Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00237

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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Full Text

Florida Governor proposes $74 billion budget for 2014 TpAWE F






AND WEEKLY k
harlotte Sun
|^k HERAir !


LIFE OR DEATH DECISION ICY WEATHER HITS THE SOUTH,
Eric Holder will make the most high-profile death penalty Atlanta schoolchildren and motorists were stranded all night '
.. decision of his career in law enforcement. THE WIRE PAGE 1 after a snowstorm paralyzed the city.


ick of the Day
Honduras coffee, $35


In Today's
4Classifieds!






THE
V WIRE
PAGE 1


VOL. 122 NO.30


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


THURSDAY JANUARY 30, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net


PUBLISHER'S INBOX



Comical



classified

leaders have spoken. By a vote of
127,321 to 2 (a very slight exag-
geration), you want the comics in
color in classified instead of black
and white in The
= Wire. I could hug
... 1,11 n .qn J .A


El-
David
DIINN-RANKIN


adcLnII dlU cevely
reader who re-
sponded.
It is often hard
to know when a
vocal minority is
only just a vocal
minority. Your
large and energet-
ic response made
it clear which


UV1 |!1u1|1 course we should
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER take.
take.
Many of our longtime readers
might remember that we used to
have the comics in black and white.
One day my boss (Dad) came into
the office and said, "I want to see
the comics in color. They are more
enjoyable to read in color."
I explained that only one out of
every hundred papers still prints
daily comics in color. It would be an
additional $100,000 yearly expense
to add color to our black-and-white
comics. A vote of just one reader
and presto color comics.
With your incredibly large re-
sponse in favor of keeping color
comics, I now get to go see the boss
to discuss the outcome Father
Knows Best.
Many of you chimed in:
"I love having the comics in the
classified section, mainly for the
reason you mentioned regarding
spousal bliss vs. spousal conflict.
Conflict would be an understate-
ment. I also like the comics in color.
Good way to start the day.
"I find it no challenge to locate. If
you are new to the paper, it is listed
on the front page. We are not all
idiots."
And this one from MM: "I enjoy
Sudoku puzzles and am always
happy when you print an extra one
somewhere. I will look for it.
"After reading the front page and
Wire, I go to the comics for the
joy of a few laughs and therapy of
the puzzles. Also, I need to read
my horoscope to find out how my
day will be, and of course Abby to
remind me that everyone has prob-
lems and mine are minor. Thank you
for a great small-town paper."
KK shared this thought: "Placing
them in The Wire would most defi-
nitely be at odds with family peace.
One of us reads the comics and does
the puzzles while the other reads
the news. Then we swap. By the way,
when the centerfold of the classified
is needed for a spread, we all know
to go to the back of the classified to
find the comics."
Even the two folks who preferred
comics in black and white in The
Wire were playful in their response.
"Despite my acceptance of your cur-
rent positioning, I would love to see
the comics returned to the position
immediately following the Letters to
the Editor section. The color is nice,
but I really don't need it.
"My reasoning is that I used
to, and still do, get very irritated
at many of the letters, but could
always look forward to then tran-
sitioning to the comics to cool me
off! Truth be told, though, I would
love it even more if you would elim-
inate the letters and expand the
comics!" WS
WS, if we got rid of the letters I
would miss my funnies each day!
David Dunn-Rankin is president
and publisher of the Sun. Email him
at daviddr@sun-herald.com.


Security eyed for race



Authorities have plan for boat grand prix


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
ENGLEWOOD Outside of the
Charlotte County Sheriff's District 1
office on San Casa Drive, postcard-size
advertisements promote the Charlotte
Harbor Super Boat Grand Prix, sched-
uled for April 11-13 on Englewood
Beach.
Inside the office, the District 1 com-
mander, Lt. Darrell Caparo, and other
officers are fine-tuning the details for
the security and public safety during
the three-day event.


Caparo said the basic operational
plan is in place and calls for a coordi-
nated effort with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
officers, the Florida Highway Patrol
Auxiliary and the Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office. He anticipated 50 law
enforcement officers from the various
agencies will be involved over the
three-day event. Boat race organizers
plan to hire a private security firm for
extra help.
The CCSO and other agencies will
have marine patrols on the water,
Caparo said.


Beach Road will remain open
throughout the weekend. To ensure
traffic safety, Caparo said, "officers will
be pre-stationed at specific locations
to keep the traffic moving. The key
point is to keep the traffic moving."
Officers will be stationed at Beach
Road and South McCall Road, the
roundabout at Gulf Boulevard-North
Beach Road, at the public Englewood
Beach where most of the events are
being staged, and other locations.
North of the Sarasota-Charlotte county

SECURITY 16


SUN PHOTO BY
GARY ROBERTS
Dr. Asjad Khan examines
Caroline, 10, who has a thyroid
condition, as her mother looks
on. Kelly Mahoney used to
drive her children two hours,
from their home in Rotonda
to the Golisano Children's
Hospital of Southwest Florida
in Fort Myers, for treatment
before the opening of the
Pediatric Specialty Clinic in
Murdock.


New pediatric clinic delivers care


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER

MURDOCK At just 4 years old,
Caroline began feeling what she
described as a "bee sting" sensation in
her legs. But over time, her symptoms
would worsen: fatigue, stunted growth
and an inability to concentrate in
school.
Even though thyroid issues run in
her family, Caroline wasn't properly
diagnosed and medicated until age 7.
The change was dramatic. She became
more energetic, improved in the


classroom, and her accelerated growth
made up for lost time.
Today, Caroline is starting fastpitch
softball in school and is almost as tall
as her mom. Her brother, Myles, 12,
with the same condition though to a
lesser degree went through a similar
transformation.
"They're growing and doing better
in school," said their mother, Kelly
Mahoney. "I think it has made a huge
difference."
Still another benefit, enjoyed by
everyone, is spending a lot less time in
the car.


When the new Pediatric Specialty
Clinic recently opened in Murdock,
the family no longer had to drive two
hours from their home in Rotonda
to Fort Myers for appointments
at Golisano Children's Hospital of
Southwest Florida. The same goes for
other local children in need of pediat-
ric specialty health-care services.
The outpatient clinic is more than
just a matter of convenience, however.
The clinic makes it more likely for
young patients to seek early diagnoses

CLINIC 16


Trashed bids spur police inquiry


By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
NORTH PORT COMMUNITY NEWS EDITOR
NORTH PORT -A police inves-
tigation found a city supervisor did
not violate state law or city policy by
allegedly throwing bid documents in a
garbage can and having an employee
show them to a bidder.
According to a recent report from
the North Port Police Department, the
incident occurred during the bidding
for fire alarm systems in 2012 for a
contract that later was awarded in
2013. The case was reviewed by the
state Attorney General's Office late last
year. Since bid rigging or bid tampering
is illegal, the Attorney General's Office
determined the local department
should investigate.


According to the report, City
Property Maintenance Manager Lou
Spreduto allegedly tossed three fire
alarm system contract bids for the city
in a trash can at City Hall. Minutes
later, Clyde Walton, a maintenance
worker, walked into the building and
retrieved the bids from the garbage.
He took them to what was at the
time the vacant Fleet Maintenance
building on Pan American Boulevard.
He unlocked the door. A short time
later, he allegedly met John Solero of
Southwest Florida Alarm and Security
of North Port. At the time, Solero had
the current contract for the alarm and
security system with the city. Walton
allegedly showed Solero the bids.
According to the report, Solero said
he could bid "as low as Space Coast."


Then Walton locked up the building
and they both left.
North Port Detective Chris Maki
wrote that he enlisted the help of Bryan
Holland, a city building official (who
works with Spreduto), to help investi-
gate the possibility of bid tampering.
According to the report, Holland
researched the specific project.
"He determined that all city policies
and procedures were followed during
the bid process," Maki wrote in the
report. "This job was not a sealed bid
and the company owner, who was
shown the other bids, was shown those
bids so that he could be included in the
bid pool for that job."
According to Florida statutes: a bid
BIDS 16


CORRECTION
The correct phone number to call for tickets to the 16th annual Irish Concert being held at 3 p.m. Friday at Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., is
941-474-8843. You can also call 941-473-2458. A story in Wednesday's Let's Go! section listed an incorrect phone number.


I NDEX I THE SUN: Police Beat 41 Obituaries 51 Legals 81 Viewpoint 101 Opinion 11 THE WIRE: Nation 21 State 31 World 5 Business 6-7 Weather 81 SPORTS: Lotto2 iLASSIFIED: Comics 11-141 Dear Abby 14 1TV Listings 15


Daily Edition $1.00

7 0525211111 I00
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A 6. :F-** Look insidefor valuable coupons- *'' -'.':
High Low : This year's savings to date... i
::, I VALUE METER W ;|
70 percent chance of rain A$i. . ..:


CALL US AT
941-206-1000


CHARLIE SAYS ...
I learn something new every day.


$1.00






Our Town Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, January 30, 2014


U.S. poet laureate, other



artists perform Friday


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD -
U.S. poet laureate
Natasha Trethewey is
scheduled to read at the
Hermitage House Friday
evening, but she will not
be alone.
Two Massachusetts
Institute of Technology
musical artists will join
Trethewey. Evan Ziporyn
will play clarinet and
electronics. Christine
Southworth will play
bagpipes before and
after Trethewey's reading
on the Gulf beach front-
ing the Hermitage Artist
Retreat on Manasota
Key.
According to the artist
retreat, Ziporyn has
described his music as
"a crossroads between
genres and cultures, east
and west." His musical
compositions have been
commissioned byYo-Yo
Ma's Silk Road, Kronos
Quartet, the American
Composers Orchestra
and other venues. He's


currently
the head of
Music and
Theater
Arts at MIT
and direc-
tor of MIT's
TRETHEW Center for
TRETHEWEY Art Science
and Technology.
Southworth is the
general manager for
MIT-based Gamelan
Galak Tika, a percussion
orchestra, based upon
Balinese traditions and
consisting of gongs,
metallophones, hand
drums with cymbals,
vocals, bamboo lutes
and spiked fiddles.
Southworth describes
her compositions as a
"cross pollination of
sonic ideas."
Trethewey is serv-
ing her second term
as the nation's poet
laureate. Among her
accomplishments,
she's earned a Pulitzer
Prize and fellowships
from the Guggenheim
Foundation, the
Rockefeller Foundation


RUBY TUESDAY GIVEBACK
EVENTS
Ruby Tuesday restaurant in the Port Charlotte
Town Center mall offers a Community GiveBack
Program for area nonprofits, churches, schools and
others. This is a great way to raise money for your
cause while enjoying lunch or dinner, organizers say.
Ruby Tuesday gives back 20 percent of net sales to
each organization.
The following organizations have GiveBack
events scheduled for February. If you are interested
in supporting any of these, visit the organization's
website for a flier or contact the group/individual
and request a flier to attend.
Tuesday North Port Chorale
The mission of the North Port Chorale is to
provide quality vocal entertainment to the residents
of North Port and surrounding areas.
Contact: Joyce Cattelane at 941-373-5335 or
northportchorale@yahoo.com, or visit http://www.
northportchorale.info/.
Feb. 12 Charlotte Desoto Building
Industry Association
The mission of the Future Builders of America -
"Learning Today, Building Tomorrow"- is to help
students pursue careers in the building industry
by providing education and technical training by


and the National
Endowment of the Arts.
Besides publishing four
collections of poetry, she
published her nonfic-
tion, "Beyond Katrina:
A Meditation on the
Mississippi Gulf Coast."
Tours of the historic
Hermitage House
Artist Complex begin
at 4:30 p.m. Friday, and
will be followed by a
5:15 p.m. beach reading
by Trethewey and perfor-
mances by Ziporyn and
Southworth.
Visitors need to
bring only their beach
chairs and any re-
freshments during the
performances.
The Hermitage House
Artist Complex is located
at 6660 Manasota Key
Road, Englewood,
adjacent to Sarasota
County's public Blind
Pass Beach. For more
information, call 941-
475-2098, or visit www.
HermitageArtistRetreat.
org.

Email: reilly@sun-heraldx.com


awarding scholarships, assisting in apprenticeships
and job placement.
Contact: Rick llmberger at suncoast_glass@
yahoo.com.
Feb. 15 International Angelman
Day: Foundation for Angelman Syndrome
Therapeutics
Contact: Kat Rankins at 630-852-3278 or
kmrankinsl@gmail.com.
Feb. 17 Port Charlotte Jewish
Community-Temple Shalom
Temple Shalom is a welcoming reform Jewish
congregation that strives to meet the spiritual,
educational, cultural and social needs of its
members.
Contact: Joyce Gelfand at jteachu@yahoo.com.
Feb. 21 Habitat for Humanity Women
Build
Contact: Doreen Stoquert at dstoquert@
centurylink.net or 941-276-6892.
Feb. 26 American Cancer Society Relay
for Life
Relay for Life raises much-needed funds and
awareness to save lives from cancer. Relay for Life
of Port Charlotte will be held April 12-13 at Port
Charlotte High School.
Contact: Ken Johnson at 941-625-1167, or visit
www.relayforlife.org/portcharlottefl.


SUBSCRIPTIONS I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated
market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard.................... $16.47
3 Months...................... $66.51
6 Months.................... $113.05
1 Year ......................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
Subscribers residing in
outlying areas may incur
additional delivery charge.

DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card .................. $16.40
3 Months..................... $74.09
6 Months .................. $119.54
1 Year ........................ $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
SundayOnly
3 Months 6 Months 1 Year
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday
$2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-
Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.
to noon. To subscribe or to report
any problems with your service,
please call or visit your local office.

Englewood: 941-681-3000
120W. Dearborn St.
Charlotte: 941-206-1300
23170 Harborview Rd.,
Port Charlotte
North Port: 941-429-3000
13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port
DeSoto: 863-494-0300


Landscaping
continues at
library
Parking and landscape
improvements continue
at the Mid-County
Regional Library, 2050
Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port
Charlotte. The parking
lot has been resealed and
striped, providing clearer
paths for pedestrians and
cars, and new trees have
been planted.
The improvements will
continue with the addition
of ground-cover plants
along the canal walkaway
and plant beds. Three
large Bismarck palm trees
have succumbed to dis-
ease and will be replaced.
The gazebo is being
relocated to South County
Regional Park in Punta
Gorda, where it will serve
a larger, diverse group in
its new location, including
remote-controlled boat
enthusiasts, and picnick-
ers. The new landscaping
will provide commercial
and residential neighbors
an attractive surrounding.
For more information,
call 941-625-7529.


Auxiliary needs
volunteers
The U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary needs volunteers.
The auxiliary is the volun-
teer arm of the U.S. Coast
Guard and a member
of the U.S. Homeland
Security. The operational
unit of the auxiliary
is the "Flotilla" where
Coast Guard policies and
programs are transformed
into action.
The flotillas support the
Coast Guard in all mis-
sions except military and
direct law enforcement.
In our area several flotillas
provide support on and
off the water from Venice
to the south end of Pine
Island including Charlotte
Harbor, Myakka and
Peace rivers. No special
military, vessel-related or
on-the-water experience
is required to volunteer,
just a desire to promote
water safety and help save
lives. Volunteers must be
at least 17 years old, U.S.
citizens, and live here
year-round or seasonally.
For more information on
volunteer opportunities,
contact Dave Nielsen at
732-616-9016.


SUN NEWSPAPERS
Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-205-6400
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero .................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor .........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
Arcadian Publisher.................... Joe Gallimore .............................. 863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray ................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar.............................. 941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


CHARLOTTE
EVENTS

*GOVERNMENT
* TODAY

South Gulf Cove,
Non-Urban Street and Drainage Unit
Advisory Committee meeting, 10 a.m.,
18400 Murdock Circle, PC. 575-3656.
Board of County,
Commissioners joint meeting with
City of Punta Gorda, 1:30 p.m.,
18500 Murdock Circle, Room 119, PC.
743-1944.

* EVENTS

* TODAY

American Legion Cafe,
Now serving b'fast/lunch 7a-2p.
Thu-Sun. Public welcome. Thanks for
supporting our vets&community 2101
Taylor Rd 639-6337
Project Linus, Quilt blankets
for kids every Thurs. 9-11am Hucky's
Softball Training 17426 Abbott Ave
Nancy 627-4364
Sierra Club Bikeride,
Sierra Club Cape Haze Pioneer Trail
Bike Ride led by master naturalist.
Rsrv. req. 941-445-6181.
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Lunch With Kathy 11-2:30
FOE Eagles #3296, Eagles
offers Lunch Mon-Fri 11am-2pm.
Dinner Tue-Sat 5-8pm.Music Wed-Sat
6:30-9:30pm.23111 HarborviewRd,
CH 941-629-1645


I NORTH PORT EVENTS


* TODAY
Table Tennis, 9-11 am, north
port senior center, 4940 Pan American
Blvd., equipment, provided, $2.00,
426-6276
Current Events Conv,
10-11:30am NP Senior Center 4940
Pan American Blvd 426-2204 bring a
topic or joke or just come & discuss
Discussion Group, lOam,
North Port Library, 941-861-1307,
Every Thursday bring a news article
to share.
Medicare Assistance,
lOam, North Port Library, 941-861-
1307, One on One counseling every
Thur. Make an appt at 866-413-5337.
Lunch VFW Post 8203,
Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues,
Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome
sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special in
canteen
Mexican Dominos,12-3pm
NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American
Blvd 426-2204 Come learn the game
& join all the fun
Amvets 2000 Dinner,
LAUX Capt Salty's catfish fry 4-7pm $7
Members & guests welcome QOH @
7pm 401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999
Lasagna Dinner, Legion
Post 254, 6648 Taney Town North
Port $6:00 Pasta, salad, tst. & dessert
6-8pm cont. Brenda 258-6550

* FRIDAY

Basic Exercise, $40/8wks
or $2/class 9-10am NP Senior Center

ENGLEWOOD
EVENTS

* TODAY

MG French Toast, Sausage,
Fresh Fruit, OJ, Coffee & AUCE Fr. Toast
8-11am Mobile Gardens Comm Ctr,
414 Camino Real, EngI $4.00 474-9825
Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted
items every Thursday 9-11:30am
(except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove
UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533
Ewd Country Liners, 9:30-
11:30AM, Christ Lutheran Church,
701 N Indiana Ave. Begin/intermed.
line, dances. Public welcome. Nancy
474-6027
Line Dancing (Beg), 9:30
to 11:30 American Legion Post 113
3436 Indiana Rd Rotonda West Phone
Eve at 941-697-8733
Parkinson's Exercise, To
increase mobility, strength & coordina-
tion. Speech clarity & voice power. 10Oam
$5 Sports Complex.1475-2123.
Plant Clinic, 10-Noon,Gota
plant/tree problem? Bring in a sample
to be identified @ New Englewood
Library, 3450 S McCall 475-6903
Story Time, Thursdays 11 am
Stories, rhymes, music & play for
children of all ages. Elsie Quirk Library,
100W Dearborn 861-5000
Englewood Bridge Cl,
Contract bridge is played every Thu
&Mon from 12:15 til 3:30 at The
Hills Rest. RGCC, 100 Rotonda Cir,
698-7945, $2.
Entertainment, V.F.W.
Englewood, Music by"Dave Grahn"
5-8 p.m.! Baby Back Rib Night
5-7 p.m.! Public, Welcome! 474-7516


4940 Pan American Blvd Marcelle
235-0346 Join today & start to feel
better
Pierogies Take
Out, Pierogies/Kielbasa,Every
Fri.10am-6pm Sat.10am-lpm. St.
Andrew Ukr. Ctr. 4100 S. Biscayne
Blvd. North Port. 941 786-5256
Tai Chi, 10:30am-12pm NP
Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd
Call for cost Jerry 496-4932 Helps with
balance
Lunch VFW Post 8203,
Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues,
Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome
sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special in
canteen
Amvets 2000 LAUX,
Ex-Board Meeting 4:30pm. Officers
be in attendance. 401 Ortiz Blvd NP
941-429-1999
Ukrainian Dinners, Friday
4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call
about takeout. St. Mary's Church
at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00
423-2427.
AYCE Fish@Elks 2153,
All U can Eat Fish +full menu-5-8pm
Music, Karaoke. Fun Night-members
& guests. Kenilworth, Port Charlotte,
625-7571
Holy Name Bingo,
5-9:30pm San Pedro Activity Center,
Non-Smoking Up to $1300.00 in
cash prizes, Refreshments Open to all
429-6602

* SATURDAY

Fundraiser, We will be


Legion Game Night, Indoor
corn-hole games 7-10 pm, lite menu
5-8 pm at Post113, 3436 Indiana Rd.
697-3616 a smoke free Post.
Free Trivia Contest,
6:30-8:30 p.m. Dance Etc., 3372 N.
Access Road, Englewood. Bring a dish
for potluck supper. 941-698-4099
Trivia Night, Free beverages
and prizes, bring a dish to share. Thurs
Jan 30 6:30pm, 3372 N Access Rd,
Englewood, 941-445-1365
Bunco, Play bunco. Meet new
people, enjoy refreshments. 7-9 pm
Lemon Bay Woman's Club. 51 N. Maple
St. $5.00 941-323-6642
Harry James Orchestr,
Harry James Orchestra, 7:00 pm,
Lemon Bay High School Performing
Arts Center. Tickets $20.00. Call
474-7702, ext. 3000

* FRIDAY

Crafting Cuties, Love to


offering free depression screenings
and we will be having a fundraiser
garage sale to fund free counseling.
Closet of Hope, Free
clothing, ID required. 1st & 3rd
Saturday 9:30a-12p. Gulf Cove UMC,
1100 McCall, PC. 697-1747
Newcomer Day, 10 AM,
North Port Library, 941-861-1307,
Come learn more about your
community.
Pierogies Take
Out, Pierogies/Kielbasa,Every
Fri.10am-6pm Sat.10am-lpm. St.
Andrew Ukr. Ctr. 4100 S. Biscayne
Blvd. North Port. 941 786-5256
AMVETS Riders 312,
Street Clean-Up 10:30 AM. Meeting
11 AM at Post 312, 7050 Chancellor
Blvd. scenic ride to follow
Bowling Tournament,
Red, White & Blue Bowling
Tournament, between AMVETS 312,
2000 & VFW 8203,2-6 pm, 7050
Chancellor, NP 941-429-5403
Bowling@AMVETS 312,
Tournament vs Post 2000, VFW, & Post
312@2PM. Prizes, Chili, Free Drink
to contestants. 7050 Chancellor, NP
429-5403
Chili Dinner@Post 312,
Hot or Mild only $5-Tribute to George
Kaiss. 5-7pm Public welcome. Live
Music @ Amvets Post 312,North Port
429-5403
Aux Rueben Dinner,
Unit 254 is having a Rueben Dinner
on 2/1 from 5:30-7:30 @ 6648
Taneytown, ph. 423-7311 Post 254 in
North Port $7.


Craft? Join us at Rotonda W Comm Ctr,
3754 Cape Haze DrRotonda,Fridays @
9:30 am. Call Elaine at 697-0212
Line Dancing (Intr), 9:30 to
11:30 American Legion Post 113 3436
Indiana Rd Rotonda West Phone Eve
at 941 697 8733
Dessert Game Day, Play
games, make friends. Enjoy a yummy
dessert at Lemon Bay Woman's Club.
51 N. Maple St. 11:30 -3. $3.00
474-9762
Seafood and More, Mike
& Carol's super seafood dinners and
ham steak dinners at Post 113,3436
Indiana Rd. 697-3616.4:30-7:30 pm
Ukrainian Dinners, Friday
4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call
about takeout. St. Mary's Church
at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00
423-2427.
Entertainment, V.F.W.
Englewood, Dance to the music of the,
"Sno-Birds"5-8 p.m.! Fish Fry or Wings
5-7 p.m.! Public Welcome 474-7516


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS


Featured Events
8th Annual Harbour Heights 5K Run/Walk, Run/Walk
event to raise funds for Autism Speaks and SEC classes at 5 CC Schools. Event
date is Feb. 22; preregistration is 7am, race starts at 8am. 27420 Voyageur Dr.,
PG. Price: $15 in advance until 2/8, $20 day of the event Awards in 20 age
groups, raffles, giveaway gifts, refreshments. 258-2890.
Antique Craft Garage sale, Sunnybreeze Christian Fellowship,
7049 SW Liverpool Rd., Arcadia, will hold its annual antique, crafts and garage
sale from 8 a.m. to noon Sat., Feb. 1. There also will be clothing and household
items along with a tea room featuring coffee, tea, pie and cookies. For more
info, call 309-361-7181.
The Best Valentine Gift Ever, On Feb. 12 through Feb. 14, The
Suncoast Statesmen Barbershoppers will provide a quartet to sing two love
songs, present a rose and take a photo for a unique singing Valentine. Surprise
your sweetheart at homework or at whatever time & place you choose in
Charlotte County for only $40.625-1128.
Huge/Multi-Family Yard Sale,"Saints and Sinners of the
Kingdom,"Relay for Life Team, hosts a huge yard sale, including clothing,
housewares, tools, toys, Christmas items, and more at 9am, Sat., Feb. 1, at
4485 Tamiami Trail, PG. Come out & support Relay for Life! Together WE can
make a difference! 204-1882.
Photo Scavenger Hunt, Scavenger Hunt, 9-11:30am, Sat., Feb.
8, New Hope Christian Fellowship (Liberty Elementary), 370 Atwater St, PC.
Support military families in need. Proceeds benefit Operation Homefront.
Clues given event day. Individuals $7; Teams $25/car (5 people). Prizes top 3
teams-back by deadline. 916-5239.
Why You Like the Art You Like, Find out why you respond
the way you do to particular works of art, with paintings from the National
Art Exhibition as examples and Roxanne Hanney as your guide. Feb. 5, from
2-4 p.m. $20 ($15 VAC members). Hosted by the Visual Arts Center, 210 Maud
St., PG. www.visualartcenter.org or 941-639-8810.
Free Concert: Emmaus Road Quartet, Punta Gorda Church
of the Nazarene will have a Free Concert: Emmaus Road Quartet from 4 pm to
6 pm, Sun., Feb. 2 at512 E. Allen St. Public welcome. Info: 639-3663.
FOE Eagles #3296, Eagles #3296 invites you to join us Thurs.,
Jan. 30, to listen to the great sounds of Galaxy. Fri., Jan. 31, we will feature
Verceal & Al. Come in for dinner either night 5-8pm with music 6:30-9:30pm.
Accepting member applications. 23111 Harborview Rd., PC. 941-629-1645


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS


Featured Events
Huge Rummage Sale / Lunch, Sat., Feb. 1, 8am to 12pm,
Gasparilla Mobile Estates, 2001 Gasparilla Rd., Placida. Selling lawn &
garden items, furniture, electronics, kitchen items, clothing, bedding,
misc. indoor & outdoor items, & much more. Hot dogs available for
purchase. For info, call 440-933-4812.
CCW Annual Rummage/Bake Sale, Council of Catholic
Women Rummage/Bake Sale, 9am-12, Sat., Feb. 1. Free admission.
Pre-Sale, 4-6:30pm, Fri., Jan. 31. $4 Admission. St. Raphael, 770
Kilbourne Ave., Englewood. Open to public. Donations accepted Thurs.,
Jan. 30, Fri., Jan. 31,9am-12. No large items permitted. 473-2431.
The Case Of The Golden Girl, Mystery Play. Feb. 3,4,6,
7,8 at 7 pm; Feb. 5 at 2:30 pm. Green Street Church, 416 W. Green St.,
Englewood. Tickets 2/$10; 1/$8. An Englewood gal solves a murder in
1958 Las Vegas. Call 941-474-3764 to reserve tickets.


OurTown Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014




:The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 3


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:OurTown Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


Authorities: Shoppers had 'numerous' counterfeit cards


MURDOCK-Two
Naples men were caught
with several counterfeit
credit cards thanks to an
alert jewelry store clerk,
according to the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office.
Osvaldo Jamie Posada
Avila, 26, and Alain
Cruz-Avila, 29, entered
Kay Jewelers at the Port
Charlotte Town Center
mall around 8 p.m.
Tuesday. Alain tried to buy
a $2,000 Movado watch
without even asking how
much it was, the clerk
told authorities, and Alain
said the debit/gift card
he wanted to use for the
purchase doesn't swipe.
The clerk said he was
going to call the bank to
make sure the card was
OK, and Alain grabbed the
card and the men left, the
report shows.
The clerk followed them
around the mall until
deputies arrived.
Osvaldo and Alain each
had on them a "large
amount" of debit cards,
credit cards and gift cards,
authorities said, and a
wallet found near the
suspects also contained
"numerous" cards.
Detectives checked

FEELING CRAMPED?
Get rid of the clutter.


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


the cards and found they
allegedly had different
account numbers and
names on the strips
than on the front, and
several had the Issuer
Identification Numbers
out of order. Osvaldo also
reportedly had many
prepaidVisa gift cards still
in the packaging.
Alain and Osvaldo
were each charged with
possession of more than
two counterfeit credit
cards. Each was booked
Tuesday evening at the
Charlotte County Jail and
released Wednesday on
$2,500 bond.
A third man who
entered the store with the
suspects was not charged.
The report shows the
three men were relatives
traveling home from
Orlando.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Kendra Lebeth Miller, 24, of Lee
St., Punta Gorda. Charge: violation of


probation (original charge: trespassing).
Bond:none.
Angela Diana McQueen, 35,12400
Catalina Dr., Punta Gorda. Charge: falsely
reporting a crime. Bond: $1,000.
Hermino Gaspar Felix Pascual, 57,
3900 block of Duncan Road, Punta Gorda.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Meghan Christine Tipton, 31,25800
block of Aysen Dr., Punta Gorda. Charge:
grand theft. Bond: none.
Audrey Antoinette Simpson, 47,
500 blockof Chamber St, Port Charlotte.
Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond:
none.
Michael Richard Hass, 47,3100 block
of Beacon Dr., Port Charlotte. Charges:
uttering a forged bill, check, draft or note;
and grand theft. Bond: none.
Zachary Alexander Holbine, 21,
21300 block of Gladis Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: three counts each of possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana and
sale of marijuana, and two counts of
possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond:
$12,500.
James GrantWhite III, 24,3000
block of Caring Way, Port Charlotte.
Charges: grand theft, providing false
information on pawned items, dealing
in stolen property and violation of
probation (original charge: driving with a
suspended license). Bond: none.


*William Edward WoodburyJr.,
25,21900 block of Felton Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: two counts of
resisting an officer. Bond: $2,000.
Jeremy Paul Lloyd, 32, of Pensacola,
Fla. Charges: possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia. Bond: $2,000.
Robert Neal Kerner, 40, of Lehigh
Acres. Charge: violation of probation.
Bond:$770.
*Tricia MarieVelez, 41,11400 block
of Poplin Ave., Englewood. Charges:
two counts of possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription and one
count of possession of drug parapher-
nalia. Bond: $8,500.
Kenneth Charles Chase, 27,
homeless. Charge: fugitive from justice.
Bond: $75,000.
Charles Arthur Maddox, 32,
homeless. Charge: possession of less than
20 grams of marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia. Bond: $2,000.
Keisha Leann Clarke, 35, homeless in
Punta Gorda. Charges: possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana, possession
of a controlled substance without a
prescription and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond: $4,500.
Eezay Kendley, 32, homeless in
Port Charlotte. Charges: two counts of
violation of probation (original charges:
possession of less than 3 grams of
synthetic marijuana or bath salts and
possession of drug paraphernalia).
Keith Joseph Carmello, 45,100
block of Barre Dr., Port Charlotte. Charge:
battery. Bond: none.


Timothy Levelle Dunbar, 43,3500
block of N. Chamberlain Blvd., North
Port. Charges: possession of cocaine,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
violation of probation. Bond: none.
Matthew Casey Nix, 29,27300
block of Sunnybrook Road, Punta Gorda.
Charge: petty theft. Bond: $1,000.

The Punta Gorda Police
Department reported the following
arrest:
Frank Lane Coon Jr., 19,3400
block of Normandy Dr., Port Charlotte.
Charge: three counts each of possession
of cocaine, delivery of a controlled
substance, possession of drug
paraphernalia and failure to appear.
Bond:none.

The North Port Police
Department reported the following
arrests:
Danzey Anissa Allen, 42,1800 block
ofAnabelle Lane, North Port Charge:
driving with a suspended license. Bond:
$120.
Robert Lawrence Sampson, 41,
3300 block of Tropicaire Blvd., North
Port Charges: DUI and hit and run. Bond:
$620.
Malena Ann Pack, 28,1400 block
ofWoodcrest Lane, North Port Charge:
battery. Bond: none.
Tracy Lee Howard, 53,5600 block
of Espanola Ave., North Port. Charge:
violation of probation (original charge:
DUI with property damage). Bond:
none.


The Venice Police Department
reported the following arrests:
Dennis James Long, 52,200 block
ofS. Porsha Road, Nokomis. Charges: hit
and run and operating a motor vehicle
without a valid license. Bond: $240.
Alain Marcel Fauteux, 50,400 block
of W. Seminole Drive, Venice. Charges:
dealing in stolen property, fraud and
grand theft. Bond: $10,500.
Wesley Sheldon Smith, 46,300
block of Azure Road, Venice. Charges:
kidnapping and battery. Bond: none.
John A. McCord,61,5100blockof
Cedar Hammock Lane, Sarasota. Charge:
operating a motor vehicle without a valid
license. Bond: $120.

The Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Timothy James Pasko, 32,6900
block of SleepyWay, North Port Charge:
violation of probation (original charge:
possession of cocaine). Bond: none.
Troy Daniel Sawyers, 48,3000 block
ofGreendale Road, North Port. Charge:
petty theft (second offense). Bond: none.
Sean Aaron Jenkins, 49,700 block
of Bird BayWest Drive, Venice. Charge:
out-of-state fugitive. Bond: none.
Tydolyn Caprice Spiro, 47,4400 block
of Tortoise Road, Venice. Charge: battery.
Bond:none.
Charles Thomas McDermott, 33, 700
block of Cypress Terrace, Venice. Charges:
DUI and resisting arrest. Bond: $1,000.
Compiled by Drew Winchester
andAdam Kreger


Health services offered at Sarasota County sites


S ^ '- ~ Provided by DIANNE SHIPLEY
SARASOTA COUNTY
HEALTH DEPARTMENT
lSARASOTA COUNTY-
-"''" The staff of the Health in
~' L'"-L: ,:: Motion Mobile Medical
"C C.::,G'* H Unit of the Florida
IIYm Spend Here ItSays HerTe Department of Health
w.punogornhamb.com in Sarasota County will
s provide free and low-cost



Have all your dental work completed


and not remember a thing!
IV Sedation and
Nitrous Oxide
Available!
FREE IV Sedation! 1
with any procedure over $2500
Call for full details, exp. 1/31/14
(941) 429-5771
dental codes: 9241 & 9242


CELEBRITY SMILES
--IM.ANT& St* .IO. DI.NTI.IRY-


health services at South
County sites during
February.
In addition, the Mobile
Medical Unit will be
present at the Winter
Wellness Fair & Expo at
the Venice Community
Center, 326 Nokomis Ave.
S. in Venice, from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Feb. 12.
Services offered
include diabetes educa-
tion and screening, blood
pressure tests, pregnancy
testing, HIV testing,
body mass index (BMI)
measurement, adult im-
munizations and health
education; however, not
all services, including im-
munizations, are offered
at all sites.
Staff also assists indi-
viduals who lack medical
insurance and do not have
a health-care provider to
find a medical home for
ongoing health care.
No appointment is


needed. Some services
are free, including HIV
rapid testing with results
in 20 minutes. Other
services are provided on a
sliding-fee scale based on
income. A registered nurse
is available at all sites.
While these services
are most often provided
in a 40-foot-long bus,
there are times when
they are provided inside
the facilities visited.
The following is
a schedule of South
County dates and loca-
tions for the mobile unit:

North Port

Monday, 9:30 a.m. to
3 p.m. atWalmart, 17000
Tamiami Trail.
Feb. 24, 9:30 a.m. to
2 p.m. at Publix super-
market, Heron Creek
Towne Center, 1291 S.
Sumter Blvd.
Feb. 28, 9:30 a.m. to


2:30 p.m. at Goodwill
Manasota Center in
the Community Room,
U.S. 41 and Sumter
Boulevard.

Englewood

*Tuesday, 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. at Elsie Quirk
Library, 100W Dearborn St.

Venice

*Wednesday, 9:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. during the
U.S. Department of
Agriculture food dis-
tribution program at
the Venice Community
Center, 326 Nokomis
Ave. S.
Feb. 19, 9:30 a.m. to
noon at the Habitat for
Humanity Re-Store, 1400
Ogden Road.
Feb. 26, 9:30 a.m. to
3 p.m. at the Salvation
Army Family Store, 1160
U.S. 41 Bypass S.


Laurel
Feb. 19, 2 p.m.
to 5 p.m. during the
USDA food distribution
program at the Sandra
Sims Terry Community
Center, 509 Collins
Road.
Mobile health ser-
vices will not be avail-
able at the USDA food
distribution program
at St. Nathaniel's
Episcopal Church in
North Port during
February.
For more information,
contact the Sarasota
County Call Center at
941-861-5000 (TTY 711
or 800-955-8771), or vis-
it www.sarasotahealth.
org to view the calen-
dar. Anyone without
computer access can
visit a health kiosk at
any Sarasota County
public library or Senior
Friendship Center.


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Presenting Sponsors
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Participating Sponsors
* 24Twentyone Event Center
*Arthur Rutenberg Homes
SandStar Homes, LLC
* Bayfront Health Port Charlotte
* Bayfront Health Punta Gorda
* Charlotte Harbor Healthcare
* Charlotte Stone Crabs
Ripken Professional Baseball
* Edward Jones Investments
* Friendly Floors
* Integrity Employee Leasing, Inc
* The Mosaic Company
* Premier Photographic Events
* You've Got Maids
*W Kevin Russell, PA
* Panther Hollow Dental Lodge


Go t: ww .Chrlote outy ambe 6or


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF


Get Fit at
Lemon Bay
Woman's Club
The Lemon Bay
Woman's Club plays host
to two forms of dance
activity Zumba and
line dancing in its




illyI


clubhouse at 51 N. Maple
St., Englewood.
Zumba is an aerobic
dance fitness program that
includes elements of salsa,
merengue, cha-cha, and
other international dances,
all choreographed to world
music. Intensity of the
activity is determined by
the participant. Classes
are from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Monday andWednesdays,
and cost $5 per session.
Line dancing is avail-
able from 10 a.m. to


11 a.m. Tuesday. While
most often associated
with country music, line
dancing at the LBWC also
includes contemporary,
standards and rock music.
Each session costs $3.
Proceeds from the
classes are used to
support local charities,
and for upkeep of the
clubhouse, which is on
the National Register
of Historic Places. For
more information, call
941-474-9762.


CHARLOTTE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE VARIANCE
The zoning official has received a request for an Administrative
Variance and intends to grant the variance pursuant to Section
3-9-6.1(g) of the Charlotte County Zoning Code. Petition
number AVAR-13-013 is being requested by Ralph J. Verbanic.
The request is for an Administrative Variance to increase the lot
coverage from 35% to 37.7%, located in the Residential Single
Family 3.5 (RSF-3.5) zoning district. The property is addressed
as 2090 New Castle Lane, Punta Gorda, Florida and is
described as Lot 5, Block 773, Punta Gorda Isles, Section 23,
located in Section 16, Township 40 South, Range 23 East. A
complete legal description and additional information are on file.

This notice is being mailed to the adjoining property owners as
revealed by the current County Tax Roll. Within fifteen (15) days
of the publication of this notice, but not thereafter, any
interested person may apply in writing stating their name, the
nature of their interest and the nature of their opposition. Any
such written communication should be addressed to Shaun
Cullinan, Zoning Official, Charlotte County Community
Development Department, Zoning Division, 18400 Murdock
Circle, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948-1095.,,


Shaun Cullinan
Zoning Official
Published: January 30, 2014


' iti





The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES


CHARLOTTE


Madeline L.
LeBlanc
Madeline L. LeBlanc,
90, of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
passed away Sunday,
Jan. 26,
2014.
She
was born
June 30,
1923, in
Trinidad,
West Indies,
to Dolin
and Phyllis DelaMothe.
Mrs. LeBlanc moved
to this area in 1989 from
Canton, Mass., and had
worked for over 20 years
as a waitress for the
Brighams Restaurant in
both Canton and Boston.
She was a very social lady
who enjoyed spending
time with friends, drink-
ing martinis and going to
the beach. Mrs. LeBlanc
was an avid cat lover.
She is survived by her
daughters, Hazel (David)
Stewart of Punta Gorda,
and Heather (Howard)
Abel of Cary, N.C.; grand-
children, Laura Long,
Mark Stewart, Nicole
Petrillo, Heidi Cope and
Kimberly Plessinger; as
well as 10 great-grand-
children. She was
preceded in death by
her husband, William
LeBlanc in 1990.
Please visit www.
kays-ponger.com to leave
the family condolences
and to sign the online
guestbook.
Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services.

James L. Sailors
James "Jim" L. Sailors,
86, Punta Gorda, Fla.,
formerly of LaFontaine,
Ind., passed
ta \ away at
8:45 a.m.
m r Saturday,
S Jan. 25,
2014,
at Port
Charlotte
Hospice
S Home in Port
Charlotte, Fla.
Jaes. ( He was born
S to Russell and
Mary K. (nee
Hunt) Sailors, March 9,
1927, in LaFontaine.
Jim was formerly
married to Bette Cook,
who passed away May 31,
2005. He was an owner
of Unique Printing &
Labels Inc. formerly in
Indianapolis, Ind., now in
Greenfield, Ind. Jim served
his country in the United
States Army and was a
member of the United
Methodist faith. He also
loved to travel all over the
world and enjoyed being
with his family.
Jim is survived by
two daughters, Mrs.
James (Terri) Vogel
of Knightstown, Ind.,
and Mrs. Greg (Dixie)
Adamson of Pittsboro,
Ind.; brother, Allen "Bud"
Sailors of LaFontaine;
seven grandchildren; and
10 great-grandchildren.
He was also preceded in
death by two sons, Russell
and Bruce Sailors; broth-
er, Dean Sailors; sister,
Ellen Cravens; his wife,
Betty; and his parents,
Russell and Mary Sailors.
Visitation for family
and friends will be from
11 a.m. until 1 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014,
at the funeral home.
Funeral Service will be at
1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1,
2014, at McDonald
Funeral Home,
LaFontaine Chapel 104 5.
Main Street, LaFontaine,
IN 46940, officiating the
service will be Pastor


Guy Provance. Burial will
follow in the LaFontaine
IOOF Cemetery in
LaFontaine. Online
condolences may be sent
to the family at www.
mcdonaldfunerals.com.


Genevieve M.
Warstler
Genevieve M. Warstler,
87, of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Monday,
Jan. 27, 2014, at Charlotte
Harbor Healthcare.
Arrangements are by
National Cremation
Society of Port Charlotte.

ENGLEWOOD


James Dixon
James "Jim" Dixon, de-
parted this life Monday,
Jan. 27,2014.
He was born
... on Gasparilla
S:4 :;A, Island, Fla.,
Feb.12, 1929.
Jim was the
owner of Eldred's Marina
in Placida, Fla., and was a
veteran of the U.S. Army.
He is survived by his
wife of 61 years, Marian
Dixon; sons, Tim, Tom,
Sam, Sylvester and Andy;
daughters, Kate, Kathy,
Becky, Ruth and Sarah;
three sisters; one brother;
22 grandchildren; and six
great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be held
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 31, 2014, at Lemon
Bay Funeral Home in
Englewood, Fla. Funeral
services will be held at
10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 1,
2014, also at the funeral
home. Burial will follow
at Gulf Pines Memorial
Park in Englewood.
Please join the family in a
covered dish celebration
of Jim's life at 2 p.m.
Saturday on the point.
Officiating will be Pastor
Bryan Lee Walton from
the Placida Road Church
of God in Grove City, Fla.
You may express your
condolences to the fam-
ily at www.lemonbayfh.
com.

Aubrey Mack
Graves
Aubrey Mack
Graves, 76, formerly of
Englewood, Fla., passed
awayWednesday, Jan. 29,
2014, at home in Moneta,
Va., surrounded by his
family.
He is survived by his
three daughters, Michele
Paulette Graves, Christen
DeLarmon Graves and
Nicole Anne Graves
Sheets; his son-in-law,
John Andrew Sheets;
granddaughter, Holly
Anne Sheets; and his
grandsons, John Andrew
"AJ" Sheets II and
Thomas Aubrey Sheets.
Mack was preceded in
death by his parents,
Aubrey Allan Graves
and Esther Anna Mack
Graves; and his brothers,
James Allan Graves and
Robert Allan Graves.
A graveside service at
noon Saturday, Feb. 1,
2014, led by the Rev.
Philip A. Bouknight
of Trinity Ecumenical
Parish, at Stonewall
Memory Gardens, 12004
Lee Highway Manassas,
VA 20109. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorial donations
can be made to Trinity
Ecumenical Parish, 40
Lakemont Dr., Moneta,
VA 24121 or Good
Samaritan Hospice, 2408
Electric Rd., SW Roanoke,
VA 24018.
Arrangements are by
Flora Funeral Service &
Cremation Center, Rocky
Mount, Va.

George E.
Hubbell Jr.
George E. Hubbell Jr.,
81, of Englewood, Fla.,
formerly of Webster, N.Y.,


passed
away
peacefully
m Tuesday,
Jan. 21,
r 2014, after a
long illness.
1He was
born in
Rochester, N.Y, and


moved to Florida in 1979.
George is survived by
his loving wife, Jeanne;
children, Sandra, Drew,
Darla, Cynthia, Bonnie,
Brenda and Bethany;
13 grandchildren; five
great- grandchildren;
and brother, Ronald. He
was preceded in death
by his parents, George E.
Hubbell Sr. and Georgia
Hubbell; and daughter,
Rebecca.
A memorial service will
be announced at a later
date. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations
may be made to Tidewell
Hospice, Venice, Fla., for
the loving care they have
given to our family.

Paul B. Mason
Paul B. Mason, 85, died
Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014, in
Englewood Hospice.
He was born Oct. 19,
1928, in Worcester, Mass.
Paul moved to the
Englewood, Fla., area
22 years ago from
Needham, Mass. He was a
retired insurance broker.
Paul was an avid golfer
and was a volunteer at
EARS and the Englewood
Community Hospital.
He is survived by his
daughter, JoAnn Bryant
of Port Charlotte, Fla.;
his grandchildren,
Jennifer Hauer of Port
Charlotte and Drew
Mason of California; and
great-grandchildren,
Robert Hauer of Port
Charlotte and Cheyanne
Burton of RotondaWest,
Fla. Paul was preceded
in death by his wife
of 58 years, Mary Jane
Mason; and his son, Doug.
A Celebration of Life
service will be held
at 3:30 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 8, 2014, at Lemon
Bay Funeral Home in
Englewood. You may
express your condo-
lences to the family at,
www.lemonbayfh.com.
Memorial donations
may be made to the
Alzheimer's Association,
14010 Roosevelt Blvd.,
Suite 709, Clearwater, FL
33762-3820.

NORTH PORT

Anna McKinley
Gaus
Anna McKinley Gaus,
a longtime resident of
La Casa Mobile Park in
North Port, Fla., died
Friday Jan. 24, 2014.
She was born and
raised in Philadelphia,
Pa., and retired from
the telephone compa-
ny. Anna danced with
Nancy's Chorus Line.
She is survived by
a son, James (Lolita)


McKinley; daughters,
Anne Rogers and Linda
McKinley; grandchildren,
Maureen, Jennifer,
Kathleen and Brian; and
great- grandchildren,
Makenna, Michael and
Ryan.
A graveside service
will be held at 2 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014,
at Venice Memorial
Gardens Chapel of the
Saints. Expressions of
Sympathy can be sent
to North Port Animal
Rescue. To send condo-
lences, please visit www.
farleyfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements are by
Farley Funeral Home in
Venice, Fla.

Robert Russell
Roderick
Robert "Bob" Russell
Roderick, 61, of North
Port, Fla., passed away
Monday, Jan. 27, 2014,
at his home in the care
of his loving partner,
Daniel Cain, and
mother-in-law, Maxine
Funk, and peacefully
surrounded by his
siblings and loving
mother, Betty J. Edens of
Madisonville, Tenn.
Bob worked at Venice
Regional Bayfront
Medical Center as a
unit clerk for 14 years.
He graduated from
Hammond Technical
Vocational High School
and pursued many inter-
ests in the medical fields
at Indiana University.
Through his career he
worked in many hospital
positions providing care
and assistance to others.
Bob was an avid garden-
er and patron of the arts.
He loved music.
Bob remained a loving
partner, brother and
son until the end. He
will be greatly missed by
everyone that touched
his life.
Bob is survived by his
partner, Daniel Cain;
mother-in-law, Maxine
Funk of North Port;
mother, Betty J. Edens of
Madisonville; siblings,
Laura J. Bryan of Venice,
Fla., David L. Roderick
and Rick Kulovits of
Crest Hill, Ill1., Victor
and Donna Roderick of
Crossville, Tenn., Darlene
and Barry Coster of
Madisonville, Mark and
Tara Garrett of Highland,
Ind.; and many nieces
and nephews.
For online condo-
lences, please visit www.
mckeenorthport.com.

DESOTO

No deaths were report-
ed in DeSoto Wednesday


Benefit helps


support Haitian


orphanage


Carol Ann Lewis Maherg
Carol Ann Lewis Maherg, 28, passed away
Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, in an automobile
accident in the Arcadia/Wauchula area.
She was born Oct. 13, 1985, in Middletown, N.Y.
Carol's life revolved around her love of animals,
particularly her passion for horses. She was en-
rolled in Valencia College in Orlando, Fla., working
toward becoming a veterinarian. Recently Carol
and her beloved horse, Razz, who her mother has
raised from a baby, had won two jumper divisions
at a prestigious show in Wellington, Fla., for which
she was very proud. Carol was a very loving and
caring person who always brightened the lives of
those around her and was loved by many.
Carol is survived by her adoring mother,
Patricia Lewis of Punta Gorda, Fla.; father, Robert
Lewis of Pine Bush, N.Y.; brother, Robert Lewis
II of Punta Gorda; grandmother, Jean Benjamin
of Punta Gorda; fiance, Frank Emmi of Orlando;
many aunts, uncles, cousins and friends; her
beloved horse, Razz; and her dog, Roxy, who was
her constant, loving companion.
A celebration of Carol's life will be held at
5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31, 2014, from the Kays-Ponger
Uselton Funeral Home 635 E. Marion Ave., Punta
Gorda, FL 33950. Family and friends will gather
from 4 p.m. until the time of the service. After
the service, family will have a time of fellowship
and refreshments in the celebration room. To
light a candle in Carol's name, please visit www.
kays-ponger.com. In lieu of flowers, donations in
memory of Carol may be made to RAIN at www.
rescueanimalsinneed.org or to the Horse Rescue
of South Florida, Rehab & Retirement for offtrack
thoroughbreds at www.horserescueflorida.com.
Arrangements are by Kays-Ponger Uselton
Funeral Home and Cremation Services Punta
Gorda Chapel.


Event supporter Linda Rubino looks at the posters showing
children at the Haitian orphanage Saturday during the event
in Punta Gorda. About 50 people attended the dinner and
dance party.


4i.

Mother and daughter Paula and Elizabeth Hannon attend
the dinner together. Paula is a social worker at the Academy
in Port Charlotte. Both are supporters of the nonprofit group
that helps orphans.


At left, Janet Gedeon listens along with Rirma Riggs as
Wilson Gedeon talks about the St. Marie's Orphanage in
Petionville, near Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
I qmf


Zaph Manigat, who went to Haiti with Wilson Gedeon, the
event organizer, to help at the orphanage, sits with Yves
Elysee at the black-tie event.

JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
www.j ameswmallonee.com
o (941) 206-2223


Musician Ray Lamatrice, right, bows his head during
the prayer Saturday at the start of the dinner to benefit
a Haitian orphanage. The event was organized by the
Multicultural American Nurses Organization at the Punta
Gorda Isles Civic Association.





OurTown Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


Deadline nears for Positive Aging Symposium


STAFF REPORT

Friday is the regis-
tration deadline set
for the Positive Aging
Symposium planned
for Feb. 7, at the
Edison State College
Auditorium.
The daylong program
is designed around
informal panel dis-
cussions on topics of
interest to Charlotte
County's older residents
and those engaged in


serving this age group.
The Positive Aging
Symposium has as its
theme Four Keys to a
Health and Fulfilling Life
After 50 and is spon-
sored by the United Way
of Charlotte County, the
Friendship Centers and
Edison State College.
Representatives from
the state's Area Agency
on Aging: Senior Choices
and Charlotte County
Elder Services will be
on hand to provide


information and answer
questions. There will be
time for networking and
a sharing of ideas.
"Older residents
have been enriching
the Charlotte County
community for many
years," said Carrie
Blackwell Hussey, United
Way executive director.
"We're hoping to height-
en the awareness of
available services and
opportunities that can
only enrich their lives as


well as helping to build a
better community for all
of us."
Discussion topics
include:
Financial planning
Physical fitness
Nutrition
Chronic disease
self-management
Mental health
Local resources for
support
Social and communi-
ty engagement.
A $10 registration


fee for the event, set
for 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
will include a conti-
nental breakfast and
box lunch. To register,
call Karen Amador at
941-276-4075. Checks


made out to the United
Way can be mailed
to Karen's attention
at South Port Square,
23023 Westchester
Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL
33980.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Rat Pack
Together Again
The Rat Pack is playing
at 7 p.m. Friday at the
North Port Performing
Arts Center at North Port
High School. For tickets,
call 866-406-7722.

'Medicare
Assistance
& More'
"Medicare Assistance
& More" is held 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Thursday in
the North Port Library
conference room, 13800
S. Tamiami Trail.
The library offers
one-on-one Medicare
counseling sessions with
a trained counselor.
All services are free
and unbiased. Review
your Medicare Part
D, Advantage and/or
Medigap plans. To make
an appointment, call
866-413-5337.

Deadline set
to file property
tax returns
The Charlotte County
Property Appraiser
reminds business and
rental property owners
the deadline for filing
2014 Tangible Personal
Property Tax Returns is
April 1, 2014. A return
must be filed by April 1
to receive the $25,000
exemption. However
if a blue postcard was
received, filing the
return has been waived,
unless additional assets



BIDS

FROM PAGE 1

includes a response to
an "invitation to bid," an
"invitation to negotiate,"
a "request for a quote" or
a "request for proposals."
Maki said he wasn't
sure what type of bid
Walton showed Solero.
'All I know is it was
not a sealed bid," Maki
said. "The way it was
explained to me is sealed
bids cannot be shown
ahead of time. If it were a



CLINIC

FROM PAGE 1

and care, make ap-
pointments and keep
them, and manage their
condition before health
issues escalate, requiring
hospitalization, said
Dr. Asjad Khan, who
practices in pediatric
endocrinology.
"Caroline is much
better," he said. "The
longer you go without
diagnoses, the symptoms
get worse and worse."



SECURITY
FROM PAGE 1

line on Manasota Key,
the Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office is expect-
ed to have patrols on its
side of the key.
The CCSO also plans to
have bicycle and motor-
cycle officers patrolling


obtained since 2008
result in a total value
exceeding $25,000.
For questions, call
941-743-1476.

Thrift store
donations needed
Giving Hope Thrift
Store, 1851 Englewood
Road, Englewood, is in
need of donations. The
organization works with
local churches and the
Senior Friendship Center
of Venice. It also works to
help the homeless in this
area, and to help people
keep their pets. Pickup
and delivery are avail-
able. For more informa-
tion, call 941-460-8110.

Video bowling
tourney at
AMVETS 312
On Saturday starting
at 2 p.m., AMVETS Post
312, 7050 Chancellor
Blvd, North Port, will
hold its first Red, White
and Blue Video Bowling
Tournament between
Post 312, AMVETS Post
2000 andVFW Post 8203.
Teams will be com-
prised of eight bowlers
from each post. Entry
fees are $100 per post
and $10 per individual
bowler. Bowlers will
each receive a free
beverage, chili and ticket
for a "basket of cheer"
raffle being held that
afternoon. AMVETS 312
has three video bowling
machines, and each
team will play one game


sealed bid, then it would
have been a different
story."
Maki wasn't sure why
the bid documents
were shown in a vacant
building by a mainte-
nance worker instead of
at City Hall by a building
official.
The statute says it
unlawful to "disclose
material information
concerning a bid or other
aspects of the compet-
itive bidding process
when such information
is not publicly dis-
closed." It is "unlawful to


The clinic offers
a comprehensive
range of specialized
medical treatment for
children from birth
through age 18. Doctors
trained in a long list of
specialty treatments
rotate through the
clinic, depending on
need: hematology/
oncology, infectious
disease, endocrinology,
nephrology, pediatric
surgery, pulmonology,
gastroenterology and
neurology.
When Khan first
arrived at Golisano

the neighborhoods on
South Manasota Key. A
command post will be
established on Manasota
Key.
"We know it will be
very congested," Caparo
said. Organizers expect
as many as 80,000
spectators attending the
boat race. "This will be
a learning experience.
This is brand new for


on each of the machines.
Various prizes will be
awarded to individuals
for each game, and
end-of-tournament
prizes will be awarded,
including a team (trav-
eling) trophy, which
the winning team may
display at their post until
the next tourney. There
will be an $80 award
for high series, and a
super prize of $1,000
for anyone shooting a
perfect game.
The basket of cheer
will be raffled following
the bowling tournament,
and a chili dump will be
held at 5 p.m. at a cost
of $5, followed by live
music.
Tourney proceeds will
support the AMVETS 312
Honor Guard, which par-
ticipates in military rites
for our departed veterans
and shares its love of our
country and the flag at var-
ious programs throughout
the community. Members
of all three posts and their
guests are encouraged to
come out and cheer their
team to victory. For more
information, call AMIVETS
312 at 941-429-5403.

Nature walks
offered
The Charlotte Harbor
Environmental Center
will hold free guided
nature walks at 10 a.m.
every Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday at Alligator
Creek Preserve, 10941
Burnt Store Road, Punta
Gorda. Trained volunteer


intentionally provide a
competitive advantage to
any person who submits
a bid."
Space Coast Fire
& Safety of Merritt
Island, Fla., bid $8,278;
SimplexGrinnell of
Tampa bid $9,185;
Southwest Florida
Alarm of North Port bid
$10,270; and Integrated
Systems of Florida in
Oldsmar bid $14,490.
Space Coast was awarded
the alarm contract.
A sales representative
from Space Coast said
he was not offered to


Children's Hospital in
2007, there was no other
pediatric endocrinologist
between Tampa and
Miami.
"I saw the opportunity
immediately, and the
chance to build on it," he
said.
For a time, Khan and
other pediatric special-
ists operated out of the
Family Health Center in
Port Charlotte, but that
service was discontin-
ued in 2012. However,
after seeing 25 young
patients come to his en-
docrinology clinic twice

Manasota Key."
Caparo stressed several
times that the boat race
venue is promoted as
a "no-parking event,"
meaning no parking
will be permitted on
Manasota Key and specta-
tors will be discouraged
from trying to drop off
passengers at Englewood
Beach. Instead, organizers
have identified parking


guides lead walkers
through the trails found
at CHEC, giving everyone
an opportunity to learn
more about Florida
plants, animals and
ecosystems. Participants
are to meet at the sign-in
the parking lot. For more
information, contact
Eileen Tramontana at
941-575-5435.

Charlotte County
Owner's Manual
The latest edition of the
Charlotte County Owner's
Manual is available with
updated information
about Charlotte County
and Punta Gorda gov-
ernment departments
and services. The booklet
provides listings for trans-
portation, parks, hospitals
and more for current and
new residents of Charlotte
County. The manual is
available online at www.
CharlotteCountyFL.
gov. Go to the "Public
Information & CC-TV"
department page and
click "Owner's Manual"
on the left. The booklet is
not available in print. For
more information, call
941-623-1092.

Youth violence
art exhibit at
Sarasota library
North Sarasota Library,
2801 Newtown Blvd.,
Sarasota, is hosting the
nationally recognized
art exhibit "Kin Killin'
Kin," by artist James Pate,
through Feb. 22.


see bids ahead of time
because "that's not the
way it's typically done."
He said the company had
no other comment.
City Purchasing
Manager Ginny Duyn
said there are several
processes for soliciting
bids, depending on the
dollar amount in the
contract.
"Requests for quotes
can be done at the
department level for
requests under $50,000,"
Duyn said.
The bid documents
are gathered by a


a month, Khan knew
there was demand.
"We saw the volume
existed. The need was
there," he said.
At the new Pediatric
Specialty Clinic in
Murdock, Khan treats
children for a wide
variety of conditions, in-
cluding thyroid, diabetes
and obesity.
"These are services
that were nonexistent in
Charlotte County. The
community was starved
for it," he said.
This is the second spe-
cialty clinic established

areas on the mainland
and will provide bus ser-
vice to shuttle spectators
to the event.
"There isn't going to
be anywhere to pull off,
and they won't be able
to stop on the street (on
Manasota Key)," he said.
"(Spectators) should take
advantage of the bus
transportation that will
be provided."


"Kin Killin' Kin" is a na-
tionally traveling exhibit
organized by EbonNia
Gallery and Shango:
Center for the Study of
African American Art and
Culture.
The show at North
Sarasota Library will be
the first time the exhibit
has been available to the
public in Florida. Pate
describes his artistic style
as techno-cubism. He
began developing the
exhibit in 2000 as a way
to facilitate conversation
about the growing issue
of youth violence in
communities across the
country.
The free exhibit
will be available for
viewing during select
times Monday through
Saturday until Feb. 22.
For more information,
visit www.sarasotaarts.
org or contact the
Sarasota County Call
Center at 941-861-5000.

Luncheon
series offered
The Friends of the
Punta Gorda Library will
hold the 2014 Literary
Luncheon Series at
11 a.m. Tuesday at the
Isles Yacht Club, 1780
W Marion Ave., Punta
Gorda. At this event, lit-
erary actor Ted Zalewski
will present "Mind, Body
and Spirit." Zalewski's
presentation will give
you insight into Teddy
Roosevelt the man.
The cost for the
luncheon is $40 for


department supervisor
and then submitted
to the Purchasing
Department to deter-
mine if the bidder met
all of the qualifications.
Then the bids are open
to the public after the
bidding process is com-
plete. Bids over $50,000
are handled at the
Purchasing Department
level.
Duyn said the city
doesn't generally "share
other quotes" during the
bidding process.
Scott Williams, who
oversees the Building


as part of Golisano
Children's Hospital. The
first opened in Collier
County in 2011.
"We opened a similar
clinic in Naples," said
Mary Briggs, director of
media relations for Lee
Memorial Health System.
'After the first year we
had to expand it, and we
expect the same thing to
happen here."
Now the challenge
is to let patients and
family practice physi-
cians know the service is
available.
"It's building slowly,

CCSO officers also
will be patrolling State
Road 776 to alleviate
any traffic hot spots on
the mainland at parking
areas and wherever else
traffic control is needed,
Caparo said.
Working with home-
owners worried about
the noise from bands and
other activities, Caparo
said he assured them the


members, or $45 for non-
members. All proceeds
will benefit the Friends
of the Punta Gorda
Library. For ticketing
information, contact Jerri
Marsee at 941-613-9048
or jmarsee@comcast.net.

Englewood
CRA meeting
The Englewood
Community
Redevelopment Area
meets at 3 p.m. Feb. 13
and the second Thursday
of every month at its
new location at 1398
Old Englewood Road, in
the Englewood Center
for Sustainability. For
more information, call
941-473-9795.

Federal
employees
to meet
The Peace River
Chapter of the National
Active and Retired Federal
Employees Association
will hold a meeting at
11 a.m. Tuesday at the
Deep Creek Elks Lodge,
1133 Capricorn Blvd.
Lunch will be at 11 a.m.,
followed by a business
meeting. Jane Lemley,
NARFE Florida execu-
tive vice president, will
be the featured guest
speaker. She will discuss
"News from NARFE." All
active and retired federal
employees, their guests
and prospective members
are welcome. For more
information, call Lois
Todd at 941-575-4252.


Division, was not
interviewed during the
investigation.
"All processes for bids
are regulated pretty
tight," he said. "The
police did their investi-
gation and they didn't
find anything. They did it
without including me."
Spreduto was un-
available for comment
Wednesday. City
Manager Jonathan Lewis
could not be reached
for comment late
Wednesday.

Email: eallen@sun-heraldx.com


but the response has
been tremendous
from local doctors and
patients," Khan said. "It's
a partnership we want to
grow."
The Golisano
Children's Hospital
of Southwest Florida
Pediatric Specialty
Clinic is located at
18316 Murdock Circle,
Suite 106. Office hours
are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
For more information,
call 941-235-4900.

Email: groberts@sun-herald.com

boat race should wind
down between 5 p.m. to
7p.m.
Private property owners
will have the responsibili-
ty to protect their parking
areas from unwanted
spectators. Law enforce-
ment agencies do not
have the authority to tow
vehicles from private
property, Caparo said.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


IF YOU GO
What: Positive Aging Symposium
When: 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 7
Where: Edison State College Charlotte Campus Auditorium, 6300
Airport Road, Punta Gorda
Registration: $10
Contact: Karen Amador, 941-276-4075





The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 7


Program brings out students' inner leader


By PAUL FALLON
SUN CORRESPONDENT

PUNTA GORDA- Neil
Armstrong Elementary
School fifth-grader Eric
Durbin isn't just a stu-
dent at the school, he's
also a valued leader.
And Durbin credits his
newfound leadership
skills to a worldwide
program aptly dubbed
The Leader in Me.
Durbin gave a presen-
tation at a The Leader
in Me symposium held
at the Charlotte Harbor
Event & Conference
Center on Wednesday
morning, which
happened to be his
1lth birthday.
Before becoming
involved in The Leader
in Me program, Durbin
had a hard time speaking
in front of large crowds,
he said.
"But just look at me
now," he told about 350
educators assembled at
the Event Center.
Durbin isn't just hon-
ing his public speaking
skills. He also is a mentor
to other students at the


school as well as par-
ticipating in the Honor
Society and numerous
other activities.
"I think my favorite
part is being a mentor,"
he said.
The Leader in Me is
a program designed to
improve education by
providing children with
skills in areas such as
leadership and creative
thinking. The program
teaches skills not ad-
dressed in traditional
curriculum, such as lead-
ership, prioritization and
teamwork. The program
is based on the work of
author Stephen R. Covey,
whose "7 Habits" prod-
ucts are widely used in
area schools.
Educators from around
Florida as well as from
Georgia, South Carolina
and as far away as Illinois
attended the three-day
symposium to hear
about the benefits of the
program.
The symposium began
Tuesday, and educators
began touring a few of
The Leader in Me schools
in the county Wednesday.


Work sessions on the
program are being
held today at the Event
Center.
The tours were held
at Sallie Jones, Neil
Armstrong and Vineland
elementary schools and
Punta Gorda Middle
School.
Charlotte County
Schools began imple-
menting The Leader
in Me program about
five years ago, said
Chuck Bradley, assis-
tant superintendent
of learning. Now, each
of the county's 10
elementary schools has
enacted the program,
Superintendent Doug
Whittaker said.
Punta Gorda and L.A.
Ainger middle schools
have also enacted the
program.
Whittaker is very
pleased with the pro-
gram's results.
"What I really like is it
helps kids take respon-
sibility for themselves,"
he said. "Before they
can lead others, they
have to learn to lead
themselves."


The program has
helped decrease be-
havioral problems and
tardiness in schools and
it has increased atten-
dance, Whittaker said.
The benefits of the
program will only
increase throughout the
county as students who
have participated since
elementary begin moving
into high schools, he
said.
Rachel Larrison, a
fourth-grade teacher
at Neil Armstrong,
also strongly supports
the program, saying it
empowers students to
take ownership of their
education.
"When you believe in
the student they believe
in themselves," she said.
Punta Gorda Middle
School Principal Cathy
Corsaletti said the
program was exciting to
watch in action.
"I think the biggest
benefit to the program
is that the students are
truly inspired to feel
good about themselves
and to take charge,"
said Corsaletti, who will


SUN PHOTO BY PAUL FALLON
Eric Durbin, a fifth-grader at Neil Armstrong Elementary School,
points to the crowd of educators gathered at The Leader in Me
symposium at the Charlotte Harbor Event & Conference Center
during his presentation Wednesday.


take over as principal of
Charlotte High School
later this year.
Sallie Jones Elementary
School Principal Jennie
Hoke also believes the


program is beneficial to
her approximately 600
students.
"The program increas-
es the students' love of
learning," she said.


PGT to get tax break for expansion


By SCOTT LOCKWOOD
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY-
Sarasota County is grant-
ing one of the area's largest
employers a tax break
after they have pledged to
add over 200 jobs in their
upcoming expansion.
PGT Industries of
Venice, which is one of the
nation's leading manufac-
turers of glass, is getting a
100 percent exemption on
ad-valorem taxes for the
planned expansion of its
manufacturing plant for
glass-cutting, tempering
and laminating processes
after a unanimous vote
by the Sarasota County
Commission. The Venice
City Council also approved
the exemption Tuesday.
The company, which
has workers from all
over the North Port, Port
Charlotte andVenice
areas, plans to invest
$3.1 million in real prop-
erty improvements and
an additional $4.5 million
in personal property.
Overall they are planning
a $12 million investment


into their property.
According to the county,
PGT will create a total of
220 new full-time jobs
by June 1, 2018, with
an estimated average
wage of $20,800 for
all non-management
jobs and an estimated
average wage of $50,000
for all management jobs.
Commissioners scoffed at
the wages before hearing
from PGT's Tim Durham,
who said the company
hires someone with little
to no experience, trains
them and gives them a
substantial pay increase
and promotion at the end
of their training, which is
usually around six months
to a year. Durham, who
said he started at one of
the entry-level positions
over 17 years ago as a way
to pay his way through
college, is an example of
PGT's in-house on-the-job
training program.
That job training
program coupled with the
company's community
involvement proved to
be a selling point for
Commissioner Nora


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Police
department
seeks sponsors
The Punta Gorda
Police Department now
seeks sponsors for its
summer youth basket-
ball league Jammers.
The Jammers youth
basketball program
has become one of
the premier leagues
in Charlotte County.
The league which is
totally free to children
- provides the young
players with uniforms,
trophies, and other
surprises throughout
the summer. Punta
Gorda police officers
are coaching eight
teams this year.
Sponsors are needed
in order to keep this
basketball league
completely free for
the children and their
parents. Team spon-
sors, which is a $300
donation, will receive
their companies' name
on the back of their re-
spective team's jerseys
and website recogni-
tion. League sponsors,
with a minimum $100
donation, will receive
recognition on banners
and on the website.
Punta Gorda police
officers started the
Jammers basketball


program in 2001 as
a way to reach at-
risk youth in public
housing. For more
information, to spon-
sor a team, or make a
donation, call Lt. Joe
King at 941-575-5525,
or email jking@pgorda.
us. For more informa-
tion on Jammers, visit
www.ci.punta-gorda.
fl.us/depts/police/
jammers.html.

Governor to visit
Sarasota today
Florida Gov. Rick
Scott is coming to
Sarasota today. An
evening reception fea-
turing the Republican
governor will be held
at 5 p.m. at Gold Coast
Eagle Distributing,
7051 Wireless Court,
Sarasota. The event
at the beer brew-
ing company is a
$500-per-person
private fundraiser,
with the donations
going toward Scott's
campaign.
Scott, elected
governor in 2010, is
running for re-election
in November. RSVP to
Sarasota Republican
Party chairman Joe
Gruters at JoeGruters@
gmail.com or
941-914-2004.


Patterson, who seemed
to be leaning against
voting for the 100 percent
exemption. Durham
said PGT has outreach
programs with the Boys
& Girls Clubs in Sarasota
County and work with the
Loveland Center inVenice.
They've also donated
windows to various places
in the county, including a
recent donation to a local
military veteran who had
just retired.
Other commissioners
were pleased with what
they heard about PGT's
training programs.
"For me, the beauty of
what this company does
is the opportunity it gives
for on the job training,"
Commissioner Carolyn
Mason said. "I'm a big
proponent of OJT and
I've been privy to that on
several occasions in my
adult life. I think it makes
for a better and more
committed employee and
I really applaud PGT for
honoring that because
a lot of companies don't
offer that."
Commission Chairman


PROVIDED BY
ALL FArITHS FOOD BANK
SARASOTA COUNTY -
The Florida Department
of Agriculture and
Consumer Services
contracts with All
Faiths Food Bank in
Sarasota to distribute
free U.S. Department of
Agriculture commodities.
In February, eligible
Sarasota County residents
will receive nine to 12 free
commodities.
Distribution in South
County will be at these
sites:

North Port
S9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Feb. 7 and 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Feb. 20 at St. Nathaniel's
Episcopal Church, 4200 S.
Biscayne Drive
9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Feb. 14 and 28 atVFW
Post 8203, 4860 Trott
Circle.

Englewood
6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.


Charles Hines said he was
ready to stick with the
83 percent exemption it
usually uses as an incen-
tive, but changed his mind
when hearing about how
PGT trains and promotes
its employees.
"PGT is one of the stars
that we look to on how to
do things going back to
when they were in down-
townVenice," Commission
Chairman Charles Hines
added. "This isn't some-
thing where you're going
to hire someone at $8-$10
an hour and that's where
they stay. There's a path to
move forward and that's
what makes this different."
Around 5 percent of
PGT 's annual sales of
$241 million occur within
the metropolitan statistical
area, which includes North
Port, Venice, Bradenton
and Sarasota. If the full tax
abatement were granted
for 2014, for example, the
exemption would equal
$23,425. The decision
will save the company
approximately $200,000
over the 10-year period.
Email: slo(idwood@siun-herald.om


Feb. 4 and 18 at Suncoast
Christian Life Center, 881
S. River Road.

Venice
8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Feb. 5 atVenice
Community Center, 326 S.
Nokomis Ave.

Laurel
2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Feb. 19 at Laurel Civic
Association, 509 Collins
Road. Call 941-483-3338.

Nokomis
1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Feb. 13 and 27 at the mo-
bile pantry at Nokomis
Park, 234 Nippino Trail.
Eligibility for the emer-
gency food program is
determined by household
size and income. Those
who receive food stamps
are automatically eligible,
and recipients must sign
a declaration of need.
For more information
about the program, call
941-379-6333.


TRESPASS ORDINANCE APPROVED
Sarasota County Commissioners unanimously approved an ordinance
Wednesday that will allow authorized county employees and law
enforcement officers to issue trespass warnings on county-owned
properties.
According to the ordinance, a trespass warning could be issued to
someone who is exhibiting unlawful and inappropriate behavior that
is jeopardizing public safety or the enjoyment of public facilities. The
proposed ordinance would allow anyone using inappropriate language
or those in violation of posted rules or laws to be issued the warning.
If someone is issued a trespass warning, they would be banned
from the property where they were issued a trespass warning for one
year. Properties covered under the proposed ordinance include parks,
recreation centers, libraries, Sarasota County Area Transit facilities and
county office buildings.
"I think it's important for us to have such an ordinance for those
times when these occurrences may happen;' Commissioner Carolyn
Mason said. "I'm not saying it happens all the time, but in the event
that it does there's something on the books to address it. There's
nothing like being at an event and something does happen. This gives
us a level of protection for people attending and participating in events
at these venues."
County Commissioners also approved a $300,000 loan to Habitat
for Humanity that will go toward the acquisition, rehabilitation, and
reconstruction of existing single-family homes to provide affordable
housing within the county. Over the last three years, the organization
has produced 33 homes and the loan will help go toward 12 more
homes. Documents show that Habitat plans to spend about $60,000 on
each home.
The loan is an interest-free loan and will be repaid when Habitat
receives its portion of Mortgage Settlement Funds that is allocated by
the Florida Legislature. An identical $300,000 loan was made to Habitat
for Humanity of Sarasota County.



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February Rates
Before 8am 40+tax
8am-12pm $49+tax
12-2pm 45+tax
2-close S24+tax
5456 Greenwood Ave.
North Port, FL 34287
o off Sumter Blvd


All Faiths food


distribution in


Sarasota County







Our Town Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, January 30, 2014


3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME
L 3112 ^


1/30/2014
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to
Section 865.09,
Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of FitHab located at
4279 Harbor Blvd, in the County
of Charlotte, in the City of Port
Charlotte, Florida 33952 intends
to register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
Dated at Punta Gorda, Florida,
this day of, 2014.
/s/ ASHLEY P. OLSON. LLC
Publish: January 30, 2014
243045 2995651
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to
Section 865.09,
Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of FITNESS HABIT
located at 4279 Harbor Blvd, in
the County of Charlotte, in the
City of Port Charlotte, Florida
33952 intends to register the
said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Punta Gorda, Florida,
this day of, 2014.
/s/ ASHLEY P. OLSON. LLC
Publish: January 30, 2014
243045 2995640

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!

NOTICE OF ACTION
Z^ 3116


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NUMBER:
2013-000947-CP
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
KIRK E. GOTTWALS,
Deceased,
Kemp & Associates, Inc., as
Owner and Holder of a Partial
Assignment of Interest of Chris-
tine Beall, Edward L. Campbell,
Scott R. Campbell, and Martha
Heironimus,
Petitioner,
V.
ROBIN VAZQUEZ, as Personal
Representative of the Estate of
Kirk E. Gottwals, Deceased,
Christine Beall, Edward L. Camp-
bell, Scott R. Campbell, and
Martha Heironimus, Sally Jane
Grimm Kreidt, AND ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN OR UNASCER-
TAINED BENEFICIARIES,
CLAIMANTS, HEIRS OR OTHER
PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST
IN THE ESTATE OF KIRK E.
GOTTWALS, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THEM.
Respondents.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Any and All Unknown or
Unascertained Beneficiaries,
Claimants or Heirs of Kirk E.
Gottwals and All Other
Persons Claiming By,
Through, under or Against
Them
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Peti-
tion to Determine Beneficiaries
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on Sherri M. Stinson, Petition-
ers' attorney, whose address is
569 S. Duncan Avenue, Clearwa-
ter, Florida 33756-6255, on or
before 2-21-14, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this court
either before service on Petition-
ers' attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
Dated December _7,2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
As Clerk of the Court
By: C. Folcik
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: January 9, 16, 23 and
30, 2014.
327219 2986645


AUCTION
wom 3119

PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
941-639-4000
AUCTION DATE 2/17/14
AT 10:00 AM
2002 FORD
VIN# 2FMZA51412BB91430
Pulbish: January 30, 2014
103614 2995697


AUCTION

WO 3119^^

NOTICE OF AUCTION
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN THAT SS
OSPREY, LLC D/B/A SIMPLY SELF STOR-
AGE LOCATED AT 660 SOUTH TAMIAMI
TRAIL, OSPREY, FL 34229 INTENDS TO
SELL OR OTHERWISE DISPOSE OF THE
PERSONAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED
BELOW TO ENFORCE A LIEN IMPOSED
ON SAID PROPERTY UNDER THE FLORI-
DA SELF DISPOSITION OF THE FOLLOW-
ING PROPERTY WILL TAKE PLACE
(UNLESS OTHERWISE WITHDRAWN) VIA
AN ON-LINE AUCTION AT
WWW.STORAGEBATTLES.COM ON
2/13/14 BEGINNING AT APPROXIMATELY
1:00 P.M. AND CONCLUDING ON
2/24/14 AT APPROXIMATELY 1:00 P.M.
THIS PUBLIC SALE WILL RESULT IN THE
GOODS BEING SOLD TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDER. CERTAIN TERMS AND CONDI-
TIONS APPLY:
1003 Brandon Bruge
2025 DeAnne Owen
Publish: Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 2014
361847 2994180

S NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
^^ 120O^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM J. VITIELLO
a/k/a WILLIAM VITIELLO
Deceased.
File No. 14000103CP
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of William J. Vitiello a/k/a William
Vitiello, deceased, whose date of
death was November 22, 2012,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Charlotte County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
350 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda,
FL 33950. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is January 30, 2014.
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Fletcher H. Rush
Florida Bar Number: 100586
Farr, Farr, Emerich, Hackett
and Carr, P.A.
99 Nesbit Street
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Telephone: (941) 639-1158
Fax: (941) 639-0028
E-Mail: frush@farr.com
Secondary E-Mail:
brussell@farr.com and
probate@farr.com
Personal Representative:
Kenneth Klose
17 Van Ethel Drive
Matawan, New Jersey 07747
Publish: 1/30/14 and 2/6/14
114849 2995632
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
MARY A. MACKEWICH,
Deceased.
Probate No. 14-50-CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMAND
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an
Order of Summary Administration
has been entered in the estate of
MARY A. MACKEWICH,
deceased, on January 17, 2014
having File Number 14-50-CP by
the Circuit Court for Charlotte
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 350 East
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950 that the total value
of the estate approximately
$40.000.00 and that the names
and addresses of those to whom
it has been assigned by such
order are:
JOSEPH C. MACKEWICH,
4368 E. Barlind Dr.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15227
JAMES M. MACKEWICH
5815 Wallace Ave.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15102
JEFFREY MACKEWICH
45 Owendale Ave,
Pittsburgh, PA 15227
JANE C. COLLLINS
2408 Academy Ave,
Holmes, PA 19043
All persons are required to file
with the Clerk of said Court


WITHIN 3 CALENDAR
MONTHS FROM TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE all claims against the
estate in the form and manner
prescribed by Section 733.703
of the Florida Statutes and Rule
5.490 of the Florida Rules of Pro-
bate and Guardianship Procedure.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has


L NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
^ 3120O

begun on January 30, 2014.
J. MICHAEL ROONEY ESQ.
Attorneys for Petitioner
Post Office Box 510400
Punta Gorda, FL 33951-0400
Fla. Bar No. 157880
(941) 639-2591
trabuelaw@yahoo.com
Publish: 1/30/14 and 2/6/14
121501 2993678

| NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
k^ 3122^^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No. 08-2009-CA-004366
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
JENNIFER L. TARTABINI, ET AL.
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Final Judgement of
Foreclosure dated, in the above
action, I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at Charlotte, Florida,
on March 7. 2014, at 11:00 AM,
at WWW.CHARLOTTE.REALFORE-
CLOSE.COM for the following
described property:
LOT 59, BLOCK 4927, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 93, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,
PAGES 1A THROUGH 1Z4
INCLUSIVE, IN THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale. The
Court, in its discretion, may
enlarge the time of the sale.
Notice of the changed time of
sale shall be published as provid-
ed herein.
DATED: November 20, 2013
By: Kristy P.
Deputy Clerk of Court
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Charlotte County, John
Embury, Administrative Ser-
vices Manager at (941) 637-
2110, fax 941-637-2283 or
at jembury@ca.cjis20.org,
Administrative Services, 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, FL 33950 at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Publish: January 23 & 30, 2014
295673 2992110
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 2012-000109-CA
RESIDENTIAL CREDIT
SOLUTIONS, INC.,
Plaintiff
vs.
RICHARD LEE MONTOGMERY,
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RICHARD
LEE MONTGOMERY, SOUTH GULF
COVE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIA-
TION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT
#1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure filed November 12, 2013
entered in Civil Case No. 2012-
000109-CA of the Circuit Court of
the Twentieth Judicial Circuit in
and for Charlotte County, Punta
Gorda, Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
in accordance with Chapter 45
Florida Statutes at 11:00 AM on
the 7 day of March, 2014 on the
following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment:
Lot 33, Block 4580, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION
SECTION 87, according to the
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 7, Pages 20A to
20N inclusive, in the Public
Records of Charlotte County,
Florida.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any. other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendes must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated this 19 day of November,
2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
By: Kristv P.
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose
office is located at 350 E.


Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is (941)
637-2110, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I
^^3122^^

than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Publish: January 23 & 30, 2014
338038 2992152

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12003294CA
GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC
Plaintiff
vs.
DEBORAH L. COX, et al
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of foreclosure dated
November 12. 2013 and entered
in Case No. 12003294CA of the
Circuit Court of the TWENTIETH
Judicial Circuit in and for CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, wherein
OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is
Plaintiff, and DEBORAH L. COX, et
al are Defendants, the clerk will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m.
at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, in accordance with Chapter 45,
Florida Statutes, on the 7 day of
March, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgement,
to wit:
LOT 21, BLOCK 805, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 27, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 20-A
THROUGH 20-F1, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus funds from the sale,
if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, this 20
day of November 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: Kristv P.
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any acco-
modation to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provi-
sion of certain assistance.
Please contact the Adminis-
trative Services Manager
whose office is located at 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
Publish: January 23 & 30, 2014
336737 2992123
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12003328CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAYMOND LEARY, et al
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pusuant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of foreclosure dated
November 12. 2013 and entered
in Case No. 12003328CA of the
Circuit Court of the TWENTIETH
Judicial Circuit in and for CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, wherein
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plain-
tiff, and RAYMOND LEARY, et al
are Defendants, the clerk will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, in accordance with Chapter 45,
Florida Statutes, on the 7 day of
March, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to
wit:
LOT 6, BLOCK 50 OF PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 4 A SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 87A
THROUGH 87D OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming interest in
the surplus funds from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, this 19th
day of November, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: Kristv P.
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any acco-
modation to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provi-
sion of certain assistance.
Plase contact the Administra-
tive Services Manager whose
office is located at 350 E.


Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is (941)
637-2281, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
Publish: January 23 & 30, 2014
336737 2992133


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 2013-CA-000085
CitiMortgage, Inc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Mary Myers; et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated October 14, 2013,
entered in Case No. 2013-CA-
000085 of the Circuit Court of
the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, in and
for DeSoto County, Florida,
wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. is the
Plaintiff and Mary Myers;
Unknown Spouse of Mary Myers;
HSBC Bank Nevada, N.A. as suc-
cessor in interest to Direct Mer-
chants Credit Card Bank, N.A.;
HSBC Bank Nevada, N.A. FKA
Household Bank (SB), N.A.; Unit-
ed States of America on behalf of
the Secretary of Housing and
Urban Development; Unknown
Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2
are the Defendants, that the Clerk
of Courts will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at, the
south door of the courthouse at
115 East Oak Street, Arcadia, FL
34266, beginning at 11:00 on
the 20th day of February, 2014,
the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT 7 OF ELLER AND HURST
SECOND ADDITION, AN
UNRECORDED PLAT, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 37
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
40' WEST ALONG NORTH
LINE OF SAID TRACT, 245.0
FEET; THENCE SOUTH AND
PARALLEL TO EAST LINE OF
SAID TRACT, 149.0 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SAME
LINE, 75.0 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 40'
WEST, 248.67 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 75.0 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 40'
EAST; 248.67 FEET TO
POINT OF BEGINNING, IN
PUBLIC RECORDS OF DESO-
TO COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH 1987
FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME
VIN #AFLWE1AG347500465
Dated this 27 day of January,
2014.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
Attorney for Plaintiff
1501 N.W. 49th Street,
Suite 200
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309
Phone: (954) 618-6955,
ext. 6209
Fax: (954) 618-6954
FLCourtDocs@brockandscott.co
m
By Jimmy Edwards. Esq.
Florida Bar No. 81855
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in a court proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance: Please contact
DeSoto County Jury Office,
115 East Oak Street, Arcadia,
Florida 34266. Telephone:
(863) 993-4876. If you are
hearing or voice impaired,
please call 711.
Publish: 1/30/14 and 2/6/14
349911 2995765
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 13-CA-2667
IBERIABANK,
a Louisiana state bank,
Plaintiff.
v.
DIANE PASQUAZZI a/k/a DIANE
M. PASQUAZZI, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DIANE PASQUAZZI
a/k/a DIANE M. PASQUAZZI, and
UNKNOWN TENANTS in posses-
sion of 239 Waterway Circle, Port
Charlotte, Florida, 33952,
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that
pursuant to a Summary Judgment
in Foreclosure entered in the
above-entitled cause in the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Charlotte County,
Florida, I will sell at public sale
that certain parcel of real proper-
ty, situated in Charlotte County,
Florida, more particularly
described below, to the highest
bidder for cash, at the Charlotte
County Justice Center, 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda, FL
33951-1687, in accordance with
section 45.031, Florida Statutes,
using the following method
(CHECK ONE), on the 10 day of
March, 2014.
[ ] At 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, FL 33951-
1687, beginning at ___
a.m./p.m. on the prescribed
date.
[ X ] By electronic sale begin-
ning at 11:00 a.m. on the pre-
scribed date at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com (list
name of website).


LOT 40, BLOCK 29, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 3, ACCORDING TO
THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF,
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGES 35A THROUGH
35C, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I
^^ 3122^^

owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
DATED this 9 day of Decem-
ber, 2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT, CLERK
Circuit Court of Charlotte County
By J. Miles
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact our offices at the Charlotte
County Justice Center, 350 E.
Marion Avenue, P.O. Box
511687, Punta Gorda, FL 33951-
1687, (941) 637-2199, within
seven working days of your
receipt of this Notice.
Publish: January 23 & 30, 2014
366622 2992189

NOTICE OF SALE

LZ: 3130 ^

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
ABLE WRECKER & ROAD SER-
VICE LLC gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on 02/13/2014,
08:00 am at 5135 NE CUBITIS
AVENUE ARCADIA, FL 34266,
pursuant to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes. ABLE
WRECKER & ROAD SERVICE LLC
reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.
1GMDXO3EXXD105938
1999 Pontiac
Publish: January 30, 2014
108133 2995694

OTHER NOTICES

L ^ 138 ^

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND
SECURITY
FEDERAL EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT AGENCY
Proposed Flood Hazard Deter-
minations for the Unincorpo-
rated Areas of Charlotte
County, Florida, and Case No.
14-04-0645P The Department
of Homeland Security's Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) solicits technical informa-
tion or comments on proposed
flood hazard determinations for
the Flood Insurance Rate Map
(FIRM), and where applicable, the
Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report
for your community. These flood
hazard determinations may
include the addition or modifica-
tion of Base Flood Elevations,
base flood depths, Special Flood
Hazard Area boundaries or zone
designations, or the regulatory
floodway. The FIRM and, if applic-
able, the FIS report have been
revised to reflect these flood haz-
ard determinations through
issuance of a Letter of Map Revi-
sion (LOMR), in accordance with
Title 44, Part 65 of the Code of
Federal Regulations. These
determinations are the basis for
the floodplain management mea-
sures that your community is
required to adopt or show evi-
dence of having in effect to quali-
fy or remain qualified for partici-
pation in the National Flood Insur-
ance Program. For more infor-
mation on the proposed flood
hazard determinations and infor-
mation on the statutory 90-day
period provided for appeals,
please visit FEMA's website at
www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm
/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Infor-
mation eXchange (FMIX) toll free
at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-
2627).
Publish: January 23 & 30, 2014
265682 2991725
PUBLIC NOTICE
Hon. Paul A. Stamoulis
Charlotte County Supervisor
of Elections
FL Statute: 98.075(7)(a)2
The following names have been
submitted to our office by the
Clerk of Circuit Court on a list of
voters that may be ineligible to
vote and have not had their right
to vote restored. Pursuant to
Florida Statute 98.075 (7)(a)3 our
office is required to remove these
names from the voter rolls if this
information is correct.
This list may contain incorrect
information and the persons list-
ed have 30 days from the date of
this notice to contact the Char-
lotte County Supervisor of Elec-
tions to resolve this matter.
For further assistance, please
contact:
Hon. Paul A. Stamoulis
Supervisor of Elections
226 Taylor St Rm. 120
Punta Gorda, FL
33950-4458
941-833-5400
Blume, Robert B
21224 Davison Ave
Port Charlotte,33954
Goforth, Tony
3525 Beacon Dr
Port Charlotte,33980
Hynes, Robert F
18353 Hottelet Cir
Port Charlotte,33948
Kinsolving, Amanda A
21106 Bersell Ave
Port Charlotte,33952
McNeal, Amanda L
22311 Lasalle Rd


Port Charlotte,33952
Osborn, Eric W
22484 Joanne Ave
Port Charlotte,33954
Warner, Susan C
213 WAnn St
Punta Gorda,33950
Washington JR, Paul
3 Manor Ct APT A
Englewood,34223
Winters, Justin D
25676 Prada Dr
Punta Gorda,33955
Publish: January 30, 2014
342309 2995690


OurTown Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014





The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 9


Judge: Accused swindler



OK to be out on bond


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER

The Punta Gorda man
accused of swindling
investors out of more
than $6 million will
remain free for at least
a little while longer, a
judge ruled Wednesday.
Anthony Defeo, 48,
appeared in federal
court in Fort Myers for a
bond revocation hear-
ing, where Magistrate
Judge Douglas N. Frazier
ruled the defendant -
whose case could go to
trial in March can
remain on house arrest.
A grand jury indicted
Defeo in May on eight
counts of wire fraud.
Prosecutors allege
Defeo between late
2007 and late 2010-
solicited investors who
thought they were buying
into an Interstate 75
improvement project
along the west coast of
Florida. Defeo falsely told
the victim investors he
had lucrative contracts
and purchase orders with
a cooperation involved
in roadway services
and civil construction
projects that would
yield a 40 to 50 percent
profit, according to court
documents.


The indictment alleges
Defeo "fraudulently
diverted and converted
approx-
imately
$6,280,580
in mon-
ies from
investors
for his own
purposes."
DEFEO Defeo was
arrested
in June in Boston and
released a week later
on $250,000 bond. He
has since pleaded not
guilty to the wire fraud
charges.
As part of his pre-trial
release conditions,
Defeo was subject to
home detention and
must wear a monitoring
bracelet. Prosecutors
sought to have his bond
revoked Wednesday
because they felt he
wasn't complying with
that term.
Defeo's attorney, Kevin
Shirley, filed a motion
Tuesday claiming Defeo
has medical issues
and has left his Punta
Gorda home only out of
necessity. But he said he
understood why he and
his client had to appear
in court Wednesday.
"Any kind of move-
ment, it shows you're


absent from the resi-
dence," Shirley said after
the hearing. "It's pre-tri-
al (services') job to make
sure you're in the home
unless you're given
permission to leave the
home."
Shirley said Frazier
agreed Wednesday that
Defeo shouldn't be kept
in jail, due to his medi-
cal conditions.
"The judge was very
clear," said Shirley.
"He didn't think it was
appropriate that the
tax-payers get saddled
with paying my client's
medical expenses."
Court records show
Defeo has "a serious
medical condition
requiring ongoing
treatment."
Defeo could face up
to 20 years in prison on
each wire fraud count
and a fine of up to
$250,000 if convicted
at trial. Federal prose-
cutors also are seeking
restitution for the
victims.
"Obviously, we're all
working to try and re-
solve it without a trial,"
said Shirley.
Defeo could not be
reached for comment
Wednesday.
Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


A 'spirited' school choice rally


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD -
Suncoast Christian
Academy Elementary
School students lined
the road Tuesday decked
in yellow scarves and
waving signs. They were
celebrating National
School Choice Week.
The point of School
Choice Week is to have
"fun and get more
people at your school,"
fourth-grader Carissa
Kinsey said.
"And you get to paint
your face," fifth-grader
Lexi Hill added.
National School
Choice week is a move-
ment to raise awareness
about alternatives to
public education such
as private schools,
magnet schools, charters
and home schooling.
However, Suncoast
Christian Academy
wraps it into school
spirit week.
"We want people of
the community to know
we are here, but this is
not a marketing ploy,"
said director Meghan
Campbell. Instead,
the rallies, which the
school is doing Monday
through Friday this
week, are more about
making students feel
connected to the
community.


"We want the kids to
know our school is a part
of the Englewood com-
munity (and) we want
our kids to be proud of
our school," Campbell
said.
During Tuesday's rally,
which lasted 30 minutes
after school, students
waved signs and cheered
things like "honk for
good education." Their
goal was to get 40 pass-
ing cars to honk and
they ended up getting 60.
The school is a
Christian private school,
and relies on enrollment
fees rather than public
funding. The school's
niche, fourth-grade
teacher Kate Allison said,
is small class sizes, spe-
cial themed classes and
extracurricular activities.
"The best part is it's
a faith-based school so
we can talk about the
love of God," Allison
said, but "even if you as
a parent aren't someone
who has faith, just the
moral basis of kindness
and compassion is
something that is really
special."
Though the rally is
about the kids and
school spirit, Campbell
said she would like to
get the word out about
the school.
"We want to get the
awareness up that there's
more than one option,"


she said. "And it's noth-
ing against the public
schools we don't want
to disparage them but
(public school) is just
not for everyone."
The smaller class sizes
tend to be better at hold-
ing the interest of cer-
tain children, Campbell
said, and some students
who came to Suncoast
Christian Academy from
public school with be-
havior problems calmed
down in the private
school's environment.
She said the school
has a low incidence of
bullying, and so far two
students at the school
transferred from public
schools because of
bullying problems. "You
can see the light come
back into their eyes,"
Campbell said of bullied
transfers.
The school has about
85 students in kindergar-
ten through fifth grade,
and also offers pre-K
and early child care for
children as young as a
year old. Campbell said
the school is planning to
include sixth grade next
year and may include
seventh and eighth
grades depending on the
demand for enrollment.
For more information
about the school, go to
www.suncoastchristian
academy.com.
Email: iross@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTO BY IAN ROSS


Suncoast Christian Academy students Esteban Harker Barnes, Kayla Pelletier, Lily Morgan, Carissa Kinsey
and Lexus Hill hold up signs, cheer and try to get passing cars to honk. Their rally is part of National
School Choice Week, a movement to raise awareness about education alternatives to public schools.


- l0 66rsw I


ACROSS
1 Circle dances
6 German
sausages,
informally
11 Jacuzzi nozzle
14 Mio"
15 George H.W.
Bush alma mater
16 Simpsons
grandpa
17 Illegal mailing
19 Meet the Press
network
20 Dojo discipline
21 Subway slogan
23 Preserve
25 Ostrich cousin
26 NewsHour
network
29 News source
34 Pedometer's
starting point
35 Where K2 is
36 90-degree
shapes
37 Striped cat
39 Code-cracking
org.
41 Lyon lasses:
Abbr.
42 Manual reader
43 Military vet
45 Coll. senior's
test
46 Deceive and
delay
50 Endorses
51 The King and I
locale
52 Drug agent
54 Malcolm X
director
58 Madame Curie's
hometown
62 "Chocolate" dog


63 Knitting pattern
65 Exile from
Eden
66 Semester
enders
67 Pour on the
theatrics
68 Waterlogged
69 Chat-room
administrator
70 Big name in
library science

DOWN
1 Leave at a
pawnshop
2 Labor Dept. arm
3 Guffaw
4 Nom de plume
5 Banished
6 "See ya!"
7 Be worthy of


WELL-CONNECTED by Bruce Venzke
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com


8 Wedding
settings
9 Grow molars
10 Web browser
11 Miss Marple
12 Recedes
13 Engineering
school, for short
18 Wranglers rival
22 Bolero composer
24 Green land
26 DC VIP
27 Toot one's own
horn
28 Reserved and
rational
30 Display stand
31 Volunteer's offer
32 Bob Cratchit's
job
33 Alternating turns
on racecourses


38 Sharp and
stimulating
40 Nerve-cell part
41 Made a move
44 Mimics a mouse
47 Some kinfolk
48 Impressive
assemblage
49 One-celled
creatures
53 Serious
wrongdoing
54 Plethora
55 Do road work
56 "Oh, sure"
57 Red Muppet
59 Store on board
60 Part of Parisian
plays
61 Cheesemaking
by-product
64 Second sight


Answer to previous puzzle


Lookfora third


crossword in

Ithe Sun Classified:

I section.

................................................


1/30/14


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Like many
abbreviated
terms in footnotes
6 "Hurlybury"
playwright David
10 Beer
14 _ballerina
15 "Foaming
cleanser" of old
ads
16 Champagne Tony
of '60s golf
17 Biblical peak
18 Confused state
19 Plodding haulers
20 Emulate the
successful bounty
hunter
23 Halloween
creature
26 Three NASCAR
Unsers
27 Part of D.A.: Abbr.
28 Fail: Irish
"stone of destiny"
29'To the best of my
memory"
33 Chem lab event
34 A.L. lineup fixtures
35 Baby powder
ingredient
36 Siesta
38 Missal sites
42 Grind
45 Start of a green
adage
48 "Shalom
aleichem"
51 Adolphe who
developed a horn
52 "Do the Right
Thing" director
Spike
53 Intraoffice IT
system
54 Attach, as a codicil
55 Devious traps, and
a hint to surprises
found in 20-, 29-
and 48-Across
59 Mechanical
method
60 Open and breezy
61 Initial-based
political nickname
65 Touched ground
66 Govt.-owned
home financing
gp.
67 Made calls at
home
68 Chest muscles,
briefly


By Ed Sessa 1/30/14


69 Early temptation
locale
70 Mails

DOWN
1 12-in. discs
2 Bush spokesman
Fleischer
3 Sardine holder
4 Colorful Apple
5 Finger painting?
6 Hilton rival
7 In _: stuck
8 Cairo market
9 Pushed (oneself)
10 Explode
11 Store name
derived from the
prescription
symbol
12 "Barn!" chef
13 Film fish
21 Second half of a
ball game?
22 Cut with acid
23 1984 Olympics
parallel bars gold
medalist Conner
24 Out of port
25 Nonstick
cookware brand
30 Seaport of Ghana
31 Bowled over
32 Tree with
quivering leaves


Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
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(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


37 Mitt Romney's
2012 running
mate
39 'The Celts" singer
40 Stacked fuel
41 Poker game
43 Bruins' campus:
Abbr.
44 Like most new
drivers
46 Hot springs
resorts
47 Strengthened


48 Prisoner's reward
49 Strikingly unusual
50 Trailing
51 Purse part
56 New York team
57 "Him _":
romantic triangle
ultimatum
58 Bout of beefy
battlers
62 ER vitals
63 "However..."
64 Product promos


1/30/14


I






Our Town Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, January 30, 2014


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW


Charlotte fair

owes success

to volunteers,

board

hen the final steer is
sold and the last of the
ribbons and trophies
handed out to 4-H and Future
Farmers of America members
at this year's Charlotte County
Fair, Shelly Jordan, head of the
agriculture committee, said her
members will get "what seems
like only a 20-minute break" be-
fore work begins on the 2015 fair.
"We meet every week and
we have to have our rules and
weights in place to give the kids
time to buy their animals for the
summer," said Jordan, a 10-year
veteran of the fair.
The work she and her volun-
teer committee members put in
and the work by an all-volunteer
fair board is indicative of what
it takes to put on a successful
county fair each year.
Kam Mahshie, general manag-
er of the fairgrounds, is the only
paid person connected with the
fair. That means all the planning,
cleaning, construction, and fair
workers come from a pool of
people who just love a good fair.
They give hundreds of hours a
year and sometimes sacrifice
time with their own families to
put on the fair and plan the 4-H/
FFA competition.
It was 1987 when the Charlotte
Jaycees sponsored a carnival at
the old Memorial Auditorium in
Punta Gorda. It was a glorified
arts and crafts festival with rides.
That's when a group that
consisted of Mahshie, his
brother, Jon, and car dealer Jerry
Wilson got together to plan a real
county fair. These three are the
only original members of the fair
board still active today.
Others, however, have played
significant roles in the success of
the fair.
Those would include Lavern
Outlaw, who was in charge of
the original ag show; Chuck
Rinehart, Charlie Fleeman, the
former vice president of First
Federal Bank, Dave Miller and
others.
Picking up the torch have been
current board members like
Jordan, Richie Walczyk, presi-
dent, Ron Miller, Jackie and Tom
Andrews, Lisa and Tom Gaylord,
Susan Toth, Shawn Bryan, James
and Dawn Shipman, Mickie and
Dennis Dunn, Rickie and Shelly
Williams, and Will and Velvet
Stott.
All those people and
likely some we missed deserve
kudos for the hard work they put
in to give Charlotte Countians an
opportunity to attend their own
fair each year.
From the contracts that must
be completed, to simple things
like cutting grass and the more
difficult work building pens and
cages for animals, these people
and dozens of other volunteers
carry on a 26-year-old tradition.
Their work is certainly not lost
on Jordan, who helps recruit
volunteers each year. And, she
does it for the kids.
"My daughter started when
she was 8 and ended up with
$10,000 for college," Jordan said
of the fair competition.
"Some city folks don't realize
how much work goes into raising
an animal. These kids are not
hanging out at the mall or in the
streets.
"It takes a lot to raise an
animal keep it clean, feed it
... and then have to let it go for
slaughter.
"But the look on their faces is
all the reward we need."
That rewarding look will be
repeated many times over on
the faces of 4-H and FFA kids
and all the fair-goers who will
catch a show, devour some
fair food or enjoy a thrill ride
- starting Friday and running
through Feb. 9 at the Charlotte
County Fair.


Hats off to all the folks who
make it happen.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Possible scenarios
for the Springs

Editor:
Now that interested parties
in the short term contract
had a chance to look at Warm
Mineral Springs, it is time to
get serious. I can see some or
all the following happening:
Some enterprising lawyer
will bring a class action
lawsuit against the city and
county for culpable negli-
gence, on behalf of businesses
and ill people who traveled
to WMS to use its healing
waters. Negligence and
stupidity is not a crime, but
negligent and stupid people
are responsible for their acts.
Closing the Springs once was
stupid enough, but potentially
opening it up for the summer
and setting a deadline to
close it for the winter again
is the height of stupidity that
deserves a gold medal.
The state Legislature
and Congress will conduct
hearings to avoid intergov-
ernmental deadlock, when
two or more governments are
involved in a joint venture,
and pass some corrective
laws like requiring setting
up an authority, like the Port
Authority of New York and
New Jersey.
Some enterprising journal-
ist will get a Pulitzer Prize for
writing up the story of the
closing ofWMS.
Some public affairs or polit-
ical science professor will do
a case study and publish it in
a professional journal, as how
not to govern a city or county
for generation of students to
study.
North Port, instead of, or
in addition to, obtaining a
worldwide reputation for its
healing waters, will become
an international laughing-
stock for its handling of its
international natural treasure.
Sandor Balogh
North Port

Schools, county
have failed us

Editor:
After reading and seeing
what a pathetic mess Doug
Whittaker has made of
Charlotte County schools, I as
a taxpayer and parent of a child
attending one these schools,
request he is terminated.
Any person in this position,
making this kind of money, and


showing these results i
plus years, is pathetic.
Under his leadership
decision-making, ours
have fallen from arour
39th in the state rankin
and he has a plan to re
situation. No thanks, I
have seen enough.
I know he is not sol
blame. Our county co
sioners control the bu
and knew that the sch
would be shorted $41
a year from the state,
not do enough to help
the shortfall. Take for
our new road, Winch(
Boulevard for $30 mil
I am sure it will be mo
convenient for a lot o
but it won't help our
Perhaps that money c
have been better spei
schools?
The bottom line is, t
failed us. We the paren
mand better and our c
deserve better. I person
know how I will vote ii
next election, how abo
Charlotte County?
Larr



New school bo
may be need

Editor:
That was a great ar
with accolades, that t
printed about Charlo
County School Board
Lee Swift, who is up f
re-election. It was aln
as good as the article
appeared on the front
the Sun on Friday coi
the poor test scores ti
Charlotte County sch
achieved.


in three-

p, and his
schools
id 16th to
ngs. Oh,
ictify the
think we

elyto
1mmis-
idget
hools
million
and did
p offset
instance
ester
lion.
ore
f nonnlo


the cumulative total; the yearly
amount paid for insurance
for Swift and the cumulative
total; and the yearly retirement
benefit that Swift will receive
if he is reelected, including the
value of medical benefits. That
$32,000 per year salary plus
$8,000 for medical, plus $8,000
retirement contribution has a
way of adding up.
Perhaps it is time to elect
new School Board members?
Salvatore Castronovo
Punta Gorda

Proud of service
in Korean War


1 V'" C'" Editor:
children. 1 nw
ildren. In the Jan. 25 Viewpoint, a
ould letter writer asked, "Would
it on ..
n on someone more intelligent
hey a than I educate me as to what
its, de- we achieved in Korea?"
childrenn I would suggest the writer
nailyn go to the library and pick up
nlthey a history of the Korean War
and the aftermath of said
'ut you, war. Or better yet, drop in
to the Veterans Museum in
y Daubner Fishermen's Village and talk
Englewood to a few of the Korean vets
that saved Pusan, landed in
S Inchon, survived the sinking
)a rd of their ships in Wonsan, were
led among the "Frozen Chosen"
or ran the gauntlet every day
in Mig Alley.
tidcle, Today, South Korea is a
he Sun showplace of freedom and
tte democracy paid for with
SMember the blood of 50,000 brave
For Americans.


nost I pray these souls
that peace without bein
t page of aged. Contrary to w
ncerning writer wrote, I am r
hiat the ed" by my three yea
ools combat in Korea, I
proud of it!


Interestingly enough, the
superintendent placed the
blame on "lack of educational
preparedness" on the part
of the teachers. Did not all
of these teachers spend four
years, or more, in college
and time as student teachers
readying themselves for the
classroom? Are they not
certified?
Is it possible that the
administration-mandated
curriculum, that the teachers
are required to follow, is
responsible for the low test
scores? Can one assume that
the School Board members
approve the curriculum?
That being said, it is time
that the Sun publishes the
salary that School Board
member Lee Swift received
each year he has been in office
and the cumulative total; the
yearly amount paid to the
retirement fund for Swift and


Say'than
with term li


Editor:
Please don't than]
my 64 months of se
World War II, for my
or its government a
Congress (of imbec
containing 319 mill
and its balance of 5
to also become mill
I learned as I bec:
a father, grandfather
great-grandfather ti
fought for my poste
children) and in my
including my service
government sent 7.
of its youth to fight
major wars to fight
countries and their
other than our own


the guise of our country's
(so-called national interests)
propaganda garbage.
Now may I ask you my
fellow Americans to honor
our service (52,000 presently
homeless fellow veterans per
the Veteran Administration's
own count) to consider that
the time has arrived to realize
that neither party is con-
cerned with your children's fu-
ture and serve them with the
following future voting action
to refrain from re-electing any
present member of Congress.
(Since we are well-aware they
are entrenched by the "No
term limits" ruling). I trust
that you, my fellow American
voters, will honor our service,
so we veterans can "thank
you."
Our only other solution
would be me leading a march
on Congress, but I am a bit
too ancient.
Eugene 0. Pentiuk
Punta Gorda


Only voters can
impact real change

Editor:
Vern Buchanan's article
offered these steps to restore
the American dream; job
training, fewer regulations,
simplify tax codes, legal
reforms, reduce government
intrusion. Ideas that can never
happen. The system is run by
corrupt politicians who set up
regulations to keep the system
just the way it is. They govern,
stuff their pockets and we re-
elect them time after time.
John Morgan spent more
than $4 million working to get
the medical marijuana issue
on the ballot. Our represen-
tatives did not want to let the
people have a say and never
would if someone with great
wealth did not have a con-
trary agenda to the reigning
politicians. There is only one
way the American citizen can
overthrow the government
legally and it is a voters revolt.
Every incumbent politician
already has a single term
limit if we vote against every
incumbent, every election for
the next 12 years, having all
new faces every term, they
just might get it. My sugges-
tion is no less a dream than
Vern Buchanan's, but it is just
a dream. The America of our
forefathers is gone.
Ronald Esser
Englewood


Second chance
to elect Kreegel


rest in Editor:
g dispar- So Trey Radel has finally
rhat the decided to put aside his
lot "haunt- arrogance and defiance and
irs of do the correct thing. How sad
am damn that he publicly humiliated
his wife and left his son a
Carl Herzog shameful legacy that will for-
Punta Gorda ever be a part of history, when
he was given the opportunity
to do something good and
ks' meaningful.
However, the voters of the
limits 19th District are getting a
second chance to do what
they should have done the
k me for first time, and that is elect
rvice in the most qualified candidate.
y country Someone whose character
nd its and integrity are beyond re-
iles)
ionaires proach, is extremely qualified
35 striving to do the job and whom I am
lionaires. happy and proud to call my
am e friend: Dr. Paige Kreegel.
ame It isn't often that we get a
hat I second chance to correct a
rity (our mistake we made, so I hope the
Lifetime voters of District 19 will take
-e this advantage of this opportunity
1 million to correct this mistake and elect
four more the man who will serve them
four more bs
for other best, Dr. Paige Kreegel.
reasons Donna Huxstep
under Punta Gorda


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY


Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must
be included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due
to the number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month.


The Letters to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the
opinions and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper
takes no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014





The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 11


America's mass numbness for gun violence


f you think it'll be a
month of Sundays
before this country
gets serious about gun
violence, you're proba-
bly underestimating.
It's already been
nearly three months of
Monday 77, to be
exact and we're not
making progress.
After the July 2012
shooting at a movie
theater in Aurora, Colo.,
a group of Washington
women a preschool
teacher, a retired prin-
cipal and a few friends
- resolved to meet out-
side the White House
every Monday until
the nation comes to its
senses on guns. They've
missed only a couple
of Monday since then
because of extreme
weather, and they've
been there through the
Navy Yard shootings,
the Sikh temple shoot-
ings in Wisconsin and
the school massacre
in Newtown, Conn.,
among others, and
they've been keeping a
running list of victims.
"There are 68 mass
shootings on our


timeline," said Linda
Finkel-Talvadkar, the
retired principal.
"Or was it 90?" in-
quired Barbara Elsas,
the preschool teacher.
"Shoot!"
On second thought,
don't shoot.
I had come to see the
gun-control activists
because of the shootings
Saturday at a mall in
Columbia, Md., 25 miles
outside Washington. For
a few hours, cable news
went with the story, but
the incident quickly
faded into a collective
ho-hum. It apparently
wasn't a terrorist -
police at this writing
are still searching for
a motive and only
three people were killed,
including the shooter.
That falls short of the


standard "mass mur-
der" definition, which
requires four deaths, not
including the shooter.
By any definition, the
level of gun violence
is obscene. USA Today
reported last month that
934 people had died in
mass shootings over the
past seven years, and
that's only 1 percent of
all gun-related homi-
cides. The newspaper's
tally, including incidents
in which four or more
people were killed, was
146 mass shootings
since 2006.
A crowd-sourced
count on Reddit of any
gun incident in which
four or more were
shot found 365 mass
shootings in 2013 alone.
The liberal Center for
American Progress'
ThinkProgress blog
found that in the first 14
school days of this year,
there had been at least
seven school shootings
of all types, compared
with 28 in all of 2013.
With so many shoot-
ings, it's perhaps inevi-
table that the Columbia
incident seems almost


routine. The weapon
used, a 12-gauge
Mossberg shotgun,
was ordinary, and the
shooter reportedly had
no criminal record and
bought the gun legally.
But it is this sort of
numbness that the
women outside the
White House are trying
to counteract with their
weekly vigils. They stand
in the closed-to-traffic
stretch of Pennsylvania
Avenue, as few as two
of them and as many as
a dozen, wearing "Stop
gun violence" pins and
yellow crime-scene
tape, and buttonholing
passersby during lunch
hour.
The women are
not motivated by any
personal connection
to gun violence but by
a generalized outrage.
They have been involved
in demonstrations since
the civil rights and
Vietnam War move-
ments of the 1960s, but
nothing recurring like
this.
At first, they had plen-
ty of company outside
the White House from


the Brady Campaign
and other gun-control
organizations, but "after
Newtown, those groups
got swamped," Elsas
said, and the groups
decamped to work on
gun legislation that
ultimately failed.
The friends remained,
and they're disappoint-
ed that their action
- and gun control
in general has not
gained more news me-
dia attention. They said
most of the interest has
been from foreign media
- Russian, German,
Japanese that are
curious about American
gun culture.
Yet the women contin-
ue, week after week. On
Monday, a strong wind
was blowing their signs
down the street and
one of their trash bags
over the fence and onto
the White House lawn.
Moments later, the wind
toppled their supply
cart, to which was
taped a Margaret Mead
quotation about a small
group of committed
citizens changing the
world. Another gust sent


a protest sign at Elsas'
head, knocking off her
glasses.
I asked if they worried
they might become
part of the scenery, like
the nearby anti-nukes
encampment, or the
ubiquitous Falun Gong
demonstrators who
also were on location
Monday. Elsas said they
aren't concerned about
that, "because, unfortu-
nately, these shootings
keep happening." And
the women can point
to small triumphs from
their conversations -
100 per week, they say
- including the time
they won over two pro-
gun skateboarders who
decided to join their
protest.
"We haven't given up
hope," Elsas said.
Real gun control,
Finkel-Talvadkar added,
"will happen in our
lifetime."
Good health, ladies.

Dana Milbank is a
Washington Post colum-
nist. Readers may reach
him at danamilbank@
washpost.com.


Floridians focus on the suffering, not the politics


t's been a long, hard
road, but proponents
of the citizens' ini-
tiative to place medical
marijuana on the Florida
ballot in November got
some good news. The
Florida Supreme Court,
on a close 4-3 vote,
approved the wording of
the ballot initiative.
Why was the Supreme
Court reviewing the
wording? The Florida
Legislature requires all
attempts by citizens to
modify their state consti-
tution to jump through
many hurdles, the last
of which is to have the
court review the wording
of the initiative and its
title to ensure that they
are not misleading.
Constitutional
changes initiated by
the Legislature enjoy an
easier path to the ballot.
So the review by the
Supreme Court was just a
routine matter?
Well, not exactly.
Attorney General Pam
Bondi, Gov. Rick Scott,
House Speaker Will
Weatherford and Senate
President Don Gaetz ex-
pressed their desire that


the Supreme Court reject
the language, claiming
the ballot summary and
title are misleading.
Some even filed legal
briefs arguing against it.
The title? "Use of
Marijuana for Certain
Medical Conditions."
Oh my goodness! What
does that mean? I'm so
confused.
Could it possibly mean
that those suffering from
debilitating illnesses
might be able to finally
gain relief from their
pain and nausea, as they
can in 20 other states?
I recognize that it's not
as easy to understand
as those proposals put
forth by the Legislature
in 2012. For example,
there was the straightfor-
ward, clear and concise
legislative proposal


titled, "Property Tax
Limitations; Property
Value Decline; Reduction
for Nonhomestead
Assessment Increases;
Delay of Scheduled
Repeal."
It's certainly under-
standable that the gover-
nor, attorney general and
Legislature would want
to protect the voters from
confusion and being
misled by the medical
marijuana ruse.
In fact, we all know
it's nothing more than a
devious plan. Not only
is it the camel's nose
under the tent leading
to full-fledged decrimi-
nalization of marijuana,
it would likely lead to all
drugs being legalized.
That's right, crack, crank
and heroin will all be
available at the corner
store.
And don't forget who
is pushing this. John
Morgan! You know, John
Morgan, the ruthless trial
lawyer from Orlando
who put millions of his
own money into the
effort to get the initiative
on the ballot.
Any thinking person


would have to question
his motives. After all,
he is a close friend of
Charlie Crist, and if this
amendment were on the
ballot, then it would be
certain to attract young
voters and more liberal
voters who are usually
unreliable in showing up
at the polls. This would
help his buddy Charlie
regain the governorship.
Aha! Great plan.
Absolutely brilliant!
Crist's election is all but
assured. And it only cost
$4 million to get it on
the ballot and another
couple mil for legal fees
and the advertising
campaign. That makes
so much more sense
than simply putting the
$6 million or so into
Crist's political commit-
tee for a get-out-the-vote
effort.
And we're not buying
that nonsense that
Morgan is doing this
because he watched his
father suffer and he had
to circumvent the law to
illegally obtain marijuana
to help manage his dad's
pain and loss of appetite.
He wants to help other


people assist their loved
ones without breaking
the law? Really? Does he
think we're that gullible?
But there's more.
He's probably going to
make millions by going
after those who will
legally be selling mari-
juana when this passes.
That's right, since it will
be legal, he's going after
them. That's what people
smarter than me are
saying. I read it on the
Internet.
Thank goodness his
twisted thinking and
selfish actions have been
exposed.
Now, let's be clear.
Those who are trying
to protect us from
ourselves and who
have deciphered the
subterfuge are very
sympathetic to those
who are suffering. They
helpfully point out that
many lives have been
ruined by alcohol and
there is the real danger
of being killed by drunk
drivers. And don't forget
our problems with pill
mills and the resulting
addiction and overdos-
ing deaths of those on


pain pills like oxycontin.
Of course those
substances will still be
available but marijuana
is just too dangerous.
It's staggering that so
many Floridians have
been duped.
In public opinion
polling, 82 percent
of Floridians support
legalizing medical
marijuana. The ma-
jority of Democrats,
independents and, yes,
Republicans all support
the legalization of
marijuana for medical
purposes and trust
doctors to prescribe it.
It seems that they are
focusing on those suffer-
ing from cancer, multiple
sclerosis, unbearable
pain, debilitating nausea
and life-threatening
appetite loss. Isn't it time
our political leaders do
the same?

Paula Dockery is a
former state senator
from Polk County and
a columnist for Florida
Voices, the state opinion
page. Readers may reach
her at pdocker@florida
voices, com.


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:OurTown Page 12 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


SUN PHOTOS BY CHEYENNE EMRICH


The Rev. Pat Organ sprays holy water on bikers and their motorcycles Sunday during the blessing
service at the North Port Moose Lodge.





Harley
owner Rick
Carpenter of '*-
Englewood

a new
member of
the Moose
Rider Club
on Sunday.


Blessings for bikes




Bud
Telthoft,
president of
... : "the Moose
Rider Club,
stands near

Harley-
Davidson.
He is also
a charter
member
J.- of the
-. i Englewood
Moose Rider
Club.


Darrell Lacourse, vice president of the Peace River ABATE Club, relaxes before the ride Sunday,
which included stops in Port Charlotte, Englewood, Venice and North Port.


The Rev. Pat Organ, left, receives a bottle of spirits from John Rizzo, chairman of the Moose
Riders 764, Sunday during the blessing of the motorcycles at the North Port Moose Lodge. Organ
joked that the club must have known he was Irish.


North Port residents Flo Sayre Lombard and Russ Stahmer stand together at the ceremony.


Past president of the Moose Riders Mark Huffman gets ready to go on the ride with his wife,
Eileen. They live in Englewood.


Motorcycle riders and their guests pray Sunday during the blessing of the bikes at the North Port Moose Lodge.






INSIDE

Bridge, road closures
continue in icy
Panhandle






Residents in the western
Panhandle remained
indoors and off the roads on
Wednesday.
Page 3 -


There's a little
Neanderthal in us


Mating between Neanderthals
and the ancestors of Europeans
and East Asians gave our fore-
bears important evolutionary
advantages but may have
created a lot of sterile males.

Page 8 -

10 things to know

1. Fed plans to curtail
stimulus
The central bank is pushing
ahead despite fears that the move
will further rattle global markets.
Seepage 2.

2. Rick Scott reveals
Florida budget
The $74 billion plan allows more
money for schools, environmental
programs and child protection.
Seepage 1.

3. Death penalty
decision imminent
Eric Holder is about to make one
of his most high profile decisions
in the case of the Boston Marathon
bombing suspect. Seepage 1.

4. Atlanta takes it on
the chin from storm
Georgia's governor and Atlanta's
mayor find themselves on the
defensive, acknowledging storm
preparations could have been
better. Seepage 1.

5. Why the fight
against obesity must
start earlier
A child's"weight fate" is mostly
set by the time he or she reaches
age 5, a study finds. Seepage 2.

6. Farm bill makes it
through the House
The bill is a compromise of nearly
$100 billion a year in spending.
Seepage 1.

1. Monarch butterfly
migration declines
Possible reasons range from a
lack of milkweed to genetically
modified crops, urban sprawl and
extreme weather. Seepage5s.

8. Ukrainian lawmakers
offer amnesty
The move by Ukraine's parliament
was quickly greeted with contempt
by the opposition. Seepage 5.

9. McDonald's tries to
out-latte Starbucks
The fast-food enterprise is
boosting "coffee-driven visits."
See page 6.

10. States move on
minimum wage
Though President Obama said he
would sign an executive order for
workers in federal contracts, there
are many measures in motion to
bring up the minimum wage.
Seepage 2.


he Wirr


h eJ lpjirewww.sunnewspapers.net
THURSDAY JANUARY 30, 2014



Scott casts $74B budget


Plan adds money for schools, environment, child


ByGARYFINEOUT
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrITER
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Gov. Rick Scott,
who came into office
four years ago vowing
to cut taxes and spend-
ing, on Wednesday
proposed an elec-
tion-year budget that
called for just about
more of everything.
Scott recommended
a nearly $74.2 billion
budget that includes
more money for


schools, a boost in
spending on environ-
mental programs and
child protection, while
at the same time hold-
ing the line on college
tuition increases.
The Republican
governor also set aside
nearly $600 million
for tax cuts, many of
which were aimed at
consumers instead of
the big ones for busi-
nesses that Scott had
previously touted to
stimulate the economy.


"My goal is 'Let's
get money back into
Florida families' hands,
let's con-
tinue to
build our
econo-
my,'" Scott
said.
State
lawmak-
SCOTT ers will
use Scott's
proposal as a frame-
work for a final budget
that will be passed
during the annual


session that starts in
March. House Speaker
WillWeatherford called
Scott's recommenda-
tion a good start and
said legislative leaders
were largely in agree-
ment with many of the
governor's proposals.
Leaders, however,
did stop short of
endorsing all of Scott's
tax-cut proposals. They
said that they were
willing to cut them by
as much as $500 mil-
lion, but that they had


protection
to be targeted to a wide
number of Floridians,
casting doubt on
Scott's push to lower
the sales taxes charged
on commercial rent.
Some details of the
proposal quickly drew
criticism, especially
since Scott's boost in
school spending relies
primarily on an in-
crease in local property
taxes.
The governor
BUDGET14


By DAVID CRARY
and RAY HENRY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

ATLANTA Thousands
of Atlanta students
stranded all night long
in their schools were
reunited with their
parents Wednesday,
while rescuers rushed to
deliver blankets, food,
gas and a ride home
to countless shivering
motorists stopped cold
by a storm that paralyzed
the business capital of the
South with less than
3 inches of snow.
As National Guardsmen
and state troopers fanned
out, Mayor Kasim Reed
and Georgia Gov. Nathan
Deal found themselves
on the defensive, ac-
knowledging the storm
preparations could have
been better. But Deal also
blamed forecasters, say-
ing he was led to believe
it wouldn't be so bad.
The icy weather
wreaked similar havoc
across much of the South,
closing schools and high-
ways, grounding flights
and contributing to at
WINTER 14


AP PHOTOS
In this aerial view looking south toward downtown Atlanta, the ice-covered interstate system shows the remnants of a
winter snowstorm Wednesday in Atlanta. While such amounts of accumulation barely qualify as a storm in the north, it
was enough to paralyze the Deep South.


Georgia National Guard troops in Humvees and a HERO unit check on a
stranded motorists and search abandoned vehicles to give aid to those
still stuck on the highway at Roswell Road and 1-285 on Wednesday
afternoon, more than 24 hours after a storm hit in Atlanta.


Death penalty decision

imminent in Boston bombing
By PETE YOST
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrER
WASHINGTON -As at-
torney general, Eric Holder
has approved pursuing the
death penalty in at least 34
criminal cases, upholding a
long-ago pledge to Congress
that he would vigorously
enforce federal law even
though he's not a proponent
of capital punishment.
With a court-ordered
deadline of Friday, Holder
will make the most
high-profile death penalty
decision of his career in law AP PHOTO
enforcement: whether to
seek capital punishment Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Wash-
ington, Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee
BOSTON 14 hearing oversight hearing on the Justice Department.


In this aerial photo, traffic is snarled along the 1-285 perimeter north of
the metro area after a winter snowstorm, Wednesday in Atlanta. Georgia
Gov. Nathan Deal said that the National Guard was sending military
Humvees onto Atlanta's freeway system in an attempt to move stranded
school buses and get food and water to people.


Farm bill

passes House

By MARY CLARE JALONICK
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrITER
WASHINGTON After years of set-
backs, a nearly $100 billion-a-year com-
promise farm bill cleared the House on
Wednesday despite strong opposition from
conservatives who sought a bigger cut in
food stamps.
The five-year bill, which preserves gener-
ous crop subsidies, heads to the Senate,
where approval seems certain. The White
House said President Barack Obama would
sign it.
The measure, which the House approved
251-166, had backing from the Republican
leadership team, even though it makes
smaller cuts to food stamps than they
would have liked. After wavering for
several years, the GOP leaders were seeking
FARM 14


Winter storm stuns Atlanta






~Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net NATIONAL NEWS The Sun IThursday, January 30, 2014


WASHINGTON (AP)
-The Federal Reserve
is pushing ahead with
a plan to shrink its
bond-buying program
because of a strength-
ening U.S. economy. It's
doing so even though the
prospect of reduced Fed
stimulus and higher U.S.
interest rates has rattled
global markets.
The Fed said it will
cut its monthly bond
purchases starting in
February by an additional
$10 billion to $65 billion.
It also reaffirmed its plan
to keep short-term rates
at record lows in a state-
ment it issued Wednesday
after Ben Bernanke's
final policy meeting.
Bernanke will step down
Friday after eight years as
chairman.
Many global investors
fear that reduced Fed
bond buying will boost
U.S. rates and cause
investors to move money
out of emerging markets
and into the United
States for higher returns.
Currency values in
emerging nations have
fallen. India, Turkey and
South Africa have raised
rates to try to protect
their currencies.
Most economists
expect a string of


AP FILE PHOTO
In this April 25, 2012, file photo, Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke arrives for a news conference at the Federal
Reserve in Washington.


$10 billion monthly
reductions in bond pur-
chases to be announced
at each Fed meeting this
year, concluding with a
final $15 billion cut in
December.
The bond purchases
have been intended to
keep long-term bor-
rowing rates low to spur
spending and growth.
The Fed's decision
Wednesday to continue
paring its purchases
signals its belief that
the economy is showing
consistent improvement.
In its statement, it up-
graded it assessment to
say "growth in economic


activity picked up in
recent quarters."
Stocks fell after the Fed
announced its decision.
Bond prices rose slightly,
and their yields dipped.
The Dow Jones
industrial average was
down 185 points about
an hour after the Fed's
announcement at 2 p.m.
Eastern time. It had been
down 127 points just
before as disappointing
earnings from big U.S.
companies contributed
to a sour mood on Wall
Street.
The yield on the
10-year Treasury note
slipped to 2.68 percent.


Some analysts said the
Fed's confidence in the
U.S. economy appeared
to outweigh any con-
cern that the turmoil in
emerging market econo-
mies might spill over into
the United States and
other developed nations.
"These economies
have not been driven
into deep recession," said
Ian Shepherdson, chief
economist at Pantheon
Macroeconomics. "Their
currencies are weak but
not in freefall."
The Fed made no men-
tion of the turbulence
that has rocked markets
for the past week.
Its bond purchases
have helped fuel a huge
stock market rally over
the past year as investors
shifted money out of
low-yielding bonds and
into stocks. Now that the
Fed is cutting back on
those bond purchases,
many investors fear
stocks will fall.
"Ultimately, the Fed
sort of had no choice but
to reduce purchases at
this meeting," said Dan
Greenhaus, chief strat-
egist at BTIG brokerage.
"If they had paused, they
risked sending a signal to
markets that they lacked
conviction."


Obama backs wage hike: A look at state efforts


(AP) President Barack the nation:


Obama said in his State of
the Union address Tuesday
that he will sign an
executive order setting the
minimum wage for work-
ers covered by new federal
contracts at $10.10 an
hour, a big jump from the
current federal minimum
of $7.25. Obama hopes his
order will spur Congress
to increase the minimum
wage for all employees.
In similar efforts,
Democrats in more than
half of U.S. states are spon-
soring or are expected to
introduce state-level wage
hike measures, according
to a national review by The
Associated Press. Even in
Republican-dominated
capitals where the bills are
longshots, the proposals
still give Democrats a
chance to hammer home
the popular theme of fair
wages in what is an elec-
tion year in most places.
Highlights from around


In Washington state, a
bill would increase what
is already the highest state
minimum wage in the
nation to $12 an hour over
the next three years.
Massachusetts' state
Senate has approved an
increase in the minimum
wage from $8 to $11 over
three years. The House
hasn't taken up the
measure.
Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn
wants to raise the rate
from $8.25 to at least $10,
and Maryland Gov. Martin
O'Malley is backing an
increase to $10.10 an hour
by2016.
Bills in other states
would push the minimum
wage over the $10 mark,
including measures
in Florida, Iowa and
Kentucky to create a
$10.10 hourly minimum.
One bill in South Carolina
would require employers


to pay at least $10 an
hour or whatever federal
law requires, whichever
is greater. In New York,
the Democrat-controlled
Assembly wants to accel-
erate the state's scheduled
minimum wage increase
to $9 by 2015 and tie it to
the inflation rate.

Ballots
Advocates of a
minimum wage hike are
trying to line up support
from voters in some
states. Backers of an effort
to raise the minimum
wage in Alaska turned in
signatures with hopes of
getting the issue on the
ballot in August. In Idaho,
an effort is underway to
get a minimum wage hike
to $9.80 an hour by 2017
on November's ballot.
A South Dakota ballot
measure would raise the
state minimum wage to
$8.50 an hour beginning
next year.
In Alabama, a pro-
posed constitutional
amendment would raise
the minimum wage
by steps to $9.80 on
Jan. 1, 2016. Proposed


constitutional amendment
introduced in the Senate
in New Mexico would
automatically increase
the state's minimum wage
each year to adjust it for in-
flation. The amendments
would require approval
from both legislators and
voters.

Developments
*With bills in the
Vermont statehouse that
would raise the minimum
wage as high as $12.50 by
2015, one lawmaker said
this week he would like to
see the minimum wage
to reach $15 an hour. Rep.
Chris Pearson, a member
of the state's Progressive
Party, was part of a group
of Vermont lawmakers
calling for a new "bill of
economic rights."
Groups backing an
increase in Michigan's
minimum wage laid the
groundwork this week for
a statewide ballot drive
in November, forming a
committee that is likely to
commence with collecting
hundreds of thousands
of signatures needed to
qualify.


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Fed to reduce pace of bond



buying by another $10B


I NATION

Republicans say
Obama can't do
much alone
WASHINGTON
(AP) Congressional
Republicans swiftly and
sharply rejected President
Barack Obama's vow to
act on his own if law-
makers won't help him
create jobs and narrow
the nation's yawning
income gap, insisting
he'll accomplish little in
a divided government
without them.
"The authority he
has doesn't add up to
much for those without
opportunity in this
economy," House Speaker
John Boehner said after
Obama's State of the
Union address before a
packed House chamber
and a prime-time televi-
sion audience.
"The real answer is for
Obama to refocus his
priorities and work with us
on the things that we can
achieve together to create
jobs and promote greater
opportunity," he added.

Michelle Obama
to appear on
Puppy Bowl
WASHINGTON
(Chicago Tribune) -
Viewers who want to see
first lady Michelle Obama
do a touchdown dance on
Super Bowl Sunday will
only have to tune in to
"Puppy Bowl X," a spoof
on Animal Planet.
As part of her "Let's
Move" campaign to
reduce childhood obe-
sity, Obama enlisted the
family's Portuguese water
dogs, Bo and Sunny, at a
pregame "training camp"
for some of the canine
participants on the South
Lawn of the White House
in October, said Jared
Albert, an Animal Planet
publicist.
With Washington
schoolchildren on hand,
13 puppies from shelters
and rescue groups played
fetch and ran agility drills
as Obama taped seg-
ments announcing "Let
the Puppy Bowl begin"
and demonstrating a
touchdown dance.
Sunday's program airs
at 3 p.m. EST.

10 US cities vow
to cut emissions
from buildings

LOS ANGELES (AP)-
Mayors from 10 U.S. cities
took aim at their skylines
Wednesday, pledging to
reduce greenhouse gas
emissions from their
buildings.
While power plants are
the nation's No. 1 carbon
emitter, it has long been
known that businesses
and homes also contrib-
ute to carbon dioxide
pollution. Most of it
comes from the burning
of fossil fuels for heating,
cooling and lighting.
Many of the partici-
pating cities Atlanta,
Boston, Chicago,
Denver, Houston,
Kansas City, Mo., Los
Angeles, Orlando, Fla.,
Philadelphia and Salt
Lake City-- already are
working toward making
their building stock more
energy efficient.

Study: 1 in 8 US
kids are obese by
kindergarten
(Bloomberg) One
in eight U.S. children
are obese by kindergar-
ten age, with the ratio


I Pi Laser0Gum SurgIry Provil de[


increasing through the
elementary school years,
a nationwide study
found.
By eighth grade,
1 in 5 U.S. students
are obese and another
17 percent are over-
weight, according to the
study released Wednesday
by the New England
Journal of Medicine. Most
of the increase takes
place before fifth grade,
giving researchers key
information about the
obesity epidemic among
American children and
the ages at which they are
most vulnerable.
Obesity more than
doubled in children and
tripled in adolescents from
the early 1980s, though
researchers say the rates
may now have plateaued.

Justin Bieber
pleads not guilty
in DUI arrest
MIAMI (AP) -Justin
Bieber has pleaded not
guilty in to charges of
DUI, resisting arrest and
driving with an expired
license in Florida.
Court records show that
Bieber's attorney filed the
written plea
Wednesday
in Miami-
Dade
County.
Bieber
already has
an arraign-
BIEBER ment set
IE for Feb. 14,
but Florida law doesn't
require the 19-year-old
pop star to be present.
Defense attorney Mark
Shapiro says a decision
on whether Bieber will
attend has not been
made.
Bieber and R&B singer
Khalil Amir Sharieff
were arrested last week
in Miami Beach during
what police described as
an illegal street drag race
between a Lamborghini
and a Ferrari. Neither has
been charged with drag
racing.

US Supreme
Court lifts stay of
Missouri execution
BONNE TERRE, Mo.
(AP) -The U.S. Supreme
Court has lifted its stay on
the scheduled execution
Wednesday of a Missouri
death-row inmate whose
lawyers had challenged
the state's refusal to
disclose where it obtained
its lethal injection drug.
The high court issued
a temporary stay less
than three hours before
Herbert Smulls was
scheduled to be executed
at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday
at the state prison in
Bonne Terre. Smulls, 56,
was sentenced to death
for killing a suburban St.
Louis jeweler and badly
injuring his wife during a
1991 robbery.
But the court lifted the
stay without explanation
just before 5 p.m., mean-
ing the execution could
move forward. Missouri
law allows an execution
to occur at any time on
the day it is scheduled.
Witnesses to the exe-
cution had been told to
report to the prison by
noon.
Smulls' lawyer, Cheryl
Pilate, made her final
pleas Tuesday, focusing
on the state's refusal to
disclose the name of the
compounding pharmacy
that produces the pen-
tobarbital used during
executions.


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-Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


NATIONAL NEWS





SThe Sun/Thursday, January 30, 2014


STATE NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 3


Bridge, road closures continue in icy Panhandle


PENSACOLA (AP) -
Residents in the western
Panhandle remained
indoors and off the roads
on Wednesday as freez-
ing temperatures caused
a layer of ice and dusting
of snow to linger.
Emergency officials
said Wednesday after-
noon that numerous
bridges in the western
Panhandle could remain
closed through Thursday
morning because of the
icy conditions.
Temperatures were ex-
pected to climb to about
35 degrees but overcast
skies would prevent
much melting.
After sunset Tuesday,
officials closed the
two bridges crossing
Pensacola Bay and con-
necting the city to rest of
the state.
Panhandle counties
further west also


announced numer-
ous bridge and road
closings.
The region hasn't seen
snow and ice for years.
Sporadic power
outages were reported
throughout the area
because of iced power
lines.
"Every major bridge
and roadway in
Escambia County is
either closed or expe-
riencing major issues
and even neighborhood
streets are icy and
dangerous," Escambia
county officials said in a
public-safety update on
Wednesday.
The region had a dust-
ing of snow that melted
quickly in 2010. It has
been more than a decade
since the area had snow
that remained on the
ground for a while,
according to weather


records.
Schools, government
offices, even military
bases were closed or op-
erating with limit staffing
Wednesday.
Emergency officials
warned residents about
falling tree limbs and
downed power lines
caused by the ice
buildup.
Farther west, officials
in Santa Rosa, Okaloosa
and Walton counties also
announced numerous
bridge and road closings
and encouraged resi-
dents to stay inside and
off the streets until the
ice melts. Residents in
normally sunny vacation
destinations including
FortWalton Beach and
Destin were urged to
remain indoors and off
the icy roads.
John Hofstad, public
works director for


AP PHOTO
Icicles hang near the M.B. Miller County Pier in Panama City Beach on Wednesday. A rare winter
storm brought snow and ice to the Florida Panhandle.


Okaloosa County, told
The Northwest Florida
Daily News that all


roads and bridges in
that area were iced over
Wednesday.


"There's not enough
sand to go around," he
said.


I HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE STATE


AP PHOTO


Lunch with Mom
A young anhinga chick begs for food from its mother,
at the Wakodahatchee Wetlands in Delray Beach, Fla.,
Monday. It is nesting season for many birds in the
wetlands. Over 140 species of birds have been spotted at
the Wakodahatchee Wetlands. The name is derived from
the Seminole Indian Language and translates as "created
waters." Fifty acres of unused utilities land have been
transformed into a wetlands ecosystem.


New airline,
familiar name to
launch in Miami
MIAMI (AP) -An airline
with a familiar name is
looking to fly out of South
Florida again.
Eastern Air Lines Group
announced Tuesday that it
has taken the first step to
launching a new airline in
Miami.
The Miami Herald
reports the company has
applied to the United
States Department of
Transportation for a certifi-
cate of public convenience
and necessity. It plans soon
to start its required certi-
fication with the Federal
Aviation Administration.
Eastern Airlines had
headquarters in Miami
until 1991, when it went
out of business.
The new company is
careful to point out that
it is not affiliated with
the former Eastern. But it
bears the branding of the
defunct company because
it acquired Eastern's intel-
lectual property several
years ago.

Rubio: Loss
of trust in
Obama stalled
immigration
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Sen. Marco Rubio, a major
player on immigration pol-
icy, said Wednesday that
there was no chance now
of passing a broad over-
haul because Republicans
have lost trust in President
Barack Obama.
The first-term Florida
lawmaker, a potential
White House contender in
2016, cited GOP concerns
about whether the pres-
ident could be trusted to
enforce tough security re-
quirements in the Senate's
bipartisan immigration bill
that Rubio helped write.
Rubio said the Obama
administration has lost
credibility as a result of
how it handled the 2012


attack against a U.S.
outpost in Libya and ac-
cusations that the Internal
Revenue Service targeted
conservative groups.
Rubio said doubts about
Obama and his team
colored his conversations
with lawmakers he had
hoped to persuade to back
the immigration overhaul,
now stalled in the House.


Mack won't run in
special election for
Radel's seat
MIAMI (AP) Connie
Mack IV won't seek
the congressional seat
vacated by U.S. Rep. Trey
Radel of Florida.
Mack made the an-
nouncement in a state-
ment Wednesday, saying
that he would advocate
for conservative princi-
ples as a private citizen.
He represented the south-
west Florida district for
eight years before a failed
run for Senate in 2012.
Radel resigned from
Congress Monday, two
months after he pleaded
guilty to cocaine-posses-
sion charges. The fresh-
man Republican faced a
House ethics investigation,
a growing group of
primary challengers and
the steady drumbeat of a
Republican establishment
calling for him to step
down.
Former state Rep. Paige
Kreegel has declared his
candidacy to replace
Radel and state Senate
Majority Leader Lizbeth
Benacquisto is consider-
ing a bid.
Gov. Rick Scott will
set a date for a special
election.


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Rich, Crist say
Scott only cares
about the wealthy
TALLAHASSEE (AP)-
Democratic gubernatorial
hopeful Charlie Crist had
nothing good to say about
Gov. Rick Scott while anoth-
er Democrat, former state
Sen. Nan Rich, didn't have
anything complimentary to
say about either.
Rich told journalists
Wednesday at the 20th
annual legislative editors
meeting hosted by The
Associated Press that she
was the only true Democrat
seeking to oust Scott. She
took several shots at Crist,
who switched parties to
enter the race just four years
after giving up the gover-
nor's seat in an ill-fated bid
for the U.S. Senate.


Both hopefuls blasted
Scott for refusing to accept
billions of dollars from the
federal government that
could have led to tens of
thousands of new jobs in
Florida.
Crist said he was much
more comfortable polit-
ically as a Democrat and
had effusive praise for
President Obama during his
appearance.

City allows
Miami Beach strip
club to reopen
MIAMI (AP) -The
City of Miami Beach has
allowed a strip club to re-
open more than two weeks
after it was shut down
because of allegations that
a 13-year-old runaway was
forced to dance there.


Club Madonna was
allowed to open Monday.
City Manager Jimmy
Morales issued an emer-
gency order to revoke Club
Madonna's certificate of
use Jan. 10. But following
assurances that new
measures including the
hiring of a compliance
officer would be taken
to prevent an underage
dancer from performing at
the club, Morales issued a
stay Monday to the original
revocation.
Police arrested three peo-
ple earlier this month for
allegedly forcing a runaway
teen to prostitute herself
and dance at the club.
Dan Aaronson, an at-
torney for Club Madonna,
said the club's owner was
unaware the girl performed
there.


Olympic drive

Kristi Yamaguchi joins USA WEEKEND for a celebration
of Olympic spirit. Enjoy expert advice, recipes, workout
tips and more to inspire your inner champion.






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, January 30, 2014 FROM PAGE ONE


Terror suspect challenges NSA surveillance program


DENVER (AP)
- Using evidence
obtained under the
National Security
Agency's warrantless
surveillance program
would violate a terror
suspect's constitutional
protection against
unreasonable search
and seizure, the suspect
argued Wednesday in
a court document filed
with help from the



BUDGET

FROM PAGE 1

earlier this week an-
nounced that he wants
to increase spending
on public schools by
$542 million. But nearly
$400 million of the extra
money is coming from a
rise in property values,
which generates addi-
tional local property tax
money.
Scott, who announced



WINTER

FROM PAGE 1

least a dozen deaths from
traffic accidents and a
mobile home fire.
Yet it was Atlanta,
home to major corpo-
rations and the world's
busiest airport, that
was Exhibit A for how a
Southern city could be
sent reeling by winter
weather that, in the
North, might be no more
than an inconvenience.
The mayor admitted
the city could have
directed schools, busi-
nesses and government
offices to stagger their
closings on Tuesday
afternoon, as the storm
began, rather than
dismissing everyone at
the same time.
The result was gridlock
on freeways that are
jammed even on normal
days. Countless vehicles
were stranded and many
of them abandoned.
Officials said 239 chil-
dren spent Tuesday night
aboard school buses;
thousands of others
stayed overnight in their
schools.
One woman's 12-mile
commute home took



BOSTON

FROM PAGE 1

in the case of Dzhokhar
Tsamaev, the defendant
in the Boston Marathon
bombings last April that
killed three people and
injured 260.
As the U.S. attorney in
Washington in 1993, Holder
recommended to Attorney
General Janet Reno that
she not seek the death
penalty in the case of a
slain police officer because
of legal obstacles that made
conviction unlikely, Reno
overruled him but in the
end, the government cut a


FARM
FROM PAGE 1

to put the long-stalled bill
behind them and build on
the success of a bipartisan
budget passed earlier this
month. Leaders in both
parties also were hoping
to bolster rural candidates
in this year's midterm
elections.
House Speaker John
Boehner did not cast a
vote on the bill, a com-
monplace practice for a
speaker, but he had issued
a statement Monday
saying it was "worthy of
the House's support."
Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi, D-Calif., voted for
the bill despite concerns
from some in her caucus
that the bill cut too much


American Civil Liberties
Union.
In the motion filed in
federal court in Denver,
Jamshid Muhtorov also
requested that prosecutors
disclose more about how
the surveillance law was
used in his case. Muhtorov
denies the terror charges
he faces.
Muhtorov was arrested
Jan. 21, 2012, in Chicago
with about $2,800 in cash,

his budget at the annual
legislative planning
meeting sponsored by
The Associated Press,
declined to answer
questions directly about
the reliance on extra
property taxes.
The Scott administra-
tion later defended the
approach because the
governor is not recom-
mending an increase in
the tax rate charged to
homeowners.
Weatherford said that
relying on additional

16 hours. Another woman
gave birth while stuck in
traffic; police arrived just
in time to help. Drivers
who gave up trying to get
home took shelter at fire
stations, churches and
grocery stores.
One traffic death was
reported in Atlanta -
that of a man killed in a
crash.
"I'm not thinking
about a grade right now,"
the mayor said when
asked about the city's
response. "I'm thinking
about getting people out
of their cars."
National Guardsmen
in Humvees, state
troopers and transpor-
tation crews delivered
food and other relief,
and by Wednesday night,
Deal said all Atlanta-area
schoolchildren were
back home with their
parents.
Atlanta was crippled
by an ice storm in
2011, and officials had
vowed not to be caught
unprepared again. But
in this case, few closings
or other measures were
ordered ahead of time.
Deal, who is up for
re-election in November,
said warnings could
have been posted along
highways earlier and


deal that put the killer away
for life imprisonment, a
frequent outcome in capital
punishment prosecutions.
"The case had problems
... and when we had the
ability to get a plea from
the defendant that put him
in jail without any chance
of parole for the rest of his
life, we decided to accept
the plea," Holder explained
later to the Senate Judiciary
Committee.
At the same hearing,
Holder assured the Senate
panel that, "I will enforce
the law that has been
passed, and any statute that
contains a death penalty
provision will be looked
at as any other statute. I


from the food stamp
program.
The bill ultimately
would cut about
$800 million a year from
the $80 billion-a-year
food stamp program, or
around 1 percent. The
House had sought a
5 percent cut.
The legislation also
would continue to heavily
subsidize major crops for
the nation's farmers while
eliminating some sub-
sidies and shifting them
toward more politically
defensible insurance
programs.
House Agriculture
Chairman Frank Lucas,
R-Okla., called the
compromise a "miracle"
after trying to get the bill
passed for almost three
years. An early version
of the legislation was


two shrink-wrapped
iPhones and an iPad as well
as a GPS device.
"We've learned over the
last few months that the
NSA has implemented the
law in the broadest possi-
ble way, and that the rules
that supposedly protect
the privacy of innocent
people are weak and
riddled with exceptions,"
Jameel Jaffer, the ACLU's
deputy legal director, said

local taxes was appro-
priate because school
funding is split between
local school districts
and the state. He noted
that the state increased
its share of funding
when property values
declined.
"There's always ebbs
and flows," Weatherford
said. "The way we fund
education in the state is
a partnership."
Democrats, however,
criticized the approach
and charged that Scott

farther out Tuesday.
But he also fended off
criticism.
"I would have acted
sooner, and I think we
learn from that and then
we will act sooner the
next time," Deal told
reporters.
"But we don't want
to be accused of crying
wolf. Because if we had
been wrong, y'all would
have all been in here
saying, 'Do you know
how many millions of
dollars you cost the
economies of the city
of Atlanta and the state
of Georgia by shutting
down businesses all over
this city and this state?'"
Deal faulted govern-
ment forecasters, saying
they warned that the
storm would strike south
of Atlanta and the city
would get no more than
a dusting of snow.
However, the National
Weather Service explicit-
ly cautioned on Monday
that snow-covered
roads "will make travel
difficult or impossible."
And around 3:30 a.m.
Tuesday, the agency
issued a winter storm
warning for metro
Atlanta and cautioned
people not to travel
except in an emergency.


will enforce the law as this
Congress gives it to us."
In recent death penalty
cases brought by Holder's
Justice Department, one
defendant was sentenced
to death and six received
life sentences, either
through a plea or a trial.
Even when there's a
conviction, the odds
against death sentences
being imposed are such
that "from the Justice
Department's point of view
the question about the
death penalty often comes
down to 'Ifwe seek it, how
likely are we to get it?'"
said David Schertler, who
was chief of the homicide
section when Holder ran


defeated on the House
floor last June after
conservatives said the
food stamp cuts were
too modest and liberal
Democrats said they were
too deep.
The House later passed
a bill with a higher,
$4 billion cut, arguing at
the time that the program
had spiraled out of control
after costs doubled in
the last five years. But
cuts that high were
ultimately not possible
after the Senate balked
and the White House
threatened a veto. The
Senate had sought a cut of
$400 million annually.
Many House conser-
vatives still voted against
the bill 63 Republicans
opposed it, one more than
in June.
One of those


in a statementWednesday.
The ACLU called the filing
the first of its kind.
Justice Department
spokesman Brian Fallon
declined to comment.
The challenge had
been expected after the
Justice Department in
October said it intended
to use information
gleaned from one of the
NSA's warrantless surveil-
lance programs against

was engaged in a "shell
game." They also said
that the budget was
full of "election year
gimmicks" meant to get
Floridians to forget that
Scott advocated large
cuts to schools when he
first became governor in
2011.
"With an election year
upon us, we're expecting
lots of'feel good' pro-
posals from the gover-
nor, and the budget he
released on Wednesday
was no exception,"


Muhtorov. It was the first
time the department had
made such a disclosure.
The Supreme Court
has so far turned aside
challenges to the law on the
grounds that people who
bring such lawsuits have
no evidence they are being
targeted. Muhtorov was
accused in 2012 of provid-
ing material support to an
Uzbek terrorist organiza-
tion active in Afghanistan.

said Sen. Chris Smith,
D-Fort Lauderdale and
the Senate Democratic
leader.
Scott's proposal calls
for spending slightly
less than what was
authorized in this year's
budget. Scott was able
to keep a limit on the
total by eliminating
vacant positions in state
government, as well as
other cuts in admin-
istrative expenses and
shifting money from
other state programs.


AP PHOTO
In this aerial photo, abandoned cars on 1-75 headed northbound
near the Chattahoochee River overpass are piled up in the
median of the ice-covered interstate after a winter snowstorm
Wednesday in Atlanta.


the U.S. Attorney's office in
Washington, D.C.
Holder has had "a lot of
experience with the death
penalty and he has always
been extremely thoughtful,
deliberate and concerned
about being consistent on
the subject," Schertler said.
As recently as last week,
Holder emphasized that
his opposition to the death
penalty is due in part to
practical concerns- what
he sees as failures in the
legal system.
"The problem is that
in too many places,
lawyers who are defending
poor people don't have
adequate resources to do
a good job," Holder said


conservative opponents
was Rep. Marlin Stutzman,
R-Ind. "It spends money
we simply don't have," he
said.
But 89 Democrats
supported it, bolstered
by the lower cut in
food stamps. The top
Democrat on the agri-
culture panel, Minnesota
Rep. Collin Peterson, said
he also enticed some
of his colleagues with
more money for fruit,
vegetable and organic
programs.
The final savings in
the food stamp program
would come from cracking
down on some states that
seek to boost individual
food stamp benefits
by giving people small
amounts of federal heating
assistance that they
don't need. That heating


in an appearance at the
University of Virginia last
Thursday. "You end up
with these miscarriages of
justice."
"It's really one of the
reasons why I am person-
ally opposed to the death
penalty," Holder added. 'As
good as our system is, it's
ultimately a system that is
filled with men and women
who are well intentioned
but who make mistakes.
And as horrible as it is for
somebody to be put in jail
for crimes that they did not
commit, it is obviously not
as bad as a situation where
somebody is executed for a
crime that he or she did not
commit."


assistance, sometimes
as low as $1 per person,
triggers higher benefits,
and some critics see that
practice as circumventing
the law. The compromise
bill would require states to
give individual recipients
at least $20 in heating
assistance before a higher
food stamp benefit could
kick in.
Some Democrats said
the food stamp cut still is
too high.
Rep. Jim McGovern of
Massachusetts, one of the
states that have boosted
benefits through heating
assistance, said the cut
will be harmful on top
of automatic food stamp
cuts that went into place
in November.
"I don't know where
they are going to make
that up," McGovern said.


ALMANAC

Today is Thursday, Jan. 30,
the 30th day of 2014. There are
335 days left in the year.
Today in history
On Jan. 30,1964, the United
States launched Ranger 6, an
unmanned spacecraft carrying
television cameras that crash-
landed on the moon, but failed
to send back images.
On this date
In 1649, England's King
Charles I was executed for
treason.
In 1862, the ironclad USS
Monitor was launched from the
Continental Iron Works in Green-
point, N.Y., during the Civil War.
In 1933, Adolf Hitler became
chancellor of Germany.
In 1939, the U.S. Supreme
Court, in Tennessee Electric
Power Co. v. Tennessee Valley
Authority, upheld the right of the
federally-owned TVA to compete
with private utilities.
In 1948, Indian political and
spiritual leader Mohandas K.
Gandhi, 78, was shot and killed
in New Delhi by Nathuram
Godse, a Hindu extremist. (Godse
and a co-conspirator were later
executed.)
In 1962, two members of "The
Flying Wallendas" high-wire act
were killed when their seven-
person pyramid collapsed during
a performance at the State Fair
Coliseum in Detroit.
In 1968, the Tet Offensive
began during the Vietnam War
as Communist forces launched
surprise attacks against South
Vietnamese provincial capitals.
In 1972, 13 Roman Catholic
civil rights marchers were shot
to death by British soldiers
in Northern Ireland on what
became known as "Bloody
Sunday.:'
In 1974, President Richard
Nixon delivered what would
be his last State of the Union
address; Nixon pledged to rein in
rising prices without the "harsh
medicine of recession"and
establish a national health care
plan that every American could
afford.
In 1981, an estimated
2 million New Yorkers turned out
for a ticker-tape parade honoring
the freed American hostages
from Iran.
Today's birthdays
Actress Dorothy Malone is 89.
Producer-director Harold Prince
is 86. Actor Gene Hackman is
84. Actress Tammy Grimes is
80. Actress Vanessa Redgrave
is 77. Chess grandmaster Boris
Spassky is 77. Country singer
Norma Jean is 76. Former Vice
President Dick Cheney is 73.
Rock singer Marty Balin is 72.
Rhythm-and-blues musician
William King (The Commodores)
is 65. Singer Phil Collins is 63.
World Golf Hall of Famer Curtis
Strange is 59. Actress-comedian
Brett Butler is 56. Singer Jody
Watley is 55. Actor-filmmaker
Dexter Scott King is 53. The
King of Jordan, Abdullah II, is.52.
Actor Norbert Leo Butz is 47.
Country singer Tammy Cochran
is 42. Actor Christian Bale is 40.
Pop-country singer-songwriter
Josh Kelley is 34. Actor Wilmer
Valderrama is 34. Actor Jake
Thomas is 24.


Gassy German
cows blamed for
barn explosion
BERLIN (AP)- A
herd of dairy cows
nearly lifted the roof
off their barn in
central Germany when
methane released by
the animals caused an
explosion.
Police in Hesse state
said in a statement that
a static electric charge
apparently triggered
the detonation, and
a spurt of flame, on
Monday at a farm in
Rasdorf. The roof was
slightly damaged and
one cow suffered light
burns. No people were
hurt.
Police say 90 cows
are kept in the shed
and it wasn't clear why
quantities of methane
had built up. Bovine
belching and flatulence
release large quantities
of the gas.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


FROM PAGE ONE





The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 5


I WORLD
Monarch migration
numbers drop
MEXICO CITY (AP) -
The number of Monarch
butterflies wintering in
Mexico plunged this year
to its lowest level since
studies began in 1993,
leading experts to an-
nounce Wednesday that
the insects' annual mi-
gration from the United
States and Canada is in
danger of disappearing.
A report released by
the World Wildlife Fund,
Mexico's Environment
Department and the
Natural Protected Areas
Commission blames the
displacement of the milk-
weed the species feeds on
by genetically modified
crops and urban sprawl in
the United States, as well
as the dramatic reduction
of the butterflies' habitat
in Mexico due to illegal
logging of the trees they
depend on for shelter.
After steep and steady
declines in the previous
three years, the black-
and-orange butterflies
now cover only 1.65 acres
in the pine and fir forests
west of Mexico City, com-
pared to 2.93 acres last
year. They covered more
than 44.5 acres at their
recorded peak in 1995.

Snowden gets
Nobel Peace Prize
nomination
WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) President
Barack Obama wants to see
Edward Snowden clapped
in irons and bound to the
U.S. for a criminal trial. Two
-Norwegian
politicians
have a
different fate
in mind for
Snowden: the
Nobel Peace
Prize.
SNOWDEN Norwegian
parlia-
mentarians SnorreValen
and BaardVegar Solhjell
nominated Snowden for the
award -the same honor
Obama himself won in 2009
- for his disclosures about
National Security Agency
spying.
The idea that the Nobel
committee would bestow
its most prestigious prize on
a man some in the United
States consider a traitor
drew a dismissive response
from aWhite House official,
who said Snowden instead
should be tried as a felon.
Snowden "should be
returned to the U.S. as soon
as possible, where he will be
accorded full due process,"
White House National
Security Council spokes-
woman Caidin Hayden said.

Third of Spanish
children at poverty
risk, group warns
MADRID (dpa) -A third
of children in Spain are at
risk of poverty an inter-
national charity warned
Wednesday as the European
Commission pushed for
the country to continue
its austerity measures and
reduce the national deficit.
Nearly 34 percent of
children are at risk of
poverty or social exclusion,
Save the Children said in its
assessment of EU statistics
agency Eurostat's data.
Many live with families who
don't have enough money
for a healthy diet, school
books or clothing.

Central African
Republic food
shortages loom
NAIROBI, Kenya


(Bloomberg) Central
African Republic faces a
"significant" drop in food
production because of
widespread violence in the
country, the United Nations
said, as it approved the
deployment of troops in
the war-torn country.
There is "deep con-
cern" about the growing
season that begins in
March with 94 percent of


communities interviewed
by the UN's Global
Information and Early
Warning System reporting
they will have insuffi-
cient seeds to plant, the
Food and Agriculture
Organization said on its
website. Farm output,
which accounts for about
53 percent of the econ-
omy, fell "sharply" last
year because of conflict,
it said.

Pakistani PM
pushing for
peace talks
ISLAMABAD (AP) -
Pakistan's prime minister
vowed Wednesday that
his government will
pursue peace talks with
the Pakistani Taliban,
naming a four-member
committee to facilitate
negotiations.
In a speech to parlia-
ment, Prime Minister
Nawaz Sharif also called
on the militants to
observe a cease-fire and
condemned them for
targeting security forces
and civilians in recent
months.
Sharif long has sup-
ported talks as the best
way to end the years of
fighting in the country's
northwest.

Merkel warns of
'deceptive calm'
in euro crisis risk
BERLIN (Bloomberg)
- German Chancellor
Angela Merkel called for a
fresh push to create "real
economic union" through
changes to European
treaties, saying that the
euro-area debt crisis isn't
yet defeated.
Addressing lawmakers
in Berlin Wednesday in
her first policy speech of
the year, Merkel said that
Europe risks falling be-
hind unless the 18-nation
euro region expands
binding commitments
and improves its current
"unsatisfactory" coor-
dination on economic
policy.
"Without decisive
progress on this front,
without a quantum leap,
we won't overcome the
European sovereign-debt
crisis," Merkel said. "We
might learn to live with it
somehow, but we won't
keep our place at the top
of global development."

Egypt puts
AI-Jazeera staff
on trial for joining
terror group
CAIRO (Bloomberg) -
Egypt's authorities pressed
charges of joining a terrorist
group against 20 staff
members of the Arab tele-
vision channel Al-Jazeera,
including an Australian, two
Britons and a Dutch citizen.
The defendants, the rest
of whom are Egyptian, are
also charged with spreading
false news that endangers
national security and harms
Egypt's image, according
to a faxed statement from
the prosecution. It said they
used two suites in a luxury
hotel in Cairo as a media
center to pursue those aims.
The prosecutors said
the defendants "fabricated
footage" to create "unreal
scenes" and give the
impression to the outside
world that "the country is
witnessing a civil war." It
said their efforts were in-
tended to serve the interests
of the Muslim Brotherhood,
which was declared a
terrorist group by Egyptian
authorities last month.
The Brotherhood has
been the target of an
unprecedented crackdown
since Egypt's army toppled
elected Islamist President


Mohammed Morsi in July.
Many of its top leaders
are on trial, including
Morsi, and hundreds of
supporters have been
killed by security forces as
they protested the military
intervention.


KIEV Ukraine (AP)
- Ukraine's parliament
on Wednesday passed a
measure offering amnesty
to those arrested in two
months of protests, but
only if demonstrators
vacate most of the build-
ings they occupy. The
move was quickly greeted
with contempt by the
opposition.
The measure was put
forth by a lawmaker from
the party of President
ViktorYanukovych, who is
casting about for a way to
end the protests, which are
calling for his resignation.
The measure was a softer
version of an earlier pro-
posal to only offer amnesty
if all protests dispersed.
But the opposition
regards the arrests during
the protests 328 by one
lawmaker's count as
fundamentally illegitimate.
"In reality, parliament
has just passed a law on
hostages. The authorities
have themselves recog-
nized that they are taking


A protester guards the barricades in front of riot
Kiev, Ukraine, Wednesday.


hostages, as terrorists so
they can trade the hostag-
es," said Oleh Tyahnybok,
leader of the Svoboda par-
ty and one of the protests'
top figures, according to
the Interfax news agency.
That disdain was
echoed in Kiev's central
Independence Square,
where protesters have
set up a large tent camp
and conducted round-
the-clock demonstrations


since early Dec
"Is this a cor
or are these po
prisoners," said
old demonstra
Sharai. "We wil
buildings, if th
ties don't really
situation in th(
Protesters ai
mandingYanu
resignation, ea
tions and the I
authorities res


F for violent police disper-
sals of demonstrators.
The protests started after
Yanukovych backed out
of a long-awaited agree-
ment to deepen ties with
the European Union, but
quickly came to en-
compass a wide array of
discontent over corrup-
tion, heavy-handed police
... and dubious courts.
A Three demonstrators
died in clashes with
police last week, as anger
AP PHOTO boiled up over harsh
police in anti-protest laws that
Yanukovych pushed
through this month.
:ember. Parliament voted on
promise, Tuesday to repeal those
)itical laws, but Yanukovych has
d 30-year- not signed the measure.
tor Artem The bill would not
11 seize new apply to several city
e authori- buildings in the center of
change the Kiev which the protesters
e country." use as dormitories and
re de- operation centers, and
ikovych's are key support facilities
irly elec- for the extensive protest
iring of tent camp on the main
ponsible square.


Bitterness of Syrian war on display at talks


GENEVA (AP) -The
bitterness and rancor
stirred by Syria's civil war
were on full display this
week at peace talks in
Switzerland and not
just in the closed room
where rival delegations are
seeking a way to end the
three-year conflict.
For the first time since
the country devolved
into its bloody civil war,
supporters and opponents
of President Bashar Assad


- many of them journal-
ists are meeting face to
face. The mix is producing
more than just awkward
moments between people
with vastly different views.
In the hallways of
the U.N.'s European
headquarters and on the
manicured lawns outside,
tempers have flared.
Scuffles have broken out
as journalists interrupt
rival reports, government
officials have received


extraordinary public
grillings, and a distraught
mother confronted the
Syrian government dele-
gation at their hotel.
More than 130,000
people have died since
the uprising against Assad
began in March 2011, and
millions of people have
been uprooted from their
homes. The conflict has
pitted neighbor against
neighbor. People who
were once friends have


stopped talking to each
other. Journalists who
once worked together
have been separated.
Sectarian tensions, once
tamped down under
Assad's grip, have explod-
ed into the open.
Many journalists have
been forced to leave the
country, either thrown out
by the regime or going
into self-imposed exiled
in order to continue their
work freely.


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Ukrainian lawmakers offer


arrested protesters amnesty






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


Stocks slide on weak earnings;




Fed cuts stimulus


NEWYORK (AP) Stock
investors had plenty to dislike
onWednesday.
Disappointing earnings
from big U.S. companies,
ongoing jitters in emerging
markets and more cuts to the
Federal Reserve's economic
stimulus combined to push
stocks lower for the fourth day
out of the last five.
Boeing slumped after the
plane maker said its 2014
revenue and profit would fall
short of analysts' expectations
as its defense business slows
and it delivers more of its 787
planes, which are less prof-
itable. AT&T, the largest U.S.
telecommunications compa-
ny fell after its outlook for the
year disappointed investors.
Currencies including the
Turkish lira and the South
African rand fell against the
dollar despite efforts by central
banks in those countries to
stem the declines by raising
interest rates. Investors say
those tighter credit policies,


which can restrict lending,
come with risks.
"If the central banks out
there continue to hike interest
rates, they are going to destroy
economic activity" said
Peter Cardillo, chief market
economist at Rockwell Global
Capital. "That will impact the
global economy as well."
The Standard & Poor's 500
index fell 18.30 points, or 1
percent, to 1,774.20. The Dow
Jones industrial average fell
189.77 points, or 1.2 percent,
to 15,738.79. The Nasdaq com-
posite dropped 46.53 points, or
1.1 percent, to 4,051.43.
Stocks opened lower in
response to the lackluster
earnings news. The market
added to its declines after the
Fed's announcement at 2 p.m.
Eastern time.
The Fed said it will lower
its monthly bond purchases
by $10 billion to $65 billion
because of a strengthening
U.S. economy. The Fed
is cutting back its bond


purchases, which have held
down long-term interest rates,
even though the prospect of
reduced stimulus has rattled
global markets. The move was
largely anticipated by analysts
and investors.
Investors should view
the Fed's move as a vote of
confidence in the economy
because it means the central
bank sees the recovery as
more entrenched, said Dan
Genter, chief investment
officer at RNC Genter Capital
Management.
Fed policymakers are
"not seeing enough bad
news to stop that process,
which should be viewed as a
positive."
The S&P 500 has dropped
nearly 4 percent since con-
cerns about developing the
emerging market jitters first
surfaced last Thursday. That's
when a survey showed that
manufacturing in China, the
world's second-biggest econo-
my, was slowing in January.


CHICAGO (Bloomberg) -
McDonald's is counting on
coffee to give sagging U.S.
sales a jolt.
The chain's top prior-
ity this year is boosting
"coffee- driven visits,"
according to a document
laying out the 2014 to 2016
U.S. strategy. In a Jan. 28
memo, U.S. operations chief
Jim Johannesen and U.S.
brand chief Kevin Newell
exhorted franchisees to
deliver "a gold-standard cup
of coffee with every visit."
In a webcast presentation
for restaurant owners earlier
this month, McDonald's
vowed to become the "envy"
of its competitors and said
Starbucks was leading the


"coffee wars."
McDonald's is battling
fast-food chains, coffee sell-
ers and even convenience
stores hawking breakfast as
cash-strapped Americans eat
out less. Earlier this month,
the world's largest restaurant
chain said U.S. same-store
sales fell 1.4 percent in the
fourth quarter; profit barely
budged.
The ramped-up coffee
effort comes almost five
years after the U.S. debut
of the McCafe menu and
strategy, which hasn't lived
up to its original intent.
Initially, the chain planned
to transform thousands of
restaurants into Starbucks-
style cafes painted in earth


tones and offering free
Wi-Fi. While drip coffee has
won a following, the com-
pany's hot espresso drinks
haven't caught on and many
franchisees balked at re-
modeling costs and buying
$13,000 espresso machines.
"McDonald's is trying
to look and feel more like
Starbucks," said Howard
Penney, managing di-
rector at Hedgeye Risk
Management, who has
covered the industry for 20
years. "It's actually hurting
them, not helping them"
because the chain's com-
petitive advantage is food
not beverages and because
making complicated coffee
drinks slows down service.


ees! Consumer Reports hates
them as much as you do. And
not just because all of that
nickel-and-diming adds up to a
pretty penny. It's also because they
can be hard to escape.
Consumers pay $2.4 billion per
year in credit card late fees and
$800 million in expedited payment
fees to avoid those late charges.
We cough up $31 billion annually
in debit card overdraft fees. That's
a lot of $30-a-pop penalties for
payments that banks authorized in
the first place.
Airline fees can be just as bad.
Spirit Airlines, for example, ropes
you in with its claim of "ultra-low
fares," then gouges you for $90 to
check your first bag at the airport,
$110 for the second and $100 per
carry-on (round-trip).
Still, many fees can be avoided
or minimized. Consumer Reports
offers this guide:
Banking. Banks often give you
an escape hatch, so use it to save.
Avoid ATM withdrawal fees, usually
$2 to $3, by using your own bank's
machines or fee-free ATM network.
Or tap the cash back features many
supermarkets offer when you pay
by debit card.
Avoid big-bank checking fees
of $8 to $15 per month by signing
up for direct deposit, maintaining
minimum balances or switching to
a credit union, community bank or
branchless online or smartphone
virtual bank, where free checking is
more common.
Credit. It's easy to avoid $65
to $495 in credit card annual fees
because only 5 percent of credit
cards have them; shop for no-
fee, low-interest rate options at
bankrate.com. Stop overlimit fees
by contacting your card issuer to
opt out of plans that let you charge
beyond your credit limit.
Knowing your consumer rights
is the key to fee-zapping here.
There's almost no need to pay
$12 to $17 in credit report fees,
because you can get a free copy
once per year from each of the
three big credit bureaus Equifax,
Experian and TransUnion at


Consumer

Reports


annualcreditreport.com.
You can deal with a variety of
mortgage fees by asking the lender
to explain them, then negotiating
to reduce or eliminate them. Those
include prepayment fees, origina-
tion fees and various document
fees.
Investing. Never pay a mutual
fund sales fee, or "load," which
can be a whopping 3 percent to
8.5 percent of the amount you pay
for fund shares; buy only true "no
load" funds. Reduce management
fees that can tax your balances by
as much as 1.5 percent every year,
which hurts long-term returns, by
shopping for stock funds with fees
below 1 percent and index funds
with fees below 0.4 percent.
Stay away from variable an-
nuities and the mortality and
expense risk charges they come
with. Annuities are overpriced,
and it's hard to comparison shop
to begin with. But such charges
cost 1.25 percent of the annuity's
asset value every year to insure the
insurer in case you live longer than
their calculations supposed.
Travel. Sidestep airline tele-
phone booking fees of $25 to $35
per ticket by reserving and buying
online. Include baggage fees to
compare the true cost of low-fare
come-ons, and consider two
carriers highly rated by Consumer
Reports' readers that let you check
one bag (JetBlue) or two bags
(Southwest) free on domestic
flights.
Autos. The additional dealer
markup, often found on new or
high-demand models, can be made
to hit the road if you threaten to
bail on the deal or simply wait
until that hot model cools down.
And let the salesman know that
because manufacturers pay dealers
to remove coatings and coverings
that protect vehicles during
shipping, you won't be paying that
dealer prep fee.


MutualFunds
3-yr
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
Advance Capital I
Balanced b 19.33 -.09 +8.2
EqGrow b 24.62 -.25 +10.9
Retinc b 8.70 +.02 +4.4
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 7.62 -.11 +12.2
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 50.73 -.66 +19.5
AllianzGI
WellnessD b 30.72 -.22 +18.7
Alpine
DynBal d 12.45 -.07 +6.7
DynDiv d 3.68 -.03 +2.1
Amana
Growth b 31.22 ... +9.1
Income b 42.18 ... +11.9
American Beacon
LgCpVlls 27.62 -.21 +13.9
American Century
CapVallv 8.49 -.08 +13.5
Eqlnclnv 8.37 -.05 +10.2
HiYIdMu 8.92 ... +7.5
InTlxFBInv 11.26 ... +4.7
InvGrlnv 31.29 -.39 +11.3
Ultralnv 32.63 -.47 +14.2
American Funds
AMCAPA m 26.74 -.23 +15.2
BalA m 23.85 -.18 +11.6
BondA m 12.55 +.02 +3.8
CaplncBuA m 56.75 -.43 +8.6
CapWldBdA m 20.27 ... +2.9
CpWdGrlA m 43.88 -.42 +9.7
EurPacGrA m 47.19 -.47 +5.9
FnlnvA m 49.86 -.56 +12.6
GIbBalA m 29.83 -.17 NA
GrthAmA m 41.85 -.47 +14.0
HilncA m 11.35 -.01 +6.9
IncAmerA m 20.21 -.12 +10.6
IntBdAmA m 13.50 +.02 +1.9
InvCoAmA m 35.50 -.29 +12.8
MutualA m 33.51 -.25 +12.7
NewEconA m 37.50 -.38 +17.4
NewPerspA m 36.12 -.43 +10.8
NwWrldA m 56.07 -.46 +3.5
SmCpWdA m 48.21 -.31 +10.3
TaxEBdAmA m12.59 -.01 +6.4
WAMutlnvA m 38.02 -.44 +14.8
Artisan
Intl d 29.12 -.19 +11.1
IntlVal d 35.87 -.17 +13.2
MdCpVal 25.85 -.20 +14.6
MidCap 46.58 -.45 +16.4
BBH
TaxEffEq d 20.66 -.13 +15.1
Baron
Asset b 59.81 -.56 +14.3
Growth b 68.29 -.93 +15.4
Partners b 31.93 -.30 +15.7
Berkshire
Focus d 17.68 -.38 +15.5
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 14.52 -.12 -3.3
EqDivA m 23.23 -.17 +11.7
EqDivl 23.29 -.16 +12.0
GlobAIcA m 20.96 -.09 +5.8
GlobAlcC m 19.41 -.08 +5.1
GlobAlcl 21.06 -.09 +6.1
HiYIdBdls 8.23 ... +9.1
HiYldSvc b 8.23 -.01 +8.8
Bruce
Bruce 459.65 -1.13 +11.1
CGM
Focus 38.05 -.19 +3.9
Clipper
Clipper 87.36 -.83 +12.7


Cohen & Steers
Realty 63.70 -.44 +8.0
Columbia
AcornlntZ 45.18 -.06 +7.7
AcornZ 35.89 -.44 +12.7
DivlncZ 17.61 -.17 +13.3
IntlVMB m 14.37 -.10 +4.8
Mar21CB m 16.69 -.22 +9.2
MarGrlA m 23.83 -.33 +13.0
DFA
lYrFixInI 10.32 ... +.6
2YrGIbFII 10.02 +.01 +.8
5YrGIbFII 10.94 +.01 +3.1
EmMkCrEql 18.16 -.13 -3.5
EmMktVall 25.63 -.19 -6.3
IntCorEql 12.50 -.08 +6.0
IntSmCapl 20.20 -.05 +9.3
IntlSCol 19.03 -.04 +8.0
IntlValul 19.29 -.18 +3.9
RelEstScI 26.43 -.15 +9.1
USCorEqll 15.89 -.17 +14.6
USCorEq21 15.70 -.17 +14.7
USLgCo 13.99 -.14 +14.0
USLgVall 30.30 -.28 +15.8
USMicrol 19.15 -.28 +17.1
USSmVall 33.59 -.46 +15.1
USSmalll 29.54 -.40 +16.1
USTgtVallnst 21.62 -.27 +14.9
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.37 -.03 +2.8
EqDivB m 40.74 -.40 +8.2
GIbOA m 43.96 -.37 +11.3
GIbOB m 38.45 -.33 +10.4
GIbOC m 38.75 -.33 +10.4
GIbOS d 45.47 -.39 +11.6
GrlncS 22.38 -.26 +14.6
HlthCareS d 36.46 -.32 +24.0
LAEqS d 24.39 -.66 -9.0
LC2020S 14.97 -.09 +7.0
StrHiYIdTxFS 12.04 ... +6.9
Davis
NYVentA m 39.42 -.39 +10.9
NYVentY 39.90 -.39 +11.2
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.41 +.02 +4.1
Dodge & Cox
Bal 96.44 -.42 +12.9
Income 13.71 +.03 +4.7
IntlStk 41.30 -.30 +7.2
Stock 162.92 -1.27 +15.7
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 10.99 ... +6.1
Dreyfus
Appredalnv 49.50 -.51 +10.7
MidCapldx 35.62 -.37 +13.4
MuniBd 11.32 ... +5.7
NYTaxEBd 14.46 -.01 +4.7
ShTrmlncD 10.64 ... +2.0
SmCoVal 34.54 -.35 +14.2
Driehaus
Activelnc 10.77 -.01 +1.4
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 12.91 -.15 +11.4
TMSmCaB m 19.90 -.24 +10.1
FMI
CommStk 27.78 -.26 +13.2
LgCap 20.01 -.14 +12.7
FPA
Capital d 43.95 -.47 +9.6
Cres d 32.39 -.10 +10.4
Newlnc d 10.30 ... +1.6
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 38.01 -.40 +7.0
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.85 ... +8.0
IntSmMCoA m 42.46 -.19 +8.1
KaufmanA m 6.11 -.07 +12.8
MDTMdCpGrStB m 35.48-.36 +10.5
StrVall 5.71 -.04 +13.8


Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.31 -.02 +4.6
AstMgr50 17.34 -.08 +7.3
Bal 22.27 -.15 +10.2
BIChGrow 61.39 -.84 +15.3
Canada d 55.68 -.44 -.1
CapApr 35.40 -.40 +16.3
Capinc d 9.81 -.03 +6.8
Contra 92.66 -1.12 +14.5
DivGrow 34.00 -.33 +10.6
Divrlwntl d 35.52 -.28 +7.3
EmergAsia d 29.03 +.02 -.1
EmgMkt d 22.40 -.19 -3.4
Eqlnc 56.62 -.42 +10.4
Eqlnc II 23.55 -.21 +10.4
FF2015 12.53 -.05 +6.3
FF2035 13.02 -.10 +8.0
FF2040 9.19 -.08 +8.1
Fidelity 41.31 -.51 +11.9
RItRtHiln d 9.99 ... +3.9
FocStk 19.61 -.17 +16.7
FourlnOne 34.63 -.26 +10.7
Free2000 12.40 -.01 +4.0
Free2010 15.10 -.05 +6.2
Free2020 15.30 -.07 +6.6
Free2025 12.98 -.08 +7.4
Free2030 15.77 -.13 +7.5
GNMA 11.40 +.03 +3.4
GrowCo 116.82 -1.51 +16.7
Growlnc 26.63 -.29 +14.9
Hilnc d 9.37 -.01 +7.5
Indepndnc 36.19 -.35 +14.3
IntRelEst d 9.98 -.07 +7.5
IntlDisc d 38.93 -.24 +7.4
InvGrdBd 7.76 +.01 +4.3
JapanSmCo d 13.17 +.09 +14.2
LatinAm d 27.96 -.42 -11.7
LevCoSt d 41.61 -.33 +13.8
LowPriStk d 47.83 -.19 +15.1
Magellan 89.44 -1.08 +10.6
MeCpSto 14.73 -.17 +14.8
MidCap d 38.58 -.37 +14.9
Munilnc d 12.91 ... +6.1
NewMille 38.39 -.39 +16.3
NewMktln d 15.38 -.04 +6.6
OTC 77.06 -.89 +16.1
Overseas d 39.16 -.15 +8.5
Puritan 20.88 -.15 +10.3
ShTmBond 8.60 +.01 +1.6
SmCapDisc d 29.67 -.36 +17.7
Stratinc 10.89 ... +5.0
TaxFrB d 11.18 -.01 +6.3
TotalBd 10.55 +.01 +4.5
USBdldx 11.51 +.03 NA
USBdldxlnv 11.51 +.03 +3.5
Value 100.82 -.79 +14.1
ValueDis 21.02 -.18 +13.9
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 72.40 -.99 +13.2
IntlCapAB m 12.60 -.07 +8.0
LmtdTermBondA m 11.49+.01+3.3
LmtdTermBondB m 11.48+.01 +2.6
LrgCapA m 25.92 -.30 +15.8
LrgCapB m 24.23 -.29 +14.9
NewlnsA m 25.66 -.25 +13.9
Newlnsl 26.10 -.25 +14.3
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 203.59 -1.46 +44.3
Electron d 62.89 +.08 +7.2
Energy d 53.35 -.44 +3.8
Gold d 20.47 +.56 -23.1
HealtCar d 198.27 -1.38 +27.9
Leisure d 125.07 -2.41 +17.5
Materials d 81.28 +.05 +9.2
MedDeliv d 73.10 -.56 +16.4
MedEqSys d 36.47 -.26 +16.6
NatGas d 36.65 -.23 +3.9
NatRes d 35.57 -.15 +1.2
Pharm d 19.34 -.15 +22.5
Wireless d 10.18 -.07 +11.0
Fidelity Spartan
5001cdxbAdvtg 62.92 -.64 +14.0
5001dxlnstl 62.92 -.64 NA
5001dxlnv 62.91 -.65 +13.9


ExtMktIdAg d 51.94 -.61 +15.0
IntlldxAdg d 39.32 -.28 +6.4
TotMktIdAg d 52.12 -.55 +14.2
First Eagle
GIbA m 52.82 -.01 +8.4
OverseasA m 22.93 +.03 +6.1
First Investors
GlobalA m 8.27 -.07 +8.0
TotalRetA m 18.63 -.09 +10.7
Firsthand
e-Comm 7.70 -.11 +9.7
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 11.97 ... +6.4
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 7.10 ... +7.3
EqlnA m 21.96 -.17 +11.9
FLTFA m 10.92 -.01 +4.3
GrOppA m 28.63 -.35 +13.1
GrowthA m 63.64 -.57 +12.5
HYTFA m 10.01 ... +6.6
Income C m 2.41 -.01 +8.3
IncomeA m 2.39 ... +9.0
IncomeAdv 2.37 -.01 +9.0
NYTFA m 11.30 -.01 +4.8
RisDvA m 46.46 -.41 +13.7
StrlncA m 10.48 -.01 +5.8
TotalRetA m 9.92 +.01 +4.4
USGovA m 6.55 +.02 +2.7
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 32.84 -.18 +10.0
DiscovA m 32.36 -.18 +9.6
SharesZ 27.41 -.17 +11.3
SharesA m 27.19 -.17 +11.0
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 12.82 -.08 +3.9
GIBondA m 12.79 -.08 +4.3
GIBondAdv 12.75 -.08 +4.6
GrowthA m 24.19 -.19 +11.6
WorldA m 18.70 -.13 +11.1
GE
S&SUSEq 52.78 -.63 +13.4
GMO
EmgMktsVl d 9.91 -.09 -5.5
IntltVllV 25.04 -.22 +7.0
Quill 23.97 -.25 +14.4
QuVI 23.97 -.25 +14.5
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 62.41 -.71 +13.2
EqlncomeAAAx 27.42 -.39 +12.4
Value m 18.75 -.20 +13.8
Glenmede
SmCapEqAd 24.88 -.34 +17.3
Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.15 -.01 +8.1
MidCpVals 43.09 -.43 +12.1
ShDuGovA m 10.18 ... +.4
Harbor
Bond 12.08 +.02 +3.9
CapAplnst 55.04 -.79 +15.8
Intllnstl 68.11 -.77 +6.1
Intllnv b 67.43 -.77 +5.7
Hartford
CapAprA m 44.98 -.55 +10.9
CpApHLSIA 57.67 -.63 +11.4
SmallCoB m 19.06 -.27 +13.8
Heartland
ValuePlus m 34.05 -.47 +10.7
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 16.24 -.22 +15.3
Hodges
Hodges m 34.26 -.50 +15.8
INVESCO
CharterA m 21.24 -.15 +11.2
ComstockA m 22.81 -.21 +14.0
DMlnclnv b 18.31 -.16 +11.8
EnergyA m 43.08 -.24 +.5
Energylnv b 42.92 -.24 +.5
EqlncomeA m 10.44 -.07 +10.2
EuroGrA m 38.19 -.30 +10.9
GIbGrB m 26.69 -.28 +8.8
GrowlncA m 26.11 -.24 +12.4
GrwthAIIA m 13.25 -.08 +8.3


PacGrowB m 21.57 +.08 -.3
SmCapEqA m 16.19 -.26 +13.5
Techldnv b 37.42 -.51 +8.6
USMortA m 12.47 +.03 +3.0
Ivy
AssetSTrB m 29.99 -.27 +9.3
AssetStrA m 31.00 -.28 +10.2
AssetStrC m 30.14 -.27 +9.4
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.64 +.03 +3.9
GoreBondA m 11.63 +.03 +3.6
CoreBondSelect 11.63 +.03 +3.8
HighYIdSel 8.03 -.01 +7.3
LgCapGrA m 30.74 -.42 +13.8
LgCapGrSelect 30.75 -.42 +14.0
MidCpVaIIll 33.97 -.22 +16.2
ShDurBndSel 10.91 ... +1.1
USLCpCrPS 26.64 -.26 +14.0
Janus
BaIC m 29.25 -.13 +9.0
ContrT 20.69 -.14 +12.2
EntrprsT 80.24 -.62 +13.4
FlexBdS b 10.47 +.02 +4.6
GIbVa[T d 13.72 -.08 +10.1
HiYIdT 9.19 -.01 +7.7
OverseasT 34.80 -.32 -7.5
PerkinsMCVL 22.91 -.13 +9.2
PerkinsMCVT 22.67 -.13 +9.0
PerkinsSCVL 25.33 -.29 +9.7
ShTmBdT 3.07 ... +1.9
T 39.38 -.31 +11.1
USCrT 19.20 -.20 +15.6
VentureT 62.82 -.75 +17.5
John Hancock
LifBal b 15.04 -.09 +8.2
LifGrl b 15.65 -.12 +9.2
Lazard
EmgMkEqlnst d 17.02 -.22 -1.3
Legg Mason
WAManagedMuniA mrr 16.13... +7.3
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl 17.44 -.15 +5.0
Long leaf Partners
LongPart 32.28 -.33 +12.5
Loomis Sayles
BdlnstI 15.12 -.02 +7.8
BdR b 15.05 -.03 +7.4
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 14.90 -.11 +10.0
BondDebA m 8.15 -.01 +7.6
ShDurlncA m 4.56 ... +3.8
ShDurlncC m 4.58 -.01 +3.0
MFS
IslntlEq 21.44 -.16 +7.7
MAInvB m 26.08 -.25 +12.8
TotRetA m 17.25 -.07 +9.5
ValueA m 31.74 -.28 +14.0
Valuel 31.89 -.29 +14.2
MainStay
HiYldCorA m 6.09 ... +7.9
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 106.18 -1.04 +16.5
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.54 -.03 +5.9
PBMaxTrmS 19.35 -.20 +9.3
WrIdOppA 8.70 -.12 +3.9
Marsico
21stCent b 19.23 -.25 +10.1
FlexCap b 17.33 -.19 +14.7
Merger
Merger b 15.92 -.01 +2.5
Meridian
MeridnGr d 35.73 -.34 +11.6
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.68 +.03 +5.9
TotRtBd b 10.68 +.03 +5.7
Midas Funds
Magic m 22.98 -.25 +17.3
Midas m 1.45 +.04 -33.7
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 44.26 -.60 +15.2


MdCpGrl 44.38 -.56 +11.2
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkrp 64.30 -.65 +10.5
Natixis
LSInvBdY 11.93 ... +6.0
LSStratlncA m 16.23 -.04 +8.5
LSStratlncC m 16.33 -.04 +7.7
Needham
Growth m 44.96 -.41 +9.7
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 58.60 -.77 +14.4
SmCpGrlnv 27.46 -.36 +15.8
Northeast Investors
Growth 16.54 -.28 +7.4
Northern
HYFixInc d 7.51 ... +8.2
Stkldx 21.97 -.22 +13.9
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.62 -.01 +5.4
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.87 -.04 +7.3
HlthSinces 19.10 -.17 +20.0
PinOakEq 43.72 -.62 +14.8
RedOakTec 14.65 -.05 +16.7
Oakmark
EqlncI 31.73 -.21 +9.5
Global I 29.58 -.12 +11.3
Intll 25.77 -.03 +11.1
Oakmark I 60.97 -.54 +16.6
Select I 38.98 -.40 +17.7
Old Westbury
GIbOppo 7.78 -.03 +4.8
GIbSmMdCp 16.74 -.09 +9.4
LgCpStr 12.01 -.08 +5.1
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 34.94 -.57 +1.4
DevMktY 34.53 -.56 +1.8
GlobA m 75.93 -.77 +9.6
IntlGrY 36.42 -.33 +10.5
MainStrA m 46.46 -.43 +13.5
SrFItRatA m 8.43 ... +5.4
StrlncA m 4.13 ... +4.4
Oppenheimer Rocheste
FdMuniA m 14.74 -.01 +6.2
Osterweis
OsterStrInc d 11.88 -.01 +6.1
PIMCO
AIIAssetl 11.94 -.02 +5.5
AIIAuthIn 9.85 ... +4.4
ComRIRStI 5.58 +.05 -5.6
Divlnclnst 11.49 -.02 +5.9
EMktCurl 9.91 -.05 -.4
EmMktslns 10.56 -.03 +5.1
ForBdlnstl 10.57 -.02 +6.5
HiYIdls 9.62 ... +7.5
LowDrls 10.34 ... +2.5
RealRet 11.17 +.03 +4.1
ShtTermls 9.87 ... +1.5
TotRetA m 10.81 +.02 +4.0
TotRetAdm b 10.81 +.02 +4.1
TotRetC m 10.81 +.02 +3.2
TotRetls 10.81 +.02 +4.4
TotRetrnD b 10.81 +.02 +4.1
TotlRetnP 10.81 +.02 +4.3
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr 29.95 -.35 +23.4
Growth 23.53 -.21 +16.1
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 35.17 -.34 +14.1
Permanent
Portfolio 43.03 -.01 +2.6
Pioneer
PioneerA m 37.68 -.39 +10.1
Principal
LCGrllnst 12.36 ... +15.3
SAMConGrA m 17.25 ... +10.2
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 21.33 -.26 +11.4
IntlEqtyC m 6.82 -.06 +5.3
JenMidCapGrZ 39.24 -.34 +13.9


Putnam
GlbUtilB m 11.27
GrowlncA m 19.37
IntlNewB m 17.16
SmCpValA m 14.77
Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 31.05
Reynolds
BlueChip b 71.65
Royce
PAMutlnv d 14.04
Premierlnv d 21.09
ValueSvc m 12.67
Rydex
Electrlnv 63.08
HlthCrAdv b 24.68
NsdqlOOlv 20.60
Schwab
1000l1nv d 46.84
S&P500Sel d 27.72
Scout
Internal 35.62
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 41.18
Sequoia
Sequoia 222.00
State Farm
Growth 65.90
Stratton
SmCapVal d 71.70
T Rowe Price
Balanced 22.81
BIChpGr 62.40
CapApprec 25.33
Corplnc 9.61
EmMktStk d 29.54
Eqlndex d 47.83
Eqtylnc 31.62
FinSer 19.75
GlbTech 12.53
GrowStk 51.02
HealthSci 60.03
HiYield d 7.17
InsLgCpGr 26.69
IntlBnd d 9.56
IntlEqldx d 13.06
IntlGrlnc d 15.20
IntlStk d 15.55
MediaTele 66.77
MidCapVa 29.18
MidCpGr 71.66
NJTaxFBd 11.65
NewAmGro 42.81
NewAsia d 15.15
NewHoriz 45.27
Newlncome 9.40
OrseaStk d 9.80
R2015 14.06
R2025 15.01
R2035 15.83
Rtmt2010 17.55
Rtmt2020 19.97
Rtmt2030 22.01
Rtmt2040 22.73
SdTech 38.37
ShTmBond 4.79
SmCpStk 43.21
SmCpVal d 48.15
SpecGrow 23.17
Speclnc 12.77
SumGNMA 9.65
SumMulnc 11.37
TaxEfMult d 19.65
TaxFShlnt 5.66
Value 32.83
TCW
TotRetBdl 10.14
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 13.60
IntlE d 18.55
Target
SmCapVal 25.66


... +2.4
... +13.7
-.10 +4.5
-.16 +14.0
-.43 +14.8
-1.00 +11.3
-.19 +12.2
-.17 +10.4
-.19 +6.7
-.27 +1.9
-.17 +20.2
-.22 +15.2
-.48 +13.8
-.28 +14.0
-.34 +4.6
-.38 +12.8
-.73 +19.3
-.65 +9.7
-.68 +16.1
-.14 +10.0
-.91 +17.6
-.14 +12.2
+.02 +6.2
-.29 -4.0
-.49 +13.7
-.28 +12.6
-.25 +12.4
-.15 +15.6
-.74 +16.5
-.51 +31.1
... +8.5
-.39 +17.4
+.01 +1.9
-.10 +5.7
-.10 +6.5
-.15 +4.5
-.98 +17.7
-.27 +12.9
-.61 +14.4
-.01 +5.9
-.64 +14.2
-.08 +1.8
-.68 +21.8
+.02 +3.6
-.08 +7.2
-.07 +8.4
-.11 +9.9
-.14 +10.9
-.07 +7.3
-.12 +9.2
-.18 +10.5
-.21 +11.2
-.41 +11.5
... +1.4
-.65 +16.3
-.58 +14.5
-.24 +11.8
... +5.6
+.02 +2.7
-.01 +6.6
-.25 +14.0
... +2.7
-.31 +15.2
... +6.5
-.14 +14.2
-.16 +6.5
-.30 +13.4


Templeton
InFEqSeS 22.00 -.16 +5.8
Third Avenue
Value d 55.28 -.31 +4.6
Thompson
LargeCap 45.53 -.42 +13.2
Thornburg
IncBldC m 20.20 -.14 +6.8
IntlValA m 29.60 -.10 +2.7
IntlVall 30.25 -.10 +3.1
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.12 +.02 +5.4
MidCapGrA m 19.01 -.18 +9.3
Tocqueville
Gold m 37.53 +1.04 -21.4
Turner
SmCapGr 37.55 -.57 +12.7
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 26.00 -.07 +9.5
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 6.60 +.13 -23.3
GlobRes m 8.99 -.03 -6.3
USAA
CorstnMod 14.73 -.05 +5.9
GNMA 9.97 +.02 +2.4
Growlnc 20.95 -.22 +12.2
HYOpp x 8.73 -.04 +8.7
PrcMtlMin 14.66 +.33 -23.8
SdTech 19.44 -.20 +17.7
TaxELgTm 13.32 +.01 +7.8
TgtRt2040 12.61 -.05 +7.8
TgtRt2050 12.42 -.06 +7.8
WorldGro 25.89 -.22 +12.9
Unified
Winlnv m 16.78 -.15 +7.1
Value Line
PremGro b 32.50 -.30 +14.3
Vanguard
500Adml 163.68 -1.67 +14.0
5001nv 163.67 -1.67 +13.9
BalldxAdm 27.08 -.14 +10.2
Balldxlns 27.08 -.14 +10.2
CAITAdml 11.46 -.01 +6.2
CapOp 46.22 -.38 +16.0
CapOpAdml 106.73 -.88 +16.1
Convrt 13.71 -.03 +7.8
DevMktsldxlP 115.22 -.89 +6.5
DivGr 20.43 -.19 +14.5
EmMktlAdm 31.40 -.30 -4.4
EnergyAdm 120.78 -.87 +3.2
Eqlnc 28.58 -.20 +15.6
EqlncAdml 59.91 -.41 +15.7
ExplAdml 92.80 -1.08 +16.3
Explr 99.79 -1.16 +16.1
ExtdldAdm 61.03 -.71 +15.2
Extdldlst 61.02 -.72 +15.2
ExtdMktldxlP 150.59 -1.77 +15.2
FAWeUSIns 95.05 -.78 +3.6
FAWeUSInv 19.03 -.16 +3.4
GNMA 10.60 +.03 +3.1
GNMAAdml 10.60 +.03 +3.2
GIbEq 22.63 -.19 +9.8
Grolnc 38.00 -.39 +14.5
GrthldAdm 45.99 -.56 +14.5
Grthlstld 45.99 -.56 +14.5
GrthlstSg 42.59 -.52 +14.5
HYCorAdml 6.04 ... +8.2
HItCrAdml 80.10 -.57 +22.7
HlthCare 189.89 -1.34 +22.6
ITBondAdm 11.29 +.04 +5.1
ITGradeAd 9.80 +.03 +5.4
InfPrtAdm 25.98 +.08 +4.0
InfPrtl 10.58 +.03 +4.1
InflaPro 13.23 +.04 +3.9
Instldxl 162.64 -1.66 +14.0
InstPlus 162.65 -1.66 +14.0
InstTStPI 40.77 -.43 +14.3
IntlGr 22.27 -.22 +7.0
IntlGrAdm 70.81 -.72 +7.1
IntlStkldxAdm 26.86 -.20 +3.6
IntlStkldxl 107.40 -.80 +3.7
IntlStkldxlPIs 107.41 -.81 +3.7


IntlStkldxlSgn 32.21 -.25 +3.6
IntlVal 35.71 -.33 +5.8
LTGradeAd 10.01 +.06 +9.2
LgCpldxlnv 32.93 -.34 +13.8
UfeCon 17.93 -.05 +6.1
UfeGro 26.86 -.19 +9.3
UfeMod 22.71 -.11 +7.9
MdGrlxlnv 34.41 -.34 +12.2
MidCapldxIP 144.02 -1.29 +13.8
MidCp 29.13 -.26 +13.6
MidCpAdml 132.20 -1.18 +13.8
MidCplst 29.20 -.26 +13.8
MidCpSgl 41.72 -.37 +13.8
Morg 24.82 -.28 +13.1
MorgAdml 76.92 -.86 +13.2
MuHYAdml 10.73 -.01 +6.9
Mulnt 13.92 ... +5.3
MulntAdml 13.92 ... +5.4
MuLTAdml 11.24 ... +6.4
MuLtdAdml 11.07 ... +2.3
MuShtAdml 15.87 ... +1.2
Prmcp 90.76 -.88 +15.0
PrmcpAdml 94.12 -.91 +15.1
PrmcpCorl 19.03 -.19 +14.4
REITIdxAd 93.44 -.57 +9.5
STBondAdm 10.52 +.01 +1.7
STBondSgl 10.52 +.01 +1.7
STCor 10.73 ... +2.4
STGradeAd 10.73 ... +2.5
STIGradel 10.73 ... +2.6
STsryAdml 10.70 +.01 +1.0
SelValu 27.14 -.25 +16.0
SmCapldx 51.10 -.61 +15.3
SmCpldAdm 51.13 -.61 +15.4
SmCpldlst 51.13 -.61 +15.4
SmCplndxSgnl 46.07 -.55 +15.4
SmVlldlst 22.55 -.26 +14.5
Star 23.53 -.11 +9.7
StratgcEq 29.10 -.28 +17.6
TgtRe2010 25.40 -.07 +7.0
TgtRe2015 14.57 -.06 +7.8
TgtRe2020 26.62 -.13 +8.4
TgtRe2030 26.92 -.19 +9.5
TgtRe2035 16.48 -.12 +9.9
TgtRe2040 27.39 -.23 +10.3
TgtRe2045 17.18 -.14 +10.3
TgtRe2050 27.26 -.23 +10.3
TgtRetInc 12.45 -.02 +6.1
Tgtet2025 15.40 -.10 +8.9
TotBdAdml 10.69 +.02 +3.6
TotBdlnst 10.69 +.02 +3.6
TotBdMklnv 10.69 +.02 +3.4
TotBdMkSig 10.69 +.02 +3.6
TotlntI 16.06 -.12 +3.6
TotStlAdm 44.98 -.47 +14.3
TotStllns 44.99 -.47 +14.3
TotStlSig 43.41 -.45 +14.3
TotStldx 44.96 -.47 +14.1
TxMCapAdm 90.18 -.95 +14.3
ValldxAdm 28.67 -.24 +13.5
Valldxlns 28.67 -.24 +13.5
Wellsl 24.74 -.03 +9.2
WellslAdm 59.94 -.07 +9.3
Welltn 37.29 -.19 +10.6
WelltnAdm 64.41 -.32 +10.7
WndsllAdm 62.82 -.55 +13.9
Wndsr 19.68 -.16 +14.3
WndsrAdml 66.40 -.52 +14.4
Wndsrll 35.40 -.31 +13.8
Victory
SpecValA m 20.12 -.16 +7.2
Virtus
EmgMktsls 8.97 -.10 +3.3
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 11.77 -.11 +7.8
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 32.25 -.47 +16.7
Growlnv 48.80 -.59 +16.3
Outk201Adm 13.24 +.01 +3.9
Yacktman
Focused d 24.23 -.26 +12.7
Yacktman d 22.70 -.23 +13.2


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE 0 CLOSE YTD 1YR 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 12.01 -0- 20.19 18.09 -.46 -2.5 V V V -0.4 +25.3 dd Pembina Pipeline PBA 27.75 -0- 35.36 33.67 -.54 -1.6 V V V -4.4 +23.1 41 1.68
Arkansas Bst ABFS 9.50 0 35.96 32.22 -.86 -2.6 V V V -4.3 +199.4 dd 0.12 Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.04 --- 22.72 19.05 -.04 -0.2 A V V -0.4 +4.8 18 1.08
Bank of America BAG 10.98 -0- 17.42 16.68 -.05 -0.3 A A A +7.1 +46.0 17 0.04 Phoenix Cos PNX 24.26 61.54 45.10+1.16 +2.6 A V V -26.5 +62.1 dd
Beam Inc BEAM 59.66 0 84.00 83.28 -.14 -0.2 V A A +22.4 +33.9 34 0.90 "
Carnival Corp CCL 31.44 -0- 41.89 39.54 -1.05 -2.6 A V V -1.6 +6.6 29 1.00 Raymond James Fncl RJF 39.31 -0- 56.31 51.34 -.98 -1.9 V V V -1.6 +18.7 18 0.64f
Chicos FAS CHS 15.27 -- 19.95 16.46 -.19 -1.1 V V V -12.6 -3.4 16 0.30f Reliance Steel Alu RS 59.44 -0- 76.78 69.26 -.44 -0.6 V V V -8.7 +11.3 15 1.32
Cracker Barrel CBRL 63.89 0 118.63 96.73 -2.26 -2.3 V V V -12.1 +58.5 19 3.00 Ryder R 52.58 -0- 75.20 71.13 -.32 -0.4 V V V -3.6 +31.0 16 1.36
Disney DIS 53.41 0 76.84 71.33 -1.55 -2.1 V V V -6.6 +35.7 21 0.86f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 55.41 0 78.19 73.48 -.07 -0.1 A V V -3.5 +31.4 19 1.68 St Joe Co JOE 16.82 24.40 18.00 -.10 -0.6 V V V -6.2 -25.1 dd ...
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 31.72 -0- 47.92 45.65 -.74 -1.6 V V -0.1 +44.6 34 0.48f Sally Beauty Hid SBH 25.00 31.86 27.80 -.34 -1.2 A V V -8.0 +6.1 19
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 5.18 4.10 -.26 -6.0 V A A +9.6 +24.6 dd Simon Property Gp SPG 142.47 0-- 182.45 150.62 -1.43 -0.9 V V v -1.0 -3.7 37 4.80f
Harris Corp HRS 41.08 72.33 70.48 +.04 +0.1 A A A +1.0 +46.2 19 1.68 Stein Mart SMRT 7.44 16.17 12.62 -.39 -3.0 V V V -6.2 +54.3 0.20
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 36.63 --- 41.09 37.84 -.08 -0.2 A A A +2.7 +0.3 q 2.36e
KC Southern KSU 91.89 0-- 125.96 102.07 +.50 +0.5 A V V -17.6 +8.4 32 1.12f Suntrust Bks STI 26.93 -- 40.21 37.55 -.49 -1.3 v A A +2.0 +31.2 14 0.40
Lennar Corp A LEN 30.90 -0- 44.40 39.00 +.48 +1.2 A V V -1.4 -7.6 18 0.16 Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 -0- 16.97 14.65 -.66 -4.3 V V V -5.4 +36.2 18 0.54
McClatchy Co MNI 2.13 0- 5.18 4.74 -.13 -2.7 V A A +39.4 +54.6 dd TECO Energy TE 16.15 -0-- 19.22 16.66 -.07 -0.4 V V V -3.4 +1.2 18 0.88
NextEra Energy NEE 71.42 0 90.00 88.77 -.01 ... A A A +3.7 +26.3 21 2.64 Tech Data TECD 43.02 55.36 52.28 +08 +0.2 V A A +1.3 +2.4 10
Office Depot ODP 3.55-0- 6.10 4.88 -.08 -1.6 V V V -7.8 +12.0 38 "
PGT Inc PGTI 4.40 -0- 11.69 10.35 -.10 -1.0 V A A +2.3 +113.7 22 Wendys Co WEN 4.97 -0- 9.51 8.90 -.04 -0.4 V A A +2.1 +77.1 89 0.20
Panera Bread Co PNRA 150.33 --- 194.77 164.46 -2.58 -1.5 V V V -6.9 +3.5 25 ... World Fuel Svcs INT 34.57 -0- 45.71 43.07 -.40 -0.9 V V V -0.2 +1.7 16 0.15


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S&P 500 -1830 NASDAQ -46.53 DOW -18977 6-MO T-BILLS 30-YR T-BONDS -05 CRUDE OIL .05 EURO a -.0004 GOLD +11.20

1,774.20 4,051.43 15,738.79 .06% '" 3.62% Y $97.36 $1.3660 $1,262.20



Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange
and the Nasdaq.


Tkr Name Last Chg
A-B-C
ACE ACE Ltd 94.03 -.54
ADT ADTCorp 37.81 -.47
AES AESCorp 13.75 -.22
AFL AFLAC 62.12 -.33
GAS AGLRes 47.39 -.02
AKS AK Steel 6.89 -.22
ASMI ASM Intl 34.52 -.21
T AT&TlInc 33.31 -.39
ABT AbbottLab 35.85 -.52
ABBV AbbVie 47.61 -.08
ANF AberFitc 35.38 -.89
ACN Accenture 80.32 -.98
ARAY Accuray 8.92 -.25
ACT Actavis 180.76 -3.40
ATVI ActivsBliz 16.91 +.22
ADBE AdobeSy 58.46 -.65
AEIS AdvEnld 24.98 -.48
AMD AMD 3.48 -.06
ABCO AdvisoryBd 63.44 -.42
ACM AecomTch 28.76 -.39
AER AerCap 38.27 +1.17
ARC Aeropostl 7.02 -.16
AVAV AeroViron 28.55 -.33
AET Aetna 68.06 -.87
A Agilent 57.65 -.45
AEM Agnico g 31.62 +1.02
AYR Aircastle 18.82 -.17
ARG Airgas 108.57 +1.14
ALSK AlaskCom 2.19 -.04
ALU AlcatelLuc 4.03 +.02
AA Alcoa 11.99 +.14
ALXN Alexion 133.73 +.72
ATI AllegTch 31.91 -.40
AGN Allergan 114.24 +.25
ALE Allete 48.85
ARLP AllnceRes 79.94 -.20
ACG AlliBInco 7.56 +.02
AB AlliBern 21.87 -.25
LNT AlliantEgy 50.77 +.13
ANV AlldNevG 4.55 +.11
ALL Allstate 51.74 -.03
ANR AlphaNRs 5.82 -.02
AOD AlpToDv rs 8.08 -.09
ALTR AlteraCplIf 32.97 +.62
MO Altria 36.43 -.42
AMZN Amazon 384.20-10.23
ABEV Ambevn 6.53 -.15
AEE Ameren 36.62 +.09
AMX AMovilL 21.05 -.23
AAL AmAirI n 32.98 +1.02
AALCPAmAiri pf 26.60 +.15
AGNCACapAgy 20.75 +.07
ACAS AmCapLtd 15.71 -.20
MTGEACapMtg 18.97 -.14
AEO AEagleOut 13.26 -.25
AEP AEP 47.59 +.08
AXP AmExp 85.55 -1.09
AIG AmlntlGrp 47.95 -.51
ARCP ARItCapPr 13.91 -.26
AWR AmStWtrs 28.17 -.30
AMT AmTower 79.56 -1.00
AWK AmWtrWks 41.96 +.17
APU Amerigas 42.79 -.08
AMP Ameriprise 105.02 -1.52
ABC AmeriBrgn 67.26 -.46
AME Ametek 49.74 -.16
AMGNAmgen 119.17 -1.53
APH Amphenol 85.63 -.46
APC Anadarko 81.29 +.18
ANEN Anaren 27.95 -.02
AU AnglogldA 14.71 +.54
BUD ABInBev 96.72 -1.86
NLY Annaly 10.50 +.07
ANH Anworth 4.56 +.02
APOL ApolloEdu 32.40 -1.20
AINV Apollolnv 8.49 -.22
AAPL Apple Inc 500.75 -5.75
AMAT ApldMatI 16.73 -.02
WTR AquaAms 23.58 +.10
PETX AratanaTn 19.75 +.46
MT ArcelorMit 16.67 -.18
ACI ArchCoal 4.19 -.01
ADM ArchDan 39.22 -.85
ARNA ArenaPhm 6.77 -.19
ARCC AresCap 17.57 -.17
ARIA AriadP 7.60 -.44
ABFS ArkBest 32.22 -.86
ARR ArmourRsd 4.09
ARRY ArrayBio 4.93 -.30
ARW ArrowEl 51.80 -.27
ARWRArrowRsh 14.30 +.64
ASH Ashland 94.06 -.13
AGO AssuredG 20.73 -.07
AZN AstraZen 63.46 -.63
ASTC Astrotch h 3.67 +.75
APL AtlasPpln 33.45 -.37
ATML Atmel 8.26 -.01
ATO ATMOS 46.60 -.17
AUQ AuRicog 4.68 +.07
ADSK Autodesk 49.65 -1.59
ADP AutoData 76.53 -.50
AVY AveryD 48.93 -.34
CAR AvisBudg 37.49 -.86
AVA Avista 28.29 +.10
AVP Avon 14.76 -.89
BBT BB&TCp 37.38 -.50
BCE BCE g 41.46 +.40
BGMDBG Med 1.23 -.16
BGCP BGCPtrs 6.31 -.11
BBL BHPBiIlplc 59.10 -.74
BP BPPLC 47.27 -.21
BPT BP Pru 77.20 +.25
BRFS BRFSA 17.83 +.03
BIDU Baidu 158.10 -6.14
BHI BakrHu 55.81 -.43
BLL BallCorp 49.07 +.80
BLDP BallardPw 1.99 +.03
BBD BcoBradpf 10.57 -.41
SAN BcoSantSA 8.71 -.08
BSBR BcoSBrasil 4.85 -.10
BKMU BankMutl 6.91 -.09
BAC BkofAm 16.68 -.05
BMO BkMontg 62.88 -.35
BK BkNYMel 31.73 -.34
BNS BkNovag 54.89 -.61
BKU BankUtd 31.00 -.91
VXX B iPVix rs 46.45 +2.90
BCR Bard 130.31 -.44
BKS BarnesNob 13.57 -1.00
ABX BarrickG 19.52 +.72
BAX Baxter 68.40 -.10
BEAM Beam Inc 83.28 -.14
BZH BeazerHm 22.76 +.19
BBBY BedBath 64.35 -.74
BMS Bemis 38.01 +.21
BRK/BBerkHB 111.28 -.73
BBY BestBuy 23.97 -.75
BIG BigLots 26.97 -.52
BCRX Biocryst 10.00 -.04
BIIB Biogenldc 305.46 -.19
BBRY BlackBerry 9.95 -.09


BME BIkHIthSci 34.62 -1.69
BX Blackstone 30.93 -.18
HRB BlockHR 29.13 -.18
BOBE BobEvans 46.98 -.17
BA Boeing 129.78 -7.31
BWA BorgWrns 53.95 -.05
SAM BostBeer 210.03 -3.67
BSX BostonSci 13.18 -.10
BYD BoydGm 9.20 -.19
BGG BrigStrat 20.58 -.32
EAT Brinker 48.05 -.72
BMY BrMySq 50.22 -.85
BTI BritATob 97.09 -2.66
BRCM Broadcom 28.69 -.27
BRCD BrcdeCm 9.34 -.11
BIP Brkflnfra 36.44 -.24
BPL Buckeye 72.39 -.57
CA CA Inc 32.20 -.35
CBG CBREGrp 26.90 +.25
CBS CBS B 57.72 -.98
CME CMEGrp 72.34 -.86
CMS CMSEng 26.78 -.18
CNHI CNHIndl 11.17 -.28
CSX CSX 26.13 -.39
CVRR CVRRfng 22.47 +.19
CVS CVSCare 67.35 -1.17
CYS CYS Invest 7.84 +.01
CVC CblvsnNY 16.27 -.08
COG CabotOGs 40.49 +.12
CDNS Cadence 14.08 +.07
CALM CaI-Maine 49.42 -1.22
CHY CalaCvHi 13.01 -.05
CCC Calgon 19.70 -.04
CWT CalifWtr 22.71 -.34
CPN Calpine 18.53 -.18
CLMT CalumetSp 29.74 -.42
CAFI CamcoF 6.47 -.05
CPT CamdenPT 60.35 +.15
CAM Cameron 56.73 -.82
CPB CampSp 41.10 -.87
CAMTCamtekh 5.22 -.18
CNI CdnNRgs 51.94 +.14
CNQ CdnNRsgs 32.20 -.35
CP CPRwyg 147.61 +5.75
CSIQ CdnSolar 39.81 +.13
COF CapOne 69.87 -1.00
CSU CapSenL 22.18 +.08
CMO CapsteadM 12.37 +.02
CPST CpstnTurb 1.59 -.05
CAH CardnlHIth 66.45 -.94
CFN CareFusion 40.52 +.60
KMX CarMax 44.73 -.22
CKEC Carmike 26.05 -.57
CCL Carnival 39.54 -1.05
CRS CarpTech 58.41 +.03
CRZO Carrizo 42.61 -.79
CAT Caterpillar 90.62 -1.85
FUN CedarF 49.26 -.46
CVM CelSci rs 1.07 -.02
CTIC CellThera 3.32 -.12
CX Cemex 12.42 -.22
CIG Cemigpfs 5.55 -.10
CNP CenterPnt 23.15 -.19
CTL CntryLink 28.59 -.36
CVO Cenveo 3.36
CHTR CharterCm 138.24 +1.59
CKP Checkpnt 13.55 -.06
CHFC ChemFinl 29.37 -.75
LNG CheniereEn 43.66 -.99
CHK ChesEng 27.17 +.41
CVX Chevron 116.00 -.84
CBI ChicB&l 76.35 -.83
CIM Chimera 3.13 +.03
CHD ChurchDwt 63.64 -1.55
CIEN CienaCorp 22.88 +.64
CBB CinciBell 3.56 -.04
CINF CinnFin 48.61 -.65
CRUS Cirrus 17.28 -1.46
CSCO Cisco 21.65 -.10
C Citigroup 48.08 -1.52
CTXS CitrixSys 57.60 -1.13
CLNE CleanEngy 11.73 +.16
CLF CliffsNRs 20.07 +.26
CLX Clorox 87.08 -1.32
COH Coach 47.93 -.87
CIE CobaltlEn 16.47 -.41
KO CocaCola 37.90 -.97
RQI CohStQIR 9.67 -.06
PSF CohStSelPf 24.10 -.10
COLE ColeREIn 15.17 -.23
CL ColgPalm s 61.59 -1.28
COBK ColonialFS 12.40
CMCSAComcast 53.06 -.29
CMA Comerica 46.44 -.34
CYHHZCmtyHIt rt .05 +.00
CVLT CommVlt 69.44 -6.66
CTG CmpTask 16.35 -.22
CPWRCompuwre 10.07 -.05
CMTL Comtech 30.72 -.07
CAG ConAgra 31.86 -.68
CTWS ConnWtrSv 33.79 -.32
COP ConocoPhil 65.82 -.39
CNX ConsolEngy 37.55 -.11
CNSL ConsolCom 19.00 -.30
ED ConEd 53.25 +.12
CLR ContlRes 107.03 -1.77
CTB CooperTire 22.40 -.39
CSODCorOnDem 54.23 -.76
GLW Corning 17.16 +.06
OFC CorpOffP 24.43 -.44
COST Costco 112.23 -2.15
COTYCotyn 13.41 -.48
DGAZ CSVInvNG 3.29 -1.50
UGAZ CSVLgNGs 41.28+10.05
XIV CSVelIVST 30.54 -2.26
TVIX CSVxShtrs 8.48 +.95
CEQP CrestwdEq 12.82 -.08
CROX Crocs 14.96 -.33
XTEX CrosstxLP 27.31 -.11
CCI CrwnCstle 70.47 -.53
CCK CrownHold 40.65 +.53
CTRP Ctrip.com 39.14 -1.12
CMI Cummins 128.59 -.04
CYBE CybrOpt 6.88 -.28
CY CypSemi 10.07 -.09
CYTR CytRx 7.36 +.16
D-E-F
DCT DCTIndl 6.91 -.12
DNP DNPSelct 9.47 +.02
DHI DRHorton 23.11 +.11
DTE DTE 66.33 -.04
DTZ DTE En61 24.81 -.01
DAN DanaHldg 19.06 -.43
DHR Danaher 75.13 -.08
DRI Darden 49.17 -.99
DV DeVryEd 36.85 -.87
DF DeanFdsrs 15.98 -.80
DE Deere 85.93 -.66
DEJ DejourEg .20 +.05
DCTH Delcath h .36 +.03
DAL DeltaAir 29.92 -.98
DNR DenburyR 16.04 -.12
DVN DevonE 59.01 -.28


1,8 8 0 .................................

1,760 ** 10 DAYS
1,760 .... 10 DAYS


S&P 500
Close: 1,774.20
Change:-18.30 (-1.0%)


4,2 8 0 .................................

4,040 ,,
41040 ...A .


Nasdaq composite
Close: 4,051.43
Change:-46.53 (-1.1%)


1,85 i............. i............ i.. .............. .. ....... ... .. .. .... .. 4 ,40 0o i............. ............ .............................. ........... .............
1,80 0 ............. ............ ...... ...... .. ....... 4 ,2 o o- ............. ............ .............. ........... .

1 ,75 o i............... .............. .. .. .... .. .. ... ... ........... 4 ,0 0 0 -: ............. i............ ......... .. ..........."


1,6 5 0 ...... .. .. .. ........... .. ............. ........... 3 ,6 0 0 .. .. .. ....... .. ........... .. ............. ...........
1,650........................D................... 43,4006. "'.. ......


1, O600 3400 ......" ......."".......5 ..... .. 0 .... ;" ...... ..... N ......" ..... ..


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD

Vol. (in mil.) 3,832 2,121
Pvs. Volume 3,320 1,985
Advanced 706 603
Declined 2410 1987
New Highs 26 44
New Lows 93 33


DEC Diageo 127.08 -.01
DO DiaOffs 49.16 -1.53
DBD Diebold 33.13 -.37
DGII Digilntl 10.10 -.09
DLR DigitalRlt 50.30 -1.82
DDS Dillards 87.90 -2.80
DTV DirecTV 68.66 -.39
SPXS DirSPBrrs 37.24 +1.10
NUGT DxGIdBII rs 39.10 +2.91
FAZ DxFinBrrs 23.70 +.70
TZA DxSCBrrs 18.59 +.73
EDC DxEMBIIs 20.90 -.94
FAS DxFnBulls 80.54 -2.62
DUST DirDGdBr s 28.07 -2.67
TNA DxSCBulls 69.11 -3.10
DFS Discover 53.98 -1.31
DISCADiscComA 78.37 +.41
DISH DishNetwh 55.49 +.09
DIS Disney 71.33 -1.55
DG DollarGen 56.62 -.65
DLTR DollarTree 50.57 -.54
D DomRescs 66.28 +.02
DPZ Dominos 68.70 -1.16
RRD DonlleyRR 18.32 -.28
DOW DowChm 44.73 +1.67
LEO DryStrt 7.98 +.02
DRYS DryShips 3.36 -.11
DD DuPont 60.71 +1.14
DUC DufPUC 10.42 +.00
DUK DukeEngy 68.99 +.17
DRE DukeRlty 14.63 -.08
EJ E-House 11.96 -.76
ETFC E-Trade 19.90 -.47
EBAY eBay 52.19 -.97
EMC EMCCp 24.65 -.73
EOG EOGRes 164.65 -2.57
ETN Eaton 73.48 -.07
EOS EVEEq2 12.58 -.08
EXG EVTxMGIo 9.75 -.11
ECL Ecolab 100.23 +.38
EW EdwLfSci 65.15 -1.13
EGO EldorGIdg 6.63 +.28
EA ElectArts 25.22 +.35
EMR EmersonEI 65.67 -.67
EDE EmpDist 22.64 -.06
EEP EnbrdgEPt 28.63 +.05
ENB Enbridge 41.45 -.32
ECA EnCanag 17.95 -.19
ENR Energizer 95.68 -6.52
ETP EngyTsfr 53.82 -.26
EBF EnnisInc 14.57 -.32
ESV ENSCO 50.52 -.91
ETR Entergy 61.54 +.42
EPD EntPrPt 64.16 +.39
EQR EqtyRsd 53.95 +.09
EAC EricksnAC 19.16 -.59
ERIC Ericsson 11.95 -.07
XCO ExcoRes 5.68 +.18
EXEL Exelixis 6.92 -.04
EXC Exelon 28.19 +.09
ESRX ExpScripts 73.71 -.55
XOM ExxonMbl 95.11 -.54
EZPW Ezcorp 11.25 +1.90
FFIV F5 Netwks 107.48 -2.26
FTI FMCTech 48.90 -.29
FNB FNBCpPA 11.86 -.32
FB Facebook 53.53 -1.61
FDO FamilyDIr 62.42 -.72
FAST Fastenal 44.18 +.02
FDX FedExCp 131.85 -2.49
FNHC FedNatHId 13.12 -.05
FGP Ferrellgs 25.27 +.26
FBR FibriaCelu 11.24 +.52
FNF FidlNFin 29.78 -.25
FIS FidNatlnfo 51.01 +.05
FSC FifthStFin 9.27 -.05
FITB FifthThird 20.95 -.35
FHN FstHorizon 11.74 -.09
FNFG FstNiagara 8.59 -.09
FSLR FstSolar 49.70 -.66
FE FirstEngy 30.58 +.03
FMER FstMerit 20.74 -.41
FLEX Flextrn 7.70 +.04
FLO RowrsFds 21.09 -.42
FLR Fluor 76.12 -1.34
F FordM 15.26 -.33
FST ForestOil 3.11 -.17
FTNT Fortinet 21.41 -.59
FBHS FBHmSec 45.65 -.74
BEN FrankRess 52.65 -1.04
FCX FMCG 32.34 -.22
FSL Freescale 17.55 +2.25
FTR FrontierCm 4.82 -.09
FRO Frontline 4.10 -.26
FCEL FuelCellE 1.40 -.02
FIO Fusion-io 10.39 -.15
G-H-I
GOM GMAC44 25.32 -.03
GTAT GTAdvTc 9.63 -.19
GDV GabDvlnc 20.94 -.29
GGT GabMultT 10.64 -.07
GUT GabUtil 6.44 -.03
GFA GafisaSA 2.59 -.18
GALE GalenaBio 5.28 -.25
GME GameStop 35.07 -.98
GLPI Gam&Lsrn 34.20 -.67
GPS Gap 36.79 -.08
GRMNGarmin 44.80 -.85
GKNT Geeknet 18.28 +.05
GAM GAInv 33.55 -.23
GD GenDynam 99.01 -1.49
GE GenElec 25.29 -.17
GGP GenGrPrp 19.58 -.07
GIS GenMills 47.94 -1.02
GM GenMotors 36.35 -.46
GEL GenesisEn 54.00 +.62
GNTX Gentex 32.78 -.57


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


GNW Genworth 14.87 -.34
GGB Gerdau 6.91
GERN GeronCp 4.33 -.28
GEVO Gevo 1.36 +.13
GILD GileadSci 79.85 -.82
GSK GlaxoSKIn 52.04 -1.22
GRT GlimchRt 8.62 -.18
GOGOGogon 20.16 -.84
GFI GoldFLtd 3.60 +.04
GG Goldcrpg 24.73 +.88
GSS GoldStrg .69 +.06
GS GoldmanS 163.90 -2.35
GT Goodyear 23.11 -.22
GOOGGoogle 1106.92-16.09
GRA vjGrace 93.71 +.62
GPT GramrcyP 5.83 +.02
GPK GraphPkg 9.31 +.04
GNI GNIron 21.71 -.62
GXP GtPlainEn 24.35 -.03
GMCRGreenMtC 76.51 -.74
GEF GreifA 51.26 -.40
GRIF Griffin h 30.75 -.98
GRPN Groupon 10.43 -.09
GSH GuangRy 20.70 +.22
HCP HCPInc 38.83 -.29
HAIN HainCel 92.37 -.69
HK HalconRes 3.48 -.10
HAL Hallibrtn 48.20 -.13
HBI Hanesbrds 65.07 +.90
THG Hanoverlns 55.36 -.57
HOG HarleyD 64.04 -.87
HSC Harsco 25.55 -.19
HIG HartfdFn 32.87 -.64
HTS HatterasF 17.48 -.29
HE HawaiiEl 25.67 -.26
HCN HItCrREIT 56.69 -.10
HCSG HlthCSvc 27.09 -.36
HL HeclaM 3.15 +.06
HEB Hemisphrx .46 -.04
HLF Herbalife 62.82 +.28
HERO HercOffsh 5.00 -.09
HSY Hershey 96.72 -2.06
HTZ Hertz 26.01 -.51
HES Hess 77.06 +.26
HPQ HewlettP 29.02 +.02
HSH Hillshire 33.49 -.68
HTH HilltopH 23.75 -.24
HIMX HimaxTch 13.70 +.16
HFC HollyFront 47.80 +1.32
HD HomeDp 76.68 -1.86
HMC Honda 38.24 +.18
HON HonwIllntI 89.74 -.71
HZNP HorizPhm 10.05 +1.55
HRL Hormel 44.36 -1.38
HPT HospPT 25.57 -.25
HST HostHotls 18.21 -.30
HOV HovnanE 6.05 +.12
HNP HuanPwr 36.69 +.16
HUB/BHubbelB 114.94 -1.06
HCBK HudsCity 9.08 +.04
HBAN HuntBncsh 9.20 -.15
HII Huntgtnlng 93.23 -.65
HUN Huntsmn 21.98 +.01
lAG IAMGIdg 3.76 +.12
IGTE iGateCorp 33.17 -.84
ING ING 13.57 -.40
IAU iShGold 12.33 +.16
EWZ iShBrazil 39.21 -.84
EWC iShCanada 27.74 -.16
EZU iShEMU 39.79 -.62
EWG iShGerm 30.25 -.55
EWH iSh HK 19.10 -.35
EWJ iShJapan 11.62 -.01
EWY iSh SKor 58.52 -.20
EWM SMalasia 14.43 -.15
EWW iShMexico 62.62 -.54
EWS iShSing 12.16 -.32
EWT iSTaiwn 13.48 -.24
SLV iShSilver 19.02 +.17
DVY iShSelDiv 68.97 -.48
FXI iShChinaLC 34.50 -.05
IVV iSCorSP500178.38 -1.74
EEM iShEMkts 37.78 -.55
TLT iSh20yrT 107.87 +.88
EFA iS Eafe 64.38 -.73
HYG iShiBxHYB 93.12 -.28
IWD iSR1KVal 90.57 -.84
IWM iShR2K 111.34 -1.63
HDV iShHiDiv 67.74 -.72
PFF iShUSPfd 37.84 -.08
IYR iShREst 64.27 -.30
ITB iShHmCnst 24.41 -.11
IDA Idacorp 51.64 -.34
IDIX IdenixPh 7.20 -.84
ITW ITW 78.32 -.69
ILMN Illumina 146.71 +2.18
IBCP IndBkMI 13.30 -.22
INFN Infinera 7.06 -.13
IR IngerRd 58.44 -.64
INGR Ingredion 61.80 -1.85
IRC InlandRE 10.29 -.08
TEG IntegrysE 53.51 -.09
INTC Intel 24.68 -.22
ICPT InterceptP 299.87 -5.55
INAP InterNAP 8.04 -.08
IBM IBM 176.40 -.45
IGT IntlGame 14.61 -.20
IP IntPap 46.91 +.78
IPG Interpublic 16.44 -.34
INTX Intersectns 7.66 -.06
ISRG IntSurg 415.20 +5.66
INVN InvenSense 18.94 -.15
IVZ Invesco 33.05 -.38
ITUB ItauUnibH 11.95 -.44
J-K-L
JDSU JDSUniph 12.05 +.16
JPM JPMorgCh 55.53 -.21


HIGH
15927.08
7272.71
497.10
10027.80
4091.27
1790.15
1312.65
19185.70
1134.18


LOW CLOSE CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR


15708.98
7171.25
492.80
9944.70
4044.76
1770.45
1299.35
18947.68
1119.80


JBL Jabil 17.79 -.26
JEC JacobsEng 61.78 -.93
JNS JanusCap 10.99 -.24
JBLU JetBlue 8.50 -.24
JNJ JohnJn 88.90 -1.20
JCI JohnsnOCl 46.31 -1.02
JNY JonesGrp 14.78 -.05
JNPR JnprNtwk 27.73 +.22
KBH KB Home 18.67 +.30
KFN KKRFn 12.05 -.18
KFH KKRFn 41 27.09 -.17
KSU KCSouthn 102.07 +.50
K Kellogg 58.37 -1.66
KERX KeryxBio 15.38 -.49
KEG KeyEngy 7.16 -.10
KEY Keycorp 12.87 -.09
KMB KimbCIk 107.01 -1.64
KMP KindME 79.37 -.81
KMI KindMorg 34.10 -1.38
KMI/WSKindrMwt 3.16 -.21
KGC Kinross g 4.67 +.09
KOG KodiakOg 10.44 -.21
KSS Kohls 49.97 -1.11
KRFT KraftFGp 52.19 -.69
KTOS KratosDef 7.21 +.02
KKD KrispKrm 17.96 -.49
KR Kroger 36.53 -.12
KLIC Kulicke 11.83 -.20
LB L Brands 52.12 -.95
LLL L-3Com 103.72 -.75
LKQ LKQCorp 26.52 -.10
LSI LSI Corp 11.03 +.01
LTC LTCPrp 37.54 +.17
LRCX LamResrch 51.25 +.03
LSTR Landstar 56.30 -.44
LVS LVSands 73.93 -1.33
LHO LaSalleH 30.32 -.34
LEG LeggPlat 29.55 -.16
LEN LennarA 39.00 +.48
LVLT Level3 31.75 -.92
LXK Lexmark 38.83 +.70
USA LbtyASE 5.61 -.09
LBTYAUIbGIobA 80.83 -2.12
LBTYKUIbGIobC 78.82 -1.19
LRY UbtProp 35.56 -.57
LFVN Uifevantge 1.44 -.05
LLY UllyEli 53.91 -.32
LNC UincNat 46.87 -.95
LLTC UinearTch 44.58 -.18
LINE UnnEngy 32.80 -.19
LMT LockhdM 147.35 -.93
LO Lorillard 49.02 -.76
LPX LaPac 17.55 -.13
LOW Lowes 45.97 -.99
LULU lululemngs 45.68 -1.03
LUX Luxottica 53.00 -.01
LYB LvonBasA 76.66 -.03
M-N-O
MTB M&TBk 111.69 +.44
MBI MBIA 10.97 -.13
MCGCMCG Cap 4.53 -.06
MDC MDC 30.43 -.10
MDU MDURes 31.45 -.14
MFA MFAFncI 7.20 -.04
MTG MGIC Inv 8.38 -.38
MGM MGMRsts 23.28 -.77
CLI MackCali 19.98 +.04
M Macys 53.39 -1.08
MHR MagHRes 8.11 -.09
MTW Manitowoc 24.30 -.34
MNKD MannKd 5.35 -.09
MFC Manulifeg 18.34 -.37
MRO MarathnO 33.04 -.32
MPC MarathPet 86.52 +3.35
GDXJ MVJrGldrs 36.81 +1.51
GDX MktVGold 24.01 +.61
OIH MVOilSvc 45.08 -.44
RSX MktVRus 25.25 -.63
PRB MVPreRMu 24.59 +.03
MWE MarkWest 69.60 +.38
MMLP MartinMid 43.45 -.18
MRVL MarvellT 14.87 -.06
MAS Masco 21.42 -.35
MSTX MastThera .82 -.03
MA MasterCds 77.70 -1.13
MAT Mattel 42.36 -.63
MXIM Maximlntg 29.67 -.25
MKC McCorm 65.30 -4.32
MDR McDrmlnt 8.38 +.08
MCD McDnlds 93.15 -1.03
MUX McEwenM 2.63 +.07
MWV MeadWvco 35.64 -.21
MDGNMedgenics 7.22 +.41
MPW MedProp 12.96 +.01
MDVN Medivaton 84.29 +8.51
MDT Medtrnic 56.36 -.73
MPEL MelcoCrwn 39.78 -1.10
MRK Merck 52.21 -.66
MCY MercGn 45.96 -.50
MDP Meredith 44.71 +.22
MTOR Meritor 10.55 +.92
MET MetUife 48.85 -.78
KORS MKors 78.74 -3.11
MU MicronT 22.71 -.34
MSFT Microsoft 36.66 +.39
MVIS Microvis h 1.25 +.05
MIDD Middleby 242.09 -1.90
MSEX MdsxWatr 19.96 -.08
MM MillenMda 7.98 -.39
MTU MitsuUFJ 6.22 -.01
MBT MobileTele 17.19 -.62
MOP Molycorp 4.86 -.09
MDLZ Mondelez 32.99 -.74
MON Monsanto 106.98 -1.04
MS MorgStan 29.94 -.14
MOS Mosaic 44.68 -.47
MYL Mylan 44.48 -.22


15738.79
7190.61
494.65
9962.92
4051.43
1774.20
1300.73
18981.64
1122.45


-189.77
-87.01
-0.78
-103.93
-46.53
-18.30
-13.59
-204.06
-15.79


MYGN MyriadG 27.60
NIHD NIl Hldg 2.74
NPSP NPS Phm 36.73
NQ NQ Mobile 15.80
NRG NRG Egy 27.19
DCM N7f DOCO 16.00
NXPI NXPSemi 47.26
NBR Nabors 16.99
NBG NBGrcers 4.49
NFG NatFuGas 74.58
NGG NatGrid 64.31
NHI NtHlthlnv 62.00
NOV NOilVarco 73.03
NKTR NektarTh 13.29
NEOG Neogen s 42.07
NTAP NetApp 42.76
NFLX Netflix 400.42
NGD NwGoldg 5.94
NJR NJ Rscs 45.40
EDU NewOriEd 29.40
NYCB NYCmtyB 16.36
NYMT NYMtgTr 6.98
NCT Newcastle 5.55
NWL NewellRub 30.34
NEM NewmtM 24.87
NWSA NewsCpA n 16.22
NEE NextEraEn 88.77
NI NiSource 33.89
NKE NikeB 71.77
NTT NipponTT 26.61
NE NobleCorp 31.66
NBL NobleEns 63.25
NOK NokaCp 7.04
NAT NordicAm 11.03
NSC NorflkSo 89.80
PAL NA Pall g .58
NADL NAtlDrll n 8.54
NU NoestUt 42.81
NTI NthnTEn 25.22
NOC NorthropG 112.13
NRF NStarRlt 14.33
NWBI NwstBcsh 14.47
NWN NwstNG 41.08
NG NovaGId g 3.06
NVS Novartis 79.27
NVAX Novavax 5.70
NVO NovoNord s 37.37
NUAN NuanceCm 15.09
NUE Nucor 48.43
NAD NuvDivA 13.45
JPZ NuvEqtP 12.25
NIO NuvMuOpp 13.61
NQM NvlQI 14.19
NMA NvMAd 12.75
NUW NvAMT-Fr 15.82
NNP NvNYP 13.80
NPP NuvPP 14.13
JPC NvPfdlnco 9.04
NPF NvPMI 13.30
NPI NuvPI 13.14
NPM NuvPI2 13.28
NPT NuvPI4 12.22
NQU NuvQInc 12.99
NVDA Nvidia 15.46
NXTM NxStageMd 12.76
OGE OGEEgys 33.55
OXY OcciPet 87.82
OCFC OceanFst 17.70
OCN OcwenFn 45.01
ODP OfficeDpt 4.88
ONB OldNBcp 14.00
ORI OldRepub 15.53
OLN Olin 25.76
OHI OmegaHlt 31.54
OME OmegaP 10.26
ONNN OnSmcnd 8.41
OGXI OncoGenex 10.31
OKS OneokPtrs 51.80
OPK OpkoHlth 7.97
OPLK OplinkC 18.30
ORCL Oracle 36.97
ORBK Orbotch 13.67
ONVO Organovo 9.60
OFIX Orthfx 20.55
OSK OshkoshCp 54.00
OER OtterTail 27.93
01 Owenslll 32.80
P-Q-R
PCG PG&ECp 40.93
PNC PNC 79.87
PNM PNM Res 24.32
PKX POSCO 68.45
PPG PPG 183.20
PPL PPL Corp 30.07
PCAR Paccar 56.54
P Pandora 32.92
PNRA PaneraBrd 164.46
PAMT ParametS 15.35
PKD ParkDrl 7.59
PH ParkerHan 114.00
PTEN PattUTI 25.26
PAYX Paychex 42.02
BTU PeabdyE 17.39
PBA Pembinag 33.67
PGH Pengrth g 6.46
PENN PnnNGm 11.09
PVA PennVa 12.00
PWE PennWst g 7.28
PNNT PennantPk 11.19
JCP Penney 6.29
PAG Penske 41.60
PNR Pentair 73.98
PBCT PeopUtdF 14.35
PBY PepBoy 12.28
POM PepcoHold 19.05
PEP PepsiCo 80.22
PRGO Perrigo 153.68


PETM PetSmart 63.30 +.20
PBR/A PetrbrsA 12.08 -.46
PBR Petrobras 11.34 -.32
PFE Pfizer 30.11 -.31
PCYC Pharmacyc 132.03 -.22
PM PhilipMor 79.44 -1.37
PHG PhilipsNV 34.61 -1.26
PSX Phillips66 74.18 -.90
PNX PhoenxCos 45.10 +1.16
PNY PiedNG 32.67 -.24
PFN PimlncStr2 10.22 -.04
PNW PinWst 51.72 -.27
PXD PioNtri 167.69 -6.80
PBI PitnyBw 21.73 -.07
PAA PlainsAAP 49.40 -.53
PLUG PlugPowrh 2.97 +.28
PCL PlumCrk 43.16 -1.41
PII Polaris 125.67 -2.45
POT Potash 31.83 -.22
QQQ PwShs QQQ84.93 -.92
PX Praxair 127.33 +1.63
PCP PrecCastpt 252.96 -2.73
TROW PriceTR 78.96 -1.74
PCLN priceline 1133.79-28.74
PFG PrinFncl 43.37 -.93
PRA ProAssur 45.65 -.65
PLD ProLogis 37.01 -.22
SH ProShtS&P 26.24 +.26
QLD ProUItQQQ 92.69 -2.01
SSO ProUltSP 94.32 -1.84
RWM ProShtR2K 17.44 +.24
TQQQ PrUPQQQ s 55.59 -1.81
UPRO PUItSP500 s84.75 -2.61
UVXY PUVixST rs 77.19 +8.75
SVXY PrShtVix s 60.03 -4.29
PG ProctGam 77.64 -1.47
PGNX PrognicsPh 4.50 -1.70
PGR ProgsvCp 23.45 -.01
SDS ProUShSP 32.06 +.61
QID PUShQQQ rs63.95+1.34
TBT ProUShL20 70.46 -1.09
SPXU PUShSPX rs67.67 +1.97
PSEC ProspctCap 10.87 -.08
PRU Prudentl 83.82 -.64
PEG PSEG 32.89 -.04
PSA PubStrg 154.51 -.22
PHM PulteGrp 19.43 -.02
PMM PMMI 6.98 +.02
QEP QEPRes 30.99 +.38
QIHU Qihoo360 91.06 -3.32
QCOMQualcom 71.12 -.87
DGX QstDiag 53.82 +.46
STR Questar 23.37 +.16
QCORQuestcor 66.15 +1.97
KWK QksilvRes 3.16
ZOK Ouiksilvr 6.98 -.55
RFMD RF MicD 5.35 +.46
RES RPC 17.63 -1.21
RDN RadianGrp 14.48 -.52
RSH RadioShk 2.41 +.01
RL RLauren 155.51 -1.23
RRC RangeRs 85.26 -1.26
RAVN Ravenlnds 37.33 +.05
RYN Rayonier 44.08 -.34
RTN Raytheon 88.63 -.58
RSOL RealGSolar 3.99 -.23
RWT RedwdTr 18.32 -.26
RGP RegncyEn 27.35 +.10
RF RegionsFn 10.31 -.22
RS RelStlAI 69.26 -.44
SOL ReneSola 3.42 +.07
RGEN Replgn 14.41 -.08
RSG RepubSvc 31.98 -.17
RSO ResrceCap 5.84 -.06
ROIC RetailOpp 14.10
RNN RexahnPh 1.00 +.00
RAI ReynAmer 48.61 -.75
RICE RiceEngy n 23.31 +1.21
RIO RioTinto 53.19 -.47
RAD RiteAid 5.36 -.19
RVBD RiverbedcT 19.48 -.37
RHI RobtHalf 41.51 +.12
ROK RockwIAut 115.09 +.08
COL RockColl 75.42 -.95
ROG Rogers 58.50 -.03
ROP Roper 136.18 -1.55
ROST RossStrs 67.66 -.11
RY RoyalBkg 61.55 -.77
RCL RylCarb 48.99 -.67
RDS/BRoyDShIIB 74.34 +.15
RDS/ARoyDShllA 70.50 -.04
RYL Ryland 43.36 +.08
S-T-U
STBA S&TBcp 23.50 -1.11
SCG SCANA 46.16 -.29
SLM SLMCp 23.13 +.25
SM SM Energy 82.87 -1.38
DIA SpdrDJIA 157.10 -1.84
GLD SpdrGold 122.47 +1.52
MDY SP Mid 236.44 -2.63
SPY S&P500ETF177.35 -1.72
XHB SpdrHome 31.29 -.33
JNK SpdrLehHY 40.72 -.08
KRE SpdrS&P RB38.57 -.74
XRT SpdrRetl 79.55 -1.34
XOP SpdrOGEx 65.92 -.42
SBS SABESPs 8.91 -.32
SBR SabnR 50.17 +.41
SWY Safeway 31.29 -.33
SAIA Saialncs 31.95 -.05
JOE StJoe 18.00 -.10
CRM Salesforcs 57.96 -1.41
SLXP SalixPhm 96.16 -.83
SBH SallyBty 27.80 -.34
SJT SJuanB 17.47 +.01
SNDK SanDisk 69.05 -.55
SD SandRdge 6.39 +.12


SNY Sanofi 48.92 -.48
SC SantCUSA n25.62 -.07
SLB Schlmbrg 87.30 -.46
SCHW Schwab 24.66 -.54
SDRL SeadrillLtd 36.04 -1.02
STX SeagateT 53.65 +2.13
SHLD SearsHldgs 36.36 -2.05
SRE SempraEn 90.22 +.02
SNH SenHous 22.22 -.23
SCI ServiceCp 17.44 -.27
SHW Sherwin 189.12 -2.56
SFL ShipFin 17.08 -.11
SID SiderurNac 4.69 -.13
SLW SilvWhtng 22.08 +.16
SPG SimonProp 150.62 -1.43
SINA Sina 66.84 -5.00
SIRI SiriusXM 3.59 -.04
SKUL Skullcandy 7.12 -.08
SWKS SkywksSol 30.14 +.09
SMSI SmithMicr 1.66 -.01
SJM Smucker 97.11 -2.20
SNA SnapOn 100.07 -.26
SODA SodaStrm 37.13 -.58
SLRC SolarCap 22.17 -.46
SCTY SolarCity 72.10 -1.97
SON SonocoP 41.09 -.48
SNE SonyCp 16.05 -.37
BID Sothebys 48.75 -.13
SOR SourcC 64.05 -1.25
SJI SoJerlnd 53.52 -.79
SO SouthnCo 40.89 -.36
LUV SwstAirl 20.61 -.70
SWN SwstnEngy 41.88 +.31
SSS SovranSS 65.26 -.59
SE SpectraEn 35.22 +.10
SRC SpiritRCn 10.52 -.12
S Sprint n 8.65 -.21
XLB SP Mails 44.12 +.18
XLV SPHIthC 55.44 -.51
XLP SP CnSt 40.90 -.73
XLY SP Consum 62.67 -1.02
XLE SP Engy 84.20 -.47
XLF SPDRFncl 21.01 -.25
XLI SP Inds 49.79 -.54
XLK SPTech 34.32 -.27
XLU SP Util 38.19 -.02
SPF StdPac 8.69 -.09
SWK StanBlkDk 78.03 +.10
SPLS Staples 13.30 -.18
SGU StarGas 5.66 +.06
SBUX Starbucks 71.56 -2.33
ST7 StateStr 67.60 -1.28
STLD StlDynam 16.60 -.25
SPH SubPpne 45.40 -.06
SUBK SuffolkBcp 19.43 -.74
SMFG SumitMitsu 9.71 -.03
SNHY SunHydrl 37.40 -1.29
SU Suncorgs 32.61 -.32
SUNE SunEdison 14.05 -.36
STI SunTrst 37.55 -.49
SVU Supvalu 6.03 -.09
SWFT SwiftTrans 21.30 -.30
SYMC Symantec 24.15 +.85
SNV Synovus 3.41 -.06
SYY Sysco 35.05 -.68
TMUS T-MoblUS n 31.05 -1.26
TCP TCPpLn 46.41 +.08
AMTD TDAmeritr 31.08 -.59
TE TECO 16.66 -.07
TJX TJX 57.25 -.90
TSM TaiwSemi 17.01 -.15
TLM TalismEg 10.81 -.28
TGT Target 56.89 -1.00
TCO Taubmn 63.34 -.30
TEAR TearLab 6.59 -1.08
TEN Tenneco 52.97 -1.08
TDC Teradata 42.07 -1.83
TER Teradyn 18.84 -.35
TNH TerraNitro 151.25 -4.55
TSLA TeslaMot 175.23 -3.15
TSO Tesoro 51.85 +.97
TEVA TevaPhrm 44.95 +.85
TXN Texlnst 42.40 -.20
TXRH TexRdhse 24.18 -.46
TGH Textainer 36.10 -.41
TXT Textron 36.10 -.73
TMO ThermoFis 111.75 -.57
DDD 3DSyss 78.20 +.33
MMM 3MCo 130.25 +.44
THI THortong 51.65 -.98
TWO TW Cable 132.10 -1.61
TWX TimeWarn 62.32 -.82
TKR Timken 54.53 -.23
TIVO TiVoInc 12.33 +.14
TOL TollBros 36.44
TRU TorchEngy .45
TMK Torchmark 74.07 -.57
TD TorDBkg 86.25 -.88
TOT Total SA 57.76 -.67
TSS TotalSys 30.53 -.05
TWGPTowerGplIf 2.47 -.12
RIG Transocn 43.85 -1.12
TRV Travelers 82.21 -.89
TY TriContl 19.15 -.19
TYp TriCntl pf 44.02 +.13
TSL TrinaSolar 14.61 -.20
TRN Trinity 57.30 -.58
TQNT TriQuint 8.29 -.07
TGI TriumphGp 68.40 -9.02
TRST TrstNY 6.59 -.15
TUP Tuppwre 79.18 -4.59
FOXA 21stCFoxA 30.73 -.54
FOX 21stCFoxB 30.21 -.46
TWTR Twitter n 59.45 -.99
TSN Tyson 34.39 -.27
UDR UDR 23.73 -.05
UGI UGICorp 41.75 -.05
UIL UlLHold 37.88 -.19
UNS UNS Engy 59.77 +.04


UPL UltraPtg 23.77 +.37
UA UnderArmr 85.22 -.56
UNF UniFirst 106.42 -1.47
UNP UnionPac 171.95 -.85
UNT Unit 50.17 -.80
UAL UtdContl 45.43 -.60
UPS UPS B 95.33 -.48
URI UtdRentals 79.99 -1.57
USB US Bancrp 39.76 -.78
UNG US NGas 26.73 +2.55
USO US OilFd 34.73 +.04
X USSteel 25.65 +.31
UTX UtdTech 113.27 -.59
UNH UtdhlthGp 71.26 -.45
UVV UnvslCp 51.44 -.58
UEC UraniumEn 1.78 +.03

V-W-X-Y-Z
VFC VF Corps 57.58 -1.10
VALE ValeSA 13.57 +.37
VALEIP Vale SApf 12.36 +.42
VLO ValeroE 51.40 +1.20
VLY VlyNBcp 9.87 -.08
VVTV ValVis A 5.71 -.33
BND VangTotBd 81.18 +.18
VTI VangTSM 92.41 -.96
VNQ VangREIT 65.96 -.36
VIG VangDivAp 71.47 -.79
VWO VangEmg 37.29 -.67
VGK VangEur 56.75 -.71
VEA VangFTSE 39.94 -.48
VVC Vectren 35.99 -.14
VTR Ventas 61.60 -.22
VE VeoliaEnv 15.88 -.22
VRSN Verisign 59.01 -.59
VZ VerizonCm 47.69 +.33
VIAB ViacomB 80.97 -1.29
VVI ViadCorp 26.55 -.81
VIP VimpelCm 9.65 -.49
V Visa 217.12 -3.84
VSH Vishaylnt 13.87 +.04
VMW VMware 91.72 -3.22
VOD Vodafone 37.31 +.14
VG Vonage 4.79 +.22
VRNG Vringo 4.79 +.82
VMC VulcanM 62.26 +.68
WDFCWD40 68.91 -1.02
WPC WPCarey 61.05 -.57
WPX WPXEngy 19.39 +.02
WMT WalMart 74.10 -.57
WAG Walgrn 56.50 -.52
WLT WalterEn 11.60 -.11
WRE WREIT 22.59 -.32
WM WsteMInc 41.07 -.37
WAT Waters 108.81 -1.60
WFT Weathflntl 13.82 -.07
WBS WebsterFn 30.16 -.50
WRI WeinRlt 28.64 -.20
WLP WellPoint 85.37 +1.07
WFC WellsFargo 45.59 -.37
WEN WendysCo 8.90 -.04
WR WestarEn 32.45 -.07
EMD WAstEMkt 11.57 -.09
WIA WAstlnfSc 11.54 +.02
WDC WDigital 84.20 +.83
WU WstnUnion 15.53 -.37
WBK Westpac s 26.78 -.23
WY Weyerhsr 30.54 -.19
WHR Whripl 141.63 -2.27
WFM WholeFds 51.61 -.39
WMB WmsCos 39.72 -.08
WIN Windstrm 7.46 -.06
WEC WiscEngy 41.57 +.10
WETFWisdomTr 14.54 -.80
DXJ WTJpHedg 47.48 -.47
EPI WT India 15.91 -.26
WWD Woodward 42.92 -.87
WWE WIdW Ent 21.43 -.53
WYNNWynn 193.87 -3.28
XEL XcelEngy 28.16 -.04
XRX Xerox 10.61 -.27
XLNX Xilinx 46.33 -.08
YPF YPFSoc 23.50 -1.73
YRCWYRC Wwde 21.89 +1.98
YY YYInc 63.78 -1.50
YHOO Yahoo 34.89 -3.33
AUY Yamanag 9.64 +.27
YNDX Yandex 35.34 -2.34
YELP Yelp 71.95 -4.14
YGE YingliGrn 6.11 -.04
YORWYorkWater 20.20 -.15
YOKU YoukuTud 29.55 -1.68
YUM YumBrnds 66.51 -1.69
ZAGG Zagg 4.13 -.17
ZMH Zimmer 93.22 -1.06
ZION ZionBcp 29.18 -.58
ZTS Zoetis n 30.78 -.66
ZF ZweigFd 14.07 -.08
ZNGA Zynga 3.42 +.03


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cild Issue has been called for
redemption by company, d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pf Preferred stock
issue, pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price. rt Right to buy security at a specified price, rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued, wd When distnb-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vj Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included, b Annual rate plus
stock, c- Liquidating dividend, e -Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement, i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears, m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement, p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown, r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend, t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown, cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covenng
market costs is paid from fund assets, d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available, p previous day's net asset value, s fund
split shares dunng the week. x fund paid a distribution during the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


Interestrates


mu



The yield on the
10-year Treasury
fell to 2.68 per-
cent Wednes-
day. Yields affect
rates on
mortgages and
other consumer
loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .04 0.05 -0.01 .06
6-month T-bill .06 0.06 ... .11
52-wk T-bill .09 0.10 -0.01 .13
2-year T-note .32 0.34 -0.02 .28
5-year T-note 1.50 1.56 -0.06 .88
10-yearT-note 2.68 2.75 -0.07 2.00
30-yearT-bond 3.62 3.67 -0.05 3.19


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.42 3.48 -0.06 2.76
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.89 4.89 ... 3.99
Barclays USAggregate 2.36 2.38 -0.02 1.90
Barclays US High Yield 5.60 5.61 -0.01 5.62
Moodys MA AACorp Idx 4.48 4.48 ... 3.87
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.72 1.77 -0.05 1.13
Barclays US Corp 3.14 3.16 -0.02 2.81


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar sank
against the
Japanese yen
but held
relatively steady
against the euro
after the
Federal
Reserve said
that it would
continue to trim
its bond-buying
stimulus
program.


~hfl


ira


MAJORS


CLOSE CHG/


USD per British Pound 1.6567
Canadian Dollar 1.1160
USD per Euro 1.3660
Japanese Yen 102.06
Mexican Peso 13.3713


-.0011
+.0009
-.0004
-.81
+.1182


EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel 3.4842 +.0012
Norwegian Krone 6.1670 -.0009
South African Rand 11.2673 -.0018
Swedish Krona 6.4584 -.0009
Swiss Franc .8942 +.0045


ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.1438
6.0559
7.7641
62.425
1.2764
1077.54
30.30


+.0037
+.0049
-.0007
-.100
+.0020
-2.06
-.06


1YR.
%CHG AGO
-.07% 1.5759
+.08% 1.0023
-.03% 1.3486
-.79% 90.69
+.88% 12.7226


+.42% 3.7282
-.55% 5.4948
-2.03% 9.0416
-.58% 6.3689
+.40% .9219


+.32% .9556
+.08% 6.2290
-.01% 7.7586
-.16% 53.656
+.16% 1.2343
-.19% 1083.30
-.20% 29.49


Commodities
The price of nat-
ural gas surged
to its highest set-
tlement level
since 2010. It
was the seventh
time in the last
eight days that
the price of gas
rose. Gold and
silver also rose.








C M


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 97.36
Ethanol (gal) 1.83
Heating Oil (gal) 3.18
Natural Gas (mm btu) 5.56
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.66

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1262.20
Silver (oz) 19.53
Platinum (oz) 1406.40
Copper (Ib) 3.27
Palladium (oz) 710.25

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.42
Coffee (Ib) 1.17
Corn (bu) 4.28
Cotton (Ib) 0.86
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 351.50
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.38
Soybeans (bu) 12.69
Wheat (bu) 5.52


PVS.
97.41
1.77
3.12
5.03
2.63

PVS.
1251.00
19.48
1407.70
3.29
715.60

PVS.
1.43
1.15
4.32
0.84
351.20
1.39
12.86
5.66


%CHG
-0.05
+0.11
+1.92
+10.41
+1.26

%CHG
+0.90
+0.26
-0.09
-0.53
-0.75

%CHG
-0.34
+2.14
-1.04
+1.42
+0.09
-0.50
-1.26
-2.56


%YTD
-1.1
-4.2
+3.4
+31.4
-4.5

%YTD
+5.0
+1.0
+2.6
-5.0
-1.0

%YTD
+5.6
+5.8
+1.3
+1.1
-2.4
+1.1
-3.3
-8.9





-Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/SCIENCE NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


TODAY



Scattered rain; cool


620/550
70% chance of rain


0 0


FRIDAY


,'" \%",;,,,,
Mostly cloudy,
scattered rain

740/610
40% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 66/57 rain all day possible
Sarasota 59/54 rain all day possible

SUN AND MOON


1# 31 o f. Di u Du Do The Sun Rise Set
8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m. The u Rse et
ThehighertheAccuWeather.com UVIndex" number, Today 7:15 a.m. 6:09 p.m.
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; Friday 7:14 a.m. 6:09 p.m.
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8.10 Very High; 11+ Extreme. The Moon Rise Set
RealFeel Temperature is the exclude Today 6:44 am 6:14 pm
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature a .
based on eiightweatherfactors. Friday 7:33 a.m. 7:21 p.m.
AIR QUALITY INDEX New First Full Last
Air Quality Index readings as of Wednesday C E

26 Jan30 F
PC 1 I ..EE M M Jan 30 Feb 6 Feb 14 Feb 22
n fin I no I o 2n qmn nn qnn


0 50 100 150U 200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees *
Grass L -
Weeds
Molds *
absent low moderate hih veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 66/570
Normal High/Low 75/520
Record High 870 (2013)
Record Low 280 (1986)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m.Wednesday 0.18"
Month to date 1.17"
Normal month to date 1.67"
Year to date 1.17"
Normal yearto date 1.67"
Record 0.85" (1966)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2014 2013 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 1.17 0.43 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 2.52 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 0.97 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 1.17 53.10 50.74 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour penod ending at 5 p.m.


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 4:44a 10:59a 5:14p 11:29p
Fri. 5:43a 11:25a 6:11p --
Sat. 6:42a 12:25p 7:10p 12:56p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours.The minor periods are shorter.

TIDES
High Low High Low
Punta Gorda
Today 1:31a 9:31a 3:57p 8:30p
Fri. 2:25a 10:10a 4:22p 9:26p
Englewood
Today 12:08a 7:47a 2:34p 6:46p
Fri. 1:02a 8:26a 2:59p 7:42p
Boca Grande
Today 1:39p 6:08a --- 5:07p
Fri. 12:07a 6:47a 2:04p 6:03p
El Jobean
Today 2:03a 10:OOa 4:29p 8:59p
Fri. 2:57a 10:39a 4:54p 9:55p
Venice
Today 12:49p 6:26a 11:17p 5:25p
Fri. 1:14p 7:05a --- 6:21p


FLORIDA CITIES
Today


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Hi Lo W
50 37 s
59 54 r
56 52 r
75 66 r
58 53 r
76 68 sh
66 57 r
68 60 r
51 38 sh
49 39 sh
76 70 c


Fri.
1Lo W
50 pc
62 s
61 s
68 sh
59 s
70 sh
63 pc
63 s
54 s
52 pc
71 pc


SATURDAY



Sun & clouds, isolated
rain

810/ 640
20% chance of rain


SUNDAY



Partly cloudy


830 / 620
0% chance of rain


Partly cloudy


840 / 640
0% chance of rain


Cleamater plant City
56 52 *57' 48 V Winter Haen
.^-.o-ll. 1 58 50
r Tampa JBrandun ,
S54/50 57 50 Bt S-
5 "Bartu'


St. Peters
56, 52


Longboat K
60/55


o
bgApollo Beach Mad
55 50 Ft. Meade
55 50 57/53



Wauchula
SBradenton 59 51
59/54
Myakka Cilt Limestone
ey 61/52 Limestone
['"*'**"*J60 51 ___
Sarasota J 6
59/54
Osprey Arcadia
61/55 62 53
Venice .
.IL .Iuii


Shown is today's weather
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Gulf Water
Temperature

600


Boca Grande%
65/60


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2014

Publication date: 1/30/14
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
NNE 8-16 1-3 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
NNE 8-16 2-4 Moderate


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today Fri.


Hi Lo W
73 68 c
58 55 r
57 52 r
64 59 r
77 68 sh
68 58 r
52 41 sh
65 57 r
59 53 r
47 34 s
48 38 s


Hi Lo W
79 70 pc
75 58 s
75 58 s
76 65 s
81 71 sh
78 64 pc
70 55 s
77 61 pc
76 61 s
61 48 pc
61 50 pc


Fort Myers
66/57

Cape Coral Lehigh Acres
64/56 66/56


High ............. 81 at Palm Springs, CA


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford


Today
Hi Lo W
68 41 pc
32 24 pc
40 22 s
29 18 s
18 7 sn
44 25 s
42 26 c
29 24 s
27 24 pc
24 18 s
40 24 s
35 18 s
31 11 sn
33 25 pc
29 25 pc
37 16 s
30 26 pc
26 14 s
62 47 pc
38 21 r
32 7 sf
25 23 sn
11 -14 pc
12 -6 s
-1 -17 pc
28 18 s


SHelena 20 9
Sanibel Honolulu 80 67
66/60 Houston 60 53
Bonita Springs Indianapolis 32 25
68/57
6/5 WORLD CITIES
A Toda


City H
Pompano Beach 7'
St. Augustine 51
St. Petersburg 5'
Sanford 5
Sarasota 59
Tallahassee 49
Tampa 54
Titusville 6:
Vero Beach 68
West Palm Beach 7!
Winter Haven 58


.v ,City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Today Fri. Beijing
I Lo W Hi Lo W Berlin
6 68 r 80 69 sh Buenos Aires
1 47 sh 65 57 s Cairo
6 52 r 72 62 s Calgary
7 52 r 74 60 s Cancun
9 54 r 74 62 pc Dublin
9 28 s 63 44 pc Edmonton
4 50 r 73 62 s Halifax
2 56 r 73 61 s Kiev
8 59 r 77 64 s London
5 65 r 79 69 sh Madrid
8 50 r 75 60 s Weather (W): s-s


sn
7s
pc
pc


iy
. I


Hi LO W
39 33 pc
69 46 s
41 25 s
30 25 c
88 73 pc
71 53 s
6 -2 sn
81 72 sh
41 34 c
0 -4 pc
23 22 s
8 -3 s
43 37 r
48 36 pc


E
T


Low ................ -29 at Embarrass, MN
Today Fri.


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


24 s 38
26 s 50
32 pc 50


Fri.
1Lo W
33 pc
23 pc
36 pc
28 pc
6 pc
40 pc
21 c
28 c
17 sf
16 sf
31 c
29 pc
6c
30 sn
23 sn
29 pc
26 sf
15 c
50 pc
12 sn
12 sn
9c
-12 pc
0 s
-8 pc
22 c
2 pc
71 pc
61 c
23 sn


Fri.
1Lo W
35 pc
45 s
28 s
31 pc
68 t
54 pc
-1 pc
73 pc
34 r
-2 pc
24 sf
3s
37 r
41 pc


unny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Studies: Neanderthal genes helped modern humans evolve


LOS ANGELES (LA
Times) Mating between
Neanderthals and the
ancestors of Europeans
and East Asians gave
our forebears important
evolutionary advantages
but may have created a
lot of sterile males, wiping
out much of that primitive


DNA, new genetic studies
suggest.
The comparison of
Neanderthal and modem
human genomes, pub-
lished online Wednesday
in the journals Nature and
Science, identified specific
sequences of altered DNA
that both Neanderthals


and several hundred
modern Europeans and
Asians had in common.
Those stretches of
common heritage offer
intriguing hints at what
borrowed code helped
modern humans adapt,
and what was eliminated.
The strongest remnant


SUN4
NEWSPAPERS
Mid-Winter Open House

& Collector Car Show

Saturday, February 8, 2014
9 AM to 1 PM at the

Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte
ADMISSION IS FREE!

Tours of Sun Newspapers office and plant

10:00am Noon

See how your AWARD-WINNING NEWSPAPER operates!

Live Music from "Power Outage Continues"
Guest Appearance by Las Vegas Performer Jimmy Mazz
Enjoy the vehicles that represent transportation of YESTERYEAR, including
antinha clasics nnrfc cnvil intarl t mntnreit m l and triuck that will hb nn riknlav.


I ll eVe tIIL Io UpIeInt LU Ullly lUII-IIIU II IU V i lc5IIII dlll LIlI;IC I llU Isn ireg LIstaLIUo II Ie .
Owners that will exhibit at the newspaper must pre-register with

Veteran Motor Car Club of America

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Cmrwrf,8i ar &


of our Neanderthal
heritage appears to be
centered around as-yet-
unknown changes in skin
and hair that likely proved
advantageous, the two
studies suggest.
"The group of genes that
stand out are genes that
code for things in the skin,
particularly keratin, which
is a structural component
of skin, and another
group of genes that are
keratins in the hair also
pops up," said geneticist
Svante Paabo of the
Max Planck Institute for
Evolutionary Anthropology
in Leipzig, Germany,
one of the authors of the
research published online
Wednesday in the journal
Nature. "So it suggests that
something came over from
Neanderthals to present-
day people that had to
do with the skin and was
advantageous and rose to
high frequency."


(Washington Post) -
Archaeologists from
the University of
Pennsylvania announced
this month that they have
unearthed the tomb of
a previously unknown
Egyptian pharaoh.
The Penn team, which
has been excavating a site
called Abydos in coopera-
tion with Egypt's Supreme
Council of Antiquities
since 1967, made a string
of discoveries in the last
months of 2013. One was
a 60-ton sarcophagus that
had been carved from
red quartzite to house
the tomb of the pharaoh
Sobekhotep near Cairo;
despite its immense
size, it was extracted and
moved hundreds of miles
to Abydos, where it was


The two studies add
detail to a growing
consensus that modem
human ancestors did
more than bump elbows
and eventually replace
the Neanderthals that
preceded them out of
Africa. They mated with
them around 50,000 years
ago a series of as many
as 300 encounters that has
left a 1 percent to 3 percent
Neanderthal footprint on
the genome of anatomi-
cally modern Europeans
and Asians, the researchers
said.
"Individually, we are a
little bit Neanderthal," said
Joshua M. Akey, a popu-
lation geneticist from the
University of Washington,
and lead author of the
study published in
Science. "Collectively, there
is a substantial part of the
Neanderthal genome that's
still floating around in the
human population that's


reused by later ancient
kings whose identities are
still unknown.
The most surprising
find was the tomb
of a pharaoh named
Woseribre-Senebkay, who
lived about 1650 B.C.
Senebkay's tomb had
been plundered centuries
ago by robbers, who not
only stripped it of gilt sur-
faces and other valuable
objects but also ripped
apart the pharaoh's mum-
my itself. Nevertheless,
the archaeologists were
able to recover the king's
bones and put together
an almost complete skel-
eton. Preliminary studies
indicate that Senebkay
was about 5-foot-10 and
probably died when he
was in his mid or late 40s.


just shattered into different
pieces, and everyone has
slightly different parts."
The reports build on the
publication in December
of the full genome of
Neanderthals that showed
that they were geneti-
cally closer to modern
Europeans and Asians
than to modem Africans.
The best explanation for
that phenomenon was
gene flow a fancy term
for interbreeding between
the divergent species,
which shared a common
ancestor some 300,000 to
500,000 years ago.
At least 20 percent of
the Neanderthal genome
"introgressed" into the
genome of our European
and Asian ancestors,
and East Asians retained
slightly more of it, ac-
cording to Akey's analysis,
based on genomes from
379 Europeans and 286
East Asians.


His burial chamber also
provided the first evidence
of the existence of what
archaeologists have named
the Abydos Dynasty.
Senebkay appears to have
been one of the first kings
in that lineage.
"It's exciting to find
not just the tomb of one
previously unknown
pharaoh but the necrop-
olis of an entire forgotten
dynasty," JosefWegner
of the Penn Museum
said in the university's
announcement. Wegner,
who led the team, added
that "continued work ...
promises to shed new
light on the political
history and society of
an important but poorly
understood era of Ancient
Egypt."


MONDAY THE NATION


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SPORTS


Thursday, January 30, 2014


Thunder rally from
18-point deficit to beat
Heat, *Page 4


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


* GIRLS BASKETBALL: District tournaments

|-r ,,i T.

"^Ire,


AP PHOTO
Country music star Blake Shelton poses with NASCAR Hall of
Fame inductee and Dale Jarrett before Wednesday's induction
ceremony in Charlotte, N.C.

* SUPER BOWL XLVIII: Denver


Bailey gets shot


at being a champ


Port Charlotte High School's Courtney Robertson battles for a loose ball with Island Coast's Leanne Ellis on Wednesday during a
District 7A-11 semifinal in Port Charlotte.




ONE UP, ONE DOWN


Pirates ease past
Island Coast W
By ROB SHORE .>;
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -There
were no whoops of celebra- y
tion from Courtney Robertson '
or Taylor Lindsey or any others
Port Charlotte High School 15 m
player at the final buzzer.
The Pirates clearly set their
sights beyond advancing to --
regionals, E wi
UP NEXT which
they did
Port Charlotte: Wednesday
vs. Venice, night with a
Friday, 7 p.m 68-45 victory
over Island
Coast in the
District 7A- 11 semifinals.
"Well, our goal is winning "
regionals, so ..." Robertson
said with a laugh. Port Charlotte High School's Emily Treasure
PIRATES 16 connects on a 3-pointer against Island Coast.


Sailors send
Bobcats packing

ByZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
SARASOTA North Port
High School's season came to
an end on Wednesday night in
a 73-34 District 4A- 11 playoff
loss to Sarasota.
The Sailors made it a three-
game sweep of the Bobcats
this season by jumping to a
23-6 lead in the first quarter.
The loud and energetic North
Port bench was quieted
quickly as Sarasota forced
11 turnovers in the opening
quarter, turning eight of them
into easy points. The Sailors
ended the quarter with a
buzzer-beating 3-pointer.
"I told the kids before the
game, the team that comes
BOBCATS|6


* NASCAR: Hall of Fame


Jarrett joins his


father in HOF


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE, N.C.-
Dale Jarrett had no idea
what crazy things Blake
Shelton might say as the
country music star induct-
ed him into the NASCAR
Hall of Fame.
"It could have gone in a
lot of different directions,"
Jarrett said of Shelton's
induction speech.
Shelton read a hand-
written and heartfelt
speech about his love of
racing, inherited through
his late father, who as
his health declined was
so thrilled that his son
got to hang with some of
NASCAR's biggest stars.
Jarrett on occasion
spoke to Shelton's father
on the phone.
"I believe it was little
things like that that kept
my dad happy those last
few years," Shelton said.


'And even though I know
he was beyond proud of
my accomplishments in
music, he just couldn't get
over the fact that I got to
spend time with guys like
Clint Bowyer and Elliott
Sadler, and most of all,
Dale Jarrett."
It set the tone for
Jarrett's emotional induc-
tion. He joined his father,
Ned, as just the second
father-son combination
with NASCAR champion-
ships inducted into the
Hall.
The Jarretts join Lee and
Richard Petty.
A three-time Daytona
500 winner, two-time
Brickyard winner and
the 1999 Cup champion,
Jarrett was emotional the
entire time.
But he had to choke
back tears when it came
time to address his father.
JARRETTI2


By JOSHUA MAYERS
SEATTLE TIMES
JERSEY CITY, N.J.
- Ever the optimist,
Champ Bailey wouldn't
let himself think he might
never make a Super Bowl.
Not even after 14 NFL
seasons, including several
when he was considered
the league's best corner-
back, and five fruitless
trips to the playoffs.
"I always think things
are going to work out," he
said Wednesday ahead of
Super Bowl XLVIII against
the Seahawks. 'And here
we are."
The wait ends in Year 15.
Still, one would be
hard-pressed to label this
season perhaps the last
of Bailey's Hall of Fame
career as "storybook". A
nagging foot injury, stem-
ming from an exhibition
loss to Seattle, forced him
to miss 11 regular-season
games, and even healthy,


SUPER BOWL
XLVIII
WHO: Seattle Seahawks (15-3)
vs. Denver Broncos (15-3)
WHEN: Sunday, 6 p.m.
WHERE: MetLife Stadium,
East Rutherford, N.J.
TV: FOX
LINE: Broncos by 2

he is far removed from his
prime.
But don't make the
mistake of determining
Bailey's value to the
Broncos these days by
measures like intercep-
tions. In his 10th year in
Denver, the 35-year-old
has become a beloved,
emotional leader of the
team, and his teammates
have rallied around get-
ting him to Sunday's big
game and sending him off
a winner.
BAILEY 13


* BOYS SOCCER: North Port

North Port junior Rodriguez keeps head in the game BOYS SOCCER
TODAY


By ZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
NORTH PORT North
Port High School is ahead
of the curve when it comes
to concussion safety.
In addition to following
FHSAA regulations for


dealing with concussions,
the high school also has
its own system. It starts
with every player taking
a baseline cognitive test
prior to the season, so that
trainers and doctors can
properly evaluate anyone
who gets a concussion.


Bobcats junior soccer
player Chris Rodriguez is
quite familiar with the sys-
tem that was implemented
last school year. He missed
six weeks of the season
with a concussion sus-
tained after being kicked


and returned last week.
Rodriguez said the
concussion tests, taken
at a computer, include
memorization and speed
tasks measuring reaction
time to images shown on
the screen. He also had to


in the head during a game, clear a four-day physical


evaluation that started with
light jogging on the first
day, and ended with a full
practice on the final day.
After clearing every
hurdle to get back on the
field, the midfielder played
HEAD 16


REGIONAL
QUARTERFINALS
Region 4A-3
North Port at Gulf Coast,
7p.m.
Region 2A-3
Clewiston at DeSoto
County, 7 p.m.


INDEX I Lottery 21 Community calendar 21 Baseball 2 | Golf 21 NFL 31 College basketball 4 | NBA 4 | NHL 4 | Scoreboard 51 Soccer 5 | Quick Hits 51 Preps 6 | Olympics 6


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, January 30, 2014


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.comrn
* CASH 3
Jan. 29N .................................. 8-3-0
Jan. 29D ..........................5........5-1-4
Jan. 28N .....................................3-3-4
Jan. 28D ....................................2-5-1
Jan. 27N ..................................... 7-4-3
Jan. 27D .....................................8-9-2
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
Jan. 29N ..................................2-2-3-7
Jan. 29D ..................................1-4-2-6
Jan. 28N ..................................2-4-6-7
Jan. 28D .................................9-8-7-4
Jan. 27N ..................................4-6-3-6
Jan. 27D ..................................5-3-4-2
D-Day, N-Night
* FANTASY 5
Jan. 29 ..........................6-8-12-24-29
Jan.28 .....................17-21-24-31-33
Jan.27 ..........................1-9-17-24-36
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 28
4 5-digit winners.......... $106,138.88
284 4-digit winners.............. $120.50
9,126 3-digit winners............. $10.50
* MEGA MONEY
Jan.28 ..............................8-20-35-41
M egaBall...........................................4

Jan.24 ..............................1-11-17-20
M egaBall......................................... 19
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 28
0 4-of-4MB..........................$500,000
7 4-of-4....................................... $841
30 3-of-4 MB ...............................$430
678 3-of-4................................ $56.50
933 2-of-4MB...........................$28.50
* LOTTO
Jan.29 ....................6-13-20-27-29-51
Jan.25 .......................2-3-7-21-36-43
Jan.22 .....................6-7-11-13-23-44
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 25
0 6-digit winners .........................$3M
34 5-digit winners................... $4,029
1,977 4-digit winners ..................$57
37,954 3-digit winners ...................$5
* POWERBALL
Jan.29...................... 11-23-28-32-47
Powerball........................................20

Jan.25 .....................8-12-18-55-57
Powerball.......................................... 2
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 25
0 5 of5 + PB............................$152M
1 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
3 4of5 + PB......................... $10,000
75 4of 5 ....................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$171 million
MEGAA MILLIONS
Jan.28 ........................ 7-16-28-53-60
M egaBall...........................................2

Jan.24...................... 22-45-46-47-65
M egaBall......................................... 10
PAYOFF FOR JAN. 28
0 5ofS+MB............................$71M
0 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
1 4of5 + MB...........................$5,000
19 4of 5 ....................................$500


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.
Submit local golf scores: Email
scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.


* BASEBALL


SPRING TRAINING
COUNTDOWN



15
Days until Tampa Bay Rays
pitchers and catchers report
for spring training on Feb. 14
at Charlotte Sports Park

MLB CALENDAR
Today: Tropicana Field clubhouse
staff packs up for spring training
at Charlotte Sports Park.
Feb. 6: Voluntary reporting
date for Arizona and Los Angeles
Dodgers pitchers, catchers and
injured players.


FGCU 3rd in A-Sun poll


Feb. 13: Voluntary reporting date
for other team's pitchers, catchers
and injured players.
Feb. 25: Mandatory spring
training reporting date.
March 12: Last day to place a
player on unconditional release
waivers and pay 30 days termina-
tion pay instead of 45 days.
March 22-23: Los Angeles
Dodgers vs. Arizona, Sydney.
March 30: Opening day in North
America, Dodgers at San Diego.
Active rosters reduced to 25
players.
-Lance Berkman retires.
QUICK HITS, PAGE 5


STAFF REPORT
FORT MYERS -Florida
Gulf Coast's baseball team
was picked to finish third
in the Atlantic Sun by the
conference coaches on
Wednesday.
"Being chosen third
gives our team something
to aim for," said Eagles
coach Dave Tollett, former
Charlotte High School
coach. "Three teams re-
ceived votes for first-place
which shows this league
is up for grabs, now it's up
to our guys to put in the


work necessary to take the
next step."
The Eagles finished
second in the A-Sun last
year after being selected
in the preseason to win
the conference. They went
37-20 overall and 19-8 in
conference play.
The Eagles finished be-
hind reigning regular-sea-
son champion Mercer and
North Florida.
Mercer received 97
points and seven first-
place votes followed by
North Florida (86, 1) and


the Eagles (73, 2). East
Tennessee State (69),
Kennesaw State (64),
Stetson (60), Lipscomb
(34), USC-Upstate (30),
Jacksonville (27) and
Northern Kentucky (10)
round out the poll.
The top eight in the
regular-season standings
advance to the A-Sun
tournament May 21-25 at
FGCU's Swanson Stadium.
FGCU opens the
season Feb. 14 at 6:30 p.m.
against Rhode Island at
Swanson Stadium.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


SATURDAY
Port Charlotte Bandits
baseball: Voting for coaches,
including cheer, 11 a.m., Franz Ross Park.
Call Shea, 941-661-9368. Registrations
at Franz Ross Park: Spring tackle football
Feb. 8 from 10a.m.-2p.m. Cost: $100
per player. Fall football and cheer Feb.
15 from 10 a.m.-noon for returnees, 12
p.m.-2 p.m. open registration. Cost: $200
per participant

Tennis seminar: Free three-
part clinic on overhead, 10 a.m., Rotonda
Community Park tennis courts. All levels
of play welcome. Contact Pete Zeeh at
pete@zeeh.com or call 941-548-2447.

BASEBALL
Charlotte Thunder U-11
and U-12 teams: Open tryouts
will be held during practices on Monday
and Wednesday (6 p.m.) for the rest of
January, Contact coach Chris Birdsall,
941-769-7870, or email cbmoc3@gmail.
com

Game Day Heat: 12U travel
team looking for players. Practices
Tuesday and Thursdays, 6 p.m. at North
Charlotte Regional Park. Call Scott,
941-421-8378.

Snowbird Classic: Seeking
volunteers to help with admissions,
scorekeeping, public address
announcing, concessions, program
selling and parking. Event held at South
County and North County parks from
Feb. 14 to March 22. Call 941-876-3226
or email steve@snowbirdbaseball.com or
Shannon@snowbirdbaseball.com.

BOXING
Youth and adult classes:
Male and female. Mondays-Fridays, 6-8
p.m., at 24710 Sandhill Blvd. in Deep
Creek. Training and/or competition.
Member of USA Boxing. Call 239-292-
9230 or visit CharlotteHarborBoxing.
com, www.facebook.com/
CharlotteHarborBoxingGymnasium.

FOOTBALL
Charlotte Warriors:
Summer and fall registration for girls
and boys 5-15 at Charlotte Field, 2610
Carmalita St, Punta Gorda. Pop Warner
registration: Feb. 6,6-8 p.m., and Feb.
8,9 a.m.-1 p.m. for August-December
season. Fees: $200 for football, $200
for cheer. Free clinics: May-July.
Call 941-347-7200 or email info@
charlottewarriors.com.

Flag Football: Franz Ross
ParkYMCA's flag football for ages 7-9
& 10-13 begins March 17. Register
at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com, or call
941-629-9622.

HIGH SCHOOL
ATHLETICS
Sarasota Area Sports
Alliance scholarships: SASA
is awarding a limited number of
scholarships to qualified high school
student-athletes in Sarasota and
Manatee counties. For guidelines and
applications, logon to www.sarasotaar-
easportsalliance.org/Scholarships.html.
Application deadline is March 21.

KICKBALL
CC Adult Sports: Games
on Thursday at 7 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.
at Englewood Sports Complex adult
softball fields. Call 941-209-5924.

PRESCHOOLERS
Franz Ross Park YMCA:
All Sport, Soccer and T-ball. Register in
person, online at CharlotteCountyYMCA.
com or call 941-629-9622.

PROSPORTS ACADEMY
Youth sport specific
personal training and


group sessions: Football,
baseball, basketball, track& field,
volleyball and soccer. Strength and
conditioning, speed, agility, stretching,
mobility and weight management
Call Elgin, 941-268-1891 or email
makeitcountsports@gmail.com.

RUNNING
Foot Landing Running
Academy: Go from walker to runner
in six-week training program. $35 fee
includes coaching, registration for the
Strides for Scholarships 5K and T-shirt.
Contact Scott and Krissy, 239-216-1355
or scottgobucks@aol.com.

Harbour Heights 5K Run/
Walk: Feb. 22,8 a.m., at Harbour
Heights park. Entry fee: $15 (on or
before Feb. 8), $20 (Feb. 8 to race day).
Call (941) 258-2890 or logon to www.
active.com.

SAILING
Charlotte Harbor
Multihull Association: For
multihull owners or those interested in
them. No dues. Meets first Monday of
each month 6 p.m. at Harpoon Harry's.
Visit http://groups.yahoo.com/group/
CHMA/or call Ron, 941-876-6667.

Punta Gorda Sailing
Club: Racing and cruising programs
forall ages. Call Bill, 781-910-3217or
visit pgscweb.com.

SOCCER
TOPSoccer: North PortYouth
Soccer program for ages 4 to 19 with
disabilities. Eight-week season starts
March 8. Players receive a uniform
shirt and soccer ball as well as a trophy
celebration at the end of the season.
Middle and high volunteers also needed
to work with the athletes. Register
online at www.northportyouthsoccer.
org. Call Jennifer, 941-266-8454.

SWIMMING
Charlotte County
Swimming:Year-round USA
Swimming team provides instruction
and competition ages 5 and up.
Visit www.ccswim.org or call Susan,
941-628-1510.

TENNIS
Instruction: Age 5 to adult,
at Franz Ross ParkYMCA. Register at
CharlotteCountyYMCA.com or call
941-629-9622.

Rotonda QuickStart: Free
lessons for parents and kids (12-under),
10-11 a.m. Saturday, Rotonda Park.
Rackets and balls provided. Call
941-698-9480.

Team Tennis Junior
League: Registration underway
in Charlotte and Sarasota counties for
beginning, intermediate and advanced
level players through age 18. Nine
weeks of Saturday play. Registration
deadline: Feb. 9. Register online at www.
teamtennisjuniorleague.com. Call Sue,
941-475-4489.

VOLUNTEERS
Charlotte County Family
YMCA: Coaches, instructors and
referees needed for soccer, T-ball, cheer-
leading and flag football. Contact Dan,
941 -629-9622 ext. 108, or dcormier@
charlottecountyymca.com.

The CommunityCalendar appears daily
as spoce permits To have your activity
published, fax (941-629-2 085) ore-mail
(sports@sun-heraldcom) eventdetails to
theSports Department at least one week in
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.


By JOHN NICHOLSON
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -
Phil Mickelson is going
ahead with his Phoenix
Open title defense after
testing his ailing lower
back on Wednesday at
exclusive Whisper Rock.
"I had a good practice
session, though I didn't go
full speed for much of it,"
Mickelson said in a state-
ment. "I feel fine. I expect
to play and play well."
He first felt soreness two
weeks ago in Abu Dhabi,
and then withdrew from
the Farmers Insurance
Open on Friday after
making the cut at Torrey
Pines. He flew to Georgia
to see back specialist Tom
Boers and was told his
facet joints locked up.
Last year at TPC
Scottsdale, the former
Arizona State star opened
with an 11-under 60 and
matched the Phoenix
Open record of 28 under.
He was set to make his
25th start in the event that


SunCoast Sports Now JARRETT


Get the latest local sports news:
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shore@sun-herald.com
Zach Miller. Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


FROM PAGE 1
"My dad has been ev-
erything a son would want
his father to be success-
ful, a leader by example, a
teacher you can believe in,
and always there to sup-
port me," Jarrett said. "My
dad was and still is today
my hero. That's what really
makes this night so very
special: I'm joining my
father in the NASCAR Hall
of Fame."
Ned Jarrett is the first
of the 25 Hall of Fame
members still alive to see
his son inducted.
"As a child and a 57 year
old one right now, there's
not a lot we can do that
our parents will take for
payment back for every-
thing they did for us in
our lives," Jarrett said. "In
a small way, I feel like this
is something I can give
to them that they can be
proud of."
Maurice Petty was


PHOENIX OPEN
WHERE: TPC Scottsdale,
Stadium Course (7,152 yards,
par 71), Scottsdale, Ariz.
WHEN: Today-Sunday
PURSE: $6.2 million. (winner's
share: $1,116,000)
TV: Golf Channel (Today, 3-7
p.m., 7:30 p.m.-1 a.m.; Friday,
3-7 p.m., 7:30 p.m.-3:30 a.m.;
Saturday-Sunday, 1-2:30 p.m.,
10:30 p.m.-3 a.m.) and CBS
(Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.)
ONLINE: www.pgatour.com

he also won in 1996 and
2005.
Mickelson lived in the
Phoenix area for 12 years.
"If it was any other
tournament I'd skip it,"
Mickelson said this week.
"But I'm defending, it's my
second hometown and I
love the event."
Lefty also said he ex-
pects to play next week at
Pebble Beach, where he's
a five-time champion. He
is skipping Riviera and the
Match Play Championship


DAYTONA
SPEEDWEEKS
WHEN: Feb. 14-23
WHERE: Daytona International
Speedway, Daytona Beach
SCHEDULE
Feb. 14: NASCAR Sprint Cup
Series practice
Feb. 15: Sprint Unlimited, 8
p.m. (Fox Sports 1)
Feb. 16: Daytona 500 quali-
fying, 1 p.m. (FOX)
Feb. 19: Sprint Cup practice,
Truck Series practice
Feb. 20: Dual 150 qualifying
races for Daytona 500, 7p.m.
(Fox Sports 1)
Feb. 21: Truck Series race, 7:30
p.m. (Fox Sports 1)
Feb. 22: Nationwide Series race,
1:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Feb. 23: Daytona 500,1 p.m.
(FOX)

inducted to complete
the Petty dynasty in the
Hall, which now includes
his father, brother and
cousin as members of the
exclusive group.
"The Chief" was in-
ducted by brother Richard


because his oldest daugh-
ter has spring break a
week earlier than his other
two children.
On Thursday at TPC
Scottsdale, the 43-year-old
Mickelson was scheduled
to open play on the 10th
tee in a morning group
with Bill Haas and Ryan
Moore.
While Mickelson now
lives near his hometown
of San Diego, Torrey Pines
winner Scott Stallings is
setting up a winter base
in Scottsdale. He also is
joiningWhisper Rock, the
club where Mickelson is a
member.
Stallings won Sunday
in San Diego for his third
tour title. "That venue and
that event was very special
and a huge stepping stone
in my career," he said.
Stallings is getting over
an illness that also hit his
wife and son.
"Honestly, if you asked
me yesterday, I'd say there
is no way I'm playing in
the tournament," he said.

Petty, the seven-time
NASCAR champion and
member of the inaugural
Hall of Fame class.
"The big deal is that
it's really the end of Petty
Enterprises because we
started in 1949, and now
that my brother is in the
Hall of Fame, then that
pretty well closes the book
on it," Richard Petty said.
Maurice Petty is the first
engine builder inducted
into the Hall. His engines
won seven titles and more
than 200 races, including
seven Daytona 500s.
Also in the Hall from the
Petty Enterprise dynasty
is patriarch Lee Petty, and
the Petty boys' cousin and
crew chief, Dale Inman.
Also inducted
Wednesday was Fireball
Roberts, considered the
first superstar of NASCAR.
Jack Ingram, considered
one of NASCAR's greatest
drivers, and two-time se-
ries champion Tim Flock
were also inducted.


* GOLF:


AP PHOTO
Phil Mickelson, hitting his second shot during the second round of last week's Farmers Insurance
Open in San Diego, will play in the Phoenix Open.



Mickelson ready




to give it a shot


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014






The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


* SUPER BOWL XLVIII: SUPER BOWL XLVIII:

a ttle_ "The championship game should be played in a climate that you know
S eat t e Iis going to be agreeable to put on a good exhibition of football. Actually,
if I was a fan, I wouldn't go to the game with that kind of temperature....
onCe When two professional teams play and they can only score seven points,
that shows you what a terrible game it was."

sou gh t CharleyTrippi,
Pro Football Hall of Famer on 1948 NFL championship game

Peyton:

By TIM BOOTH
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERSEY CITY, N.J.
They sat on the tarmac
just hoping for the chance
at a meeting.
Pete Carroll and John
Schneider waited in the
private plane in Denver,
wondering if Peyton .
Manning would accept
a request to meet with
the brain trust of the
Seattle Seahawks to see if Z. '"-- .
that could be a potential -
landing spot for the free
agent quarterback.
This was March 2012,
before Manning decided
Denver would become his
permanent address and
before Russell Wilson took
up residency in Seattle.
And as Carroll recalled
on Wednesday, the entire AP FILE PHOTO
process was "brief."
"We tried to get Dick Lynch of the New York Giants trips up Green Bay's Tom Moore after a 30-yard kickoff return during the third quarter of the NFL
involved with that to see championship game on Dec. 30,1962, at Yankee Stadium. The Packers won, 16-7.
if there was a next stage
to the process and there

inr n NFL once tackled the cold
Mannngt, hsand. the
Seahawks intersect in
Sunday's Super Bowl, t tmthga
which is no coincidence. By PAUL NEWBERRY By the time the game
The decision to bring ASSOCIATED PRESS COLDEST SUPER WEATHER WATCH kicked off, the field was
Manning to Denver NEWYORK -For the BOWLS Tracking the weather forecast for completely covered
was the catalyst for the first time, the Super Bowl Jan. 161972 New Orleans 39 the first Super Bowl outdoorsin a again, this time by
Broncos becoming an is being played outdoors n 7 Nwn cold-weather city: several inches of the
offnsie mrve tht st n acol-wethe ciy. Jan. 12, 1975 New Orleans 46
offensive marvel that set in a cold-weather city Jan. 13, 1974 Houston WEDNESDAY: No rain or snow in white stuff. What fol-
records on their way to It used to be the norm the forecast for Sunday. lowed barely qualified as
an AFC championship, for the NFL's champion- Jan. 20, 1985 Stanford degrees football, much less a title
And his decision not to ship game. Jan.18,1976 Miami 57 HIGH: 44 degrees game.
LOW: 27 degreesgae
seriously consider Seattle Just ask 92-year-old Source: NFL "It was more of a push-
was hugely important in Charley Trippi. ing game," Trippi said,
the Seahawks finding free Long before there and domed stadiums to by having better footing recalling how the players
agents and draftees to was a Super Bowl, the choosefrom. than their opponent were slipping and sliding
build a team that w th the Hall of Famer played in "The championship Both title games that all over the place. "It was
class ofmiosi thetNC.ttottiteggaesswihhth
clManning recalled C hicago t ite games withnals game should be played in Trippi played in were incredible. The officials
Wedn resayho ed hi le wea climate that you know affected by the weather, improvised the whole
Wednesday p c ithe sneerst pe we n is going to be agreeable In 1947, Comiskey game. No one could see
wantprocess of figurivacyng out icy field, the sneakers to copend in to put on a good exhi- Park was coated with a the lines. The ballplayers
his next team after eing a Philadelpthia blizzard bition of football," he thin sheet of ice when just couldn't react like
his next team after being tamadep said. "Actually, if I was a the Cardinals hosted the they wanted. I think the
released by Indianapolis. that made it impossible p 1i i*1 11 1 i A
"I remember it wasn'tatoo tha madehe yard linessl fan, I wouldn't go to the Philadelphia Eagles on a fans got cheated out of
"I remember it wasn't to even see the yard lines.
very private. It was quite "You never really game with that kind of bitterly cold day (Trippi seeing a real champion-
a public spectacle," knew if you had a first temperature. remembers the wind ship game.
Manning said. "I could down," Trippi remem- Before the first Super chill being minus-20). The Cardinals, who
have done without that." bered Wednesday when Bowl in 1967, the NFL Borrowing a page from had gone 11-1 during
Manning eventually reached at his home in title game was a matchup the Giants, Trippi traded the regular season and
signed with Denver in Athens, Ga. where, in- between division winners his cleats for sneakers led the league with an
late March. The process terestingly enough, there in late December, hosted and scored two touch- average of more than 391
leading to his decision was snow on the ground by one of the teams. downs on a 44-yard run yards per game, managed
included a number of from a freak winter storm Since most pro franchis- and a 75-yard punt re- just six first downs and
other franchises, including that paralyzed much of es in those days were turn, leading Chicago to 131 yards in the horrible
an early morning phone the South. located in the Northeast a 28-21 victory and what conditions. The Eagles
call that awoke Carroll. It wouldn't be at all and Midwest, it wasn't remains the franchise's didn't fare much better,
Manning had heard surprising to have flur- at all surprising for the only title, but a Chicago turnover
Seattle was interested and ries at MetLife Stadium championship to be de- "The only time I played early in the fourth quar-
thus the process started, on Sunday, when the cided in some especially an NFL game in tennis ter set up the game's only
Seattle was in the Denver Broncos face the brutal weather. In fact, it shoes was in Chicago for sr et ptega e's
market for quarterbacks at Seattle Seahawks, though often became the central our championship team, 5-yard touchdown run.
that point. They had gone the forecast called for theme. Trippi said. "We got The finalPhiladelnhia
through Matt Hasselbeck, only a 20 percent chance Most notably, better footing in tennis The final: Philadelphia
Charlie Whitehurst and of precipitation. The there was the famous shoes. You couldn't stand 7, C hicago .
Tarvaris Jackson during temperature, expected "Sneakers Games" in up in cleats." To this day, Trippi
Carroll's first two seasons to climb well past the 1934, when the New York The following year, the figures the Cardinals
and now stood the chance freezing mark in the Giants borrowed some teams met again in the were wrongly denied
to possibly make a pitch afternoon, could dip basketball shoes from a title game, this time at their second consecutive
to Manning. back into the 20s after nearby college, changed Philadelphia's Shibe Park. title.
They had yet to draft nightfall, out of their cleats in the A full-fledged blizzard "When two profession-
Wilson who Carroll Trippi doesn't under- third quarter, and turned struck the city dump- al teams play and they
said he now would have stand why the NFL took a 13-3 deficit into a 30-13 ing so much snow the can only score seven
selected much higher a chance on its signature victory at the ice-covered grounds crew couldn't points," he said, "that
than the third round-- so game being marred by Polo Grounds. The Giants remove the tarp. The shows you what a terrible
it made sense for the inclement weather, when would repeat the tactic players were summoned game it was."
Seahawks to try and get the league has plenty 22 years later, romping from the locker room to He hopes there's not a
involved, of warm-weather cities to another title largely help pull it off the field, repeat on Sunday.


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


0 SUPER BOWL XLVIII
NOTEBOOK


SLynch


sits as


teams


Practice

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. Running back
Marshawn Lynch took
his usual Wednesday off
as the Seattle Seahawks
began their final series
of practices for Sunday's
Super Bowl.
SLynch was the only
Seattle player not
to participate as the
SSeahawks practiced
Indoors at the New York
SGiants team facility.
SLynch has been typically
Given Wednesday's off for
Much of the season.
S "Everybody's fine,"
SSeattle coach Pete
SCarroll said. "This is the
Sday we rest Marshawn.
SWednesday is always a
rest day for him. We've
been doing that for years,
Sand it's always worked
out great. We're in great
Shape. We're just as
Fortunate as can be to be
Sin this kind of shape this
Slate in the year."
SSeattle opened the
Doors to the Giants'
Facility during practice in
San attempt to simulate
the temperature the
SSeahawks are likely to see
SSunday against Denver.
SThe indoor temperature
Dropped to 36 degrees,
Close to the projected
Temperature on Sunday.

S Manning, Broncos look
Sharp: In Florham Park, N.J., the
SDenver Broncos braved the cold for
Their first full practice of Super Bowl
Week, working in pads for nearly two
Hours after a 30-minute walkthrough
Session.
Denver practiced on the synthetic
Sturf outdoor field at the New York Jets
Straining facility. By the end of practice,
the temperature dipped to 21 degrees.
"It was great," Broncos coach John
SFox said after practice. "We're pretty
much weather-proof. We practice in
This stuff all the time. Being in Denver,
We've played in a few different
Elementss"
S Fox has chosen the type of natural
Elements that will greet his team at
SMet Life Stadium on Super Sunday.
S Peyton Manning was in command
Sand precise with his throws. He
Seemed unaffected by the elements.
"Very sharp," Fox said. "What
SI've noticed, he had to get used to
Weather over the past two years. I
Think he's done an unbelievable job,
Which I think people forget."

S Elway: Manning can't
really seal legacy Sunday:
SPeyton Manning cannot stamp
himself as the greatest quarterback in
SNFL history even if he wins on Sunday,
John Elway said.
S Elway told The Associated Press on
* that he's come to realize the argument
* over who's the best QB ever is a lot like
* beauty: It's in the eye of the beholder.
* "1 don't think there's ever going to
be a 'very best.' I think there's always
* going to be a conversation;" said
* the Broncos'Hall of Fame quarter-
back-turned-executive vice president.
* Manning can become the first
* starting quarterback to lead two
* franchises to Super Bowl titles.


BAILEY
FROM PAGE 1
The fanciful notion
seems to border on sappy
until you hear it from the
players.
"Champ is a special
player," said linebacker
WesleyWoodyard, who
was ushered into his first
community event by
Bailey. "He's a great leader
- and that's hard to
find. Being here is a great
moment for him."
Safety David Burton
added: "He's someone
you can always trust and
confide in, in a lot of
issues, whether it's on or
off the field. He's been a


true professional with me
and a lot of the younger
guys with the team, and
it's great that in his 15th
season we're getting the
chance to be in the Super
Bowl and try to bring one
home for him."
As a resource, Bailey's
reach has extended
beyond teammates,
where even players on
offense, like receiver Eric
Decker, credit him for
tips on things like route
running. Coach John Fox
said Bailey was one of
the instrumental figures
to offer him insight into
the organization, the city
and the team upon being
hired before the 2011
season.


And Fox, too, has
picked up on the "Win
one for Champ" feeling.
"It might have been
one of my fonder mo-
ments in coaching just
watching him hoist that
Lamar Hunt trophy there
in Denver," Fox said of
the AFC Championship
Game.
Broncos defensive co-
ordinator Jack Del Rio has
called Bailey "one of the
real, classy, long-stand-
ing, great players in this
league."
Admiration is shared
by the Seahawks. Seattle
safety Earl Thomas said
he had a picture of Bailey
proudly displayed on his
MySpace page in high


school, calling it "a hum-
bling experience to see
a guy who's been in this
league 15 years, and this
is his only opportunity to
play in the Super Bowl."
A Super Bowl ring
would seem to be all
that's left to be won for
Bailey, who has deflected
any questions about his
future until after Sunday's
game.
Just don't expect him to
say that.
"I love the respect and
everything my teammates
give me, but it's not about
me," said Bailey, who
has three interceptions
in five games against the
Seahawks. "It's definitely
about this organization."


AP PHOTO
Denver cornerback Champ Bailey talks with reporters during
a news conference Wednesday in Jersey City, N.J. Super Bowl
XLVIII will be the first for the Broncos'veteran.


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


1








* NHL: I : :



NHL shows NFL how it's done outdoors


PANTHERS AT
MAPLE LEAFS
WHO: Florida (21-25-7)
at Toronto (28-21-6)
WHEN: Today, 7 p.m.
WHERE: Air Canada Centre,
Toronto
TV: Fox Sports Florida

LIGHTNING
AT SENATORS
WHO: Tampa Bay (31-17-5)
at Ottawa (22-20-10)
WHEN: Today, 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Canadian Tire Centre,
Kanata, Ontario
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 103.9 FM, 970 AM,
1220 AM


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORLANDO -Joe
Jackson scored 17 points,
Chris Crawford and
Michael Dixon added 12
each and No. 22 Memphis
was able to hold off UCF
69-59 onWednesday
night.
The victory extends the
Tigers' winning streak
to four games. Memphis
(16-4, 6-2 American
Athletic Conference) also
extended its conference
road winning streak to 16
games.
UCF (9-9, 1-6) was
within a basket for most of
the second half, but was
outscored 13-5 to end the
game.
The loss drops the
Knights to 1-15 all-time
against the Tigers.
Memphis struggled to
pull away in the second
half, but carved out a 66-
58 lead with 3:59 to play
on a layup by Jackson
MEMPHIS 69, UCF 59
MEMPHIS (16-4)
Goodwin 2-4 2-6 6, Nichols 3-7 0-0 6, Jack-
son 5-10 6-8 17, C. Crawford 4-7 0-0 12,
Johnson 3-63-410, King 0-0 0-00, Dixon Jr.
3-6 5-5 12, Pellom 3-4 0-1 6,Woodson 0-1
0-0 0, Iverson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 23-45 16-24
69.
UCF (9-9)
Blair 4-6 0-0 8, Sykes 12-22 0-0 24, Newell
0-11 2-2 2, Williams 4-10 1-3 13, Goodwin
0-1 1-2 1, Spurlock 2-4 0-0 4, McCrory 0-2
0-0 0, Haney 1-2 0-0 3,Wilson 2-5 0-0 4, Mc-
Bride 0-0 0-0 0.Totals 25-63 4-7 59.
Halftime-Tied 39-39. 3-Point Goals-
Memphis 7-12 (C. Crawford 4-7, Johnson
1-1, Jackson 1-1, Dixon Jr. 1-3), UCF 5-23
(Williams 4-9, Haney 1-2, Goodwin 0-1,
Spurlock 0-2, Wilson 0-2, Newell 0-7).
Fouled Out-None. Rebounds-Mem-
phis 31 (Johnson 6), UCF 36 (Sykes 12).
Assists-Memphis 14 (Jackson 5), UCF 10
(Sykes 5). Total Fouls-Memphis 12, UCF
18.A-5,161.
Penn St. 71, No. 24 Ohio
St. 70, OT: In Columbus, Ohio,
D.J. Newbill hit a pull-up jumper over


By IRA PODELL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK -Daniel
Carcillo scored the
tiebreaking goal 4:36 into
the third period, and the
New York Rangers com-
pleted a two-game sweep
of the outdoor series
with a 2-1 victory over
the New York Islanders at
frigid Yankee Stadium on
Wednesday night.
Building off their 7-3
win over New Jersey at
the ballpark in the Bronx
on Sunday, the Rangers
took out another division
rival under the lights in
front of 50,027 fans. The
temperature was 22 de-
grees when the first puck
dropped at 7:45 p.m. with
a single-digit wind-chill


* COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP


No.


22


Memphis


STATE SCHEDULE
TODAY
Florida at Mississippi State, 7 p.m.
Florida Intl. at Marshall, 7 p.m.
FAU at Charlotte, 7p.m.
Lipscomb at Jacksonville,
7:15 p.m.
Northern Kentucky at North
Florida, 7:30 p.m.

Aaron Craft with 2 seconds left in
overtime, ending Penn State's years
of futility against the Buckeyes (16-5,
3-5 Big Ten), who have lost five of six
after a 15-0 start. Newbill, who led
the Nittany Lions (11-10,2-6) with 25
points, hit a 3 that forced overtime.
Buckeyes coach Thad Matta was 17-0
against Penn State since taking over
as coach in 2004-05.

St. Bonaventure 78, No.
21 Massachusetts 65: In
Olean, N.Y.,Youssou Ndoye scored
11 of his 12 points in the second
half, and St. Bonaventure (13-8,3-4
Atlantic 10) clamped down on defense
to upset Massachusetts (17-3,4-2).
The Bonnies ended a 24-game losing
streak against ranked opponents,
dating to a 57-56 home win over No.
20 Temple on Jan. 15, 2000.

WOMEN
No. 20 West Virginia
67, No. 23 Iowa St. 56: In
Morgantown, W.Va., Asya Bussie
scored 14 points and grabbed 11
rebounds to lead West Virginia (18-3,
7-2 Big 12) to a win over Iowa State
(15-5,4-5), holding the Cyclones to 28
percent shooting.

Around the nation:
Wednesday's game between No. 25
Middle Tennessee and Southern Miss
was postponed due to inclement
weather conditions. The game been
rescheduled for Feb. 5 at 8p.m.


AP PHOTO
Michael Dixon Jr. of Memphis glides for a layup past Central
Florida's Matt Williams during Wednesday night's game.


New York Islanders goalie Evgeni
York Rangers center Brad Richarc
outdoor game at Yankee Stadiun
factor.
It got progressively
colder as the night went
on.
Benoit Pouliot also
scored for the Rangers,


The only goal he allowed
was a late second-period
tally to Brock Nelson
"- that gave the Islanders a
P short-lived 1-0 lead.
"9. The Rangers evened
B the season series with the
y Islanders 2-2. The teams
S' will play for the final time
S ^this season on Friday at
r Madison Square Garden.
Wearing a ski cap with
a pompom atop his mask,
AP PHOTO Evgeni Nabokov had 32
i Nabokov blocks a shot by New saves for the Islanders,
ds during Wednesday night's who made their outdoor
n. debut. Road teams are
9-1-1 in NHL outside
who are 3-0 in their histo- games.
ry while playing outside. Carcillo fired in a
Henrik Lundqvist stopped rebound of Dominic
30 shots while again Moore's shot for his third
adorning pinstriped pads goal of the season, help-
in honor of the Yankees. ing drop the Islanders to


* NBA:


AP PHOTO
Oklahoma City's Kevin Durant fires a jumper against Miami's LeBron James during the second
quarter of Wednesday night's game in Miami. The Thunder rallied from 18 points down to win.



Durant, OKC rally,




thunder past Heat


By IRA WINDERMAN
SOUTH FLORIDA SUN SENTINEL
MIAMI Kevin Durant
and LeBron James did not
disappoint.
They also canceled each
other out.
Considering the
Oklahoma City Thunder
remained without Russell
Westbrook and consid-
ering Dwyane Wade was
back in the Miami Heat's
starting lineup, that
should have favored the
Heat.
For 6 minutes, 20 sec-
onds it did on Wednesday
night at AmericanAirlines
Arena, as the Heat pushed
to an 18-point lead at the
outset.
After that? Not so much,
as the Thunder soon
found their rhythm on the
way to a 112-95 victory.
"There's no running
away from it," Heat
coach Erik Spoelstra said.
"Other than the first eight
minutes of the game, they
outclassed us tonight."
From Durant there were
33 points on 12-of-23
shooting, continuing the
sizzling pace he brought
into the night, now with
12 consecutive 30-point
games. James countered


HEAT AT KNICKS
WHO: Miami (32-13)
at New York (18-27)
WHEN: Saturday, 8:30 p.m.
WHERE: Madison Square
Garden, New York
TV: ESPN, Sun Sports
RADIO: 99.3 FM

with 34 points on 12-
of-20 shooting, the two
spending much of the
night matched up against
each other, consistently
counter-punching.
But once the Thunder
found their composure,
the Heat lost theirs,
staggered for most of the
final three periods, unable
to regain their stance.
"We did not help
ourselves," Spoelstra said.
"We've taken care of the
ball better in years past."
And that was that,
the Heat closing with 21
turnovers that led to 25
Oklahoma City points.
"Our offense got us in
trouble quite a bit to-
night," Spoelstra said.
All the while, the
Thunder shot 16 of 27
on 3-pointers, the most
3-pointers they have
made in a game since


relocated from Seattle.
"There was a lot of
different issues," Spoelstra
said. "One, they shot the
heck out of it."
While center Chris Bosh
added 18 points and nine
rebounds for the Heat and
Wade 15 points, there was
a far greater depth of con-
tributions from Durant's
Westbrook-less support-
ing cast, from Serge Ibaka
to Jeremy Lamb to Derek
Fisher, who shot 5 of 5 on
3-pointers. No Heat player
beyond James, Bosh and
Wade scored more than
Chris Andersen's eight
points.
THUNDER 112, HEAT 95
OKLAHOMA CITY (112)
Durant 12-23 5-5 33, Ibaka 10-20 2-2 22,
Perkins 0-0 0-0 0, Jackson 2-74-6 9, Sefolo-
sha 3-724A 9, Lamb 7-100-0 18, Fisher 5-7
0-0 15, Collison 1-2 1-23, PJones 1-4 0-0 3,
Adams 00-0 0OO.Totals41-8014-19112.
MIAMI (95)
James 12-20 9-9 34, Battier 1-5 0-0 3, Bosh
7-14 3A4 18, Chalmers 2-4 0-1 4,Wade 7-12
1-215, Allen 1 -4 345, Andersen 4-5 0-0 8,
Cole 0-2 0-0 0, Beasley 2-5 2-2 6, Haslem 0-0
0-0 0, Douglas 1-1 0-0 2, Lewis 0-0 00 .To-
tals 37-72 18-22 95.
Oklahoma City 21 34 36 21 -112
Miami 30 20 25 20 95
3-Point Goals-Oklahoma City 16-27
(Fisher 5-5, Lamb 4-6, Durant 4-9, PJones
1-1,Jackson 1-3,Sefolosha 1-3), Miami 3-19
(Bosh 1 A, Battier 1-5, James 1-5, Wade 0-1,
Cole 0-1, Beasley 0-1, Allen 0-2). Fouled
Out-None. Rebounds-Oklahoma City
40 (Ibaka 8), Miami 43 (Bosh 9). Assists-
Oklahoma City 23 (Durant 5), Miami 20
(Chalmers 8). Total Fouls-Oklahoma City
16, Miami 15. A-19,673(19,600).


0-3-1 in the last 4 games.
With both teams strug-
gling to control the puck
early, it took nearly 39
minutes for the scoreless
deadlock to be broken by
the Islanders and then 30
seconds for the Rangers
to get back even.
The Islanders built up
a big lead in shots, but
couldn't get any past
Lundqvist despite get-
ting the first three power
plays and a 2-minute
stint of 4-on-4 play. When
Islanders forward Kyle
Okposo went off for hold-
ing, and took Rangers
forward Rick Nash with
him for embellishing with
9:49 left in the second
period, the Islanders held
a 21-10 edge in shots.


NBA ROUNDUP


Lowry


lifts


Raptors


to win

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO Kyle
Lowry scored a season-
high 33 points and
dished out 11 assists,
Amir Johnson had 22
points and 11 rebounds
and the Toronto Raptors
beat Orlando 98-83 on
Wednesday night, their
fifth consecutive victory
over the Magic.
The Raptors never
trailed, winning for the
fourth time in five games.
Lowry, who had seven
rebounds, matched his
season best with six
3-pointers. He came
within three points of
matching his career-high
of 36, set Feb. 16, 2011,
against Philadelphia,
when he played for
Houston.
RAPTORS 98, MAGIC 83
ORLANDO (83)
Afflalo 4-11 2-2 10, Davis 14 3-5 5,Vucevic
6-12 4-4 16, Nelson 5-15 0-0 13, Oladipo
3-14 5-8 12, Moore 4-8 0-0 9, Harris 2-8 5-5
9, O'Quinn 2-5 2-2 6, Harkless 1-6 0-0 3,
Nicholson 0-1 0-00 .Totals28-8421-2683.
TORONTO (98)
Ross 4-13 2-2 12, Johnson 10-20 1-2 22,
Valanciunas 6-11 2-2 14, Lowry 11-20 5-7
33, Vasquez 2-7 0-0 6, Salmons 1-6 0-0 3,
Hayes 1-6 0-0 2, Novak 2-3 0-0 6, Stone 0-1
0-0 0, Hansbrough 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-87
10-1398.
Orlando 20 20 25 18 83
Toronto 33 22 25 18 98
3-Point Goals-Orlando 6-19 (Nelson 3-6,
Moore 1-2, Harkless 1-4,Oladipo 1-4,Afflalo
0-1, Harris 0-2),Toronto 14-31 (Lowry 6-11,
Novak 2-3,Vasquez 2-6, Ross 2-6, Salmons
1 -2, Johnson 1-2, Stone 0-1). Fouled Out-
None. Rebounds-Orlando 49 (Harris 11),
Toronto 65 (Valanciunas 15). Assists-Or-
lando 17 (Nelson, Davis 4),Toronto 26 (Low-
ry 11). Total Fouls-Orlando 14, Toronto
20. Technicals-Orlando Coach Vaughn.
A-17,694 (19,800).

Suns 126, Bucks 117:
In Milwaukee, Goran Dragic scored
30 points, including 13 in the fourth
quarter despite sustaining an apparent
injury to his left elbow, to lead Phoenix.

76ers 95, Celtics 94: In
Boston, Evan Turner sank a layup at the
buzzer to give Philadelphia a win over
in a matchup of the Atlantic Division's
worst teams.

Timberwolves 88,
Pelicans 77: In Minneapolis, Kevin
Love had 30 points and 14 rebounds
to carry Minnesota above .500 with a
victory over New Orleans.

Around the league: A
winter storm that made travel unsafe
in Atlanta postponed Wednesday's
game between the Hawks and Detroit
Pistons. It will be rescheduled but no
date has been announced.

BUCKS AT MAGIC
WHO: Milwaukee (8-37)
at Orlando (12-35)
WHEN: Friday, 7p.m.
WHERE: Amway Center, Orlando


TV: Fox Sports Florida
RADIO: 1010 AM, 1280 AM,
1480 AM
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com


holds off UCF


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014









* MEN'S SOCCER:



Johnson injury, Altidore's woes concern U.S. 2014
SH TEAM USA
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS of the last opportunities his right hand during a plans for the U.S., one of although he's had little SCHEDULE


After returning from 12
days of training in Brazil,
the U.S. soccer team will
take the field in one of its fi-
nal pre-World Cup matches
when it hosts South Korea
on Saturday.
The American squad will
feature 22 players after coach
Jurgen Klinsmann pared
down the roster following the
return from Brazil.
Saturday's exhibition in
Carson, Calif., will mark one


for Klinsmann to watch
the U.S. in game action
before the players gather
in mid-May ahead of the
Americans' seventh straight
World Cup appearance.
While the U.S. trains at
home this week with players
mostly from Major League
Soccer, many of the likely
starters are with their clubs
in Europe and Mexico.
Fabian Johnson, a starter
for Hoffenheim of the
German Bundesliga, broke


4-0 win at Nuremberg on
Saturday and but could
resume training this week.
The versatile Johnson can
play either in the midfield
or at defender. He played
in eight games, starting all
eight, duringWorld Cup
qualifying last year and had
three assists. Injury permit-
ting, he is widely projected
to make this summer's U.S.
squad.
While Oguchi Onyewu
isn't likely in the summer


its top goal scorers con-
tinued to struggle over the
weekend.
Jozy Altidore, who tied
for the team lead with eight
goals last year in 14 appear-
ances for the Americans,
was scoreless in Saturday's
1-0 win for Sunderland in
the FA Cup. The forward
has scored just one goal in
the English Premier League
this season, and his lack
of production has to be a
concern for Klinsmann,


service with the Black Cats.
Altidore did draw a foul that
got Stoke's Steven Nzonzi
ejected for a second yellow
card in Sunderland's 1-0
victory Wednesday.
Altidore has 21 goals for
the U.S. in 66 appearances,
and scored 31 goals for
AZ Alkmaar of the Dutch
Eredivisie in 2012-13, eight
more than Clint Dempsey's
previous record for goals by
an American in a European
club season.


EXHIBITIONS
Saturday: vs. Korea
Republic, 5 p.m., at
Carson, Calif.
March 5: at Ukraine,
TBD, at Kharkiv,
Ukraine
WORLD CUP
June 16: vs. Ghana, 6
p.m., at Natal, Brazil
June 22: vs. Portugal, 3
p.m., at Manaus, Brazil
June 26: vs. Germany,
noon, at Recife, Brazil


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
BOXING
9p.m.
FS1 Super welterweights, Eddie Go-
mez (15-0-0) vs. Daquan Arnett (11-0-0);
champion Luis Collazo (34-5-0) vs. Victor
Ortiz (294-2),forWBA International welter-
weight title, at NewYork.
GOLF
3p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Phoenix Open, first
round, at Scottsdale, Ariz.
1 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai Desert
Classic, second round, at Dubai, United
Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7p.m.
ESPN -Cincinnati at Louisville
ESPN2 Florida at Mississippi St.
FS1 -Providence at Marquette
8p.m.
ESPNU Bryant at Robert Morris
9p.m.
ESPN -Purdue at Michigan
ESPN2- UCLAat Oregon
10p.m.
ESPNU Saint Mary's (Cal) at San Diego
NBA BASKETBALL
8p.m.
TNT- Cleveland at New York
10:30 p.m.
TNT- LA Clippers at Golden State
NHI HOCKFY


7p.m.
FSFL- Florida atToronti
7:30 p.m
SUN -Tampa BayatOt

Glantz-Cul
NFL
Sunday
Super Bo
At East Rutherfi
FAVORITE 0 T Q
Denver +1 2 (

NCAA BASKE
FAVORITE LINE
at Charlotte 7
at Marquette 51/2
at Marshall 41/2
Florida 13
at Louisville 11
atMiddleTenn. 101/2
atMilwaukee-x 1
atW. Kentucky 8
La.-Lafayette 1
Arkansas St. 21/2
at UAB 7
at Nebraska Pk
atBYU 121/2
LouisianaTech 4
atUTSA 2
at Oregon St. 9
at Oregon 21/2
atUConn 14
at Michigan 111/2
atCalPoly 161/2
Saint Mary's (Cal) 3
at UC Santa Barbara 3
at CS Northridge 7
at Hawaii 8
at Furman Pk
at IPFW 3
at Georgia Southern 11
at Davidson 12
at UNC Greensboro 21/2
atElon 4
at Marist 5
atE.Kentucky 16
W. Illinois 4
atQuinnipiac 3
atTennesseeTech 8
N. Dakota St. 8
at Siena 8
Weber St. 3
Montana 12
at Denver 9
at E.Washington 1
N. Colorado 41/2
Idaho St. 2
at Auburn 11/2
at Robert Morris 8
x-at Klotsche Center

NBA
FAVORITE LINE/
at Indiana 91/2 (2C
at NewYork 61/2 (19
at Golden State 41/2 (21


FAVORITE
atToronto
at Columbus
at Boston
at Ottawa
at Dallas
at Phoenix
San Jose
at Colorado
atAnaheim
Pittsburgh


NHL
LINE UN
-155 FIc
-140 Wa


Pro basketball


EAS
Atlantic
Toronto
Brooklyn
NewYork
Philadelphia
Boston
Southeast
Miami
Atlanta
Washington
Charlotte
Orlando
Central
Indiana
Chicago
Detroit
Cleveland
SMilwaukee


NBA
TERN CONFERENCE


W L
24 21
20 23
18 27
15 31
15 33
W L
32 13
23 21
22 22
19 27
12 35
W L
35 9
22 22
18 27
16 29
8 37


Pet GB
.533 -
.465 3
.400 6
.326 91/2
.313 101/2
Pet GB
.711 -
.523 81/2
.500 91/2
.413 131/2
.255 21
Pet GB
.795 -
.500 13
.400 171/2
.356 191/2
.178 271/2


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest W L Pet
San Antonio 33 12 .733
Houston 30 17 .638
Dallas 26 20 .565
Memphis 23 20 .535
NewOrleans 19 26 .422
Northwest W L Pet
Oklahoma City 37 10 .787
Portland 33 13 .717
Denver 22 21 .512
Minnesota 23 22 .511
Utah 16 Q "9356


name to the Arizona Coyotes beginning at
the start of the 2014-15 season.
WINNIPEG JETS Assigned D Paul
Postma to St. John's (AHL) on a condition-
ing loan.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
LA GALAXY Formed LA Galaxy II to
compete in USL PRO.
NEW YORK RED BULLS Re-signed D
Jamison Olave.
PHILADELPHIA UNION Announced
the resignation of assistant coach Brendan
Burke.
COLLEGE
FLORIDA Announced men's fresh-
man basketball F Chris Walker was cleared
to play by the NCAA.
GEORGIA SOUTHERN Named Doug
Ruse offensive coordinator/quarterbacks
coach, Matt Barrett wide receivers coach,
Johnny Jernigan defensive ends coach,
Michael Mutz linebackers coach, Kevin
Peoples defensive line coach, defensive
secondary coach and Chad Lunsford tight
ends coach.
SAGE Named Kristin Brown assistant
softball coach.
SYRACUSE Announced the resigna-
tion of women's tennis coach Luke Jensen.
WAGNER Named Jason Houghtaling
associate head coach/offensivecoordinator.
YESHIVA Named Ira Miller men's ten-
niscoach.


Pacific W L Pet GB Hockey
to LA.Clippers 32 15 .681 Ho y
n. Phoenix 27 18 .600 4 NHL
:tawa Golden State 27 19 .587 41/2 EASTERN CONFERENCE
L.A. Lakers 16 30 .348 151/2 Atlantic Division
Ie Ln Sacramento 15 29 .341 151/2 GP W LOT Pts GF GA
ver LineBoston 52 34 15 3 71 159 115
Tuesday's results LIGHTNING 53 31 17 5 67157 131
NewOrleans 100, Cleveland 89 Toronto 55 28 21 6 62 158 170
SDetroit 103, Orlando 87 Montreal 53 28 20 5 61 131 134
DWI
ford NJ NewYork 114,Boston88 Detroit 53 23 19 11 57135 149
OrU UDD Houston 97, San Antonio 90 Ottawa 53 23 20 10 56 150 167
U UNDERDOG Memphis 98, Portland 81 PANTHERS 53 21 25 7 49129 164
47) Seattle Washington 88,Golden State85 Buffalo 52 1430 8 36 101 152
ETBALL Indiana 104, L.A. Lakers 92 Metropolitan Division
N D Wednesday's results GP W LOT Pts GF GA
UNDERDOG Oklahoma City 11l2, Miami 95 Pittsburgh 53 37 14 2 76 171 128
P FAU Toronto 98, Orlando 83 N.Y. Rangers 55 29 23 3 61 141 139
vience Philadelphia 95, Boston 94 Philadelphia 54 2622 6 58 147 158
FU Detroit atAtlanta, ppd. Carolina 53 2420 9 57 134 150
at MississippiSt. Minnesota88,NewOrleans77 Columbus 53 2623 4 56 154 151
Cincinnati Phoenix 126, Milwaukee 117 Washington 53 24 21 8 56 153 158
Wright HoustonatDallas, late NewJersey 54 22 21 11 55 127 135
WghSt Charlotte at Denver, late N.Y.Islanders 56 21 27 8 50 158 187
Texas-Arlington Chicago at San Antonio, late WESTERN CONFERENCE
at UALR
at La.Monroe Memphis at Sacramento, late Central Division
OdDominion Washington at L.A. Clippers, late GP W LOT Pts GF GA
Old Indiana Today'sgames St. Louis 52 36 11 5 77 180 119
Pacific Phoenix at Indiana,7p.m. Chicago 55 32 10 13 77 194 154
atUEc Cleveland at NewYork,8p.m. Colorado 52 33 14 5 71 153 137
at UTEP
Rice LA.ClippersatGoldenState,10:30p.m. Minnesota 55 2920 6 64 133 135
SouthernCal Dallas 53 24 21 8 56 154 157
TSouther Nashville 55 24 23 8 56 136 166
UCLA Transactons Winnipeg 55 25 25 5 55 155 162
HoustonI
Pacific Division
Purdue BASEBALL GP W LOT Pts GF GA
UCDavis Major League Baseball Anaheim 55 39 11 5 83 184 134
atSanDiego OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER -- San Jose 53 34 13 6 74 165 126
UClrvine Suspended Philadelphia LHP Christopher LosAngeles 55 30 19 6 66 133 116
UCRiverside O'Hare (Lakewood-SAL) 50 games after a Vancouver 54 27 18 9 63 137 138
LongBeachSt. secondpositivetestforadrugofabuseun- Phoenix 53 25 18 10 60154 160
Samford der the Minor League Drug Preventionand Calgary 53 1927 7 45 124 169
Nebraska-Omaha Treatment Program. Edmonton 55 1732 6 40 144 190
The Citadel American League NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
Chattanooga KANSAS CITY ROYALS-- Acquired OF overtimeloss.
Appalachian St. Carlos Peguero from Seattle for a player to
W.Carolina be named or cash considerations. Desig- Tuesday's results
Monmouth (NJ) nated LHP EverettTeaford for assignment. Boston 6 PANTHERS 2
UT-Martin LOA ANGELES ANGELS Announced Toronto 3, LIGHTNING 2
^ u iniu r ,Toronto 3, LIGHTINING 2
at IUPUI the additions of orthopaedic surgeons Dr. Philadelphia 5, Detroit 0
Canisius Robert Grumet and Dr. Michael F. Shepard Ottawa 3, Columbus 2
Tennessee St. to its medical staff. Washington 5, Buffalo 4 OT
at South Dakota MINNESOTATWINS- Agreed to terms M nt BCaroln O
:Montreal 3, Carolina 0
Niagara with RHP Matt Guerrier on a minor league St Louis3,NewJerseyO
at N. Arizona contract. Nashville 4,Winnipeg 3
at S. Utah NEWYORKYANKEES Agreed to terms Phoenix3, Los AngelesO
S. Dakota St. withRHPBruceBillings,INFRussCanzler,RHP CalgaryS, Chicago4,OT
North Dakota Robert Coello, RHP Brian Gordon, RHP Chris Minnesota 4 Anaheim 2
at Portland St. Leroux, OF Antoan Richardson, INF Scott Wednesday's results
at Sacramento St. Sizemore, INF Yangervis Solarte and INF N.Y. Rangers 2, N.Y. Islanders 1
Alabama ZelousWheeleronminorleaguecontracts. San JoseatEdmonton, late
Bryant SEATTLE MARINERS-Agreed to terms ChicagoatVancouverlate
with RHP Scott Baker on a minor league Today'sgames
contract Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
TEXAS RANGERS-Claimed LHP Pedro PANTHERS atToronto, 7p.m.
i/U UNDERDOGI Figueroa offwaivers fromTampa Bay. Des- Washington atColumbus,7 p.m.
01) Phoenix ignated RHP ChazRoefor assignment. LIGHTNING at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
97) Cleveland National League NewJerseyatDallas,8:30p.m
1) L.A.Clippers CINCINNATI REDS Agreed to terms MinnesotaatColorado, 9 p.m.
with INF Ramon Santiago on a minor San Jose at Calgary, 9p.m.
IDR I league contract. Buffalo at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
,DERDOG LINE ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Agreed to Philadelphia atAnaheim, 10p.m.
orida t +135 terms with INF Daniel Descalso on a one- Pittsburgh at LosAngeles, 10:30 p.m.
ashinnton -120


-175 Montreal +155
-120 Tampa Bay +100
-135 NewJersey +115
-200 Buffalo +170
-165 atCalgary +145
-155 Minnesota +135
-190 Philadelphia +165
-115 at Los Angeles -105


Tennis
WTA OPEN GAZ DE FRANCE SUEZ
At Stade Pierre de Coubertin, Paris
Purse: $710,000 (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
First Round
Elina Svitolina, Ukraine,def RobertaVinci
(6), Italy, 6-3,0-6,7-5.
Kirsten Flipkens (8), Belgium, def Mona
Barthel, Germany, 6-3,4-6,6-2.
Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def Ste-
fanieVoegele, Switzerland, 5-7,7-5,7-6 (3).
Kristina Mladenovic, France, def. Simona
Halep (5), Romania, 7-6(1), 64.
Second Round
Maria Sharapova (1), Russia, def. Daniela
Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-0,6-1.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, def
Carla Suarez Navarro (7), Spain,6-2,3-6,6-3.

WTA PTT PATTAYA WOMEN'S OPEN
At Dusit Resort, Pattaya, Thailand
Purse: $250,000 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Second Round
Sorana Cirstea (3), Romania, def. Alison
Riske, United States, 6-3,6-4.
Ekaterina Makarova (4), Russia, def. Vera
Zvonareva, Russia, 6-0,6-2.
Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, def.
Alia Kudryavtseva, Russia, 4-6,6-3,6-4.


year contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association EA.
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS-Assigned
G/F Sergey Karasevto Canton (NBADL).
NEWYORK KNICKS-- Assigned C Cole Reading
Aldrich, G Toure'Murry and F Jeremy Tyler Wheeling
to Erie (NBADL). Elmira
NBA Development League
IDAHO STAMPEDE Signed F Derrick
Caracter. Cincinnati
FOOTBALL Evansville
National Football League Kalamazoo
ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed K Dan- FortWayne
ny Hrapmann to a reserve/future contact. Toledo
BALTIMORE RAVENS Named Steve
Spagnuolo secondary coach and Brian Par-
iani tight ends coach. South Carolii
BUFFALO BILLS Named Jim Hostler Orlando
senior offensive assistant. Florida
MIAMI DOLPHINS Announced assis- Greenville
tant general manager Brian Gaine and the Gwinnett
team have mutually parted ways. WES
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Named h
Brendan Daly defensive assistant coach.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Named Alaska
Ethan Casson chief revenue officer. Colorado
ST. LOUIS RAMS-Fired defensivecoor- Idaho
dinatorTimWalton. Utah
Canadian Football League
TORONTO ARGONAUTS Released
QBZach Collaros. Ontario
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Ac- Stockton
quired DB Matt Bucknorfrom Hamilton for Bakersfield
the rights toWRGiovanni Aprile. c-San Francis
HOCKEY LasVegas
National Hockey League c-Ceased op
ANAHEIM DUCKS Agreed to terms Note: Two p
with D Mark Fistric on a three-year contract one point foi
extension.
DALLAS STARS Signed F Ryan Gar-
butt to a three-year contract extension. Orlando at S
PHOENIX COYOTES Announced the W
team will officially change their franchise FortWayne-3


ECHL
STERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
392315 1 047119102
421917 1 5 44107 124
401422 2 2 32 99 130
North Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
392512 1 1 52136 103
3921 10 3 5 50132 121
412216 1 247117111
401814 4 4 44115 123
391422 3 0 31117143
South Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
na412810 1 2 59121 81
382213 1 247116 110
402215 1 2 47131 120
4221 18 2 1 45111 115
421524 1 2 33105 132
STERN CONFERENCE
Mountain Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
382510 2 1 53130 80
3921 11 5 2 49124 110
392015 2 2 44116 113
401716 3 4 41 98 106
Pacific Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
4027 8 2 3 59121 100
4021 14 0 5 47135 127
391718 1 3 38100 111
sco401520 4 1 35101 143
371023 3 1 24 84 130
erations
points are awarded for a win,
r an overtime or shootout loss.

Tuesday's result
outh Carolina, ppd.
Wednesday's results
3,Wheeling 1


Elmira 4, Kalamazoo 1
Greenville 5, Florida 4
Cincinnati 4, Reading 1
Toledo 3, Evansville 1
Las Vegasat Utah, late
Colorado at Ontario, late
Idaho at Alaska, late
Today's games
Orlando at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.
Stockton at San Francisco, Cancelled
AHL
Tuesday's results
Lake Erie 3, Utica 2,SO
Charlotte at Norfolk, ppd., Inclement
weather
Wednesday's results
Hartford 5, Adirondack 2
Binghamton 6, Worcester 3
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4, Syracuse 0
Rochester 4, Chicago 1
San Antonio atTexas, late
Today's game
Toronto at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.

College basketball
WEDNESDAY'S MEN'S SCORES
SOUTH
Barton at Mount Olive, ppd.
Belmont Abbey at Erskine, ppd.
Campbell 65, Charleston Southern 57
Coastal Carolina 66, Liberty 64
Delaware 89,William & Mary 72
Gardner-Webb 82, Longwood 62
King (Tenn.) at North Greenville, ppd.
Lees-McRaeat Limestone, ppd.
Lenoir-Rhyne 78, Catawba 73, OT
Memphis 69, UCF 59
North Carolina 78, Georgia Tech 65
Radford 76,Winthrop64
Randolph-Macon 69, Hampden-Sydney60
South Carolina 80,Texas A&M 52
Tennessee 86, Mississippi 70
VCU 76, Fordham 60
Vanderbilt 59, Georgia 54
EAST
Albany (NY) 77, Stony Brook 67
American U. 74, Navy 52
Baruch 79,York (NY) 69
Boston College 76,Virginia Tech 52
Boston U. 86, Army81,OT
Buffalo 84,W. Michigan 63
Drexel 77, Hofstra 74
Duquesne 71, NJIT64
GeorgeWashington 69, La Salle 47
Holy Cross 60, Loyola (Md.) 51
James Madison 49, Northeastern 46
Lehigh 66, Bucknell63
Maine 68, New Hampshire 60
Montclair St. 64,William Paterson 59
Old Westbury 70, St.Joseph's (LI) 53
St. Bonaventure 78, UMass 65
St. Francis (NY) 83, Sacred Heart 78
Staten Island 74,CCNY51
Temple 88, Rutgers 82
UMBC 73, Binghamton 61
Vermont 67, Hartford 60
W. New England 70, Curry 57
MIDWEST
Akron 73, Ball St. 46
Aquinas 98, Marygrove 63
Cornerstone 84, Madonna 77
Detroit 74, III.-Chicago 68
Drake 84, Missouri St. 74
E. Michigan 69, Bowling Green 57
Indiana Tech 59, Siena Heights 51
Lakeland 95, Concordia (Wis.) 88
Lourdes 66, Concordia (Mich.) 56
N. Illinois 50, Kent St. 49
N. Iowa 95, Evansville 81
Northwestern Ohio 65, Michigan-Dearborn
47
Ohio 71,Cent. Michigan 67
Penn St. 71,OhioSt. 70,OT
SE Missouri 91, UMKC 81
SIU-Edwardsville 77, Crowley's Ridge 48
SaintJoseph's 60, Dayton 57
Saint Louis 77, Richmond 57
Toledo 83, Miami (Ohio) 70
Valparaiso 75, Green Bay60
Viterbo 72, Mount Mercy 62
SOUTHWEST
No scores reported
WEST
No scores reported

WEDNESDAY'SWOMEN'S SCORES
SOUTH
Arkansas St. 80, Louisiana-Monroe 68
Barton at Mount Olive, ppd.
Belmont Abbey at Erskine, ppd.
Converse at Pfeiffer, ppd.
Duquesne 64, George Mason 45
King (Tenn.) at North Greenville, ppd.
Lees-McRaeat Limestone, ppd.
Lenoir-Rhyne 66, Catawba 65, OT
Md.-Eastern Shore 68, NJIT 61
Memphis 62, UCF 53
South Florida 71, Houston 53
Thomas More 100, Chatham 37
W. Kentucky 59, Texas-Arlington 46
Winston-Salem at Johnson C. Smith, ppd.
EAST
Army 72, Boston U. 45
Baruch 80,York (NY) 30
Bucknell82, Lehigh 68
Chowan 71, Lincoln (Pa.) 65
Curry 59,W. New England 43
Fordham 64, Rhode Island 51
GeorgeWashington 89, UMass 76
Hartford 64,Vermont51
Holy Cross 80, Loyola (Md.) 65
Lafayette 90, Colgate 75
Marist 66, Rider 56
Navy 48, American U. 44
New Hampshire 74, Maine 73
Niagara 69, Canisius 60
Richmond 56, La Salle 39
Saint Louis 69, Saint Joseph's 65
St.John's 80, Xavier 48
Staten Island 47,CCNY31
Susquehanna 66,Juniata 60
Villanova 59, Georgetown 49
West Virginia 67, Iowa St. 56
Westminster (Pa.) 74,Thiel 49
MIDWEST
Butler 72, Providence 69
Carroll (Wis.) 67, Lawrence 32
North Central (Minn.) 59, Faith Baptist 33
Ripon 67, Beloit63
Texas 80, Kansas 55
Wis.-Superior 90, Northland 40
SOUTHWEST
Baylor 92,TexasTech 43
Oklahoma St. 49,TCU 48
Tulane 62, Rice 55
Tulsa 79, North Texas 63
UALR 74, Louisiana-Lafayette 60
WEST
No scores reported


I QUICK HITS


NCAA CLEARS UF'S
WALKER TO PLAY

GAINESVILLE No.
3 Florida is about to get
deeper and probably
better.
The NCAA cleared
highly touted fresh-
man Chris Walker on
Wednesday and said he
will be eligible to play
Tuesday night against
Missouri.
The 6-foot-10 forward
from Bonifay will have
sat out 12 games, or 40
percent of the season, af-
ter the NCAA determined
he "received preferential
treatment from five
people, including two
agents." The NCAA said
Walker has to donate the
$270 received from the
agents to a charity of his
choice and serve 80 hours
of community service.
The agents, meanwhile,
have not been punished.
Walker failed to qualify
academically last summer
and spent the fall taking
online classes to gain
eligibility. He joined the
team Dec. 14 and has
been practicing since, but
he missed 10 games while
awaiting the NCAAs deci-
sion. He still has to sit out
Thursday night's game
at Mississippi State and
Saturday's home contest
against Texas A&M.
Walker is a talented
shot-blocker, rebounder
and finisher who won
the dunk contest at the
McDonald's All-American
game last year. Since ar-
riving on campus, he has
gained about 10 pounds
while learning coach
Billy Donovan's complex
offensive and defensive
schemes.
Donovan said earlier
this week he plans to play
Walker immediately.


BASEBALL

Berkman retiring: Six-time
All-Star Lance Berkman is retiring
after 15 seasons in the major leagues.
Berkman almost left the game
last offseason before signing with the
Texas Rangers. He then had another
injury-plagued season and was
limited to 73 games.
The 37-year-old Berkman was
Houston's first-round draft pick in
1997 out of Rice, and played 12
seasons for the Astros. He played
1,879 career games, all but 287 for
Houston, finishing a .293 career hitter
with 366 home runs and 1,234 RBIs.
"Lance was one of the greatest
players in Astros history,"his original
team said in a release.
He finished the 2010 season with
the New York Yankees before two
years in St. Louis, where he was part
of the 2011 World Series champions.

The Texas Rangers were awarded
left-hander Pedro Figueroa on a
waiver claim from Tampa Bay.
Figueroa made 24 relief appear-
ances over two seasons for the A's.
He allowed four runs in three innings
last season. He spent most of the year
with Triple-A Sacramento.
The Rays waived Figueroa to make
room for free agent closer Grant
Balfour. Tampa Bay had acquired the
28-year-old Figueroa on waivers from
Oakland.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Notre Dame plans
$400M project at stadium:
In South Bend, Ind., the University of
Notre Dame's iconic football stadium
will be flanked by three massive
buildings under a $400 million project
that will also create nearly 4,000


GATORS
AT BULLDOGS

WHO: No. 3 Florida
(17-2,6-0 SEC)
at Mississippi State (13-6, 3-3)
WHEN:Today, 7 p.m.
WHERE: Humphrey Coliseum,
Starkville, Miss.
TV: ESPN
RADIO: 620 AM, 930 AM, 1200
AM, 1460 AM


premium seats at the "House that
Rockne Built.'
The plans for the buildings were
presented to the university's board
of trustees during their meeting in
Rome.
The Rev. John Jenkins, the
university's president, called it "the
most ambitious building project in
the 172-year history of Notre Dame,";'
saying more space was needed
to accommodate the university's
broadening research activity.
"What's exciting about this project
is it brings together athletics, faculty
and academics, research and a student
center, so it's an integrated model,";'
Jenkins said.
The new buildings will add about
750,000 square feet and will house a
student center, the anthropology and
psychology departments, and a digital
media center and music and sacred
music departments. The side facing
Touchdown Jesus won't be changed.


TENNIS

Sharapova routs
Hantuchova: In Paris,
top-seeded Maria Sharapova of Russia
maintained her dominance over
Daniela Hantuchova, thrashing the
Slovak player 6-0,6-1 to reach the
Open GDF Suez quarterfinal.
The four-time Grand Slam
champion has beaten Hantuchova
nine straight times, with the Slovak's
only win coming when they first
played 10 years ago.
"I had a tough first opponent who
can play extremely good tennis,";'
Sharapova said."l wanted to start
the match off well. It was extremely
important to put that pressure on her
from the beginning. I think I did that
really well today.'
Sharapova hit 10 aces, saved all
seven break points she faced, and
broke Hantuchova's serve six times.
Fourth-seeded Angelique Kerber
of Germany and Russia's Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova also reached the last
eight. ...
With Serena Williams and Sloane
Stephens pulling out because of inju-
ries, the U.S. Fed Cup team will field
an inexperienced roster of Madison
Keys, Alison Riske, Christina McHale
and Lauren Davis against Italy.
The first-round matches are Feb.
8-9 at the Public Auditorium in
Cleveland.
Keys is the highest-ranked member
of the U.S. team at 37th. She, Riske
and Davis will make their Fed Cup
debuts.
Italy also will be without its top
two players, No. 7 Sara Errani and No.
14 Roberta Vinci....
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray
was impressed with both the setting
and the city where the first round of
the Davis Cup match between the
United States and Great Britain will
take place this weekend.
"It looks great, it's a cool, cool
place, Murray said of the clay court
that has been set up in left field of the
San Diego Padres' Petco Park for the
matches Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
"I think it's going to basically be a
great spectacle for the people who are
coming to watch it."
Murray joined British teammates
Kyle Edmund, James Ward, doubles
specialist Colin Fleming and captain
Leon Smith in a news conference at
Petco Park, the first open-air baseball
stadium to host Davis Cup matches.


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, January 30, 2014


BOBCATS
FROM PAGE 1
out with fire in their
eyes is the team that's
gonna jump out and
win," Bobcats coach Tom
Tintor said. "They came
out with fire in their eyes
and we didn't. They took
it to us every which way.
Rebounding, they passed
better, they shot better,
they were more aggres-
sive, they picked up loose
balls, they outplayed us in
every aspect of the game."
The biggest difference
between Wednesday's
game and the Jan. 9
game that was tied with
five minutes to play was
the absence of North
Port guard Shauna
Naudascher. The junior,
who sat out due to a
concussion, is the team's
best defensive perimeter
player and held Sailor
junior Camille Giardina
in check in that game.
On Wednesday, Giardina
scored 22 points, includ-
ing a four-point play in
the second quarter.
"That defensive effort
on the other team's point
guard, that sets the tone
and we didn't have that
tonight," Tintor said. "It's
too bad for our kids. I
thought with their kids
being younger, they might
come out a little shaky,
but they played like
seniors and we played
like freshman."
Four Sarasota players
scored in double figures,
while senior LeKyra Smith
led North Port with 11.
Tintor took out all of
his starters with 5:32 left
in the game to give his
younger players a chance
to play. He loses five
seniors to graduation.
"We have three kids
that played a lot, so we'll
have three good starters
coming back," he said.
"We'll have to develop
some younger kids."
Contact lach Miller at 941-206-1140
orzmiller@sun-herald.com.
SARASOTA 73, NORTH PORT 34
NorthPort 6 12 11 5-34
Sarasota 23 17 17 16-73
NORTH PORT (34): LeKyra Smith 11, Fred-
erick 8, Burke 6, Adams 4,Williams 3, McKay
2. Totals: 13(1) 7-10
SARASOTA (73): Camille Giardina 22,
Zharia Grable 18, Shelby Miller 12, Jada
Bennett 10, Trebbles 4, Pack 3, Leblanc 2.
Totals: 24(5) 20-26

PREP SCHEDULE
TODAY
Boys basketball
Sarasota at Lemon Bay, 7:30
p.m. Cardinal Mooney at North
Port, 7:30 p.m.
DeSoto County at Port Charlotte,
7:30 p.m.
Girls basketball
District 3A- 10 district semifinal
Imagine at Cardinal Mooney,
7p.m.
Boys soccer
Region 2A-11 quarterfinal
Clewistown at DeSoto County,
7p.m.
Region 4A-1I quarterfinal
North Port at Gulf Coast, 7p.m.



HEAD
FROM PAGE 1
in all three of the Bobcats'
games last week and
helped them go 2-1 in the
District 4A- 11 playoffs and
earn the first boys soccer
regional playoff appear-
ance in school history.
Tonight, the Bobcats
travel to Gulf Coast to


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO
Port Charlotte High School's Taylor Lindsey passes the ball around the Island Coast defense during
Wednesday's District 7A-11 semifinal in Port Charlotte.

But Port Charlotte
PIRATES SHARE US ON eventually found its feet
FACEBOOK behind behind Robertson,
FROM PAGE 1 who scored the Pirates'
Port Charlotte coach Share shot of the day photos first eight points and
only at Facebook.com/ made four of seven
Kevin Purcell highlighted SunCoastSports 3-point attempts on the
the team's ambitions, night.
noting it always aimed FOLLOW US ON "'After a Robertson buck-
to.... n the ....ic ......- =i I. 1









to be in the districtT Ret on a press break evened
TWITTERY ENIERBRN






championship. the game at 8-8 with 3:07
"Obviouslye wve talked t live Twitter updates from in the first quarter, Port
aboutouesdayls Dsrc a-11sea- ia nPrtCalte





about our goals all sea- s basketball and other prep Charlotte closed out the
son," Purcell said. "To be events @SunCoastSports quarter on a 10-2 run to
the No. 1 seed in district, t oe f g
PIRATES SHARE USONeovertalyforunod.isfe
toC Ebe0undefeatedehindatbehson





to be undefeated at home SUNCOAST SPORTS The Pirates finished
and to play in the district the night hitting 10 of
championship. We're one 12 shots from the floor,
step away from one of And when news breaks, we blog which Purcell insisted was
those goals." it at suncoastsportsblog.com more representative of his
The Pirates play host squad than a shaky start.
to Venice, which beat "In th sn half
North Fort Myers 64 1 on comes out a Nd she goes f our offensive setson were
Wednesday in the district right by her. She's a tough
vveaesay i medistict p clicking," Purcell said. "We
final at 7 p.m. Friday cover for us." cikn, ucl ad W
championsh7pm. T T E R et o awere reading the defense
the gayme a 88sihould 07






"Robertson played a big Lindsey finished with 15 wr reading the dees
part in advancing toward points for Port Charlottere haylwte s ou be
the district final, finishing (21-5). JeniferFasano the proper cuts. I'm just so
with 31 points and eight scored 18 points to lead proud of my girls."
ndIsan tooplytin(he2ditric






rebounds, appearing Island Coast (12-14). Robertson offered a
virtually unguardable at The Gators made things simpler explanation.
times. interesting early on. "Just listen to our
For good measure, she The Pirates opened coaches and run the
found Lindsey cutting to the contest committing plays," she said.
the basket for a couple four straight turnovers as Contact Rob Shore at 941-206-1174 or
of buckets in the fourth Island Coast's Leanne Ellis shore@isun-herald.om
quarter to give the Gators buried her first 3-point try P a sld
1 t ttl,<- t fft PORT CHARLOTTE 68, ISLAND COAST 4S
more headaches. to get the Gators off to a Island Coast 10 6 15 14-45
"The problem is she can quick start. Island Coast's PortCharlotte s18 11 16 23-68
play inside-out, so how deliberate style of play SLAND COAST (45): Goodwin 4, Jones 6,
Leanne Ellis 15,ienifer Fasano 18,A. Heavlin
do we guard her?" Island caused some issues early. 2. Totals: 16 (2) 11-1445.
Coast coach Jerry Ellis said "It was a grinder," PORT CHARLOTTE (68): Katie Stewart 14,
o goo mesr h TKing2,Treasurer3,Whitee3,eLindseyo15,Rob-
of Robertson. "Our big Purcell said. ertson31.rTotals:26(8)8-1468


face the defending Class
4A champions.
North Port coach
Gerard Gregoire watched
the Sharks win the
District 4A- 12 title on
Friday, and feels good
about his team's chances.
"I think we should
come out on top if we
show up and play,"
Gregoire said. "I'm gonna
prepare for what I saw.


Their speed of play isn't
anything close to what
we've been playing. I'm
looking to press because
I don't think they can
handle it; we'll find out in
the first ten minutes."
A win tonight would
likely set up a rematch
of last week's district
championship game
between the Bobcats
and Lakewood Ranch.


Because North Port is not
a district champion, and
because of its position in
the Class 4A bracket, the
Bobcats will be on the
road tonight and for every
other playoff game.
"It's exciting because
our school hasn't gone
this far," Rodriguez said.
"Hopefully we can make
the most out of it."
ContactZach Miller at 941-206-1140
orzmiller@sun-heraldxom.


By WILL GRAVES
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ken Gold never saw this
coming. He just didn't
think it was possible for
his son Taylor and his
daughter Arielle to share
the same room with each
other, let alone the same
sport.
"Every possible oppor-
tunity for them to get into
a fight, it happened," he
said.
Toys. Who sat where
at dinner. The remote.
Normal brother and sister
stuff. Give the Golds a
chance to disagree and
they not only took it,
they usually took it up a
notch, to the point where
Ken once broke his hand
after punching a wall in
frustration trying to get
them to cut it out.
So no, the patriarch of
snowboarding's resident
first family didn't see
this coming, the day his
kids would stand as the
semi-stoic bookends of
a giddy photo of the U.S.
Olympic snowboarding
team.
There they were on the
sun-splashed Mammoth
Mountain two weeks ago,
arms aloft in triumph after
taking two very differ-
ent routes to the same
destination.
Sochi.
"There wasn't any cheesy
hugging or anything,"
Arielle said with a laugh.
"We're not like that."
They're also not at each
other's throats anymore
either. That stage has long
since passed, replaced
by a close friendship that
has helped both join the
elite halfpipe riders on
the planet. There's every
chance 17-year-old Arielle
and 20-year-old Taylor
- born 899 days apart -
come home from Russia
with a medal draped
around their neck.
Ask them how that's
even possible and they're
eager to give the other
credit.
For Arielle, her older
brother is equal parts
coach, motivational speak-
er and sounding board.
For Taylor, his little sister's
rapid rise from part-timer


OLYMPIC
COUNTDOWN


8
Days until the opening
ceremony for the Winter Games
on Feb. 7 in Sochi, Russia

to budding star provided
the jolt necessary for him
to close the gap on the
ShaunWhites and Danny
Davises of the world.
When Arielle spent most
of 2013 coming home
fromWorld Cup events
with a medal stuffed in
her luggage, he couldn't
help but notice no matter
how much she tried to
downplay it. She hadn't
even gotten serious about
her riding until 2011 and
yet here she was throw-
ing down world-class
runs on a weekly basis
while Taylor bitten by
the snowboarding bug
while watching the 2002
Olympics on TV spent
the year struggling just to
get out of qualifying.
"I was definitely
jealous," Taylor said. "I
think that was important
for my progression. I just
liked having her there to
support me and help me
push through a kind of
the rough season. It was
awesome."
And, it turns out,
necessary.
"He had to find ways to
be competitive with the
best guys in the world,"
Ken said.
Now Taylor is there, only
he's done it in an entirely
different way than his
sister. He's an old soul in
a sport is obsessed with
reinvention and pushing
the limits. While he lacks
White's explosiveness, he
makes up for it by trying
to tweak each well-estab-
lished trick into some-
thing new. An extra board
grab here. A remix on an
old favorite there.
It led to a series of podi-
um finishes in the run-up
to Sochi. He was the first
U.S. halfpipe snowboarder
to earn an automatic bid
for Russia.


AP FILE PHOTO


Taylor Gold competes during the men's snowboarding superpipe
final at a December Dew Tour event in Breckenridge, Colo. Taylor
and Arielle Gold are taking their brother and sister act to Sochi.


*OLYMPIC NOTEBOOK


Sochi chief says city is world's 'most secure venue


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON -After all the talk
of terror threats, corruption,
overspending and anti-gay
legislation, the head of the
Sochi Olympics is determined
to show the world the games
will be a huge success.
Nine days before the open-
ing ceremony, organizing
committee chief Dmitry
Chernyshenko said Wednesday
that Sochi is "fully ready" and


will deliver safe, friendly and
well-run games that defy the
grim reports that have over-
shadowed preparations.
"History will be made," he
said of Russia's first Winter
Games.
With Sochi facing threats
of terrorist attacks from
insurgents from the North
Caucasus, Chernyshenko said
the city is the "most secure
venue at the moment on the
planet" and promised that


tight security measures will
not detract from the atmo-
sphere of the games.
"I can assure you that Sochi
will be among the most secu-
rity-friendly games and all the
procedures will be very gentle
and smooth," he said in a
conference call with reporters.
Russia is deploying more
than 50,000 police and soldiers
to guard the Olympics. A
Muslim militant group claimed
responsibility for back-to-back


suicide bombings that killed
34 people in Volgograd in late
December and threatened
attacks on the games.

U.S. intel sees uptick in
Olympic threat reports: There has
been an uptick in reports of security threats
against next month's Winter Olympics in
Sochi, Russia, but the key concern for an
attack centers on locations outside the main
event areas, a top U.S. intelligence official
said.
Matthew Olsen, director of the National


Counterterrorism Center, told the Senate
Intelligence Committee that there is exten-
sive security at the sports venues in Sochi.
But, he added, "The greater threat is to
softer targets in the greater Sochi area, and
in the outskirts, beyond Sochi, where there is
a substantial potential for a terrorist attack."
FBI Director James Comey told the panel
that U.S. cooperation with the Russian
Security Service has improved, and officials
from the two agencies have discussed the
Sochi threat.

-Associated Press


* OLYMPICS: Snowboarding




Golds take




sibling act




to Sochi


-Page 6 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014













rf ,.. -


w


Friday, February 14
Your Special Person That Special Gift
Fishing Electronics Clothing
Shoes Sunglasses Gifts t


A weekly publication of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. __ Serving Southwest Florida outdoor enthusiasts


- UsMm


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/ -.- ../.. ,







EM-"I


23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-276-9657
Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com

EDITOR
LEEANDERSON
239-292-9230
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com

MARKETING
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& SUBSCRIPTIONS
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CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Alien
Dr. Mark Asperilla, MD
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Jared Brimer
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Ryan Ingle
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Jeff Kincaid
Dawn Klemish
Robert Lugiewicz
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi
Capt. Mike Myers
Capt. Dan Sansiveri
Betty Staugler
Matt Stevens
Bryan Stockbridge
Tony Towns
Capt. Cayle Wills
Walter W. Wilt

Produced & printed by
Sun Coast Media Group
Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.

MU@M
Photo provided
Marty Hoover caught this
19.5-inch sheepshead on
Lemon Bay. Photographer Dave
Hoover thinks they are BOTH
fantastic catches.


m --m
Boat theft happens around here. After all, we
live in Charlotte Harbor, a boating mecca. But a
boat that was stolen last week got me thinking.
Like many, some of my favorite memories
involve boating during my childhood. I grew up
with a bright orange dinghy built of fiberglass
in the early 1970s. We had a little 8-horsepower
motor on it, but it also had a mast, and could be
turned into a sailboat in minutes. We did a lot of
fishing on it, and a lot of memories were made.
The boat stolen last week was a 1958 Herters
model fishing boat bearing Florida tag FL2997Y
on a 2014 Continental aluminum boat trailer
bearing Florida tag 167NVJ. It had a 25-horse-
power Mercury outboard motor attached. The
motor had a black housing with two white fish
skeleton stickers on the sides with a stainless steel
propeller. It's not the fanciest boat in the Harbor,
but it probably means the world to that owner
and his family. If that 1958 boat could talk, I'm
sure it would have a bunch of good stories to tell.


Back to the orange dinghy. One day, my dad
and I stepped onto the Gibson houseboat, only
to discover that the dinghy was missing from the
stern. I remember looking everywhere for it. We
basically gave up on it.
A couple of days later, we got a call from a man
saying he found that little orange dinghy. We
went back to the houseboat, walked to the stern
and looked down. Inches below the surface, we
could just make out the tip of the mast. Turns out
somebody forgot to take out the drain plug. It had


Heels and Reels LADYFISH TOURNAMENT
Rules and registration ..................................................................................Page 16
Tournament Bassin' GREG BARTZ
A day w ith the kid ......................................................................................... Page 21
Best of The Fumbling Fisherman TOM JOHNSON
Fishin'in the rain ........................................................................................... Page 22
Take a boat for a demo at Ingman Marine's All-Start Sale............................Page 23
Boating Safetye BILL HEMPEL
Running aground ain't fun ...........................................................................Page 24
Mechanical Mojo TONY TOWNS
Props: 10 1 ....................................................................................................Pag e 2 5
Diving Delight* WALTER W. WILT
Shark!...........................................................................................................Page 26


been raining the past week, and the weight of the
accumulating water snapped the chains off the
dinghy mount. At least we got our boat back.
As I said, last week's boat theft got me thinking.
My heart goes out to the victim and his family,
and I hope that boat shows up in his driveway,
much like I got that little orange dinghy back.
Anyone with information about the theft of the
boat, motor and trailer is asked to please call the
Charlotte County Sheriff's Office at 941-639-2101,
or Crime Stoppers at 800-780-TIPS (8477).


i i I I'

i if you have a cominmient or question for oi i( c,1,Piii t'" es n / i oIAii i /I', 0h i e., j) .in seen IIe s e n. t adi ie/ sein/ I s ome. furi,, iIII
WaterLine editor Lee Anderson, e-mail t0 ,1'( IIiI f Ik neied r/A a i"iss.e fiom 20/0o' e011idnes. ar /iAel/2i led t.osomebod'i aerin,,10
him at Editor@WaterLineWeekly.comni. A^ii r'anA o' r,, hif\ Ta lliOui'SL anr. Pa a1 (i l ini Bc
Ltee 11nIte sonII ire' tineedi. ot1 injLI m OIAi actu(lll lit} a P'j appluse JI LIias


LEE:
I look forward to WaterLine every week. I
have over 200 past issues over the last four
or five years. I especially liked the knots.
Maybe you could bring that back and start
with the quick release first.
Jerry Chamberlain, Charlotte County
JERRY:
FiISt 010111A | I()I (oi me/n/ ta'el. i 'a'e comI-
ilt)i [InIII Iiin(Iushtl I foil some lie1.so so SO eLl 01
Okie c(0o1 [Ie a'e a1 ppiecia.ret)d Se(olnd LIe ill//
.. 110it I cWi l i )[0 ttier 1KI h Ano t hlt "I scolsOl"IS
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ioliit(ll so i(li1/l r1iar I t1ion t e n A1/ OLI II 1) lee


-r-r


Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS. DVM
1eI ai Ile- of (hi(Il.iw


Angling 101 ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
ij, :,,:,I (,,,I t~er

Angling 201 CAPT. CAYLE WILLS
Get yur V ,iq qear ready
Kayak Away BRYAN STOCKBRIDGE
Maitlia- 'i'.a uona.l.3


Around Charlotte Harbor CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
Can I keep a gag .......................................................................................


LEE:
I saw WaterLine on the Jay Leno show on
Monday night. Congratulations!
Vince Anderson, Punta Gorda
VINCE:
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1i0:12 1 Ti hirnr


The Ethical Hunter
',ie: CAPT. JOSH GREER

a Here, turkey!
The experience of turkey
hunting is what keeps me
coming back. I hunt turkeys
because they're hard. Getting
12 a turkey to answer your call is
tough enough, and that's a real
Page 13 accomplishment.


, ,,l
f ; ,I o .


Seafood, or seafraud?................................................................................... Page 29
From the Publisher's Desk JOSH OLIVE
Greer takes CCA reins .................................................................................... Page 31
Slack Tides..................................................................................................... Page 32
S I I


TIDE CHARTS I Page 4

MAP OF LOCAL WATERS I Page 5

FISH FINDER I Page 6

FISHING REGULATIONS I Page 7


BULLETIN BOARD I Page 9


SEAFOOD RECIPES I Pages 13,15,25,26

FISH PROFILES I Page 14

READER PHOTOS I Page 18

BOATING CLASSES I Page 29

SOLUNAR TABLES I Page 30


Return the boat


The Man on the Pier MATT STEVENS Shooting Straight RYAN INGLE
Jetty sheepshead .........................................................................................Page 14 So w here is the am m o? ................................................................................Page 28


., e7, 0 F 7-, A




M/^K~ ~* Page 3 January 30,2014


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BOTSHWatGSPRLAMIN
Fri Fbrar?'9 I oSat Fbrury8'9 I Sn Fbrar I 1I 4d


Liii E~zE~~


275 Freedom


Family Owned and Operated for Over
33 Years In Charlotte County. 41


2014 Sea Hunt
Ultra 234


2014 Grady White 2014 Pathfinder 2014 Sea Hunt 2014 Sea Hunt
306 Canyon 2600 HPS Escape 234 LE Edge 24
All Featured Boats and More Will be ON DISPLAY at the Showf


2014 Maverick 2014 Cobia
17 HPX 256 CC


2014 Pathfinder
2200 Tournament Edition


2014 Skeeter
SX 240


2014 Cobia
237 Center Console

al


2014 Bennington 2014 Bennington 2014 Bennin tonr
Family Pontoon 22 SSX Pontoon 20 LF Porntff0
While at the show, enjoy a great meal at the Waterside Grill at Gasparilla Marina!
Boat Show Location: Gasparilla M........
Boat Show Location: Gasparilla Marin..a


I15001 Gasparilla Rd., Placida, FL 33946
VAMA A 941-697-1000
1*YAnMtAn/A www.lngmanMarine.com _
Come seatrial the BEST-SELLING boats in Florida at ONE LOCATION, at the LOWEST PRIC


................


Eitb OT B^


F .J ,..J p ,..r.A.,AJ -l-FJ- r' J-r





j#Ea.&C .,&VU Page 4 January 30,2014


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-:iMARINA-!I Ih


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THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
VENICE INLET 27.1117 N, 82.4633': W
!f ---- 23:11 -00:04- nn.o


13:20 1.92


MONDAY


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY


15:19


13:46


15:56 -


*'k- 06:25-0.64 --- 07:04 -049-7L 07:40-19:28 08:14--20:25-V 08:45 21:25-'09:14-1-22:31-09:40 23.i45
V -0.76 V -0.65 v-.0.48 0.34 -0.27 0.22 -0.04 0.14 0.18 0.08 0.38 0.02
MHHW 2201, MHW 1932, MSL 1.172, MTL 1152, MLW 0 371, MLLW 0.000 All measurements in feet, for more info see TidesAndCurrents noaa gov

THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
PUNTA GORDA 26.9283' N, 82.0650 W (ADD 32 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES)
01:30 02:24 03:18 04:11 18:29 19:06.
1,93 1 88 .... 1 77 if..- ,,, 17:24 05:06 17:55 ..... 82190
J193--16:12 1.88 16:34 1.77- 16:57"- '1.58-- 3 3-- 06:04-1.48-07:082- 1.54-
1.28-1.36 1.39
\ 1.02 1.08 1.17 J 1.12 0.89

,, 20:39 \ 21:34 22:29 l V __12:43'
019:23 0.60 V 10:030.46 10:39 0.33 11:14 2 11:47 00:28 12:17 01:34
0.70 -0.60 -0.43 -0.23 2 .0.02 0.13 0.19 0.07 38
MHHW 1902, MHW 1703, MTL1 076, MSL 1070, MLW 0.149, MLLW 0.000
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
PLACIDA, GASPARILLA SOUND 26,8333 N, 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES)
23:52 00:44 01:35 15:44 16:23.
1323 1:59 13:48 1.50 -14.13 1.35 1440 022915:1 03:28 04:39 1.24
10.3 0.881.16 1.12 1.19
0.83 A 0.88 A 095 A 1.3 ^ 0.96^ 0.76 A

18:04 19:00
0\7:05 0.47 V 07:44 0.36 08:19ls6 8:4 21570:06 1
.0.59 0.51 -0.37 0.26 -0.21 0.17 0.0:4 0.11 0.14 0.07 0.30
MHHW 1407, MHW 1175, MSL 0 784, MTL 0 768, MLW 0 358, MLLW 0 000
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
MATLACHA PASS (BASCULE BRIDGE) 26.6333 N, 82.0667" W
01:08 02:02 02:54 03:45018:33
-L 1.92 _15 .33 1.88 __15:58 .1.78 16:23 .1.61 16:50 04:39 17:20- 05:38 17:54 18:33
0.9 .04 1.12 p 1.23 1.38-1.33 1.13 1:.42-06:49-1.47-
o0.99 4 A 09A / \ /\ o0.
V VvV \ *\/ f
0:32 0.56 V 10:11 043 10:46 23 1 11:51 00:24 12:21 01:3
0.69 -0.60 040.44 30 11:20 0.21 -0.03 0.13 0.17 0.08 0.36
MHHW N/A, MHW N/A, MSL N/A, MTL N/A, MLW N/A, MLLW 0 000 .24
MHHW N/A, MHW N/A, MSL N/A, MTL N/A, MIW N/A, MLLW 0 000


VENICE INLET
Thursday 0625
1254
17:36
23:11
Friday 07:04
1320
18:32

III Saturday 00:04
07:40
13:46
1928
Sunday 0059
08:14
14:15
2025
Monday 0156
08:45
14:45
2125
Tuesday 0255
09:14
15:19
22:31
Wednesday 04:02
09:40
1556
23:45


PUNTA GORDA


-0.76 feet
1.14 feet
0.64 feet
2.05 feet
-0.65 feet
120 feet
049 feet

1.92 feet
-048 feet
129 feet
0.34 feet
1.72 feet
-027 feet
1Al41 feet
022 feet
1A48 feet
-0.04 feet
152 feet
0.14 feet
122 feet
0.18 feet
1.61 feet
0.08 feet
0.97 feet
0.38 feet
1.67 feet
0.02 feet


Thursday 01:30
09:23
16:12
20:39
Friday 02:24
10:03
16:34
21:34
Saturday 03:18
10:39
16:57
22:29
Sunday 04:11
11:14
17:24
23:27
Monday 05:06
11:47
17:55

Tuesday 00:28
06:04
12:17
18:29
Wednesday 01:34
07:08
12:43
19:06


1.93 feet
-0.70 feet
1.02 feet
0.60 feet
1.88 feet
-0.60 feet
1.08 feet
0.46 feet
1.77 feet
-0.43 feet
1.17feet
0.33 feet
1.58 feet
-0.23 feet
1.28 feet
0.22 feet
1.36 feet
-0.02 feet
1.39 feet

0.13 feet
1.12 feet
0.19feet
1.48 feet
0.07 feet
0.89 feet
0.38 feet
1.54 feet


PLACIDA
Thursday 07:05
13:23
18:04
23:52
Friday 07:44
13:48
19:00

Saturday 00:44
08:19
14:13
19:56
Sunday 01:35
08:53
14:40
20:54
Monday 02:29
09:24
15:10
21:57
Tuesday 03:28
09:54
15:44
23:06
Wednesday 04:39
10:23
16:23


MATLACHA PASS


-0.59 feet
0.83 feet
0.47 feet
1.59 feet
-0.51 feet
0.88 feet
0.36 feet

1.50 feet
-0.37 feet
0.95 feet
0.26 feet
1.35 feet
-0.21 feet
1.03 feet
0.17feet
1.16feet
-0.03 feet
1.12 feet
0.11 feet
0.96 feet
0.14 feet
1.19feet
0.07 feet
0.76 feet
0.30 feet
1.24 feet


Thursday 01:08
09:32
15:33
20:31
Friday 02:02
10:11
15:58
21:27
Saturday 02:54
10:46
16:23
22:23
Sunday 03:45
11:20
16:50
23:21
Monday 04:39
11:51
17:20
00:24
Tuesday 05:38
12:21
17:54

Wednesday 01:33
06:49
12:50
18:33


1.92 feet
-0.69 feet
0.99 feet
0.56 feet
1.88 feet
-0.60 feet
1.04 feet
0.43 feet
1.78 feet
-044 feet
1.12 feet
0.30 feet
1.61 feet
-024 feet
1.23 feet
0.21 feet
1.38 feet
-0.03 feet
1.33 feet
0.13 feet
1.13 feet
0.17 feet
1.42 feet

0.08 feet
0.90 feet
0.36 feet
1.47 feet


BOAT STORAGE


DRY STORAGE

WET SLIPS

BOAT LIFTS



WATERSIDE GRILL


OPEN EVERY DAY

FOR BREAKFAST,

LUNCH & DINNER


AMENITIES


BOAT RENTALS

FUEL DOCK

BAIT & TACKLE

SHIPS STORE

24/7 SECURITY

ON-SITE SERVICE


GASPARILLA
(~-M ARI NA-)A: l

15001 GASPARILLA RD
PLACIDA, FL 941-697-2280
GASPARILLAMARINA.COM

MARKER 20 %

ON THE ICW :




/n nfnlAflnka--iknn earn
jujmn/cers.v,, Page 5 January 30,2014 mmbuMmmunumsmswmmmm.u.m




IntelVI MARINATE

SARASOTA COUNTY FRIENDLY FUN FESTIVE
Blackburn Pt Boat Launch -800 Blackburn Pt Rd, Osprey
DallasWhite Park 5900 Greenwood Ave, North Port I
\ Higel Park. 1330 Tarpon Center Dr,Venice rn-rr -n ,\ /
Indian Mound Park. 210 Winson Ave, Englewood L ULI tl L'
.. ~t Loreto Bay Access 800 Loreto Court, Nokomis .
lb Manasota Beach Park. 8570 Manasota Key Bd F
(7.a %^ .Marine BoatRamp Park.301E.VeniceAve,Venice /
9 Marina Park 7030 Chancellor Blvd, North Port
%^\ .~~~~~~~~~Nokomis Beach Park 901 Casey Key Rd Pj / j I [\j | J n
.-Snook Park. 5000 E. Venice Ave, Venice
@ l,\ DESOTO COUNTY
r\ J ^ Brownyville Park. 1885 NE Brownville St '
S-. Deep Creek Park. 9695 SW Peace River St
-\ .C *DesotoPark.2195lNWAmerican LegionDr B r,
fi~ "V \ .Liverpool Park -9211 Liverpool Rd
SNocatee. 3701 SW County Road 760
I, I. I ,.~ W I .Lettuce Lake. 8801 SW Reese St CU T ,
Ak u--- 11 F1S- -Aii ^^ r^^ W MIQ
Jill V CHARLOTTE COUNTY Bay~ ? ^I -i^ 11*' ^
oo" i:'. .H. a AingerCreekPark.2011PlacidaeRd, Englewood Pa, rk2 72
[,:II :".; a~t / ButterfordWaterwayPark. 13555 ^f %
S : ,-\ ', ^eMarathon BldPortCharlotte r d'9
'" -^ ^ V^ '^ ^*'1 .DarstPark.537DarstAve,.PuntaGorda ', J.. P %- '
l k" El .ElJobean Boat Ramp .4224 P EACE
N ^; S~fS1^^'^'^El Jobean Rd, Port Charlotte 49q-^\ 1 v gSvag
^V?^^ ^ .~~Harbour Heights Park- 27420 ^ -f
\S ... Voyageur Dr, PuntatGorda Spin Lake ar 5 Leie B r t" .
%je \ Hathaway Park .35461 Washington Loop, Punta Gorda 1
S ?Placida Park. 6499 Gasparilla Rd, Placida
,D ^ ^.' I ^ Port Charlotte Beach -4500 Harbor Blvd, Port Charlotte V
-- Se .South Gulf Cove Park. 10150 Amicola St, PortCharlotte I4 A0
S4 Cap Spring Lake Park.3520LakeviewBlvd, Port Charlotte '

ICw#8 '\
-0.50 0.5 1 2 5 .-3
NAUTICAL MILES 1 A RM o
-, a i o
l. ... .. q. i
"\ ".x >v I[,. .. .. n -,/ r -it
FRIENDLY Gaspmtsfl I^' -
0 F U N d *
F U N. 17Sandfi Ke .nly Turtle 0y ~
F E S T IV E Devilfish CBaa\ Bay .Om a
FIKey ea
Come for a lesson or rental... Burnte
hang at our pool 8& cabana
for a true destination paddle*
Rent a GoPro video camera [ -
Free Launching qCt eeW
Free Deliveru on all day local rentals 0 shoA 0% To
Kayaks also available for you yakkers. Il 4"
V/e look forward to making L' (
your excursion awesome! C abe A r
Key Indian
(941) 504 1699 I hookedonsup.com e )J Field 4
Like us on Facebook for event updates ..
facebook.com/hookedonsup a 6
Shoal 0
ca ro Pss
CaPiIa I 0o 1 Little q


6950 Placida Road '
Englewood. FL 34224
CapeHazeMarina comr
Directli across the ICW fromvieusAass
Palm Island Resort & Rum BaIji
This map is not keg
intended for 0 c
navigational
purposes.
Refer to a
.'- ~nautical Chart (
-. for navigation o
0. --'9 information. s
r Snbl sad FFrFF





j#E ,&PtVKE Page 6 January 30,2014


I*-annnU nelfinlinn anne
aa~tesatani*ui EtDiUEU.MiOEEia


LAISHLEY MARINE
Punta Gorda
941-639-3949





D&D BAIT AND
TACKLE
Matlacha
239-282-9122




OLD PINE ISLAND
MARINA
St. James City
239-283-2548


Bonnethead sharks are scattered around Cape
Haze and the east wall. Sheepshead are scattered
everywhere. Redfish are scattered, but the water
temperature has slowed them and their appetites
ilii.i[i S.'I. iii- I|,1 ,,I ,iih ,, l ,,ii i r-il h iv,- l ,-,-[i li, iiii,,]
III, ,Jr l,- IF'. i i hI ,ihiii ,] i ,ii- l ,m],]-r r,-,i in III ,- ,l,-,-[ii -r
,iI,- Pom pano iri- l irh ,] l,, I [- im III ,' h [6 H iriiir
,-l A, [11,h- I,,- I 1h,-

'itII- iii ll-ir mangrove snapper ir- iIiiiiiii iii I
[it-, iii ii iriil, li- rt-i ii 1, A I-wj flounder it-i,,r
hl .-,,III, Ir.- iin [lii,- 1 1 .11 ,,-1 1 1 1 ,-ll I
pompano A iii,,i sheepshead ir,- ur, -,inii l i
lliiIn| i- ir M 1ill I, i l iiil h i- I I [ iin.,ijnii



The redfish are scattered in areas like Indian Fields and
Two Pines. Look for the bigger ones in deeper holes.
Some cobia have been caught near the Harbor's bars.
Sheepshead are eating along any type of structure.
Docks, oyster beds and bridges are good places to start.
Use oysters, barnacles or small crabs.


Grunts and mangrove snapper reports
have been coming in seven to 12 miles
offshore. Most people aren'tgoing out too far
due to the weather.




Fir I ir.-ir red grouper iril mangrove
snapper ri iii i l- i i liii- l,-,i I ,, i li-r
,in Ih,,ri- f, 1" i111 irii hil ri-i-I inl .r,-, I-





When the weather is good, you can find
amberjacks, red grouper, big
sheepshead, mangrove snapper and
grunts off the wrecks.


Trout is the hot ticket. Pine
Island Sound up to Lemon
Baywill hold the bigger
ones in 4 to 5 feet of water
, i,, r l ii ,- i l ii l i ii j i,
lr I,, l |> 1 i ,rl. ,-11



Trouti lh i-ti-i -nh n,
iriiii, n I I '.,l--i-I I All viJ

h l, lii I th-i ii i i it-i
-rt I I.. ri
l111l lJill



Trout are scattered all over
the grassflats of Pine Island
Sound. Artificial or live
shrimp under a popping cork
works.


Gotta have one?

Send in this coupon
with a check or money
order, or stop by the
Charlotte Sun office at
23170 Harborview Road.

Hats are priced at $14.02 each plus tax, which
conveniently comes to $15 (we planned it that
way). Shipping is $7 anywhere in the U.S., whether
you buy one or 100. Mail to WaterLine Hat, 23170
Harborview Road, Port Charlotte FL, 33980.


SNanr
Addi



City

Stat


ie


ress


e ___ ZIP ______





uja ,Ou s.va Page 7 January 30,2014


n.eu...lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


State and federal regulation for Southwest
Florida waters as of Nov. 25, 2013. All bag
limits are per harvester per day. Other limits
may apply. This chart does not include
every rule an angler needs to know; for
most current rules visitMyFWC.com/fishing.
Ignorance of the law is no excuse.

LICENSES
Resident saltwater or freshwater:
Annual $17, 5-year $79. If you fish from
shore only, a license is required but is free.
Resident license for both freshwater and
saltwater fishing: $32.50 annually.
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3
days $17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore
fishing license not available for nonresidents.
Fishing permits: Snook $10/year, lobster
$5/year, tarpon $51.50 per fish

SALTWATER FISH
ALMACOJACK
Bag limit 100 pounds in state waters (includ-
ed in aggregate bag of 20 reef fish in federal
waters); notes: 9,11
AMBERJACK, GREATER
30"min. size; bag limit 1 season closed June
1-July 31 (subject to additional closure if
quota met); notes: 1,3,4,5,9
AMBERJACK, LESSER& BANDED
RUDDERFISH
Slot 14"to 22"; aggregate bag limit 5; notes:
1,4,5,9
BLACK DRUM
Slot 14"to 24" (may possess one over 24");
bag limit 5; notes: 5,7,8
BLACK SEA BASS
10"min. size; bag limit 100 pounds; notes:
2,4,5,9
BLUEFISH
12"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 1,5
BLUE RUNNER
Bag limit 100
BONEFISH
Harvest prohibited; may be possessed tem-
porarily at capture site for photos, measuring
and weighing.
COBIA
33"min. size; bag limit in state waters, 1 per
harvester or 6 per vessel, whichever is less;
limit in federal waters, 2; notes: 1,5
DOLPHIN (MAHI MAHI)
Bag limit 10 per harvester or 60 per vessel,
whichever is less; notes: 5
FLOUNDER, ALL SPECIES
12"min. size; bag limit 10; harvest by gig or
spear OK; notes: 2,5,8
GROUPER, BLACK
22"min. size; bag limit 4; notes:
2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, GAG
22"min. size; bag limit 2; season scheduled
to open July 1 in state and federal waters;
notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, GOLIATH
Harvest prohibited. Legal to target for catch
and release in state but not in federal waters
GROUPER, RED
20"min. size; bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, SCAMP
16"min. size; bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, SNOWY&YELLOWEDGE
Bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, WARSAW & SPECKLED HIND
Bag limit I per vessel; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, YELLOWFIN &YELLOWMOUTH
20"min. size; bag limit 4; notes:
2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, CONEY, GRAYSBY, RED HIND,
ROCK HIND &TIGER
Bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
HOGFISH
12"min. size; bag limit 5; notes: 1,4,5,9
MACKEREL, KING (KINGFISH)
24"min. size; bag limit 2 (reduced to 1 in
some state waters when federal waters are
closed to harvest; see MyFWC.com/Fishing
for current regulations); notes: 1,5


MACKEREL, SPANISH
12"min. size; bag limit 15; transfer of
Spanish mackerel to other vessels at sea
prohibited; notes: 1,5
MULLET, STRIPED & SILVER
Bag limit, Feb 1-Aug. 31, aggregate 50 per
harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever is less;
Sept. 1-Jan. 31, aggregate 50 per harvester
or per vessel; bag limit also applies to mullet
used as bait; harvest or possession of striped
mullet prohibited in Punta Gorda between
6 p.m. and 6 a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb. 29. See
http://bit.ly/urExej.
PERMIT
Slot 11" to 20" (may possess one over 20";
maximum of 2 over 20" per vessel); bag
limit 2; hook and line gear only in state
waters; spearing legal in federal waters;
notes: 1,5,7
POMPANO, FLORIDA
11"min. size; bag limit 6; notes: 1,5,7
POMPANO, AFRICAN
24"min. size; bag limit 2 per harvester or per
vessel; spear fishing prohibited; notes: 1,5,7
PORGY, RED
Bag limit 100 pounds; notes: 4,5,9
REDFISH
Slot 18"to 27"; bag limit 1 per harvester or 8
per vessel, whichever is less; transport limit
6 per person; gigging, spearing or snatching
prohibited; illegal to harvest or possess in
federal water; notes: 2,5,7
SAILFISH
63" min. size from tip of lower jaw to center
of fork; bag limit 1 any billfish (sailfish and
marlin); Highly Migratory Species permit
required to harvest in federal waters and all
harvested fish must be reported to NOAA
within 24 hours; notes: 5
SEA TROUT, SPOTTED
Slot 15"to 20" (may possess one over 20");
bag limit 4; notes: 2,5,7
SHARK, ALL SPECIES
54" min. size except Atlantic sharpnose, blac-
knose, blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and
smooth dogfish (only exceptions to 54"min.
in federal waters are Atlantic sharpnose and
bonnethead; bag limit in state waters 1 per
harvester or 2 per vessel, whichever is less;
bag limit in federal waters, 1 per vessel; may
be harvested by hook and line only; Highly
Migratory Species permit required to harvest
in federal waters; lemon and hammerhead
sharks prohibited; notes: 1,5,7
SHEEPSHEAD
12"min. size; bag limit 15; notes: 2,5,7
SNAPPER, CUBERA
Slot 12"to 30"(may possess 2 over 30" per
harvester or per vessel); bag limit 10 if under
30"; fish over 30"not included in aggregate
limit; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, GRAY (MANGROVE)
10"min. size in state waters; 12"min. in
federal waters; bag limit 5; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, LANE
8"min. size; bag limit 100 pounds in state
waters; not included in aggregate limit;
notes: 2,4,5,9,11
SNAPPER, MUTTON
16"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER,RED
16"min. size; bag limit 2; season scheduled
to open June 1 in state and federal waters;
notes: 2,3,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, SCHOOLMASTER
10"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, VERMILION (BEELINER)
10"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,11
SNAPPER, BLACKFIN, DOG, QUEEN,
MAHOGANY, SILK &YELLOWTAIL
12"min. size; limit 10 per harvester; notes:
2,4,5,9,13
SNOOK
Slot 28"to 33"; bag limit 1; season closed
Dec. 1-Feb. 29 & May 1-Aug. 31; $10 snook
permit required to harvest when license
is required, including free resident shore fish-
ing license; state regulations apply in federal
waters; notes: 2,5,6,7,8
TARPON
Bag limit 1 per harvester per year; $51.50 tar-
pon tag required to harvest or possess, which


is legal only in pursuit of an IGFA record; for
seasonal Boca Grande Pass rules, see http://
bit.ly/16zrDj; notes: 6,8
TRIGGERFISH, GRAY
14"min. size in state waters; 12"min. size in
federal waters); bag limit 2; season closed
June 1-July 31; notes: 1,4,5,11
TRIPLETAIL
15"min. size; bag limit 2; may be harvested
by hook and line only; notes: 2,5,7,8
WAHOO
Bag limit 2; notes: 1,5
LIONFISH
Invasive exotic; kill all specimens on sight.
Fins have venomous spines.
NO-HARVEST SPECIES
Zero bag limit for Bonefish, Goliath Grouper
(Jewfish), Nassau Grouper, Sawfish, Spotted
Eagle Rays, Lemon Sharks, Hammerhead
Sharks. Go to the website listed below for a
full list of no-harvest species.
Visit http://bit.ly/1OnYDIz for full rules.
NOTES
1. Measured fork length. Fork length is
the straight line distance from the most
forward part of the head with the mouth
closed to the center of the tail.
2. Measured total length. Total length is
the straight line distance from the most
forward part of the head with the mouth
closed to the farthest tip of the tail with
the tail compressed orsqueezed together
while the fish is lying on its side.
3. Bag limit zero for captain and crew of
for-hire vessels on a paid trip.
4. Reef fish gear rules apply. Anglers must
use non-stainless steel circle hooks when
using natural baits, and must possess a
dehooking device.
5. Must remain in whole condition (head
and tail intact) until landed ashore.
Removal of gills and internal organs OK.
6. Harvest byspearfishing prohibited.
7. Use of multiple ortreble hooks in con-
junction with natural bait prohibited.
8. Harvest by snatching prohibited.
9. Except for sand perch and dwarf sand
perch, fish designated as reef fish are
illegal to use as bait in federal waters or
aboard a vessel with a federal reef fish
permit. In state waters, legal-size reef
fish may be used as bait but must remain
in whole condition and must be counted
against bag limit.
10. Included in aggregate grouper bag
limit of 4fish.
11. Included in 20-fish reef fish aggregate
bag in federal waters (vermilion snapper,
lane snapper, almaco jack, grey triggerfish,
all tilefishes).
12. Closed Feb. 1-March 31 ONLY in federal
waters outside 20-fathom break.
13: Included in aggregate snapper bag
limit of 10 fish.

FRESHWATER FISH
LARGEMOUTH BASS
South of State Road 80; max. size 14", bag
limit 5 (may possess one over 14") North
of State Road 80; slot 14"-22", bag limit 5
(may possess one over 22")
SUNFISH (excluding crappie)
Aggregate limit 50
CRAPPIE
Limit 25
BUTTERFLY PEACOCK BASS
Max. size 17", limit 2 (may possess one over 17")
GRASS CARP
Must be released immediately
OTHER EXOTIC FISHES
Please keep and eat or otherwise destroy; do
not use as live bait.
UNREGULATED SPECIES
No bag or size limits on gar (except alligator
gar; possession of this species is illegal),
bowfin, pickerel and all catfish.
Visit http://bit.ly/lOnYJQr for full rules,
including special management areas.


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Once upon a time there was
a sandhill crane named Chickie
Pants.
Well, in all fairness, that is
probably not the name his biological parents
gave him. But since it can sometimes be diffi-
cult to translate "Cranese" to modern English
(the accent alone makes most words almost
impossible to pronounce), his foster parents at
Peace River Wildlife Center dubbed him with
this less-than-regal moniker.
Chickie was admitted to PRWC in May 2013
along with a sibling. His brother had gotten
caught in a barbed wire fence and had to be
cut out. When the rescuer arrived, the crane
that was tangled in the fence was not alone.
His parents and sibling were waiting there
with him. The young crane was transported
to PRWC to treat the wounds sustained from
his encounter with the barbed wire. The other
young crane was scooped up also because his
beak was slightly off-kilter and we had hoped
his presence would keep the injured crane from
being too stressed.
Unfortunately, Chickie's brother did not
survive his ordeal. He had suffered spinal
trauma from struggling against his entan-
glement and died after several days despite
intensive treatment. Chickie, on the other
hand, thrived in captivity. However, as he grew,
his beak got more and more deformed. What
had started as a minor scissor beak deviation
- the top grew off to one side while the
bottom curved to the other side became
so bad that Chickie would not have been able
to feed himself in the wild. He requires timely
trimming of the beak and certain foods in
special bowls that allow him to eat.
After a few months with us, Chickie's leg
started to show signs of a problem also. His
right "ankle" (a bird's ankle joint is at the
approximate level of a mammal's knee) would
twist inward at times when he was walking. It
was subtle at first, but got progressively worse.
We tried bracing it, but that did not help.
X-rays showed that the bones were normal, but
there was apparently a soft-tissue problem,
similar to a football player with an MCL injury.
(We were completely unaware of Chickie
having tried out for the Bucs, but perhaps if he


had made the team they would have fared a
little better than four wins and 12 losses this
season. But since Chickie was sidelined with
a medial collateral ligament injury anyway, it
was probably a moot point.)
Jason Eisele, DVM with specialized veteri-
nary services in Fort Myers, offered to consult
on Chickie's case. Dr. Eisele performed ortho-
pedic surgery on Jan. 22 to try to stabilize the
joint. Screws were placed above and below the
joint, and a thick nylon thread was stretched
between the two to reinforce the joint against
medial laxity. After the surgery site was closed,
an external fixation device was applied to
further assist with healing. Four long pins
were drilled into Chickie's leg bones, two above
and two below the joint, and a cross bar was
attached to these four pins. This temporary
device will be removed in three to four weeks
and will help keep the joint stable while the
permanent device under the skin heals.
While Chickie has a long convalescent period
in front of him, we are hopeful that the surgery
will help him to be more comfortable here
at PRWC, where he will live out his life. We
would not normally go to such extremes for
a wild animal. Most would not tolerate these
ministrations, but Chickie Pants handles it all
with aplomb. He walks in and out from the
pelican yard to the hospital for his treatments.
He eats his crane pellets, worms and fish out of
his deep bucket. He loves his handlers and gets
along well with the other birds at the pelican
pond. Chickie Pants has the personality of a
Disney character and it is impossible not to fall
in love with him.
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If you have a meeting, tournament, festival or other event you want included in the Outdoor Hie Bulletin Board, e-mail it to WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com


FLORIDA SPORTSMAN EXPO
Visitors will be treated to a huge array of indoor and outdoor
events for anglers, hunters, boaters, off-roaders and gun
enthusiast on Feb. 1st from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lee Civic
Center (11831 Bayshore Road, North Fort Myers). Cost is $8 and
kids are free. Call 239-543-2020 for more information.

PARENTS AND KIDS BEGINNING
FISHING SEMINAR
Save the Tarpon is hosting a free fishing seminar on Feb. 1st from
10 a.m. to noon at the Boca Grande Community Center (131 1st St.
W, Boca Grande) for parents or grandparentsto bring their children
or grandchildren and learn basic angling skills from some of the
areas most respected fishing guides. The guides will work
both with the children, and their parents, to provide adequate
knowledge for a successful family outing at one of the many public
fishing areasfound in our region. Leading the seminar is Capt. Frank
Davis, Capt. Van Hubbard, Capt.Tom McLaughlin, and Capt. Rhett
Morris. The Captains will be availableto answer beginnerfishing
questions.Topics covered during this fun and informative two-hour
session include: How to pick out the right gear and tackle, what kinds
of bait to use, what licenses you need, where you can go fishing,
what you should expect to catch, local laws and regulations, proper
fish handling, howto safely revive and release a fish and much more.
All children will leave with a rod, reel and tackle box complete with
the gear needed to fish a local public fishing pier.The event is free and
open to the public. No prior fishing experience is necessary. Call Holly
Haynes at 941-260-2479 for more information.

FLORIDA ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
Steve Noll examinesthe relationship of people to the land through-
out Florida history from Native Americans through today. Starts at


IS BACK! Capt. Mike Myers will speak at the next
installment ofWaterLine's seminar series. The
seminar will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 8th, at Gasparilla Marina (15001 Gasparilla
Road, Placida). Capt. Mike will discuss the secrets
of fishing docks for sheepshead and black drum,
and will also be answering questions from the
audience. There is no cost to attend, and you do
not need to register. Door prizes will be given out,
and refreshments will be available. So stop by
what's better than spending a Saturday night
talking about fishing, drinking beverages and
having a chance to win free stuff? For additional
information, call 941-276-9657.


2 p.m. on Feb. 4th at the Elsie Quirk Library (100 West Dearborn St.,
Englewood). Admission is free. Call 941-861-5000 for more info.

2014 CHARLOTTE HARBOR REGATTA
The 2014 Charlotte Harbor Regatta is set for Feb. 6th-9th. The
regatta will be run out of the regatta desk at Port Charlotte
Beach Park. This is the fifth annual regatta. More than 100 boats
in 12 classes are expected. Competitors from multiple states

BULLETIN BOARD 130


dil f III


DUHII'I UHrlElI'IIU HI IAHV H"UHMIUlRtA
boaters'get-together is held from I to 2 p.m. the
second Sunday of each month at the waterfront
chickee hut at Nav-A-Gator Grill/DeSoto Marina
(9700 S.W. Riverview Circle, Lake Suzy). This infor-
mal gathering is open to the public to discuss boats,
fishing, the Peace River and other topics. For more
information, call the Nav-A-Gator at 941-627-3474.
GULF COVE FISHING CLUB MEETINGS: The Gulf
Cove Fishing Club meets on the second Monday
of the month October through May. The meetings
are held at the Hope Lutheran Church in Gulf Cove
(14200 Hopewell Ave., Port Charlotte) at 7 p.m.
where speakers talk on timely topics. In addition
to the meetings the Club holds a monthly fishing
tournament and a monthly picnic. For more
information call 941-698-8607.
HANG OUT WITH SCRUB JAYS: Spend the
morning with the scrub jays at Oscar Scherer State
Park (1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) from 8:30 to
10:30 a.m. every Sunday. This unique Central Florida
experience includes a nature walk to see the park's
diverse ecosystems, native flora and fauna. Call
941-483-5956 for more information.
SIX MILE CYPRESS SLOUGH PRESERVE: Take a
leisurely stroll on our fully accessible boardwalk
trail anytime dawn to dusk (7791 Penzance Blvd.,
Fort Myers). Visit our Interpretive Center to learn
more about the plants and animals that live in
the Slough or just talk to a friendly volunteer. The
center is open Tuesdays through Sundays from
10a.m. to 4p.m. Parking is $1 per hour, per vehicle.
Reservations not required. No groups of eight or
more. For more info call 239-533-7550, or visit
LeeParks.org/SixMile.
VOLUNTEER AT SHAMROCK PARK: Shamrock Park
Nature Center (3900 Shamrock Dr., Venice) holds its
monthly volunteer work mornings from 8 to 10a.m.
on the third Friday of each month. As abilities and
interests allow, volunteer tasks may include trash
collection along trails and within vegetated areas
of the park, light trimming along paved multi-use
trail, organization of storage areas, exotic plant
removal and other maintenance tasks. Long pants,
closed-toe shoes, sun protection, and plenty of
drinking water are recommended. Park staff will
provide trash collection buckets/bags, pickers,
gloves, and other tools as necessary. Meet at the
Shamrock Park Environmental Center. For more
information, call Jennifer Rogers at 941-861-5000,
or email her atjrogers@scgov.net.
WHAT'S THAT BIRD?: Volunteer bird interpreters
share their expertise on ID and behavior of raptors,
shorebirds, waterfowl and other avian visitors at
Myakka River State Park (13208 S.R. 72, Sarasota).
Volunteers set up scopes and help people identify
birds from 9a.m. to Ip.m. every day of the week.
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB: We are a scuba dive
club that meets on the third Tuesday of each month.
Club is based out of Punta Gorda. Call 941-740-4245,
or contact BottomTimeDiveClub.net.
LEARN TO TIE FLIES: Capt. Harry Hall will offer a
free saltwater fly tying seminar every Wednesday
from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at West Wall Boats (787 Tamiami
Trail, Port Charlotte). The public is invited to attend.
Call 941-875-9630 for more info.
BIRD WALK AT LAKES PARK: A bird patrol guide
will lead an easy walk along clear paths of Lakes
Regional Park (7330 Gladiolus Dr., Fort Myers)
at 8:30 a.m. on the first Saturday of each month.


IIIs ltee wdKI ule dli uppotuiUinity ltou see uIIu
in natural vegetation as your guide points out the
many species in what is a birding hot spot and
crucial nesting area for many birds. Arrive at 8 a.m.
at Shelter A7 for a brief intro and sign-in. Wear
comfortable shoes and dress for outdoors. Bring
water, hat, sunscreen, binoculars and camera. Call
239-533-7580 for more info.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASS'N:
Members of this club for multihull owners, sailors or
those who are interested in the exchange of ideas
about equipping and sailing boats, share
information about anchorages and cruising
destinations, hold informal races that help to
improve their sailing ability, and have local raft-ups.
No dues. The club meets at the Celtic Ray (145 E.
Marion Ave., Punta Gorda) on the first Monday of
each month at 6 p.m. For more info, visit Yhoo.it/
XV96fO, or call 941-876-6667.
KORESHAN STATE HISTORIC SITE STROLL:
Walk or bike the historic site (3800 Corkscrew
Road, Estero). Park fee is $2 for walk or bike; $4
for single-occupant vehicle; $5 for two to eight
occupant vehicles and $2 for each additional person
over eight per vehicle. Call 239-992-0311 for more
information.
SARASOTA FITNESS WALKS: Join Sarasota County
Parks staff each Friday for a fitness walk through
Rothenbach Park (8650 Bee Ridge Road, Sarasota)
from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. The pace will be geared
toward fitness, aiming for a 20-minute-mile pace.
The walk will cover approximately three miles
in one hour of brisk walking. Enjoy the beautiful
scenery and wildlife, but keep up the pace. Wear
appropriate workout clothing, including good
walking shoes, and bring your water bottle.
Meet in the pavilion near the playground. Call
941-861-5000.
FREE SAFETY CHECKS IN VENICE: The Coast
Guard Auxiliary conducts free vessel safety checks
every Saturday morning from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
at the Venice boat ramp (200 N. Seaboard Ave.,
Venice). They'll make sure the safety equipment
mandated by federal and state regulations is on
board. If an inspected vessel is found to be safe, a
"Seal of Safety" is affixed to it. For more info or to
schedule an appointment, call Patrick Wheeler at
941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER:
Year-round, ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek
are offered each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State
Park (1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register
at 8:30 a.m., tour at 9 a.m. Cost is park fee plus
canoe or kayak rental fee. Bird walks are also
offered every Thursday at 7:30 a.m., and guided
scrub jay walks every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. For more
info on any of these programs, call 941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH:
Listed as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail.
Meet your volunteer guides (weather permitting)
at 8:30 a.m. Monday through Friday at the kiosk at
Tigertail Beach. Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail)
to 951 South to Marco Island. Turn right on Kendall
Court, the fifth light after crossing the bridge to
Marco Island. Turn left at four-way stop sign at
Hernando Court to Tigertail Beach. Water shoes and
binoculars are also suggested. The following walks
in the Naples area are offered at no cost through the
Conservancy of Southwest Florida (1450 Merrihue
Dr., Naples). For more info, call 239-262-0304, or
visit Conservancy.org.


lese ou inas are oen[I te pub Iic free 0 Charue. FE. 2TODDTSNTALHK: From :30


Paddle participants must provide their own pfd, water-
craft and be able to swim. Voluntary donations to the
Charlotte Sierra Club are always gratefully accepted.
Reservations are required. Visit: bit.ly/1IbSHFgx.
JAN. 30TH, CAPE HAZE PIONEER TRAIL BIKE
RIDE: From 9 a.m. to noon with Florida Master
Naturalist Merrill & Bob Horswill along eight mile early
phosphate railbed through state preserve across Coral
Creek. Reserve: 941-445-6181.
FEB. 1ST, SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists
John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine
flatwoods, scrub and hardwood hammock. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
FEB. 5TH, CHARLOTTE FLATWOODS PRESERVE
HIKE: From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Master Naturalists
John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds in the pine
flatwoods, marshes and freshwater habitats. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
FEB. 6TH, DEEP CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. with Master Naturalist Rick Fried through side
channels of the lower Peace River to the Nav-A-Gator for
lunch and back a different route. Reserve: 941-637-8805.
FEB. 10TH, MORGAN PARK, ARCADIA HIKE: From
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through live oaks, cypress
and unusual vegetation. Reserve: 941-639-7468.
FEB. 13TH, SHELL CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Rick Fried.
Participants must provide pfd, watercraft and be able
to swim. Reserve: 941-637-8805.
FEB. 17TH, PRAIRIE CREEK PADDLE: From
8:30 a.m. to noon with Florida Master Naturalist Jamie
Reynolds through cypress wetlands. Participants must
provide pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-637-8284.
FEB. 19TH, MYRTLE CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Jim Story through
fresh water jungle to tidal Shell Creek and waterfall
over the Punta Gorda water supply dam. Participants
must provide pfd, water craft, and be able to swim.
Reserve: 941-505-8904.


11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John Phillips
and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods, saltwater
and freshwater marshes with unusual plant species.
Reserve: 941-639-7468.
FEB. 24TH, DEEP CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
wetland marshes and hardwood hammocks. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
FEB, 27TH, DON PEDRO ISLAND STATE PARK
PADDLE/HIKE: From 9 a.m. to noon with Islanders
and Florida Master Naturalist Merrill & Bob Horswill
from park mainland launch to island for hike
and lunch at beach pavilion. Bring lunch, water,
pdf, watercraft and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-445-6181.
FEB. 28TH, PRAIRIE CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists, John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
palmetto prairies, marshes and wetlands. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
MARCH 5TH, LOWER PEACE RIVER BIRD
WATCHING PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with
Master Naturalist Rick Fried to an active rookery,
to the Nav-A-Gator for lunch. Participants must
provide pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-637-8805.
MARCH 5TH, PRAIRIE SHELL CREEK PRESERVE
HIKE: From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master
Naturalists John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through
pine flatwoods, scrub and hardwood hammock.
Reserve: 941-639-7468.
MARCH 12TH, WEBB LAKE PADDLE: From
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists
Jamie Reynolds and John Phillips through wetlands
identifying native plants and birds. Participants must
provide pfd, water craft, and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-637-8284.
MARCH 15TH, SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE:
From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists
John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine
flatwoods, scrub and hardwood hammock. Reserve:
941-639-7468.


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Ah, winter in Florida. Ya gotta love the
schizophrenic nature of our cool season: It
might be freezing right now, but the day after
tomorrow will be 85 degrees. If you think this
makes it tough for you to plan, think about
how it must be for the fish. So far this winter,
our water temperatures have been a bit higher
than what we and the fish normally
expect. Over the past week or so, that tempera-
ture has dropped way down, to the point it's
almost too low.
Every fish species has an ideal temperature
range, in which they will be most active and
behave "normally.":' Colder-water fish, like
cod and tautog, would do very poorly here
because the water is much too warm for them.
Yet truly tropical species sometimes run into
trouble because the water is too cold. Florida
is where tropical and temperate climate
ranges meet, so we have a mix of species
that prefer tropical and warm temperate
temperatures. Some, like snook and tarpon,
prefer water in the 70s and low 80s. Others,
including trout and sheepshead, get fired up
by water temps in the 60s. And still more,
such as flounder and redfish, are tolerant of a
wide temperature range. But when the water
temperature dips down into the 50s, even
chill-tolerant fish start to slow down.
Fish are cold-blooded, which means
their metabolism is dependent on ambient
temperature. When it's warm, it speeds up;
when it's cold, it slows down. It doesn't stop,
though, so fish still need to eat. That means
you can still catch them, but you have to
understand a few things.
First, a slow metabolism means slow diges-
tion, and slow digestion means that a large
food item might rot in the fish's belly before
it's digested. Fish don't know that, of course,
but they instinctively"sense" it. Instead of
eating one big crab, a redfish might seek out
two or three smaller ones. A big mullet may
not appeal to a snook, but smaller baitfish will
be snapped up. This is why we always say you
should downsize your baits in winter.
Second, a slow metabolism means fish are
just less active. When you're feeling sluggish,
you don't want to go out and exercise. Neither
do the fish. This is why we always say you
should work your baits or lures more slowly in
winter. That doesn't mean you need to spend
all day in one spot. About 20 minutes should be


enough time to figure out whether an area will
be productive.
Third, fish will seek out warmer areas to
speed their metabolism up a bit. Sometimes
this means deeper water, which tends to hold
heat longer. Sometimes it means shallow
water, which tends to heat up more quickly.
Water with a dark bottom or next to a seawall
is usually a bit less chilly. Another neat trick
is to fish in the afternoon, when the sun has
warmed the water a bit. Just a few degrees can
turn the bite on.
Remember, water temperature affects
everything in the water, not just gamefish.
Plankton is less plentiful, so small fish that
depend on plankton for food are less active.
Shrimp, crabs and worms often burrow deeper
into the mud, where the temperature is more
stable, or move into deeper water. There's less
overall for fish to eat, which is the main reason
artificial lures often work better in winter than
in summer, when the water is full of real food.
The water is also clearer, which means the
fish will be able to see your terminal tackle
better. It's a good idea to use fluorocarbon
leader material, as light as you think you can
get away with. Longer leaders say, 5 feet
instead of 2 feet are also helpful.
Even if you keep all these things in mind,
you won't catch anything if the fish aren't
there. With water temperatures fluctuating,
fish are always on the move. They might be
where you expect them to be, but they might
not. Be ready for that have a backup plan,
and a backup plan for your backup plan. Fish
new spots, even if you don't have to it's
good for you to learn new areas and not get
stuck in a rut. And don't be afraid to experi-
ment. I'm the last one to want a change, but
sometimes it turns a lousy day on the water
180 degrees. Broaden your knowledge. It won't
hurt, really.
Fishing in cool weather is a very different
challenge from fishing here the rest of the
year. But if you adapt your tactics to the reali-
ties on the ground, there's no reason you can't
be successful year-round.
Robert Lugiewicz is the manager of Fishin'
Frank's Bait& Tackle, located at 4425-D
Tamiami Trail in Charlotte Harbor. Call
941-625-3888 for more information about
the shop or for local fishing info, or visit them
online at FishinFranks.com.





__* Page 11 January 30,2014

AGING21 AP.CUEWIL


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WaterLine photo
by Lee Anderson
Big fish season is
near, so get your
gear ready.


11


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Big fish season is right around the corner,
and now is the time I start checking out my big
fish gear. It's time to pull out all your big tackle
and start going through it. Sure, it's only been
a few months, but I've seen reels lock up solid
in that amount of time simply because they
weren't taken care of. The day you grab it and
head for the dock is the wrong day to figure out
something needs a good fixing. Ask me how I
knowthis...
I like to start with my reels because that's
where the rubber meets the road. I get all my
big spinning and conventional reels out and
start giving them function checks. No sense
in tearing them apart now if they don't work
right. Make sure drags are strong and smooth. If
they aren't, it's either time to get a new reel, or
order new drag washers. If you have dual drag
reels or baitrunners, it's a good idea to check the
function of that also.
Another problem area with spinning reels put
away for the season is the line roller bearing.
That's that little wheel on your bail. That bearing
needs to turn smoothly to lay the line on your
spool. If you're using braid, and that bearing
doesn't roll, then you'll start getting twists
in your line, and next come the wind knots.
You need to be careful when you take it apart,
because that's the most ignored part on a reel,
and it's very easy to strip the screw. I recom-
mend not taking the screw out all the way, just
enough to open the bearing a little and get
some oil in there.
If you have a level wind on your conventional
reel, now is a good time to clean and lubricate
it. It's already the weakest link on a strong reel,
so it isn't the place to press your luck. If you're
up to it, take apart the pawl gear and clean all
the gunk out of it too. Look at the level wind
from the bottom, and you should see a cap with
a flathead screwdriver slot. That holds the pawl
gear and usually a spring. Make sure that spring
doesn't shoot across the room. Ask me how I
knowthis...
Make sure all your switches switch, your
buttons press and knobs turn. Hit them all with
a drop of oil while you're doing it. Things like
anti-reverse switches are usually corroded solid,
so pay attention to those types of things if you
haven't been.
Take a look at the line on your reels. If it
looks like it's starting to dry rot, get it replaced.
Also, make sure you check your rods. Look for
corrosion on the rod eyes and take care of it if
you find it. Check your eyes for cracks, and if you
have roller guides, make sure they roll smooth.
If not, take them apart and clean and lubricate
them. They have a tendency to heat up and melt
through the line if they aren't turning, especially
when a big tarpon or shark is the culprit. Ask me
how I know this...
Break out any leftover tackle from last year
that you plan on using. Hooks, lures and leaders
can all corrode. Replace rusty hooks, and if your


leaders show any signs of corrosion, replace
them. Even the plastic-coated leaders can
corrode, so look for brown spots on the clear
plastic. If it doesn't wipe off, then it's internal
and you should replace it. If the rust spot did
wipe off, then it's external and you need to
find what caused it because that needs to be
replaced.
Check your leader material from last year. I
can't tell you how many times I've grabbed that
spool of 80-pound leader that's been hanging
off my rod holder in the sun for the last three
months, only to have it turn to dust at the first
attempt at tying a knot.
Your bait thrower that's been sitting in your
console rod holder all winter? Check it. If it's
faded to pink from red you might want to give
it a field test. Squeeze it and see if it cracks or if
it is still pliable. You don't want it to crack and
shatter into a bazillion pieces on your first throw
of newly netted whitebait. Ask me how I know
this...
Speaking of newly netted whitebait, now
is a great time to break out the cast net and
give it a good going-over. Chances are it's been
sitting in its little white bucket for two or three
months, so get it out and look for holes or
signs of dry-rot. Give it a throw or two in the
yard. If it feels stiff, you can soak it in fabric
softener to soften it up.
I take a cup of liquid fabric softener and put
it in a 5-gallon bucket or the cast net bucket.
Dilute it with some water and place the top, or
horn, of the net in first and then place the rest
of the net in the bucket and cover the net with
the weights to hold it down. Then fill the bucket
up with water and swish the net in there to mix
everything up good. Let the net sit overnight,
and the next morning just set the hose in the
bottom of the bucket and flush it until the water
runs clear. Then hang the net up from the horn,
making sure the weights still touch the ground.
This is imperative or you will stretch the lines
and pretty much ruin your net. Ask me how I
knowthis...
Now your net smells clean and fresh and not
like the rotten piece of whitebait you left gilled in
the net from last year. Ask me how I knowthis...
Big fish season is fun. We all love to catch big
cobia, sharks and tarpon. We love to run offshore
and go after grouper and amberjacks and other
big fish. Don't let your day be ruined by some-
thing that could've been found and fixed long
before taking your first big fish trip. I don't mean
to sound condescending in this article. I've made
these mistakes, so you don't have to.
The good news is that I will continue to make
mistakes for you to learn from.
Capt. Cayle Wills owns and operates Bad Fish
Charters on Charlotte Harbor. You can book him
through Fishin'Frank's or contact him directly at
941-916-4538 or Capt. Cayle@ReelBadFish.com.
You can also visit him online at ReelBadFish.com
or FaceBook.com/BadFishCharters.


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_____ i* Page 12 January 30,2014

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It was a cold, brisk Sunday morning. My
fishing partner Dan and I decided to go out
at dawn on our kayaks and head out to our
favorite spot on the water. I love kayak fishing,
especially at sunrise. Nothing beats getting on
the water early in the morning when the sun is
just peaking over the horizon and everything
looks so calm, clear and serene from shore.
As I slide into my kayak and paddle out, I'm
immediately captivated by the slow-moving
fog floating across into the horizon and the
feel of the cool mist on my face as it permeates
over the warm waters of the sound. Some-
times the fog gets so thick, that you're lucky
if you can see the bow of your kayak as you're
paddling out. But it's worth it, even if just to
get a glimpse of all the wildlife, especially the
birds. There are birds feeding in the shal-
lows, flying overhead, resting in nooks in the
mangroves and even swimming right by your
kayak. If you're a birder, this is definitely the
time to be on the water. It's also feeding time
for large predators like the tarpon. And out
here in the pass, you'd be surprised how big
they get, and what a ruckus they make when
they're on the prowl. Last time we were out,
we paddled right through a school of tarpon
tearing up some mullet. It was an all-out
feeding frenzy, and all you could see were
shiny, silvery scales glimmering in the sunlight
as they whizzed by our kayaks chasing their
prey. Now I understand why they call tarpon
the silver king.
This particular morning, as we were
paddling out to our favorite fishing spot, Dan
starts telling me about the legend of the
Florida Skunk Ape, the large and smelly cousin
of the infamous Big Foot that's said to live in
the Everglades. Dan is one of the smartest
guys I know. He loves to read and he loves to
research the local history and flavor of this
area. He's also a heck of a fisherman, and I'm
hoping I can pick up a thing or two from him to
add to my bag of tricks.
As he's discussing his latest findings, I start
to wonder: Is it possible that we may have
a big, scary, menacing beast roaming the
shores of Pine Island Sound? For those of you
not familiar with this area, Pine Island is the
largest island in the state of Florida. It's mostly
agriculturally zoned and is approximately
17 miles long with palm tree nurseries and
tropical fruit farms as far as the eye can see,
from St. James City in the south to Bokeelia in
the north.
This is a unique wetland ecosystem with
an extraordinarily diverse plant and animal
life including high marshes, buttonwoods and
dense mangroves forests, and many little unin-
habited islands surrounded by three aquatic
preserves. What a perfect place for an exotic
creature to feed on the abundance of local
wildlife and vegetation, to grow, thrive and
roam wild, all without ever being disturbed or
even seen. Instead of a large hairy and smelly


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ape, we could have ourselves a giant snake-
like sea monster with horns on its head similar
to the legend of the Yacumama that's said to
live in the Amazon River in South America. It
could be a hybrid of some sort. Reptile meets
amphibian meets primate! Watch out, Skunk
Ape; here comes the Matlacha Yacumama! It
could be waiting for the perfect opportunity to
take over and invade the mainland! I wonder if
this is how legends get started.
And why not? It wouldn't be the first time
we hear about an exotic invasive species taking
over native vegetation and wildlife! We have
plenty of exotic invasive species here in Florida
that have either been brought over by humans,
or have hitchhiked here with unsuspecting
travelers. Since they don't naturally occur in
Florida, they are considered nonnative. I guess
you could say that about all of us so-called
"Floridians!"
When plants and animals start to invade
our natural habitat and out compete native


species, that's when they become a problem,
that's when they become invasive. The Nile
monitor, for example, is an exotic first intro-
duced to this area in the 1990s. Rumor has it
that it was a pet store that went under and
decided to let all its animals loose. Thanks,
guys! Unbeknown to them, these lizards have
become a real problem in this area. In their
native Africa, they have natural predators
such as the crocodile, but here in Florida, they
have none and thus are multiplying rapidly
and creating all sorts of havoc. They're vicious
little suckers that love to prey on burrowing
owls, gopher tortoises, nesting sea turtles and
their eggs. With razor-sharp teeth, long, sharp
claws and a mean whip to their tail, not even
the house cat or small family dog is safe. Run,
Fido, run!
Wouldn't it be something if one day we
discovered a big and scary exotic species
living amongst us in one of the surrounding
preserves of Pine Island, similar to the


It's not enough that we have Nile moni-
tors like this one out and crawling about
- now Dan has to invent snake-Big Foot
hybrids. Just what we needed!

infamous Skunk Ape? Come to think of it, I
remember the last full moon kayak tour that
we did, there was an unidentified noise reso-
nating from one of the mangrove islands that
we paddled around. It was something like a
low-pitched humming noise, and as hard as we
tried, none of us could figure out what kind of
animal, if any, could make such a noise I'm
getting goosebumps just thinking about it! It
definitely made me think twice about paddling
out here on my own in the dark.
I think for now I'll just stick to my early
morning kayak fishing trips with Dan. At
least if my imagination starts to run wild, I'll
have a buddy to keep me company in case
the Matlacha Yacumama decides to make an
appearance.
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Clear water is beautiful Being able tIo: see
straight down t,:' the bo:'ttoim is wonderful for
boaters and sightseers, but it s not quite as
pretty for a fisherman Alth:ough it certainly
makes seeing fish ini(h easier, it also ensures
the fish (an easily see yu1 Worse, they (an see
your bait Any little thing, like a shiny h:oo:k :or
visible leader, (an be enough ti: causee a fish
to snub yoiir offering It s even harder when
you're trying t:o (at(h fish with bits of, plastic(
or feathers instead :off real food In dear water.
the skill :ofi an angler be(:imes mu(iih m:ore
important Part :of that skill lies in selecting
the right ta(lkle Use the smallest h::ook that
will get the job done, and get it in a dull finish
Old-sch':,:'l shark fishermen used t,: rLust their
hooks o:n purpose tIo: take the fish-sp::ooking
shine off them When the water s dark and
murky,I, m'onofilamlent leader is line BIut
fluoro(arbon is iniu(h less visible underwater.


and when conditionss are dear and bright that
(an make a hugeedifferen(e For lure fishermen.
bigger baits are mn:re obvious fakes Downsizing
means the fish has t: 'get really lose tIo: tell
it s not the real deal. and hopefully by then
hes already in ful ll-on eat it node You (an
help (onvin(e the fish yolr artificial is edible
by adding a bit :of sent If the lIre mimi(s a
shrimp, use shrimp ofr (lrab smell, if it loo::ks like
a baittfish. use mullet o:'r menhaden Whatever
you do. don t use the same triks yo:u would
when you lre trying to: attract a fishs attention in
the dark waters :of sumiller Big sp:oo:ns put out
a lot :of flash t:,: mudh flash Spinnerbaits
o:n the flats make t,:":' ilL(h commotion and
will drive fish away Ditto luIres with edtra-loud
rattles and : other rlauous soundiilllakers Think
subtlety and finesse Sound still works, you
just need less And try no:t to: move around t:oo:
imuch they re watching you


B ''B Sunday is fun
with the family...
IThursday is fishing with the girls.
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I ran into a little problem while on a
fishing trip last week. The problem wasn't
with the quality of the fishing, the weather
or with the boat. The problem was all the
questions from my guests which wr diffi--
cult to answer. Here's what happened.
Early in the day we got into a hot grouper
bite during which we caught at least 15 gags
in the span of about half an hour. They were
nice fish, with at least half of them of keeper
size, and there were a few that easily topped
10 pounds. Since the season on gags in the
Gulf is currently closed, all those beautiful
fish were carefully released, and that's when
the questions started coming. Following is a
rundown of some of their questions and my
attempts to answer them:
We're catching all these gags, is the season
closed because gags are scarce?
Well, no. There are quite a few gags in the
Gulf. Anglers from the Keys to the Panhandle
seem to be catching quite a few of them, and
the fishing seems to be improving each year.
If gags are not scarce, why is the season
closed?
Well, the fishery managers at the Gulf of
Mexico Fishery Management Council look at
population estimates each year and decide
how many fish can be taken by recreational
fishermen without hurting the fish stock.
Then they set bag limits, size limits and


seasons they think will result in the right
number offish being taken each year. Unfor-
tunately, their data usually lags a year or two
behind, so when a fish stock is recovering
rpidly, which soms to-be happening with
gags, it can take a while for the increase to
result in more relaxed fishing regulations.
Why is the season closed now instead of
some other time of year? Is it their spawning
season?
No, not quite. Gags mostly spawn in
February and March, but it really doesn't
matter about spawning season since very few
recreational anglers ever catch spawning-size
gags because their spawning grounds are
located very far offshore. Fishing in the gag
spawning grounds is closed during February
and March anyway. The season is closed now
in the Gulf because it's the best time to catch
gag in Florida.
Why would they close the season during
the time of the best fishing?
The season is set for the summer months
because the fishing for gag is slowest then,
and this allows the season to be open for the
longest possible time.
You're kidding, right?
No. People gripe when the fishing seasons
are short, so one of the goals of the fishery
managers has been to establish open seasons
that are as long as possible, even if this


sometimes means selecting times of year
when the fishing isn't very good.
So, when is the season going to be open
this year?
We don't know because it hasn't been set
yet. We think it will open on July 1, because
that was the opening date the last two
seasons, but we're not sure, and we don't yet
know how long the season will last this year.
After I'd fumbled through the questions on
gags, we continued to fish. Once we'd gotten
past the gags, we started catching other
species, including mangrove snapper.
We were fishing with shrimp in about
40 feet of water and we caught mangos of
various sizes from wee 10-inch throwbacks
on up to a few fish that were pushing four
pounds apiece. Our guests that day were not
from Southwest Florida, but they still knew
that mangrove snapper was a great eating
fish, and they wanted to keep as many as
possible. When we released some of the
smaller fish, it started another round of
questions:
Why can't we keep this 11-inch mangrove
snapper? I just pulled up the regs from the
FWC website on my cellphone and it says that
the size limit is only 10 inches.
That's the state of Florida's size limit on
mangrove snapper. We're following federal
regulations, which require that mangrove


snapper be at least 12 inches in length.
Are we in state waters or federal waters?
I can see the beach right there.
Well, we are in state waters, but on this
federally licensed charter boat, we are
required to obey some federal regulations
even when we're fishing in state waters.
Does that mean that we get to keep 10
mangrove snapper per person, which is the
federal bag limit on mangrove snapper when
we're fishing here in state waters on your
federally licensed charter boat?
Well, no. The law actually states that a
federally licensed charter boat must obey the
stricter of the state or federal regulations for
any reef fish species when fishing in state
waters. So, since the bag limit on mangrove
snapper is five per person in state waters
we must obey the five-fish bag limit, but
must also obey a 12-inch size limit because
the state law is stricter on bag limit but the
federal law is stricter on size limit.
You're kidding, right?
I wish.
Let's go fishing!
Capt Ralph Alien runs the King Fisher
Fleet of sightseeing and fishing charter
boats located at Fishermen's Village Marina
in Punta Gorda. He is an award-winning
outdoor writer and photographer and is a
past president of the Florida Outdoor Writers


1 cup blue crab meat A clip-n-save seafood
1 cup Ritz crackers, crushed recipe provided by


3 tbsp butter, melted
16 oz. cream cheese, softened
3 eggs
1/4 cup sour cream
1 tsp fresh lemon juice
2 tsp onion, grated
1/4 tsp Old Bay Seasoning
2 drops Tabasco sauce, or to taste
1/8 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup sour cream, to serve


- Recipe adapted from


Preheat oven to 350F. Mix together the crackers and butter; use the mixture to line a
9-inch springform pan. Bake for about 10 minutes. Set aside to cool. Reduce oven tempera-
ture to 325F. With an electric mixer, beat together until fluffy the cream cheese, eggs, and
1/4 cup sour cream. Add the lemon juice, onion, Old Bay, Tabasco and black pepper. Stir in
the crab meat and mix well. Pour into the cooled crust and bake 50 minutes, or until set.
Remove from oven and run a knife around the edge of the cake, loosening it from the pan.
Cool on a wire rack. Remove the sides of the pan. Spread sour cream over cheesecake and
serve. Serves 8.


Reliability is Standard


YETI Abel's Marine
COOLERS 7341 Sawyer Cir. ,
-j Port Charlotte, FL 33981 S sS
I 941-698-4006 it A6 .
...... Power forWhen &Where you need it. I_ -


I --,!: :,,1,





* Page 14.january3O,2014 ma~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


w


Just as terrain and techniques for catching sheepshead
differ at the jetties, so to do the best baits. While I gener-
ally head out on the pier at Placida or Boca Grande with a
bucket of mud crabs and barnacles, I seek out a different
kind of crustacean for the jetties: sand fleas.
Also called mole crabs, sand fleas are small, football-shaped
critters that live just beneath the sand at the edge of the surf.
So considering the location of the jetties they are a natural
food source to the sheepshead that hang out there.
There are two ways to go about getting sand fleas, the
easy way and the hard way. I'll get right to the easy way for
you underachievers out there.
Go to the bait shop and buy some frozen sand fleas.
Pretty easy, huh? These sand fleas will look different from
the ones you can catch in the surf here. They have been
cooked, are quite a bit bigger and come from the Atlantic
coast of Florida. But just because these fleas aren't the
same ones as on our coast doesn't mean they're not effec-
tive as bait. They are.
But if you want to harvest your own Gulf Coast fleas
you'll need one very important piece of equipment: The
Florida snow shovel, AKA a sand-flea rake. Some folks also
use these tools to find sharks teeth.
Drag the sand-flea rake parallel with the beach at a
shallow depth through the sand where the waves break.
Sometimes the fleas will be closer to the trough (drop-off),
sometimes they will be up near where the waves barely
reach, you just have to cover ground and find out where
they're hiding.
It may take you awhile to dig enough fleas for bait, so
plan accordingly. It's also a good idea to take some frozen
fleas for backup just in case the bite is on. Fiddler crabs are
also a good bet at the jetties.
If you happen to run out of bait and want to keep fishing,
you can find just what you're looking for on the rocks near
the water. There are hundreds of thousands of limpets
covering the jetty rocks.
I know what you're thinking: What the heck is a limpet?
Limpets are mollusks, or more simply-put, small, roundish
shells covering a juicy morsel that sheepshead love to dine
on. Take a knife and find a rock where they are attached to,
pry them loose and put a hook through the fleshy under-
neath side. Leave them in the shell, it is easier to feel the
bite and hook a sheepshead that way.
I've never seen anyone else using limpets as bait, but
I can attest to their effectiveness. I stumbled upon using
them several years ago when I ran out of bait on one of
those days the bite just doesn't seem to quit. So give them
a try, I think you'll be surprised. Just don't do it in Lee
County, there is a law in place specific to that county which
prohibits the harvest of limpets.
Until next time, hook'em up and fight'em hard. Fish on,
fellow anglers.
Matt Stevens is an avid saltwater angler and award-win-
ning outdoor writer. His writing is dedicated to all types
of shore-bound angling in Charlotte Harbor and the
surrounding waters. Email him at mstevens@sun-herald.
com.



| Visit www facebook out/MannT'slogePier for photos, videos, tips and
t~rliclks f Als~o ,chheck out Matt's bl og at http://www.fi sh infra nksco~m/blog/


P S SIZE LIMIT: n/a whole; large


I DAILY BAG LIMIT: 50 per harvester (aggre-
gate panfish limit includes bluegill, redear
sunfish (shellcracker), flier, longer sunfish,
mud sunfish, shadow bass, spotted sunfish
(stumpknockers), warmouth and redbreast
sunfish, individually or in total)
AVERAGE SIZE: Less than half a pound
STATE RECORD: 2.44 Ib
HABITAT: Warmouth like dense weedy areas
and require clean water. They're not fond of
fast current and are usually found in lakes.
ponds and sluggish streanms
LEGAL GEAR: Pole and line o:r r:d and
reel only
FOOD VALUE: Eh(ellent
Usually scaled, gulled and filed


FISHING M
their large rr
large prey. 0
grass shrimp
also taken.
one of these


r fish can be filleted.
ETHODS: As may bejudged by
youths, warmouth eat relatively
One of their favorites is crayfish, but
p, small fish and aquatic insects are
ny small artificial lure imitating
may also be eaten.


NOTES: Warmouth are much thicker across
the back than most other sunfish and take
the ecological place of rock bass in southern
Florida. May be used whole as bait by the
iiiangler who caught
i d dJ1 them


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,L,,p^i. l Page 14 9 January 30,2014


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%'Vt. _/H ^M Page 15 january 30,2014


mr- -- m


Why would anyone ever go out to hunt
a wild turkey? They're plentiful and cheap
at the grocery store, and those birds are a
lot more tender. If you go shoot your own,
you'll end up with a tough bird that basically
yields just a breast, and it's a lot smaller
than one of its domestic cousins. And that's
assuming you bag a turkey at all which is
far from guaranteed, because the wild ones
are a whole lot sharper than the birds living
on the feedlots.
But the experience of turkey hunting is
what keeps me coming back. I hunt turkeys
because they're hard. Getting a turkey to
answer your call is tough enough, and that's
a real accomplishment. When one is in full
strut 30 yards away, thinking he's about to
go on his dream date because I've success-
fully made him think that's what is about to
happen that's when I feel like I'm really,
truly hunting. When you're deer hunting
from a tree stand, all you have to do is be
quiet and hope a deer will walk by. That
deer has no idea what's going on you
rely on stealth. To hunt a turkey, you have
to call that bird in to you. The turkey knows
something's up, but he doesn't know it's you.
I love hunting turkeys for the same reason
I love hunting ducks: To be successful, you
have to fool Mother Nature. You have to
want it. You have to work for it.
In Florida, that's especially true. Here, we
have Osceola turkeys throughout the penin-
sula. Osceolas are hard to hunt because
they're less vocal than other subspecies.
They are hunted by panthers, bobcats and
coyotes, and it doesn't pay for a turkey to
walk around announcing himself. That's
a good way to get ate. So a Florida turkey
hunter has to work hard to get one of these
wary birds to buy into his act. If the turkey
thinks something is "off," it's in his best
interest to leave the area and he will.
If the reason why appeals to you, then
there's the how. Turkey hunting is not some-
thing you do on a whim. It takes planning
and practice, at least if you want to bring
one home.
Calling turkeys is a skill that must be
learned don't think you're going to buy
one today and go out in the field tomorrow.
YouTube is full of decent instructional
videos, or you can buy DVDs that will teach
you. It's actually easier to learn from a
video, because you're probably going to fail
embarrassingly the first few times you try it.
If you're by yourself, there's no one around
to laugh at you. Diaphragm calls that you
hold in your mouth are especially tricky, and
even box and slate calls are tough to master.
Don't get me wrong you can make noise
right away, it's just not going to be the right
noise.
Although you can legally hunt turkeys
with a rifle, pistol or bow, the standard is


a 12-gauge shotgun (20-gauge for women
and youth). To me, hunting turkeys with
a rifle is just wrong. Like I said before, the
sport lies in fooling that bird and getting
him in close. With a rifle, you're going to
basically blow up the bird when you shoot
it, too often ruining that nice piece of breast
meat. It's also tempting to shoot the bird
from a greater distance, maybe even on
the roost (which is unethical, illegal and
despicable). Shotguns for turkeys can get
very specific, but generally a gun with a
tight choke and a short barrel is what you're
looking for. Turkey-specific loads are heavy,
usually 1.5 to 2 ounces of high-brass shot.
This gives plenty of knock-down power
(they're big birds, after all) but also means
they kick like a sonofa.
If the turkey sees you, your hunt is over,
and turkeys have very keen eyesight.
Camouflage is key to success. Everything
needs to be drab and hidden the
gun, your boots, your hands, everything.
Anything shiny, like your glasses, watch
or any jewelry, is a problem, because any
glint is enough to turn that turkey around.
Build a blind that you can see out of to
help you hide. Palmettos make great blind
construction material. And when that turkey
is coming in, keep as still as you can. Ignore
the fire ants marching up your leg. Try not
to blink or even breathe. If you really must
move, keep it very slow and steady or
say goodbye to Tom.
As with any other sort of hunting, you
need to know the law. Only gobblers
(male) and bearded turkeys may be taken.
The daily bag limit is one turkey, and the
season limit is two. Baiting is against
the law, but using decoys is allowed. You
may not use dogs to hunt turkeys, and
you may not use recorded turkey calls or
sounds. Wildlife management areas have
additional rules, so be sure to learn them
before you walk into the woods. South of
State Road 70, spring turkey season is open
March 1 through April 6, plus a special
youth hunt season Feb. 22 and 23.
If you are lucky enough to harvest a
turkey, remember it's not a domestic bird. I
hate waste, so I'll suggest boiling the thighs
and drumsticks for soup. But the breast -
it's so different from supermarket turkey.
It's not really white meat like you might
expect. Cut it into chunks, bread it with
flour and cornmeal and deep-fry it in Crisco.
Put a plate of that on top of your head, and
your tongue will beat your brains out trying
to get to it. In fact, I'm getting hungry just
thinking about it, so I've gotta go.
Capt Josh Greer is a fourth-generation
Floridian, born and raised in South Florida.
Growing up with a rifle in one hand and a
rod in the other, he developed a true passion
for all aspects of the outdoors. His mild
manner and fun-loving attitude promise
an enjoyable experience for you and your
family, and you'll benefit from his 20years
of experience in the woods and on the
water. For hunting or fishing trips, call him
at 863-781-1373. You can also visit him at
Fishin'Frank's orSportrap Gun Shop when
he's not in the field.


Hi


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intlDetUlIIunIII hItaE shI iImqJ lllui i iisnE1EUP I I


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II I I


1 pound raw Gulf shrimp, peeled, deveined and butterflied
1-1/2 cups cornstarch, divided
2 cups plain bread crumbs
2 cups sweetened coconut flakes
1 cup liquid pina colada drink mix, divided
2 tablespoons powdered sugar
1/3 cup Captain Morgan Spiced Rum


A clip-n-save seafood
recipe provided by



-Recipe adapted from
all-fish-seafood-redipes.com


Place 1 cup cornstarch in a bowl; set aside. Combine bread crumbs, 1/2 cup cornstarch, and
coconut flakes in a separate bowl; set aside. Combine 1 cup pina colada mix, powdered sugar,
and rum in a separate bowl; set aside. Coat shrimp in cornstarch, then dip in pina colada mixture,
then in coconut mixture, back into the pina colada mixture, and back into the coconut mixture.
Carefully drop each coated shrimp into 375F oil, fry until golden brown, and drain on paper
towels. Serve warm with Pina Colada Sauce. Makes appetizers for 6.

PINA COLADA SAUCE
1/2 cup liquid pina colada drink mix, divided
1/3 cup sour cream
1/3 cup canned crushed pineapple, drained

Combine all ingredients and mix well. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.


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^ ,Prs/mK. Page 16 *January 30,2014


*aam6~..u U .e.UFie~Imi.eeu ~~~hUi
aa~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


Ari // Page 17 *January 30,2014


* ~
aamusasama~wmumuu m~uauumu.s.mhmEa


On Saturday, March 8,50 all-female fishing teams
will take to the water. Their goal: The heaviest bag of
10 ladyfish. The reason: To raise money for a Charlotte
County Habitat for Humanity Women Build project.
The fun actually gets started the night before at the
big Heels & Reels team party, which starts at 5:30 p.m.
Friday, March 7, at the Punta Gorda Isles Civic Asso-
ciation building. The party will be catered by Luigi's
Family Restaurant of Port Charlotte and will feature
some great raffles and silent auctions. Some of our
local firefighters will be making an appearance to
help with the raffles, and rumor has it they might not
remember to bring their shirts.
Since no one wants to get up too early after the
party, the tournament itself will get started at 9 a.m.
the next morning at Burnt Store Marina. Each team
will be responsible for rounding up their own boat and
fishing tackle. After a brief inspection (just to make
sure there are no sneaky ladyfish already on the boat),
the teams will be off and fishing.
Angling teams will consist of two to three women
from age 6 to 106. Because we know the ladies will


want to focus on the fun, they can choose to round out
their teams with a captain and a mate, which can be
male or female. The captain and mate can drive the
boat, bait hooks, take fish off the lines everything
but fish. For you true angling women, fear not: You
don't have to have the guys on the boat if you don't
want them.
All the fish will need to be kept on ice, because
they're going for a good cause as well: The Center
for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) on Sanibel
will be taking them to use as food for their pelicans,
herons and other birds on the mend.
With the fish in the bag, our teams will return to
Burnt Store Marina for the weigh-in and awards cere-
mony, where some awesome (and very girly) prizes
will be given out. After that, it's time to party yet
again this time with a cookout and live music on
the marina grounds.
All in all, it's going to be yet another WaterLine
tournament where we'll have some fun and do some
good. Ladies, start getting your teams together it's
gonna be a good one.


The WaterLine Heels & Reels fishing tournament entry fee is $275 plus sales tax ($294.25) for a team of two or three
l : ..... anglers. At least one team member must attend the team party at 5:30 p.m. March 7,2014, at the
PGI Civic Association building. All participating anglers must be at least 6 years of age on March 7,2014. All
team captains must be at least 18 years of age on March 7, 2014. Any minor wishing to participate must provide
tournament organizers with an affidavit signed by his or her legal guardian.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------*
Team name T-SHIRT SIZE

Captain S M L XL XXL

SMate(optional) S M L XL XXL
L Angler#1 S M L XL XXL


^^H TOUIAMENT Angler #2 S M L-XL-XXL
^^^^ I\\l\A\ J-ll Angler #23_________________________________________________XL______
TOUAM ENT[Angler#3 S M L XL XXL

SMail this slip along with your check or money order for $294.25 to Heels & Reels, 23170 Harbor-
view Road, Port Charlotte, FL 33980. To register online, go to HeelsAndReels.com.




Heels & Reels official tournament rules


1. The tournament is planned for March 8,2014, but may be rescheduled in the
case of extreme weather. Entry fees will not be refunded due to rescheduling.
2. The entry fee for the tournament is $275 plus sales tax ($294.25 total) per
team. You may enter by mail, online at HeelsAndReels.com, or in person at the
following locations: The Charlotte Sun (23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte),
the Punta Gorda Herald (312 Sullivan Street, Punta Gorda), the North Port Sun
(13487 S. Tamiami Trail, North Port), the Englewood Sun (120 W. Dearborn
Street, Englewood), Fishin' Frank's (4425-D Tamiami Trail, Charlotte Harbor)
and the Burnt Store Marina Harbormaster's office (3192 Matecumbe Key Road,
Punta Gorda).
3.The tournament will be limited to 50 teams. Entry forms and payment are
due no later than March 4,2014. If there are available slots, late entries will be
accepted up to the team party; however, team shirts may not be available for
late entries.
4. Teams may consist of two or three anglers. All anglers must be female. In
addition to the anglers, teams may also include a captain and mate. The captain
and mate can be male or female. The captain and mate are not permitted to cast
or to touch the rod, reel or line while the line is in the water or while a fish is
being fought.
5. A team party and meeting will be held from 5:30 to 9 p.m. March 7,2014, at
the Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association building (2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda).
All anglers, captains and mates are encouraged to attend; at least one member of
each team must attend. Any team that is not represented at the meeting will not
be permitted to participate in the tournament, and will not be eligible for a refund
of the entry fee.


6. All team members must be at least 6 years old on March 7,2014. All team
captains must be at least 18 years old on March 7,2014. To participate, minors
must provide tournament organizers with a waiver signed by their legal guardian.
7. Except with prior approval from tournament organizers, no person who is not a
member of that boat's team may be aboard a competing boat.
8. All tournament boats will be subject to inspection at Burnt Store Marina prior
to the start of the tournament. Boats will be released to fish in the order of team
registration beginning at 9 a.m. March 8. Late arrival is permitted, but no boats will
be released after 11 a.m.
9. Tournament anglers and mates who are of legal age are permitted to drink
alcohol during the tournament. Team captains are NOT permitted to drink alcohol
during the tournament.
10. Anglers may fish anywhere on tournament waters accessible by boat, except
areas designated as off-limits by local, state or federal officials. Anglers must keep
a minimum distance of 50 yards from any other competitor or competitor's boat
unless invited closer. Competitors must remain in the boat while fishing.
11. Tournament fish must be caught during the tournament. Teams may enter only
fish they have caught themselves from the wild. Fishing assistance from any out-
side entity is not permitted. Tournament fish must be caught using a rod and reel
and in a sporting manner. Fish that have been foul-hooked, whether intentionally
or not, may not be entered. Anglers may use only one rod at a time. The number of
lines a team has in the water must not at any time exceed the number of anglers
on the team.
12. All legal baits and artificial lures are allowed.


13. No tournament boats may come together for any reason or pass anything
between boats during the tournament, except for emergency purposes.
14. During the tournament, fuel, bait and other supplies may be acquired from
retail facilities only.
15. All participants are required to follow all applicable federal, state and local stat-
utes, rules and regulations. This includes slow or idle zones and manatee areas. Any
violations of such statutes, rules and regulations may result in disqualification from
this tournament and future WaterLine tournaments. Additionally, all competing
boats must have all required U.S. Coast Guard safety equipment.
16. All tournament participants are required to conduct themselves in a
sportsmanlike manner during all tournament activities. Unacceptable behavior may
result in expulsion from future WaterLine events. Disqualification or misconduct
in any other fishing tournament within 36 months prior to the tournament date is
grounds for an application not being accepted or returned. WaterLine may refuse
any tournament application by returning the entry fee to the team captain.
17. No angler may alter or attempt to alter the weight of any tournament fish. Any
team which enters one or more altered fish will be disqualified. Fish entered by
winning teams are subject to internal inspection to ensure this rule is followed.
18. Weigh-ins will be held in groups beginning at 2:45 p.m. Each team is responsi-
ble for transporting their own fish to the scales.
Boats 1 thru 10 must check in by 2:30 p.m. and be at the weigh-in stage by 2:45 p.m.
Boats 11 thru 20 must check in by 2:40 p.m. and be at the weigh-in stage by 2:55 p.m.
Boats 21 thru 30 must check in by 2:50 p.m. and be at the weigh-in stage by 3:05 p.m.
Boats 31 thru 40 must check in by 3:00 p.m. and be at the weigh-in stage by 3:15 p.m.
Boats 41 thru 50 must check in by 3:10 p.m. and be at the weigh-in stage by 3:25 p.m.


19. Each team may enter up to 10 ladyfish. Winners shall be determined by total
weight of ladyfish entered, regardless of the number offish. Bonus prizes will be
awarded for the heaviest and lightest single ladyfish; each team will be permitted
to choose one fish to enter for the heaviest fish category and one to enter for the
lightest fish category. In the event of any ties, the winner shall be determined by
coin toss. In the event no ladyfish are entered, prizes shall be awarded by random
drawing of all teams that fish the tournament.
20. All tournament fish will be donated to CROW or a similar facility to be used
as food for the animals. By entering fish in the tournament, participants agree to
donate them for this purpose. Each team is required to have a cooler or other suit-
able insulated container with at least 10 pounds of ice. All tournament fish must
be properly iced to prevent spoilage. Teams may bring back additional ladyfish for
donation if desired; there is no competitive advantage in doing so.
21. Winning teams are subject to polygraph tests. Each captain agrees to submit,
by their signature on the official entry form, to a polygraph test to determine the
results of the tournament and shall not contest the results. Failure to be available
for the test is grounds for disqualification. Polygraph tests may be required up to
one week after the event.
22. Protests are allowed up to one hour after the end of the tournament. All
protests must be in writing and accompanied by a $200 fee. If the protest is
upheld, the fee will be returned. If the protest is denied, the tournament will retain
the protest fee. Protests will be determined by tournament organizers and/or
polygraph test.
23. WaterLine reserves the right to amend these rules at any time except during
tournament hours.


More information online at HeelsAndReels.com, or call 941-276-9657


wtB





, ,tfM ,,,* Page 18 January 30,2014


*aam6.~u U .eeUFie~Imi.eeu E~~hU
aa~esasamm~inuumuu m.umuumu.smhuE*


Teddy Longo, 8, took a
vacation from Delaware
to visit grandpa John
j ~Kraybill and caught this
impressive trout. He
was fishing in Alligator
Creek. Good job, Teddy!


I...


Recognize
someone in a
Photo? Go tag
them online at
Facebook.com/WaterLineMagazine!


Chelsea Russell
with a 28-inch
redfish caught
on shrimp
in Charlotte
Harbor. Nice.


4


*//
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j#E .&PtVK, Page 19 *January 30,2014


MnI lnnf,, ln,.r-'fn .,n. ,.
int etUIBunhltaEUsI ilmBu~snEE


A typical day for
Richard Madison.


Bob Gaydos caught this
sheepshead on a nice
day on Charlotte Harbor.


^I-



." f'



-A'^


WEWANT
YOUR PHOTOS!
Here's how it works: Take
pictures of your outdoor
adventures. Send your
high-quality digital photos to
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.
corn, or send prints by snail
mail to WaterLine, 23170
Harborview Road, Port
Charlotte, FL 33980, ATTN:
Lee Anderson. Include
a self-addressed stamped
envelope if you want your
prints returned to you.
DO NOT send us photos of
oversized or other release-
only fish being poorly
handled. Photos of such
fish being gaffed, held by the
lower jaw only or obviously
damaged or dead WILL NOT
be published, no matter how
big the fish or how proud the
angler may be.


.......................

..... ........ .


w .


I

-, '1 tI~*


Dan Marks from
Traverse City,
Mich., caught this
sheepsheadin
Punta Gorda Isles. %
<'"*S"Lu'* 'S1


......... ::: .





,M/^K Page 20 January 30,2014


*aam6~..u U .e.UFie~Imi.eeu E~~hUi
aa~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


1 111111,11


Carl Long, from Indiana,
caught this red grouper
with friend Duane
Jackson. Duane is from
Indiana as well, and
winters in Englewood.


Sheldon Jobb
from Ontario,
Canada, with
an impressive
redfish. Eh?


/


. ,0 ...
their
>p


WE WANT YOUR PHOTOS!
Here's how it works: Take pictures of your outdoor adven-
tures. Send your high-quality digital photos to Editor@
WaterLineWeekly.com, or send prints by snail mail to
WaterLine, 23170 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte, FL
33980, ATTN: Lee Anderson. Include a self-addressed stamped
envelope if you want your prints returned to you.
DO NOT send us photos of oversized or other release-
only fish being poorly handled. Photos of such fish being
gaffed, held by the lower jaw only or obviously damaged or
dead WILL NOT be published, no matter how big the fish or
how proud the angler may be.


^*^s.





_________._______.p."w Page 21 *January 30,2014

TOURNAMENT III SINP e GREG BARTZ 11^


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msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


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ith the


id


The front of side of a cold front can oftentimes
lead to some very good fishing. Weather patterns
do crazy things to the fish under the water and at
times, it can put them in a feeding mode like no
one has ever seen. But there's a flip side to that
which isn't so much fun.
This past weekend I took my teenage daughter
out to the lake in hopes note the word "hopes"
- of catching some nice fish. The weather was to
be overcast in the morning and warming up. The
bad news was that it was the tail end of a cold
front with a high moving in for a very brief period
of time. My worst fears were about to come true,
but being the mentally tough individual that
I am, I was hoping that my persistence would
wear off on the kid. Now that she is going to fish
tournaments in high school, I thought this would
be a good learning curve for her to be patient.
Well, I can tell you one thing. When the fish
don't bite, this kid eats like Yogi Bear at a picnic
fest. I have never seen one girl go into the cooler
and glove compartment for food as much as
this child does. Mind you, she is 16 and very fit
because she plays soccer. I guess the nourishment
gives her energy for soccer, but it sure didn't make
her make any extra casts when we were trying to
catch bass.
She was great for the first three hours or so.
But with no fish in the boat and no bites to be
had, she was getting bored. That's when the
assault on the food began. First of all, I didn't
realize she brought that much to eat. She had
food coming out of every compartment in the
boat. If I ate like that, I couldn't get out of the
boat to get the truck at the end of the day. I am
good with a pack of crackers and a couple of
waters.
OK, she reads these so she will think I am
picking on her, but what it showed me is that


Take your kid fishing. Odds are they
will take home some memories,
even if you don't catch fish.


mentality plays a huge role in fishing. I tried to
express to her that she really needs to be diligent
and stay after it. Keep the bait in the water and
keep casting to new areas. Keep trying different
baits if that is what it takes to keep the excite-
ment up, but no matter what, you can't catch
fish with your bait dangling 3 feet above the
waterline. Wayne Gretzky had a famous quote:
You can't score if you can't hit the net, or if you
don't shoot the puck. Fishing is the same way.
Sometimes you have to knock them on the head
to get them to bite, and the only way to do that is
to keep throwing.
All in all, we had a good day of hanging out,


just not a good day of fishing. I managed one bass
that was not very big at all, but at least we got
to see one. I fished my brains out for the time I
was on the water. I hope that my daughter got a
little taste of what a tough day can be. Because
I have to pilot the boat she will fish out of, and
keep my mouth shut, days like that will bring me
right to my knees. I am all about the kids fishing,
getting out there and doing something outdoors,
but at the same time, I want her to compete.
Wait, let me rephrase by compete I mean just
stay focused. Win, lose or draw, I really don't care
about, but not giving yourself a chance will drive
me nuts.


On an up-note to the day, I did teach her how
to handle the big F-250 and back the trailer down
at the boat ramp. She got as much of a kick out
of that as she did anything else throughout the
day. The main thing is she did enjoy herself; the
bad thing was we only fished until 12:30. I can't
imagine what those 3 p.m. afternoons will be like
if the fishing is slow.
Good Lord, grant me patience.
Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fisherman
based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes throughout
Florida's Heartland with his wife and tournament
partner, Missy Snapp. Contact him at Greg.Bartz@
SummitHoldings.com.


ImIiL!IIHnm
w wob, -


-'wwb P wA


- Mi m -"- m 6mi im


aftgrune 1975



a Foiahninglcne





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j#Eat,&,PtVU Page 22 January 30,2014


I*-an *nn UI neflnklnn ann
aal M lltesata**nrlul EtDI IIqllIUUEU .MOEEl I


i : M iJ I "a iii k"1, LL i i l k IiiU L kill II lh I


Editor's note: Although Tom
has passed away, his writing is still
in demand. Therefore, we will re-run
one ofhis columns each month.

Nothing brings out a fisherman's
eternal optimism like a rainstorm.
During dreadful downpours, anglers
tend to utter happy but nonsensical
statements. Here is a short list of
thoughtless wet words. I'll bet
you've heard every one.
"A little rain never hurt anybody."
Basically, this is true. But if you feel
the need to vocalize this proverb, the
rain is generally not "little" anymore.
If it was, you could ignore it. Yes,
individual raindrops are small.
But put enough of them together
and they become as irritating as
dawdling drivers in the passing


lane. Also, the definition of a "little"
rain is not clear. I would consider
speckles on sunglasses small. Rivers
running down my forehead is not. I
first heard the "little rain" comment
from my father during a rampaging
rainstorm on Cedar Lake. It was an
intensely cold spring day, even for
Minnesota. I was soaked to the bone
and shivering like a dog at the vet's
office. In today's world, this would be
considered child abuse. Back then, it
was called going fishing with Dad.
"The fish bite better in the rain.":'
I would like to see the scientific
evidence for this claim. More than
likely, it was an axiom dreamed up by
a charter captain whose clients were
considering bailing out for the day,
but I don't know for sure. Hey, maybe
fish do get hungry when their ceiling
gets pelted. Personally, I hunker
down, eat flavored potato chips, and
watch old westerns on TV when it
rains. Come to think of it, I do the
same thing when it's not raining.
"It should blow over soon.":' So
what you are telling me is that these


gale-force winds that are spattering
raindrops like bird shot on my
face are going to continue for an
unknown period of time. Gee, that's
reassuring. Hand me the tanning oil.
"The weatherman said it was
supposed to clear up this afternoon'."
Yeah right, and Hurricane Charley
will miss us and head for Tampa.
And gas prices are based strictly
on supply and demand. Do you
also believe in the boogie-man?
Remember the radical political
group from the '60s called The
Weathermen? Their intention was
to create chaos in an orderly society.
Probably just a coincidence they
were named after meteorologists.
"The rain is moving away from us.":'
I equate the value of this statement
with a land-based experience. I had
a neighbor with two 24-hour-a-day
barking dogs. I kept hearing rumors
that he was planning to move away.
But when push came to shove, I
moved before he did. And I wasn't
planning on it. I think about this
whenever somebody promises that a


storm is departing the area.
"Look, there's some sun over
there." Not meaning to rain on your
parade, but the sun is always shining
somewhere even at night. Of
course, if you can't feel it, or it is
blocked out by dark thunderclouds
overhead, you are going to experi-
ence some goose bumps, or maybe
just a touch of hypothermia.
"We needed the rain'." Of course
we do. I'm not asking the sky to seal
up permanently. But did it have to
spill its guts on the only afternoon I
have free this week? Yes, for life to
continue on this planet we need rain
- but please, not right this minute.
"It's better than a really hot day!'
No it's not. Only newcomers to Florida
use this line. People who grew up
in Arctic weather (or former Seattle
residents) may prefer getting wet
from the outside elements rather
than their own sweat glands. Not me.
I'll take damp armpits over a rivulets
running off my cap bill any day.
"You'll dry off quick when we move
the boat to the next spot.":' So, when


we get up on plane, you want me to
stand on the bow and re-create that
famous scene from the movie Titanic?
Sure, I'll just spread out my sopping
shirt-sleeves like a cormorant with
a beer belly. Look buster, I came out
here to fish. If I want the stimulating
experience of blow-drying my exte-
rior, I will run through a self-service
car wash with the windows open.
Or give myself a sponge bath in the
WalMart restroom and whirl around
in front of their electric hand dryers.
I'll probably get arrested, but at least
I won't freeze to death!
"There will be fewer people on
the water.":' So, what you are saying is
that only drenched dummies like us
will be out here fishing. Thanks for
the compliment. I think you're really
smart, too.
Despite all my whining, there is
nothing wrong with fishing in the
rain especially if the fish are
actually biting. But I will point out
there's a difference between a short
shower and a torrential downpour.
Just ask Noah.


If you suspect a
wildlife or boating law
violation, report it to
the FWC's Wildlife
Alert Reward Program.
If your information
results in an arrest, you
may be eligible for
a reward of up to $1,000.


CHARLOTTE COUNTY'S
#1GUN SHOP *




2301 Tamiami Trail
Port Charlotte FL 33952
Phone: 941,89,97065
Fax: 941889.7068


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or dial *FWC or
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MAKE A DIFFERENCE. | OVER 100 YEARS OF WEAPON EXPERIENCE!


I




jE.a&/C ,VA Page 23 January 30,2014


MMSEEU~nIIMU *SI**m**.tuuD*


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Sale


Marine Custom Canvas + Upholstery
Custom Canvas Canvas Repair Mobile Service
BAYVIEW CANVAS
1 B AI27 Jam es Sr., Poi i(hoilao irre, FL
S www941.661.4070B
www.BayviewCanvas.com
;~~~~~~~~~ I I I E


If you've heard of Sea Hunt, Grady White, Maverick, Skeeter,
Pathfinder, Cobia or a Bennington, you know that those line of boats
are the premium names in the industry.
Have you ever wondered what it's like to drive one? Well, wonder
no longer. On Feb. 7,8 and 9, you can demo the nine premium boat
lines that Ingman Marine offers. The event is dubbed the"All-Star
Weekend Boat Show and Demo Days7and has been attracting
people all over Southwest Florida for eight years.
Located at Gasparilla Marina in Placida (15001 Gasparilla Road,
Placida), you'll get a hand-on experience of some of the best-selling
boats in Florida, at the lowest prices of the year. And after you demo
a boat, you can enjoy a waterside meal at the Waterside Grill at
Gasparilla Marina.
"Very few boat shows offer demos~says owner Gary Ingman.
"That's what makes this event special. You can come and try out
a boat then go grab something to eat while sitting right on the
water!'
Family owned and operated for 33 years, Ingman Marine has
consistently provided the finest products and services in the
industry. The entire staffat Ingman Marine is dedicated to one
objective: making your boating experience enjoyable, economical
and safe! Our people are professionals in their fields, and they are
the individuals you will come to know, trust and rely on throughout
the years.
At Wingman Marine, they take the time to get to know their
customers and make sure they end up with the product and service
that best fits their needs. Customer service and support is the top
priority at Ingman Marine.
For more information, call 941-697-1000 or visit
IlngmanMarine.com.


"'A.A-Star eekten oat low and emo uays. Free boat rides.
Free admission. Free parking. Demo nine different premium boat lines.
WHERE: Ingman Marine at Gasparilla Marina. 15001 Gasparilla Road,
Placida 33946.
WHEN: Friday, Feb. 7th from 9ea.m. to 5p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 8th from
9a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 9th from 10a.m. to 4 p.m.
CONTACT: 941-697-1000 or visit IngmanMarine.com.


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m What you don t know can hurt you!
Concealed Carry
Basic Handgun Instruction
NRA-Certified Firearms Instructor
BILLY CARL
-( 941-769-0767-jcarI@embarqmail.com
S Sportrap Gun Shop, 941-629-7775

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Will be talking about
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9 a l years Iscme."s
Cp Mik Myers
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941-416-8047
h SHARKS TARPON GOLIATH GROUPER REDFISH SNOOK TROUT


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Cvstal Cay Cunrero
a 941-6319-6603
WWW CRYSTA1CAY COM3NI
4725 Taylor Rosd, PG 0-


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In the tidal flats of Charlotte
Harbor, as well as the Peace and
Myakka Rivers, there are plenty
of opportunities to run aground.
During these winter low tides,
we are particularly vulnerable as
the shoals sticking up out of the
water clearly show. Fortunately,
most of the bottoms are soft
sand or muck, so grounding is
normally more of a nuisance than
a danger. When you do run aground
what to do and acting quickly can
inconvenience to a matter of minuL
knowing what to do can leave you
hours, and possibly destroy your v
If you run aground, immediately
nobody is injured, and get life jaci
persons aboard. Then, proceed dir
certain there is no hull damage. A
punctured hull is bad news. It's be
aground while you make emerged
call for help.
Once you know the hull is OK, yo
to the task of freeing your boat. Y(
always check the tide tables before
on the water. A rising tide may we
you and set you free, while a fallir
leave you stranded for hours. So it
know the tide status and to work c
not run your engines to force the I
drawing muck or sand into your w
can disable your vessel and create
repair.
First, tilt your outboard up or tr
outdrives to a raised position. Ons
raise any center or daggerboards.
getting all passengers into the ste
the bow and see if you can free th
Depending on which part of the v
aground, you may want to shift th
of the passengers to one side or thi
or to rock the boat from side to sic
aid each of these actions with a bo
water who is pushing the boat tow
water. If you do put someone over
first attach a safety line from then
boat, and be certain they are wear
preserver.
While a passing wake is normal
friend, this is one instance where
helpful. You can hail a passing boa
them to make a couple of high wa
near you. Their wake may well ser
you free.
Sailboats with their deep keels
times more difficult to free. Heelir
by getting all the crew to one side
trick. If you need more angle, you
man on the boom and swing it ou
more leveraged weight. Another n
use the dinghy to set an anchor so
from your boat. You may free the I
slowly winching in the anchor rod
is blowing towards deeper water,


inning




around


ain't fun
id, knowing the sail broadside to the wind may also help
reduce your push you off. You can further heel the boat by
ites. Not rigging a halyard to an anchor that you set off
i stranded for the beam. By slowly winching in the halyard,
iater pump. you may sufficiently reduce the draft and set
y make sure the boat free. As you try various methods to
(ets on all free the boat, you can do a number of these
ectly to make steps simultaneously.
cracked or When all else fails, it's time to call a
>st to remain commercial tow company that's why we
icy repairs or carry insurance. Before calling, make sure you
know your estimated position. It may ruin
ou can get the days outing, but what the heck. With the
'ou should proper attitude, you can sit back and relax
e going out while waiting for a tow. As an experienced
ell work with "grounder;'," I can tell you I've had many an
ng tide may enjoyable experience wading around a shoal
t pays to and examining the water creatures while
quickly. Do waiting for help.
boat off When you call for help, call directly for a
rater intake commercial tow service. Above all, unless
an expensive your hull is punctured and or severe weather
in closing in, do not issue a mayday call. A 9
im your mayday call means there is immediate danger
sailboats, to life or property. Besides being the wrong
Then, try call, a mayday call may open you up to a
irn to raise salvage claim by the one who frees you.
e boat. There are four points required to justify a
vessel is salvage claim. The most important two are:
ie weight there must be immediate danger to life or
ie other, property, and the salvor must save that life or
de. You can property from peril. Don't open the door to a
oater in the claim by calling mayday. It's also a good idea
wards deeper to make it clear to the tow service that there
r the side, is no danger and you simply want to be free
n to the to continue on enjoying your day. This is only
ring a life one more reason every boater should carry a
log book. You can record the time, conditions Z
ly not our and situation in your log in case you need later
it may be documentation of the day's events.
it and ask The three main causes of collisions and
ike passes running aground are excessive speed, alcohol
ve to float and not paying attention. Obviously, a little
prevention will help insure you have a safe
are some- and enjoyable outing. A chart and a Captain
ig the boat that knows what he's doing are also helpful.
Smay do the Reading a chart and the basic principles of safe
can put a boating are taught by the Peace River Power
board for Squadron. For information on upcoming classes
method is to please call 941-637-0766.
'me distance Bill Hempel is the Assistant Safety Officer for
boat by the Peace River Power Squadron and a member
e. If the wind of the USPS national marketing committee.
hoisting Contact him atbillmarl@comcast.net. I


16' 1984 Rinker Bow Rider. OMC Chevy 4 Cyl 140 HP. 16 MITCHELL. Cenler Console 1984.
Single AxleTrailer /le* Wheels &Tiies! 1,695. Mooring Cover -75HP Evinrude. 91.rQ S1350.
0 ,gstal Cay Cent./ v-c stal Cay C-enter
941-639-6603 r 941-639-6603
WWW CRYSTAICAY CVI WWW CRYSTALCAV ColVIa
4225 Taylor Road, PS 42S Taylor Road. PG


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There are quite a few things you need to
consider when choosing the correct propeller.
First, lets cover some basic prop lingo.
What do the numbers mean? Let's say
the size of the prop is 131/2 x 15. The first
number is the diameter of the prop in
inches, meaning the distance from the
center of the prop to the end of one of the
blades, then doubled. The second number is
referred to as pitch. Pitch is the theoretical
distance in one revolution the prop would
move in a forward direction. This means
a 15-pitch prop would move 15 inches per
revolution.
Many tests have been done on props,
so the basic selection isn't so difficult. Of
course, it's best to test run the boat and
motor combination to be sure the selected
prop is correct. When propping an engine,
you want to be in the upper 25 percent
of revolutions per minute range. In other
words, if the engine's operating RPM is
500-6000 RPMs when wide open, you want
a prop that lets the engine run up to 5,750
RPMs or more. Understanding pitch makes
prop selection easier. Let's say that the prop
selected only lets the engine turn 5,000
RPMs. Knowing you need at least 750 more
RPMs means you have to select a prop with
less pitch. A general rule of thumb is that
each inch of pitch equals 200 RPMs, so in
this example, you would need a prop with
3 to 4 inches less pitch. Three inches less
would give 600 more RPMs, and 4 inches
less would give around 800 more RPMs. It's
just the opposite if you're getting too many
RPMs then you need a prop with more
pitch. I know it sounds strange, but more


17 2007 Carolina Skill S12.50
Call Riclhaid RoIanoi 203-912-95
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL r.& A .


Mercury EFI 2011 Lowe Custom Trailer
Minn Kota wireless trolling motor, Lowrance GPS &
Fish Finder Boat is like new -Only 34 Hours
Just Serviced turn key See full details & water test
video @ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


pitch brings RPMs down, and less pitch
brings RPMs up.
Most outboards use either stainless steel
or aluminum props. In sandy conditions,
stainless is best, as it'll wear a lot longer
than aluminum. However, in conditions
like oyster beds, the aluminum will break,
hopefully saving the prop shaft. Another
consideration is that the stainless will stay
at the truer pitch as it has less flexibility
than aluminum. Then there's the cost a
stainless prop can easily be 3 to 4 times the
expense of aluminum.
Lets talk about the number of blades on a
prop. The most consistent is a three-blade
prop. It achieves a consistent performance.
However, the four-blade prop give a little
better hole shot (rapid acceleration from
a stopped position), but slightly slower
top-end speed. Then there's the five-blade
prop. It acts very similar to the three-blade
prop, with a better hole shot, and close to
the same top-end speed however, these
are very pricey props.
In closing, propping each boat is different
and a lot of it depends on how one uses the
boat and wants it to perform. You should ask
advice from professionals. That's their job!
Tony Towns is owner and operator of
Abel's Marine located at 7341 Sawyer Circle,
off Gasparilla Road. Tony has more than 25
years of experience in the marine industry
and certifications for Mercury Marine,
Johnson/Evinrude, Yamaha and is the state
of Florida's only Honda Marine master tech.
To contact Tony with any questions, email
Tony@A belsMarine.com or call Abel's Marine
at 941-698-4006.


Just Serviced Ready to go! $3,950
C,, Stal Cay Cener
941-639-6603
q WWW.CRYSTAL.CAYCOIV% M
Q 4225 Taylor Road. PG


17' SUNCATS 2004,2006 & 2014 Available
Please call for pricing!
Punta Gorda's Com-Pac Dealer
941-833-0099



......
u-i-



18' 2006 C Hawk Bay Boat w/90hp Four Stroke Merc.
Asking $13,990. Very Low hrs almost like a new boat!
SS Propeller, Garmin Color Chart Plotter GPS. Comes with
trailer. Bimni top, Live Well, Coast Guard Equipment.
Ready For the Water!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


18 2006 Sea HunI 186 115Yamaha 4-Slroke 2012 Magic
tilt Aluminum Trailer-Swing tongue-Garage Friendly
Removable T-Top, Leaning Post, Color GPS/Fish Find-
er, Stereo and VHF. Super nice condition. Just serv-
iced turn key. See full details and virtual water test
video @ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


18' GLASTRON 183CC with VERY low hr
Johnson 2004 at $13,900 with nice trailer.
Call Tod 941-457-0131
Or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


m-
19'1996Wellcrall Cenler Console. Johnson 112HP
$7,990. Fish Finder, CD Player, Fishing Chair,
Life Jackets, Bimini Top & Swim Ladder. Fresh Water
Boat Very Good Condition! Has Trailer. This boat
Needs nothing ready for fun in the sun today!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com



*- W-ON



19' 2000 Seaswirl Center Console: Good shape,
115HP Johnson. New VHF, Garmin fishfinder/chartplot-
ter combo, battery and bilge pump. Bimini and console
cover included. Asking $11,500. i -
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 T ie O x:L


s, 2010 MagicTilt Alum Trailer. Great family/fishing boat.
Color GPS/Fish Finder, shallow water anchor. Like new
w/only 81 hours. Yamaha Warranty through 11/16. Just
Serviced Turn Key package. See full details and virtual
water test video@ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


zuv zuo,. ,Jea ilUm zuz t.iur.pv r. lamlalla 4-IR-,Ji e
Wesco Aluminum Trailer, T-Top, Color GPS/Fish
Finder ,VHF and Stereo. Super nice family fishing
boat. Boat just serviced turn key. See full details and
virtual water test video
@ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


U" learn ailTisn, 19b, withn trailer. enier console, live
well, motor Yamaha 130,2 stroke, w/ SS prop, recently
tuned up trailer. New hubs, brakes, buddy bearings, and
tires, excellent condition, ready to launch and go fishing.
Was $7,900 REDUCED To: $6,900
941-626-4571 or 941-627-5777


---
.-U.-


4 flounder fillets A clip-n-save seafood
1 small ripe avocado, coarsely chopped recipe provided by


6 tbsp butter
2 tbsp lemon juice, divided
1/4 tsp garlic powder
2 tbsp salsa
2 oz. cream
1 tsp Dijon mustard
1/3 cup fine dry breadcrumbs


-Recipe adapted from
all-fish-seafood-recipes.com


Combine the avocado, butter, 1 tbsp. lemon juice, salsa and garlic in a blender. Cover and process
until smooth. Combine Dijon mustard and cream. Dip the trout fillets in mustard mixture and
dredge in breadcrumbs. Place on a buttered baking dish and bake at 450F for 7 minutes. Turn the
trout fillets over and bake for 7 minutes more. Warm avocado sauce for 30 seconds in microwave.
Top the baked fillets with the avocado sauce and serve. Serves 4.


18' 2008 SEA FOX BF 185 BAY
140 HP Suzuki 4 stroke, power pole,
trolling motor, trim tabs, trailer and more!
$16,900 941-916-9874


Zu I- I iroJIiotst1 v-u iyicitei uioci ifJ
Boat & Trailer. Ready to ride! 64,85. $3,995.
Ca- t*>sl Cay Cen er,.
941-639-6603
-^- VWW.CRYSTALCAI'Y.CC>M 1~f
4225 TVylor Rocad, P43



.1 --


18'6"2005 Larson Bow Rider, 4.3 Vortech Volvo 21' 1998 Wellcraft Dual Console with a 150hp Mercury. Very
Sale price @ $11,990. Very Low Hrs Since New. Lower Unit Clean! $11,990. Garmin GPS Color Chart Plotter.'08 Alum.
just completely redone. Full cover. Engine is spotless. Runs Trailer. Full Windshield. Lots of seating. Much easy to main-
Exc.needs nothing!. Very solid boat with a great ride and fast. tain then a deck boat ( Removable Cushions) with a much
better ride.Turn Key! Ready for the water today!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com

























21 2001 MONTERAY 220 Sporl NOW ONLY $12,900!
Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A -m ,a
Licensed Yacht Broker R
Located at BEAUTIFUL % .A RI A ,.'


23 2006 SHEARWATER 2200z $34,900
Ultimate Fishing Boat! Richard Horste 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only AO B
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL IM A IN A I.i


21'2013 HURRICANE SUNDECK Fun in [he Sun!
Full Warranty $28,900 Call Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only ,I A M
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL rI ,MA RI N A N .


A lot of people ask me if I'm afraid of
sharks after they find out I dive. Well,
people are afraid of things they don't
understand. Once we start to understand
them, the fear begins to disappear.
Divers are no braver than non-divers.
When I first learned to dive, I was afraid
of sharks.
I remember very clearly the instant I
lost that fear. It was the summer of 1984
and I had made about 10 to 15 dives.
Except for visits to aquariums, I'd never
seen a shark. A group of 25 of us were
diving in the Bahamas from the 60-foot
long live-aboard dive charter, Impossible
Dream. On this particular afternoon,
none of us were diving because we were
all maxed out on the tables that
means we had to stay on the surface
for several hours until we off-gassed
the nitrogen that had absorbed into our
bodies during our earlier dives.
Most of the people were swimming
on the surface or resting on floats in
the water by the stern. This was my first
trip to the Bahamas, and rather than
playing in the water, I was standing on
the bow enjoying the scenery. Looking
ahead, I saw something large and dark
moving through the water out in front of
the boat. I wasn't concerned, because in
addition to the SCUBA diving we'd been
doing, we also had been snorkeling with
dolphins. We'd seen lots of dolphin, but
no one had seen a shark.
As it got closer, I was able to see it
better. It wasn't coming up to breathe. It
was swimming with a side to side, not an
up and down, motion. This was a shark
headed right toward us. It wasn't just a
shark, it was a really, really big shark.
There were about 20 people splashing
in the water about 60 feet away from
me. Sharks are attracted to splashing.
At this point, I was scared. I could just
imagine what this shark was about to
do to my dive buddies. Being one of the
least experienced divers on the trip, and
keeping in mind the other divers had told
me they didn't fear sharks, I was hesitant
to shout,"Shark!" On the other hand, I
didn't want a shark attack to happen.
Unsure of what I should do, I watched


the shark continue its approach. Slowly
swimming within a couple of feet of the
boat's starboard side, the shark came to
a point right under me. This shark was at
least 10 feet long My heart came up into
my throat. I was just about to give that
blood curdling yell of"SHARK!!!" when a
shudder passed through the shark as it
came to a sudden stop. It could now see
what was just ahead. It made an imme-
diate about face and left at top speed.
It slowly dawned on me this shark was
afraid of people. It was at that moment I
lost my fear of sharks. Why should I fear
something that's afraid of people?
In the years since, I've encountered
hundreds of sharks while diving. Some
of those encounters have been up-close
and personal. I've stuck my head under a
ledge to come nose to nose with a 6-foot
nurse shark. Once, while free diving
(no tanks), a shark latched onto a large
speared hogfish. I pulled the gun to the
surface and started pulling in line. The
shark soon left the fish to me.
Most sharks I've seen diving have run
away as soon as they saw me. Several
have totally ignored me. Very few have
come in for a closer look. They usually
come in close only if I'm hovering
motionless in the water.
My experience has shown me that
sharks encounter three types of objects:
They encounter things that can't hurt
them, but are not food. They ignore these
objects. They encounter things they want
to eat. They go after these objects. They
encounter things they think might eat
them. They run away from these objects.
Our goal, as divers, is to avoid looking
like the second type of object. We don't
want to look like prey. To avoid looking
like prey, we need to know what sharks
look for when they are looking for prey.
They look for animals that are weak and
easy to kill. Weak animals are often on
the surface. When diving, stay off the
surface. Get in the water, get together
with your buddy and descend together to
your dive depth right away. When diving
from an anchored or moored boat, come
up very close to the boat and exit the
water right away.


Lrl TImo II A-

1-1/2 pounds trout fillets A clip-n-save seafood
2 ounces almonds, peeled and grated recipe provided by


3 tbsp brown sugar
2 tbsp butter, melted
2 tbsp lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste


- Recipe from www.
all-fish-seafood-redipes.com


Mix almonds, sugar, lemon juice and butter. Put the trout fillets in an oven tray. Sprinkle salt and
pepper on top and grill for 5 minutes. Turn the fillets around and divide the nut-sugar mixture on
top of them. Grill 3 minutes more. Serves 4 to 6.


z n zu ni nt nyvvt n n z n i u r n ,io
Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I A B
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL [,MA I NAI


21' STRIPER 2007, CC with tandem
alum trailer. Yamaha 200HP warr
until 1/8/15. Exc. cond. $28,000
609-519-1177


22 2005 SHAMROCK 220 PREDATOR W
$39,900 Call Meagan McCall 941-26
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I A
Licensed Yacht Broker Cu mH
Located at BEAUTIFUL i % M A a


'mi Pr.:.il.n.r W 1A1: I HP VYm.h: Ht.buII lA LOW Hr"
Just Serviced! Alum. Tandem Axle Trailer. Must See! $7,995.
cvstal Cay Center.
WW -941-630-6603
-- WVWW.CRYSTALCAYCOMVi
Azzs Taylor Road, PG E,


23' 1993 SEA RAY SUNDANCER '.',i,.i 1 .h, ,:r ,.:,l:i
$12,900 Call Meagan McCall for Details! 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only h m
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located in BEAUTIFUL I.N, t.. & .Il


23 2005 TROPHY 2352wa S27,500
Richard Horste 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I G
Licensed Yacht Broker ______
Located at BEAUTIFUL l'M.AR INA-I


Z.O IAY LINII- I Ii'uriYL VVLI-IMUUIN,
2000.150HP Fuel Injected Yamaha
(2004 w/low hrs). Lift stored.
Excellent condition $16,900, OBO
Call 941-488-0073 or 941-412-1735







24'2000 Crownline, In Excellent Condtion! 5.7 Mercrusier
EFI Only $16,990. Garmin GPS Sounder, Sleeps 4
Comfortably. Was Dry rack Stored and she shows!
Very Low Hrs Always maintained. Great Price!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com







24'2000 Sea Ray SUNDECK with 5.7 Bravo 3 Dual Prop.
Only $15990. Plenty of seating. Porta Potty Room. Garmin
GPS, Stainless BiminiTop. New oil pan, oil exchanger &
shift cable just replaced.Turn key!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


24' 2002 SHAMROCK Cuddy cabin
all maintenance records
$29,000, OBO 661-964-9282


r


7i I.


Clean with rasied console.T-Top Rocket launcehers, w/ Float in 8"
of water & can run way offshore. Best of both worlds. Rare Find!
Two live wells, fish boxes, hydrolic steering & more!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com







24 2005 SHAMROCK V ". ri .:.'
hours. Call Richard Rosano 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only 1M& I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL Lf. 4,I n A R ,..I


24"2008 Bay Scoul 240 "' -;i.- j :I-Ij ji.:.. ..... .-i
boat!! Call Megan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I A ,
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [.i MARINA.





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MUlU~aSEEEniUmaHtIEUE~i5.SmOEEil


Call 941-429k3irgeit- --
to list your boat today! __












24 Ptivaleei Renegade 1987, *ilh Iiailei, 260hp molol, 26' 2002 FourWinns 268Vista: Super clean inside
Stereo, Furuno Radar, GPS, plotter, much more! $12,000. and out, just waxed, 5.7 Volvo w/289 hrs,
t l Cay cente generator w/86 hrs, full camper enclosure.
9 4"1-839-66 tal03 Recent survey rated above average. Asking $34,000.
WWw.CRYSTALCAY.coMv Call Ray Mason cTie,. Q O
4225 Taylor Road, PG RS 941-505-7269. lIRnfTalf


Prey animals run away from predators.
Prey animals can often swim faster than
predators, either over a long distance to
escape, or for a short distance to find shelter
to escape. Even wearing fins, we swim very,
very slowly. Speed is not a diver's friend. You
can't outrun a shark. Don't try. All you'll do
by trying to get away is signal that you are
food. That's a signal I try very hard to avoid
sending.
How can you tell if a shark has classified
you as food? Sharks are beautiful, graceful
animals. They swim slowly with a smooth
flowing rhythm. If they are moving quickly,
you should be alert that the shark is in
hunting mode. Another danger signal is
when a shark swims with jerky movements.
If the shark arches its back or works its jaw,
it's ready to attack something, hopefully
it's that fish nearby. If you see anything
like this, grab your buddy, and watch each
other's back so one of you can see that shark
at all times. If you are close enough to the
boat, get out of the water. If you aren't close
enough to the boat to exit immediately, and
a shark gets the idea you are prey and comes
after you, you have to send another signal.
The most effective signal you can send is
that the shark is your prey. A shark's prey
never charges right at it. If something is
charging a shark, the shark thinks it is about
to get eaten and will swim away. The shark
may not go far and may return, so don't
assume you are safe after you've charged.


Yelling or growling through your regulator
also seems to help. Sometimes divers have
had to charge sharks several times before
the shark leaves. Even if you believe the
shark has left the area, you need to exit the
water.
I believe sharks avoid people. They don't
understand us, but we don't appear to be
food. Anything they don't understand they
fear. They are a great deal like us in that
regard.
Sharks are very dangerous animals, but
with knowledge and a calm, strong appear-
ance a diver should not have to fear them.
Shark attacks on people are extremely rare.
Of those few attacks, most don't involve
divers. Most people who are attacked by
sharks are in 3 feet of water or less.
Learn about sharks. Respect sharks. Don't
fear them, and certainly don't let them stop
you from participating in such a life-en-
riching activity as diving.
Walter Wilt began diving in 1983. He is
a retired Instructor Trainer with two dive
training agencies, YMCA SCUBA and SEI. He
is also a retired boat captain having oper-
ated dive boats in the upper Keys from the
mid 1980s through the early 1990s. An avid
diver with thousands of logged dives, Walter
enjoys diving vintage equipment. His hobby
is making artwork (primarily bells and
umbrella stands) from condemned SCUBA
tanks. You can see his art on his facebook
page.


25' 1986 REGAL YAMAHA OUTBOARD $5,900 26' Pursuit Denali 2670: Excellenl condilion,T-200 Yamaha
Call Orion Wholean at 941-249-0177 four strokes w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure, windlass,
McCa/lMarineSales.com elec. head, Garmin OPS and fishfinder. Asking $68,500.
By appointment only i ___ er
Licensed Yacht Broker Call Cpt. Bob Babineau," Tier Of)
Located at BEAUTIFUL I .,ARINA-J. 941-626-1329 Yw M 5fq


...... .... SO D "




25 2001 PRO SPORTS CENTER CONSOLE 2003 26 SEA RAY SUNDECK $45,900
SUZUKI TWIN 140 H.P. 4-STROKES. Serious fishing Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
machine Deluxe T-Top outriggers, downriggers, McCallMarineSales.com
color GPS, fish finder, Radar. Just serviced turn key By Appt ONLY! m AL k X
boat. See Full details and virtual water test video @ Licensed Yacht Broker
WWW.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835 Located at BEAUTIFUL [f.,IARjNjA.IIL


r -


rb

251 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter GPS with Sonar. Hard
Top, A/C! Comes w/Aluminum trailer.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


Call Richard Rosano at 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only a
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL F'-hNAR IN.AJ


2 6 19 8 9 B O C A G R A N D E V ,. r 1 ,ri' ,. ,i -, ,: ,," ,
Call Richard Rosano for Details! 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.corn
By Appt. ONLY I M
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL G A N I RI -


--~~ I. : I N.
It" __ ,




26' 1996 CHRISCRAFT CROWN
With new engine and trailer $15,000
Call Mike at 941-412-6430 or
the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


Like new condition, twinYamaha 4 strokes, generator,
AC, radar, hardtop, all the amenities.
This boat has it all. Asking $65,000.
Call Ray Mason Tier O t'
941-505-7269 Y__ Ur \'ii'i







27 2006 LARSON CABRIO 274 1or $39,900
Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt. ONLY ACIIfI~l I A
Licensed Yacht Broker A
Located at BEAUTIFUL [t-,RI NA-


27' ODAY 1986 INBOARD DIESEL
Installed air conditioning, $12,995
Call Mike 941-412-6430
Or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
i"


26 2001 Sea Ray 260 Sundancer i''n,.:uii.- .:.:.-.3,i.:.' 28' 1991 Sea Ray Weekender: Two rebuilt
$29,900 Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070 Mercs with low hours, large cockpit for
McCalll~arineSalesxcom ;i! ;*;
By appointMcCallMarineSales.co fishing, new interior
Licensed Yacht Broker upholstery. Ask $23,900. r f
Located at BEAUTIFUL 'M ,ARI NA.. Ray Mason, 941-505-7269. 'J"c Si"fl





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Wkl qt 1LIh3I If lihUMUUSUEUEE5.t9WUEU IIIII IlO ll I


28' 2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin,
310 dual prop AC, GPS, bridge enclosure,
electric head, full galley, 45 mph, only 125 hrs.
lift kept. Excellent condition.
$O8,500. $22,500 941-639-7890.
r a=Z -.= wl


beautiful! $109,900 Call Meagan McCall at
McCallMarinesales.com
By appointment only ^ L
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL a


*1B -. -


28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000, T/250HP,Yamaha's, 30 Check
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar 2 MerCruiser
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig- C-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000, "
941-966-5400


REDUCED' A

~UIi

28' CruiserYacht 1998,5.7Twin Merc engines, 30 CRUl,
Full canvas covers, Many extras. $6,000. $23,900. Full cabin,
C0Vst.al Cay Cfenr.
S 941-639-6603
-V WWW CRVSTAtLCAY.COMNW
TS -raylor Road, PG 4S


male 300SX, 1986, wilh ri-axle trailer
600HP motors, bimini, & more. $34,500
jst.al Cay Cent0arv
941-639-0603
-VwIV.CwkCYS IALCAYCOft.#I
4225 Taylor Road, PG


ISER IND 1988,Twin 350s, 10 beam.
bimini top & more. 648.,9. $16,900.
.Istal Cay Center
S41-639-6603
'WW.CRYSTALCAY.COIV
422S Taylor Road, P43


I want to address one of the biggest
questions we have been getting here at the
store: "Why is there no ammo available?" Well,
in order to understand the answer to that
question, we need to look at the last eight to
10 years.
Ammunition companies over-produced for
many years, with exception to high-dollar
ammo such as custom rifle and handgun loads.
Many of those would be considered an odd
caliber. Here's a good example: Ten years ago,
.380 ACP was in that basket. A couple years
later, firearms companies started making small
lightweight "pocket" guns. The guns were
cheap and easy to conceal and became very
popular, thus causing a huge spike in demand
in .380 ammo. It took the ammunition manu-
facturers 12 or 18 months to get production up
to an acceptable amount to feed the need for
.380. Currently, .380 ammo is still in extremely
high demand, and if it is not on a shelf at a
retailer it is most likely not available. Expect to
pay manufacturer's suggested retail for .380.
Now let us rewind to 2001 Sept. 11,
2001, to be exact. We all remember what we
were doing on that day and what happened.
Well, shortly after, our military went into
Afghanistan and Iraq. As operations continued for
years, the U.S. government needed more ammo.
Ammunition companies continued to produce
military ammo in huge quantities and at record
low costs to the military, while still making huge
profits. During that time is when most ammuni-
tion buyers took notice of price increases. In early
2004, my gun club was selling 1,000 rounds of
quality 5.56/.223 rifle ammo for $199. Now that
same ammo is about $500 or $600, on a good day.
So why the huge increase in price? Simple: Supply
and demand. Take a look on the trade commod-
ities lead and copper prices are up. When the
last bullet-producing lead smelter in the country
closed its doors on Dec. 31, it opened the door to
"green" bullets driving up the cost of bullets so
much that most people will not be able to afford
to shoot.
My contact at Federal Ammunition tells
me that rimfire ammo, such as .22 LR and .22
Magnum, will continue to be low supply over
the next three to five years due to previous
orders taken and low supply of components
such as brass, lead, copper and most impor-
tantly gunpowder. We have noticed over
the past 12 to 18 months a 23 to 37 percent


increase in dealer prices, in some cases even
higher. Reloading supplies will be between
slim and none, with slim most likely being out
of town.
There are many people who believe that
government conspiracy through people
hoarding ammunition is the reason why
ammunition supplies have dried up. Ammo
companies are at maximum production, and
in many cases have added more employees
and around-the-clock production sched-
ules (provided they have the components
needed to make ammunition). The simple
fact is people have always bought in bulk for
discounts, just as the government entities do.
In the future, bulk purchasing will not get
the average person much of a discount, if any
at all. There are some online and mail-order
companies who have taken advantage of the
shortages, especially in regards to ammo,
and are charging outrageous prices plus huge
shipping costs.
Another aspect of this issue that is seems
everyone is forgetting: We have more people
than ever who own guns. The largest market
is by far hands down women! The facts
and numbers do not lie. It has been reported
that in recent years women account for
(depending on which poll you read) between
51 and 73 percent of new shooters. Either way,
those are massive increases. Women are just
as active in shooting sports such as IDPA and
USPSA, as well as 3-Gun Challenge, hunting
and self-defense carry. This is no longer a
male-dominated industry for sure!
Regardless of the reasons, ammo is tough
to get and it will take quite a while to get back
on track. Ammunition manufacturers can only
make so much with the limited availability
of components. After they make it, they have
contracts to fulfill in the United States and then
around the world. The big box stores are going
to see a little more than your locally owned gun
store. Then the rest of the public will get their
hands on what is left as it trickles out a bit at a
time. If a retail store has it on the shelf and you
need it, my suggestion is to buy it.
Ryan Ingle has owned and operated Higher
Power Outfitters in Punta Gorda since 2011. His
lifelong passion for firearms has led to many
connections in the gun world and in the local
community. Contact him at 941-347-8445 or
sales@higher-power-outfitters.com.


28' Luhrs Open, twin Yanmar Diesel, 2006,
$119K Contact Daryl at 941-685-2399
or the office at 941-833-0099
Offered by
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


O MPIVIiUb oporui riiiermanidii, 19O
(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler I/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, encl. head.
$26,000 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales


29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10,
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator.
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600.


29 Larson Cruiser, 2007 EFI 4.3 s Only $29,900.00
New seals in the outdrives. Radar Depth finder GPS
Marine Stereo, Bimini Tops, SS Prop. Full stand up
head w/ shower. Aft cabin with plenty of room. LOADED!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com

IftZk.^ki~ll'^I^ II^^


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A lM ,
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [. N ., ARIIN ..-]







31' 2005 Chaparral 310 Signature: Loaded w/options,
T-Mercs w/300 hrs, Bravo III outdrives, well main-
tained, lift kept. Owner open to a trade for 24'-26'
walkaround. Asking $98,000.
Ray Mason,941-505-7269 c i,- Z.2e
Pier One Yacht Sales ^ lt-Ox








31' CAMANO FLY BRIDGE TRAWLER 1997
GREAT condition, lift kept, single diesel and
much more! $100K Call Daryl 941-685-2399
Or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
$69,000. 5Tier One
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 ar A


3u 199 ivionmerey 2o ,Cruiser $33,uu 0L zivoou rF t Ln i-I^tpieoo. r-vtL v UL.ii-a,
Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198 clean inside & out, 5212 Garmin chartplotter, lift
McCallMarineSales.com kept & serviced on a regular basis. Trade an
By appointment only = 0n1Aii option. Ask $75,000. T
Licensed Yacht Broker Ray Mason, lYr O,.
Located at BEAUTIFUL [M .- IAHI NA-I 1N 941-505-7269 yiql5Al%





* ~i*uK.,.UFieUi.e.u
~SaSEhE~EuUU5aEE~DIEUEI~.SuSuEEI


Call 941-429, iG- e
to list your boat today! -. -







-M-.7-
32' 2006 Century for $109,999

Call Orion for details at 941-249-0177 34' Sea Ray 340 Sportsman 2006
McCallMarineSales.com This is the upscale package with lots of
By appointment only M standard gear and over 700hp total $116,900
LicensedYacht Broker ContactTommy Head at 941-769-2594 Punta Gorda
Located at BEAUTIFUL t*.MNARIN.J.J Yacht Brokers & Redfish Yachts 941-639-9400

... ... ... .. .


32 2008 Cenlury Offshore T, iii --i... ,,,,,,iI. 35 1999 CARVER MARINER SPORT CRUISER
$129,900 Call Orion Wholean 941-249-0177 Listed for $59,900. Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only J i By appointment only j lk,' I
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL IT-, A RI N.NAl^J Located at BEAUTIFUL M A IN

o j


The Kansas City Star


Your dinner has arrived, a nice piece offish,
delicately cooked, served perhaps over a bed of
rice or, wow, maybe quinoa.
Was it wild salmon you ordered? Would you
be surprised and disappointed to learn that
you got coho instead?
As the nonprofit organization Oceana has
put it: "Recent studies have found that seafood
may be mislabeled as often as 25 percent to
70 percent of the time for fish like red snapper,
wild salmon, and Atlantic cod, disguising
species that are less desirable, cheaper or more
readily available.":'
Seafood fraud has been documented in
recent years by newspapers, Consumer Reports
and others.
And now two senators want the Obama
administration to do something about it.
Sen. Edward Markey, a Democrat from
Massachusetts, and Roger Wicker, a Mississippi
Republican, wrote last week to President
Barack Obama urging action on seafood fraud.
"This fraud is ripping off consumers/they
wrote,"posing health risks by disguising
species that may be harmful for sensitive
groups, and harming our oceans by making it
easier for illegally caught product to make its
way into the U.S. market.":'


A big part of the problem, according to
a 2009 report by the Government Account-
ability Office, involves a lack of coordination
and communication by three agencies most
responsible for seafood inspections: the Food
and Drug Administration, the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration and Customs
and Border Protection. (It may only add to the
confusion and inefficiencies to note that the
Department of Agriculture has jurisdiction over
catfish.)
Upward of 90 percent of all seafood
consumed domestically is imported, the
senators noted, but the FDA inspects less than
2 percent of those products.
In 2011 Oceana conducted a study of
seafood in the Los Angeles market fish sold
at grocery stores and restaurants, including
sushi purveyors and reported that 55 of
all samples it collected were mislabeled, and
every fish sold with the word "snapper" in the
label, 34 out of 34, was misidentified and out
of whack with FDA guidelines.
Markey and Wicker say they will work
toward solutions in Congress, but expressed
hope that Obama's agencies would do a better
job of working together on the fraud. They
should get on it.
Fish consumers deserve accurate descrip-
tions of what's on their plates.


rIN 1:1. & I 1j 'ILM
SARASOTA POWER SQUADRON 941-400-6467
Basic Coastal Navigation Sem inar .............................................................................................
ABC Boating Course (2 days) ............................................................................................... 9 a

VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-408-8591
Call for information


..7 to 9 p.m. Feb. 6
.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 8


PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-637-0766
Charting Local W aters Sem inar ........................................................................................... 9 a.m to noon Feb. 22
G PS Sem inar ....................................................................................................................... 1 to 3:30 p.m Feb. 22

CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
Call for information

Provided by Greg Scotten




PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb. 1 .................................... Punta Gorda ................941-639-3811
Navagating with GPS .................................... Feb. 1 .................................... Rotonda West..............941-934-0321
Boating Skills and Seamanship..................... Feb. 3.................................... Venice .........................941-492-5904
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb. 3....................Feb. ................Cape Coral ...................239-283-2208
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb. 11.................................. Punta Gorda ................941-639-3811
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb. 12..................Feb.12 ................North Port...................941-223-9064
About Boating Safely.................................... Feb. 15..................Feb.15 ................Fort Myersl..................239-322-7089

Provided by Dave Nielsen
-)


32' CATALINA 2003, 30 hp Yamnar,
AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
asking $77,000. 941-505-2787
email irvina32@centurylink.net


5 CRUISERS 3570 ESPRIT 1995
$46,900 Genset and much more!
Call Tommy 941-769-2594
Or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


REDUCED


EEEEEEE===......=.Ei.= ..- 1 .. l ............,,,,,,,.,.........m
"=.... : .... .V .

34' 2000 LEGACY 34 EXPRESS i ". .
Call Richard Horst 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY! A i I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL G M _MARINA ]%

I REDUCED! -


uall UICK Horst hor uetais 941-b48-b
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only M
Licensed Yacht Broker ___
Located at BEAUTIFUL [I..MA RI N


34' 2006 SEARAY 340 SUNDANCER 5129,900
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only g
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [M4IARINA.


36' 1998 CARVER Mariner 350,
Twin Merc Cruisers, All Electronics,
Shows Like New!
$69,900. 941-255-5311
.. .l.





36' 2000 Carver Mariner Diesels: (PRICED BELOW GAS
ENGINE MODELS)Twin Cummins diesels, Westerbeke
diesel gen set, radar, autopilot, much more. Just detailed
and serviced. Asking $79,900. Call Tier Owf
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 flCMlAo


JUST REDUCED!


uaKK UIcK Horst hor Uetails 941-b48-b6u/u
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only a -- -- M
Licensed Yacht Broker M E
Located at BEAUTIFUL L'MA RINA-1 11 I


39' MAINSHIP TRAWLER 1998
34' Catalina mkl, 1989, diesel, new canvas, whin s eAC$94
$39.9K Call Jim at 941-740-0389 or the with single diesel, AC. $94,500
K ffica at 941-833-039o Call Jim at 941-740-0389 Or at the office
Punoffice at 941-833-0099cBroers 941-833-0099 Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
Puand Redfish YachtBrokers & Redfish Yachts
and Redfish Yachts ________________


34' CruiserYacht Express, $99,900 40" EAGLETRAWLER 1972 -
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989 Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
McCallMarineSales.com Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull.
By appointment only I Full NewTanks. Asking $75,000
Licensed Yacht Broker1-40-9572
Located at BEAUTIFUL 1 )zRI L .Call]941-408-9572





ElLeha~iO,.eunII diekUln.. nmar



BULLETIN BOARD
FROM PAGE 9

(California, New York, Michigan, Ohio, Florida, etc.), Canada
and the Caribbean are expected to participate. Charlotte Harbor
Regatta Inc. is the regatta's organizing authority. It is a 501(c)(3)
not-for-profit organization whose mission is to promote sailing
on Charlotte Harbor. Racing will take place Feb. 7th, Feb. 8th
and Feb. 9th. Racing begins at 11a.m. on Feb. 7th and 10a.m.
on Feb. 8th and 9th. Racing will end around 2 to 3 p.m. all days.
Race results will be available each day around 5 p.m. Regatta re-
sults are available on the CHR website at CharlotteHarborRegatta.
com. Call 941-661-6415 for more information.

FULL MOON TRAM TOURS
AT FAKAHATCHEE STATE PARK
Ride the new"Ghost Rider'tram, named in honor of the famous
Ghost Orchid found in the park. The Fakahatchee is home to
more orchid speciesthan any other place on the North American
continent. Onlythree Full Moon tours will be offered this season.
All tours start as the sun is setting. A naturalist will lead each tour.
The Full Moon tours leave from the ranger station (137 Coastline
Drive, Copeland, off Janes Scenic Drive). Please arrive early as the
tram leaves promptly according to the following schedule: Feb.
14th, depart at 5 p.m., return 7:15 p.m.; March 15th, depart at
6 p.m., return 8:15 p.m. Reservations forthe Full Moon tours are
$25 per person and can be made by visiting OrchidSwamp.org.

MIAMI BOAT SHOW TRIP FROM CAPE CORAL
Sit back, relax and enjoy a trip to the Miami Boat Show that


,lUldl~t ime r IdID0 llmunnel Ll el dll lU lneUl
Charlotte County Natural Resource Department will
be conducting the following free guided walks and
programs in December. Unless noted, all walks begin at
9 a.m. For directions or further information, call Cedar
Point Environmental Park at 941-475-0769.
FEB. 2ND: Join Merrill & Bob Horswill on a guided
walk through the scrub and pine flatwoods of 217-acre
Amberjack Environmental Park in Cape Haze. Meet in
the parking lot at the end of Gasparilla Pines Blvd.
FEB. 5TH: Learn about Rain Gardens & Rain Barrels
from Thomas Becker, UF/IFAS Extension Agent. The
lecture will be conducted at Cedar Point Environmental
Park from 10 to 11:30 a.m. with a short tour of the
butterfly garden afterward. Orders for the purchase of
rain barrels will be offered. Reservations advised.
FEB. 6TH: Get wild & wet! Join Bobbi Rodgers at Cedar
Point Park on a Seagrass Adventure Wading Trip into
Lemon Bay in search of marine organisms such as sea
horse, crabs and juvenile fish. Registration required.
FEB. 7TH: Join Gloria Hansen on a guided walk
through Tippecanoe II Mitigation Preserve in Port
Charlotte. This 150 acre preserve is home to several
families of the threatened Florida scrub jay. Meet in the
parking lot.
FEB. 9TH: Join Pat Peterson on a guided walk through
308-acre Tippecanoe Environmental Park This Charlotte
County park includes habitats such as scrub, pine
flatwoods, marsh and wetlands. Meet behind the
Charlotte County Sports Park.
FEB. 10TH: Join Bruce Dayton on a guided walk
through Cedar Point Environmental Park in Englewood.
Situated on Lemon Bay, this 115-acre park is home to
nesting bald eagles as well as other flora and fauna.
Meet at the Visitor Center.


departs on Feb. 15th at 7 a.m. from the Cape Coral Yacht Club
Community Park (5819 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape Coral) and
returns at 9 p.m. The trip includes transportation, entry fee,
parking, tolls, snacks and soft drinks. Call 239-574-0806 or visit
CapeParks.com for more information.

LEARN ALL ABOUT MANGROVES
The University of Florida/IFAS Extension, Charlotte County and
Florida Sea Grant are pleased to announce their upcoming program,
a 2014 Mangrove Symposium, which will be held on Feb. 20th from
8 a.m.to 3:30 p.m. at the Charlotte County Eastport Environmental
Campus (25550 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte).This program is
intended for landscape professionals, master gardeners, homeowner
associations, and residents living on the water who wish to enhance
or incorporate mangroves in their landscape. Symposium speakers
will discussthe role and value of mangroves: Rules and laws that
govern mangrovetrimming and mangrove pruning and growing
techniques. The cost to attend is $25 which includes lunch. Register at
http://bit.ly/lhwFcb3. Space is limited so pre-registration is required.
For more information, please contact Betty Staugler at 941-764-4346
or Tom Becker at 941-764-4351.4.25 ISA and 4 FNGLA CEUs are
being offered for professional mangrove trimmers who attend the
symposium.

ANNUAL HARBOUR HEIGHTS RUN/WALK
The eight annual Harbour Heights 5K run/walk is a community event
on Feb. 22nd that benefits Autism Speaks and exceptional students
at four Charlotte County elementary schools. Through this race we
hope to raise awareness about autism and help the classrooms for
developmentally disabled children. We appreciate your support! The
race starts at 8 a.m. at Harbour Heights Park (27420 Voyageur Dr.,
Punta Gorda). Call 941-258-2891 for more information.


r. .i L i, i n ui ia* mllIVIdlIdieLUUIN, ~lUI]dI Ull M CYU i dll l LUll
on a birding walk through Amberjack Environmental
Park in Englewood. Meet at the entrance at 8 a.m.
FEB. 12TH: Get wild & wet! Join Bobbi Rodgers at
Cedar Point Park on a Seagrass Adventure Wading Trip
into Lemon Bay in search of marine organisms such as
sea horse, crabs and juvenile fish. Registration required.
FEB. 13TH: Bring the Pre-school Wee Ones to Cedar
Point Environmental Park for a one-hour Moms &
Tots Nature Adventure. The theme will be "Love the
Outdoors.'AII children must be accompanied by an
adult. Program begins at 10 a.m. Reservations are
required.
FEB. 14TH: Join Bobbi Rodgers on a full moon guided
walk through the scrub and pine flatwoods of 217-acre
Amberjack Environmental Park in Cape Haze. Meet in
the parking lot at the end ofGasparilla Pines Blvd. Walk
begins at 6:30 p.m. Reservations required.
FEB. 16TH: Join Jim Knoy on a guided walk through
Tippecanoe II Mitigation Preserve in Port Charlotte. This
150 acre preserve is home to several families of the
threatened Florida scrub jay. Meet in the parking lot.
FEB. 17TH: Get wild & wet! Join Bobbi Rodgers at
Cedar Point Park on a Seagrass Adventure Wading Trip
into Lemon Bay in search of marine organisms such as
sea horse, crabs and juvenile fish. Registration required.
FEB. 22ND: Plant Native Day salutes Florida Native
Wildflowers at this annual event with exhibits, lectures,
plant sales, guided walks and tours of the Cedar Point
Park Butterfly Garden. 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call or see
website for program agenda.
FEB. 23RD: Join Stu Lewis on a birding walk along
Ollie's Pond Park in Port Charlotte. This 41-acre park may
be small and hard to find (address is 18235 Avon Ave),
but it's a hotspot for birding! Walk begins at 8 a.m.


Whatisasolunar THURSDAY FRIDAY
table?The sun Sunrise: 7:16 a.m. Sunrise: 7:16 a
and moon, even Sunset: 6:09 p.m. Sunset: 6:10 p
when they are out Moonrise: 6:44 a.m. Moonrise:
of sight, exertforces Moonset: 6:14 p.m. Moonset: x
wild creatures can Moon Phase Moon Phas
feel.These forces 0 New moon Waxing cre
affect when fish 0% N j or I% .n are
and other animals Major Times Major Time
feed.Weatherand --.:- 12:57 a.m.-2:57
tide also play a role, 12:28 p.m.-2:28 p.m. 1:26 p.m.- 3:26
but expect fish to be Minor Times Minor Time
more active during 6:44 a.m. 7:44 a.m. 7:34 a.m. 8:34
the majorand minor 6:14p.m. -7-14 pm 7:22pm --22


':l.lllJII J Ii l i1111^ .

SUNDAY
<,unr i;e 7 1. a m
.urien i: 12 p mni
M,:nr:,nn e ': 0" a ni
Moonset: 9:30 p.m.
Moon Phase
11%Waxing crescent
Major Times
2:48 a.m. 4:48 a.m.
3:15 p.m.- 5:15 p.m.
Minor Times
9:02 a.m.- 10:02 a.m.
9:30 p.m.- 10:30 p.m.
Prediction: Average


rreaicton: Best

MONDAY
uriri ;,e 7 143 m
,urn;,el : 12 p mni
M,:iri, e '' j 44 a m
Moonset: 10:31 p.m.
Moon Phase
19% Waxing crescent
Major Times
3:36 a.m. 5:36 a.m.
4:06 p.m.- 6:06 p.m.
MinorTimes
9:44 a.m.- 10:44 a.m.
10:31 p.m.-11:31 p.m.
Prediction: Average


i.m.
i.m.
x

e
scent
es
a.m.
p.m.
is
a.m.
pm


rreaicton: ueter

TUESDAY
uriri ;,e 7 13 f m
,urel;e 1. p nim
M inr e 11 ,:',a mni
Moonset: -:-
Moon Phase
29% Waxing crescent
Major Times
4:31 a.m.- 6:31 a.m.
4:56 p.m. -6:56 p.m.
Minor Times
10:24a.m.- 11:24a.m.
11:30 p.m.- 12:30 a.m.
Prediction: Average


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 7:15 a.m.
Sunset: 6:11 p.m.
Moonrise: 8:19 a.m.
Moonset: 8:27 p.m.
Moon Phase
5% Waxing crescent
Major Times
1:54 a.m. 3:54 a.m.
2:21 p.m.- 4:21 p.m.
Minor Times
8:19 a.m.- 9:19 a.m.
8:27 p.m q-17 pm
Prediction: Better

WEDNESDAY
,uririe 7 13 f m
un,,el i:. 14 p m
M : i:, e 11 ':,a m
Moonset: -:-
Moon Phase
39% Waxing crescent
Major Times
5:21 a.m.- 7:21 a.m.
5:46 p.m.- 7:46 p.m.
MinorTimes

11:06 a.m.- 12:06 p.m.
Prediction: Average


do j ~


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//,ift4 /,i* Page 31 January 30, 2014









. .


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Some of you may know him as Sasquatch.
Some of you may know him as The Tallest
Working Fishing Guide on Charlotte Harbor.
Some of you may not know him at all. But as of
Monday, Capt. Josh Greer has another name to
go by: CCA Charlotte chapter president.
The Coastal Conservation Association has not
been very active in this area for a while. In fact,
there hasn't even been an active slate of officers
since summer. But it looks like that's going to
change. Capt. Greer has told me that he expects
to enliven our local chapter and get our local
angling community excited about the orga-
nization again. He's also said that CCA Florida
will be committing to doing some projects here
that will benefit fishermen and fishing in the
Charlotte Harbor area. If that is indeed the case,
I don't think Capt. Greer will have any problems
with getting folks interested in being part of a
rejuvenated local CCA chapter.

As you may have noticed on pages 16
and 17, WaterLine has another tournament
coming up. This one is a ladies-only event, with
the men relegated to driving the boat and
baiting hooks. That's because the charity is our
Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity Women
Build project. Since no men are allowed to pick
up hammers, we figured it's fair that no men
are allowed to pick up rods. The entry fee is a
little higher than it was for our Trout Scramble,
but that event was focused on bringing in
food donations. Habitat for Humanity actually
needs money. If you can't fish it because of
your gender, or if it's just too rich for your
blood, we understand. You can still pitch in,
though, because we're planning to invite
everyone to the weigh-in and afterparty
at Burnt Store Marina. Unless the weather


Phci:, .r: 1.3e,.


decides to get ugly on us, the party is going to
be a guaranteed hoot.

If you have kids, here's an interesting item
from Save The Tarpon that might interest you:

"Save the Tarpon is presenting a free fishing
seminar for parents or grandparents to bring
their children or grandchildren and learn basic
angling skills from some of the areas most
respected fishing guides. The guides will work
both with the children, and their parents, to
provide adequate knowledge for a successful


family outing at one of the many public fishing
areas found in our region.
We also hope to encourage participation in
the localyouth fishing tournaments sponsored
by Lee County Parks & Rec, by providing the
skills and education necessary to form confident
young anglers. (For more information on the
Youth Fishing Tournament, please contact Joe
Wier at 941-964-2564 orjwier@leegov.com.)
The event is free and open to the public. No
prior fishing experience is necessary (it's actually
preferred).
Leading the seminar will be Capt. Frank Davis,


Capt. Van Hubbard, Capt. Tom McLaughlin, and
Capt. Rhett Morris. The captains will be available
to answer beginner fishing questions.
Topics covered during this fun and informative
two-hour session include how to pick out the
right gear and tackle, what kinds of bait to use,
what licenses you need, where you can go fishing,
what you should expect to catch, local laws and
regulations, proper fish handling, how to safely
revive and release a fish, and much more."

The seminar will be held this Saturday,
Feb. 1, at Boca Grande Community Park (they'll
move it indoors to the Boca Grande Commu-
nity Center if it rains). Every child will also
receive a fishing rod, reel and tackle box with
gear. There are only 20 spots available, so don't
delay. To sign up your child, go to http://bit.
ly/1 k4AON8 and fill out the form at the bottom
of the page.

Speaking of seminars, we held one with
Capt. Mike Myers a few weeks back at Gaspar-
illa Marina. Ever since, we and the marina have
been hearing a whole lot of people asking
when we're going to do that again. Well, we
finally have an answer for you: Saturday,
Feb. 8, is when we're going to do that again.
Capt. Mike will be talking about his secrets of
fishing docks for sheepshead and black drum,
but you know Mike: Just ask him a question
about pretty much anything fishing-related
and it's off to the races. We're moving the
seminar from the drafty boat storage building
to a climate-controlled area, so there's no
worries about the weather. The marina will
be providing refreshments, and Mike will be
giving out some nifty door prizes, so come on
out. The talk will start at 6 p.m.





t./^Ks.vam, Page 32 January 30,2014


*aam6~..u U .e.UFie~Imi.eeu ~~~hUi
aa~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


I 0iiii lii 1i


SEASONS? WE DON'T NEED
NO STEENKING SEASONS
w V, -Iwmmmw


-.* .t ,'*' ".*B K r ,
,,


Thanks to a National Marine Fisheries Service pilot
program, Gulf Coast have an opportunity to catch and
keep red snapper outside of the regular recreational
season. According to collaborative manager Capt.
Randy Boggs, "this program was designed by headboa
captains who wanted to find a better way to regulate
recreational for-hire fishing one thatwould ensure
strict adherence to catch limits, butwithout being
constrained by short fishing seasons."The Gulf Headbo
Collaborative is a group of 17 headboat captains from
Brownsville, Texas to Tampa, Fla., who are testing a ne
allocation-based management program thatwill allow
them the freedom and flexibility to fish for red snappe
and gag grouper when it is best for their businesses ar
customers. Granted an experimental fishing permit by
NMFS, this pilot program has two years to be successful
Through strict monitoring and reporting requirements,
the EFP will allow the headboats in the collaborative
to catch the same number of fish they would normally
catch during the short fishing seasons but to take angel
fishing any time during the calendar year. Participation
headboats will test new electronic data collection
methods and collaborate with academic researchers to
help answer important management questions about
new approach to managing recreational for-hire fishing
SCIENTISTS TEAM TO STUDY TARPON
(AP) Earlier this month, the University of New Orlear
hosted seven of the nation's leading tarpon researchers f
an invitational workshop, and the scientists agreed to fo
a consortium to pool their future research efforts. The re'


should be a better understanding of silver kings and,
ultimately, more of them in the Gulf of Mexico, according to
S UNO's Will Stein, who organized the workshop. "This is the
first consortium that has involved scientists from Florida,
Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas,";' he said. "We will
be conducting collaborative research."That's crucial because
tarpon stocks aren't what they once were. Recent research
has begun to paint in the gaps of the tarpon portrait, but
there's still much to learn about one of the most-fascinating
S and storied fish in the Gulf of Mexico. Stein is expecting the
newly formed consortium to find answers that will lead to
even more questions. "It's very exciting what's going on,"he
S said. "It's a great time to study tarpon."
AUSSIES KILLING SHARKS



it*


at



id '
the The Western Australian government killed its first shark
ul. last weekend as part of a controversial culling program
that has drawn an angry reaction from conservationists
and activists. A spokesman for the Western Australia
government confirmed that a commercial fisherman had
ers caught and shot a 10-foot tiger shark. The government's
g program of using hooked lines attached to floating drums
to cull sharks in its waters follows a spate of fatal shark
attacks in the waters off Australia's largest state. Seven
this people have been killed in shark attacks in WA over the
g. past three years, the government said. The scheme has
been denounced by conservationists who say the sea
predators should remain protected species, but federal
is environment minister Greg Hunt granted an exemption
for under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity
rm Conservation Act, allowing the state to hunt down sharks
sult including the protected great white shark.


BOAT SALES STILL HEADED UP
Interest in boating has picked up months before the
spring thaw. Dealerships and industry experts say
the steep decline in nationwide boat sales during the
recession has reversed, with business inching back to
more normal levels. New powerboat sales were up 10
percent in 2012, the industry's first sign of recovery,
followed by an estimated 5 percent jump for 2013. And
this year, powerboat sales are expected to be up another
5 percent to 7 percent, according to the National Marine
Manufacturers Association. "The housing market has
improved, consumer confidence has steadily increased
the last two years, and spending is on the rise. All of
those are factors that are helping to fuel stable growth
for the U.S. recreational boating industry,"said Thom
Dammrich, the group's president.
CALIF.: MARINE RESERVES WORKING
Two years after the creation of marine sanctuaries in
more than 350 square miles of Southern California coastal
waters, state wildlife officials and environmental groups
say the restrictions on fishing are largely being obeyed.
The reserves, known as Marine Protected Areas, bar or
limit fishing in 50 zones spanning 15 percent of state
waters from Santa Barbara County to the Mexican border.
They took effect in the state's busiest region in 2012, with
some favored fishing spots remaining open and others
placed almost entirely off-limits to promote marine life
conservation. Recreational fishermen who fought their
lost access have suffered a series of defeats in court. After
spending more than $1.3 million on legal challenges,
the United Anglers of Southern California say they are
running out of money and are close to giving up. "We're
still fighting, but we're probably going to end up losing,"
said John Riordan, the group's treasurer.
SNEEZE CALLS DEER IN
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) -The deer hunter figured
sneezing had blown his chance at a deer, but blowing
his nose brought a big buck running. Ron Manning of
Hinds County said he's hunted deer for 54 years and had
never seen anything like what happened earlier this
month though he did once see a deer that tried to eat
grape bubble gum and got gum all over itself, he told The
Clarion-Ledger. On Jan. 16, he said, he suffered a volley of
nine sneezes in 10 minutes. He tried to muffle the noise


Li


in his elbow, but figured he had no chance of seeing a
deer for an hour. So he went for the honk. The next thing
he knew, "a 17-inch, 8-point came roaring in,";'Manning
said. "He had his ears laid back, his eyes glazed over
and the hair standing up on his back. Obviously, I said
something to upset him because he came to fight. He
wasn't cautious. He came in running. He was wide open,
coming to me,"Manning said."l shot him at 25 yards."
Manning joked that instead of a grunt/wheeze call, this
deer was fooled by a cough/sneeze. "I wish I knew exactly
what I did so I could duplicate it," Manning said.
TALK OR FISH
Ol'John was a local fishing legend. When everyone else
came back to the dock empty-handed, Ol'John brought
in coolers full. In fact, John was so successful Officer Dan
started to wonder how he did it. Dan asked John, who
just smiled and said, "Come fishin'with me tomorrow."
Dawn came and out they went. John took a winding
course through narrow mangrove creeks, finally leading
to a saltwater pond of several acres."Oh, I get it" said
Dan as he scanned the shoreline. "This is your own private
honeyhole! With no competition, you've got the fish all
to your..." He turned just in time to see Ol'John light a
stick of dynamite and toss it as far as he could."John!"he
shouted. "This is how you catch all those fish?You can't
fish with dynamite it's illegal! I'm gonna run you in!"
John just smiled, lit another stick and placed it in Dan's
hand. "Look," he said, "are you gonna jabberjaw all day, or
are you gonna fish?"


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4 Bedroom 2 Bath Golf
Course Pool Home
newer roof, remodeled
kitchen. This is a steal
for under $70/sq.ft.
$129,900.00
$1000.00 Buyer rebate if
purchased through
Fla Golf Properties Inc
Please Call for
Appointment to view
941-698-4653

WENEBAY
DIES
RESORT COMMUNITY






RENTALS FROM $890.
$299. IST MTH RENT
950 RIDGEWOOD AVE
VENICE FL. 34285
941-485-5444
, "AGED QUALIFIED"


LAKEth UZY UPEN SUN 1-3
13167 SW PEMBROKE ClIN.
3/2/2 2053SF CUSTOM BUILT
POOL HOME. MANY EXTRAS. 9'
CEILINGS, SS APPL'S, ALL TILE
W/ CARPET IN BR'S & 4" WELL.
VERY NICE MUST SEE!
$248,900. 616-690-1875





OPEN FRIDAY 4PM-7PM
300 Klispie Dr. (Marion to
Klispie) Punta Gorda
Experience the Sensational
Sunset Views From This
Peace River "Old Florida-
Style" Home. Sip on a Glass
of Wine & Nibble on Cheese
& Crackers While You Savor
the Tranquility of the River
and the Magnificent Hues of
the Setting Sun $774,900.
Sharon Kerr 941-286-7315
Coldwell Banker Sunstar


I NP FORECLOSURE TOUR
FRI. 4-6 & SAT. 10-12
Call 800-261-0454 x3123
For A Pre-Recorded
Message With Details.
BHHS FL Realty
941-584-7400
Open Sat 12-3pm
15 Bunker Circle
Rotonda West

UL qI


OPEN HOUSE
a t1010


EI urfl nuuEo IVIun-odI
11-1 pm 3403 Vessels PC
2004 Bit, Gorgeous 3/2/2
pool. Rose Padua 941-624-3800
Century21 Sunbelt RealtyI


0p


in the
Classifieds!


-a- BUNS ..w


OPEN HOUSE
[^ 1010 ^







OPEN HOUSE
TODAY
11AM 2PM
400 Waterside St
$79,900
Located on Haverhill water-
way. Fenced Backyard.
(W. on Veterans Blvd, R on
-larbor Blvd, R on Peachland,
R on Waterway, House on R)


UPEN WEEKENDS NOON 4PM
19757 COBBLESTONE CIR.
STONEWALK OFF VENICE Av
3/2/2 WITH OFFICE ON PRIS-
TINE LAKE. 2150', STONE,
TILE, WOOD; AWESOME!
FSBO @ $414,900
941-497-2228
CILASSIFI^n
'W4D RKS!^


Listing Price $139,800 Sold


OPEN HOUSE
[^ 1010 J


01/30/14


ANY PRICE OR CONDITION!
CASH FOR YOUR HOUSE OR
MOBILE. 941-356-5308
Rotonda SUN. 12-3PM
288 Rotonda Circle


3 Bed 2 Bath Golf
Course home with
breathtaking views
and open floor plan
perfect for entertain-
ing. Great curb appeal
with majestic palms
$179,900.00
$1500 Buyer Rebate if pur-
chased through
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653




NEED CASH?


4665 Thisbe Stree
North Port, fl
3428(

Single Family Homr
3 bedrooms,2 bath,

for $135,000


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Thursday, January 30, 2014


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ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, January 30, 2014


HOMES FOR SALE

:Z^ 020 ^







10 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
"Gated Private PRAIRIE
CREEK EQUINE ESTATE"
2008 Exquisite Custom 6847
SF home (5034 SF underAir).
4 bedrooms, 2/2 BathsFabu-
lous Kitchen & Home has
Extra Ordinary Features
Throughout. 3 car attached
(1100 SF) garage + detached
(2068 SF) 5 Stall garage.
Exceptional "1448 SF CBS"
Deluxe Equine Barn, Box
Stalls, Air Conditioned Tack
& Feed Rooms. Vinyl
Fenced 10 acres, paddocks,
pasture, Pond. New Listing
Virtual Tour Available!
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304 j


RAMBLING RANCH
5/3.5/2+ Pool Home
6500 SF (4400 under air)
!! OBSERVATORY!!
&
FLEX USE "BARN"
(2500 SF under air)
$734,500
17901 Wood Path Ct.
Punta Gorda, FL 33982
isualtour.com/show.asp?T=3101917
Michael Saunders & Co.
Debra Gurin 941-875-3242







SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


2 ACREK, venice 3rI/2Da
home. County water possible
owner financing or best offer.
Cash Offers Pay Less!
941488-2418 or 496-9252


2007 BUILT-EXTRA LOT/RV
PAD! 3/2/2 1850 sqft GREAT
ROOM + DEN, Separate
dining and breakfast room
$179,000 C7048826
Mary McKinley
"Selling With Integrity"
941-629-2100
AGjREIVE

ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 J


RARE FIND! CANAL FRONT
GULF ACCESS 2003 HOME
2000 SF -DOCK+2 LIFTS ON
WIDE CANAL. SWIM SPA
POOL NO FLOOD INSURANCE
NEEDED! 3/2+ BONUS ROOM
& SCREENED LANAI -ATT
GARAGE PRIVATE FENCED
YARD, NICE NEIGHBORHOOD
NEW LISTING $245,000.
JUDY K PETKEWICZ GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES &
HOMES 941-456-8304 j






5 Acre Prairie Creek Park
Home with Caged Pool
Punta Gorda 3 bdrm 2
bath Gem 2100 SQ FT,
Beautiful Setting Pond &
Very Private Fenced &
Gated 2 stall Attached +
Detached garage Horses
Welcome, Black top Rds,&
miles of riding trails. New
Listing $295,000 Hurry!
Judy Petkewicz
941-456-8304
Allison James Estates &
\^ _Homes j


3/2/2 GULF ACCESS WITH
POOL $249,900
SOLAR POWERED HOME, 5 MIN
TO OPEN WATER. DOCK/LIFT.
CALL TO SEE TODAY!
CAPT. BOB & KELLY DAVIES
941-468-4485
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
WWW.BUYHOMESBYBOAT.COM


5-30 ACRES Starting
$49,900
Punta Gordas's
BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcome, black
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community'!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Propertiesforsale.com


$129,900 495 Cartagena st.
very nice 3/2/2 very quiet
area. 1200 sf. with tile and
wood laminates, fenced back
yard. pictures and info at:
KL30.com 941-677-8550.


DEEP CREEK HOME
26220 Chesterfield Rd.
Immaculate Tim Towles Built
3/2.5/2 1920 Sq.Ft.
Split Floor Plan, Upgrades,
Elec. Hurricane Shutters
BY OWNER
$167,000 941-979-5785

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


DEEP CREEK, Pl:,
home Granite counters in
kitchen & baths, lots of
upgrades. S/S appls. Over-
looks Irg greenbelt. $189,900.
A CLEAR CHOICE REALTY
941-979-9396
s"_ ]


uD-PC EKh-: 336 Japura
Street. Custom home, 2156
sq ft with pool, built in
2002, spectacular large
park-like yard with lake view,
cul de sac. FABULOUS!
Don't Miss this ONE!!!
$289,900
Pat Walker RE/MAX Anchor
Realty 941-276-4674


6127 Bennington St. 3/2/2
Immaculate pool home on
corner lot with many
upgrades. Built in 2004,
hurricane shutters, propane
back-up generator, 1746 SF.
Turnkey Possible.
By Owner. Appointment Only
815-228-6801






510 Dalton Blvd., PC
$79,000
30064 Balsam Blvd.,
PG $79,000
450 Dalton Blvd., PC,
$89,900
661 Kellstdadt St NW,
PC $89,900
7248 Sablon Rd, NP
$134,900
26164 Harborview Rd,
CH $139,000
57 Allworthy, PC
$149,000
29412 Taralane Dr. PG
$219,000
5235 Blackjack Cir, PG
$299,000
For more information
contact Bobbi Bevis
941-815-1176 or
www.thebevisgroup.com
Employ Classified!



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HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


LAKi. SULY 125b/ SWvv em-
broke, Circle. 3/2/2, 1964sf.
Beautiful Split Plan w/ Sepa-
rate Living & Family Rooms!
$249,900. Linda 941-457-
7245 or Jill Brouwer 941-276-
4459 Jill Brouwer Realty






LOOK
North Port S888/Im'HLY
*LIKE NEW* *
Total Owner Financing
3BR/2BA/2CG, Fenced
$139k 941-716-0040


1237 Rice Terrace, Beautifu
3-bd/2ba, 1267 SF move-in
ready home w/2-car garage,
ully fenced back yard & large
screened lanai. $135,000.
Patty Gillespie Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755


NIuR P II rI-u 1 i .:.ri,,ri i
St. Totally updated 1344 Sf
2/2/2 carport in upscale
Gated 55+ Comm. Gourmet
Kitchen, Granite, all new
appliances. $117,000
PATTY GILLESPIE, Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755


2300 Jasmine Way
Beautifully Remodeled 200E
Pool Home 3/2/2 Plus den,
1946 SF Under Air, New SS
Appliances, tropically Land-
scaped in gated Community
of Charleston Park. Asking
$259,900
Bay Bridge Homes
941-626-8200


NORTH PORT -: 2 2
1672sf, Granite, SS,
Immaculate! $149,900
Not a short sale or bank owned
Annette Moffat Allison James Estates
& Homes 941-539-2813

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!


3463 Narcissus Ter.,
BEAUTIFUL '05-BUILT 3/2/2
WITH FULLY FENCED BACK
YARD IN A PRIME QUIET
AREA AT THE EDGE OF
NORTH PORT ESTATES. NO
CARPET (tile and laminate
thruout). A WHOLE LOTTA
HOUSE FOR JUST A LITTLE!
$149,900
PATTY GILLESPIE Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^

I I


iNU/r i n r Hn I
3885 N.Cranberry Blvd.
A Gardner's Dream. Custom
2/2/2 with extra lot. Utility
shed, city water, Fruit Trees.
$149,900
Patty Gillespie Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755
rI I^^


NORTH PORT 4+/2/2,
4940 HURLEY AVE.
COMPLETELY RENOVATED,
SHOWS LIKE NEW! MOVE IN
CONDITION! MUST SEE TO
APPRECIATE! $179,900
941-661-2588


6334 sqft Built 2012
LUXURIOUS,FRENCH PROVINCIAL
MANSION BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM
HOME ON YOUR OWN TWO PRI-
VATE LOTS. NO DEED RESTRIC-
TIONS HERE, SO YOU CAN BE THE
KING AND QUEEN OF YOUR OWN
CASTLE Priced at $589,900.
Call Adam Banka
941-284-5656
LISTING SERVICES DIRECT

BAN


2/1 Avanti Cir. $47,700
3/2 Music $129,900
3/2 Vizza la $149,900
3/2/Pool San Bruno $167,900
3/3/pool/3AC N Biscayne Dr
$289,900
COMING SOON
3/2 Ripley St. TBD
3/2 Orchard Cir TBD
3/2 Amnesty Dr. TBD
3/2 Deer Run Rd TBD
3/2 Phineas Ave. TBD




ANCHOR REALTY
Call for FREE list of
surrounding area
Foreclosures
Call "The Estill Team"
941-228-2849

Looking for

Adventure?

Find it

in the

Classifieds


Beautiful 3/2/2 Pool Home,
2063 SF, lots of upgrades, Tile
Floors, S/S apple & Granite in
Kitchen. Walk-in Showers in
baths, corner lot.
$229,000 neg. 941-993-5909


|iv|n||n|run i, -. -, r,,r-,it
Terrace, 3/2/2 Pool home
on corner lot, sprinkler sys-
tem, utility shed, Newer A/C.
GORGEGEOUS Curb Appeal.
$195,000
PATTY GILLESPIE Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755


HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 ^


Beautiful Private 3/2/2 on 3
Lots! 1550+ SF. New A/C &
Well! Freshly Painted. Granite
Counter Tops. Must See!
$159,900. 941-451-4274


PUOI UHAKLUI I
12285 Tranter Ave., Lovingly
maintained 3/3 w/over 2000
SF under air. Double corner
lot. Close to all amenities!
$165,000
Patty Gillespie Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755


PORT CHARLOTTE
2007 3/2/2 Custom
designed heated pool home.
Lots of upgrades! Must see!
$T74,900
A Clear Choice Realty
Henry Gustaf 941-204-8213

lhI7UI


FRUKI CHAKLUI IT
23204 Rountree Ave.,
Flawless! Beautiful 2/2,
totally new kitchen, incl apple
and cabinets. New Tile &
electrical panel. Freshly
painted inside & out. DON'T
MISS THIS EXCEPTIONAL
BUY! $84,900
PATTY GILLESPIE REMAX
ANCHOR 941-875-2755

REDUCED!I



PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2.5/2 Like New POOL Home
onOmsizedLot Open Floor Plan!
Lush Landscaping
$249,900.
Jeff Runyan, Re/Max Palm.
941-979-2843


Beautiful 3/2/2 located in
great neighborhood, within 2
miles of schools. Home fea-
tures New A/C, appliances &
flooring. Oversized corner lot.
$122,500 941-628-3984


rUKIri ,nrriKL.UIIt i. LuuTr luI
Sailboat, mins. to Harbor. Ship-
shape 3/2/2 +2 lanais, hot
tub. "Country quiet." Great
neighbors! Owner financing
avail. (No Flood Ins. rqd.) Make
Offer! $205K 941-753-7433
me~~*^I:llm~


Port Charlotte, 22139
Bahama Lane across from
Presby. Church. Move In ready,
immaculate older 2/1. Florida
Room, Carport, Workshop,
CHA, City Water & Sewer, Not
in Flood Zone. All up-graded.
$59,900. Excellent investment
property. 941-391-2022





Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


HOMES FOR SALE
:Z^ 020 ^



PT CHARLOTTE
2/2/1.5 OVER 1500SQFT.
(BLOCK HOUSE) W/
BONUS RM & POOL
JUST RESURFACED, NEW
TILE, GRANITE & POOL
EQUIP. NEW ELECTRIC
PANEL $89K BY OWNER
941.268.8794


ruiIn A vil ln -, -, --'
26481 Feather Sound Dr.,
Seminole Lakes. Immaculate,
Golf Course, Updated home!
$179,900 715-533-2611


ruiN IA LunuA
Harbour Oaks Gated Com-
munity. 3 Bedrm/2.5 Bath
POOL Home. 2,401 SF on
Oversized Lot. $279,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty


PUNTA GORDA, 2/2/1 Deed
Restricted Charlotte Park! Boat
Ramp & Amenities! Newly Redec-
orated & Landscaped. SS
Apple. Granite Counters. Turn-
Key! $149,900. 941-505-2324
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
[ ---- : ----


R'U I UI' VVWE I
157 COUGAR WAY
Beautifully Remodeled 2001
Pool Home, 3 bd/2ba/2car,
Granite & New SS Appls.,
Park Like Setting, On DIb
Lot, Asking $199,900
BAY BRIDGE HOMES
941-626-8200




1 Q*
ROTONDA WEST, FSBO
253 Mariner Ln, 3/2/2 Solar
heated Pool, Built 2005,
New A/C, Low Insurance, 7K
in hurricane shutters.
Furnished. Buyers agent 3%.
$184,000 941-698-4776


HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 J


F -'BBB
i H^^Ii


13 BED, 2 BATH, 2 CAR HOME'
'TO BE SOLD MARCH 9TH,SUN'
I JUSTSTEPS TOTHE BEACH I
I ON THE ISLAND OF VENICE I
I PAULAVANDEREE I
S (941) 488-1500 I
SVANDEREE AUCTIONEERS I
IREALTORS SINCE 19341
I WWW.VANDEREE.COM I
L J-----------
S WATERFRONT
^ HOMES 1030 ^


Water Front 2012 Burnt
Store Isles 2408 SF
Custom Canal Home!
Seawall Dock & BoatLift
Nice locationPrivacy
Viewing Nature Preserve.
New Listing! Was $499l1
Now $479,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES
ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304

oid your Best
Friend In thdie
Classified!


ENGLEWOOD/CAPE HAZE
SAILBOAT WATERFRONT
2BR/1BA WITH LG. ENCLOSED
LANAI OR FAMILY ROOM, ALL TILE,
LOTS & LOTS OF UPGRADES
ROOF, AC, MORE. 90x110'
SEAWALLED LOT.
$250,000 920-737-9159
OR 941-441-7648


S WATERFRONT

HOMES 1030


r vnl\^ i.nniiLV i I..
3/2/2 Pool home on Spring
Lake waterway, gulf access.
Large LOT- 17,193 sq.ft!
Completely remodeled &
updated! $259,900
A Clear Choice Realty
Henry Gustaf 941-204-8213


PORT CHARLOTTE S: 2
Built 2007, vaulted ceiling in
great room, dining/kitchen,
custom cabinets, jetted tub.
100' sailboat water, 10 min to
harbor. Great area! $369,000
Rich Hulet 941-815-7588
1I WEDMCEM


PORT CHARLOTTE-
17259 Lake Worth Blvd.
Luxurious 3/2/2 HEATED
POOL Home on Canal!
$4,29,900. $405,000.
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris RealLy, Inc


r ui l li iAIL1J I I --
Waterfront Beauty, Furn'd
+ Boat! Dock, Lift, Pool.
Views Galore! $395,500.
Marianne Lilly, RE/IVAXHarbor
941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!


WATERFRONT
LVHOMES 1030







PT CHARLOTTE WATERFRONT
3/2/2 POOL HOME WITH LG
CORNER LOT AND SEAWALLED,
WITH DAVITS & DOCK.
ALL TILE, NEW KITCHEN.
ONLY $215,000
920-737-9159 OR
941-441-7648

5w vjpi=w-


PUNTIA LUHU
424 Panarea Ave. Custom
built home in Burnt Store
Isles with 80 ft seawall
sailboat access. $374,775
June Poliachik
Realtor CDPE, SFR Sun Realty
941-916-0100

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!


PUNTA GORDA Immaculate,
water view, private dock. Open
plan, 2/2. Quality construc-
tion, professionally decorated.
Active community. $168,900
414-520-0374


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
Spectacular Water View!
3/2/2 w/POOL! Well
maintained on Oversized
Sailboat Lot! $374,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty


S WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


S WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030 1


PUNTA GORDA ISLES PUNTA GORDA ISLES, 2005
3/2/2 5 POOL w/ Waterfall- Masterbuilders Showplace.
Home on Canal. Fabulous 3Bd+Office With 2565sf. Like-
Kitchen and Master Suite. New/Extras & Upgrades!Quick
Exquisite Gardens. $675,000 Boating Access! $525,000
Sharon Kerr 941-286-7315 John Littlejohn 941-380-5354
Coldwell Banker Sunstar Coldwell Banker Residential RE
1 -I r- .---.


WM- PEND
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2, Updated Kitchen-
Heated Pool, Large Lanai,
30' Dock, Boatlift.
Priced to Sell at $429,000.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
& REDUCED!


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
4BD/3BA/3CG with 2810SF.
Loads of Extras & Upgrades
On 2 Full Size Sailboat Lots.
160Ft On Water.
$699,509 Now $649,900.
John Littlejohn 941-380-5354
Coldwell Banker Residential RE
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
Sailboat Water- 3 Bd. Pool
home w. Ig. lanai, about 10
min. to Harbor. Great Rm.
plan, 2 car garage + work-
shop. Granite counters,
hurricane shutters, gas stove
+dock & 10,0001b vertilift.
$477,700 Adele Bourcier
Coldwell Banker
941-468-2571





PUNTA GORDA
Lazy Lagoon Waterview
Lot #34. 55+ Resident
Owned Park, 2005 Fleetwood.
Furnished 2/2 w/ Sun room,
living room, kitchen, dining
room. Carport. Excl. cond.
$67,900 941-505-0758


2 Triplexes (6apts). Dock on
basin. Min. to harbor, Furn,
rented. Must see. Immaculate.
$3600/mo income.
$299,000 FSBO, No Realtors.
941-626-9652
_


UNI IT lAUKUR-
2br, Fla Room, Garage, Large
Kitchen, IG Windows, Fresh Paint,
Seawall & Lift. $137,500
Marianne Lilly, RE/MAXHarbor
941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


,L ."4L_'T 1,


ROTONDA BRAND NEW
CONSTRUCTION
LUXURIOUS 3/2/3 w/ POOL @
17 MEDALIST CT, WHITE MARSH.
AND IT'S NEW! $339,900.
CALL 941-769-0200 OR EMAIL:
ROTONDAREALESTATE@COMCAST.NET


VVlIILJIVII-LL VIIiMU1r
Punta Gorda on Alligator
Creek. New 2013 Palm
Harbor Home. 2 Bedroom,
2 Bath, 960 Sq.ft. with
carport, shed & more!
$128,500 270-726-0808


increailDie rark like setting!
Beautiful Custom 3/2.5/2+CG
Estate Home. Amenities:
Granite, Custom Cabinets,
Fireplace, 18" tile throughout,
Electronic Gated entrance,
Board Fencing, Barn, RV pad,
+++. BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
HomeServices Florida Realty
941-585-9599
www.CarolWade.com


JCUJNDER COWTIAR 7M I


NIHUKIfH uI Kemoaelea
3/2/2 with Granite counters,
wood cabinets, upgraded
tile, new A/C w/warranty.
$154,900
A Clear Choice Realty
Henry Gustaf 941-204-8213





The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, January 30, 2014


GOLF COURSE
I COMMUNITY I
1i 035^ i


LAKE SUZY-4, 2 2 P':":,'L,
Hot Tub! Outside Kitchen
Located on the 15th Hole!
MUST SEE! $295,500.
$289,950. Linda 941-457-
7245 or Ji Bramuer 941-276-
1445 Jill Brouwer Realty

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

REDUCED! .401


REDUCED!
LAKE SUZY 3/2/3
12539 SW KINGSWAY CIR.
Newer S/S Appliances,
Granite Countertops, All Tile
except one guest bdrm, walk
in closets in master bdrm,
beautiful view of Kingsway
Country Club on 17th
Fairway, oversize garage,
New pool screen.
Jill Brouwer Realty,
Jill Brouwer 941-766-1606
or 941-276-4459 or
Call Linda 941-457-7245
SREDUCED!- -




LAKE SUZY
11971 SW Kingsway Cir
Exec. Home. Golf Course &
Lake View. 3/2.5/2, Updated
Kitchen. Metal Roof,
EIc. Shutters, Workshop.
4237 sf. with Additional
Buildable Lot Available.
Must See! $299,999.
Lolly Lopinski, South East
Realty (941)-628-0941


LAKEL SULY, I-':44 '-:.W
Kingsway Cir. 2 Bdrm/2Bath
w/ Family Room. (Possible
3rd Bedrm.) Lakeview. IVLMustSed
$239,950. Linda 941-457-
7245 or Jill Brouwer 941-
276-4459 Jill Brouwer Realty


I COMMUNITY I
1^L035^ ^ "






NORTH PORT, 1840 Silver
Palm Rd., 3/2/3 Pool Home
in Gated Golf Community.
New A/C, Push Button Hurri-
cane Shutters. Mins to Shop-
ping, Beaches & Restaurants.
PATTY GILLESPIE Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
114 1040~


Affordable Upscale
Gated Community. 2/2
Lower End Unit, lanai, tile,
clubhouse, fitness center,
tennis & pool. Asking
$69,000 920-378-4217


tNIULtfV WL IOLtO
2/2/2 Almost 1700 SF,
Single Detached Condo
Home, Private Area W/Pool,
Deep Water, No Bridges To
Intercoastal. $279,500
Jerri King 941-374-2562


VILLA, MODEL LAKEFRONT
1718' 2BR/2BA/2CG + DEN,
LOTS OF EXTRAS
FOR SALE BY OWNER
$239,900. 941-681-2424
774-810-0094
[ 4LL ift_]-


LAKE SUZY, Located in
Kingsway Golf Course Area.
2+Bed/Den, 2 Bath, 2CG Sh-
Lde Ui! Meticulas! $209,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-276-4459
Jill Brouwer Realty
A


NORTH PORT
Short sale. 2/2/2 built 2006
Cypress Falls villa in the
Woodlands with community
heated pool, and many more
amenities. Call June Poliachik,
Sun Realty 941-916-0100


run.I I ,nH LU I I
Juniper Model in Riverwood
Brand New 2 Bedroom Villa
with Den, 2 Car Garage.
Never Been Lived in!
Carl Anderson, Real Estate
Broker 941-629-9586


E206, 2/2 Totally renovated,
Partially furnished, heated
Pool, Active Clubhouse,
Beautiful Grounds.
$58,500 OBO
Owner 423-343-6349


SCONDOS/VILLAS
SFOR SALE
^,1040 ^


PT CHARLOTTE CONDO
PROMENADES EAST 2/2
ALL UPDATED APPLIANCES, AC,
& FURNITURE. COMM POOL,
ELEVATOR & INSIDE PARKING
$69,900 941-255-5252
PUNTA GORDA Harbor Point.
By Owner. 5127 Melbourne St.
Unit 8202. Open house on Fri.
Jan 31st 1-4pm, Sat. Feb. 1st
1-4pm. 941-258-6149.
[ REDUCED! 1


3/2/1 w/ Deeded Dock!
Sailboat Access to Harbor.
Top Floor Corner Unit.
$274,000. $259,000.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Village Realty. 941-661-4800

Need a new
Home?
Look in the
Classifieds!





PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2 w/ Deeded Dock! Par-
tial Harbor View. 2nd Building
From Harbor! Walk to Fisher-
man's Village $419,000.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Village Realty. 941-661-4800





PUNTA GORDA ISLES
Water Front-Gateway
Point. Ground floor, Lanai,
Tile, Stainless Appl., club-
house, large pool, walk to
Fisherman's 2/2/2
Owner 419-863-9358
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net

TOWNHOUSES
FOR SALE


ru in 1i JlV A1/ r- .'j. .-'u
3/2.5/2 in Gated Calusa
Creek. Lots of Amenities!
Short Distance to Historic
Punta Gorda! $169,900.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Village Realty. 941-661-4800

MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE


ru r .l A%11,'1 U,..I I1,t- .+,
Maple Leaf! Estates! 2/2/CP
in Gated Golf Course
Community! Open Floor Plan.
Amenities Galore!! $69,900.
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc


MOBILE HOMES
SFOR SALE
10^90 ^


VENICE Full, rrhd, mint
condition w/new lanai in newly
renovated Ramblers' Rest
Resort on Myakka River.
High end amenities, docks
available. Just reduced to
$23,000! 941-497-0703
VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com

MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
~1095~


UNTIA LiUGUA
RIVERSIDE!
$39,995
2/2, FURNISHED.
UPDATED & VERY CLEAN!
Call Mike 941-356-5308
716-864-9862
www.riversideoaksflorida.com

PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!
FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


$49,985 Well Kept, 2/2
Sectional, 2 Lanai's,
Drywall, Fully Furnished.
Oversized, Beautiful!!
"WHERE WE LEFT THE TREES"
Call Mike, 941-356-5308
716-864-9862
WWW.RIVERSIDEOAKSFLORIDA.COM
ARCADIA VILLAGE #81 DW
2b/2ba new flooring. Open
house on Saturdays or by
appt. $23,600 863-993-0885
ARCADIA, Nearly New
3BR/2BA Manufactured
Home on 1/2 Acre.
Financing Available! $69,995
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122




En
PUNTA GORDA 2/1 + Den
on Large Lot. Open Kitchen!
Laundry Rm. Upgrades! Fully
Furn. $35,000. obo 517-6394204
Punta Gorda saltwater front
boat mooring allowed, 2
large BR w/walk in closets,
2 baths, new fixtures & tile,
cathedral ceiling, beautiful
sun room overlooking
ocean 96K. 941-629-3261


V'uUa.^GE
PUNTA GORDA
Unbeatable Pricing on
Turn-Key Package!
Model on Display.
Resales. Active Community!
Call Greg 941-626-7829


MANUFACTURED
I HOMES FOR SALE I
2i 095^ i

PUNTA GORDA-
Newer Home! 2BD/2BA/CP.
Large Raised Screen Room,
Utility Room & Lake View!
$39,900.
Call Greg 941-626-7829


STI ILE ESTIA
$34,995
IMMACULATE
ADULT COMMUNITY.
Immediate possession.
Conveniently located near
town. Immaculate all drywall
2/2 sectional. All new &
updated.
Ask For Joe (941)628-8751
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


NEED CASH?

WANTED TO BUY



MAX THE GAIN
WANTED: House or Rental
Property Owner Wanting to
Trade/Exchange for
Larger, Smaller, or Just
Something Different.
Learn about Exchanging.
Call Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586

HOMES FOR RENT
1210


PUNTA GORDA
3/1 WITH SHED
NORTH PORT
2/2/2 LARGE 55+ GATED
PORT CHARLOTTE
2/1.5/2 CORNER LOT
3/2/2 LARGE LANAI


$700

$1250

$800
$925


WE NEED RENTAL LISTINGS
FULL PROPERTY LIST ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE YOUR PROPERTY




* 2/2/2 Rotonda lanai
den, golf course $900
* 2/2 Condo end unit
Engl. water inc. $775
* 2/2 lanai 55+ mobile
$525
West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
--Bring your pets!-A
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME


For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1250...3+/2/21890SqFt......NP
$1050..3/2/2 1546 Sq Ft........PC
$850..3/2/2 All Tile..............PC
$850....2/2/2 1717 Sq Ft....PC
$750....3/1.5/1884 Sq ............NP
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters


HOMES FOR RENT
L 1210 ^


ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-U33
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com

NEED A RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT
N. PORT NEARLY NEW 3/2/2
OFF SAN MATEO W/TILE THROUGH.
SCR. LANAI & SHED. PRIVACY,
$975/Mo 941-350-1288
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/1,
703 Phyllis St,scrnd. porch,
fenced,quiet area.$775 +Sec.
Pets $25/mo 941-627-6448
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2,
Pool, Lanai, Shed, 2200 SF,
$1350/mo 941-628-1203
Seize the sales
with Classified!
PORT CHARLOTTE Large
3/2/2 close to 1-75. 1622
Abalom St. $1100/mo
First/last/sec. 941-628-2224







FOR RENT
^^, 1240

PORT CHARLOTTE, 2/2, 1st
floor, newly renovated, central-
ly located, water incl. $750 1st,
Last, & Sec. 941-286-6252
PUNTA GORDA-BS Meadows,
2/2, Pool, new tile, no pets,
$750/mo annual, unfurnished
941-456-7899
7 DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
Q ,,1300 ^
EAST ENGLEWOOD, 2/1
W/W Carpet, W/D Hook-Up,
Lawn Care. No Pets $600 mo.
941-769-6548 Days or 941-
639-8829 evenings.
PUNTA GORDA ISLES, 607 Via
Tripoli, 2/2, end of canal, dock
avail, all appl. $750+water &
elec, Avail Mar 1,941-575-7867
I APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
L 1320 ^




NOW ACCEPTING
S WAITING LIST
APPLICATIONS 941-473-0450

STUDIO APTS
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY: 1-800-955-8771





PORT CHARLOTTE
VILLA SAN CARLOS II
AFFORDABLE
Income Based Apartments
for 62 or Older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


LOOK
VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$475 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
Venice Studio &1 -
Bedroom Accepting
Section 8 Vouchers
941-488-7766 oyww





Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


APARTMENTS
FOR RENT


VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1,800-955-8771
I EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNI Ty
WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community.
941-429-2402 W

MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
~1340~

r[ENGL 55+ park /1 part1
I ly furn. Lg. Lot w/ shade I
I Clean quiet safe park.
$550Lmo 941-786-7777

S EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
^1350^1

HARBOUR HEIGHTS close to
river, newly renovated efficien-
cies w cable & internet, Sunny-
brookMotel 941-625-6400
| ROOMS FOR RENT
L 1360 ^


ENGLEWOOD Room for rent
$150 wk+ dep. or biwkly. cou-
ples welcome incl elec &
water. 941-237-6149.
PORT CHARLOTTE, Furn. Pri-
vate Entrance & Bath, $125
Week +Sec., 941-889-7119

|RENTALS TO SHARE

L ^ 13 70 ^

MURDOCK 2 people to share
house. Newly Tropical design,
Furn'd. Close to Forrest Nelson
Blvd & YMCA. $600 per mo
740-490-8828
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2
M/F room in very nice clean
quiet home with lanai pool
laundry, ect. no Drugs/Drunks
or pets. 1 month sec dep +
first month rent. utils included
$450 781-572-8215
PORT CHARLOTTE Mother-in
law suite. Furn. $650/mo incl.
cable & internet 941-255-5767
SLOTS & ACREAGE

L:Z 500 ^


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
175,000 readers in
Charlotte, Sarasota, &
DeSoto dCounties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


LOTS & ACREAGE


1D
Z 500 J






ARCADIA: Private Country
Living: 2.5 Acres, Includes
3/2 MH & Carport Near 1-75,
Walmart & Peace River Boat
Ramp. $145k Cash.
941-743-6601
ENGLEWOOD
DOUBLE WIDE LOT IN PINE
HAVEN MHP $21,500.
** MUST SELL* *
941-214-0889

**RV LOTS**
WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN
OWN. SITES AVAILABLE:
* FISHING LAKE
*FREE GOLF *BOAT LAUNCH
*PARK MODELS
*NEAR BEACHES.
Low MAINTENANCE FEES,
ACTIVITIES, 55+ PARKS!!
CALL KATHY 810-444-3044
OR ARLENE 810-919-4000
CHARLOTTECO U NTYREALTY.COM
Classifie = Sales


33661 Serene Dr. 10 Acres
Zn AE, Partly Cleared 40/80
steel bldg, w/elec, slab, 2
12X12 OH drs $139,000
941-505-7272
VENICE ISLAND GOLDEN
beach lot for sale 13,244sf,
621 Hibiscus Dr. $349,000.
Call 941-408-5604
L WATERFRONT
L : 1:515 J


/ AC +/- ESTATE LOT, 1600
NEW POINT COMFORT RD., ENGLE-
WOOD. CAN BE SPLIT INTO 2 LOTS.
90 FT. DOCK. OWNER FINANCING POSS
$529,900 941-769-0200
CARUBANEWS@COMCAST.NET
NORTHPORT: Fresh water
canal lots; various sizes, some
up to 5 adjacent lots; buy one
or the whole trac; well located;
$5,900/$13,900; standard
size lots; singles, doubles
triples; $ 4000/$6900; many
cleared; no scrub jays; call or
e-mail for showing or direc-
tions; 941-286-7003; e-mail;
lotsites@hotmail.com


PEACE RIVER Frontage 20+
acres over 537 feet on the
River. Multimillion dollar estate
adjoining property. Build your
dream home or hide-away.
Near historic Arcadia. Bring all
offers. BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
HomeServices Florida Realty
941-685-9599
www.CarolWade.com

L TRADE/ EXCHANGE/

Z ^1540 J

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS!
Exchange Possibility.
Brand New Villa in
Riverwood for your Unwanted
House or Rental Property,
Trade Up Down Out.
Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586


BUSINESS
1FOR SALE


SUCCESSFUL
WATERFRONT
RESTAURANT, ARCADIA
90 SEATS INSIDE/100 OUTSIDE
I 7 COP LICENSEINCLUDES
40 SLIPS MARINA. OPTION-
AL: HOME AND 3 COTTAGES
OWNER FINANCING. OVER
10% CAPRATE. SIMPLY
MARINAS: 305-439-9581

BUSINESS RENTALS
^^ 1610 ^


Professional & Retail
Space in Several
Punta Gorda & Port
Charlotte Locations.
Call 941-815-2199
For Availability & Prices.

COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP


AKLAuiAn 4T.4 ac^ by uwvviic
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992
S WAREHOUSE
STORAGE
^ 1640 ^

CHARLOTTE HBR. 20X40
warehouse/business, AC
office, city water, dumpster,
23250 Harper Ave #3. $475
mo. tax incl. 715-367-8236
NORTH PORT 800SF WH
$450/mo. 400 SF, $220/mo
400SF Office, $295/mo, All +
Tax 941-661-6720
Need a
new Ride?
Find it
in the
Classifieds!
PUNTA GORDA Warehouse
9000 sf, 2000 sf offices
zoned Cl, Taylor & Technology.
$5400 mo. 954-383-8867.

2000






EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

PROFESSIONAL
2010


COSMETOLOGIST Great
location-41. Licensed hair-
dresser wanted to rent sta-
tion. $500/mo 941-769-4077


PROFESSIONAL
L 2010 ^



ROYAL PALM
RETIREMENT CENTRE
is seeking candidates to
fill the position of
COMMUNITY SALES
LEADER.
Competitive compensation
plus benefits. Previous
experience in senior housing
is preferred.
Qualified applicants should
Email Resumes to
nark.ackerman@holidatouch.com
SMALL WORLD CHRISTIAN
LEARNING CENTER
IS LOOKING FOR OFFICE ASSIS-
TANT. MUST HAVE A PROGRAMS
FLORIDA CHILD CARE CREDEN-
TIAL, PROFICIENT IN COMPUTER
SYSTEM AND PROGRAMS, BE A
TEAM PLAYER, AND BE PART OF
A CHRISTIAN FAMILY MINISTRY.
SEND RESUMES TO
DQUAN@FPCPC.COM
BANKING

L4WO:2015

F/T TELLER SPECIALIST
& PERSONAL BANKER
Hometown bank seeks F/T
Teller with cash handling
experience and FT Personal
Banker with previous
banking experience.
Must be professional and
possess excellent customer
service skills. Apply at
Charlotte State Bank & Trust,
1100 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte, FL 33953
or submit resume online to
tshremshock@csbtfl.com
EEO/AA
FINANCIAL

Lm^m2016 ^


FINANCIAL
CONSULTANT LEVEL II,
Experience with Budget
Forecasting and Creating
Revenue and Expense
Statements. Capital Project
Accounting Experience
Preferred.
Please View Job Details at:
www.chadrottecountyfl.com.
Charlotte County is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.
f -GET RESULTS--
USE CLASSIFIED!

CLERICAL/OFFICE

L z 2020 ^


CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
PART TIME

THE ENGLEWOOD SUN
NEWSPAPER IS SEEKING
INDIVIDUALS THAT HAVE
EXCELLENT CUSTOMER SERVICE
SKILLS AND WORK WELL IN A
TEAM ENVIRONMENT.
APPLICANT MUST BE RELIABLE,
FLEXIBLE AND HAVE A
PLEASANT PERSONALITY.
MUST HAVE COMPUTER
EXPERIENCE, BE ABLE TO
WORK IN A FAST PACED
ENVIRONMENT AND
MULTI-TASKING IS A PRIORITY.
"WE ARE A DRUG AND
NICOTINE FREE WORKPLACE."
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG/
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
APPLY AT:
THE ENGLEWOOD SUN
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FL. 34223
OR
EMAIL RESUME TO
MARUIZ@SUN-HERALD.COM.
EOE NON-SMOKING OFFICE


SCLERICAL/OFFICE

: 2020 ^

CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda
EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEPER
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
WATER RAINSOFT PAYROLL,
QUICKBOOKS, GENERAL ACCOUNT-
ING, MULTITAKING. RESUME TO:
ccwrainsoft@msn.com
LICENSED CUSTOMER
SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE
Needed. Please Fax Resume
to: 941-206-0036
SECRETARIAL/
BOOKKEEPING POSITION
Proficient with Quick Books,
Excel, Word. F/T or P/T.
donna.brundermanbuilding@
comcast.net
/ COMPUTER
Lao 2025 ^


GRAPHIC ART
DESIGNER
for ads and page design.
Experience with Mac's,
Quark, & photo shop,
Call 941-276-0061

MEDICAL
Lowam:2030



ALF in the Port Charlotte
area is looking for a
RESIDENT CARE
SUPERVISOR (DON) for a
mid-sized facility. Needs to
be able to manage and unify
care staff, meet with fami-
lies, and coordinate with
medical professionals. Salary
based on experience.
Send resume to
sunclassifiedsl@gmail.com
***********
CNA's/HHA's
t WORK
NOW!
Busy Home
Care Agency
has F/T and P/T Openings.
EXP REQUIRED CALL
NOW! 941-257-4452

CNA/HHA's NEEDED
FOR IMMEDIATE PLACEMENT!





NEW OFFICE!
NEW OPPORTUNITIES!
NEW PAY PLANS!
MAJOR MEDICAL, & 401K &
LIFE INSURANCE
CALL TODAY,
WORK TOMORROW!
Call Mon. Fri., 8a-4pm.
941-764-0880 or
941-480-0880
ALL STAT HOME HEALTH

MEDICAL BILLING POSI-
TION MUST HAVE 1
YEAR EXPERIENCE -
Computer and 10 key
efficiency required.
Experience in Medicare and
Commercial insurances -
plus input claims, process-
ing payments, billing
research & collections. Pos-
itive attitude & team player.
Paid insurance and vacation
benefits. State salary
requirements & experience.
Email resume:
sunclassifiedl@gmail.com
Or fax: 941-429-3111
Attention: Dept 4109
All emails/faxes are confidential.


L MEDICAL
Wava:2030 ^

I|MED ASST/CNA FT/PT, for
peds off. Multitask, Ped VS,
EMR & Exp nee. 625-4919
OFFICE SPECIALIST
FT position with benefits.
Physician office exp req'd.
Please fax resume to
941-625-2751
PORT CHARLOTTE REHAB
is looking for:
RN Full Time
3PM-11PM & 11PM-7AM
At least 1 year experience
in Long Term Care.
Apply in person at
25325 Rampart Blvd
Port Charlotte Fl 33983
RN/LPN/MA, Needed For
Busy Dermatology Office. Full
Time/Part Time. Experience
a Plus Fax Resume to:
941-627-4389


SIGNATURE
HEATHCARE LLC
IS SEEKING DEPENDABLE &
COMPASSIONATE PEOPLE TO
JOIN OUR TEAM:

RN/SUPERVISOR
FULL TIME
3-11 SHIFT

RN/SUPERVISOR
WEEKENDS

LPN's
3-11 and 11-7

PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON:
SIGNATURE
HEALTHCARE LLC
4033 Beaver Lane,
Port Charlotte.
EOE/DFWP

SIMPLY THE BEST

WE NEED (2) FULL
TIME RN'S
RN Weekend Supervisor
F/T or weekends only.
Also need CNA's all shifts,
PRN and F/T 3PM-11PM.
Please Apply in Person to:
Charlotte Harbor Healthcare
4000 Kings Highway
Port Charlotte, Fl 33980

., HORIZON
HEALTHCARE
INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN within
11 months. Enrollment ongoing.
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Feb 3 '14
LPN-next class starts
Feb 17th '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506

MUSICAL
Lv 2035 ^


Do you have a heart for
serving the Lord? Englewood
East Church of Christ is
looking for a VOLUNTEER
PIANO PLAYER. Contact
Church Office @ 941-468-5520





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, January 30, 2014


L RESTAURANT/
/ HOTEL
Zi 2040TU i


BOCA GRANDE CLUB
NOW HIRING FULL
TIME ALL SHIFTS, FOR THE
FOLLOWING POSITIONS:
WAITSTAFF, BARTENDER,
HOSTESS, BUSSER.
DFW, TOLL PAID. CALL
BECKI @ 941-964-2211 OR
EMAIL
CLUBHOUSEMANAGER@
BOCAGRANDECLUB.COM.
COOKS & SERVERS Needed.
Apply in Person: Four Points by
Sheridan, 33 Tamiami TrI. P.G.
EXPERIENCED
FINE DINING SERVER
needed to fill a full time
seasonal position.
Available immediately.
Send resume to:
info@bocabaypassclub.com
Or fax to:
941-964-2997

EXPERIENCED SERVERS/
BARTENDER NEEDED
P/T Position Sundays are a
Must! Great Perks.
Employee & Spouse Golf
Free when Available.
Apply in Person Mon.-Sat.
266 Rotonda Circle
Ask for Cathy
FOOD RUNNER needed for
busy restaurant in Arcadia. Call
Dean at 863-494-6077.
LINE COOK Experienced. Apply
in Person: 3883 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte. No Phone Calls!


Great Deals in

the Classifieds!

WAITRESS NEEDED,
No Sunday, Apply Within:
Wee Blew Inn, Venice
| SKILLED TRADES

Z 2050 ^

A/C INSTALLERS AND
SERVICE TECH'S,
FT, 40+hrs, HOURLY, FLAT
RATE, COMMISSION, BENEFITS
AVAIL. Must have tools,
FLDL, 5+ yrs exp. and be
able to pass criminal
background check. DFWP
We are continuing to
grow. Are you?
NO PHONE CALLS.
Apply In Person
AA Temperature Services
24700 Sandhill Blvd
Deep Creek, 33983.
AUTO TECHNICIAN NEED-
ED Full Time for Walton's
Auto Repair Inc. Drug Free
Work Place. Apply in Person:
2533 S. Mc Call Rd.
Englewood (941)-474-0686
BUSY AUTO BODY SHOP
NEEDS EXPERIENCED
HEAVY HIT TECHNICIAN
APPLY IN PERSON
23309 HARBORVIEW RD,
CHARLOTTE HARBOR, FL 33980.
DOOR & WINDOW
INSTALLER
Must be experienced,
Have tools & truck. Apply at:
23245 Harborview Rd. PC
EXPERIENCED TIRE
TECH with light mechani-
cal exp. DL Required!
Starting pay $400-
$600/wk 941-639-5681


SKILLED TRADES /
L 2050 J


FLEET MECHANIC, FT/PT
for marine construction
company. Able to work on
cranes, pumps & other
misc. machines. Benefits.
Please call 941-380-6813

Positions Available for
BACKHOE OPERATORS
with CDL. Apply:
SOS Septic Inc.
941-662-0095
HANDYMAN HELPER Car-
pentry exper. plus. Able to lift
materials. 941-204-8237
HAZARDOUS WASTE
TECHNICIAN SARASOTA COUNTY
GOVT WWW.SCGOV.NET/CAREERS
941-861-5742
PAINTER WANTED, Must
have spray exp. Call & leave
message at 941-255-0045
Advertise Today!



EXPERIENCED, with all
phases of plumbing
including Experienced
BACKHOE OPERATOR
DFWP, references, clear
driving record.
PLEASE CALL Jimmy @
941-625-9981
WRECKER DRIVER, Must
have experience & be able to
work nights & weekends.
Live in Englewood area.
Clean Drivers License.
Apply in person:
Sterns Auto Service, 1590
S. McCall Rd., Englewood.

SALES
2070


ADVERTISI G
ACCOUNT
EXECUIIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY
WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


SALES
L 2~070 ^


Advertising Sales
Executive
The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
Training
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:
Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!



Turn your




trash into




cash!



Advertise




your yard




sale!


SALES
L ^ 2L070 ^


CUSTOMER
SERVICE/INSIDE SALES
Large Internet Pet Supply
Company needs a Rock Star
for Inside Sales and Other
Responsibilities. You Must
Have Excellent Phone and
People Skills and be
Competent Using the
Following Software:
Microsoft Word, Excel and
Access. An Accounting
Background Using
QuickBooks, Peachtree or
Sage50 Software and a
College Degree is Preferred
but not Required.
E-mail Resume to:
careers@radiofence.com
or Fax to: 941-505-8229.
FRONT COUNTER
INSIDE SALES &
ORDER TAKER
Computer skills a must
Apply in person:
Raymond Building Supply
2233 Murphy Court
North Port, Florida
EOE DFWP

OUTSIDE ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE/FULL TIME
We are looking for a
Self-starter who is
efficient, experienced,
well organized and
effective in developing
strong business
relationships.
You will be on the front
line growing new revenue
opportunities through
display advertising in the
Nokomis, Osprey, and
South Sarasota area.
A key initiative is to drive
success and an ROI for
your customer base.
We are a well-established,
high-production,
successful community
business. The dress code
is business casual.
If you determine you are
the right fit for this
exciting sales opportunity,
please send your resume
o bobw@smartshopg.com


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN .....
/Find a Pet
./Find a Car
VFind a Job
/Find Garage Sales
./Find A New Employee
VSell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results



PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


SALES
Lwow 2070 ^



READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?
SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER
Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
located in
S North Port Florida.
We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
loves learning new skills and:
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.
We offer:
,e Training
:0 Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
* Opportunity to expand
your business skills

Please email your resume
to:
Jobs@sunletter.com

S Equal Opportunity
SEmployer/Drug & Nicotine
: Free Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.
SALES & MARKETING
ASSISTANT
Entry Level Marketing/
Entry Level Advertising
We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. We are
located in North Port Florida.
Duties Include, but are
not limited to:
Executing sales and
marketing functions to
company standards
Assists customers with any
questions they may have in
regards to our products
Gains knowledge on
all new clients the
company acquires
Ensure highest level of
customer service resulting in
increased productivity and
achieving sales goals
Knowledge of our
systems follow through of
advertising copy
Growth opportunities may be
available for those who
qualify.This position is entry
level, previous experience in
sales and marketing helpful.
We look for candidates with
the following:
Some college or
degree preferred
S* Outstanding
interpersonal skills
Student Mentality
Leadership Experience
Experience in retail, sales,
advertising & marketing
Ability to work in a high
energy environment
Please email resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com
Sun Classifieds attention:
Geri Kotz EOE, DFWP
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.



ji.!'r. y^H


SALES
L 2070 ^


LICENSED REAL ESTATE AGENT
Wanted For Small Non
Franchise Office Located In
Venice FL. Must Be Willing To
Join The Venice Board Of
Realtors. Call (941)350-0441
SALES POSITION
*IMMEDIATE OPENING*
Best compensation in the
industry!
So many leads to handle!
The absolute best
inventory to sell from!
Call or email Jimmie Tucker:
1-863-494-3838
tucker3314@yahoo.com
ARCADIA CHEVROLET BUICK
AND CHEVROLET TRUCKS

CHILD/ADULT
CARE NEEDED


Accepting applications for
AFTER SCHOOL WORKER.
Must be 18 or older, 10+
hrs/wk. Call 941-627-4849
LIVE IN HOME CARE GIVER
For growing company
Assist 2 developmentally
challenged individuals with
daily living needs in a beau-
tiful Cape Coral home.
Great pay, long term, very
rewarding work. Great Job.
Call 239-770-5668
239-945-6241 Office

PRESCHOOL TEACHER
Apply within: Educare
3028 Caring Way, PC
PRESCHOOL TEACHER
Apply within: Our Little World
1603 Castlerock Ln,
Port Charlotte

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!

GENERAL
^^ 2100 ^


BOAT WASHER/DOCK MAS-
TER, Part Time, Cleaning,
Scrubbing and light mainte-
nance for medium sized boats.
Pine Island & Punta Gorda
area. Two Days per week, week-
ends are expected. Friendly
customer service required.
Email resume & phone number
spitser@freedomboatclub.com

INDEPENDENT
NEWSPAPER
CARRIERS NEEDED:
The ENGLEWOOD SUN
has home delivery
routes available.
Supplement your income
with this great business
opportunity.
Earn $200-$300/week
for a few early morning
hours of delivery. Reliable
transportation, a valid
Florida driver's license
and proof of insurance
are required.
Apply in person at the
Englewood Sun
120 W. Dearborn St,
Englewood Florida,
or online at
www.yoursun.com
LINCARE, a leading national
respiratory company, seeks a
caring SERVICE REPRESEN-
TATIVE. Service patients in
their home for oxygen & equip-
ment needs. Warm personality,
age 21+ who can lift up to 120
Ibs should apply. CDL with DOT
a plus or obtainable. Growth
opportunities are
excellent. To Apply, Fax
Resumes to 941-488-2815 or
Call 941484-6656. DFWP. EOE.





Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


L GENERAL
wow 2100 ^


CHILD CARE
Provider/Teacher
Boca Grande. FCCPC pre-
ferred. Competitive pay,
benefits, tolls paid.
941-964-2885

PART TIME
"AMBASSADORS" Needed,
to solicit "Free Subscriptions"
for the Smart Shopper.
A 20 year old weekly shopper.
Contact Jim DeFalle
941-786-7676
Very busy transportation
company looking for mature
transport driver for the dis-
abled. Must have clean dri-
ving record, be able to pass
a background screening and
DOT physical. Knowledge of
the local areas. Committed
drivers with positive attitude.
Excellent customer service
skills. We supply the vehicle
and you supply the man
hours. Please call Shannon
Villar 727-532-6299 or fax
resume: 727-532-6289

WAREHOUSE/
MAILROOM
THE CHARLOTTE SUN
NEWSPAPER

NOW HIRING

Part-time, must be produc-
tion oriented, able to lift at
least 20 Ibs. and willing to
work flexible hours.
To fill out an Application
Apply in person
Mon.-Fri. 8-5
The Charlotte Sun
Newspaper
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Please, no phone calls
We are a drug and
nicotine free workplace
Pre-employment drug
and nicotine testing
required
PART TIME/
TEMPORARY


CLUB ATTENDANT, P/T, for
Pinebrook South Clubhouse
Assoc. to Work Weekly From
Tues.- Fri. Applications Avail-
able From Noon-5pm Daily at:
Pinebrook South Clubhouse:
1343 Featherbed Lane, Venice.
Detail Job Description
Will be Discussed During
Interview Process.

3000








NOTICES

|ANNOUNCEMENTS
[ iT 3010








DR. QUINTOS is moving his
cardiothoracic surgery
practice. Hospital records of
patients will still be available
from the institutions where
they received care. He wishes
to thank the community for
the opportunity to serve the
past six years.


ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010


-k***ADOPTION: *
Entertainment &
Marketing Execs long for
1st baby to LOVE.
Laughter, Sports, Music
await. Expenses Paid
1-800-552-0045
FLBar42311
**** Rita & Greg****




FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**







RAYMOND BENNETT
Renowned Evangelist and
Radio Host to preach at
South Venice Christian Church.
2390 Seaboard Ave Venice
10:30 AM Feb 2nd.
TOM SHELTON
Gospel Musician Same place
Feb 2nd at 6PM Sunday
Night. Tom is in Who's Who
of Gospel Singers.

HAPPY ADS
W 3015




Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
Loom 3020


ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
BODY RUBS BY
BRANDI 941-600-4317
SNOWBIRD SPECIALS
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520



SENSATIONS
STRESS RELEASE
941- 766-7995
3860 RT. 41, 2 MI. NORTH
OF PUNTA GORDA BRIDGE.


PERSONALS
So3020 ^


WM, LATE 50'S seeks female
in the PC & PG area for dinner
& walks. Call 352-682-6302.

SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
S3060



CNA Training, HHA, MED
ASST, CPR. Onsite testing
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
1 Employ Classified!
TRADITIONAL SHAOLIN
KUNG FU CLASSES for
Adults & children. FREE
classes available. All areas.
Call for more info.
941-204-2826
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 or 941-347-7445

BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
LW4! 3065 ^

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
EDGAR CAYCE A.R.E.
Search for God Study Group
6 PM 7 PM each Tuesday at
Venice Public Library
More Info call 941-966-1964.
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
Bible Study on the Book of
Romans will be on Thursdays
starting on Feb. 6th at 6:30
pm at 1460 S. McCall Rd.
Suite 1C Englewood. Dr. Ken
Lindow, PHD. will be teaching
a 6 week topical study of prin-
ciples taught in the Book of
Romans. For more info.
Call church office at
(941)475-7447 or log on to
fcenglewood.com
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
GULF COAST
HEALING ROOMS
If you need healing, we want
to pray with you!
Our prayer teams are
available to minister to
you by appointment.
Thursday 10 am-12:30 pm
For apt. call p.863.558.7455
1538 Rio de Janeiro Blvd.
Punta Gorda, Fl 33983
Jesus Still Heals Today!

BURIAL LOTS/
CRYPTS



2 BURIAL PLOTS in Rest-
lawn Memorial Gardens The
Masonic Garden Section B.
Lot 210 Spaces 1 & 2.
Both spaces for $3200.
Call Sandi (941)-743-9662
or 941-585-9533


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.


CLUES ACROSS
1. Character (abbr.)
4. Animal companions
8. A country in SE Asia
10. Of Carthage
11. On top of
12. Boater hat
13. Eat rapidly (slang)
15. Paddlers
16. Food consumer
17. Aeronaut
18. Tonto's Kemosabe
21. Division of geological time
22. Hill (Celtic)
23. Towing boat


CLUES DOWN
1. Clothes storage area
2. "_and her Sisters"
3. Revolve
4. One who makes puns
5. Inspire with love
6. Chronograph
7. Look over quickly
9. French philosopher Georges
10. A peerless example
12. Picture done in oils
14. To and __ movement
15. Egg cells
17. Macaws
19. Nerve inflammation
20. Energy unit












L AO


S S A7R F


T HEFL ION


Clatter
Trees of the genus Abies
Deprive by deceit
Decomposed
Nail & hair protein
A citizen of Iran
Whitish edible root vegetable
Actress Winger
Lessens in intensity
Afrikaans
Connected spirals
Accordingly
Competently
Angle (abbr.)


23. Herbal infusions
24. Female deer
25. Before anything else
26. Cotangent (abbr.)
27. Run off the tracks
28. A small drink of liquor
29. Get free of
30. A sharp narrow mountain
ridge
31. Knight's tunic
32. Infuriate
33. Lines in a drama
34. Skewered meat
36. Ground dwelling rodent


T S
I C
M A
E N
R


- i i i i t


KIE RAIT I N I RAIN I

p AIRS NIIP DE BRIA
ABA T ES T A A L
c 001 L s EIR G0
A07B L Y DE





The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, January 30, 2014


LOST & FOUND
L ::3090 ^


FOUND CAT: Tiger stripe,
gray, brown and lots of white.
Appeared on doorstep 2
months ago in Nokomis.
941-716-2294
FOUND HEARING AIDE :
HiBte Mini found at Deep creek
Barber shop on Friday Please
call 941-764-0021
FOUND JACKET & KEYS!
Near West Rotonda Entrance
on Placida Rd. 941-468-3045
FOUND JAN 17 large male
white/yellow dog. Maybe lab.
941-766-7333
FOUND RING: Cape Haze Pio-
neer Bike Trail. 941-697-3994
LOST CAT: Black long haired,
partially blind since birth. Lost
off Lyons Bay Rd. near Albee
Rd. Nokomis. Reward 941-
485-5836/609-709-2956
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!
LOST: CAT Male, Black w/
white on paws & under belly,
Declawed. Neutered, Lost
near Holiday Estates 1 & 2 in
Englewood. Please call 906-
282-7462 with any informa-
tion.


LOST: DOG, yellow medium
sized mixed breed spade
female, named Roxy.
REWARD Wauchula/Zolfo
Springs area.
941-916-2305
LOST: PUG, Male, dark tan,
from Felton Ave. Port Charlotte
Jan 26 Call 941-979-7423
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face, ear & back.
Missing from North Port
5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909

L ARTS CLASSES
L 3091 ^


ACRYLIC PAINTING CLASSES
Beginners on Tuesday, All other
Levels On Saturday At Hobby
Lobby, North Port. Call Barb
For Info 941-497-1395
ACRYLIC PAINTING-VENICE
Friday's 10-lpm
$30.00 per session
Call Vickie Lucas, 941485-8150
email: vlucas0509@hotmail.com
BEACH GLASS & Shell
Jewelry @ Creative Classes.
New Designs!
Home Classes Available
Call Susan for info, Venice:
941-492-2150.
FREE DRAWING CLASSES-
at the Beach. Contact Madge
at 941-234-3498
FUSED GLASS & STAINED
GLASS CLASSES at Creative
Classes in Venice. For info &
scheduling, Call Gayle Haynie
941-830-8448
COMPUTER CLASSES
L 3092 ^


E gg I VA 1(
Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org
EDUCATION
L : 3094 ^


MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.


I EXERCISE CLASSES
L 3095 J


GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
NOKOMIS ADVENTURE
BOOT CAMP for WOMEN
Jump Start the New Year!
Camp starts 1/6/2014,
runs on Mon, Wed & Fri.
More Info & Register at
www.NokomisBootCamp.com
Or call 213-361-8627
Special Rates Available

RELIGION CLASSES
Z3096

BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
BIBLE STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
Wednesday 10AM-11AM.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
OTHER CLASSES

L Z 3097 J

CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.

S APPLIANCE
I SERVICE/REPAIR I
LZ 5020 -

DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lie 990010103532/Ins
DRYER VENT CLEANING
Fact:15,000 house fires a
year caused directly from
clogged dryer vents, don't
be one of the 15,000. Avg.
price is $40 New year
price is, you name a fair
price, your heard right,
save your family, no excuse
now! 941-249-1161
Classifie = Sales

ADULT CARE
F 5050C 7


A LENDING HAND, INC.
Caregivers/Companions,
Hourly or 24/7 Care
941-809-3725
SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483


L CHILD CARE
LJ 50O51 ^


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
| COMPUTER SERVICE



*1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR &
TUTOR... IN YOUR HONE
Reasonable & Prompt!
Sr. Disc. 941-451-3186
EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./lns.
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS!!
941-764-3400 or
941-276-5011
-NEED A JOB?--)
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED! /

CONTRACTORS
Z : 505C4


TEDDY'S HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins.
CRC 1327653

| COURIER/TAXI
L ^ 5055T I^


AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE
ALWAYS RELIABLE
TRANSPORTATION
PROVIDING SAFE, RELIABLE,
COURTEOUS & AFFORDABLE
TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM
ALL AIRPORTS!
941-626-5226
RSW-$50 SRQ-$55
TPA-$125 MIA-$225
*ALL RATES ARE FROM PC SEE
WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL RATES
WWW.ALWAYSRELIABLETRANSPORTATION.COM


941-763-2388
24 Hour Service-
All Occasions
ANYWHERE!
Airport Service
Ft. Myers $49.
Tampa $119.
Door to Door Service
Clean A/C'd Cars
L--------------- J
| CONCRETE
L 50C57 ^


CONCRETE
Driveways Patios
Sidewalks Pads
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES


A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658


CHRIS RABY'S
CLEANING SERVICE
Servicing Venice to
Northern Sarasota.
941-623-3601
MAJESTIC CLEANING
PROFESSIONAL CLEANING AT
AFFORDABLE RATES! HAPPY TO
ACCOMMODATE YOUR NEEDS!
941-268-3075 LIC/INS
ELECTRICAL



DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
'Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
^ 5080 ^


BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing *
*Bush Hogging *
*ALL Mulching *
*Selective Clearing
*Tree & Stump Removal
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
Lic./iAns
DUMP TRUCK SERVICES
A DIVISION OF
TREMENDOUS TREE
Bobcat Services, Fill Dirt,
Grading, Driveways Installed
(Shell/Rock), Private Roads,
Tri Axle Dump Truck
Free Estimates
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983

HANDYMAN/
GENERAL REPAIR



"HONEY DO" Handyman
& Odd Jobs
Kitchen & Bath Tune Ups
Faucets, counters,
windows, doors and more!
..related electrical &
plumbing work.
Experienced &
References Available
941-275-0712
HEATING & AIR
^5090 ^


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738

S.O.S. -
A/C & Heat
941-468-4956
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2995 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY!
ST. LIC #CAC1816023

HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT



TOPP'S FENCE INC.
941-429-0800
PVC
ALUMINUM
CHAIN LINK
"NOW HIRING"

LICENSE #AAAOO10261


-5100 Basic Gutter
Cleaning & Handyman
Services Call: Mike
240-925-6806
ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244




Commercial/Residential
County Red Tag Problems
New & Remodel Drawings
Owner/Builder Supervision
HARLEY DESIGN
Accurate Detailed Construction Drawings
941-741-1126
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
fans, lights, faucets, toilets &
washer/dryer repair, etc...
(941)-661-8585 lic.
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
DAVID BECK
The Handyman, LLC.
Kitchen Bath Remodels .
Ceramic Tile *
941-766-1767 Lic# 1327942
Ins. Member BBB
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 LIc.CGC#060662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227
HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
*PRESSURE CLEANING*
Homes, Roofs, Etc.,
Auto Detailing, Window
Cleaning & More. Lic & Ins
Call 941-276-0628

J & J HANDYMAN
941-525-7967, 941-493-6736
Painting, Pressure Washing &
Much More!
Over 30 Years Experience &
Satisified Customers
Serving Venice & Sarasota Areas
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR ODD
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
LICENSED & FULLY INSURED

J. BONANNO COMPLETE
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Pressure Washing, Gutter
Cleaning, Mowing, Yard Work
& More 35 years exp.
Call John 941-286-5940
JJ's RESCREENING &
Handyman Services.
941-875-8296
Lic and Insured.
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
RAINSCAPE INC A Full
Service Irrigation Company
Monthly Maintenance starts at
$40. 941-888-2988


Ray Tippins
Seawall Erosion
Repair: Repair Sink-
holes & Sodding, Tree
Service, Shrub & Weed-
ing. Owner Operated,
Lic./Ins. 941-625-2124
SIDING, Soffit, Facia, Seamless
Gutters & Pressure Washing
Jenkins Home Improvement
941497-2728


SLIDING
GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs.
Free Estimates Lic/Ins.
Bob @ 941-706-6445



E75LIDER
SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
& Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
Susanne's Cleaning
Residential Cleaning
Free Estimates
941-223-9289
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
The Stucco Guy
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/Ins.
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#AAA006387


VENICE ISLAND PAINTING
Island Residents receive 20%
off. Interior Doors $25. Over
21 years of experience. Call
Wes Smith 941-266-8901
PROTECT YOUR FAMILY
WITH CLEAN WATER!
OXIDIZES HOME
INLINE WATER 30-DAY
BACTERIA & if MONEY BACK
CHLORIDE GUARANTEE
RESIDUE
WATER CREEK INLINE SOLUTIONS
FLOW-BITE IS A SUPPLEMENTAL
DEFENSE SYSTEM THAT TAKES A
BITE OUT OF INLINE WATER BACTERIA
BUILD-UP & RESIDUE.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE
VISIT US ON OUR WEBSITE:
WWW.WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
INFO@WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
"FEED THE BEAR"

WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing,Concrete,Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

L LAWN/GARDEN
I & TREE
^ 5110 ^

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune,
install, design, removal,
stump grinding.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com

AMERICAN IRRIGATION
Call 941-587-2027
FREE ESTIMATES!!!
Licensed & Insured
Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-11-
00010. Serving Charlotte
and Sarasota Counties





Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


LAWN/GARDEN
I & TREE
^ 5110 ^^

C&D TRACTOR & TREE Services
One call for all your tree &
home services!
Including tree removal, stump
grinding, pressure washing,
trash haul off, mulching &
much more! 15+ yrs exp.
Serving Charlotte/Sarasota
Counties 941-276-6979
Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages, Scr. lanais etc...
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
WINDOW WASHING
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding .
*Lawn Service e
*Bucket Service e
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./lns.
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
ISLAND BREEZE
LAWN SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
14 years experience
Owner operated. Lic&
Ins.Venice & surrounding
areas. For free estimate
call Keith 941-445-2982
J RIZ TREE SERVICES
Complete Tree Services
Servicing Charlotte & Sarasota
941-306-7532 Lic & Ins


OF FLORIDA INC.
LAKE & POND SERVICES
INCREASE PROPERTY VALUES
CREATE AN AESTHETICALLY
PLEASING AMENITY
SERVICES TO FIT YOUR
SPECIFIC LAKE & POND NEEDS
FREE QUOTE
Call To Schedule An
Appointment With One Of
Our Licensed & Insured
Technicians.
941-378-2700
WWW.APOPFL.COM
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
PROFESSIONAL Tree Ser-
vice. Stump Removal, Palm &
Hedge Trimming. Free Esti-
mates! 941-624-4204 Lic
#001053
ROMAN'S LAWN PRO
RESIDENTIAL & COMM.
LICENSED & INSURED
941-380-LAWN
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/lnsured941-484-6042
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
TJ MILAZZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
MILAZZO'S LANDSCAPING
941-830-1005
ALL PHASES OF RESIDENTIAL
LANDSCAPING, INSTALLATIONS,
PLANTING, PEPPER BERRY CON-
TROL & CONCRETE CURBING.
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035

| LEGAL SERVICES

Z 5115 ^

NON-LAWYER SERVICES
Wills, Divorces, Taxes, Living
Trusts. Call 941-629-0770


I MARINE REPAIR
Z ^5121 J




MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329

MASONRY
ora 5129


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
FiZN5130 ]


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service!
24 Hrs. a Day!
941-764-0982 or
941-883-1231

Delivery & Transport
No Item Too Small
MoveltSuncoast0mail.com


MOVING HELP
$$$ Save $$$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870

PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
^^^ 5140



BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10/% Off With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L-------------------------J
STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINTING
Res/Comm. Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!
Colin's Painting
3rd Generation Painter.
Interior & Exterior Painting,
Carpentry & Pressure Washing.
Free Estimates. Ask About
Senior Discounts.
Serving Sarasota & Charlotte
Counties. (941) 468-7082
SERVING ENGLEWOOD, NORTH
PORT, PORT CHARLOTTE, VENICE
DANNY MILLER PAINTING, LLC
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING
941-830-0360
FREE ESTIMATES
danspaintng4602@comcast.net
LICENSED & INSURED AAO09886
INDIVIDUAL CRAFTSMAN
Interior & Exterior-One Job
At A Time Yours! The job is
done when you are happy!
Family Man Living in Venice.
Marc 920-421-0767
LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do lt!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
IZ 5140^


MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764

Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates Prompt Service
941-484-4576

PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet!
Family Owned and Operated.
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-00015
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lie # AAA009837
SWEENEYS PAINTING
Pressure Cleaning *
MildewTreatment Painting I
Interior & Exterior *
SFree Est. Sr. Discounts *
941-916-1024
Lc#WAO010702
We Do It A Shade Better!
LARRY BATES PAINTING
Free Estimates
Locally Owned & Operated
941-625-1226
Lic/Ins #RRR002261

PET CARE
mmZ5155 ^


DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853

7 PLUMBING /
Loot 5160 ^


DO ALL PLUMBING LLC
A Full Service Company for
ALL Your Plumbing Needs.
Call for Our Monthly Specials.
941-626-9353 Lic#CFC1428884
LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
REPIPES, SLAB LEAKS
FULL SERVICE PLUMBING
PRECISION PLUMBING
941423-3058
#CFC1427378

THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393

POOL SERVICES
L ^ 5165


ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Repairs & Service
FREE WATER TESTING
941-426-6500
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps
*Weekly Maintenance e
941-809-5121 CPC1458222/lns.
JADVERTISE!l

Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268

| PRESSURE
CLEANING
^^ 5180

PACKERS A-Z PRESSURE
CLEANING & MORE
Roofs, Homes, Docks,
pool decks & cages,
Mobile detailing etc... No
job too small. Free Est.
Sr. Disc. 941-929-6775


BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
BENSON'S QUALITY
CLEANING
Pool Cages, Lanais,
Driveways, ETC!
941-697-1749
or 941-587-5007
www.BensonsQualityCleaning.com
PRESSURE WASHING
SERVICE
941-766-0902
PRESENTTHIS AD
WORTH $20 OFF WHOLE HOUSE
FREE ESTIMATES
Pest Eliminators Inc.
LICENSE STATE OF FL #JF138591
LOCAL BUSINESS TAX LICENSE
CHARLOTTE CO. #4998
FL TAX CERTIFICATE #18-8015280394-1

7~~I7
L SCREENING
W Z 5184 ^


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779
wescreenflorida.com-
Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/Ins.
L ROOFING
lw:5185


HOME TYWN
Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30 Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors &Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE C C C #1325731 & INSURED

JAMES WEAVER ROOFING
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1984. FREE ESTIMATE
941-426-8946
UC#1325995

LEONARD'S ROOFING &
INSULATION INC.
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187
R.L. TEEL ROOFING
Reroofs & Repairs
Insurance Inspections
Veterns Discounts
941-473-7781
RC29027453 Lic/Ins
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838
SEmploy Classified!

WAT .j- C0
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
Old Roof Removal Our Specialty
Full Carpentry
Free Estimates
LIC #ccc 068184
FULLY INSURED
I ^"Authorized


WINDOW CLEANING

Z 5225 ^

CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting. Also available
Wallpaper Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845
Serving Sarasota County

TERRY SOWERS
WINDOW CLEANING &
PRESSURE WASHING
Store Fronts, Residential,
and Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES
Accept all Credit Cards
941-697-9439


SUSE CLASSIFIED!

WE DO WINDOWS &
PRESSURE WASHING.
New Customers e
*Specials Package Deals *
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates. Lic./Ins.
(941)-661-5281

6000
q v D


MERCHANDISE
GARAGE SALES


6001 Arcadia
6002 Englewood
6003 Lake Suzy
6004 Nokomis
6005 North Port
6006 Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
6007 Punta Gorda
6008 Rotonda
6009 Sarasota
6010 South Venice
6011 Venice
6012 Out Of Area
6015 Flea Market
6020 Auctions
MERCHANDISE
6013 Moving Sales
6025 Arts & Crafts
6027 Dolls
6030 Household Goods
6035 Furniture
6038 Electronics
6040 TV/Stereo/Radio
6060 Computer Equip
6065 Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
6070 Antiques &
Collectibles
6075 Fruits/Veges
6090 Musical
6095 Medical
6100 Health/Beauty
6110 Trees & Plants
6120 Baby Items
6125 Golf Accessories
6128 Exercise/Fitness
6130 Sporting Goods
6131 Firearms
6132 Firearm Access.
6135 Bikes/Trikes
6138 Toys
6140 Photography/Video
6145 Pool/ Spa & Supplies
6160 Lawn & Garden
6165 Storage Sheds/
Buildings
6170 Building Supplies
6180 Heavy Constr.
Equipment
6190 Tools/Machinery
6220 Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
6225 Restaurant Supplies
6250 Appliances
6260 Misc. Merchandise
6270 Wanted to Buy/T rade

L ARCADIA AREA
GARAGE SALES
6001

m SAT. 8-12 7049 SW
I Liverpool Rd. Sunnybreeze
Christian. Comm. garage sale!
Antiques, crafts. Tea room
Refreshments! (On US 17 S. of
Ft Ogden or N. of Live Oaks)


m-FRI-SAT FRI-SAT 7514
escondido ST 8 to noon
this is a very Ig sale
m-]FRI.-SAT. 9-? 9041 Aval-
lon Ave.. MOVING SALE!
Furniture, tools, and lots of
misc. items!
[-MON. 9-2 26193 Barce-
los Ct.
m-THU-SAT 8-4 111 Via
IMadonna Bikes, Tools,
Antiques, Household, Plants,
Records, Comics, 60s ca
[-THU.-SAT. 8-? 1067
LHumboldt St. Carpenter
Tools, Ladders, Household,
Solid Oak Ent. Center & MORE!
[-THUR.&FRI. 8-1 2031
LForked Creek Drive. MOV-
ING SALE! Clothing, furniture,
household items & more.

| LAKE SUZY AREA
GARAGE SALES
6003 ^

F--SAT. 8-2 11644 SW
LJEgret Circle, off Kingsway
Circle/Crystal Bay Condo @
poolhouse. Something for
everyone plus baked goods.

L NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES
^ 6005^ ^

[-FRI 8-3 6700 S Biscayne
DDR collectibles, furniture,
Avon.TV.MisC

Need a
new Ride?
Find it
in the
Classifieds!
m-FRI. SAT SUN. 8-2
I18092 Edmiston Ave.
Like new gas dryer, Desk, Lots
of misc. items.
m-]FRI.-SAT 8-? 5460 Ken-
Iwood Drive. Furn., car,
costume jewelry, household
items and much more!
m-]FRI.-SAT. 9-? 3451 S.
Salford Blvd. Baby Boy &
Adult Clothes, Ladies Formals,
Home Goods, Nice Items!
m-]SAT ONLY 8-3 4748 DAB-
LNEY ST WOMEN'S
SCRUBS, CLOTHING, ELEC-
TRONICS, DOLLS, JEWELRY
-]ISAT. 9-1 4994 Jody Ave.
i at the corner of Atwater.
Rugs, furniture, kitchen items,
pictures, comforters, outdoor
items and more!
m-SAT. 9-3 330 Trailorama
lDr. Harbor Cove. MOVING!
Antique China, Glassware, Vin-
tage Jewelry & MUCH MORE!
m-]THU.-SAT. 8-12 3730
Santana St. TOOLS! Tow
chains, Fishing gear, trolling
motor, dishes, jewelry & more!
SPT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
L 6006




FRI. & SAT. 9-1 PM
2382 BREMEN CT.
DEEP CREEK FROM HARBORVIEW
TAKE RIO DEJANIERO TO
NUREMBERG THEN TO BREMEN.
ENTIRE ESTATE TO BE
LIQUIDATED INCLUDING
ETHAN ALLEN DINING AND
BEDROOM FURNITURE,
WATERFORD, ALL TYPES OF
GLASS COLLECTIBLES, PAT-
TERN, CARNIVAL, DEPRES-
SION, ETC. CONDUCTED BY
MCMILLEN & Co.
FRI. 8-3 23292 Delavan
Ave. Collectables, plates &
etc. 800 cc motorcycle.
m-iFRI.-SAT. 8-2 154 Salem
lAve. LOTS OF TOOLS! Lad-
ders, 10" Delta saw, bikes,
fishing equip., boat & more!





The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, January 30, 2014


[ FRI.-SAT. 8-2
-1 20360 LADNER AVE
ESTATE SALE
All contents: furniture, house-
hold items, ladies clothes 8-
12, garden tools, much more.
No Large appliances.
-] FRI.-SAT. 8-2 2149 Giles
lAve. Household Goods,
Furniture, Lawn Mower, Small
Appliances & MORE!!
m-FRI.-SAT. 8-2 2365
lMontpelier Rd. (D.C.) Lots
of Household Goods, Bedding
Comforters, Plants & MORE!!
-iFRI.-SAT. 8-4 12469
LWillmington Blvd. MOVING
SALE! King size bed, dining set
& misc. household items.
m-FRI.-SAT. 9-3 472
lEppinger Dr. MOVING
SALE! Tools, Household,
Clothes, & MUCH MORE!!
m FRI.-SAT. 9-5
I23170 Maclellan Avenue.
Everything from A-Z Items for
cars, homes, linens, pets, etc
m-SAT ONLY 8-1 280 Tor-
1rington St.Great variety! All
proceeds benefit Relay For
Life.
iI SAT. 8-12
23000 Midway Blvd.
HUGE GARAGE SALE
inside PC Middle School
Wide variety of items.
Clothes, Books, & Much more
r-iSAT. 9-2 615 NW Ellicott
LJCir. ESTATE SALE, 5 pc
White King Bed Set, Queen
sleeper sofa, Chairs, Avon Col-
lectibles, Pioneer Stereo, Work
Bench and Much More.
-iTHU.-SAT. 8-2 1074
Darby Drive. Antiques, col-
lectibles, furniture and lots of
household misc.
I Classifie = Sales

L PUNTA GORDA
GARAGE SALES


m-]FRI.-SAT. 8-12 311
LMonaco Dr.. High & low
prices on too many quality
items to list! No Early Birds!
D FRIDAY ONLY 8-1
- 3700 Bal Harbor Blvd.
COMPLEX ANNUAL SALE!
Something for everyone
including a car!

[ PELICAN HARBOR
WOMEN'S CLUB
PRESENTS OUR
ANNUAL TRASH &
TREASURE SALE!!
on Sat. 8am-2pm
@ 6720 Riverside Dr.
Raffle Baskets,
Bake Sale, Lots of
Books, Clothing and
MUCH, MUCH MORE!

r'-i- RIVER'7
FOREST
VILLAGE
I ARTS&
* CRAFTS FESTIVAL
S SAT. 10-4
S4300 Riverside Dr
FEATURING ARTISTS AND
CRAFTERS FROM ALL AROUND
THE UNITED STATES.
COME JOIN THE FUN!
SOFREE PARKING & ADMISSION
*DOOR PRIZES
I DRAWINGS EVERY HALF HOUR
DELICIOUSS BAKED GOODS
SAND REFRESHMENTS.
m'SAT. 10-4. 208 Colony
Point Dr. Punta Gorda
Isles. Tools, pet supplies,
clothing, household/patio etc
D- SAT. 8-1 Buttonwood
Village, 701 Aqui Esta
Drive, Punta Gorda, FL.
Treasures, Bake Sale,
Coffee Donuts & Hot Dogs
m-SAT. 8-2 27279 Porto
IINacional Dr. Desk, File
cab, tw Bunk bds, Clothes,
shoes, jewelry ,crafts, more


] SAT. 8AM-NOON
PG CHAMBER CITY
WIDE GARAGE SALE
401 TAYLOR ST. &
225 W. VIRGINIA AV.
PARKING LOT OF
CENTENNIAL BANK &
KOCH & COMPANY CPA'S.
m- SAT. 9-1 2509 Padre
Island Dr.. Various House-
hold items, Tools, Some vin-
tage, tile wet saw etc.
[-|SAT. 9-1 NO EARLIES
I3620 Magnolia Way. Huge
Garage Sale. A little bit of
everything. Off Rio Villa/Tam TrI.
D 1 ST. VINCENT
-1 RUMMAGE SALE
25200 Airport Rd. and Taylor
Rd. Sat. Feb. 1st 9-12 noon.
Rain Date Sat. Feb. 8th 9-12
noon. Household items, furni-
ture, clothing, jewelry, shoes,
purses, books and linens.
m-THU.-FRI. 8-2 3301 Wis-
Iteria Place. Fishing Equip-
ment, Gun Cabinet, Aquari-
ums, Trailer & MUCH MORE!!
[-THUR-SAT 9-5 3225
IMagnolia Way piano,furn
collectibles &household items
conversion van & misc. tools
-iTHURS-FRI-SAT 8-4
9025 Gewant Blvd, Golf
Cart, trailers, designer plates,
tools, power & hand, air comp.
-NEED A JOB?-\
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!

GARAGE SALES
^ 6008 ^

m FRI. ONLY 8-2 978
Rotonda Cir. Boating, Yard
Trailer, Deep Freezer, 7 Pc.
Patio Set. (941)-662-7969
rmFRI.-SAT. 8-1 25 Oak-
l1land Hills Ct. MOVING
SALE! Some Furniture, House-
hold. A Little Bit of Everything!!
m- FRI.-SAT. 8-2 30 Broad-
I moor Lane. Household
Items, Lots of Tools,
Weedeaters & MUCH MORE!
m-FRI.-SAT. 9-3 472
lEppinger Dr. MOVING
SALE! Tools, Household,
Clothes, & MUCH MORE!!

GARAGE SALES
^ ^ 6011

[-SAT ONLY 8-2 Estate
LSale Every Thing Must Go
1488 Vermeer dr
I1m SAT. 8-2 105 E. Alba
Street. Venice Island.
MOVING SALE!

GULF COVE/SGC
GARAGE SALES
~6014~

Il FRI & SAT 8-4
El 5538 MONTEGO LN
TV, XBOX, PS2, DVD'S,
FURNITURE, HUGE........
AUCTIONS /
LmvaI 6020 J


AUCTION SATURDAY
Feb 1st @ 10 AM
27841 Lippizan Trail
Punta Gorda.
3 Horses, Zero Turn Lawn
Mower, GMC pickup, Chevy
Blazer, Horse Trailer, Sea-
Doo, 5 Saddles Round Pen,
miscellaneous tack and tools.
10% Buyer Premium
Phillip Wilson
Auctioneer.com
AU1191 AB2321
ilson Realty 941-629-6624
JACK ROBILLARD,
Auctioneers & Appraisers
Robillardauctioneers.com
(941)-575-9758


L AUCTIONS
W4 4 6020 ^

PUBLIC AUCTION
EVERYONE WELCOMED
Gulfcoast Wonder &
Imagination Zone, Inc. (GWIZ)
Science & Technology
Museum
LIVE & ONLINE Tuesday
Feb. 11th at 11am
1001 Blvd. of the Arts
Sarasota, FL 34236
All exhibits, toys, displays,
state-of-the-art interactive cen-
ters, tools, machinery, furni-
ture, computers & worksta-
tions will be auctioned off.
Full Day Preview 2/10
from 10am-4pm
ABC Case No.:
2013-CA-008840-NC
Details at
www.moeckerauctions.com
(800)-840-BIDS
15%-18% BP
$100 ref. cash dep.
Subject to Confirm
AB-1098, AU-3219 Eric Rubin


PUBLIC AUCTION Sat.
Feb 1 @ 10 am. Insp @ 9am
630 Chambers St PC 33948
FULL ESTATE AUCTION
Auctionzip.com #25770 for
pics. 10% BP. Jack Robillard
941-575-9758 AU3437 AB2632

ARTS AND CRAFTS

z^ 6025 ^

ARTIST FRAMES 3 24 x 18,
1 20 x 16 $70
941-629-4857
CORK ROLL 4 ft wide, 12 ft
long, 3/16 in thick $20 941-
475-6424
ERASING MACH. Electric,
Staedler/Mars #5270 $25
941-505-6209
FIVE METAL framed prints
signed 18"X26".each $8
941-889-7592
PRINT BY Tracy Dennison
Signed, framed & #. $130
941-889-7592
QUILTRACK NEW wallrack
narural wood $15 941-235-
1910
MOVING SALES
LZ^6029 ^

2 LEATHER rocker recliners 2
almost like n $350 941-769-
0777
MOVING BOXES (40) Asst'd
Sizes $50 617-230-3845
WARDROBE BOXES (6) with
Metal Hang Bars $50 617-
230-3845
HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z 6030 ^

4 DINING chairs Oak like new
$125 941-356-0129
6 PIECE Canister Set with
mushroom pattern. $12
941-629-4973



BANQUET TABLE 8 ft.folding
legs.like new. $65 941-235-
2203
BAR STOOL Black, Modern
Good condition $14
941-894-4115
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BLINDS LEVELOR 72x96
patio doors, tan $65
941-416-4822
BRADFORD REGISTERED
Plates w/holder & certificate
$15 941-629-4973
BREADMAKERT-FALEMERIL
FOR homemade bread $20
941-235-1910
BRISTAL GREEN machine
good for removing sp $40
941-505-0089


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

z :^ 6030 ^

4 HP Shop Vac New Wet & Dry
$35 941-697-0822
CALPHALON/UTENSILS 6
pieces like new $70 OBO
941-575-4364
CEILING FANA/LIGHT Hamp-
ton Bay w/Remote Beauti $80
941-460-8189
CHAIR CHAIR Ivory Fabric,
Swivels, Ex. Co $75 443-621-
7428
CHINA NORITAKE pat-
tern#5558, 91 pcs, perfect
$350 941-575-8881
CHINA SERVICE for 8, ex.
condition ,crown ming $45
941-505-0809
COMPACT PERSONAL
Space Heater 1000/1500w
$12 941-763-0442
DINETTE SET Glass top table
w 4 chairs on caste $199
931-510-9625
FULL SIZE mattress
set,frame. LIKE NEW. $250
941-426-5146
GARAGE SCREEN doors 4
panels, track not include $125
239-292-7111
GOURMET COOKWARE
15pcs.Cost $300 LIKE NEW.
$85 941-916-9026
HOOVER HARD floor cleaner
it vacuums scrubs dr $50
941-626-3142
HOOVER WIDE Path Vaccuum
With attach & bags $30
941-697-0005
KIRBY VACCUM including all
part plus shamp $200
941-235-9185


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

z :^ 6030 ^

BED KING beauty rest, lyr.mt
/bx. $350 941-697-1566
KITCHENAID STOVE Self
Cleaning. Electric. $50
941-661-7092
LAMP 29" tall heavy brass
29" tall new shade gr $20
941-627-6542



FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**

SUNLIF
I^ h / *** ,_ S~'R


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

CONAIR GARMET Steamer
Like New $30 941-627-6542
LIGHT Tiffany Pendant; 2
avail; Deep Creek $60 941-
276-2411
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New-Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
ORIENTAL RUG 8'X10'nice,
can email pics $125
941-697-2163
ORIENTAL STYLE Rug 5'X7'
nice condition $50
941-697-2163
PET CARRIER Bergan small
pet carrier. Black nylon $10
931-510-9625
POLE LAMP 65" Off White 3
Lights $8 941-473-1026
PORTABLE HEATER Delonghi
safe heat (oil filled) $35 941-
830-4892
RUG ORIENTAL STYLE
8'X10' good condition c $150
941-697-2163
RUG ORIENTAL STYLE Rug
5'X7' nice condition $50
941-697-2163
SERGER, 5 Spool, Berette,
Model 335, excellent condition
$250 941-493-7166
SEWING MACHINE Brothers
Zig Zag Commercial. $400
941-276-0488
SEWING MACHINE Janome
M.Craft,233 bltn's $395 920-
470-5014
SEWING MACHINES, White
Kenmore, Brother, $50 & up.
Exc. Cond. 941-493-7166


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.




SUDOKUA ~
SL D K A-- ~Fun By The

7 9 2 4 Numbers

Like puzzles?
- Then you'll love
2 5 4 9 sudoku. This
mind-bending
6 7 4 8 puzzle will have
S_ you hooked from
4 5 6 the moment you
S6 __ square off, so
9 sharpen your
pencil and put
9 2 7 yoursudoku
9 2_ 7 savvy to the test!

114 6

3 1 5
Level: Advanced
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

89 9 VL L S 9 Z6
9 E;6 9 Z 9 V I.

L L. 6 9 t9 8 9
6 989 9 Z I. L 9
SL S996 Z9V
9 Z 9 V L L 66 9
6 6 / L I. t9 9 8 Z

V96.9.6.9 6
8 I. j69 69g
:UIMSNV





Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11


Challenger
DIRECTIONS: C
Fill each square with a number, one through nine. /ii-
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right. I0
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom. 1
* Diagonal squares through center should add to 22
total in upper and lower right.
THERE MAY BE MORE 9 30
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge 7 31
Time 9 Minutes
6 Seconds 3 8
Your Working 7 -
Time Minutes
Seconds iiH
18 16 20 22 19

(2014 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.
solution f-2 4

Yesterday's 2 61 i
Challenger
Answers 7 6 8 aj


Cryptoqui 2p 2011 by King Features Syndicate

1-30


HQ LKD'PW OUVHZF U EKZF

AUOX, H PWBVKZ LKD RXKDEM

AW BUPWQDE ZKO OK RWO

KQQ OXW RKUV MWOWBOKP.
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: DUBIOUS ABOUT HIS
CURRENT PROBLEM-SOLVING METHOD, THE
TRIG PUPIL IS HAVING SECANT THOUGHTS.
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: Q equals F


RMADUKE By Brad Anderson


"Waltz time!!! Waltz time!!!"


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne


MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters

M W CLOCK
is50 LOUve[


IN THE NBA


MH E B YWTB T R O L J GE

BYKWU R B NACNUD PN

KI GEDBAZXYVSQOM
K I G E CY R CAY LWU S Q

P ND L R I KZ T I WON J S

TE(A B D U L J AB B AR)E N

H I N O S R E V I F D EY C I

CATOYXYVA R U A S RK

QP L T LNMKOHH J H E L

F E E C EA B J Z C YXV I I

UTYRQPMTS EWPOPW
Wednesday's unlisted clue: HUSKY
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: BOTH KARL AND MOSES
Abdul-Jabbar Dantley Jordan Schayes
Barkley Duncan Nowitzki West
Baylor Havlicek Pettit Wilkins
Bryant Iverson Pierce
2014 King Features, Inc. 1/3C


B.C. By Mastroianni & Hart


SPORTS
SLEUTH






The un lassfie Pae 12EINC IJ~mnij~ !':i:'2:1' 0


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii


greatt deals in the Business & Service

blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and

i the Classified Section of the Sun!


0-1N-N1m14IIOtA[1a 63 1ON WI


Anpurism treatment


REX MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Terry Beatty


HOW DOES A MAN YOU'RE NOT ALONE.
determined by size, location APMIT HE4S TERRIFIED UCK! WHEN PI THETH
OF HIS WIFE, REX? PHYSICAL ABUSE
DEAR DR. ROACH: My -sTAR1"
question is about my sister,
who is 66 years old wi-th
aortic disease and who's had


four aneurisms: an ascend-
ing aneurism 4.5 x 4.6 cm, a
descending at 4.2 x 4.7 cm,
and also an abdominal at
2.4 x 3.2 and another just at
2 cm. I missed an in-depth
story on the local evening
news, but its hook was "a
breakthrough on treating
aneurisms that dramatically
shrinks them."- K.K.
ANSWER: An aneurism
is a dilation of a blood
vessel at a site of weak-
ness. This can happen
in virtually any blood
vessel, but they are most
concerning in the heart,
the brain and the aorta,
the main blood vessel that
takes the blood from the
heart to the body. In your
sister, the large aneurisms
are in the thoracic aorta,
the part of the aorta that
is in the chest. The major
risk factors for thoracic
aneurisms are high blood
pressure, high cholesterol
and smoking. However, ge-
netic diseases like Marfan's
syndrome and Ehlers-
Danlos syndrome should
be suspected in younger
people with thoracic aortic
aneurisms. Infectious and
inflammatory diseases
like syphilis and giant cell
arteritis are uncommon
causes.
Medical therapy in-
cludes blood-pressure
reduction, especially by
beta blockers, manage-
ment of high cholesterol
and diabetes if present and
tobacco cessation. The
decision of when and how
to treat aortic aneurisms
surgically should be made
by an expert.
I don't know what the
"breakthrough" referred
to on your news was.
However, I suspect it was
one of several new devices
that are placed inside the
blood vessel to let blood
flow through while pro-
viding strength to the wall.
Repair also can be done
through an open chest
procedure. The decision of
when to operate is made
by carefully reviewing the
size of the aneurism and
how quickly it is growing.
DEAR DR. ROACH: Will
colloidal silver (suspension
of ultra-fine silver) help
a sore throat if sprayed
or gargled? My camping
friends say this will sanitize
drinking water. J.E.
ANSWER: I am aware
that other media doctors
have recommended this
product. However, I am
unable to find enough
evidence that it is safe and
effective for me to do so,
and I recommend against
using it for either a sore
throat or for sanitizing


Dr. Roach

drinking water.
For sanitizing water, I
recommend filtering with
a 0.1 micron filter, avail-
able at camping supply
stores.
DEAR DR. ROACH:
Should I be concerned
with blood tests that
show MCV, MCH and
mono numbers in the
high range? What do high
readings indicate? C.E
ANSWER: "MCV"
is "mean corpuscular
volume," and "MCH"
is "mean corpuscular
hemoglobin" both
indicators of the size of red
blood cells. The monocyte
("mono") is a type of white
blood cell.
Large red blood cells
happen with deficiencies
of vitamin B-12 and
folic acid. They also come
about with many kinds of
uncommon and rare blood
diseases. Monocyte levels
can be high in infections
and certain other kinds of
blood diseases.
All that being said, the
"normal" range from a
laboratory is based on a
sample of people in the
population. By definition,
5 percent of normal,
healthy people will have a
lab test result that comes
out as abnormal. If you get
15 or 20 lab results, there's
a very good chance that
at least one will come out
abnormal. Lab tests always
must be interpreted keeping
the whole situation in mind.
READERS: The booklet
on macular degeneration
explains this common
eye ailment. Readers can
order a copy by writing: Dr.
Roach- No. 701, PO. Box
536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475. Enclose a check or
money order (no cash) for
$4.75 U.S./$6 Can. with the
recipient's printed name
and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
Dr Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer
individual letters, but
will incorporate them
in the column when-
ever possible. Readers
may email questions to
ToYourGoodHealth@med.
cornell.edu or request an
order form of available
health newsletters at P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Health news-
letters may be ordered from
www. rbmamall.com.


ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein
LIZ, ALL YOUR LIFP THEN YOUR WORK
YOU STIlV/G TOWAIP LIFP NPS, YOU?
SOMTITHIN&. KIPS A1G cCPOVON,









Mmnd
MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella


ANP SUPPGNLY YOU
NG6P TO ?6INVGNT
YOURSELF. ANP
THAT TAKEG TIME.
PAP...


The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


,:,:.:. ',,ur ..uri ne t





Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463. 1638


BUI S N ESAP ESBBRC
^-^SU N ^NEWSPAPERS ^U^mlJIJBI^IH^


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek V "-Q 1 .
ROW OL i5 YOUK. UNCLE MEA? RCS R5 SO OLtTPAT WREN I4C
.I TKIESTOFiLLOUTANONU E-
Ei AP-- -F--L. i C ATp10 tIO FO0 K5 0 AE-T lA 1...
You really noed to ,PLCAIO FO f..T ....
Sworkonyour 1 I- see what
E cockney accent if I cda do.
,i wantr this role.


ITkE w P-oWrA L5T TO SELECT
& F.. WCWL\CT'5 '(EOFA T
| OES5TT GO FA Ex.OUGR K
11 s-/^^TO iNCLUIUt>MEIYEw
50 Wks
\& A ORH ^


--7^' --1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your s
answer here:mm
(Answers tomorrow)

Yesterday's Jumbles: AWOKE IRONY MOTION THEORY
Answer: When Tabitha Spruce met Stephen King in
college, she met MR. "WRITE"

Mayo chews up gum


Dear Heloise: Do you
have an easy way to get
gum out of hair? My
daughter has gotten it
stuck a couple of times,
and I hate having to cut it
out. Janice in Arizona
Yes in fact, I have
several for you! The next
time this happens, try
using REAL mayonnaise.
Just rub it in on the gum
to break it up, wipe it out
with a paper towel, then
wash the hair. You also can
use mineral oil or creamy
peanut butter; something
with a little oil breaks up
the gum. Heloise

Black marks
Dear Heloise: I have
two different sets of white
dinnerware, and both of
the dinner plates have
silverware marks on the
eating surfaces. I have
tried cleaners for ceramic
cooktops and bleach, but
nothing has helped. -
Ann H. in California
Unfortunately, if the
marks go all the way
through the glaze on the
plates, then they will not
be removable. However,
try a paste of baking soda
and water. Use a sponge to
scrub the marks until they
disappear! Baking soda is
found in most homes, but
we sometimes forget just
how many money-saving
hints it can be used for. You
keep asking for baking-
soda hints, which is why I
wrote my Heloise's Baking
Soda Hints and Recipes
pamphlet. To receive
one, send $5 and a long,
self-addressed, stamped


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott


Hints from Heloise

(70 cents) envelope to:
Heloise/Baking Soda, P.O.
Box 795001, San Antonio,
TX 78279-5001. You can
test this baking-soda
method the way I do. Clean
one half of a plate, rinse
and dry. Take a look. It
should look much better.
- Heloise

Remover
substitute
Dear Heloise: I usually
use store-bought makeup
remover to get my eye
makeup off. When I run
out, I use baby oil with a
cotton ball or pad. My mom
taught me that it is a good
substitute and it is less
expensive. I have oily skin,
so I use baby oil only for a
short time. Monica A. in
Oklahoma City

Sippy-cup wrap
Dear Heloise: If you have
a toddler whose hands get
cold from the chilled drink
in his or her sippy cup,
simply slip a terry-cloth
wristband on the cup.
These are found in stores'
athletic departments, are
sold in pairs and are easily
laundered. Mary in Ohio


WWW,,flim RELAX!
I FOUND
TIE SOE.


ASO N{Ai lul
M D To,..g

Vl f, lNOW
OUFLc~tJN~r^'Ta I 1- ^
OXLWi'cey-1 sfi N %j




.1
'': ':i"" "":8'



4- .* ** : '; *Z,


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE By Lynn Johnston


1=


S .







The Sun Classified Page 14 E IN IC ads .yoursun net Thursday, January 30, 2014


Daughter acts like a winner,

but still feels like a loser


DEAR ABBY: I'm a
27-year-old woman who
still lives at home. I do it so
I can help my mom with
my five nieces and neph-
ews. Their mother passed
away suddenly in 2009 at
the age of 30. My mom
and stepdad kept them
rather than scatter them to
fathers who don't appear
very interested in them.
Since my sister's death I
have earned two degrees,
entered the health care
field and have lost almost
140 pounds. Despite what
I have accomplished, I
feel I have nothing to
show for myself. When
I point my accomplish-
ments out to myself, they
don't seem like a heck of
a lot. What can I do so
I can stop feeling like a
loser? LOST IN THE
NORTHEAST
DEAR LOST: A loser?
From where I sit, you
appear to be not only a
caring daughter, but also
an intellectually accom-
plished young woman
who is being very hard
on herself. If you feel you
haven't accomplished a
lot, I have to question the
yardstick you're using.
It's time you discussed
your feelings with a
licensed mental health
professional who can
help you understand
what is causing your low
self-esteem. If you do, it
may help you be kinder to
yourself, because what's
currently going on in your
head is unfair to you and
destructive.
DEAR ABBY: I work
in a buffet restaurant. I
wish you would alert your
readers to how waste
increases the costs at
restaurants like this one.
And then people com-
plain because the cost of
the food goes up!
I have seen customers
stick their fingers or used
utensils into pans of food
to taste it before serving
themselves. And instead
of the tongs we provide,
they use their hands
to help themselves to


Dear Abby

chicken, bread, etc.
The fact is that once
anyone touches the food
with his or her hands or
eating utensil, the restau-
rant is required by the
health code to dispose
of the entire pan of food.
This causes tremendous
waste. Customers also
overfill their plates only to
throw half the food away.
It makes me sad because
so many people in this
world are hungry.
I have seen children
run around, making a
mess of the dessert bar,
and especially the ice
cream and drink stations.
Their parents seem to
think it's "cute."
I wish you would
remind your readers to
use common sense when
dining out and to PLEASE
control their children.
The parents should serve
food to their little ones
who don't know better. -
FRUSTRATED BUFFET
WORKER, PUEBLO, COLO.
DEAR FRUSTRATED:
Children can't practice
behavior they haven't
been taught, and par-
ents who don't take the
time to explain proper
behavior to their little
ones are shirking their
responsibility.
As to adults who have
so little understanding
of hygiene or consid-
eration for others that
they put their hands or
used utensils into food
that is meant for others,
well perhaps after
being reminded that it
raises the prices they
have to pay, they'll think
twice about it. But don't
bet on it.


"And Jesus answering said, 0 faithless and perverse
generation, how long shall I be with you, and suffer you?
Bring thy son hither And as he was yet a coming, the
devil threw him down, and tare him, and Jesus rebuked
the unclean spirit, and healed the child, and delivered
him again to his father And they were all amazed at the
mighty power of God,"- Luke 9:41,41, 43a.
Jesus was in full command whether it was in the
feeding of a multitude, raising of the dead or deliver-
ance from the devil, He is still in command and is the
same Jesus who has invited us to follow Him.


MALLARD FILLMORE By Bruce Tinsley


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers
1N5 5U:5 M*9V5 LgCOUa6L,,6.e. I
16 ALW N 11LOOKOCT fM- AY
-TAMSI-WT HAV 60UTIeC
FOI. Wl i6 PpLW-q.ES g.Om
OPPO61M6 TEA"5. __________


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


I HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19). There's a fine line
between expressing your own individuality and
rejecting the group culture of those around you. Put
the group culture first and you'll have no trouble.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).You like to concentrate
on what needs to be done and can't see the point of
dwelling on what you've already accomplished. It's
necessary to compartmentalize the past.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). It's only natural to leave
the door of your heart open around loved ones. Be-
ing so emotionally vulnerable is not always best for


your relationships. To protect your heart's treasures,
you must sometimes lock them up.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Your neighborhood is
really only as good as your neighbors. Taking care
of those who live around you will be part of today's
work.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Misinformation will provide
a test ofyour inner guidance system.You are not
likely to believe something just because it's what
you're asked to believe.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).Today, you will have to


main strengths and yet, you will be willing to do
whatever it takes to helpyour plans bear fruit.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You have one style of
doing things, and someone close to you has a
completely different approach.The two styles may
clash, and someone will have to back down.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).Your love takes work
now, and your work takes love. It feels so worth-
while though, as today's project will provide you
with excitement on par with romantic rapture.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You strive to be


cally. Foryou, being sure of this isyour freedom. It
allows you to say"no"and "yes"to whomever you
want.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).You are now doing
the work that once seemed so beyond your capabili-
ties. Backing out was never an option for you, and
you will benefit from your perseverance.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).You'll enjoy the
challenge of being a stranger in a new land for a
few hours today, and this experience will teach
you something about your confidence, defense


bend to avoid breaking. Flexibility is not one ofyour self-sufficient emotionally, financially and physi- mechanisms and social strengths.


PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).Thinking ahead is your
talent now. You've witnessed the kinds of difficulties
and delays that are caused by a lack of preparation,
and you're determined to do everything you can.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (Jan. 30).You'll deliberately
put yourself in opportune situations, and the busy-
ness of the next four months will have the feeling
of catching your life on the fly. Snap pictures often
oryou'll forget what this blur was all about. June
brings a calm stretch of self-reflection, though you
may have to travel for it. Libra and Sagittarius adore
you. Your lucky numbers are: 47,6,44,39 and 20.


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

4 8 6 Rating: BRONZE
9 5 2 1 Solution to 1/29/14

-8 1 5 3582736194


7 1 3 6 5 3 94965812733
3 8 9 7_ 8 93456
-~ 163457928

5 2 6 4 3 9542687311
247315689
2- 1 5 7- 3 4 .
--- uj 7 3 1 5 6 18

3 2 7 6 1 639824517


9 8 1/30/14
1/30/14


I I


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, January 30, 2014






Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORT CHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


JAN. 30 Ef ,k E PRIME TIME
ABC7 News World News To Be a A Millionaire? The Taste: Go Green The teams create vegetarian dishes, Shark Tank Home security; ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC AN 7 7 7 10 7 7 @6pm((N) Diane Sawyer Millionaire? The 2000s. (R) taking mentors out of their comfort zones. (N) (HD11) salsa. (R) (1HD1) @11pm((N) KimmelLive
_________(N) (N) (N)
ABC7 News World News The 7 O'Clock Entertainment The Taste: Go Green The teams create vegetarian dishes, Shark Tank Home security; ABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC 2 7 11 7 6:00pm(N) DianeSawyer News(N)(HD)) Tonight(N)(H)) taking mentors out of their comfort zones. (N)(HD)) salsa. (R)(HD) @11:00pm KimmelLive
_________(N) (_______ __ ___ (N) (N)
WINKNews CBS Evening WINKNews Inside Big Bang The Millers Crazy Ones 21/2Men (l0) Elementary: Dead Clade WINK News Late Show
CBS 11)213213 5 5 5 at 6pm (N) (HD) News (N) (HD) at7pm(N)(HD) Edition (N) (HD Sheldon Driving Carol. Creativity Bachelor party. Walking Unsolved case tied to at 11pm (N) PhilMcGraw.
__ ______conventon. (N) contest. (N) fossil. (N) (HD)) (N)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Big Bang The Millers Crazy Ones 21/2 Men (.10) Elementary: Dead Clade 10 News, Late Show
CBS Mi) 1010 10 1o6pm (N) News (N) (HD) Fortune(N) (HD) Sheldon Driving Carol. Creativity Bachelor party. Walking Unsolved case ted to 11pm (N) Phil McGraw.
(H))_____ convention (N) contest. (N) fossil. (N) (N)
NBC2 News NBC Nightly Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Community Parks &Rec.: Saturday Night Live: SNL Sports Spectacular Host Seth NBC2 News The Tonight
NBC 2 2 2 2 6pm (N)(HD) News (N)(HD)) Fortune (N) (HD)) Staff AnnandChris Meyers presents the funniest sports themed sketches from @11 pm(N) ShowMiley
(HD) negotiations. the show. (N) (HD) (HD) Cyrus.
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Community Parks&Rec.: Saturday Night Live: SNL Sports Spectacular Host Seth NewsChannel The Tonight
NBC W- 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:OO(N) News (N) (HD) 8at7:OO(N) Tonight(N)(HD) Staff AnnandChris Meyers presents the funniestsports themed sketchesfrom8at11:00(N) ShowMiley
SInegotiations. the show. (N) (H11))D Cyrus.
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy The Simpsons American Idol: Auditions #6 Rake: A Close Shave Amish FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX 4 News TheArsenio
FOX M6 4 4 4 Community news; weather; Leaving Olympic stars. Omaha, Neb., auditions. (N) bakers tried to shave a bishop. news report and weather at Eleven (N) Hall Show (N)
_____ traffic; more. (N) boyfriend. ______ (HD) (N) (HD)) update. (N) (HD())
-FOX136:00 News News TMZ (N) The Insider American Idol: Auditions #6 Rake:A Close Shave Amish FOX 1310:00 News The FOX 13 News Access
FOX IN 131313 13 13 events of the day are reported. Bruno Mars. (N) Omaha, Neb., auditions. (N) bakers tried to shave a bishop. top news stories are Edge(N)(HD) Hollywood(N)
S _____ (N) (HD1) (HD1) (N) (HD1) updated. (N) (HDP) (HD))
_BBCWoi_ d Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) Antiques Rd Antiques Rd Masterpiece: Sherlock, Series III: The Sign of Three Charlie Rose (N) (HD)
SPBS 30 3 3 3 News Business Doll furniture. Relic Sherlock faces the challenges of being John's best man
America Report (N) appraisals, and finding a killer. (R) (H))
BBCWoi_ d Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (H)) WEDU Arts Suncoast Project: Shattered Silence Masterpiece: Sherlock, Series III: The Sign of Three
WEDUI3 3 3 3 3 News Business Plus (HD) Business Teenagers from Tampa Bay, Sherlock faces the challenges of being John's best man
_____ America Report (N) Forum (R) Fla., area. (N) and finding a killer. (R) (HD))
Modem Modem Big Bang Big Bang The Vampire Diaries The Reign: Sacrifice Mary frees a WINK News @lOpm (N) (HP)) 21/2 Men 21/2 Men
CW IM) 6 21 6 Family Trials of Family: LiUttle Teaching Careers in Devil Inside Elena has minutes. peasant with a tie to Bash. (N) Charlie's brash Lyndsey's
_____ life. Bo Bleep football, science. (N) (HD)) (H1)) foe. present.
King of Queens 21/2Men 21/2 Men The Vampire Diaries The Reign: Sacrifice Mary frees a Rules Timmy's Rules The Arsenio Hall Show
CW M) 9 9 9 4 QueensSexor Birthday stress. Charlie's brash Lyndsey's Devil Inside Elena has minutes. peasantwith a tietoBash. (N) acappella. (H)) Engagement: Scheduled: actor Steve
hold. (H)) foe. present. (N) (HD() (H)) They Do? Austin. (N) (HD))
Raymond Seinfeld Family Feud Family Feud House: Instant Karma House: Brave Heart Officer's Cops Cops Seinfeld Community
MYN 13111 11 11 14 Holiday Elaine's big (VPG) (N) (1VPG) (N) Businessman uses karma; heart failure; Chase's ghosts. Reloaded (HD) Reloaded (HD) Racist Jerry. Unique party.
_____ romance, date. Dibala case. (HD4)) (H1)) (HD))
Access Cleveland Family Guy Family Guy House: Instant Karma House: Brave Heart Officer's Law & Order. Special Victims Seinfeld Seinfeld
MYN a] 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) Show Black ancestor. Separate beds. Businessman uses karma; heart failure; Chase's ghosts. Unit: Resilience Teen ponders Elaine's big Racist Jerry.
_____ (HD) Matchmaker. Dibala case. (HDP) (HD)) death. date.
Modem Modem Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order Special Victims Law & Order Special Victims The Office The Office Family Guy Family Guy
IND 32 12 12 12 38 12 Family Trials of Family: LiUttle Teaching Careers in Unit Resilience Teen ponders Unit: Screwed Issues to resolve. Male bonding. Dwight takes Black ancestor. Separate beds.
life. Bo Bleep football, science, death. (HD) (HD) over.
Law & Order Criminal Intent: Law & Order: Criminal Law & Order. Criminal Intent Law & Order. Criminal Criminal Minds: Coda Reid Criminal Minds: Valhalla
ION 66 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Cruise to Nowhere High roller. Intent: To the Bone Logan On Fire Arson-fueled church Intent: The Good connects with an autistic Prentiss suspects an old
S(HD)) kills cop. (HDP) fires. (HDP) Bludgeoned. (HDP) child. (HDP) nemesis. (HD()
A&E 262 26263950181 48 Witness murder. (R)R ) Duck (R) Duck (7 Duck(R) k Duck (R) Duck(R) k Duck (R) Crazy: All Trucked Up Wahlburger Mayne ()
AMC 5 5 5 5 3 1 (5:30) Four Brothers ('05) Four men revert to their criminal Am Legend ('07) A military scientist is immune to a virus (:01) Batman Begins ('05) A billionaire develops a dual
AMC 56 56 5656 3 1 roots to get their foster mother's killers, that transforms humans into monsters. personality to fight crime in Gotham City.
APL 44 4444443668130 Woods Law: Uncuffed Alaska Wildlife (R) (H)) Alaska (R) (H) AlasAka (N(H) () Grizzly Sized (N) Alaska (R) (H))
BET 35 33535 40 22270106 & Park (N) (H11)) Game (R) Black Dynamite ('09) African-American vigilante from ghetto. Scandal (H11)) Scandal (H11))
BRAVO 6866868 1825451185 Bethenny (H1D) Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (N) Toned Up Toned Up Watch What Matchmaker
COM 6 666666 1527190 Sunny Sunny Colbert Daily (R) Sunny ISunny Tosh.O (R) Tosh.O (R) Sunny Sunny Daily (N) Colbert
DISC 40 4040402543120 Fast Loud (R) (H11)) Fast Loud (R) (H11)) Treehouse (H11)) Treehouse (H11)) Treehouse (H11)) Treehouse (H11))
E! 46 46446 27 26196 Kardashian (R) (H1D) E! News (N) (H1D) #RichKids #RichKids Kardashian (R) (H1D) Kardashian (R) (H1D) C. Lately News (R)
FAM 555555 5 1046199 Middle ]Middle 17 Again ('09, Comedy) **1/ High school do-over. The Pacifier ('05, Comedy) ** Tough babysitter. The 700 Club (TV G)
FOOD 373737 37 76 164 Cupcake: Derby Dolls Donut Donut Chopped Pigs' feet. (R) Chopped Seafood. (N) Cutthroat (R) Diners (R) Diners(R)
21/2Men 2 1/2 Men Anger (R) (H11)) (:31) Underworld: Awakening ('12, Action)* -k*1 2r Humans Anger (N) (H11)) The Waterboy ('98) **1 A simple-minded waterboy
FX 51 51 51 51 584953 (H)) (H)) are hunting vampires and lycans. (R becomes a football star with his unique ability.
GSN 179179179179 34 179184 Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fain. Feud Fam. Feud Newlywed INewlywed Mind (R Mind (R) Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Prairie: Family Quarrel Waltons Waltons: The Wager Waltons: The Spirit Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
HGTV 414141415342165 Income: Family Effort Hunters Hunters Addict Addict Addict Addict Hunters Hunters Project (R) Project (R
HIST 81 81 8181 3365128PawnStars PawnStars PawnStars PawnStars PawnStais PawnStars PawnStars PawnStars Appalachian: Tit for Tat Curse Visitor's theory.
LIFE 36 36363652 41 140WifeSwap (1V14) Gunn First impression. Gunn (R)(H) Gunn Nick is in trouble. Lizzie Borden Took anAx (14) Family's murder.
NICK 25 252555 24 44 252 Sponge Sponge Sam&Cat Witch Way Thunderman Thunderman Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse IFull Hse Friends IFriends
OWN 58 58585847 103161 Dateline (R) (H11)) 20/20 Girl kidnapped. 20/20 Couple stranded. 20/20 Clara Harris. (R 20/20: What Remains 20/20 Couple stranded.
QVC 141414 9 1413150 Shark Solutions Joan Rivers Classics Collection Fashion tips. Shark Solutions Shoe Shopping Now That's Cool
SPIKE 57575757 2963 54 Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R) ICops ( Impact Wrestling (N) (HD)) Cops (R) Cops (R)
SYFY 67 67676725364180 Voyage of Dawn Treader (10) Sailing the seas. 2012 ('09) Man must save his family from catastrophic, natural disasters around world. Stonehenge
TBS 595959 59326252 Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld FamilyGuy FamilyGuy FamilyGuy IBigBang Big Bang King of: Weird Science Conan Ray Odierno. (N)
Devil's Mask (:45) The Unknown ('46, Mystery) ** An The Best of Everything ('59, Drama) ** Hope Lange. A(:15) What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? ('62, Thriller)
TCM 65 65 6565 169230 (46)** inheritance leads to murder. (NR) woman learns interoffice gossip. (NW ***1r/ A woman is terrorized by her sister.
TLC 45 45 45 4557 72139 Sister (R) (HD)) Welcome (R) (H11)) HereComes HereComes IHoneyBoo Honey Boo Welcome (N) (H11) HoneyBoo HoneyBoo
Castle: Dial M for Mayor NBATip-Off NBA Basketball: Cleveland Cavaliers at New York Knicks from NBA Basketball: Los Angeles Clippers at
TNT 61 61 61 61 285551 Traced to mayor. (HD1)) Madison Square Garden (bive) (HDP) Golden State Warriors (bive)
TOON 80 80124124 46 20 257 NinjaGo IDance (1 Gumball Universe TitansGo! JohnyTest King Cleveland Dad (HD) Dad (HD) FamilyGuy FamilyGuy
TRAV 69 69696926066170 Bizarre African country. v Food (R v Food (R) Bizarre Tango dancing. Mysteries (N) Legend (R) Mysteries (R)
TRUTV 63 6363635030183 Dumbest (R) Guinness Frying pans. Guinness World (N) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (N) Jokers (R) Panic (N) Jokers (R
TVL 62 6262623154 244 Griffith IGriffith Gilligan Gilligan Gilligan IGilligan Raymond Raymond: The Ball Raymond Raymond Raymond
USA 343434 34225250 SVU Revenge in rape. SVU Teen prostitutes. SVU Private school. White (N)(HD) ((:01) SVU (1V14) (HD)) SVU: Bang Baby found.
WE 117117117117 117149 Law Missing model. Law & Order: Slave Braxton: Chix in a Row Braxton Family (1V14) SWVReunit(N) Braxton Family (1V14)
WGN 16 161619,41 11,9 Home Videos (1VPG) Home Videos (1VPG) How I Met HowlMet How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine (N) How I Met Rules
CNBC 39393939 137102 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Greed (R) Greed (1 Greed A Ponzi scheme. Mad Money (N)
CNN 32 32323282 38 100 Situation ICrossfire Erin Burnett (N) Cooper 360 (N) (HD) The Sixties: (N) The Sixties: (R) Cooper 360 (R) (HD)
CSPAN 18 1 8 183712109 U.S. House of Representatives (N) Tonight from Washington Public policy. (N) Washington (N) Capital News Today
FNC 64 6464644871118 Special Report (N) (HD) On the Record (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 83 8308383185 40103 PoliticsNation (N) (H11)) Hardball with Chris (N) All in with Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow (N) Last Word (N) (H11)) All in with Chris Hayes
SNN 66T611 11 News(N) I News (N) Paid Paid Evening News (N) Paid News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N)
CSS P 283283280280497o4The Best SEC r Worn. College Basketball: Duke vs Miami (Live)t College Basketball: Rice vs UTSA (Live) (bHurricane SEC
ESPN 29 2929291258 70 SportsCenter (HD)) College Basketball: Cincinnati vs Louisville (HD() College Basketball: Purdue vs Michigan (Live) SportsCenter (HD))
ESPN2 30 30 30 3 59 74 Horn (HP)) Ilnterruptn College Basketball: Florida vs Mississippi State College Basketball: UCLA vs Oregon (Live) (HP)) Olbermann (HP))
FS1 48 4848484269 83 FOX Super Bowl (HD) ( College Basketball (Live) (HD) FOX Fight Night (bive) (HD) FOX Sports Live (HD)
SFSN 72727272 56 77 Insider Marlins NHL Hockey: Florida Panthers at Toronto Maple Leafs (bive) Panthers UFC (H11)) Wrid Poker (Replay)
GOLF 494949 495560 304 PGA TOUR Golf (bve) Golf Cntrl PGA TOUR Golf: Waste Management Phoenix Open: First Round (Replay) (H11) PGA (H))
NBCS 71717171 5461 90 (5:00) Pro US Ski Warren Miller's Ticket to Ride IFreeskiing: Freeskiing Top 10 NFL Turning Point (HD) NFL Turning Point (HD)
SUN 38 384014014557 76 Basketball Prep Zone Lightning _/ NHL Hockey: Tampa Bay vs Ottawa (Live) ()HD) Lightning MLB Baseball (Replay) (HD()
Jessie Chess Austin &Ally Jessie Family Dog with a Good Luck Wizards of Waverly Place: The Movie Phineas Dog with Blog AN.T. Farm Austin &Ally
DISN 1361361361369945 250 contest. ( (H11)) Music industry, history. (R) (H11)) Blog (R) Leftfor ('09, Comedy) **1/2 Wish made out of Mysterious Internet photos. Australia trip. Aly's friend. (R)
(R) Tennessee. hasty anger comes true. (NR) animal. (R) (R)
(5:05) My (:40) Inspector Gadget ('99) *1/ A scientist Mr. 3000 ('04, Comedy) Bernie Mac. An (:45) Hitch ('05, Comedy) **1 2 Will Smith, Eva Mendes. A (:45) My
ENC 150150150150 150350 Baby's Daddy rebuilds an inept security guard when he gets aging baseball star returns to the game to romance coach helps men lure in ladies, but he soon has his Baby's Daddy
('04) blown to bits. (PG) reach a goal of 3,000 hits. own problems. (PG-13) ('04)*
(545) Red Tails (12, Acton) ** Terrence Howard, Cuba Giils Looking Oblivion (13, Science Fiction) *** Tom Cruise, Cathouse True Defective
HBO 302 302 302 302302302400 Gooding Jr. A squadron of black pilots faces racial segregation Unexpected Dom'sex. (R Morgan Freeman. One of the last drone repairmen Brothel tryouts. Hidden image.
_____ during World War II. (H11)) death. (R) (H11) stationed on Earth has one last job. (PG-13) (R)
(:10) 2013 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Highlights from the annual Looking Veep Pig roast; Stoker (13, Drama) *** Mia Payback (99)
HB02 303 303303303 303303402 ceremony showcase the music of Heart, Randy Newman, Public Enemy and other inductees; Dom'sex. (HD) Pilates. (HD) Wasikowska. A young woman's uncle A thief's
several music artists perform. (H11)) comes to live with her and her mother. (R) revenge.
(520) Les Misdrables ('12, Musical) Hugh Jackman, Russell The Sopranos The Weight Real Time with Bill Maher True Detective: The Locked Identity Thief ('13, Comedy)
HB03 304304304304 304404 Crowe. Lives of runaway prisoner& helpless girl come to a boi Insulting remark leads to Scheduled: Erin Brockovich. Room A hidden image leads to **'/ A man searches for
_____ in 19th-century Paris. violence. (HDP)) (TVMA) (HD)) a suspect. who stole his life.
(5:30) Primary Colors ('98, Drama) John Travolta, Emma Snitch (13, Drama) *** Dwayne Johnson, Barry Taken 2: Unrated Extended Version (12, The Jump Off
MAX 320 320320320 320320420 Thompson. A Clintonesque candidate campaigns with an odd Pepper. After his son is framed, a father goes undercover Action) **12 Liam Neeson. CIA Angry husband.
assortment of supporters, to clear his name. (PG-13) (H11)) operative's family is targeted. (H11))
(5:10) Abraham Lincoln: ', The Long Kiss Goodnight ('96, Action) *** Geena Bullettothe Head ('13, Action) A hit man DiariesThree (:10)Diaries (:45) Chronicle
MAX2 321321321321321321422 Vampire Hunter (12, Horror) ii ,: An amnesiac housewife learns she was once a and a detective work together to bring down chefs compete. Man and (12) Super
Vampire hunting, government assassin. (R) (H11)) a dangerous enemy, daughter, kids.
(530) The World According ', "The Words (12, Drama) *** Bradley Cooper, Zoe Silver Linings Playbook (12, Comedy) ***1/2 Bradley Gigolos: One Unhung Hero
SHO 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 to Dick Cheney (13) Dick i, An aspiring writer decides to pass a man's long-lost Cooper. A former teacher leaves a mental institution and Per Centaur (N (13)-***1 2
_____ Cheney's life. manuscript as his own work. attempts to reclaim his life. (R) (HD) (NR)
(:05) The Rundown ('03, Action) **1 2 Dwayne Johnson. A W. ('08, Drama) **1/2 Charles Fathy, James Cromwell. (10) Elizabeth ('98, Profile) k***1 2 Cate Blanchett, Geoffrey
TMC 350 350350350 350 350385 bounty hunter is sent to the Amazon to find the gold-hunting A biography of George W. Bush depicts his early life and Rush. A princess sacrifices love, security and happiness when
son of a mobster. (PG-13) his time as president. (PG-13) (H11)) she becomes the queen.
WIA,, 11 -a a a a a 1 -


Today's Live Sports

3 p.m. GOLF PGA TOUR Golf
Waste Management Phoenix
Open: First Round. (L)
7 p.m. CSS Women's College
Basketball Duke Blue Devils at
Miami Hurricanes. (L)
ESPN College Basketball
Cincinnati at Louisville. (L)
ESPN2 College Basketball
Florida at Mississippi State. (L)
FS1 College Basketball Provi-
dence College Friars at Mar-
quette Golden Eagles. (L)
FSN NHL Hockey Florida Pan-
thers at Toronto Maple Leafs. (L)
7:30 p.m. SUN NHL Hockey
Tampa Bay Lightning at Ottawa
Senators. (L)
8 p.m. TNT NBA Basketball
Cleveland Cavaliers at New York
Knicks. (L)
9 p.m. CSS College Basketball
Rice at UTSA. (L)
ESPN College Basketball
Purdue at Michigan. (L)
ESPN2 College Basketball
UCLA Bruins at Oregon Ducks
from Matthew Knight Arena. (L)
FS1 FOX Fight Night Golden
Boy Promotions: Victor Ortiz vs
Luis Collazo. (L)
10:30 p.m. TNT NBA Basketball
Los Angeles Clippers at Golden
State Warriors. (L)
1 a.m. GOLF European Tour
Golf Omega Dubai Desert Clas-
sic: Second Round. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
Barry Gibb talks about the "Mythol-
ogy Tour"; Dr Oz visits the show. (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: the "FOX
NFL Sunday" broadcasters; singer
Barry Gibb performs. (N)
10:00 a.m. CBS Rachael Ray
Scheduled: three football stars take
on the annual Super Bowl Recipe
Playoff. (N)
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Sched-
uled: Jay Mohr guest co-hosts; from
"Dr Phil" host Dr Phil McGraw. (N)
11:00 a.m. CW The Queen Latifah
Show Scheduled: Channing Tatum
and Jonah Hill on the set of "22
Jump Street." (N)
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Scheduled:
Mario Batali and Clinton Kelly join
forces to make a party platter. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Scheduled:
"Shameless" star William H. Macy;
gossip columnist Diana Madison. (N)
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Williams
Show Scheduled: Wendy has an
important announcement for the
viewers. (N)
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey
Scheduled: the women who took
on the 90-date rule; New Orleans
grannies. (N)
3:00 p.m. NBC The Dr. Oz Show
Scheduled: how to get a slimmer
stomach and sharper brain by cut-
ting out wheat. (N)
5:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil Scheduled:
an interview with 16-year-old twin
heirs and their father's abuse. (N)
11:00 p.m. TBS Conan Scheduled:
Ray Odierno; Bill Burr (N)
11:30 p.m. FOX The Arsenic Hall
Show Scheduled: actor Steve
"Stone Cold" Austin; actor Lamorne
Morris. (N)
11:35 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel
Live Scheduled: actor Zac Efron;
actress Alison Brie; musician Sara
Bareilles. (N)
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled: TV
host Dr. Phil McGraw; reality star
Danny Koker. (N)
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno Scheduled: Miley
Cyrus; Howie Mandel; musical guest
Sarah McLachlan performs. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv






The Sun Classified Page 16 EINIC ads.yoursun.net Thursday, January 30, 2014


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

STOVE FRIGIDAIRE glass 5
burner speedbake E $250
941-766-7545
TANK R/O RESERVOIR Tank
drinking H20 NEW was
179.00 $75 941-235-9600


TIFFANY STYLE Lamp Shade
Wht/Green trim. 20" $40
941-391-6270
VACUUM HOOVER Runabout
with attachments. $20 941-
629-4973
VACUUM- HOOVER, bagless
upright $15 941-629-8650


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 J

VALANCES 8', 6', box pleat
fabric.For lanai door $200
941-416-4822
WHITE COTTON Blanket New
90 x 90 $10 941-473-1026
| HOLIDAY ITEMS /

Z 6031 J

BEAUTIFUL 7' Christmas
tree. Assembles in $21
941-475-1275
PLATES LARGE Assc.Still in
org.bx. $15 941-391-6377
1 Classified = Sales


L FURNITURE
4Z6035 ^

2 END tables vintage, real
wood $30 941-627-6542
3 SECTIONAL wall unit wood,
glass 86' 22' $275
941-474-6184

NEED CASH? I

5 PC dinning room high end
oak 48in round ta $499 941-
627-6002
ANTIQUE DESK Antique writ-
ing desk $300 941-539-7468
ANTIQUE ITALIAN Florentine
end tables Great! $150
941-575-9800


S FURNITURE 1
Z ^6035 ^

ANTIQUE TRUNK Antique
steamer trunk $150 941-539-
7468
ARMOIR FOR TV Pine armoir.
61X35 inches. $60 617-901-
8524
BAR STOOL 24" high. Solid
wood. Exc. cond. $15 941-
249-3946
SSeize the sales
with Classified!
BAR STOOLS whitewash,
swivel $35 239-292-7111
BARSTOOLS KITCHEN
chocolate metal ex cond $40
941-258-0810


S FURNITURE /
L OZ6035 ^

BDRM SET Dressr/mirror
chest nightstnd 2twinhdb
$500 941-497-1351
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED 8 PSC King Bed Rm Set
Lite color/rattan $495
941-505-5615
BED PILLOW tp, double,
mt/bx, lyr. guest, room $100
941-697-1566
BED, DOUBLE NEW bed &
frame $125 941-539-7468
1 Advertise Today!]


FURNITURE /
L ^ 6035 ^

BED, IRON full sz.inc. matt &
sheets $400 941-743-2333
BEDROOM 6PC set, Queen
wicker brown sturdy clean
matt/$150 sold sold sold
BEDROOM SET good condi-
tion bedroom set $200
941-629-0806
( --GET RESULT5---
USE CLASSIFIED!
BEIGE LACQUER Bedroom
Set 5 Piece set $300
941-628-0941
BOOKCASE/ TOY shelves
4'x17" deep $45 941-815-
8218


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH & BOB JONES
2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
THE EASY ROAD


Both vulnerable. West deals.


NORTH
*AK54
SA93
0543
4AKQ
WEST
46
KQJ10874
0 K107
497


EAST
683
)65
0J986
4 J 10 8 6 2


SOUTH
A QJ 10972
S 2
0 AQ2
16543


The bidding:
WEST NORTH
3K Dbl
Pass 5V
Pass Pass


EAST
Pass
Pass
Pass


SOUTH
46
66


Opening lead: King of

North was too good to pass South's
four-spade bid and chose five hearts
as a general slam try. South had
enough to accept. Good bidding if
they make it. Can they?
South won the opening heart lead
in dummy, ruffed a heart in hand, and
drew trumps in two rounds.
Dummy's last heart was ruffed, the
ace of diamonds was cashed,


followed by all three of dummy's top
clubs, stripping both hands of clubs
and hearts. Next came a diamond to
his queen, a play that would have
succeeded had the king of diamonds
been in the East hand or if West had a
doubleton king. West, after winning
his king, would have to give a ruff-
sluff for the 12th trick.
South was quite unlucky to find
West with both the diamond king and
a third card in that suit. Study the
hand for a moment. Was South just
unlucky, or did he misplay?
Knowing that West had a seven-
card heart suit gave South an easy
road to 12 tricks. He should not have
ruffed the last heart in dummy nor
should he have cashed the ace of
diamonds. Instead, simply draw
trumps, ruff one heart, and cash the
three high clubs. Now when declarer
leads dummy's last heart, he discards
a low diamond from hand and West is
end-played! West must give a ruff-
sluff or play a diamond into South's
ace-queen. The location of the
diamond king was not relevant.
(Tannah Hirsch and Bob Jones
welcome readers' responses sent in
care of this newspaper or to Tribune
Content Agency, LLC., 16650
Westgrove Dr., Suite 175, Addison,
TX 75001. E-mail responses may be
sent to tcaeditors@tribune.com.)


7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter -
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle. a
M
CLUES SOLUTIONS .>

1 interstellar cloud (6) _____

2 guitar legend Ry (6) _____
3 alleviated (9) ______

4 most vertical, for example (11) _______

5 proceeding on foot (8) _____

6 lake in Switzerland (7) _____

7 concerning newborns (8) _____


PPI


NEO


ULA


RAI


Wednesday's Answers: 1. REPRESENTS 2. HUMBLING 3. OUTWEIGH
4. STATEWIDE 5. SPIRALED 6. SANDIEST 7. BALLOTS 1/30


NAT


GHT


RNE


HTE


NEB COO


LU


LIG


AL


NED


NG


EST


ST


DER


STE


CE


ACROSS
1 Dreary
6 Cut drastically
11 Ruin, with "up"
14 Pay-phone
place
15 Sun, in combos
16 Environmental
prefix
17 Rica
18 Lariat
19 Non-verbal OK
20 Hawaiian island
22 Geneva's river
24 Roomy sleeve
28 Lao and Thai
29 Thunderstruck
30 Dismantle a tent
32 Ukraine's
capital
33 White heron
35 Get better
39 Ultimatum word
40 Geological
period
41 Bowser's pal
42 Cattail or
bulrush
43 Ism
45 Mr. Stravinsky
46 Complies
48 Rule
50 Dodgers' Reese
(2 wds.)
53 Umpire
54 Shaman's
findings
55 Fleeting


British title
Flawless
Rainwater pipe
Bulldogs backer
Florentine poet
Delete a file
Billy Williams
Type of test
Pithy
DOWN
"Doctor Who"
network
London lav
Selene's sister
Legal rep
Army duds
Monsieur's
gesture
Carrie's
"Star Wars" role
Jai -
Take a chair
Froggy
Columbus' port
Huskies of the
NCAA
Fashions
Poker stake
Exuberant
greeting (hyph.)
Bread pro
Loose-limbed
Not those
Flag (2 wds.)
Well-put
Encourages
Essential item


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
MATCH SIPAITEBACH
ABASEIL USH AR LO
GETTY AILTANNEIN
MEA JUMFINGJACK
AR IUMS KIOSKS
F A SNIITS
M EA JBJ MiM^ A CTK


GAFF| FAUNAYAK

OB I NIAII LS PWED
TELLS Ep0
sPRAW L RPALS
QUANTUMLEAP GUT
UP I SOAK IMAGE
A PS EEAVE N AVEL
D Y E DSTT A YGE SE
1-30-14 2014 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclickfor UFS


34 Big steel town
36 "The -
Sanction"
37 Be crazy about
38 Greene of
"Bonanza"
43 So-so mark
44 Pointed arch
47 Next to
49 Compensate for
50 Sat for a photo
51 Novelist-- Zola
52 Like a wolf's
howl
53 The life of


55 Hecht and
Franklin
56 Pro -
(in proportion)
59 "The" to Fritz
61 Opposite of
"post-"
62 Boathouse
implement
63 Enterprise
64 Casual wear


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, January 30, 2014





Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


S FURNITURE /
L OZ6035 ^


CAPTAINS CHAIRS 2 white
good cond. $135
440-725-8295
CARACOLE HUTCH/CHINA
New. minor damage $350
941-258-8171
CHAIR OFFICE High Back
Swivel w/Arms BIkFabric $25
941-475-8379
CHAIRS (2) rattan swivel on
castors $40
941-629-8650
CHINA CABINET Excellent
condition, oak. $150
937-684-7449
COFFEE & 2 End Tables glass
top, light cane $55 941-764-
7971
COFFEE TABLE Dark wood,
30" x 50" Folds out for $50
941-625-6053
COFFEE TABLE Rattan, glass
top, vg condition $30
941-627-6542
COFFEE/END TABLE nice!
high quality $95
941-740-1214
CORNER DESK solid wood
corner desk new,black new so
$120 941-505-1503
COUCH LEATH CAMEL seat
6 L shape,nice! $395
941-740-1214
CREAM LACQUER BDRM
SET by LANE 6 pieces $495
941-575-7822
DAYBED & cover Comfortable
daybed $50 941-539-7468
DESK 2PC henry/link
47w72h20d/hutch rattan trim
$175 941-474-3194
DESK CHAIR cushion back &
seat. arms, 5 wheels $29
941-426-1088
DESK KLING mahogany 2
drawer $100 941-456-1837
DESK SOLID wood dk fin tradl
4 bot 2 top dwr $65 941-704-
0322
DINETTE & BAR STOOLS
w/L 4castor 3bar $295
401-439-9522
DINETTE SET & BAR STOOLS
Dinette w/L 4 $295 401-439-
9522
DINETTE SET Oak/White Tile
Table, 57" w/Leaf in, 6 Chairs,
$299 941-493-5268
DINING ROOM CHAIRS (4)
Chrome Craft Upholstered w/
Castors. $200 941-474-9052
DINING ROOM set. Table, 6
chairs. Cherry $125
941-764-8529
DINING SET 48" round, 4
chairs. Like new. $400 941-
249-3946


FURNITURE / FURNITURE
'01 6035 LoolIZ6035 ^


DINING SET glass
top/microfiber chairs from
IKEA$125 239-292-7111

I B 7tj


UINIINU b L I1, L11 ^" h l' lL lll,
Square Round Glass, 11
Chairs. $1,150. 941-575-7822I
DINING SET, Wrought iron,
Antique;Glass Top $175 941-
276-2411
DINING TABLE & CHAIRS
GLASS ROUND 45 INCH $175
941-249-8288
DISHWASHER,GE, Stainless
Steel:32 $125 941-276-2457
DRESSER BEDROOM 6
$275 941-249-8288
DRESSER PINE with mirror
good condition $60 937-684-
7449
ELECTRIC FIREPLACE
tv/console 2 drawers,like new
$499 941-429-8507
END TABLE dk wd
28x28,cane trim& inside stor-
age $65 941-474-3194
END TABLE inlaid round table
e/c $90 937-864-7449
END TABLE pedestal wood
e/c $30 937-684-7449
ENT. CTR. Red oak holds 37"
TV. 82" wide $200
941-421-9760
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Oak 3-pc10x6.5 TV/tank spc
31"sq $500 941-624-2224
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
solid wood $1,500 941-769-
0163
ENTERTAINMENT CTR w/w
accordian door Light $125
941-766-1198
ENTERTAINMENT WALL unit
lexington*wht.3pc* $300
941-697-1566
FLORAL LOVESEAT Floral
love seat excellent con $75
859-200-2776
HUTCH HONEY pecan, 2 pc,
lit $150 941-626-8156
HUTCH, BUFFET, table & 6
chairs solidoak 2leafs $499
941-423-6190
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
IKEA CHILD Bed new with
mattress $110 941-575-
8229
IKEA TV Cabinet Open 3
shelves solid wood $50
941-764-6123


KING BED Pillowtop, set w
dark wood head $150 307-
332-5389
KING BED set King mattress
set with frame $150 941-564-
8577
LAMP LARGE ceramic lamp
tan color e/c $16 937-684-
7449
LAMPS 2 MATCHING LAMPS
$10 EACH 941-460-87
LOVE SEAT 5' exc.cond. mod-
ern $99 941-828-2608
LOVE SEAT Norwalk, exc
cond, It brown, $155 941-
697-4991
LOVE SEAT Upholstered oat-
meal/beige fabric $150 508-
864-3794
LOVESEAT MICROFIBER
light olive green $50
315-790-9217


LOVESEAT w/ 2 recliners
cup & storage console bonded
leather $325 941-769-4260
MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS & box spring
Sealy,posturepedic, $165
941-460-9698
MID-CENTURY WALNUT
Dresser Perfect w/m $250
913-486-8036
OAK DRESSER great condi-
tion $75 941-815-8218
PATIO SET brown metal
umbrella table 4 chairs $100
941-258-0810
PATIO TABLE GLASS TOP & 4
CHAIRS $75 941-429-7914
POWER RECLINER Like New,
Microfiber $475 941-697-
4713
PUB TABLE 30" White Fiber
Glass ex. cond. $45
941-575-7822
QUEEN BED Cherry with
pewter metal finish. $250
941-505-1955
QUEEN SOFA bed Beige
queen sofa bed 125 $125
859-200-2776
RATTAN OPEN SHELVED Wh
Washed, Like New $45
941-575-7822
RATTAN TABLE Matching rat-
tan chairs $185 941-380-
3392
RATTAN-PALMTREE LAMP
Handpainted $60 941-875-
4541
RATTAN-PALMTREE ROOM
screen Hndpainted $75 941-
875-4541
RECLINER LIKE new, large
brown microfiber $125 941-
421-9760
RECLINERS BEIGE SLIM-
LINE, MAHOGANY OVERS
$100 941-460-8777
ROCKER RECLINERS Lg
Beige Comfy micro $195
941-475-6128
SECTIONAL 4 pc. Lane
reclines both ends, tan/green
cloth vgc $300 860-928-6812
SECTIONAL COUCH leather
off white good condition $150
941-830-8287
SECTIONAL SOFA TAUPE,
leather with recliner & pull out
bed. w/ sealey mattress with
plastic still on. Ex cond.
Reduced $300/OBO 941-
627-8034
SELLING ENTIRE ROOM OF
FURNITURE from an Assisted
living facility (2) Moss Green
Swivel Rockers, 7 Draw triple
dresser, Accent cabinet 2 door
2 draw, Lamp table cottage
white, Sm. Table glass top 2
chairs & cushions, 2 Bamboo
foot stools with cushions, Lg.
Picture with frame. All like new
$500 941-423-3360


L FURNITURE
Z ^6035 ^


QUEEN BED set mattress set
with fra $125 941-564-8577
SEWING CABINET Wood, 2
dwr 36"w 50"w/If $75 941-
704-0322
SIMMONS MAPLE Crib Used
for 1 child. $125 941-426-
1205
SLEEPER SOFA floral, exc
condition $99 941-637-3700
SLEEPER SOFA/COUCH
Lazy Boy Beautiful $275
941-258-8171
SMALL COMPUTER desk
Oak colored. $40
239-292-7111
SOFA & chair broyhill cottage
style $125 941-258-0810
SOFA & Loveseat Beautiful,
excel, cond. $250 941-637-
0047
SOFA ,Full Size, Pillow Top,
Light Blue. Excellent Condition.
$100 941-623-6762
SOFA AND loveseat Large
dark gr. high back $250
941-914-5431
SOFA BRAXTON,83", beige
background floral print, $185
941-697-4991
SOFA CHOCOLATE brown
apt sized couch, very nice
$100 941-423-0954
SOFA DUAL recliner dark
green, good cond $150
941-613-1678
SOFA FLEXSTEEL in exc.
cond. dual reclining $350
941-833-0132
SOFA LOVE SEAT, Rocker
Recliner, Dining Room table
w/4 Chairs $475 906-221-1845
SOFA soft floral color excel-
lent conditi $300 941-460-
8777
SOFA/HIDE A BED extra
pillows, good shape $60
941-429-4969
SOFABED MUTED beige print
Excellent condition $225
941-497-2880
SOFABED RATTAN with rat-
tan recliner beige col $80
941-456-1837
STOOLS DARK Rattan seat
height 25" $175 941-627-
6542
TABLE 4 chairs 48" round
glass top with 4 c $200 941-
380-3392
TABLE COFFEE Round 35"
glass top,chrome. $40
941-740-3286
TABLES END tables coffee,
smoke glass tops per $125
941-460-8777
TV HUTCH Knotty Pine, High
End, Solid Pine 45" W X 68" H.
Cabinet for Tv & 2 large draws.
$200, OBO 941-743-2485
TWO CARD TABLES Use for
yard sales, each $4 941-889-
7592
VINTAGE MAPLE Vanity Chair
lovely $35 941-460-8189
WICKER TWIN Bedroom Set
WHite wicker $300 617-901-
8524
WINE COOLER Stunning con-
toured smoked glass $225
941-575-7822
WOOD CRENDENZA/MIR-
ROR 30x35x13 enclosed
storage $65 474-3194
WOOD DROP leaf kitchen
table, chairs wo $125 941-
505-1503
L ELECTRONICS
: ^ 60380 ^


CELL PHONE LG OPtimus
3GSmart MicroSD card $26
941-697-0794
CELL PHONE Prepaid Sam-
sung R451C, keyboard $15
941-575-4838
HARMAN/KARDON SPEAK-
ERS Excellent sounding sp
$30 941-629-3921


S ELECTRONICS
Z ^60308


NOOKCOLOR BARNES &
NOBLES 8GB 71N $55
941-697-6553
PORTABLE PA system
portable pa system10094
$100 941-624-2002
PRINTER BROTHER
model# mfc 210c all $20
941-743-7212
SIRIUS/STARMATE SATAL-
ITE Radio $75 OBO 941-575-
4364
SQUARE-D LIGHTING con-
tactor like new cond., enclo-
sure extra $500 419-973-
7514
TOMTOM ONE Navigation
$65 941-828-0226
XBOX 360 Kinect New! With 6
games $200 941-575-9800
YAMAHA TILT-TRIM Switch
still in package #704- $70
941-993-9852
/TV/STEREO/RADIO

::^ 6040 ^

ANTENNA ANTENNA with
mast $20 941-286-1170
PIONEER VSX-820-K Perfect
condition $90 941-621-6830
RECORD PLAYER/RECEIV-
ER/Speakers. $100
941-429-7930
SAMSUNG 46" TV w/Power
Antenna SAM $300 941-681-
6228
SPEAKER WOOFER good
condition $20 941-698-9979
<--NEED A JOB?--~
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
SPEAKERS FOR pool/patio,
good quality. $20
941-697-7634
SPEAKERS INFINITY (2)
bookeshelf, (1) center $50
941-408-0178
TV 52" Panasonic good for
DVD or gaming $75 941-539-
7468
TV ANALOG converter box,
new for TV antenna $35
941-474-7387
TV HITACHI 53" 4 SuperBowl
$119 941-637-9772
TV New Craig 13" HD LCD
after 5pm only $60 941-628-
5293
TV New Craig 15" HD LCD
720p. Still in box. $80 941-
628-5293
TV PHILLIPS 20" TV free
941-625-6053
TV TV BIG SCREEN PROJEC-
TION 50" GREAT $100
941-629-6429
TVS 36",27",19" $30 941-
828-2608
VHS FLIMS 22 Great Movies
$25 for all or each $2
941-488-2267

EQUIPMENT
^ 6060 ^

17" MONITOR Great picture
and condition. $15
941-743-2656
3 PIECE PC items Smsung
monitor,keybd, $17 941-629-
3921
AKAI 50 flat plasma display
Used in spare roo $400
941-661-6941
COMP.DESK,WITH TOP self.
EC 53 x 24 $40 941-623-
0346
COMPUTER MONITOR HP
17" monitor w/speakers $10
941-488-2267
COMPUTER WORK STATION
30"w 19"d, 3 S $40 941-627-
6780
DELL INK Jet Like New -
Print/Scan/Copy/Fax $100
617-230-3845
GATEWAY LAPTOP Laptop in
excl. cond XP $40
941-629-3921


S COMPUTER
S EQUIPMENT


HP PRINTER,ALL- IN
ONE.4500 4500 ALL IN $50
941-875-1757
IPAD SMART cover apple i
pad smart cover,poly $25
941-743-7212
LAPTOP BATTERY New Li-ion
HD438. I paid $68. $35 941-
488-2267
NOTEBOOK DELL Inspiron
17" small screenfault $85
941-743-3482
PRINTERS DELL 964 &
Epsom C62 both for $10
941-488-2267
CLOTHING / JEWELRY/
L ACCESSORIES


COSTUME JEWELRY cos-
tume jewelry bag full $15
941-286-1170
HARLEY BOOTS ladies 9 1/2
starter switch D8201 $45
941-993-9852
HARLEY BOOTS mens 10
1/2 brake buckle D9168 $80
941-993-9852
JACKET LEATHER NFL
bears jacket size5x good cont
$100 941-505-0089
JEAN JACKET Calvin Klein
large almost new $25 941-
445-5619
LEATHER JACKET Robert
Comstock brown Ig $225
941-575-4364
MEN'S COLUMBIA fishing
shirt LS grey $15 941-575-
2675
MEN'S COLUMBIA fishing
shirt SS blue $15 941-575-
2675
MENS DRESS Coat never
worn size 40cost $100 941-
979-5187
ADVERTISED!

MENS SPORTCOAT, It. blue,
42 short & like new. $20
941-875-2285
MENS SPORTCOAT, tan, size
42 short & like new. $20
941-875-2285
MENS WRIST watch- Gold
color w/ stretch band $20
941-889-7592
MEPHISTO AGACIA silver
sandals Women's sz 38 $70
941-575-2675
l ... 1...........


MINKS:
BLOND MINK CAPE LARGE
SIZE & DARK MINK COAT
LARGE SIZE GREAT COND.
$250/EA 941-204-3734

ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES


$2 DOLLAR bill 1976 1st day
issue stamped $10
941-473-9004
29 CENT Elvis stamps US
Mint Sheet Elvis 1992 $15
941-473-9004
45 RPM records Great Condi-
tion and Selection $1
941-474-1776

LGOK:
ACTIVELY BUYING!
Antiques, Paintings; All Sub-
jects, Silver, Ivory, Jewelry, Ori-
ental Rugs, New England
Items. Anything Unusual or of
Quality! Local 941-306-8937
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
AMER FLAG WWII 48 stars
5'x9' $30 941-445-5619
ANSONIA ANTIQUE CLOCK
100 years old $169 941-764-
7971


SUN



CLASSIFIED


To Place, Correct, or Cancel Ad


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13487 TAMIA/I TA




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Thursday, January 30, 2014


COLLECTIBLES
i 6070 i

ANTIQUE SIDE Chairs(2) Oak
w/carvings.Needlep $125
941-575-9800
ANTIQUE TRUNK silver and
black/wood trim $475
941-815-8218
APPLE BLOSSOM footed
cake plate Sovereign $15
941-764-7971
AVON BOTTLES Trucks,Cars
Not open,EX. $25 941-391-
6377
BED 1850'S DOUBLE bed,
very ornate EC + bedding
$499 941-623-0346
BOOK ENDS petrified wood
from Calif. forest $100
941-585-8149
BOTTLES MOXIE,
Schmidts, Ballantine & more
up $5 941-697-6592
BUTLERS DESK Mahogany
CA 1850 Dovetaile $500 913-
486-8036






Buying Pre-1965
Silver Coins
Top Prices Paid!
Call 941-759-0274

CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
CEDAR CHEST labeled 1947
Roos/cedar scent $275 941-
815-8218
CHINA DINNERWARE Serv
for 12 plus 5 extra's $125
941-429-9305
CHINA, Sango, Fresco pat-
tern, 88 pieces, service for 12
plus many extras such as:
gravy boat, sugar bowl, plat-
ters, vegetable bowls, ect.
$300, 941-485-9501.
CHRIS CRAFT Quarterly
Brass Bell. 1998/1998 $20
941-661-6347
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
CLOCK ANSONIA ANTIQUE
100 years old $169
941-764-7971
COIN CANADA 1907 one
cent bronze Newfoundland
$20 941-697-6592
COIN CANADA 1919 50
cent silver Newfoundland $55
941-697-6592
COIN SILVER dollar Morgan
1921 bu collector $100 941-
697-6592
CONV COFFEE Table DrpLf
legs loc 16>30h 36w $65
941-704-0322
CORNER CABINET $375.
Hoosier cabinet. High Boy,
Dropleaf tables 941-421-4646
DRESSER CHERRY CA 1840
Dovetailed $200 913-486-
8036
FINE CHINA, Mikasa Serv/8
Many ex. Pieces, pic aval.
$300 OBO 941-575-4364
HESS TRUCK 1963 needs
TLC $250 941-735-1452
HO TRAIN cars 10 asst
advertising w t&t $50 941-
286-3119
KODAK N01A CAMERA with
box and instruc $90 941-473-
9004
LANAI SET 7 pc.,wrought
iron, glass top, indr/o $350
941-743-2333
LIONEL TRAIN engine 1950
nice $200 941-735-1452
MAJOR KIRA nerys plate of
star trek 1994 $20 941-423-
2585
MILKGLASS WESTMORE-
LAND: rare piece, perF $35
941-575-8881


S ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6* (070 i

MURANO GLASS clown 14 in
tall aqua and orange $75 941-
474-3194
MURANO GLASS clown 9in
tall,chianti bottle shape $35
941-474-3194
NAPOLEON COGNAC bottle
& box Over 50 yr. $325 941-
735-1452
NEW HAVEN CLOCK ca.
1880 Round Gothic $100
941-629-4857
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
ORGAN MAGNUS CHILDS
tabletop organ very old $50
941-423-2585
PICTURE THUNDERBIRDS
AIRPLANE picture 16x20 $25
941-423-2585
PRIMATIVE PINE Dry Sink CA
1840 Dovetaile $400 913-
486-8036
STAMPS, FIRST Day Covers
Plate BIk. & more $5 941-
505-6290
TABLE FORMICA TOP 2
CHAIRS 1950'S X CD $100
941-286-4894
TAPA CLOTH from Fiji
framed/glass 42"X42" $175
941-585-8149
U.S. POSTAGE stamp sheet
unused, more $12 941-735-
1452
VHS 39 ORIG. Star Trek VHS
tapes Mostly sealed $50 941-
423-2585
VICTROLA RECORD cabinet
labeled $325 941-815-8218
VIETNAM FIELD GEAR Pon-
cho, sleep bag $20 941-445-
5619
VINTAGE 1960S Car Maga-
zines great selection $3 941-
474-1776
VINTAGE COMIC books
1980s & 90s 1200+ comics
$495 941-474-1776
WALNUT DRESSER 5 draw-
ers.some marble.ex. $350
941-235-2203
WANTED TO BUY: blamp
Collector Seeks Stamps &
Old Envelopes. Call Tom
716-860-0218
WATERFORD-NIGHT
BEFORE Christmas with box.
$30 941-889-7592

S FRUITS &7
VEGETABLES
Lra 6075 -

[WET 'COAST A --A"
S FARMS
:75% LOCAL PRODUCE GMO:
FREE! FRESH SEAFOOD
MENTION THIS AD FOR 10%
OFF YOUR PURCHASE!
:2189 TAMIAMI TRAIL, VENICE.
941-426-7921
S MUSICAL
L ,^W 6S090 J


AMERICANA TECHNICAL
WIRELESS AMP IDEAL $75
941-894-4287
ARCHTOP ELECTRIC Guitar
Ibanez AF150, case $500
941-493-3050
CLARINET-ARTLEY GOOD
condition $85 941-268-5227
DRUM MACHINE Yamaha
RX15 Many rhythm $75
941-624-6685
DRUM, 5PC Set + Cymbals
all hardware etc $499
941-488-3033
ESTEBAN GUITAR CONDI-
TION..RARELYUSED,INCLD.AM
P+CASE $225 941-391-6211
IBANEZ ELECTRIC Guitar
with case good condition
$160 941-575-8229
KEYBOARD CASIO ELEC-
TRIC/BATTERY LK40/42 61
KEYS $50 obo 941-484-2483


MUSICAL
L 6090 ^


TROMBONE W/CASE fare
condition $100 941-474-
3441
YAMAHA DGX205 All inclu-
sive $175 941-375-8639
| MEDICAL

Lwla 6 0 9 5


2003 FORD WINDSTAR
WHEELCHAIR Van, "Ramp
Van By IMS", vehicle kneels,
Flat floor, ALL seats remov-
able, w/tie downs in ALL
$8,900, OBO 941-575-2317
3-WHEEL WALKER 8" tires,
storage $85 941-474-7387
ADJUSTABLE ELECTRIC
BED TWIN XL latex $300 941-
266-6273
BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296
HUMIDIFIER TWO years old
only been used twice $5
941-698-9979
KNEE WALKER Roscoe knee
walker w/basket $150
941-637-8569
LIFT CHAIR by Pride, Taupe,
Retail $1089, exc cond. $600
Cash only 941-350-9128
LIFT CHAIR Lt. Brown in
color, Good color, works well
$300 517-546-8632
LIFT CHAIR Pride, Ex cond.
$500/obo ; Invacare 3mth old
Extra Lg. wheel chair with 3"
cushion $350. 941-889-7246
LIFT CHAIR reclining lift chair
new condition (grn) $400
941-915-2435
LIFT RECLINER Remote con-
trol-excellent cond $400 941-
270-1183
MED BAT chargers,
Lesterl2610, Everest Jen-
nings $50 941-474-7387
MEDICAL SUPP & Equip
6002 Fabian Sat a.m $300
941-780-1544
MEDICAL TOILET seat 4" ele-
vation w/arms $26
941-474-7387
PATIENT LIFT "EZ Swivel Lift"
This is a good one & safe.
No power required.
$950 OBO 941-575-2317
POWER LIFT Chair Pride,
Excl. Cond. Blue New 900.00
$300 941-497-1351
SAUNDERS CERVICAL
TRACTION NEW. CO $425
941-916-8211
SCOOTER 4 wheel scooter, 2
new batteries, in g $500 941-
473-1093
TUB TRANSFER Seat Sliding
seat with safety $50
941-575-2317
TWO WHEELED WALKER
Folding walker, adjustable $10
941-575-2317
WHEELCHAIR FOLDING 20"
Invacare Padded Seat & B $55
941-575-2317
WHEELCHAIR QUALITY built,
18" seat, foot rests $125
941-474-7387
| HEALTH/BEAUTY

Z ^ 6100 ^

BED PADS stay dry 10 per
pack and pull ups $5 941-
916-9124
FINISHING TOUCH Lumina
new cond. comes w/all $5
941-626-9027
MASSAGE PAD HT-1470
Back Never been used $50
941-916-9719
SUNQUEST PRO24RS per-
sonal tanning bed $400
941-575-9800


TREES & PLANTS
L ^ 6110 ^


BIRD OF PARADISE wht vari-
ety, 6ft, great pot $30 941-
626-8156
GARDENIA 2 Gallon Pot Flow-
ering $10 941-204-9100
HUGE DESERT Rose Large
Flowering Succulent $125
941-204-9100
KEY LIME Trees 2 Gallon Pot
$20 941-204-9100
LADY PALMS About 6 ft tall in
large pot. $20 941-639-8245
MAHOGANY HIBISCUS
Flowering Cool Maple Leaf
$15 941-204-9100


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL, SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMY PALMS & MORE
Sui'sNusuRy 941-488-7291
PAPYA PLANT in 1 gallon pot
$4 941-697-0794
SNOW QUEEN Hibiscus Red
Flower Varig Leaves $15
941-204-9100
BABY ITEMS
L 61'20


2 CAR SEATSlnfant+baby 5-
22ponds +5-35ponds $15
941-235-1910
BASSINET LK new cony
whls/rckr nt It/sound $45
941-704-0322
CHILD BOOSTER SEAT New
in box W/cup holder $10
941-639-7766
GRACO PACK n' play in bag
with pad & sheet $35 941-
697-0005
GRAYCO ROUND playpen in
bag no pad exc con $5 941-
697-0005

|GOLF ACCESSORIES

L Z 6125 ^

2002 E-Z GO
White 4 Passenger Golf
Cart 2013 Batteries, flip
rear seat, head & tail lights,
windshield & charger
AS NEW $2495
941-830-5312

'T \ \


2007 RED CLUB CAR DS
4 Passenger Golf Cart, New
Batteries (12-2013)New Paint
New Rear(Flip) Seat Fully Refur-
bished $3395. 941-716-6792
2010 CLUB CAR GOLF
CART PRECEDENT I
New batteries (11/13), new
"Steel Blue" paint, folding
rear seat. As new $4250
941-830-5312

2014 STAR Golf Carts
Starting at $5195!
The CART GUYS
941-575-8181
3 METAL WOODS Left hand 3,
5 & 7. VGC $35 941-249-
3946
'97 CLUB CAR golf cart.
Good Trojan batteries. New
service & lights. $1450
941-716-6792
CLUB CAR '99 golf cart.
Brand new batteries & lights.
$1995 941-716-6792
CLUB CAR BODY 1994 Good
condition. $65 941-475-6128
EZ GO $1800, Yamaha
$1300, EZ GO $1500 OBO
All w/chargers. 941-626-0652
GOLF BAG brand new Call-
away, silver & black $150
941-743-2656
GOLF BAG Classic Hot-Z,
blue, excel cond. $50 941-
743-2656


GOLF ACCESSORIES
L 6125 ^


GOLF BAG Wilson. VG cond.
Blue/black/pink $75
941-743-2656
GOLF CLUB SLDR Driver
Used 3 Times $250 810-399-
3556
GOLF CLUBS G2 Ping Irons 3-
LW $125 810-399-3556
GOLF SET COMPLETE Tour
Edge clubs etc $200
941-429-7930
JACK NICKLAUS Q4 DR
440cc. 9 deg. R flex. $50
941-249-3946
MEN'S GOLF SHOES
NEW,SIZE SMALL, BLAC $20
941-627-6780
MENS CLUBS with bag Dri-
ver, 3&5 woods, XL20 ir $75
941-681-6074
TAYLORMADE SLDR Driver
2013 $399 new $250 941-
639-6277
UTILITY ADAMS like new
w/cover proA12 -20 deg $50
941-391-0042

FITNESS
WMW4 1128

BOW FLEX Extreme Older
Model Bow Flex $275
941-204-9258
ELLIPTICAL PRO-FORM 350
12 LEVELS $249
941-764-7971
ELLIPTICAL PRO-FORM 350
12 LEVELS $249 941-764-
7971
ELLIPTICAL-WESLO
MOMENTUM G3.8 GOOD CO
$100 941-268-5227
EXERCISE BOX step exercise
box and tapes $15
941-475-2169
PROFORM XP115 Elliptical
Excellent!Has fan $200 941-
575-9800
TREADMILL PRO-FORM
Crosswalk 400 w/incline $250
941-426-2562
TREADMILL PROFORM Fully
loaded features. Barely $225
941-822-7155
TREADMILL-NORDIC
TRACK C2420 programma
$280 941-268-5227
WEIDER PRO home gym up
to 5501b. press $275
941-625-5977
WEIGHT BENCH and equip-
ment weight bench. $125
941-628-1020
WEIGHT BENCH, inclined
heavy duty Body Solid $50
941-347-7759
WESLO G3.8 Elliptical
Machine Like new $75
941-286-1266
SSPORTING GOODS

L 6130 ^

3 WORKING BEACH CHAIRS -
$10 FOR ALL $10 714-599-
2137
CHAD JOHNSON CINCINNATI
BENGALS JERSEY $40
714-599-2137
DONOVAN MCNABB OFFI-
CIAL REDSKINS JERSEY $40
714-599-2137
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
FISHING TACKLE SALTH20
ALL FOR $100 714-599-2137
HALEX DARTS Never used -
2E points to L & 11 $20 941-
916-9719
HUMMINGBIRD PLATINUM
ID. Screen Only. $15
941-697-7634
NEW CHAPMAN PILOTNG in
hard case new $35 941-505-
1503


SPORTING GOODS
L 6130 ^


WEIGHTS 150LBS. 15 Ibs.
cement $20 941-286-1170
WINDSURFER /PADDLE-
BOARD,W/sail,fin,mast,Frenc
H $499 941-474-5125

L FIREARMS
wo a 6131 ^


BUYING
WW II Memorabilia
Guns, Bayonets, Daggers,
Swords, Helmets, insignia,
etc. etc. Eric, 941-624-6706
















Higher Power Outfitters
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
Guns*Ammo*CCW
Financing Available!!
Buy*Sell*Trade
941-347-8445
STOGEGER 12 GA o/u sold. S&W
mod 52-2 38 $950. S&W mod 41
$1100.941-380-2762

I BICYCLES/
S TRICYCLES
a 6135

3 WHEELER Beautifully
restored 3 Wheel bike $225
941-474-1776
ADULT/TEEN BIKES good
looking/great riding bikes $45
941-474-1776
AERO BARS Profile Design
AirStryke 2000 Aero Bars $50
941-488-2267
BICYCLE LADIES speed fun-
tionally sound $50 814-392-
BICYCLE MEANS Like new 5
speed New tires $100
814-392-6013
BICYCLE NEXT Mtn Bike 24"
used once $65 941-697-
0822
BICYCLE NEXT Power X Mtn
Bike 26" $65 941-697-0822
BIKE 26 INCH men and
woman bikes Brand new Huff
$135 865-696-5844
BIKE CARRIER 2-4 Yakima
carrier, like new $155 941-
639-5479
BIKE LADIES Schwinn Beach
Cruiser 26" $50 941-625-
2779
CYCLING SHOES Shimano
size 9 w/pedal clips. $65
941-575-2305 94-7
GIANT ALUMINUM Ladies
Simple Single Clean $75
941-544-004216-8
LADIES 60S Schwinn 3 speed
Brand new tires $50 941-544-
0042
LADIES ALUMINUM LaJolla
Cruiser Clean $60
941-544-0042
MEN'S BIKE MEN'S 26" / 1
SPEED EXC. TIRES/T $35
941-391-6163
MENES BIKE bike, 2 wheel-
er, 26 inch, 6 s $45 941-639-
7766
C TOYS/GAMES

L 6138 ^

4 WHEELER/POWER wheels
3 + age/ max 651bs $125
941-286-8736







Thursday. January 30. 2014 ad&yoursunnet E/NIC The Sun Classified Page 19


L TOYS/GAMES
Z^^6138 _

KITCHEN DORA FisherPrice
with music en sounds $20
941-235-1910
LITTLE TIKES mountain
climber with slide $150
941429 8507
RIDING TOYS zebra$20 and
lion$10 $10 941-429-8507

VIDEO
l 6140O

CAMERA CANON 35mm film,
EOS Elan, V G C $80 941-
505-6290
CANNON FTB camera 50mm
lens leather case $150 941-
575-7822


Local Manufacturer
offering to sell direct
to public 0 5 PI-isoN
SPA $1895.0 SWvIlM SI'A
LOADED $7995.* FI Iii-
GLASS roo.l 10ox2) $67 00
LOCAL: 941-421-0395





**SPAS &MORE**
MARQUIS bPAS and
VIKING SPAS

www.spasandmoreflorida.comn
941-625-6600
SOLAR POOL Heat Panels ten
4' x 10' panels $500 941-
979-8405

|LAWN & GARDEN


Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Spli, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
9414684372
EDGER SEARS Gasoline Ex.
Running $55 941-575 0690
ELECTRIC HEDGE Trimmer
16 inch Black & Decker $20
941-624-6685
HEATER NEW uses cooking
gas $120 941-575-8229
JOHN DEERE steel cart 7
c.f. Never used. $250 OBO
941-698-1292
LAWN MOWER Briggs Strat-
ton 22" Self Prop $175 941-
916-0771
LAWN MOWER TROY-BILT
self propelled w/bag $195
941493-0674
LOT OF junk mowers 6 mow-
ers w xtra parts $60
941-286-3119
MYERS LAWN Irrigation
Pump 1.5HP $350 941-697-
8566
I Employ Classified!
PINEAPPLE PLANTS in pots,
healthy mature $5
941 743-2333
TOP SOIL For Sale! Please
call. 9414684372
TRANSMISSION FOR TORO
w/b s/p mower. $35
207-319-6141
TRIMMER, RYOBI 2cyc.
c-shaft.s tring,head used4X
$75 941916-0771
I STORAGE SHEDS/
BUILDINGS
*^^ 6165 S

HURRICANESHED.COM
FENCED YARD....
TIGHT SPACES...NO PROBLEM!
941-626-4957
LICENSE # CBC 1259336


FEDERAL PACIFIC Breakers
Very hard to find! $20 314-
609-1540
GOODMAN 3 ton condenser
outside unit $225 941456-
1100
HURRICANE SHUTTERS 19,
clear, Miami Grade. 86" long.
$45 each 941-623-7265
METAL AWNING 58'W X
59"L, WHITE $35
540-247-1971
SLIDING GLASS DOORS 1
set of 2 sliding glass doors,
78.5"X48" $50 941497 2373
TIN FOR Tin Ceiling 8 pieces
of 2X2. $80 941-539-7803

TOP (2) 31wx22d min.
Venice area Please call 847-
567-4634


EQUIPMENT
66180~

PALLET 3/8" steel. 48"x40".
Very heavy duty. $25
941-697-7634
TOOLS/ MACHINERY
L 61"0 ^

2000 HALLMARK enclosed
trailer 20' ramp door $3k.
Also have utility trailer 6'x9' all
steel $600 301-501-6911
6'REMINGTON HEDGE Wiz-
ard Electric Heavy Duty $50
941-697-0822
AIR COMPRESSOR 5 1/2 HP
Honda Dual Tank $400
941-628-2311
AIR NAILER&STAPLER
Brand new with nails&stap $25
941-575-0690
APRON CARPENTER
LEATHER COST $18 LIKE NEW
$8 941-2864894
BUSH HOOK for cutting small
trees etc. $25 941585-8149
CHAINSAW PARTNER P-70
15" bar runs w/manual ru $95
941-697-6592
CIRCULAR SAW Craftsman 6
1 2". Vintage. g.c. $20
941697-7634
DRILL/DRIVER 18V cordless
3 '8 NIB $25 941-6244089
DRILL/DRIVER 18V cordless
3/8 NIB $25 941-6244089
FREUND BISQIUT JOINER
MODEL JS 100 W/BISQ $45
941-204-1079
GENERATOR CRAFTSMAN
like new few hou $200 941-
474-3441
HYDRALIC JACK 4 ton Bottle
Great little Job $15 941-575-
0690
JORGENSEN WOODWORK-
ING clamps 4-6 & 4- $180
941-764-7957
LADDER 66" black & white,
like new $22 941-423-9371
LADDER LITTLE Giant Osha
Approved Ladder $50 941-
697-0822


LADDER MULTI-POSITION.
Exc. cond. $50 941-697-
3613
MAKITA MITRE saw model Is
100 on stand $60 941-286-
3119
MK 470 Tile Saw Good cond.
Works well! $100
941-266-4731
MULTI-METER DIGITAL
Tester NIB $10 941-624-
4089
NAIL GUN-AIR PORTER
CABLE, FN250B CASE $80
941286-5666


tTOOLS/7 MACHINERY

!_ 6190 ^

PIPE CUTTER Cuts 1/8-
2.00" $20 941-575-0690
PIPE THREADER (Ridgid) 5
dies exc.cond. $120 941-
585-8149
POWER TOOLS band saw
table saw drill press $400
941-505-6181
RIKON MINI wood lathe Call
for details $300
941-764-7957
ROCKWELL 10" WOOD
LATHE model # 46010-w/
tools $175 941204-1079
SCROOL SAW Like new. $45
941-764-7957
1 Classified = Sales
TILE SAW Portable, stainless
table, clean. $25
941-697-7634
|OFFICE/BUSINESS
EQUIPJSUPLIES
6220O^

OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Preonmed & new office furniture.
VENICE 941 485-7015
FELLOWS BINDING
MACHINE FELLOWS QUASAR
$100 941-764-9212
OFFICE PORTIONS. Herman
Miller office part $250 941-
456-1100
I RFSTATI A NT


SLIPPL
^^622!

BLENTEC 15
maker commercial
941-375-4054
BUNN COFFEE
24 cups $75 94
GRACO TRAVEL
tral color with
941-375-4054
ICED TEA MAK
gallon capacity $
4054
ISI CREAM make
ers stainless steel
375-4054
| CAV
Ln^x L623;

NOTICE: Status
states that all do
sold in Florida mu
eight weeks old,
cial health certific
er shots, and beI
nal and external
| DOG:
Lm Z6233

NOTICE: Stati
states that all d(
sold in Florida mw
eight weeks old,
cial health certific
er shots, and beI
nal and external
CHIHUAHUA TEA
1 Chocolate M,
Great V-Day gift!9


-"


DOGS OFVENII
groomed in my n
15 yrs exp. C
(941)786
STANDARD POO
M, 5 mths, Apric
$600, ltd. reg. 94
| MHSC. P

62i36234

55 Gal. Saltwabte
fish, cabinet, li
coral, rock & pro
Set up and runnir
Fri-Sun 941-380-5


I PET SUPPLIES
I & SERVICES
144Z 6236

42"X72" GATES 6 Chain link
6 ates, dog pen. etc $225
41-456-1100
A & R Aqua Pros Inc
Aquarium Services
Installation~Maintenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
941-441-8658 Uc/Ins
BIRD CAGE for Small Bird w/
Accessories & Seed Screen.
$25 941-979-5481
BIRD CAGE Nice 20 % 20 x 48
Medium size $50.00
941-426-2562
Find the
perfect
companion
in the
Classifieds!
LARGE BIRDCAGE large
deluxe black birdcage on rolle
941429-2236 S99
REPTILE ACCESS bowls,
rocks, castle 10.00
941-286-1170
APPLIANCES
625TO --


-rt B APPLIANCES FRIDGE stove
s J micro d/w 499 20167 $499
-5 201675-0160
COOKTOP KENMORE Elite
S smoothie like newl8 mos old $499
al use i $250 941-637-7706
DEHUMIDIFIER WHIRLPOOL
server holds Top Rated Model $119
1-3754054 760-579-3232
- system neu- DRYER KENMORE, older but
extras $100 works good, poss del $50
941625-2779
(ER, Bunn 2 FRIDGE side by side ice and
60 941-375- water Ronton $130 423-650-
9148
er with charg- GEORGE FOREMAN Grill 17
el $75 941- in. dia. electric. $20
941-639-8245
GEORGE FOREMAN grill in
[ great shape black and $15
2 941-698-9979
JUICER MONTEL Health Mas-
ter with manuals $85 941-
ute 585.195 575-8229
ogs and cats KENMORE 30" Electric
ist be at least Range Color Bisque $200
have an offi- 941-833-0740
ate and prop- KENMORE MICROWAVE
free of intent Almost New countertop wh
parasites. $35 941 204-7530
S KENMORE MICROWAVE
Color Bisque $100 941-833-
3 0740
MICRO/HOOD BLACK -
te 585.1 w/turntable excellent $65
ute 585.195 941-426-2562
ogs and cats
ist be at least MICROWAVE OVER the
have an otfi- range Frigidare gallery 1.6
:ate and prop- $125 941-6399134
free of intesti- MICROWAVE SHARP
parasites. carousel white $75 941-391-
ACUP Puppy, 6788
Olale, $400. MICROWAVE/HOOD WHITE,
41-391-1331 turntable, excellent $50
941-629-0011
RANGE KITCHEN Aide
ceramic top stainless co $325
-, .'- 941-625-7135
RANGE RANGE smooth top
5 bnr bisq works fine $200
CE. Your dog 941-743-0799
mobile salon.
Call Stacy REFRIGERATOR MAYTAG
r7877 18cuft 2 door w/ice ma $150
)DLE PUPPY 941-625-7135
:ot & Cream, REFRIGERATOR SIDE by
41 7646036 Side w/ice & water $325
941-426-2562
ETS REFRIGERATOR SIDE by
4 side, white, excel. cond. $150
7 941-493-4412
SMOOTHTOP STOVE
er Fish Tank, Frigidaire gallery series bisque
ghts, pump. $150 941-204-7530
tein skimmer. STOVE FRIGIDAIRE White
ng $100 Call smoothtop 5 burner s $250
5802 941.766-7545


APPLIANCES
^ 6250 ^


DRYER Maytag. $100 Works
well $100 614-2714701
STOVE, GE bisque black
glass top. $100
941-214-8034
STOVE/OVEN FRIGADAIRE
DROP-IN,EXC COND $160
941-268-5227
TOASTER OVEN small good
shape $10 941-698-9979
WASHER/DRYER-MAYTAG
NEPTUNE Stacked,full si
$290 941-268-5227
WASHING MACHINE G.E.
Heavy duty. Lge capicit $65
715-4390458
WASHING MACHINE, G.E
Profile Extra Large Capacity
$145 941-7164195
WHIRLPOOL UPRIGHT Freez-
er New 16.9 cubic foot $399
770-356-8352
MISCELLANEOUS

L: 6260 ^

2 TIRES/TUBES 2 26"
tires/tuber 9 each $9
941-3916163
AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13/CARTON
RiLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
TOP BRAND ToBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LiQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
ALUMINUM FLAG Pole 22 Ft.
New 500 $250 941-624-
4089
ALUMINUM FLAG Pole 22 Ft.
New 500.00 $250 941-624-
4089
BASEBALL CARDS 3 Roger
Marns 50s Mint $75 941-445-
5619
BATHROOM SHELF three
shelf space saver behind t $20
941-698-9979
BIKE AUTO-CARRIER
Reese-hurculous4 $95
9414969252
BINGO EQUIPMENT
750Cards,Cage 'Balls,Tabs Tot
e $250 9412238718
BLUE OX TOW BAR TOW BAR
IS ABOUT 3 $325 630-292-
8692
BOAT COVER 17' TO 19'
HEAVY DUTY, IJE $115
906-323-6250
BOAT GAS TANK 6.6 GALS
PLASTIC, MERC $25
906-323-6250
BOOKS-NEWER 50 Romance
paperbacks, various ao $25
941-628-5293
BRAKE BUDDY&TOW BAR
WILL SELL SEPARATELY $950
630-292-8692
BRASS VALVES & fittings Ck,
ball & gate valve $7 314-609-
1540
CARGO CARRIER for vehicle
roof top $50 941575-8229
CARGO CARRIER sears fiber
glass like new $125
941-6984264
CLOCK & barometer chrome,
ship's wheel $100 941-575-
8881
COFFEE FROM Honduras
Excellent quality 5 Lbs. $35
941-697-0794
COIN Set of World Great-gift ..
$6.25 941496-9252
CRAB TRAPS New
w/Rope,Float,Zinc,Rebar $35
941-830-0998
CULUGAN WATER Softener
Perfect Condition 4 yrs $500
734-395-5219
DINNERWARE 90 pieces,
decorative pattern. $60
941-629-2699
DOME LIGHT Large flashing
blue dome light 110 $15
9416246685


MISCELLANEOUS
:Z 62260 ^

DOCK CORD 30 amp with
case $35 941-697-7592
DUFFLE BAG/BACKPACK
folds, w wheels, new $25
941-505-6290
ELECTRIC PATIO AWNING
EXCELLENT CONDITION $500
941-460-8189
EXTENSION CORD 150 ft,
12 gage, yell $50 307-332-
5389
FIRESIDE GAS Stove
Heat/Glo $499 941-763-
0442
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect tor these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
9414684372
JUMBO SHRIMP and
STONE CRAB
ARRIVING Now FREE DELIVERY
941-249-4665
KAYAK STORAGE Swagman
Storage Mounts $35 307
332-5:389'
KIA SOUL front end mask kia
soul front end $75
201-675-0160
LENOX CHAMPAGNE Set
Great wedding gift $50
941-429-9305
LIFE JACKETS 4 Adult, Type
II, bright orange. $15
941-5754838
MAGNIFIER FOR SEEING
IMPAIRD 25 50X $495
941-764-1820
MIATA BRA Black Rarely
used. Fits early 1990's $99
941-223-8718
MOTORCYCLE COVER
cover for Irg bike $70
941-585-8149
MOTORCYCLE HELMET
HJC,Blk,1/2shell,large $20
314 609-1540
MOTORCYCLE JACKET Size
Irg w/armor $65 314-609-
1540
MOVING BOXES 10 used
wardrobe boxeS $25
941-391-6090
OIL CHANGER New in the box
$25 9416977592
PATIO STONES Red brick
color $45 941-624-6685
PATIO STONES Red Patio
Stones. $45 941-624-6685
POOL TABLE WITH ALL
ACCESSORIES FULL $500
941-697-6553
PUNCH BOWL set Anchor
Hocking 27 piece $40
941626-9027
ROLL-ON SUITCASE Grey
tones tapestry. 18"x26" $8
941475-1275
SLIDING GLASS DOORS
METAL GOOD COND 72x80
$25 941-204-3458
SNOW CONE MAKER Rival
new in box $10 941445-
5619
STONEWARE, BRITTANY 8
bowls with handles & lids. 16
pieces. $10 941629-2699
STORM SHUTTERS Alum
Panels- For 14 wnd/5 drs
$480 404-316-2038
TICKETS-WAR HORSE (2)
Row 7 Marl6 1PM $148
941-505-0860
TOW HITCH Reese tow power
class 3 w/2" recei $150
941-661-6941
TRAILER TIRE & rim New
Goodyear galvanized rim $50
941-697-7592
TRAILER TIRE New Goodyear
Galvanized rim 6.50x $50
941-697-7592
TRUCK CAP White fiberglass,
fits 6' box pic $125 585 396
9006
TWO HEIGHT RV STEPPER
TWO HEIGHT RV $60 630-
292-8692
US FLAG Plaque 12"x18"-alu-
minum-NEW emboss $29.92
941-496-9252


Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19





The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, January 30, 2014


MISCELLANEOUS

Z 6260 ^

TIRE P215 GREAT tread. $55
941-575-9393


BUYING gold, silver
and vintage costume
jewelry. 941-769-8561


Cash paid FOR WWI WWII
Korean Vietnam,German,
Japanese, etc Military items
(941)416-3280
TILE- FEW 18 X 18 Imola-
gres, Arena, color: Tortora.
Sold '04-'05. 941-828-0302
WANTED: Vintage Marbles &
Costume Jewelry. Please call
585-365-2034

7000


TRANSPORTATION
| BUICK

Lwow 7020 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

LEXUIJ5 OF 5AkRAkOTA^
1998 BUICK PARK AVENUE
Low Mi! Lthr! Well Maintained!
$3,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
2003 BUICK CENTURY
Extremely Nice Car! $5495
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 BUICK LESABRE
Custom, Very clean, Leather,
Smart wheel, Gray, 83k
$6200 814-450-7323


Z==U=Z) DU= IIUIM ULN.I IUK YI
55,500 miles, Excellent shape
$6500. 617-686-3062 Venice
2005 BUICK LACROSSE
58,720 mi, $8,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL 1 owner 59k act. mi.,
very clean $8950 941-979-6234
2010 BUICK ENCLAVE
34K $27,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 BUICK ENCLAVE
48,343 mi, $24,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 BUICK REGAL
10K $23,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2014 BUICK ENCORE
328 MILES $26,988
877-211-8054 DLR
S CADILLAC
wmrZ7030 ^


DHS 48k miles, Senior Owner
New tires/ shocks, Well main-
tained, $7950. 941-613-
9596


2001 CADILLAC CATERA
124K, Silver, 4Dr. $2900 Runs
well! Call 941-525-2568
2002 CADILLAC DHS, Only
60K Miles! Excellent Condition!
$6,500. 941-423-2196
2004 CADILLAC DEVILLE
Like New! Car Fax! 67,000 MIL
$7,500; 401-440-2923
2006 CADILLAC DTS
55K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 CADILLAC DTS 72K,
Clean, Good condition,
$11,995 Call 419-203-6432
2007 CADILLAC DTS
74,148 mi, $12,784
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CADILLAC CTS
19,567 mi, $22,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 CADILLAC CTS
2463 MILES $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
CHEVY
L ^ 7040 J


1999 CHEVROLET MALIBU
LS, 110 OK mi, new a/c, 2 new
head gaskets, V6, very clean
$3,700 941-625-8074
2003 CHEVY BLAZER,
Only 90K Miles! Extra Clean!
$4,988 941-639-1601, DIr.





2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA
Only 46K Mi! Always Garaged!
Asking $9,4. $7,500. 573-
434-4649 (Englewood Area)

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
2007 CHEVROLET TAHOE
100,812 mi, $18,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 CHEW IMPALA LTZ,
Leather! Loaded!
$13,988. 941-639-1601 RP.G.
2010 CHEVROLET COBALT
40,799 mi, $12,584
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 CHEVY COBALT
41K $9,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 CHEVROLET AVEO
22,542 mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CHEVY EQUINOX LT,
4 cyl, Mocha, 38,945 mi,
$18,450 863-494-1870
2013 CHEW IMPALA LTZ, Lthr,
Red! Sunroof Fact. Warr!
$16,990. 941-639-7300 Dk
L CHRYSLER
L ^ 7050 J


CORDE LX. 1 Owner! 87,300
Mi. Auto, PW, PB, 22-29 MPG,
$4,500. 941-697-1115
2006 CHRYSLER 300, Gold,
V6. Alloy Wheels! Extra Clean!
$8,990. 941-639-7300 Dk
2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
CONV., $7,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Convert Limited edition white
w/ black top. Looks like new
$12,500. 941-613-1864


2009 CHRYSLER T&C
57,410 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 CHRYSLER T & C
45,401 mi, $15,985
877-219-9139 DIr
DODGE
LW4047060 ^


1991 DODGE DAKOTA
Truck, runs great, good cond.
$1,700, 941-488-5353.
2004 DODGE INTREPID
Only $5193!! Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 GRAND CARAVAN
Was $6987 Now $5987!!!
941-916-9222 DIr.


Great Condition! Gray. Clean
Title! $5,900. 941-268-1993
2010 DODGE AVENGER RT,
Loaded! $11,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
SAdvertise Today!I
2012 DODGE JOURNEY
23,925 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 DODGE CARAVAN
30,565 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 DODGE CARAVAN
40,799 mi, $19,874
877-219-9139 DIr
| FORD
/0 0
L r 7070 ^


1997 FORD THUNDERBIRD
2 DR Coupe, 53,650 mi, V8
$3,750. SOLD SOLD SOLD
2004 ANNIV. EDITION
FORD MUSTANG CONV.
GT Package, High End Stereo,
45k Mi., Cherry!! $10,500
941-505-7044
2006 FORD F350
DIESEL, 67K $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 FORD EDGE, Leather! All
Power Opt! $13,988. 941-
625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2007 FORD MUSTANG
CONV, Blue Beauty! $12,988.
941-639-1601, DIr RG.
2008 FORD FOCUS 79,771
mi, $11,474
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 FORD FOCUS 49,086
mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 FORD FOCUS 49,086
mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EXPLORER
47,024 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD FUSION
37,962 mi, $14,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 FORD EDGE
LOADED, 60K $25,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 FORD EXPLORER
14,046 mi, $27,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD EDGE LTD
AWD, Looks ABSOLUTELY new!
Save thousands over new.
$27,895 941-916-9222 DIr.
2012 FORD FOCUS HATCH-
BACK, Low Mi! Factory Warr!
$14,990. 941-639-7300 Dk
2012 FORD FUSION, Low
Miles! Factory Warranty!
$15,990. 941-639-7300 Dk.
2013 FORD E350
36,369 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 FORD FOCUS 4 Door
Sedan, Fact. Warr! Low Mi!
$15,990. 941-639-7300 DIr


SCADILLAC CHRYSLER
Lol' 7030 LIO L7 75 0


I FORD


7.g 0
0 070 ^





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and place your ad.
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TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
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merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
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GMC
Law 7075C ^


2005 GMC CANYON CREW
CAB Exceptionally clean!!
$5195 941-916-9222 DIr.
2011 GMC SIERRA1500
53,557 mi, $30,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 GMC VAN
14,708 mi, $48,795
877-219-9139 DIr
| JEEP
L ^ 7080P ^


2002 JEEP LIBERTY
127,883 mi, $5,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 JEEP WRANGLER
46,384 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 JEEP WRANGLER
59K $26,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 JEEP CHEROKEE
33,908 mi, $24,575
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 JEEP WRANGLER
52,935 mi, $27,854
877-219-9139 DIr
LINCOLN
L 7090 ^



SO n 1day


1996 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
Runs great. Many upgrades
$3,200. obo sold sold sold
2000 LINCOLN TOWN-CAR
clean, beige and tan, $4,250
941-587-2896
2011 LINCOLN MKS
NAVI, 12K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| MERCURY
L004: 7100 ^


2004 MERCURY SABLE
62,284 mi, $6,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 MERCURY GRAND
MARQ 42,698 mi, $9,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 MERCURY BASE
57,049 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr


98 SW2 Wagon
01 SL1 Sedan
02 L200 Sedan
04 Ion Sedan
04 Vue SUV
06 Vue SUV
06 Saturn Vue
08 Vue SUV


$2,500
$2,800
$3,499
$3,400
$4,200
$5,899
$6,099
$7,800


Used Saturn Parts & Service
941-627-8822

USED CAR DEALERS
Z^ 7137


MATTAS MOTORS
941-916-9222
"SAVING YOU MONEY MATTERS
AT MATTAS MOTORS"

Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here

MISC.DOMESTIC
AUTOS


r PUNTAGORDA
BUY HERE PAY HERE I
127 Carmalita St. I
941-637-0131 I
I I
* 1990 DODGE RAMI
1500 4X4 Lifted, 154k Mi,
$4900
* 2003 SANTE FE Light
Blue, cloth AC, V6, 107k'
I Miles $4950 I
I* 2000 HONDA CIVIC
I HATCHBACK. BLACK. GREY I
CLOTH. COLD AIR. AWESOME1
RUNNING VEHICLE. 159K MILES.
MANUAL. $3200 I
I* 2001 Jeep Cherokeel
I Sport. 4 Door. Yellow. Cold I
lAir. Cloth. Inline 6 Motor. I
1$2200 |
I* 1997 Nissan Maxima.|
115k Miles. Cloth "CREAM
PUFF" Immaculate! $3950 I
I* 1998 Sebring ConvertI
I white, black top 85k, $29951
I* 1999 Honda Odysseyl
IVan 91k miles, $38951
1* 2004 Pontiac Sunfire
1109k mi, Nice cond. $4495
* 2002 PT Cruiser 98k
iCream. Very clean $4495
1* 2003 Honda Accord'
I Green, Cloth, 4 cyl All power I
I$5795 I
1* 2000 BMW 528i1
1Loaded 116k miles, Black,i
$5995.
www.PgUsedCars.com

| ACURA
L 7145 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
WILOEW O
LEIJ5U OF SAAST


OLDSMOBILE
L M 11 0


2001 OLDSMOBILE AURORA
3.5, great condition, loaded,
leather. $3800 941-637-9637
| SATURN
Lww^m71U35


2007 SATURN AURA, Loaded,
Moonroof! Black Beauty!
$11,988 941-639-1601 DIr.
2009 SATURN VUE
74,485 mi, $12,897
877-219-9139 DIr



PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


I ACURA
7145


2008 ACURA 3.2LT
68,538 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 ACURA 3.2TL
NAVI, 7308 Ml, $31,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| AUDI
LW ^ 7147


2002 AUDI Tr CONVERTIBLE
AWD!! $10,988. 941-625-2141
#1 Used Car Dealer
2009 AUDI Q7
66K $33,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| BMW
L 7148 ^


1997 BMW Z3ROADSTER
65,203 mi, $8,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 BMW 325CIC
CONVT., 75K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 BMW 3351
CONVT., 34K, $25,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 BMW 3351
65,655 mi, $24,575
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 BMW 3281S
16K $29,911
877-211-8054 DLR
71 0
L HONDA
wmmm:7160


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
LWyss"E
LEXU5I OF SARASOTA
1998 HONDA CIVIC
40,807 mi, $6,987
877-219-9139 DIr
1999 HONDA ACCORD EX,
auto, leather, good cond. new
tires $3,195 941-575-2214
2004 HONDA ACCORD
89,636 mi, $9,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA ACCORD
69,837 mi, $11,454
877-219-9139 DIr
i ADVE=RTmSE!F" I
2006 HONDA ACCORD
85,625 mi, $11,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CR-V
80,918 mi, $12,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
32,920 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
61,212 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
69,461 mi, $12,574
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC
66,573 mi, $11,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ELEMENT
60,360 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA PILOT
112,564 mi, $14,995
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
68,330 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA RIDGELINE
47,939 mi, $24,577
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
35,321 mi, $14,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
62,639 mi, $17,995
877-219-9139 DIr





Thursday, January 30, 2014


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 21


HONDA
0 160 ^


2010 HONDA CIVIC
27,122 mi, $12,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V,
15,399 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V,
22,594 mi, $20,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V,
26,153 mi, $22,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
CERT,. 2.285 mi, $17,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
CERT,. 5,404 mi, $17,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA PILOT
EXL, 63K $20,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 HONDA ACCORD
15,746 mi, $20,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
31,645 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
48,158 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
34,844 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
41,075 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
41,559 mi, $16,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
8,775 mi, $19,325
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 32,720 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 35,081 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
19,301 mi, $22,498
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
24,873 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
28,736 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
36,474 mi, $21,897
877-219-9139 DIr
SEmploy Classified!
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT,. 16,055 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-Z
CERT,. 35,594 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
21,761 mi, $26,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
5,440 mi, $20,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 26,966 mi, $19,742
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
10,287 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
10,308 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
38,811 mi, $16,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 12,017 mi, $15,487
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 16,112 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 28,792 mi, $16,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 28,792 mi, $16,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 5,071 mi, $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr


S HONDA / MAZDA
L 7160 ^ 10


2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 6,964 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
32,500 mi, $24,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
32,500 mi, $24,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
CERT,. 35,334 mi, $23,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
45273 mi, $19,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
8,989 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CIVIC
CERT,. 6,155 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA FIT
5,849 mi, $12,845
877-219-9139 DIr
SClassified = Sales
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT,. 7,028 mi, $34,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2014 HONDA ACCORD
CERT,. 4,151 mi, $28,975
877-219-9139 DIr

7~AI
L HYUNDAI
4411:7163 J


2007 HYUNDAI SONATA
85,868 mi, $6,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HYUNDAI SONATA
1 owner, 47k mi., Sweet!!
$8500 941-505-7044
2008 HYUNDAI SONATA LTD,
Loaded! $9,988. 941-625-2141
#1 Used Car Dealer
2009 HYUNDAI SONATA
66,573 mi, $11,546
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
3,950 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
| LEXUS
Low, 7178S ^


2004 LEXUS ES330
79K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2004 LEXUS LS430
45K $21,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2004 LEXUS RX330
77K $15,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2005 LEXUS ES330
93K $11,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2005 LEXUS LS430
78K $19,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2005 LEXUS LX470
106K $27,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2006 LEXUS GX470
112,686 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 LEXUS LX570
NAVI, 47K $54,990
877-211-8054 DLR

LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!
1-877-211-8054
W//IL IJE "
LEXUS OF SARA30TA
2013 LEXUS IS250C
NAVI, 5719 Ml, $45,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| MAZDA
L v 7180 J


2003 MAZDA PROTEGE
48,166 mi, $8,754
877-219-9139 DIr


2007 MAZDA MX-5
55K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 MIATA MX-5
5 speed, Convertible,
$8500 941-240-5983
2011 MAZDA MAZDA3
33,652 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
SMERCEDES7
L ^ 7190 ^


1988 MERCEDES-BENZ 300E
4dr, 98K mi, Garage-Kept,
$3,200. 941-697-3660
1999 MERCEDES-BENZ
SLK 230, hard top conv, white,
very nice condition. 68K miles,
$9400 OBO 218-348-0338
2006 MERCEDES CLK3500, 2
Dr Coupe! Must See! $14,988.
941-625-2141 #1 Used CarDealer

MINI COOPER
L 71902


2007 MINI COOPER, Red!
Double Moon Roof! $12,988
941-639-1601 P.G. DIr

/ MITSUBISHII
L 71959 'S'


2010 MITSUBISHI LANDER
48,216 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
NISSAN
L ^ 7200 ^


2006 NISSAN 350Z, 6 Speed!
Must See! $12,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2006 NISSAN ARMADA LE,
Loaded! 90 Day Warr! Xtra
Clean! $13,990. 941-639-7300U)
2008 NISSAN 350Z
13K $21,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 NISSAN FRONTIER
63,890 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN MURANO
79,077 mi, $13,974
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN MURANO
83,646 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN MURANO
90,562 mi, $16,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 NISSAN MURANO CON-
VERTIBLE Tan Lthr & Tan Top!
$24,990. 941-639-7300 Dk.
2012 NISSAN PATHFINDER,
White, Ent. System! Fact. Warr!
$21,990. 941-639-7300 Dk.
I Advertise Today! I
2013 NISSAN JUKE, Turbo!
Low Miles! Factory Warranty!
$17,990. 941-639-7300 Dk.

SPORTS CARS
LmmmZ 7205 ^


78k mi, Runs Great. cold AC
$7,500 941-234-3242


1987 PORSCHE 944,
Red/Mint/MUST SEE!
$5500 OBO 96,000mi,
1-864-415-3601
1999 CHEVY CORVETTE
Targa top, Auto, VGC $15,000
OBO 941-698-0637


I SAAB
S7206


2005 SAAB 9-3
60,533 mi, $8,957
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 SAAB 9.3, Sports Turbo!
$8,988. 941-625-2141 #1 Used
Ca Dealer
L SUBARU
vm:7207 ^


2008 SUBARU LEGACY
80,946 mi, $13,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 SUBARU OUTBACK
60K $19,990
877-211-8054 DLR

| TOYOTA
Y2 7100 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!
1-877-211-8054

LEJUEW OF ASOTA
2000 TOYOTA CAMRY LE,
4 cyl, auto, air, power
windows, power locks, ABS
113,000 Mi, Very Reliable
$3,500 941-492-7152
2005 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE Gray, power: windows,
locks & sunroof, $7900. 941-
961-7349
2005 TOYOTA SOLARA 2 Door
Red Convertible! Tan Lthr. &
Top! $9,990. 941-639-7300 DM
2006 TOYOTA AVALON
83,345 mi, $12,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 TOYOTA COROLLA
124,768 mi, $6,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 TOYOTA PRIUS
55 MPG, $8,900, 1 owner,
garaged, 98K 941-426-7844
2007 TOYOTA SCION
12K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 TOYOTA PRIUS
31K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 TOYOTA CAMRY
52,087 mi, $18,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 TOYOTA VENZA
45K $18,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 TOYOTA SIENNA
14,312 mi, $28,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA TUNDRA
51,006 mi, $32,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA VAN
55,590 mi, $28,860
877-219-9139 DIr

PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!

FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY
48,973 mi, $14,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 TOYOTA MATRIX
9,670 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
7VOLKSWAGEN
4Z^ 71220 ^


2006 VOLKSWAGEN BEE-
TLE 31,550 mi, $10,844
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 VOLKSWAGEN BEE-
TLE 71,565 mi, $12,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
46,396 mi, $17,458
877-219-9139 DIr


SVOLKSWAGEN
L 71220 ^


2009 VW JET'A,, Wolfsberg Edi-
tion! Turbo! $12,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Car Dealer

6VOLVO
L 72300 ^


2006 VOLVO C70 Hardtop
Cony! Red! $13,988 941-
639-1601 P.G. DIr.


I COLLECTIBLES I
^^ 250 ^


1926 MODEL-T FORD
SHOWCASE $10,000/obo
941-473-7359
1979 JEEP Restored from
ground up. $1500 Firm
sold 1st day








1988 FORD MUSTANG
Convertible, 61k original mi.,
everything original, full power.
$5,600. 941-575-9023

SAVE THIS DATE:
SAT., 2/8/14
9:OOAM-1:OOPM

SUN NEWSPAPERS
OPEN HOUSE &
MIDWINTER
COLLECTOR
CAR SHOW
Hosted by:
The Sun Newspapers,
23170 Harborview Rd.
Charlotte Harbor, P.C.
24 Trophies will
be awarded.


1 over 4' high
FREE Coffee,
Doughnuts, Orange
Juice to Antique
Car Owners for
the first hour.

TOUR OF THE
PAPER OFFICE
& PLANT
See first hand
how the Best
Community
Newspaper in the
Country operates!.
Music begins at lOAM by
"Power Outage Continues"
playing hits from the
50's, 60's & 70's!
And Guest Appearance
by Las Vegas performer
Jimmy Mazz.
FOOD & BEVERAGES
AVAILABLE
SEE THE NEW
2014 AUTOS!
Open Only to Non Modified
Cars/Trucks/Motorcycles
at least 23 years old.
NO REGISTRATION FEE.
Owners that will exhibit
at this fun EVENT must
Pre-Register to the
Veteran Motor Car Club
of America with Ozzie
Osborne at 941-235-7701.
Regretfully space allows for
only 100 vehicles.
CALL NOW!
PUBLIC INVITED FREE!!


SBUDGETBUYS
L 72T52





1996 TOYOTA TERCEL
186K mi, dependable, good
tires, good mechanically, Cold
AC. $1100 863-494-3050
1997 FORD EXPLORER
Turbo 4WD. Good Condition!
$1,600. obo sold sold sold
1997 PLYMOUTH VOY-
AGER, Loaded! $988. 941-
639-1601 DIr. P.G
AUTOS WANTED


* 7260


WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204





sos ee



CASH FOR YOUR CAR,
TRUCK or CYCLE
GOOD PRICES 941-626-6041

L AUTO PARTS/
I ACCESSORIES I
7270 i

2 TIRES P215/60R16 50%
TREAD $40 714-599-2137
67-69 CAMARO $200
941-629-6429
69 BELVEDERE Bumpers,
$100 941-883-1463
CASTROL MOTOR OIL $20
941-916-0771

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!
HIDDEN HITCH, complete,
fits 2008-2013 Dodge Journey
with wiring and ball mount.
Call 941-637-4870.
HOLLEY CARB /ALUM
INTAKE $150 941-629-6429
MUSTANG SALEEN $300
941-629-6429
ROOF BARS montblanc
rectangular $75 used once
715-439-0458
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TOYOTA CAMRY Doors
$150 941-627-9466
TOYOTA COROLLA 14" Hub-
caps (3) $25 941-627-9466
TRUCK TOPPER $100 941-
451-4274


a





The Sun Classified Page 22 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, January 30, 2014


IBOATS-POWERED
L 7330 ^


L AUTO SERVICE
S& REPAIR


I-HEADLIGHTIJENIE-I
Repair hazed, cloudy or dull
headlights... GUARANTEED!
We come to you!
941-587-0584
VANS
^ 7290 ^


Only 98K Miles! $6,500.
941-780-1544 (North Port)
2002 GMC CONVERSION,
350 vortex eng., 4 capt.
chairs, elec. fold down bed,
elec. heat/cool console, tlr.
hitch, new tires & brakes, roof
rack. $5900 941-830-3438
2003 CHEVROLET VEN-
TURE Florida Van! Exc.
Cond! No Rusts or Dents.
$2,500. obo
**SOLD IN 1 Day!!**




2003 DODGE GR.CARAVAN
Gray, Good Tires, Cold AC,
$3,195. obo 937-831-0146
2007 CHRYSLER T & C,
Stow & Go! Only 70K Miles!
$9,988. 941-639-1601 DIr
2008 HONDA ODYSSEY
85,844 mi, $16,745
877-219-9139 DIr
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
82,285 mi, $18,474
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 VW ROUTAN, Loaded!
HAS IT ALL! $16,988. 941-
625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-8704325
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
32,177 mi, $23,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
45,503 mi, $24,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
53,050 mi, $28,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT,. 10,454 mi, $30,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT,. 5,436 mi, $32,978
877-219-9139 DIr
2014 HONDA ODYSSEY
5,678 mi, $37,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2014 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT,. 15,292 mi, $35,787
877-219-9139 DIr
2014 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT,. 5,329 mi, $37,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2014 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT,. 5,329 mi, $37,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2014 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT,. 5,934 mi, $37,985
877-219-9139 DIr
|TRUCKS/PICK-UPS
L 7300 ^

r NJ--J""

DON'T WAIT. DRIVE TODAY
GUARANTEED CREDIT
I APPROVAL
941-473-2277 I
Swww.pctcars2.com
11116 --.. .


STRUCKS/PICK-UPS
L 7300 J


[ WE BUY CARS *
Top Dollar for your car
or truck Call us today
941-473-2277
I www.pctcars2.com I

WE FINANCE
EVERYONE
MUST HAVE INCOME
& DOWN PAYMENT
941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com
L--------- J
I SPORT UTILITY/
| VEHICLES|
Z ^7305 ^
2003 FORD EXPLORER
Auto, leather, cold ac, Ex
cond. $5750. 941-468-1489




2006 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
Blue, 47K Miles! Garage Kept!
$10,400. 941-475-3047
2007 FORD EDGE Great
cond. 56k+, Non smoker
941-629-8893
2007 TOYOTA RAV4
49,796 mi $14,987
877-219-9139 DLR
2009 DODGE JOURNEY
3rd Row! Low Miles!
$13,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
WILSIE
ILEXU I OF SAA.OTA

PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


02 Saturn Vue
04 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
07 Chevy HHR
08 Saturn Vue XE
08 Saturn Vue XR


$3,299
$4,200
$5,299
$5,899
$6,099
$6,600
$7,800
$11,500


I 941-627-8822 |
ADVERTISED!]

BOATS-POWERED
7330

14' SEA NYMPH, & Galv. trl.
Exc. cond. $1,500 30HP
Evinrude, low hrs, runs great.
$850. 25HP Yamaha. 4 cyl,
elec. start, like new $2200
941-650-1258
15'6" BOSTON WHALER
1995 Rage w/ 115 HP Evin-
rude Jet, bimini, center counsel,
marine radio, garmin fish find-
er, mincota remote control
trolling motor, bracket used 2
hours, Alum. trailer, Just Ser-
viced $6,950 863-494-5011



arm
16' WELLCRAFT CC, 50HP
Johnson, Low Hrs! Trailer. Must
Sell! $3,900. 941-716-3011


18' HEWES BONEFISHER
Flats Boat, '88 Evinrude Spe-
cial, 24 Volt Trolling Motor,
Aluminum Trailer. Must See!
$6,000 941-697-3894


1999, 90HP 2 STROKE MERC.
SS PROP, CENTER CONSOLE,
BIMINI, FF, GALV. TRAILER. PLUS
EXTRAS. $4,500/0BO0 941-
380-9800 OR 941-505-1514
20' 1994 BAYLINER Needs
Starter. Make Reasonable
Offer. 941-268-2121


W/A cuddy Runs great trailer
$7200 obo. 941-979-0465.


22' 2007 BENNINGTON Tri-
Toon, 150 Yamaha, Loaded!
Low Hours. Like New! Trailer.
$22,700 obo 941-423-3717

NEED CASH? I


Walk Around, 1997. MERC.
225 EFI, CHART PLOTTER,
DEPTH GAUGE, VHF, FULL COCK-
PIT ENCLOSURE, RUNS GREAT.
$9,700 941-637-6443 OR
773-717-0919


needs engine work $4,00UUU
941-505-4010
Sale Pending!



44' DEFEVER44 1987
Cleanest you will find!
Low hours, Imron hull paint
2013 Maintained to the highest
standards. Call for a c/d and
full specs. $179,900
Tod Sullivan 941-457-0131
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
L SAILBOATS
:7331

25' 7" Person Arial. Fitted like
a 34 footer. $3,500 Firm 941-
637-1455
SMISC. BOATS

IW4: 7333 ^

8' WALKER BAY Dinghy with
oars. $400 941-276-0488
OUTBOARD/
MARINE ENGINES
LZ 7334^ ^ -
YAMAHA 3 HP 2 stroke
motor. $300. Very good cond.
941-423-4227.
BOAT STORAGE/
DOCKING
LZ 7336^

BOAT SLIPS available ranging
25-28' in length. Rent $240 to
$330. Excellent location, pro-
tected marina, quick access to
gulf, water & electric available.
Annual lease with quarterly
payments. 215-317-6843


BOAT STORAGE/
/ DOCKING I
^^ 7336 11

SLIP, Water & Elec. 5 Min. to
Stump Pass. Up to 36' Boat.
$10.00 a foot 941-460-9698
|MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
Z ^7338 ^
ANCHOR 14LB.DANFORTH
w/line Incl. 150' 3/8 nylo $75
941-698-4103
BIMINI TOP bimini top. 78"w
60"h 6' I teal com $50 941-
830-8391
BIRD REPELLERS SCARE
EYE BALLOONS: PKG OF $25
941-575-8881
BOW ROLLER Windline Like
NEW.Excellent Con $175 941-
698-4103
CASTING NET 6' New $20
941-423-9371
DANFORTH S-1600
ANCHOR LIKE NEW $50 941-
204-1079
DANFORTH S-1600
ANCHOR LIKE NEW $50
941-204-1079
ENGINE COVER for Yamaha
115 HP 4 Stro $375
941-916-0771
FENDER HOLDERS (2) for
10" Fender $15 each $15
941-697-0940
Seize the sales
with Classified!
GARMIN 3600-C with arial
and chip Garmin $375 513-
368-7874
HARD DINGHY WATER-
TENDER 8.8 HARD DINGH
$400 941-764-9212
HELM CHAIRS (2) with cush-
ions and p $40 941-830-
8391
ROD HOLDER Alum. 4 rod
alum.holder,40"Lx1ll' $75
941-698-4103
ROD HOLDER Poly 4 rod
holder,w/ mounting hw $20
941-698-4103
SPREADER BARS dor pon-
toon boat for davits $50
732-473-1619
SS OMC PROP 15.5X 14-
#390831. 150-235HP 0/B
$150 941-204-1079
ZINCS (2) 3" DISCS $20
941-697-0940
ZINCS Shaft (2) Zincs for 1
3/4" Shaft $25 941-697-
0940
/ CANOES/KAYAKS

L Z 7339 ^

10' 2" Ascend, Camo color.
fishing kyaak, sit in, 511bs,
$425 941-468-7757
CANOE INDIAN RIVER 16'
electric motor, paddles $375
740-593-7181
TRAILER 1
& ACCESSORIES I
^^, 7341 ^


TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
L4 ^7341\ ^
UTILITY TRAILER Utility
TRAILER 8x41",HEAVY D $180
423-650-9148
WELLS CARGO Trailer NEW
2014, 7'X16', fold down rear
door, $4,150 941-587-2896

I CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS


Collectable, 1,245 true miles
Full documentation, FL title.
It deserves a look! $3900
Englewood 941-474-4931
2007 YAMAHA VX 1300 R'
4371 miles, hwy bars, passen-
ger seat w back rest. Garage
kept. Excellent cond. $6,500
941-585-2680
2009 HARLEY DAVIDSON
ROADKING
Mint! 2743 miles, Many Xtras!
$15,000 941-460-8338
2009 KAWASKI CONCOURS
14 Black, 730mi, perfect,
loaded. $8200 810-444-4998
2011 SUNNY 150 CC 3
Wheel, Only 500 Miles!
$1500. obo *SOLD in 1 DAY*
HARBOR
SCOOTERS
FOR ALL YOUR
SCOOTER
NEEDS...


3315 Tamiami TrI. PG
We Repair Scooters too!
941-347-8705
HARLEY SEAT sundowner
like new softtails $200 2000-
2006 941-286-1266
SEmploy Classified!
4k,



URAL 750CC w/ Fact. side
car. Fun Ride! 2170. mi, Like
new. Health causes sale.
$5,900 941-661-4572
I CAMPERS/ I
I TRAVEL TRAILERS I
^ 7370 ^

2007 LINX FLEETWOOD
2007 5th wheel, all upgrades!
Incl. 1 Shed, Lot 178 @
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$10,000 obo 863-444-1631
2011 COUGAR Extra lite 5th
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2014 44' Premier Elite 5th
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options. Must See! $47,500
OBO 941-894-5219
I iA


4X8 UTILITY trailer, with
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$500 941-276-0488 _

25* TOY HAULER: 2003
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Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.


A*. B C D! E F (HJK L N* 0 P 0g R S T* 0 V WB X Yn
ABCDEFGHiJKLMNOPQRSTOVWXYZ

CRYPTO FON


DeeerfiLKe Eke code Eo reveo.L LEke: oKser!


Solve the code to discover words related to shopping.
Each number corresponds to a different letter.
(Hint: 20 = e)


7 18 21 20 7



8 10 20 3 25 9


7 9 16 10 20


11 17 10 8 5 18 7 20


SHOPPING WORD SEARCH


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Find the words hidden vertically, horizontally & diagonally throughout the puzzle.


WORDS


AFFORDABLE
BROWSING
BUDGET
BUILDING
CASH
COMPARISON
CREDIT CARD
DEALS
DISCOUNT
GIFTS
LAYAWAY
MALL
MERCHANDISE
MONEY
PARKING LOT
PERCENTAGE


PRESENT
PROFIT
PURCHASE
REFUND
REGISTER
RETAILER
RETURN
SALES
SHOPPING
SPENDING
STORE
TRAVEL
WALLET
WEBSITE
WISHLIST
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WORD SCRAMBLE
Rearrange the letters to spell
something pertaining to holiday shopping.


RBCYE




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I am an American actress born on
November 19, 1961 in Connecticut.
I have been a leading lady in many
romantic comedies, including two in
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Thursday, January 30, 2014


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PAGE 1

Charlotte SunAND WEEKLY HERALDCALL US AT 941-206-1000THE SUN: Police Beat 4 | Obituaries 5 | Legals 8 | Viewpoint 10 | Opinion 11 | THE WIRE: Nation 2 | State 3 | World 5 | Business 6-7 | Weather 8 | SPORTS: Lotto 2 | CLASSIFIED: Comics 11-14 | Dear Abby 14 | TV Listings 15 VOL. 122 NO. 30 AN EDITION OF THE SUN AMERICAS BEST COMMUNITY DAILYTHURSDAY JANUARY 30, 2014www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00 70 percent chance of rain62 55 High Low Look inside for valuable couponsThis years savings to date ...S UN COUPON VALUE METER CHARLIE SAYS ...I learn something new every day.INDEX | 705252000258 Daily Edition $1.00 $9,803 Florida Governor proposes $74 billion budget for 2014 LIFE OR DEATH DECISION ICY WEATHER HITS THE SOUTHAtlanta schoolchildren and motorists were stranded all night after a snowstorm paralyzed the city. Eric Holder will make the most high-profile death penalty decision of his career in law enforcement.THE WIRE PAGE 1 THE WIRE PAGE 1 Pick of the DayHonduras coffee, $35In Todays Classifieds! THE WIRE PAGE 1 Readers have spoken. By a vote of 127,321 to 2 (a very slight exaggeration), you want the comics in color in classifieds instead of black and white in The Wire. I could hug each and every reader who responded. It is often hard to know when a vocal minority is only just a vocal minority. Your large and energetic response made it clear which course we should take. Many of our longtime readers might remember that we used to have the comics in black and white. One day my boss (Dad) came into the office and said, I want to see the comics in color. They are more enjoyable to read in color. I explained that only one out of every hundred papers still prints daily comics in color. It would be an additional $100,000 yearly expense to add color to our black-and-white comics. A vote of just one reader and presto color comics. With your incredibly large response in favor of keeping color comics, I now get to go see the boss to discuss the outcome Father Knows Best. Many of you chimed in: I love having the comics in the classified section, mainly for the reason you mentioned regarding spousal bliss vs. spousal conflict. Conflict would be an understatement. I also like the comics in color. Good way to start the day. I find it no challenge to locate. If you are new to the paper, it is listed on the front page. We are not all idiots. And this one from MM: I enjoy Sudoku puzzles and am always happy when you print an extra one somewhere. I will look for it. After reading the front page and Wire, I go to the comics for the joy of a few laughs and therapy of the puzzles. Also, I need to read my horoscope to find out how my day will be, and of course Abby to remind me that everyone has problems and mine are minor. Thank you for a great small-town paper. KK shared this thought: Placing them in The Wire would most definitely be at odds with family peace. One of us reads the comics and does the puzzles while the other reads the news. Then we swap. By the way, when the centerfold of the classified is needed for a spread, we all know to go to the back of the classified to find the comics. Even the two folks who preferred comics in black and white in The Wire were playful in their response. Despite my acceptance of your cur rent positioning, I would love to see the comics returned to the position immediately following the Letters to the Editor section. The color is nice, but I really dont need it. My reasoning is that I used to, and still do, get very irritated at many of the letters, but could always look forward to then transitioning to the comics to cool me off! Truth be told, though, I would love it even more if you would elim inate the letters and expand the comics! WS WS, if we got rid of the letters I would miss my funnies each day! David Dunn-Rankin is president and publisher of the Sun. Email him at daviddr@sun-herald.com.Comical classifieds ENGLEWOOD Outside of the Charlotte County Sheriffs District 1 ofce on San Casa Drive, postcard-size advertisements promote the Charlotte Harbor Super Boat Grand Prix, scheduled for April 11-13 on Englewood Beach. Inside the ofce, the District 1 commander, Lt. Darrell Caparo, and other ofcers are ne-tuning the details for the security and public safety during the three-day event. Caparo said the basic operational plan is in place and calls for a coordinated effort with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission ofcers, the Florida Highway Patrol Auxiliary and the Sarasota County Sheriffs Ofce. He anticipated 50 law enforcement ofcers from the various agencies will be involved over the three-day event. Boat race organizers plan to hire a private security rm for extra help. The CCSO and other agencies will have marine patrols on the water, Caparo said. Beach Road will remain open throughout the weekend. To ensure trafc safety, Caparo said, ofcers will be pre-stationed at specic locations to keep the trafc moving. The key point is to keep the trafc moving. Ofcers will be stationed at Beach Road and South McCall Road, the roundabout at Gulf Boulevard-North Beach Road, at the public Englewood Beach where most of the events are being staged, and other locations. North of the Sarasota-Charlotte county Security eyed for raceBy STEVE REILLYSTAFF WRITERAuthorities have plan for boat grand prixSECURITY | 6 MURDOCK At just 4 years old, Caroline began feeling what she described as a bee sting sensation in her legs. But over time, her symptoms would worsen: fatigue, stunted growth and an inability to concentrate in school. Even though thyroid issues run in her family, Caroline wasnt properly diagnosed and medicated until age 7. The change was dramatic. She became more energetic, improved in the classroom, and her accelerated growth made up for lost time. Today, Caroline is starting fastpitch softball in school and is almost as tall as her mom. Her brother, Myles, 12, with the same condition though to a lesser degree went through a similar transformation. Theyre growing and doing better in school, said their mother, Kelly Mahoney. I think it has made a huge difference. Still another benet, enjoyed by everyone, is spending a lot less time in the car. When the new Pediatric Specialty Clinic recently opened in Murdock, the family no longer had to drive two hours from their home in Rotonda to Fort Myers for appointments at Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida. The same goes for other local children in need of pediatric specialty health-care services. The outpatient clinic is more than just a matter of convenience, however. The clinic makes it more likely for young patients to seek early diagnoses By GARY ROBERTSSTAFF WRITERCLINIC | 6NORTH PORT A police investigation found a city supervisor did not violate state law or city policy by allegedly throwing bid documents in a garbage can and having an employee show them to a bidder. According to a recent report from the North Port Police Department, the incident occurred during the bidding for re alarm systems in 2012 for a contract that later was awarded in 2013. The case was reviewed by the state Attorney Generals Ofce late last year. Since bid rigging or bid tampering is illegal, the Attorney Generals Ofce determined the local department should investigate. According to the report, City Property Maintenance Manager Lou Spreduto allegedly tossed three re alarm system contract bids for the city in a trash can at City Hall. Minutes later, Clyde Walton, a maintenance worker, walked into the building and retrieved the bids from the garbage. He took them to what was at the time the vacant Fleet Maintenance building on Pan American Boulevard. He unlocked the door. A short time later, he allegedly met John Solero of Southwest Florida Alarm and Security of North Port. At the time, Solero had the current contract for the alarm and security system with the city. Walton allegedly showed Solero the bids. According to the report, Solero said he could bid as low as Space Coast. Then Walton locked up the building and they both left. North Port Detective Chris Maki wrote that he enlisted the help of Bryan Holland, a city building ofcial (who works with Spreduto), to help investigate the possibility of bid tampering. According to the report, Holland researched the specic project. He determined that all city policies and procedures were followed during the bid process, Maki wrote in the report. This job was not a sealed bid and the company owner, who was shown the other bids, was shown those bids so that he could be included in the bid pool for that job. According to Florida statutes: a bid Trashed bids spur police inquiryBy ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICHNORTH PORT COMMUNITY NEWS EDITORBIDS | 6 CORRECTIONThe correct phone number to call for tickets to the 16th annual Irish Concert being held at 3p.m. Friday at Englewood United Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St., is 941-474-8843. You can also call 941-473-2458. A story in Wednesdays Lets Go! section listed an incorrect phone number. DavidDUNNRANKINPRESIDENT AND PUBLISHERPUBLISHERS INBOXNew pediatric clinic delivers care SUN PHOTO BY GARY ROBERTSDr. Asjad Khan examines Caroline, 10, who has a thyroid condition, as her mother looks on. Kelly Mahoney used to drive her children two hours, from their home in Rotonda to the Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida in Fort Myers, for treatment before the opening of the Pediatric Specialty Clinic in Murdock. ff T Y6yDIIIIIIIIIIUMD \ a is

PAGE 2

Our Town Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014 The SUN (USPS 743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin .....................941-206-1001 Publisher ................................... David Dunn-Rankin .....................941-206-1003 Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter .................................941-206-1134 Advertising Director .................. Leslee Peth ..................................941-205-6400 Circulation Director ................... Mark Yero ....................................941-206-1300 Arcadian Editor ......................... Susan E. Hoffman ........................863-494-0300 Arcadian Publisher .................... Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300 Charlotte Sun Editor .................. Rusty Pray ...................................941-206-1168 North Port Sun Publisher .......... Steve Sachkar ..............................941-429-3001 North Port Sun Editor ................ Lorraine Schneeberger ................941-429-3003 Englewood Sun Publisher ......... Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031 Englewood Sun Editor ............... Clinton Burton ............................941-681-3000 SUN NEWSPAPERSMember of the Audit Bureau of Circulation SUBSCRIPTIONS Home Delivery Rates: Newspaper designated market: City ZoneCarrier home delivered 7 days. Rates as follows plus 7% Florida Sales Tax: Monthly Bank/ Credit Card ....................$16.47 3 Months ......................$66.51 6 Months ....................$113.05 1 Year .........................$197.69Does not include Waterline and TV Times. Above rates do not include sales tax.Subscribers residing in outlying areas may incur additional delivery charge. DESOTO COUNTY RATES Monthly Bank/ Credit Card ..................$16.40 3 Months .....................$74.09 6 Months ..................$119.54 1 Year ........................$196.70 Arcadian home delivery $29.99 per year. Mail subscription rates: Rates as follows (advance payment required): 7 Days 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $120.88 $216.81 $386.10 Sunday Only 3 Months 6 Months 1 Year $58.81 $110.56 $186.19 Single Copy rates Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00 Unclaimed account balances under $10, inactive for 15 months, will be used to purchase newspapers for classroom use. CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe or to report any problems with your service, please call or visit your local office. Englewood: 941-681-3000 120 W. Dearborn St. Charlotte: 941-206-1300 23170 Harborview Rd., Port Charlotte North Port: 941-429-3000 13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port DeSoto: 863-494-0300 GOVERNMENT TODAYSouth Gulf Cove, Non-Urban Street and Drainage Unit Advisory Committee meeting, 10a.m., 18400 Murdock Circle, PC. 575-3656. Board of County, Commissioners joint meeting with City of Punta Gorda, 1:30p.m., 18500 Murdock Circle, Room 119, PC. 743-1944. EVENTS TODAYAmerican Legion Cafe, Now serving bfast/lunch 7a-2p. Thu-Sun. Public welcome. Thanks for supporting our vets&community 2101 Taylor Rd 639-6337 Project Linus, Quilt blankets for kids every Thurs. 9-11am Huckys Softball Training 17426 Abbott Ave Nancy 627-4364 Sierra Club Bikeride, Sierra Club Cape Haze Pioneer Trail Bike Ride led by master naturalist. Rsrv. req. 941-445-6181. Deep Creek Elks 2763, Lunch With Kathy 11-2:30 FOE Eagles #3296, Eagles offers Lunch Mon-Fri 11am-2pm. Dinner Tue-Sat 5-8pm.Music Wed-Sat 6:30-9:30pm.23111 Harborview Rd, CH 941-629-1645 TODAYTable Tennis, 9-11 am, north port senior center, 4940 Pan American Blvd., equipment, provided, $2.00, 426-6276 Current Events Conv, 10-11:30am NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd 426-2204 bring a topic or joke or just come & discuss Discussion Group, 10am, North Port Library, 941-861-1307, Every Thursday bring a news article to share. Medicare Assistance, 10am, North Port Library, 941-8611307, One on One counseling every Thur. Make an appt at 866-413-5337. Lunch VFW Post 8203, Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues, Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special in canteen Mexican Dominos, 12-3pm NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd 426-2204 Come learn the game & join all the fun Amvets 2000 Dinner, LAUX Capt Saltys catfish fry 4-7pm $7 Members & guests welcome QOH @ 7pm 401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999 Lasagna Dinner, Legion Post 254, 6648 Taney Town North Port $6:00 Pasta, salad, tst. & dessert 6-8pm cont. Brenda 258-6550 FRIDAYBasic Exercise, $40/8wks or $2/class 9-10am NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd Marcelle 235-0346 Join today & start to feel better Pierogies Take Out, Pierogies/Kielbasa,Every Fri.10am-6pm Sat.10am-1pm. St. Andrew Ukr. Ctr. 4100 S. Biscayne Blvd. North Port. 941 786-5256 Tai Chi, 10:30am-12pm NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd Call for cost Jerry 496-4932 Helps with balance Lunch VFW Post 8203, Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues, Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special in canteen Amvets 2000 LAUX, Ex-Board Meeting 4:30pm. Officers be in attendance. 401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999 Ukrainian Dinners, Friday 4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call about takeout. St. Marys Church at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00 423-2427. AYCE Fish@Elks 2153, All U can Eat Fish +full menu-5-8pm Music, Karaoke. Fun Night-members & guests. Kenilworth, Port Charlotte, 625-7571 Holy Name Bingo, 5-9:30pm San Pedro Activity Center, Non-Smoking Up to $1300.00 in cash prizes, Refreshments Open to all 429-6602 SATURDAYFundraiser, We will be offering free depression screenings and we will be having a fundraiser garage sale to fund free counseling. Closet of Hope, Free clothing, ID required. 1st & 3rd Saturdays 9:30a-12p. Gulf Cove UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-1747 Newcomer Day, 10 AM, North Port Library, 941-861-1307, Come learn more about your community. Pierogies Take Out, Pierogies/Kielbasa,Every Fri.10am-6pm Sat.10am-1pm. St. Andrew Ukr. Ctr. 4100 S. Biscayne Blvd. North Port. 941 786-5256 AMVETS Riders 312, Street Clean-Up 10:30 AM. Meeting 11AM at Post 312, 7050 Chancellor Blvd. scenic ride to follow Bowling Tournament, Red, White & Blue Bowling Tournament, between AMVETS 312, 2000 & VFW 8203, 2-6 pm, 7050 Chancellor, NP 941-429-5403 Bowling@AMVETS 312, Tournament vs Post 2000, VFW, & Post 312@2PM. Prizes, Chili, Free Drink to contestants. 7050 Chancellor, NP 429-5403 Chili Dinner@Post 312, Hot or Mild only $5-Tribute to George Kaiss. 5-7pm Public welcome. Live Music @ Amvets Post 312,North Port 429-5403 Aux Rueben Dinner, Unit 254 is having a Rueben Dinner on 2/1 from 5:30-7:30 @ 6648 Taneytown, ph. 423-7311 Post 254 in North Port $7. TODAYMG French Toast, Sausage, Fresh Fruit, OJ, Coffee & AUCE Fr. Toast 8-11am Mobile Gardens Comm Ctr, 414 Camino Real, Engl $4.00 474-9825 Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted items every Thursday 9-11:30am (except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533 Ewd Country Liners, 9:3011:30 AM, Christ Lutheran Church, 701 N Indiana Ave. Begin/intermed. line, dances. Public welcome. Nancy 474-6027 Line Dancing (Beg), 9:30 to 11:30 American Legion Post 113 3436 Indiana Rd Rotonda West Phone Eve at 941-697-8733 Parkinsons Exercise, To increase mobility, strength & coordina tion. Speech clarity & voice power. 10am $5 Sports Complex.l 475-2123. Plant Clinic, 10-Noon, Got a plant/tree problem? Bring in a sample to be identified @ New Englewood Library, 3450 S McCall 475-6903 Story Time, Thursdays 11am Stories, rhymes, music & play for children of all ages. Elsie Quirk Library, 100 W Dearborn 861-5000 Englewood Bridge Cl, Contract bridge is played every Thu & Mon from 12:15 til 3:30 at The Hills Rest. RGCC, 100 Rotonda Cir, 698-7945, $2. Entertainment, V.F.W. Englewood, Music by Dave Grahn 5-8p.m.! Baby Back Rib Night 5-7p.m.! Public, Welcome! 474-7516 Legion Game Night, Indoor corn-hole games 7-10 pm, lite menu 5-8 pm at Post 113, 3436 Indiana Rd. 697-3616 a smoke free Post. Free Trivia Contest, 6:30-8:30p.m. Dance Etc., 3372 N. Access Road, Englewood. Bring a dish for potluck supper. 941-698-4099 Trivia Night, Free beverages and prizes. bring a dish to share. Thurs Jan 30 6:30pm, 3372 N Access Rd, Englewood, 941-445-1365 Bunco, Play bunco. Meet new people, enjoy refreshments. 7-9 pm Lemon Bay Womans Club. 51 N. Maple St. $5.00 941-323-6642 Harry James Orchestr, Harry James Orchestra, 7:00 pm, Lemon Bay High School Performing Arts Center. Tickets $20.00. Call 474-7702, ext. 3000 FRIDAYCrafting Cuties, Love to Craft? Join us at Rotonda W Comm Ctr, 3754 Cape Haze Dr,Rotonda,Fridays @ 9:30 am. Call Elaine at 697-0212 Line Dancing (Intr), 9:30 to 11:30 American Legion Post 113 3436 Indiana Rd Rotonda West Phone Eve at 941 697 8733 Dessert Game Day, Play games, make friends. Enjoy a yummy dessert at Lemon Bay Womans Club. 51 N. Maple St. 11:30 3. $3.00 474-9762 Seafood and More, Mike & Carols super seafood dinners and ham steak dinners at Post 113, 3436 Indiana Rd. 697-3616. 4:30-7:30 pm Ukrainian Dinners, Friday 4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call about takeout. St. Marys Church at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00 423-2427. Entertainment, V.F.W. Englewood, Dance to the music of the, Sno-Birds 5-8p.m.! Fish Fry or Wings 5-7p.m.! Public Welcome 474-7516 | NORTH PORT EVENTS 8th Annual Harbour Heights 5K Run/Walk, Run/Walk event to raise funds for Autism Speaks and SEC classes at 5 CC Schools. Event date is Feb. 22; preregistration is 7am, race starts at 8am. 27420 Voyageur Dr., PG. Price: $15 in advance until 2/8, $20 day of the event. Awards in 20 age groups, raffles, giveaway gifts, refreshments. 258-2890. Antique Craft Garage sale, Sunnybreeze Christian Fellowship, 7049 SW Liverpool Rd., Arcadia, will hold its annual antique, crafts and garage sale from 8a.m. to noon Sat., Feb. 1. There also will be clothing and household items along with a tea room featuring coffee, tea, pie and cookies. For more info, call 309-361-7181. The Best Valentine Gift Ever, On Feb. 12 through Feb. 14, The Suncoast Statesmen Barbershoppers will provide a quartet to sing two love songs, present a rose and take a photo for a unique singing Valentine. Surprise your sweetheart at home/work or at whatever time & place you choose in Charlotte County for only $40. 625-1128. Huge/Multi-Family Yard Sale, Saints and Sinners of the Kingdom, Relay for Life Team, hosts a huge yard sale, including clothing, housewares, tools, toys, Christmas items, and more at 9am, Sat., Feb. 1, at 4485 Tamiami Trail, PG. Come out & support Relay for Life! Together WE can make a difference! 204-1882. Photo Scavenger Hunt, Scavenger Hunt, 9-11:30am, Sat., Feb. 8, New Hope Christian Fellowship (Liberty Elementary), 370 Atwater St., PC. Support military families in need. Proceeds benefit Operation Homefront. Clues given event day. Individuals $7; Teams $25/car (5 people). Prizes top 3 teams-back by deadline. 916-5239. Why You Like the Art You Like, Find out why you respond the way you do to particular works of art, with paintings from the National Art Exhibition as examples and Roxanne Hanney as your guide. Feb. 5, from 2-4p.m. $20 ($15 VAC members). Hosted by the Visual Arts Center, 210 Maud St., PG. www.visualartcenter.org or 941-639-8810. Free Concert: Emmaus Road Quartet, Punta Gorda Church of the Nazarene will have a Free Concert: Emmaus Road Quartet from 4 pm to 6 pm, Sun., Feb. 2 at 512 E. Allen St. Public welcome. Info: 639-3663. FOE Eagles #3296, Eagles #3296 invites you to join us Thurs., Jan. 30, to listen to the great sounds of Galaxy. Fri., Jan. 31, we will feature Verceal & Al. Come in for dinner either night 5-8pm with music 6:30-9:30pm. Accepting member applications. 23111 Harborview Rd., PC. 941-629-1645 Featured EventsPAID ADVERTISEMENTS Huge Rummage Sale / Lunch, Sat., Feb. 1, 8am to 12pm, Gasparilla Mobile Estates, 2001 Gasparilla Rd., Placida. Selling lawn & garden items, furniture, electronics, kitchen items, clothing, bedding, misc. indoor & outdoor items, & much more. Hot dogs available for purchase. For info, call 440-933-4812. CCW Annual Rummage/Bake Sale, Council of Catholic Women Rummage/Bake Sale, 9am-12, Sat., Feb. 1. Free admission. Pre-Sale, 4-6:30pm, Fri., Jan. 31. $4 Admission. St. Raphael, 770 Kilbourne Ave., Englewood. Open to public. Donations accepted Thurs., Jan. 30, Fri., Jan. 31, 9am-12. No large items permitted. 473-2431. The Case Of The Golden Girl, Mystery Play. Feb. 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 at 7 pm; Feb. 5 at 2:30 pm. Green Street Church, 416 W. Green St., Englewood. Tickets 2/$10; 1/$8. An Englewood gal solves a murder in 1958 Las Vegas. Call 941-474-3764 to reserve tickets. Featured EventsPAID ADVERTISEMENTS | CHARLOTTE | EVENTS | ENGLEWOOD | EVENTS ENGLEWOOD U.S. poet laureate Natasha Trethewey is scheduled to read at the Hermitage House Friday evening, but she will not be alone. Two Massachusetts Institute of Technology musical artists will join Trethewey. Evan Ziporyn will play clarinet and electronics. Christine Southworth will play bagpipes before and after Tretheweys reading on the Gulf beach fronting the Hermitage Artist Retreat on Manasota Key. According to the artist retreat, Ziporyn has described his music as a crossroads between genres and cultures, east and west. His musical compositions have been commissioned by Yo-Yo Mas Silk Road, Kronos Quartet, the American Composers Orchestra and other venues. Hes currently the head of Music and Theater Arts at MIT and director of MITs Center for Art Science and Tech nology. Southworth is the general manager for MIT-based Gamelan Galak Tika, a percussion orchestra, based upon Balinese traditions and consisting of gongs, metallophones, hand drums with cymbals, vocals, bamboo lutes and spiked ddles. Southworth describes her compositions as a cross pollination of sonic ideas. Trethewey is serving her second term as the nations poet laureate. Among her accomplishments, shes earned a Pulitzer Prize and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Endowment of the Arts. Besides publishing four collections of poetry, she published her nonction, Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Tours of the historic Hermitage House Artist Complex begin at 4:30 p.m. Friday, and will be followed by a 5:15 p.m. beach reading by Trethewey and perfor mances by Ziporyn and Southworth. Visitors need to bring only their beach chairs and any refreshments during the performances. The Hermitage House Artist Complex is located at 6660 Manasota Key Road, Englewood, adjacent to Sarasota Countys public Blind Pass Beach. For more information, call 941475-2098, or visit www. HermitageArtistRetreat. org.Email: reilly@sun-herald.comU.S. poet laureate, other artists perform Friday By STEVE REILLYSTAFF WRITER TRETHEWEY RUBY TUESDAY GIVEBACK EVENTSRuby Tuesday restaurant in the Port Charlotte Town Center mall offers a Community GiveBack Program for area nonprofits, churches, schools and others. This is a great way to raise money for your cause while enjoying lunch or dinner, organizers say. Ruby Tuesday gives back 20percent of net sales to each organization. The following organizations have GiveBack events scheduled for February. If you are interested in supporting any of these, visit the organizations website for a flier or contact the group/individual and request a flier to attend. Tuesday North Port Chorale The mission of the North Port Chorale is to provide quality vocal entertainment to the residents of North Port and surrounding areas. Contact: Joyce Cattelane at 941-373-5335 or northportchorale@yahoo.com, or visit http://www. northportchorale.info/. Feb. 12 Charlotte Desoto Building Industry Association The mission of the Future Builders of America Learning Today, Building Tomorrow is to help students pursue careers in the building industry by providing education and technical training by awarding scholarships, assisting in apprenticeships and job placement. Contact: Rick Ilmberger at suncoast_glass@ yahoo.com. Feb. 15 International Angelman Day: Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics Contact: Kat Rankins at 630-852-3278 or kmrankins1@gmail.com. Feb. 17 Port Charlotte Jewish Community-Temple Shalom Temple Shalom is awelcoming reform Jewish congregation that strives to meet the spiritual, educational, cultural and social needs of its members. Contact: Joyce Gelfand at jteachu@yahoo.com. Feb. 21 Habitat for Humanity Women Build Contact: Doreen Stoquert at dstoquert@ centurylink.net or 941-276-6892. Feb. 26 American Cancer Society Relay for Life Relay for Life raises much-needed funds and awareness to save lives from cancer. Relay for Life of Port Charlotte will be held April 12-13 at Port Charlotte High School. Contact: Ken Johnson at 941-625-1167, or visit www.relayforlife.org/portcharlottefl. | COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFSLandscaping continues at libraryParking and landscape improvements continue at the Mid-County Regional Library, 2050 Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port Charlotte. The parking lot has been resealed and striped, providing clearer paths for pedestrians and cars, and new trees have been planted. The improvements will continue with the addition of ground-cover plants along the canal walkaway and plant beds. Three large Bismarck palm trees have succumbed to disease and will be replaced. The gazebo is being relocated to South County Regional Park in Punta Gorda, where it will serve a larger, diverse group in its new location, including remote-controlled boat enthusiasts, and picnickers. The new landscaping will provide commercial and residential neighbors an attractive surrounding. For more information, call 941-625-7529.Auxiliary needs volunteersThe U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary needs volunteers. The auxiliary is the volunteer arm of the U.S. Coast Guard and a member of the U.S. Homeland Security. The operational unit of the auxiliary is the Flotilla where Coast Guard policies and programs are transformed into action. The otillas support the Coast Guard in all missions except military and direct law enforcement. In our area several otillas provide support on and off the water from Venice to the south end of Pine Island including Charlotte Harbor, Myakka and Peace rivers. No special military, vessel-related or on-the-water experience is required to volunteer, just a desire to promote water safety and help save lives. Volunteers must be at least 17 years old, U.S. citizens, and live here year-round or seasonally. For more information on volunteer opportunities, contact Dave Nielsen at 732-616-9016. I

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Our Town Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS MURDOCK Two Naples men were caught with several counterfeit credit cards thanks to an alert jewelry store clerk, according to the Charlotte County Sheriffs Ofce. Osvaldo Jamie Posada Avila, 26, and Alain Cruz-Avila, 29, entered Kay Jewelers at the Port Charlotte Town Center mall around 8 p.m. Tuesday. Alain tried to buy a $2,000 Movado watch without even asking how much it was, the clerk told authorities, and Alain said the debit/gift card he wanted to use for the purchase doesnt swipe. The clerk said he was going to call the bank to make sure the card was OK, and Alain grabbed the card and the men left, the report shows. The clerk followed them around the mall until deputies arrived. Osvaldo and Alain each had on them a large amount of debit cards, credit cards and gift cards, authorities said, and a wallet found near the suspects also contained numerous cards. Detectives checked the cards and found they allegedly had different account numbers and names on the strips than on the front, and several had the Issuer Identication Numbers out of order. Osvaldo also reportedly had many prepaid Visa gift cards still in the packaging. Alain and Osvaldo were each charged with possession of more than two counterfeit credit cards. Each was booked Tuesday evening at the Charlotte County Jail and released Wednesday on $2,500 bond. A third man who entered the store with the suspects was not charged. The report shows the three men were relatives traveling home from Orlando. The Charlotte County Sheriffs Office reported the following arrests: Kendra Lebeth Miller, 24, of Lee St., Punta Gorda. Charge: violation of probation (original charge: trespassing). Bond: none. Angela Diana McQueen, 35, 12400 Catalina Dr., Punta Gorda. Charge: falsely reporting a crime. Bond: $1,000. Hermino Gaspar Felix Pascual, 57, 3900 block of Duncan Road, Punta Gorda. Charge: battery. Bond: none. Meghan Christine Tipton, 31, 25800 block of Aysen Dr., Punta Gorda. Charge: grand theft. Bond: none. Audrey Antoinette Simpson, 47, 500 block of Chamber St., Port Charlotte. Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond: none. Michael Richard Hass, 47, 3100 block of Beacon Dr., Port Charlotte. Charges: uttering a forged bill, check, draft or note; and grand theft. Bond: none. Zachary Alexander Holbine, 21, 21300 block of Gladis Ave., Port Charlotte. Charges: three counts each of possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and sale of marijuana, and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $12,500. James Grant White III, 24, 3000 block of Caring Way, Port Charlotte. Charges: grand theft, providing false information on pawned items, dealing in stolen property and violation of probation (original charge: driving with a suspended license). Bond: none. William Edward Woodbury Jr., 25, 21900 block of Felton Ave., Port Charlotte. Charges: two counts of resisting an officer. Bond: $2,000. Jeremy Paul Lloyd, 32, of Pensacola, Fla. Charges: possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $2,000. Robert Neal Kerner, 40, of Lehigh Acres. Charge: violation of probation. Bond: $770. Tricia Marie Velez, 41, 11400 block of Poplin Ave., Englewood. Charges: two counts of possession of a controlled substance without a prescription and one count of possession of drug parapher nalia. Bond: $8,500. Kenneth Charles Chase, 27, homeless. Charge: fugitive from justice. Bond: $75,000. Charles Arthur Maddox, 32, homeless. Charge: possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $2,000. Keisha Leann Clarke, 35, homeless in Punta Gorda. Charges: possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $4,500. Eezay Kendley, 32, homeless in Port Charlotte. Charges: two counts of violation of probation (original charges: possession of less than 3 grams of synthetic marijuana or bath salts and possession of drug paraphernalia). Keith Joseph Carmello, 45, 100 block of Barre Dr., Port Charlotte. Charge: battery. Bond: none. Timothy Levelle Dunbar, 43, 3500 block of N. Chamberlain Blvd., North Port. Charges: possession of cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of probation. Bond: none. Matthew Casey Nix, 29, 27300 block of Sunnybrook Road, Punta Gorda. Charge: petty theft. Bond: $1,000. The Punta Gorda Police Department reported the following arrest: Frank Lane Coon Jr., 19, 3400 block of Normandy Dr., Port Charlotte. Charge: three counts each of possession of cocaine, delivery of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and failure to appear. Bond: none. The North Port Police Department reported the following arrests: Danzey Anissa Allen, 42, 1800 block of Anabelle Lane, North Port. Charge: driving with a suspended license. Bond: $120. Robert Lawrence Sampson, 41, 3300 block of Tropicaire Blvd., North Port. Charges: DUI and hit and run. Bond: $620. Malena Ann Pack, 28, 1400 block of Woodcrest Lane, North Port. Charge: battery. Bond: none. Tracy Lee Howard, 53, 5600 block of Espanola Ave., North Port. Charge: violation of probation (original charge: DUI with property damage). Bond: none. The Venice Police Department reported the following arrests: Dennis James Long, 52, 200 block of S. Porsha Road, Nokomis. Charges: hit and run and operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Bond: $240. Alain Marcel Fauteux, 50, 400 block of W. Seminole Drive, Venice. Charges: dealing in stolen property, fraud and grand theft. Bond: $10,500. Wesley Sheldon Smith, 46, 300 block of Azure Road, Venice. Charges: kidnapping and battery. Bond: none. John A. McCord, 61, 5100 block of Cedar Hammock Lane, Sarasota. Charge: operating a motor vehicle without a valid license. Bond: $120. The Sarasota County Sheriffs Office reported the following arrests: Timothy James Pasko, 32, 6900 block of Sleepy Way, North Port. Charge: violation of probation (original charge: possession of cocaine). Bond: none. Troy Daniel Sawyers, 48, 3000 block of Greendale Road, North Port. Charge: petty theft (second offense). Bond: none. Sean Aaron Jenkins, 49, 700 block of Bird Bay West Drive, Venice. Charge: out-of-state fugitive. Bond: none. Tydolyn Caprice Spiro, 47, 4400 block of Tortoise Road, Venice. Charge: battery. Bond: none. Charles Thomas McDermott, 33, 700 block of Cypress Terrace, Venice. Charges: DUI and resisting arrest. Bond: $1,000. Compiled by Drew Winchester and Adam KregerAuthorities: Shoppers had numerous counterfeit cards | POLICE BEATThe information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriffs office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is determined by the court system. SARASOTA COUNTY The staff of the Health in Motion Mobile Medical Unit of the Florida Department of Health in Sarasota County will provide free and low-cost health services at South County sites during February. In addition, the Mobile Medical Unit will be present at the Winter Wellness Fair & Expo at the Venice Community Center, 326 Nokomis Ave. S. in Venice, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 12. Services offered include diabetes education and screening, blood pressure tests, pregnancy testing, HIV testing, body mass index (BMI) measurement, adult immunizations and health education; however, not all services, including immunizations, are offered at all sites. Staff also assists individuals who lack medical insurance and do not have a health-care provider to nd a medical home for ongoing health care. No appointment is needed. Some services are free, including HIV rapid testing with results in 20 minutes. Other services are provided on a sliding-fee scale based on income. A registered nurse is available at all sites. While these services are most often provided in a 40-foot-long bus, there are times when they are provided inside the facilities visited. The following is a schedule of South County dates and locations for the mobile unit: North Port Monday, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Walmart, 17000 Tamiami Trail. Feb. 24, 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Publix super market Heron Creek Towne Center, 1291 S. Sumter Blvd. Feb. 28, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Goodwill Manasota Center in the Community Room, U.S. 41 and Sumter Boulevard.Englewood Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Elsie Quirk Library, 100 W. Dearborn St.Venice Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the U.S. Department of Agriculture food distribution program at the Venice Community Center, 326 Nokomis Ave. S. Feb. 19, 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store, 1400 Ogden Road. Feb. 26, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Salvation Army Family Store, 1160 U.S. 41 Bypass S.Laurel Feb. 19, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. during the USDA food distribution program at the Sandra Sims Terry Community Center, 509 Collins Road. Mobile health ser vices will not be available at the USDA food distribution program at St. Nathaniels Episcopal Church in North Port during February. For more information, contact the Sarasota County Call Center at 941-861-5000 (TTY 711 or 800-955-8771), or visit www.sarasotahealth. org to view the calendar. Anyone without computer access can visit a health kiosk at any Sarasota County public library or Senior Friendship Center.Health services offered at Sarasota County sitesProvided by DIANNE SHIPLEYSARASOTA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT FEELING CRAMPED? Get rid of the clutte r. Sell It In The Classifieds. Call (941) 206-1200 | COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFGet Fit at Lemon Bay Womans ClubThe Lemon Bay Womans Club plays host to two forms of dance activity Zumba and line dancing in its clubhouse at 51 N. Maple St., Englewood. Zumba is an aerobic dance tness program that includes elements of salsa, merengue, cha-cha, and other international dances, all choreographed to world music. Intensity of the activity is determined by the participant. Classes are from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, and cost $5 per session. Line dancing is available from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Tuesdays. While most often associated with country music, line dancing at the LBWC also includes contemporary, standards and rock music. Each session costs $3. Proceeds from the classes are used to support local charities, and for upkeep of the clubhouse, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. For more information, call 941-474-9762. G O O D H E A L T H GOOD HEAL TH Read all about it in FEELING FI T Every Sunday only in the EXPO 2014 Tradeshow Business Summit Business CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Hottest Business Day in Paradise! rrMeet Hundreds of Business Decision Makers! Attend FREE Fast-paced Business Seminars! Enter to Win GREAT PRIZES! OVER 100 BUSINESSES From Charlotte County Showcasing Their Products and Services Business EXPO Sponsors Go to: www.CharlotteCountyChamber.orgPresenting Sponsors Associate Sponsors rfntb ntb n n nfn fb rbbbf bbtb b tb bt tb b rbb nParticipating Sponsors Media Sponsors Platinum Sponsors 50446747 CHARLOTTE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE VARIANCE The zoning official has received a request for an Administrative Variance and intends to grant the variance pursuant to Section 3-9-6.1(g) of the Charlotte County Zoning Code. Petition number AVAR-13-013 is being requested by Ralph J. Verbanic. The request is for an Administrative Variance to increase the lot coverage from 35% to 37.7%, located in the Residential Single Family 3.5 (RSF-3.5) zoning district. The property is addressed as 2090 New Castle Lane, Punta Gorda, Florida and is described as Lot 5, Block 773, Punta Gorda Isles, Section 23, located in Section 16, Township 40 South, Range 23 East. A complete legal description and additional information are on file. This notice is being mailed to the adjoining property owners as revealed by the current County Tax Roll. Within fifteen (15) days of the publication of this notice, but not thereafter, any interested person may apply in writing stating their name, the nature of their interest and the nature of their opposition. Any such written communication should be addressed to Shaun Cullinan, Zoning Official, Charlotte County Community Development Department, Zoning Division, 18400 Murdock Circle, Port Charlotte, Florida 33948-1095. Shaun Cullinan Zoning Official Published: January 30, 2014 470586 50461922 Afraid Of The Dentist? Have all your dental work completed and not remember a thing! (941) 429-5771 13801 S. Tamiami Tr., Unit B, North Port, FL 34287 www.celebritysmilesdentalcare.com *The fee advertised is the minimum fee charged. The patient and any other person responsible for pay ment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or to be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of respondin g to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatmen t. IV Sedation and Nitrous Oxide Available! FREE IV Sedation! with any procedure over $2500 Call for full details. exp. 1/31/14 dental codes: 9241 & 9242 50463210 H % LOCAL c' I,"a-Gc,CASI P'("' 'P,IDJ Sd '0'O ',110yi H'Eww.punlogordocktr rn com"1 i J I'1ln i0 0CSP 4`'19'1J00 UWarlott q umi ty/"T TV-SS r rr O a_T fl J: I I I lr:... ; 9II ")Lrr4StateINSURA941-979-6426VRM DESIGN SIGNSIm ij im

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The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C Our Town Page 5 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS | OBITUARIESCHARLOTTE Madeline L. LeBlancMadeline L. LeBlanc, 90, of Punta Gorda, Fla., passed away Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014. She was born June 30, 1923, in Trinidad, West Indies, to Dolin and Phyllis DelaMothe. Mrs. LeBlanc moved to this area in 1989 from Canton, Mass., and had worked for over 20 years as a waitress for the Brighams Restaurant in both Canton and Boston. She was a very social lady who enjoyed spending time with friends, drinking martinis and going to the beach. Mrs. LeBlanc was an avid cat lover. She is survived by her daughters, Hazel (David) Stewart of Punta Gorda, and Heather (Howard) Abel of Cary, N.C.; grandchildren, Laura Long, Mark Stewart, Nicole Petrillo, Heidi Cope and Kimberly Plessinger; as well as 10 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, William LeBlanc in 1990. Please visit www. kays-ponger.com to leave the family condolences and to sign the online guestbook. Arrangements are by Kays-Ponger & Uselton Funeral Home and Cremation Services.James L. SailorsJames Jim L. Sailors, 86, Punta Gorda, Fla., formerly of LaFontaine, Ind., passed away at 8:45 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014, at Port Charlotte Hospice Home in Port Charlotte, Fla. He was born to Russell and Mary K. (nee Hunt) Sailors, March 9, 1927, in LaFontaine. Jim was formerly married to Bette Cook, who passed away May 31, 2005. He was an owner of Unique Printing & Labels Inc. formerly in Indianapolis, Ind., now in Greeneld, Ind. Jim served his country in the United States Army and was a member of the United Methodist faith. He also loved to travel all over the world and enjoyed being with his family. Jim is survived by two daughters, Mrs. James (Terri) Vogel of Knightstown, Ind., and Mrs. Greg (Dixie) Adamson of Pittsboro, Ind.; brother, Allen Bud Sailors of LaFontaine; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. He was also preceded in death by two sons, Russell and Bruce Sailors; brother, Dean Sailors; sister, Ellen Cravens; his wife, Betty; and his parents, Russell and Mary Sailors. Visitation for family and friends will be from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, at the funeral home. Funeral Service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, at McDonald Funeral Home, LaFontaine Chapel 104 S. Main Street, LaFontaine, IN 46940, ofciating the service will be Pastor Guy Provance. Burial will follow in the LaFontaine IOOF Cemetery in LaFontaine. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www. mcdonaldfunerals.com.Genevieve M. WarstlerGenevieve M. Warstler, 87, of Port Charlotte, Fla., passed away Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, at Charlotte Harbor Healthcare. Arrangements are by National Cremation Society of Port Charlotte.ENGLEWOOD James DixonJames Jim Dixon, departed this life Monday, Jan. 27, 2014. He was born on Gasparilla Island, Fla., Feb. 12, 1929. Jim was the owner of Eldreds Marina in Placida, Fla., and was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Marian Dixon; sons, Tim, Tom, Sam, Sylvester and Andy; daughters, Kate, Kathy, Becky, Ruth and Sarah; three sisters; one brother; 22 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Visitation will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31, 2014, at Lemon Bay Funeral Home in Englewood, Fla. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, also at the funeral home. Burial will follow at Gulf Pines Memorial Park in Englewood. Please join the family in a covered dish celebration of Jims life at 2 p.m. Saturday on the point. Ofciating will be Pastor Bryan Lee Walton from the Placida Road Church of God in Grove City, Fla. You may express your condolences to the family at www.lemonbayfh. com.Aubrey Mack GravesAubrey Mack Graves, 76, formerly of Englewood, Fla., passed away Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, at home in Moneta, Va., surrounded by his family. He is survived by his three daughters, Michele Paulette Graves, Christen DeLarmon Graves and Nicole Anne Graves Sheets; his son-in-law, John Andrew Sheets; granddaughter, Holly Anne Sheets; and his grandsons, John Andrew AJ Sheets II and Thomas Aubrey Sheets. Mack was preceded in death by his parents, Aubrey Allan Graves and Esther Anna Mack Graves; and his brothers, James Allan Graves and Robert Allan Graves. A graveside service at noon Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, led by the Rev. Philip A. Bouknight of Trinity Ecumenical Parish, at Stonewall Memory Gardens, 12004 Lee Highway Manassas, VA 20109. In lieu of owers, memorial donations can be made to Trinity Ecumenical Parish, 40 Lakemont Dr., Moneta, VA 24121 or Good Samaritan Hospice, 2408 Electric Rd., SW Roanoke, VA 24018. Arrangements are by Flora Funeral Service & Cremation Center, Rocky Mount, Va.George E. Hubbell Jr.George E. Hubbell Jr., 81, of Englewood, Fla., formerly of Webster, N.Y., passed away peacefully Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, after a long illness. He was born in Rochester, N.Y., and moved to Florida in 1979. George is survived by his loving wife, Jeanne; children, Sandra, Drew, Darla, Cynthia, Bonnie, Brenda and Bethany; 13 grandchildren; ve great-grandchildren; and brother, Ronald. He was preceded in death by his parents, George E. Hubbell Sr. and Georgia Hubbell; and daughter, Rebecca. A memorial service will be announced at a later date. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to Tidewell Hospice, Venice, Fla., for the loving care they have given to our family.Paul B. MasonPaul B. Mason, 85, died Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014, in Englewood Hospice. He was born Oct. 19, 1928, in Worcester, Mass. Paul moved to the Englewood, Fla., area 22 years ago from Needham, Mass. He was a retired insurance broker. Paul was an avid golfer and was a volunteer at EARS and the Englewood Community Hospital. He is survived by his daughter, JoAnn Bryant of Port Charlotte, Fla.; his grandchildren, Jennifer Hauer of Port Charlotte and Drew Mason of California; and great-grandchildren, Robert Hauer of Port Charlotte and Cheyanne Burton of Rotonda West, Fla. Paul was preceded in death by his wife of 58 years, Mary Jane Mason; and his son, Doug. A Celebration of Life service will be held at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, at Lemon Bay Funeral Home in Englewood. You may express your condolences to the family at, www.lemonbayfh.com. Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimers Association, 14010 Roosevelt Blvd., Suite 709, Clearwater, FL 33762-3820. NORTH PORT Anna McKinley GausAnna McKinley Gaus, a longtime resident of La Casa Mobile Park in North Port, Fla., died Friday Jan. 24, 2014. She was born and raised in Philadelphia, Pa., and retired from the telephone company. Anna danced with Nancys Chorus Line. She is survived by a son, James (Lolita) McKinley; daughters, Anne Rogers and Linda McKinley; grandchildren, Maureen, Jennifer, Kathleen and Brian; and great-grandchildren, Makenna, Michael and Ryan. A graveside service will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014, at Venice Memorial Gardens Chapel of the Saints. Expressions of Sympathy can be sent to North Port Animal Rescue. To send condolences, please visit www. farleyfuneralhome.com. Arrangements are by Farley Funeral Home in Venice, Fla.Robert Russell RoderickRobert Bob Russell Roderick, 61, of North Port, Fla., passed away Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, at his home in the care of his loving partner, Daniel Cain, and mother-in-law, Maxine Funk, and peacefully surrounded by his siblings and loving mother, Betty J. Edens of Madisonville, Tenn. Bob worked at Venice Regional Bayfront Medical Center as a unit clerk for 14 years. He graduated from Hammond Technical Vocational High School and pursued many inter ests in the medical elds at Indiana University. Through his career he worked in many hospital positions providing care and assistance to others. Bob was an avid gardener and patron of the arts. He loved music. Bob remained a loving partner, brother and son until the end. He will be greatly missed by everyone that touched his life. Bob is survived by his partner, Daniel Cain; mother-in-law, Maxine Funk of North Port; mother, Betty J. Edens of Madisonville; siblings, Laura J. Bryan of Venice, Fla., David L. Roderick and Rick Kulovits of Crest Hill, Ill., Victor and Donna Roderick of Crossville, Tenn., Darlene and Barry Coster of Madisonville, Mark and Tara Garrett of Highland, Ind.; and many nieces and nephews. For online condolences, please visit www. mckeenorthport.com.DESOTONo deaths were reported in DeSoto Wednesday. Carol Ann Lewis MahergCarol Ann Lewis Maherg, 28, passed away Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, in an automobile accident in the Arcadia/Wauchula area. She was born Oct. 13, 1985, in Middletown, N.Y. Carols life revolved around her love of animals, particularly her passion for horses. She was enrolled in Valencia College in Orlando, Fla., working toward becoming a veterinarian. Recently Carol and her beloved horse, Razz, who her mother has raised from a baby, had won two jumper divisions at a prestigious show in Wellington, Fla., for which she was very proud. Carol was a very loving and caring person who always brightened the lives of those around her and was loved by many. Carol is survived by her adoring mother, Patricia Lewis of Punta Gorda, Fla.; father, Robert Lewis of Pine Bush, N.Y.; brother, Robert Lewis II of Punta Gorda; grandmother, Jean Benjamin of Punta Gorda; anc, Frank Emmi of Orlando; many aunts, uncles, cousins and friends; her beloved horse, Razz; and her dog, Roxy, who was her constant, loving companion. A celebration of Carols life will be held at 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31, 2014, from the Kays-Ponger Uselton Funeral Home 635 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda, FL 33950. Family and friends will gather from 4 p.m. until the time of the service. After the service, family will have a time of fellowship and refreshments in the celebration room. To light a candle in Carols name, please visit www. kays-ponger.com. In lieu of owers, donations in memory of Carol may be made to RAIN at www. rescueanimalsinneed.org or to the Horse Rescue of South Florida, Rehab & Retirement for offtrack thoroughbreds at www.horserescueorida.com. Arrangements are by Kays-Ponger Uselton Funeral Home and Cremation Services Punta Gorda Chapel. Benefit helps support Haitian orphanage SUN PHOTOS BY CHEYENNE EMRICHMusician Ray Lamatrice, right, bows his head during the prayer Saturday at the start of the dinner to benet a Haitian orphanage. The event was organized by the Multicultural American Nurses Organization at the Punta Gorda Isles Civic Association. Event supporter Linda Rubino looks at the posters showing children at the Haitian orphanage Saturday during the event in Punta Gorda. About 50 people attended the dinner and dance party. Mother and daughter Paula and Elizabeth Hannon attend the dinner together. Paula is a social worker at the Academy in Port Charlotte. Both are supporters of the nonprot group that helps orphans. At left, Janet Gedeon listens along with Rirma Riggs as Wilson Gedeon talks about the St. Maries Orphanage in Petionville, near Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Zaph Manigat, who went to Haiti with Wilson Gedeon, the event organizer, to help at the orphanage, sits with Yves Elysee at the black-tie event. 50461627 JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A. LAW OFFICE JAMES W. MALLONEE PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM 9 46 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953 901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285 (941) 207-2223 www.jameswmallonee.com (941) 206-2223

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Our Town Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014 FROM PAGE ONE Friday is the registration deadline set for the Positive Aging Symposium planned for Feb. 7, at the Edison State College Auditorium. The daylong program is designed around informal panel discussions on topics of interest to Charlotte Countys older residents and those engaged in serving this age group. The Positive Aging Symposium has as its theme Four Keys to a Health and Fullling Life After 50 and is sponsored by the United Way of Charlotte County, the Friendship Centers and Edison State College. Representatives from the states Area Agency on Aging: Senior Choices and Charlotte County Elder Services will be on hand to provide information and answer questions. There will be time for networking and a sharing of ideas. Older residents have been enriching the Charlotte County community for many years, said Carrie Blackwell Hussey, United Way executive director. Were hoping to heighten the awareness of available services and opportunities that can only enrich their lives as well as helping to build a better community for all of us. Discussion topics include: Financial planning Physical tness Nutrition Chronic disease self-management Mental health Local resources for support Social and community engagement. A $10 registration fee for the event, set for 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., will include a continental breakfast and box lunch. To register, call Karen Amador at 941-276-4075. Checks made out to the United Way can be mailed to Karens attention at South Port Square, 23023 Westchester Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL 33980.Deadline nears for Positive Aging SymposiumSTAFF REPORTIF YOU GOWhat: Positive Aging Symposium When: 8:30a.m. to 2p.m. Feb.7 Where: Edison State College Charlotte Campus Auditorium, 6300 Airport Road, Punta Gorda Registration: $10 Contact: Karen Amador, 941-276-4075 line on Manasota Key, the Sarasota County Sheriffs Ofce is expected to have patrols on its side of the key. The CCSO also plans to have bicycle and motor cycle ofcers patrolling the neighborhoods on South Manasota Key. A command post will be established on Manasota Key. We know it will be very congested, Caparo said. Organizers expect as many as 80,000 spectators attending the boat race. This will be a learning experience. This is brand new for Manasota Key. Caparo stressed several times that the boat race venue is promoted as a no-parking event, meaning no parking will be permitted on Manasota Key and specta tors will be discouraged from trying to drop off passengers at Englewood Beach. Instead, organizers have identied parking areas on the mainland and will provide bus ser vice to shuttle spectators to the event. There isnt going to be anywhere to pull off, and they wont be able to stop on the street (on Manasota Key), he said. (Spectators) should take advantage of the bus transportation that will be provided. CCSO ofcers also will be patrolling State Road 776 to alleviate any trafc hot spots on the mainland at parking areas and wherever else trafc control is needed, Caparo said. Working with homeowners worried about the noise from bands and other activities, Caparo said he assured them the boat race should wind down between 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Private property owners will have the responsibility to protect their parking areas from unwanted spectators. Law enforcement agencies do not have the authority to tow vehicles from private property, Caparo said.Email: reilly@sun-herald.comSECURITYFROM PAGE 1 and care, make appointments and keep them, and manage their condition before health issues escalate, requiring hospitalization, said Dr. Asjad Khan, who practices in pediatric endocrinology. Caroline is much better, he said. The longer you go without diagnoses, the symptoms get worse and worse. The clinic offers a comprehensive range of specialized medical treatment for children from birth through age 18. Doctors trained in a long list of specialty treatments rotate through the clinic, depending on need: hematology/ oncology, infectious disease, endocrinology, nephrology, pediatric surgery, pulmonology, gastroenterology and neurology. When Khan rst arrived at Golisano Childrens Hospital in 2007, there was no other pediatric endocrinologist between Tampa and Miami. I saw the opportunity immediately, and the chance to build on it, he said. For a time, Khan and other pediatric specialists operated out of the Family Health Center in Port Charlotte, but that service was discontinued in 2012. However, after seeing 25 young patients come to his endocrinology clinic twice a month, Khan knew there was demand. We saw the volume existed. The need was there, he said. At the new Pediatric Specialty Clinic in Murdock, Khan treats children for a wide variety of conditions, including thyroid, diabetes and obesity. These are services that were nonexistent in Charlotte County. The community was starved for it, he said. This is the second specialty clinic established as part of Golisano Childrens Hospital. The rst opened in Collier County in 2011. We opened a similar clinic in Naples, said Mary Briggs, director of media relations for Lee Memorial Health System. After the rst year we had to expand it, and we expect the same thing to happen here. Now the challenge is to let patients and family practice physicians know the service is available. Its building slowly, but the response has been tremendous from local doctors and patients, Khan said. Its a partnership we want to grow. The Golisano Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida Pediatric Specialty Clinic is located at 18316 Murdock Circle, Suite 106. Ofce hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information, call 941-235-4900.Email: groberts@sun-herald.comCLINICFROM PAGE 1 includes a response to an invitation to bid, an invitation to negotiate, a request for a quote or a request for proposals. Maki said he wasnt sure what type of bid Walton showed Solero. All I know is it was not a sealed bid, Maki said. The way it was explained to me is sealed bids cannot be shown ahead of time. If it were a sealed bid, then it would have been a different story. Maki wasnt sure why the bid documents were shown in a vacant building by a maintenance worker instead of at City Hall by a building ofcial. The statute says it unlawful to disclose material information concerning a bid or other aspects of the competitive bidding process when such information is not publicly disclosed. It is unlawful to intentionally provide a competitive advantage to any person who submits a bid. Space Coast Fire & Safety of Merritt Island, Fla., bid $8,278; SimplexGrinnell of Tampa bid $9,185; Southwest Florida Alarm of North Port bid $10,270; and Integrated Systems of Florida in Oldsmar bid $14,490. Space Coast was awarded the alarm contract. A sales representative from Space Coast said he was not offered to see bids ahead of time because thats not the way its typically done. He said the company had no other comment. City Purchasing Manager Ginny Duyn said there are several processes for soliciting bids, depending on the dollar amount in the contract. Requests for quotes can be done at the department level for requests under $50,000, Duyn said. The bid documents are gathered by a department supervisor and then submitted to the Purchasing Department to deter mine if the bidder met all of the qualications. Then the bids are open to the public after the bidding process is complete. Bids over $50,000 are handled at the Purchasing Department level. Duyn said the city doesnt generally share other quotes during the bidding process. Scott Williams, who oversees the Building Division, was not interviewed during the investigation. All processes for bids are regulated pretty tight, he said. The police did their investigation and they didnt nd anything. They did it without including me. Spreduto was unavailable for comment Wednesday. City Manager Jonathan Lewis could not be reached for comment late Wednesday.Email: eallen@sun-herald.comBIDSFROM PAGE 1 | COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFSRat Pack Together AgainThe Rat Pack is playing at 7 p.m. Friday at the North Port Performing Arts Center at North Port High School. For tickets, call 866-406-7722.Medicare Assistance & MoreMedicare Assistance & More is held 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays in the North Port Library conference room, 13800 S. Tamiami Trail. The library offers one-on-one Medicare counseling sessions with a trained counselor. All services are free and unbiased. Review your Medicare Part D, Advantage and/or Medigap plans. To make an appointment, call 866-413-5337.Deadline set to file property tax returnsThe Charlotte County Property Appraiser reminds business and rental property owners the deadline for ling 2014 Tangible Personal Property Tax Returns is April 1, 2014. A return must be led by April 1 to receive the $25,000 exemption. However if a blue postcard was received, ling the return has been waived, unless additional assets obtained since 2008 result in a total value exceeding $25,000. For questions, call 941-743-1476.Thrift store donations neededGiving Hope Thrift Store, 1851 Englewood Road, Englewood, is in need of donations. The organization works with local churches and the Senior Friendship Center of Venice. It also works to help the homeless in this area, and to help people keep their pets. Pickup and delivery are available. For more information, call 941-460-8110.Video bowling tourney at AMVETS 312On Saturday starting at 2 p.m., AMVETS Post 312, 7050 Chancellor Blvd, North Port, will hold its rst Red, White and Blue Video Bowling Tournament between Post 312, AMVETS Post 2000 and VFW Post 8203. Teams will be comprised of eight bowlers from each post. Entry fees are $100 per post and $10 per individual bowler. Bowlers will each receive a free beverage, chili and ticket for a basket of cheer rafe being held that afternoon. AMVETS 312 has three video bowling machines, and each team will play one game on each of the machines. Various prizes will be awarded to individuals for each game, and end-of-tournament prizes will be awarded, including a team (traveling) trophy, which the winning team may display at their post until the next tourney. There will be an $80 award for high series, and a super prize of $1,000 for anyone shooting a perfect game. The basket of cheer will be rafed following the bowling tournament, and a chili dump will be held at 5 p.m. at a cost of $5, followed by live music. Tourney proceeds will support the AMVETS 312 Honor Guard, which par ticipates in military rites for our departed veterans and shares its love of our country and the ag at var ious programs throughout the community. Members of all three posts and their guests are encouraged to come out and cheer their team to victory. For more information, call AMVETS 312 at 941-429-5403.Nature walks offeredThe Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center will hold free guided nature walks at 10 a.m. every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at Alligator Creek Preserve, 10941 Burnt Store Road, Punta Gorda. Trained volunteer guides lead walkers through the trails found at CHEC, giving everyone an opportunity to learn more about Florida plants, animals and ecosystems. Participants are to meet at the sign-in the parking lot. For more information, contact Eileen Tramontana at 941-575-5435.Charlotte County Owners ManualThe latest edition of the Charlotte County Owners Manual is available with updated information about Charlotte County and Punta Gorda government departments and services. The booklet provides listings for transportation, parks, hospitals and more for current and new residents of Charlotte County. The manual is available online at www. CharlotteCountyFL. gov. Go to the Public Information & CC-TV department page and click Owners Manual on the left. The booklet is not available in print. For more information, call 941-623-1092.Youth violence art exhibit at Sarasota libraryNorth Sarasota Library, 2801 Newtown Blvd., Sarasota, is hosting the nationally recognized art exhibit Kin Killin Kin, by artist James Pate, through Feb. 22. Kin Killin Kin is a nationally traveling exhibit organized by EbonNia Gallery and Shango: Center for the Study of African American Art and Culture. The show at North Sarasota Library will be the rst time the exhibit has been available to the public in Florida. Pate describes his artistic style as techno-cubism. He began developing the exhibit in 2000 as a way to facilitate conversation about the growing issue of youth violence in communities across the country. The free exhibit will be available for viewing during select times Monday through Saturday until Feb. 22. For more information, visit www.sarasotaarts. org or contact the Sarasota County Call Center at 941-861-5000.Luncheon series offeredThe Friends of the Punta Gorda Library will hold the 2014 Literary Luncheon Series at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Isles Yacht Club, 1780 W. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. At this event, literary actor Ted Zalewski will present Mind, Body and Spirit. Zalewskis presentation will give you insight into Teddy Roosevelt the man. The cost for the luncheon is $40 for members, or $45 for non members. All proceeds will benet the Friends of the Punta Gorda Library. For ticketing information, contact Jerri Marsee at 941-613-9048 or jmarsee@comcast.net.Englewood CRA meetingThe Englewood Community Redevelopment Area meets at 3 p.m. Feb. 13 and the second Thursday of every month at its new location at 1398 Old Englewood Road, in the Englewood Center for Sustainability. For more information, call 941-473-9795.Federal employees to meetThe Peace River Chapter of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association will hold a meeting at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Deep Creek Elks Lodge, 1133 Capricorn Blvd. Lunch will be at 11 a.m., followed by a business meeting. Jane Lemley, NARFE Florida executive vice president, will be the featured guest speaker. She will discuss News from NARFE. All active and retired federal employees, their guests and prospective members are welcome. For more information, call Lois Todd at 941-575-4252.

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The Sun /Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C Our Town Page 7 LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS PUNTA GORDA Neil Armstrong Elementary School fth-grader Eric Durbin isnt just a student at the school, hes also a valued leader. And Durbin credits his newfound leadership skills to a worldwide program aptly dubbed The Leader in Me. Durbin gave a presentation at a The Leader in Me symposium held at the Charlotte Harbor Event & Conference Center on Wednesday morning, which happened to be his 11th birthday. Before becoming involved in The Leader in Me program, Durbin had a hard time speaking in front of large crowds, he said. But just look at me now, he told about 350 educators assembled at the Event Center. Durbin isnt just honing his public speaking skills. He also is a mentor to other students at the school as well as par ticipating in the Honor Society and numerous other activities. I think my favorite part is being a mentor, he said. The Leader in Me is a program designed to improve education by providing children with skills in areas such as leadership and creative thinking. The program teaches skills not addressed in traditional curriculum, such as leadership, prioritization and teamwork. The program is based on the work of author Stephen R. Covey, whose Habits products are widely used in area schools. Educators from around Florida as well as from Georgia, South Carolina and as far away as