Charlotte sun herald

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Charlotte sun herald
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oclc - 36852667
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arlotte SunfUS
H E RANrD WEEK


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SEE FLAIR


AN EDITION OF THE SUN
VOL.121 NO.321


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


SUNDAY NOVEMBER 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


GOOD MORNING


A romance that

might have been

I come each year hoping to see a
model of my first affair with a car.
It was a 1931 Chrysler rumble-seat
roadster convertible with leather seats, a
side-mounted spare
tire and tail-end

{i w Last week, on a
cool, sunny day,
happy crowds,
bratwurst and live
^ toe-tapping music
^ reminded me of a
A county fair. It was
Derk the fall antique
Dere car show on the
DUNN-RANKIN Harborview Road
CHAIRMAN grounds of the
Charlotte Sun that
Don Royston and his wife Lee have
organized for several years now.
Restoring and driving an antique car
used to be a guy thing and often took a
number of years of patient, loving labor.
These days, proud owners are often a
husband-and-wife team.
The show is a chance to spot a car
that had a special place in our memo-
ries. Just over there was a green MG TD
just like the one I traded in on a Lincoln
Zephyr convertible that swallowed a
gallon of gas every 9 miles.
Back to that 1931 Chrysler. My de-
livery partner on a large Miami Herald
route had supplied the car and the gas
stamps to deal with wartime rationing.
Gas was hard to come by, but newspa-
per delivery was considered an essential
wartime service. The partnership ended
when he revealed that he had used up
all the gas coupons on trips with his
dates.
My brothers helped me get the papers
delivered, if a little late, on our bikes.
I needed a car in a hurry. In addition,
I needed to learn to drive over the
weekend and, on Monday, get my own
gas coupons.
Our father said he could help. He had
a used car lot owner as a client, and said
he would bring home a recommended
car that I could afford. If I brought my
route collections up to date, I thought
$100 cash was possible, with maybe
another $100 credit from the dealer.
Our dad arrived home with a real
beauty. The dealer said the sporty
Chrysler was a steal because it had a
nonstandard tire size that might be
difficult to replace at a time when only
retreads were being sold.
During a five-minute lesson, our
father explained the floor starter button,
the brake pedal (left foot), and clutch
and gas (right foot). Standing in the
center like a cane was the emergency
brake to be used when parking on a
hill. Fortunately, it was not necessary to
worry about that because we didn't have
hills.
He observed as a passenger for an-
other five minutes. Seeing no reason for
both of us being in a wreck, he sent me
off to practice on some nearly vacant
roads.
My trouble seemed to be coordinating
the clutch and the gas pedal to get the
car engaged in first gear. I had to give it
a lot of gas or I stalled out. Given a lot
of gas as it went into first or second, it
would suddenly jerk forward.
It was somewhat alarming to see the
trail of smoke I left behind when we
took off.
On Monday, with my learners permit
in hand and Peter on the running
board to run the apartments, we jerked
through the route, just missing the
pump at the Texaco station.
Safely home I told my dad the car was
a beauty, but no thanks. "Please return
the car to the used car lot."
It may have been two cars later that
I figured it out. That black stick, the
emergency brake, had been on the
whole time.
Derek Dunn-Rankin is chairman of
the Sun Coast Media Group. He can be
reached at derekdr@sun-herald.com.


Gone too soon


Single-car crash claims two young adults


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
TROPICAL GULF ACRES -
Kassandra Sedore, known as "Kassie
K" to friends and family, always made
herself available to others dealing with
difficult situations.
"She was just a beacon of light, no
matter what," said her uncle, Don
Sedore. "If you were going through
something, she would be there for
you."
But as her extended family gathered
early Saturday morning in the most


H painful time they will ever
know, Kassie K couldn't
comfort them. Just after
x ,midnight, Kassandra, 19,
and Anthony Buffington,
23, both of Punta Gorda,
were killed in a single-ve-
hicle accident south of
KASSANDRA Punta Gorda.
The Florida Highway
Patrol reported Kassandra was driv-
ing east on Tribune Boulevard at a
high rate of speed around 12:20 a.m.
Saturday when she failed to negotiate a
curve at Poindexter Avenue, slamming


into a Florida Power &
Light pole. Reports said
the driver, for unknown
reasons, lost control of
the 2010 NissandVersa,
causing it to spin before
the driver's side of the
car hit the pole, knocking
it down on top of the ANTHONY
vehicle.
Kassandra and her passenger,
Anthony, both pronounced dead at
the scene, were wearing their seat

GONE17


A true community event


SUN PHOTO
BY GARY
ROBERTS

Two-year-old
"Little John"
Smith of the
Parkside
area of Port
Charlotte has
his ups and
downs in the
bounce house
at Saturday's
Parkside
International
Fall Festival.


Neighborhood pride in Parkside


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE "Little John"
Smith, who lives up to his name at
the just-getting-started age of 2, was
overjoyed at receiving a free "Spider-
Man" book from the Charlotte County
Library System. And so was his dad.
"I like this," said "Big John" Smith,
a resident of the Parkside area in the
heart of Port Charlotte. "He likes to
read and I do too."
"Big John" was taking in all that
Saturday's Parkside International
Fall Festival had to offer, including a


bounce house and treats for "Little
John," and a sense of community for
his entire family.
"I'm from Philadelphia, where we
have a bunch of neighborhoods and
everyone knows where they're from.
We have the same thing here," said
"Big John," noting the park, library
and grocery store all within walking
distance.
With Team Parkside playing host to
the event at the Promenades Mall, the
Parkside Festival is representative of
the community itself, drawing a wide
range of young families and senior
citizens to partake of its international


foods, stage entertainment, a fun park
for kids, exhibits from local merchants,
and a crafts fair.
And, like Parkside itself, the second
annual festival is gaining support and
forward momentum, featuring many
more vendors and visitors than last
year.
"It's a collaborative effort," said Pat
Garriton, Team Parkside board member
and festival co-chairwoman. "The goal
is to bring awareness to the community
about Parkside, and have a fun event."
Joining this cooperative venture in

PRIDE 17


Two business startups ready to roll


By BILL JONES
SUN CORRESPONDENT
Andrew Ganski, 37, a mechanic, spent a good
part of his life under the hoods of cars and trucks,
untangling a myriad of cables and wires.
"There's got to be a better way to make a living,"
he thought.
Dustin Orr, 25, a professional driller, was
installing conduits in the frozen tundra of Alaska,
longing to get back home to Arcadia to start his
own business.
Then they met Jim Crumbaugh, who is turning
their lives and their new businesses around.
Crumbaugh, a retired businessman from Punta
Gorda, offered to mentor young entrepreneurs,
STARTUPS 7


SUN PHOTO
BY BILL
JONES
Heidi and
Andrew
Ganski, left,
Jim Crum-
baugh and
Dustin Orr,
right, pause
in discussions
of their new
startup busi-
nesses that
Crumbaugh is
mentoring.


INDEX I THE SUN: Police Beat 41 Obituaries 5 Viewpoint 81 Opinion 9-101 THE WIRE: Nation 2-3 State 4-5 Travel 71 World 7-91 Weather 101 SPORTS: Lotto 2 CLASSFIED: Puzzles 16-18 1 TV Listings 171 Dear Abby 19
Sunday Edition $2.00 F-6. .-" Look inside for valuable coupons "--"' 4q -" C
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Pick of the Day


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I






Our Town Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun ISunday, November 17, 2013


Local attorney




recognized


Jim and Dawn Nolan.


Keystone
founders
Shirley
Mearns and
Garnette
Scholl
unveil the
painting
being
presented
to the 2013
Keystone
Society
honoree,
Cort
Frolich.


Brenda Hussey and Donna Ball. SUN PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES

I Edison State College recognized prominent local attorney Cort Frolich as its 2013 Keystone
SSociety Honoree on Nov. 8. He also received a painting by local artist Vicki Glynn. Pictured here
are Charlotte County Commissioner Ken Doherty, and Jean and Bill Ringelstein.


Cort Frolich and his
wife Tammy speak
to the attendees and
give thanks for being
the 2013 Edison State
College Keystone Society
honoree.


M.J. Isakson, Julie Flood and Kellie Dunson, all members of Cort
Frolich's staff.


Edison State College Charlotte Campus President Patricia Br B
Land gives the opening remarks at the 2013 Keystone Societyil
Honoree Reception.


SUBSCRIPTIONS I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $16.47
3 Months............................ $66.51
6 Months.......................... $113.05
1 Year ............................... $197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.......................... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates as
follows (advance payment required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5p.m.
Monday- Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204.You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


TODAY

American Legion 103,
Cafe opened for B'fast/ Lunch
Thu-Sun 7a-2p Public invited. Help
us support our Vets! 2101 Taylor Rd
PG 639-6337
Market @Post 103, Great
price & selection of fruits, vegs,
plants & more. 2101 Taylor Rd.
639-6337 Help support our Vets!
Port Charlotte Elks, 11-9,
20225 Kenilworth Blvd, 625-7571,
new breakfast buffet $7,8:30-11:30,
Bar Bingo 1-4, Sunday Football, 1-6
wings, etc.
Farmers Market, History
Park Farmers Market open every
Sunday 9am-2pm, 501 Shreve St.,
between Virginia Ave. & Henry St.
941-380-6814.
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Lunch 1:30-5:30, NFL Package, Come


Watch Your Team
Punta Gorda Elks, Bar
open at 12, Picnic on the Water 2-5,
Music by Tim & Roseanne, Tiki open
at 1@25538 Shore Dr PG 637-2606
mmbrs& their gsts
Pinochle, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St. 12:30P-3:30P $1.50.
Cultural Center MembersPLUS free.
Everyone Welcomed. 625-4175
American Legion 103,
Dart Tournament 1-4pm 501 Soft
Tip $3 per rd. Win cash & meet new
friends! All skill levels. 2101 Taylor Rd
PG 639-6337
Stress Relief Yoga, Yoga
for Stress Relief, Nov 17,1-3pm,
Open to all., The Yoga Sanctuary, 112
Sullivan, 505-9642, $35
Visit with Santa, Visits/
Photos with Santa, Fishermen's
Village, 1-4pm Bring your Camera
639-8721


* MONDAY

Fitness'n' Fun, Exercise to
contemporary Christian music; 11330
Brnt Str Rd, PG; 9am; Mon, Wed & Fri;
$35 for 10 classes; info 575-2034
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Lunch With Amy 11-2:30, Dinner
4:30-7:30 With Linda, Tacos, Burgers
and more, Corn Hole @ 6pm
Port Charlotte Elks, 11-9,
20225 Kenilworth Blvd, 625-7571,
Lunch with Shirley 11-2, Lounge 11-9,
Indoctrination @6:30
Stretch 'n' Tone, Exercise to
contemporary Christian music; 507 W
Marion Ave, PG; 11 am; Mon, Wed&
Fri; $35 for 10 classes; info 575-2034
Punta Gorda Elks, Lite Lunch
11-2,Chicken Dinner 4-8,Tiki open at 4,
Karaoke 6:30-10:30@25538 shore Dr PG
637-2606 mmbrs & their gsts
Four Leaf Strummers,


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title; as thatwill be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


Left: Vernon and Edna Jane Peeples.


Live Banjo Music, Center Stage,
Fishermen's Village, 11:30am-1pm
639-8721
American Legion 103,
VET APPR DAY 12p-3p, 2101 Taylor Rd,
639-6337
Fun with Music, Ip-3p
Cultural Center 2280 Aaron St. Come
Dance with Friends to Live Music.
Musicians always welcomed $1.
625-4175
DAR Regular Meeting,
1:30 social 2:00 meeting, refresh-
ments 401 W Henry St PG Dale Philips
CCSO talk Crimes Against Women
RSVP Suzy 505-5507
Online Genealogy Pub,
2pm Mid-Cty Library, PC, Discuss
DeskTop publishing, uses & demo MS
Publisher. Register- www.ccgsi.org or
613-3162


Ukrainian Dinners, Friday
4:30-6:00 Homemade pierogies, call
about takeout. St. Mary's Church
at Price & Biscayne. Cost $9.00
423-2427.
Michael Hirst, Live Music,
Center Stage, Fishermen's Village,
5-7 pm 639-8721
Pinochle, Cultural Center
2280 aaron St. 6p-8p $1.50. Cultural
Center MembersPLUS fre. Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Monday Night Dance,
Cultural Center 2280 Aaron St. $5,
7p-lOp Cash Bar Live Entertainment.
Band info at theculturalcenter.com
625-4175
FunnySongs/BadAdvice,
7:30 Roy Zimmerman's satires bite,but
inspire for Peace & Social Justice 1971
PinebrookRd.Ven 4852105 $whatever


SUN NEWSPAPERS
--_ Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................... MarkYero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor.........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager..........Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3001
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher.........Carol Y. Moore.............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


CONTACT US WITH YOUR NEWS: Email Charlotte Sun Editor Rusty Pray at rpray@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1168, or email Deputy Charlotte Editor Garry Overbey at overbey@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1143. Fax to
941-629-2085. On Saturdays, contact Assistant Charlotte Editor Marion Putman at mputman@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1183, or the newsroom at 941-206-1100. On Sundays, contact Garry Overbey or call the newsroom.
Circulation director-Mark Yero, 941-206-1317. Business news -email business@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1121. Consumer advocacy- email dmorris@sun-herald.com orcall 941-206-1114. Obituaries -call 1941-206-1028 or
email obituaries@sunletter.com. Religion/ church news or events- mputman@sun-herald.com. Editorial letters email letters@sun-herald.com or write: Letter to the Editor, c/o Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor,
FL 33980. Puzzles 941-206-1128. Classified ads 866-463-1638. Subscriptions For missed papers, or to put your paper on hold, call 941-206-1300. Display advertising 941-206-1214

The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Featured Event
Open House & Collector Car Show, Sun., Nov. 17,2 to
5 PM. The Veteran Motor Car Club will display antique autos during Isles
Yacht Club's Open House, 1780 W. Marion Ave., PG. Special refreshments
to prospective members and the opportunity to vote for your favorite
antique vehicle. Info at 941-626-4452.


OurTown Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013





:The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 3


From Persian Gulf to Meadow Park


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER

PORT CHARLOTTE -
The military took Paul
Curtis around the world.
It also helped him
become the educator he
is today.
Curtis, assistant
principal at Meadow
Park Elementary School,
believes soldiers have a
natural ability to nurture
students because of their
military background.
"Students from all
ages, and no matter what
backgrounds they
always relate military
service to being disci-
plined, to being a great
role model. They have
always been able to put
that together, and that is
great," Curtis said.


Curtis credits his
service with making him
a good teacher first by
shaping his character.
"What happens in the
military is they break
you down and they put
you in a situation where
you have to be very
well-structured ... as you
go through the process
... you learn how to be a
leader," Curtis said.
Curtis served in the
Army as a satellite oper-
ator from 1989 to 1995.
Once his training was
completed, he served in
the Persian Gulf War for
nine months, and later in
Germany.
It was in his post in
Germany that he took
the first steps that led
him toward his educa-
tion career.


Curtis began a Big
Brothers Big Sisters
program, in which
American soldiers based
in Germany worked in
the schools,
spending
time with
children
whose
parents
were away
in military
CURTIS training
or military
service.
Curtis said the pro-
gram, which started
with about five soldiers,
quickly grew to about
30, an outcome that felt
very rewarding to him
personally.
Once his service was
finished, Curtis decided
he wanted to stay in the


schools, helping children
in need. Here too his mil-
itary past helped him by
providing the resources.
He joined Troops to
Teachers, a Department
of Defense program that
provides counseling and
resources to veterans who
want to pursue a career
in education. He earned a
degree in education from
Florida State University
-paid for by the GI Bill.
Once he graduated,
Curtis started working
with students he de-
scribed as "a very tough
group" at Second Chance,
an alternative school
in Tallahassee. "The
students actually would
come from jail, or there
were behavioral issues
with them at neighboring
public schools," Curtis


said.
While Curtis worked in
more traditional schools
throughout his career, his
interest kept him involved
with alternative schools,
eventually leading him
to a principal position in
Louisiana, where he also
oversaw four alternative
schools within the state.
Curtis came to
Charlotte County as the
assistant principal of
Meadow Park last year,
and also serves on the
board of directors for
New Operation Cooper
Street in Punta Gorda.
"The little ones, they
ask me sometimes, 'Tell
me about what hap-
pened?' and I am more
than happy to explain
(and) give them a little
snapshot of my military


service."
Looking back on his
career, Curtis said, "it
was eye-opening to see
different cultures. It was
intense. At the same time,
it was rewarding because
I felt like we were doing
a service for our country
and for the Middle East."
This month, Curtis was
one of 58 in the country
nominated for a Troops
to Teachers award for his
success in teaching.
Although pleased by
the nomination, Curtis
remains modest.
"It's good to be rec-
ognized," he said, "but
I just want these kids to
be OK and be successful.
There's a lot out there for
them."

Email: iross@sun-herald.com


Mayor's husband offers to buy city land


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER

PUNTAGORDA- The
city has accepted an offer
by Klint Keesling, owner of
Keesling Construction and
Mayor Rachel Keesling's
husband, to purchase a
city-owned parcel of land
once used as a recycling
and sanitation yard.
The property, located at
507 Nesbit St., is just off


Keesling Construction on
Dupont Street. The prop-
erty was listed at $160,000
and appraised at $133,780
by the Charlotte County
Property Appraiser's
Office. Last week, the City
Council accepted an offer
for $142,500.
"The city has no plans
for that property, and
we'd rather have it on
the tax rolls and in use if
somebody wants it," City


Manager Howard Kunik
said.
The prospective buyer
has 90 days to complete
an environmental assess-
ment of the property and
inspections, if he chooses.
If it all pans out, the buyer
indicated he'd like to close
on the deal within 10 days
of the completed feasibil-
ity study.
The City Council in a
4-0 vote agreed to the


conditions of the sale.
Mayor Keesling abstained,
citing a conflict of interest.
Kunik said the city had
received several counter-
offers but considered the
$142,500 a fair one.
"It's a very reasonable
offer considering what we
know," said Bill Dryburgh
of Coldwell Banker Morris
Realty in Punta Gorda, the
city's agent.
The property, which


had housed a parks and
grounds facility, a public
works facility, a sanita-
tion storage yard and a
recycling collection center,
has been vacant for about
three years.
City Councilwoman
Carolyn Freeland asked
Dryburgh what plans the
prospective owner has for
the property, but no one
could say.
"Do we know what


the property is going to
be used for?" Freeland
asked.
"No," Dryburgh said.
"It makes no difference
to us."
Klint did not return
calls for comment, and
his Realtor, Randy Fassett
of Sun Realty, said he
did not know his client's
intended use for the
property.
Email: bbarbosa@sun-heraldx.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF

Pool to get new Cooper St., Punta Gorda, of summer, providing begun and is expected in pool temperatures. Charlotte Beach pool,
energy system is having an energy-effi- patrons a more enjoyable to be completed by Contact South County 4500 Harbor Blvd.; or the
cient geothermal system experience when visiting mid-December. During Regional pool staff at Oyster Creek Regional
The Charlotte County installed. This system the pool. In addition, this the installation process, 941-833-3809 to check pool, 7001 San Casa
Community Services will provide the ability to technology will result each pool will be without pool temperatures and Drive, Englewood, during
Department announces heat the pools during the in a reduction of pool heat for up to 10 days. for updates on this the installation process.
that the South County winter months and cool operating costs. Staff will take all actions project. Patrons are For more information,
Regional Park pool, 670 the pools during the heat The installation has to minimize the drop encouraged to visit Port call 941-833-3809.


IESOUlIICi


What does Live United mean to me?

My first contact with the United Way was
during the Community Impact process,
more than 15 years ago. At that time, we'd
hop in a car with four others and visit the
agency, ask questions and make a funding
recommendation. There really wasn't a formal
process in place, but I did make some life-long
friends during the road trips.
I've served as a Community Impact volunteer
almost every year since and the process
for assessing the needs of our agencies and
making funding recommendations to match
the needs is solid. The allocation process has
been researched, analyzed and tweaked by the
volunteers who participate. They are 100%
comfortable with the decisions they make on
behalf of the thousands of Charlotte County
residents who support our local United Way.


LIVE UNITED


United Way of Charlotte County


One of the life-long friends I made on the road
trips asked me to join the Board of Directors
6 years ago. As a Board member, I've been
a celebrity bartender, attended fundraisers,
promoted events and painted at New Operation
Cooper Street on behalf of United Way. But,
the most rewarding experience has been during
Board meetings where this very committed
volunteer Board listens, questions, discusses
and makes sure that our United Way is a model
for other non-profit organizations.
I am honored to serve on the Board of the
United Way of Charlotte County. What
the United Way does makes a tremendous
difference in the lives of families right here at
home. By donating my time ii il ,none\. I iin
making a difference for folk', i hIt hee in I
Charlotte County. That's ho\\ I
LIVE UNITED.


Julie Mathis

Executive Director of
the Charlotte County
Chamber of Commerce
and a United Way
Board of Directors
volunteer


The United Way of Charlotte County invests
in the bimiiii, blocks" to a great life:
education, resources and health.
Resources include: supporting family
sustaining employment, financial literacy,
affordable housing, short term financial
assistance, and income
tax assistance.
For those walking
a financial
tightrope,
the
United Way
is here
to help.


LIVE UNITED.


YES, I WOULD LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE UNITED WAY OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY'S 2014 CAMPAIGN!
Donation amount: $1000 U $500J U$250 $100 UJ$75 U $50o U$25 U Other $____


S I would like to make a recurring gift in the amount of $
D debit -or- D charge in intervals of D weekly D monthly D other
Include account information or voided check if debit, fill in credit card for charge.


to be paid as a


Please charge my credit card: J MasterCard J VISA J American Express J Discover


Account #
Signature


Exp. Date
Sec Code


D My check is enclosed, made payable to: United Way of Charlotte County
" I wish my gift to remain anonymous.
To make your gift online, go to www.unitedwayccfl.org
Please mail this form with your gift to: UNITED WAY OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY
17831 Murdock Circle Port Charlotte, FL 33948


Name(s):
Address:


City:


State:


Phone: ( )


Email:
Business Name/Employer:


Please contact me about: (check all that apply)
U United Way payroll deduction
L Volunteer opportunities
LU Gift through my estate plan
L[ Gift of securities or real estate AA14-NPI


United Way of Charlotte County is a nonprofit, charitable organization classified as a 5o01(c)3 by the IRS. Gifts are tax-deductible. #CH226


For more information, call 941-627-3539





:OurTown Page 4


C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


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".,,. p .,g "u- ,,,,PI "i. [R





It's..."a ,c
FACTSrgr*ouhhs -oe.


To provide better care for our patients, Florida Advanced
Cardiothoracic Surgery-FACT Surgery South has moved to a new
location. Just down the street from our previous location, top
quality cardiovascular surgery is still close by and convenient.


New Address:
2380 Harbor Boulevard
Port Charlotte

Gertrude Ave.
FACT South


3 Brinson Ave. <

FACTSouth Medical Center
\ Previous Location 0 0
Olean Blvd.
IPeace River Regional



Previous Address:
2525 Harbor Boulevard, Suite 208
Port Charlotte







?F.A.C.T 2380 Harbor Boulevard
Sure rPort Charlotte
South Phone: 941-206-0325


With greater eari g otosfrma B
Ill i i^


I ". ". : oo o o


Traffic enforcement locations set


CHARLOTTE COUNTY
- Beginning Monday, the
Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office will increase traffic
enforcement at the follow-
ing locations:
Speed enforcement:
Entire length of
Bermont Road, east of
Punta Gorda.
Olean Boulevard, Port
Charlotte.
Traffic light/stop sign
enforcement:
U.S. 41 and Cochran
Boulevard, Murdock.
Kings Highway and
Interstate 75/Exit 170,
Port Charlotte (near Deep
Creek).

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Nathan Dorman Burley, 23,15400
block of Mango St., Punta Gorda.
Charges: driving with a suspended
or revoked license and two counts of
leaving the scene of a crash involving
property damage. Bond: $2,000.


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


Ashley Elizabeth Dahl, 21,
homeless in Punta Gorda. Charges:
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription and selling
a synthetic narcotic schedule I or II.
Bond:none.
Shawen Nathaniel Paske, 34,
22100 block of Hernando Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: nonsupport of
dependents. Purge: $370.
Rachel Dawn Searle, 19,
22100 block of Hernando Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: two counts each
of violation of probation (original
charges: possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription and
grand theft) and failure to appear.
Bond:none.
Jeffery Wayne Mathis, 49, 2200
block of Picnic St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond:
$20,000.
Stephanie Lee Mulligan, 36,
1000 block of Kensington Drive, Port


Charlotte. Charges: possession of
cocaine and possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription.
Bond: $7,000.
Rick Lee Miller, 43, homeless in
Port Charlotte. Charges: driving with a
suspended or revoked license and two
counts of violation of probation (original
charge: trespassing). Bond: none.
Timothy Daniel Backer, 33, of
Clearwater, Fla. Charges: possession
of a controlled substance without a
prescription and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond: none.
James Randolph Stewart, 38,
200 block ofN. Brevard Ave., Arcadia.
Charges: possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription,
possession with the intent to sell a
synthetic narcotic schedule III, and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond:none.
Compiled by Gary Roberts
and Marion Putman


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Bridge
construction
to begin
Construction of a new
bridge on Harborview/
Sunnybrook roads,
between DeSoto Drive
and Discovery Drive, will
begin Monday. Variable
message boards are in
place to notify the public
that stop signs will be
installed on Sunnybrook
Road at the intersection
of Highlands Road


Tuesday. The contractor
will begin with the con-
struction of a temporary
road and a temporary
bridge to divert traffic
for the demolition of the
existing bridge.
The school zone is
being extended to the
east of Highlands Road,
and the speed limit is
being reduced in the con-
struction area to 15 miles
per hour for the safety of
the traveling public and
schoolchildren. Exercise


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3100 S. McCall Rd., Englewood, FL 34224 941.474.7734
125 Nesbit St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950 941.637.8909
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extreme caution while
traveling through this
area. For more informa-
tion, call 941-575-3645.

AMIKids to
hold fundraiser
The young men at
AMIKids Crossroads
are holding their first
fundraiser. This organi-
zation is a therapeutic
group home for foster
boys located in Punta
Gorda. The young men
are selling engraved
pavers for $50 that will
be placed in a prominent
place on the Crossroads
campus. They will be
responsible for managing
the project, which will
raise money to support
their activities. Many
of these young people
have been in multiple
foster home placements,
and have not had the
opportunity to learn
some of the lessons of
responsibility, leadership
and cooperation that
children in a stable home
environment routinely
learn.
For a donor paver ap-
plication, email scm619@
embarqmail.com.

New maestro, new
season
The Charlotte
Symphony Orchestra
will open its 2013-2014
concert season at
7:30 p.m. today at the
Charlotte Performing Arts
Center, 701 Carmalita St.,
Punta Gorda. A lecture on
the evening's orchestral
selections will begin at
6:30 p.m. The orchestra,
now under the direction
of Maestro Raffaele
Ponti, will perform
music by Tchaikovsky and
Giuseppe Martucci, along
with George Gershwin's
"Rhapsody in Blue."
The evening will
begin with Tchaikovsky's
"Capriccio Italien," one of
his most distinctive and
famous works, which has
been featured through-
out the world's greatest
symphonic venues. The
Gershwin classic will
feature internationally
renowned classical pia-
nist Jeffrey Biegel playing
the orchestra's Grand
Steinway piano. Ponti
will conduct the full score
of "Rhapsody in Blue,"
which, composed in 1924
for solo piano and jazz or-
chestra, has become one
of the most popular of all
American concert works,
including 50 measures
of music that have been
eliminated over the years.
The evening will conclude
with Giuseppe Martucci's
"Symphony No. 1," one
of his most heralded
compositions.
Tickets cost $40 per
person. They may be
purchased by calling
941-205-5996, or at www.
charlottesymphony.com.


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The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES
CHARLOTTE


Sally Jo Baldwin
Sally Jo Baldwin, 73,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Monday,
Nov. 4, 2013,
at Moffitt
Cancer
ECenter in
c Tampa, Fla.
She
was born
Sept. 21,
1940, in
Danville, Ill., to Max and
Edith Baldwin.
Sally graduated from
Vienna High School in
Vienna, Mo., in 1958.
She then graduated from
college in Warrensburg,
Mo., in 1962; and received
her master's degree
from Appalachian State
University in Asheville,
N.C., in 1971. Sally came
to Port Charlotte in 1962,
and began her teaching
career primarily in
Physical Education in the
high school and also in
the jr. high school. She
loved all of the many kids
she taught and, of course,
her seven dogs.
Sally is survived
by her two sisters,
Barbara Williams of Port
Charlotte, and Sharon
Wilson of Meta, Mo.;
aunt, Peggy Rose of Punta
Gorda, Fla.; and multiple
nieces and nephews. She
was preceded in death by
her parents.
A memorial service
will be held at 1 p.m.
Saturday Nov. 23, 2013,
at Port Charlotte United
Methodist Church,
21075 Quesada Ave.,
Port Charlotte. Memorial
contributions may be
made to the Girls' Athletic
Association, Charlotte
High, Punta Gorda.

Doris Bishop
Doris "Dee" Bishop,
72, of Port Charlotte,
Fla., passed away
Monday Nov. 11, 2013, at
Consulate Health Care of
Port Charlotte.
She was born Oct. 10,
1941, in Hartford, Conn.,
to Rosario and Angelina
Attenello.
Dee and her husband
William moved to Port
Charlotte in 1976 from
England. She was a retired
phlebotomist and worked
in the lab at Fawcett
Memorial Hospital in
Port Charlotte for 20
years. At the hospital,
she was on the Patient
Family Experience Team.
Dee was a member of
Port Charlotte United
Methodist Church. At
church she was a member
of the choir, former mem-
ber of the Administrative
Board, and a former
teacher of the fifth-grade
Sunday school class.
She volunteered at the
Douglas T. Jacobson State
Veterans Nursing Home in
Port Charlotte.
Survivors include her
loving family, including
her husband of 52 years,
William S. "Bill" Bishop of
Port Charlotte; daughter,
Bonnie Calhoun of Biloxi,
Miss.; son, William G.
Bishop of Seville, Tenn.;
sister, Rosemarie Attenello
of Hartford; brother,
Richard Attenello of
Homer, Alaska; and four
grandchildren. She was
preceded in death by a
son, Bruce Bishop; sister,
Lenore White; half-sister,
Bertha Poole; half-brother,
Joseph Booker; and her
parents/
Memorial services
will be held at 3 p.m.
Friday Nov. 22, 2013, at
Port Charlotte United
Methodist Church. The


Rev. Brian James will
officiate. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions
may be made to Tidewell
Hospice Inc., 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, FL 34238.
Friends may visit online
at www.robersonfhfi.com
to sign the guestbook and
extend condolences to the
family.


Arrangements are
by Roberson Funeral
Home & Crematory, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Avie L. McCall
Avie L. McCall, 96,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Thursday,
Nov. 14, 2013.
She was born April 21,
1917, in Gainesville, Fla.,
moving to Arcadia, Fla., as
a small child.
Avie was a homemaker.
She enjoyed quilting, trav-
eling, canning, crocheting,
cooking, arts and crafts,
and spending time with
her family. Avie was a
member of First Christian
Church of Arcadia.
Survivors include her
four sons, Carroll McCall
of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
Ronnie (Kwan) McCall
of Jacksonville, Fla.,
Charlie (Sharon) McCall
of Roswell, Ga., Darrell
D. McCall of Arcadia;
one daughter, Elinor
(Gene) Scott of Punta
Gorda; one sister, Marie
Haffner of Callahan,
Fla.; 12 grandchildren;
35 great-grandchildren;
23 great-great-grandchil-
dren; and two great-great-
great-grandchildren. Avie
was preceded in death
by her parents, Issac and
Vashti Campbell Simmons;
her beloved husband of
41 years, Nolon McCall;
daughters, Patricia (nee
McCall) Matthew, Sandra
(nee McCall) Hendry
and Martha McCall; son,
Jerry McCall; grandson,
Robie Prescott; sisters,
Wilimena Cox and Lillian
McCall; and brothers,
H.T. Simmons and Daniel
Simmons.
A gathering of family
and friends will be held
to celebrate the life of
Avie L. McCall from
10 a.m. until a memorial
service at 11 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 19, 2013, at the
chapel of Ponger-Kays-
Grady Funeral Home,
50 N. Hillsborough Ave.,
Arcadia, with the Rev.
Dr. Ron York officiating.
Online condolences may
be made at www.ponger
kaysgradycom.
Arrangements are
by Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services,
Arcadia.

Steve Ritzer
Steve "Hollywood"
Ritzer, 66, of Port
Charlotte, Fla., passed
awayWednesday Nov. 13,
2013. Arrangements are
by Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

AulineW.
Robinson
AulineW. Robinson, 92,
passed away Thursday,
Nov. 7, 2013.
n She was
the daugh-
ter of Frank
and Flossie
Wilkins of
Cleveland,
Fla.Auline
iwas a
native of
Punta Gorda, Fla., and
a fourth-generation
Floridian. She had been
a member of First United
Methodist Church of
Punta Gorda, the Punta
Gorda Woman's Club,
the garden club, the
hospital auxiliary and the
Old Timers Luncheon
committee.
Auline is survived by her
daughter, Sharon R. (Tom)
Carnohan of Indialantic,
Fla.; granddaughter,
Chelsea (Jeremy) Cushing;
two great-grandchildren,
Gabriel and Caroline


Cushing, all of Graceville,
Fla.; niece, Donna
Snyder of Punta Gorda;
great-nephew, Erich
Snyder; and great-great-
nephew, Ethan Snyder,
both of Dallas, Texas.
A memorial celebration
of Auline's life will be held
with her friends early next


year on the date of her
birthday Feb. 17, 2014,
in Punta Gorda. She will
be buried next to her
parents at Indian Springs
Cemetery during a family
graveside service.

Daniel R.Watson
Daniel R. Watson, 69,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Friday,
Nov. 8, 2013.
^H.. He was bom
";w,-.. 'April 18, 1944,
in Cincinnati,
Ohio, and
moved to this area 12
years ago from Cincinnati.
Mr. Watson was a
retired police officer for
the Cincinnati Police
Department. He was a
member of the Fraternal
of the Police, and enjoyed
and traveled throughout
the country racing cars.
Daniel served in the U.S.
Navy.
Survivors include his
brothers, Edward of
Port Charlotte, Mark of
Phoenix, Ariz., and Keith
of Marysville, Ohio.
Inurnment with
Military Services will be
held at 10:30 a.m. Friday
Nov. 29, 2013, at Sarasota
National Cemetery, 9810
State Road 72, Sarasota,
Fla. Memorial donations
maybe made to Tidewell
Hospice Inc., 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, FL 34238.
Arrangements were
made in Port Charlotte.

ENGLEWOOD

William L.
Hubbard
William L Hubbard,
76, of Englewood, Fla.,
and formerly of Placida,
Fla., passed away
Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013.
Arrangements are by ICS
Cremation and Funerals
Inc., Harbour Heights,


NORTH PORT


Marsha Diane
Chancey
Marsha Diane
Chancey, 61, of North
Port, Fla., went home
to be with the Lord,
Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013.
She was born Nov. 28,
1951, in Tampa, Fla.
Marsha was a
member of Murdock
Baptist Church in Port
Charlotte, Fla.
She is survived by
her daughters, Amber
Chancey (fiance, Tim
McNutt) of Acworth,
Ga., and Amy (Mike)
Bianconi of Port
Charlotte; her father,
Robert Cooper of Winter
Haven, Fla.; seven
grandchildren, Taylor,
Robyn, Brady, Heather,
Kasie, Cameron and
Nicholas; and a large,
loving extended family.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
the Rev. Steve Chancey;
and her mother, Evelyn
Davis.
A funeral service
will be held at 11 a.m.
Monday, Nov. 18,2013,
at Murdock Baptist
Church, with burial
to follow at Venice
Memorial Gardens
in Venice, Fla. In lieu
of flowers, memorial
donations may be made
to Murdock Baptist
Church, 18375 Cochran
Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL
33948. To send condo-
lences, please visit www.
farleyfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements are by
Farley Funeral Home,
North Port.

DESOTO

There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Saturday.


-717i e MorIaS in 12 e /,eC2
BI Honor your passed loved ones anytime
II -Q'' with a personalized memorial tribute.
S Call (941) 206-1028 for rates.


JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
www.j ameswmallonee.com
|(941) 206-2223


COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Rose S. Mercier
Rose S. Mercier, 92, of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
passed Friday, Nov. 1, 2013.
She was one of eight siblings and lived in cen-
tral New Jersey for most of her life.
Rose moved to Punta Gorda
in 2005 to be near her children.
HB Eventually, she went to South Port
S Square Skilled Nursing Facility to
get the continued quality care she
N required.
S Rose loved to cook and prided
herself that her recipes were pub-
lished in her own cookbook, "Mangia, Mangia."
She also loved to teach many who were near to
her to cook as well. When her family enjoys one
of her recipes, they will remember her fondly.
Rose was a remarkable woman who devoted
her life to lovingly support her spouse, William
Mercier, along with their children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. She also reached out to
many other family members, cousins, nieces and
nephews as they were growing up. Her influence
on many family members will carry to future
generations.
Rose will be missed by her family and everyone
who knew her.
She is survived by her sister, Lillian Soltis;
brother-in-law, Fred Soltis; sisters-in-law,
Dorothy Mercier and Margaret Eodice; her loving
daughter, Nancy (Mike) Femrite; her loving son,
Robert (Joanne) Mercier; and grandchildren,
Keith Femrite, David, Diane, Ronald, Robin,
Mark, Cheryl and Donna Ferguson, Robin and
Leonardo Selvaggi, Robert Mercier Jr., William
and Ele Mercier, Michelle Ryan and Jill Cushing.
Rose was preceded in death by her beloved
husband, William Mercier.
Her family will be planning a memorial in late
December 2013 in Florida, and again in New
Jersey at a date to be determined. The family re-
quests that any donations made on her behalf be
sent to South Port Square at S.P.S. Appreciation
Fund, 23013 Westchester Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL
33980.


Big Band
celebrates 'Year
That Was'
The Charlotte County
Big Band will devote the
2013-2014 season to some
of the best years of music
with its season called
"The Year ThatWas..."
at the Cultural Center
of Charlotte County
Theater, 2280 Aaron
St., Port Charlotte. The
series kicked off Sept. 16
with 1938, featuring the
Carnegie Hall concert
by Benny Goodman.
The remaining schedule
includes:
Nov. 25: 1941 -
"Stardust" by Artie Shaw,
Glenn Miller's "Elmer's
Tune," Billie Holiday's
"God Bless the Child" and
more.
Dec. 16:1942-
Glenn Miller's "I've Got
a Gal in Kalamazoo"
and "Serenade In Blue,"
Benny Goodman's "Jersey
Bounce," Bing Crosby's
"White Christmas" and
more.
Jan. 27: the 1950s -
Rock 'n' roll comes on
the scene, especially Elvis
Presley. Big bands still
were producing hits like
"Night Train" by Buddy
Murrow, and "Lady Be
Good" by Count Basie.
Feb. 24: the 1960s -
Latin American influence
produces gems like "Girl
From Ipanema," "How
Insensitive" and Herbie
Hancock's "Watermelon
Man."
March 17: the 1970s
- The fusion of rock and
jazz influences Chicago
with "Does Anyone Really
Know What Time It Is"
and "25 or 6 to 4," along
with the big band sounds
of Maynard Ferguson,
Buddy Rich and Woody
Herman.
April 21: the 1980s-
contemporary influences
of Henry Mancini, Sammy
Nestico, Don Schamber
and Dave Wolpe lead to
"Pink Panther," "Sweet
Georgia Brown" and
more.
Shows are scheduled to
begin at 7 p.m. Advanced
ticket prices are $11
per person for Cultural
Center members, or $12
for nonmembers; tickets
the day of the show are
$13 per person, with no
member discounts. The
full season is available for
only $85. Purchase tickets
at www.theculturalcenter.
com or the box office. For
more information, call
941-625-4175, ext. 221.

Free HIV testing
offered
The Charlotte County
Health Department and
CARES Outreach Services
Inc. of Sarasota will offer
free HIV testing the fourth
Saturday of every month
at the following locations
and times (the next date
is Saturday):
Edgewater United
Methodist Church, 19190
Cochran Blvd., Port
Charlotte: 8 a.m. to noon.
Charlotte County
Homeless Coalition, 1476
Kenesaw St., Murdock:
1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
No appointment is
necessary, and test results
are ready in 15 minutes.
Several local businesses
in Port Charlotte, Punta
Gorda and Englewood
have free condoms avail-
able to help prevent the


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spread of STDs and HIM.
For free condom locations
and information about
testing and prevention,
visit www.CharlotteCHD.
corn; or contact Eric
Stockley, CCHD preven-
tion training consultant,
at 941-624-7235.

Lunchtime
concerts offered
For the past two years,
Judy Kaff and Al Rozier,
members of the Cultural
Center of Charlotte
County's Two Piano
Group, have provided
free two-piano classical
concerts once a month
on Friday. The concerts
are sponsored by the
Learning Place, and in-
clude brief comments on
the featured pieces. These
are mini-concerts, in that
they take place during
the lunch hour, and those
attending are encouraged
to enjoy their lunch
during the performances.
The concerts take place
beginning at noon in
the Music Room at the
Cultural Center, 2280
Aaron St., Port Charlotte.
The next date is Nov. 29.
Rozier and Kaff will
join together Nov. 29 to
present movements from
Mozart's well-known
"Sonata in D." For more
information, visit www.
theculturalcenter.com, or
call 941-625-4175.


'Christmas With
The Celts'
Marcille Wallis &
Friends will present
"Christmas with the
Celts" at 7 p.m. Dec. 12
at Congregational United
Church of Christ, 1201
Aqui Esta Drive, Punta
Gorda. This year marks
the 14th annual staging
of the series and brings
with it two notable
changes to the band's
lineup: the final appear-
ances of 10-year band
veteran and champion
fiddler Matt Miller, and
the introduction of
young world-qualifying
Irish dancers Johnny
Maio and Kate Valley.
The program includes
seasonal music from the
Celtic lands and favorite
Christmas carols a
mix of Irish, Scottish,
Welsh, Cornish and
Appalachian song and
dance. Tickets are $10;
order them online at
www.marcillewallis.com,
or call 941-625-8544.


I


, I I


v






Our Town Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun ISunday, November 17, 2013


Brain growth key to success


he 21st centu-
ry student is no
longer patient.
He is not good at being
bored in the classroom.
Rather, the 21st century
student is a multitasker.
He is dedicated to getting
answers and getting
them fast. He is used to
wanting information and
having it in the palm of
his hand within minutes.
Need to know who
sings the song playing in
the elevator? Well, simply
hold up your phone and
there is an app that will
name the band. Want to
impress your friends by
knowing constellations
in the sky? No problem.
Augmented reality apps
can make the sky come
alive.


So the question for
the 21st century teacher
is how to keep up with
these students. How do
we teach them to strug-
gle to learn information
when they so easily can
refer to an app for help?
These types of discus-
sions are commonplace
in our staff meetings.
Recently, a not-so-
recent study was brought
back to the table. Carol


Dweck, leading research-
er at Stanford University,
developed the idea of the
"Growth Mindset." To
summarize, the Growth
Mindset is exactly how it
sounds. It is the devel-
opment and growth of
your mind. Our students
have information at their
fingertips, but how much
of it do they really and
truly comprehend, know
and retain?
The Growth Mindset
encourages teachers to
approach learning as
a process. The brain is
a muscle that can only
grow with practice.
According to the Growth
Mindset, knowing and
understanding that the
brain can grow is the first
step toward success. The


proof of learning is in the
struggle to get there.
Students are afraid to
fail. They are terrified of
bad grades and making
mistakes. When students
fail it isn't because they
aren't smart enough. It
oftentimes is because
they don't put in the
effort it takes to learn
the concepts. Just as in
sports. We cannot go to
the free-throw line never
having taken a shot and
hope to make 10 of 10.
However, if we practice
shooting every day, then
when we approach the
line we feel confident
in our chances to make
them all.
In our own study, we
found our teachers and
students are on the same


page. Both the teachers
and the students related
an "A' grade with hard
work, and an "F" grade
with laziness.
This impressed me.
Edison Collegiate High
School accepts students
based on a random
lottery. When students
enter our building as
freshmen, they are from
different backgrounds
and different abilities.
We know that with
hard work, dedication
and "grit," each one of
these students can be
successful.
I like to think of the
Growth Mindset as an
adventure race. Racers
no longer just run to the
finish line; they have to
overcome each obstacle


along the way. Our stu-
dents will face challenges
in their academic race,
and our goal is to teach
them to stay focused and
committed, and to con-
tinue to run. We know that
exercise gives us endur-
ance, and now we know
that learning actually can
grow your brain.
We have the power
to fuel our minds with
knowledge. Who knows,
maybe MapMyBrain is
the next big app!

Matthew Catanzarite
is assistant principal
of Edison Collegiate
High School at Edison
State College Charlotte
Campus in Punta Gorda.
Email him at matthew.
catanzarite@edison.edu.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF

Daughters of Daughters of the 401 W. Henry St., Punta Dale Phillips with is free and open to the information about the
the American American Revolution Gorda. Social time the Charlotte County public. Charlotte Bay Chapter
Revolution will hold its monthly will begin at 1:30 p.m., Sheriff's Office will For more information of the DAR, visit www.
meeting at 1:30 p.m. with the business speak about Crimes about the meeting or rootsweb.ancestry.
The Charlotte Monday at the Church meeting set for 2 p.m. against Women and to RSVP, call Suzy at com/-flcbcdar/char
Bay Chapter of the of the Good Shepherd, Following the meeting, Self-Defense. This event 941-505-5507. For more bay.htm.





BUSINESS Journal



Let Dale's Air Conditioning & Heating Evaluate Your AC To See If You Can Save


John and Carrie Gable own
Dale's Air Conditioning &
Heating, 18260 Paulson Drive,
Port Charlotte. The Gables run a
focused business on customer
service and pride themselves in
providing service on your
heating and cooling unit, and
pool heater. They strive to
educate their customers on how


to keep their home heated and
cooled in the winter and summer,
and what to do to extend the life of
the unit. Dale's can advise you on
your duct design and insulation
and explain the effects of the sun
exposure on each side of your
house. If you feel your electric bill
is too high, you may need a new
unit. You can count on the service,


advice and fair pricing that you
receive and a thorough and
complete check at each service
visit. Call Dale's Air Conditioning &
Heating for sales or service. The
phone number is 941-629-1712
and business hours are 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday, with
24 hours emergency service to
their customers.


jonn anu Carrie aole atD uale s Air
Conditioning & Heating, 18260 Paulson
Drive, Port Charlotte. 941-629-1712


Westchester Gold Best Quality

And Selection For 37 Years


Steve Duke of
Westchester Gold & Diamonds,
4200-F Tamiami Tr., Pt. Char.
Steve Duke, owner of
Westchester Gold is on
site to assist you with
jewelry purchases and


appraisals, or the sale of
your old gold and other
valuables. Duke says, "We
pay top dollar for your
items and have been in
business for more than 37
years. Don't be fooled by
"We Buy Gold" offers from
others, see us first for the
best prices offered.i
They specialize in pre-
loved Rolex watches, new
and estate jewelry pieces,
oriental rugs, unusual
gifts, paintings, rare


collectibles, and more.
Westchester Gold is a
community staple and is
known for its generosity in
giving back. Listen to Steve
Duke's Friday morning
show on 1580 AM radio
each week 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
It is interesting, fun and
always topical. The store is
located in Baer's Plaza, and
the phone number is 941-
625-0666.Visit their
website at
www.westchestergold.com


Q. How do I clean my
pool cage without the
expense of hiring a
professional?What other
services do you offer?
A. Go to your local ACE
Hardware and purchase
Pool Cage Plus. Follow
simple instructions for
professional results. For
almost 3 years Pool Cage
Plus, LLC has been
providing affordable and
simple solutions to
problems that previously
were really expensive to
fix. They also provide
roof cleaning, pool deck
and paver brick sealing
to preserve the integrity
of the home owner's
investment. For more
information call Pool
Cage Plus at 941-584-
7937 or go to http://
www.poolcageplus.com

Q. My spouse just had a
little fender bender. Now
we don't know where to
get the car repaired.Who
canyou recommend?
A. Whether you have a
small dent in your car


door or major collision
damage, your car will be
put back in like-new
condition at Jackie's
Auto Body. This first rate
repair shop is known by
local car dealers as a first
class auto body work and
custom paint shop. Jack
D'Amico has over 35
years of experience and
uses only the finest
Sherwin-Williams paint
products and materials
and has state-of-the-art
equipment. Jackie's Auto
Body accepts all types of
insurance claims and is
on the preferred
insurance list. Jack and
Regina run a first class
operation and are always
available to give a free
estimate. Jackie's Auto
Body is located at 19888
Veterans Highway, Port
Charlotte. Trust the pros
to make your vehicle like
new again.

Q. Where can I go to
have my motor home
evaluated and repaired?
A. For all your auto


repairs give Dr. D's Auto
Repair a call. Dr. D's
repairs all types of
vehicles including motor
homes and four
wheelers. At Dr. D's you
can count on the best
service, diagnostics,
repairs, replacement
parts, etc. Only superior
quality replacement parts
are used and rates are
very reasonable. Owner,
Mike True, and his staff
are all ASE certified and
they offer the finest full
service repair in this
area. With the
computerized engine
analysis, you can be
assured that the service
required on your vehicle
is necessary. True is well
known as an excellent
auto mechanic and the
business enjoys an
excellent reputation. Dr.
D's is located at 23415
Janice Avenue in the
Whidden Industrial Park
in Charlotte Harbor and
the phone number is
941-743-3677. For the
best service at a


Go To Absolute Blinds
For The Best Selection

Of Window Treatments
Absolute Blinds has
been in business in
Charlotte County
S and the surrounding
area for over ten
-. .... years and has
become one of the
largest and most
Absolute Blinds 2842 Tamiami successful licensed
Trail, Port Charlotte, call 941-627- window treatment
5444 companies in
Southwest Florida.
With unbeatable pricing, blinds made while you
wait, free advice from a professional decorator,
and the best selection available, Absolute Blinds
can fulfill all your window treatment needs. An
array of verticals, a selection of wood plantation
shutters, horizontals, mini-blinds, pleated shades,
top treatments, cornices, draperies and more is
among their offering. Absolute Blinds is a Graber
dealer and estimates are free. If you need window
coverings for home or office, Absolute Blinds is
there to assist you. The store is located at 2842
Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte and the phone
number is 941-627-5444. Past and present
customers can like Absolute Blinds' Facebook
page. For more information, visit their website
at www.absoluteblinds.com/


reasonable price, call or
stop by Dr. D's Auto Repair.

Q.What is the best alarm
system and installer?
A. Here is a quick
reference when choosing
to purchase an Alarm
and Monitoring System.
Proper installation is
very important. If you
don't have a radio cell
back up installed on your
alarm and the phone
lines are cut there is no
alarm or police-
emergency contact
available. Most
companies charge $40-
$60 per month for a radio
back up system. Quality
TV only charges $29.95


per month. Quality TV
has professional
installers, installing
hardwired systems in
every door and window
in your home. No bulky
transmitters on your
doors and windows. No
batteries to change.
When it comes to your
security needs, Quality
TV is your Security
Expert. Give them a call
at 941-426-1773 and
allow them to give you a
quote, or stop by the
store located at 14212 W
Tamiami Trail, North
Port. For more
information, please visit
their website at
www.qualitytv.com


DOSYU UIES ULFCLL912560


QUESTIONS & ANSWERS


OurTown Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 7


PRIDE
FROM PAGE 1

a big way was Fawcett
Memorial Hospital,
which provided its
employee parking lot
for the event; and the
Charlotte County govern-
ment, for its all-around
support. Susan Swanson,
Team Parkside president,
credited the county
for having a constant
presence in the commu-
nity, helping to sponsor
events, curb crime and
rebuild its housing stock.
"Their doors are always
open to us," Swanson
said. "It speaks well that
the county recognizes
the need here, but it's
another thing for them
to actually do something
about it."
Over at "Touch a
Truck," kids are climbing
all over heavy-duty
equipment such as a
cherry picker, an end
loader, a dump truck, an



Gator DJ
supplied the
afternoon
music
during the
all-day
Parkside
Interna-
tional Fall
Festival, i "
with live '
bands slated '
to take the
stage later
in the day.


excavator and a bucket
truck all provided by
Charlotte County Public
Works and foreman
Christopher Andersch.
"They love getting up
in them. Up until a cer-
tain age, kids think these
are the coolest things
in the world," he said.
"Anytime there is some-
thing like this festival, we
jump at that chance to
advocate Public Works
for the next generation."
As Neighborhood
Watch captain Mary
Ann Bosco dances with
other zone captains
to the music of Gator
DJ, they provide a live
demonstration of the or-
ganization's community
aspect. Beyond looking
out for criminal activity,
Neighborhood Watch
brings residents together.
"It's about taking pride
in your home," Bosco
said, "and knowing your
neighbors on either
side."

Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTOS BY GARY ROBERTS
Jonathan Walker, 4, of Port Charlotte takes the wheel of an end Michael Seabar, 4, of Port Charlotte receives the eye of the
loader, one of the monster machines put on display by Charlotte tiger, along with the rest of the feline's face, from artist Carrie
County Public Works at Saturday's Parkside Festival. O'Brien during the festival.


At Saturday's second annual
Parkside Festival, Mary Ann
Bosco, from left, Tana Wilson
and Sandee Pellerin do the
Parkside Neighborhood
Watch shuffle.


GONE
FROM PAGE 1

belts, and alcohol was
not a factor in the crash,
according to the FHP.
Born in Port Charlotte,
Kassandra was one of
six children, with two
older sisters, a younger
sister and two brothers.
She attended Charlotte
High School in Punta
Gorda for one year, and
most recently worked at
Dunkin' Donuts, also in
Punta Gorda. According
to family members,
Kassandra did not pos-
sess a driver's license.
Kassandra's aunt Pam
Wisniewski of Englewood
said her niece had a good


STARTUPS
FROM PAGE 1

helping them build
business plans and
startup companies, and
providing them prime
office space in return for
a small percentage of
their companies.
He's interviewed some
two dozen candidates
so far, he said, and while
most didn't meet his
high standards, "two
of them had me within
60 seconds," he said.
Both, he added, "are
great ideas with global
scope."

An untangled web
Ganski of Punta
Gorda, a self-professed
"problem-solver" from "a
long line of engineers,"
said when a sister-in-law
came home from her
job at DeSoto Memorial
Hospital four years ago
complaining that it
took her 28 minutes to
untangle a patient's IV
lines, "it hit me like a bolt


heart and was generous
with it.
"She had much love to
give," Wisniewski said.
"When she came into the
room, she was all smiles.
She would give hugs to
everyone just happy."
Jennifer Gayheart,
whose house is closest
to the accident, was
awakened by the crash
around midnight.
"I heard something but
didn't know what it was,"
Gayheart said. "The pow-
er flickered on and off
and then stayed off. Then
I looked outside and saw
the flashing lights."
Gayheart walked down
to the corner and still
didn't realize how bad it
was.
"The car was so

of lightning. It was so
simple, I couldn't believe
no one had done it yet."
He and his wife Heidi
went to a crafts store,
bought some Styrofoam
and an X-ACTO knife,
and fashioned a "line
consolidation unit,"
which, he said, "will
revolutionize the way IV
lines are managed and
allow patients greater
flexibility."
They also incorporat-
ed MediCord Solutions,
acquired six patents
and are working on a
seventh, but they have
"sacrificed much these
past four years," they
said, to get the business
off the ground.
With Crumbaugh's
business guidance,
they now are ready to
go nationwide with a
medical sales company
promoting the device,
accounting services, a
production facility in
Tampa, and plans for
"multiple production
facilities" around the
country.
And the vision is
growing. With the


mangled you couldn't tell
if anyone was in there,"
she said.
Gayheart wasn't able to
go back to sleep, staying
awake in the dark with
family members. Power
to the home didn't return
until about nine hours
later. Work crews, who
labored throughout the
night to replace the fallen
utility pole, told a friend
of Gayheart's that the
driver must have been
going 80 mph to snap the
utility pole in two, she
said.
Gayheart said she
wasn't aware of any other
accidents taking place at
this bend in the road.
Meanwhile, Don
Sedore, his voice choked
with emotion, spoke

design of the device,
Crumbaugh said, size is
no barrier. It's applica-
ble to everything from
home computer line
tangles on up to consol-
idating huge lines in oil
fields. Crumbaugh said
investors are welcome
through jamescrum-
baugh@gmail.com. The
company's website is
medicordsolutions@
gmail.com.

'The next YouTube'
Orr was born and grew
up in Arcadia, graduated
in 2007 from DeSoto
County High School, and
went into his father's
drilling business, Dixie
Directional. Up in the
wilds of Alaska, however,
his thoughts turned to
"making money without
breaking my back."
It was a long, thought-
out process, he said, but


remorsefully about
Kassie K.
"She was a little angel
in disguise," her uncle
said. "She was just a great
person. She will be truly
missed."
Anthony's loved ones
could not be reached
Saturday.

Email: groberts@sun-heraldx.com

SUN PHOTO BY
GARY ROBERTS
A utility pole was sheared
off in a double fatality early
Saturday morning. Kassandra
Sedore, 19, and Anthony
Buffington, 23, were killed
in a single-car crash at the
corner of Tribune Boulevard
and Poindexter Avenue in
Tropical Gulf Acres, south of
Punta Gorda.

the result was Seventh
Day Fame, based in
Arcadia, an entertain-
ment/social media web-
site featuring short-form
videos covering a multi-
plicity of ventures from
entertainment, sports
feats, hunting, fishing,
modeling and real estate,
to mixed martial arts and
"wipe-outs."
Crumbaugh, smiling,
said admiringly, "It's
the next YouTube."
The website is www.
SeventhDayFame.com.
It will cost a presenter
$1 to post a video for one
week. Viewers will have
the week to vote for the
best video in each of the
many categories. Access
and votes are free. At the
end of seven days, votes
will be counted, and the
entrant with the best
video in each category
will receive 70 percent of
the money paid to post


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the video.
So, if there are
100 videos in a category,
the winner will receive
$70 back, and the
video will be posted for
another seven days on
the company's website.
After seven days, a whole
new stable of videos will
be posted.
Viewers, Orr said, can
see firsthand accounts
of current events, find
videos about hobbies
and interests, "and
discover the quirky and
the unusual." It will have
links with other social
networks like Facebook
and Twitter.
A principal focus of
the website, Orr said,


will be "up-and-coming
new talent," to give
entertainers, particularly
locally, a presence on the
national stage. Investors
in Seven Day Fame also
can do so through james
crumbaugh@gmail.com.
Both the Ganskis and
Orr presently are oper-
ating out of their homes,
but once the businesses
are more established,
they will take advantage
of Crumbaugh's offer of
free office space at the
headquarters of Allison
James Estates and
Homes in Punta Gorda.
"We're so excited,"
Heidi said.
"This means every-
thing to me," Orr said.


'IIy'(,111
o,, ;. c t-'0,4,, /C tQ, el,(

Routine Annual Visits Laparoscopy Surgeries Hysteroscopic Procedures
Bladder & Rectal Prolapse repair Treatment Of Abnormal Bleeding
Diagnosis & Treatment Of Urinary Incontinence
Now Accepting New Patients. Please Call For An Appointment


O Yasmeen M. Islam, MD
Board Certified Obstetrics & Gynecology
941.625.5855
HARBOR PROFESSIONAL CENTER
S 3400 Tamiamrni Trail, Suite #102, Port Charlotte


DIABETIC SHOES
NEW BALANCE & MANY MORE

If you are diabetic and have Medicare, Call:

7 DR. MICHAEL METYK
I.? 941-613-1919

Iw 3191 Harbor Blvd., Unit D
L-L Port Charlotte, FL 33952
50458481


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Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun ISunday, November 17, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW


New chapter


for Chamber


in Englewood

OUR POSITION: Small busi-
ness with an upper-case "C."

I n a place like Engle-
wood split between
two counties and with no
central city-style government
- interest groups that span
the entire community take on
a special importance.
That's long been the case
with the Englewood, Florida,
Chamber of Commerce,
until recently called the
Englewood-Cape Haze Area
Chamber of Commerce. Most
American communities have
Chamber branches. Here, the
business organization is often
the only formal organization
representing the interests
of the entire community to
outside governments.
Englewood also is a fami-
ly-run, small-business town,
not a big-chain town. Its
economy relies primarily
on tourism and seasonal
business. It's a fishing town,
a beach town. Promotion
and outreach is critical:
Englewood is proud of being
"an undiscovered gem," but
the truth is that a little more
"discovery" would be a very
healthy thing.
Which is why it's a big deal
when the Englewood Chamber
of Commerce names a new
executive director. The direc-
tor is the eyes, ears and voice
for the small-business com-
munity, and often, by exten-
sion, the entire community.
The work of the Chamber can
make a real difference in both
tying the community together
and extending a welcoming
hand to those outside the
community.
Deborah Beck was named
the new Chamber executive
director by the Board of
Directors last week.
Beck was born in Sarasota
- she wouldn't say exactly
when and was attracted to
Englewood by its Old Florida
ambiance. Beck worked for
the Florida Bar for 12 years
and lived in Tallahassee for 23.
As an independent contractor,
she staged conferences and
worked as an events director
for the Florida Chamber of
Commerce.
Beck told the Sun she will
take some time to get her feet
wet, meet with members and
set goals with the board. We
hope for good things and wish
her well.
A word also about Don
Musilli, who stepped in as
interim executive director six
months ago after Mary Smith
left the post.
Musilli brought a burst
of energy and fresh ideas
to the Chamber. Under his
leadership, the Chamber
dropped the "Cape Haze" from
the name, concentrating on
Englewood (Florida, which
is how anyone Googling the
place would most easily find
it.)
"We changed the tempera-
ture of the Chamber by going
through a rebranding pro-
cess," Musilli told us. "We got
people to rethink it."
Musilli also nurtured a more
digitally savvy Chamber. Plus,
he said, 40-50 new members
signed up in recent months,
bringing the total membership
to 432.
"All in all, I think I made
significant changes and really
re-engaged the community
back in to the Chamber, which
I thought was really import-
ant," he said.
We wish Musilli well as he


continues to develop the non-
profit Englewood Incubator
Center.


L--.Mo
PP73


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Good for
scrap-booking

Editor:
I'd like you to know that
your newspaper makes my
day. Nearly every day, I find
something worth pasting in
my scrapbook. You're highly
appreciated.
Alice Arr
Port Charlotte

Bottom line
on Obamacare
Editor:
In 1983, my former husband
lost his job and his health
insurance. So we went on the
open market to try and get
him health insurance. We were
denied. Why? Even though he
was healthy at the time, he
was denied health insurance
because his father and grandfa-
ther had heart issues.
Is insurance any better now?
Somewhat and a whole lot
better. Now he would not be
denied with Obamacare.
Does Obamacare have is-
sues? Yes. So, let's fix them and
make Obamacare better for all.
Let's stop these negative com-
ments from the Republicans
and step up to fix it. After
all, we are all Americans and
should care about one another.
American exceptionalism,
right?
I want Obamacare to work
and it will if given a chance
with everyone helping, because
I don't want to see 1983 again.
Oh, and by the way, my former
husband never got health
insurance. Thank God he was a
veteran and had the VA.
Ann Devore
Port Charlotte

Lawsuit is
abuse of system

Editor:
After reading an article in the
Sun, I must say I really have
seen it all. When an individual
chooses a life of crime and is
incarcerated, they lose their
freedom and other rights as
well. Someone chose to com-
mit a criminal act, and as such
is now a guest of the Charlotte
County Jail.
If he is unhappy with the
cost of his specialty meals and
lack of an orthopedic pillow,
perhaps he should not have
become a criminal in the first
place. He would then be free


to eat and pay for his kosher
meals and special pillow out of
his own pocket.
To be able to file a lawsuit
is ridiculous to say the least.
It is an abuse of the system
which should immediately be
thrown out of court. I hope he
eventually sees the error of his
ways and can at some point
become a member of society
again where he will be able to
exercise his freedom as long
as he respects the rights and
freedom of everyone else.
Pamela Gross
Port Charlotte

Wait'til
next time

Editor:
I'm sick of reading letters
about how bad a president
Obama is.
You voted for him, so suck
it up. He is there and he isn't
going away.
You will have your chance at
the next one no matter which
party he or she belongs to.
Shirley C. Elliott
Port Charlotte

Pre registration
next time at library

Editor:
Thank you for publishing
the notice of the Englewood
Charlotte County Library's pro-
gram "A Land Remembered."
Many people apparently read it,
as they had to turn people away.
A suggestion for the library
perhaps would be to have pre
registration for these events.
Let's hear more about the
Englewood Charlotte County
Library events.
Joan Stegmeyer
Englewood

Republicans:
No sniveling

Editor:
A recent writer put forth a
proposition based on some facts
with a good dash of fantasy.
The passage of the 13th, 14th
and 15th amendments required
Democratic votes because
Republicans did not have the
numbers for the 75 percent
majority requirement. Lincoln
freed the slaves not from the
purest of motives but with less
than noble motivations. Not a
criticism of my favorite presi-
dent, but recognition that he did
not walk on water.
It would be nice to have
some references cited for: the
Democratic Party started the


KKK; the Republican party
sponsored the NAACP; the 1909
NAACP leader was a Republican.
The most noteworthy outcome
of the 1957 Civil Rights Act was
as a stepping stone to the acts
on 1964/1965. It had no impact
of improving voting rights for
blacks. The writer threatens with
the statement that she could go
on (probably on and on and on).
Thankfully there is a 250-word
limit.
When someone contends that
all these are good and all those
are bad, there are lots of smoke
and mirrors involved.
The party of Lincoln is not
the Republican Party of the 21st
ronti InrT nor i- tbo l nonorftir


cencurly, 11o1 1is Lneijernd
Party the same as the o
dominated by the solidi
Republicans, do not
eling whiners. Stand pi
those principles for wh
stand.
Jac



Donate to he
in Philippin

Editor:
I read an email front
executive director oft]
American College of S
related to the tragic los
devastation and isolat
Philippines as a result
recent massive typhoon
They are gearing up
preparing to sign up v
in case a request for an
tional medical support
initiated.
However, the ACS C
on Trauma strongly sul
open our hearts and d
the Red Cross or the P
Red Cross to help alley
massive human degra
and suffering.
TitaN



Saving bigger
lie for last

Editor:
And to continue on i
where other writers ha
written: Remember the
ter budget cuts last Ma
According to Obama a
apologists in the media
sequester was going to
economy, but after it w
effect nobody noticed.
Then there was the r
government shutdown
According to Obama, I
Reid, the networks and
major papers, it would
an economic Armagec
what we really got was
ment "slowdown." In fa
most, 17 percent was s


and life in the country went on.
According to Obama, not rais-
ing the debt ceiling would have
led to a worldwide disaster. I
guess he had to save his biggest
lie for last.
William F. Holinka
Punta Gorda

Beautiful trail
is now completed

Editor:
Good news! Eight weeks
after Charlotte County com-
missioners disentangled their
legal issues with Coral Creek
Golf Course regarding right of
way to construct the last 1,100
feet of the Cape Haze Pioneer
Trail, the job is done, the
connector is paved.
Congratulations to the
commission for assuming
the responsibility and to the
Department of Public Works in
the person of project manager
David Milligan for building a
safe, efficient 8-foot-wide link
between the eight miles of
trail and the existing multi-use
corridor on County Road 771.
Cyclists and pedestrians
enjoy. It's a beautiful trail.
Ann Mercer
Englewood

Arguments
built on lies

Editor:
An ill-informed woman
wrote in with a list of counter-
points to allegations of racism
in the GOP and I'd like to set
the record straight.
Firstly, the Democrats and
Republicans switched parties
around the early 1900s. So
there goes about half her
argument right there. Yes, the
KKK were Democrats, but


ne..... they were also conservatives.
d south." Conservatives have long been
be sniv-" on the wrong side of history-
roudly for racism, slavery misogyny child
uich you labor, voting rights, food, drug
ich you and water safety. They continue
on this legacy of bile today with
k Marshall hatred of gays, women, atheists
Englewood and anyone who is different.
This is not a matter of opinion,
Syou can witness the hatred
coming straight from their own
es mouths unashamedly.
Incidentally, while I'm here,
I'd also like to point out that
i the Obama was not targeting
he conservative groups through
urgeons the IRS. That is an outright lie
ss of lives, and I'm tired of seeing it spread
ion in the around. A worker within the
of the IRS was ensuring conservative
Dn. groups had all their Ts crossed
) and so they would get the special
volunteers tax considerations they were
n interna- requesting.
t team is Stop spreading lies. If you
need to lie to bolster your case,
committee you don't have a case.
iggests to Bobbie Jean Pentecost
[onate to Punta Gorda
hilippine
viate this
dation Don't wait to

M. Quintos install a light
Punta Gorda Editor:
How sad that John L. Brough
was struck and killed at this
est intersection yesterday. I can't
t believe that the road people
don't feel a traffic light is needed
at this busy four-lane highway
from intersection, yet someone felt
ve a traffic light is necessary at
e seques- Indian Cemetery Road and
irch? Jones Loop.
nd his I know the light that was there
a, the temporarily for two years didn't
) tank the meet hurricane standards, but
vent into we didn't have a hurricane and if
it were still there, John L. Brough
recent would most likely be alive today.
I My condolences to his family,
Harry and hopefully those who make
J the traffic light decisions will use
Again be common sense and put a traffic
[don. But light at U.S. 41 and Acline before
govern- the next fatality.
act, at Cindy Salmon
hut down Punta Gorda


I LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013











President Obama in a fix


resident Barack
Obama just admit-
ted that the "set-
tled law of the land" isn't
the least bit settled, and
it hasn't been sabotaged
by Republicans so much
as by the ignorance and
incompetence of his own
administration.
Presidents have had
worse press conferences
than President Obama's
announcing a "fix" for
people losing their
health insurance, but
probably not much
worse. He had to resort
to his desperation execu-
tive maneuver under the
pressure of a full-blown
Democratic panic on
Capitol Hill and rebuke
from none other than
Bill Clinton.
In an interview with
Ozy.com, the former
president addressed
those millions of
Americans getting
cancellation notices
from their insurance
companies, despite


Obama's infamous
promise that they
could keep their plans.
"I personally believe,"
Clinton said, "even if it
takes a change in the
law, the president should
honor the commitment
the federal government
made to these people
and let them keep what
they got."
The words were barely
out of Clinton's mouth
before the specula-
tion over his motives
began. For the sake of
argument, let's be overly
credulous and assume
that he simply thinks it's
wrong for a president
to lie to people about


whether they can keep
their health insurance.
If Democrats were
inclined to catch the
falling flag of Obama's
credibility as they once
were with Clinton's, they
might take a page from
the 1990s and insist that
"everyone lies about
historic health care
legislation." They aren't
so inclined. They not
only tied themselves to
the law, they repeated
Obama's false promise
themselves, and evident-
ly don't appreciate it one
bit.
Maybe they genuinely
didn't know better.
Our representatives in
Congress can't be expect-
ed to read or understand
legislation they support
to transform a major
sector of the American
economy. These are busy
and important people,
after all. But at the very
least, the president's
policy staff could have
let them in on the joke.


Obama's promise
on insurance wasn't
just injudicious, it was
completely impossible.
It wasn't an incidental
falsehood but ran count-
er to the central premise
of his own health care
law. People losing their
current insurance
isn't an unintended
consequence of the
law; it is an intended
consequence without
which much of the law
doesn't work. Its viability
depends on people being
forced from their current
policies and onto the
exchanges.
That's why Obama's
"fix" is so deeply cynical.
Its purpose is to provide
the greatest possible
political cover while
having the smallest pos-
sible real-world effect.
The White House hopes
congressional Democrats
can point to the ad-
ministrative action as
addressing the problem
of cancellations, at the


same time insurers and
state regulators won't be
able to reverse field and
undo the train of policy
cancellations already
underway.
The White House
vehicle is, as usual, a
unilateral and undem-
ocratic act. There's no
reason that the president
couldn't have asked
Congress to change the
law, except he wouldn't
have total control over
the process. It's not clear,
though, that his ploy
will work. At the end
of the day, it might not
forestall congressional
action, and it may be
that insurers manage to
preserve enough policies
outside of the exchanges
to further undermine the
struggling health care
law.
At the very least,
the president has
again shown that he
is perfectly happy to
rewrite the law, when it
suits him. At his press


conference, he repeat-
edly said that he and
his team had fumbled
the ball on Obamacare
implementation and
misunderstood basic
things, like how people
buy insurance. These are
the same people who
think they possess the
administrative mastery
to run highly complex
law-remaking swaths of
the American economy.
As for his promise
about people keeping
their insurance, the pres-
ident admitted he knew
it wasn't going to be true
for everyone. Even his fix
is only good for a year,
because he ultimately
needs those people on
the exchanges. He never
meant his promise, and
he still doesn't. No won-
der even Bubba might be
shocked.
Rich Lowry is the editor
of the National Review.
Readers may reach him
at comments.lowry@
nationalreview. corn.


A hint of 2016 excitement


he New Republic
magazine was,
appropriately, the
stimulant that last week
gave the Democratic
base a frisson of antici-
pation about a possible
Elizabeth Warren pres-
idential candidacy in
2016. Now in her 1lth
month as a Massachu-
setts senator, she is suit-
ed to carry the progres-
sive torch that was fueled
99 years ago this month
by The New Republic's
founding.
Its first editor was
Herbert Croly, whose
1909 book "The Promise
of American Life" -
Theodore Roosevelt
read it, rapturously,
during his post-pres-
idential travels is
progressivism's primer:
"The average American
individual is morally and
intellectually inadequate
to a serious and con-
sistent conception of
his responsibilities as a
democrat," so national
life should be a "school."
"The exigencies of such
schooling frequently
demand severe coercive
measures, but what


schooling does not?"
And "a people are saved
many costly perversions"
if "the official school-
masters are wise, and the
pupils neither truant nor
insubordinate."
Today the magazine,
whose birth was partly
financed by a progressive
heiress, Dorothy Payne
Whitney, is owned by
Facebook co-founder
Chris Hughes. Warren, a
scourge of (other) eco-
nomic royalists, and es-
pecially of large financial
institutions, is aWilliam
Jennings Bryan for our
time: She has risen from
among Harvard's down-
trodden to proclaim:
"You shall not crucify
mankind upon a cross of
derivatives."
Before she sank to a
senator's salary, she was


among the 1 percenters,
whose annual incomes
now begin at $394,000.
Hillary Clinton recently
made more than that
from two speeches, five
days apart, for Goldman
Sachs, a prowling Wall
Street carnivore that
Warren presumably
wants to domesticate.
Between Warren, hot in
pursuit of malefactors
of great wealth, and
Clinton, hot in pursuit
of great wealth, which
candidate would be
more fun for the kind of
people who compose the
Democrats' nominating
electorate?
Such people are in
politics for, among other
satisfactions, the fun of
it. Americans profess de-
testation of politics and
its practitioners, but their
behavior belies their
rhetoric. Last month,
a poll reported that
60 percent of Americans
favor voting out of office
all congressional incum-
bents, including their
own representatives. But
just 11 months before
this poll revealed the
electorate's (supposedly)


extraordinary dyspep-
sia, voters re-elected
90 percent of represen-
tatives and 91 percent
of senators. Most
Americans most of the
time have better things
to do than feel strongly
(aggrieved or otherwise)
about politics. They
are not as angry about
goings-on in Washington
as they say they are, or
imagine themselves to
be, or think they ought
to be when a pollster
takes their emotional
temperature.
Since Andrew Jackson,
with his collaborator
(and presidential succes-
sor) Martin Van Buren,
displaced the politics of
deference to elites with
the politics of mass mo-
bilization by parties, the
electoral scramble has
been popular entertain-
ment. Analyses of Chris
Christie's appeal are
neglecting something:
He has fun seeking and
wielding power, and his
fun is infectious.
Can Democratic
activists, for whom
politics is catnip, cheer-
fully contemplate the


uncontested nomination
of someone who will
be 69 on Election Day
2016, who will have
been conspicuous in
the nation's life for a
quarter of a century, and
who cultivates nostalgia
for the last decade of
the previous century?
Can forward-leaning,
clench-fisted MSNBC
viewers really work
themselves into a lather
of excitement about
the supposed feminist
triumph of smashing the
ultimate "glass ceiling"
for a woman whose
marriage took her to
the upper reaches of
politics? Do Democrats,
ankle-deep in the
rubble of Obamacare's
paternalism, really want
to nominate the author
of Hillarycare? Before a
Democratic-controlled
Congress spurned it, she
explained her health care
plan this way (a delicious
quotation excavated by
The Wall Street Journal's
Holman Jenkins):
"We just think people
will be too focused on
saving money and they
won't get the care for


their children and them-
selves that they need....
The money has to go to
the federal government
because the federal
government will spend
that money better."
Come 2016, Clinton
may be the one thing
no successful candidate
can be, and something
Warren (or some other
avatar of what Howard
Dean in 2003 called "the
Democratic wing of
the Democratic Party")
would not be: boring.
The social scientist
Robert Nisbet called
boredom "one of the
most insistent and
universal" forces that has
shaped human behavior.
It still is. So, all those who
today regard Clinton's
nomination as it was
regarded in 2008 as a
foregone conclusion-
should ask themselves:
When was the last time
presidential politics was
as predictable as they
think it has become?
George Will is a colum-
nist for The Washington
Post. Readers may reach
him at georgewill@
washpost.com.


Dreaming of the White House


I s it too early to think
about who's running
for president in 2016,
three years from now?
Not in Washington, a
city with more campaign
consultants than dry
cleaners.
After all, we're talking
about a business that
raised and spent more
than $2 billion, em-
ployed thousands of
people and consumed
more than two years of
planning, fundraising
and campaigning during
the last presidential
election. And that was
for a race in which
Democrats knew who
their nominee would be.
This time, both parties
have a wide-open field,
at least in theory.
Some of the politicians
being talked about are
unlikely to run, but
that doesn't mean they
don't love to hear their
names mentioned. A
presidential campaign is
long, expensive, pun-
ishing and sometimes
even humiliating. But a
presidential flirtation is
none of those things. A
politician's prestige and
power only grow when
he or she is mentioned
as White House material.


So who is being
mentioned?
Let's start with the
Democrats. Former
Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham
Clinton has opened a
prohibitive lead in the
early polls, with support
from 66 percent of
Democratic voters in
an NBC poll released
Tuesday, against
14 percent for all other
candidates combined.
That's a much bigger
lead than Clinton held in
polls three years before
the 2008 campaign. And
Clinton even has a cam-
paign organization in
waiting, a group called
Ready for Hillary, which,
though not officially
authorized, is raising
money, commissioning
polls and collecting
names of volunteers.
But none of that has
stopped Democrats


from talking about other
possible candidates. This
week's heartthrob was
Sen. Elizabeth Warren
of Massachusetts, who
starred in a long article
in the New Republic that
cast her as everything
thoroughgoing progres-
sives could want.
Warren insists she
isn't running. The
Boston Globe quoted
the senator as saying:
"No, no, no, no, no." But
that ambiguous wording
"leaves Warren plenty of
room to start running if
she chooses," the Globe
noted.
Democratic cam-
paign strategists have
reason to think about
potential alternatives:
Clinton's health remains
a question mark. She
collapsed from apparent


exhaustion last year
during her final months
as secretary of state. If
she decides not to run
for personal reasons, her
party will need someone
in the wings.
Luckily, there are
several Democrats
who think they ought
to be considered. Vice
President Joe Biden
stands ready, former
Vermont Gov. Howard
Dean has talked about
running and Maryland
Gov. Martin O'Malley is
angling for a place in the
race.
Meanwhile,
Republicans in Iowa
are having a difficult
time scheduling enough
dinners to accommo-
date all of the potential
candidates who want
to visit in advance of


the state's 2015 straw
poll. Sens. Ted Cruz of
Texas, Marco Rubio of
Florida and Rand Paul of
Kentucky have already
dropped by; so have for-
mer Sen. Rick Santorum
of Pennsylvania and Gov.
Rick Perry of Texas.
About the only big-
name Republicans
who haven't visited
Iowa recently are Govs.
Chris Christie of New
Jersey and Scott Walker
of Wisconsin, but that
doesn't mean they aren't
serious contenders.
"We're in the age of the
Fox News primary now,"


one GOP strategist told
me. "Candidates don't
have to go to Iowa every
week."
Christie jumped to the
top of the polls with his
landslide re-election in
New Jersey this month.
And as the new chair-
man of the Republican
Governors Assn., he'll
soon oversee a war chest
that could top $140 mil-
lion for statehouse
campaigns next year.
But Tuesday's NBC
poll revealed a potential
problem for Christie,

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The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 9


VIEWPOINT











The European money trap


hen Greece
hit the skids
almost four
years ago, some ana-
lysts (myself included)
thought that we might
be seeing the beginning
of the end for the euro,
Europe's common cur-
rency. Others were more
optimistic, believing that
tough love tempo-
rary aid tied to reform
- would soon produce
recovery. Both camps
were wrong. What we
actually got was a rolling
crisis that never seems to
reach any kind of resolu-
tion. Every time Europe
seems ready to go over
the edge, policymakers
find a way to avoid com-
plete disaster. But every
time there are hints of
true recovery, something
else goes wrong.
And here we go again.
Not long ago, European
officials were declaring
that the Continent had
turned the corner, that
market confidence was
returning and growth
was resuming. But now
there's a new source of
concern, as the specter
of deflation looms over


much of Europe. And
the debate over how
to respond is turning
seriously ugly.
Some background:
The European Central
Bank, or ECB, Europe's
equivalent of the Federal
Reserve, is supposed
to keep inflation close
to 2 percent. Why not
zero? Several reasons,
but the most important
point right now is that
an overall European
inflation rate too close
to zero would translate
into actual deflation in
the troubled economies
of southern Europe.
And deflation has nasty
economic side effects,
especially in countries
already burdened by high
debt.
So it's a source of great
concern that European


inflation has started
dropping far below
target; over the past
year, consumer prices
rose only 0.7 percent,
while "core" prices that
exclude volatile food and
energy costs rose only
0.8 percent.
Something had to be
done, and last week the
ECB cut interest rates.
As policy decisions go,
this had the distinction
of being both obviously
appropriate and obvious-
ly inadequate: Europe's
economy clearly needs
a boost, but the ECB's
action will surely make,
at best, a marginal differ-
ence. Still, it was a move
in the right direction.
Yet the move was
hugely controversial,
both inside and outside
the ECB. And the contro-
versy took an ominous
form, at least for anyone
who remembers Europe's
terrible history. For ar-
guments over European
monetary policy aren't
just a battle of ideas;
increasingly, they sound
like a battle of nations,
too.
For example, who


voted against the rate
cut? Both German
members of the ECB
board, joined by the
leaders of the Dutch and
Austrian central banks.
Who, outside the ECB,
was harshest in criticiz-
ing the action? German
economists, who made a
point not just of attack-
ing the substance of
the bank's action but of
emphasizing the nation-
ality of Mario Draghi, the
bank's president, who is
Italian. The influential
German economist
Hans-Werner Sinn
declared that Draghi was
just trying to give Italy
access to low-interest
loans. The chief econo-
mist of the newsweekly
WirtschaftsWoche called
the rate cut a diktatt from
a new Banca d'Italia,
based in Frankfurt."
Such insinuations are
grossly unfair to Draghi,
whose efforts to contain
the euro crisis have been
little short of heroic.
I'd go so far as to say
that the euro probably
would have collapsed
in 2011 or 2012 without
his leadership. But never


mind the personalities.
What's scary here is the
way this is turning into
the Teutons versus the
Latins, with the euro -
which was supposed to
bring Europe together -
pulling it apart instead.
What's going on? Some
of it is national stereo-
typing: The German
public is eternally
vigilant against the
prospect that those lazy
southern Europeans are
going to make off with
its hard-earned money.
But there's also a real
issue here. Germans
just hate inflation, but
if the ECB succeeds in
getting average European
inflation back up to
around 2 percent, it
will push inflation in
Germany which is
booming even as other
European nations suffer
Depression-like levels
of unemployment -
substantially higher than
that, maybe to 3 percent
or more.
This may sound bad,
but it's how the euro
is supposed to work.
In fact, it's the way it
has to work. If you're


going to share a currency
with other countries,
sometimes you're going
to have above-average
inflation. In the years be-
fore the global financial
crisis, Germany had low
inflation while countries
like Spain had relatively
high inflation. Now the
rules of the game require
that the roles be re-
versed, and the question
is whether Germany is
prepared to accept those
rules. And the answer to
that question isn't clear.
The truly sad thing is
that, as I said, the euro
was supposed to bring
Europe together, in ways
both substantive and
symbolic. It was sup-
posed to encourage clos-
er economic ties, even
as it fostered a sense of
shared identity. What
we're getting instead,
however, is a climate of
anger and disdain on the
part of both creditors
and debtors. And the end
is still nowhere in sight.
Paul Krugman is a
columnist for The New
York Times. He can be
reached at www.newyork
times.com.


This could be a game-changer


is signature ini-
tiative is on the
ropes Down
in the count! Fourth and
long! but President
Obama remains strange-
ly sportsmanlike.
"We fumbled the
rollout on this health
care law," he admitted
at Thursday afternoon's
news conference. "I am
very frustrated, but I'm
also somebody who, if
I fumbled the ball, you
know, I'm going to wait
until I get the next play
and then I'm going to
try to run as hard as I
can and do right by the
team."
Four times he men-
tioned fumbling both
the HealthCare.gov web-
site and his promise that
people could keep their
health plans if they liked
them. "These are two
fumbles on something
that on a big game,
which but the game's


not over," he said.
In a narrow sense,
that's probably true:
There may well be
enough time to salvage
Obamacare.
But on the broader
question of whether
Obama can rebuild an
effective presidency after
this debacle, it's starting
to look as if it may be
Game Over.
The record for recent
second-term presidents
is not good: Ronald
Reagan had Iran-contra,
Bill Clinton had im-
peachment, and George
W Bush had Katrina and


Iraq. Once a president
suffers a blow such as
Obama is now suffering
with his health care law
- in which the public
not only disapproves of
a president's actions but
starts to take a negative
view of him personally -
it is difficult to recover.
Last week's Quinnipiac
University poll found
Obama's job-approval
rating at its lowest ever,
39 percent. More omi-
nous: Only 44 percent
say Obama is honest
and trustworthy, while
52 percent say he is not;
that's the first time more
thought him untrust-
worthy than trustworthy.
Polls show Obama's
personal favorability
rating has dropped in
tandem.
We have seen this
before. After the flubbed
response to Katrina in
2005, Bush's honest-
and-trustworthy rating


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fell below 50 percent
for the first time, and it
never returned. Clinton
began his second
term with 42 percent
calling him honest and
trustworthy; he soon
slipped into the 20s in
Washington Post polling
and stayed there.
The loss of trust will
make even harder the
already uphill effort
to persuade Congress
to enact other items
on his agenda, such as
immigration reform and
a comprehensive budget
deal. House Speaker
John Boehner last
week dashed hopes of
immigration legislation
getting through Congress
anytime soon, saying
the House wouldn't even
negotiate with the Senate
over an immigration bill
that chamber passed.
Also last week, House
and Senate conferees
meeting to discuss the
budget they have been
assigned to produce
acknowledged they had
given up hope for a
far-reaching agreement.
Obama, in his
Thursday news confer-
ence, spoke of regaining


MCMANUS
FROM PAGE 9

the most moderate of
the leading Republican
possibilities: His appeal
may not travel outside
his home turf. The
New Jerseyan drew
support from 57 per-
cent of Republicans
in the Northeast but
only 22 percent of
Republicans in the West.
The GOP strategist
- who asked not to be
identified, partly be-
cause he hasn't commit-
ted to a candidate yet
- predicted a three-way
race among Christie,
Walker and Paul.
David Carney, who
managed Perry's 2012
campaign, thinks it's still
too early to predict who


his clout as part of the
game. His game plan:
"My intention in terms
of winning back the con-
fidence of the American
people is just to work as
hard as I can, identify
the problems that we've
got, make sure that we're
fixing them."
"There are going to be
ups and downs during
the course of my pres-
idency," Obama said.
"I think I said early on
when I was running, I
am not a perfect man
and I will not be a perfect
president."
He didn't seem to
consider that this may
not be part of the usual
ups and downs. And
though he deserves
credit for his apologies
- seven times during
his news conference, he
said the problems with
Obamacare are "on us" or
"on me" it's not likely
that the public's loss of
trust will be repaired no
matter how often or how
genuinely he says "my
bad."
Even as he accepted
responsibility for the
debacle, he couldn't
resist transferring some

the front-runners will be.
"Any time you have an
open seat, lots of people
are going to want to test
the waters," he said. "I'd
bet we have 20 people
see what the market's
like" and that's just
on the Republican side.
(His list of potential
candidates also includes
Ohio Gov. John Kasich,
Louisiana Gov. Bobby
Jindal, Santorum and
Perry.)
"We've had an heir
apparent in almost every
presidential race since
Eisenhower," Carney
noted of the GOP, which
has frequently given its
nomination to a candi-
date who came in sec-
ond place before. "That's
not true this time."
Do any of those can-
didates look like pres-
idential material? Not


blame to the assembled
press ("the things that
go right, you guys aren't
going to write about" and
to Republicans ("repeal,
repeal, let's get rid of this
thing").
But Obama seemed
genuinely puzzled by the
notion that his leader-
ship may have been the
cause. He dismissed a
question about whether
his administration may
be too insular ("I meet
with an awful lot of
folks").
And, he said, "when
I do some Monday-
morning quarterbacking
on myself," he concludes
that maybe he should
have been "breaking the
mold" with the rollout
earlier because "the
federal government has
not been good at this
stuff in the past."
Wait a minute:
Monday-morning
quarterbacking? Maybe
the president does un-
derstand that the game
is over.
Dana Milbank is a
Washington Post colum-
nist. Readers may reach
him at danamilbank@
washpost.com.

to former Alaska Gov.
Sarah Palin, who looked
at the field this week
and sniffed: "There's no
Ronald Reagan."
But one or two of them
will grow on us. They
always do.
By this time a year
from now, several of
those names will have
made their candidacies
official. By this time two
years from now, they'll be
campaigning in earnest
for the Iowa caucuses.
And by this time only
three years from now,
we'll have elected a new
president at which
point we'll start spec-
ulating about the 2020
race.
Doyle McManus is a
columnist for The Los
Angeles Times. Readers
may reach him at doyle.
mcmanus@latimes.com.


Find The Perfect

Companion

in the CLASSIFIED!


SUNEAPk


Our Town Page 10 C


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The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


VIEWPOINT





The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 11


I WINNERS CIRCLE

American Legion Post 103
SSunday Darts winners Nov. 3: Round 1:1-Paul
Martin, George Stern; 2-Mike Hanagan, Joey Siracusa;
3-Christy Buzzell, Bill Sutton. Round 2:1-Bill Kirkaldy, Joey
Siracusa; 2-Henry Tropea, Christ Azarias; 3-Ron Hickson, Bill
Sutton. Nov. 10:1-Mike Hanagan, Bill Kirkaldy; 2-Henry
Tropea, Christ Azarias; 3-Kim Hill, Fran Smith.

Charlotte HarborYacht Club
Partners Bridge winners Nov. 7:1-LaQuita Morris,
Geri Dempsey, 3230; 2-Cleta and Harold Clark, 2360;
3-Colleen and Jerry Shoemaker, 1720.
Slam Bridge winners Nov. 13:1-Jerry Shoemaker,
3820; 2-Colleen Shoemaker, 3170; 3-Chuck Floramo, 2870;
4-LaQuita Morris, 2700.
Mahjong winners Nov. 12:1-Judy Fiedler;
2-Bette Albarran; 3-Carol Hyatt.

Charlotte Square
Condominium Complex
Charlotte County Bridge Group winners Oct. 26:
Jug Gogia, 7070; Jini Clayton, 5280; Jane Cain, 4840; Bill
Kutschman, 4690.

Chubbyz Tavern
Big Dog's Live Trivia Challenge winners Nov. 13:
1-The Cat's Meow, $50; 2-The Bimini Bay Buddies, $25;
3-The Pool Sharks, $25.

Cultural Center of
Charlotte County
Duplicate Bridge Club winners Nov. 5: N/S: 1-Jean
Pilon, George Doeren; 2-Akemi and Art Odamura; 3-Mary
and David Atwood. E/W: 1-Warren Prince, Zenon Shpon;
2-Florence Burns, Ann Benmayor; 3-Pat Betts, Earl Lewis.
Nov. 7 (a.m.): 1-Bill Murphy,Yoshi Lapo; 2-Jim Fraser, Bob
Bonjean; 3-Richard Locker, Bert Rockower. Nov. 7 (p.m.):
N/S: 1-Diana and Warren Prince; 2-Ernie Bourque, Mary Ann
Baird; 3-Pat Betts, Lois Kenyon. Ef/W: 1-Pat DeNapoli, Denis
Leduc; 2-Robert Rancourt, Peggy Villela; 3-Marilyn Grant,
Sarah Robin.
Monday Night Pinochle winners Nov. 11:l-Sylvia
Meyer, 740; 2-Sally Durbano, 733; 3-Alice Trautman, 713.


Contract Bridge winners Oct. 30: Maria Johanson,
5880; Judy Tayler, 5820; Nancy Lutz, 5540; Larry Fau, 5210.
Nov. 6: Art Fritz, 6370; Carmen Fuller, 5320; Ro Johnson,
5150; Nick Forte, 5070. Nov. 13: Carmen Fuller, 5470; Larry
Fau, 5440; Jini Clayton, 5330; Jay Oberlander, 4930.
Wednesday Double Deck Pinochle winners Nov. 13:
1/2-Gordon Byer, 1747; 1/2-Paul Headrick, 1747;
3-Audrey Speidell, 1534; 4-Bob Paulsen, 1488.
Thursday Night Double Deck Pinochle winners
Nov. 7:1 -Paul Headrick, 1715; 2-Rita Headrick, 1583;
3-Jan Howard, 1560.
Pinochle winners Nov. 12:1-Mike Hess, 691; 2-Sally
Durbano, 647; 3-Dot Ladd, 638.
Port Charlotte Cribbage Club 147 winners Nov. 13:
Marilyn Gaudreau, 15; Bob Sheehan, 15; Jim Adams, 14;
Doris Mills, 14; Eric Gorrell, 13.

Deep Creek Elks Lodge
Monday Bridge winners Nov. 11:1-Tom Zinneman,
4440; 2-Linda Kopp, 4200; 3-Kathy Beattie, 4060;
4-Wanda Humphrey, 3770.

Isles Yacht Club
Scrabble winners Nov. 8: Mary Lou Coutts, 218,210;
Judith Howell, 248; Diana Lehr, 205; Bev MacMahon, 226;
Liane Riley, 311; Sandy Robinson, 221.

Kingsway Country Club
Ladies Bridge winners Nov. 8:1-Judy Strub;
2-Allene Croy; 3-Lucy Schmidt. Nov. 13:1-Dee Nutt.
Partners Bridge winners Nov. 13:1 -Bob and Carol
Niemann; 2-Ron and Dee Nutt; 3-Dave Baker, Norma Block.

PGI
Duplicate Bridge Club winners Nov. 4: N/S: 1-James
Kioski, Robert Rancourt; 2-Joanna Dennis, Herb Dawson;
3-Sarah Robin, Susan Lewis. Ef/W: 1-R. Paul Urbanick,
Nanette Crist; 2-Florence Burns, Polly Engebrecht; 3-Mary
and Stephen Chupak. Nov. 6:1-Pat DeNapoli, Bill Murphy;
2/3-Mary and Stephen Chupak; 2/3-Joan and Ted Walbourn.
Nov. 8: N/S: 1-John Bush, Goran Hanson; 2-Clifford and
Barbara Reitz; 3-James Kioski, Polly Engebrecht. Ef/W: 1-Ken
and Patty Earl; 2-Susan and Earl Lewis; 3/4-Mary and
Stephen Chupak; 3/4-Fred and Linda Andreas.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF

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The Charlotte Harbor and Nov. 26, 27 and 29. screen. For comfort and
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resume interpretive guided "Hikes Start Here" sign to bring a walking stick, a
hikes at 10 a.m. Monday in the parking lot. Hikes camera, binoculars, water
at its Alligator Creek are easy-to-moderate, and bug spray. For more
Environmental Center, and last about two hours, information, call 941-575-
10941 Burnt Store Road, Participants should 5435, or email eileen@
Punta Gorda. Hikes also are wear close-toed shoes or checflorida.org.














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Our Town Page 12 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun ISunday, November 17, 2013


3100







LEGALS


| FICTITIOUS NAME

Z 3112 ^

11/17/13

L NOTICE OF ACTION

Z 3116 ^

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 12000699CA
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
VS.
UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIA-
RIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS. CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER
OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF
JUDITH A. CUTLER A/K/A JUDITH
ANN CUTLER; et al.,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Unknown Heirs, Beneficiaries,
Devisees, Grantees, Assignees,
Lienors, Creditors, Trustees, And
All Other Parties Claiming An
Interest By, Through, Under Or
Against The Estate Of Judith A.
Cutler A/K/A Judith Ann Cutler
Last Known Residence: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property in
CHARLOTTE County, Florida:
LOT 1, BLOCK 695, PUNTA
GORDA ISLES, SECTION 23,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 12, PAGE(S) 2A
THROUGH 2Z41, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on ALDRIDGE CONNORS, LLP,
Plaintiff's attorney, at 1615 South
Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Del-
ray Beach, FL 33445 (Phone
Number: (561) 392-6391), within
30 days of the first date of publi-
cation of this notice, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before December 13,
2013 on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
Dated on November 6, 2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
As Clerk of the Court
BY: C. L. G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
334261 2962617
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 13-000972-CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARK. A. GOMES, ET AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
UNKNOWN SETTLERS & BEN-
EFICIARIES OF THE SABRINA
F. GOMES TRUST
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
UNKNOWN SETTLERS & BEN-
EFICIARIES OF THE OCTAVIA
S. GOMES TRUST
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose Mort-
gage covering the following real
and personal property described
as follows, to-wit:
Lot 27, Block 719, PUNTA
GORDA ISLES, SECTION
23, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 12 at Pages 2A
through 2Z41, of the Pub-
lic Records of Charlotte
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on Vanessa Pellot, Butler &
Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway
Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida
32812 and file the original with
the Clerk of the above-styled
Court on or before 30 days from
the first publication, otherwise a
Judgment may be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said Court on the 6th day of
November, 2013.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT. If you are a person
with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please


contact Jon Embury, Adminis-
trative Services Manager,
whose office is located at 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2110, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.


I NOTICE OF ACTION

: 3116 ^

Barbara T. Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: C. L. G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
109392 2962629
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 13001351CA
DIVISION:
PNC BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARIA H. BURNS,
AS TRUSTEE OF THE MARIA H.
BURNS REVOCABLE TRUST
AGREEMENT DATED APRIL
27, 2010, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To:
THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIA-
RIES OF THE MARIA H.
BURNS REVOCABLE TRUST
AGREEMENT DATED APRIL
27,2010
Last Known Address:
Unknown
Current Address:
Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address:
Unknown
Current Address:
Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage
on the following property in Char-
lotte County, Florida:
LOT 80, BLOCK 3270,
PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDI-
VISION, SECTION 44,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
54A THROUGH 54G, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY FLORIDA.
A/K/A 17492 FOREMOST
LN PORT CHARLOTTE FL
33948-2446
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, if
any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623,
and file the original with this Court
either before 12/12/2013 ser-
vice on Plaintiff's attorney, or
immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once a week for two consecutive
weeks in the Charlotte Sun-Her-
ald.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on this 5th day of
November, 2013.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
**See the Americans
with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are enti-
tied, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 and
whose telephone number is
(941)637-2281, within two (2)
working days of receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
To file response please contact
Charlotte County Clerk of Court,
350 E. Marion Street, Punta
Gorda, FL 33651-1687, Tel:
(941) 637-2238; Fax: (941) 637-
2216.
Publish: 11/10/13 & 11/17/13
272484 2962068

S NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CHARLOTiE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO.
082008CA007215XXXXXX
CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LANCE RAWSON, MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE
FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC., UNKNOWN TENANT IN POS-
SESSION #1, UNKNOWN TENANT
IN POSSESSION #2.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure filed Novem-
ber 14, 2012 entered in Civil
Case No.
082008CA007215XXXXXX of the
Circuit Court of the Twentieth


Judicial Circuit in and for Char-
lotte County, Punta Gorda, Flori-
da, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com in accor-
dance with Chapter 45 Florida
Statutes at 11:00 AM on the 13
day of December, 2013 on the
following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment::
Lot 14, Block 498, Port Char-
lotte Subdivision, Section 9,
according to the plat thereof


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^

as recorded in Plat Book 4,
Pages 19-A through 19D, of
the Public Records of Char-
lotte County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens. must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated this 6 day of November,
2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
BY: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose
office is located at 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is (941)
637-2110, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
338038 2962606
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-2010-CA-001185
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
V.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
GRANTEES, DEVISEES, LIENORS,
TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF
SALLIE C. KNUTSON,
DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, GRANTEES, DEVISEES,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND CRED-
ITORS OF CHRISTOPHER SMITH
KNUTSON, DECEASED; et.al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on
July 31, 2013, and the Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale
entered on September 27, 2013,
in this cause, in the Circuit Court
of Charlotte County, Florida, the
clerk shall sell the property situat-
ed in Charlotte County, Florida,
described as:
LOT 5, BLOCK 3674, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION, SEC-
TION SIXTY FIVE, ACCORDING TO
THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,
PAGES 3A THROUGH 3P, INCLU-
SIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
a/k/a
11097 CORRIGAN AVENUE,
ENGLEWOOD, FL 34224
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, in accordance with Chapter 45
Florida Statutes, Charlotte Coun-
ty, Florida, at eleven o'clock a.m.,
on December 27, 2013.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, Florida,
this 30 day of September, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
146641 2962742
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 08 2010 CA 002429
Division No.
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
OF THE RESIDENTIAL ASSET
SECURITIZATION TRUST 2006-
A4, MORTGAGE PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-D UNDER THE
POOLING AND SERVICING
AGREEMENT DATED MARCH 1,
2006
Plaintiff,
vs.
THOMAS G. SCHOONMAKER,
et al.,
Defendants
RE-NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
November 21, 2012, and entered
in Case No. 08 2010 CA 002429
of the Circuit Court of the 20TH
Judicial Circuit in and for CHAR-
LOTTE County, Florida, wherein
Deutsche Bank National Trust
Company, as Trustee of the Resi-
dential Asset Securitization Trust
2006-A4, Mortgage Pass-
Through Certificates, Series
2006-D under the Pooling and
Servicing Agreement dated
March I, 2006 is the Plaintiff and
THOMAS G. SCHOONMAKER,
DARLENE S. SCHOONMAKER,
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGIS-
TRATION SYSTEMS. INC., ACTING
SOLELY AS, ROTONDA WEST
ASSOCIATION, INC AND
UNKNOWN TENANTSS, N/K/A
EDWARD A. DUDLEY are the


Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash
www.CHARLOTTE. realforeclose.c
om, the Clerk's website for on-line
auctions, at 11:00 a.m, on the 9
day of December, 2013, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Order of Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^


Lot 747, Rotonda West Oakland
Hills, According To The Plat There-
of Recorded In Plat Book 8 Pages
15A Through 15K Of The Public
Records Of Charlotte County,
Florida
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIM-
ING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAIN-
ING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK
OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU
FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL
NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY
REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60
DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF
RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF
THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM
THE SURPLUS.
DATED at CHARLOTTE County,
Florida, this 6 day of November,
2013.
Barbara T. Scott, Clerk
CHARLOTTE County, Florida
By: Kristy P.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
109440 2962596
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 08-2011-CA-003026
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
V.
SHEILA M. MARZ, SUCCESSOR
TRUSTEE OF THE MARGARET M.
MARZ TRUST, DATED JUNE 28,
2006; UNKNOWN TENANT 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS, WHO (IS/ARE)
NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA DEPART-
MENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on
September 24, 2013, in the Cir-
cuit Court of Charlotte County,
Florida, the clerk shall sell the
property situated in Charlotte
County, Florida, described as:
LOT 15, BLOCK 2176, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION, SEC-
TION 37, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 41A THRU
41H, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
a/k/a 4379 RANDYPAAR
STREET, PORT CHARLOTTE, FL
33948
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, on December 30, 2013.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: J. Miles
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose
office is located at 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is
(941)637-2110, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
schedule appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voce impaired, call
711.
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
146641 2962872
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 08-2012-CA-002014
SEC.:
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
V.
MARILYN PIZARRO; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Sum-
mary Judgment of Foreclosure
dated September 24. 2015,
entered in Civil Case No. 08-
2012-CA002014 of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Charlotte County,
Florida, wherein the Clerk of the
Circuit Court will sell to the high-
est bidder for cash on 30 day of
December, 2013, at 11:00 a.m.
at website: https://www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com, in accor-


dance with Chapter 45 Florida
Statutes, relative to the following
described property as set forth in
the Final Judgment, to wit;
LOTS 16 AND 17, BLOCK 3832,
PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 72, OF THE PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGE 28A, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as


L NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE I
^^3122^^

of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
ATTENTION:
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose
office is located at 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is (941)
637-2110, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
DATED AT PUNTA GORDA, FLORI-
DA THIS 15 DAY OF October,
2013.
Kristv P.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
329037 2962868
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2130-CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING LP
Plaintiff
v.
TIMOTHY SEAN DUGAN; ANY
AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER,
OR AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN
TENANT and JANE TENANT
whose names are fictitious to
account for parties in possession
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of foreclosure dated Sep-
tember 3. 2013, and entered in
Case No. 12002130CA of the Cir-
cuit Court of the TWENTIETH Judi-
cial Circuit in and for CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, Florida, wherein
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, is
Plaintiff, and TIMOTHY SEAN
DUGAN, et al are Defendants, the
clerk will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, beginning at
11:00AM at www.charlotte.real-
foreclose.corn, in accordance
with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes,
on the 26 day of December,
2013, the following described
property as set forth in said Sum-
mary Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 24, BLOCK 2769, PORT
CHARLOTTE, SECTION 33, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 5, PAGE(S) 35A
THROUGH 35F, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus funds from the sale,
if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, this 24
day of September, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: MaryL.
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provi-
sion of certain assistance.
Please contact the Adminis-
trative Services Manager
whose office is located at 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
336737 2962699
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE No. 08-2013-CA-000868
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK. N.A.
S/B/M CHASE HOME FINANCE
LLC, S/B/M TO CHASE MANHAT-
TAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KEREN J. HENRY, et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in Case No. 08-
2013-CA-000868 of the Circuit
Court of the 20TH Judicial Circuit
in and for CHARLOTTE County,
Florida, wherein, JPMORGAN


CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCI-
ATION, Plaintiff, and, KEREN J.
HENRY, et. al., are Defendants, I
will sell to the highest bidder for
cash at, www.charlotte.realfore-
close.com, at the hour of
11:00AM on the 26 day of
December, 2013, in accordance
with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes,
the following described property:
Lots 29 and 30, Block 123,
HARBOUR HEIGHTS SEC-
TION SIX, a Subdivision
according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in


I NOTICE OF
I FORECLOSURE
^^ 3122^^

Plat Book 3, Pages 82A
thru 82C, of the Public
Records of Charlotte Coun-
ty, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
DATED this 24 day of Septem
ber, 2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk Circuit Court
By: Mary L.
Deputy Clerk
IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Clerk of the Court's disability
coordinator at 18500 MUR-
DOCK CIRCLE, PORT CHAR-
LOTTE, FL 33948, 941-743-
1944, at least 7 days before
your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7
days; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call 711.
Publish: November 10, 17, 2013
146548 2962668


IN TUie
CLASSlIi i-'i-)
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NOTICE OF SALE

L:: 3130 ^

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
STEVE'S TOWING gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles on
11/29/2013, 09:00 am at
19888 Veterans Blvd Port Char
lotte, FL 33950, pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. STEVE'S TOWING
reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.
3G4AG55M6RS616750
1994 BUICK
Publish: November 17, 2013
274754 2965948





A Bargain



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OurTown Page 12 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013





:The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 13


I WEEKLY RECORD

Charlotte County
births
Remington Cotte, to Nichole
and James Cotte of Port Charlotte,
at 2:57 p.m. Nov. 4. He weighed
6 pounds, 12 ounces.
McKenzie Grace Johnston, to
Megan Coleman and Alexander
Johnston of Port Charlotte, at
12 a.m. Nov. 7. She weighed
7 pounds, 4 ounces.
Wesley James Preston, to
Jaima and Mark Preston of Port
Charlotte, at 9:30 p.m. Nov. 7. He
weighed 7 pounds, 0.89 ounce.
Briella Quinn Pickle, to Kelly
Mae and Arron Brady Pickle of
Englewood, at 8:52 p.m. Nov. 9. She
weighed 6 pounds, 7 ounces.
Destinee Leila Whitzel, to
Michelle and Rev Whitzel of
North Port, at 11:19 p.m. Nov. 11.
She weighed 8 pounds, 10 ounces.
Logan Thomas Ramirez, to
Shannon Marie and Jose Carmen
Ramirez of North Port, at 9:07 a.m.
Nov. 12. He weighed 8 pounds,
2.4 ounces.
Loryn Ella Elgersma, to
Rachel and Tyler Elgersma
of PortCharlotte, at 11:18 a.m.
Nov. 12. She weighed 8 pounds,
5 ounces.
Corey Shane-Michael
Stebner, to Chantelle and
Shane Stebner of Port Charlotte,
at 8:25 p.m. Nov. 12. He weighed
8 pounds, 2.2 ounces.
Chase William Larsen-St.
Croix, to Tara Evonne Larsen and
Brandon William St. Croix of Port
Charlotte, at 10:12 a.m. Nov. 13. He
weighed 6 pounds, 5 ounces.

Charlotte County
marriages
Zackery James Cumberland of
Englewood, and Karissa Ann Sluiter
of Englewood
Anthony David Mioduszewski of
Port Charlotte, and Loren Michelle
Dowdy of Port Charlotte
*Thomas Christopher Powell of
Port Charlotte, and Celys Marie Velez
of Port Charlotte
David Michael McClarren of
North Port, and Destiny Rae Migan
of North Port
Leland Nelson Haines of Port
Charlotte, and Eleanor Kay Nichols
of Watertown, N.Y.
Jonathon David Ricewick of
Punta Gorda, and Crystal Marie Croft
of Punta Gorda
Jeffrey Alan Griffith of North
Port, and Deborah Dean Vanderveld
of Punta Gorda


Theodore Schlesinger of Clifton,
N.J., and Susan Jane Gage of Clifton,
N.J.
William John Jury of
Englewood, and Jeanean Marshall of
Englewood
Nicholas Lee Renfro of Punta
Gorda, and Alyssa Rae Sandrock of
Punta Gorda
Shawn Matthew Gannon of
Punta Gorda, and Nicole Basora of
Fort Myers
Theodore Stanley Kielb of Port
Charlotte, and Barbara Jean Hinn of
Port Charlotte
Frank James Donato of
Bradenton, and Joy Ann Thomas of
Englewood
Michael Allen Lafever of Punta
Gorda, and Chelsea Lorie Calvert of
Punta Gorda
Robert Anthony Allshouse of
Port Charlotte, and Kalli Jo Retino of
Port Charlotte
William Christopher Pfannkuch
of Port Charlotte, and Cassandra
Brooke Anderson of Port Charlotte
*James Joseph Mitchell III of Port
Charlotte, and Deanna Rae Bennett
of Port Charlotte
Michael Joseph Jawitz of
Rotonda West, and Michele Daniello
Jacapraro of Rotonda West
John Michael Okeefe Sr. of Port
Charlotte, and Julie Ann Dykstra of
Port Charlotte
Tyler Louis Russell ofYoder,
Ind., and Elyse Nicole Soellinger of
Yoder, Ind.
Charles Ray Wells of Punta
Gorda, and Julia Ann Valentine of
Punta Gorda
Keith Amery Lodge of Port
Charlotte, and Jessica Lee Bernier of
Port Charlotte
John Lee Booker of Port
Charlotte, and Catherine Linda
Piedlow of Port Charlotte
John Frederick Quinton Jr. of
Punta Gorda, and Deborah Kay
Parker of Punta Gorda
Curtis Alonza Palmes of North
Port, and Nancy Elaine Tatom of
Punta Gorda
Ruslan Vasiliy Gudnyy of Toledo,
Ohio, and Viktoriya Vladimirovna
Dzhuga of North Port

Charlotte County
divorces
Nathan Noel Ayres v. Maria
Christina Ayres
Paula Anna Beers v. Christopher
David Beers
John Perry Bihari v. Virginia M.
Bihari
Erin Lee Block v. David Michael
Block


North Port Interventional Pain Center, Inc.
Witford Reid, M.D.
j Board Certified Anesthesiologist
Specializing in:
Epidural Injections, Cortisone
Injections, Trigger Point Injections
and Nerve Blocks
Most insurance accepted
*All procedures done with Se habla espafiol
fluoroscopy and under
sedation on premises No Referral Needed
*No drugs prescribed
Only Interventional 941-423-91 00
Pain Management
S3151 Bobcat Trail Village Center Rd.
North Port, FL, across from Bobcat Trail Golf Course
ww entaIfI ala 1n a a em en co mlT

The Lions Den











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Buffet M enu




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DISCOUNT ROCK
4qAAA VFlITIFDANS Rltlh DiPl. QA4_.f'i_ 1.4Q1O


Jeffrey Stephen Clarke v. Lori
Lynn Clarke
John Olier Davis v. Pamela
Denise Brown Davis
Billy R. Dennison Jr. v. Kathleen
A. Dennison
Candida S. Frey v. James R. Frey
Sandra Griffin v. Charles Griffin
*Deshea Stephens Grimm v.
Nathaniel Van Lloyd Grimm
Joann Guariglia v. Robert V.
Guariglia
Cassandra M. Halufska v.
Anthony P. Halufska
Jennifer Ann Huling v.
Christopher Lee Huling
Ralph Edward Johnson v. Judy
Charlene Johnson
*Phillip Kline v. Teresa Laninga
*Phyllis Holland McBean v.
Kiwmonie Pendley
Christopher Palmieri v. Nicole
Broadwell Palmieri
Bruce Powers v. Jessica Powers
Devon Jones Rowand v. Aaron
David Rowand
Lyubov N. Sieczkowski v.
Edward Sieczkowski
Max L. Teisinger v. Laurie J.
Teisinger
James Anthony Vandeloo v.
Donna J. Vandeloo


I BIRTHDAYS


Happy 44th birthday to Eric Happy 4th birthday to Anissa Happy 11th birthday to Riley
McDonald on his special day Richardson on her special day Pressley on his special day
Nov. 21. Nov. 17. Nov. 15.


CONTACT FOR
BIRTHDAYS
Each week in Sunday's
Charlotte Sun, we run free
birthday announcements
along with a photo. Email your
.jpg photo of the birthday
boy or girl of any age, along
with the person's name, age,
and birthday month and date,


STARTING AT $2,900 A MONTH
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to Marion Putman, assistant
Charlotte editor, at
marionmputman@gmail.com.
Deadline is noon Thursday.
Note: If you bring or mail in
a hard-copy photo (to 23170
Harborview Road, Charlotte
Harbor, FL 33980), we will
try to accommodate you, but
we CANNOT guarantee the
ability to return it to you. For

R Start your day with the
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:OurTown Page 14 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


JFK remains hot conversation topic


By AL HEMINGWAY
SUN CORRESPONDENT

After years of exten-
sive research, Robert J.
Groden does not believe
Lee Harvey Oswald shot
and killed President John
E Kennedy.
One of the leading
critics on the assas-
sination of our 35th
president, Groden was
the first person to bring
the Abraham Zapruder 8
mm film of the shooting
to national attention in
1975 on "Good Night
America."
He was staff pho-
tographic consultant
for the House Select
Committee on
Assassinations and the
author of several books
on the assassination, in-
cluding "The Killing of a
President: The Complete
Photographic Record of
the JFK Assassination."
On Wednesday, Groden
delivered a one-hour
slide presentation
detailing the tragic
events that unfolded the
afternoon of Nov. 22,
1963, in Dallas, and why
the accused killer, Lee
Harvey Oswald, could
not have committed the






(
Shop Charlotte

Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecountychamber.org


SUN PHOTOS BY AL HEMINGWAY
A still from the 8-mm film that storeowner Abraham Zapruder shot that day. It was taken
seconds before the fatal shots.


"most filmed murder" in
history.
Groden said Kennedy
had traveled to Dallas
to cement relations
within the splintered
Democratic Party.
Because of his liberal
views, Kennedy was not
popular in the South. He
was greeted by a recep-
tive crowd at Love Field,
where he was met by
Gov. John Connally and
his wife, Nellie.
After breakfast and
meeting with local
officials, the presiden-
tial motorcade began
its 10-mile ride to the
Dallas Trade Mart for a
luncheon. As the presi-
dent's limousine neared
Dealey Plaza, and the car
slowly made the sharp


S-curve onto Elm Street,
shots rang out, striking
Kennedy in the back
and his head, killing him
instantly.
After a 10-month
investigation, a commis-
sion headed by Supreme
Court Justice Earl Warren
concluded that Oswald
acted alone and a single
round, dubbed the magic
bullet or single-bullet
theory, struck Kennedy
and Connally when it
was fired from the sixth
floor of the Texas Book
Depository building
that overlooks the street
where Kennedy's car had
passed.
"The Warren Report
is a fabulous work of
fiction," Groden said.
"The weapon they
claim was used was an
Italian Carcano 6.5 mm
bolt action rifle. There
were three rifles found,
but only that one was
introduced as evidence.


II


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Even the best shooters,
not aiming, could only
get off two shots in
2.3 seconds."
Groden said that there
was more than one
gunman, and that the
fatal shots came from
the grassy knoll, an area
to the right of Kennedy
as he was riding in the
motorcade. Numerous
witnesses present that
day claim they heard
shots from the knoll and
raced toward the area.
"Everyone's attention
was there," Groden
explained. "There is a
photo of bystanders
running where they
heard shots. It shows a
shadowy figure behind
the stockade fence at
the grassy knoll. They
actually caught the guy,
but he claimed that
he was with the Secret
Service. They believed
him and then he quickly
disappeared, melted into


Robert Groden, autographing one of his books after his lecture
at the Cultural Center, served as the staff photographic consul-
tant for the House Select Committee on Assassinations.


the crowd, never to be
seen again."
Groden said that there
could have been as many
as 15 shots fired that pro-
duced seven non-fatal
wounds and the two that
killed the president.
According to Groden,
Oswald was a dupe in
the plan to assassinate
the president. There was
a shooter at the sixth
floor window in the book
depository, but Oswald
was in the lunchroom at
that time, witnesses later
verified.
Groden said that
he has uncovered
a 2 1/2 page memo from
then head of the Central
Intelligence Agency, John
McCone, to the chief of
the Secret Service, James
Rowley, stating that
Oswald was in fact a spy
for the CIA in the Soviet
Union.
"He wasn't defecting,"
Groden said. "They sent
him there. They trained
him at Camp Perry, Ohio
and he went to Soviet
Union in September
1959."
Groden said that this
may be the smoking
gun because McCone
admitted in his letter that
certain CIA personnel
killed Kennedy, not the
agency itself.
"JFK had said that he


A photo of the single bullet
that the Warren Commission
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wounded Connally.
would 'tear the CIA into
a thousand pieces,'"
Groden said. "He wanted
to pull out of Vietnam
and that was the CIAs
war."
Jack Ruby, the Dallas
nightclub owner who
shot Oswald on national
television when he
was being led from jail
by detectives, was an
informant for the FBI
and CIA, according to
Groden. Ruby also had
ties to the Mafia.
Groden's newest book,
"JFK -The Case for
Conspiracy 50 Years
Later," will have 1,000
photos and will be
released later this month.
He admits that what he
has discovered is just the
"tip of the iceberg."
Author Robert
Groden gave a
one-hour slide
presentation
about the JFK
assassination.
Groden believes
that there was
a conspiracy
by individuals
within the CIA
who wanted the
president dead.


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:OurTownPagel6 C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013
0


Fine Arts



Festival


Paintings created by VAC artists celebrate the life and works of artist John Singer Sargent.
vw ---


Claire Harvey stands alongside her piece "Lady Agnew."


Becky Van Pelt displayed her work"An Artist In His Studio."


SUN PHOTOS BY SUE PAQUIN

Left: The 10th annual Fine Arts
Festival celebrates the life and
works of artist John Singer
Sargent. The monthlong series
of educational and entertain-
ment events will benefit the
Visual Arts Center, 210 Maude
St., Punta Gorda. Paintings on
display during the festival will
be auctioned to the highest
bidder at the special evening,
"Travel the World with John
Singer Sargent," set for Friday.
For more information about this
and other events at the VAC, call
941-639-8810, or visit www.
visualartcenter.org. Here, Thelma
Daida poses with her artwork
titled "Venetian Doorway."
Below: Claire Wally was
inspired by gourds when she
created "Sea Grapes."


Alex Haak proudly shows his painting "Head of a Neopolitan Boy." Frank Sperry displayed his painting "A Waterfall.":'


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"El Jaleo"was painted by Ed Kosiewicz.


Liz Hutchinson-Sperry is very proud to have her artwork, titled
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Helga Weichselbaum displayed her work "Santa Sofia."


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:OurTown Page 16 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE


Cannon from 111777
battle back'home'


One of John Burgoyne's cannons
is finally back where the British
general and his redcoats lost it
more than 230 years ago: the
Saratoga Battlefield, scene of
one of American history's most
important battles.

Page 2 -



Army scrapping 4 US
chemical weapons
incinerators


The Pentagon spent $10.2 billion
over three decades burning tons
of deadly nerve gas and other
chemical weapons stored in four
states some of the agents so
deadly even a few drops can kill.

Page 3 -


Toronto mayor
in crisis; some
backers stay loyal


The loyalty of the mayor's
constituency, known as Ford
Nation, is being tested as he
faces intense pressure to resign
following sensational revelations
about his drinking problems
and illegal drug use, as well as
repeated outbursts of erratic
behavior and crude language.
Page 7 -



Bomber kills 6 in
Afghanistan ahead
of US deal talks

LaTALI-1rA'I


A suicide car bomber tore
through the Afghan capital
Saturday, just hours after
President Hamid Karzai
announced U.S. and Afghan
negotiators had agreed on a
draft deal allowing U.S. troops
to remain in the country
beyond a 2014 deadline.
Page 8 -



Clashes hit Libyan
capital after militia
attack


Soldiers and government-affili-
ated militias stormed a military
base occupied by gunmen in
Libya's capital on Saturday,
sparking fresh fighting that left
four dead a day after a deadly
militia attack on protesters.
Page 9 -


he Wi"re e

^he lp |^|www.sunnewspapers.net
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 17, 2013



Can Obama save health law?


Breakthroughs needed to avoid

Affordable Care Act coming unglued


By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrITER

WASHINGTON-
President Barack Obama's
health care law risks corning
unglued because of his ad-
ministration's bungles and
his own inflated promises.
To avoid that fate, Obama
needs breakthroughs on
three fronts: the cancel-
lations mess, technology
troubles and a crisis in


confidence among his own
supporters.
Working in his favor are
pent-up demands for the
program's benefits and an
unlikely collaborator in the
insurance industry.
But even after Obama
gets the enrollment website
working, count on new con-
troversies. On the horizon
is the law's potential impact
on job-based insurance.
Its mandate that larger


employers offer coverage
will take effect in 2015.
For now, odds still favor
the Affordable Care Act's
survival. But after making it
through the Supreme Court,


a presidential eie
numerous congre
repeal votes and.
emment shutdown
law has yet to win
acceptance.


rP T UIU


cnon, President Barack Obama makes a statement in the
essional Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington,
a gov- Friday, before the start of a meeting with repre-
vn, the sentatives of health insurance companies. From
n broad left are, Senior Adviser, Health and Human Services
Office of Health Reform Michael Hash, Marilyn
Tavenner, head of the Centers for Medicare and
HEALTH 16 Medicaid Services and the president.


By DAVID PITT
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrITER
DES MOINES, Iowa Five
chickens live in artist Alicia
Rheal's backyard in Madison,
Wis., and when they age
out of laying eggs, they may
become chicken dinner.
"We get egg-layers and after
a couple of years we put the
older girls in the freezer and
we get a newer batch," Rheal
said.
Rheal is a pragmatic
backyard chicken enthusiast
who likes to know what's in
her food. But others find the
fun of bringing a slice of farm
life into the city stops when
the hens become infertile.
Hesitant to kill, pluck and
eat a chicken, some people
abandon the animal in a park
or rural area.
As a result, more old hens
are showing up at animal
shelters, where workers in-
creasingly respond to reports
of abandoned poultry.
"The numbers are explod-
ing. We had hoped that the
fad had peaked and maybe we
were going to get a little bit of
a break here, but we haven't,"
said Mary Britton Clouse, who
operates Chicken Run Rescue
in Minneapolis.
In 2001, she had six calls
from people seeking homes
for abandoned chickens.
That rose to nearly 500 last
year, said Clouse, who takes
animals from the city's animal
control department and
works with local humane
groups to place unwanted
birds.
As winter approaches


In this Sept. 27 file photo, technidans work on NASA
bound spacecraft, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatikle
(MAVEN), at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Cana
robotic explorer is scheduled to blast off Monday.


In this photo taken Thursday, Mary Britton Clouse, who operates Chicken Run Rescue in Minneapolis, holds a
chicken named Cristhina in her living room. Britton Clouse and her husband Bert take in domestic fowl, mostly
chickens, that are neglected, abused and abandoned.


the number of abandoned
chickens rises, Clouse said:
"The summer fun is over."
Chickens begin laying
eggs where they're 4 to 6
months old and are most
productive for about two
years, University of Wisconsin
poultry specialist Ron Kean
said. Egg production drops off
significantly after that, but the
hens can live another decade
or more.
Urban chicken populations
have been on the rise since
the mid-2000s, championed
by people who wanted to
know where their eggs came
from and whether the animals


were free-range and hor-
mone-free. It's unclear how
many people have backyard
chickens and there's no
official count of the number
of cities that have approved
chicken-friendly ordinances.
Clouse said the problem
worsened around 2007, and
her organization and others
began pleading with cities to
either deny requests to allow
backyard chickens or to bud-
get for regulation, inspection
of coops, and enforcement of
animal cruelty laws. It didn't
slow the trend.
"What you've got are all
these people who don't know


In this photo taken Thursday,
the sun highlights the crown of a
rooster named Derek held by Bert
Clouse at the Chicken Run Rescue
in Minneapolis that he and his wife
Mary Britton Clouse operate.
what the hell they're doing.
They're sticking these birds in
HENS16


NASAs newest Mars craft


will explore atmosphere


SBy MARCIA DUNN
AP AEROSPACE WRITER
CAPE CANAVERAL NASA hopes
its newest Mars spacecraft lives up to
its know-it-all name.
The robotic explorer called Maven
is due to blast off Monday on a
AP PHOTO 10-month journey to the red planet.
's next Mars- There, it will orbit Mars and study the
e Evolution atmosphere to try to understand how
veral. The the planet morphed from warm and
wet to cold and dry.


"A maven is a trusted expert,"
noted NASAs space science chief,
John Grunsfeld. Maven will help
scientists "build a story of the Mars
atmosphere and help future human
explorers who journey to Mars."
The $671 million mission is NASAs
21st crack at Earth's most enticing
neighbor, coming on the heels of the
Curiosity rover, still rolling strong a
year after its grand Martian arrival.
MARS|6


Builder claims drilling rights under Fla. homes


By DREW HARWELL
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrITER

BRANDON, Fla. -
When Mallory and
Zach Sinclair were
looking for their first
home, they swooned
over a new townhouse
in the Brandon subdi-
vision ofWhispering
Oaks. With well-mani-
cured lawns, it looked
fresh and untouched,
with streets bearing
pastoral names like


Spring Flowers and
Summer Clouds.
But in January, when
the young parents
cracked open their
closing papers, they
noticed an alarming
clause. Their home-
builder had quietly
signed away the rights
to the land beneath
their home to its own
energy company. It
now had free rein deep
below the surface to
drill, mine or explore.


Selling underground
mineral rights has long
been big business in
the oil- and gas-rich
boomtowns of Texas,
North Dakota and
beyond.
But homeowners
here might be surprised
to learn that they, too,
could be part of the
prospecting. A Tampa
Bay Times analysis
found that D.R. Horton,
the nation's largest
homebuilder, has


pocketed the rights be-
neath more than 2,500
Tampa Bay homesites,
whether the homeown-
er realizes it or not.
It's unclear what
homebuilders expect
to find deep beneath
Tampa Bay's suburbs.
Homes here sit on
swiss-cheese blocks of
water and limestone,
known more for
sinkholes than fuel or
treasures.
But with recent


advances in drilling
technologies in-
cluding hydraulic
fracturing, known as
crackingg" tapping
into once-untouchable
natural gas and oil
reserves, experts say
builders see the deeds
as lottery tickets: po-
tential jackpots buried
beneath homes they
can still sell at full price.
"With the possibility
DRILLING 16


Urban hens often abandoned





-Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


Cannon from 1777 battle back'home'


STILLWATER, N.Y (AP)
- One of John Burgoyne's
cannons is finally back
where the British general
and his redcoats lost it
more than 230 years ago:
the Saratoga Battlefield,
scene of one of American
history's most important
battles.
After spending the past
40 years at a museum
in Alabama, the cannon
has been returned to


the upstate NewYork
landmark, thanks to a
chance remark four years
ago and some dogged
investigative work by U.S.
Army and National Park
Service employees.
The rare, 555-pound
artillery piece, known
as a six-pounder for the
weight of the ball it fired,
disappeared in the early
1960s from abam near the
battlefield, officially known


as the Saratoga National
Historical Park.
"The long-timers here
at the park had always
heard about this cannon
that was legendary among
park staff," said Christine
Valosin, the Saratoga park's
curator.
Known in Department
of the Army records as
"Saratoga Trophy Cannon,
Six-Pounder No. 102," the
wayward relic from the


RevolutionaryWar's Battles
of Saratoga was tracked
down to the Tuscaloosa
Museum of Art. Acquired in
the early 1970s by museum
founder JackWarner, a
paper company owner
and major art collector,
the cannon had been on
display for years.
In 2009, an Alabama man
visiting Saratoga Battlefield
remarked in the visitor
center how the cannon on


display there resembled
one in a museum back
in his home state. The
Saratoga cannon he was
talking about actually was
another British six-pounder
captured here in 1777 and
loaned to the battlefield
by a museum in Ohio.
Longtime park Ranger
Joseph Craig overheard the
man's remark and passed
the information along to
park officials.


That set off an investiga-
tion involving historians,
law enforcement in the
Army and the park service.
Valosin began compiling
information that traced
the cannon's history from
its creation in 1756 at a
foundry outside London to
its surrender by the British
when they laid down their
arms on Oct. 17,1777,
10 days after their defeat in
the second Saratoga battle.


Half a century later, JFK conspiracies still thrive


WASHINGTON (MCT)
-Who killed JFK?
Fifty years after the
slaying of the nation's
35th president, that's
still a provocative


question for many.
Conspiracy theo-
ries began swirling
almost immediately
after President John F.
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the 50th anniversary has
revived some theories,
tried to squelch others
and found intriguing
new details of botched
investigations or delib-
erate concealment by
authorities.
There's a ready
audience: Sixty-one
percent of the American
people believe that Lee
Harvey Oswald did not
act alone in killing the
president, according to
the most recent Gallup
poll, released Friday.
While the percentage of
those who believe in a
conspiracy is the lowest
since the late 1960s, it
confirms the public's
ongoing doubts about
the "lone gunman"
theory.
The likely
conspirators?
The poll found that
13 percent believe the
Mafia and 13 percent
think the federal gov-
ernment was involved;
7 percent named the
CIA; 5 percent each
believe Cuban leader
Fidel Castro, "special
interests" and political
groups were responsi-
ble; the Ku Klux Klan,
then-Vice President
Lyndon Johnson and
the Soviet Union each


drew 3 percent.
The random-sample
poll of 1,039 people 18
and older was conduct-
ed Nov. 7-10. It has a
margin of error of plus
or minus 4 percentage
points. The belief in
a conspiracy hasn't
diminished in nearly 50
years of polling. Doubts
also persist about the
findings of the Warren
Commission, which
was created by Johnson,
after he became pres-
ident, to investigate
the assassination and
was led by Supreme
Court Chief Justice Earl
Warren.
It is a deep-seated
belief that no single
man could commit
what some consider the
crime of the century-
that's been part of the
American psyche since
the 1960s and that got a
Hollywood boost from
director Oliver Stone's
conspiracy-fueled 1991
re-creation, "JFK."
But it's also one that
no one speaks about
too loudly, as Secretary
of State John Kerry
discovered earlier this
month when he said
publicly that he didn't
think Oswald had acted
alone, only to clam up


within days.
"To this day, I have
serious doubts that Lee
Harvey Oswald acted
alone," Kerry told NBC
News' Tom Brokaw
for a 50th anniversary
package. "I certainly
have doubts that he was
motivated by himself."
Kerry touched on sev-
eral of the theories that
have swirled around
the assassination: Was
more than one gun-
man involved? Beside
Oswald's perch on the
sixth floor of the Texas
School Book Depository,
did more shots come
from the grassy knoll
at Dealey Plaza? Did
Cuba and the former
Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics commu-
nist nations furious
at being pressured to
remove Soviet missiles
from Cuba figure in
Oswald's action?
Oswald, a former
Marine, defected to the
USSR for several years
and married a Russian
woman before returning
to Texas. He was also
considered a Cuban gov-
ernment sympathizer
who, seven weeks before
the Dallas shooting, was
in Mexico City trying to
get a visa to Cuba.


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Army scrapping 4 US chemical weapons incinerators


ANNISTON, Ala. (AP)
-The Pentagon spent
$10.2 billion over three
decades burning tons of
deadly nerve gas and other
chemical weapons stored
in four states some of
the agents so deadly even
a few drops can kill.
Now, with all those
chemicals up in smoke
and communities freed
of a threat, the Army is
in the middle of another,
$1.3 billion project:
Demolishing the inciner-
ators that destroyed the
toxic materials.
In Alabama, Oregon,
Utah and Arkansas,
crews are either tearing
apart multibillion-dollar
incinerators or working
to draw the curtain on a
drama that began in the
Cold War, when the United
States and the former
Soviet Union stockpiled
millions of pounds of


chemical weapons.
Construction work con-
tinues at two other sites
where technology other
than incineration will be
used to neutralize agents
chemically, according to
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
At the incinerator com-
plex at the Anniston Army
Depot where sarin, VX
nerve gas and mustard
gas were stored about
55 miles east of
Birmingham the
military this week said
it's about one-third of the
way into a $310 million
program to level a gigantic
furnace that cost $2.4 bil-
lion to build and operate.
Tim Garrett, the govern-
ment site project manager,
said officials considered
doing something else with
the incinerator, but the
facility was too specialized
to convert for another use.


Also, the law originally
allowing chemical inciner-
ation required demolition
once the work was done.
So teams are using large
machines to knock holes
in thick concrete walls
and rip steel beams off the
building's skeleton, which
was previously decontami-
nated to guard against any
lingering nerve agents or
mustard gas. Metal pieces
are being recycled, and the
rest will be hauled to an
ordinary landfill.
"It's the end of an era,"
said Garrett, a civilian.
The military said the
incineration program cost
$11.5 billion in all, with the
cost of tearing down the
four facilities built in from
the start.
A $2.8 billion inciner-
ator is being demolished
in Umatilla, Ore., the
Pentagon said, and
work will begin soon to


tear down a $3.7 billion
incinerator at Tooele,
Utah. Workers already
have finished demolishing
the $2.2 billion Pine Bluff
Chemical Demilitarization
Facility in Arkansas, the
military said.
While opponents of the
incinerators predicted
dire consequences and
the possibility of floating
clouds of nerve gas in
the event of an accident,
the CDC said no nearby
residents were exposed
to or harmed by chemical
agents.
In east Alabama, before
incineration work began
in 2003, the military and
emergency management
workers spent millions of
dollars distributing emer-
gency kits to households,
erecting warning sirens
and reinforcing schools
with ventilation systems to
keep chemical weapons at


AP PHOTO
In this photo taken Tuesday, workers continue the process of
demolishing chemical waste incinerator at the Anniston Army
Depot in Anniston, Ala.


bay during any accidents.
But Garrett said nothing
worse than normal work-
place injuries occurred by
the time the last chemical
weapons were burned in
2011.
"This place has the
safety record of a library or
a public school," he said.
More than 660,000
artillery shells, small


rockets and land mines
were stored in dirt-covered
bunkers at the Anniston
depot beginning in 1963
during the height of the
Cold War. The prospect
of a major accident was
frightening because more
than 360,000 people lived
in the surrounding four
counties by the time the
incineration ended.


Video shows mall shooter likely changed plans after firing shots


(MCT) -Richard
Shoop, who terrified
thousands of people at
the Westfield Garden
State Plaza in New Jersey
last week when he fired
random shots from a rifle,
is seen in surveillance
video released Friday
calmly strolling through
the mall before making a
sudden about-face and
disappearing through an
exit that leads to a storage
area.


The body of the
20-year-old Teaneck,
N.J., resident was found
hours later in an area of
catacomb-like hallways,
authorities said. They
said Shoop, who shot
himself in the head, did
not appear to be intent on
killing anyone but himself
and avoided confronting
police, who arrived min-
utes after the shooting
began around 9:20 p.m.
Video clips released


by Paramus, N.J., police
show him slowly walking
past stores moments after
employees lock doors and
run to hiding places, ap-
parently after he had fired
shots. He is carrying a
rifle in his right hand and
wearing black clothing, a
motorcycle helmet, and
a red and black knapsack
strapped to his shoulders.
At some point after
police arrived, entering
the mall near Nordstrom,


Shoop's plans seemed to
change, authorities said.
He is seen on video
walking purposefully
south along the upper
concourse of the mall
toward an area near
Macy's when he turns
and briefly heads back
toward Nordstrom. He
then makes a right turn
and heads for the exit
door. It is not clear why
he changed direction
or whether police


already had arrived.
"We believe he detected
some of my officers com-
ing in from an entrance
there, and on tape he flees
into a back corridor exit
door," said Chief Kenneth
Ehrenberg of the Paramus
police. "We think what-
ever he was originally
planning, he changes his
plan at that point."
Deputy Chief Robert
Guidetti said the sudden
movements indicate that


"there was a good chance
he was scared."
Shoop spent a total
of four minutes inside
the main concourse of
the mall, based on time
stamps on video clips
released Friday. He is seen
getting off an elevator at
9:19 p.m. and making a
left turn, his rifle pointed
toward the floor, seconds
before a man runs to a
nearby exit that leads to a
parking garage.


Former U.S.

Treasury Secretary to

join private equity firm


(AP) Former U.S.
Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner, who
played a central role
in the government's
response to the financial
crisis of 2008-2009, is
joining private equity firm
Warburg Pincus LLC.
The firm announced
Saturday that Geithner
will serve as its president
and managing director
starting March 1.
Geithner led the Federal
Reserve Bank of New York
for more than five years
before becoming Treasury
secretary in 2009, when
the economy had sunk
into a deep recession.
Few Treasury secretar-
ies received as much scru-
tiny. Supporters credited
Geithner with helping
prevent the recession
from spiraling into a
second Great Depression
by stabilizing the banking
system and restoring in-
vestor confidence. Critics
said he was too cozy with
Wall Street.
Warburg Pincus said
that Geithner would
advise the firm on strat-
egy, investing, investor
relations and other topics.
The New York-based firm


AP FILE PHOTO
This Feb. 2,2012, file photo
shows then Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner during a
news conference at the Treasury
Department in Washington.
has been involved in
buyouts of such well-
known companies as
luxury department store
chain Neiman Marcus
and contact lens maker
Bausch + Lomb.
The firm declined to
comment on Geithner's
compensation. Through
an aide, Geithner declined
an interview request.
Geithner, 52, stepped
down from Treasury in
late January, days after
President Barack Obama
was sworn in for a second
term. He was the last
of Obama's original
economic advisers to
leave the administration,
and was succeeded as
Treasury secretary by Jack
Lew.


I NATIONAL NEWS BRIEFS


Man sentenced
to death for killing
baby sitter
DALLAS (AP)- A
Dallas-area man was sen-
tenced to death Saturday
for killing his children's
baby sitter to prevent her
from testifying that he
raped her.
Franklin Davis admit-
ted in court to killing
16-year-old Shania Gray,
describing how he lured
her into his car outside
her school, shot her and
dumped her body in a
river. But he said he killed
her out of revenge and
hatred, not to obstruct
the sexual assault case
that was nearing trial.
A Dallas jury convicted
Davis of capital murder
Tuesday before sentenc-
ing him to death.


U.S. soldier
charged with
murder
(MCT) -A U.S. sol-
dier has been charged
with two counts of
premeditated murder in
the killing of two Iraqi
civilians.
The charges against
Army Sgt. 1st Class
Michael Barbera, 31,
stem from an alleged
shooting of two civil-
ians near the village
of As Sadah in Diyala
Province in March
2007. Barbera was
charged Wednesday at
Joint Base Elmendorf-
Richardson in Alaska,
U.S. Army Public
Affairs Officer Major
Johnpaul Arnold
told the Los Angeles
Times.


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& their effect on your quality of life
* Most common causes of hearing
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If you cannot attend our Lunch &
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appointment for a FREE Hearing
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o The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


WIRE Page 3


www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS





-Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


STATE NEWS


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


Combat medic's healing journey leads to FlU


MIAMI (AP) -Staff Sgt.
Victor Arvizu has spent
20 years as a U.S. Army
combat medic from the
Middle East to the South
Pacific. He has pulled glass
shards from soldiers' chests
and taken blood samples.
He has inserted chest tubes
and sutured wounds.
Today, he tends to
retired soldiers as a health
tech at the Veterans
Administration clinic in
Pembroke Pines, Fla.
But he has long had
ambitions of doing more.
'All along I've wanted to
be a nurse," he said of an
aspiration that crystallized
into determination during
a 2004 stint in Iraq. There
he saw nurses knowl-
edgeable about medicine
soldier alongside doctors
at a combat hospital inside
Baghdad's Green Zone.
Now, Arvizu, 38, is
winding up his career with


a Florida National Guard
unit and getting ready to
embark on a transition
that's a sign of the times:
Starting in January
he will leave his day job
and use the post-9/11
G.I. Bill to plunge into a
new program at Florida
International University
- with a study plan to
become a registered nurse
in just one year.
The program seeks to tap
the talent that has come
home from the wars in Iraq
and Afghanistan and help
likely mostly male, battle
-tested medics fine-tune
their skills for civilian life.
And help stem the national
nursing shortage, too.
Rather than study side-
by-side with FIU's first-year
nursing students, the
program will evaluate these
veteran medics and corps-
men and give them credit
for both formal schooling


and life experience.
Arvizu is a case in point:
Nursing students start out
at FIU learning to start
an intravenous line in a
mannequin. Long before
he deployed to the Combat
Support Hospital in the
Green Zone in 2004, Arvizu
had already passed the test
of putting in an IV on a live
person. In the dark.
"The fact that they've
traveled the world and
bring a global health
perspective is amazing,"
says FIU nursing professor
Maria Olenick, who won a
$1.3 million federal grant to
run the program from 2014
until 2018 with the goal
of graduating 90 veteran
medics as nurses over the
next four years.
"These guys are back
and they're highly skilled,"
she says. "Why let them
get around as transporters
and phlebotomists? These


guys could work in critical
care, emergency rooms ...
they're amazing."
The Veteran Bachelor's
of Science in Nursing
program, whose first class
will begin in January, is not
meant to make the older
world travelers start from
scratch. Rather, the grant
lets FIU provide counseling
and a special section to
give the veterans credit
for past classes and life
experience, assessing and
"refreshing" their skills
while filling in the gaps
with formal education.
In the case of Arvizu, he
has been taking classes
toward a bachelor's degree
between deployments.
Once he and his wife, a for-
mer Army medic already
turned nurse, settled in
South Florida five years
ago, the goal seemed more
achievable.
Then he read in a


veterans chat room about
the nascent FIU program,
found Olenick, and was
accepted as the very first
student in a class that will,
for the most part, segregate
the vets from the typical
four-year students.
Olenick says the inspi-
ration was the decade-old
Foreign Educated
Physicians program that
helps immigrant doctors
from Latin American and
Caribbean countries be-
come certified as medical
professionals, usually short
of being recognized as
physicians.
But the impetus was
discovering that the
Department of Health and
Human Services was en-
tertaining grant proposals
under the Hire the Heroes
Act (2011) to help skilled
veterans become nurses.
Olenick applied, and won
the grant in September.


AP PHOTO


Army Staff Sgt. Victor Arvizu
poses at the Pembroke Pines
VA Outpatient Cinic, in this
Nov. 7 photo. Florida Interna-
tional University is launching
a novel program to help
recently demobilized combat
medics become civilian
nurses. Arvizu, 38, is the first
ex-medic accepted to the
program.


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11-year-old girl
killed in
scooter crash
ST. PETERSBURG (AP)
- An 11-year-old girl
has died after a scooter
accident in southwest
Florida.
St. Petersburg police
say Sonia Savage and
a friend were riding
scooters Friday when
Sonia didn't look both
ways before crossing the
street. She crashed into a
truck and was run over by
the left rear wheel of the
vehicle.
The girl was taken
to the hospital where
she later died from her
injuries. Savage celebrat-
ed her 11th birthday on
Wednesday.

Experienced pet
owners can adopt
exotic species
NAPLES (AP) -
Florida wildlife officials
are looking for expe-
rienced pet owners to
adopt exotic species.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission and the
Southwest Florida
Cooperative Invasive
Species Management
Area are offering quali-
fied adopters the chance
to take home exotic
species turned in by
those who no longer can
keep them. The animals
include a boa con-
strictor, leopard gecko,
African spurred tortoise,
African grey parrot and
sugar glider.
The FWC says
adopters must have an
understanding of the
natural history and safe
caging requirements for
the animals.

13-year-old driver
charged after
police chase
JACKSONVILLE (AP)
-A 13-year-old runaway
Florida boy has been
arrested after authorities
say he led a deputy on a car
chase with two other teens
that ended in a dangerous
collision.
Florida Highway Patrol
officials said the teen was
driving an SUV through
Columbia County on
Saturday with 14-year-old
and 13-year-old passengers.
All three had reportedly run
away from their homes in
Clay County. The Associated
Press is not naming them
because they are minors.
Authorities said they tried
to stop the boy, but he ran
a red light and crashed into
another vehicle. The two
occupants of that vehicle
were treated for minor
injuries.
The teens were not
injured. All three were
arrested, but the FHP
report does not specify the
charges.


Driverless vehicles
topic of Tampa
summit
TAMPA (AP)-
Transportation experts
say advances in computer
software, sensors and
global positioning systems
have made driverless
vehicles possible for
widespread use within a
decade or so.
Florida's Department of
Transportation, along with
the University of South
Florida's Center for Urban
Transportation Research
and other groups, hosted
the first Florida Automated
Vehicles Summit on
Thursday and Friday to
help position the state as a
leader in putting driverless
cars on the road.
The Tampa Bay Times
reports that Florida is one
of just three states that has
passed legislation allowing
automated vehicles to be
tested on public roads.
3 sent to prison
in mortgage
fraud case
MIAMI (AP) -Three
people have been
sentenced to prison for
operating a South Florida
mortgage fraud scheme
that involved at least
$2.4 million in falsely
obtained loans.
Federal prosecutors
said Friday that 64-year-
old real estate agent and
mortgage broker Jose
Armando Alvarado got
the longest sentence at
more than 11 years in
prison.
Former loan closer
and title agent Alberto
Morejon, 27, got three
years behind bars.
The sister of Alvarado
and Morejon's mother,
58-year-old Reyna Orts,
was sentenced to more
than four years in prison.

Standoff ends
peacefully
WEST PALM BEACH
(AP) -A standoff with
a convicted felon has
ended peacefully after
authorities say a South
Florida man fired at bail
bonds agents as they tried
to arrest him.
Palm Beach County
sheriff's officials say bail
bonds agents arrived
at Kenneth Burroughs'
home Friday night
and were shot at by
Burroughs. The suspect
eventually came out
of his home and was
charged with aggravated
assault with a firearm,
felon in possession of a
firearm, shooting within
a dwelling, and child
neglect.
Authorities say
Burroughs has several
past felony convictions.
A search warrant of
Burroughs' home alleged-
ly turned up a shot gun,
pistol and a revolver.










Body of man who fell from plane likely found


FORT LAUDERDALE
CAP) Authorities said
Saturday that they've
likely found the body
of a Florida man who
they say fell out of a
private plane, three
days into a land and
sea search that includ-
ed parts of the Atlantic
Ocean near Miami.
"Even though we
presume that the
body found is that
of Gerardo Nales,


investigators are
pending 'official
identification' from
the Medical Examiner's
Office," Detective
Alvaro Zabaleta said in
a statement.
The presumed body
of 42-year-old Nales
was found in an area
of mangroves around
10:30 a.m., Zabaleta
said. A day earlier,
police air and water
units were scouring the


sea and had expand-
ed their search area
because of currents
and wind.
The pilot's identity
has not been released,
nor has the intended
destination of the
plane. Authorities said
there were only two
people on board.
The pilot of the Piper
PA 46 called for help
Thursday afternoon,
radioing "mayday,


mayday, mayday" and
telling an air traffic
controller that a door
was open and a pas-
senger had fallen from
the plane. The aircraft
had just taken off from
Tamiami Executive
Airport, located south
of Miami, police said.
Federal Aviation
Administration officials
said plane was flying at
about 2,000 feet, some
eight miles southeast


of the Tamiami airport.
Police said investiga-
tors have no evidence
of foul play.
According to a report
on the website Live
ATC.Net, the pilot
calmly radioed the
air traffic controller.
LiveATC.Net provides
live air traffic-control
broadcasts from con-
trol towers and radar
facilities around the
world.


"I have a door ajar
and a passenger that
fell down. I'm six miles
from Tamiami," the
pilot said.
"You said you've got
a passenger that fell
out of your plane?" the
air traffic controller
responds.
"That's correct, sir,"
the pilot said. "He
opened the back door
and he just fell out the
plane."


Fla. retailers predict boost in holiday shopping


TALLAHASSEE (AP)
- Florida retailers are
predicting a boost in
shopping during the
upcoming holiday
season.
In its annual forecast


released Friday, the
Florida Retail Federation
predicted a 3.5 percent
to 4.5 percent increase
in sales.
Federation president
and CEO Rick McAllister


said the forecast is
based on a favorable
outlook in many key
economic indicators in-
cluding unemployment
and a boom in tourism.
The state is on pace for


a record year of visitors.
McAllister said an
increase in tourism
usually translates
into higher sales for
retailers.
The retailer forecast,


however, contrasts
with recent consumer
confidence surveys.
The October survey
from the University
of Florida showed
consumer confidence


at its lowest level in
two years. Those who
answered the survey
expressed concerns
about whether it was a
good time to purchase
big-ticket items.


I STATE NEWS BRIEFS


Dontae Morris
guilty of killing
2 police officers
TAMPA (AP)- A man
already serving a life
sentence for murder was
convicted Friday evening
fatally shooting Tampa
police officers David Curtis
and Jeffrey Kocab during a
routine traffic stop in East
Tampa.
After four hours of de-
liberations, a Hillsborough
County jury found Dontae
Morris guilty of two counts
of first-degree murder. The
same panel will reconvene
next week to recommend
either a life sentence or the
death penalty. A judge will
make the final decision.
Morris killed Curtis
and Kocab in June 2010
after they stopped a car
driven by Cortnee Brantley.
Morris was in the passen-
ger seat and reportedly
shot both officers to avoid
arrest on a warrant.
Brantley was previously
sentenced to a year in pris-
on for concealing informa-
tion from authorities.

Panther festival
sheds light on
endangered animal
NAPLES (AP) -The
Florida Panther Festival
taking place in Naples
will help shed light on the
endangered animal.
The third annual festival
is Saturday at the North
Collier Regional Park.
Visitors will learnm more
about the hunting habits
of panthers, how they
territory and raise their
young. The event also
includes a swamp buggy
ride in panther territory.
Ben Nottingham is the
refuge manager of Florida
Panther National Wildlife
Refuge. He says the goal is
not only for guests to cel-
ebrate the Florida panther
but also to increase their
awareness of how to safely
coexist with panthers,
along with their livestock
and pets.
The festival is free to the
public.
Field trips will be avail-
able on Sunday throughout
southwest Florida where
panthers roam. Fees do
apply

Deputy frees deer
from soccer net
BIG PINE KEY(AP) -A
deer in the Florida Keys
is breathing more easily
after a deputy helped
untangle him from a
soccer net.
Monroe County
Sheriff's Deputy Danielle
Malone found the young
Key deer buck Saturday
morning with his head
and antlers caught in a
soccer net at a church on
Big Pine Key. She was able
to free him safely and he
ran off, uninjured.
Key deer are the small-
est of the Virginia white-
tailed deer subspecies
and are endangered.


Documentary
explores mental
illness
KEYWEST (AP) -Actress
Mariel Hemingway,
cult filmmaker
John Waters and a
steel-bending strong-
man are among stars
gathered at the Key
West Film Festival.
Hemingway screened
"Running from Crazy,"
on Friday night. The
documentary explores
her family's history


I


of mental illness and
her efforts to escape
it, on the island where
her late grandfather


Single Visit Crowns
- Using the Latest in 3D CAD-CAM


Ernest Hemingway lived
during the 1930s.
The festival continues
through Sunday.


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-----------


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


WIRE Page 5


www.sunnewspapers.net


I


STATE NEWS





Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


DRILLING

FROM PAGE 1

of cracking, as stupid as
it seems to do that in
Florida, no one's taking
any chances," Tampa
land use attorney Pamela
Jo Hatley said about
builders.
D.R. Horton represen-
tatives did not respond
to calls or emails. But
the builder's own words
fill stacks of deeds filed
since 2007 reserving the
rights below homesites,
including more than 400
in Tampa Bay this year.
The mineral-rights
claims lie mostly below
cookie-cutter homes and
townhouses sprinkled
across the Tampa sub-
urbs, but affected home-
sites can also be found


HEALTH

FROM PAGE 1

"There's been nothing
normal about this law
from the start," said Larry
Levitt, an insurance expert
with the nonpartisan
Kaiser Family Foundation.
"There's been no period of
smooth sailing."
Other government
mandates have taken root
in American culture after
initial resistance. It may be
a simplistic comparison,
but most people automat-
ically fasten their seat belts
nowadays when they get
in the car. Few question
government-required
safety features such as air
bags, even if those add to
vehicle costs.
Levitt says the ACA
may yet have that kind of
influence on how health
insurance is viewed. "An
expectation that every-
body should have health
insurance is now a topic of



MARS

FROM PAGE 1

When Maven reaches
Mars next September, it
will join three functioning
spacecraft, two U.S. and
one European. An Indian
orbiter also will be arriv-
ing about the same time.
Maven will be the 10th
orbiter to be launched to
Mars by NASA; three have
failed, testimony to the
difficulty of the task.
"No other planet, other
than perhaps Earth, has
held the attention of peo-
ple around the world than
Mars," Grunsfeld said.
Early Mars had an
atmosphere thick
enough to hold water
and moist clouds, said
chief investigator Bruce
Jakosky of the University
of Colorado's Laboratory
for Atmospheric and
Space Physics in Boulder.
Indeed, water flowed once
upon a time on Mars, and
microbial life might have
existed.
"But somehow that
atmosphere changed
over time to the cold,
dry environment that we
see today," Jakosky said.
"What we don't know is
what the driver of that



HENS

FROM PAGE 1

boxes the size of battery
cages in their backyard,"
said Clouse, who like
many opponents of
keeping urban chickens
advocates a vegan diet.
Many backyard chicken
keepers build or buy
elaborate fence-enclosed
houses with elevated
nesting areas to make the
chickens feel safe. Some
communities, including
Madison, offer tours to
show off chic coops.
Aside from the eventual
drying up of egg produc-
tion, there are a number
of headaches that


in every county across
the bay area, and in cities
from St. Petersburg to
Spring Hill.
Signed over from the
builder to its Texas-based
subsidiary, DRH Energy,
the deeds hand eternal
rights to practically any-
thing of value that it finds
buried underground,
including gold, ground-
water and gemstones.
They also give the
energy firm the right to
explore, study, mine, drill,
pump or install wellsites
to access any and all trea-
sures starting, depending
on the deed, either 30 feet
or 500 feet below ground.
Homeowners are pro-
tected from oil derricks or
any other equipment in
their front yard by a one-
page "surface waiver,"
though nothing prohibits
a company from drilling


conversation in families,"
he says.
That conversation was
interrupted by news that
the HealthCare.govwebsite
didn't work and that
people with coverage were
getting cancellation notices
despite Obama's promise
that you can keep your
insurance.
Obama maneuvered
this past week to extricate
Democrats from the
cancellations fallout.
The president offered a
one-year extension to more
than 4.2 million people
whose current individual
policies are being canceled
by insurers to make way for
more comprehensive cov-
erage under the law. This
move by the White House
was intended to smooth
a disruption for which his
administration completely
failed to plan.
But it also invited
unintended consequenc-
es, showing how easily
the law's complicated
framework can start to


change has been."
Maven short for
Mars Atmosphere and
Volatile Evolution, with a
capital N in EvolutioN -
is the first spacecraft de-
voted entirely to studying
Mars' upper atmosphere.
India's orbiter will also
study the atmosphere but
go a step further, seeking
out methane, a possible
indicator of life.
Scientists theorize
that some of the early
atmospheric water and
carbon dioxide went
down into the crust of the
Martian surface there
is evidence of carbonate
minerals on Mars. Gases
also may have gone up
and become lost to space,
stripped away by the sun,
molecule by molecule,
lakosky said.
Maven holds eight
scientific instruments
to measure the upper
atmosphere for an
entire Earth year half
a Martian year. The boxy,
solar-winged craft as
long as a school bus and
as hefty as a 5,400-pound
SUV will dip as low as
78 miles above the surface
for atmospheric sampling,
and its orbit will stretch as
high as 3,864 miles.
Understanding the
makeup and dynamics of


backyard chicken farmers
may face.
Feed, shelter, litter, and
veterinary bills add up,
and chickens are vulnera-
ble to predators and must
be in a secure shelter.
Their feed can attract
rodents, and chickens
can contract parasites
requiring veterinary care.
Plus, there's always the
chance that a baby chick
turns out to be a rooster.
Most cities don't allow
roosters because their
crowing is a nuisance,
but determining the sex
of a baby chick isn't easy.
Kean said about one in 20
chicks turns out to be a
rooster, a surprise that he
thinks is a bigger prob-
lem than the unwanted


horizontally from afar.
Not all homeowners
are pleased to learn
they've settled the biggest
purchase of their lives on
a potential drilling zone.
Some worry underground
meddling could lead to
contamination, industrial
noise or home-destroy-
ing sinkholes. Others
just want to earn a cut
of any drilling profits
themselves.
But some homebuyers
said they don't even
remember hearing of the
underground deal. Mark
McDonald, who bought a
$150,000 townhome this
year in FishHawk Ranch
in eastern Hillsborough,
said he remembers a
thick stack of paperwork
at closing but nothing
about the mineral-rights
deed.
"I'm surprised," he


come loose.
State insurance commis-
sioners warned that the
president's solution would
undermine a central goal
of the law, the creation of
one big insurance pool
in each state for people
who don't have access to
coverage on their jobs.
Fracturing that market
could lead to higher future
premiums for people
buying coverage through
the law's new insurance
exchanges, which offer
government-subsidized
private insurance.
That Obama is willing to
take such a gamble could
make it harder for him to
beat back demands for
other changes down the
line.
On the cancellations
front, the president seems
unlikely to break through.
He may yet battle to a
political draw.
Obama realizes it's on
him to try to turn things
around, and quickly. In
the first couple of weeks


Mars' present atmosphere
will help guide humans
more safely to the planet's
surface, especially if the
ship takes advantage of
the atmosphere for brak-
ing, Jakosky said. NASA
targets the 2030s for the
first manned expedition.
The spacecraft also
holds an antenna and
radio to serve as a
communications relay for
NASAs two active Martian
rovers, Curiosity and
Opportunity, as well as
the next pair of landers to
be launched in 2016 and
2020.
Maven is considered
so important that launch
preparations were allowed
to resume a couple of
days after the start of
the 16-day government
shutdown. Maven has one
month to launch; Earth
and Mars line up just so,
just every 26 months. So
if Maven isn't flying by
mid to late December, the
spacecraft will be ground-
ed until the beginning of
2016.
The red planet is a no-
toriously tricky target. The
world's overall success
rate since the 1960s for a
Mars mission is less than
50/50.
NASA has attempted
the most, 20 launches


elderly hens.
The U.S. Department
of Agriculture said it's
seeing an increasing
number of requests for
data and is considering
a nationwide survey of
cities to see how many
permit them. In April,
the agency published a
report on urban chicken
owners in Denver, Los
Angeles, Miami, and New
York, finding 1.7 percent
of Miami residents had
their own flocks, followed
by 1.2 percent in L.A. and
less than 1 percent in the
other two metropolitan.
The survey results
mirror what observers
anecdotally say occurs
in cities that pass local
ordinances allowing


said, when a Times
reporter told him about
the deed. "I didn't expect
that at all."
A homebuyer who
learns the land is en-
cumbered might decide
to look somewhere else.
And a homeowner who
agrees to the deal could
have problems selling
to someone else. Banks,
lenders and insurers
have balked at giving
mortgages or insurance
coverage to homes where
the underground rights
belong to someone else
or drilling is underway.
"It could screw up a
deal if that were brought
to the forefront," said
James Ruffolo, a Realtor
with Charles Rutenberg
Realty. "Buyers want the
best deal possible, they
want to own the home
outright, and that could


after the website debacle,
Obama played the side-
lines role of"Reassurer in
Chief." Now he's on the
field, trying to redeem
himself.
"I'm somebody who, if I
fumbled the ball, I'm going
to wait until I get the next
play, and then I'm going to
try to run as hard as I can
and do right by the team,"
Obama said Thursday at a
news conference.
Making sure the website
is running a lot better by
the end of the month may
be his best chance for a
game-changing play.
Although only 26,794
people signed up in health
plans through the federal
site the first month of
open enrollment, 993,635
applied for coverage and
were waiting to finalize
decisions. For many it took
hours of persistence, deal-
ing with frozen screens
and error messages. When
states running their own
sites are included, a total
of 1.5 million individuals


really rub people the
wrong way."
Florida law doesn't
demand that builders
alert homebuyers that
they own the rights
beneath their feet.
Attorneys rarely attend
closings. And though
title-insurance policies
and public county
records can cast light on
the deeds, Realtors say
it's all too easy to miss
the fine print.
Buyers sometimes sign
away their rights know-
ingly, too. They learn
of the mineral-rights
deed at closing time,
after they've arranged a
mortgage, prepared to
move and daydreamed
about their new kitchen.
The deal is set up, some
buyers said, in a way that
makes it nearly impossi-
ble to say no.


have applied.
The law's supporters
believe that's evidence of
pent-up demand, and so
far the insurance industry
agrees. Public criticism
of the administration by
industry leaders has been
minimal, even though
insurers also have been
on the receiving end of
the website problems.
Compounding the lower-
than-expected sign-ups,
much of the customer data
they got was incomplete,
duplicative or garbled.
Insurers, eager for the
new business expanded
coverage would bring, are
pressing the administra-
tion to clear a route for
them to sign up customers
directly. Such workarounds
may put Obama back
on track toward his goal
of signing up 7 million
people for 2014. Medicaid
expansion, the other arm
of the law's push to cover
the uninsured, signed up
396,000 people last month,
a promising start.


AP PHOTO
Two days before the scheduled launch, an Atlas V rocket and
NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) space-
craft rolls out of a hangar to the launch pad in Cape Canaveral,
on Saturday.


so far, and has the best
success rate: 70 percent.
Russia, in second place
with 18 Mars launches,
has a dismal 14 percent
success rate. China
collaborated on one of the


chickens small num-
bers of people actually get
birds. Kean said the issue
of abandoned chickens,
while real, is often over-
stated by animal rights
activists.
Iowa City officials
approved an ordinance
in 2012 allowing up to
four chickens with a
permit and consent from
neighbors. A spokeswom-
an at the city's animal
control and adoption
center said typically one
or two people a month
file applications.
A Minneapolis city
spokesman said the
city has about 1,500
chickens permitted and
gets between six and 10
application requests a


Russian flops. Europe and
Japan have attempted one
Martian mission apiece;
the European Mars
Express has had mixed
results, while the Japanese
effort fizzled.


week during spring and
summer months, fewer
when it gets cold.
For all the naysayers,
chicken keepers stand
behind their ventures.
Rheal said she intends
to have the hens hang
around far into the future,
both for the eggs and the
meat.
But even Rheal has a
soft spot for some of her
flock, especially Minnie
and Scoozie, 7-year-old
Bantams. Rheal says
those two will be in
her yard until they die,
describing Scoozie as
a sweet chicken who
mothers baby chicks.
"Everyone loves
Scoozie. She's just a very
gentle bird," Rheal said.


ALMANAC
Today is Sunday, Nov. 17, the
321st day of 2013. There are 44
days left in the year.
Today in history
On Nov. 17,1800, Congress
held its first session in Washington
in the partially completed Capitol
building.
On this date
In 1558, Elizabeth I acceded to
the English throne upon the death
of Queen Mary.
In 1869, the Suez Canal opened
in Egypt.
In 1911, the African-American
fraternity Omega Psi Phi was
founded at Howard University in
Washington, D.C.
In 1917, French sculptor
Auguste Rodin died in Meudon at
age 77.
In 1934, Lyndon Baines
Johnson married Claudia Alta
Taylor, better known as Lady Bird,
in San Antonio, Texas.
In 1962, Washington's
Dulles International Airport was
dedicated by President John F.
Kennedy.
In 1969, the first round of
Strategic Arms Limitation Talks
between the United States and the
Soviet Union opened in Helsinki,
Finland.
In 1970, the Soviet
Union landed an unmanned,
remote-controlled vehicle on the
moon, the Lunokhod 1.
In 1973, President Richard
Nixon told Associated Press
managing editors in Orlando, Fla.:
"People have got to know whether
or not their president is a crook.
Well, I'm not a crook.":'
In 1979, Iran's Ayatollah
Khomeini ordered the release of
13 black and/or female American
hostages being held at the U.S.
Embassy in Tehran.
In 1987, a federal jury in
Denver convicted two neo-Nazis
and acquitted two others of civil
rights violations in the 1984
slaying of radio talk show host
Alan Berg.
In 2000, the Florida Supreme
Court froze the state's presidential
tally, forbidding Secretary of State
Katherine Harris from certifying
results of the marathon vote count
just as Republican George W. Bush
was advancing his minuscule lead
over Democrat Al Gore. Also, a
federal appeals court refused to
block recounts under way in two
heavily Democratic counties.

Today's birthdays
Rock musician Gerry McGee
(The Ventures) is 76. Singer
Gordon Lightfoot is 75. Movie
director Martin Scorsese is 71.
Actress Lauren Hutton is 70.
Actor-director Danny DeVito is
69. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Tom
Seaver is 69. Actor Stephen Root
is 62. Rock musician Jim Babjak
(The Smithereens) is 56. Actress
Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio
is 55. Entertainer RuPaul is 53.
Actor Dylan Walsh is 50. U.S.
Actress Sophie Marceau is 47.
Actress-model Daisy Fuentes is
47. Rock musician Ben Wilson
(Blues Traveler) is 46. Actor David
Ramsey is 42. Actor Leonard
Roberts is 41. Actress Leslie Bibb
is 40. Actor Brandon Call is 37.
Country singer Aaron Lines is
36. Actress Rachel McAdams is
35. Rock musician Isaac Hanson
(Hanson) is 33. Actor Justin
Cooper is 25. Musician Reid
Perry (The Band Perry) is 25.




Wedding rings
swapped for
Chiefs tickets
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
(AP) -A longtime
Kansas City Chiefs fan
says he swapped six
game tickets for a wed-
ding ring set advertised
on Craigslist.
The buyer, 49-year-old
Kansas City resident
Rusty Jones, said he
first learned of the ring
offer last week through
a story in The Kansas
City Star. He contacted
the seller, who wanted
to swap the rings and
surprise a loved one


with tickets to the Dec.
1 game at Arrowhead
Stadium, The Kansas
City Star reported Friday.
The tickets are a hot
commodity as the Chiefs
have started the season
9-0, and the December
home game against
Denver could have
playoff implications.





The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


TRAVEL/WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


Toronto mayor in crisis; some backers stay loyal


TORONTO (AP)-
When Rob Ford was
elected mayor of Toronto
in 2010, his bluster and
checkered past were
widely known. A plurality
of voters backed him
anyway, eager to shake
things up at a City Hall
they viewed as elitist and
wasteful.
Those voters many
from Toronto's conserva-
tive-leaning, working-
class outer suburbs
- got their wish, and
perhaps more turmoil
than any could have
expected.
Now the loyalty of the
mayor's constituency,
known as Ford Nation, is
being tested as he faces
intense pressure to resign
following sensational
revelations about his
drinking problems and
illegal drug use, as well
as repeated outbursts


of erratic behavior and
crude language.
The City Council voted
Friday, on a 39-3 vote, to
suspend Ford's authority
to appoint or dismiss
the deputy mayor and
his executive committee,
which oversees the
budget. Further efforts
are expected Monday
to strip Ford of most of
his remaining powers,
though he vows to resist
with court action.
Many of Ford's political
allies including most
council members are
deserting him, and polls
show his approval rate is
down sharply from two
years ago. Yet some of
his loyalists want him to
hang on.
"Yes, he is an em-
barrassment, but not a
thief," said Joe Amorim,
49, a supply chain man-
ager from the city's Little


Italy area. "People are
tired of smooth-talking
politicians that waste
public money and serve
corporations and the
wealthy."
That outlook is re-
flected on a Facebook
site called "I Hate The
War On Mayor Rob
Ford" which praises him
for trying to fulfill his
campaign mantra: "Stop
the gravy train."
"Everyone, including
all of his voters, knew
he was rough-around-
the-edges and had
incidents involving pot
and alcohol in his past,"
says a summary on the
site. "MAYOR FORD IS
GOING NOWHERE, NOR
SHOULD HE!"
Ford has been embat-
tled since May, when
there were news reports
that he had been caught
on video smoking crack


cocaine.
Newly released court
documents show that
Ford became the subject
of a police investigation
at that point. Staffers
accused the mayor of
frequently drinking on
the job, driving while
intoxicated and making
sexual advances toward
a female staffer. The
mayor added to the furor
Thursday by using pro-
fanity while denouncing
the latest allegations.
Most city councilors
want Ford to step aside
but lack the authority to
force him out unless he
is convicted of a crime.
Given that the core of
Toronto its downtown
and close-in neighbor-
hoods has a liberal
tilt, a politician like Ford
probably never would
have been elected mayor
had it not been for an


AP PHOTO


In this Nov. 12 file photo, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford holds a
bobblehead doll depicting him at Toronto City Hall. An electoral
map of the 2010 mayoral election shows that Ford's voter base
resides mainly in a more conservative constituency than the
downtown electorate.


amalgamation forced on
the metropolitan area in
1998 by the Conservative
provincial government.
Toronto, with a popu-
lation of about 700,000,


was merged against
its will with five of its
neighboring municipali-
ties, creating a mega-city
that now has 2.7 million
residents.


Easing of China policy may not result in baby boom


BEIJING (AP) -Don't
expect a new Chinese
baby boom, experts say,
despite the first easing of
the country's controversial
one-child policy in three
decades.
Some 15 million to
20 million Chinese
parents will be allowed
to have a second child
after the government
announced Friday that
couples where one
partner has no siblings
can have two children.


But the easing of the
policy is so incremental
that demographers and
policymakers are not
anticipating an influx of
newborn babies at a time
when young Chinese cou-
ples are already opting for
smaller families, driving
the country's fertility rate
down to 1.5 to 1.6 births
per woman.
"A baby boom can be
safely ruled out," said
Wang Feng, professor of
sociology at the University


of California Irvine.
Wang noted that
although Chinese couples
where both parents have
no siblings have for some
time been allowed to have
a second child, many have
elected to have only one.
"Young people's
reproductive desires have
changed," he said.
Xia Gaolong and his
wife are among those who
will be allowed to have a
second child as a result
of the new policy, but he


said he has no intention of
giving his 10-year-old son
a sibling.
Xia, who runs a tour bus
business in the thriving
city of Nanjing in eastern
China, said the high
cost of living and fierce
competition for schools
and jobs would deter him
from bringing another
child into the world.
"No way will I have an-
other child," said Xia, who
is in his late 30s. "There
are so many pressures in


life in today's society, and
our children will only face
more pressures."
Experts estimate that
the new rules allowing
couples where one part-
ner is an only child to have
a second baby will result
in 1 million to 2 million
extra births per year in the
first few years, on top of
the 16 million babies born
annually in China.
Cai Rong, an assistant
professor of sociology at
the University of North


Carolina at Chapel Hill,
said the figure could be
even lower because of the
growing acceptance of
small families.
In an unscientific
survey on the Chinese-
language social media
platform SinaWeibo,
more than 60 percent of
those who self-identified
as being eligible for the
new exemption from the
one-child limit said they
would have a second
child.


Intense therapy can help for overcoming the fear of flying


(MCT) Megan
Thomson Connor was
"freaking out." Her air-
plane flight from Seattle
to New York City was
taxiing down the runway,
engines thrumming,
when she hit the "emer-
gency" button overhead.
A flight attendant hustled
over, and Megan was
crying and shaking, her
father's consoling arm
around her for naught.
"Do you want to get off,
or not?" a flight attendant
asked her, repeatedly.


She did, and her fellow
passengers groaned as
the plane returned to the
gate.
Connor was mortified,
calling it "one of the
worst experiences of my
life."
Such dramatic "fear
of flying" episodes don't
happen often, mostly
because those with acute
fear of flying never make
it onto the airplane to
begin with. One recent
survey found that one
in eight Americans


will avoid commercial
airplane travel, if at all
possible.
But in San Francisco,
a business called Fear of
Flying Clinic has provid-
ed intensive therapy to
familiarize anxious trav-
elers with the airborne
experience in hopes of
avoiding situations faced
by Connor and her fellow
passengers.
Founded in 1976 and
based at San Francisco
International Airport,
Fear of Flying Clinic


includes 24 hours of
instruction spread over
two weekends. It involves
a licensed behavioral
therapist to teach coping
mechanisms, as well
as lectures from airline
pilots, flight attendants,
mechanics and air traffic
controllers. Participants
also familiarize them-
selves with the cockpit,
control tower and
maintenance facility.
"We're taking away the
fear of the unknown,"
said Fran Lawrence, a


company spokeswoman.
The "final exam"
involves a daytime flight
from SFO to Seattle on a
commercial flight, where
participants have lunch
and then fly back home.
"I've been here
14 years, and we've never
had to leave behind
anyone in Seattle or any
place else," Lawrence
said. "They've all come
back. We've had a few
panic getting on the
plane, and we have had
people get off the plane


(before the trip), but our
success rate is 90 to
95 percent."
Lawrence herself is a
graduate of Fear of Flying
Clinic.
"I used to think, 'If
God wanted me to fly,
he would've given me
wings,'" she said. "But I
realized that I was being
irrational. I've flown all
over now."
For more information
on Fear of Flying Clinic,
call 650-341-1595 or go to
www.fofc.com.


Families will see stars and much more on these trips


(MCT) Gather your
family to wish upon
a star. Here are five
places to discover the
glory of the night sky:
1. Natural Bridges
National Monument,
Lake Powell, Utah.
This high desert
landscape became the
International Dark-
Sky Association's first
International Dark-Sky
Park, acknowledging
visitors' ability to
witness the Milky
Way's distinct structure
without a telescope.
By day, short hikes
enable families to
observe the unique
natural structures.

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Check the website for
seasonal talks, lectures
and Ranger-led tours.
Junior Ranger activ-
ities help kids learn
more about the region
through puzzles, games
and activities.
Contact: nps.gov/
nabr/forkids/index.
htm; utahscany
oncountry.com
2. Northern Arizona.
Flagstaff, a college
town and haven for
outdoor enthusi-
asts in the Grand
Canyon State, was
designated the world's
first International
Dark-Sky City by the
International Dark-Sky


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Association. Expect
stellar stargazing as
well as the chance
to tour the Lowell
Observatory. You'll see
the telescope where
Pluto was discovered in
the 1930s and also look
through the centu-
ry-old Clark telescope.
During the day, hike
nearby Sedona's stun-
ning red rock country
to add color to your
adventure.
Contact: lowell.edu;
flagstaffarizona.com
3. Furnace Creek
Resort, Death Valley,
Calif. The vast expanse
of arid landscape
provides an ideal


LASER

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setting to see the night
sky at its starry best.
Ask about star parties
on the airstrip and pick
up a stellar guide in
the general store. By
day, kids can swim in
a spring-fed pool, ride
horses and play golf
on a family-friendly
18-hole course. For
contrast, pair your stay
with a visit to nearby
Las Vegas, where the
bright lights cast a
different glow.
Contact: furnace
creekresort.com; nps.
gov/deva/index.htm;
vegas.com
4. Cherry
Springs State Park,


Coudersport, Pa. As
many as 10,000 stars
can be seen from this
stargazing mecca in the
northwestern corner of
the state. Comprising
82 acres, Cherry
Springs is known for its
stands of black cherry
trees and for some of
the best stargazing in
the east. On a clear
night, visitors can view
the Milky Way galaxy's
nucleus and under
certain conditions its
shadow. The site has
also received one of
two International Dark-
Sky Park designations
from the International
Dark-Sky Association.


Contact: 888-727-
2757; dcnr.state.pa.us/
stateparks/findapark/
cherrysprings/index.
htm
5. Big Pine Key, Fla.
Have you ever seen the
Southern Cross? Plan a
visit to this balmy par-
adise and you'll have
your chance to see the
small constellation.
Just 100 miles from the
glitter of Miami, this
island restricts artificial
lighting to support
nesting sea turtles,
making for ideal
stargazing conditions.
During the day, snor-
kel, kayak, fish or take
an eco-tour.


Florida on pace for record tourism


TAMPA, Fla. (AP)
- Florida is on pace
to have a record year
for tourism, Gov. Rick
Scott said Friday.
About 22.9 million
visitors came to Florida
in the third quarter
of 2013, which is an
increase of 1.7 percent
over the same period in
2012.
Gov. Rick Scott
announced the tourism
numbers during a
news conference at
Busch Gardens and
said his goal is for
the state to reach
100 million visitors.
Scott, who is running


for re-election, tied the
rise in tourism to job
creation.
"Tourism creates a
whole bunch of jobs in
our state," said Scott,
adding that for every
85 visitors, one job is
created.
Scott, who was
joined by officials from
Visit Florida and Visit
Tampa Bay the state
and region's tourism
marketing groups -
said more visitors came
to the state between
July and September
of this year than any
other third quarter in
the state's history.


Visitor spending
in Florida between
January and August
2013 was $51.8 billion,
officials said.
There have been a
total of 72.6 million
visitors to the state
through September.
Some of Florida's
tourism growth is
coming from overseas
visitors. There were
2.9 million in the third
quarter, representing a
10.1 percent increase
over the same period in
2012.
"We've got the best
tourism product in the
world," he said.









Bomber kills 6 in Afghanistan ahead of US deal talks


KABUL, Afghanistan
(AP) A suicide car
bomber tore through the
Afghan capital Saturday,
just hours after President
Hamid Karzai an-
nounced U.S. and Afghan
negotiators had agreed
on a draft deal allowing
U.S. troops to remain in
the country beyond a
2014 deadline.
The blast, which killed
six people near where
thousands of tribal lead-
ers will discuss the deal
next week, was a bloody
reminder of the insecu-
rity plaguing the country
after 12 years of war.
The suicide bomber
attacked security forces
protecting the Loya Jirga
site, Interior Ministry
spokesman Sediq Sediqqi


said. He said the blast
killed six people and
wounded 22. Among the
dead were two security
personnel, he said.
Sediqqi said Afghan
security forces had prior
knowledge of the suicide
bombing, but were
unable to stop the attack.
He did not elaborate.
No group immediately
claimed the attack,
though blame is likely
to fall on the Taliban,
who have adamantly
opposed the presence of
any foreign soldiers in
Afghanistan.
Karzai called for the
Loya Jirga, a national
consultative assembly of
tribal elders, which will
begin meeting Thursday
to discuss the proposal.


Some 3,000 elders and
influential figures will
debate the Bilateral
Security Agreement.
Without its approval,
Afghanistan likely
will refuse to sign the
agreement. If the Loya
Jirga does approve it, the
agreement still requires
final approval from
parliament, Karzai said.
U.S. officials refused to
comment on the draft,
describing the effort as
an ongoing diplomatic
process. Karzai provided
few details regarding
how and when the
draft was finalized, but
said there still remain
"differences" between
Washington and Kabul
on the deal.
Negotiations have


been protracted and
often acrimonious. In
the end it took a surprise
visit to Afghanistan in
October by U.S. Secretary
of State John Kerry to
produce the outlines of
a deal.
Earlier, two senior
U.S. officials told The
Associated Press that
Afghanistan had sought
specific security guar-
antees, particularly
against cross-border
incursions by insur-
gents from neighboring
Pakistan. Washington
is cautious about
any commitments
that could lead to a
conflict with Pakistan.
The officials spoke on
condition of anonymity
because of the deal was


AP PHOTO
An Afghan policeman secures an area after a suicide vehicle
bomb tore through the area on the outskirts of Kabul.


still being negotiated.
Karzai described a
laborious negotiation
process that sometimes
came down to fine
details of phrasing.
"There was one word


that we didn't want in
the agreement but (the
U.S.) wanted it and in
the end they agreed to
not use that word," he
said, without identifying
the offending word.


President Assad gaining ground in Syrian civil war


BEIRUT (AP) -Forces
loyal to Syrian President
Bashar Assad have firmly
seized the momentum in
the country's civil war in
recent weeks, capturing
one rebel stronghold after


6


another and triumphantly
planting the two-starred
Syrian government flag
amid shattered buildings
and rubble-strewn streets.
Despite global outrage
over the use of chemical


weapons, Assad's gov-
ernment is successfully
exploiting divisions
among the opposition,
dwindling foreign help
for the rebel cause and
significant local support,
all linked to the same
thing: discomfort with the


V, F .. '..- Islamic extremists who to coi
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"A Punta Gorda Tradition for 30 Years" The battlefield gains take r
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December 4th thru 31st, 2013 government's hand in exile,
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ISLAMABAD (AP)
- The Pakistani govern-
ment has imposed a rare
curfew in the garrison
city of Rawalpindi next to
the capital after sectarian
clashes during a Shiite
religious commemora-
tion killed seven Sunni
Muslims.
Shoaib Bin Aziz, an
official with the govern-
ment of Punjab province
where Rawalpindi is lo-
cated, said Saturday that
residents were ordered to


peace
world
Bot
ment
have
to attic
peace
GeneN
and R


Stalks sought by the
t community.
h the Syrian govern-
and the opposition
said they are ready
end a proposed
Conference in
va that the U.S.
Russia are trying
nvene, although it
ins unclear whether
meeting will indeed
)lace. The Western-
id opposition in
which has little


a their homes until
er notice.
--A


soldiers ana police
were patrolling the
streets to enforce the
curfew.
The seven Sunnis were
killed Friday in a clash
with Shiites who were
holding a procession to
mark Ashoura, one of the
sect's most important
religious occasions.
Police officer
Mohammad Wasim said
35 other people were
wounded. Shiites set fire
to dozens of shops in
anger.


support among rebel
fighters inside Syria and
even less control over
them, has set several
conditions for its par-
ticipation, chief among
them that Assad must not
be part of a transitional
government a notion
Damascus has roundly
rejected.
"President Bashar
Assad will be heading
any transitional stage in
Syria, like it or not," Omar


Gayoom elected
Maldives president
MALE, Maldives (AP)
-Voters in the Maldives
have chosen the broth-
er of the archipelago
nation's former strong-
man ruler to be their
new president over the
country's first democrat-
ically elected leader in
a closely fought runoff
election.
With just four out
of 475 ballot boxes to
be counted, Yaamin
Abdul Gayoom had
51.39 percent of the
total vote in Saturday's
election. Gayoom is the
brother of former au-
tocrat Maumoon Abdul
Gayoom, who ruled this
Indian Ocean nation for
30 years.


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Ossi, a member of Syria's
parliament, told The
Associated Press.
The government's re-
cent gains on the outskirts
of the capital, Damascus,
and in the north outside
the country's largest city,
Aleppo, have reinforced
Assad's position. And the
more the government
advances, the easier it is
to dismiss the weak and
fractious opposition's
demands.


Over 2K trucks
block French
highways in protest
PARIS (AP) Between
2,000 and 4,000 freight
trucks closed off major
French highways and
slowed traffic to a crawl
on nine roadways to
protest a proposed envi-
ronmental tax on heavy
loads.
France's Socialist
government in late
October suspended the
tax, which initially was
the focus of sometimes
violent demonstrations
in the region of Brittany,
where opponents donned
red caps and torched the
still-unused payment
kiosks.
The protest ended with
no reports of violence.


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-Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


WORLD NEWS





SThe Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 9


Clashes hit Libyan capital after militia attack


TRIPOLI, Libya (AP)
- Soldiers and govern-
ment-affiliated militias
stormed a military base
occupied by gunmen
in Libya's capital on
Saturday, sparking
fresh fighting that left
four dead a day after a
deadly militia attack on
protesters.
Armed residents
and pro-government
militiamen have set
up checkpoints across
Tripoli, as thousands of
protesters gathered in
the city center to mourn
the 43 killed in Friday's
attack when militias fired
on a crowd urging the
dissolution of unlawful
armed groups.


Friday's demonstra-
tions had been the
biggest show of public
anger over militias in
months. Some
500 people were also
wounded there, health of-
ficials said. On Saturday,
some residents of Tripoli
have said they will go
on strike until unlawful
militias are disbanded.
Since the fall of long-
time dictator Moammar
Gadhafi in 2011, hun-
dreds of militias many
on the government
payroll have sprung
up across Libya, carving
out zones of power,
defying state authority
and launching violent
attacks. The government


has tried to incorporate
them into the fledgling
police force and army
but failed.
Saturday's violence
started at dawn when
militiamen from Misrata
raided the base in the
Tajoura neighborhood,
taking arms and ammu-
nition before escaping to
the outskirts of the city,
Col. Musbah al-Harna
told state news agency
LANA from inside the
base.
A fighter on the
government side said
one of his comrades was
shot dead in the fighting.
He spoke on condition
of anonymity because
he was not authorized


to brief journalists. A
hospital official later said
that three others were
killed and 13 people were
wounded. He too spoke
anonymously for the same
reasons.
Later in the day, gov-
ernment-affiliated militias
and residents erected
checkpoints along the road
from Tajoura to the city
center, checking IDs and
searching cars in hopes
of preventing outside
militiamen from entering.
Prime Minister Ali
Zidan told militias from
outside the capital not to
enter, saying that could
lead to a "bloodbath,"
LANA also reported.
Zidan, who was briefly


AP PHOTO


This image made from video shows a protester holding up
spent ammunition in Tripoli, Libya, after militiamen attacked
peaceful protesters demanding the disbanding of the country's
rampant armed groups on Friday, killing dozens of people as
they opened fire on the march with heavy machine guns and
rocket-propelled grenades.


kidnapped by militiamen
himself last month, said
Friday his embattled


government was working
on a plan to drive all
militias out of Tripoli.


Newborn babie


TACLOBAN, Philippines
(AP) -Althea Mustacisa
was born three days ago in
the aftermath of the killer
typhoon that razed the
eastern Philippines. And
for every one of those three
days, she has struggled to
live.
But she has clung to
life because her parents
have been pushing oxygen
into her tiny body with a
hand-held pump non-stop
ever since she came into
this world.
And "if they stop, the
baby will die," said Amie
Sia, a nurse at a hospital in
typhoon-wracked Tacloban


city that is running without
electricity and few staff or
medical supplies.
"She can't breathe with-
out them. She can't breathe
on her own," Sia said. "The
only sign of life this little
girl has left is a heartbeat."
More than a week after
ferocious Typhoon Haiyan
annihilated a vast swath
of the Philippines, killing
more than 3,600 people,
the storm's aftermath is still
claiming victims and
doctors here fear Althea
maybe the next.
When the fierce storm
smashed into this tropical
country on Nov. 8, it


fight for life in


transformed Tacloban into
an unrecognizable waste-
land of rubble and death.
The bottom floor of the
two-story government-run
EasternVisayas Regional
Medical Center was flood-
ed, and the intensive care
unit for newborns was left
a muddy ruin. Life-saving
machinery, like the facility's
only incubator, was soiled
with water and mud.
As the storm hit, doctors
and staff took 20 babies
who were already in the
intensive care unit to a
small chapel upstairs for
their safety, placing them
three or four in one plastic


crib cart built for one
newborn.
With the chapel convert-
ed into an ad-hoc neo-
natal clinic, all the babies
survived initially. But six
died later, "because we lack
vital medical equipment
that was destroyed," said
the attending physician,
Dr. Leslie Rosario.
Within days, however,
10 more babies born
during or in the aftermath
of the storm were taken
in, including Althea. She
was born in her family's
typhoon-wrecked home
on Nov. 13, weighing
2.65 kilograms (5.84


chapel-hospital

pounds), suffering from an The baby was not born
inability to breathe, premature.
When she was rushed Still, there was a good
to the hospital, doctors chance of saving Althea
performed CPR on her and had the hospital been
since then they have been equipped with electricity
giving her oxygen from the that would have run a yen-
hand-held pump connect- tilator, incubator and other
ed to a blue rubber bubble life-saving equipment.
that fits into her tiny mouth Until Saturday, the
and draws sustenance from makeshift ward in the
a green tank through a chapel had no light except
transparent pipe. candles. On Saturday,
Doctors said the storm one small fluorescent
had not been a factor bulb attached to a diesel
in the baby's problems, generator was hung in the
noting that insufficient middle of the room where
prenatal care most likely a few packs of diapers sit
complicated the pregnancy on the altar below a picture
for the 18-year-old mother, of Jesus.


Islamists call for dialogue

in Egypt after coup


CAIRO (AP) -A Muslim
Brotherhood-led alliance
said Saturday it is ready for
a national dialogue to end
Egypt's political standoff,
for the first time not
formally demanding the
nation's toppled Islamist
president return to power.
The country's military-
backed government, how-
ever, signaled no intention
to start talks with support-
ers of ousted President
Mohammed Morsi.
Underscoring that, judges
also suggested Saturday
that the government
disband the Brotherhood's
political party.
The call by the alliance
of Islamist groups is the
first formal proposition
by Morsi supporters, who
have organized near-daily
protests demanding his
return to office since he
was removed in a popularly
supported military coup
July 3.
Mohammed Bishr, a
leading member of the


Brotherhood, told reporters
the proposition calls for
the release of detainees
arrested after the ouster
of Morsi. The coalition
also asked for the end of
security crackdown on
Brotherhood members
and its allies, as well as the
reopening of television
channels supporting them.
"We are keen on the


country's stability and to
get out of the economic
crunch," Bishr said.
The coalition said its
call is directed to other
national political forces,
as well as the military and
the interim government
it supports. The coalition
offered a two-week period
for them to discuss the
proposal.


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-Page 10 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


TODAY




Sun & Clouds


85/66e
20% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature@ Today


1 3~I~J~)


1* o,.


72 84 91 91 84 81
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4p.m. 6p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 Highi; 8-10 Very Highi; 11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.
AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Saturday
26
If1 I as....
0 50 100150 200 300 500
0-O50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: particulates
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Saturday

Grass ]
Weeds o 'j- o o n
Molds'**. |
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: NationalAllergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Saturday
Temperatures
High/Low 80/690
Normal High/Low 81/590
Record High 890 (1988)
Record Low 370 (1969)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Saturday Trace
Month to date Trace
Normal month to date 1.12"
Year to date 52.12"
Normal year to date 48.08"
Record 4.50" (2002)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.12 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 3.48 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. Trace 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 52.12 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


MONDAY


Partly Cloudy


86/ 660
0% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 87/69 part cldy none
Sarasota 85/68 part cldy none

SUN AND MOON
The Sun Rise Set
Today 6:50 a.m. 5:37 p.m.
Monday 6:50 a.m. 5:36 p.m.
The Moon Rise Set
Today 5:52 p.m. 6:43 a.m.
Monday 6:38 p.m. 7:37 a.m.
Full Last New First


10C
Nov 17 Nov25 Dec 2 Dec 9

SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 4:41a 10:53a 5:06p 11:18p
Mon. 5:31a 11:43a 5:56p --
Tue. 6:23a 12:13a 6:48p 12:35p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 1:22a
Mon. 1:49a
Englewood
Today 2:43p
Mon. 12:26a
Boca Grande
Today 1:48p
Mon. 2:26p
El Jobean
Today 1:54a
Mon. 2:21a
Venice
Today 12:58p
Mon. 1:36p


Low High Low

9:24a 4:06p 8:06p
9:59a 4:44p 8:33p


--- 6:22p
3:21p 6:49p


6:01a 11:31p 4:43p
6:36a --- 5:10p

9:53a 4:38p 8:35p
10:28a 5:16p 9:02p

6:19a 10:41p 5:01p
6:54a 11:11p 5:28p


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY THE NATION
,.._ 10s I*Os 0s 10s I20s I30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80 90s I 90s~ I


" j,,,'x ; ',,'k !^ ... ., ":
Isolated PM. Rain Isolated Rain Partly Cloudy
Isolated RM, Rain Isolated Rain Partly Cloudy


81/ 630
30% chance of rain


CleamatJ
84 70





St. Petersbu
85,69







Longboat Key
84/72
S
8




Shown is today's
Temperatures are
highs and tonight



Gulf Water
Temperature
710


80 / 650
30% chance of rain


81/640
0% chance of rain


at. Plant City/
851 68 V Winter Haven

Tampa -Brandun
85/70 86 67 B *-
Bartu*v
, urg
g Apollo Beach F Md
85 68 Ft. Meade
85 68 I 84/67




S Wauchula
4 Bradenton 86 68
84/69
al _____ 8Cit Limestone
Y,86 68 j87 67
arasuta \ '
5/68 *. r
Osprey __ Arcadia -. :'-
85/70 % 86 69 j
Venice Hull
s weather. f 85/68 North Port Hull
e today's 86/67 87/67
t's lows. PortCarlotte
,d I ,85'66
Englertuud J .'**...
84 67 ,
r Punta Gorda


e Placida
85/68


Boca urande*
85/73
Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013

Publication date: 11/17/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop


Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
ESE 8-16 1-3 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
SSE 7-14 2-4 Moderal


88/ 0


Fort Myers
87/69
0
Cape Coral
86/68


Lehigh Acres
86/68


Sanibel
85/73


Bonita Springs
87/69 9,


e AccuWeather.com


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
77 70 sh
84 69 pc
84 70 pc
84 72 pc
82 68 c
84 73 c
87 69 pc
83 67 c
81 65 pc
80 64 pc
83 75 c


Mon.
Hi Lo W
79 51 sh
83 69 pc
83 68 sh
83 69 pc
83 61 sh
83 69 pc
84 69 pc
85 66 pc
82 50 sh
82 49 sh
83 73 pc


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
84 76 pc
85 67 pc
84 67 pc
83 68 c
84 73 c
86 69 pc
83 65 pc
83 67 pc
85 68 pc
77 68 t
78 68 t


Mon.
Hi Lo W
84 73 pc
84 66 sh
83 67 sh
83 69 sh
84 70 pc
83 70 pc
83 57 sh
85 66 pc
84 67 sh
77 51 t
78 49 t


Today
City Hi Lo W
Pompano Beach 84 73 c
St. Augustine 78 68 c
St. Petersburg 85 69 pc
Sanford 84 68 pc
Sarasota 85 68 pc
Tallahassee 78 68 sh
Tampa 85 70 pc
Titusville 82 67 c
Vero Beach 83 67 c
West Palm Beach 85 71 c
Winter Haven 85 68 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
83 70 pc
81 55 sh
81 69 sh
84 64 sh
82 68 pc
81 48 sh
81 69 sh
81 66 sh
85 67 pc
84 69 pc
85 68 sh


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.


7le Mneapoia,'. DetO' Tointo
50141 128 .5-/'0.

/. ^'T i i B 5hng 8 ~P' -.w. u' S7'* ..y"iW -


"- l l ^ .......... 67w42r
\.San'Fandico Kansas :City g....... :.. *6. 6
5M9\49 *"'" Deve w Waaninglon
............s
Biels 6ings 57142

~ \6 -aiu-" : ;::! :!: :::::i :

\ ~< 'lHousloi. : :..."
\ ChiuahEua .. ....
\ h ^7t6864 I:;:: : 57140
V. .? Now Yol


Monlerrey
82/62


Fronts

Cold Warm Stationary


Miami
84/73


Precipitation

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice


U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


High ..................... 86 at Edinburg,TX


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


Today
Hi Lo W
59 36 pc
20 7 s
71 60 t
65 57 c
38 28 c
75 56 t
45 30 pc
60 54 c
62 46 sh
58 56 pc
71 49 t
69 61 c
68 36 t
73 44 t
65 45 r
72 63 c
69 45 t
53 48 c
83 49 pc
52 28 pc
56 33 sh
68 42 r
45 26 r
3 -4 c
38 21 sn
58 56 c
36 26 sn
84 69 pc
84 67 c
72 41 t


WORLD CITIES


City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


Today
Hi Lo W
50 43 pc
73 56 s
51 30 s
48 37 c
77 64 s
73 58 pc
18 10 pc
86 76 pc
52 41 r
13 4 c
50 45 pc
44 39 pc
48 43 pc
50 37 r


Mon.
Hi Lo W
60 34 s
15 8 s
68 43 pc
68 40 pc
48 33 pc
69 42 pc
50 39 pc
64 41 r
49 32 sh
58 35 r
59 35 pc
73 38 pc
43 28 pc
53 31 pc
49 34 sh
77 46 pc
51 33 pc
61 34 r
70 48 pc
60 29 pc
43 29 pc
49 30 sh
29 18 sf
1-15 sf
26 21 pc
66 36 r
43 29 pc
84 70 pc
76 49 pc
50 29 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
48 40 r
71 58 t
47 26 s
46 36 c
81 62 s
72 56 pc
17 8 pc
85 75 pc
43 32 sh
16 -1 c
57 44 pc
45 38 c
46 34 r
54 37 pc


Low ......... 11 at Bodie State Park, CA


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today
Hi Lo W
82 57 t
60 32 pc
70 52 t
64 49 pc
69 54 pc
73 46 t
79 48 t
64 37 r
50 28 sh
79 64 t
74 47 t
82 68 t
64 61 c
70 63 c
71 38 s


Today
Hi Lo W
79 52 pc
57 52 pc
57 44 sh
45 33 pc
18 5 sf
76 70 t


Mon.
Hi Lo W
72 43 pc
51 33 s
63 38 pc
67 50 s
70 53 pc
57 34 pc
62 42 pc
43 29 c
35 28 pc
75 44 pc
61 37 pc
75 52 pc
68 42 r
72 46 pc
64 37 s
48 31 s
70 41 r
77 54 s
50 32 sh
59 37 r
50 45 r
66 39 r
72 41 pc
52 38 pc
53 33 s
76 53 pc
65 58 pc
59 49 pc
49 43 r
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Mon.
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52 32 r
53 30 r
46 34 c
19 12 pc
79 71 c
66 54 c
46 40 s
84 70 sh
73 52 c
66 51 s
49 29 sh
47 43 r
23 15 c


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


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SPORTS


Sunday, November 17,2013


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


High school boys
basketball preview,
Page 3

Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Duke 48, No. 24 Miami 30




Duke extends Miami's slide


SCOREBOARD
Florida State 59, Syracuse 3
Ohio State 60, Illinois 35
Oregon 44, Utah 21
Auburn 43, Georgia 38
South Carolina 19, Florida 14
Oklahoma State 38, Texas 13
Michigan St. 41, Nebraska 28
UCF 39, Temple 36
Wisconsin (8-2) 51, Indiana 3
Louisville vs. Houston
Oklahoma 48, Iowa State 10
Oklahoma State 38, Texas 13
Duke 48, Miami 30
Auburn 43, Georgia 38
FAU 41, Southern Miss 7
Delaware St. 29, Florida A&M
21
Bethune-Cookman 42,
Hampton 12
Jacksonville 45, Stetson 24


Blue Devils take control of race
for spot in ACC title game


By JOEDY McCREARY
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DURHAM, N.C.-
Miami couldn't stop
Duke's running game.
And once the Blue Devils
started scoring, the
24th-ranked Hurricanes'
offense couldn't keep up.
"There's enough blame
to go around in this
game," coach Al Golden
said.
The Hurricanes' free-
fall continued Saturday
when Duke beat them
48-30.
Their third consecutive
loss dropped them down


the ACC Coastal Division
standings and prob-
ably out of the national
rankings, too.
A win would have
put Miami in control of
the division and set
up a rematch with No.
2 Florida State in the
league championship
game.
Instead, it's the Blue
Devils who have the
inside track to Charlotte.
"It's really about
executing, and we didn't
do that well enough,"
Golden said. "Duke did."
Dallas Crawford


rushed for 115 yards and
Stephen Morris threw for
379 and two touchdowns
but the Hurricanes
(7-3, 3-3) lost their third
straight since climbing
to No. 7. They've allowed
at least 41 points in each
loss.
"Obviously, we're giving
up too many points,"
Golden said. "That's
changing the way we play
the game on offense."
They could stop nei-
ther Brandon Connette
nor the Blue Devils'
ground game.
The Blue Devils rolled
up 358 yards rushing
- by far, the most by a
DUKE I 6


* PREP WRESTLING: Lemon Bay Duals


Lemon Bay began its season with its annual Lemon Bay Duals on Saturday in Englewood. The Manta Rays finished fifth.


A day of promise for two

Lemon Bay, Port Charlotte find
reasons for optimism in Duals


By GARY BROWN
SUN CORRESPONDENT
ENGLEWOOD Both
the host Lemon Bay High
School and Port Charlotte
wrestling teams found
reason to be happy with
their results in Lemon
Bay Manta Rays Duals
Challenge Saturday.
The Manta Rays
finished fifth in the 10-
team tournament with
a 3-2 record, defeating
Gulf Coast 42-21 in


the fifth-place match.
Lemon Bay also had
three wrestlers make the
all-tournament first team
with undefeated records.
Dominic Schofield (120
pounds) and Ryan Dodge
(160) went 5-0 with two
and three falls, respec-
tively. Bobby Caspolich
(170) went 5-0 with four
falls. Jack Lipp (113)
made the honorable
mention list with a 4-0
DUALS I 4


The Manta Rays beat Naples for one the team's three victories
in five matches Saturday at the Lemon Bay Duals.


AP PHOTO
Miami's Herb Waters jumps over Duke's Deondre Singleton
during the first half of a Saturday's game in Durham, N.C. The
Blue Devils handed the Hurricanes their third consecutive loss.

* PREP SWIMMING: Class 4A state meet


Personal-best



at states lifts



Rutherford


North Port
senior ends
career with
8th-place in
By JON SANTUCCI
SUN CORRESPONDENT
STUART -Thomas
Rutherford paused before
pulling himself out of the
pool after the 100-yard
butterfly, realizing he
had just finished his final
race for North Port High
School.
The senior, who posted
personal bests in the
morning preliminaries,
finished eighth in the 200
IM and llth in the 100
fly in the Class 4A FHSAA
Finals at the Sailfish
Sunsplash Aquatic Athletic
Center on Saturday.
"It's the end of one
chapter and the opening
of a new one pretty soon,"
Rutherford said. "I could
have done better, actually.
I knew I could be faster in
the 100 fly as well as the
200 IM. I think I gave away
a tenth (of a second) or
two in that one as well.
"This meet was a lot
faster than 3A last year.
This was the deepest state
meet I have ever seen."
Rutherford finished the
200 IM final with a time
of 1:55.99; Palm Harbor
University's Manuel
Barragan won the event
in 1:49.94. Rutherford also
finished eighth in the 200


IM in the Class 3A state
meet last year.
"I felt like in the morn-
ing I was coming too high
out of the water and push-
ing too much water," said
Rutherford, who posted a
1:55.43 in the preliminar-
ies. "I tried staying lower,
took a breath too late
going into backstroke -
not too much, just enough
to throw me off and get
me just a little out of it.
"One mess-up and it
was just too late consider-
ing how fast kids were."
Rutherford swam 52.12
in the 100 fly and finished
third in the consolation
final. Gateway's Walker
Brooks won the heat with
a time of 51.06; Oviedo's
Noah Hensley won the
100 fly with a 49.27.
Rutherford was slightly
better in the preliminaries
with a 52.06.
"He did really well in the
morning- the pool was
wicked fast and he had
some awesome swims,"
North Port coach Daphne
Bazenas said. "He was
definitely pumped in the
morning, maybe a little
fresher.
"The pool was definitely
fastest in the morning.
Everybody was shaving
time right and left. You
look at the times at night,
some people dropped,
but some people went up
a bit, too. He wasn't quite
as fast this evening, but
he still did really well. I'm
really proud."


* NFL: Tampa Bay


Bucs try to target a stifled Jackson


Tampa Bay wide receiver Vincent Jackson has struggled
against double coverage the past three weeks since
teammate Mike Williams was lost to injury.


By JOE SMITH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA -Mike Williams
has joked that in Tampa
Bay's dynamic receiving
duo, he's Robin and Vincent
Jackson is Batman.
In that case, Jackson, 30,
is missing his sidekick quite
a bit.
With Williams gone
due to season-ending
hamstring surgery, Jackson
could have used some
super powers the past three


weeks to free himself from
suffocating coverage as the
2012 Pro Bowl pick saw
more double-teams and
fewer passes.
The last time Williams
played, Oct. 20 in Atlanta,
Jackson had 22 targets and
10 catches for 138 yards,
including a 59-yard score
that remains the Bucs'
longest offensive play of the
season. But in the past two
games, Jackson has been
targeted just 12 times with


five catches.
With the Bucs missing
Williams and running back
Doug Martin (shoulder
surgery), opponents have
focused on Jackson, their
best remaining offensive
option.
But most No. 1 receivers
get extra defensive atten-
tion and still get the ball,
and coach Greg Schiano
made it clear the team must
get Jackson more involved
JACKSON I 8


FALCONS AT BUCS
WHO: Atlanta (2-7) at Tampa
Bay (1-8)
WHEN: Today, 1Ip.m.
WHERE: Raymond James
Stadium,Tampa
TV: FOX
RADIO:103.5 FM, 620 AM
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com
INSIDE: Dolphins still have a
chance at a playoff berth despite
recent troubles, Page 8


INDEX I Lottery 21 NBA 2 | College basketball 2 | Shorelines 21 Preps 3-41 Golf 4 | College football 5-7 | NFL 81 Scoreboard 91 NHL 91 Autoracing 10






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.comrn
N CASH 3
Nov. 16N ................................. 1-8-6
Nov. 16D.....................................6-0-1
Nov. 15N ....................................3-9-5
Nov. 15D.............. .......................6-5-2
Nov. 14N ....................................9-3-9
Nov. 14D.....................................2-1-6
D-Day, N-Night

* PLAY
Nov. 16N .................................6-2-1-7
Nov. 16D..................................8-5-4-6
Nov. 15N .................................3-6-9-3
Nov. 15D.......................1.......13-1-1-4
Nov. 14N .................................0-1-6-4
Nov. 14D..................................9-1-6-4
D-Day, N-Night

* FANTASY 5
Nov. 16........................7-15-17-28-35
Nov. 15..........................4-8-15-23-36
Nov. 14........................5-24-28-31-33
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 15
2 5-digit winners.......... $114,835.16
369 4-digit winners................... $100
10,031 3-digit winners ............... $10

* MEGA MONEY
Nov. 15................................8-9-20-43
MegaBall...........................................4

Nov. 12...........................3-12-19-27
M egaBall........................................... 5
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 15
0 4-of-4 MB..........................$700,000
5 4-of-4............................... $1,233.50
40 3-of-4 MB ............................... $338
832 3-of-4...............................$48.50
1,242 2-of-4 MB......................$22.50
* LOTTO
Nov. 16...................8-19-22-29-32-38
Nov. 13...................5-12-14-28-45-50
Nov. 9.....................9-12-15-21-33-45
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 13
0 6-digit winners ......................$30M
22 5-digit winners.............$6,624.50
1,491 4-digit winners............. $74.50
32,493 3-digit winners ..................$5

* POWERBALL
Nov. 16...................... 10-29-37-44-59
Powerball........................................10

Nov. 13.....................5-31-50-55-56
Powerball.......................................... 9
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 13
0 5of5+PB...........................$110M
1 5 of5............................... $1,000,000
3 4of5 + PB.........................$10,000
49 4of 5 ....................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$130 million

MEGAA MILLIONS
Nov. 15...................... 25-44-49-54-63
MegaBall...........................................8

Nov. 12...................... 20-30-32-42-71
MegaBall......................................... 15
PAYOFF FOR NOV. 15
0 5 of5 + MB........................... $132M
0 5 0of5..............................$1,000,000
0 4of5 + MB..........................$5,000
14 4of 5 ....................................$500


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...

Submit a story idea: Email or call
Mark Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must
contain name, address and phone
number.
Report a high school result: Call
877-818-6204 or 941-206-1126 by
10:30 p.m. the day the event is held.
Submit local golf scores: Email
scores to golfscores@sun-herald.com.
Scores appear in the weekly Herald
sections.


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Zach Miller. Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


*SHORE LINES



Winter's dumbest trade rumor has surfaced


his column should
be read while
listening to "Angel
in Blue" by J. Geils Band
(running time: 4 min-
utes, 57 seconds).
We have a winner
for this winter's award
for Most Absurd Trade
Rumor Ever: Someone
on Twitter apparently
made up a trade that
would send Tampa Bay
Rays ace David Price
to the Philadelphia
Phillies for once-feared,
now broken-down
slugger Ryan Howard.
Even with the Phillies
eating a large chunk of
salary and a significant
throw-in, there is no
way the Rays deal Price
without getting back a
top-ten prospect (think
Wil Myers), which the
Phillies don't have.


^ Rob

-1 ,S WRITER


SHORE@SUN-HERALD.COM

Then again, that
rumor was prefaced by
the words "a report out of
Philadelphia."
I don't know if
ESPN's Keith Law was
specifically looking at the
Howard-Price non-rumor
when he was asked in a
chat about the origins of
baseball trades and he
responded, "Mostly GMs
just read Twitter looking
for great suggestions
from fans."
Life is good when
Charles Barkley opens
an NBA pregame show
with what ends up as


a discussion forum on
an N-word that isn't
Nowitzki.
Now that neither
player is the flavor of
the month anymore,
can we find out whether
Joe Flacco or Colin
Kaepernick won the
game of horse for Flacco's
chicken wings?
A Kansas City Chiefs
fan reportedly swapped
a wedding ring set worth
$2,800 for six game
tickets. Just a thought,
but StubHub might have
been cheaper.
Do you suppose
Florida and Miami would
like Central Florida to go
away and stop encroach-
ing on their turf? The
Golden Knights are in
line for a BCS bowl. The
Gators and Hurricanes -
not so much.


ONLINE
Don't miss Rob Shore's Hat Trick
every weekday morning at
suncoastsportsblog.com.
Also, follow us online:
Help us get to 500 followers on
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Follow at
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@SunCoastSports.


A group of Kentucky
fans saw their business
selling shirts promoting a
perfect Wildcats bas-
ketball season take off
after losing to Michigan
State this week. Mostly,
the business came from


opposing fans wanting
to mock Kentucky.
A Marion County,
Tenn., assistant football
coach has been arrested
and charged with van-
dalizing his own school
ahead of a big rivalry
game against South
Pittsburg (in an effort
to fire up the troops).
For what it's worth,
South Pittsburg defeated
Marion County 35-17.
In the wake of a
three-game losing
streak, the Cleveland
Cavaliers held a rather
heated players-only
meeting to clear the air.
On the other hand, if the
meeting didn't end with
Kyrie Irving signing with
the Miami Heat, it's still
a pretty good result.
Contaa Rob Shore at941-206-1174
or shore@sun-herald.com.


* MEN'S BASKETBALL ROUNDUP




Big day for Prather, Gators win


By DOUG FERGUSON
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GAINESVILLE Casey
Prather scored 27 points
and Dorian Finney-Smith
showed great versatility
in his Florida debut,
helping the 1lth-ranked
Gators shake loose from
Arkansas-Little Rock for
an 86-56 win Saturday.
Prather put back a
loose ball, scored on a
driving layup and capped
off a 17-4 run with a
dunk off a steal by DeVon
Walker as Florida (2-1)
woke up from a first-half
malaise. The score was
tied at 27 after a sloppy
opening half.
The Gators stepped up
the pressure against the
UALR (0-2) and it paid
off in a big way, as they
outscored the Trojans
59-29 in the second half.
Finney-Smith, a Virginia
Tech transfer who sat
out the first two games
with a suspension, had
17 points and nine
rebounds.

No. 11 FLORIDA 86, UALR 56
UALR (0-2)
White 8-13 0-0 16, Leeper 0-3 0-0 0, Isler
1-5 0-0 2, Hagins 2-7 2-2 6, Thomas 3-8
2-3 8, Osse 0-5 1-2 1, Hill 0-2 0-0 0, Smith
11 0-0 2, Billings 0-2 0-0 0, Isom 0-4 0-0 0,
Neighbour 7-11 5-5 21.Totals 22-61 10-12
56.
FLORIDA (2-1)
Yeguete 2-5 2-2 6, Prather 10-11 6-8 27,
Young 5-9 0-410, Hill 4-6 6-814,Walker 0-4
0-0 0, Carter 0-2 0-0 0, Finney-Smith 5-10
4-6 17, Edwards 0-0 0-0 0, Frazier II 2-9 0-0
6,Kurtz3-30-1 6,Donovan0-10-000.Totals
31-6018-2986.
Halftime-Tied 27-27. 3-Point Goals-
UALR 2-11 (Neighbour 2-3, Hagins 0-1,
Isler 0-1, Isom 0-2, Osse 0-4), Florida 6-17
(Finney-Smith 3-4, Frazier II 2-7, Prather
1-1, Carter 0-1, Donovan 0-1, Walker 0-3).
Fouled Out-Isler. Rebounds-UALR
36 (White 9), Florida 40 (Finney-Smith 9).
Assists-UALR 6 (Hagins 3), Florida 16
(Hill 6). Total Fouls-UALR 21, Florida 12.
A-8,843.

No. 10 Ohio State 52,
No. 17 Marquette 35:
Playing in front of a loud home crowd
in Milwaukee, Marquette had all


Arkansas-Little Rock guard J.T. Thomas (14) tries to get around
Florida's Kasey Hill (0) during Saturday's game in Gainesville.


the ingredients to make a big early
season statement. Instead, they
came out flat struggled offensively all
afternoon in a 52-35 loss.

No. 25 Virginia 70,
Davidson 57: Mike Tobey
had 18 points, and Virginia used a
second-half surge to defeat Davidson
70-57 on Saturday in Charlotte.
Malcolm Brogdon added 17 points
and seven rebounds for the Cavaliers,
who bounced back from a tough loss
to No. 14 VCU on Tuesday.

No. 16 Wichita State
85, Tennessee State 71:
Tennessee State was right there, up
by one at halftime against No. 16
Wichita State in Wichita, Kan, but any
momentum it had quickly dissipated
in the second half.
Patrick Miller scored 23 points, but
the Tigers were unable to keep up
with the Shockers during an 85-71
loss.

No. 9 Syracuse 69,
Cogate 50: C.J. Fair scored 20
points and freshman guard Tyler
Ennis hit four 3-pointers for 12 points
to lead Syracuse to a win against
Colgate. The Orange (3-0) have now
won 48 straight against Colgate.


No. 14 VCU 92,
Winthrop 71: In Richmond, Va.,
Briante Weber scored 16 points and
No. 14 Virginia Commonwealth pulled
away in the second half to remain
unbeaten with a 92-71 victory. The
Rams are 3-0 for the first time since
the 2010-2011 season, which ended
with a trip to the Final Four.

Southern 87, North
Florida 78: Calvin Godfrey scored
25 points with 12 rebounds and
four blocked shots to lead Southern
University past North Florida 87-78
on Saturday night in Jacksonville.
Yondarius Johnson added 21 points
- with 4-of-4 3-point shooting -
and Damien Goodwin added 13 for
the Jaguars (1-4), who broke open a
tight game in the second half.

SOUTHERN U. 87, NORTH FLORIDA 78
SOUTHERN U. (1-3)
Godfrey 11-17 3-4 25, Snow 2-4 0-0 4, Hy-
der 0-1 1-2 1, Monroe 0-1 2-2 2, Miller 2-4
0-0 4, Goodwin 5-5 3-5 13, Banks 2-5 2-2 7,
Clark 1-5 1-1 3,Johnson 6-12 5-6 21, Lynch
2-4 2-4 7, Mitchell 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 31-59
19-2687.
NORTH FLORIDA (1-3)
Wallace 3-11 4-7 10, McRoy 4-9 6-10 14,
Davenport 3-5 2-4 8, Beech 4-9 2-4 12,
Moore4-9 3-414,Nesbitt 1-2 2-34,Wilson
4-7 0-0 11, Bodager 0-0 0-0 0, Daniels 1-4
0-0 2, Banks 1-2 1-3 3. Totals 25-58 20-35
78.
Halftime-Southern U. 48-43. 3-Point


Goals-Southern U. 6-13 (Johnson 4-4,
Lynch 1-3, Banks 1-3, Miller 0-1,Clark 0-2),
North Florida 8-22 (Moore 3-5, Wilson 3-6,
Beech 2-4, Davenport 0-1, Nesbitt 0-1,
McRoy 0-2, Daniels 0-3). Fouled Out-
McRoy, Wallace. Rebounds-Southern U.
39 (Godfrey 12), North Florida 36 (Wallace
9).Assists-Southern U.8 (Banks 3), North
Florida 11 (Moore 4). Total Fouls-South-
ern U. 26, North Florida 23. A-1,794.

Florida International
70, Texas Southern 68:
Tymell Murphy scored 22 points
to lead Florida International on
Saturday night in Miami. Murphy
was 10 of 14 from the field with 12
rebounds and two steals. Jerome
Frink chipped in with 16 points and
eight rebounds. The Golden Panthers
(4-2) were down by as many as 10
points in the first half before a 23-13
run to tie the game at halftime.

FlU 70, TEXAS SOUTHERN 68
TEXAS SOUTHERN (2-2)
Gibbs 2-4 2-2 7, Johnson-Danner 0-3 1-2
1, Scott 2-2 1-1 5, Murray 8-19 6-10 22,
Clayborn 4-6 2-2 10, Rodriguez 2-9 8-10
14, Penn 2-12 4-4 9.Totals 20-55 24-31 68.
FlU (4-2)
Taylor 2-9 4-7 8, Frink 7-12 0-2 16, Murphy
10-14 2-3 22, Buckles 3-8 0-0 8, Mavin 4-11
3-5 11, Boswell 0-0 0-0 0,OWilliams 0-2 0-0
0, Porcher Jimenez 2-5 0-0 5, Jurkovic 0-0
0-0 0, De La Rosa 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 28-62
9-1770.
Halftime-Tied 34-34. 3-Point Goals-
Texas Southern 4-16 (Rodriguez 2-5, Gibbs
1-2, Penn 1-8, Murray 0-1), FlU 5-15 (Buck-
les 2-3, Frink 2-4, Porcher Jimenez 1-4,
Williams 0-1 ,Taylor 0-1, Murphy 0-1, Mavin
0-1). Fouled Out-Buckles. Rebounds-
Texas Southern 42 (Murray 11), FlU 36
(Murphy 12). Assists-Texas Southern 11
(Gibbs 3), FlU 11 (Taylor 8). Total Fouls-
Texas Southern 15, FlU 23. Technical-
Mavin. A-1,348.

Gardner Webb 87,
Jacksonville 78: Naji Hibbert
scored 20 points to lift Gardner-
Webb to its first win of the season
on Saturday night. Hibbert, who
was 6 of 11 from the field with
two 3-pointers, got help from Josh
Castellanos, who had 15 points, and
Jerome Hill, who had 13 points and
eight rebounds in the home opener.

GARDNER-WEBB 87,
JACKSONVILLE 78
JACKSONVILLE (1-2)
Martin 4-7 2-2 11, Slawson 6-10 6-8 19,
Dawson 2-5 0-0 4, Haywood 6-12 5-6 17,
McDougald 4-8 2-3 10, Fleming 2-5 0-0
4, White 0-0 1-2 1, Holder 1-3 0-0 2, Hunt
1 -3 0-0 2, Alderman 2-6 4-4 8.Totals 28-59
20-2578.
GARDNER-WEBB (1-2)


UP NEXT
Florida: vs. Southern, Monday,
7p.m.
North Florida: vs. Savannah
State, Monday, 7:30 p.m.
Florida International: vs.
Stetson, Monday, 7 p.m.
Jacksonville: at Wake Forest,
Monday, 7 p.m.

MEN'S STATE
SCHEDULE
TODAY
Bethune-Cookman at Central
Florida, 2 p.m.
Florida Atlantic at Boston
College, 8p.m.

Hill 4-9 5-7 13, Byron 2-6 2-3 6, Strange 3-8
1-2 9, Castellanos 5-6 4-6 15, Hibbert 6-11
6-8 20, Stumpf 0-0 2-2 2, Branch 1-4 2-2 4,
Nelson 4-7 4-6 12, Ivey 2-5 0-0 4, Tuff 1-1
0-0 2.Totals 28-57 26-36 87.
Halftime-Gardner-Webb 41-36. 3-Point
Goals-Jacksonville 2-10 (Slawson 1-2,
Martin 1-3, Hunt 0-1, Haywood 0-1, Holder
0-1, McDougald 0-2), Gardner-Webb 5-11
(Strange 2-4, Hibbert 2-5, Castellanos 1-1,
Ivey 0-1). Fouled Out-Byron, McDou-
gald, Slawson. Rebounds-Jacksonville
29 (Dawson 5), Gardner-Webb 39 (Hill 8).
Assists-Jacksonville 13 (Haywood, Mar-
tin 3), Gardner-Webb 18 (Strange 8). Total
Fouls-Jacksonville 26, Gardner-Webb
20. A-2,350.

WOMEN
No. 6 Notre Dame 96,
Valparaiso 46: Jewell Loyd
scored 22 points, Lindsay Allen had
15 and No. 6 Notre Dame defeated
Valparaiso 96-46 on Saturday in
South Bend, Ind. Loyd had 14 points
in the first half and helped fuel an
early second-half run that put the
game out of reach before resting for
the final 12:50.

No. 20 Oklahoma State
87, Northern Colorado 51:
Tiffany Bias scored 18 points and
dished out seven assists as No. 20
Oklahoma State defeated Northern
Colorado 87-51 on Saturday in
Stillwater, Okla. There was a moment
of silence prior to the game to honor
four lives lost in a plane crash on Nov.
17,2011.


* NBA ROUNDUP




James leads banged-up Heat


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE, N.C.-
LeBron James scored 30
points to help Miami
beat Charlotte 97-81
Saturday night for the
Heat's 13th straight victo-
ry against the Bobcats.
With Mario Chalmers
suspended, Chris Bosh
limited due to foul
trouble, Ray Allen out
with the flu and Dwyane
Wade a non-factor, James
came up big for the Heat.
The four-time MVP was
13 of 18 from the field
and had seven assists in
his eighth 20-point game
this season.
Chalmers was serving
a one-game suspension
after being ejected from


the Heat's win against
Dallas on Friday night.
Chalmers was called for
flagrant-2 foul in the
fourth quarter after refer-
ees ruled he intentionally
swung an elbow at Dirk
Nowitzki's head.
Chalmers can return
for Tuesday night's home
game against Atlanta.

HEAT 97, BOBCATS 81
MIAMI (97)
James 13-18 4-4 30, Battier 1-1 2-2 5, Bosh
3-4 0-0 7, Cole 3-10 2-2 8, Wade 1-7 2-4 4,
Andersen 2-2 6-6 10, Lewis 3-7 2-2 9, Bea-
sley 7-140-015,Anthony 0-10-0 0, Mason
Jr. 2-53-39.Totals 35-6921-2397.
CHARLOTTE (81)
Kidd-Gilchrist 3-8 2-2 8, McRoberts 3-10
0-0 6, Biyombo 1-2 2-2 4, Walker 7-18 5-6
22, Henderson 4-12 4-5 13, Taylor 5-142-5
14, Zeller 0-20- 0,Tolliver 1-9 0-0 3, Ses-
sions5-80-0 11 .Totals29-83 15-2081.
Miami 26 19 23 29- 97
Charlotte 16 25 19 21 81
3-Point Goals-Miami 6-15 (Mason Jr.


2-5, Battier 1-1, Bosh 1-2, Lewis 1-3, Beas-
ley 1-4), Charlotte 8-27 (Walker 3-5,Taylor
2-4, Sessions 1-2, Henderson 1-3, Tolliver
1-7, McRoberts 0-6). Fouled Out-None.
Rebounds-Miami 49 (Lewis 9), Char-
lotte 46 (Biyombo 8). Assists-Miami
18 (James 7), Charlotte 20 (McRoberts
9). Total Fouls-Miami 22, Charlotte 20.
Technicals-Bosh, Miami Coach Spoel-
stra, Charlotte Coach Clifford. A-19,084
(19,077).

Hawks 110, Knicks 90:
In New York, Jeff Teague scored 16
points to lead Atlanta. It was the fifth
straight home loss for New York. Paul
Millsap, back in the starting lineup,
had 14 points and 13 rebounds as
the Hawks shot 56 percent and won
for the fourth time in five games.
NewYork hasn't won at home since
beating Milwaukee on Oct. 30 in its
season opener, and where the fans
are getting restless.

Cavaliers 103, Wizards
96: In Washington, Kyrie Irving


scored nine of his 41 points in over-
time to help the Cleveland snap a
three-game skid. Irving scored seven
straight points on three possessions
in overtime to give Cleveland the
lead for good.

Bulls 110, Pacers 94: In
Chicago, Luol Deng scored 23 points,
Derrick Rose added 20 points and the
Chicago Bulls knocked off the NBA's
last unbeaten team. Taj Gibson had
15 points and eight rebounds for
Chicago (5-3), which won its fourth
straight game behind 11-of-19
shooting from 3-point range.

Mavericks 108, Magic
100: In Orlando, Monta Ellis had
19 points and eight assists. Dirk
Nowitzki and DeJuan Blair added
18 apiece for the Mavericks, who
won for the eighth straight time in
Orlando. Arron Afflalo led Orlando


with 25 points and four assists.

Timberwolves 106,
Celtics 88: Kevin Love had 23
points and 12 rebounds and Nikola
Pekovic had 20 points and 12 boards
to lead Minnesota. The Celtics have
now lost three in a row following a
four-game winning streak.

Pelicans 135, 76ers 98:
Anthony Davis had 13 points, nine
rebounds and a career-high eight
blocks in less than three quarters,
and New Orleans emphatically
snapped a three-game skid.

Rockets 122, Nuggets
111: Dwight Howard scored 18 of
his 25 points in the fourth quarter,
including 13 of 19 free throws in a
two-and-a-half minute stretch for
Houston.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


lp-








WINTER SPORTS PREVIEWS GIRLS SOCCER BOYS SOCCER GIRLS BASKETBALL Boys BASKETBALL WRESTLING GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTING WINTER SPORTS PREVIEWS


BOYS BASKETBALL


Times and dates subject to change.
All times unless noted
Monday, Nov. 18
North Port at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 19
Lemon Bay at Sarasota, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov.20
North Port at Cardinal Mooney, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 21
Cape Christian at Community Christian, 6
p.m.
First Baptist at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Lakewood Ranch at Venice, 7 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 22
Community Christian at Manatee HEAT, 6:30
p.m.
IMG at Lemon Bay, 7 p.m.
Port Charlotte at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 26
Bayshore at Venice, 7 p.m.
Lemon Bay at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
First Baptist at DeSoto County, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 29
Charlotte, North Port at Island Coast Tourna-
ment,8:30a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 30
Charlotte, North Port at Island Coast Tourna-
ment, 2:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 3
Fort Myers at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Venice at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
DeSoto County at Sebring, 7:30 p.m.
Hardee at Lemon Bay, 7:30 p.m.
North Port at Sarasota, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 4
Port Charlotte at Lemon Bay, 7 p.m.
Sarasota-Riverview at Venice, 7 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 6
Island Coast at Venice, 7 p.m.
Port Charlotte at North Fort Myers, 7 p.m.
Riverdale at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Hardee at DeSoto County, 7:30 p.m.
Lemon Bay at Sebring, 7:30 p.m.
Palmetto at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec.10
Comm. Christian at Everglades City, 5:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Gulf Coast, 7 p.m.
DeSoto County at Lemon Bay, 7:30 p.m.
North Port at Lakewood Ranch, 7:30 p.m.
Venice at Ida Baker, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec.11
Sarasota at Venice, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Dec.12
Charlotte at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
DeSoto County at Tenoroc, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec.13
Ida Baker at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Lemon Bay at Hardee, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, Dec.16
Charlotte at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec.17
North Port at Venice, 7:30 p.m.
Sebring at DeSoto County, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec.19
New Beginnings at DeSoto County, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec.20
Lemon Bay at Venice, 7 p.m.
Braden River at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
DeSoto County at Lake Placid, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Mariner Tournament, TBA
Port Charlotte at Lakeland Christian Tourna-
ment, TBA
Saturday, Dec.21
Charlotte at Mariner Tournament, TBA
Port Charlotte at Lakeland Christian Tourna-
ment, TBA
Monday, Dec.23
Charlotte at Mariner Tournament, TBA
Port Charlotte at City of Palms Showcase
(Bishop Verot), TBA
Thursday, Dec.26
North Port at Riverview Tournament,TBA
Friday, Dec.27
Charlotte, Port Charlotte at Lemon Bay Holi-
day Shootout, TBA
North Port at Riverview Tournament,TBA
Saturday, Dec.28
Charlotte, Port Charlotte at Lemon Bay Holi-
day Shootout, TBA
North Port at Riverview Tournament,TBA
Friday, Jan 3
Riverview at North Port, 7:30 p.m
Lemon Bay atVenice Beach Bash, TBA
Saturday, Jan. 4
Port Charlotte, Port Charlotte at Venice Beach
Bash,TBA
Tuesday, Jan. 7
Lakewood Ranch at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 8
Charlotte at Fort Myers, 7:30 p.m.
Port Charlotte at Island Coast, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 9
HEAT at Community Christian, 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan.10
Port Charlotte at Venice, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Riverdale, 7:30 p.m.
DeSoto County at Hardee, 7:30 p.m.
North Port at Palmetto, 7:30 p.m.
Sebring at Lemon Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Jan.11
Venice at Lemon Bay, 4 p.m.
Charlotte, Port Charlotte at Fort Myers SWFL
vs. FL Challenge, TBA
Tuesday, Jan.14
Cardinal Mooney at Lemon Bay, 7 p.m.
Gulf Coast at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
North Fort Myers at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Sarasota Military at Community Christian, 7
p.m.
Venice at Island Coast, 7 p.m.
Lake Placid at DeSoto County, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 16
DeSoto County at Avon Park, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan.17
Port Charlotte at Charlotte (Wally Keller
Invite), TBA
Ida Baker at Venice, 7 p.m.
Lemon Bay at DeSoto County, 7:30 p.m.
Sarasota at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 18
Lemon Bay, North Port, Port Charlotte at Wal-
ly Keller Invite (Charlotte),TBA
Tuesday, Jan.21
Ahfachkee at Community Christian,6:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Lemon Bay, 7 p.m.
North Fort Myers at Venice, 7 p.m.
Port Charlotte at Ida Baker, 7 p.m.
Avon Park at DeSoto County, 7:30 p.m.
North Port at Sarasota-Riverview, 7:30 p.m.
WednesdayJan.22
Venice at Cardinal Mooney, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Jan.23
Cape Christian at Comm. Christian, 5 p.m.
Bradenton Christian at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 24
Community Christian at HEAT, 6 p.m.
Island Coast at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Lemon Bay at Cardinal Mooney, 7 p.m.
North Port at Braden River, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, Jan.27
Bishop Verot at Charlotte 7 p.m.
North Port at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 28
Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
DeSoto County at First Baptist, 7:30 p.m.
WednesdayJan.29
Venice at Lakewood Ranch, 7 p.m.
Thursday, Jan.30
Sarasota at Lemon Bay, 7 p.m.
Sarasota Christian at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cardinal Mooney at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
DeSoto County at Port Charlotte, 7:30 p.m.


Friday, Jan. 31
Ida Baker at Charlotte, 7 p.m.


NICKSEN BLANC
Port Charlotte Senior Forward
This beast of a big man looks like he
should be able to overpower anyone he
sees in the paint. His game has evolved
since his freshman season, but he still
needs to finish around the basket better.
If he developed a mean streak, that would
take his game to a different level.


TONY LEE
DeSoto County Junior Guard
He was a speedy revelation at point
guard for DeSoto County last season. He'll
be asked to do more at shooting guard
this season without having to worry about
playmaking duties. Bulldogs coach Richard
Koonce is hoping he could average 15
points a game or better.


DWIGHT REYNOLDS
Charlotte Senior Forward
No player in the area was better over
the final third of the season than Reynolds
last year. He is an explosive 6-foot-3 player
who can play any of the big three spots on
the floor and jumps out of the gym.


MALEK BARBER
North Port Junior Forward
At 6-foot-4, Barber has the quickness
and length in the paint to give opponents
fits. He gave Port Charlotte all sorts of
problems at the Preserve last season.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT


The unlikely captain


Manta Rays elect

Cutting, who sat

out last season to

focus on baseball

By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
A funny thing happened
when Lemon Bay High School
boys basketball coach Sean
Huber had his players vote
for the Mantas team captains
for the upcoming season: The
players unanimously voted for
a guy who had willingly missed
most of the team's summer
workouts and didn't even play
last season.
For that matter, this par-
ticular team captain had
never played a minute of varsity
basketball.
But then, Brendan Cutting
isn't your usual case.
Cutting decided not to play
varsity basketball in 2012-13 to
concentrate on baseball, where
his college future lies. Cutting
signed a letter of intent to play
baseball at Eastern Kentucky
University on Wednesday.
But over breakfast with the
EKU baseball coach Jason Stein,
he was asked what other sports
he was playing. Cutting said
he used to play basketball, but
gave it up to avoid getting hurt.
Stein told him to get right
back on the basketball court.
"He said, 'You can get hurt
doing anything. We want you
to be as athletic as possible,'"
Cutting said.
And with that bit of advice,
Huber inherited a senior leader.
In fact, it was a bit of a relief
for Cutting, who actually had
missed the sport.
"Basketball is just a fast-
paced sport," Cutting said. "I
like to get aggressive, I like to
move quick and in baseball, it's
hard to do that."






CHARLOTTE


COACH: Tom Massolio
LAST YEAR: 21-8, won District 7A-11, lost in Region 7A semis.
DISTRICT 7A-11: Charlotte, Fort Myers, Gulf Coast, Riverdale.
KEY PLAYERS LOST: G Tyliek Sylver, F Jimmy Stewart, G Jeff
Vargo, F Jalen Howard.
KEY PLAYERS RETURNING: F Dwight Reynolds, sr.; F-G
Dwayne Reynolds, sr.; G Mason Bokon, sr.; G Adrian Ivankovic, sr.
OUTLOOK: The Tarpons will not depart from their usual MO
this season a deep squad that will look to open shots with
pressing and making the extra pass. Bokon takes over for the
graduated Sylver at the point, and he was excellent at that
spot late last season. Massolio thinks this is one of the deepest
squads he's had and can legitimately go 10 deep. Senior Ty Tyler
is a newcomer and can play the power forward or center spot.



LEMON BAY


COACH: Sean Huber
LASTYEAR: 12-14, lost in District 5A-13 semifinal
DISTRICT 5A-11: DeSoto County, Hardee, Lemon Bay, Sebring.
KEY PLAYERS LOST: G Vince Kisiday, G Matt Mages, G-F Cedric
Jackson.
KEY PLAYERS RETURNING: G-F Joseph Garza, so; G Justin
DiLorenzo, sr.; F Jonathan Hill, jr.
OUTLOOK: With the graduation of Kisiday, Mages and Jackson
- the central core of last year's squad finding an identity
early will be key. This year's squad could be deeper and more
athletic. G Montrel Jackson (Cedric's brother) will man the point,
but he is quite different from his brother. Garza provided energy
off the bench last season, but he will be asked to do more in his
sophomore season. If Huber has his way, the Mantas will not be
shy about shooting the ball.


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO


Brendan Cutting drives for a basket during a preseason game for Lemon Bay.
Cutting, a senior, was unanimously voted to serve as captain for the Manta Rays.


Huber saw that desire to go
back to basketball as well.
"Once the coach up there
said you need to get to playing
more than one sports, I think
he was somewhat relieved,"
Huber said. "It's like being told
be careful walking on those egg-
shells for a year. Now, he's being
told, go ahead and smash those
eggshells, don't worry about it."


That's good, because if Huber
has his way, Cutting will be in
for a lot of eggshell-smashing.
Cutting fits the mold of a
Lemon Bay player who doesn't
mind not being a first option of-
fensively. The Mantas have had
a handful of such players, such
as Antonio Gore and Cedric
Jackson, who would each score
sometimes but were better as


_______ THE TEAMS___ |


COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN


COACH: Jim Engmark
LAST YEAR: N/A
DISTRICT: Independent
KEY PLAYERS LOST: C Andrew Brothers, PG Willie Craft, C Ryan
Via, F Stefan Hyde
KEY PLAYERS RETURNING: G Scott Higginbotham, sr.; G-F
Jacob Foster, sr.
OUTLOOK: It's the first season for Engmark heading the
independent school's squad, so everything is likely to be a little
new. Engmark hopes to wear down opponents by getting up
and down the floor with an uptempo style. Everything in the
Mustangs'early workouts has been building toward that.


NORTH PORT


COACH: Travis Slanger
LAST YEAR: 14-14, lost in Region 8A-3 quarterfinal
DISTRICT 7A-10: Braden River, Lakewood Ranch, North Port,
Palmetto, Sarasota.
KEY PLAYERS LOST: G Luke Hogue, F Walgas Bastien, G Evan
Baker.
KEY PLAYERS RETURNING: G Teddy Deas, jr.; F Malek Barber,
jr.; F Justyn Miller, sr.; G Brandon Gonzalez, so.
OUTLOOK: The Bobcats have a new coach, so look for the team
to have a different feel. Slanger wants North Port to establish
itself defensively as a way of manufacturing scoring opportuni-
ties while buying into discipline and the team concept. Barber
is a bouncy forward with a nice inside-outside game and can
be tough to stop. Deas has a nice overall game with the ability
to take over at point in a pinch and can be a defensive stopper.
Miller showed last season he can shoot it when called upon.


THE CUTTING FILE
NAME: Brendan Cutting
YEAR: Senior
POSITION: Forward
PARENTS: Father William and mother
Lauri.
COLLEGE: Has already committed to
Eastern Kentucky to play baseball.
WHEN WILL YOU START TRAINING
FOR BASEBALL? "I'll probably give
myself until winter break, then I'll get
back into it."


players doing the intangibles.
Huber compared him to Joe
Wojcik, who was the Mantas'
leading big man two seasons
ago, but wasn't a big scorer.
"(I want) guys who really
buy into their role and revel
in it," Huber said. "(A guy who
thinks), 'I'm going to take so
much pride in being a rebound-
er. Every time the ball goes up,
I'm going to get it.' And I see
that with him."
Cutting said it did take him
some time to re-acquire his bas-
ketball skills and conditioning.
"It took me about three to
four weeks in the fall league
at the Venice YMCA (to get my
conditioning back)," he said.
'After the first game, I was just
thinking, 'Oh, my gosh.' It was
tiring. But after three or four
weeks, it was easy."
And he's playing a carefree,
tough game on the floor, always
vocal with his teammates.
So why wouldn't he have been
a unanimous choice for a team
captain?
"I think it made him feel good
and I know he likes that role,"
Huber said.
Cutting agreed and was very
appreciative of the honor.
"I love all those guys, they're
a great bunch of guys," Cutting
said. "I'm very excited for the
honor."
Contact Rob Shore at shore@sun-herald.comn or
941-204-0091.


DESOTO COUNTY


COACH: Richard Koonce
LAST YEAR: 13-9, lost in Region 5A-3 quarterfinal
DISTRICT 5A-11: DeSoto County, Hardee, Lemon Bay, Sebring.
KEY PLAYERS LOST: F Pedro Buenrostro, G Jordan Washington,
G Kareece Richardson, G LaQuavious Hightower.
KEY PLAYERS RETURNING: G Tony Lee, jr.; F-C Kari Williams,
sr.; F Dequan Richardson, sr.; F AlfredrickTyson, jr.
OUTLOOK: The Bulldogs want to out-athlete you and with
Koonce having lost frontcourt mainstay Pedro Buenrostro, the
ability to do so becomes even more critical. Tony Lee was a good
looking player at point guard last season, but he moves to the
shooting guard this season in an effort to boost his scoring. In
Lee's place at the point is a committee. Williams should provide
a smooth presence in the paint, but has the ability to take the
ball out on the perimeter somewhat.


PORT CHARLOTTE


COACH: Bill Specht
LASTYEAR: 21-7, lost in Region 7A-3 quarterfinal
DISTRICT 6A-11: Ida Baker, Island Coast, North Fort Myers,
Port Charlotte, Venice.
KEY PLAYERS LOST: G Fernando Burga, G Derrick Farquharson,
F MalikVaccaro-Dixon.
KEY PLAYERS RETURNING: F Nicksen Blanc, sr.; G Kyle Collins,
sr.; G Tyler Specht, sr.; C Sean Phillip, sr.; F Harrison Rains, sr.
OUTLOOK: The Pirates are loaded with six seniors, many of
whom received plenty of floor time last season. Specht will
demand Port Charlotte plays a scrappy style. Offensively, the
team will work around the 6-foot-7 Blanc, who can dominate
inside but is trying to edge his game outside a little. Collins
and Tyler Specht lead a group of guards who can shoot, but the
Pirates could look to attack the basket more than in the past.
Phillips and Rains could be size mismatches for some teams.


FOUR TO WATCH|


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3






Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


* PREP FOOTBALL:



Glimmers not



enough for



Tarpons in loss


f the Charlotte High
School players had tak-
en a moment through
their postgame tears and
thought about their 38-26
loss to Melbourne, some
of that sadness would
have turned a little angry.
Somewhere in that loss
was the team Charlotte
could have been, a really
good, maybe champion-
ship team. Maybe it was
there all along.
Trailing 7-0 in the first
quarter, Tarpons quar-
terback Brennan McGill
hit Dwight Reynolds
on a go route between
Melbourne's Parker
Kempfer and Diavante
Welch for a 68-yard touch-
down to tie the score.
The Charlotte sideline
erupted. The Melbourne
defenders turned around
incredulously: What do
you want us to do about
that?
"We could have (com-
peted with Melbourne),"
Charlotte senior Trent
White said. "We should
have. We had too many
turnovers and didn't take
advantage of the opportu-
nities we had."
Turnovers, that was
the issue. Even after
Dwight Reynolds' long
touchdown, the Tarpons
were already chasing their
mistakes. Melbourne's first
touchdown came when
McGill was stripped of the
ball inside his own 20.
Charlotte finished
with four turnovers on
the night. Factoring in
a kickoff return that
Melbourne's Brandon
Moon returned to the
Charlotte 34, the Bulldogs
started their first three
possession deep in Tarpon
ground.
Another fumble helped
push Melbourne's first
quarter lead to 17-7.
Were these mistakes
representative of
Charlotte? Both Waldrop
and players said they
weren't. But the Tarpons
went into the game at
minus-3 for the season
in net turnovers. (Even in
their 65-12 rout of East
Lee County, Charlotte lost
the turnover battle 4-3.)
The easy (and short)
way to say it was that the
Tarpons never led after
that. It was a little more
complicated than that.
Charlotte feasted on
out patterns underneath
Melbourne defensive
backs wary of getting
burned downfield again.
It was a big reason Dwight
and Dwayne Reynolds
finished with 11 catches
apiece, why McGill had a
career-high 382 passing


/"R (-: -)
ASHORE
.* ,,S WRLFER


SHORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


FHSAA PLAYOFFS
WHO: Melbourne (9-2) at Port
Charlotte (9-1)
WHEN: Friday, 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Pirates Cove, Port
Charlotte

yards.
"I know there's probably
people sitting around go-
ing, 'Well, you keep giving
them the out, coach,'"
Melbourne coach Todd
Wilson. "Well, the alterna-
tive is giving them what
they got in the first. We
knew they could do that,
they're really athletic."
But Friday night, they
weren't good enough to
make the plays when
they needed. Charlotte
had the ball inside the
Melbourne 20 in each of
their last three possession
of the first half and ended
up with a total of three
points a 26-yard field
goal by Austin Roberts, a
McGill interception (that
went through Dwayne
Reynolds' hands) and a
missed field goal attempt
to end the half.
How would a touch-
down on any of those
drives changed things?
Trailing 24-10 in the
third quarter, Charlotte
again looked sharp with
McGill hitting six straight
passes and or a while, you
wondered if it was really
that easy.
"They're as good as
we've been around,"
Wilson said of Charlotte.
"Not only are those kids
great athletes, but (McGill)
- to throw the timing
routes he throws is really
impressive."
The Tarpons finished
the drive against the phys-
ical Melbourne defense
with four consecutive runs
up the middle by Amari
Washington, cutting the
lead back to seven.
Good stuff, very good
stuff from the Tarpons.
At times, championship
stuff, maybe.
There just wasn't
enough of that, as is
required by playoff
football. Not even from
the defense, which tried
to stand tough two
Melbourne sweeps that
got around containment
for an important late
Bulldog score showed
that.


I FRIDAY NIGHT'S SUMMARIES


PORT CHARLOTTE 14, EAU GALLIE 10
PortCharlotte 7 7 0 0-14
Eau Gallie 3 7 0 0-10
First quarter
EG -Alec Burak34fg,7:46
PC -TurtleTyler run 3 (Andres Hernandez
kick), 1:34
Second quarter
EG Torrance Brown run 1 (Alec Burak
kick), 7:15
PC Traige McClary run 1 (Hernandez
kick), 1:24
PC EG
Firstdowns 13 7
Rushes-yds 40-120 33-93
Passing 0 44
C-A-I 0-3-2 4-10-2
Fumbles-lost 1-1 0-0
Penalties-yds 6-40 7-46
Individual stats
Rushing: Port Charlotte, lan Tyler 13-36,
Grady Wells 6-27, Anthony Stephens 6-32,
Traige McClary 12-15, Keon Suber 2-8,
Paulsin Heitter 1-2. Eau Gallie, Torrance
Brown 18-46, Tim Price 8-32, Tracey Wil-
liams 5-12, Craig Dewberry 1-2, Austin
Pruitt 1-1.
Passing: Port Charlotte, Traige McClary,
0-3-0-2. Eau Gallie, Torrance Brown 4-10-
44-2.
Receiving: Eau Gallie, Daniel Kourpa, 2-31,
LanceWhite 2-13.


. *m SU N S:10."s


MELBOURNE 38, CHARLOTTE 26
Charlotte 7 3 10 6-26
Melbourne 17 0 7 14-38
First quarter
M Dwayne Robinson 1 run (Omar Rojas
kick), 9:29.
C Dwight Reynolds 68 pass from Bren-
nan McGill (Austin Roberts kick), 8:29.
M -Rojas FG 23,5:08.
M BJ. Daniels 2 run (Rojas kick), :45.
Second quarter
C -Roberts FG 26,7:41.
Third quarter
M -Robinson 1 run (Rojas kick), 10:50.
C Amari Washington 3 run (Roberts
kick), 6:43.
C -Roberts FG 20,1:23.
Fourth quarter
M Chris Singh 19 run (Rojas kick), 9:50.
M Daniels 5 run (Rojas kick), 6:21.
C Dwayne Reynolds 3 pass from McGill
(run failed), :27.


C
First downs 24
Rushes-yds 24-64
Passing 383
C-A- 1 30-50-1
Fumbles-lost 4-3
Penalties-yds 7-41
Individual stats


M
14
48-208
49
1-3-0
1-1
340


Rushing: Charlotte, Amari Washington 10-
32, Marquell Platt 7-22, Dwight Reynolds
1-6, Zack Kennedy 1-3, Trent White 2-1,
Sam Spence 1-1, Brennan McGill 2- (-1).
Melbourne, BJ. Daniels 22-101, Chris Singh
9-65, Brandon Moon 9-38, Bryson Hill 4-4,
Dwayne Robinson 4-0.
Passing: Charlotte, Brennan McGill 30-
50-383-1, Trent White 0-2-0-0. Melbourne,
Dwayne Robinson 1-3-49-0.
Receiving: Charlotte, Dwight Reynolds 11-
202, Dwayne Reynolds 11 -129, Trent White
5-45, Sam Spence 1-6, Amari Washington
1-6. Melbourne, Chris Singh 1-49.


* GOLF ROUNDUP


AP PHOTO
Robert Karlsson from Sweden lines up his putt on the third green during the third day of the OHL
Classic at Mayacoba in Quintana Roo, Mexico on Saturday.




English, Karlsson




lead rainy OHL


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PLAYA DEL CARMEN,
Mexico Harris English
and Robert Karlsson
shared the lead Saturday
in the rain-delayed OHL
Classic when third-round
play was suspended
because of darkness.
English and Karlsson
were 15 under overall with
11 holes left in the round.
English matched the
lowest round of his PGA
Tour career in the morn-
ing with a 9-under 62
on Mayakoba Resort's El
Camaleon course.
Karlsson played 36
holes Friday, shooting
63-67. He birdied Nos. 3-5
in the third round.


None of the 78 players
who made the cut were
able to finish the round.
Rory Sabbatini and
Kevin Stadler were tied
for third at 12 under.

Thompson holds edge
at Ochoa: In Guadalajara, Mexico,
Lexi Thompson moved into position
for her second victory in her last four
starts, taking the third-round lead in
the Lorena Ochoa Invitational.
The 18-year-old Thompson shot
a 5-under 67 to reach 13-under 203
at Guadalajara Country Club. She had
a one-stroke lead over South Korea's
I.K. Kim.

Scott in control at
Aussie Masters: In Melbourne,
Australia, defending champion Adam
Scott shot a 5-under 66 at Royal


* GOLF:


Lawhorn among Clas!

By CHUCK BALLARO fact, some years ago, he
SUN CORRESPONDENT said he was one of the top
golfers in his native North
PORT CHARLOTTE- Carolina.


Greg Lawhorn is so busy
these days remodeling
homes that if he can get
out to shoot a quick nine
on a Sunday, he's lucky.
That didn't stop the Port
Charlotte resident from
shooting a 71 on Saturday
in wet conditions to put
himself in contention
after the first round of
the second-annual Port
Charlotte Classic at the
Port Charlotte Golf Club.
Lawhorn was one of
four golfers to put up red
numbers. His 1-under par
was five strokes behind
leader Eric Barnes of Cape
Coral.
"I've been so busy with
work, I can only play once
a week," Lawhorn said. "I
didn't expect to play very
well this weekend, so a 71
is pretty good."
Lawhorn, 37, is no
duffer by any stretch. In


Lawhorn said he
became hooked on the
game because of his father
when he was about 13.
He played in high school
before graduating and
moving on to the mini-
tours for four years in an
attempt to make the PGA
tour.
However, he was unable
to find a sponsor and was
forced to return to the
real world, becoming a
contractor.
"I couldn't work and
play golf and pay for
everything, so I had to go
to work," Lawhorn said.
"You can't make enough
money on the mini tour if
you don't have a sponsor."
He moved to Florida in
2005 in the aftermath of
Hurricane Charley, and
despite the housing bub-
ble collapse a few years
later, was able to hold his


Melbourne to open a four-stroke lead
at 14-under 199 in the Australian
Masters.
Fifty-year-old Vijay Singh had a 63
to join Australians Matthew Griffin
(69), Nick Cullen (69) and Nathan
Holman (70) at 10 under.

Stenson has title in
sights: In Dubai, United Arab
Emirates, Henrik Stenson closed
on the European Tour money title
Saturday, birdieing four of the last
five holes to take a one-shot lead
in the season-ending World Tour
Championship.
Trying to become the first player to
win the FedEx Cup and European title
in the same year, the Swede finished
with a 5-under 67 to reach 17-under
199 on Jumeriah's Earth Course.





sic leaders

own, thanks to golf.
"I've been fortunate
through golf to meet so
many people, that I stayed
busy even though the
slump," Lawhorn said.
"I've been very fortunate
in that respect."
Lawhorn, who has a
wife and two kids, said
he plays in most of the
pro-ams and local tourna-
ments to support the local
pros that have been good
to him.
Despite the lack of work
on his game, things tend
to work out when it's time
to play in a tournament.
"In tournaments, I have
a tendency to play decent
because I focus better,"
Lawhorn said. "Today I
grinded it out. I didn't hit
many greens, but I was
able to make my putts."
The Port Charlotte
Classic will have winners
in seven flights, with
$7,000 in prize money be-
ing handed out, including
$1,100 for the low pro.


I GOLF SCOREBOARD


PGA Tour
OHL CLASSIC
At Mayakoba Resort
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
Purse: $6 million
Yardage: 6,987; Par: 71
Third Round
No players completed the round


Robert Karlsson
Harris English
Rory Sabbatini
Kevin Stadler
Alvaro Quiros
Jason Bohn
Chris Stroud
Spencer Levin
Justin Leonard
Scott Brown
Charles Howell III
Robert Allenby
Wes Roach
Brian Stuard
Pat Perez
TimWilkinson


Score Through
-15 6
-14 6
-12 8
-12 6
-11 14
-11 9
-11 7
-10 15
-10 14
-10 9
-10 7
-9 15
-9 13
-9 10
-9 9
-9 8


LPGATour
LORENA OCHOA INVITATIONAL
At Guadalajara Country Club
Guadalajara, Mexico
Purse: $1 million
Yardage: 6,633; Par 72
Third Round
LexiThompson 72-64-67- 2
I.K.Kim 70-67-67- 2
Stacy Lewis 72-66-67- 2
SoYeonRyu 68-67-71 2
Anna Nordqvist 68-67-72 2
Pornanong Phatlum 66-69-72 2
Suzann Pettersen 70-68-70 2
LizetteSalas 70-67-71- 2


InbeePark
MichelleWie
Azahara Munoz
Carlota Ciganda
AmyYang
Karine Icher
Karine Icher
Gerina Piller
Brittany Lincicome
Mo Martin


68-68-72
69-73-67
71-69-69
72-69-69
67-73-70
70-68-72
70-68-72
71-65-74
76-67-69
73-69-70


European Tour
DPWORLD TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP
At Jumeriah Golf Estates (Earth Course)
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Purse: $8 million
Yardage: 7,675; Par: 72
Third Round
HenrikStenson 68-64-67- 199
Victor Dubuisson 70-66-64 200
lan Poulter 69-68-66 203
AlejandroCanizares 66-67-70 203
MiguelA.Jimenez 72-66-66 204
JustinRose 70-67-68 205
LeeWestwood 70-70-65 205
R.Mcllroy, No. Ireland 71-67-68 206
L.Donald, England 73-66-67 206
J.tLuiten, Holland 73-68-65 206

Australasian Tour
TALISKER MASTERS
At Royal Melbourne Golf Club
Melbourne, Australia
Purse: $1 million
Yardage: 7,024; Par: 71
Third Round
Adam Scott 67-66-66 199
VijaySingh 72-68-63 203
NickCullen 6569-699 203
Matthew Griffin 69-65-69 203
Nathan Holman 68-65-70 203


Matt Kuchar
Ryan Fox
Brendon de Jonge


71-66-67
68-71-66
68-70-68


Local golf
PORT CHARLOTTE CLASSIC
at Port Charlotte Golf Club
Stroke play
Professional: Eric Barnes 66, Tucker Mc-
Clendan 68, Kyle Dobbs 69, Greg Long-
horn 71, Mike Dopslaff 74, Adam Miller 74,
George Sakadelis 76, Doug Reed 76, Gary
Baker 76,Todd Evans 77.
Championship: Kevin Miskiminis 72,
Nathan Kucan 77, Doug Oslett 79, Scott
Harvey 80, Jeff Abbott 81, Yancy Franks 82,
Garth Carter 82, Bruce Smith 86.
Stableford scoring
Bogey=1 point; Par=2, Birdie=3; ea-
gle=4; double eagle=5.
A Flight: Marvin Godfrey 41, Bill Starks 38,
Larry Wheeler 38, Larry Goodman 37, Jim
Marlow 37, Angus Black 36, Mark McCom,
Scott Gould 36, Bubba Nase 36, M. McCom
35, Sterling Gould 34
B Flight: Jack Hensley Jr. 44, Bill Dubal 38,
Jack Hensley Sr. 37, Larry Rash 36, Don
Ham 36, Kirk Johnson 36, Joe Cracciolla
35, Bill Klingler 34, Mike Anderson 33, Cliff
Beverly 33.
Ladies Flight (Orange): Jerry Sandman 40;
Anita Senko 39, Sally Byous 35, Marilyn
Carlson 30.
Ladies Flight (Red): Barbara Layne 37, Mary
Ellen Ryder 35, Maggie Coffman 35, Eve
Rupinski 34, Brenda Smith 30, Sandra Miller
28, Sharon Nicholas 24, CharlotteTaylor 23,
Cheri Dahlberg 23, Carol Wolfe 23.
Senior: Ed Markowski 42, Bob Francis 40,
Neil Carlson 40, Darwin Fulford 39, Hugh
Leavell 38, Dave Sandman 38, Dave Hogan
37, Pat Cataldo 36, Paul Wilson 35.


DUALS

FROM PAGE 1
mark with two falls.
Lemon Bay forfeited
two weight classes, but
beat Naples and Booker
and lost to Southeast and
Riverview in pool play.
"I was very happy with
how our kids did today,"
Lemon Bay coach Gary
Jonseck said. "We still
don't have a full weight
roster, but we did well. We
had some young wrestlers
get caught on their backs,
but we'll work on that."
The Manta Rays won
the district championship
last season and had a
21-15 record. And compe-
tition like Saturday's will
help them improve. Lipp
and Schofield were the
District 1A-11 champions
at 106 and 113 pounds,
respectively, last season.
Lipp finished second in
the Region 1A-3 meet and
won two matches at the
state meet.
Port Charlotte coach
Dave Winger had only six
wrestlers available. Even
though the team went
0-5 and finished 10th,
Pirates wrestlers went
29-6 individually. Three
Pirates earned honorable
mention status with 5-0
records: Nick Dowling
(120), Robert Warner
(126) and Chris Maler
(145).
"Considering we only
had six guys, they did
very well," Winger said.
"We didn't bring some
guys because of injuries
and other things. But
we should have more
wrestlers come out when
the football season ends
for us."
Port Charlotte lost
to Braden River, Oasis
Charter, Gulf Coast,
Sarasota and Booker.
Oasis Charter won the
event, beating Southeast
48-28 in the final.

POOL PLAY
Brown pool
Oasis Charter 48, Port Charlotte 30; Saraso-
ta 42, Braden River 39; Gulf Coast 54, Port
Charlotte 18; Oasis Charter 45, Sarasota 36;
Oasis Charter 42, Braden River 39; Sarasota
42, Gulf Coast 39; Sarasota 54, Port Char-
lotte 24; Gulf Coast 47, Braden River 36; Oa-
sis Charter 45, Gulf Coast 33; Braden River
42, Port Charlotte 30.
Orange pool
Southeast 48, Booker 28; Riverview 45, Na-
ples 24; Lemon Bay 48, Naples 27; South-
east 60, Riverview 25; Southeast 36, Lemon
Bay 25; Riverview 47, Booker 37;Southeast
39, Naples 24; Lemon Bay 57, Booker 18;
Riverview 42, Lemon Bay 40; Naples 49,
Booker 30.
Championship match: Oasis Charter 48,
Southeast 28.
Third-place match: Sarasota 58, Riverview
18.
Fifth-place match: Lemon Bay 42, Gulf
Coast 21
Seventh-place match: Braden River 48,
Naples 27.
Ninth-place match: Booker 42, Port Char-
lotte 28.


PREP SPORTS
SCHEDULE
MONDAY
Boys basketball
North Port at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Girls basketball
Braden River at Venice, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Manatee, 7:30 p.m.
Girls soccer
Imagine at Sarasota Christian,
5p.m.
Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte, 7
p.m.
Boys soccer
Imagine at Sarasota Christian
Academy, 7 p.m.
Venice at Sarasota, 7 p.m.
TUESDAY
Boys basketball
Lemon Bay at Sarasota, 7 p.m.
Girls basketball
First Baptist Academy at Char-
lotte, 7 p.m.
Lemon Bay at North Port, 7 p.m.
Ida Baker at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Venice at North Fort Myers, 7 p.m.
Girls soccer
Sarasota Military Academy at
DeSoto County, 5 p.m.
St. Stephens at Imagine, 5 p.m.
Charlotte at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
North Port at Lakewood Ranch,
7p.m.
Lemon Bay at South Fort Myers,
7:30 p.m.


Boys soccer
Port Charlotte at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Sarasota Military Academy at
DeSoto County, 7 p.m.
St. Stephens at Imagine, 7p.m.
South Fort Myers at Lemon Bay,
7p.m.
Lakewood Ranch at North Port
Girls weightlifting
North Port at Lemon Bay, 4 p.m.
DeSoto at Avon Park, 4:30 p.m.


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013








* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:




Gamecocks barely escape Gators


By PETE IACOBELLI
ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBIA, S.C.-
Elliott Fry kicked four field
goals and No. 11 South
Carolina won its school-re-
cord 16th straight home
game, sending banged-up
Florida to its fifth con-
secutive loss with a 19-14
victory Saturday night.
The Gamecocks (8-2, 6-2
Southeastern Conference)
struggled to score points
against the Gators' SEC-
leading defense until Fry
gave them a 16-14 lead
with a 22-yard field goal
with 6:43 remaining.
Trailing 19-14, Gators
freshman quarterback
Skyler Mornhinweg led the
Gators into South Carolina
territory but was inter-
cepted by Jimmy Legree
to end the threat. This is
the longest losing streak


for Florida (4-6, 3-5) since
dropping nine straight
during its 0-10-1 season in
1979.
The Gamecocks' win
kept them in the SEC's
Eastern Division race.
They got a large boost in
the bid for the title game
with Auburn's last-second,
tipped-ball comeback to
defeat Georgia. They still
need Missouri to lose once
more.
Missouri play at Ole
Miss next week and then
at home against Johnny
Manziel and Texas A&M
on the final weekend of
the regular season. South
Carolina is done with
league play, facing FCS
opponent Coastal Carolina
before finishing with
Clemson.
The Gamecocks' win
surpassed the 15 straight
the program won from


1978-80 when Heisman
Trophy winner George
Rogers was leading the
way. South Carolina's
16 straight in its home
stadium is longest current
streak in the country.
But Florida looked ready
to end it the way it played
in the first half. Without in-
jured starting quarterback
Tyler Murphy, the Gators
successfully went to the
run. They ran for 169 yards
in the opening half and
Kelvin Taylor had rushing
TDs of 20 and 29 yards, the
two longest permitted by
South Carolina this season.
The Gamecocks defense
tightened in the second
half as Florida managed
just 31 rushing yards.
South Carolina's rally
began on Connor Shaw's
32-yard scoring pass to
Bruce Ellington to cut the
lead to 14-13.


NO. 11 S. CAROLINA 19, FLORIDA 14
Florida 7 7 0 0O- 14
South Carolina 3 3 7 6 19
First Quarter
SC-FG Fry 25,10:21.
Fla-Kel.Taylor 20 run (Hardin kick), 3:03.
Second Quarter
SC-FG Fry 45,14:04.
Fla-Kel.Taylor 29 run (Hardin kick), 10:51.
Third Quarter
SC-Ellington 32 passfrom Shaw (Fry kick),
10:23.
Fourth Quarter
SC-FG Fry 22,6:43.
SC-FG Fry 43,2:16.
A-83,853.
Fla SC
First downs 15 15
Rushes-yards 41-200 35-164
Passing 107 213
Comp-Att-Int 10-14-1 14-28-0
Return Yards 0 13
Punts-Avg. 4-36.3 3-33.3
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 8-65 5-45
Time of Possession 31:01 28:59
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UF, Kel.Taylor 21-96, M.Brown
1 -51, Showers 2-31,Patton 3-11,Joyer 1-8,
TBurton 3-3. South Carolina, Carson 13-
102, Davis 13-54, Ellington 1 -5, Shaw 8-3.
PASSING-UF, Mornhinweg 10-13-1-107,
TBurton 0-1-0-0. South Carolina, Shaw 14-
28-0-213.
RECEIVING-UF, Dunbar 3-25, Fulwood
2-6, M.Brown 1-28, TBurton 1-24, Kel.Taylor
1-15, Ajagbe 1-5, Patton 1-4. South Caro-
lina, Ellington 4-67, Byrd 4-55, Anderson
3-69, Roland 1-9,Jones 1-7, Davis 1-6.


AP PHOTO
Florida quarterback Skyler Mornhinweg hands off to Mack
Brown during the first half Saturday night in Columbia, S.C.


IBIG TEN ROUNDUP


GARDNER LIFTS
MICHIGAN OVER
N'WESTERN IN 30T
EVANSTON, Ill. (AP)
- Devin Gardner scored
on a 5-yard run to lift
Michigan to a 27-19 tri-
ple-overtime victory over
Northwestern on Saturday
after the Wolverines'
Brendan Gibbons tied it
with a 44-yard field goal at
the end of regulation.
Gardner scored on an
option and ran it in on
the two-point conversion
to make it an eight-point
game.
Northwestern had one
more chance, but Trevor
Siemian got sacked for
a 14-yard loss by Jibreel
Black on second down.
Then, his desperation
pass on fourth down was
intercepted by Thomas
Gordan, giving the
Wolverines (7-3, 3-3 Big
Ten) their second win in
five games and sending
the Wildcats (4-6, 0-6) to
their sixth straight loss.

No. 3 Ohio State 60,
Illinois 35: In Champaign, Ill.,
Carlos Hyde ran for 246 yards and four
touchdowns and Braxton Miller had
another 184 yards rushing and two
scores to push Ohio State past Illinois.
But even with Hyde's offensive
explosion, the Buckeyes (10-0,6-0 Big
Ten) needed a third-quarter defensive
stop and safety to secure the win.
After trailing 28-0 in the second
quarter, Illinois (3-7,0-6) closed to
35-21 in the third on two Nathan
Scheelhaase touchdown passes.
Illinois had the momentum when
the Buckeyes' Ryan Shazier sacked
backup quarterback Reilly O'Toole
in the end zone. Illinois recovered
his fumble but the safety gave the
Buckeyes a 37-21 edge and the ball.
Minutes later, a Hyde touchdown put
them up 44-21.

No. 14 Michigan St. 41,


Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller scores on a 70
touchdown run against Illinois on Saturday.


Standings
LEGENDS Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Michigan St. 6 0194 79 9 1309132
Minnesota 4 2140154 8 2307234
Nebraska 4 2178138 7 3351246
Michigan 3 3191168 7 3343252
Iowa 3 3125119 6 4266187
Northwestern 0 6106166 4 6271261
LEADERS Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
OhioSt. 6 0284127 10 0494188
Wisconsin 5 1235 91 8 2385140
PennSt. 3 3160209 6 4293267
Indiana 2 4213257 4 6391388
Illinois 0 6141273 3 7302372
Purdue 0 6 52238 1 9127380
Saturday's results
Wisconsin 51, Indiana 3
Ohio St. 60, Illinois 35
Penn St. 45, Purdue 21
Michigan 27, Northwestern 19,30T
Michigan St. 41, Nebraska 28
Saturday's games
Michigan at lowa,TBA
Indiana at Ohio St.,TBA
Nebraska at Penn St.,TBA
Illinois at Purdue,TBA
Wisconsin at Minnesota,TBA
Michigan St. at Northwestern,TBA


Nebraska 28: In Lincoln, Neb.,
Michigan State converted five Nebraska
turnovers into 24 points and took a
big step toward winning the Big Ten
Legends Division.
Jeremy Langford ran 32 times for
151 yards and scored two touchdowns,
and Keith Mumphrey caught a 27-yard
touchdown from Connor Cook in the
fourth quarter after the Cornhuskers
pulled within six points.
The Spartans (9-1,6-0) beat the
Huskers (7-3,4-2) for the first time in


eight all-time meetings.
They would clinch the
a win at Northwestern nei
a loss by Minnesota in ei
last two games. Michiga
Minnesota to end the reg

No. 17 Wiscons
Indiana 3: In Madiso
White rushed for a career
yards and Melvin Gordon
Wisconsin beat Indiana.
The Badgers (8-2,5-1
in expecting a big game
against the conference'sI
rushing defense with the
2-4) giving up an average
217 yards a game.
Indiana's high-flying o
meanwhile, was nowhere
Second in the conference
a game, the Hoosiers we
224 yards.

Penn State 45,
21: In State College, Pa.
ran for three touchdown:
Robinson set Penn State's
receptions mark.
Christian Hackenberg
touchdown pass and ran
help the Nittany Lions (6
Ten) clinch at least a .50(
Nittany Lions are still suf
sanctions the NCAA levie
Sandusky scandal and ar
for a bowl game.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL: 7



Tigers deflect Bulldogs

By JOHN ZENOR off safety Tray Matthews Murray gave the Tigers a
ASSOCIATED PRESS and Louis reached out his big scare. He had plowed
left hand to corral it. into Ryan Smith at the
AUBURN, Ala.- Aaron Murray who had goal line for a 5-yard
,, Ricardo Louis scored on
SL s sco on engineered the comeback touchdown with 1:49 left.
Sa deflected 73-yard pass with three fourth-quarter Auburn challenged, but
.:.| on fourth and 18 with 25 touchdowns, could only replay officials upheld the
Seconds left to lift No. 7 stare helplessly from the call on the field.
- -g Auburn to a stunning 43- bench. A win could have That left the Tigers start-
38 win over No. 25 Georgia kept the Bulldogs alive in ing at their own 22 with
on Saturday night, the SEC East. 1:45 left. They managed
a The Tigers (10-1, 6-1 Murray led Georgia one first down but Jordan
S Southeastern Conference) (6-4, 4-3) all the way to Jenkins sacked Marshall to
AP PHOTO had blown a 27-7 lead but Auburn's 20 but his final set up fourth and 18.
-yard pulled out one more huge two passes fell incomplete Marshall then produced
play to continue the big- as time ran out. Dee Ford the biggest play of his ca-
gest turnaround in major hit him on the last pass reer against the Bulldogs,
college football. They can as Murray ran toward the where he played as a
Sw win the SEC West with line before trying to throw, freshman defensive back.
ext week or a victory in two weeks Some Auburn players He was dismissed from
their of its against No. 1 Alabama. climbed into the stands to the team in February 2012
n State plays Auburn's Nick Marshall celebrate with students, for violating team rules
gular season heaved the ball down- and most fans stayed put and returned to the SEC
field with two defenders to celebrate the victory, after a season in junior
sin 51, around Louis. It bounced It only came after college.
on, Wis., James
r-high205 ISECROUNDUP
i added 146 as
BiglTen)came BOWL ELIGIBLE was their best since 1915. Standings
I BigTen)cameJordan Matthews caught
ontegoun Jrda Mtthwscauht EAST Conference All Games
on the ground AGAIN: VANDY BEATS 12 passes for 141yards, be- WAST Conference APGamesW PF PA
10th-ranked s w L PF PAWL PF PA
0tsres KENTUCKY, 22-6 coming the first Vanderbilt Missouri 5 1 231 118 91 413202
Hoosiers (46,verwithback-to-back South Carolina 6 2 253 178 8 2 308213
e of more than NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) receiver with back-to-back Georgia 4 3233237 6 4358302
S1,000-yard seasons. Vanderbilt 3 4 199 231 6 4313265
-Brian Kimbrow scored 1 0y a 0 lost Florida 35159163 46199190
offense, on a 21-yard run, and Kentucky (2-8, 0-6) lost Tennessee 1 5 107 217 4 6249320
etobefound.d its 14th straight SEC game. Kentucky 0 6 87205 2 8215288
e to be found. Vanderbilt beat Kentucky The Wildcats never scored WEST Conference All Games
eat 527 yards 22-6 Saturday in becoming w L PF PAW L PF PA
re held to just bowl eligible for a third after Jojo Kemp's 2-yard TD Alabama 7 0277 83 100388102
ri on the opening drive. Auburn 6 1253 196 10 1 429242
straight season under p g TexasA&M 4 2276230 82492309
coach James Franklin LSU 3 3193162 73 379235
Purdue the first time in the Mississippi 51, Troy 21: Mississippi 3 3160179 73345250
Mississippi St 1 5138 210 4 6275 265
ZachZwinak Commodores'history. In Oxford, Miss., Bo Wallace threw for Arkansas 0 6 91 248 3 7204314
and Allen Vanderbilt had been three touchdowns and ran for another Saturday's results
's iungle n as Mississippi setaschool record1for total Mississippi 51,Troy 21
single-season to only four bowls before as Mississippi set a school record for total Vanderbilt 22, Kentucky 6
Franklin took over. Now offense with 751 yards Saturday as the Auburn 43, Georgia 38
South Carolina 19, Florida 14
threw a the Commodores (6-4, 34 Rebels defeated Troy 51-21. Alabama 20, Mississippi St. 7
for one to Southeastern Conference) Wallace was 17 for 26 for 272 yards Saturday's games
5-4,3-3 Big have won two with two and rushed for 66 yards on nine carries Mississippi St. vs. Arkansas at Little Rock,
12:21 p.m.
Record. The games remaining in the as the Rebels (7-3) extended their Coastal Carolina at South Carolina, 1 p.m.
feringfrom the regular season, and bowl winning streak to four games. ChattanoogaS e at Alabama,2 pm.
feringGeorgia Southern at Florida, 2 p.m.
d in the Jerry eligibility means they will The total offense production was the Texas A&M at LSU, 3:30 p.m.
e noteligible have a chance to match best since 1951, when the Rebels totaled Kentucky atGeorgia, 7 p.m.
Vanderbilt atTennessee, 7 p.m.
last year's 9-4 record that 623 yards against Auburn. Missouri at Mississippi, 7:45 p.m.


I PAC-12 ROUNDUP


MARIOTA THROWS
FOR 3TDSAND
DUCKS BEAT UTAH
EUGENE, Ore.-
Marcus Mariota's knee
didn't matter all that
much against Utah.
Oregon's sophomore
quarterback threw for
288 yards and three
touchdowns and the sixth-
ranked Ducks rebounded
from last week's loss to
Stanford with a 44-21
victory on Saturday.
Mariota went into the
game with questions
about the health of his left
knee, which impacted his
mobility in the 26-20 loss
to the Cardinal.
De'Anthony Thomas
caught a touchdown pass
and scored on an 86-yard
kickoff return for the
Ducks (9-1, 6-1 Pac-12).
Byron Marshall ran for
two additional scores but


Standings
NORTH Conference All Games
W L PF PAW L PF PA
Oregon 6 1 325 155 9 1 509 182
Stanford 6 1 219 142 8 1 287 175
Oregon St. 4 2 222 157 6 3335 250
Washington 3 4 238 207 6 4 366 237
Wash. St. 3 4 178 270 5 5 292 311
California 0 8 162362 110263 488
SOUTH Conference All Games
W L PF PAW L PF PA
Ariz.St. 5 1 272 160 7 2393 227
UCLA 5 2 212 183 8 2370 237
USC 42 198 148 7 3290 196
Arizona 3 4 199 196 6 4 330 222
Colorado 1 6 137 327 4 6 259 388
Utah 1 6 169224 4 6289 270


the Ducks were slowed
on the ground by Utah's
defense, rushing for 145
yards after averaging
nearly 302 yards a game
this season.
Utah (4-6, 1-6) was dealt
a blow before the game
when starting quarterback
Travis Wilson didn't make
the trip to Eugene because
of a concussion. Backup
Adam Schulz threw for
157 yards and a touch-
down and ran for another.


Friday's results
UCLA 41,Washington 31
Saturday's results
Washington St. 24, Arizona 17
Oregon 44, Utah 21
Colorado 41, California 24
Stanford at Southern Cal, late
Oregon St. at Arizona St., late
Saturday's games
Oregon at Arizona,TBA
Arizona St. at UCLA, TBA
Southern Cal at Colorado,TBA
California at Stanford,TBA
Utah at Washington St., 3:30 p.m.
Washington at Oregon St., 10:30 p.m.


Washington St. 24,
Arizona 17: Tucson, Ariz., Connor
Halliday threw 25 yards to Isiah Myers
for a tie-breaking touchdown with
2:15 to play to give Washington State
an upset over Arizona.
Halliday completed 39 of 53 passes
for 319 yards and two scores, the
junior's seventh 300-yard passing of
the season.
Ka'Deem Carey scored both
touchdowns for Arizona (6-4, 3-4
Pac-12) on a 30-yard run and a 7-yard
reception from B.J. Denker. Carey
gained 132 yards in 26 carries.


On the final play of the game, from
the Washington State 13, Denker's
pass to Samajie Grant in the end zone
was caught well out of bounds.
Washington State (5-5,3-4) had
lost its previous three games by a
combined score of 162-83.

Colorado 41, California
24: In Boulder, Colo., Sefo Liufau
threw for a career-high 364 yards and
Paul Richardson tied a team record for
receptions in a contest with 11 to help
Colorado snap a 14-game conference
losing streak by beating slumping
California.
Liufau also tossed three TD passes
as he outplayed fellow freshman
Jared Goff, who struggled to ignite
the offense as the Bears (1-10,0-8
Pac-12) dropped their 13th straight
league game.
Nelson Spruce and Richardson
each went over the 100-yard receiving
mark for Colorado (4-6,1-6). Spruce
had eight catches for 140 yards and
Richardson had 140 yards. Richardson
now has 1,201 yards receiving this
year, a new single-season record at
Colorado.


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The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5






Page 6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


DUKE

FROM PAGE 1
David Cutcliffe-coached
team at either Duke or
Mississippi against a
Miami run defense that
gives up an average of
152.
"Coach said we were
going to call it and haul
it," Snead said, "and that's
what we did."
Connette rushed
for a career-high four
touchdowns and threw
for a fifth for Duke. The
change-of-pace quarter-
back had touchdown runs
of 1, 2, 3 and 4 yards, and
threw a 22-yard TD to
Shaq Powell.
"This team is not just
a fluke," center Dave
Harding said.
Duke (8-2, 4-2) for
years, one of the nation's
worst programs in a pow-
er conference claimed
its sixth consecutive win,
and it ranks as one of the
most significant in school
history.
"I remember when I
first got here, the team
hadn't won a game in,
like, three years," running
back Josh Snead said.
Cutcliffe told him: "'Just
believe. Believe in the
process.' We got a lot of
guys that believe in this
process, and we're here
today."
Snead rushed for a
career-high 138 yards
and Powell added a
backbreaking 33-yard
touchdown run that put
the Blue Devils in com-
plete command of a wild
game that featured 1,108
total yards and three lead
changes.
Ross Martin gave Duke
the lead for good late in
the third quarter when he
banked in a 48-yard field
goal off the upright late to
make it 31-30.
Two possessions later
- and two plays after
Snead burst 56 yards
into the Miami red zone
- Connette powered in
from 4 yards out to put
the Blue Devils up 38-30
with 11:37 left.
Powell then effectively
iced the win on Duke's
next possession when his
33-yard touchdown run
on fourth-and-1 gave the
Blue Devils a 45-30 lead
with 6:50 left.
After Miami turned
the ball over on downs,
Martin added a 32-yard
field goal with 1:04 left.
Morris finished 30 of
49 with touchdowns of
50 and 5 yards to Herb
Waters. Stacy Coley
returned a punt 79 yards
for a touchdown.
Connette, who often
spells starter Anthony
Boone in short-yardage
situations, became the
first Duke player to rush
for four touchdowns since
Justin Boyle did it against
Vanderbilt in 2006.

DUKE 48, No. 24 MIAMI 30
Miami 17 3 10 0- 30
Duke 7 14 1017- 48.
First Quarter
Mia-FG Goudis32,10:27.
Mia-Coley 79 punt return (Goudis kick),
9:33.
Duke-Connette 2 run (Martin kick), 6:22.
Mia-Waters 5 pass from Morris (Goudis
kick), 2:01.
Second Quarter
Duke-Powell 22 pass from Connette
(Martin kick), 9:02.
Mia-FG Goudis 32,4:42.
Duke-Connette 3 run (Martin kick), 2:01.
Third Quarter
Duke-Connette 1 run (Martin kick), 11:50.
Mia-Waters 50 pass from Morris (Goudis
kick), 11:12.
Mia-FG Goudis31,5:04.
Duke-FG Martin 48,2:47.
Fourth Quarter
Duke-Connette 4 run (Martin kick), 11:37.
Duke-Powell 33 run (Martin kick), 6:50.
Duke-FG Martin 32,1:04.
A-30,044.
Mia Duke
First downs 28 27
Rushes-yards 29-186 52-358
Passing 379 185
Comp-Att-lnt 30-49-1 16-24-0
Return Yards 80 74
Punts-Avg. 4-42.8 4-43.5
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 7-69 5-55
Time of Possession 31:59 28:01


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Miami, D.Crawford 19-115,
Clements 1-28, Edwards 4-22, Morris 4-18,
Hagens 1-3. Duke,Snead 9-138, Duncan 16-
98, Powell 7-59, Connette 11-37, Crowder
1-13, Boone 6-11, Thompson 1-4, Team
1-(minus 2).
PASSING-Miami, Morris 30-49-1-379.
Duke, Boone 11-15-0-104, Connette 5-9-
0-81.
RECEIVING-Miami, Waters 9-116, Hums
8-107, D.Crawford 3-48, Hagens 3-42,
M.Lewis 2-27, Walford 2-19, Coley 2-10,
Scott 1-10. Duke, Crowder 6-53, Deaver
3-30, Braxton 2-24, Powell 2-23, McCaffrey
1-43, Duncan 1-8, Blakeney 1-4.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:


Florida State's Jameis Winston, leftthrows a block to take out Syracuse's Julian Whigham,
allowing Kermit Whitfield (7) to score on a 74-yard touchdown run in the first quarter.





Winston, FSU





crush Orange


By KAREEM COPELAND
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TALLAHASSEE On
the field, it was business
as usual for Jameis
Winston and No. 2 Florida
State.
The Heisman Trophy
candidate showed no
effects from a tumultu-
ous week, completing
19-of-21 passes for 277
yards and two touch-
downs as the Seminoles
rolled Syracuse 59-3 on
Saturday.
News broke Wednesday
that Winston was under
investigation for an
alleged sexual assault that
took place Dec. 7, 2012.
Attention moved away
from his Heisman Trophy
campaign to unanswered
questions surrounding
an investigation that is
nearly a year old.
Any questions about
whether the off-field
issue would impact
Florida State's game
were answered imme-
diately. Florida State
(10-0, 8-0 Atlantic Coast
Conference) led 28-0 in
the first quarter. Syracuse
(5-5, 3-3) was held
scoreless until late in the


fourth quarter.
Florida State outgained
the Orange 523-427.
"It's the same thing ev-
ery single week," Winston
said. "We prepare our-
selves the same way every
single week. One thing
about Florida State, we're
a big family. So we stay
inside the family.
"We want to be elite.
We want to be great.
And just like we had the
1993 championship team
come down. We want to
be just like those guys.
We want to just keep
everything rolling the
right way."
It seems only a problem
with Winston can get in
Florida State's way. If he
were to be changed with a
felony, school rules would
require he not be allowed
to play.
With him, and consid-
ering the upcoming com-
petition, the Seminoles
have been unstoppable.
They scored 28 points
before the Orange
recorded 28 yards of total
offense and Winston
was the star.
"I thought he played
exceptionally well," FSU
coach Jimbo Fisher said.


STATE ROUNDUP


FAU RUNS OVER
SOUTHERN MISS
HATTIESBURG, Miss.
(AP) -Two games does
not a season make, but
Florida Atlantic has been
as good as it can be with
interim head football
coach Brian Wright at the
helm as he led Florida
Atlantic to a 41-7 win
Saturday over Southern
Miss.
For Southern Miss,
the misery continued
as the Golden Eagles
forged another link for
the nation's longest losing
streak in the Football
Bowl Subdivision at 22
games.
FAU (4-6, 3-4
Conference USA) notched
back-to-back victories for
the first time since the
2010 season, and im-
proved to 2-0 since Wright
replaced Carl Pelini,
who was dismissed over
alleged illegal drug use.
Jaquez Johnson and Jay
Warren both rushed for
more than 100 yards as
FAU piled up 333 yards
on the ground in front
of 20,802 at Roberts
Stadium.
"The game plan was to
run the football and our
guys up front did a great
job," Wright said. "They
led the way."
Johnson, the Owls'
dual-threat quarterback,
rushed for 111 yards
and two touchdowns,


while Warren tacked on
105 yards on 18 carries.
Damian Fortner added
94 yards and two touch-
downs on just 10 carries.

Delaware St. 29, Florida
A&M 21: In Tallahassee, Cory Scott
scored on a 55-yard fumble recovery
and the defense caused three fourth-
quarter turnovers to secure Delaware
State's 18-point comeback against
Florida A&M 29-21.
The Hornets (5-5,5-2 Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference) trailed 21-3 with
11:09 left in the second quarter as a
result of their early mistakes.
Carson Royal was 18 of 24 for 277
yards, three touchdowns and three
interceptions for Florida A&M (3-8,
2-5), which outgained Delaware State
379-346.

Bethune-Cookman 42,
Hampton 12: In Daytona Beach,
Quentin Williams passed for 68 yards
and rushed for two touchdowns as
Bethune-Cookman beat Hampton.
Isidore Jackson rushed for 102
yards as part of a ground game
that kept the Wildcats (9-2,6-1
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference)
well ahead of the Pirates (4-7,4-3)
throughout the game. Bethune-
Cookman amassed 475 yards on the
ground, led by Jackson and starting
QB Jackie Wilson who had 74 yards
and a rushing touchdown.

Jacksonville 45, Stetson
24: In Jacksonville, Kade Bell threw
two of his four touchdown passes in
the fourth quarter to lead Jacksonville
(5-6,4-4) past Stetson (2-8,1-6) in a
Pioneer League game.
Bell finished the game with 325
yards passing and three interceptions.


"His mind was really in
the game."
NO. 2 FLORIDA ST. 59, SYRACUSE 3
Syracuse 0 0 0 3- 3
Florida St. 28 10 21 0 59
First Quarter
FSU-Wilder 3 run (Aguayo kick), 12:29.
FSU-Whitfield 74 run (Aguayo kick),
10:41.
FSU-Freeman 4 run (Aguayo kick), 4:41.
FSU-Greene 6 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), :40.
Second Quarter
FSU-Benjamin 6 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 11:52.
FSU-FG Aguayo 53,5:07.
Third Quarter
FSU-Wilder 37 run (Aguayo kick), 10:51.
FSU-O'Leary 17 pass from Maguire
(Aguayo kick), 7:45.
FSU-Casher 31 fumble return (Aguayo
kick), 5:47.
Fourth Quarter
Syr-FG Norton 32,7:42.
A-74,491.
Syr FSU
First downs 17 20
Rushes-yards 50-143 19-225
Passing 104 298
Comp-Att-Int 15-28-1 22-26-1
Return Yards 7 45
Punts-Avg. 7-40.0 2-48.0
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 3-20 2-10
Time of Possession 41:42 18:18
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Syracuse, McFarlane 13-81,
G.Morris 21-67, Allen 2-8, Smith 5-1, Gulley
1 -0, Loeb 1-0, Hunt 7-(minus 14). Florida St.,
K.Williams 4-78, Whitfield 1-74,Wilder 3-52,
Freeman 4-29, Abram 1-2,R.Green 1-2,Win-
ston 5-(minus 12).
PASSING-Syracuse, Hunt 10-18-0-75, Al-
len 5-9-1-29, Loeb 0-1-0-0. Florida St., Win-
ston 19-21-0-277,Maguire 3-5-1-21.
RECEIVING-Syracuse, Broyld 3-18, West
3-17, Clark 3-16, McFarlane 1-23, Kobena
1-10, Parris 1-10, Cleveland 1-4, Moore 1-4,
Wales 1-2. Florida St., Shaw 7-99, Benjamin
6-66, Greene 4-40, O'Leary 3-55, Freeman
1-34,Whitfield 1A-4


BIG 12 ROUNDUP

NO. 12 OKLAHOMA
STATE CLOBBERS
NO. 23 TEXAS, 38-13
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) -
The Big 12 championship
is still solidly in reach for
No. 12 Oklahoma State,
which showed Saturday
just what No. 4 Baylor will
be up against next week.
They did it by clobber-
ing No. 23 Texas and
in a fashion that no team
has ever done here against
Mack Brown.
Quarterback Clint Chelf
ran for two touchdowns
and threw for two more,
and the Cowboys beat
the Longhorns 38-13 to
hand Brown his worst
home loss in 16 seasons.
It comes at a time when
speculation about Brown's
job security had just
started quieting down
following a bumbling
start this season for the
Longhorns.
But that's of no concern
to the Cowboys (9-1, 6-1),
who won in Austin for
the third straight time.
They've now pulled off
six straight wins since an
early stumble against West
Virginia.
"We understand how
big the game is. I'm not
sure if at times everybody
wants to say that that's
a heck of a win, but it is
what it is," Oklahoma
State coach Mike Gundy
said. "You very seldom go
on the road and win by


IACC ROUNDUP


MARYLAND UPENDS
HOKIES IN OT, 27-24
BLACKSBURG, Va. (AP)
C.J. Brown knew that
he was largely to blame
for the offensive woes that
had seen Maryland lose
four of five games, turning
a once-promising season
into one that was quickly
slipping away.
The quarterback did
something about it,
running for 122 yards,
including the winning
touchdown in overtime,
as the Terrapins became
bowl eligible with a 27-24
victory against Virginia
Tech on Saturday.
"I kind of had a chip on
my shoulder coming in,"
said Brown, who carried
23 times and also threw
for 135 yards. "The offense
wasn't doing very good.
That reflects on me....
They play a lot of man
coverage. When they try to
run with the receivers, it
gives me a lot of running
lanes. With my athletic
ability, I thought I could
outrun the defensive ends.
I took advantage of that."
Brown had runs of
38, 18, 16 and 18 yards,
all on scrambles, hit
Nigel King for a 16-yard
touchdown and William
Likely returned a punt 67
yards for the Terrapins
(6-4, 2-4 Atlantic Coast
Conference), who led 21-7
and then held on after the
Hokies pulled even with
9:32 to play.
The loss damaged
Virginia Tech's chance of
playing for the ACC cham-
pionship. They started
the game knowing if they
beat Maryland and then
Virginia next week, and if
Duke lost one of its three
remaining games, they
would win the Coastal
Division and a spot in the
championship game.
Instead, it became a
most forgettable Senior
Day for Logan Thomas
and 11 other seniors who
trotted onto the field at
Lane Stadium as players
for the final time.
"I told the younger guys,
'Just remember this day.
It's not the way you want
to go out on your Senior
Day, and don't ever let it
happen again,'" Thomas
said. "This is supposed to
be a day you remember
for the rest of your life."
The Terrapins (6-4, 2-4)
surely will.


Standings
Conference All Games
WL PF PA W L PF PA
Baylor 5 0279 100 80 488 123
Oklahoma St. 6 1 268 149 91 404 190
Texas 6 1 223 169 73 323260
Oklahoma 5 2 188 160 82 308201
TexasTech 4 3 243 227 73 378270
Kansas St. 4 3233 175 64 339233
TCU 2 6150191 47 263262
WestVirginia 2 6 207 287 47 272 348
Kansas 1 6116270 37 174317
Iowa St. 0 7133312 19 212388
Saturday's results
Oklahoma 48, Iowa St. 10
Kansas31,West Virginia 19
Kansas St.33,TCU31
Oklahoma St. 38,Texas 13
TexasTech vs. Baylor at Arlington,Texas, late
Saturday's games
Oklahoma at Kansas St., Noon
Kansas at Iowa St., 8 p.m.
Baylor at Oklahoma St., 8 p.m.



more than three touch-
downs with teams that are
undefeated in conference
play in the middle of
November."
Texas and Oklahoma
State still have yet to face
undefeated No. 4 Baylor.

No. 22 Oklahoma 48,
Iowa State 10: In Norman, Okla.,
Bob Stoops matched Barry Switzer's
record for most coaching victories at
Oklahoma when the 22nd-ranked
Sooners cruised to victory.
Trevor Knight led the way as Stoops
recorded win No. 157 with Oklahoma
(8-2,5-2 Big 12), which closed the
game with 45 unanswered points over
the final three quarters. The backup
quarterback was 8-of-14 passing for 61
yards and rushed for 123 yards and one
touchdown.
Iowa State (1-9,0-7) held Oklahoma
scoreless in the first quarter and led
10-3 before Jalen Saunders returned
a punt 91 yards for a touchdown right


Standings
ATLANTIC Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
FloridaSt. 80411 98100 527111
Clemson 7 1 323 168 91 413 216
Boston College3 3 154 164 64 281 274
Syracuse 3 3 74177 55 224265
Maryland 24 94 207 64 253 248
WakeForest 2 5 103 199 46 178238
NC State 0 7 114230 37 225 279
COASTAL Conference All Games
W L PF PAWL PF PA
Duke 42203178 82349230
GeorgiaTech 5 3 249 186 64 339224
VirginiaTech 4 3 166 134 7 4265 203
North Carolina 4 3 200 152 5 5 281 254
Miami 3 3 164205 7 3 345255
Pittsburgh 2 4 131 173 5 5264269
Virginia 0 6 100 215 2 8205338
Thursday's results
Clemson 55, GeorgiaTech 31
Saturday's results
Boston College 38, NC State 21
North Carolina 34, Pittsburgh 27
Maryland 27,Virginia Tech 24, OT
Duke 48, Miami 30
Florida St. 59, Syracuse 3
Saturday's games
The Citadel at Clemson,TBA
Virginia at Miami, TBA
Old Dominion at North Carolina,TBA
Duke at Wake Forest,TBA
Pittsburgh at Syracuse, 12:30 p.m.
East Carolina at NC State, 12:30 p.m.
Alabama A&M at Georgia Tech, 1:30 p.m.
Idaho at Florida St., 3:30 p.m.
Boston College at Maryland, 3:30 p.m.



Boston College 38,
N.C. State 21: In Boston, Andre
Williams ran for 339 yards to break
Boston College's single-season and
single-game rushing records, leading
the Eagles to victory over North
Carolina State on and helping them
qualify for a bowl game for the first
time in three seasons.
Williams broke Mike Cloud's
single-season record of 1,726 yards
on a strange play in the fourth when
he broke free on a 65-yard run but
fumbled just before the goal line. On
his school record-tying 42nd carry
of the day, he scored on a 34-yard
touchdown run.
With the win, the Eagles (6-4,
3-3) became bowl eligible in Steve
Addazio's first season as head coach.
Backup quarterback Pete Thomas
completed 22 of 33 passes for 207
yards for N.C. State (3-7,0-7).

North Carolina 34,
Pittsburgh 27: In Pittsburgh,
North Carolina's Ryan Switzer returned
two punts for touchdowns, including
the go-ahead score with 4:46
remaining as the Tar Heels held off
Pittsburgh.
Switzer returned a punt 65 yards
in the second quarter to give North
Carolina (5-5,4-3 ACC) a 21-point
lead. He did it again in the fourth
quarter, zig zagging 61 yards to help
the Tar Heels fend off a Pitt rally for
their fourth straight win.
The Panthers (5-5,2-4) drove to
the North Carolina 26 with under 2
minutes remaining but the Tar Heels
stuffed Pitt running back James
Conner on fourth-and-1 and escaped.
North Carolina quarterback
Marquise Williams ran for two
touchdowns to overcome a shaky day
passing and the Tar Heels sacked Pitt's
Tom Savage seven times.


before halftime.
Damien Williams added 10 carries
for 128 yards and two touchdowns for
the Sooners.

Kansas State 33, TCU 31:
In Manhattan, Kan.,Jack Cantele kicked
a 41-yard field goal, his fourth of the
game, with 3 seconds remaining to
give Kansas State a thrilling victory
overTCU.
The Horned Frogs had taken the
lead on a 56-yard field goal by Jaden
Oberkrom with 2:13 left, but the
Wildcats (6-4,4-3) quickly marched
down field. Jake Waters hit Tyler Lockett
for 12 yards to convert a third down,
and hit him again for eight more yards
to get within field-goal range.
Cantele trotted onto the field,
lined up and sent the kick through
the uprights, leaping into the air as
several Wildcats poured onto the field
to celebrate.
TCU (4-7,2-6) couldn't do anything
with the kickoffas Kansas State
wrapped its fourth straight win.

Kansas 31, West Virginia
7: In Lawrence, Kan., James Sims
rushed for 211 yards and three
touchdowns and Kansas snapped a
27-game Big 12 losing streak.
Thousands of fans stormed onto the
field and tore down the south goalpost.
Sims, who recorded a career-high
on 22 carries, broke runs of 62 and 68
yards while Kansas (3-7,1-6 Big 12)
ended a Big 12 drought since a win
over Colorado on Nov. 6,2010.
West Virginia (4-7,2-6), which
wasn't a Big 12 member when Kansas
notched its previous conference win,
took a 7-0 lead on its first possession.
But the Mountaineers were unable to
generate anything more until two late
meaningless touchdowns.


Page 6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013





The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7


THE HEISMAN WATCH


MARCUS MAROTTA
QB Oregon
vs. Utah
Has completed 63.3 percent of
his passes for 22 touchdowns
and no interceptions this season.


JAMEISWINSTON
QB Florida State
vs.Syracuse
Throws two touchdowns while
completing 19 of 21 passes for
277yards in 59-3 victory.


BRYCE PETTY
QB Baylor
vs. Texas Tech
Bryce Petty throws three
touchdown passes and runs for
two more in 63-34 win.


JOHNNY MANZIEL
QB Texas A&M
Off week
His three interceptions last
week give him 11, eclipsing
his total from last year.


AJ. McCARRON
QB Alabama
at Mississippi St.
Completes 18 of32 passes
for 187 yards and two TDs
in a 20-7 victory.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:





UCF escapes Temple's upset bid


Teammates lift Central Florida kicker Shawn Moffitt into the air after kicking the game-winning
field goal late in the fourth quarter of Saturday's game against Temple. The victory was the fourth
time the Knights trailed in the second half before winning.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL: I COLLEGE FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD

S* SOUTH Indiana (Pa.) 42, Shippensburg 21
Alabama 20, Mississippi St. 7 Juniata 17, Susquehanna 10
U Alabama A&M 50, Ark.-Pine Bluff42 King's (Pa.) 35,Wilkes 28
Alabama St. 19, MVSU 7 Kutztown 41, Edinboro 10
| I Albany St. (Ga.) 17, Miles 14 LIU Post 62, Pace 28
Alcorn St. 48,Jackson St. 33 Lafayette 27, Fordham 14
Appalachian St. 33,Wofford 21 Lehigh 31,Colgate 14
os Auburn 43, Georgia 38 Lycoming 36, Stevenson 20
SAve Maria 42, Apprentice 21 MIT 48, Coast Guard 31
Belhaven 55, Bethel (Tenn.) 45 Maine 41, Rhode Island 0
0 f e s Bethune-Cookman 42, Hampton 12 Marist 33, Mercer 7
Butler 58, Morehead St. 27 Mercyhurst 37, East Stroudsburg 20
fa e rCarson-Newman 52,Wingate 35 Merrimack 35, S. Connecticut 24
Catholic 42, Bridgewater (Va.) 19 Misericordia63,FDU-Florham40
Cent. Arkansas 17, Nicholls St. 10 Monmouth(NJ)21,Bryantl18
f lt e Centre 53, Birmingham-Southern 19 Montclair St. 21,Kean 14
Christopher Newport 58, Ferrum 12 Mount Ida 6, Husson 0
Coastal Carolina 46, Presbyterian 13 Muhlenberg 24, Moravian 12
a a in Cumberland (Tenn.) 41,Alderson-Broaddus NY Maritime 7, Gallaudet 6
a b 6 e S 17 Navy 42, South Alabama 14
a g a in Cumberlands56,Bluefield South 14 New Hampshire 37, Albany (NY) 20
Delaware St. 29, Florida A&M 21 New Haven 27, Assumption 17
ByFED GOO Duke 48, Miami 30 North Carolina 34, Pittsburgh 27
By FRED GOODALL East Carolina 63, UAB 14 Norwich 31,Castleton St. 13
ASSOCIATED PRESS FAU 41, Southern Miss 7 Penn St. 45, Purdue21
Fairmont St. 47,Virginia-Wise 44 Princeton 59,Yale23
TAMPA- Jake Elliott Faulkner 42, KentuckyChristian 14 RPI31,Union(NY)28
kicked a pair of first half Florida St. 59, Syracuse 3 Richmond 46, Delaware 43
kicke apairo rs-al Florida Tech 17,Webber 3 Sacred Heart 42, Robert Morris 25
field goals, one of them Furman 32,W.Carolina 20 SetonHill 17,Cheyney10
a 56-yarder that hit the Gardner-Webb 27,Charleston Southern 10 Springfield 35,WPI 21
Sn b Georgetown (Ky.) 20, LindseyWilson 10 St. Lawrence 31, Merchant Marine 0
crossbar and bounced Georgia Southern 38, Elon 20 UCF 39,Temple 36
through to help Memphis GlenvilleSt. 17,W.VirginiaSt. 12 Ursinus31,DickinsonO0
eats tteringo uth Guilford 35, Emory&Henry31 W. Connecticut 37,Westfield St. 0
beatsputeringSouh Hampden-Sydney28, Randolph-Macon 26 W. New England 62, Nichols37
Florida 23-10 for the Huntingdon 45, Maryville (Tenn.) 38 Wagner 10, St. Francis (Pa.) 7
Tigers' first American Jacksonville 45, Stetson 24 Washington &Jeffersonr38,Waynesburg 13
Johns Hopkins 52, McDaniel21 West Chester 41, Clarion 14
Athletic Conference victo- LaGrange 37, Averett 9 Westminster (Pa.) 30, Geneva 27
ry on Saturday night Lenoir-Rhyne 48, Catawba 15 MIDWEST
Th Tie (36 14 Liberty 59, Brevard 21 Albion 34, Hope 31
The Tigers (3-6, 1-4) Louisiana-Lafayette35, Georgia St. 21 Alma 31,Trine 13
broke open a close game, Louisville 20, Houston 13 Aurora 44, Rockford 7
dring 59 ards in plas Maryland 27,Virginia Tech 24, OT Baker 38, Peru St. 13
vig yards in plays McNeese St. 43, Northwestern St. 17 Bemidji St. 35, Minot St. 14
following a punt to Memphis 23, South Florida 10 Benedictine (Kan.) 38, Evangel 24
score on a 5-yard run by Methodist 69, NCWesleyan 62 Bethel (Kan.) 26, Bethany (Kan.) 14
BranOn Haye ta k it Mississippi 51,Troy21 Bethel (Minn.) 28, St. John's (Minn.) 7
Brandon Hayes to make it NCA&T41, Savannah St. 14 Bluffton17,Defiance10
13-3 with 4:09 remaining. NC Central 24, Norfolk St. 13 BuenaVista 29, Dubuque 28
F (27, 2-) avode Newberry55, North Greenville21 Capital 41,Wilmington (Ohio) 27
USF (2-7, 2-3) avoided NotreDameColl.30,West Liberty13 Carleton 49,Augsburg 45
going without an offensive Old Dominion 42,Campbell 14 Carroll (Wis.) 23,Illinois College 21
score for the fifth time Pikeville 56, Union (Ky.) 38 Cent. Michigan 27,W. Michigan 22
Reinhardt 66, Campbellsville 48 Central 21, Coe 7
when Mike White threw a Rhodes 49, Millsaps 30 Concordia (1lll.)48, Maranatha Baptist 22
31-yard TD pass to Andre S.Virginia 40, Southwestern (Texas) 0 Concordia (Moor.) 38, Gustavus 31
wt 46 sec d ft SE Louisiana 34, Sam Houston St. 21 Concordia (Neb.) 45, Briar Cliff 7
Davis with 46 seconds left. SE Missouri 36, Austin Peay 34 Concordia (Wis.) 58,Wis. Lutheran 31
The loss was the third in a Samford 17,Chattanooga 14,OT Cornell (Iowa)45,Grinnell0
row for the Bulls. Shenandoah 21,Washington & Lee 14 Dakota Wesleyan 27, Dordt 0
row or us. Shepherd 41,Concord 33 Dayton 45,Valparaiso 20
South Carolina 19, Florida 14 Denison 42, Kenyon 7
MEMPHIS 23, SOUTH FLORIDA 10 Southern U. 53, Clark Atlanta 0 E.lllinois52,JacksonvilleSt. 14
Memphis 3 3 017 23 StonyBrook41,JamesMadison38 EmporiaSt.34,Washburn23
SouthFlorida 0 0 3 7 10 Tennessee St. 17, MurraySt. 10 FerrisSt. 35,N. Michigan22
First Quarter The Citadel 31,VM1I10 Findlay49,Walsh28
Mern-FG Elliott 19,1:46 Towson 15,William &Mary9 Franklin59,Hanover21
Second Quarter Tusculum 49, Mars Hill 42 Grand Valley St. 49, SaginawValley St. 34
Mem-FG Elliott56, 12. UNC-Pembroke63,Va. Lynchburg 0 Heidelberg 42, Baldwin-Wallace 14
Third Quarter UT-Martin 16, E. Kentucky 7 Hillsdale 24, Northwood (Mich.) 7
USF-FG Kloss 28, 9:26 Vanderbilt 22, Kentucky 6 lllinoisWesleyan 24, Elmhurst 10
Fourth Quarter Warner 13,Concordia-Selma 7 Indianapolis 21,Truman St. 14
Mern-Hayes 5 run (Elliott kick) 4:09 Wesley 47, Alfred 0 Kalamazoo 39, Olivet 37
Mern-FG Elliott 34, 2:08 West Alabama 91, Central St. (Ohio) 28 Kansas 31,West Virginia 19
Mern-McCain 36 interception return (El- EAST Kansas St. 33,TCU31
liott kick), 1:35 Akron 14, UMass 13 Lake Erie 50,Tiffin 32
USF-A Davis31 passfrom MM.White Kloss Albright 40, Lebanon Valley 25 Lake Forest 31, St. Norbert 3
USF-A.Davis 31 pass from M.White (Kloss : ,- ,, i 111
kick), :46 American International 27, Stonehill 17 Lakeland 15, Benedictine (111.) 12
Mem USF Bentley 56, St. Anselm 41 Lincoln (Mo.) 51, SW Baptist 28
First downs 16 18 Bethany (WV) 56, St.Vincent 35 Macalester 7, Hamline 0
Rushes-yards 39-183 29-127 Bloomsburg 42, Slippery Rock 38 Manchester 42, Anderson (Ind.) 13
Passing 59 198 Boston College 38, NC State 21 Mary31,Minn.-Crookston 15
CompAtt-Int 6-13-1 18-34-4 Bridgewater (Mass.) 45, Mass. Maritime 20 McKendree 58,KentuckyWesleyan 14
Return Yards 61 52 Brockport 43, Morrisville St. 33 McPherson 37, Southwestern (Kan.) 7
Punts Avg. 5-458 3-380 Bucknell 17, Georgetown 7 Michigan 27, Northwestern 19,30T
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 3-1 California (Pa.)48, Millersville 14 Michigan St. 41, Nebraska 28
Penalties-Yards 9-81 9-70 Case Reserve 35, Carnegie-Mellon 32 Michigan Tech 28,Wayne (Mich.) 21
Time of Possession 29:18 29:56 Cincinnati 52, Rutgers 17 Mid-Am Nazarene 64, Cent. Methodist 23
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS Cornell 24, Columbia 9 Millikin 28, Carthage 21
RUSHING-Memphis, Hayes 20-78, Lynch Cortland St. 28, Ithaca 24 Minn. Duluth 39, Northern St. (SD) 7
6-51, Dorceus 8-51, Craig 1-5, Craft 1-(mi- Curry 54, MaineMaritime 38 Minn. St.-Mankato 73, UpperIowa 7
nus 1), Steib 3-(minus 1). South Florida Dartmouth24,Brown20 Missouri Southern 35, PittsburgSt.21
nus 28, elaware(mValley)50ouWideneri28
Shaw 11-57, W.Davis 6-38, Dunkley 1-28, DelawareValley50,Widener28 Missouri Valley26,AvilaO
Tice 5-4, Pierre 1-3, Martin 1-1 MWhite Duquesne24,CCSU21 Monmouth(lll.)37,Knox10
2-(minus 1),Team2-(minus3) Endicott 24, Salve ReginaO0 Morningside51,Doane 13
PASSING-Memphis, Lynch 6-13-1-59 FitchburgSt. 41,PlymouthSt. 30 Mount Union 42,John Carroll 34
South Florida, MWhite 18-33-4-198, Team Framingham St.36,Worcester St.0 Muskingum 24,Marietta 14
0-1-0-0. Franklin & Marshall 36, Gettysburg 26 N. Dakota St. 35,Youngstown St. 17
RECEIVING-Memphis, Malone 2-25, Craft Gannon 44, Lock Haven 14 N. Iowa 17, Missouri St. 10
216, Craig 19,Tones 19 South Florida GroveCity50,Thiel44,OT NWMissouriSt.51,MissouriWestern21
ADavis 7-110, Price 4-18, WDavis 2-13 Hartwick21,Utica 10 NebraskaWesleyan43,Hastings 14
Gonzalez 1-20,Welch 1-13,Shaw 1-12, Mc- Harvard 38, Penn 30 North Central (1l) 53,Augustana (1L) 14
Farland 1-7, Duval 1-5 Hobart42,Rochester21 Northwestern (Iowa) 55, Midland 27


By NICK MENTA
ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHILADELPHIA- A
sensational one-handed
catch to tie. An unlikely
long-gainer to set up the
last-second winning kick.
UCF's latest comeback
win was the wildest yet.
Shawn Moffitt kicked a
23-yard field goal as time
expired after Rannell Hall
got behind the Temple
defense for a 64-yard
reception, and the 15th-
ranked Knights survived a
scare with a 39-36 victory
Saturday.
For the fourth time
this season, UCF (8-1,
5-0 American Athletic
Conference) trailed in the
second half and won.
UCF's last possession
started at its 19, with
no timeouts. Overtime
seemed likely until Blake
Bortles found Hall deep to
get to the Temple 6.
"Rannell Hall has pre-
viously said that Temple
was sitting on everything
and jumping things
outside," Bortles said. "He


told me he wanted to go
and he went and made a
big play."
Bortles managed to
get the ball spiked with 2
seconds left and Moffitt
booted through the game
winner to keep UCF in
control of the American
Athletic Conference
race and its BCS bid.
The Knights are the only
unbeaten team in AAC
play, and with three games
to go can even afford to
lose a game.
Bortles completed 27 of
38 attempts and finished
with a career-high 404
yards passing and four
touchdowns.
Freshman P.J. Walker
was spectacular for
Temple (1-9, 0-6), with
a season-high 382 yards
passing, four TD passes
and a touchdown run. He
finished 26 of 44 and his
yardage was the third-best
passing game in school
history.
Temple dropped to 2-78
all-time against the Top 25
opponents.


IAACROUNDUP

Oberlin 47, Hiram 13
Ohio Dominican 40, Malone 13 KAY'S CAREER DAY Stam
Ohio Northern 42, Otterbein 21 LEADS CINCINNATI
Ohio St. 60, Illinois35 LE D l l N TI
Ripon 48, Lawrence 28
Robert Morris-Chicago 42, Concordia PICATAWAY, N.J. (AP) UCF
Louisville
(Mich.)2 5 Brendon Kay threw for a Cincinnat
Rose-Hulman 53, Earlham 15 Houston
S. Dakota St. 27, South Dakota 12 career-best 405 yards and stonMU
S. Illinois 24, Illinois St. 17 four touchdowns, Mekale Rutgers
SW Minnesota St. 34, Augustana (SD) 24 : t Fr
Simpson (Iowa) 28, Luther 21 McKay caught three TDs S.Florida
u Memphis
Sioux Falls35,Wayne (Neb.) 10 and Cincinnati rolled UConn
St. Ambrose 80, Waldorf 20
St. Cloud St 64, Minn. St.-Moorhead 27 to its fifth straight win Temple
St. Francis (Ind.)41, Marian (Ind.)24 with a 52-17 thrashing of UCF39,T
St.Joseph's(Ilnd.)37,WilliamJewell31,OT R gers on Saturday Cincinnat
Rugrs on Saturday. Cncna
St.Thomas (Minn.)45, St. Olaf23 tge SMU38,L
St. Xavier 34,Olivet Nazarene 7 The Bearcats (8-2, Mernphis
Sterling 36, KansasWesleyan 19 5-1 American Athletic Louisville
Tabor 23, Ottawa, Kan. 20 rin A in L u1
Taylor 30, St. Francis (111.) 20 Conference) gained 619 Rutgers
Thomas More 59, Mount St. Joseph 13 yards in offense, includ-
Urbana 24,Charleston (WV)21 Memphis
W.l Illinois21, Indiana St. 14 ing 422 in the first half Cincinnat
Wabash 38, DePauw21 when they jumped to a UConnat
Wartburg 59, Loras 3 p7 pr hi lVa an SMU atSo
Washington (Mo.) 17,Chicago 7 38-7 lead behind Kay and SMUtS
Wheaton (ILL.) 58, North Park 0 couple of trick plays.
William Penn 23,Trinity(lll.) 18 Kay hit M a n
Wis.-Eau Claire24,Wis.-LaCrosse21 hit McKay on becoming
Wis.-Platteville 17,Wis.-Oshkosh 16 touchdowns plays of 24 must win
Wis.-Stevens Pt. 19,Wis.-Stout 14 and 66 yards in the first games.
Wis.-Whitewater43,Wis.-RiverFalls6 games.
Wisconsin 51, Indiana 3 quarter. UConi
Wittenberg 56,Alleghenyo atouchd
Wooster 28,OhioWesleyan 27 tu
SOUTHWEST SMU 38, UConn 21: In remained
Abilene Christian 65, PrairieView 45 Dallas, Garrett Gilbert threw four
Angelo St. 7, Incarnate Word 0
Arkansas St.38,TexasSt.21 touchdown passes to help SMU hold No.
Austin 35,Trinity (Texas) 7 off Connecticut 38-21 Saturday. Houst
E. New Mexico 35, Texas A&M Commerce The national leader in offense at Dominiq
28
E.Texas Baptist 34, Sul Ross St. 32 409.4 yards per game before Saturday high 137
East Central 23, SE Oklahoma 16 passed for 353 yards and ran for 23 including
Fort Hays St. 56, Nebraska-Kearney 17
Harding 28, ArkansasTech 17 against the Huskies. third qua
Henderson St. 60,Ouachita 52,30T SMU (4-5,3-2 American Athletic carried 1
Howard 40,Texas Southern 6
Lamar46, Stephen F. Austin 45 Conference) improved its chance of for 50 ya
Langston 33,Wayland Baptist0O
Louisiana College 46, Hardin-Simmons 34
Mary Hardin-Baylor 56, Mississippi College NATIONAL OUNDUP
30 o ATegeAL lOU
North Alabama 44,Tarleton St. 7
Northeastern St. 45, Cent. Oklahoma 38
Oklahoma 48, lowa St. 10 NAVY QUALIFIES time
Oklahoma Baptist 39,TexasCollege28 n fl Navy0
Oklahoma St. 38,Texas 13 FrU BUOWL bid to
Rice 52,LouisianaTech 14
S. Arkansas44, Ark.-Monticello 20 ANNAPOLIS, Md. Arme(
S NazareneMcMurry2 (AP) Darius Staten FortV
SMU 38, UConn 21
SW Assemblies of God 38, Bacone 34 had a career-high 127 Dec. 3
SW Oklahoma 62, NW Oklahoma St. 17 yards on seven carries from t
Sewanee35, Hendrix9
Texas Lutheran 63, Howard Payne 14 with a touchdown to lead Confe
UTEP33,FIU 10 Navy to a 42-14 victory The
WestTexas A&M 19, Midwestern St. 12
WEST over South Alabama on scored
Adams St. 19,MesaSt. 17 Saturday. points
Azusa Pacific 28, Simon Fraser 19 With the win the also fi
BYU 59, Idaho St. 13 hthe win, the also fir
BYU 59, Idaho St. 13
Black Hills St. 17, Fort Lewis 14 Midshipmen qualified for athor
CSU-Pueblo 38, Western St. (Col.)13 a bowl game for the 10th since


Larroll Uvont.) 48,UicKinson St. 3
Cent.Washington 44, Dixie St. 0
Chapman 37,Cal Lutheran 27
Claremont-Mudd 29, Pomona-Pitzer 23
Colorado 41, California 24
Colorado Mines 23, Chadron St. 0
Colorado St. 66, New Mexico 42
E. Oregon 42, Montana Western 20
E.Washington 35, Cal Poly22
Linfield 28, Pacific 22
Menlo 38,ValleyCity St. 28
Montana 42, Weber St. 6
N. Arizona 24, N. Colorado 7
Occidental 49, La Verne 21
Oregon 44, Utah 21
Redlands 70,Whittier 16
Rocky Mountain 49, Montana St.-Northern
28
S. Oregon 31, Montana Tech 10
S. Utah 22, Montana St. 14
Sacramento St. 43, Portland St. 42
San Diego 23, Drake 13
UC Davis 34, North Dakota 18
W. New Mexico 43, NM Highlands 14
W. Oregon 27, Humboldt St. 14
Washington St. 24, Arizona 17
Whitworth 61,Lewis&Clark28
Willamette 62, Puget Sound 2


No. 15 UCF 39, TEMPLE 36
UCF 5 17 017 39
Temple 0 21 7 8 36
First Quarter
UCF-Safety, 6:39.
UCF-FG Moffitt 20,3:31.
Second Quarter
Tern-Gilmore 32 pass from Walker (Visco
kick), 13:48.
UCF-Stanback49 pass from Bortles (Mof-
fitt kick), 11:08.
Tern-Walker 3 run (Visco kick), 6:15.
UCF-Worton 4 pass from Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 3:56.
Tern-Anderson 30 pass from Walker (Vis-
co kick),2:13.
UCF-FG Moffitt 35, :00.
Third Quarter
Tern-Anderson 75 pass from Walker (Vis-
co kick), 3:31.
Fourth Quarter
UCF-Worton 38 passfrom Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 6:37.
Tern-Parthemore 7 pass from Walker
(Parthemore passfromWalker),2:04.
UCF-Worton 30 passfrom Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 1:06.
UCF-FG Moffitt 23, :00.
UCF Tern
First downs 28 22
Rushes-yards 36-253 24-136
Passing 404 382
Comp-Att-Int 27-40-0 26-45-1
Penalties-Yards 8-72 8-55
Time of Possession 33:34 26:26
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-UCF, SJohnson 14-122, Bortles
11-63, Hall 3-43, Stanback 8-25. Temple,
Harper 10-77, Walker 9-41, Gilmore 1-13,
Z.Williams4-5.
PASSING-UCF, Bortles 27-38-0-404, Team
0-2-0-0. Temple, Walker 26-44-1-382.
RECEIVING-UCF, Worton 10-179, Hall
9-159, Godfrey 3-0, SJohnson 2-4, Stan-
back 1-49, Tukes 1-9, Reese 1-4. Temple,
Anderson 8-184, Fitzpatrick 5-52, Harper
3-34, Christopher 3-29, Parthemore 2-26,
Alderman 2-16, Gilmore 1-32, Karpinski 1-6,
Z.Williams 1-3.


tidings
Conference All Games
W L PF PAWL PF PA
5 0182 119 81317 185
5 1174 81 9 1 366 108
i 5 1213 125 82352 186
4 2158 104 73356 218
3 2208 182 45292 343
2 3119 197 54264 283
a 2 3 75122 27133 273
1 4105 127 3 6186 185
0 5 74 185 09146 302
0 6145 211 1 9237 309
Saturday's results
ernple 36
i52, Rutgers 17
JConn21
.s 23, South Florida 10
20, Houston 13
Thursday's games
at UCF, 7:30 p.rn.
Saturday's games
at Louisville,TBA
i at Houston, Noon
Temple, 7 p.m.
outh Florida, 7 p.m.


g bowl eligible. The Mustangs
n two of their final three

1n (0-9,0-5) stayed within
own of SMU until 3:50
A in the game.

19 Louisville 20,
on 13: In Louisville, Ky.,
ue Brown ran for a career-
Syards and two touchdowns,
g the go-ahead score in the
iarter for Louisville. Brown
1 times in the third quarter
rds and a touchdown run.


n the past 11 years.
(6-4) will accept a
the Bell Helicopter
i Forces Bowl in
North, Texas, on
30 against a team
he Mountain West
rence.
Midshipmen, who
d 22 consecutive
s in the second half,
nished undefeated
ne for the first time
2004.


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Page 8 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


NFL EXTRA


* WEEK 11


JACKSON

FROM PAGE 1
starting today against the
Falcons.
"We need to make
sure he gets his touches
because he's a dynamic
player," Schiano said
"You're talking about a Pro
Bowl player. And certainly
with the loss of some (of
our) weapons offensively,
defenses are really going
to key on him now. That's
a fact of life. But get over it
and find a way to get him
the ball."
The team has tried to
move Jackson around,
including playing him
as the inside slot, an
uncommon place for a
player of his size (6 feet 5,
230 pounds) and stature.
Offensive coordinator
Mike Sullivan said they're
working on new ways to
utilize Jackson and the
best solution includes
play-calling and design.
"It's a matter of finding
the right mixture because
you can move him
around. But then you say,
'Wait a minute, if we're
putting him in this spot,
then it's 100 percent pass
if you check the run-pass
ratio,'?" Sullivan said. "So
maybe you better run
out of that. We're focused
on (freeing up Jackson)
because that is a guy we
are counting on."
Jackson, a nine-year vet-
eran, still leads the team
in receptions (46) and
yards (662) and is on pace
for his third consecutive
1,000-yard season. He said
while he still wants the
ball, he's not frustrated by
the double-teams because
it means a teammate
should be open.
"We just want to move
the ball," Jackson said.
"We want to come away
with points. We want to
do the right things on
offense, and that's all
we're asked to do is score
points. However that gets
done with whomever it
gets done, we'll be happy
with that."
Rookie quarterback
Mike Glennon said with
Jackson often having two
defenders responsible for
him, it has been tough
to get him the ball. So
Glennon said has looked
at others in one-on-one
coverage. There aren't
many proven options
after Jackson, though
Tiquan Underwood has
eight catches over the past
three games starting for
Williams and rookie tight
end TimWright has 10.
"As a receiver being on
the other side of a guy
like Vincent Jackson, you
know a lot of attention is
going to be focused on
him," Underwood said.
"So you have to step up,
and when the ball comes
your way, be ready for
your opportunities."
Glennon tried a deep
ball to Jackson in the third
quarter Monday against
the Dolphins. But he
was double-covered and
didn't appear to expect
the ball, slowing up on
what turned out to be
an overthrow. Another
intended pass to Jackson
was intercepted.
"We won't shy away
from Vince at all. We'll still
look to get him the ball
as many times as possi-
ble," Glennon said. "But
overall, (I've) just got to
go through my reads and
throw the ball where my
eyes take me.
"If teams want to
double him, we know we'll
just have to sometimes
throw to other guys and
find other ways to get
Vince the ball."


Around the league: Atlanta
Falcons running back Jason Snelling
will not play today atTampa Bay
after being arrested on misdemeanor
charges of marijuana possession and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Coach Mike Smith said he was
"disappointed in what has transpired
over the last 48 hours'."


FOUR-DOWN TERRITORY
Game after game, NFL quarterbacks get sacked, get hurt and miss starts. Of the 15 games on this week's schedule, nine -60percent- feature at least one team
that has been forced to change its quarterback because of injury this season. Amid those regular reminders of the dangers facing players at the sport's marquee position, the
league's competition committee will take a look this offseason at whether to expand rules that protect the QB. (By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press)


I Consider: Nine of the 15 games St. Louis, one of the two teams Seven teams with sole posses- Moon attributes spread offenses,
on this week's schedule -60 | with a bye this week, lost its No. sion of first place in their division with empty backfields and fewer
percent- feature at least one I 1, Sam Bradford, for the season. entering today started the same players hanging back to help
team that has been forced to change Bradford, the 2010 top overall draft pick guy behind center every week: New in pass protection, as a major reason
QBs because of injury this season. who tore a ligament in his left knee England (Tom Brady), Indianapolis games are averaging 2.65 sacks, on
The committee will review last month, is one of nine quarterbacks (Andrew Luck), Cincinnati (Andy pace for the highest rate since the 2.67
position-by-position injury data and on injured reserve in 2013, the second Dalton), Kansas City (Alex Smith), New in 1986.
go over video from games, a regular most through 10 weeks in any of the Orleans (Drew Brees), Detroit (Matthew And yet Moon also sees a significant
process between seasons. past 15 seasons, according to STATS. Stafford) and Seattle (Russell Wilson). upgrade in the way the position is safe-
"Currently the quarterback is as A year ago, only one QB had gone So has Denver (Peyton Manning), guarded today, compared with when
protected now as he's ever been,";' Dean on IR by this point in the season. which at 8-1 has the league's second- he was in the NFL from 1984-2000.
Blandino, the NFL's vice president of Indeed, 2012 was about as healthy as best record but is in second place in the "No question, it's a lot safer, because
officiating said in a telephone interview it gets for quarterbacks: 20 of 32 NFL AFC West behind the unbeaten Chiefs some of the hits we took back in the
this week,"but I think that's been the teams started the same one in every entering tonight's showdown. day they could still drive us into the
case for eight or nine years. game, the highest percentage for a full, "On most teams, there's a huge turf when they hit us,"he said. "Didn't
"Should he always get protection non-strike season since the AFL-NFL drop-off from the starter to the always cause an injury, but made you
from low hits or head hits, regardless merger in 1970. With nearly half of backup,"said Hall of Fame quarterback a little more antsy about taking hits.
of the posture he's presenting? Part of this season still to play, the number of Warren Moon. "It's a watered-down The guys these days don't really have
the conversation will be: Should that teams able to rely on one starter at that position, because there's not a lot of to put up with it. I don't think there's
protection be expanded to all times key spot already is down to 20. great guys after the top 15 or so. When much more you can do. It's as good as
when the quarterback has the ball in Already using three QBs this season you get a good guy, you want to keep it's going to get, unless you put flags
the pocket?" are Buffalo, Cleveland and Green Bay. him healthy'." on them'."


SPOTLIGHT:




Fins aren't fini just yet

By OMAR KELLY
SOUTH FLORIDA SUN SENTINEL
DAVIE Stop throw-
ing dirt on the Miami
Dolphins' coffin for a
minute. i
You can pick out the "
team's final suit, reserve
the hearse, and select thet
caskets. But despite the
nightmarish bullying saga, i i
and despite five losses
in the last six games, Joe i
Philbin's team still has a i
pulse.
The Dolphins (4-5)
actually have a decent
shot of making it to
the postseason despite
coming off what can be
argued as the worst week AP PHOTO
in Dolphins' history.
tMaybe after a loss to the Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill has time to throw against Tampa Bay last Monday
San Diego Chargers today night, not always the case in the team's 22-19 loss and not always the case this season.
or after the Dec. I road
game against the New plays and won the game. Problem is the Dolphins and 357.1 yards (20th) per
York Jets (5-4), who are in 'Another team that haven't played well for two game, has been a letdown.
possession of the AFC's is ahead of us is on our months. What's most trou- Teams often take on the









possessgionst. They "T eesaltoffobl h ofne hc fr6siue.
final playoff spot, we can schedule twice," Philbin bling is the fact Philbin's personality of their head
safely say the season is said, referring to the Jets. squad lacks an identity., coach. These Dolphins are
over for Philbin's team. If the Dolphins can In previous seasons bland, much like Philbin,
But right now the beat the Chargers (4-5) the defense was at least who began his tenure with
Dolphins still have a at home today, triumph respectable, or Miami was the Dolphins promising a
pulse, and a playoff over the Jets twice in more physical than most sound, smart and tough
berth could possibly save December, beat the Bills of its opponents. Neither football team.
Philbin's job. in Buffalo, and then pro- is accurate anymore. Twenty five games
"Three of the teams duce at least one win over Miami's depleted into his tenure he hasn't
that are ahead of us, we've the Carolina Panthers, offensive line is struggling delivered on any of those
beaten two of them," Pittsburgh Steelers or in every possible aspect, principles.
Philbin said, referring to Patriots, Philbin's team and the defensive line "We've demonstrated
the Indianapolis Colts would produce the has allowed 1,072 rushing (them) throughout the
and Cincinnati Bengals, franchise's first winning yards and 10 touchdowns course of the season at
division leaders in the season since 2008. in nine games. The times, but not consistently
AFC South and North. And nine wins might be Dolphins only allowed 11 enough," Philbin said.
B"One of the teams we enough to back into the rushing touchdowns all of "We've got to put together
played a competitive final AFC wild-card spot. last season. a consistent performance
game against. They "There's a lot of football The offense, which for 60 minutes."
certainly deserved to win," left to be played," Philbin averages 303.9 yards More like 60 minutes
Philbin said, referring to said. "We have to focus on per game (ranked 30th), in at least five of the next
the second-half collapse this one game. We have to has been a disaster. The seven games, or it'll be
against the New England play well against the San defense, which is allowing safe to start shoveling dirt
Patriots. "They made more Diego Chargers." 23.2 points (14th in NFL) on the Dolphins again.


GRIDIRON GRID

GAME OF THE WEEK
Kansas City (9-0) at Denver (8-1) 8:35 p.m. NBC Broncos by 81/2
AFC's best play twice in three weeks. Winner: Broncos. Manning has home edge he will not have Dec. I at Arrowhead. Fantasy football: Chiefs WR Donnie Avery will surprise.
GAME OF THE WEAK
Atlanta (2-7) atTampa Bay (1-8) 1 p.m. FOX, 99.3 FM Pick
This used to be a big game. Winner: Falcons. Atlanta has won eight l0in the division rivalry. FF: WR Harry Douglas had 149 yards and a TD in the Falcons'31-23 victory Oct. 20.
AROUND THE STATE
Arizona (5-4) at Jacksonville (1-8) 1p.m. NoTV Cardinals by18
Well, Jaguars will not go winless. Winner: Cardinals. Arizona isn't great but has more players and better incentive. FF: Cecil Shorts has a tough matchup vs. Cardinals secondary.
GeSan Diego (4-5) at Miami (4-5) 4:05 p.m. CBS, 96.1 FM Chargers by 1 /2
The Chargers go east. Again. Winner: Chargers. Dolphins' line woes make them unattractive. FF: Expect Philip Rivers to make more plays than Mike iglennon did last Monday.
OTHER GAMES
Cleveland (4-5) at Cincinnati (6-4) 1 p.m. No TV Bengals by 6
Bengals have dropped two close ones in a row. Winner: Bengals. Erratic Andy Dalton needs to bounce back at home. FF: What ever happened to Bengals WR Marvin Jones?
Oakland (3-6) at Houston (2-7) 1 p.m. No TV Texans by 7
Texans haven't won since Week 2. Winner: Texans. If Houston can't stop slide with Gary Kubiak returning, then Texans might lose out. FF: Should be a big day for Ben Tate owners.
*Washington (3-6) at Philadelphia (5-5) 1 p.m. No TV Eagles by 41/2
Eagles can take division lead with first home win. Winner: Eagles. Michael Vick might not take another Eagles snap. FF: The DeSean and LeSean Show is the NFL'S best 1-2.
Baltimore (4-5) at Chicago (5-4) 1 p.m. No TV Bears by 3
Josh McCown, who probably should've started last week, gets the call at QB. Winner: Bears. FF: Not even the Bears' porous front can make Ravens RB Ray Rice look good.
N.Y. Jets (5-4) at Buffalo (3-7) 1 p.m. No TV Bills byl1
After two-year hiatus, Jets again look like Rex Ryan team. Winner: Jets. Bills won at home last year but will not duplicate. FF: Jets TE Jeff Cumberland might get red-zone love.
Detroit (6-3) at Pittsburgh (3-6) 1 p.m. No TV Lions by 21/2
Lions in control. Winner: Lions. If Matthew Stafford can win at Soldier Field, Heinz Field is doable. FF: Wrong on Reggie Bush last week. Shame on me, will not do it again.
San Francisco (6-3) at New Orleans (7-2) 4:25 p.m. FOX Saints by 3
Panthers made S.F look vulnerable. Winner: Saints. FF: Saints WR Marques Colton went from questionable to 101 yards and a TD on seven catches last week.
Minnesota (2-7) at Seattle (9-1) 4:25 p.m. No TV Seahawks by 12
With home field in their grasp, the Seahawks will not let up. Winner: Seahawks. They learned their lesson vs. Tampa Bay. FF: WR Percy Harvin makes Seattle debut vs. ex-team.
Green Bay (5-4) at N.Y. Giants (3-6) 4:25 p.m. No TV Giants by 41/2
Scott Tolzien makes first NFL/start. Winner: Giants. The way Packers play defense, Aaron Rodgers is irreplaceable. FF: Giants RB Andre Brown made big debut last week.
MONDAY NIGHT
~New England (7-2) at Carolina (6-3) 8:40 p.m. ESPN Panthers by 21/2


Keeping Coach Ron Rivera was Panthers'best decision in years. Winner: Patriots. Carolina defense is stout, but Bill Belichick's 9-3 post-bye record for New England prevails.
Byes: Dallas, St. Louis
Earl Bloom, Orange CountyRegister (2013 record: 87-50)


I


sion), WR Mario Manningham (knee), RB
Bruce Miller (hamstring), S Eric Reid (con-
cussion), LB Dan Skuta (foot). SAINTS: OUT
S KennyVaccaro (concussion),TE Benjamin
Watson (concussion).
GREEN BAY PACKERS at NEW YORK
GIANTS PACKERS: OUT: CB Casey Hay-
ward (hamstring), QB Aaron Rodgers (col-
larbone). QUESTIONABLE: T Don Barclay
(knee), LB Andy Mulumba (ankle). GIANTS:
OUT: CBCoreyWebster (groin,ankle). QUES-
TIONABLE: RB Brandon Jacobs (hamstring,
knee), DEJason Pierre-Paul (shoulder).


Page 8 www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


PICK SIX
Six running backs who could reach
1,500 yards rushing this season:
SLESEAN MCCOY, EAGLES:
McCoy's 184 yards in Week 1
against Washington stands
as the top rushing day this season,
and his 932 yards lead the NFL this
season.
2 MARSHAWN LYNCH,
SEAHAWKS: He has 871 yards,
second in the NFL, through 10
games and needs to pick things up
down the stretch. And he can his
27 carries of 10 or more yards lead
the NFL, according to STATS.
ALFRED MORRIS, REDSKINS:
He finished with a franchise-re-
cord 1,613 yards as a rookie,
and has 825 yards after nine games.
His average of 91.7 trails only McCoy
and is a tad shy of what's needed.
S ADRIAN PETERSON,
S VIKINGS: He probably
won't come anywhere near
replicating his 2,097 yards in 2012.
Peterson needs 102 per game the rest
of the way for 1,500, within reach,
especially if he gets a bit more than
the 19.2 carries he's been averaging.
5 JAMAAL CHARLES, CHIEFS:
Last season, he ran for 1,509
yards after missing most of
2011 with a knee injury. He is tied for
the lowest percentage of runs stuffed
for a loss, 4.1, among players with at
least 120 carries, according to STATS.
6 EDDIE LACY, PACKERS: He has
only 669 yards but leads the
league in rush attempts per
game at 19.8, and Green Bay's last
four opponents Atlanta, Dallas,
Pittsburgh, Chicago all rank
among the league's bottom six in
yards rushing allowed.
-Associated Press


INJURY REPORT
NEW YORK JETS at BUFFALO BILLS -
JETS: OUT: WR Jeremy Kerley (elbow), LB
Garrett McIntyre (knee). BILLS: DOUBTFUL:
WR Stevie Johnson (groin), WR Robert
Woods (ankle).
ATLANTA FALCONS at TAMPA BAY BUC-
CANEERS FALCONS: OUT: DE Malliciah
Goodman (calf). QUESTIONABLE:WR Harry
Douglas (knee), TE Tony Gonzalez (toe), DT
Peria Jerry (toe), DT Corey Peters (knee), RB
Jason Snelling (knee, not injury related).
BUCCANEERS: OUT: G Carl Nicks (foot).
QUESTIONABLE: DE Da'Quan Bowers (con-
cussion),WR Chris Owusu (foot).
DETROIT LIONS at PITTSBURGH STEEL-
ERS LIONS: OUT RB Montell Owens
(knee). DOUBTFUL: CB Bill Bentley (knee),
WR Nate Burleson (forearm). QUESTION-
ABLE: DE Ziggy Ansah (ankle), T Corey Hil-
liard (knee). STEELERS: OUT: S Shamarko
Thomas (ankle). DOUBTFUL: LB LaMarr
Woodley (calf). QUESTIONABLE: G Ramon
Foster (ankle), DE Brett Keisel (foot).
WASHINGTON REDSKINS at PHILADEL-
PHIA EAGLES REDSKINS: QUESTION-
ABLE: DE Stephen Bowen (knee), S Jose
Gumbs (ankle), CB DeAngelo Hall (foot).
EAGLES: OUT: LB Jake Knott (hamstring), S
Earl Wolff (knee). QUESTIONABLE: CB Brad-
ley Fletcher (pectoral), LB Mychal Kendricks
(knee),TJason Peters (quadriceps, pectoral),
QB Michael Vick (hamstring).
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at MIAMI DOL-
PHINS CHARGERS: OUT: T King Dunlap
(neck). QUESTIONABLE: S Jahleel Addae
(ankle), C Nick Hardwick (neck), LB Jarret
Johnson (hamstring), RB Le'Ron McClain
(ankle), WR Eddie Royal (toe). DOLPHINS:
OUTT Jonathan Martin (illness),TWillYeat-
man (knee). QUESTIONABLE: CB Dimitri Pat-
Sterson (groin), C Mike Pouncey (illness),WR
MikeWallace (hamstring).
BALTIMORE RAVENS at CHICAGO BEARS
- RAVENS: QUESTIONABLE: WR Marion
Brown (knee), S James Ihedigbo (toe), DT
Haloti Ngata (knee), LB Daryl Smith (thigh),
CB Jimmy Smith (groin), CB LardariusWebb
(groin). BEARS: OUT: LB Lance Briggs (shoul-
der), QB Jay Cutler (ankle), DTJeremiah Rat-
liff (groin). DOUBTFUL: C Patrick Mannelly
(calf), DE Shea McClellin (hamstring). QUES-
TIONABLE:TE Martellus Bennett (ankle).
CLEVELAND BROWNS at CINCINNATI
BENGALS BROWNS: OUT: TE MarQueis
Gray (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: G Ja-
son Pinkston (ankle). BENGALS: OUT: DT
Devon Still (elbow), G Kevin Zeitler (foot).
DOUBTFUL: S Chris Crocker (hamstring), LB
Rey Maualuga (knee). QUESTIONABLE: LB
James Harrison (calf).
OAKLAND RAIDERS at HOUSTON TEX-
ANS RAIDERS: OUT: S Tyvon Branch
(ankle), WR Juron Criner (shoulder), CB DJ
Hayden (groin), RB Darren McFadden (ham-
string). QUESTIONABLE: LB Kaluka Maiava
(ribs), T Matt McCants (toe), QB Terrelle
Pryor (knee). TEXANS: OUT: TE Ryan Griffin
(concussion), CB Elbert Mack (hamstring,
groin). QUESTIONABLE: CB Kareem Jack-
son (chest), P Shane Lechler (illness), LB Joe
Mays (knee, abdomen), LB Mike Mohamed
(hamstring).
ARIZONA CARDINALS at JACKSONVILLE
JAGUARS CARDINALS: QUESTIONABLE:
LB John Abraham (hamstring), WR Michael
Floyd (shoulder), WR Brittan Golden (ham-
string), LB Dontay Moch (illness). JAGUARS:
OUT WR Stephen Burton (concussion), WR
Stephen Williams (Achilles). DOUBTFUL: G
Will Rackley(head). QUESTIONABLE: LB Paul
Posluszny (concussion).
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS at DENVER BRON-
COS CHIEFS: NONE. BRONCOS: DOUBT-
FUL: CB Champ Bailey (foot). QUESTION-
ABLE: LB Nate Irving (shoulder).
MINNESOTA VIKINGS at SEATTLE SEA-
HAWKS -VIKINGS: OUT: DT Letroy Guion
(chest), TE Kyle Rudolph (foot). DOUBTFUL:
RB Matt Asiata (shoulder). QUESTIONABLE:
TE Rhett Ellison (ankle), DT Fred Evans
(knee). SEAHAWKS: OUT: CB Brandon
Browner (groin). QUESTIONABLE: DT Tony
McDaniel (hamstring)..
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS at NEW ORLE-
ANS SAINTS 49ERS: OUT: DT Ray Mc-
Donald (ankle), WR Quinton Patton (foot).
DOUBTFUL: TE Garrett Celek (hamstring).
QUESTIONABLE: TE Vernon Davis (concus-






The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 9


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
AUTO RACING
2p.m.
NBC Formula One, United States Grand
Prix, at Austin,Texas
3p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford Eco-
Boost 400, at Homestead, Fla.
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
FOX- Atlanta at Tampa Bay
4:05 p.m.
CBS San Diego at Miami
4:25 p.m.
FOX- San Francisco at New Orleans
8p.m.
NBC -Kansas City at Denver
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
11p.m.
NBCSN Playoffs, division finals, teams
TBD (same-daytape)
FIGURE SKATING
4:30 p.m.
NBC- ISU Grand Prix: Skate France, at Paris
(same-day tape)
GOLF
2p.m.
TGC PGATour, OHL Classic, final round,
at Playa del Carmen, Mexico
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4p.m.
FSN Long Beach St. at Kansas St.
5p.m.
ESPN2 Michigan at Iowa St.
FS1 -Towson atVillanova
7p.m.
ESPN2 Robert Morris at Kentucky
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3p.m.
FS1 -California at Georgetown

Glantz-Culver Line
NFL
Today
FAVORITE 0 T 0/U UNDERDOG
at Tampa Bay +1 Pk(431/2) Atlanta
N.Y Jets Pk 1 (41) atBuffalo
Detroit 3 21/2(461/2) at Pittsburgh
at Philadelphia 3 41/2 (53) Washington
San Diego 1 11/2(451/2) at Miami
at Chicago 3 3 (44) Baltimore
atCincinnati 6 6 (4112) Cleveland
at Houston 7 9 (41) Oakland
Arizona 61/2 81/2 (41) atJ'ville
at Denver 8 8 (49) Kansas City
at Seattle 131/2121/2(46) Minnesota
at NewOrleans 3 3 (48) San Francisco
at N.Y Giants 4 4 (42) Green Bay
Monday
at Carolina 21/2 21/2 (46) New England
NCAA BASKETBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
atWestVirginia 131/2 Duquesne
at Notre Dame 11 Indiana St.
atUMass 12 Youngstown St.
at Kansas St. 13 Long Beach St.
at Baylor 16 La.-Lafayette
at Clemson 6 South Carolina
Michigan 11/2 at Iowa St.
atVillanova 121/2 Towson
at Illinois 12 Bradley
at Maryland 101/2 Oregon St
at Ohio 61/2 Valparaiso
at Boston College 19 FAU
atGonzaga 20 Oakland
at Northwestern 10 Illinois St.
Milwaukee 41/2 at N. Illinois
at Kent St. 14 St. Peter's
at Denver 11/2 Stanford
at North Carolina 15 Belmont
at Morehead St. 5 Marshall
at Purdue 13 Rider
at Florida St. 22 UT-Martin
atWashington 13 E.Washington
atUConn 161/2 Boston U.
at Indiana 10 Stony Brook
at Kentucky 20 Robert Morris
NBA
FAVORITE LINE 0/U UNDERDOG
atToronto 11/2 (194) Portland
Memphis 3 (192) at Sacramento
at LA. Lakers 11/2(2051/2) Detroit
NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
Columbus -145 at Ottawa +125
St. Louis -120 atWashington +100
at N.Y Rangers -120 Los Angeles +100
atChicago -140 San Jose +120
atVancouver -160 Dallas +140
atMinnesota -190 Winnipeg +165

Pro basketball
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic W L Pet GB
Philadelphia 5 6 .455 -
Toronto 4 6 .400 1/2
Brooklyn 3 5 .375 1/2
Boston 4 7 .364 1
NewYork 3 6 .333 1
Southeast W L Pet GB
Miami 7 3 .700 -
Atlanta 6 4 .600 1
Charlotte 5 5 .500 2
Orlando 4 6 .400 3
Washington 2 7 .222 41/2
Central W L Pet GB
Indiana 9 1 .900 -
Chicago 5 3 .625 3
Detroit 3 5 .375 5
Cleveland 4 7 .364 51/2
Milwaukee 2 7 .222 61/2


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest W L Pct GB
San Antonio 9 1 .900 -
Houston 7 4 .636 21/2
Dallas 6 4 .600 3
Memphis 4 5 .444 412
NewOrleans 4 6 .400 5
Northwest W L Pet GB
Portland 7 2 .778 -
Oklahoma City 6 3 .667 1
Minnesota 7 4 .636 1
Denver 4 5 .444 3
Utah 1 9 .100 61/2
Pacific W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 6 3 .667 -
Golden State 6 3 .667 -
Phoenix 5 4 .556 1
L.A. Lakers 4 7 .364 3
Sacramento 2 6 .250 31/2
Friday's results
Indiana 104, Milwaukee 77
Chicago 96,Toronto 80
Portland 109, Boston 96
Charlotte 86, Cleveland 80
HEAT 110, Dallas 104
Atlanta 113, Philadelphia 103
Denver 117, Minnesota 113
Brooklyn 100, Phoenix 98, OT
San Antonio 91, Utah 82
Memphis 89, LA. Lakers 86
Detroit 97, Sacramento 90
Saturday's results
Dallas 108, MAGIC 100
Cleveland 103,Washington 96,OT
HEAT 97, Charlotte 81
Atlanta 110, NewYork90
Chicago 110, Indiana 94
Minnesota 106, Boston 88
Houston 122, Denver 111
New Orleans 135, Philadelphia 98
Oklahoma City 92, Milwaukee 79
Utah at Golden State, late
Brooklyn at LA. Clippers, late
Today's games
Portland at Toronto, 1 p.m.
Memphis at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's games
Portland at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas,8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Utah, 9 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

Pro football
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East W L T Pet PF PA
NewEngland 7 2 0 .778 234 175
N.Y.Jets 5 4 0 .556 169 231
DOLPHINS 4 5 0 .444 193 209
Buffalo 3 70 .300 199 259
South W L T Pet PF PA
Indianapolis 7 3 0 .700 252 220
Tennessee 4 6 0 .400 227 226
Houston 2 7 0 .222 170 248
JAGUARS 1 8 0 .111 115 291
North W L T Pet PF PA
Cincinnati 6 4 0 .600 234 186
Cleveland 4 5 0 .444 172 197
Baltimore 4 5 0 .444 188 189
Pittsburgh 3 6 0 .333 179 218
West W L T Pet PF PA
KansasCity 9 0 01.000 215 111
Denver 8 10 .889 371 238
SanDiego 4 5 0 .444 212 202
Oakland 36 0 .333 166 223
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East W L T Pet PF PA
Dallas 5 5 0 500 274 258
Philadelphia 5 5 0 .500 252 244
N.Y.Giants 3 6 0 .333 165 243
Washington 3 6 0 .333 230 287
South W L T Pet PF PA
NewOrleans 7 2 0 .778 265 163
Carolina 6 3 0 .667 214 115
Atlanta 2 7 0 .222 186 251
BUCS 1 8 0 .111 146 209
North W L T Pet PF PA
Detroit 6 3 0 .667 238 216
Chicago 5 4 0 .556 259 247
Green Bay 5 4 0 .556 245 212
Minnesota 2 7 0 .222 220 279
West W L T Pet PF PA
Seattle 9 1 0 900 265 159
San Francisco 6 3 0 .667 227 155
Arizona 5 4 0 .556 187 198
St. Louis 4 6 0 .400 224 234
Thursday's result
Indianapolis 30,Tennessee 27
Today's games
Baltimore at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 1 p.m.
N.Y Jets at Buffalo, 1p.m.
Atlanta at BUCS, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Arizona at JAGUARS, 1 p.m.
San Diego at DOLPHINS, 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at NewOrleans, 4:25 p.m.
Green BayatN.Y.Giants,4:25 p.m.
Kansas Cityat Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Dallas, St. Louis
Monday's game
New England at Carolina, 8:40 p.m.
CFLPLAYOFFS
Today's games
DIVISION FINALS
East Division
Hamilton atToronto, 1 p.m.
West Division
Saskatchewan at Calgary, 4:30 p.m.


Nov. 24
GREYCUP
Division finalswinners,TBD, 6p.m.

Pro hockey
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
LIGHTNING 20 14 6 0 28 64 50
Boston 19 12 6 1 25 53 36
Toronto 20 12 7 1 25 57 47
Detroit 21 9 5 7 25 54 60
Montreal 21 10 9 2 22 52 45
Ottawa 19 8 7 4 20 57 58
PANTHERS 20 412 4 12 42 69
Buffalo 22 5 16 1 11 41 68
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Pittsburgh 20 12 8 0 24 56 47
Washington 20 11 8 1 23 65 58
N.Y Rangers 19 10 9 0 20 42 49
Carolina 20 8 8 4 20 39 55
NewJersey 20 7 8 5 19 42 49
N.Y Islanders 21 8 10 3 19 61 68
Philadelphia 19 7 10 2 16 35 48
Columbus 19 6 10 3 15 48 56
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Chicago 20 13 3 4 30 73 60
St. Louis 18 13 2 3 29 65 42
Colorado 18 14 4 0 28 58 37
Minnesota 20 12 4 4 28 53 43
Dallas 19 10 7 2 22 56 55
Winnipeg 21 10 9 2 22 56 59
Nashville 20 9 9 2 20 46 63
Pacific Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Anaheim 22 15 5 2 32 71 56
San Jose 20 13 2 5 31 71 45
Phoenix 21 14 4 3 31 73 66
LosAngeles 20 13 6 1 27 57 46
Vancouver 21 11 7 3 25 55 56
Calgary 19 610 3 15 52 71
Edmonton 21 4 15 2 10 49 81
NOTE: 2 pointsfor win, 1 pointforOT loss.
Friday's results
Carolina 3, Anaheim 2, SO
Montreal 3, Columbus 2, SO
Washington 4, Detroit 3, SO
Winnipeg 3, Philadelphia 2, SO
Buffalo 3,Toronto 1
Los Angeles 2, New Jersey 0
Pittsburgh 4, Nashville 1
Ottawa 4, Boston 2
Minnesota 3, PANTHERS 2
San Jose 3, Edmonton 1
Saturday's results
N.Y Islanders 5, Detroit 4, SO
Toronto 4, Buffalo 2
N.Y Rangers 1, Montreal 0
NewJersey4, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 4, Carolina 2
Nashville 7, Chicago 2
Phoenix 6, LIGHTNING 3
PANTHERS at Colorado, late
Edmonton at Calgary, late
Today's games
Columbus at Ottawa, 1 p.m.
St. LouisatWashington,6 p.m.
Los Angeles at N.Y Rangers, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Dallas atVancouver, 8 p.m.
Monday's games
Boston at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary atWinnipeg, 8 p.m.
ECHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA
Wheeling 12 6 5 0 1 13 32 31
Reading 10 6 4 0 0 12 26 19
Elmira 11 3 8 0 0 6 25 37
North Division
GPW L OL SLPts GF GA
Evansville 10 7 1 0 2 16 31 29
Cincinnati 11 8 3 0 0 16 42 33
FortWayne 11 5 4 0 2 12 34 38
Toledo 11 4 5 2 0 10 32 37
Kalamazoo 9 4 4 0 1 9 27 27
South Division
GPW L OL SLPts GF GA
Florida 1410 2 1 1 22 57 38
South Carolinal12 9 1 1 1 20 40 29
Orlando 14 8 5 0 1 17 45 38
Greenville 13 4 7 1 1 10 26 36
Gwinnett 13 4 9 00 8 29 42
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Mountain Division
GPW L OL SLPts GF GA
Alaska 12 9 3 0 0 18 47 19
Colorado 9 6 2 1 0 13 30 21
Idaho 11 5 4 1 1 12 34 40
Utah 9 3 4 1 1 8 19 26
Pacific Division
GPW L OL SLPts GF GA
Ontario 12 7 1 1 3 18 38 31
Stockton 11 7 4 0 0 14 36 27
SanFrancisco 1l 4 5 1 1 10 19 34
LasVegas 11 4 7 0 0 8 24 35
Bakersfield 11 1 9 0 1 3 16 42
Note: 2 points a for win, 1 pointforOTor
shootout loss.
Friday's results
Florida 3, Gwinnett 0
Wheeling 5, Elmira 1
Kalamazoo 2, Reading 1
Cincinnati 2, Greenville 1, SO
FortWayne 5,Toledo 4, OT
Orlando 5, Evansville 4, SO
Idaho 4, San Francisco 3, SO
Ontario 4, Stockton 1


SNHL ROUNDUP
Lightn i
Las Vegas 4, Alaska 3
Saturday's results
Wheeling 5, Elmira 4 Lg i* L i
Florida 4, South Carolina 1
Kalamazoo 5, Cincinnati 2
FortWayne 4, Greenville 3, OT
Evansville 3, Orlando2 2v p
Colorado at Utah, late
Ontario at Bakersfield, late v e p
Idaho at San Francisco, late
Las Vegas at Alaska, late
Today'sgames B THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gwinnett at South Carolina, 3p.m. I
Ontario at San Francisco, 5:15p.m. GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) L
Reading atToledo, 5:15 p.m. MrtN HA nzAhA
Bakersfield at Stockton, 7 p.m. Martin Hanzal had AT K
LasVegas at Alaska, 7:05 p.m. a goal and three assists W
WHO: Ta
AHL and Lauri Korpikoski had at Los A
EASTERN CONFERENCE a goal and two assists
Atlantic Division and the Phoenix Coyotes WHEN:
S GPW LOLSLPtsGF GA
Manchester 1711 3 1 2 25 54 43 defeated the Tampa Bay WHERE
St. John's 17 7 7 1 2 17 48 49 Lightning 6-3 on Saturday LosAng
Providence 14 7 5 0 2 16 52 48 TV n
Portland 12 5 5 0 2 12 34 34 night. TV: Sun
Worcester 13 5 7 1 0 11 29 41 Michael Stone, Mike RADIO:
East Division Ribeiro, Connor Murphy
GPLW 1015SLPts GF GA
Binghamton 1511 4 0 0 22 57 45 and Shane Doan also PAN'
W-B/Scranton15 10 3 0 2 22 57 42 scored for Phoenix. Radim
Syracuse 15 9 4 1 120 49 39 AT C,
Norfolk 17 8 6 0 3 19 40 40 Vrbata had three assists. A
Hershey 14 5 5 2 2 14 44 43 Richard Panik, J.T. WHO: F
Northeast Division
S GPW L OL SL Pts GF GA Brown and Alex Killorn at Vanac
springfield 1410 3 0 1 21 38 32 scored for the Lightning. WHEN:
Slbany 16 9 6 0 119 41 39 The Coyotes handed ERE
hartford 16 8 6 0 2 18 48 55 WHERE:
Adirondack 15 7 6 0 2 16 36 38 the Eastern Conference- Vancou
B13ridgeport 14 4 8 1 1 10 36 51 leading Lightning
S WESTERN CONFERENCE TV: Fox
S Midwest Division their first loss in eight
S GPW L OL SLPts GF GA games againstWestern
Grand Rapids 1610 4 1 1 22 62 44 p ",
Milwaukee 14 8 3 2 1 19 41 37 Conference teams this Rang
Chicago 16 9 6 0 1 19 43 43 season. InMontrea
Rockford 18 9 8 1 0 19 54 61 o
iowa 14 6 8 0 0 12 35 40 COYOTES 6, LIGHTNING 3 York's four
S North Division LIGHTNING 0 2 1- 3 Montreal a
GP W L OL SLPts GF GA Phoenix 2 2 2 :6 22savesf
Rochester 15 7 4 2 218 48 54 Phoenix 2 2 2 6 22savesf
LakeErie 15 8 6 0 1 17 43 42 FirstPeriod-1, Phoenix, Stone 6 (Ribeiro, becometh
Toronto 14 7 6 1 0 15 41 39 Rundblad), 15:58 (pp). 2, Phoenix, Han-
Hamilton 16 6 7 0 3 15 39 51 zal 6 (Korpikoski), 16:55. Penalties-Ek- shutoutin
Utica 14 2 10 1 1 6 29 49 man-Larsson, Pho (boarding), 8:15; Sustr, a 5-0 win
West Division TB (tripping), 14:29; Killorn, TB (slashing),
GPW L OLSLPts GF GA 20:00.
Abbotsford 1913 5 0 1 27 64 57 Second Period-3, Phoenix, Ribeiro 6 Mapl
Texas 16 9 5 2 0 20 60 43 (Hanzal, Vrbata), 1:48 (pp). 4, LIGHTNING, InToront,
OklahomaCity16 7 7 0 2 16 40 46 Panik 1 (Johnson, Killorn), 16:19. 5, IT n,
San Antonio 16 7 8 0 1 15 41 45 Phoenix, Murphy 1 (Vrbata, Korpikoski), twiceand
Charlotte 15 5 9 0 1 11 37 50 17:05.6, LIGHTNING, J.Brown 1 (Purcell, winnerand
Note: 2 points a for win, 1 point for OT or Sustr), 17:55. Penalties-Crombeen, TB
shootout loss. (tripping), 1:00; Moss, Pho (holding), 14:13. three-gain
S Friday's results Third Period-7, Phoenix, Doan 10 (Han- Buffalo.
Worcester 3, St. John's 2,SO zal, Vrbata), 1:37. 8, LIGHTNING, Killorn 6
Rochester 4, Utica 2 (St. Louis, Sustr), 18:58. 9, Phoenix, Kor-
pringfield 3,Bridgeport 2 pikoski 4 (Hanzal), 19:41 (en). Penalties- Islan
Albany 3, Hartford 0 None.
Grand Rapids 5, Rockford 3 Shots on Goal-LIGHTNING 4-12-14- SO: In Ur
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 5, Syracuse3 30. Phoenix 11-10-9-30. stoppedall
Binghamton4,Adirondack2 ePower-play opportunities-LIGHTNING shootouta
Norfolk4, Providence 3 0 of 2; Phoenix 2 of 3.
Portland 4, Manchester 1 Goalies-LIGHTNING, Bishop (14 NewYorkc
Lake Erie 5,Hamilton 3 shots-11 saves), Lindback 1-4-0 (1:48 Wings.
Abbotsford 5, Oklahoma City4 second, 15-13). Phoenix, Smith 12-3-3
rhicago 4, Milwaukee 3 (30-27).
San Antonio 5, Iowa2 A-12,562 (17,125). T-2:25. Referees- Devil
Saturday's results Jean Hebert, Mike Leggo. Linesmen-
Toronto 4,Chrot 1 Newark, N.
Toronto 4, Charlotte 1 Shane Heyer,John Grandt. Newar,
Worcester 2, St. John's 1, SO goals and I
Springfield 2, Portland 1, SO
Hamilton 3, Lake Erie 2, SO Blues 4, Hurricanes 2: In to leadthe
Albany2 Syracuse 1SO St. Louis, Alexander Steen scored his
Hartford 4, Bridgeport 1 Arou
Manchester 3, Norfolk2 league-leading 17th goal and also Arou
Texas 2, Utica 1 added an assist to lead the Blues to a AnaheimD
$~inghamton 7, Rochester 3
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3, Hershey 1 win over Carolina. Holland an
Chicago 4, Grand Rapids 3 Maple Leai
Oklahoma City 4, Abbotsford 1 Predators 7, Blackhawks Jesse Black
Rockford 4, San Antonio 2
Milwaukee 1, Iowa 0 2: In Nashville, Tenn., rookie Marek was a seco
* Today's games Mazanec made 39 saves for his first Leafs in 20
Portland at Providence, 3:05 p.m.
Texas atToronto, 5p.m. NHL victory and the Predators beat NHL roster.
IChicago. spent the
Transactions
BASKETBALL Trapped? Get away from It all
National Basketball Association
NBA Suspended Miami G Mario ,NovembeP
Chalmers one game for throwing a forearm .
Bnd making contactwith the head of Dallas Golf Special t)" 7
F: Dirk Nowitzki during Friday's game. includescarT hotdog &chips
I FOOTBALL
National Football League :: 9 holes 5 -,O
SCHICAGO BEARS Signed DE Cheta after 12:00 noon eCl1gji
Ozougwu from the practice squad. Re- |n
leased LB Larry Grant. w31King
CINCINNATI BENGALS- Signed STony 4 Il[-
Dye from the practice squad. Released CB
Chris Lewis Harris ila1flnB ai B( i
HOCKEY
National Hockey League kwl i i Mtitfl'fhiTuesdays
SANAHEIM DUCKS Assigned D Jesse -94 W _WeMalidafSiS. Fufilt: jq.A .sa'-
Blacker to Norfolk (AHL). "f lNiQiSUtDii--
SDETROIT RED WINGS Recalled C '- -" ,
Luke Glendening from Grand Rapids (AHL).
I TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS Traded D 20 a r BldH r
Jesse Blacker and a 2014 third-round and P iL-altui
seventh-round draft pick to Anaheim for Fs
Peter Holland and Brad Staubitz. Assigned i OETO HEPBI
Staubitz toToronto (AHL).
SWINNIPEG JETS Recalled D Julian Cll941-625-O68 ForMoelIoor
Melchiori from St. John's (AHL).Cal'14112 013111FoM re1 rl


ing




ered



tTNING
WINGS
ampa Bay (14-6-0)
ngeles (13-6-1)
Tuesday, 10:30 p.m.
E: Staples Center,
eles
Sports
: 970 AM


OTHERS
ANUCKS
Florida (4-12-4)
ouver(11-7-3)
Tuesday, 10 p.m.
E: Rogers Arena,
iver, B.C.
Sports Florida


ers 1, Canadiens O:
il, Ryan Callahan ended New
-year-old goal drought in
nd rookie Cam Talbot made
'r his first NHL shutout to
e first Rangers goalie to earn a
Montreal since Ed Giacomin in
on Feb. 25,1967.

e Leafs 4, Sabres 2:
James van Riemsdyk scored
Nikolai Kulemin got the
id the Maple Leafs snapped a
ie losing skid with a win over


ders 5, Red Wings 4,
iniondale, N.Y., Kevin Poulin
I three Detroit skaters in the
after coming on in relief, and
outlasted the reeling Red


s 4, Penguins 1: In
J., JaromirJagr scored two
vMartin Brodeur made 27 saves
SNew Jersey.

nd the league: The
Ducks traded forwards Peter
nd Brad Staubitz to the Toronto
fs on Saturday for defenseman
;er and two draft picks. Blacker
nd-round pick by the Maple
09, but never cracked the
r. The 22-year-old defenseman
)ast two years in the AHL.


at Kings Gate.


Tro Book A Tee Time


I QUICK HITS


U.S. TEEN SHIFFRIN
WINS WORLD CUP
SLALOM OPENER
LEVI, Finland-
American teenager
Mikaela Shiffrin won the
World Cup slalom opener
Saturday, beating reigning
Olympic champion Maria
Hoefl-Riesch of Germany
by more than a second,
making a statement ahead
of the Sochi Olympics.
The 18-year-old slalom
world champion led by
half a second after the first
run and raced seamlessly
in the second to extend
her advantage, overcom-
ing a mistake near the
end to clock a combined
time of 1 minute, 55.07
seconds....
In Lillehammer, Norway, Germany's
Natalie Geisenberger won the women's
World Cup luge season-opener after
U.S. slider Kate Hansen found trouble
on her second run....
South Korea's Lee Sang-hwa broke
the world record in the women's 500
meters for the second straight day
and third time in eight days, finishing
in 36.36 seconds in a World Cup
speedskating meet at the Utah Olympic
Oval in Kearns....


In Paris, Olympic runners-up Pang
Qing and Tong Jian won the pairs at
the Trophee Bompard for the first
time. World bronze medalists Meagan
Duhamel and Eric Radford of Canada
finished second with 190.89.


SOCCER
Nigeria, Ivory Coast
qualify for WCup: Nigeria and
Ivory Coast qualified for the 2014World
Cup in Brazil. The Nigerians became
the first African team to qualify for
next year's showcase, beating Ethiopia
2-0 in the second leg of their playoff.
Nigeria, playing at home Calabar, won
4-1 on total goals. Ivory Coast will be
going to its third straight World Cup
after playing to a tense 1-1 draw with
Senegal for a 4-2 aggregate victory.


TENNIS
Czechs win doubles to
lead Davis Cup final 2-1:
The Czech Republic is one victory from
winning a second straight Davis Cup.
The defending champions defeated
Serbia in doubles for a 2-1 lead when
Tomas Berdych and Radek Stepanek
beat Nenad Zimonjic and Ilija Bozoljac
6-2,6-4,7-6 (4). Berdych plays Novak
Djokovic, who is on a 23-match
winning run, in the first reverse singles
match today on the indoor hard court
at Belgrade Arena.


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~Page10 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


* AUTO RACING ROUNDUP


AUTO RACING SCOREBOARD


Points leader




Johnson fast




at practice


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOMESTEAD -
Championship contender
Matt Kenseth posted the
fastest speed during final
practice for NASCAR's
season finale.
One major problem:
points leader Jimmie
Johnson was fast, too.
Johnson had the sec-
ond-quickest lap around
Homestead-Miami
Speedway on Saturday and
the fastest 10-lap average.
"We're just working on
comfort," Johnson said
afterward. "It's different
conditions now than what
we'll have during race
time, so we're being smart
about our changes."
Kenseth reached
171.980 mph around the
11/2-mile oval, just ahead
of Johnson's 171.647.
Defending series cham-
pion Brad Keselowski
was third, followed by
Martin Truex Jr. and Kevin
Harvick.
The 10-lap average is
often a better indicator of
the top cars. Johnson aver-
aged 167.905 mph over his
first 10 practice laps.
Johnson, Kenseth and
Harvick are the only
drivers still in contention
for the title. Johnson
enters today's finale with
a 28-point lead over
Kenseth. Johnson needs
to finish 23rd or better to
win his sixth title in eight
years.
Johnson has seven top-
five finishes in nine Chase
races this season, the kind


of closing success that
makes a tough task nearly
impossible.
Kenseth was tied with
Johnson three weeks ago,
but pit trouble at Phoenix
last week diminished his
chances. Still, Kenseth's
crew chief, Jason Ratcliff,
believes staying close with
one of the most dominant
programs in NASCAR
history says a lot about
their team.
"I prefer it's them
over anyone actually,"
Ratcliff said after the final
practice. "It's more of a
challenge for us and it's
setting the bar very high."

Dillon edges Hornish
for Nationwide title: Austin
Dillon won the NASCAR Nationwide
Series championship, holding off Sam
Hornish Jr. in Homestead. Hornish
looked as if he would overcome an
eight-point deficit in the standings
for much of the 200-lap race, but a
lengthy caution late posed problems.
Hornish dropped from third to ninth
on the final restart with five laps to
go, ending his chances at the title
Dillon, driving the famed No. 3 car
for his grandfather, Richard Childress,
finished 12th, good enough to hold
off Hornish by three points. Hornish
crossed the line eighth.

Vettel snags pole at US
Grand Prix: World champion
Sebastian Vettel once again got the
better of Red Bull teammate and
rival Mark Webber, qualifying in pole
position Saturday for the U.S. Grand
Prix in Austin, Texas. Webber appeared
set to earn his third pole in four races
until Vettel lapped the Circuit of the
Americas in 1 minute, 36.338 seconds
on his last run.


Formula 1
UNITED STATES GRAND PRIX
After Saturday qualifying; race today
At Circuit of the Americas
Austin, Texas
Lap length 3.426 miles
Third Session
1. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 1
minute, 36.338 seconds.
2. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull,
1:36.441.
3. Remain Grosjean, France, Lotus,
1:37.155.
4. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Sauber,
1:37.296.
5. Lewis Hamilton, England, Mercedes,
1:37.345.
6. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari,
1:37.376.
7. Sergio Perez, Mexico, McLaren, 1:37.452.
8. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Lotus,
1:37.715.
9. Valtteri Bottas, Finland, Williams,
1:37.836.
10. Esteban Gutierrez, Mexico, Sauber,
1:38.034.
Eliminated after second session
11. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Toro Rosso,
1:38.131.
12. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India,
1:38.139.
13. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes,
1:38.364.
14. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 1:38.592.
15. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso,
1:38.696.
16. Jenson Button, England, McLaren,
1:38.217.
Eliminated after first session
17. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India,
1:39.250.
18. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Wil-
liams, 1:39.351.
19. Giedo Van der Garde, Netherlands, Ca-
terham, 1:40.491.
20. Jules Bianchi, France, Marussia,
1:40.528.
21. Max Chilton, England, Marussia,
1:41.401.
22. Charles Pic, France, Caterham, 1:40.596.

NASCAR Sprint
Cup Series
FORD ECOBOOST 400
After Friday qualifying; race today
At Homestead-Miami Speedway
Homestead, Fla.
Lap length 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 177.667 mph.
2. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 177.445.
3. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 177.282.
4. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 177.061.
5. (11) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 176.846.
6. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 176.655.
7.(48) JimmierJohnson, Chevrolet,176.598.
8. (56) MartinTruexJrToyota, 176.436.
9. (17) Ricky StenhouseJr, Ford, 176.436.
10. (55) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 176.413.
11. (18) Kyle BuschToyota, 176.355.
12. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 176.355.
13. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 176.304.
14. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 175.747.
15. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 175.73.
16.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford,175.69.
17. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 175.507.
18. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 175.433.
19 (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 175.376.
20. (51) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 175.353.
21. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet,
175.347.
22. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 175.273.
23. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 175.109.
24. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 175.092.
25. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 174.78.
26. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 174.61.
27. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,


174.537.
28. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
174.329.
29. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 174.317
30. (30) Parker Kligerman,Toyota, 173.171.
31.(38) David Gilliland, Ford, 173.099.
32. (83) David ReutimannToyota, 172.563.
33. (93)Travis KvapilToyota, 172.2$7.
34. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 172.26.
35. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, 172.046. I
36. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Toyota, 171.734.
37. (36) JJ.Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,' Owner
Points.
39. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevroleti Owner
Points.
40. (13) CaseyMears, Ford, Owner Points.
41.(32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,' Owner
Points.
43. (40) Tony Raines, Chevrolet,: Owner
Points.

NASCAR
Nationwide Series
FORD ECOBOOST 300
Saturday
At Homestead-Miami Speedway
Homestead, Fla.
Lap length 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (3) Brad Keselowski Ford, 200 laps, 120.7
rating, 0 points, $83,475.
2. (8) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200,130.7,44,
$77,675.
3. (6) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 1285, 0,
$49,175.
4. (5) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200, 11.1,0,
$40,860.
5. (9) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 94.8, 39,
$40,380.
6. (4) Joey Logano, Ford, 200, 121.6, 0,
$26,580.
7. (16) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 200,98.7,
37, $28,980.
8. (1) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 200, 1 4.1,37,
$32,555.
9. (13) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 200, 81.9, 35,
$26,930.
10. (15) Nelson Piquet Jr, Chevrolet, 200,
77,34, $27,080.
11. (2) Blake Koch, Toyota, 200, 81.6, 33,
$25,880.
12. (11) Austin Dillon Chevrolet 200,87.2,
32, $24,330.
13. (19) Ryan Reed, Ford, 200, 74.9, 31,
$23,930.
14. (17) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 200, 78.2, 0,
$23,730.
15. (12) Drew HerringToyota, 200, 82.1,29,
$24,220.
16. (18) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 200, 92.3,28,
$24,415.
17. (23) Michael Annett, Ford, 200,6 6.8,27,
$23,405.
18. (22)Travis Pastrana, Ford, 200, 62.4,26,
$23,590.
19. (14) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200, 93,
25, $23,030.
20. (29) Jeff Green, Toyota, 200, 58.8, 24,
$23,595.
21. (31) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 200, 52,
23, $22,810.
22. (39) Bryan Silas, Ford, 200, 146.4, 0,
$22,700.
23. (35) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 200i 41.7,0,
$22,565.
24. (34) Dakoda Armstrong, Toydta, 200,
48.1,0, $22,450.
25. (36) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 19g, 38,19,
$16,790.
26. (30) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 198, 40.7,
18, $22,185.
27. (33) Dexter Stacey Ford, 194, 34.7,17,
$16,070.
28. (28) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, accident,
184,50.6,16, $21,955.
29. (25) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, accident,


183,75,15,$21,850.
30. (32) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, acci-
dent, 183,50.2,14, $22,040.
31. (7) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 175,68.3,13,
$21,930.
32. (10) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 173, 72.2,
12, $21,665.
33. (21) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 163,
57.8,11, $21,460.
34. (20) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 148, 46.5, 10,
$15,395.
35. (24) Kevin Swindel| Ford, accident, 127,
54.1,9, $21,356.
36. (38) Ryan Ellis, Toyota, vibration, 102,
29.3,8, $20,150.
37. (27) Mike Bliss, Toyota, electrical, 49,
37.7,7, $14,085.
38. (37) TJ. Bell, CheVrolet, vibration, 20,
31.4,6, $19,994.
39 (40) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, electrical, 5,
30.8,5,$13,735.
40. (26) Michael McDpwell, Toyota, over-
heating, 5,29.7,0,$13|700.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner 109.025
mph.
Time of Race 2 hour, 45 minutes, 6 sec-
onds.
Margin of Victory 1.126 seconds.
Caution Flags 10 for 49 laps.

NASCAR Trucks
FORD ECOBOOST 200
By The Associated Press
Eds: Adds earnings
NASCAR Camping World Truck-Ford
EcoBoost 200 Results
Friday
At Homestead-Miami Speedway
Homestead, Fla.
Lap lengthl.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (12) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 148 laps, 136.8
rating, 0 points, $37,985.
2. (1) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 148, 138.5, 44,
$36,275.
3. (15) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 148, 113.4,
41, $21,670.
4. (13) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 148,
104.1,40,$18,285. |
5. (11) Ron Hornaday Jr, Chevrolet, 148,
96.5,0,$14,410.
6. (14) JohnWesTownley, Toyota, 148,89.6,
38, $15,435.
7. (20) German Quiroda, Toyota, 148,92.9,
37, $15,235.
8. (5) Ross Chastain, Ford, 148, 84.2, 37,
$15,035.
9. (19)Timothy Peters, Toyota, 148,77.4,35,
$14,835.
10. (9) Cale Gale, Chevrolet, 148, 79.9,34,
$13,660.
11. (10) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 148,
715,33, $14,535. I
12. (22) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 148,70.8,32,
$14,360.
13. (6) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 148,
82.8,31, $15,235.
14. (3) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 148,102.4,30,
$14,135.
15. (18) Darrell Wallac Jr, Toyota, 148, 76,
29, $15,110.
16. (2) Johnny Sauter,Toyota, 148,101,29,
$13,910.
17. (30) Jimmy Weller ll, Toyota, 148,46.3,
27, $13,810.
18. (26) Jeff Agnew, Chevrolet, 148,45,26,
$13,710.
19. (32) BJ. McLeod, Chevrolet, 148, 40.7,
25, $11,360.
20. (7) Austin Dillon, chevrolet, 148, 88.6,
0,$11,865.
21. (8) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 148, 97.7,24,
$13,285.
22. (16) Max Gresham,chevrolet, 148,63.9,
22, $13,035.
23. (21) Dakoda Armstlong,Chevrolet, 148,
54.2,21, $12,910.


24. (27) Frank Kimmel, Toyota, 148, 50.6,
20, $10,360.
25. (28) Mason Mingus, Chevrolet, 148,
49.8,19,$10,310.
26. (34) DJ. Kennington, Chevrolet, 147,
35.7,18, $10,960.
27. (25) Joey Coulter, Toyota, 142,54.6,17,
$10,760.
28. (35) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 140,
31.5,16, $9,560.
29. (23) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, ac-
cident, 135,49.6,15, $9,335.
30. (17) Ben Kennedy, Chevrolet, engine,
103,53.5,14,$9,135.
31. (4) Nelson Piquet Jr, Chevrolet, acci-
dent,101,63.1,0,$8,585.
32. (33) Spencer Gallagher, Chevrolet, acci-
dent, 101,40,12, $8,560.
33. (24) Chad McCumbee, Ford, power
steering, 42,36.5,11, $8,535.
34. (36) Travis Kvapil, Chevrolet, rear gear,
5,31.1,0,$8,510.
35. (29) Chris Jones, Chevrolet, transmis-
sion, 3,29.7,9, $8,485.
36.(31)JJ. Yeley,Toyota,fuel pump,2,28.7,
0, $8,400.

Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner 109.225
mph.
Time of Race 2 hours, 1 minute, 57 sec-
onds.
Margin ofVictory 0.081 seconds.
Caution Flags 8 for37 laps.
Lead Changes 13 among 6 drivers.
Lap Leaders R.Blaney 1-8; J.Sauter 9-10;
R.Blaney 11-49; M.Crafton 50-61; R.Blaney
62-65; K.Busch 66-77; R.Blaney 78-93;
K.Busch 94-96; R.Chastain 97-98; K.Busch
99-112;A.Dillon 113-114; K.Busch 115; A.
Dillon 116; K.Busch 117-148.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led,
Laps Led) R.Blaney, 4 times for 67 laps;
K.Busch, 5 times for 62 laps; M.Crafton, 1
timefor 12 laps;A.Dillon,2timesfor3laps;
R.Chastain, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Sauter, 1
time for 2 laps.
Top 10 in Points 1. M.Crafton, 804; 2. T
Dillon, 764; 3. J.Buescher, 761; 4. J.Sauter,
732; 5. J.Burton, 731; 6. R.Blaney, 726; 7.
B.Gaughan, 717; 8. D.Wallace Jr, 704; 9.
M.Paludo,697;10.TPeters, 683.

NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained
in a race.
The formula combines the following
categoriesWins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes,
Average Running Position While on Lead
Lap, Average Speed Under Green, Fastest
Lap, Led Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.
Lead Changes 19 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders S.Hornish Jr. 1-4; B.Kesel-
owski 5; S.Hornish Jr. 6-38; K.Larson 39-48;
K.Busch 49-51; M.Kenseth 52; K.Busch 53;
M.Kenseth 54-61; K.Busch 62-65; B.Kes-
elowski 66-82; J.Logano 83-102; K.Busch
103-121; B.Keselowski 122-125; K.Larson
126-133; J.Logano 134-150; TDillon 151-
159; K.Larson 160-166; K.Busch 167-168;
K.Larson 169-197; B.Keselowski 198-200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led,
Laps Led): K.Larson, 4 times for 54 laps;
J.Logano, 2 times for 37 laps; S.Hornish
Jr, 2 times for 37 laps; K.Busch, 5 times for
29 laps; B.Keselowski, 4 times for 25 laps;
M.Kenseth, 2 times for 9 laps; TDillon, 1
time for 9 laps.
Top 10in Points 1.A.Dillon, 1,180;2. S.Hor-
nish Jr, 1,177;3. R.Smith, 1,108; 4. E.Sadler,
1,090; 5. JAllgaier, 1,090; 6. TBayne, 1,086;
7. B.Scott, 1,053; 8. K.Larson, 1,001; 9. P.Kli-
german, 993; 10. BVickers, 970.


j wneeI HILL
US .h Cars Golf Fitness Assessment By Local
Push Carts # Certified Expert Ken Dobbs From 1-3PM

6. "You Can Gain 35 Yds In 4 Weeks"
6999SALE IS 1 DAY ONLY -


ALL PRODUCT IS GONE
WHEN GONE

"-/TODAY
i-- 4J T6 1ra iJl p ] ,ji RiifiiiONLY


-Pagel0 SP


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net










PORT CHARLOTTE PONTA GORDA NORTH PORT ENGLEWOOD ARCADIA


INSIDE:


9t


d/


Shop carefully for affordable
long-term-care coverage
Page 4


Lee Memorial launches family
medicine residency program
Page 7


Lung Cancer Research Council
holds 5K run/walk
Page 12


, "i'-:'"


,


now
A


0


Sunday, November 17 2013






:Page 2 www.sunnewspapers.net feelingfit.com The Sun /Sunday, November 1~
U U


Feeling Fit


CEO
DerekDunn-Rankin

President and Publisher
David Dunn-Rankin

Feeling Fit Publisher
Dave Powell
941-258-9522
dpowell@sun-herald.com

Feeling Fit Editor
Karin Lillis
941-258-9530



Medical Advertising Executive
Anthony Feroce
941-258-9527
aferoce@sun-herald.com

Medical Advertising Executive
Bibi R. Gafoor
941-258-9528
l",o l ,, lli ,,.M, i hl ,, l. dll I,1111


Medical Advertising Executive
Kim Lee
941-205-6409
klee@sun-herald.com

Columnists and Contributors
Laureen Albrecht
Barbara Bean-Mellinger
Judy Buss
Tom Cappiello
Patricia Garlausky Horwell
Shirley George
Renee LePere
Bob Massey
Barbara Pierce
Warren Richardson
Ted Robedee

Deadlines
Supportgroup'ririi. 1. i h hiJlrli, 1i
as space permits. To have your group
included, send the information to


News briefs and announcements must be
received'," I.I.nui' I. ii1.0ito be included in
Sunday edition of Feeling Fit. Contact Karin
Fr l .., I. Fr,," I ,, ., h, ,., i ,F .,,r call
941-258-9530.

Letters to the editor can be submitted by
e-m ail to lri -ii r .m ii ,F i I ,
can be mailed to Feeling Fit, 18215 Paulson
Drive, Port Charlotte, FL 33954.

Your name and phone number must be
'II 1.-1 1, 1, 11, h 1.-,1.. .. .J., ,, ,l
Letters have to be kept to 250 words or fewer
and ill ... hh ,Ji f ii,.i li .i.iiiiii.ir and
spelling.All letters must be signed with a
full name, not initials.An e-mail address and
telephone number must be included. The
phone number and e-mail address are not for
publication, but must be provided.

FeelingFitis I Mci u' u it, i ,.'1,1,i !',ti
' 1i,,, i. ,111, i ,l,, i.. 'i Paulson
Drive f,'i' I.hi, l' I I. .'* 4


Navigating the Health Insurance Marketplace


The subject of the Affordable Care
Act seems to be on the minds of many
people. My last article on this subject
was a month ago. I wrote about
the Health Insurance Marketplace
Navigator, Yamaya Pino, who is at
the Virgina B. Andes Volunteer Clinic
through August 2014. She still has
coming in to the office, with my
article in hand, trying to find her. The
following is a report on how we are
doing with enrolling people through
the Marketplace. I also have included
the contact information for those who
may have missed it.
Here are some numbers on what has
happened. Since we started, Charlotte
County has had 49 enrollments. That
is not very many but is a start. We have
around 160,000 people in the county,
and if only 10 percent are eligible to
be signed up we would have 16,000 in
the program. I do not know the actual
numbers, but this is a guess.
You can determine if you are eligible
for an Affordable Care Act subsidy
through the Kaiser Foundation's


Dave Powell
website at http://kff.org. When you
get into the site, search for the subsidy
calculator. That will compute your eli-
gibility and the amount for which you
would qualify. Do not automatically
disqualify yourself because you think


Navigator guides consumers through Health Insurance Marketplace


By YAMAYA PINO
SPECIAL TO FEELING FIT

At the Charlotte County
Community Health Improvement
Partnership's Access to Healthcare
subcommittee
meeting, I had
the opportunity
to share the
progress of my
role as a Health
Insurance
Marketplace t
Navigator with
a very dedicated
group of com-
munity leaders.
The members Yamaya Pino
of the commit-
tee have played a key role in our
efforts to promote the existence of
the Affordable Care Act's navigator
project throughout our region.
As the only navigator for Charlotte
County, my role is to educate
consumers about the purpose and
functions of the Marketplace, the
importance of having health care,
and the different options they have
through the Marketplace.
My goal is to help consumers
make educated decisions about their
health care coverage and provide
them with unbiased, nonpartisan in-
formation not to sell them insur-
ance or steer them in any particular
direction.
After completing training and
certification, navigators offer as-
sistance with the Health Insurance
Marketplace website (http: / /
healthcare.gov), completion of
applications, applying for govern-
ment assistance, comparing plans,
submitting enrollment and premium
payments, and filing for exemptions
in some cases.
Over the last few weeks I have had
great feedback from members of our
community who are interested in
volunteering to help spread the word
about how to apply and enroll in the
marketplace with that one-on-one
support from a navigator.
For those of you who are interest-
ed, here is your opportunity to make
a positive impact on the community
by assisting the navigator project.


You can become a part of our
Marketplace Volunteer Committee.
I will work closely with you to fulfill
duties such as scheduling consumer
appointments, distributing educa-
tional materials, assisting in enroll-
ment events, and taking our message
to people who need our help.


Every single one of you count-,, aiid
I offer my appreciation in advance
Together we can certainly accom -
plish more!
To volunteer or get information oni
your insurance eligibility, call 941 -
766-9570, ext. 130 or email Yama7'a
Pino at ypino@volunteercare. org


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FILLERS
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Replaces volume thatyou lose
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WRINKLE RELAXERS
(Botox, Dysport&)
elaxes dynamic lines onyourface


Jamie Raisor
ARNP


M McDonnell
Dermatology

(941) 205-3376
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Restores tone & glow to yourface
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HAIR REDUCTION
A more permanent solution
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that you make too much money. A
family of four can qualify if they i n ke
less than $92,000 per year
There is some good news on the
cost of insurance in Charlotte Couimr
We rank 18th out of 67 counties in the
state, with 67 being the most expein-
sive. We are also the least expense e
of our 10-county area in Southwest
Florida.
Yamaya Pino said she is looking
for volunteers to help local resideint-.
understand the Health Insurance
Marketplace.
Duties would be to work closely \ th
navigator to:
*Assist in setting up appointmeint-,
*Distribute marketing material-.
throughout the community.
*Assist in promoting enrollment
events.
*Spreading the word about the
marketplace.
To volunteer or get information oni
your insurance hligil'ili[ call 941- 71-.
9570, ext. 130 or email Yamaya PImo t
ypino@volunteercare.org.


:Page 2


The Sun /Sunday, November 1 2'i 213


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com


\ -"





The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3


A,.


ONLY HOSPITAL IN THE COUNTY TO RECEIVE:


Top Performer on Key Quality Measures by Joint Commission
*3 Years in a Row
Accredited Chest Pain Center with PCI
Best Hospital by Florida Weekly, 2009-2013
Best Hospital & Best ER by Charlotte Sun, 2005-2013
Leap Frog "A" Hospital Safety Score, 3 times in a row
CARF Accredited Rehabilitation Facility

ADDITIONAL AWARDS & ACCREDITATIONS:

Blue Distinction Center for Knee & Hip Replacement
Certified Hip & Knee Replacement by Joint Commission
Accredited Cancer Program (ACos CoC)
Certified Spine Surgery by Joint Commission
Blue Distinction Center for Spine Surgery
Accredited Primary Stroke Center by Joint Commission
Accredited Pain Management Program


Fawcett Memorial Hospital



FawcettHospital.com 1 (941)624-4441 1 21298 Olean Blvd.


/


C~j~
.74


)
Top PRrform.cr on
-a0n ComfisiorI
Koy Qou. y
2012






h r
c ^ ..
(iU^
-ca.n
4 ^^ .


Blue
Dislhii ,clo
Center
for Spine Surgery
(-Slue
I I ~ 1u~ e
Di ,,liciclio
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for Knee and Hip Replacement


The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3


feelingfit.com


CLINICAL EXCELLENCE IN OUR COMMUNITY I


J91











Shop carefully to find affordable long-term-care coverage


By KIMBERLY LANKFORD
KIPLINGER PERSONAL FINANCE

The average cost of a private room
in a nursing home is now about $248
per day (or about $90,000 per year),
and 12 hours a day of home care
costs even more, according to the
MetLife Mature Market Institute. But
for many baby boomers, it takes more
than the threat of financial catastro-
phe to be prodded into buying a
long-term-care insurance policy.
Ted Sarenski, a CPA and personal
financial specialist in Syracuse, N.Y.
recommends to clients in their 50s
that they have some form of long-
term-care coverage to protect their
retirement savings.
Until recently, people who bought
policies generally got enough insur-
ance to cover 100 percent of the cost
of care. But insurers boosted their
rates after paying more money in
claims than they expected. Rates for
new policies have shot up espe-
cially for women buying on their own
- and it's become a lot more difficult
to qualify for coverage if you have
health issues.
Sarenski helps his clients calculate
how much of their savings they can
afford to spend on long-term-care
costs and still keep enough money for
the other spouse to live on, possibly
for decades. Then he recommends
buying enough coverage to fill the
gap usually at least half of the
cost of care. Fortunately, insurers are
offering new options that shift more
risk to you but make policies less
costly.
*Buy his and her policies.
Several major long-term-care
insurers have switched from unisex
to gender-differentiated pricing.
Genworth, the largest long-term-
care insurer, announced the change
in late 2012, and John Hancock,
Transamerica and Mutual of Omaha
quickly followed suit.
In many cases, single women -
who tend to live longer than men and
are more likely to need care now
pay about 50 percent more than
single men, said Claude Thau, a
long-term-care insurance consultant
in Overland Park, Kan. The rate hikes
haven't been approved yet in some
states, and a few insurers still offer
unisex rates, especially for policies
sold through employers.
Most insurers continue to offer
discounts for couples of about 30
percent, said Thau. For example,


Genworth's couples policies give
women a big break. For healthy
55-year-olds buying a policy with a
three-year benefit period and a $150
daily benefit, plus 5 percent com-
pound inflation protection, the cost
is $2,190 a year for a single man and
$2,966 for a single woman. But the
price drops to $1,854 each if they buy
as a couple.
Couples can also hedge their bets
with a shared-benefit policy. Instead
of two separate benefit periods, you
share a benefit pool three years
each becomes a pool of six years that
can be split between the spouses.
Genworth charges $2,187 per person
for a couple sharing a six-year benefit
period versus $1,854 each for a
couple who buy separate three-year
policies with a couples discount.
If you're a single woman, consider a
policy that combines long-term-care
and life insurance. With a combo
policy, rates won't go up, and either
you or your heirs are guaranteed a
payout.
For example, a 60-year-old woman
who invests $100,000 in Lincoln
Financial's MoneyGuard policy could
get $6,627 in monthly long-term-
care benefits for six years totaling
$477,144. If she dies before needing
care, her heirs will get a death benefit
of $159,048. (Money she uses for
long-term care is subtracted from the
death benefit.)
"Combination policies are a better
deal for single women than they were
in the past," said John Ryan, of Ryan
Insurance Strategy Consultants, in
Greenwood Village, Colo. He recom-
mends getting quotes for both combo
and stand-alone policies. You can buy
a combo policy outright or pay for it
over 3-10 years.
*Get inflation protection for less.
In the past, most policies automat-
ically increased benefits by 5 percent
compounded per year. But policies
with 3 percent or CPI-adjusted infla-
tion protection, which trims premi-
ums, have become more popular.
For example, a 50-year-old woman
who buys a John Hancock policy
with a $150 daily benefit, a three-year
benefit period and a 90-day waiting
period would pay $3,374 per year
with 5 percent inflation protection,
compared with $1,560 for a CPI-
adjusted policy. A man would pay
$2,174 per year for the 5 percent
compound policy, or $956 for one
with a CPI adjustment.
Some insurers are offering policies


iL PH
FILE PH-.'.T-."


with future purchase options, which
cost less than traditional inflation-
adjusted policies to start out but
don't increase benefits automatically.
Instead, you can boost your benefits
every few years if you pay more.
When choosing an inflation option,
don't simply compare premiums.
Calculate how much the pool of ben-
efits will grow to by the time you're
likely to need care. A policy with a 3
percent inflation adjustment may not
seem as good a deal when you see
how much smaller the benefit pool
will be when you're 80.
Some states have partnership
programs that let people who buy
long-term-care insurance keep more
of their assets if they exhaust their
long-term-care policy benefits and
have to rely on Medicaid. Some states
require that policies have 5 percent
compound inflation protection to
qualify for the partnership program.


Contact your state insurance depai t -
ment (you'll find links at \wx\ iuiac
org).
*Buy a policy when you're still
healthy.
Insurers are also managing rlieii
risk by rejecting more people foi
health issues and making it moiie
difficult to qualify for the best iaites
A study by the American A-.ss:ci ia in
for Long-Term Care Insuraiice fIIund
that 45 percent of people a gesO- -0-'_
qualified for good health disc,:utui.
but only 30 percent of people age,
60-69 qualified.
Health requirements vai \ fim
company to company. A loii-,tei in -
care specialist who works witiI in iia \
insurers can help you find dhe c,:inm-
pany that offers the best raites. \ Iu
can find one at www.aaltci 0g db':
shop insurers, such as Noi ihvesiei i
Mutual and New York Life. hi, ,i 0 k
only with their own agents


Primary Care Lab Services Imaging Centers
Diagnostics Urgent Care Physical Therapy
Diabetes Education Medical Aesthetics

DID YOU KNOW?
Heart Disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and many other diseases are
prewventable? Our providers are here to help you manage your
Illnesses and diseases, as well as preventing future health Issues.
Our offices have services Including Imaging diagnostics, labs,
education programs and so much more to help our patients
manage and prevent illnesses.
Don't delay your health Is waiting!
Dr. Sanjay Kumar Is now accepting new patients for primary care.
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Port Charlotte, Florida 33952
941-613-2222

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: t f ;n ", m '' I 1%. 1 1y ,
:ll~ ? Si r :l i i ff i j t l l i n i 1P B


* Radiesse/Juvederm injections
Boto, IInjections
SSculpta Facial Volume
Resloiation
SVaser Liposelecdion
* "Pelleve Prep" Before any Filler
SArtistic Lip Smoolhing and
Augrrierildalion


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* ...:z- '


... ............... ..


:Page 4


The Sun /Sunday, Nove ril:,e, ..' 201 3


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com


-J4fr






The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5


Injectables can slow


the formation of wrinkles


WHATDOCTORSKNOW.COM
TRIBUNE CONETNT AGENCY

Fine lines, wrinkles and folds in
the skin develop with age but are not
necessarily a welcome badge of honor
we're readily willing to display. As our
skin loses collagen and elasticity, the
lines and folds develop and our youth
begins to slip away.
Thanks to an increasingly popular
non-surgical treatment called in-
jectables, slowing down the visible
aging process can be achieved. These
include:
1. Fillers. The term "filler" refers to a
substance injected into the face's soft
tissues to add volume. These substanc-
es literally restore lost volume thereby
reducing the appearance and visibility
of lines, folds, and wrinkles in the skin.
How long do fillers last? Although
the above fillers are broken down
by the body, the metabolism rate
varies by product and from patient
to patient. Generally, studies have
shown fillers to last anywhere from
6-18 months. In some cases, fillers can
stimulate new collagen growth result-
ing in more permanent improvement.
Are fillers safe? The fillers listed
above have been extensively studied,
are FDA-approved, and have been
used to treat millions of patients
worldwide. They are biocompatible
with the human body and eventually
break down naturally. Most patients
can expect some temporary swell-
ing, bruising, redness or tenderness
following treatment usually lasting
less than seven days.
2. Neurotoxins. For those unfamil-
iar with these products, the idea of
deliberate injection of a neurotoxinn"
raises eyebrows. However, the two
most commonly used and well-known
of these prescription medications,
Botox Cosmetic and Dysport have
been extensively studied.
Botox Cosmetic has a longer track
record and has been used in close to
12 million cosmetic procedures. As
with other medications and vaccines,
a medication potentially harmful in
large quantities can be therapeutic
when used in smaller concentrations
directed at specific targets.
How long do neurotoxins last?
Injections are made with a fine gauge
needle and last 3-6 months. With
repeated injections, the muscle grad-
ually becomes weaker and injections


FILE PHOTO
can often be spaced further apart.
Are they safe? When used in correct
doses, proper location, and when
administered by a physician trained in
facial structure and anatomy, neu-
rotoxins effectively reduce fine lines
and wrinkles. The most common side
effects include temporary bruising and
swelling. More safety information can
be found at botoxcosmetic.com.
Are injectable treatments painful?
Cosmetic injectables are administered
through a very small, fine gauge
needle, not unlike a typical shot or IV
The use of topical anesthetic creams
can significantly reduce injection dis-
comfort. Ice is also recommended to
minimize pain, swelling and bruising.
Injectables treat these lines at their
source and achieve powerful results
while allowing patients to immediately
return to normal daily activities.
Because these substances are inject-
ed beneath the skin near important
nerves, muscles, and blood vessels,
seeking treatment from a physician
who's thoroughly trained in the
anatomy and physiology of the face is
critical.

WhatDoctorsKnow is a magazine
devoted to up-to-the minute informa-
tion on health issues from physicians,
major hospitals and clinics, universities
and health care agencies across the U.S.
Online at www. whatdoctorsknow.com.


Feeling Fit

-'.!:% ....... 3







Read us every Sunday in the Charlotte, North Port,

Englewood and Arcadia editions of the Sun.


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5


o The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


feelingfit.com











Local student invited to attend Congress of Future Medical Leaders


By BOB MASSEY
1 1 1 1 1o I II G -, i li I 1, I

Chalol itte Co(- i, leidel R,3,beit
B,:bb\" Coi-,,I, lihas been iivited
ti aitteind the Congiee, if Ftutuie
Nledicail Leaidels in Fehiiiua\ iiin
\\Vihlngt,,n,. DC (C xheie lie will be
imentoied b\ ni, less than ihve Noibel
Pize aild Natioiial Nledail if Scieiice
\iiiieil, ii, rt i Ine iltI ii i the
migeoliil (eneieil ',f tihe Iited _'`ireS
Thie thinrig. i. Coi'-,,o i ,o:inl\ 1\ veails
,old
Thie Cogien1e i I, i1a iihn,:-,:,nlr\
pi,:,'.1ii fir i[ hig:,h schi,,,),l Ltldelrt
hil [i to become plivh.icil-iil 01
go nIto Iedic.il ieeeaicli heldsi Tire
pui pos'e oif tinl eveit i,-, :, liliii.
iiNpiie. miotiV;ite ;iIId direct thie ,ip
StudetL iII thie coi tllt Vi r io '-Ipiie tI,:,
be pl.hhici-iii 0 Inedhicail Sclelti-t.
t,:, t;-i\ tie t,:, theii die m- ;-id. ;-iftei
thie event, tI,:, provide ai piathi. plain ;iiid
le,,lluce t, i help them eaichi thieii

Co,' ar i' I iinii ted h\ )I
C(o-innie Nliiii o. lithe iiedhic.il diiect,'ir
if tlie N;itioiii, l c;idem\ ,f Futuie
[PhVhIv-.iI~iSi ;-iId M.edhc~al Sclelnti-.is
to lepieseiwi Edi,,i C'Collegiatie Higli
Scml,,l bas-ed ol Ill ;-ic;-idemic
aicliie\eent, leaideilhIiip potential
;ild determinitioi-ii to sei\e i tliLii;ii\
ii tlie held f inediciiie
D)urigig tlie tliiee-da\ Colgiee.-.
Coir,:,\ will Loi, top ithdeit, hfrlml
-icrIO' thie 'coliit\ ;-iIId hiea NbIel
Lalliea-ite, a-ild Natiliial ledal ,-,f
_imence \\imleilS talk abotlt leadllig
inedicial ieealcli. be _giveii id\ ice
hfron I[N Leai:iue ;ind top inedicial
sclihool de;il-,i, ln xihit IN to, expect iI
inedicial scliool. \itnie ,, rtol ie, tiild
bv p-itleiit vliho aile liiIII:_ ingedicial
iniaicle,. be Inpiiled b\ fellow teeii
inedichil ,cieiice piodig:ie_,. 1e id lea ii
abotlt ctuttlng-edge adV;ilces alnd
tihe future Iii inediciie aid inedichil
teciliolog
C-,,' ., p.iaeiirt, lolii aiid N ir\.
dol't talk aiboiit thlieii ,0l ;ii muclih
,-i, tie\ glih Aniid thqts uitlte
llideiatlinidable
\While still living i Nekv xVOik. (--o
ai, iIn ,i\tli _:aiide lieiin lie troo ik iils
hirlt SAT a,1 pi'it of t he loli,,n Hiopkini
Gifted aind iTaleited Pogi-iIm He
had ii, t \et beeil titliht ,,l'me if trle
;id;-iiiced ilaih coiiceptl lie kiiekv
, umidh be ion tle test -,o lie leaiiied
them oill Ils, oVII .At 11. lie scied a
1..5i ,II aicceptaible scie fi,,I mo-,t
college,
\\e too'k im tI,,i the middle
cliool lIhelie aiind 1 tld tlie guidaiince
cointieloi. I kinoiV e\er\ paileit r \
III\ 'Io i sp, eciail ;iId taileited, but
I eialk meain it I,'" lolin .id ftel
lie hniihied Ili hirst ,i\ Iniirlit,. hIie
aictuaill\ called i, oii tlie pliione aid


PH'-.,T'-. B, B-. BCB1-SSE,
Bobby Corso flanked by his parents, John and Mary has been invited to attend the Congress of Future Medical Leaders.


id. Yot kiio \V,:,tl e e lglh[ '"
A dozeil ;i- id\ fi 'inl Iil hilt \eai
in middle chi,-,l hiangi ,on tlie kiall -
;lld those do'ft iiictlude tlie eiie, tLIhat
haive t alleii do, i1, lI-,n sid. Includ-
S 11,:) ;a N I i c I pal', .l\iaId
Both Ills, middle andh Ingli scll,
didiil't h;ive ;i ilaih teim butl eaichi
built tl lie -ii,,mllid Cir.lo
He lii, ;i 4 (6ii x eiglited GP.,"
M;i \ added He', iII Iti lgide butl
lie ihmllied ;ill t ihat lie cmId idllhIi ;-it
Edi-ol Collegi.ite Higli Schiool Tlie\
did ever lihuig tlie\ could f:i hIn He
did lii'i i ii Ill ll ml ili., clelce iaid
li ,,ltoi\ N:,x lie' ;it tlie point i liiee
lie', ;i full-time Edis-on Stii te (eCollege
ttildelt "
\When tie ilughi s.chli l culdhnt
,iffel tlie ci,,tle lie needed iII-
cIltdIlI:) _,p;-IlI l .hI ;. LatII a;lgebii '-'
;ind geometlI \ lie Sil ted t-ikilio
thiemn oilnlre. tlile lasit tL, suhbjects
mcniiientl\
Il Ill ,p;-ile tim e. Cn, ,i \ohl-ii
teesi, fi tlihe Naitiolial liiunil H, inr
,ociet\, coi tV\ hib i\a ;-id Chiiln iLLte
(-iiLnt\ Homnele (-, C ialitilii -aind
IlNo i ;i peel tutoi ilt ithe college
He ieaid a lot i Ii hi ,paie lime.
too." Nlai\ -aid Righit nn lie' h leaid-
igie e b erk iaboLt mathe conice.pt "
Like evei\ ,othei kid, I pla\ ,,-,ome


v-ideo ,_2,ales. (o-o-,:,;,,nad A, lot ,o,
tile lime I go,,L i lLh ites ;ild
leat ii imht iIl caisses -ilel't Leaichllg_
me I'I'll l ok uip uie\V ciicept ,, i tli
I cain igelt Um\,elf familii ized with
themT Thi iv;-i\ I caii be piepaied foi
;ill tile lima h c',:,l pe nlil:,l1- "
Alid lie c;ii -olke ;i Ruhbik' culbe iII
s'' -secoinds
He plain L, iLattend scliool legi:lii-
;ill\ ;ilt Flo ida Gulf (E''ia l Ullli\ei t\
- because if i itlgii:il\ i ated inaih
depai tinmeiL befoiie minglk ili o-i
I'L thie JUmeiieltV o'f C;ilifotrilIi ,1[
Beikele\. xliere ie l ie nti to Li' ii-i i iiI
cOl' pulter ,,i Aft -iie elii_1eeiiI:_. ia d
tLihei el el licilo-ioft _JU i\ei tl\
,,o hv doee ;-i tlfutle ci'lLmpet ell-
gi1 eel get ,Il ii i\ i 1t-IL iii ti ;-iLttele d tihe
Colgiele 'f Ftlutie Medicail Leaidei-'
I \ai, thl killed beciaue I 'ee Bohbb\


ai a Suugeleii,,i." r. .i\ aid I ilnik lie
lihia tuirge,: ii iugeis. eeiliitlhu:hi lie'he
iii i ilteleted ili the inedicail held
But things) cllhiiige He', still \,,tlg
II as, ie;ill\ excited aiibolut tLii,
':pp:l lllllLV1\ oir him1 "
Coi,:, lio. xe\ei, sees, p,',ihbliles
tLi \,,i k a ;-im eniiieeIn hieailthi ciaie
Thie things, the\ liset ,foir futile
po 'titi' aiie iredhicail scleltilt.
inedicial miathiemiathici;ai,. ild ithei
e\ei\olie iII thie coilnpuLter ci lelice
held. lie a.iid iddii g tLIhati maili amid
cilelice aie prioibl\ thie (e;-i,,l i foi
hi II\Imvi ili,1ii i[,, thire coiigie,,e
\\heirn ne t-li ted sio,,ilng_ him lithe
paipeliik amid lie\ liai\e aill tliee
guest peaikel. hliln I've nivele
hieaid ,f. lectu min bhut Bobb\

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The Sun/Surnclay 2.:,ve0l: ,e I'uI


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com










Lee Memorial launches family medicine residency program


By RENEE LePERE
FEELING FIT CORRESPONDENT

Medical students from Southwest
Florida now have the option of doing
their residency closer to home as
Lee Memorial Health System in Fort
Myers starts its program in July 2014.
Lee Memorial Health System has
received more than 950 applications
for its new family medicine residency
program in collaboration with Florida
State University College of Medicine,
according to Pat Dolce, Lee Memorial
public affairs specialist.
Competition is stiff. Applications
are being accepted through February
2014 and interviews are currently
being scheduled for six first-year
residents.
"We now have 22 applicants from
Florida 10 from FSU's College of
Medicine and the remainder is
from all over the United States and
the world," said Gary A. Goforth, MD,
founding program director, clinical
professor of family medicine, FSU
family medicine residency program
at Lee Memorial, said in an e-mail in-
terview. "One applicant is from Punta
Gorda, three are from Port Charlotte."
According to the American
Medical Association's Fellowship
and Residency Electronic Interactive
Database Access System (FREIDA),
until Lee Memorial's program begins
next year, the closest hospitals that
have family medicine residency pro-
grams are in Miami, about 156 miles
from Fort Myers, and St. Petersburg,


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which is just over 110 miles away.
Goforth said in a press release he
is very pleased with the quality of the
applicants and the level of interest
Lee Memorial's program is getting.
"I do not recall receiving this many


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applications initially in the four
residency programs I served prior,"
Goforth said.
Creating a residency program is
no small task. Lee Memorial started
developing its program in May 2012,
Goforth said. A hospital that wants
to start a residency program must
be "financially strong and willing
to support a residency program for
several years before clinical income
and federal and state funding is
sufficient to support the program,"
Goforth said.
Accreditation Council for Graduate
Medical Education is also a very
difficult process, Goforth added, so a
hospital must have a strong academic
partner and an experienced program
director to prepare accreditation
documents, develop curriculum,
recruit faculty and design a facility
capable of meeting all accreditation
requirements.
"Residency programs are very com-
plex organizations that require major
funding, initially," Goforth said. "It
takes millions of dollars and constant
adjustments to maintain a strong
teaching program, meet changing
accreditation requirements and

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maintain a strong financial status."
The "primary goal" of the residency
program is to increase the number
of family physicians in Southwest
Florida, according to Dolce. Medical
school graduates are required to
complete residency training in their
specialty in this case, family med-
icine to earn board certification
and practice medicine independently.
Dolce said numerous studies have
shown most physicians ultimately
practice close to where they com-
pleted their residency or fellowship
training.
Lee Memorial reports Florida faces
the possibility of a primary care phy-
sician shortage as the baby boomer
population grows older and needs
more medical attention.
Scott Nygaard, MD, chief medical
officer of physician services for Lee
Memorial, said in a press release the
residency program could address
that concern: "We are going to need
more primary care physicians in
our community. We are making the
necessary financial commitment
to create a pipeline of primary care
physicians who will make Southwest
Florida their home."

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Study: Many Medicaid patients with lupus stop taking meds


By BOB MASSEY
FEELING FIT CORRESPONDENT

A significant number of Medicaid
patients who have lupus stop taking
their medications.
That's the conclusion a recent
study by Dr. Jinoos Yazdany, associate
director of the lupus clinic at the
University of California- San Francisco
Medical Center, and her colleagues.
She presented her findings at the an-
nual meeting of the American College
of Rheumatology.
Lupus is a disease in which the
immune system mistakenly attacks
healthy tissues and cells which
can lead to damage of the skin, blood
vessels, joints and organs. There
are many kinds of lupus, and it has
no known cause and no cure.
However, there are medications that
can help control the illness.
The most common type, systemic
lupus erythematosus (SLE) which
was the subject of the study- affects
many parts of the body. Symptoms
of lupus can include joint pain or
swelling, fatigue, muscle pain, red
rashes that often appear on the face
and a fever with no apparent cause.
"We found in this nationwide
cohort of people on Medicaid who
have lupus, over 20,000 patients -
less than half of patients adhered
to their treatment," Yazdany said. "For
some drugs, it was actually less than
a third of individuals. We calculated
adherence using something called an
average medication possession ratio.
We're actually looking at the days
covered by the days supplied that was
dispensed by the pharmacy."
There were other surprises in the
numbers as well.
The study used data from 2000 to
2006 to identify more than 23,000
patients with SLE who were taking
at least one immunosuppressive or


antimalarial drug, tracking use of the
drugs over a period of 180 days. The
mean age of the patients was 38 years
old. With women more vulnerable
to developing lupus than men, 94
percent of the patients were female,
and the racial and ethnic makeup was
diverse (40 percent black, 34 percent
white, 16 percent Hispanic, 5 percent
Asian, and 5 percent other). The high-
est proportion 36 percent lived
in the southern United States.
The study brought to light several
factors. For example, younger people
were less likely to adhere to treatment
with several of the drugs. There
were also some racial/ethnic differ-
ences with traditionally vulnerable
populations.
"These are Medicaid patients who
have low income, and among those
patients black, Hispanic and
native populations have the lowest
adherence," Yazdany noted.
One surprise she found were some
of the geographic variations. For
example, people on Medicaid who
lived in the Northeast were more
likely to adhere to treatment than
people who lived in other areas of the
United States.
The obvious question is why
patients with access to medications
would stop taking them. Yazdany has
her own theories.
"I think that there are probably a
variety of reasons," she said. "I've
done my professional time taking
care of people with lupus, and I think
sometimes as physicians, we may
actually be unaware of our patients'
adherence. And I think patients may
not be as forthcoming about this issue
because they perhaps want to be their
own physicians."
She explained that some patients
might have had unasked questions
about the potential side effects of
the medications, or an inadequate


uideisaniiding ,if, hio beiiehciial tie\
aie
Tlheie miii;i\ ilo be co,,st bliiei,.-
Yazdaim\ idded Even thi:uIgh the
coc-pia\ ,iie geneiill\ \ei\ I,:,n in the
Medicaid piogi m fo,, diCNgS l.l.ll-
ly between $1 aind $4 that still mai\
be ai b.iiiei f,:,i ,:ome people if the\
ha e ai lot ,:i 4 inedic.ii' ,-, "
N,:,x\ that the s.tud\ lihas identihed
the pioblemn, ie i,_ Scleiilthc ieeseaicli
studied, need t, be coi iducted t,
determine itr, l,'lutiin
Ol)e exciligg ,tud\ that I'm a
pa-it I ,_-,' I f [ t.ulded bv ,11-ilig;-liz;-tolnl
called tle P-itieit-C-eteied Resea-icli
Outcllmeie Iititute. with 'i nlme ciil-
leaigue it thie Uimueiit\ ,,of Iiabaina.i
Yazd;-m\, -IId \\e'ie actiuall\ goIg to,
develop aiid tea t ;i tieaitineie deci-
sio ;aid to1-i mimoilV p-ileiit$, withl
kidieV in\kolkeinet in luhptu, ()ne of
the thuiig tlihi-I ui, decii-iio aid \will
do i ;actuill\ th alk to, p-iitlelnt a, ,iut
thell coice n, aiild lleii 1 leil-, to
tre itineiit ;id incoi- piia e lihai it,
p;-it ie t-[ le tdl\ ii i;-itelil l lhalt cair
recall\ lielp vlrh rlit e _c-,linin u ic ti-iiiO
piece, .0 tlihat \e c;in im;ike Suie lihat
we c _ei tlie belieitl aid d-if't r ,-ei -
estim t;ite thle llks. ;-ild ulldeilt-iitid
the ilks ,if ii_-ii-idlie ie ce "
Accoidmg thYazdan\. the b,:ott,,in
line i tihait thleie i ,1i tuigent need
foi better c lininiuictih i iiO beteenii
p i-ileiit ;-iid thlieii dtihie-, ;iiiouid tr e
issue o-f aidlieieice t_, l t it cii-ir h be
addi essed
I \\,:uld like phivciciaii, tr a imike
assessIing aisking paitieiits aibolut
adlieieice ai ceiitiil tilig tihait tlie\
actuall\ do m a- I chih.i-l eiico_ itei.
becau,ee \\e ki,-,\\ fi,-in this data that
m,:ie than lialfof tliethe patient, aie
not taking thleii inedic nitiii. ;-id
that's ie;hill\ gong to put them at 11sk
foi pool outconmes-rc hIie said It',
as impoi-t, iit- ,- iv ;-ul\llig else tihat
we dc, iucludiug piesciibiug trle


COMMON LUPUS SYMPTOMS
r'e3u'e lIupu+ :3in 3ffe:t '1, nirriv dilereriet r:'rq]3n 3
,vile rarie:]e ,:,f vnlt,:,nic ,:nri C,:, ur ihe i e vnl: ,t,:nit
na'v :,:'nipe ard ,j I,:1 ] r, j jirIf ririt >vni:,t,:,i. ni av
a 3ippar at ejirferit tinie djurinq the ,:oure :,I thIe
Ihe i n ':,t :,:nini:,rin vni'it:ni ,:,i upuc iih,:h arie thIe
canme fi:,r fieniale ardj nale 3are
* treine tti:lue ir, rien l
*Heada,3:hpe
*f 'airiul ,:Ir c ,:Illenri |iiit
* hener
* Arieniia l'v nriunil:er c:,f rijed b:il: :eij illc c:r henc,,-
I:]l:,bi c:,r lI:,v 1 ,, l cil,.l,,,',,l iinlunie l
* '.eIlhirn: ledl in1 fiIeel : harnj arj dan, rd'urnij
eves
* P'airi in :hpt ,:n ijr tee ir ireathmirq Ieurinvl
* :utierfIv- h :,:ip j ra h a,.:rc:, pp:eec. r ,j rin':e
* .un- i:cr i,:hr ieriigiiniv l h,:,iti eri9iniiitl
* Hair I,,
SAtricn rni l tibli'ij :l'I:iriq
* iriierc Iurninq vhii arIj r :cr btilue hr i .ri :,:II
i:avriaudc hrieri.,nieririI
* Mcuth i:ir rin,:'e uli:er
Man riv :,if thiee vni:,t:ini c:,:,:ur in c:Ihier illripe e In
ia,:t lu uc i c,'nimeIinie ,:all3e thIeqre lt iniitial,'r
t'e,:auce itc >vni:,ti:ni are ',lenri 1i4e Ihe v ni:,ti:,nic ":i
rhieun t.C'id arthn riri iblc::ii'd ji:ir:'rer riiornilvahli3
,jihaeitei Ihvr,:'i j :ir,::ileni. Lvnieicp3acpe ar.d a
riunitier "fI hearti lurniq nfui:le 3rd.l ,'rie ,i:hi3iea
.iu rlav an inirci rIrian roie h in h I ,irinq vi:'ur i,::lI: r
niariaqpe v,:ur ,ic.ae e,
Litlen I:, v,:'ur t,'dv a quec ii:in arnj l tav iri:ilheiij

il.', l~ t' sLl. V r f',.'l. iklll,.',,l 4.'I 1ii: lll I'nl n I 1 1 1 h1'1.A -..'I l:.l

di g I1n tlI e tIIe police If ke pIecIIhbe
inedici-I IiiA tIiiat people di-iii 't tike.
thlieii 'ie iit-, goi-g ;- icleii e tle
-utcl'lme lihil bthli tle di-ict-ii, ;-id trle
pitient ;-iie hoi ping fi,-I
F'_iI piieii., tlhe Iml-,t imp,-il -iiil
lihgii t i r ti be \eil\ hi cliie t ;iid open
witrli ll lAtf lieii l iehiltli ciie pl,\-idei'
;ib,:,ut side effect., ci-,t. tlih :_g, i lhit
;-iie miakiiig it difficult fi t lhem toi r ike
tlheii miedhiatlki, Ti-l, S ;\V lite\ c;ail
ie;ill\ ,:,ik a;-it it tgetliei withl tlheii
d,:,ct,:i,, 01 iiiel,,We. r put ; i plin in
police"


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:Page 8


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Study shows how social media engages people with chronic diseases


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Using Facebook chats to convey
health information is becoming more
common. A study at Hospital for
Special Surgery (HSS) in New York
City set out to find the best way to
boost participation in the chats to
raise awareness of lupus, an autoim-
mune disease.
Specifically, investigators at HSS
wanted to see if collaboration with a
community-based lupus organization
would increase patient awareness
and participation. They found that
the number of people participating
in the chat tripled when the hospital
joined forces with the S.L.E. Lupus
Foundation to publicize the chat.
The study, titled, "Utilizing
Facebook Chats to Convey Health
Information to Lupus Patients at the
Lupus-Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Center of Excellence at Hospital for
Special Surgery," was presented at the
American College of Rheumatology/
Association of Rheumatology Health
Professionals Annual Meeting on Oct.
28 in San Diego.
The Lupus Center of Excellence at
Special Surgery uses Facebook chats
to raise awareness, reach a wider au-
dience, allow for interaction between
patients and health care providers,
and answer patients' questions about
lupus. The chats help to educate
patients about their disease and the
FIL P importance of maintaining relation-
FILE PHOTO ships with their rheumatologists.
"The Facebook chats provide a
new venue to get information from
rheumatologists and other health
professionals who understand this
complex disease.
Lupus patients are hungry for
information, and with social media,
we can address their specific con-
cerns in real time," said Jane Salmon,
MD, director of the Lupus Center of
S Excellence and senior author of the
study.
Three chats have taken place to
date. "The first two were promoted
an help through advertising and promotion
on HSS's Facebook and Twitter
vibrant accounts, targeted pitching of lupus
bloggers and awareness groups, word
Living, of mouth, and by flyers.
For the third chat, HSS collaborat-
ed with the S.L.E. Lupus Foundation,
using similar advertising strategies,"
said Elyse Bernstein, assistant di-
rector of Public Relations and Social
Media at Hospital for Special Surgery.


STUDENT

FROM PAGE 6
knew them, he knew what they did
and was excited about it I knew
this is something that he needs to go
to," Mary said. "There are going to
be powerful and influential people
there that John and I can't provide
for him otherwise. Going back to
being a surgeon, Bobby's kind of a
loner, he has magnificent fingers that
need to do something other than just
play video games. You just notice his
hands." She added that, because of
Corso's natural love of learning, her
and John's job as parents is to recog-
nize their son's strengths, encourage
and motivate him and help him to
be the best he can be.
"When I was younger and wanted


Participants were instructed to
"like" the HSS Facebook page and
post their questions. A panel of
HSS rheumatologists, an obstetri-
cian-gynecologist, social workers,
physical therapists, nutritionists, and
a rheumatology nurse practitioner
responded to as many questions as
possible over one hour. Remaining
questions were distributed to the
experts for answers and turned into
a blog series on "HSS on the Move"
(www.hss.edu/onthemove).
The first chat in May 2012 focused
on lupus and medications. A total of
2,280 users saw the chat post, with
60 questions and comments from
20 users. Promotional Facebook
posts before the chat were shared
247 times. The HSS Facebook page
received 30 new likes on the day of
the chat, and 21 users liked the chat
post.
The second chat in October 2012
discussed lupus, pregnancy and
reproductive health. This time,
2,203 people saw the chat, with 25
questions and comments from 12
users. The promotional Facebook
posts were shared 81 times. The HSS
Facebook page received 34 new likes
on the day of the chat.
In May 2013, HSS collaborated
with the S.L.E. Lupus Foundation to
publicize the third chat on lupus and
general health. This time, a total of
6,624 people saw the chat. The HSS
Facebook page received 332 new likes
on the day of the chat, compared
with the daily average for the month
of 34 likes. The chat post drew 78
likes. For this chat, 123 participants
representing six countries and 28
states posted 162 questions and com-
ments. The promotional Facebook
posts before the chat (from HSS and
the S.L.E. Foundation) were shared
288 times.
When the hospital's Lupus Center
joined forces with the S.L.E. Lupus
Foundation, awareness of the chat
and participation soared by about
200 percent. Participation was also
higher when the topics were more
general. Lower participation in
the second chat may be related to
the private nature of the topic and
privacy concerns.
"The findings suggest that collabo-
ration between health care providers
and disease-specific community
organizations can enhance patient
participation and increase our ability
to educate patients about staying
healthy," said Salmon.


to go to high school, my parents
didn't tell me what I should do," John
said. "They asked me what I wanted
to do, and then they pointed out
some tools that I could use. I applied
to 10 high schools and was accepted
to all 10, and I had to narrow it down
to a vocational high school. That
was a good experience for me, and
I did the same with Bobby. I didn't
force him to go anywhere. I made my
recommendation and he took it from
there. He's done pretty good with his
choices so far."
Corso offers his own piece of
advice to his peers: "Try to figure out
what you want to do in life and try to
pursue that. Don't be closed-minded
and try to go for one thing but at
the same time, be consistent and
persistent in what you want to do. Be
open to things that are similar to it,
things that you enjoy."


Assisted Living Facility H3915


o The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 9


feelingfit.com


ly






~Page 10 www.sunnewspapers.net feelingfit.com The Sun /SLiricIay NcveIvIbeI 17 2013


Living well: More than just an idea


By PAOLA DALY
LuPus FOUNDATION OF AMERICA

This year's annual American College
of Rheumatology meeting in San
Diego brought together approximate-
ly 15,000 excited visitors to attend
thousands of lively sessions and
meetings. Several hundred of these
meetings focused on lupus, drawing
in visitors to learn about new findings
in treatments, quality of life and living
well with lupus.
After I attended more than 15
sessions about lupus, two overall
topics stayed with me as I traveled
back to Washington, D.C.: infection
prevention and reproductive health.
Regardless of the specific topic, the
overall theme was about living well
with lupus. Living well can seem like
a fuzzy concept that is difficult to
define and it may even feel hazy to
you.
The truth is, it can seem that way,
if you can't walk away with concrete
recommendations. And that's why
I liked each of these topics: they


presented practical, concrete steps
that people with lupus, and their care
teams, can take to make living well
with lupus a reality.
With lupus, infections are not
trivial issues. They can cause serious
complications, are difficult to fight
off, and contribute significantly to
death rates. In one study, pneumonia
was the second most common cause
of hospitalization, right after flares.
While these are frightening facts,
researchers point out that there are
effective vaccines available to help
fight and prevent these infections.
The flu vaccine and the pneumococ-
cal vaccine are just two of these, and
they are safe and available to help you
fight off infections that can deeply
affect your health. Talk with your
health care provider and make sure all
your shots are up to date.
Equally important to your well-
being is the topic of reproductive
health. Researchers from around
the world, as far away as Qatar and
Spain, presented in-depth research
on lupus and reproductive health.


A commonn:n tiiead tli,'ugh,,Out these
pieseiirtis x;n-s tie need t I,:, look
;it iepioductie hlieailthli tlui,:ugh,:Iut ;-i
iVO' n iai's life-sp;ai It'sr i o t Sti -t b'aout
pieg;i-icV it's ;abo,;ti health tli t ie
\li,:,le peis-,,n i nd hvlii g \\ell to, ;-
lifetine
O(ne sessIi;,n I lttelded p,;iied outi
thai ,t nome letiirmItologirts doi't feel
c,:,mi ,: fittralle 1I, piep-iiedi tIalking
,:, tle pii tireisr ab' oit lepioductirVe
;- ld se\ial lhealthl Tis llietuiinatr l,:,:I
clinic \i,-lked rto -id ;ai pl;aictic;l
solutionii b\ calling tie lepiodducti\e
lhealthl clinic ;and hlielping them t 11 11tin-
deri-taid moie ;aboiIt lupus This \va\
tie mIedical staff ait tie pioducticrle
lhealthl clinic and tie ilieumaiinItologists
xeie :in trie samine page ;ia:b'ot plild-
iig tle bert caie to t lte ptrieirts
I a'lso \-ieied a scieirihc p-,stei pie-
seln;irioi that einplhasized tlIt \o''it
c;-I pl;I\ V ;-i ctil\e l le i V \,:,Lit iepio-
dhctic\e lhealthl caie Foi example, each
time \ouii ;I,,Lnd do'ctoi decide tr:
clihaJige \voiii rieainleit., talk tiI him
,:i hei ab'oit lir:,\ tisn might affect
fa;inil\ plai-innig aind hliat steps \,:,i


caiin take t, piepaie t':i ;t piegninc\, if
tlihat i ,_-,nl etlii g \,_-,i de'iie
Oheiall. tle f':,cuti ,,n piekentire
liealli aiid lihIng iell gak\e me hope
It' eiicoi;iga g go- kiil'-,r thai. even eii-
\\e eeaicli t- 'ihiie ;iand bettei lu ptl
tieaitmeiitS. \,-,i caii ,till take practical
step, t, in;aiiage \-iii lupu, ;tand hlielp
\,ou li\e i\ell with ;i \ei\ difficult
disease [lmpo-tiith. It ;-il-, m;ide me
ie;alize that.i moie aiitld moie. liealtlih
ca-ie pil, e-1 lO ila- ;-ie fctlc il-. g o tii
lUi-kt ,on h t ,i_-,o ig -,it iliIde \o-,l
cellk. but alo h lia-t'r go'lg onii urli
\o 1;-i ;-I peillii \oviii ell-being
;ind \oiii quailrt\ f life
Tiul double focus leieif'ices tlie
idea thliat l-Ing i\ell with lupuri i t;ail
fin ;a lia;z\ c,:ncept Rathliei it', one ,_f
thlie moi-t implliiamit ex, thalit hliealthli
pil'fev'oi:iiakl caiin take tr pi:\-ide thlie
best caie aid tieaitineii t-i \,-,Li
P['70i7o E 0n' i's 1tilt" ithcons nuild
LWnIln/i S01i1Oi iliini.70ti [oi il _iL ius
Fouildi7lOil rO AMilli ITi s Tins ii L'[
ni7 p t Oili i S tOi S1' of 1`10l Oi'iilIi7ilOil
Foi MiOWiMt ilOiili7intiol. 1iSiI SIt'1'
lhupuls oig


At least 1.5 million Americans diagnosed with lupus


By PATRICIA G. HORWELL
FEELING FIT CORRESPONDENT

Rashes, joint pain, dizziness,
abdominal pain, frequent fevers,
anemia. Each is a symptom of a host
of ailments. But when they are seen
in one person, they, as well as other
symptoms, could be indications of
lupus.
It's a complicated disease and often
takes years to diagnose. An autoim-
mune disease, lupus damages other
parts of the body inside and out.
The immune system's job is to
produce proteins called antibodies.
These antibodies protect the body
from bacteria, germs and viruses.
When a person has an autoimmune
disease it simply means the body
cannot tell the difference between
healthy tissue and those invaders. It
begins to create autoantibodies that
attack and destroy healthy tissue. This
autoimmune action will cause pain
and inflammation in the body as well
and possibly damage organs.
People with lupus will often go
for periods where they feel fine.
Eventually, a flare-up occurs, and the
symptoms return.
According to the Lupus Foundation
of America, at least 1.5 million
Americans today have lupus. But
since it is so difficult to pinpoint,
there's really no way to know how


many cases there are. It is estimated
that more than 16,000 Americans are
diagnosed each year.
If diagnosed, it is important that a
patient see a rheumatologist, a doctor
who specializes in treating people
with this disease. Unfortunately, there
is no cure yet, but there are courses of
treatment available. Since no medica-
tion will work for all, a patient often
goes through a trail period of hit and
miss, until the right drug or combina-
tion of drugs works. Early diagnosis is
important in order to prevent damage
to the body's organs.
Some patients with mild cases
might get relief from simple, over-
the-counter anti-inflammatory
medications like aspirin, ibuprofen
and naproxin. For more severe cases,
stronger prescription drugs must be
used to regulate the immune system
and protect the body from continued
damage. Prednisone has been effec-
tive in controlling lupus. But it also
can cause reactions such as mood
swings, increased appetite, and puff-
iness around the face. Antimalarial
and immunosupressive drugs are
also used. However, much research
is ongoing to come up with new and
better drugs to combat the disease. In
fact, two years ago, Belimumab, the
first new medication in 50 years to
treat lupus, was approved and is being
used successfully.


pi*r-


Live well!


Read Feeling Fit


revery Sunday

... .., .. ...,


It im' helpful t ieacli out t i,:, ligaJiii-
zarti-,, i like tlie Lupus F'-ilidatrl- ii ,_- ,f
knei icI tf-''i tlpp'l 'i ;rid iIIf' iina;i'nll
Thle f iund;ittr:',In suggesting that hlien
miev Iv diagi'_1oed. ;i peil-ln ib caIutIlou,
;ibaout telling a-n einplovel ;ib'alut tlie
dismease .kMlioughl tlie disease ingliht
iitel feie withli ixv-: k petif' :iiilice
;at ,-mine poiit. ;-ni empl;\,ei liai, n',
ugliht t,-, ;-i peil,_-,l'i medical litri\
.Alid it im illegal t,:i ,an emnplo\ei tI,:,
dismiss;-III emnpl'o\ee ,:1 pa\ hni ;-I
lo ei (-tl;\ t i lia;Viig tlie disease
LF. leco,-'ninemid1 r t;aikig co-lnpl;iitv
of thliat i t,, tlie Equal Emplo,\ineit
O(pp.:-[ tuim t\ C':numm i:n
People i w li lupui need tr: take cale
,f thlieii bodies better thaliin tlie iest
of thlie pOpullatili;n E\elcie. liealtli\
foodi'., a\,oidmig m,:'okmig aind ailcoliol.
;lld getting iert all hlielp t: build tip
tlie imuntume Sv\tel Ir il,-, implllt-
;-iIt t,, pi'-tect \,:tuiself fi,-in tlie til1
;-illd tr-, ;avi-id tie, ft l lrulr-itl,_-,i ;-
iIniucli -a possible
Foi 1O1 ilo iinilillOil Oii o l li 'ltll
lpuisv. isit{ lie Lupus FoilildinflOil o
.Aill'i i7i7i [ In'ln'I t'IIlups oig. tie L tupus
E'OSL'i li I s[iI lt [iilt" i7[ I'l'I lii '-
SLi'lllilStiKtilt Oii. Oi tlit \iillOili7l
[iIStitiltOS of HOi7li i It'l'i ili7il1S ilill
gor

GOLF TOURNAMENT
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7!
Millennium Physician Group is hosting its flisi golf IournamentI
benefl [hie American Heart Associalior'
Did you Know thai hear disease Is Ihe leading causeOf death in
men and women' that s why Millennium Pnysicwan Gioup hIs I
up with the Ameii(an HearT Asoialior I to raise awaieriess We
to keep oui community health'


FACTS ABOUT LUPUS

*Lupus is not contagious, not even
through sexual contact.
*Lupus is not like or related to cancer.
*Lupus is not like or related to HIV or
AIDS.
*Lupus can range from mild to
life-threatening and should always be
treated by a doctor. With good medical
care, most people with Ilupus can lead
a full life.
*Lupus strikes mostly women of child-
bearing age (15-44). However, mnen,
children, and teenagers develop lupus,
too.
*Women of color are two to three times
more likely to develop lupus than
Caucasians.
*People of all races and ethniic groups
can develop lupus.

Soute: Lupus Fountdono o[ Amenca


Participation Millennium Physician
Individual Golfers S70 Group Golf Tournament
Foursome S280 Saturday, December 7. 2013
Sponsorships still available Kingsway Country Club
13625 SW Kingsway Cir
LakeSuzy.FL 34269


MILLENNIUM
P Hi ( i \N C- RP' I P
American
SHeart
Association.
To sign up and more information please visit to
www.MillenniumPhysidcian.com/golf
Prinl Sponsor Or call (941) 979-5717
CT IrNJ 4_________k__


:Page 10


The Sun/Sunclay 2 0.:,v i ,,l: I "UI


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com




The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 11



StC 3tdicth- Arttrctmcnt


tor vcnous dis ca-,cdiatcmw

ckanegryar iz c..
m0



"Severe venous disease with ulcers are --m
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-Dr. Joyce


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RESULTS: Since 1998, Dr. Joyce has developed, refined
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VEIN TREATMENT TEAM: A professional staff including
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Toys for Tots
Collection Site
11/14 through 12/13
25092 Olympia Avenue
Punta Gorda 941-575-0123
Visit us at www~jvai.com




Page 12 www.sunnewspapers.net feelingfit.com The Sun/nSundy ,J:,vefl-I,' I



Lung Cancer Research Council holds 5K run/walk

The Lung Cancer Research Council held its first annual Southwest Florida Lung
Cancer5K Run/Walk and Mile of Memories Walk on Nov. 9 at Charlotte Sports
Park, Port Charlotte. Tom Cappiello, president of the Port Charlotte-based
council, estimated the event drew 600 runners, walkers and volunteers, and
raised $77,000 to date. Proceeds benefit research, education and awareness
programs in Southwest Florida. For more information or to make a donation,
www.lungcancerresearchcouncil.org.






II



PH ,:-.T ,'S-., B V P I l LILLIS
Lung Cancer Research Council member Marc Cohen and Tom Cappiello, council president, were
among the driving forces behind the first annual Southwest Florida Lung Cancer 5K Run/
Walk and Mile of Memories Walk, held Nov. 9 at Charlotte Sports Park, Port Charlotte. Cohen is
Above, from left are Cindy Noriega, director of nursing at the Virgina B. Andes Volunteer Clinic, currently battling stage 4 lung cancer; Cappiello is a 6-year survivor.
Mary Stuart, clinic volunteer, and Becky Lewis, race participant.






-..........









Team Breath Savers took part in the Southwest Florida Lung Cancer 5K Run/Walk.




RUNNE

iT H A NI Cancer survivors, caregivers and their loved ones took part in a special Mile of Memories Walk to
honor those who had died from lung cancer and those battling the disease.


Pulmonologists Dr. Lohaliz Bobe and Dr. Fabrizio Monge took part in the race in honor of their
patients who have lung cancer or are survivors of the disease.


S 'I k. r ,
To scLIhetI dlanl
.1ppoincilentlC4 l
239.936.4706
_ollnn1 Vn Con lon


iJ,:,-l.E Alessi OD M,:ha lJ Cllirins MD FACS EliL'l-th ,M Gearrig OD


VSION Dr Ncoe AlesO

NO CCPIN EWPTIN SfrSomrees iv
ey exam s, cntct en fti gsaduretey ae


MICHAEL R MARKGRAF, D.D.S.
General & Implant Dentistry
Former faculty member of Marquette University School of Dentistry --
301 W. Olympia Ave., Punta Gorda 575-2273
www.drmarkgraf.com 50458805


V4





SThe Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


Runners take off from the starting line at the Southwest Florida Lung Cancer 5K Run/Walk, held Nov. 9 at Charlotte Sports Park in Port Charlotte.


Representatives from MedSol Clinical Research Center, Port Charlotte, staffed a booth at the
Southwest Florida lung cancer awareness race on Nov. 9.


Take Charge
of Your Health.


KnowYour

Choices,

That is why HCA West Florida affiliated hospitals are in-network
with 17 Medicare Advantage plans, including:


&Aetna
PBeHealthy America
&Blue Cross Blue Shield
of Florida
NCarePlus Health Plans
&Coventry Healthcare
&Florida Healthcare Plus
&Freedom Health
&Humana
&MMolina Healthcare


&Optimum Health Care
&Physicians United Plan
&Preferred Care Partners
&Simply Healthcare Plans
&Sunshine State
Health Plan
tUltimate Health Plan
(United Healthcare
P(WellCare Health Plans


Please visit www.Medicare.gov/find-a-plan
to confirm plan options in your zip code.


Blake Medical Center I Brandon Regional Hospital I Doctors Hospital of Sarasota I Edward White Hospital
Englewood Community Hospital I Fawcett Memorial Hospital I Largo Medical Center I Medical Center of Trinity
Memorial Hospital of Tampa I Northside Hospital I Oak Hill Hospital I Palms of Pasadena Hospital
SRegional Medical Center Bayonet Point I South Bay Hospital I St. Petersburg General Hospital I Town & Country Hospital
S1-877-4-HCA-DOCS I HCAWestFlorida.com


Karen and Ethan Brown (left) and Cindy and Noah Fisher participated with the Millennium Physician
Group team at the first annual Southwest Florida Lung Cancer 5K Run/Walk.


Medals line a table at the Southwest Florida Lung Cancer 5K Run/Walk.


Paqe 13


feelingfit.com


www.sunnewspapers.net






~Page 14 www.sunnewspapers.net feelingfit.com The Sun /SLrcIay NcveIvIbeI 17 2013


Good friends


Tom Cappiello


LIVING WITH CANCER MY DIARY
I was diagnosed with stage 3A locally advanced
adenocarcinoma (nonsmall cell lung cancer) in
October of 2007. lam one of the few survivors of
this terminal disease.
My diary is written to give cancer patients hope and
understanding about life after a cancer diagnosis.
This is for those who are being treated for cancer
and those caring for a loved one.
If you are interested in becoming involved in lung
cancer awareness, research and early detection,
contact Tom Cappiello at tecappiello@gmail.com.


The first thing I do every morning
when I wake up is walk my dog, Moe,
to get some exercise. A morning walk
with the dog is "me time" to relax
and think before the day begins. As
soon as I wake up, before I wash my
face or even brush my teeth, I throw
on a pair of gym pants and a hat, get
music going on my iPhone, put on
my crocs, put the dog on a leash and
walk out the door into our neighbor-
hood. You can spot us most mornings
walking one route or another. Moe is
running around sniffing out squirrels
and rabbits while I enjoy inspired
music and the beauty of the early
morning. Every day of life, post a
cancer diagnosis, is a good day.
It just so happened that this
morning, written on the rear window
of a car I passed in our neighbor-
hood, was the message: "What Are
You Grateful For?" It was an obvious
reference to God's blessings and
all that is good in life. I walked the
neighborhood this morning thinking
of all the ways I have been blessed
and the loving family and many good
friends I have.
The night before I had attended the
monthly JAM (Jesus and Me) Session
organized by my good friend, Janet
Minerich. Janet's inspired idea is to
provide a forum to demonstrate how
God is amongst us, hears our hopes
and prayers, and intervenes in our
daily lives. She asked me to be the
first JAM Session speaker in October
and I talked about my personal
miracle being cured from lung


cancer and the role faith played in
my healing.
November's presenter was another
friend, David Campbell, who told
the story of how he was healed
from a spinal stroke that left him
partially paralyzed. David's miracu-
lous healing happened in a church
service presided over by Pastor Alex,
a visiting minister from Cuba. No one
could be more grateful than David
or I for the blessings of being saved
from dreadful pain and disease.
Last night, we prayed for other
friends who are suffering, including
one woman I know who shattered
her pelvis falling off a kitchen
step-ladder; another friend who is
single Mom with two small children
recently diagnosed with stage 4
breast cancer, a third friend with
stage 4 lung cancer putting up an
inspired fight for her life, and a
fourth friend who was just recently
diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer.
The Cuban minister who had healed
David attended the JAM Session
and prayed with us that all who are
suffering be healed. I am hopeful
that just a mustard seed of faith can
save them.
The fact is that anyone can be
living a perfectly happy existence one
moment and then face life threaten-
ing disaster in the next. This week,
in particular, I am thinking of all the
suffering souls in The Philippines. I
am also thinking about my 25 year
old nephew, Tim, who went to work
one morning this summer at the


Na \a;-id imi \\suiingi:n D (C aind
X\\;a- c,'niifi'ned b\ a mad gtiiiniaii
\\When I sai\ Timu ia I\ daughlitel'
ixeddiiig in Octclbei. hlie coiifen ed
lihat lie vas shiakeii b the evelt aid
suddeniil\ icalized ti, shilii life caii
be
N, one iS iiniiile fiOlin facing life
iluearteiiig cliallemiges
I c-,irmmue ro be co_-mcemied t-,i lthe
iulli'iS -, cf Anei calh -S, like uni\self,
S\\I li aIpplh g' about t lieii life aind
oiie da\ vake uip to face ;i life rliieat-
el lig_ di-i_. ,-, I ,-, f late-sage lung
c;-icei t lie deadhest f aill ca;iceie
_Sa ;I coiitiV. ve c;aii amid sIituldh d
bettei \\e kii-i e c;aiin reduce t lie
mot iralmv fioin lmig c;aiincei bv uri-
lizmig ctiii ie l\ l I a aIlable techllIiog
10 1-1 cieei i im gli l lk 'populartinii
Out of 1.000 ait a 1k people scieenied.
x\\e i'uldl expect to r ind 20 nei lung
c;aiicei cases Thle eailiei te hid
cases,_- f lunmi caiicei. t lie bettei tlie
cliiices ;i parmemti caii be cuied
I lia\e ro -sa\ I amn \ei\ giateful ro
m in II;i\ fiieid iiI thlie (C-hal ilre
Co(_mIrm co,- inni\ hlit,:, caiine -,rut
No\ '-Ir to pa irtcipate as, a iiiIei.
\xalkeioi \v,-,oliiieei iii smutlivesr
Fl,-iida Lunig Caicei 5W RPnm'\\;alk
;aiId M ile '-,f Nlel'i-ieS \\;ilk ro iaim e
ftliid t,-I limig c;aiicei scleem iig ;aiid
eail\ detectioiin ()Outi ,ob nnii' wil be
1t pur tlie fuidS, xe lia e ialed t,
g:OOil liSt Oi MOM1 lIOCnl/ cOiiiilitji'
Tlie' Lung'1 _-ncit" EI'seci 'COuncIl
is i7t't_ ''_ I / iliiuio s hlOii ;l L' D
.."1 Foi MiOW MitOii ii ir 1'ISi H '1'1'
hltiii' nicCiDCO WS Li7 otii iciL_/ or


Mindfulness meditation can be effective tool in reducing stress


By AMIT SOOD, MD
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY

Dear Mayo Clinic: Is it true that
mindfulness exercises can help
reduce stress? What does it involve?
Meditation is a group of practices
that train the mind to be more
focused and relaxed, as well as more
compassionate and less judgmental.
Mindfulness is one form of medita-
tion that involves focusing intently
on the present: what you're feeling
or sensing in each moment. It can
be a very effective tool in reducing
stress, increasing self-awareness, and
bringing an overall sense of calm to
everyday life.
It's normal for people's minds to
wander throughout the day. In fact,
studies have shown that the average
person is distracted for nearly 50
percent of the day. And unfortunately,
nearly two-thirds of that time that
the mind is wandering, it's actually
focused on neutral or negative
thoughts. Thinking about how much
there is to do, or about regrets from
the past can cause stress, anxiety or
even depression.
People who practice mindfulness
and other forms of meditation, how-
ever, learn how to better control what
they focus on, or direct their attention
to. This allows them to move away
from negative thinking, which can

fib44' ia/iere/ettwsak/rrntAM


lead to reduced stress and anxiety,
as well as better overall mood. And it
works not only during the actual time
spent meditating, but also throughout
the day. Those who regularly practice
mindfulness can quickly recognize
when the mind is wandering, and are
therefore able to redirect it to focus on
something more positive.
Many great books, mobile appli-
cations ("apps") and other online
resources are available that can guide
you through mindfulness and other
types of meditation. But mindfulness
exercises can also be done on your
own, wherever you are, without any
formal training.
There are a few different ways to
practice mindfulness. The most basic
is to just pay attention and focus on
your breath. Sit in a quiet place with
your back straight, but not tense. As
you breathe in and out, pay attention
to how the air feels at the tip of your
nose, making the inhalation and
exhalation more subtle. Consider how
your abdomen expands and collapses.
It is normal for your mind to wander,
but when it does, don't get discour-
aged. Just return your focus to your
breathing.
Another way to be mindful is to
find an everyday object a cup or a
pencil and look at it in a new way.
Find a detail about the object that
you may not have noticed before, and



flu usUoodlwuwot lqorflslSHOLV
we4ely muhe to oNtlde rsocroantoIn


Every Thuruduy mu muo

SUNAM-W-U


become more aware of its character-
istics. Study it intently. The more that
you do this, the more likely it is that
you'll find things around you more
interesting.
Starting each day with a gratitude
meditation may also help with your
practice. When you wake up in the
morning, before you even get out of
bed, take a few deep breaths. Think
about five people in your life that
you're grateful for. As you breathe in
slowly and deeply, picture the face of
one of these people. Try to "see" him
or her clearly. Then, while breathing
out slowly and deeply, send this
person silent gratitude. Repeat this
with all five people without rushing
through the exercise, taking time to
enjoy the few seconds you spend


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The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 15


When a friend is sick


By HELENA OLIVIERO
THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION

Friends didn't know what to say to
Letty Cottin Pogrebin after her 2009
cancer diagnosis.
Conversations with well-inten-
tioned friends turned awkward. Some
said nothing. Others talked too much.
Cottin Pogrebin, author of the new
book, "How to Be a Friend to a Friend
Who's Sick," interviewed dozens of
people, including several in her wait-
ing room, and quickly realized how
common it is for people to struggle
with what to say, and what to do,
when a friend faces a serious illness.
Unfortunately, sometimes what is
said is so off the mark, it can make
the sick friend feel even worse.
Her true-story examples of what
not to say include the following:
*A woman who underwent a
mastectomy was told, "At least you're
already married."
*When a woman who was di-
agnosed with cancer eight years
after her husband, a New York City
firefighter, died in the collapse of the
World Trade Center, a friend ex-
claimed, "Wow! You must have really
bad karma. How come you always
attract bad luck?"
*A woman shrieks to a friend
diagnosed with leukemia, "Wow. A
girl in my office just died of that! Wait!
It wasn't leukemia! It was lymphoma.
I mixed up my L's."
And then there are all the useless
cliches: Everything happens for a rea-
son. Everyone's dying. No one knows
how long they'll live. What doesn't kill
you makes you stronger. You don't
deserve this.
Cottin Pogrebin's book offers a
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healthy dose of sensible advice on
how to relate and help a sick friend.
The book is full of tips such as "Ten
Tips for Good Giving" and "Twenty
Rules for Good Behavior While
Visiting the Sick, Suffering, Injured
or Disabled" and is intertwined with
personal stories.
Pogrebin, a lifelong activist, writer
and co-founder of Ms. Magazine, has
a new mission: She wants to change
the norms of illness etiquette.
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
recently interviewed the author:
Q: Did you hear a lot of "what not
to say" comments yourself, or was
it more that your friends just didn't
know what to say?
A: In most cases, people simply
didn't know what to say. But I do talk
in the book about a friend of three
decades who lives 1,000 miles away
and emailed me. It's ironic that she
had breast cancer herself, because
she said: "Oh Letty, I was so sad to
hear the news! It's almost unbeliev-
able because you've always been so
vibrantly healthful and youthful. How
are you?" It was if she was saying,
"This is the end of who you are. You
will never be young or youthful."
It was an erosion of who I was as a
human being. It cut me to the quick.
Q: Why do we struggle so much
with what to say?
A: I think it's about our own vul-
nerability. When someone gets sick,
it reminds us of our mortality and
challenges. When we are younger,
we think this can happen to me. If
we are older, we think, this is going
to happen to me. It's a very natural
reaction in our culture. Illness is very
sanitized. We don't really talk about
what illness looks like and feels like


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and especially the big problems when
people don't get better.
Q: You hear a friend has been
diagnosed with cancer. What should
you say?
A: As soon as you are told a person
has cancer, you have an establishing
conversation that goes: 1. Tell me
what's helpful and what's not. 2. Tell
me if you want to be alone and when
you want company. 3. Tell me what to
bring and when to leave.
It makes us feel good to send a $50
houseplant or a basket with orange
cellophane with fruit you can't taste.
But it's not individualized.
When you say, "Tell me what you
really want me to bring" and you
mean it and you say it, and underline
it, boy this opens it up for everyone to
be honest and forthright. You set the
tone: This is our policy, to be truthful
with each other.
Q: What were the acts of kindness
or words said that made you feel
better while you were going through
your own treatment for breast
cancer?
A: Someone who said, "I have been
thinking about you, but I wanted
to make sure if I call you a couple
times a week, it is not annoying."
That person picked up on that getting
those calls twice a week was not
what I needed. I didn't want to be
"cancer girl," and if everyone called
me asking me "How are you?" that
would be a lot of calls ... I would say,
let's do email and I would send out
a group email. Other people want to
talk about their illness and what they
are going through. You have to shape
your response to the needs, person-
ality and condition of your friends as
well as the nature of the experience.


TIPS FOR HELPING
A SICK FRIEND
From Letty Cottin Pogrebin, author of"How to be
a Friend to a Friend who's Sick'."
1. Ask the person to be honest with you and all of
the person's friends whether it's zero visitors
or certain hours of the day.
2. Instead of saying,"Tell me if you need
anything',"ask: "What can I do to help?"
3. Don't bring food in a dish or container you want
returned. If you have no choice but to deliver your
lasagna pan and want it back, tell the patient you
will pick it up next time you come. Sick people
have enough on their minds; the obligation to
return your crockery would just add another
burden to their to-do list.
4. Rehearse the visit in your mind. Don't count on
spontaneity to start the conversation ball rolling.
Decide in advance on three or four subjects that
might stimulate discussion. Bring along an item
of interest: a newspaper clipping, a CD, a new
app. Watch a movie or TV show together. Bring a
jigsaw puzzle.
5. Think about your role in the visit. Ask yourself,
"What am I prepared to do and what can I expect
my visit to accomplish?" Consider helping out in
the following ways: cook a meal, tidy up, water
the plants, walk the dog, do the dishes, change
the sheets, etc.
6. On gift giving, try to personalize it. "When in
doubt, my rule is pamper,"says Cottin Pogrebin.
For a woman, consider a manicure or spa treat-
ment. For a man, perhaps an old-fashioned shave
at a barbershop.
7. Just show up. Here's how my daughter Abigail
put it in a recent email: "So much of friendship
is just being in the room. Not necessarily what
you say, give as a gift or write in a note just
showing up when it matters."


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:Page 16 www.sunnewspapers.net feelingfit.com The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


Implementing a tobacco-free workplace


STAFF REPORT
FEELING Firr

Pascale Edouard hopes more
employers will take advantage of a
free Florida Department of Health in
Sarasota County program.
Through its Smoke-Free Sarasota
program, the health department aims
to help employers launch tobacco-free
workplace initiatives or strengthen
those already in place from help
with policy development to educa-
tional materials and tools to help em-
ployees kick the habit, said Edouard,
an employer cessation specialist.
"For a business, making the choice
to implement or strengthen tobac-
co-free policies can help the bottom
line. Choices like making outdoor
areas and entryways smoke-free,
banning smoking indoors (if your
business is exempt from the Florida
Clean Indoor Air Act), and offering
help for employees who want to quit
can help you cut costs, raise revenue,
protect health, and increase worker
productivity," the Sarasota County
department's website says.
"More people in the United States
die from lung cancer than any oth-
er type. Most cases are caused by
smoking or exposure to second-hand
smoke," Edouard said. "November is
Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and
this is a great time for employers to
encourage a tobacco-free lifestyle.
Nov. 21 is also the American Cancer
Society's Great American Smokeout."
Statistics posted on the Sarasota
County website indicate that 20
minutes after a person quits smoking,


GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT
TAKES PLACE NOV. 21
The American Cancer Society marks the Great Amer-
ican Smokeout on the third Thursday of November
each year by encouraging smokers to use the date
to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance and
quit smoking that day. By quitting even for
one day smokers will be taking an important
step towards a healthier life one that can lead to
reducing cancer risk.
Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable
cause of disease and premature death in the US, yet
about 43.8 million Americans still smoke cigarettes
- Nearly 1 in every 5 adults. As of 2010, there
were also 13.2 million cigar smokers in the US, and
2.2 million who smoke tobacco in pipes other
dangerous and addictive forms of tobacco.
For more information and resources, visit www.
cancer.org/healthy/stayawayfromtobacco/greata-
mericansmokeout/index.
his or her heart rate decreases, and
the carbon monoxide level in the
blood drops to normal in 12 hours.
During the first two weeks to three
months, heart attack risk drops, and
lung function improves.
One to nine months after his or her
last cigarette, coughing and shortness
of breath ease up. One year later a
person's risk of coronary disease is
half that of a smoker's; 10 years later
the risk of lung cancer is also cut
in half. Fifteen years after quitting,
a former smoker's risk of coronary
disease is the same as that of someone
who has never smoked, according
to the county website. Many health
insurance policies will cover nico-
tine replacement therapy, Edouard
noted. DOH-Sarasota also offers free
resources:


*"Quit Smoking" Classes provid-
ed by Gulfcoast AHEC: Tobacco
Cessation Classes are available
through the Gulfcoast South Area
Health Education Center (AHEC).
Please visit the Gulfcoast AHEC
website (www.ahectobacco.com/) for
dates and times). In addition to the
classes, AHEC offers free counseling
and support, and worksite wellness
programs for employers.
*Florida Quitline: The Florida
Quitline is available to anyone living


FILE PHOTO
in Florida who wants to try to quit
smoking. The program offers coun-
seling sessions; self-help materials;
counseling and materials in English
and Spanish (translation service
provided for other languages); TDD
service for those with hearing impair-
ments; and pharmacotherapy assis-
tance. Call the Quitline at 877-U-CAN-
NOW (877-822-6669).
For more information on Sarasota
County resources, visit www.sarasota-
health. org/tobacco/.


Weight management program offered to people quitting tobacco


Provided by the FLORIDA DEPARTMENT
OF HEALTH CHARLOTTE COUNTY

Do you want to quit tobacco but
you're concerned about weight gain?
The Florida Department of Health's
Tobacco Free Florida program's new
expanded resources can help.
Participants who enroll in the
Florida Quitline phone counseling
may access the Weight Management
Program, a pilot program designed to
help tobacco users quit while limiting
possible weight gain associated with
quitting.
Those enrolled will receive up
to three tobacco cessation calls in


addition to up to three weight man-
agement coaching calls. Participants
with Type 2 diabetes will receive up to
three calls with registered dietitians
trained in the weight loss needs of
people with Type 2 diabetes.
The Weight Management Program
is available to Florida Quitline partic-
ipants, age 18 and older, who speak
English, currently use tobacco, and
have a body mass index (BMI) of 23 or
higher. Participants cannot be preg-
nant, diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes,
or have had weight loss surgery in the
past 12 months.
Tobacco Free Florida has also ex-
panded its free nicotine replacement


therapy (NRT) offering. Any partic-
ipant who smokes more than nine
cigarettes per day or chews more
than two tins per week is eligible for
combination NRT, including a supply
of both nicotine patches and gum,
free of charge.
This offering comes after a change
in the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services' Treating Tobacco
Use and Dependence guidelines. For
those who use tobacco at these levels,
the guidelines indicate this combi-
nation of medications "may result
in greater suppression of tobacco
withdrawal symptoms than does the
use of a single medication."


Florida residents who want to quit
tobacco and qualify for the Weight
Management Program and/or com-
bination NRT can take advantage by
calling 877-U-CAN-NOW Both pro-
grams are free and give participants
access to a trained Quit Coach.
Tobacco users interested in quitting
are encouraged to use one of the
state's three ways to quit.
To learn about Tobacco Free Florida
and the state's free quit resources, visit
www. tobaccofreeflorida.com or follow
the campaign on Facebook at www.
facebook.com/Tl'acco7 F ,VFloi id7
or Twitter at www. twitter.com/
tobaccofreefla.


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:Page 16


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com











How to prevent elderly financial abuse on another's behalf


By CLAUDIA BUCK
THE SACRAMENTO BEE

It started when an alert broker
called to let Alan Sims know that
$3,360 was being withdrawn weekly
from his 103-year-old friend's broker-
age account. Turns out that a live-in
caretaker was padding her hourly
wages, writing checks of varying
amounts that could have pushed her
annual salary to more than $165,000
a year.
Sims, executor of his elderly friend's
estate, and her attorney had to step
in and confront the caregiver, who
was immediately fired.
"It was devastating," said Sims,
recalling the events eight years later.
"Not only the amount of money that
was taken, but the trust that was
broken."
Sadly, it's not unusual. Every year,
thousands of examples of elderly
financial abuse occur, often at the
hands of friends, family or caregiv-
ers. In 2010, the annual amount of
losses due to financial exploitation
of seniors was estimated at $2.9
billion, according to a study by the
MetLife Mature Market Institute
and the National Committee for the
Prevention of Elder Abuse.
"Unfortunately, it's a lot more
common than we like to think," said
Marylou Robken, a Carmichael, Calif.,
CPA who has worked as a forensic in-
vestigator on dozens of elderly abuse
cases in the past 15 years. "So many
elderly people are isolated, and they


may not even know that something's
wrong."
Certainly, financial exploitation
of seniors is nothing new. In recent
years, local, state and national orga-
nizations have attacked the problem
on numerous fronts, encouraging
more awareness, better reporting and
stiffer penalties.
Plenty of older Americans are more
than capable of handling their own
affairs and value their independence.
But for many, "admitting that we
can no longer manage our financial
affairs can be as traumatic as having
to give up driving," noted Eleanor
Blayney, consumer advocate for the
Certified Financial Planner Board in
Washington, D.C.
*Getting help: An estimated 50
million-plus U.S. residents are 62 and
older. As cognitive abilities fade or
health issues intervene, it's a given
that many of us will be or already
are picking up the financial reins
for aging parents, family, friends or
neighbors.
That role is what's known as being a
fiduciary, someone who puts another
person's best interests above their
own. It takes many forms. It could be
a daughter who has power of attor-
ney for financial or medical decisions
on a parent's behalf. It could be a
trusted friend who's the designated
receiver of veterans' or Social Security
benefits for someone unable to do
banking. It could be the trustee
named to manage assets in a person's
living trust.


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It's up to the "caregiver generation"
to be sure that aging parents and
others get the help they need to man-
age their financial affairs and avoid
becoming victimized, said Richard
Cordray, director of the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau, in a
recent statement.
Last month, Cordray's consumer
bureau issued a series of free how-to
guides, "Managing Someone Else's
Money," that spell out what's required
of those who have power of attorney
to make someone's financial deci-
sions; are court-appointed guardians
or conservators; are trustees of
someone's revocable living trust; or
are government appointees handling
someone's income, such as Social
Security or veterans' benefits.
The guides are intended to "walk
these caregivers through their finan-
cial duties and provide practical tips,
like explaining common consumer
scams," Cordray said.
All too often, seniors fall victim to
fraud or financial exploitation. "They
make attractive targets because they
often have tangible household wealth
- whether it is in retirement savings
or home equity but they may
be isolated or lonely or otherwise
susceptible to being influenced by a
predator in disguise," he noted.
*Keep good records: Fiduciaries are
expected to act in the other person's
best interest, manage the finances
carefully and maintain good records.
Keep a detailed list or a file of all
money you receive or spend. Include
the date, amount and purpose of
checks paid or deposited, as well
as names of people/companies
involved. Keep receipts and notes,
even for small expenses. For example,
write on the receipt: "$50, groceries,
AllBrands Grocery Store, May 2."
After Sims was given power of
attorney for the financial affairs of
his 103-year-old friend, for instance,
he maintained a written journal
and took meticulous notes of every
financial transaction he made on her
behalf. Also, checkbooks and other
financial documents were safely put
away where they weren't accessible to
caregivers.
*Avoid conflicts: No matter what
kind of fiduciary role you're taking,
it's imperative to keep the senior's
money separate from your own,
the Consumer Financial Protection
Bureau says. For instance, it might
be OK to buy a car with the senior's
funds to drive to doctors' appoint-
ments or to do banking, but if you're
using the vehicle mainly for personal
use, that could be a conflict of inter-
est. Same with paying your relatives
to do work at the senior's home or
apartment.
*Get signed up: No matter our age,
all of us should designate someone to
act on our behalf, in the event we're
incapacitated due to illness or other
impairments. Some financial advisers
recommend that anyone reaching 18
or college age should fill out a pow-
er-of-attorney document for financial
or health care reasons.
In a Federal Reserve Bank survey
earlier this year, only 22 percent of
those age 40 and up said they'd cre-
ated a power-of-attorney document,
naming someone to handle their
financial affairs in the event they're ill
or mentally incapacitated. Another 12
percent said they'd considered it but
never followed through.
Health care power-of-attorney


RESOURCES FOR SENIORS AND
THEIR FAMILIES
*"Managing Someone Else's Money:" Four free
guides covering how-tos of being a financial
fiduciary, as well as potential signs of elderly
financial abuse, provided by the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau. For copies, go to:
ConsumerFinance.gov or call 855-411-CFPB
(2372).
* "Financial Self-Defense for Seniors:" Free
booklet from the Certified Financial Planner
Board covers 10"red flags"of financial abuse
and how seniors can avoid getting scammed.
To download a copy, visit LetsMakeAPlan.org.
For a mailed copy, go to mailCFPBoard.org or
call 800-487-1497.
*"Citizen's Guide to Preventing & Reporting
Elder Abuse:" Free consumer advice in English,
Chinese or Spanish from the California
Attorney General's office: www.oag.ca.gov.
*National Center on Elder Abuse: www.ncea.
aoa.gov.


documents are easily found online
through medical and government
agencies and must be signed by two
witnesses. Power-of-attorney docu-
ments for financial affairs are a bit
more involved. They can be obtained
online, at a bank, brokerage or
through an attorney but usually must
be notarized.
*Report financial abuse: In a 2012
national survey of certified financial
planners, more than half 56 per-
cent said they'd worked with older
clients who were victims of "unfair,
deceptive or abusive" financial
practices. In its new guide, "Financial
Self-Defense for Seniors," the finan-
cial planner board outlines 10 com-
mon financial frauds that may entrap
seniors, such as "free lunch" seminars
or inappropriate investments.
According to the board's survey,
only 5 percent of seniors report
financial abuse, either due to embar-
rassment, fear of naming the perpe-
trator or uncertainty about exactly
what occurred.
Perhaps the most insidious type of
financial abuse occurs at the hands of
someone's own children.
As a certified fraud examiner for
15 years, Robken has seen more than
her share of financial abuse targeting
seniors. The most upsetting was a
Placer County, Calif., case in 2008
where an adult son moved his elderly
mother out of the family home,
put himself on the property deed
and lived a cushy lifestyle with his
girlfriend. His mother, in the early
stages of Alzheimer's, was essentially
abandoned in a neglected apartment.
It wasn't until a granddaughter
blew the whistle on the situation,
Robken said, that law enforcement
got involved. By the time the son was
found guilty at trial and sentenced to
prison, his mother had died.
"It tugs at your heart strings," said
Robken. "How could someone do
this, especially to (their) mom?"
Whether it's a bank, a trusted friend
or an adult child, those who step in
as fiduciaries to help manage some-
one's financial life have a built-in
responsibility to report suspicions of
elder financial abuse, said CPA Stuart
Robken, a forensic auditor for 30
years. He and his wife, Marylou, both
are retiring this year. "People just
need to be aware. They don't have to
prove anything, but just suspect it."


o The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 17


feelingfit.com


CLINI






:Page 18 www.sunnewspapers.net feelingfit.com The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


Understanding and treating arthritis


By Drs. KAY JUDGE & MAXINE BARISH-WREDEN
THE SACRAMENTO BEE

Chances are, you or someone you
know has dealt with one form of
arthritis or another. According to the
latest data from the National Health
Interview Survey, an estimated 50
million adults in the United States
have arthritis, and close to half of
those people have physical limitations
because of their arthritis symptoms.
There are many different types of
arthritis, including osteoarthritis,
rheumatoid arthritis and systemic
lupus (both inflammatory autoim-
mune disorders), and gout. The CDC
even lists fibromyalgia as a type of
arthritis. Osteoarthritis, also known as
degenerative joint disease, is the most
common form of arthritis.
People with arthritis often try alter-
native approaches to healing, as the
drugs that are used to treat arthritis
often have side effects, or may not
be effective enough to significantly
relieve pain and reduce disability.
Several recent studies have shown
promise in this area.
An 18-month study recently pub-
lished in the Journal of the American


Medical Association looked at the
impact of weight loss and exercise on
454 overweight or obese adults 55 and
older with osteoarthritis of the knees.
In this study, participants who lost at
least 10 percent of their baseline body
weight had a significant improvement
in both pain and function; those who
lost weight and exercised had even
better outcomes they had improve-
ments in pain and function, as well
as mobility, quality of life, and blood
markers of inflammation. Pain was
reduced by about 50 percent in this
group.
In another recent study in the
Annals of Rheumatic Diseases, scien-
tists in Sweden looked at the effect of
fish intake on the risk of developing
rheumatoid arthritis. The researchers
followed more than 32,000 women
born between 1914 and 1948 and
estimated the amount of dietary
omega-3 fats they consumed based
on their reported consumption of
fish; this information was gathered
from dietary questionnaires that the
women completed in 1987 and 1997
as part of the Swedish Mammography
cohort.
Those women who consumed an


average of about 1,500 mg of omega-3
fatty acids per week (equivalent to
about one serving of fatty fish like
salmon), compared to women who
consumed less, had a 29 percent
lower risk of developing rheumatoid
arthritis. Those women who con-
sumed fish more than once a week
had a 52 percent reduction in risk.
The researchers also found what's
called a threshold effect: The benefit
seemed to disappear in women who
ate more than 2,400 mg of omega-3
oils per week, indicating more is not
necessarily better. Your best bet is to
eat about 2 servings of fatty fish per
week.
And finally, another recent study
looked at the impact of cherries on
the symptoms of gout. Researchers
from Boston University Medical
Center studied about 550 patients
with gout and assessed their intake
of cherries or cherry extract. Those
people who consumed the cherry
products had a 35 percent lower risk
of developing a gout attack.
So here are three approaches to
help reduce your risk of various forms
of arthritis: Keep your weight normal
and exercise on a regular basis to


FILE PHOTO


reduce your risk of osteoarthritis; eat
fish every week to minimize your risk
of rheumatoid arthritis; and consider
eating cherries, especially if you have
gout.
Drs. Kay Judge and Maxine Barish-
Wreden are medical directors of Sutter
Downtown Integrative Medicine
program in Sacramento, Calif.


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:Page 18


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com










The benefits of exercise for patients with chronic illness


ByTED ROBEDEE
CULTURAL CENTER OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY

Why does anyone exercise? The
benefits are pretty obvious building
stronger muscles, increasing flexibility
and range of motion, decreasing
fatigue and controlling weight. As we
age, exercise can also help prevent
joint stiffness, muscle degeneration
and atrophy.
Exercising when you have a chronic
illness like lupus might be the last
thing you want to do. You feel fatigued
and your muscles and joints ache.
The thought of exercise sounds
preposterous. The most difficult part
is motivating yourself to begin an
exercise routine. Always be sure to
consult your doctor before beginning
any type of exercise regimen. Make
the commitment, but be aware of
your limitations, as per your physi-
cian's advice.
Determine the best time of day for
you, and stick to it. Make it a part of
a weekly routine. Begin slowly in all
facets of exercise. Stress low-impact
exercise, walking on a treadmill and
cycling on a stationary bike ex-
ercises that won't impact heavily on
your joints. Next thing you know your
endurance will increase and you will
become more energetic.
To regain flexibility and range
of motion, stretching is essential.
Stretching will reduce stiffness and
enhance limberness. Incorporate a
weight-resistance program if your
doctor indicates it is OK for you to do
so. Lifting weights will increase bone
density and overall strength. Thus
lessening the chance of fractures and
even prevents osteoporosis.
People afflicted with chronic illness-
es often battle depression. Exercise
has been proven to greatly reduce
depression naturally.
Finally, exercise reduces fatigue.
That feeling of sluggishness, con-
stantly feeling tired and a total lack of
energy.
Exercise will increase your energy
and a feeling of well being. You will
feel better about yourself, a feeling
of accomplishment. Keeping your
independence is another benefit.
Get off that couch, get up and
re-activate your life and help yourself
to feeling better. There is nobody who
can do this but you.
Consider getting a friend to join you
in your routine. Having a buddy to
work out with is very beneficial.


Fitness Salon members Jackie and Mary Jane, who asked that only their first names be used, work out on the stationary bikes.
Competition: Week 8 Hot Peppers, 4.5 Sibling Rivalry 2.8
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o The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 19


feelingfit.com











Want to avoid surgery? Take care of your joints


By LESLIE BARKER
THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS

As much as Dr. Sean Haslam loves
performing surgery, he certainly
wouldn't object if people would take
good enough care of themselves to
avoid or at least postpone it.
'Anytime we can get something to
help patients without surgery," said
the Frisco, Texas, orthopedic sur-
geon, "it's good for everybody."
But people don't seem to be paying
attention. The number of knee
replacements is up 165 percent in the
last two decades and, according to
the Journal of the American Medical
Association, could exceed 3.5 million
by 2030.
Why pay attention to your knees,
hips, shoulders and other joints?
First, doing so could keep you out
of the operating room. Second, when
your joints don't hurt, you're going to
feel better physically and mentally.
Plus you're better able to stand up,
sit down, move around and do any
number of ordinary tasks with the
most minimal of groans and bodily
creaks.
"The main reason for total knee
replacement is for pain," Haslam
said. "If we can get rid of the pain, we
can get rid of the real need to have
surgery."
The keys to joint health for most
people are, no surprise, losing weight
and exercising. Some dramatic cases
in point:
In a Canadian study, none of 125
obese knee-replacement candidates
who lost 10 percent of their body
weight went on to have the surgery,
said Haslam, who was part of the
research team.
About half who dropped out of the
study, which he stresses isn't yet pub-
lished, lost "a significant amount" of
weight and also opted not to have
their knees replaced.
Because six to eight times your
body weight is experienced through
the knee, every 10 pounds lost means
60 to 80 pounds less pressure, he
said. Plus, additional weight can
lead to a greater risk in developing
arthritis and a likelihood that mild
osteoarthritis you might already have
will worsen.
At the T. Boone Pickens YMCA in
Dallas, trainer Shane McLean has
clients who have "not great knees"
and "not great shoulders," he said.
"They're usually overweight."
The obvious solution to joint
health is to lose weight. But, said
Haslam, "it's a vicious cycle. The
formula is simple; the execution is
difficult."
Patients tell him they can't lose
weight because they can't work out,
and they can't work out because it
hurts. The less you move, though, the
stiffer you get. And the stiffer you get,
the more you'll hurt when you start
moving.
But inactivity leads to loss in


P,,1C T PH,".,T,"..
Randi Schwartz, left, gets instructions on proper swimming technique from trainer Bryan Mineo at a pool in Dallas on Oct. 24, 2013. Schwartz has
taken up swimming to help rehabilitate after hip replacement.


cartilage, which "allows some slide,"
between your bones, Haslam said.
Without cartilage, you have scraping
of bone on bone, which is as painful
as it sounds.
Losing weight won't replace carti-
lage; what's done is done. But it will
make for less stress on joints.
Exercise also helps because it
stimulates the release of synovial
fluid. Think of the Tin Man and how
a few squirts of oil helped loosen his
joints and get him moving.
The more you move your joints,
the more a release of synovial fluid
you have, Haslam said. "It bathes the
cartilage."
That's important because cartilage
doesn't have a blood supply. Instead,
it depends on the fluid to provide
nutrients.
Proper exercise technique is
essential for healthy joints, success-
ful workouts and weight loss, said
McLean of the YMCA.
He has three herniated discs in his
own back, so he empathizes with the
many people who have pain.
"There are various things I do to
work around the problem," McLean
said. "Just because you have a bad
back or bad knees, I believe there's
something you can do."
Poor posture causes many of the
joint issues he sees.
"People are hunched over," he said.
"Shoulder problems usually stem
from posture issues and incorrect
weightlifting technique. When you
have a hunched back and your upper
body isn't underneath your hips,


chronic conditions start to happen.
It won't hurt today or tomorrow, but
somewhere down the track it will."
Randi Schwartz, 52, said during the
years she was running regularly, she
ignored signs that something was
amiss in her body. Not until her hip
started roaring did she pay attention.
"I had whispers, and I kept running
right through it," said Schwartz. "Big-
time yoga right on through it."
Several years of discomfort even-
tually led to hip replacement surgery
Feb. 1. She no longer runs but walks
for exercise. She's also built up her
technique and stamina to swim an
excellent exercise for joints for
more than 2 miles without stopping.
But the journey has been tough.
"This I did to myself," said
Schwartz, who works in retail cou-
ture. "All those years of running and
pounding and not listening."
Running isn't inherently bad
for joints. A recent study pub-
lished by the National Center for
Biotechnology Information found
that running "significantly reduced"
the incidence of osteoarthritis and



C

Scan fowsHOM



The Anterior
Minimize Pain,

Jason E. Re
BRn drI


risk of hip replacemeniit Oniie ieai,,nii
seems to be that iiiiiei liiae ai
lower body mass inde\
In general, thioughli. Hilaiin caii-
tions that runni1i:g a;d ,,rihei liigli-
er-impact sports ucli ,-i. ba.iketb.ill
and tennis are better rt|ii ted lien ai
person is young \:,u iage aiind lo-e
bone mass, youi b:d\ caillk upoiin tlie
bone mass you've ilieaid\ biinked. lie
said. Starting it Liatei caiin caiise inile
pain.
"My rule of thumb i tlit i if \,:,Li'le
not having pain, go ilieahid. Hailaiin
said. "But if you s[t-ii tr develop
arthritis and have paiii evei\ tune
you're 300 yards out ind it gets
worse, you may \Vilii to ,witcli
exercise."
He and McLeanii einpliiaize
low-impact work outs sucli ,-, pe-
cific classes, the elliptical ti-iiiei.
a recumbent bic\ cle. \\ilkiiig iind
swimming- anvliiii:ng thliiat iiiii-
tains cardiovascuiai beiineht witlihout
loading the joini-.
"If you can onl\ \\ilk hie iinuite-.
a day, walk five inute-. dai\.-
McLean said.


Advanced
Orthopedic
Center
REPAIR. RESTORE.-RECOVERY


~ebook


onter For Joints

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Speed Recovery

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:Page 20


The Sun/.urnclay [',0:,. nil:, I


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com










Women's pelvic pain often goes underreported, untreated


By APRIL FRAWLEY BIRDWELL
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Although many women experience
pelvic pain in their late teens and
early 20s, a new University of Florida
Health study indicates that only a
small fraction of these women report
their symptoms to their doctors and
seek treatment, leaving some health
problems unresolved.
Up to 72 percent of the women who
responded to the survey reported
experiencing pelvic pain in the past
year, yet nearly three-quarters of
them did not seek treatment from a
physician. The study was published
in the November issue of the Journal
of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
and was presented at the Society of
Laparoendoscopic Surgeons meeting
in August.
Led by Nash Moawad, MD, the
researchers surveyed 2,000 women
and received nearly 400 responses.
Almost 80 percent of respondents
had reported painful periods, nearly
one-third reported painful sexual
encounters and one-fifth reported
pain in external genitalia.
Some of the reasons women report-
ed not talking to their doctors about
the pain included embarrassment,
difficulty with insurance or making
appointments, or a lack of empathy
and understanding from physicians.
"But a big part of the problem is
that women often don't realize their
pain is abnormal," said Moawad, the
director of the Center of Excellence
for Minimally Invasive Gynecology at
UF Health.
"There is a significant lack of aware-
ness about pelvic pain in general,"
Moawad said. "Some women thought
their pain was normal. They think that
is how periods are supposed to be. But
if you are missing days from school
or work or have to cancel activities,
that is striking. No pain should ever
be that severe. If a woman has to take


PHOTO PROVIDED
Nash Moawad, MD, director of the Center of Excellence for Minimally Invasive Gynecology at UF Health, recently led a study that found pelvic pain
in women often goes underreported and untreated.


narcotics for pain, or if she has had to
drop out of classes, that is not normal.
She should see a physician."
Aside from painful periods, other
examples of conditions that cause pel-
vic pain include endometriosis, which
occurs when the uterine lining begins
to grow outside the uterus, usually on
the ovaries or bowels; ovarian cysts;
interstitial cystitis; irritable bowel syn-
drome; and urinary tract infections.
Endometriosis, for example, is
often described as an extremely
painful condition, yet it typically takes
women five to 15 years to receive a
diagnosis for it, Moawad said.


It's important that women get
treatment for pain, because aside
from the obvious effects, pain also
affects women's overall health and
how they feel about themselves. The
researchers found that women who
reported higher levels of pain also
reported having a lower overall quality
of health. They reported a greater
number of sad days and had more
irregular sleep patterns, too.
"There is a big difference between
those with pain and those without
pain and their perception of their own
health and how it affects their daily
activities," Moawad said.


The study was the first of its type
and examined pelvic pain and health
in a group of college-educated wom-
en, a group that typically has access
to medical care and is in good health.
Studies examining how pelvic pain af-
fects women in lower socioeconomic
groups, who typically have less access
to medical care, could reveal that
pelvic pain is even more problematic
for women, Moawad said.
"Women need to understand
they do not need to wait so long to
get help," Moawad said. "There are
ways to diagnose and treat these
conditions."


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5458817 www.harboraudiology.net


o The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 21


feelingfit.com


lw










Fawcett Memorial Hospital named 'Top Performer'


Fawcett Memorial Hospital, Port
Charlotte, was named one of the na-
tion's Top Performers on Key Quality
Measures by The Joint Commission,
the leading accreditor of health care
organizations in America.
Fawcett was recognized by The
Joint Commission based on data
reported about evidence-based
clinical processes that are shown to
improve care for certain conditions,
including heart attack, heart failure,
pneumonia and surgical care.
Fawcett Memorial Hospital is one


of 1,099 U.S. hospitals nationwide to
earn this distinction for attaining and
sustaining excellence in accountabil-
ity measure performance.
Fawcett was recognized for
achievement in the following mea-
sure sets: heart attack, heart failure,
pneumonia and surgical care. The
ratings are based on an aggregation
of accountability measure data
reported to the Joint Commission
during the 2012 calendar year.
This is the third year in a row that
Fawcett Memorial hospital is being


recognized a,. ai Top Pei foi mei
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World AIDS Day performance benefits local community


On Dec. 1, Suncoast AIDS Theatre
Productions will present "Jeffrey"
in Port Charlotte at the Langdon
Playhouse.
The production takes place at
Langdon Playhouse, 1182 Market
Circle, Port Charlotte. Doors open at
6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m.
Free HIV testing will be offered 6-10
p.m.
The play, by Paul Rudnick, tells the
story of "Jeffrey," a gay actor/waiter
in NewYork City in the early 1990s
who decides to live a life of celibacy
to avoid being infected with the HIV
virus. However, his plan soon comes
under pressure when his flamboyant
friends introduce him to the man of
his dreams. Things take a twist when
Jeffrey's dream man reveals that he
has AIDS. We will let this delightful
comedy tell you the rest of the story.
Artistic director Garry Breul and Eric
Stockley, prevention training consul-
tant with the Florida Department of
Health in Charlotte County chose this
play because it shows how AIDS was
very much seen as a "death sentence"
in the early 1990s. It is important to
realize that significant advances in
the treatment and care of HIV positive


persons have been made since Mr.
Rudnick wrote this play. The discovery
of protease inhibiting drugs in 1995
showed a reduction in HIV related
deaths as early as 1996. Since then,
many new classes of antiretroviral
medications have been developed,
and today over 30 medications are
available to fight HIV. Today's medica-
tions often contain a combination of
3-4 medications in one pill. Because
of these advances in treatment it is
not unusual for newly diagnosed
HIV positive persons to live active
lifestyles while taking as few as 1-2
anti-retroviral pills a day.
Today in the United States,
men remain at the highest risk of
contracting HIV (the virus that may
develop into AIDS). While improved
medications have changer this disease
from a death sentence to a chronic,
long term disease, it is important to
remember that there is still no cure
for HIV infection. To date, after more
than 30 years of research, no effective
vaccine has been developed. The only
sure way to know if you are infected
with the HIV virus is to get tested.
Free, confidential rapid HIV testing
will be available at the show courtesy


ofCorn mnuiit\ kIDS Netcik ,iif
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v,,iii ticket


ER Extra 'Player of the Game'


H


FOO 9ALL


During Charlotte High School's Nov. 1 game against Port Charlotte High School, one player
walked away a star. Senior Amari Washington (center) played an outstanding game and
was named Charlotte Regional Medical Center's ER Extra Player of the Game. He had 87
yards rushing and two touchdowns, and played really well the last few games. Washington
is pictured above with Oscar Gamble (left), director of Charlotte Regional's Rehab and Well-
ness Center and Charlotte High School's coach Binky Waldrop.


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Health & Hope

In Sunday's Feeling Fit!
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:Page 22


The Sun/.urnclay ,2:,ve0 l- i .. I


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com






The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 23


Free stroke screening
Fawcett Memorial Hospital will
host free stroke screenings for the
community at Encore Bank (2120
Kings Highway, Port Charlotte)
from 2-4 p.m. on Nov. 19 and Dec.
3. Participants are encouraged to
register by calling Consult-A-Nurse at
941-624-4441.
Stroke is the fourth leading cause of
death in the United States and a lead-
ing cause of adult disability. A stroke
or "brain attack" occurs when a blood
clot blocks an artery or a blood vessel
breaks, interrupting blood flow to an
area of the brain. Anyone can have a
stroke; however, your chances in-
crease if you have certain risk factors.
Approximately 795,000 strokes occur
each year, and up to 80 percent of
them could be prevented.

Sarasota doctors honored
Sarasota Memorial honored two
outstanding physicians for their ser-
vice to the hospital and community.
Sarasota Pulmonologist and Critical
Care Specialist Bruce Fleegler, MD,
was awarded the health system's 2013
Lifetime Achievement Award, while
local OB-GYN Specialist Kyle Garner,
MD, was named 2013 Physician of the
Year.
Both physicians were selected by
a committee of physician leaders
and honored at Sarasota Memorial's
annual medical staff meeting Oct. 29.
Fleegler specializes in the treatment
of critical care patients and those with
lung disease. He joined Sarasota Lung
Associates and SMH's medical staff in
1976. He served as the hospital's Chief
of Staff from 1997 to 1998 and Chief
Medical Officer from 2003 to 2005,
overseeing key quality initiatives,
clinical research and medical staff.
Among other advanced practices, he
helped develop Sarasota Memorial's
emergency and critical care protocols


for resuscitative hypothermia fol-
lowing cardiac arrest, brought new
and experimental treatments to SMH
patients with serious respiratory
conditions and helped implement
the hospital's Intensivist program, a
coordinated system of care for high-
risk patients in the hospital's intensive
care units.
Garner joined SMH's medical staff
in 2006. Dual trained in family med-
icine and obstetrics and gynecology,
he was appointed chair of the OB/
GYN Department in 2012 and has
spearheaded several patient safety
and quality initiatives, including
collaborations with local obstetricians
to reduce the rate of C-sections and
advance programs and protocols that
encourage women to customize their
birth plans. He has been a strong
proponent of creating as natural a
childbirth experience as possible
within the safety of a hospital setting.


available to assist in the enrollment
process and answer Medicare-related
questions.

Fitness classes added
The Wellness Center at Charlotte
Regional Medical Center recently
beefed up its aerobics class schedule
with several new and exciting classes
and instructors.
All Wellness Center members can
now take advantage of the follow-
ing: Pilates with Marianne Hicks;
SilverSneakers Classic with Marianne
Hicks; SilverSneakers Cardio with
Cindy Brehse; Chi Balance with Pete
Gaylord; and Zumba with Bernadette
Serafini.
The Wellness Center is located at
733 E. Olympia Ave., Punta Gorda.
For a class schedule and description
or for information on fitness center
membership, call 941-637-2450 or
visit www.CharlotteRegional.com.


Medicare insurance helpline Alzheimer's support groups


There are more Medicare insur-
ance options than ever before, and
navigating through the information
can be time-consuming and con-
fusing. To help people find the right
plan for them, Charlotte and Peace
River Regional Medical Centers have
launched a free Medicare Insurance
Helpline 855-256-1502.
The new helpline, serviced by
MedicareCompareUSA, is staffed by
licensed Medicare insurance special-
ists who provide unbiased assistance.
Helpline representatives begin the
process by identifying Medicare plans
accepted by an individual's physicians
and hospital, including regional and
national Medicare Advantage and
Medicare supplement plans.
They can provide plan compar-
isons, help determine the most
cost-effective Medicare prescription
plan, and email or mail Medicare plan
materials. Representatives are also


The Alzheimer's Association Florida
Gulf Coast Chapter-affiliated support
groups are for family members, care-
givers and others interested in learn-
ing more about Alzheimer's disease.
Meetings are open to everyone and
free of charge.
For information concerning sup-
port groups, or for more information
on services provided through the
Alzheimer's Association, please call
941-235-7470.
Local meetings are held at the
following locations:
*Royal Palm Retirement Center,
2500 Aaron St., Port Charlotte, meets
10 a.m. on the fourth Tuesday of
the month. Free daycare service for
patients is provided at this facility
for the meeting; Call Royal Palm in
advance to schedule daycare services
at 941-623-9461.
*South Port Square (Harbor
Terrace), 23033 Westchester Blvd.,
Port Charlotte, meets at 3 p.m. on
the third Tuesday of the month. For
directions, call 941-625-1220.
*Saint Maximilian Kolbe Catholic
Church, 1441 Spear Street, Port
Charlotte, meets at 2:30 p.m. on the
fourth Thursday of the month.
*Port Charlotte United Methodist
Church, 21075 Quesada Avenue, Port
Charlotte, meets at 3 p.m. on the third
Thursday of the month.
*Charlotte Harbor Healthcare,
4000 Kings Highway, Port Charlotte,
Meeting dates and times vary. For
more information, call 941-255-5855.
*Life Care Center, 450 Shreve Street,
Punta Gorda, meets at 3 p.m. on
the third Monday of the month. For


directions, call 941-639-8771.
*Punta Gorda Isles Civic
Association, 2001 Shreve Street, Punta
Gorda, meets at 3 p.m. on the second
Tuesday of the month.
*Arcadia Oaks, 1013 Gibson
Street, Arcadia, meets at 11 a.m. on
the fourth Monday of the month.
Lunch is served. For directions, call
863-993-9760.

Grief support group
A new weekly support group,
Life after Loss, meets at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday in the education building
of First Baptist Church of Charlotte
Harbor, located at 4506 Church St.,
Port Charlotte It is open to all persons
grieving at any stage in their process.
Those who have more experience,
help the newly grieving, and it in turn,
helps them as well. For more informa-
tion, call 941-629-2075.

Parkinson's disease support
A new Parkinson's disease caregiver
support group meets from 10:30-11:30
a.m. the fourth Friday of every month.
Meetings take place at the Punta
Gorda Isles Civic Association, room 4,
2001 Shreve St., Punta Gorda.
For meeting information, visit www.
PDCareGiverSupport.org or call Kelly
Gaylord at 941-637-6418.

Drawing for free wheelchair
HealthSource of Port Charlotte is
offering their customers the opportuni-
ty to win a free Golden Technologies' lift
chair or mobility scooter.
"There is no obligation on the part of
our customers to make a purchase to
qualify. All they need to do is complete
a brief registration form and return it
to our store no later than Dec. 6," said
owner Chris Wagner. "We will send all
of the forms to Golden Technologies
for them to select lift chair and scooter
winners from this nationwide contest."
The winners of the contest will be no-
tified by their local authorized Golden
dealer. The winners will be able to select
from their favorite Golden lift chair or
scooter with a maximum retail value
of $3,000. "HealthSource is located at
3616 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte and
is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through
Friday with weekend appointments
available.

Celebrate Recovery meets
Liberty Community Church, 2759
Wylam Drive (off Veterans Boulevard
in Port Charlotte, between Harbor and
Orlando boulevards), North Port, offers
Celebrate Recovery (for hurts, habits
or hangups), at 7 p.m. Thursday. For
more information, call 941-429-0776.


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o The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 23


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:Page 24 www.sunnewspapers.net feelingfit.com The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


Reason


Why People Choose
Charlotte Regional and Peace River Regional Medical Centers.


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:Page 24


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com






>>>INSIDE


Huntress chic


No hiding the fashion world's love of camouflage


By JOE TASCHLER
MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL


Camouflage clothing is in vogue -
and not just among those who are trying
to remain invisible to white-tailed deer
and other critters.
"It's a trend that is most popular now in
the U.S. and Europe, but has seen its time
in nearly every part of the world," said
Jordan Dechambre, a Milwaukee-based
style expert.
In addition to guys in tree stands and
duck blinds across Wisconsin, celebrities
including Rihanna, Justin Timberlake,
Gwen Stefani and Sarah Jessica Parker
have been spotted wearing camo gear.
"Camo has been an important trend
over the past couple seasons and
shows no sign of slowing down" Sofia
Wacksman, vice president of trend for
Menomonee Falls, Wis.-based Kohl's
Department Stores, said in an email.
"While re-colored and abstract iterations
make it look new, the classic camo can
also feel modern when mixed with
softer colors like ballet pinks and creamy
neutrals."
The fashion appeal of camo comes as
no surprise to Al Lobner.
"I always thought that," said Lobner,
president of the Wisconsin Bear Hunters'
Association. "The rest of the world is
starting to figure it out."
Lobner, 60, said he has been wearing
camo for at least 30 years. He has a
closetful of the stuff. So do a lot of other
people these days.
"The fact that camouflage is more
easily accessible than ever whether
it's from local boutiques or national
retailers makes it much more conve-
nient to rock the trend;" Dechambre said.
"Standing out'in camouflage is no longer
an oxymoron."
"Obviously you wear (blaze) orange
when it comes to rifle season but other
than that,"camo is the order of the day,
said Lobner, who lives in Milladore in
central Wisconsin. "It's just the way it is up
here."
Archery hunters especially rely on
camouflage to try to be invisible to deer.


The DNR says more than 250,000 bow
hunters harvested more than 93,000 deer
in 2012. Hunters also rely on camouflage
when they are pursuing ducks, geese,
turkeys, bear and other animals.
"Around here, it's not a fashion state-
ment. It's just what they're wearing," said
Mike Brust of Wausau, who is president of
the Wisconsin Bowhunters Association.
"From a hunter's standpoint, it's nice to
be out in front of the trend."
Camo reflects a lifestyle as much
as it reflects fashion, said Jill Soltau, a
Wisconsin native who is president and
chief merchandising officer for Green
Bay-based Shopko stores.
With stores based primarily in small
cities and rural towns in the Midwest,
Mountain, North Central and Pacific
Northwest regions of the U.S., the chain
has made camouflage a big part of its
merchandise offerings, Soltau said.
There are basically two pieces to the
camouflage trend, Soltau said. One is
military camo. Those are the types of
patterns that are showing up on pouty,
wafer-thin runway models as well as in
boutiques and fashion retailers.
The other is outdoor camo,
which makes up much of the
CHIC|8


MCT PHOTO
Cabela's employee Becky Scheider models
camouflage hunting jacket and pants that
are specifically sized for women, Oct. 30, at
Cabela's in Richfield, Wis. The jacket sells for
$189.99, the pants $129.99.


Youth-sized camouflaged clothing is displayed, Oct. 30, at Cabela's in Richfield, Wis.


rimleIIuueiruuuie
The cook doesn't clean


Eat Chea

Reader's

request


IPAGE 5
PAGE 5


. PAGE 4


Consumer

Reports

Kitchen dangers
*PAGE 2






I G 4
PA im


m


Thank-you etiquette 101


By SHELBY SHEEHAN-BERNARD
MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

Have a stack of unwritten
thank-you notes you need to
get to? If you're worried about
your sloppy penmanship or
clumsiness with words, take
some advice from author of
"The Art ofThankYou"Connie
Leas: "The only thing you can
really do wrong is not to send
one."
Leas knows this firsthand, as
she got the idea for the book
after sending a wedding gift
and not receiving a thank you
note. "Rather than get mad, I
gave the recipients the benefit
of the doubt and concluded
that they were too intimidated
by the writing process to send
a note," she says.
But as Kelly Browne, author
of"101 Ways to Say ThankYou,"
notes, it's much bigger than
following prescribed rules of
etiquette. "Gratitude is a thread
than connects us all," she
says. "It's about honoring and
respecting one another."
Feeling intimidated? Check
out these tips to get you into
the writing mode.

WHEN TO SEND
According to Leas, you'll
never go wrong by sending a
thank-you note, so if you're not
sure whether one is necessary


- write it anyway.
Browne suggests sending a
note for any gift you receive, no
matter how small. A thank-you
note is also appropriate if some-
one has done something special
for you. "If someone has taken
the time, you should take the
time to thank them," she says.
If you find yourself skimping
out on notes here and there,
Leas provides a word of
caution: "People remember the
people that don't write thank-
you notes."

HOW TO SEND
Leas and Browne recognize
that the rules are changing
with the advent of new
technologies; however, the
golden rule of"paper is best"
still applies. It also can be more
appropriate for those who are
less than tech-savvy.
But that's not to say technol-
ogy doesn't have its place in
expressing gratitude.
"Handwritten notes are
always the best, but there are
some really great apps that you
can use to share pictures with
your note, and it's convenient
because you can do it on your
tablet'" says Browne, citing apps
from Redstamp (redstamp.com)
and Postagram (postagramapp.
corn).

ETIQUETTE 18


5 myths about deafness:


'Project Runway'alum shatters assumptions


ByWENDYDONAHUE
CHICAGO TRIBUNE


In a "Project Runway"
season where fights between
contestants raged for hours,
one of the finalists took
refuge in what some would
consider a disability: being
deaf.
Justin LeBlanc would turn
down the volume on his
cochlear implant or com-
pletely remove the external
device, and he would focus
on his designs. "It worked to
my advantage," LeBlanc said.
"It allowed me to block out all
the drama'."
LeBlanc fell short of the
win, but by making it all
the way to the final four, he
helped educate the viewing
- and hearing public
about being deaf.
"A lot of people have never
been around a deaf person,"
he said, though 2 to 3 out
of every 1,000 children in
the U.S. are born deaf or
hard-of-hearing, according
to the National Institute
on Deafness and Other
Communication Disorders.
LeBlanc hopes his
appearance on "Project
Runway" helped dispel some


MCT PHOTO
Fashion
designer
Justin
LeBlanc
stands on the
22nd balcony
of Tribune
Tower in
Chicago,
on Oct. 10
LeBlanc
fell short
of the win
on "Project
Runway,";' but
by making
it all the
way to the
final four,
he helped
educate
the viewing
and hearing
public about
being deaf.


assumptions, myths and
stereotypes about deafness.
Among the misperceptions:
"Hearing-impaired" is the
preferred adjective. Not nec-
essarily. "A lot of deaf people
get offended when they're


referred to as 'hearing-im-
paired'" LeBlanc said. "For me
it's not an impairment. It's
a way of life. I was born this
way. Deaf is appropriate. I'm a

MYTHS18


A weekly section of the Sun Vol.3 No. 46 November 17,2013






www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


No. 1110


FLAIR


NEW YORK TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD


BYE-LINES By Alan Olschwang / Edited by Will Shortz


Across
1 Former Belgian
national airline
7 Just says no
14 Cremona craftwork
20 Origami staples
21 1993 5x platinum
Nirvana album
22 Wise guy
23 The Lone Ranger
25 Phillip, e.g., in
Disney's "Sleeping
Beauty"
26 Carrier inits.
27 Kemo (the Lone
Ranger)
28 Move a muscle?
29 No longer in enemy
hands
30 Kind of appeal
32 Base, e.g.
34 Infusing with a soda
maker
35 Hospital supply
37 Fail, Ireland's
coronation stone
38 Strike callers
39 Massachusetts motto
starter
40 Dietary claim
44 Deeply rooted
46 Toothpaste type
47 Roger Ebert
52 84-Down writer's
monogram


For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


53 Opportunities,
metaphorically
54 Hands (out)
55 Trig ratio
59 Old camera settings,
for short
61 Add (up)
62 Francois Truffaut's
field
63 Sweet-talk
64 Porky Pig
69 Fixes up, as a run-
down house
70 Cato's man
71 When doubled, one
of the Teletubbies
72 "Now!"
73 "August: .
County" (2008
Pulitzer winner for
Drama)
74 "S.N.L." alum Cheri
76 Mimicry
78 July third?
79 George Burns
83 Genus of small
rodents
86 Items sometimes
sniffed at a
supermarket
87 Highlights
88 Mille (part of
Quebec with a
rhyming name)
90 Fill
91 Other side
92 Volleyball venue
96 Hair extensions?
98 Something you want
to come down from
quickly


102 Dry: Prefix
103 Home of Banff
National Park
104 Animal house
105 2004 Chevy debut
107 can't"
108 Beefeaters, e.g.
109 Red Skelton
112 Record of the Year
Grammy nominee
for "Lose Yourself"


14 Defames
15 One of the von
Trapp girls
16 Do some banking,
say
17 Going down in the
rankings, say
18 Holy smoke
19 First Mets manager
24 CNBC news item
29 Mag proofs


113 Primary pigment 31 Shallot, e.g.


for printers
114 Rays' div.


33 Keyes and King
34 Mosey along


115 Luna's counterpart 36 "Beowulf" quaff


116 Auto steering
system components
117 Potential
sweethearts

Down
1 Downhill run


38 Jesse and Leo of TV
sitcoms
41 Poky sorts
42 Order to go?
43 Onward
44 Sees through
45 Latte option


2 Massenet opera based 47 Opera enue


on Greek myth
3 Bears' home in Texas
4 2005 Drama Pulitzer
finalist Will
5 Costner role
6 Like the origin of the
food in many
fusion restaurants
7 Pulled apart
8 Compass dir.
9 Nickname for
Huntington Beach,
Calif.
10 Bologna's place
11 Clinched, with "up"
12 "Time 1" (I ...
sci-fi series)
13 -based


48 Chops up
49 S. Merkerson,
four-time
N.A.A.C.P. Image
Award-winning
actress
50 Oscar-winning
Forest Whitaker
role
51 Judo gyms
56 Ancient Mexican
57 Base
58 Company that owns
Gerber
60 Layered coifs
62 Groups of strings,
maybe


65 Letter-shaped bridge 82 Extreme point


support
66 Mr. Right
67 Dominant
68 Church group
74 Black Hills native
75 Sweetie
76 Lace's end
77 Vittles
80 Possible answer to


83 Sights not to be
believed
84 Poem that ends,
"This ghoul-
haunted woodland
of Weir"
85 What a judge might
do during a hearing


"Is that you?" 89 "A Sentimental


63 Sword fight sounds 81 Apple product


Journey" author


91 Thomas Jefferson or 100 Nobelist writer


Jimmy Carter,
once
93 Virgil hero
94 Bit of field sport
equipment
95 Lifts
97 Where to find
"books in the
running brooks,"
per Shakespeare
98 Star, maybe
99 Indian melodies


Andric
101 Go by bike
104 Beginning of some
temple names
106 Preceder of "di" or
"da" in a Beatles
song
109 Invoice fig.
110 Since 1/1
111 "___ Sylphides"
(ballet)


FOR ANSWERS, TURN TO PAGE 8


How to avoid the top kitchen dangers


FROM CONSUMER REPORTS


You know that knives are sharp and
ovens are hot, and that they can cause
serious cuts and burns. But when you're
in a rush or a post-workday daze, it's
easy to make a mistake, says ShopSmart,
the shopping magazine from the
publisher of Consumer Reports.
Accidents often happen because peo-
ple haven't thought everything through
before starting to cook, says Elizabeth
Briggs, a chef and Culinary Institute of
America professor. Here are some safety
tips from Briggs and ShopSmart's own
experts:

KNIVES
Lacerations caused by knives of all
kinds (not just the kitchen type) affected
more than 350,000 people in 2012. Dull
knives are actually more dangerous than
sharp ones, because they require more
pressure to use and their worn edge can
cause the knife to slip off food and into
your fingers. To prevent injuries:
Keep knives sharpened.
Use a cutting board that doesn't have
a slippery surface.
Cut away from your body.
Store knives in a block, not in a drawer,


Consumer


Reports


where they can easily slice fingers.

OVEN/RANGE
Last year, almost 40,000 people were
injured from these appliances. Kids are
especially at risk if they're not supervised
and climb on an open door, causing the
range to tip over. To prevent injuries:
Install an anti-tip bracket if your cur-
rent range does not have one to ensure
that it is securely in place.
Never place heavy roasts and other
food on an oven door that's been left
open.
Drape a towel on the oven handle
while a pan is cooling to remind you that
it's still hot.
Prevent injuries caused by shatter-
ing glass bakeware by avoiding these
no-nos: taking the dish directly from
the freezer to the oven or vice versa,
putting the dish directly on a burner or
under a broiler, adding liquid after the
dish is hot, putting a hot dish on a cold


or damp surface, or using a dish that's
chipped or cracked.

COOKWARE
More than 37,000 people were injured
from using cookware in 2012. Hot han-
dles can burn, ShopSmart warns. And
the food you're cooking can catch fire. To
prevent injuries:
Never step away from the kitchen
when you're cooking.
Always use oven mitts to pick up hot
pans.
If a grease fire starts, don't douse
with water or pick up the burning pan.
A cookie sheet or lid can smother the
flames; keep it covered for 10 to 15 min-
utes to make sure the fire is out. You can
also throw baking soda on the flames.
Keep a fire extinguisher with a
minimum 5-B:C rating on hand.

SLICERS AND CHOPPERS
They caused more than 21,000 injuries
in 2012, including cuts from the blades.
To prevent injuries:
Don't leave motorized models on for
a long time; they can overheat.
Never reach into a slicer or a chopper.
There is no need to hand wash and
subject your fingers to injury; many


parts are dishwasher-safe including
blades.

MICROWAVE OVENS
More than 10,000 people were hurt
last year using microwaves. Burns were
most common. To prevent injuries:
Remember to be careful when
removing a wrapper or cover on a
microwaved dish; steam can escape and
cause a nasty burn.
Food can heat unevenly in a micro-
wave, so use caution when touching or
tasting.
Let food cool for a minute or two
before removing it from the microwave.

BLENDERS
More than 9,600 injuries occurred
last year involving blenders. To prevent
injuries:
Avoid the temptation to put your
hand inside, especially if it's plugged in.
Most blenders don't have safety inter-
locks, so you could accidentally turn it
on and mangle your hand.
To clean blades without touching
them, add dishwashing detergent and
hot water to the blender container and
let it run on high for a minute. Unplug,
then rinse.


Lessons for life: Tips for tipping during the holidays


ByJEN WEIGEL
CHICAGO TRIBUNE

The day after Halloween,
I saw a person setting up
his Christmas decorations.
As I tried not to drive off
the road, it dawned on me
that the holidays will be
here sooner than we think.
Buying presents for family,
friends and loved ones are
a given. But what should
we give the baby sitters,
mail carriers, nannies and
teachers who watch over
our children or homes in
our absence?
"Giving a tip or bonus is
not required, but it's that
little something extra that


tells people in your life that
you appreciate them,";' said
Erin Krex, founder of the
Illinois placement agency
First Class Care. "These peo-
ple are taking care of your
personal space your
home and your children
which are your most im-
portant prized possession.
You don't have to break the
bank, but it's also not the
place to skimp."
Krex said "cash is defi-
nitely king/'with gift cards
coming in a close second.
And if times are tough, Krex
said even a hand-written
note of appreciation can
do the trick.
"Domestic workers such


as a nanny, housekeeper
or baby sitter because
they're working in the
home, they know if times
are tough;' she said."We
always say, if you can't give
what you gave last year
then always give them a
card saying how much
they are appreciated so
they don't think the lack
of bonus is related to their
work. Perhaps you can
give them days off if you
have work flexibility? Let
them know you care and
they matter. They want to
know they are making their
employers happy."
Here are Krex's guide-
lines for tipping during the


holidays.
Domestic help -
nanny or housekeeper:
"What is typical is to give
one week's pay as a holiday
bonus if they've been there
for a year or more,";' she said.
"If they've been there five
or ten years, typical is two
weeks pay. If they've been
there for less than a year -
it's one day's pay for every
month they've been there."
Baby sitter: "If you have
a Saturday night baby sitter
that you use on a regular
basis, their bonus is usually
equal to one or two nights'
pay,";' she said.
Teachers or bus
drivers: "My son's school


bus driver is amazing and
tells us if there is anything
happening on the bus,
so she gets $30-$50 gift
cards,;' she said. (There is
usually a rule with schools
that you shouldn't be
giving cash, so Krex said
to check with your school
district.)
"For a teacher, send an
email to the parents of
the class and give a gift
as a group so each family
pitches in $5-$ 10. And
definitely add a personal-
ized note."
Doorman or garbage-
man: "This depends on
how much they do for
you, but if your doorman


is calling for your car or
bringing up your laun-
dry, that bonus can be
between $50-$150,"/' she
said.
"A nice tip for a gar-
bageman is $20'," she said.
UPS, FedEx or mail
carrier: "If you're a big
online shopper and you
see your UPS person or
your mail carrier once a
week, a holiday card with
money or a gift card is
truly appreciated,' she
said. "A typical amount
is anywhere from $20-
$50. If you see your UPS
person daily, you don't
want them to throw your
packages!"


-Page 2


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net






The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013 FLAIR www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3


W4


-iv


ANYTHING MADE OF GOLD! BROKEN OR DAMAGED
SCRAP GOLD, FINE JEWELRY, ALL CONDITIONS


Up To:
Class Rings ..................$...$1,000
Chains & Necklaces .....$5,000
Charm Bracelets ...........$4,000
Wedding Bands.............$500
Other Rings.....................$500


Up To:
Earrings ............................$500
Pins & Broaches.............$1,000
Mountings ...................... $500
Antique Items.................$5,000
Dental Gold Items.........$200


ANYTHING

GOLD


ANYTHING MADE OF SILVER! SCRAP/BROKEN SILVER,
ALL KINDS, ERAS & CONDITIONS
We buy all types of Sterling Silver by all manufacturers and makes,
with an emphasis on finer, more ornate pieces.


UD To
Full flatware sets ............$8,500
Single flatware items.....$600
Punch bowl & sets.........$5,500
Pitchers ............................$4,000
Spoons, forks, knives......$150/each
Tea Sets ..........................$12,000
Trays ................................. $4,000
Candelabras...................$2,000
Silver Jewelry..................$250/piece


.9


I


4' .-


N~


ANYTHING SILVER


ALL KINDS, ALL TIME PERIODS, ALL CONDITIONS!


UD To
Audemars Pigues ..........$30,000
Breitling ............................$30,000
Cartier..............................$40,000
Elgin..................................$600
Ham ilton..........................$200
Jules Jurgenson .............$15,000
LeCoultre.........................$5,000
Longines ..........................$12,000
Movado...........................$2,000
Omega............................$60,000
Patek Philippe................$60,000
Rolex ................................$20,000
Tiffanv & Co ...................$70,000


-,
U


ALL CONDITIONS! BRING IN ANY& ALL CURRENCY
FOR A FREE EVALUATION!
Small & large notes, all denominations, Confederate,
fractional currency, silver & gold certificates.

.A..


Confederate (pre-1864)


*Emphasis on Rolex.


Federal Reserve Note


II


Fractional Currency


ESTATE/ VINTAGE JEWELRY
All Kinds, All Eras, All Conditions. We will pay fair market value for the following:


Up To:
Cameos...........................$600
Broaches .........................$600
Charm Bracelets ...........$5,500
Pendants.........................$14,000


Up To:
Victorian..........................$12,000
Bracelets......................... $10,000
Cocktail Rings................$12,000
Necklaces.......................$7,500


UP To:
1/4 CARAT......................$2,500
1/2 CARAT......................$7,000
3/4 CARAT......................$15,000
1 CARAT ..........................$30,000


i Yes 114


Up To:
2 CARAT..........................$50,000
3 CARAT..........................$75,000
4 CARAT..........................$150,000
5 CARAT ..........................$500,000


: v.


COSTUME JEWELRY


HAT & FIGURAL PINS
COMPACTS
CUFF LINKS
GOLD ITEMS


EARRINGS
SILVER BOXES
MARCASITE ITEMS
NECKLACES


AMBER ITEMS
BAKELITE ITEMS
BRACELETS
RHINESTONE ITEMS


.t t
~ t
La


Since we cannot list everything that we buy here, please bring in your items for a
FREE evaluation and quote.
We pay more for the rarer and unusual items!
*ALL KINDS, ALL ERAS, ALL CONDITIONS ALL FINE JEWELRY


BRING IN ANY & ALL COINS FOR A FREE EVALUATION! NC
Indian Heads, Coronets, Liberties, Eagles, St. Gaudens -- WE BUY ALL


U.S. SINGLE COINS OR COMPLETE SETS
UP TO:
SILVER QUARTER, DIMES, & HALVES ........$3,000
THREE CENT PIECES 1889 & OLDER ........$400
TWO CENT PIECES 1873 & OLDER ..........$550
INDIAN HEADS 1 CENTS- 1909 & OLDER .$550
LARGE CENTS 1857 & OLDER .................$2,500
HALF CENTS 1857 & OLDER.....................$21,000
M organ Dollars .......................................... $50,000
Standing Liberty 25 cents .........................$3,000
Walking Liberty 50 cents...........................$400
Flying Eagle/Indian Cents ........................$550
Barber Dim es ............................................. $550
M ercury Dim es............................................$2,500
Peace Dollars ............................................ $21,000


USED: NEW/MINT:
$1 ........... 1849-1889 ...................$1,200......$10,500
$2.50...... 1796-1834 .................. $5,000...... $17,000
$3...........1854-1889...................$2,500......$10,000
$5...........1795-1804...................$10,500....$50,000
$10.........1795-1804...................$10,500....$50,000
$20......... 1850-1933 .................. $12,000....$50,000
SILVER DOLLARS:
UP TO:
Trade dollars .............................................. $10,500
1749-1803 ....................................................$50,000
1836-1839 ....................................................$5,000
1840-1873 ....................................................$5,000
1878-1904 ....................................................$17,000
1921-1935 ....................................................$10,000


., -.
_?-3" A. -
C a' ..-' / ii .


) OBLIGATION!
L COINS! I
GOLD US & FOREIGN COINS
GOLD BULLION, KRUGERRANDS, U.S. EAGLES,
CANADIAN MAPLE LEAFS, MEXICAN 50 PESOS,
CHINESE PANDAS, ALL PROOF SETS. PRICE BASED
ON MARKET VALUE.
SILVER COINS (1964 & EARLIER)
DIMES, HALF DOLLARS, QUARTERS,
SILVER EAGLES, INGOTS
WILL PAY UP TO 1600% OF FACE VALUE
ALL COMMEMORATIVE COINS, ROLLS, SETS,
CERTIFIED & PROOFS
ALL PCGS, NGC, ANACS & ICG, PROFS & SETS


Sive Coi ns (]I1964 &U Earlier)iumiD iimmes H l D llr, urtie rs, Silvr Eagles, O[ I[ ngIIots

L0il a po10 0% of fae value I


UNKIN'S

DIAMONDS,


BUYING GOLD AND


DIAMONDS


a
LOWES
0.


___________TAMIAMI TRAIL_____
DUNKIN'S DIAMONDS
BUYING GOLD AND
DIAMONDS


NORTH PORT
COMMONS


NORTH PORT 114800 TAMIAMI TRAIL I 941-876-4180


;


6~4 (~\

K5 ~A)~


o The Sun/Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3


FLAIR






~Page4 www.sunnewspapers.net FLAIR The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


Toot, Toot Tootsie Toy


Look what I found!


By HERB FAYER
. SUN CuLNLM1N


he Tootsie Toy brand appeared
around 1925. The name was taken
from one of the founders'grand-
daughters named "Toots."
Before 1925 the Tootsie Toy name
began to appear in catalogs, but did
not appear on the bottoms of the
items until a year or so later. Cars and
other vehicles were popular and later
they added army vehicles. You'll also
find gasoline trucks, airplanes, boats,
cannons and much more.
The Great Depression, when con-
sumers were happy to buy a 10 cent
toy, was the height of Tootsie Toy's
success. After WWII higher costs made
the production of complicated dies
and multiple-part assembly overly
expensive.
Foreign manufacturers were able to
significantly under price Tootsie. Today
Tootsie makes toy blocks and some
metallic toys like soldiers and vehicles.
As for collectible values the highest
price paid for a Tootsie Toy was $3,250
for a Lincoln Zephyr auto pulling a


trailer. A play set of planes and heli-
copters called Speedy Airplanes sold
for $2,800 in 2007. An Andy Gump set
of six toys brought $ 2,300. The set
consisted of Andy Gump, a motorcycle
and side car, a police car, an ice truck, a
roadster, and a boat.
On the low end you will find many
Tootsie Toys at $5 to $10 and up. You
can find them at yard sales and flea
markets for as little as a quarter.
Just after the turn of the century they
made three miniature cars designed
to be favors, charms, pins, buttons and
cuff links. The first of these, an Olds
type car, came out about 1901. Three-
dimensional models were issued for the
next few years, but a model car did not
appear until 1911, when a limousine
was brought out.
One line of Tootsie was doll house
furniture made in 1930 they pro-
duced a metal three-piece bathroom
set including a bath tub, a washstand
and a commode. A large set consisting
of many toys in the original boxes


was valued on "Antiques Roadshow"
at $2,500 to $3,500. These toys made
in the 1930s originally sold for about
$1.25 for each boxed set of several toys.
Sears had sets in their catalog for $1
each.
The Dowst brothers, who founded
the company, marketed their die-cast
miniature furniture to go inside various
cardboard houses made by other com-
panies. One of those was the Tootsie
Toy Doll House, a colonial-style home.
It was listed in the Sears catalog for
$3.79. You could buy a complete doll
house with furniture for under $10.
If you had a collection of metal
Cracker Jack toys when you were a
kid, you already had some of Tootsie
Toy's products. These included a
varied line of cars, animals planes and
boats. A good website to see a wide
variety of Tootsies is: tdtone.org/
dollhouse-miniatures/tootsie-toy.
One wonders if these package
inserts were lead-free and placed in
the Cracker Jack without a protective


baggie. You can imagine that there
wasn't a lot of concern about such
things many years ago.

HAVE A QUESTION?
Herb Fayer has been collecting for over 30 years and
knows his stuff. Please feel free to email him with
questions or comments at drjunk941@gmail.com.


The cook doesn't clean the kitchen


Cook, don't clean.
This is the standing rule in most
firehouses through out the world.
Once you put that much effort into
dinner and feeding the masses, you are
exempt from the chores of making the
station look better than it was before
you started. There are those who pitch
in after dinner, but any good crew will
kick you out of the kitchen.


WHOLE WHEAT
CORNBREAD MUFFINS
11 cups cornmeal
1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
2 tablespoons ground flax seed
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1 cup unsweetened almond milk
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/4 cup honey
1 cup fresh corn kernels or frozen corn kernels, thawed
1 cup chopped nuts, such as pecans or walnuts


I don t always cook wvhen I m on1 dutv,
and I mI one of the fhist to ask the cook to
enjoy his or her time off. Cleaning is not
that bad, because there are usually four
or more people in any fire station. With
one cooking, that leaves three to clean
and the job gets done quick.
Just because you cook doesn't mean
you're off scot-free. It's got to be good, or
you will never live it down. I once made


Directions:

Preheat oven to 350. Line a standard muffin tin
with paper liners or oil with canola spray oil.
Whisk together cornmeal, flour, flax seed,
baking powder and salt in a medium bowl.
In a separate small bowl, whisk together
almond milk, applesauce and honey. Stir honey
mixture into cornmeal mixture. Add corn and nuts
and stir until combined.
Fill each muffin cup about 34 full. Bake
25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the
center comes out clean.


a spaghetti with veggies
and meat, and it tLilned -
out to be more like a chili.
That still gets brought up
on occasion, with a laugh or two.
This week I give you Whole Wheat
Cornbread Muffins. If you stick close to
the recipe, hopefully your family wont
make fun of you ...
And that's bringing the firehouse
home.


N By FRANK E.VAEREWYCK
TIE FIREHOUSE FOODIE



HAVE A COMMENT?
Firehouse Foodie, Frank E. Vaerewyck, is a graduate
of Charlotte High School who began his firefighting
career in Punta Gorda. He is currently with the
Manassas Volunteer Fire Company 501 in Virginia.
You can contact him at frank.vaerewyck@ thefire
housefoodie.com.


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By DOREEN CHRISTENSEN
SuN SENTINEL

It's hip to clip. Those
Sunday coupons are
money in your pocket.
Double dip by dialing into
digital deals. Just use your
smartphone and computer
to score even more.
Here's five ways to score
more at the store with
digital deals:

BUY THE BOOK
Purchase your local
edition of"Entertainment
2014" savings book for
$35 and get a free mobile
app download valued at
$9.99. Besides the app and
savings for 13 months at
hundreds of businesses,
you'll also receive a mem-
bership card to get special
deals at stores. Offers
expire in December 2014.
Order at Entertainment.
com.


GET REWARDS
Big-box retailers aren't
the only ones with
reward programs. Many
mom-and-pop stores
offer perks and savings
through SpotOn, a loy-
alty reward card popular
with local retailers. See
a list of participating
businesses at SpotOn.
com/findspoton, or look
for the logo in business-
es'windows.

CHECK IT OUT
Use the social appli-
cation Foursquare.com
on your smartphone
to check in and score
coupon-free specials and
freebies at restaurants,
stores and spas. Search
"Specials"and pocket
savings like $10 offat a
painting party at a local
art studio (wine is in-
volved), or down at your
neighborhood Lowe's.


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DEALS DISTILLED
Forget sifting through
individual offers from daily
deal sites. Dealize.com
rounds up the best offers
from 35 sites including
LivingSocial.com and
Saveology.com in one
email, so you can save
with one convenient click.
Once you sign up, you'll
get daily emails with all
the best offers.

MOBILE ALERTS
Put that expensive
smartphone to work by
getting coupons and
savings alerts from your fa-
vorite stores via text. Sign
up and flash your phone
to save up to 20 percent at
your local Macy's, Kohl's,
Target, Bed Bath & Beyond
and many others. Use our
handy list at SunSentinel.
com'MobileOffers
Standard imessaging and
data iates al)plV


-Page 4


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


i


0





The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013 FLAIR www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5


Reader's recipe request


By MARY KLEISS


etty, a sweet 82-year-old reader from
Englewood, called me yesterday and
wanted to know what to do with cans
of salmon, as fresh salmon is so expensive
these days. A couple of recipes came to
mind ... salmon patties and salmon salad.
If readers have suggestions for Betty,
please email me, or call with your recipes
and I'll be happy to print them. I some-
times think that you can do more with
canned versus fresh salmon ... at least with
the recipes in my repertoire.
Jean, another sweet reader, called and
suggested this easy appetizer recipe for the
holidays, actually good anytime: chopped
green olives and cream cheese, sprinkled
with a little garlic salt, on celery sticks.
Years ago at the now defunct Towne
Restaurant in downtown Miami, my
lunch usually consisted of chopped green
olives with cream cheese on a toasted
buttered bagel, along with a side order
of matzo ball soup. Even though I'm
Catholic, I learned to love Jewish foods
from working for Mr. Solomon, the senior
partner at a Jewish law firm. He'd come in
every morning toting his lox and bagels
with him. And when he and Ben Novak,
owner of the Fountainebleau Hotel on
Miami Beach, got together, the smells of
carry-out food from the Towne Restaurant
drove us all nuts.
Hope all had a nice Veterans Day.Thanks
for reading!
BAKED HAM WITH FRUIT SAUCE
7-12 pound canned ham
Start cooking ham according to direc-
tions on can.
In meantime, prepare fruit sauce:


1 pound, 14 ounces canned fruit (your
favorite combination)
1 tablespoon corn starch
1 cup apple juice or cider
3-4 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon dry mustard
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 teaspoon grated lemon peel
2-3 tablespoons pan juices from ham
Drain fruit, reserving fruit and 12 cup
syrup. Blend cornstarch with small
amount of reserved fruit syrup and
remaining ingredients except fruit. Bring
to a boil, stirring, till clear and slightly
thickened. Remove from heat. Set aside
12 cup sauce for glazing ham.
About 20 minutes before meat is done,
drain off pan juices. Pour 12 cup reserved
fruit sauce over ham and bake 20 min-
utes more. Pour rest of sauce, including
fruit, over ham. Bake till fruit is heated.
Slice ham, arrange fruit sauce over and
serve. Makes 10 or more servings.
GREEN BEANS WITH WATER CHESTNUTS
1A cup butter
2 cans (5-ounces each) water chestnuts
drained and sliced (reserve liquid)
1 teaspoon salt
4 packages (9-ounces each) frozen cut
green beans
Butter or margarine
Melt butter in saucepan, stir in water
chestnuts and cook about 5 minutes.
Blend in salt and green beans. Add liquid
from chestnuts and continue cooking
till beans are tender, about 10 minutes.
Season to taste with butter, adding more
salt if necessary. 8-10 servings.


SALMON PATTIES FOR BETTY
8-ounce can skinless boneless salmon,
drained and flaked
1/2 medium chopped onion
1/2 cup seasoned breadcrumbs
2 beaten eggs
2 tablespoons butter
Salt and pepper to taste
Saute onions in butter till just brown.
Combine salmon, onion, breadcrumbs,
eggs, salt and pepper. Form mixture into
patties and brown in butter, turning once,
for about 4 minutes on each side. Place
patties on paper towel to absorb excess oil.
CANNED SALMON SALAD
13-ounce can boneless salmon, drained
and flaked
10-ounce package frozen thawed peas
S10-ounce package frozen white and wild
rice, thawed
4 ounces cubed Swiss cheese
2 cups loosely packed spinach leaves
1' teaspoon dried dillweed
8-ounce bottle creamy cucumber salad
dressing
1/2 cup shredded carrot
Mix salmon with peas, rice and Swiss
cheese, tossing well. Cover and chill. When
ready to serve, arrange spinach leaves on
individual plates, top with salmon mixture.
Drizzle evenly with salad dressing, sprinkle
with carrots. 4-6 servings.
PRE-HOLIDAY LAZY OVEN STEW
2 pounds beef stew meat cubed
1 can tiny peas
1 cup sliced carrots
2 chopped onions
Salt and pepper to taste


1 can cream of tomato (or mushroom)
soup thinned with 2 can water
1 sliced raw potato
Mix all together in a casserole dish and
cover. Bake at 275 degrees for 5 hours.
SHERRY CHOCOLATE PUDDING
1 package chocolate pudding mix
1 cup milk
cup sherry
Cinnamon
Combine mix and milk and heat accord-
ing to package directions. Take off the heat,
stir in sherry and pour into sherbet glasses.
Top with whipped cream lightly dusted
with cinnamon.
RUBY RED CRANBERRY DESSERT
3 cups each cranberry juice and water
cup sugar
6 tablespoons cornstarch
1 stick cinnamon
2 whole cloves
Whipped cream
Sliced almonds
Combine cranberry juice, water, sugar,
cornstarch, cinnamon and cloves in a
saucepan. Bring to boil, then simmer,
stirring till juice is clear and slightly
thickened. Chill. Serve in individual
glasses topped with whipped cream and
almonds. 12 servings. (Recipe from Sunset
Cookbook, 1971)

HAVE A RECIPE?
Mary Kleiss welcomes calls, suggestions and recipes
for her column. Email her at mkleiss@msn.com, or
call 941-889-7297.


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FLAIR





www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


New releases from Daughtry and Herb Alpert1


New releases from Daughtry and Herb Alpert


here's a new release out this week
by Daughtry called Baptized.
Daughtry is a band that features
five individuals who took the surname
of their lead singer. Most people know
Chris Daughtry because of his televised
performances on the fifth season of
"American Idol." He made it into the
final four and was expected to win, but
after some controversy, he was voted
off. He was immediately signed to RCA
Records and began to create his first
album. After it was complete, the label
hired the rest of the band, so the debut
release was really all Chris.
The self-titled album was released
in 2006 and became the fastest selling
debut rock album in modern times.
With sales over 4 million and reaching
the No. 1 status on Billboard's Top 200,
he really had made it. Actually, besides
Kelly Clarkson, he is the best-selling
artist that has come from "American
Idol."
Baptized is his fourth studio release
and is a little more on the pop side
than his original work. Oh and for
the people that are wondering, Chris
Daughtry was born Christopher Adam


Daughtiv on Dec 26, 197'9, in Roanoke
Rapids, N.C. He mai ied at the age
of 21, and he and his wife have four
children.
Next we have a new release by Herb
Alpert called Steppin Out.
Herbert Alpert was born March 31,
1935, in Los Angeles, Calif. He began
learning to play the trumpet at the
age of 8. Alpert broke on to the music
scene as a songwriter and became
quite successful at it.
During a trip to Tijuana, Mexico,
Alpert became fascinated by the music
played at a bullfight. Once he returned
to the states, he infused the bullfight
music into the songs he was writing
and came up with "The Lonely Bull." He
funded the entire project by himself
and created the sound of many players
by overdubbing himself. In 1962 "The
Lonely Bull" became a Top 10 hit.
Alpert was on his way, he created
his own music studio in his garage and
with his friend Jerry Moss created the
recording label A&M Records. After a
few albums were released, a growing
demand began to see them live. Well
there really was no Tijuana Brass band.


So Allpeit hied session ip)lavei to
foain the band.
While researching Herb Alpert
and the Tijuana Brass band, it
shocked me to find out that no one
in the band including Alpert was
Hispanic. The sound, the look, the mari-
achi band, all made to look Hispanic. At
their concerts, Alpert would joke that
the band consisted of"Four lasagnas,
two bagels and an American cheese."
During the 1960s, Herb Alpert owned
the charts, he is the only artist to have
a No. 1 hit as a vocalist and one as an
instrumentalist. He has sold more than
72 million albums worldwide and there
is not a person from that era that didn't
have a copy of Whipped Cream and Other
Delights. Alright, maybe not everyone
from that era had one, but you can not
be in the record business of buying and
selling old records without that album
being brought in 10 to 15 times a week.
Steppin Out is a jazz album that fea-
tures his wife, Lani Hall, on vocals. She
is best known as the singer in Sergio
Mendes band Brazil '66. Herb Alpert
is 78 and still doing what he loves...
making music.


-ByTJKOONTZ

Other major releases are from Jake
Bugg, Eric Clapton (Crossroads 2013),
Five Finger Death Punch, Nickelback
(Best of), Perfect Circle, Rush (Live),
Webbie,Yo Gotti. Independent releases
are from Apocalyptica, Awolnation,
Amanda Palmer, David Lee Roth (Best of),
Saxon and Haystack.
Since last week's column was an
interview, I omitted the new releases for
the week of Nov. 11. Major releases were
from The Beatles (BBC & On Air), Keane,
The Killers, Lady Gaga, Duane Allman
(box set), Lady Antebellum and Now
48. Independent releases were from
Counting Crows, John Hiatt, Phish, Katey
Sagal (Yes, Peg Bundy!), Kellie Pickler
and Sammy Kershaw.
Keep rockin'folks!

HAVE A COMMENT?
Tom Koontz is the owner ofTJ's CDS & More at
3275-A Tamiami Trail in Port Charlotte. He loves
reader comments, and can be contacted at
tjscds@peoplepc.com.


ByMAURAJUDKIS
THE WASHINGTON POST


It's not enough to merely re-
invent your look each season.
These days, you also have to
reinvent the language used
to describe the clothes you
wear. Fashion bloggers and ad
copy writers have taken to this
task with enthusiasm, coining
"abbreves" and portmanteaus
(the combining of two words
to create a new one) for
every trend they can get their
ombre-manicured hands on.
And this is a problem. To put
it in perspective: These words
ugly up the English language
the way Ed Hardy tattoo-art
tees muck up fashion.
Some words stack hyperbole
upon hyperbole; others cutesy
up language to the point that
a blog post written by a grown
woman can read like a text
from an illiterate tween. Since
many of these new fashion
terms appear online, in tweets
or in print ads, the words look
better than they sound. (Try
saying covetablee" out loud
without smirking.)
"Words have always gone in
and out of fashion," says Allison
Leopold, assistant professor at
New York's Fashion Institute


of Technology. "Some slang is
fleeting :'23 skidoo"the bee's
knees.' Other terms become
part of the lexicon, like'cool'or
'funky."
In recent times, some vocabu-
lary words ("skinnies,""sunnies")
have already gone mainstream;
others are unlikely to ever
leave the corner of the Internet
relegated to discussing the
re-emergence of stacked heels
and moto jackets. Here's our list
of the worst offenders in the
current fashion pack.

PLATFORMS
Noun: Platform shoes that are
also flats, for those who crave a
look that hints at the aesthetic
of orthopedic shoes, minus the
matching cane.
Example: Before you judge a
fashionista, walk a mile in her
flatforms.

FEROSH
Adjective: Because "fierce,"' as a
fashion descriptor, was starting
to seem too tame. Derives from
ferocious, though you might
not know this from the dorky
spelling.
Example: Girl, those flatforms
are a ferosh new look for you.

SUNNIES
Noun: Sunglasses, because the


word "sunglasses" really needed
to be cuter, and "shades" sound
like something Tom Cruise
sported circa 1983.
Example: What's more ferosh
- these Prada flatforms or these
Ralph Lauren sunnies?

COLLAB
Noun: Short for collaboration,
particularly when a high-end
designer deigns to work with
a low-end retailer. The word
is a forewarning of long lines
outside H&M, and, potentially,
trampling deaths.
Example: These sunnies are
care of the Phillip Lim collab at
Target, which was so ferosh it
sold out in, like, literally three
minutes.

FROW
Noun: The front row of a
fashion show. Add one letter
and it becomes "frown," which is
what this word should make you
do. Oh, come on, seriously, how
hard is it to just say "front row"?
Example: I almost didn't rec-
ognize Kim Kardashian in those
ferosh flatforms and sunnies in
the frow at the Givenchy show.

GENIUS
Adjective: Some might say
"genius" is a word that should
be reserved for the Gateses and


Galileos of history. In fashion,
the bar is considerably lower.
You've come up with a new way
to tie a scarf? Genius!
Example: From the frow, those
ferosh flatforms were a GENIUS
look in the collab collection.

LOUBS
Noun: Christian Louboutin
heels can be characterized by
their red soles. Folks who say
"Loubs"can be characterized by
their braggy Instagrams.
Example: Wearing Loubs,
sitting in the frow in my sunnies
- just an average day for a
fashion blogger ferosh genius

SKINNIES
Noun: No, not another word
for models it's short for
skinny jeans.
Example: Skinnies & Loubs,
or should I wear the genius
flatforms from the Man Repeller
collab? Wanna impress people
with my ferosh style when I'm
sitting there in the frow!

INTERESTING
Adjective: It might not
be so dazzling in real life,
but add a Valencia filter on
Instagram and throw it on your
"swoon-worthy looks" board,
and you have found something
Interesting.


Example: Your ferosh auber-
gine flatforms with emerald
skinnies and wood sunnies
from the genius Isabel Marant
collab are soooo Pinteresting.

CURATED
Adjective: A concise and
cohesive closet or collection.
Proper usage applies to high
fashion (think Met exhibits) or,
duh, Picassos. Your closetful of
Ann Taylor ain't "curated."
Example: Every curated clos-
et includes skinnies, sunnies,
flatforms and Loubs it's
what makes your wardrobe
Pinteresting, and helps you
earn your place in the frow
for the unveiling of the next
genius collab.

SWOON-WORTHY
Adjective: If as many things
in life were as "swoon-worthy"
as fashion blogs claim, it would
be considered a medical epi-
demic and the Lincoln Center
tents would be quarantined.
Example: I love this ferosh,
well-edited look, worthy
of being curated from the
frow: swoon-worthy skinnies,
Pinteresting flatforms (left foot,
c/o Asos), Loubs (right food,
c/o Louboutin), and sunnies
from the DVF collab. I am a
genius.


Buckles and punk and plaid, oh my!


ByJULIE GALLEGO
THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER


It is the biggest trend this season,
but to TONS of everyday fashioni-
stas some who were here when
the looks were born and some who
have been around for each iteration
thereafter it never went away.
I'm talking about the punk, rocker,
neo-grunge trends that populated
the fall 2013 runways (and which
even showed up on some spring 2014
runways, too).
It might have something to do
with the Met's "Chaos to Couture"
show this year, but it could be a gift


to me from the fashion gods. What
I do know is that I have had a great
time finding new ways to wear my
various Doc Martens, leather jackets
and studded etceteras.

MOT PHOTO
Right: Moto vest Real world: Work-ap-
propriate moto is totally doable if it's a
two-piece suit (Rebecca Taylor Tweed Moto
Vest, $425, and Tweed Flounce Skirt, $295)
over punk-worthy stripes (Aqua Stripped
Button Up Blouse, $68) and paired with
an iridescent clutch (Milly Holographic
Clutch, $375). Also shown: Sam Edelman
"Petty" Short Leather Boots ($130). All from
Bloomingdale's Fashion Island.


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5 weird ways to relax


Check out these five
ways to add some relax-
ation to your day noth-
ing too hard, we promise!
- and get ready to reap
the health benefits that
come with kicking back.
1. Sniff an orange.
When you're stressed,
your sense of
smell actually ..
gets sharper t.i
because
your body '
is in survival A,
mode. Put
those super-
human powers to use
by sniffing some citrus
essential oil. In a recent
Brazilian study, partic-
ipants who endured a
stressful test felt much
less anxious when they
sniffed orange essential
oil for five minutes prior
to the exam. Best of all,
the effects followed them
throughout the day.
2. Snack well. Eat your
way to relaxation? Count
us in. Blueberries are load-
ed with
vitamin
C, which
helps
lower the
levels of
the stress
hormone
cortisol,
and cham-
omile is a


known anxiety-soother.
3. Make faces. When
you feel tense, looking ri-
diculous can help. Scrunch
up your whole face for
15 seconds, release and
then repeat, he says, to
help zap any strain you're
inadvertently holding
above the neck.
4. Go for a midday
vacay. Just because
National Relaxation Day
isn't a federal holiday -
yet doesn't mean you
can't take a break. A quick
walk around the block or
a five-minute meditation
can recharge your day
almost as well as a stroll
down a beach. Oh, and
tonight? Don't even think
about bringing work
home with you.
5. Change a bulb. A
simple swap can help
you mellow, according to
research. High-wattage
light can raise stress levels,
make you hungry, and
even make you eat faster.
Switch normal white light
bulbs for
blue-en-
riched
light,
which
decreases
fatigue,
ups your
mood, and
improves
sleep.


-Page 6


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~Page 8 www.sunnewspapers.net FLAIR The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


Pumpkin, spice & everything nice


By ELEANOR LANGSTON
FAMILYFuN MAGAZINE

Celebrate autumn with
these gourd-geous, har-
vest-inspired beauty buys
that will leave you feeling
pampered and polished.
Fall for these picks:
Nest Fragrances
Pumpkin Chai Candle
envelops your home in
the aromas of pumpkin,
chai, cinnamon, and
ginger. Savor that just-
baked pie smell with
no calories to tempt you.
$34, neimanmarcus.com.
SChock-full of pump-
kin's exfoliating enzymes,
Peter Thomas Roth
Clinical Peel & Reveal


works in less than 5 min-
utes to slough off dead
cells and reveal newer,
younger-looking skin.
$58, peterthomasroth.
com.
Super-rich Burt's Bees
Ultimate Care Body Lotion
softens even elbows and
feet with readily absorbed
pumpkin seed oil. $10,
burtsbees.com.
*Yummy-smelling
Philosophy Homemade
Pumpkin Pie Shampoo,
Shower Gel & Bubble Bath
hydrates skin and hair.
You'll want to eat it, but
put it in your bath instead.
$16.50, philosophy.com.
Topshop Make
Up Nails in Smashing


Pumpkin is both
long-lasting and flattering
to all skin tones. $10,
nordstrom.com.
It's OK to get your
hands dirty with whipped
Farmhouse Fresh Splendid
Dirt Nutrient Mud Mask
With Organic Pumpkin
Puree. The formula of
pumpkin, yogurt, and
clay helps cleanse the
skin and leave it silky and
refreshed. $20, farm
housefreshgoods.com.

DID YOU KNOW?
Pumpkins are packed
with vitamins C and A,
which help soften and
soothe skin and prevent
signs of aging.


MCT PHOTO
Right: Celebrate autumn
with these gourd-geous,
harvest-inspired beauty
buys, clockwise from candle:
Nest Fragrances Pumpkin
Chai Candle, $34, neiman
marcus.com; Peter Thomas
Roth Clinical Peel & Reveal,
$58, peterthomasroth.com;
Burt's Bees Ultimate Care
Body Lotion, $10, burtsbees.
corn; Philosophy Homemade
Pumpkin Pie Shampoo,
Shower Gel & Bubble Bath,
$16.50, philosophy.com;
Topshop Make Up Nails in
Smashing Pumpkin, $10,
nordstrom.com; Farmhouse
Fresh Splendid Dirt Nutrient
Mud Mask With Organic
Pumpkin Puree, $20, farm
housefreshgoods.com.


CHIC
FROM PAGE 1

hunting and casual
camouflage clothing seen
in outdoor stores and
discount retailers such as
Shopko.
"The growth of outdoor
camo has really been
influenced by pop culture
and reality TV," Soltau said.
"Cable shows like'Duck
Dynasty' have celebrated
this outdoor lifestyle.
They've made it chic.
Outdoor camouflage has
become very cool"


ETIQUETTE
FROM PAGE 1

Think twice about
sending a thank-you
exclusively through social
media, though.
"Thank you notes are
meant to be intimate
and private, with the aim
to make the person feel
special. Social media is


MYTHS
FROM PAGE 1

proud deaf person"
Any deaf person would
welcome a cochlear
implant. False. "I was
against it for a long
time. I feared people


"It's cool to be country
today."
And it's not just guys
who are in on the trend.
"Our core customer -
and this is no different than
most of retail is female,"
Soltau said."The mom or
the female head of the
household does most of
the shopping."
That has led to all sorts
of colorful camo patterned
clothing, including pinks
and purples hitting the
market.
"Many, many women
are out there hunting,"
Soltau said. "They love the
lifestyle. They really relate

a public space and not
really appropriate for
something like that,"
Browne says.

WHAT TO SAY
If you're sending a thank
you for a gift, Leas recom-
mends personalizing the
message by also noting
how you're going to use
the gift. That doesn't
mean it has to be a novel
(although it can be if you


were trying to change
who I was," said LeBlanc,
whose parents learned
he was deaf when he
was 18 months old. The
opportunity to get an
implant arose when
he was about 15, and
LeBlanc decided to do
so at age 18. "I decided
I had nothing to lose.


VeniceTheatre


THE DESTINATION




A /I


to the product. They'll buy
the pink forjust hangin'out
and saying 'hey, you know, I
really love this lifestyle and
I'm proud of what I do.'
The state's natural re-
sources department says it
sold nearly 30,000 first-time
hunter licenses for last year's
deer season and nearly
10,000 of those licenses
were sold to women.
"Our women's camo
is our biggest growing
sub-department in our
whole camo department,"
said Casey Zeigler, clothing
manager at the Cabela's
outdoor store in Richfield.
"Women's and children's

want it to). Two or three
sentences is sufficient.
Browne says it's always
crucial to stay genuine and
conversational. "Pretend
the person is standing
there in the room with
you, and you're thanking
him as enthusiastically as
you can."
She says every note
should have the date, a
salutation (Dear Ms., etc.),
an acknowledgment for


I could choose to take
it off or turn it down."
In adulthood, many of
his deaf friends have
eschewed a cochlear
implant, which is why he
suggests parents think
twice about making the
decision for a baby or
young child. "It's not for
everybody," LeBlanc said.


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(camo) is just blowing up
on us."
The hullabaloo sur-
rounding camouflage
doesn't come as a shock to
Jody Clowes, exhibitions
manager at the James
Watrous Gallery, part of
the Wisconsin Academy of
Sciences, Arts and Letters in
Madison.
Clowes was curator for an
exhibit in 2010 that included
an exploration of landscape
through fabric and embroi-
dery. Camouflage was a part
ofthat.
"It's just surprisingly
long-lived,"Clowes said. "It's
got legs."

what you're thanking the
person for, some note of
goodwill (I look forward to
seeing you soon, etc.) and
a signature. A compliment
to the reader, such as "You
always know just what
to get me" can be a nice
touch as well.

HOW TO GET KIDS STARTED
Motivating adults to
write thank-you notes is
hard enough. Getting kids


"I think everyone should
have a choice."
Speaking louder
and slower enhances
understanding. "That is
a complete myth for me
since it will only make
it more difficult for me
to understand," LeBlanc
said. When he first meets
people, he needs to see
their lips move in their
typical manner. As he
gets to know them and
their delivery, he trains
himself so he can look
away and still under-
stand. "It takes practice."
If he is in a dark or loud
environment or crucial
information is being
conveyed, he uses an
interpreter for backup,
as on "Project Runway."
"I don't always trust
what I hear," he said. "I
don't like missing out on


MCT PHOTO
Retail marketing manager Stephanie Crangle fixes a display
of women's heated camouflage jackets, Oct. 30, at Cabela's in
Richfield, Wis.


to write them? Even more
challenging.
Leas recommends try-
ing to make it fun for kids.
You can start them when
they're young and just
get them to sign the card.
As they get older, make
it a craft project and let
them decorate notecards
to add their own personal
touch. Apps like those
mentioned above can
be great for older kids,


information."
Society has moved
past"deaf and dumb.'
False. "I still encounter
people to this day who
associate being deaf
with being dumb,;' said
LeBlanc, who completed
graduate studies in fash-
ion at the School of the
Art Institute of Chicago
and now teaches fashion
and design at North
Carolina State University,
where he earned an
undergraduate degree
in architecture. He did
so despite being told
once by a high school
teacher that he couldn't
go to college because he
was deaf. "I went to the
school board over that,"
he said. "'Deaf and dumb'
is the biggest stereotype
that bothers me."
American Sign


especially if they want to
attach pictures with the
message.
After birthdays or a
holiday, "you can just have
them do a couple cards
a day -just make a list
of the gifts everyone sent
and have them check each
off one by one," Browne
says. "This makes every-
one's life so much easier
and teaches kids to be
grateful."


Language limits ex-
pression. False. "I still
consider ASL as my first
language,"' LeBlanc said.
"I would love to use
it all the time but not
everyone knows it. It's a
beautiful language, all
about body language.
And body gestures speak
louder than words."' A
visit to Thailand rein-
forced that belief. A Thai
person who was deaf
approached LeBlanc
and, despite differences
in Asian sign language,
they understood each
other. "With verbal
language it's hard to
convey the emotion. ASL
is performance in a way.
All of us could benefit
from using more gestural
communication," LeBlanc
said. "It has really allowed
me to be who I am."


ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD ON PAGE 2

SA-B E -N RESISTS AMATIS
E -R"E-ST-S'Y'S"--A-M A'Y T'
CRANES E S N U T E R 0 S A V A N T
H I Y 0 1 L [V' R A W A YJ P R I N C E
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S E RUM I mP S ENSE
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G U AR D S-A-N D M A-G oD B L E- S S
EM I N E M AGENT A A LEAST
S E L ENE T-I E D-S L AS S E S


The Sun /Sunday, November 17, 2013


-Page 8 www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR

































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HAVE KNOWN 9OU WEREN'T A SUNRISE PERO5N!


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Comics Page 2 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com The Sun I Sunday, November 17, 2013


by parker and hart


YOU GUY5 GROW UP!
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Comics Page 2 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com


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NEXT: 2ncrlntr)b









BY BOB WEBER JR.


SQUEAK loll
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Sunday, November 17, 2013 / The Sun


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www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 5





Comics Page 6 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald .com The Sun I Sunday, November 17, 2013


THE PHANTOM


BY LEE FALK


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TUESDAY
Bryan Cranston stars
on the ABC special
"David Blaine: Real or
Magic," at 9:31 p.m.


THURSDAY
Candice Bergen guest-
stars on "The Michael J.
Fox Show," at 9:30 p.m.
on NBC.


FRIDAY
Cary Grant stars in the
1938 screwball comedy
"Bringing Up Baby," at
10 p.m. on TCM.


SATURDAY
At 9 p.m. on SYFY, a
tornado generates
exploding boulders in
"Stonados."








Conversion Chart


Comcast Comcast Comcast Comcast Comcast Comcast FiOS Ven, EngI, N PortNokoNns PtChar, SPG


Venice Englewood Sarasota Chrol'ote Arcadia Go', Sarasota DISH DIRECT DISH DIRECT
WZVN 6 ABC Bonita Springs 7 11 7 26 26
WFTS 8 ABC-Tampa 11 28 28
WWSB 0 ABC Sarasota 7 7 7 10 7 7 7 40
WTSP 1 CBS- St. Petersburg 10 10 10 10 10 10
WINK M) CBS- Fort Myers 213 213 5 5 5 11 11
WFLA C NBC-Tampa 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
WBBH 20 NBC Fort Myers 2 2 2 20 20
WTVT 13 FOX-Tampa 13 13 13 13 13 13 13
WFTX [ FOX- Cape Coral 4 4 4 36 36
WEDU M PBS-Tampa 3 3 3 3 3 3 -
WUSF 1 PBS-Tampa 204 204 204 16 16 16
WGCU 30 PBS-Fort Myers 3 3 3 30 30
WXCW Ac CW 6 21 6 46 46
WTOG 4 CW 9 9 9 4 44 44 -
WTTA 8 MYNET 11 11 11 14 38 38
WNFM C MYNET 8 9 8
WMOR 3 IND 12 12 12 38 12 32 32 -
WXPX 6 ION St. Petersburg 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 66 66
WCLF 2 IND St. Petersburg 22 22 22 2 22
WRXY 9 IND- Ft. Myers-Naples 22 44 10 49
WFTT 5 Telefutura Tampa 23 23 23 95 5 50 50
WVEA 6 Univision -Venice 15 15 15 6 62 62
A&E Arts & Entertainment 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 118 265 118 265
AMC American Movie Classics 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 131 254 130 254
APL Animal Planet 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 184 282 184 282
BET Black Entertainment TV 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 124 329 124 329
BRAVO Bravo 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 129 237 129 237
COM Comedy Central 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 107 249 107 249
DISC Discovery Channel 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 182 278 182 278
E! Entertainment Channel 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 114 236 114 236
ESQ Esquire Network 82 82 82 82 118 118 160 115 235 115 235
EWTN Eternal Word Television Network 243 243 243 12 17 285 261 370 261 370
FAM ABCFamily Channel 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 180 311 180 311
FOOD TV Food 37 37 37 37 76 164 110 231 110 231
FX FX Network 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 136 248 136 248
GSN Game Show Network 179 179 179 179 34 179 184 116 233 116 233
HALL Hallmark USA 5 5 5 17 73 240 185 312 185 312
HIST History Channel 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 120 269 120 269
HOME Home & Garden 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 112 229 112 229
HSN Home Shopping Network 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 222 240 222 240
LIFE Lifetime 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 108 252 108 252
OWN OprahWinfrey Network 58 58 58 58 47 103 161 189 279 189 279
QVC Quality Value Convenience 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 137 317 137 317
SPIKE SpikeTV 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 241 241 241 241
SYFY Science Fiction 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 122 244 122 244
TBS Turner 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 139 247 139 247
TCM Turner Classic Movies 65 65 65 65 169 230 132 256 132 256
TLC The Learning Channel 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 183 280 183 280
TNT Turner Network Television 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 138 245 138 245
TRAV Travel 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 196 277 196 277
TRUTV truTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 242 246 242 246
TVLAND TV Land 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 106 304 106 304
USA USA Network 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 105 242 105 242
WE Women's Entertainment 117 117 117 117 117 149 128 260 128 260
WGN WGN America 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 239 307 239 307
CSS Comcast Sports South 28 28 28 28 49 70
ESPN Entertainment Sports 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 140 206 140 206
ESPN2 Entertainment Sports 2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 144 209 144 209
FS1 Fox Sports 1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 150 219 150 219
FSN Fox Sports Network 72 72 72 72 56 77 423 654 423 654
GOLF Golf Channel 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 401 218 401 218
NBCS NBC Sports 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 159 220 159 220
SUN Sun Sports 38 38 401 401 45 57 76 422 653 422 653
NICK Nickelodeon 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 170 299 170 299
TOON Cartoon Network 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 176 296 176 296
CNBC Financial News/Talk 39 39 39 39 37 102 208 355 208 355
CNN Cable News Network 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 200 202 200 202
CSPN Congress 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 210 350 210 350
FNC Fox News Channel 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 205 360 205 360
MSNBC News/Talk 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 209 356 209 356
SNN SNN Local News 6 6 6 11 11
CMTV Country Music TV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 166 327 166 327
MTV Music Television 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 160 331 160 331
VH1 Video Hits 1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 162 335 162 335
CINE Cinemax 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 310 515 310 515
CINE2 Cinemax 2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 312 517 312 517
DISN Disney Channel 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 172 290 172 290
ENC Encore 150 150 150 150 150 350 340 535 340 535
HBO Home Box Office 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 300 501 300 501
HB02 Home Box Office 2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 301 502 301 502
HB03 Home Box Office 3 304 304 304 304 304 404 302 503 302 503
SHOW Showtime 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 318 545 318 545
TMC The Movie Channel 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 327 554 327 554








On the Cover

New Futuristic Cop Drama


Debuts on FOX
3Y CANDACE HAVENS
) FYI Televsion, Inc.
After surviving a vicious at-
ack, Detective John Kennex
?Karl Urban, "Star Trek") is back
it work He's been in a coma the
ast 17 months, and he's been
givenn a synthetic leg. He's suffer-
ng from mental atrophy, he's de-
wressed, and he can't remember
:he attack It's the year 2048, and
lis boss, Capt. Sandra Maldo-
iado (Lili Taylor, "Six Feet Un-
ler"), forces him to get back on
:he job. He's the only person she
man trust, and she needs his help.
But the job comes with a caveat:
uis new partner is an android.
John doesn't trust the robots and
giants nothing to do with the
:hing. In fact, he treats Dorian
Michael Ealy, "Sleeper Cell") like
i piece of machinery. But it isn't
ong before he discovers his new
partner may be more hu-
nan than he could
rave ever expect-
Ad on the new
FOX series
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nan1." |'i-- ^^^^
nllh ilrI ill
,| p.ii- .
itlllllll\ ,.llll
'Iilt l', .m ii
it S p.mi. ^ ^^H


Urban says he's drawn to
shows and movies set in theworld
of science fiction and fantasy. "I
watched a lot of television as a
kid," says the actor. "I was always
drawn to shows like 'Star Trek;,'
which presented a wonderful
kind of vision of the future where
it didn't matter what race or cul-
ture or creed that you came from,
that you were accepted on equal
terms and that humanity had
overcome the warring and the
differences and was now united.
And it's a very positive and opti-
mistic vision of the future. And I
think that's why that show was
so successful and people were
latching onto that. And one of
the wonderful things that I think
that Joel (executive producer
J.H. VWyman) is doing in Almost
Human' is we're not presenting
a dystopian vision of the future.
"This is a future
that is immedi-
ately accessi-
ble;' Urban
continues.
"We've still
got mort-
gages.
Mom and
dad still
take the
kids to soc-
LL er. It's just


that, in this slightly tutunshtic vi-
sion, society is dealing with ele-
ments and difficulties that are
just a little bit beyond the curve
for us, and I find that interest-
ing. And we play characters who
are really at the frontline of pro-
tecting the society against the
misapplication of, whether it be
genetics or robotics, or anything
like that. And the wonderful
thing that I think the show does
is it really sort of questions us.
It makes us, as an audience, ask
what does it mean to be human.
And if I were in that situation,
how I would react? And I think
that's a key of all good shows."
While it isn't new to have a
robot that wants to be human,
the producers twisted the idea to
make Ealy's character more origi-
nal. "We wanted to do something
that was a little bit different, and I
think we've all seen the robot that
longs to be human," says Wyman.
"We felt that, to tell the story we
wanted to tell, it was probably
better for us to have a robot that
was more human than he could
handle and sort of trying to un-
derstand what he is versus want-
ing and longing to be something
he's not. So, that was our way in."
'As an actor," adds Ealy, "you
tend to draw on your human
instincts and your background,
what you've gone through as
an individual. And the hard-
est things in terms of playing
Dorian is to act like I don't have
that and to bring that kind of in-
nocence to him that he doesn't
have the life experience that
Karl's character, John Kennex,
has. He doesn't have that. So, he's
fascinated with that, and he ob-
serves it, and he learns from it."
The treatment of the androids
is a big part of the show. "You
know, we have the good fortune
of speaking to somebody at MIT
who literally was in robot eth-
ics,";' says VWymVan. "If you tell a
story about somebody who's a
pedophile that's using children,
but robotic children, is it still
wrong? So, there are so many
interesting things you could


talk about, and ethics is one ot
those. In the show right now,
we're going to be examining that.
"We're not at the point in
the future where it's almost like
this is an actual concrete thing.
These androids are supposed
to help make certain that the
police force and the brave men
and women that fight on the
front lines day to day are out of
harm's way. So, the truth is that
John could say, 'Hey, look This
is just like having a great gun.
You're with me, and you're an
incredible smartphone and shut
up and don't speak until you're
spoken to.' And the problem is
the gun feels very differently."


index
Cover Story................................ 3
Sports ..................................... 4-5
Soap Update ............................. 21
Radio/News/Weather............... 5
Q&A ........................................... 11
TV Crossword .......................... 42
Movies ..................................... 48
guide to symbols
**** = Exceptional*** = Good
** = Fair* = Poor
Symbols & codes:
(CC)= Close Captioned; 'R'= Repeat;
'N'- new; (HD)'= High Definition;
DVS = Descriptive Video Service;
iTV = Interactive television; T =
Taped.
Parental Guidelines forTV:
You may see rating codes on your
TV screen. Here what they mean:
'Y'-appropriate for all Children. 'Y7'
appropriate for 7 and older. 'G'
general audience. 'PG' parental
guidance suggested. '14'-14 and
older. 'M' 17 and older.
Along with the rating codes mentioned
above, you may see additional
abbreviations. Here's what they
mean: 'AC'- adult content. 'AH'
adult humor. 'AL adult language.
'AS' adult situations. 'BN' brief
nudity 'GL- graphic language. 'GV'
graphic violence. 'MT'- mature
themes. 'MV' mild violence. 'SC'
sexual content. 'SSC' strong
sexual content. 'V'- violence.
Motion picture guidelines:
Movies that appear on movie channels
may have a theatrical rating. Here's
what they mean: 'G'- general
audiences. 'PG'- parental guidence
suggested; some material may not
be suitable for children. 'PG-13'
special parental guidance strongly
suggested for children under 13.
'R'- restricted; under 17 requires
accompanying parent or guardian.
'NC-17'- not recommended for
persons under 17.
contact information
Programming Questions?
1-800-Comcast or www.Comcast.com


Michael Ealy plays a robot
cop on "Almost Human," pre-
miering Sunday and Monday
at 8 p.m. on FOX.


Why is TV Schedule Different from this book?
TV networks sometimes change schedules af-
ter this weekly book is printed. More accurate
TV schedules are in our daily Sun Newspaper
and our websites: www.venicegondolier.com
or www.sun-herald.com.









SPORTS


AUTO RACING

Formula 1
Sunday
2:00 p.m. NBC United States
Grand Prixfrom Circuit of
the Americas in Austin,
Texas. (Live)
6:00 p.m. NBCS United States
Grand Prixfrom Circuit of
the Americas in Austin,
Texas. (Live)
Friday
11:00 a.m. NBCS Formula One
Practice Brazilian Grand Prix
from Sdo Paulo (Live)

NASCAR
Sunday
3:00 p.m. ESPN Ford EcoBoost
400from Homestead-Miami
Speedway in Homestead,
Fla. (Live)

BASKETBALL

Men's College
Sunday
Noon FSN Indiana State
Sycamores at Notre Dame
Fighting Irish (Live)
4:00 p.m. FSN Long Beach
State 49ers at Kansas State
Wildcats (Live)
5:00 p.m. ESPN2 Michigan
Wolverines at Iowa State
Cyclones (Live)
5:00 p.m. FS1 Towson Tigers
at Villanova Wildcats (Live)
7:00 p.m. ESPN2 Robert Mor-
ris Colonials at Kentucky
Wildcats (Live)


Sebastian Vettel will
attempt to win his first
"United States Grand Prix"
when NBC presents "For-
mula One Racing," Sunday
at 2 D.m.


Monday
7:00 p.m. FS1 Vermont
Catamounts at Providence
College Friars (Live)
7:00 p.m. FSN The Citadel
Bulldogs at Tennessee Vol-
unteers (Live)
7:00 p.m. SUN Southern Jag-
uars at Florida Gators (Live)
Tuesday
6:00 p.m. FS1 Vanderbilt Com-
modores at Butler Bulldogs
(Live)
7:00 p.m. FSN College Basket-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
8:00 p.m. ESPN Old Spice
Classic: Regional Round
Memphis Tigers at Oklaho-
ma State Cowboys (Live)
8:30 p.m. FS1 Bucknell Bison
at St. John's Red Storm
(Live)
Wednesday
7:00 p.m. SUN North Caro-
lina Central Eagles at North
Carolina State Wolfpack
(Live)
8:00 p.m. FS1 Miami (Ohio)
RedHawks at Xavier Muske-
teers (Live)
Thursday
5:00 p.m. ESPN2 Puerto Rico
Tip-Off: Quarterfinal #3 Long
Beach State 49ers vs Michi-
gan Wolverines (Live)
7:00 p.m. ESPN2 2K Sports
Classic: Semifinal #1 Con-
necticut Huskies vs Boston
College Eagles (Live)
7:30 p.m. SUN Middle Ten-
nessee State Blue Raiders at
Florida Gators (Live)
9:00 p.m. ESPN2 2K Sports
Classic: Semifinal #2 Indiana
Hoosiers vs Washington
Huskies (Live)
Friday
7:00 p.m. ESPN2 2K Sports
Classic: Championship from
Madison Square Garden in
New York (Live)
7:00 p.m. FS1 Delaware Blue
Hens at Villanova Wildcats
(Live)
7:00 p.m. TRUTV Coaches vs.
Cancer Classic: Semifinal #1
Oklahoma Sooners vs Seton
Hall Pirates (Live)
9:00 p.m. FS1 Monmouth
Hawks at St. John's Red
Storm (Live)
9:30 p.m. TRUTV Coaches vs.
Cancer Classic: Spmifinal t*2


iviicnigan state Spartans vs
Virginia Tech Hokies (Live)
Saturday
3:30 p.m.SUN Tulsa Golden
Hurricane at Creighton Blue-
jays (Live)
7:00 p.m. TRUTV Coaches vs.
Cancer Classic: Consola-
tion from Barclays Center in
Brooklyn, N.Y. (Live)
9:30 p.m. TRUTV Coaches vs.
Cancer Classic: Champion-
ship from Barclays Center in
Brooklyn, N.Y. (Live)

NBA
Wednesday
7:00 p.m. ESPN Indiana Pac-
ers at New York Knicks (Live)
7:00 p.m. FSN Miami Heat at
Orlando Magic (Live)
9:30 p.m. ESPN Houston
Rockets at Dallas Mavericks
(Live)
Thursday
8:00 p.m. TNT Los Angeles
Clippers at Oklahoma City
Thunder(Live)
10:30 p.m.TNT Chicago Bulls
at Denver Nuggets (Live)
Friday
8:00 p.m. ESPN San Antonio
Spurs at Memphis Grizzlies
(Live)
10:30 p.m. ESPN Golden State
Warriors at Los Angeles Lak-
ers (Live)
Saturday
7:30 p.m. FSN Orlando Magic
at Miami Heat (Live)

FOOTBALL

College
Sunday
11:00 a.m. CSS Georgia Bull-
dogs at Auburn Tigers (Live)
Wednesday
8:00 p.m. ESPN2 Northern
Illinois Huskies at Toledo
Rockets (Live)
Thursday
7:30 p.m. ESPN Rutgers Scar-
let Knights at UCF Knights
(Live)
7:30 p.m. FS1 Rice Owls at
UAB Blazers (Live)
Friday
9:30 p.m.ESPN2 Navy Mid-
shipmen at San Jose State
Spartans (Live)
Saturday
Noon NBCS Harvard Crimson
at Yale Bulldogs (Live)
Noon MYN College Football
SFC Game of the Week(I ivpe


NOOnABC college -ootball
ACC Game of the Week (Live,
12:20 p.m. CW College Foot-
ball SEC Game of the Week
(Live)
12:30 p.m. CW College Foot-
ball ACC Game of the Week
(Live)
3:30 p.m. NBCS James Madi-
son Dukes at Towson Tigers
(Live)
3:30 p.m. NBC BYU Cougars
at Notre Dame Fighting Irish
(Live)
3:30 p.m. CBS Texas A&M Ag-
gies at LSU Tigers (Live)

NFL
Sunday
1:00 p.m. FOX NFL Football
Regional Coverage Teams
TBA (Live)
4:00 p.m. CBS San Diego
Chargers at Miami Dolphins
(Live)
4:25 p.m. FOX NFL Football
Regional Coverage Teams
TBA (Live)
8:20 p.m. NBC Kansas City
Chiefs at Denver Broncos
(Live)
Monday
8:25 p.m. ESPN New England
Patriots at Carolina Pan-
thers (Live)

GOLF

LPGA
Thursday
1:30 p.m. GOLF CME Group
Titleholders: First Round
from Tibur6n Golf Club in
Naples, Fla. (Live)
Friday
1:30 p.m. GOLF CME Group
Titleholders: Second Round
from Tibur6n Golf Club in
Naples, Fla. (Live)
Saturday
1:30 p.m. GOLF CME Group
Titleholders: Third Round
from Tibur6n Golf Club in
Naples, Fla. (Live)

PGA
Sunday
2:00 p.m. GOLF OHL Classic at
Mayakoba: Final Round from
El Camaleon in Riviera Maya
Mexico (Live)
Wednesday
9:00 p.m. GOLF ISPS HAND
World Cup of Golf: First
Round from Royal Mel-
bourne Golf Club in Victoria,
Australia (L ivet


Cancer Classic: Semifinal #2 SEC Game of the Week (Live) Aust lia(Live)








RADIO DIAL & EVERY HOUR CHANNELS


FM RADIO STATIONS
Station Freq. Format
WJIS 88.1 Religious
WMNF 88.5 Eclectic
WSMR 89.1 Classical
WUSF 89.7 Classical/Jazz
WGCU 90.1 Public Radio
WBVM 90.5 Religious
WSOR 90.9 Religious
WSEB 91.3 Religious
WJYO 91.5 Religious
WVIJ 91.7 Religious
WDDV 92.1 Easy Listening
WYUU 92.5 Latin
WIKX 92.9 Country
WFLZ 93.3 Contemporary
WTLT 93.7 Easy Listening
WARO 94.5 Album Rock
WWRM 94.9 Easy Listening
WOLZ 95.3 Oldies
WMTX 95.7 Contemporary
WRXK 96.1 Album Rock
WINK 96.9 Contemporary
WTLQ 97.7 Latin
WXTB 97.9 Rock
WUSV 98.5 Country
WBCG 98.9 Contemporary
WJBX 99.3 Alternative
WQYK 99.5 Country
WCKT 100.1 Country
WAW 101.1 Easy Listening
WPOI 101.5 Album Rock
WWGR 101.9 Country
WHPT 102.5 Album Rock
WJGO 102.9 Oldies
WTBT 103.5 Country
WXKB 103.9 Pop
WKZM 104.3 Religious


Location
Sarasota
Tampa
Sarasota
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Englewood
Ft. Myers
Punta Gorda
Venice
Safety Harbor
Punta Gorda
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Ft. Myers
St.Pete
Ft. Myers
Clearwater
Bonita Springs
Ft. Myers
Ft. Myers
Seminole
Ft. Myers
Murdock
Ft. Myers
St.Pete
Pt. Charlotte
Ft. Myers
St.Pete
Tampa
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Bradenton
Ft. Myers
Sarasota


WRBQ
WCVU
WZSP
wBn
WDUV
WTZB
WJPT
WCTQ
WENG
WSRZ


AM RADIO STATIONS
Station Freq. I
WHNZ 570
WDAE 620
WBDN 760 I
WWCN 770
WRFA 820
WGUL 860
WLSS 930
WFLA 970
WQYK 1010
WMTX 1040
WKII 1070
WTIS 1110
WINK 1200
WIBQ 1220
WINK 1240
WTMY 1280
WDDV 1320 I
WCRM 1350 I
WRBQ 1380
WMYR 1410
WBRD 1420
WWCL 1440 I
WSDV 1450 I
WWPR 1490
WENG 1530
WCCF 1580


I





I

I


Classic Hits
Easy Listening
Latin
-lip Hop
Easy Listening
Rock Alt.
Easy Listening
Country
ralk
Oldies

Format
Talk
Talk
Latin
Talk
Talk
Oldies
Talk
Talk
Talk
Talk
Oldies
Religious
Talk
Talk
Talk
Talk
Easy Listening
Latin
Oldies
Country
Religious
Latin
Easy Listening
Oldies
Talk
Talk


Tampa
Solana
Zolfo Springs
Ft. Myers
New Pt. Richey
Englewood
Ft. Myers
Venice
Englewood
Sarasota

Location
St. Pete
St. Pete
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Largo
Dunedin
Sarasota
Tampa
St. Pete
Clearwater
Pt. Charlotte
St. Pete
Sarasota
Ft. Myers
Sarasota
Venice
Ft. Myers
Tampa

Bradenton
Ft. Myers
Sarasota

Englewood
Punta Gorda


HOCKEY

College
Friday
T:30 p.m. NBCS North Dakota
3t Boston University Terriers
,Live)

NHL
Monday
T:30 p.m. NBCS Anaheim
)ucks at Pittsburgh Pen-
guins (Live)
ruesday
T:30 p.m. NBCS Boston Bruins
3t New York Rangers (Live)
10:00 p.m. FSN Florida Pan-
thers at Vancouver Canucks
,Live)
10:30 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay
-ightning at Los Angeles
Wednesday
3:00 p.m. NBCS Pittsburgh
Penguins at Washington
capitals (Live)
rhursday
):30 p.m. FSN Florida Pan-
thers at Edmonton Oilers
,Live)
O10:30 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay
-ightning at San Jose Sharks
,Live)


Friday
9:00 p.m. FSN Florida Pan-
thers at Calgary Flames
(Live)
10:00 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay
Lightning at Anaheim Ducks
(Live)

SOCCER

English League Soccer
Saturday
7:40 a.m. NBCS Liverpool at
Everton (Live)
9:55 a.m. NBCS Southampton
at Arsenal (Live)
12:30 p.m. NBC Chelsea at
West Ham United (Live)

International
Tuesday
3:00 p.m. FS1 Germany at
England (Live)

MLS
Saturday
7:30 p.m. NBCS 2013 MLS Cup
Playoffs Teams TBA (Live)

World Cup
Wednesday
1:00 a.m. ESPN World Cup
Qualifying Soccer Mexico at
New Zealand (Live)


SPORTS

TRIVIA

1. In 2013, Baltimore's
Chris Davis became the
fourth player in major-
league history to hit
homers in the first four
games of a season.
Who else did it?

2. Don Larsen pitched
a perfect game for the
New York Yankees in
the 1956 World Series.
How many career regu-
lar-season games did
he win?

3. When was the last
time before 2012 that
Georgia Tech's foot-
ball team won a bowl
game?

4. Name the last Golden
State Warrior before
David Lee in the 2012-13
season to be selected
to an NBA All-Star
Game.

5. When the NHL ex-
panded in 1967 from six


to 12 teams, it located
two franchises in Cali-
fornia. Name them.

6. In 2013, Morgan
Shepherd became the
oldest driver to start a
NASCAR Cup race. How
old was he?




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CN
CNN Headline News
(HALF HOUR)
:00 National and International News
:15 Dollars & Sense
:20 Sports
:24 Local News/People & Places
Available on: VEN 27,ENG 27, SAR 27, PTC 27, ARC 27, SPG 59








The Weather Channel
(HOUR)
:00 Today's Weather
:05 Extended Forecast
:10 Radar Update
:17 Traveler's Update
:20 Day Planner
:25 Morning's Weather
:30 Today's Weather
:35- Extended Forecast
:40 -International Weather
:47 Season Update
:55 Drivers Report

And Storm Stories every night at 8 and 8:30 p.m.
Available on: VEN 31,ENG 31, SAR 31, PTC 31, ARC 31, SPG 52







10v I .

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*26t
AB I I I
ABC


H H H H H


KIDS NEWS SPORTS


MORNING SUNDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


S.. . .. .. .. I.I 1


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Sunday u Sunday 11 Weekend III IHil Stephanopoulos II III'i makersim
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FOX FOX13'sGoodDay FOX 13's Good Day FOX 13's Good Day FOX News Sunday with PaidPro- Paid Pro- Sports Tailgate
FO 3 3 3 Tampa Bay at 6:00 (N) Tampa Bay at 7:00 (N) Tampa Bay at 8:00 (N) Chris Wallace (N) ram ram Stars(N) Sunda
FOX 4 4 4 Paid Pro- Paid Pro- McGregor Baptist Paid Pro- LeePitts FOX News Sundaywith Catholic Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro-
4__ 44 gram gram _______gram Live Chris Wallace (N) Mass gram gram gram
PBS 3 3 3 3 Sesame Street Big Bird Curious(R) Cat in Hat (R Peg + Cat DinoTrain Daniel(R) Super Why BizKid (CC) Crossroads Capitol Up-Florida (CC)
PB may move. (R) (HD) (HD) (HD) (CC) (R) (R) (HD) (HD) (R) R) (CC) date
PBS 204 204 16 European E Street (CO Crossroads Florida (CC) Tothe Con- Scully (CC) Washington McLaughlin Moyers and Company Egypt's Golden Empire
...H. (CC).N) (R) (CC) tray(N)i (N) (N) I(N) (CC) (N)(HD) Hittites defeated.
PBS Curious (CC) Curious (CC) Arthur (R) Wild Kratts: Curious (R) Cat in Hat (K Peg + Cat DinoTrain Cyber True Capitol (CC) Florida (CC) Biofuel (R)
X (R 3(. (141 HD) Mimic (HD) (1(HD) (CC) (R) (R) (HD) Colors ()___ ______)
CW 621 Paid Pro- Paid Pro- On the Spot Family Style Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Chat Room Think En- Into Wild (CC) Paid Pro- Paid Pro-
6 _2 gram gram (N) (N) gram igram gram ergycell. (N) gram gram
CW 9 9 4 PaidPro- Dr. Charles Stanley Real Life Career Day Teen Edi Whaddya- PaidPro- PaidPro- PaidPro- 44OnThe PaidPro-
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IND 12 1212 38 12 Paid Spon- PaidSpon- Mayor's Hour Mayor Old House Aqua Kids Edgemont Chat Room Teen News Young Family Styl Coolest (N)
32 sored sored. talks Tampa. (HD) (CC)(N) (CC) _____ (N) Icons (N) (N)
ION 2 2 1 Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Turning (CO Leading Dr. Charles Stanley Hour of Power Hour of Catholic Paid Pro- Flashpoint: A World of
Sram gram (N) CWay(CO Command of faith. (R) Power. Mass gram Their Own (R)(HD)
WCLF 22 2222 2 Time of Destin Citylife Faith Life Meyer(CC) Search M. Love a Baptist Abundant Jerry Today Henry
22 Grace Reign (C) Church Church (R) Lyon Child Church Life Savelle Babers, Sr.
WRXY 22 A A Celebration under the Faith Life Van Impe Dr. Charles Stanley McGregor Baptist Christian Worship Word of Life
99 10 Silverdome Church (CC) Command of faith. (R) _______Hour
TLF 3 2 Programa Programa Plaza S6samo Aventura animal La leyenda de Johnny Lingo ('03, Aventura) La Shanghai Noon ('00)
50 737 pagado pagado Aprendiendo. (CC) Preguntas. (CC) (HD) suerte del bebe cambio con el tiempo. (CC) Secuestro imperial.
UNIV 15 15 15 6 Desayuno Desayuno Programa Programa ParavolveraamarTras La hora pico Chistesy Al punto Temas Repblica deportiva (N
60 I I (HD) (HD) paado pagado Ilafelicidad.(HD) risas. (CC) (HD) candentes. (CC) (HD) (CC) (HD)

A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 Paid Paid Midnight Run ('88) ***-k Bounty hunter and Mob seek embezzler. (CC) The Recruit ('03)AI Pacino. CIA recruit spies.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Mad Men (R) (HD) Mad Men (R) (HD) Mad Men (R) (HD) Space Cowboys ('00) **1/2 Four retired pilots are sent into space. (CC)
APIL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Extreme (CC) (HD) Freaky Freaky Untamed(CC)(HD) To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 20M Morning Inspiration Prestigious black ministers speak. B. Jones (TYG) (N) B. Jones (TVG) (CC) (R) (HD) Johnson
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Styled Risque. (R) Shahs (R) Shahs Facing off. (R) Housewives (CC) (R) Housewives (CC) (R) Thicker Cyrene's guy.
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Paid Paid Paid Paid (:1 5) Trading Places ('83) Rich man and street hustler swap lives. (CO) (:51) Bill Cosby ('83)
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Paid (HD) Gold Rush (R) (HD) |Bering Sea (R) (HD) Buying Buying
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 Paid Paid E! News (R) (HD) Fashion Police (R) He's Just Not That Into You ('09) **/ Dating struggles. The Life
ESOQ 82 82 82 82 118 118 160 Brew Dogs: Boston The Net ('95) **1/2 Woman's identity deleted from records. Parks Parks Parks Parks Parks
EWTN 243 243 243 12 17 285 Angelus Luke Michael Holy Name Sunday Mass (N) Litany of Bookmark Vaticano Jesus Apostolate Rosary
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Reign Mass Middle The Sorcerer's Apprentice ('10) **1/ Sorcerer needs help. The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Paid Paid Barefoot Giada (R) Pioneer Trisha's Week Roast turkey. Guy Bite Southern Pioneer Farmhouse
FX 51 51151 51 58 49 53 Paid Paid Buffy: Empty Places Buffy Failed mission. Takers ('10) **1Y2 Five bank robbers do one last job. (CC) Salt (10)
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179184 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Password+ Whammy Whammy LoveTrian Pyramid Pyramid
HALL 5 5 5 17 713 240 The Christmas Card *** A Christmas Visitor ('02) Christmas miracle. A Town Without Christmas ('01) ** /2 (CC)
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Paid Paid Marvels: Balls (R) Alaska: Big America History of Alaska. (R) American (R) (HD) Nazi America (CC) (R)
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Paid Paid Undercover (R) Undercover (R) Undercover (R) Undercover (R) PropBro (R) (HD)
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Home Gifts HSN Today HSN Today HighgateManor Serious Skin Care Serious Skin Care
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 Paid (HD) Paid(HD) Stanley (CC) (R) Paid(HD) DavidJere Osteen Paid(HD) Betty Betty HolidayHigh ('12)
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 Nate Berkus Show Rachael Ray (HD) Phil: Daddy Dramas Dr. Phil (CC) (HD) Super Soul (R) (HD) Super Soul (N) (HD)
QOVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 Nancy's Holiday Great Gifts Keurig Keurig products. Keurig Coffee Sundays with Carolyn & Dan Holiday gifts.
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29163 54 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD)
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Vegas (R) Vegas (R) Naked Vegas
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Married Married Friends Friends Friends Friends You, Me and Dupree Unwanted houseguest. Killers (10) (CC)
TOM 165 65 65 65 169 230 This Land Is Mine ('43) Love and resistance. Till the Clouds Roll By Songwriter's music. (:15) The Big Heat ('53) One honest cop. (CC)
TIC T 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 Paid (HD) |Paid(HD) Paid(HD) |Paid(HD) Paid(HD) |Paid(HD) Say Yes SayYes SayYes SayYes SayYes SayYes
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Law Private school. Law: Act of God (HD) Law Double homicide. Law Autistic youth. Law Suicide of friend. Law: Purple Heart
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Paid Paid Vacation Attack (R) City (N) City (N) Mysteries (CC) (R) D.B.(R) Gem Hunt (CC) (R)
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Bait Car Bait Car Bait Car Bait Car
TVLND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Gold Girl GoldGirl GoldGirl (:48) Gold Girl GoldGirlBrady Brady Brady Brady Brady Brady
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 House (CC) (HD)) Paid Paid PPaid Paid Covert (C) (R) SVU: Name (TV14) SVU: Angels (TV14)
WE 1117 111 117 11 117 149 P a Paid IPaPad Paid PaidPaid Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne


- I I I
WGN 116 16 16119141 IT 1 9 IR Meredith Discover iPaid (CC) Facts


David (N) IBevond


Matlock: The Umpire


Matlock: The Doctors Heat Night (C0 (HD)







CELEBRITY
EXTRA
BY CINDY ELAVSKY
King Features Synd., Inc.

Q: Can you tell me if one
of my favorite shows,
"Franklin & Bash," will be
back for another season?
-- Jamie F., via email

A: I am happy to report
that TNT has renewed
the hour-long courtroom
comedy/drama for a
fourth season. I recently
spoke with series co-
star Dana Davis, and she
told me all about how
great it is to work on the
show: "It's just too fun
working with Mark-Paul
(Gossaaler) and Breckin
(Meyer), because they're
really, really funny. And
I respect them so much.
I find it amazing to work
with people like Breckin,
Mark-Paul and Kumail


Nanjiani. They're so much
fun, and they light up a
room."

Before season four
begins, Dana will be busy.
She is co-starring in the
Syfy pilot "High Moon."
But more importantly, she
has a project of her own
she wants the world to
see. "I had this idea for a
show, called "The Wish i
Mayz," that teaches kids
about music, all the while
giving them amazing
music to listen to. It's
about three aliens from
the Star Planet who speak
only in song, and that's
how they teach the kids
on Earth about music.
Right now, I am pitching
it around town. I want to
evolve children's music,
and also stimulate their
brains a little bit more. I
want to give them music
that they can keep with
them for a lifetime."


Q: I am a huge "X-Files"
fan, and my husband and
I have been re-watching
the series at home on
DVD. Can you tell me if
there will be another
feature film? -- Carissa G.,
Tacoma, Wash.

A: If series stars David
Duchovny and Gillian
Anderson, and series
creator and head writer
Chris Carter have their
way, there will be a third
movie. All parties are
interested, they told
a crowd of fans at the
Paley Center for the
Media in New York this
past October. (They were
there to celebrate the
20th anniversary of the
sci-fi cult hit.) According
to David: "It's really up to
20th Century Fox at this
point." Gillian added: "If it
takes fan encouragement
to get Fox interested in
that, then I guess that's
what it would be."


Dana Davis


Write to Cindy at King
Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475;
or e-mail her at
letters@cindyelavsky.com.
For more news and
extended interviews, visit www.
celebrityextraonline.com and
twitter.com/Celebrity_Extra.


SKIDS NEWS SPORTS MORNING SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
NOV. 17

CSS 2828 28284970 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid 7Beyond Trophy Tracks Paid Inside |College Ftbl(Uve)
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 Coll. Ftbl NFL Match SportsCenter (HD) SportsCenter (HD) SportsCenter (HD) Sunday NFL Countdown (N) (HD)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 SportsCenter (HD) College Ftbll (HD) Outside Sport Rpt Colin's New (HD) SportsCenter (HD) Fantasy (N) (HD)
SFS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 FOX Sports (HD) FOX Sports (HD) FOX Sports (HD) FOX Sports (HD) FOX Sports (HD) Kickoff (N) (HD)
SFSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 College Football: West Virginiavs Kansas (Replay) (CC) (HD) Big 12 Live (HD) Ext. Games (N) (HD) Game365 ShipShape
GOLF 49 49 49 4955 60 304 1 European Tour Golf (live) Morning Drive (N) (HD) European Tour Golf (Replay) (HD)
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 WildLifers NA Hunter Whitetail Wild Premier PLWodid LucasOil (HD) Qualifying (Replay)
SUN 38 38 401401 45 57 76 Paid Paid Reel Dream Paid Paid College Football: Florida Gators at South Carolina Gamecocks (Taped)
SNICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 Dad Run Dad Run Kung Fu Fanboy Megaforce Rabbids Sponge Sponge Sponge Sanjay TMNT Sponge
TOON 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 Tunes LooneyT. Berk(R) Tenkai Beyblade Unova Ben 10 TitansGo! TitansGo! Universe Abracadabra Doo
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Options Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
CNN 32 32 32 3218 38 100 New Day Sunday (N) Sanjay New Day (N) State (CC) (N) (HD) Fareed Zakaria (N) Reliable Source (N)
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 C-Span Weekend Washington Journal Key events and legislation discussion. (N) Newsmkr C-Span Weekend
FNC 64 64 64 6448 71 118 FOX & Friends (N) FOX & Friends (N) FOX & Friends (N) FOX & Friends (N) NewsHO Housecall MediaBuzz(N)
MSNB 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Mind Over (R) (HD) Hardball Business Up w/Steve Kornacki Pundit panel. (N) Melissa Harris-Perry Political talk. (N)
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 Good Morning (N) Good Morning (N) Good Morning (N) News Paid Diocese Medical News Paid
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 (4:00) CMT Music CMT presents music videos from some of the hottest stars in country music. (N) Hot 20 (R) (HD)
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous
IVH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 (4:00) VH1 + Music Top music videos. (N) VH1 Top 20 Video Countdown (R) (HD) Best Week Miami Monkey (R) Boy Scout
CIE 3203032320200 Friday the 13th, Part II ('81) ** Kingdom of Heaven ('05) A blacksmith defends Jerusalem The Wedding Date ('05 Debra Strike Back
CINE 20 320 320 320 320 320 420 yngeful bein stalks campers, from the Saracens during the Crusades. (CCO) Messing. A pretend boyfriend. (R)
Ci MInE2I M 321 32 3 1:105) Nancy Drew ('07) Murder & (:45) The Rocketeer ('91) **y2 Billy Campbell. The Money Pit ('86) *1/2 A couple (:10)Alvin andthe Chip-
CINE2 321 321321 321 321 321 mystery in Los Angeles. (CC) A stunt pilot discovers a jetpack. (CC) purchases a decrepit mansion, munks('11) *1'/
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 Octonauts Henry (CC) (R) Mickey (R) Mama Hook Doc Mc(R) Sofia(R) Friends (N) Austin (R) Shake it(R) AN.T.(R) Jessie(R) Jessie(R)
__ _(R) (lID) (R) (lID) (lID) (lID) (lID) (lID) (lID) (lID)
ENC i15i05i05 1 5 (5:10) Dances with Wolves ('90, Western) A sol- (:20) Elf ('03) A man who is raised by elves travels Rich Man, Poor Man Rich Man (:50) Rich
,E1 0 50 150350 dier lives with the Lakota Sioux. (C) to New York to find his real father. Brothers' paths. (CC) Man
HBO 302 32 0 American Crisis Hot- (:15) Up Close & Personal ('96) A veteran newsman's Rosenquist W.C. Boxing: Ward vs. 24/7(CC)(HD) (:45) Faceoff
S0 3 302 302 400i (12) line (R) mentoring of an ambitious newcomer leads to love. (HD) Rodriguez (HD) (R)
H02 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 :05) Rushmore ('98) A man and a (:45) The Long Kiss Goodnight ('96, Action) An Dream House ('11) Family uncovers Promised Land (12)
HO 33 33 33 33 3 33 4 boy fight over a teacher. (CC) amnesiac confronts her violent past. secrets about new home. Small town fights.
H03 304304304304 304404 (:15) Master- (:45) Julia (77) ****** Jane Fonda. A woman I Want Someone to Eat Cheese :10) The Tuskegee Airmen ('95, Drama) Afri-
HBO3 cl4 3i4 3043 3444ass smuggles money through Germany. (CCO) With ('06) Actor's troubles. (R) can-American combat pilots in WWII.
SHOW 340 340 340 348 340 340 365 :15) Will (Family) Inside the NFL: 2013 Jim Rome on Showtime The Cold Light of Day ('12) ** (:45) Dawn 1
Week #11 (R) (CC() (R) (HD) Man finds family's kidnappers. (11)
TMC 35050303353508Outside Providence ('99) Alec A Film with Me in It ('10) (:10) Step Up Revolution ('12, Drama) **'/2 War Horse ('11) Search
TMC 350 35o 350 350 350 350 385|Baldwin. A teenage misfit. (CC) Two men must get rid of corpses. Woman falls for dance crew lead. (CCO) for horse. (CC)
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FOX FOX NFL Sunday (N) NFL Football: Regional Coverage -Teams TBA (live) (CC (H) )H NFL Football: Regional Cov-
N 4 (CC (4)(HD) erage Teams TBA (live) (CC)
PBS nMcLaughlin Florida (CC) Tothe Con- Gulf Coast WEDU Arts Diamonds Great Performances: Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma! Romance
S3 3 3 3 (N) tray (N) (CC) (HD( (R) of cowboy and farm girl. (CC) (R) (HD)
PBS 204 204 204 16 Strangers on a Train ('51, Thriller) Farley Death in Paradise Bride Kitchen (CC( Cook's (N) Cooking: Martha (R) Home (CC() (R) Old House
F616 Granger. A psychopath plays a deadly game. (CC) murdered. (HD() (R) (HD141 Frying (H()rt (HD)( (R)
PBS McLaughlin Wash Wk Moyers and Company American Experience: JFK, Part 1 JFK's life American Experience: JFK, Part 2 Presidency,
S 33 (N) (HD) ( H)(N HD from south to resident. (CC) (R) (HD() successes and more. (CC) (R) (HD)
CW Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End ('07, Action) *** Pirate alli- Cats and Dogs (01, Comedy) Jeff Goldblum. Rules: Rules (CC)
21 N 6 ance battles a nefarious shipping magnate and a cursed crew. (PG-13) Puppy uards allergy vaccine from cats. (C) Les-Bro (HD)
CW 9 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End ('07, Action)*** Pirate alli-The Whole Nine Yards ('00, Comedy) **/2 Reel Dream 'Til Death
F441 994 ance battles a nefarious shippin magnate and a cursed crew. (PG-13) Woman plots to have her husband killed. (R) (HD1) (HD)(
MYN I 11 14 PaidSpon- PaidSpon- Get Shorty While recovering a debt from a pro- PaidSpon- PaidSpon- SAF3 (CC() (N) (HD) Community Community
381 1sored. scored. ducer, a man decides to break into show biz. scored. scored. _H (_____1(HD) (HD)
MYN 8 Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Addams Addams The End (78) With six months to live, a man de- Haunted Honeymoon (86, Comedy) Gene
8X98 gram gram cides to try and take his own life repeatedly. Wilder. Newlyweds trapped in a haunted house.
IND 12 12 12 12 Cats and Dogs ('01, Comedy) Jeff Goldblum. Diamonds ('99) ** Lauren Bacall. An aged 30 Rock(CCO 30 Rock(CCO How I Met How I Met
3I2 12 Puppy guards allergy vaccine from cats. (CC) rascal plans a road trip. (PG-13) (CC) ((HD) (H) (HD) HD)
ION 1 1 Flashpoint Rival biker Flashpoint Perfect mem- Flashpoint $2 million Flashpoint: Lawmen Flashpoint Ed recounts Flashpoint Shocking
2 2 2 13 26 18 17 gangs. (CC) (R) (HD) ory. (CC) (R) (HD) truck. (CC) (R) (HD) Sons see reality. (R) mission. (R) (HD)) turn. (CC) (R) (HD)
WOLF 222222 2 Living Green The Turning Point Fear of Christ. & Jewish Van Penrry Stone Gaither Homecoming In- Dr. Charles Stanley
22 1 Stones Word God. (CC) (N) Jews Jewels Koevering (N) spirational music. Command of faith. (R)
WRXY Don Wilton Love Worth Love a Testi- Retro Angel The Dieti- UnlkReve- Bill Gouley Tommy Voice of Through Bi
22 44 10 (CC) Child moniesof Braham cian nation Bates Faith ble(N)
TLF 23 23 23 95 5 Shanghai Noon ('00) Rompiendo los Ifmites F6rmula 1 (N) (CCO() (1) F6rmula Uno Automovilismo: Gran Francotirador
FS50 Secuestro imperial. (CC) 1d _______(1 Premio de EEUU (Diredo) (CC) () Recargado'11)
UNIV (15 1515 6 (1:00) Repdblica Camino a la Copa (N) Fabrica de risas Comicos Fabrica de risas C6micos|El chavo Tu salud (N) Como dice el dicho
62 1 deportiva(N)(CC)(HP)D) famosos.(1V14) famosos.(1(M4) animado (H)4) Relatoyreflexion.(HID)
5___ i P I- *dv I *4Jv It *lJv : I |'*lv I *[ l f = I
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 Recruit Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Bad Ink Bad Ink Bad Ink Bad Ink Bad Ink
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Aliens ('86, Science Fiction) ***'/2 Planetary colonists disappear. (CC) Red Planet ('00) The Mars astronauts fight to survive. (CC) Rider **
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Johnson Family Vacation ('04) Urban family. TD Jakes (N) Big Momma's House ('00) Martin Lawrence. FBI stakeout. Thin Line
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Housewives (CC) (R) Housewives (CC) (R) Vanderpump (R) Vanderpump Tattoo. Shahs (R) Shahs Facing off. (R)
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 BillCosby South Prk South Prk South Pik South Prk (:24) Life ('99) Two men survive prison by their wits. (CC) I Love You, Man ('09)
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Buying Buying BarHunter BarHunter BarHunter BarHunter GoldRush (CC)(HD) Yukon Men (R) (HD) Yukon Men (R) (HD)
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 The Life and Death of Anna Nicole: E! NewsSpecial (R) E! Spec. (R) (HD) |He'sJust NotThat IntoYou (09)**1/2 Dating struggles.
ESQ 82 82 82 82 118 118160 Getaway (R) (HD) Getaway (R) (HD) |Getaway (R) (HD) psychh (CC) (HD) psych (CC) (HD) psych (CC) (HD)
EWTN 243 243 2434 12 17 285 Sunday Mass (R) Litanyof ln Concert Musical settings. (YVG)(R) Rosary Finding Parables SavFaith TheNew
FAMI 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Prince Caspian ('08) Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone ('01) Orphan enrolls in school of magic. Jumanji ('95) Ancient board game.
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Guy's Surf and turf. 20th Birthday (R) Restaurant (R) Restaurant (R) (HD) |Mystery Mystery Diners Diners
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 Salt (10) A CIA officer is accused of treason. Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen ('09) Robots seek relic. (CC) Real Steel (11) (CC)
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179 184 The Chase (R) Minute(R) Minute "Nutstacker. Fam. Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Night Before Christmas ** Santa's memory. The Christmas Ornament (13, Holiday) (CC) Christmas Magic ('11, Holiday) Angelic task.
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Nazi America (CC) (R) Cults: Dangerous Devotion Cults to die for. (R) The Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History (TV14) (R) Jonestown Lost (R)
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Love It Vegan house. Prop Bro (R) (HD) PropBro (R) (HD) Prop Bro (R) (HD) Prop Bro (R) (HD) Lived in My House (R)
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Daughter Hair care. Electronic Gift Electronic Gift Serious Skin Care Serious Skin Care Home Gifts
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 Holiday High (12) Holly's Holiday ('12) Holiday mannequin. (CC) A Christmas Proposal ('08) Dueling lawyers. Dear Santa (11) (CC)
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 OprahWinfrey(l1D) OprahWinfrey(HD) Super Soul (R) (HD) Oprah's (CC) (R) (HD) Oprah's (CC) (R) (HD) Oprah's (CC) (R) (HD)
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 In the Kitchen with David: Keurig David Venable shares Keurig products. Computer Shop Laura Geller
SPIKE 51 517 51 517 29 63 54 Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD)
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Frank Miller's Sin City ('05, Crime) ***1/2 Tough outlaws. Blade II ('02) **/2 Vampire hunter battles mutant vampires. Hulk ('03) Eric Bana.
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 (11:00) Killers (10) |Life As We Know It (10) **1/2 Unexpected parents. (CC) Ghosts of Girlfriends Past ('09) ** (CC) (HD) |KnockUp
TOM 65 65 65 65 169230 East Side, West Side ('49) Old flame sparks. To Be or Not to Be Actors become spies. Under the Yum Yum Tree ('63) **1/2 (NR) (CC)
TLO 45 45 45 45 5 72 139 SayYes |Say Yes Undercover (HD) Undercover (R) (HD) Undercover (HD) Undercover (HD) -Undercover (HD)
TNT 61 61 61 61l 2 55 51 Law & Order: Switch Law & Order: Pride Law: Bitter Fruit (HD) The Longest Yard ('05) **l/2 Prison competition. (CC) (HD) Soldiers
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Bizarre (CC) (R) Bizarre (CC) (R) Paradise (CC) (R) Paradise (CC) (R) Paradise (CC) (R) Paradise (CC) (R)
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Jokers Jokers Storage Storage Storage Storage Most Shock (R) Most Shock (R) Most Shock (R)
TVLND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Brady Brady Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Roseanne Roseanne
USA 3434 34 34 22 52 50 SVU: Storm (1V14) SVU III kidnap victim. SVU Patients' rights. SVU:Weak(TV14) SVU Military secrets. SVU: Sick (1V14)l(HD)
WE 117 117117117 117149 Roseanne Rsenne ne eR eaoseoseanne Roseaneoseanne CSI Miami (CC) (HI) CSI Miami (CC) (HI)


WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 Heat Night (CC) (HI) Heat Night (CC) (HI) Heat Night (CC) (HP) Heat Night (CC) (H1I) HeatNight(CC)(HPI)


Wall Street ('87) (CC)







SUNDAY
HIGHLIGHTS

Almost Human
8 p.m. on FOX
"Pilot" After awakening
from a 17-month coma
to find his leg has been
replaced with an artificial
one, a depressed Detective
John Kennex, who rejects all
synthetics, learns he must
work alongside a discontin-
ued android that possesses
emotions to fight crime.
(HD)

Gran Torino
8 p.m. on TNT
After an aging, disgruntled
veteran of the Korean War
catches his Asian neigh-
bor's son trying to steal
the 1972 Gran Torino he
dearly prizes, he faces his
racial prejudices while he
becomes involved in the
troubled teenager's life. [
(HD)


Revenge
9 p.m. on ABC
"Secrecy" Emily's bridal
shower is being organized
by Victoria, and she is put-
ting all of her effort into en-
suring it will be one neither
of them will forget; Emily
goes to drastic measures to
ensure that Daniel doesn't
pull too far away. (HD)
The Walking Dead
9 p.m. on AMC
"Live Bait" As the world
around them begins to fill
with various threats and
familiar faces, the individ-
ual members of the group
desperately search for the
humanity that has been
buried deep beneath the
chaos of the surrounding
horror. (HD)

The Good Wife
9 p.m. on CBS
"Ice, Ice Baby" Alicia tries
to stop the deportation of
an illegal immigrant back to
Mexico, where his life has
been threatened by a local


cartel; Marilyn is concerned
about ethics when Eli re-
connects to Natalie Flores.
(HD)

The Simpsons
9 p.m. on FOX
"Labor Pains" When Homer
comes to the rescue and
helps deliver a baby in an
elevator by using his past
knowledge of Lamaze, he
finds that he is deeply con-
nected to the baby after it
is named after him. (HD)

The Mentalist
10 p.m. on CBS
"The Great Red Dragon"
After the shocking events
at Jane's home, the CBI's
priority shifts to tracking
down those on the quickly
narrowing list of Red John
suspects. (HD)

Betrayal
10:01 p.m. on ABC
"...One More Shot"'TJ finds
that after a traumatic event
he is becoming reckless
and admits to himself that


Quarterback Alex Smith and
the Kansas City Chiefs put
their 9-0 record on the line
when they visit the Denver
Broncos for a "Sunday Night
Football" game, airing at
8:20 p.m. on NBC.

he must face his past to
take the measures neces-
sary for the present; Jack
realizes he's losing touch
with his family; Drew and
Sara struggle with home
life. (HD)


SKIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOON SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
NOV. 17 ,,, iPd'K i Iu' i d' | lL : i -d' 'U' [i

CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 College Football: Georgia vs Auburn (HD) (D Women's College Volleybal (Live) College Football: Kentucky vs Vanderbilt
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 NFL Cntdwn (HD) ESPN Radio (HD) Countdown (HD) I# NASCAR Sprint Cup: Ford EcoBoost 400 (Live) (HD)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 Fantasy (N) (HD) College Ftbll (HD) Football Sunday on ESPN Radio (N) (HD) College Bball (ive)
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 NASCAR RaceDay: Homestead (N) (H1D) Lucas Oil (N) (HD) Worn. College Basketball (Live) (CC) (HD) College Bball (ive)
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 1 College Basketball (live) (HD) Dodgeball Hall Fame Unlimited (N) (HD) College Baskelball (1.-1 (iil
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 European Tour Golf (Replay) Pre Game PGA TOUR Golf: OHL Classic at Mayakoba: Final Round (Live) Golf Cntrl PGA
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 2014 Winter Olympic Trials: Men and Women's Curling (Taped)
SUN 38 38 401 401 45 57 76 Florida College Basketball (Replay) (1D) (Women's College Volleybal (Replay) Best Boat Ship Shape Fishing
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 Sam & Cat Sam & Cat Thundermn Thundermn Hathaways Hathaways Fairly Fairly Sponge Sponge Sponge Sponge
TOON 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 Scooby-D Cartoon Planet JohnyTest JohnyTest Regular Regular Adventure Adventure Universe Grandpa Grandpa
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 State (CC) (R) (HD) FareedZakaria(R) CNNNewsroom(N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N)
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings. C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings. C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings.
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 America's HQ (N) |News HO (DC)(N) FOX News(HD) America's HQ (N) CarolAlt NewsHQ MediaBuzz(R)
MSNB 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Weekends with Alex Witt (N) (HD) Meet Press (HD) MSNBC Live (N) Karen Finney (N) Caught (R) (HD)
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 News News News Daytime (N) News Paid News Paid News News News News
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 Hot 20 Countdown Videos and news. (R) Reba Reba Reba Joe Dirt ('01) ** A janitor tries to find his parents.
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 GirlCode GirlCode The House Bunny ** Playmate aids girls. Clueless ('95, Comedy) Girl helps friends. Beastly (11)**
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 The Last Boy Scout ('91) Corrupt sports. Crew (CC) (R) (HD) Love Parting ways. Love Reunited. (R) Love: Lez B Honest
CINE 30 320 320 320 320 320 420 Strike Back Vehicle 19 ('13) *%' Man fights to Two Weeks Notice ('02) A million- (:45) The Bourne Legacy (12, Action) A new agent escapes
CINE 320 32] 3u 3(30040(R) reveal police corruption. (CC) aire falls for his attorney. (CC) termination and seeks to expose CIA crimes.
CINE2 3 321 3213 32132 321i 422 Chipmunks (:40) Grosse Pointe Blank ('97, Comedy) Hit man Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story (:10) L.A. Confidential ('97, Drama) Kevin
('11) attends his high school reunion. (R) Dodgeball tournament Spacey. Detectives uncover a conspiracy.
DISN 136 136 136 136 4 250 ANT. (R) A.N.T.(R) A.N.T.(R) Blog(CC)(R) Blog(CC)(R) Blog(CC)(R) A.N.T.(R) Blog(CC)(R) Jessie (R) Shake lt(R)R) Good Luck Good Luck
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 (141)) (141)) (14D)) (HP)) (HP) (14)) (R) (R)
IE ENC105015 10 v5 (11:50)Rich RichMan, PoorMan RichMan, PoorMan Rich Man, PoorMan RichMan RichMan, PoorManUn- Rich Man, PoorMan:
15 t0 150 15 0 150 350 Man Babywith minor. Fighting career. Fight for marriage. (CO) derworldfled. Chapter 9 (TVPG)
MH 0 War of the Worlds ('05, Science Fiction) Father Real Time with Bill (: 5) Crisis Hotline: Vet- Taken 2 ('12) **% CIA operative Curve('12)
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 protects kids as aliens attack. (CC) Maher (VMA)(R) erans Press 1 (R) and his wife are targeted. (CC) (CC)
HB 03 Promised Land (12) Taking Chance ('09) An officer es- (:50) This Means War ('12) **/'2 Two men find (:35) Boardwalk Empire Boxing (Re-
HB02 33 303 303 303- 303 303 402 Small town fights. corts the body of a Marine. they are dating same woman. (CC) (HD) Extra cargo. play)
H 0434344 In the Valley of Elah ('07, Drama) **** A cou- One Day ('11) Two young people experience an Jawbreaker ('99) % An abduction Wanderlust
H 433 301z '04' ple seeks their vanished son. (R) (CC_) intricate relationship over their ives. meant as a joke goes wrong. (12)
SHOW 0 3 0 3 v v The Twilight Saga: Breaking (45) Sling Blade ('96) A simple-minded man befriends a boy (: 15) Jay Z Made in America (13) Jay Z. 2012
W340 340 340 340 340 340 365 Dawn: Part 1 Marrying Edward. coping with his mother's abusive boyfriend. (R) "vMade in America"music festival. (CC)
TM 3 0 5350 350 350 1:00) War Horse ('11, Drama) A Peace, Love & Misunderstanding (05) For Ellen (12) ** A man tries (40) Every Day ('11, Drama) Televi
TMC 350 350 3 350 3 0 385 man searches for his horse. (12) Self-discovery. (CC) to bond with his daughter. ssion writer has a crisis. (CC)
E",] i r --i L I J I P i T I ] ]LT ] ]IT ] ]L, n


9







KIDS NEWS SPORTS


EVENING SUNDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


6 PM 6:3 7 PM 7:3 8 PM 83 M 9:0 1 M 1:


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NewsChannel NBCNightly Football Night in America (:20)SundayNight Football: Kansas City Chiefs at Denver Broncos from
NBC 8 at 6:00 News News Week- (N)(CC) (HD)) Sports Authority Held at Mile High (live) (CC) (HD)
C] 8 8 8 and weather, end Edition (N)

NBC 222 News (N) (141) NBC Ni htly Football Night in America (
___ __ ___ (HD) I ____________
NBC 2 2 2 News(N)(HD) NBC Nightly Footbell Night in America -(1:20) Sunday Night Football: Kansas City Chiefs at Denver Broncos from Sports
2 2 2 News ( I) (N) (CC) (H1)_) AAuthority Field a Mile High (live) (CC) (H1))
2 (4:25) NFL Football: Regional The OT (N) (CC) Almost Human: Pilot A detec- The Simp:.ns Family Guy FOX 13 10:00 News Top sto-
FOX 13 13C 13 13 1 Coverage Teams TBA (live) (CC) (HP) tive finds he must work with a Elevatordeliv- iStucKnltaly riesofthenewsdayareup-
[l31 ` 13 13 13 13 (141)) discontinued android against his ery. (N) (1i) (CC) (N)(1iB) dated by the FOX r3 Nightly
will. (N) -News Team. (N)
FOX (4:25) NFL Football: Regional The OT(N)(CC) Almost Human: PilotAnan- Simpsons(N) Family Stuck in FOX 4 News at Ten Nightly
m 4 Coverage Teams TBA (live) (CC) (HD) (HD() droid partner. (N) (HD)) (HD) Italy. news report. (N)
PBS 3 3 3 3 PBS WEDU Arts Extraordinary Women Ameri- Secrets of Scotland Yard Be- Masterpiece: The Paradise Masterpiece: Downton Abbey
C73 Newshour(N) Plus(HP) can actress. (C) coming a sleuth. (N) IMoray's dilemma. (N) II Spanish flu. (R
Ps204 204 204 1 AskThis (CC) (R P. Allen: Res- JFK In Tampa: The 50th American Experience: JFK, Part 1 JFK's life from youth to American Experience Presi-
m_ (HP)D) Htoration Anniversary (R) president. (CC) (N) (HD)) -_____ dencyto death. (N)
PBS The African Americans Jim Antiques (CC) Antiques (CC) Secrets of Scotland Yard Be- Masterpiece: The Paradise Masterpiece: Downton Abbey
go___ ^ _Crow era. (R) (HD)) coming a sleuth. (N) Moray's dilemma. (N) II Spanish flu. (R)
CW 6 21 6 21/2Men(CC( 21/2Men(CC() BigBang(CC( BigBang(CC( HowlMet: HowlMet(CC) FamilyPhirl's ModernFam- WINK News @O1pm(N) (H)
(HD( (HD (HD1 (HP( Noretta (HD)) ex. (HD) ily(HD)________
CW 9 9 9 4 Friends (FVPG) Friends 21/2 Men (CC) 21/2 Men (CC) CSI: Miami: Silencer Mala CSl: Miami: Fade Out Murder Criminal Minds Tracking psy-
W (CC) "Smelly Cat." (HD) (H1) Noche gang. (CC) (HD) they wrote. (CC) (HD)) chopath. (CC) (HD()
MYN 11 Solitary Man ('10) *** A man tries to reform after losing Seinfeld: The Seinfeld (CC) Republic of Doyle: He Sleeps Our Issues Whacked Out
3N J 4 everything because of amorous dalliances. (CC) Seven with the Chis ((C(C
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IND 12 1212 12 Family Phil's Modern Fam- Bi Bang (CC) Bi Bang (CC) Glee: The Power of Madonna Glee: Home atchmaker; crazy Office Investi- Office (CC)(HD)
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WCLF 22 2222 2 The Brody The Watch- Peter Great Awakening Tour Love a Child Unspoken Rejoice Daniel Jesse
B22 22 22 2 File man Youngren Kolenda Duplantis(CC)
WRXY 22 The Good Life Pe Stone Great Awakening Tour Jentzen Saving the In- Entertain- Time of Day of Salva-
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5L 3 Recargado ('11)Venganza. idea un plan ara sacarde la carcela suesposa.(PG-13)(CC) _Stallone. Viae a Burma, pais en guerra. (R)
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nUSA 343 4 5 5 9 nLaw & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order Special Victims Law & Order Special Victims
34 34 34 22 52 50 Unit: Brotherhood Unit Past secrets. Unit: Burned (HD) Unit Serial killer. Unit Dance troupe.
WE 117 117117117 1171 49 CSI: Miami: About Face Natalia CSI: Miami: Caged Protecting CSI: Miami: Paint It Black Dead CSI: Miami: G.O. Murderer's CSI: Miami: Mayday Plane
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C5 38 38 38 38 49 10 College Football: Georgia Bulldogs at Auburn Tigers from Talkin Football (N) College Football: Alabama Crimson Tide at Mississippi
SS 12 8 28 28 4 0 Jordan-Hare Stadium (Replay) (CC(() (Hf) State Bulldogs (Taped) ((C) (1HD)
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ESPN130 30 30 30 j 9 74 nvs Iowa State (live) NV Kentucky Wildcats from Rupp Arena (live) (HD) Countdown (HD) I(N) (H1D)
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NBGS 171 71 71 71 54 90 Austin, Texas. (lve) (CC) (HD) Stalker (HD) (H4D)
SUN 38 38 401401 4 7 76 Fishing Flats Spo rt Fishing Sportsman College Football: Syracuse Orange at Florida State Seminoles from Doak S. Campbell FSU First (HD)
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FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 Wallace (CC)(HD) (wrap-up.N (ND) (N) (1(CD) (NC PDertarian issues. (HD)
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M 33 33 33 35 48 210hopewrh romance. New relationships. Worse Co-parenting. (R) Babysitter. (R) weekend. (HD) (HX)
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ENC 150 150 150 150 150 350 Chapter 10 Brothers'mom is Poor Man: Chapter 12 Protestersendjob. Houston. In the 1960s, three Detroit sisters attempt to make Fisher ***
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IND 3 1212 12 38 12 There Yet ThereYet Dangerous ('85) (CC) Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
ION AM 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Order: Cl Order: Cl Order: Cl Order: Cl Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
WCLFM2 22 22 22 2 Tommy Awaken Awaken Prophecy Fruit CTN Spec Copeland Citylife Good Life Jesus CTN Spec Youngren Hmekeep
WRXY4M 22 44 10 Totally Awaken Awaken Ministry Life Faith Women B.Gouley Skunks Gaither Exercise Fitness
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API 44 44 44 44 36 681 Wildman Wildman Bigfoot Legend Legend Bigfoot Legend Legend Wildman Wildman Bigfoot
BET 35 35 35 35 40 2221 TD Jakes Inspiration Inspiration Inspiration ___
BRAV 686868682 5118 Watch Fashion Housewives Shahs Thicker Watch Fashion Paid Paid Paid Paid
COM 66 66 66 66 15 271 Williams Tosh Tosh South Pik South Prk Brickle South Pik South Prk Tosh SunSun n Sunny Presents Paid Paid
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 431 Alaska Yukon Men Alaska Alaska Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
E! 46 46 46 46 27 261 Drama Total Diva Drama C. Lately Soup E! Spec. C. Lately Paid Paid Paid Paid
ESQ 82 82 82 82118111 Getaway Getaway Getawa Sex City SexCity Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
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FAM 5555555510 4619 Incredible Osteen Meyer Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Reign Life Today
FOOD 37 37 37 37 761 Restaurant Restaurant On Rocks Restaurant Guy's (R) Paid Paid Paid Paid
FX 51515151 58 49 53 Green Lantern ('11) Louie Louie Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
GSN 1791791717 341711 NewlywedlNewlywed Fam. FeudFam. Feud Pyramid Pyramid Pyramid Pyramid Dog Eat Paid Paid Paid Paid
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HIST 81 81 81 81 33651 American American Ax (R ( R(R) American American American Paid Civil War Paid
HOME 41414141 53 4216 Hunters Hunters Prop Bro Renovation Hunters Hunters Undercover Paid Paid Paid Paid
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 411 Witches of Twelve Trees ('13 Witches of Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
OWN 5858 58 58 47 10161 Oprah's Oprah's Oprah Berkus Rachael Phil (HD)) Dr. Phil
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 296354 Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Paid Paid Paid Paid
SYFY 67 67 67 672 641 Godzilla ** I guana on rampa e. Star Trek II: Wrath Khan Twilight Twilight Twilight
TBS 5959595932 62 52 Change ('11) Knocked Up ('07) ***-- (R) |Dupree ('06) Q**2(CCl Married Married
TCM 65656565 16 Johnny Films: Part 1 (N) La Strada ('54) ***1/ Lili ('53) (C) MGMPar
TIC 45 45 45 45 57 7213 Letters to Jackie (R) LI Medium LI Medium LI MediumLI Medium Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
TNT 61 61 61 61 285551 Three Days ( 10 (CC) The Longest Yard ('05) Valkyr ie ('08, Thriller) (CC)
TRAV 69 69 69 69 26 6617 Mysteries Mysteries America De Mysteries Mysteries Paid Paid Paid Paid
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 301 Dumbest Top 20 Dumbest umbest Dumbest Paid Paid Paid Paid
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WE 11111111 11 14 CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami Paid Paid
WGN 1616 1619 41 11 9 Bones Bones 30 Rock 30 Rock 30 Rock Sunny Dharma Til Death Dharma Dharmnna Dharma Dharma
CSS 282828284970 Coll. Rbl NSaban Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 SportsCenter SportsCenter ]SportsCenter Coll. Ftbi (Replay) Sports
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 NASCAR ESPN FC NASCAR Sprint Cu (Taped) Sports SportsCenter
FS1 4848484842 6983 FOX Sports (N) FOX Sports FOX Sports Jones FOX Sportsenr
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Wrid Poker The Best Ext. Games Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
GOLF 4949494955 60 European Tour Golf (HD)) GolfCntrl Golff Cntri GolfCntri Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 CFL Football: Teams TBA (live) Still (H)) Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
SUN 33 3 40140145 57 716 Saltwater Intothe Basketball (Replay) Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
CNBC 3939 39 371 60 Minutes Marijuana Fugitives Paid Paid Fugitives Worldwide Ex (N)
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 381 The Sixties: (R) Anthony The Sixties: (R) Anthony Early (N)
CSPN 1818181837 1210 Q&A(R) Capital News Today Today in Washington Today in Washington
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 7111 Huckabee Hannity Stossel FOX News Huckabee Stossel FOX-Friend
MSNBC 83 83 83 83185 401 Predator Lockup Lockup Meet Press Caught Meet Press First Look Too Early
SNN 666 11 11 News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N)
CINE 32032032 320042 Battleship Girl's Gui Offt JAll Babe ('13) I Idle Hands */ (:20) Nothing to ('97)
CINE2 3213213213213213214 Top Top (:15) Weapon 2 ('89) (:10) Stash ('12) (:50) Orgazmo ('98) ** Hendersn
DISN 1361361 1 9945 2Gravity Shake ft Good Lck GoodLck Shakef IA.N.T. On Deck Jumping('01) Phineas On Deck FishHks Phineas
ENG 150150151 1535Antwone ('02) The River Wild ('94) Powers ('97) (:l 5) Touchback ('12)
HBO 302302232302040 Empire Eastbnd Ladies |Taken2('12) Real Time 1:35) Zero Effect ('98) SaveFace
HB02 303303 4 Lincoln 24/7 (:20) Long Kiss G. ('96) ***- Iron Fists ('12) Miss. Burning ('88)
HB03 30 American (12) (:25) This Is 40 ('12) Valley of Elah ('07) Espacio (13)
SHOW 343440= 361 Homeland Masters of Homeland Masters of Jarhead ('05, Drama) Dawn 1


America Nature Calls *12 Soldiers (02) Buq (07) **12 Perfect (11) (RI Bia Easy


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Perfect (11) (R)


Bia Easy






KIDS NEWS SPORTS


MORNINGS WEEKDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid iComicBk Aliens ('86) Planetary colonists disappear. (CC)
PINE 022 320 320 40 Stigmata (99, Horror) A woman has (45) Meet Joe Black ('98, Fantasy) A tycoon's daughter unwittingly flirts Office Space ('99) Man who hates
INE 3u 3( 3u 3n 3u uu 4 paranormal attacks. with Death when he comes for her dad. (CC) his ob hatches a pan.
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Hendersons ('87) |(:20) Won't Back Down ('12) School bureaucracy. (:25) She's the Man ('06 **12 Ice Age: Drift ('12)
S150 150101 1500:20) Red Dawn ('84, Action) ,**2 U.S. teenag- The Amazing Spider-Man ('12) *** Peter Parker attains (:35) Extreme Measures ('96) **
_NC\ 150\ \5( 1C 1 ers defend against invasion. (CC) superhuman abilities in the fight for good. Doctor in danger. (R) (CC)
HBO 2 0 3 30 32 40 Save Face (:35) Houseguest ('95, Comedy) ** Debtor Divorce (R) Anywhere But Here ('99) ** Mom and daugh- Red Eye ('05) Onboard
HBO 302 302 302 3302 302400 ('12) fleeing mob invades man's life. (CC) HD ter battle over relocation. (CC kidnapping.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 (:15i) Wallace & Gromit ('05) |(:45) Garden State ('04) Detached man. Crisis Cloud Atlas ('12) Impact over time. (R)
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 The Mean Season Killer taunts man. Moon Over Parador ('88) ** (:45) Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close ('11)
SSW 30 30 3 30 30 (65:05)Brealdng Dawn, P1 (:15)3 Men and a Little Lady ('90) Men could Quiz Show ('94, Drama) John Turturro. Televi- TheWayBack Prisoners
SHOW 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 (,11)(CC) lose girl they helped raise. (CC) sion quiz show scandal probed. escape.
TM 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 Big Easy Express A con- The Other Sister (99, Comedy) A men- (:10) The Mighty ('98, Drama) *** Misfit boys Billy Elliot ('00) Miner's
M 350 350 35 3 350 50 385ce tour. tally-challenged woman finds love. (CC) find stren th in each other. (CC) son dances.
TOPM 65 65 65 1 2 Show People (28) A comedicac- Baby Face ('33) Barbara Stanwyck. Possessed (31) Worker hopes to The Bride Wore Red ('37, Drama)
TCM 65 65 65 65 169 230 tress dreams of drama. Corporate seduction. leave assembly line. ,-**12 Rich husband. (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid The Haunting ('99) **A house born bad. (CC) Hannibal
INE 320320 320 30 320 320 420 Hot Fuzz ('07, Comedy) Simon Pegg. A top cop (:05) Dead Silence ('07) A man seeks (:40) The Debt ('11, Drama) Helen Mirren. Agents (:35) Strike
_INE 3 3 33 is sent to a quiet village. (CC) his wife's killer. (CC) track down Nazi war criminal. (HD))
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Southern Wild Girl's search. Fever Pitch ('05) **, 2 Love for baseball. Revolutionary Road ('08, Drama) (CC) Wedding
(:EN 105101 05) Calendar Girls ('03, Comedy) Women de- Men in Black III ('12) Alien assassi- :45) Stepmom ('98) A new stepmom must help the children
mENC 150 150 15 150 150 350 cide to pose naked for calendar. nates Agent K in 1969. face the possible loss of their mother.
HO 3 0 3 30 30 40 Conchords I, Robot ('04, Science Fiction) Will Smith. Robot Pitch Perfect ('12, Comedy) *** An all-girls a Crisis Hotline: Veterans Napoleon
HBO 302 30 302 3 302 302 400 1 may be guilty of murder. (CC) capella singing group. (CC) (HD) Press 1 (R) ('04
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Love in the Time of Cholera Lifelong romance. (:25) Romy & Michele ('97) Moonrise Kingdom ('12) Madagascr
HBO3 304 304304 304 304 404 (:20) The River ('84) **/2 A farm in trouble. (CC) One Day ('11) *** Relationship. (CC) (:25) Hitchcock ('12, Drama
SOw 30 34 3 30 34 35 Beware the Gonzo ('11) *** (:45) The Parent Trap ('61) Two twin sisters hatch a plan to Comic Bk Villains ('02, Comedy) Good Heart
SHOW 340 34 34 34 340 40 365 Uni que newsletter. (NR) (CC) switch places and reunite their parents. ,,** Comic Bks. (CC)y (R)( er
TMO 0 0 5 3 3 3 (5:15)The Kings of A Stranger Among Us ('92, Drama) NY cop Sexting ('11) Multiple love relations (35) Street Racer (08) The perilous
TMC 350 350 350 35 350 50 385A ppletown ('11) hunts killer among Hasidics. (CC) with two people. (CC) world of street racing.
TOM 65 6565 65 169 230 Cyrano de Bergerac ('50, Drama) *** A East of Eden ('55, Drama) James Dean. Little Women ('33, Drama) **** The Civil
TM 5 5 5 5 13swordsman loves a woman from afar. Brothers vie for their father's respect. War affects four sisters. (NR) (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Eddie and The Cruisers ('83) ** (CC) (:15) Hackers ('95)
-PGINE 3 2 on 30 30 40 (5:30) Off Air Station down- Rounders (98, Drama) Matt Damon. A student is Great Expectations ('98, Drama) ** A tal- (:55) The Island ('05) Uto-
CINE 320 32 32 3 320 320 420 ti me. (HD() dragged back into gambling. ented artist loses his inspiration. (CC) plan society.
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Friday 13 |(:45) Last Bombshells (00) (:10) Garden Party ('08) CC) (:40) Something to Talk About ('95) ** L.A. (R)
150P 0510 1 0) Ace Ventura: Pet Detective The Medallion ('03) Medallion gives (:1 5) Brother Bear ('03) A young (:45) Johnny Be Good ('88) Teen
ENC 150 15( 1 150 350 1('94) Mascot kidnapped. a cop superpowers. hunter turns into a bear. plays football. (CC)
HBO 302 0 3 32 30 Fierce Creatures (97) **'/2 A fail- (:35) Hop ('11, Family) Easter Bunny (1 5) Dreamer: Inspired by a True Story ('05) Phil Spector ('13) Phil's
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 ing zoo is bought out. (CC) suffers an injury. (CC) Racehorse comeback. (CC) relationship.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Doctor Dolittle ('98) ** (CC) In Good Company ('05) Younger boss. (:25) Dream House ('11) (CC) Apollo 13 ('95)
HBO3 304 304 304304 304 404 Leap of Faith ('92) ** (CC) (:50) Mrs. Henderson Presents ('05) Youngarts In the Valley of Elah ('07) Missing son.
SHOW 0 340 340 340 340 340 365 Springstee Captain Ron ('92) *'/2 A disreputa- (:15) Will (Family) (:05) Autumn in New York ('00, Drama) *1/2 A
Sble takes a family to sea man falls for a dying woman. (CC)
TMO 333 5 Charm George of the Jungle 2 ('03) One Good Cop ('91) A policeman (:45) Outside Providence (99) ** Teenage If You Dare
TMC 350 350 350 35 350 350 385('72) Saving the family. (CC) steals from a drug lord. misfit is sent to a prep school. (CC)
TOPM 65 5 1 69 0 The Mighty McGurk ('47, Drama) High Barbaree ('47) A downed pilot (1: 5) Command Decision ('48) An officer defends (:15) The Sellout ('52) Cor-
T*M 65 65 65 65 169 230 -,-/ Finding family. (NR) relates his life story. his bombing missions. (CC) rupt sheriff.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Virus ('99) *** Ship harbors entity. (CC) Anaconda ('97) *1/2
INEC 32302 3 320 3n :t 4 0) Network ('76, Drama) A man's ravings make (:15) Life of Pi ('12) ***-y/2 A zookeeper's son is surrounded The Terminator ('84) A futuristic cy-
S32 32 32 320 320 a TV superstar. (R (CC) by loose animals after a shipwreck. (CC) Oborg targets a woman.
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 (5:30) Off Air (HD) Beach Kings (08) *-1/2 (CC) The Parent Trap Twins trick parents. (:50) They Live (88) -**-2 (CC)
S1501 0101 15 30 Speechless Man loves 1:20) Hope Springs (12, Comedy) **'/2 Married Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle ('03) k*1/ The (:55) The Fifth Element
r.NC 150 15 150 150 150 350opponent. couple rekindles their romance. girls track a treacherous ex-Angel. ('97)- k-r (CC)
HBO 3200 3 302 302 (4:50) Stay Now and Then (95) Childhood (:15) Edward Scissorhands ('90) Bizarre outsider Love Wrecked ('05) ** A rock star U-571 ('00)
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 (o5 friends reunite after years. adjusts to suburbia. (CC) is stranded with a fan. _l/
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Moonstruck ('87) A widow finds love. The Clearing ('04) **12 (CC) Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets ('02)
HBO3 304304304304 304 404 Rocky ('76, Drama) A boxer trains. (CC) Rocky II ('79) **** A boxer's fame. (CC) Rocky III ('82, Drama) (CC) Rocky IV
OW 30 30 3 3 (5:00) The Brothers The Little Match Makers ('11) *1/2 Two kids and Late Bloomers ('96) **l/2 Two The Other F Word ('11) ***
SHOW 34 34 34 34 340 40 365 Bloom ('09) (CC) their parents' vacation. (CC) women have an affair. (CC) Tony Adolescent. Fatherhood.
TMO 350503030353 8(:05) Rain Fall ('09, Action) Kippei Shiina. Killed (:55) Rare Birds ('01) Faux news Far and Away ('92) A young Irishman facing eviction flees to
ii aaaTMC 35 u 35 u 35C 3. 8 official's corrupt proof sought. story brings customers. America with his landlord's daughter.
TOM 5 65 65 1 2 A Child Is Waiting ('63, Drama) *** A South Sea Woman A Marine ser- (:45) Ten Tall Men ('51, Adventure) **'/2 A ser- Shadow
TM 65 65 65 65 169 230 teacher befriends an Autistic student. qeant is court-martialed. geant tries to delay an attack. (NR) (51)**
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Escape from New York ('81 *** (CC) Kingdom ('07) (R)
pINE 3 2 3n 32 30 40 Idlewild ('06, Musical) **Y2 Big Boi. Musicians Infamous ('06, Drama) Sigourney Weaver. I Still Know What You Did Last Bourne
CINE 320 320 320 3 320 320 420 contend with mobsters. (R) (CC) Friends recall Truman Ca pote's life. Summer Terror returns. 12
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Paparazzi ('04, Drama) (CC) Fat Albert Cartoons aid girl. Southern Wild Girl's search. |(:40) Madagascar ('05) (CC)
S 15:5 5) 10 51Seven Years In Tibet ('97) (35) The Natural ('84) A gifted professional baseball player is :55) All ('01, Drama) **'/2 Will Smith. The life
ENC 150_ 150 15 15 150 350 Man meets Dalai Lama forced to overcome a horrible injury. and career of Muhammad All. (CC)
HBO 30 0 3n 32 32 4n Space Jam (96) Jordan teaches Rosenquis William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Real Sports Gumbel Mr. & Mrs. Smith Married
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 cartoons to shoot hoops. t Dream Tale of hidden love. (CC) (HD() assassins.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 One True Thing ('98, Drama) ***1/2 (CC) (1 0) Comedy in Muslim World ('06)** Big Miracle Saving whales. iMikeTyson
HBO3 304304304304 304404 Zero *1/2 Stay ('05) A suicidal patient. (:15) Primary Colors ('98) Candidate campaigns. Silence of the Lambs ('91)
w SHOW 340 30 3 30 Highball Quiz Show ('94, Drama) John Turturro. Televi- (:45) Knucklehead ('10, Comedy) ** A con art- Your Sister's Sister ('12) Emily
SHOW 34 34 34 34 340 40 365 '( sion quiz show scandal probed. ist seeks an orphan's help. (CC) Blunt. Two women. (CC)
TM 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 Billy Elliot ('00) Miner's Where the Red Fern Grows ('03) Happy Accidents ('00, Comedy) A boyfriend A Gentleman's Game ('01, Drama)
TMC 350 35 35 0 son dances. 3**1/2 Boy wants puppies. says he is from the future. (CC) **y2 A difficult life. (R)
TOM 65 6565 65 169 230 AggieAppleby, Maker of (:15) One Man's Journey ('33) Man of Two Worlds A British voy- (:15) Break of Hearts ('35) ** Two By Your
M 6 65 65 65 1 Men (33) **** Doctor helps others. eager meets an Eskimo. composers marry. (CC) Leave
11* T /, H :T 1 'l!L, 1 I'* L I1 i *- ll;LT l"II Ii If *l!Ll







KIDS NEWS SPORTS


MORNINGS WEEKDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


ABC 2 7 11 7 News News Good Morning America News Millionre. Millionre. TheView
ABC 2 11 News Good Morning America Steven and Chris Right This Right This The View
ABC AJ 7 7 7 10 7 7 News Good Morning America Better America Supreme The View
CBS I1 10 10 10 10 10 News, 6am CBS This Morning Studio 10 Inside Jeopardy The Price Is Right
CBS H] 213 213 5 5 5 News News CBS This Morning LIVE! with Kelly Rachael Ray The Price Is Right
NBC 8 8 8 _8 _8 News Today Today Daytime RachaelRay
NBC 2I 2 2 2 NBC2 News Today Today _______NBC2 News @ 11am
FOX I 13 13 13 13 13 News News News FOX 13's Good Day LIVE! with Kelly Wendy Williams
FOX X 4 4 4 (5:00) FOX 4 Rising FOX 4 Morning Blend Bridezillas Maury Friends Friends
PBS C) 3 3 3 3 Clifford Sid Arthur Kratts Curious Cat in Hat Peg + Cat DinoTrain Sesame Street Daniel SuperWhy
PBS 1 204204204 16 Yoga Lilias! Electric Stretch Sewing Quilting Sew Room Sit Fit Painting Cook's Cooking Yoga
PBS JM 3 3 3 _Electric Stretch Arthur Kratts Curious Cat in Hat Peg + Cat DinoTrain Sesame Street Daniel SuperWhy
CW __ 6 21 6 Queens Queens News News News Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Queen Latifah
CW I 9 9 9 4 (5:00) The Daily Buzz Til Death Paid Middle Middle Millionre. Millionre. Queen Latifah Justice Justice
MYN 11 11 11 14 Paid Paid On Spot OK!TV America Communit The700 Club Maury The People's Court
MYNCC 8 9 8 Cash Cab Cash Cab Paid Paid Cops Cops Steve Wilkos Show Trisha Goddard Jerry Springer
IND 32 12 12 12 38 12 Shepherd's Chapel Cheaters Cheaters We People We People Supreme Supreme Jerry Springer Steve Wilkos Show
IONS 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Archer Archer Paid Paid Thr.Bible Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Married Movie
WCfa 22 22 22 2 Gospel Destined Today Meyer Digging In Copeland Parsley Youngren It's Time KnowCse LifeToday Wilton
WRXY3I 22 44 10 Gospel Variety Salvation Destined The Lamp Thr. Bible Gospel Meyer Hilliard Faith LifeToday Day
TLF SM 23 23 23_ 95 _5 Qu6 locura! Noticias Nacional Mujer casos Las vfas del amor Qui6n tiene la?
UNIV 215 15 15 6 Tu desayunoalegre Despierta Am6rica La rosa de
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 Paid Paid Dog Bounty Dog Bounty ____ Criminal Minds Criminal Minds CSI: Miami
API 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Orangutan Chimp Big Cat Big Cat Meerkat Meerkat Animal Cops Animal Cops Pit Bulls
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Morning Inspiration Matters Matters Movie Movie
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Movie Fashion Fashion Fashion Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Daily Colbert Sunny South Prk Movie
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Almost Got Away FBI: Criminal Wicked Attraction
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 Phineas Jessie Dog Blog Mickey Mickey Jakeand Mickey Sofia Doc Mc |Henry Jakeand Octonauts
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 Paid Paid Save Bell Save Bell Save Bell Save Bell Kardashians Kardashians Kardashians
ESQ 82 82 82 82 118118 160 SexCity Sex CitLy Sex City Sex City Sex City Sex City NewYork NewYork NewYork
EWTN 243243243 12 17 285 EWTN Catholic Michael Holy Name Daily Mass Life on the Rock Variety WomenGr |Rosary
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Meyer Drenda Grounded Grounded '70s '70s '70s 700 Club The 700 Club Gilmore Girls
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Grill It! Cook Real Neelys Sweet Genius
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 Paid Paid Buffy Vampire BuffyVampire Ellen Ellen Movie
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179184 Paid Paid Paid Paid Match Match Password Press Luck Sale of |Pyramid Password |Pyramid
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Movie Movie Home & Family_______
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Paid Paid Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Paid Profession Abroad Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice Candice
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 HSN Today HSN Today HSN Today Household Helpers E.A.T. -A by Adrienne
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 Paid Paid Balancing Balancing Christine Christine Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 (5:00) Great Gifts Mornings Made Easy Holiday Decorating with Carolyn Denim & Co.
SPIKE 575 57 57 29 63 54 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Paid Paid Paid Paid Twilight Naked Vegas Naked Vegas Naked Vegas Face Off
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Rules Earl Married Married ThereYet Payne Browns Prince Prince Prince Prince Wipeout
TIC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 18Kids 18Kids FirstDay Multiples BabyStry BabyStry BabyStry BabySty Abby Abby Borrowed Borrowed
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Smallville Charmed Charmed Supernatural Supernatural Supernatural
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid 1000 1000 The Layover Variety
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Hinman Hinman Hinman Hinman Vegas Vegas
TVLAND 62 62 6262 31 54 244 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Murder, She Wrote Van Dyke Van Dyke Lucy Lucy
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 White Collar Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
WE 117 117 117 117 117 149 Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne
WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 Paid Meyer Destined Creflo Paid Paid Matlock Matlock In the Heat of Night
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Paid Paid Mayhem in the AM Geico SportsNITE Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 Mike & Mike ESPN First Take
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Sports Unlimited World Poker Tour The Best of Pride W Coast Customs Game365 HallFame Sports Unlimited
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Golf Central Morning Drive Morning Drive Morning Drive
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Paid Paid Premier League Premier League The Dan Patrick Show
SUN 38 38 401401 45 57 76 Best Boat O'Neill TravisJoh Headlines Dateline Lightning Heat Reel Dream Reel Fish Driven College Football
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 Dad Run Dad Run Sponge Sponge Sponge PAW Patrol Umizoomi Umizoomi Dora Dora Guppies Guppies
TOON 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 Scooby Gumball Ben 10 Beyblade Pok6mon Movie Garfield Garfield Tunes Tunes
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 SquawkBox Squawk on the Street
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 NewDay CNN Newsroom Legal View with
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 Today in Washington Washington Journal U.S. House of Representatives
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 171 118 FOX& Friends America's Newsroom Happening Now
MSNBC 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Morning Joe The Daily Rundown Jansing and Co. MSNBC Live
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 SNN Good Morning SNN Good Morning SNN Good Morning SNNGood Morning Paid News News News
CMTV 47 47 47 41 23 24 221 (4:00)CMT Music
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 AMTV: Music Feed AMTV: Music Feed AMTV: Music Feed Gir Code GirlCode Gid Code GirlCode GidCode GirlCode


- -... I -- I -- I -- I -- I .- I -- --
VHl + Music Gossio IBia Mornina Buzz I Love & Hit) Hot)


VH1 + Music






KIDS NEWS SPORTS


AFTERNOONS WEEKDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


AMIC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Aliens Alien 3 ('92) Ripley &the alien survive crash. (CC) Christine ('83) Classic auto kills. (CC) Hannibal 01 **'2
INE 302 320 30 40 Office (99) Strike Back (:20) Prometheus ('12) The discovery of possible alien origins Million Dollar Baby ('04, Drama) A boxing traine(1:50) Mars
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 for humanity sparks an expedition. takes a female pupl. () ('96)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 IeeAge (:45) Rain Man ('88) A hustler kidnaps his brother. |BrokenCit ('13) **1/2 (R)(CC) (:50)The Descendants (11)
cp 150 150 10 Measures (:35) Austin Powers: International (:05) The Crush ('93) A young teen (:40) Sparkle ('12, Drama) ** Sisters try to Spider-
EC 150 150 150 150 150 350 ('96) Man of Mystery ('97 girl harasses a writer, make t in Motown scene. (CC) Man
HBO 302302302 3 302 302 400 Red Eye Crossfire Hurricane The Rolling Stones are pro- 24/7(CC)(HD) Mama ('13) **1/2 A man takes in Makingof The Three Stooges ('12)
HBO (i230 f3S3X i4O05 filed. (CC) (R) (HD) his troubled nieces. (CC) (R) *** (PG) (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Cloud Atlas ('12) |(:20) Chernobyl Diaries '12) :50) Seduced and Abandoned ('13) Joyful Noise ('12) ** ((CC)
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 War of the Worlds ('05) Tom Cruise. North Country Sexual harassment. (:10) Backdraft ('91) Brothers fight fire.
SHOW 340 340 340 3403 340 365 (11 1":'5) The Way Back ('10) ***1/2 The Other Shore: The Diana Nyad (:15) The Perks of Being a Wallflower ('12) A Stage Beauty ('04) The
SHOW 340 34 34 3 340 40 365 Prisoners escape. (CC) Story ('13) (NR) (CC) freshman befriends two seniors. first actress.
TM 350 5 5 m 3 3 Billy Elliot ('00) Miner's The Frighteners (96, Horror) **** A psychic Sylvia ('03, Drama) A poet struggles (:50) The Woman in Black ('12, Hor-
M 350 350 350 350 350 385 son dances. fights a dead serial killer. (R) (CC)) with depression. (CC) ror) Vengeful ghost.
TPM 5 6 6 16 Bride Red What Price Hollywood? ('32, (:15) Comet over Broadway ('38) (:45) I'll Cry Tomorrow ('55) Susan Hayward, Richard Conte.
TM 65 65 65 65 169230 (37 Drama) The latest new star. Broadway ambitions. A famous singer turns to alcohol. (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Hannibal ('01) **1/2 Serial killer returns to America. Twister ('96) **1y/2 Helen Hunt. Storm chasers. (CC) Angels ('09) (CC)
pINE 30 3 3 3 3 4 (11:35) Strike A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christ- (:10) Just Like Heaven ('05) **1'/2 (50)The Five-Year Engagement (12, Comedy) **'/2 En
CINE 320 320 320 3 320 20 420 mas ('11 ) John Cho. Man loves ghost. (CC:) gagement causes strain for couple. (R) (CC)
COINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Wedding ('05) *** Ted ('12) Living teddy bear. (:50) Savages ('12) Blake Lively. Fighting cartel. (:15) Fockers ('04)
FNP 10 0 10 35 (:55) Think Like a Man ('12, Comedy) **'/2 Miracle ('04, Drama) Kurt Russell. A hockey (20) The Bourne Supremacy ('04, Action)
EN 10 15 15F 10 150 350 Four couples manipulate each other. team fights against the odds. (CC) Bourne is framed for murder. (CC)
HBO 3 0 n(11:30) Napoleon Dyna- (:15) Wrath of the Titans ('12, Action) Perseus Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (45) Thunderstruck (12) ** Kevin
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 mite ('04 *** rescues father in underworld. ('13) Life and career. (CCO) Durant. Basketball star.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Madagascar ('12) :10) Entrapment ('99 Agent baits thief. The Ring Two k** Videotape surfaces. The Hobbit ('12)
HBO3 304304304 304 304 404 Mr. & Mrs. Smith Married assassins. (:15) The Silence of the Lambs ('91) (:20) Beyond ('12) Kidnapped girl. (CC()
SHOW 340 340 340 3340 340m 365 The Good Heart ('10O) A bar owner Red Flag (12) *1/2 Indie filmmaker John Mellencamp: It's About You Springsteen & I ('13) Bruce
SonW 3 34 3 34 helps a oor boy. (CC) traverses the U.S. (CC) Musical journey. (HD)) Springsteen. Rock musician.
TMPO 3535353303035Swingingwith the Finkels('11) Venus ('06) An aging man falls for a Passion Play ('11) *1/2 Two lovers (:40) Man on a Ledge ('12) ****
TM 350 35C 350 35 350 350 385 ja /2 ouple swap. (R) (CC) younger woman. (CC) attempt to evade a killer. Suicidal man. (PG-13) (CC)
TOPM 6 5 6 6 16 2 Far from the Madding Crowd ('67) A beautiful young woman becomes The Rising of the Moon ('57) British Man in the Attic ('53) A new tenant
IM 65 65 65 65 169 230 entangled in the lives of the three men. (CC) oppression. (CC) may be a murderer.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 (11:15) Hackers ('95, Thriller) |Ghost Ship ('02) **-k-k Terrorized by ship. Ghost ('90) A man's spirit protects his girlfriend.
INE 320n 320320 30 320 320 420 The Island ('05) Utopian :15) Warm Bodies ('13, Romance) Nicholas Vehicle 19 ('13) *1/2 Man fights to The Lucky One ('12) Zac Efron. Ma-
INE 30 3( 3C 3 320 ]0 40 society. (CC) Hoult. A zombie falls for a human, reveal police corruption. rine's luck charm. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 L.A. Confidential ('97) (CC) (:50) For a Good Time ('12) The Chronicles of Riddick Battling invaders. 11000 Words
F 1501501501 1 5(:15) Reindeer Games ('00, Thriller) **/2 A (:05) Someone to Watch Over Me ('87) Cop pro- :55) Open Range ('03, Western) Two cowboys
ENC 150 150 150 10 150 350 gang plans a casino robbery. (CC) tects wealthy murder witness. (encounter a corrupt town. (CC)
HBO 302 302302 3 302 302 400 Phil ('13) (CC) (:45) Taken 2 ('12, Action) **1/2 CIA operative The Dark Knight Rises ('12) **** Christian Bale. Bat- (:15) Ray ('04) *** Life
HB_ 3 30 30 3 30 0 00and his wife are targeted. (CC) man protects Gotham from terrorist. (CC) (H1D) of Ray Charles.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Apollo 13 Problem in space. (:25) This Means War ('12) |(:05) Cloud Atlas ('12) The impacts of individuals' actions.
HBO3 304304304304 304 404 Zero1/2 (:40) Small Town Sat. ('10) Anywhere But Here ('99) Family strife. (:15) The Watch ('12) **1y/2 Alien invasion.
SHOW 30 340 340 30 340 340 365 The Brothers Bloom ('09) **** Swindling A Better Life ('11, Drama) **** Demian Bichir. The Ref (94) Denis Leary. Hostages Even
SoW- 0 34 34 3 340 40 65 brothers pick the wrong mark. (CCO) A man provides for his son. (CC:) ruin burglar's holiday. Money rk
TMO 350353503350503 (11:25) Love Me If You The Bedroom Window ('87) Man becomes a The Bang Bang Club ('11, Drama) (50) King of California ('07) ***
TM 350 350 350 350 350 350 385areect over crime re ort. (CC) Apartheid hate. (CC) Treasure hunting. (CC)
TOM 65 65 65 65 169230 Sellout (52) (:45) Strange Lady in Town ('55) ** A woman (:45) Tension at Table Rock ('56, Western) ** Monkey on My Back ('57, Drama)
** 6 6 6 13 sets up a medical practice. (NR) A pariah battles outlaws. (CC:) _*** Hero turns addict.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Anaconda ('97) *y1/2 Slither ('06) *** Worm-like aliens. (CC) Reign of Fire ('02) Dragons rule Earth. |Catwoman ('04) *
INE 320n 320320 30 320 320 420 Terminator (:25) Battlefield Earth ('00) '/2 An alien race tries Battleship ('12, Science Fiction) **1/2 Human (:45) Courage Under Fire ('96)
S320 32 32 3 320 20 420 (R) to enslave humanity. (CC) (HD) navy battles alien armada. (CC) **1/2 Dead pilot. (R) (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 They Live The Bourne Legacy Agent's mission. (:45) Payback ('99) A thief's revenge. (R) The Lovely Bones ('09) (CC)
FNO 101501015015 0: 155) The Fifth Element (:05) My Favorite Martian ('99) *1/2 Christmas with the Kranks ('04) ** Family (:25) Hope Springs ('12) **1'/2 Re-
ENC 150 15 150 1 150 (950(9 (CC'97 ) Spaceship crash. (CC) prepares last-minute celebration. kindling romance. (CC)
HBO 302 0 3 30 32 40 U-571 ('00) An American crew seize Whoopi Goldberg Presents Moms One Day ('11, Drama) Anne Hathaway. Two peo-War of theWorlds ('05)
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 a German U-boat. Mabley Comic profiled. lpe's intricate relationship. (CC) Tom Cruise.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 (:20) Mama ('13) **1/2 Alone in the forest. The Eagle ('11) Lost army bad clan. iThe Long Kiss Goodnight ('96) (CC)
HBO3 304304330404 304 404 Rocky IV ('85) **1/2 (:15) Rocky V ('90) ** Rocky'sprotege. Pescador ('11, Drama) *** (:35) Pitch Perfect (12) (CC)
SHOW 30 30 3 3 3 3 (:15) D3: The Mighty Ducks ('96) *1/2 A hockey Steel Dawn ('87) ** Warrior pro- The World According to Dick Cheney ('13) Polanski
SHOW 340 34 34 34 340 40 365 eam enters a private academy. tects a widow and her son. *** Interviews with Dick Cheney. (13
TMO 3505050 505085Dino Wolf (11) 1/2 Creature terror- After Image ('03, Drama) Premoni- (:05) The Woman in Black ('12, Hor- (:40) 50/50 ('11, Drama) Young man
IMC 350 350 350 350 350 350 385j izes mountain community. tions of a murder. (CC) ror) Vengeful ghost. tries to beat cancer.
TM 65656565 169 230 (11:30) Shadow in the Sky Glory Alley ('52, Drama) A boxer Code Two ('53) LA Police (45) Jeopardy ('53) **Y1/2 Vaca- The Dirty Dozen Suicide
I 5 5 ((51) throws in the towel. (CC) Academy. tioners encounter a fugitive. mission.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 (11:00) The Kingdom ('07) |The Cave ('05) *1/2 Cave creatures. (CC) Daylight ('96) A tunnel collapse traps commuters.
pINE 320 2 3 32 30 420 (11.40) The Bourne Legacy ('12, Action) Agent Swingers ('96) Lovelorn comedian's The Negotiator ('98) A brilliant hostage negotiator is wrong-
N0 320 320 320exose CIA crimes, 32 42 single life in L.A. (CC) fully accused of murdering his partner. n o ri o
OINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 She's the Man ('06) **1/2 Girl in disguise. The Siege (98) **1/2 Martial law. (R) (CC) Child's Play (88) **1/2 (R) (CC) Rev.Road
NP 10150150 150 9:55) Ali ('01) (:35) Dances with Wolves ('90) A soldier living among the Sioux faces (:40) Confessions of a Teenage Out of Africa (85) Wife's
__ENC 150 5 n 10hard choices as the U.S. Army approaches. Drama Queen ('04) (CC) romance.
HBO 302 302302 32 302 302 400 Mr. & Mrs. Smith Married Dark Shadows ('12) A vampire imprisoned for (:15) Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close ('11, Drama) Kid Gumbel (HD)
HB 302 30 30 30 302 302 400 assassins. 200 years wakes up in 1972. searches for hidden message. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Mike Tyson ('13) Mystic Pizza *** Young women in love. (:20) TheHobbit:AnUnexpected Journey ('12, Fantasy)
HBO3 304304304 304 304 404 Silence A Simple Plan ('98) Trio learns greed. |Hyde Park on Hudson ('13) The Three Stooges ('12) ** Up Close
w* SHW 30 30 3 34 Rock 'N' Roll Exposed: The Photography of Stage Beauty ('04, Drama) *** An actress Sling Blade ('96, Drama) ~**1/2 A sim-
SHOW 340 340 340 3 340 340 365 Bob Gruen Music photographer. breaks theatre precedents. (R) (CC) ( le-minded man befriends a boy. (R) (CC)
TMO 350530 o 350 35 Gentleman (:25) Elizabeth: The Golden Age (:20) The Double ('11, Crime) **1 2 CIA opera- War Horse ('11, Drama) *** Jeremy Irvine. A
50 350 350 350 3 350 350 385_ kl/2 (*07) Romance and war. tives search for an assassin. (CC) man searches for his horse. (CC)
TOM 65 5 1 69 0 (11:45) By Your Leave (:15) Gridiron Flash ('34) Eddie Star of Midnight ('35) A lawyer (:15) Sylvia Scarlett ('35, Comedy) ** A
TMv 5 65 65 6 193 ('34) ** (NR) Quillan. College football. seeks a missing actress. woman masquerades as a boy. (CC)







KIDS NEWS SPORTS


AFTERNOONS WEEKDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


ABC 2 7 11 7 Bethenny The Chew General Hospital Katie Ellen DeGeneres News News
ABC 8 11 ABC Action News The Chew General Hospital Katie Ellen DeGeneres News News
ABC J7 7 7 10 7 7 ABC7 News at Noon TheChew General Hospital RachaelRay TheDoctors News News
CBS 10 10 10 10 10 News Young Restless Beautiful The Talk Let's Make a Deal Dr. Phil News News
CBS f 213213 5 5 5 News Young Restless Beautiful The Talk Let's Make a Deal News at 4pm News News
NBC 8 8 8 _8 _8 Today Days of Our Lives The Doctors The Dr. Oz Show News News News
NBC2 __ 2 2 2 NBC2 News @ Noon Days of Our Lives The Doctors The Dr. Oz Show News News News
FOX I 13 13 13 13 13 FOX 13News TMZ Dish Bethenny TMZ Live Judy Judy FOX 13 5:00 News
FOX X 4 4 4 America We People Justice Supreme Judy Paternity The Test Maury Judy Judy
PBS 3 3 3 __3 Charlie Rose Great Performances ___________Martha WordGirl Curious Europe
PBS 1 204204204 16 Ballykissangel Travels Journeys Globe Trekker Variety Antiques Roadshow Journal Travels
PBS M 3 3 3 Cook's Kitchen Landscape Sew It All Thomas Sid Clifford WordGirl Curious Arthur Martha Kratts
CW AM 6 21 6 Dr. Phil Bill Cunningham Wendy Williams Steve Harvey Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Dr. Phil
CW I 9 9 9 4 America America Patemrnity Paternity Cold Case Files Bill Cunningham Steve Harvey Queen Latifah
MYN 3 11 11 11 14 Judge Mathis Trisha Goddard The Test Judge Mathis Maury The People's Court
MYNh C 8 9 8 OK! TV Paid The People's Court Judge Mathis The People's Court Law & Order: SVU Community Community
IND I 12 12 12 38 12 Cheaters Cheaters Jerry Springer Steve Wilkos Show Jerry Springer 30 Rock 30 Rock How Met How Met
ION E 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Movie Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
WCLF 2I 22 22 22 2 Destined Thr. Bible Hmekeep Christian Jim Bakker The 700 Club Your Health It's Time Parsley
WRXY3M 22 44 10 Hmekeep It's Time The 700 Club Your Health Jim Bakker Connect Mission Salvation
TLF IB 23 23 23 95 5 Laura Laura Fdtbol Fdtbol international El Chavo
UNIV- 15 15 15 6 Hoy Cachitodecielo Lamujerdel El gordo y laflaca Primerimpacto
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 CSI: Miami 7Criminal Minds Criminal Minds The First 48 The First 48 The First 48
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Pit Boss To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Movie Wife Wife Matters Matters Matters Movie
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Real Housewives Real Housewives Real Housewives Thicker Than Water Thicker Than Water Real Housewives
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Movie Tosh Tosh Tosh Tosh (:20)Tosh.0 Sunny Community Futurama Futurama
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Sins & Secrets Porter Porter Porter Porter Moonshiners Moonshiners Moonshiners
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 Mickey Doc Mc Movie Dog Blog Dog Blog Friends Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 E! News Sex City Sex City Sex City Sex City Variety
ESQ 82 82 82 82 118 118 160 New York New York New York New York New York Burn Notice
EWTN 243243243 12 17 285 Daily Mass The Journey Home Threshold of Hope Reflection Holy Name Truth Catholic Saints Choices
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Reba Reba 8 Rules 8 Rules BoyWorld Boy World Boy World BoyWorld Ravenswood Ravenswood
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Pioneer Barefoot Sandra's Ten Dollar Rest.Chef 30Min. Giada Giada Barefoot Barefoot Pioneer Trisha's
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 Movie Movie Movie How I Met How I Met How Met
GSN 179179179179 34 179184 Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Catch 21 Pyramid Chain Chain Fam.Feud Fam.Feud The Chase
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Better Home Home Movie Movie
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Hunters Hunters Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Cozy Chic Sweaters FERN FINDS Hal Rubenstein Winter Solutions Perlier Holiday Gifts A byAdrienne
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 HowlMet HowlMet Grey's Anatomy Grey's Anatomy Charmed Charmed WifeSwa
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 Dr. Phil Too Cute! Too Cute! Too Cute! Too Cute! Too Cute!
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 Q Check Gifts Antonella's Jewelry Gift Favorites DecktheHalls Gourmet Holiday
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Criss Angel Criss Angel
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Face Off Movie Movie Movie
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Wipeout Cleveland Dad Dad Dad Cougar Friends Friends Friends Friends Queens Queens
TIC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 What Not to Wear 19 Kids 19 Kids LI Medium LI Medium What Not to Wear Borrowed Borrowed Four Weddings
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Bones Bones Bones Bones Castle Castle
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Variety Variety Bourdain Food Paradise Bizarre Foods v Food v Food
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30183 Vegas Vegas Vegas Vegas Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
TVLAND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Griffith Griffith Gunsmoke Gunsmoke Bonanza Bonanza (:11) Bonanza
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
WE 117117117117 117149 Roseanne Roseanne My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding My Fair Wedding WillGrace WillGrace
WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 In the Heat of Night WGN Midday News Walker Walker Law & OrderCl Law & OrderCl
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Geico SportsNITE To Be Announced Talkin Football Beach GolfWeekl
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 SportsCenter SportsCenter NFL Primetime Insiders Mike NFL Live Horn Interruptn
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 Numbers Never Lie ESPN First Take SportsCenter SportsNation Highly Outside College ESPN FC
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 NASCAR Race Hub Jones & Moseley Fantastic Soccer International Soccer Crowd Goes Wild
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 College Basketball Extreme Games Sports Unlimited World Poker Tour The Finsiders
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 (11:00)Morning The Golf Fix PGA Cup HL Russian Open Golf Big Break NFL Big Break NFL
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Sports Dash Blue NA Hunter DeerHunt Soccer Fantas Pro
SUN 38 38 401401 45 57 76 (11:00) College Football College Basketball Texas A&M Inside UCF UCF Sports Florida
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 PAW Patrol Dora Dora Peter Sponge Sponge Fairly Fairly Sanjay Sponge Sponge Sponge
TOON 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 Tom Jerry Tom Jerry Tom Jerry Tom Jerry Cartoon Planet TitansGo! Island Adventure Adventure Regular Regular
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Fast Money Power Lunch -Street Signs Closing Bell _______Fast Money
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 Around The World CNN Newsroom Jake Tapper Situation Room
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives IU.S. House of Representatives
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 (11:00) Now America's News HQ Real Story Gretchen ShepardSmith Your World Cavuto The Five
MSNBC 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Alex Wagner Andrea M -News Nation The Cycle Martin Bashir The Ed Show
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 News Paid SNN News Daytime Paid News Paid News News News Live @ 5 News
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 Movie Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover Reba Reba
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 GirlCode GirlCode GirlCoCode ridGirlCode Girl Code Snooki Snooki Snooki 70s '70s GirlCode GirlCode


A6L~ 1/I-Il 50 50 50 50 43 23 2llIBlacklnkCrew Jones What What What What What What Love & Hip Hop Greatest


Greatest


16 V-1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 Black Ink Crew


Jones What What What What What What Love & Hip Hop







MONDAY
HIGHLIGHTS

Hart of Dixie
8 p.m. on CW
"I Run to You" When Joel
begins to wean off writ-
ing, Zoe is quick to blame
Wade, as the two have
been spending more time
together; trying to avoid
AnnaBeth, Lavon engrosses
himself in his track team;
George and Lynly wonder if
they should tell Lavon. (HD)

Almost Human
8 p.m. on FOX
"Skin" When a high-profile
missing persons case arises
alongside a suspicious
murder, Kennex and Dorian
begin investigating the
profitable world of Intimate
Robot Companions for
answers; no longer able to
avoid it, Kennex must come
to terms with his past.(HD)


The Voice
8 p.m. on NBC
"Live Top 10 Performances"
Season five's 10 remain-
ing hopefuls prepare for
another nerve-wracking
week of live performances;
the coaches work to make
sure their team members
are challenging themselves
in order to show a new side
to themselves. (HD)

Ratatouille
8:07 p.m. on DISN
A rat dreams of becoming
a great French chef just like
his culinary hero and is able
to seize the oppor-tunity
when he teams up with a
young, bumbling kitchen
worker at a famous restau-
rant in Paris.

Mike & Molly
9 p.m. on CBS
"Sex and Death" Molly has
a stunning experience
after going to the funeral
home Victoria works at for
research on her novel; Mike


SOAP OPERA UPDATE


THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
After his brush with death,
Bill told Katie that he wanted
x come home to her and Will.
Brooke mourned her breakup
vith Bill but also was happy
.or her sister. Hope and Liam
-ame to an understanding about
here they stood in each other's
ives. Brooke reflected back on
ier life and how she had set a
ioor example for her children.
Meanwhile, Hope appeared to
)e following in her mother's
footsteps as she flirted with
Vyatt. Liam and Wyatt called
i temporary truce after almost
osing their father. Hope and
2aroline acknowledged how
heir friendship has grown.
Liam accused Hope ofpunish-
ng him for being so indecisive
bout her and Steffy over the
{ears. Wait to See: Brooke has
i meltdown. Liam gives Hope a
ieek into their future together.
Katie and her company are tar-
,eted by some shady dealers.

DAYS OF OUR LIVES
Maggie blasted Victor for
sing Marlena. Rory attempted
x lure JJ into using drugs. Eric


confronted Kristen with what
he remembered. Later, Eric
and Brady got into a physical
altercation. Maggie turned to
Daniel for advice about her
marriage problems. EJ worried
that Sami would discover that
he knew about Kristen's plot all
along. Jordan kept quiet about
her mysterious phone calls.
Eric's job was on the line. Sonny
accidentally stumbled upon
Gabi's secret. Sami had a fit
when she found an incriminat-
ing text message on EJ's phone.
Nicole didn't accept Eric's
apology without speaking her
mind first. Gabi left out some
important information when
telling Will about her modeling
contract. Wait to See: Shane and
Kimberly visit their daughter
in Salem. Sami is impressed
by EJ's support of Will. Kate
confronts Jordan.

GENERAL HOSPITAL
Robin was eager to process
Luke's blood so that she could
manufacture the cure for Jerry.
Robin was hit hard when she
arrived at the lab, remember-
ing the last time she was there
with Patrick In court, Maxie
told Diane to go after Lulu as


takes a peak at Molly's
work while she's out. (HD)

Beauty and the Beast
9 p.m. on CW
"Guess Who's Coming to
Dinner?" Cat's Thanksgiv-
ing dinner plans wind up
in disaster when she asks
for the help of her father in
having Vincent join them,
as she makes it her person-
al mission to find out who
has been handling Vincent
and pulling the strings. (HD)
Hostages
10 p.m. on CBS
"Loose Ends" Duncan is
ordered to get rid of an
insider after investigators
come close to discovering
the conspiracy to assas-
sinate President Kincaid;
Duncan takes the next step
in his plans by giving Ellen
the poison to use to kill
President. (HD)

Castle
10:01 p.m. on ABC
"Disciple" Castle and

ruthlessly as Lulu was attacking
her. Patrick and Sabrina broke
the news to Emma that they
were getting married next week.
Felix soon arrived with a slew of
wedding dresses for Sabrina to
try on. Luke and Tracy marveled
over baby Connie while waiting
for the doctor. Carlos kept pres-
suring Sabrina for a reconcilia-
tion. Robert and Anna enacted
a plan to escape from Jerry. Silas
and Sam shared a passion-
ate kiss. Sonny broke down in
Olivia's arms. Wait to See: Robin
realizes it's Patrick and Sabrina's
wedding day. Robert, Anna and
Duke disappear. Franco threat-
ens to harm Heather.

THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Jack hired Hilary to help
him get even with Victor. Nikki
invited Dylan to a charity event
for Veterans Day. Abby feared
that Tyler was involved with his
ex again. Kevin grew frustrated
with how slow the investigation
into Delia's death was going.
Fen told Abby that he didn't
remember what happened the
night that Carmine died. Billy
found an online support group
for people who have lost a child.
Devon refused to be a spy for
Jack while working at Newman


Ichabod (Tom Mison) joins
forces with Abbie, Captain
Irving and Jenny Mills to
face the Headless Horseman
on "Sleepy Hollow," airing
Monday at 9 p.m. on FOX.

Beckett are worried for
the members of the 12th
precinct when they find a
murder victim that bears a
strong resemblance to Med-
ical Examiner Lanie Parish
and think that a cosmetic
surgeon from Manhattan
may be involved. (HD)

Enterprises. Nick felt uncom-
fortable when Dylan showed
up to the veterans' tribute with
Avery. Michael tried to negotiate
a reduced sentence for Fen. Paul
found a napkin with Lauren's
DNA on it at the scene of
Carmine's murder. Tyler planned
a romantic birthday surprise for
Abby. Adam turned the tables
on Victor after he accused Sha-
ron of being a bad parent. Wait
to See: Devon's new ally has a
hidden agenda. Nikki prepares
to tell her secret to her family.
Paul and Christine team up to
help Michael.







KIDS NEWS SPORTS


EVENING MONDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


ABC7 News @ABC World The7 Entertainment Dancing with the Stars (CC) (N) () [01)Castle: Disciple Castle and
ABC 7 11 7 6:00pmThe News with O'Clock Tonight (CC) (N) Beckett are worried for the de-
2_6 newsofthe Diane Sawyer News(N)(HD) (HD) tectivesofthe 12th precinct. (N)
_____ day. (N) (HD) __________(HD)
ABC NewsThelat- ABCWorld The List (IV) Ask America Dancing with the Stars (CC) (N) (HD) (:01)Castle: Disciple 12th pre-
28 est news. News (N) (HD) (%VG) n_______________cint may e atarget.(N)
ABC 7 7 7 10 7 7 ABC7 News at ABC World A Millionaire? A Millionaire? Dancing with the Stars (CC) (N) (HD) :01)Castle: Disciple 12th pre-
SM i 7 7 6(N) News(N) (CC)(N) (CC)(R) cinctmaybeatarget.(N)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of For-Jeopardy! (C) How I Met 2 BrokeGirls: Mike& Molly: Mom Bonnie Hostages: Loose Ends Duncar
CBS 1 10 10 1 6pm Local Newswith tune(CC)(N) (N)(HD) YourMother And The Pastry Sex and Death struggles. (CC) istoldtodealwithan insideraf-
CS 10 10 10 10 newsreport. Scott Pelley(NNH) ( Man meets his Porn(N)(HD) Funeralhome. (N)(NN) ter the conspiracy is nearlyex-
__ (N ) __ (141)) _______ w ife ____________ p o se d ._____
CBS News (N) (HD) Evening News News (N) (HD) Inside Edi- HowMet Broke Gir (N) Mike Molly (N) Mom Bonnie Hostages: Loose Ends In-
i] 213 213 ______ (N) (HD) tion(N) Mother (HD) (HD) (HD) struggles. sider. (CC) (N) (HD)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment The Voice: Live Top 10 Performances The coaches work The Blacklist: Anslo Garrick
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:00 News News Current 8at7:00 News; Tonight(CC)(N) to makesuretheirteam membersarechallengingthem- Thenewestmemberofthe
and weather. events. (N)(HD) weather; more. (HD) selves and pushing the boundaries in order to show a new blacklistsneaksontothe FBI
_____ ______ ____side to themselves. (CC) (N) (HD)) black site. (N)
NBC 2 2 2 News(N)(HD) NBCNightly Wheel of For- Jeopardy!(N) The Voice: Live Top 10 OPerformances The 10 Oremaining :01) TheBlacklist:Anslo
20] News (N) tune (N) (HD)) hopefuls prepare for another live performance. Garrick FBI infiltration. (N)
FOX 13 6:00 News News TMZ (CC) (N) omg! Insider Almost Human: Skin The Sleepy Hollow: Into Dark- FOX 1310:00 News Top sto-
FOX 13 13 13 13 13 eventsoftheday areexamined (CC) (N((H) world of Intimate Robot Com- ness The Headless Horse- riesofthenewsday areup-
1 Fr 3 1 3 and reported byhe FOX 13 panions is explored when a man's true motives. (CC) (N) dated bythe FOX 13 Nightly
____ News Team. (N) _________ ____ death arises. (N) (HN)) News Team. (N)
FOX FOX 4 News at Six Local Judge Judy Simpsons (R) Almost Human: Skin Intimate Sleepy Hollow: Into Darkness FOX 4 News at Ten Nightly
__ 444 news; weather. (N) (CC(HD) (HD)) Robots. (CC) (N) (HD)) True motives. (N) news report. (N)
PBS BBC World Business Re- The PBS NewsHour (CC) (N) Antiques Roadshow: Survi- Antiques Roadshow Jewelry Independent Lens: Indian Re-
S 3 3 3 News (CO) port(N) (HD) vors Urn; chess table. collection. (R) (HD) la Horseracing. (N)
S.20421 Sesame Street Unexpected CatinHat(R) Peg+Cat(CC JFK In Tampa: The 50th Travels (CC) (R) Journeys (N) Globe Trekker Qingping
im,0 6 guests. (CC) (R) (HD)) (HD)) (R) Anniversary (R) (HD) market. (CC) (N)
PBS 3 3 3 BBC World Business Re- The PBS NewsHour (CC) (N) Antiques Roadshow: Survi- Antiques Roadshow Jewelry Secrets of the Dead Reporting
[W News (CC) port(N) (HD)(N___) vors Urn; chess table. collection. (R) (HD)) on death. (R) (HN))
CW 6 21 6 Family Jays Family Model Big Bang (CC) Bigang (CC) Hart of Dixie: I Run to You Zoe Beauty and the Beast Vin- News @lOpm (N) (HD)
m__ brother, airplane. (HD[HI blames Wade. (N) cent's handler. (N) (HN)D
CW 9 9 9 Queens Dopey Queens (IWVPG) 21/2 Men (CC) 21/2 Men (CC) Hart of Dixie: I Run to You Zoe Beauty and the Beast Vin- Rules: Fun Rules Boring
MW l Doug. (HD)) (HD)) (HD)) blames Wade. (N) cent's handler. (N) (HD)) Run (HD) lives.
MYN 1 Raymond (CC) Seinfeld: The Family Feud Family Feud Law & Order: Special Victims Law &Order: Special Victims Cops Re- CopsRe-
F3 8 _1 ______14Jacket (WVPG) (IVPG) Unit: Competence Unit: Deception loaded (HD) loaded (HD)
MYN 8 Hollywood (N) Cleveland (CC) Family Peter Family: Airport Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order Special Victims
_- 8 9 8 (HD)) (HD)) converts. 07 Unit: Competence Unit: Deception Unit: Pique (HD))
I1 11 Family Jay's Family Model B Bang (CC) Big Bang (CC Law& Order: SpecialVictims Law & Order: Special Victims Office (CC) (HD) Office: Cafe
12 12 12 12 brother, airpane. (H_ (H Unit: Pique(HD) Unit: Parts (H) D_____ ____sco
ION 13 17 Criminal Minds: Identity Mur- Criminal Minds: Lucky Killer Criminal Minds: Penelope Criminal Minds: True Night Criminal Minds: Birthright Kill-
I0 2 3 2 derous duo. (CC) (HD) cannibal. (CC) (HD) Garciatargeted (HD) Comic Bk killer. (HD) ing spree. (CC)(HD)
WCLF 22 22 22 2 Christian Fit- Today Faith& ZolaLevitt(CC) Great Awaken Tour Love a Child Richard Rob- Gospel Truth Jewish Jewels Life Today
22 ness healing. (N) erts (CC) (CC) O(CC)
WRXY 22 M 10 Joyce Meyer Entertain- Marketplace Great Awaken Tour Stop Hurting Love a Child Joyce Meyer Place Mira- Prophecy in
AM4 (CC) ment Wisdom Oen(C's cles theNews
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s 23 23 23 95 5 Felipfn el naufrago. (CC) infantil. group to exact revenge on a ruthless Vegas kinginn. Robos rapids. (R) (C)
UNIV I 6 Noticias (CC) Noticiero Coraz6n indomable Amor Porque el amor manda Relato Lo que la vida me rob6 Mentir para vivir Oriana
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A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 gressive inmates. (R) Brothers; gangster. (R) gressive teens. (R) Deady encounter. (R) gravatedteen. (R)(HN))
AMC 56 56 56 56 5 (5:00) Hannibal ('01, Thriller) A disfigured doctor lures the fu-Angels & Demons ('09, Thriller) **%y2 Tom Hanks, Ewan McGregor. Experts in symbol-
AMC 56 56 56 3 3 "3 gitive Hannibal Lecter back to America. (CC) ism seek the link between a murder, terrorism and the Vatican. (PG-13) (CC)
I 44 44 44 44 6 To Be Announced Info un- Infested!: The Most Horrifying Monsters Inside Me: Dying Monsters Inside Me: Maggots Extreme Animal Obsessions:
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 available. Spiders and rats. (R) Abroad (CC) (R) (HD) are Eating Me (N) I Eat Roadkill (N)
T 3 3 3 0106 & Park Top10 videos selected by the Black Nativity The Perfect Holiday ('07)* Girl asks Santa Claus to aid Friday After Next ('02, Com-
16 & Pa viewers. (CTo) (N) (Hd) Special her in finding a husband for her divorced mother. edy) Moving out. (C(
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BRAVO 68 68 68 68 25 51 185 Kylehires SUR.(R) Supporting Lisa. (R) Beverly Hills Practices. Lonely Lakehouse. ami Attack. (N) (HD)
COM 666 6 12 (:58) South Prk Tosh.0 Pick-up (:59) Colbert (:29)Daily Futurama(IV14 Futurama(IV14 SouthPrk(R) SouthPrk(R) South Pirk(R) SouthPrk(R)
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 ()5 artist. Report Show(H[) (R) (R) (HD( (HD( (HD1) (HD1)
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43120 Fast N' Loud Classics re- Fast N' Loud Classics re- Fast N'Loud: Revved Up Hot Fast N'Loud Two junk cars. Pure Evel Reload (CC() (N) (HN)
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E! 46464646 7 196 Total Divas: Nurse Nikki Nikki E! News (N) (HD) E! Spec. (R) Keep Up with the With the Kardashians: Kylie's
E!46 46 46 46 I moves in with John. __________(HD) Kardashians Camping. (R) Sweet16 (R) (HD))
ES 82 82 82 8211811811 Burn Notice: Army of One Mi- Late Night with Jimmy Fallon psych Gifted school. (CC) (HD) psych: Rob-A-Bye Baby Top psych: Bounty Hunters Sus-
ESQh82 82 82 82 1111160 ael's hostages. Billy Crystal. (H) __________secret agents. (HD) ect is innocent. (HN))
EWIN 243 243 243 12 1187 Culture Jour- Beacons of DailyMassCelebrationofthe The Journey Home Call-in Evangeliza- HolyRosary TheWorldOverNewsfrom
EWTN \4 \4 4 8 nalism. Light Hoy Eucharist. (R) program. (TVG) tion (FI) around theworld. (CC)
FA 0 46199 Middle Social The Goonies ('85, Adventure) **** Sean stin. A group of playmates Beetlejuice ('88) An obnoxious family and a sleazy demon
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 worker. 1 tries to stop ruthless developers and finds a treasure map. (CC) make death a living hell for two ghosts. (CC)
FOOD 317 37 37 37 7 164 Diners: Euro- Diners: L.A. Guy's Grocery Games Sea- Diners (R) (HD) Diners: Gone Diners (R) (H() Diners Pig Diners, Diners (R) (HD)
FOOD37 37 37 37 7 entric() Eats (R) food dish. (R) Global nheadtacos. Drive-Ins (N)D
FX 51 51 51 51 5 49 53 Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa ('08) *** Ben Stiller. Rio ('11, Comedy) Karen Disher, Leslie Mann. Macaw's mundane lifestyle RioBird'sad-
FX_ 4 Homesick animals get stuck in savannah. (PG) (CC) is transformed by encounter with a free-spirited bird. (CC) venture.
GSN 179 179 179 179 17919 Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud
GSN 179(17 17 17 34 179184 I((IV (IVPG) (IVP) (IVPG) (IVPG) (IVP) (VPG) (IVPG)
iALL 5 5 17 73 O40 Holiday Engagement ('11)** A young woman hires an A Princess for Christmas ('11, Holiday) **1/2 Katie Matchmaker Santa (12, Holi-
__ALL 7 3 unemployedartistto pretendtobe her fiance. (CC) McGrath. A woman falls for a charming prince. day) Small town. (CC)
HIST 81 81 8i a81 65 18 The Bible: Beginnings Re-enactments of God's wrath on The Bible: Homeland Jericho battle; Samson weakened; Bible Secrets Revealed: The
HIST 8081 8oi 81 33 6 128 sin, Abraham's test, & Moses leading Israelites. David's victory stirs jealousy; temple built. (R) Promised Land (N)
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HSN 24 24 2424 51 19 151 As Seen On TV Italy Cameo by M+M Studio Barse Jewelry Studio Barse Jewelry As Seen On TV


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EVENING MONDAY


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TMC 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 Woman in sets out for her sister who has been taken bN
Black (12) a man who abducted her. (CC) (HD)


I ake I his Waltz (12, Urama) **-* Setn Hogen, Jungle Fever (9ai1, urama)
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IK 57 5 5 5 9 54 (5:30) Training Day ('01)***, A rookie police officer rides Law Abiding Citizen (09, Crime) JamieFoxx. A man intends to exact re- GTAcademy
SSK 1 57 7 7 with a training officer who makes his own rules. venge 10 ears after his wife and child are murdered. (R) (CC) (HD)
SYFY 6 6 6 253 M 180 (5:00) X2'03, Adventure)***The X-Men join Magneto Fright Night (11, Horror) **1 Anton Yelchin, Colin Farrell. A teen be- DriveAngry
toF 1 67 7'Z7 3 1I battle a government agent's genocidal plan. gins to suspect that his neighbor is actually a dangerous vampire. ('11) **
TBS 59 59T59 59 3262 2 Seinfeld: The Seinfeld: The Seinfeld:The Family (CC) Family (CC) Family Third Family: Big Bang (CC) Big Bang (CC) Big Bang (CC)
TBS 59 59 59 59 era Virg in Contest grade. Ocean's 3.5 (HD) (HD) (HD)
TM 65 65 65 65 169 230The Hard Way ('42) *** An ambitious woman goes to Gregory's Girl ('82) An awkward young boy goes on a se- The Elephant Man ('80) A
v TC___5 1_ 3 great lengths to make her talented sister a star. (CCO) ries of confusing dates with attractive women. man's deformity. (CC)
TIC 45 45 4545 5 71239 Toddlers and Tiaras Show- Extreme (CC) (R) Cheapskates: Long Island (36) Medium (NI Medium Long Island Medium: Bunny (:24) Medium (N)
i L 14 4 4 4 down. (CC) (R) (HD) (HD) Victoria Pool(N) (HD) Bonding trip. Love Baby rabbit. (N) (HD)
TNT 1 1 1 1 2 Castle: Pretty Dead Pageant Castle: Knockout Investigation Castle: Rise Castle's guilt; new Castle: Heroes & Villains Major Crimes: Backfire Deal
TNI 1 61 61 28 55 51 murder. (CC) (H) -leads to conspiracy. Captain in charge. -Masked vigilante. (HD) with a killer. (R) (HD)
TFAV 69 69 69A 69260 66 171 Bizarre Foods with Andrew Manv.Food: vFood:Phila- Bizarre Foods America Cab- Bizarre Foods America Mys- Bizarre Foods America Yak
TRAV 9 9 9 0 10 lZimmem: Texas (R) -Boulder delphia bage, great heart. (R) tery snails. (CC) (N) meat soup. (CC) (R)
TRUTY 63 63 63 63 50 30 13 World's Dumbest... Fire World's Dumbest... Karl World's Dumbest... Ward- Jokers: Art At- Impractical Jokers Public Impractical
V 3 3 3 3 eater; rocker. (R) Rove raps. (R) robe mishap. (R) tack(R) Jokers park. (R) Jokers
TVLND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Bonanza Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Raymond Raymond Friends Friends
USA 34 34 343422 52 50 NCIS: Kill Ari, Part 2 Ari taunts NCIS: Mind Games Serial WWE Monday Night Raw (N) (CC) (HD)
USA 3 34 3 3 Gibbs. (CC) (HD) killer. (CC) (HD)
WE 117 1171 17 i1 7 Will Grace (CC) Will Grace (CC) Will Grace (C) Will Grace (CC) CSl: Miami: Lost Son Team CS: Miami: Pro Per Rappers' CSI: Miami: Under the Influ-
SW I "(HD) (H1D) 1(HD) 1 N(H D)' member dies. (HD) war leads to gunfire. ence Stalker claims.
WGN 16 6 1 America's Funniest Home America's Funniest Home America's Funniest Home America's Funniest Home WGN News at Nine The head-
WN 16 16 19 41 11 Videos Reel comedy. Videos Reel comedy. Videos Reel comedy. Videos Reel comedy. line news. (N) (HD)
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Geico SportsNITE (HD) To Be Announced Program information is unavailable at this time. Talking Football
ESPN 29 29 29 29 158 O SrtsCenter Monday Night Countdown (N) (CC) (HD) (:25) Monday Night Football: New England Patriots at Carolina
ESPN(29 29 29 29 12 58 70 ((D __,_Panthers from Bank of America Stadium (live) (CC) (H1D)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 5 t Around the Interruption SportsCenter: from Bristol, SportsCenter Featured (N) NBA Coast to Coast (N) (HD)
ESPN230 30 30 30 6 59 74 Homr(HD) (CC) (HD) Conn. (N) (CC (HD) (HlD) ... .
cci 48 48 48 48 42 69 133 FOX Football Daily (N) (CCO <>) Colleg e Basketball: Vermont Catamounts at Monday Night Fights: Golden Boy Promotions: Sadam Ali
FS>1 48 48 48 48 42 6983 (HD) Providence college Friars (live) (CC) (HD) vs Jay Krupp (Replay) (C) (HD)
FSN 72 72 72 7 77 Hall Fame ShipShape College Basketball: The Citadel Bulldogs at Tennessee World Poker: WPT Grand Prix World Poker Tour: Borgata
*1 17 7 (14D) (TV (R) Volunfeers from Thompson-Boling Arena (live) de Paris Part 2 Poker p0e n-Part2
GOLF 49 49 49 49 5 6 304 Golf Central (N) (HD) The Golf Fix (N) (HD) Feherty: Ben Crenshaw (HD) Tin Cup ('96, Comedy) -k-,* A former golf pro decides to
GOLF 149 49 4 49 60 a04 __compefenorder to impress his rival's girlfriend.
NBCS 71 1 1 Pro Football NHL Live (N) NHL Hockey: Anaheim Ducks at Pittsburgh Penguins from CONSOL NHL Overtime NHL Top 10
71 71 71 54 61 90 Talk(N) Z Energy Center (live) (CC) (14D)
SUN 38 38 401 401 45 76 Ship Shape Florida < College Basketball: Southern Jaguars at Florida Fishing Flats Sport Fishing Sportsman Saltwater Exp.
SUN 8 8 401 401 TV (R) Fishing (HD) '' Gators from O'Connell Center (live) (HPD) (HD) A(HD) Adv. (HID) (HD)
NICK 25 25 2 2 2 4 9Sponge (CC) Sponge (CC) Sam & Cat (R) Awesome: Us Full Hse Best Full Hse(CC) Full HseArt Full Hse (CC) Full Hse Full House
C (R2 (R2 (HD) &Jan friend. cancelled. .Jesse'sfired. Preschool.
oN 88 1241 46 20 27 Adventure (R) Adventure (R) Adventure (N) Regular (N) Universe (N) MAD (N) King Charity Cleveland (CC) Bob's Bur- American
TOON80 80 12412 46 57oftball. (HD) aers: Topsy Dad! (HD)

CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Mad Money (CC) (N) The Kudlow Report (N) 60 Minutes (R) Greed A lottery winner. Car Chaser Car Chaser
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 100 Situation Crossfire (CC) Erin Burnett OutFront Be- Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan LIVE (CC) (N) Anderson Cooper 3600
CNMN 3 3 3 3 i8 38 i00Room (N) (N) yond the news. (N) Breaking news. (N) (HD) (IHD)Later(N)
SPN 1 1 1 1 1219 U.S. House of Representatives Issues in the House of Tonight from Washington First Ladies: Influence and Image: Lady Washington
CSPN 18 18 18 18 7 Representatives. (N) _____Public policy. (N) Bird Johnson (N) (N)
FNC 64 64 6464 48 71 SpecialReportwithBretBaiei On the Record with GretaVanThe O'Reilly Factor News The Kelly File News up- Hannity Conservative news.
FN M 8 7 11 The latest news. (N) Susteren (N) (HD) talk. (CC) (N) (lID) dates. (N) j(CC() (H)lD)
MSNB 83838383 185 40 103 PoliticsNation Rev. AI Hardballwith Chris Matthews All in with Chris Hayes Po- The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word with Lawrence
NB_ 8 8 83 8 8 Sharpton. (N) (1HD) Political issues. (N) litical panel. (N) (H1D) News and views. (N) O'Donnell (N) (HD)
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 News(N) News(N) Paid Paid SNN Evening Edition (N) Paid News (N) News (N) News (N)
CMIV 4 1 Reba Trading Reba (HD) Reba Kyra Reba Weather Hoot ('06, Comedy) Man plans to construct restaurant in lo- Cops Re- Cops Re-
SCMTV 47 47 47 47 23 aces drinking girl. cation of endangered owls' habitat. (PG) (HPD) loaded (HD) loaded (HD)
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 4 210 The Hook Up The Hook Up True Life Real-life stories of Teen Mom 3 Teens have Teen Mom 3 Teens have Teen Mom 3: Reunion Pt. 1
_young people. (CCO) kids. kids. (N)
H1 50 500 50 a 9 Love & Hip Hop: Stray Bullet Love & Hi Hop: Lez B Hon-Love & Hip Hop (CC) (N) (HD) & Mr. Jones (N) Black Ink Crew (CC) (N) (HD) Love & Hip
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 Reunited; label. (R) est (CC) (R) D) ___ (H14 ______D) Hop(R)
(5:50) Mars Attacks! ('96, Science Fiction) (:45) Ocean's Twelve ('04, Comedy) **%' The mastermind of a Las Ted (12) Mark
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 When Martians arrive the U.S. president Vegas casino robbery reconvenes his gang to pull off another huge heist in Wahlberg. Man'steddy bear
_____ believes that they come in peace. Europe after his previous victim demands his money back. threatens relationship. (R) (CC)
(4:50)The (:50) Seven '95, Thrller) **** Brad Pitt. Two detectives team up to A Night at the Roxbury ('98) ** Two L.A. Lingerie
CINE2 321 321 321 321321 321 422 Descendants track a serial killer who chooses each of his victims based on one of the party-scene wannabes gain access to the Business
_____ ('11) (CC) seven deadly sins and executes them accordingly. (R) (CCO) Icoolest nightclub in town. (CCO) investor. (0D)
Dog Blog: Austin: Livand Jessie (CC) (R) (07) Ratatouille ('07, Comedy) *** Patton Oswalt, Sir Wander Dogwith a
DISN 136136 136 136 99 45 250 TylerGetsa Presidents& Maddie:Brain-I(HD) lanHolm. A rat teams up with an inept, young chefto Yonder:The Blog
_____ Grillfriend Problems A-Rooney realize his culinary dreams. (6) (CC) Fugitives Competition. (R)
(5:40) The Amazing Spider-Man (12, Action)*** Rich Man Poor Man: Chapter Rich Man (50) Rich Man, Poor Man: Austin
ENC 150 150 150 150 150350 Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone. Peter Parker attains 1 After WW2, brotherstake PoorMan: Chapter 3 Tomisin Calif.;Julie Powers:
___ __superhuman abilities in the fight for good. (PG-13) (CC) opposite paths. Chapter 2 is in Y. (IVPG) Mystery (97)
(5:00)The (:45) This Is 40 (12, Comedy) **'2 Showcased is a comedic look inside Whoopi Goldberg Presents (:15) Mama (13, Horror) Jessica
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 Three Stooges the life of a not-so-average American family; Pete and Debbie are Moms Mabley Comic profiled. Chastain. A man takes in his
(12) ** approaching a significant milestone in their relationship. (CCO) (CC)(N)(HD) troubled nieces.
Joyful Noise The Return ('06, Thriller) ** A young Real Time with Bill Maher Boardwalk Empire: Havre de 24/7: Cloud Atlas
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Singing woman has terrifying visions that have been (TVMA) (CC) (HD) Grace Nuc takes inventory in Pacquiao/Rios Impact over
competition. haunting her for many years. (CC)O __)______his cellar. (H ) _) 02 (C) (HD) time. (R)
Backdraft ('91) Valentine Road (13) *** 2 All-encom- The Sopranos: Kaisha Phil The Sessions ('12, Drama) *** John (:45) HBO First
HBO3 304304304304 304404 Brothersfight passing look at death of eighth-grader who Leotardo is not pleased. (CC) Hawkes. A man in an iron lung decides he's LookBoy
_____ fire. was shot by fellow student. (NR) (CC) (DH) ready to lose his virginity. (R) (CO) trains.
(5:00) Stage Beauty ('04, Time of Death: Maria & Homeland: A Red Masters of Sex: Love and Homeland: A Red
SHOW 340 340340340 340 40365 Drama) An actress breaks Cheyenne(R) Wheelbarrow Carrie and Quinn Marriage Masters and Johson Wheelbarrow Carrie and Quinn
______ theatre precedents. (CCO) hunt for a terrorist. (R) (HD) film the study. (R) hunt for a terrorist. (R) (HD)







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ABC I 7 7 7 10 7 7 News Kimmel Nightline Paid ES.TV ABC World News Now (N) News News News
CBS M ll~1010 10 News Late Show Late Late ,Paid News Up tothe Minute (N) News News News
CBS M1 21321 5 5 5 News Late Show Late Late TMZ Inside Comics Minute News News News(N)
NBC[E 8 8 8 8 8 News Leno Fallon Last Call Today (N) Paid Extra Early News News News
NBC 20 2 2 2 News Leno Fallon Last Call Dr. Oz Money Early News News (N)
FOX I 131313 13 13 3 News Access Dish TMZ News Paid Alex Divorce Dish TMZ News News News(N)
FOX X 4 4 4 News Arsenio Raymond Raymond Office Office 30 Rock 30 Rock Patemrnity Divorce Alex News(N)
PBSC1 3 3 3 3 Exchange Exchange Rose (N) Antiques Yard (R) Masterpce. Masterpce. (R) (HD)
PBS 20120 16 Smiley Rose(N) Europe Trekker Travels Journeys Perform (R) Sousa Compass Yoga
PBS 3M 3 33 Rose(N) Smiley Crossroad Antiques Yard(R) Masterpce.____ Masterpce. (R) (H)
CW 4) 6216 21/2 Men 21/2Men How I Met How I Met Rules Rules Middle Middle Dish TMZ Harvey 70s 70s
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MYN 3C 11 11 11 14Seinfeld Cmmunit Raymond America OK! TV Bridezilla 70s 70s Paid Let's Ask Hidden Shepherd
MYN 7) 8 9 8 Seinfeld Seinfeld King King Dad Dad Sunny Sunny Til Death 'Til Death Paid Paid Shepherd
IND 3 121212 3B 12 Family Family Dad Dad Cleveland Payne Payne ThereYet ThereYet Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
IONA 2 2 13 26 1817 Criminal Criminal Without Without Paid Paid Inspiration Today
WLFI 22 22 22 2 Kingdom Awaken Awaken You and Me CVance 700 Club Youngren Hmekeep
iRVXY 2244 10 News Awaken Awaken You and Me Ren Gaither Exercise Fitness
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API 44 44 44 44 36 6813 Monsters Animal Monsters Infested! Monsters Monsters Animal
BET 35353535 40 2227 Friday ** Wendy Waiting to Exhale ('95) **1/2 (COC) BET Inspiration
BRAV 68 68 68 68 25 5118 Watch Housewives Vanderpump Housewives Watch Vanderpump Paid Paid Paid Paid
COM 66 66 66 66 15 271 Daily Colbert SouthPrk South Pik Daily Colbert Wrkholic Wrkholic Wrkholic Wrkholic Sunny Entourage Paid Paid
DISC 40 40 40 40 254312 Fast Loud Pure Evel Fast N Fast Loud Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
E! 46 46 46 46 27 261 C. Lately News (R) |C. Lately Drama C. Lately Kardashian E! Spec. Paid Paid Paid Paid
ESQ 82 82 82 821181181 Notice Notice Sex City Sex City Sex City Sex City Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
EWTN 24242412 17 28 Sacred |WomenGr Dail Mass Journey Faith Theology Sisters Wisdom Jesus GodWps Backstag Faces
FAM 5555555510461 700 Club Bel-Air Bel-Air-Air l-Air Bel-Air Paid Paid 700 Club Paid Paid Reign LifeToday
FOOD 37 37 37 37 7616 Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Private Paid Paid
FX 51515151 58 49 53 Rio Bird's adventure. Rescue Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
GSN 1791791717 3417 1 Fam.FeudFam.Feud Baggage Baggage Fam. Feud Fam. Feu Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Baggage Baggage Paid Paid Paid Paid
HALL 5 5 5 17 7324 Matchmaker It's Christmas ('12) Thanksgiving ('08) Wishing Tree ('12) **
HIST 81818181 33 65128 Big _Big (01) The Bible (R) Bible (R) B'ig Big Paid Civil War Paid
HOME 41414141 5342161 Love It Love It Hunters Hunters Love It Love It Paid Paid Paid Paid
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 4114 Double Double Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Duck Double Double Paid Paid Paid Paid
OWN 5858 58 58 4710 161 lyanla Fix lyanla Fix lyanla Fix Dateline Dateline Dateline Dateline
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 296354 Training Day ('01, Drama) Jail Jail Jail Jail Entourage Paid Paid Paid Paid
SYFY 67 67 67 67 2 6418 DriveAngry ** The Hitcher ('07) **1/2 Vegas Twilight Paid Paid Paid Paid
TBS 595959593262 52 Conan Holmes Conan Holmes Office This Is Spinal Tap Married Marrined Earl
TCM 65656565 1623 Elephant (:15) Brightness ('87) (:15) Film (CC) Repentance ('87, Drama)
TIC 45 45 45 45 57 7213 Medium Medium Medium Medium Medium Extreme Extreme Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
TNT 61616161 285551 CSI: NY CSI: NY Law (HD) Law (HD) Closer Southland S'ville
TRAV 6969 69 69 26 66171 Bartender Bizarre Bizarre Bartender Bizarre Paid Paid Paid Paid
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 3018 Dumbest Dumbest Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Dumbest Saloon Stings Paid
TVLND 6262626231 54 2 Queens Queens Queens Queens Raymond Raymond The Exes Cos Cos Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby
USA 34 34 34 34 225250 Covert NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS SVU (HD) SVU (HD)
WE 11111111 1114 CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami Paid Paid
WGN 1616 161941 11 9 How I Met Rules Rules Parks Parks 30 Rock 30 Rock Sunny Futurama Til Death Paid Paid Paid Paid
CSS 2828282849 70 Sports Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 Football SportsCenter NFL Prime. Sports Sports Sports Sports
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 659 74 Sports Olbermann NASCAR portsjNFL Films Coll. Ftbl (HD) Coll. Ftbl (Replay)
FS1 48484848426983 FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports FOX Sports
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Wrld Poker The Best Ext. Games Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
GOLF 4949494955 60 30 Tin Cup Golf Cntrl Tin Cup ('96, Comedy) **1/2 Fix Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Trucks CFL Football: Teams TBA Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
SUN 3B 3 40140145 57 76 Intothe Reel Fish Basketball (Replay) Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
CNBC 39393939 3710 Money 60 Minutes Car Chase Car Chase Paid Pad Paid Paid Worldwide Ex (N)
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 3810 Erin Burne P. Morgan 3600 (R) Anderson P. Morgan 3600 (R) Early (N)
CSPN 1818181837 1210 Capital Capital News Today Today in Washington_______ Today in Washington
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MSNBC 83838383185 4010 Hayes (R) Maddow O'Donnell Hardball Hayes (R) Maddow First Look Too Early
SNN 6 6 611 11 News News News Paid News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N) News (N)
CINE 320320 320 320042Ted ('12) Origins 02: Inside Out ('07) (:40) Shame (12) (CC) Pariah (11) **1/2
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ENC 1501501501 135 3 Powers Criminal Law ('89) Amazing Spider-Man ('12) The Crush ('93)
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SHOW 404340 365 Masters of Time of On the Road (12) (R) Deadfall (12) Sebastian (R)


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NOV. 18


ABCL2-1


INews


Kimmel


The Illusionist ('06)


Eraserhead


1(:40) Death ('08)


Kings


Jungle







TUESDAY
HIGHLIGHTS

Marvel's Agents of
S.H.I.E.L.D.
8 p.m. on ABC
"The Well" Following
Thor's latest adventure
and encounter with Earth,
Coulson and the Agents of
S.H.I.E.L.D. are making sure
to clean up the mess left
behind, but one particular
artifact threatens the life
of one of Coulson's agents.
(HD)

Dads
8 p.m. on FOX
"Dad Abuse" Eli and Warner
devise a scheme to break
their dads out of a foster
care home after the guilt of
accidentally springing an
investigation of elder abuse
nags at them; Crawford
drives a wedge between
Camila and Warner with his
childish habits. (HD)


Brooklyn Nine-Nine
8:30 p.m. on FOX
"Sal's Pizza" A determined
Jake intervenes in an
investigation involving the
burning down of Sal's Pizza,
where the owner is pinned
as the prime suspect, all
while chaos strikes the
precinct when a computer
virus exposes everyone's
browser history. (HD)

New Girl
9 p.m. on FOX
"Werewolf" While Coach
and CeCe go out on their
first date together, Jess is
left with the grueling task
of making sure that a hys-
terical Schmidt stays at the
loft; on a frantic search to
find Ferguson the cat, Nick
and Winston encounter a
frisky bus driver. (HD)

The Goldbergs
9:01 p.m. on ABC
"Stop Arguing and Start
Thanking" Murray is prepar-


TV DISH


rhe Muppets meet a new
Friend on "Lady Gaga and
rhe Muppets' Holiday
Spectacular," airing
-riday at 9:30 p.m. on
NBC. The 90-minute


special features perfor-
mances by Lady Gaga,
as well as Sir Elton John,
Joseph Gordon-Levitt and
RuPaul. The Muppets will
also sing several of Lady
3aga's hits.

Enjoy the Americana
music scene with
'Nashville 2.0" as its


shares performance
highlights from the
2013 Americana Music
Association Honors &
Awards, Friday at 9 p.m.
on PBS (check your local
listings). Rosanne Cash
is one of the featured
artists on the program
and her American music
roots run deep. "Part of
it is DNA, and going back
even before my father
(Johnny Cash) because
his grandfather was a
choir leader in a Baptist
church in Arkansas,"
says Cash. "And, before
that, we were Scottish
minstrels before we
even came to America.
So, I think the DNA
has kind of coalesced
over the centuries. But
also, it's what I grew
up around. Music was
currency in my family.
It was language. If you
didn't know how to say
how you felt in words,
you had songs to say
how you felt." The
special includes such
musical performances


ing for Marvin to arrive for
Thanksgiving and make it
difficult for the rest of the
family, despite Beverly's
suggestion to take it easy;
Murray is ready to take care
of Marvin until he arrives
with news that shocks Mur-
ray. (HD)
The Mindy Project
9:30 p.m. on FOX
"Mindy Lahiri Is a Rac-
ist" When Danny invites a
patient of his to write about
Schulman & Associates
after learning that she is a
mommy blogger, the situa-
tion gets out of hand after
she paints the practice in
a racist light, forcing the
team to bring in a PR guru.
(HD)
David Blaine:
Real or Magic
9:31 p.m. on ABC
David Blaine makes a return
to primetime television by
bringing viewers into the
homes of celebrities such
as Kanye West, Harrison

as Emmylou Harris and
Rodney Crowell, Shovels
& Rope, Kelly Willis and
Bruce Robison, Alabama
Shakes, Billy Bragg, The
Mavericks, The Milk
Carton Kids, Old Crow
Medicine Show, Holly
Williams, Dr. John, Duane
Eddy, John Fullbright,
Stephen Stills, Mumford
& Sons, Buddy Miller and
Jim Lauderdale.

Writer and naturalist Joe
Hutto is portrayed by
wildlife photographer
Jeff Palmer in this
film about the Hutto's
experience with raising
wild turkeys on "Nature:
My Life as a Turkey,"
airing Wednesday, Nov.
27, at 8 p.m. on PBS
(check local listings).
In the deep woods of
Florida, Hutto created
a turkey family with his
chicks. They became so
close that it was hard
for him to let them go
when it came time. Might
make you think twice
about putting that bird
on your table and then
again, maybe not. The
film originally aired in


Tuesday at 8 p.m. on NBC,
Danni Allen, the most recent
winner of "The Biggest
Loser," stops by the ranch
for lunch and a pep talk with
the contestants.

Ford, Will Smith and Olivia
Wilde while travelling the
world to astonish people
from all walks of life with
his magic. (HD)

2011 and has become a
Thanksgiving staple for
PBS.

Coming up on Thurs-
day, Nov. 28, PBS' "POV"
airs "Listening Is an Act
of Love: A StoryCorps
Special," at 9 p.m. (check
your local listings). This
is the first animated tele-
vision special from Sto-
ryCorps and celebrates
the transformative power
of listening. Six stories
were taken from Story-
Corps' 10 years of gath-
ering everyday people
to share their conversa-
tions with family and
friends. The oral histories
are shown just in time
for the National Day of
Listening, which is on
November 29, a holiday
created by StoryCorps
to record conversations
with loved ones on the
day after Thanksgiving.
Founder Dave Isay says
"you find wisdom and
poetry" in the words of
everyday people. Sounds
like a great family tradi-
tion to begin this holiday
season.







KIDS NEWS SPORTS


EVENING TUESDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


ABC7 News @ ABC World The 7 Entertainment Marvel's Agents of (01) The (31) David Blaine: Real or Magic David
ABC 7 11 7 6:0pmThe Newswith O'Clock Tonight (C) (N) S.H.I.E.L.D.: TheWellArti- Goldbergs Blainetravelstheworldtoshowoff his
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______ day. (N)(HD) ____________Agent. (CC) (N) (HD)) news. (N)________ _
ABC News The lat- ABC World The List (NG) Ask America Marvel's Agents of (01) Goldbergs (:31) David Blaine: Real or Magic David
28 est news. News (N) (H)) (1) S.H.I.E.L.D. Artifact danger. (N) Blaine brings magic to the world. (N)
ABC 7 7 7 10 7 ABC7 News at ABC World A Millionaire? A Millionaire? Marvel's Agents of (01) Goldbergs (:31) David Blaine: Real or Magic David
7707 7 6 (N) INews (N) (CC) (N) (C)R) SH.EL
M 6(N) News(N) (N) (((R) S.H.I.E.LD. Artifact danger. (N) Blaine brings magic tothe world. (N)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of For- Jeopardy! ((C) NCIS: Gut Check (CC() (N) (HD) NCIS: Los Angeles A team of (01) Person of Interest: The
CBS 10 10 10 10 6pm Local Newswith tune ((CC) (N) (N) (H)) special agents protect the coun- Crossing (C) (N) (HD)
10 news report. Scott Pelley (N) (HD) tryfrom national securitythreats.
______ (N) (HD) _____________(D)
CBS 231 5 News (N) (HD) Evening News News (N) (HD) Inside Edi- NCIS: Gut Check ((C) (N) (HD) NCIS: Los Angeles National (01) Person of Interest: The
N ______ (N)) HD) _____ tion (N) ____security. (C) (H Crossing (N) (H14)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment The Biggest Loser 15: Sec- The Voice: Live Eliminations Chicago Fire: No Regrets The
NBC 8 R R R 8at6:00 News News Current 8at7:00 News; Tonight (CC)(N) ond Chances Music; motiva-Votes reveal which two are sent firehouse hastheir limNs tested

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CW 9 9 9 4 Queens (VPG) Queens: Move 21/2 Men (C) 21/2 Men (C) iHeartRadio Album Release Supernatural: Bad Boys Rules ((C) (HD) Rules: Cats &
CW M D (H)) Doubt (HD) (HD) ((C() (N) (HD)) Dean's delinquency. (NW Dogs
MYN 11 1 Raymond ((C) Seinfeld ((C) Family Feud Family Feud Bones: Two Bodies inthe Lab Bones Underground world. Cops Re- Cops Re-
S1 1 4 (WVPG) (IVPG) Online dating. (HD) (TVPG) ((C) ()HD)) loaded (HD) loaded (HD)
MYN 8 9 8 Hollywood(N) Cleveland(CC(() FamilyWest FamilyLois Bones: Two Bodies in the Lab Bones Underground world. Law & Order: Special Victims
(9 (4)HD) 1(HD) accused, cheats. Online dating. (HD) ((C) (1HD) Unit Justified killer.
IND 12 1212 12 Family ((C) Family: The In-Big Bang ((C) Big Bang ((C) Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Office: Paper The Office Vol-
3 12 12 12 38 12 )HD) cident (HD) (H) Unit Justified killer. Unit: Goliath (HD Airplane leyball.
ION 2 2 1 11 Criminal Minds: The Crossing Criminal Minds: Tabula Rasa Criminal Minds: Magnum Criminal Minds: Broken Inac- Criminal Minds: Carbon Copy
IN 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Traveling stalker. Killer in coma. (HD) Opus Personal lss. fH) curate watches. (HD) Closing in. (CO (HD)
WCLF 22 2222 2 Christian Fit- Today Faith & Rhema Praise Great Awaken Tour Henry Babers, Richard Rob- Hannah ((C) Perry Stone Life Today
22 22 22 2 ness healing. (CC_) Sr. erts ((CC) (N) ((C)
WRXY 22 44 10 Joyce Meyer Savingthe In- Hannah ((C) Great Awaken Tour Connect Joyce Meyer Place Mira- Stakelbeckon
AM2 ((C) vestor ((C) cles Terror
TLF 323 95 5 El nifio quevino delmar Pequeios Gigantes Talento Cleaner ('08, Crimen) Un descontaminador de la escena China Strike Force ('00) Contra
50 23 2323 Felipin el naufrago. (CC) infantil. del crime elimina evidencia crucial. (R) (C (C ) )H) narcotrafico. (CC)
UNIV 15 15 15 6 Noticias (CC) Noticiero Coraz6n indomable Amor Porque el amor manda Relateo Lo que la vida me rob6 Mentir para vivir Oriana
A2 1 1 6 (N) Univisi6n (N) interesado.(C) |) de un amor. (HD) Boda sin amor. cambiasu identidad. (HD)
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(141)D) (141D) (1D) 1D)HD) (HD) )HD) )(HD) )H )1D)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Angels & Demons ('09) Experts in symbolism seek the link Ghost ('90) The spirit of a slain investment banker realizes that his girlfriend is in danger
_m__ \between a murder, terrorism and the atican. from the men who killed him, and enlists the aid of a phony medium.gr i e
10 To Be Announced Info un- Blue Planet: Seas of Life The Blue Planet: Seas of Life Life Great Barrier Reef An extraordinary natural wonder and its
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 available, planet's seas. (HD)) nearthe abyss. (HD) fascinating wildlife are presented. (O (R) (HHD)
BET 3 5 222107106 & Park Top music vid- Tyler Perry's I Can Do Bad All By Myself (09) '/2 Troubled lady raise Husbands ((C) Husbands: Husbands:
BET 3 3 3 3 40 22 270eos. (C) (N) (HD)) -niece and nephews, as immigrant urges her to make changes. (R) Outdated Outdated
Vanderpump Rules: Only the The Real Housewives of At- The Real Housewives of At- Shahs of Sunset Facing off. Shahs of Sunset Secrets
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 18 Lonely Lakehouse. lanta Homeless. (R) lanta Moving out. (R) (R) spilled. (N)
COM 66 66 66 66 15 7 SouthPark: Tosh.0 Bubb Colbert Repor (:29) Daily Wrkholic(R) Tosh.0 Brian Tosh.O Tosh.O ((CC) (R) Tosh.O ((CC) (N) Brickle (VMA)
O 6 6 190 Wing(R) Rubb. (R) (R) |Show(R) (HD)) Atene. Pedophiles. (R) (HD) (4HD) (N)
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 10 Moonshiners Tradition re- Moonshiners Tradition re- Moonshiners: Outlaws Cuts Moonshiners ((C) (N) (HD) Porter(CC))(N) Porter Limo;
DS40 40 40 40 4 10vealed. ((CC) ()HD)) vealed. ((C) (HD)) Legal shine; extras. __________________(___) extras.
E E! Entertainment Specials E! News (N) (HD) Total Divas: Nurse Nikki Nikki Tia & Tamera Talk show au- Giuliana & Bill 70th birthday
E!46 46 46 46 27 26 196 Larry Birkhead. (R) _______moves in with John. edition. (HD)) party. (HD)
S82 82 82 82 11811 Burn Notice: Dead to Rights Late Nig htwith Jimmy Fallon Women We Love: Women Risky Listing Agents argue. White Collar Brawlers: White
ESQ 82 82 82 82 11118160 ichael sheds guilt. Mariah rarey. (HD) We Love (N) (HD)) (N) (H) Collar Brawlers (N)
EWIN 243 243 243 12 17 25 Culture Jour- Dominican Daily Mass Celebration of the Mother Angelica Live Clas- Catalogue Holy Rosary Threshold of Hope Pope
EWN 24324324 12 1785 nalism. Sisters Hoy Eucharist. (R) sics Mother Angelica. (TYG) (1G) John Paul II.
FAI 55 5 5 55 10 46 199 Ravenswood: Believe Three Ravenswood Relative Ravenswood: Scared to Death Up ('09, Comedy) Ed Asner. An elderly widower flies his
F_ 5 5 5 5 0 4 hold seance. (R) (HD)) sought. (R) (HD)) Clue to end curse. house to South America to fulfill a lifelong dream.
FOOD 317 37 7 1 16164 Cutthroat Kitchen Shep- Chopped: Sunny Side Apps Chopped Bean casserole. (R) Chopped: Belly Dance! Tuna Chopped: Cloche Call
FOOD37 37 37 37 76 164 herd's pie. (R) Gummyfried eggs. (R) ()HD)) bell ;lamb. (R)(Hl) Gefilte fish. (N) (HD)
S51 51 5 5 5 4 5 How I Met 2 1/2 Men ((C) 21/2 Men ((C Hall Pass ('11, Comedy) **1/2 Owen Wilson. Husband allowed affair Sons of Anarch Trouble
FX 4) 4 (V14)(HD) (HD) (HD) tries luring women at bars with pals, causing trouble. (R) ((C) ()HD)) changing. ((C (N) (HD)
GSN 179 17179 1 79 3 119184 Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud The Chase (N) 1 vs. 100 Psychics and FamilyFeud FamilyFeud
GSN179 179 179 179 34 179 184 G G _G W_______,.. Mm punks. (TYG) (IVPG) (IVPG)
iALL 5 5 17 7 3240 Christmas with Holly (12) Coffee shop owner Mark con- Pete's Christmas (13) A 14-year-old's grandfather arrives The Thanksgiving House
HALL 7 tinues to run into Maggie, who just came to town. for the holiday season, and it goes wrong. ((CC) Plymouth residence.
HIST 81 81 81 81 3 65 128 Modern Marvels: Wood Built Pawn Stars (R) Pawn Stars (R) Cars Icon's Counting: Counting: Van Cars Direc- Top Gear ((C) (N) (HD)
HIT 8 8 8 6 civilization. (R) (HD) (HD) 4(HD) classic. (R) Soap Box Haulin tor-rocker.
HOME 41 41 1 41 5 2 12 Property (CC) (R) Property ((CC) (R) Hunters ((CC) (R) Hunters ((CC) (R) Property ((CC) (R) Property (CC) (R) Income Property Downsizing House International
HOME41 41 4D 41 4 1)) )HD) (HD) (HD) (1HD) home. ((((N)(HD) Hunters (N) (R)(HD)
HSN 24 2424 24 51 19 151 Carmen: 1st Anniversary Rara Avis by Iris Apfel Soft and Cozy Cozy Chic A by Adrienne Faux fur.
Chasing Nashville Open mic Abby's Ultimate Dance Comn- Abby's Ultimate Dance Sabo-Abby's UltimateDanceCompetition: MeetAbby's
22 LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 night.(R)(HD) ipetiton Diva theme. tageconsidered. (R) Newest Ultimate Dancer Final routines. ((C) (N) (HD)







KIDS NEWS SPORTS


EVENING TUESDAY


SPECIALS MOVIES


Fanrenneit 9/11 (o4, Uocumentarv) *** Michael (:05) Knife ignt ('12, Urama)
Moore, Dan Briody. View on how George Bush used the *12 A political strategist's job
9/11 attack to push his agenda for wars. (R) (CC) (HO) getstough. (R) (CC)


Man on a spy Kids: All the Time in the world ( 11)
TMC 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 Ledge Suicidal *2 Jessica Alba. A retired spy returns to
man. the field. (PG) (CC) (HO)


i,', l 4n I


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57 57 57cult illusion. (R) 5Gymnastics. (R) tate Shag (R) Torture Escap of Illusions (N)
SYFY 67 6 1 61 253 6 180 (4:30) Fright Night (11, Horror) Face Off: Swan Song Sorcerer Face Off: Naked and Painted Face Off Judges' picks. (CC) Naked Vegas Body painting.
7 7 7 5 180 Vampire neighbor. and aswan. (R)(HP) Body painting. (R) (N) (HP)
TBS 59 595 59 T Seinfeld: The Seinfeld: The Seinfeld: The Family: Family Big Bang (CC) Big Bang (CC) Big Bang (C) Big Bang (C) Big Bang (C) Trust Me (N)
TBS 59 59 59 59 Ar Pick Visa Gay (HO) (HO) (H) (HO) (HO)
TOM 6 65 169 230 Goodbye, My Fancy ('51) ***A congresswoman revis- The Maltese Falcon ('41) A detective becomes involved in Mildred Pierce (45) Joan
M 65 65 65 its her college in the hopes of a lovers' reunion. (NR) a desperate search for a priceless statue. (CC) Crawford. A love triangle.
TIC 45454 54551 9 Toddlers and Tiaras Shore LI Medium (R) Long Island Little People, Big World: Little People, Big World: For- Treehouse Masters Dream
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TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Murdering Thief. (HO) murder. (CC) (HO) hostage. (Ct (HO) tcCity murder (HO) ters Married couple.
TRAV 69 69 69 L6926 10 Bizarre Foods with Andrew v Food: San v Food: Sacra- Bizarre Foods America: San Baggage (CC) Baggage (CC) Gem Hunt Rarest sapphires.
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Fod in Seoul. (R) Diego(R) mento Diego San Diego. (R) N (R) (CC) (N)
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CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Mad Money (CC) (N) he Kudlow Report (N) Greed (R) CarChase CarChase Car Chase Car Chase
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 3 100 Situation Crossfire (CC) Erin Burnett OutFront Be- Anderson Cooper 360o Piers Morgan LIVE (CC) (N) Anderson Cooper 3600
NMN 3 3 3 3 8 3 100Room (N) (N) yond the news. (N) Breaking news. (N) (H) (H) Later (N)_________
CPN 18 18 18 18 3 U.S. House of Representatives Issues in the House of Tonight from Washington Unedited and uninterrupted Tonight from Washington
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 Representatives. (N) IssnhH eo coverage of the day's top public policy events. (N) Public policy. (N)
FNC; 64646644 Special Reportwith Bret Baiei On the Record with GretaVanThe O'Reilly FactorNews The Kelly File News up- Hannity Conservative news.
64 64 64 48 71 118 The latest news. (N) Susteren (N) (HO) talk. (CC) (N) (iH)) dates. (N) (CC) (N) (H)
MSNB 83838383 185 40 103 PoliticsNation Rev. Al Hardballwith Chris Matthews All in with Chris Hayes Po- The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word with Lawrence
MSNB 83 83 83 8 185 40 10Sharpton. (N) (HI)ii Political issues. (N) litical panel. (N) (HI)ii News and views. (N) O'Donnell (N) (HP)
SNN 6 6 6 11 11 News(N) News(N) Medical Paid SNN Evening Edition (N) Paid News (N) News (N) News (N)
CMI 41 44 4 2 RebaBrockin Reba(HP) Reba(HO) Reba(HO) Die Hard (88, Action) ***% Bruce Willis, Alan Rickman. A New York cop battles a
CTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 garage. r- Igang of ruthless terrorists in a high-rise building. (R) (HO)
MT 3 33 33 35 2 The Hook Up The Hook Up Teen Mom 3: Reunion Pt. 1 Teen Mom 3: Reunion Pt. 2 Snooki andJWowwJersey Snooki& Awkward. (N)
MTV 3 333 5410T(R) (R) Shore girls. (HO) JWoww (N) (HO)
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__VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217(R) events. (TV14) (R) (1(H) edy)Memorial chaos.
Big Momma's House 2 ('06) An FBI (:45) Tombstone (93, Western) *** The three Earp brothers and Doc Me, Myself & Irene ('00) ,**%
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 agent repeats his disguise as "Big Momma" Holliday move to an Arizona mining town only to find that the place is under Schizophrenic trooper escorts a
_____ to work undercover as a nanny. (CC) the control of a gang led by the Clanton brothers. (CCO) suspect. (CC)
(5:15) Meet the Fockers ('04, (:15) AVP: Alien vs. Predator ('04, Science Fiction) ** Strike Back (:50) Con Air ('97, Action) Nicolas Cage. An
CINE2 321 321 321 321321 321 422 Comedy) Fockers in-laws Sanaa Lathan, Raoul Bova. Two deadly alien races renew Origins(CC)(HO) airplane transporting dangerous criminals is
_____ meets his parents. la centuries-old battle in Antarctica. (CC) (HOi) hijacked by the inmates. (CC)
Good Luck PJ Jessie Chess Austin & Ally: Jessie Liv: Dodge- Jessie (CC) (R) A.N.T. Farm: Good Luck: Shake It Up!: Good Luck
DISN 136136136136 99 45 250 the investigator, contest. (CC) (R) Sports& Homework A-Rooney(R) (HO) finANTialcrisis Bob's Beau- Remember Me Charlie Lost
(HO)) iSprains wager. (R) (HO) (HO)) i(R) Be-Gone (R) earring.
(10) Men in Black III (12, Science Fiction) *** Will Rich Man, Rich Man, Poor Man: Chapter (:45) Rush Hour ('98, Action) A Hong Kong
ENC 150150150150 150350 Smith, Tommy Lee Jones. In an alternative timeline, an Poor Man: 5 Tom has Theresa, son & detective and LAPD cop search for a
a_____ lien criminal assassinates Agent K in 1969. (CCO) Chapter 4 fighting career. diplomat's kidnapped daughter. (CC)
Thunder- 24/7: Real Time with Bill Maher Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth ('13) Eastbound & Real Sports with Bryant
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 struck** Pacquiao/Rios (TVMA) (CC) (R) (HO) Former boxer Mike Tyson discusses the Down: Chapter Gumbel (N) (CC) (HO)
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5:00) The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (12, Fantasy) Moonrise Kingdom (12, Drama) A young The Making of Real Time with Bill Maher
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Martin Freeman. Bilbo Baggins joins a quest to reclaim a boy and girl run away from their New ...: Promised (TVMA) (CC) (HO)
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(55) Argo ('12) A CIA specialist forms a plan to rescue six Boardwalk Empire: Havre de The Sopranos: Soprano Home Mr. & Mrs. Smith ('05, Action)
HBO3 304304 304304 304 404 Americans from their haven in the Canadian ambassador's Grace Nucky takes inventory in Moves Weekend getaway. Married couple hired to kill each
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SHOW 340 340 340 34 340 340 365 career criminal that holds her hostage during a prison Richard Jenkins. A man working for the Mob investigates a Marriage Masters and Johson
____ break, but later helps the FBI track him down. (C C) robbery committed against them. (R) (CC) (HIi) filmthe study. (R)







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WEDNESDAY
HIGHLIGHTS

The Middle
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