insurance, another that
kicks in if crop prices fall
below certain thresholds.
There's also more money
for expanding traditional
crop insurance.
Critics say the bill
misses a chance for real
reform. Rep. Ron Kind,
a Wisconsin Democrat,
said it "maintains huge
taxpayer subsidies that go
to a few... very large agri-
businesses at the expense
of our family farmers
around the country."

said he hopes charges are
brought quickly, at which
point the chemist will be
fired.
The department is
contacting state attor-
neys and law enforce-
ment agencies across the
state that have pending
cases that could be


compromised.
"We are going back
and looking at each case
that was worked and we
are going to the evidence
rooms of sheriff's depart-
ments and police depart-
ments around the state


trace" principle.
Hall was charged with
one count of felony
aiding and assisting in
criminal mischief and
Taylor with one count of
felony criminal mischief.
They both face up to five
years in prison, though
the Emery County
district attorney told
reporters that he would
seek a plea deal.
In the video, Glenn
Taylor flexes and grunts
as Hall appears to
explain their rationale.
"Some little kid was
about ready to walk
down here and die, and
Glenn saved his life by
getting the boulder out
of the way, so it's all


the opposition to remain
united and peaceful and
keep talking with the
government.
Kerry also called
on Ukrainian Foreign
Minister Leonid Kozhara
for the government to
take steps such as the
release of prisoners and
the formation of a "tech-
nical government" that
can address the country's
economic problems, the
department said.
Klitschko left the con-
ference briefly to address
several hundred support-
ers at a demonstration
about a kilometer


about saving lives here in
Goblin Valley," Hall says.
No child is depicted
in the video, but the
men told media after the
incident that a family
had walked by a few
minutes before. Hall told
the Salt Lake Tribune in
November that when
he was 10, his uncle
was killed by a falling
boulder.
Parks officials and
geology experts re-
sponded that every rock
could eventually fall,
but tourists had no right
to topple them before
their time. The mush-
room-like formations
that fill the state park
are variously known as


(half-mile) away.
"We want to be a
modern European
country, live with a
secure future," Klitschko,
a former heavyweight
boxing champion, told
the crowd. "Without a
fight there's no victory.
Therefore, we must fight."
Appearing later at a
panel discussion along-
side Klitschko, Kozhara
pushed back against criti-
cism of his government.
"We think we have
met all major demands
from the opposition, but
today is the time that the
opposition shares also


hoodoos, goblins and
fairy chimneys.
The charges filed
are the lowest of three
degrees of felonies in
Utah, meaning the rock
formation was valued at
$1,500 to $5,000. In the
immediate wake of the
incident, prosecutors
had said charges could
range anywhere from a
simple misdemeanor to
a second-degree felony.
The valuation seemed
low to Marjorie Chan, a ge-
ology and geophysics pro-
fessor at the University
of Utah. She said
Saturday that state parks
officials consulted with
geological engineers to
determine the value.


responsibility," he said.
He added that "when the
police (are) attacked with
Molotov cocktails, this
is not a peaceful protest;
if ministries and the ...
city mayor's office (are)
occupied, that's also not
a peaceful protest."
Kerry told the confer-
ence that the crisis in
Ukraine is about ordinary
people fighting for the
right to associate with
the European Union. And
he said Ukrainians have
decided their futures
don't have to be tied with
just one country an
allusion to Russia.


the Keystone XL. District
officials have said they
can't discriminate against
customers, but Kleeb said
candidates will challenge
.4r the pipeline while pro-
moting more alternative
S energies in Nebraska.
r "We will make sure folks
r. know that we have not
gone away, that we are
*.still fighting this pipeline,"
Kleeb said.
Many opponents have
AP PHOTO turned their hopes to


In this Dec. 3,2012, file photo, crews work on construction of the
TransCanada Keystone XL Pipeline near County Road 363 and County
Road 357, east of Winona, Texas. In a move that disappointed
environmental groups and cheered the oil industry, the Obama
administration on Jan. 31, said it had no major environmental
objections to the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada.


Kleeb said 115 land-
owners in Nebraska still
refuse to sign agreements
with pipeline developer
TransCanada and would
engage in nonviolent
civil disobedience if the
company tries to lay pipe
through their land. She
said her group also plans

The changes come
as farm country has
enjoyed record profits
recently. Projected net
farm income for 2013 is
$131 billion, a 15 percent
jump over the previous
year, the USDA said in
November. Prices have
come down from their
highs, however.
One of the new pro-
grams, called Agriculture
Risk Coverage, will
cover farmers' "shallow
losses" what they lose
before their regular crop
insurance kicks in. For
example, if a producer's
crop insurance carries a
25 percent deductible,
but the farm suffers only
a 15 percent loss, ARC
could help cover the gap.
The program might kick
in sooner than previously
thought because some
crop prices have dropped
in recent months.
The other program,

and actually physically
looking especially at
the prescription meds -
to see if what is in that
particular package is
in fact a prescription
medication and not in
fact an over-the-count-
er calcium tablet,"
Bailey said.
Bailey said the agen-
cy doesn't yet know the
motive. The chemist
isn't cooperating with
the investigation.
"The quantities
are large," Bailey
said. "It's early in


to run candidates for the
Nebraska Public Power
District, a state board that
approves and regulates
power projects.
The district plans to
construct a 115,000-volt
transmission line to sup-
port a pumping station
that would be used for

Price Loss Coverage,
looks more like the
soon-to-end traditional
price support programs.
Farmers will get pay-
ments if crop prices fall
below certain targets,
such as $3.70 per bushel
for corn, $8.40 for
soybeans and $5.50 for
wheat. The bill would
raise the floor price for
all 14 crops it covers,
almost doubling some,
so the subsidies would
kick in much sooner than
current law if prices drop
enough.
One reason the final
bill included both ARC
and PLC was the need
to find solutions that
worked for all crops and
all parts of the country.
Losing direct payments
will be hard for Southern
rice farmers, said Dow
Brantley, who helps run
a family farm that grows
rice, corn, cotton and

the investigation.
We don't know if the
individual is a user or a
trafficker."
The department
is reviewing its drug
testing program to
try to prevent similar
incidents. One idea
may be to increase
employee drug testing,
Bailey said. Right now,
employees are drug
tested when they are
hired, but not again
unless they have
reason to suspect they
are abusing drugs.


Nebraska, where a group of
farmers and ranchers have
joined forces with national
environmental groups to
block the pipeline.
"They have some
lawsuits in the works,
and they're pretty pas-
sionate people," said
Paul Seamans, of Draper,
S.D., who farms and
ranches on land where
the pipeline would cross.
"I'm putting my hopes
in them and the fact that
President Obama is envi-
ronmentally inclined."

soybeans on about
8,500 acres in central
Arkansas near England.
He said the price-loss
coverage won't offer
nearly as much profit
protection.
"It's not going to be
the same but we do have
something in place to
back us up if the world
came apart," Brantley
said. "It's just not the
safety net that we all
would hope to have."
It won't be easy for
farmers to decide
which program is right
for them, Ohio State
University agricultural
economist Carl Zulauf
said. They'll need to
think five years out about
how much risk they can
assume, what they think
will happen with prices
and whether they expect


their debt loads
thus their risks -
increase.


-and
- to


Attorney General
Pam Bondi has of-
fered to assist in the
investigation.
"The Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement is a top-
notch law enforcement
agency. I continue to
have complete con-
fidence in them and
their work. This situa-
tion simply underlines
the extent of the prob-
lem our country faces
with prescription drug
abuse," Bondi said in
an emailed statement.


Ex-Scout leaders charged in destruction of Utah rock formation


was a cat in the library.
So the librarians put
salmon in a cage and left
one night. When they
returned a half-hour
later, the cat was in the
cage.
The cat- gender
unknown now has a
temporary home with a
library employee.


ALMANAC
Today is Sunday, Feb. 2,
the 33rd day of 2014. There are
332 days left in the year. This is
Groundhog Day.
Today in history
On Feb. 2,1914, Chadrles
Chaplin made his movie debut
as the comedy short Mak ing
a Living"was released by
Keystone Film Co. (Five days later,
Keystone released"Kid Auto
Races at Venice,"in which Chaplin
first played his famous Tramp
character.)
On this date
In 1536, present-day Buenos
Aires, Argentina, was founded by
Pedro de Mendoza of Spain.
In 1653, New Amsterdam
- now New York City was
incorporated.
In 1848, the Treaty of
Guadalupe Hidalgo, ending the
Mexican-American War, was
signed.
In 1887, Punxsutawney, Pa.,
held its first Groundhog Day
festival.
In 1922, the James Joyce
novel "Ulysses"was published in
Pars on Joyce's 40th birthday.
In 1943, the remainder of
Nazi forces from the Battle of
Stalingrad surrendered in a major
victory for the Soviets in World
War II.
In 1964, Ranger 6, a lunar
probe launched by NASA, crashed
onto the surface of the moon as
planned, but failed to send back
anyTV images.
In 1988, in a speech the
broadcast television networks
declined to carry live, President
Ronald Reagan pressed his case
for aid to the Nicaraguan Contras.
In 1990, in a dramatic
concession to South Africa's
black majority, President F.W. de
Klerk lifted a ban on the African
National Congress and promised
to free Nelson Mandela.

Today's birthdays
Actress Elaine Stritch is
89. Former French President
Valery Giscard d'Estaing is 88.
Actor Robert Mandan is 82.
Comedian Tom Smothers is 77.
Rock singer-guitarist Graham
Nash is 72. Actor Bo Hopkins
is 70. Country singer Howard
Bellamy (The Bellamy Brothers)
is 68. Actor Jack McGee is 65.
Actor Brent Spiner is 65. Rock
musician Ross Valory (Journey)
is 65. Sen. John Comyn, R-Texas,
is 62. The president of South
Korea, Park Geun-hye, is 62.
Model Christie Brinkley is 60.
Actor Michael Talbott is 59.
Actress Kim Zimmer is 59. Actor
Michael T. Weiss is 52. Actor-
comedian Adam Ferrara is 48.
Rock musician Robert DeLeo
(Army of Anyone; Stone Temple
Pilots) is 48. Actress Jennifer
Westfeldt is 44. Rock musician
Ben Mize is 43. Rapper T-Mo
is 42. Actress Marissa Jaret
Winokur is 41. Actress Lori Beth
Denberg is 38. Singer Shakira
is 37. Actor Rich Sommer (TV:
"Mad Men'J is 36. Country singer
Blaine Larsen is 28. Actress
ZosiaMamet(TV:"Girs") is26.




The intruder in the
library was a cat
CLOVIS, N.M. (AP)-
Salmon did the trick.
The initial suspicion
was that a homeless
person stayed in Clovis'
public library past closing
time and triggered the
alarm system's motion
detector.
But according to the
Clovis News Journal,
a search by police and
librarian Margaret
Hinchee for more than
an hour that night was
fruitless.
It happened the next
few nights too. But then
a custodian reported
seeing a cat, and library
staff spotted clues such
as scratches in plant soil.
A check of video
footage confirmed there


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


FROM PAGE ONE





The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


NATIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page5


More states grant in-state tuition to immigrants


WASHINGTON (AP)
- Giancarlo Tello paid
$14,000 more than other
New Jersey high school
graduates to attend Rutgers
University the state's
flagship public college.
Why the difference?
Tello spent much of
his childhood in the U.S.
without legal permission
after his parents moved
from Peru when he was 6.
That changes if he re-en-
rolls this fall, as he plans,
thanks to a law recently
signed by New Jersey Gov.
Chris Christie that provides
in-state tuition to immi-
grants like him.
Supporters of immi-
grants' rights are energized
because after years of
contentious fights, New
Jersey and three other


states passed statutes last
year that will allow such
students who came to
the U.S. when they were
minors to pay in-state
tuition.
Fifteen states now have
such a statute, said Ann
Morse of the National
Conference of State
Legislatures. In addition,
university boards in
Hawaii, Michigan and
Rhode Island have granted
these students in-state
tuition. To qualify, high
school graduates typically
must meet requirements
such as living in a state for
a set number of years.
Florida, Indiana,
Massachusetts,
Missouri, Mississippi,
New Hampshire and
Virginia have bills under


consideration that would
extend the in-state benefit,
said Tanya Broder, a senior
attorney with the National
Immigration Law Center.
Supporters next plan
to step up lobbying on a
related issue: making these
students eligible for state
financial aid, including
scholarships or grants.
Already, California, New
Mexico and Texas have
laws spelling out this right,
and it is under consid-
eration in states such as
Washington.
Sen. Patty Murray,
D-Wash., and Rep. Jared
Polls, D-Colo., filed a bill
in Congress that would
provide money to states
that offer in-state tuition
or financial aid to these
students.


"It's an economic issue,
and it's an issue of fair-
ness," Murray said.
In this time of financial
austerity the bill faces a
difficult road.
The students are known
as "Dreamers" from the
shorthand for legislation
stymied in Congress that
provides a way for them to
permanently remain in the
U.S. The measure's full title
is the Development, Relief,
and Education for Alien
Minors Act (DREAM Act).
Lacking legal immigra-
tion status, the students
typically aren't eligible for
federal financial aid and
many other aid programs.
But in many cases they
are able to remain in
the United States under
President Barack Obama's


2012 "deferred action"
program. That allows im-
migrants brought into the
United States without legal
permission as children
by their parents to obtain
temporary resident status
for two years. The status is
renewable.
Tello andYves Gomes,
21, who was brought to
the U.S. from India as a
toddler, signed up.
Gomes attends the
University of Maryland and
pays in-state tuition, which
he had lobbied for. But he
says in some cases that isn't
enough. He called for state
and other financial aid,
especially for those who
don't qualify for Maryland's
in-state tuition benefit.
Tuition and fees for
Maryland residents come


to about $9,000 this
academic year, compared
with more than $28,000
for those from other states.
That doesn't include
thousands more in room
and board.
"I met so many friends
who are off and on in
school just because they
have to take time off to
help their families put food
on the table. You have to
survive," Gomes said.
The issue of what edu-
cational benefits should
be available to immigrants
living illegally in the
country has been conten-
tious. Critics say helping
the students encourages
unlawful behavior and
means they potentially
take someone else's seat at
taxpayers' expense.


SC Supreme Court to rule on public autopsy reports


COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)
-Are autopsies medical
records or public records?
South Carolina's
Supreme Court will
begin grappling with that
question Wednesday,
when it hears a lawsuit by
a Sumter County newspa-
per against the county's
coroner.
The Item newspaper
wants the high court to
toss out a lower court's
ruling that said autopsies
do not have to be made
public because they do
not fall under the state's
Freedom of Information
Act.
The coroner says autop-
sies should be considered


George

(LA Times) -
A man has been
arrested in New York City
for allegedly threatening
former President George
W Bush after declaring
his love for the 43rd pres-
ident's daughter Barbara,
officials said Saturday.
George Ogilvie, a
spokesman for the U.S.
Secret Service, told the
Los Angeles Times that
officials arrested the man
on Friday on suspicion of
violating U.S. Code Title
18 Section 879 on issuing
"threats against former
presidents and certain
other persons."
Ogilvie would not
comment further on the
arrest or give the man's
name.
However, Reuters


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medical records that
are exempt from public
view. The newspaper
says autopsy reports are
investigative tools, not
medical records.
Open records advocates
say the Sumter County
case is an example of
government officials
making it harder to get
public documents.
It's a debate that is far
from settled nationally.
About 15 states across
the U.S. allow the public
release of an autopsy
report. About a half-dozen
other states allow the
release of reports not
being used as part of a
criminal investigation. The


W Bush


reported that the man
has been identified as
44-year-old Benjamin
Smith of Pittsford in
upstate New York. Inside
his car, officials found a
loaded rifle, machete and
container of gasoline.
Reportedly, Smith
screamed "Bush will get
his" when he was taken
into custody. He allegedly
told agents he was
divorced and "working
on a relationship with
Barbara Bush," referring
to Barbara Pierce Bush,
32, one of Bush's twin
daughters.
Smith was first report-
ed to local police by his
mother after she found
a threatening note in the
home they share, Reuters
reported.


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rest severely restrict what's
released or don't give any
information from the
reports, according to the
Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press.
Keeping autopsy
records secret closes
off an important tool to
make sure police agencies
do the right thing when
they investigate deaths,
especially people shot
and killed by officials or
who die in custody, said
Frank LoMonte, executive
director of the Student
Press Law Center.


"There is any number of
cases over the years where
journalist watchdogs have
been able to shed light on
suspicious circumstances
only by having access on
those records," LoMonte
said. 'And those records
don't just show culpability,
they can clear someone,
too."
Autopsy reports have
been a sensitive topic
since the death in Florida
of NASCAR driver Dale
Earnhardt during a race in
2001. Florida lawmakers
quickly amended laws to


make sure the state's broad
Freedom of Information
Act didn't include pictures
from Earnhardt's autopsy
because they feared


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Miami is the product being placed in these films


MIAMI (AP) -Product
placement is nothing new
in movies or TV Insert a
fast-food logo or a certain
car in a scene and you've
made a subtle (or maybe
not-so-subtle) pitch for the
brand.
Now a group in South
Florida is using the concept
of product placement to
market Miami. In this case,
the product is the city itself.
And the placement is in
a series of short fictional
films, with various neigh-
borhoods serving as the
backdrop for stories about
out-of-towners discovering
the destination.
The films, collectively
called the Reel Miami
Project, will be marketed
online and through social
media with the goal of
promoting tourism.
Films for Miami Beach
andWynwood were re-
leased this week, with films
featuring South Beach,
Downtown Miami, Coral
Gables and the Everglades
set to follow.
Bacardi, the liquor com-
panywhose U.S. headquar-
ters is located in Miami,
is providing some of the
financial backing. Each film
will feature the company's


signature rum, along with
local business partners
like hotels, restaurants and
bars.
But because the movies
tell a story and attempt to
engage viewers the way a
narrative film might, with-
out a straightforward "buy
this" or "visit us" message,
creator and producer
Frank Kelly says the project
is more movie than ad. The
focus is on storytelling, not
story-selling. The brands,
he says, are shown in a way
that seems natural.
"First, we entertain
viewers," said Kelly "We
want people to come
in and watch the films,
simply for the pleasure of
viewing a good movie. And
then the idea is that a wife
in Berlin or Birmingham
reaches out to her husband
and says let's go down
to Miami and explore
Wynwood."
The project uses social
media to attract viewers to
its website, Facebook page
and YouTube channel -
wwwreelmiamiproject.
com, www.facebook.com/
reelmiamiproject and
www.youtube.com/user/
ReelMiamiProject.
But the project also offers


In this undated photo provided by Reel Miami Projec
played by Eric Aragon and Elisabetta Fantone, sit onh
Beach. The Reel Miami Project is planned as a series
films, each featuring different story lines set in neigi
around Miami. Films for Miami Beach and Wynwood
already been released, with films featuring South Be
town Miami, Coral Gables and the Everglades set to f


viewers a way to connect
with the product that is,
Miami. On the Reel Miami
website, viewers can find
links to help them book
vacations similar to those
in the films or even create
their own custom trips.
"There's so much more
to Miami than just Ocean
Drive," Kelly said. "And
I thought that with this
format, we can truly expose
this city for what it really
stands for."
The Miami Beach film
follows a couple on a
weekend getaway. Their ad-
venture begins when they
pick up the wrong luggage
at the airport, sparking a


S, like Bacardi, where you
see half the bottle, and you
know its Bacardi," Rojas
said. Besides, he added,
having every bottle turned
perfectly toward the cam-
era would take audiences
out of the story
While blending products
AP PHOTO and locations into the
narratives will be important
:t, a couple, to the project's ultimate
Miami success, Carlos Gutierrez,
of six short director of the Miami
hborhoods Beach film, said the first
have priority is to showcase the
each, Down- Miami area and individual


follow.


series of high-society stops
meant for a mysterious
stranger.
The Wynwood film
follows a different couple
as they visit Miami for a
wedding. After learning the
nuptials might be canceled,
they decide to explore
Wynwood, an emerging
arts district. The audience
soon learns the couple is at
a crossroads in their own
relationship.
Fro Rojas, who directed
the Wynwood film, has
experience directing com-
mercials but consciously
avoided shooting the film
like an advertisement.
"There are some brands,


neighborhoods.
"We always talked about
Miami being the third
principal character in
each film. It shouldn't be
just background noise,"
Gutierrez said. "What
happens to these char-
acters is sort of a mirror
image of what's happening
in these neighborhoods. I
don't think what happens
to the characters could
happen to them in their
hometowns."
Elizabeth Beimes,
marketing manager at
Casa Modema, said her
hotel's appearance in the
Wynwood film went far
beyond a simple commer-
cial or promotional video.


"This actually portrayed
what our neighborhood is
like and the type of people
that come to this area,"
Beirnes said. "So it really
showcased not just our
hotel- which is what we
were going after but all
the offerings in this new
part of Miami."
Thomas Meding, the
area vice president of
The sbe Hotel Group,
said he's happy that the
SLS Hotel was included
in the project's first film,
but he foresees the value
of his early involvement
increasing as more films
are added.
"The goal really is to
showcase Miami in the
films overall," Meding said.
'And then of course while
we would like to keep
SLS on the top of their
minds, it really encourages
viewers to create their own
Miami or Miami Beach
experience."
Deborah Breiter, a
professor at the University
of Central Florida's Rosen
College of Hospitality
Management, said there's
good data to suggest that
featuring a location in a
movie or TV show can help
drive tourism.


Disney's new Fantasyland scheduled to open in March


(Cox Newspapers)
- Entering the Magic
Kingdom Production
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maintained- is like
tiptoeing among sleep-
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Here, in the shadow
of Splash Mountain and
shielded from prying
eyes and unauthorized
cameras, Disney's
parade team is putting
the finishing fairy
dust on its Festival of
Fantasy Parade, which
will bring "Peter Pan,"
"Pinocchio," "Brave"
and "Tangled" to life


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in March on Disney's
largest floats ever.
"You'll see them
coming because of
their size and scale,"
says Disney producer
Kris Bunnell. "It will be
the most grand parade
we've ever done ... like
mini-Broadway shows
rolling down the street."
For the Disney crew,
the supersized parade
is a fitting tribute to the
imminent completion
of the new Fantasyland,
the largest expansion
of the Magic Kingdom
since the park opened
in 1971.
Meanwhile, over at
SeaWorld Orlando,
they'll celebrate their
50th anniversary
this year with a new
nighttime Shamu show.
Legoland Florida will
throw a weekend-long
party following the

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release of the first Lego
movie in early February.
And this summer,
Universal Studios
Orlando will open a
second Harry Potter
section: the Wizarding
World of Harry Potter,
Diagon Alley.
Like Islands
of Adventure's
Hogsmeade, Diagon
Alley will be an ex-
pansive area of shops
(Quality Quidditch
Supplies), restaurants
(Leaky Cauldron) and
attractions (Knockturn
Alley and Harry Potter
and the Escape from
Gringotts).
Fans of Harry Potter
will fall under Diagon
Alley's spell, promis-
es MarkWoodbury,
president of Universal
Creative. "And if you're
not a fan when you
come, you'll surely be
one by the time you
leave."
But the big story at
the biggest player in
town is the completion
of the new Fantasyland,
which has slowly
undergone a makeover
worthy of Cinderella.
The home of the
iconic "It's a Small
World" ride has


welcomed Under the
Sea, a shimmering tour
of the Little Mermaid's
colorful underwater
world, and upgraded
Ariel's Grotto, where
the green-tailed red-
head meets and greets
admirers.
Be Our Guest
Restaurant opened
in October 2012, but
parkgoers are still
lining up at the Beast's
castle to chow on
Mickey Meatloaf and
Croque Monsieur inside
one of three elaborately
themed rooms.
Big Top Souvenirs
began selling Disney
paraphernalia and
mouthwatering sweets
inside an intricately
detailed circus "tent"
whose fixtures and
display units are works
of art in themselves.
And last September,
Cinderella, Rapunzel
and other royal types
began welcoming
little girls (and boys)
to Princess Fairytale
Hall. In two intimate
but vibrant rooms (both
designed and lit with
amateur and profes-
sional photographers in
mind), the princesses
spend a few moments


chatting privately with
each visitor.
Even Dumbo got a
do-over two sets of
high-flying elephants
now take off and
land on the edge of
Tomorrowland.
In March, Imagineers
will place the final jew-
el in the Fantasyland
crown when the Seven
Dwarfs Mine Train
leaves the station for
the first time.
To board the fam-
ily-friendly coaster,
guests must first cross a
stone bridge and mean-
der through a woodland
environment toward
the Dwarfs' cottage in
the distance. The queue
area will be dotted with
barrels of glittering
jewels and interactive
features themed to
mining.
The ride, whose track
winds its way through
indoor and outdoor
sections (providing
incredible views of
Fantasyland and its
closest neighbors, says
one Disney employee),
blends old and new.
Guests will encounter
Snow White, her seven
little men and their
animal friends from the


77-year-old film while
secured in a coaster
built with cutting-edge
technology.
After studying the
film's mine scene and
the movements of the
dwarfs' mine cars,
Imagineers were able
to create a coaster with
cradle-like pivots that
allow the vehicles to
swing back and forth
during the ride.
Says Dave
Minichiello, director of
Creative Development
at Walt Disney
Imagineering, "It moves
like no other thing
we've ever developed."
Which takes us back
to those towering,
twisting and turning
parade floats, like the
steampunk-inspired
Maleficent dragon,
which stretches 53 feet
in length and stands
26 feet tall. "There is so
much movement and
kinetic energy to all the
floats," Bunnell says.
"There's so much to see,
so much to take in."
And, so much to
photograph, says
technical director Chris
Ort: "These will make
fantastic panoramic
shots."


Why baby penguins are dying in the rain


Magellanic penguin
chicks in Argentina have a
new killer to fear death
by climate change.
The downy chicks were
already vulnerable to pre-
dation and starvation in
the first few weeks of their
lives, but now they are
threatened by increasing


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rainstorms caused by
changing weather patterns.
"Climate change is a
new mortality factor," said
Dee Boersma, a conser-
vation biologist at the
University ofWashington.
"It didn't use to kill these
penguins and now it does."
Boersma and her team
have been studying pen-
guins for 28 years at Punta
Tombo on the Atlantic side
of Argentina home of the
largest Magellanic penguin
colony in the world. Each
year 200,000 penguins stay
there from September to
February to incubate their
eggs and raise their young.
Boersma describes the
gathering as "one of those
spectacles of nature."
Over the course of the
28-year study, Boersma
found that an average of
65 percent of the penguin
chicks died per year. The
most common killer was
starvation, which was
responsible for 40 percent
of the total chick deaths.
But in 1991 an unusual
rainstorm in the normally
arid area killed the same
number of chicks as
starvation and predation


combined. In 1999, rain
killed as many chicks as
all other causes of death
combined.
Not all rainfall is deadly
to chicks, but prolonged,
big storms can be. Baby
penguins are covered in a
soft down that keeps them
warm, but only if it stays
dry.
"You have to realize that
most species of penguins
live in deserts," Boersma
told the Los Angeles Times.
'As long as they are dry,
they are nice and warm,
but as soon as they get
wet the down doesn't
insulate them anymore.
And then, just like hu-
mans, it doesn't need to be
freezing for them to die of
hypothermia."
Younger chicks actually
have a better chance of
surviving a rain than older
chicks who have not yet
fledged because they are
still small enough to be
protected from the rain
by their mom or dad. The
researchers found that
chicks between the ages
of 9 and 23 days were
most likely die in a storm.
As they get older, their


waterproof feathers come
in and they are no longer
vulnerable.
On average, Punta Tombo
gets about 4 inches of rain
during the six-month
period of the Magellanic
penguin breeding season.
But that seems to be
changing.
"Climate models show
it is getting wetter, and we
show it has gotten wetter,"
said Boersma. "Not every
storm kills chicks, but the
big storms do."
Boersma said she was
not surprised by the
findings in her study,
published this week in the
journal PLoS One. "When
you work on anything for
28 years there shouldn't be
a lot of surprises," she said.
But what does surprise her
is that people feel there
is no way to help these
penguins.
"It is not all over and
done," she said. "What
these penguins need is
a marine protected area
so they can have more
food close to their colony.
The major cause of death
of these chicks is still
starvation."


Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


TRAVEL/SCIENCE NEWS





SThe Sun/Sunday, February 2,2014


NATIONAL/WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


Clashes grip Thai capital on eve of vote


BANGKOK (AP)
- Gunfire rang out
across a busy inter-
section in Thailand's
capital for more than
an hour Saturday as
government supporters
clashed with protesters
trying to derail tense
nationwide elections
one day before the vote
begins. At least seven
people were wounded,
including an American
photojournalist.
People caught up in
the mayhem crouched
behind cars and ducked
on a pedestrian bridge
while others fled inside
a nearby shopping mall.
Several masked gunmen
wearing armored vests
bent down under a
highway overpass as one
of them fired a weapon
concealed in a green
sack.
The exchange of fire


was the latest flare-up in
a monthslong struggle by
protesters to overthrow
Prime Minister Yingluck
Shinawatra's beleaguered
government, which they
accuse of corruption.
The turmoil raises the
prospect of more vio-
lence Sunday, when polls
open for an electoral
contest that has devolved
into a battle of wills
between the government
and protesters and
those caught in between
who insist on their right
to vote.
Saturday's confronta-
tion began after a group
of pro-government
supporters marched to
a district office in the
northern Bangkok sub-
urb of Laksi. The office
had been surrounded
by protesters intent on
preventing ballot boxes
housed inside from being


delivered to a nearby
polling station Sunday.
Tensions mounted
for hours before clashes
finally broke out. As
gunfire rattled the area
and people screamed
in fear, an enraged mob
of pro-government
supporters wielding
huge sticks smashed
the windshields of a car
carrying protesters that
sped away.
Associated Press
journalists saw a gunman
allied with protesters
firing an assault rifle, and
another firing a pistol as
he lay on his stomach on
the road. Sunai Phasuk,
a senior researcher for
Human Rights Watch,
said several pro-govern-
ment gunmen climbed
to the mall's rooftop
and began firing down
toward rivals. The two
sides also fought with


rocks and firecrackers.
"What is clear is that
both sides had weapons,
both sides were armed,"
Sunai said. "This is a very
worrying sign."
According to the city's
emergency services,
at least six Thais were
wounded, including a
reporter for the local
Daily News newspaper.
An American photojour-
nalist, James Nachtwey,
was grazed by a bullet in
the leg.
The conflict pits
demonstrators who say
they want to suspend the
country's fragile democ-
racy to institute anti-cor-
ruption reforms against
Yingluck's supporters
and civilians who know
the election will do little
to solve the nation's crisis
but insist the right to
vote should not be taken
away.


AH HH.UIU


Anti-government protesters duck for cover during a gun fight
with pro-election supporters in Bangkok, Thailand, Saturday.
Gunfire rang out at a major intersection in Thailand's capital
on Saturday as clashes between protesters and government
supporters erupted on the eve of tense nationwide elections.


The protesters, a
minority that cannot win
power at the polls, are
demanding the govern-
ment be replaced by an
unelected council that
would rewrite political
and electoral laws to


combat deep-seated
problems of corruption
and money politics.
Yingluck has refused to
step down, arguing she
is open to reform and
such a council would be
unconstitutional.


Africa Union urges united stand against ICC trials


ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia
(AP) -The African
Union urged its mem-
bers to "speak with one
voice" to prevent crim-
inal proceedings at the
International Criminal
court against sitting
presidents, according to a
statement Saturday.
The 54-nation organi-
zation said it was disap-
pointed that a request to
the U.N. Security Council
to defer the trials of
Kenya's leaders "has not
yielded the positive result


expected." The African
Union also has sought
the deferral of criminal
proceedings against
Sudan's President Omar
al-Bashir, who has been
charged with genocide in
Darfur.
Only Botswana has op-
posed the stand taken by
the African Union, made
in a statement received
Saturday after a summit
in Ethiopia attended by
34 leaders.
'African states parties
should comply with


African Union decisions
on the ICC and continue
to speak with one voice,"
the statement said,
adding "There is an
imperative need for all
member states to ensure
that they adhere to and
articulate commonly
agreed positions..."
Kenya's President
Uhuru Kenyatta and his
deputy William Ruto
face charges of crimes
against humanity at the
international court at
The Hague for allegedly


orchestrating post-elec-
tion violence that killed
more than 1,000 people
following a disputed
presidential election in
late 2007. Both men deny
the charges.
The International
Criminal Court has re-
cently come under strong
criticism from African
leaders who accuse it of
racism in indicting only
Africans. Countries such
as Uganda have suggest-
ed they may decide to
sever ties with the court


in solidarity with Kenya.
Some Africans also argue
that the Kenyan leaders
need to concentrate on
governing their countries
to ensure stability as
the region faces un-
precedented terrorist
challenges.
Ruto's trial continues at
The Hague but the case
against Kenyatta may
collapse. Kenyatta's trial
was to start in November
but was postponed
to February after the
prosecution and defense


teams said they needed
more time to prepare. The
prosecutor in December
asked for an additional
three-month adjourn-
ment after one witness
withdrew and another
said they gave false
evidence.
A Kenyan court on
Friday refused to stop
the arrest of a journalist
wanted by the interna-
tional court for allegedly
interfering with prosecu-
tion witnesses in the case
against Ruto.


Labor unions financing Republican rift with tea party
WASHINGTON That record and some labor leaders are "We see Defending said it's a "win-win"
Bloomberg News) LaTourette's new alliance hedging their partisan Main Street as one group situation for her organi-
N Republican group with labor though the bets, recognizing that and one way of part of our zation because the labor
promotingg pro-business super-PAC is drawing Republicans are likely overall political program money will help defend
candidatess as it battles the scoffs from leaders of the to hold a majority in the to try and get some more Republican seats. "Why
ea party in primary cam- small-government tea House after the midterm folks elected to Congress not take union money to
paigns is being financed party movement, elections and bipartisan who are going to work maintain a majority in
nostlv bv labor unions. "It's not surprising that allies could be beneficial together to get things the United States House?"


one of the Democratic
Party's staunchest allies.
Defending Main Street,
a super-political action
committee aligned with
the Washington-based
Republican Main Street
Partnership, received
more than 90 percent
of its $845,000 in do-
nations last year from
labor groups, according
to reports filed with
the Federal Election
Commission.
The group is led by
former Ohio Rep. Steve
LaTourette, a Republican
who had good relations
with labor in Congress.
He voted for a minimum
wage increase, the 2009
auto bailout and a bill
making it easier to
organize a union.


a liberal Republican who
supported big labor's
agenda in Congress would
raise money from his
allies in big labor," Barney
Keller, a spokesman for
the Washington-based
Club for Growth, said in
a telephone interview. "It
ain't exactly dogs and cats
living together. It's more
like birds of a feather."
In an odd pairing, given
its funding source, Main
Street is working along-
side the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce, the nation's
largest business lobby,
to defend Republican
candidates deemed more
practical and econom-
ic-minded over the tea
party recruits.
The union financing for
Main Street shows that


later.
Jay Lederer, commu-
nications director for the
International Union of
Operating Engineers, said
that transportation and
infrastructure projects
that provide jobs are
getting "bogged down in
this extreme polarization
we've seen" in Congress.


PORT CHARLOTTE
DENTAL CARE


like that done, instead of
putting these things off
in continuing resolutions
year after year after year,"
Lederer, whose union has
donated to the super-PAC,
said in an interview.
Sarah Chamberlain,
the chief operating
officer of the Republican
Main Street Partnership,


Benefits of 3D CBCT
3 Dimensional Diagnosis
SIdentification of bone-loss/disease
Definitive Implant planning
Computer guided surgery
* 1/lOOth the exposure of Medical CT Scan
'yr -T


she said.


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Indonesia volcano erupts again; kills at least 14


MOUNT SINABUNG,
Indonesia (AP) -An
Indonesian volcano that
has been rumbling for
months unleased a major
eruption Saturday, killing
14 people just a day after
authorities allowed thou-
sands of villagers who had
been evacuated to return
to its slopes, saying that
activity was decreasing,
officials said.
Among the dead
on Mount Sinabung
were a local television
journalist and four high
school students and their
teacher who were visiting
the mountain to see
the eruptions up close,
said National Disaster
Mitigation Agency
spokesman Sutopo Purwo
Nugroho. At least three
other people were injured,
and authorities feared the
death toll would rise.
Sinabung in western
Sumatra has been


DAMASCUS, Syria (AP)
-The United Nations'
secretary-general pressed
the U.S. and Russia to help
ensure that peace talks
aimed at stemming Syria's
civil war can soon resume,
while Russia's foreign
minister said Saturday
that it was "very difficult"
to push Syrian President
Bashar Assad's government
to make concessions.
A week of peace talks
ended in Geneva on
Friday with no concrete
progress and no immediate
commitment from Assad's
envoys to return on Feb. 10
for more meetings with the
Western-backed opposition
as suggested by mediator
Lakhdar Brahimi.
U.N. Secretary-General


erupting for four months,
sending lava and searing
gas and rocks rolling
down its southern slopes.
Authorities had evacuated
more than 30,000 people,
housing them in cramped
tents, schools and public
buildings. Many have
been desperate to return
to check on homes and
farms, presenting a dilem-
ma for the government.
On Friday, authorities
allowed nearly 14,000
people living outside a
five-kilometer (three-mile)
danger zone to return
home after volcanic
activity decreased. Others
living close to the peak
have been returning to
their homes over the past
four months despite the
dangers.
On Saturday, a series of
huge blasts and eruptions
thundered from the
2,600-meter (8,530-foot)
-high volcano, sending


Ban Ki-moon told a con-
ference of global security
officials in Munich that
he urged Russian Foreign
Minister Sergey Lavrov
and U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry at a meeting on
the sidelines "to use their
influence to ensure the
talks proceed as scheduled
on Feb. 10."
The U.S. has insisted
that Assad cannot be part
of a transitional govern-
ment, while Russia has
been a key ally of Assad's
government.
Speaking to reporters on
his return to Damascus,
Syrian Foreign Minister
Walid al-Moallem said his
delegation was "ready" and
waiting for an invitation to
return to Switzerland, in a


lava and pyroclastic flows
up to 4.5 kilometers
(2.8 miles) away, Nugroho
said. Television footage
showed villages, farms and
trees around the volcano
covered in thick gray ash.
Following the eruption,
all those who had been
allowed to return home
Friday were ordered back
into evacuation centers.
"The death toll is likely
to rise as many people are
reported still missing and
the darkness hampered
our rescue efforts," said
Lt. Col. Asep Sukarna,
who led the operation to
retrieve the charred corps-
es some three kilometers
(two miles) from the
volcano's peak.
Indonesia is prone to
seismic upheaval due to
its location on the Pacific
"Ring of Fire," an arc of
volcanoes and fault lines
encircling the Pacific
Basin. Mount Sinabung is


statement carried on state
media.
Ban urged the warring
parties to "come back with
more sense of earnestness
as well as seriousness and
urgency." Specifically, he
called on "both sides and
the government in partic-
ular to allow the unfettered
access required under
international humanitari-
an law."
An agreement to allow
aid convoys into rebel-held
parts of the central Syrian
city of Homrns has remained
stalled, with the govern-
ment and opposition
accusing each other of
holding up the aid delivery
into the city, which has
been under siege for nearly
two years.


among about 130 active
volcanoes in Indonesia
and has sporadically
erupted since September.
In 2010, 324 people were
killed over two months
when Indonesia's most
volatile volcano, Mount
Merapi, roared into life.


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As now in Sinabung,
authorities struggled to
keep people away from
the mountain. Scientists
monitor Merapi, Sinabung
and other Indonesian
volcanos nonstop, but
predicting their activity
with any accuracy is all


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but impossible.
The latest eruptions
came just a week after
President Susilo Bambang
Yudhoyono visited
displaced villagers in
Sinabung and pledged to
relocate them away from
the mountain.


Participating Sponsors
* 24Twentyone Event Center
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Tickets: $12 in advance (until Jan. 15) $15 at the door
Tickets available at the Box Office 10:00am-1:00pm Mon-Fri
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Port Charlotte, South of Harbor Blvd. & Punta Gorda
Bibi Gafoor (941) 258-9528
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Punta Gorda (941) 258-6402
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North Port (941) 429-3000
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Venice (941) 207-1000


UN chief pushes for quick

return to Syria talks


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Z o toww.haloteouthmbrStyhmro


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


WIRE Page 9


www.sunnewspapers.net


I THE M I RACLE OF


WORLD NEWS






-Page 10 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WORLD NEWS/WEATHER


The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


H Partly Cloudy Partly Cloudy


S 82/620 830/640
0% chance of rain 20% chance of rain

AY AIRPORT
ature Today Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 84/65 part cldy none
Sarasota 79/62 part cldy none
SUN ANn MOON


66 77 87 88 81 76
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4p.m. 6 p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 Highi; 8-10 Very Highi; 11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.
AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Saturday
29
PC I Is ..o
0 50 100 150 200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: particulates
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Saturday

Grass
W ee d s o o A
Molds .-"..j
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Saturday
Temperatures
High/Low 81/660
Normal High/Low 76/530
Record High 850 (2002)
Record Low 370 (1997)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Saturday 0.02"
Month to date 0.01"
Normal month to date 0.08"
Year to date 3.68"
Normal year to date 1.88"
Record 1.03" (1972)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2014 2013 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 3.67 0.43 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 0.01 2.12 2.52 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 0.97 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 3.68 53.10 50.74 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


The Sun Rise Set
Today 7:13 a.m. 6:11 p.m.
Monday 7:13 a.m. 6:12 p.m.
The Moon Rise Set
Today 9:02 a.m. 9:30 p.m.
Monday 9:43 a.m. 10:31 p.m.
First Full Last New


4 DO
Feb6 Feb14 Feb22 Marl

SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 7:42a 1:29a 8:08p 1:55p
Mon. 8:40a 2:27a 9:06p 2:53p
Tue. 9:37a 3:24a 10:02p 3:50p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 4:09a
Mon. 5:02a
Englewood
Today 2:46a
Mon. 3:39a
Boca Grande
Today l:51a
Mon. 2:44a
El Jobean
Today 4:41a
Mon. 5:34a
Venice
Today l:01a
Mon. 1:54a


Low High Low

11:19a 5:13p 11:20p
11:50a 5:43p ---

9:35a 3:50p 9:36p
10:06a 4:20p 10:39p

7:56a 2:55p 7:57p
8:27a 3:25p 9:00p

11:48a 5:45p 11:49p
12:19p 6:15p ---

8:14a 2:05p 8:15p
8:45a 2:35p 9:18p


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
69 61 c
79 63 pc
78 64 pc
82 70 pc
80 63 c
81 73 pc
84 65 pc
81 66 pc
78 59 c
77 60 c
80 71 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
69 59 c
79 64 pc
79 65 pc
81 72 pc
81 63 c
79 75 pc
82 66 pc
81 66 pc
80 58 c
80 59 c
79 72 pc


St
79


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY



Partly Cloudy Isolated RM. Rain Isolated Rain


820/650
0% chance of rain

Clearwater|
78 64

"-.. Tampa
79 64


J
SPetersburg
1, 63


83 / 640
30% chance of rain


'Brandi
82 62


Plant City
%82y62

(n 1


Apollo Beach Ft.Mad
79 62 82F59t. a
S 82, 59


Today
City Hi Lo W
Pompano Beach 81 71 pc
St. Augustine 75 62 c
St. Petersburg 79 63 pc
Sanford 81 64 c
Sarasota 79 62 pc
Tallahassee 73 58 c
Tampa 79 64 pc
Titusville 79 63 pc
Vero Beach 81 65 pc
West Palm Beach 81 70 pc
Winter Haven 82 63 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
80 72 pc
78 62 c
80 64 pc
82 64 pc
79 63 pc
75 59 c
81 63 pc
79 64 c
80 67 pc
80 72 pc
83 64 pc


THE NATION
*lOs I -Os os 1


MONDAY
,:,,,,,., .


Fronts

Cold Warm Stationary


U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)
High .................... 85 at Kingsville,TX Low ......... .......... -21 at Merrill,WI


Bradenton
79/63
Longboat Key 8/Myakka
78/66 82/62
7 Saras.ota I 1 1


79/62

Osprey
79/62


Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Gulf Water
Temperature

61


S Limestone
j83 61


Arcadia :
83 64 '-lb-


VeniceIt Hu
79/62 North Po ` Hull
82/61 83/61

I Port Charlotte
I 82 '62
Englkruod J ,.....
79 61 -.- :
A" m -, Punta Gorda
o0A /Al


Placida%
80/61.
Boca Grande%
79/69


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2014

Publication date: 2/2/14
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
SE 7-14 1-2 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
S 4-8 1-2 Light


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
78 72 pc
81 61 pc
82 60 pc
81 67 pc
82 72 pc
82 66 pc
79 60 c
81 66 pc
82 63 pc
69 59 c
66 58 c


Mon.
Hi Lo W
77 73 pc
82 63 pc
82 63 pc
81 69 pc
84 73 pc
81 67 pc
80 60 c
80 66 pc
83 64 pc
69 59 sh
66 58 sh


Fort Myers
84/65 *

Cape Coral
83/64


Lehigh Acres
84/64


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


Today
Hi Lo W
45 31 pc
27 17 s
64 47 c
54 31 c
23 2 pc
64 38 c
38 28 s
50 28 c
34 15 sn
40 13 sn
44 29 sh
64 47 c
14 -4 pc
35 16 c
29 14 sn
67 51 c
36 18 sn
44 18 c
34 26 i
32 12 pc
17 4 s
27 8 pc
6-11 pc
12 -11 s
6-16 pc
46 23 c
25 7 pc
79 67 sh
65 42 r
25 9 pc


WORLD CITIES


City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo


Today
Hi Lo W
45 35 pc
60 44 s
46 25 pc
39 30 c
81 70 r
75 52 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
49 28 sh
28 15 pc
61 47 sh
35 24 sn
14 -7 sn
57 47 sh
36 21 sn
33 24 sn
25 13 pc
25 8 pc
40 28 sn
56 35 r
17 5 pc
34 22 pc
24 11 pc
65 44 r
32 21 pc
32 11 c
44 35 c
32 8 sn
25 10 pc
19 9 pc
12-13 pc
8-14 s
5-22 pc
35 19 c
14 -5 sn
79 68 sh
56 47 c
26 17 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
43 34 s
54 43 sh
38 19 pc
39 32 pc
79 70 r
69 52 c


Today Mon.
City Hi Lo W Hi LoW
Mexico City 77 45 pc 74 45 pc
Montreal 34 9 sn 23 9 pc
Ottawa 30 7 pc 21 7 pc
Paris 46 34 pc 45 39 pc
Regina 7 -14 c 1-22 pc
Rio de Janeiro 91 78 pc 92 78 t


Calgary 15 -6 pc 1 -14 pc Rome 54 45 r 54 45 c
Cancun 85 73 s 84 73 pc St. John's 32 22 sn 31 15 pc
Dublin 46 41 pc 46 39 r San Juan 84 73 sh 86 72 sh
Edmonton 12 -7 pc 2-21 pc Sydney 81 68 s 79 66 s
Halifax 40 24 r 34 18 s Tokyo 57 46 sh 63 41 c
Kiev 21 12 s 28 18 s Toronto 28 7 pc 24 7 c
London 50 39 pc 48 39 c Vancouver 41 26 sh 36 22 pc
Madrid 48 30 pc 43 30 c Winnipeg 8 -17 c -3-27 pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Out of sight: Communists




stage 1st Sochi protest


SOCHI, Russia (AP)
- In the shadows of
an elevated highway,
inside an out-of-the-way
park, a hardy band of
local Communist Party
members staged the first
formal protest of the
Sochi Olympics.
Miss it? That's not
surprising. About
12 kilometers (seven
miles) from the nearest
Olympic venue, a handful
of curious onlookers, a
few mothers pushing
young children in carriag-
es, two TV cameras and a


sprinkling of uniformed
and plain-clothed police
were there to witness Igor
Vasiliev, leader of Sochi
Communist Party Branch,
and six supporters stage a
peaceful rally on Saturday.
Russian authorities are
allowing public demon-
strations during the
Olympics, but there's un-
likely to be massed angry
mobs of people protesting
against the kind of issues
in Russia that have gained
international attention
ahead of the games.
Under the guidelines,


all demonstrations and
rallies must be staged in
the designated zone at
the "50 Years of Victory
in the Great Patriotic
War Park" in the coast-
al neighborhood of
Khosta and must be
pre-approved.
Vasiliev said he
applied for his permit
on Jan. 27 and was
given approval to stage
a rally on Saturday, six
days before the opening
ceremony.
The group, wearing
red scarves and holding


placards, wanted to raise
awareness of the plight
of the so-called Children
of the War Russians
born between 1928-45 -
and their campaign for
public financial aid.
Not even Vasiliev
thinks the designated
protest zone will get
much use it is bound-
ed by a river on one side,
a railway on another, is
nestled under the new
main Sochi highway, and
is accessed by a pedes-
trian pathway near the
end of a dead-end street.


AP PHOTO


IgorVasiliyev, head of the local branch of the Communist Party,
adjusts his scarf decorated with a hammer and sickle, a symbol of
the communist movement, as he leads a protest in the 50 Years
of Victory in the Great Patriotic War Park to hold the first official
demonstration in the designated Olympic protest area for the
2014 Winter Olympics, Saturday, in Sochi, Russia.


To say it's tucked away
would be an understate-
ment. Some of the local
residents have confused
the location, with some


asking the manager
of a nearby children's
amusement park if
that is the designated
demonstration zone.


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(941) 526-0186


I WORLD BRIEFS

El Salvador Activists: Syrian
election polls forces launch new
show runoff likely Aleppo strikes


MEXICO CITY (LA Times)
-Salvadorans vote Sunday
in a presidential election
that may give former leftist
rebels a second chance at
government or return
national leadership to the
right-wing party that ruled
the country for two decades.
Opinion surveys have
shown an extremely tight
race, especially with the en-
trance of a new third party
run by a former conserva-
tive president with family
members tied to notorious
corruption cases.
Salvador Sanchez
Ceren, vice president
and candidate for the
Farabundo Marti National
Liberation Front, or FMLN,
the guerrilla group that
became a political party
after the war, appears to
have a slight lead going into
Sunday's vote. Close behind
is Norman Quijano, a pop-
ular former mayor of San
Salvador, the capital, who
represents the once-domi-
nant Arena party.


BEIRUT (AP) -Syrian
military helicopters
dropped barrels packed
with explosives in the gov-
ernment's latest air raids
on rebel-held areas of the
northern city of Aleppo on
Saturday, killing at least 23
people including a family
trapped in a burning car,
activists said.
In neighboring Lebanon,
a car bomb blew up near a
gas station in a Shiite town,
killing at least three people,
in the latest attack linked
to the war in neighboring
Syria.
Footage on al-Manar
television, associated with
the Shiite group Hezbollah,
showed a bright orange
blaze as black silhouettes
of people ran by the gas
station in the northeastern
town of Hermel that lies
near the Syrian border.
Blasts could be heard
in the background. The
Lebanese Red Cross said
another 18 people were
wounded.


TODAY


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
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CONDITIONS TOD
UV Index and RealFeel Tempera


6.
2 4)


Os I 20s I 30s 40s 50s I 60s 70s 80sI 90s5


80/620
30% chance of rain

4
Winter Haven
82,63

Bartu* :
82 63


Precipitation
Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice-
Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice


Today
Hi Lo W
63 37 sh
20 4 pc
53 36 sh
52 38 s
64 49 pc
40 20 c
39 27 sn
13 0 pc
8 -2 s
71 49 c
45 28 sh
71 56 r


Mon.
Hi Lo W
54 44 c
31 16 pc
50 35 sh
52 38 pc
60 48 pc
39 27 pc
42 32 pc
18 9 pc
18 1 pc
63 50 sh
42 32 pc
58 54 sh


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC


c 34 25 sn
c 43 35 r
sn 36 28 c
s 32 11 pc
c 36 24 sn
s 60 41 pc
c 31 17 pc
c 31 13 c
pc 42 28 pc
c 36 23 sn
c 5234r
s 36 21 pc
pc 32 20 pc
c 55 45 c
pc 59 51 pc
r 57 42 pc
pc 39 26 pc
c 37 28 sn


Sanibel -
80/70
Bonita Springs j
83/65

AccuWeather.comn -"'


i rI .


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8


oo/i O .










SPORTS


Sunday, February 2,2014


Prep tennis, softball
season previews,
*Pages 10-11


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* PREP WRESTLING: District tournaments


Bobcats win; Mantas


seven


ByZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
PLANT CITY- North Port High
School got one for the thumb on
Saturday.
As the Bobcats took team photos
with their first-place trophy after
the District 3A-8 meet, each wrestler
held up one hand with all five fingers
out. They weren't waving hello to the
crowd of parents taking photos, they
were making it known that this is
the fifth consecutive district title the

By GARY BROWN
SUN CORRESPONDENT
ENGLEWOOD Lemon Bay High
School displayed its depth Saturday
as seven of its nine wrestlers qualified
for regional tournament.
Jack Lipp and Ryan Dodge each
won their respective weight classes
to lead the host Manta Rays, who fin-
ished fourth as a team in the District
1A-12 meet.
"I was expecting us to maybe
qualify five wrestlers for regions, but


UP NEXT
North Port: In Region 3A-2 meet at Osceola HS
(Kissimmee), Friday-Saturday, TBD

program has won.
The five-peat is impressive on its
own, but is especially significant to
North Port because it one-ups the
four-peat that rival Manatee posted
before the Bobcats started their run.
BOBCATS112


UP NEXT
Lemon Bay: In Region 1A-3 meet at Berkeley
Prep (Tampa), Friday-Saturday, TBD

we had seven," Lemon Bay coach
Gary Jonseck said. "We're pleased
with how we did. We finished first
the previous two seasons, but we
only had six teams in our district
those years. Today, we had 11 teams
MANTAS 112


Lemon Bay High School's Jack Lipp takes control of his opponent, Dunbar's Trevor McDaniel's leg during
the finals of the 113-pound weight class at Saturday's District 1A-12 meet in Englewood. Lipp defeated
McDaniel to become one of seven Manta Rays who qualified for the Region 1A-3 meet Friday and
Saturday at Berkeley Prep in Tampa.


* SUPER BOWL XLVIII: Matt Prater


A-' IL l-IMUIU
Denver Broncos kicker Matt Prater, left, celebrates a 64-yard field goal with Britton Colquitt against the Tennessee Titans on Dec. 8 in Denver. Prater set the NFL
record for longest field goal with that kick. A graduate of Estero High School, Prater is Southwest Florida's lone representative in tonight's Super Bowl.





Icewater in his foot

Prater looks to cap nearly perfect season with Super Bowl victory


* PRO FOOTBALL:
Hall of Fame


Ex-Buc


Brooks


makes


HOF
ByRICKSTROUD
TAMPA BAY TIMES
NEWYORK -There
has always been a
determined look in
Derrick Brooks' eyes, a
seriousness he brought
to the huddle and that
focus was carved into his
face. The captain of the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
defense and undisputed
leader of the team for
parts of two decades has
been described as a quiet
catalyst.
But Brooks also has
always had a bright smile
that could light up the
darkest days in Tampa
Bay and he will be taking
it to the Pro Football Hall
of Fame.
Arguably the best play-
er in franchise history,
Brooks was among the
five modern day players
elected in his first year of
eligibility to the Class of
2014.
Tackle Walter Jones of
the Seahawks who, like
Brooks, played at Florida
State wide receiver
Andre Reed of the Bills,
cornerback/safety Aeneas
BROOKS18



I^TJL


ByZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
Playing in the first Super Bowl
and biggest game of his career,
Matt Prater's parents will be on
hand to watch him try to put the
"icing on the cake" of one of the
best seasons ever by a kicker.
The Estero High School and
University of Central Florida
graduate, Southwest Florida's
lone representative in Super
Bowl XLVIII, set the NFL record
for longest field goal with a 64
yarder on Dec. 8 in Denver,
and also led the league in both


touchbacks and
extra points.
Prater's parents
made the trip
to New York
on Thursday,
suitcases packed
with warm
clothes. It will be
only the second
Broncos game
they've attended
this season, the


INSIDE
Rob Shore offers some prop
bets to consider for tonight's big
game, PAGE 2
Two-page preview of Super
Bowl XLVIII, including 48 things
you should know and reports
on why each team should win,
PAGES 6-7


64-yard field
goal on Dec. 8,
breaking a record
that had not
been surpassed
for more than 40
years.
"I was actually
at a Christmas
party and
someone called
my wife and told
her about it,"


other when Denver played host said John Prater, Matt's father
to Kansas City on Nov. 17. They who is a psychology professor at
weren't even watching when Florida Gulf Coast University in
Prater kicked his record-setting Fort Myers. "We thought he was


kidding at first."
They immediately found the
nearest TV to watch a replay,
something that will not be an
issue tonight. The trip itinerary,
put together by the Broncos
staff, reaches its height when
John and Stacey Prater head
across the Hudson River to
watch the Broncos face the
Seahawks at MetLife Stadium in
East Rutherford, N.J.
It's the biggest game of a
career that started in Estero
with a teenage Prater kicking
PRATERI8


AP FILE PHOTO


Tampa Bay Buccaneers
linebacker Derrick Brooks
reacts during a 2008 game
against the Oakland Raiders in
Tampa. Brooks was elected to
the Pro Football Hall of Fame
on Saturday.


INDEX I Lottery 2 | College football 21 Golf 2 | Shore Lines 2 | Olympics 3 | MLB 31 College basketball 4-5 | NBA 5 | NFL 6-81 Scoreboard 9 Quick Hits 9 1 Preps 10-12 NHL 12






~Page2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.comrn
* CASH 3
Feb. 1N .................................. 7-2-9
Feb. 1 D ..................................... 6-5-0
Jan.31N .....................................5-5-9
Jan. 31D ....................................4-9-6
Jan. 30N .....................................6-0-5
Jan. 30D .....................................2-3-0
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
Feb. 1N....................................9-9-3-1
Feb. 1D ...................................9-1-1-8
Jan. 31N ..................................2-5-7-8
Jan. 31D .................................9-9-5-5
Jan. 30N ..................................7-6-0-8
Jan. 30D ..................................9-8-6-0
D-Day, N-Night

* FANTASY 5
Feb. 1 .........................2-11-16-23-24
Jan.31 ...........................4-5-9-18-21
Jan.30...................... 11-14-20-24-29
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 31
9 5-digit winners............ $26,397.87
489 4-digit winners .................... $78
12,681 3-digit winners.................. $8
* MEGA MONEY
Jan.31 ................................4-8-14-34
M egaBall...........................................5

Jan.28 ...........................8-20-35-41
M egaBall...........................................4
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 31
1 4-of-4MB..........................$550,000
2 4-of-4............................... $3,046.50
39 3-of-4 MB ............................... $342
952 3-of-4................................. $41.50
1,162 2-of-4MB........................$23.50
* LOTTO
Feb.1 ...................11-12-20-23-33-44
Jan.29 ....................6-13-20-27-29-51
Jan.25 .......................2-3-7-21-36-43
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 29
0 6-digit winners ........................$4M
28 5-digit winners ..................$3,553
1,339 4-digit winners............. $63.50
25,425 3-digit winners ..................$5
* POWERBALL
Feb. 1 ..........................5-12-15-27-38
Pow erball.........................................17

Jan.29...................... 11-23-28-32-47
Powerball........................................20
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 29
0 5ofS+PB...........................$171M
1 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
3 4of5 + PB.........................$10,000
104 4 of 5 ..................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$171 million
MEGAA MILLIONS
Jan.31 ..........................3-9-13-47-52
MegaBall...........................................8

Jan.28 ........................ 7-16-28-53-60
MegaBall...........................................2
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 31
0 5 of5 + MB............................. $84M
1 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
2 4of5 + MB..........................$5,000
29 4of 5 ....................................$500


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.
Submit local golf scores: Email
scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.


SunCoast Sports Now
Get the latest local sports news:
www.suncoastsportsblog.com


Vl


Like us on
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Contact us

Mark Lawrence Sports Editor
mlawrence@sun-herald.com

Mike Bambach Deputy SE
mbambach@sun-herald.com
Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com

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shore@sun-herald.com
Zach Miller. Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


*SHORE LINES



Prop bets to consider for tonight


his colunm should
be read while
listening to "Magic
Johnson" by Red Hot Chili r
Peppers (running time: 2
minutes, 57 seconds). "
In this space on Super Ro h
Bowl Sunday for the past
several years, we've high- SHOR
lighted a few prop bets SPORTS mX
for tonight's big game. The
prop bets I looked at (on Bovada.
corn) were more subdued than in
past years, but still taking a shot
with four...

Denver QB Peyton Manning to
win MVP ($100 bet to win $110):
If the Broncos win, Manning will
be the MVP and you can't get the
good side of the payout with the
Broncos otherwise.

Seattle WR Percy Harvin to
catch three passes or fewer ($100
bet to win $130): Traditionally
we look for the positive end of
the payout which is hard to find


1- f



RER
WRITER


in prop bets. Harvin has
been hurt for much of
the season with various
injuries and hasn't built
up much chemistry with
quarterback Russell
Wilson. He'll play some
part today, but expect it
to be limited. (If Harvin
catches four passes, it's a
push; five is a loss.)


Seattle WR Marshawn Lynch to
catch one pass or fewer ($100 bet
to win $71): The spread on this
game is actually 2, so that would
be a push. But in the Seahawks'
last six games, and he's caught
one pass or fewer four times,
caught two passes in one other
game.

Denver TE Julius Thomas
to catch more passes than
Canadiens-Jets goals ($100 to
win $77): Montreal andWinnipeg
have been averaging better than
51/2 total goals (for and against)


in their past eight games. But it
just takes a hot goalie to change
that. Meanwhile, Thomas had
14 catches in two playoff games
(and Manning has targeted him
18 times).
There is a prop bet dealing
with whether members of the
Red Hot Chili Peppers will go
shirtless during the halftime
show that we passed on. So the
media will go bananas when
Janet Jackson has a "wardobe
malfunction" but not with Flea?
The Pro Football Writers'
Association complained at the
start of the week that Lynch
wasn't being very cooperative
during his media sessions.
Somehow they had missed that
Lynch hadn't even been talking
to the media in Seattle, so why
would he talk to media people he
didn't know?
First, NFL commissioner
Roger Goodell speculated about
doing away with the PAT. Then
Colts kicker AdamVinatieri


suggested that field goals beyond
50 yards count for four points,
rather than three. Can't people
accept the game is the game? It's
football not a PlayStation game
where you can reset the rules.
IfVinatieri's suggestion
were enacted, it could present a
situation where a team needed
to lose a certain number of yards
to score more points. It's hard to
see Goodell going for that.
In a mild surprise, it didn't
even take until February for
media types to start wondering
about the state of Tiger Woods'
game. Can't he even get to the
Masters before those questions
start up anymore?
Meanwhile, the NBAs MVP
award has all but been awarded
to the Oklahoma City Thunder's
Kevin Durant, even before the
All-Star Game. Sure, give LeBron
James more motivation ...
Contact Rob Shore at 941-206-1174 orshore@
sun-herald.com and checkout The Hat Trick week-
days at suncoastsportsblog.com


* GOLF ROUNDUP


Watson burrows


into PGA lead


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.- A
desert critter saved leader
Bubba Watson at least
a stroke Saturday in the
Phoenix Open.
Some pigskin play cost
Phil Mickelson to the
chagrin of the rowdiest
fans in the largest crowd
in golf history.
The estimated 189,722
in attendance had a lot to
see on a sunny, cool day at
TPC Scottsdale.
Watson's drive on the
par-5 13th went into a
desert bush and settled
next to a burrowing ani-
mal hole that would have
interfered with his swing,
giving him a free drop.
"Right next to my ball
was a burrowing animal
hole and my club was
going to hit it at impact,"
Watson said. "It was big
hole and the club would
get caught on it. So, I got a
free drop and could easily
wedge it out."
He hit a 150-yard shot to
the fairway, followed with
a wedge to the fringe and
two-putted for par on the
way to a 3-under 68 and a
two-stroke lead.
Without the free drop,


he thought he could have
played a shorter shot.
Mickelson made a
double bogey on the par-3
No. 16, the 20,000-seat
stadium hole where he
"lost focus" thinking
about throwing footballs
into the crowd.
The defending cham-
pion half-shanked his tee
shot left on the 128-yard
hole. He followed with a
weak flop shot into the
bunker, blasted to 8 feet
and two-putted.
On the positive side,
showed no signs of the
back pain that forced him
to withdraw last week at
Torrey Pines.
He finished with a 72 to
drop to 3 under. Watson
was at 15-under 198.

Gallacher takes 2-shot
lead in Dubai: Defending
champion Stephen Gallacher had seven
birdies and an eagle on the back nine
to surge past Rory Mcllroy and take a
two-shot lead in the Dubai Desert.

American leads in New
Zealand: Christchurch, New
Zealand, American Anya Alvarez had six
birdies in an unblemished 66 to take a
two-stroke second-round in the New
Zealand Women's Open over Lydia Ko.


I GOLF SCOREBOARD


PGA Tour
PHOENIXOPEN
At TPC Scottsdale
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,152; Par: 71
Third Round
Bubba Watson 64-66-68-
Kevin Stadler 65-68-67-
Ryan Moore 66-71-64-
Harris English 65-67-69-
Hideki Matsuyama 66-67-68-
Brendan Steele 66-74-62-
HunterMahan 66-71-65-
Matt Jones 65-65-72-
Jason Kokrak 66-69-68-
Pat Perez 65-68-70-
Greg Chalmers 65-67-71-
Graham DeLaet 67-72-65-
Matt Every 72-66-67-
Ricky Barnes 71-67-67-
Chris Stroud 70-67-68-
NickWatney 69-68-68-
Patrick Reed 67-67-71-
Morgan Hoffmann 69-66-70-
John Rollins 72-67-67-
John Mallinger 67-72-67-
Charles Howell III 70-69-67-
Martin Laird 67-68-71-
Spencer Levin 67-69-70-
Brandt Snedeker 70-64-72-
Ben Crane 69-69-69-
Cameron Tringale 71-67-69-
Webb Simpson 68-72-67-
William McGirt 65-69-73-
Bryce Molder 67-71-70-
David Lynn 72-66-70-
Kevin Na 70-70-68-
Bill Haas 69-68-71-
David Lingmerth 72-68-68-
Brendon de Jonge 66-73-70-
John Merrick 75-65-69-
Ken Duke 70-67-72-
GeoffOgilvy 71-70-68-
Scott Piercy 67-67-75-
CamiloVillegas 70-71-68-
Chris Smith 70-69-71-
Phil Mickelson 71-67-72-
ErikCompton 67-72-71-
Robert Garrigus 70-70-70-
James Driscoll 67-70-73-
Michael Thompson 72-68-70-
Ryan Palmer 76-64-70-
Kiradech Aphibarnrat 66-71-73-
Jason Bohn 70-70-70-
KJ.Choi 71-70-69-
Brian Stuard 73-68-69-
Charley Hoffman 70-71-69-
Justin Hicks 71-70-69-
Jonathan Byrd 68-73-69-


Aaron Baddeley 68-70-73-211
GaryWoodland 67-72-72--211
Jonas Blixt 68-71-72-211
David Hearn 68-70-73-211
Brian Gay 69-71-71-211
Martin Kaymer 69-71-71-211
Nicolas Colsaerts 69-68-74-211
Sang-Moon Bae 67-73-71-211
Roberto Castro 72-69-70-211
Brian Davis 72-69-70-211
J.B.Holmes 73-68-70-211
John Peterson 68-70-74-212
YE.Yang 64-73-75-212
JhonattanVegas 71-66-75-212
MarkCalcavecchia 70-71-71-212
Scott Langley 71-70-71-212
Kevin Streelman 71-68-74-213
Chris Kirk 65-73-75-213
BenCurtis 68-72-73-213
Derek Ernst 72-69-72-213
Steven Bowditch 71-69-75-215
Fred Funk 69-71-76-216
VijaySingh 69-72-75-216
Joe Ogilvie 71-70-77-218

European Tour
DUBAI DESERT CLASSIC
At Emirates Golf Club (Majlis Course)
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Purse: $2.5 million
Yardage: 7,316; Par: 72
Third Round
S. Gallacher, Scotland 66-71-63-200
Rory Mcllroy, N. Ireland 63-70-69-202
Brooks Koepka, U.S. 69-65-70-204
T.Olesen, Denmark 71-68-65-204
Robert Rock, England 67-70-68-205
Edoardo Molinari, Italy 65-72-68-205
Steve Webster, England 71-70-64-205
Roope Kakko, Finland 69-69-68-206
Damien McGrane, Ireland 66-70-71-207
EmilianoGrillo, Argentina 71-67-69-207
Jamie Donaldson,Wales 69-68-70-207
D.Van derWalt, S. Africa 72-70-65-207
Darren Fichardt, S. Africa 69-72-66-207
T.Jaidee,Thailand 68-69-71-208
Richard Sterne, A. Africa 66-73-69-208
Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 70-70-68-208
Paul Waring, England 70-70-68-208
RomainWattel, France 68-73-67-208
Also
Francesco Molinari, Italy 69-69-71-209
Joost Luiten, Netherlands 70-69-70-209
C. Montgomerie, Scotland 70-70-69-209
Paul Casey, England 70-72-67-209
Thomas Bjorn, Denmark 72-70-68-210
Paul Lawrie, Scotland 68-71-72-211
TigerWoods,U.S. 68-73-70-211
HenrikStenson, Sweden 70-67-75-212
Fred Couples, U.S. 70-71-73-214


Thousands

turn out

for belated

homecoming
By KAREEM COPELAND
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TALLAHASSEE -An
estimated 30,000 people
descended on the Florida
State campus to celebrate
the program's third
national championship in
school history. FSU co
Fans were welcomed celebr
onto the field after the footb
hour-long program at one c
the football stadium and Flori
hundreds surrounded think
coach Jimbo Fisher of the
begging for pictures and beca
autographs. like n
"We love you, Jimbo!" took
was shouted from the
crowd, sorry
crowd. here
"Jimbo, you're a ge- Flo
nius!" followed moments Fo
later. out s]
The crowd filled nearly "Crys
the entire home side of with:
the stands and hung on on th
every word spoken as spray
Fisher, Heisman winner and c
Jameis Winston, athletic coaci
director StanWilcox and NFL
receiver Rashad Greene Freer
all took turns speaking Jr., KE
on a stage constructed at and I
midfield. retur]
"We didn't just develop the c
a team, folks," Fisher said. Telvin
"We developed a pro- from
gram. We plan on being Senic
here for a long time. and I
"To me, this team unab
dominated maybe like "I w
no other team in college you'v


AP PHOTO
ach Jimbo Fisher hoists the crystal ball trophy during a
ation of the football team's national title on Saturday.


all history. We're
f the great teams in
Ida State history, but I
They've become one
e great teams overall
ise they dominated
o other team. They
no prisoners, felt
for no one. We're
to stay."
rida State passed
shirts that read
stal Ballin'" and hats
a miniature trophy
em. Confetti was
yed into the crowd
over the players and
hes on stage. Early
entrees Devonta
nan, James Wilder
devin Benjamin
'immy Jernigan all
ned to take part in
celebration. Senior
i Smith arrived late
training in Miami.
ors Lamarcus Joyner
Bryan Stork were
le to make it.
vas told, 'Man,
e got to get this


training in, you've got
to stay' but we put a lot
of work into what we
did this season," Smith
said. "It wouldn't have
been right not to come
back and show love to
everybody who gave us
that same love during the
season."
Winston drew the
loudest applause among
the players. That happens
when a freshman quar-
terback wins the Heisman
Trophy and a national
championship and is part
of an offense capable
of repeating with eight
returning starters.
"Before ya'll ask me any
questions, just know that
we are the champions,"
Winston said with a smile.
"We've got to keep doing
it. We've won it now. It's
a new year and a new
season and we've got to
keep getting better and it
starts now. We've got to do
it again next year."


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Florida State


AP PHOTO
Heisman Trophy winner and Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston smiles as highlights of the
Seminoles'victory over Auburn in the BCS national championship game are shown.





Play it again,





Seminoles


-Page 2 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014






The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


*MLB:



Rays looking



to go deep

Rv MARC TOPKIN


TAMPA BAY TIMES
ST. PETERSBURG-
Concluding what has
been generally considered
a positive offseason for
what they did, and didn't
do, the Tampa Bay Rays
have been focused on
depth.
Anywhere, and
everywhere.
One lesson they've
learned the past few
seasons is that they can
never have enough. And
another is that as soon as
they think they do, they
don't.
So that's why they
have continued to add
seemingly spare parts,
primarily on minor-league
deals with spring training
invites, pushing the camp
roster to the low 60s.
The signing of INF
Wilson Betemit, an
11-year big-league vet
coming off a 2013 season
lost mostly to injury, is the
latest example.
Maybe, at best, the
switch-hitter turns out to
be valuable insurance at
Triple A, a capable and
experienced fill-in at first,
third or in the DH rotation
to be summoned in the
event of injury.
Or maybe he could be
more. The addition of
INF/OF Logan Forsythe
seemed to leave just
an opening for a fifth
outfielder, with out-of-
options Brandon Guyer
the apparent leading
candidate. But with the
versatility to use Forsythe,
Sean Rodriguez and/
or Ben Zobrist in the
outfield, the Rays could
fill that final bench spot
with the most potent bat,
creating an opening for
Betemit, Jayson Nix or
one of the other invitees.
Depth allows those types
of options.
With pitchers and
catchers reporting Feb. 14,
the Rays don't have much
else to do. They are still
having talks about trading
C Jose Lobaton, but bring-
ing him to camp, though
somewhat awkward, isn't
the worst idea: protection
if either Ryan Hanigan
(already working out at
the Trop catching bullpen
sessions) or Jose Molina
gets hurt, and opportunity
if another team has to
react to an injury.
OF Sam Fuld could end
up in Port Charlotte if he
doesn't get a big-league


SPRING TRAINING
COUNTDOWN



12
Days until Tampa Bay Rays
pitchers and catchers report
for spring training on Feb. 14
at Charlotte Sports Park

deal elsewhere. RHP Juan
Sandoval (the blind-in-
one-eye reliever who had
a solid 2013 mostly at
Double A) is coming back
and OF Jeremy Moore, a
former Angel, is coming
in. Depth, they say, is
good.

Numbers game: RHP Grant
Balfour will get No. 50 back, with
bullpen coach Stan Boroski switching
to 41. New RHP Heath Bell will wear
13, Hanigan 24 and Forsythe 10, with
Guyer switching (potentially) to 5. OF
Kevin Kiermaier will switch to 39.

Prospecting: ESPN's Keith Law
dropped the Rays from third to 23rd
in his annual ranking of farm systems,
with three Rays among his top 100
prospects: RHP Taylor Guerrieri (who is
recovering from elbow surgery) at 66th,
SS Hak-Ju Lee (recovering from knee
surgery) at 79, C Nick Ciuffo (their 2013
top pick) at 95. ... Baseball Prospectus
had two Rays in its 100: LHP Enny
Romero at 90 and RHP Jake Odorizzi 92.

Rays rumblings: ESPN's Jim
Bowden anointed Rays executive VP
Andrew Friedman and A's counterpart
Billy Beane as the GM "stars of the
offseason"and called them "small-
market geniuses."... Balfour and the
Rays got creative to make his two-year,
$12 million deal work, with a $1
million signing bonus and salaries of $4
million and $7 million, with $2 million
each year deferred with no interest for
two years .... Noted sabermetrician
Clay Davenport's first 2014 computer
projections have the Rays winning 90
games and the AL East, the Red Sox
winning 86, the Yankees 85. ... There
has been some negative reaction to
the new Fan Fest autograph policy
(with a $125 top price), but it should
be noted the Rays have kept admission
to the Feb. 22 event and parking free.
Other teams charge: $12, for example,
in Baltimore; $10 in Texas; $40 for a
three-day pass in St. Louis. ... Bell,
coming off two rough seasons, tweeted
he has "been grinding"all offseason
with personal trainer Todd Durkin and
feels "better than ever'."... 3B Evan
Longoria lost to Phillies 2B Chase Utley
in the first round of MLB Network's Face
of MLB Twitter voting. ... New short-
season Class A Hudson Valley manager
Tim Parenton, in his first pro job after
a long college coaching career, was a
backup quarterback when not playing
baseball at Mississippi State.


* MLB NOTEBOOK


Lincecum glad


to be back in SF


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO- A
long line of fans waiting
to see Tim Lincecum
weaved around the cor-
ner and down a hallway
on the suite level of AT&T
Park.
The popular pitcher
had a pile of his baseball
cards signed and at the
ready to keep the morn-
ing moving smoothly at
Giants FanFest under
blue skies on a crisp,
sunny Saturday.
The fact he is even
back in the Bay Area is
a big deal for The Freak,
a longtime fan favorite
who helped the franchise
capture World Series titles
in 2010 and again two
years later.
For a few weeks last fall
after the season ended
without a playoff berth,
Lincecum had doubts
he would be back with
the Giants and prepared
himself for the unknowns


of free agency. Then, he
received a $35 million,
two-year contract Oct. 25
to stay put with the only
organization he knows.
"Early in the offseason,
no," he said of whether
he expected to be back.
"But after I signed, yes....
When we got to the point
negotiations got finalized,
it was just one of those
things where I felt like I
couldn't say no. I've been
ecstatic about coming
back ever since."

Around the majors: The
Kansas City Royals announced the
signing of veteran pitcher Bruce Chen
to a $4.25 million, one-year deal that
includes a mutual option for the 2015
season. ...
Right-handed starter Doug Fister
and the Washington Nationals agreed
to terms on a contract, avoiding
arbitration. ...
The Los Angeles Dodgers and
catcher A.J. Ellis avoided arbitration,
agreeing to a one-year contract.


OLYMPICS:


AP FILE PHOTO
Canada's Patrick Chan, competing during the Canadian figure skating championships on Jan. 10 in Ottawa, will be seeking Canada's
first Olympic gold in men's figure skating at the Sochi Olympics.




Patrick Chan's chase


Figure skater

eyes Canada's
first gold in
men's event
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO -When
Patrick Chan was a young
boy, the first thing he'd do
when he arrived for skat-
ing lessons at Toronto's
Granite Club was scan the
rink for his coach.
Chan always half hoped
Osborne Colson wouldn't
be there. His heart sank
every time he was.
More than a decade lat-
er and now a three-time
world champion, Chan
thinks back fondly to the
eccentric coach he calls
"scary strict," the man he
credits with making him a
complete skater.
Colson died in 2006
with the Chan family
at his bedside. But the
coach's presence is felt in
every powerful push of
Chan's blades against ice.
Sitting in the dressing
room of a Toronto rink,
Chan laughs about how
much he used to dread
his lessons with the crusty
coach who died at 90.
"I'd think, 'I hope I
don't get the first lesson,'
because if you were the
first lesson, there was
a lot of pressure riding
on you," Chan told The
Canadian Press. "If you
put him in a bad mood,


OLYMPIC
COUNTDOWN


5
Days until the opening
ceremony for the Winter Games
on Friday in Sochi, Russia

if you didn't skate well, if
he wasn't happy with you,
then everyone else's les-
son would be miserable. I
got used to being under a
lot of pressure and being
in scary, nerve-racking
situations."
There will be plenty of
pressure in Sochi, where
Chan will be seeking
Canada's first Olympic
gold in men's singles.
Brian Orser and Elvis
Stojko each won two
Olympic silver medals;
Jeffrey Buttle and Toller
Cranston each won
bronze.
Chan is the Olympic
favorite. Colson is one of
the biggest reasons why.
"The way that Patrick is
able to edge and turn and
then suddenly go into a
jump and come out, and
do this and do that, his
agility on the ice, that is
all Mr. Colson," said cho-
reographer David Wilson,
who was also coached
by Colson. "Patrick was
literally trained by Mr.
Colson from (the begin-
ning), so his entire vision
and evolution was poured


into this boy.
"I said to Patrick, 'You
know, you were the skater
that we all tried to be for
Mr. Colson but we weren't
good enough.' Finally Mr.
Colson found someone
that was good enough to
manifest his vision."
Chan's free program,
which opens with two
quad jumps, is a nod to
the man who molded
his skating career. There
are signature Colson
movements "that I hated,
absolutely hated when I
was younger," Chan said.
"But now that I'm more
experienced and more
mature, I'm able to do
these movements much
better."
The 23-year-old skater
originally had visions of
being a hockey player.
His mom enrolled him in
speed skating in Ottawa
at age 4, then signed him
up for figure skating at 5
when the family moved to
Toronto.
"There have been times
that I've got mad at my
mom for not putting me
into hockey," Chan said.
"But my mom wanted me
to keep my teeth, so that's
one bonus. And I'm not
big enough to be a hockey
player; if I was 6-feet tall,
maybe.
"Basically that means I
was born to do what I do.
My body was built to be
a figure skater, and not
a hockey player. I don't
think I would be at the


highest level if I had been
a hockey player, so you
just identify what's best
for you, and figure skating
was my path."
Chan won Canadian
titles at pre-novice,
novice and junior levels
with Colson as his coach.
He finished seventh in
his first Canadian senior
championship in 2006,
then fifth. He has been
unbeatable in Canada
since, winning seven
consecutive national
crowns.
He finished fifth in
2010 inVancouver. In
the months leading to
the games, Chan injured
his calf and changed
coaches, from Don
Laws, whom he first met
at Colson's funeral, to
Christy Krall. Chan also
couldn't execute a quad
then. He has since added
the four-revolution jump,
which has made him
virtually unbeatable when
he lands it. And he almost
always does.
He switched coaches
again, from Krall to Kathy
Johnston following the
2012 worlds, then last
spring abruptly moved
from Colorado Springs,
Colo., to Detroit. He grew
up on the drive east.
"That drive," he said,
"was my bridge from
being a dependent
athlete to being an
independent athlete who
is responsible."


* OLYMPICS NOTEBOOK


Bach faces challenging 1st games


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOCHI, Russia-
Vladimir Putin isn't the
only president with a
lot riding on the Sochi
Olympics.
Thomas Bach will
preside over his first
games as head of the
International Olympic
Committee: For the first
time in 12 years, someone
other than Jacques Rogge
will be in charge.
It's a daunting debut
for Bach, a 60-year-old
German and former
Olympic fencing gold
medalist who was elected
the IOC's ninth president
in September.
Rather than easing
into the top job, Bach is
starting his term with one
of the most contentious
Olympics in years. If that
wasn't enough, he'll then
face another major chal-
lenge: the delay-plagued
2016 Olympics in Rio de
Janeiro.
With Sochi, Bach has
to tread a fine line of sup-
porting the host country


AP- I-HUIUO
Gondolas make their way to the Sanki Sliding Center, a venue
for bobsleigh, skeleton and luge in Krasnaya Polyana, Russia.


and being attuned to
the uproar over the law
against gay "propaganda"
and allegations of cor-
ruption in the $51 billion
Olympic project. The
threat of terror attacks by
Islamic insurgents from
the North Caucasus has
added to the volatile mix.
Bach knew what he
was getting into when he
sought the top job. And,
despite all the concerns
swirling around Sochi, he
says there are no worries
keeping him awake at


night.
"I'm sorry to tell you
I'm sleeping very well,"
Bach said. "Fear is a very
bad adviser. It is not
a category in which I
think. I knew about the
challenges of this office
before I decided to run.
I'm really looking forward
to this firstWinter Games
under my presidency and
I'm very confident they
will be successful."
Bach checked into his
room in the athletes'
village today, continuing


a tradition started by
Rogge. He chairs a
one-day IOC executive
board meeting today
and then convenes a
21/2-day session of the full
IOC general assembly
beginning Wednesday. A
global television audience
will get a close look at
Bach when he speaks
at Friday's opening
ceremony.

Around the rings: Sochi
Olympic organizers said only six of the
nine media hotels in the mountain
area are ready to welcome guests.
Some Olympic-accredited visitors
have been turned away from their
accommodation over recent days
because hotels were not yet ready ...
The first of two American warships
heading into the Black Sea in advance
of the Olympics sailed from Italy. In
another sign of U.S. efforts to protect
Americans in Scochi, the FBI said at
least 24 agents are going to Sochi....
Russian Prime Minister Dmitry
Medvedev urged his government to
come up with a plan for the post-
Olympic use of Sochi venues, signaling
the government's worry over the
maintenance of expensive buildings.


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3







Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


I rffIl I r. FRACVI/TRAI I crnFDERnADn : COLLEGE MEN'S BASKETBALL ROUNDUP


IVLLLIL UIJRL I UhMLL J .VInLUVMnUi


MEN
SOUTH
Alabama A&M63,Texas Southern 62
Alabama St. 76, PrairieView 63
Arkansas St. 83,Troy 73
Auburn 74, Georgia 67
Charleston Southern 80, Liberty66
Charlotte 73, FIU 61
Chattanooga 67, Furman 52
Clemson 53, Florida St. 49
Coastal Carolina 61,Campbell 58
Coil. of Charleston 67, Hofstra 49
Concordia-Austin 83, Louisiana College 80
Davidson 62,The Citadel 43
E.Kentucky 79, SE Missouri 78
East Carolina 74, UAB 67
Elon 83, Appalachian St. 76
FAU 65, Marshall 57
Florida 69,Texas A&M 36
Gardner-Webb 73, Radford 72, OT
Georgia Southern 64, UNC Greensboro 62
Georgia Tech 79,Wake Forest 70
Hampden-Sydney 85, Emory& Henry 57
Hampton 79, Coppin St. 76,OT
High Point 65,Winthrop 64
Jacksonville 95, N. Kentucky 77
LSU 88, Arkansas 74
Lipscomb 60, North Florida 58
La-Lafayette 66, Louisiana-Monroe 50
Maryland 80,Virginia Tech 60
McNeese St. 79, Oral Roberts 68
Md.-Eastern Shore 67, NC A&T60
Miami 64, Norfolk St. 49
MiddleTennessee 64, Old Dominion 48
Mississippi 75, South Carolina 71
Morehead St. 65, Jacksonville St. 54
Morgan St. 77, Delaware St. 64
NC Central 79, Howard 65
North Carolina 84, NC State 70
SC State 63, Florida A&M 59, OT
Savannah St. 50, Bethune-Cookman 40
Southern Miss. 78,Tulane 47
Southern U. 62, Alcorn St. 54
UALR 62, South Alabama 58
UNC Asheville 67, Longwood 66
Union (Ky.)88,Tenn.Wesleyan 74
VCU 81, Richmond 70
Vanderbilt 55, Mississippi St. 49
W. Kentucky 68,Texas St. 64
West Georgia 63, Union (Tenn.) 62
Wofford 77, Samford 58
EAST
American U. 63, HolyCross57
Army 77, Loyola (Md.) 71
Brooklyn 81, Lehman 72
Brown 64, Columbia 56
Bucknell 79, Colgate 68
CCSU 74, Robert Morris 73
Canisius 84, Fairfield 58
Clarkson 77, Hobart 68
Dartmouth 78, Princeton 69, OT
Delaware 66, UNCWilmington 65
Elmira 76, Utica 65
Fordham 85, Rhode Island 79
Georgetown 64, Michigan St. 60
Hartwick 77, St.John Fisher 65
La Salle 71, Duquesne 63
Lafayette 72, Navy 54
Lehigh 82, Boston U. 80, OT
Maine 83, UMBC 80
Marist 78, Niagara 64
Mass.-Lowell 62, Binghamton 55
Quinnipiac 103, Siena 95,OT
Randolph 54, Shenandoah 52
Rutgers 93, Houston 70
Saint Joseph's 73, UMass 68
Slippery Rock64, California (Pa.) 53
St. Francis (NY) 73,Wagner 72, OT
St. Francis (Pa.) 83, Fairleigh Dickinson 75
St. John's 74, Marquette 59
Stonehill75, St. Rose 73
Stony Brook 56, Hartford 52
Syracuse91, Duke 89, OT
Towson 75, Drexel 73
Vermont 55, Albany (NY) 45
Villanova 90,Temple 74
West Virginia 81,Kansas St. 71
William Paterson 88, Rowan 75
Yale61,Cornell57
MIDWEST
Dayton 75, George Washington 65
Doane 86, Dakota Weslyn 76
E. Illinois 76, SIU-Edwardsville 70
Green Bay 62, Wright St. 55
IPFW 77,W. Illinois 64
Illinois St. 75, Drake 57
Indiana St. 87, N. Iowa 81
Iowa 81,Illinois 74
Iowa St. 81, Oklahoma 75
Kalamazoo 60, Albion 58
Kent St. 60, Akron 57
Kentucky 84, Missouri 79
Lake Erie 89, Ohio Dominican 85
Lake Superior St. 79, Michigan Tech 78
Miami (Ohio) 65, E. Michigan 61
Minn. Duluth 76,Wayne (Neb.) 53
Minn. St.-Mankato 106, Minot St. 95
Missouri St. 74, Bradley61
N. Illinois 67, Ball St. 65, OT
Nebraska-Omaha 99, IUPUI71
Northwestern 55, Minnesota 54
Notre Dame 76, Boston College 73, OT
Ohio 95,Toledo 90, OT
Ohio St. 59,Wisconsin 58
Providence 77, DePaul 72
S. Dakota St. 70, South Dakota 68
S. Illinois 81, Loyola of Chicago 76, OT
Saint Louis 87, George Mason 81, OT
Seton Hall 68, Xavier 60
Upper Iowa 76, Northern St. (SD) 70
Valparaiso 70, III.-Chicago 46
W. Michigan 75, Cent. Michigan 72
Wayne (Mich.) 69, Grand Valley St. 64
Wichita St. 81,Evansville67
Wis.-Eau Claire 60,Wis.-La Crosse57
Wis.-Oshkosh 68,Wis.-River Falls 55
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 63,Wis.-Superior 46
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 66, Grambling St. 64
Baylor 76, Oklahoma St. 70
CS Bakersfield 72,Texas-Pan American 64
LouisianaTech 87, UTSA 72
SMU 87, Memphis 72
Sam Houston St. 81,Houston Baptist 63
Stephen F.Austin 76, IncarnateWord 74
Texas 81, Kansas 69
TexasTech 60,TCU 54
Tulsa 94, North Texas 63
WEST
Colorado 79, Utah 75, OT
Denver 67, N. Dakota St. 63
E.Washington 94, N. Colorado 90, OT
Long Beach St. 75, Cal St.-Fullerton 56
N. Arizona 67, Idaho St. 65
Nevada 69, Air Force 56, OT
New Mexico 72, San Jose St. 47
Oregon 78, Southern Cal 66
Pacific 84, San Diego 67
Pepperdine 80, Loyola Marymount 69
San Diego St. 65, Colorado St. 56
Stanford 76, Arizona St. 70
UC Santa Barbara 82, UC Davis 67
UNLV73,BoiseSt. 69
Washington St. 72,Washington 67
Wyoming 74, Utah St. 57


WOMEN
SOUTH
Appalachian St.61,Wofford 54
Belmont 69,Tennessee Tech 56
Belmont Abbey 74, Limestone 64
Berea 101, Brescia 88
Bethel (Tenn.) 78, Loyola NO 74
Campbell 61, Liberty 55, OT
Campbellsville 70, Cumberland (Tenn.) 54
Catawba 56, Carson-Newman 47
Chattanooga 76, Davidson 62
Coastal Carolina 64, Longwood 55
Delaware St. 86, Morgan St. 66
Duquesne 55, Richmond 45
E.Kentucky 75, SE Missouri 56
ETSU 72, North Florida 57
East Carolina 71, Charlotte 62
Elon 80, UNC-Greensboro 57
FIU 76, FAU 72
Fayetteville St. 81, St. Augustine's 74
Florida A&M 70, SC State 64
Gardner-Webb 76, UNC Asheville 53
Guilford 72, Bridgewater (Va.) 43
Hampton 83, Coppin St. 75
Howard 66, NC Central 61
Jackson St. 63, MVSU 56
King (Tenn.) 76, Barton 66
Lenoir-Rhyne 68, Brevard 57
LouisianaTech 71,UTSA50
La.-Monroe 66, Louisiana-Lafayette 59
Mercer 64, Kennesaw St. 59
N. Kentucky 63, Florida Gulf Coast 43
NC A&T 73, Md.-Eastern Shore 63
Nicholls St. 69, Cent. Arkansas 60
Northwestern St. 76, Abilene Christian 72
Old Dominion 65, Marshall 52, OT
Pfeiffer 74, Lees-McRae 62
Radford 60, Charleston Southern 57
Randolph-Macon 91, Lynchburg 73
SC-Upstate 66,Jacksonville 58
Samford 58, Georgia Southern 43
Savannah St. 71, Bethune-Cookman 64
South Alabama 61, UALR 56
Stetson 82, Lipscomb 47
Tenn.Wesleyan 67, Union (Ky.) 62
Texas Southern 66, Alabama A&M 61
Texas St. 72,W. Kentucky 63
Texas-Arlington 67, Georgia St. 51
Troy 83, Arkansas St. 65
UCF 52, Houston 43
UTEP 86,Tulane 72
Union (Tenn.) 63,West Georgia 55
Virginia Union 68, Chowan 37
W. Carolina 65, Furman 54
Winthrop51, Presbyterian 43
Xavier (NO) 66,Tougaloo 65
EAST
Albany (NY) 69,Vermont 52
American U. 58, Holy Cross 53
Army 56, Loyola (Md.) 45, OT
Brooklyn 75, Lehman 56
Brown 79, Columbia 57
Bucknell 64, Colgate 54
California (Pa.) 85, Slippery Rock 67
Castleton St. 61, Maine Maritime 49
Clarkson 69,William Smith 57
Cornell65,Yale 56
DePaul 74, Providence 63
Dominican (NY) 65, Chestnut Hill 62
Elmira 64, Utica 57
Fairfield 52, St. Peter's 40
George Washington 83, Rhode Island 68
lona 80, Siena 66
Lafayette 70, Navy 69
Lehigh 67, Boston U. 54
Maine 61, UMBC 48
Marist 65, Monmouth (NJ) 40
Penn 67, Harvard 38
Philadelphia 91, Caldwell 80
Princeton 76, Dartmouth 53
Quinnipiac 93, Niagara 78
Rider 73, Manhattan 56
Robert Morris 67, Mount St. Mary's 60
Rutgers 66, Memphis 48
Saint Joseph's 70,VCU 51
St. Bonaventure 74, Fordham 67
St. Francis (NY) 71, CCSU 50
St. Francis (Pa.) 92,Wagner 78
St. John's 69, Seton Hall 48
Stonehill92, St. Rose81,OT
Susquehanna 62, Drew 43
Villanova 68, Creighton 54
Washington &Jefferson 62,Thiel 49
Washington (Md.) 69, Dickinson 43
William Paterson 78, Rowan 46
MIDWEST
Butler 68, Xavier 54
Cleveland St. 84,Youngstown St. 80
Concordia (Mich.) 85, Marygrove 52
Concordia (St.P) 74, Mary55
Davenport 82, Madonna 57
Dayton 103, George Mason 81
E. Illinois 71, SIU-Edwardsville 61
Green Bay 84, Detroit 72
IUPUI77, Nebraska-Omaha 45
Iowa St. 84, Kansas St. 65
Marquette 77, Georgetown 54
Martin Luther 97, Crown (Minn.) 57
Michigan Tech 65, Lake Superior St. 40
Milwaukee 85,Valparaiso 80
Minnesota 85, Michigan 69
N. Dakota St. 85, Denver 79
N. Michigan 74, Northwood (Mich.) 62
Nebraska 80, Iowa 67
North Dakota 69, Portland St. 44
Olivet 63, Alma 53
Saint Louis 53, La Salle 43
St. Mary's (Minn.) 72, Concordia (Moor.) 69
UConn 86, Cincinnati 29
W. Illinois 68, IPFW 65
W. Michigan 56, N. Illinois 43
Wis.-EauClaire57,Wis.-LaCrosse47
Wis.-Oshkosh 58,Wis.-River Falls 46
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 65,Wis.-Superior 58
Wis.-Whitewater81,Wis.-Stout60
Wright St. 77,III.-Chicago 74
SOUTHWEST
Ark.-Pine Bluff 64, Grambling St. 58
Baylor 87,Texas 73
Kansas 70,TexasTech 62
Lamar 87,Texas A&M-CC 72
MiddleTennessee 67,Tulsa 57
North Texas 66, UAB 58
Oklahoma 81, Oklahoma St. 74
SMU 85, Temple 75
Southern Miss. 74, Rice 58
Stephen F.Austin 79, IncarnateWord 59
West Virginia 66,TCU 62
WEST
Boise St. 79, UNLV 49
CS Bakersfield 82,Texas-Pan American 74
CS Northridge 75, Hawaii 72, OT
Cal Poly 84, UC Irvine 79
Colorado St. 95, San Diego St. 48
E.Washington 52, N. Colorado 51
Gonzaga 101, San Francisco 66
Grand Canyon 74, UMKC 63
Idaho 77, Seattle 59
Idaho St. 82, N. Arizona 72
Long Beach St. 83, Cal St.-Fullerton 64
Loyola Marymount 90, Pepperdine 74
Montana 81, S. Utah 73
Nevada 84, Air Force 74, OT


'101













Ohio State's Amedeo Delia Valle shoots between Wiscons
Dekker during Saturday's game in Madison, Wis. The Buc




Buckeyes





confidence

Syr cus nis CJ.Fair scored a career-best 2
1Syracuse nips I.'
Syracuse (21-0,8-0 ACC) seta
Duke in OT; record for wins to start a seas

ailing Sp artans No. 4 Wichita Stat
Evansville 67:In Wichii
fall to G3tovwn Fred VanVleet and Ron Baker
14 points apiece, and fourth-
B THEs ASSOCIATED PRESS Wichita State (23-0,10-0 Miss

MADISON, Wis.- Valley) which spotted Evansv
Aaron Craft scored all (10-13,3-7)a 15-point lead.
seven of his points in No. 5 San Diego St
Dthe final 4 minutes, Colorado St. 56: In Sa
LaQuinton Ross added coach Steve Fisher won his 3(
13 for the game, and No. game at San Diego State wh
24 Ohio State gained a Thames scored 24 points to h
confidence-boosting win Aztecs (19-1,8-0 Mountain V
on the road Saturday by improve to 80 in conference
beating No. 14 Wisconsin the first time in the program'
59-58. history.
EAmadeo Della Valle hi
;added 11 points for the No. 25 Texas 81, N
Buckeyes (17-5, 4-5 Big Kansas 69: In Austin, Te>
Ten) in a bruising back- Isaiah Taylor scored 23 points
and-forth affair with the Jonathan Holmes had 22 and
Badgers (17-5, 4-5). rolled to its sixth consecutive
Sam Dekker missed The Longhorns (17-4,6-2) he
a 3 at the buzzer for four consecutive wins over To
Wisconsin, which suf- opponents.
feared a third straight Baylor 76, No.8
Some loss. B?
the los Oklahoma State 70:
Georgetown 64, No. 7 Stillwater, Oka., Brady Hesli
1 Michigan St. 60: In NewYork, season-high 20 points to hell
SMarkel Starks scored 16 points and end a fivetgame losing steal
Georgetown (12c9) ended a five game No 1 Kentuck 8
losing streak by beating short-handed to-0 in c
Michigan State (19-3) at Madison Missouri 79: In Cogrmbl
Square Garden. Aaron Harrison scored 21 roi
e 1James Young added 20 for K8
; No. Syracuse 91, No. 17 (16-5,6-2 Southeastern).
BDuke 89, OT: In Syracuse, N.Y.,
TJerami Grant scored eight points in No. 9 Villanova 90
overtime to finish with a career-high Temple 74: In Philadelpi
24 and Syracuse stayed unbeaten. James Bell scored 19 points
Wisin'siFr ankch WaMEnS BAS oenA l










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Villanova (19-2), which
Big 5 play and earned it
championship. Temple (
11 of its last 13 games.
No. 15 Iowa 81
74: In Champaign, III.,
Olaseni had 15 points a
rebounds and Iowa (17-
Ten) escaped after build
lead just 12 minutes int
and losing it all while b
by the lllini (13-9,2-7)
Ten-best rebounding.

No. 16 Iowa St
No. 23 Oklahoma
Ames, Iowa, sophomore
Niang scored a career-h
and Iowa State (16-4,4
for the second time in s

No. 19 Saint Lo
George Mason 8
St. Louis, Rob Loe score
career-high 23 points ir
the hosts. Loe hita 3-po
the game at 68 with 44
play and a 3-pointer to
giving the Billikens (20-
10) the lead for good.

Saint Joseph's
21 Massachusett
Philadelphia, Saint Jose
Atlantic 10) hit five foul
final minute to secure ti
UMass erased a 16-poin
it at 68.

SMU 87, No.2;
Memphis 72: In D
Moore had 14 points wi
and keyed a game-turn
the second half, and SW
improved to 11-0at hor


STATE ROUNDUP



rMiami



ends


slide


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CORAL GABLES Rion
SBrown scored 15 points as
SMiami snapped a three-
Sgame losing streak and
Defeated Norfolk State
64-49 on Saturday.
S The Hurricanes never
Trailed after a late first-
Shalf run that resulted in a
S10-point lead at halftime.
Manu Lecomte scored
13 points and Garrius
Adams finished with 12
points and 10 rebounds
for the Hurricanes (11-
10). The win was Miami's
first since a 56-42 Atlantic
Coast Conference victory
at Georgia Tech on Jan.
18.
Three-pointers from
SLecomte and Adams
helped Miami on a 12-0
surge to start the second
half that stretched its lead
to 43-2 1. Tonye Jeriki's
jumper capped the run
with 14:19 remaining.
Pendarvis Williams
scored 21 points and
Brandon Goode finished
with 14 for the Spartans
(12-10).
MIAMI 64, NORFOLK ST. 49
NORFOLK ST. (12-10)
Lila-St. Rose 1-5 0-03,Fuentes 1-5 2-44,Wil-
liams8-21 2-221,Goode6-82-3 14,Gaston
0-2 0-0 0, Phelps 1-4 1-1 3, Alexis 0-6 2-2 2,
AP PHOTO Maye 1-5 0-0 2,Vinogradovas 0-0 0-0 0.To-
tals 18-569-12 49.
SSam MIAMI (11-10)
Brown 5-13 2-2 15, Lecomte 4-6 2-2 13, Kirk
2-8 6-810,Jekiri 2-3 0-0 4, Adams 2-6 7-812,
Reed 1-5 1-24,Swoope2-22-46.Totals18-
4320-2664.
Halftime-Miami 31-21. 3-Point Goals-
Norfolk St. 4-18 (Williams 3-11, Lila-St.
Rose 1-4, Phelps 0-1, Alexis 0-2), Miami
8-22 (Lecomte 3-4, Brown 3-10, Reed 1-2,
SAdams 1-4, Kirk 0-2). Fouled Out-None.
Rebounds-Norfolk St. 29 (Goode 7), Mi-
ami 39 (Adams 10). Assists-Norfolk St.
s t 11 (Fuentes 5), Miami 11 (Adams 4). Total
Fouls-Norfolk St. 17, Miami 13. A-5,127.

S Lipscomb 60, North
Florida 58: In Jacksonville, J.C.
Hampton scored 15 points, including
wets 22nd Big 5 the game-winner with 45 seconds
: n Bi left, for Lipscomb. Khion Sankey
(6-14) has lost ^ ^ ^ ^1
614) has lost and Josh Williams added 11 each for
the Bisons (10-12,5-6 Atlantic Sun
I, Illinois Conference). Wallace led the Ospreys
Gabriel (12-12,6-5) with 23 points and 11
nd 12 rebounds.
-5,6-3 Big
ling a 21-point Savannah St. 50,
o the game Bethune-Cookman 40:
being battered In Daytona Beach, Alante Fenner
bench and Big scored 18 points on 7-of-10 shooting
to lead Savannah State (8-14,6-2
Mid-Eastern Athletic), which led
ate 81, 37-35 midway through the second
a 75: In half when Fenner scored seven in
e Georges a row. Malik Jackson led Bethune-
igh 27 points Cookman with 12 points as the
-4 Big 12) won Wildcats (4-20,2-7) made only 14
ix games, field goals in the game.

ouis 87, Jacksonville 95,
1, OT: In Northern Kentucky 77: In
d 10 of his Jacksonville, Keith McDougald scored
n overtime for 22 points to lead Jacksonville (9-13,
)int shot to tie 5-6 Atlantic Sun), which put up 51
seconds to points in the first half.
start overtime, FAU 65, Marshall 57: In
-2,1- Atlantic Huntington, W.Va., Pablo Bertone
scored 20 points, Justin Raffington
73 No added 19 and Florida Atlantic survived
ts 68: In a 4:33 dry spell down the stretch.
ph's (15-6,5-2 The Owls (8-14,3-4 Conference USA)
shots in the made five free throws in the final 24
he win after, seconds.
it deficit to tie
Charlotte 73, FlU 61: In
Charlotte, N.C., Ben Cherry scored 17
2 points, hitting 5 of 6 from beyond the
alias, Nic arc, as Charlotte (14-7,5-3 Conference
th 10 assists, USA) scored the last eight points of
ing run to start the half and the first six of the second
LU (17-5,6-3) to pull away from Florida International
me. (11-11,3-4).


PUNTA GORDA STORE ONLY
Now Open Sundays Noon-4pm
ALL LOCATIONS are open Mon-Thur lOam-6pm
Friday lOam-5pm Saturday lOam-3pm
WWW.AeMEBleYeLESHOP.eOM
941-258-8400 941-0839-ACME 8083-884-233888


UConn holds Cincy to 29 points


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CINCINNATI Bria
Hartley and Kaleena
Mosqueda-Lewis each
scored 17 points to help
No. 1 Connecticut rout
Cincinnati 86-29 on
Saturday.
Hartley added a
career-high six steals
for the Huskies (23-0,
10 American Athletic
Conference), who
jumped to a 41-11


halftime lead and never
looked back.

No. 9 Baylor 87, Texas
73: In Waco, Texas, Odyssey Sims
scored 44 points, freshman Nina
Davis had a double-double for
Baylor (18-3,8-1 Big 12), which
extended its conference home
winning streak to 32 games. The
last loss was to the Longhorns on
March 7,2010. Nneka Enemkpali
had 19 points and 15 rebounds to
lead Texas (14-7,5-4). Four of the
Longhorns' losses have been to


ranked teams.

Oklahoma 81, No. 11
Oklahoma St. 74: In Norman,
Okla., Sharane Campbell scored a
career-high 28 points as Oklahoma
won the annual Bedlam Series
game. The Sooners (14-8,5-4 Big
12) handed Oklahoma State (18-3,
7-3) its first conference road loss.

No. 22 Gonzaga 101,
San Francisco 66: In
Spokane, Wash., Lindsay Sherbert
scored a career-high 23 points,


including 18 in the second half
when Gonzaga outscored San
Francisco 51-20. Sunny Greinacher
added 17 points for Gonzaga (20-3,
10-1 WCC), which has won 11 in
a row to reach 20 wins for the
eighth-consecutive year.

No. 25 Middle
Tennessee 67, Tulsa 57:
In Tulsa, Okla., Ebony Rowe scored
18 points and grabbed 15 rebounds
as Middle Tennessee (18-3,7-0
Conference USA) pushed its win
streak to 17 games.


THANK YOU
FOR MAKING 112 # I DIKE 2HOP!


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014






The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


* COLLEGE MEN'S BASKETBALL: U COLLEGE MEN'S BASKETBALL:




Clemson snaps I!L


FSU drought


Teams struggle
from the floor
as 'Noles lose
third in a row

By KAREEM COPELAND
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TALLAHASEE -
Birmingham, Ala. native
K.J. McDaniels had his
mom, grandmother,
brother, sister, aunt and
a handful of cousins
travel to Florida State to
see him and Clemson
face the Seminoles on
Saturday. That, in addition
to a five-game losing
streak to Florida State,
provided all the motiva-
tion the Atlantic Coast
Conferences' 10th leading
scorer needed.
McDaniels put up
26 points as Clemson
defeated Florida State 53-
49 on the road in Atlantic
Coast Conference action.
He was one point shy of a
career high as McDaniels'
family drowned out most
of the Florida State crowd
throughout the second
half.
"Florida State, they're
a great defensive team,
they're a long team,"
McDaniels said. "I just had
to find those open spots
to get to and try to wedge
my way through there.
"My shoot-around
this morning was great.
I felt like I had the right
energy and I had so much
confidence. I've always
had good games in here.
I like Florida State. I like
their court. Just going out
there being aggressive and
playing as hard as I can for
my team."
The Tigers (14-6, 5-3)
survived a slow-moving
defensive battle in which


HOKIES AT
SEMINOLES
WHO: Virginia Tech (8-13,1-8
ACC) at Florida State (13-8, 4-5)
WHEN: Wednesday, 9p.m.
WHERE: Donald L. Tucker
Center, Tallahassee
TV:ESPN3
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com

both teams failed to
shoot 40 percent from the
floor most of the game.
The Seminoles led 20-17
at halftime, but an 11-2
run midway through the
second half gave Clemson
a 40-32 lead that it never
gave up.
Jeron Blossomgame
scored 10 points and
Jordan Roper added eight
for the Tigers. McDaniels'
three 3-pointers tied the
second-most he's hit all
season.
"KJ was unbelievable
tonight," Clemson coach
Brad Brownell said. "He
played at an exceptionally
high level. I'm hoping that
people in this league take
notice of that.
Florida State (13-8, 4-5)
dropped its third consecu-
tive game as Okaro White
was held to nine points.

CLEMSON 53, FLORIDA ST. 49
CLEMSON (14-6)
Blossomgame 4-7 0-0 10, McDaniels 9-18
5-6 26, Nnoko 2-3 0-0 4, Filer 0-2 0-0 0, Hall
0-4 2-3 2, Roper 3-7 0-0 8, Harrison 0-10-0 0,
Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Djambo 1-21-2 3, Djitte 0-0
0-1 0.Totals19-448-1253.
FLORIDA ST. (13-8)
White 4-8 1-3 9, Gilchrist 1-4 2-2 4, Bo-
janovsky 0-4 2-2 2, Bookert 1-7 4-4 6, Bran-
don4-91-39,Smith 1-20-02,Thomas4-10
4-4 13,Miller 0-2 2-2 2,Ojo 1-1 0-02.Totals
16-4716-2049.
Halftime-Florida St. 20-17. 3-Point
Goals-Clemson 7-19 (McDaniels 3-6,
Roper 2-4, Blossomgame 2-5, Djambo 0-1,
Filer 0-1, Hall 0-1, Harrison 0-1), Florida
St. 1-8 (Thomas 1-3, Smith 0-1, White 0-1,
Brandon 0-1, Bookert 0-2). Fouled Out-
Nnoko. Rebounds-Clemson 33 (McDan-
iels 7), Florida St. 29 (Bojanovsky, Brandon,
Gilchrist, Miller, Ojo, Thomas, White 3).
Assists-Clemson 10 (Hall 6), Florida St. 5
(Ojo,Thomas 2). Total Fouls-Clemson 19,


Florida gu
Kourtney
Gainesvill


ISTAN


ard Michael Frazier II shoots over Texas A&M forward
Roberson during the first half of Saturday's game in
e.


WDINGS


ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE
W L Pet. W L Pet.
Syracuse 7 0 1.000 20 0 1.000
Virginia 7 1 .875 16 5 .762
Pittsburgh 6 2 .750 18 3 .857
Duke 6 2 .750 17 4 .810
Clemson 5 3 .625 14 6 .700
Maryland 5 4 .556 13 9 .591
N.Carolina 4 4 .500 14 7 .667
NCState 4 5 .444 14 8 .636
Wake Forest 4 5 .444 14 8 .636
Florida St. 4 5 .444 13 8 .619
GeorgiaTech 3 6 .333 12 10 .545
NotreDame 3 6 .333 12 10 .545
Miami 2 6 .250 11 10 .524
Boston Coll. 2 6 .250 6 15 .286
VirginiaTech 1 8 .111 8 13 .381


SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE
Conference AIIGames


Florida
Kentucky
Mississippi
LSU
Tennessee
Missouri
Georgia
Miss. St.
Vanderbilt
Alabama
Texas A&M
Arkansas
Auburn
S. Carolina


L Pet.
01.000
2 .750
2 .750
3 .571
3 .571
4 .500
4 .500
4 .429
4 .429
4 .429
5 .375
5 .286
6 .250
7 .125


L Pt.
2 .905
5 .762
6 .714
6 .684
7 .650
5 .762
10 .500
7 .650
8 .579
11 .450
9 .571
7 .650
9 .526
13 .381


Frazier II leads

Florida's rout

of Texas A&M

By MARK LONG
ASSOCIATED PRESS
GAINESVILLE -
Michael Frazier II scored
21 points, Dorian Finney-
Smith added 11 and No.
3 Florida overwhelmed
Texas A&M 69-36 on
Saturday.
The Gators (19-2, 8-0
Southeastern Conference)
pushed their winning
streak to 13 games and
extended a school record
for consecutive home
wins to 27.
The latest one was
another defensive gem.
It tied the fewest points
Florida has allowed in
SEC play since 1950,
matching last year's
defensive effort against
South Carolina.
Florida held the Aggies
(12-9, 3-5) to 26 percent
shooting and 20 percent
from 3-point range. The
Gators also outrebounded
Texas A&M 57-27.
The Gators closed the
first half with a 12-2 run
that turned a seven-point
lead into a double-digit
advantage. They were up
34-17 at the break, and
the lead would have been
bigger had they hadn't
missed 11 of 12 shots
from behind the arc.
Coach Billy Donovan's
team found its long-range
rhythm in the second
half, with Frazier and
Scottie Wilbekin connect-
ing from behind the arc,
and Florida really started
pulling away. Frazier's
second trey made it 53-24


TIGERS AT GATORS
WHO: Missouri (16-4, 4-3 SEC)
at Florida (19-2, 8-0)
WHEN: Thursday, 9 p.m.
WHERE: Stephen C. O'Connell
Center, Gainesville
TV: ESPN
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com


with 12:27 left.
The Gators coasted
from there, improving to
9-1 in Saturday games
that followed Thursday
night tilts.
Texas A&M also
benched its leading
scorer, Jamal Jones, for
undisclosed reasons.
Jones came off the bench
about 3 minutes in, but
didn't make a difference.
He had seven points on
2-of-lI shooting.
The Aggies were down
38 points when Donovan
emptied his bench.
About the only thing
worth watching down the
stretch was senior Patric
Young chase his first dou-
ble-double of the season.
Young finished with nine
points and 14 rebounds.
No. 3 FLORIDA 69, TEXAS A&M 36
TEXAS A&M (12-9)
Roberson 3-7 1-2 7, Space 1-3 0-0 3, Smith
1-71-2 3, Green 0-2 0-0 OCaruso 1-30-1 2,
Miller 2-4 0-0 4, McDonald 0-0 0-0 0, Harris
1-5 0-1 3, Fitzgerald 2-9 0-0 5, Jones 2-11
2-2 7, Dobbins 0-1 0-0 0, Carrell 0-0 0-0 0,
Johnsl -20-1 2.Totals 14-54 4-9 36.
FLORIDA (19-2)
Yeguete 2-5 1-2 5, Young 2-25-8 9, Hill 1-5
2-5 4,Wilbekin 3-8 0-0 8, Frazier II 6-15 6-8
21, Finney-Smith 4-12 3-4 11, Edwards 0-0
0-0 0, Prather 3-5 1-2 7, Kurtz 2-2 0-0 4,
Donovan 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 23-5618-2969.
Halftime-Florida 34-17. 3-Point
Goals-Texas A&M 4-20 (Space 1-2, Harris
1-3, Fitzgerald 1-6, Jones 1-6, Green 0-1,
Smith 0-2), Florida 5-25 (Frazier II 3-11,
Wilbekin 2-6, Yeguete 0-1, Hill 0-1, Dono-
van 0-2, Finney-Smith 0-4). Fouled Out-
Caruso, Hill. Rebounds-Texas A&M 27
(Roberson 7), Florida 57 (Young 14). As-
sists-Texas A&M 6 (Caruso 3), Florida 10
(Wilbekin 3). Total Fouls-Texas A&M 22,
Florida 13.A-12,426.


* NBA ROUNDUP U NBA:



Heat hammer Knicks in Garden i'jW:-


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEWYORK -LeBron
James had 30 points,
eight rebounds and
seven assists, and the
Miami Heat avoided a
winless season in the
Big Apple with a 106-91
victory Saturday night
that snapped the New
York Knicks' four-game
winning streak.
Dwyane Wade added
22 points for the Heat,
who avoided becoming
the first team to go 0-4
in New York this season
after losing on their
previous trip to Madison
Square Garden earlier
this month and both
games in Brooklyn.
Carmelo Anthony
had 26 points and eight
rebounds for the Knicks,
who had been 4-1 against
the Heat over the last
two seasons but were
overmatched in this one.
They finished 4-4 on their
eight-game homestand,
which matched the lon-
gest in franchise history.

Pelicans 88, Bulls 79: In
New Orleans, Anthony Davis scored 24
points and grabbed eight rebounds to
lead New Orleans. Tyreke Evans added
11 points for the Pelicans, who have
won four of their past five games. D.J.
Augustin scored 23 points, Taj Gibson
added 17 and Joakim Noah had 14
for Chicago.

Hawks 120,
Timberwolves 113: In
Atlanta, Kyle Korver scored 24 points,
including a trio of 3-pointers in
a third-quarter stretch that gave
Atlanta the lead, and the Hawks
overcame Kevin Love's 43 points. Paul
Millsap, guarded by Love much of the
night in a matchup of All-Stars, had
20 points and 13 rebounds before
fouling out late. A jam by Minnesota's


I' r I
AP PHOTO
Atlanta guard Louis Williams, left, drives against Minnesota's
Alexey Shved during Saturday's game in Atlanta, which was won
by the hosts.


MAGIC
AT CELTICS
WHO: Orlando (13-35) at
Boston (15-33)
WHEN: Today, 1p.m.
WHERE: TD Garden, Boston
TV: Fox Sports Florida
RADIO: 1010 AM, 1280 AM,
1480 AM


Corey Brewer with 2:55 remaining cut
Atlanta's lead to 107-104. JeffTeague,
who had 19 points, drove for a layup
and DeMarre Carroll's free throws
pushed the lead to seven points.

Pistons 113, 76ers 96: In
Auburn Hills, Mich., Andre Drummond
had 22 points and 14 rebounds, and
Detroit's frontcourt overwhelmed
short-handed Philadelphia. Greg
Monroe added 21 points and 12
rebounds. Brandon Jennings and
Kyle Singler added 20 points apiece


for Detroit. Philadelphia was without
rookie of the year candidate Michael
Carter-Williams, who sat out with a
sore right shoulder. TonyWroten led
the 76ers with 18 points.

Pacers 97, Nets 96: In
Indianapolis, Paul George and Roy
Hibbert both had 20 points, and
Indiana (36-10), who improved the
league's best home record to 22-2.
Shaun Livingston had a season-high
24 points for the Nets, who couldn't
hold an early seven-point lead against
the Eastern Conference leaders.

Wizards 96, Thunder 81:
In Washington, John Wall scored 15 of
his 17 points in the second half and
Washington took advantage of a rare
off-game from hometown star Kevin
Durant. Two days after being selected
to the All-Star game for the first time,
Wall also had 15 assists and six steals
and went 7 for 11 from the field
after halftime, more than making up
for an O-for-7 first half. Trevor Ariza


added 18 points and did a solid job
defending Durant, whose 26 points
came on 8-for-21 shooting.

Rockets 106, Cavaliers
92: In Houston, James Harden
returned from injury to score 28
points and Jeremy Lin had his first
career triple-double to lead Houston
to its third consecutive win. Dwight
Howard added 26 points and Lin came
off the bench to tally 15 points, 11
rebounds and 10 assists.

Grizzlies 99, Bucks 90:
In Memphis, Tenn., Nick Calathes,
subbing for an injured Mike Conley,
scored a career-high 22 points as
Memphis won its season-best sixth
straight. Zach Randolph had 23 points
and 10 rebounds for Memphis.

Bynum signs with
Pacers: The Pacers added size and
scoring to the Eastern Conference's
best team, signing free agent center
Andrew Bynum for the rest of the
season. Team officials did not release
additional details of the contract. He is
expected to join the team next week.
Because Indiana had an open spot
on its roster, it will not have to make
a roster move to add the mercurial
7-foot-1,285-pound backup to
All-Star center Roy Hibbert.

Around the league:
Amare Stoudemire (sprained left
ankle) and Kenyon Martin (sprained
left ankle) were back in uniform for
the New York Knicks, who remained
without Iman Shumpert and Andrea
Bargnani for their game late Saturday
against Miami. ... Memphis point
guard Mike Conley is expected to miss
at least a week because of a sprained
right ankle. An MRI exam revealed
a Grade 2 sprain. ... Atlanta signed
forward Cartier Martin to a 10-day
contract. ... Los Angeles Lakers
center Pau Gasol will miss at least the
next week with a strained right groin.
The spiraling Lakers announced their
latest injury setback on Saturday after
an MRI exam for the 7-foot Spaniard.


m-r nlki- rn'^li'^
Adam Silver, shown alongside David Stern in 2011, officially
took over from Stern as the fifth NBA commissioner on
Saturday.


Silver takes over


as commissioner


By BRIAN MAHONEY and dedicated team take
ASSOCIATED PRESS the NBA to successes
NEWYORK -Adam that were unimaginable
Silver has become the even a short while ago,"
NBAs fifth commissioner. Stern wrote Friday in a
The NBA posted a pic- thank you email to media
ture on its Twitter account members.
Saturday of Silver holding Stern announced he
a basketball and shaking would retire on Oct. 25,
hands with outgoing com- 2012, and owners unan-
missioner David Stern. imously chose Silver as
"It's official: Adam Silver his successor. The NBA
succeeds David Stern as will now begin using balls
NBA Commissioner" the with Silver's signature in
caption read. games.
Stern retired after Like Stern, Silver left the
exactly 30 years in charge, legal field to join the NBA.
making him the NBAs Originally Stern's special
longest-serving and most assistant, he went on to
successful commissioner, become NBA Chief of
Silver joined the NBA Staff before running NBA
as his assistant in 1992 Entertainment for about
and has been the deputy a decade before replacing
commissioner since 2006. Russ Granik as deputy
"It is a source of great commissioner in 2006.
satisfaction to me that Silver was the league's
the NBA will now be led lead negotiator during the
by Commissioner Adam 2011 collective bargaining
Silver, for whom I have negotiations and seemed
tremendous admiration, to be more Stern's partner
respect and expectations than deputy in recent
as he and his experienced years.


Gators hit





lucky 13


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5





The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014 The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


* SUPER BOWL XLVIII:


Seattle's Marshawn Lynch breaks away for a touchdown run during the second half oft
Championship game against the San Francisco 49ers. Seattle's run game could power i
Denver in tonight's Super Bowl.




Defense, run gaim



give Seahawks ed


By TIM BOOTH
ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. In the midst of
being reclusive for most
of the week leading up
to his first Super Bowl,
Marshawn Lynch spoke
a truth about his Seattle
Seahawks.
What they might lack
with a roster void of
Super Bowl experience,
they make up for with an
attitude and approach
that Pete Carroll has
instilled from the moment
he landed in Seattle.
"I stay ready," Lynch
said. "So there ain't no
getting ready."
If there is an over-
bearing quality Carroll
has produced in his four
seasons in charge of the
Seahawks it's a continuous
trend of always being
competitive. They don't
get blown out. They don't
get overwhelmed. They
don't succumb in the
moment. They treat each
week as an individual,
singular event.
The Seahawks are
trained to operate in this
manner and it's why even
against Peyton Manning,
even against the most pro-
lific, pass-happy offense
in NFL history, Carroll's
team will not be astound-
ed by what they walk into
Sunday night at MetLife
Stadium.
"You don't see ner-
vousness in guys' eyes,"
Seattle cornerback
Richard Sherman said.
"You don't see guys acting
any different than they
would on any other day
or any other week of the


HIS PREDICTION
Seahawks 27, Broncos 22

season. They're going out
there and following the
same routine as they have
all season long. You just
get the sense that guys
are comfortable in the
situation and comfortable
in the moment because
you don't really think
about the moment."
Seattle's been on this
stage once before, eight
years ago with a com-
pletely different style of
team that was unable to
match the physicality of
Pittsburgh.
Wilson can win the
game with his arm if
needed but Lynch and the
running game is always
Seattle's priority. The
Seahawks defense was the
best in the NFL in scoring,
total yards allowed and
turnovers forced. They are
unlike anything Manning
and the Broncos have
seen this season. Denver
faced only two teams all
season with total defenses
that finished ranked in the
top 10 when the regular
season concluded.
"This is something that
we've been looking for-
ward to. Us being the No.
1 defense, them being the
No. 1 offense, I think it's
fitting," Seattle linebacker
BobbyWagner said. "It's
our time to prove why
we're the No. 1 defense."
Also not to be over-
looked is Seattle's red
zone defense, which was
the best in the NFL. It's
inevitable that Manning


J
AP PHOTO
the NFC
it past




ie
alia


will move Denver's
offense. He's one of the
best quarterbacks in
NFL history because he's
been able to find quick
solutions to problems
defenses present.
But those drives that he
converted into 55 touch-
down passes during the
regular season will be far
more difficult to achieve
against the Seahawks. The
Seahawks allowed 36 red
zone drives during the
regular season and touch-
downs on only 13 of those
possessions. The 132
red-zone points allowed
by Seattle is the fewest by
any team since 2006.
"They pretty much
just line up, and say,
'Hey we are better than
you, and we're going to
beat you,'" Denver wide
receiver Wes Welker said.
"They do a great job (in
different) situations, and
getting pressure on the
quarterback."
That is where this game
will be won. The Denver
defense Wilson and Lynch
will face is not on the
same scale as the prob-
lems San Francisco posed
in the NFC championship
game and that's without
mentioning the availabil-
ity of Percy Harvin and
what that could add to
Seattle's offense.
Meanwhile it's unreal-
istic to think Seattle will
be able to stop Manning.
Thinking otherwise is
foolish. But while Manning
will be able to lead some
drives, Seattle's defense
inside the 20 is suffocating.
They will force Denver to
settle for field goals.


I SEATTLE SEAHAWKS


ROSTER
Coach: Pete Carroll
No. Player Pos
3 Russell Wilson QB 5
4 Steven Hauschka K
7TarvarisJackson QB
9Jon Ryan P
11 Percy Harvin WR 5
15 Jermaine Kearse WR
19 Bryan Walters WR
20 JeremyLane CB
22 RobertTurbin RB 5
24 Marshawn Lynch RB
25 Richard Sherman CB
26 Michael Robinson RB
28WalterThurmond CB 5
29 EarlThomas S 5
31 Kam Chancellor S
33 Christine Michael RB
35 Deshawn Shead CB
40 Derrick Coleman RB
41 Byron Maxwell CB
42 Chris Maragos S
49ClintGresham C
50 KJ.Wright LB
51 Bruce Irvin LB
53 Malcolm Smith LB
54 BobbyWagner LB
55 Heath Farwell LB
56 CliffAvril DE
57 Mike Morgan LB
60 Max Unger C
61 Lemuel Jeanpierre C
64J.R. Sweezy G
67 Paul McQuistan G
68 Breno Giacomini T
69 Clinton McDonald DT
72 Michael Bennett DE


73 Michael Bowie
74 Caylin Hauptmann
76 Russell Okung
77 James Carpenter
78 Alvin Bailey
79Red Bryant
81 GoldenTate
82 LukeWillson
83 Ricardo Lockette
86 Zach Miller
87 Kellen Davis
89 Doug Baldwin
91 Chris Clemons
92 Brandon Mebane
S93 O'Brien Schofield
95 Benson Mayowa
97 Jordan Hill
S99TonyMcDaniel


Ru.Wilsor
TEAM
OPPONENT


M. Lynch
Ru.Wilsor
Turbin
Harvin
TEAM
OPPONENT


D. Baldwir


PLAYOFF STATISTICS
Passing
ATT COM PCT YDS TD INT
S 43 25 58.1 318 1 0
43 25 58.1 318 1 0
WTS 67 38 56.7 462 2 2
Rushing
ATT YDS AVG LONG TD
50 249 5.0 40t 3
S 8 16 2.0 8 0
5 15 3.0 5 0
1 9 9.0 9 0
64 289 4.5 40t 3
WTS 54 269 5.0 58 2


G.Tate 5 44 8.8 13 0
Z. Miller 4 36 9.0 15 0
Harvin 3 21 7.0 16 0
J. Kearse 3 69 23.0 35t 1
M.Lynch 1 3 3.0 3 0
Turbin 1 9 9.0 9 0
TEAM 25 318 12.7 51 1
OPPONENTS 38 462 12.2 52 2
Interceptions
NO. YDS TD
Chancellor 1 0 0
Ma. Smith 1 0 0
TEAM 2 0 0
OPPONENTS 0 0 0
Punting


J.Ryan
TEAM
OPPONENTS


G.Tate
TEAM
OPPONENTS


D. Baldwin
TEAM
OPPONENTS


YDS AVG
311 36.7
311 38.9
323 40.4


Punt Returns
NO.YDS AVG TD
4 15 3.8 0
4 15 3.8 0
S 1 0 0.0 0
Kickoff Returns
NO. YDS AVG TD
4 130 32.5 0
4 130 32.5 0
S 6 135 22.5 0
Kicking
XP/XPA FG/FGA PTS
4-4 6-6 49
4-4 6-6 49
3-3 1-3 25


MATCH GAME'14
THREE OF A KIND: Peyton Manning is Denver's third
Super Bowl quarterback and they all have the Colts in
common. Manning and John Elway, who started five
Super Bowls for the Broncos and won two, both
were drafted No. 1 overall by the Colts Elway
in 1983 and Manning in 1998. Manning and
Craig Morton both started a Super Bowl for two
different teams, and the Broncos were the second team
for both. Manning's Colts beat the Chicago Bears 29-17 in
Super Bowl XLI and lost to the New Orleans Saints 31-17
in Super Bowl XLIV. Morton's Broncos lost 27-10 to the
Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl XII in 1978 Denver's first
appearance in the NFL championship game. Seven years
earlier, Morton started Super Bowl V for the Cowboys, who
lost 16-13 ... to the Colts.

TWO OF A KIND: Peyton Manning is one of the greatest
athletes ever to wear No. 18 (some might remember
former Florida State basketball star Dave Cowens
S wore No. 18 during his Hall of Fame NBA career
S with the Boston Celtics.) But you might not
know that Manning is the second Broncos
quarterback to wear No. 1. Frank Tripucka, the first starting
quarterback in Broncos history, wore No. 18 from 1960-63
in the first years of the American Football League. Tripucka
played four years in the NFL before retiring in 1952.
In 1962, the Broncos went 7-7-the franchise's only
non-losing record from 1960-72.

TWO MORE OF A KIND: Denver's Quentin Jammer and
Michael Huff could become the first pair of
S University of Texas alums to win Super Bowls for
the same team since ... well, since last season
when Baltimore's Chykie Brown and Justin
Tucker did it.

ONE OF A KIND: Peyton Manning, Craig Morton and
Kurt Warner are the only quarterbacks to start a Super
Bowl with two different teams, but Manning can
become the first to win Super Bowls with
4 two different teams. Manning is 1-1 in Super
Bowls, Morton was 0-2 (see above) and Kurt
Warner was 1-2. He and the St. Louis Rams
beat the Tennessee Titans 23-16 in Super Bowl XXXIV
and lost 20-17 to Tom Brady and the New England
Patriots in Super Bowl XXXVI. Warner nearly led the
Arizona Cardinals to victory in Super Bowl XLII, but
Santonio Holmes'touchdown catch in the corner of
the end zone in the final minute gave the Pittsburgh
Steelers a 27-23 win.

MATCHUPS
ADVANTAGE SEATTLE: This is only the fifth Super Bowl
matching the No. 1 offense (Denver) vs. the No. 1 defense
(Seahawks) in terms of points scored and allowed,
and only the second 1 vs. 1 based on yards gained
S and allowed. It's worth noting that in those
previous instances the teams that were No. 1
on the defensive side have been 4-1 on Super Sunday. NFC
teams that led the league in scoring defense are 6-0 in
Super Bowls. Seattle gave up a league-best 14.4 points per
game this season.

ADVANTAGE DENVER: Then again, the Seahawks have
never had more to defend because there has
6 never been an offense that scored more than
S Peyton Manning's record-setting Broncos, who
scored 606 points, 55 touchdowns coming off
Manning's arm, an average of 37.9 per game.

X FACTORS: Knowshon Moreno might not be the MVP,
but he will be the most important player in this
game because of his ability to block blitzers and
catch passes out of the backfield. Denver will
S lose if Moreno doesn't have a great game. Other
X-factors: Seahawks defensive end Michael
Bennett and Broncos tight end Julius Thomas.

THE SPREAD: The Broncos are a 2-point favorite according
to the Glantz-Culver Line, making it 30 consecutive games
in which Denver has been favored. They are
S 20-9 against the spread in the previous 29). But
S the Seahawks have been a remarkable 34-16-1
against the spread in its last 51 games overall,
and underdogs have covered five of the last six and nine of
the last 12 Super Bowls.

MATCH THIS
UNLIKELY MVP: Don't be surprised if a defensive
player wins the game's most valuable player award -
even if he's on the losing side. It's happened
9 before. In Super Bowl V, Dallas Cowboys
linebacker Chuck Howley was the first
defensive player to win the Super Bowl MVP
trophy. He's also the only member of a losing team
to win the award, as the Cowboys lost 16-13 to the
Baltimore Colts.

UNKNOWN MVPS: Two of the most unrecognizable
names in Super Bowl MVP history
1 O are Dexter Jackson of the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers and Larry Brown of the
Cowboys. They are the only two cornerbacks
to win the award, thanks to the charitable efforts of
quarterbacks Rich Gannon (Oakland Raiders) and Neil
O'Donnell (Pittsburgh Steelers).

COACHING SECONDS: While Seattle's Pete Carroll
and Denver's John Fox are going for their first Super
Bowl victory, Fox joined elite company
II t be becoming the fifth coach to lead
two different teams to a Super Bowl.
He coached the Panthers to Super Bowl
XXXVIII, losing 32-29 to the New England
Patriots. He joins Don Shula (Baltimore 1968; Miami
1971-73,1982,1984), Bill Parcells (N.Y. Giants 1986,
1990; New England 1996); Dan Reeves (Denver 1986-87,


1989; Atlanta 1998); Dick Vermeil (Philadelphia 1980;
St. Louis 1999); and Mike Holmgren (Green Bay 1996-97;
Seattle 2005). All but Reeves won a Super Bowl, but only
with one team.

WEATHER WATCH: Today's game also has a chance to
beat Super Bowl VI on Jan. 16,1972, in
2 New Orleans as the coldest Super Bowl.
SThe temperature that day, when the Dallas
Cowboys beat the Miami Dolphins 24-3,
was 39 degrees.


Four-down territory, Super Bowl edition:

48 things you should know about the game
Compiled by Mike Bambach; Contributing The Associated Press; John Boell, Newsday; Bob Condotta, Seattle Times;
Greg Cote, Miami Herald; Cedric Golden, Cox Newspapers


GAMEDAY
CHILLING STATISTIC: Peyton Manning is only 4-7 when
the kickoff temperature is below 40 degrees,
S which is the forecast today for MetLife
SStadium in East Rutherford, N.J..

NATIONAL ANTHEM: Renee Fleming will perform"The Star-
Spangled Banner"today, and she said she will sing it live
because that's the only way she knows how to
SA sing. The 53-year-old opera singer, known as
14 sn"The People's Diva,";' said she will not sing to
a pre-recorded track and that she "wouldn't
know how to lip-sync if you paid me."

NETWORK COVERAGE: FOX will broadcast to more than
200 stations throughout the U.S. Westwood One Radio to
600 stations within the U.S. The Armed Forces
S Television will also broadcast to 175 countries.
1 The game will be distributed internationally
by the NFL and NFL International to more than
185 countries and broadcast in 30 languages.

FORYOUR ENTERTAINMENT: Halftime entertainment will be
provided by Bruno Mars, and now we officially
S can call ita youth movement after Beyonce
1 6 c performed in 2012.With previous acts like
The Who, The Stones, Prince, Tom Petty and
Springsteen, the Super Bowl had become AAR-Pop.

FOUR OFFENSIVE PLAYERS TO WATCH*
*-Not named Peyton Manning

MARSHAWN LYNCH: Seahawks, RB, (24) 5-11,215,7th
season, California: "Beast Mode"with a
7 penchant for Skittles... Powerful back with
a burst, broke 40-yard TD run in NFC title
game ... Rushed for 1,257 yards and 12 TDs
this season ... Also a threat as receiver out of backfield.

KNOWSHON MORENO: Broncos, RB (27),5-11,220,5th
season, Georgia: First-rounder in 2009 whose career seemed
to be waning until Manning arrived ... Rushed
8 for1,038 yards and 10TDs this season...
1 Can gain yardage inside or out, and picks
up blitzers well ... Also caught 60 balls and
scored three times ... Has become a producer in the clutch.

JULIUS THOMAS: Broncos, TE (80), 6-5,250,3rd season,
Portland State: A breakout player, thanks
S greatly to Manning ... Went from obscure to
1 9 star with 65 catches for 788 yards and 12 TDs
... Excellent target in red zone, also can break
tackles for long gains ... Former college basketball player.

RUSSELL WILSON: Seahawks QB (3), 5-11,206,2nd
season: Holds NFL record for wins at start of career with
24... Third-round draftee who immediately
0 O seized starting job and led Seattle to 2012
Playoffs ... Dynamic runner who excels
throwing on the run ... Poised in the pocket,
very dangerous outside of it ... Played at North Carolina
State, then one year atWisconsin as a grad student.

FOUR DEFENSIVE PLAYERS TO WATCH
CHAMP BAILEY: Broncos CB (24), 6-0,192,15th season,
Georgia: Getting Bailey to Super Bowl for first time was
a rallying cry for defense ... Not nearly the
SAll-Pro defender he once was, but has had
Solid playoffs ... Has 52 career interceptions,
tops among active players.

SHAUN PHILLIPS: Broncos, DE (90), 6-3,255,10th season,
Purdue: Signed away from division rival San Diego as free
S agent ... Uses moves and smarts to get into
backfield, made 10 sacks this season... Has
2 791-2 sacks for career.

RICHARD SHERMAN: Seahawks, CB (25), 6-3,195,3rd
season, Stanford: Forget the post-game diatribe against
Michael Crabtree after NFC title game, this is
2 3 best cornerback in football ... Will play press
Coverage or lay back and is equally adept... Hits
hard, too ... Led NFL in interceptions with eight.

EARL THOMAS: Seahawks, S (29), 5-10,202, 4th season,
Texas: Despite lack of size, Thomas is one of league's most
rugged safeties ... Versatile, active and
S smart, gets to the right place nearly all the
Stime... Richard Sherman calls him leader of
the league's top defense.


FOUR SPECIAL TEAMERS TO WATCH
PERCY HARVIN: Seahawks, KR (11), 5-11,184,5th
season, Florida: Has been injured for most
2 5 of the season after being signed as free
agent away from Vikings ... Comes off
concussion sustained in playoff game vs.
Saints, when he had three receptions ... Had 58-yard kick
return against former team in only regular-season game
in 2013.

STEVEN HAUSCHKA: Seahawks, PK (4), 6-4,210,
6th season, North Carolina State: Also has kicked for
Baltimore and, yes, Denver ... Caught on
6 with Seattle in 2011 and has been very
2 strong ... Has made 82 of 92 field goal
tries for Seahawks and is particularly solid
from distance ... Made six FGs against Jacksonville and
five vs. Minnesota this season.

TRINDON HOLLIDAY: Broncos, PR-KR (11), 5-5,170, 4th
season, LSU: Has all kinds of breakaway
7 potential, and also can drop the ball...
SHad 81-yard punt return and 105-yard
kickoff runback for TDs this season ... NFL's
shortest player.

MATT PRATER: Broncos, PK (5), 5-10,195, 7th season,
Central Florida (Estero HS): The only player
2 8 from Southwest Florida in Super Bowl
SXLVIII set NFL record with 64-yard field
goal this season ... Will not be bothered by
playing outdoors in cold weather ... Very strong leg, had
81 touchbacks on 114 kickoffs ... Missed one FG, from
52 yards.

FACTS & FIGURES
ATTENDANCE: MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.,
has a seating capacity of 82,000. To date,
9 3,652,409 have attended Super Bowl
2 9 games. The largest crowd was 103,985 at
the 14th Super Bowl at the Rose Bowl in
Pasadena, Calif.

TICKETS: Super Bowl XLVIII ticket prices range from
$500-$2,600. Tickets for Super Bowl I in
0 1967, between the Green Bay Packers and
0 Oakland Raiders at Memorial Coliseum in
Los Angeles, cost $6, $10 and $12.


31


PLAYERS SHARE: Winners: $92,000 per
man. Losers: $46,000 per man.


OVERTIME: No Super Bowl has gone to overtime, but
if the Broncos and Seahawks do the NFL new overtime
rule applies. Both teams will have at least one possession
unless the team that receives the opening kickoff scores
a touchdown on its first possession. If
S the team with the ball first scores a field
Goal the other team will get a possession.
If that team scores a touchdown, it is
the winner. If the score is tied after both teams have a
possession, the team next scoring by any method wins.

VINCE LOMBARDI TROPHY
WINNING PRIZE: The winning team receives permanent
possession of the Vince Lombardi Trophy, a sterling silver
trophy created by Tiffany & Company and
S presented annually to the winner of the
SSuper Bowl. It is a regulation-size silver
football mounted in a kicking position on
a pyramid-like stand of three concave sides.

THE SIZE: The trophy stands 20%4 inches tall, weighs 6.7
pounds and is valued more than $25,000.
4 The words "Vince Lombardi"and "Super
Bowl XLVIII"are engraved on the base
along with the NFL shield.

THE NAMESAKE: The trophy was named after the late
coach Vince Lombardi of the two-time
S Super Bowl champion Green Bay
SPackers. In his nine seasons, the Packers
went 96-34-6 (.728) and won five NFL
championships.

THE MEMORIAL: Lombardi, who coached the
Washington Redskins in 1969, died on
3 6 Sept. 3,1970. The NFL championship
Trophy was named in his honor before the
1971 Super Bowl (V).


THE OLD WEST
RIVALRY RENEWED: The Broncos and Seahawks, who
meet in Super Bowl XLVIII, formerly fought it out in the
AFC West from 1977-2001. In fact, Denver's 34-18 record
against the Seahawks is the most wins by
S any Seattle opponent. There have been a
Sfew Super Bowls pitting teams who were
each members of the same division in the
NFL before the 1970 merger, but today's game will be the
first time two teams who were members of the same AFC
division will meet in the Super Bowl.

THREE FOR THE BOOKS
The most memorable games in the series:

1979: The first win: Seattle had come frustratingly close
to beating the Broncos earlier in the season, blowing a
34-10 lead at Mile High as Denver came back to win 37-34.
That remains the largest blown lead in
S Seattle history. But on a rare Saturday game
Sat the Kingdome, the Seahawks got their
revenge in dramatic fashion when Steve
Largent caught a 43-yard touchdown pass from Jim Zorn
with 1:40 left for the winner in a 28-23 victory.

1983: The first playoff win: Seattle's first playoff game,
and victory, came against Denver at the Kingdome on
Christmas Eve, 1983, in a rather surprising 31-7 rout. Dave
Krieg had the game of his life, completing
S 12 of 13 passes for 200 yards, three
Touchdowns and a perfect passer rating
of 158.3, which remains the only one in
Seahawks history. The next week, Seattle won at Miami to
Advance to its first conference title game.

1984: The showdown: In the first truly huge
Sregular-season game in Seahawks history, a 10-2 Seattle
squad traveled to Mile High to play an 11-1 Denver team
in a game billed as a battle for AFC West
4 O supremacy, if not the entire NFL. It was a
Shining moment for the Seahawks as Krieg
| threw an 80-yard TD pass to Daryl Turner
on the first play of the game and Seattle held on to win
27-24 when Rich Karlis missed a 25-yard field goal with
less than a minute left. Sadly for Seattle, Denver got
revenge with a 31-14 win at the Kingdome on the last
Weekend of the regular season to win the division.

FOR THE RECORD
LEGACIES: While Peyton Manning will try to burnish
his reputation with a second Super Bowl ring, Terry
Bradshaw gets no love for winning four Super Bowls.
| It's as if Joe Montana was the only QB to
S' ever go 4-0 in championship appearances.
4 1 Probably has something to do with Terry's
70.9 career passer rating or that awful
appearance in "The Cannonball Run."

GREATEST PLAYERS WHO WERE NEVER SUPER: Peyton
SManning once was the greatest quarterbacks never to
| win a Super Bowl. Today is his third and
S2 he's 1-1. Now Earl Campbell tops the list
Sof greatest Super Bowl-era players to not
make the title game. The others are Barry
Sanders, Tim Brown, Cris Carter and O.J. Simpson.

NOW THAT'S COLD: Jim Kelly, one of the greatest never
| to win a Super Bowl, led Buffalo to four
3 straight Super Bowls but lost all four. About
4 the upcoming game being played in a winter
setting, Kelly told Keith Olbermann,"They
should have done it 20 years ago. We might have won one'."

SUPER BOWL APPEARANCES: The Broncos (2-4) are


44


making their seventh Super Bowl appear-
ance, tied with the Patriots for second
behind Dallas and Pittsburgh (8). This is
the Seahawks'second appearance (0-1).


FINAL FOUR
FOURTO GO: Four teams have never appeared in a Super
| Bowl, though three have played host to one:
4 5 Cleveland, Detroit, Jacksonville and Houston.
SOnly the Browns, who won their last NFL
| championship in 1964, have never been
involved in a Super as a participant or host.

SUPER BOWL TV RATINGS: The Super Bowl is one
| ofTV's highest-rated programs in the
6 Neilsens every year, consistently drawing
4 a rating in the 40s a share in the 60s or
| 70s. The rating represents the percentage of
S televisions tuned to a program. The share is the percentage
of televisions on at the time that watched.
LAST FOUR SUPER BOWLS
Year Network Rating Share Result
2013 CBS 46.3 69 Ravens34,San Francisco31
2012 NBC 47.0 71 N.Y. Giants 21, New England 17
2011 FOX 46.0 68 Green Bay31, Pittsburgh 25
2010 CBS 45.0 68 NewOrleans 31, Indianapolis 17
FOUR HIGHEST-RATED SUPER BOWLS
Year Network Rating Share Result
1982 CBS 49.1 73 San Francisco 26,Cincinnati21
1983 NBC 48.6 69 Washington 27,Miami 17
S1986 NBC 48.3 70 Chicago 46, New England 10
1978 CBS 47.2 67 Dallas 27, Denver 10

THE LONGEST YARDS: With 1,277 passing yards, Tom
| Brady has accounted for more yards than
I 7 any player in Super Bowl history. But he
Accomplished the feat in five Super Bowls.
Single-game leaders in four categories:
PASSING
S414yards Kurt Warner, St. Louis vs.Tennessee, 2000
RUSHING
2O4yards-Tim Smith,Washington vs. Denver, 1988
RECEIVING
S215 yards Jerry Rice, San Francisco vs. Cincinnati, 1989
SCORING
18 points- Byfour players: Roger Craig, San Francisco vs. Miami,
1985; Jerry Rice, San Francisco vs. Denver, 1990 and vs. San Diego,
1995; RickyWatters, San Francisco vs. San Diego, 1995;Terrell Davis,
SDenver vs. Green Bay, 1998.

LAND OF THE FEW: America's most prodigious sporting


48


event has also produced some pee-wee
numbers. Single-game "leaders" in four
team categories:


SCORING
3 points (oneteam) Miami vs. Dallas, 1972
21 points (both teams) Miami (14),Washington (7), 1973
RUSHING
7 yards New England vs. Chicago, 1986.
PASSING
35 yards Denver vs. Dallas, 1978


* SUPER BOWL XLVIII:


AP PHOTO
Denver quarterback Peyton Manning passes during the first half of the AFC Championship game
against the New England Patriots in Denver. Manning's deep receiving corps, including five
players who caught 60 or more passes and had 10 or more touchdowns, could key a Broncos'win.




'Duck Dynasty' makes



Broncos team to beat


By ARNIE STAPLETON
ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. Denver was wal-
loped 40-10 by Seattle in
the preseason with Ronnie
Hillman fumbling, Montee
Ball stumbling and Peyton
Manning grumbling.
The Broncos are a much
different team now, one
that should return to
Colorado on Tuesday for
a victory parade clutching
their third Lombardi
Trophy.
Chewed out by boss
John Elway after that
spectacle in Seattle last
summer, the Broncos
responded with a season
for the ages, scoring more
points than any team in
NFL history (606) with
Manning throwing for
more touchdowns (55) and
yards (5,447) than anyone
ever had.
They're not always
the prettiest of passes,
as Seahawks star talker
and cornerback Richard
Sherman pointed out, but
Manning's always won
with his brain, not his arm.
Manning didn't disagree
with Sherman's assessment
that he "throws ducks."
"I do throw ducks," he
said. "I throw for a lot of
yards and TD ducks, so I'm
actually quite proud of it."
Manning's "Duck
Dynasty" consists of
an unprecedented five
players who caught 60 or
more passes and scored
10 or more touchdowns:
Demaryius Thomas, Eric
Decker, Wes Welker, Julius
Thomas and Knowshon
Moreno.
This could be the


HIS PREDICTION
Broncos 27, Seahawks 23

difference tonight at
MetLife Stadium, where
the forecast isn't for
weather as frigid as so
many feared.
The Broncos boast
enough pick-your-poison
talent in their five-receiver
sets to befuddle even the
stingiest of secondaries
like Seattle's. Including
the playoffs, Manning has
thrown for an astonish-
ing 59 touchdowns this
season.
"I think they had a heck
of a season," Sherman
said. "I don't know if
they're going to score 59
touchdowns in one game.
I think that would be a
record, too.... We've got
our own accolades and
awards and none of it
means anything when you
get between those lines."
No, what matters is
execution and Manning
has had his team on a
no-nonsense mission
for months and he's only
ratcheted up his focus and
his dogged determination
during preparations for the
biggest game of his stellar
career.
Manning is the only
player in this game who's
won a Super Bowl, and
his top target today could
even be Jacob Tamme or
Bubba Caldwell. He doesn't
discriminate, he distrib-
utes. He doesn't often get
duped. He deciphers. He
doesn't force passes, he
finds the best matchup.
And he's got time to do
it because the Broncos


added size and strength
to the middle of their line
with the addition of right
guard Louis Vasquez (6-5,
335 pounds), which moved
Manny Ramirez (6-3, 320)
to center next to left guard
Zane Beadles (6-4, 305).
The line's also opened
enough holes for
Knowshon Moreno to cap-
italize on soft underneath
coverages to amass 1,761
yards from scrimmage,
rendering Ball a fresh-
legged cohort and Hillman
an afterthought.
Moreno picked up the
blitzes and the first downs
all season, providing
balance to the Broncos'
aerial fireworks.
Manning was sacked an
average of just 1.11 times a
game, the lowest takedown
rate of any quarterback
who started all of his
team's games.
Even when they stall
they don't usually have to
call upon Britton Colquitt,
who's punted just once in
the last month, because
the Broncos have the
strongest, most accurate
long-range kicker in
football, Matt Prater, who
kicked a record 64-yarder
in icy conditions in Denver
last month.
Champ Bailey missed
much of the season with a
foot injury but he's coming
off his best game and
playing in his first Super
Bowl in his 15-year career.
"Things do take time,
and I finally got with the
right group of guys," Bailey
said. "I played with some
great players, but this is
definitely the best team
I've been on."


I DENVER BRONCOS


ROSTER
Coach: John Fox


No. Player
2 Zac Dysert
4 Britton Colquitt
5 Matt Prater
11 Trindon Holliday
12 Andre Caldwell
17 Brock Osweiler
18 Peyton Manning
20 Mike Adams
21 Ronnie Hillman
22 CJ. Anderson
23 Quentin Jammer
24 Champ Bailey
27 Knowshon Moreno
28 Montee Ball
29 Michael Huff
30 David Bruton
31 Omar Bolden
32 TonyCarter
33 Duke Ihenacho
34 Marquice Cole
36 Kayvon Webster
45 D. Rodgers-Cromartie
46 Aaron Brewer
51 Paris Lenon
52 WesleyWoodyard
53 Steven Johnson
54 Brandon Marshall
56 Nate Irving
57 Jeremy Mincey
59 DannyTrevathan
60 SteveVallos
65 LouisVasquez
66 Manny Ramirez
68 Zane Beadles
70Vinston Painter


Pos Ht
QB 6-3
P 6-3
K 5-10
WR 5-5
WR 6-0
QB 6-8
QB 6-5
S 5-11
RB 5-10
RB 5-8
CB 6-0
CB 6-0
RB 5-11
RB 5-10
S 6-0
S 6-2
S 5-10
CB 5-9
S 6-1
CB 5-10
CB 5-11
CB 6-2
LB 6-5
LB 6-2
LB 6-0
LB 6-1
LB 6-1
LB 6-1
DE 6-4
LB 6-1
C 6-3
G 6-5
C 6-3
G 6-4
OT 6-6


73 Chris Kuper
74 Orlando Franklin
75 Chris Clark
77Winston Justice
80 JuliusThomas
81 Joel Dreessen
83 WesWelker
84 JacobTamme
85 Virgil Green
87 Eric Decker
88 DemaryiusThomas
90 Shaun Phillips
91 Robert Ayers
92 Sylvester Williams
94Terrance Knighton
96 Mitch Unrein
97 MalikJackson
98 Sione Fua


PLAYOFF STATISTICS
Passing


303 Ju.Thomas 14 161 11.5 37 0
320 Welker 10 76 7.6 16 1
305 Decker 7 105 15.0 21 0
317 M.Ball 3 13 4.3 12 0
250 Moreno 3 34 11.3 18 0
245 Caldwell 2 26 13.0 15 0
185 Tamme 2 24 12.0 23 1
230 V.Green 1 3 3.0 3 0
255 TEAM 57 630 11.1 37 4
214 OPPONENTS 42 494 11.8 49 3
229
255 Interceptions
274 NO. YDS TD
313 TEAM 0 0 0
335 OPPONENTS 1 0 0
306 Punting
293 NO. YDS AVG
310 B.Colquitt 1 48 48.0
TEAM 1 48 48.0
OPPONENTS 7 354 50.6


ATT COM PCT YDS TD INT
P. Manning 79 57 72.2 630 4 1
TEAM 79 57 72.2 630 4 1 Decker
OPPONENTS 65 42 64.6 494 3 0 TEAM
OPPONENTS


Moreno
M. Ball
V. Green
P. Manning
TEAM
OPPONENTS


Rushing
ATTYDS AVG LONG TD
37 141 3.8 28 1
22 95 4.3 9 0
1 6 6.0 6 0
2 -2 -1.0 -1 0
62 240 3.9 28 1
34 129 3.8 16 1


Holliday
TEAM
OPPONENTS


Receiving M. Prater
NO. YDS AVG LONG TD TEAM
De.Thomas 15 188 12.5 30 2 OPPONENTS


Punt Returns
NO.YDS AVG TD
3 66 22.0 0
3 66 22.0 0
S0 0 0.0 0
Kickoff Returns
NO.YDS AVG TD
4 81 20.3 0
4 81 20.3 0
S0 0 0


Kicking
XP/XPA
5-5
5-5
3-3


FG/FGA
5-6
5-6
2-3


Receiving Hauschka
NO. YDS AVG LONG TD TEAM
8 136 17.0 51 0 OPPONENTS


Page 6 www.sunnewspapers.net


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7


1


I






Page 8 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


BROOKS
FROM PAGE 1
Williams of the Cardinals
and Rams and defensive
end Michael Strahan of
the Giants are the others.
Punter Ray Guy of
the Raiders and Claude
Humphrey of the Falcons
were senior committee
selections.
"Thought of tonight
is JOY, HUMILITY, and
gratefulness, I'm in the
Hall of Fame Now,"
Brooks tweeted.
Two other former
Bucs who were finalists
- safety John Lynch
and ex-Tampa Bay and
Indianapolis Colts head
coach Tony Dungy fell
short.
The enshrinement
ceremonies will be the
first weekend in August in
Canton, Ohio.
"So proud of Derrick
Brooks. NFL Hall of Fame.
Congratulations," Dungy
tweeted.
Tampa Bay waited
18 years to have an-
other player join Lee
Roy Selmon in the Pro
Football Hall of Fame
when Warren Sapp was
enshrined last year.
They only had to wait 12
months for another.
"The simple comments
that people have sent
me in the past couple
of weeks, one put in
perspective, that they
appreciate Derrick Brooks
the man more than No.
55 the football player,"
Brooks said earlier.
That might be true, but
the 46 members of the
Pro Football Hall of Fame
selection committee
decided Saturday after
more than eight hours
of deliberation that
he belongs among the
immortals.
A first-round pick
with Sapp in '95, Brooks
helped transform the
Bucs from the league's
laughingstock to Super
Bowl champions.
Brooks never missed
a game until he retired
after the 2008 season,
amassing 11 Pro Bowl
selections, nine All Pro
honors and the 2002
Defensive Player of the
Year. With Brooks, the
Bucs led the NFL in total
defense twice (2002 and
2005) and topped the
NFC five times (1998,
1999,2002,2005,2007)
during his career.
But his best year
came in 2002, when he
was named the league's
Defensive Player of the
Year and led the Bucs
with 173 tackles, a
career-high five intercep-
tions (three returned for
TDs), 15 passes defensed,
one fumble recovery and
one sack.
It was no surprise he
was a major contributor
in the Bucs' victory in
Super Bowl XXXVII, where
he had three tackles, one
pass defensed and one
interception returned 44
yards for a TD against the
Oakland Raiders.

SMITH INVITES
URLACHER TO CAMP
Tampa Bay coach Lovie Smith
confirmed he has invited former
Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher to
spend some time with the Bucs in
training camp.
"Brian is a family member
for life" Smith said. 'I've had the
priveledge to be around a lot of
great players, any great player I've
been around is always welcome
wherever I am. We're trying to
build something here foot-
ball-wise, and I'm going to call on
the Brian Urlachers of the world,
and of course all our former Bucs
around here. Derrick Brooks will


tell you I've been in his ear quite
a bit, got a chance to text with
John Lynch yesterday ... anytime
you can have players around your
current roster that have been
through our system and know
what it takes, it's a good thing.
I will always be inviting any old
player that I've been around."

-Tampa Bay Times


HALL OF FAME: CLASS OF 2014
A capsule look at the seven players elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame:


DERRICK BROOKS
Linebacker, 6-0,232
Team: Tampa Bay Buccaneers
(1995-2008)
Career: 14 seasons, 224 games.
... First year eligible. ... Selected
by Buccaneers in first round
(28th player overall). ... Never
missed game in career.... Earned
All-Rookie honors.... Elected to 11
Pro Bowls.... In 1997, led Bucs to
first postseason appearance since
1981 ... NFL's Defensive Player of
theYear in 2002. ... Helped Tampa
Bay post top defense in NFL twice
(2002 and 2005) NFC five times
(1998,1999, 2002, 2005, 2007)....
Named All-Pro six times, AII-NFC
eight times.... Selected to the NFL's
All-Decade Team of the 2000s.

RAY GUY
Punter, 6-3,195
Team: Oakland/Los Angeles
Raiders (1973-86)
Career: 14 seasons, 207 games.
...Senior nominee. ... First punter
ever drafted in first round, Raiders
1973 (23rd player overall)....
Became impact player from very
first game as a rookie. ... Had best
average (45.3 yards) as rookie....
Career average was 42.4 yards....
Averaged under 40 yards only one
season in NFL career. ... Led NFL
in punting in 1974,1975,1977.
...Had only three of 1,049 punts
blocked.... Had 619 punts without
a block, 1979-1986. ... Veteran of
22 postseason games, adding 111
punts for 42.4 average. ... All-Pro
six straight seasons, 1973-1978.
... Played in seven Pro Bowls,
including six straight from 1974
to 1979.... Played in seven AFC
championship games and three
Super Bowls.... Three-game Super
Bowl totals: 14 punts, 41.9-yard
average.... Had 57 punts inside
20-yard line, 1984-1985. ... First
punter to hit Louisiana Superdome
scoreboard, 1977 Pro Bowl.

CLAUDE HUMPHREY
Defensive end, 6-4,252
Teams: Atlanta Falcons (1968-74,
1976-78), Philadelphia Eagles
(1979-81)
Career: 13 seasons, 171 games....
Senior nominee.... Falcons'first-
round pick (third player overall)
in 1968 draft.... Recorded 11.5
sacks his first year and was NFL's
Defensive Rookie of the Year....
Credited with 122 career sacks. Led
team in sacks nine of 13 seasons.
... Earned first-team All-Pro five
times. Selected for six Pro Bowls.
... Missed just two games before
season-ending knee injury in 1975.
Rebounded with career-best 15
sacks in 1976 and was chosen
team MVP. ... Traded to Eagles in
1979 for two fourth-round picks
following brief retirement.... In
1980, his team-high 14.5 sacks
helped Eagles advance to 1981
Super Bowl.

WALTER JONES
Offensive tackle, 6-5,300
Team: Seattle Seahawks (1997-
2008)
Career: 12 seasons, 190 games.
First year eligible. ... Selected in
first round (sixth player overall)
by Seahawks in 1997.... Earned
starting left tackle spot in rookie
training camp.... Consensus pick
for multiple all-rookie teams...
Following the 1999 season, Jones
became the first offensive linemen
in Seahawks history to be elected
to the Pro Bowl, the first of nine
All-Star appearances.... Team
leader and integral part of Shaun
Alexander's MVP season in 2005
when RB ran for franchise-record
and league-high 1,880 yards and
set NFL mark forTDs in season....
All-Pro six times (2001-02, 2004-


07). ... Named to NFL's All-Decade
Team of the 2000s. three straight
seasons (1999-2001).

ANDRE REED
Wide receiver, 6-2,190
Teams: Buffalo Bills (1985-1999),
Washington Redskins (2000)
Career: 16 seasons, 234 games.
... Selected by Buffalo in fourth
round (86th overall) of 1985
draft.... Most prolific receiver in
Buffalo Bills history. ... His 951
career receptions were third in NFL
history at time of his retirement....
His 941 career receptions still are
a Bills record and 266 more than
No. 2 on that list. ... His 13,095
yards receiving and 36 games with
100-plus yards are current team
records. ... Known for gaining
yards after catch.... His 13 seasons,
including nine consecutive, with
50-plus receptions is exceeded
only by Jerry Rice. ... Reed is tied
with Bills running backThurman
Thomas for team's most career
touchdowns (87), most of them
on passes from Jim Kelly.... Kelly-
Reed tandem held NFL record for
career receptions (663) until 2004
when eclipsed by Peyton Manning
to Marvin Harrison.... Known for
toughness, he made many of his
receptions over the middle....
Selected to play in seven consec-
utive Pro Bowls (1989-1995)....
Had 85 catches for 1,229 yards,
including five 100-yard games, in
postseason play.

MICHAEL STRAHAN
Defensive end, 6-5,255
Team: NewYork Giants (1993-
2007)
Career: 15 seasons, 216 games.
... First-year eligible.... Selected in
second round (40th player overall)
in 1993 draft.... Dominant pass
rusher and excellent at defending
the run.... Recorded 141.5 career
sacks.... Had 38 multi-sack games
during career.... Registered
double-digit sack totals six times
during nine-season span, 1997-
2005.... Suffered torn pectoral
muscle in 2004 but rebounded
following season by starting all 16
games and amassing 11.5 sacks.
... Named first-team All-Pro five
times (1997,1998, 2001, 2003,
2005). ... AII-NFC five seasons....
Voted to seven Pro Bowls.... Set
NFL single-season sack record
with 22.5 sacks, 2001.... Also won
NFL sack title in 2003 with 18.5
sacks.... Named unanimous NFL
Defensive Player of the Year, 2001.
... Started at left defensive end in
two NFC championship game wins,
two Super Bowls.... Recorded
two tackles, one assisted tackle,
one sack and one pass defended
in Giants'17-14 win over Patriots
in the 2008 Super Bowl, his last
NFL game.... Selected to the NFL's
All-Decade Team of the 2000s.

AENEAS WILLIAMS
Defensive back, 5-11,194
Teams: Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals
(1991-2000), St. Louis Rams
(2001-2004)
Career: 14 seasons, 211 games....
Selected by the Cardinals in third
round (59th overall) of 1991 draft.
...Starred at cornerback for 12
seasons before switching to safety.
... Named to Pro Bowl seven times
as a cornerback and once as a
safety.... First career interception
came in NFL debut.... Compiled
five or more interceptions in a
season six times.... Recorded
55 interceptions for 807 yards
and nine touchdowns. ... Had
a then-record 104-yard fumble
return vs. Redskins in 2000....
Selected to NFL's All-Decade Team
1990s.
Source: Pro Football Hall of Fame


AP FILE PHOTO


Buffalo's Andre Reed races for the end zone in an AFC playoff
game against the Kansas City Chiefs on Jan. 15,1992.


* NFL NOTEBOOK




Manning scores




5th MVP award

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK --Peyton
Manning made his fifth -
MVP award a family affair.
Manning's record-set-" lT .

The Associated Press NFL
MVP award Saturday night
in a landslide. No other
player has won more than
three.
Denver's record-setting
quarterback, who threw
for 55 touchdowns and
5,477 yards in leading the
Broncos to the AFC's best
record, earned 49 votes
from a nationwide panel
of 50 media members who
Regularly cover the league.
New England quarterback
Tom Brady got the other
vote.
Manning won his other A o
MVPs with Indianapolis PO
in 2003, '04, '08 and '09. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie holds a souvenir football helmet
He also was the runner-up as he leaves after a ceremony to pass official hosting duties of
last season to Adrian next year's Super Bowl to representatives from Arizona.
Peterson.
"I am humbled by this Boobirds for Christie:
recognition and grateful NFL HONORS New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie must've
to my family, (Broncos MVP: Peyton Manning, QB, felt like a Super Bowl kicker who
Sooner) Pat Bowlen, John Denver Broncos missed a big kick. Or, more accurately,
Elway, John Fox and the OFFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE a politician mired in scandal.
entire Denver Broncos YEAR: Peyton Manning, QB, Christie was greeted with a
organization, andsof Denver Bronscattering of boos during a ceremony
Sorganization, anced o e Denver Broncos
course, my coaches and DEFENSIVE PLAY ER OF THE in Times Square handing off the big
my teammates," Manning YEAR: game to next year's hosts in Glendale,
said in a prepared video Luke Kuechly, [B, Carolina Ariz. Leaders of the NewYork-New
Lukeetaner speech. He PantJersey organizing committee gave a
a acotanc dsp i h hei ahplatter to their Arizona counterparts.
Swas not on harey ond as he ROOKIES OF THE YEAR: Sheldon Christie has been under fire after
Sgets ready for SuBnday's Richardson, DT, N.Y. Jets (AFC);e s
Super Bowl against Eddie Laci RB Green Ba Packers es top aides orchestrate a traffic
Seattle. y, y mess on the George Washington
Seattle.(NFC)
Archie Manning, hold- NCOF tBridge connecting NewYork and
ing his grandson Marshall COMEBACK PLAYER OF THE New Jersey, apparently in retribution
in his arms, accepted the hYEAR: Philip Rivers, QB, San Diego against a political opponent. He
award from two more Chargers has denied any knowledge and
MVPs, Joe Montana and WLATER PAYTON MAN OF THE didn't seem affected by the crowd's
Aaron Rodgers. YEAR: Charles Tillman, CB, Chicago response, which also included some
Manning still trails Bears cheers.
several Hall of Famers for COACH OF THE YEAR: Ron Rivera,
total MVPs in their sport. Carolina Panthers And now, for the
SWayne Gretzky won nine weather: Remember all those
SNHL MVPs, Barry Bonds a azg worries about playing the NFL'S
owns seven in baseball, amazing." biggest game outdoors in a cold-
Sand Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Carolina grabbed two weather city? Turns out, this likely
won six in the NBA. major awards, with Ron won't even be the coldest Super Bowl.
Manning also took the Rivera winningAP NFL Forecasters were calling for a high
AP's Offensive Player of Coach of the Year and of 49 degrees today, with the evening
the Year award for the sec- linebacker Luke Kuechly low only expected to dip to 32
ond time. Elway accepted voted top defensive player. degrees after the game is over.
Son Manning's behalf. Rivera engineered the At the 1972 Super Bowl in New
"I can say I have never Panthers' turnaround Orleans, the temperature was 39
seen a better year played from a 7-9 record to 12-4, degrees with a wind chill of 24. It
by a quarterback than the NFC South title and a now seems highly unlikely to get that
SPeyton Manning," said first-round playoff bye. cold at MetLife Stadium, though the
Elway, a Broncos executive Kuechly keyed a defense chance of evening precipitation was
who won the 1987 MVP that allowed 241 points, picking up.
award. "To see what he less than every team There was a 50 percent shot of rain
did this year, it was truly except Seattle. or snow flurries.

P there's no pressure on this week one of his
: R T cme and all the pressure's goals was to kick the
on him," said punter game-winning field goal
FROM PAGE 1 Britton Colquitt, who's in the Super Bowl.
50-yard field goals into also the holder on field Asked whether he
the neighbors yard. goals. "He even says, 'I dreamed about that same
"We have five acres don't care about the laces kick, Prater shrugged.

makeshift soccer facility down, and I'll kick it.' He's be honest, when I was
*back there, and once he very confident." younger, I didn't even
*got into football I made And for good reason. want to be a kicker. I
some field goal posts out Prater, in his seventh sea- wanted to play baseball.
of PVC pipes so he could son with the Broncos, has "I try not to think about
kick back there," John converted 47 of 50 career the situations," Prater
Prater said. field goals in the fourth




: ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r too playus the asvie theya~atoa--^ i-
Prwatheri ca0e opefec scribequarater,'n s 4approah 4i trtoplaye the as threy
field-goal attempts this overtime. He also has the present themselves."
season, including 5 for 5 best field-goal percentage John Prater isn't
in the playoffs. He plans from 50-plus yards (.778, worried about the final
to line up from about 21 of 27) in league history score. To him it's more
65 yards out before the among players with 20
game to gauge his range. or more attempts who about the process that
*The fact MetLife Stadium began their careers after got his son here. Before
*has FieldTurf is a plus, 1970. he became the Broncos
:too, because it provides When asked to de- starter in 2008, Matt
*what he called "perfect scribe Prater's approach, played with or worked
*conditions" no matter the Denver's Brandon out for the Detroit Lions,
*weather. Marshall, a reserve Cleveland Browns, Green
*After getting over the linebacker who plays Bay Packers, Minnesota
* flu last week "I felt on special teams, just Vikings, Miami Dolphins
like a truck hit me, but laughed, and Atlanta Falcons.
I would've still tried to "Power," Marshall said. Today he's kicking in the


play in the Super Bowl "The dude is not even 6 Super Bowl.
even if I was sick," he feet (actually, 5-foot-10), "He's had a lot of
said -Prater is good to so I don't know where it resiliency," Prater said.
go. And with the Broncos' comes from.... I got big "He got cut a lot of times,
top-ranked offense going feet (size 14) and I tried but he's had a good work
up against the Seahawks' kicking in eighth grade ethic and good persever-
No. 1 defense, there's a and the ball didn't go ance to get where he's at
chance it could be a tight anywhere. So I've got all and it paid off for him."
game that comes down to the respect in the world Contact Zach Miller at 941-206-1140
a field-goal attempt, for Matt." orzmiller@sun-heraIldxom.
"We've done it so many Prater's counterpart, Corn, i citing The
times and Matt's so good Seattle Seahawks kicker Associated Press, Pam
that I almost feel like Steven Hauschka, said Stalk


Page 8 www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014






The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 9


I QUICK HITS


AP PHOTO


South Korea defender Kim Kee-Hee, left, battles United States
forward Landon Donovan for the ball during Saturday's interna-
tional friendly in Carson, Calif. The United States won 2-0.


BRYANS KEEP U.S.
ALIVE IN DAVIS CUP

SAN DIEGO Bob and
Mike Bryan beat Dominic
Inglot and Colin Fleming
6-2, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1 Saturday
to pull the United States to
2-1 against Britain in the
first round of the Davis
Cup.
The Bryans, identical
twins who are from
Camarillo in Ventura
County, breezed through
the fourth set and won the
match on a smash by Bob.
That set up the "Bryan
Bump" the famed chest
bump they use to cele-
brate their victories.
The twins had a mini-
chest bump after breaking
Inglot's serve to take a 2-0
lead in the fourth set.
The match will be
decided today in reverse
singles, when Wimbledon
winner Andy Murray of
Britain faces Sam Querrey
and James Ward of Britain
faces Donald Young.
Murray won the opening
singles match in straight
sets against Donald Young
on Friday while Ward
rallied to beat Querrey in
five sets.
The match is being
played on a red clay court
in a temporary stadium
built against the left-field
bleachers at Petco Park,
the downtown home
of baseball's San Diego
Padres.
With Britain leading 2-0
entering Saturday, captain
Leon Smith replaced
Murray with Inglot for
doubles.
The Bryans broke
Inglot's serve in the sec-
ond game of the first set
and then broke Fleming's
serve to win the set.
The Bryans didn't face
a break point until they
trailed 30-40 in the sixth
game of the third set.
Fleming hit a backhander
down the line to win the
game for a 4-2 lead for the
British. The teams held
serve and the British won
the set when Inglot had
two straight aces in the
ninth game....
In Paris, top-seeded Maria
Sharapova lost 4-6,6-3,6-4 to
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in the
semifinals of the Open GDF Suez in an
all-Russian match.
Pavlyuchenkova will play third-
seeded Sara Errani of Italy or Alize
Cornet of France for her first final since
the Korea Open in September 2013. In
their only previous meeting, Sharapova
beat Pavlyuchenkova in August 2010 in
Cincinnati....
In Pattaya, Thailand, fourth-seeded
Ekaterina Makarova of Russia beat
Andrea Hlavackova 6-3,0-6,6-4 to reach
the final of the Pattaya Open where she
will play Karolina Pliskova of the Czech
Republic for the first time. Makarova
is chasing her second career title after
winning in Eastbourne in 2010. She
needed 1 hour, 46 minutes to eliminate
Czech doubles specialist Hlavackova.


WINTER SPORTS

Shiffrin can bag WCup
slalom title before
Olympics: American teenager
Mikaela Shiffrin can retain her World
Cup slalom title title and become the
only skier to secure a crystal globe
before the Sochi Olympics. Shiffrin can
do it by extending her 144-point lead
in the discipline standings to more than
200 points. A win today would give her
100 points, then she'd have to hope her
closest rivals do not make the podium.
Winning the discipline title with two
slaloms in March to spare would make
for a huge contrast to last season, when
Shiffrin had to make up 1.17 seconds


on overall champion Tina Maze in the
final run of the last event to snatch it....
In St. Moritz, Switzlerland, fog
prevented downhill racers from getting
their Olympic dress rehearsal. Poor
visibility on the middle section of the
course forced World Cup officials to call
off a men's downhill, the last speed
race before the Sochi Olympics. A
women's giant slalom in Kranjska Gora,
Slovenia, was also canceled because of
poor weather. The start of the race was
postponed several times and pushed
back more than two hours before
officials finally gave up....
In Kranjska Gora, Slovenia,the
final women's World Cup giant slalom
before the Sochi Olympics was called
off because of rain and fog, following
a day of heavy snowfall. A decision on
whether to go ahead with a slalom
scheduled for today on the same
Podkoren course will be made shortly
before that race....
In Willingen, Germanyworld
champion Kamil Stoch of Poland won
his third ski jumping World Cup of the
season. Stoch soared 139.5 meters in
his first jump and 145.5 in his second
for a total of 263.2 points, one more
than local favorite Severin Freund.
Jernej Damjan of Slovenia was third
after jumps of 141.5 and 150.5 earned
him 258.5 points.


SOCCER

Wondo's two goals lead
U.S. past South Korea: In
Carson, Calif., Chris Wondolowski
scored two goals in the United States'
2-0 victory over South Korea in its first
exhibition of the World Cup year.
Wondolowski strengthened his case
for inclusion on the roster in Brazil with
his sixth and seventh goals in his last
eight appearances for the U.S. team,
which was missing several top players.
The San Jose Earthquakes striker
headed home a rebound in the fourth
minute and struck again on a short
shot in the 60th minute.
The Americans'patchwork lineup
handled South Korea's offensive
pressure to win its 13th straight home
match, thrilling a flag-waving sellout
crowd at StubHub Center.
After winning 16 games and the
Gold Cup title in 2013 during the
most successful year in team history,
the Americans began World Cup
preparations with a 22-week training
camp in Brazil last month before a
week in Southern California....
Luis Aragones, the former Spain
coach who shaped the team's rise from
perennial underachiever to global
powerhouse with a long-awaited title
at the 2008 European Championship,
has died. He was 75.
The Spanish football federation
announced the death early Saturday,
saying Aragones died at a Madrid
hospital. He had been battling leukemia.
Federation president Angel
Maria Villar said Aragones would be
remembered as "very special"- both
for his contributions to Spanish football
and as a person.


BASKETBALL

Finland gets disputed
wild card for FIBA tourney:
Finland received a wild card for the
World Cup of Basketball on Saturday
in a decision criticized for being more
about business than basketball.
Traditional contenders Brazil,
Greece and Turkey drew the other
three spots to complete the 24-team
field for this summer's tournament in
Spain, basketball governing body FIBA
announced Saturday at its meeting in
Barcelona. The draw is Monday.
Greece is ranked fifth in the world
and the only team to beat the U.S.
since Mike Krzyzewski became coach in
2005. Turkey is ranked seventh and was
runner-up to the Americans in the 2010
world championship. Brazil, which will
host the 2016 Olympics, is No.10.
Finland is only 39th, the only one
of the 12 teams since 2006 to receive a
wild card that wasn't in the top 24. But
it had the support of Rovio, the Finnish
company behind the popular Angry
Birds games that had agreed to provide
advertising if Finland was selected.


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
GOLF
1 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Phoenix Open, final
round, at Scottsdale, Ariz.
3p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Phoenix Open, final
round, at Scottsdale, Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
12:30 p.m.
ESPNU Virginia at Pittsburgh
1 p.m.
CBS- Michigan at Indiana
2:30 p.m.
ESPNU- UCLAat Oregon St.
NBCSN William & Mary at James Madi-
son
NBA BASKETBALL
6p.m.
FSFL- Orlando at Boston
NFL FOOTBALL
6p.m.
FOX Super Bowl XLVIII, Seattle vs. Den-
ver, at East Rutherford, NJ.
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC -Detroit atWashington
SOCCER
8:25 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Liverpool at
West Bromwich
10:55a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Arsenal vs. Crys-
tal Palace, at London
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
2p.m.
ESPN -Notre Dame at Duke
4p.m.
ESPN2 -Stanford at California

Glantz-Culver Line
NFL
Super Bowl
At East Rutherford, NJ.
FAVORITE 0 T 0/U UNDERDOG
Denver +1 21/2 (48) Seattle

NCAA BASKETBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
at Penn St. 41/2 Purdue
atCincinnati 161/2 South Florida
at Pittsburgh 41/2 Virginia
atMilwaukee-x 3 Oakland
Michigan 1 at Indiana
Buffalo 1 at Bowling Green
at James Madison 1 William&Mary
UCLA 4 at Oregon St.
x-at Klotsche Center

NBA
FAVORITE LINE 0/U UNDERDOG
at Boston 41/2(193) Orlando

NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atWashington -135 Detroit +115
at Montreal -145 Winnipeg +125

Tennis
WTA OPEN GDF SUEZ
At Stade Pierre de Coubertin, Paris
Purse: $710,000 (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
Semifinals
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, def.
Maria Sharapova (1), Russia, 4-6,6-3,6-4.
Sara Errani (3), Italy, def. Alize Cornet,
France, 7-6 (3),3-6,7-6 (5).
Doubles
Semifinals
Timea Babos, Hungary, and Kristina
Mladenovic (4), France, def. Sara Errani and
Roberta Vinci (1), Italywalkover.
WTA PTT PATTAYA WOMEN'S OPEN
At Dusit Resort, Pattaya, Thailand
Purse: $250,000 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Semifinals
Karolina Pliskova,Czech Republic, def.Ju-
lia Goerges, Germany, 6-3,4-6,6-3.
Ekaterina Makarova (4), Russia, def. An-
drea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 6-3,0-6,
6-4.
Doubles
Semifinals
Peng Shuai and Zhang Shuai (4), China,
def. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand,
and Vera Zvonareva, Russia, 6-2,6-3.
Davis Cup Results
WORLD GROUP
First Round
Winners to quarterfinals, April 4-6; los-
ers to WG Playoffs, Sept. 12-14
Britain 2, United States 1
At Petco Park, San Diego
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Andy Murray, Britain, def. Donald Young,
United States,6-1,6-2,6-3.
James Ward, Britain, def. Sam Querrey,
United States, 1-6,7-6 (3), 3-6,6-4,6-1.
Bob and Mike Bryan, United States, def.
Colin Fleming and Dominic Inglot, Britain,
6-2,6-3,3-6,6-1.

Pro basketball
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Atlantic
Toronto
Brooklyn
NewYork
Philadelphia
Boston
Southeast
Miami
Atlanta
Washington
Charlotte
Orlando
Central
Indiana
Chicago
Detroit
Cleveland
Milwaukee


WESTERN CONFERENCE


Southwest
San Antonio
Houston
Memphis
Dallas
New Orleans
Northwest
Oklahoma City
Portland
Minnesota
Denver
Utah
Pacific
L.A. Clippers
Phoenix
Golden State
L.A. Lakers
Sacramento


Pet GB
543 -
.444 41/2
.413 6
313 11
313 11
Pet GB
.711 -
543 712
500 91/2
.438 121/2
.271 201/2
Pet GB
.783 -
.500 13
.413 17


340 2
.170 2


Pct
.723
.653
565
.563
.435 1
Pct
.776
.717
.489
.489
348 2
Pet
.673
.609
.604
340
319


Friday's results
Orlando 113, Milwaukee 102
Atlanta 125, Philadelphia 99
Memphis 94, Minnesota 90
Oklahoma City 120, Brooklyn 95
Dallas 107, Sacramento 103
Toronto 100, Denver 90
Charlotte 110,L.A. Lakers 100
Golden State 95, Utah 90
Saturday's results
Indiana 97, Brooklyn 96
Washington 96, Oklahoma City 81
Detroit 113, Philadelphia 96
Atlanta 120, Minnesota 113
Houston 106, Cleveland 92
Memphis 99, Milwaukee 90
New Orleans 88, Chicago 79
San Antonio 95, Sacramento 93
Miami at NewYork, late


Charlotte at Phoenix, late
Toronto at Portland, late
Utah at LA. Clippers, late
Today's games
Orlando at Boston, 1 p.m.
Monday's games
Orlando at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Portland atWashington, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New York at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Toronto at Utah, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Agreed to
terms with LHP Bruce Chen on a one-year
contract. Designated INF Emilio Bonifacio
for assignment.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Agreed to
terms with C Yorvit Torrealba on a minor
league contract.
TEXAS RANGERS Assigned RHP Chaz
Roe outright to Round Rock (PCL).
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS Agreed to
terms with C AJ. Ellis on a one-year con-
tract.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS Agreed
totermswith RHP Doug Fister.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
ATLANTA HAWKS Signed F Cartier
Martin to a 10-daycontract.
INDIANA PACERS Signed C Andrew
Bynum for the remainder of the season.
NEWYORK KNICKS Recalled G Toure'
Murryfrom Erie (NBADL).
SAN ANTONIO SPURS Signed G
Shannon Brown to a 10-day contract. Re-
leased G Othyus Jeffers from his 10-day
contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIM DUCKS Recalled C David
Steckel from Norfolk (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS Recalled F
Simon Moserfrom Milwaukee (AHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Reassigned
G Kristers Gudlevskis to Syracuse (AHL).
ECHL
SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS -
Loaned F Jack Downing to Iowa (AHL).
Signed F Dale Mitchell.
COLLEGE
ARKANSAS-Suspended men's basket-
ball F Alandise Harris and G Michael Quails
indefinitely.

Hockey
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Boston 54 35 16 3 73 164 119
LIGHTNING 55 32 18 5 69162 137
Toronto 57 30 21 6 66 170 176
Montreal 55 29 20 6 64 136 137
Detroit 54 24 19 11 59 139 152
Ottawa 55 24 21 10 58 158 176
PANTHERS 55 21 27 7 49133 174
Buffalo 54 15 31 8 38 105 161
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Pittsburgh 55 38 15 2 78 176 132
N.Y. Rangers 56 30 23 3 63 145 140
Columbus 55 28 23 4 60 163 154
Philadelphia 56 27 23 6 60 152 163
Carolina 54 25 20 9 59 137 151
New Jersey 56 23 21 12 58 132 140
Washington 55 24 22 9 57 158 167
N.Y.Islanders 57 21 28 8 50 159 191
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
St.Louis 54 37 12 5 79 185 125
Chicago 56 33 10 13 79 199 156
Colorado 54 35 14 5 75 165 142
Minnesota 56 29 21 6 64 137 140
Nashville 57 25 23 9 59 142 172
Dallas 54 24 21 9 57 156 160
Winnipeg 56 26 25 5 57 159 165
Pacific Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Anaheim 56 40 11 5 85 189 137
SanJose 55 34 15 6 74 166 133
LosAngeles 57 30 21 6 66 134 122
Vancouver 56 27 20 9 63 142 147
Phoenix 55 26 19 10 62 159 164
Calgary 54 20 27 7 47 128 170
Edmonton 57 18 33 6 42 147 194
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss.
Friday's results
Detroit 4, Washington 3, SO
N.Y. Rangers 4, N.Y. Islanders 1
Carolina 3, St. Louis 1
Nashville 3, New Jersey2, OT
Winnipeg 4,Vancouver 3
Saturday's results
St. Louis 4, Nashville 3, SO
Boston 4, Edmonton 0
LIGHTNING 2, Montreal 1, OT
Colorado 7, Buffalo 1
Philadelphia 2, Los Angeles 0
Toronto 6, Ottawa 3
Columbus 4, PANTHERS 1
Phoenix 3, Pittsburgh 1
Minnesota at Calgary, late
Dallas at Anaheim, late
Chicago at San Jose, 1 ate
Today's games
Detroit atWashington, 12:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at Montreal, 1 p.m.
Monday's games
Edmonton at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


01/2 ECHL
8/2 EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GB GPW L OL SLPts GF GA
- Reading 412515 1 0 51126 105
3 Wheeling 442018 1 5 46111 129
71/2 Elmira 421622 2 2 36107 135
71/2 North Division
31/2 GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
GB Cincinnati 412613 1 1 54141 110
- Evansville 4121 12 3 5 50136 128
31/2 Kalamazoo 432316 1 3 50122 115
14 FortWayne 421914 5 4 47124129
14 Toledo 41 1424 3 0 31120 151
01/2 South Division
GB GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
- South Carolina422910 1 2 61125 83
31/2 Florida 422415 1 2 51141 128
31/2 Orlando 412216 1 2 47121 120
16 Greenville 4421 18 2 3 47119 125
17 Gwinnett 441724 1 2 37111 135
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Mountain Division
GPW L OL SLPts GF GA
Alaska 402710 2 1 57135 83
Colorado 4021 12 5 2 49126 114
Idaho 412016 2 3 45119 118
Utah 421916 3 4 45105 109
Pacific Division
GPW L OL SLPts GF GA
Ontario 4228 9 2 3 61 127 107
Stockton 4021 14 0 5 47135 127
Bakersfield 401719 1 3 38102 116
c-SanFrancisco401520 4 1 35101 143
LasVegas 391124 3 1 26 90 134
c-Ceased operations
Note: Two points are awarded for a win,
one point for an overtime or shootout loss.

Friday's results
Wheeling 3, Kalamazoo 2, SO


SThe United States' Bob Bryan returns a shot from the British
Steam of Colin Fleming and Dominic Inglot during a doubles
match Saturday at the Davis Cup in San Diego.


South Carolina 4,Orlando2
Cincinnati 3,Toledo 1
Florida 5, Greenville 4, SO
Elmira 4, FortWayne 3, OT
Reading, Evansville 2
Utah 5, Bakersfield 2
Las Vegas 5, Ontario 2
Colorado at San Francisco, Cancelled
Alaska 3, Idaho 2, SO
Saturday's results
Florida 5, Greenville 4, SO
Gwinnett 3, Orlando 2
Elmira 4,Toledo2
Fort Wayne 6, Cincinnati 2
Kalamazoo 3,Wheeling 1
Reading 2, Evansville 1
Utah at Bakersfield, late
Ontario at LasVegas, late
Colorado at Stockton, late
Idaho at Alaska, late
Today's games
No games scheduled
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Manchester 492913 2 5 65146 125
St.John's 452616 1 2 55142 120
Providence 472318 1 5 52151 138
Worcester 442218 3 1 48112 124
Portland 431618 2 7 41120 148
East Division
GPW LOLSLPts GF GA
Binghamton 462914 0 3 61172 141
Norfolk 452413 1 7 56125 117
WBScranton 462616 1 3 56128 111
Hershey 442315 3 3 52140 123
Syracuse 441720 2 5 41111 137
Northeast Division
GPW LOLSLPts GF GA
Springfield 452812 1 4 61136 119
Albany 452414 3 4 55139 120
Adirondack 442220 0 2 46107 114
Bridgeport 471923 1 4 43123 149
Hartford 441623 0 5 37113 148
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
GrandRapids4629 13 2 2 62157 114
Chicago 452516 2 2 54127 115
Milwaukee 4421 13 6 4 52118 120
Rockford 482121 4 2 48133 156
Iowa 431916 5 3 46107 117
North Division
GPW LOLSLPts GF GA
Toronto 452615 2 2 56127 118
Rochester 432215 3 3 50125 119
Hamilton 432019 0 4 44102 118
LakeErie 441921 0 4 42115 141
Utica 431621 2 4 38102 130
West Division
GPW LOLSLPts GF GA
Texas 462813 2 3 61169 127
Abbotsford 452714 3 1 58136 122
Charlotte 432220 0 1 45129 129
SanAntonio 451721 3 4 41123 144
Oklahoma City451722 1 5 40124 155
Note: Two points are awarded for a win,
one point for an overtime or shootout loss.
Saturday's results
Adirondack4, Hershey 1
Norfolk 3, Syracuse 2, SO
Hartford 4, Albany3, SO
Charlotte 5, Lake Erie 3
Bridgeport 3, Springfield 0
Rockford 2, Utica 1
Worcester 3, Providence 2
St. John's 3, Manchester 1
Binghamton 7, Portland 1
Rochester 4,Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 0
Grand Rapids 3, Milwaukee 2, SO
Texas 6, Toronto 0
Chicago 3, Iowa 2, OT
Hamilton at Abbotsford, late
Today's games
Manchester at Portland, 1 p.m.
Norfolk at Hershey, 2 p.m.
Oklahoma CityatTexas,2 p.m.

Boxing
FIGHT SCHEDULE
Wednesday
At Kaikou, China, Xiong Zhao Zhong vs.
Oswaldo Novoa, 12, for Xiong's WBC min-
imumweight title; Yang Xing Xin vs. Siri-
mongkol Singwancha, for Yang's WBC Asia


SCouncil Continental welterweight title; Qiu
Xiao Jun vs. Jason Cooper, 10, super ban-
tamweights.
Friday
At UIC Pavilion, Chicago (ESPN2), Ro-
berto Garcia vs. Norberto Gonzalez, 10,
middleweights;Kamil Laszczykvs. Daniel
Diaz, 10, featherweights.
At TBA, Ohio (SHO), Angelo Santana vs.
Mark Davis, 10, lightweights; Amir Imam
vs. Jared Robinson, 10, junior welter-
weights.
Saturday
At TBA, Mexico, Adrian Hernandez vs.
Janiel Rivera, 12, for Hernandez's WBC
junior flyweight title.
Feb.10
At San Antonio (FS1), Fidel Maldonado
Jr. vs. Steve Forbes, 10, junior welter-
weights.
Feb.14
At Benavidez, Argentina, Juan Carlos
Revecovs. Manuel Vides, 12, for Raveco's
WBAWorld flyweight title.
At the Paramount Theatre, Huntington,
N.Y. (ESPN2), Chris Algieri vs. Emmanuel
Taylor, 10, junior welterweights.
Feb.15
At Kempton Park, South Africa, Ryno Li-
ebenberg vs.JoeyVegas, 12,vacantWBC
International light heavyweight title;
Johnny Muller vs. Wilberfoce Shihepo,
12, for the vacant WBC International Sil-
ver light heavyweight title.
At Buenos Aires, Argentina, Juan Carlos
Revecovs. Manuel Vides, 12, for Reveco's
WBAWorld flyweight title.
Feb.17
At the Storm House, Salinas, Calif. (FS1),
Manuel Avila vs. Enrique Quevedo, 10,
featherweights; Paul Mendez vs. Raul
Casarez, 10, for Mendez'slIBAContinental
middleweight title.
Feb.22
At Macau, China (HBO), SimpiweVetyeka
vs. Akifumi Shimoda, 12, for Vetyeka's
WBA featherweight title; Miguel Vazquez
vs. Denis Shafikov, 12, for Vazquez's IBF
lightweight title. Rex Tso vs. Mako Mat-
suyama, 10, super flyweights.
March 1
At Magdeburg, Germany: Robert Stieg-
litzvs. Arthur Abraham, 12, for Stieglitz's
WBO super middleweight title.
At Glasgow, Scotland, Ricky Burns vs.
Terence Crawford, 12, for Burns' WBO
lightweight title.
At Alamodome, San Antonio (HBO), Julio
CesarChavezJr. vs. Bryan Vera, 10, super
middleweights; Orlando Salido vs. Vasyl
Lomachenko, 12, for Salido's WBO feath-
erweight title; Juan Diaz vs. Gerardo Ro-
bles, 10, lightweights.

College hockey
SATURDAY'S SCORES
EAST
American International 5, Canisius 3
Curry 4,W. New England 2
Cornell 2, Brown 1
Union (NY) 4, Clarkson 3
Dartmouth 5, Princeton 3
Mercyhurst 4, Bentley 1
UMass-Lowell 4, MerrimackO
New Hampshire 5, Notre Dame 2
Robert Morris 6, Army 4
Holy Cross 4, RIT 2
Utica 3, Elmira 2
Niagara 4, Sacred Heart 1
RPI 4, St. Lawrence 3
Yale 4, Colgate 1
UMass-Boston 5,Castleton St. 1
MIDWEST
Michigan Tech 5, Bowling Green 4, OT
Wisconsin 2, Michigan 2, OT, Michigan wins
shootout 1-0
Minnesota 1, Michigan St. 0
Nebraska-Omaha 8, St. Cloud St. 6
Minn. St. (Mankato) 5, N. Michigan 1
Ohio St. 5,PennSt. 2
Minn.-Duluth 3,W. Michigan 1
WEST
Air Force 3, UConn 1


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SPRING PREVIEWS BASEBALL TRACK & FIELD TENNIS BOYS WEIGHTLIFTING SOFTBALL BASEBALL TRACK & FIELD TENNIS BOYSWEIGHTLIFTING SPRING PREVIEWS


TENNIS


FOUR TO WATCH


Times and dates subject to change.
All times p.m. unless notes
Monday, Feb. 3
DeSoto County at Hardee, 4:30
Tuesday, Feb.4
Girls: Venice at Lemon Bay, 3:30
Boys: Lemon Bay at Booker, 3:30
Charlotte at Venice (Laurel Nokomis),
3:30
Thursday, Feb. 6
Port Charlotte at North Port, 3
Venice at St. Stephen's, TBA
Friday, Feb. 7
Port Charlotte at North Fort Myers,
3:30
Monday, Feb. 10
Girls: DeSoto County at Lemon Bay, 4
Tuesday, Feb.11
Charlotte at Port Charlotte, 3
DeSoto County at Sebring, 4
Venice at Bishop Verot, TBA
Wednesday, Feb. 12
Girls: North Port at Charlotte, 3
Venice at Osceola, TBA
Boys: Charlotte at North Port, 3
Thursday, Feb.13
Sebring at Lemon Bay, 3 (girls at high
school, boys at Tringali Park)
North Port at Cardinal Mooney, 3
Tuesday, Feb.18
DeSoto County at Avon Park, 4
Girls: Braden River at Venice, 3:30
Boys: Venice at Braden River, 3:30
Wednesday, Feb.19
Ida Baker at Charlotte, 3
Girls: Out-of-Door Academy at
Venice, 4
Boys: Venice at Out-of-Door
Academy, 4
Thursday, Feb. 20
Port Charlotte at DeSoto County, 4
Girls: Lemon Bay at Venice (at City
Courts), 3:30
Boys: Lemon Bay at Venice (at Laurel
Nokomis), 4
Monday, Feb. 24
Girls: Venice at Palmetto, 4
Boys: Palmetto at Venice (at Laurel
Nokomis), 4
Tuesday, Feb. 25
Port Charlotte at Lemon Bay (boys at
high school; girls at Tringali), 3
Boys: Venice at North Port, 3
Wednesday, Feb.26
Girls: North Port at Booker, 3
Boys: Booker at North Port, 3
Thursday, Feb.27
North Port at Port Charlotte, 3
Riverview at Venice, 3:30
Lemon Bay at Sebring, 4
DeSoto County at Lake Placid, 4:30
Monday, March 3
Venice at Largo, TBA
Girls: Hardee at DeSoto County, 4:30
Tuesday, March 4
DeSoto County at Port Charlotte, 4
Girls: Lemon Bay at Charlotte, 3
Boys: Charlotte at Lemon Bay, 3
Wednesday, March 5
Girls: Lemon Bay at Naples (Cambier
Park), 4
Thursday, March 6
North Port at Riverview, 3
Girls: Sarasota at Venice (at TBD), 3:30
Boys: Lemon Bay at DeSoto County, 4
Sarasota at Venice (at Laurel
Nokomis), 4
Tuesday, March 11
Lake Placid at DeSoto County, 4:30
Tuesday, March 18
Port Charlotte at Charlotte, 3
Girls: Venice at Lakewood Ranch, 4
Boys: Lakewood Ranch at Venice (at
Laurel Nokomis), 4
Thursday, March 20
Girls: St. Stephen's at Venice, 3:30
Lemon Bay at Out-of-Door Academy, 4
St. Stephen's at Venice, 3:30 p.m.
Boys: Out-of-Door Academy at Lemon
Bay,4
St. Stephen's at Venice (Laurel
Nokomis), 4
Monday, March 24
Girls: Charlotte at North Port, 3
Boys: North Port at Charlotte, 3
Hardee at DeSoto County, 4:30
Tuesday, March 25
Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte, 3
Girls: Bishop Verot at Venice, 3:30
Avon Park at DeSoto County, 4:30
Boys: Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte, 3
Bishop Verot at Venice (Laurel
Nokomis), 4 p.m
Wednesday, March 26
Ida Baker at Port Charlotte, 3:30
North Fort Myers at Charlotte, 3:30
Thursday, March 27
Girls: Booker at North Port, 3
Charlotte at Venice, 3
Oasis at Lemon Bay, 3:30
Boys: North Port at Booker, 3
Venice at Charlotte, 3
Oasis at Lemon Bay (at Tringali Park),
3:30
Monday, March 31
District play begins


Tuesday, April 8
Regional play begins


DJ. Botts
Senior, Port Charlotte
Botts is the lone Pirates senior. He
had a losing record as the team's
No. 1 player last year, but he gained
important experience.


Long, steady climb
puts Lown on cusp
of Manta's top spot
By ZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
ENGLEWOOD Everything
is coming together for Lemon
Bay High School senior Jessica
Lown.
As Lown prepares for her final
season of high school tennis,
she has plenty to look forward
to after graduation. She'll
continue her tennis career at
Embry-Riddle University, an
NAIA school in Daytona Beach,
while pursuing a major in
aerospace engineering at the
top-ranked aeronautical school
in the country.
While she has developed into
a state-caliber tennis player in
nine years of playing, Lown's
knack for engineering goes
back further.
She's been building things
as long as she can remember
and still does so in her spare
time. She started with building
blocks as a child and moved
onto bigger projects such as
model-size houses and air-
planes out of wood, model-size
bridges out of popsicle sticks
- even a wind-powered model
car. Five years ago, she earned a
four-year scholarship to Florida
Gulf Coast University with
a science fair experiment in
which she tested the wingspan
of an airplane she built.
"I think I want to design cars
or airplanes; I don't know yet,"
Lown said. "It's a lot with fluid
mechanics and I liked physics
a lot."
Her education goals will get a
big financial boost from Embry-
Riddle's female engineering
scholarship, created to assist
students such as Lown trying to
break into a male-dominated


CHARLOTTE

COACH: Nandci Daniel
LAST YEAR: 8-4
DISTRICT: 3A-11 (Fort
Myers, Ida Baker, Island
Coast, North Fort Myers, Port
Charlotte, Riverdale)
STARTERS LOST: Kirun
Kadiwar, Joanna Ritter,
Andrea Lansdale
RETURNING STARTERS:
Rachel Taggart, Raffaella
Ferretti
KEY NEWCOMERS: Meagan
Ice
OUTLOOK: Daniel isn't
sure what to expect from a
district full of schools the
Tarpons haven't faced in
years. The Tarpons lose three
starters from last year but
gain Ice, a senior who moved
from Colorado.


CHARLOTTE k

COACH: Tony Balut
LAST YEAR: 9-2
DISTRICT: 3A-11 (Fort
Myers, Ida Baker, Island
Coast, North Fort Myers, Port
Charlotte, Riverdale)
STARTERS LOST: Grant
Rumreich, Aric Popovich
RETURNING STARTERS:
Alex Guzman, AlexWestin,
Sam Heitman, Matt
Greenberg
KEY NEWCOMERS: Jared
Bivens
OUTLOOK: The Tarpons
need to replace Rumreich,
last year's player of the year,
and play in a brand new
district. Balut said they have
a promising freshman talent
coming in Bivens.


SUN FILE PHOTO
Jessica Lown, shown during a match last season, is battling Linda Antonova for the No. 1 singles spot for Lemon Bay this
preseason. A senior, Lown will continue playing tennis next year at Embry-Riddle University.


field. And best of all, she'll get
to continue playing competitive
tennis for four more years.
Lown's final tennis season at
Lemon Bay will be focused on
helping to build the Manta Rays
into a team that can compete
for a Class 2A state title.
"We need to get to states and
our goal is fourth at states,"
Lown said. 'As a team, our goal
is to have a winning doubles
record at the No. 1 and No. 2
doubles because that's one of
the things we can (all) work on.
Other teams might have good
singles players, but if we have
the doubles, that's two more
points we can earn at matches."
As an individual, Lown's
goals depend on whether she


DESOTO COUNTY

COACH: Not yet appointed
(boys coach Damon Durato is
filling in temporarily)
LAST YEAR: Record not
available
DISTRICT: 2A-11 (Avon
Park, Cape Coral, Hardee,
Lake Placid, Lemon Bay,
Oasis, Mariner, Sebring)
STARTERS LOST: none
RETURNING STARTERS:
Yaleta Palafox, Elizabeth
Pacheco
KEY NEWCOMERS: none
OUTLOOK:The Bulldogs are
still rebuilding after losing
several seniors two years
ago and hope to have a new
coach in place soon.





DESOTO COUNTY

COACH: Damon Durato
LAST YEAR: Record not
available
DISTRICT: 2A-11 (Avon
Park, Cape Coral, Hardee,
Lake Placid, Lemon Bay,
Oasis, Mariner, Sebring)
STARTERS LOST: Derrick
Hollimon
RETURNING STARTERS:
Cesar Fernandez, Juan
Medina, Jose Lara
KEY NEWCOMERS: none
OUTLOOK: Bulldogs players
won a total of three matches
last year, so Durato is looking
forward to a fresh start.


LEMON BAY

COACH: Darrell Roach
LAST YEAR: Record not
available
DISTRICT: 2A-11 (Avon
Park, Cape Coral, DeSoto
County, Hardee, Lake Placid,
Oasis, Mariner, Sebring)
STARTERS LOST: Andrea
Volicek, Molly Hauer
RETURNING STARTERS:
Linda Antonova, Jessica
Lown, Maddie Casad
KEY NEWCOMERS: Steph-
anie Krisinski, Sarah Lown,
Taylor Schott, Ashley Tormey
OUTLOOK:The Manta Rays
return their top three from
last season, but lost captain
Volicek. Roach and his
players are confident they
have a team that can make it
to states.


LEMON BAY

COACH: Tony Geraci
LAST YEAR: 8-4
DISTRICT: 2A-11 (Avon
Park, Cape Coral, DeSoto
County, Hardee, Lake Placid,
Oasis, Mariner, Sebring)
STARTERS LOST: Kade
Cicchela, Owen Berry, Yuki
Fujii, Mike Messina
RETURNING STARTERS:
Andy Kappelman, Zach Yates
KEY NEWCOMERS: Diasuke
Fujiwara, David Kappel-
mann, Lucas Tedesco
OUTLOOK: Even though the
Manta Rays need to replace
four starters, Geraci's goal
for the team is to repeat as
district champions.


THE LOWN FILE
NAME: Jessica Lown
CLASS: Senior
Parents: Garrett and Jennifer Lown
SIBLINGS: Sarah (15)
FAVORITE FOOD: Rib-eye steak
FAVORITE MOVIE: Forrest Gump
FAVORITE SPORT BESIDES TENNIS:
Golf
COLLEGE PLANS: Study aerospace
engineering and play tennis at Embry-
Riddle University in Daytona Beach.

or teammate Linda Antonova
earn the Manta Rays' No. 1
singles position. Antonova was
the No. 1 last year, but coach
Darrell Roach said Lown has
worked hard and has a chance


NORTH PORT

COACH: Karyn Strauss
LAST YEAR: 3-4
DISTRICT: 4A-8 (Country-
side, East Lake, Manatee,
Palm Harbor University,
Pinellas Park, Saraso-
ta-Riverview, Seminole, St.
Petersburg)
STARTERS LOST: Carley
Andrews, Genesis Calo
RETURNING STARTERS:
Paige Robson, Samantha
Hayes, Ashlyn Hayes,
Cameron Auer, Ericka Weaver
KEY NEWCOMERS: Tiffany
Hoffman, Lindsey Starr
OUTLOOK:This is the largest
girls tennis team North Port
has fielded, and Strauss
hopes the Bobcats can carry
the momentum of finally
winning a district tourna-
ment point last year.

NORTH PORT

COACH: Seth Christy
LAST YEAR: Record not
available
DISTRICT: 4A-8 (Country-
side, East Lake, Manatee,
Palm Harbor University,
Pinellas Park, Saraso-
ta-Riverview, Seminole, St.
Petersburg)
STARTERS LOST: none
RETURNING STARTERS:
Bryce Starr, Kamal Riegel,
Jonah Mcrorey
KEY NEWCOMERS: Robby
Holmes
OUTLOOK: New coach
Christy is hoping to instill
a "never say die mentality"
into a team that was
competitive but didn't win
any matches last year.


to surpass the fellow senior. If
Lown is the team's No. 1, her
goal is to finish with a winning
record. If she's the No. 2, her
goal is to go undefeated.
Joining Lown on the team this
year is her sister, Sarah, a fresh-
man. Sarah Lown, who started
playing tennis at the same time
as her sister, said she hopes to
earn a spot in the Manta Rays
starting lineup.
"Ever since Jessica started I've
been really excited to join high
school tennis, it sounds really
fun," Sarah Lown said. "I want
to be able to play doubles, that's
my main goal."
Contact ath Miller at 941-206-1140 orzmiller@
sun-herald.om.


PORT CHARLOTTE

COACH: Tom Tirb
LAST YEAR: 5-5
DISTRICT: 3A-11 (Charlotte,
Fort Myers, Ida Baker, Island
Coast, North Fort Myers,
Riverdale)
STARTERS LOST: Madison
Butler-Ogle, Margaret
Soares, Jesse Hevia
RETURNING STARTERS:
Katie Rioux, Nicole Bifaretti,
Paige Sargent, Andrea
Buchholz
KEY NEWCOMERS: none
OUTLOOK: The Pirates lose
their top two from last
season, which will push
other players into tougher
matches. Tirb doesn't know
what to expect in the new
district.



PORT CHARLOTTE

COACH: Scott Toney
LAST YEAR: 4-8
DISTRICT: 3A-11 (Charlotte,
Fort Myers, Ida Baker, Island
Coast, North Fort Myers,
Riverdale)
STARTERS LOST: Jeff
Whaley
RETURNING STARTERS: D.J.
Botts, Ethan Katz, Matthew
Amontree, Parker Murno
KEY NEWCOMERS: Christian
Guzman, J.P. Coogan
OUTLOOK: Toney expects
the Pirates to get back over
.500 with a team that is
deeper than last year. The
Pirates'new district includes
one team from last year's
district: Charlotte.


COACH: Bob Halsted
LAST YEAR: 10-6
DISTRICT: 3A-10 (Braden
River, Clearwater, Dixie
Hollins, Lakewood Ranch,
Largo, Northeast, Osceola,
Palmetto, Sarasota)
STARTERS LOST: Taylor
Jais, Emma Carey, Emme
Zastempowski
RETURNING STARTERS:
Michaela Mignemi, Ansley
Rice, Sophia Gasca
KEY NEWCOMERS: Erica
Dempsey, Laura Dempsey,
Lexi Jais
OUTLOOK: Last year's team
finished in the top 10 at the
state tournament, and the
Nos. 1,2 and 3 players are
back. The starting lineup
features five seniors.


VENICE

COACH: Wayne Robertson
LAST YEAR: 12-2
DISTRICT: 3A-10 (Braden
River, Clearwater, Dixie
Hollins, Lakewood Ranch,
Largo, Northeast, Osceola,
Palmetto, Sarasota)
STARTERS LOST:Brian
Felman, Eric Gasca
RETURNING STARTERS:
Shiv Krishnaswamy, Charlie
Bond, Alex Fong, Thomas
Whittaker
KEY NEWCOMERS: Danny
Manieri, Alex Sosa, Jacob
Daniels
OUTLOOK: After winning
back-to-back district titles,
the Indians are hoping to
be competitive in a tougher
district.


Raffaella Ferretti
Junior, Charlotte
Ferretti won a district championship
at No. 3 singles last year. This year,
she'll move into the No. 1 or No. 2
spot.


Alex Guzman
Junior, Charlotte
Guzman, the Tarpons'No. 2 last year,
moves up to replace last year's player
of the year, Grant Rumreich.


Paige Robson
Senior, North Port
Robson, the team captain, helped
lead the Bobcats to their first district
point as a No. 1 singles and doubles
player last year.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT





Engineering success


Page 10 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014





SThe Sun/Sunday, February 2,2014 www.sunnewspapers.net


SPRING PREVIEWS BASEBALL TRACK & FIELD TENNIS BOYS WEIGHTLIFTING SOFTBALL BASEBALL TRACK & FIELD TENNIS BOYSWEIGHTLIFTING SPRING PREVIEWS


SOFTBALL


FOUR TO WATCH I


Times and dates subject to change.
All times unless notes
Tuesday, Feb. 4
North Port at Southeast, 6
DeSoto County at Port Charlotte, 7
Cypress Lake at Charlotte, 7:30
Wednesday, Feb. 5
Charlotte at Mariner, 7
Thursday, Feb. 6
Charlotte at DeSoto County, 7
North Port at Venice, 7
Friday, Feb. 7
Lemon Bay at Riverview, 7
Sarasota at Venice,7
Palmetto at DeSoto County, 7:30
Monday, Feb. 10
North Port at Charlotte, 7
Tuesday, Feb.11
Charlotte at Lemon Bay, 7
Port Charlotte at Ida Baker, 7
Riverview at Venice, 7
DeSoto County at LaBelle, 7:30
Thursday, Feb.13
Bayshore at DeSoto County, 7
Venice at Lemon Bay, 7
North Port at Port Charlotte, 7
Friday, Feb. 14
Port Charlotte at Venice, 7
Tuesday, Feb.18
Gulf Coast at Charlotte, 7
Palmetto at North Port, 7
Wednesday, Feb.19
Charlotte at Port Charlotte, 7
Lemon Bay at North Port, 7
Venice at North Fort Myers, 7
Thursday, Feb. 20
Lemon Bay at Bayshore, 7
Braden River at Venice, 7
Friday, Feb.21
Charlotte at Fort Myers, 7
North Fort Myers at Port Charlotte, 7
Island Coast at Venice, 7
Monday, Feb.24
DeSoto County at North Port, 7:30
Tuesday, Feb.25
Riverdale at Charlotte, 7
Port Charlotte at Island Coast, 7
Venice at Ida Baker, 6
Wednesday, Feb.26
Lemon Bay at Lakewood Ranch, 7
Manatee at Venice, 7
Friday, Feb. 28
Charlotte at Gulf Coast, 7
Hardee at Lemon Bay, 7
Port Charlotte at Ida Baker, 7
Sebring at DeSoto County, 7:30
Monday, March 3
DeSoto County at Lake Placid, 7:30
Tuesday, March 4
Fort Myers at Charlotte, 7
North Port at Riverview, 7
Port Charlotte at Venice, 7
DeSoto County at Hardee, 7:30
Lemon Bay at Sebring, 7:30
Thursday, March 6
North Port at Palmetto, 7
Friday, March 7
North Port, Port Charlotte at North Port
softball tourney, TBA
Lemon Bay at DeSoto County, 7
North Fort Myers at Venice, 7
Saturday, March 8
North Port softball tourney, TBA
Monday, March 17
DeSoto County at Charlotte, 7
Tuesday, March 18
LaBelle at DeSoto County, 7
Port Charlotte at Lemon Bay, 7
Wednesday, March 19
Lemon Bay at Charlotte, 7
Thursday, March 20
DeSoto County at Bayshore, 7:30
Friday, March 21
Port Charlotte at Charlotte, 7
Lemon Bay at Venice, 7
Monday, March 24
North Port at DeSoto County, 7:30
Tuesday, March 25
Riverdale at Charlotte, 7
Riverview at North Port, 7
Port Charlotte at North Fort Myers, 7
DeSoto County at Lemon Bay, 7
Wednesday, March 26
Mariner at Charlotte, 7
Thursday, March 27
North Port at Port Charlotte, 7
Saint Stephen's Episcopal at Venice, 7
Friday, March 28
Episcopal Academy at Charlotte, 6:30
DeSoto County at Sebring, 7:30
Lemon Bay at Hardee, 7:30
Monday, March 31
Port Charlotte at DeSoto County, 7
Bayshore at Lemon Bay, 7
Tuesday, April 1
Venice at Riverview, 7
Wednesday, April 2
Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte, 7
Thursday, April 3
Sebring at Lemon Bay, 7
Venice at Manatee, 7
Hardee at DeSoto County, 7:30
Friday, April 4
Southeast at North Port, 6
Monday, April 7
Lake Placid at DeSoto County, 7:30
Tuesday, April 8
South Fort Myers at Charlotte, 6:30
North Port at Lemon Bay, 7
Port Charlotte at Mariner, 7
DeSoto County at Palmetto, 7:30
Thursday, April 10
Charlotte at Longshore Memorial
Tournament, 4
Riverview at Lemon Bay, 6


Monday, April 14
District tournaments beain


Brooke Clemens
Lemon Bay. Junior. Catcher
The younger Clemens holds the Manta
Rays'career and single-season home
run records and last season verbally
committed to play at the University of
Florida.


Debbie Brown
DeSoto County. Senior. Third baseman
Brown is the lone holdover from the
state runner-up team and because of
that, can show the newcomers what
it takes to take their game to the next
level.


Kali Barnhill
Port Charlotte. Senior. Pitcher/Infield
The fourth-year varsity player should
easily stand out among a young,
inexperienced squad. She is solid at the
plate and isn't afraid to work hard.


Kasi Shaffer
Lemon Bay. Freshman Infielder
Shaffer is new to varsity but not the
game. She can hit and play solid
defense, and she has all the tools to
stand out in a stacked lineup.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT |


Sister act takes last bow


Inseparable on
the field and
off, Clemenses
lead Lemon Bay
By DAWN KLEMISH
SUN CORRESPONDENT
ENGLEWOOD -The
Clemens sisters are so
close in age and appear-
ance, they are mistaken
for one another every-
where they go.
They share a lot of the
same friends, and spend
much of their free time
together.
Inside though, they're
polar opposites. Brooke
Clemens, a Lemon Bay
junior catcher, is the loud
one, always the first to
crack a joke or make light
of a situation.
Baleigh Clemens, a
senior center fielder,
is the more reserved,
level-headed of the duo,
the calming influence in
a storm.
What they have in com-
mon is a desire to take the
Manta Rays further in the
postseason than they've
gone, and together, they
feel they can help their
team achieve that goal.
"I think our main goal
this season is to bring the
team as far as we can pos-
sibly go, and play our best
all the way there," Baleigh
Clemens said. "We set a
lot of goals for ourselves
in the past and gained a
really good reputation,
and I want to go out with
a bang for my senior year.
Baleigh, 18, began play-
ing softball first. Since
Baleigh started playing at
a young age, Brooke has

CHARLOTTE

LAST YEAR: Record not available,
lost to Venice in District 7A-11
quarterfinal
COACH: Greg Higgins, sixth season
LOST TO GRADUATION: Jen Gering,
Miranda Johnson, Kari Dennison,
Alexis Tyre, Alice Horton
KEY RETURNERS: Kayla Johnson,
Sr. IF/OF; Courtney Sunnaborg, Sr. P/
OF; Riley Garand, Jr. IF
NEWCOMERS: Julie Dietrich, Fr.
P/IF; Marissa Stack, Fr. IF; Kaylie
Brennan, Fr. 3B; Kaylie Chevria, Fr.
OF; Jessie Valerius, So. C/IF; Madison
Weekly, So. OF; Sammie Darnett
Jr. IF
OUTLOOK: The Tarpons are a young
team without little experience,
but they have an advantage when
it comes to knowing each other:
Several girls play travel ball together
and should adjust well to varsity.
Higgins is excited that this season's
team is very serious about the sport
and said its strengths are hitting
and defense. Pitching is Charlotte's
weak spot, so the Tarpons will have
to find an arm to count on.

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corn.


always been by her side.
It's something Baleigh
thinks about often as
she begins her last year
of softball. Life without
16-year-old Brooke is
definitely going to take
some getting used to.
"We've been playing to-
gether forever," the elder
Clemens admitted. "It's
hitting me now more so
since the season started
that I'm graduating soon
and leaving. It's super
weird for me because
it's a normal thing to see
(Brooke), we're always
together."
The sisters are so in
tune that last year, when
Baleigh hit her first home
run of the year at Mariner,
Brooke closed the game
in the same fashion. That,
they agreed, was their
favorite softball moment.
Both sisters are com-
petitive, so some might
find it hard to believe
sibling rivalry doesn't
exist in the Clemens
household. But Lemon
Bay coach Kim Pinkham
said Baleigh and Brooke
Clemens provide a
valuable lesson in that
regard.
"They bicker far
less than I could ever
imagine," Pinkham said.
"For the amount of time
they spend together
and playing competitive
sports together, they don't
fight. When one does
something good, both
are happy about it. They
are genuinely so proud
of each other, which is
pretty neat, and everyone
learns from that on the
team.
"Being proud and

DESOTO COUNTY

LAST YEAR: Record not available,
lost to Academy of Holy Names in
the Region 4A-3 quarterfinal
COACH: Billy Hines, 11th season
LOST TO GRADUATION: Katelynn
Johnson, McKayla Jeter
KEY RETURNERS: Debbie Brown,
Sr. 3B; Shelby Cross, Sr. 3B; Jillian
Deriso, Sr. OF; Hayden Lipe, Jr. C/1iB;
Destiny Payne, Jr. P/OF; Amber Reid,
Jr. P/OF; Miranda Corbin, So. IF
NEWCOMERS: Courtney Bonville,
So. OF
OUTLOOK: The Bulldogs have made
a name for themselves with consis-
tently solid softball teams and this
year should be no different despite
the fact that DeSoto County is very
young. Hines anticipates it taking
six to eight games for the girls to
settle in and learn roles. During that
time there will be a lot of position
shuffling to see who fits best in each
spot. The veteran coach preaches
fun first, which should help Bulldogs
during their adjustment period.


supportive of each other,
instead of being ticked
that it isn't you. They
definitely demonstrate
that on a regular basis."
Baleigh readily
admits her sister is
the better ballplayer.
As a sophomore, the
younger Clemens orally
committed to play at the
University of Florida, and
it's Brooke who holds the
Lemon Bay single-season
and career home run
records. Brooke, however,
was quick to point out
that her sister is a "much
better outfielder," than
she.
"We get along well,"
Brooke Clemens said.
"We're one, big, happy
family and it's going to be
so weird next year playing
without my sister. A lot
more boring, too."
Whatever is going on
out at Lemon Bay seems
to be working, as the
Manta Rays went 22-3 last
season and advanced to
the regional final before
bowing out. Pinkham is
very candid when talking
about how much she has
enjoyed coaching the
Clemenses and is looking
forward to coaching
the youngest Clemens,
10-year-old Brynn in the
future.
"They're definitely
awesome to have around,
they get their work in and
take care of business but
still know how to keep
things fun," she added.
"And some day, we'll have
the next little Clemens
come along, and she's
going to have a lot to live
up to."

LEMON BAY

LASTYEAR: 22-3, District 4A-14
champions, lost to Plantation
American in Region 5A-4 final
COACH: Kim Pinkham, 11th
LOST TO GRADUATION: Brooke
Carvey, Hunter Mars, Nikki Woodard
KEY RETURNERS: Brooke Clemens,
Jr. C; Baleigh Clemens, Sr. CF; Kacyn
Shirley, Jr. UTIL; Bridget Ruhl, Jr.
P; Ashton Werden, Jr. P; Summer
Jones, So. OF; Danielle Koche, So.
IF; Amanda Chapman, sr. OF;Vicki
LaMarr, Sr. UTIL; Brandi Neumeyer,
Sr. C
NEWCOMERS: Kasi Shaffer, Fr. IF;
Brooke Kvaternick, Fr. IF
OUTLOOK: The Manta Rays lost
three from a team that went to the
region final. Though the trio was
a major part of the team's success,
replacements exist. Lemon Bay
thrives under what Pinkham calls
the"Zobrist versatility;' named after
theTampa Bay Rays super utility
player Ben Zobrist. Many of the
girls play several positions, which
helps when injuries and slumps
necessitate changes.


'Deep Creek
I M Golf Club


RATES

Before Noon After Noon After 2pm
Includes 18 Holes with Cart &Tax. Rates expire 3/30/2014
I s i I I
_3w.De 6e~ofo


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO
Baleigh (top) and Brooke Clemens have one last softball season
together before Baleigh heads off to college. Both say it will be
weird to no longer be on the same team.


THE CLEMENS FILES
NAME: Baleigh Clemens
NICKNAME: Bale-Bale, 2-2
YEAR/POSITION: Senior center
fielder
PARENTS: Scott and Tammy
Clemens
SIBLINGS: Brooke 16, Brynn 10
FAVORITE CLASS: My genetics
class
AFTER HIGH SCHOOL: I want to
become a dental hygienist.
PRE-GAME RITUAL: I have a
playlist on my phone that I listen
to on bus rides.


NORTH PORT

LAST YEAR: Record not available,
lost to Palm Harbor in District 8A-8
semifinal
COACH: Amanda Wathen, second
year
LOST TO GRADUATION: No infor-
mation provided.
KEY RETURNERS: No information
provided
NEWCOMERS: No information
provided
OUTLOOK: The Bobcats are young
with just a few returning players. But
they have raw talent. North Port's
squad should be much improved
over that of last season. Wathen Is a
professional hitting coach, which can
only help the team at the plate. But
the Bobcats need to figure out their
pitching situation. North Port has no
shortage of candidates: Wathan has
used five pitchers in the preseason,
but she is waiting for one to seize the
starter's job.


NAME: Brooke Clemens
NICKNAME: Little Brooke
YEAR/POSITION: Junior catcher
PARENTS: Scott and Tammy
Clemens
SIBLINGS: Baleigh 18, Brynn 10
FAVORITE CLASS: History
AFTER HIGH SCHOOL: I want to
be a criminologist, go into crim-
inology, and I have a scholarship
to UF for softball.
PRE-GAME RITUAL: I just have
a playlist I listen to on the bus to
our road trips.


PORT CHARLOTTE

LAST YEAR: 6-17, lost to Sarasota in
District 7A-11 quarterfinal
COACH: Rodney Taylor, ninth season
LOST TO GRADUATION: Lauren
Jansen, Taylor Richards, Ariel
Needham
KEY RETURNERS: Kali Barnhill, Sr.
P/IF; Rachel White, Sr. OF; Brianna
Burkhart, Sr. IF; Maria Suarez, Sr.
1 B/P; Maureen Coslor, Jr. C/OF; Abby
McVety, Sr. P
NEWCOMERS: Not available
OUTLOOK: The team is waiting
on at least five athletes currently
playing other sports. Taylor said his
team is a little behind schedule as a
result, and several girls are playing
out of position until the roster fills
out. Port Charlotte may take its
lumps early. What the Pirates do
have is a strong defense and the will
to learn on the fly, something that
will aid the younger teammates as
they adjust to the varsity.


"a n I I i M I







Rated In heIb 1
Flria ol cum b


SP Page 11






~Page12 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


Lemon Bay High School's Ryan Dodge takes down Oasis'Joe Pascale during Saturday's District 1A-12 meet in Englewood.


MANTAS

FROM PAGE 1
and there was tougher
competition."
Dodge raised his record
to 57-7 with his victory at
160 pounds. He had a bye
the first round, pinned
Mariner's Jake Burger
at 1:31 in the semifinals
and took a 10-3 win over
Oasis's Joe Pascale in the
finals.
"I felt pretty good,"
Dodge said. "The key
was I didn't do anything
different in the match
regardless of what
happened.
"I just didn't think it
would be that tough."
Dodge was second
in the district meet last
season and finished third
at regions, qualifying for
the state.
Lipp took a 12-1 major
decision victory over
Dunbar's Trevor McDaniel
in the 113-pound finals
Saturday. He had a bye
in the first round and
pinned Evangelical
Christian's Alex Metcalf in
20 seconds in the second
round. He beat Lely's



BOBCATS

FROM PAGE 1
The Hurricanes placed
second behind North Port
for the second year in a
row.
"It's a big rivalry," North
Port coach Mark Kemble
said. "I've been here for
10 years and it's gone
back nine to the first
time we wrestled them in
districts. There's always
been a little animosity
between the teams and
the coaches."
A new chapter was
added to the rivalry
in the first final of the
evening when North
Port junior Anthony
Tripke went up against
Manatee's Marshall Craig
for the 106-pound title.
Referees ruled that Tripke
had pinned Craig in
the second period, but
later recinded that ruling
after a discussion with
Manatee coach Andrew
Gugliemini.
They determined that
Tripke used an illegal
hold, eliciting frustration
from Kemble, who drew
an unsportsmanlike
conduct penalty from
his ensuing conversation
with the referees. Tripke


Lemon Bay High School's Artem Loundouskikh lifts Clewiston's
Michael Counts during the District 1A-12 meet in Englewood.
Loundouskikh finished fourth at 195 to qualify for regionals.


Bryce Bogart 6-1 in the
semifinals before topping
McDaniel in the finals. He
is 41-9 on the season.
"I felt really good," Lipp
said. "I had a lot of energy
and was able to stay on
my feet. I feel really con-
fident about how I will do
next week. I also went 2-2
in last year's state meet."
Lemon Bay had three
second-place finishers
and two fourth-place
finishers, all qualifying
for the Region 1A-3 meet
Friday and Saturday at
Berkeley Prep in Tampa.
Dominic Schofield


PREP SCHEDULE
All times p.m. unless noted
MONDAY
Boys basketball
District 7A-10
Sarasota (5) at Braden River (4), 7
District 6A- 11
Ida Baker (5) at North Fort Myers
(4), 7
Tennis
DeSoto County at Hardee, 4:30
TUESDAY
Boys soccer

couldn't pin Craig after
that, but went on to to
win the match 14-6.
"In the 20 years I've
been involved in the
sport, I've never seen
a pin taken away from
someone," Kemble said.
"But he came back and
got the major decision."
Tripke was one of four
district champions for
North Port. Freshman
John Cruz beat Durant
senior Reagan Haley by
a 15-0 technical fall to
win at 132 and sopho-
more Dacoda Flenard
pinned Bloomingdale's
Julian Cala at 138.
Marcus Kirkland won the
Bobcats' final title with a
2-1 double overtime win
after keeping his oppo-
nent on the mat for a full


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was second at 120,
losing to Mariner's Gianni
Matamoros 4-2 in the
finals. The Mantas' Riley
Castle lost on a technical
fall to Mariner's Keaton
Koselke in the finals at
126 class and Bobby
Caspolich placed second
at 152.
The other Lemon Bay
regional qualifiers were
JoshWashington at 132
and Artem Loundouskikh
at 195. Loundouskikh had
a 16-21 record coming
into the meet, but had a
forfeit in the first round
before losing in the


Regional semifinals
North PortatLakewood Ranch,7
Bishop Verot at DeSoto County, 7
Boys basketball
(seed in parentheses)
District 7A-11
Gulf Coast (3) at Charlotte (2), 7
Riverdale (4) at Fort Myers (1), 7
District 5A- 11
Hardee (4) at Sebring (1), 7
DeSoto County (3) at Lemon Bay
(2), 7


30 seconds in overtime.
In what has become
the norm during North
Port's string of district
dominance, all 14 North
Port wrestlers that
competed placed in the
top four to secure spots
in next week's regional
tournament. Chris Fritz
(152), David Towers (160),
Jake Bennett (220) and
Brannon Scott (heavy-
weight) all did so with
second-place finishes.
"It was one of our goals
in the beginning of the
season to win another
district title," Kemble
said. "It's hard when
you're on top for five
years to keep repeating,
but our kids know what
it takes and they put the
hard work in."


second. He came back to
take a pin victory in the
wrestlebacks before los-
ing to Southwest Florida
Christian's Andrew Van
Helden by pin in the
third-place match.
Lely won the team
championship with 179
points, edging Mariner's
175.5. Dunbar was third
at 140.

DISTRICT 1A-12 CHAMPIONSHIP
At Lemon Bay HS, Englewood
Team scores: 1. Lely 179,2. Mariner
175.5,3. Dunbar 140,4. Lemon Bay 106,
5. Immokalee, 6. Clewiston 75.5,7. Oasis
72,8. LaBelle 59,9. Southwest Florida
Christian 43,10. Evangelical Christian 27,
11. Gateway Charter 12.
Individuals: 106 pounds: Latham John-
son (D) p. Alguess Antoine (LE) 2:30, 3rd,
Matthew Malavsky (EC); 113: Jack Lipp (LB)
md. Trevor McDaniel (D) 12-1, 3rd, Bryce
Bogart (LE); 120: Gianni Dattolico (M) d,
Dominic Schofield (LB) 4-2,3rd, Eric Garcia
(LE); 126: Keaton Koselke (M) tf. RileyCastle
(LB) 16-1,3rd, Azeekwuai Bryant (CL); 132:
Thomas Antonides (D) p. Alfrande Pierre
(LE) 5:23, 3rd, Andonet Thermidor (IMM);
138: Kesly Joseph (LE) md.Tyrone Callaway
(D) 13-3,3rd, Aaron Crump (IM).
145: Marquis Outlaw (D) p. Tarken Peksen
(LE) 2:56,3rd, Roney Paul (IM); 152: Ashton
Flourde (M)) md. Bobby Caspolich (LB) 14-
2,3rd, Lavaris Preston (D); 160: Ryan Dodge
(LB) d.Joe Pascale (0) 103,10-3,3rd Darrian
Silas (D); 170: Tupac Isme (LE) d. Arnoldo
Ayala (LA) 12-7, 3rd, Robenx Julien (IM);
182:Termaine McClendon (LE) p. Zach
Fouch (M) 1:19,3rd, MatthewJohnson (CL).
195: Jefferson Dorvil (LE) p. GuillermoCris-
tobal (IM) 3:37,3rd, Andrew Van Helden(S-
FC); 220: Alejandro Lopez (M) p. Noah
Huxley (SFC) 4:55; 3rd, Jared Escorcia (CL);
Heavyweight: Russell Panos (M) p. Jordan
Phillips (D) 2:35; 3rd,Joe Hernandez (C).


Softball
North Port at Southeast, 6
DeSoto County at Port Charlotte, 7
Cypress Lake at Charlotte, 7:30
Girls tennis
Venice at Lemon Bay, 3:30
Boys tennis
Charlotte at Venice (Laurel
Nokomis), 3:30
Lemon Bay at Booker, 3:30




Contact Zach Miller at 941-206-1140
orzmiller@sun-heroaldxom.
DISTRICT 3A-8 CHAMPIONSHIPS
at Durant High School, Plant City
Team: 1. North Port 205,2. Manatee 189,3.
Riverview 140,4. Durant 110,5. Newsome
70, 6. East Bay 58, 7. Bloomingdale 39, 8.
Sarasota-Riverview 19.
Individuals: 106 pounds: Anthony Tripke
(NP) md. Marshall Craig (M) 14-6,3rd: Doug
Washington (R); 113: Caleb Rudisill p. Joey
LeBarre (N) 4:52,3rd: Alejandro Torres (NP);
120: Austin Haley (D) d. Kizhan Clark (R) 11-
9,3rd:Josh Patterson (NP); 126:TyrekHoyte
(M) d. Anthony Busciglio (N) 5-1, 3rd: Mi-
chael Parker (R); 132:John Cruz (NP) tf Rea-
gan Haley (D) 15-0,3rd: Jordan Hunter (R).
138: Dacoda Flenard (NP) p. Julian Cala (B)
2:29, 3rd: Tony Hernandez (R); 145: Alex
Ginn (M) d. Kevin Clifford (D) 8-3,3rd:Jason
Huertas(R); 152: Dakota Dossey(M) p.Chris
Fritz (NP) 3:01,3rd: Ben Stahl (R); 160:Jesse
Fulk(M) d. David Towers (NP) 7-6,3rd: Cody
Walsh (B); 170: Johnny Baldwin (M) d. Park-
erWadman(R) 10-3,3rd: LeviWilliams (D).
182: Ricardo Calderon (EB) p. Cody Craven
(D) 5:32, 3rd: Roman Morales (NP); 195:
Marcus Kirkland (NP) d. Connor Barrick (R)
2-1, 3rd: Julian Miles-Rubio (D); 220: Alvin
Burns (N) d. Jake Bennett (NP) 8-4, 3rd:
Kyle Rodriguez (R); Heavyweight: Mason
Culver (EB) d. Brannon Scott (NP) 4-0, 3rd:
Colton Deiser (M).


* NHL: Tampa Bay 2, Montreal 1


Lightning pad


division lead

Thompson's LIGHTNING

OT goal lifts AT WILD


lampa bay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MONTREAL Nate
Thompson scored twice,
including the winner at
4:36 of overtime, to give
Tampa Bay a 2-1 victory
against Montreal on
Saturday.
Ben Bishop stopped
28 shots for Tampa Bay,
which snapped a two-
game losing streak.
Daniel Briere scored
for Montreal. Carey Price
made 34 saves.
Thompson scored
the clincher when Alex
Killorn found him all
alone in from of Price.
The Lightning have
a five-point advantage
over the Canadiens in the
Atlantic Division.
After the Lightning took
a 1-0 lead in the second
period, Briere tied it at
7:25 of the third, taking
a cross-ice pass from
captain Brian Gionta and
firing home his ninth of
the season over Bishop's
shoulder. The goal was
Briere's second in as
many games.
Thompson was credited
with the game's first goal,


WHO: Tampa Bay (32-18-5) at
Minnesota (29-21-6)
WHEN: Tuesday, 8 p.m.
WHERE: Xcel Energy Center, St.
Paul, Minn.
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 970 AM
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com


at 5:58 of the second,
after defenseman EK.
Subban put the puck in
his own net.
With Killorn in the pen-
alty box for interference,
Thompson skated into
the Canadiens' zone and
sent an innocent-looking
pass in the direction of
the net. Subban deflected
the puck between Price's
legs to give Tampa Bay
the lead on a short-hand-
ed goal.

LIGHTNING 2, CANADIENS 1
LIGHTNING 0 1 0 1 2
Montreal 0 0 1 0- 1
First Period-None.
Second Period-1i, LIGHTNING, Thomp-
son 4 (Hedman, Brown), 5:58 (sh).
Third Period-2, Montreal, Briere 9 (Gion-
ta),7:25.
Overtime-3, LIGHTNING, Thompson 5
(Hedman, Killorn), 4:36.
Missed Penalty Shot-Kucherov, TB, 4:41
first.
Shots on Goal-LIGHTNING 10-9-16-
1-36. Montreal 6-10-8-5-29. Goal-
ies-LIGHTNING, Bishop. Montreal, Price.
A-21,273 (21,273).T-2:43.


Flyers, Bruins

post shutouts;

Maple Leafs

blitz Senators
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Linemates Ryan Johansen
and Boone Jenner each
had a goal and an assist
in the first period, and
Sergei Bobrovsky made
36 saves to lead the
Columbus Blue Jackets
past the Florida Panthers
4-1 on Saturday night.
After Brad Boyes cut
Florida's deficit to 2-1
early in the second
period, Nick Foligno and
Mark Letestu scored for
the Blue Jackets. Nathan
Horton had two assists in
the opening 20 minutes.
In their last 13 games,
the Blue Jackets won
eight in a row, lost three
straight and now have
won the past two. It was
Columbus' final home
game for a month due to
four road games and the
NHL Olympic hiatus.
Down 3-1 going into
the third, the Panthers
dominated the pace but
Bobrovsky made several
big stops to maintain the
two-goal lead. He im-
proved to 11-2 in his last
13 starts.

BLUE JACKETS 4, PANTHERS 1
Florida 0 1 0 1
Columbus 2 1 1 4
First Period-1, Columbus, Jenner 9 (Jo-
hansen, Horton), 15:33. 2, Columbus, Jo-
hansen 22 (Jenner, Horton), 18:02.
Second Period-3, Florida, Boyes 15
(Campbell, Upshall), 7:41. 4, Columbus,
Foligno 13 (Nikitin), 17:46.
Third Period-5, Columbus, Letestu 8
(Tropp, MacKenzie), 9:28.
Shots on Goal-Florida 7-15-14-36.
Columbus 13-10-7-30.Goalies-Florida,
Thomas. Columbus, Bobrovsky. A-16,762
(18,144).T-2:24.

Maple Leafs 6, Senators
3: In Toronto, Phil Kessel scored three
goals, and Toronto won its sixth in a
row at home. Toronto's (30-21-6) streak
is its longest since the Maple Leafs
concluded the 2006-07 season with 10
straight home victories. They have won
five in a row against Ottawa.

Flyers 2, Kings 0: In Los
Angeles, Steve Mason posted his
second shutout in three games with 35
,'jt"-' tliI W tiv w mII,- ", i 1, ,ll, l' ',,, n,-, i


MAPLE LEAF
AT PANTHERS
WHO: Toronto at Florida
WHEN: Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: BB&T Center, Sunrise
TV: Fox Sports Florida
RADIO: No local affiliate
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com

CALENDAR
FEB. 9: Olympic break begins.
FEB. 12: Olympic men's hockey
tournament begins: Sochi,
Russia.
FEB. 23: Olympic men's hockey
gold-medal game: Sochi, Russia.
FEB. 26: NHL regular season
resumes.
MARCH 1: NHL Stadium Series:
Pittsburgh Penguins at Chicago
Blackhawks, Soldier Field.
MARCH 5: Trade deadline, 3
p.m., EST.
MARCH 10-12: NHL general
managers meeting, Boca Raton,
Fla.
APRIL 13: Last day of regular
season.

100th NHL goal to lead Philadelphia. It
was the 22nd career shutout and third
this season for Mason.

Avalanche 7, Sabres 1: In
Denver, Jamie McGinn had two goals
and an assist, Gabriel Landeskog also
had two goals and Colorado won its
third in a row in a rout. The Avalanche
were playing their final home game
before going on a four-game East Coast
road trip ahead of the Olympic break.

Bruins 4, Oilers 0: In Boston,
David Krejci scored a second-period
power-play goal and Chad Johnson
made 22 saves for his second career
shutout for Boston. Krejci's 12th goal of
the season at 2:06 of the second period
was enough for the Bruins to win for
the sixth time in their past eight games
and maintain the second-best record in
the Eastern Conference.

Coyotes 3, Penguins 1:
In Glendale, Ariz., Zbynek Michalek
scored against his former team, his first
goal in 83 games, and Phoenix became
the first Pacific Division team to beat
Eastern Conference-leading Pittsburgh
in regulation this season. Mike Ribeiro
had a goal and an assist for Phoenix.
Radim Vrbata scored the third goal
for the Coyotes, who were coming off
perhaps their worst loss of the season,
3-2 at home to the East's worst team,
[hi- l'.nn i11,, ". IIlr-' ,l [hii ll '[ ,f| i in,]lh[


* NHL ROUNDUP


First period


buries Panthers


-Pagel2 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014





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Health monitoring via Internet, digital devices offers benefits
Page 15


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Sunday, February 1, 2014


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:Page 2


www.sunnewspapers.net


Feeling Fit


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DerekDunn-Rankin

President and Publisher
David Dunn-Rankin

Feeling Fit Publisher
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Columnists and Contributors
Laureen Albrecht
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Deadlines
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as space permits. To have your group
included, send the information to
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News briefs and announcements must be
received'," i 'ii.'II. iil.0ito be included in
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Fr .1 r, I h ru r ,, F I, ,[, ,r call
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Letters to the editor can be submitted by
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m S


Improving community health care


Last week, we had our all-commit-
tee meeting for CHIP (Community
Health Improvement Partnership).
CHIP has five committees. The
steering committee acts as the um-
brella for the organization. Under
that umbrella are the marketing,
access to healthcare, chronic disease
and mental health committees.
The committees all meet monthly,
but once a quarter, all five commit-
tees gather and provide progress
updates. This was only our second
all-committee meeting, and it also
coincided with the first anniversary
of CHIP. It hardly seems possible
that we have only been operating for
one year and that is especially so
when you hear the progress reports
from our committees.
The marketing committee, which
formed late last year, has already
established a website that is un-
dergoing substantial updates. Take
a look: www.charlottecountyCHIP.
org. The committee also made a
PowerPoint presentation that can
be used by the newly formed CHIP
speaker's bureau; speakers are avail-
able to give 15-minute presentations
to community organizations.
The mental health community is


Dave Powell
working in three areas. First they are
increasing community knowledge of
when and where to seek behavioral
health treatment. There is an aware-
ness campaign to identify to the
public what is available and where.
Second, they are working to reduce
the suicide rate in Charlotte County.
Third, there is a goal to increase the
utilization of substance treatment
resources in Charlotte for children


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


and adults by 5 percent. It is amaz-
ing the progress this committee has
made in a short period of time.
Chronic disease is creating part-
nerships to help reduce obesity and
eliminate tobacco use. These are the
two behaviors that create the great-
est risk of illness and death. They
are also both very treatable. CHIP
works with existing organizations
on tobacco prevention, and with the
school system and others on nutri-
tion information. These preventive
measures can add up to a healthier
population.
The access to healthcare commit-
tee has been very busy with getting
the message out on the Affordable
Healthcare Act (ACA). Working with
the ACA navigator they have helped
many to sign up for health insur-
ance. They also provide information
on Medicaid and Medicare. We
cannot forget the access for those in
need without money or insurance
that is provided by the Virginia B.
Andes Volunteer Community Clinic.
It is truly amazing what can hap-
pen when our local organizations
come together.
Stay tuned and expect great
things from CHIP.


Social Security Q&A: new card mailed; average benefits


Q: I recently applied for a replace-
ment Social Security card, but I
might be moving before it arrives in
the mail. What should I do if I move
before I get it?
A: Once we have verified all your
documents and processed your ap-
plication, it takes approximately 10 to
14 days to receive your replacement
Social Security card. If you move after
applying for your new card, notify the
post office of your change of address
and the post office will forward your
card to your new address. If you do
not receive your card, please contact
your local Social Security office. To
get a replacement, you will have to
resubmit your evidence of identity
and United States citizenship, or
your lawful immigration status and
authority to work. You can learn more
at www.socialsecurity.gov.
Q: What's the average monthly
Social Security benefit for a retired
worker? How is the retirement bene-
fit amount calculated?
A: The current average monthly
Social Security benefit for a retired
worker is $1,294. Social Security ben-
efits are based on earnings averaged
over most of a worker's lifetime. Your
actual earnings are first adjusted or
"indexed" to account for changes in
average wages since the year the earn-
ings were received. We calculate your
average monthly indexed earnings
during the 35 years in which you
earned the most. We apply a formula
to these earnings and arrive at your
basic benefit amount. Learn more by
visiting us online at www.socialsecu-
rity.gov.
This column was prepared by the

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N Daily N


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SP32178


Social Security Administration. For
fast answers to specific Social Security
questions, contact Social Security


toll-free at 800-772-1213. For more
information, visit www.socialsecurity.
gov.


FLORIDA COLON & RECTAL

SURGICAL ASSOCIATES
Domingo E. Galliano, Jr., M.D., FACS, FACRS, P.A.
Board Certified Colon & Rectal Surgery
Board Certified General Surgery
0 Board Certified Surgical Critical Care
Clinical Assistant Professor, Dept. of Surgery, USF

Areas of Expertise


- Colorectal Cancer
- Fissure
- Anal Cancer
- Laparoscopic Surgery
- Incontinence
- Constipation
Diverticular Disease
- Anorectal Physiology Laboratory
- Anal Ultrasound
- Irritable Bowel Syndrome
- Crohn's Disease
- Ulcerative Colitis


- Anal Rectal Abscess
- Hemorrhoids
- Pilonidal Diseases
- Pruritis Ani
- Anal warts
- Colonoscopy
- Rectal Prolapse
- Polyps of Colon and Rectum
- Anal Pain
- STD
- Anal Rectal Fistula
- Starr


Murdock Circle Executive Center
18308 Murdock Circle, Suite 108
Port Charlotte, Florida 33948

941-625-3411
www.GallianoSurgery.com




The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3


Can

measure ti


Yes, yc


you

mely care?


)u can.


Heart Attack Patients given PCI within
90 Minutes of Arrival
(Four quarters ending Q1, 2013)


Fawcett Memorial


95%


83%


Peace River


National (Average for all
reporting hospitals)


Data is sourced from CMS Hospital Compare through 1Q2013.

So, what makes Fawcett Memorial Hospital different?
Improving blood flowto your heart during a heart attack, through Percutaneous
Coronary Intervention (PCI) procedures, lessens the damage to your heart
muscle. It needs to be done as quickly as possible as It can increase your
chances of surviving. Fawcett consistently beats the national average in
delivering this timely care when you need it most.
We work hard every day to improve quality and expand services because
we are committed to patient care and nothing's more important than your
health.

Fawcett Memorial Hospital

6- 6 6-6MEN,


Formoe nfrmaio o6 Fwcet erics o o


96%


100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
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o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3


feelingfit.com











Type 1 diabetes often overlooked


By RENEE LePERE
FEELING Frr CORRESPONDENT

A few years ago, a teacher friend
and I were talking about our jobs
when it came up one of friend's
students had recently found out he
was diabetic.
"I don't get it," she said. "He's this
skinny little thing and his parents
are so health conscious."
"How old is he?" I asked.
"Seven."
"How long has he been diabetic?"
"A few weeks. He got sick all of a
sudden. Poor kid ended up in the
hospital," she said.
"I'm not a doctor, I don't play one
on TV," I said as a medical disclaimer
- but I was thinking of my grandfa-
ther, an uncle and two cousins who
had all been diagnosed with Type 1
diabetes by age 13. "But I'm betting
this kid has Type 1 diabetes."
There was a pause and a blank
look.
"What's Type 1 diabetes?"
As Type 2 diabetes continues to
grab national headlines because
of the rising number of Americans
with this disease, Type 1 seems to
have been forgotten to the point of
nonexistence. Search the internet
using a term like, "Type 1 diabetes
ignorance," and more than 160,000
hits appear, mostly blogs and face-
book pages that serve as support
groups for people with Type 1 who
have had to deal with situations such
as a stranger screaming at them for
"causing their own diabetes" when
he or she is seen injecting insulin at
fast food restaurant before they eat.
Because of this level of ignorance
in the general public's understand-
ing of the differences between Type
1 and Type 2 diabetes, grass roots
groups in both the United States
and Australia have sprung up on
facebook and change.org, an online
petition platform active in more
than 190 countries, asking officials
in the medical community that the
name of Type 1 diabetes be changed
- though, no suggestion as to
what the new name should be to
distance themselves from the stigma
attached to Type 2 diabetes, which
has been strongly linked to obesity
and inactivity.
Type 1 and Type 2 are very dif-
ferent diseases. According to the
American Diabetes Association
(ADA), Type 1 is usually diagnosed in
children; Type 1 was originally called
"juvenile diabetes" for this reason
and the Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation (JDRF) still uses it. The
ADA estimates that 5 percent of
diabetics in the United States have
Type 1.
The JDRF reports an estimated 3
million Americans have Type 1. Each
year, more than 15,000 children and
15,000 adults are diagnosed in the
United States with Type 1 that
works out to about 80 people per


day. The majority of people living
with Type 1 are no longer children,
however. About 85 percent are
now adults who were diagnosed as
children, JDRF said. The number
of diagnosed cases of Type 1 also
continue to rise, along with Type 2.
A human's pancreas has about
1 million islet cells there are
several types of cell within the islet
cluster which work together to
regulate blood sugar, according
to the Diabetes Research Institute
Foundation. The job of the beta cell
is to "sense the amount of sugar in
the blood and release the necessary
amount of insulin to maintain
normal blood sugar levels," the foun-
dation said.
In Type I, however, the immune
system mistakes the beta cells as a
foreign body and destroys them as it
would any other perceived threat. It
is unknown why this happens. What
is known, however, is the results.
Without beta cells, the body cannot
convert food into energy and feed
cells. The blood sugar continues to
rise in the body while the cells are
essentially starving. Before the in-
vention of injectable insulin, people
with Type 1 diabetes died within
weeks of the onset of the disease.
There is nothing a person can do to
prevent or cure the disease, the JDRF
reports. Using insulin injections
or infusions is not a cure, both the
JDRF and ADA stress. It is a way
to manage the disease. And injec-
tions, proper diet and exercise still
"do not prevent Type 1 potentially
serious effects which include kidney
failure, blindness, nerve damage,
heart attack, stroke and for women,
pregnancy complications," the JDRF
said.
Warning signs of Type 1 can come
on suddenly and can include:
*Extreme thirst.
*Frequent urination.
*Drowsiness or lethargy.
*Increased appetite.
*Sudden weight loss.
*Sudden vision changes.
*Sugar in the urine.
*Fruity odor on the breath.
*Heavy or labored breathing.
*Stupor or unconsciousness.
In Type 2 diabetes, the beta cells
have not been destroyed. Instead,
the body either does not produce
enough insulin, or the cells "ignore"
the insulin otherwise known as
insulin resistance according to the
ADA. The body begins to produce
more insulin to keep up with the
elevated levels of sugar, and at first,
is able to keep pace. Eventually,
though, the pancreas cannot keep
up with the rising levels of glucose
and is unable to maintain a normal
blood sugar level.
Unlike Type 1, Type 2 can be
managed by diet and exercise alone,
depending on the severity of the
condition. Doctors may need to
prescribe oral medication and/or


insulin in' moie sevee cases, lie
ADA sa id
Research lihias shon [hle iae ;i
stro]i:g link beteenii T\pe diaibetes
and o'besil aiind inaictii\ Iii T\-pe 1.
there is nii link
Wlile signs of T\ pe 1 cain be
dramatiic ;-ild ;-ic[i,: IM tsi[ be [tikei
immrediiate. Hlie s\ inptoinS of T\-pe
2 are suNbtle ,: muchh s ,. tHie
ADA estimaltes tlieie aiie aibut 7'
million AiN-eiics\ h,:lio, aie piedia-
betic id liaal, ei-e 7 Im illil,,l vh lioaie
undilig1o-,ed
Cc'nl'ii s\, inptoms of T\-pe-'
diabetes iie
UIIl;II Ili, opalen
*Feellng \ei\ tluust\
*Feellng \ei\v hllv\ evel though
you aiie eaiiii ,
*E\ileie fri[tigle
tBhle iiV\ VleIOe
*Cuts,"blises tllie at aie sl-,:,I to lieal
*T inll ig,. p;-iil. :I1 It m bN ess ill
the ]ilnds,"feet


W '..... ......

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Former faculty member of Marquette University School of Dentistry
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www.drmarkgraf.com 50461737


:Page 4


The Sun /Sunclay Fel:.i .al y 1u 2


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com


.-AL-






The ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ AZHIE' SuDISEASerayE,21 eeigi~cmwwsnnwppr~ntPg


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BAYFRONT HEALTH PORT CHARLOTTE AND PUNTA GORDA
are pleased to offer free educational lectures on how to live
a healthy, active life. Each week, our experts will present the
latest information on a variety of heath topics and answer your
questions. Choose any or all of the sessions offered and watch
for others in the coming weeks.

Wednesday, February 5,2014


Ken Kenzie,
LCSW AD, Grief
Education


Mark Davis, M.D.,
Orthopedic Surgeon


Fred Swing, M.D., FACA
Acupuncture


Lenita Hanson, M.D., FACE,
CDE, CPT
Endocrinology and Diabetes


Livingwith Loss 11:00 p.m.
Guest Speaker: Ken Kenzie
Bayfront Health Punta Gorda
Medical Office Building
Fourth Floor Conference Room
773 East Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda

Oh My Aching Knee! 1 2:15 p.m.
Physician Speaker: Mark Davis, M.D.
Bayfront Health Punta Gorda
Medical Office Building
Fourth Floor Conference Room
773 East Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda


Wednesday, February 12,2014

Medical Acupuncture I 1:00 p.m.
Physician Speaker: Fred Swing, M.D., FACA
Bayfront Health Port Charlotte
Conference Center
2500 Harbor Boulevard, Port Charlotte


Diabetes Clinical Research,
Should You Participate? I 2:15 p.m.
Physician Speaker: Lenita Hanson, M.D., FACE,
CDE, CPT
Bayfront Health Port Charlotte
Conference Center
2500 Harbor Boulevard, Port Charlotte


Light refreshments served. Seating is limited, so registration
is required. Please call 941-637-2497 to register.



% Bayfront Health

BayfrontPuntaGorda.com

o Independentmember of the medical staff


Village Place to start Alzheimer's

support group, lecture series


I


^MHe.,


Get Your Weekly Dose


of Health & Hope


In Sunday's Feeling Fit!



Get a DAILY Dose


at FeelingFit.com!


By BOB MASSEY
FEELING Firr CORRESPONDENT

Kim Spencer sees a vital need in
the community and she intends to
meet it.
The community sales leader at
Village Place Assisted Living in Port
Charlotte has been working with
seniors for nearly two decades. And
she's concerned about Alzheimer's
disease but especially the
caregivers.
So she has initiated an Alzheimer's
support group and caregiver lecture
series.
"Our elderly population is get-
ting more and more afflicted with
Alzheimer's," she said. "We've found
that the caregivers are needing
support from other people, so that
they can talk through what they're
doing and share the problems they're
having."
An estimated 450,000-plus people
in Florida live with Alzheimer's
disease nearly 9 percent of the 5.4
million cases in the entire United
States.
According to the National Institute
on Aging, "Alzheimer's disease is an
irreversible, progressive brain disease
that slowly destroys memory and
thinking skills and, eventually even
the ability to carry out the simplest
tasks of daily living. In most people
with Alzheimer's, symptoms first
appear after age 60. Alzheimer's
disease is the most common cause of
dementia among older people."
Although symptoms in some
patients can be managed with
treatment, there is still no cure for
this devastating disease.
Within the 17 counties that com-
prise the Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
of the Alzheimer's Association (AA-
FGC) which include the counties
of Charlotte, Sarasota and DeSoto
- the Florida Department of Elder
Affairs has estimated that more than
170,000 people have the disease. This
number does not include the season-
al residents who make their home in
the region during winter months.
There are only eight states with


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5


feelingfit.com


FILE PHOTO
higher incidence of Alzheimer's than
that within AA-FGC's service region.
Nationally, one in every 58 people of
all ages has Alzheimer's disease. In
Florida, it is one in every 41 people.
In the areas served AA-FGC, that
number spikes to one in every 33
people.
According to the organization,
research shows that caregivers who
don't have the training or support
system or a help line they can call,
have a much higher risk of depres-
sion, accidents, even early death.
The support group at Village Place
Assisted Living, 18400 Cochran
Blvd., Port Charlotte, will meet at
10 a.m. on the third Thursday of
every month, beginning Feb. 20. The
caregiver lecture series starts at 2:30
p.m. the day after, and will meet on
the third Friday of every month.
"The training helps caregivers learn
how to care for their loved one,"
Spencer said. "The topics will be
everything from safety to laundering,
behavior and stress management.
Each month it will be a different
topic. Linda Howard from the
Alzheimer's Association will take care
of the lecture series, but I have two
staff members who are being trained
to run the support group."
The support group and lecture
series are free of charge and open to
the public. For more information, call
Spencer at (941) 766-8900.


iMh










Teen gets explanation for her lifelong mysterious muscle weakness


By ERYN BROWN
Los ANGELES TIMES

Honors student Lilly Grossman sat
propped up daintily in an armchair in
her family's sunny living room, talking
about what it was like being home-
coming princess of her junior class.
The night of the game a come-
from-behind victory for the La Jolla
High School Vikings she rode
around the school's field in a Jeep.
At her side was the homecoming
prince, a handsome football player in
uniform.
Lilly held court the next night in a
royal blue dress, her hair twisted into
an up-do. When the moment came to
dance, she offered her hands to the
prince. He looked at her sheepishly,
unsure what to do.
"That was awkward," Lilly said with
a smile and just the slightest bit of
world-weary exasperation.
It isn't easy being 16, social, smart
- and sitting in a wheelchair.
Lilly has never been completely
"normal" (quotation marks her
emphasis).
Afflicted with a mysterious form
of muscle weakness since infancy,
she has trouble walking, talking and
eating. It's hard for her to hold her
head up. At any moment, she might
fall forward, slumped, until one of
her parents lifts her back into posi-
tion, wedging her into place with an
ever-present pillow or two.
Because her speech can be difficult
to understand, she depends on text
messages and social media to gab
with her friends. Sleep eludes her.
Seizure-like fits rouse her at night,
bringing her parents running to her
bedside.
Perhaps worst of all, she spent most
of her childhood not really knowing
what was wrong with her.
Lilly and her parents wanted
answers even if the journey of
discovery would bring both hope and
heartbreak.
When scientists first assembled a
draft of the human genome in 2000,
they hoped sequencing technology
could revolutionize medicine by
revealing the genetic underpinnings
of all sorts of ailments.
Since then, the cost of reading the 3
billion DNA letter pairs that make up
a person's genetic blueprint has plum-
meted from hundreds of millions of
dollars to about $1,000. It used to take
months; now, technicians can get a
read in about a day.
As more people had their DNA
analyzed, scientists hoped, it might be
possible to find rare mutations that
caused poorly understood illnesses.
If doctors knew what genes were mak-
ing people sick, perhaps they could


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Lilly Grossman, 16, zips along a La Jolla, Calif., beach with her pet dog on Jan. 15, 2014. A few miles up the beach, scientists at Scripps Hospital
analyzed her genome and found two mutated genes that have made it all but impossible for the teenager to walk on her own or talk clearly.


treat illnesses in a more precisely
targeted way maximizing results
and avoiding side effects.
Gay and Steve Grossman, sick of
hearing doctors grasp at unconvinc-
ing explanations for their daughter's
woes, thought Lilly would be a perfect
candidate for sequencing.
When they heard in 2011 about
a study at the nearby Scripps
Translational Science Institute that
was using sequencing to find genetic
causes for mysterious illnesses, they
leaped at the chance to take part.
Lilly's neurologist at San Diego's
Rady Children's Hospital, Dr. Jennifer
Friedman, who has championed the
girl's efforts to understand and battle
what ails her, signed on to help with
the research.
The physician understood the
desire to get some answers but also
worried about how the process would
affect the family.
"I had no idea what we would find,"
she said. "I was concerned that be-
cause Lilly was so involved emotion-
ally, she'd be devastated if we found
nothing, or found something bad."
Once Lilly's DNA was sequenced,
the researchers found two suspicious
mutations, in genes called ADCY5 and
DOCK3. Scientists didn't know much
about either one.
Reading up in the scientific litera-
ture, Friedman saw that a small group
of people with mutations in one of the


same gene seeiled t,: iep,:,nd v\ell
to a drug called aicetaiz,:llnide \tei
talking it :\ei witl tli e (il,-, linii-l.
Friedmanii decided t[ piesc ibe it fi
Lilly
The hi t iiiglit u ;-ii tiei bible. but
within ai eelk tlie di ing liad diaiinit-
ically iinlpio,,ed Lill\'" sleep Sie oit-
longer :ke ait iiiglit \\itli better ie .t,
her strenigiTli aiid peecli n pio,,ed
She got ini -ies \, tlie Gii Sl in
said.
"I sta ited m\ iek\ sliakiil: inIedicai-
tion a n\eek a :, ;ild [IT-_. AC T]UALLY
WORKING'"''" site ioire i-i lhei blgi .
Lilly Gi,,lii Life
She pelnned ;i iioel. Thlie G(ill The\
Thouglit Tlhe\ Ne\ei Knie\. in i lu cli
a ficticiinil cliaiictei iaiined Lill\ lia,
her geni,-ie seqtuelced, taikes ai ne\
pill and becoiime, niiil mreal i:ei uniglit
When i i\ike uip :itn FiId;i\ m,1 ining,.
I feel diffeient I can't quite place
what feelk, diffeietr Iitil I l-tiitd iup


rti;-uglit Withoiut feellilg unstable I
tiptore into mir in piients' lo-in \\ait.
tiptoe;' 1 uuilall .,iuind like an ele-
plihant uunnin:g ilniugli the lihouse
In the bhook. Lil\ l eieti ritoi s.cli,,,l
inco-glit i. r-ii k e\victritllg leveltge ,oi
kids hlio'\e been nmein to lhei, and
gets ai bo\ iend
But withln neeks the ieal-life Lilk\
began healing ti,:uble opeiatlig lIei
phone, cmputip;el ild inIotnii Ized
hlieelclini lhei lifelines -, to tlhe
noi, Id
Fi iedmltla dialed bick -i tlire
nek ditlg. aind Lill\'s sleeple.ssne-.ss
leuinned
B\ loit Atngs-t, on t hle eve oif i
I:liog-ainticipaited i Itp to visit college.,
Lill\ wasi tmffeing isezume-like riein-
oi, isll mI glit Thlie episodes, caimne eteiv
10iinmmultes- Tilig saiien't;i ssimnple
;i -,one InIgli t aissumne." FiiedmaLil

TEEN 119


Speiaist i Moio


Hip, Knee, S SS *Shole on Rpaeet- rhocpcS urgery


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:Page 6


The Sun /Sunclay Fel:i nal y "2 "U 1


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com


I






The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7


* SMALL INCISION / NO STITCH CAT1.
LU
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With genetic testing,


patients can see the future


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ByALLIE SHAH
STAR TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS)

Denis Keegan was out of answers.
The 30-year-old was suffering from
kidney disease, but his doctors were
struggling to pinpoint the cause.
That's when Keegan turned to genetic
testing.
Doctors at the Mayo Clinic in
Rochester, Minn., extracted his DNA
from a blood sample and examined
his genome. There, embedded in his
genetic code, they discovered the
source of his kidney problems a
mutant gene. The finding led them,
at last, to a diagnosis: fibronectin
glomerulopathy, an extremely rare
kidney disorder. Armed with that
knowledge, his doctors were able to
tailor treatment for the condition.
"It was really reassuring," said
Keegan, 30.
The human genome was mapped
in 2003, revealing for the first time the
entire genetic makeup of our bodies.
Since then, genetic testing has be-
come a booming industry and an
option for patients, such as Keegan, to
learn more about their bodies' inter-
nal mysteries.
Advancements in the testing are
coming rapidly, slashing the price
and time it takes to get results. Just
as the X-ray machine made it possi-
ble to peer inside the human body,
genetic testing is changing the way we
diagnose and treat diseases.
Testing is available through
your doctor, or increasingly via
direct-to-consumer kits that can be
ordered online or purchased at a
drugstore. By the end of the decade,
Americans are expected to spend
as much as $25 billion a year on
genetic tests for everything from
diagnosing types of kidney diseases
to determining breast cancer risk to
screening prenatal health, according
to UnitedHealth.
But for some patients, genetic
testing represents a Pandora's box
that, if opened, could cause needless
anxiety among healthy people or sow
discord in families if one member's
test reveals troubling findings about
the family's genetic makeup.
"In terms of how we apply it to our
health, that's where the door has just
been opened," said Melissa Truelson,
a certified genetic counselor at the
University of Minnesota Medical
Center, Fairview.
To help navigate this brave new
world, we turned to those on the front
lines of this fast-evolving medical
technology:
What is genetic testing?
Genetic testing typically involves
looking at a person's genes or chro-
mosomes to help prevent, diagnose or
treat a disease. It also can be used to
determine whether a person is a carri-
er of a genetic disease and if there is a
risk of passing it on to their children.
Most often, the testing begins with
DNA collected from a blood sample,
but many labs also can get DNA from
a person's saliva.
Genetic testing jumped into the
spotlight last year when Angelina
Jolie, whose genetic test revealed a
high risk of developing breast cancer,
chose to undergo a double mastec-
tomy in the hopes of preventing the
disease.


"Everything our body does
functions off of genes," Truelson
explained. "When you think about
diseases, many of them have an
underlying genetic or inherited basis
to them."
How much does it cost, and does
insurance cover it?
The cost varies widely, from $99
at-home kits (such as the controver-
sial 23andMe) to thousands of dollars
for tests conducted at hospitals and
clinics. Pricing also varies depending
on what you are testing for, such as a
newborn screening or colon cancer.
Insurance coverage also is dictated
by the kind of testing and the indi-
vidual's plan. Typically, insurance
companies will cover tests that are or-
dered by doctors and usually involve
diagnosing a disease. Patients who
have a significant family history with
a particular disease tend to receive
coverage.
Direct-to-consumer genetic test
kits are not covered. Hundreds of
thousands of people have used
23andMe, which analyzes a segment
of a person's DNA sequence for
genetic alterations linked to cystic
fibrosis, sickle cell anemia and even
breast and ovarian cancer. But crit-
ics including the U.S. Food and
Drug Administration say the test
is limited in its ability to diagnose
health risks accurately and could lead
users to undergo unnecessary medi-
cal procedures. FDA officials recently
ordered 23andMe to halt marketing
its DNA test kits.
What can a test reveal?
For someone with a defined disease,
the use of genetic testing can be very
effective in determining what medi-
cines work best in treatment, doctors
say.
A 44-year-old woman with gall
bladder cancer is among the success
stories at the Mayo Clinic's Center
for Individualized Medicine, said
Dr. Alexander Parker, the center's
associate director. Her tumor was not
responding to the standard medicine
used to treat gall bladder cancer.
Through genetic testing, doctors
discovered that drugs used on leu-
kemia patients might work for her.
They tried it, and her tumor started to
shrink, Parker said.
But for healthy people, whom he
calls the "worried well," there is little
to no value in having your genome
mapped. It may cause harm by raising
anxiety about the odds of developing
a disease.
"At the end of the day, this is about
risk," Parker said. "While we all want
definitive answers to everything, the
beautiful thing about our world is
that there is random chance. Because
of that, we can never say 100 per-
cent that we know exactly what will
happen to anyone."
What factors should go into your
decision to get a test?
Parker encourages those curious
about genetic testing to have a con-
versation with their primary doctor
first. Ask: "Is there any value in this for
me?"
Genetic counselors also play a
key role in helping reach a decision.
They typically hold master of science
degrees in programs that include

GENES119


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


feelingfit.com











February marks age-related macular degeneration awareness month


By Dr. NEIL ZUSMAN
SPECIAL TO FEELING FIT

Macular degeneration often called
AMD (for age-related macular de-
generation) is a deterioration of the
macula which is the central part of
the retina at the back of the eye that
allows one to see fine details clearly
and perform activities such as reading
and driving.
AMD is the leading cause of vision
loss and blindness of Americans age
65 and older. Since older people rep-
resent an increasingly large percent-
age of the general population, vision
loss associated with AMD is a growing
problem. In 2004, it was estimated
that 1.75 million U.S. residents now
have significant symptoms associ-
ated with AMD, with the number
expected to grow to almost 3 million
by 2020. Approximately 10 percent of
patients 66 to 74 years old will have
findings of macular degeneration. The
prevalence increases to 30 percent in
patients 75 to 85 years of age.

Risk factors
Strong risk factors include aging,
smoking, and a family history of AMD.
Genes have also been discovered
which are strongly associated with
a persons risk for developing AMD.
Possible risk factors include exposure
to sunlight (especially blue light),
hypertension, cardiovascular risk
factors such as high cholesterol and
obesity, female gender, non-Hispanic
whites and far-sightedness. It should
be noted that African Americans are
much less likely to lose vision from
AMD than Caucasians.

Types of AMD
There are two basic forms of AMD:
"dry" AMD and "wet" AMD; 85-90
percent of AMD is the dry form. It
is caused by aging and thinning of
the tissues of the macula. Vision loss
is usually gradual. A primary lesion
appears to occur deep to the retina
with the deposits known as drusen.
Drusen are thought to be metabolic
by products that result over many
years from chemical reactions that
occur when light stimulates the
retina. Patients with dry AMD must
be monitored closely as the condition
may deteriorate in to wet AMD.
The wet form of AMD results when
abnormal blood vessels form under-
neath the retina. These new blood
vessels leak fluid or blood and blur
central vision. Vision loss may be
rapid and severe.

Signs and symptoms
AMD can cause different symptoms
in different people. The condition
may be hardly noticeable in its early
stages. Sometimes only one eye loses
vision while the other eye continues
to see well for many years. AMD
usually produces a slow or rarely
sudden painless loss of vision. Early
signs of vision loss can include seeing
shadowy areas in your central vision
or experiencing unusually fuzzy or
distorted vision.
Patients sometimes describe a dark
gray spot similar to the after affect
caused by a flash bulb. There may be
other changes in vision such as the
size of an object appearing different
for each eye or difference in colors
between the two eyes. These changes
in eyesight are important symptoms


and anyone who has such symptoms
should make sure they see an eye
doctor promptly.
Although AMD reduces vision in the
central part of the retina, it does not
affect the side or peripheral vision.
Therefore, AMD alone does not result
in total blindness. Even in more
advanced cases, people continue to
have some useful vision and are often
able to take care of themselves.

Diagnosing AMD
The diagnosis of dry AMD is made
on clinical findings alone by examina-
tion of the retinas using specialized
equipment. A simple vision test with
a chart that resembles graph paper
(Amsler Grid) can quickly assist the
physician to make a diagnosis of
AMD. When the physician suspects
wet AMD, a fluorescein angiogram
may be performed to look for leaky
or bleeding blood vessels beneath the
macula. There are also newer imaging
studies that can see beneath the
surface of the retina to assist in the
diagnosis of wet AMD. This technol-
ogy, known as Optical Coherence
Tomography (OCT), is quick and
painless.
Although the exact causes of AMD
are not fully understood, antioxidant
vitamins and zinc may reduce the
impact of AMD in some people.

Treatment options
The 10-year Age Related Eye
Disease Study (AREDS 1) found that
people with moderate to severe AMD
lowered their risk of progression by
about 25 percent when treated with
a high dose combination of beta
carotene, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and
zinc. Among those who have either no
AMD or very early AMD, the supple-
ments did not appear to provide an
apparent benefit.
Nutritional supplementation is
the primary treatment for dry AMD.
Consuming green leafy vegetables is
also thought to be beneficial. In 2013,
the results of the AREDS 2 indicated
that removing the beta carotene and
adding lutein as well as zeaxanthin
were even more beneficial in prevent-
ing progession of AMD.


Thlie tieatineni if eet ANIE) i i-, mie
cliallengiug Tiheweaie.. h,:,\evei, ne\\
exCtin glm ieaitinelntl- thit ci iiniite to,
eoe liii[iillv\. n\et AMID -)as ieaited
with lasei teanienw to ,,seal the leak\
bl,:,,id vesels _hiiotlii nul t-el\. ieait-
inein c;iiI pil,-dice c tiie- ii tIlie iet ;i
which aiie peiceiked a, blind sp,:,I b\
lhie p-iniein
I aiddiniii,. thlie lecuiieice iaite if
w\et AMID with l tn-, tieitieian IS ,-is
lli_, ;-. 70 peicein Ph'otoidvii-uhic
lheilap\ iPDfnTi ,,l\es, electing
inedhicie ini, t lie ipanien'e, \eil iand
lhell shlililin ;ii,-,leche ial l; i -ei light
illn thlie e\e t, piodice ;i clieuicail
ieaci ,-ieii \ivchi des tlvs tliedic i lo-ii-nili
blo,,d vess els ]-in, ile-ileinI i _nlie
plitectike t: tlie iheailthi v ietihaI l ti ue
c,:,mpaied to, thlie tiadi _-iial lasei




eiie~ tinei emeitndm~niii
eIS ii,-, v kile \ ii i ii t ;-i pl,-ite mi
nii-Vii-, vaScnlaii e dmi-thelie l giol-ih
fact,-i i \TGFi is, les.pmnsible tfi, the
pliilifeilatilii of ablolimal blood
Nessels tlldei the ietll-i ]-helPi-ie
l,_-,v iev ;-i1nti-\ (F C I edhic ,ii-,s t hat
cain be panlesshl\ injected into, the
eve to, mike tlie i1-,ni blood vessels
iegies,-, Tliese iev ledTica Ii_-,lS
m ;I\ sl-,I tlie -A ve i-,ual l l I,-,s i-,1
eveln le,_-tli VIS-,II _[tldies, with al1
]rui|tah;ble inmaitie telescope to:,


HERE IS \\ HERE....
N CIA C1111, Cnl,__ c Otls td c t '.,lldcOtlllmK ltct
d,,c liUI_'II' Occ,, .ll \% lhln Otl1 \\ ldll ,,i_'o_% lod,_'-C
\' oil 'ill filid SIJic-oI-Il-Jiccllm-ioloh n Jlld
dtJ 'noii tiic cqiii|?lin fi fom .\ C.i dcnikil miccd


FILE PH,-.T-..
pl,-vide mII;igiiihncitioII o-i paineiis
wili A NE)ID min\ pive o, be beiiehcihil
Rese-iicli t ,_ develop aiit ihciil ietil;is
;ind methods ,-. ,iinilitnlaiii the ietnia
fti tlih-,e -w li imaictilii degeiieiaini,_ii
ace iii"Ieai-i11_,
hlive, lgtci; it_ ithl ,v 11 ;-i a inholal
11ht,-,l e ietllnu;-i i ci hchlp lvhh i IS-
iinplanied tlmdei the ietiai lihia sli -1vii
tha[t ,miiiillalt lheahhlthl\ ietlal cells
caii lentlOie $Olnl e \i i.i n t i tlo-,e witli
\ IM ) L,,k\ Vlil-,iI device f-i paitietii
witli ANID cian alk-s, be ei\ hlielpful
\\ tlh lie use i.f iI.;iII I in i devices
withl biit ^light. patieiint fiequiienl
c 1i ) ee betei I1 aiddini,-,l., ,-,l e
devices L;-IiI i hl 11t 1m ;1_e ,_-tl h e ,_-f
the ceiiiil blind .pit to the peiipli-
eiy\ to allow: \ panlewSt[,-, see better
Theie ma\ als,-, be a ,,le t,:it suigei\
mi paeiiten li\\h .IDE) In one [\-pe of
uigei \. thlie abhiiimi al blhd vesselk
aild hbl-d cli-,s tideiiieaihtli hlie ietnia
ace iemnoed A.ilihei t \pe iof,suig:ei\
called mi ;-i't ll;- [ii i-Ii _'iii-dlo I II ;i [tii-
all\ imolles imovig aind epaiating
damilaged tiS, tle fi1'inh lieailtlih \ iS. e ;1
ai vn\ ti- pieseive vitlial fuIiici_-,II
ZilSiliMil ^i i[lL'SOW WLiliiil W o Wll[l l-
IIilog0ai7 Zisiiiiiiu EyO Uic (Oi
oL'Wh / Wi .:_.: T7i111ni im T n l. ti/cA.
['Ni f(hailUuo Foi iiMOoi liWiifiuiWI.
call W 41-i4'- 43011


Standing L to R: Malcolm Kerslemn. DDS. Roberi
Coseo. DDS. Ashley Reynolds. DMD. Tim Palmer
DDS. Richard Gelder. DMD. Sitting L to R: John
Waters. DMD, Joseph Bender. DMD A


PANTHER HOLLOW

DENTAL LODGE


192401) Quesnda Avenue
Port Chanlotte, FL 33948
(941) 743-7435


v"r. !I-*.R I llt0 .
1I% f r r I I. I I ,: F
wwwv.Pant heirHollowDenlal.com


:Page 8


The Sun /Sunclay Fel:.i al y 2 ,2U 4


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com










Keeping children safe from burns


Provided by
BAYFRONT HEALTH PORT CHARLOTTE

Most everyone knows the im-
portance of fire safety- especially
when it comes to children but
did you know that children are more
likely to sustain burn injuries from
hot liquids or foods?
According to the American Burn
Association, most burn injuries
happen at home during preparation
or serving of hot food or drinks, or
from exposure to hot tap water in
bathtubs or showers. Among chil-
dren ages 4 and under hospitalized
for burn-related injuries, more than
half are treated for scalding.
The good news is that parents can
prevent scald injuries from happen-
ing by making some simple envi-
ronmental and behavioral changes
at home. Feb. 2-8 is Burn Awareness
Week and CuddleBugs at Bayfront
Health Port Charlotte would like to
share some burn-prevention tips to
help keep your family safe.
Young children are particularly
vulnerable to scald injuries because
their thinner skin burns more quick-
ly than an adult's. People of all ages
can be burned in about 30 seconds
by a liquid that's 130 degrees; at 155
degrees, it only takes a second to
cause a third-degree burn coffee,
tea and hot chocolate are often
served at this temperature or hotter.
For children younger than 5, these
temperatures can cause a burn in
even less time.


In addition, the proportion of
a child's body that's exposed to a
scalding liquid is also greater that
spilled cup of coffee will burn a
much larger percent of a small child's
body than if it was spilled on an
adult. Children are also more suscep-
tible to scalding because they don't
understand that hot liquids can burn
just like fire. As they grow and are
able to reach new things each day,
it's important to assure that they're
safe from potential scald dangers.
Tap-water scald injuries are com-
mon among young children and
are often more severe than cook-
ing-related burns, according to the
American Burn Association.
Scalds typically occur when the
child is left unattended in the bath-
room, even briefly. Burns can occur
in water that's too hot, when another
child turns on the hot water, or when
a child falls into the tub. To prevent
injuries, the health care profession-
als at Bayfront Health Port Charlotte
recommend the following tips:
*The safest temperature for bath-
ing is 100 degrees. When filling the
tub, run cold water first, then hot,
and turn off the hot water first when
filled this can prevent scalding if
a child falls in while the tub is filling.
Check the temperature using your
wrist, elbow and back of your hand
before placing the child in the tub.
The water should be warm, not hot.
*Set your water heater's thermostat
to 120 degrees or lower. In addition,
consider installing anti-scald or


tempering devices. These devices
offer added protection from danger-
ously hot tap water.
*Provide constant supervision of
young children while they're bath-
ing. Make sure you have everything
you need within arm's reach before
you place the child in the tub so
there's no need to leave him or her
unattended.
*Use knob covers on faucets for
extra protection. In addition, face the
child away from the faucets so he or
she will be less likely to fiddle with
them.
"Scald injuries can be extremely
painful and often require prolonged
treatment, and can even result in
lifelong scarring," said Dr. Nay Hoche
of Comprehensive Women's Health
Care. "Following safe-bathing tips,
providing adequate adult super-
vision, and creating a safe home
environment are the best ways to
protect children from scalding-relat-
ed injuries."
Meal-time and cooking-related
injuries are common among young
children since they can easily knock
over containers of hot food or
beverages, pull on tablecloths, or
grab pot handles or appliance cords.
These burns can be deeper because
of higher temperatures or can stick
to the skin longer in the case of
hot foods. In order to create a safe
kitchen and dining environment, you
should:
*Establish a safe zone in the
kitchen area. Make sure children are


at least three feet away from cooking
hazards and can play safely while
being supervised. *Consider high
chairs or play enclosures to keep
them safely contained.
Inspect countertops for hazards.
Are there any cords hanging down
or pot handles facing outward that
tiny hands can grab easily? Anything
that's hot or has the potential to be
pulled down should be placed far out
of reach.
*Use nonslip place mats on dining
tables. Rather than using a tablecloth
that can be pulled easily, nonslip
place mats are a better choice. Put
hot items in the center of the table,
at least 10 inches away from the
edge.
*Never hold hot items while car-
rying a child. A quick or unexpected
movement can easily send hot food
or liquid spilling onto your child.
Keeping children away from open
flames, furnaces, fireworks and other
burn hazards is common knowledge,
but protecting children from scald
injuries is less obvious. Exposure
to hot liquids can present a serious
danger to children, so it's important
to rid the environment of potential
hazards and practice safe behaviors
to prevent injuries.
Remember that this information
is not intended to replace the advice
of your doctor, but rather to increase
awareness and help equip patients
with information and facilitate
conversations with your physician
that will benefit your health.


I~ PIMARY CARE LA B SERV1 ICE A D[IO~LOGY I A G NO[TIC S 9I r URG ENT ~~ ~Ci ~ i~ :b1[AREii 9 ]PHYS: ~ICALTHEAPY9 IABTSEUAION MEI CA[gAESTHEICS I [Aw*1i


feeling ill?


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Open Monday through Friday
from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.





MiLLENNiUM
SJ PHYSICIAN GROUP

www.MillenniumPhysician.com


Port Charlotte, Florida 33952

941-629-2900


ii
.1


0


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 9


feelingfit.com


......... ... ,











Stress can be as contagious as germs


By JEFF STRICKLER
,. ,1 1o I i i i 1N i, ,, i

Debia Stafvie a ,ta .iidiiing I1i line
waiting ,,, lidei luiincli h lien slie iai,
hit by a suddeiin i\ae of aiin\iet\
"Theie xasi- io lea,-lii t,,i miie ,,, be
triggered iliht xa,\, -slie s-,id Tlien
I noticed rlie peil,,iin iII filing, ,if me
She waI, itteii nIIg ,:0 bIdlk h,liakiiig
so badlh. hliar I ia' i esp'niidiiig to-
her stie, ;aiid Id1 didn't eeii talk aI
her."
Her expeilieiice i'as no, I siiiitiikal
Secoiidliaiild Sriee teiioi ii liait
we pick up fi'inm tlie people ;and
activities aiu'iid us i i, ; I;Itii;ial
defense inecliaiii'sin hliatl helped keep
our ancetli, ali\e, said [)i Ainti
Sood, an- e\peit n Sities t tlie :Ia\,'
Clinic But as, :,,:,1 as, ie pick uip tliat
tensioii,. ve i isk betec:iniiig caili eil,.
passing it iIn ,:, ain\ fiieiind,, tfaiil
member '1 c'-,''ikei, ;-ind. \e,.
even stiaiigeil, ilio ive eiico''iiitel
"Stres ,, tiavels I, s -,oci;il iiet-
works". lie ,aid It i, ilglil\, lgiil\
contagilo ,"
Fortliiitelh fi S-if ie. ;a f,:i iin ei
nurse ;aiid f'tuiindei of, Saite C;-it;-l\,t,
a Richfield. Niiiii -based c,:inpaii\
focusiniig :n pei,:niial aiid gil:,up
energy niiiiiageiene, l. lie quiickl\
realized elieie liei slpiise ;-iixiet\
was coiniig fi- ;inaiid ;ai, ablee to-
move ;aI\\;IV fi' 'i it, -'LiIce
"It's kind ,t like a tLiiiing :folk. -,lie
said of sec:niidai\ ensiin W\ lien
you hit a Uiiiiig folk. evei\ rtliiiig
around it s ,;- i b ;iti g nitli it lt',s
the same tliiiig ritli Sriels If Siels i,
a veryS,-tioig vibiatio-,l -il-iiid v\o,_L.
you're go,-i,,g t -, ;ait iea;ctiiig ,-, it
The ii t t-it:lia, seciitdliaiild Siess
has on i, lia ,;i -,I l\ ieceiil\ beeii
appreciated b\ ps,\cli'ologist,. s-ad
Dr. Beieiidiliia Niiii-i. c,-,'t-iiitdei
of the Ceeii tfi C,,unsiel-ng ;idt
Stress NIa;iagelneirt. i lh ,itli 'fhce, iII
Minneapoli,, aiid Nliiiiinetoinka. Miiiii
"It's beei l _-,II I lie ;la i,t 10 \eaiI,
that the topic liah, beeii e\ploied iII
much deptli. slie said Tlieie liaiii't
been eii,:,lgli iese;aicli kii', ;-iall dlie
answer ;iba-,it ecoldliaid Stess "
Doctli-,I dt-' kiil',-,I liait Stess i
small di:e i es,,eitiall\ a goo'd
thing, Sooid -id It', pairt f tlie
body's ;-aiuiiing ,\,tem hliait ciearte,
the figlit-oi,-fliglit i, lespo,'ne aind gein-
erates a ulige ,:, enieigv liai hlielp,
us deal mill ;aI cili" But e\cessi\ve ''1
prolonged Stess caii lead r hliealtli
issues iaiigigig fio-n hlieadaclie, e,,,
heart pi oblems,


Piotectrig 'loneself fi in, secoliitd-
liauind Sltess blegmin, wivli idetiiri -
mig it, cau- ses. s;utid Da;i;i K-idue.
,i', iiei ,of Life FlI,:,' Coaicliuig iin
Nlhmiieap,:,hs
Thlie hiSt step s a-\ilieness f thlie
tliigs ailtiiitld mIe rliar-i cieare Stless
il u\ life." ,aid Kadue. ixi, rl teaclie,
a class called Fi',inm Striess t \\ell-
BePigi tfi lhe Paitlhxa\s Nluieaipol,
lieail leie-,luice celei t're ;iall ab'oit
"elf-;-ivaieie "es, dtlScivco 11ei g vilieu tlie
Sl.tess Sli'In"V up "
Start tlie iiierig;ai- l vii ih liv'h,-,sC
ai-uiid at thlie tine, suggested S,:,:d.
xIh-,:, lmte the lecenth published
The a\' Cl(iitc (Guide t, Stess-
Fiee Living"
Nlain\ f us i, liae paitiieis., su-
pe vis,' i". colleague, '1 ne'iiegliblo'i"
axli, aie stiess-pilv'kimg." lie s;id
H,:,x d, I liec,:guize tliese peopled'
Tliese aie thlie people I feel judged
bI too much I feel ;ai'luioS hliei
I'm mineeriig them I riV to ;iaid
bemi'g withi thli em I hiid thl iese people
Uiipiedicrable Tlie \ ofteii liave hugli
e\pectaiins ;amid I feel like I liave t,
be pei fect rwlri thltem. tlie\ aie \ei\
lgid A d I've ,_-,ftel, oU d tlaIit ;in \
of tliese people lia\e diffeiet minial
valueses li,;ain mine


Oince V,,u've ideitnhed the pi,,blem
people, v\, ,IIliave rliiee bam-icc c,-luises
- facril-, 'ii \o caii cliaiige t liemN 'ili
c;aii get aav fiinm thliemC O(i vu c;-ii
le;aimin t,, pitect v,:uiself fi inm thliem
The hilSt tr: hliae Immuited appli-
cabilm v A peis,:n ii might be opeii
col'iiiuctIve ctimrimcI ;ibit tr lieii
belihavioi,, but it must be piesented
it ;I av;i\ thli doesn, 't put triem
-i trlie defensive. S,,,td S;aid Evei
thlien. tlieie's n,: gu;Ii;-itee tlie\ 'II be
ies poiisive
As to ,i getting aixa\ fiinm thlie
ii I;i r t. rlir ii-'s n al ; x;i\s ;a \viable ,',p-
tio-ii. eithliei. especiall\ f oi ,lsme-liie
'"i:se Stless IS collmling flo1 ;i 'in o
,i1 c,:-ixvikei In ;1i aob thliee\ don't alie
the hn;i-mcial xvIehe itlilt to leave
\\Whiuclih b lIgs us t tlie tlid
,optioin leai1immig lio, tio avi,'id tifallming

StieSS lesihelice is s,_-,lerlimmig ive
t;aiI i\,_-,ik --11.-" Kaidue s;uId I',s abouti
lesp,-ldii ig ,-, tlie Stess iriei t lih;i
ie;acmig ,o it "
Botli Kaidue aitd S;aif ie lec-,l'nemitd
hilndng s',,nmetliing suppo, irie it
c;aii be ;ai phtgiapli. a Imein-i\
,-i ;-,ii 'object like a bracelet thliat
gelieiates pleasaint tlihuglits thliat
all,:,x\ \,:,u t,-, gi1,:und v\,ouiselt du ing


FILE PH,-.T,-..
;a SIleS- ilidiuic'g ,-itIuarilii
S,;-\ iI I r '- c i i h iri it -, vi _,l'ie ii,
Ilt il t lieii eieigv. S;iafvie -,aid If
\1ou lia;ie ;a clifi'nt -irlr l, tell \,_-I -
"elf. I'm iio g' iig o ;-ill'o' rli r-,
liia ppen '"
I ii hs b,:,k. S.,:,d ,:utline, a im ir-
bei ,of c,,piig umecliaisu11uns"
Oiie ',f lithem i lar, t \o u caii
Iil,-igllle \, ,illelf \emIlg el rei ;a
Tell'n ,i1 Vehia klci' \et. hlie ,aid If
it'n \ Velci-, e\el \ hli 1i'g li, r, tlii 's -,Vi
at \oiu will stick But if it', Tel -ll,.
evei\trliig hlide", off So if \ou hklive
t li,, a e a c,-'iifi' ir-r i, 'i i tih ;ia
Sriess-itldicel ci. mike Stue v\o-- lihake
\ oiii Te1-:ll' vesr o1i, \YoLI ca;i'tIr gi\e
thliat pei-iin thlie ke\ t ,,iii liiheait "
The s,-,uice f thlie stess, i-s not
ali\a\s, a pei,onii. Numlai-i s;aud
S',-lmeinmel l Jt .alknig ini, 'a place
trlia I eL. et up Slulai r-il to, 'ii e lieie
\v,: had a r i e",flsul expei ieiice iill dt:
it,." slie said el it0 c,1uhl be ; sUdd
,'i1 smell riiggeuing tlie ie;ictol,-'.
Kad Lie S- tId
\\e cai bhe trmallh obl t' -isI ,- ,
v -liait'r ciaulig thlie Stles.s S-ii lie
, taid It' ;ill ;-ibt i It nves,tg;- ig P;ai\
aitteliii it-,o li''- l \V 'ie lespillidllig
Aild \v,, liha\e o,,r be vei\ b-,eia;irt
ab',irt xh liatr liappeimng at thlie time


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:Page 10CI


The Sun /Sunclay Fel:.i al y 2 "u 4


www.sunnewspapers.net


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The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 11


I

Socs ingou ewnae


We are now Southwest Florida Heart Center.
You've known us as Peace River Heart Institute, offering patients the
latest technology in cardiac care. As an Accredited Chest Pain Center,
we provide extensive cardiac services, including open heart surgery,
with the finest cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons and clinical
care team. All with hands of experience.
All that is still true. It's just our name-not our quality of care-that
has changed. The fact is, word spread quickly about the level of skills
and services we were making available, and patients are coming from
all over the region for our care. We hope our new name will welcome
even more individuals with heart issues to our facility.
For a physician referral, call 941-637-2497
or visit BayfrontPortCharlotte.com.


Tour our Mega Heart on Friday,
February 7, from 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
Huge. Inflatable. Interactive. What a great
opportunity to step inside the human
heart-to see the complex anatomy,
follow cardiovascular functions, learn
about heart disease and discover the latest
medical treatments. For a limited time, it's
front and center, right outside the entrance
to the Southwest Florida Heart Center


Bayfront Health Port Charlotte is proud to support the
American Heart Association's My Heart. My Life. initiative.

. American
Heart My Heart. My Life.
Associations


Bayfront Health
Port Charlotte
2500 Harbor Boulevard Port Charlotte, FL 33952
BayfrontPortCharlotte.com


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 11


feelingfit.com


-r"










Designing a weight-resistance training program


ByTED ROBEDEE
CULTURAL CENTER OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY
Many of our clients at the Fitness
Salon tell us that they want to regain
strength and flexibility; as personal
trainers, we need to help them devel-
op a weight-resistance program that
meets their individual needs.
Before any weight training, it is nec-
essary to warm up for approximately
10 minutes; using a stationary bike,
treadmill, elliptical or rowing machine
for this warm up is ideal. Once the
warm-up is completed, the stretching
phase begins. The stretching should
involve all of the major muscle
groups. Stretching promotes better
flexibility and balance, and decreases
the chances of injuries like a pulled
muscle.
After warming up those muscles,
we begin the resistance a program
that will target all of the major muscle
groups the legs, back, shoulders/
arms, abdomen and chest. For the
beginner or someone who has been
living a sedentary lifestyle, the first
few sessions will start off with light
weights and usually one set of 8-15
repetitions. After the first week or two,
more repetitions will be added. The
muscles at this point are primed to
add exercises that specifically work
the client's target areas.
After each work out, there should be
a cool down period. Riding a station-
ary bike at a gentle pace or walking
on a treadmill will do the trick. Follow
this by stretching those major muscle
groups again to avoid muscle tighten-
ing and muscle cramps.
Weight resistance should be done
every other day when possible, two to
three days a week. Never should the
same muscle group be worked two
days in a row. Muscles need 48 hours
to recover and rebuild.


As always, check with your physi-
cian before you begin any exercise
program.
Weekly weight loss results
Team name, percentage lost
Animal Lovers, 2.24
A Weigh We Go, 3.51
Beauty And The Beast, 3.46
Busy Bees, 3.38
Canam, 1.2
Canucks, 3.89
Carb Dodgers, 3.23
Charlies Crew, -0.25
Charlotte County Fatties, 4.09
Diet Divas, 4.07
Dogs Rule, 4.67
Gems By Design, -1.23
Happy Sisters, -0.92
Keweenaw Couple, 1.33
Las Vegas Crappers, 3.83
Leasee Losers, 3.26
Lefty T's, 1.41
M & M, 3.05
Mick And Moxie, 2.90
Misfits, 2.30
One More Time, 1.56
On Maigri, 3.26
Quest For Success, 5.73
Remedy, 2.3
Rice Girls, 1.8
Second Time Around, 0.22
Sexy P J's, 2.46
Sibling Rivalry, 1.13
Size Ten Again, 1.79
The Birds, 2.68
The Dumbells, 0
The Girls, -0.28
The New Us, 0.46
The Spice Girls, 3.17
Two Peas In A Pod, 4.11
Young Robins, 1.24
Ted Robedee is the manager for the
Fitness Salon at the Cultural Center of
Charlotte County. He can be reached
at 941-625-4175, ext. 263, orfitness@
theculturalcentercom.


LUNG CANCER SUPPORT


.2-3 p.m. the third Wednesday of every month at Sarasota Memorial
Emergency Room and Health Care Center, 2345 Bobcat Village Center
Road, North Port (off Toledo Blade Boulevard). For information, contact
Marc at 941-240-8989 or marcscohen@aol.com.

.2-3 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month at Charlotte Regional
Medical Plaza, fourth floor. The plaza is located next to Charlotte
Regional Medical Center, at 713 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda.
For more information, call 941-637-9575.


IF.


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*! / ,:i'


I


FILE P H ,.T ,..


S2014


V PHYSICIAN &

MEDICAL GUIDE


It.


The New Physician

& Medical Guide

Publishes Sunday, March 16, 2014

Your Community is
Constantly Changing

BE SURE YOU CAN

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Executive
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Anthony Feroce (941) 258-9527
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Venice (941) 207-1000


:Page 12


The Sun /Sunday, February 2 21 14


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com











Organic milk may be good, but there are limits on its benefits


ByTAMAR HASPEL
SPECIAL To THE WASHINGTON POST

A recent study comparing the kinds
of fat in organic and conventional
full-fat milk concluded that, by
drinking organic milk, consumers
could help reduce or eliminate "prob-
able risk factors for a wide range of
developmental and chronic health
problems."
The benefit was attributed to the
quantity of two kinds of fats, omega-6
and omega-3, and the ratio between
them. The research paper made the
case that there are health benefits
to lowering the ratio decreasing
omega-6 intake and increasing
omega-3 and that drinking organic
milk helps do that.
Largely funded by the organic milk
industry and published in December
in the journal PLOS One, the study
was heralded as evidence that organ-
ic whole milk has a heart-healthy fat
profile, primarily because it contains
higher omega-3 levels than conven-
tional milk. Do the math, though, and
you'll find that you would have to
drink 5 1/2 gallons of full-fat organic
milk to equal the omega-3 content of
one eight-ounce piece of salmon.
There are good reasons to buy
organic dairy. USDA organic stan-
dards require that the cows graze
outdoors, on pasture, for as long as
the grazing season allows, that they
be kept in uncrowded conditions
with opportunity to exercise and that
their manure be managed to avoid


contaminating soil, water or crops.
The animals also are raised without
antibiotics, a practice that reduces
the risk of antibiotic-resistant infec-
tions in humans.
But the idea that the fat profile of
organic milk makes it a better choice
for broad health reasons than con-
ventional milk is difficult to support.
At issue, first, is the evidence for
the importance of the two kinds of
polyunsaturated fats omega-6 and
omega-3 and the ratio between
them.
Omega-6 fats come primarily from
vegetable oils and are essential to
normal body functioning, but high
levels of them may promote inflam-
mation, which is linked to heart
disease and other health problems.
Omega-3s come in two flavors:
long-chain and short-chain. Long-
chain omega-3 fatty acids eicos-
apentaenoic (EPA), docosapentae-
noic (DPA) and docosahexaenoic
(DHA) come mainly from fish and
are generally associated with lower
disease risk. The primary short-
chain omega-3 is alpha-linolenic
acid (ALA), which comes from plant
sources such as walnuts and flax,
and is converted by the body to
long-chain. Experts generally believe
it to be less important because only
a small part of the ALA we eat gets
converted.
Because omega-6 and omega-3 fats
are metabolized by the same enzyme,
some experts theorize that when
high levels of omega-6 fats hog that


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enzyme, there's not enough of it to
convert ALA to long-chain omega-3s.
Although some studies support the
importance of the ratio, many health
authorities are skeptical
Alice H. Lichtenstein, director
of the Cardiovascular Nutrition
Laboratory at the Research Center
on Aging at Tufts University, says,
"The bulk of the evidence suggests
the absolute amount of omega-3
fatty acids, rather than the omega-6/
omega-3 ratio," is what correlates to
better health.
Three reviews of the importance of
the ratio in cardiovascular disease,
published in different journals,
concluded that "the ratio is, both on
theoretical and evidential grounds,
of little value," that it is "not a useful
concept" and that it is "of no value
in modifying cardiovascular disease
risk."
Dariush Mozaffarian, an associate
professor of medicine and epide-
miology at the Harvard School of
Public Health, says that the evidence
for the ratio's importance just isn't
there: "One cannot find any series
of systematic evidence from human
studies that shows that the 'ratio' is
significantly associated with poor
health outcomes when omega-3 lev-
els are high i.e., when the 'ratio' is
not simply driven by low omega-3s."
The milk study does not provide
conclusive evidence of the ratio's
importance. Of the 19 studies refer-
enced to back up the health claims
about the ratio, only a few showed
a direct correlation between a lower
ratio and a better outcome. Most oth-
ers focused on omega-3 levels. One,
which the study cited as evidence
that a lower ratio decreases risk of
diabetes, concludes that "Omega-6
and omega-6:omega-3 ratio were not
associated with incidence of type 2
diabetes."
Charles Benbrook, lead author of
the milk study, agrees that "there's
no consistent pattern of whether the
omega-6:omega-3 ratio is a statis-
tically significant driver of health
outcomes. In some studies it is, in
some it isn't." He says that getting
people to increase their intake of
foods high in omega-3 fats is the bet-
ter-supported goal, but he remains
persuaded that lowering omega-6 fats
at the same time, particularly if they
are high to begin with, "is better than
just increasing omega-3," given the
issue of omega-6 hogging the enzyme
necessary for the metabolization of

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omega-3.
The second issue with focusing on
ratio is that, even if you accept that
both strategies increasing ome-
ga-3s and increasing omega-3s while
decreasing omega-6s are good for
health, many foods allow you to do
both more effectively than drinking
many glasses of organic whole milk.
Of milk's omega-3 content, the
study says, "based on recommended
servings of dairy products and sea-
foods, dairy products supply far more
ALA than seafoods, about one-third
as much EPA, and slightly more DPA,
but negligible DHA."
That suggests that dairy is almost
as good a source of omega-3 fats
as fish, but the critical phrase is
"based on recommended servings."
Because the federal government's
Dietary Guidelines for Americans
recommend three dairy servings per
day but only eight ounces of fish per
week, the paper compares 21 cups
of organic milk (for a weekly total) to
eight ounces of fish.
But a serving-for-serving compar-
ison puts organic milk's fat profile in
a different context. An eight-ounce
glass of organic whole milk has 0.078
grams of omega-3s (compared with
0.048 for conventional milk), most
of it ALA. An eight-ounce serving of
salmon has 6.82 grams of omega-3s,
or the amount in 88 cups of milk.
Compare that milk to walnuts, a rich
source of ALA, and you find that a
one-ounce serving of shelled walnuts
has 2 1/2 grams of ALA, which is as
much as 2 1/2 gallons of organic
milk.
(The U.S. Dietary Guidelines
recommend that people stick to fat-
free or low-fat milk and other dairy
products, but such forms of milk have
negligible amounts of omega-3 fats.)
A tablespoon of flaxseed has 2.3
grams of omega-3 fats. A dozen oys-
ters have about a gram, depending on
the variety. Two omega-3 eggs (from
chickens fed high-omega-3 diets) can
have over a gram.
Buying organic dairy products can
safeguard the treatment of cows and
encourage agricultural practices that
benefit human and environmental
health. And, although concerns about
hormone, antibiotic and pesticide
levels haven't been borne out by
research, many consumers feel more
comfortable with organic for that
reason. But, if omega-3s are what
you're after, there are better ways to
get it than organic milk.


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 13


feelingfit.com


C LINIC]











Smoothies are not always so nutritious


By AMANDA MASCARELLI
SPECIAL To THE WASHINGTON POST

Like many people, I've long wanted
to overhaul my eating habits and
shift to a diet that includes more
fresh vegetables and fewer processed
foods. But as a mother of three young
children, I have found this to be chal-
lenging. It's too easy to fall back on
carb- and meat-heavy recipes. So the
idea of getting vegetable nutrients -
including those found in such greens
as kale, spinach and Swiss chard in
pureed juice or smoothie form is
appealing. But are these popular
drinks an effective way for your body
to get what it needs?
They can be, experts say, but liquid
greens shouldn't take the place of
whole fruits and vegetables. Also,
what is in the smoothie makes a big
difference. Some smoothies might
be an adequate meal substitute;
others are more of a healthful snack.
In some cases, these drinks are just
a glorified dessert. "There's a huge
spectrum of how filling and nutri-
ent-dense you can make smoothies,"
said certified clinical nutritionist
Gena Hamshaw, author of the
Choosing Raw blog.
For instance, a smoothie of ba-
nanas with a few leaves of spinach is
fit for a snack, whereas a smoothie


made from banana blended with al-
mond milk, a cup of fresh spinach or
kale, a tablespoon of almond butter,
a bit of brown rice protein powder
and some berries could serve as an
adequate meal replacement.
"Having a balance of carbs, fat and
protein is important to building any
kind of healthy meal," Hamshaw said.
Some good sources of healthful fats
include avocados, hemp seeds and
nut butters. Protein options include
chia seeds, protein powders such as
those made from brown rice or yellow
peas, and flaxseed. Fruit provides
healthful carbohydrates, and diets
rich in fruit and vegetables have been
linked with lower body mass index,
reduced risk of Type 2 diabetes and
reduced risk of heart disease and
mortality.
Still, people too often make the
mistake of replacing breakfast or
lunch with a smoothie or juice that
doesn't have enough nutrients,
Hamshaw said. "Then they're more
likely to seek out foods that... aren't
healthy or to go overboard with
dinner and crave foods that are much
heavier."
Moreover, even though smoothies
contain the pulp and fibers of fruits
and vegetables, consuming those
foods whole is generally more nutri-
tious and filling than drinking them


ai liquid C-lihewnig aiind digesting
Wih,:le f ,d,, 4Ion\ ;-iIId mtahilizes the
enti\ of i iimutiiet inti, the bl,':d-
stie;iin iild helps keep iiiulli aild
otiei holi InI-, liie balanced. s.aid Diavid
Kaitz. ,fo-tdi g diiect,-,i ,the Yaile-
G iinii Pie eiiitliio Reseaiicli Ceiitei
;iid autihli of Di -)leasie-Piooo The
Rei;ii kiable Ti utli Ah bout \\ihait iake
lU, \\ell "
\\-i\ e;itiii, the sime -iin,-uiirt
-A ,--,-d Il hli,:,le foi, n i lmigh ct c Ib
ltiiigei Iie_-i thalii xhlie it iS blended
s ;-I Ia l-IJoI que t,_-,llon III o[,-,,-,d -cslelce.
said B;- I h a i Rolls a I L tIItI1:,n pIo -fe,
SOa at PelilS\ l\allla State [_ih\ei lt\
;I Id a-iltII,_-,l o-,[f tiIe\V,-,hlllmetI Ihc diet
book- seilies In1 ;-i 2-00'1 tud\. Rolls
;and c,,-authloi Wlhe Flood-()bb)ag
f,:uiid tliihat tud\ p-iilicipa-III vlio
aite ai \liole ipple ,a1 ai Iilt c,,uI e
co'iiluined 1 peiceiir fe[ ei cailii es
tliio:ugliult thie ineail cinp.iied
withli tlio-e li,:, dite :Inh the tet ineail.
w lieieasi people \ hI,: ate aipplesauice
bef[,le lhel i11,111 meal reduced
cal,:,i ie itaike b\ 6 peicent. di ikiiig
apple juice wtli ,0i --hitliuit bhhei did
iiot liie ai ineaistuiiahle effect ,-,i cail,-
lie iiiake (Othiei Studies lihiae c-ine t,-,
-itih con li-m o -, iltlio :)gli -e eiil
Slllll-II AulhlIOllS. ah,:ughse~eial
]lav~e sungges.ted tha~t sunch \;-~iibles. a1s
c,_,np -,'ltl',_ ,,f iiu tiieltu III tihe ,food
souice. ti1uiigi f thle f,-d 0-1 liquid
iitike. aid IIiddiVidtuial diffeieiices inl


ih imln''ie-. lmiglht pla\ ;i inclie imp'-lit-
aint iole in liiungei tuppieSuil' thain
tle phli icil I I in o-A trle food
StiRll. Rolls sad. inf,,t oi us ;iie not
eatiig eiinough fli i aniid \egetalhle.
'-, if Nl_-,,_-thliue aiie eic-tluil;-ig ig peo-
pie t,:, eait moinle tit aiid \egetaibles.
tlie\ ie keeping the othiei Uigiedients
piett liealtli\ nd thie\lie ndui g
thlien at.i-viiig. tIlnik thliiat could be
ai goo:d tilung -
IUnlike sumootlue., gieein ijuice aiie
ustuaill\ ti ipped of pulp aind hhbei.
m;ikiglen them t;ii les-., tii tlri -,l ;u-iid
lest, hllllllg. Katz sahd
\Whole fiult aiid \ egetaihle aiie
ChIIo ice A." lie ,aId. bhut the :gieeii
un'-',tl_,ue i, ;-i ptiett\ goo,,d Clihice B "
Tli-, i, i tiLe epeciall\ if un'-_-,tlie5
aiie diplaicimg ,omnetlig ;ufii le-,, iiu-
trnItou-,. like ;i sodai I ,111 iu lieuinhliful
S,;iick -,I ifli the aie lielpuig people
\oi,'d skipplig imeal,
I i\ cae. aiftei In\ clieaipie blenid-
ei hil,-ke d_ 1-, ii. in\ liutlhiid aiid I
decided to fo:lk ,_-\i tei tlie imoneV ,,I ;-i
hgli-po,,eied blended that \wil ;lillo,
u, to blend tiluts ;-ild \egetables
wItli inc'ie ,Af tlie itutiielt-deilse pulp
;ild hheils ili'ude ituclii a puieaipple
coie, ;iand kivi i kmi i I d'iit kii', if
sumnl'ltliieh, ill become ;i dail\ f\tuie
IA ;-Ill, o C;-eIDA;U-1i r ,IiIck. but evel ;i
te\ sips, of kale 01:, -I pl;i-icli [ ;-i ,goo,,d
pla ce t,:, t[IIt


Folic acid is important, but avoid excessive intake


By the EDITORS
ENVIRONMENTAL NUTRITION NEWSLETTER

An adequate amount of folic acid
is vital to achieve optimal health.
Folic acid is the synthetic form of
folate, a water-soluble B vitamin that
supports cell production, including
hair, skin and nail growth, and may
protect against anemia, as well as
cancer and neurological and cardio-
vascular diseases.
Folic acid occurs naturally in foods,
such as legumes, dark leafy greens
and asparagus. It's important to
get enough folic acid, but there is
concern that too much may promote
cancer growth.
Folic acid was in the spotlight a
couple of decades ago when mater-
nal folic acid deficiency was linked
to spinal cord and brain defects in
infants. The U.S. and Canada re-
sponded in 1998 by mandating that


enriched cereal grains be fortified
with 140 micrograms (mcg) of folic
acid per 100 grams of cereal.
In the decade following, folic acid
was given credit for a decline in birth
defects, in addition to its cancer
prevention potential. In Harvard's
long-term Nurses' Health Study,
women taking a multivitamin with
folic acid for at least 15 years were 75
percent less likely to develop colon
cancer than women not taking a
multivitamin.
Concern has arisen over folic
acid's role in increasing cancer risk,
especially given the increased con-
sumption of folic acid in the general
public, thanks to fortified foods.
The 2007 Aspirin/Folate Polyp
Prevention Study found that indi-
viduals taking daily one-milligram
folic acid supplements had more
than twice the risk of developing
pre-cancerous polyps, compared


with plaiceb Anid iII ;i secoiidaii\
al\ahsI o-A tlie srtud\. IJuimeitV of
S'-, theu l ie i 11i1h,_-, i ii lese i-clieil,
discc ,\eied thiaet Iel t-ikllg dalh ,,olic
aicid supplementitin ii liid inclie trlii
d,'uble tlie i lk ',o developing pio--
la te c;-iiicei
HoIe\\ei. ai lecet miet;i-;i;-i
seemed t,, s-quash tile theoiv thlit
fllic acid mIl;i\ pio-in-te c;iicei Aftel
;-i ;ilh zi gl 1:; cllilic -il tri Iila Iicludilg:
5.000UU p-iint.ip;IItS, leehels
f,1lld 7i peicelt ,if lito-e iecei\ -
img, folic acid tupplemneiintitloii
developed m Iili;- icie-I.e ,- did 7 ;
peicelt of t liose ieceIViig, placebh,.
lestlltllui'g Iii iio-'luigln,1i1 c;-iuIt huldlin ,


Reeaiclieil, c,:,cluded thlit o-Alic acid
5tupplelmelt-itilii does iii-,ot Iicie-ise
1-i decieaise ,ite-,peclhc c;iicei \irli-
iII tlie hi.t hve v\eais ,cf tieairuneli
YOuIh besrt aid ice i t, 'keep im line
vili tlie cmllieii dail\ folic acid
iecolnmelldantlion, 400 mcg to[, mO-t
dtlh. )00 mcg I,1-oi pieg1;-IIt V-lmel.
;-IId IIo-, Ilin le thali 1.000 m cg ,I1 I ,gi
fi','nll uiV liethc ;-iuId I;-tuitil '- ,tuiceS
coll'bllied
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:Page 14


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Health monitoring via the Internet, digital devices offers important benefits


HARVARD HEALTH LETTERS
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY

If you've ever tried to get your doc-
tor on the phone on short notice, you
appreciate the challenge of staying
connected in modern medicine. But
the coming era of "connected health"
promises to change all that using
the Internet and wireless digital
devices. It's a way for you to engage
with your health care providers
and get better results with greater
convenience.
"People can and do take very good
care of themselves when you give
them the tools to do so," said Dr.
Joseph C. Kvedar, the founder and
director of the Center for Connected
Health at Partners HealthCare,
Boston.
Partners HealthCare is the not-for-
profit system that provides medical
services at a number of Harvard
University-affiliated hospitals and
clinics. It's only one large provider
in the United States that now offers
connected health. If your provider
offers it, look into it. Connected
health offers some concrete benefits
for men with high blood pressure
(hypertension) and other chronic
conditions.
Connected health simply means
using technology to deliver medicine
where and when you need it. It al-
lows you to collect important health
information at home and send it
automatically to your doctor's office.
It can reduce unnecessary office


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visits. For example, some doctors
in the Partners system use Skype to
conduct routine follow-ups that don't
require an in-person visit.
Connected health programs for
hypertension help you to track your
blood pressure readings. In the usual
approach, you have to go to the doc-
tor's office periodically for a pressure
check. Wireless technology offers
a more convenient option: a home
blood pressure cuff that sends your
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function or a home Wi-Fi modem.
Research shows that people armed
with wireless blood pressure cuffs
take their blood pressure more
frequently. This information is then
displayed on a "dashboard view" at
the medical office that flags people
with spiking pressures. That allows
nurses and doctors to reach out to
their patients to coach them about
lifestyle factors, like a high-salt diet,
that can affect blood pressure, or to
suggest changes in medication.
But the data superhighway is a
two-way street. In the Partners Blood
Pressure Connect program, a person
can visit a secure website to see how
his blood pressure is responding
to medication as well as exercise,
weight loss, and stress control. This
provides useful feedback.
"Knowing your blood pressure in
the context of your lifestyle gives
you an opportunity to make lifestyle
choices and see your blood pressure
respond to it, whether you are on
medications or not," Kvedar said.
Automatic reporting also motivates
some people to stay on track.
"Knowing that a doctor's office
will know your blood pressure is a
powerful incentive for people to get
their life in order," Kvedar said. "They
want to look good for their doctor."
In recent studies of older adults
with hypertension, those who were
formerly struggling to bring their
blood pressures under control













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achieved drops in pressure in the
range of 5 to 10 mmHg with a con-
nected health approach. That's
enough to lower risk of heart attacks
and strokes.
Connected health is also targeting
heart failure, a condition in which
the heart does not pump enough
blood to meet the body's needs. In
Partners' Connected Cardiac Care
program, doctors receive measure-
ments of blood pressure, pulse, blood
oxygen, and weight collected at
home. This allows doctors to inter-
vene early, before a medical crisis
that could end in hospitalization.

What can you do now?
Connected health services will
continue to grow, in part fueled by
reforms under the Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act. Ask your
doctor if you qualify for any con-
nected health programs. If you are
offered a chance to participate, be an
informed and skeptical consumer.
Ask whether it will add out-of-
pocket costs. Ask what benefits you
can expect. For example, conve-
nience is likely to be a big selling
point for those with hypertension.
Instead of trekking to the doctor's
office for a 5-minute blood pressure
check, you can now take your blood
pressure at home and relay that
information securely to your doctor.
But it only works if the doctors and
nurses keep tabs on you and inter-
vene when they need to. Make sure
that they do.

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Eating at your desk, an annoyance and a necessity


By JEFF STRICKLER
STAR TRIBUNE (MINNEAPOLIS)

Mike O'Neill works in the IT depart-
ment at the state office complex in
St. Paul, Minn., which means he's the
one who gets the calls when workers
who have been eating at their desks
discover that their keyboards are
clogged with food-related detritus.
"They are disgusting," he said.
"Filled with crumbs and sticky -
yuck! And of course, there are the
times when one of them spills a drink
on their laptop. Then it's an emergen-
cy I have to deal with."
But he's not lobbying for a ban on
eating at office workstations because
he also has a confession to make.
"I eat lunch at my desk every day,"
he said.
Long gone is the two-hour,
two-martini lunch that was the main-
stay of the 1950s and '60s. Eating
lunch at your desk, once considered
something done only under unusual
circumstances, has become the
norm. According to a Gallup Poll,
two-thirds of American workers eat at
their desks more than once a week.
And not just lunch.
"It's breakfast, too," said Laura
Barclay, founder of the Civility &
Etiquette Centre. "It's become part of
our culture."
The practice also has become a
topic of debate in human resources
departments looking for common
ground between employees who want
to eat at their desks and co-workers
who object to the practice.
It "can be annoying to co-workers,"
said Kathryn Helmke, employee
relations and benefits director at
MRA, a nonprofit employer associ-
ation that serves more than 4,000
Upper Midwest companies "There
are aroma and hygiene issues. Some
companies ban it."
The bans typically target food al-
lergies, pungent odors, messes being
made in shared work spaces and


leftover/discarded food that could
attract rodents.
Employees who deal directly with
customers such as a dental office
receptionist almost always are
forbidden to eat at their desks, and
some employers feel that it's better
to have the same noneating rules for
everyone rather than let some par-
take and others not.
Whatever the rules may be, the rea-
sons behind this surge in desk-dining
are many. They include:
*Heavier workloads. "The work is
driving our day and eating is second-
ary," Helmke said. "I'll eat at my desk
if it means that I can go home at 6
instead of 6:30."
*No convenient access to cafeterias
or restaurants. And when the polar
vortex swept down on us earlier this
month, a lot of people's definition of
convenient was expanded to mean
"not having to leave the building,"
said Michelle Love, MRAs chief
marketing and technology officer.
*Replacing lunch with errands
or exercise. "I eat at my desk every
day so I can take my hour lunch
break to wander the skyways," said
CaseyWojchik, communications
coordinator at Faegre Baker Daniels
in downtown Minneapolis. "All of us
desk-job people need to get out and
move around."
*Healthier eating habits. Some
workers are eating several small
meals a day, as recommended by
numerous dietary studies. Others are
shying away from greasy, fried fast
food by bringing their own meals
from home.
*Not wanting to interrupt the
workflow. "I am project-oriented,
so I don't like to take a break in the
middle of something just to eat," said
LindseyYoung, program manager
of the ALPHA (tutoring) Center at
University of Northwestern in St.
Paul. "I also find that sitting in a
break room to eat is monotonous
and, quite honestly, a waste of time."


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Thleie i-,ii,-,liei ie;i,-,ol ,-,ftell cited
for i-ctlibicle eitiiig. buit eei\,'ine
who lihas studied tdie iS.tLe agiees,
that it' a ; -i bid lige I iii:, cie ite
the nnpie-si'i:n o: being i dedicated
empl,:,\ee willing t,: g, the e\xtiai mile
"If \,:ile sitting i t \,oiii desk. \:,i'ile
not building tliho-e lielaitiiiiliip tliiat
are goo,,:,d fi \,,ii caiieei. Baiclai\
said
"If \-:,u ee \,:,o i b,,i gong o, t l,-,
lunch witli voIIi c,-,,-ikeis, its, good
for viu to: go:. too Otlieikvi e. \,:,'ie
just ging t,: get mi:,ie nik piled
on y,,iu xhile \,:,iii co,-n'x,:ikeis get
pro inlOt I'l "
Hehlike agieed Bemng tlccesstftl
in tie n\:ifkplice is aibo'ut building
relatio,-ii, liipS. ;ild \'oI c;ill'I do tli;-it
sitting at \o,:u desk "
In ;idditilOi. iiinmeil,_-,ti i ntdies liaie
sho\n ithaiat taking bieaks, enliiinces,
prodUnc tIlIt
"People tluik tliat b\ itting ait tlieii
desks idiing huticlii, tlie\*ie being
moie piodhictie. biut tle\ ie ie i nt.
Love -,iid
Sta \ I g Iat ,: ,oII des.k ;-ill da\. da\
aftel dia\. c-ii lead t,, incieaied stiess
levels tliiat caiin affect ai cinpainI\ in
term,-, f reduced pilOducIlM it\l. ibseii-
teeiism, einplo\ee tiiio i,_ei. co 'inpeii-
sati,-,n caim s, liealtli i1,Li ;iilce ;-ild
medical expeiinse
"W\e need blieaik,. -lie added
Of cou se, if \,:,iu use \,_-i, hutcli
break k foI. : ,a\. exeIcIsIIg:_. \,ou ti ll
face tHlie iue '4f etniiio a it \_o-iii desk
when v\ otl ietiiiI Tlieie aiie ,_-,ite
basic ile, tlait mwill help \,:u d,' thiit


de-.ks
Aie ,od thlng_, with st,,n_ aiomas.
ti c I -I a _, g.;I-ilIc." B;-uicl;-iVa\ S-Ihd _1t;i\
a;\a\ hom thiings that make a Iot
ofi ni:',e \lien \,,uI eait them. like
p,,tti: clip, mind. pe lihaip,. soup -
',:,me people sluip tliei s'oup If \:,ui
liae gai baige. don't tliox\ it I voiii
xa teb.iaket. take it t,: i biea ik -io_-,-in
ieceptaicle Don)'t taick up empty\
lake-,ut cl l iii, m eit o, voiii desk If
\,I -,L liaie a 'oik space, be tuie ,-,
cleain up aill thlie ci umb- "
Al-o be nmitdful thlie magi.e \,:,i'ie
piolectmig
\\When ii\u'ie ttming :at \ouiii desk
eamig. it'l ieasvtI,-, s end tile imes,,age
tliiat \ 'i-le ui naippio:;icliaible. -hlie
,aid W\hen \,:,u eat \hlale \,:,u \\oik,.
\,:IIu tend t,: d,:, b,,th ai little l,:, ei
_ iim enle it;ai\ lia\e ai 111Iip-I [-rii
itle tl,-i to,-, ;ai \k V-,tii., mid \o-LI d,-n't
;-itl them \ViilIIig 45 -m iute t, (,-,I
\,u tI: Ihmli eitmig Don't gi _e thlie
mipie,s,io liithat \,,u'\e put tip lthat
\ello-,\\ tape N-Ii\-ing t;-i\ v\ v -
A _-,lloll o a,_-l e-itii ;it -,lies desk
liia, beco-ime. Hellnke ltlmik, tlhat thlie
pheitnomemit,,no might be aibi'It tin rpeaik
ea. at least, cliaiige
\\With lmai tph'clie ;id itahblets amid
-thiei -iieles- teclihni-,l,_-, \e do-n't
liiae t, be ttuhig et ,,mi desks- th be
i-'lkmx i g., slie ahid \\e c;ili it Il ;i
paik lind eat a saindwicli ind still be
co -iected "
In' thliei vo ids. mi',teaid '4 leaving
lunch at ,mu deks. e'll liae deks, at
_-Ll Itl ch











With medical mysteries, no easy answers


By SANDRA G. BOODMAN
SPECIAL To THE WASHINGTON POST

Seven years ago, I began writing a
medical mysteries column for The
Post, which each month recounts a
puzzling case from the perspective of
someone who was intimately involved:
the patient, a parent, a spouse and
sometimes the doctor who made the
correct diagnosis.
One of the most wrenching cases
involved a woman whose obvious
stomach problems were repeatedly
brushed off- until doctors discovered
she had advanced appendix cancer.
One of the most memorable was a
man whose six-year itching stumped
two dozen specialists, a case solved by
an astute young physician who kept
pushing for an answer. And one of the
most frustrating was a woman whose
multiple health problems clearly
seemed related to her faulty artificial
hip, a case I had to drop because of her
doctor's stubbornness.
While medical diagnosis may seem
straightforward, the column illustrates
how complicated and difficult it can
be, illuminating the often opaque
process by examining where and why
it went awry and how easy it is for
mistakes to snowball. Sometimes ser-
endipity plays a key role, as it did when
a patient's deep tan reminded a doctor
of photographs of a former president
with the same unusual illness. Medical
mysteries stories also document the
impact on families of the search for
answers, a process that can take de-
cades and involve considerable pain,
anxiety and uncertainty.
Over the years, diagnoses have
ranged from the prosaic a
Washington lawyer whose raging
case of head lice was missed by
three dermatologists to the exotic:
life-threatening conditions so rare that
most doctors will never see them.
Among these was a NewYork nurse
whose daring cardiac treatment
became the basis for a recent episode
of the hit television series "Grey's
Anatomy." Other cases have been
featured on ABC News, "Mystery
Diagnosis" and an Animal Planet show


I


called "Monsters Inside Me."
The column has inspired many
reader questions, some of which recur
perennially in online comments. The
new year seems like a good time to
answer some of them. Consider this
an appeal as well: I'm always looking
for interesting cases that meet the
column's specs.
Q: What makes a good medical
mystery?
A: For starters, the mystery has to
have been solved and the diagnosis
must be substantiated by medical re-
cords and confirmed by a credentialed
physician willing to discuss the case.
Experimental treatments need to be
grounded in science, as in the case of
the NewYork nurse whose lethal heart
tumor was successfully treated with
medical super glue.
I regularly hear from readers or their
desperate relatives seeking help for a
debilitating illness that has confound-
ed numerous doctors. I would love
to hear from these patients after they
have an answer, but I can't help them
find one. I'm a medical journalist, not
a medical doctor, and unfortunately I
can't make referrals.
Some people are convinced they
solved their mystery themselves, often
by avoiding a particular substance or
food they deem toxic or by ingesting
megadoses of over-the-counter sup-
plements. Others swear by treatments
for which there is no scientific evi-
dence, often provided by a specialist in
alternative medicine. These cases don't
work, in part because their outcomes
are impossible to prove.
To be considered for the column,
patients must be willing to use their
real names, submit relevant medical
records or allow me access to them,
and permit the doctor who made the
correct diagnosis (or, if that person is
unavailable, the current treating physi-
cian) to discuss details of their case.
There are no age limits: I've writ-
ten about a 6-week-old boy and an
87-year-old woman. And the problem
need not be unusual; columns have
focused on a teenage boy who turned
out to have whooping cough, a college
student who suffered for years from


textbook gallbladder disease and a Fox
news reporter with a common, painful
eye condition.
Q: What evidence do you use?
A: Medical records are a must. Some
patients insist that their doctor never
mentioned the diagnosis that years
later turned out to be correct or failed
to order a crucial test. I've found that
records sometimes tell a different
story, contradicting those assertions.
But records alone are not enough.
Sometimes a doctor and patient have
such different perspectives that it is
impossible to proceed.
One Maryland woman was con-
vinced that the systemic ailments that
had plagued her for several years were
caused by her artificial hip a flawed
device that emitted metal particles and
for which the manufacturer recently
settled a multibillion-dollar class
action suit.
Her voluminous medical records
seemed to confirm the link. But her
internist adamantly refused to attri-
bute any of her problems to the device,
which had been recalled by its man-
ufacturer, and her orthopedist could
not be reached. Case unfortunately
- closed.
Q: Where do you find mysteries?
A: Many are submitted by patients
or their relatives, others by doctors or
hospitals; some stem from articles in
medical journals. Regardless of the
source, all require a subject who is
willing to speak candidly.
Most patients say their purpose
in recounting sometimes harrowing
experiences is to spare others a similar
ordeal; some want to shed light on a
little-known disease or condition. At
times there is a happy ending treat-
ment in the form of a drug or surgery
that provides a fix but that is far
from the rule.
Jamie Fear, a former editor at the
National Academy of Sciences who
died in 2011 of a malignancy that had
been repeatedly misdiagnosed as
irritable bowel syndrome, talked about
what it was like to be dismissed as a
hypochondriac by skeptical doctors.
Jan Weymouth, a manager at the
National Institutes of Health who
died in 2012, said she was ultimately
grateful for the years before doctors
figured out she had an unusual form
of lung cancer, news that forced her to
confront a terminal illness.
And engineer Jeff Williams, whose
cirrhosis was wrongly attributed to
alcoholism, not a genetic disease, is
on a crusade to raise awareness of


hereditary hemochromatosis caused
by the dangerous accumulation of iron
in the blood. Williams also struggles
with anger about the callous way he
was treated by doctors and nurses and
remains convinced that his liver might
be less severely damaged had the
doctors who dismissed him as a drunk
followed up on the results of a telltale
lab test he later discovered buried in
his medical records.
Q: What role do medical journals
play?
A: I am especially interested in cases
that advance knowledge about pub-
lic-health issues, particularly contro-
versial ones. I regularly read (okay,
skim) major medical journals, which
sometimes suggest possible columns.
One of the most memorable was a
2011 case report in Pediatrics about
five children whose seizures and other
neurological problems were believed
by their parents to have been triggered
by the DPT vaccine.
Years later, testing revealed that they
actually had a rare genetic mutation
present at birth that caused a severe
form of epilepsy called Dravet syn-
drome. The vaccine, doctors reported,
had nothing to do with the seizures.
Because the symptoms of Dravet typ-
ically surface at 6 months, the age at
which children receive a DPT shot, the
vaccine had been erroneously blamed.
I contacted one of the report's authors,
who secured permission to provide the
names of some affected families.
Two refused to participate, but
Laura Cossolotto, who heads a group
composed of families whose children
have Dravet, agreed to tell the story of
her daughter's decade-long ordeal and
eventual diagnosis at the Mayo Clinic.
Until a genetic test revealed the errant
gene, Cossolotto said she, too, had
blamed the vaccine for her daughter's
life-threatening problems.
Q: How long does it take to track
down a mystery?
A: Some, like the vaccine case, take
months, while others, especially those
proposed by a hospital's media rela-
tions staff, typically proceed far more
quickly: The patient has signed what-
ever release the hospital requires, the
doctor has agreed to cooperate, and
obtaining records is a relative snap.
Because delays are inevitable and
a mix of cases age, sex, profession
and illness or condition is essential,
I juggle several cases simultaneously.
After 80 columns, finding maladies
that haven't been covered or don't echo
previous cases becomes more difficult.


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Credentialing Center since 1990.


MiLLENNiUM
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Thousands of Health Stories from Feeling Fit & WebMD


_ w.FeelingFit Lo


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j vvvv MillenniuniPhyslmaln lo1n


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 17


feelingfit.com


F











Several choices available to treat degenerative hip disease


By Dr. MARK SPANGEHL
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY

Dear Mayo Clinic: I'm 36 years old
and have had constant pain in my
right hip for two years. Last year,
I was diagnosed with moderate
degenerative hip disease. Medication
managed my pain initially but is
no longer effective. My doctor says
the next step is a steroid shot or a
procedure that involves going in and
"cleaning the roughness." What does
this mean?
In a person your age, several choic-
es are available to treat degenerative
hip disease. When medications don't
help, one of the options you mention
usually is the next step. Lifestyle
changes could help relieve some of
your symptoms, too.
Degenerative joint disease, also
known as osteoarthritis, happens
when the protective cartilage on
the ends of your bones wears down
over time. Cartilage is firm, slippery
tissue that allows your joints to move
smoothly. In osteoarthritis, the sur-
face of the cartilage becomes rough.
Eventually, if the cartilage wears down
completely, bone rubs on bone.


Osteoarthritis can occur in any
joint, but it most commonly affects
joints in the hands, neck, lower
back, knees and hips. Osteoarthritis
gradually worsens with time, and no
cure exists. But treatment may slow
the progression of the disease, relieve
pain and improve joint function.
Medications can be used to reduce
the pain and joint inflammation
caused by osteoarthritis. But as in
your situation, eventually they may
not be enough to control symptoms.
In those cases, a steroid shot can be
helpful. These shots involve injecting
a corticosteroid medication into
the joint. It's not a permanent treat-
ment, but a steroid shot usually can
provide temporary improvement in
symptoms.
The amount of relief you receive
from a steroid shot can be a bit
unpredictable. In some cases, these
injections may give effective relief for
many months occasionally they
will help for six months or longer. But
in other situations, the relief may only
last a few weeks, or rarely the shot
may not provide any benefit.
A steroid shot is a reasonable
option to try, particularly in situations


where someone needs relief for a
specific period of time, for example,
so they can participate in a social
engagement. Typically, however, these
shots are not used for ongoing pain
relief. Steroid shots are generally safe,
but they do have a small potential for
infection.
The other option you mention,
"cleaning the roughness," refers to
a procedure that surgically removes
bone spurs. Bone spurs, also called
osteophytes, are bony projections
that often develop along the edges
of bones in joints affected by osteo-
arthritis. They can result in pain and
loss of joint motion.
During this procedure, the rough
areas of bone and cartilage are re-
moved and smoothed. It is important
to note, though, that in moderate de-
generative joint disease, some of the
cartilage that covers the ends of the
bones is damaged and some may be
worn away completely. Unfortunately,
cleaning out the joint does not cause
new cartilage to form.
If cartilage loss is significant, clean-
ing out the roughness is less likely to
provide symptom relief, and this pro-
cedure may not be a useful option. In


those cases, when other non-surgical
treatment is no longer effective, then
a hip replacement would be needed.
Along with the treatment options
already mentioned, there are a
number of lifestyle changes that
could help. First, maintain a healthy
body weight. Extra weight causes
stress on the joint, leading to more
symptoms. Weight loss, if needed, can
often improve symptoms. Second,
exercise to increase your endurance
and strengthen the muscles around
your joint. This can make the joint
more stable. Stick to gentle exercises,
though, such as walking, biking,
swimming or playing golf, to avoid
aggravating the joint.
Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic is
an educational resource and doesn't
replace regular medical care. To sub-
mit a question, write to: medicaledge@
mayo.edu. For health information,
visit www.mayoclinic.com.

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The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


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feelingfit.com







Perimenopause not likely cause of hot flashes at age 31


Perimenopause not likely cause of hot flashes at age 31


By Dr. JOAN BENGTSON
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY

Q: I have hot flashes, sweating, heat
rashes and headaches. Could it be
premenopause? I'm only 31. I'm not
interested in having more children.
Ideas?
A: The symptoms you describe are
typical for a woman approaching
menopause. But you haven't men-
tioned the most common symptom of
perimenopause: a decrease in men-
strual flow.
The average age for menopause
is 51. Also, the symptoms you men-
tioned are not unique to menopause,
so they may have another cause. You
should seek the advice of your doctor


GENES
FROM PAGE 7
training in medical genetics and
counseling. They work in consulta-
tion with doctors, nurses and other
health professionals.
Truelson said she encourages
patients to ask these questions:
What type of information will the
test give me? How will this affect me
from a medical standpoint? How will
this affect me from an emotional
standpoint?
Nada Maalouli, of Eagan, Minn.,
has wrestled with these questions
for years. Her mother died of ovarian
cancer before she reached meno-
pause. Her grandmother and an aunt



TEEN

FROM PAGE 6
said. "Finding the gene is only the
beginning."
Lilly hasn't given up on her dream
of being "normal."
Sitting in her living room in
December, the only subject that
excited her more than homecoming
or talking about her book was re-
membering her trip to the University
of California-Berkeley.
Gay offered a few details: A tour
guide who also uses a wheelchair
squired Lilly around campus, show-
ing her a marble rooftop swimming


to determine their cause in you.
Menopause is the time in a woman
life after her menstrual periods end. It
happens when the function of the ova-
ries declines and eventually stops. The
ovaries are small glands in the pelvis
that produce eggs and hormones.
Ovarian function usually does not
stop suddenly but rather decreases
over several years. Many body changes
may accompany this transition. There
could be a decrease in fertility, the
end of regular menstrual periods, and
symptoms like hot flashes and disrup-
tion of sleep cycles. The symptoms
of menopause tend to get better after
a few months, but may last up to a
couple of years.
Menopause is a normal event. But

on her mother's side died of breast
cancer. Maalouli worries she may
be next. A genetic test would tell her
if she carries a mutant gene associ-
ated with higher risks of breast and
ovarian cancer.
She has agonized over the decision
to get tested, in part because she
fears the test for breast cancer would
be positive.
"I don't know if I can live with that,"
she said. "I feel like maybe it will
(make) me depressed."
She has visited a genetic counselor
three times in the past 10 years to
weigh the pros and cons. At 51, she
and her three sisters all healthy
so far have made a pact. They will
get regular mammograms and MRIs,
and if any of them detects that there
is something wrong, then the sisters

pool where she might continue her
swimming and a specially equipped
dorm where she might live with a
suite mate.
The university offers unique
services to help students like Lilly
navigate college on their own and
get jobs after graduation. Stores
and restaurants in Berkeley are fully
wheelchair-accessible unlike her
high school, where she has to rely on
her aide to open the library door.
The Grossmans have come to terms
with the fact that discovering a ge-
netic cause for Lilly's illnesses didn't
reveal any obvious way to make her
better.
"Sometimes our friends ask, 'What
did you get out of this? Things aren't


when ovarian function decreases
before age 40, it is not normal. This
condition is called primary ovarian
insufficiency (POI). It happens in less
than 1 percent of women.
POI was previously called "prema-
ture ovarian failure" or "premature
menopause." But these terms are no
longer used because POI may not be
the permanent end of ovarian func-
tion. Usually the cause is unknown.
But it may occur more often in women
with a relative who has it suggesting
a genetic factor. In some women, it
may be due to ovarian damage from
prior surgery, radiation or chemo-
therapy. In other women, it may be
associated with a disorder of the
immune system.

will all go in for genetic testing.
How will testing affect your family?
One person's choice to get tested
may also reveal health information
about your relatives, who may prefer
not to know, Truelson said.
For Keegan, who visited Mayo
from Ohio, the decision to have his
genome mapped affected several
members of his family. Mayo doctors
asked his older brother and father
also to submit a DNA sample to
find out if Keegan had inherited
his father's disease. Keegan's father
previously had a kidney transplant.
In addition, Keegan and his wife
were thinking about starting a
family and wanted to know what
their chances would be of passing on
the mutant gene. Turns out there is
a 50 percent chance their offspring

better for Lilly,'" Gay said.
But the Grossmans all say that se-
quencing Lilly's DNA has been a good
experience. Just knowing her gene
mutations and that she doesn't
have a condition that could kill her
at any time, once a major fear is
"huge for us," Gay said.
And now when they have a sleep-
less night, the family knows there's
someone else out there thinking
about Lilly and how to make her
better, she added.
"I am so happy that my genome
didn't come back all normal and say
nothing is wrong," Lilly wrote on her
blog soon after getting the results.
As the cost of sequencing was
coming down, two more families had


To diagnose POI, your doctor will
carefully review your medical history.
He or she will also order a blood test
for a hormone called follicle-stimulat-
ing hormone (FSH), which is elevated
in menopause.
The treatment of a woman with
POI will depend on whether or not
she wants to get pregnant. Ovarian
function may fluctuate over time. So a
patient who is sexually active but not
trying to get pregnant will need a con-
traceptive. And a woman who wants
to get pregnant may need to explore
assisted reproductive technologies.
In addition, symptoms and future
risks of early estrogen loss can be
treated with hormone replacement
therapy.

will inherit it. For the couple, the test
results have led to many discussions
about having children.
They talked about possibly taking
a fertilized embryo and checking
it to see if it has the mutated gene
before deciding to continue with the
pregnancy. "We stepped back, and
thought, 'We're kind of playing God
here,'" Keegan said. "We didn't think
we wanted to do that."
In the end, they've decided that
when the time comes, they'll roll the
dice and have children the old-fash-
ioned way.
Even if he passes the gene onto
his child, there's a good chance that
during the child's lifetime there will
be medical advancements to improve
treatment of the disease, Keegan
figures.

learned that their daughters shared
the same ADCY5 mutation as Lilly.
The mother of one of the girls con-
tacted Gay on Facebook and met with
Steve when he traveled to her town
on a business trip.
Scripps researchers said they would
like to study the three girls as a group,
which should improve their under-
standing of ADCY5 and could point
to a treatment.
It could take months for the work
to begin. This doesn't bother the
Grossmans.
"This is a marathon it's not a
sprint," Steve said.
Listening from her perch on the
flowered sofa, his sleepy daughter
again lifted a fist, tired but defiant.


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0


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 19


feelingfit.com











Englewood clinic honors volunteers


sincee opening i$ts doo-, iin I inal;i[\
2011 lie Englewou,,Id Comminniu
Ciie C liuc his sei\ed moile liin
1,.800 patients in minoie han ,.800
patient \isuits
Debb)elie Biono, ih: hasI been a \k,:l-
unteel ;i t ie clinic since it r ,pened.
; ia niined \o-llineei of i he eai1 ;it ;i
recent \v-Iunteei ;ippieci;itioin dininei
held iat The Fisliei\ iestaiiiint in
PIlacldal
\e aie i ncieddil\ giatefil ,:,i :,n
voliineei., foi lien geneit, is\. -said
Betli HaHs-oS,_Hi. lhe clinic's executLie
dnectoiW \\e co'tldn't lifae coine
close e to helping rlie numinbei of peo-
pie ne liia e o,,ei lie lasi t liee \eais
witliont li ein "
The Englek:,:ood C,,oininninit\ Caiie
Chnlic. 6868 Sa-il C;i-S;-Di Ik\e, isa
50lici:; i nonpiOt' inedic-iI clinic
pOV di0 9 no-co-St inedicail sei-
vices to lie tlindeis ei\ed lesidentS
of Englenood ;1,1nd StliHOtlidilng
comminlinities
It is lie bi-iiiicliild o f D Ri\-inondd
Jaines. ,an eineig:enc\ 1'''liol pi\ -
sicilii i lrh (uilf Cnias EineigencV
Pli\S.iciain Incli i-, ieciilted tile
help of Di -1h. Ma\ik Aspeilla and
David Klein, co-founders of the
larger Virginia B. Andes Volunteer
Community Care Clinic in Port
Charlotte.
The clinic's roster of volunteers
currently numbers about 75 some
of them prominent community
members who take the opportunity
to give of their time. This is the


Englewood Community Care Clinic recently honored its volunteers at an appreciation dinner. From left are physician assistant Pat Murtha, nurse
practitioner Chris Bradley with Dr. Raymond James, who initiated the founding of the clinic.


second annual appreciation dinner,
which the clinic staff organizes to
show their gratitude.
"It's the volunteers that make
a clinic like this able to operate,"


Asperilla said. "The physicians could
never do it alone. We are extremely
blessed to have such support from
the community. These volunteers
have taken a genuine interest in


caIIngII :,i then neighlibc-,,
Foi moic mfOi mi7lhil.lon cill _I -. -

I'i 1:-Oil iihT. Oi1'1ISI Fi c 11 I'sl.IK i7
nt 'lr 'ii' lL nw/ 'l loo ii h, ,Oi


Cut your risk, cut your insurance rates


By KIMBERLY LANKFORD
KIPLINGER PERSONAL FINANCE

Q: My wife told her life insurer
she lost weight and the company
slashed her rate by nearly $200 a
year. Can I do the same if my health
has improved, and does this work
with other types of insurance? -J.K.,
Baltimore
Life, disability and long-term-care
companies often reduce their rates if
you become less risky to them but
only if you ask and usually only if you
show proof of a long-term change.
Your best bet is with term life
insurance. Insurers will often reduce
your rate if your health improves
rather than risk losing you to another
insurer. If you lose weight, stop


smoking, or lower your cholesterol
or blood pressure level, or if you've
been cancer-free for several years
since buying the policy, ask for a
reduction.
You usually need to provide proof
that the change isn't a blip. Most
insurers will reduce your premium
if you keep the weight off for one
full year, said Byron Udell, CEO of
AccuQuote.
Some insurers give you a break if
you stop smoking for one year, but
others wait until two or three years
have passed. Get a weigh-in at the
doctor or a urine test to show you're
nicotine-free right away to start the
clock ticking, said John Ryan, of
Ryan Insurance Strategy Consultants,
Greenwood Village, Colo.


Long-term-care insurers may
also lower your rate if your health
improves. Disability companies do
the same and may trim premiums if
you switch to a less-risky job. You can


appeal a litlSctllai skeletal l exchlsi_-i
Inhlch V-cli't c,\ei am-\iV dsabilht
related t a bahd nieck i1 pinei aiftei
\:,u'e been n sMpi,,in-fiee f,:,i rliee
\eati. s, aid R\an


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The Sun /Sunclay F l:,i nal y 2 2u 4


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com







TheVW Su NOTSudFeray2204flngicowwsunwppr tPge1


Medical lectures scheduled
Bayfront Health will hold its next
Mini Medical School health lecture
on Feb. 5.
A 1 p.m. Ken Kenzie, licensed
clinical social worker and grief
educator, will speak about "Living
with Loss." Learn how to live with
the pain of losing a loved one.
Understand the stages of grief, the
personal loss felt through grief, and
how to heal developing peace
and a purposeful life in spite of the
pain.
At 2:15 p.m., orthopedic surgeon
Dr. Mark Davis will present, "Oh
My Aching Knee!" Learn to identify
the various causes of knee pain and
their symptoms, and understand
the different treatment options -
both non-surgical and surgical.
Lectures will take place in the
Medical Office Plaza at Bayfront
Health Punta Gorda (formerly
Charlotte Regional Medical Center),
713 E. Marion Ave., 4th floor, Punta
Gorda. Each physician will hold
a question and answer session
following the lecture.
The lecture is free.
Complimentary snacks and bever-
ages will be served. Seating is limit-
ed. Attendees must register prior to
the lecture by calling 941-637-2497.

Bayfront announces classes
Get close to your heart in
February by celebrating American
Heart Month with Bayfront Health.
Learn how to improve and maintain
heart health at various events and
activities throughout the month.


*Cardiac diet nutrition class: 9-11
a.m. Feb. 4 and Feb. 18, Bayfront
Health Wellness Center, 733 E.
Olympia Ave., Punta Gorda.
Heart-healthy nutrition tips for
those with cardiac issues. Learn
about heart-healthy, low-fat and
low-sodium food options and
also how to read and understand
food labels. To register, call
941-637-2507.
*HealthFair mobile screening:
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 4, Publix, 1291
S. Sumter Blvd., North Port; and
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 15, CVS, 24200
Veterans Blvd., Port Charlotte.
Bayfront Health has partnered
with HealthFair to combat cardio-
vascular disease by offering cost
effective and convenient mobile
health screenings throughout
Charlotte and Lee Counties. The
HealthFair bus is a self-contained
mobile unit that provides partic-
ipants access to ultrasound tests
of the heart and arteries, which go
beyond what is offered at a typical
physical exam.
These in-depth and painless
tests check for abnormalities that
can lead to stroke, heart attack
and aneurysm and all test results
are reviewed by a board-certified
physician and available within 7-10
days. To register, call 800-519-4325
(HEALTH).
*Pulmonary diet nutrition class:
9-11 a.m. Feb. 11, Bayfront Health
Wellness Center, 733 E. Olympia
Ave., Punta Gorda.
Healthy nutrition tips for those
with pulmonary issues. Learn about
healthy, low-fat and low-sodium
food options and also how to read


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and understand food labels. To
register, call 941-637-2507.
*Lunch and Learn: Heart Disease,
How Women Can Beat the Odds:
Noon-1:30 p.m. Feb. 14, Bayfront
Health Port Charlotte Conference
Center, 2500 Harbor Blvd., Port
Charlotte.
Women are five times more likely
to die of cardiovascular disease
than from breast cancer, and are
less likely than men to receive the
appropriate treatment after a heart
attack.
Join Dr. Gonzalo Carrizo, cardio-
thoracic surgeon with FACT Surgery
South, as he discusses the different
warning signs for women and how
you can beat the odds when it
comes to heart disease. Lunch will
be provided. Seating is limited. To
register, call 941-637-2497.
*Ride Your Heart Out Poker-Run:
10 a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 22, Bayfront
Punta Gorda Medical Office
Building parking lot, 713 E. Marion
Ave. Registration will start at 10 a.m.
The ride begins at 10:30 a.m., ends
at Black Widow Harley Davidson
and includes four other stops along
the way. Participants will enjoy a
barbecue lunch at the ride's end
and prizes for the best and worst
hands will be given.
All motorcycles are welcome to
participate. It is $25 to ride and $15
for passengers which includes a
poker hand and lunch. Nonriders
can purchase lunch for $10. All
proceeds will benefit the American
Heart Association. For more infor-
mation, visit BayfrontPortCharlotte.
corn, or call 941-766-4285.

Fawcett schedules activities
As part of American Heart Month,
Fawcett Memorial Hospital will host
the following events:
Lunch and Learn: Mitral Valve
Repair and TAVR: Noon-1 p.m.
Feb. 20. at H2U in the Promenades
Mall. Cardiothoracic surgeon Dr.
Alessandro Golino will review the
anatomy of the mitral valve and
options for an abnormal, damaged
or leaky valve, including transcathe-
ter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).
Complimentary lunch will also be
provided. Reservations are neces-
sary and can be made by calling
Consult-A-Nurse at 941-624-4441.
Guard Your Heart Screening and
Breakfast: 7:30-9:30 a.m. Feb 26,
H2U in Promenades Mall. This ini-
tiative helps cardiac patients better
define what their risk factors are
and more importantly, know how
to mitigate them, before a cardiac
incident ever occurs. This compre-
hensive screening includes a blood
pressure check, and cholesterol and
blood sugar screenings. Surgeons
and dieticians will be available for
consultations. Appointments are
necessary, and breakfast is includ-
ed. Reservations are necessary and
can be made by calling Consult-A-
Nurse at 941-624-4441.

Senior alert seminar
North Port Community United
Church of Christ offers a senior
alert seminar from 10 a.m.-noon
Feb. 13; the church is located at
3450 South Biscayne Drive.
Presenters at this seminar in-
clude Phyllis Ballet from the Senior
Friendship Center. She will provide
handouts and valuable information
answering the frequently asked
question, "Where do I go for help?"
John Griffin, a local attorney, will


discuss setting up trusts, how to
establish an advocate, and steps
on how to protect your personal
assets. The third presenter, Carasa
Compair of he Neuro Challenge
Foundation, will discuss dementia,
Parkinson's and related diseases and
conditions. Sponsored by The UCC
Women's Fellowship, our goal is to
provide information for the better-
ment of those living in the greater
North Port area. All are invited and
welcome to attend.
Theres is no charge to attend the
event. For information or to reserve
your spot, call Patti at 941-426-5580
or Norma at 941-423-5608.

Heart Walk scheduled
The 2014 Charlotte County Heart
Walk takes place Feb. 8 at Laishley
Park, 120 Laishley Court, Punta
Gorda. Activities begin at 7:30 a.m.
and the walk starts at 8 a.m.
For more information,
contact Whitney Carney at
CharlotteCounty@heart.org or call
800-257-6941 ext. 4916.

Blood drive scheduled
Burnt Store Presbyterian Church,
11330 Burnt Store Road, Punta
Gorda, will host a blood drive from
7 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 2. For more infor-
mation or to sign up to donate con-
tact the church office at 941-639-
0001 during normal business hours,
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday, or
by e-mail to bspc83@embarqmail.
com. The church is located at, two
miles south of the US 41/Burnt
Store Road intersection.

Free diabetes classes
The Florida Department of
Health in Charlotte County (DOH-
Charlotte) is offering diabetes
management classes at no cost. The
classes will be held Thursday eve-
nings from 4-6 p.m. for five weeks,
beginning March 6 and ending April
3. There will also be a follow-up ses-
sion on June 26. Classes will take at
1100 Loveland Blvd., Port Charlotte.
This five-week program is taught
by a registered nurse practitioner
who is certified in diabetes educa-
tion. Class participants will learn to
reduce their long-term health risks
and improve their quality of life.
Some topics covered include keep-
ing track of blood glucose, nutri-
tional management, carbohydrate
counting, exercise and physical
activity, medications, and foot care.
In addition to participating in the
educational classes, participants
will receive nutrition consultation
and program materials at no cost.
Class size is limited, and reg-
istration is required. For more
information or to register, call
941-624-7200.

Free medical lectures
Life Care Center of Punta Gorda
and Bayfront Health are offering the
following medical lectures:
*3-4 p.m. Feb. 7, skin cancer,
plastic surgeon Dr. Chris Constance.
*3-4 p.m. Feb 27, osteoarthritis/
hip and knee replacement, orthope-
dic surgeon Dr. Stephen Schroering.
*3-4 p.m. March 4, shoulder pain/
non-surgical, surgical options,
orthopedic surgeon Dr. Jeffrey
Bentson.
Lectures take place at Life Care
Center, 450 Shreve St., Punta Gorda.


NEWS 122


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 21


feelingfit.com






:Page 22 www.sunnewspapers.net feelingfit.com The Sun /5LIrICL3y F.eI:'i Lid' y 2 2~ -i


NEWS
FROM PAGE 21

RSVP required. For more informa-
tion or to reserve your spot, call
941-815-8548.

Free stroke screenings
Charlotte State Bank & Trust, in
conjunction with Fawcett Memorial
Hospital and the Alzheimer's
Association, Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, is offering free stroke
screenings Feb. 12 at its Punta
Gorda office, 2331 Tamiami Trail,
Punta Gorda and Feb. 26 at its
Parkside office, 3002 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte.

Prostate support group
The Charlotte County Prostate
Support and Information Group
will meet from 1:15-3 p.m. Feb. 21.
The speaker will be Dr. Eric Lubiner
from Florida Cancer Specialists.
Meetings take place at Fawcett
Memorial Hospital's H2U facility
located in the Promenades Mall,
next to the Sheriff's office. It is eas-
iest to enter the mall via the Winn
Dixie marque on Harbor Boulevard.
The group is supported by the local
American Cancer Society office
and the room and refreshments
are provided by Fawcett Memorial
Hospital.

Health fair scheduled
Port Charlotte United Methodist
Church presents the Healthy Foot
Forward health fair and fundraiser
from 10 a.m.-noon Feb. 20. The
church is located at 21075 Quesada
Ave., Port Charlotte. For more
information on securing a vendor
table or signing up to entertain at
the event, call Sherry Mearns at
941-258-5997 or Jenn McLaughlin at
941-447-0801.

Spring Fling Luau
Join us for an evening of fire
dancers, hula dancers, live tropical
music, auction and a fabulous
dinner provided by Smugglers -
it's our Spring Fling Luau party at
6:30pm on March 1, 2014 at the
Holy Trinity Banquet Hall (24411
Rampart Blvd., Port Charlotte.)
Tropical attire encouraged. Tickets
are $75. To purchase tables or
tickets, please contact sboon@
volunteercare.org or call Susan
at 941-766-9570 Ext. 4. Purchase
tickets/sponsorships online www.
VolunteerCare.org.


All the fun for a good cause:
Proceeds will benefit the Virginia
B. Andes Volunteer Community
Clinic, which provides semi-urgent
medical services, pharmacy and
preventive health programs to those
in need in Charlotte County.

Cancer support group
A bilingual (Spanish/English) can-
cer support group meets the second
Wednesday of the month. Some
patients struggle with multiple
issues, such as financial difficulties,
absence of family members and a
chronic illness, said coordinator
Brenda Gonzales, a licensed clinical
social worker in Port Charlotte.
For more information, including
meeting location and times, contact
Gonzalez at 941-661-3964.

Arthritis support groups
United Rheumor Arthritis Society
will offer two support groups in
North Port and Venice. The second
Tuesday of every month beginning
Feb. 11, the Gardens of North Port
will host the Healthy Lifestyles
Health Information Support Group
from 5:30-6:30p.m.
The second Wednesday of every
month beginning Feb. 12, Gardens
of Venice will offer the same sup-
port group. These are free and open
to the community. Refreshments
and light snacks will be provided.
For more information or to RSVP,
email info@urasociety.org.

Alzheimer's support groups
The Alzheimer's Association
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter-
affiliated support groups are for
family members, caregivers, and
others interested in learning more
about Alzheimer's disease. Meetings
are open to everyone and free of
charge.
For program information and to
verify meeting dates, times, and
locations, please call 800-272-3900
or 941-235-7470. Local meetings are
held at the following locations:
*Royal Palm Retirement Center,
2500 Aaron St., Port Charlotte,
meets at 10 a.m. on the fourth
Tuesday of the month.
*South Port Square (Harbor
Terrace), 23033 Westchester Blvd,
Port Charlotte, meets at 3 p.m. on
the third Tuesday of the month.
*Saint Maximilian Kolbe Catholic
Church, 1441 Spear St., Port
Charlotte, meets at 2:30 p.m. on the
fourth Thursday of the month.
*Port Charlotte United Methodist
Church, 21075 Quesada Ave., Port
Charlotte, meets at 3 p.m. on the


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:Page 22


The Sun /Sunclay Fel:.i al y 2 2U 4


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com


AM.;- I







Th SUnPPORTGFeROUarP,21Selnftcmww~unwppr~e ae2
m.F ugI


Alcoholics Anonymous
Charlotte Harbor, 941-426-7723.
Port Charlotte, 941-380-9177.
Punta Gorda, First United
Methodist Church, 507 W
Marion Ave.
Port Charlotte United Methodist
Church, 21075 Quesada Ave.
St. Nathaniel's Episcopal Church,
4200 S. Biscayne Drive, North Port.
Congregational Church,
1201 Aqui Esta Drive, Punta Gorda.
Community United Church of
Christ, 3450 S. Biscayne Drive,
North Port.

Al-Anon
Arcadia, 863-444-0763
Englewood, 941-270-7662,
941-475-1832, 941-697-4910,
941-697-3554.
North Port, 941-429-8622,
941-423-0623.
Port Charlotte, 941-564-6039
Punta Gorda, 941-639-8107

Alzheimer's Support
Port Charlotte, 941-235-7470

Amputee Support
Port Charlotte, 941-575-7022.

Anger Management
Port Charlotte, 941-206-2480.

Arthritis Support
Port Charlotte, 941-627-4643.

Bereavement Support
Port Charlotte, 941-625-4356.


Bipolar Support
Murdock, 941-613-1450.

Brain Injury Support Group
Port Charlotte, 941-697-3055.
Breathing Support
Arcadia, 863-491-4245.

Breast Cancer Support
Port Charlotte, 941-629-1181 ext.
6867 or 941-766-9570 ext 7.

Cancer Support
Port Charlotte, 941-627-3000
Punta Gorda, 941-637-9575.
Punta Gorda, 941-575-7266
Englewood, 941-214-8488.

Celebrate Recovery
Port Charlotte, 941-629-0999.
Port Charlotte, 941-625-7435.

Chemical Dependency
Punta Gorda, 941-637-2474.

Children of Aging Parents
Port Charlotte, 941-766-7991.

Cocaine Anonymous
Punta Gorda, 941-637-2474.

Co-dependents Anonymous
Venice, 941-488-8025.

COPD Education and Support
Englewood, 941-475-6571.

Depression Support
Charlotte Harbor, 941-613-1450.
Deep Creek, 941-629-2633.


Diabetes Support
Southwest Florida, 888-DIABETES.

Divorce Support
Port Charlotte, 941-625-3039,

Down Syndrome Support
Port Charlotte, 941-204-7509.

Dual Diagnosis Support
Murdock, 941-613-1450.

Emotions Anonymous
Murdock, 613-1450.
Epilepsy Support
Port Charlotte, 941-629-3309.

Ex-offenders Support Group
Murdock, 941-613-1450.

Family to Family
North Port, 941-957-3626.

Food Addicts Support
Punta Gorda, 941-380-6550.

Gastric Bypass Support
Port Charlotte, 941-228-4153.

Grandparents Support
North Port, 941-698-1943.
Arcadia, 863-494-5965
Englewood and North Port,
941-697-7287 or 941-341-4268.

Grief Support
Englewood, 941-460-1400.
North Port, 941-564-1400.

Hearing Impaired
Port Charlotte, 941-624-2947.

HIV Support
Port Charlotte, 941-625-2552
or 941-716-3041.

Insulin Pump Workshops
Port Charlotte, 941-484-1200

Intervention Program
Punta Gorda, 941-637-2474.

Kidney Cancer Support
Englewood, 941-697-1212

Kidney Health Support
Port Charlotte, 941-625-9985.

Lap Band Support
Port Charlotte, 941-624-4441.

Leukemia and Lymphoma
Ft. Myers, 239-992-5781.

Life After (Any) Loss
Punta Gorda, 941-585-9576.

Lung Cancer Support
Punta Gorda, 941-637-9575.

GUARDIAN
ANGEL
.FOOT CARE
.X E tra Gentle
Care Podiatrist
Diabetic Foot Care
Advanced Wound Care
Latest Technologies
Fellow American professional Wound
Care Association


Laryngectomy Support
Deep Creek, 941-204-1515.

Memory Care Support
Rotonda, 941-698-1198.

Mental Health Support
Port Charlotte, 941-263-8033.
Englewood, 941-475-2000.
Port Charlotte, 941-627-2100.
Port Charlotte, 941-380-9177.

Multiple Myeloma
Port Charlotte/Englewood,
941-457-5478 or 941-697-7861.

Narcotics Anonymous
Charlotte Harbor, 941-624-1204.
Port Charlotte, 866-389-1344.

Nar-Anon
Port Charlotte, 941-235-0353.

Ostomy Support Group
Port Charlotte, 941-627-9077

Overeaters Anonymous
Port Charlotte, 941-258-8548.

Parents Group
Port Charlotte, 941-627-3982.

Parkinson's Support
North Port, 941-426-4624 or
941-926-6413.
Port Charlotte/Punta Gorda,
941-637-6418

Pulmonary Hypertension
Port Charlotte, 941-875-4224.

Prostate Cancer
Port Charlotte, 941-627-3000,
ext. 3800.

Quit Smoking Support
QuitTeam, 941-552-1283.

Respite Care
Port Charlotte, 941-697-5109.

Stress Support
Punta Gorda, 941-637-2450.

Stroke Support
Englewood, 941-475-3558.
Port Charlotte, 941-639-2360.

Victims of Abuse Support
Punta Gorda, 941-639-5499.

Women's Support Group
Murdock, 941-613-1450.

Contact us
To add or update a support group
listing, email feelingfit@sun-herald.
corn or klillis@sun-herald.com.
1.


Feeling Fit
L


Read us every Sunday in the Charlotte, North Port,

Englewood and Arcadia editions of the Sun.


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>>>INSIDE


AP PHOT(
Visitors pose in front of the Olympic rings at the 2014 Winter Olympics Jan. 25, in Sochi, Russia.
The Olympics begin Feb. 7.

Get into the Olympic spirit

with USA fashion and gear


By LESLEY KENNEDY
SHOPATHOME.COM


If you've got gold, silver and bronze
on the brain, you're likely gearing up for
the Sochi Winter Olympics. And, with
the opening ceremony just days away
on Feb. 7, it's also time to score actual
gear for the international games as in
snag some sweaters, jackets, shoes and
even jewelry in honor of the event.
From Ralph Lauren's official


made-in-America designs for Team USA
to Alex and Ani's sporty bracelet charms
to Nike's latest shoes, we've rounded up
11 items to show your patriotism and
appreciation for winter sports. See you
at the fashion podium.
Look like a champion: So, the Ralph
Lauren-designed opening ceremony
cardigan has been met with well, let's
just call it mixed results, but it seems
plenty of Olympic fans are into the Ugly
Christmas Sweater/patchwork/possibly


MCT PHOTO


Whether you're braving the cold temps of
Sochi, Russia, this February, or just trying
to make it through yet another polar vortex
stateside, we recommend the women's and
men's Team USA pea coat, a pricy $795.
handed down from Grandma vibe;
both the men's and women's styles are
currently sold out at ralphlauren.com.
OLYMPIC 16


Shrimp,

salmon
and
muscovies


"'T
V \


PAGE5


. PAGE 4


Consumer

Report
Should you repair or replace
that broken product? PAGE 3


Cute animals go up


against the Super Bowl


By RICH HELDENFELS
AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
The old bumper sticker
about braking for animals has
an entertainment equivalent: I
pause for animals on video.
I know this very well. As
my wife and I are relaxing at
home, she will suddenly break
into laughter, or offer a heart-
felt "Awwww." And I know, in
that moment, that she has
found yet another image of a
cute animal online.
While the Super Bowl on
Sunday will draw a big audi-
ence, an increasingly wide-
spread competing tactic is to
appeal to animal lovers. Why?
Because, as the Puppy Bowl is
so often promoted, critters are
"really freaking cute." In fact, it
seems impossible for Animal
Planet to talk about the dogs

.. ......


IMAGE PROVIDED
running on a small football
field without assuring us of
"excess cuteness" or breaking
out the "cute cam." (See more
at www.animalplanet.com/
tv-shows/puppy-bowl or
check out the videos from
previous games on YouTube.)
But the Puppy Bowl, which
ANIMALS 15S


j^ Mannequins

get a makeover

to look more

i I reaNlistic
By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP RETAIL WRITER


7









4,,


AP PHOTO


In this Dec. 17, 2013 photo, David's Bridal senior vice
president Michele von Plato arranges a dress on a plus-size
mannequin. David's Bridal, the nation's largest bridal chain,
started changing its fit mannequins used to create gowns to
reflect the average body.


NEW YORK -The one-size-fits-all
mannequin is getting a much-needed
makeover.
Wings Beachwear's mannequins in
Miami sport flower tattoos like some of
the women who shop there. The manne-
quins at American Apparel's downtown
New York City store have pubic hair
peeking through their lingerie. And at
David's Bridal, mannequins soon will get
thicker waists, saggier breasts and back
fat to mimic a more realistic shape.
"This will give (a shopper) a better idea
of what the dress will look like on her,"
LOOK16


RIVERCHASE DERMATOLOGY


Aia


r !I- AND COSMETIC SURGERY a Y .
'PPr' Dermatology without the wait... So you have more time fi)r tli'igs 'o ih/ov

SAME WEEK APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE
Now in North Port
14840 Tamiami Trail, North Port, FL 34287







A weekly section of the Sun 4 Vol. 4 No. 5 February 2, 2014





www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


NEW YORK TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD


IT'S ALL RELATIVE By DANIEL A. FINAN / Edited by Will Shortz


ACROSS
1 Apply quickly
7 Wall
13 Gringos' land
20 Place with wheels
and deals
21 Summit planner
22 Worse
23 Woodworking tool
24 Untrustworthy sort
25 What players do
at the start of a
game of tag
26 Some bling
27 One for the "no"
column
29 Most Cypriots,
ethnically
31 Massages
32 Like some eagles
and tires
34 Li'l Abner's
surname
36 Company with the
Havoline brand
38 Notre dame, e.g.
39 Valdez of
coffee advertising
40 Period of the
Cenozoic Era
42 Language suffix
45 Servings of mashed
potatoes, e.g.
47 Writer Kipling
48 Let go
49 Cynic Bierce who
once defined
"alone" as "in
bad company"

Online subscriptions:
Today's puzzle and more
than 4,000 past puzzles,
nytimes.com/crosswords
($39.95 a year).


52 Swear off
53 Potentially
dangerous
55 Sapling
56 Relax
58 Goes in
59 Stairway post
60 Twinkie filler
62 "Back to the
Future" villains
64 Amo: I love:: __
: I hate
65 "The Merry
Drinker" painter
66 Pop singer Del Rey
67 In need of a lift
70 "Adoration"
subjects in a
Leonardo painting
74 Maine college
75 Irish county and
seaport
77 Have troops in
79 [What a bore]
81 Martin Sheen's real
family name
83 Tops off?
85 Pam of "Jackie
Brown"
86 Takeout choice
87 All riled up
88 Part of London
where Eliza
Doolittle is from
90 One side of an 1899-
1902 war
91 Smidgen
92 Source of ivory
93 Uzbekistan's
Sea
94 About a quarter
of the population of
Sicily lives on its
slopes


98 Title girl in a Chuck
Berry hit
99 Make enforceable
100 Opportunity
101 Learn well
104 Take blows for
107 A line in an A-line?
109 Punk offshoot
110 Be supported by
112 Movie director
who was himself
the subject of a
1994 movie
114 Gold-medal
gymnast Mary Lou
116 Powell's successor
on the Supreme
Court
117 Some starting help
118 "Keep going!"
119 Love to hate?
120 Canon parts
121 On the receiving
end of a Dear John
letter

DOWN
1 Writer of old
2 Secular
3 See 51-Down
4 Gumshoes
5 __ empty
stomach
6 73-Down, relatively
7 Denver-to-
Albuquerque dir.
8 See 52-Down
9 Break a peace
treaty, say
10 Gaelic tongue
11 Lunging sport
12 93-Down, relatively
13 Lines to Wrigley
Field


14 See 82-Down 26
26 l^
15 Fine point
16 Bone: Prefix 32 33
17 Moreno of "West
Side Story" 38
18 Ticked (off) 45
19 Goofs I
28 "Yessiree!" 49 50 51
30 Dreamcast maker
33 Resume datum 5
35 __ in kangaroo 59
37 Boomers' kids
40 Sip on 64
41 Limit 70 71
42 95-Down, relatively _
43 gut" 77 78
44 Breyers --
alternative 83
46 Rest in a hammock, 87
say
47 Wanders 91
48 Abbr. at the start
of a memo 98
49 He's 2, for one 101 102 103-
50 He "will never
speak unless he 110
has something to
say," in a song 116
513-Down, relatively
52 8-Down, relatively 119
54 "Bambi" doe -
57 Air-freshener scent
61 Cleaner's supply 73 See 6-Down
63 One who might yell, 74 Cartoon sound
"Go home!" 75 Hubbub
66 Rested in a 76 Macros, e.g.
hammock, say 77 Words of
68 Gets up there remembrance,
69 Nap briefly
71 Taking a certain 78 Michaelof
tone
tone "Arrested
72 Fuel-economy Development"
authority, for
short 80 McFlurry flavor


82 14-Down, relatively 97 Observed Yom


84 Indian wrap
89 Depots: Abbr.
90 Built-in part of
a tank top, maybe
92 Block party?
93 See 12-Down
95 See 42-Down
96 "Make it stop!"


Kippur
98 Italian grandpa
99 Funeral delivery
of old
1011" stupid
question..."
102 Vitamin
a.k.a. para-
aminobenzoic acid
103 Director
Gus Van


105 In a hammock,
maybe
106 Gershwin
biographer David
108 Many a Yelp link
111 Big Apple N.L.
team
113 Fielding feats:
Abbr.
115 Cable inits. for
a cinephile


FOR ANSWERS, TURN TO PAGE 7


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No. 0126





SThe Sun/Sunday, February 2,2014


FLAIR


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3


gLNUE EOT


Should you
deciding whether to fix a
broken product or spring
for a new one often feels
like an expensive guess, notes
Consumer Reports. But there's
no need to throw away good
money on a bad product. In
fact, repairing broken items
and keeping them going as
long as possible isn't always the
best way to save money.
Consumer Reports offers
these tips that can help extend
the life of your current product
or new purchase, based on
the experiences of 29,281
subscribers it surveyed as
part of its 2013 Online Annual
Questionnaire.
Products aren't breaking
faster. The repair rates of most
products in Consumer Reports'
latest survey are similar to what
it found when it conducted the
survey in 2010. Some products
are breaking less often. Laptops
had a repair rate of 24 percent,
down from 36 percent in 2010;
the LCD TV repair rate is 7


repair or replace that broken product?


Consumer

Reports

percent, down from 15 percent.
So why does it seem like things
don't last as long as they used
to? Because when products do
break, it's memorable: They stop
working altogether (53 percent)
or work poorly (32 percent),
according to the survey

SAVE MONEY ON REPAIRS
People who used indepen-
dent repair shops were more
satisfied with the repairs than
those who used factory service,
which is consistent with what
Consumer Reports found previ-
ously. And repairs cost less, too.
That was especially true when
it came to large appliances and
lawn equipment.
Another way to save on
repairs is to do them yourself,
as 31 percent of those surveyed


did when their products
weren't covered by warranty.
The prevalence of how-to
videos on YouTube and other
sites such as RepairClinic.
corn, which itself hosts more
than 1,400 videos makes
repairing even complicated
appliances a much less formi-
dable challenge.
But if your product is under
manufacturer's warranty, you'll
need to use a factory-autho-
rized repair shop or risk voiding
the warranty. Just make sure
the technician who will be sent
to your home has been proper-
ly trained on your product.
No matter who does the
repair, Consumer Reports'
long-standing advice remains:
Don't spend more than 50
percent of the cost of a new
product on repairing an old
one. And if an item has already
broken down once before,
replacement may make more
sense.
Warranties don't improve


satisfaction. Only 15 percent
of products in Consumer
Reports' survey were covered
by the manufacturer's regular
warranty when they broke, and
about 10 percent were under
a service contract or extended
warranty. People who had a
service contract or an extended
warranty weren't any happier
with their repairs. They actually
were more likely to have had
repairs done incorrectly the
first time around and waited at
least two weeks for the repair
than people who didn't have
those contracts.
Even the 77 percent of
people with those contracts
who were offered a free repair
or replacement for their prod-
uct didn't save much money
overall. The median cost for the
contract or warranty was $136;
the median cost for repairs was
$152.

CHEAP FIXES YOU CAN HANDLE
Not every problem needs a


repair technician. Easy fixes you
can do yourself include:
Refrigerator. If it seems
to run constantly, dirt and
debris might be coating the
condenser coil. (See the
manual for the location.)
Cost: up to $5 for a condenser
brush.
Range. If your cooktop coil
doesn't heat or heats inter-
mittently, replace the burner
receptacle. Cost: $10.
Clothes washer. If water en-
ters the machine even when
it's off, replace the water-inlet
valve, which can wear out.
Cost: $25 to $50.
Vacuum. If the brush roll
turns little, if at all, it could be
the brush roll belt or the roll
itself. Cost: $3 to $40.
Snow blower or mower. If
you know you have fresh fuel
and have primed the engine
as outlined in the manual,
trouble starting could simply
be caused by an old spark
plug. Cost: $2 to $5.


Helpful advice when caring


for an aging loved one


PROVIDED BY STATEPOINT


An estimated 15 million Americans
are sandwiched between two gener-
ations and working to support both,
according to the Pew Research Center.
Known as the "Sandwich Generation,"
these adults struggle to balance caring
for their children and their elderly
parents.
"Staying organized is important to
ensure that loved ones aren't ignored
in the hustle and bustle of a hectic
family schedule," says Mark Armstrong,
founder and CEO of ComForcare Senior
Services and At Your Side Home Care,
an international senior care franchise
that provides in-home, non-medical
care to seniors and others in need of
assistance.
Armstrong is offering some juggling
tips for family caregivers:
Map out doctor's appointments,
prescription pick-up dates, school talent
shows and other planned events on
a calendar or on your smart phone to
avoid double booking and overextend-
ing yourself.
Members of the sandwich genera-
tion often feel they don't spend enough
time with their children because they're
busy caring for their parents and vice
versa. Combat this issue with intergen-
erational activities, such as cooking
dinner, taking a walk and watching a
movie.
Caring for another human being for
an extended period of time can take its
toll on even the most caring and nurtur-
ing of people. Don't be afraid to ask for
help. It may mean alternating days with
a relative or bringing in a professional
caregiver.
Watch out for these red flags that
could mean your aging relative is in
need of additional assistance: mis-
matched, wrinkled or soiled clothing,
weight loss or gain, trouble remember-
ing names or an unclean home.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY STATEPOINT


Discuss the possibility of hiring a
professional caregiver to relieve some
strain on you. A caregiver can help your
loved one age safely and comfortably
in his or her own home by providing a
wide range of non-medical home care
services, including help with bathing,
hairstyling and dressing, incontinence
care, medication reminders, chores and
light exercise assistance.
Look for a company that offers a wide
range of services 24 hours a day, seven
days a week, including holidays. For
example, ComForcare Senior Services
and At Your Side Home Care, develop
a customized care plan based on an
in-home evaluation by a nurse and
provides ongoing training and educa-
tion to caregivers. More information can
be found at www.ComForcare.com or
www.AtYourSideHomeCare.com.
Even you need some care some-
times! Set aside "me" time every day to
do something just for you and you'll be
able to return to your caregiving duties
refreshed and ready to help.
Every so often, take the time to
address the challenges facing you and
your aging loved one.


Opera star to sing national


anthem at Super Bowl
NEWYORK (AP) -The Super Bowl will
have a touch of the classical this year: Opera
star Renee Fleming will sing the national
anthem.
The four-time Grammy winner will
perform before the Denver Broncos and the
Seattle Seahawks play at MetLife Stadium
in East Rutherford, N.J., on Feb 2. Fleming
is the first opera star to sing the national "
anthem at the Super Bowl. In recent years, it
has been performed mainly by a mix of pop ......
and country stars.
Known as"The People's Diva," the soprano
is closely identified with the New York
City region, having spent years singing on
iconic stages such as Lincoln Center and
Carnegie Hall. Last year, she received the
National Medal of Arts, the highest honor This March 19, 2012, fl
the government gives to artists. singer Renee Fleming
Fleming, who lives in NewYork City, sang the State of Illinois bu
the national anthem before Thompson Center, in C
Game 2 of the 2003 World Series at Yankee time Grammy winner,
Stadium. national anthem befo
Online: take on the Seattle Se
http://www.superbowl.com Stadium in East Ruthe


,


AP PHOTO
ile photo shows opera
in the rotunda of
Jilding, the James R.
Chicago. Fleming, a four-
will perform sing the
re the Denver Broncos
ahawks at MetLife
erford, N.J. today.


New releases from I

Ruben Studdard,

Toni Braxton and Babyface


uben Studdard's got
a new release this
week called Uncon-
ditional Love.
Ruben Christopher
Studdard was born in
Frankfurt, Germany on
Sept. 12, 1978. He is best
known as the winner of
the second season of
American Idol. Come on,
you remember the man
they called "The Velvet
Teddy Bear,"/' the guy who
beat Clay Aiken.
Studdard grew up
in the Birmingham,
Ala., area and began
performing at the age
of 3 in his church's choir.
Both of his parents
were school teachers
and instilled the love
of music in their son. In
high school, he split his
time between singing
and playing football. He
earned a scholarship to
Alabama A&M University
for football, but once he
got there his interest in
music soared. He tried
so hard to find that big
break into the music
scene, and it wasn't until
a friend asked him to
accompany her to the
American Idol auditions
in Nashville that things
started to happen. We
know that he won the
title but what has he
done with that exposure
since? Well, let me give
you the rundown. He has
five previous releases,
four R&B and one gospel
- not old time gospel
but new style gospel. OK,
Jack? (Just a little humor
for one of my loyal
readers.) Studdard has
sold millions of albums
and has been nominated
for a Grammy Award
back in 2003.
Unconditional Love


album is his sixth studio
release, and his first in
two years. It features new
original songs and some
of the most romantic
standards. I am excited
to hear his version of the
Boz Scaggs' hit "Love,
Look What You've Done
To Me'"and his duet
with the daughter of
one of Ruben's idols,
Donnie Hathaway, Lalah
and they cover Syreeta
Wright and Billy Preston's
hit "With You I'm Born
Again." Let's hope Ruben
brings that velvet voice
back to top of the charts.
Next we have a new
major release by Toni
Braxton and Babyface
called Love, Marriage &
Divorce. Here is an album
created by two giants
from the R&B world.
During the 1980s and
1990s, these two were
unstoppable when it
came to turning out hits.
Who doesn't remember
Babyface's "Whip Appeal"
and Toni Braxton's
"Unbreak My Heart"?
And that is only naming
a few. These artists have
16 Grammys between
them.
Toni Michele Braxton
was born in Severn, Md.
on Oct. 7, 1967, and
Kenneth Brian Edmonds
was born on April 10,
1959 in Indianapolis,
Ind. Both were raised in
large families. Toni is the
oldest of six siblings and
Babyface is the fifth child
in his family. His father
passed away while he
attended middle school
and his mother had to
finish raising the family.
This was the time in
his life that he became
determined to have a
career in music. Good for


Tft ByTJKOONTZ

him and great job by his
mother. I know how hard
it is to raise children by
yourself, I too have had
to take on that task.
Toni Braxton was
singing with her sisters
during the late 1980s
and was signed to Arista
Records, but albums
sales were not satisfacto-
ry. It was Babyface who
gave her a chance by
having her sing with him
on a song for a movie in
1992. He immediately
signed her to his Laface
Records records and pro-
duced her debut album,
which won a Grammy
Award.
These two have not
worked together for
21 years. The album
seems to flow through
a relationship starting
with "Roller Coaster"
and ending with the
"D-Word." And what
timing just a few days
before Valentine's Day.
Other major releases
this week are from the
Augustines, Big Head
Todd & the Monsters,
Bombay Bicycle Club,
Les Claypool's Duo De
Twang, Paul Rodgers,
Smoking Hearts, Aretha
Franklin ( box set), Pat
Metheny (jazz), Now 49
and Wow Gospel 2014.
Independent releases
are from Nicole Atkins,
Behemoth, Within
Temptation, 2 Pistols
(rap) and Lil Wyte &
Frayser Boy
Keep Rockin'Folks!

HAVE A COMMENT?
Tom Koontz is the owner ofTJ's CDS
& More at 3275-ATamiami Trail
in Port Charlotte. He loves reader
comments, and can be contacted at
tjscds@peoplepc.com.


TOs



M I 0c SI






~Page4 www.sunnewspapers.net FLAIR The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


IL I


.0. WN6IAkN
BOOK COMPANY
Look what I found! (941) 505-1624
16480 Burnt Store Rd.

By HERB FAYER Punta Gorda, FL 33955 12
NU CLUiNL~L www.SandmanBooks.com
.5439


)PW


The art of the deal


I was asked in an email why I shop an-
tique malls where you are almost always
looking at retail prices. First off, I often
find items where the dealer has not been
up-to-date on current prices. I can buy those
items without worrying about a haggling.
For example, I was in a small town in
Tennessee and saw a set of Hall autumn
leaf Irish coffee mugs for about $450
for eight. In the front of the mall, in the
showcase where the register sat was the
same set for $110. Then they took off the
standard 10 percent and I got them for
$99.
Another thing to be aware of in malls
is that the mall will almost always be
willing to call a dealer with your offer. I
always offer less than I'm willing to pay


because I expect the dealer to make a
counter offer and usually that will be
close to my price. Sometimes they will
only call if an item is over some minimum
price. In that case, I leave my offer in
writing with my phone number.
I sometimes shop with friends tag-
ging along. I find that they are usually
shy about offering low-ball amounts. I
explain to them that when I'm a seller
and I've had an item for sale for a long
time, I'll usually accept what would be
an unreasonable offer just to turn over
my inventory. That means the item you
are looking at may be on the "dead" list
for that dealer and it's worth a try. I can't
ever remember meeting a dealer who
wouldn't bargain.


The same holds true on eBay. If you see
an item that you would want to buy at a
lower price, you can make an offer before
the bidding ends or better yet wait until
the auction is over if it didn't sell then
make an offer. Bargains abound on eBay if
you know how to find them. Try search-
ing on possible misspelled item names
such as "Victroila" instead of Victrola. You
may end up being the only bidder. Use as
many off-words as you can think of.
Recently on an auction site there was
an item I have tried to buy before but has
always sold for more than what I was will-
ing to pay. In this case there was an awful
photo that made it look like a ruined,
beat up version of the item. Most bidders
will skip over that kind of listing. Reading


the description I found an apology for a
bad photo and a description that said it
was a mint piece. I bought it for a fifth of
what I would have had to pay in normal
circumstances.
In parting, I'd like to tell you my favor-
ite antique mall story. A little sign on the
tray of pennies next to the register said,
"If you need one take one, if you need
two take two, if you need three get a job."


HAVE A QUESTION?
Herb Fayer has been collecting for over 30 years and
knows his stuff. If you have questions or comments
please write to him at drjunk941@gmail.com and
please tell him what city you're in.


Ready for Christmas 2014? One frugal blogger is already on it


By CLAUDIA BUCK
THE SACRAMENTO BEE

While most of us are
finally putting Christmas
away for the year, Erin
Huffstetler is just getting
warmed up. For 2014.
For years, the Tennessee-
based "frugal living"writer
has made it a mission to
spend less than $100 on
Christmas for a family of
four, plus gifts for teachers,
parents and extended
relatives. That amount also
includes a fair amount
spent on holiday foods and
decorations.
Last month, she tallied
up everything she'd spent
on Christmas 2013.Total:
$99.70.
How does she do it?
With a mixture of year-
round bargain hunting,
couponing and frugal
shortcuts, enough so that
she can buy brand-names
and new electronics at
deep discounts.
For Huffstetler, 33, it's a
lifestyle and a full-time job.
A mother of two daugh-
ters, ages 9 and 11, she
writes a regular frugal-liv-
ing column on About.com
and hosts her own site,
MyFrugalHome.com.
To find out how this "fru-
galista"accomplishes a $100
Christmas, the Sacramento
Bee spoke with her earlier
this month by phone.
CLEARANCE: Make
it a habit to check the
clearance racks, sales bins
or "endcaps" (the end-of-
the-aisle discount spots) in
stores you regularly visit.
"It's hit or miss. You may
not find something every
time, but when you do,
stick it in a closet, and it's
there when you need it.


It's such a simple thing but
saves a huge amount on
our budget."
DVDS, ELECTRONICS
FOR LESS: This year, her
girls wanted the new
DreamWorks'animated
movie, "The Croods,"
which was selling for
$17.99 at Target. What
she paid: $2.48. Here's
how: On Amazon.com,
she spotted a "flash sale,"
a brief, minutes-only
sale designed to attract
quick-buying customers,
that offered the movie for
$7.48. She printed out the
Amazon page and took it
to her local Target, which
matched the price and let
her use a $5-off coupon
she'd picked up online.
Bottom line: She got the
DVD for roughly 86 percent
off the original price.
The Kindle e-reader
topped both her daughters'
Christmas wish lists last
year. She bought the $69
model for $12. "It was
something they weren't
expecting, but it was a
great deal'"albeit one that
took a little maneuvering.
As a $79-a-year Amazon
Prime account holder, she
is entitled to special offers,
along with free two-day
shipping for regular online
purchases, two free Kindle
e-books a month, plus
video streaming of movies
and TV shows. In October,
Amazon offered its Prime
members the basic Kindle
for $40 off, which brought
it down to $29. Coupled
with $17 in Amazon
credits that she'd earned
from answering surveys
on other sites, her total
out-of-pocket price was
about $12.
BEST BARGAINS? On


her MyFrugalHome.com
blog, Huffstetler posted
photos of her family's 2013
holiday gifts. Among them:
a blue-striped tank top
from a JCPenney clearance
rackfor$1.97;a $3 art
portfolio case, found at a
yard sale; a Transformer
action figure ($59 new) for
her nephew, scooped up
at a garage sale for $1.99.
Using online sites like
Hip2Save.com, she clicks
weekly on three to five free
items from varied retailers,
things "perfectly tailored
for going into someone's
stocking."A click of a
mouse"really saves me
a ton of money. and it's
actually less effort than
going out to a store'
Among her favorites:
K-Cups, the tiny sin-
gle-serving coffee contain-
ers offered by most major
coffee retailers. She created
a coffee basket for her
dad, filled with 25 or more
K-Cups from Starbucks,
Gevalia, Green Mountain
and other purveyors eager
to send free samples to
potential customers. "Of all
the gifts I've given him, that
was the one I heard about
again and again."
One year, she took
advantage of an irresistible
Pottery Barn offer: $10 off
a minimum $10 purchase,
with free shipping. She
purchased a number of
$10 gifts that arrived on
her doorstep for zero cost.
GROCERIES, TOO:
All the major holidays
- Easter, Thanksgiving
and Christmas are
prime time to stock up on
discounts for traditional
foods, whether it's hams
and turkeys or baking
ingredients, like chocolate


chips, flour and canned
pumpkin. Using a coupon
matchup site tied to
her local grocery store
(Kroger), Huffstetler buys
on-sale items, paired with
coupons from her Sunday
newspaper. She'll buy
expensive brands of flour
and freeze them. Even
the most mundane items
get stretched. All those
mini-candy canes handed
out everywhere during the
holidays? She pulverizes
them to use as peppermint
flavoring in hot chocolate
and cookie recipes.
CREDIT CARD, BANK
REWARDS: Huffstetler likes
credit cards with rewards
programs, either cash-back
or points toward other pur-
chases. She uses two Chase
cards, which give reward
points on Amazon.com that
can be used for purchases.
She also takes advan-
tage of special discounts
offered by her bank at
specific stores. One month
it might be 5 percent
cash-back on all Wal-Mart
purchases; another month
it might be Starbucks or a
major pharmacy. You sign
up online but there's no
fee or other commitment,
she said. "If I'm logged into
my bank to check my ac-
count balance, I'll click over
to see what deals they're
offering." For instance, in
December, there was a
10 percent cash-back offer
for any purchase at Great
Clips hair salons. The hair
salon itself was already
offering $12.99 haircuts for
$9.99 as a holiday promo-
tion. She bought a year's
worth of $9.99 haircuts
for her husband, knowing
there'd be an additional
10 percent bank rebate off


the entire purchase.
Similarly, with Starbucks,
she bought a $5 gift card
online, which triggered
another $5 incentive card
from the coffee company.
And her bank offered a
$5-back offer. "So for my
$5 investment, I had a $15
gift. You start with the
simple stuff, then it kind of
gets to be a game. It's fun
to learn these things"
UNCOOL FOR TEENS?
It's relatively easy to delight
unsuspecting young kids
with freebies, garage-sale
finds and other thrifty
gifts, but does it fly with
brand-conscious teens?
Huffstetler said she's not
a bit concerned that her
preteen daughters might
balk at thrift-store gifts as
they get older or prefer
labels that don't fit within
her budget.
"My kids are wearing
the same stuff everyone
else is wearing. They're
wearing Nike sneakers and
Under Armour T-shirts,
things that are on trend
with everybody else' But
instead of spending $50
on a sweatshirt, it might be
50 cents at a yard sale. "My
experience is that people
get rid of stuff a lot faster
than you'd think."
With her kids, "It's
definitely a mind-set," said
Huffstetler. "If it's a brand
they like, they could care
less where it came from."
DIAL OUT THE NOISE:
It's easy to get over-
whelmed and tempted
by too many"deals"on
things you don't really
need or want. "You have to
dial out the noise. If there
are too many deal sites
or too many emails from
companies in your inbox,


it'll stress you out.You can
drive yourself crazy trying
to follow too many sites.
Find one or two that work
for you."
Her favorites: Coupons.
corn and Hip2Save.com,
which post discounts and
freebies offered by major
stores, restaurants and
grocers. She checks the
latter once or twice a day
when she's online.
NOT AN OBSESSION:
Although Huffstetler
makes her living being
frugal, she knows it's not
for everyone.
"If it makes you miser-
able, is taking too much
time or you're buying
something you really don't
like, pay attention. What
works for me may not work
for you. But it's so much
more fun than handing my
money to a cashier."
After her husband's job
was downsized last year,
he joined her full time on
her blogging and writing
venture. Primarily based
on her income from About.
corn, she said, the two
pull down a very respect-
able income, which she
declined to state publicly.
With two college degrees -
in communications and art
- she writes daily posts
for About.com, which
pays her based on every
1,000 page views. She also
writes for magazines and
websites and contributes
to books on frugal living.
Frugal living is hugely
satisfying, Huffstetler said.
"When you live frugally,
you pick up a lot of skills
along the way. This is a
lifestyle that empowers
you to do more for yourself
and rewards you for your
effort"


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Then, use your rewards card to start earning"Stars"each time you
make purchases at coffee shops or in grocery stores to earn coupons
and freebies. You'll even get a free drink on your birthday.
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Get the most out of your devices and download free user guides to
iOS7 for iPhone or iPad from Apple.
The easy-to-understand instructions reveal tips to getthe most out
of your devices and come straightfrom the source- Apple. Download
the guides in iBooks for iOS devices or on iTunes for use on your
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-Sun Sentinel


em
v400


Visit Our L
New Showroom! | 5

E. PRICE BLVD.


-Page 4


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


Meet Ron Base

Author of The Sanibel
Sunset Detective
January 8, 2014
til 4 PM






The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014 FLAIR www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5


I 4 By MARYKLEISS
ti o w.' "'so I I


2 $O2 $200 21bs of SHRIMP
2 F R $ 2 PEELED & DEVEINED for '22!


ASEA SCALLOPS JUMBO & COLOSSAL SHRIMP
WILD CAUGHT WILD CAUGHT WWORFIH
lB am, MAINE STEAMERS HADDOCK COD SWORDFISH
WSMOK D
WhileTheyLast! MAINE LOBSTERS SWORDFISH DIP
mAIntCCIrC


3LBS LO BSTERS seafood Market 2700 Placida Rd., Eng. (941)698-8946
FOR $10 W N L B T R Seafood Market 2700 Placida Rd., Eng. (941) 698-8946


Shrimp, salmon and muscovies


While moving into a new
apartment, I noticed
several Muscovy ducks
waddling around. Several
months later, two mommy
ducks had 12 ducklings each.
Many were lost to the wilds, but
a set of twins from one duck
survived and about eight from
the other. How can you not feed
these cute little fluffy chicks
hanging around your front
door?
They are darned smart little
birds as well. I bet I'm the only
grandma who has ducks tap-
ping on her door each morning
between eight and nine waiting
for a handout!
A lot of folks don't like them
and their messes, but Muscovies
eat all kinds of bugs roaches,
spiders and almost all creepy
crawlies. So they've probably
saved us all from a few spider
bites.
No duck soup on the menu
today, but lots of shrimp,
salmon and sausage. Speaking
of which you can get great
fresh fish from Harbor Seafood.
Maralee and Tony are the
owners. Their shop is located
in Port Charlotte, 3762-D
Tamiami Trail. Or phone them at
941-764-3474.
Gotta go, the ducks are
knocking. Thanks for reading!
Happy Super Bowl Sunday,
fans!


SHRIMP PORT CHARLOTTE
1 12 pounds shrimp
12 pound blue cheese,
Gorgonzola or Roquefort
1 8-ounce package cream
cheese
1 tablespoon chopped chives
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
cup white wine (or cooking
wine)
Mix together cream cheese
and blue cheese. Add chives,
parsley, garlic and wine to make
sauce. Pour over raw, cleaned
and shelled shrimp. Bake in
oven-proof dish at 400 degrees
for 30 minutes.

HERB ROASTED ORANGE SALMON
2 tablespoons olive oil
1A cup fresh orange juice
Finely grated zest of 1 orange
2 teaspoons minced garlic
2 teaspoons dried tarragon
Salt and pepper to taste
4 8-ounce salmon steaks
2 teaspoons fresh chopped
chives
Combine olive oil, orange juice,
jest garlic, tarragon, salt and
pepper into a bowl. Add salmon
to marinade for 1 hour at room
temperature, turning over once
or twice. Preheat oven to 475.
Place salmon in oven-proof dish,
pour marinade on top. Bake 7 to
8 minutes.Turn and bake 7 to 8
minutes more. Fish should flake
easily when tested with a fork.


Carefully remove to a serving
platter and sprinkle with chives.
Serves 4 salmon lovers.

CLASSIC FRIED CATFISH
cup yellow cornmeal
1A cup flour
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
A teaspoon garlic powder
Catfish fillets
Vegetable oil
Combine cornmeal, flour,
salt, cayenne pepper and garlic
powder. Coat catfish with mixture,
shaking off excess. Fill a 12-inch
skillet half full with vegetable oil,
heat. Add catfish in single layer
and fry till golden brown, about 5
to 6 minutes, depending on size.
Remove and drain on paper tow-
els or newspapers. (Easy recipe for
John Cavanaugh of Punta Gorda.)

HANGTOWN FRY
1 can oysters, drained
12 cup white wine (or cooking
wine)
12 cup chopped green onion
Butter or margarine
3 eggs
Salt and pepper to taste
Dash chopped parsley
Heat large skillet add butter.
Add oysters, saute for a moment
then add wine. Do not overcook
oysters. Remove to a heated plate.
Add onion to remaining liquid
in skillet. Reduce mixture over
medium high heat and reserve.


Lightly whip eggs and 1 table-
spoon water. Pour into a preheat-
ed omelet pan. When omelet
begins to form, add oysters, salt
and pepper. Fold omelet over and
pour reserved liquid over top.
Sprinkle with parsley.

TEMPTING TUNA POCKETS
1 6-ounce can tuna, drained
2 cup chopped onion
2 cup diced cucumber
1 diced tomato
1 diced green pepper
1 tablespoon mayonnaise
2 teaspoons lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste
Dash Tabasco
4 whole wheat pita pockets, cut
in halves
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Flake tuna, stir in other ingredi-
ents. Spoon into pita pockets.
Place on cookie sheet and bake
5-10 minutes or till crisp.

ITALIAN SAUSAGES IN
PEPPER-BASIL SAUCE
5 mild Italian sausages (Publix
makes their own and they are
great!)
1 medium onion, coarsely
chopped
1 large clove garlic, chopped
1 tablespoon butter or oil
3 small red and green bell
peppers, cut into strips
2 large tomatoes, coarsely
chopped
1A cup fresh basil


Salt and pepper to taste
Cook sausages in greased skillet
until well browned on all sides.
Remove sausages, set aside. Add
onion and garlic and cook until
onion is soft. Add peppers to
skillet and cook about 4 minutes.
Add tomatoes, basil, sausages, salt
and pepper. Stir and cook over
medium heat for a few minutes,
stirring gently. Cover and con-
tinue cooking about 25 minutes,
stirring occasionally. 4-5 servings.

MARSHMALLOW APPLE BETTY
4 medium apples, peeled and
coarsely chopped
4 cup raisins
/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon lemon juice
12 teaspoon cinnamon
Dash nutmeg
Dash salt
1 12 cups miniature
marshmallows
Preheat oven to 350. In medium
baking dish mix all ingredients
except marshmallows. Cover and
bake 30 minutes or till apples are
tender. Remove cover and stir
well. Sprinkle marshmallows on
top and broil for 1-2 minutes or
till nicely browned. Serves 8.


HAVE A RECIPE?
Mary Kleiss welcomes calls, suggestions
and recipes for her column. Email her at
mkleiss@msn.com, or call 941-889-7297.


Automakers ready to react in real time to Super Bowl ad responses


By BRENT SNAVELY
DETROIT FREE PRESS


Automakers advertising in the Super
Bowl this year will be more prepared than
ever to immediately react in marketing
war rooms to feedback about their ads
that promise to feature Muppets, British
villains, patriotic themes and, of course,
something secret from Chrysler.
This year will be the fourth in a row
with a big showing from the automotive
industry. Once again, automakers will
use whatever they can, from canine to
supermodel, to be memorable amid the
advertising clutter.
Volkswagen will have a staff of about
10 people from marketing and advertis-
ing, public relations and the legal de-
partment watching the game, said Justin
Osborne, general manager of marketing
communications for the German auto-
maker. Its 60-second ad will air during the
second quarter.
"We've set up a pretty robust war
room," Osborne said. "This year, I think
there will be a lot more emphasis on
real-time marketing and reacting to
what's happening at the game."
Ford hasn't run a commercial during
the actual game for seven years for the
Ford brand, but it's hinting at big plans.
The Dearborn, Mich., automaker bought
an ad for Lincoln last year. General Motors
said in August it will return to the big
game after benching itself last year.
This year, at least nine automotive
brands, one automotive retailer and an
automotive accessory company plan to
flood the zone during the Super Bowl
on Sunday. They include: Audi, CarMax,


Chevrolet, Hyundai, Jaguar/Land Rover,
Kia, Toyota and WeatherTech.
It can cost up to $10 million to produce
a Super Bowl commercial and buy the ad
time. Most automotive companies release
teasers in the days and weeks before the
game. They intensely monitor viewer
responses during the game and as they
continue the promotion afterward.
"For us, it is not just about the spot on
Sunday,"said Michael Sprague, executive
vice president of Kia Motors America. "We
build whole campaigns around them,
and they are part of the overall launch
campaign for the overall product."
Most automakers now have a staff of ad
writers, public relations professionals and
lawyers watching the game together. The
industry buzzword of the day -"re-
al-time marketing"- is best exemplified
by Oreo.
Last year, Oreo reacted quickly when
the lights went out at the Super Dome in
New Orleans for more than 30 minutes.
During the blackout, Oreo sent out an ad
on Twitter that said, "You can still Dunk in
the Dark."
The message quickly generated more
than 15,000 re-tweets. It also proved that
people aren't just watching the game:
They are also watching their smartphones
and sending messages to friends and
followers.
"The advertisers that are able to con-
nect all the screens, those are the ones
that will succeed,"said Mark Simon, chief
creative officer for Lowe Campbell Ewald,
located in downtown Detroit.
In 2013, automotive companies spent
about $92 million on 12 commercials for
nine different brands, according to Kantar


Media, an advertising research company.
"Automotive is still a heavily cluttered
category," said Jon Swallen, chief research
officer for Kantar Media.
Automotive manufacturers are at-
tracted to the Super Bowl because they
market their products to people across
almost all age groups and demographics
and are continuously rolling out new
products that need marketing support.
They have budgets large enough to be
able to absorb the cost, Swallen said.
And it's not just the size of the audience
- which can exceed 100 million it's
that many people are just as interested in
the commercials as they are in the game.
"It's that one time of the year that
advertising gets invited for the party,"
Simon said.
This year's Super Bowl will include au-
tomakers who are making their very first
appearance as well as all-pro veterans.
Jaguar/Land Rover is a newcomer to
the game and also has one of the most
intriguing marketing campaigns so far.
The Indian-owned automaker is playing
off its roots and heritage with a market-
ing campaign called "British Villains"that
plays off Hollywood's tendency to cast
British men as bad guys.
Its 60-second ad called "Rendezvous"
stars Sir Ben Kingsley, Tom Hiddleston
and Mark Strong and was filmed in
London by Oscar-winning British director
Tom Hooper.
Chrysler continues to be one of the
few companies that doesn't reveal any
details about its plans until its com-
mercial debuts during the game. The
Auburn Hills, Mich., automaker generated
political controversy in 2012 with Clint


MOT PHOTO
Kermit the Frog and the all new 2014 High-
lander on the set of Toyota's new commercial to
air during the 2014 Super Bowl on Feb. 2.
Eastwood's "Halftime in America" pep
talk and changed the nature of Super
Bowl advertising with the widely praised,
first-ever two-minute ad starring Eminem
in 2011.
"We had the right commercial and the
wrong car" in 2011, Chrysler CEO Sergio
Marchionne said earlier this month
after the company unveiled an all-new
Chrysler 200 at the North American
International Auto Show in Detroit. "I
think we now have hopefully the right
commercial and the right car."
GM is planning to air two 60-second
commercials for Chevrolet but hasn't said
which nameplates will be featured.
Hyundai will be returning to the
Super Bowl for the seventh year straight.
The Korean automaker has two 30-sec-
ond spots.
"They don't call it the Super Bowl for
nothing. When it comes to audience size,
engagement with the advertising, social
media talk value, and driving shopping
traffic to Hyundai.com, nothing else even
comes close,";' said Steve Shannon, vice
president of marketing, Hyundai Motor
America.


ANIMALS
FROM PAGE 1

will air its 10th version at
3 p.m. Sunday on Animal
Planet, is getting more
and more competition.
Where the Puppy Bowl
has a halftime show
featuring cats, Hallmark
Channel is cranking up
an entire Kitten Bowl
(www.hallmarkchannel.
com/kittenbowl) at noon
Sunday. The three-hour


telecast promises "the
greatest feline show-
down in cable television
history.:'
But the strangest (and
potentially most watch-
able) animal-themed
Super Bowl Sunday
telecast may be that
of the Fish Bowl, on
National Geographic
Wild. Beginning at 6 p.m.
Sunday, the network
promises four hours of a
fish swimming in a bowl.
And, as far as I can tell,
just a fish swimming in a


bowl. See more at
http://channel.national
geographic.com/
wild/fish-bowl.
It's like a yule log for
the Super Bowl. Or a
tribute to Andy Warhol.
And there's a replay at
10 p.m.!
The irresistibility of
animals has been known
since long before there
was an Animal Planet;
one'90s sitcom included
a fictional TV hit consist-
ing of puppies playing
in a box. At the same


time, though, we're a
long way from people
giving up their mid-win-
ter football-watching
parties in favor of ones
built around cavorting
creatures.
But some of those
animal telecasts are
during the pregame
blather. And if the game
itself is a blowout, or
you hit a long stretch
of commercials you've
already seen, won't you
be wondering what the
fish is up to?


1


o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5


FLAIR


P.:,
FLORIDA
LITTLE NECKS
125/100
FLORIDA
riumni r hirrur









Fashion blogs by and for the common people


By SAMANTHA MELAMED
THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER


By now, 2013 has been widely eulogized as
the year of the selfie the year when, it ap-
pears, our collective vanity finally surpassed
our sense of shame.
But for Danielle Audain, who regularly
hits the streets of Fishtown and Northern
Liberties in Philadelphia armed with a
camera, tripod and remote, selfies are just a
practical necessity.
That's because Audain runs a person-
al-style blog, a genre devoted to showcasing,
through several photo shoots per week, her
every outfit and accessory itemized. The blog,
IndieElectronicAlternative.com, is part tutorial,
part sartorial kaffeeklatsch for the masses.
And while passersby may stop and
gawk, Audain is on to something. As top
personal-style bloggers are making the
transition from Internet fame to mainstream
celebrity landing TV gigs, like Filipino
blogger Bryanboy on "America's Next Top
Model"and book deals, like "Man Repeller"
Leandra Medine, who published a memoir in
September more bloggers are following
their lead.
The long tail of personal-style blogs now
encompasses all sizes, ages, colors, faiths, and
fashion proclivities.
"You'd think that in order to do this, you'd
have to be a certain type of person: be in the
fashion industry or have connections. And it's
totally opposite. I thinkthat's why so many
people are creating blogs," said Audain, who's
31 and a pharmaceutical sales representative.
"It doesn't matter who you are, what you look
like, or what you do."


According to Minh-HaT. Pham, a Cornell
University professor who's writing a book
about Asian personal-style bloggers,
such sites are born from a basic impulse:
"People generally want to be recognized as
individuals.:'
The advent of Facebook, Instagram and
self-facing smartphone cameras has made
satisfying that impulse easier than ever.
But more than that she added,"these
technologies have helped people forge taste
communities. Personal-style blogging is a
conversation not a monologue."
In other words, what might appear as
the ultimate in narcissism is actually an
exchange of ideas about fashion, bodies and
consumerism.
That exchange is what inspires Risa Page,
31, to continue blogging at ReallyRisa.com.
She never intended it to be a fashion blog,
but readers responded to her outfit posts, so
she kept adding more.
Page said she still hasn't gotten used to it
Her husband, Chris Page, takes the pictures
against the backdrop of South Philadelphia's
picturesque alleyways and graffitied walls.
"It has been a fun bonding experience for
us, but it's also kind of embarrassing,"she
said."l'm not a model, so to pretend that I am
with people walking by can be really, really
awkward."
Yet Page said, through fashion, she has
made connections with readers around the
world as well as with other local bloggers,
some of whom have banded together to
form a network called Philly Blog Love.
While many successful style bloggers tend
to be rather modelesque Audain, for one,
parlayed her blog into a modeling contract


- Page is petite, measuring 4-foot-i 1. Also,
last year, she was pregnant. She noticed that
her readership seemed to grow in direct
correlation to her baby bump.
Page thinks her appeal is grounded in the
fact that she's a lot of things your average
fashion model isn't."l'm wearing things that
normal women can wear, as opposed to
maybe really expensive items that most of
us can't afford, or high-fashion pieces that
are hard for anybody to incorporate into an
outfit," she said."lt's approachable in a way
that a lot of high-fashion blogs aren't"
Likewise, other local bloggers also appeal
to readers looking for fashion role models
who lookand dress more like they do.
Keziah Ridgeway blogs at PHKIdaily.com
(that's short for Philly Hijabis Killing It), a site
where the history teacher and devout Muslim
shows how a hijab can be chic.
Georgette Niles, 41, runs a blog called
Grown and Curvy Woman which, as its
title suggests, targets readers who are both
older and more generously proportioned
than your typical fashion blogger.
"I wanted to chronicle my journey into
self-acceptance," said Niles, who started the
blog at age 40. "We're told, 'When you hit a
certain age, style isn't for you'l wanted to use
the blog as a platform to show women that
that's not true."
A social worker who takes her selfies in
the morning before work, Niles said she has
heard from women around the world who
have connected with her message. "This is
something that can unite people."
Media companies are taking notice of
the combined clout of this army of amateur
fashionistas, developing blogger networks


that supply a steady stream of content.
lan Michael Crumm's eponymous blog
is part of Conde Nast's Details blogger
network. Crumm, 21, a Drexel student who
allows himself only one pair of sweatpants (a
slim-fit version by 3.1 Phillip Lim forTarget),
said that, as Philly's nascent menswear
scene improved, more male bloggers were
following.
His challenge, then, is creating something
unique."With so many people broadcasting
what they're doing with their lives and what
they're wearing;' he said, "there's content
overload."
Get enough traffic, though, and the perks
can be significant.
For example, Chrisi Lydon, 26, a hair stylist
and jewelry maker, said that since she began
blogging at OhHeyChrisi.com, new opportu-
nities have opened up for her.
A year and a half in, the King of Prussia
(Pa.) Mall has recruited her for styling work,
and a few boutiques have picked up her
jewelry.
Audain, meanwhile, has made a couple
of trips to New York Fashion Week and been
pictured in magazines such as Marie Claire.
With about 2,500 monthly visitors, she
gets a steady stream of inquiries from
companies that want to send her free clothes
or pay her to showcase their products. She
also works with a service that allows her to
embed a type of code called an affiliate link.
If a reader clicks through and buys what she's
promoting, she gets a commission.
Audain said she had shown only products
she liked; recent partnerships include
Minnetonka Moccasins and Abercrombie&
Fitch.


OLYMPIC
FROM PAGE 1

Still available, however, are the opening
ceremony wool turtleneck sweaters, and,
with reindeer, hearts and even Xs and Os,
should keep athletes and you nice
and toasty for $395 a pop, at ralphlauren.
com.
Dress for the cold: Whether you're
braving the cold temps of Sochi, Russia,
this February, or just trying to make it
through yet another polar vortex state-
side, we recommend the women's and
men's Team USA pea coat. Yes, it is pricy
at $795, but the color-blocked red bands
give the navy classic a great new twist.
Welcome a bad hair day: Ralph
Lauren's Team USA earflap hat is so cute,
with its braided tassels and reindeer
motif, that you'll want to wear it for
many Olympic Games to come. Find it at
ralphlauren.com for $95.
Lend a hand: Looking for an ador-
able and affordable way to get
your mitts on some Olympic gear? Navy
Go USA mittens should be right up your
alley. At just $14, one mitten says "Go"
and the other says "USA."Two thumbs,
way up. Find them at teamusashop.com.
Don't forget the smallest fans:
Not that you needed an excuse to buy
another cute outfit for your baby, but a
pack of three red, white and blue onesies


MCT PHOTOS


Ralph Lauren's opening ceremony wool turtle-
neck sweaters, with reindeer, hearts and even Xs
and Os, should keep athletes and you nice
and toasty for $395 a pop, at ralphlauren.com.
(red with the American flag and Olympic
rings; white with the flag and "Go USA!";
and blue with the rings and "Team USA"),
are kinda too great to pass up. Find the
three-piece set for $29.95 at teamu-
sashop.com.
STake the gold. and the silver: Alex
and Ani have launched a Team USA
Winter Collection, with bangles featuring
skier, ice skate, ice hockey, snowflake and
Team USA charms. Best of all, a portion
of the sale of the bracelets, made from
recycled materials, go to support the
Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.
Visit AlexandAni.com to purchase, $32.
Freestyle into fashion: An official


When they collect their medals in Sochi,
U.S. athletes will be clad in Nike Flyknit
Chukka sneakers. The shoes hit stores in early
February.

sponsor of U.S. Freeskiing, The North
Face's 2014 International Collection
features great red, white and blue
apparel and accessories. We're keen on
the women's striped full-zip hoodie, $99,
the striped fleece scarf with a flag patch,
$40, and the kids'flat-brimmed quilted
cap, $25. Check them and other styles
- out at thenorthface.com.
SStand proud: When they collect their
medals in Sochi, U.S. athletes will be
clad in Nike's silver Aeroloft 800 Summit
jacket and Nike Flyknit Chukka sneakers.
Recreate the podium at home in the


M a
When they collect their medals in Sochi, U.S.
athletes will be clad in Nike's silver Aeroloft 800
Summit jacket. The jacket is $450 for both men
and women, and is available now at nike.com.
same styles the jacket is $450 for both
men and women, and is available now
at nike.com; the shoes hit stores in early
February.
Rock a hoodie: When they're
hanging out in the village and training,
Team USA will be donning Nike hoodies,
jackets and other gear. We kinda need
the women's NikeTech Fleece Cape,
$110, which features a longer hem in
back. Three words: Big. Fashion. Win. Get
it at nike.com.


LOOK
FROM PAGE 1
says Michele Von Plato,
a vice president at the
nation's largest bridal
chain.


Stores are using more
realistic versions of
the usually tall, svelte,
faceless mannequins in
windows and aisles. It's
part of retailers'efforts
to make them look more
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their clothes. That means
not only adding fat and
hair, but also experiment-
ing with makeup, wigs
and even poses.
This comes after two
decades of stores cutting
back on mannequins to
save money. Many have
been using basic, white,
headless, no-arms-or-
legs torsos that can cost
$300 compared with the
more realistic-looking
ones that can fetch up to
$1,500. Now, as shoppers
are increasingly buying
online, stores are see
mannequins as a tool to
entice shoppers to buy.
Indeed, studies show
mannequins matter
when shoppers make
buying decisions. Forty-
two percent of customers
recently polled by market
research firm NPD Group
Inc. say something on a
mannequin influences
whether they buy it. In
fact, mannequins ranked
just behind friends
and family in terms of
influence.
"Mannequins are the
quintessential silent
sales people,;' says Eric
Feigenbaum, chair of the
visual merchandising de-
partment at LIM College,
a fashion college in New
York City.
Stores for over a centu-
ry have played with the
look of their "silent sales
people." Until the early


1900s, the most common
ones were just torsos.
But with the rise of mass
production clothing, by
full-length mannequins
became popular.
The first ones were
made of wax and melted
in the heat and had de-
tails like human hair, nip-
ples and porcelain teeth.
By the 1960s, stores were
investing in hair and
makeup teams specifi-
cally devoted to taking
care of the mannequins.
That decade also started
the trend of mannequins
being made in the image
of celebrities.
The late Adel Rootstein,
founder of mannequin
maker Rootstein, created
a mannequin based on
elfin model Twiggy in
1966. A year later, it made
the first black mannequin
based on Donyale Luna,
the first black cover girl.
The next decade or
so ushered in an era
of hyper realism, with
mannequins showing
belly buttons and even
back spine indentations,
says ChadMichael
Morrisette, an expert in
mannequin history. But
by the late 1980s, the
trend moved away from
realistic mannequins and
toward torsos or man-
nequins without faces.
Now, retailers are doing
another about-face.
Saks Fifth Avenue, for


instance, spent about
a decade using mostly
mannequins who were
headless or faceless. But
in the past two years,
the luxury retailer has
been showcasing more
mannequins with hair,
makeup and chiseled fea-
tures. "There's this whole
generation of shoppers
that hadn't seen real-
istic mannequins," says
Harry E. Cunningham,
a senior vice president
at Saks. "We saw it as an
opportunity."
Others also see
opportunities. Ralph
Pucci International, a big
mannequin maker that
creates figures for Macy's,
Nordstrom and others,
plans to offer versions
with fuller hips and wider
waists next year.
David's Bridal also
is going for a more
realistic look. In 2007,
the company scanned
thousands of women's
bodies to figure out what
the average woman looks
like and applied those
measurements to its first
mannequins.
Whereas the original
forms were closer to a
size 6 with 36-26-36 bust-
waist-hip measurements,
David's Bridal's Von Plato
says the new torso has
less of a difference in
measurements between
the bust and the hip. The
breasts are now flatter on


top and rounder under-
neath. And the plus-size
mannequins will now
show the imperfections
of getting heavier, with
bulges in places like the
belly and back.
American Apparel,
the teen apparel retailer
known for its racy ads,
this month has man-
nequins in its store in
New York's trendy SoHo
shopping district that
are wearing see-through
lingerie that reveal pubic
hair and nipples.
Ryan Holiday, an
American Apparel
spokesman, says the
number of customers in
the store has increased
30 percent since the de-
but of the mannequins.
"We created it to invite
passersby to explore the
idea of what is sexy and
consider their comfort
with the natural female
form," the company said
in a statement.
The windows were
attention grabbing,
with most people on a
recent Friday, stopping,
pointing and laughing.
"It's a brilliant idea," said
Ali Mohammed, 55, a
New York resident who
works in construction in
the area.
But Allison Berman,
19, thought the realism
went too far. "I see this as
sexual;' says another New
York resident.


-Page 6 www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


The Sun /Sunday, February 2, 2014










Toddlers love selfies: Parenting in an iPhone age

By GILLIAN FLACCUS _.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS I


LOS ANGELES Every so often,
Brandi Koskie finds dozens of photos of
her 3-year-old daughter, Paisley, on her
iPhone but they aren't ones Koskie
has taken.
"There'll be 90 pictures, sideways,
of the corner of her eye, her eyebrow,";'
said Koskie, who lives in Wichita, Kan.
"She's just tapping her way right into my
phone."
The hidden photos, all shot by Paisley,
illustrate a phenomenon familiar to
many parents in today's tech-savvy
world: Toddlers love selfies. Observant
entrepreneurs have caught on to
these image-obsessed tots, marketing
special apps that make taking photos
super-easy for little fingers. You can even
buy a pillow with a smartphone pocket
so toddlers can take selfies during diaper
changes.
But toddlers aren't the only ones
taking photos nonstop. It's not unusual
for doting parents to snap thousands of
digital photos by the time their child is 2.
Today's toddlers think nothing of finding
their own biopic stored in a device
barely bigger than a deck of cards.
While the barrage of images may
keep distant grandparents happy, it's
not yet clear how such a steady diet of
self-affirming navel-gazing will affect
members of the first truly "smartphone
generation."Tot-centric snapshots can
help build a healthy self-image and
boost childhood memories when han-
dled correctly, but shooting too many
photos or videos and playing them back
instantly for a demanding toddler could
backfire, said Deborah Best, a professor
of cognitive developmental psychology
at Wake Forest University in Winston-
Salem, N.C.
The instant gratification that smart-
phones provide today's toddlers is
"going to be hard to overcome," she said.
"They like things immediately, and they
like it short and quick. It's going to have
an impact on kids'ability to wait for
gratification. I can't see that it won't."
Julie Young, a Boston-based behav-
ioral analyst, has seen that firsthand.


In this January 2014 photo provided by Brandi Kos
at her home in Wichita, Kansas to chat with her co
number of parents of toddlers are finding their te(
with selfies.

She was recently helping her 3-year-old
son record a short birthday video for his
cousin on her iPhone when he stopped
mid-sentence, lunged for her phone and
shouted, "Mom, can I see it?"
"It's caught on the end of the video.
He couldn't even wait to get the last
sentence out'" said Young, who has two
sons. "The second the phone comes out,
they stop, they look and they attack."
NowYoung and her husband make
their sons wait to look at a new video
or photo until after dinner or until the
other parent comes home, when every-
one can watch together. They are careful
to sit with their kids when looking at
photos and have adopted the phrase
"practice patience"as a family mantra.
It's natural for toddlers to be fascinat-
ed with their own image (think mirrors),
and that interest plays an important
developmental role as they develop a
sense of self, child development experts
say. Watching a video again and again
can also help move events from short- to
long-term memory, Best said.


Star-packed sendoff


for Leno's final show


By LYDIA HARVEY and
SHARON KENNEDY WYNNE
TAMPA BAY TIMES
Jay Leno's run on The
Tonight Show will finish
the same way it began
22 years ago with
an appearance by Billy
Crystal. Crystal was
Leno's first guest when
he took over for Johnny
Carson in May 1992, and
he and Garth Brooks will
send Leno off in style on
his final show on Feb. 6.
Jimmy Fallon, who has
hosted Late Night since
2009, is set to take over
the Tonight Show gig
from Leno on Feb. 17.
He announced this week
that his first show will
feature guests Will Smith
and U2. Not too shabby,
Fallon.
Meanwhile, Seth
Meyers will take Fallon's
old slot when Late
Night with Seth Meyers
debuts Feb. 24, with
Amy Poehler as the first
guest.
Best Guests: Of Leno's
final lineup, we're most
excited to see these
three. Michelle Stark,
Times staff writer
Jimmy Fallon
Feb. 3
Yes, the man taking
over Leno's job will stop
by the Tonight Show
for a farewell visit. Hey,
probably better to make
friends with Leno now,
lest you end up in a
Conan situation, Jimmy.
Trust us, Fallon is just as
good a guest as he is a
host, so this should be a
delight.
Betty White
Feb. 3
Whenever there's a
chance to celebrate the
modern marvel that is
Betty White, we're all


AP PHOTO
This Jan. 13, file photo shows presenters Jimmy Fallon, left,
and Jay Leno posing backstage at the 70th Annual Golden
Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills,
Calif. Leno will close out his 22-year run as host of NBC's"The
Tonight Show" with a nod to the future and to the past. His heir
apparent, Fallon, will kick off Leno's final week with a guest
appearance on Feb. 3. Fallon is taking over the gig after hosting
NBC's"Late Night" since 2009.


in. The Hot in Cleveland
actor is 92 years old
and shows no signs of
slowing down any time
soon. Plus, she's a game
(and hilarious) late-night
talk show guest. Never
forget: She played beer
pong with Jimmy Fallon
on Late Night twice.
Matthew
McConaughey
Feb. 4
The McConnaissance
is upon us, friends.
The actor who made a
name for himself as an
oft-shirtless romcom
staple has been on an
upward career swing the
past couple years. Heck,
he just won a Golden


Globe this month
for his role in Dallas
Buyers Club, and is a
contender to take home
an Oscar on March 2.
McConaughey is every-
where lately, from bit
parts in movies like The
Wolf of Wall Street to a
starring role on HBO's
True Detective. Basically,
he's the most interesting
man in show biz right
now.
Southwest Florida
fans, take note: Leno
will be at the Van Wezel
Performing Arts Hall in
Sarasota on Feb. 7 and
at Clearwater's Capitol
Theatre on Feb. 9, and
March 29.


This January 2014 screen grab shows a photo
collage provided by Brandi Koskie of her
daughter, Paisley, 3, in selfies that Paisley shot
on her mother's phone in an unsupervised
moment at her Wichita, Kansas home.
EvoMail. "Someday it's all going to
come back to bite me or she's going to
come back and say, 'Wow, there's this
whole encyclopedia of my whole life.'
We're very plugged in, for better or for
: worse."
Still, parents who remember the days
AP PHOTOS before iPhones wonder if their children
skie, her daughter, Paisley, 3, uses Facetime will ever really understand the power
usin, who lives in Oklahoma. An increasing of a cherished photograph. Jason
h-savvy 2-Band 3-year-old kids are obsessed Michael, a 32-year-old father of two in
Denver, has taken so many photos of
his 11-month-old son and 4-year-old
But like any other fun thing kids get stepdaughter (about 4,000) that his
obsessed with, too much of it can be iPhone's memory has filled up three
bad. Parents should make sure some times. His stepdaughter takes plenty of
photos show the child with other family selfies and loves to film herself singing
members or friends. Parents can also favorite songs, then watches the videos
sit with kids and narrate the photo or again and again.
video as if it were a bedtime story. Michael worries that all that visual
"When we read a book to a child, noise may keep them from treasuring
it's the same thing we do with these that one special image that can evoke
photos," Best said. memories decades later. For him, it's
Koskie has noticed that cuddling in a photo of himself as an 8-month-old
bed on a lazy Saturday morning and baby lying on a pink blanket decorat-
swiping through digital photos is one of ed with a rabbit eating a carrot. He
Paisley's favorite activities, and it seems remembers the photo so vividly that he
to encourage her to ask about her place asked his mother for the blanket when
in the world. They look at photos and his son was born.
videos together on the iPad going back "I know everything about that photo.
to Paisley's birth and "she'll start to ask But there are 20,000 photos of my
questions: 'When I was a little tiny baby kids, so will it have that same emotional
did I do this? Did I do that?" impact for them?" Michael said.
Paisley and the iPad are almost the "It sounds a little cheesy, I guess, but
same age: She was born two weeks you look at the photos and it's so rich
after it came out. "That's a base-level, and there's so much you remember
foundation technology for her," said about it' he said."Now, all they have to
Koskie, who handles marketing and do is swipe their hand to the left and it's
content strategy for the e-mail app gone and there's a new picture"



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Sun Sentinel



ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD ON PAGE 2
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o The Sun/Sunday, February 2, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7


FLAIR






www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


The Sun /Sunday, February 2,2014


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Sunday, February 2, 2014 I The Sun www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 3


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ooXOXoooo& IRR


VAL, CAPTURED AND CLAIMED BY THEN
LEADER OF THE MYSTERIOUS SIRENS,
RECEIVES A DISCIPLINARY SMACK WHEN
HE OBJECTS.


SL. ONCE ALL YOUR COMPANIONS
HAVE PERISHED!" AND ON THE
BEACH BELOW, ALETA AND THE
SURVIVORS OF THE WRECKED
ISLAND QUEEN FACE THE HORRID
DENIZENS OF A RISING TIDE.


"NO, YOU ARE MINE!" ... -w
A FEVERISH LIGHT BLAZES IN HER FIERCE EYES:
"YOU DO NOT RECOGNIZE THE GODDESS QUEEN-CALYPSO?
SOON YOU WILL REMEMBER, MY BRAVE ULYSSES...


ALETA BY HAPPENSTANCE STILL HOLDS VALS
SINGING SWORD, BUKOTA MAKES DO WITH
THE FLOTSAM AT HAND...



C2014 King Features Syndicate, Inc.


SLYLOCK FOX and COMICS FOR KIDS


Sunday, February 2, 2014 / The Sun


www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 3


I


BY BOB WEBER JR.






Comics Page 4 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com The Sun I Sunday, February 2, 2014


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Comics Page 4 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com


The Sun / Sunday, February 2, 2014





Sunday, February 2, 2014 / The Sun www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 5


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Sunday, February 2, 2014 / The Sun


www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V


Comics Page 5





Comics Page 6 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald .com The Sun I Sunday, February 2, 2014


THE PHANTOM


BY LEE FALK


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Comics Page 6 D/E/N/C/V


www.sun-herald.com


The Sun / Sunday, February 2, 2014





M -


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'


Ir


MONDAY
Zoe (Rachel Bilson) and
Joel finally buy a house
on "Hart of Dixie," airing
at 8 p.m. on The CW.


TUESDAY
At 8 p.m., PBS' "Ameri-
can Experience" con-
cludes its two-part
study of "The Amish."


U D
W., Iv
1B1A&


WEDNESDAY
Kimmie (Rebel Wilson)
is advised to behave on
"Super Fun Night," at
9:31 p.m. on ABC.


- =^
|VTN N \ '1 \ I' FI I.

THURSDAY
The new A&E series
"Crazy Hearts: Nash-
ville," airs at 10 p.m.








Conversion Chart


Comcast Comcast Cot Comt Comcst Comc Com Comcst FiOS Ven, EngI, N Port Nokns Pt Char, SPG
Port Punta
Venice Englewood Sarasota Chrop-i Arcadia Gordo Sarasota DISH DIRECT DISH DIRECT


WZVN 6 ABC- Bonita Springs- 7 11 7 26 26
WFTS 28 ABC-Tampa 11 28 28 -
WWSB 0 ABC-Sarasota 7 7 7 10 7 7 7 40 -
WTSP 1 CBS-St. Petersburg 10 10 10 10 10 10 -
WINK M) CBS- Fort Myers 213 213 5 5 5 11 11
WFLA CB NBC-Tampa 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 -
WBBH 20 NBC-Fort Myers 2 2 2 20 20
WTVT 13 FOX-Tampa 13 13 13 13 13 13 13
WFTX [3 FOX- Cape Coral 4 4 4 36 36
WEDU W PBS-Tampa 3 3 3 3 3 3 -
WUSF 16 PBS-Tampa 204 204 204 16 16 16
WGCU 30 PBS-Fort Myers 3 3 3 30 30
WXCW 46 CW 6 21 6 46 46
WTOG 4 CW 9 9 9 4 44 44 -
WTTA 38 MYNET 11 11 11 14 38 38
WNFM C MYNET 8 9 8
WMOR 3 IND 12 12 12 38 12 32 32 -
WXPX 6 ION-St. Petersburg 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 66 66
WCLF 2 IND St. Petersburg 22 22 22 2 22 -
WRXY 49 IND-Ft.Myers-Naples 22 44 10 49
WFTT 5 Telefutura Tampa 23 23 23 95 5 50 50 -
WVEA 6 Univision -Venice 15 15 15 6 62 62
A&E Arts & Entertainment 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 118 265 118 265
AMC American Movie Classics 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 131 254 130 254
APL Animal Planet 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 184 282 184 282
BET Black Entertainment TV 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 124 329 124 329
BRAVO Bravo 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 129 237 129 237
COM Comedy Central 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 107 249 107 249
DISC Discovery Channel 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 182 278 182 278
E! Entertainment Channel 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 114 236 114 236
ESQ Esquire Network 82 82 82 82 118 118 160 115 235 115 235
EWTN Eternal Word Television Network 243 243 243 12 17 285 261 370 261 370
FAM ABCFamily Channel 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 180 311 180 311
FOOD TV Food 37 37 37 37 76 164 110 231 110 231
FX FX Network 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 136 248 136 248
GSN Game Show Network 179 179 179 179 34 179 184 116 233 116 233
HALL Hallmark USA 5 5 5 17 73 240 185 312 185 312
HIST History Channel 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 120 269 120 269
HOME Home & Garden 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 112 229 112 229
HSN Home Shopping Network 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 222 240 222 240
LIFE Lifetime 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 108 252 108 252
OWN OprahWinfrey Network 58 58 58 58 47 103 161 189 279 189 279
QVC Quality Value Convenience 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 137 317 137 317
SPIKE SpikeTV 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 241 241 241 241
SYFY Science Fiction 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 122 244 122 244
TBS Turner 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 139 247 139 247
TCM Turner Classic Movies 65 65 65 65 169 230 132 256 132 256
TLC The Learning Channel 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 183 280 183 280
TNT Turner Network Television 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 138 245 138 245
TRAV Travel 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 196 277 196 277
TRUTV truTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 242 246 242 246
TVLAND TV Land 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 106 304 106 304
USA USA Network 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 105 242 105 242
WE Women's Entertainment 117 117 117 117 117 149 128 260 128 260
WGN WGN America 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 239 307 239 307
CSS Comcast Sports South 28 28 28 28 49 70
ESPN Entertainment Sports 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 140 206 140 206
ESPN2 Entertainment Sports 2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 144 209 144 209
FS1 Fox Sports 1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 150 219 150 219
FSN Fox Sports Network 72 72 72 72 56 77 423 654 423 654
GOLF Golf Channel 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 401 218 401 218
NBCS NBC Sports 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 159 220 159 220
SUN Sun Sports 38 38 401 401 45 57 76 422 653 422 653
NICK Nickelodeon 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 170 299 170 299
TOON Cartoon Network 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 176 296 176 296
CNBC Financial News/Talk 39 39 39 39 37 102 208 355 208 355
CNN Cable News Network 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 200 202 200 202
CSPN Congress 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 210 350 210 350
FNC Fox News Channel 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 205 360 205 360
MSNBC News/Talk 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 209 356 209 356
SNN SNN Local News 6 6 6 11 11
CMTV Country Music TV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 166 327 166 327
MTV Music Television 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 160 331 160 331
VH1 Video Hits 1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 162 335 162 335
CINE Cinemax 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 310 515 310 515
CINE2 Cinemax 2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 312 517 312 517
DISN Disney Channel 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 172 290 172 290
ENC Encore 150 150 150 150 150 350 340 535 340 535
HBO Home Box Office 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 300 501 300 501
HB02 Home Box Office 2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 301 502 301 502
HB03 Home Box Office 3 304 304 304 304 304 404 302 503 302 503
SHOW Showtime 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 318 545 318 545
TMC The Movie Channel 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 327 554 327 554









On the Cover

Sochi Games Create Challenges


for Broadcasters

BY CANDACE HAVENS
FYI Televsion, Inc.
The "2014 Winter Olympic
Games" begin in Sochi, Russia, on
Thursday and continue through
Sunday, Feb. 23. There are so many
events that the coverage begins the
day before the opening ceremony on
Friday at 7:30 p.m. on NBC. People
canwatchontheirtabletsandphones,
online and on several NBC Univer-
sal networks, including NBC Sports
Network, CNBC, MSNBC and USA.
Like many Olympic Games of
years past, there is controversy sur-
rounding the host country. That's
nothing new for the veteran team
covering the sporting event. "Sochi
in Russia, like every Olympic site,
comes with political and social is-
sues, some of which have been in the
news recently," says Mark Lazarus,
Chairman, NBC Sports Group. "We
will address those issues as they are
relevant at the time of the Games,
and we cannot wait to get to Sochi.
We are very optimistic about the
U.S. team. We're optimistic about
the location, and we look for-
ward to presenting them -
to the United States."
With n, manv plat-
forms. tIn ..\ A'.


primetime even though it was many
hours later, and that we were able to
use technology," says Lazarus. "The
people who used one, two or three
devices during the day, whether
they used a tablet, a phone or a PC,
with the addition of each device they
added more television viewing. So,
the entire ecosystem worked very
well [for] consumers the more we
gave them, the more they consumed.
You know, it's very hard to do an
event live if it's 4 in the morning in
the citywhere you are. So, we have to
show them on delay if we're going to
have a primetime show, and that is
when the most people are available
to watch. And we felt very good that
they voted each of those 17 nights to
the timune of an average of well over
20 some odd million homes a night
- closer to 30 million and set a re-
cord as the most watched event in
television history. So, we think that
by doing both, using all the technol-
ogy available to us, we can satisfy the
immediacy needs of those who want
tn sPee it live but also sat-


hockey between the USA and Rus-
sia. 'You have the best of the best in
the world," Michaels says. "It's set up
for some amazing, incredible stories,
where, granted, that was a very spe-
cial situation in 1980. We were at
odds with the Soviet Union at that
time. We would eventually boycott
their Games in July. A lot of people
looked at it as a jingoistic thing
where we could show that our capi-
talism system was better than their
communism system or whatever.
"To me, it had very little to do
with that, but it had more to do with
the fact that itwas one of the greatest
sports upsets of all time that a young
team could beat what, in effect, was
a professional hockey team at that
point. This is what the Olympics re-
ally are, because I watched Canada
beat the U.S. even with the NHL
pros playing in 2010 in Vancouver,
and it's just the people rolling out
of that building in Canada that day,
they didn't know what to do with
themselves. They were so excited
and so over the top, and everything
was just over the moon for them.
In London, to watch their athletes
perform the way they did and so,
the great thing about the Olympics
is that you see the best of the best.
The whole world looks. I know the
Olympics come with a lot of warts
and a lot of blemishes, but to me, I've
always been very excited to be a part
of it. There's always controversy sur-
rounding it. 'Oh, they won't have the
venues ready,' blah, blah, blah, traffic,
. other, and all ofthat, but all ofthem
''i ni to work out pretty well. So, it
. iII e a prettygood 18 days foryou."
I his is a bittersweet situation
I I' ight-time medalist speed skater
.\! ..1o Ohno, the most decorated
i ., rican Winter Olympic athlete of
.ill i mine,whowill nowbe on the other
. 1i of the action as a commentator.
I .. td thought often of my perfor-
i ,.11 ices in Vancouver that there was
.1 11 finite possibility I'd be finished,"
-.N Ohno. 'As an athlete, I think
S.., never fully rule it out until there
,i ,s a time to decide and kind of
,,I 1 licly say it. It was never my in-
li i iion to actually make a statement
.1I, it it or have a press conference
,I .iiything of the like. I wasn't re-
,I.k interested in anything like that.


T,..... EEC At.. n....:a nil.,.


"I had a wonderful career, and for
me, being in London for the 2012
Olympic Games and watching all
of those incredible athletes compete
and seeing some of my very close
friends compete live and some of
them are very close to the same age
as I and have been through the same
struggles that was my most diffi-
cult moment When you're an ath-
lete watching these friends and U.S.
Olympians compete, you feel like
you can do it one more time. Even
today, I feel like I can do it one more
time. But there comes a time in every
single athlete's life when they have to
make a decision, and I've been very,
very blessed to have a wonderful
career and looking forward to the
next chapters in my life as a broad-
caster and as a part of this team.'


index

Cover Story................................ 3
Sports ..................................... 4-5
Soap Update ............................. 21
Radio/News/Weather............... 5
Q&A ........................................... 11
TV Crossword .......................... 42
Movies ..................................... 48

guide to symbols
**** = Exceptional**-*- = Good
** = Fair* = Poor
Symbols & codes:
(CC) = Close Captioned; 'R'= Repeat;
'N' new; (HD)'= High Definition;
DVS = Descriptive Video Service;
iTV = Interactive television; T =
Taped.
Parental Guidelines forTV:
You may see rating codes on your
TV screen. Here what they mean:
'Y'-appropriate for all Children. 'Y7'
appropriate for 7 and older. 'G'
general audience. 'PG' parental
guidance suggested. '14'-14 and
older. 'M' 17 and older.
Along with the rating codes mentioned
above, you may see additional
abbreviations. Here's what they
mean: 'AC'- adult content. 'AH'
adult humor. 'AL adult language.
'AS' adult situations. 'BN' brief
nudity. 'GL- graphic language. 'GV'
graphic violence. 'MT'- mature
themes. 'MV' mild violence. 'SC'
sexual content. 'SSC' strong
sexual content. 'V'- violence.
Motion picture guidelines:
Movies that appear on movie channels
may have a theatrical rating. Here's
what they mean: 'G'- general
audiences. 'PG'- parental guidence
suggested; some material may not
be suitable for children. 'PG-13'
special parental guidance strongly
suggested for children under 13.
'R'- restricted; under 17 requires
accompanying parent or guardian.
'NC-17'- not recommended for
persons under 17.


HCrill uan3 s UavI vv Iec
S is one of the freestyle skiers contact information
on the road to gold in Sochi, Programming Questions?
Russia, at the "2014 Winter 1-800-Comcast or www.Comcast.com
Hlff Olympic Games." The
s lymopening ceremony begins W isTVSchedule Different from this book
TV networks sometimes change schedules a
1 Friday at 7:30 p.m. ter this weekly book is printed. More accurate
on NBC. TV schedules are in our daily Sun Newspaper


and our websites: www.venicegondolier.com
or www.sun-herald.com.


f-
te








SPORTS


BASKETBALL

Men's College
Sunday
1:00 p.m. CBS Michigan Wol-
verines at Indiana Hoosiers
(Live)
Monday
7:00 p.m. ESPN Notre Dame
Fighting Irish at Syracuse
Orange (Live)
7:00 p.m. FS1 Xavier Muske-
teers at Villanova Wildcats
(Live)
9:00 p.m. FS1 Georgetown
Hoyas at DePaul Blue De-
mons (Live)
9:00 p.m. ESPN Iowa State
Cyclones at Oklahoma State
Cowboys (Live)
Tuesday
7:00 p.m. ESPN & ESPN2 Col-
lege Basketball Teams TBA
(Live)
7:00 p.m. FS1 St. John's Red
Storm at Providence College
Friars (Live)
9:00 p.m. ESPN Missouri Ti-
gers at Florida Gators (Live)
9:00 p.m. FS1 Butler Bulldogs
at Marquette Golden Eagles
(Live)
Wednesday
7:00 p.m. ESPN2 Boston
College Eagles at Virginia
Cavaliers (Live)


Seattle cornerback Richard
Sherman hopes to slow
down the Denver Broncos'
potent offense as the two
teams battle for the Vince
Lombardi Trophy in "Super
Bowl XLVIII," airing Sunday
4 at 6:00 p.m. on FOX.


7:00 p.m. FSN Pittsburgh Pan-
thers at Miami Hurricanes
(Live)
8:00 p.m. MYN Alabama
Crimson Tide at Arkansas
Razorbacks (Live)
9:00 p.m. FSN Virginia Tech
Hokies at Florida State
Seminoles (Live)
9:00 p.m. ESPN2 Stanford Car-
dinal at California Golden
Bears (Live)
Thursday
7:00 p.m. ESPN & ESPN2 Col-
lege Basketball Teams TBA
(Live)
9:00 p.m. ESPN & ESPN2 Col-
lege Basketball Teams TBA
(Live)
9:00 p.m. FS1 UTEP Miners at
East Carolina Pirates (Live)
11:00 p.m. FS1 Oregon State
Beavers at Arizona State
Sun Devils (Live)
Friday
7:00 p.m. FS1 Seton Hall
Pirates at Villanova Wildcats
(Live)
9:00 p.m. FS1 DePaul Blue De-
mons at Creighton Bluejays
(Live)
Saturday
Noon ESPN Alabama Crimson
Tide at Florida Gators (Live)
Noon FSN Virginia Tech Hok-
ies at Pittsburgh Panthers
(Live)
Noon CW North Carolina Tar
Heels at Notre Dame Fight-
ing Irish (Live)
1:00 p.m. CBS Butler Bulldogs
at Georgetown Hoyas (Live)
1:00 p.m. ESPN2 Cleveland
State Vikings at Wright
State Raiders (Live)
1:30 p.m. CW Kentucky Wild-
cats at Mississippi State
Bulldogs (Live)
1:30 p.m. MYN Kentucky
Wildcats at Mississippi
State Bulldogs (Live)
2:00 p.m. FSN North Carolina
State Wolfpackat Miami
Hurricanes (Live)
2:00 p.m. ESPN Michigan
Wolverines at Iowa Hawk-
eyes (Live)
3:00 p.m. ESPN2 Florida State
Seminoles at Maryland Ter-
rapins (Live)
3:00 p.m. FS1 Providence
College Friars at Xavier
Musketeers (Live)


4:00 p.m. ESPN West Virginia
Mountaineers at Kansas
Jayhawks (Live)
4:00 p.m. CW Arkansas
Razorbacks at Vanderbilt
Commodores (Live)
4:00 p.m. MYN Arkansas
Razorbacks at Vanderbilt
Commodores (Live)
5:00 p.m. FSN Missouri
Tigers at Ole Miss Rebels
(Live)
5:00 p.m. FS1 Oregon Ducks
at Arizona State Sun Devils
(Live)
5:00 p.m. ESPN2 Saint Louis
Billikens at La Salle Explor-
ers (Live)
6:00 p.m. ESPN Duke Blue
Devils at Boston College
Eagles (Live)
7:00 p.m. ESPN2 Baylor Bears
at Oklahoma Sooners (Live)
9:00 p.m. ESPN Gonzaga
Bulldogs at Memphis Tigers
(Live)
9:00 p.m. ESPN2 Wichita
State Shockers at Northern
Iowa Panthers (Live)

NBA
Sunday
1:00 p.m. FSN Orlando Magic
at Boston Celtics (Live)
Monday
7:00 p.m. FSN Orlando Magic
at Indiana Pacers (Live)
Wednesday
8:00 p.m. ESPN Portland Trail
Blazers at New York Knicks
(Live)
10:30 p.m. ESPN Miami Heat
at Los Angeles Clippers
(Live)
Thursday
8:00 p.m. TNT San Antonio
Spurs at Brooklyn Nets (Live)
10:30 p.m.TNT Chicago Bulls
at Golden State Warriors
(Live)
Friday
7:00 p.m. ESPN Portland Trail
Blazers at Indiana Pacers
(Live)
7:00 p.m. FSN Oklahoma City
Thunder at Orlando Magic
(Live)
9:30 p.m. ESPN Minnesota
Timberwolves at New Or-
leans Pelicans (Live)

BOXING

Professional
Friday
9:00 p.m. ESPN2 Jonathan
Gonzalez vs. Norberto Gon-
zalezfrom UIC Pavilion in
Chicago (Live)


SoWA fAtE


r-1 "' ,



Senior forward Melvin
Ejim and the Iowa State
Cyclones visit the Okla-
homa State Cowboys in
a "College Basketball"
game, airing Monday on
ESPN at 9 p.m.

FOOTBALL
Sunday
10:00 p.m. FOX Super Bowl
XLVIII Postgame Show (Live)

NFL
Sunday
6:00 p.m. FOX Seattle Se-
ahawks vs Denver Broncos
(Live)

GOLF

Champions Tour
Friday
12:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Cham-
pions Tour Golf: Allianz
Championship: First Round
from The Old Course at
Broken Sound in Boca Raton,
Fla. (Live)
Saturday
3:00 p.m. GOLF PGA Champi-
ons Tour Golf: Allianz Cham-
pionship: Second Round
from The Old Course at
Broken Sound in Boca Raton,
Fla. (Live)

European Golf Tour
Saturday
5:30 a.m. GOLF Joburg Open:
Third Round from Royal
Johannesburg & Kensington
Golf Club in S.A. (Live)

PGA
Sunday
3:00 p.m. CBS Waste Manage-
ment Phoenix Open: Final
Round from TPC Scottsdale
in Scottsdale, Ariz. (Live)








RADIO DIAL & EVERY HOUR CHANNELS


FM RADIO STATIONS
Station Freq. Format
WJIS 88.1 Religious
WMNF 88.5 Eclectic
WSMR 89.1 Classical
WUSF 89.7 Classical/Jazz
WGCU 90.1 Public Radio
WBVM 90.5 Religious
WSOR 90.9 Religious
WSEB 91.3 Religious
WJYO 91.5 Religious
WVIJ 91.7 Religious
WDDV 92.1 Easy Listening
WYUU 92.5 Latin
WIKX 92.9 Country
WFLZ 93.3 Contemporary
WTLT 93.7 Easy Listening
WARO 94.5 Album Rock
WWRM 94.9 Easy Listening
WOLZ 95.3 Oldies
WMTX 95.7 Contemporary
WRXK 96.1 Album Rock
WINK 96.9 Contemporary
WTLQ 97.7 Latin
WXTB 97.9 Rock
WUSV 98.5 Country
WBCG 98.9 Contemporary
WJBX 99.3 Alternative
WQYK 99.5 Country
WCKT 100.1 Country
WAW 101.1 Easy Listening
WPOI 101.5 Album Rock
WWGR 101.9 Country
WHPT 102.5 Album Rock
WJGO 102.9 Oldies
WTBT 103.5 Country
WXKB 103.9 Pop
WKZM 104.3 Religious


Location
Sarasota
Tampa
Sarasota
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Englewood
Ft. Myers
Punta Gorda
Venice
Safety Harbor
Punta Gorda
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Ft. Myers
St.Pete
Ft. Myers
Clearwater
Bonita Springs
Ft. Myers
Ft. Myers
Seminole
Ft. Myers
Murdock
Ft. Myers
St.Pete
Pt. Charlotte
Ft. Myers
St.Pete
Tampa
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Bradenton
Ft. Myers
Sarasota


WRBQ
WCVU
WZSP
WBTI
WDUV
WTZB
WJPT
WCTQ
WENG
WSRZ


AM RADIO STATIONS
Station Freq. I
WHNZ 570
WDAE 620
WBDN 760 I
WWCN 770
WRFA 820
WGUL 860
WLSS 930
WFLA 970
WQYK 1010
WMTX 1040
WKII 1070
WTIS 1110
WINK 1200
WIBQ 1220
WINK 1240
WTMY 1280
WDDV 1320 I
WCRM 1350 I
WRBQ 1380
WMYR 1410
WBRD 1420
WWCL 1440 I
WSDV 1450 I
WWPR 1490
WENG 1530
WCCF 1580


I





I

I


Classic Hits
Easy Listening
Latin
-lip Hop
Easy Listening
Rock Alt.
Easy Listening
Country
ralk
Oldies

Format
Talk
Talk
Latin
Talk
Talk
Oldies
Talk
Talk
Talk
Talk
Oldies
Religious
Talk
Talk
Talk
Talk
Easy Listening
Latin
Oldies
Country
Religious
Latin
Easy Listening
Oldies
Talk
Talk


Tampa
Solana
Zolfo Springs
Ft. Myers
New Pt. Richey
Englewood
Ft. Myers
Venice
Englewood
Sarasota

Location
St. Pete
St. Pete
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Largo
Dunedin
Sarasota
Tampa
St. Pete
Clearwater
Pt. Charlotte
St. Pete
Sarasota
Ft. Myers
Sarasota
Venice
Ft. Myers
Tampa

Bradenton
Ft. Myers
Sarasota

Englewood
Punta Gorda


Thursday
3:00 p.m. GOLF AT&T Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am: First
Round from Pebble Beach
Golf Links in Pebble Beach,
Calif. (Live)
Friday
3:00 p.m. GOLF AT&T Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am:
Second Round from Pebble
Beach Golf Links in Pebble
Beach, Calif. (Live)
Saturday
1:00 p.m. GOLF AT&T Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am:
Third Round from Pebble
Beach Golf Links in Pebble
Beach, Calif. (Live)
3:00 p.m. CBS AT&T Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am:
Third Round from Pebble
Beach Golf Links in Pebble
Beach, Calif. (Live)

HOCKEY

NHL
Sunday
12:30 p.m. NBC Detroit Red
Wings at Washington Capi-
tals (Live)
Tuesday
7:30 p.m. FSN Toronto Maple
Leafs at Florida Panthers
(Live)


8:00 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay
Lightning at Minnesota Wild
(Live)
Thursday
7:30 p.m. FSN Detroit Red
Wings at Florida Panthers
(Live)
7:30 p.m. SUN Toronto Maple
Leafs at Tampa Bay Light-
ning (Live)
Saturday
7:00 p.m. SUN Detroit Red
Wings at Tampa Bay Light-
ning (Live)

MOTORCYCLING

Motocross
Saturday
10:30 p.m. FS1 San Diego from
San Diego (Live)

SOCCER

English League Soccer
Saturday
7:00 a.m. USA English Pre-
mier League Soccer (Live)
10:00 a.m. USA English Pre-
mier League Soccer (Live)
12:30 p.m. NBC Cardiff City at
Swansea City (Live)


SPORTS

TRIVIA

1. In 2013, for the third
time in major-league
history, the reigning
Cy Young Award win-
ners (R.A. Dickey, David
Price) faced each other
in a regular-season
game. Name either of
the other two pairings.

2. How many times did
pitcher Greg Maddux
strike out 200 or more
batters in a season dur-
ing his 23-year major-
league career?

3. In 2012, Adrian Peter-
son became the second
Minnesota Vikings run-
ning back to have five
consecutive 100-yards-
rushing games. Who
was the first?

4. When was the last
time before 2012 that
Harvard's men's bas-
ketball team made the
NCAA Tournament?

5. Name the last time
before the 2013-14 sea-


son that the Colorado
Avalanche started a
season at least 6-0-0.

6. Austrian skier Mario
Matt set a record in
2013 for the oldest skier
(34) to win a World Cup
slalom. Who had been
the oldest?


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CN
CNN Headline News
(HALF HOUR)
:00 National and International News
:15 Dollars & Sense
:20 Sports
:24 Local News/People & Places
Available on: VEN 27,ENG 27, SAR 27, PTC 27, ARC 27, SPG 59








The Weather Channel
(HOUR)
:00 Today's Weather
:05 Extended Forecast
:10 Radar Update
:17 Traveler's Update
:20 Day Planner
:25 Morning's Weather
:30 Today's Weather
:35- Extended Forecast
:40 -International Weather
:47 Season Update
:55 Drivers Report

And Storm Stories every night at 8 and 8:30 p.m.
Available on: VEN 31,ENG 31, SAR 31, PTC 31, ARC 31, SPG 52






F KIDS NEWS SPORTS MORNING SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

ABC i ABC7 es,,. 6:00am ABC7 fles *.57:O0am GoodMorningAmerica ThisWeekhilh lews- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro-
261 Sunday l Sunday 11 Weekend III)IIIl Slephanopoulos 1mii.1 makersim gram gram gram
ABC ABC Aclion flevs Good Morning America ABC Aclion levs ThisWeekhilh PaidPro- PaidPro- PaidPro- PaidPro-
2n Weekend (N)(HD)) Weekend (N)(HD)) Weekend (N) (H)) Stephanopoulos (N) (HD)) gram gram gram gram
me I l l American Black OurWorld Black Alma-Good Morning America ThisWeekwith Paid Pro- First BaptistFaith Life PaidPro-
401 i.itIl Enlerp.iu iiim nac Weekend iii)1.,1 Slephanopoulos1)imi.1, gram iiI Church gram
CBS PaidPro- TruslDale All In Jmll) Changers PaidPro- Joel Osleen CBS lers Sunday Morning ,I iialion i) PaidPro- PaidPro-
10 M 1 gram TV (HP) (II)(HP) gram (Ic) 1(H") (11) gram gram
CBS WINK News ,<5 6AM Sunday ill 1III1 CBS News Sunday Morning ii'l Face Ihe Nalion ii'll All Int,''ii
111 ;i' ;i *m~ HI1HI:|
NBC PaidPro- PaidPro- LazyTown Noddy "1 TodayWeekend" ll Hlews il NewsChan Meel he Press," il PaidPro- PaidPro-
SI $ gram gram I'' IIII, nel8ii gram gram
NBC IBC2 ers SundayTo- IBC2 levsSundayTo- TodayWeekendi",,i IBC2 levs Sunday Meel he Press" iiil Noddy II'i AboulAni-
2__ day News report day News report. (N) ([4)) Today News report. (N) mals(N)
FOX 1 1 FOX13's GoodDay FOX13's Good Day FOX13's Good Day FOXNewsSundaywith Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro-
31 13 13 1 13 13 Tampa Bay at 6:00(N) Tampa Bay at 7:00 N) Tampa Bay at 8:00 (N) Chris Wallace (N) gram ram gram gram
FOX PaidPro- PaidPro- McGregor Baptist PaidPro- LeePitts FOX News Sundaywith Catholic PaidPro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro-
__ 4 4 4 gram gram _______gram Live Chris Wallace (N) Mass gram gram gram
PBS 3 3 3 3 Sesame Street Firefly Curious(R) Cat in Hat (R Peg + Cat DinoTrain Daniel(R) Super Why Crossroads Capitol Up-Florida (CC) Moyers(N)
PB captured. (CC) (R) (H) (HD)) (HD)) (CC)(R) (R) (H) (HD)) (R) ((CC) date (HD1)
PBS 204 204 16 European CEO (CC((N) Crossroads Florida (CC) Tothe Con- McLaughlin Scully (CC) Moyers (N) Great Continental Rail- Produced by George
16- (CC)(N) (HD)) (CC) tra_____ y(N) (R) (N) 1(HD) way Journeys(R) Martin (CC) (R) (HD)
PBS Curious (CC) Curious: Arthur(R) Kratts(R) Curious(R) CatinHat (K Peg + Cat DinoTrain Cyber(CC)(R) Capitol (CC) Florida (CC) Makers (R)
X___ (R) Steam (HD)) (HD)) 1(HD) (HD)) (CC)((R) (R)(HH) (HD)) ____ ___
CW 6 PaidPro- Paid Pro- On the Spot Family Style Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Chat Room Think Pet Into Wild (CC) Paid Pro- Paid Pro-
m 621 6 gram (N) (N) gram gram gram (N) collar. (N) gram gram
CW 9 4 Paid Pro- In Touch with Dr. Real Life Career Day Teen Edl Whaddya- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- 44 On The PaidPro-
OW gram Charles Stanley (CC) 101 (R) (N) tion(N) do(N) gram gram gram Town gram
MYN 1 11 14 Townhall PaidSpon- Sacred Revealing PaidSpon- PaidSpon- PaidSpon- PaidSpon- PaidSpon- PaidSpon- The Ernest Angley
X 1 1 (COC) scored. Name (CC) (CC) scored. scored. scored. scored. scored. scored. Hour (CC)
MYN 8 8 PaidPro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Lighthouse Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro-
X81 gram8 gram gram gram _____ gram gram gram grgram gra ram gram gram
IND 12 1212 38 12 Old House Paid Spon- Paid Spon- Paid Spon- Aqua Kids Edgemont Edgemont Chat Room Young Family Style Coolest (R) Teen News
3 12 (HD)) 3sored, scored, scored. (COC) (CCO) (CC) I(N) Icons (N) (N) (N)
ION 2 2 2 13 26 18 11 Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Turning (CC) Leading In Touch with Dr. Hour of Power Hour of Catholic Paid Pro- Monk Obese man
m 2 g2 2 8 g ram (R) Wa (CC) harles Stanley (C) Power. Mass igram accused. (CC)
WCLF 2222 Time of Destin Citylife Faith Life Joyce Search M. Love a Baptist Abundant Jerry Today Henry
12 2 2 Grace Reign (C) Church Church Meyer (CC) Lyon Child Church Life Savelle Babers, Sr.
WRXY Celebration under the Faith Life Van Impe In Touch with Dr. McGregor Baptist Christian Worship Word of Life
S22 44 10 Silverdome Church (CC) Charles Stanley (CC) _______Hour
TLF 2 2 Programa Programa El Chavo El Chavo Aventura animal Nuestra pandilla ('93, Familia) **1y2 Tom Alvin and the Chip-
50 23 23 23 95 5 pagado pagado (WYPG) (1VPG) Preguntas. (CC) (HD) Guiry. Muchachos juegan beisbol en la cancha. munks ('07) Jason Lee.
UNIV 15 15 15 6 Desayuno Desayuno Programa Programa Paravolver a amarTras LahorapicoChistesy AI PuntoTemas Repdblica deportiva (N)
62 ] 6 (H)) (H) pagado paado la felicidad. (HD) risas. (CC() (HD) candentes. (CC) (HD) (CC) (HD)

A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 Paid Paid Criminal (TV14) (HD) Criminal (TV14) (HD) Criminal (TV14) (HD) Criminal: The Fallen Liar Liar ('97) **12%
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53231 Mad Men After hours. Mad Men (R) (HD) Mad Men (R) (HD) Mad Men: The Crash Walking Dead Zombie epidemic. Dead (R)
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Extreme Parasites. Freaky Freaky Untamed (CC) (HD) Dogs 101: Puppies Too Cute! (R) (HD) Too Cute! (R) (HD)
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Morning Inspiration Prestigious black ministers speak. B. Jones (IG)(N) Voice (N) Moesha Moesha Hurricane
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 100 Days Frustration. 100 Days (R) Matchmaker (CC) (R) Matchmaker (CC) (R) Housewives (CC) (R) Housewives (CC) (R)
COM 166 66 66 66 15 27 190 Paid Paid Paid Paid Caddyshack ('80) *** The Comebacks ('07) (CC)
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Paid (HD) jGold Rush: Medevac Bering Sea (R) (HD) Moonshiner (R) (HD)
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 Paid Paid E! News (R) (HD) Maid in Manhattan ('02) **r Political love. (HD) Kardashian (R) (HD) Kardashian (R) (HD)
ESO 82 82 82 82 118118160 Alternate The Usual Suspects ('95) A heist goes wrong. Horse Handicapping. Horse: Derby Darling Friday Youth football. Friday
EWTN 243 243 243 12 17 285 Angelus Luke Michael Holy Name Sunday Mass (N) Litanyof Bookmark Vaticano Jesus Apostolate Rosary
FAMI 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Paid Mass Secretariat ('10) Naive lady takes horse-racing stables. The Rookie ('02) **** A coach promises to fulfill his dream.
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Paid Paid Barefoot Giada (R) Heartland Trisha's Pioneer Rachael Guy Bite Sandwich Giada(R) ~Barefoot
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 Paid Paid Real Steel ('11) Hugh Jackman. Former fighter designs a robot boxer. Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen ('09)
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179184 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Password+ Whammy Whammy LoveTrian Pyramid Pyramid
HALL I5 5 5 17 3 240 Lucy Lucy Lucy Lucy Brady Brady Brady Brady Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl
HIST81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Paid Paid Swamp (CC) (R) (HD) Swamp (CC) (R) (HD) Swamp (CC) (R) (HD) Swamp (CC) (R) (HD) Swamp (CC) (R) (HD)
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165Paid Paid Property Property Property Property Property |Property Property Property PropBro (R) (HD)
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 NUTRiBULLET HSN Today HSN Today Electronic Dermabrsh Infiniti Lancome Paris
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 Paid(HD) Paid (HD) In Touch (CCO) Amazing DavidJere Osteen Paid(HD) Unsolved (CC) (HD) Movie
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 Nate Berkus Show Dr. Phil (CC) (HD) Dr. Phil (CC) (HD) Dr. Phil (1TV14) (HD) Super Soul (R) (HD) Super Soul (R) (HD)
QOVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 Hagit-lsraeli Jewelry Jewelry showcase. Judith Ripka Michael Dawkins Jewelry Collection Judith Ripka
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid PowerNat. PowerNat. PowerNat. PowerNat. Police Videos (R)
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Zone Zone Zone Ice Quake *1/2 Melting permafrost.
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Married MenWork Cougar Friends Friends Friends Friends Life as We Know It ('10) Unexpected parents. Mia (08)
TCM 65 65 65 65 169 230 The Letter Death in Singapore. (:45) Kings Row ('42) A small town has dark secrets. (CC) A Thousand Clowns ('65) A unique family.
TIC 45 45 45 45 57 4 12139 Paid (H)) Paid(H)) Paid(H)) Paid(H)) Paid (H)) Paid(H)) Say Yes SayYes SayYes ISayYes SayYes ISayYes
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Law Mob accountant. Law Dead journalist. Law: Magnet (HD) Law: Choice of Evils Law Bank murder. Law: America, Inc.
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Paid Paid Vacation Attack (R) Grounds (R) Mysteries (CC) (R) America (R) Legend (R)
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Most Shock (R) Most Shock (R)
iTVLND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244GoldGirl Gold Girl GoldGirl Gold Girl: Break-In Gold Girl Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan Roseanne Roseanne
USA 134 34 34 34 22 52 50 House: Unfaithful Paid Paid Paid Paid The Mechanic ('11) ** Avenging murder. Faster ('10) 1/R 2 (C)
WE 117 117 11 117 117 149 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid M Paid Roseanne mRoseanne Roseanne Roseanne
WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 R Meredith Paid (CC) Zacharias Facts David (N) Beyond Heat Night: Intruders Heat Night (CC) (HD) Open Range ('03)







CELEBRITY
EXTRA
BY CINDY ELAVSKY
King Features Synd., Inc.

Q: can you tell me what
Christian Slater is up to
now? I recently saw his
amazing performance
in the movie "He Was a
Quiet Man," and it made
me realize I really miss
seeing him. -- Veronica W.,
Hanover, Pa.

A: You have only about
a month to wait before
you can see Christian
again on a regular basis.
On Tuesday, March 11, at
10 p.m. ET/PT, ABC will
premiere a new series
called "Mind Games,"
which stars Christian
and Steve Zahn. They
play brothers Ross
(Christian) and Clark
Edwards (Steve), who are


partners in Edwards and
Associates, an unusual
business based on the
belief that people's
decisions are influenced
by their environment
in ways they're not
aware. By using the hard
science of psychological
manipulation, the
brothers commit to
solving their clients'
problems. With Clark's
expertise and Ross' con-
artist ways, the brothers
use psychology and
science to offer clients an
alternative to their fates.

Q: Any news about
"Devious Maids"? --
Pamela G., via email

A: I have two exciting
bits to tell you: First,
season two will premiere
on Lifetime on April 20
at 10 p.m. ET/PT. Second,
Mark Deklin (whom you
all know I LOVED on


"GCB") has signed on as
a regular cast member.
As of this writing, I don't
know whom he'll play
or how he'll impact the
season, but I'll let you
know as soon as I can
drag the information out
of him.

Q: am a fan of "NCIS"
and have wondered why
Cote de Pablo left the
series. -- Judy D., via email

A: Cote left for personal
reasons, which she
chooses not to expand
on. On the possibility of
returning, she told TV
Guide Magazine: "The
greatest thing about this
last episode is that Ziva
doesn't die. As long as
a character doesn't die,
the character can always
come back." Cote recently
signed on to co-star in
the film "The 33," which


Christian Slater


Write to Cindy at King
Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475;
or e-mail her at
letters@cindyelavsky.com.
For more news and
extended interviews, visit www.
celebrityextraonline.com and
twitter.com/Celebrity_Extra.

is based on the events
of the 2010 Chilean mine
collapse.


KIDS NEWS SPORTS MORNING SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
FEB. 2

CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Sportsmen TravisJoh Fishing Paid Paid Paid lnsideGeo
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 Sports NFL Match SportsCenter (H1) SportsCenter (HD) SportsCenter (H1) Sunday NFL Countdown (N) (H1)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 Storied: The Book of Manning Super Bowl Outside Sport Rpt Nation (CC) (H1) Colin's New (HD) Numbers (N) (HP)
SFS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 FOX Sports (HP) FOX Sports (HP) FOX Sports Red Bull Crashed: Helsinki FOX Super Bowl Kick-Off (N) (CC) (HP)
SFSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Worn. College Basketball (Replayi) () Wrld Poker (NP) Wrld Poker (NP) Courtside Dodgeball Game 365 ShipShape
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 (4:00) European Tour Golf (Live) (H) Morning Drive (N) (HP) European Tour Golf (Replay) (HD)
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 WildLifers NA Hunter To Be Announced Info unavailable. To Be Announced Info unavailable. Countdown (HD)
SUN 38 38 401401 45 57 76 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Swimming (Taped) Florida B.Donovan
SNICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 Cooper Cooper Penguins Kung Fu Megaforce Sponge Sponge Sponge Sponge Sponge TMNT Kung Fu
TOON 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 Tunes LooneyT. Berk(R) Tenkai Beyraiderz Pok6mon Ben 10 TitansGo! fTitans Go! Universe Abracadabra Doo
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Options Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
CNN32 32 3232 18 38 100 New Day Sunday (N) Sanjay New Day (N) State (CC) (N) (HP) Fareed Zakaria (N) Reliable Source (N)
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 C-Span Weekend Washington Journal Key events and legislation discussion. (N) Newsmkr C-Span Weekend
FNC 64 64 64 6448 71 118 FOX & Friends(N) FOX & Friends(N) FOX & Friends(N) FOX & Friends(N) NewsHO Housecall MediaBuzz(N)
MSNB 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Heist: (R) (1) Hardball Business Up w/Steve Kornacki Pundit panel. (N) Melissa Harris-Perry Political talk. (N)
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 Good Morning (N) Good Morning (N) Good Morning (N) News Paid Diocese Medical News Paid
CMIV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 (4:00) CMT Music CMT presents music videos from some of the hottest stars in country music. (N) Hot 20 (R) (H1D)
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous To Be Announced
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23217 VH1 + Music Top music videos. (N) VH1 Top 20 Video Countdown (R) (HP)) Single (R) (HP)) House Party ('90)
CNE 32020 2 30 30 40 Hot Fuzz (:35) Simon Sez ('99)' An Interpol (:05) Snitch (13) After his son is framed, a father On Her Majesty's Secret Service ('69, Action)
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 (07) (R) agent hunts a kidnap victim. goes undercover to clear his name. Blofeld has plan to release virus. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321321422 Ruby Sparks ('12) Rc- Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous Chasing Mavericks (12, Drama) Gerard Butler. Dark Shadows (12)
INE2 3\ 5\ 3\ 3 3 3 tional character. ('05) Pageant pals are kidnapped. (CC) Training to surf massive waves. (CC) Vampire'sfamily.
D I 13 13 13 995I20 Meetthe Octonauts Mickey(R) DocMc(R) Jakeand Sofia(R) Jessie (R) Austin(R) Austin(R) AN.T.(R) GoodLuck Blog(CC) (R)
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 Small (R( (14D) (14D) (R) (14D) (31D) (14D) (14D) (14D) (R)
ENC i50i50i50i 150 35 20) Hotel Transylvania ('12, Family) *** Bio-Dome ('96) Two half-wits fall (:40) Police Academy ('84) Misfits (:20) 50 First Dates ('04)
ENC 150150150 Monsters gather at a hotel resort. (PG) (CC) into an experiment. (C) create chaos at cop school. Memory loss.
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 The Return ('06) r** A young White Noise ('05) Man uses elec- (:15) Herblock- The Black and the White (13) Chain Reaction ('96) Pair
O 0 3 30 30 30 3 4 oman has terrifying visions. (CC) tronics to speak the dead. (CC) *** Award-winning cartoonist profiled, seek culprits.
S 802 30303030303030Buffy the Vampire Slayer ('92) Journey 2: The Mysterious Island Oblivion ('13 One of the last drone repairmen (:15) Hard Times: Lost on
HB02 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Kristy Swanson. A hero is born. ('12) Search for grandpa. stationed on arth has one last job. ILong Island
803 304'3400 The Loving Story Interracial couple (:25) In Good Company ('05) Man's (20) El Espiritu de la (:10) Hitchcock ('12, Drama) A film- Prome-
HB03 304 304 304 304 304 404 fights for marriage. (H1D) new boss is half his age. Salsa('10)-*-*(CC) maker meets his future wife. theus (12)
SHOW 34 30 43435Powder ('95, Science Fiction) ** Albino with Inside the NFL: 2013 The Rundown ('03) **-'/2 A bounty (:45) Silver Linings Playbook (12,
SHO 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 special powers faces abuse. (CC) (H1D) Week #22 (R) hunter seeks a mobster's son. Comedy) Reclaiming life.
TMC 3 3 eProducers (:35) The Three Musketeers ('11) **'/2 A October Sky ('99) Coal miner's son (:20) Varsity Blues ('99) James Van Der Beek.
Ti050 (5) swordsman joins the King's defenders. (CC) tries to build rockets. (CC) Coach and quarterback battle it out. (R)
350 350 3503 the King's







KIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOON SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

ABC i Enlerlainersilh Red Carpel Paid Pro- The insider The Road lo Gold Paid Pro- The Bachelor: Sean And Calherine's Wedding
61 Byron Allen I i m I Ii gram IiI gram I I,, I II ,, I I --,-, ,, I -:1, ,,- I -, 1,,l ii 1 IMIII
ABC Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- We Have A Dream i-. 1iih ,: Ii .1. 1ii. iii,.- The Bachelor: Sean And Calherines Wedding
281 gram gram gram gram l, l, ll,,,- 'l r.l ,i,,,i_ ,, i i TI,, 1 I :l,, 1:1, I- b h, H I, |HH|
ABC 7 7 PaidPro- PaidPro- Crook& Chase Luke Paid Pro- PaidPro- Homes(CC) Game The Bachelor: Sean And Catherine's Wedding
401 gram gram ,, III,, I gram gram Ill Time I, Ti. ii,,, i -i,.- I:,, I : i i: ,, I II IM III
CBS I I I I CBSSpoils: I. .. I College Baskelball: MI. ih.II ..'.I .A1,,,,i. I1.1i :1 F TOi iiG o. I.:
10 1 :_l .. ,.|- :,r l ,,,|H )l ..l.....l .....: ,- h .. : ,I .l, l lli 1 .1.1r1. : ..ll 1: ,l _- l: ..| II HI:I|
CBS CBSSpoils: '.* i. CollegeBaskelball: MI. ii.iiih ,,'....I .-1i1.: PGATOURGolf: ,,'i .i li, .,,,,iii h... ':. i--in l..iii.:
1 1 1 :-] i. i ,,: m )l Il M ll,'h Il, -I .I I Ii .. I- I I- i ll II 1 I,, I-- :_ .ll :. l Tl ,l l :- .ll ': .i l-l- I l |I,..| | lt | |Hit ll
NBC l ef sChan fIHLHockey: l-i, ,iiR- I I,,i,,,,i: ii I. l,, ,ii .... w 11 Redlilii, Red Bull Signalure Series: ri--i DogShows:ii, ill -I,-
S_ nelS ili ...n I :1 h.. ,,_-:.. .-I i ;.i- | 1,| 11|1|HI:I| 1111m1 l h ii,, i,,niii I iHiii 1- I-.,I' I I I .I. iHIII
NBC Paid Pro- fIHL Hockey: i-,i. ii I I. i.',.: ii. ,,:,,ii. w ... 1' Red illi, I Red Bull Signalure Series: Fi..:- Dog Shows: ii, -. i I.-
F 0 g ra m .- I:/ 1 h i i ., ,, ., _-i :. .i -,' i |1_,I I |I;. |,} HI:1| |HI:1| H l : l, i |i .,|. }{ll | | Il I_'.,I |' lh ll., ,.l1. 1 HlI:1|
FOX Road lo Ihe Super Foolball America: Our Super Bowl XLVIII Pregame Show "1. 1..iii(,1
131 Bo il ill) i,, I HI"i, Sloriesill)|I1.,)_
FOX Road to the Super Football America: Our Super Bowl XLVIII Pregame Show (live) (CC) (HD)
37 6 1 Bowl (N) (CC) (HD) Stories (N) (Hi))
PBS 3 3 3 McLaughlin Florida (CC) TotheCon- Project: ShatteredSi- Business The All-Star Orchestra Masterpiece: Sherlock, Series Ill: The Sign of
P3 3 (N) tray (N) lence Teenage stories. (R) Orchestra pieces. Three John's best man seeks a killer. (R) (HD)
PBS Easter Parade ('48, Musical) *** Judy Gar- Death in Paradise Sugar Kitchen (CC) Cook's (R) Cooking: Martha (R) Home (CC)(R) Old House
1 6 204 204 204 16 land. A man adjusts to a new dance partner. (NR) canefarmer. (lID) (R) ((ID) Roasting ((ID)) (ID)) (R)
PBS McLaughlin Wash Wk(R Moyers (R) TheWeek The SmartestTeam Frontline: League of Denial: The NFL's Concus- Secrets of Scotland
( 3 3 R) (1DH) (HD) (R) (1D Football safety. R) (HD) sion Crisis, Part 1 NFL & brain injury. (R) Yard (CC) (R) (HD)
CW Bolt ('08) Pampered, performing dog tries to Robots ('05) **/2 A robot journeys to the big Private Practice Surro- Rules:Jeff Rules:Zy-
AC 6 21 6 make cross-country journey tofnd hisowner, citytoshowhis inventions to a business tycoon, gate in coma. (HP)D) Day gote(HP)
CW 4 Snow Buddies ('08) ** James Belushi. A Bolt ('08) Pampered, performing dog tries to Kings of Comics (CC) 'Til Death Til Death
F441 9 group of talking dogs' adventures. (G) (CC) make cross-country journey to find his owner. Court (11H)) (HD))
MYN 1 $5 a Day ('09) Son of conniving conman reluc- Worn. College Basketball: Florida Gators SAF3: Adrift SAF3 heli- Community Community
1 1 4 tantly joins father on the road after his release. at Ole Miss Rebels (ve) (CC) copter. (CC) (N) (HP) (lI)) (1D)
MYN PaidPro- PaidPro- Addams Oliver Twist ('48, Drama) *** A young orphan escapes Master of Dragonard Hill ('87, Fantasy) 1/2 A
8 9 8 gram gram an abusive workhouse and falls in with a gang of thieves, man looks to stop a colonial governor. (R)
IND 12 12 1 3 12 The Private Lives of Pippa Lee ('09, Drama) Into the Blue ('05) Scuba divers run afoul of a 30 Rock (CC) 30 Rock (CC) How I Met How I Met
3 J2 12 12 3 1 Robin Wright. Wife explores sensuality at 50. drug lord after they retrieve his illicit cargo. (ID1) (lI)) (lI)) (14D))
ION 2 2 21326 1 17 Monk Ferris wheel. (CC) Monk Asylum murder. Monk Software king Monk A murdered law- Monk Woman mur- Monk Disbelieved wit-
2J)_326 1_7(CC) shot. (CC) yer. (CC) dered. (CC) ness. (CC)
WCLF 22 Living Green The Turning Point Heaven's Christ. & Jewish Van Penrry Stone Gaither Homecoming In- In Touch with Dr.
22 2 2 Stones Word importance. (R) Jews Jewels Koevering (N) spirational music. Charles Stanley (CC)
WRXY 22 4 Don Wilton Love Worth Love a Testi- Retro Angel The Dieti- Unlk Reve- Bill Gouley Tommy Voice of Through Bi
M 4, 10 (CC) JChild moniesof Braham cian nation Bates Faith ble(N)
TIF 23, 23 23 95 (11:))Alvin and theChip- Los infiftrados 06, Crirmienr) **** Leonardo DiCaprio. Un police Rompiendo los limits Futbol Central
50L munks ('07) (CC) encubierto descubre ue un mafioso se hace pasar por policia. (R) (CC) (CC) Informacion defutbol. (N)
UNIV 15 1515 6 Rep.Dep. (. (50) Fdtbol de M6xico: Club Tijuanavs UNAM desde TraslaverdadMundode Elchavoanimado Comodiceeldicho
62 1 (N) (HD) 1 Universitario (Diredo) (CC) (lID) famosos. (lI)) Versi6n animada. (HID) Relato reflexion. (HID)

A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 (11:00) Liar Liar ('97) Mayne Mayne Mayne Mayne Crazy Bad romance. Crazy (CC) (R) (lD) Wahlburger (R) (HiD)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Dead (R) Dead (CC) (R) (I)) Walking Dead: Vatos Dead: Wildfire (R) Dead: TS-19(R) (lI)) Walking Dead Escaping Atlanta.
API 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 (:02) Too Cute! (R) Too Cute! (R) (lID) Too Cute! (R) (ID) IPuppy Bowl X Doggie football. (N) (ID) PuppyBowl X (R) (ID)
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 (11:30) Hurricane Season ('08) Former rivals. The Longshots ('08) 2 A young girl joins a football team. Radio ('03) **1/2 Unlikelyinspirer.
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Shahs (R) Shahs (R) Blood Heel (R) Blood Heel (R) Blood Heel Scene. (R) Blood Heel (R)
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Comebacks Dazed and Confused Teens finish school. (R) Vegas Vacation ('97) **1/2 Tosh(R) Tosh(R) Tosh(R)
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Rods N'(CC) (R) (HI)) Billy Bob's Gag (R) Alaska (CC) (R) (HI)) Alaska Udder issue. Alaska (CC) (R) (HI)) Alaska (CC) (R) (HI))
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 Kardashian (R) (HD) #RichKids #RichKids Sex&City Sex&City Sex&City Sex&City Sex & City Sex & City Sex&City Sex&City
ESQ 82 82 82 82 118 118 160 Friday |Friday (R)(lID) Friday (R) psych (CC) (lI)) psych Plans go awry. psych(CO (lI)D) Ghostbust
EWTN 243243243 12 17 285 Sunday Mass (R) Litany of Dane Sings Bridges Reflection Rosary Finding Parables SavFaith TheNew
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Rookie |RemembertheTitans ('00) *** Coachingfootball. (CC) We Are Marshall ('06, Drama) A coach brings hope to a tragic team.
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Kitchen (R) Trisha's Pioneer |Guy's Gourmet salad. Iron Chef (R) (HID) Mystery Mystery Diners (R) (HI))
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 Transformers 2('09) Transformers: Dark of the Moon ('11) **1/2 The Autobots battle the Decepticons. Underworld: Awakening ('12)
GSN 179 179 179 179 34179 184 The Chase (R) Minute Teaming up. Minute (R) Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73240 Hallmark Channel's Inaugural Kitten Bowl Cats compete. (CC) (N) (HD) Hallmark Channel's Inaugural Kitten Bowl Cats compete. (CC) (R) (HD)
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Swamp: Bad Mojo (R) Swamp: Blood Lines Swamp: Waging War Swamp: Deadly Chill Swamp (CC) (R) (HD) Swamp (CC) (R) (HD)
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Love It Small home. Prop Bro (R) (HD) Prop Bro (R) (HD) Prop Bro (R) (HD) Prop Bro (R) (HD) Prop Bro (R) (HD)
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Electronic Electronic NUTRiBULLET Lancome Paris Epilady Infiniti Electronic
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 (11:00) Movie Movie Movie Movie
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 Super Soul (R) (1HD)) SuperSoul(R) (H)) SuperSoul(R) (H)) Super Soul (R) (HD)) SuperSoul (R) (H)) SuperSoul(R) (H))
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 (11:00) Judith Ripka Barbara Bixby Jewelry Portfolio Michael Dawkins Judith Ripka Sterling Collection
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R)
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Ice (10) Polar Storm (09) r*1/2 Magnetic storms. (CC) Ice Twisters ('09) Weather experiments. (CC) Snowmageddon (11) *1/2 (PG-13)
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 (11:45) Mamma Mia! ('08) **1/2 Meet the Parents ('00) Potential in-laws. (CC) Home Alone ('90) *** Boy foils burglary. (CC)
TCM 65 65 65 65 169230 (:15) Rachel, Rachel ('68) Changing her life. (:15) The Caine Mutiny ('54) A lieutenant stages a mutiny. The Defiant Ones ('58) ***l/2 (CC)
TIC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 Say Yes JSayYes 90 Day (R) (HI)) To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Law&Order: D-Girl Law Wily suspect. Law: Showtime(HI)) Law: Refuge, Part 1 Law Witnesses jailed. Law (CC) (HI))
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 110 Grills Gone Wilder (R) Adam Richman's (R) Paradise (CC) (R) Paradise (CC) (R) Paradise (CC) (R) Paradise (CC) (R)
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Most Shock (R) Pawn(R) Pawn(R) Jokers Jokers GuinnessWorld (R) Guinness(R) Guinness(R)
TVLND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Brady Brady Brady Brady Brady Brady Cleveland Cleveland
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 500 (11:00) Faster (10) (R) SVU Rape case. (HD) SVU Lesbian group. SVU Meat-packing. SVUActivist raped. SVU Pro football star.
WE 117 117 117117 111 149 Roseanne senne Roseanne Roseanne RRa sennne Roseanne Rosea eoseaRsenne Law War crimes. (HI)) Law: Endurance (HI))
WGN16 16 16 19 41 11 9 openRange***R HomeVid HeatNight(CC (HD) HeatNight (C (HP) HeatNight (CC) (H)) Home Videos (TVPG)







SUNDAY
HIGHLIGHTS

America's Funniest
Home Videos
8 p.m. on ABC
The episode for this week
features a man with a
remote control airplane
that he steers into his own
head; a golf ball dispenser
that has gone haywire; a
sleeping bulldog that chews
in his sleep when a cheese-
burger is held near his
nose. (HD)

Shrek 2
8 p.m. on TBS
A surly ogre and his new
bride pay a visit to her
home kingdom, but they
get a less than friendly
reception from her disap-
proving royal parents and
a fairy godmother who is
determined to see her own
candidate married to the
princess. (HD)


Why Did I Get
Married?
8 p.m. on TNT
While one of the four cou-
ples at an annual college re-
union in Colorado struggles
with infidelity, each of the
other couples has some
serious conversations
about the states of their
own marriages, discussing
commitment, betrayal and
forgiveness. (HD)

Harry Potter and the
Prisoner of Azkaban
9 p.m. on FAM
Three wizards-in-training
try to discover a secret
that their new professor is
hiding, as well as prepare
for the possibility of hav-
ing to confront a recently
escaped convict who may
have aided in the murder of
one of the wizard's parents.
V (HD)

Masterpiece
9 p.m. on PBS
"Downton Abbey IV" Lady


Rose MacClare decides to
hold a surprise party for
Robert Crawley, but the
celebration may lead to an
unexpected scandal; as
Lady Edith Crowley worries
for Michael Gregson, she is
presented with some dis-
concerting news. (HD)

Little Fockers
9:04 p.m. on NBC
A man takes on a new job at
a pharmaceutical company
and focuses on caring for
his wife and family, but
havoc ensues when the
bond that he established
with his characteristically
unyielding father-in-law
crumbles beneath suspi-
cions of infidelity.l (HD)

New Girl
10:30 p.m. on FOX
"Party Time" When a
chance encounter presents
Jess and Cece with a once-
in-a-blue-moon invite to a
party held by music roy-
alty Prince, Nick, Schmidt,


It's love at first sight for a
ballerina (Emily Blunt) and a
politician destined for suc-
cess, but their union doesn't
fit "The Plan," as enforced
by a mysterious group of
omnipotent beings known as
"The Adjustment Bureau," a
fantasy thriller airing Sun-
day at 9 p.m. on SYFY.
Winston and Coach deter-
minedly find a way to crash
the event and witness the
festivities themselves. (HD)


SKIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOON SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
FE.2

CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 U.S. Olympic Trials U.S. Olympic Trials Worn. College Basketball (live) (CC) Talkin Football
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 (10:00) Sunday NFL Countdown (N)(HD)) Worn. College Basketball (Live)(CC) (HD)) PBA Bowling (Taped)(HD)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 ESPN First Take (N) (CC) (HD) College Ftbl: 2014 All-Star Challenge Worn. College Basketball (live) (CC) (HD)
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 FOX Kick-Off (HD) Women's Int'l Soccer (Replay) (CC) (H1D) FOX Fight Night (Replay) (CC) (HD) Fighting for a (HD)
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Inside Magic LIVE NBA Baskel ball: Orlandovs Boston (live) (CC) (HD) Magic LIVE Big-Air: Miami, FL. Highlights Highlights
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Euro.Tour PreGame PGATOURGolf (Replay) (IH) PreGame European Tour Golf (Replay)(HI))
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Club Guide (HI)) Wild Skies Whitetail Outdoors C.Moore FLW(H)D) To Be Announced Info unavailable.
SUN 38 38 401 401 45 57 76 Womrn. College Basketball (live) (CC) (HI)) Womrn. College Basketball (live) (CC) (HI)) B. Donovan FSU First Reel Fish Into the
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 Sam & Cat Sam & Cat Haunted Thundermn Ice Age ('02) *** Lost infant. TBA Rabbids Sanjay Fairly Fairly
TOON 80 80 124124 46 20 251 Scooby-D Powerpuff JohnyTest JohnyTest JohnyTest Regular Regular Adventure Adventure Universe Grandpa Grandpa
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 State (CC) (R) (HD) Fareed Zakaria (R) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N)
CSPN 18 18 18 18 31 12 109 C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings. C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings. C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings.
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 America's HQ (N) News HO (DC)(N) FOX News (HO) America's HQ (N) CarolAlt NewsHQ MediaBuzz(R)
MSNB 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Alex Witt (N) (HD) Taking the Hill (N) Meet Press (HD) MSNBC Live (N) Karen Finney (N) Caught: Proof? (R)
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 News News News Daytime (N) News Paid News Paid News News News News
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 Hot 20 Countdown Videos and news. (R) Hazzard (CC) (HD) The Beverly Hillbillies ('93) *1/ Shack to mansion. Groundhog
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 GirlCode GirlCode GirlCode GuyCode (:18)Guy Code GuyCode GuyCode GirlCode GirlCode GirlCode GirilCode
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 House Party ('90) Love (CC) (R) (HD) Therapy (R) (HD) Mob Wives (R) (HD) Mob Wives (R) (HD) MobWives(R) (HD)
CINE 3o 320 320 320 320 320 40 1M0as ty (:25) A Nightatthe Banshee: Bloodlines (:45) Restraint ('08, Thriller) A thug (:20) Taken 2: Unrated Extended Version (12)
E 320 32 32 32( 320 320 420, Roxbury (98) (CC) Schoolteacher. (R) and his lady take a hostage. **1 2 CIA operative's family is targeted.
(CINE2 321 :3 3 3 3 4 05) Summer of Sam ('99, Drama)**%2 John Leguizamo. Asa killer ter- (:15) Mr.& Mrs. Smith ('05, Action)Brad Pitt. (:15) The Dark Knight
IN2 321321321321321321422 rifles New York, residents look for people who don't fit in. (R) Married couple hired to kill each other. Rises (12) (CC)
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45250 Austin (R) Austin(R) Austin & Shakeft(R) Shake It Up! Shake ft (R) Austin (R) Austin (R) Austin (R) Austin(R) Teen Beach Movie (13)
ISN 136 134 (D) (1D) Ally (R) (H1D) (R) (lHD) (HD) (1D) (1HD) (1DH) 1960s musical.
ENC 150101010 10 (11:20) 50 First Dates ('04) (:05) Premium Rush (12) *** (:40) Good Will Hunting ('97, Drama) *** (:50) Finding Neverland ('04) The in-
C 150 15(] 150 150 350 Memory loss. Cyclist pursued. (PG-13) (CC) Troubled genius deals with his past. (R) (CC) spiration for "Peter Pan."
HBO 302302 302 302 302 302 400 Chain Reaction ('96) Pair RealTimewith Bill The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (:45) Joyful Noise (12) ** Queen Latifah. Choir (:45) Epic
S302 30 30 30 302 02 400 seek culprits. Maher (1VMA) (R) ('13) Magician memories, leaders can't agree on direction. (CC) (13)
H82 33 33 33 33 10) Roc k of Ages (12, Comedy) Julianne (15) Making Game Change ('12, Drama) Ed Harris. Presiden- The Negotiator ('98) A police negoti-
HB02 303 303 30 30" 303 3 -03 402 Hough. Two kids chasing fame fall in love. of tial campaign in 2008. (NR) (CC) (HD) ator takes hostages. (CC)
803 4043430 304 44 (11:50) Prometheus (12, Science Fiction) Expedi- True Detective Past case True Detective Case True Detective Hidden Entrapment ('99) ***
"HB3 304 304 304 304 304 404 tion to learn humanity's origins. (CC) discussed, threatened. (H1D) image. (CC) (HlD) Agent baitsthief.
~SHOW 340340340340340365Silver('12) (:50) Jay Z: Made in America ('13) Jay Z. 2012 (25)50/50 ('11, Drama) Young man Episodes (35) Coach Carter('05)Coachjeop
S_ HOW 3 3 3 3 3 4 3(CC) Made in America" music festival. (CC) tries to beat cancer. (R) (CC) (R) ardizes a winning season.
TMC 350 350 0 350 350 3 385 (:05) People Like Us ('12, Drama) *** Chris Amdlie A shy waitress decides to bring delight (:05) Salmon Fishing in the Yemen ('12, Drama)
TM_ 35 3u 3u 3( 30 ]0 8 Pine. Adult siblings meet for the first time. and awe into the lives of other people. *** Sheiks vision of fly fishing. (CC)







KIDS NEWS SPORTS


EVENING SUNDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


I P 6:30 PM 7:30 8 P 8 9 9:0 10 PM 1I


ABC World ABC7 rlews Americas Funniesi Home Americas Funniesi Home
Newswilhh *:. 6:30pm iiu Videosr.li, ni iiihl Videos ,, di hi ii,,:,,
David M uil l i) ,,n i l, h, 1,, iii iHII 'I : l, iii iHII
IHII
1Nes Ti-ii I i World lNews America's Funniesl Home America's Funniesl Home
-: I II : HIIIIHIIII Videos i",, I 111111 Videosi-,, I 111:,1
World lNews News iiu America's FunniesI Home America's FunniesI Home
IIIIIIII Videos iI 111i III Videos i' I IH1III
CBSEvening IONeis Tii, 60Minules,,i"iiiiiI(i The Good Wife: Tii,- i 1
NeCBSI Ilen 1 eI s I Mi,- : M ,nu,-Ie 1 T G:oa Wif -l I : "
,,,- : IlIIIHIIII I ln l i) im | I | H HI:I|
CBS Evenina tlew s nill JIHI.I 60 M inules oi,,iiiii .:, The eood W ife -1 .1 .....1


SharkTank i, i 1i H,,I, Shark Tank H1 i'.. '.i ,ii"

I HI:II HI:1|
SharkTank i i, Ri i. .1.i SharkTank R .. '. 1..
,:.inl,- r.1 l n fl H IHII, .,l1- :, i,,,i n i t.:iI IH I
S hark T ank i 11 i R .1 .i S hark T ank R v I.. .. i.
,:.inl,- r.1 l fll t: ,HHII.,lH :, i,,,l il i :lI IH I
The Menlalisi: Tih, : :, IC[S: :, ,- i .. i i. .-I -


TheMenlalisl .i i. iii :i : N OB : I 1 C.1. Fi i: : :


3S _ILj I(N)(HD) _. ._. .._firm. (CC) (R) (HD141) tpets. (CC) (R) (HD) pact.(CCl(R)(HP)D
NewsChannel NBC Nightly Dateline NBC (CC) (N) (:04) Little Fockers ('10, Comedy) ** Robert De Niro.
NBC 8 at 6:00 News News Week- A man takes a new job at a pharmaceutical company and
B 8 8 8 8 and weather, end Edition (N) focusesoncaring for his family, buthisuntrusting fa-
(HD) __ther-in-law wreaks havoc on his life. (PG-13) (CO)
NBC NBC2News NBNightly Dateline NBC (C) (N) :04) Little Fockers ('1 0) ** A man focuses on being a
2B22 (N) News (N) I good father while trying to impress his father-in-law.
F 1 Super Bowl XLVIII: Seattle Seahawks vs Denver Broncos from MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford N.J. (Live) Super Bowl New Girl: Party
FOX 13 13 13) (HD) 111N w TimeeA party
31 ` 13 1 Postgame with Prince. (N)
Show (Live)
FOX )Super Bowl XLVIII: Seattle Seahawks vs Denver Broncos from MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford N.J. (live) (CC) Postgame (le) New Girl: Party
3m 4)4D4 (141H) ___ _Time
PBS i PBS WEDU Arts The Diamond Queen A Masterpiece Bates seeks an- Masterpiece: Downton Abbey (:58) Masterpiece Despised
PE 3 33 3 Newshour(N) Plus(HD) modern monarchy. swers. CC) (R) (HD) IV Robert's party. (N) foe. (CC) (N) (H)
PBS I2 2 AskThis (CC(R) P. Allen (CC) Pioneers of Television Female NOVA Combating Zeppelins. Chasing Shackleton Explorer's Chasing Shackleton Rough
I] 204 204 204 16 (H) (R) comics. (R) (HD1) (CC) (R) (HD) story. (CC) (R) (HD1) seas. (CO (R) (HD)
PBS Scotland Yard Masterpiece: Downton Abbey IV Tom's Masterpiece: Downton Abbey Masterpiece Bates seeks an- Masterpiece Dangerous
_33 (R(1H1) night with Edna may cost him. (R) (HD) IVTom's dilemma. swers. (CC)(N)H() killer. (CC) (N) (HD)
CW 6 2 6 21/2Men(CC) 21/2Men(CC) BigBang(CC) BigBang(CC) HowlMet(CC) HowlMet(CC) Modern: Leap Modern (CC) WINK News @lOpm (N) (HP)
m (HD) (H) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) Day (HD)1 ____Dy 14
CW 9 9 9 4 Friends (PG) Friends Nana 21/2 Men (CC) 21/2 Men (CC) CSI: Miami: Internal Affairs CSl: Miami: Throwing Heat Criminal Minds: Doubt Cam-
CW (CC) passes. (HD) (HD) Natalia suspected. (HD) Land mine. (CC) (HD) -pus killings. (CC) (HD)
MYN 11 1 1 Dirty Dancing ('87) **1/2 A sheltered teenager falls for Seinfeld (CC) Seinfeld: The Republic of Doyle: Live and Our Issues Whacked Out
MN a dance instructor to the dismay of her father. (CO) F-Up Let Doyle (C) (H)) (C) (C)
MYN 8 9 8 Friends (CC) Friends Nana Family Guy Family Guy Blue Streak ('99, Comedy)** A hapless jewel thief Leverage: The Inside Job
B__ ______ passes. (CC) ((CC) oses as a police officer to retrieve stolen diamonds. Parker's mentor. (HD)4
IND 12 12 12 3 1 Modern: Leap Modern (C) Big Bang (CC) Big Bang(CC) Glee: Sexy Facts of life; relation- Glee: Original Song Quinn's Office Ethics Office: Baby
3n Da (H1) (HD) H(H ship issues. (HD1) mission. (Q (C1) )Dseminar. Shower
ION 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Monk Businessman killed. Monk Manager killed. (CC) Monk Mr.MonkandtheAir- Monk Teacher death. (CC) MonkA couple's murdered.
F6-6 (CC) lane First plane ride. (CC)
WCLF 22 22 22 2 The Brody The Watch- Peter Great Awakening Tour Love a Child Unspoken Knowthe Daniel Jesse
22) File iman Youngren Cause (CC) Kolenda Duplantis(N)
WRXY 22 10 The Good Life Pe Stone Great Awakening Tour Connection Savin the Entertain- Time of Day of Salva-
2244 10(CC(N) (CInvestor ment tion
TLF 23 23 23 95 5 c Fdtbol de M6xico: CruzAzul vs Guadalajara desde Ben-Hur (09) Ray Winstone. Dos amigos de la infancia pelean en bands opuestos du-
50 ",l: Estadio Jalisco (Diredo) (CC) (H1) rante la guerra. (CH) (D)D)____________
UNIV 15 15 15 6 Humor es (CC) Noticiero Aqufy ahora Periodismo de Voces inocentes ('05, Drama) Chava lucha por sobrevivir (:05) Sal y pimienta Tras las
62 1 1 lUnivisi6n (N) investiaci6n. (N) (HD) en medio de la querra y la violencia. (CC) (HD) cameras. (CC)(N) (HD)

AE 22 6 50 Wahlburger(R) DuckWillie's Duck (CC) (R) Duck (CC)(R) Crazy Hearts: Nashville Crazy Hearts: Nashville Birth- Crazy Hearts: Nashville Bad
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 (HD) gift.(R) ()HD) 1(HD) Rocker; bachelor. (R) (HD) day pa. (R)(HD) romance. (R) (HD)
IC 5 5 5 3 7The1 e Walking Dead: Blodlet- TheWalking Dead Shane in TheWalking Dead Staying on The Walking Dead: The Walking Dead: Secrets
__AMC 56 t a ing Safetyfound. (R) trouble. (CC) R (1 HD) the farm. (R) liHD) Chupacabra Alone and injured. Andrea's new skill. (R)
4 A A A 1 0 ion Puppy BowlX Sixty-sxpup- Puppy Bowl X Sixty-six energetic puppies vie for barking Puppy Bowl X Sixty-six energetic puppies vie for barking
APL 4444 44 44 36 68 130 upieshtthegridiron. (R) rights and a chance to be voted MVP. (R)(HD) rights and a chance to be voted MVP. )R)(HD)
ET 35 35 3 3 (4:30) Radio ('03) **Y/2 Un- Wayans: The Wayans (CC) 2nd Genera- Wayans: High 2nd Genera- 2nd Genera- Wayans Movie 2nd Genera-
B 40 22 270 iKely inspired. (P) Arral R) tion (R) Anxety tion: Cut! tion (R) funds. tion (R)
8 V 68 68 68 68 24 ,, Real Housewives of Atlanta The Real Housewives of At- Trhe Real Housewives of At- The Real Housewives of At- Real Housewives of Atlanta
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 25451 1 Mynique offends. (R) lanta Old news. (R) lanta Athens. (CC) (R) lanta Jewelry show. Tense vineyard trip.
M 6 6 66 6 1 7 1 Tosh.O Tosh.O (CC) (R) Tosh.O (CC)O (R) Tosh.OWorst Tosh.O (CC) (R) Tosh.O (CC) (R) Tosh.O (CC) (R) Tosh.O (CC) (R) Tosh.O(CC) (R) Tosh.O
COM 66 66 6666 15 i 190 Lohanthony. (R)(HD) (HD1) school. (HD) (HD) (HD1) (HD) ,(HD) Movember.(R)
DIC 4 4 4 0 25 12 Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier Two Alaska: The Last Frontier Cat-
DiSC 40 40 40 40 25 43120 Hunting for moose. (R) Summer projects. (R) Duck hunting. (R) (HD1) hunt deer. (R) (HD) tle drive. (R)(HD)
Sex & City SexCity: I Sex & City Sex & City Sex and the City Paris life. KeepingUpwith the #RichKids(R) #RichKids(R)
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 (14) Heart NY (TV14) TV1) (TV14) (CC) Kardasnians: How to Deal ()HD) (HD)
ES 82 82 82 82 118118160 (5:30) Ghostbusters ('84) A group of paranormal investiga- Parks Sex ed- Parks First Parks: Leslie Parks Park de-Worst Wk. Worst Week
tE i000 ors goes into the ghost extermination business. ucation. meetin g, vs. April signs. (HD1) (HD)
EWIN 243 243 243 12 17 285 Benediction Crossing/Goal The World Over News from Sunday Night Prime Callers' Chesterton (IV Holy Rosary Dogmatic Theology Host ex-
EWTN 433 2 (1VG) I(VG) around theworld. (CC) questions. (TVG) (N) G) (TYG) ploresthemes of faith.
FAM 0 461 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban ('04, Fantasy) *** Daniel Radcliffe. A Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban ('04, Fantasy)
FAM 55 55 55 55 0 46 199 young wizard learns that an escaped convict may have betrayed his parents. ,*** An escaped convict stalks Harry Potter.
D 3177 3 31 16164 Chopped: Big Fish, Small Bas- Rachaelvs.Guy:: Big Game Guy's Grocery Games: Surf's Chopped: Pizza Perfect Cutthroat Kitchen:A Crepe-Y
FOO 7 7 3 3t 7 teian;mezcal. Grub Chicken wings. UpSurf andtuif.(R) Candied mushrooms. (N) Situation No basket.
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 5 Underworld 4 Twilight ('08, Fantasy) **Y2 Kristen Stewart. A student falls for a yam- The Twilight Saga: New Moon ('09, Fantasy) ** Kristen
X 1 __ 1 5 49 3 (12)**12 pire, but soon another vampire wants to hunt her down. (PG-13) Stewart. Edwardleaves, and Bella turns to Jacob.
GSN 179 179 179 179 1719184 Family Feud Family Feud Newlywed Newlywed Newlywed Newlywed Newlywed Newlywed Newlywed Newlywed
GSN 179171717VPG) I(VPG) Game(R) Game(R) Game(R) Game(R) Game(R) Game(R) Game(R) Game(R)
HALL 5 5 5 17 730 o Hallmark Channel's Inaugural Kitten Bowl Host Beth Stern presents an intense com- Hallmark Channel's Inaugural Kitten Bowl Young cats
_ALL 730petition involving young cats. (CC) (R) (HD1) compete against each other. (CC) (R) (HD)
HIST 81 81 81 81 15 Swamp People: CursedDead Swamp People: Ride or Die Swamp People: Devoured Swamp People: Young Blood Swamp People: Ten Deadliest
HIS 8 8 8 8 6 I2 gator bites. (R)(HP) Toughest season. (R) Sinkhole; lightning. (R) Unity; office job. (R) Hunts Lives risked.
OM 11 4 4 2 Property Brothers Desperate Property Brothers Expect- Hunt (R) Hunt (R) LifeAhomein Life (R) Hunters (R) Hunters Florida
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165toescape. (R)HD) inga chiNd. (R) (HD) Oahu. Keys.
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Electronic Electronics. NUTRiBULLET Dermabrush Infiniti Electronic Electronics. Electronic Football
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 (5:00) Movie Movie Movie


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KIDS NEWS SPORTS


EVENING SUNDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


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Super Soul Sunday I:I Super Soul Sunday 111i Oprah: Where Are They Oprah: Where Are They Oprah ii 0 mii
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IU ( HIIl (HIll : I (Hil: 1,1,: :1. 1, l (i, I HI.1| (HI.1| ( J(H rlhl l T I .I .ll:I
Snovmagedd The Day Afler Tomoirro i ,4 i 'in ** C'.,,,: ,.,, .i ,, .... TheAdjuslmeni Bureau, ii Thiiill.ii ***1 r.lii
Shrek i I iii- : ,i ii .1 1, 1 iii il ll ,ii .1 ,1,, Shrek2,,4 I ii-, : '. d..i,,, .I-u: : i, .., ShreklheThird i. r.l. l .-
t.1 12 Angry Men ', ,", ii, i.'ii: il i.., I The Losl Weekend 1 4'': *** I'. ..I..I. ii,-i i And Ihe Oscar Goes To...
ToBe Announced IiI,,1 ToBe Announced iii,11 Sex Senil Melo IlheER i. I SexSenI Me loI heERi-i ,i,,i SexSenI Me loIheER 111
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INT 01 o 01 o 501 I lof two families, so the mothers must save them. somber as one of the couples attending confronts infidelity. (C:) Too '-10
TA 696696 9n Food Paradise: Chile Paradise Food Paradise Hands-on Food Paradise: Deli Paradise Food Paradise Kobe beef Food Paradise Classic N.Y.
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Best chili recipes. feasts. ((CC) (R) U.S. delicatessens. sashimi. (CC (R) pizza. ((CC (R)
TRUTY 63 63 63 63 50 30 13 Guinness World Records Guinness World Records Guinness Worid Records Un- Guinness World Records Guinness World Records
TRUTV 3 Strong woman. (R) Unleashed: Blast Off leashed: The Blob Frying pans. (R) iFeet archery. (R)
TVLND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Cleveland Cleveland Surprise baby. Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl
USA 3434 34 3422 52 50 Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: SVU Stolen car Law & Order: SVU Rape accu- Law & Order Special Victims Law & Order Special Victims
S3 3 2 UnitArt patron. and baby. (1V14) station. (1V14) (HN)) Unit Violent son. Unit Rollins hunch.
WE 1171171111 11711 4 Law & Order Medication Law & Order: Dissonance Vio- Law & Order: Standoff Inmate Law & Order Return Law aids Law & Order: Burn Baby Burn
W 1 1 withheld. (CC) (H())( linist murdered. (HN) kills inmate. (H8)1 deserter. ((1((H())8 Possiblehatecrime.
WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 America's Funniest Home America's Funniest Home Red Dragon ('02, Crime) ***, Anthony Hopkins. An FBI agent tracks a ThePledge
WVN 1 l l 4 11 videos (VPG(1D) Videos (VPG)(1D) serial killer whose murders coincide with afull moon. (R) (01) (C)
CSS 28282828 9 70 U.S. Olympic Trials Wn's Gym.: Alabama, Ken- Women's College Gymnastic: Women's College Gymnastic:
CSS tucky & Nebraska Ilowa vsGeorgia Georgiavs Florida
ESPN 29 29 29 29 1 730 for 30: One Night in Ve- 30 for 30: No Mas (CC) (HN) 30 for 30 30 for 30 30 for 30 SportsCenter NFL
ESPN 1 2 \ 0 gascc(HCCD) () Shorts (HD) Shorts (HD) Shorts (HD) (NHD) Primetime(HP)
S7 Poker(Replay) World Series of Poker: Main 2013 World Series of Poker: 2013 World Series of Poker: Final Table: from Rio SportsCenter
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 14 (HD) Event-Day 7 (HD)) IMain Event Da 7 All-Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas (Replay) Z(N)(HD)
S8 8 8 48 42 69 3 (5:00) Fighting for a Genera- Ultimate 100 Knockouts: Part Ultimate 100 Knockouts: Part Knockouts: Part 4: Top 10 FOX Spor its FOX Sports
FS1 48 4 48 48 42 69 83 tion ((I (HN) 2: Knockouts 70-41 3: Knockouts 40-11 Greatest Knockouts Live (HN) Live (HN)
FSN 71 22 Highlights: UFC Insider World Poker Tour Bay 101 World Poker Tour: Bay 101 UFC Unleashed Best of the World Poker Tour: Bay 101
N 1 7 7 7 Lifestyle (HN)) Shooting Star-Part 2 ShootingStar-Part 3 best of UFC fights (N) Shooting Star-Part 2
GOLF 49 49 4949 55 60 304 (aGolf Central (N European Tour Golf: Omega Dubai Desert Classic: Final Round: from Emirates Golf Club in Dubai, U.A.E. (Replay) (HM) PGATOUR
GOLF 149 4' 4' 49 55 60 :04 (HD)) Golf (141))
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 Lucas Oil Motorsports UnderWild Whitetail Di- Eye of the North to Territories Deer Hunting Winkelman Nrth Am.
BCS 61 90 Hour(HD)) Skies aries(HO) (HD)) Alaska(HO) Wild (HP) (HMDI (H1D) Hunter
SUN 3 4 5 < 16 dShipShape Captain's Fins & Skins Sport Fishing Sportsman Reel Time Saltwater Exp. College Swimming/Diving: Golden (Taped)
SUN 38 38 401 401 45 57 76 V (R Taes (R (HD I Adv. (HD) (H1D)) (HD) FloridavsAuburn ____ _
NICK 25 2525 25 24 44 2,2 Sponge Pro Sponge ((CC) To Be Announced Info un- Rugrats in Paris: The Movie (00) Kids Full Hse ((CC) Full HseArgu- Full Hse ((CC)
NIK 1 wrestlers. (R) available, seek suitable new mommy in France. ments.
TOON 80 80124 124 A46 2 27 Scooby-Doo! The Mystery Begins ('09, Comedy) Frank NinjaGoa The NinjaGo (R) King ((CC) King (CC Burgers: Bur Burgers Dou-
TOON 80 80 124124 Welker, Al Rodrigo. Paranormal detective team. Surge q er War ble date.

CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Paid Paid Debt Money (N) Greed: Shipwrecked! (R) reed Southern charm. Greed Still scamming. (R)
N 32 32 32 32 18 3B 100 CNN Newsroom Sunday CNN Presents One-topic Anthon Bourdain Parts Un- Anthony Bourdain Parts Un- CNN Presents One-topic
CNN 3 3 3 3 18 x 1 News and updates. (N) studies. (CC) (HP)) Iknown Exotic foods. known Exotic foods. studies. (CC (1HP))
PN 1 1 1 1 11 Newsmakers American Politics News coverage keeps Q&A Interesting people dis- PM'sQues- American Politics News coverage keeps
CSPN 18 18 18 8 37 12 109 (R) vewers informed, cuss their work. (N) tions (R) viewers informed. (R)
NC 4 4 6 6 4 1 FOX News Sunday with Chris FOX Report Sunday News Huckabee Entertaining talk. Hannity Conservative news. Stossel The host reports on lib-
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 Wallace (C) (HD)) wrap-up. (N) (HD)) (N) (14)) (C UD ertarian issues. (HD))
UMD B 83 83 83 83 185 4n0 0Caught on Camera: Defiance Caught on Camera Armed Caught on Camera: Mysteries Ted Bundy Death Row The Mind of Manson 1987
MSNB 83 83 83 8385 40 103 Peope standing up. robbers. (R) (HM) and Monsters (R) Tapes The last interviews, interview. (R)
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 News(N) News(N) News(N) Paid Annette News (N) Paid News (N) SNN Evening Edition (N)
CM 4114413 215:30) Groundhog Day ('93) An arrogant weatherman is Swamp Pawn: Where's My Big My Big Party Down South: Things are
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 22 forced to relive the same day over and over again. Shorty?(R) (H1)) Redneck (R) Redneck (R) Gonna Get Weird
MT 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 Are You the One? Secret Are You the One? Secret Teen Mom 2 Teens have Ridiculous- Ridiculous- DyrdekFan- DyrdekFan-
I 3333333 020matchmaking in Hawaii. matchmaking in Hawaii. kids. (HN)) ness (HD) ness (H) tasy (CC) tasy ((CC)
VH1 0 0 5 5 4 9 1 Mob Wives: Vegas Part One Mob Wives: Vegas Part Two Mob Wives: Vegas Part Three Mob Wives: Loose Lips Vicious Mob Wives: Eat Worms B*"h
VH 0 4 a a Pack. (R) (N)) Trying to reconcile. Vegas strip club. (R) tabloid. (R) (N) Dritawrites track. (R)
Erin Brockovich ('00, Drama) *** Julia Roberts, Albert (10) Promised Land ('12, Drama) **1, 2 Matt Damon, Snitch (13) Dwayne Johnson.
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 Finney. A secretary's determined crusade brings an John Krasinski. Natural gas company representatives try to Afathergoes undercoverwith
_____ arrogant utility company to account. (R) ((CC (HD)) buy out a small rural town. (R) (C (1DHD) the DEA. (C_______
(5:15) TheDark Knight Rises C12, Action) **** Banshee: Bloodlines Lucas War of the Worlds ('05) *** Tom Cruise. A man
CINE2 321321321321321321422 Christian Bale, Gary Oldman. The Dark Knight resurfaces speakswithAmish rotects his children as aliens launch a deadly attack on
___ __to protect Gotham rom a brutal, new enemy. (CC) schoolteacher. ((CC (1)) Earth. (PG-131)(CC) (ND))
(5:00)Teen (:45) Cloud 9 (14, Action) After a young snowboarder with a I Didn't (CC) (R) Austin & Ally Jessie Dance Good Luck Dogwitha
DISN 136136 136 136 99 45 250 Beach Movie hugeego is kicked off of herteam, she must improve her D.C. museum, class. (CC (R) Charlie'splay. BlogFuture
____ (13) abilities with a former major competitor. (WR) (D4)) (R)(D4)) plans. (R)
Finding (:40) Home on the Range ('04, Comedy) Hotel Transylvania (12 Family Dracula, (:35) Premium Rush ('12, Thriller) **** A
ENC 150 150 150 150 150 350 Neverland *** Barnyard animals put aside their Frankenstein and a number of other bike messenger is pursued by a dirty cop
_____ Author's life. differences to capture a yodeling outlaw,. monsters gather at a hotel resort. (CC) throughout New York City. (CO
(5:45) Epic (13, Fantasy) Colin Farrell. An (:40) This Is 4 (12, Comedy) -*k-k Showcased is a comedic look inside Girls Jessa Looking
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 army of bugs recruits mqrhical warriors to the life of a not-so-average American family; Pete and Debbie are makes Dom's
Help fight against an evil queen approaching a significant milestone in their relationship. (CC) changes. (R) restaurant. (R)
(4:30) The Negotiator ('98, Real Time with Bill Maher Oblivion (13, Science Fiction) ***I Tom Cruise, Morgan (:15) Big Momma's House 2
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Thriller) A police negotiator takes (VMA) (CC) (ND) ) Freeman. One of the last drone repairmen stationed on ('06) FBI agent in disguise
_____ hostages. (CC)I / Earth has one last job. (PG-13) (CCI (MD) watches suspect.
(5:00) Entrapment ('99, Thriller) City of Ghosts ('02, Thriller) **% Matt Dillon, James Hitchcock (12, Drama) **,12 Anthony The Making of
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 *** A sexy agent baits a Caan. A con artist travels to Cambodia to collect the money Hopkins. A filmmaker meets a woman ...: Prometheus
____ master art thief. from a failed scam. (R) (C (ND)I) during a tough time in his career. (CC) (ND)I
(4:35) Coach Carter ('05, Shameless: Like Father, Like Episodes House of Lies The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn: Part 2 (12, Fantasy)
SHOW 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 Drama) Coach jeopardizes a Daughter Sammi has a son. (CC) Potential job. (R) Grocery **kk2 Knristen Stewart. Bella experiences a new life and
_____ winning season. (CO |(RI)(14)) (HN)D) scheme. new powers after the birth of her daughter. (CC)
Diary of a Mad Black Woman ('05, Comedy) % The Words (12, Drama) **** An aspiring (:40) People Like Us (12, Drama) Chris
TMC 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 Kimberly Elise, Shemar Moore. A rejected wife turns to her writer decides to pass a man's long-lost Pine. A brother and sister meet for the first
g_____ un-toting grandmother for help and advice. (CC)I manuscript as his own work. (CC) time after their elderly father dies.







KIDS NEWS SPORTS LATE NIGHT SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
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ABC1261 1 ews ETIh Extra i Paid ABC World flers low mi f lews flevs iii
ABC 281 a liers Caslle Praclice Paid Paid Paid World lers il lers lers lers
ABC 401 l i ers Paid McCarvei Cold Case Cars.TV Raceline World lers lo* i, lers lers lers
CBS 101 11 1 1 1 l1ers Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid ii .iUp Io Ihe Minule i, lers lers lers
CBS ii _, iI lers McCarver Paid Inside Outdoors. Kickin II Minule II, Ners Ners Ners iii,
NBC 818 8 8 8 8 News Paid Star Wtch Paid Paid Paid Paid Meet Press Paid Eary News News News
NBC 0 2 2 2 News Paid Bones Paid Storms Dateline Meet Press Early News News (N)
FOX 31 I I cI cI c Brooklyn lers police Closer Paid Paid Judy Judy lers Nlews Hlers m
FOX 361 1 1 1 Brooklyn lers Closer flolice Homes 30 Rock 30 Rock Palemity Divorce Alex flers il,
PBS -Ii31 C C C Masletpce. AsTime Keeping Masletpce. Masletpce. Masleipce. IHi, Hawking
PBS Ti6 :," :" :", Chasing NOVA 0 Chasing Chasing Chasing NOVA 0 Bolder Yoga
PBS X01, Maslerpce. II .H..) Makers: Women Who Make SoulhwesI Florida
CW 4) 6 21 6 Queens Queens TMZ (N) Alien Alien Cheaters Paid Paid Harvey 70s 70s
CW 4) 9 9 9 4 Criminal Family Family Mr. Box Mr. Box Paid Paid Paid Outdoors. Paid Paid Daily Buzz
MYN 3C 1111 11 14 Ride Honor Rin Paid Bones OK!TV Raymond Hol ywd Hollysc Paid Paid Shepherd
MYN 7) 8 9 8 Futurama Futurama Springer Access All That Jazz (79) (R) Sea Hunt Sea Hunt Shepherd
IND 132 1212 12 38 12 ThereYet ThereYet As Good As It Gets '97) *** Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
IONJ) 2 2 2 13261817 Monk Monk Monk Monk Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
WCLFM2 22 22 22 2 Tommy Awaken Awaken Prophecy Fruit CTN Spec Copeland Citylife Good Life Jesus CTN Spec Youngren Hmekeep
RIXY4M 22 44 10 Angel Awaken Awaken Ministry Life Faith Women B.Gouley Paid Gaither Exercise Fitness
TLF I5 23 23 23 95 5 Deportivo En lo profundo ('02) Pantera Rosa ('06) *2 Pagado Pagado Contacto
UNIV 1) 1515 15 6 Humores Noticiero Verdad Al Punto Como dice Horapico Para amar Humores Noticiero
I *0,559"I imm II
A&E 262626263950181 Craz (R) Crazy (R) Crazy (R) Crazy (R) Crazy (R) Paid Paid Paid Paid
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53231 Dead (R) Dead (R) Dead (R) Dead (R) Dead (R) Dead (R) Dead (R)
API 4444444436681 Puppy Bowl X (R) Puppy BowlX(R) Puppy Bowl X(R) TooCute!
BET 35353535 402221 Wayans Wayans Inspiration Inspiration Inspiration
BRAV 68 68 68 68 25 5118 Housewives Blood Heel Blood Heel Blood Heel Blood Heel Paid Paid Paid Paid
COM 66666666 15 271 Tosh Tosh Tosh Tosh C. D'Elia South Prk South Prk Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Paid Paid
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 431 Alaska Alaska Alaska Alaska Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
E! 46 46 46 467 2261 Soup C. Lately Kardashian #RichKids #RichKids #RichKids Soup C. Lately Paid Paid Paid Paid
ESQ 82 82 82 8211111 Horse (R) Horse (R) Getaway Getaway Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
EWTN 24242412 1728 GodWps Bookmark Mass (R) Litany of Devotions Sunday The Bread Suffering Catholic Catalogue Bookmark Cateches.
FAM 5555555510 4619 Azkaban Osteen Meyer Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Reign Life Today
FOOD 37 373737- 7616 Restaurant Chopped Cutthroat Restaurant Guy's (R) Paid Paid Paid Paid
FX 51515151 58 49 53 New Moon Twilight Saga ('10) Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
GSN 1791791717 341791 The Chase 1 vs. 100 Mind Mind Pyramid Pyramid Dog Eat Paid Paid Paid Paid
HALL 5 5 51 1732 Kitten (R) Frasier Frasier Gold Girl GoldGirl Gold Girl Gold Girl Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Lucy Lucy
HIST 81 81 81 81 33651 SwampS Swam Swam Swamp Swamp Paid Paid Paid Paid
HOME 41414141 534216 Hunters Hunters Life Life Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunt Hunt Paid Paid Paid Paid
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 411 (02) Movie (:02) Movie Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
OWN 5858 58 58 4710161 Oprah Oprah Oprah Berkus Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Cops Cops Jail Jail Jail Jail Jail iJail Jail Jail Paid Paid Paid Paid
SYFY 67 67 67 67 259 64 18 Bureau My Soul to Take ** __ Pulse Wireless evil. Psychosis ('10) (/2 (R) Twilight
TBS 5959 59 59 32 6252 Shrek 3rd Home Alone ('90) ***Meet Parents ('00) Married Married Married Married
TCM 65656565 162 The Oscar St. Mary Bells ('45) Spellbound ('45) (: 15) Anchors ('45)
TC 45 45 45 45 57 72139 Sex (R) Sex (R) Pi Sex(R) P i TBA Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Married 2 ('10) *'/2 hy Marry ('07) (C O Meet Browns ('08) '2 S'ville
TRAV 69 69 69 69 26 66 17 Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paid Paid Paid Paid
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 301 Guinness Guinness Guinness Guinness Guinness Paid Paid Paid Paid
TVLND 6262626231 542 GoldGirl GoddGirl Kirstie The Exes Queens Queens Queens Queens 70s o70s 70s 70s Curb YourlCurb Your
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 psych (R) NCIS __ NCIS NCIS NCIS SVU (HD)) SVU (HD)
WE 117117117117 117149 Law (HD)) Law (HD)) CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami Paid Paid
WGN 1616 1619 41 11 9 The Pledge ('01) (CC) Parks 30 Rock 30 Rock Sunny Dharma Til Death Creek Manor ('03) *1/2
CSS 21 2 21 2 49 70 TBA Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 1NFL Prme. SportsCe enter (12NFL Prime. SportsCenter 2 v ESportsCenter (Sports
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 Sports Sports ESPN FC SportsCenter ( ( Poker Poker B WS of Poker (HR)
FS1 4848484842 6983 FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports a FOX Sports
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Wrld Poker NBA (Replay) (HI)) Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 (10:30) PGA TOUR Golf (Replay) (H)) Golf Cntrl Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Shark Shark Pro Mazda Countdown Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
SUN 3 3 40140145 57 76 10:30) Golden Wom Bball (Replay) Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
NBC 39393939 37 0 Greed (R) Hv Greed (R) *(Greed (R) Paid Paid Greed (R) Worldwide Ex (N)
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 381 Anthony Anthony Presents Anthony Anthony Presents |Early (N)
CSPN 1818 1818 37 121 Q&A (R) Capital News Today Today in Washington Today in Washington
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 7111 Huckabee Hannity Stossel FOX News Huckabee Stossel FOX-Friend
MSNBC 83 83 83 83185 401 The Confessions (R) Manson Meet Press Caught Meet Press First Look Too Early
SNN 666 11 11 News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N)
CINE 32 3203232042 Snitch Offt Offt A Good Day ** (:40) Payback ('99) (R) Sentinel ('06)
CINE2 321321321321321321 422Traveler 1 (:35) American ('12) Banshee Traveler 2 Traveler 3 Empire of the Sun ('87)
DISN 136136136136 99 45 2 Austin A.N.T. Good LckGood LckShakeit A.N.T. On Deck Megaplex ('00) OnDeck OnDeck FishHks Phineas
ENG 150150150 1 503 (:10) Batman ('97) Starship Troopers ('97) (R) Bio-Dome ('96) Rush ***
HBO 302302302302302302 Girls Looking Girls Looking Burt('13)(CC) |Code 46 ('04) Snake Eyes ('98) **
HB02 3033033033033033 Big Momma SEX/NOW Detective Showgirls ('95) % (CC) O Rock of Ages ('12)** Don Juan
HB03 304304304304 304 Prometheus ('12) *** (:10) Flawless ('99) Werewolf ('97) (:45) Loving
SHOW 340340334034034036 Silver Linings ('12) Katt Willi (:05) Jay Z: ('13) Fade to Black ('04) WhrnMan
TMC 3503"350 350353 People Havana ('04) ** (:05) Day ('12) The Machinist ('04) __ Local Boys**






KIDS NEWS SPORTS MORNINGS WEEKDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid (:15) The Longest Day ('62, Action) *** The D-daV invasion.
INE 0 320 320 320 320 320 42n (:15) The Hurricane ('99) A boxer is wrongfully accused of a (:45) Bee Season ('05, Drama) ** Girl wants to The Thirteenth Floor ('99) Craig
lNE 3 3 triple homicide and im prisoned for life. be spelling bee champion. (CC) Bierko. Layers of reality
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Apollo 13 ('95) An explosion aboard a spacecraft. (:40) High Roller ('03) A card prodigy. The Three Stooges ('12) **
S150 150 10 10 30 Rush (12) (:50) Hairspray ('88, Comedy) Divine. Teens vie Finding Neverland ('04) The inspi- :15) Batman Returns ('92, Action) Batman bat-
ENO 150 I5 IS15___ IS _30 ((CC) for a spot on a dance show. ration for "Peter Pan.' ties a grotesque Penguin. ((CC)
HBO 2 0 3m 32 00 m The Rugrats Movie ('98, Family) Reality Bites ('94) Winona Ryder. (:15) Seduced and Abandoned ('13) Raise funds Jackthe Giant Slayer
HBO 302 302 30 30 302 3024 Tommy returns Dil. (CC) Two men woo girl. (CC) for their next feature film., ., .' .11 i,
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Don Juan De Marco ('95) Muppets from Space ('99) Mission: Impossible ('96) Taxi ('04) Cabbie helps cop.
HBO3 304304304304 304 404 (05) Here on Earth ('00) (CC) Rushmore Lovetriangle.(R) Wag the Dog ('97) Fake war is staged. Guidance (12) **1/2
SHOW 340340 340 340 3403 1(5:45) When a Man Loves a Woman ('94) A Nobody Walks ('12) ** John But I'm a Cheerleader (99) ** On the Shoulders of Gi-
SHOW 340 34 34 0 woman battles alcoholism. (CC) Krasinski. Temporary home. Accused of gayness. (CC) ants (11)
TMP 0 30 30 3 3 3 (:10) Junior (94, Comedy) */2 An experiment Housesitter ('92) **l/2 A woman (:45) Big Business ('88, Comedy) Two sets of Girl Run
TM_ lu 3u 3C 3u 3 3 8 eads to e pregnancy. (CC) pretends to be man's wife. twins are swapped at birth. (CC) (13)
TOM 65 6565 65 169 230 Anchors Aweigh (45) Mildred Pierce ('45, Drama) ***'/2 Two How to Marry a Millionaire ('53) Three women Call Me Madam ('53,
T S1 3Shore leave, women fall for the same man. (NR) (CC) hope to marry rich men. (CC) Comedy)(CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid i Paid Pad Paid Paid Paid Escape from New York ('81) *** (CC) Behind ('01) (CC)
INE 320 320320 32 320 320 420 (:05) Moonrise Kingdom ('12, (:45) Rain Man ('88) A jaded hustler kidnaps his autistic brother The Five-Year Engagement ('12) Engagement
INE 3m 3u 3u 3' 3u u 4 Drama) Runaway love. (CC) in the hopes of getting money. (CC) causes strain for couple. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Where the Heart Is ('00) Teen in store. (:15) Roll Bounce ('05) Popular skaters. (:15) Never Been Kissed ('99) r** (CC)
S10 10 10 (1:55) Under the Tuscan Sun ('03) (:50) American Graffiti (73, Comedy) Four young (:45) Cold Mountain ('03) *** A Confederate soldier flees
ENC 150 150 15*0 150 350 *Yr**Woman buys a villa, men cruise the town. (CC) the Civil War to reunite with his true love.
HOn 30320 n n Chernobyl (40) The Crocodile Hunter: Colli- (:15) Oblivion ('13) *** One of the last drone repairmen Hitchcock (12) A filmmaker meets
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 sion Course 02 (CC) stationed on Earth has one last job. (CC) his future wife. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Mortal Kombat ('95) **/2 (CC) Because of Winn-Dixie Life lessons. Office Space ('99) ***y/2 (CC) Real Sports (HD)
HBO3 304304304304 304 404 Out Towner Chain Reaction ** Pair seek culprits. (:40) The Long Kiss Goodnight (96) (:45) In Good Company ('05)
SHOW 340 34 340 340 30 30 35 Dinosaur Holy Man ('98, Comedy) Eddie Murphy. A home- :25) Before and After ('96) *** A (:15) Miami Rhapsody ('95) An engaged woman
SHOW 34 340 340 34[ 340 340 36 (12 es guru becomes a celebrity. teen is accused. (CC) questions her decision. (CC)
TMO 0 30 30 3 3 3 (5:05) Schultze Gets the Happily N'Ever After Cinderella's Good Boy! (03 *1/2 Dogs' invasion Three O'Clock High ('87, Drama) Politics ('11)
ITMC 350 350] 350 35 350 350 385 Blues ( _04)stepmother takes over. of Earth is ratling. (C _-1/**/2 Nerd fights bully.
TM 65 65 65 651 Brigadoon (:45) La Strada ('54, Drama) ***1/2 A peasant (:45) The Burmese Harp ('56) ***1'/2 Japa- (:45) The Virgin Spring ('60, Drama)
T IM 5 5 5 5 169230 girl is sold to a strongman. (NR) nese musician inspires his comrades. Daughter is killed.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid The Thomas Crown Affair ('99) A suave art thief. House
pINE 3 2 3n 30 3 4 (:10) Fever Pitch ('05, Comedy) Woman corn- Just My Luck ('06) A girl inherits a (:45) Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter ('12) Weapon 2
NE 320 320 320 32 320 320 420 petes for boyfriend's love. (CC) guy's misfortune. ((C) **1/2 Vampire hunting. (R) (CC) .(89)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Watcher (:45) Spawn ('97) ** Hero from hell. (CC) Being Flynn ('12) **1/2 (CC) (:15) TheHobbit:Journey ('12) (CC)
ENP 15050101 1 Here (35) Mr. Deeds ('02) A small-town (:15) Confessions of a Teenage (:50) Rush Hour ('98, Action) LA cop and Hong TheJerk
mENC 15 150 1a IaSO 15 I0 350 Comes guy inherits a fortune. Drama Queen ('0 CC) Kong detective team up. (CC) (79)
B 302 302302 3 402 (:30) Off Air Station down- Battlefield Earth ('00) 1/2 John Travolta. An alien Parental Guidance (12) **1'/2 Old (:45) Mary and Martha (13) **1'/2
HBO 3 time. (HD( race tries to enslave humanity. school methods. (CC) Malaria prevention. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 (:20) Jane Eyre (11) **** Forbidden love risk. (CC) iLife of Pi ('12) ***-1/2 Shipwreck. (CC) Brokedown Palace ('99) -**-1/2
HBO3 304304 304 304 304404 Joyful Noise ('12) Singing competition. One True Thing ('98) Woman cares for mom. (R) Tequila: The Story of a P
Gentle Ben ('02) Boy be- Powder (95, Science Fiction) ** Albino with It's a Disaster ('13) Rachel Boston. StreetDanc 3D ('10) A street dance
SHOW 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 friends bear. special powers faces abuse. (CC) End of the world. (C BoC) crew's new start-up.3 A e
TM 350 350 350 350350 350385 Terminal Velocity ('94) A Paradise ('91, Drama) r**1k/2 A boy spends a Newsies ('92, Musical) *1/2 Two newsboys orga- (:15) Dead Poets Society
TM 3 35 35 3 35505KGB lot, summer in a small town. (CC) (HD)) nize a citywide strike. (PG) (CC) ('89) (CC),
TOM 65 6565 65 169 23 (:15) Bus Stop ('56, Comedy) A cowboy doggedly (:15) A Farewell to Arms ('57, Drama) **l/2 An American serving for the Billy Budd ('62) Accused
TM 1 30pursues a sexy singer. (CC) Italian army falls in love with a British nurse. of murder.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid History of the World, Partl ('81) (CC) Back to School
GINE 320320320 3 320 320 4 BIk Widow Revolutionary Road ('08, Drama) A couple The Hurricane (99) A boxer is wrongfully accused of a triple The Hobbit: Journey
S32 32 32 32 320 320 420 R wants to escape the suburbs. (CC) hohomicide and im risoned for life. (CC) ii i,'. 11
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Jawbreaker ('99) (:0) Bowfinger ('99) **1/2 (CC) (0) Cloud Atlas ('12) The impacts of individuals' actions. Congenial.
ENC 150 150 150 150 150 350 Underworild (:50) Rush Hour ('98, Action) LA cop and Hong Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle ('03) :20) Good Will Hunting ('97, Drama) Troubled
m Kong detective team up. (CC) Murderous ex-Angel. ,genius deals with his past. (CC)
HOn 33 0 3o ThePaper Music-Me Pure Country 2: The Gift ('10) Woman makes Joyful Noise ('12, Comedy)** Choir leaders Big Miracle ('12) Saving
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 (94) (CC) Q mistakes & tries to atone. (CC) can't agree on direction. (CC) whales. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 (5:30) Off Air (HD) Grace I Harriet the Spy Secret journal woes. Herblock-Black White ('13) Big Momma ('06) *
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 Black Rumble Fish ('83) A teen loves fights. (:25) Reality Bites ('94) (CC) (:05) The Deep End of the Ocean ('99)
SHOw 3404030303434 Quiz Show Mr. Destiny ('90, Fantasy) James Belushi. Man The Ramen Girl ('08, Comedy) (:15) Love and Honor ('13, Romance) *** Sol-
SHOW 340 340 34 340 340 340 36 *** experiences alternate reality. **-1/2 A chef in Tokyo. (CO) dier tries to win back ex-girlfriend.
TMO 353535303030 Loosies (:45) Labyrinth ('86, Fantasy) David Bowie. A Life with Mikey ('93) Michael J. Fox. (:05) Tom and Huck ('95) **1'/2 Consenting
S350 3 5 (12)i teen's stepbrother is abducted. A new child star. (CC) Boys witness murder. (CO) **
TOM 65 6565 65 1 230 (5:45) The Green Years ('46, Drama) ** A man Romance ('30) Bishop tells about The Constant Nymph ('43) ***1'/2 Teenage Caged ('50)
TM S S 1 30 raises his great grandson. (CC) youthful love affair. (C) girl in love with family friend. (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Stooges Along Came Polly Safety obsession. Dave
OINE 320 320320 32 320 320 420 The Wedding Date ('05) ** A pre- Dangerous Liaisons ('88) ***1/2 Decadent Con Air ('97, Action) **1/2 Nicolas Cage. An Bulletto
lNE 3s 3 3 '[ 0 s s tend boyfriend. (CC) (HD) duo indulges in sexual games. (CC) airplane is hijacked by inmates. (CC) (13)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Soundof My Voice ('12) **1 2 Turbulence ('97) Ray Liotta. (:15) Seeking a Friend for End (12) Science ('85 (CC)
NP 0 1 1 1 50 I Ghoulies The Meteor Man ('93) A meteor (:10) The River Wild ('94, Action) Killer forces Crazy/Beautiful (01) Poor boy falls Batman
ENC 150 150 15 1a 1503 (85) grants sup er powers. (CC) woman to help him escape. (CC) in love with a bad irl. ('92)
HBO 302 302302 3 302 302 400 (:20) The Odd Couple II ('98, Comedy) Two Volcano ('97) ** Volcano erupts (:45) Simply Irresistible ('98, Romance) ** Chamber
HB 302 302friends get into some trouble. ((C) under Los Angeles. (CC) Young chef finds love, magic. (CC) ('02)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Tobacco R4 Mr. Holland's Opus ('95) Man becomes mentor. | Presumed Innocent ('90) *** (R) (CC) (:10) Pee-wee (HD)
HBO3 304304304 304 304 404 (5:30) Off Air (HD) Herblock-Black White ('13) Wag the Dog ('97) Fake war is staged. |Life Is But a Dream ('10)
SHOunw 333333 6 iKnife Fight ('12) *1/2 A political (:45) Darkman (90, Science Fiction) An injured The Reunion (11) John Cena. Bail (:15) Bending the Rules
SHOW 340 34 340 34 340 340 365 strategist's job ets tough. man assumes a new identity. bonds business. (CC) (12) ** ((C
TMO 3530505300 (530) Rain Fall ('09) Killed official's Local Boys ('02) ** Two surfing (10) Dead Man on Campus ('98) (:45) Mimic (97) Man-eating bugs
TMC" 350 35(] 3SC 350 ]S0 38corrupt proof sought., __ brothers are divided. (CC) Suicide equals 4.0 (CC) mimic human rey. (C_)
The Shop Night Must Fall ('37, Thriller) *** A charming Conquest (37, Drama) Greta Garbo. A countess Abe Lincoln in Illinois ('40) *
TCM 65 65 65 65 169 230 (65) psychopath strikes again. (C) meets with Napoleon. (C G A c The life of Lincoln. (C4)







KIDS NEWS SPORTS MORNINGS WEEKDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

ABC32B__ 111_ News News Good Morning America News Millionre. Millionre. The View
ABC 2 11 News Good Morning America Steven and Chris RightThis Right This The View
ABC JA 7 7 7 10 7 7 News Good Morning America Better America Supreme The View
CBS I1 10 10 10 10 10 News, 6am CBS This Morning Studio 10 Inside Jeopardy The Price Is Right
CBS H 213 213 5 5 5 News News CBS This Morning LIVE! with Kelly Rachael Ray The Price Is Right
NBC-XD 8 8 8 _8 _8 News Today Today Daytime RachaelRay
NBC 2I 2 2 2 NBC2 News Today Today _______NBC2 News @ 11am
FOX I 13 13 13 13 13 News News News FOX 13's Good Day LIVE! with Kelly Wendy Williams
FOX 4 4 4 (5:00) FOX 4 Rising FOX 4 Morning Blend Bridezillas Maury Law & Order: SVU
PBS E[) 3 3 3 3 Clifford Sid Arthur Kratts Curious Cat in Hat Peg + Cat DinoTrain Sesame Street Daniel SuperWhy
PBS 1 204 204 204 16 Yoga Lilias! Electric Stretch Sewing Quilting Sew Room Sit Fit Painting Cook's Weir's Yoga
PBS M] 3 3 3 _Electric Stretch Arthur Kratts Curious Cat in Hat Peg + Cat DinoTrain Sesame Street Daniel SuperWhy
CW A __ 6 21 6 Queens Queens News News News Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Queen Latifah
CW I 9 9 9 4 (5:00) The Daily Buzz Til Death Til Death Middle Middle Millionre. Millionre. Queen Latifah Justice Justice
MYN38 11 11 11 14 Paid Paid On Spot OK!TV America Community The700 Club Maury The People's Court
MYN CC 8 9 8 CashCab Cash Cab Paid Paid Cops Cops Steve Wilkos Show TrishaGoddard Jerry Springer
IND 32] 12 12 12 38 12 Shepherd's Chapel Cheaters Cheaters We People We People Supreme Supreme Jerry Springer Steve Wilkos Show
IONSN 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Archer Archer Paid Paid Thr.Bible Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Movie
WCFa 22 22 22 2 Gospel Destined Today Meyer Digging In Copeland Parsley Youngren It'sTime KnowCse LifeToday Wilton
WRXY] 22 44 10 Gospel BrodyFile Salvation Destined Trhe Lamp Thr. Bible Gospel Meyer Health Faith LifeToday Reveaton
TLF i] 23 23 23_ 95 _5 Qu6 locura! Noticias Nacional Rebelde Las vfas del amor Pasi6n
UNIV 2U 15 15 15 6 Tudesayuno alegre Despierta Am6rica ________________Como dice el dicho
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 Paid Paid Dog Bnty Dog Bnty Dog Bnty Dog Bnty Criminal Minds Criminal Minds CSI: Miami
API 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Orangutan Chimp Big Cat Big Cat Next Gen. Next Gen. Animal Cop s Animal Cops Animal Cops
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Morning Inspiration Moesha Moesha Everybody Everybody Wife Wife J. Foxx J. Foxx
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Southern Days Summer Days Summer___ Days Summer Sweat & Heels Sweat & Heels Southern
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Daily Colbert Sunny South Prk Presents Futurama
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Almost Got Away FBI: Criminal Wicked Attraction
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 Henry Mickey Chug Mickey MMickey Mickey Jakeand Doc Mc Sofia Micke Doc Mc Octonauts
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 Paid Paid Save Bell Save Bell ell Bell SaveBell Save Bell Save Bell E! Ent. Special E! Ent. Special
ESQ 82 82 82 82 118 118 160 Queer Eye_____ Million Dollar Million Dollar____ Million Dollar Million Dollar Million Dollar
EWTN 243243243 12 17 285 Christian Catholic Michael Holy Name Daily Mass Life on the Rock Variety WomenGrc Rosary
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Meyer Drenda 70s '70s '70s '70s Standing 700 Club The 700 Club Gilmore Girls
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Grill It! Cook Real Neelys Cupcake Wars
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 Paid Paid Movie Movie Movie
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179 184 Paid Paid Paid Paid Match Match Blockbust Press Luck Sale of |Pyramid Password Pyramid
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Lucy Lucy Lucy Lucy Gold Girl GoldGirl Gold Girl GoldGirl Home & Family
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Paid Paid Modern Marvels Variety Clash of the Gods Clash of the Gods
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Paid Donna Selling NY Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 HSN Today HSN Today HSN Today HSN Today Perlier E.A.T. Joan Boyce Jewelry
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 Paid Paid Balancing Balancing Christine Christine Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 The Dr. Oz Show The Dr. Oz Show Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 Help@ Home Mornings Made Easy Garden Party tarte beauty Denim & Co.
SPIKE 575 57 57 29 63 54 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Nightmares Nightmares Nightmares Nightmares Nightmares Movie
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Paid Paid Paid Paid Haunted Highway Haunted Highway Haunted Highway Haunted Highwa
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Rules Earl Married Married There Yet Browns Payne Prince Prince Full Hse Full Hse Wipeout
TIC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 19&Counting FirstDay Multiples BabyStry BabyStry Variety Pregnant Pregnant Extreme Extreme
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Smallville Charmed Charmed Supernatural Supernatural Supernatural
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Ext. Hme Ext. Hme Vacation Attack Vacation Attack
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid World's Dumbest... World's Dumbest... Vegas Vegas
TVLAND 62 62 6262 31 54 244 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Gunsmoke
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 White Collar White Collar Movie Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
WE 117 117117117 117149 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Bridezillas Bridezillas
WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 Paid Meyer Destined Creflo LifeToday Paid Walker Walker Law & Order
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Paid Paid Mayhem in the AM Geico SportsNITE Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 Mike& Mike ESPN First Take
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Sports Unlimited World Poker Tour Magic LIVE Magic LIVE UFC Reloaded
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Golf Central Morning Drive Morning Drive
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Paid Paid To Be Announced The Dan Patrick Show
SUN 38 38 401401 45 57 76 ReelTime O'Neill TravisJoh Headlines Dateline Heat LIVE! Heat LIVE! Do Florida ReelFish Women'sCollege Playing
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 Dad Run Dad Run Sponge Fairly Sponge PAW Patrol Umizoomi Umizoomi Dora Dora Guppies Guppies
TOON 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 Gumball Gumball Grandpa Beyblade Pok6mon Movie Garfield Garfield Tunes Tunes
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 SquawkBox Squawk on the Street
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 NewDay CNNNewsroom LegalViewwith
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 Today in Washington Washington Journal U.S. House of Representatives
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 FOX& Friends America's Newsroom Happening Now
MSNBC 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Morning Joe The Daily Rundown Jansing and Co. MSNBC Live
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 SNN Good Morning SNN Good Morning SNN Good Morning SNN Good Morning Paid News News News
CMTV 47 47 4 4 23 24 221 (4:00)CMT Music
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 AMTV: Music Feed AMTV: Music Feed AMTV: Music Feed Catfish Catfish Catfish
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 VH1 + Music Love & Hip Hop






KIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOONS WEEKDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Longest Day ('62) 15) Escapefrom New York 'l () (:15) Missing in Action ('84) Mission finds MlAs. iBehind
P~INE 30323 203042(:15) The World Is Not Enough ('99, Action) *1/2 James BondTed ('12) *** Mark Wahlberg. Man's teddy The Apparition (12) Couple
"_CINE 320_3(_2_'_ thwarts terrorist's scheme. (CC) (HD)) bear threatens relationship. (R) (CC) pagued b an evil spirit. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Cruel Intentions ('99) (CC) (:45) Mama (13) **1 2 Alone in the forest. |Bowfinger (99) **1/2 (CC) (:10) 8mm ('99) ***
CeI 150 5 1 Batman The Principal ('87) Principal rules (:20) Stripes ('81, Comedy) *** Cab driver (:10) Hope Springs ('12) **1/2 Re- Batman
S1 1 1 1 1 3 ('92) crime-ridden school. (R) takes advantage of Army life. (CC) kindling romance. (CC) (92)
HBO 230 3 (11:00) Jackthe Giant Flight of the Phoenix ('04, Adventure) Crash Juwanna Mann ('02) Basketball In Good Company ('05) Man's new
HBO 302 30 30 3 302 302 400 Slayer (13) survivors build new plane. (CC) player poses as woman. boss is half his age.
HBO2 303 303303303 303 303 402 Taxi *1/2 Safe House ('12) CIA in South Africa. J.Groban New Year's Eve ('11) ** Love is sought. |Date Movie ('06)*
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 Parental (:50) Life Is But a Dream(10 (NR() (:25) The Debt (11) Nazi war criminal. (:25) City by the Sea ('02) (R)
SHOW 340 340340 340 340 340 365 (:15) Elizabeth: The Golden Age ('07) Elizabeth I (:15) The Magic of Belle Isle (12) Author moves (:15) Stage Beauty (04, Drama) An actress
SHOW 340 340 3 340 30 dares war with Spain. (CC) to a rural town to write. (CC) breaks theatre precedents. (R) (CC)
TM 350 350 350 3 350 350 385 See Girl Run Woman re- Cool Runnings ('93) Jamaican men :35) Dawn Rider ('12) A young (10) Blackthorn ('11, Western) *** Butch
TM 3 3333 visits past. form a bobsled team. avenger falls in love. (CC) Cassidy joins a Bolivian heist. (CC)
TM 65 65 65 65 169 230 (11:00) Call Me Madam It Should Happen to You ('54) Tess ('80, Drama) *** Nastassja Kinski, Peter Firth. (P6) Innocence
TCM 65656565 16230 (53) *,1/2 (CC) *** A publicity stunt. (CC) (93)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Behind Enemy Lines ('01) The Scorpion King Ancient assassin. The Scorpion King 2: Rise of a Warrior ('08)
INE 30 320 320 320 320 320420 (.:05) Dodgeball: A True Underdog Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (:15) Tomorrow Never Dies ('97, Action) A mogul (:20) The Bourne Legacy
INE g 3(] 3 3' 3004 Stor w (04, Coiedy) *1/2 Search for rare bat. tries to spark World War III. ('12) (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 (:05) Seeking Friend ('12) (R) Madagascar 3: Most Wanted (12) *** |Undercover Brother ('02) Trouble with (12)
EN 150 150 150 150 Cold Mtln. :25) Here Comes the Boom ('12) (:15) The Natural ('84) A gifted professional baseball player is Swimfan ('02) *1Y2 Transfer student
EC 15015151 150 350 0 -**1/2 Teacher fights. (CC() forced to overcome a horrible injury. obsesses over athlete.
HBO 3023230 3 30 32 (:1 5) Epic (13, Fantasy) Colin Farrell. The fight Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets ('02, Fantasy) (:45) Oblivion ('13) *** The last
HBO 3 3 3 3 3 against an evil spider queen. Monster stalks school of magic. (CC) drone repairman on Earth.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 (:15) Admission ('13) The adopted son. Behind the Candelabra (13) *** (CC() Primary Colors Candidate campaigns.
HBO3 304304304304 304 404 Good The History Boys Gifted young men. (:35) Entrapment ('99 Agent baits thief. Jack the Giant Slayer (13)
SHOw 034340334030365Darkman (90) An injured man as- Darkman II: The Return of Durant Darkman III: Die Darkman Die ('96) (:45) Smiley (12) *1/2 Freshmen
SHOW 3(] 3 3 3 sumes a new identity y (R) Durant strikes back. Darkman entrapped. paranoid about online killer.
TM 350 350 350 3 350 350 385 Politics of Love Cam- The Innkeepers ('12) Hunting Water Damage ('99) A man is in- (:15) The Iron Lady ('12, Drama) Former Prime
TC 3 3( 3 3 30 0 8paignworkers. ghosts in century-old hotel. vited to a school reunion. Minister Margaret Thatcher.
TOM (105) Closely Watched Trains ('66) (:45) The Battle of Algiers ('66) ***l/2 A (:45) Z ('69, Thriller) ***y/2 In 1960s Greece, a murder in-
TM 65 65 65 65 ***1/2 Plotting a revolt, bloody uprising forces brutal choices, vestigation uncovers hig h -level corruption.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 The Last House on the Left ('09) (CC) The Bone Collector ('99) Cop pursues killer. (CC) The Departed ('06) **** (CC)
GpINE 0323203320204 (11:30) Lethal Weapon 2 ('89) Diplo- Savages ('12, Crime) Blake Lively. Men save (:50) Kicking & Screaming ('05) Coach becomes Taken 2
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 mats and drugs. (CC) shared girlfriend from cartel. (CC) obsessed with winning. (CC) (12)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 The Hobbit ('12) :10) Dream House ('11) (CC) Falling Down ('93) L.A. fwy. madness. (:40) Dark Shadows ('12) **1/2
E 150 150 150115 The Jerk (79) Charm but (:05) Mr. Deeds ('02) A small-town (:45) Resident Evil: Retribution (12, Horror) The The Corruptor ('99) ** A cop un-
ENC 50 15( 150 1 150 350 nobrains. guy inherits a fortune. _T-virus continues to spread. covers policecorruption.
HO 3220332 4Mary (13) Here on Earth ('00) 1/2 Preppie Herblock- The Black and the White ('13) Parental Guidance (12) **1/2 Old Mildred (R)
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 falls for a rival's irl. (CC) Award-winning cartoonist rofiled, school methods. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Brokedown Mars Attacks! (96) **1y/2 (CC( Just Like Heaven Man loves ghost. (:10) Rock of Ages (12) Chasing fame.
HBO3 304304304304 304 404 (:20Me, Myself & Irene ('00) Personalities clash. (:25) Hitchcock ('12, Drama) (:10) Muslim Comedy ('06) iMatch R.
w SHOW 34034334 0 (:15)50/50 (11, Drama) Joseph Gordon-Levitt. (:05) Quiz Show ('94) Rumors of a setup prompt an investiga- Man on a Ledge ('12) *** Sam
SHOW 340 34] 340 340 340 340 3651 Young man tries to beat cancer. tion of a 1950s television quiz show. Worthington. Suicidal man._
TMO 350 30 30 3 30 0 3 11:15) Dead Poets Society ('89) Amelie (01 Comedy) ****** Audrey Tautou. (:35) The Producers: The Movie Musical ('05, Musical)
TMC 350 35T 350 350 350 350 385 teacher inspires. (CC) A shy waitress brings joy to others. *** Broadway producers stage a flop. (CC)
TOM 65 66 65 1 23Billy Budd ('62) Accused The Dirty Dozen (67) Convicts are offered a suicide mission The Reivers ('69, Comedy) *** An old man Big Man
TM 65 65 65 65 169 230 f murder. to redeem themselves during WWll. looks back sixty years. (CC) (70)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Back School ('86) Scarface ('83, Crime) ***1/2 Al Pacino. The rise and fall of a crime boss. (R) (CC) Pulp Fiction ('94)
pINE 320320203203032 (11:00) The Hobbit: An Unexpected Fight Club ('99) An underground fight club escalates into an (:15) EDtv ('99, Comedy) **l/2 A store clerk's life
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 Journey ('12) (CC) organization dedicated to anarchy. (R)) becomes a TV show. (CC) (HD))
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Miss Congeniality 2 (*05) *1y/2 Fantastic Four Superhuman powers. Wanderlust ('12) Paul Rudd. ](:15) Smith ('05)
5P 5 5 ] i i1~350Good Will Adaptation ('03, Comedy) Nicolas Cage. A 50 First Dates ('04) Man falls for girl (:10) Unbreakable ('00, Drama) *** Man un-
ENC 150 150 150 1 150350 ( 97) screenwriter struggles to write. (R)( with memory loss. covers extraordinary abilities. (CC)
HBO 302 0 3 30 30 40 Big Miracle ('12) Saving The Incredible Burt Wonderstone Making of White Noise ('05) ** Michael Kea Joyful Noise ('12) Choir leaders
HBO 302 30 30 3 302 02 400 whales. (CC) Magician memories. ,(R) ton. Ghosts in static. (CC) can't agree on direction.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Big Momma ('06) Taxi ('04) Cabbie helps cop. Lethal Weapon 4 Chinese smugglers. Rise of the Guardians (12)
HBO3 304304304304 304 404 Prometheus (12) Space expedition. (R) Lola Versus Soul-searching. (:40) The Loving Story (HD)) Chernobyl I12)**
SHOnw 304 340 34 30 Made in America ('13, Documen- (:35) The Magic of Belle Isle (12) Author moves (:25) A Map of the World ('99, Drama) A woman Quality
SHOn (333 ta Ja Z, Kan e West. to a rural town to write. ((CC) is wronglyI accused of abuse. 13
TMO 0 30 30 3 350 30 35 Consenting Adults** (1:20) Homer and Eddie ('89, Comedy) An unlikely Intermedio ('05) Four teenagers ter- Union Square ('12) Unexpected re-
TMC 350 35(] 350 35 350 350 385 Man framed. couple set out on a journey. rorized in tunnels. (CC) union with sister. (CC)
TOM 6 S11:30) Caged ('50) The Bad Seed ('56) A cherubic six-year-old girl is inexplicably What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? ('62, Thriller) ***1/2
TCM 65 65 65 65 169 230 Women's prison, surrounded by a series of murders. A woman is terrorized by her sister. (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231(11:30) Dave ('93) Faux president. (CC) Mission: Impossible III ('06, Thriller) Spy vs. dealer. (CC) Die Hard ('88) (R)
INE 320320 320 320 320 320 420 Bullettothe Head Similar (:05) The Apparition (12) Couple Ace Ventura: Pet Detective ('94) Natural Born Killers ('94, Crime) Two young lov-
S320 32 32 3 320 20 420enemy. plagued by an evil spirit. **1/2 Mascot kidnapped. ers go on a killing spree. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Science |(:40) The Eagle (11) Lost Roman army. (:35) Sideways ('04) Wine road trip. (R) Undercover Brother ('02)
150 150 150 150 350 (11:50) Batman Returns (92, Action) *** Bat- (:05) Cape Fear ('91, Thriller) *** Vengeful (:15) The Brothers Grimm ('05, Fantasy) Con art-
ENC 150 man battles a grotesque Penguirn. ex-con hunts his former lawyer. (CC) ists encounter magical curse.
HBO 30230 3 32 30 40 (11:30) Harry Potter and the Chamber of Se- (:15) Oblivion ('13) *** One of the last drone repairmen Mildred Pierce: Part Four & Part
HBO 302 30 30 3 302 02 400crets ('02) School of magic. (CC) stationed on Earth has one last job. (CC) Five A family fight. (R)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Pee-wee (:45) Epic ('13) Fight against evil. (CC) The Island ('05) Utopian society. (CC) Real Sports (H[1) Million $
HBO3 304304 304 304 304 404 Dream Argo (12) Iranian revolution rescue. (R)( In Good Company ('05) Younger boss. (:25) Here on Earth ('00) (CC)
Bending (:45) Venus and Serena (13, Profile) Rise to (:25) Deliver Us from Eva ('03) ** (15) Barbershop 2: Back in Business ('04) Cal-
SHOW 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 (,12) fame of lympic gold medalists. Gigolo falls for Eva (R) vin's shop is in danger again. e(4C
TM 350 350 350 350 350 385 Mimic ('97) (:35) Cocktail ('88, Drama) **1Y2 Tom Cruise. The Three Musketeers (11) **1/2 A swords- Dawn Rider (12) ** A young
TM 35 35( 35 3 35 0 (CC) Hotshot bartender falls in love. (CC) man joins the King's defenders. (CC) avenger falls in love. (R) (CC)
TOM 65 6565 65 169 230 Lincoln The Magnificent Yankee ('50) The Search ('48, Drama) *** A soldier aids a (:15) The Lavender Hill Mob ('51) Father ('47)
TM 5 5 65 5 1 ('40) I*** Supreme Court. (CC) Holocaust survivor. (NR) (CC) ***1/2 Gold smugglers.







KIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOONS WEEKDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

ABC 2 7 11 17 Bethenny The Chew General Hospital Katie Ellen DeGeneres News News
ABC 2 11 ABC Action News The Chew General Hospital Katie Ellen DeGeneres News News
ABC J7 7 7 10 7 7 ABC7 News @ Noon The Chew General Hospital RachaelRay The Doctors News News
CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News Young Restless Beautiful The Talk Let's Make a Deal Dr. Phil News News
CBS f 213 213 5 5 5 News Young Restless Beautiful The Talk Let's Make a Deal News at 4pm News News
NBC 8 8 8 _8 _8 Today Days of Our Lives The Doctors The Dr. Oz Show News News News
NBC2 __ 2 2 2 NBC2 News @ Noon Days of Our Lives The Doctors The Dr. Oz Show News News News
FOX I 13 13 13 13 13 FOX 13News TMZ Dish Bethenny TMZ Live Judy Judy FOX 13 5:00 News
FOX X 4 4 4 America We People Justice Supreme Judy Paternity The Test Maury Judy Judy
PBSCI) 3 3 3 3 Charlie Rose Masterpiece Variety Thomas Kratts Martha WordGirl Curious Europe
PBS 1 204 204 204 16 Newsline Contrary Travels Travel Globe Trekker Railwa Journey Antiques Roadshow Journal Travels
PBS M 3 3 3 Cook's Kitchen Landscape Sew It All Kratts Arthur Clifford Kratts Arthur WordGirl Cat in Hat DinoTrain
CW A 6 21 6 Dr. Phil Bill Cunningham Wendy Williams Steve Harvey Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Dr. Phil
CWMI 9 9 9 4 America America Paternity Paternity Cold Case Files Bill Cunningham Steve Harvey Queen Latifah
MYN 3 11 11 11 14 Judge Mathis Trisha Goddard The Test Judge Mathis Maury The People's Court
MYN 1__ 8 9 8 OK! TV Paid The People's Court Judge Mathis The People's Court Community Community Friends Friends
IND R 12 12 12 38 12 Cheaters Cheaters Jerry Springer Steve Wilkos Show Jerry Springer 30 Rock 30 Rock How I Met How I Met
ION E 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Movie Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
WCLFU 2 222 22 2 Destined Thr. Bible Hmekeep Christian Jim Bakker The 700 Club Your Health It's Time Parsley
WRXY3M 22 44 10 Hmekeep It's Time The 700 Club Your Health Jim Bakker Connect Mission Salvation
TLF Si 23 23 23_ 95 _5 (11:00)Pasi6n Laura Qui6n tiene la? Casos de familiar Laura El Chavo
UNIV6Z1 15 15 15 1 6 Hoy Larosade Lamujerdel El gordo y laflaca Primerimpacto
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 CSI: Miami Criminal Minds Criminal Minds The First 48 The First 48 The First 48
API 444444 44 36 68 130 Pit Bulls Pit Bulls Fatal Attractions Infested! Gator Boys Finding Bigfoot
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Parkers Parkers Wife Wife J.Foxx J. Foxx Parkers Movie
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Community Movie Tosh Tosh Tosh Tosh Tosh Futurama Futurama
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Sins & Secrets Porter Porter Porter Porter Moonshiners Moonshiners Moonshiners
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 Mickey Movie Mickey Good Luck Liv Liv Liv Dog Blog Jessie Jessie Jessie
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 E! News Sex & City Sex & City Sex & City Sex & City Movie #RichKidsof
ESQ 82 82 82 82 118118160 Million Dollar Million Dollar Million Dollar Risky Listing Risky Listing Risky Listing
EWTN 243243243 12 17 285 Daily Mass The Journey Home Threshold of Hope Reflection Holy Name Truth Catholic Children Choices
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 8 Rules 8 Rules Reba Reba Reba Reba Boy World Boy World Boy World Boy World Middle Middle
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Pioneer Barefoot Sandra's Ten Dollar Rest.Chef 30Min. Essentials Gada Barefoot Barefoot Pioneer Trisha's
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 Movie 21/2 Men 21/2 Men Movie HowlMet
GSN 179 179179 179 34 179 184 Lingo Lingo Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Catch 21 Pyramid Deal or No Deal Shop Shop The Chase
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Home & Family TheWaltons TheWaltons Brady Brad Brady Brady
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Clash of the Gods Clash of the Gods Clash of the Gods Clash of the Gods Clash of the Gods Variety
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Hunters Hunters Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Joan Boyce Jewelry Valentine Gift Ideas DeborahLi Swarovski Perlier Valentine Gift Valentine Gift
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 HowlMet HowlMet Grey's Anatomy Grey's Anatomy Charmed Charmed Wife Swap
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 Dr. Phil Haves and Nots Haves and Nots Haves and Nots Haves and Nots Haves and Nots
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 1500 Check Quacker Factory by Jeanne Bice Host of Beauty Gourmet Holiday
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Movie Movie Movie
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Haunted Highway Haunted Highway Haunted Highway Haunted Highway Haunted Highway Haunted Highway
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Wipeout Cleveland Dad Dad Dad Cougar Friends Friends Friends Friends Queens Queens
TIC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 What Not to Wear Variety Little Little Atlanta Atlanta Four Weddings Gown Gown
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Bones Bones Bones Bones Castle Castle
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Vacation Attack Vacation Attack Bourdain Food Paradise Bizarre Foods v Food v Food
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Vegas Vegas Vegas Vegas Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Pawn Pawn
TVLAND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Gunsmoke (:49) Gunsmoke Gunsmoke Bonanza Bonanza Griffith Griffith
USA 34 34 34 34 22 5250 Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
WE 117 117 117 117 117 149 Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne WillGrace WillGrace WillGrace WillGrace CSI: Miami CSI: Miami
WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 Law& Order WGN Midday News Law & Order Law & Order Law & Order Cl Law & Order Cl
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Geico SportsNITE To Be Announced Talkin Football Beach GolfWeekl
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Insiders Mike NFL Live Horn Interruptn
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 Numbers Never Lie ESPN First Take SportsNation Highly Outside College F-Ball
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 College Basketball College Basketball NASCAR Race Hub Crowd Goes Wild
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 NBA Basketball Dodgeball Icons of The New College World Poker Tour The Finsiders
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 (10:00) Morning The Golf Fix European Tour Golf
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 BoxScore Blue Blue NA Hunter DeerHunt LoveHunt ONTV Winkelman Americana Americana Pro Football Talk
SUN 38 38 401 401 45 57 76 Women's College Basketball LMLB Baseball Hall Fame Inside UCF Heat Wn's Gym.
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 PAWPatrol PAWPatrol Dora Peter Sponge Sponge Sponge Fairly Sanjay Invasion Sponge Sponge
TOON 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 Tom Jerry Tom Jerry Tom Jerry Tom Jerry Codenme Codenme Gumball Gumball Adventure Adventure Regular Regular
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Fast Money Power Lunch Street Signs Closing Bell Fast Money
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 Around The World CNN Newsroom Jake Tapper Situation Room
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 (11:00) Now America's News HQ Real Story Gretchen Shepard Smith Your World Cavuto The Five
MSNBC 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 MSNBC Live Andrea M News Nation The Cycle Alex Wagner The Ed Show
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 News Paid SNN News Daytime Paid News Paid News News News Live @5 News
CMTV 4 447 47 47 23 24 221 Dukes Hazzard Movie Redneck Reba Reba
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 Catfish Catfish Catfish Catfish Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 Single Ladies Movie _Love & Hip Hop Couples Therapy Mob Wives







MONDAY
HIGHLIGHTS

The Real Housewives
of Beverly Hills
8 p.m. on BRAVO
"The Birthday Witch" Joyce
accuses Carlton of putting
a spell on Joyce's husband,
but Carlton denies the
claims; during preparations
for a joint birthday party for
Lisa and Kyle's husbands,
Lisa asks Brandi to talk to
Scheana and awkwardness
ensues.

Hart of Dixie
8 p.m. on CW
"Should've Been a Cowboy"
Brick promises to help Zoe
fix up her new house if she
can recruit the town to
lose 500 pounds altogether
for Health and Wellness
Month; Joel follows Wade
for research, but winds up
running the bar; AnnaBeth
throws a bachelorette party
for a friend. (HD)


Switched at Birth
8 p.m. on FAM
"It Hurts to Wait with Love
if Love is Somewhere Else"
Emmett has already started
to date again, which leaves
Bay surprised about her
conflicting feelings over it;
Daphne considers taking
Jorge up on an invitation to
his family function. (HD)

Almost Human
8 p.m. on FOX
"Unbound" When an
advanced DRN with the
mentality of a soldier is
restored, disastrous conse-
quences ensue as she sets
off with a mission, leaving
Kennex and Dorian to turn
to a brilliant roboticist and
DRN creator in order to
catch her. (HD)

Richard Pryor:
Omit the Logic
8 p.m. on SHOW
Filmmaker Marina Zenovich
provides a profile of leg-


SOAP OPERA UPDATE


THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
Brooke asked Katie if Ridge
was seeing another woman.
With the assistance of Pam
and Charlie, Liam determined
the exact location of where
Hope and Wyatt were camping.
Brooke made another attempt to
get Bill to work on his relation-
ship with Katie. In return, Bill
tried to get Brooke to give up on
her desire to have a perfect fu-
ture with Ridge. Pam told Rick
about Wyatt's publicity stunt.
Bill was thrilled when Justin
was able to find some damning
information about Ridge. Katie
had a hard time focusing on her
lunch with Caroline after seeing
Brooke dining with Ridge. Wyatt
tried to win Hope back after she
found out about his deception.
Wait to See: Brooke learns what
Ridge really did in Paris. Wyatt's
future with Forrester Creations
is questionable. Katie finds joy
in her life again.

DAYS OF OUR LIVES
EJ warned Sami that things
must change between them
-- one way or another. JJ
scrambled to throw Theresa


off-track. Kate found herself
in a sticky situation. A fed-up
Maggie told Brady she couldn't
be his sponsor any longer. Hope
had another tense meeting
with Aiden. Daniel and Nicole
worked together to clear Eric's
name. Meanwhile, Eric did some
major soul-searching. JJ worried
that Theresa wouldn't take the
bait. Rafe was furious to learn
about the latest development
in Gabi's life. Daniel and Nicole
decided to hunt down Dr. Chyka
together. Jordan came to Rafe's
aid during a tense encounter.
Victor wound up in the middle
of Maggie and Brady's dispute.
Wait to See: Theresa falls for
JJ's trap. Nicole and Daniel find
themselves in danger. Sami can't
believe her eyes when she comes
home early.

GENERAL HOSPITAL
Olivia asked Sonny if he
was going to retaliate regard-
ing Morgan's betrayal. Lucy's
secret weighed on Felicia. Julian
relayed shocking news to Anna.
Lulu told Nathan that she
walked out on Dante. Julian
pressured Ava about Silas. Kev-
in's patient (guest star Chandra


endary comedian Richard
Pryor, featuring interviews
with industry figures such
as Whoopi Goldberg, Robin
Williams, Mel Brooks, Quin-
cy Jones, Dave Chappelle
and Lily Tomlin. (HD)

Beauty and the Beast
9 p.m. on CW
"Recipe for Disaster" When
J.T. is captured and held
captive, Tori attempts to
get involved while Cat and
Vincent team up to rescue
him, but faces grave danger
in the process; a face from
FBI Agent Dana Landon's
past could have answers to
Vincent's history. (HD)

The Following
9 p.m. on FOX
"Trust Me" Ryan attempts
to piece together the link
between the recent killing
sprees in New York City
and the members of the
Havenport cult as the FBI
grows closer to revealing
his agenda; Joe sets a new

Wilson from "Greys Anatomy")
saw an unfamiliar nurse.
Carly tried to use her kidnap-
per, Heather, to her advantage.
Franco and Silas compared
notes while in jail together. Kiki
visited the Miscavige Institute.
Tracy demanded that Anna
open a missing person's case
on Luke. Victor Cassadine
returned to Port Charles with
some scandalous news. Anna
blindsided Luke. Wait to See:
Britt is perplexed by a missing
hairbrush. Lucas has a surpris-
ing announcement for Julian.
Michael confronts Kiki about
hiding Franco.

THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Kevin learned of a witness in
Delia's hit-and-run case. Kyle
told Victor that he was resigning
from the company. Nikki's worst
nightmare came true when
Ian said that he was staying in
Genoa City. Chloe was curious
as to why Chelsea and Adam
were in such a hurry to move
to Paris. Sharon told Nick that
she was having less visions of
Cassie. Devon asked Hilary to
help plan the event to honor
Delia. Michael told Lauren
not to tell the police about the


Premiering Monday at
9 p.m. on HISTORY, season
five of the hit series "Swamp
People" boasts the long
awaited return of one of the
toughest men in the swamp,
Terral Evans, as well as
the debut of fierce Apache
hunter Roger Rivers.

plan in motion following a
distressing event. (HD)

latest secret gift she received.
Fen made Summer promise not
to take energy pills ever again.
Dylan shut out Ian's attempts to
tell his side of the story. Lily was
irked by Hilary's presence on the
event committee. Wait to See:
Billy and Jill are reunited. Cane's
biological father returns. Sharon
and Chelsea have an important
conversation.







KIDS NEWS SPORTS EVENING MONDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
FEB.3 3
ABC7 News @ABC World The7 Entertainment The Bachelor ((C) (N) (1)) (01) Castle: Smells Like Teen
ABC 7 11 7 6:00pmThe News with O'Clock Tonight (CC) (N) Spirit ((C) (N) (HD)
F26 newsofthe DianeSawyer News(N)(HD) (HD)
___~~_____ ~day. (N)HD) ___________________________________________________
ABC NewsThelat- ABCWorld TheList(IVG) AskAmerica The Bachelor (CC) (N) (HD) :01) Castle: Smells Like Teen
2 N estnews. News(N) (HD) (TYG) ______________Spirit (CC) (N) (HD)
ABC 7 7 7 10 7 7 News(N) ABCWorld A Millionaire? A Millionaire? The Bachelor (CC) (N) (HP) :01) Castle: Smells Like Teen
_____ '_______ _____ News (N) (CC))N) (CC(R) Spirit (CC) (N) (1HD))
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of For- Jeopardy!: How I Met 2 Broke Girls Mike & Molly: Mom: Nietz- Intelligence: The Rescue (CC)
CBS 0 1 1 1 6pm Local News with tune (CC) (N) Decades Tour- Your Mother: Venture capital. Dips&Salsa scheanda (N)(HDP
0 0 0 0 news report. Scott Pelley (N) (HD) nament-1980s Sunrise(N)(HD) (CC)(HD) (CC) (N) (HD) BeerRun(CC)
_____ (N) (HD)) ______(N) I(N)(HD)_______)
CBS 90, News (N) (HD) Evening News News (N) (HD) Inside Edi- How I Met: 2 Broke Girls Mike Molly (N) Mom (CC) (N) Intelligence: The Rescue (CC)
i 213 213 5 5 5(N) (H) ______ tion(N) Sunrise (N) (HD) (HD) (HD) (N) (HD?
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Hollywd Game Night: Orange Sports Illustrated Swimsuit: 50 Years of Beautiful A cel-
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 at 6:00 News News Current 8 at 7:00 News; Tonight (CC)(N) is the New Game Night Celeb- ebration of one of popular culture's most-anticipated annual
.B and weather, events. (N) (HD) weather; more. (HD) rityteams play unique party fixtures, the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, hosted by for-
_______ ___ ______ __ games. mer cover model, Heidi Klum. (TV1 4)
NBC 2 2 2 News (N) (HD) NBC Nightly Wheel of For- Jeopardy (N) Hollywd Game Night Celebrity Sports Illustrated Swimsuit: 50 Years of Beautiful A cel-
20) News (N) tune(N) (HD)) game show.(N) ebration of the popular magazine. (TV14) (N) (HD)
FOX 13 6:00 News News TMZ ((CC) (N) The Insider Almost Human: Unbound Di- The Following: Trust Me Ryan FOX 1310:00 News Top sto-
FOX 13 13 13 13 13 events of the day are examined (CC) (N) (HD) sastrous consequences ensue pieces tether the link between ries of the news day are up-
173 1 3 and reported byme FOX 13 when a soldier-like DRN is re- he recent killing sprees and the dated bythe FOX 13 Nightly
_____ News Team. (N) ____________ stored. (N) cult. News Team. (N)
FOX FOX 4 News at Six Local Judge Judy Simpsons Bart Almost Human: Unbound The Following: Trust Me RFind- FOX 4 News at Ten Nightly
3 __. news; weather. (N) (R) (HD) flirts. DRN is restored. (N) (HD) ing a link. (N)(HTD) news report. (N)
PBS BBCWorld Business Re- The PBS NewsHour (CC) (N) Antiques Roadshow: Detroit Antiques Roadshow Chest; POV: American Promise Boys'
S3 3 3 News (C) port(N) (HP) Passport; painting. map; sword. (R) (1)) journey. (N) (P))
P Sesame Street Elmo& others Cat in Hat ( Peg+Cat(CC) Europe British Rudy Maxa (CC(() Travels City The Travel De- Globe Trekker Fiji & other
a16Sesame Street Elmo& others Cat in Hat (R) +Cat((( Lbri ()eprd ecie ae.(( r
r 0 2m 16 cheer. (CC) (N) (HD) (HD) ( Libra (explored. tective laces. (CC) (R)
PBS BBC World Business Re- The PBS NewsHour (CC) (N) Antiques Roadshow: Detroit Antiques Roadshow Chest; Independent Lens Original
W[Z News (CC) port(N) (HD()) Pas sport; painting. map; sword. (R) (HD) films. (CC) (HD)
CW 6 2 6 Modern(CC) Modern:Aunt Big Bang (CC)( Big Bang Ten- Hart of Dixie 500 pounds. Beauty and the Beast J.T. is News@lOpm(N) (HD)
C 6 21 6 (HD)) Mommy (H14 urefight. (CC) (N) (HD)) captured. (N) (HD)
CW 9 Queens (VPG) Queens (IWP) 21/2 Men (CC) 21/2 Men (CC) Hart of Dixie 500 pounds. Beauty and the Beast J.T. is Engagement: Rules: Cookng
IW 9 9 (HD) I(HD)) (HD)) (1HD) (CC) (N) (HD)) captured. (N) (HD) Kid? sClass
MYN I Raymond: Seinfeld:The Family Feud Family Feud Law & Order: Special Victims Law &Order: Special Victims Cops Re- Cops Re-
3] i Good Girls Limo (YPG (VPGM) Unit: Care (HD) Unit Killer strirpper. loaded (HD) loaded (HD)
MYN Hollywd (N) (HD) Cleveland (CC) Family Guy Family Guy (CC) Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order Special Victims
8 ______ (HD) (COC) (HD) Unit: Care(HD) Unit Killer stripper. Unit: Mercy (HD)
IND 12 12 12 1 Modern (CC) Modern: Aunt Big Bang (CC) Big Bang Ten- Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Office (CC) (HD) The Office ((CC)
3 12 12 12 1HD) Momm (HM) ure fight. Unit: Mercy (HD) Unit: Uncle (HD) 14HD)
ION 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Criminal Minds: Big Sea Criminal Minds Human traf- Criminal Minds BAU ques- Criminal Minds: Proof Robbed Criminal Minds: Dorado Falls
66 1 Buried bodies. (CC)(HP) picking. (CC) (HD) tioned. (CC) (HD) senses. (CC) (HD) An unlikely suspect.
WCLF 22 22 22 2 Christian Fit- Today Faith& Levitt (CC) (N) Great Awaken Tour Love a Child RichardRob- GospelTruth Jewish Jewels Life Today
22 ness Rhealing. herRs(CC) ((IlN) (CeC) (CC) _o
WRXY 22 4 10 Joyce Meyer Entertain- Marketplace Great Awaken Tour Stop Hurting Love a Child Joyce Meyer Place Mira- Prophecy in
WM2v (CC) ment Wisdom (CC) cles the News
TLF 23 23 23 95 Fuego en la sangre Seduccion Pequefios Gigantes Talento No Code of Conduct ('98) *% Charlie Sheen. Vice detec- Game of Death (10) Tras un
0] vengadora. ()VPG) infantil. (CC) ()D) _tive uncovers dirty cops. (R) (CC) (D) (traficante de armas.
UNIV i 6 Noticias(CC) Noticiero Mentir para vivir Oriana PorsiempremiamorEnvidia Loquelavidamerob6 Boda Qu6 pobres tan ricos
62 1 1' 15 L (N) |Univisi6n (N) cambiasuidentidad.(HD) ymaldad. (CC) (HD) Isin amor. (CC) (HD) Humi dehogar.

A 22 6 Duck Radio Duck Career Duck(CC) (R) Duck(CC)(R) Duck'Black Duck (CC) (R) Bad Ink (CC) (N) Bad Ink (CC) (N) Mayne (CC (N) Mayne (CC) (N)
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 show.(R) day.(R) (HD) 1HD)) Panther. (HD)) 1HD)) (HD 1HD) )(HD)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 1 l(5:30) Behind Enemy Lines ('01) A pilot struggles to survive Shooter ('07) A former Marine sniper is recruited to prevent the assassination of the presi-
HIVC 6 56 6 3 33 in hostile territory after his lane is shot down. dent and is framed for the assassination of an Ethiopian dignitary. (CC)
API 44 44 4444 68 130 Finding Bigfoot: Further Big- To Be Announced Info un- Finding Bigfoot Possible en- Gator Boys: Cat Scratch Fever Beaver (R) Beaver (R)
L 44 44 44 44 6 6 foot in dayliht. (R) available. counter. (CO (R) (HD) Paul's struggles.
BT 3 3 0 7 106 & Park Bow Wow and Keshia Chante count down the Movie Keyshia Fam-
BET 35 35 35 35 40 222 1 top 10 videos chosen by the audience. (HD)) ilyife.
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 1 ihe Real Housewives of Vanderpump Rules: Bitch Real Housewives Beverly Vanderpump Rules: I Lied En- Vanderpump Rules: I Lied En-
BAVO 6 6 68 6 Beverly Hills Pool party. Slap Revenge. (R) Party drama. (C(() (N) gagement party. (N) gagement party. (R)
COM 66 66 6666 152 127 10 South Pik (R) Tosh.0 (CC) (R) ColbertRepo Daily Show (CC) Futurama Futurama(1V14)SouthPrk(R) SouthPrk(R) South Pik:t City South Prk(R)
()M ( 1 HD) HD) (HD) |(HD) (1V14) R) (R) ()HD) (HD)) Sushi )(HD)
DISC 40 40 40 4025 43120 Fast N' Loud Classics re- Fast N' Loud Classics re- Fast N'Loud: Revved Up Re- Rods N'Wheels: Holwd Hot The Devils Ride (CC) (N) (HD)
S40 40 40 40 4 aired. (CC) (HD) paired. (CC) (HD) pair&extra info. ()HD)) Rod (CC) (N) (HD)
E! 46464646 7 26196 JWith the Kardashians Broad- E! News (N) (HD) Celeb Boot Keeping with the #RichKids (R) #RichKids (R)
46 46 46 46 way dreams. (R) (1HD) Camp(R) Kardasiians: Howto Deal (HD) 14HD)
S829 82 82 82 118 11 1 Burn Notice: Identity Michael Burn Notice: Fight or Flight Wit-psych Rafting dangers. (CC) psych: A Very Juliet Episode psych: Death Is in the Air
ES 82 82 82 8211118160 epswoman. (Ha)e) ness on the run. (HD) Juliet's secret. (HD) deadly virus. (CC) (HD)
EWIN 243 243 243 12 17 185 EWTN Mother DailyMassCelebrationofthe The Journey Home Call-in Evangeliza- HolyRosary TheWorldOverNewsfrom
WTN 4 \ \ 8 Nightly (N) Teresa Hoy Eucharist. (R) program. (TV 6) tion (NYG) around theworld. (CC)
FAMi 5 5 5 55 10n46 19 Middle: Errand Middle Open- Switched at Birth: Fountain Switched at Birth Emmett's The Fosters: Famly Day News The Fosters: Family Day News
FA_ 5 5 5 1 Boy ing up. Troublefound. (R) (HD) dating. (N) (HD)) may ripfamily. (N) may rip family (r)______
S37 37 37 37 -71 Diners (R) (HP) Diners, Gu's Grocery Games: Surf's Rachaelvs. Guy:: Big Game Rachael vs. Guy: Coney Is- Buy: Fresh Myst