Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Physical Description:
Unknown
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group ( Charlotte Harbor, FL )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00202


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

Egypt names Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist group TIPAGE,1





Charlotte Sun


Pick of the Day
Headboard, $35


AND WEEK
HERAI


CHRISTMAS AT THE VATICAN 1ST CLASS STAMP PRICE TO RISE
Pope Francis, from the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica, offered Regulators approved a temporary 3-cent price hike, bringing the
Christmas wishes for a better world. THE WIRE PAGE 1 charge to 49 cents Jan. 26. THE WIRE PAGE 1


MERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


THURSDAY DECEMBER 26, 2013


I


www.sunnewspapers.net


$1.00


PUBLISHER'S INBOX



The day



after
sometimes folks give me a pitiful
look when they find out I am in
the newspaper business. "Bless
your heart," they say.
Recently, one of
the brightest young
people I know, with
an IQ 40 points
higher than mine,
said he didn't have
any friends who
read a newspaper.
Given that my IQ
is closer to a speed
avid limit than genius
David level, I was sure he
DUNN-RANKIN must be right. No
one reads a news-
PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER one reads a news-
paper anymore. Or
do they?
Doing a little research was a bit like
opening a series of small Christmas
presents.
More people chose to read a news-
paper this week than used a Bank
of America product. That was fun to
unwrap.
I shook this box a little before
opening. More people read a newspa-
per this week than used a Coca Cola
company product. Not many busi-
nesses in town can make that claim.
But David, isn't the newspaper
industry struggling to stay relevant
with a limited market of newspaper
consumers? Actually, our market
share among consumers is huge.
Here's a big present I unwrapped
- more people read a newspaper
in the last seven days than used a
MasterCard or Visa in the last three
months. Wouldn't you like to have a
present like that?
This present surprised me. More
people read a paper regularly than
always vote in a presidential election.
We're more popular with the public
than the Democrats and Republicans
put together? Well, in today's environ-
ment, that's not such a great present.
Maybe I can trade that one in.
My skeptical young friend is in the
technology business, so I went look-
ing for some tech presents to open.
Here's an interesting tech present
I unwrapped. More people read a
newspaper in the last seven days than
sent or received a text message.
The last big present was still under
the tree waiting to be opened. While
our market value may not be the
same, more people read a newspaper
in the last seven days than visited
Google in the last 30 days.
The problem with our industry is
that for a 30-year period, we got quite
fat and cocky. Our success surely was
due to superior management. Many
newspapers ran at 30 percent and 40
percent operating cash-flow mar-
gins and were valued like high-tech
companies, based on multiples of
revenue not cash flow like a regular
business.
That period was not normal. Now
newspapers are just like any other
business, with comparable "same-
store sales" growth challenges. Profit
margins are comparable with other
mature industries.
Our newspaper's revenue is up a
modest amount over last year, and
paid print circulation is holding
steady. I am grateful for the advertis-
ers and readers who support our ven-
ture. You made unwrapping presents
this Christmas such a delight.
David Dunn-Rankin is president
and publisher of the Sun Coast Media
Group. You can email him at
daviddr@sun-herald.com.


Economy picks up steam


2013 saw improvements in jobless rates, real estate


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
Editor's note: The Sun is recapping
its most compelling and talked about
stories of 2013. Look for stories to
follow each day, through Dec. 31.
It's been a good year for many
Southwest Florida homeowners and
homebuyers, courtesy of increasing
home values and affordable mortgage
rates, according to local Realtors.
Meanwhile, the area's jobless
numbers also showed marked im-
provement during 2013.
The median sales price that at


Best of





2013

which half the homes sold for more,
half for less for single-family
homes in the Charlotte County area


rose to $130,000 in November, rep-
resenting a 4 percent increase from
$125,000 a year ago, according to the
latest data from the Punta Gorda-Port
Charlotte-North Port Association of
Realtors.
Year-over-year statistics continue
to post a strong comeback in the
housing market, with September's
$138,000 median price reaching its
highest point since 2008.
"Year to year, I see nothing but
good. Overall, we're looking at a
positive trend," said Sharon Neuhofer,
ECONOMY111


~O.


SUN PHOTO BY BRENDA BARBOSA
Santa's good buddy Paul Gagnon, and his "elf,"Jean-Paul Gagnon, wave goodbye after dropping off Christmas presents at the Douglas T. Jacobson
State Veterans Nursing Home in Port Charlotte on Christmas Eve, Tuesday.


Patriot Riders make wishes come true


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -When the res-
idents of the Douglas T. Jacobson State
Veterans Nursing Home were making
their Christmas wish list, the last thing
Tim Key, president of the Patriot Riders
of America Charlotte County chapter,
expected to find on the list was a
Vegas-style slot machine.
"But that's what they wanted, so we
said, 'OK,'" Key said with a little smile
and a shrug.
Tuesday, on Christmas Eve, nearly


two dozen Patriot Riders decked out in
black leather and motorcycle gear rode
to the veterans home to deliver four
shiny slot machines, complete with
flashing lights and metal tokens.
It was the first of two stops the group
made this Christmas to help veterans
in need.
"We do everything for our veterans,"
Key said. "We go out there and help
these people, no matter who they are."
In addition to the slot machines, the
Patriot Riders also donated a new com-
puter to a veteran family who couldn't
afford to buy Christmas presents for


1-75 to shut down


twice on Friday


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER
NORTH PORT -Two
more Interstate 75
closures remain until
Florida Department of
Transportation crews are
able to complete work
on the Ponce De Leon
Boulevard overpass, follow-
ing a dump truck crash last
week that caused severe


damage to a support beam.
According to FDOT
spokesman Dave Parks, the
southbound lanes of 1-75
near mile marker 184 will be
closed from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m.
Friday, then again from
8 p.m. Friday until 7 a.m.
Saturday, to complete the
work.
Traffic will be routed
1-75110


their children.
"It's like a high," Key said. "It feels so
great to watch."
Key, who ironically is not a veter-
an, said he was moved to help after
hearing war stories from several of his
veteran friends who served during the
VietnamWar.
To date, the Patriot Riders have
raised tens of thousands of dollars
to assist area veterans. In addition to
helping to pay for veterans' medical
bills, groceries and basic living expens-
es, they also help with the nontangible
WISHES 111


AMVETS post home

to many during holidays


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER
NORTH PORT Peg
Pierro's son wanted her to
come home to Long Island
for Christmas. She didn't
go.
It wasn't only the frigid
temperatures that kept her
in Florida highs in New
York City were not expected
to top 30 on Christmas
Day but also her friends


atAMVETS Post 312, where
she spent the holiday
enjoying a nice dinner in
the company of people she
considered her family away
from home.
The 78-year-old has been
coming to the AMVETS
post in North Port and to its
annual Christmas dinners
for 15 years, she said, and
she didn't plan to change
AMVETS 110


INDEX I THE SUN: Obituaries 51 Police Beat 61 Legals 61 Viewpoint 81 Opinion 91 THE WIRE: Nation 21 State 3 World 5-6 Weather 6 1 SPORTS: Lotto 21 CLASSIFIE Comics 9-12 Dear Abby 12 TV Listings 13
Daily Edition $1 00 ....... ."w-- Lookinsidefor valuable coupons '--'".: 940- CHARLIE SAYS...
t IfIHigh CLow ThiN year i8 CALL US AT What is a Boxing Day?
li 11 111111111 8 Ie 0 ri |. VALUE M R $084P316 941-206-1000
7 0252 00025 8 Isolated afternoon rain. -- -- ----.-.----.-- .-----j:


AN EDITION OF THE SUN
VOL. 121 NO. 360 A


In Today's
y Classifieds!

KLY






Our Town Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 26, 2013


HAVE YOU SEEN THE LIGHTS?

Port Charlotte area
Collingswood Boulevard at Godwin Avenue, Port Charlotte: Lights on
block from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. daily.
1552 Eppinger Drive: 75,000-80,000 lights, 12 inflatables, many other
decorations.
22215 Breezeswept Ave. (near Neil Armstrong Elementary School):
Synchronized light show to music, classic and Siberian; 5,000-7,000 lights,
6-9 nightly.
21418 Gladis Ave. (corner of Harbor Boulvard, near Midway Boulevard).
S23306 Freeport Ave.: 8-foot Ferris wheel with characters.
S1053 Orton St.: Huge Christmas display.
S2160 and 2151 Alton Road (off Midway Boulevard, across from Port
Charlotte Middle School): Eighth annual holiday display features two
homes completely decorated with inflatables and thousands of lights.
Display lighted from 6 to 10 nightly.
1218 Stamford St. (at the end of Quasar Boulevard): Thousands of
lights; a homemade display of a waterway with animals and snow-covered
hills; snow sharks and Florida-themed snowmen. Light show programmed
to music with more than 20 songs; lots for kids; tune radio to 101.3 FM to
listen from car. From 6-10 nightly.
Gamewell Avenue and Pellam Boulevard.
Harbor Boulevard and Seville Place (toward Port Charlotte Beach).
Lake View Boulevard, from Midway Boulevard to Edgewater Drive.
3481 Catskill St.: 30,000-plus lights.
2440 Starlite Lane.
3222 Leamington St.: Lots of lights and inflatables.
Mamaroneck Avenue (off Conway Boulevard).

Punta Gorda area
Lakewood Village, 5601 Duncan Road (U.S. 17): Entrance decorated
with Santa with sleigh, packages, Christmas trees, candy canes, snowmen.
Gulfview Road cul-de-sac, PGI: A neighborhood effort for two decades;
easily viewed driving by or while enjoying the boat tour.
3805 Rosemary Drive (just east of Interstate 75, turn left onto Regent


Road, off U.S. 17, then right onto Rosemary): Thousands of flashing lights,
large American flag, several inflatables and snow globes, and Christmas
music. From dark until about 10 most nights, until New Year's.
*Windmill Village, 215 Rio Villa Drive.
S701 Tarpon Way (Charlotte Park): Lots of lights and inflatables; a large
Christmas tree. Lots of homes in the area with lights.
Burnt Store Colony off Burnt Store Road: Entire park lighted, especially
the pond.

Deep Creek area
65 Manizaks Ave.: Thousands of LED lights on everything, soft
Christmas music. Most houses on the block have lights.
2200 block of Bonn Court: Most homes and cul de sac thousands of
lights and lawn decor; more added this year. The back can be seen from Rio
De Janeiro Avenue.
1461 Capricorn Blvd.: Winter wonderland village display includes
a Thomas Kinkade village, train, carnival, outdoor decorations and much
more. From 6:30-8:30 nightly through Jan. 2,2014.
Panache Lane (off Rampart Boulevard and Raintree Lane): Huge
display of lights. Go down one street to Kowloon Lane; the cul de sac has
nice lights, and at 25370 Kowloon, a snowman actually makes it snow.

Harbour Heights area
3233 Desoto Drive: Lots of lawn lights. In garage: stroll-through
Christmas village display with 100-plus "houses," holiday tunes, talking
Santa on his train. Runs 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday through Sunday only,
through Jan. 5,2014. A donation box is set up for the food pantry.

Englewood area
10430 Reims Ave.: More than 15,000 lights that go on and off with
music from Mannheim Steamroller and the Trans-Siberian Orchestra.
Generally, lights go on around 6:15 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. daily.
2351 Englewood Road (State Road 776), about a half-mile north of
Overbrook Boulevard: Life-size mobile made of Christmas-light-decorated
bikes.
1951 Wisconsin Ave.: Thousands of lights and lighted yard figures, with
the house trimmed in blue.


7059 Natalie St.: About 50 inflatables;"Holidays in Florida"theme.

North Port area
321 Blackburn Blvd. in Harbor Cove manufactured home park: Display
includes giant 19-foot inflatable Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer, thou-
sands of LED and icicle lights synchronized to music and other inflatables.
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily.
4525 Avanti Circle: Music, animation, thousands of lights. The resi-
dents also dress up as Santa and Mrs. Claus on the weekends and pass out
candy canes to children.
2866 Escambia Circle: Multicolored light display synchronized to
music.
House on Chamberlain Boulevard, heading toward Cranberry Boule-
vard: Yard full of displays, and two other houses along with them.
SChamberlain Boulevard and Boca Chica Avenue.
S5364 Greenhouse Ave.
S2399 Oracle Lane (off Chamberlain Boulevard, take Snowflake Lane to
Cynthia Terrace, and then to Oracle).
SGerona Terrace (off North Cranberry Boulevard).
S1553 Log Lane (off South Cranberry Boulevard): Light display and
music.
S5980 Spearman Circle.
S4673 Germany Ave. (off Atwater Street).
S1563 Arundel Ave.: Thousands of lights and lighted yard figures
synchronized to music.
S1339 Prairie Terrace: A lot of lighted figures and other lights.
S4590 Symco Ave: Light show with some 50,000 lights and an 8-foot
video screen in a lighted mega wreath. Lights are synchronized to the
music video on the screen; you can hear the music by tuning your car
radio to 88.9 FM. Also, a16-foot tree featuring a 3-D, spinning Bethlehem
star, as well as 24 mini Christmas trees, glowing gutter lights, 24 roof
snowflakes, 16 cascading snowflakes, four leaping arches and more than
50 strobe lights.

DeSoto area
SEntryway to Lake Suzy Estates (the area includes 12969 S.W. Doug
Drive): Trees, angels, reindeer, snowmen and more.


Village




shows man's




're-creativity'


I CHARLOTTE EVENTS


* TODAY
American Legion 103,
Cafe opened for B'fast/ Lunch Thu-Sun
7a-2p Public invited. Help us support
our Vets! 2101 Taylor Rd PG 639-6337
Deep Creek Elks 2763,


SUBSCRIPTIONS
Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $16.47
3 Months............................ $66.51
6 Months.......................... $113.05
1 Year ............................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
Subscribers residing in outlying
areas may incur additional
delivery charge.

DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.................... ...... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-
Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.
to noon. To subscribe or to report
any problems with your service,
please call orvisityour local office.

Englewood: 941-681-3000
120W. Dearborn St
Charlotte: 941-206-1300
23170 Harborview Rd.,
Port Charlotte
North Port: 941-429-3000
13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port
DeSoto: 863-494-0300
or toll-free at 877-818-6204
108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia


Lunch With Linda 11-2:30
Festival of Lights, Over one
million lights and themed decora-
tions, 10 am-8 pm Fishermen's Village.
639-8721
Guided Nature Walks,
Guided walk w/knowledgeable leader
in great natural area, 10am, 10941
Burnt Store Rd, PG, 941-575-5435,
public invited.
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2,Dinner 5-8,Bingo 6:30-
8:30@25538 Shore Dr PG 637-2606
mmbrs & their gsts
Mahjongg, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St. 11:30a-3:30p $2.
Cultural Center MembersPLUS free.


SUN PHOTOS BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH


Fred Connor adjusts a figurine on the Christmas village display
at his home at 4194 Watova Ave. (just off Salford Boulevard),
North Port. His village is made with everything from coffee
cans, SPAM containers and pine cones, to beer can holders
and numerous other recycled items he creatively turned into
scenery.


Everyone Welcomed 625-4175
Chess Club, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St.p-4p$1.50. cultural
Center MembersPLUS free. Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Pinochle, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 5:30p-8:30p $2 Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free 625-4175
All Welcome

* FRIDAY
American Legion 103,
Cafe opened for B'fast/ Lunch
Thu-Sun 7a-2p Public invited. Help
us support our Vets! 2101 Taylor Rd
PG 639-6337
Sierra Club Paddle,


Sierra Club Deep Creek Paddle 9-3
with master naturalist. Reserve req:
941-637-8805
Sierra Club Paddle,
Sierra Club Deep Creek Paddle 9-3
with master naturalist. Reserve req:
941-637-8805
Estuary Wading Trip,
Seagrass wading, sea critters, dip
netting & more. 10 AM, Ponce de
Leon Park, PG, 941-575-5435. Free.
Festival of Lights, Over
one million lights and themed
decorations, 10 am-8 pm Fishermen's
Village. 639-8721
Guided Nature Walk,
Guided walk w/knowledgeable leader


Fred Connor shows off his village, which has scenes including a
car sales lot, police and fire departments, an ice skating rink,
a nativity scene and more. Most items are made with recycled
materials. The display, in the garage at his home at 4194
Watova Ave., North Port, is open to the public from 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. through Monday.

PAID ADVERTISEMENTS

Featured Events
Free Open Cruise In, Thurs., Dec. 26,5 to 8 p.m. Beef'O'
Brady's, 1105 Taylor Road, PG & Veteran Motor Car Club of America offer
a Free Open Cruise-In to any year, make or model car/truck including
modified. No preregistration or fees; no need to have been in the military.
BOGO meal to show participants. 941-626-4452.
New Year's Eve Dance, Johnny Walker's Red High Tops
Band at Alligator Park, 6400 Taylor Road, PG. 8 p.m., Dec. 31. Hors
d'oeuvres buffet. BYOB. Tickets cost $10 per person. For info, call Art at
586-321-6105; Patti at 941-575-7993; Laurie at 941-676-2078; or Lois at
419-239-4469.


in great natural area, 10 AM, 10941
Burnt Store Rd, PG, 941-575-5435,
public invited.


BINGO, 2280 Aaron St. Game
Packs start at $12. Over 25 games
with payouts up to $250.


I NORTH PORT EVENTS


* TODAY
Current Events Conv,
10-11:30am NP Senior Center 4940
Pan American Blvd. 426-2204 bring a
topic or joke or just come & discuss
North Port Moose,
11-2:30 Lunch. Liver/Onions,
Burgers, Philly's 5-7. No Bingo
tonight. Member/Qualified Guest.
14156 Tamiami 426-2126
Lunch VFW Post 8203,


I ENGLEWOOD EVENTS


* TODAY
Plant Clinic, 10-Noon, Got a
plant/tree problem? Bring in a sample
to be identified @ New Englewood
Library, 3450 S McCall 475-6903
Englewood Bridge Cl,


Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues,
Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome
sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special
in canteen
Mexican Dominos,
12-3pm NP Senior Center 4940 Pan
American Blvd 426-2204 Come learn
the game &join all the fun
Amvets 2000 Dinner,
LAUX Soups & Sandwich Buffet
4-7pm $6. Members & guests


Contract bridge is played every Thurs
& Mon from 12:15 til 3:30 atThe
Hills Rest. RGCC, 100 Rotonda Cir,
698-7945,$2.
Entertainment, V.F.W.
Englewood, music by "QUIET FIRE",


welcome. QOH @ 7pm. 401 Ortiz Blvd
NP 941-429-1999
Legion post 254, Baked
Ziti, salad, dessert 6-8 pm $6:00,
legion post 254,6648 Taneytown
North Port, info. Brenda 258-6550
Bingo VFW 8203, Bingo
is fun for all ages, come and enjoy
excitement of the game. Come try
your luck, you might even win a
game or two



5-8 p.m.! Baby Back Rib night
5-7 p.m.!, Public Welcome 474-7516
Legion Game Night,
Indoor Corn Hole games, smoke-free
AL Post 113, Rotonda 697-3616, food
5-7pm, games 7PM.


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event,"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text"area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title," as that will be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


* FRIDAY
Basic Exercise, $40/8wks or
$2/class 9-10am NP Senior Center 4940
Pan American Blvd Marcelle 235-0346
Join/feel better
North Port Moose, 112
Lunch. Fish, Seafood, Prime Rib 5-8.
Dan & Sunny Karaoke 7-11. Member/
Qualified Guest, 14156 Tamiami
426-2126
Pierogies Take-Out,



* FRIDAY
Seafood Dinner, Carol &
Mike's famous seafood dinner, ham
steak or burgers. 4:30-7:30PM. AL
Post 113, Indiana Rd. 697-3616
Entertainment, V.F.W.
Englewood, music by "ANDY G."
5-8 p.m. Fish Fry or Wing night 5-7
p.m. Open, to the Public! 474-7516
VFW Seafood Night,
VFW10476 3725 CapeHaze Dr 5-8
The best fresh haddock shrimp or


Pierogies/Kielbasa,Every Fri.10Oam-6pm
Sat.1 Oam-l1pm. St. Andrew Ukr. Ctr.
4100S. Biscayne Blvd. North Port. 941
786-5256
Tai Chi, 10:30am-12pm NP Senior
Center 4940 Pan American Blvd Cost ask
Jerry 496-4932 Helps with balance and
makes you feel better
Lunch VFW Post 8203,
Lunch 11-2 every day except Tues, Sat,
Sun, Take out & Public welcome.



scallops in the area $10+ 697-1123
Legion Dance, AL Post
113, Music in the lounge by:
Reconnection 7-10pm, Indiana Rd.
697-3616.

* SATURDAY
Pancakes and More!,
7:30-11:30 am, egg & sausage/
biscuits & gravy/or quiche & fruit;
$5/$3 kids. EUM Church, 700 E.
Dearborn, 474-5588


SUN NEWSPAPERS h
--_ Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation 3
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor.........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager..........Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


I


OurTown Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013




:The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 3


'Nutcracker'featured at Concert Band show


PHOTOS PROVIDED


The North Port Concert Band held a Christmas concert Dec. 15 at the North Port Performing Arts
Center. Here, soprano Doreen Schnell sings"O Holy Night.":'


Ballet students Marcus Skyles and Alexa Greenwood dance a selection from "The Nutcracker"
Dec. 15. The Concert Band is preparing for its Jan. 22 "Reel Music"show, featuring some of the Silver
Screen's best. Tickets are available online at www.northportconcertband.org or by calling the NPPAC
box office at 941-426-8479 or 866-406-7722 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekdays.


Right: A brass quintet played
Christmas carols for audience
members as they entered the
Performing Arts Center.


Left: Kenneth Carter, Concert
Band scholarship recipient,
plays a sax solo on "The
Christmas Song" during the
recent show, "Horns for the
Holidays;' at the NPPAC.


Purchase or
I0 Professional
Set up & Installation!
S --
G BOSCHR
Q 15 Place Setting
T Highest in customer
satisfaction with
|rni dishwashers.
I 1 IJ.D. Power & Associates
SYear 2012
sale sale
,$699 $749
S WHfE/BLACK STAINL


^, Members of the North Port High School Dance Department perform selections from "The
1Nutcracker" during the North Port Concert Band performance.



iaru'fai Mon-I1-a
la~~~arPor Cli i ICharlotte

1700 Tamiami Trail,
-~ Port Charlotte
MWi Mo-o--- un1-


iElDf ursdayjmovnin.Shoo,& Save! vo'

more kitchen appliances & get contractor discounts! ___

SJust North of Cochran Blvd. IWe Service 941.624.5555
What We Sell!

*P I ....... ..... : I / f^ Plasma
51- *^ if i0| i _m0 /
0 [ i ts 43PIasma
i 43" 51"
| sale sale
[jai $399 $499
0PN43F4500A PN51 F4500A
ak6irs!
CStunninp views with 720p Plasma HDTV Clear Image Panel
amazing value! 60OHz Subfield Motion ConnectShare Movie
~~~~. .... ..a m .z v l. e.. . .o .o .i .z . .... ..o.r.o ... ..C.o.n.?.t.k .r o. y.. .
...LG Smart TV with superfast
'^ 1Dual Core Processor
5 LED 5 Trumotion 120HZ
s sale 471L I ULOG Clear Voice II Dialog
sSaleE999 2"V "Enhancer 42"
$9i99 $1 799 1 j2" GSH7742 SMARTTV
S51,7 GSH25JGD l 4 ED sale sale
b JL vbai' .:':... = ^a j1 B L3 32^ "LE D$49 $599
^ '* ------- ^ *32LN5700 42LN5700
H 69/4"x xW35/4" x D 339/16" H 693/4" x W 353/4" x D 33916" 47 1L 5 5" -L7
p sale sale
25.6 CF French Door Refrigerator 25.3 CF Side by Side Refrigerator $ $.699 $1,099
253CFSd y Sd ergrtr47LIN5700O 55LN5700
..... ||.. I |... ..



EfficientY
Whir!jpol |i '
Convection : ^ l27" Top-Load Washer, 1| I Front-Load Steam
Convectio 3.9 CF Washer 3.6 CF : 27" Top-Load Washer, 3.8 CF
S Wj 27" Front-Load Large Froni-Load Steam E a 29 Front-Load Large
S30" Freestanding Rane1 Capacity Dryer, 7.0 CF Dryer 7.3 CF Capacity 7.0 CF
Self-Clean Range :.:i _
5Smoothop Matching DrVer Matching Drver Matching Drver
Burners,5.3 CFsale 699 S S 49 S 6 6
Oven Capacity w$49So9w $499 $699 $699 $649 $629
WF55OW WASHER GTWN4250DWS DRYER GTDP490EDWS WASHER WF365BTBGWR DRYER DV365ETBGWR WASHER MVW600BWI DRYER MED.00.B


(9 7 SW Florida Showrooms (I Expert Advice. Alwiays the Best Price

5 Eg Famly owned & operated since 1954 Lowest Price Guaranteed Largest Brand Selection
E5 96 1st Place Reader's Choice Awards 1912-Month No-interest Financing E9 Company Owned Service Center
Copyright Bill Smith, Inc. 2013. All rights reserved. *See store for details. Finance offers available to approved applicants on retail soles only. Minimum or equal payments required.
tPrice Match Guarantee does not apply to internae quotes, companies in bankruptcy, outlet stores, warehouse-bype reduced service compa hies,uarly-bird specials, limited time offers
or limited quantity items. If you find an identical model in a caron from a local socking dealer we will refund he difference. Factory reaes elegble on applicable models only. I I I
No dealers. Closeout specials in limited quantities. All models not at all locations. Prices/offers valid through 12/28/13 unless otherwise indicated. See store for a dditional details.





:Our Town Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 26, 2013


MSSTHIS

OPPOIHETY


Spend and Save


any Purchase over $499



150 OFF
any Purchase over $999


With Same Day
Pick Up or Next
Day Delivery Plus
No Interest 'til
January 2015!*

COME BUY
& SAVE BIG!!!!


FAUX MARBLE DINING SET
which includes dining table and 4 $
matching chairs with upholstered seats.

SPECIAL PURCHASE
STRESS FREE DANISH
STYLED RECLINERS. 4.stre55"
In blended leather. -_Free



Stuff Brown Red Cognac
S% % %$349
SB Red Burgundy
% c $399


100% LEADER SOiR




^\ i^/


I
q


SPECIAL PURCHASE
NASA TECHNOLOGY memory foam
mattress. Why pay $2,000 $4,000?
..ioon.





IUEEN $399
IATTRESS Why pay more?


PORT CHARLOTTE
I___ 1241 El Jobean Rd.
VIS (776 across from Sam's)
S764-8700
* BMon.-Sat. 9-9
* WITH
APPROVED Sun. 11-6.


VENICE
550 S. Seaboard Ave.
Just North of Venice Nissan
on U.S. 41 Bypass
485-3211
Weekdays 9-6
Sat. 9-6 Sun. 11-6


SARASOTA
4027 N. Washington (US 301)
1 Mile South oT University
on US 301
351-8600
Mon.-Sat. 9-9
Sun. 11-6


BRADENTON
1100 West Cortez Rd.
Corner of 41 and Cortez
Next to Office Depot
749-6069
Mon. Sat. 9-9
Sat. 11-6


ELLENTON
581418th St East
Across from the
Elienton Outlet Mall
941-479-7900
Mon.- Sat 9-9
Sun. 11-6


SPECIAL PURCHASE

? -'-v f


Coastal Florida Living $ 399
Sofa from 39


LIKE FLOATING ONA CLOUD.
This 100% leather sofa offers style $ 99
comfort and unquestionable value. 5
Your choice beige or brown.


:OurTown Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013





The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 5


Gone, but not forgotten


SUN PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
Case manager Alecia Cunningham and volunteer resource navigator Gerry Dougherty pass out
memorial candles at the Charlotte County Homeless Coalition Saturday. The day is set aside to
remember the homeless who have died in the community over the past year.


With candles
lit, Iman
Bedward,
Norman
Harding,
Teresa Evans,
Greg Wilkie
and Thomas
Evans came
to remember
the home-
less who lost
their lives
this past
year.


Weekend
supervisor at
the homeless
coalition Maria
Kingsley stands
with attendees
Jack and Diane
Harkins at
the memorial
service.








Shannon
Goodman
and her
son,
Kevone,
sit and
remember
the
homeless
during the
memorial
service in
Murdock.


Chris Smith, cook for the Charlotte County Chrissy and Chris McCoy came out to the
Homeless Coalition, and his wife Elena memorial service at the Charlotte County
attended the memorial service. Homeless Coalition in Murdock.


Guest speaker, the Rev. Amy Kindred of the
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Charlotte
County, shares thoughts and prayers about
the homeless being remembered at Saturday's
gathering.


Karla Sears reads a poem during the memorial
service.


I OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE


Jack Charles
Alexander Sr.
Jack Charles
Alexander Sr., 62, of
North Ft. Myers, FL,
formerly of
Shelbyville,
IN, went
S home to
his Savior
SWed-
S nesday,
Dec. 18,
2013.
He was born May 27,
1951 in Greensburg, IN.
He owned the Hub Shoe
Store in Shelbyville, IN
prior to relocating to
the Cape Coral area in
1989. Jack was the own-
er of Insurance Depot of
Charlotte Co, FL for the
last 22 years. An active
member of New Hope
Baptist Fellowship in
Cape Coral, Jack's pas-
sion was helping others.
He was a private pilot
who sacrificially gave
his time and talent to
Angel Flight Southeast
since 2001, flying 80
missions.
Jack was married to
Sherryl (Puckett) for 40
years and is survived
by his mother, Geneva
(Straber), his brothers
Jim and John, his son,
Jack Jr., his daughter,
Lyndsey (Allender), son-
in-law, Jim, and three
grandchildren whom
he adored: Jalyn, Blake,
and Will.
A memorial will be
held at New Hope
Baptist Fellowship in
Cape Coral, FL at 5 p.m.
on Sunday, Dec. 29.
In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be
made to New Hope
Baptist Fellowship, 431
Nicholas Pkwy., Cape
Coral, FL 33990 or to
Angel Flight Southeast,
8864 Airport Blvd.,
Leesburg, FL 34778.
"We pray that
you'll live well for
the Master, making
him proud of you as
you work hard in his
orchard... We pray
that you'll have the
strength to stick it out
over the long haul...
the glory-strength God
gives is strength that
endures the unendur-
able and spills over
into joy." Col. 1:10-12


Alexander
Rodriguez
Alexander Rodriguez,
34, of Port Charlotte,
Fla., passed away
Friday, Dec. 20, 2013.
Funeral arrangements
are by Kays-Ponger &
Uselton Funeral Home
and Cremation Services
Port Charlotte Chapel.

ENGLEWOOD

There were no deaths
reported in Englewood
Wednesday.

NORTH PORT

There were no deaths
reported in North Port
Wednesday.

DESOTO

There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Wednesday.


? .*' { /'!
S Words or Comfort l i
j I am richer
S tor having kro.n 'you I
- Thie vlIjci,3IIed mernm.:r-ry
j ris b erlcr t, frjur --
, ,,o aEcfl ne Aill j,
ou arr gone but I know ?
i T.... mai you, my friend, .
art. a close as ever.
Th,:mas Gunn


For more
Words of Comfort, go to
www.wordsofcomfort.net


Carl Bible Harmon
Carl Bible Harmon, 86, of Barboursville, WVa.,
passed away Sunday, Dec. 22, 2013, at Cabell
Huntington Hospital, surrounded by his family
and friends.
.. He was born Dec. 29, 1926, in
.;',- /, Whitesburg, Tenn., a son of Junius
Bible and Mable Douglas White
Harmon.
Carl "PopPop" was a caring, quiet man who
loved the Lord, his family, Cowboy his cat, the
University of Tennessee, his church and Sunday
School class, and the Barboursville senior group.
He was a member of River Cities Community
Church. Carl was a 1944 graduate of Whitesburg
High School, and a 1950 graduate of the
University of Tennessee, with a Bachelor's degree
in Civil Engineering. He served in the U.S. Army
from 1944 to 1946. Carl lived and worked in
Chillicothe, Ohio; Oak Ridge, Tenn., Morristown,
Tenn., and Knoxville, Tenn.; Lexington, Ky.; Punta
Gorda, Fla.; and Barboursville.
PopPop is survived by his children, Steven
(Patricia) Harmon of Naperville, Ill1., Carla
(Gregory) Prater of South Point, Ohio, Laurence
(Catherine) Harmon of Crown Point, N.Y., and
Theresa (Michael) Wolterman of Brighton,
Mich.; his grandchildren whom he loved and
of whom he was so very proud, Steven, Ryan
(Melissa) and Sean Harmon, Jessica (Aaron)
Runyon, Kendra (Anthony) Marino, Ethan Prater,
Vincent (Christine) Wolterman, Andrew and
Melinda Wolterman, and Emily and Catherine
Eleanor Harmon; and his great-grandchildren
whom he loved, Reanna and Ty Harmon, Shelby,
Nick and Grace Runyon, and Michael, Cassidy
and Connie-Lou Wolterman. In addition to his
parents, he was preceded in death by his wife
of 54 years, Margaret "Betty" Lawson Harmon;
his brothers, Junius Bible "J.B." Harmon Jr., Guy
Wallace Harmon and Kenneth N. Harmon; and
his sisters, Evelyn Cook, Marjorie "Jo" Greene,
Madge Harmon and Margarette Harmon.
Visitation will be from 6 p.m. until the funeral
service at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, at
Schneider-Griffin Funeral Home in Chesapeake,
Ohio. Pastors Larry Greene and John Fry will
officiate. There will be a private family burial in
the Prater Family Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
Carl's wishes are for donations to be made to the
Alzheimer's Association in memory of his wife,
Margaret "Betty" Harmon. Condolences may be
expressed to the family at www.schneidergriffin.
com.



Paulette J. Morrison
Paulette J. Morrison, 67, of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
passed away Monday, Dec. 23, 2013, at home.

to Bruce and Evelyn Holt.
Paulette had lived in Florida for
the last 50 years, moving to Punta
Gorda from Englewood, Fla. She
Swas a retired Licensed Practical
Nurse and volunteered with the
SAmerican Cancer Society's Relay
NO for Life. Paulette was a member
of Friendship United Methodist
Church in Punta Gorda, Order of the Eastern
Star, and volunteered with the Order of the
Rainbow, Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts.
She is survived by her loving family, includ-
ing her daughters, Victoria Lynn Cordes of King
George, Va., Bridgette Veal of Lake Panasoffkee,
Fla., and Gina Parker of Cimarron, Kan.;
sons, Philip, David and Edsel Morrison, all
of Punta Gorda, and Big David Morrison of
Lake Panasoffkee; sisters, Bonnie Tidwell of
Punta Gorda, Geri Holt of North Port, Fla., and
Terri Help of Clear Lake, Minn; a brother, Paul
Holt of Englewood; 15 grandchildren; and six
great-grandchildren. Paulette was preceded in
death by her husband, Edsel Morrison, who
passed away in 2009; her parents; and broth-
ers, Joe and Butch Holt.
Visitation will be held from 1 p.m. until
3 p.m. today, Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013, at
Roberson Funeral Home Punta Gorda Chapel.
Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday,
Dec. 27, 2013, at Friendship United Methodist
Church. The Rev. Dr. Bruce Antle will offici-
ate. Entombment will follow at Royal Palm
Memorial Gardens in Punta Gorda.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions
may be made to Friendship United Methodist
Church, 12275 Paramount Drive, Punta Gorda,
FL 33955; or Relay for life Team Conway
Professional, via www.relayforlife.org/
puntagordafl. Friends may visit online at www.
robersonfh.com to sign the memory book and
extend condolences to the family.
Arrangements are by Roberson Funeral
Home Punta Gorda Chapel.




(I. Os Lotrr:


^l~r Whaustf eematin
Have you ever asked for a price, and they start
giving you quotes, but say there will be extras?
We believe in giving straight answers to your


questions.

Nobody likes unexpected surprises.
Old Fs-ioNEd SERVICE
AT A PRICE YOU CAN AffoRdC T IC/

STAYLOR FUNERAL V- (941)833-0600
and Cremation Services PnTamiaTrl L0
and Cremation Services Punta Gorda, FL 33950k%


77. LT a I.IJJneI r cI. lJI.B ow ,AvBaialeto u2 AD trl.ll l llJTI.o u .oneie


I





OurTown Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


3100







LEGALS


|FICTITIOUS NAME
L 3112 ^


12/26/13





NOTICE OF ACTION
L 3116 ^


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 13-2318-CA
Cl BANK F/K/A COMMUNITY
BANK & COMPANY, AS SUCCES-
SOR BY MERGER TO FIRST COM-
MUNITY BANK OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff,
v.
CARY ROSILLO, AS PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE OF THE
ESTATE OF ROBERT A. ROSILLO,
DECEASED, and MICHAEL COR-
BIT,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Cary Rosillo, as Personal
Representative of the Estate
of Robert A. Rosillo, Deceased
6650 West Indiantown Road,
Suite 200
Jupiter, FL 33458
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to enforce a lien on and to fore-
close on a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Charlotte Coun-
ty, Florida:
Lot 16, Block 4444, Port
Charlotte Subdivision, Section
Eighty-Two, according to the
map or plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 6,
Page(s) 52A through 52M,
inclusive, of the Public
Records of Charlotte County,
Florida
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on RYAN L. SNYDER, ESQ.,
Plaintiff's Attorney, whose
address is 11031 GATEWOOD
DRIVE, BRADENTON, FL 34211,
within thirty (30) days after the
first publication of this notice, and
file the original with the clerk of
this court either before service on
the Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This is an attempt to collect a
debt. Any information
obtained will be used for that
purpose.
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Manatee County Jury Office,
P.O. Box 25400, Bradenton,
Florida 34206, (941)741-
4062, at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 17th
day of December, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk Circuit Court
350 E. Marion Avenue
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
By: J. Kern
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: 12/26/13 and 1/2/14
277412 2982133
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
In the Matter of the Termination of
Parental Rights for the Proposed
Adoption of:
J.J.B.,
a minor child.
Case No. 13-3209-CA
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS AND ADOPTION
TO: MR RAUL HERNANDEZ,
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED than an
action for Termination of Parental
Rights Pending Adoption and Peti-
tion for Adoption has been filed
by James and Katherine Batsel
against you.
You are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on MIRA STAGGERS
WHITE, Attorney at Law, P.O. Box
381175, Murdock, Florida 33938
on or before January 27, 2014,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court at 350 E. Marion


Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida
either before service on the afore-
mentioned attorney or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
DATED December 20. 2013
Clerk of the Court
By: J. Kern
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: 12/26/13, 1/2/14,
1/9/14, and 1/16/14
357522 2982130


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I
^^ 3122^^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
08-2010-CA-003589-XXXX-XX
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
OF THE INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-AR6, MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-AR6, UNDER THE
POOLING AND SERVICING
AGREEMENT DATED APRIL 1,
2006,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Defendant(s) MARC PARDO;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARC
PARDO; TERRI PARDO;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TERRI
PARDO; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPEC-
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFEN-
DANT(S); BANK OF AMERICA;
BURNT STORE VILLAGE PROPER-
TY OWNER'S ASSOCIATION, INC.;
DISCOVER BANK; WHETHER DIS-
SOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXIST-
ING, TOGETHER WITH ANY
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDI-
TORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES
OF SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, WHETHER UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to a Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered in
the above-styled cause, in the Cir-
cuit Court of Charlotte County,
Florida, I will sell the property sit-
uate in Charlotte County, Florida,
described as:
LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK
317, PUNTA GORDA ISLES,
SECTION 16, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
8, PAGES 27A THROUGH
270, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com at 11:00
AM, in accordance with Chapter
45 Florida Statutes on January
2.2014.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of
this court on the 19 day of
December. 2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By M.B. White
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950,
and whose telephone number
is (941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication, if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Publish: December 21, 26, 2013
107236 2980142
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 13-002130-CA
RADC/CADC VENTURE 2010-2,
LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability
Company, as assignee of the
FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE
CORP., acting as Receiver for
FLORIDA COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VENICE AVENUE, LLC; an inactive
Florida Limited Liability Corpora-
tion; JACARANDA90 LLC, an inac-
tive Florida Limited Liability Cor-
poration; BISCAYNE 107, LLC, an
inactive Florida Limited Liability
Corporation; J&J HOMES, INC.,
an inactive Florida Corporation;
JACQUES CLOUTIER ESTATE and
any SUCCESSORS or ASSIGNS;
JACQUES CLOUTIER, an individ-
ual (Guarantor); LOOE KEY REEF
RESORT PROPERTIES, LLC, an
inactive Florida Limited Liability
Corporation (Guarantor); LOOE
KEY REEF RESORT & DIVE CEN-
TER, LLC, an inactive Florida Lim-
ited Liability Corporation (Guaran-
tor); LOOE KEY TIKI RESTAU-
RANT, LLC, an inactive Florida
Limited Liability Corporation
(Guarantor); EDWARDS FAMILY
PARTNERSHIP, LP, a Delaware
Limited Partnership; 5th3rd Bank,
a Foreign Profit Corporation;
LANDMARK BANK of FLORIDA, an
inactive Florida Profit Corpora-
tion; UNKNOWN PERSONS) in
possession; and all others who
may claim any interest in this
property,


Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO 45.031.
FLA.STAT.
TO ALL DEFENDANTS AND ALL
OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CON-
CERN:
Notice is hereby given that pur-
suant to the Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on
November 18, 2013 in Case No.:
13-CA-002130-CA of the Circuit
Court in and for Charlotte County,
Florida, in which VENICE AVENUE,


S NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^ ^ 3122^^


LLC; an inactive Florida Limited
Liability Corporation; JACARAN-
DA90 LLC, an inactive Florida
Limited Liability Corporation; BIS-
CAYNE 107, LLC, an inactive
Florida Limited Liability Corpora-
tion; J&J HOMES, INC., an inac-
tive Florida Corporation;
JACQUES CLOUTIER ESTATE and
any SUCCESSORS or ASSIGNS;
JACQUES CLOUTIER, an individ-
ual (Guarantor); LOOE KEY REEF
RESORT PROPERTIES, LLC, an
inactive Florida Limited Liability
Corporation (Guarantor); LOOE
KEY REEF RESORT & DIVE CEN-
TER, LLC, an inactive Florida Lim-
ited Liability Corporation (Guaran-
tor); LOOE KEY TIKI RESTAU-
RANT, LLC, an inactive Florida
Limited Liability Corporation
(Guarantor); EDWARDS FAMILY
PARTNERSHIP, LP, a Delaware
Limited Partnership; 5th3rd Bank,
a Foreign Profit Corporation;
LANDMARK BANK of FLORIDA, an
inactive Florida Profit Corpora-
tion; UNKNOWN PERSONS) in
possession; and all others who
may claim any interest in this
property are the Defendants. I,
Colleen M. Reilly, the ORANGE
County Clerk of the Court, will sell
at public sale the following
described real property:
See LEGAL DESCRIPTION
attached hereto as
Exhibit "A"
The sale will be held on January
17 2014 to the highest bidder or
bidders for cash at:
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
the Clerk's website for on-line auc-
tion at 11:00 a.m.
in accordance with 45.031,
Fla.Stat, any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the
Lis Pendens must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of the court on the 18 day of
December, 2013.
COLLEEN M. REILLY
Clerk of the Court
By: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
EXHIBIT A
A parcel or tract of land being a
portion of vacated plat of Port
Charlotte Subdivision Section
100, recorded in Plat Book 13,
pages 7A through 7H, per Reso-
lution of Vacation recorded in Offi-
cial Records Book 1454, pages
1254 and 1255, all being record-
ed in public records of Charlotte
County, Florida lying and being in
a portion of lands Section 14 and
15, Township 40 South, Range
21 East, Charlotte County, Flori-
da, being more particularly
described as follows:
Commence at the common Sec-
tion corner for said Sections 10,
11, 14, and 15; thence south 89
41' 22" east, a distance of 25.00
feet to the Easterly right-of-way
line of Tulip Street (50 foot right-
of-way) as shown on said plat;
thence South 00 26' 45" West,
along said Easterly right-of-way
line a distance of 1330.61 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINNING of this
description; thence North 78 34'
38" East, a distance of 372.28
feet; thence South 64 27' 32"
east, a distance of 125.18 feet to
a point on the arc of a circular
curve to the left; also being the
Westerly right-of-way line of East
Fork Waterway, whose radius
point bears South 64 27' 32"
East, having a radius distance of
750.00 feet, a central angle of
22 12' 22" thence along the arc
of said curve in a Southwesterly
direction, an arc distance of
290.68 feet, to a point of tan-
gency; thence south 03 20' 06"
West, a distance of 67.11 feet to
the Northerly right-of-way line of
State Road 776 per Florida
Department of Transportation
Right-of-way Maps Section
01050-2508 and thee Northerly
right-of-way line of the former
Seaboard Airline Railroad right-of-
way; thence along said Northerly
right-of-way line the following two
courses: South 68 58' 51" West,
a distance of 461.46 feet; South
69 02' 11" West, a distance of
754.73 feet to the easterly right-
of-way line of Biscayne Drive (100
foot right-of-way); thence North
18 20' 00" West, along said
Easterly right-of-way line, a dis-
tance of 29.23 feet to a point of
curvature of a circular curve to
the left, having a radius distance
of 1050.00 feet, a central angle
of 14 55' 40"; thence along the
arc of said curve in a Northerly
direction, an arc distance of
273.57 feet; thence North 33
15' 40" West, a distance of
594.05 feet; thence South 89
38' 05" East, leaving said Easter-
ly right-of-way line and along
Southerly plat limits of Port Char-
lotte Subdivision Section 57, as
recorded in Plat Book 5, pages
71A thru 71C of the public
records of Charlotte County, Flori-
da, a distance of 1187.35 feet to
the Easterly right-of-way line of
Tulip Street (50 foot right-of-way)
and the POINT OF BEGINNING.
AND
PARCEL 1:
The West 615.5 feet to the
Northeast 1/4 of the Northeast
1/4 of Section 34, Township 38
South, Range 19 East, LESS the
South 170 feet thereof, Sarasota
County; Florida.
AND
PARCEL 2:
Non-exclusive easement for the
benefit of Parcel 1 as created by
instrument recorded in Official
Records Book 1088, page 1038,
of the Public Records of Sarasota
County, Florida, for the purpose
of ingress and egress over and


across the land described there-
in.
Publish: 12/26/13 and 1/2/14
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


350371 2982134


CIRCUIT COURT TWENTIETH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 11-126-D-CJ
IN THE INTEREST OF:
PANIAGUA, Aliciana 05/10/2009
CORTEZ, Michele 02/21/2011
Minor children
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF
ADVISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA
TO: MARCIAL CORTEZ
WHEREAS a Petition for Termi-
nation of Parental Rights under
oath has been filed in this court
regarding the above-referenced
children, a copy of which is
attached; you are hereby com-
manded to appear before Magis-
trate Robert Koch, on January
16, 2014, at 1:30 p.m., for a
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL
RIGHTS ADVISORY HEARING. You
must appear on the date and time
specified.
FAILURE TO PERSONALLY
APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION
OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO
THESE CHILDREN. IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED
YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL
RIGHTS TO THE CHILDREN
NAMED IN THE PETITION
ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE.
WITNESS BY HAND as the
Clerk of Said Court and the seal
thereof, this 26th day of Novem-
ber, 2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: L.Maceikis
as Deputy Clerk
Publish: December 12, 19, 26,
2013 & January 2, 2014
366173 2976466


MEETING
^133126

NOTICE OF MEETING
LAKESIDE PLANTATION
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
The regular meeting of the
Board of Supervisors of the
Lakeside Plantation Commu-
nity Development District will
be held on Wednesday, January
8, 2014 at 7:00 PM at the
Lakeside Plantation Club-
house, 2200 Plantation Blvd.,
North Port, FL 34289. The
meeting is open to the public and
will be conducted in accordance
with the provisions of Florida Law
for Community Development Dis-
tricts. A copy of the agenda for
this meeting may be obtained
from the District Manager, at 135
W. Central Blvd., Suite 320,
Orlando, FL 32801. This meeting
may be continued to a date, time,
and place to be specified on the
record at the meeting.
There may be occasions when
one or more Supervisors, Staff or
other individuals will participate
by telephone.
Any person requiring special
accommodations at this meeting
because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the
District Office at (407) 841-5524
at least forty-eight (48) hours
prior to the meeting. If you are
hearing or speech impaired,
please contact the Florida Relay
Service 1-800-955-8770, for aid
in contacting the District Office.
Each person who decides to
appeal any action taken at
these meetings is advised
that person will need a record
of the proceedings and that
accordingly, the person may
need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings
is made, including the testi-
mony and evidence upon
which such appeal is to be
based.
George S. Flint
Governmental Management
Services- Central Florida, LLC
District Manager
Publish: December 26, 2013
297693 2982126

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!

I NOTICE OF SALE



PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
(941) 639-4000
AUCTION DATE 1/10/14
AT 10:00 AM
2002 HONDA
VIN# 1HGCG56462A067703
Publish: December 26, 2013
103614 2982113

I NEED CASH? I


Tom Adams Bridge



struggles again


ENGLEWOOD It
was a not-so-merry
Christmas Day for
motorists with plans to
spend the day building
"snowmen" out of beach
sand and seashells.
Their regular portal to
fun in the sun hit a snag
once again, when the
Tom Adams Bridge -
which links beach goers
to their Manasota Key
destinations broke
down for the second
time in as many weeks.
The Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office reported
around 11 Wednesday
morning that the draw-
bridge was stuck in its
open position. Traffic
had to be diverted to
alternate beach routes.
The bridge had
similar troubles Dec. 14.
Charlotte County tech-
nicians were able to lock
the bridge in its down
position later that day
for traffic, but that left
sailboats and larger
water vessels unable to
pass for several days,
until repairs were com-
pleted late Dec. 17.
The county Public
Works department,
which is responsible for
the bridge's operation,
hoped a refurbishment
scheduled for early 2014
would make the bridge


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered
from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest
leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence
is determined by the courtsystem.
more up to date and
prevent further prob-
lems, the Sun reported
Dec. 19.
There were no updates
as of late Wednesday
afternoon.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Vincent Edward Azbell, 26, 26000
block of Salonika Lane, Deep Creek.
Charge: DUI. Bond: $750.
Pierre M. Ridore, 59,13500 block
of Drysdale Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Victor Leonardo Medina, 27, of
Hollywood, Fla. Charge: out-of-county
warrant. Bond: $4,000.
Bethany Breynn Mercurio, 22,
of Apopka, Fla. Charge: petty theft.
Bond:$500.
Jeff Jack Zephirn, 29, 23500
block of Quasar Blvd., Port Charlotte.
Charges: driving while license is
suspended or revoked, and failure
to register a motor vehicle. Bond:
$1,000.
Shawn Scott Cameron, 42, 23300
block of Lehigh Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.

Compiled by Brenda Barbosa
and Marion Putman


ood day to all and
Merry Christmas.
Hope everyone is
enjoying a great holiday
season. I am, particularly
our annual Christmas
Eve adventure for Turtle
Bay oysters with family
and friends.
Did you know a coffee
plantation owner from
Bombay (Mumbai), India,
had a significant role in
early development around
Charlotte Harbor, but for a
street bearing his name is
hardly remembered?
John Cross came to
Florida around 1880 and
established the port town
of Liverpool on the Peace
River just south of Fort
Ogden. Now vanished, it
was located near today's
Sunnybreeze Harbor
subdivision. Cross built
a warehouse and wharf,
then established a freight
company hauling goods
overland to Fort Ogden
and returning with ship-
ments of oranges. At its
height, Liverpool boasted
around 60 residents, a
hotel, post office, and
quarterly newspaper.
Soon after arriving,
Cross became the area's
agent for Hamilton
Disston. Disston was a
successful Philadelphia
manufacturer, who in June
1881 purchased 4 million
acres of south Florida for
$1 million. That's right,
25 cents an acre, at the
time making him the
largest private landholder
in the United States. His
plan was to drain the
Everglades and create a
vast sugar plantation.
Cross was also the agent
who handled Colonel
Isaac Trabue's purchase
of James Lanier's 30-acre
tract on the bay in 1884,
which was then platted
as the town of Trabue
(Punta Gorda) and acted
as agent for the Florida
Southern Railway. He was
instrumental in helping
convince the railroad to
make Trabue's new town
its southern terminus and
was very active in early
real estate transactions.
Cross also served as a
trustee for the colonel's
annual chess tournament,
and in appreciation had
a street named after him,
Cross Street (U.S. 41


south).
Disston was eager to sell
off some land to finance
his dream, so in 1886
Cross purchased a few
hundred acres on what
was then known simply
as a mangrove bay. He
then platted his own town,
Grove City On-The-Gulf.
Cross' business plan called
for selling house lots in
town, each with a 10-acre
tract outside of town
planted in lemons. Thus,
he renamed the body of
water, Lemon Bay.
In 1893, Cross set up
a booth at the Chicago
Exposition promoting
the advantages of his
new town. Three brothers
attending the exposition
from Englewood, Ill.,
became so interested they
decided to make the trip
down. Sold on the idea
of Florida living, Herbert,
Howard and Ira Nichols
purchased over 1,000 acres
on Lemon Bay, in today's
Sarasota County, set out
seedlings and decided to
plat their own town.
Unfortunately, a severe
frost in late 1894 devas-
tated the citrus trees. John
Cross, financially ruined,
fled the area, leaving his
wife and two children
to fend for themselves
in Arcadia. The Nichols
brothers, undaunted,
recorded their plat in
August 1896 and the rest,
as they say, is history.

Visit Charlotte County
History Collections online
to view photographs
of Liverpool, houses on
Cross Street, and the
Nichols brothers' hotel
in Englewood. And don't
forget about the Historical
Center's current exhibit,
Beaches, Creatures, &
Cowboys: Florida Movie
Posters, open through
January. The Historical
Center is located at 22959
Bayshore Road in historic
Charlotte Harbor


Plantation owner


part of local history





The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 7


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
Editor's note: The Sun is
recapping its most com-
pelling and talked about
stories of 2013. Look for
stories to follow each day,
through Dec. 31.
PLACIDA- At a time
when few locals had even
heard of kayaks, Marian
Schneider took a chance
on what would become
one of the area's prime
ecotourism attractions.
"I brought the first 12
kayaks into this county,
and people didn't know
what they were," Schneider
said. "Everything that
Grande Tours did, we were
the first dog off the porch."
Schneider first opened
Grande Tours in the
Fishery in 1988 before
building and moving her
business to its present
location at the junction
of Placida and Gasparilla
roads, across from the
Boca Grande Causeway.
But the time came to say
goodbye. Schneider, 70,
closed her Grande Tours
Dec. 1.
"It is just time, just time,
that's all I can say," said
Schneider, who planned
to keep the property as her
private residence. "I had a


spirit to guide me to start
it, and I think I am guided
to stop it, to end it, so it's
just time to do it. I didn't
want to sell Grande Tours
as a business because it is
my legacy. It's my name."
Schneider grew up on
Boca Grande when the
island community was
more populated with com-
mercial mullet fishermen,
fishing guides and dock
workers than millionaires
and billionaires. Her
passion as a child was the
marine and other wildlife
she observed.
"I remembered watching
the big ships coming into
the Port of Boca Grande
to load up with phosphate
and head out to various
parts of the world," she
said, recalling how she
would imagine what life
was like for the captains.
Schneider attended
the University of Miami,
where she graduated with
a bachelor's degree in
medical technology and
"cyto-technology," the
study of cancer cells.
"After 16 years working
in hospitals a career
that took me as far as
Africa (where she volun-
teered for two years in a
bush hospital) I ended


PHOTO PROVIDED BY GRANDE TOURS
Marian Schneider and her pup, Nemo, have been a fixture
in Placida and Gasparilla Islands for decades. Since 1988,
Scheider's Grande Tours has provided boat tours of local waters
and encouraged enviornmental awareness. She closed her
doors Dec.1.


Best of




2013
my career in a hospital in
Central Florida," she said.
While she worked in
Central Florida, Schneider
would return to Placida
and Gasparilla Island
whenever she could, often
bringing friends with her
so they could discover the
area.
One weekend on the
beach, Schneider said,
"I listened and I heard
something tell me, 'Follow
that dream and become
the creative self that you
knew you were meant to
be all along.'"
She decided to redirect
her energies into building
a business that became
Grande Tours.
"Risky? Why, yes, it was,
but I took risks before,"
Schneider said. "Why not
do what I had already
been doing all my adult
life? Riding friends in my
boat around Boca Grande
and telling them what it
was like as a child?"
Schneider admits the
success of Grande Tours,
and its vision to promote
marine ecology and
environmental awareness,
has not been a solo effort.
She said she's had a lot
of support from friends,
other individuals and the
local media.
Bobbi Rodgers -
the Charlotte Harbor
Environmental Center
manager at Cedar Point
Environmental Park -
said, "(Schneider) is such
an icon in this commu-
nity. She's been doing
marine education before
(CHEC) has been at Cedar
Point."
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


ACROSS
1 OH neighbor
4 Touchdown
predictions
8 Until today
13 Farm female
14 High-calorie
15 Rallying cry
17 Peeve
18 Reverse, as
an action
19 On-off switch
20 Wit's responses
23 Gold standard
24 Grey's Anatomy
sets
25 Go bad
26 Overwhelm
with humor
27 Suppress
30 Greet the
crowd
31 Long ago
32 Poll goer
33 Audiophile's
annoyances
39 Reaches out to
40 Green space
41 Fisher of The
Great Gatsby
42 In a huff
44 Not that great
48 NBA stats
49 Dallas airer
50 The Mikado
locale
51 Brunch
selections
56 It's ENE of
Cleveland
57 Nile beast
58" likely!"
59 Anticipate,
with "with"
60 Airborne
predator


61 Mia in
Pulp Fiction
62 Peanut-butter
cup inventor
63 Airborne
predators
64 According to

DOWN
1 Kitchen
implements
2 Adjective for
equinox
3 Eurasian
capital
4 Boil over
5 Microscopic
6 Adapter
designation
7 "Amscray!"
8 Nautical
direction


Look for a third

crossword in .

the Sun Classified

section.

...............................................*


Grande Tours closes


- a Cro0s swor


Answer to previous puzzle
ELFMC R AG S!91IT
CIER ELIRA PiElLE
TEREMACAPPEILLA


|C|H|E|SS S|HIP P~GAN G
HA IHYASAHORAS=E
ENL SEEENDSANES
ALONE EJIGS
A 6L E D SH~c E DiJ W ED|S
EORAHHLIT;JN

FT I ASIAF IRD E
ORATORIOS AREAS
COKE I R I S NAACP
T|E|A|RMOIS|L O WRY
12/26/13


oward Spielman is
a prime example
of someone thriv-
ing in retirement by doing
what he loves.
The Port Charlotte man
just concluded another
successful exhibit of his
unusual art at the Sanibel
Masters Art Festival.
He's been on a roll since
being selected as the
developing artist of the
year by the Peace River
National Arts Festival
committee.
Howard got a kick out of
that designation because
he's been an artist ever
since he could hold a
pencil and paintbrush.
He laughs when he says,
"It only took me 70 years
to become a 'developing
artist.'"
He wanted to live his
life as an artist but instead
worked as an art teacher
for 30 years.
"With a wife and family,
my emphasis had to be on
earning a living," he says.
After he retired, Howard
said he realized he had
time for himself, time to
find his passion.
"You can work at your
career all your life and
you can do really well at
it. But most times that's
different from finding your
passion," he says.
After realizing he had
plenty of artistic talent
but knew nothing about
new technology, he signed
up for photography and
computer classes at the
Punta Gorda Visual Arts
Center.
Now, his unique artwork
is mostly created on the
computer using a digital
tablet and a digital brush.
When combined with his
drawing, painting and
photography, the result is a


Pattie
Uahalhk



fresh approach to fine art.
Howard is just one of the
lucky ones thriving after
retirement by finding his
passion.
Jack Rabito says he
found his passion when he
was able to finally pursue
acting.
"The acting bug bit me
early in life but I knew it
wasn't a reliable way to
earn a living," says the
Englewood man.
So he worked in
broadcasting for 20 years,
finding a successful career
as a radio announcer.
"Now, I'm pursuing my
passion for acting. I'm
doing something out of
real love," he says.
Jack has traveled the
country, filling the role of
Harry Truman in a one-
man show called "Give 'em
Hell, Harry."
He says he spent a full
year researching Truman.
"I listened to every
one of his speeches and
studied his Midwestern
inflection, posture and
mannerisms," he said.
Jack is currently starring
in the "Gin Game" at
Lemon Bay Playhouse.
That kind of dedication
is what happens when one
follows his passion.
Many people have to
wait until retirement to
find their passion. Some
never do it at all.
I consider myself richly
blessed because my career


and my passion were
always one and the same.
From my sophomore
year in high school I
wanted to write for a news-
paper. There was never any
doubt through 40 years of
journalism that I picked
the right career.
Decades ago, when I was
scheduled to have serious
neurosurgery, the doctor
told me I should do what
I most wanted while I wait-
ed for surgery.
I stayed in work doing
interviews and writing
because that was exactly
what I wanted to be doing.
Every interview enriches
me in some way.
That's passion for the
job.
Even now, I still need to
write the same as I need
to breathe. That someone
actually pays me to do
what I love has always
been a marvel for me.
Most kids today pick
careers based on passion,
not on job prospects and
not on future paychecks.
In decades past, people
like Howard and Jack
thought first about how
they could support them-
selves and their family. If
they realized the long-term
job potential was slim,
they found a different
career.
Sometimes, as Jack and
Howard learned, passion
has to be put on the back
burner in favor of more
practical pursuits.
But happy is the man
or woman who finds a
passion at any age -
and has the opportunity to
pursue it.

Pattie Mihalik is a regu-
lar columnist for the Sun.
Contact her at newsgirl@
comcast.net


ACROSS
1 Chess side
6 Chest bone
9 Stripped
14 Ancient region in
Asia Minor
15 Republic on St.
George's
Channel: Abbr.
16 Basket willow
17 Pompeii
attraction
18 Quicken Loans
Arena NBAer
19 Strike site
20 Place to see FDR
21 40-decibel unit
22 St. Pat's Day, e.g.
23 Pretend to be
24 Cricket call
26 French pop
29 Large primates
31 Barbary Wars
participant, now
33 One of the smart
set
36 Seaweed extract
37 Ballpark fig.?
38 Boxing biopic
39 Minnesota's state
fish, and a hint to
all 12 border
answers in this
puzzle
41 Chum
42 Do goo
43 Covent Garden
highlight
44 Dalmatian's spot
46 Slothfulness
48 Meyers of "SNL"
49 Motor suffix
50 "Coffee ?"
52 Pequod captain
56 Shade provider
58 Put in shells, say
59 Little brook
60 Prove untrue
62 Like the vbs.
"creep" and
'IWeep"
63 "Please, Mom?"
64 Lay to rest
65 Bolted down
some nuts
66 '50s movie
monster
destroyed at
Mount Aso
67 Calm water
metaphor
68 Rosy
69 Brooks
Robinson's base


By C.C. Burnikel 12/26/13


DOWN
1 Swallows, e.g.
2 Acerbic dispatcher
on 'Taxi"
3 Moving manga
4 Multiplexes
5 in kilo
6 Some copiers
7 "Argo" extra
8 Drink
9 Conductor of the
first rescue
mission
10 At an angle
11 Best-selling
program, in tech
lingo
12 Broad foot letters
13 Like some humor
21 Novel query
requirement
25 What possums
do when
threatened
27 Bing, to Google
28 Two under par
30 Investigate,
tabby-style
32 Classic
33 Hogwarts
teaching
34 Kagan who
clerked for
Thurgood
Marshall


Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
P F|F|TIA|B|B AIS SN OW
ALOE0HAR T E A0 N E
S A N A N I T A_ G A T E

S I s H O
RE D I i-'DR -
RUIDOLPH1BoYSEN






DENO IVORY S Li
SA KSL' -M---" S L E I I D E
K E N O' I V0O R Y o0P E N
S A K SIT E N A|MpIPSS|T|


(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
35 Rosetta Stone 531
discovery area
36 Like
40 1997 film with the 54 S
tagline "Coming
soon. Honest."
45 Giza pyramid 55 (
builder
47 Depends (on) 57 S
48 Like some
sesame-crusted 60I
tuna 61 E
51 Rich cake 63 (


12/26/13
Language that
gives us
'pajamas"
Scene of some
sworn
statements
Compulsory
poker bet
Seas, to
Cezanne
important
Blowup: Abbr.
DOld PC monitor


CERE
Edited

9 Mess makers
10 Class with mats
11 Mattress-pad
style
12 Discuss
16 Fledglings
21 Be worthwhile
22 Roundup
sound
27 Irreverent NBC
show
28 Cool and
refreshing
29 Nissan Leaf
competitor
30 Lo-mein cooker
31 Declares
acceptable
32 Airport shuttle
33 Cheerful
34 Museum
specialist


AL-IZATION by S.N.
I by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com
35 Caribbean
cuisine staple
36 Deduction
expert
37 Light touch
38 Farm female
42 Absurd
43 Numbered rd.
44 Lose resilience
45 Speak frankly
46 Biblical dancer
47 Auto tracking
system
49 Printing
problems
50 Poker pair
52 Dog from
China
53 Resound
54 Do a sketch
55 Cereal
serving


Living your passion



sometimes delayed


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


I I


I






Our Town Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 26, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Plans forming

for development

in North

Englewood

OUR POSITION: How will a
large-scale housing project be
received?

B ack in early 2008, a
neighborhood meeting
on a large-scale develop-
ment proposed for State Road
776 near Manasota Beach Road
attracted more than a hundred
local residents. Some seemed
neutral, some were skeptical
and others outright hostile.
Few realized it at the time,
but the real estate market was
in the early slide to the Great
Recession. The high pace of de-
velopment was a still-growing
concern throughout Sarasota
County.
One focus of attention
was the SR 776 corridor in
Englewood, which had become
a key target for development.
A major project under scruti-
ny at the time sought rezoning
of 40 acres off Artists Avenue
for a mixed-use development
of housing, assisted living units
and businesses. Another sought
a comprehensive plan change
for a development called
Gottfried Village which
would have opened the door
to a 7,000-plus housing devel-
opment just east of Thomas
Ranch-West Villages. West
Villages itself had approval for
15,000 homes.
The Gottfried Village pro-
posal was defeated by a single
vote on the Sarasota County
Commission. To many, the
project became an emblem of
the rush to over-development.
Into that setting came the
Villages of Manasota Beach.
Plans called for 1,448 housing
units on 700-plus acres east of
State Road 776, south of the
Manasota Beach Road intersec-
tion and north of Keyway Road.
The property was zoned for
open-use estate, which allows
one home for every five acres.
But the comprehensive plan
also allowed for the possibility
of a mixed-use, village-style
development.
Proposed was commercial
space with housing above it, at-
tached homes, condominiums
and apartments. Development
was to be clustered. Buildings
would be as high as three
stories over parking. Half the
property would remain open
space. The village would have
tennis courts, a clubhouse and
a pool. A 20-acre pond would
remain as is.
The village never got past the
community workshop. Soon
came the recession and out
went the proposal.
A new Village of Manasota
Beach is back, though, and it
received a green light recently
from the county Development
Review Committee. The
property is roughly the same.
Sixteen acres is owned by the
Englewood Water District. The
rest has been purchased by
BMG Three LLC.
Details are spotty right now.
The proposal is for 1,520 new
homes, but the configuration is
unknown. The commercial vil-
lage center had been dropped.
A few months ago, one partner
said options were being evalu-
ated. Details will be presented
at a neighborhood workshop
scheduled for Jan. 22.
The SR 776 corridor has seen
a resurgence of home construc-
tion and proposals as economy
has picked up. Public fears of
over-development subsided
after the housing market
collapsed, replaced by hopes for
jobs and a stronger economy.
But a project of this size
will draw a lot of scrutiny. The
impact will be felt on traffic and
schools. It will be interesting


to see what shape this devel-
opment takes and whether it
spurs another shift in public
attitudes.


I ,YouE:_. ar 7 .e& _



)KEMrFIIME -ow LO W r
uOVIE-TFe-1V I": E0S -

SYEEfR, PROPERrTY
SINSURANICE RRTE. R I tv
RE"ARINHIC-PHI


R:Cc3- r4 AffES -r"uE- 'It


Dangerous liaison: Prostitution and the law


n 2001, the German parlia-
ment almost totally dereg-
ulated prostitution. The
majority, left-wing coalition of
Social Democrats and the Green
Party trumpeted the new law as
a reform that would end prud-
ishness about "sex work" and
bring the business into the open
so prostitutes could bargain
for higher pay and claim social
insurance.
Things haven't quite gone
according to plan. Large brothels
have popped up in various cities,
packed with women and girls
lured by human traffickers from
poverty-stricken Eastern Europe
and handed over to pimps upon
arrival.
Sex tourists from around the
globe flock to German estab-
lishments that offer unlimited
sex for a "flat rate" of 100 euros
(about $135) or, sometimes,
"gang-bang" parties, according
to extensive exposes of what
some in the German press call
"modern slavery." Meanwhile,
there has been no increase in
prostitutes signing up for social
benefits.
Amid a growing backlash
from women's rights advocates,
Chancellor Angela Merkel is
promising tougher rules. A likely
reform is the elimination of flat-
rate brothels, though how that
would be enforced is anyone's
guess.
Now the Supreme Court of
Canada is trying its hand at
prostitution reform. The justices
unanimously struck down the
country's prostitution laws and


Charles Lane
Washington Post



ordered parliament to rewrite
them within a year. Will this
experiment end better than
Germany's, or will it confirm
that there's something inherently
exploitative about prostitution
that neither market forces nor
enlightened legislators and
judges can eradicate?
Prior to the court's ruling,
Canadian law took a charac-
teristically middle-of-the-road
approach. Performing sex acts
for money was not a crime. But
it was illegal to solicit customers,
operate a brothel or live off
the "avails" of prostitution -
Canadian for pimping. Basically,
prostitution was permitted but
contained.
To the Supreme Court,
however, this "arbitrary" scheme
"imposed dangerous condi-
tions" by preventing prostitutes
from working indoors, from
hiring drivers, receptionists or
bodyguards, and from talking to
would-be clients ahead of time
to screen out potential abusers.
The imposition of these risks
was out of proportion to any
social benefit, thus violating
Canada's 1982 Charter of Rights,
the court ruled.
In contrast to the knee-jerk
libertarianism that informed the
2001 German law, the Canadian
court professed its intent to
protect the vulnerable. It was not


in denial about the fact that pov-
erty, addiction or other problems
leave "many prostitutes ... no
meaningful choice" about selling
their bodies. And the justices
had a point when they called out
parliament for letting people sell
themselves but not necessarily
as safely as possible.
One obvious remedy- ban-
ning prostitution was never
on the court's agenda, however.
That's because the plaintiffs in
the case were self-styled sex
workers who claimed theirs is
a profession like any other and
were trying to use the case to
eliminate limitations that the
law had placed on it.
So the court ordered par-
liament to make life safer for
prostitutes without offering any
ideas for how to do that.
Allowing prostitutes to hire
"drivers" or "bodyguards" would
mean de facto legalization of
pimping, as Canada's prose-
cutors unsuccessfully argued.
Citing the notorious case of
serial killer Robert Pickton, who
preyed on prostitutes in British
Columbia, the court implied
that repealing existing laws
could be justified if doing so
saved "one" woman. What are
the justices going to say the first
time a prostitute gets killed by
her driver?
As for brothels, they may
be safe havens, as the court
claims. Then again, they may be
virtual prisons, as with some in
Germany.
For all of its confusion, the
Canadian ruling may have


done a service: reminding us
that modem norms about sex
and the law push in potentially
conflicting directions.
We want maximum privacy;
the state has no business telling
consenting adults what they
can and can't do with their own
bodies in their own homes. On
the other hand, we want gender
equality and maximum protec-
tion of vulnerable individuals,
especially children.
The German experience
demonstrates that outright legal-
ization of prostitution strikes the
wrong balance. Yet German-style
deregulation is what Canada will
get unless parliament acts by the
court's deadline.
Prime Minister Stephen
Harper's government should
learn from Germany's experi-
ence and that of other countries,
including Sweden. There, what's
illegal is buying sex so the
burden of law enforcement falls
on customers (mostly men), not
prostitutes (mostly women).
Since Sweden passed that
rule in 1999, human trafficking
and prostitution have declined
in that country. In November,
Harper's party called for a "plan
to target the purchasers of sex
and human trafficking markets,"
which sounds very much like
the Swedish approach and a
promise that a lawsuit intended
to legitimize sex work will end
up doing the opposite.
Charles Lane is a Washington
Post columnist. Readers may
reach him at lanec@washpost.
com.


Coal for the GOP, empty stockings for the unemployed


congressional Republi-
cans returned home for
the holidays with emp-
ty stockings for constituents
suffering through long-term
unemployment, after the GOP
repeatedly blocked renewal of
the federal Emergency Unem-
ployment Compensation fund.
Now a new survey shows their
stinginess could create a signif-
icant backlash at the polls next
year including from some
Republican voters.
Public Policy Polling (PPP)
took a look at four Republican-
occupied swing districts in
the House, as well as that of
House Speaker John Boehner.
Bipartisan majorities of voters in
each district supported extend-
ing long-term unemployment
benefits:
In Rep. Gary Miller's California
district, 68 percent of voters


George Zornick
The Nation



want the benefits continued and
28 percent support ending them.
Republicans support an exten-
sion, 54 percent to 41 percent.
In Rep. Mike Coffman's
Colorado district, 63 percent of
voters want the benefits extend-
ed, with a narrow plurality of
Republicans (48 percent) in favor.
Rep. Dan Benishek will face
voters in Michigan who heavily
support (66 percent) an exten-
sion, including 60 percent of
Republicans.
In Rep. Rodney Davis' district
in Illinois, 66 percent favor ex-
tending benefits, with 53 percent
of Republicans in favor.
Even Boehner's home district


exhibits similar views: Sixty-three
percent of voters want the fund
extended and 34 percent do not,
including a majority (52 percent)
of Republican voters.
A common rejoinder to such
polling data is that voters might
not prioritize the issue when
casting a ballot next fall but
PPP also asked if a failure to ex-
tend long-term unemployment
benefits would make voters less
likely to re-elect the incumbent.
In each district, the answer was
yes.
The liberal group Americans
United for Change commis-
sioned the poll, which is part of
a wider strategy by Democrats
and progressives to push
Republicans into renewing the
benefits as soon as Congress
returns next year.
Poll results such as these, along
with increasingly brutal local


media coverage, must be worri-
some to Republican strategists.
They reinforce several major
negative perceptions about
congressional Republicans: that
they are pervasively obstruction-
ist, that they have little concern
for struggling Americans and
that they have allowed ideol-
ogy to hamper the economic
recovery. (A failure to renew the
Emergency Unemployment
Compensation program would
cost 240,000 jobs, according to a
White House report.)
That's the message progres-
sives will be hammering home
over the holiday break, especially
when benefits for the long-term
unemployed stop three days
after Christmas.
George Zomrnick is a columnist
for The Nation. Readers may
reach him at george@thenation.
com.


he three young Syrian
women had managed
to escape from the
rebel-held section of Aleppo
for a few days' rest across the
border in Turkey. Asma, 26, a
university graduate in English
literature, has been volun-
teering for the past two years
as a nurse in a field hospital,
treating civilian victims of the
war, which has divided Aleppo
into conflict zones held by the
rebels and the regime.


Trudy
Rubin



Salam, 30, and Islam, 28,
sisters who were teachers
before the war, are volunteers


in an orphanage that shelters
650 children who lost parents
in the fighting. "These children
are only a fraction of the num-
ber of war orphans," Salam
told me. It was hard to believe
that these fresh-faced, smiling
women, their faces framed
by head scarves, had lived for
years under bombardments.
But just after they arrived in
Gaziantep, the Assad regime
began dropping "barrel
bombs" filled with hundreds


of pounds of explosives and
shrapnel on apartment build-
ings in their neighborhood,
killing hundreds of civilians
and wounding hundreds
more. The three were planning
to rush back into the mayhem.
"There are not enough
doctors or nurses or supplies,"
Asma explained as we sat
over a simple lunch of bread,
cheese and cucumbers in the

RUBINI9


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


US needs to get tough on Assad or stay home


OurTown Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013











The world's anthem of joy


n a season of joy, it
is worth dwelling on
and marveling at the
world's anthem of joy,
arguably the best piece of
music ever written, which
hasn't lost its power to
astound after nearly
200 years and, as long as
there is such a thing as
civilization, never will.
It is, of course,
Beethoven's Ninth
Symphony. Everyone
knows the unforgettable
melody of its "Ode to Joy,"
the fourth movement that
sets a poem by Friedrich
Schiller. Performances
of the symphony always
feel like an event. When
the Berlin Wall fell, it was
natural that Leonard
Bernstein turned to the
Ninth at the celebration.
The man who gave us
this hymn of affirmation
and possibility could be
nasty and arrogant. But
he was a towering musical


genius who left to posteri-
ty incalculable gifts. Music
historian Paul Lang says
of Beethoven that "there
is still no department of
music that does not owe
him its very soul." The
great composer would
have expected as much.
In all of his letters,
Mozart never referred
to himself as an artist.
Beethoven considered
himself an artist with a
capital "A." He evange-
lized for the importance
of music in general and
himself in particular.
Listening to his work,


it is hard not to conclude
that he got his place in
the firmament exactly
right. Beethoven began
composing the Ninth
in 1818, when he was
already deaf, but had
thought about setting
Schiller's poem to music
as far back as the early
1790s. The symphony
premiered in Vienna
in 1824. The story goes
that Beethoven was on
stage beating the time
and, with his back to the
audience, couldn't hear
the applause. A singer
turned him around so he
could see the rapturous
reaction.
The first three move-
ments are brilliant
enough shimmering
to life from nothingness
at the beginning in what
has been compared to
the Creation story, then
delivering crashing
drama but the fourth is


a revelation. Soaring and
haunting, it builds toward
the entry of the baritone
soloist: "0 friends, not
these tones. But rather,
let us strike up more
pleasant and more joyful
ones."
A chorus erupts, sing-
ing "Joy! Joy!" The singers
praise "joy, beautiful
spark of divinity" and
tell of how "all mankind
become brothers," and
exult "Be embraced
you millions/This kiss
goes to the whole world."
These sentiments, un-
controversial if not banal
today, had a political
point. Dismayed by the
ascendancy of reaction in
Europe, Beethoven meant
the symphony to be an
enduring expression of
his faith in democracy
and the brotherhood of
man.
But it is more than
that. "Joy is beautiful


because it provides
harmony," Schiller
wrote of his poem. "It is
'god-descended' because
all harmony is derived
from the Master of
Worlds and flows back to
him." The ode declares,
"Brothers above the
starry canopy/A beloved
father must surely dwell."
Beethoven biographer
Lewis Lockwood notes
how the composer
brought the religious
message to the fore "as
part of the great synthesis
in which humanity's ideal
state can be found only
by reaching toward the
heavens to find God."
It is a testament to
Beethoven's achievement
that his masterpiece is
familiar to the point of
ubiquity the anthem of
the European Union no
less yet still vital. A new
documentary, "Following
the Ninth," traces its


impact on people around
the world. A few months
ago, "60 Minutes" did
a segment on a plucky,
against-the-odds sym-
phony orchestra in the
desperately poor Congo.
Its rendition of the
"Ninth" is ragged, but
heartfelt and as moving
as anything ever per-
formed in Vienna.
The music historian
Harold Schonberg writes
of the Ninth Symphony,
"The music is not pretty
or even attractive. It is
merely sublime." The Ode
to Joy asks, "Do you sense
the Creator, World?" It is
the miracle of the Ninth
that, at the height of its
power, it almost compels
the listener to answer
"Yes!"
Rich Lowry is the editor
of the National Review.
Readers may reach him
at comments. lowry@
nationalreview. com.


Legislature casts difficult vote to fill budget hole


recently Gov. Rick
Scott announced
his intention to cut
the insidious car tag fee
increases that occurred
five years ago. During
his announcement in
his opponent's backyard
of Tampa Bay, he hinted
that he was reducing the
taxes that his predecessor
raised.
This is a smart political
move, no doubt orches-
trated by political consul-
tants who hoped no one
would notice it was fellow
Republicans who crafted
and then passed the bill to
increase fees.
To understand the
dynamics of the "Great
Fee Hike of 2009," a brief
primer on Florida's budget
numbers and process is in
order.
In 2007, during Charlie
Crist's tenure as governor,
the state budget reached
a high of $72 billion.
By 2009, revenues were
estimated to be a much
lower $66.5 billion because
of the recession.
Legislators preparing the


RUBIN
FROM PAGE 8

apartment of friends
who had escaped from
Aleppo. "They are op-
erating in the corridors,
cutting off limbs without
anesthetic." A school
had been hit, and many
of the new victims were
children.
No surprise. Bashar
al-Assad's war against
his own people is a
deliberate war against
civilians and children.
The greatest humanitar-
ian catastrophe of the
21st century thus far is
unfolding in Syria. The
war crimes committed by
Assad rival anything seen
in Darfur or Bosnia.
Yet the international
community has failed
to take steps that could
slow or halt these war
crimes. And the Obama
administration has
unwittingly helped Assad
continue slaughtering
civilians.
This has to stop.
According to the
Oxford Research Group,
at least 11,000 of the
more than 113,000
known dead were
younger than 18; of those
child victims, more than
70 percent were killed by
bombs or artillery shells.
There were also 764 cases
of summary execution
of children and 389 of
sniper fire with clear
evidence that children
were targeted. (Indeed,
the entire Syrian revolt
was sparked in late 2011


budget tried to maximize
spending in certain areas
to obtain federal stimulus
funds. After making severe
cuts to many programs,
some vital, legislators
were still struggling to fill a
$2 billion budget hole.
A desperate Republican-
led Legislature had little
choice but to temporarily
raise fees and taxes to fill
the gap. In all, they raised
revenues $2.2 billion,
including a $1-per-pack
tax increase on cigarettes
generating $935 million,
and fee increases on
certain court costs totaling
$195 million.
The toughest vote
was for increasing fees
on driver's licenses and
new car tags to generate

by the arrest and torture
of a group of children for
writing anti-Assad graffiti
on a wall.)
Indiscriminate bomb-
ing and shelling have
been Assad's weapons of
choice for depopulating
whole urban neighbor-
hoods and towns under
rebel control. The result
is that nearly one-third of
Syria's 23 million people
are either refugees in
neighboring countries
or internally displaced,
living in schools, in
mosques, or on the
ground.
As winter sets in, Assad
is preventing food and
medicine from reaching
250,000 starving civil-
ians in besieged areas
surrounded by regime
forces. As I heard from
doctors in Gaziantep,
the dictator is abetting a
growing polio epidemic,
which is on the verge
of exploding in the
rebel-held north; regime
policy ensures that
the most endangered
children lack access to
the vaccine.
U.N. investigators
have alleged that the
Syrian government has
carried out "a cam-
paign of terror" against
civilians that includes
widespread abductions
and disappearances. The
top U.N. human rights
official, Navi Pillay, says
evidence links Assad to
crimes against humanity,
including horrendous
torture and rapes in
regime prisons. (Yes,
some opposition groups
have also committed war


$800 million. This was
done in Senate Bill 1778,
which passed 40-0, with all
senators, Republican and
Democratic alike, voting
for the increase even
though many did so with
extreme reluctance.
In the Florida House
the auto fee hike passed,
74-43, but it did so primar-
ily along party lines, with
one Republican joining
42 Democrats in dissent.
SB 1778 was sent to
then-Gov. Crist along with
the budget, known as the
appropriations bill. It's
important to note that this
was no ordinary bill; it was
a conference committee
report that was negotiated
in the final days of session.
The bill to increase fees
was needed to enhance
revenues so that they
matched the amount of
money spent in SB 2600,
the appropriations bill.
Why is this important?
If the governor had vetoed
SB 1778, known as a
conforming bill, it would
have thrown the budget
out of balance. In this

crimes, but they amount
to a tiny fraction of the
regime's atrocities.)
Yet Assad is sitting
pretty in the run-up
to peace talks with the
opposition, to be held in
Switzerland on Jan. 22.
His Russian backers
blocked a U.N. Security
Council statement
last week that would
have condemned the
barrel-bomb attacks.
Their veto makes it
impossible to refer Assad
to the International
Criminal Court for
crimes against humanity.
Obama's decision to
forgo a strike on the
regime's military sites in
favor of a deal to destroy
its chemical weapons
gave the dictator a
green light to slaughter
civilians by other meth-
ods. As Assad ups the
killing before peace talks,
Obama's only card is to
ask Moscow to rein him
in.
If Russia (and Iran)


case, the budget would
have authorized spending
$800 million in revenues
that would not have been
collected. At that point, it
would have made sense
to veto the entire budget.
However, that would be
highly unusual, particu-
larly when the governor
and legislative leaders were
from the same political
party.
In 2011, when state
revenues were almost
$70 billion, the Florida
Senate wanted to roll back
the 2009 fee increases
but Gov. Scott was more
interested in reducing
corporate income taxes.
During the 2013 session,
state Sen. Joe Negron,
Appropriations Committee
chair, introduced and
passed in the Florida
Senate SB 7132 to take
revenue from eliminating
a tax credit benefiting
insurance companies and
use it to reduce a portion
of the auto fee increases.
The Florida House refused
to go along.
Gov. Scott didn't weigh in.

will not force Assad to
cease his slaughter of
civilians and declare
a humanitarian truce
before the beginning
of peace talks, the talks
are pointless. Unless the
administration stands by
this precondition, it will
be complicit in Assad's
crimes.
Americans may be
indifferent to the slaugh-
ter of Syrian civilians
because they view the
war as too confusing to
grasp. But if they had the
chance to talk to Asma,
Salam, Islam and all the
brave Syrian civilian ac-
tivists I met in Gaziantep,
they would understand
the essence of this fight.
These young people have
exposed themselves to
mortal danger to save
civilian lives.
This war is about a dic-
tator who will go to any
lengths to retain power,
and who has triggered a
humanitarian catastro-
phe that destabilizes the


PO OL BoY
SERVICE REPAIRS 0 SUPPLIES RENOVATIONS

Enjov Your Pool!

Let us clean it.
Call today to arrange weekly service.
L.C6fc ... nc.255-1900
uCCI 6ig: j ---5 *-3

I CC POOLB ,I .E U |



w3n ww oolboyinc.com


In September, as legis-
lators started preparing
for the 2014 session, Gov.
Scott expressed interest
in reducing taxes by
$500 million and began a
listening tour to hear from
the public how to do so. He
also indicated that he had
no list of what taxes and
fees he had in mind to cut.
It is estimated that there
will be a surplus of at least
$840 million above the
$74.5 billion in the current
budget.
During the October
committee week, Senate
Appropriations Chair Joe
Negron introduced SB
156, again trying to reduce
certain motor vehicle fees
but this time using the
surplus in general revenue
funds.
Then in December, Gov.
Scott announced his plan
to cut $401 million in car
and truck registration fees.
If passed, it could save the
average motorist about
$25 a year, a very popular
idea with re-election
looming.
Senate President Don

whole region. Assad's
reign of terror has fueled
a rise of radical Islam
that will threaten the
entire Middle East and
the West.
Peace talks in Geneva
are unlikely to end the
war, but at least they
might stop Assad's
assault on civilians. If
Obama cannot persuade
the Russians to force


rC
C/

L "


/r 2
\- '.( :*,
'- '\


w ~

C
I -


Gaetz welcomed the
governor to Negron's
bandwagon.
With more than an
$8 billion increase in the
state budget from 2009
to the present, isn't it well
past time to undo the fee
increases that were sup-
posed to be temporary?
The timing and loca-
tion of the governor's
announcement, along
with his inaction over the
past three years, make
the governor's motives
appear more opportunistic
than sincere. It's an insult
and a disservice to the
Republican legislators who
took the tough but respon-
sible vote to balance the
budget.
Wouldn't it be more
honorable to be honest
with voters rather than
to try to deceive them for
political gain?
Paula Dockery is a
syndicated columnist
who served in the Florida
Legislature for 16 years as a
Republican from Lakeland.
Readers may reach her at
pauladockery@aol.com.

Assad to permit the
delivery of food to the
starving and vaccine to
the children, the U.S.
delegation should stay
home.
Trudy Rubin is
a columnist and
editorial-board member
for the Philadelphia
Inquirer Readers may
reach her at trubin@
phillynews.com.


FINALLY IN

PORT CHARLOTTE

LOW COST

J DENTURES!!


Rolex

Watches


Large Selection
of Diamond
Bezels & Dials


(BHNDACA.UOS
625-066

Monday Friday 10 a.m. 6 p.m.; Saturday 10:30 4 p.m.
Not affiliated with Rolex
54796


A a

DR. SUSAN R. BROOKS
New Patients 629-4311
Welcome www.susanrbrooksdds.com
General Dentistry
S- Implants Cosmetic Nitrous Oxide
| Dentures & One Day Repair
SLaser Periodontal Therapy
3440 Conway Blvd. #2A (Behind Post Office) Port Charlotte


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 9


VIEWPOINT





:OurTown Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


AMVETS
FROM PAGE 1

the tradition anytime
soon.
"I love this place; I
have a lot of friends
here," she said, adding,
"I'm going to keep
coming here until I drop
dead."
The post was busy
welcoming its members
to the annual dinner
Wednesday, offering a
ham dinner with all the
trimmings for only $5.
According to Terry
Corson, the post's 1st
vice commander, the
dinners are aimed at pro-
viding the membership


Peg Pierro was among the AMVETS Post 312 members who
decided to take advantage of Wednesday's Christmas dinner.


people who stick around Pierce Ryan, left, Landa Corson and Paul Watterson serve up a heapin' helping' of holiday cheer
for Christmas or have on Christmas at AMVETS Post 312 in North Port, by providing tasty and affordable meals for their
no place to go (who) post members who don't have family living locally.
show up for the dinner," serving in Afghanistan on
Corson said. "Of course, Dec. 18.
we'd want for people to Recognizing the fam-
be with their families, ily might face difficulty
but if they can't, then we during the holiday with-
got them backed up." out proper time to plan, "
The dinner was only the post kicked in and H. -_
one of several activities ....tirash ,.ch ,th,,hc


Nikki Balentine was busy serving up some holiday cheer on
Christmas while bartending at AMVETS Post 312 Wednesday.




with healthy mouth cleaning


13801 S.I U, U iU U i T. ni ,Nrt otUF 4 8
ww -clbrts miesenalar.co


in recent days that rep-
resented an opportunity
for the post to give back
to the community.
It just provided some
Christmas spirit to the
Cottes, a North Port
family in which the
patriarch, James, had just
been discharged from


L'1UVllUU vCUS.tll, 1 I tiULI o,
toys and food for the
family during a fundrais-
er to ensure the Cottes
had a great holiday.
"This post is all about
vets helping vets,"
Corson said. "We think
globally but act locally,
and we make sure we're
doing things to help the
people of North Port."
The food was being
prepared and served
by PaulWatterson and
Pierce Ryan, two guys
who said it was an honor
and a privilege to provide
affordable food to those
who might be alone on
the holiday.
They echoed Pierro's
statements, saying the
post was a place where
many who had no family


This was the third year Floyd and Beverly Standley visited
AMVETS Post 312 for the annual Christmas dinner, which
consisted of ham and all the fixins'for only $5.


found their surrogate
family members, a
blessing during what
otherwise could have
been a very lonely day.
"We're not looking to
make money here, we
just want to help people,"
Ryan said, adding, "We're
pretty close-knit here."
Provost marshal Lee
Herlin agreed, saying the


Our Dining Room

S"serves breakfast, |

i dinner, and an
^^Kl^^^^I^--KfOTiOM


tman z,y5u

Households

... utilized our


I wish to make a meaningful and significant gift of $. To make your gift online, go to
wwwrrcchnmelecrnalitionn nr


and click on Donate Now.


State


Zip Code


Email


HOMELESS

Charlotte County Homeless Coalition
PO Box 380157
Murdock, FL 33938
.ex..118
www.cchomelesscoalition.org
Tina.Figliuolo@cchomelesscoalition.org


Name(s)

Address

City

Phone(_


SMy check is enclosed, payable to Charlotte County Homeless Coalition.
J Please charge my credit card: J MasterCard J VISA J Discover J American Express


Account No.


Exp. Date


Signature
This gift is J in Memory of J in Honor of

Please notify of my gift: Name
Address C


CVC Billing Zip_


State


AA13 SUN1 Registration #CH2328 Charlotte County Homeless Coalition is a nonprofit, charitable organization classified as a 50 (c)3 by the IRS Gifts are taxdeductible


post, especially during
the holidays, is a place
members can count on
to provide a home away
from home. Herlin was
one of the organizers
of the fundraiser that
helped the Cotte family,
and said there was no
place he'd rather be on
Christmas Day.
"It's a place for people
to eat, relax, be around
friends and enjoy
themselves," Herlin said
of the post. "A lot of
these people don't have
families here."
Email: dwinchester@sun-heraldx.com


1-75
FROM PAGE 1
from River Road to U.S.
41 through North Port
during the closure,
according to Parks, using
the Sumter Boulevard exit
as an access point to the
interstate.
FDOT crews will be
pouring a concrete
sidewall on the Ponce De
Leon Boulevard bridge,
which is the final stage of
the rebuild process. Once
complete, Parks said the
overpass should be re-
opened by Saturday, and
should make the North
Port Estates community
more easily accessible for
residents.
The overpass has been
shut down since Dec. 18,
after North Miami man
Bonnie Ramsingh, 56,
reportedly struck it in
a dump truck he was
driving with the bed
extended, and fled the
scene.
The southbound lanes
of the interstate were
closed from River Road
to Sumter a nine-mile
stretch for 13 hours
following the crash. The
section was also shut
down three other times
overnight for repair work.
Ramsingh was released
Friday from the Sarasota
County Jail on $620 bond,
after being charged with
fleeing the scene of the
crash and driving without
a license.
Ramsingh works for a
trucking company that's
a subcontractor for the
current 1-75 widening
project in the area,
according to the FDOT.
That company couldn't
be reached for comment
about why Ramsingh was
allowed to work without a
driver's license, and FDOT
officials could not provide
the name of the company.
Email: dwinchester@sun-herald.com





:The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 11


WISHES
FROM PAGE 1

things that put smiles on
many veterans' faces.
Eighty-year-old Vivian
Poller was a recipient of
one of those gestures.
As a young Navy nurse,
Poller had a boyfriend
who would take her for
rides on his motorcycle.
She remembered once,
while in nurse training,
being reprimanded by
the head nurse who
disapproved of Poller's
joyrides.
"She said to me,
'Young ladies don't ride





SUN PHOTOS BY
BRENDA BARBOSA
Residents of the Douglas
T. Jacobson State Veterans
Nursing Home in Port
Charlotte are joined by
Santa's pal, Paul Gagnon, and
members of the Patriot Riders
of America Charlotte County
chapter. Tuesday, the Patriot
Riders dropped off four slot
machines, early Christmas
presents the residents will
use during"Casino Nights" at
the home.


ECONOMY
FROM PAGE 1

the association's presi-
dent and a Realtor with
Coldwell Banker Morris
Realty in Punta Gorda.
Meanwhile, town-
houses and condos
contributed to the good
news, with closed sales
jumping 15 percent in
November from a year
ago, although the medi-
an sales price, much like
in 2012, hovered around
the $100,000 level.
In Sarasota County,
the median sales price
continued to climb com-
pared to year-over-year
numbers, according to
the Sarasota Association
of Realtors. Single-
family-home prices
were up 20 percent, at
$187,000 this November,
compared with $155,000
last year; while condo
prices dipped slightly
from the previous year
to $157,750.
Total property sales
in Sarasota County saw
large year-over-year
increases over the
summer months, then
tapered off.
In North Port, permits
and inspections have in-
creased so dramatically,
the city has had to hire
more part- and full-time
employees to handle the
workload.
In 2012, there were
4,415 permits for new
homes and commercial
buildings. Permits also
include remodeling and
additions to homes and
businesses.
"There was an increase
of nearly 600 permit
applications as of Dec.
23 of this year," said city
Building Official Bryan
Holland. "There were
4,981 so far this calendar
year."
There were 13,272
inspections in 2012,
compared with 17,651
as of Dec. 23 this year.
North Port residents
must get inspections
for everything from
changing out a hot water
heater to installing a
pool. Inspections also
include mechanical,
electrical, plumbing, etc.
"That was an increase
of nearly of nearly 4,400
inspections," Holland
said. "We had predicted
in 2013 there would be
about 5,000 more inspec-
tions over last year."
Providing still more
optimism in Southwest
Florida was the dramatic


on motorcycles,'" Poller
recalled the head nurse
saying. "And I said, 'Yes
they do. I just got off
one.'"
Last year, Poller, one
of just a handful of
female veterans at the
nursing home, asked for
permission to ride on the
back of one of the Patriot
Riders motorcycles. It
was a request the group
- and the nursing home
- gladly granted.
"Oh, it was wonderful,"
Poller said cheerfully. "I
loved it."
Longtime volunteer
Lee Paquin, 93, of Port
Charlotte, said the
veterans look forward to


decline in foreclosure
filings, which are about
half the number from the
same period a year ago.
New foreclosure
filings for Sarasota and
Charlotte counties
totaled 276 last month,
a 47 percent fall from
the 525 reported in
November 2012.
Meanwhile, the
commercial real estate
market continued to
plod along, waiting for
its recovery to take hold.
On the unem-
ployment front, the
state Department of
Economic Opportunity
reported that Charlotte,
Sarasota and DeSoto
counties all showed im-
provement in November


Patriot Riders David Obermier and Phil Pauley are joined by
Santa's good friend Paul Gagnon Tuesday as they deliver one of
four slot machines for Christmas.


seeing the Patriot Riders
each week.
"They are great," he
said. "That's the best


from the same time last
year.
Charlotte's unem-
ployment has fallen
steadily from 8.2 percent
in November 2012 to
6.3 percent last month,
the DEO reports.
Similarly, Sarasota
and DeSoto counties
saw a decrease in the
unemployment rate. In
Sarasota, unemployment
fell to 6.1 percent in
November, from an
8.0 percent jobless rate
the year before.
In DeSoto County,
unemployment fell from
9.1 percent to 7.2 per-
cent during the same
period.
Overall, the region
fared better than the


VI \IFA FklI r


THIS SAT/SUN/MON ONLY!'
NEW Pianos from $2 00''
NEW Grand Pianos from $5600!
NEW Player Grands from $9200!
NEW Digitals from $ 5 0(0'
Used Balwins/Yamahas from $1000!
Used Pianos from $250!
Used Grands from $800!


thing they can do for the
people. It keeps them
young."
Email: bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


state and the nation,
which reported season-
ally adjusted unemploy-
ment rates in November
of 6.4 percent and
7.0 percent, respectively.
Florida's rate of
6.4 percent was the
lowest since July 2008.
North Port Community
News Editor Elaine
Allen-Emrich coniut, ihi-
ed to this report.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


-dfR w -' IWmAA
Military veteran Ben Greer, right, stands with Patriot Rider
David Obermier, enjoying one of four slot machines donated to
the residents veterans home.


From left, Donald Pamerleau, David Obermier, Phil Pauley and
Edgar "JR" Hernandez of the Patriot Riders of America, Charlotte
County chapter, unload one of four Christmas gifts donated to
the residents of the Douglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Nursing
Home in Port Charlotte. The residents asked for slot machines
for Christmas to play during "Casino Nights" in the nursing
home's activity room.





DIVORCE/FAMILY LAW


1IOD
15-Month Certificate of Deposit


i: I:



~


Gulf of Mexico


Cl Bank


Member FOIC "

,, t r. I.... I -_h1 .. -. h m. .. .... I l J i i ,w i i [. -1 1 I 1 h i b l
withdrawn atany time.


Y~ WAI- ilK-II n
IQUDTO


Clog


0^






:Our Town Page 12 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun IThursday, December 26, 2013


Let the 'Light' shine


SUN PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES


The Rev. Mike Loomis opens the candlelight ceremony Christmas Eve at First United Meth-
odist Church of Punta Gorda.


SUN PHOTOS BY DALLAS EMRICH
Donna Lussier attends the Freedom Bible Church ceremony with her granddaughter, Stephanie,
7, who goes to Community Christian School in Port Charlotte.


The congregation of the First United Methodist Church of Punta Gorda stands and raises
their candles and their voices in song.


Andy Peden,
Michelle
Jamieson, and
Wayne and
Sabrina Alexander
stand with their
lighted candles
and sing Christmas
songs during First
UMC's candlelight
service Christmas
Eve.


I NMembers and guests of Freedom Bible Church
who on Tuesday night filled the venue, the
One-year-old Ashlyn Antoine makes a funny Cultural Center of Charlotte County in Port
face after the Christmas Eve service was over Charlotte light their candles during the
Tuesday night. Christmas Eve service as they sing Silent Night.


Pianist Shawn Mullen plays a medley of Christmas carols Christmas Eve at First United Meth-
odist Church of Punta Gorda.


After lighting
the Christ
candle, Ron
and Lisa
Dougherty
read a
scripture
and lead the
congregation
in prayer at
First United
Methodist.


Mission honors its 'founder' on his birthday .


SUN PHOTOS BY
BRENDA BARBOSA

Volunteers Sushila Cherian,
Amanda Maltby and Chad
Maltby prepare meals for the
homeless on Christmas Day at
the Bread of Life mission in
Punta Gorda. The mission will
distribute more than 3,000
meals across four counties
during the holiday. More
than 50 volunteers donated
their time to help prepare,
cook, package, serve and
distribute meals. Volunteers
are welcome every day, from
morning to night.


Bread of Life mission president Judy Jones and volunteers prep
holiday meals for the homeless on Christmas Day, Wednesday.


:OurTown Page 12 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE


Calif. girl's family
spends holiday
at hospital


The family of a 13-year-old
Northern California girl
declared brain dead after
suffering complications
following a tonsillectomy was
trying to give the girl as normal
a Christmas as possible.
Page 2 -





Snowden says spying
worse than Orwellian


Edward Snowden invoked
George Orwell and warned
of the dangers of unchecked
government surveillance
Wednesday in a televised
Christmas message to the
British people.

Page 3 -




Leaders betting lots
on SunRail launch


Central Florida will embark
this spring on one of its largest
mass transportation experi-
ments when service begins on
the first 32-mile phase of the
$1.2 billion SunRail commuter
train.
Page 3 -




Bombings in Iraq's
capital Kill 37


Militants in Iraq targeted
Christians in three separate
Christmas Day bombings
in Baghdad, killing at least
37 people, officials said
Wednesday.

Page 5 -





Iran officials threaten
nuclear speed-up


More than a third of Iran's
parliament has signed on to a
bill ordering an acceleration of
the country's nuclear program
if the U.S. Congress follows
through with new sanctions.

Page 6 -


I 'II III~ II IIIII







h e^ W i r e www.sunnewspapers.net
THURSDAY DECEMBER 26, 2013




Cold and dark up North


More than half-million homes powerless after ice storm


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LITCHFIELD, Maine
- Utility crews from
Maine to Michigan and
into Canada worked
Wednesday to restore
power to the more than
half a million homes
in the U.S. and Canada
that were left in the dark
by last weekend's ice
storm and people slowly
trickled out of shelters
to spend Christmas Day
at their finally warm
homes.
But not everyone
was so lucky, including
AshleyWalter, who
was forced to spend
Christmas at a shelter
set up in a school in


Litchfield, Maine, with
her husband, Jacob, and
their month-old daugh-
ter, Leah.
The family lost power
Saturday, got it back
temporarily then lost it
again Sunday and have
been without since.
Ashley, 27, and Leah
stay warm at the shelter
while Jacob makes
frequent trips home to
check on their cats and
water pipes.
"It's definitely kind
of strange but we're
hanging in there," she
said Wednesday of the
challenge of being forced
out of their home at
Christmas. "We did our
Christmas together last


night. I packed little
stockings and gave them
to my husband, sisters
and my daughter."
The frigid tempera-
tures that cloaked a
region from the Great
Lakes to New England
meant that ice remained
on power lines and
limbs. Officials worried
that wind gusts of more
than 20 mph could bring
down more branches
and that 2 to 6 inches
of snow in places on
Thursday would hamper
line crews trying to get to
remote spots.
"We've had two
beautiful, sunny days in


AP PHOTO
Dave Dora, a lineman from Grand Haven Board of Light and
Power, works on connecting fallen wires on Macon Avenue in
Lansing, Mich., Monday. From Michigan to Maine, hundreds
of thousands remain without power days after a massive ice
storm blacked out homes and businesses in the Great Lakes


Christmas wish: A better world

By FRANCES D'EMILIO
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
VATICAN CITY- Pope
Francis offered Christmas
wishes Wednesday for a
better world, praying for
protection for Christians
under attack, battered
women and trafficked
children, peace in the
Middle East and Africa,
and dignity for refugees
fleeing misery and conflict
around the globe.
Francis delivered the ......,..
traditional "Urbi et Orbi" ..........
(Latin for "to the city and
to the world") speech from
the central balcony of St.
Peter's Basilica to more
than 70,000 cheering tour-
ists, pilgrims and Romans
in the square below.
In his first Christmas
message since being
elected pontiff in March, '
he asked for all to share
in the song of Christmas
angels, "for every man or
woman ... who hopes for a AP PHOTO
better world, who cares for Pope Francis carries a statue of baby Jesus as he celebrates the Christmas Eve Mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the
CHRISTMAS 14 Vatican, Tuesday.



First-class stamps to cost 49 cents


By BRADLEY KLAPPER
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
WASHINGTON Mailing a
letter is about to get a little more
expensive.
Regulators on Tuesday ap-
proved a temporary price hike
of 3 cents for a first-class stamp,
bringing the charge to 49 cents
a letter in an effort to help the
Postal Service recover from severe
mail decreases brought on by the
2008 economic downturn.
Many consumers won't feel
the price increase immediately.
Forever stamps, good for first-
class postage whatever the future
rate, can be purchased at the
lower price until the new rate is


effective Jan. 26.
The higher rate will last no
more than two years, allowing
the Postal Service to recoup
$2.8 billion in losses. By a 2-1
vote, the independent Postal
Regulatory Commission rejected
a request to make the price hike
permanent, though inflation over
the next 24 months may make it so.
The surcharge "will last just
long enough to recover the loss,"
Commission Chairman RuthY.
Goldway said.
Bulk mail, periodicals and
package service rates will rise
6 percent, a decision that drew
immediate consternation from

STAMPS 14


AP FILE PHOTO


This Feb. 7 photo shows packages waiting to be sorted in a Post
Office in Atlanta. Regulators on Tuesday approved a price hike
of 3 cents for a first-class stamp, bringing the charge to 49 cents
a letter.


Egypt declares Muslim Brotherhood terrorists


By MAGGIE MICHAEL
and SARAH EL DEEB
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
CAIRO Egypt's military-
backed interim govern-
ment declared the Muslim
Brotherhood a terrorist organi-
zation Wednesday, intensifying
its campaign of arrests and
prosecutions targeting its
members and tightening the
noose on the group's network
of charities and businesses.
The unprecedented ex-
ecutive decision likely ends
any chance of reconciliation
between the government and
the 85-year-old Brotherhood,
still Egypt's most organized


political group. It marks a
stunning reversal of fortunes
for the long-outlawed orga-
nization that saw member
Mohammed Morsi reach
Egypt's highest office in the
country's first democratic
election, only to be ousted in
a popularly backed military
coup in July. And it takes a step
that not even autocrat Hosni
Mubarak took in his nearly
30-year rule.
Hossam Eissa, deputy
prime minister and minister
of higher education, read the
government's declaration,
saying the decision was in
response to Tuesday's deadly
bombing in the Nile Delta city


of Mansoura which killed 16
people and wounded more
than 100. It was the deadliest
militant bombing since Morsi's
ouster and showed growing
reach of the country's Islamic
insurgency, previously concen-
trated in the northern Sinai.
Although Eissa and the
government offered no proof
of the Brotherhood's involve-
ment, the accusation instilled
in the public mind the image
of the group as being behind
the surge in violent attacks.
The Brotherhood has
denied being responsible for
the Mansoura attack. Earlier
Wednesday, an al-Qaida-in-
spired group called Ansar Beit


al-Maqdis, or the Champions
of Jerusalem, said it was
behind the suicide bombing
to avenge the "shedding of
innocent Muslim blood" at
the hands of Egypt's "apostate
regime" a reference to the
security forces' crackdown on
Islamists following the coup.
Brotherhood members dis-
missed the government label
Wednesday, promising their
near-daily protests against
Morsi's ouster would continue.
"The protests are in the
streets despite a law restricting
them and killings and
prison sentences. All this has
EGYPT|4


COLD 14 and Northeast.





Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


Calif. girl's family spends holiday at hospital


OAKLAND, Calif.
(AP) -The family of a
13-year-old Northern
California girl declared
brain dead after suffering
complications following
a tonsillectomy was
trying to give the girl as
normal a Christmas as
possible, with a tree and
presents in her hospital
room, her uncle said.
The family of Jahi
McMath will wait until
Thursday to discuss a
possible appeal of a
judge's decision allowing
a hospital to remove her
from life support, said
Omari Sealey, the girl's
uncle.
They planned to
spend Christmas Day
at Children's Hospital
Oakland and had set up
a Christmas tree in Jahi's
room with presents for
her and her siblings. The
family normally gathers
at Jahi's grandmother's
house, where they share
food and play dominos
and cards, Sealey said.
"We're going to
discuss our opportunities
tomorrow. Today we are
going to keep as regular
as possible," Sealey said.
"We still got five days


Quinton Reynolds, of Emeryville, wears a purple cape as he holds his daughter Qniya
Reynolds, 4, as he gathers with others outside of Children's Hospital Oakland in supp
McMath in Oakland, Calif., on Monday. McMath was declared brain dead after expert
complications following a tonsillectomy at the hospital.


for a miracle. We are still
hopeful."
Alameda County
Superior Court Judge
Evelio Grillo ruled on
Tuesday that the hospital
could remove Jahi from
the ventilator keeping
her body functioning,
but gave the family until
5 p.m. on Dec. 30 to file


an appeal. Until then, she
will stay on life support.
The family has not
decided if they will keep
fighting.
Jahi's family has said
they believes Jahi is still
alive, and that the hos-
pital should not remove
her from the ventilator
without their permission.


The teen suffer
arrest after blee
profusely follow


I


argued that the teen had
no chance of recovery
AP PHOTO since all brain function
had ceased.
a "Our sincere hope
ort of Jahi is that the family finds
fencing peace and can come to
grips with the judge's de-
ed cardiac cision," hospital attorney
ding Doug Strauss said outside
ving her court after Grillo's ruling.


operation this month.
The family has said
that as long as the teen is
breathing, there is hope
of recovery.
Grillo based his
decision on the conclu-
sions of two doctors,


The case is now out
of Grillo's court and the
decision will be up to
the California Court
of Appeal if the family
decides to pursue its
legal case to keep Jahi on
the ventilator.


Another defeat for Utah on gay marriage


SALT LAKE CITY (AP)
-A federal appeals court
has refused yet again
to stop gay marriage in
Utah, making it more
likely that same-sex wed-
dings in the home of the
Mormon church are here
to stay for the immediate
future.
The 10th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals' rejec-
tion of Utah's request for
an emergency order to
put gay marriage on hold
marked yet another legal
setback for the state. Utah
lawyers have repeatedly
struck out in their bid
to block gay marriage,
getting rejected on four
occasions in recent days.
Utah's last chance to
temporarily stop the
marriages would be a
long-shot request before
the U.S. Supreme Court.
That's what the Utah
attorney general's office
is prepared to do, spokes-
man Ryan Bruckman
said. Gov. Gary Herbert's
office declined to com-
ment on the decision.
"We're disappointed
in the ruling, but we just
have to take it to the next


level," Bruckman said.
Carl Tobias, a consti-
tutional law professor
at Virginia's University
of Richmond who has
tracked legal battles for
gay marriage, said he
expects the U.S. Supreme
Court to make a decision
by Friday. He thinks
Utah faces long odds to
get their stay granted,
considering two courts
have already rejected it
and marriages have been
going on for days now.
"The longer this goes
on, the less likely it
becomes that any court is
going to entertain a stay,"
Tobias said.
Judge Robert J.
Shelby's decision last
week to strike down a
2004 voter-approved
gay marriage ban sent
gay couples rushing to
county clerk offices to get
marriage licenses. About
700 gay couples have
obtained licenses since
Friday, with most of the
activity in Salt Lake City.
The frenzy has put
Utah at the center of
the national debate on
gay marriage given the


Dan Trujillo, left, and Clyde Peck get married as about 1,500
people gather to show support of marriage equality after
a federal judge declined to stay his ruling that legalized
same-sex marriage in Utah, at Washington Square, just
outside of the Salt Lake City and County Building Monday, in
Salt Lake City.


state's long-standing
opposition to same-
sex weddings and its
position as headquarters
for the Mormon church.
It made Utah the 18th
state where gay couples
can wed or will soon be
able to marry.
The appeals court said
in its short ruling Tuesday
that a decision to put gay
marriage on hold was not
warranted, but said it put
the case on the fast track


for a full appeal of the
ruling.
One of the couples who
brought the case, Moudi
Sbeity and Derek Kitchen,
were driving home from
the grocery store when
their attorney called with
the news. Sbeity said it's
wonderful that multiple
levels of courts are mak-
ing it clear that there's no
room for discrimination.
"It seems like we win
over and over again. This


is crazy," Sbeity said.
"This has been the best
Christmas gift ever."
Shelby's ruling has
created a confusing set of
circumstances for county
clerks, same-sex couples
and state officials as they
wait on an appeals court
to bring some clarity to
the issue.
Some county clerks
were refusing to issue
marriage licenses to gay
couples, even though
they could face legal
consequences.
The Utah attorney
general's office warned
counties they could be
held in contempt of
federal court if they refuse
to issue the licenses.
In the meantime, state
agencies have begun
trying to sort out how the
gay marriages may affect
state services.
Herbert's office sent a
letter to state agencies
Tuesday afternoon
advising them to comply
with the judge's ruling or
consult the Utah attorney
general's office if the
ruling conflicts with other
laws or rules.


LONDON
(Washington Post)
- National Security
Agency whistleblower
Edward Snowden
invoked George Orwell
and warned of the
dangers of unchecked


government surveil-
lance Wednesday in
a televised Christmas
message to the British
people that reflected
his growing willingness
to take a public role in
the debate he ignited.


SPCILI ING INIMPANS& EIODONTIC




A ~ Eerenis





WilliamLa.eMcGenzieeJa.,



Scalging &Ro


Speaking directly
into the camera from
Moscow, where he took
refuge after leaking
vast troves of informa-
tion on NSA spying,
Snowden said gov-
ernment surveillance
methods far surpass
those described in
Orwell's dystopic novel
"1984."
"The types of col-
lection in the book
- microphones and
video cameras, TVs that
watch us are nothing
compared to what we
have available today.
We have sensors in
our pockets that track
us everywhere we go,"
he said. "Think about
what this means for the
privacy of the average
person."
The brief video
marked Snowden's first


television appearance
since he fled possible
prosecu-
asi tion in the
United
States and
arrived in
cMoscow
in June. It
came days
SNOWDENafter The
Washington Post
published an extensive
account of Snowden's
comments during
more than 14 hours of
interviews.
Revelations from
documents leaked by
Snowden first appeared
in June in The Post and
in Britain's Guardian
newspaper, and have
continued to emerge in
the months since.
In The Post interview,
Snowden said he had


I Pei e i 0i !Il"i[Lse u ?Srger dPoidWer


succeeded in spawning
the debate he sought
by bringing the extent
of surveillance by the
U.S. and British govern-
ments to light.
"The mission's already
accomplished," he said. "I
already won. As soon as
the journalists were able
to work, everything that
I had been trying to do
was validated. Because,
remember, I didn't want
to change society. I
wanted to give society a
chance to determine if it
should change itself."
Snowden echoed those
sentiments Wednesday,
saying he sees an
opportunity to "find a
better balance, end mass
surveillance and remind
the government that if it
really wants to know how
we feel, asking is always
cheaper than spying."
Snowden, a 30-year-
old former NSA
contractor, has been
condemned by au-
thorities in the United
States and Britain for
jeopardizing security
on both sides of the
Atlantic by divulging
vital information about
programs used to spy
on hostile governments
and would-be terrorists.


court-appointed Dr.
Paul Fisher of Stanford
University and the
hospital's Dr. Robin
Shanahan.
Fisher examined the
girl for several hours
on Monday and report-
ed to the judge Tuesday
that the teen was
brain dead, the same
conclusion Shanahan
reached.
Grillo said he had no
other choice but to allow
the hospital to remove
the ventilator.
"I wish I could fix it,
but I can't," he said.
The hospital had


to get in touch with a
nonprofit to help him find
a therapist, and work or
vocational school.
McCollum, 49, had the
subway map memorized
by the time he was 8, and
tried unsuccessfully to get a
job with the transit system.
Instead he became a transit
impostor and has been
arrested 29 times.


Snowden says spying worse than Orwellian


I=


I NATION

Housing sales rise
to highest level
since 2008
WASHINGTON
(Washington Post) -
Pent-up demand for
housing continues to lift
new-home sales figures to
their highest levels since
2008, according to new
monthly figures released
Tuesday by the Commerce
Department.
New-home sales in
November hit an annual-
ized rate of 464,000, which
is 16.6 percent higher
than a year ago. The figure
slipped 2.1 percent from
October, but the rate of
sales is still just below a
five-year high.
Although the housing
market still has a long way
to go to make a full recov-
ery, analysts said the latest
numbers point to positive
trends that are likely to
pick up more steam in
the new year, helping to
buttress the U.S. economy
even further as it slowly
picks up momentum.

Influential jazz
musician Yusef
Lateef dies
(Washington Post) -
Yusef Lateef, a Grammy
Award-winning musical
explorer who played many
exotic instruments and was
among the first to combine
jazz with elements of what
became known as "world
music," died Monday at his
home in Shutesbury, Mass.
He was 93.
His wife, Ayesha Lateef,
confirmed
the death to
the Detroit
Free Press.
The cause
was not
immediately
disclosed.
LATEEF Lateef be-
gan his career
as a saxophonist in swing
bands in the 1930s and
had a career that lasted 75
years. A man of boundless
musical and intellectual
curiosity, he found inspira-
tion in the musical motifs
of Asia and Africa as early
as the 1950s.
He was one of the first
jazz musicians to popular-
ize the flute, and he soon
added the oboe, bassoon
and various other wood-
wind instruments from
around the world to his
performances.

NYC transit
impostor released
from jail

NEWYORK (AP) -A
man arrested more than
two dozen times for posing
as a transit worker to steal
buses and trains in New
York City and drive the
routes has been paroled.
Darius McCollum was
released Tuesday night, after
pleading guilty earlier this
year to stealing a Trailways
bus in 2010, when he was
arrested behind the wheel
on the highway that leads
to Kennedy International
Airport.
He had faced up to
15 years if convicted at
a trial, but the Queens
district attorney and his
lawyer worked out a deal:
McCollum will volun-
tarily enter a program
to undergo cognitive
behavioral therapy. He
was diagnosed with what
was until recently called
Asperger's syndrome but
is now referred to as an
autism spectrum disorder,
and his repeated arrests
stem in part from it.
He told The Associated
Press Wednesday he plans





SThe Sun/Thursday, December 26, 2013


STATE NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 3


Leaders betting lots on upcoming SunRail launch


ORLANDO (AP)-
Central Florida will
embark this spring on
one of its largest mass
transportation experi-
ments when service be-
gins on the first 32-mile
phase of the $1.2 billion
SunRail commuter train,
an effort to ease night-
marish traffic and protect
the region's long-term
economic health.
Currently, tens of thou-
sands of commuters and
tourists cram a few main
highways and roads in
the popular, fast-growing
area. The first phase
-12 stations from
Debary in Volusia County
through downtown
Orlando to Sand Lake
Road in Orange County


- will be the ultimate
viability test case for an
area that has never had
this kind of transporta-
tion alternative before.
And with promised
federal money for the
second phase suspended
in Washington budget
limbo, the success or
failure of SunRail's initial
stage will garner an even
brighter spotlight.
"This is a dramatic
evolution step for central
Florida. It's the first
time we're building a
fixed transit system a
regional one with the
ability of being able to
connect into high-speed
(rail)," said U.S. Rep.
John Mica, a Republican
from Winter Park


and a member of the
House Transportation
Committee.
Florida Gov. Rick
Scott rejected more
than $2 billion in federal
high-speed rail funding
in 2011 that would have
connected Tampa and
Orlando. But after some
hesitation, he eventually
approved a deal that
opened construction
for SunRail after being
sold on its jobs creation
benefits and potential
to reduce congestion on
Interstate 4, the region's
main east-west highway.
But now federal budget
cuts have cast at least
some doubt on whether
another $80 million in
funding will be there for


I HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE STATE


Teen shot by
police after
high-speed chase
PENSACOLA (AP)
Police in Florida's
Panhandle say officers
fatally shot a teenager
who led them on a high-
speed chase.
Police tell the Pensacola
News Journal that officers
spotted 17-year-old
William Goodman of Gulf
Breeze driving recklessly
and pursued him.
Officers caught up to
Goodman early Tuesday
at an intersection, where
the teen allegedly tried
ramming his Corvette
into their cars.
Police say Officer
Chad Willhite fired into
Goodman's car after
another officer's leg was
run over in an attempt to
detain the teen.
Goodman died at a
hospital. A police spokes-
woman says the officer
with the injured leg was
treated at a hospital.
Willhite is on paid
administrative leave
pending an investigation.
Goodman was charged
in the death of a pedestri-
an in March. He was due
in court next month.

Panther kills small
dog in southwest
Florida

NAPLES (AP) -Wildlife
officials say a Florida
panther attacked and
killed a small dog in
southwest Florida.
Nickie Koch tells
WBBH-TV that he heard
a strange noise outside
his Collier County garage
Sunday night. Then he
heard whimpering from
his Chihuahua named
Buddy.
Koch says he went out-
side and saw the panther
with Buddy in its mnuth
I 111 .111.[%.- k I, I N i V 'l III
ItlIs ,| h'I\ -r '. liil-ls


\iit~ hl,~i',i ,.'' i~ii l-.i t
Ih,' i I.inh. h1,I.l tIIII .[S
l \b' l,.lln l. nlllh Ih.ll'- s,|\ .l

II, Ii II, .I II il-11.11' i

-). l ll Il'll I lt i 'l I I.



reporting ll DUii~ is/i
I\ll hl'u hlll-| i l l \l lll V
* .. l ,. h Ih, ,.IM~i n..|ts| ,.I,.

I. A11 I l
N'ri lil l i i IiI, i .i \I ,I
h ull h,'! h III .Vlls i ,.I ,,' >||








I.i d .t. I'll'\" .i h~ih. I II
In>.i ,ll>.l~l .lll ,Ih.l p.l, ,,lil

[i. l hII I. n %k -.
l\ k I Ill,[ pi-Is Il l


Program
gives $100 for
reporting DUIs
\\l. |,1 I'.\1. *I1 I .. t II
i.\[' I- A. pliii, .I it l n I
I'.ihn ..i,.h I ( ,Iilnl\ pi,-
V 1.h'-s | \. ,lI.s >| '1 Ill Ill
p ," Ipl,' k% hIll 'I'1,1), 11 ,.11tLink,
1.11 INi Il\sI 1 11 '%.1) '111- rllil ll
I. lv.I .I.M In ....,l| p.nhk.
I h11 % h.l Iv ( 1 Llln. [ lS N s
I'.ihin Ir..i,.hi ( tlll s,.i\s
Ih .ll ,Mlh.l I.\,., pli^, ,.mlu
sIpI | t,[\ ,' li i,., i'n ,lll
-,'l-SI nn,'l ,11 i,'-I p'i i|pl,.

k% h llh. ln|'l, .l
lh,.r I'.ilin Il..i,.hl I',,,I
i,: 'p ,,i i|hl i l .li, ,II I-liM- .i .


the $100 Mobile Eyes
reward this year.
To qualify, the person
reporting the impaired
driver must ask that the
911 call be coded as a
Mobile Eyes call. The
officer must make an
arrest after validating that
the individual is a DUI
offender.
Officials say the
money for the rewards
mostly come from police
agencies and corporate
donations.
The program is year-
round but authorities
want to emphasize its
importance during the
holiday season.

US Coast Guard
calls off search
for 6 Cubans
MIAMI (AP) Coast
Guard officials have

Iml - 11 IIi,.i i .i .h n .t i N\ .iI
[h 'l\\ r'rll lib' I ), mn ltih. ,Ill



Ii ii[ lllr .. I ( II. I
( ill,llcd -IIh'lnn'll
\\n'th-.li\..|i\ ,1I.itnll







f II, I V'Alt.ll 1 h I' 1 I l.lllV



I, ll i ll III. Ill il lih

lExperts set to) >.lI.





discuss Goliath
grouper ban
1 .i, t III 1 11. 1 I 1 kl. ll .111
IllI, N .illh .1 Ih
I'l .uM II i nll -11
1t'-cll,llV i'Vlr'll'llll.. llh'lll

I )i in illlh..,lll l .Iib|lll .ll>. 11.
In1h1 lllr ullI I'.i,,.i,.4,

Experts set to
discuss Goliath
grouper ban

KI.Y I_\1{(,O ) .\1'i --
li,'._tlllll,l |n, ,,-'nl Ihln._ll:- I,,|
-( '.h'-II H >lllr h.li t.lh'l-lr
t\ r III ,' .11-,. u --,' l 11. 11\ll l
up. llll,.. i.i iIhll'lh.l' III.1
lll' I I,,ll1.1,1 K,'\-


State and federal fishery
experts are set to meet
early next month in Key
Largo to consider stream-
lining the regulations for
fishing in South Florida.
"If you drive down
U.S. 1 in the Keys, you
might legally catch a
snapper on one side of
a bridge," said Robert
Mahood, executive
director of the federal
South Atlantic Fishery
Management Council.
"But if you take it across
the road to your car, you
may be breaking the law."
An update on Goliath
grouper populations is
expected at the meeting.
A ban on harvesting
Goliath grouper has
been on the books since
1990, but fishermen
say its population has
rebounded.


the on-time construc-
tion of Phase 2, which
will extend the rail line
farther north into Volusia
County and south
into Osceola County.
When completed, it
would stretch the rail to
17 stations and 62 miles.
Construction for
the next phase was
scheduled to begin next
summer, but there are
currently no guarantees
SunRail will be included
in the 2014 federal
transportation budget.
It's caused lobbying
efforts to intensify locally
and in Washington, with


opinions differing about
what will happen.
"I know a lot of local
business leaders went to
D.C. to make the point
about trying to make
sure to continue to help
build it, and get the mo-
mentum going," Florida
Transportation Secretary
Ananth Prasad said. "I
think ultimately that's
needed. We need that
federal budget certainty
... and I know everybody
is working hard to get
there."
U.S. Rep. Corrine
Brown, a Democrat who
serves alongside Mica


on the transportation
committee, said in a
statement last month
that not having a 2014
transportation budget
and the potential for an
additional $100 million
in cuts next year "has
brought a high level
of uncertainty and a
limitation on the abil-
ity to fund new transit
projects."
But she added she
had spoken to Federal
Transit Administrator
Peter Rogoff about
SunRail's importance and
would also reach out to
President Barack Obama.


See what experts and readers have selected
as the best of 2013 in 8 different categories,
from vacation spots to BBQ competitions.


/"- Three times a week, every

1Tuesday, Thursday & Friday

Doors open at 1OAM Gamines start at 11 AM
1 cpev. .hri.stimcls vIe AND' New years EVel

Port Charlotte Elks Lodge#2153 I
20225 Kenilworth Blvd, Port Charlotte
,,,i_ '. _t i,,' I?, <-l ._, t.,.*. t_, '^ ^ ~ ^ '^

For information, call (941) 627-4313 ext. 109 i
or email us at j_. I
Bingo@cchomelesscoalition.org. N---- ,. .....


AP PHOTO


Surfing Santa

In this Tuesday photo, a young surfing Santa Claus hits
the waves during the fourth annual "surfing Santas"
event in Cocoa Beach, Fla. Organizer George Trosset said
he may move the holiday event to downtown Cocoa Beach
next year to accommodate growing crowds. He started
the tradition in 2009 with a few family members after
seeing a television commercial featuring people surfing
in Santa Claus attire.






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 26, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE


COLD

FROM PAGE 1

Maine and the ice isn't go-
ing anyplace," said Lynette
Miller, spokeswoman for
the Maine Emergency
Management Agency.
"They're very concerned
about more weight com-
ing down on trees that are
already compromised by
ice."
The ice storm last week-
end was one of the worst
to hit during a Christmas
week and repair crews
were working around the
clock to restore service.
States that weren't hit were
sending crews to help.
So far, authorities blame
the storm for 27 deaths;
17 in the U.S. and 10 in
Canada. Five people in
Canada died from carbon
monoxide poisoning from
emergency generators
powering their homes,
while two people in
Michigan, a man in Maine
and a man in Vermont
also died from the poison-
ous fumes.
In Michigan, police say
a 73-year-old woman died
Christmas Eve when she
ran a stop light that was
out of service because of
the ice storm.
About 156,000 homes



CHRISTMAS

FROM PAGE 1

others, "humbly.
Among places ravaged
by conflict, Francis singled
out Syria, which saw its
third Christmas during
civil war; South Sudan; the
Central African Republic;
Nigeria; and Iraq.
In Iraq on Wednesday,
militants targeted
Christians in two attacks,
including a bomb that
exploded near a church
during Christmas Mass
in Baghdad. The separate
bombings killed dozens
of people.
The Vatican has been
trying to raise concern in
the world for persecution
and attacks on Christians
in parts of the Middle
East and Africa.
"Lord of life, protect
all who are persecuted in
your name," Francis said.
Adding an off-the-cuff
remark, Francis said he
was also inviting non-be-
lievers to join their desire
for peace with everyone
else.
The pope also prayed
that God "bless the land
where you chose to come
into the world and grant
a favorable outcome to
the peace talks between



STAMPS

FROM PAGE 1

the mail industry. Its
groups have opposed any
price increase beyond
the current 1.7 percent
rate of inflation, saying
charities using mass
mailings and bookstores
competing with online
retailer Amazon would
be among those who
suffer. Greeting card
companies also have
criticized the plans.
"This is a counterpro-
ductive decision," said
Mary G. Berner, presi-
dent of the Association



EGYPT
FROM PAGE 1

not changed the will of
the people," said Ibrahim
Elsayed, member of the
Brotherhood's political


group, the Freedom
and Justice Party. "The
decision has no value for
us and is only worth the
paper it is written on."
Another member,
Islam Tawfiq, said the
Brotherhood is consider-
ing whether to challenge
the declaration in courts


Ah- PHMUIU
Trees frozen in ice cripple a section of power lines on Maplehurst Drive in Belgrade, Maine, Tuesday. From Michigan to Maine,
hundreds of thousands remain without power days after a massive ice storm which one utility called the largest Christmas-
week storm in its history blacked out homes and businesses in the Great Lakes and Northeast.


were still without power
Wednesday evening in
Michigan, down from
more than 500,000 at the
storm's peak.
In Canada, about
160,000 customers
were without power
Wednesday evening.
There were 72,000
customers without power
in Toronto, down from
300,000 at the height of


the outages, and Mayor
Rob Ford said some may
not have power restored
until the weekend.
Back in Maine, Trudy
Lamoreau was supervising
the emergency shelter
where about 25 people
stayed Tuesday night.
Lamoreau, who's also
the town manager, said
they warmed the shelter
with generators until the


school got power back late
Tuesday night. Maine still
had about 60,000 people
without power, down from
a high of 106,000.
"People are doing
quite well considering
the circumstances," she
said.
Volunteers tried to
make the shelter homey,
including cooking up
a ham dinner with


potatoes, vegetables,
bread and pie for dessert
for Christmas.
"They have been amaz-
ing," Walter said, adding
that the volunteers set up
a separate room for her
and Leah so they wouldn't
disturb others when the
infant woke during the
night. "They just try to
make everything better
for us."


AP PHOTO
In this picture provided by the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano, Pope Francis delivers his "Urbi et Orbi" (to the City and
to the World) message from the central balcony of St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, Wednesday. Pope Francis on Christmas Day
is wishing for a better world, with peace for the land of Jesus' birth, for Syria and Africa as well as for the dignity of migrants and
refugees fleeing misery and conflict.


Israelis and Palestinians."
Francis then explained
his concept of peace.
"True peace is not a
balancing of opposing
forces. It's not a lovely
facade which conceals
conflicts and divisions,"
the pope said. "Peace


of Magazine Media. "It
will drive more custom-
ers away from using
the Postal Service and
will have ripple effects
through our economy
- hurting consumers,
forcing layoffs and
impacting businesses."
Berner said her orga-
nization will consider
appealing the decision
before the U.S. Court of
Appeals.
For consumers
who have cut back on
their use of mail for
correspondence, the
rate increase may have
little impact on their
pocketbooks.
"I don't know a whole

at home or abroad.
"An interim govern-
ment for nine months
will not stymie with
terrorism a group work-
ing for (nearly) 90 years,"
Tawfiq said.
Soon after the dec-
laration, however, a
state-owned print shop
stopped printing the
Brotherhood party's
newspaper. Tawfiq said it
followed oral orders from
security agencies to halt
publication.
The declaration comes
after another sweep-
ing decision Tuesday


calls for daily commit-
ment," Francis said,
reading the pages of
his speech as they were
ruffled by a chilly wind.
Francis also spoke
of the lives of everyday
people, especially those
struggling for a better life.


lot of people who truly,
with the exception of
packages, really use snail
mail anymore," said
Kristin Johnson, a Green
Bay, Wis., resident who
was shopping in down-
town Anchorage, Alaska,
while visiting relatives
and friends. "It's just so
rare that I actually mail
anything at this point."
The Postal Service is
an independent agency
that does not depend
on tax money for its
operations but is subject
to congressional control.
Under federal law, it
can't raise prices more
than the rate of inflation
without approval from

aimed at draining the
Brotherhood's finances
by freezing the funds
of more than 1,000
non-government orga-
nizations with links to
the group and putting
more than 100 schools
run by the group under
government supervision.
That directly attacks the
grassroots strength of the
Brotherhood, where it
has much of its power in
Egyptian life.
Eissa said Wednesday's
decision means that
those who "participate
in the group's activities,


Recalling the hundreds
of migrants who have
drowned this year while
trying to reach European
shores, including many
close to the Italian island
of Lampedusa, Francis
prayed that refugees
receive hope, consolation


the commission.
The service says it
lost $5 billion in the last
fiscal year and has been
trying to get Congress
to pass legislation to
help with its financial
woes, including an end
to Saturday mail delivery
and reduced payments
on retiree health benefits.
The figures through
Sept. 30 were actually
an improvement for
the agency from a
$15.9 billion loss in 2012.
The post office has
struggled for years with
declining mail volume
as a result of growing
Internet use and a
2006 congressional

in the organization or
promotion verbally or by
writing or by any other
means or financing its
activities" will be facing
punishment according to
the law.
"It's not possible for
Egypt the state nor Egypt
the people to submit to
the Muslim Brotherhood
terrorism," Eissa said.
He also said that the
government had notified
other Arab countries
about its decision. The
Brotherhood has orga-
nizations and political
parties in other nations


and assistance.
He added that "our
thoughts turn to those
children who are the
most vulnerable victims
of wars, but we think,
too, of the elderly, of
battered women" and
others.

requirement that it
make annual $5.6 billion
payments to cover
expected health care
costs for future retirees. It
has defaulted on three of
those payments.
The regulators
Tuesday stopped short
of making the price
increases permanent,
saying the Postal Service
had conflated losses it
suffered as a result of
Internet competition
with business lost
because of the Great
Recession. They ordered
the agency to develop
a plan to phase out the
higher rates once the
lost revenue is recouped.

in the region. A Foreign
Ministry spokesman said
a regional agreement for
combating terrorism re-
quires Arab countries to
hand over those wanted
by Egypt.
Ahmed el-Borai,
the minister of social
solidarity, told reporters
that the decision means
that demonstrations
by the group will also
be banned. He said
that members who
abandon their mem-
bership and withdraw
from the group "will be
pardoned."


ALMANAC

Today is Thursday, Dec. 26,
the 360th day of 2013. There
are five days left in the year. The
seven-day African-American
holiday Kwanzaa begins today.
This is Boxing Day.
Today in history
On Dec. 26,1776, the British
suffered a major defeat in the
Battle of Trenton during the
Revolutionary War.
On this date
In 1862,38 Santee Sioux
Indians were hanged in
Mankato, Minn., for their roles
in an uprising that had claimed
the lives of hundreds of white
settlers.
In 1908, Jack Johnson became
the first African-American boxer
to win the world heavyweight
championship as he defeated
Canadian Tommy Burns in
Sydney, Australia.
In 1933, Nissan Motor Co. was
founded in Yokohama, Japan, as
the Automobile Manufacturing
Co.
In 1943, the German battle-
ship Scharnhorst was sunk by
British naval forces during the
Battle of the North Cape off
Norway; only 36 of its crew of
more than 1,900 survived.
In 1944, during the World
War II Battle of the Bulge, the
embattled U.S. 101st Airborne
Division in Bastogne, Belgium,
was relieved by units of the 4th
Armored Division.
In 1973, the demon-posses-
sion horror film "The Exorcist"
was released.
In 1996, 6-year-old beauty
queen JonBenet Ramsey was
found beaten and strangled in
the basement of her family's
home in Boulder, Colo. (To date,
the slaying remains unsolved.)
In 2004, some 230,000 people,
mostly in southern Asia, were
killed by a tsunami triggered
by the world's most powerful
earthquake in 40 years beneath
the Indian Ocean.
In 2006, former President
Gerald R. Ford died in Rancho
Mirage, Calif., at age 93.

Today's birthdays
Actor Donald Moffat is 83. Actor
Caroll Spinney (Big Bird on TV's
"Sesame Street") is 80. Rhythm-
and-blues singer Abdul "Duke"
Fakir (The Four Tops) is 78. Record
producer Phil Spector is 74.
"America's Most Wanted" host John
Walsh is 68. Country musician
Bob Carpenter (The Nitty Gritty
Dirt Band) is 67. Baseball Hall
of Fame catcher Carlton Fisk is
66. Humorist David Sedaris is
57. Rock musician Lars Ulrich
(Metallica) is 50. Actress Nadia
Dajani is 48. Rock musician J is 46.
Country singer Audrey Wiggins
is 46. Actor-singer Jared Leto is
42. Actress Kendra C. Johnson
(TV: "Love Thy Neighbor") is 37.
Rock singer Chris Daughtry is 34.
Actress Beth Behrs is 28. Actress
Eden Sher is 22. Pop singer Jade
Thirlwall (Little Mix Actor) is 21.
Actor Zach Mills is 18.


Pranksters stop
tram to film
Tolkien scene
WARSAW, Poland
(AP) It's almost like
in J.R.R. Tolkien's "The
Fellowship of The
Ring": Gandalf stands
in the way of Balrog
and tells him to "go
back to the shadow"
to buy time for fleeing
Frodo Baggins and his
companions.
But the scene is
Warsaw, not the Mines
of Moria. A Polish
prankster dressed as
Gandalf stops a city
tram, which represents
Balrog, and recreates
the scene with sev-
eral others dressed
as Middle-earth
characters.
Tolkien's Gandalf
almost died in the
confrontation, but the
Warsaw practical joker,
called SAWardega, just
irritated the tram driver.
AYouTube video of
the prank posted last
week has gone viral
with nearly 3 million
views by Saturday, just
days before Poland's
premiere of the "The
Hobbit" film sequel.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE






The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 5 WORLD NEWS


I WORLD

Official: Israel
plans settlement
construction

JERUSALEM (AP)-
Israel likely will announce
new plans for construc-
tion in Jewish settlements
next week, an official
said Wednesday, a move
that is likely to trigger an
international uproar and
threaten peace talks with
the Palestinians.
The timing of the
announcement would
coincide with the expect-
ed release of a group of
Palestinian prisoners.
The government has
announced new settle-
ment construction plans
during previous prisoner
releases to blunt domes-
tic criticism.
The Israeli official
said he "expects" an
announcement on new
construction next week,
but declined to elaborate.
He spoke on condition
of anonymity pending a
formal announcement.

3 Turkish Cabinet
ministers resign
over probe
ANKARA, Turkey (AP)
- Three Cabinet minis-
ters resigned in Turkey
on Wednesday, days after
their sons were taken into
custody in a sweeping
corruption and bribery
scandal that has targeted
Prime Minister Recep
Tayyip Erdogan's allies in
one of the worst political
crises of his more than
10 years in power.
Economy Minister Zafer
Caglayan and Interior
Minister Muammer
Guler announced
their resignations in
statements carried by
the state-run Anadolu
Agency. Environment and
Urban Planning Minister
Erdogan Bayraktar gave
his resignation from
both the Cabinet and
Parliament in a live inter-
view with the private NTV
television during which
he also urged the prime
minister to step down.
All three ministers
denied any wrongdoing.
Caglayan's and Guler's
sons, along with the chief
executive officer of the
state-run bank Halkbank,
are among 24 people
who have been arrested
on bribery charges.
Bayraktar's son, Abdullah
Oguz, was detained as
part of the probe but later
released from custody.

Antarctic tourists
spend Christmas
icebound
SYDNEY (MCT) -
Tourists aboard a polar
research vessel will spend
Christmas awaiting
rescue, after the vessel
got stuck in Antarctic ice.
Australian officials said.
The Australian
Maritime Safety Authority
dispatched three
ships after receiving a
distress call from the
Russian-registered ship
Wednesday.
The Finnish-built MV
Akademik Shokalskiy,
with about 50 passengers
and 20 crew aboard, is
icebound south of the
Australian city of Hobart.
Officials said the ship
was not in danger but
that it would take at
least two days for help to
arrive.
The ice-strengthened
oceanographic research
vessel built for polar
exploration has 26 berths
set aside for tourists to
join as members of the
Australasian Antarctic


Expedition.
The tourists booked
through Expeditions
Online, which is based in
Tyreso, Sweden.



T In WaterLine every n,. I
Thursday only in the LSUN


Bombings in Iraq's capital kill 37


BAGHDAD (AP)-
Militants in Iraq targeted
Christians in three
separate Christmas Day
bombings in Baghdad,
killing at least 37 people,
officials said Wednesday.
In one attack, a car
bomb went off near a
church in the capital's
southern Dora neighbor-
hood, killing at least 26
people and wounding
38, a police officer said.
Earlier, two bombs
ripped through a nearby
outdoor market simulta-
neously in the Christian
section of Athorien,
killing 11 people and
wounding 21, the officer
said.
The Iraq-based leader
of the Chaldean Catholic
Church, Louis Sako, said
the parked car bomb
exploded after Christmas
Mass and that none of
the worshippers were
hurt. Sako said he didn't
believe the church was
the target.
There was no imme-
diate claim of respon-
sibility for the attacks,
but Iraq's dwindling


An Iraqi Christian woman lights candles before a Christmas Mass at the Mother Tere
Church in Basra, Iraq's second-largest city, 340 miles southeast of Baghdad, Iraq, We
Militants on Wednesday launched two separate attacks against Christians in Baghda
more than a dozen people, officials said.


Christian community,
which is estimated to
number about 400,000
to 600,000 people, often
has been targeted by
al-Qaida and other
insurgents who see the


Christians as heretics.
The U.S. Embassy in
Baghdad condemned the
attacks in a statement.
"The Christian
community in Iraq has
suffered deliberate and


senseless targe
terrorists for im
as have many c
nocent Iraqis,"
ment read. "Th
States abhors a
attacks and is c


to its partnership with
the government of Iraq
to combat the scourge of
terrorism."
Along with
Christians, other
targets include civilians
in restaurants, cafes
or crowded public
areas, as well as Shiites
and members of the
Iraqi security forces,
attacked in an attempt
to undermine confi-
A dence in the Shiite-led
Government and stir up
Iraq's already simmer-
'K ing sectarian tensions.
A medical official
confirmed the casualty
figures. Both officials
spoke on condition of
anonymity because they
AP PHOTO are not authorized to
talk to the media.
sa Catholic Wednesday's bomb-
ednesday. ings came amid a
ad, killing massive military oper-
ation in Iraq's western
ting by desert as authorities try
iany years, to hunt down insurgents
other in- who have stepped up at-
the state- tacks across Iraq in the
ie United past months, sending
ill such violence to levels not
committed seen since 2008.


UN says mass grave of 34 found in South Sudan


NAIROBI, Kenya (AP)
- U.N. investigators
discovered a mass grave
in a rebel-held city in
South Sudan, the United
Nations said Tuesday,
as a possible opening
occurred for negotiations
to avert civil war in the
world's newest country
where ethnic violence has
erupted.
In NewYork, the U.N.
Security Council voted


DEAL OF THE DA
9.99
LEAIANCE
I-,, 1 ,




DEAL OF THE DA
169.99
SUIT SEPARATES
I--, I s I
Da-3l .:.1 h- Day 10
Deal of the Day S
I -:l {I I'- *'/,-I
'JI = ; I '

DEAL OF THE DA
75% OFF
MEN S SWEATER;
Deal of the Day
V1.)16 25 I.- :,
*-, : i I- -

'A V,*;-I .HI. '?|-J5.


unanimously to beef up
its peacekeeping force in
South Sudan. It con-
demned targeted violence
against civilians and
ethnic communities and
called for "an immediate
cessation of hostilities
and the immediate
opening of a dialogue."
The government,
meanwhile, announced
that its military forces had
taken back another key


city, Bor, from the rebels
who held it over the last
week.
The bodies were
found in the town of
Bentiu in oil-rich Unity
state: one grave with 14
bodies and a site nearby
with 20 bodies, said
U.N. human rights office
spokeswoman Ravina
Shamdasani.
The government
minister of information,


Michael Makuei Lueth,
said Bentiu is under the
control of rebels loyal to
the country's former vice
president, Riek Machar,
indicating they were re-
sponsible for the killings.
The dead in Bentiu
reportedly were ethnic
Dinka who belonged
to the Sudan People's
Liberation Army, said
Shamdasani, referring
to government military


A











1 1M6" 1111 1I "MSLAU1M1101 I W2S

Y DEAL OF THE DAY EXTRA 50% OFF ':

FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF 75%-85% OFF '
lF I_ -'IP'-'I I- F iL l -il 'Pii 7.F IT IF L '-'I I- -' P -- -'P_'-i -- TI I .. F '-'. .' IP lJIi I .. I'-T1 I-' 'I-' HH I-P
I I,_, 'ArJTsi SKI'TS .\ IrI1-,'E F,-l ,' JIIlSSES PET TES I 'VF IIIEr J tIir JI',I 'S i. KII',S
_,ESi.-r jEP .:rP'.I-. I Ir j. S.Er i F S .-:LE A.', p..,r .-:AE S V E..',i P- ,'-PTSHi'ITS .\ I...:,, E


kY

^ r
999
t60
,11.,i



'S


DEAL OF THE DAY
EXTRA 15% OFF
ALL SALE.PIICEDCOOkWAIE
Deal olftheDay849.50999

*. 1 HI Ir


DEAL OF THE DAY
75% +
15% OFF
ALL H(CLIDA. TPl.l1
Only at Mcys
I- ,H ": 1,:1l ,,

Deal of the
D y 6 4 $ 4 .2 .5
i -.. _, y.,


DEAL OF THE DAY
59.99
^*^^~~ ou~'WEAn' *





f ( DEAL OF THE DAY
75% OFF
i. IN FAV( 'lTES
D l I "of the -Dry
IC- b.-J,.'_I" 2, Ht ,
fl T -., :,1;I','..,,, ^


V,'-I !, 'E'.'.-.
DEAL OFTEAYI


DEAL OF THE DAY
EXTRA 15% OFF
ALL SALE.PFiCED TABLETOP
Deal of the Day 4 67.65959
1I ] : 1 1' .' -' 1_ ', ,


ii *, .
II
I I
I r


DEAL OF THE DAY .
40% OFF
FoI:'IDS& I N JIINC'IS
:I 1 c1-,l i ih y 6.53 4I -L II" ,I

I r : i ; i :l. l;- i i tI i
III,.I.I ,1:;r:l,^ |
I = I, IIl1 lZ


DEAL OF THE DAY
FREE GIFT m,,,c
ccI('iU TIu'E CLUTCH

I.'",.1,"" '^ ^^b
II :F :Ir ,,IU
: 1i,, r, i.
i -, :,, r ,,IF "J
II X a,.


DEAL OF THE DAY
EXTRA 15% OFF
BEDS &BATH Deal of the Day
3 39.28899 -:l t- '' i: -
I,, '' : I l l,',, I:lI r : ,,
i i i ~ : : ', r .,=r. r ,=I ,, ,


*Kt.


DEAL OF THE DAY
EXTRA 25% OFF>-
IMPULSE
Deal of the Day
1440.7140



DEAL OF THE DAY
25% OFF FAMOUS
MAIAKEIPHANDBAGSn
Deal of the Day
44 251 ,261 I:
-:,. r : : ,' h I: ,,, : ,
DEA O "HEDA


DELOiH A


DEAL OF THE DAY
ALL' FINE JEWELI'
30%-50% OFF +
EXTRA 25% OFF
SELECT TICNS
Deal of the Day $75 $4200
F'.- :I '10":":' :' :"":
E', i,,, :h l :i:l:l


forces.
South Sudan President
Salva Kiir is Dinka, the
country's largest ethnic
group, while Machar is
Nuer, the second-largest
ethnic group.
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry spoke on
the phone Tuesday with
Machar, who said he told
Kerry he is ready for talks
with Kiir, likely to take
place in Ethiopia.


DEAL OF THE DAY
60% OFF
DESiGSNEi SEPAlATES
Deal of the Day
1960.3560
I1 lr -I {4 '
1-.-

DEAL OF THE DAY
3 FOR 39.99
-:_; : .i.:. 'S
:-'':"? '""1 5dr 11



DEAL OF THE DAY
EXTRA 25% OFF
ALL SALE BCCOOTS FO, HEI'
Deal of the Day 2999.14249
I:.-1 '-',, 1 4 1 7'1 '
F, -,, N d f
I : ;-I-':1 ,,,1 :, *
, ^ f I,,. 7II .T


-
6


.J..


VALID THURSDAY, 12/26 ALL DAY CANNOT BE USED ON DOORBUSTERS OR DEALS OF THE DAY
YmoCHS wow! F i$25 ORFMO ,,, *' ^ :11111
IQ T I( c y W W $ 1C )C. F ......'I"- .', .....1.....". "l "", ..... .... ......... ........,.. ..
i-1 -h-,a ,-,-, ... ........ ll.,, ., I, h,.,- I,,ih.. ,-i' ,,dl, I" ,,
,| v O F F ': p : T l" .. .... ... .. ..... ... I ... .. I ,. .. ... ... .
I'Y ^ LJ-| -I.:.[ l .....1 : l l .... .... [I ....,....N. I,,,,, -, I 1,,, .... I.I .. .-.I ..|." I ..... .. ,, I .... l. r h Ih ... i"

YOUR PURCHASE OF $25 OR MORE ..... ,-, ....................
VALID 12O26 13 ONLY ME 0003600 11018112,,11
LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER 00036001107518020112


Fine jewelry Deals of the Day are only available at stores that carry fine jewelry. One free gift per customer, while supplies last.
S REG. & ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES AND SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT IN EFFECT DURING THE PAST 90 DAYS. ONE DAY SALE PRICES IN EFFECT
12/26/13. MERCHANDISE WILL BE ON SALE AT THESE & OTHER SALE PRICES THROUGH 1/4/14, EXCEPT AS NOTED. *Intermediate price reductions may have been taken. tDoes not include watches, designer
collections, fashion jewelry or diamond engagement rings. Extra savings are taken off already-reduced prices; "Deal of the Day" prices reflect extra savings; does not apply to Everyday Values, super buys,
specials or trunk shows. Jewelry photos may be enlarged or enhanced to show detail. Fine jewelry at select stores; log on to macys.com for locations. Almost all gemstones have been treated to enhance
their beauty & require special care, log on to macys.com/gemstones or askyour sales professional. Deal of the Day & clearance items are available while supplies last. Advertised merchandise may not be
carried at your local Macy's & selection may vary by store. Prices & merchandise may differ at macys.com. Electric items carry mfrs' warranties; to see a mfr's warranty at no charge before purchasing,
visit a store or write to: Macy's Warranty Dept, PO Box 1026, Maryland Heights, MO 63043, attn: Consumer Warranties. *Enterthe WebID in the search box at MACYS.COM to order N3111280.
I OPEN A MACY'S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 20% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS, UP TO $100, WITH MORE REWARDS TO COME. Macy's credit card is available subject to credit
approval; new account savings valid the day your account is opened and the next day; excludes services, selected licensed departments, gift cards, restaurants, gourmet food &
wine. The new account savings are limited to a total of $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible.


i


42


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


WIRE Page 5


www.sunnewspapers.net


WORLD NEWS






-Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/WORLD NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature Today


2 3 2


0 0


60 70 76 79 75 67
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number,
the heater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6.7 Higi; 8-10 Very Higi; I11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eioit weather factors.


TODAY


*,,, \ .\". .
Isolated p.m. rain


780 / 600
40% chance of rain


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor
Today 12:16p 6:04a --
Fri. 12:37a 6:50a 1:03p
Sat. 1:24a 7:37a 1:51p


FRIDAY




Mostly cloudy


80/610
20% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.


Hi/VLo Outlook
Ft. Myers 79/61 showers
Sarasota 76/61 showers

SUN AND MOON


The Sun
Today
Friday
The Moon
Today
Friday
INa..


AIR QUALITY INDEX "w "r
Air Quality Index readings as of Wednesday A


33
0 50 100150200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees ** o.*I
Grass
needs o Al
Molds
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC


Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 79/530
Normal High/Low 75/530
Record High 840 (2011)
Record Low 270 (1989)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Wednesday 0.00"
Month to date 0.39"
Normal month to date 1.46"
Year to date 52.52"
Normal yearto date 50.33"
Record 1.04" (2004)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.01 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 0.39 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 52.52 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour penod ending at 5 p.m.


Rise
7:15 a.m.
7:16 a.m.
Rise
1:06 a.m.
2:03 a.m.


Major
6:28p
7:16p
8:05p


The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 9:47a
Fri. 11:36a
Englewood
Today 8:24a
Fri. 10:13a
Boca Grande
Today 7:29a
Fri. 9:18a
El Jobean
Today 10:19a
Fri. 12:08p
Venice
Today 6:39a
Fri. 8:28a


Low High Low

4:17a 9:26p 3:12p
5:26a 10:11p 3:59p

2:33a 8:03p 1:28p
3:42a 8:48p 2:15p

12:54a 7:08p 11:49a
2:03a 7:53p 12:36p

4:46a 9:58p 3:41p
5:55a 10:43p 4:28p

1:12a 6:18p 12:07p
2:21a 7:03p 12:54p


FLORIDA CITIES
Today Fri.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo
Apalachicola 61 47 pc 62 50
Bradenton 75 61 sh 75 61
Clearwater 74 60 sh 74 60
Coral Springs 79 67 t 80 68
Daytona Beach 73 59 sh 71 60
Fort Lauderdale 80 70 t 80 71
FortMyers 79 61 sh 80 63
Fort Pierce 76 64 sh 79 64
Gainesville 68 48 sh 62 51
Jacksonville 61 46 sh 58 49
Key Largo 79 71 t 79 73


SATURDAY




Mostly cloudy


810/ 640
20% chance of rain

Clearwateri
74'60

Tampa
':" "...'.1 -...7j4 58


Delays
none
none


Set
5:43 p.m.
5:43 p.m.
Set
12:56 p.m.
1:37 p.m.


a
St. Petersburg
73, 59


st Full Last


Longboat K
76/63


SUNDAY




Isolated rain


760/560
70% chance of rain


MONDAY THE NATION


a-

Partly cloudy Less
humid

720 / 490
0% chance of rain


Plant City ,
-751 59 Winter Haven

Brandun 74, 58
aBrandun '.
75 59 j --41w -%
Bartu* .:;k.1r
S 75,58 ''5',"'"


4
Apollo Beach
74/58


Ft. Meade
7Ri/Q


____ *. vI/ v .



Wauchula
Bradenton 77 59
75/61
(ey Myak Cit Limestone
78/60 78 60
Sarasuta | a-
76/61 .. .-

Osprey Arcadia *___
77/61 78 61 '
Venice Hull
77/. .,., i. n ,..nh Dn- u


Shown is today weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Gulf Water
Temperature

630


r. 4 77/61 iiurth Pon 'I
79/60 79/60
i PortCharloutte
6 8/60
Engleeuud .- _""6.-
78 61 '"-
',4 Punta Gorda
Olac;ida 79/60 ,


riciblUaal
78/61.
Boca Grande*
78/65


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013

Publication date: 12/26/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
E 6-12 1-2 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
NE 10-20 1-3 Light


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
79 71 sh
74 60 sh
74 59 sh
75 65 sh
79 69 t
80 63 sh
70 53 sh
76 60 sh
74 60 sh
60 45 pc
59 41 pc


Fri.
Hi Lo W
80 72 c
73 61 c
73 59 c
79 64 c
80 71 c
80 65 c
66 53 sh
78 61 c
73 60 c
60 47 pc
60 44 pc


Fort Myers
79/61

Cape Coral
79/61


9w
.* "":;


Lehigh Acres
79/61


Fronts

Cold Warm Stationary


,, ",, ,,,,,,,
Houston' -VA." '
,^ .^ ^
'* : Miami

Precipitation

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow


Ice


U.S. Extremes (Forthe 48 contiguous states yesterday)
High ................. 86 at Oceanside, CA Low ....................... -15 at Stanley, ID


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford


Today
i Lo W
3 27 s
) 1 s
3 30 pc
3 25 pc
5 33 pc
2 27 pc
4 21 pc
8 28 sn
1 19 sf
1 21 sn
) 20 pc
1 25 pc
7 20 pc
3 23 pc
) 21 sf
2 30 pc
3 24 pc
1 16 sn
5 31 s
7 29 pc
3 17 pc
7 20 sf
) 5 c
9 -38 s
2 12 sf
7 23 sn


Helena 37 20
Sanibel Honolulu 82 70
79/65 Houston 60 38
Bonita Springs Indianapolis 33 22
79/62
79/62WORLD CITIES
"t Tod..
AccuWeather.com To......


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Today
Hi Lo W
79 69 t
65 54 sh
73 59 c
73 59 sh
76 61 sh
61 43 pc
74 58 c
73 62 sh
76 64 sh
79 66 sh
74 58 sh


-,ty
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


pc
0s
pc
pc


ly
A W


I LU VI
5 37 c
2 40 pc
3 14 s
3 37 c
) 68 t
9 46 s
3 30 pc
1 69 sh
5 43r
2 14 sn
t 27 sn
1 31 s
3 41 pc
8 41 pc


Fri.
Lo W
26 s
16 pc
33 s
26 s
28 s
33 s
22 s
27 s
26 sf
19 pc
25 s
25 s
22 pc
28 pc
28 pc
30 pc
29 pc
13 pc
35 s
34 s
26 s
25 c
15 sf
-28 s
13 pc
21 s
18 s
69 s
36 c
27 pc


Fri.
Lo W
43 r
42 pc
17 s
39 pc
68 pc
51 s
SOc
72 sh
34 r
-6 sn
19 sf
32 s
43 sh
43 sh


Today Fri.
City Hi Lo W Hi LoW
Jackson, MS 56 29 pc 56 27 s
Kansas City 37 22 pc 39 27 s
Knoxville 45 24 pc 49 26 s
LasVegas 59 39 s 58 40 s
Los Angeles 79 50 s 81 50 pc
Louisville 39 27 s 47 29 s
Memphis 46 31 s 53 33 s
Milwaukee 22 16 sf 30 23 pc
Minneapolis 23 11 sf 30 18 pc
Montgomery 57 30 pc 57 35 s
Nashville 44 23 s 51 26 s
New Orleans 57 41 pc 57 41 pc
New York City 40 30 c 38 30 s
Norfolk, VA 48 32 pc 45 29 pc
Oklahoma City 52 29 s 54 32 s


Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


7 19 pc
1 27 pc
9 46 s
3 20 sn
3 21 sn
4 30 s
) 26 sn
8 26 pc
5 16 pc
2 29 s
7 38 pc
7 50 s
4 43 s
8 36 pc
5 29 pc


Today
i Lo W
8 44 pc
7 16 sn
2 9 sn
4 36 pc
5 16 pc
6 71 s


26 s
29 s
43 s
26 pc
18 pc
32 pc
23 s
25 s
16 s
32 s
36 c
49 pc
45 pc
38 sh
31 s


Fri.
Lo W
46 pc
14 pc
11 pc
45 r
-5 c
76 s
41 s
20 sn
74 pc
61 pc
35 c
21 c
37 sh
3c


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Iran lawmakers threaten



nuclear speed-up


TEHRAN, Iran (MCT)
- More than a third of
Iran's parliament has
signed on to a bill order-
ing an acceleration of the
country's nuclear pro-
gram if the U.S. Congress
follows through with new
sanctions, lawmakers
said.
In a gesture apparently
intended as retaliation for
congressional sanctions
legislation, 100 members
of Iran's parliament have
signed on to a resolution
calling for an increase in
uranium enrichment to
60 percent purity from a
current 20 percent. The
bill also would order
activation of the partially
built Arak heavy-water
nuclear reactor, which
could generate plutonium
that could be used as
bomb fuel.
The lawmakers signed
the bill and presented
it to the parliament's
governing body, which
could still block the bill.
Some U.S. advocates of
sanctions maintain the
Iranian threats are hollow.
They say that because of
the economic pressure
created by past Western
sanctions, Tehran can't
afford to walk away from
the upcoming nego-
tiations to restrain its
nuclear program.
But the legislation was
another sign of the con-
tinuing tensions between
the two sides one month
after Iran and six world
powers, including the
United States, signed a
preliminary agreement to
freeze some aspects of its
nuclear program.
Iranian lawmakers first
described the legislation,
unveiled on Dec. 14, as


AP FILE PHOTO


In this Oct. 26, 2010, file photo, a worker rides a bicycle in front
of the reactor building of the Bushehr nuclear power plant, just
outside the southern city of Bushehr, Iran.


a response to the U.S.
Treasury Department's
blacklisting of 19 indi-
viduals and groups in
enforcement of past
sanctions, a senior U.S.
Senate aide said. But
last week the lawmakers
began describing their
bill as retaliation for the
new U.S. sanctions bill,
according to the aide,
who declined to be iden-
tified because he was not
authorized to speak on
the record.
The six world powers
have been negotiating
with Iran for a decade to
try to impose limits on its
nuclear program. Many
countries fear, despite
Iran's denials, that it seeks
to obtain nuclear weap-
ons capability.
Mehdi Moussavinejad,
a member of the parlia-
ment's energy committee,
told the official Fars news
agency that the bill would
require acceleration
of the program if new
sanctions are imposed
or existing sanctions are
"intensified."
Iranian officials said


the higher-grade uranium
would be used to power
nuclear-fueled ships and
submarines.
In a television inter-
view, Ali Akbar Salehi,
head of Iran's atomic
energy agency, ac-
knowledged that if the
negotiations fail, Iran
will resume the pace of
the nuclear program. He
said that construction of
the Arak reactor, which
is a special worry for the
West, is up to 80 percent
complete.
Despite heavyWhite
House lobbying, 26
senators this month
signed on to new sanc-
tions legislation that
would be activated if the
negotiations break down.
Supporters are seeking
enactment when Congress
reconvenes in January.
Sanctions bills have been
almost unstoppable in
Congress, and the new
legislation has the back-
ing of top Democrats,
including New York's Sen.
Charles Schumer, the No.
3 official in the Senate
Democratic leadership.


A Georgian Christmas


A Georgian police officer stands at the St. George Monument decorated with illumination
resembling a Christmas tree set for New Year celebrations in Freedom Square in Tbilisi,
Georgia, Wednesday.




Report: Al-Qaida leader


targeting UN workers


BAGHDAD (AP) -
The shadowy leader
of a powerful al-Qaida
group fighting in Syria
sought to kidnap United
Nations workers and
scrawled out plans for
his aides to take over in
the event of his death,
according to excerpts
of letters obtained
Wednesday by The
Associated Press.
Iraqi intelligence
officials offered the AP
the letters, as well as the
first known photograph
of the Nusra Front leader,
Abu Mohammed al-Go-
lani, the head of one of
the most powerful bands
of radicals fighting the
Syrian government in the
country's civil war.
The officials said
they obtained the
information about


al-Golani after they
captured members of
another al-Qaida group
in September. They
spoke on condition of
anonymity because they
weren't authorized to
speak to journalists.
"I was told by a soldier
that he observed some
of the
workers of
the U.N.
and he will
kidnap
them. I ask
God for his
AL-GOLANI success,"
read an
excerpt of a letter given
by officials from Iraq's
Falcon Intelligence
Cell, an anti-terrorism
unit that works under
Prime Minister Nouri
al-Maliki.
The officials said


other letters planned
the kidnapping and
killing of other foreign-
ers, and Syrian and Iraqi
civilians.
One U.N. worker was
kidnapped for eight
months in Syria and
was released in October.
Another two dozen
U.N. peacekeepers were
briefly held this year. It's
not clear if those abduc-
tions had any relation to
al-Golani's letters.
Syria's uprising began
with peaceful protests,
but it turned into an
armed uprising after
Assad's forces cracked
down on demonstrators.
Since then, hard-line
Islamic brigades have
emerged as the stron-
gest rebel forces in Syria,
chiefly among them the
Nusra Front.


-10s I -Os OI 10s I 20s 30s 40s I 50s 60s 70s 80s190SsT
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

S Winnipeg Mnn
A_ / .. / ) Billings ., ',. '.. ." *O a'
/ ( V .-4BM --35 .. .Torto\.221:-
Minnuo; li 3
/ ^ J Ca..go" De NoYok
San'Franclsco/ D Cver- g7 a *4
w \ / 57/29 .Kansas City Washington
37/22 J460


Jan 1 Jan 7 Jan 15 Jan 24


AP PHOTO


rim-


wm










SPORTS


Thursday, December 26, 2013


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* GIRLS SWIMMING: All-area team


SUN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JENNIFER BRUNO






Medals provide






mettle insight


Lemon Bay's Cattermole leaves a
wake of clues to her success and plans


By ZACH MILLER
SPORTS WRITER
ENGLEWOOD On the
dresser in Sophie Cattermole's
bedroom is a calendar. On one
side of the calendar is a pile
of letters from colleges and
universities that she is consid-
ering swimming for. On the
other is a pile of letters from
schools she is not interested
in.
No letter gets thrown away.
Every email from a recruiter
is responded to, whether she's
interested or not.
Along a wall, her trophies are
lined up with medals draped
around them. The Florida High
Schools Athletic Association's


Class 2A state championship
medal she won in the 200
individual medley last month
hangs off her tallest trophy -
along with her second-place
medal from the 100 freestyle in
the same competition.
A glass box holds the medals
she has won at the YMCA
National Championships as
part of the Sarasota YMCA
Sharks club the past two years.
She has won so many
medals and ribbons during her
eight years of swimming that
any more than a year old, such
as both of her second-place
medals from last year's state
championships, are put in a
container under her bed.


The orderliness the sense
of structure is as intrinsic to
the Sun's girls swimmer of the
year's life as the pool. And, the
Lemon Bay High School junior
applies it not just to her daily
life but to the years ahead -
Cattermole already has her
path into coaching mapped
out, starting with her college
plans. Those colleges interest-
ed in adding her to their teams
in the fall of 2015 must offer a
parks, recreation, leisure and
fitness studies major.
"If you don't have my major,
then sorry, but you're automat-
ically out," Cattermole said.
"You need to have that or I
can't accomplish what I want
to do."
In addition, the school can't

CATTERMOLE I 4


THE CATTERMOLE FILE
NAME: Sophie Cattermole
CLASS: Junior
PARENTS: Robert and Wendy
SIBLINGS: Rees, 18
FAVORITE SUBJECT: Math
FAVORITE FOOD: Bacon
COLLEGE PLANS: Hopes to earn a full
scholarship to swim at an NCAA Division I
school.

ALL-AREA SCHEDULE
Sunday: Volleyball
Monday: Boys golf
Tuesday: Girls golf
Wednesday: Boys swimming
Today: Girls swimming
Friday: Boys cross country
Saturday: Girls cross country
Sunday: Football


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:
Florida State


Williams

arrives

like a

train
By BRENDAN SONNONE
ORLANDO SENTINEL
TALLAHASSEE Karlos
Williams does not run with
much flash or style.
His 6-foot-i, 223-pound
frame flails as his legs wild-
ly pump and churn.
But the chaos is usually
controlled. The Florida
State running back moves
without much of a purpose
other than inflicting as
much damage as possible.
It is poetic violence.
"For Karlos, it's funny
because he gets his
yards the hard way," FSU
fullback Chad Abram said.
"When he first came in, he
made no reads. He wasn't
indecisive. He just made a
decision quick. And it just
worked out for him. He's
so fast, he just got through
holes really fast and got
yards."
Williams, a junior,
moved from safety to
running back after the
Seminoles' season opener
against Pittsburgh. FSU
had depth in the defensive
backfield but needed extra
runners to spell Devonta
Freeman and James Wilder
Jr.
The move has paid off.
Although still learning
the nuances of FSU's
offense, Williams amassed
705 rushing yards and
11 touchdowns on 86
attempts.
FSU coach Jimbo Fisher
suggested that Williams
move to offense a year
earlier, but pride got in the
way.
"I was young. I came as
WILLIAMS I 2


BCS NATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIP
WHO: Florida State (13-0)
vs. Auburn (12-1)
WHEN: 8:30 p.m., Jan. 6
WHERE: Rose Bowl,
Pasadena, Calif.
TV: ESPN
RADIO: 99.3 FM, 620 AM,
820 AM 1040 AM, 1250 AM


* NBA: Miami 101, Los Angeles Lakers 95


Bosh, Wade


power Miami


By BETH HARRIS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES -The
Los Angeles missed having
Kobe Bryant out on the
court on Christmas Day.
Same for LeBron James.
Playing without its
biggest star, Los Angeles
stayed right with the
Miami Heat for most of
the day before slipping to
a 101-95 loss against the
defending NBA champi-
ons on Wednesday.
Chris Bosh and Dwyane
Wade had 23 points
apiece, and James added
19 points in the Heat's
sixth straight win. Bosh
grabbed 11 rebounds
and Ray Allen made four
3-pointers for 12 points,
helping Miami improve to
5-0 against the Lakers on


the holiday.
"I knew we would get a
good game out of them,
and I think the NBA want-
ed a good game," James
said, noting the blowout
results of the day's first
two games.
Bryant was relegated
to the sideline with his
fractured left knee, leaving
him unable to extend his
NBA record for Christmas
Day appearances to 16.
"It's not as special when
Kobe's not out there," said
James, who shared a post-
game hug with Bryant.
Streaky reserve Nick
Young scored 20 points for
the Lakers, who were tied
four times in the fourth
quarter. Jodie Meeks
added 17 points, Xavier
HEAT I 3


AP PHOTO
Los Angeles forward Xavier Henry, left, shoots past Miami's
Mario Chalmers and Chris Andersen during the first half
Wednesday in Los Angeles.


* COMMENTARY: NFL


Dolphins must


fix woes on fly
By ANDRE C. FERNANDEZ they can't happen again."
THE MIAMI HERALD The Dolphins could
Miami couldn't find not run the ball, stop the
much silver lining from run, protect quarterback
watching the film of their Ryan Tannehill, harass
worst performance of the Bills quarterback Thad
season Sunday at Buffalo. Lewis, get off to a fast
And they know they start or "be better in ball
have very little time to fix security," as Philbin said
their issues with a must- Monday, than Buffalo.
win game against the Jets The inexplicable part
coming up with a still is how the Dolphins had
slightly favorable chance done these things effec-
of making the playoffs. tively enough for three
"We have to move on, consecutive games to put
but you have to make cor- themselves in position to
reactions Dolphins coach secure a postseason bid
Joe Philbin said. "You without help.
can't just throw things out But after totaling 103
the window and pretend yards, not crossing the
they didn't happen. The Bills' 35-yard line all
problems that popped game, allowing seven
up in this game need to quarterback sacks, and
be fixed and we need watching the Bills rack


to make sure that our
players understand that


FERNANDEZ I 4


INDEXI Lottery 21 Community Calendar 2 | College basketball 2 | NBA 31 Scoreboard 31 Quick hits 31 Preps 41 NFL 4






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, December 26, 2013


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.comrn
* CASH 3
Dec. 25N.................................. 6-3-8
Dec. 25D..........................3........3-2-5
Dec. 24N..........................5........5-2-2
Dec. 24D.................................... 2-0-8
Dec. 23N.....................................0-6-6
Dec. 23D ....................................6-8-4
D-Day, N-Night

* PLAY
Dec. 25N..................................6-9-5-6
Dec. 25D..................................2-0-4-5
Dec. 24N................................. 6-9-2-2
Dec. 24D................................. 7-3-9-3
Dec. 23N..................................6-0-2-2
Dec. 23D..................................8-0-9-8
D-Day, N-Night

* FANTASY 5
Dec. 25........................ 8-24-28-34-36
Dec. 24...................... 11-16-20-34-35
Dec. 23........................2-21-25-27-35
PAYOFF FOR DEC. 23
0 5-digit winners .......................... $0
278 4-digit winners .................. $555
9,363 3-digit winners ................. $26

* MEGA MONEY
Dec. 24...........................5-16-39-40
M egaBall...........................................6

Dec. 20.....................2........2-3-15-35
M egaBall........................................... 5
PAYOFF FOR DEC. 24
0 4-of-4MB..........................$500,000
5 4-of-4............................... $1,328.50
32 3-of-4 MB ............................... $455
722 3-of-4....................................$60
1,021 2-of-4MB.......................$29.50
* LOTTO
Dec.25...................4-12-23-32-45-48
Dec.21 .....................1-8-12-24-45-53
Dec. 18.......................2-5-9-24-34-40
PAYOFF FOR DEC. 21
0 6-digit winners ........................$2M
28 5-digit winners.............$4,576.50
2,112 4-digit winners ..................$55
39,452 3-digit winners ...................$5

* POWERBALL
Dec. 25...................... 23-28-38-39-56
Powerball ........................................32

Dec.21 ...................... 25-36-40-45-51
Powerball..........................................8
PAYOFF FOR DEC. 21
0 5 of 5 + PB............................... $60M
0 5 of 5............................... $1,000,000
3 4of5 + PB...........................$10,000
62 4 of5 ...................................... $100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$74 million
MEGAA MILLIONS
Dec. 24...................... 23-34-53-58-73
M egaBall...........................................2

Dec. 20................3.......3-4-31-49-57
M egaBall...........................................6
PAYOFF FOR DEC. 24
0 5 of5 + MB............................. $22M
0 5 of5.............................. $1,000,000
0 4of5 + MB..........................$5,000
16 4of 5 ....................................$500


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.
Submit local golf scores: Email
scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.


SunCoast Sports Now
Get the latest local sports news:
www.suncoastsportsblog.com


Like us on
Facebook:
facebook.com/
SunCoastSports
Follow us on
Twitter:
@SunCoastSports


Contact us

Mark Lawrence Sports Editor
mlawrence@sun-herald.com

Mike Bambach Deputy SE
mbambach@sun-herald.com
Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com

Rob Shore* Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
Zach Miller* Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:


Hurricanes relish bowl experience


By CHRISTY CABRERA
CHIRINOS
SOUTH FLORIDA SUN SENTINEL
ORLANDO Miami
coach Al Golden knows
his players face a tough
test against 18th-ranked
Louisville.
But after the
Hurricanes' first on-
site practice ahead of
Saturday's Russell Athletic
Bowl, Golden reiterated
again how much he wants
his players to enjoy the
experience and the
perks of playing in
the postseason, espe-
cially since most of the
Hurricanes haven't had
the opportunity to play in
a bowl because of Miami's
self-imposed two-year
postseason ban.
"The philosophy is to
be where you are," Golden
said. "When you're in a
meeting, you're locked
into the meeting. When



WILLIAMS

FROM PAGE 1
a high-recruited safety.
I always wanted to play
safety," Williams said.
"Played it in high school.
Played it in little league.
Always wanted to play
that position. So I was still
stuck in that immature
mindset of I want to do
this."
Eventually, Williams saw
that his team needed him
at running back.
Playing safety has
helped Williams' transi-
tion, with physicality and
natural talent carrying
him as he becomes better
acquainted with the new
position.
"I say it all the time, I
know how it feels to hit
people hard. I know how
it feels to lay a guy out,"
Williams said. "I don't
want to be that guy to get
laid out. So I definitely run
a lot more physical than a
lot of guys do."
Teammates tease
Williams because he
doesn't try to avoid con-
tact. Rather, he creates it.
"People laugh at me
because I'm very, very
athletic, but I don't have
a lot of moves," Williams
said. "I'm a straight-line


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOT


Lynch r


final run


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO -Jordan
Lynch will make a run
at history tonight when
he suits up for the final
time for No. 24 Northern
Illinois in the Poinsettia
Bowl against Utah State.
Lynch already owns
the major college record
for yards rushing for a
quarterback with 1,881.
With 119 yards, he can
become the first player to
rush for 2,000 yards and
throw for 2,000.
"I'm just really proud of
him and wish I had him
for about 10 more years
but we don't," NIU coach
Rod Carey said. "This is
the last game we get him.
That's the biggest thing
with him."
Lynch has passed
for 2,676 yards and 23
touchdowns. He's rushed
for 22 scores and even
caught a touchdown pass
in leading the Huskies to
a 12-1 record.
"Jordan Lynch is fun
to watch it's not fun


to watch because you
understand you're going
to have to defend him,
but from a quarterback
perspective, I've got a
lot of respect for him,"


RUSSELL ATHLETIC
BOWL
WHO: No. 18 Louisville (11-1)
vs. Miami (9-3)
WHEN: Saturday, 6:45 p.m.
WHERE: Florida Citrus Bowl,
Orlando
TV: ESPN
RADIO: 99.3 FM
TICKETS: Tickermaster.com


you're out on the practice
field, which they just
(were), be focused and
execute. If you're over at
Disney or Universal, enjoy
that. You can't be intense
every minute of every day
here. I think they under-
stand what the goal of the
trip is and continue to be
focused on that."
Though the team had
only been in Orlando a
little more than a day,
players had already


gotten a taste of what
the bowl experience is all
about. Monday, the team
practiced at the Citrus
Bowl, site of Saturday's
game. Then they headed
to a local Best Buy, where
each player got their own
shopping spree thanks to
a $450 gift card.
Miami (9-3, 5-3 ACC)
players also visited with
underprivileged children
at Give Kids the World
Village in Orlando, and
Golden said more players
would be visiting theme
parks on Monday night
after the Best Buy trip.
Still, the focus remains
on football and Louisville
(11-1, 7-1 AAC), which
comes into Saturday's
game looking for a second
straight bowl victory
against one of Florida's
traditional powerhouse
programs. The Cardinals
stunned Florida 33-23 in
last year's Sugar Bowl, and


players said they want a
win against Miami next.
Miami, meanwhile, is
in search of its first bowl
win since a 21-20 win over
Nevada in the 2006 MPC
Computers Bowl. Monday,
Golden emphasized what
a victory would mean
to his program, which
spent more than two
years mired in an NCAA
investigation of the Nevin
Shapiro scandal.
"All these things that
we're learning, whether
it be the bowl practice
pre-site, now being on the
bowl site, that's all part of
it," he said. "That's all part
of your team experienc-
ing, your team learning,
your team growing and
we have not had that op-
portunity to do so. It feels
great to do that. Being
on the road and hearing
nothing but the positives,
finally after 28, 29 months
just feels different."


AP FILE PHOTO


Florida State running back Karlos Williams runs for a first down past North Carolina State
cornerback Marchez Coates on Saturday in Tallahassee.


speed guy. So if I kind of
stop, it's kind of hard to
start up again."
Duke defensive back
DeVon Edwards knows
that first hand. He was
blasted back and up into
the air byWilliams on a
12-yard scoring run in
the ACC Championship
Game.
The ferocious finish to
the run prompted broad-
caster Brent Musburger


to exclaim, "Can't stop the
freight train," in regards to
Williams.
That sums up Williams'
mindset: He's the train
and defenders are the
tracks.
Williams who, like his
running style, is some-
what frenzied and hyper
- has embraced his new
role on and off the field.
He recently had a son he
named Karlos Williams Jr.


BOOK BOWL SCOREBOARD
S SATURDAY'S RESULTS
k SNew Mexico Bowl
Colorado State 48, Washington State 45
Las Vegas Bowl Arizona
Southern Ca145, Fresno State 20 1230
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl :
gr San Diego State 49, Buffalo 24
a .. New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 24,Tulane 21 Virginia
a gy MONDAY'S RESULT (CBS)
Beef'O'Brady's Bowl
East Carolina 37, Ohio 20
TUESDAY'S RESULT Rice (9
said Utah State coach Hawaii Bowl (ESPN)
Matt Wells, who played Oregon State 38, Boise State 23
quarterback at Utah State TODAY'S GAMES
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl Texas A
in the mid-1990s. At Detroit (ESPN)
Bowling Green (10-3) vs. Pittsburgh (6-6),
6 p.m. (ESPN)
Bowling Green favored Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
against Pittsburgh: Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Utah State (8- UNLV
Pittsburgh's award-winning defensive 5), 9:30 p.m. (ESPN) (ESPNU
tackle Aaron Donald hopes to close FRIDAY'S GAMES
Military Bowl
his career with a win tonight against At Annapolis, Md. Nebra
Bowling Green at the Little Caesars Marshall (9-4) vs. Maryland (7-5), 2:30
p.m. (ESPN)
Pizza Bowl in Detroit to give the Texas Bowl
Panthers a winning record for the first Minnesota (8-At Houston (), 6 p.m. Wiscon
Minst 84) vs. Syracuse (6-6), 6 p.m. 1P.M.()
time since he was a freshman. But (ESPN)
the Falcons will not be easy to beat. Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco Iowa (8
Bowling Green (10-3) is favored to top BYU (8-4) vs. Washington (8-4), 9:30 p.m.
*(ESPN(
the Panthers (6-6) at Ford Field, where SATURDAY'S GAMES
SATURDAY'S GAMESStno
it defeated previously unbeaten and Pinstripe Bowl I
16thranked Northern Illinois in the N At NewYork 5 p.m.)
16th-ranked Northern Illini e (8-4) vs. Rutgers (6-6), Noon
Mid-American Conference champion- (ESPN)
ship game earlier this month. Belk Bowl Baylor
ship game At Charlotte, N.C. (ESPN)
Cincinnati (9-3) vs. North Carolina (6-6),
3:20 p.m. (ESPN)
Report: Texas president Russell Athletic Bowl
insisted Brown resign: At Orlando
Sw e t r Miami (9-3) vs. Louisville (11-1), 6:45 Alabarr
Mack Brown was poised to return p.m. (ESPN) p.m. (E'
as Texas coach in 2014 until he was Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
told to resign at the insistence of Kansas State (7-5) vs. Michigan (7-5),
university President Bill Powers, 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) Ohio S
according to a story posted on Yahoo MONDAYS GAMES p.m. (E
Sports late Monday. The story, based At Fort Worth, Texas
Middle Tennessee (8-4) vs. Navy (8-4), Missou
on one anonymous source, said 11:45 a.m. (ESPN) I ou
Brown thought he would be back Music City Bowl 7.30 p.r
At Nashville, Tenn.
the morning after the teams annual Mississippi (7-5) vs. Georgia Tech (7-5),
banquet on Dec. 13. But things 3:15 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl Vander
changed midday as new mens athletic At San Antonio (ESPN)
director Steve Patterson informed Oregon (10-2) vs. Texas (8-4), 6:45 p.m.
(ESPN)
Brown it was best he resign. Texas Holiday Bowl B'
spokesman John Bianco said Brown At San Diego
SArizona State (10-3) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), Florida
would have no further comment. 10:15 p.m. (ESPN) 8:30 p.


His punishing brand
of running combined
with his explosive speed
will make him a valuable
weapon against Auburn
in the BCS Championship
Game.
The Tigers surrender an
average of 4.59 yards per
carry and have allowed 76
runs of 10 yards or more,
more than 98 other teams.


TUESDAY'S GAMES
AdvoCareV100 Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
a (7-5) vs. Boston College (7-5),
.m.(ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Tech (8-4) vs. UCLA (9-3), 2 p.m.
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
-3) vs. Mississippi St. (6-6), 4 p.m.
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
A&M (8-4) vs. Duke (10-3), 8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY'S GAMES
Heart of Dallas Bowl
At Dallas
7-5) vs. North Texas (8-4), Noon
U)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
iska (8-4) vs. Georgia (8-4), Noon
(ESPN2)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
sin (9-3) vs. South Carolina (10-2),
ABC)
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
-4) vs. LSU (9-3), 1 p.m. (ESPN)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
d (11-2) vs. Michigan State (12-1),
ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
(11-1) vs. UCF (11-1), 8:30 p.m.
JAN. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
na ( 11 -1) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 8:30
SPN)
JAN. 3
Orange Bowl
At Miami
tate (12-1) vs. Clemson (10-2), 8
SPN)
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
ri (11-2) vs.Oklahoma State (10-2),
n. (FOX)
JAN. 4
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
bilt (8-4) vs. Houston (8-4), 1 p.m.
JAN. 6
CS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
ia State (13-0) vs. Auburn (12-1),
m. (ESPN)


I COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

TODAY
60-plus Evening Slow
Pitch league: Sign up for the
winter/spring season, 5 p.m. at the
Carmalita Complex, Punta Gorda.
Other signup dates: Tuesday, Jan. 2,
Jan. 7. and Jan. 9. Anyone turning 60
by January 2015 is eligible. Season
starts in mid-January. Contact Vince,
941-624-3630.

BASEBALL
Charlotte County
over-53 team: Championship
level players needed for all positions,
college playing experience a plus.
Tryouts in December. Split season
(Jan.-June, Sept.-Oct.). Games
scheduled for Sundays. Contact
Dave, 941-456-5229 or pgj2007@
embarqmail.com.

Englewood Area Youth
Baseball: Cal Ripken and Babe
Ruth for boys 4-15 and girls 4-8.
Registration (fee is $30): Jan. 4,12-2
p.m., Jan. 7 and 9,6-7:30 p.m., Jan.11,
11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tryouts: Jan. 18 and
25 for all boys 9-15 not returning to
same team. Registration, tryouts at
Englewood Sports Complex. Call Bill,
941-468-3871.

Snowbird Classic: Seeking
volunteers to help with admissions,
scorekeeping, public address
announcing, concessions, program
selling and parking. Event held at
South County and North County
parks from Feb. 14 to March 22.
Call 941-876-3226 or email steve@
snowbirdbaseball.com or Shannon@
snowbirdbaseball.com.

FISHING
Feed the Hungry Trout
Tournament: Jan. 11,11 a.m. at
The Fishery Restaurant, Placida. Two-
to four-person teams. Entry fee: $125
plus sales tax ($8.75)/team. Register
atTroutScramble.com. Tournament
format: Each team must catch limit of
trout, check it in and catch a second
limit; fastest time wins. All trout
donated to Salvation Army.

FOOTBALL
Charlotte Warriors: Spring,
summer and fall registration for girls
and boys 5-15. FSYFL registration: Jan.
6, 6-8 p.m., for January-April season.
Fees: $135 for football, $75 for cheer.
Pop Warner registration: Feb. 6,6-8
p.m., and Feb. 8,9 a.m.-1 p.m. for
August-December season. Fees: $200
for football, $200 for cheer. Free clinics:
May-July. Call (941-347-7200 or email
info@charlottewarriors.com.

Peace River Athletic
Club flag football: Coed teams
for ages 5-17, games on Sundays.
Space limited to 300 participants.
Contact Elgin 941-268-1891, Carolyn
941-457-4291 or register at www.
pracflorida.com.

Buffalo Bills Backers:
Meets for every Bills game at Buffalo
Wings and Rings, Price and Toledo
Blade, North Port. Everyone is asked
to bring a non-perishable food item
for the North Port Salvation Army food
bank. Call Betty, 941 429 6835.

SOCCER
Franz Ross Park YMCA:
For ages 3-13. Register in person,
online at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com or
call 629-9622.

North Port Youth Soccer
annual meeting: Jan. 8,6:30
p.m., at Narramore Soccer Complex
(behind Glenallen Elementary School).
Election of board members and officers
will take place. Contact bcallan@
northportyouthsoccer.org.

SOFTBALL
Charlotte County Half
Century League signups:
For 50-and-over team, Jan. 2, 7, 9
from 5:30-7 p.m. at Carmalita Softball
Complex, 6895 Florida St., Punta
Gorda. Cost: $50. Season starts Jan. 14.
Games played on Tuesday, Thursday
nights. Call Bruce 941-743-9694 or
John 239-243-6150.

VOLUNTEERS
Charlotte County Family


YMCA: Coaches, instructors and
referees needed for soccer, T-ball,
cheerleading and flag football.
Call program director Dan Cormier,
941-629-9622 ext. 108, or e-mail
dcormier@charlottecountyymca.com.

To have your activity published,
fax (941-629-2085) or e-mail (sports@
sun-herald.com) event details to the
Sports Department at least one weekin
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


pl







The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


U NBAROUNDUP


Sports on TV
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6p.m.
ESPN- Little Caesars Bowl, Pittsburgh vs.
Bowling Green, at Detroit
S9:30 p.m.
ESPN Poinsettia Bowl, Utah St.vs. North-
em Illinois, at San Diego
NBA BASKETBALL
SD8p.m.
TNT Memphisat Houston
S10:30 p.m.
TNT- L.A. Clippers at Portland
SOCCER
S7:40a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Manchester
United at Hull City
*19:55 a.m.
NBCSN- Premier League, Arsenal at West
Ham
12:25p.m.
SNBCSN Premier League, Liverpool at
Manchester City

Collegetbasketball
MEN
S Wednesday's results
TOURNAMENTS
Diamond Head Classic
SAt Honolulu
Seventh Place
r i George Mason 65, Saint Mary's (Cal) 63
Fifth Place
Hawaii 79, Oregon St. 73
Third Place
South Carolina 69, Akron 59
Championship
S,., ,,. Iowa State 70, Boise State 66


















Oklahoma City, Serge 9bak bloca2 5 81
AP PHOTO Today'sgames
No games scheduled
ks a shot from New York's Tim Friday'sgames
f of Wednesday's game. SOUTH
St. Andrews atuMercer, 7 p.m.
N. Kentuckyat North Carolina, 7 p.m.
EAST
Lafayette at Seton Hall, 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
l Defiance at Oakland, 7 p.m.
1 Louisiana-Monroe at Ohio St., 7 p.m.
DePaul at Northwestern, 9 P.M.
2I77 (1tCS a WEST
Y o r OMorgan St. at CS Northridge, 10 p.m.
Saint Katherine at San Diego St., 10 p.m.
C strs MVSU atWashington, 10:30 p.m.
WOMEN
Lr lilu ck : Wednesday's results
No games scheduled

10- of- 14 shooting as the Today'sgames
No games scheduled
Thunder left a sellout
crowd of 19,812 booing Friday's games
the home team, or mak- Nogamesscheduled
ing no noise at all. Pro basketball

Bulls 95, Nets 78: In New NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
York, Taj Gibson scored 20 points Atlantic W L Pdt GB
andJimmyButleradded 15 tohelp Toronto 11 15 .423 -
Boston 12 17 .414 12
Chicago rout Brooklyn. Trailing 50-49 NewYork 9 19 321 3
early in the third quarter, the Bulls Brooklyn 9 19 .321 3
behind Butle, who keyed a Philadelphia 8 20 .286
took over :in Btle e Southeast W L Pdt GB
21-5 run. Deron Williams scored 18 HEAT 22 6 .786 -
points for the Nets, who have lost four Atlanta 15 13 .536 7
Charlotte 14 15 .483 812
straight. Washington 12 13 .480 812
MAGIC 8 20 .286 14
Central W L Pdt GB
Rockets 111, Spurs 98: Indiana 23 5 .821 -
In San Antonio,James Harden scored Detroit 14 16 .467 10
ointsand D gtHwr h Chicago 11 16 .407 1112
28 points and Dwight Howard had Cleveland 10 17 .370 1212
15 points and 20 rebounds, leading Milwaukee 6 22 .214 17
balanced Houston to a victory over WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest W L Pct GB
the Spurs. San Antonio 22 7 .759 -
Houston 19 11 .633 312
Dallas 16 12 .571 512
No Kobeon Christmas; NewOrleans 12 14 .462 812
says recovery is'slow': Kobe Memphis 12 15 .444 9
Northwest W L Pdt GB
Bryant wasn't happyaboutnspending Portland 23 5 .821 -
Christmas Day on the bench, unable Oklahoma City 23 5 .821 -
to help the struggling Los Angeles Denver 14 13 .519 812
Sh t ings a ngeles Minnesota 13 15 .464 10
Lakers in theire101-95loss to the Utah 8 23 258 1612
Miami Heat.Bryant leads the NBA with: Pacific W L Pt GB
L.A.Clippers 20 9 .690 -
a record 15 Christmas appearances, Phoenix 17 10 .630 2
but he's out 4-6 weeks with a fracture Golden State 16 13 .552 4
in letL.A. Lakers 13 16 .448 7
in his left knee. He said his recovery is Sacramento 8 19 .296 11
going slowly because he can't put any Tuesday's results
eon his knee. No games scheduled
















pressure on thiskee.ad nd ^^
paes ke Wednesday's results
Chicago 95, Brooklyn 78
Oklahoma City 123, NewYork 94
32 minutes. HEAT 101, L.A. Lakers 95
Houston 111,San Antonio 98
"I hadn't even played L.A. Clippers at Golden State, late
5-on-5 since I got hurt, so Today's games
Atlanta at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
this is the first time I've :Memphis at Houston, 8 p.m.
actually played basket- San Antonio at Dallas,8:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
ball," he said. "Health- Friday'sgames
wise, everything stayed Detroit at MAGIC, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
intact and I felt good out Trnote~r,3p
a nd-1 f-21 OO out 1-23, SToronto at NewYork, 7 30 p.m.
there, so it's progress." Milwaukee at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
The Lakers played a Washington at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
DenveratNewOrlean s,8p.m.
competitive game against L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9sp
the loaded Heat despite HEATat Sacramento, 10 p.m.
their poor shooting and Phoenix at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
the absence of Bryant, Pro football
Steve Nash (nerve root
irritation) and Steve Blake NFL
(ri*[ght elbow). Thney led East W L T Pdt PF PA
by 10 points and never :y-New England 11 4 0 .733 410 318
uy""mor thn tat. DOLPHINS 8 7 0 .533 310 315
"I thought we attacked Buffalo 6 9 0 .400 319 354
them the way we wanted South w L T Pd PF PA
y-Indianapolis 10 50 .667 361 326
to," Lakers coach Mike Tennessee 6 9 0 .400 346 371
D'Antoni said. "We can JAGUARS 4 11 0 .267 237 419
Houston 2 13 0 .133 266 412
step it up abit and be a :North W L T Pdt PF PA
little bit tougher, espe- y-Cincinnati 10 5 0 .667 396 288
ciall' my on the boards and Baltimore 8 7 0 .533 303 318
Pittsburgh 7 8 0 .467 359 363
places like that." :Cleveland 4 11 0 .267 301 386
West W L T Pdt PF PA
HEA11,LAER95 y-Denver 12 3 0 .800 572 385
HEATI 01,) AES9 x-Kansas City 11 4 0 .733 406 278
MIM (0)San Diego 8 7 0 .533 369 324
James 7-14 5-919, Battier 1-50-03, Bosh Oakland 4 11 0 .267 308 419
9-18 5-623, Chalmers 3-7 0-07, Wade 11I NATIONAL CONFERENCE
170-2 23, Allen4-5O0-02, Lewisl -50-03, East W L T Pdt PF PA
Andersen -10-02, Cole 3- 0-07, Haslem Philadelphia 9 6 0 .6uu 418 i6u
1-20-02 2Totalsl 418010-17101. : Dallas 8 7 0 .533 417 408
L.A. LAKERS (95) :N.Y.Giants 6 9 0 .400 274 3771
Johnson 4-10 0-0 12, Williams 1-4 0-0 3,: Washington 3 12 0 .200 328 458
Gaso16-121-213, Farmarl-71-23, Meeks South W L T Pdt PF PA
6-121-217, HenryS-8 4-74, Hil12-65-9 :x-Carolina 11 4 0 .733 345 2211
9,Young7-182-220, Kellyl1-21-24.Totals NewOrleans 10 5 0 .667 372 287
33-7915-2695.: Atlanta 4 11 0 .267 333 422
Miami 21 30 25 25-- 101 BUCS 4 11 0 .267 271 347


Oklahoma City's Serge Ibaka blocl
Hardaway Jr. during the first half



Durant



leave N(



Thunde


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK -Not
only was there no Kevin
Durant-Carmelo Anthony
showdown, there wasn't
much of a game, either.
The Oklahoma City
Thunder made sure of it
with the most dominant
performance ever by a
road team on Christmas.
Durant scored 29
points, Russell Westbrook
had a triple-double by
the middle of the third
quarter, and the Thunder
rolled to a 123-94 victory
Wednesday over the New
York Knicks.
The 29-point victory
was the largest for a road
team on Christmas.
"I just know that if we
play the way we play,
team basketball, Thunder
basketball, not too many
teams that can beat us,"
Westbrook said.
Westbrook finished
with 14 points, 13 re-
bounds and 10 assists in
his first triple-double of
the season and seventh
of his career. Serge Ibaka
added 24 points on



HEAT
FROM PAGE 1
Henry had 14 and Pau
Gasol added 13 points
and 13 rebounds.
Miami shot 51 percent
from the field while
improving to 7-0 against
the Western Conference
this season. It was its
19th straight win overall
against West opponents.
Bosh scored 13 of his
23 points in the first half,
when Miami trailed 27-21
after the first quarter.
"I just made an effort
to get to the basket a little
more," he said. "We just
kept wearing on them
offensively. They made
some tough shots."
Los Angeles shot
42 percent in its third
consecutive loss. The
Lakers were 14 of 36 from
3-point range as they
tried to go over the top to
beat the Heat's interior.
"Teams will try to get
us moving and play out
of our rotations," Heat
coach Eric Spoelstra said.
"Early they were getting
wide-open ones. Some of
those Nick Young hit were
tough."
Jordan Farmar returned
from a left hamstring
tear after missing 10
games, giving the Lakers
a true point guard to run
the offense. But he was
ineffective, with three
points and two assists in


I SCOREBOARD


LA.Lakers 27 19 28 21- 95 North W L T Pet PF PA
3-Point Goals-Miami 9-27 (Allen 4-5, Chicago 8 7 0 .533 417 445
Wade 1-1, Cole 1-2, Chalmers 1-3, Battier Green Bay 7 7 1 .500 384 400
1-5, Lewis 1-5, Bosh 0-2, James 0-4), L.A. Detroit 7 8 0 .467 382 362
Lakers 14-36 (Young 4-7, Johnson 4-9, Minnesota 4 10 1 .300 377 467
Meeks 4-10, Kelly 1-1, Williams 1, Henry West W L T Pet PF PA
0-1, Farmar 04). Fouled Out-None. Re- x-Seattle 12 3 0 .800 390 222
bounds-Miami 47 (Bosh 11), L.A. Lakers x-San Francisco 11 4 0 .733 383 252
56 (Gasol 13). Assists-Miami 29 (Chalm- Arizona 10 5 0 .667 359 301
ers, Wade 7), L.A. Lakers 15 (Meeks, Gasol St.Louis 7 8 0 .467 339 337
3). Total Fouls-Miami 20, L.A. Lakers 19. x-clinched playoffspot
A-18,997 (18,997). y-clinched division


Houston
Detroit a
Carolina
Clevelan
Washing
Baltimor
JAGUAR
N.Y. Jets
Denver a
Kansas C
St. Louisa
San Fran
Green Ba
BUCS at
Buffalo a
Philadeir

Coil



North Da
2p.m.

Pro



Boston
LIGHTNI
Montrea
Detroit
Toronto
Ottawa
PANTHE
Buffalo

Pittsburc
Washing
Philadelr
N.Y.Ranc
NewJers
Columbi
Carolina
N.Y.Islan


Chicago
St. Louis
Coloradc
Minneso
Dallas
Winnipeg
Nashville

Anaheirm
Los Ana


Sunday's games United Statesvs. Slovakia, 7:30 a.m.
atTennessee, 1 p.m. Sweden vs. Finland, 9 a.m.
t Minnesota, 1 p.m. Canada vs. Czech Republic, 11:30 a.m.
at Atlanta, 1 p.m. Russia vs. Switzerland, 1 p.m.
d at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m. Sunday's games
ton at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
eat Cincinnati, pm Germanyvs. United States, 9 a.m.
S at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Norwayvs. Sweden, 11:30 a.m.
at DOLPHINS, 1p.m. Monday's games
at Oakland, 4:25 p.m. Czech Republic vs. Germany, 7:30 a.m.
ityat San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Russia vs. Finland, 9 a.m.
at Seattle, 4:25 p.m. Canada vs. Slovakia, 11:30 a.m.
cisco at Arizona, 4:25 p.m. Switzerland vs. Norway, 1 p.m.
iyatChicago,4:25 p.m. Tuesday's games
New Orleans, 4:25 p.m. Slovakia vs. Czech Republic, 7:30 a.m.
t New England, 4:25 p.m. Sweden vs. Russia, 8 a.rn.
hiaatDallas,8:30p.m. United Statesvs. Canada, 11:30a.m.
Finland vs. Switzerland, Noon
ege football Jan. 2
Relegation, 5 a.m.
FCS CHAMPIONSHIP Quarterfinal,6 a.m.
Jan. 4
At FC Dallas Stadium Quarterfinal, 8:30 a.m.
Frisco, Texas Quarterfinal, 11 a.m.
akota State(14-0)vs.Towson (13-2), Quarterfinal, 1:30 p.m.

h e I Transactions
hockey
h c BASEBALL
NHL National League
EASTERN CONFERENCE LOS ANGELES DODGERS Agreed to
Atlantic Division termswith 3BJuan Uribe.
GP W LOTPts GF GA
37 25 10 2 52 106 77 FOOTBALL
ING 37 23 11 3 49106 87 National Football League
I 38 22 13 3 47 96 84 DALLAS COWBOYS Released WR/KR
39 17 13 9 43 99 108 Micheal Spurlock. Signed QBJon Kitna.
39 18 16 5 41 106 113 NEWYORK GIANTS-Placed S Cooper
39 15 17 7 37 111 126 Tayloroninjuredreserve. Signed G EricHer-
ERS 38 1419 5 33 88123 manfrom the practice squad and CBTravis
37 1024 3 23 66 105 Howard to the practice squad.
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
gh 39 27 11 1 55 121 88 Glantz-Culver Line
ton 37 19 14 4 42 117 112
phia 37 17 16 4 38 93 104 NCAA FOOTBALL
gers 38 18 18 2 38 88 102 FAVORITE 0 T 0/U UNDERDOG
;ey 38 15 16 7 37 92 99 TONIGHT
Js 37 16 17 4 36 101 106 LittleCaesarsPizzaBowl
37 14 15 8 36 86 105
ders 38 11 20 7 29 96 129 AtDetroit
WESTERN CONFERENCE Bowling Green 51/2 412 (50) Pittsburgh
Central Division Poinsettia Bowl
GP W LOT Pts GF GA At San Diego
39 26 7 6 58 145 107 Utah St. +2 1 (571/2) N.Illinois
36 24 7 5 53 128 85 FRIDAY
S 36 23 10 3 49 106 88 Military Bowl
ta 39 20 14 5 45 88 96 At Annapolis,Md.
36 18 12 6 42 106 107 Marshall 1 212(6212) Maryland
g 39 16 18 5 37 103 116 T x s o
S 37 16 17 4 36 85 109 TexaBow
Pacific Division At Houston
GP W L OT Pts GF GA Minnesota 412 4 (471/2) Syracuse
S 39 27 7 5 59 127 98 Fight Hunger Bowl
eles 38 25 9 4 54106 76 At San Francisco


San Jose 37 23 8 6 52 121 94
Vancouver 39 22 11 6 50 106 93
Phoenix 36 19 10 7 45 111 110
Calgary 37 14 17 6 34 95 118
Edmonton 39 12 24 3 27 101 135
NOTE: 2 points for a win, 1 pointfor OT loss.
Tuesday's results
No games scheduled
Wednesday's results
No games scheduled
Today's games
No games scheduled
Friday's games
Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m.
Buffalo atToronto, 7 p.m.
Columbus at NewJersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Minnesota atWinnipeg, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Phoenix, 9 p.m.


Washington


Notre Dame


3 3 (60)
SATURDAY
Pinstripe Bowl
At NewYork
151/2 14(521/2)


Rutgers


I BelkBowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina 3 21/2 (57) Cincinnati
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando
Louisville 3 31/2 (57) Miami
BuffaloWild Wings Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Kansas St. 3 41/2(551/2) Michigan
MONDAY
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Navy 61/2 61/2(561/2) MiddleTenn.
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi 21/2 3 (571/2) GeorgiaTech
Alamo Bowl


ECHL At San Antonio
EASTERN CONFERENCE Oregon 101/2131/2(671/2) Texas
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Holiday Bowl
Wheeling 2614 7 0 5 33 76 71 AtSanDiego
Reading 2212 9 1 0 25 58 57 ArizonaSt. 111/214(711/2) TexasTech
Elmira 24 912 1 2 21 60 75 TUESDAY
North Division AdvoCareVi100 Bowl
GPW L OL SL Pts GF GA At Shreveport, La.
Cincinnati 2616 8 1 1 34 83 67 Arizona 7 71/2(571/2) Boston Coll.
Evansville 2514 7 1 3 32 83 83 SunBowl
Kalamazoo 2413 9 0 2 28 66 60 AtEl Paso, Texas
FortWayne 2410 9 1 4 25 72 80 UCLA 71/2 7 (471/2) VirginiaTech
Toledo 24 813 3 0 19 68 89
South Division Liberty Bowl
GPW L OL SLPts GF GA AtMemphisTenn.
S.Carolina 2619 4 1 2 41 85 54 Mississippi St. 7 7 (501/2) Rice
Florida 2818 8 1 1 38101 77 Chick-fil-ABowl
Orlando 271511 0 1 31 72 72 AtAtlanta
Greenville 271213 1 1 26 64 69 TexasA&M 111/212 (75) Duke
Gwinnett 26 717 0 2 16 57 81 WEDNESDAY
WESTERN CONFERENCE Gator Bowl
Mountain Division At Jacksonville
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA Georgia 9 9 (60) Nebraska
Colordo 2817 6 (60) Nebraska
Colorado 2817 6 3 2 39 95 76
A~kaHeart of Dallas Bowl
Alaska 2517 7 1 0 35 84 47 Heart of Dallas Bowl
Idaho 2714 9 2 2 32 87 81 NorthTexas 61/2 61/2(551/2) UNLV
Utah 24 714 1 2 17 48 66 Capital One Bowl
Pacific Division At Orlando
GPW L OL SLPts GF GA Wisconsin 2 11/2 (51) South Carolina
Ontario 2719 4 1 3 42 82 65 OutbackBowl
Stockton 2714 9 0 4 32 89 82 AtTampa,


San Francisco28 10 15 2 1 23 63 96 LSU
LasVegas 24 813 3 0 19 60 83
Bakersfield 25 915 0 1 19 61 83
Note: Two points are awarded for a win,
one point for an overtime or shootout loss. Stanford
Tuesday's results
No games scheduled
Wednesday's results Baylor
No games scheduled
Today's games
South Carolina at Gwinnett, 6:05 p.m.
Reading at Elmira, 7:05 p.m. Alabama
LasVegas at Bakersfield, 10 p.m.
Friday's games
Wheeling at Gwinnett, 6:05 p.m.
South Carolina at Greenville, 7 p.m.
Kalamazoo at Reading, 7:05 p.m. Missouri I
Toledo at FortWayne, 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Evansville, 8:15 p.m.
Utah at Colorado, 9:05 p.m. Ohio St.
Idahoat LasVegas, 10:05 p.m.
Stockton at San Francisco, 10:30 p.m.
Ontario at Alaska, 11:15 p.m.
Vanderbil
AHL
Tuesday's results
No games scheduled
Wednesday's results
No games scheduled Ball St.
Today's games
Hamilton atToronto, 1 p.m. BC
Portland at Manchester, 7 p.m.
Hartford at Bridgeport, 7 p.m. Florida S
Providence at Worcester, 7 p.m.
Adirondackat Springfield, 7 p.m.
Hersheyat Binghamton, 7:05 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. FAVORIT
Rockford at Iowa, 8:05 p.m. Carolina
Friday'sgames atChicag
Adirondackat Albany, 7 p.m. atTennes
Binghamton at Utica, 7p.m. at Pittsbu
Syracuse at Hershey, 7 p.m. at N.Y. Gia
Norfolk at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m. atCincinr
St. John's atWorcester,7:30p.m. at Indian
Chicago at Lake Erie, 7:30 p.m. Philadelp
Toronto at Hamilton, 7:30 p.m. : Miami
Grand Rapids at Rockford, 8 p.m. at Miami
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. at Minne5
Texas at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. at New Er
Oklahoma Cityat Abbotsford, 10 p.m. at NewO
Denver
WORLD JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIPS atArizona
At Malmo, Sweden at San Die
Todays'games at Seattle
Germany vs. Canada, 7:30 a.m. OffKe
Norwayvs. Russia, 9 a.m.
Czech Republicvs. United States, 11:30a.m.
Switzerland vs. Sweden, 1 p.m. FAVORIT
Friday's games Atlanta
Slovakia vs. Germany, 9a.m. at Houstc
Finland vs. Norway, 11:30 a.m. San Anto
Saturday'sgames atPortlar


7 71/2 (49) Iowa
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
11/2 51V2(421V2) Michigan St.
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
171/2161/2(69) UCF
JAN. 2
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
141/2 15(511/2) Oklahoma
JAN. 3
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Pk 1 (601/2) Oklahoma St.
Orange Bowl
At Miami
5 21/2(681/2) Clemson
JAN. 4
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
It 2 21/2 (54) Houston
JAN. 5
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
9 81/2 (64) Arkansas St.
JAN. 6
S National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
t. 91/2 81/2(671/2) Auburn
NFL
Sunday
E 0 T 0/U UNDERDOG
8 61/2(451/2) atAtlanta
o OFFOFF(OFF) Green Bay
see 6 7 (441/2) Houston
rgh 51/2 7 (44) Cleveland
ints 3 31/2 (46) Washington
inati 4 6 (441/2) Baltimore
apolis 4 111/2(451/2) Jacksonville
hia 21/2 61/2(521/2) at Dallas
61/261/2 (41) N.Y.Jets
sota 2 3 (52) Detroit
gland 71/2 91/2 (47) Buffalo
'rleans12l/2121/2(47) TampaBay
101/2121/2(531/2) at Oakland
a 3 Pk(421/2) San Francisco
ego 10 91/2 (45) KansasCity
101/2101/2(43) St.Louis
y: Green Bay QB questionable
NBA
E LINE 0/U UNDERDOG
11/2(2051/2) at Cleveland
on 6/2 (197) Memphis
nio 21/2 (206) at Dallas
id 41/2 (212) L.A. Clippers


QUICK HITS


JAPANESE TEAM SAYS
TANAKA CAN SEEK
CAREER IN MLB
TOKYO (AP) -The
Masahiro Tanaka sweep-
stakes will officially
begin today, when big
league teams can begin
courting the Japanese star
pitcher through baseball's
revamped posting system.
The Rakuten Eagles,
Tanaka's Japanese team,
announced Wednesday it
was prepared to let him
leave, reversing its earlier
rejection.
"I'm grateful to the
team for allowing me to
try. Now I've made a first
step," he said. "I hope I
would receive offers from
as many teams as possible
so I have a wider option."
The NewYorkYankees
are considered the leading
candidates to sign Tanaka,
though the capping of the
posting fee at $20 million
means other teams can
afford to make offers.
The Chicago Cubs,
Los Angeles Dodgers and
Texas Rangers are among
other clubs expected to
pursue the 25-year-old
right-hander, who went
24-0 with a 1.27 ERA with
the Eagles during the
regular season.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
No. 14 Iowa State beats
Boise State 70-66: In Honolulu,
DeAndre Kane scored 23 points and No.
14 Iowa State overcame its worst half
of the season to beat Boise State (10-3)
in the Diamond Head Classic champi-
onship game. Kane hit a 3-pointer with
less than 2 minutes left to help seal the
win for the Cyclones (11-0).

OLYMPICS
Russia earmarks extra
$50M for Sochi Olympics:
Russia's Cabinet approved nearly
$50 million in extra subsidies for the
organizers of the Sochi Olympics,
scheduled for Feb. 7-23. The Cabinet's
decision increases the total number
of subsidies for the Sochi Organizing
Committee to the equivalent of more
than $420 million. The Cabinet said the
extra money would help finance the
committee's activities.

YACHTING
Sydney to Hobart race
begins: Defending champion Wild
Oats XI was the first of 94 yachts out of
Sydney Harbour today as it attempts
to win the Sydney-to-Hobart race for
a record-equaling seventh time in the
annual "bluewater classicl"The 70-foot
Clipper fleet has boats representing
six continents and has drawn crews
from 42 nations for the 723-mile race.
The 100-foot super maxis, including
Wild Oats XI, Perpetual Loyal and
Ragamuffin, are favored with Wild
Thing.

OBITUARIES
Longtime Indians
broadcaster dies: Mike Hegan,
who played 12 years in the majors and
was a longtime broadcaster with the
Cleveland Indians, was 71 ...
Gunnar Ericsson, a long-time
International Olympic Committee
executive and former member of the
executive committee, was 94.

BookYour

Tee Time Today

941-426-2804

Holiday Special
Limited Time Offer .

$ q OFF
^^* V I thisad|
Per person Not valid with any other
discount or promo. Exp. 12/31/13


Ratfs3maMn PM







Rates $35 AM /$30 PM


5456 Greenwoe
NorthhPflTd


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3









PREP SCHEDULE FALL ALL-AREA TEAMS


All times p.m. unless noted
TODAY
Boys basketball
Suncoast Holiday Classic at
Sarasota-Riverview
Palmetto vs. East Bay, 3
Mourning (Miami) vs. Braden
River, 4:30
Cardinal Mooney vs. Southeast,
6:30
Booker vs. North Port, 7:30
Wrestling
A.J. Jones Invitational at Osceola
HS, TBA (Lemon Bay in the field)
FRIDAY
Boys basketball
Lemon Bay Holiday Shootout
Charlotte vs. Haines City, 1
Sarasota vs. Wiregrass Ranch,
2:45
Port Charlotte vs. Strawberry
Crest, 4:30
West Oaks vs. Lemon Bay, 6:15
Suncoast Holiday Classic at
Sarasota-Riverview
Second round
Sickles vs. Palmetto/East Bay
winner, 3
Covington Catholic vs. Cardinal
Mooney/Southeast winner, 4:30
Lake Howell vs. Booker/North
Port winner, 6
Riverview vs. Mourning/Braden
River winner, 7:30
Girls basketball
Queen of Palms Tournament
Sapphire Divison
at Cape Coral HS
Estero vs. North Miami, 9 a.m.
Port Charlotte vs. Calloway
County (Ky.), 10:30 a.m.
Barlow vs. Leesburg, 5
Heritage vs. Sickles, 8:30
Amber Division
at Cypress Lake HS
Seminole Ridge vs. Tampa Bay
Tech, 9a.m.
Charlotte vs. Braden River, 10:30
a.m.
Cypress Lake vs. Jensen Beach, 7
Palmetto Ridge vs. Oasis, 8:30
Wrestling
Lakeland (HS) Invitational, TBD
(Charlotte in field)
A.J. Jones Invitational at Osceola
HS, TBA (Lemon Bay in field),
TBD

SATURDAY
Boys basketball
Lemon Bay Holiday Shootout
Charlotte vs. Strawberry Crest,
noon
Port Charlotte vs. Haines City,
3:30 p.m.
Lemon Bay vs. Wiregrass Ranch,
5:15 p.m.
Suncoast Holiday Classic
atSarasota-Riverview
Consolation, Teams TBD, 3
Consolation, Teams TBD, 4:30
Semifinal, 6
Semifinal, 7:30
Girls basketball
Queen of Palms Tournament
at Cape Coral HS
Barlow/Leesburg loser vs. Port
Charlotte/Calloway County (Ky.)
loser, 10:30 a.m.
Estero/North Miami loser vs.
Heritage/Sickles loser, noon
Estero/North Miami winner vs.
Heritage/Sickles winner, 3:30
Barlow/Leesburg winner vs. Port
Charlotte/Calloway County (Ky.)
winner, 5
at Cypress Lake HS
Charlotte/Braden River loser vs.
Seminole Ridge/Tampa BayTech
loser, noon
Cypress Lake/Jensen Beach loser
vs. Palmetto Ridge/Oasis loser,
1:30
Charlotte/Braden River winner
vs. Seminole Ridge/Tampa Bay
Tech winner, 3:30
Cypress Lake/Jensen Beach
winner vs. Palmetto Ridge/Oasis
winner, 7


UYgaf &W IVf
Volleyball Boys golf Girls golf Boys Girls Boys Girls Football
Sunday Monday Tuesday swimming swimming cross country cross country Sunday
Wednesday Today Friday Saturday


SUN PHOTO BY KATHERINE GODINA
Lemon Bay's Sophie Cattermole competes in the girls 200 yard freestyle during the Charlotte County Swim Meet at South County Pool in Punta Gorda this season.
Cattermole sees herself coaching after her competitive days are finished. First up for the junior is choosing a college.


CATTERMOLE

FROM PAGE 1
be located in a region
"too hot" or "too cold,"
although she might
be willing to bend on
that one, particularly
if the school or pro-
gram appeals to her
competitiveness.
After all, winning
championships, as she
did in the FHSAA's 200
IM, causes her as much
stress as happiness be-
cause of the expectation
it sets.
"I can't go down in
place, I have to win


it again next year,"
Cattermole said. "If
I don't, it's gonna be
embarrassing."
She isn't just compet-
itive about swimming.
Three weeks ago, she did
test corrections on a test
she earned a 100 on just
to get back some of the
extra credit points she
missed.
Cattermole sees coach-
ing as a future because
she doesn't believe her
swim career will last
much past college. She
hopes to place in the
top eight at the NCAA
Championships by the
end of her collegiate


career, but the best she
sees herself doing after
that is competing in the
British Olympic Trials
(she's was born in and
spent her early childhood
in England).
"I want to be like my
head (club) coaches,"
Cattermole said. "To be
honest, I really want to be
a coach on the Sarasota
(YMCA) Sharks when I'm
older. I hope that that
team is still alive. That's
what I ultimately want
to be. I've grown up on
that team, I really want to
continue it on."
Cattermole trains year-
round with the Sharks


and has already earned
two sets of the club's
prestigious "black shirts,"
which are given only to
the swimmers that meet
the clubs' qualifying
standards for the YMCA
National Championships,
which the Sharks have
won as a team every year
since 2005.
Sharks coach Steve
Brown, who has worked
closely with Cattermole
for years, sees her as a
swimmer with the poten-
tial to be one of the best
in America next year,
swim at a top college
program and compete in
international meets.


"By the end of her
career she's going to
have a lot of experienc-
es," Brown said. "She'd
probably be a really good
coach. It's like anything
else; if you really want to
do it, you'll be better at
it than something your
heart's not in. I'm excited
about the possibilities
that are ahead."
And the fact she
already possesses the
orderliness, discipline
and competitiveness of a
coach doesn't hurt those
possibilities either.
Contact Zach Miller at 941-206-1140
orzmiller@sun-heraldxom.


ALL-AREA TEAM


GRACE COLDIRON
Charlotte Senior
After a year out of the a
pool, Coldiron returned and
qualified for the Class 3A
state championship in the
500 freestyle by swimming
a 5:18.31 at regionals. She
won that event and finished
second in the 200 freestyle
at the Charlotte County Championships.



HANNAH JAMES
Charlotte Senior
James medaled in two
events at the Class 3A state
championships. She finished
second in the 200 freestyle
with a time of 1:49.46 and
third in the 100 butterfly
with a time of 55.58. She
won district titles in both
events and a regional title in the 200 freestyle.


JESSICA COLLINS
Lemon Bay Senior
Despite dealing with a
nagging shoulder injury,
Collins won a district title in
the 50 freestyle and swam a
26.02, good for third place at
regionals. She qualified for
states as part of the Manta
Rays'200 medley and 200
freestyle relay teams.



DAKOTA MASON
Charlotte Junior
Mason won the 50 0
and 100 freestyle events f
at the Charlotte County
Championships and swam
a 57.06 in the 100 freestyle
at districts. She was also a
member of the 200 and 400
freestyle relay teams that
qualified for the Class 3A state meet.


FAITH CULVER
Charlotte Junior
Charlotte coach Jeff Cain
called Culver one of his
most improved swimmers.
She was a member of the
200 and 400 freestyle relay
teams that competed at the
Class 3A state champi-
onships and took first in
the 100 backstroke at the Charlotte County
Championships.


KATIE MORAN
Charlotte Senior
Moran contributed in
the pool and on the diving
board. She placed 21st
in diving at the Class 3A
state championship after
placing sixth at regionals.
She anchored the Tarpons'
200 and 400 freestyle relay
teams, which both qualified for states.


SARAH FRANTZ
Lemon Bay Sophomore
Frantz qualified for the
Class 2A state champion-
ships in the 200 and 500
freestyle and finished in
the top 11 at both events.
She won district titles and
was the regional runner-up
in both events. She won
the 100 butterfly at the Charlotte County
Championships.


MARIA PENNELLA
Port Charlotte Senior
Pennella set the school 7
record in the 100 backstroke I
with a 1:04.46 at regionals, i
which she also qualified
for in the 100 freestyle.
She placed in the top four
at both events during
the Charlotte County
Championships, including a second-place finish
in the 100 backstroke.


HONORABLE MENTION: Abby Shea (Lemon Bay), Kaitria Abbatematteo (Charlotte), Anna Coldiron (Charlotte), Caroline Spoonts (Charlotte).


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
- New England coach
Bill Belichick is blaming
recently instituted NFL
rules shortening offseason
practice time for what he
claims to be an increasing
number of player injuries.
"I'm in favor of total
preparation for the
players for the season,"
Belichick said during
a conference call with
Buffalo reporters this
week in leading up to
New England's home
game against the Bills
on Sunday. "And I think
that's been changed


U NFL


significantly and, I would
say, not necessarily for the
better when you look at
the injury numbers."
Belichick said players
are more vulnerable
to being hurt because
they're less prepared,
and described the
limits placed on offseason
workouts including
training camp as being
counterproductive.
Teams were prevented
from holding two-a-day
practices during training
camp. Limits were also
placed on how many
times players practiced in
pads throughout the year.


FERNANDEZ


Belichick blames FIRoM--


up 203 rushing yards,
the Dolphins must beat
the Jets and hope either
the Ravens lose to the
Bengals or the Chargers
upset the Chiefs in order
to make the playoffs for
the first time since 2008.
"We'll make some
corrections, but right
now we are focused on
getting ready for the Jets
and playing the most
important game since
we've been here together
probably right now
coming up this week,"
defensive coordinator
Kevin Coyle said.
The Dolphins' incon-
sistency running the
football has been one of
the biggest problems in
their defeats this season.


But Sunday was one of
the worst and broke a
trend of solid games in
that category.
The Dolphins ran
for 125 yards or more
against the Jets and
Steelers and mustered 89
yards against the Patriots
before a dismal 14 yards
on 12 carries against the
Bills. The Dolphins are
6-1 when rushing for
more than 100 yards as a
team this season.
The Dolphins rank
26th in rushing yards
overall and 25th in
rushing yards allowed.
"I just did not feel
at any point that of
those 12 carries our
longest run was 3 yards,"
offensive coordinator
Mike Sherman said.
"We really haven't had
many explosive runs this
year, which is not good.
We need to continue to


build towards that. A
lack of productivity in
the run game caused me
to veer off into another
direction."
Buffalo ran for 203
yards on 51 carries.
During their recent
three-game winning
streak, the Dolphins held
all three opponents to 89
rushing yards or less.
"That's unacceptable,
as far as we're con-
cerned," Coyle said of the
Bills game.
Coyle said it wasn't
easy to pinpoint why
a seemingly improved
group at the start of the
season has still not been
able to shut down the
run.
"We just, as I've
mentioned a few times
here throughout the
year, we've been in
games where we've gone
stretches of playing


outstanding run de-
fense," Coyle said. "We've
had more runs break
out at different times,
whether it be by tackling,
whether it be by a fit
that wasn't correct. We
are going to have to do a
real, hard study of this."
So here come the Jets,
a team that can both run
well and stop the run.
Although eliminated
from postseason conten-
tion, the Jets (7-8) have
won two of their past
three games and are still
one of the best teams in
the league at running
the football (sixth) and
stopping the run (third).
The Dolphins held the
Jets to only 99 yards in
their first meeting Dec. 1.
Ryan Tannehill had
one of his best games
of the season, throwing
for 331 yards and two
touchdowns.


rules for injuries


-Page 4 SP


The Sun /Thursday, December 26, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net







N


Laishley
MARINE I..


Please Visit Our RV Accessory Department
,.941-639-3868
Mon.-Sat. 8 AM.- 6 PM
24 Sunday10AM-4 PM
3415 Tamiami Trail
If We Do Not Stock It We Will Special Order It PuntaGorda, FL33950
A weekly publication of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. s, Serving Southwest Florida outdoor enthusiasts


12


rryYT'rrT^'TLki bnT


r





v ,/ k,' .. -, ,


Southwest Florida's
ONLY weekly guide to
outdoor recreation

ROOM

EMILMnD




23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-276-9657
Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com

EDITOR
LEEANDERSON
239-292-9230
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com

CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Alien
Dr. Mark Asperilla, MD
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Jarrod Brimer
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Ryan Ingle
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Jeff Kincaid
Dawn Klemish
Robert Lugiewicz
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi
Capt. Mike Myers
Capt. Dan Sansiveri
Betty Staugler
Matt Stevens
Bryan Stockbridge
Tony Towns
Capt. Cayle Wills
Walter W. Wilt

MARKETING
Advertising Director
Leslee Peth
941-205-6400
LPeth@sun-herald.com
Advertising Manager
Mike Ruiz
941-205-6402
MRuiz@sun-herald.com
Display Advertising
Chris Beckett
941-205-6405
CBeckett@sun-herald.com
eBoaters'Bargains
941-429-3110
Printed by
Sun Coast Media Group
Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.

GMum
WaterLine photo by Josh Olive
The sun is setting on 2013 -
get those last few casts of the
year is as soon as you can.


All in the same boat


I was putting away my kayak last week when
my wife came into the garage and asked me a
question. "What do you have against people from
Wisconsin?" she asked. I knew she wasn't referring
to the old rivalry between Wisconsin and my native
Minnesota, so I asked her what she meant. Turns out,
I mentioned in a column last week how sometimes
people from outside of Florida come to fish without
a solid grasp of the regulations here, and take an
illegal fish on occasion. It's an innocent enough
mistake, and people from all over are prone to make
it. There are a lot of rules to follow, and I'm sure many
Florida residents don't know them all.
But my point in that column was that small
mistakes like that are nothing compared to what


happened earlier this month up in the Panhandle.
More than 400 pounds of trout, pompano, flounder
and other prized fish were selfishly dumped at a boat
ramp, left to rot.
I apologize to Wisconsin Willy. By no means was
I singling out The Badger State, or Yankees for that
matter I use that term with pride. Whether it's
Alabama Abbie and Florida Frank from the south, or
Rhode Island Ralph and even Minnesota Matt from
the north, it's too bad whenever anybody keeps a fish
outside of the slot. But it's a whole different matter
when somebody wastes hundreds of pounds offish,
and doesn't come clean.
If that dumping took place in our Charlotte Harbor,
I personally know people would be heated. The news


would likely make it in both the Sun newspaper
and WaterLine Weekly until the culprit was caught.
And considering how much the Gulf means to the
Panhandle, I'm pretty sure there are plenty of people
up there searching for the criminals right now.
Again, no offense to anyone, just try to follow
regulation as best as you can. We're all in the same
boat here. If you do ever hear about anything
happening like the dumping up in the Panhandle,
be sure to notify the authorities. The Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission is there for a
reason. Anyone with helpful information is asked to
call the Wildlife Alert hotline at 888-404-3922.
Thanks to all the readers, and a special thanks to
my wife. She keeps me in line. Here's to 2014!


IIf you have a comment or question for think when I think about you. LEE:
WaterLine editor Lee Anderson, email It's a cold world out here all alone. You Senior citizens who are Florida residents
him at Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com. want to provide for your family, and need to might like to know that they do not need to
|p ml bring the money home. The sun will come, buy a saltwater fishing license according to


LEE:
My name is Michelle Gwinn. I am a commercial
fisherman's daughter. My father is a third
generation commercial fisherman in Charlotte
County. He started fishing when he was 11.
Fishing and crabbing have been his life. My
father has recently found out he has cancer and
is fighting for his life. I wrote a poem for him,
about the fisherman's life. His name is Rodney
Hedrickson. It would mean a lot to me if you can
find any room to put it in your paper. I think he
would love it! Thank you for your time.

A Commercial Fisherman's Daughter:
As I sit here seeing what you have seen so
many times before me too, I think of you, I
hear it too!
I sit here and listen to the water, and only
see darkness. I'm hoping they will come to
me too. And I still think of you!
The sun will come, and I will pray that they
will come to me on this day. This is the way I


9rrr


fihirrq reQula ,ri:,nr
Around Charlotte Harbor CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
Pelian trief.;
Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS, DVM
WIhat a year it miu,
Man on the Pier* MATT STEVENS
ihe tale of th e ni.( pihirn
A Life on the Water CAPT. VAN HUBBARD
otin tine i e rino i
Angling 101 ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
Learning it a ll ..............................................................................................


Shooting straight. RYAN INGLE
.3 80 or 9m m ?................................................................................................ Page 13
Angling 201 CAPT. CAYLE WILLS
Don't fear the river ....................................................................................... Page 16
Slack Tides..................................................................................................... Pag e 18
Diving Delight* WALTER W. WILT
W inter diving ................................................................................................ Page 2 0
Tournament Bassin'* GREG BARTZ
Fishing friends .............................................................................................. Page 21
Tackle Tech JEFF KINCAID
Is good tackle really worth the money?....................................................... Page 22
Boating safety classes................................................................................... Page 25
Bill introduced to raise price of duck stamps................................................ Page 26
Florida Keys pelicans found with pouches slashed....................................... Page 26


and we close our eyes, Oh God please don't
let the mullet go by.
This all you have and it's not much, but as
your daughter, I truly believe that fisher-
man have a special trust. They wake in the
morning before dawn, and ask their family
if they want to come.
You know it's really not fair to live this
fishing life only few men can bear. The
ups the downs, the strikes and misses. The
stories are they true? Nobody really knows,
except for you.
You are my father, and I have to say thank
you for being a fisherman that taught me
this way. It wasn't fishing that really kept us
strong, it's been you all along!
Asthe sun comes up and I start to close my
eyes, Oh God please don't let these mullet go by.
Michelle Gwinn


the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission. There are others who also
qualify for not paying this fee including:
Children under 16, Armed Forces members
home on leave (not stationed in the state)
and those on Medicaid and/or food stamps
(shore fishing only for these folks). You could
always direct people to the FWC online page.
It might make a difference to some people.
Denise DeLong
DENISE:
Tliel e ill e o// iI [ 11 i 1"1i0lt'ii 'l 0.' 1d i lle '

ie10 106d0l 0 Mdi ae 1i10[/ 1 ea Iaoll / f MlIceSe 01sTi ) l.t
"c'liSII /.)i' 'l pLl If!) MC'$L~ IOE O"H(/'/lflc'n l("lo0'l 1p10[W
li/(llE i|(i /M.Sc ['",IO E i'Si 'IO [ i "M//Oi~o c'I.Sc. IlE I\']1(.
ll. i an en e paae dei 1I e rl f[/I l ail i i Oi jnllunhi l .icens
e \AeIptiO i O ( o .ll iuc IlltOitii ll fIIOlI t l stMoat I L'iS
Pithi ci l ictli' i e i' lic ii/tl ui'tifi.Aiol fsie2 a
half ci)unAi of cjia/)e Ikeoi-nl 'ilti .[0/-
tie Adleison Ii"iteitie ll (d'i


- tee lAeI'slieiltile Edili


MICHELLE:
TllonlA I ou


1i0:12 1 Tibdrha


a7 Trading Post
finds home at
aq iBurnt Store Marina

Fae Supposedly, back in the 1850s,
there was a trading post
located somewhere near what
Paqe 10 is now Burnt Store Marina. And
supposedly, conflicts between
the settlers and the remaining
a 11 Semminoles led to the alleged
burning of the store hence
.Page 12 the name Burnt Store. Well...


Record number of Florida manatee deaths reported in 2013.......................Page 26
Kayak Away BRYAN STOCKBRIDGE
Real m meaning of holidays.............................................................................. Page 27
From the Publisher's Desk JOSH OLIVE
Resolutions, schm esolutions........................................................................ Page 28


I I


BULLETIN BOARD I Page 3

TIDE CHARTS | Page 4


READER PHOTOS I Page 14

FISH RECIPES I Page 21


MAP OF LOCAL WATERS I Page 5 FISH PROFILE I Page 23

FISH FINDER I Page 6 SOLUDAR TABLE I Page 26


., e7, 0 F 7-, A





'2 /j n,.. u.,lr-Tiik.e ,uAm
xiM< c Page 3 December 26,2013 -wnunuE *iummiiiiwm.iim


If you have a meeting, tournament, festival or other event yon want included in
the Outdoor Hews Bulletin Board, email it to WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com


HIKE THE WILDFLOWER PRESERVE
A guided ecology walk of about two miles from Wildflower
Preserve (3120 Gasparilla Pines Blvd., Englewood) to adjacent
Amberjack Preserve on Dec. 28th from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Differences in habitat types, management and animals and
plants will be discussed. Call 941-830-8922 for more info.
COMMISSION SEEKS VOLUNTEERS
The Charlotte County Commission is seeking volunteers for the
Marine Advisory Committee: An organization or association
to volunteer to serve as a permanent member of the Marine
Advisory Committee. Each organization shall be marine-oriented
and hold regularly scheduled meetings, and have a membership
of at least 25 people. Representatives from this organization/
association will serve three-year terms. The term of the first
representative will be effective once the organization/association
is approved, or as soon thereafter as a selection is made, and
shall expire Dec. 31st. For an application form to turn in with
your resume, contact Pam Alexander at 941-764-4909 or Pam.
Alexander@CharlotteFL.com, or fax your request for a form to her
at 941-764-4108.
SARASOTA CHILDREN'S GARDEN
Drop in from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and do a cool art project in The
Painted Bird Art Gallery at the Sarasota Children's Garden (1670


10th Way, Sarasota). Each week is a different hands on art project
come paint or learn collage or mix colors. This is a free art class
for members and it is included in admission for nonmembers.
Admission: Free-$10. Call 941-330-1711 for more information.
ONSHORE OFFSHORE BOAT SHOW
Come and check out everything that is boats at the Bradenton
Area Convention Center (1 Haben Blvd, Palmetto). Family-friendly
event to let you see what the industry and Florida have to offer.
Admission is $5. Call 727-894-3644 for more information.
LET'S GO FISHING! CLASSES
An introductory course in Florida Fishing is being offered at
the PGI Civic Association building on Shreve Street. Topics to be
covered include fishing techniques, tackle selection, rigging,
knot tying, lures, baits, cast nets, fish identification, tides,
and fishing regulations for fishing in fresh and salt waters of
Southwest Florida. Rods, reels, lures, nets and other fishing
equipment will be displayed during the class and there will
be a number of useful handouts issued to students. The class
is geared towards beginning anglers, but more experienced
fishermen will pick up helpful tips as well. The instructor is
long-time local fishing guide Capt. Ralph Allen who might
BULLETIN BOARD 124


S D, D A1 11 A


me reace miver AU.auDon .ociery win nosi me
following field trips and walkabouts. These trips are
free and open to the public.
OLLIE'S WALKABOUT: At Ollie's Pond Park (18235
Avon Ave., Port Charlotte) on Jan. Istat8 a.m. Contact
Stu and Louise Lewis at 603-742-2874.
WILD TURKEY STRAND FIELD TRIP: AtWild Turkey
Strand Preserve (11901 Rod & Gun Club Road, Fort Myers)
on Jan. 25th. Meet at 7 a.m. at south car pool location. Call
Jim Knoy at 303-868-8337 for more information.
PUNTA GORDA HISTORY PARK WALKABOUT: At
Punta Gorda History Park (501 Shreve St., Punta Gorda)
on Feb. 4th at 8 a.m. Call Starr Zachritz at
941-391-4446 for more information.
CELERY FIELDS FIELD TRIP: At Celery Fields (100
Coburn Road, Sarasota) on Feb. 22nd. Meet at 7 a.m.
at the north car pool location. Call Eleanor Marr at


94i-bZ4-4i/z bor more minormanon.I
DEEP CREEK PRESERVE WALKABOUT: At Deep
Creek Preserve (10797 SW Peace River Street, Arcadia)
on March 4th. Call Shannon McGinnis at 941-268-0429
for more information.
BABCOCK FIELD TRIP: At Babcock-Webb Wildlife
Management Area on March 22nd. Meet at 7 a.m. at
the Babcock-Webb entrance. Call Dave Lancaster at
586-214-0203 for more information.
SHELL CREEK WALKABOUT: At Shell Creek Preserve
(3081 Duncan Road., Punta Gorda) on April 1st at
8 a.m. Call Dave Lancaster at 586-214-0203 for more
information.
FORT DESOTO FIELD TRIP: At Fort DeSoto Park
(3500 Pinellas Bayway S., Tierra Verde) on April 19th.
Call Eleanor Marr at 941-624-4182 and Stu and Louise
Lewis at 603-742-2874 for more information.


I Illan c IlIUUI LIIVIIIIvi lu Il llai CLll lC anu m e
Charlotte County Natural Resource Department will
be conducting the following free guided walks and
programs in December. Unless noted, all walks begin at
9 a.m. For directions or further information, call Cedar
Point Environmental Park at 941-475-0769.
DEC. 27TH: Join a CHEC volunteer on a guided walk
through the oldgrowth pine flatwoods and mangrove
fringe of 125-acre Oyster Creek/Ann Dever Regional
Park in Englewood. Meet at the San Casa entrance.
DEC. 31ST: Get wild & wet! Join Bobbi Rodgers at
Cedar Point Park on a Seagrass Adventure Wading Trip
into Lemon Bay in search of marine organisms such as


sea IloU1 LlcI llUan juvenile lll1 IeJistlauoUnl Ie uIIeU.
JAN. 3RD: Seagrass Wading Adventure at Ponce de
Leon Park at 10 a.m. Register by calling 941-575-5435
or online at SeagrassAdventure.eventbrite.com.
JAN. 6TH: Public presentation Florida Waterbirds
by Jerry Waters.
JAN. 8TH: Wild Wednesday Video and Discussion at
10:30 a.m. featuring the Private Live of Plants by David
Attenborough.
JAN. 14TH: Young Children and Nature, register by
calling 941-575-5435 or on line at ChildrenAndNature.
eventbrite.com.


2014 NEW YEAR SPECIALS

FREE $399 Lowrance Elite 4 PRO GPS/ Fishfinder
with the purchase of any new Boat*

S2007 Carolina Skiff JV 17












Powered by a F40 Yamaha stroke $7,995.00*
A i')

I EL IAI;


LEE:
I don't know if you have or use a NOAA
weather radio with its constant rotating
reports. For years they have been doing
the offshore conditions, but just added a
separate Charlotte Harbor one recently.
It would be great if they added a tide
report from a specific Harbor location to
that report. Any idea on who to contact
to make that suggestion?
-Rick Fried, Arcadia

RICK:
/ visit the National OceanicandAtmospheric
Administration website often. I wouldn't be
surprised if they started charging me a fee!
Your best bet is to get in contact with the local
National Weather Service representative. I will
do the same. His name is Daniel Noah (no pun
intended) and you can contact him at Daniel.
Noah@NOAA.gov, or call his office at
813-645-2323. In the meantime, don't forget
about our tide chart on page 4.
-Lee Anderson, WaterLine Editor

LEE:
I love reading WaterLine and have been
very disappointed this year due to my
newspaper carriers failing to deliver it at
least eight times. I had thought that it


was my carriers'oversight, but my carrier
changed and it happened again with the
new carrier. I call the circulation depart-
ment every time and someone delivers it
the same day. It may be that I'm not the
only one this is happening to. I wanted
to let you know of this problem. When
I was a younger person and in better
health, I was a fisherwoman from early
childhood to well past middle age.
-Judith Lavine, North Port

JUDITH:
I will also look into this, Ifpeople aren't getting
their WaterLine each week, something is
extremely wrong. However, if this ever happens
again, let me know. I will personally deliver a
copy to you. It won't be the first time.
Lee Anderson, WaterLine Editor

Letters are welcome on any outdoor-related subject,
but we do have some rules. Please keep them to less
than 250 words. Letters may be edited for length as
well as grammar and spelling. All letters must be
signed with full name not initials. Slanderous or
libelous material will not be published. The Letters
to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for
community discourse. The opinions and statements
made in letters are solely those of the individual
writers. WaterLine and Sun Coast Media Group take no
responsibility for the content of these letters.


I1


I *Port Charlotte Location Only, Offers end 1115114
The Boat House of Charlotte Harbor The Boat House of Cape Coral
4295 Laura Rd. 1516 SE 46th St., Cape Coral
S 941-979-5219 239-549-2628

SE] 30Years of Serving OYA"MAHA
i F N.M -F E


il


N (


AI~II~iiPm7InrWi


I


I





tu,/J,KPr ,u Page 4 *December 26,2013


*aam6~..u U .e.UFie~Imi.eeu ~~~hUi
aa~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


-1T4 -._ Inp
Lk F T A7 11T<-a /F I-AmL--


THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
VENICE INLET 27.1117 N,82.4633 W
I-1____8 ______18:58 ______19:46 ______20:35___ 21:25 22:17 23:08
L18:13 1: 199 2. 12 2.23 2.26 2.25
r0:3-~7___ 1.85 102 .99,2.1
f06:38 -1.73__ 08:38 5 10:21- 11:30 12:20 13:01 / 13:33
0.99 0.96 1.02 / \ 1.09 1.13 \ / \ 1.17
/ \ /'- \ / 13:44\ / 14:39\ 15:34 \- 16:29\1/ 7:31
01:10-12:04 120:53:224 0-93-.0:2019011\0[ 1.0290.91
i0.29u062 02:21 0:80 03:24 0 04:20 05:11 05:58 06:42
0.29 0.04 -0.22 -0.47 -0.67 -0.79 .0.82
MH HW 2 201, MHW 1932, MSL 1.172, MTL 1152, MLW 0 371, MLLW 0.000 All measurements in feet, for more info seeTidesAndCurrents noaa gov
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
PUNTAGORDA 26.9283 N, 82.0650 W (ADD 32 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES) 01:33
21:27 22:12 23:00 23:50 00:41 2.08
!-09:42-1.60-11-39-1.71 1355 1-83-- 15:12-1.96-- 15:57" 2.06--16:31 -, 16:54
0.91 /8 02 o 0.98 1.0\ 2 1.02/\ 05

1'50., \ 15:50 \ / 16:45 \ 17:42 \ 18:36 \ 19:42\ / 20:33
04:15 0.60 v 0.76 / 0.88 \0 0.95 \/ 0.96 / 0.92 \ / 0.86
0.27 0.60 05:23 06:24 07:19 V V
0.04 -0.21 -0.43 08:09 08:57 09:40
MHHW 1 92, MHW1 703, MTL1 076, MSL 1070, MLW 0 149, MLLW 0.000 -0.61 -0.72 -0.74
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
PLACIDA, GASPARILLA SOUND 26.8333 N, 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES)
F 18:5219:38 20:25 21:13 22:03 22:56 23:46
f 11.82143 1:52 1:62 1.70 -1.73-- 1.73-
07:14 1.33 09:03 10:35 11:47 12:42 13:26 14:00
FL, 0.74 / 0.72 0.75 0.79 0.82 0.82 0.84
S\ 14:22 15:13 16: / 03 16:54 17:54
'1:51 125 00. 0-63 -0.69- 0.72 0.70 0.66-
0.40 03:00 0.53 :01 04:56'-
0.21 0.02 -0.18 .0.37 05:47 06:35 07:20
MHHW 1407, MHW 1175, MSL 0 784, MTL 0 768, MLW 0 358, MLLW 0 000 -0.52 -0.61 -0.64
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
MATLACHA PASS (BASCULE BRIDGE) 26.6333 N,82.0667"W 23:23 00:13 01:06
21:02 21:48 22:35 1.92 2.02 2.05
L-02-1.58- 11-13-169-- 12-45-1.81-- 113:57 -14:52 15:367 1-16:10
. 87 1 0.85 A 0.89 0.94 0.97 0.97 / 1.00 /


042 0.48 05:27 0.63 06:28 U.74
.25 0.02 -0.22
MHHW N/A, MHW N/A, MSL N/A, MTL N/A, MLW N/A, MLLW 0 000


VENICE INLET
Thursday 01:10 0.29feet
06:38 0.99 feet
12:04 0.62 feet
18:13 1.73feet
Friday 02:21 0.04feet
08:38 0.96 feet
12:52 0.80feet
18:58 1.85 feet
Saturday 03:24 -0.22 feet
10:21 1.02 feet
13:44 0.93 feet
19:46 1.99feet
Sunday 04:20 -0.47 feet
11:30 1.09feet
14:39 1.01 feet
20:35 2.12feet
Monday 05:11 -0.67 feet
12:20 1.13feet
15:34 1.02 feet
21:25 2.23 feet
Tuesday 05:58 -0.79feet
13:01 1.13feet
16:29 0.99feet
22:17 2.26feet
Wednesday 06:42 -0.82 feet
13:33 1.17feet
17:31 0.91 feet
23:08 2.25 feet


Thursday 04:15
09:42
15:03
21:27
Friday 05:23
11:39
15:50
22:12
Saturday 06:24
13:55
16:45
23:00
Sunday 07:19
15:12
17:42
23:50
Monday 08:09
15:57
18:36

Tuesday 00:41
08:57
16:31
19:42
Wednesday 01:33
09:40
16:54
20:33


0.27 feet
0.91 feet
0.60 feet
1.60 feet
0.04 feet
0.86 feet
0.76 feet
1.71 feet
-0.21 feet
0.92 feet
0.88 feet
1.83 feet
-0.43 feet
0.98 feet
0.95 feet
1.96 feet
-0.61 feet
1.02 feet
0.96 feet

2.06 feet
-0.72 feet
1.02 feet
0.92 feet
2.08 feet
-0.74 feet
1.05 feet
0.86 feet


PLACIDA
Thursday 01:51
07:14
12:45
18:52
Friday 03:00
09:03
13:33
19:38
Saturday 04:01
10:35
14:22
20:25
Sunday 04:56
11:47
15:13
21:13
Monday 05:47
12:42
16:03
22:03
Tuesday 06:35
13:26
16:54
22:56
Wednesday 07:20
14:00
17:54
23:46


MATLACHA PASS
Thursday 04:18 0.25feet
09:24 0.87 feet
15:12 0.48feet
21:02 1.58feet
Friday 05:27 0.02 feet
11:13 0.85feet
16:00 0.63 feet
21:48 1.69feet
Saturday 06:28 -0.22 feet
12:45 0.89feet
16:49 0.74feet
22:35 1.81 feet
Sunday 07:23 -0.44feet
13:57 0.94feet
17:40 0.82 feet
23:23 1.92 feet
Monday 08:14 -0.61 feet
14:52 0.97 feet
18:30 0.85feet


0.21 feet
0.74 feet
0.40 feet
1.33 feet
0.02 feet
0.72 feet
0.53 feet
1.43 feet
-0.18 feet
0.75 feet
0.63 feet
1.52 feet
-0.37 feet
0.79 feet
0.69 feet
1.62 feet
-0.52 feet
0.82 feet
0.72 feet
1.70 feet
-0.61 feet
0.82 feet
0.70 feet
1.73 feet
-0.64 feet
0.84 feet
0.66 feet
1.73 feet


Tuesday 00:13
09:02
15:36
19:21
Wednesday 01:06
09:47
16:10
20:21


2.02 feet
-0.73 feet
0.97 feet
0.83 feet
2.05 feet
-0.76feet
1.00 feet
0.78feet


GASPARuLA


^[-MARINA- A


As a busy working charter captain, my boat has
to be available and ready to go when I need it.
Here at Gasparilla Marina, I have everything I
need to make sure that happens. My boat is
securely stored on a lift, but I have easy access
to it 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. I can get fuel,
bait and supplies at competitive prices right
here. I love not having to trailer it anywhere to
have work done; the marina's service depart-
ment takes care of everything. Plus I have quick
access to the area's best fishing spots. I can't
imagine keeping my boat anywhere else.
Capt. Mike Myers, Reelshark Charters


BOAT STORAGE:
WET SLIPS, BOAT LIFTS
COVERED DRY STORAGE


WATERSIDE GRILL

OPEN 6:30 AM -I IPM


BOAT RENTALS, FUEL DOCK,
BAIT & TACKLE, ICE, BEER,
SHIPS STORE & SERVICE



GASPAILA

L-MARINAT-] I

15001 GASPARILLA RD
PLACIDA, FL 941-697-2280

GASPARILLAMARINA.COM

MARKER 20 m

ON THE ICW W


mom= -- :--.. -.--
_- *"g ^ ^ .~ g





uJf.w&.ur,u Page 5 December 26,2013


n.eu...lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


yF


-0.50 0.5 1 2 5
NAUTICAL MILES
NAUTICAL MILES


U~'W 1 EU El14 j .. ... 1 ~... 1....


memorial grouper tournamer





Entry Fee Only $1 50 Per Boat 4 Anglers
iacddi ,londl .i' cii_ .) i L_',,'':i J s)l


Saturday, January 18 1 6:30pm Captain s Meeti
Sunday, January 19 1 7:00am Lines In 2-4:00p
4:00pmr Barbecue/Fish Fry I 5:00pmr Aware


ENTRY FORMS AT www.CaptainJohnB.com

SPONSORS TO DATE... Key Agency Inc, Cape Haze Marina,
Naplesyacht.com, Castle Air, YAMAHA, Recycled Plastic Factory, Wellbaum
& Emery PA, Caribbean Waterworks/Action Watersports, Leverocks, Bass
Pro Shops, High Gear Automotive, Gulf Harbor Marina, Barnacle Bill's
Seafood, Native Charters, Dan Noble/Cesar Sordo, Mike Fuller Group, Florida
Film &Tape, Rob Kozmits Aluminum Creations, Winter Haven High School
friends, Eunice Fuller, Rum Bay, Krieger Electric honoring Rob Krieger, Abel's
Marine Service, Adrian Volney Inc, Andy Thornal Company, Interpoint Web,
Coral Creek Golf, Gulf Coast True Value, Judi Breuggeman, Premier Tees,
Honda Marine Freedom Boat Club Luke/Nina O'Kellev MarcaliYacht
ijjir. n.i1 in,, .r. ,rin Connie Breuggeman
941-473-4018 or 941-650-9921


6I
FRI
,.,,?


MARINA)
FRIENDLY FUN FESTIVE
, Osprey
th Port
glewood [W [ f l..
Nokomis
iasota Key Rd 0
Venice Ave, Venice
r Blvd, North Port
:aseyKeyRd
ce Ave, Venice
Y
B85 HE Brownville St .
* 9695 SW Peace River St
2195 NW American Legion Dr ,,
Park .9211 Liverpool Rd
ocatee. 3701 SW County Road 760
*Lettuce Lake.- 8801 SW Reese St --I-I '
CHARLOTTE COUNTY ILjjf11,.0 AligatoI.
Alngei Cieek Paik. 2011 Placida Rd, Englewood E "ay
/ ButteifoidWateiwayPark.13555" -
-n Maiathon Blvd, Port Charlotte ,%,, 04f 0
DaistPaik.537DarstAve,PuntaGorda i J PEACE
El- .Jobean Boat Ramp .4224 J [ RIVER
El Jobean Rd, Port Charlotte ---
Harbour Heights Park- 27420
Voyageur Dr, Punta Gorda
em T/ Hathaway Park .35461 Washington Loop, Punta Gorda '. I 1 i
Placida Park. 6499 Gasparilla Rd, Placida
j', Port Charlotte Beach 4500 Harbor Blvd, Port Charlotte "
I0'.eeU SouthGulfCovePark.10150AmicolaSt,PortCharlotte I .0
S. L .Spring Lake Park.3520 Lakeview Blvd, Port Charlotte '-
CaneapeHa
'' Marina IT

2.'. icw.8 c 1



Uaa ,^'^I... ,'... .. ^ ^ "
0^ -



C -Sandfiy
Ke8Turtle" ,Ky

Devilfish Bayay ,_ ,
Sey Pela'u
Burnt
'Store





CjgeeW
Two




it ^ ~r "S3 ^ ~~Part A '^Il
it Cabbage Isan



Captive
^ __\ V .,"v&^S I,1 ca cs ,, '

a ch Shoal
CaptivaPrass SLLittle



I"~ \ ^ 7" \^ ia TrS
['j v. ^^\sl n^^
C' % > Pine? .

ing
m Weigh-In



This map is not keg, la "--
intended for ,
navigational
purposes.
Refer toa a
nautical chart
l7 .(INaae ri a. for navigation
,_ _information. a
FNDLY FUN FFSTIVF ^%^ ^' 0 ^ --- ----
- I'' ,11 3 IPi ,:i,3 ,:, I Eri .'l7 ?.,,:,,:,,T3 1 .. -' T .... '--*....
CapeHazeMarinacom v f.





j#EMa/lPtE Page 6 December 26,2013


* ani.nn.U nnelfinlhinn. nne
aalitesita*nii*u* iEtDImlHai iUUEUMOEId|i


LAISHLEY MARINE
Punta Gorda
941-639-3949






D&D BAIT AND
TACKLE
Matlacha
239-282-9122




OLD PINE ISLAND
MARINA
St. James City
239-283-2548


Spanish mackerel are swimming from the U.S. 41
bridges all the way to Boca Grande Pass. Pomano are
in the passes and like small crabs or you can use a pom-
pano jig. Snook are looking for deeper, warmer water.
i itt i irit i cobia r'r ,,i r ir ,i>- i r, inr Ii iii i,,rini, low
H irl,] I, ir itr-i li iv,- lii'-t-r I-i flounder ir-puiir
irr f li- I, iv rir iii redfish


Spanish mackerel ilI ladyfish irin iii lriiiiiirI
fii, 1 i I m ,,1nij 1- i him. ij. h iiirir iiv iiii-I i] ,, I..w ltir,
hi-v iri- il, l [ ir[ [ii viii r liii, ih i I li/ '. iI lri-
lI-ri,- irt- iiin'- lhiir [vi',' I n ri ii [li-ri- I, 111 I 4 [ I1
, iti redfish iriiuil l iii iiOw lri ,,'. ,lrin l h1 wiii- iii,,nirl
[ni,- l,,-r,- 1,-v'- ,11-i ".i i 1,-w ,i-[ir[ ,I cobia illil l,'-



Mangrove snapper and smaller snook are piling up in
the Pine Island canals. Live bait works best, but the bait
has been really hard to come by. Shrimp is always an op-
tion. Sheepshead are just about everywhere. Redfish
are scattered around the flats in places like Matlacha
Pass, Indian Field and Two Pines. The flounder bite has
been slow.


Amberjacks are going crazy out there. Go to
any structure in at least 50 feet of water and
use live bait. Red grouper are holding in 80
feet of water and deeper. No reports of tuna.





Red grouper ill it-,n mangrove
snapper h iv'- lI,-t-i ri-iir[-I i lnii I liii-'.
--uI il,- ,II ,lh 111'r- 1 IlI S'., .I l' 1-






Try targeting red grouper using live and
frozen bait in 100 feet of water offof Redfish
Pass. Scattered king mackerel reports have
also come in.


Trout 16 to 20 inches in
length are out there. Fish
the mouths of canals like Pi-
rate Harbor.They are all over
[lii- il I li-l v irt-' li, iin]il
Iii i irvr l' [ liiI,] l ii[ i ,' l
i.,1 f i n f m 1n, Sliniiinln
-InIn [11-I .- [lin [n. r,

Trout lri- '. li rii] 1ill ,v'-r
lii- 'i] l i 1 l lii- lii'l]]-r
'nit- irt- ii jii lily I nI in, |
l rii i l II -i-i. li,'r I li-,'v
Iiv' riov vi'riv II r I l,[I-li
.. li ilr lli- : nli iri



Trout are scattered near
Jug Creek Shoal. Look for
the sand holes and toss your
artificial or live bait over the
holes. Repeat until you catch
a trout.


Hats are priced at $14.02 each plus tax, which
conveniently comes to $15 (we planned it
that way). Shipping is $7 anywhere in the
U.S., whether you buy one or 100. Clip this
and send it along with your check or money
order to WaterLine Hat, 23170 Harborview
Road, Port Charlotte FL, 33980.

Name
Address




City

State ___ ZIP _______

If you live in Southwest Florida and want to
avoid the shipping fee, call 941-276-9657.
I. I .





^tf&uswu Page 7 December 26,2013


n.eu...lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


State and federal regulation for Southwest
Florida waters as of Nov. 25, 2013. All bag
limits are per harvester per day. Other limits
may apply. This chart does not include
every rule an angler needs to know; for
most current rules visitMyFWC.com/fishing.
Ignorance of the law is no excuse.

LICENSES
Resident saltwater or freshwater:
Annual $17, 5-year $79. If you fish from
shore only, a license is required but is free.
Resident license for both freshwater and
saltwater fishing: $32.50 annually.
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3
days $17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore
fishing license not available for nonresidents.
Fishing permits: Snook $10/year, lobster
$5/year, tarpon $51.50 per fish

SALTWATER FISH
ALMACOJACK
Bag limit 100 pounds in state waters (includ-
ed in aggregate bag of 20 reef fish in federal
waters); notes: 9,11
AMBERJACK, GREATER
30"min. size; bag limit 1 season closed June
1-July 31 (subject to additional closure if
quota met); notes: 1,3,4,5,9
AMBERJACK, LESSER& BANDED
RUDDERFISH
Slot 14"to 22"; aggregate bag limit 5; notes:
1,4,5,9
BLACK DRUM
Slot 14"to 24" (may possess one over 24");
bag limit 5; notes: 5,7,8
BLACK SEA BASS
10"min. size; bag limit 100 pounds; notes:
2,4,5,9
BLUEFISH
12"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 1,5
BLUE RUNNER
Bag limit 100
BONEFISH
Harvest prohibited; may be possessed tem-
porarily at capture site for photos, measuring
and weighing.
COBIA
33"min. size; bag limit in state waters, 1 per
harvester or 6 per vessel, whichever is less;
limit in federal waters, 2; notes: 1,5
DOLPHIN (MAHI MAHI)
Bag limit 10 per harvester or 60 per vessel,
whichever is less; notes: 5
FLOUNDER, ALL SPECIES
12"min. size; bag limit 10; harvest by gig or
spear OK; notes: 2,5,8
GROUPER, BLACK
22"min. size; bag limit 4; notes:
2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, GAG
22"min. size; bag limit 2; season scheduled
to open July 1 in state and federal waters;
notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, GOLIATH
Harvest prohibited. Legal to target for catch
and release in state but not in federal waters
GROUPER, RED
20"min. size; bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, SCAMP
16"min. size; bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, SNOWY&YELLOWEDGE
Bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, WARSAW & SPECKLED HIND
Bag limit I per vessel; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10
GROUPER, YELLOWFIN &YELLOWMOUTH
20"min. size; bag limit 4; notes:
2,3,4,5,9,10,12
GROUPER, CONEY, GRAYSBY, RED HIND,
ROCK HIND &TIGER
Bag limit 4; notes: 2,3,4,5,9,10,12
HOGFISH
12"min. size; bag limit 5; notes: 1,4,5,9
MACKEREL, KING (KINGFISH)
24"min. size; bag limit 2 (reduced to 1 in
some state waters when federal waters are
closed to harvest; see MyFWC.com/Fishing
for current regulations); notes: 1,5


MACKEREL, SPANISH
12"min. size; bag limit 15; transfer of
Spanish mackerel to other vessels at sea
prohibited; notes: 1,5
MULLET, STRIPED & SILVER
Bag limit, Feb 1-Aug. 31, aggregate 50 per
harvester or 100 per vessel, whichever is less;
Sept. 1-Jan. 31, aggregate 50 per harvester
or per vessel; bag limit also applies to mullet
used as bait; harvest or possession of striped
mullet prohibited in Punta Gorda between
6 p.m. and 6 a.m. from Nov. 1-Feb. 29. See
http://bit.ly/urExej.
PERMIT
Slot 11" to 20" (may possess one over 20";
maximum of 2 over 20" per vessel); bag
limit 2; hook and line gear only in state
waters; spearing legal in federal waters;
notes: 1,5,7
POMPANO, FLORIDA
11"min. size; bag limit 6; notes: 1,5,7
POMPANO, AFRICAN
24"min. size; bag limit 2 per harvester or per
vessel; spear fishing prohibited; notes: 1,5,7
PORGY, RED
Bag limit 100 pounds; notes: 4,5,9
REDFISH
Slot 18"to 27"; bag limit 1 per harvester or 8
per vessel, whichever is less; transport limit
6 per person; gigging, spearing or snatching
prohibited; illegal to harvest or possess in
federal water; notes: 2,5,7
SAILFISH
63" min. size from tip of lower jaw to center
of fork; bag limit 1 any billfish (sailfish and
marlin); Highly Migratory Species permit
required to harvest in federal waters and all
harvested fish must be reported to NOAA
within 24 hours; notes: 5
SEA TROUT, SPOTTED
Slot 15"to 20" (may possess one over 20");
bag limit 4; notes: 2,5,7
SHARK, ALL SPECIES
54" min. size except Atlantic sharpnose, blac-
knose, blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and
smooth dogfish (only exceptions to 54"min.
in federal waters are Atlantic sharpnose and
bonnethead; bag limit in state waters 1 per
harvester or 2 per vessel, whichever is less;
bag limit in federal waters, 1 per vessel; may
be harvested by hook and line only; Highly
Migratory Species permit required to harvest
in federal waters; lemon and hammerhead
sharks prohibited; notes: 1,5,7
SHEEPSHEAD
12"min. size; bag limit 15; notes: 2,5,7
SNAPPER, CUBERA
Slot 12"to 30"(may possess 2 over 30" per
harvester or per vessel); bag limit 10 if under
30"; fish over 30"not included in aggregate
limit; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, GRAY (MANGROVE)
10"min. size in state waters; 12"min. in
federal waters; bag limit 5; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, LANE
8"min. size; bag limit 100 pounds in state
waters; not included in aggregate limit;
notes: 2,4,5,9,11
SNAPPER, MUTTON
16"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER,RED
16"min. size; bag limit 2; season scheduled
to open June 1 in state and federal waters;
notes: 2,3,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, SCHOOLMASTER
10"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,13
SNAPPER, VERMILION (BEELINER)
10"min. size; bag limit 10; notes: 2,4,5,9,11
SNAPPER, BLACKFIN, DOG, QUEEN,
MAHOGANY, SILK &YELLOWTAIL
12"min. size; limit 10 per harvester; notes:
2,4,5,9,13
SNOOK
Slot 28"to 33"; bag limit 1; season closed
Dec. 1-Feb. 29 & May 1-Aug. 31; $10 snook
permit required to harvest when license
is required, including free resident shore fish-
ing license; state regulations apply in federal
waters; notes: 2,5,6,7,8
TARPON
Bag limit 1 per harvester per year; $51.50 tar-
pon tag required to harvest or possess, which


is legal only in pursuit of an IGFA record; for
seasonal Boca Grande Pass rules, see http://
bit.ly/16zrDj; notes: 6,8
TRIGGERFISH, GRAY
14"min. size in state waters; 12"min. size in
federal waters); bag limit 2; season closed
June 1-July 31; notes: 1,4,5,11
TRIPLETAIL
15"min. size; bag limit 2; may be harvested
by hook and line only; notes: 2,5,7,8
WAHOO
Bag limit 2; notes: 1,5
LIONFISH
Invasive exotic; kill all specimens on sight.
Fins have venomous spines.
NO-HARVEST SPECIES
Zero bag limit for Bonefish, Goliath Grouper
(Jewfish), Nassau Grouper, Sawfish, Spotted
Eagle Rays, Lemon Sharks, Hammerhead
Sharks. Go to the website listed below for a
full list of no-harvest species.
Visit http://bit.ly/1OnYDIz for full rules.
NOTES
1. Measured fork length. Fork length is
the straight line distance from the most
forward part of the head with the mouth
closed to the center of the tail.
2. Measured total length. Total length is
the straight line distance from the most
forward part of the head with the mouth
closed to the farthest tip of the tail with
the tail compressed orsqueezed together
while the fish is lying on its side.
3. Bag limit zero for captain and crew of
for-hire vessels on a paid trip.
4. Reef fish gear rules apply. Anglers must
use non-stainless steel circle hooks when
using natural baits, and must possess a
dehooking device.
5. Must remain in whole condition (head
and tail intact) until landed ashore.
Removal of gills and internal organs OK.
6. Harvest byspearfishing prohibited.
7. Use of multiple ortreble hooks in con-
junction with natural bait prohibited.
8. Harvest by snatching prohibited.
9. Except for sand perch and dwarf sand
perch, fish designated as reef fish are
illegal to use as bait in federal waters or
aboard a vessel with a federal reef fish
permit. In state waters, legal-size reef
fish may be used as bait but must remain
in whole condition and must be counted
against bag limit.
10. Included in aggregate grouper bag
limit of 4fish.
11. Included in 20-fish reef fish aggregate
bag in federal waters (vermilion snapper,
lane snapper, almaco jack, grey triggerfish,
all tilefishes).
12. Closed Feb. 1-March 31 ONLY in federal
waters outside 20-fathom break.
13: Included in aggregate snapper bag
limit of 10 fish.

FRESHWATER FISH
LARGEMOUTH BASS
South of State Road 80; max. size 14", bag
limit 5 (may possess one over 14") North
of State Road 80; slot 14"-22", bag limit 5
(may possess one over 22")
SUNFISH (excluding crappie)
Aggregate limit 50
CRAPPIE
Limit 25
BUTTERFLY PEACOCK BASS
Max. size 17", limit 2 (may possess one over 17")
GRASS CARP
Must be released immediately
OTHER EXOTIC FISHES
Please keep and eat or otherwise destroy; do
not use as live bait.
UNREGULATED SPECIES
No bag or size limits on gar (except alligator
gar; possession of this species is illegal),
bowfin, pickerel and all catfish.
Visit http://bit.ly/lOnYJQr for full rules,
including special management areas.


4'
IA


1 mi


S11' II


LIM


1111 '~!~!i1~!~


I




I


3i]


p -
S '- -
DI I r


v


I n


-1





/, ^",I ~* Page 8 December 26,2013


-*an,*flnnflnln knnea rn, 1 --b *,
SUMSUEI flUU nME Ei IImUUE/U.MOEEI


- -


r W Oh
-t


3 ___


-77-


Residents of Southwest Florida tend to take them
for granted, but few Florida creatures are as iconic
as the brown pelican. Just about every tourist who
visits the waterfront in Florida snaps at least a few
photos of these odd-looking animals. Especially as
the large birds sit on pilings, bob around in marinas,
waddle awkwardly along piers or docks, or perform
their famous crash-dives into the water in pursuit of
their fishy prey.
Brown pelicans are probably best known for their
dramatic fishing technique. They fly 10 to 30 feet off
the water, scanning for small fish swimming near the
surface. When a target is located, the birds fold their
wings and roll over into a crash dive, plunging splashily
into the water at high speed. Just as a pelican hits the
water, it extends its neck and opens its bill, allowing the
pouch beneath the bill to scoop up a significant volume
of water which hopefully contains small fish. Surpris-
ingly, the old rhyme quoted above is accurate.
The expandable pouch beneath the lower jaw of a
brown pelican can hold approximately three gallons,
while the stomach of a pelican has a capacity of only
about a gallon. Fortunately, pelicans do not need to
swallow all the water in their pouch to eat their prey.
After plunging into the water, a pelican will bob
back to the surface and squeeze its pouch shut, forcing
most of the water out between the jaws, while hope-
fully retaining whatever fish have been caught.
Sometimes, when pelicans are fishing for very small
fish such as glass minnows (bay anchovies), a few
of the captured fish will manage to escape with the
draining water, and it's not uncommon for seagulls


"An odd bird is the
pelican, for his beak
holds more than his
belly can."

to try to snatch a free snack from feeding pelicans by
landing near, or sometimes right on top of the heads
of the larger birds.
Anglers tend to pay close attention to pelicans
because pelicans are better at finding fish than are
most humans.
Pelican eyes are designed to see efficiently beneath
the surface and have a better vantage point for spot-
ting fish when they're flying aloft. Besides, they have
more incentive to succeed than do human anglers,
because if they don't find prey, they can't order pizza.
Many a Southwest Florida angler has benefited
from spotting pelicans on the feed and joining the
action, either by catching live bait or by catching
larger fish drawn to the schools of baitfish. So here's to
you, you odd bird.
Capt. Ralph Allen runs the King Fisher Fleet of
sightseeing and fishing charter boats located at
Fishermen's Village Marina in Punta Gorda. He is an
award-winning outdoor writer and photographer
and is a past president of the Florida Outdoor Writers
Association. Call him at 941-639-2628 or email
Captain@KingFisherFleet.com.


Brown pelicans are large birds with wingspans which often exceed seven
feet, but they are not heavy animals. Most brown pelicans weigh less than ten
pounds.
Brown pelicans can be long-lived, sometimes exceeding 30 years of age in
the wild. The oldest documented brown pelican lived to 43 years of age.
Male pelicans are almost identical to females and are very difficult to tell
apart, even when side-by-side. Males have a slightly longer beak, but are
colored the same as females.
Coloration gives a clue to the age of a pelican. Adults have white necks and
heads, while youngsters have brown heads and necks. It takes approximately
three years for a young pelican to achieve adult coloration.
In Southwest Florida most pelican nests are in mangrove trees, where
the birds build their nests in colonies which sometimes include only pelicans,
but which often are mixed in with the nests of other birds such as herons and
egrets.
Young pelicans remain in the nest until they reach full size.
It's thought that the impact of a diving pelican's body slamming into the
surface of the water stuns or disorients small fish, helping the pelican to catch
them.
Brown pelicans were once on the endangered species list because their
numbers dwindled during the years that DDT was used as a pesticide. Since DDT
was banned in the U.S. their numbers have rebounded greatly.
There are two species of pelicans which are common in Southwest Florida.
Brown pelicans are year-round residents. The much larger white pelicans are
winter visitors which migrate to our area in the fall and return north in the
spring on a schedule that's similar to that of many of our human snowbirds.


r


OPE HU0



6 *M N6S R0
0he06.u JO 6


.4).







You're Invited...

TO A SPECIAL OPEN HOUSE EVENT!


Visit any of our Open House locations fot esil ,
& a boat ride to learn how your options ae. is
wide open as the waterways.

It's everything you imagine boating should be! M .-Z

888.905.5868 Q
Freedom BoatClub.com


Saturday, December 28th
S 10am 4pm
VENICE
L IIl L .cj LII [' E ii
PUNTA GORDA
L ?l.l'll ., 1' [ 1.1i'l .?
]20 L .i;il'-l';, ,Lli t

Sunday, December 29th
10am 4pm
ENGLEWOOD
i l:, | H .--; [1 1: ii'i
:,'^:",. P'I .?,: r:l F. :',?,.,:l


a-.

-r-.,


-~ ~mC~~t fl~


~ -

~Z
~thse~~m
C -___
-~




--_ 0-~~~
-~
-- -

a





j ,Etfl ,KeV Page 9 December 26,2013


As 2013 draws to a close, everyone at Peace
River Wildlife Center would like to thank the
Charlotte Harbor community for your support.
Since we also take in wounded animals from
DeSoto, Lee, and Sarasota counties, our
gratitude extends to the residents of those
areas as well.
We have taken in a record number of
animals this year: 966 birds, 896 mammals
and 148 reptiles. We have seen many
changes in our existing facility over the last
12 months. We have new fences and signs in
place thanks to the Charlotte Community
Foundation and Modern Woodsmen. Our
buildings have been painted thanks to
the Walmart Distribution Center volunteers.
The screech owl habitat has been refurbished
by our head honcho handyman, Gunnar.
Overall, PRWC has a more welcoming facade
to greet our visitors. And we hope to see more
improvements in the coming year.
A generous bequest from the estate of
Frank Wotitzky will jump-start our efforts to
raise enough money to build a new hospital
and surgery building. Our multiple old
prefab buildings and sheds are in disrepair
and we would like to consolidate the three
small buildings that now house our office/
hospital, surgery/isolation ward and laundry/
food storage. If we can build one structure to
serve all these needs, we will not only have a
cleaner, more updated environment in which
to treat our patients, we will also have more
room to update habitats for our residents.
We have had a number of special patients
this year memorable because of the
horrific circumstances of their injuries. There
were four ospreys that were shot because
they were perched atop someone's sailboat.
There was the sandhill crane that a motorist
saw hit by a truck that intentionally swerved
onto the shoulder of the road to hit it. And
then there were the wonderful people who
went out of their way to help an injured
animal, brought it to us, and saved its life.
Phoenix, the bald eagle that was burned
by an electrical transformer, was treated and
released. He was admitted in January and
faced the possibility of a prolonged recovery
which could have taken up to three years.
After only seven months, he was released
this August. Between Punta Gorda Home
Depot's donated supplies, our volunteers'
back-breaking labor and donations from


across the country we were able to optimize a
special habitat for him to reduce his stress so
he could concentrate on healing. He has been
spotted visiting PRWC recently, perching atop
a phone pole over our parking lot, looking
hale and hearty.
Luna, the leucistic screech owl, is our new
mascot. He came in as a fledgling in April
after having been found on the ground,
apparently having fallen (or been kicked) out
of the nest. A genetic abnormality has made
his feathers white instead of the mottled
grey/brown that would allow him to blend
in with his natural environment. Without
his natural camouflage, he will remain at
PRWC for his own protection from predators.
But don't feel bad, he has become our most
sought-after education ambassador.
Lafitte, a magnificent frigatebird, is one of
our newest residents. He came from Louisiana
with a poorly-healed broken wing. This
species is unusual in captivity, but Lafitte has
settled right in here and seems to be enjoying
the ambiance of the pelican pond enclosure.
We saw a record number of gopher tortoises
this year. Most had been hit by cars and had
to have their shells pieced back together like
jigsaw puzzles, held in place by zip ties and
super glue. Wildlife rehabbers are, if nothing
else, a resourceful bunch. We have had turkey
vultures with broken wings that were splinted
with rolled up newspaper. We splint songbird
legs with drinking straws. We use tape as a
cast for a bat's broken "wing" bone.
PRWC was awarded nonprofit business
of the year by the Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce for 2013. None of these achieve-
ments would have been possible without
the support of our community, people both
near and far, who care about wildlife and the
environment and want to make a difference,
one life at a time.
Peace River Wildlife Center is a nonprofit
organization, dedicated to the care, preserva-
tion and protection of Charlotte County's native
wildlife since 1978. They are open 7 days a
week year-round, including holidays. Tours are
offered from 11 a.m. to 4p.m. PRWC receives
no government funding and relies entirely on
private donations. For more info, or ifyou would
like to volunteer or make a donation (including
aluminum cans), visit PeaceRiverWildlifeCenter.
corn, email PeaceRiverWildlife@yahoo.com or
call 941-637-3830.


Jlarine

LDynamics

Your Marina on the Wat r


I<










Everglades W IE


*2013 Models on Sale*
2013 Starcraft Limited 1915 OB Deck Boat w/Yamaha F115
-Two to choose from, as low as $23,495
2013 Starcraft Limited 2000 OB Deck Boat w/Yamaha F150 Just $28,749
2013 Starcraft 190 StarDeck w/Yamaha F70 Just $19,995
2013 Sea Fox 209 Commander w/Yamaha F150 Just $37,495
2013 Sea Fox 226 Commander w/Yamaha F150 Just $39,999
2013 Sea Fox 240 Viper w/Yamaha F300 Just $46,497



e rine a
Dynamics

i3340 Placida Rd.
Englewood, FL 34224
H 941-698-1444 CYAMAHA
www.MarineDynamics.com
504602 *AII prices are plus taxes, registration and fees.





r ,. ,# Page 10 December 26,2013


-*a *ln|nflni el mlnknni eain


/


\ .^ S
-, -. .

,' .x,
'; *' .
,. "

H


K., ,


L\%.


&


\1\ l1-r Lne tn,',l,', ,. ^ ^ 3
L". Mal h--I.:.r '^ ^
You never know
what's lurking under .
pilings like this one. .


-' -THE ORIGINAL-

WATERPROOF CHARTS


S INSHORE
FISHING
CHARTS

CU-SaTOM a of

CHART
R, A M.. .. .......... ..
F- FRAMING,
320 CROSS STREET rlr
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33950
CALL NOW 1-800-423-9026
www.waterproofcharts.com it


I You might say there's no such thing as magic pilings, but as for me
and Cliff Burnell, we believe.
H ; 1 For nearly two hours we fished the same piling, dropping our baits
-within a couple feet of each other and pulling out sheepshead after
sheepshead. The biggest fish was a bruising 19 inches.
People stopped. They stared. They wondered how in the heck we
were catching all those fish. Oh, and course they wanted us to tell
them how to catch fish like that.
Truth be told I'm not really sure how we pulled it off, but I'll try
and explain. But first let me rewind to earlier in the day.
S My trip to the Placida fishing pier didn't start out with any magic.
In fact, it was quite uneventful. The tide was going out as I dropped
my first bait shortly after sunrise. There was one other sheepshead
angler on the pier and he had an impressive stringer going already.
S The bait of choice was fiddler crabs; not usually my first choice but it
|was what I had on hand and generally they produce pretty good results.
S Except on this day they just weren't doing the trick. While my counterpart
added to his catch, I struggled with small fish and a slow bite.
S It was just one of those things. I was a couple feet away from a
guy who was whacking fish after fish while I had the same bait and
was catching squat. To amplify my growing frustration my eyes kept
wandering back to his stringer full of sheepshead.
It was producing a growing case of fish envy.
Before too long another sheepshead angler who I would later
come to know as Cliff showed up and proceeded to start catching
keepers as well.
My patience was wearing thin, and so was my supply of fiddler
crabs. Now there were not one, but two stringers showing off fish I
just couldn't seem to catch.
Finally, after around my 10th undersize fish I missed a hook-up
and had a meltdown.
All I can say is thankfully there were no women or children in
earshot to hear my profanity-laced tirade.
But things were about to take a turn for the awesome.
After sacrificing my last crab to another short sheepie I decided to take
a closer look at what the guy standing just down the pier from me was
doing. I enquired about what bait he was using, and he happily told me.
"Barnacles."
While I'd heard about using barnacles for bait before, I'd never
really gave it a shot. So I went fishing for some bait, if you will.
"Do those things actually work?" I asked.
"Yup. It's about all I ever use," replied Cliff, a North Port resident
originally from Maine.
"Well, I'm out of bait I think I'm gonna get going..."
I tossed out my final plea without really begging for bait.
"You wanna try a couple?" Cliff said.
"Sure do."
About five minutes later I pulled up my first keeper sheepshead of
the day on a barnacle. I was sold.
After catching another keeper shortly thereafter, the end of the pier
began to get crowded. Cliff suggested we move to a more secluded
spot on the pier that he said was a good one when the tide was high. I
probably would have followed him anywhere at that point.
Not only did Cliff show me the ropes of using barnacles to catch
sheepshead, he was sharing his barnacles with me. Now that's a good
~ fishing buddy. But what followed was the stuff of sheepshead legend.
Cliff lightly scraped the magic piling, and as bits of barnacles
showered down I waited anxiously for the first strike. He beat me to
do it, promptly landing a nice sheepshead. But it was my turn next,
Sand my third keeper ofthedayfell victim to an enticing barnacle.
And the action didn't stop, even as the incoming tide slowed down
^ M in the mid-afternoon. We simply kept catching sheepshead until we
were rather tired out. As Cliff left the pier to fillet his catch, I couldn't
let the last couple barnacles go to waste.
And sure enough, a sheepshead stole them clean off my hook. .
SThey were still biting at the magic piling. .
AlMo .f fStEI EIS Sll ol 01 (1 S0ltil OtElif 0110El fl 0( 1 1011 ll i01d-1 1111ii1
0 t1do001 I11 i tE lHs 11 iting isg (l(EdiCted to 0i1t t'type S o lf S PiOI- lI "
t71igling > Il (/lP/l OttE i HI-I, tool >1 t ll 1iS 1ll1o lli.l11,ii tlt S EM111011 hI t >
111i l etti E.11,,' 11-hE.lOIld (oti


INTRODUCING


0 l,


Pioneer
Boats

Powered
by Yamaha

Exclusive Area Dealer for Peterson
Aluminum Boat Trailers
A~
---Z Z2TL* LE^Z |ffifefl?! ^--
A Amn-.,hemK "iT'me NI^MEVEH^fK STOP.


Abel's Marine
91 7341 Sawyer Circle
Port Charlotte, FL 33981
S941-698-4006


YETI





_____l ~* Page 11 December 26,2013


an *nnfl.n.lr-'nk .nn e.a.n
M int eUllIIIunItaEhll shllI I mJIluI ii nEEUIPl


NO


"MaylW ve visitors coming downrto
visit right now. WaterLine offers many things
to do while they are visiting. I'll explore a few
right now.
Of course, we have the best fishing in the
world; this especially applies to tarpon and
snook. Our grouper, snapper, in-and offshore
fishery is impressive by any standard. We
tend to take for granted just how fortunate
we have it here with Boca Grande, Charlotte
Harbor, Lemon Bay, Pine Island Sound and
much more to offer not to mention a few
special lakes and rivers. This is a great place to
settle down and explore.
Our fishing is good now. You just need to
coordinate your schedule with the weather.
Our offshore grouper fishing is fine, and
snapper are there too we just need to be
sure you stay safe out there. Just because it
seems calm on the beaches does not ensure
the waves are similar offshore. Note the wind
direction, and explain your comfort level to
your captain. He wants to show you a good
time and catch some fish. He needs to make a
living, and holiday time is short. If he says you
can go, but it will be rough, don't be surprised
if he's accurate. Fish don't mind big waves, but
you might.
Inshore and backcountry fishing can be
much calmer because you can usually get out
of the wind on a leeward shoreline and catch
fish open waters don't have a place to hide
from winds. Again, be sure to listen to your
captain's suggestions. His job is to please you,
but he doesn't get paid if he doesn't fish. As
captains, we want you to enjoy your time on
the water, and you know what conditions suit
you better than we do. We always do our best
to put smiles on our faces.
Near shore, we can still find a few mackerel
and flounder if it doesn't get too cold. Triple-
tail and cobia are moving through, but not
dependable. If you don't try, you won't catch
any. It's your call. We still had some bigger fish
last week, but it has been cooler and windy.
Personally, I don't do rough seas.
Inside, we have several options available.
Redfish are fun but require more effort and
patience on both of our parts. If we stalk
them, it's challenging when it's calm. They are
easier to see than capture. Lures allow us to
cover more area, and natural baits let us sit
and wait your call for strategy.
Speckled trout are around, and are usually
easier to capture. They taste great and are
very colorful. Lures or live shrimp are usually
best here. A popping cork helps you cast
further and attracts hungry fish. It requires


SUJI1 1 L. L1I/ IIUIII Ll II U1 1W -If i J, UUL t l LCIIIily
calls the trout in.
Flounder, sheepshead, bluefish, mackerel
and a few pompano are also hanging around
right now. Lures work well for exploration and
help you seek out the hungry fish. If you're
not desiring to cast a lot, try natural baits.
Live shrimp are good for anything, but
are a hassle to get early, because the trucks
don't get to bait shops until later in the
day. The shrimp are caught as far north as
Bayport, and they must be trucked to your
favorite bait shop.
Traffic picks up now, and since the shops
need more shrimp, the boats stay out as long
as possible, so trucks get later starts. Many of
us like to start later when it's chilly anyway.
Strategies vary with species. Live shrimp
under a popping cork can be the easiest
method just remember to pop your cork.
Most fish cruise around the grassy flats
edges in search of food. Just consider your
target and modify your technique accordingly.
Trout, mackerel and pompano all suspend,
while flounder and redfish like to bottom
feed. Sheepshead like to hold close to struc-
tures and oyster bars. It helps to understand
your target, but fish are full of surprises, and
break patterns all the time. Fortunately, we
can usually find fun fish for a tasty fresh fish
dinner. Look in WaterLine's advertisements
for a local fishing guide to share our area
with you and your family. Ask questions to
make sure you mesh and your trip meets your
expectations.
Our area offers awesome bird watching
opportunities also. We have thousands
of migratory birds to complement our
abundant local populations. You can
observe most from land but several of us
guides can also show you around local bird
hot spot congregations. We have flocks of
white pelicans to surprise you with their
huge size. The ospreys are everywhere.
Eagles are everywhere, you just have to
know where to look. Several area parks
and conservancy lands are perfect places to
enjoy our bird life. Or, just contact Water-
Line columnist Abbie Banks.
Please enjoy the Holidays, and share time
outside with friends and family. Here's to a
new year!
Capt. Van Hubbard is a highly respected
outdoor writer and fishing guide. He has been
a professional USCG-licensedyear-round guide
since 1976, and has been fishing the South-
west Florida coast since 1981. Contact him at
941-740-4665 or VanHubbard@CaptVan.com.


A 1 A\ A


S1 A A ^ ^ A ^ ^ ,i

From fuel drops to discounts at the pump, a Sea Tow'
membership saves you money where it matters the most.
Trust the local experts.
Sea Tow Charlotte Harbor \ 941-625-5454 \ 800-4-SEATOW
seatow.com/charlotteharbor
Follow us on Facebook N

1 Join now.


SEA7F joW


GetourFREE App!
seatow.com




















































Southwest Florida is an angler's paradise.
We have dozens and dozens of potential target
species and hundreds of square miles in which
to pursue them. Whether you want to catch a
few for dinner, hook into something to keep
the kids entertained, or battle with a genuine
monster, we've got something for you.
Now, let's look at that from a slightly
different perspective. If you want to learn our
local waters, there are hundreds of square
miles that you have to commit to memory
- channels, shoals, oyster bars, grassflats,
deep holes, reefs, etc. Then if you want to
catch fish while you're out there, you've got
to educate yourself about the habits and
patterns of dozens of different species. Throw
in common variables such as tides, winds and
weather, and getting a grasp on Charlotte
Harbor may seem to be an impossibly monu-
mental task.
These are two sides of the same coin. Yes,
there are a lot offish and a lot places to catch
them, but you've got to learn a thing or three
before you can expect to go out and start
catching on a regular basis. If you weren't
raised on these waters and that's the vast
majority of us it's a serious uphill climb to
learn it all. But there's some really, really good
news: With just a few basics, you can start
having success.


There are a few things that can make you a
better fisherman here or anywhere you live.
It's never easy going someplace new. Most of
your fishing has probably been in fresh water,
and going from fresh water to salt water is
very intimidating. But take whatever you think
you know about saltwater fishing and erase
it. You're not going to chase marlin or bluefin
tuna or bonefish here (not without a hundred-
mile boat ride, at least). Most of our local
saltwater fishing is actually very much like
fishing for largemouth bass.
The first step is actually what you're doing
right now: Pick up and read local magazines
and papers. You'll find a lot of useful informa-
tion in them. You'll also find a certain amount
of less useful stuff. Be sure to look through
several editions of any given publication, and
you'll find at least a few writers who really
speak to you. Looking up local information on
the Internet can also be helpful, but there's
more"junk info"out there than you'll find in
the print mags. If it's online, take it with a
grain of salt.
Armed with a bit of info, it's time for a
little face-to-face. One of your best resources
is a local tackle shop (not a big-box store).
Here you'll find employees and fellow
customers who will chat and share some of
what they know, and usually be very helpful.


Just remember that this is a give-and-take
relationship. The advice is free, but it costs the
shop money to keep the lights on. Show your
appreciation by buying your tackle and bait at
the shop where you find the most help, and
trust that it will be worth your while.
Fishing clubs are another great source.
Attend a couple meetings and then join the
ones that are the most enjoyable and helpful.
Most of the fishermen you'll meet were once
new in town themselves and will know exactly
what you're going through. Don't be afraid to
ask questions. Swallow your pride.
You can also get solid advice about a partic-
ular spot from someone who's actually fishing
it. This works a lot better with shore-based
fishing an angler on the beach or pier
is much more likely to respond in a friendly
way than a guy who's trying to sneak up on
a school of redfish on the flats. Watch before
you ask; many times, you can figure out what
the successful fishermen are doing that makes
them that way.
So far, all this education is free. But if you
want a crash course, you'll need to shell out
some tuition money. Hire at least two different
charter captains and learn what you can from
them. This gives you an opportunity to see
how guys who make a living fishing here actu-
ally do it. Be sure to tell your guides that you


want to learn, not just catch fish. If you're in
the market for a boat, this is also a fine oppor-
tunity to see how the pros outfit their vessels
for fishing here. If you've got a boat already,
see if the guide will take you out in your boat
- many will so you can learn aboard your
own vessel. This college-level learning will cost
you, but it will save you a ton of time, money
and aggravation in the long run.
All the education in the world won't do you
any good if you can't remember it. Keep a
fishing log, journal or diary. This is a long-term
commitment and a habit that takes time to get
used to, but the knowledge is priceless. I forget
stuff all the time. It helps to have a refresher or
reminder that I can look back to.
You never stop learning heck, I get to
learn every day. Take it one day at a time. It
took you years to learn your home waters, and
it's the same here. Actually, I don't think you
could learn everything about fishing here even
if you lived to be 300 years old. Pick up what
knowledge you can and just have fun out there
- it's not a bad thing.
RobEl t Li. ie\ icz is the inol.IGEl ofFistiii
fto S &oiit. TOC/E lootEd ot 44125-D
Tollitibil inhl 111 (nhllon tteHotoi Gil
9-11-625-3SSS Nfoi motiE ifoitno(ltion otbo'
thE Shlop 01 foi0 lOIishlil. 111 fo 01I iSi thEal
Oll/ille t FishtiifliiiAs (0111i


SIZE LIMIT: n/a
DAILY BAG LIMIT: 100 Ib per harvester
AVERAGE SIZE: About a pound
STATE RECORD: n/a; may reach 12 Ib
HABITAT: Shallow coastal waters over
seagrass or reefs; sometimes over open sand.
Young fish, which are dark with silvery spots,
are often found among floating seaweeds.
LEGAL GEAR: HookI and line
spears. igs. sene 'or
Cashele


FOOD VALUE: Edible, but not desirable.
FISHING METHODS: Usually caught by
accident. Sometimes takes a hook baited with
shrimp or squid.
NOTES: A relatively strong fighter for its size,
the Bermuda chub is best released. It's not
good to eat and it doesn't make good bait,
either.


rfi~WU\


-5-.
rr *:


(941)915-3575
(888) 891-8569
(aplainjohn: .',knoi110 (Ocni


I w o ce K c


FOR SALE

1 .1 .............
,,, u .... .....

.. I .. I .. .. ......
.. .


III'''''


Hi I m Captain John Howe
,.i* K) ,[ h a ',~,- iii..ih : -d ,- \ ,,1 1,, i I ,, I.. l ? .' i, buy or sell
-1 l., ,,~i i I *,,, n i ( ll, i 1FI l ir ,, (, 11, ,i f ,1 ,i


.... I ,,,,, ~ .... I ...... .
I .. I I h. ....
........ I ......l lm
..... I I ,I I ,11 .. ...I l l l ll... l.. .. lh
..... I ...........IIIII


i ,, i ,.... ...... 11
: .... .....



KNOT 10
YACHT SALES'


MI1" I M Mg





j#tflePtVU Page 13 *December 26,2013


nanfnnf*ln.d--nkmnn eam
ld int lullI~IuDn l taEllsiII mI l I uIi snEEU I lliI


0.380 or (


"Should I get a .380 or a 9mm for self-de-
fense?""Can I shoot 9mm ammo in my .380?"
These are questions we get almost daily at
Higher Power Outfitters. The confusion exists
because the bullets are the same diameter, but
these two calibers are not the same.
Let me first address what the current issue
in the industry as a whole. As most avid
shooters know, it has been a struggle (to say
the least) to get ammunition. In most cases,
even the largest box stores out there can't get
it. The connections we have in the industry
are directly involved with Federal Ammunition
(ATK). We have been told the lack of ammo will
continue for at least the next 18 to 30 months
while prices continue to climb due to manu-
facturing and materials costs increasing. The
.380 ACP is much more difficult to get currently
than 9mm ammo.
On to the decision of carrying the .380 ACP
versus the 9mm, in respect to sufficient elimi-
nation of a possible threat. Let us first under-
stand that most confrontations are within 3 to
10 feet of yourself. You should always be aware
of your surroundings. That is the first key to
protecting yourself.
The .380 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) is a
rimless, straight-walled cartridge developed
by firearms designer John Browning and intro-
duced by Colt in 1908. It has been a popular
self-defense cartridge ever since. Other names
for .380 ACP include .380 Auto, 9mm Browning,
9mm Corto, 9mm Kurz, 9mm Short, 9x17mm
and 9mm Browning corto.
The .380 ACP has seen widespread use in the
years since its introduction. It was famously
used by many German officers during World
War II in the Walther PPK (think"James Bond"
on that gun). However, its limited power did
not provide suitable penetration for combat,
and the German military was very unhappy
with its lack of killing power. Due to its low
recoil, it did find use as a backup gun. Today
it's popular in the civilian market as a personal
defense round. The combination of good pene-
tration in close-range defense situations and
light recoil has made it a reasonable choice for
those who wish to carry a small, lightweight
handgun that can still provide adequate
defense.
There are many popular pistols cham-
bered in .380 ACP, including the Sig Sauer
P238 hands down one of the best made
subcompacts ever made, in my opinion. Its
quality is second to none, but at $700 or
$800 with all the bells and whistles, it's not
cheap. Most people have a budget to work
within and a specific need or use for the gun
being purchased, but I am a firm believer in
buying quality the first time. Another quality
.380 that comes to mind is the Diamondback


DB380 made in Cocoa Beach, Fla. This gun is
constructed of polymer and is very light in
weight. It's comfortable to carry, easy to use
and at about $400 not as hard on the budget.
In 1902, the 9x19 Parabellum was unveiled
by Georg Luger. Parabellum is part of a
Latin phrase,"Si vis pacem, para bellum"-
roughly, "If you wish for peace, prepare for
war." It is now a standard cartridge for NATO
forces as well as many non-NATO countries.
However, this is a relatively new caliber in
the U.S. military's firearms history. Smith and
Wesson was the first company to mass-produce
a gun for this cartridge in the Model 39.
A few guns that are popular in the 9mm
Para are the Glock 26, a polymer-framed gun
that is widely used by law enforcement for
backup carry. Pricing ranges from about $500
to $650. Also very well-regarded is the Sig
Sauer P938. It's one of my favorites because it
is small, slim and rugged. The Sig costs $700 to
$900, but it's worth every penny. Really, there
are a lot of quality guns out there from many
manufacturers.
I haven't really answered the question yet:
Which one should you carry for self-defense?
Personally, I would go for the 9mm. The 9mm
and the .380 are so similar in size and even
in ballistics that it's a very close decision, but
if you purchase a 9mm there are far more
options in firearms if you wanted to keep one
caliber as a platform. As I already pointed out,
the .380 is well-liked because it usually comes
in guns that are very low-profile concealed
carry options. I think at any close-range situa-
tion, either will get the job done.
But when people ask me if the .380 ACP and



Here is a comparison of .380 ACP and 9mm Para
loads from Speer Ammo (a division of Federal
Ammunition).
Speer GDHP.380,90 grain bullet
Muzzle velocity: 980 feet/second
Muzzle energy: 196 ft/lbs
Speer GDHP 9mm, 124 grain bullet
Muzzle velocity: 1150 feet/second
Muzzle energy: 364 ft/Ibs
I don't shop for ammo by virtue of numbers alone,
but these kinds of numbers don't help the case
for .380 very much. I'm not saying a .380 won't
do damage, by any means, but the 9mm is clearly
more powerful and this isn't even including
the obvious benefits of being able to launch a
faster, heavier, better-constructed bullet. And
don't forget, the .380 ammo costs more.


ImmP


9mm Para are the same, the answer I give is
very simple: No. Both are 9mm in diameter,
but the length of the bullet and case are
significantly different. Even if you could get
9mm Para ammo to fit in your .380 (or vice
versa), it would be very dangerous to actually
fire the gun. In firearms, a good rule to live by


is that close is not good enough.
Ryan Ingle has owned and operated Higher
Power Outfitters in Punta Gorda since 2011. His
lifelong passion for firearms has led to many
connections in the gun world and in the local
community. Contact him at 941-347-8445 or
sales@higher-power-outfitters.com.





/ /, Page 14 December 26,2013
j^M~riv-9 Page 14 9 December 26,2013


*aam6...u U .eeUFie~Imi.eeu E~~hU
aa~esasamm~muumuu m~.umuumu.s.mhuEm


#^tK/H Page 15 December 26,2013


* ~
aamusasama~wmumuu *~*au*mu.s.mh*ua


. -"-i .
,. i :'
i,,:.. ;I i1""


WE WANT
YOUR PHOTOS!
Here's how it works: Take
pictures of your outdoor
adventures. Make sure you have
good lighting. No shadows. Send
your high-quality digital photos
to Editor@WaterLineWeekly.
corn, or send prints by snail
mail to WaterLine, 23170
Harborview Road, Port
Charlotte, FL 33980, ATTN:
Lee Anderson. Include a
self-addressed stamped envelope
if you want your prints returned
to you.
DO NOT send us photos of
oversized or other release-
only fish being poorly
handled. Photos of such fish
being gaffed, held by the lower
jaw only or obviously damaged
or dead WILL NOT be published,
no matter how big the fish or
how proud the angler may be.

Remember to smile!


1.





fU(/,.* Page 16 0 December 26,2013


.*an nfn e lflnknn earn
SUMUEalUUnMEi EtIImEU.MiOEEia


~s1


So far our winter has been easy: No frosts, no unrea-
sonably cold stretches and no crazy water temperature
drops. With our last cold front, the water dropped down
to 63 degrees for a couple of days and then steadily
climbed right back up to the mid 70s with a few weeks
of 80-degree weather. That warm weather held its
pattern for a while, but now we're back into cooler
weather. It also won't be here for long.
Winter fishing is much more predictable and easy
when we're not going from hot to cold and high
pressure to low pressure every three days like we did
last winter. And while that is a good thing during the
winter, you always worry about it biting you in the
hindquarters come summertime. If the water stays
warm all winter, it will only get that much hotter
during summer.
It's nothing you can control, so just take advantage
of it now. All fish are doing well in this weather. It's
not chilly enough to shut down the snook but it's just
cool enough to make redfish fight like redfish instead
of overheated slabs of meat that shake their heads a
Sfew times and allow themselves to be limply dragged
to the boat.


The hot spot right now seems to be the Peace River.
Not many people fish the river because they don't
know it well or are just plain afraid of it. The morning
low tides make fishing and navigating the river very
simple. How simple? See that sandbar over there
sticking up out of the water? Don't go there. Your boat
won't make it and there are no fish on dry land. It
really is almost that easy.
A well-tuned depthfinder is a great tool to have
when running upriver. While the deep holes in the river
are easy to find because they are on the outside of the
turns, there are a lot of other holes that you would
never realize are there if it wasn't for a bottom machine
to find them. Just south of the first channel markers
of Shell Creek, there is a 20-foot-deep hole that you
wouldn't know existed. That hole just happened to be
plumb full of snook the other day.
The deep holes in the intersections of the river also
can be a challenge to find. There are many branches
and forks in the river. Some make sandbars, some
make holes. Some of those holes between Harbor
Heights and the Nav-A-Gator are holding nice redfish.
They are also wintertime haunts for our local tarpon.


They will also hold ladyfish, gar and the occasional
trout or whiting.
Another thing I like to do on very low tides is to run
upriver and mark sandbars that you normally don't see.
That way you have a reminder when you run upriver in
the summer and forget not that I've ever done that
myself a half-dozen times.
Shrimp seems to be the best bait in the Peace River
at the moment for reds and snook, but trolled plugs
also work well on those big snook. The best-producing
lure seems to be the Storm Twitch Stick in the ghost or
white/silver color. These things are just the hot ticket
for snook anywhere and everywhere in the Harbor, so I
suggest you pick up a few.
Don't be scared get up that river and start
learning. Once these 15- to 20-knot northeast winter
winds start cranking up, you'll be happy to be protected
in the river and catching fish.
Capt. Cayle Wills owns and operates Bad Fish Charters
on Charlotte Harbor. You can book him through Fishin'
Frank's or contact him directly at 941-916-4538 or Capt
Cayle@ReelBadFish.com. You can also visit him online
at ReelBadFish.com or FaceBook.com/BadFishCharters.


-" if
4.


CHARLOTTE COUNTY'S
#1 GUN SHOP

A&eSIA
GUNS

23S1 Tamiami Trail
Port Charlotte FL 33952
Phone: 941.989.7065
Fax: 941-889,7068

www.aandhgunsofswfl.co m


We Buy & Trade Guns!
I OVER 100 YEARS OF WEAPON EXPERIENCE!





5I4/,& K., Page 17 December 26,2013


n.eu...lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


Trading Post finds home


at Burnt Store Marina


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor
Supposedly, back in the 1850s, there
was a trading post located somewhere
near what is now Burnt Store Marina.
And supposedly, conflicts between the
settlers and the remaining Seminoles
led to the alleged burning of the store
- hence the name Burnt Store. Well,
there's a new store in Burnt Store Marina,
and it's aptly named the Trading Post.
And if there's anybody who can respect
the history, or myth, of the Burnt Store
folklore, it's Capt. Will Olds.
For more than two decades, Will
taught high school history in Florida.
Then he decided he had enough. Long
story short, now he and his wife, Lisa,
take pride in suiting the needs of the
Burnt Store community, as well as Char-
lotte Harbor anglers and sightseers.
"In a way, we're kind of doing what the
old trading post used to do'"Will says.
If you're in the Burnt Store area and
are in need of a quick bite to eat, the
Trading Post has you covered. They offer
a constantly changing breakfast and
lunch menu, using fresh baked goods and
Boar's Head products in their deli. They
also carry locally made ice cream and
make their own potato salad.
If you're an angler and need to stock up
on a few supplies before you hit the water,
the Trading Post again has you covered.
They provide fishing gear, clothing, bait,
boat supplies, alcoholic and other bever-
ages and various other supplies.
"We really take pride in catering to
people'"Will says."If we don't have
something that somebody wants, we can
order it in the morning and have it here
by the afternoon."
If running the store weren't enough,
Will and Lisa also own and operate Calusa
Queen Eco-Tours and Excursions. As
mentioned before, Will knows his history.
But he also knows about boats. He may
have taught history for 20 years, but
during the summers, Will taught boating
safety classes and ran a 49-passenger
touring boat. At Burnt Store Marina, they
have a 30-passenger vessel.
"We consider what we do a nature
tour"Will says. "I like to take passengers
to places off the beaten path. Sure, we
go to all the hot spots, but I like to give
people some history and facts that most
people wouldn't know."
Will offers tours of the Peace River,
Sanibel Island and everything in between.
"The store and the tours really comple-


RI CONTsACTINNI GROUP
C&D MARINE s
SSeawalls Caps Docks
Boat Lifts Dredging


Marine Custom Canvas + Upholstery
Custom Canvas Canvas Repair Mobile Service
S BAYVIEW CANVAS
( 27UJoni- esSi,-Po i,(holoneFL-
S 941.661.4070
www.BayviewCanvas.com


Punta Gorda's Premier
RYIBoat Storage ^
hCarotte RV0A
Storage
Gated Secured Vt
4T ,Voted
Camera Monitored Clean -, BEST
RV&
Hupprricane Rated Covered Storages Boat
*Sate Access 24/7 Storage
U-HAUL 150 Rio Villa Drive, Punta Gorda, Florida -
AUTHORIZ OD DEALERJ 941-575-7473 www.charlotteRVStorage.com


IeCi 6ark -1guaraniecnou
e1 5 111 will he talking about
.....,i y adv enturef tor
aw w^ iiilll^^


ReelSharlLcom
941-416-8047


SHARKS. TARPON GOLIATH GROUI


II IIIF '1


gd "What you don't know can hurt you! I
Concealed Carry
SBasic Handgun Instruction
S1 NRA-Certified Firearms Instructor
BILLY CARL
941-769-0767- jcarll@embarqmail.com
Sportrap Gun Shop, 941-629-7775


meant each other;"Will says. "A lot of times,
the men will come in and get sandwiches,
beer and other supplies for a day fishing
on the Harbor. Then the women will want
to come and take a tour to Boca Grande
or go shelling down on Sanibel. Not that
women don't fish. A lot of them do. I just
wanted to make that clear.":'
Located next to Porto Bello Restaurant
in Burnt Store Marina, the Trading Post


may not resemble the store of the 1850s,
but its purpose is largely the same.
Whether on land or water, the Trading
Post seems to have it all covered.
The Trading Post is located at 3190
Matecumbe Key Road, Punta Gorda
33955. You can call the store at
941-677-3137. You can call Calusa Queen
Eco-Tours and Excursions at
941-301-8687 or visit CalusaQueen.com


Get Your Weekly Dose of
Health & Hope
In Sunday's Feeling Fit! ii
Get a DAILY Dose at FeefingFit.com!
---eehi-g !-it ....- l


R -REDFISH -SNOOK -TROUT





8 i* Page 18 December 26,2013


Pnn*5nanumipin, s~ m
liiUUEUUfiiinl icUi iiiiii. UiiEi


I 0iiii lii 1i


SHAKK FIN S ILL UN (.HINEE MIlNUS


Even as Chinese President Xi Jinping clamps down
on excessive wining and dining, the controversial
delicacy shark fin soup remains on the menu in
plenty of China's upscale restaurants.
That's shown by a survey of 207 high-end
restaurants in Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen
carried out by Humane Society International and
the Nature University, an environmental organiza-
tion in Beijing. More than three out of four staffers
queried, or those from 156 restaurants, said shark
fin soup remains available. In the survey, 52 of the
restaurants canvassed were asked more detailed
questions, including whether they had heard of
restrictions on serving the soup. Only 16 knew of
the ban, while just 21 restaurants were aware that
populations of some shark species are threatened.
China is the largest consumer of shark fin soup in
the world, with the dish popular at official ban-
quets, despite years of efforts to restrict it. In July of
last year, China's State Council announced plans to
prohibit the dish at all official government functions
within three years. A ban was finally announced last
month. Items now restricted from official receptions
include "cigarettes, expensive alcohol, and dishes
containing shark fin, bird nests and wild animal
products,"'Xinhua reported.
SHARKS OK WITH EATING PEOPLE
According to Southern Cross University shark expert
Dr. Daniel Bucher it is not true sharks don't like
the taste of human flesh. He says there was no
evidence to support this claim, which he believed


gained acceptance to aiiay peoples rears OT snark
attack. "Normally they eat fish, but they don't mind
red meat if they can get it,"he said. "Sharks don't
mind. To them, it's just food." Because most shark
attacks on humans involved a single bite people
deduced sharks did not enjoy taste and attacks
were a case of mistaken identity, Dr. Bucher said.
However, it was more likely the sharks were taking
an exploratory bite to see what the object was.
And if it fought back, which would usually be the
case, this might put the shark off from proceeding
with the attack. "They are trying to work out if it's
alive, whether it will fight back,"he said. He said
a shark would weigh up the risk of attacking and
depending on how hungry it was would attack, or
not. "Act aggressively, swim at it, attack it," he said.
"It might be enough to put it off." Of course, as Dr.
Bucher pointed out, you have more chance of dying
from a car crash on your way to the beach.
FISH POOP BETWEEN YOUR TOES


Everyone loves a beautiful white-sand beach.
Next time you're lying on one of those glistening
tropical shores, think about this: The brightest white
sand is made of tiny bits of coral. Some of that is
weathered by wave action, but a large percentage
is produced biologically. Parrotfish are coral-eaters.
A large adult can eat more than 2,000 pounds of
coral a year, using its powerful beak to pulverize the
calcium carbonate coral skeletons. After digesting
the very small percentage of edible content, the
parrotfish excretes the rest as fine, snow-white


sana. inK OT it: iviliiions ana millions OT parrotirsn,
each pooping out a ton of sand a year for untold
millions of years. Happy sunbathing.
BP HITS IT BIG IN THE GULF
BP unveiled a significant oil discovery Dec. 18 in
the deep water Gulf of Mexico. The London-based
energy giant announced that it made a large
discovery in the Gila prospect, co-owned with
ConocoPhillips, making 2013 BP's most successful
year for exploration since 2004. BP, Europe's
second-largest oil firm, added that more drilling
will be needed to determine the exact size of the
find. The well was drilled under 4,900 feet of water,
or a total depth of about 5.5 miles, roughly 300
miles southwest of New Orleans. Gila represents
the seventh discovery from a total of 15 exploration
wells completed this year. Tiber, a 2009 discovery
located close to Gila, has at least 1 billion barrels of
recoverable resources. At the time, it was the largest
Gulf discovery in a decade. CEO Bob Dudley has led
an effort to focus more on exploration in the Gulf
of Mexico and elsewhere, looking to fuel growth
at BP after the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. "The
Gila discovery is a further sign that momentum
is returning to BP's drilling operations and well
execution in the Gulf of Mexico,";' Richard Morrison,
regional president of BP's Gulf of Mexico business,
said in a statement.
FRESH GREAT PLAINS SHRIMP
There are shrimp growing in Cedar Falls, Iowa. "We
just have big hot tubs,"said MattWeichers, owner
of Northern Iowa Shrimp, "and we're raising shrimp
in them. It's the darnedest thing."Tucked away in
a small warehouse on University Avenue, Weichers
and his wife, Jen, have been quietly growing
150,000 Pacific white shrimp in temperature con-
trolled aquaculture tanks since early October. Now
that the shrimp have reached maturity, Weichers
is opening his doors to begin selling the critters at
$20 a pound. "This is a perfectly healthy product
that is in very high demand,"Weichers said. "It is
the top-quality product you can buy." Last winter,
Weichers and his wife decided to join a small but
growing class of shrimp farmers in the Midwest.
They made up their minds after visiting Shrimp 59,
a shrimp farm in Holstein. According to Cheryl Shew


OT Zeigier Bros., a company mtat sells snnrimp Tood
to about 50 aquaculture farms across the country,
there are six shrimping operations in Iowa alone.
FISH STORY
\W \ L.-71


As in any good fishing story, the grouper weighed
300 pounds and put up a heck of a fight. Plus, there
were two of them! But this time, they didn't get
away. Fishermen on a Gulfstar Fishing boat hauled in
two massive Warsaw grouper last week and decided,
along with partner Northwest Seafood, to give the
meat to people in need. After running a contest
for patrons to guess the weight of the fish the
grouper on display at Northwest's Millhopper
location weighed 271 pounds, and the one at the
store's Tioga location was 273 pounds the two
"supergroupers"were cut up and vacuum sealed
Dec, 19. The meat will be distributed to food banks
in Alachua and Marion counties. Food banks don't
get a lot of high-quality protein donated, Northwest
Seafood co-owner Scott Richardson said, and the
two fish could yield nearly 300 pounds of meat.
THERE ARE NO GOOD OCTOPUS JOKES
How does an octopus go to war? Well-armed ...
How many octopi does it take to screw in a light
bulb? One-eighth ... Where do you find a down-
and out octopus? On squid row ... What does an
octopus wear when it's cold? A coat of arms...
Knock knock knock knock knock knock knock knock!
Who's there? An octopus!


Your #1 resource for

on-the-water information *11|

in Southwest Florida... ..__%N


F~ichRiB 1g


2ra


lwvw mu


TOP NOTCH
Covering Boats Since 1990
Marine Canvas & Upholstery
Biminis Boat Cushions Full Enclosures
Owners: MOBILE SHOP
SLeonard & Susie 1j- 7
Bolyard 19411l 25 -0 7


I BAT DTAI


IS *~ I **
M* yW

CHARLOTTE HARBOR
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY, LLC
S- Marine Upholstery
S* Canvas Cushions
S Full Enclosures Biminis
*- 941-979-5349
Lic./Ins.



ALL FUEL TANKS CLEANED
Gas or Diesel
Removal of Ethanol, Water, & Sludge

Lic. 941-815-6631


i Bennett Marine Construction Inc. An Occupational License may
Seawalls Boat Docks Boat Lifts be required by the city and/or
SServing the Gulf Coast Since 1961" county. Please call the
Call 941-697-3882 Englewood appropriate occupational
www.bennettmarineconstruction.com prpia uaton
LI FREE EsTiMATPs licensing bureau to verifv.


and research our archives,

with years'worth of Info just

a click away -and it's FREE!


To Advertise In This Directory

Please Call 941-429-3110


6-


I MAJN CNSRUONIiJ


2:c:m::;




/i Page 19 December 26,2013
j^M~r~i-* Page 19 December 26,2013


n.eu..lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu mhummmm~.in.ehEum


It's 'ff ee
arock concert
rock concert!


Iy


Come and join us!
Bring non-perishable food
items for donation to The
Salvation Army. Each item
gets you a ticket for the raffle,
featuring awesome prizes! k94


7-1


THE TIME: Noon Saturday, January 1I1,2014
THE PLACE: The Fishery Restaurant in Placida
For full details or to register for the fishing tournament, go to


DOING THE
MOST GOOD
L,- ,D.O,.
FISHING d
Publix


As


Rpccl5hark
Charters


t &.. -


BoatingAndFishing.com


aAbu
Garcia f
5wu4, '/e?$wwt e


-BAIT tTACKLE


SE


LICK-EM-LURES


i ^WEEKLY MAGAZINE


PRESENTS THE
FIRST ANNUAL
[oaro'i19


RES 7AURAH r
41W
LLLdff
,-"4,


iWic'
tdj








irniWAnniaa I l iamm


TIc


12FT. 2013 CRAIGCAT F2 ELITE Key West Edi-
tion, 30HP E-Tec, full remote electric start, elec. tilt,
rod holders, ProSpec saltwater AM/FM/USB sound
system, bimini top & more! With new EZ Loader
trailer. TONS OF FUN!! $11,500 941-475-4941


^ ...^% L^



17' Angler Cenler Console 1982, 115 Merc-1982, Irailer
Just Serviced Ready to go! $3,950
C0, tttLal Cay Centr-
941-639-6603
WWW A/.CRVSTALCAY.COIMJ&
4225 Taylor Road. PG


BBBRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!! It's been cold lately,
how does that affect diving?
Lots of people stop diving in the winter; in
fact, it's common, in the spring, to hear people
talk about the beginning of the dive season.
When water is cold, many people don't want to
be in it. But for many of us, that's not an option
because we love diving too much to restrict it
to six months of the year.
We've all been in cold water and gotten a
chill. It's not fun at all. If we get too cold, it can
actually be life-threatening. Hypothermia is a
condition in which the body temperature drops
below 951F.
Heat is lost from the body through a process
called conduction. Since our bodies produce
heat, this is normally a good thing it keeps
us from getting overheated. Heat travels
from warmer areas to cooler ones, so as we
produce heat, we lose it to the surrounding
air. Air temperature is typically lower than
skin temperature, which is usually about 931F.
While there are other modes of body heat
loss, conduction is the one with which we are
primarily concerned when diving.
Water is a much better conductor of heat
than air. Water draws heat away from our
bodies 24 times faster than air of the same
temperature. This explains why 75 F air is
comfortable, but 75 F water feels quite cold.
The water draws heat away from our bodies
much faster than we can replace it.
When water temperatures drop, as the
usually do in our area in November, we must
take measures to conserve body heat when we
dive. One method is to wear a wet suit. Wet
suits are designed to hold in body heat. They
come in different thicknesses depending on
what conditions we'll encounter. Thicker suits
keep us warmer in colder water or on longer
exposures, but they also restrict our move-
ments and require additional weights to allow
us to achieve neutral buoyancy on our dives.
Without the extra lead, we would never get
underwater.
This is not a case of one size fits all, as some
people are less tolerant of cold than others.
Some people get cold easier at one time than
at another. I know I get cold much more easily
than I did 30 years ago. The bottom line: If
you're cold, you're cold. Use a thicker suit or put
on a hood. Make sure you have a snug-fitting
suit that does not constrict your ability to move
and breathe.
Wet suits work with two principles insu-
lation and restricting water movement. Water
gets in the suit, but if the suit fits well, it stays
put. It will initially be cold, but your body heat
will quickly warm it. If the suit is too loose,
cold water will come in and flush out the warm
water. This water exchange will rob you body
of heat. You'll be uncomfortable and will be
in danger of hypothermia. A spine pad is very


helpful in restricting water flow and keeping
you warm.
Another option is a dry suit with under-
garments. In very cold water, a dry suit is
absolutely necessary. Water doesn't get that
cold in Florida, but they can still make winter
diving more pleasant. There are disadvantages.
Dry suits are expensive and often require
assistance to put on and take off. You also
need thermal clothing underneath. The dry
suit itself merely keeps you dry; the thermal
undergarments are what keep you warm.
Dry suits keep water out by using wrist and
neck seals. If the seals are cut too big, the suit
will leak. If a neck seal is too tight, it can cause
the diver to lose consciousness and drown.
When diving a dry suit, be very careful the
neck and wrist seals fit properly. Diving with a
dry suit requires additional training.
Our northern dive buddies wear hoods to
help them stay warm. All too often, Florida
divers don't wear hoods because we believe it's
not cold enough. If you need thermal protec-
tion, you need a hood. A very good rule to
follow is if you start shivering, it's time to end
your dive and get warmed up.
To warm up after a dive, quickly strip off
your wet suit and dry off with a towel. If
you can get inside, do so, but even if you are
outside in cold wind, do it anyway. Then put on
warm, dry clothing. Layering for extra warmth
is best. Don't forget you lose heat quickly from
your wet head; a stocking cap is a great idea to
combat heat loss.
Other than the challenges of keeping warm,
winter diving is not usually much different
than summer diving in Florida. There are a few
differences that relate to annual migrations.
Grouper tend to be found in deeper water
during the summer, but come in shallow when
water temperatures drop. The east coast of
Florida, near Jupiter, is famous for the annual
migration of lemon sharks in January and
February. This is important to know whether
you want to experience large schools of shark
up close or you'd really rather avoid the honor.
From personal experience, I highly recommend
going at least once.
Diving is a wonderful lifestyle, and in Florida
it's one that can be experienced year-round
if you know how to stay warm when water
temperatures drop.
Walter Wilt began diving in 1983. He is a
retired Instructor Trainer with two dive training
agencies, YMCA SCUBA and SEI. He is also a
retired boat captain having operated dive boats
in the upper Keys from the mid 1980s through
the early 1990s. An avid diver with thousands
of logged dives, Walter enjoys diving vintage
equipment. His hobby is making artwork
(primarily bells and umbrella stands) from
condemned SCUBA tanks. You can see his art on
his Facebook page.


I J 1997 rli,:,:, C31 H ull .-h,rp .I,:.hr,,',:,r, vV r, Ir3i1 r >-.99
Very Dry and stable ride for it's size. New Floor and transom. 17' SUNCATS 2004, 2006 & 2014 Available
BiminiTop, Brand NewTrolling Motor, and CMC Jack Plate Please call for pricing!
Draft's 8 Inches. Punta Gorda's Com-Pac Dealer
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com 941-833-0099






16 1987 SLarCral Sporl boal w trailerr S1500 1 6 6 c HiiC K BIy 6.:.,i ti 90'rp .:.ur I .ir :.K M.,rc
Motor does not work. $1,200 for boat alone. Asking $13,990. Very Low hrs almost like a new boat!
..vstal Cay Caentr SS Propeller, Garmin Color Chart Plotter GPS. Comes with
41-639-66o03 trailer. Bimni top, Live Well, Coast Guard Equipment.
VWWW.CRYSTALCAY.COMnAJ Ready For the Water!
4225 Taylor Road, PG BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


16 MITCHELL, Cenler Console 1984,
Mooring Cover-75HP Evinrude. 4,000 $1350.
c-.r.jstat Cay Cent-
941-639-6603
WVVyCRVSTAL-CAY.COMI
4s42r5Taylor Road, PG


i tUU ,diUiiiiod Onhlll I$,5U
Call Richard Rosano 203-912-95
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A I
Licensed Yacht Broker da
Located at BEAUTIFUL .% .. % ,


2011 Lowe Custom Trailer Minn Kota wireless trolling
motor, Lowrance GPS & Fish Finder Boat is like new
-Only 34 Hours Just Serviced turn key
See full details & water test video @
www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835






every Thursday,



Only In the


18'2006 SEA HUNT TRITON 186CC 2006 Yamaha 115
H.P. 4-S only 154 hours & 2006 Wesco Alum Trailer
Super nice family fishing boat.T-Top, trim tabs, color
GPS/fish finder, stereo, VHF. Fully serviced turn key
package. See full details and virtual water test video
@ WWW.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


18' 6" 2005 Larson Bow Rider, 4.3 Vortech Volvo
Sale price @ $11,990. Very Low Hrs Since New. Lower Unit
just completely redone. Full cover. Engine is spotless. Runs
Exc.needs nothing!.Very solid boat with a great ride and fast.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


18' GLASTRON 183CC with VERY low hr
Johnson 2004 at $13,900 with nice trailer.
Call Tod 941-457-0131
Or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


19' 1996 Wellcrall Cenler Console. Johnson 112HP
$7,990. Fish Finder, CD Player, Fishing Chair,
Life Jackets, Bimini Top & Swim Ladder. Fresh Water
Boat Very Good Condition! Has Trailer. This boat
Needs nothing ready for fun in the sun today!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


Sf your ad were here,



50,000

people would have seen it this week.
,-I q {, 'i | ,' I1 {-- ; *74 I,,.,





*an..nn*n**. n.ilnknn ean--rn
MUUH SaiEEEHliU~aiIEUEiI5.BUOEEI


Call 941-42k3iG -
to list your boatStdvI -
SL I


19' 2000 Seaswirl Center Console: Good shape,
115HP Johnson. NewVHF, Garmin fishfinder/chartplot-
ter combo, battery and bilge pump. Bimini and console
cover included. Asking $11,500. ,,
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 w C' O tt


21' 2003 SEASWIRL $17,500
Please contactTod Sullivan at 941-457-0131
or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers and
Redfish Yacht Brokers


2006Yamaha 150 HP 4-stroke & 2008 Continental Tan-
dem Aluminum Trailer. Deluxe Custom Bay Boat-196
hours. Loaded with options. Just serviced turn key
package. See full details and virtual water test
@www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


21 2013 HURRICANE SUNDECK Fun in Lhe Sun!
Full Warranty $28,900 Call Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only d AQ
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [-NI A -Rl N .A
a4


You've heard me talk about f
friendships in fishing clubs. Not L J
just within clubs, but within I l
the fishing community. Let me | |
share with you an example 1 1
of how a support system of
anglers can truly become an aid
to someone in need.
I currently belong to a small club up in the
Tampa/Brandon area. The name of the club is
the MacDill Bassbusters. The club originated
from a bunch of retired military servicemen
that were all working as civilians out at MacDill
Air Force Base in Tampa. Some of those guys
were friends of mine and had become friends
through fishing. So when the club formed, I
became a member out of respect to the guys
that have served.
Recently, one of those original members
incurred a great loss. We don't know for sure,
but he may have lost his home to a fire. There
is no word yet on how it started, but he lost
his three dogs, and I know there are items
that he and his wife had that were lost in this
disaster.
His wife cares for her dad from Germany, and
they were both home when the fire started.
Just a truly bad turn of events for someone
who has always been willing to help if anyone
else ever needed.
My wife Missy and I were discussing this
the other night, and she came up with a great
idea: Why not host a tournament, charge our
normal entry fee, and all proceeds go to help
them in their time of need? What better way
to get folks together than to have a cookout
and do something to help friends in their time
of need. So, the planning is underway.
We hope to identify a lake here in the very
near future to host this event, then invite
everybody over to our home for a cookout.
When I approached some of the other
members of the club with our idea, they were
all on board and in full support of such an
event.
This is the time of year where you can't
stand to see anyone down on their luck. To go
through what they are going through is just



1-1/2 Ib trout fillets
Juice of 3 limes
1/2 cup butter
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
Tabasco sauce to taste


s, 2010 MagicTilt Alum Trailer. Great family/fishing boat.
Color GPS/Fish Finder, shallow water anchor. Like new
w/only 81 hours. Yamaha Warranty through 11/16. Just
Serviced Turn Key package. See full details and virtual
water test video@ www.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


unfair, considering the time of year. I know the
money we raise won't even be close to cover
anything that they've lost, but it may be able
to help them get some things taken care of in
the short term. I think the biggest hurdle we
will have with this event is the holiday season.
My better judgment tells me to at least wait
until after the New Year's so we can get more
people to attend this event. After all, the more
money we can raise, the more it will help.
It's funny, we take this time of year to have
fun with our families and friends and never
stop to think about those that go through
hardships this close to the holidays. I know
other folks go through these sorts of things,
but until it hits someone close to you, you can't
imagine the agony until you speak to them.
My wife and I feel like this is a time to step
up, gather our other fishing friends that are
also close to this couple and do the right thing
to help them out. I'm hoping we can make
it somewhat of a surprise for them and keep
them in the dark about this whole event until
they think we're handing out the awards, when
in fact, it will all be for them.
With all that being said, I want to wish each
and every one of my WaterLine family, and of
course our readers, a very happy holidays and
a safe and Happy New Year. While we are all
out and about with family and friends, make
sure you and everyone around you are safe and
enjoy this great holiday season. I look forward
to this time of year every year, and I hope to
make it even more special by helping out a
couple that is very close to my wife and me.
Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fisherman
based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes throughout
Florida's Heartland with his wife and tourna-
ment partner, Missy Snapp. Contact him at
Greg.Bartz@SummitHoldings.com.



A clip-n-save seafood
recipe provided by

f7 (


21 2013 KEY WEST 219 FS for S33,900
Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only II
Licensed Yacht Broker _______ N
Located at BEAUTIFUL -.M .A RI NAI.JI


20' 1997 Aquasport 200 Center Console $14,999 21 2013 Sea Huni Ulira 211 for S34,900
Call Orion Wholean at 941-249-0177 Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only 4 IM By appointment only I S I
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL G -1AR I .- .*] Located at BEAUTIFUL G R I .,.
I A:RSN4.A


20' POLAR 2010 Bay with trailer,
150HP Yamaha, poling platform,
Minnkota, Bimini Top, Simrad,
Excellent condition, Many Extras
$18,900 941-497-3205


u learn SaITIsn, 19b, witrn trailer. center console, live
well, motor Yamaha 130,2 stroke, w/ SS prop, recently
tuned up trailer. New hubs, brakes, buddy bearings, and
tires, excellent condition, ready to launch and go fishing.
Was $7,900 REDUCED To: $6,900
941-626-4571 or 941-627-5777


20' THOMPSON 1988, V-6 Mercruiser IO
Boat & Trailer. Ready to ride! $4,805. $3,995.
c.,Vstal Cay Centr
941-639-6603
WW.CRYSTAALCAY.COIVtAiA b
4225 -rylorRmad. -000-


Now $3,000. Motor available $2,800 installed.
.sCatI Cay Cernter.
941-639.-603
ZV WWW.CRYSTALCaVY-CciA
4225 Taylor Road, PGS







22 2013 SEA HUNT ULTRA 225 for $35,000
Call Meagan McCall at (941) 268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only AIBA
Licensed Yacht Broker A Iii_ l
Located at BEAUTIFUL I'.MARINA-J







23' 1993 SEA RAY SUNDANCER uind-.- l .:,r :l:
$12,900 Call Meagan McCall for Details! 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only i H
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located in BEAUTIFUL [t MA R=INA,.


- A"-^
.-- j1 t.--


Place fillets in a fiat pan; squeeze lime juice on top. Refrigerate 4 hours to tenderize. When ready
to cook, place on an oiled grill over hot coals and brush with butter. Season with salt and pepper.
Grill 3-4 minutes on each side, basting frequently with butter as fish browns. Serves 4.


- Recipe from justseafoodredcipes.com


Clean! $11,990. Garmin GPS Color Chart Plotter. '08 Alum.
Trailer. Full Windshield. Lots of seating. Much easy to main-
tain then a deck boat ( Removable Cushions) with a much
better ride. Turn Key! Ready for the water today!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


Bimini, 150 Merc gas engine. No trailer. $9,200
CrT-stgal Cay Csnfter
q-' 041-639-6603
-10 WWW-CRYSTALCA'-COIm
%, 422S Taylor Road, PG




orl* nnflnnfln.Ufln-'kInn ew
II in mI sutmhIII uinhi aUdlIl EII UU1 a e u.IIIl n UIUEiII


Is good tac


ie


reallY worth __
IUI- a.w. 1-..i


the monevY?


EFI Only $16,990. Garmin GPS Sounder, Sleeps 4
Comfortably. Was Dry rack Stored and she shows!
Very Low Hrs Always maintained. Great Price!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


^^? _


a ~-


Only $15990. Plenty of seating. Porta Potty Room. Garmin
GPS, Stainless BiminiTop. New oil pan, oil exchanger &
shift cable just replaced.Turn key!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


f ... -. .... ...j- .... ... t j I 3 .. ...
Clean with rasied console.T-Top Rocket launcehers, w/ Float in 8"
of water & can run way offshore. Best of both worlds. Rare Find!
Two live wells, fish boxes, hydrolic steering & more!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


Call Orion Wholean at 941-249-0177
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A f H
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL C.ilA RINA.]*






25 2001 PRO SPORTS CENTER CONSOLE 2003
SUZUKI TWIN 140 H.P. 4-STROKES. Serious fishing
machine Deluxe T-Top outriggers, downriggers,
color GPS, fish finder, Radar. Just serviced turn key
boat. See Full details and virtual water test video @
WWW.17Marinellc.com 941-575-4835
7" ..




25"1 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter GPS with Sonar. Hard
Top, A/C! Comes w/Aluminum trailer.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.comrn


A great way to save money on your fishing
tackle is to buy more expensive rods and reels.
Doesn't make sense, you say? Yes, it does -
and here's why.
Let's say you buy a $30 rod-and-reel combo
from one of the big-box stores. That's a great
price, right? Take it out and fish with it. You
can cast, retrieve and catch fish. It'll be a little
heavier than a higher-grade combo, so casting
may get to be a chore by the end of the day.
The drag on your bargain reel will probably be
notchy, making it harder to effectively fight
a strong-running fish, and may overheat if a
big red or other hard-charging fish puts it to
the test.
If any salt water splashes on the reel's
metal parts, the onset of corrosion on the
visible metal parts will be quick. If you stash
the combo in the back of the truck after
you're done fishing, when you break it out
next weekend to fish you'll probably be sorry
you didn't rinse and lube it. With low-quality
equipment, there's a lot more maintenance
involved you'll get no high-tech corro-
sion-resistant materials for these prices.
Let's assume you do maintain the low-cost
combo properly. After a few trips, especially
if you're catching big, strong fish or doing a
lot of casting and retrieving, you may notice
the reel feels a bit gritty. This isn't something
you've done wrong it's just that cheaper
reels utilize inferior internal parts. The gears
are made from poured metal basically
potmetal injected into a mold or some-
times even plastic. These gears have a limited
useful life. No matter how well you take care of
them, the soft materials wear down with use
- sometimes surprisingly little use.
At some point, it would not be a huge
surprise if your bargain rod broke under the
strain of a big fish. Quality control is more
or less nonexistent in low-end rod manufac-
turing. Inexpensive rods are typically made
from a "fiberglass-like substance"-- typically,
a composite of graphite, fiberglass, plastics
and resins. The exact mix of materials will
vary, often in the same brand. Basically, the
manufacturers are using the least expensive
material available. The guides are made
from low-grade recycled metal, which often


WaterLine photo by Josh Olive
The two reels pictured above are a lot alike:
They're made by the same manufacturer
and are the same size. The one on the right
retails for $20; the one on the left, $240.
Something must be different, but what?

contains lead and other impurities. Like many
other manufacturers, rod builders try to find
the lowest possible prices for the parts they
need to buy, so when they're putting together
low-cost models they often use the cheapest of
the cheap rod blanks and guides.
In a rod, guide materials make a big
difference. The new braided lines are tough
on guides and can leave nicks and grooves in
inexpensive guide inserts. Aluminum oxide,
long the standard for use with monofilament
line, does not stand up to long-term use
with braid. Hardloy, titanium, silicon carbide
and other very hard, smooth materials resist
abrasion from braid. The smoother the guide
insert, the farther you can cast. A larger
number of guides, which spreads out the
stress load along the rod when you're fighting
a fish, is a feature not usually found on
low-priced rods.
Don't forget that you're the last link in a
chain of manufacturer to consumer. There are
multiple middlemen involved, each of whom
has to make a profit. To make the economics
work, a rod that sells for $20 may cost $3 or
less to build. That's for materials and labor.
A $20 rod and a $200 rod look a lot alike
- they're both long and thin, they both
have guides, they both have reel seats. But a
Mercedes and a Yugo also look a lot alike -
they both have wheels, the both have head-
lights, they both have engines. The difference
is in the build and component quality.
OK so you paid $30 for your rod and
reel, and it lasted six months. Let's be
generous and assume that your warranty
covers defects in materials and workmanship
for a year. The big-box store is no help in
getting warranty service, so you have to ship
it back to the maker. You'll be paying shipping
both ways, and it'll probably
cost you more than the $30 you 11


24' 2004 TRITON
Superbly well kept loaded with extras. Also comes
with a complete full mooring and storage cover.
Also includes trailer. $40,000 Call John
@ Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


24 2005 SHAMROCK "4 ,....". Vj.-i rii I rini.-- .:..
hours. Call Richard Rosano 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only l
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL r.L., r n, .,


24 2008 Bay Scoul 240 ':":' -;i.-i jll.:.. .-,
boat!! Call Megan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I
Licensed Yacht Boker
Located at BEAUTIFUL MARIN.]


24' MAXUM 2400 SCR with single gas,
genset, AC and more 2000 at $19,900
Call Daryl 941-685-2399
Or the office at 941-685-2399
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


Ku-UU(.u-U
24' Privateer Renegade 1987, with trailer, 260hp motor,
Stereo, Furuno Radar, GPS, plotter, much more! $12,000.
C,9stal Cay Center
941-639-6603
SWWW.CRYSTALCA'Y.COMv J i.
4225 Taylor Road, PG


i l IIU C mmUi I iaIn UbUuUU
Call Richard Rosano at 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only i mm ilf
Licensed Yacht Broker *i m JlR
Located at BEAUTIFUL [1% N A R INA-Jr






26' 1989 BOCA GRANDE V'j.- r 1 -I -i.-, ; ,':":":'
Call Richard Rosano for Details! 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt. ONLY
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL NI. 'RINA .






26' 1996 CHRISCRAFT CROWN
With new engine and trailer $15,000
Call Mike at 941-412-6430 or
the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


26 2001 Sea Ray 260 Sundancer r,,:ui. ::ri
$29,900 Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A-
Licensed Yacht Broker _____
Located at BEAUTIFUL uI. ATR RINAJ


*<^S


26 2002 Four Winns 268 Visia: Super clean inside
and out, just waxed, 5.7 Volvo w/289 hrs,
generator w/86 hrs, full camper enclosure.
Recent survey rated above average. Asking $34,000.
Call Ray Mason Y- One
941-505-7269. ,Ttr L





wIS lSiUUIMUMWl eaE i iE iu OBI

paid to start with. So you decide to toss the
now-junk rod and reel and buy another one.
You'll probably get another six months of use
out of the next one, and the next one, and the
next one.
Before you go back to the big-box store,
stop and think for a minute. If you go to your
local tackle shop instead, and spend a little
more to buy a quality piece of equipment,
you'll save money because you won't have to
replace it in six months. Some better-made
rods will come with a lifetime warranty,
which means that as long as you don't step on
it, stick it into a ceiling fan or do something
else stupid, that rod will last you a lifetime or
be replaced. A higher-quality reel, with cold-
forged or milled internals and an aluminum or
carbon fiber body, will also withstand harder
use and more of it. Although only a few
top-shelf reels come with lifetime warranties,
the warranty on well-made gear will still be
better than what you get with lower-priced
equipment.
When a manufacturer puts a good warranty
on a product, you can be sure they've tested
that product to ensure its quality. Warranty
returns are expensive, and no manufac-
turer wants to see product coming back, so
they make sure the quality is built in. Some
high-end products have service warranties that
guarantee turnaround within a specific time.
You can expect to use a high-quality outfit
for at least several years. If you pay $120 for
a good rod and reel, you'll start coming out
ahead after about two years because you won't
be buying a new $30 combo every six months.
And the benefits aren't only financial you'll
also have gear that actually works and does
what it's meant to do. The drag will be smooth,
the rod will be much less likely to have weak
spots, and the whole setup will be lighter.
Overall, better-made equipment is more effec-
tive and more fun to fish with.
A higher price doesn't always mean that
you're getting a higher-quality piece of equip-
ment be sure to get a recommendation
from the staff at your local shop. And no reel is
going to last long if it's not properly main-
tained. Even a top-quality reel can be ruined by
using it for something it's not intended to do.
For example, don't try to catch Goliath grouper
with a 3000 series Shimano Stradic. Problems
with reels aren't always the manufacturer's
fault; they rely on suppliers for a lot of their
parts. Witness what happened to Fin-Nor
several years ago. Fin-Nor had a reputation for
high-quality reels, but they got a bad batch of
bearings from their supplier and it bank-
rupted the company.
For kids who are going to drop their gear in
the water and not take care of it, inexpensive
gear is perfectly fine. In fact, it's probably
best to start kids off with the cheap stuff -
that way, you won't be nearly as angry when
they ruin it. But if you're a little more serious
about your fishing, it's actually in your best
interest to step up to higher quality and
stop throwing away your money on inferior
equipment.
Jeff Kincaid is the owner and operator of
Capt. Ted's Tackle in Port Charlotte. Contact him
at CaptainTedsTackle.com or 941-627-6800, or
stop in at the shop (1189 Tamiami Trail, in front
oflngman Marine).


^tf K/^,* Page 23 *December 26,2013


here is a basic guide to determining the quality of
gear before you make a purchase. Mid-grade models
will often have some overlap with low-and high-
grade features, but this should give you a good idea.

LOW-GRADE RODS
v Non-branded plastic or aluminum oxide guides
v Fewer guides
v Foam or cork veneer handle
v Plastic reel seat
v Unspecified blank construction
v Often have weak spots
v Inconsistent action from rod to rod
v No or short warranty

MID-GRADE RODS
v Name brand aluminum oxide or ceramic guides
v More guides
v Durable foam or agglomerated cork handle
v Graphite reel seat
v Graded graphite (IM6, IM7) or fiberglass blank
v Weak spots rare
v Consistent action from rod to rod
v Warranty at least a year

HIGH-GRADE RODS
v Name brand high-tech ceramic or
composite guides
v More guides
v Solid cork handle
v Graphite, carbon fiber or metal reel seat
v Graded graphite (IM7 and up), fiberglass or
high-tech composite blank
v Weak spots rare
v Consistent action from rod to rod
v Limited lifetime warranty

LOW-GRADE REELS
v Plastic or potmetal body
v Fewer bearings, usually unsealed
v Low-grade stainless or non-stainless steel
bearings
v Poured potmetal or plastic gears
v Notchy, inconsistent drag
v Easily corroded metal hardware
v Foam or hard plastic handle
v Gritty feel when reeling
v No or short warranty

MID-GRADE REELS
v Aluminum or graphite body
v More bearings, sealed or unsealed
v Mid-grade stainless steel or ceramic bearings
v Stamped bronze or steel gears
v Smooth drag
v Corrosion-resistant metal hardware
v Wood or soft-touch plastic handle
v Smooth feel when reeling
v Warranty at least a year

HIGH-GRADE REELS
v Aluminum or carbon fiber body
v More bearings, sealed
v High-grade stainless steel or ceramic bearings
v Cold-forged or milled stainless steel gears
v Smooth drag
v Corrosion-resistant metal hardware
v Soft-touch plastic or high-tech
composite handle
v Smooth, well-greased feel when reeling
k Warranty at least a year


'I IIfF ~

SIZE LIMIT: n/a tails. Sand brear
DAILY BAG LIMIT: 100 Ib per harvester pieces of squid
I AVERAGE SIZE: Less than half a pound NOTES: Properl
STAT CO ay rea I b c (mo-HARR-uh),
STATE RECORD: n/a; may reach 2.5 lb never hear; som


HAB IAI: Usually tound over sand or
mud in shallow inshore waters. A
(olllon fish in mI ny I,:,(al alals
May be ifounld several miles up the
Peace and Myakka rivers
LEGAL GEAR: HookI and line.
spears. Igs selle r castlet
FOOD VALUE: Very go:d ,,
aind ild-lavo:red
FISHING METHODS:
Usually caught on ,
peeled shrImp


old-timers. I he i
& tube, used to re,
ouLt prey Smalll


m will also take small crabs,
mand occasionally cut fish.
y called striped mojarra
which is a name you'll almost
times called silver jenny by
mouth extends into a long
ach into small crevices to slurp
salnd brealn are fantastic bait


[r tarponl aind big snook


Call 941-429O3iG-
to list your boatStoday! _


26' Pursuil Denali 2670: Excellenl condilion,T-200Yamaha
four strokes w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure, windlass,
elec. head, Garmin GPS and fishfinder. Asking $68,500.
Call Cpt. Bob Babineau, 329 -r f^2,,
941-626-1329 Unnn(Snrc


Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY! ,1 l 1
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL G i.W .i I i A -,


Like new condition, twin Yamaha 4 strokes, generator,
AC, radar, hardtop, all the amenities.
This boat has it all. Asking $65,000. Cl R
Call Ray Mason T r O W
941-505-7269 9_____501t


27' 2006 GLASTRON
With its beautiful condition and many fine
amenities, this boat is a must-have
for any boating enthusiast.$34,000 Call John @
Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575

.v





27 2006 LARSON CABRIO 274 for S39,900
Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.corn
By Appt. ONLY AIJ I
Licensed Yacht Broker I
Located at BEAUTIFUL I[.M A R I NA-J







27' 2006 SEA RAY AJ
This 27 Amberjack is the perfect all around
package. Engine has been updated
and shows 30 hrs.$40,000 CALL JOHN
@ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575







28 1991 Sea Ray Weekender: Two rebuilt
Mercs with low hours, large cockpit for
fishing, new interior
upholstery. Ask $23.900. 7'ier, O e
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269. "" qi3 'BL


"uIU --I


28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000, T/250HP,Yamaha's,
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000,
941-966-5400







28' CruiserYacht 1998,5.7 Twin Merc engines,
Full canvas covers, Many extras. $25,000.
C4 ,.lstalI Cay Center
9441-630-6603
UWWW Ct-YSTALCAV-COIVI.-ga
4Z2S Taylor Road, P4.-


28' Luhrs Open, twin Yanmar Diesel, 2006,
$119K Contact Daryl at 941-685-2399
or the office at 941-833-0099
Offered by
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler I/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, encl. head.
$26,900 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales







29'1989 Cruisers
. Very clean with owner having kept her in great condition,
new bottom service, batteries and cockpit carpet are just
a few of the upgrades. $19,000 Call John
@ Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10,
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator.
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600.


29 Larson Cruiser, 2007 EFI 4.3 s Only $29,900.00
New seals in the outdrives. Radar Depth finder GPS
Marine Stereo, Bimini Tops, SS Prop. Full stand up
head w/ shower. Aft cabin with plenty of room. LOADED!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


28'2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin.
310 dual prop AC. GPS. bridge enclosure.
electric head. full galley. 45 mph. only 90 hrs.
lift kept. Excellent condition.
$28,500. 941-639-7890.


Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only IMI I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL t'N .,\ R|I N A'I


. goI dm










BULLETIN BOARD
FROM PAGE 3

even reveal the locations of a few local hotspots! The course
is open to all members of the public and includes six evening
sessions which are to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. beginning on
Jan. 8th. The cost for the class is $40 and advance registration is
recommended by calling 941-637-1655.

SOUTH FLORIDA MUD RUN 5K
The South Florida Mud Run is the only 100 percent charity
Mud Run of it's kind! Grab your friends, create a team and
come get dirty for a good cause while we work together
to build America's newest Children's Hospital in American!
The 3.1-mile race is on Jan. 11th and starts at 9 a.m. at the
Redneck Yacht Club Punta Gorda (44570 Bermont Road, CR
74, located three miles east of CR 31, Punta Gorda). Call
941-505-8465 for more information.

VENICE SAILING SQUADRON
MEMBERSHIP MEETING
Venice Sailing Squadron's membership meeting is on Jan. 15th
at 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Venice Community Center (326 Nokomis
Ave. South, Venice). There will be a potluck dinner with guest
speaker. Monthly races and cruises will be discussed. Racing
crews needed. You don't need a boat to join. Interested parties
are always welcome to attend. Call 941445-5069 or
941-861-1380 for more information.

FULL MOON TRAM TOURS
AT FAKAHATCHEE STATE PARK
Ride the new"Ghost Rider" tram, named in honor of the
famous Ghost Orchid found in the park. The Fakahatchee is
home to more orchid species than any other place on the North
American continent. Only three Full Moon tours will be offered
this season. All tours start as the sun is setting. A naturalist
will lead each tour. The Full Moon tours leave from the ranger
station (137 Coastline Drive, Copeland, off Janes Scenic Drive).
Please arrive early as the tram leaves promptly according to
the following schedule: Jan. 16th, depart at 4:45 p.m., return
7 p.m.; Feb. 14th, depart at 5 p.m., return 7:15 p.m.; March
15th, depart at 6 p.m., return 8:15 p.m. Reservations for the
Full Moon tours are $25 per person and can be made by visiting
OrchidSwamp.org.


GULF COUNCIL RECREATIONAL
ANGLER INPUT SESSION
The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will hold a
Recreational Angler Participation session on Jan. 23rd to hear about
the issues Gulf of Mexico recreational anglers have regarding current
federal fisheries management, and to explore potential solutions
to those issues. Who should attend? Anyone with concerns about
recreational fisheries regulations who would like to play a role in
shaping the future of recreational fisheries management. The session
will be held at the Bass Pro Shops in Fort Myers (10040 Gulf Center
Drive, Fort Myers) from 6 to 9 p.m. Call 813-348-1630for more info.

MIAMI BOAT SHOW TRIP FROM CAPE CORAL
Sit back, relax and enjoy a trip to the Miami Boat Show that
departs on Feb. 15th at 7 a.m. from the Cape Coral Yacht Club
Community Park (5819 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape Coral) and
returns at 9 p.m. The trip includes transportation, entry fee,
parking, tolls, snacks and soft drinks. Call 239-574-0806 or visit
CapeParks.com for more information.

LEARN ALL ABOUT MANGROVES
The University of Florida/IFAS Extension, Charlotte County and
Florida Sea Grant are pleased to announce their upcoming
program, a 2014 Mangrove Symposium, which will be held on
Feb. 20th from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Charlotte County Eastport
Environmental Campus (25550 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte).
This program is intended for landscape professionals, master
gardeners, homeowner associations, and residents living on the
water who wish to enhance or incorporate mangroves in their
landscape. Symposium speakers will discuss the role and value of
mangroves: Rules and lawsthat govern mangrove trimming and
mangrove pruning and growing techniques. The cost to attend is
$25 which includes lunch. Register at http://bit.ly/lhwFcb3. Space
is limited so pre-registration is required. For more information,
please contact Betty Staugler at 941-764-4346 orTom Becker at
941-764-4351.4.25 ISAand4 FNGLACEUs are being offered for
professional mangrove trimmers who attend the symposium.

ANNUAL HARBOUR HEIGHTS RUN/WALK
The eight annual Harbour Heights 5K run/walk is a community event
on Feb. 22nd that benefits Autism Speaks and exceptional students
at four Charlotte County elementary schools.Through this race we
hope to raise awareness about autism and help the classrooms for
developmentally disabled children.We appreciate your support! The
race starts at 8 a.m. at Harbour Heights Park (27420 Voyageur Drive,
Punta Gorda). Call 941-258-2891 for more information.


....... .................1.................................


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989 clean inside & out, 5212 Garmin chartplotter, lift
McCallMarineSales.com kept & serviced on a regular basis. Trade an
By appointment only I !H option. Ask $75,000. _
Licensed Yacht Broker Ray Mason, T ier OC,
Located at BEAUTIFUL V R I NA .* 941-505-7269 CfTllJ


Jx'SL __ 1^


beautiful! $109,900 Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3198
McCallMarinesales.com
By appointment only B M V
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFU L .


30' Checkmate 300SX, 1986, with tri-axle trailer
2 MerCruiser 600HP motors, bimini, & more. $34,500
r, !tMt 041-039-6003
A225 JTratCItVS RCad. 4 3
^ 4225 Taylor Road. PG SpS


Call Orion for details at 941-249-0177
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only 1 JI I
Licensed Yacht Broker _AM R
Located at BEAUTIFUL [-NiM \RI N..-%'


$129,900 Call Orion Wholean 941-249-0177
McCallMarineSales. corn
By appointment only I .
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL G I- ARIN-..
RIIB A'** R I!, J


Club meets on the second Monday of the month
October through May. The meetings are held at the
Hope Lutheran Church in Gulf Cove (14200 Hopewell
Ave, Port Charlotte) at 7 p.m. where speakers talk on
timely topics. In addition to the meetings the Club
holds a monthly fishing tournament and a monthly
picnic. For more information call 941-698-8607.
HANG OUT WITH SCRUB JAYS: Spend the morning
with the scrub jays at Oscar Scherer State Park
(1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.
every Sunday. This unique Central Florida experience
includes a nature walk to see the park's diverse
ecosystems, native flora and fauna. Call 941-483-5956
for more info.
SIX MILE CYPRESS SLOUGH PRESERVE: Take a
leisurely stroll on our fully accessible boardwalk trail
anytime dawn to dusk (7791 Penzance Blvd., Fort
Myers). Visit our Interpretive Center to learn more
about the plants and animals that live in the Slough
or just talk to a friendly volunteer. The center is open
Tuesday through Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Parking is $1 per hour per vehicle. Reservations not
required. No groups of eight or more. For more info call
239-533-7550 or visit LeeParks.org/SixMile.
VOLUNTEER AT SHAMROCK PARK: Shamrock Park
Nature Center (3900 Shamrock Drive, Venice) holds
its monthly volunteer work mornings from 8 to 10 a.m.
on the third Friday of each month. As abilities and
interests allow, volunteer tasks may include trash
collection along trails and within vegetated areas of
the park, light trimming along paved multi-use trail,
organization of storage areas, exotic plant removal
and other maintenance tasks. Long pants, closed-toe
shoes, sun protection, and plenty of drinking water are
recommended. Park staff will provide trash collection
buckets/bags, pickers, gloves, and other tools as
necessary. Meet at the Shamrock Park Environmental
Center. For more information, call Jennifer Rogers at
941-861-5000 or email her atjrogers@scgov.net.
WHAT'S THAT BIRD?: Volunteer bird interpreters
share their expertise on ID and behavior of raptors,
shorebirds, waterfowl and other avian visitors at
Myakka River State Park (13208 State Road 72,
Sarasota). Volunteers set up scopes and help people
identify birds from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every day of the
week.
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB: We are a scuba dive club
that meets on the third Tuesday of each month. Club is
based out of Punta Gorda. Call 941-740-4245 or contact
BottomTimeDiveClub.net.
LEARN TO TIE FLIES: Capt. Harry Hall will offer a free
saltwater fly tying seminar every Wednesday from
4:30 to 6 p.m. at West Wall Boats (787 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte). The public is invited to attend. Call
941-875-9630 for more info.
BIRD WALK AT LAKES PARK: A bird patrol guide will
lead an easy walk along clear paths of Lakes Regional
Park (7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers) at 8:30 a.m.
on the first Saturday of each month. This free walk
offers an opportunity to see birds in natural vegetation
as your guide points out the many species in what is


d UIIUIIIY IIUL J UL IU IU L IU I LId I 2 Ily ied UIIV[ llI
birds. Arrive at 8 a.m. at Shelter A7 for a brief intro
and sign-in. Wear comfortable shoes and dress for
outdoors. Bring water, hat, sunscreen, binoculars and
camera. Call 239-533-7580 for more info.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASS'N: Members
of this club for multihull owners, sailors or those who
are interested in it exchange ideas about equipping
and sailing boats, share information about anchorages
and cruising destinations, hold informal races that help
to improve their sailing ability, and have local raft-ups.
No dues. The club meets at Harpoon Harry's on the first
Monday of each month at 6 p.m. For more info, visit
Yhoo.it/XV96fO or call 941-876-6667.
KORESHAN STATE HISTORIC SITE STROLL: Walk
or bike the historic site (3800 Corkscrew Road, Estero).
Park fee is $2 for walk or bike; $4 for single-occupant
vehicle; $5 for two to eight occupants vehicle and $2
each additional person over eight per vehicle. Call
239-992-0311 for more information.
SARASOTA FITNESS WALKS: Join Sarasota County
Parks staff each Friday for a fitness walk through
Rothenbach Park (8650 Bee Ridge Road, Sarasota)
from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. The pace will be geared toward
fitness, aiming for a 20-minute-mile pace. The walk
will cover approximately three miles in one hour of
brisk walking. Enjoy the beautiful scenery and wildlife,
but keep up the pace. Wear appropriate workout
clothing, including good walking shoes, and bring your
water bottle. Meet in the pavilion near the playground.
Call 941-861-5000.
FREE SAFETY CHECKS IN VENICE: The Coast Guard
Auxiliary conducts free vessel safety checks every
Saturday morning from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m. at the Venice
boat ramp (200 N. Seaboard Ave., Venice). They'll make
sure the safety equipment mandated by federal and
state regulations is on board. If an inspected vessel is
found to be safe, a "Seal of Safety"is affixed to it. For
more info or to schedule an appointment, call Patrick
Wheeler at 941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER:
Year-round, ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek are
offered each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State Park
(1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register at
8:30 a.m., tour at 9 a.m. Cost is park fee plus canoe
or kayak rental fee. Bird walks are also offered every
Thursday at 7:30 a.m., and guided scrub jay walks
every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. For more info on any of
these programs, call 941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH:
Listed as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail.
Meet your volunteer guides (weather permitting)
at 8:30 a.m. Monday through Friday at the kiosk at
Tigertail Beach. Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail)
to 951 South to Marco Island. Turn right on Kendall
Court, the fifth light after crossing the bridge to
Marco Island. Turn left at four-way stop sign at
Hernando Court to Tigertail Beach. Water shoes and
binoculars are also suggested. The following walks
in the Naples area are offered at no cost through the
Conservancy of Southwest Florida (1450 Merrihue
Dr., Naples). For more info, call 239-262-0304 or visit
Conservancy.org.


30 CRUISER IND 1988,Twin 350s, 10 beam.
Full cabin, bimini top & more. $48,000. $16,900.
,-vvttal Cay Centr,.
-41-639-6603B
W W.CRYSTALCAY.COIVS
422 AZS*Taylor Read, P43 EGS


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only i l
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL L J j ,


T-Mercs w/300 hrs, Bravo III outdrives, well main-
tained, lift kept. Owner open to a trade for 24'-26'
walkaround. Asking $98,000.
Ray Mason,941-505-7269 Zi f ,e-.
Pier OneYacht Sales "P I er IIL


32' CATALINA 2003, 30 hp Yamnar,
AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
asking $77,000. 941-505-2787
email irvina32@centurylink.net


33'2004 GRADY WHITE
Meticulously maintained and upgraded, this owner
knows how to keep his boat right! $129,900
Call John @ Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575








34' 2000 LEGACY 34 EXPRESS 1 i,,
Call Richard Horst 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY! A IB
Licensed Yacht Broker _____
Located at BEAUTIFUL It A M RI N...


REDUCED!


31' CAMANO FLY BRIDGETRAWLER 1997
GREAT condition, lift kept, single diesel and
much more! $100K Call Daryl 941-685-2399
Or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


31 Sporlcrafl 2002 3150: LilI keplIT- Mercruiser MPIs
5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
$69,000. Per O e-
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 YRCHw ,fhIB


34'2006 FOUR WINNS
This is one of the most beautiful boats in its class.
She is in superb condition showing
its high pride of ownership. $2,000. $87,000
Call John@ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575





* ~i*uK.,.UFieUi.e.u
~SaSEhE~EuUU5aEE~DIEUEI~.SuSuEEI


BtIL I* Page 25 December 26,2013


- 1. -


el


............... I


6V
I '' 1




SARASOTA POWER SQUADRON 941-400-6467
ABC Boating Course (4 days) ....................................................................................................... 7 to 9 p.m Jan. 6
ABC Boating Course (2 days) ............................................................................................... 9 a.m to 1 p.m Feb. 8

VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-408-8591
Call for information

PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-637-0766
ABC Boating Course (7 W eds)............................................................................................ 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 8
Marine Electrical Systems Course (9 W eds) .......................................................................... 9 to 11:30 a.m. Jan. 8
Sail Course (8 W eds).......................................................................................................... 6:30 to 8:30 p.m Jan. 8
Cruise Planning Course (4 Mons and Thurs) .................................................................... 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 13
Marine Engine Maintenance Course (11 Tues)......................................................................... 9 to 11 a.m. Jan. 14
Partner in Com mand Seminar................................................................................. 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Jan. 25
Charting Local W aters Sem inar ........................................................................................... 9 a.m to noon Feb. 22
G PS Sem inar ....................................................................................................................... 1 to 3:30 p.m Feb. 22

CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
Call for information

Provided by Greg Scotten


@M~ffln ^^

PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
Boating Skills & Seamanship ........................ Jan. 6.................................... Venice ......................... 941-492-5904
Boating Skills & Seamanship ........................ Jan. 13.................................. Englewood..................941-697-9435
Boating Skills & Seamanship ........................ Jan. 18.................................. Fort Myers...................239-322-7089
Provided by Dave Nielsen


Call 941-4293iG-
to list your boattoday! -


inese outng are open to me puDIic tree oTcnarge.
Paddle participants must provide their own pfd, water-
craft and be able to swim. Voluntary donations to the
Charlotte Sierra Club are always gratefully accepted.
Reservations are required. Visit: bit.ly/1bSHFgx
JAN. 13TH, WEBB LAKE PADDLE: From 8:30 to
11:30 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists Jamie
Reynolds and John Phillips through wetlands
identifying native plants and birds. Participants must
provide pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-637-8284.
JAN. 14TH, DEEP CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
wetland marshes and hardwood hammocks. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
JAN. 15TH, SHELL CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Rick Fried.
Participants must provide pfd, watercraft and be able
to swim. Reserve: 941-637-8805.
JAN. 20TH, PRAIRIE CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists, John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
palmetto prairies, marshes and wetlands. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
JAN 23RD, MYRTLE CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Jim Story
through fresh water jungle, tidal Shell Creek waterfall
and Punta Gorda water supply dam. Participants must
provide pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Reserve:
941-505-8904.
JAN. 28TH, PRAIRIE SHELL CREEK PRESERVE
HIKE: From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master
Naturalists John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through
pine flatwoods, scrub and hardwood hammock.
Reserve: 941-639-7468.
JAN. 30TH, CAPE HAZE PIONEER TRAIL BIKE
RIDE: From 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. with Florida Master
Naturalist Merrill & Bob Horswill along 8 mile early
phosphate railbed through state preserve across Coral
Creek. Reserve: 941-445-6181.
FEB. 1ST, SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From 8:30
to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John Phillips
and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods, scrub and
hardwood hammock. Reserve: 941-639-7468.
FEB. 5TH, CHARLOTTE FLATWOODS PRESERVE
HIKE: From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Master Naturalists
John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds in the pine
flatwoods, marshes and freshwater habitats. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
FEB. 6TH, DEEP CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. with Master Naturalist Rick Fried through
side channels of the lower Peace River to the
Nav-A-Gator for lunch and back a different route.
Reserve: 941-637-8805.
FEB. 10TH, MORGAN PARK, ARCADIA HIKE: From
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through live oaks, cypress
and unusual vegetation. Reserve: 941-639-7468.
FEB. 13TH, SHELL CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Rick Fried.
Participants must provide pfd, watercraft and be able
to swim. Reserve: 941-637-8805.


I-rb. I/I H, IKARII"t LKttrr A'UULI': From
8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist
Jamie Reynolds through cypress wetlands. Participants
must provide pfd, water craft and be able to swim
Reserve: 941-637-8284.
FEB. 19TH, MYRTLE CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Jim Story through
freshwater jungle to tidal Shell Creek and waterfall over
the Punta Gorda water supply dam. Participants must
provide pfd, water craft, and be able to swim. Reserve
941-505-8904.
FEB. 20TH, OLD DATSUN TRAIL HIKE: From 8:30 to
11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John Phillips
and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods, saltwater
and freshwater marshes with unusual plant species.
Reserve: 941-639-7468.
FEB. 24TH, DEEP CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
wetland marshes and hardwood hammocks. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
FEB, 27TH, DON PEDRO ISLAND STATE PARK
PADDLE/HIKE: From 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. with Islanders
and Florida Master Naturalist Merrill & Bob Horswill
from park mainland launch to island for hike and lunch
at beach pavilion. Bring lunch, water, pdf, watercraft
and be able to swim. Reserve: 941-445-6181.
FEB. 28TH, PRAIRIE CREEK PRESERVE HIKE: From
8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists, John
Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine flatwoods,
palmetto prairies, marshes and wetlands, reserve:
941-639-7468.
MARCH 5TH, LOWER PEACE RIVER BIRD-
WATCHING PADDLE: From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with Master
Naturalist Rick Fried to an active rookery, to the Nav-A-
Gator for lunch. Participants must provide pfd, watercraft
and be able to swim. Reserve: 941-637-8805.
MARCH 5TH, PRAIRIE SHELL CREEK PRESERVE
HIKE: From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master
Naturalists John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through
pine flatwoods, scrub and hardwood hammock.
Reserve: 941-639-7468.
MARCH 12TH, WEBB LAKE PADDLE: From
8:30 to 11:30 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists
Jamie Reynolds and John Phillips through wetlands
identifying native plants and birds. Participants must
provide pfd, water craft, and be able to swim. Reserve
941-637-8284.
MARCH 15TH, SHELL CREEK PRESERVE HIKE:
From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Florida Master Naturalists
John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds through pine
flatwoods, scrub and hardwood hammock. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
MARCH 18TH, CHARLOTTE FLATWOODS
PRESERVE HIKE: From 8:30 to 11 a.m. with Master
Naturalists John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds in the pine
flatwoods,marshes and freshwater habitats. Reserve:
941-639-7468.
MARCH 19TH, MYRTLE CREEK PADDLE: From 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. with Florida Master Naturalist Jim Story
through freshwater jungle to tidal Shell Creek waterfall
and Punta Gorda water supply dam. Participants must
provide pfd, watercraft and be able to swim. Reserve
941-505-8904.


34' CruiserYacht Express, $99,900
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A R
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL lM =AARINA.


,11? t^-gi S





34' Sea Ray 340 Sportsman 2006
This is the upscale package with lots of
standard gear and over 700hp total $116,900
ContactTommy Head at 941-769-2594 Punta Gorda
Yacht Brokers & Redfish Yachts 941-639-9400


35 1999 CARVER MARINER SPORT CRUISER
Listed for $59,900. Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only fl iMn inB3
Licensed Yacht Broker _
Located at BEAUTIFUL [.M A RI NA.]- A







35 2014 Regal Sportl. Coupe ,:":":'
Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only AIllli
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL I.M-R HINA.







35' CRUISERS 3570 ESPRIT 1995 at
$46,900 Genset and much more!
Call Tommy 941-769-2594
Or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
REDUCED






36' 1998 CARVER Mariner 350,
Twin Merc Cruisers, All Electronics,
Shows Like New!
$69,900. 941-255-5311


36' 2000 Carver Mariner Diesels: (PRICED BELOW GAS
ENGINE MODELS)Twin Cummins diesels, Westerbeke
diesel gen set, radar, autopilot, much more. Just detailed
and serviced. Asking $79,900. Call Tie. O "w
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 qIRlI fAIL


"-4

36'2008 TWIN VEE
With a tower, cutty cabin and twin 300 HP Suzuki
engines makes this boat a great find.
$129,000 Call John @
Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575

JUST REDUCED!


Cakk Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.corn
By appointment only d AI
Licensed Yacht Broker _____
Located at BEAUTIFUL IM A RI NAJ


iM IrIniHnr I tRWVVLR 19 IO
with single diesel, AC. $94,500
Call Jim at 941-740-0389 Or at the office
941-833-0099 Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
& Redfish Yachts


~q
40' DEFEVER DOWNEASTTRAWLER 1980,
twin diesel, new fiberglass decks,
fuel tanks, water tanks,
$35,900 NOW $29,900.
SOLD SOLD


4U -'UJL_ I nIHVVLt-n I12-
Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull.
Full NewTanks. Asking $75,000
Call 941-408-9572


w.a-m,-_gr

41'1989 Egg Harbor
Beautiful condition shows a meticulous owner
that has loved his boat and has it professionally
maintained. $89,000
Call John @ Knot 10Yacht Sales 941-915-3575

dI L


McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only I l I
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [N RI NA


li


34' 2006 SEARAY 340 SUNDANCER S1;
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only A lR l
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [ .I RI N


34' Catalina mkl, 1989, diesel, new canvas,
$39.9K Call Jim at 941-740-0389 or the
office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers
and Redfish Yachts
| -' .





irl *****- *** *1r-' **I**In *n*
oMM nnfilnnf I iln.Uf Ilnk/1inn II earnmll I I I


l/ Page 26 December 26,203
j^M~r~i.* Page 26 December 26,2013


Bill introduced to raise


price of duck stamps


Provided by Ducks Unlimited

A bill was introduced in the U.S. Senate
today to increase the price of the federal duck
stamp to $25. The current price of $15 was set
more than 20 years ago, in 1991.
The price of the federal duck stamp has
been raised only seven times in the program's
history, with the last increase bringing the
price to $15 in 1991. Yet the value of the duck
stamp has decreased by 40 percent as the price
of land has tripled.
"We appreciate the introduction of a federal
duck stamp increase bill by Senators Begich,
Baucus, Coons and Tester to meet very real
on-the-ground wetland habitat conserva-
tion needs. We are committed to seeing this
legislation signed into law and look forward
to working with Senators on both sides of the
aisle to enact this;'said DU CEO Dale Hall.
Since its enactment in 1934, the federal


duck stamp program has protected more than
6 million acres of wetlands an area the size
of Vermont through expenditures of more
than $750 million. This has contributed to the
conservation of more than 2.5 million acres in
the Prairie Pothole Region.
Land values have drastically increased since
the last price increase in the 1990s. While the
duck stamp price remains stagnant, the cost to
conserve land and habitats that host waterfowl
and other species has increased dramatically.
The buying power of the federal duck stamp
has never been lower over its 79-year history.
"Once again, sportsmen and women have
demonstrated their willingness to pay for
conservation by supporting a long-overdue
increase from $15 to $25. With 98 cents of
every $1 from duck stamp receipts going to
conserve wetlands habitat, it is vital that the
cost of the stamp keep up with inflation and
land acquisition costs;' Hall said.


Florida Keys pelicans found


with pouches slashed


44' DEFEVER 44 1987 Cleanest you will find!
Low hours, hull paint 2013
Maintained to the highest standards.
Call for a c/d and full specs. $179,000
Tod Sullivan 941-457-0131
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


chartering (Bahamas here you come). Two staterooms (cen-
terline queen in aft), two heads, large living area refrigera-
tion, AC and spare sails. Asking ,..
$75,000. Call Ray Mason, 941-505-7269 !i er Ox"


EDDYLINE SANDPIPER
Only 381bs and 12' long with 3501b capacity.
Anyone can paddle this boat and
take the dog along! $1,299.
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter







Elie Gulf 120XE 12 foot long, 350 Ib capacity
Stable fishing Ergoflex Seating system,
Bow and Center hatches
$729 Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


BIG PINE KEY, Fla. (AP) Authorities are
investigating the deaths of several brown
pelicans found with their pouches slashed in
the Florida Keys.
Florida Keys Wildlife Refuge Director Maya
Totman said last week that 10 pelicans have
been found dead.
The birds are being found with the large
pouches they use to catch food almost entirely
cut through. The pelicans are left unable to
hunt and swallow their food, leaving them to
starve to death slowly.
"With the way the cuts are done, fish slide


out of the pouch and the bird can't eat. It gets
weaker and weaker and dies;'Totman tells The
Key West Citizen.
Nancy Finley, spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Services at the Florida Keys National
Wildlife Refuge Complex in Big Pine Key, said
the cuts don't appear to be a natural occurrence.
"The cuts are deep, all the way to the wind-
pipe;'she said. "It appears to be a knife slice.":'
Pelicans are protected under the Migratory
Bird Treaty Act, and anyone injuring the birds is
subject to fines and possible jail time if found
guilty, Finley said.


48'1999 SUNSEEKER
Very well taken care of and lift kept since 2002, this boat
is loaded with options. Low hours and superb Yanmar
engines. This boat is must-have! $279,000
Call John @ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


Feel Free Moken 12 Angler Kayak. New kayak:
127" long, 56 Ibs, unit-track quick release
system for custom fishing accessories. Kingfisher
seat, Wheel in the keel for easy transport.
$1099. 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Record number of Florida

manatee deaths reported in 2013


49'2007 HUNTER
This is a one owner boat and never been chartered. In
superior condition and well-maintained for the next owner,
with many options and amenities.$295,000.
Call John @ Knot 10 Yacht Sales 941-915-3575


JACKSON ORION KAYAK
Great little kayak for fishing, birding,
photography. 10' long, only 521bs 3001b capacity
Save $100 on year end sale! $799.
Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) The number
of manatee deaths has topped 800 for the
first time since such record-keeping began in
the 1970s. According to the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg,
803 manatee deaths have been recorded this
year. That's about 16 percent of the state's
estimated population of 5,000 manatees. The
previous record for manatee deaths was 766,
set in 2010 after a lengthy cold snap. That cold


snap mostly affected younger manatees that
had not yet reached breeding age. Scientists
blame a massive bloom of red tide algae along
southwest Florida's coastline and a mysterious
ailment affecting manatees in the Indian River
Lagoon for this year's deaths. There was one
highlight among the manatee death reports,
officials said: This year, 71 manatees were
killed by boat, down from 81 last year and well
shy of the record 95 recorded in 2002.


Whatisasolunar THURSDAY FRIDAY
table?The sun Sunrise: 7:17 a.m. Sunrise: 7:17 a
and moon, even Sunset: 5:44 p.m. Sunset: 5:44 p
when they are out Moonrise: 1:07 a.m. Moonrise: 2:04
of sight, exertforces Moonset: 12:56 p.m. Moonset: 1:38
wild creatures can Moon Phase Moon Phas
feel. These forces 38% Waning crescent 28% Waning ere:
and otheranimals Major Times Major Time
feed.Weatherand 7:05 a.m. 9:05 a.m. 7:45 a.m. 9:45
tide also play a role, 7:29 p.m.-9:29 p.m. 8:20 p.m.-10:20
but expect fish to be Minor Times Minor Time
more active during 1:07 a.m. 2:07 a.m. 2:04 a.m. 3:04
the majorand minor 17:56p.m .1-56pm 1:38pm -2-38
.IIJ .h~.1I liiiA.. .. -


':l.HlJ IU I I I 1111^ .

SUNDAY
,uririe 7 1.' a ni
M,:,:nri.e 4 i)7 3 ni
Moonset: 3:16 p.m.
Moon Phase
11% Waning crescent
Major Times
9:43 a.m.- 11:43 a.m.
10:13 p.m.-12:13 a.m.
Minor Times
4:07 a.m. 5:07 a.m.
3:16 p.m. -4:16 p.m.
Prediction: Average


freaicton: Average

MONDAY
uririe 7 1.': f ni
nur-,e; 4:. p mni
M,:','n:r e ., 11 a ni
Moonset: 4:14 p.m.
Moon Phase
5% Waning crescent
Major Times
10:43 a.m.- 12:43 p.m.
11:14 p.m.- 1:14 a.m.
MinorTimes
5:11 a.m.- 6:11 a.m.
4:14 p.m.- 5:14 p.m.
Prediction: Better


i.m.
i.m.
a.m.
p.m.
e
scent
es
a.m.
p.m.
es
a.m.
pm


rreaiction: Average+

TUESDAY
urir6;e 7 1'3 a ni
uriet 5 47 p ni
M ::ririe i:. 13 a ni
Moonset: 5:17 p.m.
Moon Phase
1% Waning crescent
Major Times

11:46 a.m.- 1:46 p.m.
Minor Times
6:13 a.m.- 7:13 a.m.
5:17 p.m.- 6:17 p.m.
Prediction: Best


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 7:18 a.m.
Sunset: 5:45 p.m.
Moonrise: 3:04 a.m.
Moonset: 2:24 p.m.
Moon Phase
19% Waning crescent
Major Times
8:47 a.m.- 10:47 a.m.
9:14 p.m.- 11:14 p.m.
MinorTimes
3:04 a.m. 4:04 a.m.
2:24 p,m -3-24 pm
Prediction: Average

WEDNESDAY
Srriri;e 7 1' a ni
Surn,;e 5 47 p mn
M r:,:iri, e 7 1 a ni
Moonset: 6:24 p.m.
Moon Phase
0% New moon
Major Times
12:17 a.m.- 2:17 a.m.
12:49 p.m.- 2:49 p.m.
MinorTimes
7:13 a.m.- 8:13 a.m.
6:24 p.m.- 7:24 p.m.
Prediction: BEST


52'2007 BLUEWATER YACHT $297,000 H : I-'.'-F:-.
THING you need to cruise!! Dick Horste 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only AC i
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL LM A ,-RlI NA.


REDUCED!! P


EVER DREAM OF LIVING ON A BOAT?
THIS IS FOR YOU!! 15.5'BEAM, DIESEL
EXCELLENT CONDITION. $44,000 NOW $92,500
ENGLEWOOD 941-266-6321






Big Tuna by Jackson Kayaks
It's an angler's dream.
The "elite" seating is super comfortable and rotate
to face fishing buddy.
Live bait well, rod holders, stagers
$1599 Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


KC Fishing Kayak Thermoformed ABS for
light weight only 631bs. 12 foot long
With mount can add a motor. $1,399.
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter




q' '--,Mai ..-10k
.-



OCEAN KAYAKTRIDENT 11 $949
CENTRAL COMMAND CENTER FOR ROD MOUNTS
MODULAR FISHING POD, BATTERY BAG,
TRANSDUCER COMPATIBLE
STABLE (400LB CAPACITY) AND QUICK. ONLY 54LBS
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Old Town Predator 13
Award winning new fishing kayak.
13'2" long, 15" adjustable seat,
425# capacity. $1,299
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


f!<


Cuda 12 From Jackson Kayak
New little brother to the Cuda 14.12'6" long 31"
wide 3501b cap. High/low comfortable seat
rod holders and stagers everywhere. $1199
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Santa Cruz Sit On Top Fishing Kayak New 2013
$999
Very Stable, Easy to paddle
Optional Live bait tank
Rod Holders, Storage
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


ig,


rt





"#?.wz Page 27 *December 26,2013






i Real meaning o0


What's the real meaning of the holiday a thing or two from these folks, and even
season? Is it spending quality time with family teach our kids a wonderful life lesson.
and friends? Or are the holidays about giving It seems children are trained at birth to
and receiving? Maybe,just maybe, it's a little expect gifts during the holidays. As soon as
bit of both! One thing's for sure the holidays they can read and write, they are encouraged
seems to bring out the best in most people, to write a Christmas list to Santa Claus and
Holiday cheer and the spirit of giving are drilled on the meaning of "naughty or
are definitely in the air during this time. nice" over and over until they are obsessed
People seem to be greeting each other with with good behavior in order to get lots of
more kindness as they say their hellos and presents on Christmas day.
goodbyes. You'll frequently hear"Merry Why do parents put themselves through
Christmas'""Happy Holidays" and "happy this needless pressure? I remember throwing
Hanukkah" as you're leaving your local the occasional tantrum on Christmas
market, barber, kayak shop, etc. morning when I didn't get everything on
Giving to the less fortunate becomes my list, later trying to recap what I had
second nature during this time, and you possibly done wrong to miss out on more
may find yourself donating to the Salvation gifts. Christmas morning became a race to
Army bell ringer during your weekly trip to see who could get to the tree first and start
the market without a moment's hesitation, opening up their presents before everyone
Maybe you tip your server just a little more else, and there was always a competition for
just for the heck of it. For those of you who who was given the most presents. The more
feel like the holiday season is more a time to the merrier became emblematic. Should it
give than to receive, you can join the many be more about quality of time over quantity
selfless people who sign up to serve holiday of gifts? Maybe we should be teaching our
meals to the homeless, donate gifts to char- children a little more about the spirit of
ities-or give their time tQ different organize -....... giving, and _m portance of family bonds
AtioOsuring thtjUme.'Perhaps-we can learn--., and tradittls instead. -- _---
.,l .._.,i -. .' ..-" ., :. _"-... .^... '^ -' -. j ^ """ *s. a. ,.:- .."",- ,,.


n.eu...lr;.ki.e.u
msa~mmm~wuumuu m~hummmm~.inaehEum


f holidays


People express their Holiday spirit in many We've also added a new tradition to
forms this time of year, and one of them is our holidays kayaking on New Year's
by decorating for the season. When I was Day! After we wake up and have a strong
a kid, our family tradition was to pick out cup of coffee, we pile in the car and
a Christmas tree from the local tree farm head for the water. Last year, my family
and cut it down ourselves a fewdays after was here in Florida during the holidays,
Thanksgiving. My siblings and I would help my and my fondest memory was seeing my
parents decorate our tree with ornaments that two-year-old niece's Cheetos-covered
my mom had kept from our first Christmas face grinning ear to ear as she watched
on, and every year we would each add a new dolphins swim by while kayaking with her
ornament. Our tree was filled with an array of mom. Maybe that's what it's all about -
colorful lights and a hodgepodge of hand- honoring old traditions, while creating
crafted ornaments that my brother, sister and I new ones, one generation at a time.
had created in school. Decorations would come So, I guess you could say that for me, an
out of the basement for the season, dusted avid outdoor enthusiast and kayaker, it's
off and strategically place around the house family traditions and family ties that are
inside and out. Our tree was not the tree you'd most important. No matter how crazy our
find in a Better Homes and Gardens magazine, lives are, or how busy we all are during the
but it had a special meaning to us. We were year, the holidays make us stop and think
so proud of our tree that we would keep it up about family, and the traditions that have
until a week or two past NewYear's. shaped us into who we are.
These traditions have shaped me and are Happy Holidays!
now part of my family culture. Every year my For more information on guided kayak eco
wife, son and I decorate our tree in the same toiw, Eissons. Of0 A).A 010d stouind-ulp pddfE -
form. We have 12 years of our son's hand- b0ood EiltIs conto(t Gulf Coost K'oiak ot
crafted ornaments,_and I wouldn't have it. 9-283- 1125-or stLs.qt-
d y W .. -..
--2 ...





8,Qi* Page 28 December 26,2013


li~aii iant i i- i iciiliaii.iim i
Dgin, ia.Kueriki^e ^^ _^ ^


M'I TH EU BI I I IJH I I


L-01







Good intentions aren't lenging enough, but keeping it burning There are a lot of situations where these adopting a Katie-bar-the-door attitude (now
L is truly difficult. Usually we burn like pine lessons can apply, but the one I'm thinking that we're in, let's keep everyone else out).
north a thing unless shavings: Fast and hot, and down to ashes about is Charlotte Harbor. We have one of the What I am saying is that we need preemptive
in moments. Most resolutions get put out on healthier and more productive estuaries in solutions for what will become problems
'e backed by action, the curb at about the same time as the empty the state, but I don't know how long that's down the road. How important is the Harbor
champagne bottles, going to be the case. The biggest threat is to you? How would you feel looking out over
What does it take? Usually, an imminent also a good thing: A more robust economy. We its polluted, fishless waters and thinking,'If
I don't get New Year's resolutions. I mean, threat. Healthy diet? Sure, sure, whatever know that when people can afford to move to only I had ... ?'
yeah, I get it: It's a new year, so it's a new hey, french fries. But end up in the ER with a Florida, they do. It's looking like we can expect Even those who don't get concerned about
beginning. What I mean is I don't get why "cardiac episode" and see how fast you throw an influx of people over the next couple years, the environment or wild places should be
people keep falling for it. How many of your out all the junk food in the pantry. We're It's great for local business but has the poten- paying attention. That Harbor is our economic
New Year's resolutions did you keep last year? programmed to not worry too much about tial to be bad for the Harbor. driver. Just look at the populations of the
How many of them were the same resolutions possibilities until they become realities. I People who want to live here because of western half of Charlotte County (where the
you'd made the year before, and probably the guess it's a strategy to save energy why the semi-unspoiled waters end up putting water is) versus the eastern half. Take away
year before that? We always say we're going waste time and money preparing for a more pressure on those waters. More people, the Harbor and Charlotte County is a whole
to eat healthier, exercise more, drink less, quit hurricane until you're absolutely certain one is more houses, more drinking water, more lot less inviting. You think the Great Recession
smoking, put more into savings, finally learn coming to your neighborhood? sewage, more boats, more cars, more lawns, was bad for our real estate market? Ruin Char-
French, blah, blah, blah. Somehow it seems to Of course, we end up kicking ourselves more fertilizers, more pesticides. One more lotte Harbor and watch our property values
work out that way just about never, over missed chances and lost opportunities, household isn't going to break the system, pull a full Detroit.
Intent is nothing without action, but we're Regret is the massive, huge, enormous but at some point it will become overtaxed. So what are you gonna do? Make a New
creatures of habit. And most of us have a lazy downside to this strategy. Why didn't I quit When will we hit that point? Three years? Five Year's resolution to do something, or actually
streak that is only too easy to embrace. Try not smoking? How stupid was I to not put up the years? Fifty years? As I've mentioned before, do something? It's up to you. If making a
to feel too bad about it it's just the way storm shutters that are sitting in my garage? my crystal ball is usually on the fritz, so I don't resolution helps you and you can stick with it,
we're built. We know what we should do, but I should have done more volunteer work have a real solid timeline for you but I that's great. You're a truly exceptional human
convincing ourselves to put forth the effort is while I was still healthy enough. Should, know it's coming, being. For the rest of us, we just have to decide
just too much. would, could doesn't mean a thing, I'm not advocating an end to development, what's important to us and either try to make
Lighting the motivational fire is chal- because you didn't. It wouldn't be realistic anyway. Nor am I a difference or give up and roll over.


owLfo4AsL9mm&UrAWCostar

&iQmqbsses, T-sk6rts, 44octs, &S MAot!


^Laishley

^ MARINE INC

A


.JR'


SUNGLASS
STRAPS


WOMEN'S SUNGLASSES GOBY


RETRO
WOMEN'S
SHORT SLV
TEE


COSTA


p 1 /
*Z^


SUNGLASS\
CARE







COSTA
HATS


COSTA
MEN'S
SHIRTS


MEN'S
SUNGLASSES
BOMBA


Lile on
Facus
L'Ia ebook]






Thursday, December 26, 2013 ads.yoursun.net EINIC The Sun Classified Page 1


Rorida's Largest Classified Section


S U N-i classifiwi gds
ea' S__ CouNEWSPiyAPiERS cd --Egeo -NrhPtotCaltPuaodaVni
America's BEST Community Daily- Arcadia Englewood North Port Port Charlotte Punta Gorda Venice


I 0 0 -t50io0 0 Sellers 4 0ay acaACassi0f 0ico


FREE ADS! Go to sun-classifieds.com N'EALL
and place your FREE 3 line

merchandise ad. Your ad will run for 7 HECK OUT OUR
days in print and online. FREE ADS are BUSINESS &
for merchandise under $500 and the SERVICE
ad must be placed online. One item DIRECTORY
per ad and the price must appear in published every
the ad. Some restrictions apply. Limit 5 PWednesday,
free ads per week. Saturday And
^ Sundavy


[,I I


Real Estate 1000
Employment 2000
Notices 3000
Financial 4000
Business Service 5000
Merchandise/Garage Sales 6000
Transportation/Boats 7000


(114.75]
Merchandise value up to $500. Private Party Ads. 3 Lines for 7
Days. Price must be in ad. No Refunds. Some restrictions apply.


PHOTO SPECIAL ADD A PHOTO FOR ONLY $13


41"1


REAL ESTATE


"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
Spirit of U.S. Policy For The Achieve-
ment Of Equal Housing Opportunity
Throughout The Nation. We Encour-
age And Support An Affirmative
Advertising And Marketing Program In
Which there Are No Barriers To
Obtaining Housing Because of Race,
Color, Religion, Sec, Handicap, Famil-
ial Status Or National Origin."


REAL ESTATE
1010- 1650
1010 Open House
1015 Real Estate Auctions
1020 Homes/General
For Sale
1030 Waterfront Homes
For Sale
1031 Foreclosures For Sale
1035 Golf Course
Community For Sale
1040 Condos/Villas For Sale
1060 Townhouses For Sale
1070 Duplexes For Sale
1075 Tri-Plex For Sale
1080 Apartments For Sale
1090 Mobile Homes For Sale
1100 Interval Ownership
1100 Out of Area Homes
For Sale
1115 Trade/Exchange
1120 Wanted To Buy
RENT
1205 Lease Option
1210 Homes
1240 Condos/Villas
1280 Townhouses
1300 Duplexes
1320 Apartments
1330 Hotel/Motel
1340 Mobile Homes
1345 Misc. Rentals
1350 Efficiencies
1360 Room To Rent
1370 Rentals To Share
1390 Vacation/Seasonal
1420 Wanted To Rent
LOTS
1500 Lots & Acreage
1515 Waterfront
1520 Out Of Area Lots
1530 Commercial Lots
1540 Trade/Exchange
BUSINESS
1600 Business For Sale
1610 Business Rentals
1615 Income Property
1620 Commercial/
Industrial Prop.
1640 Warehouse & Storage
1650 Farm/Ranches
Seize the sales
with Classified!


15 Bunker Circle
Rotonda West

I -. I


Spariuing clean ana
move in ready 2 bed-
room 2 bath canal
front home with super
floor plan. Minutes
drive to beach,
$137,750.00
$1000.00 buyer rebate if
purchased through
Fla Golf Properties
Inc. 941-698-4653

THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSING AT
NOON ON TUESDAY-
CHRISTMAS EVE AND
WILL BE CLOSED
CHRISTMAS DAY.
*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am, Thursday,
December 26th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Tuesday, 12/24,
10:30 am for
Wednesday, 12/25
and Thursday, 12/26
We Wish Everyone a
Merry Christmas!

O*PE HOUSEiDECu29, 1-


MANOR:
*5/3.5/2+* Pool
6500 SF (4400 under air)
TWO OUTBUILDINGS:
OBSERVATORY!!
&
Flex Use "Barn"
(2500 SF under air)
$734,500
visualtour.com/show.asp?T= 3101917
Keller-Williams Realty
Debra Gurin 941-875-3242
Advertise Today!


NOUKIM HORUKI Sun. 1-4
3493 Lakewood Blvd
Beautiful 2 bdrm w/den Villa
Extended lanai, full lake view
$184,901 Priv. appts. avail.
Steve Bailey 941-786-4632
HORIZON REALTY INTL.


PUNTA GORDA
17400 White Water Ct
PRAIRIE CREEK PARK ESTATES
4BD/4.5BA/3 BAY GARAGE.
5500+SF HEAT/AIR,
8500 SF TOTAL, POOL/SPA,
BASS STOCKED POND.
EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY.
DEED RESTRICTED ON 5 ACRES.
$599,888. RE/MAX ANCHOR
LEANN CROKE 941-769-4663
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


I OPEN HOUSE
L1010 J




ANY PRICE OR CONDITION!
CASH FOR YOUR HOUSE OR
MOBILE. 941-356-5308
Rotonda
288 Rotonda Circle




3 Bed 2 Bath Golf
Course home with
breathtaking views
and open floor plan
perfect for entertain-
ing. Great curb appeal
with majestic palms
$179,900.00
$1500 Buyer Rebate if pur-
chased through
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653


FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!


Listing Price $99,900 Sold


Single Family Homr
2 bedrooms,2 bath,

I for $90,000




iii


Stay On Top of Sales and Prices
in YOUR Neighborhood!
Check the listings in
AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS
Every Saturday in your
Sun Newspaper's Real Estate Classified Section
SUNAE

An BE/ST Community Daily"'R
Cl ))~tc* f'wIa hltw i N11^K f* ^I
Anien~id' Bl 5 Cunirunity Daily"


Listing Price $74,900 Sold


3657 Brooklyn Ave
Port Charlotte, fl
33952

Single Family Hom(
3 bedrooms, 2 bath,

I for $68,425



U
F ,-


Stay On Top of Sales and Prices
in YOUR Neighborhood!
Check the listings in
AREA PROPERTY TRANSFERS
Every Saturday in your
Sun Newspaper's Real Estate Classified Section


ASUN. I.. ['ouAII S'
0-1 ,9w N-iiIIwi t I Vc
An1rici Bt F Communily Daily '


I


1000 OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE
1010 1010


.---/ rlfo


bh&, SEE COMICS I


N


I


Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 1


OUR&~~. m >





The Sun Classified Page 2 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, December 26, 2013


OPEN HOUSE
L 1010 ^


12/26/13
HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 ^


PORI CHARLOIIE
3578 Harbor Blvd. Updated
3/2/carport home with
newer PGT windows/sliders,
10k HVAC. FL room and
newer pool, cage, lanai &
shed. Home Warranty &
Offered at $118,900.
Marge Trayner
Bud Trayner Realty, PA
941-380-2823






10 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
"Gated Private PRAIRIE
CREEK EQUINE ESTATE"
2008 Exquisite Custom 6847
SF home (5034 SF underAir).
4 bedrooms, 2/2 BathsFabu-
lous Kitchen & Home has
Extra Ordinary Features
Throughout. 3 car attached
(1100 SF) garage + detached
(2068 SF) 5 Stall garage.
Exceptional "1448 SF CBS"
Deluxe Equine Barn, Box
Stalls, Air Conditioned Tack
& Feed Rooms. Vinyl
Fenced 10 acres, paddocks,
pasture. Pond. New Listing
Virtual Tour Available!
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
L 941-456-8304 j



PORT CHARLOTTE,
completely renovated,
3/2/1 + Den and office!
New kitchen & baths,
fenced yard & shed.
$109,900.00
Suncoast Isles Realty
Pat Rice SOLD!
(941)-268-6820


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!
w m -ii u


zA L~to, venicI jriz~aJ
home. County water possible
owner financing or best offer.
Cash Offers Pay Less!
941488-2418 or 496-9252

GET RASSIIED!SULTS


HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 J


2/2/1 WATER FRONT
HOME in Pt. Charlotte
Huge back yard with
Shed and citrus trees.
Asking $69K O.B.O.
FOR MORE INFO CALL
941-815-8245


2007 BUILT-EXTRA LOT/RV
PAD! 3/2/2 1850 sqft GREAT
ROOM + DEN, Separate
dining and breakfast room
$189,000 07048826
Mary McKinley
"Selling With Integrity"
941-629-2100
AGGRESSIVE


PRAIRIE CREEK PARK!
5-30 ACRES Starting @
$49,900
Punta Gordas's
BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcomeblack
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community'!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Propertiesforsale.com

5923 SW HWY 17
ARCADIA Short Sale





Small 1993 built block
and stucco 2 bedroom
home sitting on 1.4
acres of land adjacent
to state roadside park.
Great starter home or
snowbird retreat
$54,900. Make Offer
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653


OLILee .U LUIII IIUIIIse, LI.U
sq ft with pool, built in
2002, spectacular large
park-like yard with lake view,
cul de sac. FABULOUS!
Don't Miss this ONE!!!
$299,900
Pat Walker RE/MAX Anchor
Realty 941-276-4674






ENTRTIN YOUR FAMPILY '






ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


GULF FRONT MANASOTA KEY
2/2 Top Floor with partial Gulf
view. Updated with private
beach on the Gulf of Mexico!
Turnkey furnished.
$299,900
RE/Max Alliance Group
Carla Stiver/Kim Shortt
941-548-4434
www.TheStiverGroup.com
-Tsa


3/2/1 remodeled, profes-
sionally painted inside &
out, new kit. cab & carpet,
newer roof, $69,900.
By Owner
941-629-6329


HARBOUR HEIGHTS
Harbour Oaks Gated Com-
munity. 3 Bedrm/2.5 Bath
POOL Home. 2,401 SF on
Oversized Lot. $279,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
/ -NEED A JOB? -- \
CHECK THE
\ CLASSIFIED!

I Just Reduced!


W"'- U
DEEP CREEK
425 Bahia Grande Ave.
1990 Pool home 3/2/2,
2121 sq.ft. cul-de-sac lot,
mature trees, etc.
Too much to list! MUST SEE!
Asking $195,000
Lorrie Tanksley
941-815-1198
Re/Max Harbor Realty


vl]":


broke, Circle. 3/2/2, 1964sf.
Beautiful Split Plan w/ Sepa-
rate Living & Family Rooms!
$249,900. MLS# C7048798
Linda 941-457-7245 or Jill
Brouwer 941-276-4459 Jill
Brouwer Realty



FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**

SUN I T

f- o* M d i' c rdAII


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


MANASOTA KEY 2/2/2
Great Room, Beach & Bay
Easements, Oak Trees &
View of Lemon Bay $379,900
Immediate occupancy.
RE/MAX Alliance Group
Carla Stiver/Kim Shortt
941-548-4434
www.TheStiverGroup.com







North Port $434/BIWKLY
*LIKE NEW* *
Total Owner Financing
3BR/2BA/2CG, Fenced
$144k 941-716-0040






NORTH PORT
2300 Jasmine Way
Beautifully Remodeled 2005
Pool Home 3/2/2 Plus den,
1946 SF Under Air, New SS
Appliances, tropically Land-
scaped in gated Community
of Charleston Park. Asking
$259,900
Bay Bridge Homes
941-626-8200


PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2.5/2 in Gated Community
of Pepper Tree Estates!
Open Concept! 2,218 SF.
New Energy Efficient AC Unit
& Newer Water Heater!
$199,500
Jeff Runyan, Re/Max
Palm. 941-979-2843


LISTING


PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2/2 House with heated
pool. Built in 2006.
(Near Murdock Middle School)
Only $139,900!
Call Gloria 239-250-9440
Coldwell Banker





PORT CHARLOTTE ::. 2. 2
on freshwater canal with
dock and a waterfall to sooth
you! Inground swim spa &
fenced yard. Updated AC,
water heater & fresh paint!
149,900 Jodi Kozenieski
A Clear Choice Realty, LLC
941-979-9396


PORT CHARLOTTE
MOVE IN ready -Clean and
partially updated 2/2 home,
great location, lovely lot.
1452 Pulaski St. $72,500.00
Peggy Mardis, Broker
REMAX EXCEL 863-990-1877

Looking for
Adventure?
Find it
in the
Classifieds


HOMES FOR SALE

Z 020 ^


REMODELED BY NEW YORK
DESIGNER. 2BR/2BA NEW
ROOF, NEW HVAC, 1 BLOCK
FROM ELEMENTARY SCHOOL &
PARK, TURNKEY FURNISHED.
$98,400. 845-798-1371
Plm :, -.1


PruN I 'HLU IOT
RIVERWOOD IBIS MODEL
2 Bedroom + Den/2Ba/2CG.
Gorgeous. Pool w/Waterfall.
$239,900. Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586





PORT CHARLOTTE, *p:i
cious Custom 3/2/2, Htd.
Pool & Spa! Beautiful Kitchen,
Top of the Line Appliances
Corner Lot! $205,000. Doris
Walters, Bud Trayner Real-
ty. 941-661-4019


PT CHARLOTTE
2/2/1.5 OVER 1500SQFT.
(BLOCK HOUSE) W/
BONUS RM & POOL
JUST RESURFACED, NEW
TILE, GRANITE & POOL
EQUIP. NEW ELECTRIC
PANEL $95K BY OWNER
941.268.8794


Er ..
PUNTA GORDA
424 Panarea Ave. Custom
built home in Burnt Store
Isles with 80 ft seawall
sailboat access. $415,000
June Poliachik
Realtor CDPE, SFR Sun Realty
941-916-0100
ru,.ir-., Am l


NOKOMIS 1,1-,, ion Valley
750 Shetland Cir, 3/3/3
Pristine Pool Home, Park
Rv/Boat, veg garden. By
Owner $3.69,0 $359,000
941-488-4499





ROTONDA WEST
157 COUGAR WAY
Beautifully Remodeled 2001
Pool Home, 3 bd/2ba/2car,
Granite & New SS Appls.,
Park Like Setting, On DIb
Lot, Asking $209,900
BAY BRIDGE HOMES
941-626-8200

Hnd your Bt
Friend in the
ClassifeMs






ROTONDA WEST, FSBO
253 Mariner Ln, 3/2/2 Solar
heated Pool, Built 2005,
New A/C, Low Insurance, 7K
in hurricane shutters.
Furnished. Buyers agent 3%.
$184,000 941-698-4776


HOMES FOR SALE
L 1020 ^



UNDER CONTRACT



Incredible Park like setting!
Beautiful Custom 3/2.5/2+CG
Estate Home. Amenities:
Granite, Custom Cabinets,
Fireplace, 18" tile throughout,
Electronic Gated entrance,
Board Fencing, Barn, RV pad,
+++. BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY
HomeServices Florida Realty
941-5856-9599
www.Carol.Wade.com


VENIII url N douse Sun
Dec 29, 12-4 2/2/2 Lake
view. 228 Southampton Ln
$190,000 401-573-6461


VtlIlut, /t//t., IUos IU
Beach, & S. Venice Ferry.
Updated W/New Wood
Cabinets, Granite
countertops, New Roof,
A/C & Wood Deck.
$165,000
Jerri King 941-374-2562

WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


Water Front 2012 Burnt
Store Isles 2408 SF
Custom Canal Home!
Seawall Dock & BoatLift
Nice locationPrivacy
Viewing Nature Preserve.
New Listing! $499 K
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES
ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304

REDUCD



PORT CHARLOTTE-
17259 Lake Worth Blvd.
Luxurious 3/2/2 HEATED
POOL Home on Canal!
$4A29,9O9 $405,000.
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc

F'md it in the
Oassifieds!






PUNTA GORDA 3/2/2 with
1707 sq ft on Macedonia
Dr, in Burnt Store Isles
with large pool and spa.
1400,000
June Poliachik
Sun Realty 941-916-0100

rw -


2 Triplexes (6apts). Dock on
basin. Min. to harbor, Furn,
rented. Must see. Immaculate.
$3600/mo income.
$299,000 FSBO, No Realtors.
941-626-9652





Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


GOLF COURSE
COMMUNITY
1035


12981 Kingsway Circle
4/2/2 POOLw/ Hot Tub!
Outside Kitchen Located on
the 15th Hole! MUST SEE!
MLS#C7048624 $295,500.
$289,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty


LAKE SUZY 3/2/3
12539 SW KINGSWAY CIR.
Newer S/S Appliances,
Granite Countertops, All Tile
except one guest bdrm, walk
in closets in master bdrm,
beautiful view of Kingsway
Country Club on 17th
Fairway, oversize garage,
New pool screen.
Jill Brouwer Realty,
Jill Brouwer 941-766-1606
or 941-276-4459 or
Call Linda 941-457-7245
REDUCED!_ _




LAKE SUZY
Exec. Home. Golf Course &
Lake View. 3/2.5/2, Updated
Kitchen. Metal Roof,
Shutters, Workshop. 4237
sf. with Additional Buildable
Lot Available.
Must See! $299,000.
.Lolly Lopinski, South East
Realty (941)-628-0941

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
~1040~


EINLEL-WUUU ISLES
2/2/2 Almost 1700 SF,
Single Detached Condo
Home, Private Area W/Pool,
Deep Water, No Bridges To
Intercoastal. $279,500
Jerri King 941-374-2562

PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!

FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040


VILLA, MODEL WATERFRONT
1718' 2BR/2BA/2CG + DEN,
LOTS OF EXTRAS
FOR SALE BY OWNER
$242,900. FULLY FURNISHED
941-681-2424


LAKE SUZY, 11335 SW
Essex Dr. Located in
Kingsway Golf Course Area.
2+Bed/Den, 2 Bath, 2CG
Single Unit! Meticulas!
MLS#C7047973 $209,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-276-4459
Jill Brouwer Realty

Find the
perfect
companion
in the
Classifieds!

m= lW~s'21A A


NORTH PORT
Short sale. 2/2/2 built 2006
Cypress Falls villa in the
Woodlands with community
heated pool, and many more
amenities. Call June Poliachik,
Sun Realty 941-916-0100





PORT CHARLOTTE
RIVERWOOD VILLA.
Gorgeous Jacaranda Model
with Pool. 3 Bedroom + Den/
2 Car Garage.
Carl Anderson
Real Estate Broker
941-629-9586


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2 w/ Deeded Dock! Par-
tial Harbor View. 2nd Building
From Harbor! Walk to Fisher-
man's Village $419,000.
Elaine Martin, Fisherman's
Village Realty. 941-661-4800


UNd IA LUUA ISL-S,
FURNISHED TURNKEY
Waterfront Condo
2 Bed/2 Bath Updated
Kitchen. Low Condo Fees -
$120,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
^^,1040


2/2 with 2 Carport.
Single floor villa, tile &
laminated floor throughout,
10 x 30 Four Seasons lanai,
community pool & dock.
Surrounded by Curry Creek
Preserve near Legacy Trail.
1953 Settlement Rd.
FSBO $59,500
941-488-7614

MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
^ 1090 ^


POu 1 CHARLUI \T 2//
$25,900! Priced Below Mkt
For Immediate Sale! No pets,
Adult Community. Fishing
Pier On Charlotte Harbor.
Immaculate & updated 2/2
double. Better hurry & call
Mike @ 941-356-5308
CLASIIE


MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
10^90 ^


PORT CHARLOTTE- '.'.+
Maple Leaf! Estates! 2/2/CP
in Gated Golf Course
Community! Open Floor Plan.
Amenities Galore!! $69,900.
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc
VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
FinaertiDs!


FOR SALE
^ 1090 ^


PALM HARBOR HOMES
2014 models are here!
$8,500 Pre-Construction
Savings
Call John Lyons for details
1-800-622-2832 ext 210

MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE


PUNTA GORDA
RIVERSIDE!
$39,995
2/2, FURNISHED.
UPDATED & VERY CLEAN!
Call Mike, 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


I^ 3,, 0J VVllweI l Cl K /, 1
Sectional, 2 Lanai's,
Drywall, Fully Furnished.
Oversized, Beautiful!!
"WHERE WE LEFT THE TREES"
Call Mike, 941-356-5308
WWW.RIVERSIDEOAKSFLORIDA.COM


HOMES FOR SALE
1095 5

ARCADIA, Nearly New
3BR/2BA Manufactured
Home on 1/2 Acre.
Financing Available!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122

PUNTA GORDA-
Newer Home! 2BD/2BA/CP.
Large Raised Screen Room,
Utility Room & Lake View!
$39,900.
Call Greg 941-626-7829


$34,995
IMMACULATE
ADULT COMMUNITY.
Immediate possession.
Conveniently located near
town. Immaculate all drywall
2/2 sectional. All new &
updated.
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!






The Sun Classified Page 4 EINIC ads.yoursun.net Thursday, December 26, 2013


HOMES FOR RENT
L 1210 ^




PUNTA GORDA
3/2/2 w/DEN IN DEEP CREEK $1075
NORTH PORT
2/2/1 SS APPLIANCES $850
3/2/2 SCREENED LANAI $1100
3/2/2 NEW FLOORING $1100
2/2/2 LARGE 55+ GATED $1250
FULL PROPERTY LIST ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE YOUR PROPERTY
ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-U333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
-A-Bring your pets!-A-
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME



EFFICIENCY, No Smoking,
No Pets, Near Manasota
Beach $800/mo.
941-493-0849 I





ENGLEWOOD 3/2/Lge
Workshop, Tile, N/S, Available
Jan 1st, Small Pets Only,
$950/mo 941-662-0926


For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1600....3/2/2 Pool & lawn incl..PC
$1000.. .3/2/2 1340 SqFt..... NP
$800....2/2/2 1182 SqFt..... NP
$750....2/2 1185 SqFt.........PC
$700....2/2/CP Gated Corn Condo.PG
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters
HARBOR HEIGHTS, 3/2/1
All Appliances, All Tile,
Window Treatment,
Hurricane Shutters $850
mo. Owner 718-465-6388
or (718)864-6482
NEED A RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT


InvestorsChoice Real Estate
A FalhBased Busines



Soo a PtS. Chrltt
andSouh enc
3/2 AFAR AVE, FENCED $950
ROTONDA WEST
2/2 ANNOPOLIS, POOL $1050
OFF SEASON/SHORT TERM
2/2 ENGL. HOME FENCED $1300
3/2 NORTH PORT $1600
LAST MINUTE
2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice


2/2 S. Venice ..


$1600


Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.


HOMES FOR RENT
L 1210 J

PORT CHARLOTTE 2/1,
LANAI Laundry rm, updated,
Nice $650 Month 1st & last +
$350 security 941-276-7395

Real ~wLiving^
WE NEED RENTALS
Reduced Mgmt Fees
www.allfloridarealty.com
(941)629-1121
S. VENICE 2/2 Furnished,
Near Manasota Beach.
No Smoking, No Pets.
$1800 mo., January Only.
941-493-0849

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
~1240~

ROTONDA WEST NATURE'S
TRAIL, upscale unfurn condo,
2/2 grand fir facing beaut, lake
pool,tennis,clubhse $900mo/
yrly, Avail 1/1/14 941474-7400
NEED CASH? I
DUPLEXES
FOR RENT




ENGLEWOOD 1/1 with
Lanai. No smoking/no
pets $550; 1st & sec.
941-400-1670
PUNTA GORDA Large, clean
2/1 w/carport, No Dogs $700
mo includes water. $1400 to
move in 941-740-0491


APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
1^ 320^ ^

CHARLOTTE HARBOR
Compl. furn 1BR, LR room, din-
ing, Cov parking, scr. lanai
Clean! Neat! Quiet! No pets.
$600/mo 941-875-9425
STUDIO APTSV -
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY:1-800-955-8771

O'PP'ORTUUN ITNY


PORT CHARLOTTE
VILLA SAN CARLOS II
AFFORDABLE
Income Based Apartments
for 62 or Older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


LOOK
VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$375 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
VENICE DOWNTOWN,
lbr Apartment No smoking or
Dogs. $595/mo + deposit.
941-484-6022


APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
13^20 ^

VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1-800-955-8771


WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!.
6& 941-429-2402

MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
~1340~



KINGS HIGHWAY AREA,
2 Bedrooms/1 Bath. CHA
$475. per mo.
941-624-0355 or
941-875-5253
EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
L 1350~


Great Deals in HARBOUR HEIGHTS close to
the Classifieds! river, newly renovated efficien-
tIh Is.ld II ,. cies w cable & internet, Sunny-
V brookMotel 941-625-6400
Venice Studio & 1 ~ ~__________
Bedroom Accepting r- Seize the sales
Section 8 Vouchers i1 tesl
941-488-7766 O with Classified!


ROOMS FOR RENT

Z 360 ^

PORT CHARLOTTE, Clean &
Quiet Furn. Room Single Working
Man $140wk+Dep 941-626-2832
PORT CHARLOTTE, Clean,
Quiet, $125wk/$450mo, incl
Util, Furnished, References.
941-743-3070/ 941-740-2565
/ GET RESULTS

( USE CLASSIFIED! )
SOUTH VENICE on Bus line,
room w priv bath. $540/mo
w/utilities W/D 941-496-8655
|RENTALS TO SHARE
L 1370 ^


PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/1
Pool Home Ig. scr. lanai
clean, quiet, full hse privdg.
$150/wk inclds all.
781-572-8215

VACATION/
SEASONAL RENTALS
~1390

NORTH PORT Harbor Cove
2/1.5, all utilities incl, 3-6mo
lease, $2100/mo
206-245-7722
| WANTED TO RENT

Z 1420 ^

VENICE European, profes-
sional, non smoking woman
looking for room to rent w/kit.
priv. in a pleasant home in
north Venice. 941-999-0587


LOTS & ACREAGE

Z 500 ^







SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
175,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!





ARCADIA: Private Country
Living: 2.5 Acres, Includes
3/2 MH & Carport Near 1-75,
Walmart & Peace River Boat
Ramp. $145k Cash.
941-743-6601
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!


PORT CHARLOTTE/PUNTA GORDA THE ANIMAL I

WELFARE LEAGUE 3519 Drance St.

(941) 625-6720


ENGLEWOOD SUNCOAST HUMANE ENGLEWOOD EARS ANIMAL RESCUE


SOCIETY- 6781 San Casa Dr.

(941) 474-7884


SOCIETY 145 W. Dearborn St.

(941) 475-0636


DESOTO COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER

(863) 993-4855


'I I'


The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, December 26, 2013





Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


i WATERFRONT
Z ^ 5:15 ^


NORTHPORT: Fresh water
canal lots; various sizes, some
up to 5 adjacent lots; buy one
or the whole trac; well located;
$5,900/$13,900; standard
size lots; singles, doubles
triples; $ 4000/$6900; many
cleared; no scrub jays; call or
e-mail for showing or direc-
tions; 941-286-7003; e-mail;
lotsites@hotmail.com


r nI" lI I.nPnn..vi IE I r '"
Leland St SE. Prime Sailboat
Water cul-de-sac Lot w/dock &
lift on 130' seawall. 5 min to
Charlotte Harbor & Gulf access.
$229,000 941-625-7088
Z BUSINESS RENTALS

: 1610 ^

PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200
US 41 Office Space
941-815-2199
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
Call for Pricing 941-484-4316

COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620


f'l'.t% ,,MfL -I','T *I, u t JVUW llel
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585

Find the

new You

in the

Classifieds!

PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992

L WAREHOUSE
I & STORAGE
^^,^1640 ^

NORTH PORT 800SF WH
$450/mo. 400 SF, $220/mo
400SF Office, $295/mo, All +
Tax 941-661-6720

2000


EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment


EMPLOYMENT

L PROFESSIONAL
Z ^2010


THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSING AT
NOON ON TUESDAY-
CHRISTMAS EVE
AND WILL BE
CLOSED CHRISTMAS
DAY.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am, Thursday,
December 26th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Tuesday, 12/24,
10:30 am for
Wednesday, 12/25
and Thursday, 12/26
We Wish Everyone a
Merry Christmas!
COSMETOLOGIST Great
location-41. Licensed hair-
dresser wanted to rent sta-
tion. $500/mo 941-769-4077
SCLERICAL/OFFICE

z 2020 J

CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda

Need a

new Job?

Look in the

Classifieds!

MEDICAL
LW4,4:2030


CNA NEEDED
For Assisted Living to
Work with Elderly. ALL
SHIFTS NEEDED. Only
licensed CNA's need
apply. Apply in person:
2295 Shreve St, P.G.

HOUSEKEEPER
PT, MUST HAVE
EXPERIENCE IN LTC
OR ALF CLEANING.
PLEASE APPLY
QUALITY HEALTH CARE
6940 Outreach Way
North Port
(941)426-8411 or
FAX Resume to
941-423-1572
EOE DRUG FREE
WORK PLACE
MILLENNIUM PHYSICIAN
GROUP IS GROWING
AGAIN!!!!

CMA'S
CMA's for Englewood,
Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda
locations. Visit us at
www.millenniumphysician.com
click on "employment" and
"open jobs" to apply for
open positions. Come work
for the best! DFWF/EOE


LPN NEEDED
WEEKENDS. APPLY AT 2295
SHREVE ST, PUNTA GORDA

PROVIDING SERVICE
WITH OUR
cg and



ENGLEWOOD
HEALTHCARE AND
REHAB CENTER IS
HIRING RN'S, CNA'S
AND LPN'S...
FULL TIME & PART TIME
ALL THREE SHIFTS
LONG TERM CARE
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
WE ARE LOOKING FOR
RN's,CNAs AND LPN's
WHO ARE PASSIONATE
ABOUT PATIENT CARE AND
ARE COMMITTED TO PRO-
VIDING A SUPERIOR EXPE-
RIENCE FOR RESIDENTS &
FAMILIES.
TO APPLY, PLEASE EMAIL
PAYROLL@
ENGLEWOODHEALTHCARE.COM



ii* 'I ,H 1-
E kjilliain .tnd Rtchab C~ninst


I ) ,..'* i1 11u -l'I'.H !.AI I i.,A


1111 Drury Lane
Englewood Fl 34224
Ph. 941-474-9371
Fax. 941-475-6593

SOCIAL WORKER N1 llime,
for Rehab Unit. Priority given
to candidates with a BSW.
Must be organized, work
independently & quickly in a
fast paced environment.
Apply online at
charlotteharborhealthcare.com

HORIZON
4 NHEALTHCARE
I INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN within
11 months. Enrollment ongoing.
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Dec 30 '13
LPN-next class starts
Feb 17th '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506

RESTAURANT/
HOTEL
~2040P

CHEF/COOK
NEW RESTAURANT ON
VENICE ISLAND NOW HIRING
CHEF/COOK WITH MIN 5 YRS
EXPERIENCE. PLEASE SEND
YOUR RESUME TO
ERICLEGLAS@GMAIL.COM
( -NEED A JOB?--)
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
EXPERIENCED SERVERS/
BARTENDER NEEDED
P/T Position Sundays are a
Must! Great Perks.
Employee & Spouse Golf
Free when Available.
Apply in Person Mon.-Sat.
266 Rotonda Circle
Ask for Cathy


2000 MEDICAL
....................


RESTAURANTT/
HOTEL
2^^040 ^


SERVERS**
EXPERIENCED ONLY
FOR FAST PACED
ENGLEWOOD RESTAURANT.
CALL 941-223-4781 OR
SEND RESUME TO
SNOOKMAN56@YAHOO.COM
MANGO BISTRO is looking
for an Assistant Manager.
Must be motivated and
experienced.
Apply in person only:
301 W. Dearborn St.
Englewood

SKILLED TRADES
L: 2050


SERVICE TECHS*
Will train persons with
Mechanical, Appliance and
Auto body repair experi-
ence. Good working con-
ditions, fringes, Drug Free,
Permanent.
APPLY IN PERSON:
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41
NOKOMIS, FL 34275
941-966-2182
MARINE FORKLIFT OPERATOR
Experienced Only. Harbor at
Lemon Bay. 900 S. McCall,
Englewood. 727-735-5036
PRODUCTION MANAGER
FOR BUSY AUTO BODY SHOP
Apply in person @
23309 Harborview Rd,
Charlotte Harbor
SALES
2070



ADVERTISI G
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


SALES
L 2070 ^


Advertising Sales
Executive
The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
* Competitive salary plus
commission
SVacation
*Health insurance
* Sick and short term
disability
*Training
* Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:
Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN .....
/Find a Pet
/Find a Car
./Find a Job
./Find Garage Sales
./Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results



A Bargain

Hunters

Delight

Check the

Classifieds

first!

A Whole

Marketplace

of shopping

is right at

your

fingertips!


SALES
L 2070 ^



READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?
SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER
Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
located in
North Port Florida.
We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
loves learning new skills and:
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.
We offer:
0 Training
:0 Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
0 Opportunity to expand
your business skills

Please email your resume
to:
Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
SEmployer/Drug & Nicotine
SFree Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.
SALES & MARKETING
ASSISTANT
Entry Level Marketing/
Entry Level Advertising
We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. We are
located in North Port Florida.
Duties Include, but are
not limited to:
Executing sales and
marketing functions to
company standards
Assists customers with any
questions they may have in
regards to our products
Gains knowledge on
all new clients the
company acquires
Ensure highest level of
customer service resulting in
increased productivity and
achieving sales goals
Knowledge of our
systems follow through of
advertising copy
Growth opportunities may be
available for those who
qualify.This position is entry
level, previous experience in
sales and marketing helpful.
We look for candidates with
the following:
Some college or
degree preferred
S* Outstanding
interpersonal skills
Student Mentality
Leadership Experience
Experience in retail, sales,
advertising & marketing
Ability to work in a high
energy environment
Please email resume to:
Jobs@sunletter.com
Sun Classifieds attention:
Geri Kotz EOE, DFWP
Pre-employment drug &
nicotine testing required.



,,^^ '1-^"Aj'....^^^





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, December 26, 2013


SALES
Lwow 2070 ^


HELP WANTED:
REAL ESTATE AGENT
Needed to round out team.
PT/FT. Must be or Join
VBR/MLS. No Franchise
Fees. Hans Kirsten Realtor
(941)350-0441
RV SALES PRO.
WOW 80K PLUS SELLING
THE BEST NAME BRANDS IN
THE INDUSTRY. EXPERIENCE
PREFERRED BUT WILL TRAIN
RIGHT PERSON. DFWP NON-
SMOKER. CALL BOB HAMILL
OR STEVE ERDMAN AT
(941) 966-2182 OR FAX
(941) 966-7421. OR
JOBS@RVWORLDINC.COM
Sun Newspapers
Home Delivery Service
Runner
The Sun is currently
seeking part-time Service
Runner for our Circulation
Department. This position
will work directly with
home delivery District
Managers and our
Customer Service
Department.
Applicant must be able to
work morning hours
between 6:00AM to
10:30AM on weekdays
and 06:30AM to 11:30AM
on the Weekends.
Requires valid Florida
driver's license and
insurance. Must have
reliable transportation to
perform daily job
responsibilities.
Responsibilities include:
Deliver newspapers and/
or missing sections to our
home delivery
subscribers. This person
will contact customer ser-
vice to acquired said re-
deliveries and promptly
provide re-delivery
service to ensure
customer satisfaction.
Opportunities available in
Port Charlotte/Punta
Gorda and North Port/
Englewood. Maximum
29 hours per week.
$11/hour, phone
allowance and mileage
reimbursement.
We are a Drug/Nicotine
Free Company.
A pre-employment
screening is required.
Apply:
23170 Harborview Rd.
Port Charlotte, FL 33980
Email:
cmerritt@sun-herald.com

Need a new

Home?

Look in the

Classifieds!

GENERAL
awo:2100 ^


EARN EXTRA
$$ MONEY $$
Deliver Phone Books
Punta Gorda
Port Charlotte
Work Your Own Hours
Have Insured Vehicle
And Valid Drivers License
Must Be At Least 18
Yrs. Old
No Experience Necessary
941-467-0483
www.sddsdelivery.com
Job #FL14


I GENERAL /
2100

CASHIERS, WANTED, F/T &
P/T for Produce Market. No
exp. nec. $9/hr. to start. Pio-
neer Farmers Mkt. 312 S.
Tamiami Trail, Venice Island
941-484-8655
LANDSCAPE INSTALLATION
Crew leader w/ exper. & good
Driver's Lic. 941-662-8733
Need a
new Ride?
Find it
in the
Classifieds!
NOW HIRING: PT COOKS &
CNA's Vick Street Manor
Fax Resume: 941-627-2007
Call: 941-627-5388
VETERINARY ASSISTANT,
F/T. Must have Experience in
Vet's Office. Call Dr. Myers
941-625-9900 M-F 8-5
WAREHOUSE ASSISTANT
Full time position with
advancement potential in a
climate controlled warehouse.
Excellent Pay and Benefits,
including health insurance and
paid vacation. Monday Friday
8:30 am- 5:30 pm
Email resume to
venicewarehouse@hotmail.com
WHEELCHAIR TRANSPORT
COMPANY HIRING CDL
LICENSE PREFERRED. MUST
HAVE CLEAN DRIVING RECORD
AND BE ABLE TO PASS BACK-
GROUND CHECK. PLEASE FAX
RESUME TO 941-625-3116

TEMPORARY


VENICE MOTEL 6 is looking
for HOUSEKEEPERS, FRONT
DESK & MAINTENANCE
Personnel. Apply in person at
281 US 41 Bypass N. Venice
L SEEKING
EMPLOYMENT
Z^ 2120 ^

WILL DO CLEANING, LAUNDRY,
ERRANDS, & PET SITTING ENGL/
VENICE AREAS 941-493-1400
3000








NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS
L ^ 3010



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSING AT
NOON ON TUESDAY-
CHRISTMAS EVE
AND WILL BE
CLOSED CHRISTMAS
DAY.
*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am, Thursday,
December 26th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Tuesday, 12/24,
10:30 am for
Wednesday, 12/25"
and Thursday, 12/26
We Wish Everyone a
Merry Christmas!


ANNOUNCEMENTS
L3010 ^





FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**

SUTN t
-VyrJ V =^ T Mnstpu




Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
:^3020 ^

BODY RUBS BY
BRANDI 941-600-4317
SNOWBIRD SPECIALS
FRANCO SEEKING
a Gorgeous Golden Goddess.
941-575-7013
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
CARD OF THANKS
::: 3040

MAY THE SACRED HEART of
Jesus be adored, glorified,
loved and preserved, through-
out the world now and forever.
Sacred Heart of Jesus have
mercy on us, St. Jude, worker
of miracles, pray for us. St.
Jude, helper of the hopeless,
pray for us. Say the prayer 9
times a day. By the 8th day
your prayer will be answered.
It has never been known to fail.
Publication must be promised.
Thank you. LML


S SCHOOLS
I & INSTRUCTION
3^ 060^ n



CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
IS SOMETHING CALLING
TO YOU? ARE YOU SHAOLIN?
Try Something New. All FREE
Classes Available in Traditional
Shaolin Kung Fu for adults &
children! For More Info
Call 941-204-2826
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 941-347-7445

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
L 3065~
CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
EDGAR CAYCE A.R.E.
Search for God Study Group
6 PM 7 PM each Tuesday at
Venice Public Library
More Info call 941-966-1964.
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
GULF COAST
HEALING ROOMS
If you need healing, we want
to pray with you!
Our prayer teams are
available to minister to
you by appointment.
Thursday 10 am-12:30 pm
For apt. call p.863.558.7455
1538 Rio de Janeiro Blvd.
Punta Gorda, Fl 33983
Jesus Still Heals Today!
LOOKING FOR AFFORD-
ABLE COUNSELING?
LIC. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING
WITH OVER 40YRS EXP.
941-876-4416
Liberty Community
Church
North Port Charlotte

BURIAL LOTS/
CRYPTS
^3070 o

BURIAL (1) LOT #276 Indian
Springs Cemetary, Punta
Gorda, $950, 863-537-6575


LOST & FOUND
L ::3090 ^

FOUND: Female Shephard
Mix, brown, black & white.
Found in section 15 off Veter-
an's on 12/20. 941-627-1937
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face, ear & back.
Missing from North Port
5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909
LOST: WOMAN'S RING
White gold with 3 small dia-
monds. Lost at Winn Dixie on
Kings Hwy around 12/14-
12/15. Very sentimental!
Please call 941-286-0372
[ ARTS CLASSES
L 3091 ^

ACRYLIC PAINTING CLASSES
Friday & Saturdays at Hobby
Lobby, North Port. Call Barb
for Info 941-497-1395
BASKETWEAVING CLASSES
in Punta Gorda.
Beginner & Advanced
Classes Monthly.
Call Teresa 941-347-7640

COMPUTER CLASSES
3092



Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org
Classifie = Sales

EXERCISE CLASSES

z 3095 ^

GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
RELIGION CLASSES

L Z 3096 ^

BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
OTHER CLASSES
L : 3097 ^

CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.


L ALTERATIONS



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSING AT
NOON ON TUESDAY-
CHRISTMAS EVE
AND WILL BE
CLOSED CHRISTMAS
DAY.
*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am, Thursday,
December 26th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Tuesday, 12/24,
10:30 am for
Wednesday, 12/25
and Thursday, 12/26
We Wish Everyone a
Merry Christmas!
APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR


DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lie 990010103532/Ins
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!
DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
/ ADULT CARE /



SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483
CHILD CARE
L 5051 ^

ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
| COMPUTER SERVICE



EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./Ins.
We Come To YOU! *
November Special
$30 Flat Rate
CERTIFIED COMPUTER
REPAIR
ALL PC & LAPTOPS *
FREE over the
phone diagnostics!
Wireless Router Set-Up
Windows Upgrade
Virus/Spyware/Malware
Removal
Microsoft Certified
941-404-5373
941-276-6623
Visa MC Discover AMEX
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS"
941-764-3400 or
941-276-5011







Thursday, December 26, 2013 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


CONTRACTORS
L :505C4T^


TEDDY'S HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins.
CRC 1327653
COURIER/TAXI
Z 51055'T ^


AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE
ALWAYS RELIABLE
TRANSPORTATION
PROVIDING SAFE, RELIABLE,
COURTEOUS & AFFORDABLE
TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM
ALL AIRPORTS!
941-626-5226
RSW-$50 SRQ-$55
TPA-$125 MIA-$225
*ALL RATES ARE FROM PC SEE
WEBSITE FOR ADDITIONAL RATES
WWW.ALWAYSRELIABLETRANSPORTATION.COM

CONCRETE



Custom Design Driveways
Pool Decks Patios.
Decorative Concrete/Natural
Stone. A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES


A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!
ROSEMARY SUNSHINE
CLEANING SERVICES
Homes Offices Move In/Out
Plus much more!
Bonded....Free Estimates
Good References Available
941-423-5906
862-219-9748
ELECTRICAL
aZ^50O70 ^


DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
"Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
^ 5081


BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing *
*Bush Hogging *
*ALL Mulching *
*Selective Clearing
*Tree & Stump Removal
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
Lic./Ins
DUMP TRUCK SERVICES
A DMSION OF
TREMENDOUS TREE
Bobcat Services, Fill Dirt,
Grading, Driveways Installed
(Shell/Rock), Private Roads,
Tri Axle Dump Truck
Free Estimates
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983


I HANDYMAN/
I GENERAL REPAIR I
5^^ 089 ^^

"HONEY DO" Handyman
& Odd Jobs
Kitchen & Bath Tune Ups
Faucets, counters,
windows, doors and more!
..related electrical &
plumbing work.
Experienced &
References Available
941-275-0712

AIR
HEATING & AIR
Z' 5090


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738

S.o.s. 0 11
A/C & Heat IT 7
941-468-4956
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2695 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY'
FEDERAL TAX CREDIT AVAILABLE
ST. LIC #CAC1816023

HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
L 51007


5100 Basic Gutter
Cleaning & Handyman
Services Call: Mike
240-925-6806

You Save
Big Bucks
Shopping
Classifieds!

TOPP'S FENCE INC.
941-429-0800
PVC
ALUMINUM
CHAIN LINK
"NOW HIRING"

LICENSE #AAA0010261
ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
fans, lights, faucets, toilets &
washer/dryer repair, etc...
(941)-661-8585 lic.
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVID BECK
The Handyman, LLC.
Kitchen Bath Remodels .
Ceramic Tile *
941-766-1767 Lic# 1327942
Ins. Member BBB
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227


1HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
Z! 5100^^

DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#060662/Ins.
HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
*PRESSURE CLEANING*
Homes, Roofs, Etc.,
Auto Detailing, Window
Cleaning & More. Lic & Ins
Call 941-276-0628

J & J HANDYMAN
941-525-7967, 941-493-6736
Painting, Pressure Washing &
Much More!
Over 30 Years Experience &
Satisified Customers
Serving Venice & Sarasota Areas
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR ODD
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
LICENSED & FULLY INSURED

J. BONANNO
HANDYMAN SERVICES,
Complete Home Repair &
Maintenance. Pressure
Washing, Mowing, & Yard
Work. 35 years exp.
Call John 941-286-5940
JJ's RESCREENING &
Handyman Services.
941-875-8296
Lic and Insured.
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
RAINSCAPE INC A Full
Service Irrigation Company
Monthly Maintenance starts at
$40. 941-888-2988


L HOME/COMM. 1
IMPROVEMENT I
^^ 5100 ^


Ray Tippins
Seawall Erosion
Repair: Repair Sink-
holes & Sodding, Tree
Service, Shrub & Weed-
ing. Owner Operated,
Lic./Ins. 941-625-2124
SELL'S ALUMINUM L.L.C.-
6" Seamless Gutters.
*Rescreens*Front Entries*36
Yrs. Exp! Greg 941-234-8056
or 941-497-4450 Lic. & Ins.
Servicing Sarasota County


SLIDING
GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs.
Free Estimates Lic/Ins.
Bob @ 941-706-6445



E75LIDER
SLIDING GLASS
DOOR
& Window Repair
Lowest Prices
GUARANTEED!!!
941-628-8579
JADVERIE

Susanne's Cleaning
Residential Cleaning
Free Estimates
941-223-9289
"The Stucco Guy"
Drywall, Window Sill & Wire
Lathe Repair, Rusted Bands,
Decorative Bands,
Match Any Texture,
Senior & Veterans Discount
941-716-0872


I HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
^^ 5100^^

SIDING, Soffit, Facia, Seamless
Gutters & Pressure Washing
Jenkins Home Improvement
941-497-2728
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/lns.
PROTECT YOUR FAMILY
WITH CLEAN WATER!
OXIDIZES HOME I
INLINE WATER 30-DAY
BACTERIA & MONEY BACK
CHLORIDE GUARANTEE
RESIDUE
WATER CREEK INLINE SOLUTIONS
FLOW-BITE IS A SUPPLEMENTAL
DEFENSE SYSTEM THAT TAKES A
BITE OUT OF INLINE WATER BACTERIA
BUILD-UP & RESIDUE.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE
VISIT US ON OUR WEBSITE:
WWW.WATERCREEKINLINESOLU1ONS.COM
INFO@WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
"FEED THE BEAR"

WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing, Concrete, Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

I LAWN/GARDEN
/ & TREE
^ 5110 ^

A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune,
install, design, removal,
stump grinding.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com


LAWN/GARDEN
I & TREE
^^ 5110 1

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
AMERICAN IRRIGATION
Call 941-587-2027
FREE ESTIMATES!!!
Licensed & Insured
Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-11-
00010. Serving Charlotte
and Sarasota Counties
Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages, Scr. lanais, etc...
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
WINDOW WASHING
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding e
*Lawn Service e
*Bucket Service e
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./lns.
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
ISLAND BREEZE
LAWN SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
14 years experience
Owner operated. Lic&
Ins.Venice & surrounding
areas. For free estimate
call Keith 941-445-2982


Make Some Quick Cash!


Have a Garage Sale!


Advertise it in the Classifieds.




Call (941) 429-3110


I


Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7





The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, December 26, 2013


LAWN/GARDEN
I & TREE
^ 5110 ^^

J RIZ TREE SERVICES
Complete Tree Services
Servicing Charlotte & Sarasota
941-306-7532 Lic & Ins


i ,... OF FLORJOA INC. I -1
LAKE & POND SERVICES
* INCREASE PROPERTY VALUES
* CREATE AN AESTHETICALLY
PLEASING AMENITY
SERVICES TO FIT YOUR
SPECIFIC LAKE & POND NEEDS
FREE QUOTE
Call To Schedule An
Appointment With One Of
Our Licensed & Insured
Technicians.
941-378-2700
WWW.APOPFL.COM
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
SAdvertise Today!]
PROFESSIONAL Tree Ser-
vice. Stump Removal, Palm &
Hedge Trimming. Free Esti-
mates! 941-624-4204 Lic
#001053
|ROMAN'5 LAWN PRO |
RESIDENTIAL & COMM.
LICENSED & INSURED
941-380-LAWN
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/lnsured941-484-6042


LAWN/GARDEN
I & TREE
^^ 5110 1

TJ MILAZZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
MILAZZO'S LANDSCAPING
941-830-1005
ALL PHASES OF RESIDENTIAL
LANDSCAPING, INSTALLATIONS,
PLANTING, PEPPER BERRY CON-
TROL & CONCRETE CURBING.
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035
Classifie = Sales
MARINE REPAIR


.'0:
Z^5121 ^




MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329

MASONRY
5129


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED


MOVING/HAULING/
L5130 ^


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a
Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-
883-1231

Delivery & Transport|
No Item Too Small
|MoveltSuncoast@gmail.corn

MOVING HELP
$$$ Save $$$
Packing- Loading- Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins
Looking for
Adventure?
Find it
in the
Classifieds

PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
Z 5140~


BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10/o Off With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAAO0101254
L __---__ -__- __- __-- ___J--


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
11Z 5140

STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINTING
Res/Comm. Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER

SERVING ENGLEWOOD, NORTH
PORT, PORT CHARLOTTE, VENICE
DANNY MILLER PAINTING, LLC
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING
941-830-0360
FREE ESTIMATES
danspainting4602@comcast.net
LICENSED & INSURED AAO09886
LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
ADVERTISED!

LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do lt!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MARK HUNTER PAINTING
34 YRS IN BUSINESS
PREFECT WORK PROMPT SER-
VICE. PAY NOTHING UNTIL
WORK IS COMPLETE. FREE EST.
BONDED INS. Lic 90000092534
SERVING SARASOTA Co.
941-475-2695


,/1


S PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
^^55140

MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764
Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates ~ Prompt Service
941-484-4576

PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet!
Family Owned and Operated.
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. &Ins. AAA-12-00015
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lie # AA009837
Employ Classified!
SWEENEY'S PAINTING
Pressure Cleaning *
*MildewTreatment *Painting *
Interior & Exterior *
SFree Est. Sr. Discounts *
941-916-1024
Lc# AAA0010702
r------------------------

WAYNE PATTON PAINTING,
LLC CUSTOM REPAINTS,
PRESSURE WASHING POOL
CAGE CLEANING, INSULATIVE
ROOF COATINGS, CONCRETE
ROOF CLEANING & SEALING.
WE DO IT ALL. 30 YRS EXP.
LIC/INS. 941-276-5245
OR 941-258-5089 I
LiJ-------------


L PET CARE
1111Z 5155 ^


DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853
L PLUMBING /
L a 5160 ^


DO ALL PLUMBING LLC
A Full Service Company for
ALL Your Plumbing Needs.
Call for Our Monthly Specials.
941-626-9353 Lic#CFC1428884
LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
REPIPES, SLAB LEAKS
FULL SERVICE PLUMBING
PRECISION PLUMBING
941423-3058
#CFC1427378
THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393

POOL SERVICES
L:5165 ^

ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Repairs & Service
FREE WATER TESTING
941-426-6500
S UGET RESULTS )
SUSE CLASSIFIED!


Want to know what's going on out on the

water? Then you need to read Southwest Florida's


WHA(g






Thursday, December 26, 2013 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


Challenger
DIRECTIONS: t
Fill each square with a number, one through nine. /t
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right. IZ-Z6
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to 27
total in upper and lower right.
THERE MAY BE MORE 8 27
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge 8 27
Time 6 Minutes ,
57 Seconds 8 23
Your Working 8
Time Minutes
Seconds g g g 3 3
Seconds 35 23 23 23 27
2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

Yesterday's -11
Challenger Iq9Ij?23
Answers 7 2

Cryptoquip@ 2011 by King Features Syndicate

12-26

MKB YKTC BCSYKV G ASEC

VK GVHCBCYH GV JBGYO,

BCQ MBXGH. ZKX JKXUQ YSZ

G'T ECBZ SOOUC-HACHGJ.
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: EXCITING SONG
ABOUT A BOXER WHO THREW JABS AND HOOKS
DURING THE HOLIDAYS: "JINGLE BELL ROCKY"
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: G equals I


RMADUKE By Brad Anderson


(C ~


K


"Who... ME? No, I didn't give him the
soundtrack to 'Cats.' Must have
been Santa."


BEETLE BAILEY By
WANNA GO OUT J
6ATURPAY?7


Mort Walker
MAYBE. 1 WAS 1:r WAS C0GOING
60lNG TO C.LEAN Cy
OIN.TOCLEAN TO THAT FANCY
MY APARTMENT I I ILL
S CECKEPMY
---. \ IF FINANCES /


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne
',6Wei 54T-.e UoW FLL ^Z
1UeVWAA- \ 7)ieIZ tJNr/s. OPeqJ
yer p A'" T


SDEC I PEP WE'P \
HAVE POPCORN )
ON A PARK BENCH14


SCLEANING6
IT IS


WY/OR.Eg Pip Yod
NOWEAVE "HRI
S;NOW 6/.IoVEL~ .


P. OOR..

PACKs^t z.i


MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters


HAVe-rOU
NOTICeP?
FRUITCAKE
POESNTTASTe
LuKe ITHmeR
FROITORAKI E


S"K" WORDS IN
SPORTS


VNK H DAX UR P KM J GD
AXV S F F OKC I K Q N K I
F DAXVMT PDR L QOM J
H F C AOYGN I E ENKWU
RELOHY E KVKE E P ER
PNB L J YHAF C KDTB Z
XAVT PR S QO I MAK I H


KF T U OKC ON KR
W(KN U C K L E B A L
TCN I PGN I K RQ


D B Z Y
D) I KV
ON L K


HI KAYAKHFDCAZXW
Wednesday's unlisted clue: MILK
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: AN ESKIMO CANOE
Kaboom Keyhole Kidney punch Kneeing
Karate Kick save Kill Knockout
Keel Kicker Kingpin Knuckleball
Keeper Kickoff Kip


PICKLES By Brian Crane
CAN YOU S W ME [OL
ROWA) Ow LA)WGGLE L)
WuR EA% GAMPA? --?








B.C. By Mastroianni & Hart


SPORTS
SLEUTH


Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


6)


2013 King Features, Inc.


12/26





The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii
w -19 W I v L .


Occasional drink is OK RE

while on warfarin [W.


DEAR DR. ROACH:
I'm a white male, age 72,
200 pounds and in good
health. I spin and lift
weights three days a week.
Approximately four years
ago, I had blood clots in my
lungs, and the cause was
Factor V Leiden.
I have been on warfarin
since then, and have had
no problem keeping within
the numbers. I watch my
diet. I have never been a
smoker, and before the
blood clots, my alcohol
consumption was a beer
a month or less. Giving up
the beer was not a prob-
lem. At times I would like
to have a glass of beer, such
as at my club Christmas
party. The literature seems
spotty regarding this. I am
not going to endanger my
life over a glass of beer, but
what do you think? By the
way, I have on occasion
tried a non-alcoholic beer
(as long as it is low in
vitamin K), but it doesn't
taste as good. R.S.B.
ANSWER: Occasional
mild alcohol use is not
prohibited on warfarin;
binge drinking is. I would
not exceed two drinks in
a day, but one once in a
while is certainly OK.
DEAR DR. ROACH: My
mom has shingles current-
ly. She was diagnosed two
years ago, and it has settled
just above her right eye.
She still has active blisters
on her forehead. The
pressure in the eye is now
controlled using predni-
sone drops and acyclovir
daily. Pain is low during
the daytime; however,
during the evening there
are times when the pain is
excruciating.
My question, sir: Should
Mom now 97 and in
otherwise good health -
get the shingles vaccine?
-L.R.A.
ANSWER: Persistent
blisters two years after di-
agnosis is very uncommon,
and it may be that, due to
her age, her immune sys-
tem is unable to get rid of
the infection, which is why
her doctor has prescribed
acyclovir. It is recom-
mended that people who
have had shingles take the
vaccine only after all the
shingles blisters are gone.
The risk of recurrence is
low in the four years after a
bout of shingles, so it isn't
essential to administer the
vaccine immediately after
the infection clears.
The bottom line for
everyone else is, the
shingles vaccine is effective
at reducing the likelihood
of developing shingles
and at reducing the
likelihood of post-herpetic
neuralgia, the sometimes


Dr. Roach

excruciating pain that can
go on for months after an
episode of shingles. The
vaccine is not effective in
people with active shingles
or those who currently are
experiencing post-herpetic
neuralgia.
DEAR DR. ROACH:
Fourteen years ago, my
eye doctor told me that
she saw a "freckle" in
my right eye. Her record
states choroidall nevus."
She took a picture of it.
In September I went to
another eye doctor, who
also diagnosed choroidal
nevus, was concerned
about melanoma and said
he would monitor it. Would
you please explain what
this is?
ANSWER: A choroidal
nevus is a benign lesion be-
low the retina. The concern
is that they can transform
into melanoma, a malig-
nant eye cancer. About 10
percent of choroidal nevi
will transform to mela-
noma in 10 years. Larger,
thicker nevi or those with
orange color or leaking flu-
id predict transformation
to melanoma. People with
choroidal nevi should have
an eye exam at least yearly.
Taking a picture can help
determine if the nevus is
growing, so the picture the
first eye doctor took might
be useful now to compare
whether yours has stayed
the same or changed.
The booklet on macular
degeneration explains the
processes of both wet and
dry degeneration of the
eyes. Readers can obtain a
copy by writing: Dr. Roach
- No. 701, PO. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Enclose a check or money
order (no cash) for $4.75
U.S./$6 Can. with the
recipient's printed name
and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
Dr Roach regrets that he
is unable to answer individ-
ual letters, but will incor-
porate them in the column
whenever possible. Readers
may email questions to
ToYourGoodHealth@med.
cornelL.edu or request an
order form of available
health newsletters at P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Health news-
letters may be ordered from
www.rbmamall.com.


Th iur.,-, .1[,: .er l r 2,, 2 i.:: ,


greatt dealk in the Business & Service


a T-"IL AT-"L s, .7 roR L ARV-J, L .F" Lt.7R~ -.7mL~t.T.7 %01& ."%,& v b% %
blushing Sundays, Wednesdays, and

a the Classified Section of the Sun! /





X MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Graham Nolan
OU ANP NIKI
(ERE KISSING! )
SAW YOU! jr."--- 'l5 WHAT
WELL, 916 IKIPS

1H... YES, PO WHEN
I GUESS;THEYCAR
WE WERE! MY BOY- ABOUT EAC
FRIEN, AT

SOMETIMES,


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By
TH14Y &AV/C MG A NGW
PHON6 AT WORK, 60
I'M &IVIN& YOU MY
OLP SMAIZTF'HONE.
EL --- "7^ --- '


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
THE HA'VEN K15 R 7" WHAT'S GOING
|SESMG17 TO ENJO'f ON BETWE% N
LTHE CHRISTMAS PARTY -IOU TWOT-4
LIESTPAf.KEN PIPin


I


,: ,: .:. ,u r.. r", r", t


T






Thrdy=eebr2,21 d yurunntENC TeSnCasfe ae1


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463. 1638


BSUNAP S SS&SEV ED C
^-^SU N ^NEWSPAPERS ^U^mlJIJBI^IH^


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek V p W 5 IT TTF ALL' FA, ,IOUF.. OP -.K
."OW WPO6 IT tF. TI AC. I6 A IMOU$ KF...O PSTEl.
TO -7 SPOTS,AUGE CRKOWS>5/ENE^-
OE | O P US 1 kNG TKEf ISTERS
ife'^l~~~~~ IA >.^ h- ?'.W~ P RESEW,5-


--~ -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PRIMP MACAW SWAYED LONELY
Answer: After he invented the Franklin stove, Ben was
able to give people a WARM WELCOME

The final Christmas gift


Dear Readers: Is it time
in your home to start tak-
ing down the decorations,
Christmas tree and more?
But what can be done
with the christmas tree?
First, check with your
city's solid-waste man-
agement agency to see if
trees are collected as part
of curbside recycling. In
many cities, the trees are
turned into mulch, which
is then offered back to
residents (for free) to use
in landscaping.
See if trees can be
dropped off at a recycling
center. More cities are
collecting trees to use for
mulch on paths for hiking
trails, among just a few of
the many ways to use a
dead holiday tree.
If you can, set the old
tree out for birds and
other animals! You even
can turn the tree into a gi-
ant birdfeeder by hanging
leftover fruit, popcorn,
etc., on it. Heloise
P.S.: Please consider a
living tree! They may not
be as big or beautiful, but
certainly will last a lot
longer than a cut tree.

Simple fix
Dear Heloise: I seem to
always have too much to
carry when going from car
to house and vice versa.
My hands are full, and
my keys are in my purse.
I have to set all the stuff
down just to dig through
my purse to open the
door. Now my keys have a
regular ponytail holder on
the key ring, so when I get
out of the car or house, I


BLONDIE By


p,-,
EX6CEPT TOA", TE. WEE.
SRBTURNINGTRE P-ES..T.-
| KINM OF LIKE. BLACK FEIZ>'(
IN ,EIV$ER.E!


MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell


COOKING...
CLEANING...
SHOPPING...
WRAPPING...


[Nj


SHE
COULP
USE A
HOLIPAY.





IL


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott


Hints from Heloise

can carry my keys, hands-
free, around my wrist. -
Lynn H. in Georgia

Sugar, not flour
Dear Heloise: I like to
make little loaves of bread
for my friends and family.
My favorite is banana wal-
nut. I use small loaf pans.
Many recipes call for you
to grease and flour the pan
before baking. I grease and
sugar my pans instead.
The loaves of bread come
out with a nice sugar
outside instead of coated
in white flour. I think it
adds to the taste and gives
them a little extra touch.
- A Reader in Texas

Birthday cards
Dear Heloise: One year,
I forgot to send my niece
a birthday card, and she
was really sad. Now I buy
all my nieces and neph-
ews birthday cards at the
beginning of the year and
keep them in a folder till
their birthday. On a piece
of paper, I write their
names, birthday and a
description of the card
to send to them. -A
Reader, via email


DOONSBURY By Garry Trudeau
AS IMPORTANT AS IT IS TO ... POUCIS IUKE OPPOSING
AVOIW 6APF-S, LAMWUA6 EQUAL. PAY, PEPUNMPIA6
ISN'T RBAU.Y THE ISSUE, PIAMNP PAR5NTHOOP ANP
6ENTL.EMEN. IT'S YOUR HEAP START, OPPOSING THE
POLICIES THAT ARE HURT- MIUTARY SEXUAL I, ASSAULT
M6 YOU.. BIU, THe6E ARE NOT NO-
.MN PRI MP-


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square.


Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11





The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, December 26, 2013


Mom's promises to kick drug MALLARD F'LLMORE By Bruce Tinsley

habit are only empty words L


DEARABBY: Iam a
15-year-old girl and a
caring person. I'm worried
about my mother. She has
been an addict for nine
years. She always says
she wants help, but she
never follows through with
getting the help she needs. I
have asked her many times
to go and get help, and
have told her how bad her
using makes me feel.
What do you think I can
do to encourage her to fol-
low through with treatment?
I miss my mother. Any
advice would be appreciat-
ed. IN NEED OF HELP
IN OLYMPIA, WASH.
DEAR IN NEED OF
HELP: You are not only a
caring young woman, you
are also mature for your
age and intelligent. If your
mother has been an addict
since you were 6, your
entire childhood has been
spent taking care of her and
raising yourself. I am truly
sorry for that.
Because nothing you say
gets through to her, consid-
er moving in with another
relative if that's possible.
You should also join a
Narateen support group.
It's a 12-step program for
teenage friends and family
members of addicts. There
is one in your city called
"Hope for Today" To find
the location, check the
Nar-Anon website, www.
nar-anon.org.
DEARABBY: Iam a
grandmother, a former
teacher and have my mas-
ter's in child psychology. I
love children.
Please pass this along to
parents and anyone who
cares for children: Quit
force-feeding them! I see
parents beg and coerce
their kids to eat. There are
too many obese people
in the world. Kids will eat
when they are hungry. Just
don't give them any junk in
between.
Remember, children
have small stomachs. They
don't need to eat much to
feel full. Let kids eat when
they need to. Just give them
healthy choices. DIANE
IN MILWAUKEE


Dear Abby

DEAR DIANE: Many
parents "encourage" their
children to eat because
they're afraid if they don't
they're not doing their
job. Too often, mealtime
turns into a power struggle,
which is a big mistake.
What you have written is
common sense. A pediatri-
cian or health clinic can ad-
vise parents what and how
much their child should
eat. And I agree, restaurant
portions are usually larger
than customers should
consume in one meal,
which is why those who are
watching their calories are
advised to cut the portions
in half before eating.
DEARABBY:I am a
grown woman with a won-
derful husband, two jobs
and five beautiful children.
I am a good person. My
parents raised me to be
respectful and accepting of
all kinds of people.
My arms are partially
tattooed with beautiful
flowers. Family members
openly express their dislike
of it. They have a right to
their thoughts and to say
what they please. What
can I say back that tells
them how rude they are
and how they hurt me?
-INKED AND IRKED IN
POCATELLO, IDAHO
DEAR INKED AND
IRKED: You should say,
"When you gave your
opinion about my arms,
I heard you the first time.
For you to keep repeating
it is insulting and hurtful,
so please cut it out. I think
my tattoos are beautiful
and that's what's import-
ant." And if your family
members persist in making
cruel comments, you have
my permission to end the
conversation.


"For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven
with a shout with the voice of the archangel, and with
the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise
first: Then we which are alive and remain shall be
caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet
the Lord in the air; and so shall we ever be with the
Lord."- 1 Thessalonians 4:16, 17
The great gathering of God's people is in the mak-
ing. We shall meet again never to part. He has made it
possible. "Even so come Lord Jesus."


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz
-EWHOLE 4AT'S THE DIFFERENCE
S1mReUE rIit W .ET JEEN 6_IN6 rH-V-t1ASH,'
IH r wIS AT /EI AND BEiNGN6 HUMBLE?
r AWIS LA/P is5HAT 'Y- -


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers

'TWOASTHE DA' AFTEP- OT A 6Rl
OWiJ5-TmASAND AL- WAS Sf1
rTtiRPUeHTI-4E 1os41 11111
I^.* 'o. &L i 2 lt r


SHOE By Gary Brookins & Susie
HOW'S THE NEW SAARTHONE RECEIVED
YOU 60TFORC1.ISTMAS? MY FIRST CALL
t /3 ON IT TIIS
" la' V ,'xI MORNIN6...


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


I HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21 -April 19). When desire is fed, the
inner animal is satisfied but not the greedy
human mind, which, once sated, only develops
hinnper annpetites


I not a good enough reason to pass on it.You'll learn, grand plan to fruition. You are tuned in to everyone a reason you are so mysteriously drawn to these
You always do. In fact, you can't help yourself, and everything that can lead to your success, pursuits, and they will connect you to good fortune.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Ifyou expend extraordi- LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You may not be able to CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).You're a cosmic


nary energy doing a seemingly ordinary thing, you'll remove the forces that oppose you, but once you
elevate this aspect of daily life to the realm of"art accept thatyou are better for having to contend


favorite these days, so be sure to want things for


unflagging energy, you'll tackle the primary things
you wanted to get finished before the end of the
year.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (Dec. 26).You only dish out


yourselfand for others. Why not be greedy for love, what you would like to eat. So your offerings to life


......form."This is the key to good living these days. with them. goodness and health? are delicious, and life repays you by feeding you all
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You really can boost k t g l t d them.
your immune system by thinking positive thoughts. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Instinct has led you to your SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).Yourencouragement is AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.18). Despite an absence of thatyour heart, mind and body needs.Whatyou
But first you have to neutralize the negativity being current pursuit. You'll wake up ready to focus on a potent, and those you cheer for will be moved to act obvious constraint, impediment or interference, you learn about your history and family will impact your
offered up by your critical inner voice. It's as easy as fresh initiative, though you may not know until after confidently and accomplish what they didn't think still may feel that you're not entirely free. Consider plans. Something you own will be valued at a high
saying"shhh..." you get to work. they could. why you don't feel at liberty to do as you wish,, price, and you'll get a chance to cash out. Gemini
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).You don't knowenough VIRGO (Aug.23-Sept. 22).You have helpers and ad- SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Look deeper into PISCES (Feb.19-March 20). Get focused, and you'll and Virgo people adoreyou.Your lucky numbers are:
to tackle the project you're considering, but that's visers, but ultimatelyyou're the one who will bring a the things that intrigue and fascinateyou.There's be astounded at whatyou can accomplish.With 28,21,4,17 and 13.


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

6 9 5 Rating: BRONZE
4 9 6 Solution to 12/25/13

3 1 1 7 12 19 4 I 6 27 531 7 985 9 4
9 4 8 6 2 5 3 7 1

7 3 1 6 2 | 94862 5

2 6 2815936472 18 3
759462183

5 2 4 8 3 436781259
4 2 7 6 5 8-89 21 514837962
427 6 _58~897216435

1 83 r36 295 471181

11 617E
12/26/13






Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORT CHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


DEC.26 s' k PRIME TIME
ABC7 News World News To Be a To Be a Shark Tank Seven-figure 20/20: Mysteries of the Castle: Beyond Downton Abbey ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC e l 7 7 7 10 7 7 @6pm(N) Diane Sawyer Millionaire? Millionaire? offer. (l (H1) The mysteries of the redefined British aristocracy in @11pm((N) KimmelLive
_____ __N) (R) (R) "Downton Abbey" unfold. (N)(1H1)) (R)
ABC7 News World News The 7 O'Clock Entertainment Shark Tank Seven-figure 20/20: Mysteries of the Castle: Beyond Downton Abbey ABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC 7 11 7 6:OOpm(N) Diane Sawyer News (N)(HD)) Tonight (N) (HD) offer. (1 (H)) The mysteries of the redefined British aristocracy in @11:00pm KimmelLive
(N) "Downton Abbey" unfold. (N)(HD)) (N) (R)
WINK News CBS Evening WINK News Inside 2013 Big Bang (R) (31) The The Millers The Millers (:01) Elementary: Snow WINK News Late Show
CBS 11)121313 5 5 5 at 6pm (N) (HD) News (N) (HD1)) at7pm(N) (HD) controversies. (HI)) Millers Cemetary plot. Sentimental AngelsSherlock&Joan try to atllpm(N) HowardStem
(N) Therapist. (R) (R items. protect vault. (R (HD)) (R)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Big Bang (R) (31) The The Millers The Millers (:01) Elementary: Snow 10 News, Late Show
CBS 1i) 1010 10 o6pm(N) News(N)(HD) Fortune(N) (HD) (HD) Millers Cemetaryplot. Sentimental AngelsSherlock&Joan tryto 11pm(N) HowardStem
______(HD)) Therapist. (R) (R items. protect vault. (R (R)
NBC2News NBC Nightly Wheelof Jeopardy! (N) Parks&Rec.: Parks&Rec.: Saturday Night Live: The Women of "SNL" The women NBC2 News The Tonight
NBC 20 2 2 2 6pm (N)(HD11) News (N)(HD11)) Fortune (N) (1HD1)) London, Part1 London, Part 2 of "SNL" are honored with clips and original material. (R) @11pm(N) ShowBette
(HD) (HD) (HD) Midler.
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Parks&Rec.: Parks&Rec.: Saturday Night Live: The Women of "SNL" The women NewsChannel The Tonight
NBC L) 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:00 (N) News (N) (HD) 8at7:00 (N) Tonight(N)(HD London, Part1 London, Part2 of "SNL" are honored with clips and original material. (R) 8at11:00(11) ShowBette
(1HD) Midler.
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy The Simpsons Glee: Glease Rachel and Glee: Glee, Actually Kurt has an FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX 4 News TheArsenio
FOX I3N 4 4 4 Community news; weather; Cardamages. Homer Kurt return for "Grease." (1 unforgettable Christmas. (R) (HD) news report and weather at Eleven (N) HallShow (R)
_____ traffic; more. (N) (R) arrested. (HD14_)) u ______ update. (N)) (HD))
FOX 13 6:00 News News TMZ (N) omg! Insider Glee: Glease Rachel and Glee: Glee, Actually Kurt has an FOX 13 10:00 News The FOX 13 News Access
FOX IN 13 13 13 13 13 events of the day are reported. Tell-all Kurt return for "Grease." (1 unforgettable Christmas. (R) (HD) top news stories are Edge(N)(HD)) Hollywood (N)
(_____N) (HD)) interviews. (HD1) updated. (N) (HD) (HPD)
BBCWoi_ d Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) Antiques Rd Antiques Doc Martin: Cats and How Sherilock Changed the How Sherlock Changed the
SPBS (W 3 3 3 News Business Item Roadshow: Sharks Al tries to pay off Worild: Part 1 Character's Worild: Part 2 Sherlock's
America Report (N) evaluations. Saltaire 1 father's debt. (R) impact. (R) (1[1)) impact. (R) (H11))
BBCWodid Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (H)) WEDU Arts Suncoast Antiques Roadshow: In Performance at the In Performance at the
WEDUI3 3 3 3 3 News Business Plus (H11)) Business Finders Keepers Accidental White House Artists White House Singer
_____ America Report (N) Forum finds. (R) (H1D) honored. (R) (H1D) honored. (R) (H1D)
Modem Modem The Big Bang Big Bang The Vampire Diaries Dead Reign: Snakes in the Garden WINK News @10Opm (N) (HD) 21/2 Men 21/2 Men In
CW IM 6 21 6 Family Family Cam's Rai's big head. Sheldon's Man on Campus Jesse asks for Mary is unsure of who she can Alan is audited, bed together.
Adoption quest, mother, nemesis. help. (R trust. (R) (HD) (HD)
Queens Doug The King of 21/2 Men 21/2 Men In The Vampire Diaries Dead Reign: Snakes in the Garden Engagement Engagement: The Arsenio Hall Show Key
CW N) 9 9 9 4 in therapy. (H1D) Queens Dog Alan is audited, bed together. Man on Campus Jesse asks for Mary is unsure of who she can Liz moves in. Time Share and Peele. (R) (H1D)
Days (HD) (HD) help. (R trust. (R) (HD) (HD)
Loves Seinfeld Family Feud Family Feud House: Merry Ltfle Christmas House: Joy to the World Cops Cops Seinfeld A Community
MYN 31 11 1 11 14 Raymond: Krameruses (VPG) (R) (1VPG) (R) House is offered a deal by Teenager collapses; thoughtful Reloaded (HD) Reloaded (H1) stolen wallet. Drunken call.
_____ Lateness butter. ITritter. (HD)) gift. (HD)) (HD4))
Access Cleveland "Die Family Guy Family Guy House: Merry LUtle Christmas House: Joyto the World Law& Order Special Seinfeld Seinfeld A
MYN a) 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) Hard" holiday. Toad licking. Stephen King House is offered a deal by Teenager collapses; thoughtful Victims Unit Kramer uses stolen wallet.
_______ (HD) tales. Tritter. (HDP) gift. (HDP) Sado-masochism. (HD) butter.
Modem Modem The Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Special Law& Order Special Victims The Office Erin The Office Family Guy Family Guy
IND 32 12 1212 38 12 Family Family Cam's Rai's big head. Sheldon's VictimsUnit Unit: Escape Convict forjustice. not returning. Andy's Toadlicking. Stephen King
Adoption quest, mother, nemesis. Sado-masochism. (HD() (H)) complaint, tales.
Without a Trace: Prodigy A Without a Trace: Copy Cat Criminal Minds AThin Line Criminal Minds A Famiy Criminal Minds: I Love You, Law & Order: Criminal
ION 6 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Russian violinist goes Malone deals with a missing BAU looks into brutal home Affair BAU investigate murders Tommy Brown Murdered Intent: See Me Illegal
II missing. (HD()) woman case. invasions, in Atanta. couples. (HD()) experiments. (HD))
A&E 262626263950 181 48 Murder on tape. (R) Duck (R) Duck (1 Duck Live nativity. (R) Duck (R) (HD) Rodeo: Rodeo & Juliet Rodeo: Rodeo & Juliet
5656566 053 1 The Godfather (72) A decorated veteran takes over control of his family's criminal empire from his The Godfather Part II (74, Drama) **** Michael Corleone faces
AMC 56 5 3 31 ailing father as new threats and old enemies conspire to destroy them. new challenges as he takes over the family crime empire.
API 44 4444443668130 Alaska (R) (HD) Grizzly Difficult choice. Grizzly: Bear Problems Alaska (14(HD) Grizzly Sized (N) Cold River (N)
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Game (R) IGame (R) Game (R) IGame (R) Game (R) IGame (R) Game (R) Game (R) Game (R Game (R) Game (R) IGame (R)
BRAVO 6868 68 68254 51 185 Matchmaker Settle. (R) Actors (N) Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (N) Courtney Matchmaker (R) IMatchmaker
COM 66 6666661527 90Futurama Futurama (:59) Jeff Dunham (R) Without a Paddle ('04) ** Camping disaster. (HD) Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay
DISC 40 40 40 402543120 Mermaids: New (HD) ) Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives (R) (HD)) River Monsters Famous monster. (HDP) Megalodon (R) (HD)
E! 46 46 46 46 27 261961(5:00) E! Spec. (1) (141) E! News (N) (41) |Total Divas Surprise. E! Spec. (N) (141) |Party-On IParty On C. Lately INews (R)
FAM 5 55 55 551046199 Middle iMiddle National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation ('89) The Santa Clause ('94) **1'/2 Dad becomes Santa. The 700 Club (TVG)
FOOD 3737 3737 76164 Chopped (R) (HD)) Chopped (R (HD) Chopped (R) (HDP) Chopped (R) (HD) Chopped Sardines. (R) Diners (R) IDiners (R)
Rocky Balboa The current heavyweight champ Real Steel ('11, Science Fiction) *** Hugh Jackman, Dakota Goyo. After boxers are (:03) Real Steel ('11)***-
*FX 515558 53 challenges retired boxer Rocky Balboa to a fight. replaced by robots, a former fighter builds a contender. (PG-13) Robot boxing. (PG-13)
GSN 179179179179 34179184 Fam. Feud IFami Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Newlywed INewlywed INewlywed Newlywed Fam.Feud Fam. Feud Fam.Feud IFam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Let It Snow ('13, Holiday) Businesswoman. (NW The Most Wonderful Time of the Year ('08) (NW The Christmas Blessing ('05) Doctor's decision.
HGTV 41414141 5342165 Prop Bro: Kristi& Jay Hunters Hunters Addict Addict Addict Addict Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
HIST 81 81 81 81 3365128 Pawn Stars PawnStars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars PawnStars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars PawnStars PawnStars
LIFE 36 363 3652 41 140 Did You Hear About the Morgans? ('09) *12 (HD) Pretty Woman ('90, Romance) *** Businessman hires a prostitute. (R) (:01) Biography (HDP)
NICK 25 252555 2444252 Hathaways Hathiaways Hathaways Hathaways Sponge ISponge Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse IFull Hse Friends IFriends
OWN 58 58585847 10316120/20 Brutal attack. (R) 20/20 Wife murdered. 20/20 Questions arise. 20/20 Manslaughter. (R) 20/20 Sexual slavery. 20/20 Questions arise.
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 315 0 Simonton Says Cobb Hill Susan Graver Style Denim & Co. Carolyn's Closet Denim products.
SPIKE 57 5757572963 54 Cops (R |Cops (R) Cops (R) iCops (R) Cops (R) Cops (R Impact Wrestling (N) (H1) Cops (R ) Cops (R)
SYFY 67 67676725364180 Daybreakers (10) **1'/2 The Faculty Students uncover a school's secret. Resident Evil: Extinction **1'/2 Corp. vs. survivors. The Ruins ('08, Horror)
TBS 5959 59 59326252 Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld IFamily (H) IFamily Big Bang Big Bang Ground IBig Bang Conan (R) (HD)
TM 5 65 65 6 1 Life with Father ('47) A kind, eccentric man raises his The Secret Life of Walter Mitty ('47, Comedy) Danny Billy Liar ('63, Comedy) ***1/2 A blue-collar British
TCM 6656 t5 3 1 son in New York City in the early 1900s. Kaye. A timid man daydreams of adventure. man is known as a liar for his vivid fabrications.
TLC 45 45 45 45 57 72139 Sisters JoAnn visits. (R Sisters Family divided. Sisters Feud to rest. (R) IGypsy Sisters Labor. Gypsy Ireland. (N) (HD) Gypsy Sisters Labor.
Castle: Head Case Castle: Kckthe Ballistics Serial NBA Basketball: Memphis Grizzlies at Houston Rockets from NBA Basketball: Los Angeles
TNT 61 61 61 61 285551 Cryogenic killings. (H) kiler back Toyota Center (Live) (H1)) ) Clippers at Portland Trail Blazers (bLive)
TOON 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 Grandpa Universe JohnyTest TitansGo! Universe IGrandpa Regular Adventure Cleveland Dad (HD) Family IFamily
TRAV 69 69696926066170 Mysteries Lost at sea. Smithsonian (R Bizarre: Hong Kong (R) Mysteries (R) Declassified (R) Mysteries (R)
TRUTV 6363 63 635030183 Dumbest (R Dumbest (R) Jokers (R Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Panic (N) (:01) Top 20 (R
TVL 62 6262 62 31 54 244 Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Raymond: Move Over Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond IQueens
USA 34 34 34342252 50 NCIS: Patriot Down NCIS: Rule Fifty-One NCIS (H1D)) NCIS Psych evaluation. NCIS Terrorist secrets. NCIS Terrorist target.
WE 117117117117 l7149 Will Grace WillGrace WillGrace WillGrace Braxton (1V14) (R) (HD) Braxton (V14 (R(HD Braxton (1V14) ( (H) Braxton (1V14) ( (H)
WGN 16 16 161941 11 9 Home Videos (1VPG) Home Videos (1VPG) How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine (N) How I Met Rules
CNBC 39393939 1 37 102 Mad Money (N) Greed Internet fraud. Greed: The Bling Ring Greed (R Fugitives (R) Mad Money (R)
CNN 32 3232 32 1838 100 Situation ICrossfire Erin Burnett (N) Cooper 360 (N) (HD) Anthony: Congo (1 Anthony: South Africa Cooper 360 (R) (HD)
CSPAN 18 18 18 18 37 12109 U.S. House of Representatives (N) Year in Review: Gun Laws (N) Washington (N) Capital News Today
FNC 646464 64 4871 18 Special Report (N) (HD) On the Record (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 3 8383 83 185 40103 PoliticsNation (N)H(11)) Hardball with Chris (N) All in with Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow (N) Last Word (N) (H11)) Lockup (R) (H11))
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 News (N) News (N) Paid Paid Evening News (N) Paid News (N) News (N) INews (N) News (N) News (N)
CSS 282828284970 Talk Ftbl SEC SEC Hoops ACC Hoops High School Football: Teams TBA (Replay) Hurricane SEC
ESPN 29 29 29291258 70 College Football: 2013 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl: Pittsburgh vs Bowling Green (Live) Collegte Foolball: Utah State vs Northern Illinois (Live) (H1D)
ESPN2 3030 3030 65974 SportsCenter (HD) SportsCenter (HD) IX Games gaped) (HD) ICollege GameDay Film Room (HI)) SportsCenter (H))
FS1 48 484848 4269 83 Football Daily (14D) UFC (11) JUFC Reloaded: UFC 157: Rousey vs. Carmouche (41) )FOX Sports Live (11)
SFSN 72727272 56 77 Icons (11) XterraAdv UFC Ultimate Submissions 2 (11) |Bull Riding (Replay) UFC Unleashed (R) Wrid Poker (Replay)
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Golf Cntrl PGA TOUR Golf: The Barclays: Final Round: from Liberty National Golf Club in Jersey City, N.J. IGolfCntrl PGA TOUR Golf (11D)
NBCS 71 71 71 71 5461 90 Premier League Encore (gaped) lPremier League Encore (Taped) Premier League Encore (aped
SUN 3384014014515776 Playing 3 Wide (R) Xterra World (11D) Ext. Games ISailing ISports Unlimited Ski Classic (14D) Rev 3 Champion (11D)
Good Luck Jessie India Dog Blog Austin &Ally Bolt ('08, Adventure) *** Pampered, Phineasand Dogwitha Jessie (R) Dog with a Austin &Ally
DISN 136136136136 99 45 250 Left for project. (R) (HD) )Talking dog Lovesong. (R) performing dog tries to make cross-country Ferb: Troy BlogStan's (HD) Blog (R) Music industry.
Tennessee. video. (R) journey to find his owner. Story game. (R)
(:20) Aterthe Sunset ('04, Comedy) **1/2 Pierce Brosnan, Resident Evil: Retribution (12, Horror) (:40) Here Comes the Boom (12, Comedy) Kevin James, The Patriot
ENC 150150150150 150350 Salma Hayek. Arare diamond and an FBI agent complicate **The Umbrella Corporation's T-virus Salma Hayek. A teacher becomes MMAfighter for his **12 A
two jewel thieves' retirement, has continued to ravage Earth. school's extra-curricular activities. veteran fights.
(5:30) Beasts of the Southern (:15) James Gandolfini: Getting On Jack the Giant Slayer (13, Adventure) ** 2 Nicholas Ja'rrie: Real Sex Nude beauty
HBO 302 302 302 302 302302400 Wild (12) Louisiana girl looks Tribute to a Friend (R (HD) Calm Hoult. A war between humans and giants erupts when a Private: pageant; sensual mud.
for mother, interrupted, boy opens an entryway. (P6-13) (11)) Episode 5 (R)
Six by Sondheim Life and art of composer Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (13) Broken City ('13, Thriller) **1/2 Mark Wahlberg, Russell Boxing's Best of 2013:
HB02 303 303303303 303303402 explored, highlighting creation of six iconic Former boxer Mike Tyson discusses the Crowe. An ex-cop finds himself in the middle of a scandal Bradleyvs. Marquez
songs. (HD) high and low points in his life. after being hired by a mayor. (R) Welterweighttite. (N)
Meet the Fockers ('04, Comedy) **12 Robert De Niro, The Sopranos: The Happy Game of Thrones: Valar Game of Thrones: Dark Getting On Dodgeball:
HB03 304304304304 304404 Ben Stiller. Greg Focker's fiancee and future in-laws meet Wanderer Tony's Dohaeris Jon meets enemy. Wings, Dark Words Sansa Calm True Under-
his eccentric parents. (PG-13) (HD) resentments. (HD) (HD) talks. (HD) interrupted, dog **1
-- (:15) In Good Company ('05, Comedy) ***k Dennis Quaid, (15) The Campaign (12, Comedy) **1/2 Will Ferrell, Zach Life of Pi (12, Adventure) ***1/2 Suraj Sharma, Irrfan
MAX 320 320320 320 320 320420 Topher Grace. A middle-aged ad executive is assigned to a Galifianakis. An unlikely candidate challenges a long-time Khan. A zookeeper's son is surrounded by loose animals
new, much younger boss. congressman in North Carolina. after a shipwreck. (PG) (11))
(5:10) Mission: Impossible Safe House (12, Action) *** Denzel Washington, Les Misdrables (12) *** A prisoner on the run from a ruthless police (:40) Million
MAX2 321321321321321321422 ('96) An agent tries to clear his Ryan Reynolds. In South Africa, a CIA rookie and a rogue inspector turns his life around and takes in a helpless girl, but he faces a Dollar Baby
good name. agent are attacked by mercenaries, dilemma during Paris' June Rebellion. ('04)
(:15) Intolerable Cruelty ('03, Comedy) **1/2 George Rolling Stones, Sweet Summer Sun (35) Beauty Shop ('05, Comedy) ** Queen Latifah, Alicia The Best Man
SHO 340 340340 340 340340365 Clooney. Successful divorce lawyer falls madly in love with a Hyde Park 2013 ('13) ***1/2 The Silverstone. A hairstylist opens her own salon, but the clientele ('99, Drama)
_____ beautiful gold digger. (PG-13) Rolling Stones live at Hyde Park. (NR) onlywant to gossip. (11))**
Little Fish ('06, Crime) **1C Cate Blanchett, Sam Neill. The Ghost Writer (10, Thriller) *** Ewan McGregor, (.10) Saw II ('05, Horror) *** The Lampoon's
TMC 350 350350 350 350350 385 A recovering addict is pulled into the drug underworld onc Pierce Brosnan. A writer discovers evidence linking a ingenious killer Jigsaw is back for deadly Dirty Movie
again. (R) (11)) politician to the CIA and war crimes, games with eight more victims. (R) ('11)*
aE,,TAzw @. ,, 1 .]r,g.1 l a a.- a a a a i a


Today's Live Sports

6 p.m. ESPN College Football
2013 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
Pittsburgh Panthers vs Bowling
Green Falcons. (L)
8 p.m. TNT NBA Basketball
Memphis Grizzlies at Houston
Rockets from Toyota Center. (L)
9:30 p.m. ESPN College Foot-
ball 2013 San Diego County
Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl
Utah State Aggies vs Northern
Illinois Huskies. (L)
10:30 p.m. TNT NBA Basketball
Los Angeles Clippers at Port-
land Trail Blazers. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morning
America Scheduled: from "12
Years A Slave" actress Sarah Paul-
son; chef Eduardo Garcia. (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
tips for returning holiday gifts;
"Bing's top searches of the year."
(N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: Kelly and
Michael take a look back at recent
interviews. (N)
9:00 a.m. MYN The 700 Club
Scheduled: a woman discusses
how she found it hard to be Godly.
(N)
10:00 a.m. FOX Maury These
couples suspect that one of them
is cheating and take lie detector
tests.
12:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil Scheduled:
the mother of late reality star Gia
Allemand discusses her suicide.
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew From
October: musician 2 Chainz helps
Mario make crab cakes and mango
salsa.
1:00 p.m. MYN The Trisha God-
dard Show Scheduled: updates
on shocking guests from the past
season. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Sched-
uled: even more personal secrets
revealed; actress Valerie Bertinelli.
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Wil-
liams Show Scheduled: from "The
Biggest Loser" contestant Ruben
Studdard.
2:00 p.m. IND The Steve Wilkos
Show Scheduled: a man claims
his ex is threatening to kill their
son. (N)
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors Sched-
uled: weight loss coaches Dan
Marino and Marie Osmond.
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey Sched-
uled: two friends are pushed into a
date to determine if they are more.
(N)
3:00 p.m. IND Jerry Springer
Scheduled: a lack of trust; a sex-
pert fights with a client's girlfriend.
(N)
3:00 p.m. NBC The Dr. Oz Show
Scheduled: research that can help
predict future illnesses based on
body shape.
3:30 p.m. HBO State of Play A look
at parents who obsess over their
kids' athletic abilities and success.
4:00 p.m. ABC The Doctors Sched-
uled: weight loss coaches Dan
Marino and Marie Osmond.
4:00 p.m. FOX Maury Women who
suspect their husbands of cheating
make them prove it. (N)
5:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil Scheduled: a
woman in the middle of a divorce
has turned to Dr. Phil for help.
11:35 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel
Live Scheduled: actress Carey
Mulligan; actor Scott Foley; musi-
cian Jeff Campbell.
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled: radio
show host Howard Stern; come-
dian Adrienne lapalucci.

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv







The' Sun ClsifeEPgF1TIICasyurunNeT HTurda DecmbRK2!01


Let The S


Light Your Way!


Your source for local, national & world news.


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH & BOB JONES
@2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
HAND OF A LIFETIME


Both vulnerable. South deals.

NORTH
*Q7
^0Q107
OQ954
46J1072
WEST EAST
4 A 108652 93
)5 2862
SVoid 0 J10 8 7 3 2
46AKQ954 463
SOUTH
AKJ4
K AKJ943
SAK6
468


The bidding:
SOUTH WEST
1) 14
4) 4A
5? ?


NORTH
2V
Pass


EAST
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: Ace of 46

What was West to do? He had the
hand of a lifetime and he was being
abused by his opponents. West
already considered himself to be the
unluckiest bridge player of all time
and this hand was the proof! Should
he pass, double or bid five spades?


Bidding those spades for a third time
didn't appeal, and neither did double
on a wild hand. West meekly passed
and led his top club when the next
two passed as well.
South didn't catch a very good
dummy, but the little that was there
was golden. Three magical queens
that were worth a trick each! South
had no trouble scoring 11 tricks and
making his contract. He just drew
trumps, forced out the ace of spades
and claimed. South was quick to
point out that West could have done a
bit better by bidding his spades once
again. Five spades would have been
down two, doubled, showing a small
profit against the actual result.
West was disconsolate. He
announced that next week, he would
go bowling instead of playing bridge.
The other three players at the table
chuckled silently. They knew West
would be back at the same table next
week enjoying a game of bridge.

(Tannah Hirsch and Bob Jones
welcome readers' responses sent in
care of this newspaper or to Tribune
Content Agency, LLC., 16650
Westgrove Dr., Suite 175, Addison,
TX 75001. E-mail responses may be
sent to tcaeditors@tribune.com.)


7 Little Words
Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.
>
CLUES SOLUTIONS |

1 comes after (7) _____
2 designed for ocean travel (8) _____
3 stretch too far (11) ______
0
4 falsifying (6) _____ _
5 mode of thought (9) _____0
6 filth (9) _____
7 put down (9) _____


ows


RE


LL


ND


NG


Wednesday's Answers: 1. BEDCHAMBER 2. BARRIERS 3. SPREE
4. BEMOAN 5. CONS 6. GIRDLES 7. VIBRATE 12/26


TT


FAKI


FO


DIR


ESS OING LITY


HYPE LED


TA


XTE


BELl SEAG


MEN


TIN


ACROSS
1 nova
6 Cornfield noises
10 Be an owner
14 Scared-looking
15 Perched
16 Yield to
17 Kind of party
18 A real clown
19 Solar plexus
20 Matterhorn echo
21 Caulks or
varnishes
23 Moines
25 Clergy mem.
26 Nutmeg cousin
29 Weeded
32 Spitting -
37 Ms. Thurman
38 Boost
39 Powerful raptors
40 Go caroling
(4 wds.)
43 Natural
44 Loosen, as a
grip
45 Find practical
46 Run on gravity
47 Visibly cold
48 Centurion's
route
49 Wind dir.
51 Cul-de-
53 Dug
58 Move a fern
62 Stanley
Gardner


Ordered
Bea Arthur
sitcom
Caves, often
Idle or Clapton
World fairs
Hit a fly
Smell strongly
Really nice
people
DOWN
Pamper
Scandinavian
city
Like plow
horses
Break away
Place for a spat
Hansoms
- vera lotion
Magician
Pirated
Fearsome cape
Drive the
getaway car
Poodle pros
Inspect
Drive a Cessna
Glisten
- to my ears
Protein-building
acid
Huge blossom
Again and again
Lionel's sister
Dugout VIP


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED

P E S OIAIS E ORN
OA H UIB I E G E D
T R E S TL -E G AR N ETmS1
NETR E RP EAMO
A B R 0IAIDI REND E E R
BL I NiII UODEACM
B U N IN.ETA O A K
E R GO LI E L I E
S T 10 CK I GES E ELY1
PI LiOI D I DIIIIES

A D E P T||EAR I D LAE
S E O UIL F LOG OSE
S E N SIEIT I K\ E1N
12-26-13 @2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


34 Walrus hunter
35 Some take a
gander
36 Organic
compound
38 Six kittens,
perhaps
39 Hairpin curves
41 Krypton, e.g.
42 Perfume label
word
47 Word of caution
48 K2 gear (2 wds.)
50 Drab, as colors
52 One- bandit


53 Make coffee
54 Wrist-to-elbow
bone
55 Take a snooze
56 McClurg or
Brickell
57 Knock flat
59 Butterfly stage
60 Skunk's defense
61 D'Urberville girl
62 Magazine execs


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, December 26, 2013





Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


S POOL SERVICES
Z ^5165 ^


GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps
*Weekly Maintenance e
941-809-5121 CPC1458222/lns.
Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268
| PRESSURE
CLEANING


A-ZRESPRESSR
WOW% 5180

ACKERS A-Z PRESSURE
CLEANING & MORE
Roofs, Homes, Docks,
pool decks & cages,
Mobile detailing etc... No
job too small. Free Est.
Sr. Disc. 941-929-6775
BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
BENSON'S QUALITY
CLEANING
Pool Cages, Lanais,
Driveways, ETC!
941-697-1749
or 941-587-5007
www.BensonsQualityCleaning.com
PRESSURE WASHING
SERVICE
941-766-0902
PRESENTTHIS AD
WORTH $20 OFFWHOLE HOUSE
FREE ESTIMATES
Pest Eliminators Inc.
LICENSE STATE OF FL #JF138591
LOCAL BUSINESS TAX LICENSE
CHARLOTTE CO. #4998
FL TAX CERTIFICATE #18-8015280394-1

SCREENING
L411:5184 ^

ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779
wescreenflorida.com -
Lic# SA37, AL0511993X


RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/lns.


L ROOFING
444,4 518'5 J


ff0Wo1%W'

Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors & Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE C C C #1325731 & INSURED

JAMES WEAVER ROOFING
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1984. FREE ESTIMATE
941-426-8946
UC#1325995

LEONARD'S ROOFING &
INSULATION INC.
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187
R.L. TEEL ROOFING
Reroofs & Repairs
Insurance Inspections
Veterns Discounts
941-473-7781
RC29027453 Lic/Ins


Fred itin the

Classified!

Reroofing Solutions-Products
for all roof types.
"Why replace when you
can Save it"
A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838

WATER R1UIICo
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
Old Roof Removal Our Specialty
Full Carpentry
Free Estimates
LIC #ccc 068184
FULLY INSURED


SUN



CLASSIFIED


To Place, Correct, or Cancel Ad


CALL






1348 TAIAMI A



Oi H ours M -Fi I i/I PM



Check Out More SUN Classified Ads Online
|o sunnewspapers.net
UPDATED DAILY!!!


WINDOW CLEANING

Z 5225 ^

CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting. Also available
Wallpaper Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845
Serving Sarasota County
TERRY SOWERS
WINDOW CLEANING &
PRESSURE WASHING
Store Fronts, Residential,
and Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES
Accept all Credit Cards
941-697-9439


Great Deals in
the Classifieds!

WE DO WINDOWS &
PRESSURE WASHING.
New Customers e
*Specials Package Deals
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates. Lic./Ins.
(941)-661-5281

6000
q v D


MERCHANDISE
GARAGE SALES


6001
6002
6003
6004
6005
6006
6007
6008
6009
6010
6011
6012
6015
6020


Arcadia
Englewood
Lake Suzy
Nokomis
North Port
Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
Punta Gorda
Rotonda
Sarasota
South Venice
Venice
Out Of Area
Flea Market
Auctions


MERCHANDISE
6013 Moving Sales
6025 Arts & Crafts
6027 Dolls
6030 Household Goods
6035 Furniture
6038 Electronics
6040 TV/Stereo/Radio
6060 Computer Equip
6065 Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
6070 Antiques &
Collectibles
6075 Fruits/Veges
6090 Musical
6095 Medical
6100 Health/Beauty
6110 Trees & Plants
6120 Baby Items
6125 Golf Accessories
6128 Exercise/Fitness
6130 Sporting Goods
6131 Firearms
6132 Firearm Access.
6135 Bikes/Trikes
6138 Toys
6140 Photography/Video
6145 Pool/Spa & Supplies
6160 Lawn & Garden
6165 Storage Sheds/
Buildings
6170 Building Supplies
6180 Heavy Constr.
Equipment
6190 Tools/Machinery
6220 Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
6225 Restaurant Supplies
6250 Appliances
6260 Misc. Merchandise
6270 Wanted to Buy/T rade
AUCTIONS
6 /
2020


JACK ROBILLARDi
CAI, AARE
Auctioneers & Appraisers
(941)-575-9758


ARTS AND CRAFTS

Z 6025 ^

ARTIST FRAMES 3 24 X 18,
1 20 X 16 $100 941-629-
4857
LOOKING FOR SOMEONE To
Create Stuffed Animals With
My 2 Fur Coats. 941-223-7901
7 DOLLS
LW ^ 6027S


DOLL CLOWN Mint condition
original box $25
941-451-0964
DOLL GROUCHO MARX
Mint condition original box $25
941-451-0964
DOLL LIBERACE Mint condi-
tion original box $25
941-451-0964
DOLL TEDDY RUXPIN Excel-
lent condition orig box $25
941-451-0964
DOLLS THE ROOSEVELT
Mint condition original boxs
$25 941-451-0964
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
L 6030 ^


5-PIECE DINETTE 59x42
table, 4 caster chairs $50
317-443-3125

PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!
FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BEDROOM SET white, misc.
furn., collectible 2 oz alcohol
bottles, bikes. 941-249-1053.
BOHEMIAN CHINA Dinner-
ware service for 12 $150
941-429-9305
CINDERLLIA LIGHT blue,8yrs
old,11l" tall. $10 941-740-
3286
THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSING AT
NOON ON TUESDAY-
CHRISTMAS EVE
AND WILL BE
CLOSED CHRISTMAS
DAY.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am, Thursday,
December 26th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Tuesday, 12/24,
10:30 am for
Wednesday, 12/25
and Thursday, 12/26
We Wish Everyone a
Merry Christmas!
COMFORTER/SHAMS
FULL, like new. Jacquard. $25
941-275-5700
ELECTROLUX VACUUM
cleaner with attachments $50
941-743-0582
ENTERTAIN/CENTER
7X6,glass doors, A 1,new
$175 941-637-3801
GAS GRILL-TABLE-CHAIRS
REAL GOOD SHAPE $200
941-429-7914
GE 27" Wall Oven Black GE 27
"Wall Oven, BI $350 941-484-
8520
GRILL GEORGE FOREMAN
Grill in good shape $20
941-258-0800
HAAN STEAM System II used
once ex-cond $45 941-623-
6414
HAVILAND CHINA 12PI Ele-
gant Cream/Gold Tri $499
941-347-8825


HOUSEHOLD GOODS

Z :^ 6030 ^

BLINDS FAUX WOOD 2 IN.
(3) sets $15 941-468-2752
LANAI SET WHITE, GOOD
CONDITION, 4 CHAIRS $100
941-740-3286
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New-Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550



FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**

SUNIM
I- h -I M~S"A'RS



NEW CANASTA Card Game
NewCardslnvented $20 941-
726-1628
PILLOWS PINEAPPLE Satin
41g/9sm Gre $100
941-681-2433
REFRIGERATOR
WHIRLPOOL Excellent cond.
SxS $300 941-676-2667
REFRIGERATOR 27"
haeir works $32
941-626-1226
SEWING MACHINE Singer. x-
cond. $65 920-470-5014
SINK STAINLESS 60/40 size
32x 20.75 under $115 941-
484-8520
STEAM CLEANER Mop Thane
Housewares #H-20 $25
941-235-2017
STEAM System II Haan used
once ex-cond $45
941-623-6414
TOYOTOMI PORTABLE air
conditioner/heater TOY $75
765-730-0139
WATER COOLER SUNBEAM
2 five gal. jugs incl. $40
336-869-8668
HOLIDAY ITEMS
L 6031 ^

AFGANS 2 Mint or Ivory
80x80 Queen size $25
941-681-2433
CHRISTMAS
NETTING/GARLAND Wreath
41/2' $50 941-347-8825
CHRISTMAS ORNAMENTS
NEW collectibles $50 941-
429-9305
CHRISTMAS TREE,GAR-
LAND 41/2 Ltd Wreath $75
941-347-8825
CHRISTMAS WREATH 3 foot
diameter blue spruce $15
941-228-1745
NEW CRYSTAL Champagne
Set BEAUTIFUL $50 941-429-
9305
|FUJRNITURE
L 6035 ^

4-SHELF, GLASS brass,
finnish 72Hx33Wx12D, $110
718-986-3608


FURNITURE /
L ^ 6035 ^


ARMOIR, Large, Maple, Like
New Condition. $275, OBO
941-429-8498
BAKERS RACK metal w/wine
shelf $75 941-766-7466
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED FRAME QUEEN /KING
W/CENTER SUPPORT $25
941-468-2752
BED HIDE A WAY Used one
week double $175
941-830-2802
BEDROOM SET 7 piece king
bed triple dress $450
864-704-3504
BOX SPRING, Queen, Can
Deliver BoxSpring $50
941-379-5586
CURIO DISPLAY Cabinet Rus-
tic oak, beautiful $450
941-999-0178
DINETTE SET 5pc round
dinette set, drop leaf $299
941-743-4742
DINING TABLE & 6 Chairs
Oak $299 941-426-1205
DINING TABLE Glass top,
black & white w/6 chairs $80
941-626-9027
DROP LEAF TABLE Seats 8
w/ leaves up..solid maple
$100 941-258-0810
ENTER.CTR. W/DOORS &
end curios(oak)+ 37" $325
941-637-3801
FUTON BED Like New Solid
Wood 7" mattress $350
757-630-3009
HEADBOARD FULL metal
design, ivory/gold $35
941-275-5700
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
KITCHEN TABLE 6 chairs 1
removable leaf $100
941-830-2802
LAZYBOY RECLINER mirco
fiber comfortable orig 900.00
$175 941-580-4460
LAZYBOY SWIVAL
rocker/recliner orig 600.00
$175 941-580-4460
I NEED CASH? I
LAZYBOY WALL hugger
leather for smaller area $185
941-580-4460
LOUNGER WHITE WICKER
white wicker lounger $80
609-972-7452
MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
PATIO SET 6 Chairs, frosted
glass top. Exc $105 941-564-
6904
RATTAN LOVE Seat Cushions
need reco $25 941-661-7092
ROCKER, LADIES petite
Refinished, CA 1930 $30
941-266-6718
ROLLTOP DESK and Chair set
(childs) CA1920 $225 941-
266-6718
SOFA ,Full Size, Pillow Top,
Light Blue. Excellent Condition.
$100 941-623-6762
SOFA BROWN, 1 yr old. Plush
& comfy $175 941-429-9305
SOFA,BURGUNDY,82LX39
W36H NEW-COND.MI $295
718-986-3608
SPIDER LAMP 5 domes
w/Ites. brass $65
941-496-7569
STRESSLESS SUNRISE
recliner, large, color-rock,
swivel table lyr old. New
$2395 asking only $1400
CASH! 941-815-8593

ELECTRONICS
^^ 6038 ^

AT&T SAMSUNG Galaxy Note
II 16GB Gray New $330
941-763-0018





The Sun Classified Page 16 EN;C.


adsyoursun.net


Thursday, December 26, 2013


I ELECTRONICS
^ 6038 ^

CELL PHONE ZTE Merit jy
ST. Works great! $20
941-235-1006
NINTENDO 2DS Bundle 2DS,
Pokemon X, Case S150
941-585-9331
1 TVNtSTERE(-/RADIO

1111 6040 _

HDTV 27" sanyo new
,,oridilion $50 941-915-2435
HDTV 27" SANYO NEW CON.
DITION $50 941-915-2435
STEREO SYSTEM w/ Bose
speakers & Karaoke System
$275. 941-627-6034
STEREO SYSTEM, Sony,
Like New, includes turn table,
tuner amp, power amp, dou-
ble cassette deck & multi play
compact disc player.
(Manual included) $250
941-204-8403
TV 32" SIANYO tube tv works
great. $25 941-275-5700
TV 37", Flat/HD,multi
nrput.excellenl $160 941-
637-3801
TV 46" Sharp aquos high defi-
rition 1080p $350
941-429-8507
COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
6(M060"'
BROTHER PRINTER all in
One In bo-New! J470 $65
941-575-9800
KEY BOARD works good $10
941-228-1745
LAPTOP CASE 17" Targus
case. Brand New, nev 532
941412-9090
MONITOR 22" Viewsoric
w/buit-iri speakers Ml $95
9414129090
PRINTER CANO works good
wvirh manuals $15
941-228-1745
CLOTHING / JEWELRY
L ACCESSORIES


LEATHER SKIRT Black, size
7/8 slim, $25 412418-5784

_1P .A


MINKS:
BLOND MINK CAPE LARGE
SIZE & DARK MINK COAT
LARGE SIZE GREAT COND.
S250/EA 941-204-3734
WESTERN BOOTS real snake
skin like new size 8.5 $25
941-766-7466
ScoXNTIQLES
COLLECTIBLES
^ ^ 6070 ^1


LOGOI
ACTIVELY BUYING!
Antiques Paintings; All Sub-
ie'ct, Silver. Ivory. Jewelry, Ori-
ental Rugs. New England
Items Anythring Unusual or of
Quality! Local 941-306-8937
ALARM CLOCK ROY ROGERS
New with box $15
941-623-0346
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
ANTIQUE OAK Vanity Pretty
piece-3 way mirror. $200
941-575-9800
BB GUN ROY ROGERS EC
with box $150 941-623-0346
CASH PAID"-any old mili
tary Jterns, swords, medals,
unitormvs, old guns. Dom
(9411-416-3280


L ANTIQUES
I COLLECTIBLES I
6070 ^

CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941488-8531
All war News- Venice**
COIN CANADA 1907 one
cent Newfoundland bronze
$145 941-697-6592
COIN CANADA silver dollar
Voyageur 1959 coil 545 941-
697-6592
COIN ENGLISH 1890 crown
silver fine rare $125 941-697-
6592
COIN GERMAN 1937A 5
Reichmndrk Hinderburg rare
*J55 941-697-6592
COMIC BOOKS BATMAI-
SUPERMAN $1
941496-7569
COMIC BOOKS DC super-
heros 80's -90's Sl each
941496-7569
CURIO, LIGHT oak anhque
with key AntiQue $199
609-972-7452
GORHAM DOLLS (12) Since
1980, Musical, stamped. Mint
cond. in original boxes. Paid
$500,'ea Asking $60.each
941-4519580
LONGENBERGER GOLF
GLOBE GIac i globe golf ball
$10 941-25&0810
NEW HAVEN CLOCK 1880
Round Gothic $125 941-629-
4857
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TrrANTic Great
gift $25 941-4183-8531
ROAD -GRADER Tonker-Toy
pressed USA steel coll $40
941-6976592
THERMOS ROY ROGERS
early 60's EC $20
941-623-0346
M MUSICAL. /
L 60"0 _

BEGINNING PIANO LESSONS,
For Adults, 16-99. Englewood.
45 min./$20 941468-6899
ESTEBAN GUITAR & AMP
*CASE $225 941-391-6211
GUITAR AMP PEAVEY great
for beginner $60
941-623-0346
/ MEDICAL /



BACK PAIN stimulator with
new pads $250
941-743-0582
BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296
LIFT CHAIR reclining lift chair
6 n-tlris old $425 call $425
941-915-2435
MEDICAL BEDS, 2, 40" x
80", Primo Manufacturing, Pd.
900 $200 941-979-0740
SCOOTER, PRIDEZchair,
new-cond.4wheel4 $470 718-
986 3608
TREES & PLANTS



BAMBOO ANGEL'S Mist $35
941-833-3326
GRAPEFRUIT TREES Red
Sweet $45 941-204-9100
HAWAIIAN TI plant $30 941-
833-3326
KEY LIME Citrus $20
941-204.9100
I Advertise Today! I
MAHOGANY HIBISCUS Flow-
ering $15 941-204-9100
MAHOGANY HIBISCUS Flow-
ering $15 941-204-9100


TREES & PLANTS
^^ 6110 ^



VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL,SYLVESTER PALMS
PiGMYw PALMS & MORE
Si's NUSURY 941-488-7291
PAPAYA RED Fruiting $10
9412049100r
L BABY ITEMIS
^ 61'20 ^

DOUBLE STROLLER graco
Quattro tour duo stroller $75
941-429-8507
HIGH CHAIR eddie bauer
wooden high chair. (2) $25
941-429-8507
GOLF ACCESSORIES

Z 6125 ^

2007 CLUB CAR GOLF
CART DS 4 Passenger, Red,
new batteries, back seal &
paint. $3395 941-716-6792
BAG BOYS 3 Wheel Cart +
Bag $75 9416251537
DRIVER, ADAMS RPM 460
RHR. 10 5*, draw, exc cond
$65 9414887774
GOLF BALL monogramer
$10 941-228-1745
GOLF BALLS ike new, no
scutt's, logos or markings $5
a dozen 941488-7774
GOLF CLUBS Tieist 822
Irons 3-SW Steel&nbs:p $200
941-697-8776
GOLF SHOES-DEXTER $20
920470-5013
LADIES GOLF CLUBS,
Orlimar Hybrid Iron 4 SW
$250 941-697-81/6
LADY FAIRWAY-HYBRIDS
Irons + Woods. $80 941-625-
1537


MERRY CHRISTMAS!!
Yellow Club Car Golt Cart
4 Passenger, new batteries,
paint & lights, TOTALLY
REBUILT! GREAT CONDITION
$2395 941-716-6792
SET POWERBILT clubs and
Bag $150 941-575-9800
XMAS SPECIAL!
2010 CLUB CAR GOLF
CART PRECEDENT
New batteries (11/13). new
"Steel Blue" paint, folding
rear seat. As new $4250
941-830-5312

EXERCISE/
FITNESS
~6128~

BAYOU FITNESS Total Gym
Trainer + Pilates $300 941-
763-0018
COMPACT HAND WEIGHT
STORAGE RACK $38 941-
235 9600
ELLIPTICAL-WESLO
MOMENTUM G3.8 $100
941.268-5227
EXERCISE BENCH golds
gym $49 941.235-9600
EXERCISE BIKE Diamond-
back. $350 obo. 941-627-
6034
HAND WEIGHTS $100
941-763-0018
NORDICTRACK ELLIPTICAL
$250 941-270-7458
RECUMBENT EXERCYCLE
$100 941-445-9069
RELAXOR MASSAGE Pad
$55 941-235-9600
TREADMILL PRO Form 495
LS Crosswalk 595
941-626-3142


SPORTING GOODS

Z^6130 ^

2 GUYS GUN|
SHOW
JAN 4TH & 5TH
Port Charlotte
Charlotte County
Fairgrounds
2333 El Jobean Rd
Buy-Sell-Trade
New-Used
FREE Parking
CWP Classes Avail.
Sat 9-5 and Sun 9-4
727-776-3442
www.nextgunshow.com
AIR HOCKEY TABLE
GOOD CONDITION $250
941-380-0530
ANCHOR FORTRESS fx.7
cast aluminum 4lib.s $65
941-639-0591
BINOCULARS FUJINON
7A50 with buil in compass. Go
$65 941-639-0591
CASTING FURNACE lee bul-
let casting furnace 2 $60
9416244244
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine. Oak, or Citrus
Split. Bundled, and ready for
the hirepit!
941-468-4372
Seize the sales
with Classified!
FISHING PENN Reel 850ss
2 Custom Mainre) Ro $125
941-681.2433
HOCKEY SKATES Bauer
914, black, size 7. $50
412418-5784
MITCHELL 306&300 REELS
ROD & TACKLE $55
941429-7914
NASCAR RADIOS Great
shape. Radio Shack Nascar
S50 941-258-0800
SKIM BOARD Blue wtblack.
40x21. $20 412-418-5784
FIREARMS
^^ 61i31 l

COLT WOODSMAN, 4" brl,
22 L.R. Fine, walnut grips, org
box, ammo, lock, holster.
$450 941-923-2920



GUN & KNIFE SHOW
LaBelle Civic Center
481 W HiVpcchee Ave
(SR80) LaBelle. F;.
Sat 12/28 9-Spmn and
Sun 12/29 9-4pm.
Admission $5.00 under 12
FREE & FREE PARKING CWP
Classes $49.95 1 lam & 1pm
daily. Lee Conty Gun
Colectors LLC.
(239Y-223-3370
BUY-SELL-TRADE
www.gunshowsflorida.com
I-igr Power Outfitters
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
Guns*Ammo*CCW
Financing Available!!
Buy*Sell*Trade
941-347-8445
KEL-TECK, 9MM w/ Crimson
Trace Red Laser, $450.,
HENRY SURVIVAL RIFLE,
22 Semi Automatic, $250.,
REMINGTON BOLT ACTION
22 Long, Rifle, $125. (941)-
258-5683

7 BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
Lt 6135a

BICYCLE 1950'S Ladies
columbia original 1950 $300
941-698-1951
MENS GIANT Cypress med.
2011 ike new $350 941-639-
5479
MENS MOUNTAIN Bike MON-
GOOSE 200XR.21 speed $75
573-201-6810


TOYS
^^ 6138 ^

TRAIN SET lionrrel $200 941-
474-7291


CAMERA CANNON REBEL
XSI, 18 to 55 lens bat charger
2 batn.. 4G SD card, Camera
bag $225 94[-681-2076
VIDEO/PHOTO slik -4pod
Model U5500 22-56 inch $25
941-661-7092
rPOOL/SP.-V
I & SUPPLIES
ht6145~

Local Manufacturer
offering to sell direct
to public! 05 Pli oN
S'ix S 1805. SwiM SPA
L(UJ ,i n $799)54 FIFI ii-
,IA 1 0KIX ,i 1 fM0 $67ff)
LOCAL: 941-421-0395





Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941 4684372
GARDEN NOME JOE MAD-
DON new in the box $50
941-228-1745
LAWN MOWER 19" WORX
Battery Powered $80
941475-0063
PRESSURE WASHER Husky/
Honda motor 2600 $150
951-698-1951
RYOBI 18V weed wacker with
batt &charger $40
941-743-0582
TOP SOIL For Sale' 'lease
call: 941-468-4372
TRANSMISSION FOR TORO
21332 w/b mower. $35 207-
319-6141
FSYORAGE SEDS/
I BUILDINGS
~6165~

HURRICANESHED.COM
FENCED YARD....
TIGHT SPACES...NO PROBLEM!
941-626-4957
LICENSE # CBC 1259336

BUILDING
SULIPPLIES
LWt116170~
FLOORING LAMINATE
12rnrn with pad 250 sq. ft.
$400 941 4298507
LADDER RACKS for 5' Cargo
trai $35 941-626-1226
TEMP CONTROL NEW
HONEYWELL T991A $100
941.429-7914

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!

TOOLS/ NLACHINERY
Z: 6190

BUSH HOOK for curtinrrg small
trees etc. $25 941.585-8149
CORDLESS TOOL set ayobi
18 volt combo cit bnib $75
714-599-2137
CRAFTSMAN SAW 10"com-
pound miter & stand $175
941-766-7466
PIPE THREADER (Ridgid) 5
dies exc.cond. $120
94l 5858149


TOOLS/ MACHINERY
z^ 61910

PUSH BROOM large bristles
heavy duty $8 941-585-6149
RYOBI TOOL chest 11 pc 18&
$150 941-623-6414
SAWSALL CRAFTSMAN w/
blades $35 941-756-7466
SCROLL SAW ryobi 16 in.
variable speed good $50
941-698-1951
SHOP VAC wet-dry 16 gal.
$20 941-625-7900
TABLE SAW 10' ryobi good
condition $100
941-698-1951
WEEDWACKER STIHL model
FS-44 Good condition $50
941-475-9689
SOFFICMBUSINESS
I EQtiJPJSUPLIESI
Z 6220~

OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Preowned & new office furniture.
VENICE 941485-701 5
CATS
L^ 6232 ^

NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that 311 dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi
cial iealti certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
DOGS
^ 60233 ^

NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that 311 dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti.
nal and external parasites.
| ClassItied =: Salaes I
HAVANESE 9 weeks. M/F.
Health certificate. Paper
trained. 941-223-0301
6hMNNM.-Af11


ACA Puppies. 904-955-4525
SHIH TZU'S Now taking
deposits $50 19411 )391-5969
YORKIE Pups 2)-IM-1IF, (3)
Std Poodle Pups-1F-2M, will
hold for Xmas. 941-764-6036

I & SERVICES


A & R Aqua Pros Inc
Aquarium Services
Installation-Maincenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
941-441-8658 Lic/Ins
BIRD CAGE 1 Lg bird cage
niceS150. + small cage avail.
5100. 941-456-2471
WIRE DOG CAGE & tray 36"d
x 22"w x 24"t $50.00
863-993-1941
APPLLtiNCES
"f^ 6250

DEHUMIDIFIER WHIRLPOOL
Top Rated Model $149
760-579-3232
DRYER W/ATTACHED
DRY CLEANING UNIT
Maytag Neptune
White. Exc. Cond.
$250, 941-204-8403
GE 2013 convection stove
NICE $425 941-999-0178
REFRIGERATOR KENMORE
TopFrez 22cf whte 2yr $450
941-235-2017





Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


APPLIANCES
L ^ 6'250 ^


MIXER KITCHEN Aid Classic
$135 941-661-2950
STACK W/D Dryer works
great, washer bangs $60
941-345-7743
WASHER & Dryer Kenmore
front-load,clean $225
947-475-6261
WASHER MAYTAG 2yrs old
$175 941-697-8146
Washers, dryers, refrigera-
tors & stoves w/warranty
$100 & up. 941-468-8489
WASHING MACHINE,
Whirlpool High Efficiency Eco
Boost. $250. 603-300-6091
MISCELLANEOUS
L 6260 ^


15' COLLAPSABLE rv sewer
hose Brand new condi $20
941-626-9027
AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
ToP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
AIR HOCKEY 8x4 gameroom
table paid 1200.00 $250
941-380-0530
BASKET GIFT-LG and small
different size baskets $15
941-496-9252
BBQ GRILL Char-Broil Patio
electric W/cover. $100 941-
474-0542
BOOKS HARDBACK Cus-
slerPatterson. clancy $2 941-
828-3636
BOOKS PAPERBACK,
Cussler, Patterson, Rollins.
$1 ea. 941-828-3636
CEILING FANS White,
matching like new $30 each
941-661-2667
CRAB TRAPS New
w/Rope,Float,Zinc,Rebar $35
941-830-0998
DISCS FOR frisbee golf
assort ea $5 941-743-0582
FIREWOOD PINE fire wood
free $1 941-441-7171
FIREWOOD SEASONED split
oak 1/2 facecord FREE DELY
$120 941-526-7589
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372


JUMBO SHRIMP and
STONE CRAB ARRIVING Now
FREE DELIVERY
941-249-4665
LARGE OUTSIDE bird cage
for under tree $65
941-743-0582
MASSAGE VIDEO PRE-NATAL-
ART-OF-MASSAGE VIDEO $20
941-496-9252
MOTORCYCLE COVER for
large bike exc. cond. $70
941-585-8149
POOL TABLE WITH QUEUES
BALLS.FULL SIZE $500 941-
697-6553
RIMS 20" CHROME GM 6
lug, fair shape. $175
941-270-7458
STAIN GLASS HANGING
LAMP OLD $60
727-906-1754
TELEPHONE CORDLESS 2
with answ. sys. AT+T $20
941-585-8149
TRAINS-WOOD-HAND-
CARVED, BEAUTIFUL gift
Nice $22 941-496-9252
TREE-OUTSIDE-ANTIQUE-
METAL-LITES XMAS tree
$45 941-496-9252


BUY/TRADE
W4^ 6270 i



Cash paid FOR WWI WWII
Korean Vietnam,German,
Japanese, etc Military items
(941)416-3280


7000






TRANSPORTATION

| BUICK
L ^ 7020 J


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

LS CF 1."OF
1 R A L o13 -sk"


2001 BUICK PARK AVENUE,
Beautiful Ride!
$5,988. 941-639-1601 DIr
1992 BUICK PARK AVENUE
Low Miles! New Tires/Batt.
Garage Kept! Must See!
$2,700. 941-716-2602
2005 BUICK LACROSSE
58,720 mi, $10,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL 59k act. mi., very clean
$9500 941-979-6234
IADV ERTISE!]

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE
50K $25,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 BUICK LACROSSE
NAVI, 13K $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR

THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSING AT
NOON ON TUESDAY-
CHRISTMAS EVE
AND WILL BE
CLOSED CHRISTMAS
DAY.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am, Thursday,
December 26th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Tuesday, 12/24,
10:30 am for
Wednesday, 12/25
and Thursday, 12/26
We Wish Everyone a
Merry Christmas!

CADILLAC
Lw 7030


2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE
58K $7,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2005 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
40k mi., pristine, 1 sen. owner,
$11,995 828-777-5610 Cell
2007 CADILLAC XTS
29,923 mi, $12,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 CADILLAC CTS
35K $17,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 CADILLAC DTS, 16K
Miles! Mint Condition! $20,988.
941-625-2141 #1 Used Car Deale-
2012 CADILLAC CTS
39K $28,988
877-211-8054 DLR


CADILLAC
L 7~030 ^


2012 CADILLAC ESCALADE
40K $51,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 CADILLAC XLR
13,956 mi, $34,950
877-219-9139 DIr
7 CHEVY

L 7040 ^


2000 CHEVY CORVETTE
80K $15,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2002 CHEVY CAMARO
Let's have Fun in the Sun.
Cony., 35th anniv edition, very
well maintained, only 107K mi,
Great Florida car or school car.
Call Barry 941-735-7925
2004 CHEVY CORVETTE
Conv., mag.red/blk, auto, 41K
$23,900 OBO 941-697-8776
2005 CHEVY CAVALIER,
Low Miles!
$3,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2005 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
$9345 Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 CHEVROLET IMPALA
$9995, Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 HONDA PILOT EXL,
Loaded! 3rd Row Seat!!
$10,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2010 CHEVY COBALT
41K $11,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 CHEVROLET AVEO
22,542 mi, $11,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CHEVY CORVETTE
13K $37,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 CHEVY MALIBU LT,
Loaded! 23K Miles! $14,988.
941-625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
CHRYSLER



1999 CHRYSLER LEBARON
Convertible, 65k. act. mi., exc.
cond. $3500 941-286-5755
2001 CHRYSLER 300M
Extremely Nice Car! $5995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 CHRYSLER SEBRING
LTD, CONV., $5995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
67,799 mi, $8,754
877-219-9139 DIr
SEmploy Classified!I
2008 CHRYSLER ASPEN
54,820 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 CHRYSLER PT
CRUISER 80,462 mi, $5,987
877-219-9139 DIr
DODGE
L v 7060 ^


2000 DODGE INTREPID ES
4Dr, V6, Auto, ACIoaded. 71K
orig mi., Lthr, keyless entry,
new tires, 1 sr. owned,
garaged., exc. cond. inside/
out. $3500 941-468-8083
2005 DODGE NEON
Only $6495!! Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 GRAND CARAVAN
Was $7995 Now $6987
941-916-9222 DIr.
2009 DODGE RAM150
46K $27,911
877-211-8054 DLR

| FORD
7 0 "7070 ^

2002 FORD MUSTANG GT
PREMIUM CONV. Auto, air,
leather, loaded. Premium
1000 watt sound, good
condition. 59k miles. $9500
OBO 941-387-4485


I FORD
0 070 ^


2000 FORD TAURUS
Runs well $1800
678-873-0520
2003 FORD MUSTANG
32K $9,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2003 FORD RANGER,
Supercab Pick-up, Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
SAdvertise Today!
2003 FORD TAURUS
WAGON $6995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 FORD MUSTANG
CONV, Blue Beauty! $10,988.
941-639-1601, DIr P.G.
2009 FORD FOCUS 49,086
mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EXPLORER
14,046 mi, $27,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EXPLORER
47,024 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD MUSTANG
27,839 mi, $17,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 FORD FLEX
30,143 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 DODGE JOURNEY
23,925 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 FORD EDGE
LTD 23K $29,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 FORD MUSTANG
21,058 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr



FREE MERCHANDISE ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
SUN-CLASSIFIEDS.COM
and place your ad.
"CLICK ON CLICK HERE
TO PLACE YOUR AD NOW"
and follow the prompts.
FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 5 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**Everyone Needs to
Register on Our
New Site**
SUN'1 1
11MffAPERS

24 h ToursI ,lO a l#rda 7 dahys w. el e k


GMC
L 7075C ^


2011 GMC C15
42K $36,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 GMC SIERRA 1500
DENALI 53,556 mi,
$37,854 877-219-9139 DIr
7 J7EEP
L ^ 7080P ^


2007 JEEP LIBERTY,
4x2 Low Miles! $12,988
941-639-1601 DIr.

LINCOLN
L 7090 ^


2006 LINCOLN LS, V8, Loaded!
HOT! $9,988. 941-625-2141
#1 Used Car Deer


L MERCURY
4OZ 7100 ^


1999 MERCURY SABLE
V6, exc mpg, 107k 4dr, all Ithr
loaded $2,900 941-627-5159





2005 MERCURY MONTEGO
32,290 mi, 4 cyl., $7,000
941-698-0600
2009 GMC SIERRA
49,818 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 MERCURY BASE
57,049 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 GMC SIERRA
14,708 mi, $48,795
877-219-9139 DIr

1 PONTIAC
ow 4:713'0


1995 PONTIAC
GRANDPRIX 55,893 mi,
$3,987 877-219-9139 DIr
2002 PONTIAC FIREBIRD,
Only 90K Miles!
$4,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
| SATURN
L v^:71U35


PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


98 SW2 Wagon
01 SL1 Sedan
02 L200 Sedan
04 Ion Sedan
04 Vue SUV
06 Vue SUV
06 Saturn Vue
08 Vue SUV


$2,500
$2,800
$3,499
$3,400
$4,200
$5,899
$6,099
$7,800


Used Saturn Parts & Service
941-627-8822

USED CAR DEALERS

Z^ 7137


Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here

ACURA
^^ 7145 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

LEIKVS OIF g~iR~5sTf





1995 ACURA INTEGRA,
4cyl., power, Clean $1500
740-815-7900 Lake Suzy
2006 ACURA 3.2rL
68K $15,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 ACURA 3.2TL
7,263 MILES $31,990
877-211-8054 DLR

| BMW
Lmvm 71748 ^


2010 BMW 6501
7,462 MILES $49,990
877-211-8054 DLR
NEED rASg
Have A Garage
Sale!


HONDA
7160


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054

LE1'JS UF SOISOn
1991 HONDA CIVIC
160,202 mi, $3,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 HONDA ELEMENT
119,702 mi, $8,957
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD
108,788 mi, $9,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD EXL
77,158 mi, $11,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V
64,446 mi, $15,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
61,212 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC
57,901 mi, $13,685
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC HYBRID
69,782 mi, $12,584
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ELEMENT
60,360 mi, $16,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 MAZDA CX7
71,133 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 SUBARU LEGACY
80,946 mi, $13,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
36,615 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
66,011 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CR-V
CERT., 44,659 mi, $16,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 MINI COOPER
S, 60,271 mi, $15,575
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
24,462 mi, $15,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
36,015 mi, $12,454
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
54,388 mi, $12,890
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
42,239 mi, $17,458
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
CERT., 56,555 mi, $18,990
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V,
15,399 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
29,249 mi, $11,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
34,672 mi, $13,958
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 MERCEDES C300
46,597 mi, $21,548
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
18,396 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
29,998 mi, $17,998
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
30,991 mi, $15,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
31,645 mi, $18,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
35,050 mi, $15,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
35,420 mi, $16,854
877-219-9139 DIr





The Sun Classified Page 18 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Thursday, December 26, 2013


HONDA
0 160 ^


2011 HONDA CIVIC
20,341 mi, $14,578
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
34,621 mi, $12,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
34,844 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
CERT., 35,081 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
19,301 mi, $22,498
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
24,873 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
27,234 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
29,940 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
36,013 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
38,727 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT., 16,087 mi, $19,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
CERT., 28,040 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CROSSTOUR,
Loaded! 20K Miles! $18,988.
941-625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2011 KIASORENTO
47,404 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
19,809 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
33,519 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
34,478 mi, $17,452
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
10,308 mi, $16,458
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT., 16,112 mi, $17,896
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT., 20,705 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT., 5,071 mi, $20,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
42,229 mi, $22,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
CERT 18,239 mi, $25,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-Z
CERT., 35,594 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
7,764 mi, $20,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
8,989 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CIVIC HF
6,155 mi, $18,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ELEMENT
35,748 mi, $20,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2014 HONDA ACCORD
4,151 mi, $28,975
877-219-9139 DIr
(-GET RESULTS--\
USE CLASSIFIED!
2014 HONDA CR-V
2,883 mi, $26,987
877-219-9139 DIr

L HYUNDAI
7163

2007 HYUNDAI SANTAFE
68K $13,990
877-211-8054 DLR


L HYUNDAI MINI COOPER
omwa:7163 Lltm: 71092


2007 NISSAN XTERA
51,992 mi, $14,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HYUNDAI SONATA LTD,
Loaded! $9,988. 941-625-2141
#1 Used Car Dealer
2009 HYUNDAI ACCENT
39,124 mi, $8,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HYUNDAI TUCSON
46,619 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SANTAFE
59,176 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE,
Like New! $15,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Ca-rDealer
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
20K $17,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
Limited SE, S/R, GPS, 24K
$17,500 OBO 941-875-9008
2012 HYUNDAI STERLING
16,612 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
JAGUAR
7175


2004 JAGUAR XJ8
65K $11,990
877-211-8054 DLR
| LEXUS
L ^ 7178S ^

2004 LEXUS RX330
59K $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2004 LEXUS RX330
77K $16,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2005 LEXUS E330, Drop Dead
Gorgeous! $10,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Ca-rDealer
2007 LEXUS IS250
56K $17,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 LEXUS LS460
72K $29,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 LEXUS LS460L
CERT., 44K $35,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS ES350
71K $16,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 LEXUS LS460
CERT. 54K $37,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS HS250H
CERT. 39K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS LS460
CERT. 41K $39,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 LEXUS IS250
46,962 mi, $25,478
877-219-9139 DIr
S Classifie = Sales

LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
WIFF.L- E
IEMN- OU F CI
2013 LEXUS RX350
CERT., 12K $40,990
877-211-8054 DLR
/ MERCEDES /
4Z^7190

2004 MERCEDES C230
Excellent Condition! Only 73K
Miles! $7,150. 941-223-0946
2006 MERCEDES CLK3500, 2
Dr Coupe! Must See! $14,988.
941-625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2009 MERCEDES SL550R
19K $52,990
877-211-8054 DLR


2007 MINI COOPER, Red!
Double Moon Roof! $12,988
941-639-1601 P.G. DIr
L MITSUBISHI
L 71959 'S'


2010 MITSUBISHI OUT-
LANDER 48,216 mi,
$15,950 877-219-9139 DIr
SNISSAN
7 7 00 ^

2004 NISSAN 350Z
34K $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2006 NISSAN 350Z, 6 Speed!
Must See! $12,988. 941-625-
2141 #1 Used Ca-rDealer
2009 NISSAN CUBE
43,705 mi, $10,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN FRONTIER
63,890 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN MURANO
83,646 mi, $16,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 NISSAN JUKE
15,237 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 NISSAN SENTRA
"AS IS" 11K $13,911
877-211-8054 DLR
SPORTS CARS
L 1::7205 ^

2006 MAZDA MIATA Grand
Touring, 55k mi, all options,
Silver/ Brown top/tan leather,
Inclds 2yr warr. $10,000
781-572-8215
2006 PONTIAC SOLSTICE
auto, black, 21K mi, super
clean $12,500 941-505-5520


Convertible, 19,900 mi.,
$23,900 941-626-9053

SUBARU
^ 7207 ^

2010 SUBARU OUTBACK
60K $16,988
877-211-8054 DLR
SUZUKI



2010 SUZUKI GRANDVITARA
18,424 mi, $14,575
877-219-9139 DIr
TOYOTA
Y2 7100 ^


LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
W/ILD
LEKUS OF SaAS67*.
2001 TOYOTA SOLARA
33K $11,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2002 TOYOTA RAV4
98,265 mi, $6,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 TOYOTA AVALON
107,986 mi, $9,978
877-219-9139 DIr
-NEED GASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!


TOYOTA
7210


2005 TOYOTA COROLA
113,776 mi, $6,578
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 TOYOTA AVALON
45K $14,911
877-211-8054 DLR
2006 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
82K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2006 TOYOTA SOLARA
91K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 TOYOTA SCION
12K $12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 TOYOTA CAMRY
44,325 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA RAV4
85,438 mi, $11,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
43,462 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
43,462 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA CAMRY
5,468 Ml $16,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 TOYOTA SIENNA
14,312 mi, $28,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 TOYOTA CAMRY
9,724 Ml $18,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 TOYOTA MATRIX
9,670 mi, $18,987
877-219-9139 DIr
CASH SPECIALS
'05 Town & Country $2900
'03 Pontiac Montana $3500
'98 Plymouth Expresso $1900
'98 Honda Civic 2DR. $2500
'94 Honda Accord 4dr $1900
'95 Cadillac Deville $1900
'03 GMC Sonoma P/U $3900
'03 Pont. Bonneville $3900
'02 Mitsubishi Eclipse $2900
'98 SATURN 78K, $2900
'99 SILVERADO LOW MI $4900
'03 CHEVY VENTURA VAN $4900
'97 CROWN ViC $1900
AUTO TECH OF
VENICE 941-214-0889

VOLKSWAGEN
%Z 7220 ^

2005 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
78,641 mi, $8,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 VOLKSWAGEN
TOUAREG 70,114 mi,
$13,245 877-219-9139 DIr
2006 VW PASSAT,
Low Miles! Great on Gas!
$10,988. 941-639-1601, DIr
| VOLVO
L 72300 ^

2006 VOLVO C70 Hardtop
Cony! Red! $14,988 941-
639-1601 P.G. DIr.
^-NEED A JOB?--\
CHECK THE
C^ CLASSIFIED!
ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES
^^, 7250 ^


L BUDGET BUYS
L 725T2





1998 DODGE NEON, Cold
A/C, runs good, 121k, gas
saver. $1295 941-467-6054
2003 HYUNDAI ACCENT
White, 91K, Auto, 4Dr, cold
a/c. $2500 941-628-0576
| AUTOS WANTED
L 7260 ^

2~


I I see


ALL AUTOS WANTED with
or without title any condition,
year, make or model. We pay
up to $20,000 and offer free
towing. Call Cindy at
813-505-6939
WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204


Available 2/I I
941-286-3122, 623-555
L.





I ACCESSORIES I
7270 ^i

MICHELIN RADIAL Tire
215/65R16 all season on Chr
$50 941-661-7093
TIRES, (4) All Season
P205/55R16. Used only 3
mos. $200 941-204-8403
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TRUCK TOPPER Will fit S-10
pick up and other small trucks.
Ex cond. $175 941-468-
1489

S& REPAIR
^ 7280 ^

HEADLIGHT JENIE
Repair hazed, cloudy or dull
headlights... GUARANTEED!
We come to you!
941-587-0584
CLASSFE


~VANS
1940 PONTIAC COUPE, L7290
69,400 mi, all orig, great l
cond. $10,000 941-882-3515
2005 CHRYSLER PTCRUISER
31K $7,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 CHRYSLER T&C
71K $12,911
1988 FORD MUSTANG 877-211-8054 DLR
Convertible, 61k original mi., 2009 VWROUTAN, Loaded!
everything original, full power. HAS IT ALL! $16,988. 941-
$6,000. 941-575-9023 625-2141 #1 Used Ca-rDealer


VANS
Lao 7290 ^


2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-8704325
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
53,050 mi, $30,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
15,469 mi, $23,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
24,762 mi, $25,950
877-219-9139 DIr


2012 HONDA PILOT
33,758 mi, $29,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
7,027 mi, $37,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
14,532 mi, $36,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
4,781 mi, $36,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
7,276 mi, $29,875
877-219-9139 DIr
|TRUCKS/PICK-UPS



2011 HONDA RIDGELINE
27,424 mi, $26,950
877-219-9139 DIr


DON'T WAIT. DRIVE TODAY
GUARANTEED CREDIT
I APPROVAL
941-473-2277 I
I www.pctcars2.com
L---------JE
WE BUY CARS *
Top Dollar for your car
or truck Call us today
941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com

WE FINANCE
EVERYONE
MUST HAVE INCOME
& DOWN PAYMENT
I 941-473-2277
www.pctcars2.com I

SSPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
L: 7305^^

2005 SUBURU FORESTER,
Low Miles! Red! $8,988. 941-
639-1601 DIr. P.G
2008 TOYOTA RUNNER
66,491 mi, $23,758
877-219-9139 DLR
2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
44,126 mi $20,950
877-219-9139 DLR

LEXUS USED
CERTIFIED
WARRANTY: 3 YEAR OR
100,000 MILE!.
1-877-211-8054
WlVIL/E~lE
LEWUKJ3 OF SARi&SO7dw
2013 NISSAN PATHFINDER
2,826 mi, $31,950
877-219-9139 DIr

PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980


02 Saturn Vue
04 Saturn Vue
03 Kia Sorento
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
06 Saturn Vue
07 Chevy HHR
08 Saturn Vue XE
08 Saturn Vue XR


941-627-8822


$3,299
$4,200
$4,299
$5,299
$5,899
$6,099
$6,600
$7,800
$11,500





Thursday, December 26, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19


C'\
1f~4%















@


-,R

(
a,

















,
af






The Sun Classified Page 20 EINIC TI iir~. Ii [:e: errLer L' L'..' I


BOATS-POWERED
L 7330 ^

14' ALUMINIUM BOAT NEW,
ZERO HRS YAMAHA $4,250
941-661-2667
17' CENTURY 2006, 90HP
YAMAHA 4 STROKE, LIVE WELL &
BAIT WELL, LOW HRS, NEW TRAIL-
ER $10,500 941-416-5221
20' 1994 BAYLINER Needs
Starter. Make Reasonable
Offer. 5262 Lovett. NP 941-
268-2121
FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your boat
in our indoor showroom!
Sales Service Body
Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-244-5288
www.CharlotteMarine.com





21' FOURWINDS sleeps 4,
OMC 5.0, drive, full canvas
bimini, custom trailer, super
clean, GPS, 2nd owner, will
demo $7,500 941-505-5520


24' WELLCRAFT 1997 WEll-
CRAFT CCF HAS EVER
$14,995 941-255-5555



I Ic
25'11" STAMAS 1980, fiber-
glass, sport cruiser, V8 mus-
tang. A good boat for the bay.
Open back for fishing. Made in
Tarpon Springs. Refurbished in
2007. $4,500 Trailer Avail-
able, not incl'd 941-474-9498


ZUU4, .IU IVIt[ -[uiser[, UbdvU o
drive, a/c, camper top, flush
system, isenglass never been
used, yearly serviced &
waxed. 240 hrs $38,000
941-421-2514
MISC. BOATS

wam 7333 ^
MAGMA New Marine Kettle-
Grille 15" Stainless $99 941-
828-3636
| OUTBOARD/
MARINE ENGINES
Z^ 7334 ^
OUTBOARD MOTOR Mariner
4-hp in very good con $100
941-639-0591
MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
^^^ 7338 ^

ANCHOR BRUCE 30kg New
List West Marine 690.00 $400
941-268-7634
BATTERY ON/OFF switch
Blue Sea 6006 $19
760-579-3232
FENDER HOLDERS (2) for
10" Fender $15 each
941-697-0940
PROP SAIL BOAT New MWC
1 1/2" Size 20RH13 $475
941-268-7634
ZINC 12" x 6 1/2" Dream Dri-
ver $25 941-697-0940
ZINCS Shaft (2)Zincs for 1
3/4" Shaft $25
941-697-0940


IAINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
7338^ i

ZINCS (2) 3" discs $20
941-697-0940
| CANOES/KAYAKS

Z 7339 J

13' PELICAN KAYAK Tan-
dem, Seats 2 People. $450
941-876-4310
I TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
L4 7341

LARK V-NOSE ENCLOSED
7X14 Was $4095 Now $3350
941-916-9222 DIr.
MISSING 14 FOOT LAWN
TRAILER Deep Creek $100
941-661-5646






TRAILER HITCH Complete
Buick Enclve 08-14 Curt $100
941-505-8875
SCYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
L:^ 7360 f

[fnkHARBOR
FOR ALL YOUR
SCOOTER
NEEDS...


3315 Tamiami TrI. PG
We Repair Scooters too!
941-347-8705
CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
L ^7370 ^
Membership to: Thousand
Trails & Naco $700 Call
864-965-8366


2014 WINNEBAGOS
2013 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld Inc.of Nokomis
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com
FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your RV
on our lot!
Sales Service
Body Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-225-2712
www.CharlotteRV.com


huKr" I JVVIW o II iULL"-
home 49,500 mls has
upgrades ex cond nada
$23,476 941-276-3820

HOLIDAY RAMBLER
A MUST SEE MOTOR HOME
MANY MODELS
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMILY OWNED/OPERATED FOR 36YRs
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182


S I(-OTOR HOMES/
^ '380) ^





LUXUPV MOTOP HOMES
2014 MODELS UP TO 45'
CcIE SEt ........LETS trADE!
RVWORLD In.: Of No 0orl s
F~nlL, (1-,'JE14OPEP-TH- Fop 36YPS
2110 US 41- NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


IRV,;
I NIOTOR HOMES/
^^ '38(0 ^^

RV SERVICE SPECIALS
Factory Warranty
All models
RV Wash
Wash & Hand Wax
Brake Flush
New Tires & Balance
Roof Reseal
RV Propane & Bottles
Water Leak Test
Lg. Parts Showroom
RV WORLD INC. of Nokomis
FAMIiL, 0 '4E1IOF'EPAT!-, f.:,P 36YPS
2110 US 41 Nokomis.
941-966-2182

NEED CASH?


I MOTOR HOMES/ MOTOR HOMES/
i ',380 -3 i r 3() -


RV Collision Repairs
: u,:ton'nei wrn In: uricr: e
1c, -I, ri r, *,-: ,l ,I l,:, lq ,i It :, i
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
FAMiL, Q'jE1O/OPEPATi[ f.:.P 36YPs
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182
RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/TRADE
CALL: MARK
RV WORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
FAMiL, ('rjE1/O ,EPAiTu ,:,P 36YPs
2110 US 41- NOKOMIS
941-966-2182


iS


SATURN TOW-CARS
:.tji tir, ;t .-. '1:. I -:lue. L,.
:,l riI-,t: e :,ld .. irn, tjied.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4 1[40 V^ h,,::,::l r, I'.:lvd P, : ::':,l' .
v;41i) 62jjnb P-SS2
WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5th whls, Pop-Ups,
Van conversion & passenger
vans. Cash paid on the spot.
for quick sale. Parts &
Service Avail 941-347-7171
ADVERTISED!


SYEAR ND CLOSEOUT SALE IS HERE!

New 2013 Mazda 3d


Starting at


wOf


after $2,000 cash Rebate.


New 2013 Mazda CX-5 SPORT





35 MPG HIGHWAIW


-==bg New 2013 Mazda CX-9

Starting at Pafter $3,000 Cash Rebate.
Plus
o 1,0000ownerL[yalty ~tEd
=,= -' { P 5m MI0 ilbary ApreitdnRdatealaeilkbn edIA


MITSUBISHI


New 2014 Mitsubishi Mirage DE


4i4 i4 i III- I_ ,-,I n_,. i .: II,. II-T4H- ,:F:F.G_ L_- 1F1, 12.,z II4I/_ ,- -'I- *1:,: *,- II 4 11F.4-inFP-_ '_'L4,'I
160 j. n IIam II9 4 -1-634 H n_'9 .4' .-II I I n '--11F.4iFn_'1F'FbSsF _


10-ya
USIS0sI.ISmii [


Af,%

MITSUBISHI
MOTORS


The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


Th, i.jr-, I ,l:,er 2., 2 1:: ,


':': .:. -..u r -", ne t


kAV%




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E8HF722Y5_8E60E7 INGEST_TIME 2014-04-01T21:41:48Z PACKAGE AA00016616_00202
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES