Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00114

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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Full Text

Deadline nearing, GOP seeks health care delay PAGE 1






Charlotte SunM


Deal of the Day
2009 Toyota Corolla,
67K--$9,850


HOPES HANG ON GAME 162
After the latest loss, the Rays need a win for a chance at
postseason play. SPORTS PAGE 1


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


BARGAIN HUNTING WISELY
For many consumers, shopping has turned into a sport.
This and more inside today's Flair.


www.sunnewspapers.net


Efforts 'scrap' metal thieves


CCSO: Related crimes down 46 percent so far this year


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
Last year, Punta Gorda
resident Kyle Anderson,
38, had some patio furni-
ture stolen from him and
sold to a local scrapyard.
The Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office handled a
total of 186 cases related
to scrap crimes from
Jan. 1 to the middle of
September in 2012, and


the scrapping business
continues to see criminal
activity today.
In early September,
a teen allegedly stole
several items from his
mother to scrap for drug
money. In August, a
couple reportedly took a
Charlotte Sun newspaper
machine and tried to
sell it to a scrap yard for
some extra cash.
Despite such cases


continuing to pile up
at the Sheriff's Office,
Allied Recycling manager
Mac Adamson who
has a scrapyard in Port
Charlotte says crime
appears to be on the
decline.
"We in Florida have
some of the strictest laws
going toward protecting
the business," he said.
New legislation took
effect in July to help


combat one of the most
common crimes in the
state.
"I think as far as steal-
ing and scrapping crimes
goes, the numbers have
actually gone down,"
Adamson said.
His thinking is right.
Local scrap-related
crimes are down about
46 percent compared
with last year, according
to the CCSO. From


Jan. 1 to the middle of
September, there had
been only 101 such cases
this year.
"That has a lot to do, I
think, with the new laws
that have been put in
place," said Matt Wagner,
a CCSO detective special-
izing in scrap and pawn
crimes.
For example, scrappers
now are required to
be paid by check as


opposed to cash for
things like manhole
covers, air-conditioning
units and government
signs, thus leaving a
paper trail.
"Plus, one of the new
laws is scrapperss) have
to have a U.S. govern-
ment-issued identifica-
tion card," Wagner said.
"Before, (scrap yards)
SCRAP 17


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
ON CHARLOTTE
HARBOR Bolstered
by this week's thrill-
ing, come-from-be-
hind victory by Oracle
Team USA to defend
its America's Cup
trophy, young sailors
took to Charlotte
Harbor Saturday
hoping for a stirring
win of their own at the
inaugural YMCA Youth
Regatta.
And the parallels
don't end there. It took
tremendous knowl-
edge of sailing and
increasing confidence
for the Oracle crew to
win an unprecedented
eight straight races
to earn the Cup. In
their own regatta from
the Bayfront Center
YMCA, seven young-
sters who were charter
members of the YMCA SUN PHOTO BY BRIAN GLEASON
youth sailing program Vincent Alforgne, at right, leads Cooper Whitten, center, and Keely Agnini across the starting line during the
YOUTH 114 inaugural YMCA Youth Regatta Saturday on Charlotte Harbor.


Assembly



to discuss


ales tax


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER
For months, Charlotte County admin-
istration officials have been working
behind the scenes to launch a countywide
campaign meant to gather buy-in for a
local sales-tax extension officials plan to
bring before voters next year.
Staff decided to kick off discussions on
the Infrastructure Sales Surtax, also known
as the "penny sales tax," next month
during the two-day Charlotte Assembly,
which generated spirited debate among
Steering Committee members who ques-
tioned whether the assembly even should
be discussing sales-tax issues, lest it be
seen as an endorsement of the tax.
The idea for posing the question at
the assembly, county officials said, is to
gather feedback from the 125 assembly
members, who represent a cross section
of the community, on the kinds of projects
they would like to see funded, should an
extension be approved.
After much consideration, the Steering
Committee last week decided it's a con-
versation that needs to be had by all and


Symphony,



maestro set major



education initiative


By BILL JONES
SUN CORRESPONDENT
When Raffaele Ponti was selected
last year to become the new maestro
and music conductor of the Charlotte
Symphony Orchestra, he said one of
his passions was to take the appre-
ciation of classical music into the
schools.
Beyond raising the orchestra's
concerts to a new artistic level, he
said, his major objective was to create
an "educational blanket ... to enrich
students' lives with great orchestral
music." The best place to begin, he
said then, was with young lives. Now,
with the third grade.
Ken Barber, new CSO chairman,
announced last week that Ponti and
the orchestra will begin an education
initiative in November.


Ponti will teach music and art seg-
ments to third-graders in 10 elemen-
tary schools prior to the orchestra's
five 2013-2014 concerts.
The orchestra will invite young
musicians from the schools to sit
side-by-side onstage with CSO musi-
cians during rehearsals before each
concert, allowing students to see and
feel up close what classical music and
its musicians are all about.
The orchestra will perform two
Young People Concerts in May, with
a full orchestra, at the Charlotte
Performing Arts Center in Punta
Gorda, free of charge for students.
The concerts will include an "instru-
ment petting zoo," where orchestra
members will familiarize students
with instruments, instruct them how

MAESTRO 114


By AL HEMINGWAY
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PUNTA GORDA "Hi, my name
is James, and I am an alcoholic
and (an) addict. Alcohol and drugs
destroyed my family, my career,
and my health. I loved only James.
I had low self-esteem; I was grandi-
ose and selfish. I snorted up half of
Peru but I don't do those things
anymore. If you are standing here
today, and you are clean, then you
are blessed."
James was one of half-dozen
recovering addicts and alcoholics
who bravely stood on the stage
Friday evening at Laishley Park,
in front of more than 200 people,
to tell their powerful stories and
deliver hope to those struggling
with alcohol or drugs.
The Recovery Vigil, now in
its fifth year, was sponsored by
Charlotte Behavioral Health Care.
LIFESAVING 17


SUN PHOTO BY SUE PAQUIN
Summer Rose Ferrer, 2, accompanied her grandfather,
Dan Thomas, to the Recovery Vigil Friday evening
at Laishley Park in Punta Gorda. Led by Charlotte
Behavioral Health Care, the event held to raise
awareness for people in need of treatment and
support services for mental and/or substance use
disorders drew a crowd of more than 200.


INDEX I THE SUN: Police Beat 41 Obituaries 5 Viewpoint 81 Opinion 9-101 THE WIRE: Nation 2-3,61 State 3,51 Travel 6 World 7-10| Weather 101 SPORTS: Lotto 2 CLASIFIED: Puzzles 16-181 Dear Abby 17 | TV Listings 19


Sunday Edition $2.00 ,*****;.
7IIl 71 3lll -High Low


7 05252 00075 3 Isolated afternoon rain


:F"-" Look inside for valuable coupons --"--:
I SUN U O This year's savings todate... |:
VASUN COUPON $12585o
l VALUE METER l,58O5 i:
.L .. ................ ...... ... ... ;


CALL US AT
941-206-1000


CHARLIE SAYS...
Wonder if they could put
one of those jetpacks on a
swamp buggy?


S-UN


VOL. 121 NO. 272


SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 29, 2013


$2.00


'We are in the


lifesaving business


---I











Kiwanis thank 'angels; friends for shoes


Christy Smith calls
them her "angels."
They're the peo-
ple at our schools who
hand out shoes each year
to kids who need them.
Every school in
Charlotte County gets
hundreds of pairs of
brand-new shoes, thanks
to Christy's Sunrise
Kiwanis Shoes for Kids
program. And thanks to
the dozens of businesses,
churches and clubs that
collect the shoes each
year. And thanks to the
thousands of individual
donors who buy the
shoes or donate money.
Christy took some time
Thursday to give her
thanks to them all and
let the "angels" tell their
stories.
Marcia Louden, princi-
pal of L.A. Ainger Middle
School in RotondaWest,
told of a "big lug" of a
boy who was walking
around on the backs of
size-10 shoes with his
size-13 feet sticking out
the back.
"We took him into the
shoe closet and got him
a pair that fit," she said.
"He cried. He said it
was the first pair of new
shoes he had ever had."
In all, Shoes for Kids
collected 5,036 pairs this
year, 80 percent of which
went to elementary
school kids who needed
them.
"We have so many
families who are in a
lot of trouble," said
Barbara Holt of Kingsway
Elementary School in
Port Charlotte. "This is
such a blessing. It's one
less burden that the
family doesn't have to
worry about."
Debbie Whitten, a
nurse at Sallie Jones
Elementary School in
Punta Gorda, explained
that on open house night
at the beginning of the
year, the school opens


Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $16.47
3 Months.... ............... 66.51
6 Months.......................... 113.05
1 Year ............................... 197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ...................... $16.40
3 Months....................... $74.09
6 Months ................... $119.54
1 Year......................... $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates as
follows (advance payment required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
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newspapers for classroom use.

Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5p.m.
Monday Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204.You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


SHOES FOR KIDS
Shoe Trophy Awards:
About Hair Salon, Burnt Store
Presbyterian Church, Charlotte
State Bank and Trust, Charlotte
Harbor Parrot Head Club,
Englewood United Methodist
Church, First Presbyterian
Church of Port Charlotte, Nav-A-
Gator, Port Charlotte United
Methodist Church, Riverwood
BOA 155 & 156, Sacred Heart
Catholic Church, St. Francis of
Assisi Catholic Church, Vivante
on Charlotte Harbor, Walmart
of Murdock, Walmart of Kings
Highway, Walmart Distribution
Center and Peace River Medical
Center Auxiliary.
Spirit Awards: Calusa
National Bank, Coldwell Banker
Sunstar-Morris Realty, Deep
Creek Community Church, Flash
Custom Metal Roofing, H2U
of Fawcett Memorial Hospital,
Church of the Good Shepherd,
Kays-Ponger & Uselton Funeral
Homes and Cremation Services,
Port Charlotte Women of the
Moose, Ocean Partners Real
Estate and Temple Shalom.

up a "shoe store," and
middle and high school
students mostly for-
mer Sallie Jones students
- help pass out shoes to
the smaller children who
need them.
Grace Shepard said a
similar giveaway at Neil
Armstrong Elementary
School in Port Charlotte
has parents lining up
around the building.
"What kids wear on
their feet is a really,
really big deal," said
DougWhittaker, super-
intendent of Charlotte
County Public Schools.


* TODAY

Post 103 Cafe, Breakfast
7-11 Thu-Sun. Public welcome. Best
sausage & gravy this side of the
bridge! 2101 Taylor Rd., 639-6337
Post 103 Marketplace,
Stop by for great selection & price
of fruits, vegs, plants, crafts & more!
7am-2pm @2101 Taylor Rd., PG,
639-6337
Farmers Market, History
Park Farmers Market open every
Sunday 9am-1pm, 501 Shreve St.,
between Virginia Ave. & Henry St.
941-380-6814
Deep Creek Elks, Lunch


SUN PHOTOS BY CHRIS PORTER
The Shoe Trophy Awards went to businesses, groups, churches and clubs that collected more than 100 pairs of new shoes for the
2013 Shoes for Kids project.


Becky Buhatcher, a nurse at Murdock Middle School, tells
about a child with the sad-looking shoes who perked up
and skipped around when he got a new pair, courtesy of
Shoes for Kids.


"Maybe not so much in
elementary school, but
when they get to about
fifth grade and into
middle school, it's almost
like if they're wearing
dilapidated shoes, it is
reflected in the way they
feel about themselves.
"Thank you for
what you do. It's really
helpful."
Christy Smith made sure
to thank the people who
helped to make it happen,
including the 150 volun-
teers. She also thanked
musician Jim Morris,
who took up the cause in
the beginning; and the
Nav-A-Gator, Riverwood
andVivante on Charlotte


Harbor, all of which had
events that brought in
$10,000 to get this year's
campaign kicked off.
Started nine years
ago, Shoes for Kids has


collected 38,000 pairs of
shoes, and $572,155 in
money to buy shoes.
Chris Porter is executive
editor of the Sun
Newspapers. He writes a


Susan Flores of
Punta Gorda
C. Middle School
told how this
week's wet
-is weather and
the fact that a
lot of middle-
schoolers walk
to school-
and caused several
of her students
to seek out new
shoes.



Christy Smith, left,
founder of Shoes for
Kids, and Kiwanis
S president Patty Kuhar,
right, hand awards
to corporate sponsors
Waste Management,
represented by Todd
Peres and Chuck Greus;
and Clear Channel,
represented by Charlie
Shoe. Gulfcoast
Engraving and the Sun
Newspapers are also
corporate sponsors.

column about good ideas
and nonprofits. If you
have a good idea for this
column, email him at
porter@sun-herald.com,
or call 941-206-1134.


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Featured

Event
Charlotte County
Browns-Backers,
Cleveland Browns fans, join
us on Sunday's at Emil's Deep
Creek Bar & Grill. Watch the
games with us on their giant
TV screens.

Cultural Center, 2280 Aaron St. $5,
7-10pm. Cash bar, live entertainment.
Band info at theculturalcenter.com
625-4175

* TUESDAY

Men's Club, Gulf Cove
Methodist Men meet 1st & 3rd
Tuesday at 8am, Stefano's Restaurant,
401 S Indiana, Englewood. 697-8373


12-?, Sausage Peppers and Onions,
Reubens and more. Come watch your
favorite NFL team
Punta Gorda Elks, Bar
open at 12, Wings & Rings 2-5, Music
by Lee James @ 25538 Shore Dr., PG,
637-2606, mmbrs & their gsts
Pinochle, Cultural Center,
2280 Aaron St. 12:30-3:30pm $1.50.
Cultural Center MembersPLUS free.
Everyone welcome. 625-4175
Garden Tours, Guided tour
of gardens at History Park, 501 Shreve
St., PG, 1pm, $5 suggested donation;
Q&A 380-6814.
Bowling Tournament,
Bowl for $25 per person, 4-8pm at


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event,"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title; as that will be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


Bowland in Port Charlotte. Includes
pizza and pitcher. Call 764-0053 to
register.

* MONDAY

Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Lunch With Amy 11-2:30, Cornhole @
6pm, Pizza 5-7 Only
Port Charlotte Elks,
11-9, 20225 Kenilworth Blvd., PC,
941-625-7571, Lunch w/Shirley 11-2,
Stark Family Cookin'2:30-6, Bring your
Friends
Punta Gorda Elks, Lite
Lunch 11-2, Chicken Nite 4:30-8,
Karaoke 6:30-9:30 @ 25538 Shore Dr.,


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


PG, 637-2606 mmbrs & their gsts
American Legion 103,
Vet appr day 12-3pm, 2101 Taylor Rd.,
639-6337
Fun with Music, 1-3pm,
Cultural Center, 2280 Aaron St. Come
dance with friends to live music.
Musicians always welcome. $1.
625-4175
FLAC Poetry Reading,
Joseph Millar of the Florida Writers
Circuit, 5:30-7:30 pm, Edison College,
0-117, 26300 Airport Rd., PG.
637-3514
Am Legion Post 110, Bar
Bingo. Starts at 6 pm. Enjoy breakfast,
lunch, or dinner at the Familia
Restaurant. Great pizza.
Pinochle, Cultural Center,
2280 Aaron St. 6-8pm, $1.50. Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free. Everyone
welcome. 625-4175
Monday Night Dance,


SUN NEWSPAPERS R
-- Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation
Chairman ............................... Derek Dunn-Rankin.................. 941-206-1001
Publisher................................ David Dunn-Rankin.................. 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ..................... Chris Porter .............................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director............... Leslee Peth............................... 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................ Mark Yero................................. 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor...................... Susan E. Hoffman..................... 863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager..........Joe Gallimore ........................... 863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor............... Rusty Pray................................ 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar........................... 941-429-3003
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .......................... 941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ......................... 941-681-3000


CONTACT US WITH YOUR NEWS: Email Charlotte Sun Editor Rusty Pray at rpray@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1168, or email Deputy Charlotte Editor Garry Overbey at overbey@
sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1143. Fax to 941-629-2085. On Saturdays, contact Assistant Charlotte Editor Marion Putman at mputman@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1183, or the
newsroom at 941-206-1100. On Sundays, contact Garry Overbey or call the newsroom. Circulation director MarkYero, 941-206-1317. Business news email business@sun-herald.com or
call 941-206-1121. Consumer advocacy email dmorris@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1114. Obituaries call 941-206-1028 or email obituaries@sunletter.com. Religion/ church news or
events mputman@sun-herald.com. Editorial letters email letters@sun-herald.com or write: Letter to the Editor, c/o Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. Puzzles -
941-206-1128. Classified ads 866-463-1638. Subscriptions For missed papers, or to put your paper on hold, call 941-206-1300. Display advertising 941-206-1214


Thomas Quigley, M.D.
Board Certified Eye Physician & Surgeon
20600 VETERANS BLVD.
PORT CHARLOTTE
941-766-7474
2529 TAMIAMI TRAIL 330 NORTH BREVARD
PUNTA GORDA (NEXT TO FARM CREDIT), ARCADIA
941-639-2020 863-993-2020
www.doctorquigley.com


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The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN,23170Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida33980-2100.


SUBSCRIPTIONS I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


OurTown Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


;I
L





:The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 3


I BIRTHDAYS


Happy 16th birthday to Hunter
Pressley on his special day
Sept. 30.
P --iJJ^^^ JI~tfi .. ... m .- *v. -~^


Happy 93rd birthday to Shirley
Ryder on her special day
Sept. 29.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF


'Side by Side'
coming to CHS
More than 200 students will
be featured when Charlotte
High School's Performing Arts
Department presents "Side by Side"
Friday at the Charlotte Performing
Arts Center, 701 Carmalita St. (next
to CHS), Punta Gorda. Drama
students will showcase their






FLORIDA


theatrical performance pieces for
upcoming district theater compe-
tition, alongside all school choirs,
including the performance choir
Charisma. In addition, the night
festival also will feature the CHS
Silver King Jazz Band. Performances
will begin at 7 p.m. For the $10 price
of admission, ticket holders will be
treated to dessert and a beverage in
the black box theater and sidewalk


caf6. Children younger than 5 get
free admission only. Additional
concessions also will be available.
The Performing Arts Department
plays host to the event each year
to raise money to fund the annual
school musical. Tickets may be pur-
chased in advance at www.thecpac.
net, or by calling the Box Office at
941-505-SHOW (7469). Box office
hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


NGo tb, Pourt: eamrk & Rie.at.,

Get Out. Get Active.


Play for Lifel


Happy 14th birthday to Hope and Amanda Cahusac on their
special day Sept. 30.

CONTACT FOR
BIRTHDAYS
Each week in Sunday's Charlotte Sun,
we run free birthday announcements
r along with a photo. Email your .jpg
photo of the birthday boy or girl of any
Sage, along with the person's name, age,
and birthday month and date, to Marion
Putman, assistant Charlotte editor, at
marionmputman@gmail.com. Deadline
is noon Thursday. Note: Ifyou bring or
mail in a hard-copy photo (to 23170
Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980), we will try to accommodate you,
Happy 31st birthday to Lisa but we CANNOT guarantee the ability to
Taylor on her special day return it to you. For more information,
Sept.26. call Marionat941-206-1183.


I WEEKLY RECORD

Charlotte
County births
Scarlett Elizabeth Lowe, to
Elizabeth Ashlee Hipp and Steven
Edward Lowe of Punta Gorda, at
12:25 p.m. Sept. 15. She weighed
6 pounds, 15 ounces.
Kaitlyn Anne Rivers, to
Kathryn and Jacob Rivers of Port
Charlotte, at 9:57 p.m. Sept. 16. She
weighed 8 pounds, 15 ounces.
Carson Edward Johns, to
Shannon and Jeremiah Johns of
North Port, at 6:12 a.m. Sept. 23. He
weighed 7 pounds, 7 ounces.
David Robert Leazenby, to
Ann and Michael Leazenby of
North Port, at 12:25 p.m. Sept. 24. He
weighed 8 pounds, 1 ounce.
Liam Eugene Sutton, to
Brittany Abel and Billy Sutton of
Punta Gorda, at 2:10 p.m. Sept. 24.
He weighed 6 pounds, 13 ounces.
Ellie Nicole Garrett,toLori
Beth and Jaime Colin Barrett of
North Port, at 6:58 p.m. Sept. 25. She
weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces.

Charlotte
County marriages
Jason Ronald Pontero of Punta
Gorda, and Caitlin Marie Johnson of
Venice
Stephen Paul Deery of
Englewood, and Linda Ann Miller of
Englewood
Raymond Charles Manuguerra of
Punta Gorda, and Deborah Lou Smoak
of Punta Gorda
Lewis Roy Robinson of Punta
Gorda, and Shelby Jo Drum of Punta
Gorda
Michael Lee Hester of Port
Charlotte, and Danielle Galhardo
Guedes of Port Charlotte
Gerald Demilio of North Port, and
Katie Marie Waters of North Port
Justin Ward McDonald of
Englewood, and Stephanie Costa Silva
of Englewood
Joseph Charles McConnell of
Punta Gorda, and Haley Bianca
McCandless of Punta Gorda
Carl Kellner Miller of Port
Charlotte, and Susan Odell Wyllie of
Port Charlotte
Paul David Whitford of Port
Charlotte, and Amber Jean Barreras of
Port Charlotte
James Robb Louis of Port
Charlotte, and Cynthia St. Jacques of
North Port
John Wesley Poling of Port
Charlotte, and Teresa Marie Litzan of
Port Charlotte


Kale Leonaka Willis of Mission
Viejo, Calif., and Kristen Nicole
Faherty of Brick, N.J.
Charles Bradley Henderson of
Port Charlotte, and Kathryn lone
Hillman of Port Charlotte
Kemar Alvin Hamilton of Port
Charlotte, and Sara Jane Sadler of
Port Charlotte
William Eugene Goff of
Englewood, and Stephanie Lynne
Lemonde of Englewood
Harry Langley of Punta Gorda,
and Patricia Ann Carlsen of Punta
Gorda
Michael Curn Howard of Port
Charlotte, and Danielle Elizabeth
Smith of Port Charlotte
Michael Scott Vaughn of Punta
Gorda, and Marlene Lynette Weeks of
Punta Gorda
Martin Louis Malone of Port
Charlotte, and Alexis Elizabeth
Beverly of Port Charlotte
Michael Stephen McPeakof Port
Charlotte, and Toni Marie Lacey of
Port Charlotte
Anthony James Bruno of Port
Charlotte, and Jami May Meadows of
Port Charlotte

Charlotte
County divorces
Shayla Brown v. Larry Brown
Jessica Marie Browning Wilson v.
Dale J. Wilson
Amy Cecile Bryan v. Sean Murray
Bryan
Angelina S. Christin v. Benjamin
E. Domenge
Lisa Didonato v. Michael Angelo
Didonato
Sharon Rose Farr v. Richard Lee
Farr Sr.
Michelle J. Hammond v. Jason 0.
Hammond
Martin A. Holland v. Nicole M.
Holland
Jeanette Bridget Kargle v. Mark
Joseph Kargle
Bruce Lee Litson v. Martha Jane
Litson
Michael Ross Marsh v. Darlene
D. Marsh
Diane Matherne v. Matthew
Matherne
Chelsea Marie McGee v. Timothy
Ryan McGee
Sharon Lynn Mofield v.
Christopher Adam Mofield
Susan Lee Smith v. Matthew
Norman Smith
David Stumpfv. Thais Mae
Stumpf
Michelle Lee Zebley v. Gregroy
Dale Zebley


hters 3ind rgarten thDugh ixth de ar invited for a magical
:ng, r ihme n ts,=dterta'jme This iting event includes
, photo opportunity special son dedication for
:ration participants. Grandfirs Guardians aT their ,'


Lexington Manor is planning a family friendiv Pp









Saturday October 12, 2013 '!

12-3 PM
We are going to have carnival games, face painting, a bounce
house, live entertainment, pony ride, prizes food and more!
We would like to invite you to join us for a
guaranteed fun afternoon!
Please contact Noelle LaPonte
if you have any questions

941.766.7991
nlaponte@ 5sqc.com





FIVESTAR SENIOR LIVING TM
941-766-7991 20480 Veterans Blvd.,
Port Charlotte, FL 33954 ,
www.lexingtonmanorportcharlotte.com
Assisted Living Facility # 10548











Traffic enforcement locations set


CHARLOTTE COUNTY
- Beginning Monday, the
Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office will increase
traffic enforcement at the
following locations:
Speed enforcement:
Entire length of
Veterans Boulevard, Port
Charlotte.
Placida Road, from
Rotonda Boulevard West
to McCall Road (State
Road 776), Rotonda West
to Englewood.
Traffic light/stop sign
enforcement:
U.S. 41 and Harbor


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


Boulevard, Port Charlotte.
McCall Road (S.R.
776) and San Casa Drive,
Englewood.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Adam Oryan Patterson, 28,1400
block of Capricorn Blvd., Deep Creek.
Charge: violation of probation. Bond:
$950.


Casey Gene Story, 25,11600
block of Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda.
Charges: driving with a suspended
or revoked license and abuse of a
temporary tag. Bond: $2,000.
Suzanne Michelle Piazza, 47,
1100 block of Talbot St., Port Charlotte.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Michael Aaron Simone, 42,
19600 block of Midway Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Charge: out-of-county
warrant. Bond: $5,000.


Cathy Clerjuste, 30, 22400 block
of Olean Blvd., Port Charlotte. Charge:
violation of probation (original
charge: DUI). Bond: none.
Mohamed Farzan Rahim Jr.,
18,18100 block of Dublin Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: violation of proba-
tion (original charges: possession
of a controlled substance without a
prescription and possession of drug
paraphernalia). Bond: none.
Hope Ann Baannister Delegal,
29,100 block of Easton Drive, Port
Charlotte. Charge: petty theft -
second offense. Bond: $500.
Joseph Fredrick Beane, 45, 21300
block of Higgs Drive, Port Charlotte.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.


James Philip Bontjes, 46,14100
block of Chesswood Lane, Port
Charlotte. Charge: driving with a
suspended or revoked license. Bond:
$500.
Michael Allen Ward, 23,2200
block of Lakeshore Circle, Port
Charlotte. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $2,000..
Mitchell Lawrence Rice, 31,
of Lehigh Acres. Charge: failure to
appear (original charges: possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana
and possession of drug parapher-
nalia). Bond: $8,000.
Earlene Joan Aiken, 78, of Lake


Suzy. Charge: petty theft. Bond:
$500.
Naudia Jane Hurlbutt, 27, of
Lake Placid, Fla. Charge: violation of
probation (original charge: driving
with a suspended license). Bond:
none.
Artistotelis Spiros Tsimis, 28,
West Fray Street, Englewood. Charge:
violation of probation. Bond: none.
Jennifer Moneke Fain, 26, 23000
block of Elmira Blvd., Port Charlotte.
Charges: possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
loitering or prowling. Bond: $4,000.
Compiled by Gary Roberts
and Marion Putman


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Canvas
Painting Class
L October 3, 2013
S 1 :00AM
October 9, 2013
6:30PM


CALL 941.624.5955 FOR DETAILS
1931 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte
www.BisqueitStudio.com


Mary G. Stewart, CPA, PA

Taking the WORK out of
BOOKWORK,
and the AXE to your TAXES!
FULL SERVICE accounting with Payroll
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4456 Tamiami Trail A7
Pt. Charlotte, FL 33980
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American Legion
Post 103
Sunday Darts winners
Sept. 22: Round 1:1-Dick Braun, Bill
Tilley; 2-Harriet Ratynski, Bill Sutton;
3-Fran Smith, George Stern. Round
2:1-Kim Hill, Christ Azarias; 2-Joey
Siracusa, Ron Hickson; 3-Kim Smith,
George Stern.

Charlotte Harbor
Yacht Club
*Partners Bridge winners
Sept. 19:1-Wini Dignam, Geri
Dempsey; 2-Jo Becker, Marty Stikkers;
3-1rene Rumkle, Jean Baker.


18320 Paulson Dr, Unit A
Port Charlotte, FL 33954
www.buffalograffix.com


Slam Bridge winners Sept. 25:
1-Glen Tschetter, 4500; 2-LaQuita
Morris, 3860; 3-Frank Betz, 3780.
Mahjong winners Sept. 24:
1-Diana Reinhard; 2-Judy Fiedler.

Chubbyz Tavern
Big Dog's Live Trivia
Challenge winners Sept. 25:1-The
Pool Sharks, $50; 2-Last Minute
Entry, $25; 3-The Cat's Meow, $25.

Cultural Center of
Charlotte County
Duplicate Bridge Club winners
Sept. 17:1-Pat Betts, Earl Lewis;


941-625-0680





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2-Chuck Skarvan, Leslie Clugston;
3-Joan and Ted Walbourn. Sept. 19
(a.m.): 1-Dave Valliant, Sharon
Topping; 2-Bob Bonjean, Jim Fraser;
3-Tom Zinneman, Judy Taylor.
Sept. 19 (p.m.): 1-Joe and Millie
Walorz; 2-Robert Rancourt, Peggy
Villela; 3-Lois Murff, Jan Propper.
Monday Night Pinochle
winners Sept. 23:1 -Mary Lewis,
701; 2-Ruth McGinty, 645; 3-Mike
Hess, 631.
Wednesday Double Deck
Pinochle winners Sept. 25:
1-Lavaun Berkland, 1789; 2-Ruth
McGinty, 1635; 3-Paul Hendrick,
1494; 4-Mike Hess, 1440.
Thursday Night Double Deck
Pinochle winners Sept. 19:1 -Bob
Paulson, 1689; 2-Fred Smith, 1664;
3-Mike Hess, 1637.
Friday Evening Bridge winners
Sept. 20:1-Marty Lauer, 5510; 2-Jug
Gorgia, 5010; 3-Virginia Clayton,
4740; 4-Trudy Riley, 4170.
Friday Night Euchre winners
Sept. 20:1-Beverly Craig, 82; 2-Mary
Lewis, 80; 3-Jan Howard, 79.
Port Charlotte Cribbage
Club 147 winners Sept. 25: Fran
Christofferson, 15; Elaine Fiske, 13;


Jack Stakley, 13; Doris Mills, 13; Eric
Gorrell, 12; Larry Miller, 12.

Deep Creek
Elks Lodge
Monday Bridge winners
Sept. 23:1-Ann Lewis, 4570;
2-Dianne Kidneigh, 3930; 3-Delbert
Benson, 3530; 4-Marla Johansen,
3480.

Kingsway
Country Club
Ladies Bridge winners
Sept. 20:1-Linda Bellmore;
2-Betty Worthington; 3-Marge
Lincoln. Sept. 25:1-Judy Strub;
2-Linda Bellmore.

PGI
Duplicate Bridge Club
winners Sept. 16:1-Chuck Pohle,
David Baird; 2-Chuck Skarvan, Earl
Lewis; 3-Helen Sullivan, Florence
Burns. Sept. 20:1-Earl and Susan
Lewis; 2-Sarah Robin, Nanette
Crist; 3-Helen Sullivan, Bob
Mohrbacher.


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The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


atf


**


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE


William C. Boehle
William C. "Bill" Boehle,
79, of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
passed away Monday
Sept. 23,
Si 2013, at
Peace River
Regional
Medical
Center
in Port
Charlotte,
Fla., after a
brief illness.
He was born July 4,
1934, in Meriden, Conn.,
to Carl E and Grace (nee
Gustafson) Boehle.
Bill attended Meriden
High School, and won
letters in four sports. He
was voted most valuable
player in his senior
year. Bill continued his
baseball and football
at Duke University
and the University of
Connecticut. In his final
year at UConn, he was
the co-captain of the
baseball team that went
on to Omaha, Neb., for
the NCAAWorld College
Series. He went on to
play semi-professional
football with the Hartford
Charter Oaks and the
Waterbury Orbits. Later
on, he became an end
coach for the Knights.
Bill continued to jog and
play softball with the
over-70 league in Punta
Gorda. He worked at the
family business, Boehle's
Express Corp., until his
retirement. Bill was also
the owner of Hanover
House Cafe, and co-own-
er of Bill & Nancy's Sports
Bar. He was a parishioner
of Augustana Lutheran
Church.
He is survived by his
children, Linda (Craig)
Ferguson of Meriden,
William Boehle of New
Port Richey, Fla., Robert
Boehle of Lake Worth,
Fla., Steven Boehle of
Austin, Texas, and the Rev.
Msgr. Kevin Randall of
South Africa; three grand-
children, William Boehle
III, Keira Brook Boehle
and Nicholas Boehle;
two great-grandchildren;
sister, Barbara B. (William)
Heidel; several nephews,
including William and Jim
Heidel; a niece, Kristen
Heidel; along with several
cousins.
A memorial Mass will
be held at a later date
in Meriden. Memorial
donations may be made
to your local Boys & Girls
Clubs.
Arrangements are by
Larry Taylor Funeral
Home.

Robert E. Frick
Robert E. "Bob" Frick,
68, of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Tuesday,
Aug. 6, 2013.
He was born
.,, Aug. 12, 1944, in
S Brooklyn, N.Y
Mr. Frick
attended New York High
School of Performing
Arts. He served his
country in the U.S. Air
Force, and was proud
to be a member of the
First Air Force Band. Mr.
Frick was a professional
Pianist, and taught
advanced piano. He and
Mary Ellen moved to
Port Charlotte in 1996,
to enjoy the sunsets.
He is survived by his
significant other, Mary
Ellen; sons, Daniel and
Steven, both of New
York; granddaughter,
Shannon, and her grand-
mother, Georgiana.
A Memorial Mass
will be held at 11 a.m.


Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, at
San Antonio Catholic
Church, 24445 Rampart
Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL
33980. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be given
to the Music Ministry
at San Antonio Catholic
Church.
Arrangements were
made in Port Charlotte.


Kenneth Marvin
Johnson
Kenneth "Marvin"
Johnson, 76, of Punta
Gorda, Fla., passed away
Wednesday,
.. Sept. 25, 2013.
:..;. He was born
Dec. 10, 1936,
in Kansas City,
Kan., to Kenneth and
Gladys (nee Schneck)
Johnson.
Marvin served in the Air
Force from 1957 to 1960
at Lackland Air Force
Base in San Antonio,
Texas. He worked for
Illinois Bell Telephone
for 25 years before
retiring, and moved from
Woodridge, Ill., to this
area in 1985. Marvin was
a member of Telephone
Pioneers of America, a
PGI Civic Association
Board Member, and
served on the Board of
Directors of the Lifelong
Learning Institute. He
was a member of First
United Methodist Church
of Punta Gorda.
Marvin will be greatly
missed by his wife, Mary
E Johnson; daughters,
Karen M. Clifford and
Diane E. Johnson; grand-
children, Katie Clifford
and Kenneth Clifford; and
sister, Sande McDonnel.
A celebration of
Marvin's life will be held
at 4 p.m. Wednesday,
Oct. 2, 2013, at Larry
Taylor Funeral and
Cremation Services. In
lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made
to First United Methodist
Church of Punta Gorda.
To express condolences
to the family, please visit
www.ltaylorfuneral.com
and sign the online guest
book.
Arrangements are by
Larry Taylor Funeral and
Cremation Services.

Richard D. May Jr.
Richard D. "Tadpole"
May Jr., 56, of Punta
Gorda, Fla., passed away
Friday, Sept. 20, 2013.
He was born Oct. 18,
1956, to Richard and
Hazel May Sr.
Tadpole was born and
raised in Punta Gorda,
and worked as a teenager
for Gulf Shore Seafood.
He also worked for many
years with the Davey
Tree Co., as well as for
Charlotte Sanitation. The
last few years he was able
to come back into com-
mercial fishing that he
loved all his life. Tadpole
will be deeply and truly
missed by family and his
many, many wonderful
friends.
He is survived by his
daughters, Jennifer M.
Boysel and Tiffany D.
May; granddaughter,
Taylerann; sisters, Gladys
Reynolds and Bettyjean
Werner; niece, Mandy
Reynolds; nephews, John
Reynolds, Robert Werner,
and Larry and Jeffrey
May; and his mother-in-
law, Ruth Temple. He was
preceded in death by his
wife.
We will not be having
a funeral, instead we
will be celebrating his
birthday. The family will
let everyone know the
date and time. Please
visit www.kays-ponger.
corn to leave the family
condolences and to sign
the online guest book.
Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services.

Martin A. Warnke
Martin A. Warnke, 87,
of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
passed away Wednesday,


Sept. 25, 2013.
H. He was born
.,: .,. Oct. 21, 1925, in
Richman Hill,
N.Y.
Martin was proud to
have served in the U.S.
Coast Guard during
World War II. He was
the owner and operator


of D & B Truck Leasing
in Massapequa, Long
Island, N.Y. Martin and
his beloved wife Dolores
retired to Punta Gorda in
1990 from Long Island.
He is greatly missed
by his wife of 59 years,
Dolores; sons, Robert of
Lindenhurst, Long Island,
N.Y., William of Punta
Gorda, and Thomas
of Seymour, Conn.;
grandchildren, Adam
(Jennifer), Tanya, Kaitlyn,
William Jr., Megan,
Ryan and Cameron; and
great-grandchildren,
Landon and Aiden.
Martin was preceded in
death by his daughter,
Deborah.
Services will be held
at a later date in Long
Island. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made
to Tidewell Hospice Inc.,
5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota,
FL 34238.
Arrangements are
by National Cremation
Society of Port Charlotte,
Fla.

Gilbert W. Williams
Gilbert W. Williams, 71,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Thursday,
Sept. 12,
2013, at
Peace River
Regional
i. Medical
Center
in Port
Charlotte.
He was
born Sept. 10, 1942, in
Jamaica, West Indies, and
moved to Port Charlotte
five years ago from
Brooklyn, N.Y.
Gilbert attended
Community Church of
God in Port Charlotte. He
enjoyed life to the fullest,
and he will be missed
faithfully by all who loved
and knew him.
Survivors include
his wife of 43 years,
Norinne Williams of Port
Charlotte; daughters,
Sandra Williams and
Theresa Williams, both
of Punta Gorda, Fla.;
sons, Mark Cato-Wiliams
of Delaware, Lorrace
Williams of Punta Gorda,
and Duane Williams
of Pennsylvania; sis-
ters, Beverly Hylton
of Pennsylvania, and
Wilhel Watson and
Geneva Williams of
Jamaica; brothers, Jimmy
Williams of Jamaica,
and Fitzpatrick Williams
and Roy Williams of the
United Kingdom; 11
grandchildren; and many
nieces, nephews and
cousins.
Visitation will be held
from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, at
Roberson Funeral Home
Port Charlotte Chapel.
The Funeral Service
will be held at 10 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013,
at Community Church
of God, 3485 Jones St.,
Port Charlotte. Interment
will follow at Restlawn
Memorial Gardens in Port
Charlotte. Friends may
visit www.robersonfh.
com to sign the memorial
book and extend condo-
lences to the family.
Arrangements are by
Roberson Funeral Home
Port Charlotte Chapel.

ENGLEWOOD


Roger Forrest
Pearson
Roger Forrest Pearson,
89, of RotondaWest, Fla.,
passed away Thursday,
Sept. 26, 2013,
H.. at Englewood
.,, .:. Health &
Rehabilitation
Center.
He was born Feb. 26,
1924, in Robertsdale, Ala.


Roger served in the U.S.
Navy during World War II.
He graduated from
Auburn University with
his BS in engineering.
Employed by General
Motors, after 19 years
he retired and moved


to Florida in 1989.
Roger was a member of
American Legion Post
400 in Orlando, Fla.
He is survived by his
loving wife of 45 years,
Mary A. Pearson of
Rotonda West; and one
sister, Maxine Miller of
Birmingham, Mich.
A service will be held
at a later date. Memorial
contributions may be
made to the Alzheimer's
Association, Florida Gulf
Coast Chapter, 3277-A
Fruitville Road, Sarasota,
FL 34237.
Arrangements are by
Englewood Community
Funeral Home with
Private Crematory.

Linda Warner
Linda Warner, 64, of
Englewood, Fla., and
formerly of Harrisburg,
Pa., passed away Tuesday,
Sept. 24, 2013.
She was a Bell
Telephone Operator.
Linda came to Florida
in 1983, and retired
as a driver's license
examiner in 2006. Her
many interests included
kayaking on the Peace
River with her friends
looking for fossils,
and at home she loved
working with plants in
her shade house and
yard. Linda helped a lot
of people through tough
times. She rescued many
animals and nursed
them back to health, and
found a lot of homes for
pets in need. Linda loved
to enjoy the beaches and
wildlife.
We will always
remember her smile and
laughter. We will miss
her very, very much.
Linda is survived by


Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes only. There's no charge
for publishing an abbreviated death
notice. Full obituaries and repeat
death notices will be subject to an
advertising charge.
Obituaries must be received by
2 p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday
publication. For Sunday publication
deadline is noon on Saturday. For
Monday publication deadline is noon
on Sunday. In Loving Memories must be
received by 2 p.m. for Tuesday through
Friday publication. For Saturday through
Monday publication deadline is noon on
Friday The American flag accompanying
an obituary indicates a veteran of the
U.S. Armed Forces. Please send emails to
obituaries@sunletter.com.


her husband, Rick; son,
Jonathan; and brothers,
David of Pennsylvania,
and Robert of California.
She will be cremated
and, as per her wishes,
there will be no public
service. Donations
may be made to the
Tidewell Hospice House,
1158 Veronica St., Port
Charlotte, FL 33952.

NORTH PORT


Hugh W. Sewell
HughW. Sewell, 60, of
North Port, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Sept. 26,
2013, at his home.
Arrangements are by
Coral Ridge Funeral
Home, Cape Coral, Fla.

DESOTO

There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Saturday.


Robert E. Thompson
Robert E. "Bob" Thompson, 85, of Port
Charlotte, Fla., went to be with the Lord, Thursday,
Sept. 26, 2013, at Peace River Regional Medical
Center in Port Charlotte.
S He was born July 15, 1928, in
Caskey, Ky., to G.B. and Fanny Mary
(nee Hendricks) Thompson, and
moved to this area 28 years ago from
New Albany, Ind.
Bob worked as a machine operator
before retiring from Phillip Morris,
and also worked for 16 years with
., the Texas Rangers in Port Charlotte. He
managed a Babe Ruth baseball team
in Indiana, a church softball team, and
played amateur baseball, fast pitch
softball and basketball in a church league. He was
a member of the Port Charlotte Shuffleboard Club,
the U.S. Bowling Congress, and volunteered with
the Punta Gorda Alliance Church bread ministry
in Punta Gorda, Fla., where he was a member.
Bob was also an avid golfer, bowler and shuffle-
board player. He was a veteran of the Korean War,
serving in the U.S. Army.
Mr. Thompson is survived by his loving wife of
63 years, Dolores (nee Flock) Thompson of Port
Charlotte; daughters, Karen T. (Roger) DeLacy of
Punta Gorda, Kathy M. Marshall of Arcadia, Fla.,
and Robin K. (Daniel) Purlee of Sellersburg, Ind.;
sister, Nita (Levern) Gervin of Fenwick, Mich.; eight
grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; one great-
great-grandchild; four nieces; and three nephews.
He was preceded in death by his parents; one sister,
Ramona Joan Crady; and a grandson.
The family will receive friends from 3 p.m. to
5 p.m. today, Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013, at Paul
Schelm Funeral Home, 12687 S.W. County Road
769 (Kings Highway), Lake Suzy, Fla. A Funeral
Service will follow at the funeral home, with Dr.
Clint Stasney officiating. Burial with military
honors will be at 11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 30, 2013,
at Sarasota National Cemetery in Sarasota, Fla.
Please visit Bob's tribute wall at www.schelmfh.
com to share memories and to send condolences
to the Thompson family.
Preferred donations may be made in loving
memory of Bob to Punta Gorda Alliance Church,
7500 Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950.
Arrangements are by Paul Schelm Funeral
Home, Lake Suzy.


JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
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Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
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901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
www.jameswmallonee.com
(941) 206-2223




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COMMUNITY
NEWS BRIEFS

Arts council
to hold Annual
Meeting
The Arts & Humanities
Council of Charlotte
County will hold its
Annual Meeting at
5 p.m. Thursday at
Congregational United
Church of Christ, 1201
Aqui Esta Drive, Punta
Gorda. After swearing in
new officers and a review
of the year's accom-
plishments, the council
will unveil its new logo.
Pianist Stephen Fancher
will perform. The meet-
ing is open to the public.
Light refreshments will
be served. Those who
wish to attend are asked
to call 941-764-8100.

Applications
accepted for
holiday help
Applications will
be available Tuesday
for Toys For Tots.
Households must be
Charlotte County resi-
dents, and must provide
proof of residency and
ID, as well as proof of the
last four weeks of income
with the application. All
applications will be put
in a database, screened
and have the information
verified. Also, applicants
must have a working
phone number or email
address so the family can
be contacted by their
sponsors. There is no
guarantee of assistance.
Applications will be avail-
able at the Department
of Children and Families
lobby, and at Pilgrim
United Church of Christ
and many other area
churches. Elementary
school students who
receive free or reduced
lunch will bring home an
application, and those
applications should be
returned to their school.
Each family can be
sponsored by only one
sponsor, and this pro-
cess is in place to avoid
duplication. Many more
sponsors still are needed
to help make this 2013
holiday season suc-
cessful. Organizations
or individuals who are
interested in spon-
soring a family for the
holiday are asked to
contact Carol Pickford,
the Charlotte County
Holiday Assistance
intake coordinator, at
941-626-6215 or carol@
carolpickford.net.










Reading to improve your writing


Some things just go
together: bacon and
eggs, peanut butter
and jelly, spaghetti and
meatballs, cake and ice
cream.
Likewise, reading and
writing are two sides of
the same coin com-
munication. Like bacon
and eggs or the piano
keys of Paul McCartney
and Stevie Wonder's
"Ebony and Ivory," they
"... live together in
perfect harmony." On a
practical level, writers
need readers to read,
and readers need writers
to write.
"Read, read, read.
Read everything -
trash, classics, good
and bad, and see how
they do it. Just like a
carpenter who works


FGCU
Herald
Court
Centre
Rick
Ramos



as an apprentice and
studies the master.
Read! You'll absorb it,"
said American writer
and Nobel Prize laureate
William Faulkner. "Then
write. If it's good, you'll
find out. If it's not, throw
it out of the window."
Edith Pendleton, who
holds a doctorate in
contemporary literature,
echoed Faulkner in
describing her five-ses-
sion short course,


"Writer's Compendium:
Reading Enhance
Your Writing."
"If you read enough
of a great author's work,
you start to emulate
them. This course really
works hard to hone
the notion of learning
through emulation,"
Pendleton said. "And, if
at the end of the course
you don't want to write
another word, you'll
have had a chance to
read some of our great
authors, and I think it
will be fun."
The course is slated
for 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Oct. 10 and 24, Nov. 7
and 21, and Dec. 5
at Florida Gulf Coast
University's Renaissance
Academy in downtown
Punta Gorda.


The course is designed
for "... writers who are
looking to find their
voice or to perfect their
voice, although it's for
anyone," Pendleton said.
"I was a journalist for
12 years, and the biggest
challenge was crossing
over from simply record-
ing others' voices to
creating my own voice."
To provide role
models to emulate,
Pendleton developed a
reading list that features
six of America's great
authors. Participants
will read Pulitzer Prize-
winners "Confederacy of
Dunces" by J.K. O'Toole
and "The Color Purple"
by Alice Walker, as well
as Stephen Crane's "The
Open Boat," Faulkner's
"As I Lay Dying," Jack


London's "To Build a
Fire" and E.B. White's
"The Ring of Time."
"Every writer needs to
practice, and the daily
journal is a good way to
develop the discipline of
writing every day. We'll
talk about journaling as
an art form, and your
daily writings will reflect
the techniques that we'll
talk about in a partic-
ular class," Pendleton
said. "So, in the weeks
after the dialogue class,
we'll have the students
practicing the devel-
opment of dialogue in
their journal entries.
The class discussion
will focus on reading
and critiquing of the
dialogue to see if it's
gimmicky or believable."
Pendleton introduces


copy editing using "The
Elements of Style" by
William Strunk Jr. and
White, which, in 2011,
was listed among Time
magazine's 100 All-Time
Best Nonfiction Books.
For more informa-
tion about "Writers
Compendium: Reading
- Enhance Your
Writing" or to register,
call 941-505-0130.
You also can register
online at https://
registerra.fgcu.edu;
enter the search term
"Compendium."
Rick Ramos is a
program coordinator
at FGCU's downtown
Punta Gorda Herald
Court Centre Renaissance
Academy. He can be
reached at rramos@fgcu.
edu.


Get more of what you're looking for in your SUN Newspaper!

Fr- 11 1 -1


Find The Perfect
Companion
In the CLASSIFIED!

SUN 4-1


BUSINESS Journal



Let Dale's Air Conditioning & Heating Evaluate Your AC To See If You Can Save


John and Carrie Gable own
Dale's Air Conditioning &
Heating, 18260 Paulson Drive,
Port Charlotte. The Gables run a
focused business on customer
service and pride themselves in
providing service on your
heating and cooling unit, and
pool heater. They strive to
educate their customers on how


to keep their home heated and
cooled in the winter and summer,
and what to do to extend the life of
the unit. Dale's can advise you on
your duct design and insulation
and explain the effects of the sun
exposure on each side of your
house. If you feel your electric bill
is too high, you may need a new
unit. You can count on the service,


advice and fair pricing that you
receive and a thorough and
complete check at each service
visit. Call Dale's Air Conditioning
& Heating for sales or service. The
phone number is 941-629-1712
and business hours are 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday, with
24 hours emergency service to
their customers.


S -.. _




John and Carrie Gable at Dale's Air
Conditioning & Heating,
18260 Paulson Dr., Port Charlotte.
941-629-1712


Westchester Gold Best Quality

And Selection For 37 Years


Steve Duke of Westchester Gold &
Diamonds, 4200-F Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte
Steve Duke, owner of
Westchester Gold is on site
to assist you with jewelry


purchases and appraisals,
or the sale of your old gold
and other valuables. Duke
says, "We pay top dollar for
your items and have been
in business for more than
37 years. Don't be fooled
by "We Buy Gold" offers
from others, see us first for
the best prices offered."
They specialize in pre-
loved Rolex watches, new
and estate jewelry pieces,
oriental rugs, unusual
gifts, paintings, rare


QUESTIONS


Q. My spouse just had a
little fender bender. Now
we don't know where to
get the car repaired. Who
can you recommend?
A. Whether you have a
small dent in your car
door or major collision
damage, your car will be
put back in like-new
condition at Jackie's Auto
Body. This first rate repair
shop is known by local car
dealers as a first class
auto body work and
custom paint shop. Jack
D'Amico has over 35
years of experience and
uses only the finest
Sherwin-Williams paint
products and materials
and has state-of-the-art
equipment. Jackie's Auto
Body accepts all types of
insurance claims and is
on the preferred insurance
list. Jack and Regina run a
first class operation and
are always available to
give a free estimate.
Jackie's Auto Body is
located at 19888 Veterans
Highway, Port Charlotte.
Trust the pros to make
your vehicle like new
again.


collectibles, and more.
Westchester Gold is a
community staple and is
known for its generosity in
giving back. Listen to Steve
Duke's Friday morning
show on 1580 AM radio
each week 9 am to 10 am.
It is interesting, fun and
always topical. The store is
located in Baer's Plaza,
and the phone number is
941-625 0666. Visit their
website at
www.westchestergold.com


ANSWERS


Q. Where can I go to have
my motor home
evaluated and repaired?
A. For all your auto repairs
give Dr. D's Auto Repair a
call. Dr. D's repairs all
types of vehicles including
motor homes and four
wheelers. At Dr. D's you
can count on the best
service, diagnostics,
repairs, replacement
parts, etc. Only superior
quality replacement parts
are used and rates are very
reasonable. Owner, Mike
True, and his staff are all
ASE certified and they
offer the finest full service
repair in this area. With
the computerized engine
analysis, you can be
assured that the service
required on your vehicle is
necessary. True is well
known as an excellent
auto mechanic and the
business enjoys an
excellent reputation. Dr.
D's is located at 23415
Janice Avenue in the
Whidden Industrial Park
in Charlotte Harbor and
the phone number is 941-
743-3677. For the best
service at a reasonable


price, call or stop by Dr.
D's Auto Repair.

Q. I have having a
problem with my laptop.
Where can I take it to
have the battery checked?
A. Batteries Plus is located
at 1690 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte (Perkins Plaza).
For great service and
expert advice, Ingrid and
Tom Brummet and their
staff can answer your
questions, test your
batteries and advise you if
you need your batteries
recharged or if you need
new batteries. They carry
over 10,000 different types
of batteries for everything
from cars, boats,
motorcycles, watches,
alarms and laptops. If it
needs a battery, Batteries
Plus has it for you. Did you
ever think how many
objects in your everyday
life require batteries?
Think about it and you will
understand why an entire
store is dedicated to the
sale of batteries and is
conveniently located. The
store phone number is
941-766-1400. Store hours


Go To Absolute Blinds

For The Best Selection

Of Window Treatments
Absolute Blinds has
I ^been in business in
SCharlotte County
and the
.surrounding area
for over ten years
and has become
one of the largest
and most
I& successful licensed
window treatment
Absolute Blinds 2842 Tamiami companies in
Trail, Port Charlotte, Southwest Florida.
call 941-627-5444 With unbeatable
With unbeatable
pricing, blinds made while you wait, free advice
from a professional decorator, and the best selection
available, Absolute Blinds can fulfill all your window
treatment needs. An array of verticals, a selection of
wood plantation shutters, horizontals, mini-blinds,
pleated shades, top treatments, cornices, draperies
and more is among their offering. Absolute Blinds is
a Graber dealer and estimates are free. If you need
window coverings for home or office, Absolute
Blinds is there to assist you. The store is located at
2842 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte and the phone
number is 941-627-5444. Past and present
customers can like Absolute Blinds' Facebook page.
For more information, visit their website
at www.absoluteblinds.com


are M-F, 8-8, Sat. 10-6 &
Sun. 9-5. The store website
is www.batteriesplus.com

Q. I want a new television
and audio system with
surround sound. Is there
a local business with a good
selection of electronics?
A. Known for its selection
of TVs, audio/video
systems, antennas and
repairs, Quality TV has a
great selection of other
products including
security alarm systems,
metal detectors, security
cameras, blue ray players,
tailgate portable antennas
and used TVs with an in-
house warranty. Quality
TV is a factory authorized
service agent for most


brands and is an
authorized Dish Network
and DIRECTV dealer/
installer and there is an
on-site repair shop.
Owner Mike Morales will
match prices on any in-
stock TV. Before you
make your purchase, give
Quality TV a call at 941-
426-1773 and allow them
to give you a quote, or
stop by the store located
at 14212W. Tamiami
Trail, North Port, and see
their vast selection. They
can advise which brands
are the best engineered
to fit your needs. For
more information, please
visit their website at
www.qualitytv.com


DOES OR UIESS QUAIFY CLg91-012


m


OurTown Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 7


LIFESAVING
FROM PAGE 1

Twenty different agencies
set up tables to distribute
literature and reach out
to anyone who needed
assistance with alcohol or
substance abuse.
"September is National
Recovery Month, and this is
all about raising awareness,"
Jessica Boles, director of
marketing at CBHC, said.
"We have purple and yellow
balloons scattered through-
out the area. They are the
theme colors selected
by the Substance Abuse
Mental Health Services
Administration, or SAMHSA,
for this year's event. We call
it a pathway to wellness."
Chrissie Salazar, public
outreach coordinator for
Drug Free Charlotte County,
handed out pamphlets
to promote the agency's
"Be The Wall" campaign
to prevent teenagers from
drinking.
"Medical studies have
proven that if kids began
drinking before they are
adults, it prevents the
prefrontal cortex, the
decision-making part of the
brain, from developing,"
she said. "For boys, that
part of the brain doesn't
stop developing until 25 to
26 years of age, and 22 to
23 years of age in girls. We
want parents and friends to
be the wall against kids and
drinking."
Teri Ashley, director of
business development at
the Riverside Behavioral
Center, said the facility has
52 licensed beds, and deals
with individuals who are
dealing with psychological
problems, suicidal tenden-
cies and depression.
"We will be celebrating
our 30th anniversary next
May," she said. "There have
been significant accom-
plishments over the years,
and events like this provide
the venue to highlight
them."
Mike Overway, coor-
dinator for the Charlotte
County Homeless Coalition,
agreed, saying there are
about 600 homeless people
in Charlotte County, and his
agency's shelter is full.
"It's great that (Charlotte
Behavioral) organizes these
events," he said. "We need
that unity and the commu-
nity needs to see that as
well."
Charlotte County Judge
Peter Bell spoke to the


TAX
FROM PAGE 1

included in the assembly's
final report.
"It certainly should be
on the table," Steering
Committee member Joe
Tiseo said during a recent
meeting. "We all pay those
taxes. We're all representa-
tive of the community."
Committee members
warned staff, however,
against posing leading



SCRAP
FROM PAGE 1

could accept Green Cards or
foreign (IDs)."
Earlier this month,
Anderson cleaned out his
garage and visited a local
scrap metal yard to sell
some old bicycles and
things. Like all sellers, he
had to take a photo, leave
a thumbprint, provide a
copy of his ID and wait
while photos were taken
of his items to be sold.
The information then is
made available to law
enforcement.
Anderson said the incon-
veniences are well worth it
if it will help catch thieves
like the ones who stole from
him.
"It doesn't bother me one
bit," he said.
According to CCSO
intelligence commander
Chris Maler, scrap crimes
also are down locally due


SUN PHOTOS BY SUE PAQUIN
Higher Ground Performing Arts Company dancers performed a number during Friday night's Recovery Vigil,
depicting an individual struggling against addiction.


crowd about the link
between recovery and the
American Revolution.
"The founding fathers
were harassed and had
enough and wanted to be
free, but realized that they
could not do it alone; they
needed help, and they got
it," he said. "People ha-
rassed today by drugs and
alcohol can't do it alone ei-
ther, and need help as well.
You can see the analogy.
If you have been harassed
enough, then reach out -
help is here."
Charlotte County
Commissioner Bill Truex
also spoke at the vigil and
stressed to those who need
help to seek it.
"Never be ashamed to say
you are in recovery for life,"
he said.
Lynn Jacobsen is one such
person who is not ashamed
to utter those words, as she
spoke to the audience.
"We do terrible things
in addiction," she said,
her voice cracking. "It's a
beautiful thing not to cheat,
steal, run or lie. The 12 steps
have kept me clean. I am
the happiest I have ever
been in my life, but I will
never deny who I am. I am
an addict."
James told those in atten-
dance that he was not there
to preach to anyone, and
that avoiding alcohol and
drugs is a constant battle.
"Every day, it's a fight to
stay sober," he said. "I take
it one day at a time. It's a
program to try. You gotta
try. We are in the lifesaving
business. Not only trying to
save your life but saving
ours."


questions that assume the
tax extension is a done deal.
"The questions have to
be phrased in such a way
that makes someone say,
'Hmmm, what's my opinion
on this?' on any questions
that we pose," committee
member Bill Schafer said.
"The rules are, the ques-
tions can't be leading, they
can't be 'yes' or 'no,' and
they can't be a one-word
answer."
The committee agreed
last week to shave time from
each of the other five topics


ti; -




...C 2 .,
S.C.N* t


of discussion and allocate
an hour and a half to the
sales-tax discussion on the
last day of the assembly. It
will be the last item on the
agenda.
The one-cent sales tax,
levied by Charlotte County
to raise revenue for con-
struction, reconstruction,
improvements of public
facilities and economic-de-
velopment projects, raises
the sales tax from 6 percent
to 7 percent. The tax, which
was extended by voters in
2008, will sunset Dec. 31,


Donnie Costa, Steve
Wodarski and Carmen
Elias handed out
brochures for Second
Chance Recovery.


2014, unless extended by
voter referendum.
Previous sales-tax ex-
tensions were passed in
1993, 1997, 2001 and 2008,
and, according to County
Administrator Ray Sandrock,
have generated a total of
$346 million in additional
revenue.
The Charlotte Assembly
will meet Oct. 16 and 17
at the Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280
Aaron St., Port Charlotte.

Email: bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER
The pile of scrap metal at Allied Recycling in Port Charlotte in mid-September was not as high as it usually
is. But employees say that business is still good, despite many criminals being deterred by new laws put into
place in July to help crack down on illegal scrapping.


to increased attention from
deputies.
"Our proactive approach
is also a big part of it," he
said.
Maler pointed out depu-
ties are patrolling suspect
areas more often, and are
making an extra effort to
keep a healthy relationship
with local scrapyards by
visiting them as much as
possible.


"And some of the bigger
crimes get put out in the
media," Maler said. "People
may see it and say, 'Maybe
we shouldn't do this.'"
And though many
criminal scrappers may
continue to be deterred,
scrapyards still have plenty
of customers.
"I wouldn't say business
has gone down so much,"
said Donna Boccanfuso, a


customer service represen-
tative with Allied Recycling
in Port Charlotte.
"We do have people
who get angry at all the
questions we ask and all
the procedures," she said.
"But by the time they're
done and we talk to them,
they understand what it's
all for."

Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


FAMILY ALBUM


Rene and Jane Schneider celebrat-
ed their 60th wedding anniversary
Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013.
They both went through Japanese-
occupied territory during World War II,
and met after the war ended at a dance.
Rene and Jane both repatriated to the
Netherlands, and continued to get to
know each other better. They decid-
ed to get married Sept. 24, 1953, in
Amsterdam, and did marry in church,
as well as for a civilian.
Not liking the damp weather in
Holland, they decided to immigrate to
the USA. Linwood Presbyterian Church
in Kansas City, Mo., sponsored them,
and after they became members, they
had a marvelous and active time at the
homebuilders class. Their membership
lasted for many years.
Jane started to work for the Belgian
Trade Office, and soon was offered
to transfer to the Belgian Consulate
General in Chicago, Ill., and accepted.
Jane worked there for 25 years until she
retired. Rene worked as a sales repre-
sentative, and later had an opportunity
to buy a lamp repair and lampshade
business, and decided to retire at 67.
They now spend their retirement in
Florida, where they've stayed for 20
years to this day.


FAMILY ALBUM

ANNOUNCEMENTS

$27 for a photo, up to 200 words

$54 for a photo, up to 300 words


Stop by your local Sun office
to pick up a form.




Fiction
1."Never Go Back,"by Lee Child (Delacorte: $28)
Jack Reacher is on the run after the army arrests him
for a crime he can't remember committing.
2."W is for Wasted,";by Sue Grafton (Putnam:
$28.95) A homeless man, one of two seemingly
unrelated deaths, leaves sleuth Kinsey Millhone an
inheritance.
3."MaddAddam,"by Margaret Atwood (Nan A.
Talese: $27.95) A plague leaves few survivors ready to
rebuild in this final book in the dystopian trilogy.
4."And the Mountains Echoed;'by Khaled Hosseini
(Riverhead: $28.95) A father's decision to give his
3-year-old daughter to a wealthy family in Kabul
begins a 60-year Afghan history lesson.
5. "Someone," by Alice McDermott (Farrar, Straus
and Giroux: $25.95) An Irish-Catholic woman's ordinary
life from childhood on in a Brooklyn neighborhood.
6. "The Cuckoo's Calling;' by Robert Galbraith
(Mulholland Books: $26) An ex-soldier turned detective
investigates a supermodel's suicide.
7. "Dissident Gardens;' by Jonathan Lethem
(Doubleday: $27.95) Three generations of one family of
American Communist true believers.
8."The Fault in Our Stars,"by John Green (Dutton:
$17.99) Two teenagers fighting cancer fall in love.
9."Wonder,"by R.J. Palacio (Knopf: $15.99) The
trials and triumphs of a 10-year-old boy starting school
for the first time.
10."Night Film,"by Marisha Pessl (Random House:
$28) A reporter investigates the death of the daughter
of a cult film director in this noir-esque mystery.

Nonfiction
1. "Still Foolin'Em," by Billy Crystal (Holt: $28) The
comedian looks back at his life, career and the absurd
challenges of turning 65.
2. "Salinger,"by David Shields and Shane Salerno
(Simon & Schuster: $37.50) Newly discovered material
reveals a deeper insight into the author's reclusive life.
3. "Empty Mansions,"'by Bill Dedman (Ballantine:
$28) A portrait of the mysterious and eccentric heiress
of the Gilded Age, Huguette Clark.
4. "Zealot," by Reza Aslan (Random House: $27) The
religion scholar examines the life of Jesus during first
century Palestine.
5."Wilson,"by A. Scott Berg (Putnam: $40) Newly
discovered material sheds new light on the life of
President Woodrow Wilson.
6."Grumpy Cat;'," by Grumpy Cat (Chronicle: $12.95)
A scrapbook filled with photos and quips of the cat
with the perpetually frowny face.
7. "Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls," by David
Sedaris (Little, Brown: $27) The essayist's recent collec-
tion of his life's travails and travel tales.
8."Lean In,"by Sheryl Sandberg (Knopf: $24.95)
The Facebook executive offers observations on gender
inequities in the professional world.
9."Lawrence in Arabia,"by Scott Anderson (Doubleday:
$28.95) The tale ofT.E. Lawrence and the main players
involved in the Middle Eastern theater of WWI.
10."Si-cology 1;'by Si Robertson (Howard Books:
$22.99) Stories from "Duck Dynasty's" Uncle Si's youth.


Narcotics Anonymous workers Roger L., Mike C. and Larry A. assist
people struggling to rid themselves of substance abuse.


Diana Clarke, Dawn Clark and April Esposito of Charlotte Behavioral
Health Care helped to coordinate the event.






Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun ISunday, September 29, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Just another

routine day of

laudable actions

OUR POSITION: Kudos to
those who demonstrate their
integrity with action.

t seemed peculiar, in a good
way.
But we couldn't help being
struck by the number of stories
about random acts of kindness,
good deeds and courage re-
ported in our newspapers last
Wednesday.
Most likely, it just happened
to be one of those days when
certain things fall together. But
fall they did, a little like the recent
rain. In buckets. Enough to make
us take notice and mention it to
one another.
There mixed in with the
typical stew of misdeeds and mis-
demeanors, comics and obituar-
ies, crosswords, classified, NFL
stats, box scores and government
meeting reports were a fistful
of stories about people in our
community doing unusual things
that merited note.
Something special? Maybe
more than usual. But something
good. No doubt about that.
In case you missed them:
The city of North Port gave
a certificate to Jose Efrain
Ochoa-Ochoa.
On Aug. 28, Ochoa-Ochoa
was on his way to work when he
encountered a car nearly sub-
merged in a canal. The driver was
stuck inside.
Ochoa-Ochoa and a friend
jumped into the water, tried the
doors and finally got the man
out.
"I put him on my back. The
water was nearly over our
heads," he told the Sun's Elaine
Allen-Emrich.
He pulled the driver up the
bank, and they were both there
when rescue trucks arrived.
Derrick Mietz, a cook at
Chili's in Port Charlotte, helped
the restaurant raise thousands
for St. Jude Children's Research
Hospital. He was responsible for
$3,762 himself.
Mietz signed up for a 24-hour
bike ride-fundraiser and had the
St. Jude's logo shaved into the
back of his head.
"I wanted to be the top
fundraiser," Mietz told the Sun's
Christy Feinberg. He was.
A small thing, perhaps, but
Randy Leisch and his daughter,
Mellissa Mariano, were pho-
tographed rescuing a pelican
that had become tangled in
fishing line at Venice Pier. Others
watched; they saved its life.
Cynthia Shafer told Sun
correspondent Al Hemingway
about her 12-year-old Bed for
Kids program, an offshoot of the
Guardian ad Litem program.
She and others deliver beds,
mattresses, sheets and pillows
to children many abused and
neglected caught up in the
court system. Without beds, kids
can't be moved from foster to
extended-family care. So beds it
is. Roughly 160 per year.
"When I get that big hug from
a child, after we help them make
their bed, it helps get me through
another week," Shafer said.
Brock Rodriguez, age 5,
received a citation and assorted
presents among them a bat-
tery-operated police cruiser for
showing bravery during a home
invasion.
On the night of June 23, Brock
and his mother, Laurie, heard
loud knocking at their door.
They ran off to the closet and
hid. A burglar broke down the
door and began carting things
off. He opened the closet door
and grabbed a jewelry box.
Throughout, Brock kept still.
Police caught the burglar
outside. Happy ending. Thanks,
in part, to one frightened, but
quiet, kid.
Bad things happen every day.
Good things too. Many of the


good things come thanks to our
neighbors who display their
integrity and heart with action.
Well done, all.


x


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Supports Counsil
in Punta Gorda

Editor:
This year there will be an
election for the Punta Gorda
City Council seat which I
have occupied for seven
years. Absentee ballots will
be mailed out shortly and
the actual election will take
place on Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Of the two candidates,
Charlie Counsil is the most
knowledgeable and best
prepared to independently
continue and expand the
initiatives and programs that
have made Punta Gorda such
a special place to live.
I urge you to join with me
and other former mayors
and council members to
elect Charlie Counsil to the
Punta Gorda City Council.
Bill Albers
Punta Gorda

It's Lemon Bay,
not Charlotte Harbor

Editor:
I am wondering about
the name Charlotte Harbor
Super Boat Grande Prix.
They seem to be rac-
ing from Stump Pass to
Englewood Beach. Living in
Englewood most of my life,
I thought this is Lemon Bay.
At least it is on the map, and
not Charlotte Harbor.
To me Charlotte Harbor
would be Punta Gorda, Port
Charlotte area, etc. Kind of a
misgiving statement.
As an APPA boat racer
myself, and avid boater of
all types of boats for years,
I raced in Lemon Bay not
in Charlotte Harbor. My
father had a outboard and
boat business in Englewood
45 years and advertised on
Lemon Bay, not Charlotte
Harbor.
Nancy Wille
Englewood

U.S. gun culture
perverse, mindless
Editor:
Unless you were under a
rock for the past few months,
you are aware of the horrific
event that transpired in an
Oklahoma City suburb. A


young man from Australia,
who came to America to
follow his dream of playing
college baseball, was brutally
gunned down by three thugs
who were bored with their
lives and wanted to expe-
rience the thrill of killing
someone.
Most of us shook our
heads and asked how
something as monstrous as
this young man's murder
could happen in a suppos-
edly civilized society. Just
contemplate for a moment
the violence displayed in all
forms of social media today,
whether it be video games,
television programming,
or movie theaters. If young
people are subjected to a
constant barrage of murder
and mayhem, then what else
can one expect from their
behavior?
The people producing this
inane violent excrement
may not admit it, but they
are contributing to the
moral decay of this nation.
This factor, combined with
the proliferation of guns
available in this country, are
equally part of this growing
problem.
In a Melbourne, Australia,
newspaper article, the
author proclaimed that
Australians can count their
blessings that they are not
living in a gun-crazed society
which is inundated with
94.3 guns for every 100 U.S.
citizens.
I completely understand
why citizens of other nations
would not want to visit a
country with a perverse and
mindless gun culture, that
protects the right to own
guns, regardless of the cost
in human lives.
Joseph Martin
Port Charlotte

Supports Counsil
in Punta Gorda

Editor:
On Nov. 5, the city of Punta
Gorda will be holding an
election to fill the open City
Council seat resulting from
the retirement of current
Mayor Bill Albers. This will
be a very important election
in which all registered city
residents will be able to vote.
Having had the privilege to
have served on the council
as either mayor or vice
mayor in the challenging
post-Hurricane Charley and
economic downturn years


of 2007-2012,1 I know from
experience just how import-
ant it is for our great city to
be led by the most qualified
people on the City Council.
Many of the challenges
of those years still exist
today, along with the need
to continue the progress we
have experienced to fulfill
the vision and potential of
what Punta Gorda can be.
While we are fortunate to
have two qualified can-
didates to choose from, I
believe Charlie Counsil is the
most skilled, knowledgeable,
independent and overall
qualified to fill this seat.
It is for these reasons that
I am joining the current
and former city mayors in
support of Charlie Counsil
for the Punta Gorda City
Council, and urge all city
voters to do the same.
Harvey Goldberg
Punta Gorda

All nations should
disarm their nukes

Editor:
I suggest that an effective


method of enforci
tion and disabling
and chemical wea
would be to have
do the same.


Supporting C
in Punta G

Editor:
A year after Hurr
Charley, I spoke be
governor and his C
and stated that the
Punta Gorda are ve
and they would see
three to five years c
Punta Gorda that w
taken maybe 15 or
change, if at all. Pu
has rebounded.
The city of Punta
has seen a remark
outstanding recove
Hurricane Charley.
ery was due to a sti
dedicated city man
and staff and a forx
ing strong City Cou
To keep this mor
the future, we need
of strong manager
organization skills
Council.
I believe that Cha
Counsil will bring t
to the council and


I am joining other former
mayors in requesting all Punta
Gorda voters to select Charlie
Counsil on Nov. 5.
Steve Fabian
Punta Gorda

A prayer for
this country

Editor:
God bless our national
and state leaders and their
families.
Please guide them to:
Make drastic cuts to our
deficit.
Reduce the size and cost of
government.
Eliminate perks and tax
breaks for special interest
groups.
Remove regulations that
put a financial burden on
small business folk.
Restore the respect and
reputation our country once
had so we can be proud
again to be Americans.
Amen.
C. Edward Dahn
Port Charlotte

Wants more space
to express opinion

Editor:
I wrote a letter to the
editor awhile back about
the county commissioners
getting too involved in the
Impact building purchase,
which never happened. Your
editing cut out a lot of the
pertinent information and
issues about that purchase
in my article. Well you, the
editors, had me reduce my
opinion by 50-75 words
and then edited my article
even more to make it 250
words or less. I just finished
reading a letter to the editor
about his complaint filed
against Commissioner
Duffy. It seems you must
have forgotten how to
count. His letter was over
700 words. Wow, looks like
you, "the media," play favor-
itism even public opinion.
Just the facts!
Kirk Johnson
Port Charlotte

Accountability
a must on boards
Editor:


ng inspec- In response to the letter
of nuclear on Sept. 23 about Section
pons 23 Property Owners
all nations Association. It is absolutely
appalling that this kind of
Gene Leboy treatment still goes on in
Port Charlotte today's society.
Port Charlotte A property owner asking
questions that he is right-
Counsil fully entitled to, then being
cursed at after the meeting
orda by the association president.
What brings on this sort of
anger and hostility toward
icane another person?
fore the Board members have an
abinet obligation to their members.
people of If they don't like this, then
*ry resilient step down. Remember,
in the next people of any community,
changes in stand up for what is right
vould have and vote whoever out if your
20 years to not happy. Overall, people
inta Gorda should be held accountable
for their actions.
Gorda Charles Hauser
[ble and Punta Gorda
ry since
This recov-
rong and A lot of money
i (arno n ant


ward-look-
incil.
mentum for
I persons
nent and
on the City

arlie
hose skills
that is why


for a tortoise


Editor:
Can someone please explain
to me how it could possibly
cost $1,110 to remove one
tortoise from the Winchester
South construction site?
Sally Brandt
Rotonda West


LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
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included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
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OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013











'Come again another day'


Good morning.
Rain, enough already.
We are ending our four
wettest months. We
are ready for some dry,
sunny days.
It seems we have been
blessed with more than
our usual summer share
of nature's gift. Still
there was that summer
of 1995, when Charlotte
County and North
Port got half a foot or
more in one morning.
Records show over a
foot and a half for the
month in both years.
The water crept up the
front steps of the Sun
office and stopped inch-
es shy of entering the
building. Our parking
lot was a shallow pond.
Writer Don Moore's car
began to float away
from the building until
halted by a high spot in
the asphalt.
The highway running


from the Tamiami Trail
to Interstate 75 acted
as a dam to a sheet flow
that seemed to know
its home was the Peace
River. We had to rent a
high-wheeled truck to
bring our employees
from the high ground at
Schoolhouse Square to
our rear loading dock
so they could get to
work. After that storm
we decided to buy an
old school bus whose
wheelbase lifted its deck
to permit crossing a
couple of feet of water.
Later the highway was


widened and the county
cleared the drainage
ditch and enlarged the
opening under the road.
Floodwaters flowed un-
der the highway to the
river. We sold the bus.
Checking the daily
rainfall records for the
last 25 years, it appears
my guess is about
right. In our corner
of Florida we average
in the neighborhood
of 50 inches a year.
Over half that comes
during the four summer
months, June through
September. Around 30
inches is a four-month
summer average. In the
summer of 1995 we got
enough rain for a whole
year with 4 1 feet in four
months. September
records for this year will
end Monday night. This
summer will be close to
or top the rainy summer
of 1995.


Red-light cameras.
I've written about them
before, not favorably.
State Sen. Jeff Brandes
of St. Petersburg has
filed a bill to do away
with them when the
Legislature meets next
winter. There is some ev-
idence that the red-light
cameras do not lessen
the number of acci-
dents. In fact, they may
increase the number of
rear-enders. The same
studies suggest they do
lessen the number of the
most severe "T" crashes
where the impact is
front end to driver or
passenger side.
My objection is to
the financial gain. For
cities and counties, it is
money in the bank with
no effort on their part.
No capital outlay, no
additional personnel,
no bookkeeping. The


camera suppliers will
sell the equipment for
no money down. They
will pay the crews to
install the cameras.
They will arrange for the
identification of those
running the red lights
and handle the ticketing
busy work. Each month
the city or county gets a
check for the collections
from the mailing of the
red-light fines, less the
costs of running the pro-
gram and payments on
the installment sale of
the cameras. No sweat,
it's easy money. It is not
particularly important
how much is paid for the
equipment and service.
Local government
collects and sends the
state of Florida a cut of
the new cash flow. It is a
payoff for the Legislature
passing the law.
Easy money is tempt-
ing and like many of the


"you can't lose schemes"
there is a temptation to
be careless. Palm Beach
wonders if it made a
mistake. They have
not made any money
yet and have a half
million-dollar obligation
to their supplier.
Some cities have been
tempted to reduce the
number of seconds
in which the motorist
needs to stop his or her
vehicle. A heavy share of
the fines is for right-on-
red turns where the car
is supposed to come to
a complete halt before
turning. Many a driver
with a clear field of vi-
sion is slowing to a crawl
and then proceeding.
The camera just loves
them.
Derek Dunn-Rankin is
chairman of Sun Coast
Media Group. He can
be reached at derekdr@
sun-herald.com.


McCain and Cruz: A character study


more in 10 minutes
on the Senate floor
tan Ted Cruz did in
21 hours.
The Texas hothead had
just completed his im-
pressive bladderbuster,
in which he discussed
Ashton Kutcher and
Toby Keith, did a Darth
Vader impression, recited
passages from Ayn Rand,
read "Green Eggs and
Ham" to his daughters at
home, and spoke directly
to his "sweetheart" via
C-SPAN. At the end,
he thanked dozens of
people for their contri-
butions to his marathon,
as if rolling the credits on
the heroic film of his life.
To the extent that
Cruz's phony filibuster
had a point (it didn't
delay any vote), it was
to shame his fellow
Republicans into joining
his crusade to shut
down the government if
Obamacare isn't defund-
ed; those who disagreed,
he said, were like "Neville


Chamberlain, who
told the British people,
Accept the Nazis.'"
Half an hour after Cruz
yielded the floor "by
force," he claimed, even
though he had declined
an offer from Majority
Leader Harry Reid,
D-Nev., to speak for
an additional hour -
McCain delivered a few
words that could have
taught his young col-
league something about
honor.
"I resoundingly reject
that allegation," the
Arizona Republican
said after reading Cruz's
words aloud. "To allege
that there are people
today who are like those


who, prior to World War
II, didn't stand up and
oppose the atrocities
that were taking place in
Europe, because I have
an open and honest
disagreement with the
process ... is an inappro-
priate place for debate
on the floor of the United
States Senate."
McCain said Cruz's
words belittled those
who served in the war,
including his father and
grandfather. He then
used the rest of his brief
speech to defend his
record in opposition
to Obamacare, which
shouldn't have been nec-
essary: Nobody fought
harder against the health
care reforms.
The difference between
the two men has nothing
to do with who hates
Obamacare more. Rather,
their difference is one
of character. McCain
exhorts his colleagues
to serve a cause greater
than self, as he did as
a prisoner of war in


Vietnam. Cruz acts as
though the greatest cause
is himself.
A casual observer of
Cruz's antics could see
what his colleagues had
been grumbling about
privately: that his time
on the Senate floor was
an exercise in self-pro-
motion. Cruz must have
been sensitive about this,
for he felt the need to
protest sometime around
hour 17, "I would be
perfectly happy if not a
single story coming out
of this ever mentioned
my name."
This is the same man
who spoke at great
length about his father's
cooking, an auto acci-
dent his wife had had
and what views he might
have in common with
Kutcher. He demon-
strated his regard for the
institution by working in
the phrase "give a flying
flip" and kissed up to
Rush Limbaugh by read-
ing something written by
the radio host's father.


In the end, Cruz joined
the 99 other senators
in voting to proceed
with the debate on the
legislation Cruz seeks
to block. He said he
would take his stand on
the next vote, but that
probably won't go much
better for him in no
small part because of
colleagues' disdain for
him, which McCain gave
voice to after the fresh-
man senator finished his
bladderbuster.
McCain ridiculed the
"extended oratory" and
then recounted his own
opposition to the legisla-
tion. "We fought as hard
as we could in a fair and
honest manner and we
lost," he said. In 2012, he
went on, "I campaigned
all over America for two
months, everywhere I
could, and in every single
campaign rally I said,
And we have to repeal
and replace Obamacare.'
Well, the people spoke ...
That doesn't mean that
we give up our efforts to


try to replace and repair
Obamacare. But it does
mean that elections have
consequences."
While McCain spoke of
honoring the will of the
electorate, Cruz was mov-
ing on to give Limbaugh
an interview in which he
said he was honoring the
will of the broadcaster's
listeners. "We're listening
to the same bosses and
trying to respond to the
same people who are
frustrated," Cruz said.
Maybe it was the
fatigue, but Cruz made
a surprisingly frank
admission to Limbaugh.
"In many ways," he said,
"the central issue that we
were trying to focus on in
the filibuster was not the
continuing resolution. It
wasn't even Obamacare."
Right. It was
narcissism.

Dana Milbank is a
Washington Post colum-
nist. Readers may reach
him at danamilbank@
washpost.com.


A tale of two parts of the same city


It was the suddenness
that shocked me.
This is one night
22 years ago. I had just
moved to Miami and was
visiting Coconut Grove
for the first time. I re-
member being charmed.
The side streets were
lined with cozy bunga-
lows. On the main streets
there was light and music
and an air of bohemia
going upscale that made
you want to linger and
people-watch as women
who looked as if they just
stepped from the pages
of Vogue were squired
to and from nightclubs,
restaurants and bou-
tiques by handsome men
in guayaberas.
Leaving, I drove west
on Grand Avenue and ...
bang. Just like that, I was
in another place. Here,
there was less light and
no music, nor flocks of
date-night couples, nor
really anybody except
a few guys standing
around, silently marking
my passage. The build-
ings rose shadowy and
WM M.ru. .M. M.


Leonard
M -1 Pitts
Ipitt1 miamiherald.0om

quiet in meager pools
of illumination cast by
street lights. These were
not streets for lingering.
These were streets for
passing quickly through.
I didn't know it then,
but I was in West Grove,
the hardscrabble, histori-
cally black area that abuts
Coconut Grove. I had
driven less than a mile
- and ended up on the
other side of the world.
Ever since that night,
the two Groves have
struck me as a vivid
illustration of the stark
dualities of race and class
in a nation that likes to
tell itself it has overcome
the former and made
immaterial the latter. If
you're one of those who


still believes that fiction,
consider this scenario:
Dangerous levels of
contaminants have been
found in the soil of a
residential neighborhood.
What happens next?
Turns out though
not to the surprise of
anyone who understood
the fiction to be just
that that it depends
very much upon race and
class. Just days after the
discovery of toxins in the
soil of a park in Coconut
Grove, residents were
alerted, the park closed,
the soil capped. All within
the last few weeks.
Down the street on
the other side of the
world, it was a different
story. There, in 2011,
soil was found to be
contaminated on the site
of an incinerator Old
Smokey that had
belched ash into the air
from the 1930s until it
was closed in 1970.


County environmental
officials ordered the city
to find out if the contam-
inants posed a risk and
draft a plan for dealing
with it. They gave the city
a 60-day deadline. The
city missed it. They gave
the city another deadline.
It missed that, too.
Residents were told
none of this, knew noth-
ing about it, until the ini-
tial finding was unearthed
this year two years
later by a University of
Miami researcher. Now we
learn that city tests have
found this land, which
sits next to a park and
a community center, to
be chock full of poisons,
among them arsenic, lead,
and benzo(a)pyrene, a
carcinogen.
Just days ago, officials
declared the site is not a
health risk. West Grove
residents can perhaps
be forgiven if they are
skeptical.


People often profess to
be confused when I write
about systemic inequity.
Absent the caricature
of some guy in a pointy
white hood, they can see
no racism. Absent the
cliche of some society
lady with nose elevated
and pinky extended, they
have no conception of
classism. They can under-
stand these as individual
failings, yes. But what
in the world is systemic
oppression?
Well, it is this, right
here.
It is a child whose
health is zealously safe-
guarded at one end of the
street and a child who is
allowed to play on soil sat-
urated with carcinogens
and heavy metals on the
other. It is the city making
a determination, albeit de
facto, that the latter child's
life has less worth.
Shame on Miami for
that.


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Shame on us all.
These inequities exist
because we allow them,
because we condone by
our silence the two-
tiered treatment and
second-class citizenship
of those who are not us.
Well, in this country,
people have the right to
expect they will be treated
as if they matter.
Even if they live along
shadowed streets on the
other side of the world.

Leonard Pitts]Jr is a
columnist for the Miami
Herald. Readers may
reach him at lpitts@
miamiherald.com.

Charlotte Hearing
Center, Inc.


Bethany L. Walden, Au.D.
Board Certified Doctor ofAudiology

Hearing
Evaluations &
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"Since 1984"
21216 Olean Blvd.,
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Port Charlotte
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766-8886
Most Major BrandsAvailable


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 9


VIEWPOINT





Our Town Page10 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


VIEWPOINT


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


A ruinous opportun


When Dwight
Eisenhower
asked Gen.
Georgy Zhukov how the
Red Army cleared mine-
fields, Zhukov replied:
"We march through
them." Being profligate
with lives is a perqui-
site of command and a
luxury of those with an
abundance of lives at
their command. Some
congressional Republi-
cans, who do not com-
mand their party but
can implicate it in their
marches through mine-
fields, might resuscitate
Barack Obama's presi-
dency by restocking his
pantry of excuses: The
economy's continuing
anemia will ever after be
blamed on any govern-
ment shutdown.
The face of this
Republican faction is
Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, on
whose boots glistens
dew from the grass
roots. Recently, he
was making desultory
passes at breakfast
oatmeal after returning
to Washington at 2 a.m.
from a Manhattan
television studio, where
he exhorted conser-
vatives nationwide to


somehow force Obama
to accept defunding
of the Affordable Care
Act. Cruz explained his
thinking:
It is two minutes
until midnight. On
Jan. 1, 2014, the ACA's
insurance subsidies
begin, like a heroin
drip, making Americans
instant addicts. The
Obama administration
knows that no major
entitlement, once tast-
ed, has been repealed.
The administration is
uninterested in en-
forcing the subsidies'
eligibility requirements.
Hence Republicans
must be prepared to
shutter the government.
Obama will be blamed
for resulting inconve-
niences because he will
have vetoed funding
for everything rather
than accepting denial


of funding for one thing
- the ACA. Granted,
Republicans, not
President Bill Clinton,
were blamed for the
1995 shutdown. But
today's circumstances
are different because
of the rise of the con-
servative grass roots.
The defeat of Obama's
gun-control agenda,
Rand Paul's filibuster
about presidential use
of drones, and opposi-
tion to attacking Syria
prove that presidents
and traditional media
no longer dominate
national debates. Since
1995, the burgeoning of
conservative journalism,
talk radio, the Internet
and social media has
changed everything.
Well. Those people
who are best at deceiv-
ing others first deceive
themselves. They often
do so by allowing their
wishes to be the fathers
of their thoughts, and
begin by wishing that
everything has changed.
If the ACA is, as
conservatives believe, as
unpleasant in potential
effects as it is impossi-
ble to implement, con-
servatives should allow


what Lincoln called "the
silent artillery of time"
to destroy it. Obama
is one of those who
mistake their good luck
for genius. Having been
wafted into high office
by gusts of Republican
failures, he became the
first president to win
a second term with
reduced percentages
of both the popular
and electoral votes.
Nevertheless, Obama
remains mesmerized by
himself. He has not no-
ticed that many objects
of his rhetorical support
- the ACA; scores of
Democratic candidates;
his gun-control agenda;
his plan to attack Syria
- have not become
popular.
The government
should not be closed;
the debt ceiling will
be raised. Republicans
should, however, take
to heart the last words
of H.L. Mencken's
summation of Theodore
Roosevelt: "Well, one
does what one can."
Republicans can give
Democrats a ruinous
opportunity to insist
upon unpopular things.
House Republicans can


attach to the continuing
resolution that funds
the government, and
then to the increase in
the debt ceiling, two
provisions: Preservation
of the ACA requirement
- lawlessly disregarded
by the administration
- that members of
Congress and their
staffs must experience
the full enjoyment of
the ACA without special
ameliorating subsidies.
And a one-year delay
of the ACA's individual
mandate.
By vetoing legislation
because of these provi-
sions, and by having his
vetoes sustained by con-
gressional Democrats,
Obama will underscore
Democrats' devotion:
Devotion to self-dealing
by the political class,
and to the principle that
only powerful interests
(businesses), not mere
citizens, can delay the
privilege of complying
with the ACA.
Arithmetic, not
moral failings, makes
Republicans unable
to overturn Obama's
vetoes. So after
scoring some points,
Republicans should


vote, more in sorrow
than in anger, to fund
the government (at
sequester levels, a
significant victory) and
to increase the debt
ceiling. Having forced
Democrats to dramatize
their perverse priorities,
Republicans can turn to
completing the neuter-
ing of this presidency
by winning six Senate
seats.
Republicans now
making a moral melo-
drama over any vote
that allows the ACA
to be funded should
remember Everett
Dirksen of Illinois.
The leader of Senate
Republicans during
passage of the 1964
Civil Rights Act recalled,
"Forty preachers caught
me one afternoon there
in that lobby. 'I am not
a moralist,' I told them,
'I am a legislator.'" It
is good to be both; it is
sterile to be the former
to the exclusion of the
latter.
George Will is a
columnist for the
Washington Post.
Readers may reach him
at georgewill@washpost.
com.


After talking the talk, Ted Cruz wins


Long ago, Ted Cruz
earned the hatred
of every elected
Democrat in Washing-
ton. Now, he's on his way
to doing the same with
nearly every Republican.
Soon, it will be almost a
clean sweep.
He is, to paraphrase
Winston Churchill's quip
about Secretary of State
John Foster Dulles, a
bull who carries a china
shop with him. He had
barely begun his 21-hour
filibuster or, to be
strictly precise, 21-hour-
long speech when he
compared his doubters
to appeasers of Adolf
Hitler, and he ended it
roughly a day later with
a prickly exchange with
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid.
The Cruz eye-rollers
had plenty of occasions
to roll their eyes -
perhaps no senator
has caused so many
colleagues to mutter
under their breaths in his
first eight months in the
world's greatest delib-
erative body but the
conservative grass roots
cheered. They are des-
perate for passion and,
above all, fight, and Cruz
delivered them during
his long hours holding
forth on C-SPAN2.
We should stipulate
upfront that he is
not going to defund
Obamacare. As a legisla-
tive strategy, the defund
effort is far-fetched to the
point of absurdity. The
theory is that on the cusp
of or after a government


shutdown, pressure
becomes so intense on
Democrats that Reid
buckles and passes a
measure defunding
Obamacare, and Barack
Obama signs it.
Let's put aside for
the moment that
Democrats believe -
probably rightly that
Republicans will be
blamed for any shut-
down. Why would a little
downside political risk
in the current confron-
tation move them? We're
talking about a party
that spent decades trying
to pass something like
Obamacare and a presi-
dent who was content to
lose his House majority
over it.
The Cruz all-nighter
wasn't a legislative tactic
so much as it was what
19th century anarchists
called "the propaganda
of the deed." It made a
point. It dramatically
reaffirmed Republican
resolve to repealing
Obamacare. It drove
more debate about
the health care law. It
perhaps opened up
space for more realistic
immediate Republican
goals, such as a delay in
the individual mandate,


wtLcetl/entce

-,6,t


in the impending fiscal
fights.
It also saved Cruz's
reputation among the
tea-party conservatives.
The House passed its
defunding measure in
a passive-aggressive
mood, as if to say,
"All right, big guy, you
wanted this now let's
see what you can do with
it." The reaction in the
House when Cruz said
the measure didn't have
the votes in the Senate
was anger combined
with schadenfreude at
his presumed comeup-
pance. Rarely have so
many harsh background
quotes been given to
so many reporters with


such glee.
By spending nearly
an entire day attacking
Obamacare on the
Senate floor, though,
Cruz demonstrated
enough gutsiness to
take the sting out of his
imminent defeat.
In the longer run, the
outcome in the short
term is irrelevant to
Cruz's stature as a con-
servative leader. No one
asked whether Ronald
Reagan had successfully
blocked the ratification
of the Panama Canal
Treaty in 1977 when
he ran for president in
1980. For that matter,
no one asked whether
Sen. Barack Obama had


successfully defunded
the Iraq War in 2007
when he ran for presi-
dent in 2008.
Obama's example is
instructive: When before
have we heard of a new
senator capturing the
imagination of his party's
base, establishing an
unimpeachable standard
of purity on a hot-button
issue absolutely essential
to it and beginning to
run for president shortly
after arriving on the
national scene?
Who knows whether
Cruz ultimately tries
the same thing. But the
scoffers are probably the
same kind of people who
chuckled at backbencher


Newt Gingrich giving
speeches to an empty
House chamber on
C-SPAN so many de-
cades ago. Gingrich was
playing an outside game,
and so is Cruz. The
disdain for him among
insiders will be inversely
related to the admira-
tion for him among the
much more important
outsiders.
They will sustain him
in a crusade against
Obamacare that, alas,
will extend long beyond
this fall's fiscal fights.
Rich Lowry is the editor
of the National Review.
Readers may reach him
at comments.lowry@
nationalreview. com.


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3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME

9 3112

9/29/13


AMENDED INVITATION TO BID
Invitation to bid for the Property
Management Services for the
Section 23 Property Owner's
Association. Proposal specifica-
tions are available at the Section
23 P.O.A. office located at 26217
Rampart Blvd., Punta Gorda,
Florida. Bids will be submitted on
the basis of a single contract
term of (2) two years commenc-
ing on December 1, 2013 and
renewable on December 1, 2015.
Bids will be submitted by 3:00PM
EST, October 23, 2013 and will
be opened in private.
Publish: 9/29/13 and 10/6/13
218798 2945447

NOTICE OF ACTION
Z 3116


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 12003416CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRUCE ANDREWS, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES,
ASIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTH-
ERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST IN THE ESTATE OF BRUCE
ANDREWS A/K/A BRUCE E.
ANDREWS
whose residence is unknown if
he/she/they be living; and if
he/she/they be dead, the
unknown defendants who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties
claiming an interest by, through,
under or against the Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property described
in the mortgage being foreclosed
herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property in
CHARLOTTE County, Florida:
UNIT 505, THE TOWNHOMES
AT CAPE HAZE, A CONDO-
MINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF CONDO-
MINIUM THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 2977, PAGE
1440, AS THEREAFTER
AMENDED, AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN CON-
DOMINIUM BOOK 15, PAGE
25, AS THEREAFTER AMEND-
ED, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on TRIPP SCOTT, P.A., the Plain-
tiff's attorney, whose address is
110 S.E. 6th Street, 15th Floor,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301,
on or before 10-24-13, 2013, (no
later than 30 days from the date
of the first publication of this
Notice of Action) and file this orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition filed herein.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court at CHARLOTTE
County, Florida, this 18 day of
Sept, 2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: D.C.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTI-
TLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CER-
TAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT THE ADMINISTRA-
TIVE SERVICES MANAGER,
WHOSE OFFICE IS LOCATED
AT 350 E. MARION AVENUE,
PUNTA GORDA, FLORIDA
33950, AND WHOSE TELE-
PHONE NUMBER IS (941)
637-2281, WITHIN TWO
WORKING DAYS OF YOUR
RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OR
PLEADING; IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 711.
Publish: 9/22/13 and 9/29/13
322180 2942460
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 08-2012-CA003769
BANK OF AMERICA, NA.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RANDALL W. NEGRICH, et al,
Defendantss.


NOTICE OF ACTION
: 3116


NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: RANDALL W. NEGRICH
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RANDALL
W. NEGRICH
whose residence is unknown if
he/she/they be living; and if
he/she/they be dead, the
unknown defendants who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties
claiming an interest by, through,
under or against the Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property described
in the mortgage being foreclosed
herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property in
CHARLOTTE County, Florida:
BEING A PART OF THE WEST
1/2 OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE
NW 1/4 OF SECTION 27,
TOWNSHIP 41 SOUTH RANGE
23 EAST, CHARLOTTE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: COMMENCING AT THE
NW CORNER OF THE SOUTH
1/2 OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID
SECTION 27; THENCE N 86
DEGREES 31'59" E, ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
SOUTH 1/2, 1489.62;
THENCE S 00 DEGREES
30'14" W, 53.10 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
JONES LOOP ROAD (55 FEET
SOUTHERLY HALF WIDTH)
AND THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. THENCE N 85
DEGREES 42'54" E, ALONG
SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY LINE 313.24 FEET TO A
POINT OPPOSITE STATION
118+00.00 PER F.D.O.T SEC-
TION 01511-2601 WHICH IS A
POINT OF DECREASE IN
RIGHT-OF-WAY WIDTH FROM
55 FEET TO 50 FEET; THENCE
N 04 DEGREES 17'06" W,
ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, 5.00
FEET; THENCE N 85DEGREES
42'54" E, ALONG SAID
SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 217.75 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SE 1/4
OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 27; THENCE S 00
DEGREES 47'33" W, ALONG
SAID EAST LINE, 1,300.14
FEET TO THE SE CORNER OF
THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SE 1/4
OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 27; THENCE S 87
DEGREES 00'08" W, ALONG
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID NW
1/4, 664.84 FEET TO THE SW
CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF
THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 27, AND THE SE COR-
NER OF THE PLAT OF ALTA
VISTA SUBDIVISION, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 40, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE N
00 DEGREES 30'14" E,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID SE 1/4 AND EAST LINE
OF SAID PLAT, 1.046.56 FEET
TO A POINT AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF AN OUT-
PARCEL RECORDED IN THE
O.R. BOOK 433, PAGE 32 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA. THENCE S 87 DEGREES
24'50" E, ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID PARCEL,
141.60 FEET TO THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF SAID PAR-
CEL; THENCE N 00 DEGREES
30'14" E, ALONG THE EAST
LINE OF SAID PARCEL,
250.00 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any. to
it on TRIPP SCOTT, P.A., the Plain-
tiffs attorney, whose address is
130 S.E. 6' Street, 15"' Floor,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301.
on or before Oct 24, 2013, (no
later than 30 days from the date
of the first publication of this
Notice of Action) and file this orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition filed herein.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court at Charlotte County,
Florida, this 17 day of Septem
ber, 2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: M. B. White
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTI-
TLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CER-
TAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE
CONTACT THE ADMINISTRA-
TIVE SERVICES MANAGER,
WHOSE OFFICE IS LOCATED
AT 350 E. MARION AVENUE,
PUNTA GORDA, FLORIDA
33950, AND WHOSE TELE-
PHONE NUMBER IS (941)
637-2281, WITHIN TWO
WORKING DAYS OF YOUR
RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OR
PLEADING; IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 711.
Publish: 9/29/13 and 10/6/13
322180 2945506


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:
08-2013-CA-001379
THE BANK OF NEW YORK
MELLON TRUST COMPANY,
N.A. F/K/A THE BANK OF
NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY.
N.A.. AS SUCCESSORTN-


NOTICE OF ACTION
Z 3116


INTEREST TO JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, N.A. FIK/A
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, AS
TRUSTEE FOR MASTR
ADJUSTABLE RATE MORT-
GAGES TRUST 2004-8, MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES 2004-8,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN SPROUSE AS TRUSTEE
OF THE 239 RIO DE JANEIRO
TRUST DATED DECEMBER 18,
2004, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
To:
JOHN SPROUSE AS TRUSTEE
OF THE 239 RIO DE JANEIRO
TRUST DATED
DECEMBER 18, 2004
JOHN W. SPROUSE ALSO
KNOWN AS JOHN SPROUSE
Last Known Address:
1601 N Sepulveda Blvd, 631,
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266
Current Address: Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage
on the following property in Char-
lotte County, Florida:
LOT 6, BLOCK 583, PUNTA
GORDA ISLES, SECTION
20, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES
2-A THROUGH 2-Z-42, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
A/K/A 239 RIO DE
JANEIRO AVE PUNTA
GORDA FL 33983-5605
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, if
any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.0,
Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623,
and file the original with this Court
either before October 24, 2013
service on Plaintiff's attorney, or
immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once a week for two consecutive
weeks in the Charlotte Sun-Her-
ald.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on this 17 day of
September, 2013.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
**See the Americans
with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are enti-
tied, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Administrative
Services Manager, whose office
is located at 350 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950 and
whose telephone number is
(941)637-2281, within two (2)
working days of receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8771.
To file response please contact
Charlotte County Clerk of Court,
350 E. Marion Street, Punta
Gorda, FL 33651-1687, Tel:
(941) 637-2238; Fax: (941) 637-
2216.
Publish: 9/22/13 and 9/29/13
272484 2942411
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRIAN GOALEN, et al,
Defendantss.
CASE NO.:
08-2013-CA-001798
DIVISION:
NOTICE OF ACTION
To:
MALISSA GOALEN
ALSO KNOWN AS
MALISSA A. GOALEN
Last Known Address:
15405 Mango Dr,
Punta Gorda, FL 33955
Current Address: Unknown
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN
INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage
on the following property in Char-
lotte County, Florida:
LOT 132 AND 133, SOUTH
PUNTA GORDA HEIGHTS
8TH ADDITION, A SUBDIVI-


SION ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGES 6A THROUGH
6D, INCLUSIVE, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


NOTICE OF ACTION NOTICE OF ACTION OTHER NOTICES
L ^3116 L 3116 LZ 3138


A/K/A 15405 MANGO DR
PUNTA GORDA FL 33955-
1226
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses within 30
days after the first publication, if
any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623,
and file the original with this Court
either before October 24, 2013
service on Plaintiff's attorney, or
immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once a week for two consecutive
weeks in the Charlotte Sun-Her-
ald.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court on this 17th day of Sep-
tember, 2013.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
**See the Americans
with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in a court proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager, whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Ave., Punta
Gorda, FL 33950 and whose
telephone number is
(941)637-2281, within two (2)
working days of receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call 1-800-
955-8771. To file response
please contact Charlotte
County Clerk of Court, 350 E.
Marion Street, Punta Gorda,
FL 33651-1687, Tel: (941)
637-2238: Fax: (941) 637-
2216.
Publish: 9/22/13 and 9/29/13
272484 2942393
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY FLORIDA,
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 13001869CA
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
W. KEVIN RUSSELL, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING-
PROPERTY
TO:
GARY L. WILKINS: ADDRESS
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS:
18501 MURDOCK CIR APT 6,
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33938
MARCIA WILKINS: ADDRESS
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS:
18501 MURDOCK CIR, APT 6,
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33938
Residence unknown and if liv-
ing, including any unknown
spouse of the Defendant, if
remarried and if said Defen-
dant is dead, his/her respec-
tive unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, credi-
tors, lienors, and trustees,
and all other persons claiming
by, through, under or against
the named Defendant; and the
aforementioned named Defen-
dant and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defen-
dant and such of the unknown
name Defendant as may be
infants, incompetents or oth-
erwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following described
property to-wit:
LOT 57, BLOCK 1943,
PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDI-
VISION, SECTION 60, A
SUBDIVISION ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGES 74A THROUGH
74K, INCLUSIVE OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
more commonly known as:
3528 FOX TERR, PORT CHAR-
LOTTE, FL 33981
This action has been filed against
you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defense, if any, to it on the Plain-
tiff's attorney, FLORIDA FORECLO-
SURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose
address is 601 Cleveland Street.
Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755,
on or before 30 days after date of
first publication, response due by
October 24. 2013, and file the
original with the Clerk of the Cir-
cult Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 17th day of Sep
member 2013.
Clerk of the Court
CHARLOTTE County, Florida
By M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 9/22/13 and 9/29/13
276862 2942440
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case File No.: 13002314CA
Division: Civil
FLORIDA PROPERTIES WEST
COAST, LLC., a Florida limited
liability company,
Plaintiff(s),
V.
RICHARD GOMEZ
and SIEW BEE CHENG,
Defendant(s),


NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: SIEW BEE CHENG, 6718 NW
192nd Lane, Hialeah, Florida
33015, if alive, or if dead, their
unknown spouses, widows, wid-
owers, heirs, devisees, creditors,
grantees, and all parties having
or claiming by, through, under, or
against them, and any and all per-


sons claiming any right, title,
interest, claim, lien, estate or
demand against the Defendant(s)
in regards to the following
described property in Charlotte
County, Florida:
Lot 1, Block 1848, Port
Charlotte Subdivision, Sec-
tion 56, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Pages 70A
thru 70H, inclusive, of the
Public Records of Char-
lotte County Florida.
Notice is hereby given to each of
you that an action to foreclose a
mortgage to the above described
properties has been filed against
you and you are required to serve
your written defenses on Plaintiffs
attorney, BILL MCFARLAND, P.A.,
P.O. BOX 101507, CAPE CORAL,
FL 33910, and file the original
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Charlotte County, 350 East Mari-
on Avenue, Port Charlotte, FL
33950 on or before October 24,
2013 or otherwise a default judg-
ment will be entered against you
for the relief sought in the Com-
plaint.
THIS NOTICE will be published
four times, once each week for
four consecutive weeks in a news-
paper of general circulation pub-
lished in Charlotte County, Flori-
da.
Dated this 17th day of Septem-
ber, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of the Court
By M. B. White
Deputy Clerk
Bill McFarland
P.O. Box. 101507
Cape Coral, FL 33910
Fla. Bar No. 195103
Publish: 9/22/13, 9/29/13,
10/6/13 and 10/13/13
202370 2942427
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-2013-CA-002405
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
ALMA J. JONES A/K/A ALMA
JEANETTE JONES, INDIVIDUALLY
AND AS TRUSTEE OF THE ALMA
J. JONES REVOCABLE LIVING
TRUST DATED JANUARY 27,
2000; ET AL.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ALMA J. JONES A/K/A ALMA
JEANETTE JONES, INDIVIDUALLY
AND AS TRUSTEE OF THE ALMA
J. JONES REVOCABLE LIVING
TRUST DATED JANUARY 27.
2000; and all unknown parties
claiming by, through, under or
against the above named Defen-
dant, who is not known to be
dead or alive, whether said
unknown parties claim as heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees,
spouses, or other claimants
Current Residence Unknown, but
whose last known address was:
22267 CATHERINE AVE., PORT
CHARLOTTE, FL 33952-5551
709 E. GREEN ST, WAVELAND, IN
47989-7544
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage
on the following property in Char-
lotte County, Florida, to-wit:
LOT 27, BLOCK 2766, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 33, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGES 35A THROUGH 35F, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose address
is 12425 28th Street North, Suite
200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716,
on or before October 24, 2013
or within thirty (30) days after the
first publication of this Notice of
Action, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court at 350
East Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, FL 33951, either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of the
Court on this 18 day of Sept,
2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: D.C.
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact
Jon Embury, Administrative
Services Manager, whose
office is located at 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is
(941)637-2110, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
schedule appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voce impaired, call
711.
Publish: 9/22/13 and 9/29/13
146641 2942374

OTHER NOTICES



THE STATE OF
NEW HAMPSHIRE


JUDICIAL BRANCH
SUPERIOR COURT
Rockingham Superior Court
Rockingham Cty Courthouse
PO Box 1258
Kingston, NH 03848-1258
Telephone: (603) 642-5256


TTY/TDD Relay: (800) 735-2964
http://www.courts.state. nh. us
CITATION FOR PUBLICATION
PETITION TO QUIET TITLE
PAD Rule 1
Case Name:
Town of Derry v Mark P Lynch,
et al
Case Number:
218-2013-CV-00865
A Petition to Quiet Title to a cer-
tain tract of land with any
attached buildings located in
Derry, in the State of New Hamp-
shire has been filed with this
court. The property is described
as follows:
A certain parcel of land, con-
sisting of approximately 67
acres plus or minus and fond-
ly known as Collette's moun-
tain, situated in Derry in Coun-
ty of Rockingham, State of
New Hampshire, Tax Map SH
121, Lot 790 and Lot 2026.
An original of the entire peti-
tion is on file and may be
examined by interested par-
ties at the Rockingham Coun-
ty Superior Court.
The Court ORDERS:
Town of Derry shall give notice to
Mark P Lynch; Marguerite B Miles;
Unknown Claimants; Unknown
Heirs; Unknown Heirs of Blanche
Sharrow; Unknown Heirs of
George Chester Miles; Unknown
Heirs of Marguerite L. Miles of
this action by publishing a verified
copy of this Citation for Publica-
tion once a week for three suc-
cessive weeks in the Charlotte
Sun, a newspaper of general cir-
culation. The last publication shall
be on or before October 21,
2013
Also, ON OR BEFORE
30 days after the last
publication
Unknown Claimants; Unknown
Heirs; Unknown Heirs of George
Chester Miles; Unknown Heirs
of Marguerite L. Miles shall file a
written appearance and written
answer withthis court. A copy of
the appearance and answer
forms must be sent to the party
listed below.
October 28, 2013
Town of Derry shall file the Return
of Service with this Court. Failure
to do so may result in this action
being discontinued without fur-
ther notice.
Notice to Unknown Claimants;
Unknown Heirs; Unknown
Heirs of George Chester
Miles; Unknown Heirs of Mar-
guerite L. Miles: If you do not
comply with these requirements,
you will be considered in default
and the Court may issue orders
that affect you without your input.
Send copies to:
Brenda E. Keith, ESQ
Boutin & Altieri PLLC
One Buttrick Road
PO Box 1107
Londonderry NH 03053-1107
BY ORDER OF THE COURT
Raymond W. Taylor
Clerk of Court
Publish: September 16, 22, and
29, 2013
363786 2939804


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net C OurTown Page 11










Foundation holds grant awards program


The Rev. Bill Klossner, along with Gene and Theresa Murtha, attend the Charlotte Community
Foundation's Grants Recognition program Wednesday at the Charlotte Harbor Yacht Club in Port
Charlotte.


Receiving a $10,000 grant from the Charlotte Community Foundation for cultural planning is the
Arts & Humanities Council of Charlotte County. Accepting the award from Denis Lowry, Ron Monck
and Brian Presley are president John Benande and president-elect Don McCormick.



Right: Vernon Peeples, -
past chairman of the ,.
Charlotte Community
Foundation, with
his wifdnaJanFdni


during the recognition
program.


1.t t


The Charlotte County Homeless Coalition received a grant of $10,000 for the MIS countywide
food pantry client tracking system. Angela Hogan and Terri Williams accept the grant from Denis
Lowry, Ron Monck and Brian Presley.


The Charlotte Chorale is the winner of a $7,500 grant from the Charlotte Community Foundation,
to purchase a TravelMaster Acoustical Shell. Executive director Lee Stein and president Laurel
Webber accept the award from Denis Lowry, Ron Monck and Brian Presley.
Left: The Girl
Scouts of
Gulfcoast Florida
.received a grant
of $1,645 for nine
sets of curriculum
materials. Sue
4. Stewart and
a".. ,Ann Carrasquillo
accept the
.award from
Denis Lowry, Ron
Monck and Brian
Presley.


Advertisement


(I PROFESSIONAL Profile


- I


Attorney For Divorce And Criminal Defense


Our office is pleased to offer
representation to clients in two
areas: divorce (and other family
law matters) and criminal
defense.
Good people may at some time
find themselves involved in
either of these stressful
situations. So, in addition to
offering effective legal
representation, we try to ease
the burden by making every


client feel as though he or she is
our only client. This means
staying in touch, being available
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quickly to any question that
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Effective representation,
whether in a divorce or the
defense of a criminal charge,
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In the area of criminal law, we
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defense of felony charges,
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To schedule an initial half-hour
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and leave phone number, type of
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We will call to schedule an
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Our offices are located within the
Murdock Professional Center
between the Town Center Mall
and the Sam's Club in Murdock
(Port Charlotte). We're central to
North Port, Englewood, Port
Charlotte, Punta Gorda and
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Auto Air Specialists Of Charlotte County


Don't let their name fool you!
They are a FULL SERVICE,
automotive repair and
maintenance shop serving the
Charlotte County area! With
many years of caring and
friendly service, their


professionalism sets them apart
from the rest! From the moment
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and efficient their waiting area
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I was in shock when I saw how
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They really do provide the
highest quality of service. Come
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I p N I


Hasan Hammami, the Charlotte Community Foundation board
member in charge of the nonprofit network, is seen here with
his wife Elizabeth during the recognition program.


Lori Irons receives a recognition certificate from president
Brian Presley for going above and beyond with the Charlotte
Community Foundation.

Fruit Harvest Workers Needed
EAM Harvesting, LLC
2692 NE Burnhan Rd., Arcadia, FL 34266
Is seeking 160 temporary Farm Workers to harvest
citrus and miscellaneous grove work, from
November 1, 2013 until June 28, 2014. During the
harvest, workers will be paid a piece rate based on
location and variety of fruit harvested. Workers
doing miscellaneous grove work will be paid the
adverse Effect Wage Rate. There is a guarantee of
the adverse effect wage rate, which at the present
date is $9.97. Juice processing early, midseason
Valencia, and Naval Oranges at .90 per 90 pound
box. Job location is in Central Florida area.
Employers will offer a 3/4 guarantee for the work
period for each employee. Employer will provide
all tools, supplies and equipment necessary to
pick fruit. Housing will be provided for individual
workers outside normal commuting distance.
Qualified workers will be provided transportation
and subsistence expenses to the workplace, upon
completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier,
if appropriate. All workers interested in the job
should contact the nearest One-Stop Career
Center Office using job listing number FL9812377.
1 _504570371


LAI


OurTown Page 12 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


I,


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






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:OurTownPagel4 C www.sunnewspapers.net FROM PAGE ONE The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


YOUTH
FROM PAGE 1

made the giant leap from
learners to racers. And
one advanced all the way
to a win.
Cooper Whitten
captured the first race
of the YMCA Youth
Regatta, but every one
of the 19 race partici-
pants took away some-
thing special.
"We all want them to
have fun, but they will
remember this day for
the rest of their lives,"
said YMCA CEO Randy
Dunn, who plans to
make the regatta an
annual event. "This is
what makes lifelong
sailors."
The Charlotte County
Family YMCA launched
its Bayfront Center
YMCA youth sailing
program this summer,
teaching 79 students
the fundamentals of


sailing, rigging, deci-
sion-making skills and
much more. The seven
novices who joined the
regatta also received
additional training for
regatta sailing from the
YMCA, free of charge.
"That was our gift to
the kids," Dunn said,
"and now they're out
here sailing in their first
regatta."
Sarah Buck, YMCA
Youth Regatta chair-
woman, has been
racing on the water for
24 years, largely due to
her own introduction
to the sport as a young
crew member. And
she wants to pass her
passion on to others.
"I am here because
somebody took a
chance on me," Buck
said. "This is the only
way we will find a future
America's Cup champi-
on racer."
Next year, Buck hopes
the YMCA youth sailing
program welcomes still


SUN PHOTO BY BRIAN GLEASON
Zack Tonkin rounds the windward mark ahead of Katie Nelson
during the first race in the inaugural YMCA Youth Regatta
Saturday on Charlotte Harbor.


more youngsters to the
experience of a lifetime.
And she said cost is not
a factor.
"We have full schol-
arships available.
Anybody can learn to
sail," she said.
Max Crombecq, 11, of
Arcadia learned to sail
this summer at Bayfront
Center YMCA. After
showing an interest, his
parents gave him the
opportunity.
"He's very keen on
sailing, very excited,"
his dad Charles said.
"He hopes he can
do more sailing in
Charlotte Harbor,"
Max's mom Marian
added.
Also racing on
Saturday were eight kids
from the Davis Island
Yacht Club in Tampa.
Richard Joyner said
although his son, Nick,
is just 9, sailing has
prepared him well to
sail solo in the water
and in life.
"Independence,
confidence, seaman-
ship, leadership there
are so many intangibles
that come from sailing,"
he said.
As a result, Nick also
has blossomed in the
classroom.
"We noticed a marked
change. His teachers
say he is more focused,
more driven, with more
confidence," Richard
said. "To sail, he must
know the wind, the
currents, the weather,
and how to rig a boat.
These are kids who
can't even remember to
brush their teeth."

Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTO BY BRIAN GLEASON
Katie Nelson, Tee Chulikavit and Christa Abberger from the Davis Island Yacht Club in Tampa race
upwind during the YMCA Youth Reqatta Saturday.


PHOTO PROVIDED BY ART RIMBACK
Katie Nelson from the Davis Island Yacht Club rounds the leeward mark during an Optimist race in
the inaugural YMCA Youth Regatta Saturday.


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FROM PAGE 1

to play them, and let
them play.
Ponti will hold two-
hour afternoon classes
at Florida Gulf Coast
University's Renaissance
Center in Punta Gorda
prior to each concert,
dissecting the concert,
its history, its composers
and its music.
A greatly expanded
CSO student summer
music camp is being
planned for the summer
of 2014.
"The orchestra is not
just about attending
concerts," Ponti said
last week after planning


sessions in Punta Gorda.
"It's about expanding
interest in classical
music."
He said his 45-min-
ute sessions with
third-graders, called


"Where in the World is
the Symphony," will take
students to orchestras
and composers around
the world, from John
Williams' theme from
"Star Wars," to Stravinsky


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iOurTown Page 14 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


SUN PHOTO BY
BILL JONES
Third-grade students
at Neil Armstrong
Elementary School in
Port Charlotte, from
left, Megan Defrosiers,
Trevor Penland, Jodi Ann
Claudius, Alex Medina,
Abigail Chung and
Vanessa Gibbs, flank
Charlotte Symphony
Orchestra maestro
and music conductor,
Raffaele Ponti, who will
be their guest teacher
for music and art prior to
a CSO concert during the
orchestra's 2013-2014
concert season.

and Tchaikovsky, and
to Aaron Copeland and
John Philip Sousa.
Why the third grade?
"It's the beginning,"
Ponti said. "It's when
young people begin to
become interested in
music, in playing instru-
ments. It's the time to
inspire them to get into
music, to be part of their
lives."
Ponti said he will
expand on the impor-
tance of the education
initiative and ask for
its support when he is
introduced to the com-
munity at the orchestra's
season-opening fund-
raising Gala on Nov. 13
at the Isles Yacht Club in
Punta Gorda.
The black-tie-optional
event will feature music
by orchestra members,
dancing, a guest appear-
ance by world-famous
harmonica player
Robert Bonfiglio, a live
auction conducted by
PhilWilson, and a silent
auction, conducted to
benefit the orchestra's
education initiative.
Additional information
may be obtained at www.
charlottesymphony.
com, or by calling
941-205-5996.




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FROM PAGE ONE






INSIDE

Price at the pump
on the decline
lowB ^^^^


Gasoline prices have fallen
steadily throughout September,
and drivers should look forward
to even cheaper fill-ups in the
weeks ahead.
Page 2 -


Palmetto berries:
Industry has health
benefits


The Seminole Indians used them
as an antiseptic and some in the
Far East swear they're a powerful
aphrodisiac. Most recently,
benefits to prostate health have
gained saw palmetto berry
pharmaceutical supplements a
worldwide following.
Page 3 -



Shutdown impact:
Tourists, homebuyers
hit quickly


If the government "shuts down"
Tuesday, your mail will still
come. Doctors will see Medicare
patients. NASA will keep talking
to the astronauts circling Earth
on the Space Station. In fact,
the majority of government will
remain on the job.

Page 6 -


New major
earthquake rocks
southwest Pakistan


A major earthquake rocked
Pakistan's southwest Saturday,
killing at least 15 and sending
panicked people running
into the street just days after
another quake in the same
region killed hundreds, officials
said.
Page 7 -


Kenya blasts US
over updated
travel warning


Kenya on Saturday sharply
criticized a decision by the
United States to reissue a travel
advisory for the country in the
wake of the deadly attack on
an upscale mall in the capital
Nairobi, highlighting fears
that the assault could hurt the
East African nation's lucrative
tourism industry.

Page 9 -


h e^J t www.sunnewspapers.net
SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 29, 2013



GOP seeks health act delay

Pressure builds as government shutdown looms Tuesday


By DAVID ESPO
AP SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

WASHINGTON -
Locked in a deepening
struggle with President
Barack Obama, House
Republicans on Saturday
demanded a one-year
delay in major parts of
the nation's new health
care law and permanent
repeal of a tax on med-
ical devices as the price
for preventing a partial
government shutdown
threatened for early
Tuesday.
The White House
quickly issued a veto
threat and Senate


Democrats vowed to
reject the measure
even before the House
began debating it.
'Any member of the
Republican Party who
votes for this bill is
voting for a shutdown,"
presidential press
secretary Jay Carney said
in a statement.
Undeterred, House
Republicans pressed
ahead with their latest
attempt to squeeze
a concession from
the White House in
exchange for letting
the government open
for business normally
on Tuesday. They also


INSIDE
Who will be affected in the
case of a shutdown?
*Seepage 6

vowed to pass legislation
assuring U.S. troops are
paid in the event of a
shutdown.
"I think we have a
winning program here,"
said Rep. Hal Rogers,
R-Ky., chairman of the
House Appropriations
Committee, after days AP PHOTO
of discord that pitted
Speaker John Boehner, House SpeakerJohn Boehner of Ohio, arrives at the U.S.
R-Ohio, and his Capitol in Washington, Saturday. Heat is building on balkan-
ized Republicans, who are convening the House this weekend
DELAY 14 in hopes of preventing a government shutdown.


Jetpacks' popularity soars

In this Aug. 26 photo, Kenny Sikora rides the JetLev, a water-powered jetpack, on the Assawoman Bay near Fenwick Island, Del. Water-powered
jetpacks are the biggest watersports craze to hit Ocean City since the Jet Ski, and one start-up company that rents them out can't get tourists
into them fast enough. See story on page 5.



Mass shootings don't mean more danger


By JESSE WASHINGTON
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

It almost feels these
days as if there is no
safe place that after
global jihad strikes
a Nairobi shopping
mall or a deranged
shooter invades the
Washington Navy Yard,
the next target could
very well be our own
store, school, theater or
stadium.
Yet those who study
such violence have a
message: Don't worry.
Even though anxiety


is a natural response to
pervasive and fright-
ening media images
of carnage, they say,
statistics indicate that
most of the world has
never been safer.
"Vivid images and
memories of these
images are used to
make judgments about
the overall likelihood
of dangerous events."
says Robert Kraft, a
psychology professor
at Otterbein University.
In fact, "these horrific
events are no more
likely today than they


were yesterday or 10
years ago."
Says David Schanzer,
a Duke University
professor who directs
the Triangle Center
on Terrorism and
Homeland Security:
"Since 9/11, you are far
more likely to drown in
your bathtub than be
killed by terrorists in
the United States."
Worldwide, as regular
bombings persist in a
few unstable countries
like Iraq, Afghanistan
DANGER14


Radio problems cited in

deaths of 19 firefighters

By FELICIA FONSECA
and HANNAH DREIER
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRrrITERS

PRESCOTT, Ariz. -
A three-month inves-
tigation into the June
deaths of 19 firefighters
killed while battling an
Arizona blaze cites poor
communication between
the men and support
staff, and reveals that an
airtanker carrying flame
retardant was hovering
overhead as the firefight- AP FILE PHOTO
ers died.
In this June 30 file photo, the Yarnell Hill Fire burns in Glenn
DEATHS 14 Ilah nearYarnell, Ariz.


AP PHOTO


A private security guard, center, checks a shopper's bag
at the entrance to a shopping mall in New Delhi, India on
Tuesday.


Southern states


try to tighten

voting rules

By MICHAEL J. MISHAK
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
MIAMI Emboldened by the Supreme
Court decision that struck down the heart
of the Voting Rights Act, a growing number
of Republican-led states are moving ag-
gressively to tighten voting rules. Lawsuits
by the Obama administration and voting
rights activists say those efforts dispropor-
tionately affect minorities.
At least five Southern states, no longer
required to ask Washington's permission
before changing election procedures, are
adopting strict voter identification laws
VOTING 14


AP PHOTO


I





iPage 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


Gas prices fall as weather, output calm markets


NEWYORK (AP) -
Gasoline prices have
fallen steadily throughout
September, and drivers
should look forward to
even cheaper fill-ups in
the weeks ahead.
The national average
price for a gallon of gas-
oline is now $3.42, down
from $3.59 on Sept. 1.
The price is the lowest it's
been at this time of year
since 2010 and is likely to
keep falling.
"It's a layup for me to
predict lower prices until
Columbus Day weekend,"
says Tom Kloza, Chief Oil
Analyst at GasBuddy.com
and Oil Price Information
Service, which tracks
retail and wholesale
gasoline prices.
Wholesale gasoline
prices have fallen faster
in recent days than pump
prices, so drivers can
expect to pay even less as
the pump prices catch up.


Gas prices tend to
decline soon after Labor
Day, but last year they
didn't start going down
until mid-October. There
are a number of reasons
for this fall's drop in price,
experts say:
Refiners can switch
to cheaper blends of
gasoline in the winter
months as clean-air rules
are relaxed.
Gasoline demand de-
clines in the fall after the
summer driving season
ends. At the same time
supplies rise, because
refiners are still making
gasoline as they keep
operations humming
to make heating oil for
winter and diesel and jet
fuel for shippers.
This year, refineries
have been relatively
problem free. There have
been no hurricanes,
and few unexpected
problems at refineries


This Friday photo shows a gas pur
national average price of gasoline
month, sliding to $3.42 per gallon
the month. The price is at its lowe
lowest it's been at this time of yea
expected to fall further in the con
or pipelines, unlike last
year.
Even high oil prices
haven't stopped gaso-
line's decline. Oil briefly
topped $112 in late
August as a U.S. threat of
military action against
Syria made the market


barrel on the New York
Ir6Mercantile Exchange.
Last year at this time
drivers were paying 37
cents per gallon more
than they are this year,
on average, because
Hurricane Irene and re-
finery and pipeline prob-
lems disrupted gasoline
production in August and
September. California
prices rose sharply in late
AP PHOTO September, then hit a
record $4.67 per gallon in
mp in Montpelier, Vt. The early October.
e has fallen throughout the There are no such
n from $3.59 at the start of pre is o src
st level since Jan. 31, it's the problems this year,
ar for three years, and it is though California drivers
ming days. are again paying the
highest average price
nervous about Middle outside of Hawaii and
East supplies. The price Alaska, at $3.95 per
of oil has since fallen, gallon, according to AAA,
but remains above $100 OPIS and Wright Express.
per barrel. Still, gasoline South Carolina drivers
has dropped to its lowest are paying the least, at
price since Jan. 31. $3.11 per gallon.
Friday, oil fell 16 cents For the year, the na-
to close at $102.87 per tional price is on track to


average $3.56 per gallon,
7 cents less than last year's
record of $3.63. That
would save U.S. drivers
$9 billion this year.
Despite the recent drop,
the national average is
unlikely to fall back to
$3.29 per gallon this
year's low, set in early
January-- unless the
price of oil falls un-
der $100 per barrel,
GasBuddy's Kloza said.
That could happen if
tensions in the Middle
East don't flare up again
and the hurricane season
remains tame. U.S. oil
production is expected
to hit a monthly rate in
October that the country
hasn't reached since
1989. Also, Saudi Arabian
exports typically rise in
late fall and winter as the
country uses less of its oil
to generate electricity for
air conditioning, pushing
global supplies higher.


Deaths linked to cardiac stents rise as overuse alleged


(Bloomberg News) -
When Bruce Peterson
left the Postal Service after
24 years delivering mail,
he started a travel agency.
It was his dream career,
said his wife, Shirlee.
Then he went to see
cardiologist Samuel
DeMaio for chest pain.
DeMaio put 21 coronary
stents in Peterson's chest
over eight months, and
in one procedure tore a
blood vessel and placed
five of the metal-mesh
tubes in a single artery,
the Texas Medical Board
staff said in a complaint.
Unneeded stents weak-
ened Peterson's heart and
exposed him to compli-
cations including clots,
blockages "and ultimately
his death," the complaint
said.
DeMaio paid $10,000


and agreed to two years'
oversight to settle the
complaint over Peterson
and other patients in
2011. He said his treat-
ment didn't contribute to
Peterson's death.
"We've learned a lot
since Bruce died," Shirlee
Peterson said. "Too many
stents can kill you."
Peterson's case is part
of the expanding impact
of U.S. medicine's binge
on cardiac stents im-
plants used to prop open
the arteries of 7 million
Americans in the last
decade at a cost of more
than $110 billion.
When stents are used
to restore blood flow in
heart attack patients, few
dispute they are beneficial.
These and other acute
cases account for about
half of the 700,000 stent


procedures in the U.S.
annually.
Among the other halft-
elective-surgery patients
in stable condition -
overuse, death, injury and
fraud have accompanied
the devices' use as a go-to
treatment, according to
thousands of pages of
court documents and reg-
ulatory filings, interviews
with 37 cardiologists and
33 heart patients or their
survivors, and more than a
dozen medical studies.
These sources point
to stent practices that
underscore the waste and
patient vulnerability in a
U.S. health care system
that rewards doctors based
on volume of procedures
rather than quality of care.
Cardiologists get paid
less than $250 to talk to
patients about stents' risks


and alternative measures,
and an average of four
times that fee for putting
in a stent.
"Stenting belongs to one
of the bleakest chapters
in the history of Western
medicine," said Nortin
Hadler, a professor of
medicine at the University
of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. Cardiologists
"are marching on" because
"the interventional cardi-
ology industry has a cash
flow comparable to the
GDP of many countries."
Stenting abuse is by no
means the norm, but nei-
ther is it a rarity. Federal
cases have extended
from regional medical
centers in Louisiana,
Kentucky and Georgia to a
top-ranked metropolitan
hospital system in Ohio.
A doctor practicing at


a hospital owned by the
Cleveland Clinic, rated the
premier heart center in
the country by U.S. News
and World Report, had his
assets seized by federal
agents in a stent investiga-
tion, according to federal
court filings in April.
The Clinic has not been
accused of wrongdoing
and says it's cooperating
with the investigation.
Two out of three
elective stents, or more
than 200,000 procedures
a year, are unnecessary,
according to David Brown,
a cardiologist at Stony
Brook University School
of Medicine in NewYork.
That works out to about a
third of all stents.
Brown said his estimate
is based on eight clinical
trials of 7,000 patients in
the last decade, which he


analyzed in the Archives
of Internal Medicine
last year. Two cardiology
researchers who have
studied the use of stents
say the number could
be as low as about half
Brown's estimate, and one
said it is probably larger.
Even the low end of
these estimates translates
into more than a million
Americans in the past
decade with implants in
their coronary arteries
they didn't need, said
William Boden, chief of
medicine at aVeterans
Administration hospital
in Albany, N.Y Boden was
the principal investigator
of a 2007 study known as
Courage that found stents
added no benefit over
medicines, exercise and
dietary changes in stable
patients.


I NATION


Vets' benefits could Howard
run out in 2 weeks if University sees
shutdown happens enrollment surge


WASHINGTON (The
Washington Post) The
Department of Veterans
Affairs told congressional
officials Friday that all
benefit checks it issues,
including disability
claims and pension pay-
ments, will be disrupted if
a government shutdown
lasts more than two or
three weeks, according to
congressional sources.
During the telephone
briefing, the leadership
of the House and Senate
Veterans Affairs com-
mittees were told VA
will run out of money to
make compensation and
pension payments if a
partial shutdown is drawn
out for weeks, according
to aides to two members
of Congress.


WASHINGTON (The
Washington Post) -
Howard University leaders
on Friday hailed the
second-largest freshman
class in 15 years, an influx
of 1,596 new students who
have helped the school re-
bound from an enrollment
plunge a year ago.
University President
Sidney Ribeau, speaking
at a convocation on the
campus in Washington,
told the Class of 2017 that
its size is evidence that
Howard is on the rise after
a trying year for one of the
nation's most prestigious
historically black centers of
higher learning.
Total enrollment stands
at more than 10,330, Ribeau
said, up 3 percent from the
fall 2012 count of 10,002.


No. 2 US nuke
commander
suspended
WASHINGTON (AP)
- The No. 2 officer at
the military command in
charge of all U.S. nuclear
war-fighting forces has
been suspended and
is under investigation
by the Naval Criminal
Investigative Service for
issues related to gambling,
officials said Saturday.
The highly unusual ac-
tion against a high-rank-
ing officer at U.S. Strategic
Command was made
more than three weeks
ago but not publicly
announced.
Air Force Gen. Robert
Kehler, who heads
Strategic Command,
suspended the deputy
commander, Navy Vice
Adm. Tim Giardina, from
his duties on Sept. 3.


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Palmetto berries: Industry has health benefits


IMMOKALEE, Fla.
(AP) The Mayans drank
saw palmetto berries as
a tonic, the Seminole
Indians used them as an
antiseptic and some in
the Far East swear they're
a powerful aphrodisiac.
Most recently, benefits
to prostate health have
gained saw palmetto
berry pharmaceutical
supplements a worldwide
following.
The industry, with
a strong presence in
Immokalee, is now the
No. 3 herbal supplement
nationwide with about
$200 million in sales,
according to Valensa, a
top provider. Added to
roughly $500 million in
sales around the world,
Valensa's president says
it's prompted a global
market of about
$700 million.
But berry picking can
lead to arrests, danger due
to bees, wasps, snakes
and other wildlife such as
boars and bears even
death from heat strokes or
snake bites, and recently
drownings.
For Immokalee's
poorer residents and
migrant farmworkers,
the 98 cents offered per
pound is one way to make
ends meet, according
to Ashley Sanchez, who
runs Sanchez Produce
in Immokalee with her
father, Juan, providing
berries to large processing
companies that grind and
dry them, extracting oils
for supplements that are
sold in health food stores
or exported.
"It's been good this
year," Sanchez said of the
season, which began in
August and usually ends
after October. "None of
the other crops are in
season. It's a real help to
the community. It pays
the bills."
For three Immokalee
men and a woman who
crowded onto a small
two-seat flatboat in
southern Golden Gate
Estates to pick and sell
the berries, the harvest


was deadly. Ramiro
Gomez, 48, and Margarita
Godinez, 36, died Sept. 16
when the boat capsized.
"It's not a very wide
canal, but considering
that he did not know how
to swim either, it was
quite a feat that he was at
least able to struggle his
way to swim his way to
shore," Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission spokesman
Jorge Pino said of one
man who made it to shore
off 34th Avenue Southeast
as the others clung to the
boat.

Saw palmetto ber-
ries (Serenoa repens),
which grow wild in the
Southeast, primarily
Florida and Georgia, have
been harvested and used
for prostate health since
the 1870s. Known as "the
plant catheter," the herb
strengthens the bladder.
About five Immokalee
produce companies
ship the berries to large
processors, such as The
Saw Palmetto Harvesting
Co. in Frostproof, in
Polk County, which
makes them into powder
products by drying,
crushing and grinding
the green whole berries
or extracting the oils from
more mature, darker
berries. Processors then
provide raw materials to
distributors and manufac-
turers worldwide, such as
Valensa.
For most, berry picking
is a lucrative endeavor.
But pickers often must
trudge through heavily
wooded areas and deal
with the trees, which
grow up to 6 feet high and
are covered in stiff, thin
leaves. Pickers wear gloves
to reach through saw-
like, razor-sharp thorns
beneath the leaves.
With recent heavy rains,
rattlesnakes and others
often slither up the trees
out of the muck. The
fronds also hide wasp and
hornet nests.
"It's a lot of danger,
really dangerous,"


On income

inequality, U.S. sits

near middle of pack


(The Washington Post)
- The way we measure
income inequality is
changing. After years of
relying on a complicated
metric called the Gini
coefficient, some econ-
omists argue that we
should adopt the Palma
ratio, which measures the
gap between the rich and
the poor in a society.
The countries that
come out looking best
include, no surprise,
the usual suspects
of Northern Europe.
Interestingly, Eastern
Europe scores quite
highly as well, as do some
post-Soviet countries in
Central Asia. Perhaps
that's a legacy of Soviet-
era social programs
meant to flatten class
divides. But it's also a
reminder that, while
income equality is great,
it's not synonymous with
a healthy economy. Some
countries are economical-
ly equal because everyone
is well-off, as in Denmark,
and some because most
everyone is equally poor.
The countries with the
highest income inequal-
ity are, by far, those in


Latin America and the
southern tip of Africa.
These countries have
been seeing economic
growth over the past
few decades, but much
of the wealth ends up
funneling into the top
social stratospheres.
This problem tends to be
self-reinforcing: The rich
are able to secure better
education and political
access, making it easier
for them to stay rich and
tougher for everyone else
to get a share of the pie.
The United States
doesn't come out of this
comparison looking
great. It's ranked 44th
out of 86 countries,
well below every other
developed society mea-
sured. It's one spot below
Nigeria, which has some
of the worst political cor-
ruption in the world and
in 2012 saw nationwide
protests over perceived
income inequality. The
United States' Palma
ratio ranks it just beneath
Nigeria but above Russia
and Turkey all countries
that have experienced
intense political unrest in
recent years.


In a March 1, 2006, photo, Saw palmetto berries hang from a
palmetto tree in Belle Glade, Fla. A year earlier, more than 5
million pounds were gathered in Florida, where most of the
world's wild saw palmettos grow.


Ashley Sanchez said of
encountering snakes and
bees. "There are a lot of
rattlesnakes because it's
deep in the woods."
As a result, prices have
risen from 40 cents a
pound a few years ago.
'A few weeks ago, it was


all the way up to $1.09
per pound. They want to
give people a reason to go
far. It's motivation," she
said. "It's hard work. Who's
going to do it for 50 cents
a pound?"
Pickers deliver any-
where from 25,000 to


60,000 pounds daily,
she said, with about 100
pounds in each sack.
"We're just one of five
in town that does the
buying," Ashley Sanchez
said. "People just shop
around until they find the
best price. It's just people
trying to make a living."
*
Although it isn't illegal
to pick berries, arrests
occur when entering pri-
vate property or wildlife
management areas, such
as Corkscrew Swamp
Sanctuary in Collier
County. The berries are
critical to the survival
of many native wildlife
species, especially the
Florida black bear.
That prompts in-
creased patrols during
berry picking season.
Last year, state Fish
and Wildlife officers
made three arrests
- two in Collier and


one in the Panhandle.
Others were made by
deputies in Florida
counties.
Edius Audatte, 42,
an unemployed North
Naples man, was arrested
in late August, accused of
grand theft and trespass-
ing after state wildlife
officers found him trying
to haul 427 pounds of
berries in burlap sacks
from private property
at Lely Resort. At the
time, his haul was worth
$350.38.
But the State
Attorney's Office in
Southwest Florida
dropped charges after
the property owner said
the berries weren't worth
anything to him, office
spokeswoman Samantha
Syoen said, adding, "It
would be hard to prove
value when the berries
were not of value to the
victim."


Prices effective through 10/2/13, unless otherwise noted. Items are subject to availability and may not be available in all JCPenney stores or at jcp.com. Percentages off original or regular prices. Actual savings may exceed stated
percentage off. "Original" and "regular" prices are offering prices that may not have resulted in sales, and intermediate markdowns may have been taken. "Original" prices may not have been in effect during the past 90 days or in all
trade areas. JCPenney reserves the right to limit returns or exchanges without a valid receipt. "Sale" events exclude Best Value merchandise. "Original" and Best Value items will remain at advertised prices after event.


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DAYS


o The Sun/Sunday, September 29, 2013


WIRE Page 3


www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE


Report: NSA studies people's social connections


WASHINGTON
(Washington Post) The
National Security Agency
has been mining for
several years its massive
collections of email and
phone call data to create
extensive graphs of
some Americans' social
connections that can
include associates, travel
companions and their
locations, according to
The New York Times.
The social graphing
began in 2010 after the
NSA lifted restrictions on
the practice, according to
an internal January 2011


DELAY
FROM PAGE 1

leadership against tea par-
ty-backed conservatives.
Another Republican,
Rep. Darrell Issa of
California, reacted angrily
when asked whether he
would eventually support
a standalone spending
bill if needed to prevent a
shutdown. "How dare you
presume a failure? How
dare you? How dare you?"
he said.
Apart from its impact


DANGER
FROM PAGE 1

or Libya, the terrorism
trend is less clear. The
number of annual fatal-
ities has fluctuated over
the past few decades,
according to figures
compiled by the National
Consortium for the
Study of Terrorism and
Responses to Terrorism
at the University of
Maryland.
Global terrorism
deaths as defined by
the consortium reached
almost 11,000 in 1984,
then dipped before
approaching 11,000
again in 1997. Deaths
fell once more before
rising in the aftermath
of Sept. 11, 2001. There
were 3,144 killings in
2003, then 12,761 in
2007. In 2012, after the
consortium made its
data collection more
comprehensive, it
counted 15,514 deaths



DEATHS

FROM PAGE 1

The 120-page report
released Saturday found
that proper procedure
was followed and as-
signed little of the blame
for the worst firefighting
tragedy since Sept. 11,
2001.
All but one member
of the Granite Mountain
Hotshots crew died
June 30 while protecting
the small former gold
rush town of Yarnell,
about 80 miles northwest
of Phoenix, from an
erratic, lightning-sparked
wildfire.
While maintaining
a neutral tone, the


VOTING
FROM PAGE 1

or toughening existing
requirements.
Texas officials are
battling the U.S. Justice
Department to put in
place a voter ID law that
a federal court has ruled
was discriminatory. In
North Carolina, the GOP-
controlled Legislature
scaled back early voting
and ended a pre-regis-
tration program for high
school students nearing


voting age.
Nowhere is the debate
more heated than in
Florida, where the chaotic
recount in the disputed
2000 presidential race
took place.


memorandum, the Times
reported online Saturday.
It based its article on
documents obtained by
former NSA contractor
Edward Snowden and
interviews with officials.
The graphing, or con-
tact chaining, is conduct-
ed using details about
phone calls and emails,
known as "metadata,"
but does not involve
the communications'
content, according to
the documents cited by
the Times. It is supposed
to be done for foreign
intelligence purposes

on the health care law,
the legislation that House
Republicans decided to
back would assure routine
funding for government
agencies through Dec. 15.
The measure marked
something of a reduction
in demands by House
Republicans, who passed
legislation several days
ago that would perma-
nently strip the health
care law of money while
providing funding for the
government.
It also contained
significant concessions
from a party that long


only, the documents
state, but that category is
extremely broad and may
include everything from
data about terrorism
and drug smuggling to
foreign diplomats and
economic talks.
The revelation is
the latest in a string of
disclosures that began
in June, when The
Washington Post and the
British newspaper the
Guardian broke stories,
based on Snowden's
documents about the
NSAs PRISM program,
which collects digital

has criticized the health
care law for imposing
numerous government
mandates on industry, in
some cases far exceeding
what Republicans have
been willing to support in
the past.
GOP aides said that
under the legislation
headed toward a vote,
portions of the health
law that already have
gone into effect would
remain unchanged. That
includes requirements
for insurance companies
to guarantee coverage for
pre-existing conditions


communications from
U.S. Internet compa-
nies, and about the
collection of call-detail
records from U.S. phone
companies.
Snowden's disclosures
and the subsequent
declassification of
records by Director of
National Intelligence
James Clapper Jr. and the
nation's secretive Foreign
Intelligence Surveillance
Court have sparked
widespread concern over
the scope of the NSA's
surveillance and whether
it appropriately balances

and to require children
to be covered on their
parents' plans until age 26.
It would not change a part
of the law that reduces
costs for seniors with
high prescription drug
expenses.
Instead, the measure
would delay implementa-
tion of a requirement for
all individuals to purchase
coverage or face a penalty,
and of a separate feature
of the law that will create
marketplaces where
individuals can shop for
coverage from private
insurers.


AP FILE PHOTO
In this Sept. 22 file photo, an army helicopter patrols the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya, seen
behind a billboard for a supermarket, as military forces engaged extremists holding hostages at


the upscale shopping center.

from terrorism most-
ly in about 10 countries.
The Nairobi attack,
by the fanatic Somali
Islamic group al-Shabab,
stood out. It touched
points across the
globe, killing at least 60

investigation found badly
programmed radios,
vague updates, and a
33-minute communica-
tion blackout just before
the flames engulfed the
men. Investigators did
not consider whether
better communication
might have saved the
men.
The report provides the
first minute-to-minute
account of the fatal
afternoon. The day went
according to routine
in the boulder-strewn
mountains until the wind
shifted around 4 p.m.,
pushing a wall of fire that
had been receding from
the hotshots all day back
toward them.
After that, the com-
mand center lost track of

Florida election officials
are set to resume an effort
to remove noncitizens
from the state's voting
rolls. A purge last year
ended in embarrass-
ment after hundreds of
American citizens, most
of whom were black or
Hispanic, were asked to
prove their citizenship or
risk losing their right to
vote.
Republican leaders
across the South say the
new measures are needed
to prevent voter fraud,
even though such crimes
are rare. Democrats and
civil rights groups say the
changes are political at-
tacks aimed at minorities
and students voting
groups that tend to lean
toward Democrats in
states with legacies of poll


civilians from countries
including Britain, France,
Canada, the Netherlands,
Australia, Peru, India,
Ghana, South Africa and
China. Five Americans
were among the nearly
200 wounded.

the 19 men. The fire-
fighters either ignored or
did not receive weather
warnings. They left the
safety of a burned ridge
and dropped into a
densely vegetated valley
surrounded by moun-
tains, heading toward
a ranch. The report
states that they failed to
perceive the "excessive
risk" of repositioning to
continue fighting the fire.
The command center
believed the hotshots
had decided to wait out
the weather change in
the safety zone. They
did not find out the
men were surrounded
by flames and fighting
for their lives until five
minutes before they de-
ployed their emergency

taxes and literacy tests.
In North Carolina, for
example, a state board of
elections survey found
that more than 600,000
registered voters did not
have a state-issued ID,
a requirement to vote
under the state's new law.
Many of those voters are
young, black, poor or
elderly.
"We're in the middle
of the biggest wave of
voter suppression since
the Voting Rights Act was
enacted," said Katherine
Culliton-Gonzdlez, direc-
tor of voter protection for
the Advancement Project,
a Washington-based civil
rights group that has un-
dertaken legal challenges
in several states.
For five decades, states
and localities with a


Al-Shabab is "a threat
to the continent of
Africa and the world
at large," Somali
President Hassan Sheikh
Mohamud said.
That attack came five
days after a man who

shelters, which was more
than a half hour after the
weather warning was
issued.
Without the guidance
of the command center,
the men bushwhacked
into a location that soon
turned into a bowl of fire.
The topography fostered
long flames that bent
parallel and licked the
ground, producing 2,000
degree heat. Fire shelters,
always a dreaded last
resort, begin to melt at
1,200 degrees.
As the flames whipped
over the men, a large
air tanker was hovering
above. But perhaps
because of an early mis-
communication about
where the hotshots were
headed, the command

history of discrimination
had to submit all election
laws, from new congres-
sional district maps to
precinct locations and
voting hours, to federal
lawyers for approval. That
practice ended in June
when the Supreme Court
struck down the provision
in the Voting Rights Act as
outdated.
Voting rights groups
said recent actions by
Southern states highlight
the need for Congress
to retool the rejected
sections of the landmark
1965 law that were cred-
ited with ensuring ballot
access to millions of
blacks, American Indians
and other minorities.
The administration
is using the remaining
parts of the law to bring


Americans' privacy rights
with national security.
The NSA did not
provide an immediate
response to the Times
article.
"This report confirms
what whistleblowers
have been saying for
years: The NSA has
been monitoring vir-
tually every aspect of
Americans' lives their
communications, their
associations, even their
locations," said Jameel
Jaffer, deputy legal
director of the American
Civil Liberties Union.

By repealing the
medical device tax, the
GOP measure also would
raise deficits an irony
for a party that won the
House majority in 2010
by pledging to get the
nation's finances under
control.
The Senate rejected
the most recent House-
passed anti-shutdown
bill on a party-line vote
of 54-44 Friday, insisting
on a straightforward
continuation in govern-
ment funding without
health care-related
add-ons.

heard voices brought a
shotgun through Navy
Yard security and killed
12 people. It was the
latest in a series of mass
shootings, which are
defined as killing four
or more people: the
December massacre of
26 in Newtown; 12 slain
in a Colorado movie
theater; other 2012 kill-
ings at a caf6, temple,
sauna, colleges.
"What troubles us so
deeply as we gather here
today is how this sense-
less violence that took
place here in the Navy
Yard echoes other recent
tragedies," President
Barack Obama said at a
memorial service.
That's not to mention
the narrowly averted
disasters: a man arrest-
ed this week on a charge
he planned to shoot up
a Salt Lake City mall;
a gunman last month
who was talked into
laying down his weapon
after invading a Georgia
school.

center did not know
where to drop the flame
retardant, the report said.
"Nobody will ever
know how the crew
actually saw their
situation, the options
they considered or what
motivated their actions,"
investigators wrote.
Though the report
points to multiple
failures, investigators
approached the incident
"from the perspective
that risk is inherent
in firefighting." They
recommend that Arizona
officials review their
communications proce-
dures and look into new
technologies, including
GPS, that might help
track firefighters during
chaotic situations.

court cases.
When Attorney General
Eric Holder announced a
suit last month to place
Texas under federal
supervision again, he said
the Justice Department
would not allow the high
court's decision "to be
interpreted as open sea-
son for states to pursue
measures that suppress
voting rights."
Gov. Rick Scott, R-Fla.,
has defended the planned
voter purge, saying his
state has an obligation to
maintain the integrity of
the vote.


"I care about your
sacred right to vote," he
said. "Your sacred right
to vote should not be
diluted by somebody who
does not have the right to
vote."


ALMANAC

Today is Sunday, Sept. 29, the
272nd day of 2013. There are 93
days left in the year.
Today in history
On Sept. 29,1789, the U.S.
War Department established a
regular army with a strength of
several hundred men.
On this date
In 1829, London's reorganized
police force, which became
known as Scotland Yard, went
on duty.
In 1862, Prussia's newly
appointed minister-president,
Otto von Bismarck, delivered
a speech to the country's
parliament in which he declared
the issue of German unification
would be decided "not through
speeches and majority decisions"
but by"iron and blood (Eisen und
Blut)."(Some references give the
date of this speech as Sept. 30,
1862.)
In 1938, British, French,
German and Italian leaders
concluded the Munich
Agreement, which was aimed
at appeasing Adolf Hitler by
allowing Nazi annexation of
Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland.
In 1957, the New York Giants
played their last game at the
Polo Grounds, losing to the Pitts-
burgh Pirates, 9-1. (The Giants
moved to San Francisco.)
In 1978, Pope John Paul I was
found dead in his Vatican apart-
ment just over a month after
becoming head of the Roman
Catholic Church.
In 1982, Extra-Strength Tylenol
capsules laced with cyanide
claimed the first of seven victims
in the Chicago area. (To date, the
case remains unsolved.)
In 1986, the Soviet Union
released Nicholas Daniloff, an
American journalist confined on
spying charges.
In 2001, President George W.
Bush condemned Afghanistan's
Taliban rulers for harboring
Osama bin Laden and his
followers as the United States
pressed its military and diplo-
matic campaign against terror.
Today's birthdays
Actress Lizabeth Scott is 92.
Actress Anita Ekberg is 82.
Singer Jerry Lee Lewis is 78.
Former Italian Prime Minister
Silvio Berlusconi is 77. Sen.
Bill Nelson, D-Fla., is 71. Actor
lan McShane is 71. Jazz musi-
cian Jean-Luc Ponty is 71. Lech
Walesa, the former president of
Poland, is 70. Actress Patricia
Hodge is 67. TV personality
Bryant Gumbel is 65. Rock
singer-musician Mike Pinera
is 65. Former child actor Ken
Weatherwax (TV:"The Addams
Family") is 58. Olympic gold
medal runner Sebastian Coe
is 57. Singer Suzzy Roche (The
Roches) is 57. Comedian-actor
Andrew "Dice" Clay is 56.
Rock singer John Payne (Asia)
is 55. Actor Roger Bart is 51.
Singer-musician LesClaypool
is 50. Actress Jill Whelan is 47.
Actor Luke Goss is 45. Country
singer Brad Cotter ("Nashville
Star") is 43. Actress Emily Lloyd
is 43. Actor Alexis Cruz is 39.
Actor Zachary Levi is 33. Rock
musician Josh Farro is 26.



UFO in Augusta
turns out to be
restaurant light
AUGUSTA, Maine
(AP) Several Augusta
residents called
police and the local
newspaper to report a
UFO hovering over the
capital city this week.
But there were
no little green men
invading. Just chimi-
changas and fajitas.
Deputy Police Chief
Jared Mills tells the
Kennebec Journal the
source of the UFO
rumor turned out to
be a spotlight being
used by Margaritas
Mexican Restaurant to


celebrate its reopening
on Wednesday night.
Manager Rob
Michaud says the
restaurant recently
completed renovations
and was shut down for
about two weeks.
Mills says police
asked the restau-
rant to shut off the
light because of the
concerns.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE











Jetpack industry zooms toward expansion


MIAMI (AP) Miguel
Endara nervously stepped
on the edge of a boat
on Biscayne Bay with
a 30-pound machine
strapped to his back. The
machine had two pipes
sticking out and a 33-foot
hose that connected to a
Jet Ski.
The instructor then told
him to jump.
"Just jump in?" the
30-year-old asked. "I feel
like I'm going to go straight
down."
But soon after he
took the plunge, Endara
screamed with excitement.
Instead of sinking, he
was flying. Two powerful
streams of water came out
of the pipes like fire out
of a space shuttle sending
Endara 25 feet in the air.
The water sport, simply
known as jetpack, has
sprung up all over the
world since its debut
two years ago and South
Florida has established
itself as the overall hot
spot, with 60 percent of the
company's business com-
ing from Fort Lauderdale,
Miami and the Keys.
The jetpack Endara
recently tried out is the
JetLev R200x. It's the com-
pany's flagship product
but they are set to intro-
duce two new products,
a modified version of the
jetpack and a hover board,
in November.
Matt Rosenblatt,
the owner of JetLev, a
company based in Dania
Beach, said the two new


products the Aquaflier
and Aquaboard will
make flying accessible to a
lot more people.
When the JetLev R200x
launched in 2011, it cost
$100,000. It was marketed
to yacht owners and oper-
ators with enough capital
to pay for the machine.
But the Aquaflier and
Aquaboard will cost less
than $10,000 when they hit
the market in November.
Rosenblatt expects the
move to shift the current
market, now primarily
made up of operators, to
individual buyers.
"I'd like to have one in
every lake and every beach
in the country," he said.
"The sky's the limit."
Ben Smith, the owner of
Rocketman, an operator
in Fort Lauderdale, Miami
and Key Largo, bought one
of the $100,000 jetpacks in
2011 and said he is excited
to see the new models join
the industry. It may open
up possibilities for more
franchises.
"I think it's great," he
said. "It's a great direction
they needed to take. Now
you can operate in a
submarket like Michigan
for three months out of the
year and make a profit."
While jetpacks conjure
up thrilling images of
men and women flying
toward the sky at blazing
speeds, they don't exactly
scream safety. JetLev
and Rosenblatt said they
have gone through great
lengths to educate clients,


w
.- -


In this Aug.26 photo, master JetLev instructor Mike Traster demonstrates the JetLev,2
water-powered jetpack, on the Assawoman Bay near Fenwick Island, Del.


regulators, and insurance
companies on what the
product is and how it
works.
The jetpack is essentially
a hose connected to a
floating vacuum called
a pod. The pod, which
can be substituted with
a Jet Ski, sucks up a high
volume of water that the
jetpack uses to fly. It can fly
as high as 30 feet and go as
fast as 30 miles per hour.
The device flies because of
the high amount of water
volume, not pressure, so
the water streams can't
hurt people, Rosenblatt
said.
Even though the product
went through years of
testing before being sold,


Rosenblatt knows that one
injury could have drastic
consequences.
"If anything happens, it
will ruin my business," he
said.
Regulators and insur-
ance companies had
a hard time classifying
the jetpack. The U.S.
Coast Guard and Federal
Aviation Administration
went back and forth when
determining which agency
should oversee the device.
Ultimately, the Coast
Guard granted the jetpack
an exemption from the
Safe Loading Standard
stating in a letter sent to
the company that, "to
grant this exemption
would not adversely affect


boating safety." I
pack is thus sanc
a water sport act
letter dated Feb.
signed by J.N. H
of the Coast Gua
of Boating Safety
reach Coast Gua
by phone and er
not successful.
Insurance con
also had a diffict
figuring out how
the jetpack. The'
up creating a ne
category for the
Today, Lloyd's of
and two other in
companies offer
to jetpack opera
"It's definitely
position to educ
regulators about


product," Rosenblatt said.
"Once they understood
what the product was, it
wasn't an issue."
Apart from working
with regulators, JetLev col-
laborates with operators
to maintain a standard of
safety.
The company requires
operators to take a
safety tutorial before
buying a jetpack. If they
don't participate in the
tutorial, JetLev won't sell,
Rosenblatt said.
But the mandatory
safety course does not
apply to people who want
to buy JetLev products for
-- personal use. Although
they are strongly encour-
AP PHOTO aged to take it, buyers
a aren't required to do so.
If the market does
shift from operators and
Fhe jet- yacht owners to personal
ctioned as buyers, the responsibil-
ivity. The ity of staying safe will
2, 2011, is likely fall on thrill-seeking
oedt, Chief individuals.
rd's Office Currently, there aren't
. Efforts to any laws in the books
rd officials regarding jetpacks.
nail were Operators arrange where
and when to fly with
npanies local agencies, whose
ult time attitude toward jetpacks
v to label can vary. In Chicago, for
y ended instance, lake officials
w JetLev initially resisted the use
device, of jetpacks because of
London overcrowded conditions
isurance while in Fort Lauderdale
insurance the Department of Parks
tors. and Recreation welcomed
a strange jetpacks as a way of
ate the attracting tourists, Smith
t your of Rocketman said.


STATE
Man dies after
plane crashes in
Lake Okeechobee
t ^^


PAHOKEE (AP) A
man has died after a
small plane crashed into
Lake Okeechobee in
South Florida.
The Palm Beach Post
reports that authorities
responded to call about
a possible boating
accident around 8 a.m.
Saturday. When they
arrived on scene they
found what appeared to
be an amateur, experi-
mental plane.
Rescue divers found
the victim in the water
around 9:30 a.m. He was
a white male between 50
and 60 years old, police
said.
CBS Miami reports
that the plane crashed
about 200 yards from
the Pahokee Marina.
Authorities with the FAA


ai
ga
ac


T
w
I-


bacnelor degrees com-
pletely online starting
this January.
The Florida Board of
Governors on Friday
approved the business
plan for UF Online to
start in 2014.
Under a measure
pushed by House
Speaker Will Weatherford
the state is providing
$15 million in the first
year to help the pro-
gram. The plan is to
start with five majors -
including criminology,
business administration,
sport management
- and expand to 35
different ones within
the next five years. The
school plans to add
biology and psychology
next summer.
UF Online by law
cannot charge in-state
students more than
75 percent of what it
costs to attend UF's
main campus.
UF is already accept-
ing applications for the
first freshman class that
will start next summer.


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The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


WIRE Page 5


www.sunnewspapers.net


STATE NEWS










Shutdown impact: Tourists, homebuyers hit quickly


WASHINGTON (AP) -
If the government "shuts
down" next Tuesday,
your mail will still come.
Doctors will see Medicare
patients. NASA will keep
talking to the astronauts
circling Earth on the
Space Station. In fact, the
majority of government
will remain on the job.
The closings would hit
random Americans first:
vacationers hoping to take
in Mount Rushmore or
a Smithsonian museum.
Homebuyers seeking
government-backed
mortgages. Veterans
appealing the denial of
disability benefits. Perhaps
on the bright side for
some tax audits would
be suspended.
Troubles would spread
the longer a shutdown
lasted.
A prolonged furlough
of more than one-third of
civilian federal workers
could mean delays in
processing applications
for new Social Security
disability claims. Lost
profits for businesses that
sell goods or services to the
government. Problems for
hotels and restaurants that
rely on tourism near na-
tional parks. Longer waits
for kids seeking delinquent
child support.
And, of course, a
shutdown would mean no
paychecks for an estimat-
ed 800,000 furloughed
workers. They might get
paid later for the missed
days but couldn't count on
that. Don't blame them for


slacking off; the law forbids
volunteering to work for
free from home.
Kaitlin Thomas, who
toured the National
Museum of American
History on Friday, found
the whole thing a little
annoying.
"If the public is paying
for this, why are they
shutting it down?" said
Thomas, visiting from New
York City.
The deadline nearing, a
government of more than
2.1 million civilian employ-
ees scrambled on Friday to
update its plans determin-
ing who would stay and
who would go home, what
would get done and what
would have to wait. The
equation was complicated
by the complexity of
federal budget rules; some
pots of money would be
caught up in a shutdown
and some wouldn't.
Ironically, a shutdown
would have virtually
no impact on President
Barack Obama's health
care law the program at
the heart of his showdown
with House Republicans.
The program that detrac-
tors dubbed "Obamacare"
is set to roll out its indi-
vidual insurance plans
on Tuesday, government
shutdown or no, and
people hoping to sign up
on that first day shouldn't
be affected.
Some of the nation's
behind-the-scenes health
and safety work would
stop, however. The Centers
for Disease Control and


ft


Storm clouds hang over Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday as the Republican-controllei
and the Democrat-controlled Senate stand at an impasse with Congress continuing to
over how to fund the government and prevent a possible shutdown.


Prevention would be
severely limited in spotting
or investigating disease
outbreaks, from flu to that
mysterious MERS virus
from the Middle East.
The government wouldn't
process auto recall infor-
mation or conduct new car
safety testing.
A shutdown America
could still go to war,
Pentagon Comptroller
Robert Hale told report-
ers Friday. But soldiers'
pay might be delayed if
closings lasted more than a
week or so.
Other work that con-
tinues no matter how the
political spat goes:
Prison guards, FBI
agents and the Border


Patrol will be at their posts.
Air traffic controllers
and airport security
screeners will keep planes
moving.
The military's 1.4 mil-
lion active-duty personnel
will stay on duty.
U.S. embassies will
stand ready to help
American travelers. And
new passports and visas
shouldn't be delayed a
change from the 1990s,
when the government last
shut down.
College students can
relax: Student loans and
Pell Grants aren't affected.
Social Security
payments and veteran's
benefits will go out.
Food-stamp dollars should


continue to flow.
Doctors will s
Medicare and Me
patients; veterans
talks stay open.
The NationalI
Service will make
and issue storm
NASA will ma
Control in Houst
support the Inter
Space Station an
two Americans a
people living abo
aside from that, o
3 percent of NASA
workers will be o
The White Ho
stay open. It's exe
from the federal 1
requires many go
ment employees
working if congre


approved funding for their
jobs expires. Obama could
still take his scheduled trip
to Asia the week of Oct. 6,
if he chose to.
The post office will
keep delivering; its budget
isn't affected because it
comes from selling stamps
and delivering packages.
*Workers in programs
funded by user fees -
such as immigration
service employees who
process green card
applications and people
who oversee truck and bus
safety also will stay on
the job.
Federal courts have
enough money to operate
A' normally for about two
AP PHOTO weeks. But if a shutdown
d House continued past mid-
struggle October, furloughs would
begin. The Supreme
Court says it's covered at
least through next week.
*ee For tourists and nature
medicaid lovers, the effects would
s hospi- hit fast. A shutdown
would quickly close all
Weather national parks, from
forecasts Acadia to Yosemite, and
warnings. national monuments
mn Mission and wildlife refuges. The
on to Interior Department
national says campers would get
d the 48 hours to pack up and
among six leave.
)ard. But And the IRS wants you
)nly about to know: A shutdown is
A's 18,000 no reprieve for taxpayers.
n the job. People who got a six-
ause will month filing extension are
;mpted still up against an Oct. 15
law that deadline, even if some
)vern- services their money is
to stop paying for have ground to
essionally a halt.


More iPad use should be allowed in air, FAA panel says


WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg News) -
The days of keeping the
iPad or Kindle off while
a commercial flight is
under 10,000 feet could
end if U.S. aviation
authorities heed an
advisory panel.
Airline passengers
should be allowed to
read e-books, send email
and browse websites
throughout flights of
Wi-Fi equipped planes,


including during takeoff
and landing, an advisory
committee to the Federal
Aviation Administration
has concluded, a person
familiar with panel's
work said Friday.
Mobile-phone calls
and text messages would
remain forbidden. They
are separately banned
over concerns the signals
may interfere with
ground networks.
Broader use of


on-board electronics
would help Gogo Inc.,
based in Itasca, Ill., which
says it has 82 percent of
the inflight Wi-Fi service
market in North America,
and Qualcomm Inc.,
which won regulatory
clearance in May to pro-
ceed with a air-to-ground
broadband service for
Wi-Fi equipped planes.
Gogo's revenue comes
from connection and
usage charges, and the


relaxed rules would allow
passengers to use Wi-Fi
services longer.
The advisory panel
recommending relaxed
rules finished its work
Sept. 25. As is the case
today, airlines would have
to demonstrate to the FAA
that each aircraft type can
safely operate with pas-
senger electronic devices
turned on and in use.
The FAA said in a
statement it would


"determine next steps"
after it receives the rec-
ommendation on Sept.
30. Les Dorr, an agency
spokesman, in an email
declined to comment on
the recommendations by
the Portable Electronic
Devices Advisory and
Rulemaking Committee,
a body chartered by the
FAA in January.
Lawmakers, including
Sen. Claire McCaskill,
D-Mo., have said the FAA


was moving too slowly to
expand usage and threat-
ened to force changes
through legislation.
The FAA now prohibits
use of personal electronic
devices while a plane is
below 10,000 feet, with
the exception of portable
recorders, hearing aids,
heart pacemakers and
electric shavers. The
restrictions are intended to
prevent interference with
flight controls.


Stretch travel dollars to Europe with holiday bookings


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great time to book tickets
at lower prices.
Airfares drop for travel
beginning around Oct. 28.
Monday through
Thursday departures and
returns offer the cheapest
fares on most airlines and
most routes. Some carriers
also allow cheap depar-
tures on Sunday.
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on a Friday, Saturday or
Sunday, however, the fares
can be as much as $100
higher round trip.
The exception to this is
travel to London, where
Monday-Wednesday
departures and returns
offer the cheapest fares.
In the past, airlines used
to allow a maximum stay
of 30, 60 or 90 days, but
many of these tickets allow
a stay of up to 330 days
from the date you book
your ticket, not the date
you depart. Most tickets re-
quire an advance purchase
of at least seven days and a
Saturday night stay.
Usually the Christmas
and NewYear's holiday
periods have higher fares
because of demand,
but there are deals on
Thanksgiving fares to
Europe because it is a




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holiday that Europeans
don't celebrate.
If you want to travel
over the Christmas
holidays and you depart
Dec. 19-Jan. 7, you will pay
a $100 to $200 premium.
The days where we expect
to see a much higher price
are departing Dec. 20-22
and Dec. 27-28, based on
a seven-day getaway. You
could see a price difference
of $300-$400 compared
with off-peak January
travel.
Sometimes the best
strategy for Christmas
travel is to look at finding
the cheapest European
destination you can by air,
then fly into one city and
out of another.
You can get to your
desired destination within
Europe by low-cost airline,
by rail or by car. You can
also do a circle trip, in
which you fly to one city in
Europe, then fly to one or
more cities within Europe
before flying home from
your final destination.


On bestfares.co
you can look at p
for these trips un
the "multi-destin
option. For airline
determine a round


business-class airfares
over the Christmas and
NewYear's holidays and in
summer.
Business travel to
Europe is slow during all of
these times.
When you are looking
i. -| for fares, you may find
1 i cheaper business-class
tickets from a different
gateway city. There are
often cheaper fares
from hub cities like
AP PHOTO New York, Chicago and
Miami, and the fare
night are difference can make
nd green it worth purchasing a
coach ticket to one of
these cities and then a
Dm, business-class ticket to
rices Europe from the hub.
der The default when book-
ation" ing air tickets on bestfares.
es to com is always economy, so
id-trip make sure you are looking


fare to qualify for what the
industry calls an open-jaw
ticket, the shortest flight
segment usually must be
at least half the distance
of the longest segment.
In Europe, almost any
city would qualify for
open-jaw tickets. To get
the best fare, you should
price a circle trip and an
open-jaw with a single
intra-Europe flight to see
which option is cheapest
for your itinerary.
There are three seasons
when we see discounts
on business-class tickets
to Europe, when fares
can be up to 50 percent
off normal business-class
airfares.
The cheapest business-
class airfares we see
just around the comer
are over Thanksgiving.
There are also discounted


at business class and not
first class, because first
class will be sky-high. We
are not seeing a weekend
surcharge on business
fares to Europe, so you
will not pay a premium for
weekend travel.
Even though we
focused on Thanksgiving,
Christmas and New Year's
airfares, if you want to go
to Europe for spring break,
you should consider book-
ing now because there are
deals in coach class.
It's not uncommon for
airlines to change the rules
at a moment's notice and
increase the fares, so as we
get closer to spring break,
you may not find any deals
to Europe for travel during
that time period. With
this sale, you can depart
through March 27 for most
destinations.


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Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


NATION/TRAVEL NEWS





SThe Sun/Sunday, September 29, 2013


WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


New major earthquake rocks southwest Pakistan


QUETTA, Pakistan (AP)
- A major earthquake
rocked Pakistan's south-
west Saturday, killing
at least 15 and sending
panicked people running
into the street just days
after another quake in
the same region killed
hundreds, officials said.
The U.S. Geological
Survey said on its
website that a 6.8 mag-
nitude quake was felt in
Pakistan's southwestern
Baluchistan province.
Pakistan's
Meteorological
Department measured
the earthquake at 7.2
magnitude, saying its
epicenter was about 150
kilometers (90 miles)
west of the town of
Khuzdar.
Baluchistan govern-
ment spokesman Jan
Mohammad Buledi said
those killed Saturday
died in the Mushkay area
of Awaran. The death toll
from Tuesday's disaster
was 359, he added.
Little may have been
left to damage after
Tuesday's disaster. Few of


the mud and homemade
brick houses in the area
survived the 7.7 magni-
tude quake that leveled
villages and buried peo-
ple in the rubble. Since
then tens of thousands
of people have been
sleeping under the open
sky or in tents.
Chief Pakistani mete-
orologist Arif Mahmood
told Pakistani television
that Saturday's earth-
quake was an aftershock
and such tremors could
continue for weeks.
Pakistan television
showed people at the
main hospital in Awaran
district fleeing into the
street. In the provincial
capital of Quetta, the
tremor was so strong it
prompted members of
the local parliament to
evacuate the building.
Baluchistan is
Pakistan's largest but
least populated prov-
ince. The rough terrain
and the lack of decent
roads have made access
difficult for rescue staff.
The Pakistani Air Force
has been air dropping


Pakistani children walk amid the rubble of houses, which were destroyed in Tuesday's
quake, in the remote district of Awaran in Baluchistan province, Pakistan, Friday.


supplies and using heli-
copters to ferry injured
people.
But the Pakistani
military has also been
targeted by separatists
operating in the region.
The military has been
trying to suppress an
uprising in the vast,
arid province for years


by rebels who want an
independent state for the
Baluch people.
In the latest attack,
gunmen Saturday killed
four Pakistani troops
carrying rations for
earthquake victims.
The Frontier Corps
troops were near the
town of Panjgore,


480 miles south
Quetta, when th
voy was attack
Pakistani militia
on condition of
ity because he v
authorized to si
the media. Thre
were also woun
To the north,
is dealing with i


who want to overthrow
the central government
and establish a hard-line
Islamic state.
Newly elected Prime
Minister Nawaz Sharif
has vowed to pursue
peace talks with the
militants. But the
militants have given
little indication they are
*interested in negoti-
ations. They initially
rejected talks with the
government and later
demanded Islamabad
release prisoners and
begin withdrawing
troops from the group's
tribal sanctuary before
talks could begin.
AP PHOTO Recent attacks have
earth- also called into ques-
tion their interest in
negotiating.
of On Saturday, a spokes-
heir con- man for the Tehreek-e-
d, said a Taliban criticized Sharif,
ry official saying his government is
fanonym- not serious about peace
was not talks. The spokesman,
peak to Shahidullah Shahid,
.e troops did not explicitly reject
ded. the offer but his words
Pakistan gave little room for
militants negotiations.


UN votes to eliminate Syria's chemical weapons


UNITED NATIONS
(AP) The U.N. Security
Council voted unani-
mously Friday night to
secure and destroy Syria's
chemical weapons stock-
pile, a landmark decision
aimed at taking poison
gas off the battlefield in
the escalating 2 12-year
conflict.
The vote after two
weeks of intense ne-
gotiations marked a
major breakthrough in
the paralysis that has
gripped the council
since the Syrian uprising
began. Russia and China
previously vetoed three
Western-backed resolu-
tions pressuring President
Bashar Assad's regime to
end the violence.
"Today's historic reso-
lution is the first hopeful
news on Syria in a long
time," U.N. Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon
told the council immedi-
ately after the vote, but he
and others stressed that
much more needs to be


done to stop the fighting
that has left more 100,000
dead.
'A red light for one
form of weapons does
not mean a green light
for others," the U.N. chief
said. "This is not a license
to kill with conventional
weapons."
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry said the
"strong, enforceable, prec-
edent-setting" resolution
shows that diplomacy can
be so powerful "that it
can peacefully defuse the
worst weapons of war."
Russian Foreign
Minister Sergey Lavrov
stressed that the resolu-
tion does not automat-
ically impose sanctions
on Syria. The resolution
calls for consequences if
Syria fails to comply, but
those will depend on the
council passing another
resolution in the event
of non-compliance. That
will give Assad ally Russia
the means to stop any
punishment from being


imposed.
As a sign of the broad
support for the reso-
lution, all 15 council
members signed on as
co-sponsors.
For the first time, the
council endorsed the
roadmap for a political
transition in Syria adopted
by key nations in June
2012 and called for an
international conference
to be convened "as soon as
possible" to implement it.
Ban said the target
date for a new peace
conference in Geneva is
mid-November.
Whether the council
can remain united to
press for an end to the
conflict remains to be
seen.
"We know despite its
clear usefulness, one
resolution alone will
not save Syria," France's
Foreign Minister Laurent
Fabius said after the vote.
Syria's U.N. Ambassador
Bashar Ja'afari accused
unnamed nations


of already giving the
resolution a negative
interpretation and trying
to "derail it from its lofty
purposes."
And Republican
senators John McCain
and Lindsey Graham,
who have been harshly
critical of Obama's policy
on Syria, dismissed the
resolution as "another
triumph of hope over
reality." It "contains
no meaningful or im-
mediate enforcement
mechanisms, let alone a
threat of the use of force
for the Assad regime's
non-compliance," they
said in a statement that
was highly skeptical
that Russia would ever
approve a threat of force
for non-compliance.
The vote came just
hours after the world's
chemical weapons
watchdog adopted a
U.S.-Russian plan that
lays out benchmarks and
timelines for catalogu-
ing, quarantining and


ultimately destroying
Syria's chemical weapons,
their precursors and
delivery systems.
The Security Council
resolution enshrines
the plan approved by
Organization for the
Prohibition of Chemical
Weapons, making it
legally binding.
The agreement allows
the start of a mission
to rid Syria's regime of
its estimated 1,000-ton
chemical arsenal by
mid-2014, significantly
accelerating a destruction
timetable that often takes
years to complete.
Kerry said the de-
struction of Syria's
chemical weapons
stockpile will begin in
November and be com-
pleted as called for by the


middle of next year.
"We expect to have
an advance team on the
ground (in Syria) next
week," OPCW spokesman
Michael Luhan told
reporters at the organi-
zation's headquarters in
The Hague, Netherlands
immediately after its
41-member executive
council approved the
plan.






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His death was con-
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London police use'super recognizers' to fight crime


LONDON (AP) Paul
Hyland almost never
forgets a face. He's a "super
recognizer," and that's
giving an unusual kind
of help to his employer:
Scotland Yard.
Several years ago, for
example, London police
were on the lookout for a
burglar wanted for nine
robberies. About a month
after seeing the burglar's
picture, Hyland and two
colleagues were stuck in
traffic.
"I looked up and noticed
this guy coming out of a
university and knew it was
him," Hyland recalled,
adding that neither of his
colleagues recognized the
burglar. Hyland arrested
the suspect, who confessed
after questioning.
"If I've met someone
before and see them again,
I'll usually know where
I know them from, even
if I can't remember their
name," he said.
How does Hyland do it?
Nobody knows. But since
2011, about 200 London
police officers have been
recruited to an elite squad
of super recognizers.
Officials say they have
tripled the number of
criminal suspects identified
from surveillance photos
or on the street each week,
and even helped prevent
some crimes like muggings,
drug deals and assaults.
"When we have an image
of an unidentified criminal,
I know exactly who to ask
instead of sending it out
to everyone and getting a
bunch of false leads," said
Mick Neville, Detective
Chief Inspector at Scotland
Yard. Neville started the
super recognizer unit after
realizing the police had
no system for identifying
criminals based on images,
unlike those for DNA and
fingerprints.
The unit proved espe-
cially valuable after riots


hit London in the summer
of 2011. After the violence,
Scotland Yard combed
through hundreds of hours
of surveillance video. So
far, there have been nearly
5,000 arrests; around 4,000
of those were based on
police identifications
of suspects from video
images. The super recog-
nizers were responsible for
nearly 30 percent of the
identifications, including
one officer who identified
almost 300 people. A
facial recognition software
program made only one
successful identification,
according to Neville.
Weeks before the Notting
Hill Carnival, the biggest
street festival in Europe,
kicked off last month, the
super recognizers were
given images of known
criminals and gang
members. After the carnival
began, 17 super recognizers
holed up in a control room
to study surveillance foot-
age and spot the potential
troublemakers.
Once targeted people
were identified, police offi-
cers were sent to the scene
as a pre-emptive strategy.
Neville said that likely
prevented some crimes like
thefts and assaults.
Neville said one super
recognizer saw what he
thought was a drug deal,
but wasn't sure. The next
day, the super recognizer
saw the same person and
when police intervened,
they found the suspect with
crack cocaine.
He noted that the officers
aren't infallible and that
their identification is only
the start of a case, after
which police start looking
for other evidence.
Legal authorities warned
it could be problematic to
use super recognizers as
expert witnesses in court,
such as in situations where
they identify criminals
based on an imperfect


image.
"Unless we subject them
to (rigorous testing), then
we are just taking their
word on trust and we have
no reason to do this," said
Mike Redmayne, a law
professor at the London
School of Economics.
"Perhaps they can do what
they say, but we don't have
the evidence yet," he wrote
in an email. "If it was up to
me, I would not (allow) it in
court."
In the U.S., experts
thought it would be up
to individual judges to
decide whether super
recognizers needed to be
verified before allowing
their testimony in court.
"It's not clear to me


that the law will demand
they be tested first," said
David Kaye, a distin-
guished professor of law
at Penn State. He said
the identification skills of
super recognizers might
be analogous to those of
sniffer dogs, whose abil-
ity to sniff out drugs are
mostly accepted without
confirmatory tests. Kaye
also noted cases where
expert witnesses didn't
need to have their skills
verified before testifying
in court and thought
that in most instances,
the prosecution would
have more evidence than
simply the identification
of an alleged criminal by
a super recognizer.


Coast

Der1


AP PHOTO
In this photo taken on Sept. 18, PC Paul Hyland a Metropolitan
Police super recognizer poses for photographs beside computer
screens at the force's New Scotland Yard headquarters in
London.


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(941) 613-2400 coastakldern


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Charlotte County, in coordination with the Charlotte County
Punta Gorda Metropolitan Planning Organization, has
launched a major update to the County's 10-year Transit
Development Plan (TDP), called Charlotte Rides. The
update considers the future of public transportation in
Charlotte County from 2015-2024. Public involvement is
an important part of the process, and numerous activities
have been planned to support Charlotte Rides, including
surveys for transit users and the general public,
stakeholder interviews, focus group discussions, and public
workshops.

Citizens are encouraged to attend one of the public workshops
listed below to express opinions, ideas and vision for future
public transportation needs. Staff will be available at these
workshops to provide information, answer questions, and take
comments.

There are three locations where the workshops will be
held:
Thursday, October 3, 2013 3 p.m. 6 p.m., at the
Charlotte Harbor Event and Convention Center, Peace
River Room-A, 75 Taylor Street, Punta Gorda, Florida
33950;
Wednesday, October 9, 2013 3 p.m. 5 p.m., at the
Englewood/Charlotte Public Library, Library Meeting
Room, 3450 North Access Road, Englewood, Florida
34224; and
Tuesday, October 29, 2013 4 p.m. 6 p.m., at the
Cultural Center of Charlotte County, Palm Room, 2280
Aaron Street, Port Charlotte, Florida 33952.

No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of these meetings. Accordingly, anyone
seeking to appeal any decisions involving the matters herein will be responsible for making a verbatim
record of the meeting/testimony and evidence upon which any appeal is to be based. (SEE.F.S.
286.0105)
Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting, should contact the
Charlotte County-Punta Gorda Metropolitan Planning Organization at least forty-eight (48) hours prior
to the meeting by calling (941) 883-3535; if you are hearing or speech impaired, call (800) 955-8770
Voice/(800) 955-8771 TDD.
The MPO's planning process is conducted in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
and related statutes. Any person or beneficiary who believes he or she has been discriminated against
because of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, or familial status may file a
complaint with the Florida Department of Transportation District One Title VI Coordinator Robin
Parrish at (863) 519-2675 or by writing her at Post Office Box 1249, Bartow, Florida 33831.
For more in/fori/atio/ call"
C/haif'lo//e C(o/H -P/fi/a G6ord/a MPO
2Jf 5// Harbor J7et- Road, Suite 4 Porf
C(/arfo/te, FL 339W/i


iPage 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


* *


* *


* *


Tel: (941) 883-3.535


www. ccmpo. corn


WORLD NEWS





The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 9


NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) -
Kenya on Saturday sharply
criticized a decision by the
United States to reissue
a travel advisory for the
country in the wake of
the deadly attack on an
upscale mall in the capital
Nairobi, highlighting fears
that the assault could hurt
the East African nation's
lucrative tourism industry.
The U.S. State
Department released
the updated advisory on
Friday that made specific
reference to the Sept. 21
terrorist attack on the
Westgate Mall in Nairobi
that left at least 67 people
dead, including several
foreigners. Five Americans
were injured in the attack,
according to the State
Department.
The advisory, which con-
tained similar wording to
one issued in June, warned
Americans to take caution
in light of ongoing terrorist
threats and the high rate
of violent crime in some
areas.
It noted that U.S.
authorities continue to
receive information about
"potential terrorist threats
aimed at U.S., Western,
and Kenyan interests in
Kenya, including in the
Nairobi area and in the
coastal city of Mombasa."
Kenya's Ministry of
Foreign Affairs condemned
the U.S. decision to issue
the statement Saturday,
saying it was "unnecessary
and uncalled for." It urged
Washington to withdraw
the advisory and said it
has made its concerns
clear through diplomatic
channels.
"Terrorism, such as in
the attack on Westgate
Mall, is a global problem.
The United States itself,
has suffered terror attacks
before, and so have other
countries right across the
globe," the ministry said.
"Issuing travel advisories
... is not what we expect of
our friends."
The militant group al-
Shabab has said it carried
out the mall attack to
punish Kenya for sending
its troops into neighbor-
ing Somalia to fight the
al-Qaida-linked militant
group that had seized


AP PHOTO
In new video made available Saturday undercover police
officers and police with guns ask shoppers caught up in the mall
to leave with their hands up in the Westgate Mall in Kenyan


capital Nairobi, Sept. 21.
large parts of that country
for years before being
dislodged from the capital,
Mogadishu.
Kenya's large tourism
industry is one of the
country's largest sources
of foreign currency.
Authorities are sensitive
to anything that could
keep visitors away from
its Indian Ocean beaches
and safaris of game parks
teeming with giraffes,
zebras and other wild
animals.
About 1.8 million tour-
ists visited Kenya in 2011,
primarily from Europe and
the United States, accord-
ing to the Kenya National
Bureau of Statistics.
Phyllis Kandie, cabinet
secretary for East African
affairs, commerce and
tourism, earlier in the
week sought to assure
tourists that Kenya
remains a safe destination.
In a statement, she said
security agencies are
doing everything possible
to keep the country safe


and assured visitors that
all tourist facilities "are
operating normally."
Other countries, includ-
ing Britain, Germany and
Australia, also have urged
citizens to be cautious
following the attack.
Several foreigners
were killed in the assault.
Britain's Foreign and
Commonwealth Office
on Saturday announced
that it has confirmed a
sixth Briton was among
the dead. It did not release
details.
FBI agents, along with
investigators from Britain,
Canada and Germany,
are participating in the
investigation into the
attack. Results are not
expected until next week at
the earliest.
Kenya has protested U.S.
travel notices before. In
June 2012, it criticized an
American advisory warn-
ing of an imminent terror
attack on the coastal town
of Mombasa as "economic
sabotage."


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NEW DELHI
(Washington Post) In
the months since a grue-
some gang rape riveted
India, a "women-only"
culture has been on the
rise here, with Indians
increasingly seeking out
women-only buses, cabs,
travel groups and hotel
floors.
One city is preparing to
open a women-only park.
And in November, the
government is launching
a women-only bank it
hopes will empower
women financially.
In a country where
reported sexual violence
is increasing despite
heightened attention to
the problem many say
the women-only spaces
are a welcome refuge
from lewd looks, groping
and unwanted male
attention. The concept
appeals to women across
a broad spectrum of
Indian society, including
a 60-year-old named
Sarita, who recently trav-
eled to New Delhi from
a village in Maharashtra
by train and said she still
had to squabble with
male passengers who
tried to sit next to her in
the women's coach.
"It's the ways of men,"
Sarita said. "They're
not good. How can we
coexist?"
But critics argue
that the trend toward


separation threatens the
gains that women have
made in education and
access to new career
fields over the past two
decades, as the economy
has rapidly modernized.
It's the men who need to
change their behavior,
they argue, not women.
"It's appalling," said
Jayati Ghosh, an econom-
ics professor at Jawaharlal
Nehru University in New
Delhi. "It's a way for a
patriarchal society to
announce it's not going
to protect women. It's
simply going to segregate
women and restrict
their freedom, instead of
securing it."
"Must banks too go
pink?" the headline of an
editorial in the Hindu, a
leading newspaper, asked
recently.
Some women-only
spaces in trains, on
Delhi's Metro system
- already had existed
before December, when
a 23-year-old physical
therapy student was
gang-raped and injured
so severely she later died.
The country's male-dom-
inated culture is rooted
in religious customs and
societal norms that date
back centuries, and the
sexes were long kept
separate in schools and
temples.
But the Dec. 16 rape
and subsequent death


penalty sentences for
the four attackers drew
intense attention to
the problem of sexual
violence against women
in India, where reports of
rape have increased more
than 25 percent in recent
years, statistics show.
Some women believe
the harsh sentences will
have little impact and feel
the harassment problem
is getting worse, forcing
them to retreat.
After the gang rape,
state governments across
India scrambled to do
something anything -
that would calm a public
increasingly agitated
about sexual violence.
They installed help lines
for crime victims, more
street lighting, better
surveillance cameras.
But it was the idea of
creating more safe places
for women that really
caught the attention of
bureaucrats. The city
of Coimbatore, in the
southern part of the
country, announced
plans to spruce up a
decrepit park and limit
it to women, who would
also have access to a gym
with a female fitness
trainer. Localities from
Assam to Odisha created
women-only bus lines.
The ministry of tourism
began pushing even small
hotels to add female-only
floors.


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Kenya blasts US over


updated travel warning


'Women-only' spaces


grow in India


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iPage 10 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/WORLD NEWS


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


TODAY




Isolated PM. Rain


890 / 700
30% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and Real Feel Temperatureg Today


73 85 97 99 94 87
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4p.m. 6p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very Highi; 11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.
AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Saturday
31
0 50 100150 200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Saturday
Trees ;
Grass
Weeds' *.'o;*^o
Molds NA |
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Saturday
Temperatures
High/Low 900/710
Normal High/Low 900/720
Record High 940 (1989)
Record Low 680 (2005)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Saturday 0.00"
Month to date 11.09"
Normal month to date 6.50"
Year to date 48.61"
Normal year to date 43.69"
Record 1.32" (1966)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.29 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 11.09 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 48.61 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


MONDAY




Isolated PM. Rain


890 / 720
30% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 88/71 part cldy none
Sarasota 88/70 part cldy none

SUN AND MOON


The Sun
Today
Monday
The Moon
Today
Monday
New


Rise
7:20 a.m.
7:20 a.m.
Rise
2:24 a.m.
3:17 a.m.


Set
7:17 p.m.
7:16 p.m.
Set
3:49 p.m.
4:27 p.m.


First Full Last


C0 )
Oct4 Oct 11 Oct 18 Oct 26

SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 1:55a 8:06a 2:18p 8:29p
Mon. 2:36a 8:47a 2:58p 9:09p
Tue. 3:15a 9:26a 3:38p 9:49p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 1:11a
Mon. 1:37a
Englewood
Today 10:01a
Mon. 12:14a
Boca Grande
Today 9:06a
Mon. 10:19a
El Jobean
Today 1:43a
Mon. 2:09a
Venice
Today 8:16a
Mon. 9:29a


Low High Low

5:46a 11:24a 7:06p
6:54a 12:37p 7:49p

4:02a --- 5:22p
5:10a 11:14a 6:05p

2:23a 11:19p 3:43p
3:31a 11:40p 4:26p

6:15a 11:56a 7:35p
7:23a 1:09p 8:18p

2:41a 10:29p 4:01p
3:49a 10:50p 4:44p


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY THE NATION


S--0 -1s Os O I10s I 20s 30s 40s 5s 0s s 70s 80l O 90


Isolated PM. Rain


880 / 730
30% chance of rain

Cleaiwater|
88'72

T a Tampa
89/71


*----


Scattered PM. Storms


880 / 740
50% chance of rain


'Brand.
89 66


Plant City
491Y67

-n


7-41
Rain Likely


850 / 740
80% chance of rain


Winter Hawen
92 69


Bartuo
91, 69


t88/71Petersburg Apollo Beach Ft. Meade
88/7188 68 I 90/67




Wauchula
SBradenton 91 68
87/71
Longboat Key(b __________Myakka City Limestone
Longboat Key 91 68 Limestone
87/72 S91 6 8aj91 68
Sarasota ....
88/70 : "

Osprey "- Arcadia '
88/71 e 91 70 J
Venice
Shown is today's weather. V 88/71 North Po 9Hull
Temperatures are today's 89/69 91/69
highs and tonight's lows. P-rt Charlutt -
SPort Chadlutt
I 89/70


i

Gulf Water
Temperature

830


89 71 -

Placida
88/71.
Boca Grande %
88/75


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2013

Publication date: 9/29/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
NE 6-12 1-3 Light
Tarpon Springs toApalachicola
ENE 7-14 1-3 Light


Punta Gorda
90/69


Fort Myers
88/71 *
4
Cape Coral
88/70


Lehigh Acres
91/70


Sanibel
87/76
Bonita Springs j
89/71

AccuWeather.com ""


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
84 67 s
87 71 pc
88 72 pc
87 74 pc
84 68 sh
86 75 sh
88 71 pc
84 67 pc
84 63 pc
81 65 sh
86 78 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
84 68 pc
88 73 s
88 74 s
87 75 pc
85 70 pc
86 77 pc
89 72 s
87 71 pc
83 64 pc
82 66 pc
86 79 pc


city
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
I Lo W
6 76 pc
6 68 pc
0 67 pc
4 69 sh
7 75 sh
9 73 pc
5 65 pc
4 67 pc
7 69 pc
3 67 pc
4 67 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
86 77 pc
86 71 s
87 69 s
85 72 pc
87 76 pc
89 73 s
86 65 s
86 70 pc
87 70 s
83 69 pc
85 68 t


Today
City Hi Lo W
Pompano Beach 85 75 sh
St. Augustine 81 69 sh
St. Petersburg 88 71 pc
Sanford 86 69 sh
Sarasota 88 70 pc
Tallahassee 85 64 s
Tampa 89 71 pc
Titusville 84 68 sh
Vero Beach 85 69 pc
West Palm Beach 87 72 sh
Winter Haven 92 69 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
86 77 pc
82 69 pc
89 74 s
87 70 pc
89 71 s
85 66 pc
89 73 s
84 70 pc
87 71 pc
87 75 pc
87 69 s


Fronts Pi

Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)
High .................. 960 at Laredo,TX Low ......... 1


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


Today
Hi Lo W
76 51 s
50 36 pc
78 62 s
76 54 pc
71 49 c
80 62 pc
67 53 sh
69 54 pc
73 57 pc
72 49 pc
76 57 pc
76 54 s
72 47 pc
72 58 pc
73 58 pc
79 55 s
74 58 pc
71 42 pc
85 66 t
78 48 s
77 52 s
70 53 sh
69 48 s
43 31 c
74 52 s
73 48 pc
63 44 c
88 73 pc
89 71 t
72 55 sh


WORLD CITIES


City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


Today
Hi Lo W
63 51 s
98 70 s
76 58 pc
61 43 s
61 39 sh
86 65 s
58 38 c
88 68 pc
64 54 s
61 33 c
69 53 s
49 36 sh
64 57 c
73 55 sh


Mon.
Hi Lo W
80 53 s
48 35 pc
78 61 pl
75 52 pc
70 43 pc
83 63 pc
66 43 c
65 56 r
71 55 c
72 52 pc
75 54 c
79 57 pc
74 54 s
75 55 c
70 55 c
82 59 s
74 56 c
66 49 r
89 71 pc
82 50 s
78 58 s
72 54 pc
71 52 s
40 30 c
77 52 pc
69 54 r
61 41 c
88 73 c
87 69 t
76 55 pl


Mon.
Hi Lo WI
63 49 s
97 70 s
76 62 pl
59 43 pc
59 45 pc
87 66 s
55 35 sI
87 72 s
62 56 r
59 32 pl
65 55 r
49 31 pl
66 55 c
74 62 r


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


recipitation

Flurries Snow


4 at Bodie State Park, CA


Today
Hi Lo W
83 64 pc
77 54 s
76 55 s
83 65 s
81 58 s
73 61 sh
76 67 r
70 48 s
73 56 s
82 61 s
77 58 t
86 68 pc
73 56 pc
73 61 c
80 53 s
78 53 s
74 56 pc
94 70 s
74 57 pc
66 46 s
59 51 r
71 52 pc
74 54 pc
77 57 pc
76 55 pc
84 73 r
77 61 s
72 61 c
57 51 r
74 58 pc


Today
Hi Lo W
77 51 t
73 57 pc
71 50 pc
70 57 sh
70 41 pc
77 71 sh
75 63 r
62 50 s
94 79 t
77 48 s
74 63 pc
72 55 c
55 51 r
72 52 s


Mon.
Hi Lo W
83 64 t
78 59 s
79 58 c
84 65 s
78 59 s
78 60 c
81 69 sh
70 55 s
78 58 s
84 61 pc
79 61 c
85 70 t
72 56 c
73 61 s
84 65 s
81 57 s
74 58 pc
94 69 s
72 55 c
63 52 r
63 49 r
65 54 r
78 59 s
81 55 pc
79 62 pc
90 74 t
72 61 s
71 56 c
60 49 r
79 61 pc


Mon.
Hi Lo W
74 51 t
70 55 pc
71 48 pc
71 56 pc
67 42 pc
82 75 t
75 61 r
65 50 s
92 80 t
84 55 pc
76 68 sh
69 52 pc
59 52 sh
72 50 s


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Sudan police fire on funeral, protesters say


KHARTOUM, Sudan (AP)
- Sudanese security forces
in pickup trucks opened
fire Saturday on hundreds
of mourners marching after
the funeral of a protester
killed a day earlier, the
latest violence in a week
of demonstrations calling
for the ouster of longtime
President Omar al-Bashir.
The man killed was a
pharmacist from a promi-
nent family, suggesting the
heavy security crackdown
could deepen discontent,
spread unrest and upset the
complex network of power
centers al-Bashir relies
upon to stay in power.
Three female protesters
interviewed separately
said dozens of pickup
trucks and security


forces surrounded them
in a main street in the
capital Khartoum before
firing tear gas and live
ammunition. It was not
possible to independently
verify their account, but
Sudanese activists and
international rights groups
say government security
forces have routinely used
live fire against protesters,
often aimed at the head
and torso. One of the three
women was waiting at a
hospital where she said two
relatives were being treated
for gunshot wounds.
The violent crackdown
that aims to quash Sudan's
most extensive street
demonstrations in two
decades could now actu-
ally be propelling them,


activists said.
"The excessive use
of force means that the
regime is becoming bare
of any political cover and it
is declaring a war against
its own people," said
Khaled Omar, a member
of the Change Now youth
movement, one of the
groups calling for protests.
"This will backfire internal-
ly, inside the regime itself
and cause cracks within
and lead to its collapse,"
he said, voicing a forecast
held widely among activists
but one that is difficult to
predict.
The protests, which
erupted Sunday night, were
initially triggered by the
lifting of fuel and wheat
subsidies. But over the


past days demands have
escalated to call for the
resignation of al-Bashir,
who has ruled for 24 years.
"The cars came from the
back and the front while
we were marching in the
street," another female
protester said. "The tear gas
was very strong. The people
fled trying to escape, taking
shelter inside homes," she
added.
Earlier in the day,
women, crying and
hugging, blocked a
side-street to prevent
police from deploying to
the funeral of 26-year-
old pharmacist Salah
al-Sanhouri. His family
says he was shot outside
his pharmacy as a march
went by Friday.


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I WORLD

Greek far-right
leader, legislators
arrested

ATHENS, Greece (AP)
- The leader of Greece's
extreme-right Golden
Dawn party and four
other of its parliamen-
tarians were formally
charged Saturday with
membership in a criminal
organization with intent
to commit crimes, in an
escalation of a govern-
ment crackdown after a
fatal stabbing blamed on
a supporter.
It was the first time
since 1974 that sitting
members of Parliament
have been arrested.
The arrests underline
the Greek government's
efforts to stifle the fiercely
anti-immigrant party,
which has been increas-
ingly on the defensive
since the killing.
Golden Dawn leader
Nikos Michaloliakos,
party spokesman Ilias
Kassidiaris and Yannis
Lagos, Nikos Michos
and Ilias Panayiotaros
were arrested by coun-
terterrorism police. The
last two gave themselves
up voluntarily. A sixth
parliamentarian, Christos
Pappas described in a
prosecutor's report as the
Golden Dawn's No. 2 -
remains at large.

India, Pakistan
hold peace summit
UNITED NATIONS
(AP) A meeting of the
Pakistani and Indian
prime ministers in New
York this weekend is a
fresh chance for one
leader to push for peace
on the subcontinent -
and likely the last chance
for the other.
Three-time Pakistani
premier Nawaz Sharif and
India's Manmohan Singh
are due to meet Sunday
on the sidelines of the
U.N. General Assembly. It


is their first face-to-face
since Sharif's election
victory in May. Singh will
step down next year.
Sharif calls the meeting
a chance for a "new
beginning," but Singh has
tamped down expecta-
tions for the talks which
take place amid an up-
surge in militant attacks
in disputed Kashmir.
Speaking Friday after a
White House meeting
with President Barack
Obama, Singh said,
"the epicenter of terror
still remains focused in
Pakistan."
The need for peace
between the South Asian
nuclear rivals has rarely
been greater. They have
been at loggerheads since
Britain granted indepen-
dence and carved up the
subcontinent in 1947,
but the impending U.S.
military withdrawal from
Afghanistan adds new
uncertainty to a region
increasingly threatened
by Islamic militancy.

Berlusconi
ministers resign

MILAN (AP) Italy's
fragile coalition govern-
ment was pushed into a
full-fledged crisis Saturday
after five ministers from
former Premier Silvio
Berlusconi's political
party announced their
resignations.
The move drew the ire
of Premier Enrico Letta,
who accused Berlusconi of
a "crazy" gesture aimed at
covering up his personal
affairs.
The five-month-old gov-
ernment has teetered for
weeks since the high court
confirmed Berlusconi's tax
fraud conviction.
Berlusconi's center-right
People of Liberty Party is in
an unusual coalition of rival
forces with Letta's center-
left Democratic Party, and
the resignations signals the
end of the alliance.


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.
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SPORTS


Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


NHL gets makeover
thanks to realignment,
oPage 2

Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* MLB: Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 2


AP PHOTO
Tampa Bay Rays starter Chris Archer reacts during Saturday's game against the Blue Jays in Toronto. Archer pitched 21% innings,
allowing one run on five hits as the Blue Jays beat the Rays 7-2.




Untimely tumble


Loss puts Rays in all-too-familiar situation RAYS AT BLUE JAYS


By IAN HARRISON
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO The Tampa Bay Rays
have left themselves with a pretty big
Game 162.
Tampa Bay dropped into a tie
with Texas for the second AL wild-
card berth, losing to Toronto 7-2 on
Saturday. Ryan Goins and Kevin Pillar
hit two-run home runs for the Blue
Jays, and J.A. Happ won for the first
time in four starts.
"I'm excited for (today)," Rays slugger
Evan Longoria said. "We like to make it
interesting, that's for sure."
Tampa Bay won the wild card in


2011 when Evan Longoria's 12th-inning
homer beat the New York Yankees
8-7, capping a seven-run comeback.
Boston's loss at Baltimore that night
put the Rays into the postseason.
"We've been here before, we've
been in these moments," manager
Joe Maddon said. "We never do things
seemingly easily so let's just play
(today) and see what happens."
The Rays (90-71) lost their second
straight following a seven-game
winning streak and dropped one game
behind Cleveland (91-70), which beat

RAYS|7


WHO: Tampa Bay (90-71) at
Toronto (74-87)
WHEN: Today, 1:07 p.m.
WHERE: Rogers Centre, Toronto
PITCHERS: Matt Moore (16-4,
3.23) vs. Todd Redmond (44-2,
3.77)
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM, 1480
AM, 1530 AM, 1580 AM

AL WILD-CARD STANDINGS
W L Pet GB
Cleveland 91 70 .565 -
RAYS 90 71 .559 1
Texas 90 71 .559 1


* BOYS CROSS COUNTRY: flrunners.com Invitational


Manta, Tarpon


boys enjoy wins


By CARL KOTALA
SPECIAL TO THE SUN
TITUSVILLE -Talk
about being able to stand
out in a crowd.
The Charlotte and
Lemon Bay high school
boys cross country teams
both won their respective
races by wide mar-
gins at the flrunners.
com Invitational 14 on
Saturday at Chain of Lakes
Park.
Charlotte, racing in the
Unseeded A race, placed
three runners inside the
top 13 and five runners
inside the top 40 to score
87 team points, easily
out-distancing sec-
ond-place Liberty, which
had 156.
Lemon Bay took part
in the Unseeded B race
and had three runners


UP NEXT
Charlotte: at SWFL Festival,
Buckingham Park, Fort Myers,
Saturday, 7:30 a.m.
Lemon Bay: at pre-state meet
in Tallahassee, Oct. 12,TBA
Port Charlotte: Disney World
Classic, Oct. 12, TBA
INSIDE: Tarpons'Young loses
headband, wins girls race,
PAGE 10

inside the top 12 and five
runners inside the top
42 for a team score of 89
points. Miami Monsignor
Pace was second with 127.
Knowing his team
was seeded No. 1 in
their event, Charlotte
coach Chris George
challenged the Tarpons
to follow through despite
ENJOY 110


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:
No. 12 South Carolina 28, Central Florida 25


Central Florida running back Storm Johnson dives for a 1-yard
touchdown past South Carolina cornerback Victor Hampton
during Saturday's game in Orlando.


Sharp Knights


dull down stretch


By KYLE HIGHTOWER
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORLANDO -After
Central Florida's upset
win at Penn State two
weeks ago, the Knights
entered Saturday's
matchup with No. 12
South Carolina confident
they could compete with
a ranked Southeastern
Conference heavyweight.
For a half the Knights
proved they were ready,
and then they spent the
final 30 minutes showing
why they aren't quite
there yet.
UCF had four turn-
overs, two leading to
Gamecocks scores, and a
late rally came up short in
a 28-25 loss on Saturday.
"If you turn the ball
over like we did, it's going
to be harder to stay in


SATURDAY
SCOREBOARD
No. 8 FSU 48, Boston College 34
No. 9 Georgia 44, No. 6 LSU 41
No. 14Oklahoma 35, No. 22 ND 21
No. 15 Miami 49, USF 21
No. 20 Florida 24, Kentucky 7
INSIDE: Hurricanes stuff Bulls;
Seminoles ease past Eagles,
PAGE 4

games," Knights' coach
George O'Leary said. "I
can't say it got away...
We have a lot of young
kids and we can't sustain
on turnovers and short
fields. When you have a
chance to make plays you
have to make them, and
we didn't make enough
plays in the second half."
KNIGHTS 15


* NFL: Tampa Bay


Glennon strives to establish himself


CARDINALS AT
BUCCANEERS
WHO: Arizona (1-2)
at Tampa Bay (0-3)
WHEN: Today, 1 p.m.
WHERE: Raymond James
Stadium, Tampa
TV: FOX
RADIO: 103.5 FM, 620 AM,
1580 AM
TICKETS: Ticketmaster.com
INSIDE: Manning enjoys best
start to season of career, PAGE 6


By FRED GOODALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA Mike
Glennon isn't promising
to have the immediate
impact of an Andrew
Luck, Robert Griffin III
and Russell Wilson, a trio
of young quarterbacks
who led their teams to the
playoffs as rookies.
He just wants to be
himself.
The third-round
draft pick out of North
Carolina State makes


his first NFL start for the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
(0-3) today, taking over
for the benched Josh
Freeman against the
Arizona Cardinals (1-2).
And while he's well
aware of the success
Luck, Griffin and for-
mer college teammate
Wilson had in helping
Indianapolis, Washington
and Seattle to playoff
berths last season,
Glennon doesn't want
to put any additional


pressure on himself by
making bold predictions.
"I'm my own player,"
the 23-year-old said. "All
those rookies that have
really excelled the past
few years, their situation
may be different. I'm not
really sure. But I'm just
going to come in here and
do everything I can and
be myself."
That's what coach Greg
Schiano is counting on.
Freeman, who's in the
GLENNONI7


MCT PHOTO
Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Mike Glennon throws
under pressure from New England Patriots defensive tackle Joe
Vellano during a preseason game at Gillette Stadium in
Foxborough, Mass. Glennon is making his first NFL start today.


INDEX I Lottery 2 I Community calendar 2 I Shore Lines 2 NHL 2 | Collegefootball 3-5 | NFL 6-7 1 Baseball 7-8 1 Preps 9-10 | Golf 10 Scoreboard 11 | Quick Hits 11 I Autoracing 12






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com
* CASH 3
Sept. 28N ................................ 4-8-9
Sept. 28D ................................... 1-4-9
Sept. 27N ..................... .......... 5-4-5
Sept. 27D ..................... .......... 4-3-2
Sept. 26N ............................... 7-2-2
Sept. 26D ..................... .......... 5-3-7
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
Sept. 28N ............................ 6-5-5-4
Sept. 28D ............................ 3-6-4-4
Sept. 27N ............................ 7-1-7-8
Sept. 27D ................................4-8-3-9
Sept. 26N ................................5-0-0-2
Sept. 26D ................................ 6-6-4-2
D-Day, N-Night
* FANTASY 5
Sept. 28.............. 8-14-17-27-30
Sept. 27...... ................. -6-7-9-17
Sept. 26 .................. 6-11-19-24-32
Sept. 25........... ..... 2-3-4-11-29
Sept. 24.................21-24-25-29-32
PAYOFF FOR SEPT. 27
2 5-digit winners.......... $111,459.88
583 4-digit winners............... $61.50
14,484 3-digit winners............. $6.50
* MEGA MONEY
Sept. 27....................... 10-15-38-40
M egaBall ............................ ......... 14

Sept. 24............................ 1-6-25-35
M egaBall............................ ......... 12
PAYOFF FOR SEPT. 27
0 4-of-4 MB...................... $550,000
5 4-of-4........................... $1,153.50
38 3-of-4 MB...................... $332.50
600 3-of-4............................ $62.50
912 2-of-4MB......................$28.50
* LOTTO
Sept. 28..................9-26-34-40-42-49
Sept. 25................1-2-25-43-48-53
Sept. 21..................8-32-35-46-47-52
PAYOFF FOR SEPT. 25
0 6-digit winners ..................... $9M
19 5-digit winners ..................$7,023
1,180 4-digit winners............. $81.50
25,146 3-digit winners ................. $5
* POWERBALL
Sept. 28.................14-47-52-53-54
Pow erball............................ ............. 5

Sept. 25..................... 2-7-17-49-53
Powerball........................................23
PAYOFF FOR SEPT. 25
0 5 of5 + PB .....................$50M
0 5 0of5.............................. $1,000,000
24of5 + PB........................... $10,000
74 4 of 5 .................................. $100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$60 million
MEGAA MILLIONS
Sept. 271................... 9-23-27-49-51
Powerball........................... ...... 38

Sept. 24................... 1-15-20-21-47
Powerball.......................... .......... 34
PAYOFF FOR SEPT. 27
0 5 of5 + MB....................... $160M
0 5 of 5............................. $250,000
1 4of5 + MB..................... $10,000


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call Mark
Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must contain
name, address and phone number.
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to golfscores@sun-herald.com. Scores
appear in the weekly Herald sections.


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Contact us

Mark Lawrence Sports Editor
mlawrence@sun-herald.com

Mike Bambach Deputy SE
mbambach@sun-herald.com


Matt Stevens* Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com

Rob Shore. Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
Zach Miller. Staff writer
zmiller@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* SHORE LINES



Bucs take prize for bad handling


his column should
be read while listen-
ing to "Amnesia" by v
the Tubes (running times:
4 minutes, 29 seconds).
Congratulations
should go out to Tampa ROD
Bay Buccaneers coach SHOF
Greg Schiano and general
manager Mark Dominik SPORTS W
for successfully handling
the Josh Freeman situation as bad
as it could have been handled.
With the ascendancy of
Mike Glennon to the starting role
with the Bucs, suddenly he has
the best chance out of himself,
Schiano and Dominik of return-
ing next season. And maybe not
as the starting quarterback.
Just a thought on the Bucs


-




RE
VRITER


quarterback situation: If
Glennon is not the guy
- and he may be anyway
- keep an eye on Georgia
quarterback (and Plant
graduate) Aaron Murray.
(Don't even think about
the circus that is Johnny
Manziel.)
0 With the NFL playing
one of its two annual


games at London's Wembley
Stadium today, you are obligated
to forgo your usual pizza or
chicken wings for fish and chips.
0 With linebacker Aldon Smith
playing all of the San Francisco
49ers' defensive snaps against
the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday,
apparently that means pro
football and politics are still two


of the only fields where you can
get a DUI on the way to the office
and still put in a full work day.
Auburn lacrosse player
Zachary Burgess drunkenly
stole a car last weekend and as
justification for the crime said he
wanted to play the video game
"Grand Theft Auto" for real.
Funny, when this happened with
"Pong," you just went over to the
ping-pong table.
True fact: Team Oracle USA,
which won the America's Cup on
Thursday, had exactly one more
American in its gameday crew
than the 1980 Soviet Union ice
hockey team had in theirs.
Speaking of which, the NHL
begins its season Tuesday, so take
a day and add "ov" to your last


name to celebrate.
The Tampa Bay Rays play
today for the right to play another
game to get into the AL Divisional
Playoffs. Unless they have to play
one-game playoff (maybe more)
to get into the play-in game.
Understand that? Me neither.
The NCAA quickly turned
down Southern California's
request to have the sanctions
against its football team reduced
or removed entirely. It's probably
never a good sign when a gov-
erning body which takes geologic
ages to make decisions calls you
back immediately.
Contact Rob Shore at shore@sun-herald.com or
941-206-1174.


THE HAT TRICK: Check out Rob Shore's digital edition of his Sunday Shore Lines column, where he offers three topics for your consideration, weekdays at suncoassportsblog.com.


* HOCKEY: I


AP PHOTO
Michael Frolik and the Winnipeg Jets, formerly the Atlanta Thrashers, are in the West where they
belong one of the major changes in the NHL's realignment starting this season.



Realignment maps



NHL's new direction


By GREG BEACHAM
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hockey fans in Detroit
and Columbus have
grown accustomed to the
inconvenience. When
the RedWings and Blue
Jackets are on the road,
they've usually had to stay
up well past most bed-
times to watch, or wait
until morning to find out
how their teams did way
out West.
With the NHL's first
significant realignment in
15 years, everybody can
sleep a bit easier this fall.
"It's definitely a lot
better for us for rest,
economically for our
team," Columbus center
R.J. Umberger said. "It just
makes a lot of sense."
The NHL is altering
its conference lineups,
dropping two divisions
and changing the makeup
of its schedules in both
the regular season and the
playoffs.
The biggest change
sends Detroit and
Columbus to the 16-team
Eastern Conference, while
the Winnipeg Jets head to
the 14-teamWest. Those
uneven numbers are the
subject of some concern,
but there's no doubt they
add up splendidly for the
three teams on the move.
"I think the travel
sometimes takes years
off all our lives," Detroit
goalie Jimmy Howard
said. "I think (moving
East) will be great for
us from the travel, even
though we're all used to it
now. It will be a lot of fun
to play a lot of games in
the Eastern time zone. It
will be great for our fans,
too, not having to stay up
until all hours of the night
to watch us."
The moves are the
culmination of years of
debate and maneuvering.
Detroit, which has been
in the Western (originally
Campbell) Conference
since 1981, has desired


NHL'S NEW LOOK
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
Buffalo
Boston
Detroit
Florida
Montreal
Ottawa
Toronto
Tampa Bay
Metropolitan Division
Carolina
Columbus
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
New Jersey
New York Rangers
New York Islanders
Washington

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
Chicago
Colorado
Dallas
Minnesota
Nashville
St. Louis
Winnipeg
Pacific Division
Anaheim
Calgary
Edmonton
Los Angeles
Phoenix
San Jose
Vancouver

a return to the East for
years. Columbus, an
expansion team in 2000,
also jumped at the chance
to shorten its list of road
games starting at 10 p.m.
or later back home.
"It's going to be great
for our fan base to be
able to see us play in the
Eastern time zone a lot
more," Umberger said. "All
of our away games used
to be in different time
zones. For us, a chance to
grow some close rivalries
with different teams like
Buffalo and Pittsburgh,
maintain Detroit, I think
we're just excited."
Winnipeg, the erstwhile
Atlanta Thrashers, will
no longer spend the bulk
of its road time in the


American South. The
Jets are grateful to be
in the Central Division
with Minnesota, Chicago
and the rest of the NHL's
Midwestern teams.
"I think it's a great
time for our fans," Red
Wings defenseman Niklas
Kronwall said. "They'll be
able to watch our games
in prime time a lot more
than they have. Playing
Montreal, Toronto, Boston
more often, I'm hoping
it's going to spark that
(excitement) even more. I
know it will for us."
The three moves are
part of a competitive
restructuring that will
affect every NHL team.
The league is back to
a four-division format,
dropping the six-division
setup introduced in 1998.
The NHL also went back
to a version of the divi-
sional playoff schedule
used from 1982 until 1994.
The top three teams in
each division get post-
season berths, and two
wild-card spots go to the
two remaining teams with
the best records in either
division. The first two
rounds of the conference
playoffs will be within the
division, which means the
last wild-card team could
be required to face the
teams on the other side of
the conference for a spot
in the conference finals.
The NHL Players'
Association initially
objected to the uneven
conferences, saying it
would be tougher to
make the playoffs with
two more teams in the
East. The union dropped
the objection after the
lockout.
The schedule matrix
also has been tweaked
after several years of
emphasis on divisional ri-
valries. Every team in the
league faces everybody
else twice this season,
giving fans in every city a
chance to see every star.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


BASEBALL
Game Day Heat:
12-and-under travel team is looking
for players for Silver team. Practices are
held Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6 p.m.
North Charlotte Regional Park. Call
Scott at 941-421-8378.

BOXING
Youth and adult classes:
Male and female. Monday-Friday, 6-8
p.m., at 24710 Sandhill Blvd. in Deep
Creek. Training and/or competition.
Member of USA Boxing. Call 239-292-
9230 or visit CharlotteHarborBoxing.
com, www.facebook.com/
CharlotteHarborBoxingGymnasium.

CYCLING
Breast Cancer Awareness
Ride: Oct. 12,10 a.m. ride starts
at the Bicycle Center, 3795 Tamiami
Trail, Port Charlotte. Registration $30
in advance, $40 at the door. Choose
the distance: 10,25,50 miles or
anything in between. Register at www.
bicyclecentercc.com, or at the store.
Call 941-627-6600 or email kim@
bicyclecentercc.com.

FOOTBALL
Buffalo Bills Backers:
Meets for every Bills game at Buffalo
Wings and Rings, corner of Price and
Toledo Blade in North Port. Everyone is
asked to bring a non-perishable food
item for the North Port Salvation Army
food bank. Call Betty, 941 429 6835.

GOLF
North Port Moose #764
tourney: Oct. 26, 8:30 a.m. shotgun
start, four-person scramble at Bobcat
Trail Country Club. Cost: $60 per person
($65 after Oct. 13th). Entry forms
available at the North Port Moose
Lodge, 14156 Tamiami Trail. Call
941-426-4320.

Operation Cooper Street
fundraiser: Oct. 12, registration
7:30 a.m., shotgun start 8:30 a.m. at
St. Andrew's Golf Club, 1901 Deborah
Dr., Punta Gorda. Four-person scramble.
Cost: $75. Putting contest ($5,000)
8 a.m. Email cpnocs@gmail.com,
call 941-639-3034 or visit www.
cooperstreetcenter.org.

The Pastor's Masters
tournament: Port Charlotte
GC, Oct. 12,8:30 a.m. shotgun start,
scramble format. Cost: $60 indi-
vidual/$240 team. Benefits Murdock
Baptist Church's Vocational Ministry
Scholarship Fund. Call 941-627-6352.

PROSPORTS
ACADEMY
Youth sport specific
personal training and
group sessions: Football,
baseball, basketball, track & field,
volleyball and soccer. Strength and
conditioning, speed, agility, stretching,
mobility and weight management.
Call Elgin, 941-505-0271 or email
makeitcountsports@gmail.com.

RUNNING
"Let's Do This!"training
squad: For area women to train
for the Women's Running 5K or
half-marathon event on Nov. 24.
Saturday at 7 a.m. at Gilchrist Park (by
gazebo) in Punta Gorda. Squad meets
weekly for group runs and follows a
training schedule of two additional
days a week.

Foot Landing Running
Academy: Go from walker to
runner in six-week training program.


$35 fee includes coaching, registration
for the Strides for Scholarships 5K and
T-shirt. Contact Scott and Krissy Varner,
239-216-1355 or scottgobucks@aol.
com.

Chik-Fil-A Race Series:
Join the herd for the 10k, 5k and 1
mile run/walk benefiting the Charlotte
County Homeless Coalition on Oct. 5 in
Port Charlotte. For more information, or
to register, visit CFAraceseries.com.

Bocca Lupo Howl at the
Moon 5kTrail Run: Oct. 19 at
7:30 a.m., Ann Dever Memorial Park,
6791 San Casa Dr., Englewood. Visit
www.zoomersrun.com.

SAILING
Charlotte Harbor
Multihull Association: For
multihull owners or those interested in
them. No dues. Meets first Monday of
each month 6 p.m. at Harpoon Harry's.
Visit http://groups.yahoo.com/groupl
CHMA/ or call Ron, 941-876-6667.

Punta Gorda Sailing
Club: Racing and cruising programs
for all ages. Call Bill, 781-910-3217 or
visit pgscweb.com.

SENIORS
Florida International
Senior Games: Dec. 7-15 in
Lee County. Competition in 22 sports
scheduled. Registration deadlines are
in mid-to-late November and entry
fees vary by sport. Eligible athletes can
register at www.flasports.com. Website
also contains info on eligibility.

SWIMMING
Charlotte County
Swimming: Year-round USA
Swimming team provides instruction
and competition ages 5 and up.
Visit www.ccswim.org or call Susan,
941-628-1510.

SOFTBALL
FGCU winter camp: For
experienced softball players, ages
13 and older, at Florida Gulf Coast
University in Fort Myers.The camp will
be split into four sessions over two
days Nov. 23-24. Cost is $65 for one
session, $125 for two sessions, $185 for
three and $235 for all four. Registration
deadline is Nov. 20. Call Alycia Bachkora
at 239-590-7062 or email abachkora@
fgcu.edu.

TENNIS
Masters Tennis for
adults: Wednesdays from 7-9 p.m.
through Nov. 20. Format is played on
a smaller 60-foot court with lower-
compression orange balls. No fee. Balls
will be provided along with a limited
number of loaner racquets. Call Art,
941-698-9480. For more on Masters
Tennis visit www.MastersTennisFlorida.
com.

Instruction: Age 5 to adult,
at Franz Ross Park YMCA. Register at
CharlotteCountyYMCA.com or call
941-629-9622.

Rotonda QuickStart: Free
lessons for parents and kids (12-under),
10-11 a.m. Saturday, Rotonda Park.
Rackets and balls provided. Call
941-698-9480.

The Community Calendarappears daily
as space permits. To have youractivity
published, fax (941-629-2085) ore-mail
(sports@sun-herald.com) event details to
the Sports Department at least one weekin
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.
Submissions suitable for publication will be
edited for length and clarity.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013






The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


I SEC ROUNDUP


AGGIES SURVIVE
ARKANSAS SCARE
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.
(AP) Johnny Manziel
made Texas A&M feel right
at home in Fayetteville.
Manziel accounted for
320 yards of total offense
and threw two touchdown
passes to Mike Evans as
No. 10 Texas A&M pulled
away for a 45-33 win over
Arkansas on Saturday
night.
Manziel, who totaled
557 yards of offense in a
win over the Razorbacks
last season, was 23-of-30
passing for 261 yards and
he rushed for 59 yards
for the Aggies (4-1, 1-1
Southeastern Conference).
TreyWilliams had
83 yards rushing to
lead Texas A&M, which
finished with 262 yards
rushing on 44 carries.
Deshazor Everett had
a 34-yard interception
return for a touchdown.
The win was the Aggies'
ninth straight on the road.
Quarterback Brandon
Allen returned from
a shoulder injury for
Arkansas (3-2, 0-1),
finishing 17-of-36 passing
for 282 yards and two
touchdowns.

No. 1 Alabama 25, No. 21
Mississippi 0: In Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
T.J.Yeldon rushed for 121 yards, Kenyan
Drake gained 99 and a dominating
defense powered Alabama.
Yeldon scored on a 68-yard run
and Drake added a 50-yard scamper
to revive a struggling running
game for the Crimson Tide (4-0, 2-0
Southeastern Conference), which
outgained the Rebels 434-205.
Ole Miss (3-1,1-1) was seeking its
first 4-0 start in 43 years but instead
was shut out for the first time since
Arkansas did it in November 1998.
AJ McCarron completed 25 of
32 passes for 180 yards with an
interception for Alabama, which came
in ranked last in the league in rushing.
Alabama was held to 36 rushing yards
in building a 9-0 halftime lead but
gained another 218 on the ground in
the second half.

Tennessee 31, South
Alabama 24: In Knoxville, Tenn.,
Brian Randolph made a game-
clinching, fourth-and-goal interception
in the end zone with 1:51 remaining
as Tennessee squandered most of a
24-point lead before hanging on for
a victory.
South Alabama (2-2) had first-and-
goal at the 7 in the closing minutes
but was unable to get the tying
touchdown. Facing fourth-and-goal
from the 8, South Alabama quarterback


Standings
EAST
Conference All Games
W L PF PAW L PF PA
Florida 2 0 55 24 3 1 95 51
Georgia 2 0 85 71 3 1 165 130
S.Carolina 1 1 65 66 3 1 120101
Missouri 0 0 0 0 4 0 182 84
Tennessee 0 1 17 31 3 2 159134
Vanderbilt 0 2 60 74 3 2 174108
Kentucky 0 1 7 24 1 3 87 93
WEST
Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Alabama 2 0 74 42 4 0 140 58
LSU 1 1 76 65 4 1 214122
Texas A&M 1 1 87 82 4 1 246154
Auburn 1 1 45 55 3 1 114 88
Mississippi 1 1 39 60 3 1 114 96
Arkansas 0 1 33 45 3 2 146111
Mississippi St 0 1 20 24 2 2 136 59
Saturday's results
South Carolina 28, UCF 25
Tennessee 31, South Alabama 24
Georgia 44, LSU 41
Alabama 25, Mississippi 0
Florida 24, Kentucky 7
Texas A&M 45, Arkansas 33
Vanderbilt 54, UAB 24
Missouri 41, Arkansas St. 19
Saturday's games
Mississippi at Auburn,TBA
Georgia atTennessee,TBA
Arkansas at Florida,TBA
Georgia St. at Alabama,12:21 p.m.
LSU at Mississippi St., 7 p.m.
Missouri at Vanderbilt, 7:30 p.m.
Kentucky at South Carolina, 7:30 p.m.

Ross Metheny was hit by Corey Vereen
while releasing the pass that Randolph
intercepted.
Tennessee's Rajion Neal rushed for
a career-high 169 yards on 25 carries.
Neal's 11-yard touchdown run gave
Tennessee (3-2) a 31-7 lead early in the
third quarter.

Missouri 41, Arkansas St.
19: In Columbia, Mo., James Franklin
orchestrated two lengthy touchdown
drives and added another score on
the ground in the second half to spark
Missouri.
Missouri scored 21 points in the final
quarter to finish their nonconference
schedule with a 4-0 record, playing
their remaining eight games in the
Southeastern Conference where they
went 2-6 in their inaugural season a
year ago.
Franklin led drives of 94 and 87
yards after his team trailed 16-14 with
11:31 remaining in the third quarter.
The Tigers failed to convert any of their
four third-down opportunities and
only possessed the ball for 9:12 in the
first half.

Vanderbilt 52, UAB 24:
In Nashville, Tenn., Jerron Seymour
ran for a pair of first-half touchdowns
to lead Vanderbilt to a win over
Alabama-Birmingham.
Seymour started the game's scoring
with a 7-yard touchdown run late in the
first quarter. With just over nine minutes
remaining in the second Seymour took
a direct snap and ran for a 58-yard score
on the only play of that drive.
Vanderbilt quarterback Austyn
Carta-Samuels ran for a touchdown
and threw for two more. He was 23-29
passing for a career high 334 yards.
Carta-Samuels'second touchdown
pass went to Jordan Matthews, who
tied a Vanderbilt record with his 21st
career touchdown reception.


IBIG 12 ROUNDUP


MOUNTAINEERS
STUN COWBOYS
MORGANTOWN, WVa.
(AP) Clint Trickett
waited patiently while
two others got the call
this season as the starting
quarterback at West
Virginia. When his time
finally came, the Florida
State transfer came
through.
Trickett threw a
touchdown pass in his
first start at West Virginia
and engineered two late
scoring drives, leading the
Mountaineers to a 30-21
win over No. 11 Oklahoma
State on Saturday.
For all the mistakes West
Virginia made in a 37-0
loss at Maryland last week,
the Mountaineers (3-2, 1-1
Big 12) seemed to get most
of the breaks Saturday.
"There has been a bunch
of emotions over the past
week, embarrassment
and disappointment,"
Holgorsen said. "But they
kept working. It was the
best week of practice that
we have had all year. We
felt like we could win, so
we went out there and
wanted it pretty bad."
Trickett was named
West Virginia's third
starting quarterback after
Ford Childress was injured
last week. Trickett was
chosen to start over Paul
Millard, who started the
first two games but lost


Standings
Conference All Games


Oklahoma
Texas Tech
Texas
West Virginia
Baylor
Kansas
Iowa St.
Oklahoma St.
Kansas St.
TCU


PF PA W L PF PA
16 7 4 0136 48
20 10 4 0155 53
31 21 2 2131 112
37 37 3 2102 98
0 0 3 0209 23
0 0 2 1 58 47
0 0 1 2 79 76
21 30 3 1 157 71
21 31 2 2127 89
10 20 2 2123 91


Thursday's result
Iowa St.38,Tulsa 21
Saturday's results
TCU48,SMU 17
West Virginia 30, Oklahoma St. 21
Oklahoma 35, Notre Dame 21
Thursday's game
Texas at Iowa St., 7:30 p.m.
Saturday's games
TexasTech at Kansas, Noon
Kansas St. at Oklahoma St., 3:30 p.m.
TCU at Oklahoma, 7 p.m.
West Virginia at Baylor, 8 p.m.

the job after a 16-7 loss at
Oklahoma.
Trickett finished 24 of
50 for 309 yards in his first
start since subbing for EJ
Manuel for the Seminoles
in October 2011.

TCU 48, SMU 17: In
Fort Worth, Texas, Trevone Boykin
completed 15 of 26 passes for 228
yards and two touchdowns and TCU's
defense forced five turnovers to lead
the Horned Frogs.
Boykin overcame a 7 of 16 first-half
performance by completing seven
of his first nine passes in the second
half, tossing touchdown passes of 20
and 56 yards to help the Horned Frogs
(2-2, 0-1 in Big 12) overcome a 10-7
halftime deficit.
The Horned Frogs retain the Iron
Skillet trophy for the second straight
year, and they are 11-2 under coach
Gary Patterson in the annual rivalry
game.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:









: I








FUN&
E













Florida's Matt Jones runs past Kentucky's Marcus McWi
game in Lexington, Ky. Jones rushed for 176 yards and



A wild wi



Gators extend domina

By GARY B. GRAVES
ASSOCIATED PRESS RAZORBACK
LEXINGTON, Ky. GATORS
Matt Jones rushed for 176 WHO: Arkansas (3-1
yards and a touchdown at No. 20 Florida (3-1
and Tyler Murphy threw WHEN: Saturday, TB
for 156 yards and a
score as No. 20 Florida WHERE: Ben Hill Gri
Stadium, Gainesville
beat Kentucky 24-7 on Stadium Gainesville
Saturday night, its 27th TV: TBA
straight win over the RADIO: 620 AM, 93C
Wildcats. AM, 1460 AM
Murphy also rushed for TICKETS: Ticketmast
a 5-yard TD in his first
career start for the Gators no problems mc
(3-1, 2-0 Southeastern ball on Kentuck
Conference), who closed to Murphy who
a difficult week on a high miss a beat in co
note after losing starting his first 11 passe
quarterback Jeff Driskel
and defensive tackle
Dominique Easley to variety that the
struggled to kee
season-ending injuries. He threw a se
Jones, who had 28 car-
ries, outgained Kentucky interception, bu
by himself while he and off Maxwell Smi
Murphy provided all of
the Gators' touchdowns the end zone en
in the first half to extend to another stifli
the longest active win- performance in
ning streak over a major the Gators' SEC-
opponent. Florida gave defense held th(
Gators wide receivers to just 48 yards
coach Joker Phillips a seven below the
happy return after his and allowed j
firing last fall as Wildcats third-down conv
coach. While the stre
Joe Mansour's 25- provided the gai
yard run on a fake field line on a warm,
goal was the only TD ning, Phillips' re
for Kentucky (1-3, 0-1), Commonwealth
which was outgained served up anoth
402-173. interesting subp
That trick play was last November a
Kentucky's only highlight 13-24 in three se
on a night that largely including thr
belonged to Murphy and to the Gators -t
the Gators. was a question (
Despite failing to he would be rec
score a second-half fans who remen
touchdown, Florida had long relationship


COLLEGE FOOTBALL:


Murray, Bulldc

By PAUL NEWBERRY teams in the first
ASSOCIATED PRESS games of a season
ATHENS, Ga. -Two Bulldogs opened
out of three ain't bad. 35 non-conferen
Georgia is certainly not Clemson, but ca
Complaining. 30andnowthel
Aaron Murray threw "We've grown
four touchdown passes, this past month
including a 25-yarder to said. "I think ev
Justin Scott-Wesley with the nation know
1:47 remaining, and the all
No. 9 Bulldogs rallied to now. We're a tou
beat No. 6 LSU 44-41 in of guys. We're fi
a thrilling game between About 10 mini
Southeastern Conference after the game, t
powerhouses Saturday ran back on the
The Bulldogs (3-1, 2-0 celebrate with th
SEC) completed their along the famed
opening-month run Sanford Stadiun
through a gauntlet of top "I'm just hono
teams with a victory that a part of someth


propelled them back into that," coach Mar
the thick of the national said.
championship race. Now, the Bull
"We've played some well-positioned
hard teams," Scott-Wesley run for their thi
said. "It just shows we're SEC East title ar
a great team. We can the conference
handle anything anybody onship game.
throws at us." "We're definite
Georgia was the fourth Murray said. "If 1
team since the BCS began lose one of these
in 1998 to face three top-10 obviously Clems


ilson during the second quarter of!
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touchdown run.

No. 20 FLORIDA 24, K
Florida 7 1
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INDIVIDUAL STA
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2-0. Kentucky, Mansour 1
Sanders 5-16, Timmons 1
Mobley 2-6, Blue 1-(minus
nus11), M.Smith 4-(minus
PASSING-Florida, Murp
Kentucky, M.Smith 12-2
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Don't get me wr
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in his return to A
the Tigers went a
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touchdown run i
to go.
But that was pl
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when neither def
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completed three
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and freshman J.J.
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to haul in a pass
just inside the py
winning score.
"We have a loi
ahead of us to g
to the top," Met
said. "We have t
out."


I BIG TEN
ROUNDUP


HUSKIES REACH
MAC MILESTONE
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind.
(AP) Jordan Lynch and
his teammates were their
usual selves on the big
stage Saturday.
They scored points, they
achieved new milestones
and, of course, they won
on the road.
Lynch threw for three
touchdowns and ran for
another while the Huskies
scored on a kickoff return
and an interception
return, running away from
Purdue 55-24 to become
first Mid-American
Conference team to win
two regular-season games
AP PHOTO over Big Ten foes in the
Saturday's same year.
"We consider ourselves
a championship team,"
k Lynch said. "When we go
on the road and win these
games, it means a lot to
the program."
Nobody has been better
t c on the road lately than
tUCKy Lynch & Co.
The Huskies (4-0) have
ayer and won 11 straight road
lyer and games, 25 of 27 overall,
nure as now have back-to-back
nure as wins at Purdue and
turned made this one look easy.
1 as he Northern Illinois tied the
thsome MAC record for larg-
th some
a est-victory margin over
yers and director Big Ten foe, matching
ac director the 31-point win Toledo
ter e posted over Minnesota in
2001.
sure Lynch, the Heisman
Trophy hopeful, made
i. another huge statement in
Drive what might have been his
r passes final college game against
ur passes the Big Ten.
ran twice He went 18 of 25 for 207
Florida's
march yards and ran nine times
mfor 35 yards and another
es 2-yard score. Lynch's numbers
might have been even
KENTUCKY7 higher had the game been
4 0 3- 24 closer or if coach Rod
0 0 0 7 Carey hadn't pulled Lynch
er at the start of the fourth
kick),7:13.
sour kick), 1:46. quarter. Still, Lynch did
rter enough to become the
Murphy (Hardin 26th player in Football
n kick),2:53. Bowl Subdivision history
rter to top 4,000 yards passing
and 2,000 yards rushing.

la K Iowa 23, Minnesota 7: In
46 21-48 Minneapolis, Jake Rudock threw for
56 125 one touchdown and ran for another as
1I 17-26-1
0 39 Iowa beat Minnesota on both sides of
.0 3-38.0 the ball.
0 0-0
28 3-25 Mark Weisman rushed for 147yards
09 21:51 on 24 carries,and Mike Meyer made three
TISTICS of his four field goal attempts to help the
s 28-176, Murphy Hawkeyes (4-1,1-0) start the Big Ten
rton 2-16 Team with a bang. After losing their opener to
-25, Kemp 3-19,
-9, Whitlow 3-9, Northern Illinois, they've outscored their
3), Collins 1-(mi- last two opponents 82-10.
22).
)hy 15-18-1-156. Senior linebackers Christian Kirksey,
0-1 -90, Whitlow James Morris and Anthony Hitchens led
rton 666, Jones a stifling effort on defense, including
r 2-48, Robinson interceptions by Kirksey and Morris of
6-40, Montgom- Minnesota quarterback Philip Nelson.
ers 3-9, D.Robin-
Nelson hadn't played in two weeks
because of an injury, but he started
ahead of Mitch Leidner for the Gophers
(4-1,0-1).

T T Illinois 50, Miami (OH)
. 14: In Champaign, III., Nathan
Scheelhaase threw for 278 yards and
five touchdowns and Illinois used a
cause 29-point second quarter to blow by
C. Not Miami of Ohio.
.d to lose. The senior quarterback had all five
ong. But touchdown throws for Illinois (3-1) by
halftime. He finished 19of24 for 278
got a ca- yards with one interception. For Illinois,
ds passing the blowout meant the third win of the
rgia quar- season came early. A year ago the Illini
ttenberger never saw win No.3, finishing 2-10 and
thens, and closing with nine-straight losses.
head 41-
l's 8-yard Standings
with 4:14 a
LEGENDS
Conference All Games
entyof w L PF PAW L PF PA
on a day Iowa 1 0 23 7 4 1164 75
j Michigan 0 0 0 0 4 0152 84
sense Northwestern 0 0 0 0 4 0165 95
ss. He Michigan St. 0 0 0 0 3 1115 53
Nebraska 0 0 0 0 3 1173108
straight Minnesota 0 1 7 23 4 1174103
move the LEADERS
trritor Conference All Games
Territory, W L PF PA W L PF PA
Green Wisconsin 1 0 41 10 3 1164 42


,ardrunto OhioSt. 0 0 0 0 4 0210 61
linois 00 0 0 3 1161 99
enitwas PennSt. 0 0 0 0 3 1133 58
akingwide Indiana 0 0 0 0 2 2178131
secondary Purdue 0 1 10 41 1 4 85183
secondary


and tiptoe
Ion for the

ng road
et back
tenberger
o win


Saturday's results
N. Illinois 55, Purdue 24
Illinois 50, Miami (Ohio) 14
Iowa 23, Minnesota 7
Wisconsin at Ohio St., late
Saturday's games
Michigan St. at Iowa, Noon
Penn St. at Indiana, Noon
Illinois at Nebraska, Noon
Minnesota at Michigan, 3:30 p.m.
Ohio St. at Northwestern, 8 p.m.


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


d








* COLLEGE FOOTBALL: 8


Winston helps FSU wing it


pa


Ist


BC


By JIMMY GOLEN
ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON -With a wave
of his left arm, Jameis
Winston motioned for
Kenny Shaw to go long.
With a heave by his right
arm, the Florida State
freshman delivered the
ball in stride.
Winston threw for four
touchdowns, including
a 55-yard score as time
expired in the first half
on Saturday to help No. 8
Florida State rally from a
slow start and beat Boston
College 48-34.
BC opened a 14-point
lead before the Seminoles
scored the next three
touchdowns, going ahead
for good on the despera-
tion heave to Shaw with
0:00 on the clock.
"I knew I had to pick
things up," said Winston,
who completed 17 of 28
passes for 330 yards and
ran 14 times for 67 more.
"We harp on scoring
before the end of the half.
We did it yet again."
The highest-scoring
team in the Atlantic Coast
Conference, Florida State
(4-0, 2-0 ACC) topped 40
points for the fourth time
this season. But they didn't

IACC ROUNDUP.

NORTH CAROLINA
STOMPED 55-31
BY EAST CAROLINA
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
(AP) Shane Carden had
all day to throw downfield
while Vintavious Cooper
kept tearing through the
defense for big gains. By
the time it was over, East
Carolina had romped to
a surprisingly one-sided
win against an instate
rival that's struggling to
fix a lot of problems.
Carden threw three
touchdown passes and
ran for three scores to
help the Pirates beat
North Carolina 55-31
on Saturday, earning its
first win in Chapel Hill in
nearly four decades.
Cooper ran for a
career-high 186 yards for
the Pirates (3-1), who had
lost to the Tar Heels in
each of the past four sea-
sons all by at 14 points
or more. Cooper added
eight catches for 70 yards,
joining with Carden to
power the Pirates to one
of their biggest wins
under fourth-year coach
Ruffin McNeill.
East Carolina had
beaten North Carolina
(1-3) on the road only
once before. That came in
1975, before four Pirates
assistant coaches were
even born. The Pirates
lost 27-6 here last year
and entered this one as a
121/2-point underdog, but
scored the first 14 points,
led 35-10 early in the
third quarter and never
let the Tar Heels closer
than 14.
ECU's no-huddle
offense finished with 603
yards, the second-highest
total ever allowed by UNC
at Kenan Stadium.

No. 3 Clemson 56, Wake
Forest 7: Clemson offensive
coordinator Chad Morris had two
words of counsel this week for Tajh
Boyd:"Have fun."
It appears he got the message -
loud and clear.
Boyd threw for three touchdowns
and rushed for another score, leading
the Tigers to a rout of Wake Forest in
Clemson, S.C. The terrific performance
made him the second Atlantic Coast
Conference quarterback to account for
100 career TDs.
"It was a fun game," Boyd said."I
got a lot of chances to smile out there."'
Boyd's return to form was part of
a solid day on several fronts for the
Tigers, (4-0,2-0), who have won their
first four games for the second time in


the QB's three seasons as starter.
Boyd accounted for five TDs in
Clemson's season-opening victory
against Georgia, making the


TERRAPINS AT
SEMINOLES
WHO: Maryland (4-0, 0-0) at
Florida State (4-0, 2-0)
WHEN: Saturday, TBD
WHERE: Doak Campbell
Stadium, Tallahassee
TV: TBD
RADIO: 899.3 FM, 820 AM,
1040 AM


Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston (5) throws
against Boston College during the first half on Satur


get the blowout they might
have expected against a
team that won just two
games last season and
finished last in the confer-
ence's Atlantic Division.
"They came out firing,"
Shaw said. "They came
out playing better than we
expected. I give them big
ups for that."
The Eagles (2-2, 1-1)
took a 17-3 lead before
Winston threw touchdown
passes of 56 and 10 yards
to tie it. BC got the ball
with 1:49 left in the half
and tried to run out the
clock, but Florida State
coach Jimbo Fisher used


Standings
ATLANTIC
Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Clemson 2 0 82 21 4 0172 69
Florida St. 2 0 89 47 4 0205 60
Boston Coll. 1 1 58 58 2 2 89107
Maryland 0 0 0 0 4 0159 41
Syracuse 0 0 0 0 2 2150 88
NCState 0 1 14 26 3 1125 75
WakeForest 0 2 17 80 2 3 92119
COASTAL
Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
VirginiaTech 1 0 17 10 4 1116 79
GeorgiaTech 2 1 76 51 3 1146 51
Pittsburgh 2 1 85 99 3 1 134126
Miami 0 0 0 0 4 0181 50
Virginia 0 1 3 14 2 2 81 89
N. Carolina 0 1 20 28 1 3101 130
Duke 0 2 69 96 3 2180141
Thursday's result
VirginiaTech 17,GeorgiaTech 10
Saturday's results
Miami 49, South Florida 21
Florida St. 48, Boston College 34
Pittsburgh 14,Virginia 3
East Carolina 55, North Carolina 31
Clemson 56,Wake Forest 7
Duke 38,Troy 31
N.C State 48, Cent. Michigan14
Saturday's games
Clemson at Syracuse,TBA
Georgia Tech at Miami, TBA
Maryland at Florida St., TBA
Ball St. at Virginia, Noon
North Carolina at VirginiaTech, 12:30 p.m.
Army at Boston College, 1 p.m.
NC State atWake Forest, 3:30 p.m.

quarterback a contender for the
Heisman Trophy and stamping the
Tigers as a team to watch this season.
Boyd's performance against Wake
Forest left him at 102 TDs in college,
joining former North Carolina State
star Phillip Rivers in the ACC's century
club. Boyd passed for 311 yards
and ran for 69 to surpass Charlie
Whitehurst as Clemson's total offense
leader.

Pittsburgh 14, Virginia
3: In Pittsburgh, the Panthers turned
a pair of early Virginia turnovers into
touchdowns and their defense did
the rest.
Tom Savage completed 13 of 30
passes for 190 yards and a touchdown
with two interceptions before leaving
late in the fourth quarter. Tyler Boyd
caught seven passes for 111 yards for
Pitt. The Panthers (3-1,2-1 ACC) have
won three straight for the first time
since 2010.
Virginia (2-2,0-1) managed 188
total yards. Quarterback David Watford
completed 15 of 36 passes for 122
yards and Virginia never threatened to
make it interesting after spotting the
Panthers two first-quarter scores.
The teams combined for 17 punts,
five turnovers and zero momentum.

N.C. State 48, Central
Michigan 14: In Raleigh, N.C.,
Shadrach Thornton and Matt Dayes
each had long scoring runs during
North Carolina State's four-touchdown
second quarter, and the Wolfpack
(3-1) routed Central Michigan (1-4).
D.J. Green's 37-yard interception return
and Rashard Smith's 67-yard punt
return for touchdowns helped N.C.
State build a 35-0 halftime lead.

Duke 38, Troy 31: In
Durham, N.C., Brandon Connette
threw three touchdowns passes and
ran for two more to lead Duke. Josh
Snead also had 108 yards rushing for
the Blue Devils (3-2), who snapped a
two-game losing streak.


Shaw got position on
A- safety Spenser Rositano,
jumped at the 5 yard-line,
a pass landed at the 1 and fell
day. into the end zone for the
touchdown.


his timeouts to get the
Seminoles the ball back at
their own 40 yard-line with
50 seconds to play.
After Winston was
sacked for a 9-yard loss,
Devonta Freeman ran
for 14 and the Seminoles
hurried to the line of
scrimmage to get one
more play off. Winston re-
ceived the snap just before
time expired, eluded one
tackler as he moved up in
the pocket and another as
he scrambled right, waved
to Shaw to go deep and
then let the ball go from
his own 40 yard-line as he
was hit.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:


"It couldn't have been
more on the money," Shaw
said. "I knew he could get
it there. He can throw it
probably on his knees to
the end zone."
Fisher said it wasn't a
Hail Mary as much as a
called play, with Shaw
running a double fake
before heading to the end
zone. Shaw said he didn't
have any thought about
breaking off his route to
bail out Winston as he
scrambled out of trouble
in the backfield.
"There was no time left,"
he said. "I was going to the
end zone."


SAN DIEGO GAINS
624 YARDS IN 59-0
.. .. r
ROUT OF STETSON
................ MDELAND (AP) Kenn
James and Joe Ferguson
each ran for two touch-
downs as San Diego
Sprouted Stetson 59-0 on
Saturday in the confer-
..ence opener for both
Steams.
Ferguson ran in a 37-
nidt c e yard touchdown on the
fourth play from scrim-
: mage and the Toreros
(2-2, 1-0 Pioneer) never
looked back, scoring
touchdowns of seven of
their first eight drives
and totaling 624 yards of
offense.
James had 13 carries for
AP PHOTO 146 yards, leading a San
1sive back Brandon Salinas Diego rushing attack that
gained 345 yards. Tyler
Tony and Montell Allen
also ran for scores to give
Spas t the Toreros six rushing
) as touchdowns. Mason Mills
hit Brandon White for
two touchdown passes as
UL well.
Stetson (1-3, 0-1),
playing its first football
season in 57 years,
rushing, but the Bulls' managed just 161 total
offense didn't come close yards and couldn't stop
to scoring again until two-time defending
Bench's 16-yard TD pass Pioneer Football League
to Derrick Hopkins with champion San Diego. The
two seconds remaining. Toreros' 59 points were
their most since a 59-19
No.15MIAMI49,SOUTH FLORIDA21 victory over Drake in
Miami 21 14 14 0 49 2007.
South Florida 7 0 014 21
First Quarter Butler 45, Jacksonville
Mia-D.Crawford 7 run (Goudis kick),
1155s. 27: In Jacksonville, Matt Lancaster
USF-Shaw3 run (Kloss kick),9:22. led Butler University to a victory
Mia-Waters 19 pass from Morris (Goudis against Jacksonville, passing for one
Mia-Coley 34 pass from Morris (Goudis touchdown and rushing for two more
kick),:53. in a Pioneer Football League game.
Second Quarter The Bulldogs (3-2,1-0 Pioneer)
Mia-Gaines recovered fumble in end
zone (Goudis kick), 8:56. were looking for their first-ever
Mia-DuJohnson 4run (Goudiskick),5:22. Sunshine State win and found it,
S1Third Quarter exploding in the second half with 31
Mia-Coley 11 pass from Williams (Goudis
kick),9:49. unanswered points.
Mia-D.Crawford I run (Goudis kick),1:19. Jacksonville (2-3,1-1 Pioneer) led
Fourth Quarter at the half,10-7, but was unable to
USF-Forte 11 interception return (Kloss
kick), 13:53. keep up despite 509 yards passing,
USF-Hopkins 16 pass from Bench (Kloss including three touchdowns, from
kick),:02. Steven Hughes. Coming off back-to-
Mia USF back 69-point games, the Dolphins
First downs 22 13 scored a field goal in the opening
Rushes-yards 39-165 33-99 drive of the game and followed up
Passing 375 189
Comp- Att-Int 19-32-2 13-27-1 with a 64-yard touchdown pass from
Return Yards 33 40 Hughes to Andrew Robustelli, who
Punts-Avg. 3-45.0 7-37.1 also caught an 81-yard touchdown
Penalties- Yards 7-48 5-30 pass in the third quarter.
Time of Possession 31:43 28:17
Rice 18, Florida Atlantic
RUSHING-Miami, Du Johnson 14-84, 14: In Houston, Darik Dillard's
Edwards 10-53, D.Crawford 13-34,Williams 20-yard run with 3:35 remaining
2-(minus 6). South Florida, Shaw 20-127, carried Rice (2-2, 1-0) to a victory
Pierre 3-2,Tice 2-(minus 1), Bench 8-(minus against FAU (14,01) in the
29). against FAU (1-4, 0-1) in the
PASSING-Miami, Morris 11-16-0-222, Conference USA opener for both
Williams 8-14-1-153, Crow 0-2-1-0. South teams.
Florida, Bench 13-27--1 89.
RECEIVING-Miami, Hums 5-81, Coley FAU led 14-6 late in the fourth
4-96, Dorsett 3-75, Waters 2-73, Sandland quarter. The Owls started their rally
2-9,Walford 1-18, Hagens 1-17, D.Crawford when Cody Bauer returned a fumble
1-6. South Florida, A.Davis 5-75, Dunkley
2-37,Price2-34,Bravo Brown 1-16,Hopkins seven yards for a touchdown with
1-16,Gonzalez 1-7, McFarland 1-4. 4:17 to play.


Miami running back Dallas Crawford runs over South Florida defend
during the first quarter of Saturday's game in Tampa.



Hurricanes bic



floundering


By FRED GOODALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA Miami's first
road test was a breeze.
The 15th-ranked
Hurricanes scored on
their first three posses-
sions and dominated
defensively during a 49-
21 rout of winless South
Florida on Saturday.
Miami (4-0) has yet
to trail this season, but
coach Al Golden was wary
of the Bulls coming off a
bye week that gave them
extra time to prepare.
Turned out he had noth-
ing to worry about.
"I think we were ready
to go," he said.
Stephen Morris and
a talented group of
speedy receivers set the
tone for an impressive
offensive display, and the
Hurricanes played stifling
defense before giving up
a long touchdown drive at
the end.
Morris threw for two
touchdowns before
limping off with an ankle
injury that's not consid-
ered serious, and Duke
Johnson scored a TD in
his eighth consecutive
game for the Hurricanes,
who are off to their best
start since 2004, when
they opened the season
with six straight wins.
Morris threw for 222
yards, moving ahead of
Steve Walsh and into


YELLOW JACKETS
AT HURRICANES
WHO: Georgia Tech (3-1, 2-1)
at Miami (4-0, 0-0)
WHEN: Saturday, TBD
WHERE: Sun Life Stadium,
Miami
TV: TBD
RADIO: 99.3 FM, 820 AM, 1040
AM

BEARCATS AT
BULLS
WHO: Cincinnati (3-1, 0-0)
at South Florida (0-4, 0-0)
WHEN: Saturday, 7 p.m.
WHERE: Raymond James
Stadium, Tampa
TV: ESPN3
RADIO: 99.3 FM, 1220 AM

ninth place on Miami's
career passing list.
At 0-4 under first-year
coach Willie Taggart, USF
is off to the worst start in
school history and has
lost 13 of 14 dating to last
season.
"Until we get to where
we want to be, we've got
to play perfect football in
order to compete with a
team like Miami," Taggart
said.
USF's offense has six
touchdowns all season -
opposing defenses have
scored six including
Marcus Shaw's 3-yard run
that made it 7-7. Shaw
wound up with 127 yards


For Boston College, it
was a big swing in emo-
tions after taking a lead,
then almost getting back
to the locker room with
the game tied 17-all. The
Seminoles barely got the
snap off in time, BC coach
Steve Addazio said, and
twice the Eagles seemed
to have him trapped in the


pocket.
"It was close," he said.
"Then I got caught up with
the fact that I thought we
had him on the ground -
twice. I'd seen that same
thing happen on tape,
where he'd spun out of
a couple of tackles and
threw a dart down field.
Give him credit. He made
a great football play."
Winston added a fourth
TD pass in the third quar-
ter that made it 31-20.
Chase Rettig completed
19 of 29 passes for 197
yards and a career-high
four touchdowns for BC,
including a 52-yard score
to Myles Willis that cut a
three-score lead to 38-27.
But the Eagles quarterback
also threw an interception
early in the fourth that T.J.
Williams returned 20 yards
for a touchdown to make
it 48-27.


No.8 FLORIDA ST. 48,
BOSTON COLLEGE 34
Florida St. 3 21 1410 48
Boston College 14 3 10 7 34
First Quarter
BC-Moore 6 pass from Rettig (Freese
kick), 9:58.
FSU-FG Aguayo 40,6:34.
BC-Sinkovec 3 pass from Rettig (Freese
kick), 1:46.
Second Quarter
BC-FG Freese 24,11:19.
FSU-Greene 56 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 10:35.
FSU-Abram 10 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 1:49.
FSU-Shaw 55 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), :00.
Third Quarter
BC-FG Freese 24,11:52.
FSU-Greene 10 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 9:06.
FSU-K.Williams 1 run (Aguayo kick), 3:42.
BC-Willis 52 pass from Rettig (Freese
kick),2:10.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-FG Aguayo 20,14:07.
FSU-P.Williams 20 interception return
(Aguayo kick), 13:41.
BC-Moore 17 pass from Rettig (Freese
kick), 9:44.
A-40,129.


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Return Yards
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
Time of Possession


FSU
25
36-184
335
17-27-1
55
4-40.0
1-0
5-44
26:44


BC
22
45-210
197
18-28-2
69
4-35.0
0-0
3-44
33:16


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida St., Winston 14-77,
Freeman 9-59, K.Williams 6-27,Wilder 6-15,
Abram 1-6. Boston College, A.Williams 28-
159,Willis 5-28, Amidon 3-19, Rettig 9-4.
PASSING-Florida St., Winston 17-27-1-
335. Boston College, Rettig 18-28-2-197.
RECEIVING-Florida St., Shaw 4-98,
Greene 4-90, Benjamin 3-103, Wilder 2-18,
Abram 2-15, O'Leary 1-14, C.Green 1-(mi-
nus 3). Boston College, Amidon 7-42, Willis
4-69, Miller 2-34, Moore 2-23, Dudeck 1-20,
Crimmins1-6,Sinkovec1-3.

STATE ROUNDUP


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013





The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


THE HEISMAN WATCH


MARCUS MAROTTA
QB Oregon
vs. California, late
Through three games
has produced 1,151
total yards and 11
touchdowns.


TAHJ BOYD
QB Clemson
vs. Wake Forest
Completes 17of 24
passes for 311 yards
and 3 TDs. Also runs
for a touchdown.


TEDDY BRIDGEWATER
QB Louisville
Off week
Has passed for 1,214
yards and 14 TDs.
Ranks third in passing
efficiency.


TODD GURLEY
RB Georgia
vs. LSU
Runs for 73 yards on
eight carries before
sustaining a day-end-
ing sprained ankle.


JOHNNY MANZIEL
QB Texas A&M
vs. Arkansas
Completes 23 of 30
passes for 261 yards
and 2 TDs. Runs for
59 yards on 9 carries.


AARON MURRAY
QB Georgia
vs. LSU
Throws 4 TDs
including the
game-winner with
1:37 left.


LACHE SISTRUNK
RB Baylor
Off week
Has rushed for 417
yards on 38 carries
(an 11.0 avg.) and six
TDs in three games.


I NATIONAL ROUNDUP


OKLAHOMA RIPS
MISTAKE-PRONE
NOTRE DAME
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP)
- A year after beating
Oklahoma in the final 6
minutes, Notre Dame just
about beat themselves in
the first 3 minutes against
the Sooners on Saturday.
Interceptions on con-
secutive passes by Tommy
Rees and two touchdown
passes by Blake Bell were
too much for No. 22 Notre
Dame to overcome in a
35-21 loss to the 14th-
ranked Sooners.
Rees didn't see a
linebacker blitzing from
behind on the first
interception, and his pass
to TJ Jones ricocheted
to Oklahoma linebacker
Frank Shannon in the
second as the Sooners
jumped to a 14-0 lead.
"We put ourselves in the
hole and couldn't fight out
of it," said running back
George Atkinson, who had
a career-high 148 yards on
14 carries.
That was the consensus
among the Irish players:
They lost the game more
than Oklahoma won it.
The win ended
Oklahoma's seven-game
losing streak to Notre


Dame and was the second
win in 11 meetings for the
Sooners (4-0) against the
Irish (3-2).

W. Kentucky 19, Navy
7: In Bowling Green, Ky., Antonio
Andrews ran for 182 yards and two
touchdowns as Western Kentucky beat
the Midshipmen at their own game.
Andrews outgained the nation's
best rushing offense all by himself as
Western Kentucky (3-2) held Navy to
107 yards, well below the 398 yards the
Midshipmen averaged through the first
two games. The Hilltoppers outgained
Navy 417-183 in total offense.
Navy (2-1) was trying to open the
season 3-0 for the first time since 2006.

Army 35, Louisiana Tech
16: In Dallas, Terry Baggett rushed
for 143 yards and two touchdowns,
and Army beat Louisiana Tech 35-16
in game delayed twice by lightning
and rain.
Baggett finished Army's 85-yard
opening drive with a 9-yard score after
the game's start was pushed back
an hour when a storm hit the Cotton
Bowl about 30 minutes before kickoff.
He scored again five plays after a
45-minute delay late in the first.
Army (2-3) had 414 yards rushing
and won again, 46 years after its last
trip to the historic Fair Park stadium.
The Black Knights beat SMU in October
1967.
Ryan Higgins threw for 320 yards
and a touchdown to Andrew Guillot,
who had 123 yards receiving for
Louisiana Tech (1-4).


IAACROUNDUP


IDAHO HANGS ON
TO DEFEAT TEMPLE
MOSCOW, Idaho -
Chad Chalich rushed
for 120 yards and threw
for 310 and a score, and
freshman Austin Rehkow
kicked four field goals
to help Idaho hold off
a late-game surge and
give the Vandals their
first win of the season,
beating Temple 26-24 on
Saturday.
Idaho (1-4) had com-
mand in the first half,
holding a 17-3 lead,
but the Owls (0-5), also
looking for their first win,
made it interesting with
three touchdowns in the
second half.

Houston 59, UTSA 28: In
San Antonio, Houston's B.J. Singleton
blocked a field goal that was returned
for a key touchdown late in the
third quarter and later intercepted
a pass that helped the Cougars stay
undefeated.
Ahead 24-21 late in the third
quarter, it appeared UH (4-0) would
be in a tie game when UTSA (2-3)
lined up for a 29-yard field goal. But
Singleton broke through the middle
and blocked Sean lanno's kick, and


Standings
Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Houston 1 0 22 13 4 0 174 80
Louisville 0 0 0 0 4 0 192 27
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 3 1 139 61
Rutgers 0 0 0 0 3 1 145 86


UCF 0 00 0 3 1 135
Memphis 0 0 0 0 1 2 6(
SMU 0 0 0 0 1 3 8z
South FloridaO0 0 0 0 4 58
UConn 0 0 0 0 0 4 72
Temple 0 1 13 22 0 4 7;
Saturday's results
TCU48,SMU 17
South Carolina 28, UCF 25
Miami 49, South Florida 21
Buffalo 41, UConn 12
Houston 59, UTSA28
Idaho 26,Temple 24
Saturday's games
Louisville atTemple, Noon
Rutgers at SMU, Noon
UCF at Memphis, 4:30 p.m.
Cincinnati at South Florida, 7 p.m.


5 66
0 52
4 161
8 1S1
2 130
2 106


Brandon Wilson returned it 78 yards to
give UH a 31-21 lead with 3:11 left in
the quarter. I

Buffalo 41, Connecticut
12: In Buffalo, N.Y., Host Buffalo
beat Connecticut for the first time in
a dozen years, increasing the pressure
on third-year Connecticut head coach
Paul Pasqualoni.
Buffalo (2-2) scored through the
air, on the ground and on defense
in building a 28-12 halftime lead
while the Huskies (0-4) committed 2
turnovers and had a field goal attempt
blocked. Connecticut gave away five
turnovers in the game.


I PAC-12 ROUNDUP


OREGON ST. BLITZES
RUSTY COLORADO
CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) -
Sean Mannion passed for
414 yards and a school-re-
cord six touchdowns,
and Oregon State won its
fourth consecutive game
Saturday with a 44-17
victory against Colorado.
Brandin Cooks caught
nine passes for 168 yards
and two touchdowns for
the Beavers (4-1, 2-0 Pac-
12), and had five carries
for 47 yards.
Colorado (2-1, 0-1)
played its first game in
three weeks. Flooding
postponed the Buffaloes'
Sept. 14 game against
Fresno State.

No. 16 Washington 31,
Arizona 13: In Seattle, Bishop
Sankey carried a school-record 40 times
for 161 yards and a touchdown, and
Keith Price threw for two touchdowns
for Washington. Sankey outperformed
Arizona's Ka'Deem Carey, the NCAA's
leading rusher in 2012. Sankey


Standings
North
Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
OregonSt. 2 0 95 65 4 1 208 158
Washington 1 0 31 13 4 0 159 43
Stanford 1 0 42 28 3 0 110 61
Wash. St. 1 0 10 7 3 1 124 48
Oregon 0 0 0 0 3 0 184 27
California 0 0 0 0 1 2 101 126
South
Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
UCLA 0 0 0 0 3 0 158 54
Arizona 0 1 13 31 3 1 144 57
Southern Cal 0 1 7 10 3 1 89 44
Utah 0 1 48 51 3 1 168 97
Ariz.St. 0 1 28 42 2 1 115 72
Colorado 0 1 17 44 2 1 96 95
Saturday's results
Oregon St. 44, Colorado 17
Washington 31, Arizona 13
Stanford vs.Washington St.at CenturyLink
Field, late
California at Oregon, late
Southern Cal at Arizona St., late
Thursday's game
UCLA at Utah, 10p.m.
Saturday's games
Washington St. at California, 4 p.m.
Oregon at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Notre Dame vs. Arizona St. at Arlington,
Texas, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Stanford, 10:30 p.m.


surpassed the school record of 38
carries set by Corey Dillon in 1996
against Washington State as stormy
conditions forced both teams to limit
their passing games.


KNIGHTS

FROM PAGE 1

Gamecocks' running
back Mike Davis rushed
26 times for 167 yards
and three touchdowns.
He picked up the slack
for an offense that played
the final three quarters
without starting quarter-
back Connor Shaw. He left
the game with a sprained
right shoulder following a
hard tackle during South
Carolina's first offensive
series of the contest.
The Knights were
sharp early, but failed to
convert all but one of the
Gamecocks' miscues into
points.
UCF quarterback Blake
Bortles threw for 358
yards and two touchdown
passes, but had two inter-
ceptions and a fumble.
"For the first half, we
were the better team,"
UCF linebacker Terrance
Plummer said. "But they
made plays in the second
half and we didn't make
plays until it was too late."
Shaw was dragged to
the ground by UCF line-
backer Terrance Plummer
and fumbled. The Knights
recovered the ball and
Shaw came up holding
his shoulder. Shaw was
taken to the locker room,
and when he returned
to the sideline he was
wearing a sling.
South Carolina (3-1)
also lost second-string
tailback Brandon Wilds
in the third quarter with
a left elbow strain, but
Davis remained steady as
the primary ball carrier.
Shaw was replaced by
junior Dylan Thompson
had several potential
big-play passes dropped
by receivers. He fin-
ished the game 15 of
32 for 261 yards and an
interception.
Shaw was replaced by
junior Dylan Thompson
had several potential
big-play passes dropped
by receivers. He fin-
ished the game 15 of


I COLLEGE FOOTB

SOUTH
Alabama 25, Mississippi 0
Alabama A&M 12,Texas Southern 10
Alabama St.49,Alcorn St.30
Alderson-Broaddus17,Va. Lynchburg 14
Army 35, LouisianaTech 16
Ave Maria 27,Warner 3
Bethany (WV) 34, Grove City 31
Butler 45,Jacksonville 27
Campbellsville 54, Belhaven 22
Catawba 25, Carson-Newman 22
Catholic 49, Anna Maria 0
Charleston (WV) 34, Notre Dame Coll. 32
Charleston Southern 27, Appalachian St. 24
Charlotte 45, Presbyterian 21
Chowan 29, Shaw23
Clemson 56,Wake Forest 7
Coastal Carolina 53, Elon 28
Concord 20, West Liberty 3
Cumberland (Tenn.) 40, Bluefield South 10
Delaware St. 24, Savannah St. 22
Delta St. 52, Florida Tech 31
Duke 38,Troy 31
East Carolina 55, North Carolina 31
Fairmont St. 56,W.Virginia St. 3
Fayetteville St.31, Elizabeth City St.27
Florida 24, Kentucky 7
Fort Valley St.35, Benedict 30
Furman 24,The Citadel 17
Gardner-Webb 55, Point (Ga.) 7
Georgetown (Ky.) 49, Kentucky Christian 7
Georgia 44, LSU 41
Georgia Southern 23, Chattanooga 21
Huntingdon 56, Ferrum 35
Jackson St.19, Southern U. 14
: Johns Hopkins45, Muhlenberg 13
LaGrange 35, Greensboro 21
Lamar27,Grambling St.16
Lenoir-Rhyne24,Tusculum 10
Liberty 73, KentuckyWesleyan 7
LindseyWilson 37, Faulkner 30, OT
Maine 28, Richmond 21
Maryville (Tenn.) 35, Methodist 26
Mercer31,Drake 17
Miami 49, South Florida 21
Miles22,AlbanySt. (Ga.) 14
Morehead St. 45, Davidson 14
Murray St. 35, Jacksonville St. 34, OT
NC State 48, Cent. Michigan 14
NCWesleyan 27,Averett24
Newberry24, Mars Hill 10
Nicholls St. 44, ArkansasTech 34
Norfolk St. 27, Morgan St. 21
North Greenville 41, Brevard 28
Northwestern St. 37, Langston 0
Old Dominion 66,Albany(NY) 10
Reinhardt 41, Bethel (Tenn.) 36
Rhodes 36, Berry 24
Robert Morris37,VMI 31,20T
SC State 30, Hampton 6
Samford62,W. Carolina 23
San Diego 59, Stetson 0
Shepherd 45,WVWesleyan 10
South Carolina 28, UCF 25
Stillman 26, Kentucky St. 21
Tennessee 31, South Alabama 24
Thomas More 49, Waynesburg 28
STulane 31, Louisiana-Monroe 14
: Tuskegee42, Lane 14


Central Florida quarterback Blake Bortles looks to pass as South Carolina defensive tackle Kelcy
Quarles rushes during the first half of Saturday's game in Orlando. Central Florida led at halftime
but lost 28-25.


KNIGHTS AT
TIGERS
WHO: Central Florida (3-1, 0-0
AAC) at Memphis (1-2, 0-0)
WHEN: Saturday, 4:30 p.m.
WHERE: Liberty Bowl Memorial
Stadium, Memphis, Tenn.
TV: ESPN3
RADIO: No local affiliate

32 for 261 yards and an
interception.
But Thompson and
the Gamecocks' offense
settled down in the third
quarter, relying on their
rushing attack led by
Davis to take control of
the game.
Still, UCF (3-1), playing
in front of its first sellout
crowd since 2011, kept
competing.
The Knights closed to
within 10, 28-18, with
10:13 to play on Bortles'
73-yard touchdown pass
to Rannell Hall and subse-
quent 2-point conversion.
South Carolina punted
on its ensuing possession,
but a UCF drive that start-
ed inside the Gamecocks
40 ended with Bortles'
second interception.


ALL SCOREBOARD

UNC-Pembroke 38, Wingate 10
Union (Ky.) 24,Virginia-Wise 17
Valdosta St.37,Angelo St.3
Virginia St. 19, Johnson C. Smith 17
W. Kentucky 19, Navy 7
Washington & Lee 35, Sewanee 24
Webber 35, Mississippi College 7
Wesley46, Birmingham-Southern 12
West Georgia 31, Shorter 14
Winston-Salem 55,Virginia Union 15
EAST
Albright 48, King's (Pa.) 29
Alfred 34, Brockport 28, OT
S Amherst 27, Bowdoin 11
Bates 20, Tufts 16
Bloomsburg 56, Lock Haven 10
Bridgewater (Mass.) 30, Fitchburg St. 20
Bryant 47,Wagner 28
Buffalo 41, UConn 12
Carnegie-Mellon 41, Geneva 34,20T
Coast Guard 37, Nichols 20
College of NJ 7, S.Virginia 2
Delaware 29,James Madison 22
Delaware Valley 41, Stevenson 23
Dickinson 31, Moravian 7
East Stroudsburg 40, Cheyney6
Edinboro 43, Seton Hill 7
Florida St. 48, Boston College 34
Fordham 38, St.Francis (Pa.) 20
Framingham St. 14,W.Connecticut 12
Franklin &Marshall 46,Juniata 16
Gannon 45, Clarion 25
Gettysburg 42, Susquehanna 28
Harvard 41, Brown 23
Hobart 24, Merchant Marine 8
Holy Cross 31, Dartmouth 28
Indiana (Pa.)20, California (Pa.) 7
Ithaca 24, Buffalo St. 20
Lebanon Valley 65, FDU-Florham 21
Lehigh 34, New Hampshire 27
Livingstone 35, Lincoln (Pa.) 7
Lycoming 16,Widener 14
Mass.-Dartmouth 38, Plymouth St. 7
Merrimack 66, Pace 14
Middlebury 27, Colby 10
Monmouth (NJ) 37, Columbia 14
New Haven 48, CW Post 23
Pittsburgh 14,Virginia 3
Princeton 50, Georgetown 22
Rhode Island 42, CCSU 7
Rochester 36, Springfield 35
Rowan 7, Montclair St. 0
Sacred Heart 16, Bucknell 0
Salve Regina 29, MIT21
Shippensburg 48, Millersville 10
Slippery Rock58, Mercyhurst 34
St. Augustine's 29, Bowie St. 7
St.John Fisher 33,Cortland St.25
St. Lawrence 30, Union (NY) 20
Stonehill 30, Bentley 3
Towson 35, Stony Brook 21
Trinity(Conn.) 20,Williams 13
Ursinus 40, McDaniel 21
Villanova 35, Penn 6
W. New England 59, Maine Maritime 0
WPI27, RPI14
Washington &Jefferson 32,Thiel 19
Wesleyan (Conn.) 35, Hamilton 6
West Chester 22, Kutztown 21


But the Gamecocks
couldn't seal the victory.
With less than four min-
utes to play, the Knights
fell on a fumble inside
their own 5 and struck
quickly with a 3-play,
95-yard drive capped by
a 7-yard touchdown pass
from Bortles to Hall.
South Carolina recov-
ered the ensuing onside
kick and was able to run
out the clock.
UCF had the early mo-
mentum, leading 10-0 at
halftime, the first time the
Gamecocks had been shut
out in a half since 2010.
South Carolina had
been a fast starter this
season, entering the game
having scored 72 of its 92
points in the opening 30
minutes in its first three
games.
The Knights mostly had
their way on both sides of
the ball early, and dialed
up more blitzes on the
Gamecocks offense with
Shaw out.
UCF's best offensive
possession was on the
opening drive of the
game. The Knights
efficiently marched 75
yards down the field in


just 10 plays. The drive,
which saw Bortles com-
plete 5 of 6 passes and set
up a first-and-goal with a
19-yard yard run, end with
a 1-yard touchdown by
Storm Johnson.
No. 12 SOUTH CAROLINA 28, UCF 25
South Carolina 0 0 1414 28
UCF 7 3 015 25
First Quarter
UCF-S.Johnson 1 run (Moffitt kick), 10:05.
Second Quarter
UCF-FG Moffitt 27,4:26.
Third Quarter
SC-Davis 53 run (Fry kick), 13:51.
SC-Thompson 2 run (Fry kick), 3:58.
Fourth Quarter
SC-Davis 13 run (Fry kick), 14:02.
SC-Davis 13 run (Fry kick), 10:31.
UCF-Hall 73 pass from Bortles (Worton
pass from Bortles), 9:48.
UCF-Hall 7 pass from Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 1:54.
A-47,605.
SC UCF
First downs 23 20
Rushes-yards 46-225 25-69
Passing 265 358
Comp-Att-Int 16-34-1 25-37-3
Return Yards 40 62
Punts-Avg. 4-36.3 4-39.8
Fumbles-Lost 3-3 3-1
Penalties-Yards 7-58 6-46
Time of Possession 30:49 29:11
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-South Carolina, Davis 26-167,
Wilds5-31,Shaw4-30,Ellington 1-2,Carson
1-0, Thompson 6-0, Team 3-(minus 5). UCF,
SJohnson 16-64, Bortles 9-5.
PASSING-South Carolina, Thompson 15-
32-1-261, Shaw 1-2-0-4. UCF, Bortles 25-36-
2-358, Godfrey 0-1-1 -0.
RECEIVING-South Carolina, Byrd 5-74,
Ellington 4-88, Anderson 2-34, Davis 2-11,
Adams 1-44, Owens 1-8, Jones 1-6. UCF,
Hall 8-142, SJohnson 4-41, Perriman 3-109,
Godfrey 3-18,Tukes 2-21, Reese 2-9, Miller
1-9, Stanback 1-7,Worton 1-2.


West Virginia 30, Oklahoma St. 21 Ohio Northern 38, Capital 24
Westminster (Pa.) 28, St. Vincent 21 Oklahoma 35, Notre Dame 21
Wilkes 33, Misericordia 14 Olivet 14, North Park 10
William Paterson 49, NY Maritime 23 Pacific Lutheran 21 ,Wis.-Eau Claire 19
Worcester St. 64, Mass. Maritime 63 Pittsburg St. 59, Lincoln (Mo.) 38
Yale 38, Cornell 23 Quincy 36, Lindenwood (Mo.) 7
MIDWEST Rose-Hulman 44, Manchester 30
Adrian 28, Carthage 14 S. Dakota Tech 70,William Jewell 48
Ashland 52, N. Michigan 24 SW Baptist 38, Missouri Southern 33
Augsburg 55, Hamline 20 SaginawValley St. 51, Lake Erie 41
Baker 63, Avila 17 Siena Heights 14, Olivet Nazarene 0
Baldwin-Wallace 23, Muskingum 13 Sioux Falls 52, Minn.-Crookston 7
Ball St.31,Toledo 24 St.Joseph's (Ind.) 24,Trine 21
BemidjiSt 41W MinnesotaSt40 St.Mary(Kan.) 45, Bethany(Kan.) 15
Bethel (Minn.) 56, Carleton 14 St. Norbert 27, Carroll (Wis.) 7
Bowling Green 31 Akron 14 St. Xavier 37, St. Francis (11.) 25
Briar Cliff 54, Dordt 14 Tennessee St. 73,Central St. (Ohio) 6
Cent. Methodist 36, Graceland (Iowa) 27
Central 31, Albion 6 UT-Martin 17, SE Missouri 7
Concordia (Moor.) 24, St. John's (Minn.) 14 Upper Iowa 36, Mary 7
Concordia (Neb.) 24, Dakota St. 0 Urbana 12,Glenville St. 9
Concordia (St.P.) 36, Minn. St.-Moorhead 34 Valparaiso 49, Campbell 42, OT
Cornell (Iowa) 23, Monmouth (111.) 20 W. Illinois 24, South Dakota 10
Dakota Wesleyan 28, Hastings 19 Wabash 65, Allegheny 0
Defiance 34, Anderson (Ind.) 0 Washburn 28, Cent. Oklahoma 19
Denison 47, Ohio Wesleyan 41,20T Washington (Mo.) 31,Centre 14
Doane 42, Midland 0 Wayne (Mich.) 38, Malone 27
E. Illinois 42, E. Kentucky 7 William Penn 21,Taylor 10
Emporia St. 45, Northeastern St. 24 Winona St. 49, Minot St. 14
Eureka 21, Minn.-Morris 13 Wis.-Oshkosh 56, Alma 3
Ferris St.59,Walsh 16 Wis.-Whitewater 65,Waldorf 0
Findlay 40, Michigan Tech 19 Wittenberg 59, Oberlin 0
Franklin 80, Earlham 14 Wooster 38, Hiram 24
Grand View 23, St. Francis (Ind.) 7 Youngstown St. 28, S. Illinois 27
Greenville 56, Martin Luther 6 SOUTHWEST
Grinnell 42, Beloit 17 Harding 63, S. Nazarene 21
Gustavus 45, St. Olaf 19 Henderson St. 63, East Central 31
Heidelberg 66,Wilmington (Ohio) 12 Hendrix 48, Southwestern (Texas) 29
Illinois 50, Miami (Ohio) 14 Houston 59, UTSA28
Illinois College 44, Ripon 28 McMurry 53, Okla. Panhandle St. 27
Illinois Wesleyan 14, Hope 7 Ouachita 45, SE Oklahoma 7
Indianapolis 17, Hillsdale 14 Prairie View 56, Stephen F.Austin 48
Iowa 23, Minnesota 7 Rice 18, FAU 14
Iowa Wesleyan 41, Mac Murray 14 S.Arkansas 47, NW Oklahoma St. 14
Jamestown 21, Mayville St. 19 SW Oklahoma 35, Ark.-Monticello 17
Kent St. 32,W. Michigan 14 Sam Houston St. 49, E.Washington 34
Kenyon 28, DePauw 26 TCU 48, SMU 17
Lake Forest 14, Knox 7 Tarleton St. 41, Abilene Christian 34, 20T
Linfield 43, Case Reserve 0 TexasA&M45,Arkansas33
Marist 31, Dayton 20 Trinity (Texas) 26, Austin 3
Mid-Am Nazarene 54, Evangel 22 WEST
Minll 52, A 4ane (Neb) 21 Chadron St.35,Western St.(Col.) 14
Minn. Duluth 64,Wayne (Neb.) 21
Minn. St.-Mankato 42, Northern St.(SD) 14 colorado Mines 30, NMHighlands 10
Missouri St.37, Illinois St. 10 Colorado St. 59, UTEP 42
Missouri Valley 29, Culver-Stockton 6 E Oregon 35, Carroll (Mont (31
Missouri Western 52, Fort Hays St. 21 Fort Lewis 38, W New Mexico 28
Montana St. 63, North Dakota 20 Idaho 26,Temple 24
Mount St. Joseph 52, Bluffton 28 Menlo 56, La Verne 7
N. Dakota St. 20, S. Dakota St. 0 Mesa St. 49, Black Hills St. 11
N. Illinois 55, Purdue 24 Montana St.-Northern 33, Montana West-
N. Iowa 41, McNeese St. 6 ern21
NW Missouri St. 53, Nebraska-Kearney 7 Oregon St. 44, Colorado 17
Nebraska Wesleyan 22, Northwestern Rocky Mountain 13, Montana Tech 6
(Iowa) 8 S. Oregon 66, Dickinson St. 20
North Central (1ll.) 27,Wis.-Stevens Pt.7 S. Utah 27, N. Colorado21
Northwestern (Minn.) 27, Crown (Minn.) 14 Sacramento St. 31,Weber St. 3
Northwood (Mich.) 26, Tiffin 11 W. Oregon 30, Simon Fraser 9
Ohio Dominican 57, Grand Valley St. 14 Washington 31, Arizona 13


F






Page 6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


NFL EXTRA


* WEEK 4


* NFL NOTEBOOK


NFL


clips


Newton


for $10K:
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK -The NFL
fined Carolina Panthers
quarterback Cam Newton
$10,000 for wearing
clips on his helmet visor
featuring the Under
Armour logo.
Although the clips that
attach Newton's clear visor
to the helmet are small
and difficult
INSIDE to see, the
NFL standings league
and injury considers
report in it a viola-
Scoreboard, tion of its
Page 11 equipment
policy.
NFL
rules state that "No visible
identification of a manu-
facturer's name or logo on
the exterior of a helmet
or on any attachment to a
helmet is permitted unless
provided for under a
commercial arrangement
between the League and
manufacturer."
Nike has a signed
contract to be the NFL's
equipment provider.
Newton is one of Under
Armour's main clients.

Dolphins'Wake ques-
tionable for Saints game:
Miami Dolphins end Cameron Wake
and two other defensive starters are
listed as questionable for Monday
night's game at New Orleans. Wake
(left knee), tackle Paul Soliai (knee) and
linebacker Koa Misi (shoulder) were all
limited in practice Saturday. Cornerback
Dimitri Patterson (groin) didn't practice
and has been ruled out.

Jaguars sign WRs off
practice squad again: For
the second consecutive week, the
Jacksonville Jaguars have signed
receivers off the practice squad -
Jeremy Ebert and Tobais Palmer. Mike
Brown (back) and Stephen Burton
(concussion) have been ruled out for
today's game against Indianapolis.
And with receiver Justin Blackmon
suspended for violating the league's
substance-abuse policy, the Jaguars
were down to two healthy receivers:
Cecil Shorts III and rookie Ace Sanders.
Ebert, a seventh-round pick by
New England in 2012, had a 5-yard
reception at Oakland.


STAT CORNER
N.C. STATE QBS IN THE NFL
When Mike Glennon starts for the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers today, he
can add to the combined record of
201-149-7 by four other former North
Carolina State quarterbacks in the NFL's
Super Bowl era:
RUSSELLWILSON*
Team: Seattle Seahawks
(2012-present)
Record: 13-5
Highlights: NFL rookie of the year
led Seahawks to divisional playoffs...
tied Peyton Manning's record for most
touchdowns passes by a rookie (26).
PHILIP RIVERS
Team: San Diego Chargers
(2004-present)
Record:71-44
Highlights: Four-time Pro Bowler led
Chargers to 2007 AFC Championship
Game ... 3-4 career playoff record.
ERIKKRAMER
Teams: Atlanta Falcons, Detroit Lions,
Chicago Bears and San Diego Chargers
(1987-99)
Record:31-36
Highlights: Replaced injured Rodney
Peete and led Detroit Lions to 1991 NFC
Championship Game.
ROMAN GABRIEL
Teams: Los Angeles Rams and
Philadelphia Eagles (1962-77)
Record:86-64-7
Highlights: Led 1967 Rams to 11-1-2
record and their first playoff game since
1957. They lost to Green Bay Packers in
Vince Lombardi's final season.


-Mike Bambach
*-Wilson was drafted by Seattle out
of Wisconsin, where he played his final
season of NCAA eligibility. But he played
three seasons at N.C. State -he grad-
uated in three years including three
bowl games. He was also an all-Atlantic
Coast Conference first-teamer.


FOUR-DOWN TERRITORY
With the San Francisco 49ers, Atlanta Falcons, Seattle Seahawks, Green Bay Packers, resurgent New Orleans Saints and promising Washington Redskins, the NFC
looked to have it all over the AFC. Three weeks into the season, it's the AFC that has been dominant. (By Barry Willner Associated Press)


1 AFC clubs have won 11 of
14 meetings with the NFC.
Most confounding have been
the early flops by five of the six
NFC playoff teams from 2012; only
Seattle has a winning record.
Meanwhile, all six AFC playoff
qualifiers from last year are winners,
while the Miami Dolphins and
Kansas City Chiefs have been reve-
lations. The Indianapolis Colts seem
even stronger than they were in
their turnaround 2012 season, and
even the Jets and Titans look good.
Sure, it's early and the Saints
and Chicago Bears certainly look
promising but there's no
question the NFC is struggling with
abysmal 0-3 starts by the Redskins,
Vikings and New York Giants and
disappointing showings by the
Packers and Falcons, both 1-2.


Of the 14 interconference
meetings, two NFC victories
were by the unbeaten Bears,
24-21 over Cincinnati, 40-23 over
reeling Pittsburgh. The other was
Seattle's 45-17 rout of Jacksonville.
Far more impressive: Indy's 27-7
victory at Candlestick Park; the
Bengals'34-30 decision against
Green Bay; the Dolphins'beating
Atlanta 27-23. Kansas City, which
has interconference wins over the
Cowboys and Eagles might be the
biggest surprise. Maybe the Chiefs
epitomize what's going on through
three weeks. The better AFC teams
are protecting the ball and getting
takeaways. They are rushing the
passer successfully. In many cases
- Chiefs over Cowboys, Bears over
Bengals, Browns over Vikings -
they are outcoaching the opposition.


Rich Gannon, the 2002 league
MVP now an analyst for CBS
Sports and SiriusXM, said
Andy Reid and Alex Smith have
been the difference for Kansas City.
"I believed (coaching) would be a
quick fix in Kansas City. I did some
Chiefs games last year, knew there
was talent there. You're looking
at a team that turned it over 37
times last year. But Alex Smith
might be the best quarterback at
ball security." Personnel is another
factor for AFC success, Gannon said.
"Indianapolis went out and got new
starters on defense after they got
bullied in the running game last
year. Look at Miami ... Joe Philbin
has done an outstanding job. The
quarterback (Ryan Tannehill) has
really benefited from the coaching
and matured."


Everything could change in
the AFC-NFC series as early
as, well, this weekend. There
are seven interconference matchups
and NFC teams are favored in four of
them. Then again, the Giants can't
protect Eli Manning or run the ball,
and the Chiefs'defense leads the
league in sacks and physicality.
New England should never be
counted out against anyone, and
is 13-2 in its past 15 road games
against the NFC. Other than the
Saints, not one of the NFC teams
playing AFC teams this weekend is
close to peak efficiency. The Giants,
Vikings and Redskins are a combined
0-9, the Philadelphia Eagles can't
stop anybody on defense, and the
Cowboys are inconsistent.


* SPOTLIGHT:



Prime time for Manning


This season,
Manning's
been at his
all-time best

By ARNIE STAPLETON
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -
Peyton Manning is only
getting better with age.
Those surgical scars on
his neck are starting to
fade like all those fears
that he might never be the
same quarterback or
even play again after
his right arm shrank from
a damaged nerve in his
biceps two years ago.
After attacking his
rehab as doggedly as he
assails defenses, Denver's
37-year-old quarterback
is making it hard to
fathom and easy to forget
that not so long ago he
was missing an entire
season and getting fired in
Indianapolis.
The four-time MVP is
off to the best start of his
storied 16-year career.
Driven by last year's
playoff pratfall, Manning
is putting up historic
numbers while directing
an imaginative offense
that's still working through
some growing pains.
Here's the scary part for
opponents: Even with so
many footballs slipping
through his teammates'
hands or going through
the uprights after stalled
drives, the Broncos (3-0)
are averaging 42 points.
"I think Peyton's playing
at an all-time (high) right
now," said Philadelphia


Peyton Manning, left, bumping fists with Mike Adams after
Denver beat the Oakland Raiders 37-21 on Monday night, is off


to the best start of his career.
coach Chip Kelly, whose
Eagles (1-2) visit Denver
today. "You couple him
being at the top of his
game and then give him
the weapons that he has,
it's a pretty dangerous
formula to go against."
The 2013 Rocky
Mountain version of the
"Fearsome Foursome" is
Demaryius Thomas, Eric
Decker, Wes Welker and
Julius Thomas, who have
collected 72 catches for
943 yards and 11 TDs.
"Usually you have a
main guy as part of the
offense, a star that you
can load up and take him
away," Eagles defensive
coordinator Bill Davis
said. "Peyton makes you
defend the field."
Manning is the first
quarterback in NFL
history to collect a dozen
touchdown throws in the
first three weeks of the
season, and his off-the-
charts passer rating of
134.7 is way above the
career high of 121.1 he


set in his pinnacle 2004
season, when he threw
for 49 TDs. Manning was
masterful Monday night in
completing a career-high
86.5 percent of his passes
in Denver's wipeout of
Oakland.
Manning, though,
finds no time in his
no-nonsense schedule to
contemplate how special
this start is.
"This is a new season.
It's one week at a time,"
he said. "Guys are making
good plays in the passing
game and we are doing
a good job getting yards
after the catch."
Take Decker's 61-yard
gain Monday night. He
runs an 18-yard curl and
there's a 6-inch window
for Manning, who delivers
a frozen rope of a throw
that seems to stun even
Decker, who hesitates
for a split second before
turning upfield for a 61-
yard gain.
"I was on him like
a shadow," Raiders


cornerback Mike Jenkins
said. "I actually felt the
ball go across my fingers.
... He's a genius."
Just imagine him in his
prime? Are you kidding? In
many ways, it's right here,
right now.
"I'd like to think that
any player would use the
experience from the year
before to his advantage, to
learn what to do against
certain defenses, to learn
what not to do," Manning
said. "With being able to
play a lot, you certainly
gain great experience."
He's putting that to use
like never before, too.
"The guy is just awe-
some," Jenkins said. "I've
never seen anything like
him. It is very frustrating
for you to be in the right
spot and he still squeezes
the ball in for a great
throw. There's not too
much you can do about
that. Most games you play,
that's your ball. But it's
Peyton Manning."
Or, Peyton Manning 2.0.
He bounced back last
year from a series of neck
injuries and surgeries that
sidelined him in 2011, an
all-too-familiar ordeal for
the first family of football
after his older brother,
Cooper, saw his football
dreams dashed because of
a spinal condition.
Family patriarch Archie
Manning said Peyton
"never took football for
granted because of what
happened to Cooper."
"I think he always knew
he was fortunate in regard
to health. But he wasn't
ready for his career to be
over, not like that."


GRIDIRON GRID

GAME OF THE WEEK
Chicago (3-0) at Detroit (2-1) 1 p.m. None Detroit by 3
Bears winners of three in a row and 9 of past 10 in series. Winner: Bears. Fantasy football: Marc Trestman has Jay Cutler looking sharp; Matt Forte is next.
GAME OF THE WEAK
Pittsburgh (0-3) vs. Minnesota (0-3) in London 1 p.m. CBS Pittsburgh by 3
If this doesn't kill talk of a London franchise, nothing will. Winner: Vikings. Adrian Peterson will not let 0-4 happen against Steelers run D allowing 115.3 YPG.
AROUND THE STATE
Arizona (1-2) at Tampa Bay (0-3) 1 p.m. FOX Tampa Bay by 2.5
This is a bad time to debut a rookie QB, even at home. Winner: Cardinals. FF: Doug Martin should take advantage of the Cardinals'loss of top three outside LBs.
Indianapolis (2-1) at Jacksonville (0-3) 1 p.m. None Indianapolis by 8
Only an emotional letdown by Colts could make this close. Winner: Colts. FF: Trent Richardson benefits from full week of practice.
OTHER GAMES
Seattle (3-0) at Houston (2-1) 1 p.m. None Seattle by 2
Texans WR Andre Johnson, LT Duane Brown are game-time decisions. Winner: Seahawks. FF: Texans'DeAndre Hopkins leads all rookies with 18 catches, 243 yards.
Cincinnati (2-1) at Cleveland (1-2) 1 p.m. None Cincinnati by 3.5
The matchup of Bengals WR A.J. Green vs. Browns CB Joe Haden is worth watching. FF: Browns WR Josh Gordon (10/146 last week) was worth waiting for.
N.Y. Giants (0-3) at Kansas City (3-0) 1 p.m. None Kansas City by 4
Seeing Tom Coughlin winless saddens me. Winner: Chiefs. Andy Reid knew Giants'weaknesses well, before they were so apparent.
Baltimore (2-1) at Buffalo (1-2) 1 p.m. None Baltimore by 3
Not ready to pick Ravens on the road yet. Winner: Bills. EJ Manuel keeps getting better. FF: Fred Jackson is good at picking up slack if C.J. Spiller gets dinged again.
N.Y. Jets (2-1) at Tennessee (2-1) 4:05 p.m. CBS Tennessee by 3.5
Two good defensive units collide. Winner: Titans. It's nice to see T itans QB Jake Locker thriving. FF: Chris Johnson due for a breakaway TD run, 100-yard game.
Washington (0-3) at Oakland (1-2) 4:25 p.m. None Washington by 3
Heat on Mike Shanahan in full-furnace mode. Winner: Redskins. Iffy status of QB Terrelle Pryor (concussion) precludes Raiders pick. FF: RG III a good play.
Philadelphia (1-2) at Denver (3-0) 4:25 p.m. FOX Denver by 11
First offense to huddle loses. Winner: Broncos. Who will wear out Eagles D more, Peyton Manning or Chip Kelly's offense? Eagles must get ball to DeSean Jackson.
Dallas (2-1) at San Diego (1-2) 4:25 p.m. None Dallas by 2
The Cowboys bandwagon is getting crowded. Winner: Chargers. FF: Two of NFL's best TEs, Jason Witten and Antonio Gates, appear unstoppable again.
New England (3-0) at Atlanta (1-2) 8:30 p.m. NBC Atlanta by 2
A Falcons loss at home is still unthinkable. Winner: Falcons. Patriots have to lose eventually and will here. FF: Tony Gonzalez will make at least one TD dunk.


Byes: Carolina, Green Bay
MONDAY'S GAME
Miami (3-0) at New Orleans (3-0) 8:40 p.m. ESPN
NFL Films'Greg Cosell says Dolphins are for real, but they're also in New Orleans. Winner: Saints. Sean Payton remains on a mi


New Orleans by 6.5
ssion.
Earl Bloom, The Orange County Registe


2-MINUTE DRILL

Some of the storylines in play for the
NFL's Week 4:
WHEN VICK TOPPED MANNING
The last time the Philadelphia
Eagles faced Peyton Manning, Michael
Vick was the better quarterback.
In Week 9 of the 2010 season, Vick
outplayed Manning in Philadelphia's
26-24 victory over the Indianapolis
Colts. Vick, returning after missing a
month following a rib injury, threw
for 218 yards and one touchdown, and
ran for 74 yards and a score. Manning
threw for 287 yards, one TD and two
interceptions that day.
"I was consistent all the way
through,"Vick recalled. "We didn't
turn the ball over. Anytime you play
against Peyton, you have to capitalize
on every opportunity, and I think
we were able to do that. We had a
great game plan. We were at home,
the crowd was great, everything was
great, the atmosphere was good, and
we were able to put it all together.
"It was probably one of my better
games, but that was so long ago."
Today, Vick and the Eagles (1-2) are
underdogs against Manning and the
high-powered Broncos (3-0).
Ron Maaddi,
Associated Press

GIANT BATTLE
The New York Giants were never
supposed to be here: 0-3 for the first
time since 1996, in danger of falling
to 0-4 for just the third time in the
88-year history of the franchise.
Truth be told: the Kansas City
Chiefs were not supposed to be here,
either, having won their first three
games under Andy Reid to eclipse
their 2-14 record in 2012.
They also traded with the 49ers
for Smith, who was replaced as San
Francisco's starting quarterback
midway through last season by Colin
Kaepernick, who led them to the
Super Bowl. All Smith has done is
restore a semblance of order to the
Kansas City offense, which has yet to
commit a turnover this season.
Smith has thrown the fewest
interceptions in the NFL among
quarterbacks with at least 1,000 pass
attempts since 2010: six fewer than
Tom Brady, eight fewer than Peyton
Manning and Aaron Rodgers.
But the Giants have had success
against Smith in past seasons,
however, winning two of the last
three meetings, including the NFC
Championship Game at Candlestick
Park en route to Super Bowl XLVI.
-Art Stapleton
The Record (Hackensack, NJ.)

GENO'S SHOW
By the numbers, Geno Smith has
had an up-and-down first three
games of his NFL career. The New York
Jets are OK with that.
He has made big plays in each of
the team's wins in a surprising 2-1
start. He vows to cut down on his
mistakes six interceptions and
the Jets appear willing to live with
them, especially with Mark Sanchez
out until at least midseason with a
shoulder injury.
This is Smith's team now.
"He's playing well,"right guard
Willie Colon said. "He's composed. I
love everything about him. He comes
out to practice every day and is a hard
worker. You can tell'The Show'is not
too big for him."
-Dennis Waszak Jr.,
Associated Press


QUICK SLANTS
The Chicago Bears'league-high
11 takeaways entering today's game
against the Detroit Lions suggest they
can sustain forcing turnovers and
match that with whatever offensive
improvements Trestman helps
achieve. "You emphasize it, you preach
it,"linebacker James Anderson said.
"I've been in Carolina you did the
same thing. But just here it actually
happens. Guys are optimistic. Guys are
hungry. Guys go make plays, and they
make turnovers happen.'..
Denard Robinson hasn't been
anything close to an"offensive
weapon"for the Jacksonville Jaguars.
And now he doesn't even have the
label. The Jaguars (0-3) said the NFL
requested Robinson be listed at one
position, so the team decided to call
him a wide receiver instead of an OW.
Odd, since Robinson has played 11
snaps in three games and hasn't been
targeted in the passing game....
An Ohio man accused of streaking
across the field during a Cleveland
Browns exhibition game on Aug.
15 has been banned from entering
the team's stadium and ordered to
clean up after tailgaters in the city's
municipal lot for four games this
season starting with today's game
against the Cincinnati Bengals.
Contributing Chicago Tribune,
r Associated Press


Page 6 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013






The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7


* NFL:'


Fitzgerald would


like to forget loss


at Raymond James


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SARASOTA Raymond
James Stadium brings
back bitter memories for
Larry Fitzgerald.
The last time the
Arizona Cardinals' wide
receiver was in the Tampa
stadium was in 2009,
and he was 35 seconds
away from being a Super
Bowl champion. Instead,
his Cardinals lost to the
Pittsburgh Steelers, 27-23,
when Santonio Holmes
caught a touchdown pass
from Ben Roethlisberger
in the final minute.
Before Holmes' catch,
it was Fitzgerald who was
likely to pull down MVP
honors after making sev-
en catches for 127 yards
and two touchdowns. His
64-yard touchdown catch
with 2:37 left gave the
Cardinals their first lead.
He'll return there today
when the Cardinals face
the winless Tampa Bay
Buccaneers.
"Yeah, I don't have the
best memories of this
place," Fitzgerald said.
"It would be nice to leave
here with a win."
Fitzgerald practiced all
week and said he's over
the hamstring issues that
hampered the previous
week. He took himself out
of a game in the Sept. 15
victory over Detroit, then
missed practice most of
the next week. Still, he
played in last Sunday's
31-7 loss at New Orleans.


This matchup carries
none of the luster of that
heady 2008 season, when
Fitzgerald shattered most
of the playoff receiving
records as the favorite
target of Kurt Warner
in that surprising run
through the NFC.
But Fitzgerald expects
Tampa Bay (0-3) to be
a formidable foe. The
Buccaneers should look
at the 1-2 Cardinals as
potential victims.
"You watch them on
tape and obviously the
Jets game they had the
roughing late in the
game. They definitely
should have won that
game. The Saints game
they had a big touchdown
called back," Fitzgerald
said. "They could easily
be 2-1. They are a good
football team. They see
the schedule and see
Arizona coming to town,
they are going to try to
get healthy on us."
On Friday, the
Cardinals confirmed that
nose tackle Dan Williams
will miss a second game
following the death of his
father in a car crash en
route to watch Williams
play. Rookie linebacker
and special teams player
Kevin Minter is out with
a hamstring injury. Safety
Rashad Johnson, who had
the tip of his left middle
finger severed in the New
Orleans game, practiced
on a limited basis and is
listed as questionable.


Arizona wide receiver Larry Fitzgeral celebrates with teammates
after scoring his second touchdown in Super Bowl XLIII against
the Pittsburgh Steelers at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.


GLENNON
FROM PAGE 1
final year of his contract,
completed less than 50
percent of his passes and
Tampa Bay scored three
offensive touchdowns in
losing to the Jets, Saints
and Patriots. The Bucs
have dropped eight of
nine overall, dating to last
season.
"I look at our offense
in the last nine games.
I don't think we've
performed up to the
level of our expectations,"
Schiano said, stressing
he has confidence in
Glennon to provide
a spark, while also
declining to compare
him to other young
quarterbacks.
Although the move
surprised Arizona coach
Bruce Arians, he said
facing Glennon instead of
Freeman won't alter the
Cardinals' approach.
"It really doesn't change
the way we prepare, we
are preparing for their
offense," Arians said.
"Josh brought special
things as far as athleti-
cism, and Mike brings
a big, strong arm. They
obviously felt (a change)
was needed. Any time you
face a rookie quarterback
... we should have an


advantage, I think."
Glennon didn't exactly
light it up in the presea-
son, and the Bucs will
try to take some pressure
off him by establishing
the running game with
Doug Martin, second in
the NFL with 297 yards
rushing. That will be
especially important if
Tampa Bay's top receiv-
ers, Vincent Jackson
(ribs) and Mike Williams
(hamstring), are limited
or worse don't play
at all because of injuries.
One of more intriguing
personal matchups
figures to be Cardinals
receiver Larry Fitzgerald
against Bucs cornerback
Darrelle Revis. Fitzgerald
has been bothered by
a sore hamstring, but
expects to be full speed.
Revis relishes the chal-
lenge of shutting down
elite receivers.
"It should be a good
one. You're talking about
two guys with about $200
million between the two
of them. They ought to
put on a show," Arians
said. "They can't cancel
each other out, nobody
wants to see that. I think
they'll both win some,
lose some."
Revis has faced the
Cardinals once, in 2008
with the Jets. He had two
interceptions, returning
one for a touchdown.


SMLB ROUNDUP


AP PHOTO
Cleveland Indians pitcher Joe Smith, left, and catcher Yan Gomes celebrate as the Indians beat
the Minnesota Twins 5-1 on Saturday in Minneapolis.




INDIANS OPEN




WILD-CARD LEAD


Rangers move into tie with Rays


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MINNEAPOLIS -The
playoff scenario for the
Cleveland Indians is
simple: win today and
they are in.
The Indians moved into
sole possession of the
AL wild-card lead on the
next-to-last scheduled
day of the regular season,
beating the Minnesota
Twins 5-1 on Saturday
behind Scott Kazmir's
strong start to extend
their winning streak to
nine.
Seeking their first
postseason appearance
since 2007, the Indians
(91-70) took a one-game
lead over Tampa Bay and
Texas (both 90-71).
"We want to keep this
roll going. This is so much
fun," Nick Swisher said.
Cleveland is assured
of at least a tie for the
AL wild card. With three
teams seeking the two
wild cards, today's results
could decide the matter
or lead to one or two
tiebreaker games at the
start of next week.
Carlos Santana hom-
ered for the Indians, who
have won 14 of their last
16.
If the three teams are
tied after today, Cleveland
would host Tampa Bay on
Monday, with the winner
advancing to the postsea-
son. The loser would play
at Texas on Tuesday for
the second wild card.
In the event Sunday
ends with a tie for the
second wild-card berth,
there would be a one-
game tiebreaker Monday.
Tampa Bay would host
Cleveland, Texas would
be home against the Rays
or the Indians would host
the Rangers.
The two wild cards
would then meet in
a postseason game
Wednesday to determine
which advances to the
division series.
"Every time you win, it
makes the next day that
much more important, so
we get to show up (today)
and see if we can win a
game," Indians manager
Terry Francona said.

Rangers 7, Angels 4: In
Arlington, Texas, Joe Nathan feels
like the Rangers have been playing
elimination games for a week. Now
they are down to the regular season's
scheduled finale, still with a chance
to get into the playoffs for the fourth
year in a row.
A rain-drenched Nathan struck out
Howie Kendrick with two runners on
and the infield flooding to close out
the Rangers'sixth straight victory, and
second in less than 24 hours.
"It doesn't change what we need


Pence, Giants
strike $90M deal
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -
Hunter Pence and the San
Francisco Giants reached a
tentative agreement on a $90
million, five-year contract,
pending a physical.
A formal announcement of the
deal is expected today.
Pence is batting .282 with a
career-high 26 home runs and 94
RBIs. He received the Willie Mac
Award on Friday night, given to
the most inspirational member of
the Giants.

to do, we need to come in and win
a game tomorrow,"Nathan said.
"We don't want to have to rely on
somebody to help us all the time."
They did get some help Saturday
when Tampa Bay lost at Toronto,
dropping the Rays (90-71) into a tie
with the Rangers for the AL's second
wild-card spot.

Mariners 7, Athletics 5:
In Seattle, Brad Miller hit a pair of
home runs, including his first grand
slam, and the Mariners beat Oakland
in a game that decided division-series
matchups in the American League.
Boston clinched home-field advan-
tage throughout the postseason with
Oakland's loss. The AL West champion
A's will play their playoff opener at
home next Friday against AL Central
champion Detroit, and AL East winner
Boston will start at Fenway Park
against the team emerging from the
wild-card playoff.

Yankees 2, Astros 1: In
Houston, Andy Pettitte completed
his career in fitting fashion. The
41-year-old left-hander pitched a
five-hitter for his first complete game
in seven years to lead New York over
his hometown Houston. Two days
after Mariano Rivera made his finale
in front of an emotional crowd at
Yankee Stadium, Pettitte followed his
teammate into retirement and left
only Derek Jeter left from the Core
Four who earned five World Series
rings with the Yankees since 1996.

Orioles 6, Red Sox 5: In
Baltimore, Steve Pearce drove in the
go-ahead runs with a double in the
eighth inning Satut and the Orioles
rallied past Boston, which clinched
home-field advantage throughout the
postseason earlier in the day.

White Sox 6, Royals 5:
In Chicago, Adam Dunn and Conor
Gillaspie each hit two-run homers.
After the game, the Chicago White
Sox announced they had fired hitting
coach Jeff Manto.

Pirates 8, Reds 3: In
Cincinnati, the postseason will start
at PNC Park. Neil Walker hit two of
Pittsburgh's six homers its biggest
power surge in six years and
the Pirates clinched home-field
advantage for the NL's wild card
playoff game. Pittsburgh will host the
Reds on Tuesday night in the Pirates'
first playoff appearance in 21 years.
They went 50-31 at PNC Park, the


third-best home record in the NL.

Cardinals 6, Cubs 2: In
St. Louis, Adam Wainwright earned
his 19th victory in a tuneup for the
NL division series opener and the
Cardinals showed no letup after
clinching the NL Central. Matt Holliday
homered for the second day in a row
and Yadier Molina drove in two runs
for St. Louis.

Brewers 4, Mets 2, 10
innings: In New York, Carlos
Gomez homered and had four hits,
including a tiebreaking single in the
10th inning that sent Milwaukee over
the Mets.

Nationals 2,
Diamondbacks 0: In Phoenix,
Dan Haren brought his disappointing
season with Washington to a strong
conclusion, blanking the Arizona
Diamondbacks on four hits through
seven innings in the Nationals'2-0
victory. Haren (10-14) struck out five
and walked one.

Padres 9, Giants 3:
In San Francisco, Jesus Guzman,
Chris Denorfia and Jedd Gyorko
each homered and drove in two
runs. Hunter Pence, who reached a
tentative agreement on a $90 million,
five-year contract before the game, hit
a two-run homer for the Giants. San
Francisco had won three in a row.

Marlins 2, Tigers 1, 10
innings: In Miami, Anibal Sanchez
all but clinched the AL ERA title by
pitching five scoreless innings for
Detroit, but Joaquin Benoit blew a
save. Sanchez lowered his ERA from
2.64 to 2.57 to increase a slim lead.
Oakland's Bartolo Colon ranks second
at 2.65 followed by Seattle's Hisashi
Iwakuma at 2.66, and both have
pitched their final game of the regular
season.

Around the league:
Three people with knowledge of
the situation told The Associated
Press that Terry Collins is close to an
agreement to stay on as the Mets'
manager. Collins'current contract
expires after this season, his third in
charge of the Mets.
The team is expected to announce
an extension for Collins at a news
conference Monday, the day after the
season ends. He is nearing a two-year
contract, one of the people said,
perhaps with a team option for 2016....
Alex Rodriguez said dealing with
his 211 -game suspension stemming
from baseball's Biogenesis drug
investigation has been a "big burden"
and adds he's ready to face it"head
on"when the arbitration hearing on
his grievance begins Monday.
He said he's excited to get the
hearing started before arbitrator
Fredric Horowitz and he plans to
attend every day. Horowitz has set
aside all five business days next week
for sessions. ...
Two days after his emotional
Yankee Stadium farewell, Mariano
Rivera said he won't pitch this
weekend during New York's season-
ending series at Houston and that his
mound days are over. "I'm done, guys,"
Rivera told reporters. "I'm done."


RAYS

FROM PAGE 1
Minnesota.
There's still a chance of
a two- or three-way tie,
which would necessitate
one or more tiebreaker
games. Maddon isn't
fretting over numerous
possible outcomes.
"The only scenario is
whatever helps us win
tomorrow," Maddon said.
"That's the only scenario
that matters. And then,
you just react to every-
thing else."
Adam Lind had two
hits and three RBIs, and
Brett Lawrie reached base
four times as the Blue
Jays continued to make
life tough for the Rays,
who start left-hander
Matt Moore (16-4) on
Sunday against Blue Jays
rookie right-hander Todd
Redmond (4-2).
"I'm totally confident
in our guys," Maddon
said. "I really believe that
you're going to see the
best side of Matt Moore
tomorrow."
Moore is 2-0 with a 2.45
ERA in two starts against
Toronto this season and
has lost just once to the
Blue Jays in six career
meetings.
"It's a big game, big
opportunity," Moore said.
"I'm looking to throw up
zeros any way I can."
Redmond was born in
St. Petersburg, where his
parents once were Rays
season ticket holders.
"We have a chance
to knock them out,"
Redmond said. "That's
baseball. Hopefully we
can pull it off."
Maddon insisted his
bullpen is in good shape
even after Saturday's
starter, Chris Archer, last-
ed 2 13 inninings. The right-
hander, who allowed one
run and five hits, is 1-2
with a 4.78 ERA in his last
six starts.
Happ (5-7) pitched
a season-high 7 1-3
innings, allowing one run
and five hits to win for
the first time since Sept. 7
at Minnesota.
"It feels really good,"
Happ said. "I've been
working and battling and
feeling like I was close.
I feel like finally the last
several starts I've kind of
been putting it together.
It feels good to end on a
good note."
NOTES: The Rays lost
consecutive games for the first time
since Sept. 10-11 against Boston....
Lawrie went 2 for 3 and walked twice.
... Lind returned to the lineup at DH
after missing two games with a sore
back. He was replaced by pinch-hitter
Munenori Kawasaki in the fifth....
Rays SS Yunel Escobar (left ankle)
started for the first time since Tuesday.

Blue Jays 7, Rays 2
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Zobrist2b-cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .277
S.Rodriguezl If 3 0 0 0 1 0 .249
W.Myersrf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .293
Longoria3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .266
D.Youngdh 4 0 0 1 0 0 .250
Y.Escobarss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255
Loneylb 3 0 1 0 0 0 301
J.Molinac 2 0 0 0 0 1 237
b-DeJenningsph 1 0 0 0 0 0 252
Lobatonc 0 0 0 0 0 0 .249
Fuldcf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .194
c-T.Beckhamph-2bl 0 1 0 0 0 .429
Totals 32 2 6 2 1 5
Toronto AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Reyesss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .294
Lawrie3b 3 0 2 0 2 0 .251
Linddh 3 0 2 3 0 1 .287
a-Kawasakiph-dh 2 0 0 0 0 2 .230
Sierrarf 4 0 1 0 0 3 288
Gosecf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .252
Goins2b 4 1 1 2 0 2 .263
Langerhanslb 3 2 2 0 1 0 286
Tholec 4 0 0 0 0 3 .176
Pillar If 4 2 2 2 0 2 .204
Totals 36 712 7 315
Tampa Bay 100 0001- 2 60
Toronto 001 240 OOx- 7120
b-grounded out for J.Molina in the 8th.
c-singled for Fuld in the 8th. LOB-Tampa
Bay 4, Toronto 8.2B-Zobrist (36), W.Myers
(21), Loney (33). HR-Goins (2), offJ.Wright;
Pillar (3), off B.Gomes. RBIs-WMyers (52),
D.Young (5), Lind 3 (67), Goins 2 (8), Pillar
2 (13). SB-Gose (4), Langerhans (1). Run-
ners left in scoring position-Tampa Bay
2 (Fuld, Longoria);Toronto 4 (Gose, Goins 2,
Sierra). RISP-Tampa Bay 1 for 8; Toronto 4
for 11. Runners moved up-S.Rodriguez,
Longoria, D.Young. GIDP-Longoria. DP-
Toronto 1 (Reyes, Goins, Langerhans).


Tampa Bay IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Archer 2 5 1 1 1 4 64 3.22
AI.TorresL,4-2 1 2 2 2 0 2 23 1.71
J.Wright % 43 3 1 2 31 3.09
B.Gomes % 1 1 1 1 2 25 6.52
C.Ramos 3 0 0 0 0 5 31 4.14
Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
HappW,5-7 7% 5 1 1 1 41134.56
Loup % 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.47
McGowan 1 1 1 1 0 1 19 2.45
Inherited runners-scored-AI.Torres 2-0,
J.Wright 2-2, B.Gomes 1-1, Loup 1-0.WP-
Al.Torres. PB-Thole. Umpires-Home,
Chad Fairchild; First, Paul Schrieber; Second,
Jeff Kellogg; Third, Eric Cooper. T-3:18.
A-33,232 (49,282).


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7






www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


I MLB STANDINGS


x-Boston
RAYS
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto


x-Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


x-Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


AMERICAN
East Di
GB W
2 -
7
13
13
23
Central D
GB W
3 -
5 2
3 8
27
30
West Di
GB W
-
5
17
24
44

NATIONAL
East Di


W L P t GB W
x-Atlanta 95 66 .590 -
Washington 86 75 .534 9
New York 73 88 .453 22
Philadelphia 73 88 .453 22
MARLINS 61 100 .379 34
Central
W L Pct GB W
x-St. Louis 96 65 .596 -
y-Pittsburgh 93 68 .578 3
y-Cincinnati 90 71 .559 6
Milwaukee 74 87 .460 22
Chicago 66 95 .410 30
West I
W L Pet GB W
x-Los Angeles 92 68 .575 -
Arizona 80 81 .497 12/2
San Diego 76 85 .472 16/2
San Francisco 75 86 .466 17/2
Colorado 72 88 .450 20
x-clinched division
y-clinched wild card
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's results
Boston 12, Baltimore 3
Toronto 6, RAYS 3
MARLINS 3, Detroit 2
Texas 5, L.A. Angels 3
Cleveland 12, Minnesota 6
Kansas City 6, ChicagoWhite Sox 1
N.Y.Yankees 3, Houston 2
Oakland 8, Seattle 2
Saturday's results
Texas 7, L.A. Angels 4
Cleveland 5, Minnesota 1
Toronto 7, RAYS 2
Seattle 7, Oakland 5
Baltimore 6, Boston 5
MARLINS 2, Detroit 1,10 innings
Chicago White Sox 6, Kansas City 5
N.Y.Yankees 2, Houston 1
Today's games
RAYS (M.Moore 16-4) at Toronto (Red-
mond 4-2), 1:07 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 13-12) at MARLINS
(H.Alvarez4-6), 1:10 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 10-13) at Baltimore (Tillman
16-7),1:35 p.m.
Cleveland (UJimenez 12-9) at Minnesota
(Diamond 6-12), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 8-4) at Chicago White
Sox (Quintana 9-6), 2:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Huff 3-1) at Houston (Bedard
4-12),2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Vargas 9-7) at Texas (Darvish
13-9), 3:05 p.m.
Oakland (Gray 4-3) at Seattle (E.Ramirez
5-2),4:10 p.m.
End of Regular Season


al D
W(





Di
W(


I MLB SCOREBOARD


Wild-card

scenarios
IN CASE OF ATIE
* In a two-way tie between the Rangers
and Rays, the tiebreaker will be played at
8:07 p.m. on Monday in Texas.The Rangers
edged Tampa Bay, 4-3, in the season series.
* In a three-way tie, the first tiebreaker
would be played between the Indians and
Rays in Tampa Bay at 4:07 p.m. on Monday,
with the winner earning a Wild Card berth.
* The loser would play the Rangers at 4:07
p.m. on Tuesday, with the location depen-
dent on which team won the season series.


Playoff schedule
WILDCARD
Both games televised by TBS
National League
Tuesday's game: Cincinnati (Cueto 5-2) at
Pittsburgh (Liriano 16-8),TBA
American League:
Wednesday's game: TBD
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5; x-if necessary)
American League
Series A
Friday's game: wild card at Boston
Saturday's game: wild card at Boston
Oct. 7: Boston at wild card
x-Oct. 8: Boston at wild card
x-Oct. 10: wild card at Boston
Series B
Friday's game: Detroit at Oakland
Saturday's game: Detroit at Oakland
Oct. 7: Oakland at Detroit
x-Oct. 8: Oakland at Detroit
x-Oct. 10: Detroit at Oakland

National League
Series A
Thursday's game: wild card at best divi-
sion winner
Friday's game: wild card at best division
winner
Sunday's game: best division winner at
wild card
x-Oct. 7: best division winner at wild card
x-Oct. 9: wild card at best division winner
Series B
Thursday's game: Los Angeles at 2nd-
best division winner
Friday's game: Los Angeles at 2nd-best
division winner
Sunday's game: 2nd-best division winner
at Los Angeles
x-Oct. 7:2nd-best division winner at Los
Angeles
x-Oct. 9: Los Angeles at 2nd-best division
winner
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
American League
All games televised by Fox
Oct. 12: Game 1, TBD
Oct. 13: Game 2,TBD
Oct. 15: Game 3,TBD
Oct. 16: Game 4,TBD
x-Oct. 17: Game 5,TBD
x-Oct. 19: Game 6,TBD
x-Oct. 20: Game 7,TBD
National League
All games televised byTBS
Oct. 11: Game 1,TBD
Oct. 12: Game 2,TBD
Oct. 14: Game 3,TBD
Oct. 15: Game 4,TBD
x-Oct. 16: Game 5,TBD
x-Oct. 18: Game 6,TBD
x-Oct. 19: Game 7,TBD
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7)
All games televised by Fox
Oct. 23: at American League
Oct. 24: at American League
Oct. 26: at National League
Oct. 27: at National League
x-Oct. 28: at National League
x-Oct. 30: at American League
x-Oct. 31: at American League


I MLB SCOREBOARD


SLEAGUE Indians 5, Twins 1
vision Cleveland AB R H BI BBSO Avg. Oal
CGB L10 Str Home Away Bourn cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .262 Cris
5-5 L-1 53-28 44-36 Swisherrf-lb 3 0 0 0 1 2 .244 Dot
7-3 L-2 51-30 39-41 Kipnis2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .282 Lov
6 3-7 W-1 45-35 39-42 C.Santanalb 4 1 1 2 0 1 .269 Mo
6 5-5 W-2 46-35 38-42 M.Carsonrf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .636 Call
16 5-5 W-2 40-40 34-47 Brantleylf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Rec
Division As.Cabrerass 4 0 0 0 0 2 .242 S.Sr
CGB L10 Str Home Away Giambidh 2 0 0 0 0 1 .183 a-C
5-5 L-2 51-30 42-38 a-Chisenhallph-dh 0 0 0 1 0 .225 Voc
9-1 W-9 51-30 40-40 b-Raburnph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .272 b-D
5 6-4 L-1 44-37 41-39 Y.Gomesc 4 1 1 0 0 0 .293 d-B
24 1-9 L-5 32-48 34-47 Aviles3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .255 K.Si
27 3-7 W-1 37-43 26-55 Totals 34 5 7 5 2 9 Sog
division Minnesota AB R H BI BBSO Avg. c-Fr
CGB L10 Str Home Away Presleycf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282 J.W
6-4 L-1 52-29 43-37 Dozier2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .243 Tot
8-2 W-6 45-35 45-36 Plouffe3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .256 Sea
12 5-5 L-3 39-42 39-41 Doumitdh 4 1 1 0 0 2 .249 B.M
19 5-5 W-1 36-44 35-46 :Willinghamlf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .208 A.A
39 0-10 L-14 24-56 27-54 Colabellolb 4 0 1 0 0 2 .195 Sea
Mastroianni rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .185 K.M
LLEAGUE c-Parmeleeph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Ibai
vision Fryerc 1 0 1 1 2 0 .400 M.S
CGB L10 Str Home Away Florimonss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Sm,
6-4 L-1 55-25 40-41 Totals 31 1 6 1 313 Ack
4 5-5 W-2 47-34 39-41 Cleveland 000230000- 5 70 Zur
17 5-5 L-3 32-48 41-40 Minnesota 000100000- 1 60 Frar
17 2-8 W-1 43-38 30-50 c-fliedoutforMastroianniinthe9th.LOB- Tot
29 6-4 W-3 35-45 26-55 Cleveland 4, Minnesota 6. 3B-Bourn (6). Oal
Division HR-C.Santana (20), off De Vries. RBIs- Sea
CGB L10 Str Home Away Bourn 2 (50), Kipnis (84), C.Santana 2 (73), a-st
8-2 W-5 53-27 43-38 Fryer (3). Runners left in scoring posi- for'
6-4 W-2 50-31 43-37 tion-Cleveland 1 (C.Santana); Minnesota er's
5-5 L-4 49-30 41-41 2(Plouffe, Florimon).RISP-Cleveland2for ed
16 6-4 W-4 37-44 37-43 3; Minnesota 1 for 7. GIDP-Presley. DP- land
24 3-7 L-2 31-50 35-45 Cleveland 1 (As.Cabrera,C.Santana). (18'
division Cleveland IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA off
CGB L10 Str Home Away KazmirW,10-9 6 6 1 1 2 111044.04 (20'
6-4 W-1 47-32 45-36 Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 1 0 11 0.92 2. R
10 3-7 L-4 44-36 36-45 Allen 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.43 (57)
14 5-5 W-1 45-36 31-49 J.Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 82.29 (21
15 5-5 L-1 41-40 34-46 Minnesota IP HR ER BBSO NP ERA in
17/2 4-6 L-2 45-36 27-52 DeVries L,0-2 5 6 5 5 1 791 10.80 Voc
Swarzak 1% 1 0 0 1 1 302.91 2 fc
Thielbar 1% 0 0 0 0 0 21 1.76 DP
NATIONAL LEAGUE Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.30 Oal
Friday's results Umpires-Home, Vanover; First, Gibson; J.Pa
MARLINS 3, Detroit 2 Second, Gorman;Third, Randazzo.T-2:53. Blev
Milwaukee 4, N.Y. Mets 2 A-30,452 (39,021). Bre
Pittsburgh 4, Cincinnati 1 Rangers 7, Angels 4 Ote
Atlanta 1, Philadelphia 0 LosAngeles AB R H BIBBSO Avg. J.C
St. Louis7,ChicagoCubs0 Aybarss 5 3 3 0 0 0 .271 Sea
Washington 8, Arizona 4 Cowgill If 4 0 1 1 0 1 .233 Ma
L.A.Dodgersll,Colorado0 Field2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Fur
San Francisco 7, San Diego 3 c-J.Hamilton ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Ruf
Saturday's results Troutcf 1 0 0 2 21 .323 Lue
Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 3 H.Kendrickdh 5 0 1 1 0 2 .300 Me
San Diego 9, San Francisco 3 Trumbolb 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Far
Milwaukee4, N.Y.Mets2,10innings Calhounrf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281 WP
St. Louis6,ChicagoCubs2 lannettac 2 0 0 0 1 0 .225 Firs
MARLINS 2, Detroit 1,10 innings a-Shuckph-lf I 0 0 0 0 0 .291 delh
Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 4 G.Green2b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .250
Washington 2, Arizona 0 b-Congerph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .251
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, late An.Romine3b 3 1 i 0 1 1 .257 Ne
Today'sgames Totals 34 4 9 4 410 Nra
Detroit (Verlander 13-12) at MARLINS Texas AB R H BIBBSO Avg. Nur
(H.Alvarez4-6),1:10p.m. Kinsler2b 5 2 1 0 0 0 .276 Car
Milwaukee (Estrada 7-4) at N.Y. Mets (Niese Andrusss 4 1 1 0 0 0 272 A.S
8-8), 1:10p.m. Riosrf 3 1 1 1 0 1 278 Ov
Pittsburgh (Cumpton 1-1) at Cincinnati A.Beltre3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 315 a-
(G.Reynolds 1-2),:10p.m. Pierzynskic 4 1 1 1 0 1 .273 Z.A
Philadelphia (Miner 0-1) at Atlanta (Teheran Morelandlb 3 0 1 0 1 0 .233 I.Su
13-8), 1:35 p.m. Gentryf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .275 Rya
Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 8-12) at St. Louis Dav.Murphydh 3 1 0 1 0 .220 C.Si
(WestbrookD7-8),2:1i1p0m.. Tot
(Westbrook7-8),2:15p.m. L.Martincf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .263 Tot
San Diego (T.Ross 3-8) at San Francisco Totals 32 7 10 3 2 4 Vil
(Moscoso 2-2),4:05 p.m. LosAngeles 101020000- 4 95 Allt
Colorado (Undecided) atL.A. Dodgers (Ryu Texas 140020 00x-7100
14-7),4:10 p.m. M.DC
Washington (Roark 7-1) at Arizona (Miley a-flied out forlannettainthe8th.b-ground- Car
10-10),4:10 p.m. ed out for G.Green in the 8th. c-doubled for 1-C
End of Regular Season Field in the 9th. E-Aybar (15), An.Romine J.D.
(4), Cowgill (1), Richards (2), Calhoun (8). B.La
LOB-Los Angeles 9, Texas 7. 2B-Aybar Pare
D3 (33),J.Hamilton (32), H.Kendrick (21), Rios Pag
I (31), Gentry (12). RBIs-Cowgill (8), Trout 2 B.Br
(96), H.Kendrick (54), Rios (80), Pierzynski (70), Tot
Gentry (20). SB-Gentry (22), L.Martin (36). Ne
Pirates 8, Reds 3 S-Andrus, L.Martin 2. SF-Trout 2, Rios. Hoe
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BBSO Avg. Runners left in scoring position-Los An- -s
S.MartelIf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .280 geles 4 (An.Romine, Trumbo, Aybar, H.Ken- a
N.Walker2b 5 2 2 2 0 0 .251 drick);TexasS5(Moreland,Andrus2,L.Martin Nex
McCutchencf 5 1 2 1 0 0 317 2).RISP-LosAngeles2for11;Texas4for15. i
Morneaulb 4 1 1 0 1 0 .260 LosAngeles IP H RER BBSO NP ERA (82
Byrd rf 4 2 3 2 0 0 291 RichardsL,7-8 4 6 6 3 1 2 764.16 (82
PAlvarez3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .233 Boshers 0 2 1 1 0 0 44.70 ZA
R.Martinc 4 0 1 0 0 1 .226 Coello % 1 0 00 1 14 371 S
Barmesss 3 0 0 1 0 3 .211 Hanson 3 1 0 0 1 1 41 542 Rui
S0 0 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Mortonp 2 0 0 0 0 0 .139 D.Holland 4% 8 4 4 0 4 793.42 gue
Mazzarop 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 SoriaW, 1-0 1b 0 0 0 2 2 383.86 B.Br
a-Lamboph I 1 1 1 00 .214 R.RossH,i15 1 00 0 1 2 153.08 Ov
Ju.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 ScheppersH,26 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 1.93 Ne
Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Nathan S,43-46 1 1 0 0 1 2 24 1.41 Pet
d-GJones ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Boshers pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Ho
e-G.Sanchezph 1 0 0 0 0 0 255 :WP-Richards 2. Umpires-Home, Scott
nhez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255: r rU dBa ;T Lo
Melanconp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Barry; First, Marquez; Second, Barrett;Third, RCL
Morris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 DiMuro.T-3:18.A-38,635 (48,114). K.C
Totals 38 8 13 8 1 6 Padres9, Giants 3 Zei
Cincinnati AB R H BIBBSO Avg. San Diego AB R H BIBBSO Avg. Fiel
Choocf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .286 Denorfiarf 5 2 2 2 0 1 .276 Umn
Ludwicklf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .244 Forsythess 4 0 0 0 0 2 .214 Sec
H.Rodriguez2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Fuentescf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .152 A-
Vottolb 2 1 1 0 3 1 .306 Gyorko2b 5 1 1 2 0 1 .249
B.Phillips2b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .261 Headley3b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .251
1-C.lzturispr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .198 Medicalb 4 1 3 1 1 0 .292 Bos
c-Heiseyph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .234 J.Guzmanlf 5 1 3 2 0 1 .228 Vict
Brucerf 4 0 1 2 1 2 262 Amaristacf-ss 5 1 1 0 0 2 .238 Dre
Frazier3b 3 0 0 0 0 234 C.Robinsonc 5 0 1 0 0 1 .167 Ped
Cozartss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .253 Stultsp 3 0 1 1 0 1 .164 NaF
Gregersonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 2-B
Haniganc 4 0 0 0 0 0 .199 c-Venableph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .267 J.G<
Arroyop 2 0 0 0 0 1 .068 1-Alonsopr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .281 Nav
S.Marshallp 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vincent p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- B.S
Ondrusekp 0 0 0 0 0 0 Totals 42 916 9 2 9 a-C
b-D.Robinsonph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .251 San Francisco AB R H BIBBSO Avg. D.R
Dukep 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Pagancf 5 1 3 0 0 0 .283 Mic
Hooverp 0 0 0 0 00 --- J.Perezlf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .267 Tot
M.Parrap 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 e-Beltph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .287 Bal
f-Paulph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Pencerf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .282 B.Ro
LeCurep 0 0 0 0 0 0 Sandoval3b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .276 Har
Totals 32 3 5 3 8 9 H.Sanchezc 4 0 0 0 0 1 250 C.D
Pittsburgh 002131010-8130 Abreu2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .263 AJic
Cincinnati 003000000- 3 51 Adrianzass 3 0 0 0 1 1 .188 i-V
a-homeredforMazzarointhe6th.b-walked Petitp 1 0 0 0 0 0 .063 Val
forOndrusekinthe6th.c-groundedoutfor Kontosp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 C.Si
C.Izturis in the 6th. d-was announced for a-F.Pegueroph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .179 Ma
Watson in the 8th. e-groundedinto a dou- Dunningp 0 0 0 0 0 0 Pea
bleplayforGJonesinthe 8th.f-struckout Mijaresp 0 0 0 0 0 0 Pric
forM.Parrainthe8th.1-ranforB.Phillipsin Hembreep 0 0 0 0 0 0 b-S
the 5th. E-Frazier (10). LOB-Pittsburgh b-B.Crawfordph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .249 c-FI
5, Cincinnati 11. 2B-Bruce (43). HR-N. Machip 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Tot
Walker2(16),offArroyo2;McCutchen(21), Kickhamp 0 0 0 0 0 0 67 Bo
off Arroyo; RAIvarez (36), off Arroyo; Byrd Totalsncoph 36 3 9 3 2 6 -267 B
(24), off Arroyo; Lambo (1), off Ondrusek. San Diego 100400 004- 9161 anr
RBIs-NWalker 2 (53), McCutchen (84), San Francisco 102000000--3 91 out
Byrd 2 (88), P.Alvarez (100), Barmes (23), a flied out for Kontos in the 4th. b-ground- ers
Lambo (2), B.Phillips (103), Bruce 2 (109). ed out for Hembree in the 7th. c-doubled E-
SF-Barmes. Runners left in scoring po- for Gregerson in the 9th. d-struck out for 7.2
sition-Pittsburgh 3 (Barmes, G.Sanchez, Kickham in the9th. e-struckout for J.Perez HR
Morneau); Cincinnati 7 (Frazier 2, Cozart, in the 9th.1-ran forVenable in the 9th. E- dro
Hanigan 2, Heisey, Bruce). RISP-Pitts- Amarista(5),Adrianza(1).LOB-SanDiego B.R
burgh 1 for 6; Cincinnati 2 for 12. Runners 8, San Francisco 8. 2B-Headley (35),Ven- Pea
moved up-R.Martin, Ludwick. GIDP- able (22), Pagan (16), Sandoval (27), Pill (4). in s
Morneau, G.Sanchez DP-Cincinnati 2 HR-Denorfia (10),off Petit; J.Guzman (9), Mic
(Frazier, H.Rodriguez,Votto),(FrazierCozart, off Petit; Gyorko (22), off Kickham; Pence die,
Votto). (27), off Stults. RBIs-Denorfia 2 (47), Fuen- Bos
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA tes (1), Gyorko 2 (59), Medica (9), J.Guzman Ma
Morton 4% 5 3 3 5 3 92 3.26 2 (35), Stults (4), Pence 2 (96), Sandoval Bos
(78). SB-Denorfia (11). Runners left in Les
MazzaroW,8-2 % 00 0 0 1 72.81 scoring position-San Diego 4 (Denorfia, Thc
Ju.Wilson 1 0 0 0 2 1 262.08 Amarista, C.Robinson 2); San Francisco 3 Taz
Watson 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.39 (F.Peguero, Belt 2).RISP-San Diego 6 for F.M
Melancon 1 00 0 0 1 16 1.39 11;SanFrancisco2for10.GIDP-Amarista. Wo


Morris 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 3.46 DP-San Francisco 1 (Adrianza, Abreu, Pill). Bal
Cincinnati IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA San Diego IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA W.C
ArroyoL, 14-124% 86 6 1 2 743.79 StultsW,11-13 7 7 3 3 0 3 973.93 Stin
S.Marshall 4 00 0 0 1 31.74 GregersonH,241 00 0 1 1 122.76 Mae
Ondrusek 1 1 1 1 0 3 154.09 Vincent 1 2 0 0 1 2 23 2.15 Gau
Duke 1 00 0 0 0 156.23 San Francisco IP H RER BBSO NP ERA JiJo
Hoover 3 1 1 0 0 92.86 PetitL,4-1 3% 75 5 0 2 69 3.56 Taz
Parra 00 0 0 0 43.33 Kontos 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 4.56 her
LeCure i i 0 0 0 0 72.66 Dunning 1 1 0 0 2 0 272.55 Wo
LeCure 1 1 0 0 0 0 172.66 Mijares 1 00 0 0 2 10 4.22 Gau
Inherited runners-scored-Mazzaro Hembree 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Ho
3-0, M.Parra 2-0. HBP-by Morton (Choo). Machi 1 2 0 0 0 1 14 2.38 ond
WP-Morton. Umpires-Home, Tim Tim- Kickham 1 6 4 4 0 12910.16 son
mons; First, MikeWinters; Second, Laz Diaz; WP-Kickham. Umpires-Home, West;
Third, Mark Wegner. T-3:24. A-40,707 First, Wolcott; Second, Fletcher; Third,
(42,319). Drake. T-3:01. A-41,201 (41,915).


land
p cf
naldsc
ivrie ss
ssib
aspo
Dick
smith I
.Youn
gtc
D.Norr
arton
uzuki
gard2
reima
eeks2
als
little
Miller s
lmon
ger3
morale
nezlf
aund
oak 1
:leycf
ninoc
nklin
als
land
little


Mariners 7, Athletics 5
I AB R H BIBBS
3 0 0 1 1
on3b 3 1 0 0 2
s 5 1 2 0 0
5 1 1 2 0
dh 5 1 2 2 0
rf 5 0 2 0 0
f 1 0 0 0 1
igph-lf 2 0 1 0 0
21 1 0 0
isph-c 0 0 0 0 1
ph 1 0 0 0 0
c 0 0 0 0 0
2b 2 0 1 0 0
nph 1 0 0 0 0
2b 1 0 0 0 0
36 510 5 51
AB R H BIBBS
s 4 2 2 5 0
terf 4 0 0 0 0
b 3 0 0 0 1
-sdh 4 0 0 0 0
3 1 0 0 1
erslf 0 0 0 0 0
b 3 1 1 2 0
2 1 1 0 1
3 1 1 0 0
2b 3 1 2 0 0
29 7 7 7 3


SO
0
2
2
1
2
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
11
SO
0
3
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
5


001001300- 5100
021040 00x- 7 70


truckoutfor S.Smith in the 6th.b-walked
Vogt in the 6th. c-grounded into a field-
choice for Sogard in the 6th.d-ground-
out for D.Norris in the 8th. LOB-Oak-
d 10, Seattle 1.2B-Lowrie (45),C.Young
),Vogt (6), Franklin (20). HR-Moss (30),
Ruffin; Callaspo (10), off Ruffin; Smoak
), off J.Parker; B.Miller 2 (8), off J.Parker
:Bls-Crisp (66), Moss 2 (86), Callaspo 2
), B.Miller 5 (36), Smoak2 (50). SB-Crisp
), C.Young (10). SF-Crisp. Runners left
scoring position-Oakland 6 (Moss,
gt, Freiman 2, Lowrie 2). RISP-Oakland
or 10; Seattle 2 for 2. GIDP-K.Morales.
-Oakland 1 (J.Weeks, Lowrie, Moss).
land IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
irkerL,12-8 4% 7 7 7 1 4 763.97
vins % 000 0 0 0 63.15
.Anderson 1 0 0 0 1 0 17 6.04
-ro 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.40
havez 1 00 0 1 0 9 3.99
little IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
urerW,5-8 5% 6 2 2 1 5103 6.30
bush % 1 0 0 1 1 15 3.74
fin % 2 3 3 1 1 25 8.38
-tgeH, 1 % 0 0 0 0 0 44.86
dinaH,19 1 1 0 0 2 2 252.91
quhrS, 16-20 1 00 0 0 2 134.20
--Maurer. Umpires-Home, Porter;
t, Hudson; Second, Layne; Third, Wen-
stedt.T-2:58. A-17,751 (47,476).


Yankees 2, Astros 1
wYork AB R H BIB
ndersoncf 4 0 0 0
nez3b 4 1 1 0
io2b 4 0 2 1
orianolf 2 0 1 0
irbaylb 3 0 0 0
Iar.Rynldsph-lbl 0 0 0
lmonterf 4 0 0 0
zukidh 4 0 2 0
nss 4 0 0 0
tewartc 4 1 2 0
als 34 2 8 1
uston AB R H BI B
arss 3 0 0 0
uve2b 4 1 2 0
)ominguez3b 4 0 0 0
terlb 4 0 1 1
rowe pr 0 0 0 0
Martinezlf 4 0 1 0
airddh 3 0 0 0
edesrf 3 0 0 0
inozzic 2 0 1 0
arnescf 3 0 0 0
als 30 1 5 1
wYork 00000200
uston 00010000


BSO Avg.
1 2 .227
0 1 .256
0 0 .314
2 1 .256
0 0 .240
0 1 .221
0 0 .230
0 1 .262
0 1 .195
0 0 .211
3 7
BSO Avg.
1 1 .245
0 0 .285
0 1 .242
0 0 .225
0 0 .225
0 1 .251
0 0 .179
0 0 .192
1 1 .143
0 1 .240
2 5
'0- 2 80
10- 1 51


truckoutforOverbayin the 8th. 1-ran for
ter in the 9th. E-Pagnozzi (1). LOB-
v York 8, Houston 4. 2B-Cano (41),
Martinez (17). RBIs-Cano (107), Carter
). CS-Granderson (2). Runners left
scoring position-New York 3 (Ryan,
Monte 2); Houston 2 (Paredes, Carter).
P-New York 1 for 6; Houston 0 for 5.
winners moved up-Altuve, M.Domin-
ez, Carter. GIDP-M.Dominguez,
arnes. DP-New York 2 (Ryan, Cano,
irbay), (Pettitte, Cano, Overbay).
wYork IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
titteW, 11-11 9 5 1 1 2 5115 3.74
uston IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
mensL,4-7 5 5 2 1 1 4 695.40
% 00 0 1 0 15 4.19
ruz % 1 0 0 0 1 8 3.43
hapman % 1 0 0 1 1 16 1.77
d % 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.67
ds 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 5.11
ipires-Home, Carapazza; First, Miller;
ond,Cederstrom;Third,Danley.T-2:49.
-37,199 (42,060).

Orioles 6, Red Sox 5


ston AB R H
:orinocf 5 0 0
wss 5 2 2
lroia2b 5 1 3
polidh 4 0 1
errypr 0 0 0
omeslf 5 1 2
'arf 4 1 4
nyder b 3 0 0
arpph-lb 1 0 0
ossc 4 0 2
idlebrooks3b 4 0 0
als 40 514
timore AB R H
oberts2b 5 1 1
dyss 4 1 2
avisib 3 0 0
onescf 4 1 1
etersc 3 0 2
IcLouthpr-lIf 0 1 0
encia3b 4 1 2
nyderc 0 0 0
rkakisrf 4 1 2
rcedh 4 0 2
iielf 3 0 0
choopph 0 0 0
ahertyph-3b 1 0 0
als 35 612
ston 0001
timore 0110:


BI BBSO Avg.
0 0 1 .294
0 0 0 .253
1 0 0 .301
0 1 1 .257
0 0 0 .750
1 0 1 .248
0 0 0 .303
0 0 2 .180
0 0 1 .294
2 0 2 .216
0 0 1 .230
4 1 9
BI BBSO Avg.
1 0 0 .249
0 0 0 .263
0 1 1 .286
0 0 2 .285
1 1 0 .235
0 0 0 .258
1 0 1 .306
0 0 0 .100
0 0 1 .271
3 0 0 .265
0 0 2 .200
0 0 0 .200
0 0 1 .218

11 200- 5140
2002x- 6121


truck out for B.Snyder in the 7th. b-was
bounced for Pridie in the 8th. c-struck
for Schoop in the 8th. 1-ran for Wiet-
in the 8th. 2-ran for Napoli in the 9th.
-Pridie (2). LOB-Boston 9, Baltimore
2B-Drew (29), D.Ross (5), Pearce 2 (7).
-B.Roberts (8), off Lester. RBIs-Pe-
ia (84), J.Gomes (52), D.Ross 2 (10),
oberts (39), Wieters (79), Valencia (23),
rce 3 (13). SB-Berry (2). Runners left
coring position-Boston 5 (J.Gomes 3,
Idlebrooks, Victorino); Baltimore 4 (Pri-
Valencia, Markakis, B.Roberts). RISP-
ston 4 for 13; Baltimore 3 for 9. GIDP-
rkakis. DP-Boston 1 (Drew, B.Snyder).
ston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
ter 5 94 4 2 4 97 3.75
)rnton 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.56
awaL,5-4 1 22 2 0 1 183.16
oralesBS,1 -11 1 0 0 0 1 104.62
rkman % 00 0 0 1 10 4.97
timore IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
:hen 5% 9 3 3 1 5 96 4.07
isonBS,1-1 1 3 2 1 0 1 203.18
tusz % 1 0 0 0 0 43.53
ismanW,3-51 0 0 0 0 2 135.66
)hnsnS,49-581 1 0 0 0 1 182.86
awa pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. In-
*ited runners-scored-F.Morales 2-2,
rkman 1-0, Stinson 1-0, Matusz 2-1,
isman 1-0. PB-D.Ross. Umpires-
me, Bill Welke; First, Brian O'Nora; Sec-
d, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Adrian John-
.T-3:21.A-36,556(45,971).


d


Brantlyc 3 0 0 0 1 0 .211
Eovaldip 1 0 0 0 0 1 .065
a-Ruggianoph-cf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .221
Totals 31 2 5 2 711
Detroit 000100000 0- 1 90
Miami 000000001 1- 2 50
One out when winning run scored, a-flied
out for Eovaldi in the 6th. b-flied out for M.
Dunn in the 8th.c-flied out for Smyly in the
9th.d-sacrificedforCishekin the 10th. 1-ran
for D.Solano in the 10th. LOB-Detroit 10,
Miami 10. RBIs-Avila (47), Stanton (62),
Lucas (28). SB-Coghlan (2). S-Iglesias,
Pierre. SF-Avila. Runners left in scoring


Nationals 2, Diamondbacks 0
Washington AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Spancf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .279
Zimmerman3b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .275
Werthrf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .318
Harper If 3 0 0 0 1 0 .274
Desmondss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280
W.Ramosc 3 0 0 0 1 1 .272
Tracylb 3 1 2 1 1 0 .202
Lombardozzi2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .255
Harenp 3 0 1 0 0 0 .170
Storenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Z.Waltersph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500
R.Sorianop 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 33 2 6 2 3 4
Arizona AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Eatoncf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .251
G.Parrarf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268
Goldschmidt lb 4 0 1 0 0 0 .302
Pradolf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281
M.Monteroc 3 0 0 0 1 0 .230
1-Campanapr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261
Davidson3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .237
Owings2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .291
Gregoriusss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .252
McCarthyp 2 0 0 0 0 2 .027
D.Hernandezp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Bloomquistph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .319
Zieglerp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 32 0 5 0 2 7
Washington 000001 100- 2 60
Arizona 000000000- 0 50
a-flied out for D.Hernandez in the 8th.
b-grounded out for Storen in the 9th. 1-ran
for M.Montero in the 9th. LOB-Washing-
ton 7, Arizona 7.2B-Davidson (6), Owings
(5). 3B-Span (11). HR-Tracy (4), off Mc-
Carthy. RBIs-Zimmerman (79), Tracy (11).
Runners left in scoring position-Wash-
ington 2 (Haren, Z.Walters); Arizona 4 (Mc-
Carthy, Owings 3). RISP-Washington 0 for
4; Arizona 0 for 4.
Washington IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
HarenW,10-14 7 40 0 1 51074.67
StorenH,24 1 0 0 0 0 1 84.52
R.SrianoS,43-491 1 0 0 1 1 263.11
Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
McCarthyL,5-11 7 5 2 2 2 1 934.53
D.Hernandez 1 00 0 0 2 94.55
Ziegler 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 2.25
WP-R.Soriano. Umpires-Home, Bell;
First, Gibson; Second, McClelland; Third,
Foster.T-2:25. A-29,673 (48,633).

Phillies 5, Braves 4
Philadelphia AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
C.Hernandezcf 5 2 4 0 0 0 .293
Rollinsss 5 2 2 0 0 1 .253
Utley2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .282
Rufib 4 0 0 0 1 4 .247
D.Brownlf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .272
Ruppc 4 0 2 2 1 1 .308
Asche3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .235
Mayberryrf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .227
E.Martin p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-C.Wellsph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .042
Lu.Garciap 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-M.Martinezph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .158
Stutesp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Diekmanp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-Frandsenph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .234
Rosenbergp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Papelbonp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 41 513 4 310
Atlanta AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Heywardcf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .257
J.Uptonrf 5 1 4 3 0 1 .264
F.Freemanlb 4 0 2 1 0 2 .319
GattisIf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .238
1-B.Uptonpr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .184
CJohnson3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .321
G.Lairdc 4 0 2 0 0 1 .256
Simmons ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244
ElJohnson2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .247
Minor p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .164
Waldenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
S.Downsp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-ReJohnsonph 1 0 0 0 0 0 244
Varvarop 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
A.Woodp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Loep 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-Constanzaph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .233
Totals 35 412 4 5 8
Philadelphia 200000 210- 5130
Atlanta 100000003- 4123
a-grounded out for E.Martin in the 4th.
b-grounded out for Lu.Garcia in the 6th.
c-grounded into a double playfor S.Downs
in the 7th. d-singled for Diekman in the 8th.
e-singled for Loe in the 9th.1-ran for Gattis
in the 9th. E-CJohnson (14), Walden (2),
Gattis (7). LOB-Philadelphia 12, Atlanta
10. 2B-Rollins (36), Rupp (1), J.Upton
(27), G.Laird (8). HR-J.Upton (27), off Pa-
pelbon. RBIs-Utley (69), D.Brown (83),
Rupp 2 (2), J.Upton 3 (70), FFreeman (108).
SB-J.Upton (8). SF-F.Freeman. Runners
left in scoring position-Philadelphia 6
(Asche 2, Rupp, Ruf 2, Mayberry); Atlanta 6
(CJohnson 2, Gattis, ElJohnson, F.Freeman,
G.Laird). RISP-Philadelphia 5 for 16; Atlan-
ta 1 for 12. GIDP-CJohnson, Simmons,
ReJohnson. DP-Philadelphia 3 (Rollins,
Utley, Ruf), (Rollins, Utley, Ruf), (Asche, Ruf).
Philadelphia IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
E.Martin 3 4 1 1 1 2 56 6.08
Lu.GarciaW,1-1 2 2 0 0 0 3 433.73
StutesH,3 1 00 0 1 0 164.58
DiekmanH, 11 1 00 0 2 1 182.58
Rosenberg 1 2 0 0 0 1 23 4.58
Papelbon 1 43 3 1 1 32 2.92
Atlanta IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
MinorL, 13-9 6 5 2 2 3 61043.21
Walden % 2 1 1 0 2 22 3.45
S.Downs t 1 1 0 0 0 73.86
Varvaro % 3 1 1 0 1 16 2.82
A.Wood 1 0 0 0 1 93.14
Loe 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 5.85
WP-Walden. Umpires-Home, Dreck-
man; First, Everitt; Second, Welke; Third,
Bellino.T-3:31.A-38,171 (49,586).

Marlins 2, Tigers 1,10 innings
Detroit AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
AJacksoncf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .272
Tor.Hunterrf 4 0 1 0 0 2 304
D.Kellyrf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .226
Mi.Cabrera3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 348
Tuiasosopolb 1 0 0 0 0 1 .247
Fielderlb 3 1 0 0 1 0 .279
R.Santiago3b-ss 0 0 0 0 1 0 .228
Jh.Peralta If-ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .305
E.Reedp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Avilac 2 0 0 1 1 1 .228
Infante2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 319
Iglesiasss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .305
Alburquerquep 0 0 0 0 0 0
Smylyp 0 0 0 0 0 0
c-VMartinezph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .301
Benoitp 0 0 0 0 0 0
H.Perez3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Ani.Sanchezp 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000
D.Downsp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dirkslf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .257
Totals 35 1 9 1 4 8
Miami AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Coghlanlf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .254
A.Ramosp 0 0 0 0 0 0
M.Dunnp 0 0 0 0 0 0
b-Dobbsph 1 0 0 0 0 0 228
Caminerop 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cishekp 0 0 0 0 0 0
d-Pierreph 0 0 0 0 0 0 247
D.Solano2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 249
1-Polancopr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .260
Yelichcf-lf 3 1 2 0 2 1 .288
Stantonrf 4 0 1 1 1 2 249
Morrisonib 4 0 0 0 0 2 242
Lucas3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 256
Hechavarria ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 228


On this date
1920 A grand jury indicted eight mem-
bers of the Chicago White Sox on charges
of fixing the 1919World Series in the"Black
Sox Scandal"
1938 Gabby Hartnett hit his famous
"Homer in the Gloamin"'in the ninth inning
against Mace Brown to give the Chicago
Cubs a 6-5 victory at Wrigley Field. It was
a keytriumph en routetothe NL pennant.


Page 8


position-Detroit 4 (Jh.Peralta, Ani.San-
chez, Fielder, Infante); Miami 4 (Stanton,
D.Solano, Brantly 2). RISP-Detroit 0 for 5;
Miami 3 for 8. Runners moved up-Cogh-
Ian. GIDP-AJackson, Jh.Peralta, Stanton.
DP-Detroit 1 (Infante, Iglesias, Fielder); Mi-
ami 2 (Eovaldi, D.Solano, Morrison), (Lucas,
D.Solano, Morrison).
Detroit IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Ani.Sanchez 5 2 0 0 0 8 66 2.57
D.DownsH,4 % 00 0 1 0 11 4.84
AlbrqrqueH,101 0 0 0 1 2 244.59
SmylyH,21 1 00 0 1 1 162.37
BenoitBS,2-26 1 2 1 1 2 0 31 2.01
E.Reed L, 0-1 1 1 1 2 0 21 4.24
Miami IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Eovaldi 6 7 1 1 2 5101 3.39
A.Ramos 1 00 0 0 2 163.15
M.Dunn % 1 0 0 1 0 18 2.66
Caminero 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 2.77
CishekW,4-6 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.33
HBP-by E.Reed (D.Solano). Umpires-
Home, Barksdale; First, Kulpa; Second, Gu-
ccione; Third, Hallion. T-3:33. A-28,750
(37,442).

Cardinals 6, Cubs 2
Chicago AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
St.Castross 4 0 1 0 0 0 .246
Lakelf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .285
Rizzolb 3 1 1 1 1 1 .233
D.Navarroc 3 0 0 0 0 1 .300
e-Boscanph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .333
Schierholtzrf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .248
Do.Murphy3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .259
Boguseviccf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .279
f-D.McDonald ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .288
Barney2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .208
EJacksonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .077
Villanuevap 1 0 0 0 0 0 .156
Rosscupp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Grimm p 0 0 0 0 0 0
d-Sweeneyph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .271
B.Parkerp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 2 7 2 2 7
St. Louis AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
M.Carpenter2b-3b3 0 0 0 1 0 .320
2-RJackson pr-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Jaycf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .273
b-B.Peterson ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .077
Hollidaylf 1 1 1 2 1 0 .300
1-S.Robinsnpr-rf-cf2 1 1 0 0 0 .248
Ma.Adamslb 3 1 0 0 1 2 .281
Y.Molinac 2 1 2 2 0 0 .319
a-T.Cruzph-c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .202
Descalso3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .237
S.Freemanp 0 0 0 0 0 0
c-A.Perezph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Axfordp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Mujicap 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Choatep 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manessp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Kozmass 4 1 2 1 0 0 .218
Chambersrf-lf-rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .167
Wainwrightp 2 0 1 1 0 0 .211
Wong2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143
Totals 33 610 6 4 8
Chicago 000000002- 2 70
St. Louis 204000 00x- 6100
a-struck outfor Y.Molina in the 5th.b-struck
out for Jay in the 6th. c-struck out for S.
Freeman in the 7th. d-grounded out for
Grimm in the 8th. e-doubled for D.Navarro
in the 9th. f-singled for Bogusevic in the
9th. 1-ran for Holliday in the 3rd. 2-ran for
M.Carpenter in the 6th. LOB-Chicago 6,
St. Louis 7. 2B-St.Castro (34), Boscan (1),
Do.Murphy (8), YMolina (44), Kozma (20).
HR-Rizzo (23), off Mujica; Holliday (22),
off EJackson. RBIs-Rizzo (80), Do.Murphy
(23), Holliday 2 (94), Y.Molina 2 (80), Kozma
(35), Wainwright (6). CS-Chambers (1).
S-EJackson. Runners left in scoring po-
sition-Chicago 4 (St.Castro, Do.Murphy,
Lake, Barney); St. Louis 3 (Kozma, M.Car-
penter, RJackson). RISP-Chicago 2 for 7;
St. Louis 3 for 7. GIDP-Barney DP-St.
Louis 1 (Kozma,Wong, Ma.Adams).
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
EJacksnL,8-182% 86 6 3 1 654.98
Villanueva 2 0 0 0 0 2 27 4.06
Rosscup 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 1.42
Grimm 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 2.00
B.Parker 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 2.72
St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
WnwrghtW, 19-95%2 0 0 1 5 72 2.94
S.Freeman 1% 0 0 0 1 1 29 2.19
Axford 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 4.02
Mujica 3 2 2 0 0 15 2.78
Choate 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.34
ManessS,1-3 % 0 0 0 0 0 22.32
Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. IBB-
off EJackson (Chambers). Umpires-
Home, Carlson; First, lassogna; Second,
Davis; Third, Knight. T-3:00. A-42,520
(43,975).

White Sox 6, Royals S5
Kansas City AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
A.Gordonlf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .265
1-Getzpr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220
Bonifacio2b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .243
Hosmerib 4 1 1 0 0 1 .302
B.Butlerdh 4 2 2 2 0 0 .291
S.Perezc 4 1 2 2 0 0 .289
Moustakas3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .233
Loughrf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .287
a-Maxwellph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255
A.Escobarss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .234
J.Dysoncf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .258
Totals 34 5 7 5 4 8
Chicago AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Le.Garciacf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .198
G.Beckham2b 3 2 1 0 1 0 .266
Gillaspie3b-lb 3 1 1 2 1 0 .247
Konerkolb 4 0 0 0 0 1 .245
AI.Ramirezss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282
A.Dunndh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .219
A.Garciarf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .283
Semienss-3b 4 1 3 1 0 1 .277
Jor.Dankslf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .236
Mig.Gonzalezc 4 0 1 0 0 2 .222
Totals 33 6 9 6 3 8
KansasCity 000012020- 5 72
Chicago 022000 20x- 6 90
a-grounded out for Lough in the 8th. 1-ran
for A.Gordon in the 9th. E-Bonifacio
(10), Moustakas (16) LOB-Kansas City
6, Chicago 6. 2B-A.Dunn (15), Semien
(4). HR-Moustakas (12), off ErJohnson;
B.Butler (15), off ErJohnson; S.Perez (12),
off Lindstrom; Semien (2), off Ventura; Jor.
Danks (5), off Ventura; A.Dunn (34), off
Ventura; Gillaspie (13), off Collins. RBIs-B.
Butler 2 (82), S.Perez 2 (77), Moustakas (42),
Gillaspie 2 (40), A.Dunn 2 (86), Semien (7),
Jor.Danks (12). SB-Getz (16), J.Dyson (34).
CS-Semien (2). Runners left in scoring
position-Kansas City4 (A.Gordon 2,A.Es-
cobar, Bonifacio); Chicago 3 (G.Beckham 2,
A.Garcia). RISP-Kansas City 1 for 6; Chica-
go 1 for 7.GIDP-G.Beckham.DP-Kansas
City1 (Ventura, A.Escobar, Hosmer).
Kansas City IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Ventura L,0-1 4 64 4 1 2 763.52
Dwyer 1 00 0 0 0 120.00
Coleman 1 0 1 1 2 3 270.61
Collins 2 1 1 0 1 73.54
Crow 1 1 0 0 0 2 21 3.38
Chicago IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
ErJohnsonW,3-255 3 3 3 4 933.25
LeesmanH, 1 00 0 0 1 67.04
D.WebbH, 1b 00 0 0 2183.18
LindstromH,20 2 2 2 0 0 63.12
Veal H,13 h 00 0 0 0 1 4.60
NJonesH,16 00 0 0 0 34.15
A.ReedS,40-48 1 00 0 1 1 273.79
WP-Crow, Lindstrom. Umpires-Home,
Paul Emmel; First, Chris Conroy; Second,
Gary Darling; Third, Jerry Meals. T-2:58.
A-22,235(40,615)






The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 9


HSFootballREWI ND

COMPIE D BYoSTAFFWRJI I TER RO: SHOREr-l:E: o: "[ H"oA:[ ."1


SUN PHOTO BY KAT GODINA:

Lemon Bay's Tyler Nelson hands off to Dakota Reigle during Friday's game at Dunbar. Reigle finished with 93 yards from scrimmage
to lead the Mantas.





GOOD TIME FOR A BYE


Mantas get film to gain some extra Daniel Cobb picking There were patches for
insight on what has been apart the Lemon Bay the Mantas to build on.

breather after working so far. defense for 127 passing Lemon Bay stopped
But will it be a key yards and two touch- Dunbar cold on its sec-
two difficult factor in beating Cape downs in the first half. ond possession as Cobb
Coral, the Mantas' next "Their quarterback misfired a pass and the
district games opponent on Oct. 10? runs the ball, so as a Mantas nabbed the Tigers
Maybe yes, maybe no. defensive coordinator, for two losses after that.
By ROB SHORE Dunbar had an extra do you stop the passing They had a few of those
SPORTS WRITER week to prepare for the game or do you stop the defensive series. Just not
FORT MYERS If Mantas' scheme that run," Ogilvie said. "As enough of them.
Lemon Bay football coach attacks to the edges, but soon as we were playing Lemon Bay needs to
D.J. Ogilvie was relieved Tigers coach Phil Vogt our nickel defense to take better care of the
to see the bye week show said it did his team little stop the pass, they were football as well, giving
up after two tough losses good. Some of that had to gashing us with runs." the ball the Tigers three
to district opponents, he do with limited field time The Mantas still have times while forcing no
tried not to show it. during a stormy two- an opportunity to earn turnovers.
He wanted to get back week stretch. a playoff spot, but with "Against the teams
out on the field, get the "We couldn't run (the losses to two presumptive we're playing right now,
sour taste of these set- Lemon Bay offense)," playoff contenders, the we need to play mistake
back out of the Mantas' Vogt said. "We didn't gain road back will be difficult. ree and we need to call a
mouths, anything. We can't dupli- Most likely, Lemon Bay good game," Oglvie said.
"I think we're a little cate their offense in scout needs a win over Cape The next chance for
"I hin wer a l team in one day and give Coral, then hope the
bit banged up," Ogilvie the kids a chance to have Seahawks grab a win that is in two weeks at
said after a 37-13 loss to a look at it." against either Dunbar or Cape Coral, a third tough
Dunbar on Friday night. Lemon Bay moved the Island Coast to force a district foe in four weeks.
"I wish we were playing ball well at times. Tyler tiebreaker, similar to last That game suddenly
next week so we could Nelson passed for 138 season. means a bit extra.
get this negative feeling yards and found gaps in Cape Coral (4-1, 2-0 "We're going to be
off our chest, losing two the middle of the Dunbar in District 5A-14) likes playing a good Cape
in a row. But it gives us a defense to exploit with to pass the ball as well, Coral team," Ogilvie said.
chance to regroup." passes to Dakota Reigle with starting quarterback "We've got to stick to-
Any football coach and Austin Hirschy. Dylan Bontrager having gether and keep working
welcomes the bye week as Stopping the pass was thrown for 957 yards hard."
a chance for players to get again problematic, with and 10 touchdowns this ContactRobShoreatshore@sun-herald.om
healthy and to go back to Dunbar quarterback season. or941-206-1174.


WEEK 5 SUMMARIES

DUNBAR 37, LEMON BAY 13 PORT CHARLOTTE 53, LEHIGH 0 LAKEWD RANCH 26, CHARLOTTE 23 NORTH PORT 35, DESOTO COUNTY 28
LemonBay 0 7 6 0-13 Port Charlotte 22 15 3 13-53 L. Ranch 7 13 0 6-26 NorthPort 0 14 0 21-35
Dunbar 7 22 8 0-37 Lehigh 0 0 0 0- 0 Charlotte 0 0 7 16-23 DesotoCnty 0 7 0 21-28
First quarter First quarter Second quarter
First quarter PC- GradyWells 1 run (Wells run), 9:06. LR -Justin Fischer 3 run (Kyla Thoma kick), NP Joshua Pollard 5 run (David Towers
D-DanielCobb26run(Cobbkick),6:16. PC Anthony Stephens 47 pass from 5:03 kick),5:21.
Second quarter Traige McClary (Andres Hernandez kick), Second quarter NP Leonard Faison 15 pass from Pollard
D- Ryeshene Bronson 24 pass from Cobb 5:50. LR -Ty McLeod 3 run (Thoma kick), 11:35. (Towers kick),2:47.
(Bob Rice run), 7:34. PC-McClary14run(Hernandezkick),1:34. LR-Chad Rex13run (kickfailed),3:46. DC DeQuan Richardson 50 pass from
LB Austin Hirschy 1 run (Josh Kennedy Second quarter Third quarter Kari Williams (Rosario Zavala kick), 1:48.
kick), 4:04. PC-Suber 1 run (Hernandez kick), 8:15. C-Amari Washington 10 run (Austin Rob- Fourth quarter
D Cobb 3 run (Marquise Bryant run), PC -lanerondre Tyler 1 run (MalikVacca- erts kick), 7:46. DC-TajahsJackson20passfromWilliams
2:34. ro-Dixon pass),2:21. Fourth quarter (Zavala kick), 9:06.
D -Joe Williams 24 pass from Cobb (kick Third quarter LR Trevor Losada 9 pass from Rex (kick NP Faison 94 kickoff return (kick
failed),:34. PC- Hernandez 18 FG, 2:17. failed), 5:28. blocked), 8:51.
Third quarter Fourth quarter C Dakari Brown 40 return of blocked NP Deas 8 pass from Simms (Pollard run),
LB- DakotaReigle2run(runfailed),5:31. PC-McClary31 run (kickfailed),8:20 punt (Dwayne Reynolds pass from Bren- 725.
D -Bryant 70 run (Cobb run),3:39. PC- Martin Luther 1 run (Hernandez kick), nan McGill),3:15. DC-Terrell Gordon 5 run (Zavala kick), 4:58.
LB D 2:59 C Dwight Reynolds 30 pass from McGill DC Dewayne Hearns 30 pass from Wil-
Firstdowns 11 14 PC L (DwayneReynoldspassfromMcGill),2:33. liams (Zavala kick), 3:42.
Rushes-yds 42-119 39-232 First Downs 24 5 LR C NP Deas 18 pass from Simms (Towers
Passing 138 175 Rushes-Yds. 51-433 24-(-44) Firstdowns 14 10 kick),1:20.
C-A-I 7-15-2 9-14-0 Passing 73 84 Rushes-yds 35-124 30-89 NP D
Fumbles-lost 2-1 4-0 C-A-I 2-3-0 6-22-1 Passing 112 204 First downs 17 15
Penalties-yds 5-38 9-53 Fumbles-Lost 4-0 1-0 9-150 17-20 Rushesyds 3194 3717
INDIVIDUAL STATS Penalties-Yds. 11-78 7-80 Fumbleslos 00 22 P assng 18 21
Rushing: Lemon Bay, Austin Hirschy 15- INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS INDIVIDUAL STATS Fumbleslost 3-1 4-2
INDIVIDUAL STATS Fumbles-lost 3-1 4-2
37, Dakota Reigle 9-32,Tyler Nelson 11-31, Rushing: PortCharlotte, Grady Wells 14- Rushin Lakewood Ranch Chad Rex 1754 Penalties-yds 730 15110
Bobby Caspolich 3-18, Josh Schulte 3-1, 145, Keon Suber 12-125, Traige McClary Justin Fischer 12-40, AShawn Angel 3- 16, INDIVIDUAL STATS
Anthony Marinola 1Dunedin Marquise 5-71, Martin Luther 1356, lanerondre Ty Brandon Luckett 2-11, Ty Mcleod 1-3. Char- Rushing:North Port, Leonard Faison 18-93,
Bryant 14-148, Daniel Cobb 9-30, Bob Rice ler5-49, Anthony Stephens 1(-13). Lehigh, lotte, Amari Washington 8-25, Marquell Platt Brennan Simms 6-10, Joshua Pollard 5-5,
9-25, Ryeshene Bronson 1-22, Tajarian Kevin Moreland 9-16, MalikDouglas2-2), 6-21, Brennan McGill 6-15, Trent White 1-10, Teddy Deas 2-(-14). DeSoto County Terrell
Chrisp4-6,TerranceAdams2- 1. Henry Shackleford 1 -(-2), Robert Clay 3-(-5), Jakhi Roberts6-9, MaleckWilliams 3-9. Gordon 25-116, Dewayne Hearns 4-30, Kari
Passing: Lemon Bay, Tyler Nelson 7-14- MatthewYzaguirre9-(-51). Passing: Lakewood Ranch,Chad Rex9-15- Williams7-25,TajahsJackson 1-0.
138-2,JeremySnook0-1-0-0. Dunbar, Dan- Passing: Port Charlotte, TraigeMcClary 2-3- 112-0 Charlotte, Brennan McGill 17-29- Passing: North Port, Brennan Simms 15-
iel Cobb 11-17-175-0, Bob Rice 0-1-0-0. 73-0. Lehigh,MattYzaguirre6-22-84-1. 201-0,TrentWhite0-1-0-0. 25-1690, Josh Pollard 1-1-150. DeSoto
Receiving:Lemon Bay, Dakota Reigle4-61, Receiving: Port Charlotte, Anthony Ste- Receiving: Lakewood Ranch, Trevor Losa- County,KariWilliams 11-22-216-2
Nic Mostyn 1-41, Austin Hirschy 1-26, An- phens 2-73. Lehigh, Malik Douglas 1-24, da 4-29, Wyatt McLeod 3-43, Cameron Receiving: North Port, SlywesterAugustyn
thony Marinola 1-5. Dunbar, Kevonte Mo- Robert Clay 1-24, Andre Thomas-Cobb Pearcy 2-40. Charlotte, Dwight Reynolds 3-24, Deas 3-44, Faison 6-50, Justus Shipp
ses4-75,JoeWilliams3-51,Rasheed Golden 1-16, Henry Shackleford 1-15, Kevin More- 9-117,DwayneReynolds4-35,AmariWash- 2-44, Pollard 2-21. DeSoto County, Hearns
3-25, Ryeshene Bronson 1-24. land 2-5. ngton,3-46 Jakhi Roberts 1-6. 4-96, Jackson 2-22, DeQuan Richardson
2-85, Gordon 2-5, Quay Fudge 1-8.


PREP FOOTBALL SCORES


FRIDAY'S GAMES
Admiral Farragut49,Carrollwood Day 35
Alonso 56, Spoto 14
Anclote 44, Fivay21
Apopka 49, Orlando Freedom 0
Armwood 28, Jefferson 9
AucillaChr.30,St.Francis8
Baker County 49, Forrest 10
Baker School 35, Rocky Bayou Chr. 13
Bayside 49, Fort Pierce Westwood 7
Belen Jesuit 24, South Fort Myers 21
Bell def.Oak Hall,forfeit
Belleview 27, Lecanto 21
Benjamin 55, Pompano Beach 0
Bishop Kenny42, Paxon 6
Bishop Verot 21, LaBelle 20
Blountstown 21, Liberty County 7
Boca Raton Chr. 28, Highlands Chr. 14
Bolles School 61, Ocala Vanguard 51
Booker 20, Braden River 18
Boynton Beach 47, Stranahan 12
Brandon 14,Chamberlain6
Branford 35,John Paul II Catholic 26
Calvary Chr.-Clrwater 31, Bradenton Chr.21
Cambridge Chr.56, All Saints0
Cape Coral 7, North Fort Myers 5
Cardinal Gibbons 49, Oakland Park NE 18
Cardinal Newman 38,John I. Leonard 6
CedarCreekChr.36, Munroe Day21
Centerville, Ohio 38, Naples 37,20T
Champagnat Catholic 52, Inlet Grove 0
Charles Flanagan 56, McArthur 13
Chiefland 31,West Nassau County 7
Chiles 22, Marianna 20
Chipley28, Port St.Joe 16
Choctawhatchee 35, Northview 0
Clay 35, 0akleaf 30
Clrwater Central Cath. 38, Ocala Trinity Cath.
14
Clewiston 21,DadeChr.6
Cocoa 47, Hernando 9
Columbia 59,Englewood 0
Comm.Sch. of Naples 48, Evangelical Chr.34
Coral Springs Charter 42, St. Andrew's 6
Cottondale 42, Bronson 12
Cypress Bay 25, Everglades 13
Cypress Creek 32, Celebration 8
DelrayAm. Heritage 40, East Lee CountyO
Dr. Phillips51,Orlando University14
Dunbar 37, Lemon Bay 13
Dunnellon 34, Crystal River 7
Durant 26, Gaither 0
Dwyer 41, Olympic Heights 7
East La ke 49,Tarpon Springs6
Eastside 13, North Marion 10
EdWhite 48, Orange Park 13
Faith Chr. 36, KeswickChr. 35
FAMU Developmental Research 24, Maclay 19
First Acad.-Leesburg 46,Windermere Prep 20
First Baptist 21, St.John Neumann 16
First Coast 26, Atlantic Coast 0
Flagler Palm Coast 21, New Smyrna Beach 20
Fleming Island 29, Ridgeview 10
Fletcher 34, Creekside 0
Flomaton,Ala. 25, Jay22
Florida 35, Leon 22
Fort Lauderdale 47,West Broward 3
Ft Laud.CalvaryChr. 13,JohnCarrollCath.7
Ft Lauderdale University 50, Boyd Anderson 0
Fort Meade 31, Bartow28
Fort Myers 34, Barron Collier 12
Fort Myers Canterbury 53,Oasis6
Fort Pierce Central 49, Sebastian River 20
Ft.Walton Beach 35,Crestview 18
Gateway 18, St. Cloud 12
Gateway Charter 19, Berean Chr. 14
Gibbs 48, Clearwater 13
Glades Day 26, Agape Chr. 6
Graceville 48, Freeport 14
Gulf Breeze 28, Bay 0
Gulliver Prep 34, Martin County 0
Hagerty 24, University (Orange City) 21
HainesCity55, LakeWales 20
Hardee 14, Frostproof 12
Harvest Community School 44,Taylor 7
Heritage 40, Okeechobee 0
Hilliard 21, Bishop Snyder 0
Hillsborough 49, Lennard 0
HolyTrinity Episcopal 34,Cocoa Beach 13
Homestead 19, Miami Killian 7
Ida S. Baker 60, Estero 10
IMG Academy 35, First Academy-Orlando 5
Immokalee 35, Gulf Coast 14
Indian Rocks 48, Shorerest Prep 7
Int'l Community 42, Cornerstone Charter 7
Island Coast 61, Mariner 6
Jesuit 28, Newsome 21
Jupiter Chr. 22, North Broward 0
Kathleen21,Winter Haven 14,OT
King 37, Blake 7
King's Academy 48, Coral Springs Chr. 0
Kissimmee Osceola 38, Harmony 12
Lafayette 34, Potter's House Chr. 6
Lake Brantley28, Lyman 19
Lake Gibson 42, Miami Palmetto3
Lake Mary35, Sanford Seminole 7
Lake Nona 54, Liberty 23
Lake Placid 14, Poinciana 6
Lake Region 26, Mulberry19
LakeWeir 15,Tavares 14
Lakeland Chr.49, Avon Park 14
Lakeland 49, North Miami Beach 35
Lakewood Ranch 26, Charlotte 23
Land O'Lakes31,Gulf20
Largo 20, Lakewood 6
Leesburg 63,West Port 0
Lexington, S.C. 34,CooperCity27
Madison County 27, Pace 20
Manatee 62, Southeast 0
Mandarin 55, Baldwin 6
Melbourne 27, St. Lucie Centennial 10



WEEK 5 LEADERS

RUSHING


Elijah Mack, Imagine
183 yards, TD
Grady Wells, Port Charlotte
14 carries, 145 yards, TD
Keon Suber, Port Charlotte
12 carries, 125 yards, TD
Terrell Gordon DeSoto County MACK
25 carries, 116 yards, TD


PASSING
Kari Williams, DeSoto County
216 yards, 3TDs, 2 INTs


RECEIVING
Dwight Reynolds, Charlotte
9 catches, 117 yards, TD


SPECIAL TEAMS REYNOLD
Leonard Faison, North Port
94-yard kickoff return for TD


I PREP FOOTBALL STANDINGS


DISTRICT7A-10
Dist All
Rec PF PA Rec PF PA
Palmetto 1-0-0 56 12 3-2-0 144 64
LakewdRanch 1-0-0 42 31 3-2-0 137147
Sarasota 0-0-0 0 0 2-2-0 107126
Braden River 0-1-0 31 42 2-2-0 108 79
NorthPort 0-1-0 12 56 2-2-0 134165
Friday's results
North Port 35, DeSoto County 28
Booker 20, Braden River 18
Lakewood Ranch 26, Charlotte 23
Palmetto 41, Bayshore 38
Friday's games
North Port at Lakewood Ranch
Braden River at Sarasota


DISTRICT7A-11
Dist All
Rec PF PA Rec PF PA
Port Charlotte 0-0-0 0 0 4-0-0 175 16
FortMyers 0-0-0 0 0 4-1-0 174 67
Charlotte 0-0-0 0 0 2-2-0 115118
Riverdale 0-0-0 0 0 0-3-0 49108
Friday's results
Lakewood Ranch 26, Charlotte 23
Port Charlotte 53, Lehigh 0
Fort Myers 34, Barron Collier 12
Friday's games
Charlotte at Riverdale
Fort Myers at Port Charlotte


DISTRICT6A-7
Dist All
Rec PF PA Rec PF PA
Largo 0-0-0 0 0 4-1-0 132 55
Venice 0-0-0 0 0 4-1-0136 90
Osceola 0-0-0 0 0 3-2-0 131 60
DixieHollins 0-0-0 0 0 2-2-0 109 94
Friday's results
Venice 35, Piano East (Texas) 21
Largo 20, Lakewood 6
Osceola 49, Dunedin 0
Pinellas Park35,Dixie Hollins 21
Friday's games
Dixie Hollins atVenice
Osceola at Largo
Largo at Lakewood


DISTRICT 5A-13
Dist All
Rec PF PA Rec PF PA
Booker 1-0-0 37 17 3-1-0 130 84
Southeast 1-0-0 41 27 1-4-0 95191
Hardee 0-0-0 0 0 3-1-0 69 40
Bayshore 0-1-0 27 41 2-3-0 113143
DeSotoCnty 0-1-0 17 37 2-3-0 156154
Friday's results
North Port 35, DeSotoCounty 28
Booker 20, Braden River 18
Hardee 14, Frostproof 12
Manatee 62, Southeast 0
Palmetto 41, Bayshore 38
Friday's games
Bayshore at DeSoto County
Booker at Hardee


DISTRICT 5A-14
Dist All
Rec PF PA Rec PF PA
CapeCoral 2-0-0 47 5 4-1-0 159 74
Island Coast 20-0101 27 3-1-0 131 68
Dunbar 10-0 37 13 22-0 98 76
No. FortMyers 1-1-0 47 28 1-4-0 69105
Lemon Bay 0-2-0 34 77 1-3-0 120121
Mariner 0-2-0 27103 0-5-0 42229
CypressLake 0-1-0 0 40 1-3-0 54113
Friday's results
Dunbar 37, Lemon Bay 13
Cape Coral 7, North Fort Myers 5
Island Coast 61, Mariner 6
Friday's games
Cape Coral at Island Coast
Dunbar at Mariner
North Fort Myers at Cypress Lake


DISTRICT 2A-6
Dist All
Rec PF PA Rec PF PA
Moore Haven 1-0-0 67 0 1-2-0 86 79
FirstBaptist 1-0-0 30 6 3-1-0 145 45
Neumann 1-0-0 40 14 2-2-0 86 83
Marco Island 0-0-0 0 0 1-2-0 80 98
SWFla.Chr. 0-1-0 6 30 2-1-0 63 37
EvangelicalChr. 0-1-0 14 40 2-2-0 156131
Imagine 0-1-0 0 67 1-3-0 69158
Friday's results
SW Fla. Christian 21, Imagine 13
Comm.Sch. Of Naples 48, Evangelical Chr,34
First Baptist21,St.John Neumann 16
Moore Haven 49, Marco Island 0
Friday's games
St. John Neumann at Imagine School
Evangelical Chr. at Moore Haven


Melbourne Central Cath. 55, Father Lopez 0
Menendez 38, Fernandina Beach 3
Merritt Island 21, Oviedo 3
Miami Carol City 7, Miami Southridge 6
Miami Ferguson 50, Miami Coral Park 14
Miami Jackson 40, Miami Edison 0
Miami Norland 20, Columbus Catholic 15
Miami Northwestern 29, Blanche Ely 16
Miami Springs42, Hialeah-Miami Lakes 3
Miami Sunset 21, Hialeah Gardens0
Miami Washington 49, Monsignor Pace 7
Miramar 49,Western 0
Mitchell 24, River Ridge 21
Monarch 28, Douglas 27, OT
MontverdeAcademy33,OrlandoChr.30
Moore Haven 49, Marco Island 0
Mosley 49, Arnold 14
Nature CoastTech 29, Pasco 28
Navarre 19, Milton 0
Newberry34, Keystone Heights 24
Niceville 57, Greene County, Miss. 28
North Florida Chr.45,JeffersonCounty12
North Miami 21, Miami Beach 14
North Port 35, DeSoto County 28
Oak Ridge 57, East Ridge 10
Ocala Chr.Academy 35, Legacy Charter 13
Orangewood Chr. 21, Foundation Acad20,OT
PK.Yonge 35, Hawthorne 16
Palatka 38, Bradford 12
Palm Bay 10,Treasure Coast 7
Palm Beach Central 37, Seminole Ridge 13
PIm Bch Grdns 21,Boca Raton Comm.20,20T
Palm Beach Lakes 53, Atlantic Community 35
Palm Harbor University 34, Seminole 33
Palmetto 41, Bayshore 38
Palmetto Ridge 13, Lely10
Pensacola Catholic 28, Rutherford 7
Pinellas Park35, Dixie Hollins21
Plant City40,Bloomingdale0
Plantation American Heritage 6, Mainland 0
Port Charlotte 53, Lehigh 0
Port Orange Atlantic 48, Pine Ridge 21
PortSt.Lucie17,JensenBeach14
Providence 63, Arlington Country Day6
Ribault 40, Stanton College Prep 3
Rickards 43, Lincoln 42,30T
Ridge Community36, Evans 27
Riverview 10, Middleton 6
Robinson 69, Leto 0
Royal Palm Beach 41,LakeWorth 7
Sandalwood 48, AndrewJackson 7
Santa Fe 26, Interlachen 0
Santaluces 42,Jupiter 21
Satellite 10, Eau Gallie 7
Seabreeze49, BartramTrail 36
Seffner Chr. 38, Santa Fe Catholic 13
Seminole Osceola 49, Dunedin 0
Somerset Academy47,Archbishop Carroll 0
South Lake51,Eustis 14
South Plantation 28, Piper 14
South Sumter 69, Brooksville Central 0
Southwest Florida Chr. 21, Imaginel 3
Southwest Miami 42, Miami 13
Springstead 30, Berkeley Prep 18
Spruce Creek 15, DeLand 13
St. Augustine28,PonteVedra 17
St. Joseph Acad. 26, Beacon of Hope Chr. 21
St. PeteCanterbury21, St. Stephen's 7
SSt. Petersburg 41, Boca CiegaO0
St.Thomas Aquinas 58, Nova 6
StrawberryCrest 22,Tampa Freedom 14
Suncoast 26, Archbishop McCarthy 9
Sunlake 22, Ridgewood 0
Tampa BayTech 14, Plant 7
Tampa Catholic 43, Cardinal MooneyO
Taravella 52, Coral Glades 0
Tate 35, Pine Forest 0
TerryParker14,R.E. Lee13
Timber Creek 46, Olympia 35
Titusville 42, Matanzas0
STrinityChr.-Deltona 13, Deltona 7
Trinity Chr.-Jacksonville 39, UniversityChr. 0
Trinity Prep35, Episcopal 30
Union County 35, Hamilton County6
Venice 35, Piano East, Texas 21
Vernon 41, Bozeman School 6
Vero Beach 42,GeorgeJenkins 10
Vero Bch Master's Acad. 54, Merritt Isl. Chr. 18
VictoryChr.47, Crescent City34
Viera 23, Astronaut 16
Wakulla 34, East Gadsden 26
Walton 46, Holmes County 7
Warner Chr. 48, Lake Highland 10
Wekiva31,Lake Howell 21
Wellington 27, Spanish River 6
West Boca Raton Community34, Forest Hill 0
West Florida42,Alma Bryant,Ala.21
West Gadsden 31, Sneads 21
West Orange 43,Jones0
Westminster Academy48, Marathon 12
Westminster Chr. 39, Keys Gate 0
Wharton 21, East Bay 18
Williston27,Wldwood 14
Winter Park36,Boone28
Winter Springs 21, East River 9
Yulee29,Wolfson 0
Zephyrhills 42,WeekiWachee 7
Zion Chr.60, Northwest Chr. 0
THURSDAY'S GAMES
American 57,Westland Hialeah 6
Coral Gables 14, Coral Reef Senior 3
Hallandale 46,Coconut Creek 13
Immaculata-La Salle 64, Ransom Everglades 7
SMourning 20,Goleman 19
PopeJohn Paul ll26,Pine Crest 16
South Dade 47,Varela 7
South Miami 23, Braddock 19
St. Johns Country Day 27, Florida School for
the Deaf and Blind 6







Page 10 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


* GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY:




Final kick boosts Young


Charlotte

brings home

Unseeded A

girls race win

By CARL KOTALA
SPECIAL TO THE SUN
TITUSVILLE It's the
kind of tradeoff Charlotte
High School's Dani Young
will take any day.
She may have lost
her headband during
Saturday's flrunners.com
Invitational 14 5K event at
Chain of Lakes Park, but
she won the race.
"I was mostly going
more for a time (rather)
than a placement today,
but I was happy with
being first," Young said.


"Everybody is."
Running in the
Unseeded A race, Young
had the lead until she was
passed by Barron Collier's
Sydnee Russo roughly
a half-mile from the
finish. Going for time or
not, that's when Young's
competitive streak kicked
in and she took the lead
back from Russo coming
around the final curve as
the runners headed onto
the finishing straight.
Young finished in 20
minutes, 12.30 seconds,
which was not the school
record she was seeking.
However, given rainy
conditions and a slight
knee injury that arose in
the past week, she was
pleased to be able to
make a final charge.


I PREP SCOREBOARD


FLRUNNERS.COM INVITATIONAL
at Chain O'Links Park, Titusville
kilometers
Boys Large School
Teams: 1. Lake Highland 92, 2. Winter
Springs 104, 3. Sickles 105, 4. Archbishop
McCarthy 133,5.Viera 165.9. PortCharlotte
248.
Individuals: 1. James Zentmeyer (S)
15:58.7, 2. Tyler Fisher (Port Charlotte)
16:00.2, 3. Jonathan Hulzebos (Lakeland)
16:23.5,4.Tyler Skidelski (LH) 16:35.3,5. Ca-
leb Pottorff (Lincoln Park) 16:47.6.
Port Charlotte: 33. Brandon Randall
17:42.8, 64. Jordan Croteau 18:20.7, 76.
Nicholas Dunakey 18:33. 5,100. Matthew
Martins 19:03.1.
Girls Invitational
Teams: 1. Coral Reef 167, 2. Robinson 211,
3.Woodstock 246,4.West Florida Tech 255,
5. Mandarin 259,12. Lemon Bay359.
Individuals: 1. Clarie Castillo (Titusville)
19:03.7,2. Alexandra Melehan (W) 19:30.5,
3. Maggie Parish (Chamberlain) 19:21.6,4.
Bethany Hardcastle (South Fork) 19:22.5, 5.
Maddy Hull (R) 19:34.3.
Lemon Bay: 24.AbigayleWeinfeld 20:10.8,
31. Haley Blem 20:22.2, 54. Sydni Ogilvie
21:06.0, 145. Rebecca Thompson 22:32.4,
226. MaggieVieta 24:11.3,253. Kelsi Ogilvie
25:34.2.
Girls Unseeded A
Teams: 1.Naples 109,2. Dwyer 191,3.Wel-
lington 230,4. Bloomingdale 236,5. Boone
260,9. Charlotte 287.
Individuals: 1. Dani Young (Charlotte)
20:12.3, 2. Sydnee Russo (Barron Collier)
20:13.1,3. Megan Fitzgerald (St. Petersburg)
20:14.9,4. Rebecca Rutila (Naples) 20:17.2,
5. Molly Delaney (Melbourne) 20:18.7.
Charlotte: 9. Michaela Flowers 20:31.4,
90. Christine Vartiainen 23:17.0, 97. Hope
Kanagy 23:22.1, 131. Melanie Moenning
24:16.3.
Boys Unseeded A
Teams: 1. Charlotte 87, 2. Liberty 156, 3.
Satellite 176, 4. Vero Beach 239, 5. River-
view241.
Individuals: 1. Sean White (Choc-
tawhatchee) 16:32.3, 2. Leonel Pozo (Mi-
ami Coral Park) 16:43.0, 3. Marshall Dillon
(C) 16:47.3,4. Jared Levine (Lake Brantley)
16:56.7,5. Rogelio Araiza (L) 17:03.9.
Charlotte: 3. Dillon 16:47.3,12.Tyler Kuhn
17:30.2, 13. Jonathan Wentworth 17:31.4,
31. Christopher Daniele 18:02.0, 38. James
Horn 18:17.8, 53. Kyle Shirley 18:42.8, 61.
Matthew Coward 18:48.6,108. Bryce Doug-
las 19:26.8.
Boys Unseeded B
Teams: 1. Lemon Bay 89.2. Miami Monsi-
gnor Pace 127, 3. Christopher Columbus
136,4.The Villages 135,5.Eau Gallie 180.
Individuals: 1. Peter Grootens (MMP)
16:58.5, 2. Devon Bradford (Jupiter Chris-
tian) 16:59.9, 3. Humberto Freire (CC)
17:22.9,4. Jerod Fuller (Lakeland Christian)
17:24.7, 5. Drew De Armas (First Academy)


North Port girls


"(That) is usually my
weakness the kick,"
Young said. "This time,
I picked it up, so I was
happy with that."
Charlotte's Michaela
Flowers finished ninth
in 20:30.40, helping the
Tarpons finish ninth.
Lemon Bay, meanwhile,
finished 12th in the Girls
Invitational race, led by
AbbyWeinfeld (24th,
20:10.80) and Haley Blem
(31st, 20:22.20).
"Our times were pretty
good," Manta Rays coach
Joe Casale said. "We've
got to compete a little bit
better. Sometimes we're
just running and not rac-
ing people. That's where
we need to make our
biggest improvement."
Weinfeld, who missed


the season's first two
races with a hamstring
injury, saw her time drop
for the third race in a row.
"I'm healing and I'm
getting better," she said.
"I'm hoping by the time
(we get to) districts, I'll be
back to normal."
Blem said she wasn't
feeling well and running
in wet, muddy conditions
didn't help. Despite that,
she had her best day.
"I was cramping up, so
I didn't really do that well
at the end, but I still got
my PR, so it was good,"
Blem said. "I just want to
break the 20's next time.
"... I was not feeling
very good, but I pushed.
And that's what we all
need to do. We're getting
stronger."


ENJOY PREP SCHEDULE

FROM PAGE1 Volleyball Y
Volybal


win Manasota race conditions that included
intermittent rain and a
SARASOTA -The North Port muddy course.
High School girls won the Mana- "I told the guys anything
sota Invitational on Saturday. less would be a disap-
The Bobcats posted 31 points, ointmentt" George said.
15 ahead of Sarasota Riverview. p
Maddison Krstec (19:54.6) We have to tryto win if
we're ranked No. 1.
was North Port's top finisher. "I feel like we did that.
She took second, just ahead of I feel lke we did that.
teammate Sydney Guenther. Every guy came out and
In the boys race, North ran extremely well. They
Port took third with 81 points, stayed focused and they
Timber Creek won with 28. Billy didn't let the course
Castrovince (17:16.3) led the conditions get to them."
Bobcats with a seventh-place Sophomore Marshall
finish. Dillon came into the
Staff Report race with the best time
of all the competitors in
his group, but wound up
17:34.0. finishing third in 16:47.30.
Lemon Bay: 6. James Harrison 17:38.3, 9. "It was the fastest
Miles Rittenhouse 17:44.6,12. Kevin Plum-
mer 17:54.0,29.NickTieu 18:33.1,42.Ryan course I've run on," Dillon
Dodge18:55.4,52.JustinRaines19:18.1,59. said. "I just enjoyed it.
WyattChandler19:284, There was a lot of mud,
MANASOTA INVITATIONAL but I enjoyed myself. It
at Chain O'Links Park, Titusville was fun. The two kids at
Boys the end, they just had
Teams: 1.Timber Creek28,2. Sarasota Riv- more left than me.
erview 67,3.North Port 81,4.Venice 106,5. "I'm proud. I PR'd. I got
Cardinal Mooney 178.
Individuals: 1. Brandon Marquez (TC) third overall and my team
16:03.9, 2. Canaa Meester-Kitterman did well."
(Bayshore) 16:27.5, 3. Carlos Ramon (TC) Dillon was followed
16:41.4,4. Michael Hazareth (TC) 16:57.1,5. llnwa oowe
Cal Davidson Turner (CM) 17:00.0 by Tarpon teammates
North Port: 7. BillyCastrovince 17:16.3,15. Tyler Kuhn (17:30.20)
Jon Back 17:48.8, 18. Trequan Moreland
18:06.9, 20. Connor Boethig 16:11.5, 21. and Jonathan Wentworth
Michael Barnes 18:19.1, 31. Ben Durrant (17:31.40), who were 11th
18:59.2,32.StevePierre-Louis 19:04.6, and 12th. Christoher
Girls Christopher
Teams: 1. North Port 31, 2. Sarasota River- Daniele was 31 st in
view46,3.TimberCreek60,4.Braden River 18:02.00 and James Horn
161,5. Sarasota 183.
Individuals: 1. Briana Burnett (TC) 19:46.9, was 38th in 18:17.80.
2. Maddison Krstec (NP) 19:54.6, 3. Sydney Lemon Bay senior
Guenther (NP) 19:59.8,4. MichaelieGrajalez James Harrison was
(SR) 20:36.5,5. Chinami Wade (SR) 20:49.0.
North Port: 2. Krstec 19:54.6, 3. Guen- sixth in the Unseeded
their 19:59.8, 7. Kaley Boethig 20:58.0, 8. B race in 17:38.30.
Shannon Collins 21:16.0, 11: Brooke Fisher Miles Rittenhouse was
21:28.1, 12: Jamie Weisberger 21:47.8, 19.
DarielleCosta 22:33.8. ninth (17:44.60) and


* PREP FOOTBALL:


Utah team returns


Community Christian at
Seacrest, 5 p.m.
Boys golf
Lemon Bay, Charlotte at
Riverview Tournament, 11 a.m.
Girls golf
Lemon Bay, Charlotte at
Riverview Tournament, 1 p.m.
Swimming
North Port at Port Charlotte,
5p.m.
Cross Country
DeSoto County at Rotary Invita-
tional at Highlands Hammock,
5p.m.

Kevin Plummer was
12th (17:54.00). Nick
Tieu (18;33.10) finished
29th and Ryan Dodge
(18:55.40) was 42nd.
Harrison didn't meet his
goal of a personal best,
but he didn't let the rainy
conditions get to him. For
the second week in a row,
he passed Rittenhouse in
the closing moments after
the underclassman passed
him late.
"Going through my
mind then was the same
thing today," Harrison
said. "I did not want an
underclassman to beat
me."
Casale left happy.
"The top three guys ran
really well today," he said.
In one of the event's
held Friday, Port Charlotte
finished ninth in the boys
large school race. Tyler
fisher finished second in
16:00.20.


* PREP FOOTBALL: death


New York team


after numshment votes to halt season


---- -I~ --I-----


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ROOSEVELT, Utah A
high school football team
in rural Utah returned to
the field after it was hit by
unique suspensions for
off-field misconduct.
Union High of Roosevelt
lost its homecoming game
41-21 on Friday night, a
week after coach Matt
Labrum took the team's
jerseys away because of
problems of skipping
classes, not doing home-
work, bullying classmates
over the Internet and
disrespecting teachers.
Instead of practicing
Monday and Tuesday,
the team was ordered by
Labrum to pull weeds,
wash windows and visit
two nursing homes in the
town of 6,100 about 100
miles southeast of Salt
Lake City. On Wednesday,
practice was replaced by a
two-hour study hall.
Labrum reinstated most
of the players later in the
week after they mem-
orized and recited to
coaches a quote on how
character is much more
important than talent.
Labrum said lessons his


players learned this week
will last long after Friday
night's loss to Emery.
"I think it will affect us
for the rest of our lives. I
don't think we'll ever for-
get it," he said, adding that
players were looking at
football as a right instead
of a privilege.
The coach said he was
surprised by the reaction
to the suspensions. He
fielded questions from
reporters across the
country all week, and the
school was flooded with
emails and phone mes-
sages in support of the
suspensions.
Union Principal Rick
Nielsen said he took a
call from an Illinois man
whose son committed
suicide after being bullied.
The man believes his son
would still be alive if he'd
had a coach like Labrum,
Nielsen said.
"I hope that we could
make a positive influence
and a positive difference
for the entire country, if
that's where it needs to
be," Labrum told KSL.
"This is what we feel like is
important in sports."


V % ,--..-I 1 %-- ..I L X

By CAROLYN THOMPSON
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BROCTON, N.Y. It
was a question with no
right answer that tugged
heavy at the hearts of
Damon Janes' teammates
when the 16-year-old died
after a hit in a high school
football game: Should the
season go on?
Should the players
rally and play every game
for their star running
back, whose motto was
"Giving up is simply not
an option?" Or should the
teenagers forget about
football and take time to
mourn their friend?
The Westfield-Brocton
varsity players took a
paper-ballot vote and
decided that the pain
was too great, that their
season would end after
two games.
"I wanted to play; I love
the game," said teammate
Stevie Wisecarver III, a
16-year-old quarterback
who has played football
since third grade. "But it
just wouldn't feel right
without him. The team
just didn't feel right."


Added 17-year-old
senior cornerback Joey
Villafrank: "It feels like
there's more to life. Before,
football used to be life for
me; it was the only sport
I played. But now I realize
that there's more than just
playing the game."
It's a grief that's spread
through the close-knit
villages of Brocton and
Westfield, tucked amid
farms about an hour's
drive south of Buffalo,
where the once-rival
high schools were forced
to combine their teams
three years ago because of
budget cuts.
Damon took what
hospital officials would
later describe as a
"helmet-to-helmet" hit
during the third quarter
ofWestfield-Brocton's
Sept. 13 game against
Portville, a 32-6 loss. He
was able to get on his feet
but lost consciousness
on the sidelines. He died
three days later at Women
& Children's Hospital in
Buffalo. An exact cause
of death has not been
released.


* GOLF ROUNDUP



Gardiner sneaks



into the lead


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PONTE VEDRA BEACH
- Scott Gardiner of
Australia had a 5-un-
der 65 and wound up
with the lead Saturday
in the Web.com Tour
Championship when
Chesson Hadley stumbled
at the end.
Gardiner has played
well enough in this
four-tournament series
that determines PGA Tour
cards that he already has
locked up his return to
the big leagues. A win
would give him top status
and a spot in The Players
Championship.
Hadley, who also has
secured his card through
Web.com Tour regu-
lar-season money list,
had a two-shot lead for
most of the third round
on the Valley Course at
the TPC Sawgrass. But he
bogeyed the 17th, and
then took double bogey
on the last hole for a 70
that left him one shot
behind with Joe Durant
(68).

Lehman takes
Champions lead: In Pebble
Beach, Calif., Tom Lehman made
a 20-foot birdie putt on the final
hole at Pebble Beach for his second
consecutive 5-under 67 and a
one-stroke lead in the Champions
Tour's First Tee Open. Lehman, the
seven-time Champions Tour winner


and former British Open champion,
had a 10-under 134 total after rounds
at Del Monte and Pebble Beach. He is
winless this year.
Russ Cochran, the Principal Charity
Classic winner in June in Iowa, also
shot 67 at Pebble Beach. Cochran
made a 60-foot birdie putt on the
par-3 seventh, his 16th hole of the
day.

Uihlein grabs 2-shot
lead at Alfred Dunhill
Links: In St. Andrews, Scotland,
Peter Uihlein holed his second shot
for an eagle on the 18th hole to
grab a two-shot lead after the third
round of the Alfred Dunhill Links
Championship. Having missed an
eagle putt that would have given
him a 59 on the Kingsbarns course on
Friday, the American managed a more
spectacular finish on St. Andrews
when his 47-yard wedge shot on the
18th found the bottom of the cup.
That gave him a 7-under 65 and a
20-under total of 196.
Ernie Els shot a 64, also on St.
Andrews, to be among six players to
sit two shots back. The group also
included Martin Kaymer (63) and
Joost Luiten (68).

Kane, Rinker share
legends lead: In French Lick,
Ind., Lorie Kane shot a 2-under 70
in tricky wind conditions for a share
of the lead with Laurie Rinker in the
Legends Championship. Rinker had a
73 to match Kane at 3-under 141 with
one round left in the Legends Tour
event at French Lick Resort's Pete Dye
Course. Val Skinner was a shot back
after a 70.


I GOLF SCOREBOARD


Web.com Tour
CHAMPIONSHIP
AtTPC Sawgrass, Dye'sValley Course
PonteVedra Beach
Purse: $1 million
Yardage: 6,864; Par: 70
Third Round


Scott Gardiner
Chesson Hadley
Joe Durant
AndrewD.Putnam
Jamie Lovemark
Bud Cauley
Andrew Loupe
Rod Pampling
Russell Knox
Chad Campbell
Ben Kohles
John Peterson
Andres Gonzales
Ryo Ishikawa
LeeWilliams
Andrew Svoboda
Jhonattan Vegas
Brad Fritsch
Roland Thatcher
Hudson Swafford
Byron Smith
Billy Hurley III
Danny Lee
Aron Price
Robert Karlsson
Jason Gore
David Mathis
Brendon Todd
Nathan Green
Tim Petrovic
Troy Merritt
Tag Ridings
Will MacKenzie
Sean O'Hair
Tom Hoge
Daniel Chopra
Heath Slocum
NickO'Hern
Nick Flanagan
Adam Crawford
Glen Day
Paul Goydos
Alex Prugh
Ben Martin
Ashley Hall
Mark Anderson
Ryan Spears
Jim Renner
Bhavik Patel
Colt Knost
Dicky Pride
Shane Bertsch
Oscar Fraustro
Jeff Klauk
Jim Herman
Fabian Gomez
CaseyWittenberg
Michael Putnam
Tyrone Van Aswegen
Chad Collins
Kevin Kisner
Steve Marino
Matt Bettencourt
Henrik Norlander
Fernando Mechereffe
Alexandre Rocha
Miguel Angel Carballo


67-68-65-
65-66-70-
66-67-68-
68-67-67-
70-67-66-
70-69-65-
68-69-67-
70-66-68-
67-69-68-
70-68-67-
70-69-66-
66-71-68-
70-68-67-
69-68-68-
69-67-69-
67-67-71-
66-69-70-
70-68-68-
69-69-68-
66-71-69-
67-70-69-
66-70-70-
71-69-66-
69-65-72-
64-74-69-
68-70-69-
71-67-69-
71-67-69-
73-66-68-
69-70-68-
73-64-70-
71-68-68-
69-67-71-
70-70-67-
68-71-69-
69-69-70-
68-70-70-70-
71-67-70-
69-68-71-
71-65-72-
70-70-68-
72-68-68-
73-66-70-
68-71-70-
63-76-70-
64-71-74-
69-70-71-
69-70-71-
69-71-70-
69-71-70-
66-74-70-
65-74-72-
71-68-72-
70-69-72-
69-71-71-
69-71-71-
68-71-73-
68-71-73-
69-70-74-
69-71-73-
72-68-73-
71-69-73-
66-74-73-
66-73-75-
70-69-76-
72-66-78-
70-69-78-


Champions Tour
NATUREVALLEY FIRSTTEE OPEN
Pebble Beach, Calif.
Purse: $1.8 million
At p-Pebble Beach Golf Links (6,837
yards, par 72)
At d-Del Monte Golf Course (6,357
yards, par 72)
Second Round
Tom Lehman 67d-67p-134
Russ Cochran 68d-67p-135
KirkTriplett 67d-70p--13
Bernhard Langer 63d-74p-13
Doug Garwood 67d-71p-138
Dan Forsman 68d-70p--13
John Cook 70d-68p-138
Chien Soon Lu 71p-67d-138
Bill Glasson 71 p-68d--13S
Craig Stadler 70d-69p-13S
Scott Hoch 70p-69d-13S
John Inman 73p-66d--13
Fred Couples 68d-71 p-113S
Joel Edwards 71d-69p-14C
DuffyWaldorf 72d-68p-14C
Mark Calcavecchia 68d-72p-14C
Ted Schulz 73p-67d-141
Tom Byrum 72p-68d-141


Olin Browne 69d-72p-141
TomPernice Jr. 71p-70d--141
Mark McNulty 67d-74p-141
SWillieWood 72p-69d-141
Esteban Toledo 69d-72p-141
Loren Roberts 70d-72p-142
Jeff Sluman 75p-67d-142
Mike Goodes 70d-72p-142
Joey Sindelar 68d-74p-142
BobbyClampett 71p-71d-142
Andrew Magee 67d-75p-142
Dick Mast 72p-70d-142
Rod Spittle 70d-72p-142
Mark Brooks 77p-66d-143
Jeff Hart 74p-69d-143
Brad Bryant 76p-68d-144
Steve Elkington 74p-70d-144
Sandy Lyle 73d-71p-144
Tom Kite 72d-72p-144
Rocco Mediate 74p-70d-144
Jay Don Blake 70d-74p-144
SFred Funk 74p-71d-145
Jeff Brehaut 76d-69p-145
David Frost 73p-72d-145
Brian Henninger 75p-70d-145
JimThorpe 75p-70d-145
Larry Nelson 71p-75d-146
MarkWiebe 71d-75p-146
MarkO'Meara 79p-67d-146
RickFehr 71d-75p-146
Tommy Armour III 73p-73d-146
Bart Bryant 75p-71d-146
Nick Price 75d-71p-146
Jerry Haas 68d-79p-147
Roger Chapman 70d-77p-147
Corey Pavin 77p-70d-147
Steve Pate 74p-73d-147
Peter Senior 72d-75p-147
Hale Irwin 72d-75p-147
John Riegger 75p-72d-147
Scott Simpson 74p-73d-147
David Eger 74p-73d-147
Steve Lowery 76p-71d-147
BobbyWadkins 73d-74p-147
SChip Beck 71d-77p-148
Larry Mize 77d-71p-148
PeterJacobsen 78p-70d-148
Brad Faxon 72d-76p-148
Bob Gilder 75d-74p-149
Colin Montgomerie 72d-77p-149
GeneSauers 76p-74d-150
Anders Forsbrand 78p-73d-151
Jim Rutledge 79p-72d-151
Michael Allen 80p-71d-151
Bruce Summerhays 76p-75d-151
-JayrHaas 75d-76p-151
TonyJohnstone 78p-74d-152
SFuzzyZoeller 73d-79p-152
Gary Hallberg 77p-75d-152
Bruce Fleisher 78p-74d-152
JK Kim 75d-79p-154
Ben Crenshaw 81op-74d-155
Joe Daley 82p-78d-160

European Tour
S ALFRED DUNHILL LINKS
S CHAMPIONSHIP
At St. Andrews and Carnoustie, Scotland
s-St. Andrews (Old Course): 7,305 yards,
par-72
c-Carnoustie (Championship Course):
7,412 yards, par-72
k-Kingsbarns Golf Links: 7,181 yards,
par-72
Purse: $5 million
Peter Uihlein, U.S. 71c-60k-65s-196
J.Luiten, Netherlands 67c-63k-68s-198
Ernie Els, South Africa 69c-65k-64s-198
SDavid Howell, England 67c-68k-63s-198
Shane Lowry, Ireland 68k-66s-64c-198
R. McEvoy, England 64s-67c-67k-198
M.Kaymer, Germany 69c-66k-63s-198
R. Gonzalez, Argentina 67s-69c-63k-199
H.Otto, South Africa 68k-63s-69c-199
C. Doak, Scotland 70c-67k-63s-200
G. Mulroy, South Africa 66k-69s-65c-200
ST.Levet, France 68s-64c-68k-200
T. Fleetwood, England 65s-66c-69k-200
C. Paisley, England 72c-62k-66s-200
M. Hoey, No. Ireland 68c-66k-67s-201
D. Clark, No. Ireland 69c-66k-66s-201
Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 70s-68c-63k-201
David Horsey, England 66s-70c-65k-201
MarcWarren, Scotland 70s-66c-66k-202
Tom Lewis, England 64k-65s-73c-202
C. Schwartzel, S. Africa 68c-68k-66s-202
SJ.Quesne, France 69c-66k-67s-202
B.Wiesberger,Austria 70c-65k-67s-202
E. Pepperell, England 66k-67s-69c-202


Page 10 www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013






The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


SP Page 11


I SCOREBOARD

Sports on TV
AUTO RACING
2p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, AAA 400, at
Dover, Del.
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Midwest Nationals, at
Madison, III. (same-day tape)
GOLF
8a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill
Links Championship, final round, at St. An-
drews, Scotland
3p.m.
TGC -Web.com Tour Championship, final
round, at PonteVedra Beach.
7p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, First Tee Open, fi-
nal round, at Pebble Beach, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
TBS Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
2p.m.
WGN Kansas City at ChicagoWhite Sox
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
FS1 MotoGPWorld Championship, Gran
Premio de Aragon, at Aragon, Spain
NFL FOOTBALL
1 p.m.
CBS Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota in London
(Tampa-St. Pete market) coverage
FOX -Arizona atTampa Bay
4p.m.
CBS Philadelphia at Denver (Fort Myers
market)
4:25 p.m.
FOX- N.Y. Jets at Tennessee
8p.m.
NBC New England at Atlanta
SOCCER
8:25 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Norwich at
Stoke City
10:55 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Liverpool at
Sunderland
3:30 p.m.
NBC MLS, Los Angeles at Portland
9p.m.
ESPN MLS, New York at Seattle
1:30 a.m.
ESPN2 FIFA, Beach World Cup, champi-
onship, at Papeete, Tahiti (delayed tape)
WNBA BASKETBALL
3p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, conference finals, game
2, Atlanta at Indiana
5p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, conference finals, game
2, Minnesota at Phoenix

Baseball
FRIDAY'S LATE MLB LINESCORES
RED SOX 12, ORIOLES 3
Boston 503000031 -12160
Baltimore 002001000 38 0
Buchholz, Breslow (8), Uehara (9) and Salta-
lamacchia, Lavarnway; Feldman, Z.Britton
(3), SJohnson (7), Belfiore (8) and Wieters,
C.Snyder. W-Buchholz 12-1. L-Feldman
5-6. HRs-Boston, Nava (12), D.Ortiz (30),
J.Gomes (13). Baltimore, AJones (33), C.Da-
vis (53).

RANGERS 5, ANGELS 3
LosAngeles 001 020 000 3 81
Texas 102 000 20x 5 70
C.Wilson, J.Gutierrez (7), Boshers (7), Cor.
Rasmus (7), Brasier (8) and Conger;Ogando,
Frasor (6), Cotts (7), Scheppers (8), Nathan
(9) and Pierzynski.W-Cotts 7-3. L-J.Guti-
errez 1-5. Sv-Nathan (42).

INDIANS 12, TWINS 6
Cleveland 430020012 -12170
Minnesota 000123000 6110
Kluber, R.Hill (6),C.C.Lee (6), Rzepczynski (7),
Masterson (8), M.Albers (9) and Y.Gomes;
P.Hernandez, Martis (2), Hendriks (5), Duen-
sing (9) and Pinto, C.Herrmann.W-Kluber
11-5. L-P.Hernandez 3-3. HRs-Cleveland,
Stubbs (10). Minnesota, Florimon (9).

ATHLETICS 8, MARINERS 2
Oakland 300 000 320 8111
Seattle 100 001000 2 41
Colon, Cook (7), Doolittle (8), Balfour (9) and
Vogt, D.Norris; F.Hernandez, O.Perez (7),
Capps (7), Luetge (8), Wilhelmsen (8) and
Zunino. W-Colon 18-6. L-F.Hernandez
12-10. HRs-Oakland, Moss (29), D.Norris
(9). Seattle, F.Gutierrez (10), K.Morales (23).

NATIONALS 8, DIAMONDBACKS 4
Washington 000 1408030-8 90
Arizona 002000002-4 90
Strasburg, Clippard (8), Abad (9), X.Cedeno
(9) and W.Ramos; Corbin, W.Harris (6), Putz
(7), Roe (8), Langwell (9) and M.Montero.
W-Strasburg 8-9. L-Corbin 14-8. HRs-
Washington,Werth (25),W.Ramos (16).

DODGERS 11, ROCKIES 0
Colorado 000000000 0 5 3
LosAngeles 401321 00x -11150
McHugh, Manship (5), Corpas (6), Boggs (8)
and Pacheco; Kershaw, Marmol (7), Capua-
no (8), League (9) and A.Ellis, Butera. W-
Kershaw 16-9. L-McHugh 0-4. HRs-Los
Angeles, Ad.Gonzalez (22), C.Crawford (6),
A.Ellis (10).

GIANTS 7, PADRES 3
San Diego 101 000001- 3 90
San Francisco 023 001 01x -7110
B.Smith, Layne (6), Boxberger (6), Brach (7),
Hynes (8) and Hundley; Vogelsong, Machi
(7), Hembree (8), S.Casilla (8), J.Lopez (9),
Dunning (9) and Posey. W-Vogelsong
sythe (6). San Francisco,J.Perez (1),Belt (17),
Pence (26).

Hockey
NHL PRESEASON
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Boston 7 6 1 0 12 24 17
Toronto 8 5 2 1 11 24 22
LIGHTNING 7 5 2 0 10 25 20
Buffalo 7 4 2 1 9 21 16
PANTHERS 7 3 1 3 9 23 23
Ottawa 6 4 2 0 8 18 13
Montreal 7 3 3 1 7 22 22
Detroit 8 3 5 0 6 22 21
Metropolitan Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Washington 7 4 0 3 11 26 21
Columbus 8 4 3 1 9 21 22
NewJersey 6 4 2 0 8 16 11
Pittsburgh 6 3 2 1 7 20 20
Carolina 6 3 3 0 6 12 18
N.Y. Islanders 6 2 4 0 4 16 21
Philadelphia 7 1 5 1 3 16 25
N.Y. Rangers 6 1 5 0 2 9 22
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Dallas 7 5 0 2 12 28 16
Chicago 5 3 0 2 8 16 14
Minnesota 6 4 2 0 8 15 13
St.Louis 6 3 2 1 7 20 19


Nashville 7 2 4 1 5 15 25
Winnipeg 8 1 4 3 5 14 27
Colorado 5 2 3 0 4 11 16
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Edmonton 8 5 2 1 11 26 22
Phoenix 7 4 2 1 9 19 21
Calgary 7 4 2 1 9 25 21
San Jose 5 3 1 1 7 14 9
LosAngeles 6 3 2 1 7 18 15
Anaheim 6 3 3 0 6 13 15
Vancouver 6 2 4 0 4 16 18
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for
overtime loss.
Friday's results
Carolina 1, Buffalo 0


Washington 6, Philadelphia 3
N.Y. Islanders 6, Nashville 4
Detroit 5,Toronto 2
St. Louis 4, Minnesota 1
Dallas 4, Edmonton 0
Boston 5,Winnipeg 0
Phoenix 2, San Jose 1
Los Angeles 4, N.Y. Rangers 1
Saturday's results
Toronto 3, Detroit 1
PANTHERS 5, LIGHTNING 3
Washington at Chicago, late
Colorado vs. Los Angeles at Las Vegas, NV,
late
San Jose at Anaheim, late
Today's games
Ottawa (ss) vs. N.Y. Islanders (ss) at Barrie,
Ontario, 6 p.m.
N.Y Islanders (ss) at Ottawa (ss), 7:30 p.m.

LIGHTNING SCHEDULE
Oct. 3 at Boston 7p.m.
Oct. 5 at Chicago 8p.m.
Oct. 8 at Buffalo 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 10 Florida 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 12 Pittsburgh 7 p.m.
Oct. 15 Los Angeles 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 17 Minnesota 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 19 Boston 7 p.m.
Oct. 24 Chicago 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 26 Buffalo 7 p.m.
Oct. 27 at Florida 5 p.m.
Oct. 29 at New Jersey 7:30 p.m.
Nov.1 at Carolina 7p.m.
Nov. 2 St. Louis 7p.m.
Nov. 7 Edmonton 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 9 at Detroit 7 p.m.
Nov. 11 at Boston 1 p.m.
Nov. 12 at Montreal 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 14 Anaheim 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 16 at Phoenix 8p.m.
Nov. 19 at Los Angeles 10:30 p.m.
Nov.21 atSanJose 10:30p.m.
Nov.22 at Anaheim 10 p.m.
Nov.25 N.Y. Rangers 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 27 Philadelphia 7:30 p.m.
Nov.29 Pittsburgh 4 p.m.
Dec. 3 at Columbus 7p.m.
Dec. 5 Ottawa 7:30 p.m.
Dec. 7 Winnipeg 7p.m.
Dec. 10 at Washington 7 p.m.
Dec. 12 Detroit 7:30 p.m.
Dec. 14 at New Jersey 7 p.m.
Dec. 15 at Detroit 5 p.m.
Dec. 17 at N.Y Islanders 7p.m.
Dec. 19 Nashville 7:30 p.m.
Dec.21 Carolina 7p.m.
Dec. 23 at Florida 7:30 p.m.
Dec. 28 Montreal 7 p.m.
Dec.29 N.Y.Rangers 7p.m.
Jan. 1 at Vancouver 10 p.m.
Jan. 3 at Calgary 9 p.m.
Jan. 5 at Edmonton 8 p.m.
Jan. 7 at Winnipeg 8 p.m.
Jan. 9 Washington 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 11 at Philadelphia 1 p.m.
Jan. 13 at Columbus 7p.m.
Jan 14 at N.Y Rangers 7p.m.
Jan. 16 N.Y Islanders 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 San Jose 2p.m.
Jan. 19 at Carolina 5 p.m.
Jan. 23 Ottawa 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 25 Colorado 7 p.m.
Jan.28 at Toronto 7 p.m.
Jan. 30 atOttawa 7:30 p.m.
Feb. 1 at Montreal 1 p.m.
Feb. 4 at Minnesota 8 p.m.
Feb.6 Toronto 7:30 p.m.
Feb. 8 Detroit 7 p.m.
Feb. 27 at Nashville 8 p.m.
March 1 at Dallas 3 p.m.
March 2 at Colorado 8 p.m.
March 4 at St. Louis 8p.m.
March 6 Buffalo 7:30 p.m.
March 8 Boston 7p.m.
March 10 Phoenix 7:30 p.m.
March 13 Florida 7:30 p.m.
March 15 NewJersey 7p.m.
March 17 Vancouver 7:30 p.m.
March 19 atToronto 7p.m.
March 20 at Ottawa 7:30 p.m.
March 22 at Pittsburgh 1 p.m.
March 24 Ottawa 7:30 p.m.
March 27 N.Y. Islanders 7:30 p.m.
March 29 at Buffalo 7 p.m.
March 30 at Detroit 5 p.m.
April 1 Montreal 7:30 p.m.
April 3 Calgary 7:30 p.m.
April 5 Dallas 7p.m.
April 8 Toronto 7:30 p.m.
April 10 Philadelphia 7:30 p.m.
April 11 Columbus 7:30 p.m.
April 13 at Washington 3p.m.

Basketball
WNBAPLAYOFFS
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-3)
Eastern Conference
Atlanta 1, Indiana 0
Thursday: Atlanta 84, Indiana 79
Today: Atlanta at Indiana, 3 p.m.
x-Tuesday: Indiana at Atlanta,TBA
Western Conference
Minnesota 1, PhoenixO
Thursday: Minnesota 85, Phoenix62
Today: Minnesota at Phoenix, 5 p.m.
x-Tuesday: Phoenix at Minnesota,TBA

Pro football
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
New England
DOLPHINS
N.Y.Jets
Buffalo
South
Houston
Indianapolis
Tennessee
JAGUARS
North
Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland
Pittsburgh
West
Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
NATI


W L T Pet
3 0 01.000
3 0 01.000
2 1 0 .667
1 2 0 .333
W L T Pet
2 1 0 .667
2 1 0 .667
2 1 0 .667
0 3 0 .000
W L T Pet
2 1 0 .667
2 1 0 .667
1 2 0 .333
0 3 0 .000
W L T Pet
3 0 0 1.000
3 0 01.000
1 2 0 .333
1 2 0 .333
)NALCONFERENCI


PF PA
59 34
74 53
55 50
65 73
PF PA
70 82
68 48
60 56
28 92
PF PA
75 64
71 64


47 64
42 76
PF PA
127 71
71 34
78 81
57 67
E


East W L T Pet PF PA
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 83 55
Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 86
N.Y.Giants 0 3 0 .000 54 115
Washington 0 3 0 .000 67 98
South W L T Pet PF PA
NewOrleans 3 0 01.000 70 38
Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36
Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 71 74
BUCS 0 3 0 .000 34 57
North W L T Pet PF PA
Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 95 74
Detroit 2 1 0 .667 82 69
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88
Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 81 96
West W L T Pet PF PA
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 86 27
San Francisco 2 2 0 .500 79 95
Arizona 1 2 0 .333 56 79
St. Louis 1 3 0 .250 69 121
Thursday's result
San Francisco 35, St. Louis 11
Today'sgames
N.Y.Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Arizona at BUCS, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at JAGUARS, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
New England at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Monday's game


DOLPHINS at New Orleans, 8:40 p.m. Gasquet (2), France, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4.


INJURY REPORT
NEW YORK (AP) The updated National
Football League injury report, as provided
by the league:
BALTIMORE at BUFFALO RAVENS: OUT:
WR Jacoby Jones (knee). DOUBTFUL: NT
Terrence Cody (knee), C Ryan Jensen (foot).
QUESTIONABLE: LB Arthur Brown (chest),
DT Chris Canty (thigh), RB Shaun Draughn
(ankle), LB Pernell McPhee (knee), RB Ray
Rice (hip), WR Brandon Stokley (groin),
WR Deonte Thompson (foot), DT Brandon
Williams (toe). BILLS: OUT: CB Ron Brooks
(foot), CB Stephon Gilmore (wrist),WR Mar-
quise Goodwin (hand), K Dustin Hopkins
(right groin). QUESTIONABLE: S Jairus Byrd
(foot), CB Leodis McKelvin (hamstring).
ARIZONA at TAMPA BAY CARDINALS:
OUT: LB Kevin Minter (hamstring), DT Dan
Williams (not injury related). QUESTION-
ABLE: S Rashad Johnson (finger). BUCCA-
NEERS: OUT: CB Michael Adams (knee),
G Gabe Carimi (illness), TE Tom Crabtree
(ankle), DT Derek Landri (knee). QUES-
TIONABLE: WR Vincent Jackson (ribs), CB
Rashaan Melvin (hamstring), WR Mike Wil-
liams (hamstring).
PITTSBURGH at MINNESOTA STEEL-
ERS: PROBABLE: CB Cortez Allen (ankle),
RB Le'Veon Bell (foot), DE Brett Keisel (ham-
string), NT Steve McLendon (hamstring),TE
Heath Miller (knee).VIKINGS: OUT: CB Chris
Cook (groin), RB Rhett Ellison (knee), QB
Christian Ponder (rib), S Jamarca Sanford
(hamstring).).
N.Y. GIANTS at KANSAS CITY GIANTS:
OUT: C David Baas (neck), TE Adrien Rob-
inson (foot), G Chris Snee (hip), CB Corey
Webster (hip). DOUBTFUL: T David Diehl
(thumb). QUESTIONABLE: S Cooper Taylor
(shoulder), LB Jacquian Williams (knee).
CHIEFS: OUT:TE Travis Kelce (knee). QUES-
TIONABLE: G Jeff Allen (groin), TE Anthony
Fasano (ankle, knee), CB Brandon Flowers
(knee), S Kendrick Lewis (ankle).
INDIANAPOLIS at JACKSONVILLE -
COLTS: OUT. RB Ahmad Bradshaw (neck),
DT Ricky Jean Francois (groin), S LaRon
Landry (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: S Joe
Lefeged (knee). JAGUARS: OUT: WR Mike
Brown (back),WR Stephen Burton (concus-
sion), CB Dwayne Gratz (ankle), S Dwight
Lowery (concussion).
SEATTLE at HOUSTON SEAHAWKS:
OUT: DT Jordan Hill (biceps), S Jeron John-
son (hamstring), RB Spencer Ware (ankle).
DOUBTFUL: T Breno Giacomini (knee), C
Max Unger (arm). TEXANS: OUT: LB Tim
Dobbins (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: T
Duane Brown (toe), CB Kareem Jackson (ill-
ness), WR Andre Johnson (shin), CB Johna-
than Joseph (toe), LB Darryl Sharpton (hip,
foot).
CINCINNATI at CLEVELAND BENGALS:
DOUBTFUL: CB Leon Hall (hamstring),
CB Dre Kirkpatrick (hamstring), S Reggie
Nelson (hamstring), G Mike Pollak (knee).
BROWNS: OUT: LB Quentin Groves (ankle),
QB Brandon Weeden (right thumb), DE Billy
Winn (quadriceps). DOUBTFUL: LB Jabaal
Sheard (knee). QUESTIONABLE: K Billy Cun-
diff (right thigh), G Shawn Lauvao (ankle).
CHICAGO at DETROIT BEARS: DOUBT-
FUL: CB Sherrick McManis (quadriceps).
QUESTIONABLE: CB Charles Tillman (knee,
groin). LIONS: OUT:WR Nate Burleson (fore-
arm). DOUBTFUL: WR Patrick Edwards (an-
kle). QUESTIONABLE: DE Ziggy Ansah (ab-
domen), S Don Carey (hamstring), T Jason
Fox (groin),T Corey Hilliard (groin).
N.Y. JETS at TENNESSEE JETS: OUT: T
Oday Aboushi (knee), RB Chris Ivory (ham-
string), CB Dee Milliner (hamstring).TITANS:
OUT: RB Shonn Greene (knee), DT Sammie
Hill (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB Patrick Bai-
ley (hamstring),WR Kenny Britt (neck, ribs),
TE Delanie Walker (toe), CB Blidi Wreh-Wil-
son (hamstring).
WASHINGTON at OAKLAND-REDSKINS:
QUESTIONABLE:TE Fred Davis (ankle), K Kai
Forbath (right groin), LB Brandon Jenkins
(ankle), CBJerome Murphy (not injury relat-
ed),TE Jordan Reed (thigh). RAIDERS: OUT:
S Tyvon Branch (ankle), T Menelik Watson
(knee). QUESTIONABLE: DE Jason Hunter
(quadriceps), G Lucas Nix (ankle), QB Ter-
relle Pryor (concussion).
PHILADELPHIA at DENVER EAGLES:
DOUBTFUL: S Patrick Chung (shoulder).
BRONCOS: DOUBTFUL: LB Paris Lenon
(thigh). QUESTIONABLE: CB Champ Bailey
(foot),TE Joel Dreessen (knee), S Duke Ihen-
acho (ankle).
DALLASat SAN DIEGO- COWBOYS: OUT:
WR Miles Austin (hamstring). QUESTION-
ABLE:WR Dwayne Harris (hip). CHARGERS:
OUT:WR Malcom Floyd (neck). DOUBTFUL:
G Jeromey Clary (clavicle), G Chad Rinehart
(toe). QUESTIONABLE: T King Dunlap (con-
cussion), CB Shareece Wright (hamstring).
NEW ENGLAND at ATLANTA-PATRIOTS:
OUT: WR Matthew Slater (wrist). QUES-
TIONABLE: WR Danny Amendola (groin),
CB Kyle Arrington (groin), RB Brandon
Bolden (knee), S Nate Ebner (ankle),TE Rob
Gronkowski (back, forearm), T Will Svitek
(knee), T Sebastian Vollmer (foot), RB Leon
Washington (thigh). FALCONS: OUT: RB Ste-
ven Jackson (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE:
T Sam Baker (foot, knee), WR Julio Jones
(knee), CB Asante Samuel (thigh), WR Rod-
dyWhite (ankle).
MIAMI at NEW ORLEANS DOLPHINS:
DNP: CB Dimitri Patterson (groin). LIMITED:
S Chris Clemons (hamstring, quadriceps),
LB Dannell Ellerbe (ribs), LB Jonathan
Freeny (shoulder), LB Koa Misi (shoulder),
DT Paul Soliai (knee), DE Cameron Wake
(knee). SAINTS: DNP: NT Brodrick Bunkley
(calf), S Roman Harper (knee), RB Mark In-
gram (toe), DE Tom Johnson (hamstring),
WR Lance Moore (hand). LIMITED: S Isa
Abdul-Quddus (ankle),CB Chris Carr (knee),
G Jahri Evans (hamstring), CB Jabari Greer
(back), G Tim Lelito (calf), DETyrunn Walker
(knee).


SE
A F
B.C.53,Winnipe
SSat
Calgary35, Han
7 Torontoat Edm
: T
A Saskatchewan

Tennis


CFL
AST DIVISION
riday's result
eg 17
urday's results
nilton 11
onton, late
today's game
at Montreal, 1 p.m.


WTA CHINA OPEN
At The Beijing Tennis Centre, Beijing
Purse: Men, $3.57 million (WT500);
Women, $5.19 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Women
First Round
Sloane Stephens (11), United States, def.
Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada,6-4,6-4.
Carla Suarez Navarro (12), Spain,def. Kris-
tina Mladenovic, France, 6-2,3-6,7-5.
Francesca Schiavone, Italy, def. Alize Cor-
net, France, 3-2, retired.
Varvara Lepchenko, United States, def.
HeatherWatson, Britain, 1-6,6-3, 6-3.
Roberta Vinci (10), Italy, def. Elina Svitoli-
na, Ukraine, 6-2,6-2.
Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Annika
Beck, Germany, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
Sara Errani (5), Italy, def. Kirsten Flipkens,
Belgium, 7-6 (3),6-1.
Urszula Radwanska, Poland, def. Simona
Halep (16), Romania, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (2).

ATP THAILAND OPEN
At Impact Arena, Bangkok, Thailand
Purse: $631,530 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
Semifinals
Tomas Berdych (1), Czech Republic, def.
Gilles Simon (4), France, 6-7 (5), 6-2,7-5.
Milos Raonic (3), Canada, def. Richard


ATP MALAYSIAN OPEN
At Putra Stadium, Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia
Purse: $984,300 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
Semifinals
Joao Sousa, Portugal, def. Jurgen Melzer
(4), Austria, 6-4,3-6,6-4.
Julien Benneteau (5), France, def. Stanis-
lasWawrinka (2), Switzerland, 6-4,6-3.

WTATORAY PAN PACIFIC OPEN
At Ariake Colosseum, Tokyo
S Purse: $2.37 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Championship
Petra Kvitova (7), Czech Republic, def.An-
gelique Kerber (5), Germany, 6-2,0-6,6-3.


Soccer


I QUICK HITS









IrA ,


AP PHOTO


MLS Toronto FC defender Donel Henry, rear, and D.C. United forward
EASTERN CONFERENCE Michael Seaton battle for a ball during the first half of an MLS
W L T Pts GF GA
NewYork 15 9 6 51 47 36 game in Toronto on Saturday. The hosts won 4-1.
KansasCity 14 10 6 48 43 29
Montreal 13 9 6 45 46 42
Houston 12 10 8 44 38 37 VERSTEEG LEADS
Philadelphia 11 10 9 42 38 39
NewEngland 1111 8 41 42 34 PANTHERS PAST
Chicago 11 12 6 39 36 43
Columbus 1114 5 38 36 39 LIGHTNING
TorontoFC 51511 26 29 45
D.C. 3 21 6 15 20 52 SUNRISE (AP) Kris
WESTERN CONFERENCE Versteeg scored twice,
W L T Pts GF GA
Salt Lake 15 10 6 51 54 39 including the tiebreaking
Seattle 15 8 5 50 38 28 goal near the midpoint of
Portland 11 513 46 45 31
LosAngeles 13 10 6 45 46 36 the third period, to lead
Colorado 12 9 9 45 37 31 Florida to a 5-3 victory

Sancouver 1111 8 41 42 39 against Tampa Bay in the
FCDallas 10 910 40 40 42 teams' preseason finale on
ChivasUSA 6 16 8 26 29 54 Saturday night.
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie. Versteeg, playing in
Friday's result his second game after
Philadelphia 1, Sporting Kansas CityO0 sre
Saturday's results undergoing knee surgery
Toronto FC 4, D.C. United 1 in March, put the Panthers
Real Salt Lake 1,Vancouver 0 ahead at 8:38 of the third
New England 1, Houston 1, tie
Montreal at Chicago, late and added an emp-
Today's games ty-netter with 1 minute
Los Angeles at Portland, 3:30 p.m.
ColumbusatFCDallas, 8:30p.m. remaining. Brad Boyes,
NewYorkat Seattle FC,9 p.m. Scott Gomez and Jesse
San Jose at ChivasUSA,11 p.m. Winchester also scored for

Glantz-Culver Line the Panthers (3-1-3). AP PHOTC
Tim Thomas stopped 19
Major League Baseball of 22 shots in his first full American Jason Brown
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE game in about 17 months. performs during the men's
atNewYork -110 Milwaukee +100 Thomas, who signed with event of the 45th Nebelhorn
atCincinnati -140 Pittsburgh +130
atAtlanta -210 Philadelphia +190 the Panthers after sitting Trophy competition in
at St.Louis -180 Chicago +170 out last season, made his Oberstdorf, Germany, on
at San Francisco115 San Diego +105 Florida debut Thursday Saturday. He finished second.
at Los Angeles -250 Colorado +220
Washington -110 at Arizona +100 night against Tampa Bay
American League but was replaced in the gained a share of first place in the
Tampa Bay -200 atToronto +185r
at Baltimore -105 Boston -105 second period. Western Conference. The Whitecaps
NewYork -130 at Houston +120 Steven Stamkos and (11-11-8) saw their playoff hopes fade
Kansas City -110 at Chicago +100
Cleveland -210 at Minnesota +190 Martin St. Louis each some more as they remained four
atTexas -200 Los Angeles +185 had a goal and an assist points behind fifth-place Colorado
Oakland -145 at Seattle +135 for Tampa Bay (5-2-0), with only four games remaining. Only
Interleague
Detroit -175 atMiami +165 and Brett Connolly also the top five teams qualify for the
NFL scored. Anders Lindback postseason....

FAVORITE O T O/U UNDERDOG made 17 saves. ... In Foxborough, Mass., Will Bruin
Pittsburgh-x Pk 3 (42) Minnesota In Toronto, Josh Leivoscored twice scored in the 76th minute to lift the
Baltimore 312 3 (44) at Buffalo Houston to a 1-1 draw with New
Cincinnati 6 312(4212) atCleveland in Torontos 3-1victory against Detroit Houston to a1 draw with New
Indianapolis 71/2 8 (421/2) at Jcksnville in the preseason finale for both teams. England. Bruin's goal was his eighth
Seattle 3 2 (41/2) at Houston Defenseman John-Michael Liles scored ofthe season and second in two
atTampa Bay 3 21/2(401/2) Arizona
at Detroit 2 3 (47/2) Chicago on a power play in the second period games, and moved Houston (12-10-8)
at KansasCity 4/2 4 (44) N.Y.Giants and assisted on Leivo's third-period into fourth place in the Eastern
atTennessee 5 312 (40) N.Y.JetsCnferN
Dallas 212 2 (47) at San Diego goal. James Reimer made 24 saves for Conference. Safer Sene gave New
Washington 2/2 3 (44) atOakland Toronto (5-2-1). Mitch Callahan scored England (11-11-8)the lead in the
atDenver 11 11 (58/2) Philadelphia 65th minute.
atAtlanta 11/2 2 (4912) New England for Detroit (3-5-0).
Tomorrow In Toronto, Toronto FC scored three


at New Orleans5/2 61/2 (48) Miami TENNIS
x-atLondon TENNIS
O-Open T-Today
Kvitova wins Pan Pacific:
Transactions In Tokyo, former Wimbledon champion
BASEBALL Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic
American League beat Angelique Kerber of Germany 6-2,
NEW YORK YANKEES Reinstated c 0-6,6-3 to win the Pan Pacific Open
Francisco Cervelli from the restricted list
and returned him to the 60-day DL. title on Saturday. The seventh-seeded
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Announced Kvitova hit a crosscourt forehand to the
the resignation of assistant general manag-
er Jay Sartori, effective next month. corner to close out the match in hour,
National League 39 minutes....
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Agreed to In Bangkok, top-seeded Tomas
terms with OF Hunter Pence on a five-year
contract. Berdych needed nearly three hours
BASKETBALL to outlast Gilles Simon of France 6-7
National Basketball Association
MIAMI HEAT promoted Andy Elis- (5), 6-2,7-5 and reach the final of
burg to senior vice president of basketball the Thailand Open. He will play Milos
operations and general manager; Adam
Simon to assistant general manager and I Raonicof Canada, who also came from
general manager of Sioux Falls (NBDL); a set down to oust defending champion
Dan Craig to assistant coach for player Richard Gasquet3-6,7-5,6-4.
development; Chad Kammerer to director
of NBA scouting and advance scout; and
Keith Askins to director of college and pro HORSE RACING
scouting. Named Juwan Howard assistant U
coach for player development; Rich Fernan-
do executive assistant to the coaches; Eric Secret Compass wins
Glass video coordinator; and Tim Hardaway at Santa Anita: In Arcadia,
scout.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS Signed C Sol- Calif., Secret Compass edged She's a
omon Alabi and F Nayal Koshwal. Tiger at the wire to win the $250,000

Nation F LLeague Chandelier Stakes for 2-year-old fillies
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed by a head at Santa Anita. Ridden by
WR Jeremy Ebert and WR Tobais Palmer Rosie Napravnik, Secret Compass
from the practice squad.Waived G Jacques
McClendon and QB Ricky Stanzi. ran 11/16 miles in 1:44.91 and paid
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Signed S $23.40, $8.40 and $3.60. She's a Tiger
Kanorris Davis from the practice squad.
HOCKEY returned $4 and $2.40. Fascinating
National Hockey League was another three-quarters of a
NHL Reduced Phoenix F Paul Bisson- length back in third and paid $2.10 to
nette's suspension from 10 games to three length back in third and paid $2.10 to
(3) games for his conduct in leaving his show as the 6-5 favorite, leaving her
team's bench to join an altercation during winless in four career starts ....
a preseason game on September 15,2013.
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Recalled G Ron the Greek pulled a 21-1 upset
Antti Raanta from Rockford (AHL). in the $1 million Jockey Club Gold Cup
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS As- nitatinal at Belmont Park. hooting
signed Fs Michael Chaput, Ryan Craig and Invitational at Belmont Park. Shooting
Jack Skille; D Cody Goloubef, Ilari Melart through a huge opening on the rail
and Will Weber; and Gs Mike McKenna and at the top of stretch, Ron the Greek
Jeremy Smith to Springfield (AHL).
DALLAS STARS Assigned D Jyrki sprinted away from Belmont Stakes
Jokipakka, D Patrik Nemeth, D Jamie Olek- winner Palace Malice to a decisive
siak, RW Brett Ritchie, RW Austin Smith, D
Maxime Fortunus and RW Matej Stransky 6%4-length victory. It was a surprising
toTexas (AHL). return to form for Ron the Greek, a
DETROIT RED WINGS Agreed to career winner of $2.7 million who was
termswith G JakePaterson on a three-year
entry-level contract. mired in a 1-for-9 slump coming in.
FLORIDA PANTHERS Acquired RW
Krys Barch and a 2015 seventh-round draft
pick from New Jersey for C Scott Timmins SOCCER
and a 2014 sixth-round draft pick. Loaned F
Bobby Butler to San Antonio (AHL). Salt Lake ains confer-
NEW YORK ISLANDERS Agreed to g
terms with F Ryan Pulock on a three-year ence lead: In Vancouver, British
entry-level contract. Loaned F Jason Clark, : Columbia, Devon Sandoval scored in
D Marc Cantin and D Andrey Pedan to
Bridgeport (AHL). Released F Greg Miller, | the ninth minute to lift Real Salt Lake
D Mike Dalhuisen, D Mike Keenan and D to a 1-0 victory over the Vancouver on
Dallas Jackson from their tryout contracts. Using a mostly a second
PHOENIX COYOTES Assigned LW aturday
Max Domi to London (OHL). team lineup, Salt Lake (15-10-6)


goals in a 20-minute span of the
second half to beat undermanned
D.C. United 4-1 in a battle of the two
worst teams in MLS. The win snapped
an eight-game league winless streak
for Toronto (5-15-11). D.C. United
(3-21-6) hasn't won in eight games.


FIGURE SKATING

Oda, Hubbell-Donohue
win Nebelhorn titles: In
Oberstdorf, Germany, figure skater
Nobunari Oda won his second
consecutive title at the Nebelhorn
Trophy, easily beating junior world
silver medalist Jason Brown. Oda
finished with 262.98 points, more than
34 in front of the American. In dance,
American pair Madison Hubbell and
Zachary Donohue claimed the title by
winning the free dance. The Nebelhorn
Trophy was also the final qualifier
for the Sochi Winter Olympics. Israel,
Romania, the Philippines, Australia,
Ukraine and Italy got the final six men's
spots while China, Turkey, Australia,
Japan and Spain will round out the
field in ice dance.


CYCLING

Vos wins at worlds: In
Florence, Italy, Marianne Vos won
her third title in the road race at the
world championships and reinforced
her status as the top rider in women's
cycling. The Dutchwoman attacked
on the final climb of the 87-mile race
with about 3 miles to go, adding to
her titles from 2006 and last year. Vos,
who also won the road race at the
London Olympics and has world and
Olympic titles in cyclo-cross and track
cycling, clocked 3 hours, 44 minutes
along the route from Montecatini
Terme to Florence. Vos was also
runner-up from 2007-11 ...
Newly elected UCI leader Brian
Cookson appointed the heads of three
continental cycling confederations as
his vice presidents. With the support
of the UCI's management committee,
Cookson selected David Lappartient
of France, Mohamed Wagih Azzam of
Egypt, and Tracey Gaudry of Australia
as vice presidents.


)


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iPage12 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


I AUTO RACING SCOREBOARD


NASCAR Sprint Cup
Series
AAA 400
After Friday qualifying; racetoday
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 161.849.
2. (20) Matt Kenseth,Toyota, 161.805.
3. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 161.74.
4. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 161.609.
5. (43) AricAlmirola, Ford,161.609.
6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 161.594.
7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 161.493.
8. (48) JimmieJohnson, Chevrolet, 161.341.
9. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 161.326.
10. (56) Martin TruexJr.,Toyota, 161.204.
11. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 161.023.
12. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 160.8.
13. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
160.736.
14. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 160.721.
15. (17) Ricky StenhouseJr., Ford, 160.714.
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 160.664.
17. (47) AJ AIImendinger, Toyota, 160.65.
18. (11)DennyHamlin,Toyota, 160.557.
19. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 160.542.
20. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 160.371.
21.(27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 160.249.
22. (55) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 160.1.
23. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 159.851.
24.(9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 159.645.
25. (31) JeffBurton, Chevrolet, 158.779.
26. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 158.611.
27.(34) David Ragan, Ford, 158.451.
28. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 158.263.
29. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 157.992.
30. (93)Travis Kvapil,Toyota, 157.929.
31. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 157.563.
32. (36) JJ. Yeley, Chevrolet, 157.549.
33. (30) ColeWhitt, Toyota, 157336.
34.(98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 156.883.
35. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, 156.692.
36. (51) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, 156.644.
37. (33) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
38. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, Owner
Points.
40. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner
Points.
42. (32)Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (40) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.

NASCAR
Nationwide Series
5-HOUR ENERGY 200
At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Lap length: 1 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (1) Joey Logano, Ford, 200 laps, 140 rating,
0 points, $49,230.
2. (17) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 200,114.7,42,
$41,322.
3. (8) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 112.7,
0, $24,265.
4. (11) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 200, 107.4, 40,
$27,696.
5. (12) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 199, 98.1, 39,
$25,821.
6.(3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 199,106.3,38,
$24,671.
7. (9) Parker Kligerman,Toyota, 199,86.4,37,
$22,256.
8. (5) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 199, 134.3, 0,
$18,110.
9. (18) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 199, 90.2, 35,
$21,621.
10. (6) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 199, 92.8, 35,
$22,446.
11. (10) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 199,85.3,33,
$20,971.
12. (14) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 199, 77.5,
32, $20,846.
13. (7) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 198, 81.6, 31,
$20,746.
14. (15) Michael Annett, Ford, 198, 72.6, 30,
$20,621.
15. (13) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 198,100.7,
29,$21,521.
16. (19) Cole Whitt, Toyota, 198, 68.3, 29,
$20,471.
17. (2) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 198, 78.6, 27,
$20,596.
18. (4) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 197, 79.5, 26,
$20,346.
19. (20) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 197,79.7,
25, $20,296.
20. (23) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 197,


59.7,24, $20,921.
21. (22) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 196, 62.5,
23, $20,191.
22. (21) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 196, 69.6, 22,
$20,091.
23. (24) Joe Nemechek,Toyota, 196,53.1,21,
$20,016.
24. (16) Nelson PiquetJr, Chevrolet, 194,62,
20, $19,966.
25.(38)TJ.Duke,Ford,191,41.3,19,$20,391.
26. (31) Eric McClure, Toyota, 189, 44.8, 18,
$19,866.
27. (34) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 177,
38.9,17, $19,816.
28. (27) TJ. Bell, Chevrolet, 162, 49.1, 16,
$19,741.
29.(33) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, rear gear, 107,
41.2,15,$19,666.
1 30. (25) Blake Koch, Toyota, handling, 85,
44.1,14,$19,916.
31. (29) Carl Long, Dodge, transmission, 74,
S45.5,13,$19,566.
32. (30) Ryan Ellis, Toyota, brakes, 60, 49.7,
12,$13,315.
33. (39) Brad Teague, Toyota, parked, 58,
30.9,11, $13,245.
34. (36) Donnie Neuenberger, Ford, acci-
dent,33,37.2,10,$19,406.
35. (28) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 13,
39.2,9,$13,155.
36. (35) JJ. Yeley, Chevrolet, overheating, 9,
34.9,0,$12,260.
37. (37) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, handling, 8,
31.6,7,$12,240.
38. (26) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, transmission,
7,32.4,6,$12,176.
39. (32) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, vibration,
4,29.3,5,$12,075.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 131.219
mph.
Time of Race: 1 hour, 31 minutes, 27 sec-
onds.
Margin ofVictory: 14.590 seconds.
Caution Flags: 2 for 8 laps.
Lead Changes: 6 among 4 drivers.
Lap Leaders: J.Logano 1-18; K.Busch 19-86;
J.Logano 87-115; M.Bliss 116-117; C.Whitt
118-120; K.Busch 121-141; J.Logano 142-
200.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led,
Laps Led): J.Logano, 3 times for 106 laps;
K.Busch, 2 times for 89 laps; C.Whitt, 1 time
for 3 laps; M.Bliss, 1 timefor2laps.
Top 10 in Points: 1. S.Hornish Jr., 989; 2. A.
Dillon, 985; 3. E.Sadler, 947; 4. R.Smith, 946;
5. BVickers, 942; 6. JAIIgaier, 919; 7. B.Scott,
916; 8. TBayne, 903; 9. K.Larson, 864; 10.
PKligerman,820.
S NASCAR Driver Rating Formula
A maximum of 150 points can be attained
in a race.
| The formula combines the following cate-
gories Wins, Finishes, Top-15 Finishes, Av-
erage Running Position While on Lead Lap,
Average Speed Under Green, Fastest Lap,
SLed Most Laps, Lead-Lap Finish.

NASCAR Camping
World Truck Series
SMITH'S 350
At LasVegas Motor Speedway
Las Vegas, Nev.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (12) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 146 laps,
134.9 rating, 47 points.
2. (16) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 146,101.5,42.
3. (7) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 146, 101.9,
41.
4. (1)TyDillon,Chevrolet, 146,119.5,41.
5. (17) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, 146, 96.1,
40.
6. (8) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 146,
116.5,39.
7. (18) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 146,76.5,
37.
8. (6) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 146,
106,37.
9. (3) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 146, 84.8,
35.
10. (9) Max Gresham, Chevrolet, 146, 73.8,
34.
11. (5) Matt Crafton,Toyota, 146,101.9,35.
12. (4) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 146,65.8,32.
13. (14) Joey Coulter, Toyota, 146,68.9,31.
14. (11) RossChastain, Ford, 146,78.7,31.
15. (13) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, 146,
58.9,29.
16. (20) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 146,
52.9,28.
17. (10) Chad Hackenbracht, Toyota, 146,
54.5,27.
18. (2) Justin Lofton, Chevrolet, 146,66.2,27.


AUTO RACING: NASCAR Sprint Cup Series

19. (21) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 146,50.2,25.
20.(15) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 146,77.4,25.
21. (19) German Quiroga, Toyota, 146, 57.4, ---
23.
22. (22) Bryan Silas, Ford, 145,39.2, 22.
23. (24) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ram, accident,
136,35.5,21.
24. (29) Matt Kurzejewski, Chevrolet, acci-
dent, 96,40,20.
25. (25) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, handling,
77,32,0.
26.(28) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, handling,
43,31.2,18.
27. (23) Chris Jones, Chevrolet, overheating,
7,32.1,17.
28. (26) Caleb Roark, Toyota, clutch, 4, 28.9,
16.
29. (27) Chris Lafferty, Chevrolet, transmis- -
sion,2,28.3,15.

NHRA _.
FIRST-ROUND PAIRINGS FORTODAY'S B l;*a--.
ELIMINATIONS '
At Gateway Motorsports Park
Madison, III.
TopFuel
1. Shawn Langdon, 3.761 seconds, 326.40
mph vs. 16.Troy Buff, 3.977, 286.92; 2. Tony Go
Schumacher, 3.782, 327.74 vs. 15. Terry
McMillen, 3.970, 314.97; 3. Clay Millican,
3.786,322.27vs.14. Spencer Massey, 3.853,
319.37; 4. Khalid alBalooshi, 3.794, 322.81
vs. 13. Bob Vandergriff, 3.843, 320.36; 5.
Brittany Force, 3.795,308.92 vs. 12. Brandon
Bernstein, 3.840, 319.75; 6. Antron Brown,
3.796, 318.24 vs. 11. Billy Torrence, 3.839, -AP PHO
315.34; 7. Morgan Lucas, 3.801, 325.85 vs.
10. Doug Kalitta, 3826, 325.06; 8. David Greg Biffle leads Matt Kenseth during practice last week at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in
Grubnic,3.818,323.58 vs.9. Steve Torrence, Loudon, N.H. Biffle is fifth in points as the Chase for the Sprint Cup continues today at Dover.
3.818,323.43.
Did Not Qualify: 17. Chris Karamesines,
3.986,299.40; 18. Pat Dakin, 4.047, 256.75;
19. Tim Cullinan, 4.088, 244.03; 20. Scott
Palmer, 4.200, 278.29; 21. Cory McClena-
than, 4.496, 189.26; 22. Luigi Novelli, 9.582,
182.21.
FunnyCar
1.MattHagan,DodgeCharger,4.001,320.20
vs. 16. Daniel Wilkerson, Ford Mustang,
4.398, 287.47; 2. Robert Hight, Mustang,
4.022, 315.64 vs. 15. Jeff Arend, Charger,
4.196,280.95;3.John Force, Mustang,4.023,
313.66 vs. 14. Chad Head, Toyota Camrny, : h o
4.115, 275.17; 4. Courtney Force, Mustang,
4.037,319.82 vs.13.Tony Pedregon, Camry,
4.112,304.60;5.DelWorsham,Camry,4.041, Driver among those lurking behind top there
314.46 vs. 12. Johnny Gray, Charger, 4.098,
311.77;6. Ron Capps, Charger, 4.058,310.05
vs. 11. BobTasca Ill, Mustang, 4.094,306.40; By DAN GELSTON history to win the first tw
TimWilkerson, Mustang,0631.13 vs ASSOCIATED PRESS AAA 400 races (2008) of the 10-rac
10. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.077, 307.37; 8.
ia Beckman, Chager 40703066 vs.9. DOVER, Del. Matt WHAT: Third race in Chase for playoff and he followed
Alexis DeJoria, Camnry, 4.076, 308.00.with a third in Kansas.
Did Not Qualify: 17. Dale Creasy Jr., 5.092, Kenseth has Chase perfec- Sprint Cup championship w A strong showing,
230.33. tion. Kyle Busch nailed the WHEN: Today, 3p.m. A strong showing,
Pro Stock just not stout enough to
1. Allen Johnson, Dodge Avenger, 6.512, runner-up finishes. And WHERE: Dover International hold off Johnson for the
212.29vs.16.LarryMorgan, Ford Mustang, no driver can touch the speedway, Dover, Del.n r e
6.631, 209.36; 2. V. Gaines, Avenger, 6.526, am ns championship pedigree of hip. Biffle ha
S211.96vs. 15.MattHartford,Avenger,6.623, i pdg" e TV: ESPN four finishes of 10th or
209.52; 3. Jeg Coughlin, Avenger, 6.527, Jinlm ie Johnson.
211.49vs. 14.GregStanfield,ChevyCama- Led by Kenseth, the DEFENDING CHAMPION: worse and finished third
ro, 6.610, 209.82; 4. Erica Enders-Stevens, Brad Keselowski in the final standings.
Camaro, 6.528, 211.36 vs. 13. Deric Kram- top three drivers in the fia ad
er, Avenger, 6.603, 209.30; 5. Shane Gray, Chase for the Sprint Cup One of NASCAR's mosi
Camaro, 6.531, 211.69 vs. 12. Steve Kent, championship standings Kenseth blows an engine consistent drivers, Biffle
Camaro, 6.571, 210.18; 6. Vincent Nobile,
Avenger 5,6 211.46 vs. 11.Greg Ander- have started to separate or Busch and Johnson was second in 2002,
son, Camaro,6.566,210.80;7.Mike Edwards, themselves from the rest wreck. Anything that takes seventh in 2009, sixth in
Camaro, 6.55538, 211.83; 8. Buddy Perkinson, of the field with eight the top drivers out of the 2010 and fifth in 2012. Bi
Camaro, 6.545, 211.96 vs. 9. Rickie Jones, races remaining, checkered flag chase. when it comes to true tit]
Camaro,6.552,212.16. But is the list of con- Kenseth, who has a se- contenders, Biffle's name
Did Not Qualify: 17. Rodger Brogdon, 6.634,
S209.98; 18.KurtJohnson, 6.646,210.31;19. tenders set? Have only ries-high seven wins, leads is rarely tossed around ir
Mark Hogan, 6.744, 205.54; 20. Dave River, three drivers out of the Busch by 14 points and the same category with
6.815,204. ProStockMotorcycle 13-car field really emerged Johnson by 18. Edwards Johnson or Kenseth or
1. Hector Arana, Buell, 6.796, 19858 vs. 16. as the favorites to win the (36 back), Biffle (38), and Kyle Busch.
Mike Berry, Buell, 6.970, 190.67; 2. Michael championship? Harvick (39) are still in the 'Am I surprised they're
Ray, Buell, 6.830, 196.99 vs. 15. Shawn lk a t 16
Gann, Buell, 6.926, 194.13; 3. Matt Smith, Not so fast. mix. not talking about the 16?
Buell, 6.850, 196.30 vs. 14. Joe DeSantis, Carl Edwards is lurk- "I wouldn't be the one Not really because we
Suzuki, 6.920, 193.02; 4. Scotty Pollacheck,
Buell, 6856, 19585 vs.13 Jim Underdahl, ing in fourth, and Greg putting my name on the tend to slide a little bit
Suzuki, 6.908, 196.27; 5. John Hall, Buell, Biffle and Kevin Harvick line to say there are only under the radar all the
6.864, 195.82 vs. 12. Andrew Hines, Har- have certainly stamped three cars in this hunt time anyway," he said.
ley-Davidson, 6.901,193.85; 6. Eddie Kraw- h
iec, Harley-Davidson, 6.872, 195.45 vs. 11. themselves as drivers who right now," Biffle said. "I "It doesn't bother me. It
Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.899, 194.38; 7. can win races and wrest wasn't necessarily saying gives you motivation to c
Hector Arana Jr, Buell, 6.873, 195.03 vs. 10.
Jerry Savoie,Suzuki, 6.888,194418. Ada the top spot away from that for the 16 team. I well and compete every
Arana, Buell, 6.876,195.42 vs. 9. LE Tonglet, Kenseth. wasn't making the case week and try to get what
Suzuki,6.885,195.70. "I can't imagine with that it's not a three-man you can. If you're winning
Did Not Qualify: 17. Wesley Wells, 7.010,
191.10;18. Michael Phillips, broke, eight races to go that race because of us. I races or you win the
somebody would be wouldn't count out Carl championship, they have
willing to say, 'Oh, this is Edwards or any of those to talk about you, so put
a three-man race,'" Biffle other guys that are right yourself in that position.'


t


e

Vo
:e















it
ut
le
[e














lo


g


"


OPEN TO ALL
Divisions: Championship Flight Men's Amateur Ladies' Amateur Seniors (60+)
ENTRY FEE: Amateurs $160, Pros $175
Includes Cart & Greens Fees, Lunch & Beverages, Player Gift.
$12,000 prize purse (based on afull field.)
r-----------------------------------------I
I Name:.I




Tel #:______________ Email:__________
Championship Flight: Yes No (Circle One)
(Circle One) Pro Amateur (Circle One) Male Female
(Circle One) Senior: Yes No Age: Male Female
L-------------------------------J





4100 Riverwood Dr., Port Charlotte, FL 33948




S NEWSPAPERS
Charlotte DeSoto- Eg1hewoodg North Pot VenimC c
America's BEST Community Daily t Wo ot KINGSWAY


said.
As the Chase shifts
today to Dover, the field
knows time is running
short to widen the list of
contenders. They'll need
that perfect blend of strong
finishes and the hope that


there in the hunt."
Biffle, who was third last
week at New Hampshire,
knows as well as any
driver that a champi-
onship isn't won in the
first two races. He was
the first driver in Chase


That starts with winning
races. Biffle has two wins
and 10 top 10s in 22 career
starts at the 1-mile track.
He made seven straight
starts at Dover in one
stretch where he finished
no worse than eighth.


* AUTO RACING ROUNDUP


Logano shows Dover dominance


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DOVER, Del. His
chase for a Cup champi-
onship all but over, Joey
Logano turned his pursuit
toward Dover history.
Logano dominated
at Dover International
Speedway once more and
took the checkered flag
in the track's Nationwide
Series race for the fourth
straight time. Logano
became the first driver
to win four straight races


at Dover in NASCAR's
second-tier series.
He pulled away in the
No. 22 Ford down the
stretch Saturday and was
never seriously challenged
for the win on the mile
track.
"It's been my favorite
race track ever since I
started here," he said.
With good reason.
Logano has swept the two
Dover races the last two
seasons.


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Logano's Ford, however,
flunked post-race inspec-
tion because both sides
off the front were too low.
NASCAR will announce
penalties later.

Hagan tops qualifying: In
Madison, Ill., Funny Car points leader
Matt Hagan took the No. 1 qualifying
position in the NHRA Midwest
Nationals at Gateway Motorsports Park.
Hagan's track-record run of 4.001
seconds at 320.20 mph in his Dodge
Charger gave him his fifth No. 1 qual-
ifying position of the season and the
15th of his career. Shawn Langdon led
the Top Fuel field, Allen Johnson was
fastest in Pro Stock, and Hector Arana
Sr. topped the Pro Stock Motorcycle
lineup in the third of six races in the
Countdown to the Championship.

Peters wins Trucks race:
Timothy Peters raced to his second
NASCAR Truck Series victory of the
year and seventh overall, pulling away
on a late restart at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway. Jennifer Jo Cobb forced
the final caution, hitting the wall in
the second turn. Series victory leader
Ron Hornaday had the lead on the
restart with two laps to go, but quickly
dropped to fifth and finished sixth.










PORT CHARLOTTE PUNTA GORDA


NORTH PoRTENGLEWOOD
NORTH PORT ENGLEWOOD ARCADIA


Sunday, September 29,2013


REST CANCER


1


INSIDE...
Breast cancer detection, treatment have become less invasive
Page 4
Two drugs suggested for some women with high risk for breast cancer; caution advised
Page 7


New hope for treating cancer? Patterns seen in 12 types of tumors
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Study focuses on blood test to determine risk of aggressive breast cancer
Page 12


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Sharing a personal experience with cancer


Editor's note: This column originally
appeared April 5, 2012.
Cancer has been part of my family
history since I first became aware of
the existence of the disease. I don't
really remember when I first learned
about cancer. But back in the early
1950s, when I was in college, I received
a message from my mother that my
paternal grandmother had breast
cancer.
Nana, as we called her, was going in
the hospital to have her right breast
removed and needed blood donors.
I went to the hospital and donated
blood for her. She recovered but lived
the rest of her life with a swollen right
arm. She was fortunate and lived for
another 20 years before passing at the
age of 88.
My wife's grandmother was also a
cancer survivor, who had a mastecto-
my and lived into her 90s.
This was just the beginning of the
women in my life being affected by
cancer. My mother suffered from
horrible back pain and went through
years of diagnosis and treatment for
something unrelated to what was




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Dave Powell
actually causing the pain. It was a tu-
mor at the very base of her breast that
had previously gone undetected. She
then a radical mastectomy, radiation
and chemotherapy. Unfortunately, the
diagnosis came too late and she died
from cancer at age 79.
My parents lived in Port Charlotte,


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and my mother's last days were spent
in the nursing home at South Port
Square.
Another woman in my life was my
mother-in-law. She also was diagnosed
with breast cancer when it was already
well advanced. We were fortunate to
be able to have her spend the last year
of her life with us. She was taken from
us much too early at the age of 64.
Then the most important woman
in my life was diagnosed with breast
cancer. My wife had a mastectomy
and Tamoxifin treatments for 5 years.
Today she is a 14-year survivor and is
cancer-free.
We are both so thankful for this.
I am no stranger to cancer but
it even becomes more personal.
Seventeen years ago, I was diagnosed
with bladder cancer. The cancerous
tissue was removed surgically and
thankfully, I have not had a recurrence.
So to all you cancer survivors,
congratulations. To those of you with
cancer today, have hope treat-
ments have come a long way in the
past 30 years and join the ranks of
survivors.




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The Sun /Su nlay S-l:'t-er l: .-. 2; I


Breast cancer detection, treatment have become less invasive


By BOB MASSEY
i i ,w I I ii ( ', ,i li i i i I

I tliink tile in,-,st imlpoI itm lt tiling
foi o-mlllell to i-le;ilize;ib ut [ileait
C;inciel I thait it', I collllimoi." -,Iid
Chi lotte Countr\ Sutigeon ir lolin
Guaiiiino Prob-ilal\ iaboutI 11 percent
ofi all noimel il Iliae blieasit clince
in thein life
FoiItllitele detect, ci iand tieai -
merit inethod,d hiae evolved to Imake
thingS mtcIh em-iSel oin tit e patient
So bileai ,t caiIclel I l c l-lionI It'
treatable. ;ind there ;iie tile-inelit
opliolls thalit aile le,, i \;i-,ile tlhall tile\
used tol bhe but equally effective ill
tei mI, of -tki:ng caie iof tile disease.
G uiI II-10 s- aid
Tli-it'h g'ci:,:d nie\VS bheca usie bileaist
c;illcel I ;-i iij miol i eah ilth collcel i
Not V cOLItiing II -lle kiilds f kin
c;incel. bieast c;iicel Ill tile UntJied
States iS. tile mois-t comminll i c;incel Ill
wOllell,. io iltiti-m el tile lace oi erlllc-
it\. accolrding to ri te U $ Ceiters, foi
Disease Con lol ;-nd Pre\entiorn it
is tie mIo-,t co_-immni, ciausie of deiathi
foimll c;iiceil iiiollg Hi-nspa.ic omr-
eni. ;nitl1 tile secollid m ios-t co-immoin
c;auIe -,ef deait fioill c;inlC cei liollng
whle. blaIck. ASinl/-Pacihc [slanldel
anti N;-itie .lnelic;-a i'.1;-sk;-a Native
Oillelli
Tlie mio-,t leceill[ M[ir-IicSh i\lible
from n lie CDC. flinoll 1n'i. h, -lo, trirt
211 .73:; .neiclain lomen i erie dilg-
no-sed \vithlih bieait c;aincel Tia;gicall.
40.6-. died
if \o l'ie o\el -i40i 01 iat a lugli ii k
foi tlie disease. \ou shouM also
haie aiiuial;ll m1;in_,oginn ;nI
phVi\ sical eiixm b\ ;i d -iocto i," ieclin -
m eilld, Bie;ei-,tC iice l ig, ;i iiollpil -t
oi:_;-i11z;itio-, idedicited to[- plo\Villl
tihe inmo-t lelilble, coinplete, anid
up-to--ilite iifo','I iii- i-o1 bu-tl bileaitr
c;incei Tihe eailhiei bieaist c;iiceil i$
fouid ;iid diligiio-,sed, tlie bettel \o-UI
clijilce of Ie-the llig it "
Bul \xlha I[.i ifi n inlno ilrl g dilpliv.
som iehi ,LIng h I-picoIu,. ;-iid futliheli
tests i-ie needed'
Tli.it'- iele tile lates-t tecillr olo ,
colmei iIll
In tile ,ol dai\s. \oIu haliid to gl\e a
p-ilelt ine-,tlies ,li, m ake 111 i n- i I oII
in tile bileait ailld tile\ oluli hake
to ideli-lgo ;- Suigical pioceduie."
GuiI 1Ii0- explained But nl\ rh tlieie' ;
proc-ceduie called i aSteiletactic hi opp.\
and I'min piett\ much tile only onee
donig that t tile liho-pital "
I[ tills case, tile lio-spitial ChilallOt te
Region-all] Medical Centei Ill Puntia


FILE PHi.,Ti..


Goilda. loseoe Bleast Health Centeli
iS ;-il ;iie;i (JGuia iin clnliideirS to be
uLidei uilIized. aild [ill Io-t Suile thliat
min\I people Ikon lt liit sev ice iS eveni
aviilahle. lie said Thlie people tlhai
;ie lpeirg it[ ind It ei\ conl- enilelt.
;i- d piallent w -i[IS-laf [I,-II o i lotugl_ thle
1loof "
GuatlIIIllO classi- i tes tle seleoltaicc
ploCceduie a 1a lesse ii\;k-,ie. less,
expensiVe ;i\ t,-, btiops,\ les,-ion l III tie
bileait thalit ;iie io-, Seeni bi\ ultlli,-lollud.
but c;ii be detected bh iII\ Iim'iniiogi';In
It' aii Otlipiltient pioceduie pel-
forim ed tlldei lcIcal ailletliesi Illn
\hch:hli 5 millimetel iniciSion i i made
- ai o,'ppos-ed tro I 2- to ::;-ceillilletei
one
Theles ie' llciing, tlieiles es,
pain (I. Guai-it-o -ind Tlie pa.iie t i Suiu-
aillh goes iblouti iei buitneiie, -- tlieie'
ii-1 lieco-\ei \ ime ;ilnd \etr e get trie
siune ;ie;i of tis rue out "
During rtie pioceduie. thie p.ienti
la s 11:n 1 table i ilile; i machlle
compiesses tle bieas-t inid c aptuiles
millliogilaphlc iiige- It t_ hell gileS
thle Sluigelon cooldinites, 1-1 to heliee


the;ialmio-imaliti i- locItced
Based o-, tihos-e cooldillite.es. \e
c;-i I m;ake )-nillllim etei iciion I, l i
thie biea., iadaiice ai bilopsv probe
thai t ca;iii l-ita e. cutr reti ue aiiid Suck it
Out though tle same small iciSion.l
GLIiIIrllO -.id Thlie patient. \\'ide
;i iake. ;id it' It d, i e uirL dei oI:cal
aietliesil Tlie plroceduie pio:lvIahI\
ti-keS 2-'0 IIImtiluteS i ;i-d mi-,t of tlihat
is setup nime Thlie actual bhiops\ takes
iboutl -2 to :; ImiLluteS-
If caiIcei i, detected,. ai ilmitectolll\
ileed iot bhe tire 1- ilv co Cui-e o_-f iic ti, -i
Thie Sutilgeil f-1i bileait chance -
just like all otihei StilgeineS -li- h
becolle less IIr\iV-,ike." Gu l-io il-, aid
Ylou do lia\e options [ lou dol'tlI hale
o li- he tire ell[iie bileait iemilloed
\\e c;an do less, iniiv-e pioceduiles,
like lllum pect llies, ;illd l dliti o1ll ;-i,
opposed to Imri-tectomleS-
.\lotlieil pro-ceduie iS c called ai
Sentrinmel inmph ii -node biops'\
Limph npoides iie small lroiund
orligai S that lielp make up rtie bo:d\ 's
1 mnplihatic s\ ,teml Tills -,\,teml I,
compos-ed of ,othei r Ir sle i ;id -lg:iiri,


- stch -I blonie mini v ;iandti spleen
- tihati pi-tduce. stoc le-id tiariispoi t
the \\litie hbl'ood cells used to ,: ight
infections and disease
Lvinph nodes aie ,found hougli-Lhout
thie hod:d. \\ itli gups of them locicaed
II thie ileck. Luiideia IllSm clies., ibdo-
Illell aind gi-ii, .A cleail tluid called
l imph tflo\s t,:uough tlie imph niodes
A sentinel l\mph npiiode is tlie hiSt
IIno-de -1 ii-node to, \vhlich alce i cells
\ill most priohibal\ spleaid firlm i
tumi ol \\ itli a sentinel 1 inpli nide
hiTps\., the sentinel nio'de is identified.
lemlllOed llld iispected tor see If
caircei cells aie present
It's less \isi\e thaiin thle old dia\s.
\lien \\e used to -ike all the nodes
oLIt." GLIIIIIIO s;d It li ais ;- ,l\el
incidence oif lmphiedemnai selling
caIused bI\ s i-i tiIsue ;iftel the suilgical
iemoin al of l inmphl nodes
Thlie ione tili g Guiiio emplihasized
is I rell pairentrs \\hien tlie\ le diag-
nosed \vilih bieast c;aicei is lhalt it is
ior ;i deaitll sentence is t ileiatiable.
;id t ele aie opriolmrs Ill feilmnS oi
tile-im ig p.ira e ts "


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SThe Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


feelingfit.com


School-age drinking increases breast cancer risk


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5


By JIM GOODWIN
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Here's a sobering fact for millions
of young women heading back to
school: The more alcohol they drink
before motherhood, the greater their
risk of future breast cancer.
That's according to new research
from Washington University School
of Medicine in St. Louis that, for
the first time, links increased breast
cancer risk to drinking between
early adolescence and first full-term
pregnancy. Previous studies have
looked at breast cancer risk and
alcohol consumption later in life, or
at the effect of adolescent drinking
on noncancerous breast disease.
"More and more heavy drinking is
occurring on college campuses and
during adolescence, and not enough
people are considering future risk.
But, according to our research, the
lesson is clear: If a female averages
a drink per day between her first
period and her first full-term preg-
nancy, she increases her risk of breast
cancer by 11 percent," said co-author
Dr. Graham Colditz, associate direc-
tor for cancer prevention and control
at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-
Jewish Hospital and Washington
University School of Medicine.
The study was published online
Aug. 28 in the Journal of the National
Cancer Institute.


Colditz also is the Niess-Gain
Professor of Surgery at Washington
University School of Medicine.
He worked on the study with first
author Dr. Ying Liu, a Washington
University School of Medicine
instructor in the Division of Public
Health Sciences, and colleagues from
Brigham and Women's Hospital,
Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel
Deaconess Medical Center and
Harvard School of Public Health.
The researchers also found that
for every bottle of beer, glass of wine
or shot of liquor consumed daily, a
young woman increases her risk of
proliferative benign breast disease by
15 percent. Although such lesions are
noncancerous, their presence in-
creases breast cancer risk by as much
as 500 percent, Liu said.
"Parents should educate their
daughters about the link between
drinking and risk of breast cancer
and breast disease," she said. "That's
very important because this time
period is very critical."
The findings are based on a review
of the health histories of 91,005
mothers enrolled in the Nurses'
Health Study II from 1989 to 2009.
Colditz was key to the development
and administration of that and
similar studies that track disease risk
in female nurses.
Colditz and Liu didn't consider
the effects of adolescent and early


adulthood drinking on women who
didn't have a full-term pregnancy
because not enough were represent-
ed among those studied, Liu said.
Breast tissue cells are particularly
susceptible to cancer-causing sub-
stances as they undergo rapid prolif-
eration during adolescence and later.
Adding to the risk is the lengthen-
ing time frame between the average
age of a girl's first menstrual cycle
and the average age of a woman's
first full-term pregnancy.
Colditz doesn't foresee any short-
ening of that, which is why young
women should drink less, he said
- to lower average daily consump-
tion and, therefore, risk.
"Reducing drinking to less than
one drink per day, especially during
this time period, is a key strategy
to reducing lifetime risk of breast
cancer," he said.
Colditz said the findings call for
more research into what young
women can do to counteract alco-
hol's adverse effects if they choose to
drink. Past studies that didn't con-
sider alcohol use suggest that eating
more fiber and exercising more
lowers cancer risk for everyone.
To learn more about breast cancer
risk based on age and lifestyle factors,
visit www.yourdiseaserisk. wustl.edu.
A related free iPad app, called Zuum,
is available on iTunes at https://
itunes.apple.com/us/app/id521273376.


SIGNS OF BREAST CANCER
A change in how the breast or nipple feels:
*Nipple tenderness or a lump or thickening in or
near the breast or underarm area.
*A change in the skin texture or an enlargement of
pores in the skin of the breast (some describe this
as similar to an orange peel's texture)
*A lump in the breast. (It's important to remember
that all lumps should be investigated by a health-
care professional, but not all lumps are cancerous.)

A change in the breast or nipple appearance:
*Any unexplained change in the size or shape of the
breast.
*Dimpling anywhere on the breast.
*Unexplained swelling of the breast (especially if on
one side only).
*Unexplained shrinkage of the breast (especially if
on one side only).
*Recent asymmetry of the breasts. (Although it
is common for women to have one breast that is
slightly larger than the other, if the onset of asym-
metry is recent, it should be checked.)
*Nipple that is turned slightly inward or inverted
*Skin of the breast, areola, or nipple that becomes
scaly, red, or swollen or may have ridges or pitting
resembling the skin of an orange.

Any nipple discharge-particularly clear
discharge or bloody discharge:
It is also important to note that a milky discharge
that is present when a woman is not breastfeeding
should be checked by her doctor, although it is not
linked with breast cancer.

Source: National Breast Cancer Foundation,
www.nationalbreastcancer.org


Girls who eat peanut butter may

improve breast health later in life


By E. HOLLAND DURANDO
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Here's some news worth spreading:
Girls who eat more peanut butter
could improve their breast health
later in life.
That's according to a study from
Washington University School of
Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard
Medical School. The research shows
that girls ages 9 to 15 who regularly
ate peanut butter or nuts were 39
percent less likely to develop benign
breast disease by age 30. Benign
breast disease, although noncancer-
ous, increases risk of breast cancer
later in life.
"These findings suggest that peanut
butter could help reduce the risk
of breast cancer in women," said
senior author Dr. Graham Colditz,
associate director for cancer preven-
tion and control at Siteman Cancer
Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital
and Washington University School of
Medicine.
The research was published in the
journal Breast Cancer Research and
Treatment.
Colditz also is the Niess-Gain
Professor of Surgery at Washington
University School of Medicine. He led
the study with Catherine Berkey, ScD,
a biostatistician at Harvard Medical
School and Brigham and Women's
Hospital in Boston.


The findings are based on the
health histories of 9,039 U.S. girls
enrolled in The Growing Up Today
Study from 1996 through 2001. Later,
from 2005 through 2010, when the
study participants were 18 to 30 years
old, they reported whether they had
been diagnosed with benign breast
disease that had been confirmed by
breast biopsy.
The researchers found that partic-
ipants who ate peanut butter or nuts
two times each week were 39 percent
less likely to have developed benign
breast disease than those who never
ate them. The study's findings suggest
that beans, lentils, soybeans and corn
also may help prevent benign breast
disease, but consumption of these
foods was much lower in these girls
and thus the evidence was weaker.
Past studies have linked peanut
butter, nut and vegetable fat con-
sumption to a lower risk for benign
breast disease. However, participants
in those studies were asked to recall
their high school dietary intakes years
later. This new study is the first to use
reports made during adolescence,
with continued follow-up as cases of
benign breast disease are diagnosed
in young women.
Because of the obesity epidemic,
Colditz recommended that girls
replace high-calorie junk foods and
sugary beverages with peanut butter
or nuts.


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Researcher: MRIs can lead to unnecessary procedures


By PATRICIA GARLAUSKY HORWELL
FEELING FIT CORRESPONDENT

Although magnetic resonance
imaging or MRI is a useful diagnostic
tool, it is expensive and not necessary
in many instances. Traditionally, MRI
is routinely used before and imme-
diately after breast cancer surgery
to further identify areas of cancer.
"MRI is an expensive procedure and
has a high false-positive result," said
Melissa L. Pilewskie, a breast surgeon
at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer
Center. "It can sometimes lead to
additional, unnecessary procedures."
Pilewskie and a team of researchers
decided to study a group of 2,321
women who had surgery for ductal
carcinoma in situ or DCIS, cancerous
cells inside a milk duct of the breast
between 1997 and 2010. DCIS is
considered the earliest form of breast
cancer. It is a noninvasive cancer and
has not invaded other parts of the
breast. Previous studies had shown
that MRI for women with invasive
breast cancer has no significant im-
pact on recurrence rates, but women
with noninvasive breast cancer had
never been studied.
Of the women they team followed,
596 had undergone an MRI either
before or immediately following sur-
gery and 1,725 had not. They looked
at outcomes five and eight years later
and found no significant difference in


RESOURCES
*The National Library of Medicine website at
www.nlm.nih.gov.
*Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center at www.
mskcc.org.
*BreastCancer.org at www.breastcancer.org.

instances of recurrence between the
two groups. After five years, women
who had received the MRI had an
8.5-percent recurrence rate and the
women who did not undergo MRI
had a 7.2-percent recurrence. After
eight years the numbers were still
similar, 14.6 percent and 10.2 percent
respectively.
"Some, but not all women with DCIS
receive radiation therapy after breast
surgery," Pilewskie said. But even the
subgroup of patients who did not have
radiation, MRI was not associated with
any improved longterm outcomes.
"Right now this is a completed
study," she said. But there is talk of a
randomized trial on MRI usage as the
next step.
"We are just looking into the fu-
ture more and are trying to be more
conscientious about the tests we
order," she said. "We need more data
to support any additional technology
we use."
Pilewskie presented her findings
at the 2013 Breast Cancer Syposium
earlier this month.


Women in Appalachia have higher rates of late-stage breast cancer


STAFF REPORT
HEALTH BEHAVIOR NEWS SERVICE

Older women living in the poorest
areas of Appalachia in the U.S. fail to
get regular breast cancer screening
and have a higher incidence of later
stage breast cancer, reports a new
study in Health Services Research.
About 25 million people
live in the 13 states that make
up the Appalachian region, a
205,000-square-mile region that
follows the spine of the Appalachian
Mountains from southern New York
to northern Mississippi.
The National Cancer Institute has
recently publicized Appalachia's
higher rates of cancer and poorer
outcomes for residents diagnosed
with cancer.
To examine regional disparities in
breast cancer screening and diag-
nosis, researchers evaluated Central
Cancer Registry and Medicare claims
data from three Appalachian states
(Kentucky, Ohio and Pennsylvania)
to measure the incidence of later


stage breast cancer in the region's
poorest counties compared with its
more affluent counties. The counties'
economic statuses were compared
based on factors such as unemploy-
ment rates, average home values and
average monthly wages.
Women living in the most econom-
ically deprived counties located in
eastern Kentucky and southeastern
Ohio had 3.31 times as many
late-stage tumors compared to
those in the least deprived counties.
Appalachian women in the study
over age 65 had a 17.3 percent
incidence of later stage breast cancer
compared to a national average of 16
percent for women of the same age.
The degree of disparity between
the counties was stronger than the
researchers had suspected, said lead
author Roger T. Anderson, PhD, from
the department of public health sci-
ence at Pennsylvania State University
College of Medicine.
"Overall, we found counties that
are struggling economically tend
to have inadequate health care


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the highest Kates of latei-stagrie bieasti
cancer s-.aid ideisoii
There \ eie also: dispauiities mIi hl:
often women iecei ed lecoiinenteded
mammo,:,iaph\ scleeimnig Although
area women ovel thle age 4of 65 had
Medicaie iiIntiiaice coverage. ,oill 53
percent lhad lmimmoigal\phi scieen-
ing witluin rte 2 \eaus before tlhei
cancer diagio,-sis coinpliied ithll the
nationaIl aveiiage 4of i percent
Andeis-on explained tiha cotomtries
that st tggle econiioimicllh in;i-\ set
up a "peipeuaitiig c\cle of fe\\ se -
vices to piomiote caiicei pleveirion


;n1d etl h detection III colmiiniuitie
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Clement Gilede. PlihD. ias,,ocltre
diiectoi of diVeiir s i at rtle l'offihr
Cancel Ceinteil i Tampa. iagieed.
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maninolgiapli\ sc1eelillig lesoluces.
ediicatio,-, t;nd a\vaelles,. ;nd
related lesoluces
\\Iitli-it tlieese biloaid aid stsu -
illled slr.ategies. tlie VicIOIs, c\cle
\\Ill pei Silt." Gilede added


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:Page 6


The Sun /SLIunlay S-e't-iiel 220 P' Il?


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com









Two drugs suggested for some women with high risk for breast cancer; caution advised


SThe Sun/Sunday, September 29, 2013


By MELISSA HEALY
Los ANGELES TIMES


Women with a higher-than-usual
risk for developing breast cancer
should consider taking one of two
medications approved by the Food
and Drug Administration to reduce
that risk, a federal panel has conclud-
ed. But the medications, which can
blood clots, are not for everyone and
should not be taken for breast cancer
reduction by most women, the U.S.
Preventive Services Task Force said.
40 Taken daily by women who are
more likely than most to develop
breast cancer, the chemotherapy drug
tamoxifen or the osteoporosis drug
raloxifene have been shown to drive
down that risk.
S"The federal panel of experts said
: physicians and patients should
discuss taking one of those medica-
.tions in cases where a woman's risk
of developing breast cancer over
the next five years is calculated at 3
percent by one of two reliable breast
cancer risk calculators. But in certain
cases, a woman's other vulnerabili-
ties including a personal or family
history of stroke or blood clots -
might outweigh the possible benefits
of the breast cancer prevention drugs,
the panel said.
The National Cancer Institute
estimates that 12.4 percent of women
born today will develop breast cancer.
But many factors influence a woman
risk, including advancing age, the age
FILE PHOTO at which she began menstruating,
whether she has a sister or mother
Swho had the disease, and the density
of her breasts.


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Those and other factors are used in
the two separate calculators that can
guide a woman's decision-making:
www.cancer.gov/bcrisktool/ or http://
bcsc-scc.org/BC5yearRisk/.
These risk calculators, and the task
force's measured recommendations,
do not apply to women who have the
BRCA-1 or BRCA-2 gene mutations,
which confer an extremely high risk
of developing breast cancer, and they
don't apply to women younger than
35 or older than 79.
Past research has suggested that
having a five-year risk of developing
breast cancer that was 1.66 percent
or greater was sufficient to justify
the use of chemoprevention such as
tamoxifen. But the task force suggest-
ed that, given the potential harm both
medications can cause, the women
who would most clearly benefit the
most were those with a five-year
breast-cancer probability of 3 percent
or higher.
Women who took tamoxifen were
also slightly less likely than those
who did not to develop nonvertebral
fractures. And women who took ral-
oxifene first approved for osteopo-
rosis had fewer vertebral fractures.
Over four trials, however, four women
developed potentially deadly blood
clots for every 1,000 women who took
tamoxifen.
Over two trials, seven women of
every 1,000 who took raloxifene
developed blood clots. Women taking
tamoxifen had a higher rate of endo-
metrial cancers, which are rarely fatal
when treated, than those who did
not take the drug. And women taking
either medication reported more hot
flashes than those who took none.

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New hope for treating cancer? Patterns seen in 12 types of tumors


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


By ERYN BROWN
Los ANGELES TIMES

Examining the molecular profiles
of tumors from 12 different types of
cancers, scientists working with the
National Institutes of Health-backed
Cancer Genome Atlas said they had
found striking similarities between
tumors originating in different
organs.
Their discoveries, made possible by
improvements in sequencing tech-
nologies and computing methods,
could herald a day when cancers
are treated based on their genetic
profiles, rather than on their tissue of
origin, said University of California,
Santa Cruz, biomolecular engineer
Josh Stuart, a participant in the
project and co-author of a commen-
tary discussing its findings released
Thursday by the journal Nature
Genetics.
Eventually, such a shift in think-
ing could lead researchers to new
treatments for hard-to-treat cancers,
Stuart said in an interview with the
Los Angeles Times.
If scientists can find molecular
similarities, say, between a rare form
of breast cancer and a form of ovari-
an cancer, they might be able to use


a drug known to target the ovarian
tumor to treat the unusual subtype of
breast cancer.
"Hopefully fewer patients will be
left out on their own," Stuart said.
The Cancer Genome Atlas or
TCGA, which has been underway
since 2006, seeks to catalog the
DNA and other molecular features
of thousands of different tumors
from a variety of cancer types. By
identifying how genes are scrambled
up in tumors and what effects those
changes have in cells, the thinking
goes, researchers might be able to
understand better how different
cancers progress, and find the best
treatments for particular tumor types
and subtypes.
The Pan-Cancer initiative that
Stuart is involved with carries the
analysis further, comparing can-
cers of different types to see what
patterns emerge. The team looked
at TCGA data gene mutations,
changes in the numbers of copies
of genes, and measures of how the
genes were behaving from tumors
sampled from thousands of patients
who had 12 different cancers (includ-
ing tumor types in the brain, head
and neck, kidney, lung, breast, ovary,
cervix, colon and rectum and one


type of leukemia.)
The cross-cancer comparison
was a project many researchers had
wanted to pursue, Stuart said. Some
had already noticed similarities as
they studied various tumors as part
of TCGA. "We'd say, hey, I recognize
that copy number profile in that
breast cancer. Didn't we see it in
ovarian cancer last month?" he said.
Comparing different types of
tumors is useful because it lets scien-
tists learn more about how cancers
behave than looking at one type on
its own can. Cancers are a jumble
of cells. Looking at just one type of
tumor might let a researcher iden-
tify the jumble within that certain
cancer, but doesn't necessarily point
to the mechanism that triggered the
cancer in the first place, Stuart said.
But looking at several cancers at
once and finding commonalities can
help tease out the cell of origin, he
added.
Over the coming months, the
collaboration will publish dozens of
papers detailing what researchers
found in the cancers. Two such pa-
pers were published, also in Nature
Genetics. One noted similarities in
gene copy-number changes across
cancers. The other classified tumors


and tumor subtypes according to
their molecular profiles, identifying
two large classes that had not been
identified previously (one set of
cancers where genetic mutations
predominate, and another where
copy number changes predominate.)
Nature Genetics also published
a second commentary about the
Pan-Cancer initiative, delving into
the computing strategies scientists
have devised to crunch vast stores of
tumor-related genetic data.
Stuart said that while the notion
tumors of different origins might
share genetic signatures wasn't a new
one, the TCGA Pan-Cancer effort
finally lets scientists dig in and see
whether it's true.
"We just haven't had the data to
step back and look at it all together
and connect the dots," he said. Over
coming months, researchers will
add tumors and tumor types to the
dataset, and will also analyze whole
genome data.
But changes in medical approaches
to treating cancers won't happen
overnight, Stuart added.
"There's a lot to put in place," he
said, noting therapies would be
tested in cells and lab animals before
there were trials in people.


Immune cells open window


to breast cancer risk


Provided by the UNIVERSITY
OF ADELAIDE
University of Adelaide, Australia,
researchers have made a major dis-
covery that highlights the important
role played by immune cells in the
risk of developing breast cancer.
Researchers have focused their
efforts on immune cells known as
macrophages in the breast, and
how the role of these cells changes
because of fluctuations in hormones
during different times of the month.
The results of laboratory studies
- published online ahead of print in
the journal Biology of Reproduction
- show that while the immune cells
have a role to play in the normal
function of the breast, at certain
stages in the menstrual cycle they
may help to make the breast more
susceptible to cancer.
"These cells should be protecting
our body from cancer, but at certain
times of the month it appears macro-
phages might be allowing cancerous
cells to escape immune system
detection," said the lead author of
the study Wendy Ingman, head of the
Breast Biology & Cancer Unit with
the University of Adelaide's School of
Medicine, the Robinson Institute and


the Queen Elizabeth Hospital.
"It's sort of a Jekyll and Hyde sce-
nario we need the macrophages
to do their job so that the breast can
function normally, but at the same
time they're giving cancerous cells
the chance to survive.
"We think there is a window of risk
that opens up around the time when
women have their period. This is
when levels of the hormone proges-
terone drop, and this affects how
the breast functions. At this time,
immune defenses in the breast tissue
are down and women could be more
susceptible to the initiating factors
that lead to breast cancer," she said.
Ingman said researchers have
known for some time that there is a
link between the number of years of
menstrual cycling and breast cancer
risk. "We're now starting to under-
stand the cell-to-cell interactions
that are impacting on this risk," she
said.
"One in eight Australian women
will be diagnosed with breast cancer.
By better understanding the bio-
logical factors that underpin breast
cancer susceptibility, we might one
day be able to close these windows
of risk, and reduce women's lifetime
risk of breast cancer."


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feelingfit.com


Making a different kind of cancer donation to a tissue bank


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 9


By COURTNEY PERKES
THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Jane Pang has given her time,
money and abounding energy to the
fight against breast cancer. She's also
shared the most personal and pre-
cious gift of all, a piece of herself.
Pang flew from Orange County,
Calif., to Indianapolis in February so
researchers could extract and freeze
a sample of her healthy breast tissue
for the Susan G. Komen Tissue Bank
at Indiana University. The bank, sup-
ported by roughly $1 million a year in
Komen funds, provides researchers
from around the world with samples
of normal tissue that can be com-
pared with cancerous tissue to better
understand and treat the disease.
"The older we get, the greater your
risk," Pang said. "At 70, I haven't got-
ten it. Are we who are elderly, without
breast cancer, do we hold the cure?"
Pang, of Huntington Beach, Calif.,
was joined by Garden Grove, Calif.,
resident Charlene Kazner and Angela
Acevedo-Malouf of Mission Viejo,
Calif. The women underwent biop-
sies to help increase the bank's ethnic
diversity and to serve as ambas-
sadors as recruitment begins for a
first-ever West Coast tissue collection
Nov. 2 in Orange County, Calif.
"It's just such an unusual, really
connected opportunity to be part of
research," said Lisa Wolter, executive
director of Komen's Orange County
branch. "I'm not a scientist, I'm not a
doctor, but I can do this."
Since the tissue bank started in
2007, most of the 3,000-plus samples
have come from white donors. But
researchers need to study women
of all backgrounds and stages of life
- they need samples from a variety
of ethnicities, ages and hormonal
states, such as those brought on
by pregnancy, breastfeeding and
menopause.
Dr. Anna Maria Storniolo, director
of the Komen Tissue Bank, said
researchers can request extremely
specific tissue samples based, for
instance, on a donor's age, her
number of children or her history
of tobacco use. Donor identities are
kept confidential.
She said researchers have pub-
lished seven studies with data
derived from the tissue bank, includ-
ing one by Thea Tlsty, a University of
California-San Francisco pathologist.
Tlsty used tissue to study the cause of
dense breasts, which are associated


MCT PHOTO
Charlene Kazner of Garden Grove, California, center, performs the hula during the 31st Annual Scholarship'Aha'Aina held at Costa Mesa Community
Center in August. She is a five-year uterine cancer survivor and was a breast tissue donor.


with a higher risk of breast cancer.
The findings were published in the
journal Cancer Discovery.
"Without access to that tissue, we
couldn't have asked this question, we
couldn't have found these results,"
Tlsty said. "You can't get this from
mice tissue. That's why this bank is
an incredible resource."
Wolter said ideally 70 percent of
the Orange County donors will be
non-white, although no one who
signs up will be turned away. Women
65 and older are also needed.
"Our goal is to make sure the word
gets out to everyone, but to carry a
message of the importance of involv-
ing the entire ethnic populations,"
she said. "There is nothing better
than a personal testimonial from
someone who has gone through the
process."
To that end, the three women are
speaking at public events, hanging
signs where they shop and attending
the Sept. 22 Race for the Cure at
Fashion Island.
Jane Pang, a retired nurse, has
cared for her husband, Victor,


through three bouts of cancer, most
recently of the breast. Breast cancer
is about 100 times less common in
men than women, according to the
American Cancer Society.
Jane Pang, who is of Chinese and
Japanese descent, grew up in Hawaii;
her husband is native Hawaiian.
Victor Pang, 75, first underwent
chemotherapy and radiation in 1983
for an eye tumor stemming from
non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Twenty
years later, surgeons removed a
golf-ball-sized brain tumor and he
went through chemo again. In 2009,
a small mass was detected during a
routine chest X-ray. His left breast
was removed and he again under-
went chemo.
Long before, the Pangs were active
in promoting breast health among
Pacific Islanders after close friends
developed breast cancer. But still,
they were shocked by the diagnosis.
"We were rather overwhelmed
despite the fact he's had all this back-
ground information," Jane Pang said.
"I discovered (men) go through the
same trauma and the same emotion-
al adjustment to the surgery itself."
For Pang, donating her tissue was
never in question. The tissue bank
hopes to eventually collect from men,
Storniolo said.
"Going to Indiana, I really under-
stood the plight they have," Pang
said. "They are predominantly white.
I said, 'We've got to make a difference
in Orange County. We've got the
diversity. Let's step up.'"
Angela Acevedo-Malouf, 54, works


Thomas
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0450998


as a nurse at St. Joseph Hospital's
cancer center in Orange, Calif. But
it wasn't until her mother was di-
agnosed with breast cancer nearly
three years ago that she gained
better insight into what her patients
experience.
Acevedo-Malouf's mother, 71, is
doing well after undergoing a double
mastectomy.
"I was there with my mom for the
biopsy, the diagnosis, the chemo
and the surgeries," she said. "When
I work with my patients, this has
helped me to view ahead what they
might need."
Acevedo-Malouf grew up in
Colombia, where she became a
nurse. At 27, she moved to California
and spent three years learning
English before passing her registered
nursing boards.
She previously worked at a com-
munity clinic that partnered with
Komen to ensure that low-income
women received breast screenings
and mammograms. She contin-
ues volunteering to help educate
Spanish-speaking women about
mammograms.
When she heard about the tissue
bank opportunity, she immediately
volunteered.
"I have been talking to my friends.
They've asked, 'Does it hurt? How
long does it take?'"
Acevedo-Malouf knew what to ex-
pect not only because of her nursing
experience, but because in 2005 she

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rwmwqR


----------------





www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com


The Sun /Sunlday S-el:te-il: 20;' I?


:Page 10


Marriage associated with better cancer outcomes, study finds


By BILL SCHALLER
HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL

People who are married when
diagnosed with cancer live longer than
those who are not, HMS researchers
at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and
Brigham and Women's Hospital report.
Married patients also tended to have
cancer diagnosed at an earlier stage-
when it is often more successfully
treated-and to receive more appro-
priate treatment.
The study's findings were published
Sept. 23 in the Journal of Clinical
Oncology.
"Our data suggest that marriage
can have a significant health impact
for patients with cancer, and this was
consistent among every cancer that
we reviewed," said Ayal Aizer, HMS
clinical fellow in radiation oncology
at Dana-Farber and Brigham and
Women's, chief resident of the Harvard
Radiation Oncology Program and the
paper's first author. "We suspect that
social support from spouses is what's
driving the striking improvement in
survival. Spouses often accompany
patients on their visits and make
sure they understand the recom-
mendations and complete all their
treatments."
Utilizing the National Cancer
Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology
and End Results Program, the re-
searchers conducted a retrospective
analysis of 734,889 people who were
diagnosed with cancer between 2004
and 2008. They focused on the 10
leading causes of cancer deaths in the
United States: lung, colorectal, breast,
pancreatic, prostate, liver/bile duct,
non-Hodgkin lymphoma, head and
neck, ovarian and esophageal cancers.
They also adjusted the data to account
for a number of demographic factors


that could have an effect on the
health outcome, such as age, sex, race,
residence type, education and median
household income.
Their analysis found that in compar-
ison with married patients, unmarried
cancer patients, including those who
were widowed, were 17 percent more
likely to have metastatic cancer (can-
cer that has spread beyond its original


site) and were 53 percent less likely to
receive the appropriate therapy.
"We don't just see our study as an
affirmation of marriage, but rather
it should send a message to anyone
who has a friend or a loved one with
cancer: By being there for that person
and helping them navigate their
appointments and make it through all
their treatments, you can make a real


FILE PH'-.T'..
difference to that peis,-ioni o_-utcome."
Said the Stud\i'S seNl,-e li a tllio. Paul
Ngii\en. HMS -iiss1-iiit pi ofe-ss, of
i;-Idl;-tion o olo0 ait Da anla-Falbel
antd Blligl ln antd \\_-men'S .1 ,A-,1-
cologI-.I ne need to be ;\;ii e of o-i
paileiiS' aviil;ble sociidl suppolis aind
enlco-lIae them- to seek ;aiind accept
Sulppoil It lioln feiid ;-In d fanil
dtl nig tin, S potentiall difllicuil tl ime


'Think pink' for Breast Cancer Awareness Month


By PEACE RIVER REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
SPECIAL TO FEELING FIT

October brings visions of warm
colors the changing of leaves from
green to yellow and red. Thanks to
the Susan G. Komen Foundation
and Evelyn Lauder's Breast Cancer
Research Foundation, there is one
color that has come to dominate the
month of October pink.
From the pink lemonade offered
on Delta flights to the pink gloves
and patches that NFL players wear
throughout the month, the color is
everywhere. And, this month Peace
River Regional and Charlotte Regional
Medical Centers are doing their
part to "think pink" by empowering
women to schedule a mammogram
through awareness.
With early detection and treatment
being imperative, The National
Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Organization offers these helpful
guidelines:
*Obtain a regular mammography


screening starting at the age of 40.
*Obtain annual clinical breast
exams.
*Perform monthly breast self exams.
*Obtain a risk assessment from a
physician
October also brings the annual
Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure.
Being the world's largest fundraising
event for breast cancer education and
research, the Race for the Cure is a
series of 5K runs/walks around the
world. For more information about
Race for the Cure in your area, visit
ww5.komen.org
Make pink your must-wear color in
October, don your ribbon, schedule a
mammogram, and stay vigilant in the
fight against breast cancer.
As part of October's National Breast
Cancer Awareness Month, Peace
River Regional and Charlotte Regional
Medical Centers are offering an
October pink ribbon special. Women
can now get a digital screening
mammogram at a pink ribbon special
discounted fee of $99, including the






) veri ihurmsln lithe
.SUN S-IFN
WW ~ ~ .mww. ums


test and interpretation at the follow-
ing locations:
*Peace River Regional Medical
Center, 941-766-4321.
*Peace River North Port HealthPark.
941-423-5000.
*Breast Health Center at Charlotte
Regional, 941-637-2449.
In addition to our pink ribbon
mammogram special we are hosting
a "Laughter is the Best Medicine"


\\oVmien's Health Expo: Tlsn, oniie-tia\
event will be held n fliom 0 ai in -3i
p in Oct 5 at Filhiei ineiis \ illge Il
Ptlisr;- GIl litt-
Reinenmbei that t hi iii oi inailloii
iS ii,[ Ilteiided to replace lie aid\ice
of voi ti doctori. buth iitliei to, iiciei.se
a;\;aelleSS ;aiinid help equip pa.iieiitS
with ilfoi-anl tioii aln i facilitate col -
vesa ,tionlS \vlh oil phli\siciain that
will beiieht \otiil iealith


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The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013 feelingfit.com www.sunnewspapers.net Page 11


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o The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 11


feelingfit.com


disease


t hat





www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com


The Sun /Suncly S-el:te-il:- 2;': Iu


Study focuses on blood test to determine risk of aggressive breast cancer


By PATRICIA GARLAUSKY HORWELL
1 I Iw II, I ( ',U l l IG I I I I

\ simple blWooid test i oight s-on0 be
able to,:, indicate lierlieil someone
is piedisposed ro aiggliessive bieiast
c;iicei
Doloies DI \ izio,. ; c;icel stilgeon
antd leseaiclei Ibelieves it can happen
anid so-, do-,es te e.o Fotiinditioni
foi \\omene The noinpiliht iecentl\
a\\aided DI \ izio ;i 'i300.000 gii
to sltd\l that poha sstlth A .1,nasso-
ciate piofessoi in thle Depaiintent
of stilgeiV ;anid thle Depa.iirnent of
PatllologoL aind Labloiatoi\ medicine
anid ;i ineinhei of thle C;Iicei Biolog
antid Uiologic Oncology Rese-uch
Po:giamsn at the Ceddais-Siaii Sauintlel
Oschiii Cominpieliensie C(iclnei
histitire. DI \ izio ;inid ; team of
reseaiiceiws ill studlV thle presence of
biominikeis in thie blood Biomiikeis


- i-dicaitoi, o,{ ;i peis-on-s likelihood
to develop cerliti inedical coiidllioi- l
- aiie ahlead\i beleig utsed Ill nediciine
to fliniulate pieveiive tile;itmreiit
\\Whe Di \i zi-o v;-is sxtadiiig pios-
tiate ciliceli. slie discoveied that lanige
onco-s.oines. licli ;lie hhbbles called
\esicles, that lie witlim c;aincel cells.
rtiiiinmit siiigialsk bemrveen cell coiin-
pi-imnelts scientists belie\e tlihesee
si:iigalsJ call ie themin iisitlit intoi tie
piogiession of thle disease Ii ;i p.iilic-
ullai patient OIcom-,,les Vithlli bIeas[t
c;-icei cells belii\e siinilii v
Reseaiclieis ill be Ilooking iat
10-\e;a --old hblooid samples ofI patients
vitlih ;i:ggiessie bie-ist caiicel. co-In-
p-i ig thle samples to iecent onies
NMok.st tliis studl\ il he pei -
fo mned im thie blood bIaiik. DI\ izio-
saiid \\e ;-iie fo-li tiii;-ie to li;-ia e fio-ze
Blood p[lasimi to tiud\ Theiin e
c;in follow up with trie imoie recent


sainples ;ulid see nihele the\ i panelliit
aiie ii-\ "
Siie hopes to, is,-,late cei tiiii iidi-
cair, s I ithe -i i:.ginl Iblood sinmples
that 11- longer exist Ill the blhiood iaftei
;-_gg_2essive le;-il elt E\eniiuall.
DI\Vizio als-o lihopes, doctoil maI\ be
a;ble ,to predict hlio, iggiessive Ibieasti
c;iicei wouldd he befolie it piogiesses
,to, that s-ta.ge
\\tali tilis sttd\. \e hliope to idein-
ila pie\vio-lus tiliecgized lainge
onc' OIle ne S poteintiai biolliikeis III
;-idiiinced rtlinilIs- t ait c;a be vistu-
alized, quitintined ;aid is,-olated losing,
metlihods easiil\ ti iiiLtahble to the
chlhc." sIie said
ED \ izio will collatiboiate witli Betli
Y Ki ii;i. diiectori of4 the \\o-mnellii
Cincel PiogIinI. diiecto-i of tlhe
Dii-,io o-Gcillecologic OIcolo_--
III the Dep.iimneiit o- O(Absteric ;aidd
G\iiecologI. the Cedaii--Siiia Bondid


ot Gove inl,-, CI(-hli ll G\-necologic
incolog'I aind the diiectori of the
Ced-ils-l-miii Gia Ratdiinel HeledillaiV
Cincel PiogiIm
The application oii tlheli inillig
could hi be f;ii-ieiciliig DI \Izio 'said
pio-state. o,,v]air aiind bieast cainceis,
;ie all sim ilin Illn taiitie
Tills i, ;-i ine held o4 s-.tud. just
emeigmitg Ill thle last 10 \eai
\\e ionly haIve ;a halidtiil o- collabo-
i;tiois \olking ,with us fiom Bo-,ston
,to Ne\\k Yoik :to al\." li she ;ad Hei
uiltimnate hope is, tihat then \,olk ill
lead tr i-iekv -illi m-ie effective din ig
theialp\I to ftieatt Vailet\ o{ caitceis
DI \Vlzio lecentih \is oil rctil Ill
Eumope piesenting hiei \olik to tlhe
medical comIiInlltI theie
Foi miow t aiifo i .ici S. risfr 1h1

<~ L"[Ol 11 I'/SI[L f i[ ilM slV Oi_ 1Oi
II'l'' h1i 7Sf'iML uc i O1 *_


Breast Health Navigator targets uninsured population


By BARBARA BEAN-MELLINGER
1 1 Io I II (C '- 1 1 1 I1'1 I

Itf \o:,ut don't lihae health Iiis.aillice.
claiiices ;iie Volu'Ve :gonlie wti-utl
m;ain iecommelded hieahlth scieeln-
inrigs becauiile if the coS-t icildiill:g
scieeillig maiinmogli;ns Yet. the
Ainei icaii C;iicei '-ocieV iccom-
mendts that noinell ige 40 ;ind o-\eli
have;i nma;immoginn eei\ Vei to,
detect bieiast caiicei III ItS eatl s\,taiges,
Thle\ iigilmia B .\iides \lluinteei
Co-linLinlit Chilic Ill Poir Clihailttre
pio\vides bieast Ihealth sei\ices.
iricludilig iiiininll,-1giaims. to female
antd male Cihala Iite CoiVii ieshidentiS
vwho meet cei tiil ci lrei i;
Katli\r Shieplianid iS tie Bieasit Heailth
lavig;a-ito- ti lie clinic ;i ceirtifiai-
tion b\ thie iitiioniil Con-lo ,itim ot
Bieas[t Centels. g:iken ,-to tho-,se \\I,-,
haie been atimied to lielp people


i\aVigate heaIlth cie s\stemsI to,,
lecele opltimum llbieast IeaIlth cIaie
Siteplitiid expl;niied the cilieil;i tiil
inuti be met to ieceive ciie at tlhe
clinic
*Be un.tltsised
*H;iae piooif of Clihailo e ICount
leshienclV
*Be 18 ol ,ldei
*Hiave iicome less tihain -'00 percent
fo the povei\ level
Foi example., ;i no-peison
hlou-usehold inmuit iiIae; in iicome less
tluin 2-.585 pei monthh" Shephaii d
explained A tliiee-peison Ihotise-
hloldi InmuIt llie ,11 income less tihain
$3.255
llininol imll iie conducted ;it
,ne of foui p;iiu icip; t._ing ;-icilities
Ciihailo ,e Regioimnal M~iedc;( Centei.
Faimcett Nlemni iala Hospital. Pe ace
Ri\ei Nledicil ;ICentel ;ind Ad\;iiced
imaging of Poit C(iii lortte Paitieits ;iie


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I1iit changed foI tlhe iImininog.ims.
;-Iid the ciih ic ieceives ;i discolluled

If. hb-ied -ii ;1 p;-tietle inim ino-
giiin. shie nieedis moine id;taiiced
scleelillig. ,shlie can i eceile ,-i ultlia-
s-tllmid. M RI PET s-ca;iIn t II-, cost
. e;i stuigeo-is doiinite tiheii time ,to
pe i ifr biopnsieis as needed
Thiese sei \ices ;iie po-ss.ible due tor
funidmig fiom intle suin G Klomienei
FOtlnd.tiioln and oiganimaztioniS like
Piioject Detect III Poli Chalii ,lotte
Ko,-inell ftundiig iS do -vii ig imhc1 iihtl\
fi,-lom pieviouus levels Gioups like
Piioject Detect. \vh i li-ise Imone\ foi
bieas[t scleellllg_. Hie vital ,to keeping
the seiv\ ces available Lait \ veai the
o-iganiz tii on iii-, sed $3:5.000 foI tthe
Chilinc. -,aind Sliepliaid
Aie;-i medical pio,-fessioi-il-s doi, iite
theii time to tle chilic fiom 5- p in to
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bieasi c;aiiceil while Shiepliiiid \ s li -
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Cutting-edge implant helps patients see clearly


By NICHOLE BROCHU
SUN SENTINEL

A Sunrise, Fla., surgeon is among
the first in the nation to perform a
stitch-less implant in the eye to correct
both acute myopia and astigmatism,
a debilitating pair of conditions that
afflict millions of Americans.
The device, called the Ophtec Artiflex
Toric Lens and manufactured by a
Netherlands-based company with U.S.
offices in Boca Raton, Fla., does not yet
have Food and Drug Administration
approval. But the FDA has afforded Dr.
Andrew Shatz a rare "compassionate
use exemption" to implant the silicon
lens in the eyes of three patients.
Confident that the southern Florida
region is home to "several thousand"
similarly vision-impaired patients,
Shatz is hoping to identify 200 of them
for a possible clinical study that could
speed up the FDAs approval.
"There's no alternative for these
patients," Shatz said. "They can't wear
contacts (well). They can't use glasses
because it causes too much distortion.
And they're not candidates for Lasik
(corrective surgery)."
That was the predicament that
Deerfield Beach, Fla., native Jennifer
Burke, Shatz's first Artiflex Toric
implant patient, found herself in.
At 25 years old, she's been through
a lifetime of ill-fitting glasses and
contacts, none of which gave her even
near-perfect vision. Because of her
severe astigmatism, which distorts the
shape of the eye, she also had several


0.


MCT PHOTO
Jennifer Burke, of Deerfield Beach, left, who recently had both eyes implanted with the Ophtec Artiflex Toric lens, sees Dr. Andrew Shatz for a
post-op appointment at SightTrust Eye Institute in Sunrise, Florida, September 10, 2013.


contacts pop out, once while driving. "I
never felt confident wearing contacts,"
she said.
Now that she's determined to join
the Navy, Burke needed a better
solution to meet the military's vision


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requirements. Two weeks after Shatz
implanted the Artiflex in both eyes,
Burke can't believe the difference in
her life.
"I can go swimming, I can go on a
roller coaster and not be afraid they'll
blow out of my eyes. It's like a brand-
new world," Burke said of her 20-25
vision post-surgery. "Even if I change
my mind about the military, this gave
me peace of mind to be able to see."
The procedure didn't come cheap.
Because it's not FDA-approved,
insurance won't cover it. Shatz estimat-
ed the implants, which must be done
separately for each eye, cost at least
$5,000 per eye. Burke took out a credit
card to pay for hers, calling the two
procedures "my No. 1 priority."
Lenses like the Ophtec Artiflex Toric
have been widely available in Europe
and Asia for years, where studies have
shown them to be highly effective in
treating severe cases of myopic astig-
matism, according to the Review of
Ophthalmology medical journal.
Now, two U.S. companies Ophtec
here and STAAR Surgical in California
- are seeking the FDAs nod for these
"foldable" lenses. Unlike other im-
plants, like those for cataracts, these do
not replace the eye's natural lens, but
instead are laid over them to correct
the distortions.
Shatz, the only U.S. surgeon who has
implanted Ophtec's lenses, said the
foldable design is key. While prior im-
plant lenses are made of hard plastic,
these are soft, like daily contacts, so
they can be folded into a much smaller
incision that doesn't require stitches to
close.


The implant procedures, then, can
be performed in less than 15 minutes,
under local anesthesia where the
patient is awake the whole time, and
the recovery time is minor, the doctor
said.
After removing an overnight patch
the morning after each surgery, Burke
said the difference in her sight was
immediate. "I could see clearly," she
said. "I was shocked."
Bringing the lenses to the U.S. mar-
ket, though, remains a challenge since
the FDA does not yet have enough
studies to complete its review, Shatz
said.
That's why Shatz, the lead surgeon at
SightTrust Eye Institute in Sunrise, Fla.,
is hoping to recruit a couple hundred
local patients so he can persuade FDA
officials to sanction a study in the
hopes of demonstrating how "safe and
incredibly effective this is," he said. To
qualify, patients between the ages of
18 and 45 must have more advanced
near-sightedness complicated by astig-
matism and have difficulty seeing and
functioning with glasses and contacts.
Florida Keys resident Devon
Spaulding, 26, had his left eye implant-
ed with the Artiflex and will have Shatz
do the right eye later this month. A
smart-home system installer by day
and musician by night, Spaulding said
the dusty, smoky environments had
made his already ill-fitting contacts
almost impossible to wear.
"This was my only option," said
Spaulding, who has worn glasses since
kindergarten and contacts since the
third grade. "I really didn't have any
other choice."


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odwwleeling Fit.- 0


o The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 13


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Be nice to your bacteria and they'll be nice to you, doctors say


By NANCY CHURNIN
THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS

At 60, Marty Wichter of Arlington,
Texas, found himself in constant
digestive distress and at a loss for
what to do.
Then he tried a probiotic capsule
packed with live bacteria. Within
48 hours, his problems went away.
Wichter is now 67, and the problems
haven't returned except for the
handful of occasions when he's taken
less than five a week, he said.
Introducing bacteria into the body
is part of a bold new way of thinking
about health, said biologist Rob
Dunn, author of the best-selling "The
Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators,
Parasites, and Partners That Shape
Who We Are Today" (HarperCollins,
$26.99).
Like an increasing number of
experts, Dunn, a biology professor
at North Carolina State University,
believes our bodies are ecosystems
that require a good balance of healthy
bacteria to help digest food and fend
off certain diseases. He sees a correla-
tion between our war against bacteria
in the form of an overuse of antibiot-
ics and antibacterial wipes, and the
rise in a host of chronic conditions
from Crohn's to inflammatory bowel
disease, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus,
diabetes, multiple sclerosis, schizo-
phrenia and autism.
"I don't mean to discredit antibiot-
ics," he said. "The use of antibiotics to
control pathogens has saved billions
of lives. But we're starting to learn
that in addition to warding off bad
bacteria, we need to start gardening
good ones. There are thousands of
species in our bodies and we don't


know which ones are important yet,
but we do know that having a good
community is important."
Wichter takes probiotics with
the support of Dr. JayYepuri, his
gastroenterologist with Digestive
Health Associates of Texas and on the
medical staff at Texas Health HEB in
Bedford.
Yepuri said that while much re-
mains to be learned about probiotics
and recommended amounts, research
and his personal experience with
patients have shown him that "we
don't know how much good it does,
but it's not going to hurt you."
The same principle applies to fecal
transplants. That procedure injects
bacteria in the body by transferring
stool from a healthy person into
the intestines of those infected with
Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that
can lead to diarrhea and colitis and
affects up to 3 million people in the
United States.
A January report in the New
England Journal of Medicine declared
that in one study in the Netherlands,
fecal transplants cured 94 percent of
the patients and was such a success
that the study was stopped and the
treatment offered to the control
group.
The Food and Drug Administration
restricted its use earlier this year,
with doctors required to submit an
extensive application and wait up
to 30 days for a response. After an
outcry, the FDA lifted the restrictions
June 17 and allowed the procedure
for infections that aren't responsive to
standard therapies.
Another procedure showing prom-
ise is the transplanting of earwax
from an ear with healthy bacteria to


one with chronic infections.
Dr. Lora Hooper, an associate
professor of immunology and of mi-
crobiology at the University of Texas
Southwestern Medical Center, said
that before she began her research
in 1996, she had thought all bacteria
were bad and it would be good to
eliminate as many as she could.
Then, as she learned about the
extent of bacterial species within the
body, she was impressed with their
beauty and complexity, she said. "I
found out we're actually more bacte-
rial than we are human. We've got 100
trillion bacteria in our gut. That's 10
to 100 times more bacteria than cells
in your body. It's almost as if we have
another organ inside us with a mind
of its own."
That's a good thing, said Hooper,
who also serves as a Howard
Hughes Medical Institute investi-
gator at UT Southwestern's Cancer
Immunobiology Center and its Center
for the Genetics of Host Defense.
"There's no question that the compo-
sition of our microbial communities
determines our health."
The National Institutes of Health
is studying that composition as part
of the Human Microbiome Project,
which it launched in 2008 to inves-
tigate how changes in the human
microbiome affect health or disease.
Dunn said it's an exciting time,
with scientists finding that the more
we know, the more we realize we
don't know. The inside of our bodies
is like a wilderness and the more we
explore, the more questions we have,
he said.
He wonders: Is it possible there
is a connection between particular
bacteria in our body and regulation


of out sti ess levels -' Could ceicami
bictei lia and tlien iie tiacntio- iii tihe
iholim-neS that liegulate appetite help
detelminie ihethliei e ale Ihea\A -i1
leaii Babaies bot Im b\ I;aitui;al child-
blthli red to hliae feieil alleigies ,i1
cases,- o'f a;-tlInnti tli tIlose bo-l II bi
Caes-ailiiin section could tliat be
because tlie\ pick up liealtli\ bacteiLa
tliiuough true mnothliei' I Ithi canal'
1S it nime to take a inmoie critical
look at rte iequeiic\ oii antibi tc-s
pieSciiptioniS III te doctor i'i office.
anld also ;iat rte aintibiotich ioturintel\
pumped IntIo te aiinilals that ive
coiinstilne'
\.1 coniiSeiiss gs 'o,' tihe impe oirt-
ant lole tliat liealtli\ bactei i pla\ Ill
the gut,. Duiiii hopes- a iine\ inid-Ser
will emieige
Instead 'of litiinaiiS eeimg them-
selves at \\al with tlie iiatuial ino'ild.
lie ,o:,uld like to -ee a fi iendliei \ite
of the liiviig rliligS itlithin u, aid tlhe
vegetirtioiil. O-trihei species ;amid liuaiiniii
with ili lom ne excliaiige -.alutii \
imiclobes
Thatli i' hli\ lie eiicoluiages Iis n-,ii
W1n bo\s- to pla\ III r tlie dii aid to
a\;-,li then ihailndd ili simunple soip
and nartei Anid lie' conSiiidei Iiig
getting a dog
Srtudie liae sh,-li-i tlihat fainilies
within dogs tenid to be hliealliiei. po-
sibly because tlie dogs I Inig iiarutie
clutS-ide Lii iIi,- ,-,t Io hme,, lie Said
\\iclitei also believes that pi'obio'rt-
ic- aie juLSt on-ie step IIll lis '-,11go11ig
jou iev He aolds- o-\el -tlie-co-tiitei
inedicartio ,ii tliat kill bactei la. lie coll-
sumens h liole giiS, ;aind biels, thait
piinlomote liealtli\ bactei il glgiomli.
and lie \\alks outside iegulai l\
You live toi knor \oiIl bloid\ Ife \o
\aInt to -li\e ;aid ,ta\ healhli\. Ie -said


Make your snacks count with nutrition-rich choices


By SHARON PALMER
ENVIRONMENTAL NUTRITION NEWSLETTER

Do you remember when between
meal snacking the "spoiler" of
meal appetites was frowned upon?
Those days are long gone, as snack-
ing now is widely viewed as a good
thing, that offers a number of advan-
tages, from helping to avoid hunger
during weight loss to promoting
stable blood glucose levels.
A 2011 study published in
Nutrition Journal found that the
inclusion of low-glycemic index,
moderately high-protein snacks
helped to reduce body weight and fat
loss in Type 2 diabetes patients.
A survey on snacking behavior,
presented at the Supermarket
Dietitian Symposium in Dallas, Texas
in February 2013 by Laura Hershey,
a dietitian and health and nutrition
manager for Daisy Brand Cottage
Cheese, found that people snack
for a variety of reasons, including to
boost metabolism and energy levels,
replace nutrients after exercise, add
protein to the diet, increase intake
of healthy foods, satisfy cravings for
sweet or salty foods and hunger, and
to replace skipped meals.
People are more likely to consume
a healthy snack such as fruits,
vegetables, or dairy foods in the
morning and the afternoon than they
are in the evenings.
Whatever the reason, our snacking
habits are at an all time high. The av-
erage number of snacks we consume
can


has doubled over the past 30 years,
according to a 2011 U.S. Department
of Agriculture report on snacking
patterns of American adults. Today,
90 percent of adults report snacking
on any given day.
We consume an average of 2.2
snacks per day, according to a 2012
survey conducted by the research
organization, The Hartman Group.
And those snacks are contributing a
large amount of our daily calories -
586 calories for men and 421 calories
for women, according to the USDA
report.
Though the Hartman report found
that most people believe that choos-
ing healthy foods is important, the
most popular snacks are soda and
sugar. No wonder snacks contribute
38 percent of our daily sugar intake
and 21 percent of our fat intake.
All that snacking can be a good
thing, if you're selective in the foods
you choose.
"Snacks are a great way to get
more energy and increase the intake
of vitamins, minerals, fiber, whole
grains, healthy fats, and even live
and active cultures," said Ruth
Frechman, California-based dietitian
and spokesperson for the Academy
of Nutrition and Dietetics.
"Snacking can be an opportunity to
enhance health. For example, per-
haps you're not getting enough fruits
and vegetables at a meal.
A snack is the perfect time to
sneak in good nutrition," said
Barbara Ruhs, supermarket


dietitian for Bashas' grocery stores.
Unfortunately, surveys show that
we're not always doing a good job of
choosing calorie-wise, nutrient-rich
snacks.
If you turn to convenient, high-cal-
orie, low-nutrient foods chips,
refined grain crackers, cookies, bars,
and candy you can miss out on
important nutrients, while promot-
ing weight gain, said Frechman.
She added, "Another problem is
that people may be grazing all day
long or not listening to their hunger
cues, which causes them to finish


wiaite\ei is Iii fi,:,nt 'of then Wheii
you feel satished, close tlie co'tm-inrei
amid sa-e tlie iest fi r toin ioiiiv
\\e ca;- add inmoie impoil ;-i
seli illgs of tiuriient -ic hli food's -
wxliolle _gi lls. fluits. \eget;ables., lea;i
plot, renS-. dm;i\ foods-. ;id uits to
thie da\
Thlieie is ai oppoirlinitu fo,:
hlealtlih\ s;icking b\ fci-.cting oi
siicks tlihat aiste good. ;aid aie coll-
veillentl S itsfi llsig. Ilitilelt-denl se
aid lie hilli\," ."said Hels- le\i it the
SNACK 119


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21 -OPHTHALMOLOGIST
2011 & 2012

624-4500


:Page 14


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Florida women partying with drinkable collagen


By NICOLE BROCHU
SUN SENTINEL

So long, cosmos. Hello, collagen
drinks!
A new breed of cocktail parties has
some women pounding shots but
instead of alcohol, they're infused
with beauty treatments. Packaged
in one-shot bottles sold over the
Internet, ingestible collagen is said to
restore luster in hair, skin and nails.
"It's a hot trend because the par-
ties are a fun fantasy that women
can afford," said Bonnie Ceja, 37,
a housewife who hosts monthly
"drink your beauty" parties at her
Wellington, Fla., home. "It sounded
like something the girls on 'Sex in
the City' would do, and that would
definitely add some fun into my
regular routine."
Ceja's parties start out with healthy
appetizers, followed by a wheatgrass
shot, a concentrated juice packed
with vitamins and nutrients. Since
the collagen shot is designed to be
taken before bed, when the absorp-
tion rate is higher, Ceja and her
friends end the night by toasting with
a 1.7-ounce glass of the beauty brew.
This type of ingestible collagen
has been all the rage for years in
Asia, where the beauty beverages are
manufactured. But only in the past
few years has it reached American
shores, industry watchers say. And
South Florida women have begun
embracing the product the best way
they know how with a party.
Costs vary by product, but a 24-day
supply of the U.S.-distributed Lac
Taut brand goes for $220, according
to the company website.
The fact that only limited research
has been done on ingestible collagen,
or that its benefits are unproven, has
not dampened the enthusiasm.
"It's a nice, fun way to get together,"
said Fort Lauderdale, Fla., personal
trainer Kacy Shaw, 33, who started
her parties to introduce friends to
a product she found effective in
improving the health of her nails and
hair. "It's amazing. It tastes just like
orange juice."
At Coral Springs, Fla., parties
hosted by physical therapist Nancy


Marilyn Lopes, from left, Kavina Patel, Manju Patel and Meera Mahabir toast before downing drinks containing collagen at a party in Hollywood,
Florida, on September 5, 2013. Sold in prepackaged doses, ingestible collagen claims to restore luster to hair, skin and nails.


Chang, massages and manicures are
also in the offing.
But unlike the parties of their
youth, these so-called "drink your
beauty" parties typically exclude
alcoholic beverages of any kind,
because alcohol is believed to offset
the fortifying and hydrating benefits
collagen drinks tout.
That's fine for new mom Chang and
her stay-at-home-mom neighbors.
"No one drinks alcohol anymore
because no one would make it
through the (night) feedings," said
Chang, who called the beauty parties
a fun way for moms with few child-
care options to get together and
pamper themselves at the same time.
"I find that more and more women
are taking things into their own
homes and into their own hands,"
said Chang, 40, a Chinese-American


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who grew up on herbal medicines.
"We (Asian women) are definitely
accustomed to drinking our health,
and our beauty, for that matter."
Before sharing the collagen drinks
with her friends, Chang said she
consulted with her dermatologist
to make sure ingesting the stuff was
safe. She was told it didn't appear to
be harmful, though her doctor wasn't
convinced it had any true health
benefits.
It's an assessment Fort Lauderdale-
area nutritionist Sandra Frank
shares. Though collagen is made in
our bodies, the ingestible version
- made from fish or animals is
broken down by the digestive system,
where it tends to lose its restorative
properties, she said.
"It sounds like a nice idea, but the
science is shaky," Frank said.
Nutritionist Nicolette Pace said she
has seen research suggesting that
in the "worst-case scenario," some
ingestible collagen may contain
estrogen components.
"Just because it's put in a fancy
bottle with all the allure, who knows


what's in it?" Pace said.
Pace lives and works in Great Neck,
N.Y., but travels to South Florida
every winter on business. It was here,
at a local hotel, where she said she
first overheard women talk about
collagen drinks.
"It's really a hot trend right now,"
she said. "Botox parties are being re-
placed by drinkable collagen parties."
Larry Pederson can attest to that.
He's the founder of RenewAlliance, a
Seattle, Wash.-based nutricosmetics
company that recently began distrib-
uting the Japanese-made Lac Taut
ingestible collagen shots in North
America.
The company's second-largest
market, behind southern California?
That would be South Florida, which
accounts for about 40 percent of the
hundreds of thousands of dollars
in online sales logged since June,
Pederson said.
"South Florida is the land of beau-
tiful people who want to live forever,
who want to look great up until the
last day," he said. "And why shouldn't
they?"


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o The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 15


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Lifelong weight control


By TED ROBEDEE
FEELING FIT CORRESPONDENT

You've finally have made a commit-
ment to lose weight and to maintain
a healthy lifestyle. You've done this by
taking the first step by entering in the
Pre-HolidayWeight Loss Challenge.
Congratulations! The important
element is to stick to your guns and not
get discourage by early results. If you
stay committed, you can and will do this.
Take advantage of the free month at the
Fitness Salon and I, Phyllis or Gregory
will help you to reach your goals with free
personal training.
Additionally we are offering you free
nutritional advice and a low impact
aerobics classes held every Saturday
morning in room 30 at the Cultural
Center. I attended last week's class and
there was a very good turn out. I loved
it, as did everyone else. Although it was
difficult for some, the instructors were
very accommodating to everyone.
Consistent exercise combined with
good nutrition and you will begin to
realize your goals of succeeding at losing
weight. Once you begin to realize these
goals, it is important to maintain them for
your lifetime. Your ultimate goal should
be to focus on lifelong weight control.


This will only be accomplished with
continued exercise and proper dietary
habits. We are providing these resources
for you. Take advantage of them.
The exercise portion consists of a com-
bination of cardiovascular exercise with a
weight resistance program. The benefits
of weight training are multifaceted. It will
create more strength and muscle tone,
as well as a leaner body mass and better
balance. Also, the body will continue to
burn calories for the next 24 hours. In
addition, it will enable you to be more fit
and to enhance cardiovascular training.
We all want to look better, but you will
also feel better about yourself physically,
mentally and emotionally. You will be so
proud of yourself and regain more self
confidence. Your friends and family will
notice a distinct difference in you, not
only your appearance but your outlook
on life. You will be healthier and will avoid
the many diseases that afflict many when
we grow older.
There is still time to join the competi-
tion. Teams consist of two, and as of now
we have an individual seeking a partner
to embark on the journey to lose weight
and enjoy a healthier lifestyle. I tell all my
clients, if you stay committed to your-
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achieving your ultimate goals.


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Experience is preferred.
Fax resume to:
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:Page 16


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The Sun /Surnclay Sel',te 2-l:e. 2"': Iul?










Missing teeth more about health than aesthetics


By WHATDOCTORSKNOW.COM
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY

Too many people think living with
a lost tooth is no big deal. In fact, the
long-term effects can make it a very
big deal.
Not replacing a missing tooth in-
creases the risk of losing the adjacent
tooth, and the gap left from the lost
tooth takes away stability and increas-
es the possibility for this adjacent
tooth to loosen and fall out.
It gets worse. A vast amount of bone
loss can follow tooth loss, which can
progress rapidly over time. Bone loss
can affect the shape of the jaw, the
bite and the future of your remaining
teeth. You may find it difficult to chew
food properly, and this can contribute
to your health and diet since you're
then limited in what you can eat. In
turn, you may find yourself fighting
obesity and even diabetes due to a
poor diet caused by lost teeth.
If you wear dentures, you may
develop the inability to use full or
partial dentures, and may even find
denture-wearing painful due to bone
structure changes caused by a simple
missing tooth.
Then there's the matter of your
facial muscles becoming out of shape
or deformed. Your teeth and jaw act
as a foundation for your facial mus-
cles and bones. When the foundation
starts to crumble, the shape of the
remaining teeth, muscles and bone
begin to change. In some cases, this
can cause social embarrassment
because the face becomes distorted or
older looking.
Finally, bone loss beneath con-
ventional bridges can cause food to
become impacted, increasing the
incidence of gum disease. And believe
it or not, tooth loss can increase the
possibility of heart disease and stroke.
Tooth replacement can be done in
several ways. Among the methods are
a tooth supported bridge, a removable


A:


FILE PHOTO


partial denture, or a dental implant.
Dental implants have quickly
gained preference from oral surgeons
and patients because of the long-term
benefits. The up-front cost of a dental
implant may be a little more, but over
time, the implant becomes the better
value. With normal care, implants can
last for years without worry about
failure.
Along with longevity, dental
implants can be installed without de-
stroying or sacrificing adjacent teeth.
Other methods may require taking
out an adjacent tooth for a bridge. Be


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it one tooth or several teeth, dental
implants are definitely the preferred
method of replacing missing teeth.
Implants are a dental restoration
system composed of a titanium screw
and a crown. The implant process in-
cludes drilling a small-diameter hole
(pilot hole) for the titanium screw.
Once in place, this screw holds the
implant in place. Surgeons often use
surgical guides when placing dental
implants.
After the pilot hole has been drilled,
the implant screw is placed. Once in
place, the surrounding gum tissue is
secured over the implant and a pro-
tective cover screw is placed on top
to allow the site to heal. After healing
is complete, the surgeon will attach
an abutment, which attaches a crown
to the implant. With the abutment
in place, the surgeon then creates a
temporary crown. The process is com-
pleted when the temporary crown is
replaced with a permanent model.
Once an implant has been placed,
maintaining diligent oral hygiene
habits is mandatory to ensure prop-
er fusing of the implant and bone


Coast

Dei


structure. If cared for properly, an
implant can remain in place for more
than 40 years.
Healing from the surgical proce-
dure to place an implants) takes up
to six months, while the fitting and
seating of the crown(s) can take up to
two months. Again, this time frame
depends on individual cases and
treatments. Follow-up appointments
with your treatment coordinators are
essential to monitor your progress.
For five to seven days after surgery,
your diet should be restricted to soft
foods. If stitches are present, they may
need to be removed by your surgeon;
however, self-dissolving stitches that
don't require removal are typically
used.
Failure to floss and brush is the
leading cause of implant failure.
Infection can also occur if the im-
plant and surrounding areas are not
cleaned properly. Smoking has been
shown to cause high failure rates
with dental implants and should be
avoided following such surgery.
For more information, contact your
oral surgeon.


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o The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 17


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Tuberculosis and Parkinson's disease linked by unique protein


By JEFFREY NORRIS
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO

A protein at the center of
Parkinson's disease research now
also has been found to play a key
role in causing the destruction of
bacteria that cause tuberculosis,
according to a UC San Francisco-led
research team.
The protein, named Parkin, already
is the focus of intense investigation
in Parkinson's disease, in which its
malfunction is associated with a loss
of nerve cells. UCSF microbiologist
and tuberculosis expert Jeffery Cox,
PhD, and his colleagues now report
that Parkin also acts on tuberculosis,
triggering destruction of the bacteria
by immune cells known as macro-
phages. Results appeared online on
Sept. 4 in the journal Nature.
The finding suggests that dis-
ease-fighting strategies already
under investigation in pre-clinical
studies for Parkinson's disease might
also prove useful in fighting tubercu-
losis, according to Cox.
Cox is investigating ways to ramp
up Parkin activity in mice infected
with tuberculosis using a strategy
similar to one being explored by his
UCSF colleague Kevan Shokat, PhD,
as a way to ward off neurodegenera-
tion in Parkinson's disease.
Globally, tuberculosis kills 1.4
million people each year, spreading
from person to person through the
air. Parkinson's disease, the most
common neurodegenerative move-
ment disorder, also affects millions
of mostly elderly people worldwide.
Cox homed in on the enzyme
Parkin as a common element in
Parkinson's and tuberculosis through
his investigations of how macro-
phages engulf and destroy bacteria.
In a sense, the macrophage which
translates from Greek as "big eater"
- gobbles down foreign bacteria,
through a process scientists call
xenophagy.
Mycobacterium tuberculosis, along
with a few other types of bacteria,
including Salmonella and leprosy-
causing Mycobacterium leprae, are
different from other kinds of bacteria
in that, like viruses, they need to get
inside cells to mount a successful
infection.
The battle between macrophage
and mycobacterium can be especial-
ly intense. M. tuberculosis invades
the macrophage, but then becomes
engulfed in a sac within the macro-
phage that is pinched off from the
cell's outer membrane.
The bacteria often escape this
intracellular jail by secreting a
protein that degrades the sac, only
to be targeted yet again by molecular
chains made from a protein called
ubiquitin.
Previously, Cox discovered


molecules that escort these chained
mycobacteria to more secure con-
finement within compartments
inside cells called lysosomes, where
the bacteria are destroyed.
The cells of non-bacterial organ-
isms ranging in complexity from
baker's yeast to humans also use a
similar mechanism called au-
tophagy to dispose of their own
unneeded molecules or worn out
cellular components.
Among the most abundant and
crucial of these components are
the cell's mitochondria, metabolic
powerhouses that convert food mol-
ecules into a source of energy that
the cell can readily use to carry out
its everyday housekeeping chores,
as well as its more specialized
functions.
Like other cellular components,
mitochondria can wear out and mal-
function, and often require replace-
ment. The process through which
mitochondria are disposed of, called
mitophagy, depends on Parkin.
Cox became curious about the en-
zyme when he learned that specific,
naturally occurring variations in the
Parkin gene, called polymorphisms,
are associated with increased sus-
ceptibility to tuberculosis infection.
"Because of the commonalities
between mitophagy and the xeno-
phagy of intracellular mycobacteria,


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as well as the links between Parkin
gene polymorphisms and increased
susceptibility to bacterial infection
in humans, we speculated that
Parkin may also be recruited to M.
tuberculosis and target it for xeno-
phagy," Cox said.
In both mouse and human macro-
phages infected with M. tuberculosis
in the lab, Parkin played a key role
in fighting the bacteria, Cox and
colleagues found.
In addition, genetically engineered
mice lacking Parkin died when
infected with M. tuberculosis, while
mice with normal Parkin survived
infection.
The involvement of Parkin in tar-
geting both damaged mitochondria
and infectious mycobacteria arose
long ago in evolution, Cox argues.
As part of the Nature study, the
research team found that Parkin-
deficient mice and flies creatures
quite distant from humans in
evolutionary time also are more


sensitive than normal mice and flies
to intracellular bacterial infections.
Looking back more than 1 billion
years, Cox noted that mitochondria
evolved from bacteria that were
taken up by cells in a symbiotic
relationship.
In the same way that the im-
mune system recognizes infectious
bacteria as foreign, Cox said, "The
evolutionary origin of mitochondria
from bacteria suggests that perhaps
mitochondrial dysfunction triggers
the recognition of a mitochondrian
as non-self."
Having now demonstrated the
importance of Parkin in fighting
mycobacterial infection, Cox has
begun working with Shokat to find a
way to boost Parkin activity against
cell-invading bacteria.
"We are exploring the possibility
that small-molecule drugs could
be developed to activate Parkin to
better fight tuberculosis infection,"
Cox said.


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:Page 18


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


feelingfit.com











Fawcett Memorial launches open-heart program


By FAWCETT MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
SPECIAL TO FEELING FIT

Fawcett Memorial Hospital, a Port
Charlotte-based HCA facility, recent-
ly launched an open-heart surgery
program in an effort to ensure a
continuum of care for patients
who need life-saving surgery. Since
opening in late August, surgeons
have performed several cases all
with successful outcomes and
anticipate serving 8-10 patients per
month.
Fawcett began the program in
partnership with Blake Medical
Center, an HCA facility in Bradenton.
The new services enhance Fawcett's
existing emergency room care,
full-spectrum diagnostics and acute
cardiovascular services.
Fawcett earned the Level I
Cardiology Services designa-
tion from the state in late 2012



SNACKS

FROM PAGE 14

symposium.
How do you choose snacks that
can contribute important nutrients
to your day, without promoting
weight gain?
Frechman urges you to consider
your goals. If you're trying to lose
weight, a 300-calorie cookie on top
of a regular meal can exceed your
calorie needs for the day.
Ruhs suggested, "Pay attention to



DONORS
FROM PAGE 9

underwent a breast biopsy that came
back negative.
"Your whole world turns. You start
to evaluate basically the whole life,
saying, 'What if? What if?'"
When it came time for her
45-minute appointment at Indiana
University's cancer center, she felt
calm and relaxed.
"You may feel the injection, which
is a very fine needle of anesthetic,"
she said. "It's nothing more than
maybe having a flu shot."
Afterward, she wore an ice pack in
her bra for the flight home. She had
a small bruise for a couple of days.


- enabling surgeons to perform
open-heart procedures such as
mitral valve repair.
Dr. Allessandro Golino, Fawcett's
medical director of cardiovascular
services, holds a mitral valve repair
rate of approximately 97 percent -
one of the nation's best according
to data from IntelliMed Group, Inc.
Additionally, the medical team
includes three board-certified
cardiothoracic surgeons nationally
recognized for clinical excellence in
heart surgery: Dr. John McKinney,
Dr. Richard Peterson and Dr. Ronald
Smith.
A professional team of registered
cardiovascular invasive specialists,
cardiologists, cardiovascular techni-
cians, registered nurses and echocar-
diography technologists is dedicated
to the diagnosis, treatment and
prevention of heart disease.
Patients are treated in new


the calorie, fat and sodium content
of snacks. Some snacks that appear
'small' can add up."
If you're dividing your meals into
frequent small feedings during the
day, you may want to consider a
more substantial snack essentially
a mini-meal that includes a serving
of carbohydrate, such as whole
grains, fruits or vegetables; and
protein, such as nuts, seeds, lean
protein or dairy.
But if your snack is merely a
between-meal contribution to tamp
down hunger, try a "handful" of
wholesome foods, such as nuts,


She tells friends how good she feels
about her contribution.
"I'm very proud," Acevedo-Malouf
said. "I'm very excited to one day
find out results of what they have
done with it. It's a good feeling to
know something good will happen
from this."
Charlene Kazner, 63, of Garden
Grove, Calif., is a 5-year uterine
cancer survivor who has made breast
cancer her cause.
In 2008, Kazner went to a new
gynecologist for her annual pap
smear. After the exam the doctor
asked her, as a new patient, if there
was anything he should know.
"I just happened to mention that
I was spotting, but it wasn't very
much," she recalled. "He said to
be safe, let's do a biopsy. He called


open-heart surgery suites and a
cardiovascular intensive care unit
using state-of-the-art equipment.
"Our entire team at Fawcett
Memorial Hospital is tremendously
proud of the successful outcomes
we've achieved thus far," said Golino.
"Each of those cases represents a
patient whose life has been saved
or dramatically improved, and we're
honored to play a role in providing
outstanding cardiac care and treat-
ment to them and many others to
come."
James Morrison was Fawcett's
first open-heart patient. His double
bypass was performed by Golino and
McKinney.
"I wish I could remember all the
names of all the wonderful people
at Fawcett who cared for me while I
was there and give them my sincere
thanks and appreciation for their
wonderful care," Morrison said.


dried or fresh fruit, or whole grain
crackers, suggests Frechman.
The formula for snacking success
The healthiest snacks are appro-
priate for your energy needs for
the day, and contribute important
servings of nutrients via whole
foods, including:
1. Whole grains such as oatmeal,
whole grain bread, corn tortillas,
brown rice, or quinoa.
2. Fruits fresh, and unsweet-
ened canned, frozen or dried such
as apples, peaches, bananas, berries,
cherries, grapes, and oranges.
3. Vegetables fresh, canned


back the following week to say I had
uterine cancer."
Kazner underwent a hysterectomy
but didn't need chemo or radiation
because the cancer was caught early.
During that time, Kazner decided
to talk to Jane and Victor Pang, who
were also members of the Hawaiian
Civic Club.
"They were very much into
promoting early detection in the
Pacific Islander community," she
said. "I was aware of what they were
doing but didn't really know them.
After I was diagnosed with cancer, I
approached them and asked if they
needed help with anything they were
doing. I wanted to give back to the
community because I was so thank-
ful to have found it early and not
have to go through treatment."


FILE PHOTO


(unsalted) and frozen like cu-
cumbers, carrots, lettuce, avocados,
snow peas, broccoli and tomatoes.
4. Nuts and seeds, including wal-
nuts, almonds, pistachios, peanuts
(actually a legume, but nutritionally
included in the nuts group) sunflow-
er seeds, and pumpkin seeds.
5. Legumes, such as edamame,
soy, lentils, beans and peas.
6. Lean meat, fish, poultry, includ-
ing slices of chicken, turkey or roast
beef, canned tuna and shrimp.
7. Low-fat dairy foods, such as
milk, cheese, yogurt, and cottage
cheese.


Kazner began volunteering with
Komen and other groups.
"I started to learn more about
breast cancer and I saw that breast
cancer affects more families than
uterine cancer, even though I myself
am a uterine cancer survivor," she
said. "I thought my impact in the
community would be far broader
and wider for breast cancer."
Kazner grew up in Oahu and
moved to California in her early 20s.
She said Indiana University research-
ers told her she was the first native
Hawaiian to donate breast tissue.
"You just feel so good because
they cheer you on," she said. "They
explain everything, nothing is a sur-
prise. You just feel so great because
you've been able to give something
to a wonderful cause."


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>>>INSIDE
DAr.E CI


Shoppers, practice the sport of


bargain hunting wisely
,. A jlK


PHOTOS PROVIDED


By SUSAN SALISBURY
Cox NEWSPAPERS
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. For
many consumers, shopping has
turned into a sport where the goal is
to score an incredible, unforgettable,
brag-worthy deal.
"Price is king for people.
Everybody is trying to find the
best stuff for the best price," said
Jody Rohlena, deputy editor of
ShopSmart magazine, published by
Consumer Reports.
Deal-happy shoppers are so
attuned to buying marked-down
merchandise that when J.C. Penney
changed its strategy to every-
day-low-pricing, sales plummeted.
"We saw what happened with J.C.
Penney. Penney's has now come
back to deals and discounting.
People like to come in with their
coupons or smartphone apps.
Bargain hunting is a skill that gives
people a lot of pride and pleasure,"
Rohlena said.
In its October issue, ShopSmart
reveals some of the tricks to score
even bigger bargains at Kohl's,


Target, T.J. Maxx and more.
"Savvy shoppers know that all
sales are not created equal," Rohlena
said.
Strategies include knowing what
day of the week the markdowns are
made or what day new items are
stocked.
"If you just know a couple of tricks,
you will still save money, and it
won't be a chore," Rohlena said.
Mark Ellwood, whose book
"Bargain Fever: How to Shop in a
Discounted World," is being released
Oct. 17, said that shoppers should
always ask the sales associate, "Are
there any discounts available today?"
"Just ask. You would be aston-
ished," Ellwood said.
It also pays to establish a rela-
tionship with a sales associate and
always ask for him or her. Then, you
will be informed about upcoming
sales, Ellwood said. He recommends
shopping during the pre-sale days
many stores set aside for preferred
customers to get the best selection.
"Don't wait to be given a sale.
Make one for yourself. As a shopper,
you have more power than the store


VOWa-AM M--
does, and you should use it," Ellwood
said.
Since 1991, brick-and-mortar retail
space has expanded 4 percent a
year, while the American population
has grown 1 percent a year, he said.
With online shopping, it's total
overload.
"There is just too much stuff. That
is why you should never ever buy
anything that is not on sale," Ellwood
said.
When shopping at stores such
as Nordstrom Rack, be aware that
everything is not from Nordstrom.
Before going to an outlet store take
a photo of the main store's label, and
BARGAIN 15


'What's for dinner?'


Grandma

Alderton'

pancake

recipe


*PAGE6


. PAGE 4


Consumer

Reports

Seven tricks to boost


*PAGE 3


your energy


iiiiiiU


Shop for fall fashions with inspiration


from spring runway trends


If the styles on the runways shown
during the recent New York Fashion
Week spring collections seemed a blur
of psychedelic prints, sheer gauzy fabrics
and bizarre patterns, take a deep breath
and look at the big picture.
Trends in colors, shapes and fabrics
will start to appear if you look at some of
fashion world's biggest names.
And, although we're just entering the
fall season, experts recommend taking a
cue from the upcoming spring styles as
you shop for cooler-weather clothes now.
"There are some great fall fashion
trends that will have legs into spring
2014/' says Red Godfrey, vice president


of the r loidstiom Fashion Office Iewv
fabl icatiolns and colol s fol the motolcvcle
jacket aie cleaned up and velsatile foil
both dressy and casual occasions."
Keep the classics in mind when shop-
ping for winter, Godfrey says.
"A clean-lined clutch bag is a new chic
option that will work right into spring,
and duo-tone shoes make a great fall
statement that will remain relevant into
the new season as well,"' he says.
Laura C. McDowell, spokeswoman for
T.J. Maxx and Marshalls, says the key
themes coming out of spring Fashion
Week are black-and-white styles; flowing,
feminine clothing; sparkle; bright colors;
and sporty trends.
As the buyers for T.J. Maxx and
Marshalls look for fashions throughout


the ne.':t few
months, they II Vince Camutot Akido,
be looking fo l ($117, Nordstrom.com).
the hues and Two-tone styling updates
styles that a chic T-strap suede pump.
styles that
top designers showed off on the latest
runways.
"We're hearing a lot about different
shades of blue,' McDowell says. "Navy
or ink blue is a key color for fall looking
toward spring. The shade will get lighter,
but deeper versions are available now."
Other styles to look for include sporty
crew-neck sweaters, cocoon style tops,
clothing with leather trim, and moto
styles studded or plain. And those
skinny jeans? They aren't going anywhere.
FALL 14


By KATHY WITT
MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE


Talk about a lifestyle lift. Carnival's
former cruise ship, Destiny, went
in for a $155 million makeover and
emerged the newly christened
Sunshine, replete with the three-deck-
high Serenity adults-only retreat a
Carnival first and teeming with
nooks, niches and crannies that com-
fortably disperse its 3,006 passengers.
Sounds like a veritable throng and


it is, but the Carnival Sunshine doesn't
feel crowded, and that has everything
to do with the re-imagined space.
Following a nip and tuck that
essentially called for gutting and
rebuilding the entire ship, Carnival
Sunshine debuted in May in Europe,
stepping out on nine- and 12-day
Mediterranean cruises visiting cities
in France, Italy and Croatia through
October. Here are several of those
enhancements Fun Ship 2.0
upgrades in Carnival parlance that


score a perfect 10.
The Carnival Sunshine, in the
Mediterranean through October, will
sail on a 16-day trans-Atlantic crossing
from Barcelona to New Orleans,
Nov. 1-17, followed by a winter
schedule of seven-day cruises from
the Big Easy through April 2014.The
ship will then reposition from New
Orleans to Port Canaveral, Fla., in April
2014, for year-round five- to eight-day
SUNSHINE 13


MCT PHOTO


Relax at the Carnival Sunshine's Cloud 9 Spa in the serene thermal suite.
Originally constructed in 1996 and named the Carnival Destiny, the
ship recently underwent a $155 million renovation. The ship will be
repositioning to Port Canaveral, Fla., in April 2014.


A weekly section of the Sun g| Vol. 3 No. 39 September 29, 2013


By MARIA MARTIN
,i ,,I \ l II. ,,,- I


MCT PHOTOS
Rebecca Taylor Leather & Wool Vest, ($695,
Nordsrom.com). The rich color of this seamed
vest will add contrast to this wardrobe essential.


V@s


CaMmniv 2unDGshn






www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


NEW YORI TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD


LETTERBOXES By Mike Selinker / Edited by Will Shortz




In this special crossword, the completed solution conceals a familiar three-word phrase related to the puzzle's
theme. 70-Across provides a hint on how to find it.


Across
1 Crew's colleagues
5 Dojo needs
9 Classic sci-fi film
billed as "a horror
horde of crawl-
and-crush giants"
13 "La-La" lead-in in a
1974 Al Green hit
16 Iberian wine city
18 "Vincent & ___
(film about the van
Gogh brothers)
19 Rings of angels
21 What X-O-X lacks?
22 "Macbeth" king
23 Words on a fragile
package
26 Irascible
27 "Mona Lisa," e.g.
28 Thumbs-up
29 Harridan
30 Orchestra section
31 Mouthpiece for the
head?
34 Jiffy
35 Not post-
37 Old piece
38 Little dog, for short
39 Aviv
40 Strawberry blond
sister of Barbie
43 Hindu "Mr."
44 "Swans Reflecting
Elephants" and
others
46 1960s-'70s series
starring Efrem
Zimbalist Jr.
49 Oscar winner
Hathaway

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
$1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


51 Material beyond the
terrestrial plane, in
medieval science
55 Hello or .11. ,.,
maybe
57 PC key
59 First word in 104-
Across
61 Cum
62 ___ engr.
63 Like hit shows,
often
67 Pitchfork-wielding
groups
69 Boo-boo
70 How to get a
message out of the
boxes
74 Van Morrison song
"___ the Mystic"
75 Numerical prefix
76 "Only the Lonely"
singer
77 Part of a wriggly
field?
78 Foreordained
80 Understands
82 Maker of the
Sorento
83 Gallivants, with
"about"
85 Boo-boos
87 Pale
89 Like citrus fruits
92 Like video games,
nowadays
94 ___ Lingus
96 Round Table
assignments
99 Old PC monitor
feature
102 Ernie's instrument
on "Sesame
Street," informally
103 Italy's main
broadcasting co.


104 TV channel with
lots of bells and
whistles
105 Take up, as a skirt
107 Rotary alternative
112 Covent Garden
performance
114 Newspaper
columnist,
humorously
115 Grampa Simpson
116 Snockered
117 Anders Celsius and
Greta Garbo, for
two
118 DDT and others
121 "Is Anybody Goin'
to San (#1
Charley Pride
song)
122 Bullet, in poker
123 Cartoonist Wilson
124 Help illicitly
125 Alley flanker
126 Hide/hair link
127 Looking up
128 Chant at a
bullfight
129 Satirical 1974
espionage film

Down
1 With 97-Down,
classic puzzle type
2 Like eyebrows
3 Ones getting the red-
carpet treatment,
say
4 "The Spiderwick
Chronicles" co-
author DiTerlizzi
5 Antarctic summit
between peaks
named for faith and
charity
6 Words after "win by"
or "hang by"
7 What lobsters and
crabs have
8 Nursery purchase


9 Baltimore club, for
short
10 Ethan of "Before
Sunrise"
11 Giant Manning
12 Company that
pioneered walkie-
talkies
13 M ater" li ..
14 African capital
15 Organic chemistry
group
16 Lilac and lavender
17 Turns into mush
20 Oaf
24 Not ephemeral
25 All ChiSox home
games are played
on it
32 Lee
33 Pro with books, for
short
35 Slapstick prop
36 Play watcher
41 Motocross entry, for
short
42 Pirate's cargo
44 Frenzied as if
possessed
45 East German secret
police
47 Where a mattress
goes
48 Shapes like squares
50 Country that has
two oryxes on its
coat of arms
52 Like much
processed wheat
53 Roman magistrates
54 Push off
55 Food item named
after an Austrian
city
56 Film set on Pandora
58 Snarly dog
60 Recedes
62 Blackmail, e.g.


64 "Well, now!"
65 Beat
66 Uncle Pedro, e.g.
68 Sign of a successful
show
71 One with a name on
a plaque, maybe
72 Nickname for
baseball's Dwight
Gooden
73 Rolling Stones #1
hit with the lyric
"You're beautiful,
but ain't it time we
said .. '


79 Hefty thing
81 Wrinkly dog
84 Ones providing cold
comfort, briefly
86 Big wheel's wheels
88 "You betcha"
90 Dim bulbs have low
ones
91 Horse hue
93 Prefix with skeleton
95 1970 John Wayne
western
97 See 1-Down


98 Placid
99 Self-image?
100 Like the Palace of
Versailles
101 English landscapist
famous for "The
Burning of the
Houses of Lords
and Commons"
104 Irritates
106 Electromagnetic
device
108 Op. __ (footnote
phrase)


109 Some West Coast
wines
110 Magazine to which
Obama gave his
first postelection
interview in 2008
111 N.F.C. West player
112 Admit
113 Trifling
117 Wilts
119 "___ my destiny be
Fustian"
(Dickinson poem)
120 Was idle


FOR ANSWERS, TURN TO PAGE 3


VERAWANG


PRADA
eyewear


'- E VERSACEa GUCCI
/^- I^J ieljrtlb// (M)


C C-f4 TIFFANY&CO.


iPage 2


No. 0922


The patient or any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment
which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.


EELS-I


WMS


IIB~iBPB







ThSUE R SuRSndy EPOTeme S9 03FARwwsnesaesntPg


Seven tricks to boost your energy


Sometimes caffeine or sugar
might seem like the only fix
for that 3 p.m. slump, notes
Consumer Reports. But in some
cases, fatigue has more to do with
the mind than with the body,
according to Dr. Roy Sugarman, a
neuropsychologist in Sydney.
Use the right techniques
and you can feel more en-
ergized--even without that
afternoon latte. Consumer
Reports suggests these seven
ways to do just that, based on
tips from Sugarman and recent
medical research:
Stand up and move. Your
brain equates being seated to
being stuck and responds by
restricting energy. If you have to
sit for long periods for work or
other reasons, try standing up
every 45 minutes and perform-
ing a few lunges. "Nothing too
strenuous, but these stretches
can give you more energy by
telling the brain that you're still
mobile," says Sugarman, who
serves as director of applied
neuroscience at Athletes'
Performance, a company that


Consumer
Reports

trains professional and Olympic
athletes. Or even better, see wheth-
er a stand-up desk is an option.
Spread out your tasks.
Whether it's paperwork or
physical errands, break your
workload into small, manage-
able assignments that you can
spread over the course of a day
or an afternoon. That helps you
avoid the "push/crash" cycle, in
which you do too much all at
once, then are exhausted for
a while. For best impact, try
to alternate mental tasks with
physical ones.
Rock out, then have a chat.
"Music, even of low intensity,
seems to prevent performance
decrements over time,"
according to the American
College of Occupational and
Environmental Medicine
(ACOEM). Stay stimulated
by playing soft background
music, especially if it helps


cover up the continuous
hum of an air conditioner
or other white noise, which
can induce drowsiness. The
organization also recommends
socializing throughout the
day via "actively involved"
conversations; no eavesdrop-
ping on others'conversations
or relying on only electronic
communications.
Bring green into your
space. A Taiwanese study
found that office workers
reported feeling less nervous
or anxious when a plant
was visible nearby. That's an
important benefit, because
anxiety can burn up a lot
of your energy. The study's
authors stated that nature's
beauty aids in recovery from
mental fatigue and "generates
opportunities for cognitive
restoration." And other re-
search has linked vegetation
to increased productivity. Not
a plant person? Simply looking
at objects with bright greens
and reds -- a wall hanging, for
example -- can have a similar


effect, Sugarman says.
Light it right and stay cool.
The ideal lighting for any work
space is bright but indirect;
overhead light shining straight
down on you can cause glare
and eyestrain, according to
ACOEM guidelines for fighting
fatigue published in 2012 in
the Journal of Occupational
and Environmental Medicine.
Aim lighting toward the walls
or ceiling instead, and keep
the thermostat set at 68 to 72
degrees Fahrenheit, tempera-
tures that are too high can slow
down your mental function.
Check your neck. If you
need another reason to sit up
straight, Consumer Reports
suggests that you consider
this: For every inch your head
tilts forward, the amount
of weight your neck has to
support doubles, a chore that
could affect your daily level
of fatigue. Whether sitting or
standing, keep your shoulders
back, your spine straight and
your head held high above your
neck.


PHOTO PROVIDED


Letting your head droop puts strain
on your neck, making you achy and
tired, notes Consumer Reports.
Fake a snooze. A quick nap
is a great way to restore energy,
but it's not always practical in
the middle of the day. Instead,
simulate the effects of a nap
using this breathing strategy:
Try taking quick, short inhales
followed by slow, drawn-out
exhales for at least 3 minutes
and no more than 20. "When we
breathe in, it puts our nervous
system into a fight-or-flight
mode, meaning we're using
energy," Sugarman says. "But
when we breathe out, it signals
rest."


SUNSHINE
FROM PAGE 1

Caribbean cruises from that
port.
Among the ship's many
culinary offerings in-
cluding the main dining
room, Lido Marketplace,
poolside burgers and
burritos, a Tasting Bar, room
service and more are
the restaurants, Fahrenheit
555, Ji Ji Asian Kitchen and
Cucina del Capitano, that
carry an up-charge. They are
well worth it for the unique
experience they offer and
any sailing should include
reservations at one or all
of these restaurants. Note:
There is no charge during
lunch at Ji Ji's (custom-made
noodle dishes) or Cucina del
Capitano's (pasta bar).
BONAPPETIT
Carnival Sunshine's new
and improved culinary
landscape is all about niche
dining, including these three
specialty restaurants.
Book a candlelit table for
two in Fahrenheit 555, a clas-
sic American steakhouse, for
a quiet repast that meanders
from artfully designed and
presented appetizers like
escargots bourguignon and
ahi tuna tartare to mouth-
watering entrees, including
spice-rubbed prime rib-eye
steak and surf and turf, to
desserts like the beast-size
portion of creamy-delicious
cheesecake so big that
only 10 percent of the diners
who order it actually polish
it off.
The fun begins when
the server rolls out a
trolley showcasing the steak
selections for your perusal
and continues right through
the last sip of coffee or
cordial. It's delicious food
and impeccable service,
an experience worth every
single penny of the $35 per
person up-charge.
Ji Ji Asian Kitchen is a
culinary adventure through
the countries of the Far East,
from Mongolia to Vietnam to
Indonesia.The slow-braised
pork belly with caramel chili
sauce with black vinegar,
Pomelo citrus fruit, Chinese
chives with gorgonzola
and spiced purple onions
- sublime. The Singapore
chili shrimp is sweet spicy
and garlicky-delicious. The
rose Creme Brulee, delicately
fragrant with ginger, will
have you licking your spoon
and wishing for more.
Restaurant decor is Asian-
inspired, from the Chinese
symbol for luck that is part
of the table setting to the
earthy color palette.The up-
charge is $12 per person and
the meal is one of the most
memorable you'll experience
on Carnival Sunshine.


MCT PHOTO
The Carnival Sunshine is moored in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in June.
Originally constructed in 1996 and named the Carnival Destiny,
the ship recently underwent a $155 million renovation.


Ji Ji Asian Kitchen sits
on one side of the Cuba-
inspired Havana Bar; on the
other side is cozy Cucina
del Capitano. Antipasti,
fried risotto balls, linguine
and meatballs, spaghetti
carbonara; it's classic Italian
comfort food served
family-style and enjoyed in
a setting that feels like your
Nonna's dining room if
your grandma is Italian and
her home moved along at a
lazy 18 knots.The up-charge
is also $12 per person.
ROCKON
There are plenty of nooks
aboard Carnival Sunshine to
find music to sing, snap, tap
or dance to without having
to elbow your way through
the masses.
A real charmer is the Piano
Bar where you can sing
along with Seth the piano
man as he leads a small
but enthusiastic crowd in
lounge favorites like"Hotel
California"and "Tiny Dancer."
The Piano Bar is intimate
but lively, the piano man
engaging and funny. Special
requests encouraged.
Other singers entertain in
the nine-deck-high atrium,
the laid-back Redfrog Pub
and its next-door-neighbor,
Ocean Plaza, where things
tend toward groovy with hits
straight from the Woodstock
and disco eras.
SHHHH
Those in search of
quietude can retreat to
Serenity, adults-only country
for lazing, reading or sipping
something frothy without
little ones underfoot. The
favored pastime: cocooning
in a cushy sun lounger while
drifting beneath a cloud-
strewn sky.
Another sanctuary is the
Cloud 9 Spa where you can
step into a tropical shower
or stretch out on a thermal
lounger. Try basking in
the warmth of the chair as
the ship makes a sunset
departure from port; it's a
perfect vacation moment.
A few decks down, the
Library Bar is a hushed hide-
away for thumbing through
guidebooks, playing chess or
board games or sipping be-
fore- or after-dinner drinks,
like a Scarlet Letter cocktail.
You might also find a great
read in a book a fellow
passenger has finished and
left on the open shelf.
CHILD'S PLAY
Families can farm the kids
out for fun with their peers


at Camp Carnival (ages
2-11), Circle C (ages 12-14)
and Club 02 (ages 15-17).
A schedule of the week's
activities, geared to your kids'
ages, will be in your cabin on
arrival but be forewarned:
if you want to hang with
your kids during activities
hours, you'll most likely have
to pry or bribe them out of
their respective clubs. Video
games, scavenger hunts,
karaoke, pizza and ice cream
parties and more in spaced
practically screaming "no
parents allowed"- it's pure
kid heaven.
There's also the
WaterWorks waterpark;
SportSquare with ropes
course, basketball, mini-
golf, pingpong, pool and
more; and fun niches for
kids big and small like the
Warehouse video arcade,
FunHub Internet Cafe and
the irresistibly colorful candy
store, Cherry on theTop.
LAGNIAPPE--A LITTLE
SOMETHING EXTRA
In November, not-so-little
miss Sunshine repositions
to New Orleans for a winter
schedule of seven-day
Caribbean voyages. She'll call
at Cozumel, Mexico; Grand
Cayman, Cayman Islands;
and Montego Bay, Jamaica,
among other Caribbean
ports.
No matter the itinerary,
Carnival Sunshine is first
and foremost a Fun Ship, so
expect plenty of poolside
entertainment, a hopping
casino and lively shows, but
also fun little extras: a coffee
bar, made-to-order pizzas
24-hours a day, spiked
floats, a Sports Bar where
you can catch the game.
There's something actu-
ally, lots of somethings for
everyone aboard Carnival
Sunshine. There's also space
for everyone and for every-
one, a space and one that
doesn't feel crowded.
Tip: The cabins in the
forward wing on Deck 6
are located directly above
Liquid Lounge, where the
DJ spins hits most nights
of the cruise until the wees
- and the sound is quite
noticeable. Carnival is aware
of the noise issue and is
looking into ways to rectify
the situation. Light sleepers
will want to avoid these
cabins until the situation is
resolved.
For more information,
visit www.carnival.com or
800-CARNIVAL.


New from Joan Jett

& The Blackhearts, Nelly "


new release by
Joan Jett &The
Blackhearts called
Unvarnished is set for
release this week.
Joan was born Joan
Marie Larkin on Sept. 22,
1960, in Wynnewood,
Pa., a small suburb of
Philadelphia. When
she was 12, her family
moved to Los Angeles,
Calif. She was already
playing guitar and knew
what type of music she
didn't like, but was still
trying to find out what
she did. In Los Angeles
there was a new sound,
somewhat underground
and populated by men
wearing makeup, called
glamm rock." She found
her interest.
At 15, she formed
her first band and
started performing. A
Los Angeles producer
discovered the band
and renamed them The
Runaways. It was an
all-female band and they
became popular overseas,
but never really made too
big a splash here in the
states. Lita Ford was also
in the band.
After they broke up,
Jett moved to New York
to pursue a solo career.


Her tough exterior and
glam rock sound made
Jett a success. Her 1981
album featured the hit
song "I Love Rock'n'
Roll" which propelled
her into the Top 10.
She has carved out a
pretty successful career
throughout the '80s and
'90s. Unvarnished is her
13th studio release and
her first in seven years.
For my sake, I hope "I
don't hate myself for lis-
tening to her." OK folks,
it's a spoof on one of her
song titles. I guess you'll
get it, only if you really
are a Joan Jett fan.
Next we have a new
release by Nelly called M.O.
Nelly was born as
Cornell Iral Haynes Jr. on
Nov. 2, 1974, in Austin,
Texas. At the age of 7,
his parents divorced
and he moved with his
mother to St. Louis, Mo.
When he was still in
high school, he formed a
rap group called the St.
Lunatics and had some
local success. After many
attempts to get the
group signed to a major
label, Nelly decided to
go solo. In 2000, he was
signed to a major label
and release his debut


CITIO SIR BI I


AISIH


By TJ KOONTZ
album called Country
Grammar, an instant suc-
cess. Since then, Nelly
has released six studio
albums, M.O. being his
seventh. He has sold
more than 21 million al-
bums and is considered
the fourth-best-selling
rap artist of all time. He
won Grammy awards in
2003 and 2004 and even
tried his hand at acting.
M.O. features many of
Nelly's friends and some
of today's hottest artists.
Other major releases
are by Scar the Martyr,
Justin Timberlake The
20/20 Expereience Part 2,
Moby, Randy Travis and
Steven Curtis Chapman.
Independent releases
are by Dr. Dog, Fates
Warning, Hank Williams
III and Bonnie Raitt
(collection), Smile
Empty Soul, Soulfly,
Dave Stewart (from
Eurythmics), K-Ci & JoJo,
and Paul Hardcastle.
Keep rockin, folks!

HAVE A COMMENT?
Tom Koontz is the owner ofTJ's CDS
& More at 3275-ATamiami Trail
in Port Charlotte. He loves reader
comments, and can be contacted at
tjscds@peoplepc.com.


ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD ON PAGE 2


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o The Sun/Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3


FLAIR


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-Page 4 www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


M O MAINE LOI
Look what I found! Wild Caught from Boston: Swordi

By HERB FAYER BACK!
Sb, LuL iiuiA Seafood Market 2700 Placida Rd,


Light up your collecting


I recently was given a bunch of items by
someone planning to move out west.
When I accept things from readers,
I always let them know I will donate a
percentage to charity after my costs.
Included in this group given to me was
a lightweight lantern with a blue glass
globe. It has the words Rochester Lantern
Company on it.
Not being a lantern person, I didn't
think much of it until I put it up on
eBay and a dozen people emailed me
asking questions. It sold for over $100,
and about $40 of that will go to school
supply programs in Charlotte County.
The schools thank the donor and eBay
for their generosity.
So I did some research on lanterns, and
it turns out not only are they are very
collectible, they have an avid contingent
of people searching everywhere for the
rare ones. The biggest manufacturer of
kerosene lanterns was Dietz, which made
both railroad signal lanterns and their
little brother the barn lantern, which


usually had a white glass globe. The one I
sold on eBay was especially rare because
of the blue globe. The railroad lanterns
had several different color globes because
they were used for signaling trains in rail
yards at night.
The white/clear lantern was used by the
brakeman to give the common signals
around the rail yard. The red one signaled
stop, and the green one meant proceed
with caution. The blue lantern was hung
on items that were not to be moved. The
yellow lantern marked camp cars, the cars
used by workers as living quarters.
Railroad lamps were similar in man-
ufacture, but were just that, they were
used to light areas around the yard. They
are mostly more squat in shape, though
they are usually larger than lanterns,
but they vary greatly. Since they were
unattended and had to stay lit a long
time, they had bigger fuel reservoirs
and could stay lit for up to 70 hours.
Some were used to mark switches, some
identified the type of train from regularly


scheduled trains to split trains.
Caboose lamps, as you would guess,
hung on the rear of the caboose
and crossing gate lamps are also
self-explanatory.
As to value: Those from the 1800s go
way up in price. Overall lanterns can run
$10 to well over $1,000. There are plenty
of inexpensive ones on eBay for someone
starting out on collecting lanterns, and
you'll also find some very rare ones.
The Dietz Monarch is probably the most
common type of lantern, called hot-blast
lanterns. A hot-blast lantern works by
the hot air rising into the tubes at the
top of the globe. Then the air is forced
downward, finally blowing back onto the
flame. These lanterns were best for indoor
use due to, supposedly, less used air
being emitted out from the lantern. Dietz
also made the No. 40 Traffic Gard (Gard is
correct) used in highway construction.
So now you know as much as I do, but
I'll be keeping my eye out for these from
now on.


PHOTO PROVIDED

HAVE A QUESTION?
Herb Fayer has been collecting for over 30 years and
knows his stuff. If you have questions or comments
please write to him at drjunk941@gmail.com and
please tell him what city you're in.


Cheery apple motif brightens the home


By GEORGEA KOVANIS
DETROIT FREE PRESS

Crisp and rustic, it's apple season.
To celebrate, you could visit an orchard, make a
pie, enjoy a glass of cider and a doughnut (or six).
Even better, you could shop for apples that will
last more than a season.
Where to start? Here's a look at a few apple
motif items in stores now.
Bright and cheery, the Kompotti Apple
Chopping Board by Marimekko might liven up
your kitchen. Made from plywood and covered
with melamine. Darling! $45 at www.crate
andbarrel.com.
Mrs. Meyer's Clean Day liquid hand soap in
apple scent is festive and practical a great
combo. $3.99 in stores.To find one or to shop
online: www.mrsmeyers.com. Also available at
www.amazon.com.
There have been a lot of changes at J.C.
Penney and one of the best is the chain's
housewares department, which now features


selections from Conran, Martha Stewart, Pantone
and tah dah! Jonathan Adler. These
Charlotte Apple Bookends are made from
resin and are part of the Happy Chic by
Jonathan Adler collection. Great for desk
top or book shelves. $42 at J.C. Penney
stores and www.jcp.com.
You may be tempted to take a bite from
one of these lovely green apples, but don't
do that! They're plastic. The set of six painted
green apples is $16 at Pottery Barn and
www.potterybarn.com.
Made from oxidized bronze and nickelp-
late, this apple serving plate by Michael Aram
is quite handsome. About 10-by-10 inches.
Great for nibbles. $79 at www.michaelaram.
com and www.nordstrom.com.

FAB FIND: BEADED BIB NECKLACE
Up close and personal, this necklace with its
cluster of acrylic, glass and metal beads looks
more expensive than its $29.99 price tag -
and that's what makes it such a fab find!


Wear it with
jeans and a
T-shirt. Wear it


with a dress and PHOTO PROVIDED
pumps. It'll look
good either way. And so will you.
The bib necklace is available at Target
through Oct. 6. To find a store, check availabili-
ty or shop online: www.target.com.

WIG OUT WITH CHRIS MARCH FOR TARGET
What's the latest from Chris March, the
ebullient fashion and costume designer who
appeared on "Project Runway" and "Project
Runway All-Stars"and has outfitted Beyonce,
Lady Gaga and Madonna?
A collection of foam Halloween wigs for Target.
The limited-edition Chris March Big Fun
collection includes eight exaggerated and highly
theatrical styles Geisha, greaser, starlet, witch,
Medusa, monster bride, Mohawk and Afro.
All are $20 or less and available at Target stores
and www.target.com.


WANTANEWIPHONE?GETUP
TO $300 WITH WALMART TRADE-IN
PROGRAM
Walmart is offering up to $300 in credit
for a working iPhone 5 in a new trade-in
program, according to a release.
The world's largest retailer's new
Gadgets for Gift Cards program launched
in 3,600Walmart and Sam's Gub stores on
Sept. 21 when Apple's latest iPhones hit
the market.
The program offers $300 for a working
undamaged iPhone5,$175 fora Samsung
Galaxy Sill and over 100smartphones
as well as tablets, MP3 players, gaming
consoles and video games. Customers can
bring devices to the electronics depart-
ments at stores for a value assessment.
Get more info about the program:
http://bit.ly/LjebVK.
See other ways to unlock or trade Apple
devices to maximize value of your old
gadget: http://bit.ly/19A1XH2.

-Sun Sentinel


FALL
FROM PAGE 1

"Flat-front with a side
or front zip looks great
with the boots and bootie
trends for fall;' she says.
That doesn't mean you
should reach for the low-
rise skinny jeans, however,
says Bridgette Raes presi-
dent of the Bridgette Raes
Style Group and author
of "Style Rx: Dressing the
Body You Have to Create
the Body You Want"
(www.bridgetteraes.com).
"The rises of jeans have
been going up and we're
seeing the waist more
emphasized now than in
past seasons,' she says.


"Belting is important and
a great way to update
shapeless items you may
still have hanging in the
closet."
Like McDowell, Raes
says feminine styles have
taken center stage.
"Everyone is talking
about the resurgence of
Dior's 'New Look.' Being
more ladylike, feminine
and polished is back as a
trend,' she adds, noting
the mid-length skirt and
plaid are in, as well.
Raes has a few predic-
tions about trends that
are on their way out, and
clothing to think twice
about purchasing.
"Even though the waist
is back, I seriously wonder
about the longevity of the


Black & White Dress ($29.99,
Marshallsonline.com). This
dress moves from office to
after-work drinks in a snap.
peplum/' she says. "Most
women find it hard to
wear and few look good
in them."
Stud embellishments
are also overdone, she
says, and while the trend
may last a bit longer, she


expects it will fade soon.
Heel-less shoes "had the
lifespan of a fruit fly," and
neon should be used
sparingly until spring, she
says. "And unless you're
under 25, heeled sneaker
wedges are probably not
something to invest in."
Following are handful
of choice items that are
worth investing in:
MSGM Optical Wave,
($260, Nordstrom.com).
Who says sweatshirts
have to be sloppy?
"The new, dressed-up
sweatshirts are a modern
addition to any wardrobe',"
Godfrey says. Stay warm
in this wool-blend shirt,
with finely layered lines.
Pleated Chiffon Dress
($179.99, TJMaxx.com).


Flowing, feminine clothes
are back in style.
Black & White Dress
($29.99, Marshallsonline.
com). There's nothing stark
about this classic dress,
which moves from office to
after-work drinks in a snap.
Mossimo Black Long-
Sleeve Blouse and Black
Skirt in Turquoise (blouse,
$22.99 and skirt, $22.99,
target.com). This classic
outfit from Target touches
on the floral prints and
flowing fabrics that will
be in style from autumn
through spring.
Bright Green Blazer
($49.99, MarshallsOnline.
com). One bright accent
piece will make a ward-
robe a hit.
Rebecca Taylor Leather
& Wool Vest, ($695,
Nordsrom.com). The rich
color of this seamed vest
will add contrast to this
wardrobe essential, which
spans the seasons.
Tan Moto Jacket
($39.99, MarshallsOnline.
com). You don't need a
Harley to look cool in this
inexpensive find from
Marshalls.
Halogen Lizard
Patent Leather, ($88,
Nordstrom.com). Simple
and elegant describes this
glossy patent envelope
clutch, which features
intricate embossing,
magnetic-snap flap and
an optional shoulder
strap. With seven colors
to choose from, you'll be
able to find a match for
any outfit.


MCT PHOTO


Pleated Chiffon Dress
($179.99, TJMaxx.com).
Flowing, feminine clothes are
back in style.
Merona Long-Sleeve
Button-Down Shirt,
Mossimo Supply Co.
Sweatshirt in Blue and
Merona Pencil Skirt in
Blue Floral Print (shirt
$22.99, sweatshirt $19.99,
skirt $22.99, target.com).
Dress up this not-so-hum-
ble bright blue sweatshirt
with a feminine shirt and
skirt.
Vince Camutot Akido,
($117, Nordstrom.com).
Two-tone styling updates
a chic T-strap suede pump
set on a slender 412 inch
heel.
Cobalt Blue Bag,
($149.99, MarshallsOnline.
com). It's a snap to add
a trendy color into your
wardrobe with a small
touch.
French Connection
Oversize, ($68, Nordstrom.
com). Step out in style
with this optic-effect
weave zip clutch, made
from faux leather.


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The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5 FLAIR


'What's for dinner?'


The shift just started and
most people do not worry
about such things this early
in the morning. But, most peo-
ple don't live in a firehouse for
24 hours with a number of other
Brothers and Sisters.
Typically our day runs with
a schedule: We come in and
catch up with each other for a
little while, then make our way
out to the trucks to check out
the equipment to make sure
it runs and performs properly.
Then it is on to station duties
such as cleaning the bathrooms,
floors and windows. The "boss"
or officer in charge of the shift
typically lays out a plan of
the day, which in most cases
includes any training, special
assignments, and events that we


HOT & SPICY
KRAUT BEER BRAT
1 package bratwurst
1 package potato roll buns
1 beer, room temperature
1 cup sauerkraut
2 medium onions, cut in half and sliced
thin
1 teaspoon dijon mustard
12 cup ketchup
3 teaspoon hot sauce
1 teaspoon butter
1 teaspoon celery seed
1 teaspoon white pepper
In a fry pan, heat bratwursts (I like
the hot and spicy ones) until brown

have to complete that day, and
of course "Whats for dinner?"
Some houses do a breakfast
together; others say you're on


,ier mpeliiun'i-hih hear P'out r beer ,' ,er
them and reduce heat and allow to
simmer, rolling bratwurst often so they
don't burn. Place potato roll buns on
cookie sheet and toast in oven with low
heat. Saute onions in butter until lightly
caramelized (onions will be soft and not
as white). Add sauerkraut to onions.
When mixture is warm, add remaining
ingredients and bring to a simmer.
Mixture will thicken as it cooks; once
thick remove from heat. Place bratwurst
in toasted potato roll and top with Hot
& Spicy Kraut. Make sure you have a
napkin. Enjoy! (The alcohol cooks out of
the beer, so this recipe is safe for kids
as well).

your own. Most all stations do
lunch and dinner together.
It's hearty comfort food that
can be re-heated if the alarm


goes off, and yes there is a cost.
In my station we try to keep
each meal at $5 a person, so
clipping coupons and checking
the circulars helps determine
"What's for Dinner!" In a
professional kitchen, the chef
and his staff too, have a plan
of the day. Prep work needs to
be done so that when there are
patrons in the seats, they don't
run out of the little things that
make your favorite dish at that
establishment, your favorite
dish.
At the station, someone from
the crew is always willing to
lend a hand, step in and be the
sous chef. At home our wives/


I ByFRANK E. VAEREWYCK
THE FIREHOUSE FOODIE



husbands and kids can take on
those roles, making cooking that
much more fun.
This week is one of my favor-
ites, Hot & Spicy Kraut Beer Brat.
It's fun to make and even more
fun to eat, now "That's Bringing
the Firehouse Home."


HAVE A COMMENT?
Firehouse Foodie, Frank E. Vaerewyck,
is a graduate of Charlotte High School
who began his firefighting career in
Punta Gorda. He is currently with the
Manassas Volunteer Fire Company 501
in Virginia. You can contact him at frank.
vaerewyck@ thefirehousefoodie.com.


BARGAIN

FROM PAGE 1

compare it with the outlet store's. If it is different,
the item is outlet only.
ShopSmart's top advice is to use a store credit
card. Kohl's gives cardholders 15 percent off their
first purchase, plus exclusive coupons and dis-
counts all year long. Target Red Card users get 5
percent off plus free shipping for online orders.
TJX card holders get $10 back for every $200
they spend at Marshalls, T.J. Maxx or HomeGoods.
Dillard's, Macy's, Gap and most other stores also
have rewards programs where shoppers rack up
points for discounts and certificates.
Of course, don't spend more than you can pay
off immediately to avoid paying interest.
Even if you don't want to sign up for the store's
credit card, you can sign up to receive its emails.
Steinmart, for example, sends out sale notifica-
tions and printable coupons.
Knowing the stores' strategy can also work in
your favor. Marshalls and T.J. Maxx usually mark
down merchandise on Wednesdays, ShopSmart
says. At H&M, the hot new items usually hit the
floors on Thursdays. Target generally marks
down women's clothes on Tuesdays, men's on
Wednesday and kids'on Mondays.
Go mobile, ShopSmart says. H&M's app sends
users sale alerts and gives instructions on getting
coupon codes on their smartphone. Text "Coupons"
to Target for access to mobile coupons that can be
used in-store. Just show your phone to a cashier.
Other retailers that send text alerts include Bath &
Body Works, Dollar Tree, J.C. Penney, Kohl's, Lord
& Taylor, Macy's, Old Navy, Target, Victoria's Secret
and Walgreens.
Here a few other tips from seasoned shoppers:
Macy's: Fans say the One Day Sale is their favor-
ite. It's held every month on a Saturday. There's a
preview day on Friday. Don't forget to bring your
coupons and shopping passes.
Bed, Bath & Beyond: Get on the store's mailing
list, cut out those 20-percent-off coupons and
keep them in your car. They accept expired cou-
pons, and you can use one for each item on one
receipt. When you return something, ask for your
coupon to be re-issued. BBB also has coupons for
$5, $15, $10, and $30 off.
To be ready to return an item to obtain a
sale price after you already bought it, label
envelopes with receipts for each store. Keep your
tags also and pay attention to that store's policy.
Most stores seem to allow 30-day return with
receipt for items not worn or used. It's also helpful
to write the item's description in pencil on the
receipt.
Instead of asking for an adjustment, return the
item, and buy it again, if possible. This gives you a
fresh new receipt with 30 days to return the item if
it happens to get marked down further.
While some upscale stores such as Brighton
don't have sales per se, they do discount merchan-
dise they are retiring, usually by 30 to 50 percent.
Selection varies from location to location. Sales
people will usually call regular customers to let
them know about the markdowns.
If you find an awesome deal on an item but your
size is gone, many stores will ship the correct size
from another store.
Shoppers, take heed: Mark Ellwood, author of
"Bargain Fever: How to Shop in a Discounted
World," says that 25 percent of people are geneti-
cally programmed to receive a pleasurable rush of
the chemical dopamine when they find a deal.





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Cynthia Davis, M.D.
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779 Medical Drive, Suite 3
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The dopamine makes them lose control and
"keeps their wallets open." If you think that hap-
pens to you, he recommends listening to calming
music or taking a break at the food court.
The Federal Trade Commission, the nation's
consumer protection agency, advises shopping
around and being aware that the "sale" price isn't
always the "best" price.
Having an item's manufacturer, model number,
and other identifying information can help you get
the best price for the item you want.
Take time and travel costs into consideration. If
an item is on sale, but it's way across town, how
much are you really saving once you factor in your
time, your transportation, and parking?
Look for price-matching policies. Some merchants
will match, or even beat, a competitor's prices at
least for a limited time. Read the merchant's pricing
policy. It may not apply to all items.
Go online. Check out websites that compare
prices for items offered online. If you decide to
buy online, keep shipping costs and delivery time
in mind.
Calculate bargain offers that are based on
purchases of additional merchandise. For example,
"buy one, get one free," "free gift with purchase," or
"free shipping with minimum purchase" may sound
enticing. If you don't really want or need the item,
it's not a deal.



* Kiwanis
PL4qZL, 4ordot


Lego unveils first'mini-fig'

female scientist


By LESLIE POSTAL
ORLANDO SENTINEL
Lego recently intro-
duced a new series of
mini-figures and one
is a female scientist, a
first for the company
famous for its plastic
building bricks and
kits. Some hope the
tiny plastic scientist
will help girls see
the hard sciences
(Professor C. Bodin
looks to be a chemist)
as a career option for
them, not just the men
who dominate those
fields.
That may be a
stretch, but the
little figure has been
welcomed by many
who are happy to
see the popular toy
line showcase more
career options for
women.
The Lego company
was hotly criticized
last year when it
introduced a new line
of building kits meant


PHOTO PROVIDED
to appeal to girls. The
Lego Friends sets,
critics said, featured
too much pink and
purple and too many
girly stereotypes, with
a focus on decorating
and beauty.
The scientist mini-fig
is "brilliant," according
to her Lego bio, and
eager to find "new
and interesting ways
to combine things
together." She holds
two Erlenmeyer flasks.


"Pottery q

Express
and BAMBOO FARM
open seven days a week
10*10off
your pottery
purchase! :
I Sale Items Excluded Coupon must be pre-
sented at time of sale Expires 106/13 Flair
S Offer not valid on previous purOhases j
941-505-8400
25370 Zemel Road
Punta Gorda, FL 33955
www.potteryexpress.com
www.bamboo-farm.com


M. MMIT Iii W. Turn to lee experts

941-206-6131
www-.4eao s


Join Punta Gorda Kiwanis at Bealls Outlet's ribbon
cutting and grand opening!
16 Like Friday October 4th, 2013
8:00 am 3:00 pm
615 Cross St, Punta Gorda, FL
-------------------------------------------------
Donate socks & receive a 10% Off coupon to
apply to your entire purchase. See store for d.k til
S............----------........................
Be part of the more than 15,000 pair of socks
donated to Charlotte County schools this vear.

ISUNk BE/ILLS
SUN= Outlet
r b I".tml i ., -. ,p

TA Y LO R FUJ N ER A L ?. .
antl Crtm.iaron cricCes


L II


o The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5


FLAIR






~Page 6 www.sunnewspapers.net FLAIR The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


Grandma Alderton's pancake recipe


I have had several calls regard-
ing the Shrimp a la King recipe
that appeared in the paper a
while back which called for fro-
zen cream of shrimp soup. When
the readers went looking for
frozen shrimp soup, it evidently
was no longer on the market.
Must not have gone over very
well. A substitution might be
canned cream of shrimp soup, if
they still make that. Thanks for
your calls!
Jack, another reader, emailed
me about his Grandma
Alderton's wonderful pancake
recipe. Grandma Nina Russell-
Alderton was a mother of four,
grandmother of 21, and wife
... 65-plus years to Felix. They
ran a 1,000-acre dairy and crop
farm plus a family dairy business
outside tiny Laona, Wisc. Work
crews returned year after year to
do work and feast on Grandma
Alderton's finest. She passed at
86 years young. Many thanks
to Jack for Grandma Alderton's
pancake recipe below.
Thanks for reading! Looking
for YOUR recipes and family
stories.

GRANDMA ALDERTON'S
BUTTERMILK PANCAKES
2 eggs
21/2 cups buttermilk
11/2 cup sifted flour


1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
A/ cup of shortening
This recipe works best with no
substitutions. Do not over-beat
the batter, it should be runny.
Cook very fast, turning only
once on a hot griddle using real
butter. Real north woods maple
syrup is the best topper. Either
white flour or buckwheat can be
used, but white is preferred by
most. These are light, fluffy and
delicious.

FLORIDA FRUITY SALAD
2 packages strawberry Jell-O
11 cups boiling water
1 large can pineapple, crushed
and drained
1 package frozen strawberries,
thawed
1 ripe banana, mashed
12 pint sour cream
Boil water and mash banana.
Combine Jell-O and water, add
fruits. Put half of mixture in
dish or mold, refrigerate till set.
Spread sour cream over jellied
mixture then top with remaining
mixture. Refrigerate till set.
Serves 4.

GRACE'S ALFREDO MASHED POTATOES
4 large potatoes, peeled and
quartered


23-ounce jar Alfredo sauce
2 teaspoon salt
% teaspoon pepper, or to
taste
2 teaspoons crushed garlic
In large pan, cover peeled
potatoes with water and boil
until tender. Drain and place
in large mixing bowl. Mash
potatoes till slightly lumpy.
After removing lid from
Alfredo sauce, microwave
on high for about 1 minute.
Mix about half of the jar of
sauce into the potatoes with
remaining ingredients. If
potatoes are too thick add
more sauce. Serves 4.

TONI'S CHICKEN PICCATTA
6 chicken breast halves,
boneless and skinless
1/ cup grated Parmesan
cheese
2 tablespoons dry Italian
bread crumbs
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/3 cup white wine
6 pieces lemon, cut in
wedges
Rinse chicken breasts with
water, but don't dry. Coat
chicken with combined
Parmesan cheese and bread
crumbs. Heat oil in 10-inch
skillet over medium high
heat. Brown chicken about
5 minutes on each side till


nicely brown and tender.
Remove to platter and keep
warm. Reduce heat to medi-
um, add wine to skillet. Stir
to loosen drippings. Remove
from heat and serve over
chicken, adding lemon wedg-
es. Makes 6 yummy servings.

FLORIDA ORANGE PORK CHOPS
Pork chops (allow one thick
chop per person)
4 tablespoons brown sugar
4 tablespoons orange
marmalade
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 can orange juice (or 6
ouces fresh)
Salt and pepper to taste
Brown chops; drain excess
fat. Combine remaining ingre-
dients and pour over chops.
Cover and simmer about 40
minutes. Serve sauce on side.
FLORIDA ORANGE ANGEL FOOD CAKE
4 eggs, separated
112 cups sugar
2 cup orange juice
112 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoon baking powder
Beat egg yolks until creamy
and lemon color. Gradually
add sugar, then orange juice,
flour and baking powder.


, i ByMARYKLEISS

Beat egg whites until stiff,
add to yolk mixture, fold
in. Pour into greased tube
pan. Start in cold oven and
bake at 350 degrees for 1
hour. When done, turn upside
down; let cool. Ice with a
white frosting. Add few
drops of orange flavoring
to frosting.

BUTTERMILK PIE
3 eggs
% cup sugar
1 tablespoon flour
2 cup buttermilk
% stick butter, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
One 9-inch unbaked pie
shell
Preheat oven to 325
degrees. Beat eggs slightly.
Mix sugar and flour together,
add to eggs Add buttermilk
and melted butter, stir in
vanilla. Pour into pie shell.
Bake one hour. 6 servings.


HAVE A RECIPE?
Mary Kleiss welcomes calls, suggestions
and recipes for her column. Email her at
mkleiss@msn.com, or call 941-889-7297.


A good deal for your good deed

By AMY DUNN
THE NEWS & OBSERVER (RALEIGH, N.C.) .


Here's an extremely nice deal paired with
an extraordinary opportunity to do a good
deed at the same time.
Pantene has teamed with Walmart to offer
up to $30 to folks who donate a ponytail of
their hair to be made into wigs for women
fighting cancer. f .
Head to GotoBeautifulLengths.com to -
fill out a form for a donation kit that -
includes a prepaid postage envelope,
ponytail cutting instructions, a $30 rebate
form and a "Pantene Beautiful Lengths
bonus bag."
You must purchase a Pantene product
from Walmart and submit a receipt from
the hair salon where your ponytail was
cut.
The value of the rebate sent in the
form of a Visa giftcard will be based on
the price of the haircut. The offer is good
through Oct. 31.




Downtown Merchants Association with
The Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce
Invites Everyone To


BERLIN SPONSORS
.. ,,
~~~~~~ENROIiI A( F. iD & co nc. ".'" "'
;...,'..,; IUN fe'.ll

MUNICH SPONSORS

..... N.... ....... .. F C B
^. *i ^ I ,,r1r',., ,-,',,,.,,.\ m r,,alri n PeoceRil ere-r.. 1


-P i1? I -i9..


PHOTO PROVIDED


AIp(sa


FREE COFFEE AT DUNKIN' DONUTS, KRISPY KREME ON
SUNDAY
Get free coffee on Sunday to celebrate National Coffee Day.
Dunkin' Donuts: Grab a free small cup of hot or iced coffee with
a mobile coupon on the chain's free smartphone app, available for
iPhone or Android. You also can buy DD Coffee for $5.99 a pound on
Sunday. The limit's two per person. Details: http://dun.kn/15Rm4B4
Krispy Kreme: Get a free small coffee at participating doughnut
shops on Sunday. No purchase is necessary. Also, get small iced
coffee and mocha or pumpkin spice lattes for $1. The chain's also
giving away free coffee for a year. Details: http://bit.ly/S5uqOx

FREE NO-SEW PATTERNS FOR KIDS' HALLOWEEN COSTUMES
Get free no-sew patterns to make cute kids costumes for
Halloween.
The downloadable directions from Jo-Ann Fabric show how to
make lions and lady bugs out of fleece with a glue gun. There's also
a handy measurement chart. Other options include pumpkin, bat,
bee, cat, dog, Indian princess or witch.
Making a costume would be a fun fall project with kids.
If you head to the store, here's a link to 40 percent off one item
coupon: www.joann.com/coupon/
Get the free patterns (PDF): http://bit.ly/OifGe8

Sun Sentinel


Pops at Edison

THE ULTIMATE RAT PACK
October 12. 2013. 6:30 PM
At Edison State College Campus
26300 Airport Rd.. Punta Gorda. Park opens at 5:30 I'M


Tickets
No* available 0i PuntaGordaChamber.com
General Entry: S20 in advance
S2i or dooi Bnrig Youi Own (lhoa0
Stage Front Tables:' 53)0 ti roable ol 8 Si10"
oi Ltable o01 10 1Tables (hois Piovided Ti)tles o 80
arid 10 aie eligible loi a deco0iarig comfpeihionr using
lhe Pa01 PacI," lheme
SWe hotel lio hst oft (hoimbei mnmbeii oteieis and
iestoutonts ii ho ion cate i ouw toble stood should vou
pietfe to ho e it piotided Coll the (hombe oftie aot
04 o11-.1' 70

Sponsored by:
Puntmi Gorda

Chamber ol Commerne


SUN,4N-m' SPIFERS
mer;c 8a B_ Corrm-mun rt Da.


clearcnnnel


'..... I,.:,m,. ... DEAll MAP. ,l .l (W illiam (ii. I .:... i




EDISON STATE
--COLLEGE--


HARBOR
STYLE-
A A,
'F~ ~ ,, 's,
la,, ,~~f lu


C i ..

I-^ _BNRF


*II. r L,r
Wi ,, 1.01 t,,V,.
TiNISSAN
WYWW.IUBORhlS8AhJ.OM


R AuLTCI
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x


(Ieekrnore
.CI I i'i Re i.
C~Iuhllti tRpL i
\ledtical Cr-fihe
--- b -b I M,1[ '1 .


-Page 6 www.sunnewspapers.net


FLAIR


The Sun /Sunday, September 29, 2013


L Lederhosen & Drindis encouraged I






















o


0





RIAN
and
cREr
WALKER


-ForHA


S0O WE CAN BEAT
THE CROWD.
WHAT
CROWD?





Comics Page 2 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com The Sun I Sunday, September 29, 2013


by parker and hart


H
A
G
A

the
horrible

BRoWNE


a' Mort Walker's

beetle
bailey$


WOULDN'T IT E EXCITING TO
REDECORATE WITH NEW EVERYTHING?!
EXCITING?!

f7)
L4^z9( *k-'j


Comics Page 2 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com


The Sun / Sunday, September 29, 2013







Sunday, September 29, 2013 I The Sun www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 3


I REMEMBER MV MOTHER'S
FACE LOKIN6 LIKE THIS. I
REMEMBER HOW THE LINES
CRPRFTFROUND
HME-K MouTH
AND HER


KAREN AND VALETA, BOTH SMITTEN WITHWONPR






THE HANDSOME CAPTAIN OF THE DRAGON .V
BOAT SKJALDDIS, HAVE SPENT A BITTER
INIGl-l SCPUBBING THAT VES ELS BILGE- .k -.
STHEY FID VAL ENGAGED IN






-,, ,SWORDPLAY WITH NATHAN,
IKEA AEO ST WBUT KAREN HAS NO PATIENCE:
THH SE PI D"THAT WAS AN ESPECIALLY

BOAT SK D HRTY TRICKS HUMILIATINGTUS
REAS SCRAPERS AT THE BOTTOM
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RTHE AETIYALLF LL'WEDEGTOETUGE





THE Ist 4 D ,- EEN "N~lDIEITHER: ,'-F THEM i h@ 2013 King Fe~atures Syndicate,Ilnc.




V, S l O FILLED PAWITH P NEtA. THE ANEL
1 / ..n --IUTggeP J.'EPTITICU5L,. [Ha F40


VAL ANSWERS: "IF MY DAUGHTERS ... lr_ iw-
HAVE GROWN SO FAR REMOVED '."
FROM COMMONBLABORSAS TO TSNOP
NOT APPRECIATE LIFE ABOARD A
DRAGON SHIP, THEY NEED TO LEARN p ,,
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HUMILITY!" BUT THEN A CRY COMES DT
FROM BEHINDHTHEM:P"LOOK-THESKY!" _. ,AS THEN-LEVIATH T
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ABUT KAPI.AHAS NO PATIENCE:

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HAVE GRWAOFAPEO ED I Ls--.EDTOPTUtjT--
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HUMILITY!" BUTLHEN A CRY COMES/ _THE___ P hi
FROM~- BEHIND HEM: 'OOK-THESKYI"i F~7~.-L-0 TUNE, T


SLYLOCK FOX and COMICS FOR KIDS


BY BOB WEBER JR.


Sunday, September 29, 2013 / The Sun


www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 3






Comics Page 4 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com The Sun I Sunday, September29, 2013


WiOTEWVE f ?WoRP,,.


NEW RESEARCH SoWSV WAT T E
AVERAGE AP6LT FORGETS THREE
S1WAGS EVERY PA,

b-^


T1E BIN LISEE






by Art & Chip Sansom


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5 F .P g-..-TIAFE
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I', STNNI G
TIE-EK ANV
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By Gary Brookins
8 Susie MacNelly


Comics Page 4 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald.com


The Sun / Sunday, September 29, 2013


_1






Sunday, September 29, 2013 I The Sun www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V Comics Page 5


BARNEY
GOOGLE




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I
BY
JOHN
ROSE


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I I


Sunday, September 29, 2013 / The Sun


www.sun-herald.com D/E/N/C/V


Comics Page 5






Comics Page 6 D/E/N/C/V www.sun-herald .com The Sun I Sunday, September 29, 2013


THE PHANTOM


BY LEE FALK


EXPECTING THREE GIRLS TO BRING
MANPRAK6 HER5 WAS A TALL. OROPR!
WHAT KINP OF SOLO HELLCAT
TAKES THe PHANTOM CAPTIVE TO
bootT! TAKES HIS SIDE4ARMSP!
OF 6 0 0


DOONESBURY


9-29


BY GARRY TRUDEAU


I I I
"blVE-TWETIAN6 FROM FOX NE5W5
MFAN'S ROOM. U WOULP NAYERR
95BLI,5V WHAT I JUST OVER-
HEARP, SO I WONAIT REPORT IT."

0


'1


19 1111111m 0111


,r


^


Comics Page 6 D/E/N/C/V


www.sun-herald.com


The Sun / Sunday, September 29, 2013


6mm1w


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SUNDAY
Brad Keselowski defends
his NASCAR Sprint Cup
title in the "AAA 400,"
airing at 2 p.m. on ESPN.


TUESDAY
Denise (Lorraine Bruce)
and her co-workers win
a lottery pool on "Lucky
7," at 10 p.m. on ABC.


WEDNESDAY FRIDAY


Marco (Demian Bichir)
searches for a missing
girl on "The Bridge,"
airing at 10 p.m. on FX.


Welsh actress Catherine
Zeta-Jones stars in
1998's "The Mask of
Zorro," at 8 p.m. on AMC.






C o n v e rs io n C h a rt Coma......t Coma....t Com... t Co s Comcast C s Fi FFortMey Tampa
Venice Englewood Sarasota Charlotte Arcadia Gorda Sarasota DISH DIRECT DISH DIRECT
WZVN 2 ABC Bonita Springs 7 11 7 26 26
WFTS 0 ABC-Tampa 11 28 28
WWSB 0 ABC -Sarasota 7 7 7 10 7 7 7 40
WTSP D CBS-St. Petersburg 10 10 10 10 10 10
WINK 0 CBS -Fort Myers 213 213 5 5 5 11 11
WFLA ( NBC-Tampa 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
WBBH 0T NBC- Fort Myers 2 2 2 -20 20
WTVT l FOX-Tampa 13 13 13 13 13 13 13
WFTX I FOX-Cape Coral 4 4 4 -36 36
WEDU M PBS-Tampa 3 3 3 -3 3 3
WUSF l PBS-Tampa 204 204 204 16 16 16
WGCU I PBS -FortMyers 3 3 3 30 30
WXCW l CW 6 21 6 46 46
WTOG g CW 9 9 9 4 44 44
WTTA aE MYNET 11 11 11 14 38 38
WNFM M MYNET 8 9 8
WMOR B IND 12 12 12 38 12 32 32
WXPX 0 ION -St.Petersburg 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 66 66
WCLF 2 IND St. Petersburg 22 22 22 2 22
WRXY g IND Ft. Myers-Naples 22 44 10 49
WFTT B Telefutura-Tampa 23 23 23 95 5 50 50
WVEA 0 Univision -Venice 15 15 15 6 62 62
A&E Arts & Entertainment 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 118 265 118 265
AMC American Movie Classics 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 131 254 130 254
APL Animal Planet 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 184 282 184 282
BET Black Entertainment TV 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 124 329 124 329
BRAVO Bravo 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 129 237 129 237
COM Comedy Central 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 107 249 107 249
DISC Discovery Channel 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 182 278 182 278
E! Entertainment Channel 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 114 236 114 236
EWTN Eternal Word Television Network 243 243 243 12 17 285 261 370 261 370
FAM ABCFamily Channel 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 180 311 180 311
FOOD TV Food 37 37 37 37 76 164 110 231 110 231
FX FX Network 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 136 248 136 248
GSN Game Show Network 179 179 179 179 34 179 184 116 233 116 233
HALL Hallmark USA 5 5 5 17 73 240 185 312 185 312
HIST History Channel 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 120 269 120 269
HOME Home & Garden 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 112 229 112 229
HSN Home Shopping Network 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 22 240 222 240
LIFE Lifetime 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 108 252 108 252
OWN Oprah Winfrey Network 58 58 58 58 47 103 161 189 279 189 279
QVC Quality Value Convenience 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 137 317 137 317
SPIKE SpikeTV 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 241 241 241 241
STYLE Style 82 82 82 82 118 118 160 115 235 115 235
SYFY Science Fiction 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 122 244 122 244
TBS Turner 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 139 247 139 247
TCM Turner Classic Movies 65 65 65 65 169 230 132 256 132 256
TLC The Learning Channel 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 183 280 183 280
TNT Turner Network Television 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 138 245 138 245
TRAV Travel 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 196 277 196 277
TRUTV truTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 242 246 242 246
TVLAND TV Land 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 106 304 106 304
USA USA Network 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 105 242 105 242
WGN WGN America 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 239 307 239 307
CSS Comcast Sports South 28 28 28 28 49 70
ESPN Entertainment Sports 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 140 206 140 206
ESPN2 Entertainment Sports 2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 144 209 144 209
FS1 Fox Sports 1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 150 219 150 219
FSN Fox Sports Network 72 72 72 72 56 77 423 654 423 654
GOLF Golf Channel 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 401 218 401 218
NBCS NBC Sports 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 159 220 159 220
SUN Sun Sports 38 38 401 401 45 57 76 422 653 422 653
NICK Nickelodeon 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 170 299 170 299
TOON Cartoon Network 80 80 124 124 46 20 257 176 296 176 296
CNBC Financial News/Talk 39 39 39 39 37 102 208 355 208 355
CNN Cable News Network 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 200 202 200 202
CSPN Congress 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 210 350 210 350
FNC Fox News Channel 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 205 360 205 360
MSNBC News/Talk 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 209 356 209 356
SNN SNN Local News 6 6 11
CMTV Country Music TV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 166 327 166 327
MTV MusicTelevision 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 160 331 160 331
VH1 Video Hits 1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 162 335 162 335
CINE Cinemax 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 310 515 310 515
CINE2 Cinemax 2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 312 517 312 517
DISN Disney Channel 136 136 136 136 99 45 250 172 290 172 290
ENC Encore 150 150 150 150 150 350 340 535 340 535
HBO Home Box Office 302 302 302 302 302 302 400 300 501 300 501
HB02 Home Box Office 2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 301 502 301 502
HB03 Home Box Office 3 304 304 304 304 304 404 302 503 302 503
SHOW Showtime 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 318 545 318 545
TMC The Movie Channel 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 327 554 327 554
2 WE Women's Entertainment 117 117 117 117 117 149 128 260 128 260








On the Cover

Spader Plays Rogue Agent With
Secret Agenda and Sensible Clothes


BY CANDACE HAVENS
FYI Televsion, Inc.
Raymond "Red" Reddington
(James Spader) is a rogue govern-
ment agent turned fugitive crimi-
nal who had given himself up to
the FBI on "The Blacklist," airing
Monday at 10:01 p.m. on NBC.
He agreed to help the government
with cases, but only if he was al-
lowed toworkwith rookie FBI pro-
filer Liz Keen (Megan Boone). And
during her very first day on the job,
Red helped Liz catch a terrorist.
This brings up many questions.
Why does Red want to work with
an agent who is so green? And
why has he turned himself in
now? These are questions
the producers iii..ini, ,
will be answei.d \XV
love great mo.'I- lil
guys, Keyser Si.'r 1- v-
ingoneofthem lii,'11
'Usual Suspq,' I[.
says executive iii'-
ducer Jon Bokii-
kamp, "and
the idea


that (executive producer John) Fox
had presented was what would
happen if one of these guys started
to talk. What kinds of stories would
he tell and what different worlds
would he be able to take us into?
"It is sort of a strange hybrid in
terms of what the show is because
each week we are going to go out
and dip into a different world of
crime," Bokenkamp continues.
"We're going to go find criminals
that, as we present in the pilot, the
FBI may not know exist. I think
there's an opportunity to sort of,
you know, have fun with the vari-
ous people who were
involved in crime in
w waysthatwehave
v. 1 .,,. I,.bre.
s. ,. IJ! li week
."r "%%ill h,ive a


Megan Boone
Liz Keen on ti
"The Blacklis
day at 10:01


different criminal, but I think the
reason you come back to the show,
or at least what excites me about
it, are the people and the secrets
that they have and what's happen-
ing at home. I think in most pro-
cedural type shows, you don't go
home. You stay at the office or in
the bullpen where they're solving
the crime, and here it's essential
that we go home. It is a little bit of
a delicate balance of going out and
solving a crime each week and also
going home and meeting these
people. But I think that's what's
sort of special about the show."
As for how soon viewers find out
why Red is back, Bokenkamp is a
bit cagey. "It is a series long ques-
tion, but it's not simple enough that
it's something we will answer right
up front. I mean, why this man has
come back and introduced himself
and inserted himself into her life
is there are many reasons, so I
think along the way we're going
to sort of address and get into the
various reasons behind why he's
come back Ultimately it may be
a singular thing, but to me, I sort


plays Agent
he new drama
t," airing Mon-
p.m. on NBC.


created the look of
with something spe
and from the first d
he wanted to give I
ity. "I knew the ve
when I got to New
the pilot -- I had
- that they were go
surveillance photo
to have on the wall
surrenders himself
"I thought it would
moment when he si
self, he takes his hi
juxtaposition of thi
with long hair and
Spader points to his
"And because actors
with everything els
done before in any r
playing, I thought
nice to take off my
entirely different
very different look t
"But working b
there, you know, t
has been for the las
moves very swiftly


life. He's moving from place to
place very quickly. I thought he
should have a haircut that he can
do himself if he cares to or he can
go to some barbershop in a little
town in Cambodia, and they can
cut his hair in 10 minutes. I just
thought it was streamlined, and
his clothes are like that, too, in that
he looks well dressed, but they are
traveling clothes. You know, he
wears clothes that he can go from
a bank to a cave and he's dressed
accordingly. And he's also in a lot
of different climates over the last
20 years, so I thought it would be
appropriate that he dress and look
as if he's able to move through the
world easily and comfortably."


index
Cover Story............................ 3
Sports .................................. 4-5
Soap Update .........................21
Radio/News/Weather............... 5
Q&A ....................................... 11
TV Crossword ......................42
Movies ................................. 48


of see it as a guide to symbols
whole meal. ****= Exceptional*** = Good
There are a **= Fair* = Poor
lot of intrica- Symbols & codes:
(CC) Close Captioned; 'R'= Repeat;
cies that we 'N'- new; (HD)' = High Definition;
I, DVS = Descriptive Video Service;
can dip into. iTV= Interactive television; T=
S pader Taped.
Parental Guidelines for TV:
the character You may see rating codes on your
iin mind, TV screen. Here what they mean:
cific in mind, 'Y'- appropriate for all Children. 'Y7'
lay of shooting appropriate for 7 and older. 'G'
general audience. 'PG'- parental
Red authentic- guidance suggested. '14'- 14 and
older. 'M'- 17 and older.
ery first thing Along with the rating codes mentioned
York to shoot above, you may see additional
abbreviations. Here's what they
very long hair mean: 'AC'- adult content. 'AH'
adult humor. 'AL adult language.
going to shoot a 'AS'- adult situations. 'BN' brief
of Reddington nudity. 'GL'- graphic language. 'GV'
graphic violence. 'MT'- mature
there when he themes. 'MV' mild violence. 'SC'
I sexual content. 'SSC'- strong
says Spader. sexual content. 'V violence.
be just a great Motion picture guidelines:
irrenders him- Movies that appear on movie channels
reies him- may have a theatrical rating. Here's
at off, and the what they mean: 'G'- general
audiences. 'PG'- parental guidence
e shot of him suggested; some material may not
then like this,' be suitable for children. 'PG-13'
shaved head. special parental guidance strongly
s shaved head. suggested for children under 13.
are burdened 'R'- restricted; under 17 requires
accompanying parent or guardian.
se that they've 'NC-17'- not recommended for
Slo tht tho persons under 17.


it would be
hat and it's an
person and a
o go with that.
ackward from
ie way his life
st 20 years, he
/ through his


contact information
Programming Questions?
1-800-Comcast or www.Comcast.com
Why is TV Schedule Different from this book?
TV networks sometimes change schedules af-
ter this weekly book is printed. More accurate
TV schedules are in our daily Sun Newspaper
and our websites: www.venicegondolier.com
or www.sun-herald.com.








SPORTS


AUTO RACING

NASCAR
Sunday
2:00 p.m. ESPN AAA 400 from
Dover International Speed-
way in Dover, Del. (Live)
Friday
12:30 p.m. FS1 NASCAR Sprint
Cup Practice Hollywood
Casino 400 from Kansas
Speedway in Kansas City,
Kan. (Live)
2:00 p.m. FS1 NASCAR Na-
tionwide Practice Kansas
Lottery 300 from Kansas
Speedway in Kansas City,
Kan. (Live)
3:30 p.m. FS1 NASCAR Na-
tionwide Practice Kansas
Lottery 300 from Kansas
Speedway in Kansas City,
Kan. (Live)
5:00 p.m. ESPN2 NASCAR
Sprint Cup Qualifying Hol-
lywood Casino 400 from
Kansas Speedway in Kansas
City, Kan. (Live)
Saturday
3:30 p.m. ESPN Kansas
Lottery 300 from Kansas
Speedway in Kansas City,
Kan. (Live)

BASEBALL

MLB
Sunday
1:00 p.m.TBS MLB Baseball
(Live)


1:00 p.m. FSN Detroit Tigers
at Miami Marlins (Live)
1:00 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay
Rays at Toronto Blue Jays
(Live)
2:00 p.m.WGN Kansas City
Royals at Chicago White Sox
(Live)

BASKETBALL

WNBA
Sunday
3:00 p.m. ESPN2 Eastern Con-
ference Finals, Game 2 Team
TBA at Team TBA (Live)
5:00 p.m. ESPN2 Western
Conference Finals, Game
2 Team TBA at Team TBA
(Live)
Tuesday
7:00 p.m. ESPN22013 WNBA
Playoffs Teams TBA (Live)
9:00 p.m. ESPN22013 WNBA
Playoffs Teams TBA (Live)

BOXING

Professional
Monday
9:00 p.m. FS1 Monday Night
Fights Golden Boy Promo-
tions: Brooklyn (Live)

FOOTBALL

College
Thursday
7:30 p.m. ESPN Texas Long-
horns at Iowa State Cy-
clones (Live)


Andrew Jean-
Baptiste and
the Portland
Timbers wel-
come the Los
Angeles Galaxy
to Jeld-Wen
Field for their
final meeting
S of the regular
season, as
NBC presents
1 "MLS Soccer,"
Sunday at
1 3:30 p.m.


10:00 p.m.FS1 UCLA Bruins at
Utah Utes (Live)
Friday
9:00 p.m. ESPN Nevada Wolf
Pack vs San Diego State
Aztecs (Live)
Saturday
11:30 a.m. CBS Air Force
Falcons at Navy Midshipmen
(Live)
Noon ABC College Football
Teams TBA (Live)
Noon ESPN2 College Football
Teams TBA (Live)
Noon ESPN College Football
Teams TBA (Live)
Noon FS1 College Football
Teams TBA (Live)
Noon SUN College Football
Teams TBA (Live)
Noon MYN College Football
Teams TBA (Live)
12:30 p.m. CW College Foot-
ball (Live)
3:30 p.m. CBS College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
3:30 p.m. SUN College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
3:30 p.m. ESPN2 College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
3:30 p.m.ABC College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
3:30 p.m. FSN College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
6:30 p.m. FS1 College Football
Teams TBA (Live)
7:00 p.m. FOX College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
7:00 p.m. ESPN2 College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
7:00 p.m. ESPN College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
7:30 p.m.NBC Notre Dame
Fighting Irish vs Arizona
State Sun Devils (Live)
8:07 p.m.ABC College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
10:30 p.m. ESPN College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)
10:30 p.m. FS1 College Foot-
ball Teams TBA (Live)

NFL
Sunday
1:00 p.m. FOX NFL Football
Regional Coverage Teams
TBA (Live)
4:00 p.m. CBS New York Jets
at Tennessee Titans (Live)
4:25 p.m. FOX NFL Football
Regional Coverage Teams
TBA (Live)


8:20 p.m. NBC New England
Patriots at Atlanta Falcons
(Live)
Monday
8:25 p.m. ESPN Miami Dol-
phins at New Orleans Saints
(Live)

GOLF

Champions Tour
Sunday
7:00 p.m. GOLF Nature Valley
First Tee Open at Pebble
Beach: Final Round from
Pebble Beach Golf in Mon-
terey Peninsula, Calif. (Live)

European Golf Tour
Sunday
8:00 a.m. GOLF Alfred Dunhill
Links Championship: Final
Round from Old Course St.
Andrews in Fife, Scotland
(Live)
Thursday
9:00 a.m. GOLF Seve Trophy:
First Round from Saint-Nom-
La-Breteche in Paris, France
(Live)
Friday
9:00 a.m. GOLF Seve Trophy:
Second Round from Saint-
Nom-La-Breteche in Paris,
France (Live)

Nationwide Golf Tour
Sunday
3:00 p.m. GOLF Web.com Tour
Championship: Final Round
from Dye's Valley Course
in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.
(Live)

PGA
Thursday
Noon GOLF Presidents Cup:
Day Onefrom Muirfield Vil-
lage Golf Club in Columbus,
Ohio (Live)
Friday
1:00 p.m. GOLF Presidents
Cup: Day Two from Muirfield
Village Golf Club in Colum-
bus, Ohio (Live)
Saturday
8:00 a.m.NBC Presidents
Cup: Day Three from Muir-
field Village Golf Club in
Columbus, Ohio (Live)

HIGH SCHOOL
Friday
8:00 p.m. ESPN2 Curtis Patri-
ots at St. Augustine Purple
Knights (Live)







RADIO DIAL & EVERY HOUR CHANNELS


FM RADIO STATIONS
Station Freq. Format
WJIS 88.1 Religious
WMNF 88.5 Eclectic
WSMR 89.1 Classical
WUSF 89.7 Classical/Jazz
WGCU 90.1 Public Radio
WBVM 90.5 Religious
WSOR 90.9 Religious
WSEB 91.3 Religious
WJYO 91.5 Religious
WVIJ 91.7 Religious
WDDV 92.1 Easy Listening
WYUU 92.5 Latin
WIKX 92.9 Country
WFLZ 93.3 Contemporary
WTLT 93.7 Easy Listening
WARO 94.5 Album Rock
WWRM 94.9 Easy Listening
WOLZ 95.3 Oldies
WMTX 95.7 Contemporary
WRXK 96.1 Album Rock
WINK 96.9 Contemporary
WTLQ 97.7 Latin
WXTB 97.9 Rock
WUSV 98.5 Country
WBCG 98.9 Contemporary
WJBX 99.3 Alternative
WQYK 99.5 Country
WCKT 100.1 Country
WAVV 101.1 Easy Listening
WPOI 101.5 Album Rock
WWGR 101.9 Country
WHPT 102.5 Album Rock
WJGO 102.9 Oldies
WTBT 103.5 Country
WXKB 103.9 Pop
WKZM 104.3 Religious


Location
Sarasota
Tampa
Sarasota
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Englewood
Ft. Myers
Punta Gorda
Venice
Safety Harbor
Punta Gorda
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Ft. Myers
St. Pete
Ft. Myers
Clearwater
Bonita Springs
Ft. Myers
Ft. Myers
Seminole
Ft. Myers
Murdock
Ft. Myers
St. Pete
Pt. Charlotte
Ft. Myers
St. Pete
Tampa
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Bradenton
Ft. Myers
Sarasota


WRBQ
WCVU
WZSP
WBTT
WDUV
WTZB
WJPT
WCTQ
WENG
WSRZ


Classic Hits
Easy Listening
Latin
Hip Hop
Easy Listening
Rock Alt.
Easy Listening
Country
Talk
Oldies


AM RADIO STATIONS
Station Freq. Format
WHNZ 570 Talk
WDAE 620 Talk
WBDN 760 Latin
WWCN 770 Talk
WRFA 820 Talk
WGUL 860 Oldies
WLSS 930 Talk
WFLA 970 Talk
WQYK 1010 Talk
WMTX 1040 Talk
WKII 1070 Oldies
WTIS 1110 Religious
WINK 1200 Talk
WIBQ 1220 Talk
WINK 1240 Talk
WTMY 1280 Talk
WDDV 1320 Easy Listening
WCRM 1350 Latin
WRBQ 1380 Oldies
WMYR 1410 Country
WBRD 1420 Religious
WWCL 1440 Latin
WSDV 1450 Easy Listening
WWPR 1490 Oldies
WENG 1530 Talk
WCCF 1580 Talk


Tampa
Solana
Zolfo Springs
Ft. Myers
New Pt. Richey
Englewood
Ft. Myers
Venice
Englewood
Sarasota

Location
St. Pete
St. Pete
Tampa
Ft. Myers
Largo
Dunedin
Sarasota
Tampa
St. Pete
Clearwater
Pt. Charlotte
St. Pete
Sarasota
Ft. Myers
Sarasota
Venice
Ft. Myers
Tampa
Bradenton
Ft. Myers
Sarasota
Englewood
Punta Gorda


CM
CNN Headline News
(HALF HOUR)
:00 National and International News
:15 Dollars & Sense
:20 Sports
:24 Local News/People & Places
Available on: VEN 27,ENG 27, SAR 27, PTC 27, ARC 27, SPG 59








The Weather Channel
(HOUR)
:00 Today's Weather
:05 Extended Forecast
:10 Radar Update
:17 Traveler's Update
:20 Day Planner
:25 Morning's Weather
:30 Today's Weather
:35 Extended Forecast
:40 International Weather
:47 Season Update
:55 Drivers Report

And Storm Stories every night at 8 and 8:30 p.m.
Available on: VEN 31,ENG 31, SAR 31, PTC 31, ARC 31, SPG 52


HOCKEY

NHL
Thursday
7:00 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay
Lightning at Boston Bruins
(Live)
8:30 p.m. FSN Florida Pan-
thers at Dallas Stars (Live)
Saturday
8:00 p.m. FSN Florida Pan-
thers at St. Louis Blues (Live)
8:00 p.m. SUN Tampa Bay
Lightning at Chicago Black-
hawks (Live)

SOCCER

English League Soccer
Sunday
8:25 a.m. NBCS Norwich City
at Stoke City (Live)
10:55 a.m. NBCS Liverpool at
Sunderland (Live)
Monday
2:55 p.m. NBCS Fulham at
Chelsea(Live)

MLS
Sunday
3:30 p.m. NBC Los Angeles
Galaxy at Portland Timbers
(Live)


9:00 p.m. ESPN New York Red
Bulls at Seattle Sounders
(Live)

UEFA Soccer
Tuesday
2:30 p.m. FSN UEFA Champi-
ons League SoccerTeams
TBA (Live)
2:30 p.m. FS1 UEFA Champi-
ons League SoccerTeams
TBA (Live)
Wednesday
2:30 p.m. FS1 UEFA Champi-
ons League SoccerTeams
TBA (Live)
2:30 p.m. FSN UEFA Champi-
ons League SoccerTeams
TBA (Live)

Women's Soccer
Friday
8:00 p.m. FSN Missouri Tigers
at Vanderbilt Commodores
(Live)

VOLLEYBALL
Thursday
7:00 p.m. ESPN2 Penn State
Nittany Lions at Indiana
Hoosiers (Live)
Friday
7:00 p.m. SUN Texas A&M Ag-
gies at Florida Gators (Live)


SPORTS

TRIVIA

1. Name the last team
before San Francisco
in 2012 whose starting
pitchers earned vic-
tories while allowing
one run or less in the
first three games of the
World Series.

2. Who had more career
shutouts as a pitcher:
Pedro Martinez or Babe
Ruth?

3. When was the last
time in franchise his-
tory before 2012 that
the Arizona Cardinals
started an NFL season
4-0?

4. The Arizona Wildcats
men's basketball team
knocked off three No. 1
seeds on the way to an
NCAA championship in
1998. Name two of the
three teams.

5. When was the last
time before 2013 that


there was a three-
overtime game in the
Stanley Cup Finals?

6. Only five schools
in 32 years have won
an NCAA team title in
women's gymnastics.
Name three of them.



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SJOMSUV






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STampa Bay at 6:00 (N) TampaBayat7:00 (N) TampaBayat8:00(N) ChrisWallace(N) Adv.(N) (H) Stars (N) Sunday
FOX 4 4 Paid Pro- Paid Pro- McGregor Baptist Paid Pro- Lee Pitts FOX NewsSunday with Catholic Paid aid Pro- Paid Pro-
gram gram gram Live ChrisWallace(N) Mass gram gram gram
PBS Sesame Street Performer Curious (R) Cat in Hat (R Super Why DinoTrai Daniel (R) Sid:The BizKid((C) Crossroads Capitol Up-Florida ((C)
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PBS 24 2 4 16 European E Street (C) Crossroads Florida ((() Tothe Con- Scully (() Washington McLaughlin Moyers and Company Intelligence Republican
20 (CC) (N) (R) (CC) trary (N) (N) (N) (N) (CC (N) () D) Party. ((C) (N) (HD)
PBS Curious (CC) Curious Arthur (R) Martha (R) Curious (R) Cat in Hat (R Super Why Dino Train Kratts (R) Capitol (((CC) Florida ((C) Makers (R)
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CW 6 21 6 PaidPro- Paid Pro- On Spot ((C Chef Jeff Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Chat Room Big Sound Into Wild ((C Paid Pro- Paid Pro-
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CW 94 Paid Pro- h Touch with Dr. Rel Life Career Day Teen Edi- Whaddya- Paid Pro- PaidPro- PaidPro- 44On The PaidPro-
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WCLF 2 Time of Destined Citylife Faith Life Meyer (CC) Search M. Love a Baptist Abundant Jerry Today Henry
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WRXY 2244 10 Celebration under the Faith Life Van Impe In Touch with Dr. McGregor Baptist Christian Worship Turning ((0 Turning (C(
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AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 23 Break Bad (:34) Break Bad (R) (:41) Break. Bad (R) Breaking Bad: Dead Freight (R) Break. Bad: Buyout Break. Bad (R) (HD)
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Extreme Extreme Freaky Freaky |Untamed (( (HD) To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Morning Inspiration Prestigious black ministers speak. Jones Gospel (TVG) Voice |GodSendMe a Man (10)((CC)
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Housewives (() (R) Housewives ((C) (R) Housewives ((C (R) Housewives (() (R) Housewives (CC) (R) Housewives (CC) (R)
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Paid Prog. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. (:16)911 (:48)RENO911! (CC) :21)911 (:53)Trading Places ('83) ** Men trade lives.
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. PaidProg. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. PaidProg. Myth (((CC) (R) ) Secret History of the Freemasons (TVPG) (R)
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. E! News (R) (HD) Fashion Police (R) Power (R) E!Spec. Soup(R) Kardashian (R) ) Kardashian
EWTN 243 243 243 12 17 285 Angelus Luke Michael Holy Name Sunday Mass (N) Litany of Bookmark Vaticano Jesus Apostolate Rosary
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Reign Mass Middle Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory Boy wins tour. Honey, I Shrunkthe Kids ** Children shrink.
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Week (R) (HD) |Giada (R) |Barefoot IPioneer Heartland Home(N) GuyBite Sandwich |BobbyFlay
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 PaidProg. Paid Prog. Ellen The Twilight Saga: New Moon (09, Fantasy) *% Dangerous love. (CC) The Twilight Saga: Eclipse ('10)
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179184 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Password + Whammy Whammy LoveTrian Newlywed Newlywed
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Lucy Lucy Lucy Lucy Lucy Lucy Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Mountain (R) (HD) Mountain (R) (HD) Mountain (R) (HD) Mountain (R) (HD) Mountain (R) (HD)
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Renovation (R) () Renovation (R) (HD) House Hunters (R) Renovation (R) (HD) Prop Bro (R) (HD)
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Home Solutions HSN Today HSN Today HSN Today Fluidity Fitness Fall Clean SkhnCare Ruby
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 PaidProg. Paid Prog. Dr. Charles Stanley Paid Prog. DavidJere Osteen Paid Prog. Devious (CC) (R) (D) My Life in Ruins (09)
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 Berkus (() (HD) Rachael Ray (HD) Dr. Phil Freeloaders. Dr. Phil ((CC)() ( Super Soul (R) (HD) Super Soul (N) (HD)
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 Keep It Clean Electronics Bob Mackie Wear Sundays with Carolyn & Dan Sunday ideas. Electronics
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Paid Prog. PaidProg. Paid Prog. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. Xtrm4x4 Horsepwr Trucks! Muscle Bar Rescue (R) (HD)
STYLE 828 82 82 82 11818 160 SexCity SexCity SexCity SexCity SexCity SexCity SexCity SexCity Knife(R) Knife(R) Getaway(R) ()
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Chapter Friday 13th Part V %
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Married Married Friends Queens Queens Charlie's Angels (00) Sexy detectives. (CC) Charlie's Angels: Full (03) ((CC)
TCM 65 65 65 65 169 230 The Strange Love of Martha Ivers ('47) (CC) Dead Reckoning ('47) *** Rich and Strange ('31) Eventful cruise. (CC)
TLC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 Paid Prog. |Paid Prog. PaidProg. |PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. Four Wedd (R) (D) Four Wedd (R) (HD) Breaking (R) (HD)
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Law& Order: Merger Law& Order: Justice Law Theft victim shot. Law & Order: Patsy Law ((C (HD) Law Radical fire kills.
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Vacation Attack (R) Mysteries Life jacket. Off Limits ((C (R) Mysteries (() (R) Mysteries (CC) (R)
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Most Shock (R) Most Shock (R)
TVLND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Cliff's aunt. Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Cosby Cleveland Cleveland
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 Paid Prog. PaidProg. PaidProg. Paid Prog. PaidProg. PaidProg. SVU Drugs for sex. SVU: Liberties (14) SVU Computer love.
WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 RMeredith PaidProg. PaidProg. Facts David(N) Beyond PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. MurderxNos. (02)






CELEBRITY
EXTRA
BY CINDY ELAVSKY
King Features Synd., Inc.

Q: I am dying to know
what will happen in
season two of Syfy's
"Defiance." It was one of
my favorite new shows
of the summer, and I
love one of the stars:
Julie Benz. -- Katie H., via
e-mail

A: I spoke with the lovely
and talented actress
-- who most recently
starred in the Lifetime
original movie "Taken:
The Search for Sophie
Parker" (check local
listings for airdates)
-- and she gave me a
few hints about what
next season holds. The
science-fiction near-
future drama, which
is currently filming its
second season in Toronto,


will take on a darker tone,
as will Julie's character.

"The world of 'Defiance'
has changed," she told
me, "and with that, so
does the look of the show.
We see a darker Amanda
this season. A much
darker Amanda -- she's
struggling; she's having
a very hard time. Her
ex-husband was killed
during season one; she
lost her job, which is truly
how she defined herself;
and her sister has gone
missing. She's really in a
bad place when season
two opens.

"In the season one
finale, we basically hit
the reset button, so we
start season two in a
whole different place.
Every character is in a
different place than they
were during season one.
Creatively, it is so much
fun to play characters
who can grow and change


exponentially each
season. That is what you
are going to see in season
two. It's a much darker
'Defiance' -- especially my
character."

Q: What's the latest
news on the judge
situation on "American
Idol"? Have they sorted
out who's new and who's
coming back? -- Tyler W.,
Fresno, Calif.

A: Finally, "American
Idol" has a judge lineup
that could make me start
watching again. Keith
Urban will be returning
for his second season,
Jennifer Lopez has
decided to come back
after a season away, and
newbie Harry Connick
Jr. rounds out the group.
Randy Jackson will be
back, as a mentor, and
Ryan Seacrest returns as
the singing-competition
show's gregarious host.
Here's hoping that this
January's 13th season of
"Al" is its luckiest one yet.


Write to Cindy at King
Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475;
or e-mail her at
letters@cindyelavsky.com.
For more news and
extended interviews, visit www.
celebrityextraonline.com and
twitter.com/Celebrity_Extra.


I KIDS NEWS SPORTS MORNING SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
SEP.29
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. Beyond Trophy Tracks PaidProg. Inside Coll. Ftbl (Replay)
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 Coll. Fbl NFL Match SportsCenter (HD) SportsCenter (HD) SportsCenter (HD) Sunday NFL Countdown (N) (HD)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 SportsCenter (HD) College Ftbll (HD) Outside Sport Rpt Colin's New (N) SportsCenter (HD) Fantasy (N) (HD)
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 FOX Sports (HD) FOX Sports (HD) .\ MotoGP: Aragon FOX Sports (HD) RaceDay: Dover (N) Kickoff (N) (HD)
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 College Football: Houston vs UTSA (Taped) ((() Big 12 Live(HD) UEFAMag. Golf Life Gae365 Polaris
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Golf Cnrl Gof Cntrl Morning Drive (HD) ? European Tour Golf: Alfred Dunhill Links Championship: Final Round (ive) (HD)
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 WildLifers NAHunter PremierLeague Premier @(:25) English Pr. League Soccer (ive) Premier (:55) Soccer (Ive)
SUN 38 38 401401 45 57 76 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Reel Dream Paid Prog. Paid Prog. College Football: Florida Gators at Kentucky Wildcats (Taped) (() (HD)
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 FullHse FullHse Penguis Fairly Megaforce Sponge Sponge Sponge Sponge Sponge TMNT Rabbids
TOON 80 80 124124 46 20 257 Tunes Looney T. Berk (R) Tenkai Beyblade Unova Chima Ben 10 Batman TitansGo! Cartoon Planet (R)
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37102 Options Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. PaidProg. PaidProg.
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 10 New Day Sunday CNN's team presents weekend news. (N) State (CC (N) (HD) Fareed Zakaria (N) Reliable Source (N)
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 C-Span Weekend Washington Journal Key events and legislation discussion. (N) Newsmkr C-Span Weekend
FNC 64 64 64 644871 118 FOX & Friends (N) FOX & Friends (N) FOX & Friends (N) FOX & Friends (N) NewsHQ Housecall MediaBuzz(N)
MSNB 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Lockup (HD) Hardball Business Upw/Steve Kornacki Pundit panel. (N) Melissa Harris-Perry Political talk. (N)
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 (4:00) CMT Music CMT presents music videos from some of the hottest stars in country music. (N) IHot 20
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48210 Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous Ridiculous The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 VH1 +Music Top music videos. (N) VH1Top 20 Video Countdown (R1)) () BestWeek TI& Tiny BlackInk Crew (R)
WE 117 117 117 117 117 149 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. IPaidProg. |PaidProg. |Paid Prog. Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne
IE (5:20) 2010 ('84) Astro- Cut: Tower The Day of the Jackal (73) **k An English hit man is Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter I, Robot (04
IN 320 320 320 320 320 320 42 nautsmission. ( Heist hired to carefully plan the assassination of de Gaulle. I *'. Vampire hunting. %
CINE2 321321313 1 M. Parador (:45) How I Got Into College ('89) (:15) Problem Child ('90) A yuppie (:40) American Reunion ('12, Comedy) *** American
32132132132132132142 (88) Choosing a college ((() couple adopts an awful kid. Friends attend high school reunion. (CC) (10)
DISN 136 136 136 136 99 45250 Octonauts Henry(C(Q(R) Mickey(R) Doc Mc(R) Jake and Sofia (R) Jessie(R) Jessie(R) Shakelt(R) A.N.T.(R) (:15) Wander Blog: Too
DISN 199 45 (R) (HD) (HD) (R) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) (R) Short
ENC i1 1 1 10 1 3 (5:40) Around the World in 80 Days (:45) Jurassic Park ('93) Sam Neill. A billionaire invites scien- The Thorn Birds: The Missing Thorn Brd
C 150 150 150 150 150 3(04) Globe travellers. (CC) tists to tour a park featuring living dinosaurs. Years ('96) Priest helps lover. (96)
H(:15) The New World ('05, History) Soldier of fortune John World Championship Boxing: Chavez Jr. vs. Vera & 24/7(()(HD) Candelabra
HBO 30'2 302 302 302 302 302 40 Smith is saved from execution by Pocahontas. Stevenson vs. Cloud & Haye vs. Fury (Replay) (HD) (R)
HBO2 30 3333 3 402 ( 10) EDtv '99) Matthew McConaughey. A store (:15) Parental Guidance ('12, Comedy) Grand- Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows ('11)
HBO2 303 303 33 33 33 erks life becomes a TV show. (C() parents babysit their grandkids. (CC) Tracking down a criminal mastermind.
HBO3 Because of Winn-Dixie A lonely girl (:45) First Million Dollar Baby ('04, Drama) ***hk A (:15) The Debt (11) *** Helen Mirren. Agents
304 304 304 304 30 bonds with a stray dog. Look boxing trainer takes a female pupil. (CC) (HD) track down Nazi war criminal. (R) ((C)
SHW 30 30 30 30 3 3 3 (:20) The Double ('11, Crime) Richard Gere. CIA Insidethe NFL: 2013 The Woman In The Fifth ('11, (:25) Gone (12, Thriller) Sister abduc-
S4 30 30 30 3 3 3 operatives search for an assassin. Week#4 (R)(HD) Thriller) A stranger in Paris. (CC) ed by sister's kidnapper.
TMC 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 Dark Horse Career Opportunities (:50) The Magic of Belle Isle ('12, Comedy) (:40) October Sky ('99, Drama) *** Coal Source ('11)
M (12) Loser gets a ob. **A Author moves to a rural town to write. miner's son tries to build rockets. (PG) () (C
:1 I II L






KIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOON SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

ABC Exploalion AquaKids Ex1ia i" lt llHl omg! h- RedCarpetExtremeWeighl Loss: Ii in I .-i-I.. X Games Preview/Re-
261 () t1110 1 sideltI 111 I | lI'- li I, I" H cap
ABC Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Extreme Weighl Loss: Ii 1 iI i.... I X Games Preview/Re-
2 gram gram gram gram gram gram Co-dependent twins. (CC (R) (1HD) cap
ABC 7 7 7 Paid Pro- Paid Pro- WWSB Girl Jack Hanna Hurricane Game Extreme Weight Loss: Daidl and' Rehet:d X Games Preview/Re-
____7 7 7 gram gram TV (C) Time (R) Co-dependent twins (C) (R) (HD) cap
CBS T ,he NFL Today 111i How lo Do Howlo Do Beer Beer CBSSporls: i I lJFLFoolball: I.,-. .- I I-i. i -.
i01 ini Fla Fla Geeks Geeks I: ii.iiii i:ni.-intlHI)l ..-,- I ii. II.. .11- I-i.-- I It i.i-liHIl
CBS I FL Foolball:l:,n. i. !1.-- -, i...... .,,1 I i 1 k. 1...... ,-,n .il,-, 1 I .... i..i iLi_. I I i :i C BS Sporls: i,: i,
1 1 1 1: i i, ii i iIl: nl,-_ li||lli)
NBC ewsChannel8al PaidPro- PaidPro- PaidPro- FLW:I.--I I:, .-,I--,.-.I MLSSoccer: I.. I,-i.-. .ii., ii i-ll..il TI .I.i.
ai Noon Sunday iII gram gram gram i' i .-1.1 .- i -i -i IIiii.4 1
NBC PaidPro- American TreeFu Slorm PaidPro- FLW: I.- ii -,1, .-,i- -.i MLSSoccer: I... i .i.-I.-. .ii., ii 1.ii In T i
2 gram i"I, Tom i"I Slories gram ll.i' l, l 1,,lll. I.-1.I1 .-IIn I.--i,.I I,. IHH |tll_
FOX i i i FOX NFL Sunday ,il lNFL Foolball: I -.iiii..., .. i. TI- ,. Tii 1 L. .1 I. H l FLFoolball: I:.-, iii. '...

FOX FOX NFL Sunday (N) -NFL Football: Regional Coverage Teams TBA (ive) ((C) (1D) NFL Football: Regional Cov-
S( (0 (HD) I erage- Teams TBA (ive) ((C)
PBS McLaughlin Florida ((C) Tothe Con- Gulf Coast WEDUArts Business Closeto Closeto 3 Steps to Incredible Health! with Joel
3 3 I (N) itrary(N) ((CC) (HD) Forum Home(R) Home(R) Fuhrman,M.D. The obesity crisis. (CC)(R) (HD)
PBS 204 0 6 Strangers on a Train (51, Thriller) Farley Death i Paradise Trea- Kitchen (C) Cook's(N) Cookhg: Martha (R) Home ()(R) Old House
S24 G2 ranger. A psychopath plays a deadly game. ((C) sure-seeker. (D) (R) (HD) Rice (R) (H) (HD) (R)
PBS McLaughlin Wash Wk Moyers and Company Mariachi High Cultural Voces on PBS Eques- Voces on PBS Mexican Latino Americans WWII;
X 3 (3N) (HD) (CC) (N) ()HD) pride. (C)(R) (1 D) trianballets. (R) (1D) wrestling.(R) (1D) cMI rights. (R)
CW 6 21 6 Race To Witch Mountain ('09, Adventure) 28 Days Later A young man awakes from a Private Practice Dell's Engage- Rules:
S6 21 **/2 Man saves unique kids from bad group. coma to find the country infested with zombies. daughter.(() ((HD) mert: Kids Game On
CW 9 9 4 Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (03, Drama) 28 Days Later A young man awakes from a Fall First Reel Dream Tunnel To Towers 5K
M 99 1 I I Game show host claims he was in CIA. () coma to find the country infested with zombies. Look(HD) (HD) run.
MYN 11 14 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The Manchurian Candidate ('04) **/ Gulf War soldiers Paid Prog. SAF3 (() (N) (H1) Community Community
m 1 11 11 ((CC) ((C) may have been part of elaborate political brainwashing plot. ((C) (HD) (D)
MYN Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Access Hollywood ((()
XC 8 98 gram gram gram gram gram gram gram gram gram gram (R) (HD)
IND 12 12 12 38 12 Pretty Bird Three entrepreneurs involved in a se Spinning into Butter ('07, Drama) A series of 30 Rock(C) 30 Rock(C() HowIMet HowlMet
3. ries of retaliations, kidnapping and murder. hate crimes at a university. (R) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD)
ION 2 2 2 13 261817 Paid Pro- Paid Pro- Flashpoint: Last Dance Flashpoint: ExitWounds Flashpoint Flashpoint Missing Flashpoint: The Farm
m 2 2 2 1 26 7 gram gram Terminal patient. (R) Hospital stand-off. Eco-terorrists. (C) (R)(HD) daughter.) (Q(R) (HD) Cult.(C(R)(H)D)
WCLF Living Green The Tuming Poit Financial Christ.& Jewish Van Manna-festGaitherHomecoming In- In Touch with Dr.
22 Stones Word collapse. () (N) Jews Jewels Koevering (N) spirational music. Charles Stanley (C (N)
WRXY 2244 10 Don Wilton Totally Love a Testi- Retro Sport Light Joy of Mu- All Over Bill Gouley Tommy Christ. & Through B
,AM 4 ,Alive Child moniesof Show sic(C) World Bates Jews ble(N)
TLF 2 (11:00) Lapandilla Benik El Substituto 4 (01) Un soldado se hace pasar Rompiendo los limits Choques Extremos Fitbol Central
S23 23 23 (85) **/2 (C) por maestro en una escuela military de elite. ((C Colisiones. (TVPG) Informaci6n de ftbol.(N)
UNIV 5 6 Rep.dep.(0I (:50) Ftbol de M6xico: Atlante vs Toluca desde Fabrica derisas Cmico El chavo Tu salud (N) Como dice el dicho
S'I'HII) Nemesio Diez Estadio (Diredo) (CC) (11) famos.( V14) aimado (HD) Relatoyreflexi6n.(HD)

A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 Criminal (V14) (HD) The Bourne Identity ('02, Action) Amnesiac agent. ((C) Barter (CC() (R ) (D) carter (CC() (R)H) BadInk
AMC 5656 56 56 30 53 231 (:06) Break. Bad (R) (:12) Break. Bad (R) Breaking Bad Tormented by guilt. (:23) Break. Bad (R) (:29) Break. Bad (R) Break.Bad
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 GodSendMea (10) A Triumph of the Heart: The Ricky Bell Story (91) *** The Color of Courage Friends face racism. |LUV (13)
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Housewives Meeting. Housewives Bonding. Housewives (CC) (R) Housewives (CC) (R) Housewives (() (R) Housewives (CC) (R)
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Trading |AustinPowers in Goldmember (02) **~2((C)(:34) American Pie 2(01) **Summer reunion. Harold& Kumar Escape (08)
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Secret America (R) Turn Buried car. (R) ITurn: Drag-On (R) |Airplane (C(( ) (HD)1) |Airplane ((R) (l1)) H Airplane: Flying Blind
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 Kardashian Kardashian(R) (HD) Kardashian (R) (1D) Kardashian Placenta. Kardashian (R) (D) 13 Going on 30 ('04, Romance)
EWTN 243 243243 12 17 285 Sunday Mass (R) Litany of In Concert (R) Bridges Chaplet Rosary Finding Parables SavFaith Feasts
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Honey, I Blew Up the Kid ('92, Comedy) Gnomeo & Juliet ('11) **% Love over feud. (G)Open Season ('06) ** Bear befriends deer.
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Chef Wanted (R)() () Restaurant (R) (HD) Race Pizza challenge. Restaurant (R) (HD) Mystery Thieves Diners Diners
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse ('10) The Curious Case of Benjamin Button ('08) ***2 A man grows younger. (() Moneyball (11)(CC)
GSN 179179179179 34 179184 Pyramid |Pyramid Minute(R) Minute Challenges. Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 First Daughter (04) *12 Students in love. () Meet My Mom (10) Lonely sergeant. (NR) (CC) Honeymoon for One ('11) ** Cheating fiance.
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Mountain (R) (HD) Mountain (R) (HD) Mountain (R) (HD) Mountain: Thin Ice Mountain (R) (HD) Mountain (R) (HD)
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Lovelt(CC)(R)(HD) Property |Property Property Property Property Property Property |Property Property Property
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 intelli no! no! Discover Toyota ybf Beauty Skh Care Ruby Home Solutions Discover Toyota
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 My Life in Ruins ('09) Someone Like You ('01) Overnight celebrity. Hocus Pocus (93) **2 Witches in Salem. (CC) Madea's Family (06)
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 OprahWinfrey (HD) HelpDesk |HelpDesk |SuperSoul (R)(HD) lyanlaFix (R) (1) lyanlaFix (R) (1) ) lyanla Fix (R) (D)
QVC 1414 14 9 14 13 150 In the Kitchen with David The host showcases new appliances. Electronics Bronzo Italia Jewelry Authentic jewelry.
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Bar Rescue Irish pub. Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Bar Rescue (R) (HD)
STYLE 82 82 82 82 118118 160 Boundless SexCity SexCity SexCity |SexCity SexCity |SexCity Semi-Pro('08, Comedy) **1
SYFY 67 67 67 67 253 64 180 Friday 13th V ('85)'% Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives ('86) % Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood ** Friday13, P.8('89)
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Charlie's MLB (N) (e MLB Baseball (ive) ((C ()HD) Friends Friends Friends Friends
TCM 65 65 65 65 169 230 Mr. & Mrs. Smith ('41) Unwedded bliss. (() Suspicion ('41) Marriage and murder. ((C) Strangers on a Train Dangerous stranger.
TLC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 Breaking: Exodus (R) Breaking Visitor.(R) Breaking Makeovers. Breaking: Exile (R) Breaking Indulge. (R) |Breaking (R) (HD)
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Law Killer landlord? Law Abortion bomber. Spider-Man ('02) Teen fights evil with spider powers. ((() Men in Black II Kay & Jay return.
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Bizarre ((C (R) Bizarre: Savannah (R) Bourdain: Egypt (R) Bourdain: Romania Halloween Crazier (R) Terrifying 2 (() (R)
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Most Shock (R) Bait Car Bait Car Bait Car Bait Car Lizard Lic Lizard Lic LizardLic LizardLic LizardLic LizardLic
TVLND62 62 62 62 31 54 244 TheExes TheExes Roseanne Roseanne(VG) Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 SVU: Snitch (TV14) SVU: Signature (HD) SVU: Unorthodox SVU: Wrath (WV14) SVU Sex traffickers. SVU: Sacrifice (1V14)
WGN 16 16 16 19 41 11 9 (11:00) Murder by Numbers ('02) WhiteSox MLB Baseball: Kansas City Royals at Chicago White Sox (live) ) ) Analyze This ('99)






SUNDAY

HIGHLIGHTS

Once Upon a Time
7 p.m. on ABC
"Journey To Neverland"
Giving viewers new and old
a chance to catch up, this
episode will recap the past
season and provide back-
story to many characters
and reveal secrets while
also giving a preview of
events to come in season
three with the hunt for
Henry. (HD)

The Amazing Race 23
8 p.m. on CBS
"We're Not In Oklahoma
No More" Teams of loved
ones and friends race 35,000
miles across four conti-
nents in a matter of weeks
in order to earn the $1
million grand prize; with a
double express pass on the
line, the racers prepare to
take on their first challenge
in Chile. (HD)


Transformers
8 p.m. on TNT
Rival clans of alien robots
who have the ability to
mimic any machine arrive
on Earth to resume their
ancient conflict and seek
an artifact from their home
world with the power to end
the human race and restore
their ruined civilization.V
(HD)

Revenge
9 p.m. on ABC
"Fear" Emily Thorne's
course of revenge is
renewed as Victoria
Grayson's son returns and
creates new challenges
and complications for the
family Emily has sworn to
tear down, and a glimpse to
the future hints at a wed-
ding that may ruin all of her
plans. (HD)

Breaking Bad
9 p.m. on AMC
"Felina" The story of Walter
White and his illegal empire


reaches its end as the
chaos that surrounded his
life settles into a calm after-
math that will be remem-
bered by everyone unlucky
enough to have known
about the crazed kingpin.
(HD)

The Good Wife
9 p.m. on CBS
"Everything Is Ending" Alicia
must help focus the firm's
attempts to prevent the
execution of a convicted
murderer while secretly
planning her resignation
from the firm with Cary; Eli
helps Peter assemble his
staff for a meeting in the
governor's office. (HD)

Boardwalk Empire
9 p.m. on HBO
"All In" Nucky learns more
about Rothstein during a
card game, and he evalu-
ates an unexpected part-
ner; after making a delivery,
Kessler gets sidetracked;
the Capones take Van Alden
with them as they finish a


Premiering Sunday at
10:01 p.m., the new ABC dra-
ma "Betrayal" begins with
a chance meeting between
top attorney Jack McAllister
(Stuart Townsend) and pro-
fessional photographer Sara
Hanley, which leads to an
instant and undeniable at-
traction, as well as great risk
to both of their marriages.

collector's route; a practical
joke goes too far. (HD)


KIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOON SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

CSS 288 28 28 49 70 College Football: LSU vs Georgia (HD) College Soccer: Tennessee vs Alabama College Football: UAB vs Vanderbilt (HD)
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 NFL Cntdwn (HD) Countdown (HD) NASCAR Sprint Cup: AAA 400: from Dover International Speedway in Dover, Del.
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 Fantasy (N) (HD) ESPN Radio (N) WNBA: Team TBA vs Team TBA (ive) WNBA i. nI ii
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 Rolex Sports Car Series: Lime Rock (Replay) (CC) (HD) Shut Up Jones Lucas Oil (N) (HD) Lucas Oil (N) (HD)
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Ship Shape Marlins | MLB Baseball: Detroit Tigers at Miami Marlins (live) (HD) Marlins Hall(N) West Coast (N)
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Euro.Tour Champions Tour (Replay)(HD) PreGame ? PGA Web.com Tour (Lve) (HD)
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Soccer (ve) Premier Whitetail Outdoors C.Moore N.toAK FLW(N)(HD) Wild Skies Wild Skies FoulaD
SUN 38 38 401401 45 57 76 Florida Rays LIVE! Q MLB Baseball: Tampa Bay Rays at Toronto Blue Jays (ive) Rays LIVE! TV (HD) ShipShape Fishing
NICK 2525 25 25 2444252 Sponge Sponge Winx (N) Sponge Sam & Cat Hathaways Rabbids Rabbids Sponge Sponge Sponge Sponge
TOON 80 80 124124 46 20 257 Scooby-Doo! Mask Falcon JohnyTest JohnyTest JohnyTest Regular Regular Adventure Adventure Grandpa Grandpa
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 100 State (CC) (R) (H) Fareed Zakaria (R) CNN Newsroom (N) Your Money (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N)
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings. C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings. C-Span Weekend Debates & hearings.
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 America's HQ(N) NewsHQ (DC) (N) FOX News (HD) America's HQ (N) CarolAlt NewsHQ MediaBuzz(R)
MSNB 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Weekendswith Alex Witt (N)(HD) Meet Press (HD) MSNBCLive (N) Karen Finney (N) Caught(HD)
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 Hot 20 Countdown Videos and news. (R) A League of Their Own ('92, Comedy) *** Women play ball. Cheerleaders(R)
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 Fast ** |Ridiculous Ridiculous Catfish (R) (HD) Catfish(R) (D) What a Girl Wants ('03, Comedy) A scandalous girl.
VH1 500 50 500 43 23217 Miami (R) (HD) Tough Love (R) Greatest (R) Greatest (R) Basketball ) (R) (H Basketball (R) (HD)
WE 11711711711 117149 Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne CSIMiami(HD) CSIMiami (HD)
CINE 32:0 320320 0(11:45)1, Robot 04) Will Smith. Ro- (45Strike Back Stolen Pitch Perfect ('12) ** Anna Kendrick. An The Game ('97) An unusual game
S 3ot may be guilty o murder. property. (R) all-girls a caela singing group. (CC) (HD) takes over a man's life. (CC)
CINE2 321321 321 31 2 TheAmerican (10) As- (:20) Imagina Heroes (04, Drama) Sui- (:20) Apollo 13 ('95, Drama) An explosion aboard a spacecraft Ring Two
321 31 31 21 31 sassin hides out. cide impacts dysfunctional family. (R) (CC) causes concerns about the crew's return. ('05) *-
DISN 136 136 136 136 9 0 d Luck Good Luck Good Luck Blog(CC) (R) Blog(CC) (R) Blog (CC) (R) A.N.T.(R) Blog (CC) (R) Cars 2 (11) % Lightning McQueen puts his
DISN 13613613136 99 45 250 ) ) (D) skillsto the test in the World Grand Prix.
ENC 1 5 5 1 (11:35)Thorn Bids: (:10) A View to a Kill ('85) ** Agent 007 investigates an The Living Daylights ('87, Action) Timothy Dal- Licence
S15015015150 150 Misshg Yrs (96) industrialist who wants to obliterate Silicon Valley. ton. Intrepid spy tackles arms dealer. ('89) %
HBO 302 32 32 32 302 302 400 Just Like Heaven 05) A lonely man Real Tine with Bill (:45) Hitchcock ('12) A filmmaker meets a woman Ocean's Twelve ('04) A gang recon-
falls in love with a ghost. Maher (fVM) (R) during a tough time in his career. venes for a European heist.
HB2 (:15) Anchorman: The Legend of Boardwalk Empire (:0) Rock of Ages ('12) *- In 1987 Los Angeles, two young Eastbound Eastbound
H 303 303 300 303 303 402 Ron Burgundy ('04) (CC) Nucky's land deal. people fall in love while they are chasing fame. ((HD) (HD)
HBO3 304 30 3 30 304 404 (:10) The Island (05) **% Two people escape holding facil- The Campaign ('12) Long-time con- World Champ. Boxing: Chavez Jr. vs. Vera &
O 3 3 3 s ity to expose trut behind Utopian society. (PG-13) gressman challenged. (CC) Stevenson vs. Cloud & Haye vs. Fury
W 30 30 30 30 30 30 3 Homeland Television Homeland: I'll Fly Away Homeland: Two Hats Pri- Homeland: Broken Homeland: In Memoriam Homeland: The Choice
H W 340 34034 34 34 365drama.(R)(HD) Liar. (R) (HD) orities.) ( D) ( hearts Priorities. (R) The hunt. (R) The future. (R)
TMC 350 35Sorce Code (11) Terror (:05) The Three Musketeers ('93, Adventure) People Like Us ('12, Drama) *** Chris Pine. The Prince& Me ('04)
TMC 30 30 35 5 35 35 35 averted. (CC) ** Musketeers defend the crown. (CC) Adurt siblings meet for the first time. (CC) *- Student in love.






KIDS NEWS SPORTS EVENING SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

ABCWorld |ABC7rews OnceUponalime: In........, OnceUponaTime: Tii,- 1--i1 Revenge: --, i, i i, Ti.. .111 i Belrayal: : ,i. ,i :i ....,-,i


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ABC World News News ill Once Upon a Time .1 Once Upon a Time, Revenge: I- I 1, Ti. I- Belrayal: ,' l ...l
I0 1 t ll inl't 1.- .., .- llpi l'l) .- .-_ lai 1 ll m l') i.-.- *. h.- Ji l- -.l:1.10 .1 .-l.- .I ill
SliniNFLFoolball: 60Minules Ii0Ji 1-111 TheAmazing Race 23: The GoodWife: F .-i,,ii.. TheMenlalisI: Tii-. I.
C B S I I.- .'.,..I I.-I :i I..I ,l:11 .. l.. r.l...1 hh .. .Il. .l,.- 14 .-Ip.. IIh.--h ,, : l I1-.....- Ia..- I ll...Ih. .
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CBS ,, CBSEvening rlensIi liili 60 Minules iiii iiui The Amazing Race 23 iiniii The Good Wife -ni.- .. The MenlalisI I ..i1.
1 IllitIii II i,- i| |illi.iiI h |11 l|ll|(I____________ I-l. Il l|llil__________(
,NewsChannel NBC liahily Foolball rfighl in America I _"1i Sunday Nfighl Foolball: I I.-.-. F, ,l i, I ii. .i. I i lAni 1 Fil... i..
NBC 8 al 6:001I.-.. News Week- iiilllii iim ,,- ,iiil_. .ll imnI
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NBC News (N) (HD) NBC Nightly Football Night in America 20) Sunday Night Football: New England Patriots at Atlanta Falcons from
2 2 2 News (N) (N) (CC) (HD) Georgia Dome (Live) (CC) (H1D)
21 (4:25) NFL Football: Regional The OT (N) (CC) The Simpsons Bob's Burgers Family Guy American FOX 1310:00 News Top sto-
FOX 13 13 13 13 1 Coverage Teams TBA (ive) (CC) (HD) Homer returns. The Belchers Placemattrea- Dad! Cloning ries of thenewsda areup-
13 13 13 13 1 (D) (CC) (N) (HD) camp. (N) (HD) sure. (iC) (N) (HD) for dates. (N) dated by the FOX 13 Nightly
I4(HD) News Team. (N)
FOX 4 4 4 (4:25) NFL Football: Regional TheOT(N)(CC) Simpsons(N) Bob's (CC) (N) Family (C(N) Dad Cloning for FOX 4 News at Ten Nightly
--'N : __" 4 4 4 Coverage Teams TBA (live) (CC) (HID) (HID) (HD) (HD) (HD)) dates. news report. (N)
PBS 3PBS WEDU Arts Queen & Country Portraits; Last Tango in Halifax Daugh- Masterpiece: Fovle's War, Series VII: Sun- Romances
a: Newshour (N) Plus (HD) more. (CC) (R) (HD) ters bond. (N) (HID)) flower Ex-Nazi officer. (CC) (N) (HI)) (CC)
PBS 20 2 Ask This (CC)(R P. Allen (CC) Buen Provecho! Florida's NOVA: Making Stuff Smarter Latino Americans 1565 to Latino Americans 1880s to
M 204 204 204 16 (HD) /(R) Spanish Flavor (R) (HD) Innovative material. 1880. (CC) (N) (HD)) 1940s. (CC) (N) (HID)
PBS Latino Americans Economic Skeletons of the Sahara An- Last Tango in Halifax Daugh- Maste iece: Fovle's War, Series VII: Sun- Bletchley (R)
3 prospects. (R) (HI)D) client cemetery. (R) (HID) ters bond. (N)(1ID) flower Ex-Nazi officer. (CC) (N) (H)D) (HID)
CW 6 21 6 21/2Men(CC) 21/2Men(CC) Big Bang (CC) Big Bang (C How lMet(CC) How lMet(CC) Modern Fam- Family Hot WINK News @10pm (N) (HID)
(D___) (1ID) (HlD) (HID) (lID) (H1ID) ily: Pilot neighbor.
CW Friends (VPG) Friends (VPG) 21/2 Men (CC) 21/2 Men (CC) CS: Miami: Identity Drugs in CSI: Miami: Money Plane Criminal Minds: Valhalla Old
9 9 9 4 (CC) (CC) (HD) I(HD) snakes. (CC) (HD) Check laden jet. (HD) nemesis. (CC) (HD)
MYN 1 11 14 Bones Violinist eaten. (VPG) Red Carpet (N) Raymond (CC) Seinfeld (CC) Seinfeld (CC) RepLblic of Doyle: The Duch- Our Issues WhackedOut
] (() (HD) (HD)ess of George ( D) (CC) (CC)
MYN 8 9 8 Community Community Family Raising Family Re- D2: The Mighty Ducks *% The coach of a little league SAF3 (CC) (N) (HD)
7I) (CC) ((HD) (CC) (HD) baby.) placement. hockey team gets the chance to coach Team USA.
IND 12 12 12 38 12 Modem Fam- Family Hot Big Bang (CC) Big Bang (CC) Glee: Pilot Reinventing school Glee: The Purple Piano Project Office: Talla- Office: After
32z ily: Pilot neighbor. (HI)) (HlD) outcasts. (C) (HD) Proiect. (C) (HD) hassee Hours
ION 1 17 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent
2 2 2 1326 18 17 Dead mob witness. Elderlydeaths. (HD) Hate crimes. (HD) DJ'sasphyxiation. Dead photographer.
WCLF 222222 2 The Brody Stakelbeckon Peter Great Awakening Tour Love a Child Unspoken Know the Daniel Duplantis (CC)
22 File Terror Youngren Cause(CC) Kolenda (N)
WRXY 22 44 10 The Good Life Manna-fest (CC) Great Awakening Tour Jentzen Saving the In- For Business Time of Day of Salva-
M (N) Franklin vestor Ition
TLF 23 23 23 95 Fdtbol de Mexico: Atlas vs Guadalajara desde La caida del halc6n negro ('01, Acci6n) ***% Josh Hartnett, Eric Bana. Un grupo de
S _23 23 23 95 5 Estadio Jalisco (Diredo)(C) (4lD)) soldados americanos de elite quedan atrapados bajo el fuego enemigo. (CC)
UNIV 15 15 15 6 Humor es (CC) Noticiero Aquy ahora Periodismo de Mira quien bailaConcurso de bailey en el que participant SalypimientaTraslas
Si Univisin (N) |investigacin. (N)(H1D) personajes muy conocidos de la TV. (N) camaras.(CC)(N)(HD)

A&E 26262626390 181 Bad lnk(CC)(R) Bad nk(CC)(R) DuckNew DuckWillie Duck (CC) (R) Duck Dynasty Surprise wed- Duck (CC) (R Badlnk(CQ(R) Bad nk(CC) (R)
A E 26 26 26 26 39 0 11 (HD) (HD) duck blind. races. (R) ((HD) ding. (CC) (R)(H7) (I(HD) (HD) I(HD)
A1 5:35) Break Breaking Bad: Ozymandias (:45) Breaking Bad: Granite State Walter's Breaking Bad: Felina The end (:15) Talking Bad: Felina
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Bad(R) Dealing with change. plans reach a critical point. (R) (HD) of chaos. (N) (HD) "Felina" discussed. (N)
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68130To Be Announced Info un- Gator Boys Medieval res- To Be Announced Info un- Wildman (CC) Wildman (CC)(R Gator Boys Training a wres-
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 available. cue. (CC) (R) (HD) available. (N)(HD) I(HD) tier. (CC) (N)(HD)
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 70 (5:30) LUV (i13, Drama)** A young orphan follows his Bet Awards 2013 Chris Tucker hosts hip-hop's biggest event, awarding artists for their
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 troubled uncle around and develops a rare bond. (R) work. (TVPG) (N)
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 15 The Real Housewivesof New Real Housewives of New Jer- The Real Housewives of New Jersey (CC) The Real Housewives of New What Hap-
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 85 Jersey Gossip. (R) sey Newopening. (N) Jersey (CC)(R) pens(N)
COM 66 66 6666 15 07 Harold& Kumar Escape ('08) Happy Gilmore ('96, Comedy) A hockey player turns golfer (:06) Happy Gilmore ('96, Comedy) A hockey player turns
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190iLocked up in Cuba. and makes the sport into a media circus. (CC) golfer and makes the sport into a media circus.
DISC 40404040 2543 120 Airplane Repo Risky heists. Alaska: The Last Frontier Icy Alaska: The Last Frontier Out- Alaska: The Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Frontier
DISC 4 4 4 40 25 43 120 (() (R) (HI)) rivers; picnic. (R) house; deer. (R) Deer hunting. (R) (HI)) Cabins; mead; more.
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26196 13Goingon Couples Retreat ('09, Comedy) ** Vince Vaughn. An island resort sur- With the Kardashians Kim's Game On (N) Kardashian (R)
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 19630 (04) prises guests with mandatory couples' thera y sessions. (PG-13) -babyshower. (N)(HID) (HID))
EWTN 243124312430 17 25 c Benediction CrossinglGoal The World Over News from Sunday Night Prime Callers' Chesterton (IV Holy Rosary Beloved The Dominican Sis-
EWTN 24324324312 17285 ( (G) around the world. (iC) questions. ( G) (N) G) G) ters of Saint Cecilia
FAM 5 55 10 46 199 Ice Age: The Meltdown The prehistoric trio meets a female Despicable Me (10, Comedy) A master thief decides to Zookeeper( 1) **-Animals
FAM 10 46 199 mammoth while seeking safety from a flood. use three orphaned girls to pull off a big heist. reveal they can talk.
Chopped: Mochi Obliged Es- Rachaelvs. Guy Kids Rachael vs. Guy Kids Cook The Great Food Truck Race Cutthroat Kitchen: Steak Out
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 cargof(R)(HD) Cook-Off Blind tasting. (R) Final completion. (N) Crab capturing. (N) Salted meat. (N)
FX 51 51 51 51 5849 53(5:00) Moneyball (i11) The general manager of the Oakland Taken ('09, Action) *** A retired covert agent sets out Taken ('09) *** Liam
FX 1 1 1 A's changes how he assermbles the team. (CC) to rescue his daughter from human traffickers. (CC) Neeson. Teen kidnapped. (CC)
GSN 17917179 179 34 179 184 Minute to Win It (R) Minute to Win It (R) Minute to Win It (R) Minute to Win It (R) Newlywed Newlywed
GSN 179179179179 34 179184 Game (R) Game (R)
The Nanny Express ('09, Family) **/ A nanny tries to Cedar Cove: Stormfront New First Daughter ('04) *% The President's daughter falls in
HALL 5 5 5 7 73 240 bring deep healing to a widower's family. (NR) (CC) career. (CC) (R) (HID) love with a fellow student who has a secret. (CC)
HST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Mountain Men Predators & Mountain Men: Judgment Day Mountain Men Life in rural Mountain Men Life in rural American Pickers Aviation
HIIST 81 81 8 8 33 65 l28 cattle.(CC (R)(HID) Deer hunt; more. (R) areas. (CC) (HI)) areas. (CC) (HI)) museum. (CC) (R) (HID)
HOME 41 41 41 41 5342 165 Hunters(CC)(R) Hunters(iC)(R) Hunters(C) (R) Hunters (CC) (R) Extreme Homes Very nar- Love It or List It, Too An House Hunters: Renovation
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42165(HD) (HD) HD) (HD) row home. (N) outdated home. (N) Massive renovation.
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 intelli no! no! Fluidity Fitness ybf Beauty Skin Care |(:40) Ruby Discover Toyota
Madea's Family Reunion Meet the Browns ('08) A single mother of three meets Madea Goes to Jail (09) An outspoken grandmother
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 eunon interrupted. quirky family members she never knew existed. ends up in prison with a bunch of other misfits. (CC)
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 lyanla Fix My Life Verge of di- lyanla Fix My Life Syleena Oprah's Lifeclass Bishop T.D. Oprah's Lifeclass Family. Oprah's Lifeclass Vulnera-
WN 8 8 8 8 vorce. (CC) (R)(HD) Johnson. (CC) (R) (HD) Jakes. (CC) (R) (HD) (CC) (R) (HD) ability. (CC) (R) (HPD)






KIDS NEWS SPORTS EVENING SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
SEP. 29. i ii

SPIKE ,, Bai Rescue: i ,ii : i. Bar Rescue -' ,i .' Bar Rescue I.i..-iii Ii, in Bar Rescue I i Bar Rescue: I II.- Hi.-I.-
'I I 1 1 I HII 1 i HII) IHI ) IHI H I .I .. 1.111.i II,
STYLE "" I1 Semi-Pto, ,'.. i-'**'. 1.... I ,ii I ,- i- Parks&Rec.: Parksi .- Parks T..m Parks:i- PartyDown PartyDown
SYFY Friday lhe 131hParl Vll Friday Ihe 131h Parl IV: The Final Chaplet 4 ..ii..i Friday Ihe 131h Parl V: A New Beginning -' H ..
'. III- 1I 1 IL,- I I ,- I .- I .- I I .-.- -I Ill ..- ( .- ,.1.- II II-1 1 I III -I l::-l .l i IIIII (
lBS 1. BigBang"i TheBigBang BigBang"ii BigBangii" BigBangiii BigBang"iii BigBang"i BigBangi"i BigBang 1 BigBang I
mil Theory I mll mill mHll mHll mHll mHll InHl mInl
CM ., ial M orM uider ': 4, ,,,- I.-,,,. .: 1 iil .I Rebecca' M ,.I,-,, .,,, ... :,11111 ... .. in.. I .iNoloiiousi A: TI ,liii.-i
I,. .- .- :11h ..l *.1=I 1.- iii... 1 .- i l..l h I.i.- I1.-1l l- 11 ..-. i.-I 11 1 I .-i 1l 11 l. I =.'.- 111h I .=. ...==.-i L .- 1 .- i '-I-1.v -
C Br ,, 7 breaking Amish: LA: ii i Breaking Amish: LA. 1 i. i..- Breaking Amish: LA. i.in Breaking Amish: LA: ..- Breaking Amish: LA. T.-
IC- III- III '- iI-.. 1 ii i _jl I I I I 1 I 11 1i lul.'l ii I.-i'll ..l ..-I,....I tI l I I III IIIIII II llh ll_ n('ll
TN T 7 R esidenl Evil: Extinclion ,, ; ......i i.- ,I. 1. T transform ers 1. h. 1 I* : _ll L i ,- ,I_ I. -,1 .-- 1. 1 I -.I 11,-n. ..i...I.
TRA 69 69 69 69 26066 1 Most Terrifying Places in Halloween Fright House: Making Monsters A mirror il- Making Monsters Big Head Halloween Night Frights
69 69 69 66 merica 4 Eere legend. Secrets Revealed lusion. (CC) (N) Baby. (CC) (N) Halloween par s. (N)
63 63 63 63 50 30 ruTV Presents: World's World's Dumbest... Sheep; World's Dumbest... Unicycle World's Dumbest... Pillow world's Dumbest... Gravy
SDumbest... () doll-raft. (R) football.(R1) fighting. (R) wrestling. (R)
TVLND 62 66262 31 54 244 old Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl Gold Girl old Girl Gold Girl
USA 34 34 3434 22 aw & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Modern Fa- Family: Family (CC) Family: Yard
U34 34 34 U nit: Repression Unit: Execution Unit: Trials (V14) i: Sni Schooed (HD) (HD) Sale
WGN 16 16 16 1941 11 9 5) Analyze This (99) Shrink America's Funniest Home HowMet How I Met How I Met How I Met News(C (N) Instant Replay
aids mobster. (CC) Videos VP) (1)( ) V(14)(H) (TVPG) (V1141) ( THD) VPG) (H) (H)
CSS 2 280 28 49 70 College Soccer: Georgia Bulldogs at Kentucky Talkin Football (N) College Football: Colorado State Rams at Alabama Crim-
2CSS Wildcats from UK Soccer Complex (ive) son Tide from Bryant-Denny Stadium (Replay)
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 7 SortsCenter: from Bristol, SportsCenter: from Bristol, Conn. (N) (CC) BaseballTo- MLS Soccer: New York Red Bulls at Seattle
SConn.(N) (C) (HD)() (HD) nite (H) : ., inders from CenturyLink Field (ive) (HD)
2 30 30 3030 6 59 74 2013WNBAPlayoffs: Team Baseball Tonight (N) (CC(() (HD) NHRA Drag Racing: AAA Insurance NHRA Midwest Nationals: from
ESPN2 30T3 BAvs TeamTBA Gateway International Raceway in Madison, III.(Taped) (HD)
FS1 44 44269 Jones (N) (CC) (HD) NASCAR: Do- UFC Insider (N) Ultimate 100 Knockouts: Part Being (CC) (HD) Being (((HD) The Ultimate Fighter: Use the
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83ver(HD) (H) 2: Knockouts 70-41 Force (CC) (R) (HD)
N 71721772 77 BMXSupercross: Papendal, World Poker WPT WWorld World Poker WPT World The Best of Pride (N) (HD) World Poker WPT World
S7 7 5 7 etherlands (N)()) Championship- Part 1 Championship Part 2 Championship- Part 1
GOLF 49 494949 55 60 Golf Central (N) (HD) PGA Champions Tour Golf: Nature Valley First Tee PGA Web.com Tour Golf: Web.com Tour Championship:
GOLF 34 Open at Pebble Beach: Final Round (ive)(HD) Final Round (Replay)(HD)
NBCS 1 71 71 54 Lucas Oil: Lucas Oil Drag Boat Wild Skies Whitetail (HD) Eye of (HD) N.toAK: Wild: Sonoran Deer Hunt Winkelman NA Hunter
RaNBCS 71 71 6190 cing Series (N) Soldotna I Antlers (HP)) (H1))
SUN 38 38 401401 45 76 est Boat Fishing Flats Sportsman Colle e Football: Florida State Seminoles at Boston College Eagles from Alumni Sta- Professional
S38 013(HD) 4(HD) Adv. (HD) idium ( aped) (HD) ((HD)
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 Sam& Cat (R) Sam & Cat (R) Hathaways(R) Hathaways(R) Dad Run (N) Instant Mom Sleepless in Seattle (93) Precocious boy attempts to find
(14 2 4 HD1) H (HD) (HD) (H1D4)) (N) a new wife for his widowed and grieving father.
TOON 80 80 12412446 20 2 Shrek ('01 Fantasy) A green ogre and a talkative donkey Berk (R) Titans Go! (R) Dad National Cleveland Skp Family Bob's Tina
travel to bring back a beautiful princess. (CC) Anthem. day. Loretta's affair. Wrecks car.

CNBC 39393939 Paid Pro Paid Pro- Knife Culinary On the Money American Greed: FugitivesA American Greed: FugitivesA American Greed: The Fug
CN 9 39 39 39 37 12 gram gram contest. (CQ Hawaiian couple. securities dealer. tives Bail jumpers. (R)
CNN Newsroom Sunday CNN Newsroom Sunday Anthony Bourdain Parts Un- Anthony Bourdain Parts Un- Inside Man Embedded stories
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 1News and updates. (N) News and updates. (N) known Exotic foods. known:ew Mexico about American lie.
CSPN 18 18 18 187 12 Newsmakers American Politics News coverage keeps Q&A Interesting people dis- PM'sQues- American Poltics News coverage keeps
___7 12 19) viewers informed. cuss their work. (N) tions(R) viewers informed. (R)
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 FOX News Sundaywith Chris FOX Report Sunday News uckabee Entertaining talk. Hannity Conservative news. StosselThe host reports on lib-
S allace (Q uHD)) wrap-up. (N) (HD) N)(HD) CC) (N)(HD) ertarian issues. (HD)
SCaught on Camera People aught on Camera People Caught on Camera People Caught on Camera People Lockup Cameras explore lie
MSNB 83 83 83 83 185 40 10ace danger. (HD) face danger. (H) ace danger. (HD) ace danger. (HD) behind bars.(HD)
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24 221 Cowbys Cheerleaders (CC) Cowboys Cheerleaders (CC) Cowboys Cheerleaders (CC) og & Beth: On the Hunt (R) o R o Re-
S(R) (R)(H)) ()(H) _________________ loaded() loaded (HP)
33 33 33 33 35 48210 Teen Mom 3: Hope for the Teen Mom 3: Second Teen Mom 3: Growing Up Fast Teen Mom 3: Pushing the Teen Mom 3: Moving Forward
MTV33 33 33 33 3 est Struggles. (R) Thoughts Surprise. (R) Money issues. (R) Evelope Therapy; fight. odeo; model. (R)
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 231 Malibu's Most Wanted ('03) Two actors pose as gangstas Black Ink Crew (CC) (R) (HD) Hollywood Exes (N) (HD) Miami Monkey (N) (HD)
and escort a white rapper deep into the ghetto.
WE 1171171111 114CS: Miami: Backfire Calleigh CSI: Miami: Meltdown Stolen CSI: Miami Soccer mom CSI: Miami: Time Bomb Team CSI: Miami: All Fall Down Killer
__WE 111 h149haunted.(C)(H) ()evidence(CC)(t) murdered. (CC) () lookswithin. (H)) tauntsCSI. (tH)
The Game :40 Taken 2: Unrated Extended Version :20) Cruel Intentions (99, Drama) *** Ryan Phillippe, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire
CINE 320320320320320320420 (97)Atwisted 12) **% Liam Neeson. CIA operative's Sarah Michelle Gellar. A added young woman and her Hunter (12) Benjamin Walker.
gift. (CC) family is targeted. (((H) step-brother make an unfortunate wager. (R)() Vampire hunting.
(5:45) The Ring Two ('05, Horror) ** Naomi Watts, Simon Strike Back Search for fMagic Mike (12, Drama) Channing Tatum. (:50)Zane's
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321422 Baker. An unmarked videotape in a murder case reveals stolen goods in Russia. (CC) A veteran dancer at a strip club attempts to TheJumpOff
Samara's terror has resurfaced. (PG-13) (CC) (HO) find a life outside of stripping. (H))
Jake and the Never Land Austin: Moon Austin: Real Livand Austin: Fresh Disney's Wander Jessie Chess Austin & Ally
DISN 136136136136 99 45 250 Pirates Forever Tree fades. Week& Life& Reel Life Maddie Hood- Starts& ShakeltUp!: Yonder: The contest. (CC (R) Al'sbird
-((_CC) (N) (H)) Mentors (R) winked. (N) Farewells Loyal It Up Fugites (HP)) escapes.
5:45) Licence to Kill ('89, Action) k* % Timothy Dalton, GoldenEye ('95) Agent 007 travels to Russia on a mission (:10)Tomorrow Never Dies
ENC 150150150150 150350 CareyLowell. Bond seeks a drug lord who beat one of his to find the mastermind behind a stolen weapons plot and (97)A mogul tries to spark
friends close to death. (PG-13) (CC) discovers Agent 006 has gone rogue. (CC) World War III. (CC)
4:30) Ocean's (:40)This Is 40 ('12, Comedy) **% Showcased is a comedic look inside Boardwalk Empire: All In Eastbound& Hello Ladies:
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 4 welve ('04) the life of a not-so-average American family; Pete and Debbie are Nucky learns more about Down: Chapter Pilot New
(CQ approaching a significant milestone in their relationship. (CC) Rothstein.(CC)(N)(HD) 22 nightclub.
Eastbound & Eastbound & Eastbound & Eastbound & Eastbound & Eastbound & Parental Guidance ('12, Comedy) *A% The Making of
HBO2 303 303 303303303303402 Down: Chapter Down: Chapter Down: Chapter Down: Chapter Down: Chapter Down: Chapter Cultures clash when grandparents agree to ...: Les
16 17 18 19 20 21 babysit theirthree grandkids.() Miserables
(4:00) Boxing The Making of Real Time with Bill Maher The Debt (11, Drama) *** Helen Mirren, Tom Million Dollar aby ('04,
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 (CC) ()H ...: Safe House (IVMA ) (C) (HD) Wilkinson. In 1997 two retired agents receive shocking Drama) A boingtrainertakes a
_news about a former partner. (R) (C(H) female pupil. (CC)
(50) Lincoln ('12, Drama) ***% Daniel Day-Lewis. The 16th President of Homeland: Tin Man is Down A Masters of Sex: Pilot (N)
SHOW 340340340340340340365 Homeland Thethe United States finds his country seceding into two separate Senate panel investigates
f future. (R) confederacies and joins the Union to help put an end to slavery. (CC) terrorism. (N) (H)_
5:00) The Prince & Me ('04, (:55) Source Code (11, Action) Jake The Good Doctor ('11, Drama) Orlando People Like Us (12, Drama)
TMC 350350350 350 350 385 Comedy)** A student falls in Gyllenhaal. Soldier inhabits the body of Bloom. Doctor Martin Blake has spent his Chris Pine. Adult siblings meet
ove witha prince. another man and has to stop a terror plot. whole life looking for respect. (CC) forth firsttime.






KIDS NEWS SPORTS LATE NIGHT SUNDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

ABC 261 New s ET in Exlira PaidPiro.RedCpeI World News rNon iia |News lNews ,e
ABC 8I I News Caslle Praclice aid Pro. Visions IWorld News Iu News Nevs tews
ABC 01 I News Paid Piog. Paid Prog. Cold Case Cars.TV Raceline World JNes rINow niNees News tels
CBS I I I I i News Paid Prog. Paid Pog. Paid Piog.IPaid Pog.PaidProg.i ". Up lo IheMinule il News News News
CBSHi '11 New es McCarver PaidProg.q iTBA Kickin' II i iMinuleitl Minule News Nlesisi
NBC ii I n n Foolball News Slar WIch Paid Proq.|Paid Po. Extra nim Meel Press IPaid Prog. Early News News JNews
NBC 201 Foolball News Paid Prog. Bones Slorms IDaleline Meel Press Early News Neisnm
FOX il I 3 I I i tNews Nolice Closer Access Paid Prog. Judy Judy Nes News Neiwsii
FOX 4 4 4 Closer Notice Raymond aymond Office 30 Rock 30 Rock Paternity Divoce Alex News (N)
PBS 1 3 3 As Time AsTime Keep Up Keep U Halifax Masterpce. (P) Bletchley Latino Latino
PBS NI I I I I' lJOVAin Lalino Lalino IFlavor Io Fishing Squared Bolder Yoga
PBS B lelchley POV in 1il1 Makers IMaslerpce. i Blelchley Lalino Lalino
CW 44 i'i Oueens Oueens TMZ II) Sanclua ry Alien Alien Paid Pro. Paid Pro. Harvey70s 70s
CW M 9 9 9 4 Criminal Famil Famil Mr. Box Mr. Box Paid Pro. Paid P aid Prog. Outdoors. Paid Pr. Paid Pg. Daily Buzz
MYN MIIIIIII 14 Ride Honor Ring Paid Pog. lien Alien Issues Health Hollywd Hollysp Paid Pr. Paid P. Shepherd
MYN ) 8 9 8 Futurama Futurama Leverage Paid Prog. Paid Pro Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prg. Paid Prog. Paid Pg. Shepherd
IND 121212 38 12 There Yet There Yet Murder by Numbers (02)Paid P. Paid Pro. Paid P. Paid Pro. Paid P. Paid Pro. Paid P
ION 2 2 132618 17 Order: Cl Order: Cl Order: Cl Order: Cl Paid Pr. Paid P. Paid Pro. Paid P Paid Pr. Paid P.
WCLFM 22 22 22 2 Tommy Awaken Awaken Prophecy Fruit CTN SpecCopeland Citylife Good Life Jesus CTN Spec Youngren Hmekeep
WRXYM 22 44 10 Love With Awaken Awaken Connect Life Fath Women Reality Skunks Gaither Exercise Fitness
TLF] 22 23 95 5 Ftbol MLS (Directo) Deportivo Doble id. 01) *% (CC) Paado Pado Deortivo
UNIV 151515 6 Humores Noticiero Verdad Al unto Como dice Hora ico Para amar Humores Noticieo

A&E 262626263950181 Bad Ink Bad Ink Duck Duck (R) Duck BadInk BadInk BadInk Badnk PidPro. PaidPro. PaidPr. Paid P
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 1 Low Winter Break. Bad (R) Talking Low Winter Break. Bad Low Winter Stooges
APL 44 44 44 44 366813 Wildman Wildman Gator Boys TBA Gator Bos TBA (R) Wildman Wildman Gator Boys
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22272013(N) Insiration Insiration Inspiration
BRAV 68 68 6868 2 5118 Housewives Watch Dream NeNe Housewives Watch Atlanta Paid Proq. Paid Pro. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
COM 66 66 66 66 15 2719 South Prk Madrigal Presents Tosh Brickle South Prk CmmunityCmmunity Sunny Sunny Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 431 Alaska Alaska Alaska Alaska Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
E! 46464646 27 2619 Kardashn Game On Kardashian GameOn Power C. Lately Ross So C. Lately Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
EWTN 24242412 17 28 Angels Bookmar Mass (RLita of Devotions Sunda Francis Feasts Catholic Cataloue Bookma Cateches.
FAM 5555 555510 4619 Zookeeper Osteen K.Shook Paid PrPaid Pro. Paid Pro. Paid Proi. Paid Pro. Paid Pro. Paid Pro. Paid Pro. Rein Life Tod
FOOD 37373717 76 Iron Chef Race (R) Cutthroat Iron Chef Rachael vs Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
FX 51515151 5849 Taken Rescue Legit Legit Paid Prog. Paid Prog. aid Prog.Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
GSN 17171717 11847 NewlywedNewlywed Fam. Feud Fam.Feud Pyramid Pyramid Pyramid Pyramid Dog Eat Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
HALL 555117 7324 Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier GoldGirl GoldGir Gold Girl GoldGir Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Lucy Lucy
HIST 81 81 8181 33 651 American Mountain Mountain American American Paid Prog. Paid Proq. Paid Pro. Paid Prog.
HOME 41 41 41 41 5 42165 Hunters Hunters Love It Renovation Hunters Hunters Homes Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
LIFE 36 36 36 3652 4114 Meet Browns (08) Madea Goes (09) Paid Prog.Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.Paid Prog.
OWN 58 585858 47 161 Oprah's Oprah's Oprah's Berkus Rachael Phil (HD) Dr. Phil
SPIKE 57575757 29 63 54 Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Paid Pro. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
STYLE 8282828211811816( Parks Parks Parks Parks Party Dwn Party Dwn Sex City SexCity Paid Pro.|Paid Proq. Paid Prog. Paid Proq. Paid Proq. Paid Proq.
SYFY 67 67 67 67 2 64180 Friday 13th VI (86) % Frida 13th VII (88) Friday 13, P. 8 (89) Twilight Twilight
TBS 59595959 32 62 52 Love Guru Another Teen (01 Maried Maried Maried Maried Married Maried
TCM 65 65 6565 162 Notorious Mysterious LadyWhite Nights '57 (15) Encounter 45
TLC 45454545 721 Breakin Breaking Breaking Breakin PaidPr.Paid Pro. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid PrPaid Pog.
TNT 61 61 6161 28 5551 Transformers (07, Action) (CC) Resident Evil (07) S'ville S'ville
TRAV 69 69 6969 26 6617 Halloween Monsters Frights Halloween Monsters Paid Proq. Paid Pro. Paid Prog. Paid Pro
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30183 Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
TVLND 62626262 31 54 Gold Girl Gold Girl Queens Queens Queens |Queens 70s |(:43) 70s 70s Gold Girl GoldGiu Gold Girl GoldGiu
USA 34343434 2252 50 Back-U Plan (10 It's Complicated (0) (CC) Cheers SVU (HD) SVU (HD)
WGN 16 16 16 19 4111 9 Insomnia (02) Al Pacino. 30 Rock 30 Rock Sunny Dharma Til Death Romeo Die (00) (CC)
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Coll.Ftbl Saban PPaidPr .PaidPro.Paid ProPaid Pro. PaidPro .Paid Prog.PaidPr .Paid Pro.aidProg.PaidProg.PaidProg.Paid Pro
ESPN 29 29 29 29 1258 70 SportsCenter SportsCenter CenterCol. Ftbl (ReSports
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 65974 NHRA NASCAR ESPN FC FIFA Beach NASCAR Sprint SportsCenter
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 FOX Sports (N) FOX Sports College Football (Replay) (HD) Jones
FSN 72727272 5677 Wrld Poker MLB Game (Replay) PaidPr.Paid ProPaid Prog.Paid Prog. Paid Prog Paid Prog. Paid Prog.Paid Prog.
GOLF 4949 4949 5560 3PGA Tour Golf Cntrl Champions Tour Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Premier Premier League (N) PremierPaidPr. Paid Pro. Paid Pro. Paid Prog. Paid Pro. Paid Pro
SUN 38 38 0140145 76 Tapon Saltwater Into the Flats ML Game(Reply) Prog.Paid Prog. PaidProg.Paid Prog.PaidPr.Paid Prog.
CNBC 39 399 3710 Fugitives Fugitives Fugitives Paid Pro.Paid Pro. Fugitives Worldwide Ex (N)
CNN 32 32 32 3218 38 Anthony Anthony Inside Man Anthony Anthony Inside Man Early (N)
CSPN 18181818 37 12109 Q&A(R) Caital News Toda Today in Washinton Toda inWashington
FNC 64 64 64 64 4871118 Huckabee Hanniy Stossel FOX News Huckabee Stossel FOX-Friend
MSNBC 83 83 83 831840 Lockup Lockup Lockup Meet Press Caught Meet Press First Look Too Earl
WE 111111117 117149 CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami CSI Miami aid Prog. Paid Pro
CINE 32(32(3 13202 4Lincoln Girl'sGui Giri'sGui GirlsGui Am. Psycho *% ZanesSe (15)Article99(92 Hustler
CINE2 3213213213213213214 Off Watcher (00) Dragon (12) *'2 Clearing ('04) (15) Hesher (11)(R)
DISN 13613613613 9945 2 Good Lck ANT. Good Lck Good Lck Shake It A.N.T. OnDeck Zenon: Z3 (04) On Deck On Deck FishHks Phineas
ENC 15(15(151 135 Tomorrow Is Not Enough (99) Cold Mountain Civil War love. Ape! (81)
HBO 30230240 Empire Eastbnd Ladies Hitchcock(12) RealTime Sessions(12) In Vogue
HBO2 3003030 402247 Meet Fockers ('04) Americans (HD) Kiss Kiss (05) |(:40) AVP (04)
HBO3 3043 301401 Million $ (:15) Killer Joe (12) Vampire (00) See Paradise (90)Makingof
SHOW q3134 34 343336 Homeland Masters of Homeland Masters of Therapy Gone (12)(CC) The Wood
TMC 323332335038 People Right One (08) (CC) Self (09) (CC) Manderlay ('05) (CC) Vanity






KIDS NEWS SPORTS MORNINGS WEEKDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Pog. IPaid Pog PaidProg Paid Pro Paid Pro PaidPro Stoo Bad Boys (03, Action) Cos bust kingpin. (CC)
CINE The Hustler ('61) Game o(: 5) Anna and the Kin (99) Jodie Foster, Yun-Fat (:45) The Dark Knight Rises (12) **** Christian Bale.
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 ool.(CC) |Chow. A teacher visits 1860s Siam. (CC) Batman protects Gotham from terrorist. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321422 (:05) Flawless ('99) A homophobic cop. |Assault on Precinct 13 ('05) (:50) Garden State ('04) Detached man. Taken2
ENC 10 1 1 50 350 (5)(Ape! Gung Ho! ('86) ** Michael Keaton. A Japa- Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls Good Will Hunting ('97, Drama) *** Trou-
S 81) nese company takes over a factory. *% Search for rare bat. bled genius deals with his past. (CC)
HBO 302 302 30 2 In Vogue (:25) Nation Splitting Heirs ('93 A loser discov- Taxi ('04) *' Taxi driver has tips fo Faceoff (R) Real Sports Gumbel 24/7(CC)(HD)
RHB 30 (R) ers he is really a due. bumbling cop. (CC) (CC)(HD
HBO2 303 303 303 303 30330 402 AVP ** Perfect (CC) Beyond ('12) Kidnapped girl. Argo (12) Iranian revolution rescue. (R) Karenina ('12) **
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 (:05) GLICKMAN (CC) (HD) Two Weeks Notice ('02) ** (:15) In Time ('11) *** Time as currency. Love Rent ('05) (R)
TW he Wood ('99) Visiing Adventures in Babysitting ('87) (:45) DickTracy ('90, Action) ** Warren Beatty. The Three Musketeers ('11) **1
SHOW 340 340 340 340340 340 365 the past. (CC) Babysitter's journey (CC) A detective battles evil villains. Defending the King. (CC)
TMC 350 350 350 50 (550) Vanity Fair ('04, Romance) A poor girl as- (:15) Agent Cody Banks ('03, Family) **% Spy Kids: All the Time in the Dredd (95)
S350350350350350350385ends the social ladder. (CC) Very efficient undercover CIA agent. World ('11) Evil threatens. */2
TCM 65 65 6565 169 230 Penny Serenade ('41, Drama) *** A woman Random Harvest ('42, Romance) *** An (:15) Flamingo Road ('49, Drama) *** A
recalls her tragic marriage. (CC) amnesia victim builds a new life. (CC) dancer tanres with politicos. (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Prog. Paid Prg. Paid Prog. PaidProg. PaidProg. Paid Prog. Galaxy Quest ('99) Actors meet aliens. |Cowboys ('00) **2
INE 3 3 3 Roadsto Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days Fever Pitch ('05) Woman competes (:45) Rain Man ('88) A jaded hustler kidnaps his autistic brother
N 01) ('12) Kid's summer. for boyfriend's love in the hopes of getting money. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 (15) Vanishing Point ('97) Beyond (12) Kidnapped girl. Sanctum ('** Team stuck in caves. (:15) Sliding ('98)
ENC 150150150150 150350 (:10) Gulliver's Travels ('96) **'2 (:45) King Creole ('58, Drama) Successful singer (45) Fools Rush In ('96, Comedy) A couple sur- Below ('02)
NA man's voyages. (PG) is threatened by past. (CC) praised by pregnancy marries. **12
HB 302 302 302 302 302 302 4 French Kiss ('95, Comedy) **'% A woman be- Apollo 13 ('95) An explosion aboard a spacecraft causes con- Pure Country 2: The Gift ('10)
O homes mixed up with a thief. (CC) cerns about the crew's return. (CC) Amending mistakes. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Little Manhattan First love. The New World ('05, History) *** (CC) Making of The Island ('05) Utopian society. (CC)
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 Money Pit (:35) Hard Times Dias de vinilo (12, Drama) (NR) (CC) Muslim Comedy06 (CC) (:15) House ('11)
SHOW 340 340 (5:00) Far and Away ('92) Tom Ceremony ('11) Man tries to win A Beginner's Guide to Endings (35) The Brothers Bloom ('09) Con
SHOW 0 30 30 30 35 Cruise. Irish immigrants. over another's wife. (CC) ('10) A gambler' sons. artist brothers. (CC)
TMC 350 350 350 350 350503851(5)Cosi (45) Autumn in New York ('00, Drama) *% A The Confession ('99, Thriller) ** A killer dis- D3: The Mighty Ducks ('96, Family)
('g96) man falls for a dying woman. (CC) agrees with his attorney. R (CC) Snobbe in sports.
TCM 65 65 65 65 169 30 King Richard and the Crusaders ('54) King at- (:15)Butterfield 8 60, Drama) Call girl and mar- (:15) Two Loves ('61, Drama)** A teacher fo-
tempts to win Holy Lands back. tried man pursue affair. (CC) causes on her career. (NR)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Prg. Paid Prg. PaidProg. IPaidProg. Paid Prog. PaidProg. Manual Manual Manual IFour Brothers ('05) **% (CC)
INE 3 3 3 3 K-PAX('01) Madagascar ('05) Zoo animals ex- (:05) The Chamber ('96, Drama) Attorney defends Snow White and the Huntsman ('12) Kristen
S320 320 320 320 320 320 420 erience outside world. his racist grandfather. (CC) Stewart. Queen vs. maiden. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321422 (:05) Dune ('84) **% Francesca Annis. Spice world. |(:45) The Five-Year Engagement (12) |(:50) Weird Science ('85) **/2
EN 150150 150 150 150350 The Secret World of (:55) Chaplin ('92, Drama) Chaplin's life from early childhood (:25) Hero ('02, Action) A warrior Crazy/BeautifulOppo-
Arrietty (12) to international stardom and scandal. facesthree assassins. sitesin love.
HB 302302 302 302 302 (530) Off Air Station down- The Loving Story Interracial couple t Kittredge: An American Girl Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted ('12)
Ht3 ime. (HD) fights for marriage. (R) ('08) Aspiring reporter. Journey through Monte Carlo.
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Ali-Frazier I (CC) Mars Attacks! ('96) ** (CC) Courage Under Fire ('96) Dead pilot. (:50) Ocean's Twelve ('04)
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 (:10) The Return ('06) ** The Contender ('00) Political scandal. Sleep Tight (11) Ruining other lives. Turner
SHOW 340340340340340340 365 Bringing Up Bobby ('12) Milla (:45) The Understudy ('08, Comedy) A perennial Camp ('03, Comedy) **A2 Everyday outcasts My Father
Jovovich. Con-artist s son. understudy gains fame. (CC) shine at musical camp. (CC) (HD) 94
TMC 3503503 Gunless (10) Cowboy From Time To Time ('12, Drama) (35) Run the Wild Fields ('00, (:20) White Fang ('91, Adventure) A Yukon pros-
S350 350 350 350 350 3 3 reaks havoc. (PG) (CC) (HD) Drama) Mystery man. (CC) sector meets a dog-wolf. (CC)
TCM 65656565 169 2i Sleep A Matter of Life and Death ('46) Playing (R) (:45) Bringing Up Baby ('38, Comedy) An heiress Rio Lobo (70) A former soldier
M 65 65 65 65 169230 Man fihts fate. (NR) (CC) falls for a paleontologist. seeks Union betrayers. (G)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Paid Pog. PaidPg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. The Pitch (R) (HD) Mission toMars ('00) Missions and II.
INE The Pick-Up Artist ('87) ** Young(:25) War of the Worlds ('05) Tom Cruise. Father (:25) The Descendants ('11) *** Wrath of the Titans Res-
CwNE 320 320 3 0 30 32 omanizer. (CC) (HD) protects kids as aliens attack. Family's dilemma. (CC) cue Zeus.
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 32142 Whiteboyz ('99) ** (:15) North Country ('05) *** Sexual harassment. BASEketball ('98) **% (CC) Hyde Park ('13)
ENC 150 150 10 150350 (5:40) Get Low ('09) *** A hermit (25) Miracle ('04, Drama) Kurt Russell. A hockey (:50) The Jerk ('79) *** Steve Martin. An ec- Jones ('04)
C 11-1-1---1 requests a living funeral. team fights against the odds. centric seeks fame and fortune. (CC) **
HB 302 302 302 3002 302 (:15) Titan A.E. ('00, Science Fiction) Spaceship is Parental Guidance ('12) **2 Old (:45) Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World Noise ('05)
mankind's last hope. (CC) school methods. (CC) (06) ** Humorfinding uest. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 (5:30) Off Air (HD) The Associate Woman oses as man. |Red Tails (12) ** Black pilots. (CC) (HD) Huckabees ('04)
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 Apollo 13('95) Anexplosion aboard a spacecraft. Dranet Cops take on a cult. 15) Entrapment ('99) Agent baits thief.
Two Family House Union Square ('12) Unexpected re- (:25) Pete Smalls is Dead ('11) ** Touching Home ('10, Drama) Ed Harris. Chronic
SHOW 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 House purchase. union with sister. (CC) Friend's funeral. (CC) shameful behavior. (CC) (HD)
TMC 350 350 3 Out of the Cold (99) (:20) Harley's Hill (' 1, Family) **12 Harley will Blame t on the Bellboy (:20) Lone Rider ('08) Soldier battles Peple ('12)
TMC 350 350 350 3 5 abor camp. soon replace his father. (CC) I I ** ii crooked landowner.
TCM 65 65 65 65 169230 (50)Return from the Christopher Strong ('33) ** An The Bride Wore Red ('37, Drama) (:15) Dance, Girl, Dance ('40) *** Woman
M 6565shes65) aviator's affair. (NR) (CC) **12 Rich husband. (CC) dreams of ballet career. (NR)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 PaidPmg. PaidPmg. PaidProg. |PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. |(:15) Fight Club ('99) Forming of an underground fight club.
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320420 Beginners Confetti ('06) Couples participate in (:15) Mr. & Mrs. Smith ('05, Action) **% (15) The Bone Collector ('99, Thriller) **%
(11 wedding contest. (CC) Married couple hired to kill each other. Cop uses 'gift'to get in killer's mind.
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 Don'tTell Anywhere But Here ('99) Family strife. Sliding Doors ('98) **% (CC) 8mm ('99) A "snuff" film is investigated.
ENC 150150 0 1 0 Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius ('04) The life of (:15) Beethoven's 2nd ('93) *% (:45) Stranger Than Fiction ('06, Drama) A man (:40)Ali('01)
N 150150150 50 1 golfing legend Bobby Jones. Children raise pups. (CC) learns he is living in a novel. **A/
HBO 302 302 302 3 2 That Old Feeling ('97) A divorced (:45) Mary and Martha ('13, Drama) **'2 Two Ali-Frazier : One Na- New Year's Eve ('11) Tales of love
HB 302 302 302 302 302 302 4 couple finds eac other. women bring attention to malaria. tion...Divisible in New York City. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303402 Tobacco Rd (HD) Don Juan De Marco ('95) FirstLook Million Dollar Baby A female boxer. Too Big Fail ('11)
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 (5:30) Off Air (HD) Ethel ('12) Life profiled. (CC) (:45) The Long Kiss Goodnight (96) (:50) Romy & Michele ('97)
SHOW 340 340340 340 3 Oscar (91, Comedy) Sylvester Stallone. A gang- Legendar ('10, Drama) ** John Cena. A teen Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate
S3 3 3 3 3 ster tries to goes straight. (CC) brings hisfamily back together. Events ('04) ** Greedy relative.
TM 350350 3503:55) 55Journey to the Center of the (:25) Dakota Skye ('08) A girl who (:55) Loosies ('12) Pickpocket reeval- (:25) Chairman of the Board ('99) A
Sarth ('08, Action) can detect any le. (CC) uates life decisions. management change.
TCM 65 65 65 169230 The Bribe (49) Contra- The Long Night ('47) Vet tries to (:45) Female ('33) Love in (:45) In the Good Old Summertime ('49) *** Pat & Mike
TC'"M I band ring. (CC) save his lover. (CC) thefactory. Feuding co-workers are pen pals. **2
F I






KIDS NEWS SPORTS MORNINGS WEEKDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
E i ii WE HEM Hl
ABC 7 11 7 News News Good Morning America News Millionre. Millionre. The View
ABC 2 11 News Good Morning America Steven and Chris RightThis Right This The View
ABC M 7 7 7 10 7 7 News Good Morning America Bette America Supreme The View
CBSM 10 10 10 10 News 10 News CBSThis Morning Studio10 Inside Jeopardy The Price Is Right
CBS 213 213 5 5 5 News News CBS This Morning LIVE! with Kelly Rachael Ray The Price Is Right
NBC 8 8 8 8 8News Today Today Daytime RachaelRay
NBC 1 2 2 2 NBC2 News Toda Today NBC2 News @ 11am
FOX 13 13 13 13 13 News News News FOX 13's Good Day LIVE! with Kelly Wendy Williams
FOX 1 4 4 4 (500) FOX 4 Rising FOX 4 Morning Blend Bridezillas Maury Friends Friends
PBS 3 3 3 3 Clifford Kratts Arthur Martha Curious Cat in Hat perWhy Dino Train Sesame Street Daniel Sid
PBS 204 204 204 16 Yoga Lilias! Electric Stretch Sewing Quilting Sew Room Sit Fit Painting Cook's Cooking Yoga
PBS 3 3 3 Electric Stretch Arthur Martha Curious Cat in Hat SuerWhy DinoTrain Sesame Street Daniel Sid
CW I 6 21 6 Queens Queens News News News Fam. Feud |Fam. Feud Queen Latifah
CWa 9 9 9 4 (500) The Daily Buzz TilDeath TilDeath Middle Middle Millionre. Millionre. QueenLatifah Justice Justice
MYN I 11 11 11 14 PaidProg. Paid Pg. OnSpot OK!TV America Cmmunity The 700 Club Maury The People's Court
MYN D 8 9 8 Cash Cab CashCab Paid Pog. Paid Pro. Cops Cops Steve Wilkos Show Trisha Goddard Jerry Springer
IND 12 12 12 38 12 Shepherd's Chapel Cheaters Cheaters WePeopl e People Supreme Supreme Jerry Sriner Steve Wilkos Show
ION 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Archer Archer PaidProg. PaidProg. Thr. Bble Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Pg. Paid Pg. Movie
WCL 22 22 22 2 Gospel Destined Today Meyer Digging n Copeland Parsley Youngen It'sTime KnowCse LifeToday Wilton
WRXYM 22 44 10 Gospel Music Salvation Destined The Lamp Thr. Bible Gospel Meyer Hilliard Miracles LifeToday Day
TLF 23 23 23 95 5 ;Qu locura! Noticias Nacional Mujer casos Entre el amor y el odio Privilegio amar
UNIVI 15 15 15 6 Tu desayuno alere Despierta America La rosa de
A&E 2626 2626 3950 181 Paid Prog. Paid Pg. DogBnty D Bnty ogBnty DogBnty Criminal Minds Criminal Minds CSI: Miami
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Orangutan Chimp BigCat Big Cat Meerkat Meerkat Animal Cops Animal Cops Pit Bulls
BET 35 35 35 3540 22270 Morning Inspiration Matters Matters Movie Movie
BRAVO 6868 6868 254 51 185 Top Chef Chef hef Top Chef Top Chef Top Chef To Chef
COM 66 66 66 66 1527190 PaidProg. PaidPg. PaidPg. PaidPg. PaidProg. PaidProg. Daily Colbert Sunny SouthPrk Presents Movie
DISC 4040 4040 25 43 120 Pa Paid PaidPr P Paid Pg. Paid Pg. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Almost Got Awa Nihtmare Next FB: Criminal
DISN 136136 136 136 99 45 250 Phineas Jessie DogBlo Good Luck Mickey Jakeand Mickey Sofia DocMc Henry Jakeand Octonauts
E! 4646 46 46 27 26196 Paid Prog. Paid Prg. Kardashians Kardashians Kardashians Kardashians Kardashians
EWTN 243 243 243 12 17285 Catholic Catholic Michael Holy Name Dail Mass Life on the Rock Variety WomenGr |Rosary
FAM 55 55 5555 1046 199 Meyer Drenda Things '70s 70s '70s 70s 700Club The700 Club Gilmore Girls
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 16 PaidProg. PaidPrg. PaidPog. PaidPg. PaidPro. PaidPro. PaidPro. Grill t! CookReal Neelys Sweet Genius
FX 51 51 51 51 5849 53 Paid Prog. Paid Pg. Buffy Vampire Buffy Vampire Ellen Ellen Ellen Ellen Ellen Ellen
GSN 179 179 179 179 34179 184 Paid Prog. Paid Pg. Paid Pg. Paid Pg. Match Match Password Press Luck Sale of Pyramid Password Pyramid
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Lucy Lucy Lucy Lucy GoldGirl GoldGirl GoldGirl GoldGirl Home& Family
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels
HOME 41 41 41 41 5342165 PaidProg. Profession Estate Estate Unscripted Unscripted Unscripted Unscripted Sarah101 Sarah101 Sarah101 Sarah101
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151SN TodHSN Today HSN Today Fashion Clearance Fashion Clearance Fashion Clearance
LIFE 36 36 36 36 5241 140 PaidProg. PaidPg. Balancing Balancing Christine Christine Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
OWN 58 58 5858 47 103 161 Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil Dr. Phil
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 1315 Bob Mackie Wear Mornings Made Easy Holiday Decorating Sole Sisters Denim & Co.
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 PaidProg. Paid Pog. Paid Pg. Paid Pg. PaidProg. PaidProg. NightmaresNightmares NightmareslNightmares Ink Master
STYLE 82 82 82 82 118 118 160 PaidPro. PaidPg. Paid Pg. PaidPg. PaidProg. PaidProg. Chef Robl & Co. Chef Robl & Co. Chef Robl & Co.
SYFY 67 67 67 67 25364180 PaidProg. PaidProg. Paid Paidrog. Deals HauntedHighway HauntedHighway HauntedHighway Highway
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Rules Earl Married Married Married There Yet Payne Browns Prince Prince Prince Prince
TLC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 Inedible Buddha FirstDay Multiples BabyStry BabyStry BabyStry BabySty Pregnant Pregnant Four Weddings
TNT 6161 6161 28 55 51 Smallville Charmed Charmed Supernatural Supernatural Supernatural
TRAV 6969 6969260 66170 PaidProg. PaidPg. PaidPmg. PaidPmg. PaidProg. PaidProg. Offbeat Offbeat Food Paradise Variety
TRUTV 63 63 636350 30 183 PaidProg. PaidPg. Paid Pog. Paid Pog. PaidProg. PaidProg. In Session Bait Car Bait Car
TVLAND 62 62 6262 31 54 244 PaidProg. Paid Pg. Paid Pg. Paid aidProg. PaidProg. Murder, She Wrote VanDyke VanDyke Lucy Lucy
USA 34 34 3434 22 52 50 Cheers White Collar Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
WE 117117117117 117149 Paid Prog. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. Roseanne |Roseanne Roseanne |Roseanne
WGN 16 1616 19 41 11 9 PaidProg. Meyer Destined Creflo PaidProg. PadProg. Matlock Matlock In the Heat of Night
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 PaidProg. Paid Pg. Mayhem in the AM GeicoSportsNITE PaidProg. Paid Pg. Paid Pg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg.
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 5974 Mike& Mike ESPNFirst Take
FS1 48 4848 484269 83 FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FOX SportsLive FOXSportsLive FOX Sports Live
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 Sports Unlimited World Poker Tour The Best of Pride W Coast Customs Game 365 |Hall Sports Unlimited
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Live Presidents Cup Morning Drive Morning Drive
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. To Be Announced The Dan Patrick Show
SUN 38 38 40140145 57 76 Fishin O'Neill TravisJoh Headlines Capital Dateline GolfDest. Reel Dream Reel Fish College Football
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 Lopez Lopez Invasion Sponge Sponge Ruby Umizoomi Umzoom Dora Dora Guppies Guppies
TOON 8080 124124 46 20 257 Tom Jerry Scooby Ben 10 Beyblade Pok6mon NinjaGo Orange Movie Tunes Tunes
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Squawk Box Squawk on the Street
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38100 (:58) New Day CNN Newsroom CNN Newsroom
CSPN 18 18 1818 37 12 109 Today in Washington WashingtonJournal U.S. House of Representatives
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 FOX& Friends America's Newsroom Happening Now
MSNBC 83 883 83 185 40103 Morning Joe The Daily Rundown |Jansin and Co. MSNBC Live
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24221 (400)CMT Music
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48210 AMTV: Buzzworthy AMTV: Buzzworthy AMTV: Buzzworthy |True Life True Life True Life
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 H1 + Music Gossip Big Morning Buzz Basketball Wives
______ ______ :1 i






KIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOONS WEEKDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Bad Boys 2 Hoodlum (97) Atouh Harlem angster makes good.(CC) |Poseidon 6) Trapped with fear. (CC) Italian
IE 3 3 3 (9:45) Dark Strike Back Stolen prop- (:25) Ray ('04, Drama) Ray Charles rises from humble begin- El Gringo (12) Outsider with $2M is Dp. Impact
S320320320320320320420 12) erty.(R) (HD) nings to become a music industry icon. attacked in Mexico. *
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321422 Taken 2 (12CC) (:15) Jaws 2 (78) ** More shark attacks. |(:20) He Got Game (98) A player chooses. (CC) HideSeek
ENC 1010110 150350 (:10) Posse ('93, Western) ** Black soldiers in (:05) Demolition Man ('93, Action) **% A cop Jersey Girl ('04) A daughter Air Force
the American West. (R) (CC) chases a thug in a future world. changes a man's life forever. (97)
HBO 3023023023023 2 Parental Guidance ('12) **% Old (:45) Ice Age: Continental Drift ('12) (:15) The Big Year ('11, Comedy) **% Bird Red Tails (12) ** Black
HBO 302 32 32 32 32 3 40 school methods. (CC) Changing continents. watcher search for rare birds. (CC) pilots. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 arenina ('12) ** (:15) L.A. Confidential (97) Cops and corruption. Big Elvis Clear History *** Executive's revenge.
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 Love Rent Hitchcock ('12) Filmmaker's romance. Contagion *** Deadly virus. (:15) Bulworth (98) Senator tells truth.
SvSHOW 3 365 Muske- Die Another Day ('02, Action) Pierce Brosnan. (:45) Step Up Revolution ('12, Drama) Woman (:25) The Twilight Saga: Breaking
SHOW 340 340 340 3403 eers 007 uncovers terror plot. (CC) falls for dance crew lead. (CC) Dawn: Part 1 (11*)
Judge Dredd *1 A The Ninth Gate ('99) **% A rare-book dealer is hired to Paycheck ('03) Ben Affleck. Man with erased Beautiful
TMC 350 350 350 550 350 385 Judge is framed. find a lost tome written b the devil himself. memory must solve clues. (CC) (06)
M The Rains Came ('39, Romance) **1 An In- Susan Slade ('61, Drama) **% Connie Leave Her to Heaven ('45, Thriller) Gene
M 65 65 65 65 169 dian aristocrat helps the poor. (CC) Stevens. A young woman ets pregnant. Tierney. A woman is ealous. (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Space Cowboys **2 One last mission. The Mummy (99) ** An Egyptian priest comes back to life. Mummy 2 ('01) **
Strike Back (50) Brokedown Palace ('99, Drama) Tourists For a Good Time, Call... ('12, Com- Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows ('11)
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 (R) unwittingly carry heroin. (CC) edy) Phone sex. (CC) -*** Criminal mastermind. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321422 Sliding98 (CC) ( Deep Impact ** Comet impacts Earth. The Sitter ('11) ** Jonah Hill. ICloser Emotional revenge.
EN 150150 150 150 1503501:40) Below ('02, Horror) WWII sub Back to the Future Part II ('89) The (:20) The Players Club ('98, Comedy) College Scary Movie 3 ('03) Crop
N 1500 crew has delusions. future and back. (CC) student works at strip club. (CC) circles.(CC)
HB 302 302 302302302302 4 ountry2 First Cousin Once Removed ('13) Purple Violets ('07) *** Woman First Look Chronicle ('12) ** Three friends Gumbel (HD)
('10) Alzheimer's disease. encounters an old flame. (R) gain superpowers. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303303 303 303 402 :20) Taxi (04) Cabbie helps cop. (CC) American Splendor ('03) **2 Come See the Paradise ('90) Activist loves teen.
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304404 House Roads to Riches ** An exotic dancer. (25) Garden State ('04) ) The Histor Boys Gifted young men.
SHOW 30 30 30 30 30 3 365 Brothers Legendary (10, Drama) ** John Cena. A teen Do the Right Thing ('89, Drama) Danny Aiello. Peace, Love & Misunderstanding
(09 brings his family back together. Racial tensions lead to a riot. ('12) Self-discovery.
: TM 0 0 15) Touchback (12, Drama) ** Injured (:15) Autumn in New York (00, Drama) *% A Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (12, Drama)
TMC 350 350 350 350 350 350 385 Ilayer gets second chance. (CC) (HD) man falls for a dying woman. (CC) Sheik's vision offl fishing. (CC)
TCM 65 65 65 65 169230he Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm ('62) **%2 Of Human Bondage ('64) A man is (:15) The Outrage ('64, Western) **% Wit-
The brothers brin fairytales to life. (CC) used by a waitress. nesses offer accounts of a crime. (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 4 Brothers (05) Shooter (07) *** Sniper framed for dignitary's death. (CC) CSI Miami (HD) CSI Miami (HD)
E :15) The Dark Knight Rises ('12, Action) The Dark Knight resurfaces to Strike Back Strike Back Plans are (:40) Strike Back Smug- Strike Back
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 protect Gotham from a brutal, new enemy. (R changed.(1) gling ob. (R(R)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321422 Science Red Eye (05, Thriller) (CC) Project X (12) Huge party. Outbreak ('95) Lethal virus in U.S. (CC) Hop**
EN 150 150 150 150 150350 Crazy/BeautifulOppo- (:55) That's My Boy ('12, Comedy) Irresponsible (:55) Zoom ('06) Kids learn to be (:25) Witness (85) *** A cop en-
S111s3ites in love. dad reconnects with son. (CC) superheroes at academy ters an Amish Cmunity.
HBO 3 3 0 Where the Heart Is ('00, Drama) **% Aban- In Good Company (05, Comedy) *** Man's Joyful Noise ('12, Comedy) ** Choir leaders
HB 302 302 302 302 302 302 ned teen lives in store. (CC) (HD) new boss is half his age. (CC) can't agree on direction. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303303 303303402 Ocean's 12 ('04) Real Sports (HD) Idlewild (06) Music and the mob. (CC) (:05) The Debt (11) Nazi war criminal.
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 Maria Full of Grace ('04*** Marathon Boy Child runner. Lola Versus Soul-searching. (:45) Being Flynn ('12) (CC)
SSHOW 0 35 (11:30) My Father,The Cool Runnings ('93) Jamaican men (:45) Meek's Cutoff ('11, Western) Guide over the Man on the Moon ('99) Jim Carrey.
SHOW 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 Her form a bobsled team. Cascade Mountains. (CC) Man's road to fame.
TM 350 350 35 0 3 (:10) Power and Beauty ('02, Drama) (:45) Silent Predators ('99, Thriller) (:15) Adventures in Babysitting ('87, Comedy) A InsideOut ('11) Retribu-
S350350350350350350385 amous lovers. (CC) *12 Snakes terrify town. babysitter aids her friend. ion to mob.
TM 5 65 65 6 192 Rio Lobo (:45) Contempt ('64, Drama) ***% Wife feels The Desperados (69) A reformed (:15) The Mercenary (68, Western) **% Sol-
70) used during film production. (NR) outlaw starts a new life. dier of fortune aids revolutionaries.
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 Mission Godzilla (98) Giant iguana attacks Big Appe. (CC) (HD) The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers ('02)
CINE 320 320 320 320 32 i2n Wrath of the Titans Res- Lethal Weapon ('87) A retiring cop (:50) Lethal Weapon 2 ('89, Action) Cops battle a (:45) Lethal Weapon 3 ('92, Action)
CINE ue Zeus. gets a new partner. (R) drug-smuggling diplomat. (R) ** A dirt cop. (CC)
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 42 Hyde Park ('13) Sneakers (92) High-tech caper. (CC) (:10) Never Been Kissed 99) ** (CC) Lucky One ('12)
ENC 150 150 1010 150 1:30) Bridget Jones: (:20) Independence Day (96) *** An alien mothership launches a fleet (:55) Little Big League ('94, Comedy) ** A
ENC 150 15 150 15 350 Reason ('04) of spacecraft which destroy entire cities. (CC) teenager inherits a baseball team.
HBO 302 302 302 30202302 4 White Noise ('05) ** (:15) This Means War ('12, Action) Two men find Hitchcock ('12) A filmmaker meets (:45) Parental Guidance ('12) Old
SGhosts in static. they are dating same woman. his future wife. (CC) school methods. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Huckabees (04) Game Change (12) Campaign in 2008. Behind the Candelabra ('13) ** (CC) Thunder (05) (CC)
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304 404 :15) Life of Pi ('12) Sura Sharma. Shipwreck. |(:25) Love in the Time of Cholera (07) Notes on a Scandal (06) (
SHOW 0 30 3 3 3 365 Pieces of April Dysfunc- (:15) The Forger ('12, Drama) ** A 15-year-old Out of Time ('03, Thriller) **% Police chief is October Sky Teen builds
S ional feast. art prodigy finds work. (CC) (HD) implicated in murders. (PG-13) rockets.
TM 350350350350350350385 People Like Us ('12) Adult siblings (:40) Resistance ('07) (CC) (HD) (:15) A Summer in Genoa ('09, (50) Serious Moonlight ('09) **
Seet for the first time. Drama New lives in Italy. Captive husband. (R) (CC)
TCM 65656565 169 230 First Comes Courage ('43, Drama) Hard, Fast and Beautiful ('51, Beware, My Lovely ('52) Ida Lupino. On Dangerous Ground ('52)
1R 1 resistance fighter. Drama) ** Tennis trouble. Danger in the house. *** Love and murder. (CC)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 :15) The Perfect Storm (00, Drama) Crew battles storm. Smokey and the Bandit ('77) A length beer run. 10 Brother
CINE 30 3 3 3 (:5) The Hurricane (99) A boxer is wrongfully accused of a (:45) What's Love Got to Do with It? ('93) (:45) The Apparition ('12) Couple
triple homicide and imprisoned for life. Angela Bassett. Tina Turner's story. plagued by an evil spirit.
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321422 Ruby Sparks (12) Fictional character. Edward Scissorhands ('90) Sanctum ('1) ** Team stuck in caves. Last Man
N 10 150 150 150 10 :1140) Ali ('01, Drama) Will Smith. The life and ca(:20) Doctor Detroit ('83, Comedy) *1 A profes- The Witches of Eastwick ('87) Friends conjure a
ENC 150 1 I 150 3 reer of Muhammad All. (CC) sor unwittingly becomes a pimp. compelling stranger. (R (CC)
HBO 302 302 3023 9 New Year's Hemingway & Gellhorn ('12, Drama) Nicole Kidman. Writers' (:15) Dream House ('11) Daniel (:45) Moonrise Kingdom ('12,
HO 02 32 32 32 32 32 passionate and chaotic love. (CC) Craig. Uncovering secrets. Drama) Runaway love. (CC)
HBO2 303 303 303 303 30 30 402 oo Big Fail ('11) |The Campaign (12) **2 (CC) The Crucible (96) *** Witches on trial. Head in the Clouds (04) **
HBO3 30 304 304 304 304 404 omy (:25) The Ring Two ('05(CC) (:20) J. Edgar (11) *** FBI director. (R) (CC)(HD) (:40) The Clearing (04 (CC)
SHOW 0 35 Peace, Love & Misunderstanding (35) Mean Girls ('04) *** Teen (:15) W. '08) A biography of George W. Bush depicts his early War Horse
(W 30 30 30 30 30 30 35 12) Self-discovery. makes hit with A-list cliue. life and his time as president. (CC) -
TM O 30000 0 (:05) 54 ('98, Drama) Young man (:40) The Way of the Gun ('00, Action) **% (:40) Mumford& Sons: (:40) John Mellencamp: It's About
works at exclusive club. Crooks kidnap a surrogate mother. Road(lV14) You Musical ourney
TCM 65656565 169230 Pat and Mike(52) Sports (:15) Billie (65) **% An athletic (:45) It Happened to Jane ('59) % A busi- An Innocent Affair ('48) Ex-fiance
and ethics. tomboy and her boyfriend. nesswoman hires a dashing lawyer, business. (CC)






KIDS NEWS SPORTS AFTERNOONS WEEKDAY SPECIALS MOVIES

ABC 2 7 11 7 Bethenny The Chew General Hospital Katie Ellen DeGeneres News News
ABC 2 11 ABC Action News The Chew General Hospital Katie Ellen DeGeneres News News
ABC 1 7 7 7 10 7 7 ABC7 News at Noon The Chew General Hospital RachaelRay The Doctors News News
CBSa 10 10 10 10 News Young Restless Beautiful The Talk Let's Make a Deal Dr. Phil News News
CBS 213213 5 5 5 News Young Restless Beautiful The Talk Let's Make a Deal WINKNewsat4pm News News
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 Today Days of Our Lives The Doctors The Dr. Oz Show News News News
NBC 2 2 2 NBC2 News @ Noon Days of Our Lives The Doctors The Dr. Oz Show News News News
FOX M 13 13 13 13 13 FOX13News TMZ Dish Bethenny TMZLive Judy |Judy FOX 13 5:00 News
FOX 4 4 4 America We People Justice Supreme Judy America The Test Maury Judy Judy
PBS l 3 3 3 3 Charlie Rose Variety Variety Variety Cat in Hat Kratts Martha WordGid Curious Europe
PBS 204 204 204 16 Ballkissangel Travels Journeys Globe Trekker Variety Antiques Roadshow Journal Travels
PBSM 3 3 3 Cook's Kitchen Landscape Sew It All Electric WordGirl Clifford Martha Arthur Kratts Curious DinoTrain
CW 6 21 6 Dr. Phil Bill Cunningham Wendy Williams Steve Harvey Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Dr. Phil
CW ) 9 9 9 4 America America Paternity Paternity Cold Case Files Bill Cunningham Steve Harvey Queen Latifah
MYN I 11 11 11 14 Judge Mathis Trisha Goddard The Test Judge Mathis Maury The People's Court
MYN L 8 9 8 OK! TV Paid Prog. The People's Court Judge Mathis The People's Court Law & Order: SVU Cmmunity Cmmunity
IND 12 12 12 38 12 Cheaters Cheaters Jerry Springer Steve Wilkos Show Jerry Springer 30 Rock 30 Rock Dad Dad
ION S 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 Movie Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
WCLF 22 22 22 2 Destined Thr. Bible HmekeeperChristian Jim Bakker The 700 Club Your Health It's Time Parsley
WRXYMI 22 44 10 Hmekeeper t's Time The700 Club Your Health Jim Bakker Connect 7thStreet Salvaton
TLF 0 23 23 23 95 5 (11:00) Privilegio Casos de familiar Qui6n tiene la? Laura Laura El Chavo
UNIV 15 15 15 6 Hoy Cachitode cielo Lamujerdel El gordo y la flaca Primer impact
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 CSI: Miami Criminal Minds Criminal Minds The First 48 The First 48 The First 48
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Pit Boss XL Untamed and Uncut Swamp Wars Wild West Alaska Gator Boys Xtra To Be Announced
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 270 Movie Wife Wife Matters Matters Matters Movie
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 185 Top Chef Married to Medicine Married to Medicine Married to Medicine Married to Medicine The New Atlanta
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 Movie |Tosh Tosh Tosh Tosh Tosh Sunny Cmmunity Futurama Futurama
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 Unusual Suspects Ragin' Cauns Ragin' Cajuns Variety Variety Moonshiners
DISN 136136 136 136 99 45 250 Mickey DocMc Austin Shake It A.N.T. A.N.T. A.N.T. A.N.T. Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck Good Luck
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 E! News Sex City Sex City Sex City Sex Cty Variety GameOn Kardashians Movie
EWTN 243243243 12 17 285 Daily Mass The Journey Home Threshold of Hope Reflection Holy Name Truth Catholic Object Choices
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 Reba Reba 8 Rules 8 Rules BoyWodd BoyWorld BoyWorld BoyWorld Reba Reba Middle Middle
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Pioneer Barefoot Sandra's TenDolar Rest.Chef 30Min. Giada Giada Barefoot Barefoot Pioneer Trisha's
FX 51 51 51 51 58 49 53 Movie 21/2Men 21/2 Men Movie
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179 184 Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Catch 21 Pyramid Chain Chain Minute to Win It Minute to Win It
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 The Better Show The Better Show TheWaltons TheWaltons TheWaltons TheWaltons
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 28 Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels Modern Marvels
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 Hunters Hunters Life Life Life Life Life Life Life Life Life |Life
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Fashion Clearance Fashion Clearance Fashion Clearance Fashion Clearance Fashion Clearance Fashion Clearance
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 41 140 How I Met HowlMet Grey's Anatomy Grey's Anatomy Grey's Anatomy Wife Swap Wife Swap
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103 161 Dr. Phil Stories of Betraal Stories of Betraal Stories of Betrayal Stories of Betrayal Stories of Betrayal
QVC 14 14 14 9 14 13 150 Q Check Josie Maran Orthaheel Footwear Problems Solved Christmas Shoppe
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Ink Master Ink Master Ink Master Ink Master Ink Master Ink Master
STYLE 82 8282 118 118160 Chef Robl6& Co. Chef Robl & Co. Chef Robl & Co. Chef Robl6& Co. Burn Notice
SYFY 67 67 67 67253 64 180 Highway Haunted Highway Haunted Highway Fangasm Movie Movie
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Wipeout Cleveland Dad Dad Family Family Friends Seinfeld |Seinfeld Family Family
TLC 45 45 45 45 57 72 139 What Not to Wear BabySy BabyStry L Medium L Medium What Not to Wear Four Weddings SayYes Say Yes
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Bones Bones Bones Bones Castle Castle
TRAV 69 69 69 69 260 66 170 Variety Variety Bourdain Carnivore Carnivore Bizarre Foods vFood v Food
TRUTV 63 63 63 63 50 30 183 Bait Car Bait Car Container Container Ctainer oContainer Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
TVLAND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Griffith Griffith Gunsmoke Gunsmoke Bonanza Bonanza Bonanza
USA 34 34 34 34 22 52 50 Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
WE 117 117 117 117 117 149 Roseanne Roseanne Bridezillas Bridezillas MyFairWedding My Fair Wedding WillGrace WillGrace
WGN 16 16 16 1941 11 9 In the Heat of Night WGN Midday News Walker Walker Law & Order Cl Law& Order Cl
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Geico SportsNTE To Be Announced Talkin Football Beach GolWeekl
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 SportsCenter SportsCenter NFL Primetime Insiders Mike NFL Live Horn Interruptn
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 ESPN First Take Numbers Never Lie SportsCenter SportsNation Highly |Outside College ESPNFC
FS1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 NASCAR |MotoGPChampion UEFAMag. UEFAPre. UEFA Champions League Soccer Crowd Goes Wild
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 World Poker Tour World Poker Tour UEFAPre. UEFA Champions League Soccer The Finsiders
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Live from the Presidents Cup Learning PGATour
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 BoxScore Blue Blue NAHunter DeerHunt LoveHunt ONTV Winkelman Americana Americana ProFootballTalk
SUN 38 38 40140145 57 76 (10:30) College Football Variety Boater Driven Texas A&M Tennessee InsideUCF UCF SportsFlorida
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44 252 PAWPatrol Dora Dora Peter Sponge Sponge TMNT Fairly Fairly Sponge Sponge Sponge
TOON 80 80 124124 46 20 257 TomJerry TomJerry TomJerry Codenme Courage Johny Test JohnyTest Gumball Action MAD Adventure adventure
CNBC 39 39 39 39 37 102 Fast Money Power Lunch Street Signs Closing Bell Fast Money
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 10 Around The World CNN Newsroom Jake Tapper Situation Room
CSPN 18 18 18 18 37 12 109 U.S. House of Representatives |U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 (11:00) Now America Live Studio B Your World Cavuto The Five
MSNBC 83 83 83 83 185 40 103 Alex Waner Andrea M |News Nation The Cycle Martin Bashir The Ed Show
CMTV 47 47 47 47 23 24221 Movie Movie Reba Reba
MTV 33 33 33 33 35 48 210 Parental Parental Parental Parental Parental Parental Parental Parental Parental Parental Friendzone Friendzone
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 217 & Tiny Black nk Crew HollywoodExes Miami Monkey Tough Love: Co-Ed Basketball Wives Behind
W Il, V9 I I1 I I I ,I -I 1 I






MONDAY
HIGHLIGHTS

How I Met Your
Mother
8 p.m. on CBS
"Last Time in New York" Lily
becomes frustrated after
discovering a list of things
that Ted wants to do in
New York before moving to
Chicago; Robin and Barney
realize they only have a
little time alone together
before their families arrive
for their wedding. (HD)

The Voice
8 p.m. on NBC
"The Blind Auditions, Part
3" A new group of hopefuls
nervously await to perform
live before a packed house,
but the judges prove to be a
tough audience; tempted to
turn their chairs for several
acts, the coaches choose
only the best and most di-
verse voices for their team.
(HD)


2 Broke Girls
9 p.m. on CBS
"And The Kickstarter"
Caroline attempts to use
the public masses of the
internet to crowdfund the
purchase of an expensive
pair of new pants through
an online fundraising web-
site; Max's new smartphone
begins to come between
her and her friendship with
Caroline. (HD)

Sleepy Hollow
9 p.m. on FOX
"For the Triumph of Evil"
Ichabod and Abbie are
faced with a new face of
evil in Sleepy Hollow when
the Sandman infiltrates
the townspeople's minds
and fills their dreams with
nightmares, leaving Abbie
to be reminded of her past
and her institutionalized
sister, Jenny. (HD)

Prometheus
9 p.m.on HBO
Two archaeologists dis-
cover a series of ancient


SOAP OPERA UPDATE


THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
Bill once again urged Liam
not to marry Hope. Meanwhile,
Wyatt told Hope that he loved
her and encouraged her to see
him as more than a friend.
Suspicious of Liam's motives,
Brooke asked him why he was
in such a hurry to marry her
daughter. Katie returned to L.A.
full of venom toward Brooke
and Bill. Rick pretended that
Maya's engagement to Victor
didn't bother him. Hope agreed
to go to Mexico with Wyatt to
search for the priceless gem.
Brooke was caught off guard
by Katie's blunt interrogation.
Despite Liam's objections, Hope
extended her trip with Wyatt.
Later, Liam came up with a
romantic plan to prove his love
to Hope. Wait to See: Awedding
is postponed. A couple takes the
next step in their relationship.
Liam makes a big mistake.

DAYS OF OUR LIVES
Eric reluctantly agreed to
be hypnotized. JJ broke into
Daniel's apartment and threw a


party. Theresa sought help from
Caroline so that she wouldn't
go to jail. Daniel took Parker to
visit Chloe. Eric had a theory
about his unusual dreams. EJ
stumbled upon Chad's secret.
A desperate Theresa turned to
JJ for help. Later, Anne agreed
to help Theresa take down Jen-
nifer. Will was shocked when he
caught Gabi reciprocating Nick's
embrace. Eric had flashbacks
while guiding Kristen and Brady
through their pre-cana class.
Sonny tried to pair Gabi up with
Cameron. Chad gave Abigail a
special gift. Nicole received a
tempting job offer. Wait to See:
Theresa continues to mess with
Jennifer's head. Sami makes
amends with EJ. Abigail de-
mands to know what Cameron
is keeping from her.

GENERAL HOSPITAL
Sabrina told Patrick that her
ex-boyfriend Carlos was trying
to win her back. Carly asked a
mentally unstable Sonny if he
was taking his medication. Silas
told Sam about his childhood.
Dante and Lulu took turns
trying to soothe their restless


cave paintings that point to
possibly interstellar origins
for humanity, and an ex-
pedition is embarked upon
to visit a dark and distant
planet, where they hope to
learn the meaning of life's
existence. (HD)
Hostages
10 p.m. on CBS
"Invisible Leash" After El-
len disobeys the order to
assassinate the president
during surgery, Duncan tells
her it will come at the cost
of a family member's life;
Duncan informs the family
that they are to go about
their everyday lives during
the next few weeks. (HD)
The Blacklist
10:01 p.m. on NBC
"NO. 216: The Freelancer"
Red and Liz work together
to try and track down an
assassin that disguises his
killings by creating disas-
ters by going undercover to
protect the woman who he
has targeted; Ressler and
a newly re-hired CIA agent

newborn, Connie. Britt and her
baby moved in with Nikolas.
Maxie and Spinelli shared a
tense encounter. Shawn was
jealous of Alexis' chemistry with
Derek. Olivia urged Lulu to
choose godparents for her baby
before the christening. Carlos
accused Patrick of carrying a
torch for Robin. Maxie tried to
summon the strength to attend
Connie's baptism. Luke's health
took a turn for the worse. Britt
was charmed by Nikolas' con-
cern for baby Ben. Wait to See:
Patrick contemplates taking off
his wedding ring. Duke sets out
to prove Derek's true identity.
Franco begins painting again.

THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Avery comforted Dylan as
he handed Chelsea's baby back
to her and Adam. Hilary was
confident that Cane's marriage
was ruined. Nikki wasn't sure
that she could tell Victor about
the baby she left at the convent.
Sharon told her psychiatrist that
she didn't need a mood stabilizer
anymore. Jack told Victor to
cut Adam some slack. Courtney
and Noah struck up a flirtation.
Adam demanded that Chelsea


Stuart Weber (Jerry
O'Connell), a Speedo-wear-
ing OB/GYN who's hiding
his assets until his second
divorce is settled, is among
the four single guys living
in a short-term apartment
complex who unexpectedly
find camaraderie over their
many missteps in love on
the CBS comedy "We Are
Men," premiering Monday at
8:30 p.m.

keep an eye on Red from a
distance. (HD)

and the baby move into his pent-
house. Dylan was surprised to
hear that Avery and Nick called
off their wedding. Victor offered
Noah a job at the family compa-
ny. Abby told Tyler that she loves
him. Summer moved into the
Abbott mansion after she found
a rat at her old place. Having
no faith in Chelsea, Adam hired
two nannies to take care of their
baby. Wait to See: Friends and
family gather to honor Lauren.
Adam and Chelsea unite during
a crisis. Paul has some impor-
tant news for Nikki.






KIDS NEWS SPORTS EVENING MONDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
SEP.30 1 i ]{I ii
ABC7 News ABC Wodd The7 Entertainment Dancing with the Stars (CC) (N) (HD) (:1) Castle: Dreamworld (CC)
ABC 6:00pm The Newswith O'Clock Tonight (CC)(N) (N) (HD)
S7 11 7 news of the Diane Sawyer News (N) (HD (HD)
day. (N) (HD)_
ABC NewsThe lat- ABCWodrd The List IV) AskAmerica Dancing with the Stars (CC) (N) (HD) (:01) Castle: Dreamworld (CC)
Z11 est news. News (N) (HD) I(TV G) (N) (HD)
ABC 7 7 ABC7 News at ABC World A Millionaire? A Millionaire? Dancing with the Stars (C) (N) (HD) (:01) Castle: Dreamworld ((C)
7 7 7 10 7 7 6 (N) News (N) (C) (N) (C) (R) (N) (HD)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of For- Jeopardy! (CC) How I Met We Are Men: 2 Broke Girls Mom (C) (N) Hostages: Invisible Leash
CBS 101010 10 6pm Local News with tune (CC) (N) (N) (H) Your Mother Pilot ((C)(N) Fundraising (HD) Duncan tells Ellen that her
0 0 0 news report. Scott Pelley (N) (HD) NewYorkto-do (HD) pants. (CC)() choice to save the president will
(N) (HD) list. (HD) come at a cost.
CBS 213213 5 News (N) (HD) Evening News News (N) (HD) Inside Edi- Howl Met(N) We Are Men: Broke Gid (N) Mom (CC) (N) Hostages: invisible Leash
213213 5 5 5 (N)(HD) tion (N) (HD) Pilot (N) (HD) (HD) Famiy member. (N) (HD)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment The Voice: The Blind Auditions, Part 3 A new group of (:01) The Blacklist: NO. 216:
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 at 6:00 News News Current 8at7:00 News; Tonight (CC)(N) hopefuls nervously await to perform live before a packed The Freelancer Assassin hides
8 8 8 8 8 and weather. events. (N) (HD) weather; more. (HD) house; the judges prepare to turn for only the best of sing- killings in disasters. (CC) (N) (HD)
ers. (CC (N) (HD)
NBC 2 2 2 News (N) (HD) NBC Nightly Wheel of For- Jeopardy! (N) The Voice: The Blind Auditions, Part 3 New group ner- (:01) The Blacklist Disaster as-
m News (N) tune(N) (HD) vously awaits to perform before a packed house. (N) sassin. (C) (N) (HD)
FOX13 6:00 News News TMZ(CC)(N) omg! Insider Bones: El Carnicero en el Sleepy Hollow: For the Tri- FOX 1310:00 News Top sto-
FOX 1 events ofthe day are examined (CC) (N) (HD Coche Sweets interrupts his umph of Evil The Sandman fills riesofthe news daare up-
13 13 13 13 13 and reported by the FOX 13 time off. (CC) (N) (H) minds with nightmares. (CC) (N) dated by the FOX 13 Nightly
News Team. (N) (HD) News Team. (N)
FOX FOX 4 News at Six Local Judge Judy The Simpsons Bones Gang member's son. Sleepy Hollow Sandman en- FOX 4 News at Ten Nightly
-__ 4 4 4 news; weather. (N) (CC) (R I(CC) (CC) (N) (HD) ters town. (C) (N) (HD) news report. (N)
PBS BBC WorId Business Re- The PBS NewsHour (CC) (N) Antiques Roadshow: Hartford, Genealogy Roadshow: Detroit Independent Lens New lead
3 3 3 3 News (CQ port(N) (HD) CT Concert poster. Linkto Lincoln. (N) singer. (CC)(N) (HD)
PBS Sesame Street Making a CatinHat(R) WordGirl(CC) Europe (CC) (R) Rudy Maxa's Travels (CC) (R) Journeys (N) GlobeTrekker: Utah and Colo-
1 204 204 204 16 friend. ((C) (R) (HD) (HD) (R) (H) World (HD) rado U.S. Mint; lake.
PBS BBC World Business Re- The PBS NewsHour (CC) (N) Antiques Roadshow: Hartford, Genealogy Roadshow: Detroit Independent Lens New lead
ST News(CQ port(N) (HD) CTConcert poster. Linkto Lincoln. (N) singer. (CC)(N)(HD)
CW 6 21 6 Family Claire Family College Big Bang (CO Big Bang (CC) iHeartRadio Music Festival, Night 1 Music festival in Las WINK News @10pm (N) (HD)
S misread. tour. (HO)) (HD) Vegas. (CC) (N) (HD)
CW Queens(IPG) Queens 21/2Men(CC) 21/2Men(CC) iHeartRadio Music Festival, Night 1 Music festival in Las RulesCollege Rules:3rd
M (HO) Carrie's hair. (H) (HO) Vegas. (CC) (N) (H) t-shirts. Wheel (HD)
MYN 11 11 11 1 aymond Seinfeld (C) Family Feud Family Feud Law & Order Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Cops Re- Cops Re-
8 11 11 11 14 Food fight. (__VPG) [ (1VP) Unit: Care (HD) Unit Killer stripper. loaded (HD) loaded (HD)
MYN 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) Cleveland (CC) Family ((C) Family Law & Order Special Victims Law & Order: Special Victims Law & Order: SVU Basketball
D (HD) (HD) Loretta's affair. Unit: Care (HD) Unit Killer stripper. Wllers. (CC) (HD)
IND 121212 8 12 Family (C) Family Big Bang (C) Big Bang (CC) Law& Order Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Howl Met (CQ How I Met (C)
2 12 12 38 1 Loretta's affair. (HD) (HD) Justice's POV. (HD) Justice's POV. (HD) (HD) (HO)
ION 2 2 2 13261817 Criminal Minds: About Face Criminal Minds: Identity Mur- Criminal Minds: Lucky Killer Criminal Minds: Penelope Criminal Minds: True Night
M 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 'Missing"fliers.(HD) derousduo.(C (HD) cannibal. (C) (HD) Garcia targeted. (HD) Comic book killer. (HD)
WCLF 222222 2 Christian Fit- Today Faith & Zola Levitt Great Awaken Tour Love a Child Richard Rob- Gospel Truth Jewish Jewels Life Today
S 2 ness healing. (CC) erts (CC)(N) (CC) (CC)
WRXY Meyer ((C) (R) Roberts Marketplace Great Awaken Tour Stop Hurting Love a Child Meyer ((C) (R) Place Mira- Christians&
RY 22 44 10 PLiardon Wisdom cles Jews
TLF 23 23 23 95 El niio quevino del mar Pelicula La Selecci6n Pasi6n del La Madame Chicas
23 23 23 95 5 Felipin el naufrago. (CC) fOtbol. (CC) (N) (HD) seductoras. (CC) (HD)
UNIV 15 15 15 6 Noticias(CC) Noticiem Coraz6n indomable Amor Porque el amor manda Relato La tempestad Un idilio Que bonito amor Ser
15 15 15 6 (N) Univisi6n (N) interesado.(C) (HD) de un amor. (HD) apasionado. (CC) (HD) mexicano. (CC) (HD)

A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 11 Storage Furni- Storage (CC)(R) Storage(CO (R) Storage (C(q(R) Barter Kings Trade up Barter Kin s: Tradecation Joint Barter Kings New shop in
A& 3 0 ture un i. (HD) (HD) (HD) snowcat. (CC) (R) (HD) familytrip.( )(HD) Utah. (CR) () (HD)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 5:30) The Italian Job (03, Drama) **% A gang of career Meet the Parents ('00, Comedy) *** Robert De Niro. A male nurse at- (:31) Angels
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 231 criminals' heist of a gold bullion shipment. ((C) tempts to impress his girlfriend's ultra-conservative father. (H)) (09)(CC)
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130 Ned Bruha (R) Ned Bruha (R) Wildman (CC) (R Wildman (CC) (R Wildman (CC) (R Wildman (C) (R Wildman: Cat Wildman (CC) (Rl Wildman (C) (R Wildman (CC) (R
APL 44 44 44 44 36 6 (H) (H) (H) (H) (HD) (H) Killer (HD) (HD) I(HD)
BET 35 35 35 35 40 22 70 106 & Park Top 10 videos selected by the Death at a Funeral ('10, Comedy) *** Chris Rock, Tracy Morgan. A Beauty Shop (05) ** Queen
T viewers. (CC) (N) (HD) family funeral dissolves into chaos as a mysterious visitor arrives. Latifah. Salon politics.
185 The Real Housewives of Mi- I Dream of NeNe: The Wed- The Real Housewives of New The Real Housewives of Mi- The Real Housewives of Mi-
BRAVO 68 68 68 68 254 51 ami Los Angeles. (R) ding (R) Jersey (CC)( (R) ami Hospital; party. ami Hospital; party.
COM 66 66 66 66 15,27 190 (:58) South Prk (:29)Tosh.O(R) 59)Colbert Daily Show (CC) Futurama (IV14 Futurama (IV4) South Prk(R South Pric Cy Brickle Bobby South Park
COM 66 66 66 66 15 27 190 (R) (HD) report (H) (R) (R) (HD) Sushi is heir. W.T.F.
DISC 4040 4040 2543120 Fast N' Loud Broken wind- Fast N' Loud Budget issues. Fast N' Loud Richard tested. Fast N' Loud: Fast & Furious Turn & Burn: Junk to Funk
SC 40 40 40 40 25 43 120 shield. (CC) (R) (HD) (CC) (R) (HD) (CC) (R) (HD) Fairmont (N)(HD) (CC) (N) (HD)
E! 46 46 4646 7 26196 Couples Re- Game On (R) E! News (N) (HD) E! Spec.(R) Keep Uwiththe With the Kardashians Kim's
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26 196 treat ('09) (H) Kardashians Specialist. (R) baby shower. (R) (HD)
E7 WTN St. Francis of Daily Mass Celebration of the The Journey Home Call-in EWTN Holy Rosary The World Over News from
EWTN 243243243 12 17285 Nightly (N) Assisi Ho Eucharist.(R) program. (VG) Nightly (R) (G) aroundthe world. (CO
Middle: Home- Middle Sue's Zookeeper ('11, Comedy) ** In order to keep their zoo- Billy Madison ('95) Millionaire's immature son repeats
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199 coming crush. keeper from leaving, animals reveal they can talk. school to prove he can run father's business. ((C)
FOOD 37 37 37 7 76 Diners Chat- Diners Diners (R) (HD) Diners (R) (HD) Diners: Big Diners: Break- Diners Uniting Diners Lamb Diners Barbe- Diners (R) (HD)
FOham, N.J. Compton, Call. Breakfast fast(R) food. burger. cue; fish.
FX 51 51 51 51 5849 535:30) Eagle Eye ('08, Thriller) Two strangers must run for Unstoppable (10, Action) *** Denzel Washington. An expert engineer Unstoppable
F_______ 4 their lives when they become wanted fugitives. and a novice conductor race to stop a runaway, toxic train. (CC) ('10) *-*
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179184 Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud Family Feud FamilyFeud Family Feud Family Feud
GSN 179 179 179 179 34 179W184 () (1VPG) (1VPG) (1PG) (WVPG) |(WVPG) (1PG) (WVPG) (WVPG) (1VPG)
HALL 5 17 73 little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie A A Valentine's Date (11, Romance) *% A woman is FrasierStolen Frasier(IVPG)
HALL 5 5 5 17 3 240 Gold causes trouble. hard decision. (CC) forced to confront the father she left behind. (CC) (HD) girl. (CC)
HST 81 81 81 81 33 65 128 Ancient Aliens Past ET con- Ancient Aliens Entryway for Ancient Aliens Eerie connec- Ancient Aliens Ancient ad- Ancient Aliens Number in his-
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65 act. (C) (R) (HD) ETs. (CC)(R)((HD) tions. (CC)(R) (HD) vances. (CC)(R)((HD) tory. (CC)(N)(HD)
H1 unters(CQ(R) Hunters Nepal Love It or List It Under one Love it or List It: A Hasty Deci- Love it or List it Home with Hunters(CC) (N) International
HOME 41 41 41 41 53 42 165 (HD) school. roof. (CC)(R)(HD) sion Empty nesters. space. (CQ(N)(HD) (HD) (N)(HD)
HSN 24 24 24 24 51 19 151 Hutton Concierge Ingenious Designs Silver: 15th Anniversary Silver: 15th Anniversary Jade: 4th Anniversary
LIFE 36 36 36 36 5241 140 Hocus Pocus ('93) % Conjured up by a curious teen, Hocus Pocus ('93) **% Conjured up by a curious teen, Hocus Pocus ('93) Bette
LIFE 3 3 3 3 4 0 three 17th-century witches take revenge on Salem. three 17th-century witches take revenge on Salem. Midler. Witches in Salem.
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103161 Our America with Lisa Ling Our America with Lisa Ling Dateline on ID Con artists Dateline on ID Decades-old Dateline on ID: Behind the
OWN 58 58 58 58 47 103 161 Killers'families. (R) Checking in. (R)(HD) exposed. ((C) (HD) case. (CC) (HD) Badge Murdered wife.






KIDS NEWS SPORTS EVENING MONDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
SEP. 30 i : iI

SPIKE7 57 57 57 2963 Cops Prostitute Cops: Street CopsDUIar- Cops (CC) R) s (CC) (R) os Sting op- Cops Sting op- Cops CopsCall at
SPIKE stin. Arrests Irest.(1) (NH) T( ) eralion. eration. |walker.(R) Fisfight. (R) motel.(R)
STYLE 82828282118118160 urn Notice: Piot, Part 2 Mi- ate Nhtwith Jimmy Fallon sych: Pilot Shawn opens sych: Spelling Bee Spell- psych Interpol agent. (C)
STYLE 82 82 82 82 8 hael heels a criminal. Justin mberlake. agency. (CC) ing bee death. ((C)
SYFY 6 7 67 67 2 64 180 5)TheCovenant ('06) % Drive Angry ('11, Action) A man escapes hell to seek Ghost Rider ('07, Action) A stunt cyclist gains fiery
SYFY een warlocks fight. revenge against his daughter's attackers. (R) powers of retribution, becoming the Ghost Rider.
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Seinfeld (CC) Seinfeld ((C) Seinfeld: The Big Bang (CQ Big Bang (C) Big Bang (CQ Big Bang (TVP) Big Bang (CQ Big Bang(C) Big Bang (WVG)
TBS 59 HD) (HD) Doll (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD)
TM 65 65 6565 169 230 Magnificent Obsession ('54) A rich, irresponsible playboy Stagecoach ('39) ***% Strangers who travel together The Story of Film War
reforms after a young widow oses her sight. fendoff Indians and bandits from stagecoach. (C trauma in film. (CC)
TL 4 454545 57 7 Toddlers and Tiaras Three Long Island Medium: Unseen Long Island Medium Across Lon Island Medium On the Long Island Medium On the
-5 45 45 45 57 7 girls compete. (R)(H) Never-before-seen. America. (R)(H) Road: Florida (R) Rod Local reads.
Castle: Secret Santa Who killed Castle: Significant Others Attor- Castle: Under the Influence Mu- Castle: Death Gone Crazy Major Crimes Wrter's
TNT 61 61 61 61 28 55 51 Santa. (CC)(H) ney murdered. (HD) sic industry. (H) Adult filmmaker. (H) ide-along. (C (R)(HD)
TRAI 69 69 69 69260 66 iO7 Bizarre Foods with Andrew Manv. Food: v Food: Balti- Bizarre Foods America Fresh Bizarre Foods America Deep Hotel Impossible The
AV 69 69 69 69mmem: Hungary Chicago more(R) sea cucumbers. (R) friedoysters. (R) Beachfront Inn. (CC)(N)
TRUT 63 63 63 635030183 Lizard Lick Lizard Lick Lizard Lick Lizard Lick Lizard Lick Lizard Lick Lizard Lick Lizard Lick Lizard Lick Lizard Lick
V 63 63 63 50 ow(R) ow(R Tow (R) Tow(R) Tow(R) Towing Tow(N) Tow(R) Tow(R) Towing
TVLND 62 62 62 62 31 54 244 Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith AndyGriffith Loves Ray- LovesRay- Friends(V) Friends(VG)
VLND 62 62 62HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD)) (HD) mond(HD) mond (HD) (HD)) (HD)
USA 34 34 34 34 221 5250 NCIS: Los Angeles: Betrayal NCIS: Los Angeles: The Debt WWE Monday Night Raw (N) (CC) (HD)
USA S34 34 34 am disappears. Deeks'error. (HO)
WGN 161616 141 11 9 America's Funniest Home America's Funniest Home America's Funniest Home Parks Night Parks Sex WGN News at Nine The head-
GN 1 11 V ideos Halloween. Videos (YPG)(H) VideosPractical jokes. out.(HD) scandal. li news. (N) (HD)
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Geico SportsNITE (HD) To Be Announced Program information is unavailable at this time. Talking Football
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 SportsCenter Monday Night Countdown (N) (C) (H) (:25) Monday Niht Football: Miami Dolphins at New Orleans Saints
(ESPN) (H from Mercedes- enz Superdome (Uve) (HD)
ESPN2 30 30 3030 6 5974 Around the Aroundthe SEC Storied: The Book of Manning (HD) ESPN Films E:60: Hispanic Heritage Baseball Tonight (N) (CC) (H)
EHorn(HD) Horn (HMonth) C() (HMonthSpecial (HD)
FS1 48 48 48 48426983 FOX Football Daily (N) (C) FOX Sports Mission Octo- Being (C) (H) Being (HC) (H). Monday Night Fights: Golden Boy Promotions:
F1 48 48 48 48 42 69 83 (CQ(HD) ber(HP) Brooklyn (Uve)
FSN 72 72 72 72 56 77 ip hape Forida Pan- Colee Football: Arizona Wildcats at Washington Huskies from CenturyLink Field (Taped) World Poker WPT World
FSN 72 72 72(R) hers(H) (CC)(H) Championship Part 1
GOLF 49 49 9 4955 6 he Golf Fix (N) (HD) Live from the Presidents Live from the Presidents Live from the Presidents Live from the Presidents
GOLF 49 49 49 49 55 60 304 Cup (N) (HD) Cup (HD) Cup (HD) Cup (HD)
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 Pro Football TheCrossover with Michelle Beadle (H) NHL36(HD) NHL36(HD)
r__ 7 7 1 9 alk(N)" Se
SUN 38 38 401 401 45 57 76 Gof Destina- Tama Bay Lihtning Sea- College Football: Florida Gators at Kentucky Wildcats from Commonwealth Stadium (Replay) (C) ()
tion (H)8 son Preview (H D)
NICK 25 25 25 25 24 44252 onge) onge (C) Sam & Cat (R) Drake Awesome (N) Full Hse (CC) FuHseBest FullHse ( FullHseArt FullHse (CC)
NICK 2 2 2 2 2 44 Regul ar y (41)) (1D)41)D) friend.' _cancelled. _
TOON 8 80 14124 46120 7 Regular (R) Regular (R) Adventure (N) Regular (N) Grandpa (N) MAD(N) King of the HillCleveland(CC) Bob's (CC)(HD) DadImperson-
TOON 80 80 14 14 46 (C (HD) ation.

S39 39 39 3 Mad Money Jim Cramertalks The Kudlow Report Busi- The Costco Craze: Insidethe 60 Minutes onCNBC: Your American Greed: Scams In-
CNBC a 3 3 bout investing. (N) ness; politics. (N) Warehouse Giant (R) Money Ben Bernanke. side trading. (R)
CNN 32 32 32 32 18 38 Situation Crossfire (C) Erin Burnett OutFront Be Anderson Cooper360 Piers Morgan LIVE (C) (N) Anderson Cooper 360'
SRoom (N) (N) yond the news. (N) Breakngnews. (N) (HD) (H) Breakngnews. (R)(H)
CSP 18 1 1 1 37 1i9 U.S. House of Representatives Issues in the House of Tonight from Washington First Ladies: Influence and Image: Flor- Washington
CSPN 18 18 18 1837 12 109epresentatives. N) Public policy.(N) ence Harding (N) (N)
S71 ecial Report with Bret Baie The FOX Report Shepard The O'Reilly Factor News Hannity Conservative news. On the Record with Greta Van
FNC 64 64 64 64 48 71 118 -he latest news. (N) Smith. (CC) (N) (HD) talk. (CC) (N) (D) (CC) (N) (1) Susteren (N)(HD)
PoliticsNation Rev. Al Hardballwith Chris Matthews All in with Chris Hayes Po- The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word with Lawrence
NB 3 harpton. (N) (HD) Poliical issues. (N) liticalpanel.(N) (H) News and views. (N) O'Donnell (N)(HD)
TV 447 47 47 23 4 2 Reba Attention Reba Reba ebReba' s Reba(H) Swing Vote ('08, Comedy) **% Kevin Costner, Madeline Carroll. One man's vote ends
CMV span. seeks ob. newob. up being the deciding factor in the presidential election. (PG-13) (H#)
M 33 33 33 33 35 1Friendzone That 70s Catfish: The TV Show Me- Teen Mom 3 Teens have Teen Mom 3 Teens have Teen Mom 3 (N)
MTV 3333 3333 48 Show( dia pen pals. (H) kids.kids.
VH1 50 50 50 50 43 23 2(4:30) Poetic Justice (93) Basketball Wives (R) (HD) Basketball Wives (N) (HD) TlandTiny(N) Black Ink Crew (CC) (N) (H) Basketball
SPoet in love. (R) (HD) ) Wives (R)
E 17 ill Grace((C) WillGrace(() Will Grace(C) Will Grace: CS: Miami: Hunting Ground CS: Miami: Special Delivery CSI: Miami: About Face Natalia
WE 1_ (H ((H) (HO) ActingOut Hunting humans. (HD) Truck driver killed. (HO)
5:45) Deep Impact ('98, Science Fiction) (:50) The Five-Year Engagement ('12) After dating his girlfriend for a year, The Dark Knight Rises (12)
CINE 320 320 320 320 320 320 420 humanity struggles to prevent its extinction a man decides to propose to her, but their relationship becomes strained Batman protects Gotham from
as a comet heads toward Earth. as their engagement is continually extended. (CC) terrorist. (CC)
(5:45) Hide and Seek ('05, Horror) After his The Return ('06, Thriller) **A young Wrath of the Titans ('12, Action) **% Girl's Guide
CINE2 321 321 321 321 321 321 422 wife's death, a shrink and his daughter are woman has terrifying visions that have een Perseus journeys to the underworld in order Incriminating
haunted by unusual events. (C) haunting her for many years. (C) to rescue his father, Zeus. (CC) (H)) text.
Good Luck Jessie India Dog with a Jessie Teen Teen Beach Movie ('13) Ross Lynch. Two high school Dog with a Jessie Nanny's
DISN 136 136 136136 99 45 250 Charlie Report project. (CC(R) Blog Future fashion show. comrades find themselves inside of a 1960s musical film. Blog: Dog sister. (C) (R)
Scared. (HD) plans. (R ) (R)(HD) (NR) ((CC) Loses Girl (HD)
5:50) Air Force One ('97, Thriller) 1% Harrison Ford, Goldfinger ('64, Action) .2 James (:50)Good Will Hunting ('97, Drama) A
ENC 150 150 150 150 150350 GaryOldman. U.S. President fights back when his plane is Bond sets out to stop a master criminal from psychologist helps a deeply troubled genius
Shijacked by Kazakhstani terrorists. (R () ( causing world economic chaos. (C) ace his past and plan his future.
(5) Red Tails ('12 Action) (15) Parental Guidance ('12, Comedy) % Billy Crystal, Prometheus ('12, Science Fiction) *** Noomi Rapace,
HBO 302 302 302 302 302 302 40 ** Black pilotsfight for ette Midler. Cultures clash when grandparents agree to Michael Fassbender. The discovery of possible alien origins
.. freedom inWWII. (C) babysit their three grandkids. (PG) () (HD) for humanity sparks an expedition. (R) (C)
The Descendants ('11, Drama) *** George Clooney, Real Time with Bill Maher Boardwalk Empire: All In Argo ('12, Thriller) 2k-%
HBO2 303 303 303 303 303 303 402 Shailene Woodley. An attorney in Honolulu will have to be a (VMAC) (CO() Nucky learns more about Ben Affleck. Iranian revolution
more involved parent to his daughters. (CC) Rothstein.(CC) (HO) rescue. ( (R)(C (H)
(:05) Contraband ('12, Thriller) k**k Mark Wahlberg, Kate The Sopranos: Christopher Hitchcock ('12, Drama) *A*/2 Anthony The Making of
HBO3 304 304 304 304 304404 Beckinsale. A man runs counterfeit money from Panama to Native American protests. (CC) Hopkins. A filmmaker meets a woman ...:Les
S I the U.S. to protect his brother. (R)(C) (HD) (H) during a tough time in his career.(CC (1H) Miserables
4:25) Breakin (:25) Flying Blind ('13, Drama) ** An Homeland: Tin Man is Down A Masters of Sex: Pilot (R) Homeland: Tin Man is Down A
SHOW 340 340 340 340 340 340 365 Dawn P1 (1) aerospace engineer begins a passionate Senate panel investigates Senate panel investigates
___ *A romance with a young Muslim student. terrorism. (R)(H)) terrorism. (R) (H)
(5:30) Beautiful Ohio ('06, Orchids: My Intersex Behind the Burly Q ('10, Entertainment) (:40) Bel Ami (12, Drama) AA In 1890s
TMC 3350 5350 350 35350 385 Drama) Afamiystruggles with Adventure '2) Phoebe Harts Alan Alda. The burlesque industry's success Paris, a young man manipulates wealthy
lie in 1970s. (CC) intersex condion. (CC) in the 20th century is discussed. women in his rise to power. (R) (C)






KIDS NEWS SPORTS LATE NIGHT MONDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
SEP.30

ABC 2 711 7 News Kimmel Nightline |Extra ET Insider Extra |World News (N) News News(N)
ABC 0 11 News Kimmel Nightline Katie (R) News |Paid Proq.World News (N) News News News
ABC 7 7 10 7 7 News Kimmel Nihtline Paid Prog. ES.TV ABC World News Now (N) News News News
CBSM 101010 10 News Late Show Late Late Paid Pog. Paid Prog. Up to the Minute (N) News News News
CBS I 2121 5 5 5 News Late Show Late Late TMZ Inside Comics Minute Minute News News(N)
NBC 18 8 88 8 8 News Leno Fallon LastCall Today(R) PaidProq.lExtra Early News News News
NBC [ 2 2 2 News Leno Fallon LastCall Dr.Oz Mone Early News News(N)
FOXM 13 1313 13 13 News Access IDish TMZ News Paid Pg. Alex Divorce Dish TMZ News News News (N)
FOX 4 4 4 News Arsenio Raymond Raymond Office Office 30 Rock 30 Rock Paid Prg. Divore Alex News (N)
PBSI 3 3 3 3 Ind.Lens BirdGuys|Rose(N) Roadshow Halifax Masteipce.(R) Bletchley SkyIsland
PBS 202020 16 Smiley Rose(N) Europe Trekker Travels Perform Errors suffered. Compass Yoga
PBSi 31313 Ind.Lens Rose(N) Smile Roadshow HalifaxMastepce. (R) Bletchley Sky Island
SCWM 61216 212 Men 21/2Men HowIMet How I Met Rules Rules Middle Middle Dish TMZ Harvey 70s 70s
CW 9 9 9 4 ArsenioFriends Friends Simpsons Simsons Kin Sunny Comics Paid Prog. Paid Prog Paid Prog. Daily Buzz
MYN 11I11 1 14 Seinfeld Cmmuniy Raymond America OK! TV Bridezilla 70s 70s Paid Pig. Paid Prog. Paid Prg. Shepherd
MYN 8 9 8 Seinfeld Seinfeld King King Dad Dad Sunny Sunny il Death il Death Paid Prog. Paid Pg. Shepherd
IND 2 121212 38 12 Office Office SouthPrkSouthPrk Ceveand Payne Payne ThereYet ThereYet Paid Pog. Paid Pro. Paid Pr. PaidPro.Paid Pog.
ION1 2 2 1326 18 17 Criminal Criminal Trace Without Paid Proq. Paid Prog. Inspiration Toda
WCLF22 22 22 22 2 Kingdom Awaken Awaken You and Me CVance 700 Club Youngren Hmeke
WRXYAI 2244 10 News Awaken Awaken You and Me Reign Gaither Exercise Fitness
TLFD e 2 2 2 95 5 Deportivo Pelicula Madame |Deportivo Pagado Pagado Contacto
UNIV I 15 1515 6 Noticias Noticiero Familia Ni contio Cem cond Carisa La rosa Gordo Primer Noticie
I I I Baer4BiBI i I HelloI Pi r .
A&E 2626262639 50181 Barter Barter Barter Barter Barter Paid Pro. idProg. Paid Pro. Paid Pr
AMC 56565656 30 53231 Anels & Demons 09) Break Bad LowWinter Hell on The Pitch Stooges
APL 444444 44 366813 Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Widman Wildman Wildman
BET 35 35 353540 27 Beauty Wendy PeoleStairs 91**Waans Vindicate BET Inspiation
BRAV 68 68 68 6825 5118 Watch Housewives Housewives Dream NeNe Watch Housewives Paid Prog. Paid Pro. Paid Prog. Paid Proq.
COM 66666666 15 2719 Dai Colbert South Prk South Prk Daily Colbet Wrkholic Wikholic Wrkholic Wtholic Sunny Entourage Paid Prog. Paid Pog.

I Fast N r (R)
DISC 40 40 40 40 25 431 Fast N Turn (R) Fast Loud Fast Loud Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
E! 46 46 46 46 27 26196 C. Lately News (R) C. Lately Game On |Power C. Lately Kardashian C. Lately Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prg.
EWTN 242424 12 17 285 Sacred WomenGr Daily Mass Journey News Theology Basilica St. Therese Backstag Faces
FAM 555555 5510 4619 700 Club Bel-Air Bel-Air Bel-Air Bel-Air Paid Pr Paid P .700 Club Paid Pro. Paid Pro. Rein Life Toda
FOOD 37373737 761 Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Private PaidProg.Paid Prg.
FX 51 51 51 51 5849 3 Unstoppable '10 Archer Archer Paid Pro Paid Pg. Paid Pr. Paid Pm. Paid Pro. Paid Pog. Paid Prog. Paid Prg.
GSN 171791717 34179184 Fam. Feu Fam. Feu Baggage Baggage Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feu Fam. Fe Ba a Ba e Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
HALL 5 5 5 17 7324 Frasier Frasier Gold Girl GoldGiu Gold Girl Gold Gid Cheers Cheers Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Lucy Lucy
HIST 81 81 81 81 336512 Ancient Ancient Ancient Ancient AncientPaid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Pro. Paid Prog.
HOME 41 414141 53 4216 Love it JLove t Hunters Hunters Love it Love It Paid Pro. Paid Pro. Paid Prog. Paid Pog.
LIFE 36 36 36 36 52 4114 Hocus Hocus Pocus (93) Hocus Pocus (93) Paid Prog. Paid Prg. Paid Prog. Paid Pg.
OWN 5858585847 10161 Dateline Dateline Dateline Dateline Dateline Dateline Dateline
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 29 63 54 Cops ops Jail Jail Jail Jail Jail Jail Jail EntouragePaid Prog. Paid Pg.Paid Prog.Paid Pg.
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SYFY 676767672 6418 Rider The Covenant 06 The Hitcher 07) Twiliht Paid Pr. Paid P PaidPr. Paid P .
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Conan Office ConanOffice RaceTo Witch09 Maed Maried Maried Ea
TCM 6565 6565 1621 (:5) Citizen Kane '41) Best Years of Our Lives ('46) Open City (45)
TLC 45 45 4545 577213 Medium Medium LI Medium LI Medium Paid Prog.Pai P Paid Prog. Paid Pg. Paid Prog.Paid Pg.
TNT 61 61 6161 28 5551 CSI NY CSI NY Law(HD) Perception Closer Southland S'ville
TRAV 69696969 26 66170 Hotel (R) Bizarre Hotel (R) Hotel (R) BizarrePaid Pro. Paid P Paid Pro Paid P
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USA 34343434225250 (05) Fast Five ('11,Action(:35) Fastive 1, Action SVU(HD) SVU(HD)
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CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 Sports Paid PrPaid Pro. Paid Prog. Pai Prog. Paid Prog.Pai Prog. Paid Pro. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.Pai Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
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TUESDAY
HIGHLIGHTS

Marvel's Agents of
S.H.I.E.L.D.
8 p.m. on ABC
"0-8-4" Agent Phil Coulson
and his S.H.I.E.L.D. agents
travel to Peru to investigate
an object codenamed only
'0-8-4' and attempt to figure
out it's origins, but when
Comandante Camilla Reyes
gets involved a conflict
seems inevitable. (HD)

Shooter
8 p.m. on AMC
An elite Marine sniper is
lured out of retirement in
order to prevent the assas-
sination of the president,
but he soon finds himself
on the wrong side of the
law when he is framed and
hunted down for the murder
of an Ethiopian dignitary.
1 (HD)


The Voice
8 p.m.on NBC
"The Blind Auditions, Part
4" The blind auditions
continue as the four teams
begin to take shape; the
judges look to find only the
most unique and appeal-
ing singers to add to their
rosters, but the task proves
difficult as they cannot see
the hopefuls that audition.
(HD)
NCIS: Los Angeles
9 p.m. on CBS
"Impact" Hetty calls
Operational Psychologist
Nate Getz back to help Sam
and Deeks cope with their
traumatic experiences and
return to work; the rest of
the team investigates the
murder of a former Navy
Admiral and a controversial
journalist on a private jet.
(HD)

Trophy Wife
9:31 p.m. on ABC
"Cold File" Pete decides to


TV DISH


Beau Bridges, who stars
on "The Millers," airing
Thursday at 8:31 p.m. on
CBS, isn't afraid to talk











Beau Bridges

about nepotism. After
many years in show
business, he's earned
his stripes, but he'll
never forget who gave
him his early education
as an actor. "I was very
fortunate to have a
father in this business,"
says Bridges of his
father Lloyd Bridges. "I
basically went to work
in my father's shop. And
I think that's one of the
most difficult things to
do, is to get your first
job in this industry. And
there are vastly talented
people who can't get


that first job, so I was
blessed. And he was a
good dad, too, I mean, in
a lot of other ways. But,
yeah, he gave me all my
tools and I've loved doing
this."

Through the years,
Charlie Rose, the host of
"Charlie Rose: The Week"
(PBS, check your local
listings), has had some
tough interviews. "Well,
I think the toughest
interview probably is
someone and I'll give
an example," says Rose.
"The former president
of Iran, Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad, was hard
because you weren't sure
that he was listening,
and it was hard because
whatever the question
was, he was going to
answer another question,
and it was hard because
he was really going to
lay out some things that
he wanted to say, and
so in a give and take
that was difficult, plus it
was being translated in
English to Farsi and Farsi
to English for me. That
was difficult. Sometimes
you can overcome that.


have Kate help him coach
Bert's soccer team, but she
doesn't realize that Bert
drank her coffee before
practice, and it leads to an
inevitable caffeine crash on
the field; Warren and Hillary
spill salsa on Diane's couch.
(HD)
Chicago Fire
10:01 p.m. on NBC
"Prove It" Following Heath-
er's incident, Lt. Casey is
finding himself struggling
with his new responsi-
bilities; Lt. Severide is tense
and waiting for the next at-
tack from the arsonist and
at the prospect of bringing
up his paternity suspicions
with Renee.(HD)
Brickleberry
10:30 p.m. on COM
"Crippleberry" When the
carnival comes to Brickle-
berry, a freaky sideshow at-
traction captures Connie's
attention, and she becomes
obsessed; Steve gets hurt,
and Malloy obtains a job as

The thing that I always
try to say to myself is
be in the moment and
be engaged so that in
a sense you can be as
spontaneous and as real
as you can. You get that
way. The best way to do
that is to prepare as hard
as you can, and then
to engage by knowing
and making sure that
the person with you
understands that you
know what you're doing,
and you're there in a
sense because of the real
curiosity about them and
you want to know things.
If you convey that, you
will get a response. I've
always argued that in
a sense what you have
to do is really, then, ask
the question in the most
precise and short way
you can."

Megan Hilty, who most
recently starred on
"Smash," isn't worried
that she won't be singing
and dancing on her new
job playing the best
friend on "Sean Saves the
World," airing Thursday
at 9 p.m. on NBC. "I'm
so excited about this,"
says the actress. "This
is all I've ever wanted
to do. I'm really excited
to be doing a complete


Now that several Gold Star
Gas N' Shop employees
finally won the lottery pool
they'd been chipping into for
years, cashier Denise (Lor-
raine Bruce) and the others
have life-changing scenarios
to consider on "Lucky 7," a
new ABC drama airing Tues-
day at 10 p.m

a lawyer and forces chang-
es to bring Brickleberry up
to code. (HD)

180 from my last job.
I love making people
laugh. I love having
a good time. And so I
really am excited about
the differences in this
job from my last one,
because I can always
go do concerts and sing
other places. I don't have
to always be singing in
every job that I do."

One of the big thrills for
the cast of "The League,"
airing Wednesday at
10:30 p.m. on FXX, is
working with some of
their favorite sports
stars. But sometimes
it's an embarrassment
of riches for them.
"Actually, we turn down
most because there
isn't the room because
for all the stuff that
we're talking about, it's
a comedy show and
we're telling comedy
stories," says executive
producer Jackie Schaffer.
"And if there's a way
that a player can fit in
organically with this
comedy story, then great.
But otherwise, we're
very happy to do sort of
comedy ideas and play
those out and execute
them with our brilliant
cast."






KIDS NEWS SPORTS EVENING TUESDAY SPECIALS MOVIES
OCT.1 1 i I ii

ABC7 News ABC Word The 7 Entertainment Marvel's Agents of (01)The Tmphy Wife: Lucky 7: Inside Job The shock
ABC 7 11 7 6:00pm The News with O'Clock Tonight (() (N) S.H.I.E.L.D.: 0-8-4 MVsteri- Golbergs Life Cold FRe ing reality of the gang winning
News of the Diane Sawyer News (N) (HD) (HD) ous object in Peru. (CO(N) (HD inthe 80's. (CC) Coaching Bert. the lotterystarts to settle in. (CC)
day. (N) (HD) (HD) (N) (N) (HD)
ABC 7 NewsThe lat- ABCWorld The List (NG) Ask America Marvel's Agents of ( 01)The Trophy Lucky7: Inside Job Shock
11 est news. News (N) (HD) (IVG) S.H.I.E.L.D.-Peru mission. (N) Goldbergs Coaching Bert. wears off. (CC) (N) (HD)
ABC 7 7 107 7 ABC7 News at ABC Word A Millionaire? A Millionaire? Marvel's Agents of (:01)The TTmphy Lucky 7: Inside Job Shock
7 7 7 10 7 7 6(N) News(N) (CC)(N) () (R) S.H.I.E.LD.-Peru mission. (N) Goldbergs CoachingBert. wears off. (CC)(N) (HD)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel of For- Jeopardy! (CC) NCIS: Past, Present, and Fu- NCIS: Los Angeles: Impact Person of Interest: Nothing
CBS 106pm Local News with tune (CC) (N) (N) () ture Tony tracking Ziva in Is- Outside hel for Sam and To Hide (CC) (N) (HD)
10 10 10 10 news report. Scott Pelley (N) (HD rael. (CC) (N) (HD) Deeks. (CC) (N) (HD)
(N) (HD)
CBS 213213 5 News (N) (HD) Evening News News (N) (HD) Inside Edi- NCIS: Past, Present, and Future NCIS: Los Angeles: Impact Person of Interest: Nothing To
213213 5 5 5 (N) (HD) tion (N) Tracking Za. (N) Help for trauma. (N) Hide (CC) (N) (HD)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment The Voice: The Blind Auditions, Part 4 The blind auditions (01) Chicago Fire: Prove It Lt.
NBC 8 at 6:00 News News Current 8 at 7:00 News; Tonight (CC( (N) continue as the four teams begin to take shape; the judges Casey is finding himself strug-
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FOX FOX 4 News al Six L ii Jude Judy TheSimpsons Dads: 1.- ii Brooklyn: 4 Ne Girli iii Mindy i, FOX 4 NeisalTen I 1IIii,
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CW Family Family: BigBang i, 'Big Bang I I iHearlRadioMusicFeslival. Nighl 2- 1-..... i i..., -I I,- WINK News I 10ipm iIHiMiI
4 6 1, 1-_' I-.- i I IHI1|) 1 .-.-h .i .. iHlI:| l11H:1|1 .-,1| .- .- i ll | ll 1 | HI:)
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MYN 11 14 Raymond (CC) Seinfeld (CC) Family Feud Family Feud Bones: Pilot Skeleton linked to Bones: The Man in the SUV Cops Re- Cops Re-
11 (1V ~ (WIV) U.S. Congressman. Car bomb. (WVPG) loaded (HD) loaded (HD)
MYN 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) Cleveland (CC) Fa Fami Family Guy: Bones: Pilot Skeleton linked to Bones: The Man in the SUV Law & Order Special Victims
JD (HD) (HD) Drunken piano. Petarded U.S. Congressman. Car bomb. (CC) (HD) Unit: Uncivilized
IND 1 12 38 Family Family Guy: Big Bang (CQ Big Bang (CC) Law& Order Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent How I Met: The How I Met (CC)
12 12 12 38 12 Drunken piano. Petarded (HD)) (HD) Justice's POV. (HD) Justice's POV. (HD) Goat (HD)
ION 2 2 2 13261817 Criminal Minds: In Heat Sexua Criminal Minds: The Crossing Criminal Minds: Tabula Rasa Criminal Minds: Lo-Fi Random Criminal Minds: Mayhem Ter-
S 2 2 2 13 26 18 17 identity. (CQ (HD) Traveling stalker. Killer in coma. (HD) shootings. (HD) rorist bombing. (HD)
WCLF 22222 2 Christian Fit- Today Faith & Rhema Praise Great Awaken Tour Henry Babers, Richard Rob- Gospel Truth Manna-fest (CC) Life Today
S22 2 ness healing. (CC) Sr. erts (C(N) (N) (0C)
WRXY 2244 10 Meyer (CC)(R) Savingthe In- Stop Hurting Great Awaken Tour Connect Meyer (CC) (R) Place Mira- Stakelbeckon
Svestor cles Terror
TLF 23 23 23 95 El nifio quevino del mar Pelicula La Selecci6n Pasi6n del La Madame Chicas
SE 23 23 23 95 5 Felipin el naufrago. (CC) fOtbol. (CC) (N) (HD) seductoras. (CC) (HD)
UNIV 15 15 15 6 Noticias (CC Noticiem Coraz6n indomable Amor Porque el amor manda Relato La tempestad Un idilio Que bonito amor Ser
6 1 15 15 6_(N) Univisi6n (N) interesado. () (HD) de un amor. (HD) apasionado. (CC) (HD) mexicano. (CC) (HD)
IIIl i. ,111 I ll M D Al~f II
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 Storage Storage 12 Storage(CQ (R) Storage (CC) (R) Storage Ivy Storage (CC) (R) Storage (CC)(R) Storage (CC) (N) Barter Kins: Trading or Bust
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50 181 shngrods. inch piano. (HD) (HD) drops out. (HD) (HD) (HD) Las Vegas rip. (N)
AMC 56 56 56 56 30 53 2 The Mummy Returns ('01) A boy finds himself in a Shooter ('07) A former Marine sniper is recruited to prevent the assassination of the presi-
AMC 30 3 23___________ tug-of-war between the Scorpion King and Imhotep. dent and is framed for the assassination of an Ethiopian dignitary. (CC)
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68130To Be Announced Info un- Swamplands USA Unique wil- Swamplands USA: North America Extreme North America Severe storms;
APL 44 44 44 44 36 68 130available. der