Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00088

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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Full Text


Federal jury rejects racial slur as a term of endearment PAWIE






harlotte Sun
HERAI

PRESIDENT SEEKS SUPPORT MICROSOFT TO BUY NOKIA
President Obama wins critical support from House Speaker Software maker attempts to compete with Apple in a $7.2 B
John Boehner. THEWIRE PAGE 1 deal. THEWIRE PAGE 1


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 4, 2013


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Out to suck your blood


Mosquito numbers on rise locally; statewide, bug-borne illnesses surface


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
It's prime time for the
Culex mosquito, the
blood-sucking culprit
responsible for spreading
West Nile virus.
With continuous rains
creating large amounts
of standing water, local
health officials are urging


residents to take precau-
tions against mosquito-
borne illnesses.
"Whenever there's a lot
of rain, you'll see mos-
quito concentrations,"
said Ana Scuteri, epi-
demiology manager for
the Florida Department
of Health in Charlotte
County. "Our main
emphasis is protection."


But with mosquitoes
comes the potential
for disease. The state's
first case of West Nile
virus this year surfaced
in Jacksonville last week.
However, a different mos-
quito-carried illness also
has hit Florida. Dengue
fever, more common to
Central America, has made
its way to the mainland.


Florida Department
of Health officials have
confirmed a total of eight
cases of dengue fever,
carried by the Aedes
aegypti mosquito, in-
cluding seven on the east
coast in Martin County
and one in Miami-Dade
County.
"I think all the coun-
ties are keeping an eye


out for this," Scuteri
said. "This disease is out
there."
The main mosquito-
borne disease of concern
in Charlotte County is
West Nile virus, first
detected in Florida
in 2002. Although the
disease can be serious,
most cases require no
medical attention. There


is no vaccine to prevent
the disease nor are there
any medications to treat
it, health officials said.
According to the
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention,
up to 80 percent of
people who have the
virus experience no

MOSQUITO 13


Parents protest deputy's tactics in son's arrest


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -
Parents alleging poor judgment
by school and law enforcement
officials protested Tuesday
morning outside Port Charlotte
Middle School where their
12-year-old son had an M-16
assault rifle pointed at him by
a Charlotte County Sheriff's
deputy on Saturday.
Jose and Mima Espinal's son -
a seventh-grader who lives across
from the school on Alton Road
-was apprehended Saturday
along with a couple of juvenile
friends for allegedly trespassing
on school grounds around 6 p.m.
The parents admitted the kids
were playing on a school roof,
but they believe Sheriff's Office
deputies and school administra-
tors misused their authority in
handling the situation.
"(Our son) was handcuffed
and had a gun pointed at him,"
said Mirna, who also claims the
boy received bruises on his chest
and face after deputies allegedly
forced him to the ground.
According to the incident
report provided by the CCSO,
Deputy Michael Fraser was
told by a dispatcher there


SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER
Concerned parents Jose and Mirna Espinal protested Tuesday morning outside Port Charlotte Middle School, where they were questioned by Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office deputies. The couple alleged the agency used unnecessary force in detaining their 12-year-old son after he was allegedly found to be
trespassing on school property Saturday.


was one suspect near the
bus ramp. Fraser wrote in his
report, "I immediately grabbed
my agency-issued M-16 from
the rear of my patrol car and
headed toward the bus ramp."
The report shows the deputy


pointed his weapon at all three
juveniles as they were ordered
to the ground, but he lowered
his gun when he noticed the
kids posed no threat. There
is no report of physical force,
despite one suspect attempting


to jump a fence. The three were
taken to the Charlotte County
Jail, where they were released
into the custody of their
parents a few hours later.
"(The kids) decided to get on
the roof," said Mirna. "If that


was a crime, we understand.
But there was no need for all
that police brutality."
Fraser was not available for
comment Tuesday, and Sheriff's

PROTEST112


Area man charged


with attempted murder


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER
NORTH PORT A North Port
man was charged with attempted
murder on Labor Day after alleg-
edly shooting his son twice in the
leg following an argument sparked
when the son claimed he was
"possessed," according to police.
Roy Alan Lafoy, 64, of the 3900
block of Caballero Ave., was


found by an off-duty
Charlotte County
Sheriff deputy at
S- the intersection of
Killian Street and
Caballero Avenue
around 1:30 p.m. on
ROYALAN Monday, holding a
Tokarev 9 mm pistol,
LAFOY according to the
police report. The deputy, who
lives nearby, heard the gunshots


and put on his bullet-proof vest
and ran toward the sound.
He found Lafoy, who claimed he
had shot his son and was looking
for him, but the 32-year-old victim
fled the area along a drainage canal
behind the homes on Caballero
Avenue. The deputy found the son,
Todd Alan Lafoy, two blocks away
hiding in the canal.

MAN 112


Cultural Center marketing

manager joins builders group


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER

For Donna Barrett, sales and
marketing manager at the Cultural
Center of Charlotte County, the
decision to take a position as the
executive officer at the Charlotte
DeSoto Building Industry
Association was an emotional one.
"I'll always support the mission
of the Cultural Center," Barrett


said Tuesday. "It'll
be very emotional
when I do leave, but
I'm excited for this
new challenge and to
dive into the building
industry."
Meanwhile, the
BARRETT Cultural Center must
fill the gap left by
Barrett's departure.
Barrett, whose last day at the


Cultural Center is Sept. 10, "did a
very good job," said Stephen Carter,
president of the Cultural Center's
board of trustees. "She grew in
the position. She developed good
contacts in the community and was
well-known. We'll miss her."
The Cultural Center was able
to find a replacement for her in
Amanda Segur, who had worked

MANAGER112


Women are


voting, but young


people aren't


re women voting?
"You betcha," as
former Alaska Gov.
Sarah Palin might say.
The 93rd anniversary of
the 19th Amendment re-
cently and quietly passed,
as do most milestones we
can't divide by five.
"In every presidential
election since 1996
women have
voted at
higher rates
than men,"
according
to a U.S.
Census
Bureau
STAMOULIS report from
STAMOULIS May 2013.
May 2013.
That, of course, was the
Bill Clinton presidency,
so feel free to insert your
own joke here.
All kidding aside,
Charlotte County women
hold the power in the


polling places.
For the 2012 presi-
dential election, 60,340
women (or 52.4 per-
cent) registered to vote
compared with 53,424
men, according to the
Supervisor of Elections'
Office. There were 1,287
registered voters who
either don't know their
gender or simply chose
not to reveal it for some
reason.
Of the 60,340 women,

CHRISTY 13


INDEX ITHE SUN: Police Beat 4 Obituaries 5 Legals8 IViewpoint 10 Opinion 11 THE WIRE: Nation 2 World2-3 Business5-7 State 8 Weather 8 SPORTS: Lotto2 CLASSIFIED: Comics 11-14 DearAbby14 TVListings15
Daily Edition $1.00 0F-- -, Look insidefor valuable coupons .- 6A
Thiy yaHigh Low n. sins' t CHARLIE SAYS ...
h Lw 7 S COUPON CALL USAT & Moosquitoes don't bug me.
7 111111111 chanceof rain .... .. .......... 9 9.. 4 A
7 05252 00025 8 60 percent chance of rain i AUE METER$O.__ 941-266-1666


AN EDITION OF THE S
VOL. 121 NO. 247











Scholarship awarded at Baker banquet


By BARBARA
BEAN-MELLINGER
SUN CORRESPONDENT

The importance of
education and how to pay
for it was the theme of the
third annual Benjamin
J. Baker Community
Development Corp.
Scholarship Fundraiser
Banquet, which held
Saturday evening at
the Cultural Center of
Charlotte County.
Those who had worked
throughout the year to
raise money for the schol-
arship and operations
attended the banquet,
along with children,
youth and others inter-
ested in education.
Lee Swift, chairman
of the Charlotte County
School Board and guest
speaker for the banquet,
talked about finding the
numerous scholarships
that are available locally
and nationally includ-
ing specialty scholar-
ships, such as one for
lefthanded people and
many that go unawarded
because no one applies
for them.
"You have to look for
them, and go to your
guidance counselor for
help," said Swift. "You
might find that you're
uniquely qualified for one
that no one else fits."
If you meet the per-
sonal and academic


Lee Swift, chairman of the
Charlotte County School
Board, spoke at the banquet
about how to find scholarships
during the third annual
Benjamin J. Baker Community
Development Corporation
Scholarship Fundraiser
Banquet, held Saturday
evening at the Cultural Center
of Charlotte County.
qualities outlined in the
scholarship's guidelines,
write your essay explain-
ing how you meet those
qualifications, he contin-
ued. Scholarships exist
for colleges and technical
schools, said Swift, and
students should also con-
sider the military as an
excellent way of receiving
education and training.
Swift also opened the
floor for questions of any
kind relating to educa-
tion and the Charlotte
County school system. In
response to a question, he
confirmed that the FCAT
was being phased out,
and that currently there


ihe Kev. tilison HaddocK,
president of the Benjamin
J. Baker Community
Development Corporation,
was the master of ceremonies
for the banquet.


SUN PHOTOS BY BARBARA MELLINGER


Banquet attendees included Lee Swift, Charlotte County School Board chairman; Cheryl
LaVecchio, secretary of the Benjamin J. Baker Community Development Corporation; members
Shauna and the Rev. Quinton Williams; member Gerald Anderson; the Rev. Ellison Haddock,
president of BJBCDC; Zelda Smith, treasurer; and member Danielle Griffiths.


Danielle Griffiths announced
scholarship winner Briana
Romero, and read a thank
you note from Romero since
she was unable to attend the
banquet.
is a huge debate among
state education officials
as to what should replace
it. Another attendee asked
if the schools would be
teaching more life skills
in the classroom. Swift
replied that there is a
conscious effort to teach
life skills, but added that


the skills are constantly
changing. Balancing a
checkbook is becoming a
thing of the past, he gave
as an example.
This year's $500 scholar-
ship from the foundation
was awarded to Briana
Romero. She was unable
to attend the banquet,
but Danielle Griffiths read
a thank you note from
Romero, in which she said
she would use the money
toward becoming certified
in early childhood care.
Queena Cooks,
a former recipient
of the Benjamin J.
Baker Community


Development
Corporation scholarship,
spoke about what the
scholarship meant to her.
"I used the money to pay
some of my tuition," said
Cooks, who earned her
bachelor's degree in busi-
ness and intends to open
her own event planning
business. "The fact that
someone saw something
in me, made me dedi-
cated to giving back my
time to help other people
and our community," said
Cooks.
The Rev. Ellison
Haddock, president of
the foundation, reminded


everyone that it's up to
them to make the effort
for their education.
"If a door closes,
another one opens,"
Haddock said. "We must
always try, try again."
The Benjamin J.
Baker Community
Development
Corporation sponsors
the annual Martin Luther
King Day parade and
celebration, and hold
fundraisers for the annual
scholarship. Successful
scholarship candidates
must have a sincere inter-
est in the Trabue Woods
area of Punta Gorda.


A month of networking opportunities

I rab your Sep- should probably dis- will be coffee, juice and Bites, Just Counters and at 6 p.m. with cocktails,
tember calendar Charlotte close that I serve on the extra munchies provided Other Stuff, U-Knead-A- hors d'oeuvres and
J and jot down the County board of United Way, so by Charlotte Regional Massage, Granite Forever music and dancing with
allowing networking Chamber I am prejudiced about and Peace River hospi- USA, and Steve's Towing Gator DJ. There will be
opportunities: the work it does in the tals. Please join us from in the small-business a buffet dinner, a short
We'll start nextJ. community. 7:15 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at category; Farr, Farr, thank you program and
Tednesdav with Jle With its partner the Event Center. Emerich. Hackett & Carr. more music and danc-


Networking at Noon at
Bocca Lupo Coal Fired
Pizza, in the Lowe's
Plaza. The cost is $15 per
person, and we ask that
you make reservations
on our website or by
calling the Port Charlotte
office at 941-627-2222.

SUBSCRIPTIONS
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delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
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3 Months....................... ..... $66.51
6 Months.......................... 113.05
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Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ................... .... $16.40
3 Months.................... ...... $74.09
6 Months ...................... $119.54
1 Year............................. 196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates as
follows (advance payment required):
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3 Months 6 Months 1Year
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Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday- Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204.You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


Not only is there yummy
food, but there are 55-
plus members who want
to talk with you about
their business and learn
what you do, too.
Our Sept. 18 Third
Wednesday Coffee will
feature a presentation
by the United Way of
Charlotte County. This
has become an annual
event for the United Way
to kick off its campaign. I


Code Enforcement, Board
meeting, 9am, 18500 Murdock Circle,
Room 119, PC. 743-1238.
Rotonda West Street, and
Drainage Unit Advisory Committee
meeting, 10am, 18400 Murdock Circle,
PC.575-3656.
Parks and Recreation,
Advisory Board meeting, 1pm,
Mid-County Regional Library, 2050
Forrest Nelson Blvd., PC.


nonprofits, it assesses
needs, develops strate-
gies to address the
priority issues, mobilizes
resources to implement
the plan, and measures
results so that its impact
can be reported to the
community.
This is a communi-
tywide effort, so what
better place to begin to
tell its story than with
hundreds of influential
business people. This
event is open to the
public and we encourage
everyone to attend. There


Woodcarving, and wood-
burning every Wed. at the Culture
Center in Pt. Charlotte, 8am-12pm.
Come and enjoy with us.
Project Linus, Crochet/
knit blankets every Weds. 9-11am,
New Day Christian Church, 20212
Peachland Blvd., Nancy 627-4364
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Lunch with Peggy 11-2:30, Fried
Chicken Only from 5-7


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event,"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title"' as that will be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


The Leadership
Charlotte class of 2014
will be introduced at a
reception in its honor.
The event will be hosted
by South Port Square
from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Sept. 19. It's always a
fun event, so LC alumni,
please join us.
*
Congratulations to
the following businesses
that have been nomi-
nated for the Business
of the Year Awards:
Harborwalk Scoops &



Stretch 'n' Balance, 1 hr
Chinese Stretch 'n'Balance (Dao Yin) ea
Wed. 10am PGICA Punta Gorda, 2001
Shreve St., info Richard 407-923-8310
Am Legion Post 110,
Bingo. Early Bird starts at 10:30. Enjoy
breakfast, lunch, or dinner at the
Familia Resturant. Great pizza.
Port Charlotte Elks,
11-9, 20225 Kenilworth Blvd., PC,
941-625-7571, Lunch 11-2, Dinner
4-7:30, Full Menu & Specials, Music by
Brian Lowe, Q of H 6:30
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2, Dinner 5-8, Karaoke 6:30-9:30 @


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


Security Alarm, and
Waste Management of
Charlotte County in the
large-category; and non-
profits Animal Welfare
League and the Punta
Gorda Airport Authority.
The nominees will
be recognized at our
88th annual banquet
on Sept. 21 at the Event
Center, and winners of
these and the Pacesetter
and Business-Education
Partner of the year will
receive a big round of ap-
plause from their peers.
The festivities begin



25538 Shore Dr., PG, 637-2606 mmbrs
& their gsts
Play Scrabble, 1-4pm. Free.
Cultural Center, Centennial Hall,
2280 Aaron St. Everyone is welcome.
941-625-4175. www.thecultural
center.com

* THURSDAY

Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted
items every Thursday 9-11:30am
(except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove
UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533
Project Linus, Quilt blankets
for children Thurs. 9-11am Hucky's
Softball Training 17426 Abbott Ave.,
Nancy 627-4364
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Cold Sandwiches with Peggy 11-2,
Initiation @ 7pm


ing. Please register in
the chamber store or by
calling 941-627-2222.

And this busy month
will conclude with the
Business Card Exchange
on Sept. 25 at the Port
Charlotte Town Center
mall.
Julie Mathis is the
executive director of
the Charlotte County
Chamber of Commerce.
She can be reached
at 941-639-2222, or
jmathis@charlottecounty
chamberorg.



Port Charlotte Elks,
11-9, 20225 Kenilworth Blvd., PC
941-625-7571, New- Breakfast
Buffet 9:30-12 $6.95, Lunch 11-2,
Dinner 4-7:30, Full Menu
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2, Dinner 5-8, Bingo 6:30-8:30 @
25538 Shore Dr., PG, 637-2606 mmbrs
& their gsts
Mahjong, Cultural Center,
2280 Aaron St. 11:30am-3:30pm, $2.
Cultural Center MembersPLUS free.
Everyone welcome. 625-4175
Chess Club, Cultural Center,
2280 Aaron St. 1-4pm $1.50. Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free. Everyone
welcome. 625-4175
Pinochle, Cultural Center, 2280
Aaron St. 5:30-8:30pm, $2 Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free, 625-4175.
All welcome


SUN NEWSPAPERS
-_- Member of theAudit Bureau of Circulation A
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................... Mark Yero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor .........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager ..........Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray ................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3003
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


CONTACT US WITH YOUR NEWS: Email Charlotte Sun Editor Rusty Pray at rpray@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1168, or email Deputy Charlotte Editor Garry Overbey at overbey@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1143. Fax to
941-629-2085. On Saturdays, contact Assistant Charlotte Editor Marion Putman at mputman@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1183, or the newsroom at 941-206-1100. On Sundays, contact Garry Overbey or call the newsroom.
Circulation director- Mark Yero, 941-206-1317. Business news- email business@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1121. Consumer advocacy email dmorris@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1114. Obituaries call 941-206-1028 or
email obituaries@sunletter.com. Religion/ church news or events mputman@sun-herald.com. Editorial letters email letters@sun-herald.com or write: Letter to the Editor, c/o Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor,
FL 33980. Puzzles 941-206-1128. Classified ads 866-463-1638. Subscriptions For missed papers, or to put your paper on hold, call 941-206-1300. Display advertising 941-206-1214

The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


fc


W0]


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


GOVERNMENT


* TODAY


* EVENTS


* TODAY


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


OurTown Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


1






:The Sun ANednesday, September 4, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE www.sunnewspapers.net C OurTown Page3


CHRISTY
FROM PAGE 1

75.6 percent cast ballots.
How did the known male
voters compare? Slightly
behind at 73.5 percent
turnout. Even if you as-
sumed all the unknown
gender voters were male,
the women still outnum-
bered the men in the
polling places.
So who isn't voting?
Young people.
"There's a problem
with young people. They
vote in far less numbers,"
Supervisor of Elections
Paul Stamoulis said.
Here are the percent-
ages of eligible, registered
voters who actually cast
ballots in the November
general election:
18-25 year olds:
42.5 percent
26-30 year olds:
48.2 percent
31-35 year olds:
54.1 percent
36-40 year olds:
60.4 percent
41-45 year olds:


MOSQUITO
FROM PAGE 1

symptoms. About 20 per-
cent of people develop
a fever with symptoms
such as headache,
body aches, skin rash,
diarrhea, vomiting, and
swollen lymph glands -
also known as West Nile
fever.
"Mild symptoms of
West Nile fever usually
resolve on their own," Dr.
Thomas Noone, market-
ing medical director for
Charlotte Regional and
Peace River Regional
Medical Centers,
stated in a press release
Monday. "However, if
you have symptoms such
as a severe headache,
stiff neck, disorientation
or confusion, call your
doctor right away."
Scuteri said it has
been more than five
years since someone
in Southwest Florida
was infected with the
West Nile virus, carried
by the Culex mosquito.
The Lee County resident
experienced only minor
symptoms.
Meanwhile, Charlotte
County is continuing







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charlottecountychamber.org


65.2 percent
46-50 year olds:
69.2 percent
51-55 year olds:
74.9 percent
56-60 year olds:
79.5 percent
61-65 year olds:
84.5 percent
66 and older:
84.3 percent
Stamoulis, his staff and
I knocked around ideas
as to why young people
don't vote (no draft to
worry about; no concept
that voting once wasn't
available to certain seg-
ments of the population;
disgust of party politics).
The truth might just
be that it's always been
that way. Unfortunately,
there weren't comput-
ers back in the day to
break out demographic
voting information.
Therefore, there's no
way to pull spread-
sheets from the 1928
presidential election to
see how many young
Charlotte people turned
out to vote for one of
the three candidates:
Republican Herbert

its efforts to curb the
mosquito population, a
difficult task when water-
laden breeding grounds
abound. However,
Johnny Hunter, the
county's pest manage-
ment supervisor, said the
volume of mosquitoes is
normal for this time of
year.
"It's about average
right now," he said, "but
that can change in a
few days depending on
the number of eggs that
hatch off."
Hunter explained the
focus is on the freshwater
Culex mosquito, which
can carry the West Nile
virus. While the county
continues to spray in
residential neighbor-
hoods to kill mosquito
larvae, their numbers are
rising.
"It's pretty much

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Hoover, Democrat Alfred
E. Smith or Socialist
Norman Thomas.
No matter the reason,
Stamoulis has made
it his mission to reach
young voters. He and his
staff, through The Great
American Comeback
Tour, go into schools to
educate students about
the voting process.
In the last two years,
Stamoulis and his
crew have been to the
following:
Kingsway Elementary
The Village Place
Punta Gorda Middle
School
Liberty Elementary
School
L.A. Ainger twice
Prime Timers
Organization
Port Charlotte Middle
School twice
South Port Square
- twice
Peace River
Elementary School
- twice
*Vineland Elementary
- four times
Murdock Middle
- twice

countywide," he said.
"When you have this
much water, you're going
to have breeding any-
where in the county."
The county's sentinel
chicken program, a
warning system in which
the blood of chickens is
tested weekly for mos-
quito-borne diseases, has
not yielded any con-
firmed cases of West Nile
virus, Hunter said.
"This is the prime
time of year for Culex
mosquito transmission,"
Hunter said. "If you're
going to be out, try and
protect yourself."
Health officials said


West County
Republican Club
Punta Gorda
Christmas Parade
- twice
East Elementary
- twice
The Academy
Family Services
Center
Home schooled
students
Martin Luther King
Day Parade
"We promote
America," Stamoulis said.
"We remind children
they were born into the
greatest country in the
world."
Here, in the greatest
country in the world,
women can wear tank
tops and shorts without
the fear of being ar-
rested. Not so in Saudi
Arabia. Don't even think
about dancing in public
or criticizing the royal
family.
Here, in the greatest
country in the world, you
can insult someone or
gesture rudely without
the fear of being arrested.
Not so in Qatar.

that if you must go out
from dusk to dawn, when
mosquitoes are most
active, take precautions.
These include covering
up with long sleeves and
pants, and using repel-
lents that contain the
active ingredient DEET.
Do not apply products
with DEET on children
under age 2 or on pets.
Also, to limit the breed-
ing of mosquitoes, drain
standing water from
garbage cans, buckets,
pool covers, flowerpots
and other containers
where rainwater has
collected.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


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Let's make sure we
maintain our status as
the greatest in the world.
National Voter
Registration Day is com-
ing up on Sept. 24. Let's
not only get our young
residents registered, but
let's also encourage them
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www.charlottevotes.com -
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registrationday.org
Facebook page? Then
why are you letting her
select your community's,
state's and country's
leaders? You can have a
say in this matter too.
Christy Feinberg is a
senior writer for the Sun
newspapers. She can be
reached at cfeinberg@
sun-herald.com.


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:The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 3


FROM PAGE ONE


m m


-a


m










Teen found guilty in officer-related shooting case


By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
STAFF WRITER
SARASOTA COUNTY
- Leron Hagins Jr., who
shot at two North Port
police officers respond-
ing to a party in the
Jockey Club in October
2011, was found guilty by
a jury on two counts of
premeditated attempted
murder last week.
Hagins, who was 17 at
the time and had no prior
record, was also recently
charged with tampering
with a witness in connec-
tion with his case.
Twelfth Judicial Circuit
Court Judge Charles E.
Roberts will sentence
Hagins on Oct. 25.
Hagins has a hearing
on the tampering charge
on Sept. 10. According to


court records, on April 9,
while on the phone at
the Sarasota County Jail
speaking to a friend,
Hagins was heard saying
to make a witness who
was expected to testify
against him to "go away"
and "handle that ASAP."
On the morning police
arrested Hagins, he was
considered "agitated." He
allegedly told police to
let him out of the patrol
car so he could "shoot"
them "all."
He was at a rowdy
house party at Roxbury
Circle in the Jockey Club
at 3:30 a.m. on Oct. 23,
2011, when he drew a
gun and fired at two
police officers. Seconds
before, police ordered
Hagins to show them his
hands, but he refused,


police explained during
the trial.
Police were called to
the scene after a neigh-
bor heard about six shots
fired outside his home.
First on the scene were
North Port Police Sgt.
Eric Stender and officer
Rick Urbina. Stender
pointed his handgun at
Hagins after he refused
to comply. Urbina was
holding his police-issued
shotgun and a flashlight
in Hagins' direction.
Hagins, who was on
the sidewalk in front
of the home, grabbed
a handgun from his
pocket and yelled at
the officers. He fired in
their direction. Urbina
ducked and the bullet
struck a vehicle. Stender
returned seven rounds


toward Hagins. Hagins
took off toward nearby
Appomattox Drive. Other
officers were trying to
stop some of the vehicles
that were fleeing the
scene to ascertain who
had fired the shots before
police were called, and
whether anyone was
injured.
Three nearby officers
were alerted Hagins was
running in their direc-
tion. They caught him.
He was "uncooperative."
Once in the patrol car,
Hagins allegedly told
a female officer, "You
better let me out of
here so I can shoot you
all," according to court
documents.
Police learned the
gun Hagins used to fire
at officers was reported


stolen in 2010. He said
another weapon was
used on the night of the
shooting. Bullet casings
from a weapon other than
Hagins' and Stender's guns
were found at the scene.
"This was a forensics
case," said North Port
Police Department
Criminalistics Specialist
Pam Schmidt. "Cortnie
Watts criminalisticss
specialists / property
and evidence) did an
outstanding job working
on this case. The whole
team did a great job on
this case."
North Port Police Capt.
Tony Sirianni agreed.
"North Port Police
Department is a family,"
he said. "The impact of
losing one of our own
would have resounding


impacts throughout
our agency and the
community of which
we serve. All one has to
do is refer to the recent
tragedy in Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office
(Sgt. Michael Wilson was
shot and killed on Aug. 5
while responding to a
domestic dispute).
"To say that the
verdict was a 'victory' is
presumptuous, but we
will accept successes of
this nature when bad
guys are put behind bars
where they can harm no
one else," he said. "Even
so, any time a person
threatens the life of a
police officer, it is a sad
day for him or her as
well as the community to
which we serve."
Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


Report: Englewood man involved in scams


PORT CHARLOTTE
- An Englewood man
has been arrested for
allegedly scamming a
local auto repair shop
into providing him
services and parts and
a local real estate agent
into providing him
money, according to
the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office.
Robert Patrick Barnett,
55, of the first block ofW.
Bay Street in Englewood,
was charged Friday with
scheming to defraud and
grand theft for incidents
dating to last year.
According to the
report, Barnett was
posing as a representa-
tive from Menus to Go -
an advertising company
for which he used to


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the courtsystem.


work. Barnett allegedly
promised A&E Auto
Repair in Port Charlotte
in December free adver-
tisements in exchange
for parts and services
that totaled $2,125.94.
But the ads never
materialized and A&E
Auto Repair contacted
authorities in June.
Later, it was discovered
Barnett tried a similar
transaction with an agent
for Keller Williams Realty
in November, the report
shows.
Barnett allegedly
advised the agent she


could get discounted or
free advertising if she
made donations to the
Make-a-Wish Foundation
through him. However,
Barnett requested she
give him cash or a
personal check. At least
once, he asked for $900,
the report states. The real
estate agent found this
unusual and contacted
authorities in late August.
Barnett was ques-
tioned Friday and subse-
quently arrested. He was
released Saturday from
the Charlotte County Jail
on $5,000 bond.


The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
*Brian Keith Wolf, 44, 22200
block of Niagra Ave., Punta Gorda.
Charges: violation of probation and
violation of a violence injunction.
Bond: none.
Tamara Lynne Mislenski, 44,
5600 block of Duncan Road, Punta
Gorda. Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Tony Youngblood, 43, 6100 block
of Safford St., Punta Gorda. Charges:
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, possession of
drug paraphernalia and driving with
a suspended license. Bond: none.
Robert Alex Henry, 20, 200 block
of Flamingo Blvd., Port Charlotte.
Charges: harming a public servant,
resisting an officer and violation of
probation. Bond: none.
Christopher Fabyan Morgan
Greene Jr., 32, 3700 block of Junction
St., North Port. Charges: driving with


a suspended license and property
damage. Bond: $1,000.
Jeffrey Alphonso Harris, 21, of
Lake Placid. Charge: driving with a
suspended license. Bond: $500.
Mark Ross Smith, 34, homeless
in Englewood. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $2,000.
Kasey Alan Waughop, 25, 5500
block of Papaya Drive, Punta Gorda.
Charges: fourth or subsequent DUI,
DUI with serious bodily injury to
another, battery and leaving the
scene of a crash. Bond: none.
Francis Michael Harsha, 43,
23300 block of Scenic Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: battery. Bond:
none.
Robert James Bracke, 35,18300
block of Inwood Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: four counts of third DUI
in last 10 years, two counts each
of property damage and driving


without insurance and one count of
leaving the scene of a crash. Bond:
none.

The Punta Gorda Police
Department reported the
following arrests:
Wendy Marie Grundvig, 37,
18300 block of Quadrille Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: loitering. Bond:
$500.
lan Christopher Wichmann, 38,
18500 Gamewell Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: loitering. Bond: $500.
Christine Lea Webster, 34, 5200
block of White Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: loitering. Bond: $500.
Charles Havilah Yonka, 71,
800 block of Kenwood Terrace, Port
Charlotte. Charge: third DUI in last
10 years. Bond: $1,000.
John Patrick Flynn, 39, of Cape
Coral. Charge: fourth or subsequent
DUI. Bond: $750.
-Compiled byAdam Kreger


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:Our Town Page 4


C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES


CHARLOTTE

William Bell Jr.
William Bell Jr., 74, of
Punta Gorda, Fla., passed
away Saturday, Aug. 31,
2013. Arrangements are
by National Cremation
Society of Port Charlotte,
Fla.

Jack Lee Clark
Jack Lee Clark, 77,
of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
passed away Sunday,
Sept. 1, 2013.
.. He was the
.; son of Donald
and Ethel Clark,
born March 2,
1936 in Decker, Ind.
Jack served in the U.S.
Army during the Korean
War. He was a retired
truck driver and moved
from Cincinnati, Ohio,
to this area in 1989. He
was a member of Sacred
Heart Catholic Church.
Jack was a member of
Masonic Lodge 115,
Punta Gorda; Scottish
Rite, Fort Myers, Fla.;
Araba Shrine, Fort
Myers; Fraternal Order
of Eagles, Mooresville,
Ind.; National Rifle
Association, Kentucky
Colonels, American
Legion Post 73,
Harmony Society, 40&8
Organization, VFW Men's
Auxiliary and Loyal
Order of Moose, all in
Vincennes, Ind.
He will be greatly
missed by his wife of
57 years, Wanda; neph-
ews, Richard Dick and
Jamie D. Clark; and
several other nieces
and nephews. Jack was
preceded in death by his
parents; brothers, James
"Buck" Clark and Donald
Clark; and sister, Anna K.
Dick.
The family will receive
friends from 2 p.m. to
3 p.m. today, Wednesday,
Sept. 4, 2013, with
Masonic Services to
follow at 3 p.m. at Larry
Taylor Funeral and
Cremation Services.
Burial will be at Allendale
Cemetery in Illinois. In
lieu of flowers, memo-
rial donations may
be made to American
Heart Association or a
charity of your choice.
To express condolences
to the family, please
visit www.Ltaylorfuneral.
com and sign the online
guestbook.

Donald C. Nelson
Donald C. "Don"
Nelson, 84, of Punta
Gorda, Fla., passed away
peacefully
i Saturday,
"r>. Aug. 31, 2013,
at 12:15 am.
He was born
Nov. 2, 1928, in Chicago,
Ill., to Carl and Alice
Nelson.
Don served as a
Military Police Officer in
the U.S. Army. He was
honorably discharged in
1948. He then went on
to become a toy buyer
for Marshall Fields &
Co., in Chicago and a
representative for Mattel,
Wonder Horse, and Gym
Dandy. Don and his
wife, Dorothy, moved to
Emerald Lake in Punta
Gorda in 1993 where
Don was a consultant for
Impac of Punta Gorda
for five years. He then
moved on to consult for
Maine Pointe of Boston,
Mass., for several years
retiring at the age of 82.
Don is survived by his
loving wife of 60 years,
Dorothy; daughter,
Nancy Anne (Joseph)
Janik of Boca Raton, Fla.;
son, Donald Jr. (Brenda)
of Cypress, Texas; grand-
children, Joshua Michael


Janik, Cooper Nelson
Janik, and Samuel Blair
Nelson; he will also be
greatly missed by his
loving nieces and neph-
ews, cousins and many
dear friends.
A contribution to
Tidewell Hospice, 5955


Rand Blvd., Sarasota,
FL 34238, will be grate-
fully appreciated by the
family.

Roy A. Oman
Roy A. Oman, 92, of
Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Sunday,
Sept. 1,
2013, at

A I Memorial
Hospital,
Port
Charlotte.
He was
born
i .. Nov. 30, 1920,
in Brooklyn,
', -'.. N.Y., to
Harry and
Florence Oman.
Roy was a retired
accountant in New
York and moved to Port
Charlotte in 1986 with
his wife from Staten
Island, N.Y. He was a
veteran of World War II,
U.S. Navy. Roy was a
member of Holy Trinity
Lutheran Church and the
Men's Club of the church,
American Legion Post
110 of Port Charlotte,
Masonic Lodge 912
F&AM of Staten Island,
Meals On Wheels,
Institute of Management
Accountants, andV.I.P.'s.
Roy was a loving
husband, father, brother-
in-law, uncle and friend.
He will be lovingly
remembered, greatly
missed, but never forgot-
ten. Roy was a kind, caring
and wonderful man.
He is survived by his
loving family, including
his wife of 64 years, Marilyn
A Oman of Port Charlotte;
daughter, Irene Marilyn
Oman of Liverpool, N.Y.;
and several in-laws, nieces
and nephews and many
dear friends.
Visitation will be
held from 10 a.m. until
11 a.m. Thursday,
Sept. 5, 2013, at the
Holy Trinity Lutheran
Church. Funeral services
will follow at 11 a.m.
at the Church. Pastors
Ken Barrios and Andrea
Barrios will officiate. In
lieu of flowers, memo-
rial contributions may
be made to Holy Trinity
Lutheran, 2565 Tamiami
Trail, Port Charlotte, FL
33952. Interment with
military honors by the
U.S. Navy will follow
at Restlawn Memorial
Gardens, Port Charlotte.
Friends may visit online
at www.robersonfh.com
to sign the memory book
and extend condolences
to the family.
Arrangements by
Roberson Funeral Home
Port Charlotte Chapel.

Edith J. Testo
Edith J. Testo, 90, of
Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Friday,
Aug. 30, 2013.
She was born Oct. 16,
1922, in Chicago, Ill., and
moved to this area eight
years ago from Sun City
in Huntley, Ill.
Mrs. Testo was a
homemaker. In her
younger days, she was an
avid golfer and enjoyed
tap dancing, she loved
sculpting and painting.
Mrs. Testo was a volun-
teer at the Port Charlotte
Library, and she painted
scenery for the Charlotte
Players.
She is survived by
her daughter, Suzanne
(Dennis) Siok of Port
Charlotte; grandchildren,
Kelly Ann Mohn-Close
of Corpus Christi, Texas,
Thomas E. Mohn of
Lakewood, Ill., and Kevin
M. Mohn of Chicago; and
seven grandchildren.
Memorial services


are pending in Illinois.
Memorial donations
may be made to Tidewell
Hospice Inc., 5955 Rand
Boulevard, Sarasota, FL
34238.
Arrangements are
by National Cremation
Society of Port Charlotte.


David L. Newton
David L. Newton, 64, of Punta Gorda, Florida,
affectionately known to his friends, and listeners
of Auction Radio as Radio Dave, passed away
suddenly on Sunday, September 1,
2013. David was born March 7,
1949 in Saint John, New Brunswick,
1 Canada. In addition to being a
loving husband, son, brother,
S uncle and master to his German
Shepherd, Jack, Dave was most im-
.- portantly a friend to all. Along with
Dave & Marty's radio show, Auction
Radio, he was a very supportive member of the
Eagles #FOE 3296, a member of the Moose Lodge
#2121, and was always welcome at the VFW #5690.
Dave was also known for his fundraising efforts at
the Eagles, Toys for Tots, Charlotte County Sheriffs
K-9 unit, and many more worthy causes. David's
love for life, laughter, infectious smile and terrific
sense of humor will be deeply missed.
He is survived by his devoted wife and soul-
mate of 28 years, Marty, along with his sister,
Dee (Gordon) Heath, brothers, Stewart and Bob
Newton, all who reside in Canada, and beloved
uncle of Sherry Heath, Troy (Michelle) Heath, Tara
Whalen & Quinn Newton. David is preceded in
death by his loving mother and stepfather, Dorothy
& Samuel Beeler and sister, Carol, in infancy.
If you were fortunate enough to have crossed
David's path, please join us for a Celebration of Life
with a potluck buffet on Saturday, September 14,
2013, at the Eagles FOE #3296 on Harborview Road
and Kings Highway, with the service starting at
1:30 p.m., and share your favorite "Dave" story.
In lieu of flowers, a donation towards Dave's
3-year dream of remodeling the Eagles FOE
#3296, 23111 Harborview Road, Port Charlotte,
FL or the American Cancer Society, 992 Tamiami
Trail, Unit C-2, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
Arrangements were made in Port Charlotte
Florida.


ENGLEWOOD

Charmaine R.
Sterkel
Charmaine R. Sterkel,
80, of Englewood, Fla.,
passed away Sunday,
Sept. 1, 2013. Arrangements
are by Lemon Bay Funeral
Home and Cremation
Services.

NORTH PORT

Joseph
Paul Master
Joseph Paul Master, 70,
of North Port, Fla., passed
away Sunday, Sept. 1,
2013, after a courageous
battle with cancer.
He was born in Buffalo,
N.Y, graduating from
Williamsville South High
School in 1961.
Paul worked for
the town of Amherst
Highway Department for
35 years. He was a proud
member of the Lances
Cruisin to the Loop Car
Club. Paul enjoyed the
outdoors, golfing, fishing
and spending time with
family and friends.
He will be deeply
missed by his wife of
49 years, Diana; mother,
Eleanor K. Master;
children, Duane (Kelly)
Master; Jeffrey (Doris)
Master and Tanya (A.J.)
Laban; brother, Larry E.
Master; grandchildren,
Paul, Harley, Kalila,
Samantha, Meghan,
Emily, Jacob and Damon;
and great-granddaughter,
Riley.
Memorial service will
be at 11 a.m. Friday,
Sept. 6, 2013, at North
Port Community United
Church of Christ, 3450
South Biscayne Dr.,
North Port, FL 34287.
In lieu of flowers, Paul's
wish was to have a Royal
Palm tree planted in his
name. Donations can be
sent to Diana Master c/o
North Port Community
United Church of Christ.
Arrangements were
made in Port Charlotte,
Fla.

DESOTO

Joe F. Colding
Joe F Colding, 66,
passed away Sunday,
Sept. 1, 2013, with his
loving family by his side.
He was born Jan. 12,
1947, in Lithia, Fla.,
where he lived until
moving to Arcadia, Fla.,
32 years ago.
Joe was of the Baptist
faith and a member of
Oak Hill Baptist Church
in Arcadia. He was a very
loving and caring fam-
ily man, and he valued
spending time with all


of them. Joe was a cattle
rancher, running the day
to day operations. He
also enjoyed hunting
and fishing when he
could.
Joe is survived by his
loving wife of 23 years,
Julie Packard Colding
of Arcadia; son, Jeremy
A. Colding, currently
enlisted in the U.S.
Navy; daughter, Katie
Colding currently at-
tending the University
of South Florida; two
brothers, Alva (Lou)
Colding of Lithia, and
Robert (Vonna) Colding
of West Virginia; three
sisters, Sarah (Paul)
Dixon of Bartow, Fla.,
Diane (Tim) McCormick
ofValrico, Fla., and Pam
Colding of Sebring, Fla.;
and numerous nieces
and nephews. Joe was
preceded in death
by his parents, H.C.
and Naomi O. Corbett
Colding; brother, Ernest
Colding; and sister,
Carol Peeples.
A visitation will be
held from 1:30 p.m.
until 2 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 5, 2013, at Oak
Hill Baptist Church,
5104 NW Oak Hill
Ave., Arcadia. Funeral
services will follow the
visitation at 2 p.m. at
the church with the Rev.
Paul Dixon officiating.
Burial will then be at
Oak Hill Cemetery.
Online condolences
can be made at
pongerkaysgrady.com.
Arrangements are
by Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Homes.

Richard James
Pawloski
Richard James
Pawloski, 87, of
Arcadia, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Sept. 3,
2013, in Port Charlotte,
Fla. Arrangements
are by Charlotte
Memorial Funeral
Home, Crematory and
Cemetery.



Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes only. There's no charge
for publishing an abbreviated death
notice. Full obituaries and repeat
death notices will be subject to an
advertising charge.
Obituaries must be received by
2 p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday
publication. For Sunday publication
deadline is noon on Saturday. For
Monday publication deadline is noon
on Sunday. In Loving Memories must
be received by 2 p.m. for Tuesday
through Friday publication. For
Saturday through Monday publica-
tion deadline is noon on Friday The
American flag accompanying an
obituary indicates a veteran of the
U.S. Armed Forces. Please send emails to
obituaries@sunletter.com.


SUN PHOTO BY PATTIE MIHALIK


As the nation gets set to observe National Grandparents
Day Sunday, Nancy Warren, left, and Barbara Voisinet talk
about the pains and pleasures of raising their grandchildren.
They are among the 2.4 million "grandfamilies."


'Bus stop



grannies'are a



stabilizing force


hen Nancy War-
ren takes her
grandson to any
school event, she is used
to being much older than
the other parents.
Nancy and her hus-
band, Bill, have had full
custody of their grandson
from the time he was
born.
When the Port
Charlotte woman waited
with Andrew at the bus
stop, she looked around
and saw two other
women who also looked
like grandmothers.
"I smiled at them and
they smiled back at me.
Soon, we were talking
and I learned we were
all grandparents raising
grandchildren."
At the Cornelius
Street bus stop in Port
Charlotte, there are 16
children who wait each
day for the bus. Three of
the 16 are being raised
either full time or part
time by grandparents.
"What are the odds that
three of us at a small bus
stop just happen to be
grandparents taking on
the role of parents?" asks
Nancy rhetorically.
Actually, while it may
be rare to have that many
grandmothers at one
bus stop, grandmothers
raising grandchildren is
becoming far more com-
mon than it used to be.
According to the last
U.S. Census, 2.4 million
families consist of grand-
parents maintaining their
grandchildren, with that
number climbing higher
each year.
It's so common, in fact,
that a new word has been
coined to describe it:
Grandfamilies.
At the Port Charlotte
bus stop, NancyWarren,
Barbara Voisinet and
Janet Gonzalez have
coined their own descrip-
tion of their situation.
"We call ourselves the
'Bus Stop Grannies,"' says
Nancy.
In addition to taking
care of their own grand-
children, the Bus Stop
Grannies are there to help
any child who needs a
helping hand.
"By now the other
parents know we can be
counted on to provided
any help that is needed,"
says Janet.
Sometimes that means
giving a child a ride
home.
Sometimes it means
keeping a child for the
day.
And sometimes it
means pitching in to help
a family during a crisis.
Barbara Voisinet points
out that the changing


S Pattile
MhPalilk



family structure and job
mobility often means a
mother has no family
nearby to help her.
"When I was a kid it
was common for three
generations to live
together. That meant a
grandmother was always
on hand to help. That has
changed," she says, "ex-
cept when circumstances
make it a necessity."
When it comes to their
own grandchildren, no
sacrifice is too big to
make, they say.
"Raising a grandchild
means being a lot more
active than we would
normally be at our age.
Sometimes there's noth-
ing I want more than to
take a pain pill and sleep.
But I don't do it if Andrew
is still up," says Nancy,
who has a lot of health
problems.
At 73, as she tries to
keep up with her two
granddaughters, Barbara
says she sometimes
worries about being in
her 80s when her grand-
daughters are still in their
teens.
But she makes clear she
would not trade one mo-
ment of being with them,
"Taking care of the girls
gives me a strong purpose
in life. I find such joy
and pleasure in watching
them grow," she says.
As one who is fre-
quently racked with pain,
Nancy says caring for her
grandson is her motiva-
tion to keep moving,
regardless of pain. "He
brings so much joy to our
home every single day,"
she says.
While the nation
will celebrate National
Grandparents Day on
Sunday, the Bus Stop
Grannies celebrate it
every day.
When they get over-
whelmed or have a
problem, they turn to
each other for support.
For other grandpar-
ents looking for a bit of
support, there is a special
website for them at www.
aarp.org/content/dam/
aarp/relationships/
friends-family/grand
facts/ grandfacts-florida.
pdf.
Pattie Mihalik is a regu-
lar columnist for the SUN.
Contact her at newsgirl@
comcast.net.


HEAR SOME GOOD NEWS?

LET US KNOW...

Charlotte DeSoto North Port Englewood

941,2@6,1 l 8634-917600 P94,q3( 941,681,3060






Our Town Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


Party night in Punta Gorda


Local band Zombie University played before a huge crowd at the
Tiki Bar in Punta Gorda on Friday night. Here, Gerald Robinson
tries to keep up with 94-year-old Penny Thompson on the new
outside dance floor.


Jim and Annie
O'Malley, Joe Yany
and his fiancee,
Tammy Henderson,
Terri Greene and
Doug Brumfield
enjoying a joint
bachelor and
bachelorette party
at the Tiki Bar in
Punta Gorda just
a week before the
wedding.


Paula Edwards and Myra Gnadt enjoying the sunset over Tonya and Sean Doherty sit back and listen to the sounds of
Charlotte Harbor from the wall at the Tiki Bar. Zombie University.
Left: Phyllis
Walker, Francis
Miller, Marci
LaDage and her
mother, Sandy
r E Pray, ready for
a night of music
and dancing.




Below: This
group found
a picnic table
to share while
listening to the
music of Zombie
University.


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www.SmilesofPuntaGorda.com 1


With backlighting provided by the sunset over Charlotte Harbor, the outdoor dance floor at the Tiki Bar was busy Friday night with
Zombie University playing.


OurTown Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS









When he wasn't keeping Navy afloat, Medina was tending bar


By DON MOORE
SUN CORRESPONDENT

Joe Medina and a
buddy were shooting
pool in a Tampa pool hall
in 1946 when the two of
them got the idea to join
the Navy. Both were 18.
"We went down to
the recruiter's office
and got some informa-
tion about the Navy
and were given a date
to come back and sign
up," the 84-year-old
former Navy man said.
"I came back and was
sworn in, but my buddy
didn't return with me.
"I went to boot camp
at Bainbridge, Md. After
that I was sent aboard
the light carrier USS
Wright (CVL-49) to work
in the engine room. I
spent the next three
years aboard the carrier
that was training young
aviators to land on a
flight deck off the coast
at Pensacola.
"When I wasn't in the
engine room, I spent a
lot of time on the bridge
watching the planes
land. Sometimes they'd
have trouble landing
and end up in the water.
There was always a
destroyer close by to pick
them up," he said.
"Since I grew up in
Key West, I wanted to get
back there while still in
the Navy. I lucked out
and got a job working
as a mechanic aboard a
sub tender at KeyWest,"
Medina said. "I worked in
the boat shop overhaul-
ing small boat engines.
Sometimes I would be
sent to work on subma-
rines that would pull up
alongside our tender.
"When I wasn't


tI


Joe Medina of Port Charlotte Medina's retirement picture.
was just getting out of boot He was 37 and a Navy Chief
camp at Bainbridge, Md., in when he got out of the service
1946 when this picture was in 1966.
takln


LanIcih
working for the Navy I
was tending bar or wait-
ing tables at the Bamboo
Room in KeyWest. The
bar was on Bahama
Street near the Strand
Theater, around the
corner from Sloppy Joe's
that was on Duval Street
(the main drag in Key
West)," he explained.
"I'd get off my Navy job
about 4:30 p.m. and show
up at the Bamboo Room.
I'd put on my civilian
clothes, work there until
2 a.m. when it closed, go
home and sleep a couple
of hours and go back to
work for the Navy the
next morning," he said.
"I was 18 and could do
it then, but I couldn't do
it now.
"Working at the
Bamboo Room was
interesting, because we
had people like Ernest
Hemingway come in for
a drink.
"Occasionally I'd greet
the famous author and
shake hands with him as
he walked into the bar
with his party," Medina
recalled.
"(Humphrey) Bogart
was a regular at the


Bamboo Room. He
owned a house nearby.
Rita Hayworth would
come in from time to
time."
After that tour, Medina
was sent to Boston to
board a new destroyer
being built up there
- the USS Henley
(DD-762).
"She was commis-
sioned in Charleston,
S.C., and after a shake-
down cruise I went
aboard the Henley
for a world cruise in
1951," he said. "We
sailed from Norfolk to
Japan. While there we
visited Nagasaki, where
we dropped the atomic
bomb. They were still
rebuilding the city from
the bomb attack during
World War II."
Medina recalls: "The
people we met in Japan
during our cruise
couldn't have been
nicer."
The Henley sailed on
to Iraq, Egypt, the Suez
Canal, Naples, Italy and
back to Bermuda, the
Panama Canal Zone and
the U.S.
Because he spoke
Spanish, Medina was


PHOTO PROVIDED


Medina is on the left with two of
buddies aboard the light carrier I
Wright, shortly after graduating
boot camp just after World War II
one of the destroyer's
two Spanish-speaking
interpreters aboard
ship. When the captain
needed an interpreter,
he or the other sailor
was called to the bridge.
After serving three
years aboard the Henley,
he returned to KeyWest
and shore duty.
"I was in charge of
the small boat shop for
the Navy in KeyWest.
In addition to keeping
the Navy's small boat
fleet afloat, I was also
in charge of collecting
the dummy torpedoes
shot by our subs in Key
West," he said. "We had
a 50-foot boat with four
racks on the stern that
we used to pick up the
dummy torpedoes and
bring them back to the
sub tender."
Medina went right
back to tending bar
after he wrapped up his
duties with the Navy in


PHOTO PROVIDED
Below: Medina inspects the sailors who worked
with him in the small engine shop he ran for
the Navy in Key West. By this time he had spent
20 years in the Navy and was retiring.


the evening. After this
hitch, he retired from
the Navy with 20 years
of service. He joined the
Navy Reserve and spent
another decade as a
reservist.
He retired from the
navy as a Chief Petty
Officer in 1966.
"My wife, Gloria, was
a hairdresser at that
time. I decided to go to
hairdressing school and
establish a beauty salon
with her. We opened
'The Fountain of Beauty
Salon' in St. Petersburg
about 1970," Medina
said.
"The women loved a
man doing their hair.
I wore a fancy shirt
with ruffles. They loved
it," he recalled with a
smile.
Three years in the
beauty salon business
was enough for the old
sailor. He and Gloria
eventually retired to


Medina today at 84.
Port Charlotte in 2000.
They have three sons:
Joseph, Frank and
Johnny.

If you have a war story,
or if a friend or neighbor
has one, contact Don
Moore at donmoore39@
gmail.com or call 941-
426-2120. Visit www.
donmooreswartales. cor
for more war stories.

S Find great bargains in the $
$ CLASSIFIED $
,$ Every day in the Charlotte Sina $


Good day to all.
Did you know
sawmills were so
important in the area's
early history that one of
the first came all the way
from Kentucky?
William Huckeby
was born around 1840
in Cloverport, Ky., just
down the Ohio River
from Louisville. During
the Civil War, at an
early age, he served
as chief engineer on a
stern-wheeler plying the
Mississippi River.
At war's end, William
returned to Cloverport,
purchased a farm and
began a sawmill opera-
tion. At the time, he also
co-signed a note on a
friend's farm who then
fell behind on his pay-
ments. Unfortunately,
by 1879 it cost both
men their land. Luckily,
Huckeby's sawmill was


not located on either
farm so it survived the
misfortune.
Remaining friends
and intent on starting
over on Florida's frontier,
the men headed south
with two mules and a
wagon, reaching Pine
Level, then the Manatee
County seat just west of
Arcadia, in 54 days.
Huckeby had left his
family and sawmill in
the care of relatives.
After two years living in
Charlotte Harbor, the
area's first permanent


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF


Bar Stool
Open set
Girls Night Out will
celebrate the sixth
anniversary of the Bar
Stool Open on Oct. 5 by
partnering with nine
Punta Gorda bars to
raise funds for Dollars
for Mammograms.
Denise Dull has chaired
this event for the past
five years and is sup-
ported by a committee
of Jill Ferguson, Kris
Peterson, Judy Poirer,
Miranda Fields, Eve
Tangeman and Clare
Donaldson. Additional
members of Girls Night
Out volunteer their
time during the day to
"man" golf holes, sell
raffle tickets and assist
with keeping more than
500 golfers on track.
Join the celebration by
stopping in at any of the
following participating


locations Ice House
Pub, River City Grill,
Four Points by Sheraton
Punta Gorda Harborside
TT's Tiki Bar, Phil's 41,
Beef 'O' Brady's Punta
Gorda, Dean's South
of the Border, Jack's on
Marion, the Celtic Ray, or
the Office and register
your foursome ($100
entry fee). The event is a
nine-hole miniature-golf
tournament that offers
anyone the opportunity
to play and win prizes.
The day begins with a
shotgun start at your
registering location at
10:30 a.m., and ends with
a wrap-up party at 6 p.m.
at the Celtic Ray. Prizes
will be awarded through-
out the day for the best
and worst finishing
scores.
For more information,
call Dull at 941-626-
9439, or Peterson at
941-815-1888.


settlement, and work-
ing at whatever en-
deavor earned him cash,
William saved enough to
bring his family and
his sawmill to Florida,
not an insignificant
undertaking at the time.
The mill, consisting of
an enormous flywheel
six feet in diameter,
boiler, steam engine,
saw blade, and log
carriage, first made its
way by barge down the
Ohio and Mississippi
rivers to New Orleans.
The machinery was then
shipped by rail to Cedar
Key, north of Tampa, at
the time Florida's south-
ernmost railroad termi-
nus. Thence by schooner
to the Caloosahatchee
River, where it was off-
loaded to a barge and
transported to a stand of
timber just east of Fort
Myers on Billy Creek.


The timber took about
a year to cut out, after
which, once again by
barge, William moved
his sawmill up Charlotte
Harbor to Shell Creek
near today's Sans Souci
subdivision just west
of U.S. 17. Arriving in
the fall of 1882, it was
almost two years before
Isaac Trabue purchased
land that would become
Punta Gorda.
Over the next 20 years,
William operated one
of the area's most
successful sawmills,
cutting timber from
tracts in Grove City
and Cleveland to meet
the needs of booming
frontier settlements. He
also established a school
on the trail that became
Huckeby Road, a portion
of which still exists off
Riverside Drive, serving
students until 1895.


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In 1902, shortly after
the mill lost a significant
amount of lumber due
to fire, Huckeby sold
his sawmill. He died
the next year at age 64.
Huckeby's descendants
proudly reside in
Charlotte County to this
day.
Visit Charlotte County
History Collections on-
line to view photographs
of William Huckeby and
his family.
The Society's annual
Lobster Bake is com-
ing up Sept. 21 at the
Port Charlotte Beach
Complex. Plan to attend
for a great time and to
help support the preser-
vation of local history.
Call the Historical Center
at 941-629-7278 (PAST)
for more information.


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Sawmills vital in this area's early history


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S.. o Your source for fishing, boating and outdoor news
t every Thursday only in your Sun newspaper


I


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 7


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS







Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IWednesday, September 4, 2013


3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME

S/ 3112

9/4/13


SUBCONTRACTOR
AND SUPPLIER
NOTICE FOR BIDS
TO CONSTRUCTION
MANAGER AT RISK
Port Charlotte High School
Storage Building, Baseball
and Softball Dugout Repairs
Charlotte County Public
Schools
Subcontractor bids are solicited
by Owen-Ames-Kimball Company
as Construction Manager for Port
Charlotte High School Storage
Building, Baseball and Softball
Dugout Repairs, to be received
at the office of Owen-Ames-
Kimball Company, Attn Frank
Mullins, 1877 Manzana
Avenue, Punta Gorda, FI
33950, not later than 2:00
p.m. on September 17, 2013.
Base Bid Scope of work
includes: Demolition of exist-
ing roof structures, concrete,
masonry, metal doors and
frames, painting, aluminum
canopies.
Alternate # 1:
Add ball field netting.
Work is planned to be started
10-16-13 and completed dur-
ing normal working hours...
All workers must be in confor-
mance with the Level II Secu-
rity Clearance and display
CCPS badges at all times
while on property. All costs
for CCPS security back
ground screening and badg-
ing costs must be included in
Subcontractor bids.
Bid Documents have been pre-
pared by Harvard Jolly Architec-
ture and may be obtained by
completing the invitation form
below and returning to the office
of Owen-Ames-Kimball Company
via email to fmullins@oakfl.com.
Plans will be distributed via our
online plan room located at
www.procore.com. Sign in infor-
mation will be issued upon return
of this form.
A mandatory pre bid confer-
ence and site examination will
be held onsite at Port Char-
lotte High School Wednesday
September 11, 2013 at 11:00
am. The address of the
school is 18200 Cochran
Blvd, Port Charlotte, FI
33948
Prospective bidders are to
assemble outside front entrance
of school building main office for
sign in. Do not enter buildings or
wander about campus without
CCPS escort. We request that
attendees register their intent to
attend the pre-bid conference
with Frank Mullins via email a min-
imum of 3 working days in
advance of the conference.
Bidders may use their standard
form of proposal and must be in
accordance with the Bid docu-
ments. Owen-Ames-Kimball pur-
chase order and terms and condi-
tions of the purchase order will be
the governing document regard-
less of any statements to the con-
trary noted in the bidders' form of
proposal. Questions regarding
the work scope may be directed
to Frank Mullins at
fmullins@oakfl.com.
Bidders must deliver their pro-
posals to the Construction Man-
ager via email or in person only
ahead of the stated time for clos-
ing of the bids. The bids will be
opened and reviewed in private.
The Construction Manager
reserves the right to reject any
and all bids, or to waive any infor-
mality in the bidding process.
Please respond via email to
fmullins@oakfl.com
Company:_
Contact Person

Business Address:

Ph#
Fax#
*Email Address:
Email Your Response:
()We Will Bid and Attend the
Mandatory Pre-Bid
()Will Not Be Bidding This
Project
Publish: 8/28/13, 9/4/13,
and 9/11/13
102791 2932116
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Florida Department of
Transportation Project
Bids will be received by the Talla-
hassee Office until 10:30 a.m. on
Wednesday, September 25,
2013 for Proposal ID T1553 in
Hardee County. The improve-
ments under this project consist
of sidewalk construction, widen-
ing, base work, curb and gutters,
and signing and pavement mark-
ing on CR 664. Budget Estimate
$108,851.00. A Certification of
Qualification is not required for
this project. Complete letting
advertisement information is
available on our website at
http://www.dot.state.fl. us/cc-


INVITATION
TO BID
ov 3114

admin/Letting Proiect Info.shtm
or by calling (850) 414-4000.
Publish: 8/28/12 and 9/4/13
109283 2930818


NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
3120O

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HAL DEAVER WOOD
a/k/a HAL D. WOOD
Deceased.
File No. 13001269CP
Division PROBATE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of Hal Deaver Wood a/k/a Hal D.
Wood, deceased, whose date of
death was June 12, 2013, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Charlotte County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
350 E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, FL 33950. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is September 4, 2013.
Attorney for
Personal Representative:
Katharine W. Payne
Attorney for Virginia Wood Barn-
hart
Florida Bar Number: 0873411
Mizell Law Firm, PA
331 Sullivan Street
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Telephone: (941) 575-9291
Fax: (941) 575-9296
E-Mail: kpayne@mizell-law.com
Personal Representative:
Virginia Wood Barnhart
622 Coventry Place
Towson, MD 21286
Publish: September 4 & 11, 2013
243045 2935256


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
FLOYD KRIEG a/k/a
FLOYD P. KRIEG,
Deceased
Probate No. 13-1281-CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of FLOYD KRIEG a/k/a FLOYD
P. KRIEG, deceased, File Num-
ber 13-1281-CP is pending in the
Circuit Court for Charlotte Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 350 East Mar-
ion Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida
33950. The names and address-
es of the personal representative
and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice if
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is September 4. 2013
By: J. MICHAEL ROONEY
Attomey for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 157880
Post Office Box 510400
Punta Gorda, Florida,
33951-0400
(941) 639-2591
trabuelaw@vahoo.com
Kathy Kosydor, Pers. Rep.
2616 Pro Tour Drive
Belleville, IL 62220
Publish: Sept. 4 and 11, 2013
121501 2935010


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2011-CA-001850
BMO HARRIS BANK N.A., as


S NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

successor-by-merger to M&l
MARSHALL & ILSLEY BANK,
a Wisconsin state banking
corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VICTOR G. MELLOR, individually,
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF TREASURY-INTERNAL REV-
ENUE SERVICE, JOHN DOE, as
unknown tenant, and JANE DOE,
as unknown tenant,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given that pursuant to
the Final Judgment of Foreclosure
in Case No.: 2012-CA-001850, of
the Circuit Court, in and for Char-
lotte County, Florida, in which
BMO HARRIS BANK N.A., as suc-
cessor-by-merger to M&l MAR-
SHALL & ILSLEY BANK, a Wis-
consin state banking corporation,
is the Plaintiff and VICTOR G.
MELLOR is the Defendant, the
Clerk of the Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
online at www.charlotte.real-
foreclose.com at 11:00 a.m.,
on October 16, 2013, in accor-
dance with FL Statutes, Chapter
45, the following described prop-
erty, pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:
Begin at the Northeast cor-
ner of Lot 8, Block "A" in
the Town of Seaboard,
Charlotte County, Florida
of W.A. McElya's Subdivi-
sion, of Little Gasparilla
Island, as recorded in Plat
Book 1, Page 11, of the
Public Records of Char-
lotte County, Florida;
thence run Westerly along
the North line of Lot 8, a
distance of 750 feet to the
point of beginning; thence
a 90 degree angle left and
to a point, thence a 90
degree angle right and run
a distance of 100 feet, to a
point; thence a 90 degree
angle right and run a dis-
tance of 75 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of this lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
M. B. White
Charlotte County Clerk of Court
Date August 22. 2013
NOTIFICATION
In accordance with The Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act, if you
are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact Court Administration, at ADA
Coordinator, 350 E. Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, FL, 33950
(941) 637-2279.
Publish: September 4 & 11, 2013
363558 2935063
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-2012-CA-002373
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EWA M WESOLOWSKI, JOSEF M
WESOLOWSKI. UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT IN POSSESSION #1,
UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES-
SION #2,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure filed April 30, 2013
entered in Civil Case No. 08-
2012-CA-002373 of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Charlotte County.
Florida, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
in accordance with Chapter 45
Florida Statutes at 11:00 AM on
the 26 day of September, 2013
on the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
Lot 4. Block 411, Port Char-
lotte Subdivision, Section 89,
according to the plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 7,
Pages 56A and 56B, of the
Public Records of Charlotte
County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated this 29 day of August,
2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
BY: M.B.White
Deputy Clerk
Publish: Sept. 4 and 11, 2013
338116 2935018
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.2012-2664-CA
ALICE M. GLATT. Individually and
as Trustee Under Agreement
Dated November 22, 1983,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL J. DAMAN, UNKNOWN
PARTIES IN POSSESSION # 1,
and UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POS-


SESSION # 2,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
Notice is hereby given that I, the
undersigned Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Charlotte County, Flori-
da, shall sell the real property set
forth below at public sale to the
highest bidder for cash, except
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

as set forth hereinafter, on Octo-
ber 17, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, in accordance with Chapter 45
Florida Statutes:
Lot 5, Block 2806, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 45, a subdivision
according to the plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 5,
Pages 56A through 56E, of
the Public Records of Char-
lotte County, Florida.
The said sale will be made pur-
suant to final judgment of foreclo-
sure of the Circuit Court of Char-
lotte County, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated this 6 day of August,
2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of Court
By: M.B.White
Deputy Clerk
Publish: September 4 & 11, 2013
108096 2935100

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY. FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO,
082012CA002737XXXXXX
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs,
MARTENS H. ISENBERG. Ill; THE
VILLAS OF CEDAR KEY CONDO-
MINIUM ASSOCIATION,INC.;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH.
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,
OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Summary
Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated June, 2013. and entered in
Case No.
082012CA002737XXXXXX of the
Circuit Court in and for Charlotte
County, Florida wherein BANK OF
AMERICA. N.A. is Plaintiff and
MARTENS H. ISENBERG, III; THE
VILLAS OF CEDAR KEY CONDO-
MINIUM ASSOCIATION,INC.;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION OR
HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST
IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and beat bidder
for cash website of www,char-
lotte.realforeclose.com County.
Florida, 11:00 a.m on the 16 day
of October, 2013, the following
described property as set forth in
said Order or Final Judgment, to-
wit:
UNIT 2-A IN THE VILLAS OF
CEDAR KEY, A CONDOMINIUM
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN CONDO-
MINIUM BOOK 5, PAGES 4-A
THRU 4-D OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, AND BEING FUR-
THER DESCRIBED IN THAT CER-
TAIN DECLARATION OF CONDO-
MINIUM FILED AUGUST 24, 1984
IN O.R. BOOK 786, PAGE 154
THRU 197, AND AMENDED FROM
TIME TO TIME IN THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH
AN UNDIVIDED 1/34TH SHARE
OF THE COMMON ELEMENTS
APPURTENANT THERETO AS
DESCRIBED IN THE DECLARA-
TION
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE. IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
DATED at Punta Gorda, Florida,
on July 15, 2013.
BARBARA SCOTT
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: Sept. 4 and 11, 2013
105230 2935094
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 08-2012-CA-003310
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MOR-
GAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST


2006-A3,
Plaintiff,
vs,
TIMOTHY KELLAR, et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in Case No. 08-
2012CA-003310 of the Circuit
Court of the 20TH Judicial Circuit
in and for CHARLOTTE County,


S NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

Florida, wherein, U.S. BANK
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-
A3, Plaintiff, and, KELLAR, TIMO-
THY, et. al., are Defendants, I will
sell to the highest bidder for cash
at,
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, at the hour of 11:00AM, in
accordance to Chapter 45 Florida
Statute, on the 16th day of Octo-
ber, 2013, the following
described property:
Lot 7, Block 2786, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION
SECTION THIRTY-THREE,
according to the Plat
thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 5, Pages 35A
through 35F, inclusive, of
the Public Records of
Charlotte County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
DATED this 15 day of July, 2013
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Clerk of the Court's disability
coordinator at 18500 MUR-
DOCK CIRCLE, PORT CHAR-
LOTTE, FL 33948, 941-743-
1944, at least 7 days before
your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7
days; if you are hearing.
or voice impaired, call 711.
Publish: September 4 & 11, 2013
146548 2935072
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 12003384CA
BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING. LLC,
A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY
COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALEXANDER DUCA. ET AL.
Defendants
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated June 18, 2013,
and entered in Case No.
12003384CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for CHARLOTTE Coun-
ty, Florida, BAYVIEW LOAN SER-
VICING, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMIT-
ED LIABILITY COMPANY (here-
after "Plaintiff"), is Plaintiff and
ALEXANDER DUCA; SOUTH GULF
COVE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIA-
TION, INC.:, are defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash via the Internet at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, at 11:00 a.m., on the 16 day of
October, 2013, in accordance to
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, the
following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment,
to wit:
LOT 45, BLOCK 4250,
PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDI-
VISION, SECTION 58, A
DIVISION ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
5, PAGES 72 A THROUGH
72J, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager, whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950,
and whose telephone number
is (941) 637-2281, within two
working days of your receipt
of this Foreclosure Complaint;
if you are hearing or voice
impaired call 711.
Dated this 15 day of July, 2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Publish: September 4 & 11, 2013
232598 2935068
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 13000167CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
GREG S. BROWN
A/K/A GREGORY S. BROWN, et al
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of foreclosure dated June


18, 2013, and entered in Case
No. 13000167CA of the Circuit
Court of the TWENTIETH Judicial
Circuit in and for CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, Florida, wherein JPMOR-
GAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and
GREG S. BROWN A/K/A GREGO-
RY S. BROWN, et al are Defen-
dants, the clerk will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash,
beginning at 11:00 AM at
www.chariotte.realforeclose.com
, in accordance with Chapter 45,


S NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

Florida Statutes, on the 16 day of
October, 2013, the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment, to
wit:
LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK
3170, PORT CHARLOTTE
SUBDIVISION, SECTION 51, A
SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
65A THRU 65H OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 1194 TYRONE STREET,
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33952
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus funds from the sale,
if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, Florida, this 16
day of Jly, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provi-
sion of certain assistance.
Please contact the Adminis-
trative Services Manager
whose office is located at 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than seven (7) days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
Publish: September 4 & 11, 2013
336737 2935064
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 08-2013-CA-000765
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PEDRO A. ROJAS, MONICA
ROJAS, DEEP CREEK CIVIC ASSO-
CIATION, INC., SECTION 20
PROPERTY OWNER'S ASSOCIA-
TION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT
IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN
TENANT IN POSSESSION 2,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure filed June
11, 2013 entered in Civil Case
No, 08-2013-CA-000765 of the
Circuit Court of the Twentieth
Judicial Circuit in and for Char-
lotte County, Punta Gorda, Flori-
da, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com in accor-
dance with Chapter 45 ,Florida
Statutes at 11:00 AM on the 9
day of October, 2013 on the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Summary Final Judg-
ment:
Lot 18, Block 598, PUNTA
GORDA ISLES, Section 20, a
Subdivision according to the
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 11, Pages 2-A
through 2-Z-42, of the Public
Records of Charlotte County,
Florida.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated this 20 day of June,
2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
BY: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 8/28/13 and 9/4/13
338116 2932658

S NOTICE OF
MEETING
3126

NOTICE OF MEETING
Master Board
The School Board of Charlotte
County, Florida, is holding a Mas-
ter Board Training on September
10, 2013. The meeting will be
held from 9:30 am to 1:30 pm at
the Hermitage Artist Retreat,
6660 Manasota Key Road,
Englewood, Florida.
The Topic for the Meeting is :
Improving Student
Achievement by Aligning the
Work of the District.
Copies of the documents sup-
porting the agenda can be
reviewed in the Office of the
Superintendent located at 1445
Education Way, Port Charlotte,
Florida. Any disabled individual
who needs reasonable accommo-
dation for this meeting may con-
tact the Department of Human
Resources at 255-0808, exten-
sion 3030, prior to the date of
scheduled meeting.
Douglas K. Whittaker, Ed.D.,
Superintendent of Schools and
Executive Secretary to the School
Board of Charlotte County
Publish: September 4, 2013
123300 2935652


NOTICE OF REGULAR
SCHOOL MEETING
A Regular School Board Meeting
is scheduled for Tuesday, Sep-
tember 10, 2013. The meet-
ing will be held at 5:30 pm in
the School Board Meeting
Room, 1445 Education Way,
Port Charlotte, Florida.
The Agenda for the Meeting is as
follows:
Reports
- Student Recognitions


OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013





The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 9


NOTICE OF
MEETING
WM 3126

- 2013 Achievement of Excel-
lence in Procurement Award
- Certificate of Appreciation
- SRO Recognition
Public Hearing
- During the Regular Meeting a
Public Hearing will be held to dis-
cuss the 2013-2014 Final Millage
Rates and 2013-2014 Budget
Consent Agenda
- Minutes
- Purchase Requests
- Bids for Approval
- Request for ITN
- Pay Requests
- Parent Reimbursements
- Student Reassignments
2013-14
- Out of State Travel and Out of
State Student Travel
- Contracts and Agreements
- Final Order
- Property Deletion
Action Agenda
- Final Budget Amendments
2012-13
- Annual Financial Report
- Personnel Action and Job
Descriptions
And any items deemed appropri-
ate for board meeting inclusion.
Copies of the documents sup-
porting the agenda items can be
reviewed in the Office of the
Superintendent located at 1445
Education Way, Port Charlotte,
Florida. Any disabled individual
who needs reasonable accommo-
dation for this meeting may con-
tact the Department of Human
Resources at 255-0808, exten-
sion 3030, prior to the date of
scheduled meeting.
Douglas K. Whittaker, Ed.D.,
Superintendent of Schools and
Executive Secretary to the School
Board of Charlotte County
Publish: September 4, 2013
123300 2935669


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NOTICE OF MEETING DATES
WATERFORD ESTATES
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
The Board of Supervisors of the
Waterford Estates Community
Development District will hold
their regularly scheduled public
meetings for Fiscal Year 2014
at 11:00 AM at the Holiday Inn
Hotel Conference Room locat-
ed at 300 W. Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950
on the second Friday of each
month as follows:
October 11, 2013
November 08, 2013
December 13, 2013
January 10, 2014
February 14, 2014
March 14, 2014
April 11, 2014
May 09, 2014
June 13, 2014
July 11, 2014
August 08, 2014
September 12, 2014
There may be occasions when
one or more Supervisors will par-
ticipate by telephone. At the
above location there will be pre-
sent a speaker telephone so that
any interested person can attend
the meeting at the above location
and be fully informed of the dis-
cussions taking place either in
person or by telephone communi-
cation.
These meetings are open to the
public and maybe continued to a
time, date and place certain.
Supervisors may attend the meet-
ing by telephone as long as there
is a quorum present at the meet-
ing place. Any person wishing to
receive a copy of the minutes of
the meeting may contact Paul
Winkeljohn at (954) 721-8681.
Each person who decides to
appeal any action taken at
these meetings is advised
that person will need a record
of the proceedings and that
accordingly, the person may
need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings
is made, including the testi-
mony and evidence upon
which such appeal is to be
based.
Paul Winkeljohn
Manager
Publish: September 4, 2013
249951 2934996


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exhibit set


I hope everyone had
fun over the Labor
Day weekend. I got
out on my newly tuned-
up bicycle. It's fun to
explore the neighborhood
on two wheels and
burn a few extra calories.
Now it's back to serious
work. Summer's over.
One of our favorite
artists is John Hermann.
John creates very popular
shadowbox pictures from
wood. His pieces always
sells because his pieces
touch something in view-
ers. They often tell me they
bought a picture because
"my mother loved cardi-
nals" or some personal
remembrance. It also helps
that his prices are very
reasonable.
John will be exhibiting
from Sept. 13 to Oct. 4 in
the Deaf Artists of Florida
show at the Venice Art
Center. There will be a
reception from 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. Sept. 13. The
exhibit is sponsored by
the Community Center
for the Deaf and Hard of
Hearing. Stop in, John
would love to meet you.

The Charlotte County
library system has
partnered again with
King Fisher Cruises in
urging people to sign up
for library cards. During
the month of September,
anyone who signs up for
a new library card will re-
ceive a certificate good for
a free sunset cruise. The
certificates must be used
by Oct. 30 and reserva-
tions are recommended.
King Fisher Cruises at
Fishermen's Village has
been supporting the li-
brary system this way for
a number of years. Bravo,
Captain Ralph! You can
sign up at any Charlotte
County library.
*
The Charlotte
Symphony Orchestra
has a new initiative.
The Musical Rewards
program allows small
and large firms to reward
employees, customers,
patients or others with
unique concert ticket
packages. The gift pack-
ages include customized
tickets, special greetings,
and photos with Raffaele
Ponti, the CSO's new
musical director, precon-
cert briefings and more.


ni-
41^ j.*


Charlotte
Arts


Judy
Malbhuissonl


Call Regina Buckley, the
CSO executive director,
at 941-205-9743 for more
information.
By the way, the sym-
phony's first concert
will be Nov. 17 at the
Charlotte Performing
Arts Center. It will feature
Pyotr Tchaikovsky's clas-
sical "Capriccio Italien"
and George Gershwin's
"Rhapsody in Blue"
(my favorite). Featured
soloist is world-renowned
pianist Jeffery Biegel.

Another film series has
come to my attention.
The Charlotte County
library system will present
Tuesday with Woody, a
month-long retrospective
on the films of Woody
Allen. The films will run
at 6 p.m. every Tuesday at
the Mid-County Regional
Library during September.
So we missed yesterday's,
but on Sept. 10 "Annie Hall"
will run; Sept. 17 "Hannah
and her Sisters"; and on
Sept. 24 "Crimes and
Misdemeanors." In addi-
tion to the screenings, there
will be a discussion about
Allen's contribution as a
filmmaker and the examin-
ing of common themes
throughout his films. Best
yet, the program is free
and open to the public. No
reservations needed.

To view some beauti-
ful artwork, visit Mary
Taglieri's new collection
"Sanctuary II" at www.
taglierigallery.com. This
work was inspired by the
Everglades. The paintings
are so serene, I just feel
myself relaxing. Enjoy.
Judy A. Malbuisson is
the executive director of
the Arts & Humanities
Council of Charlotte
County. She can be con-
tacted at 941- 764-8100,
or info@charlottearts.org.
Visit the council's website
at www.charlotte
arts.org. Friend us at
www.Facebook.com/
charlottearts.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Draft development
public-input
meeting set
The Charlotte County
Community Development
Department will hold
a public-input meeting
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sept. 6 in Room 119 of
the Charlotte County
Administration Center,
18500 Murdock Circle,
Murdock, regarding
the Draft Unified Land
Development Code. The
10-chapter draft ULDC
will be discussed over the
course of three months,
three chapters at a time.
Chapters 4-6 of the draft
ULDC will be discussed at
this meeting. Each month
there will be a meeting
for gathering input from
the public, followed by
a roundtable meeting
(which, for September,
will be held Sept. 18)
to discuss those issues
identified during the
public-input meeting.
All interested parties
are invited to participate
in both monthly meet-
ings. Citizens that raised
issues during the public-
input meeting should be
prepared to participate in
the subsequent roundta-
ble meeting. Draft chap-
ters of the ULDC may
be viewed online. Visit


www.CharlotteCountyFL.
gov and click "Unified
Land Development Code
(ULDC)" in the "Hot
Topics" list on the left.
For more information,
call 941-764-4934.

'Recovery Vigil'
planned
Charlotte Behavioral
Health Care will lead a
RecoveryVigil from 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Sept. 27 at
Laishley Park, 100 Nesbit
St., Punta Gorda, to raise
awareness for people in
need of treatment-and-
recovery support ser-
vices for mental and/or
substance use disorders.
This event will emphasize
the importance of seeking
physical and mental well-
ness every day.
The observance of the
RecoveryVigil will raise
awareness of mental
and/or substance use
disorders; will celebrate
individuals in long-
term recovery; and will
acknowledge the work
of prevention, treatment
and recovery service
providers. For more
information, or to reserve
a provider table, contact
Jessica Boles, director of
marketing at CBHC, at
941-639-8300, ext. 275, or
jboles@cbhcfl.org.


ACROSS
1 Hawaiian "hi"
6 Reach across
10 Monk's hood
14 Methods
15 City on Hawaii
16 Cookie found
in ice cream
17 Derisive
sound
18 Colonizing
insects
19 "Auld Syne"
20 Stopped
moving
23 "Little piggies"
24 Units of wt.
25 More malleable
29 Co. bigwig
30 Bank
convenience
33 Competent
34 Stubborn
animal
37 Courage, so
to speak
39 Do a Friar's job
42 Reach
43 Stretch out on
a sofa
44 Filleted fish
45 Feminine suffix
46 Not yet filled,
on a sched.
48 Gen-Xer's
parent
50 Fella
51 Clicked image
53 Wore down
gradually
59 Port of Egypt
60 Graph line
61 Humdrum
63 Strait-laced
64 Dry cleaner's
target


65 Wed in haste
66 Prefix for
dynamic
67 A few
68 Core belief

DOWN
1 Pro-_ (some
tourneys)
2 Lasting a while
3 Redolence
4 Cylindrical
sandwich
5 Mentally sharp
6 Parasol's
offering
7 Ale servings
8 Choir part
9 "The deal's off!"
10 Coke and Pepsi
11 Spoken
12 Took one's turn


WHAT'S YOUR BEEF by Fred Piscop
Edited by Stanley Newman


13 Nautical record
21 Designer
Kamali
22 Cold War
concern
25 Looie's
subordinate
26 Bassoon
cousins
27 Alternative to
high heels
28 Examination
29 Hive
compartment
30 Self-evident
truth
31 Car owner's
document
32 Stephenie
who wrote
Twilight
35 Pac-12 sch.


www.stanxwords.com
36 Zodiac beast
38 Roughly
40 Find the sum of
41 Jostle
47 Go around
49 With money at
stake
50 Doodad
51 Figure of
speech
52 Social rank
53 Remedy
54 Prince Charles,
for one
55 Trade fair
56 New Haven
school
57 Quote book
abbr.
58 Carton sealer
59 Hot-tub locale
62 Suffix for star


Answer to previous puzzle
IclAISlA SILI I I PHARICIH


Look for a third

crossword in

the Sun Classified

section.

.. .. .. .. .


A BORT L
MEATY A


ERIO
HEM


STRIPISITEAK HATE
SEA DISOBEY
S COT DUIBWEAR


IA UIDI I


S TIOIC KI INGS TIUIF FER
HERR INSET PLACE
0RIEvYVo WA RIKIS
ASSURES EAT
LE IS STA|NDS|TILLI
TE XTTACO SINA I
ETAL OGRE TROVE
ROMEREIEL ER/AS
9/4/13


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Saw point
6 Etching fluid
10 Touches
affectionately
14 Prenatal exam,
for short
15 Body part that
smells
16 Jump in a skater's
short program
17 Legend with an ax
19 Actress Hayworth
20 Dinner pair?
21 Like cough syrup
22 Indigenous New
Zealander
23 Legend with a
clarinet
26 Alcove
29 Not at all well-
done
30 "Let's Get"
Marvin Gaye hit
31 Udder parts
33 Jamaican genre
36 Legend with a
vine
40 Animal on
Michigan's state
flag
41 Coffee shop cupful
42 Fishing tool
43 "Your Majesty"
44 It includes a bit of
France
46 Legend with a bat
51 Betting every last
chip
52 Hat-borne
parasites
53 Toward the rudder
56 Charlatan, e.g.
57 Legend with a
bathrobe
60 Sour
61 Actor Morales
62 Dutch pianist
Egon who taught
Victor Borge
63 Lime beverages
64 Holiday song
65 Important word for
17-, 23-, 36-, 46-
and 57-Across

DOWN
1 Packer's need
2 Arab League
member
3 Burden
4 Up to, briefly
5 Bindle carriers
6 Former U.N. chief


By Victor Barocas 9/4/13


7 How some flirt
8 Life-cabaret link
9 Place to relax
10 Where to see
floats
11 Self-evident truth
12 Flashy tank
swimmer
13 Like many
characters in
Shakespeare's
dramas
18 Catering hall
dispensers
22 Dashing
inventor?
231885
Motorwagen
maker
24 Reduce to small
pieces
25 Inauguration Day
pledge
26 Customary
observance
27 Reference list abbr.
28 Bulletin board
material
31 Icon on a pole
32 Immature newt
33 Goad
34 "Felicity" star
Russell
35 Like the Flying
Dutchman


Tuesday's Puzzle Solved

A GEE e C I DERISE V E
CRAZ YJO NY U 0 X E N
HER OIRES SPARS
YH RSE BR LANK ET
SAFE S B AR A-RE

WAN RIGA COAIR I




ENSU E PA ARE UWIE
VATS BU L L F I DD L E
ED I TI INUI T AGED
RAC Y ITOGAS BETS


(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


37 "In space no one
can hear you
scream" film
38 Not, quaintly
39 On the safer side
43 Bypasses
44 Chickenpox
symptom
45 Expletive
replacements
46 Sicily neighbor
47 Epic that ends with
Hector's funeral


9/4/13


48 County on the
River Shannon
49 Pond plants
50 Zero, to Nero
53 Prefix with war or
hero
54 Forest floor flora
55 High school math
class
57 Feathery layer
58 Club for GIs
59 "... but are
chosen"


Ss. 0rosw dI


T. A D|O |






OurTown Page 10 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IWednesday, September 4, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Chris Porter Executive Editor

Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

To fill empty

homes, rooms

just add Harbor

OUR POSITION: To compete
for new residents and visitors,
add Harbor to Charlotte County's
name.
No matter where your views
about Charlotte County's
economic development,
there is no questioning that a
steady stream of newcomers is the
only thing standing between the
status quo and relentless stagna-
tion. With an average resident's
age in the mid-60s and an average
life expectancy of 79.7 years,
the hard truth is that the homes
occupied today will need new
occupants at some point.
Over the past three years, an
average of 2,250 people have
passed away in Charlotte County
every year. In 2012, 1,036 babies
were born here. Over a 10-year
period, that translates to thou-
sands of homes that must be
filled just for the county's popula-
tion and economy to remain
stable. Filling those homes and
convincing people to come
here and build new ones has
become increasingly difficult in
recent years with the real estate
bust and subsequent buckling of
the financial industry. But long-
term growth rates in Charlotte
County had slipped dramatically
long before that.
In the heady days of the
1960s, '70s and '80s, the county's
population doubled every
decade, largely on the strength of
three major developers building
homes in four communities,
General Development Corp.
in Port Charlotte, Punta Gorda
Isles Corp., in Punta Gorda and
Deep Creek, and Cavanaugh
Communities in Rotonda. The
advertising dollars and marketing
might of those companies helped
pushed the county's population
from 12,594 in 1960 to 110,975 in
1990.
We'd have 440,000 people here
today if we continued to double
every decade. Nobody wants that
to happen any time soon, but the
extreme example doesn't erase
the truth that the absence of ag-
gressive marketing is at the root
of Charlotte County's slowdown.
Which brings us to a topic
we've raised here before: Adding
the word Harbor to the county's
name.
When it comes to the mind-set
of our residents and visitors, we
already are Charlotte Harbor. In
fact, the local tourism bureau has
used the term Charlotte Harbor
& the Gulf Islands for more than
a decade. Business interests
lobbied hard to name the new
auditorium the Charlotte Harbor
Event and Conference Center
- and ballot-stuffed a Sun-
sponsored poll the county used
to pick a name. (In retrospect,
the Charlotte Harbor Center or
another permutation would have
been better, since everyone now
calls it the stupefyingly boring
Event Center.)
Not only would adding Harbor
to the county's name generate
considerable publicity in and out
of the state Broward County
got weeks of nationwide media
coverage just for considering a
name change to Fort Lauderdale
County it would differentiate
us from that other Charlotte, the
one in North Carolina. One of the
justifications for changing the
name of the Charlotte County
Airport to Punta Gorda Airport
was travelers' confusion between
the two Charlottes.
For visitors and would-be
residents, county names don't
resonate. In the Northeast and
Midwest our target audience
- cities and towns are the domi-
nant place names, not the county
in which they are located. Absent
the corporate dollars pitching
place names like Port Charlotte,
Punta Gorda Isles and Rotonda,
people in the Charlotte County
real estate and tourism industry


must sell Charlotte Harbor. That
would be a lot easier if that was
its name.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR


More thanks
for grad project

Editor:
I would like to thank the
DeCarlo family for helping out
with Project Graduation this
past June.
Nancy has been involved in
Project Graduation for several
years. She recently passed the
torch to me. We drove to work
together a lot last school year
and without her asking me
about once a week if I did this
or took care of that, I think
little things would have gone
undone.
Frank is always part of the
evening's events and at 5:30 a.m.


he is there ready to help clean
up. This year, Lindsey and
Frankie helped with some of the
food deliveries.
They were all left off the thank-
you list published in last Sunday.
So Nancy, Frank, Lindsey and
Frankie, I thank you very much
for helping to make 2013 Project
"SAFE" Graduation another
successful year.
Peaches Vacca
North Port

Recent letters
way off-base

Editor:
The implicit racism in several
letters in Friday's Sun is topped
only by their sheer ignorance.
One writer claims that
President Obama is just no
good because he wasn't raised
as an American. According to


this person, Obama didn't go
to kindergarten and recite the
Pledge of Allegiance.
For his information, Obama
attended kindergarten at Noelani
School in Honolulu. Then, after
four years in Indonesia, where
his mom and stepdad lived,
he returned to Honolulu and
went to school there (Punahou
School) from fifth through 12th
grades.
During this time, he lived
with his American grandfather,
Stanley Dunham, who both lived
through the Depression and was
a U.S. Army sergeant who served
in France duringWorldWar II.
Contrary to what the writer as-
serts, Obama apparently had
all the benefits that the writer
uses to determine in his own
small mind who is a "true-blue"
American.
In another letter, a writer
sarcastically says no white
people in American history have


received the adulation shown to
Dr. King. He needs a trip to D.C.
The rally he watched took place
between the Lincoln Memorial
and the Washington Monument.
Close by are the memorials
to Jefferson, FDR and soon to
Dwight Eisenhower. Couple
of white guys there who the
country has thought highly of.
Tom Flynn
Punta Gorda


Citrus industry
is not dying out
Editor:
In regards to you editorial
of Aug. 21, I believe the article
found on the Huffington Post,
"Citrus Greening Forces
Florida Growers To Trust A
Controversial Savior," more ap-
propriately represents the way
the growers in the Peace River
valley feel.
We have been taking bus
tours to Mr. Boyd's grove for four
years to monitor his progress,
and each year have found the
trees to look better and healthier
with a larger crop. Seeing was
believing and the first year of
the tour most growers began
nutritional programs.
Keeping nutrients to the trees
isn't the silver bullet and growers
must now watch each and every
stress to the tree that in the past
could be ignored.
However, grove sale prices
remain high and growers are
replanting both resets within
the grove where they have lost
trees and they are planting solid
sets where trees were lost to the
Canker Eradication Program of
years past.
We also see more children
coming back into their families'
grove businesses for a career.
These are not things that hap-
pen when the industry is dying.
There has been and will
continue to be groves lost, but
the planting should help to turn
the trend around and begin
to rebuild the industry to its
former glory.
Barbara Carlton
Arcadia


Mote Marine s mission is



research and outreach


ote Marine
Laboratory has
traveled a long
way since the lab was
opened in 1955 with
generous philanthropic
support, the energetic
passion for science
brought by Founding
Director Dr. Eugenie
Clark (who at 92 contin-
ues to work at the lab)
and the partnership of a
local fisherman named
Beryl Chadwick.
Today, Mote is the
research hub for nearly
three-dozen of the most
passionate and produc-
tive minds in global
marine science, all
Ph.D.s, nearly 200 pro-
fessional staff, dozens
of visiting researchers
from around the world
and 150 college interns
each year. Mote has
grown from a small field
station when we first
opened our doors just
outside of Boca Grande
to seven campuses that
reach from Sarasota
south to KeyWest.
We are a world-
class marine research
organization engaged
in groundbreaking
science to conserve
our environment.
Today our projects are
focused on sustaining


Gulf fisheries, restoring
vital, yet fragile, reefs
and supporting dozens
of active global studies
that have brought some
of the brightest minds
in marine science
and technology to our
region.
Our birth, growth
and impact has been in
great measure through
the generous commit-
ments of our donors,
who provide us with a
significant amount of
the funding needed to
support our research
and operations, and our
1,600 volunteers, whose
donation of time adds
up to the equivalent of
100 paid support staff.
As a home-grown,
independent, nonprofit
organization, Mote
remains especially com-
mitted to Southwest
Florida and always
interested in explor-
ing ways we can be of


further service to our
community. With that
in mind, we were happy
to recently provide
Sarasota County and
City of North Port staff
with a behind-the-
scenes tour of Mote, and
discuss our mission,
goals and priorities.
Mote's vision for our
future can be found
in our 2020 Vision and
Strategic Plan a
document that lays out
our guiding principles
and sets our strategic
priorities (www.mote.
org/2020vision).
Basically, Mote's mission
is to:
Perform scientific
research that supports
the health and sus-
tainability of marine
natural resources,
biodiversity and
habitats, and
Share that informa-
tion with the public
through education and
outreach programs
to help create a more
ocean-literate citizenry.
Our primary ve-
hicle for increasing
ocean literacy is The
Aquarium at Mote,
an Informal Science
Education Center.
While The Aquarium
is a major tourist


attraction that bolsters
the local and regional
economies and is
enjoyed by hundreds of
thousands of residents
and visitors every
year, its focus remains
consistent with Mote's
mission of increasing
public knowledge
about oceans.
While we are flat-
tered that some leaders
in our community
would consider us as
potential managers for
the Springs, we believe
that taking on such a
role would be contrary
to our mission and well
outside the scope of
our organization.
There are, however,
areas where our insti-
tution's scientific and
education expertise
could be of service,
provided that there was
interest in our involve-
ment and funding
from the state/county/
city to support such
programs. Specifically:

Research and
outreach
For years, Mote
manatee researchers
have studied how these
endangered marine
mammals use the creek


associated with Warm
Mineral Springs. The
lower creek not the
spring itself has the
potential to be a vital
warm-water refuge
for manatees during
cold weather periods
if habitat restoration
and enhancement is
undertaken by state/
county/city action.
As a global leader in
manatee research and
conservation, Mote
could potentially play
a key leadership role in
research related to such
restoration, monitoring
the manatees' use of the
enhanced habitat and
public outreach and
education associated
with manatees and their
conservation needs in
the Southwest Florida
region.

Springs research
Mote scientists
have technical diving
skills, experience with
Florida's offshore "blue
holes" essentially
underwater sinkholes
- and underwater cave
systems, and expertise
in monitoring the
condition and potential
connectivity with the
springs.
MICHAEL 11


LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


Our Town Page 10 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013





The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 11


City Council schedules


two budget hearings


he first public
hearing on the
proposed FY 2014
budget will be held at
5:01 p.m. today. At this
meeting, City Council
will adopt the City's
tentative millage rate and
budget, as well as the
final assessments for the
Punta Gorda Isles and
Burnt Store Isles Canal
Maintenance Districts.
A second public hear-
ing to adopt the final
millage rate and budget
will be held at 5:01 p.m.,
Sept. 18. Both meetings
will be held in council
chambers. The proposed
budget can be viewed on
the city's website www.
pgorda.us under What's
New.

Water plant
At today's meeting, City
Council will discuss the
application for coopera-
tive grant funding to the


Southwest Florida Water
Management District for
the city's groundwater re-
verse osmosis plant. The
project will address three
significant concerns:

Regulatory
Shell Creek is sus-
ceptible to drought
conditions and wide
variations in water
quality, and does not
meet state and national
regulatory requirements
for total dissolved solids
year-round.
The City's aquifer
storage and recovery


wells, used to store
treated water from Shell
Creek, must be remedi-
ated due to regulatory
changes to the maxi-
mum contaminant level
permitted for arsenic.
SWFWMD has
established minimum
flows and levels (MFL)
for Shell Creek and
is in the process of
revising the MFL. It
is anticipated that the
revised MFL will be
more stringent, further
reducing Punta Gorda's
supply of water.

Reliability
Our communities
should have 100 percent
certainty that their water
supply and quality will
meet demands for drink-
ing water, irrigation and
firefighting. Due to future
regulatory requirements,
Shell Creek will not meet
these demands.


Redundancy

Currently, there is an
emergency interconnect,
but it does not provide
sufficient redundancy
should the Shell Creek
water treatment plant not
meet demand because
of drought, algal blooms,
petroleum, or other
contamination.
This action is in conjunc-
tion with the city's request
to gain support from the
regional water authority
and state legislators. Vice
Mayor Rachel Keesling and
Council Member Carolyn
Freeland represent City
Council before the water
authority and state legisla-
tors, respectively.

Laishley leases
At today's meet-
ing, the Community
Redevelopment Agency
will review two new


leases for Laishley Park
- amendment to ground
lease for construction
of a deck extension for
the Crab House and
re-opening a ship's store
in the Marina building.
Both leases will not only
bring additional revenue
to the city but also serve an
increasing customer base.

Harborwalk
funding
The Metropolitan
Planning Organization
approved at its Aug. 26
meeting, City Council's
request to place $600,000
in its FY 2018 budget for
Harborwalk improve-
ments at Gilchrist Park.
With this action, grant
funds earmarked for
Harborwalk improve-
ments (FY 2017 & 2018)
now total $1.8 million.
Also at the MPO meeting,
the Florida Department of
Transportation secretary


announced a "complete
streets program" for the
state, similar to what
City Council recently
adopted. It seems the
state is heading in the
same direction as the city
in an effort to enhance
bicycle/pedestrian access.
Council Member Freeland
represents City Council on
the MPO board.

Flood work
Downtown Flooding
Phase II: The FEMA
funding contract has been
signed by Mayor Bill Albers
and returned to the state
Department of Emergency
Management for signature.
Once signed by FDEM, the
city is authorized to accept
bids and begin construc-
tion of the project.
Howard Kunik is the
Punta Gorda city manager
Readers may reach him at
HKunik@ci.punta-gorda.
fl.us.


Putting it all together: The Unified Land Development Code


Charlotte County
is currently in the
process of revis-
ing its land development
regulations and pre-
paring a Unified Land
Development Code that
collects all of the various
ordinances that govern
and control the devel-
opment of land and
presents them in a single
document. There are
several reasons for this
revision and the devel-
opment of the ULDC.
The existing land
development regula-
tions were prepared at
various times, and are
spread throughout the
Charlotte County Code
of Laws and Ordinances.
In many cases, these reg-
ulations were prepared
without a full review of
how they might work
with or against other
existing regulations. By


Matt Trepal
Guest Columnist


consolidating all of the
regulations into a single
code, the ULDC works
to eliminate conflicts
between sections and
standardize procedures
and definitions.
Many of the existing
regulations are old.
The zoning regula-
tions, for example, were
first prepared in the
1980s, and have only
been updated on a
piecemeal basis. Before
now, there has been no
comprehensive attempt
to modernize the land
development regulations
or to incorporate current
best planning and zoning
practices into them. The
ULDC includes many
current planning and


zoning practices to mod-
ernize and streamline the
procedures, practices,
and standards included.
The ULDC works to
improve the quality
of development in the
County. Many develop-
ment standards were
raised, even as many
other standards were
relaxed. The Smart
Charlotte 2050 compre-
hensive plan introduced
many new planning
concepts to the County,
such as increased walk-
ability and more mixed-
use development, and
the ULDC implements
these comprehensive
plan policies.
The draft ULDC is still
a work in progress, with
some sections incom-
plete or unfinished. The
incomplete sections
are still being devel-
oped, and will be made


available for review
when they have been
fully developed.
Public input meetings
on the draft ULDC have
begun, and the County
has received comments
that the review and
comment schedule is too
aggressive while the input
format is inadequate.
One change that has been
made subsequent to the
first meeting on Aug. 9 is
that all meetings will now
be roundtable meetings,
allowing for discussions.
The next set of public
input roundtable meet-
ings are scheduled for
Friday and Sept. 18, to
discuss Chapters 4, 5, and
6, although additional
meetings may be sched-
uled. These meetings are
open to the public, and
anyone interested in the
draft ULDC is invited to
attend.


Besides the meetings,
however, there are many
other avenues for public
comment on the draft
ULDC. The document
is available online for
review at the county's
website. Visit www.
CharlotteCountyFL.
gov and click "Unified
Land Development Code
(ULDC)" in the Hot
Topics list on the left.
Comments may be sub-
mitted by email at any
time to uldc@charlottefl.
com. Finally, Planning
and Zoning staff are
available to discuss
the code. The county
intends for this process
to be transparent,
inclusive, and as collab-
orative as possible, given
the three main motives
behind this revision.
All residents are invited
to submit comments
on the draft ULDC and


are invited to attend the
roundtable meetings. All
submitted comments
will be considered during
the review and revision
process.
The county's land
development regula-
tions directly affect the
county's future appear-
ance and development.
A site developed now
will retain its form and
appearance for 20 years
or more. The ULDC will
establish a framework
for getting higher-qual-
ity development while
streamlining processes
and allowing greater flex-
ibility for developers.
Matt Trepal is the
principal planner
for Charlotte County
Community Development
Department. Readers may
reach him at matthew.
trepal@charlottefl. com.


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FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


PROTEST
FROM PAGE 1

Office spokeswoman
Debbie Bowe declined
comment.
An excerpt from
CCSO's Use of Force
Policy reads: "Use of
force may range from
verbal persuasion to
lethal force. ... Where
use of force is warranted,
members should assess
the incident in order
to determine which
technique or weapon will
reasonably de-escalate
the incident and bring it
under control safely."
"We understand, if
there was a crime, they
had their procedure to

PLEASE

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do," said Mirna. "But the
way they went about it,
to traumatize my son, it
went too far."
According to the
report, Port Charlotte
Middle principal
Demetrius Revelas
requested the three
boys be charged with
trespassing.
On Tuesday, Revelas
directed inquiries about
the incident to district
spokesman Mike Riley,
who said, "Our priority
is the safety and security
of our kids. ... (Revelas)
followed procedure."
The incident report
shows one of the ju-
veniles said they were
"doing Parkour" a
form of urban gymnas-
tics in which participants



MAN
FROM PAGE 1

The deputy saw what
he thought were two
gunshot wounds in
Todd's upper thighs as
he was pulling him out
of the water. Roy then
approached the deputy
and Todd, which upset
Todd, who then tried to
pursue his father saying,
"You will have to kill me,"
according to the report.
North Port Police
K-9 officers responded


jump around using
parts of buildings and
structures. Riley said the
kids could have damaged
air-conditioning units
and expensive electrical
equipment on the roof.
"That could have been
a bad situation," he said.
"If they were just playing
football in the field or
something, it might have
been a different story.
But they had no business
being on the roof."
The Espinals held signs
Tuesday morning near
Port Charlotte Middle
during parent drop-off,
where they were ques-
tioned by deputies but
allowed to continue.
The posters read: "Stop
police brutality," "racism"
(Jose was born in the


seconds later and tried to
get Todd to calm down.
However, Todd didn't
comply with the officers'
command and suffered a
dog bite on his right calf,
the report shows.
Todd was then trans-
ported to the North Port
emergency room to be
treated for his injuries.
There, he told authorities
he was having mental
issues and believed he
was possessed.
Todd said he had taken
his family to Roy's house
around 10 a.m. Monday
to discuss the situation,


Dominican Republic),
"abuse their power"
and "stop the scare
tactics." Another ad-
dressed Revelas by name,
claiming he "lacks good
judgment."
Jose said he and his wife
contacted an attorney
and hope to express their
concerns about how the
situation was handled
to the Charlotte County
School Board and possibly
to the governor's office.
"It's not about my son
being arrested," said
Jose. "It's about how he
was treated, and now my
son's spirit is broken."
Jose said his son
did not attend school
Tuesday because he was
scared.
Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


the report states. The
family had multiple con-
versations about Todd's
mental health issues and
at one point talk turned
to calling a family priest
to try to help him.
What happened next is
unclear, as much of the
police report is redacted,
but Todd became upset
and started yelling at his
family members. How
or when Roy shot at the
victim is also unknown.
The victim was treated
for his injuries at the
North Port Emergency
Room. Meanwhile, Roy


SUN PHOIO BY ADAM KREGER


Jose and Mirna Espinal protested Tuesday morning outside Port
Charlotte Middle School alleging the Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office and school authorities overreacted to an incident at the
school Saturday. The Espinals' 12-year-old son allegedly had a
gun pointed at him by deputies after he reportedly tresspassed
on school grounds, and the principal wanted to pursue charges.


was taken into custody
around 3:30 p.m. for ques-
tioning. During the inter-
view, Roy complained of
chest pains. He was then
transported to Peace River
Regional Medical Center
in Port Charlotte.
He was later trans-
ferred to the Sarasota
County Jail, where he
remains without bond.
According to the
Sarasota County Clerk's
website, Todd has crimi-
nal charges dating back
to 2008, including driving
and drug offenses. Roy
Lafoy has no previous


arrests, records show.
Police had to call in
four officers for overtime
to secure the two crime
scenes (one where the
shooting took place
and the other where
Todd was found in the
waterway). The road was
blocked off to traffic for
nearly 10 hours.
According to NPPD
Capt. Tony Sirianni, Todd
is still being treated for
his injuries and charges
are pending upon his
release from the hospital.

Email: dwinchester@sun-herald.com


.I.


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Segur was "very profes-
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"Likewise, she knows a
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do a good job for us."
As the marketing
manager for the Cultural
Center, Barrett had a
large array of people and
events she worked with.


"Currently," she said, "I
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ships between the Cultural
Center and the commu-
nity. I also do a lot of the
fundraising campaigns in
the Cultural Center. We've
been promoting over
12,000 different happen-
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volunteers."
She will serve in a
similar capacity in her
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affiliation under the
Florida Homebuilders'
Association and the
National Association of
Homebuilders, which ad-
vocates for the interests
of builders and contrac-
tors. She will begin as
the local association's
executive officer Sept. 16.
Suzanne Graham, the
governmental affairs chair-
woman of the association,
said that as the executive
officer, Barrett "will be the
face of the association,
and she'll be in charge of
the day-to-day operations,
helping to grow member-
ship and aiding govern-
mental affairs."
Though Barrett is sad
to leave the Cultural
Center, where she has
worked since 2008, she


said the association
was alluring because
the industry itself is at a
critical point.
"With the building
industry back on an
upswing," she said, "it
just feels like this is a
really exciting time where
I could put a lot of my
passion into helping the
industry. I'm excited. It's
a great opportunity."
Barrett said that, while
the decision to leave the
Cultural Center was a
tough one, she's glad that
she continues to cham-
pion what she believes to
be a worthy cause.
"It's an honor to be
able to work in an indus-
try where you're helping
others," said Barrett.
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INSIDE

Moon mission
to study dust

@ ".. ..


A $280 million robotic satellite
mission will try to solve the
puzzle of floating moondust
and also determine for the first
time just how thin the moon's
atmosphere really is.
Page 2 -


Vehicles cross new
Oakland Bay Bridge


There was little fanfare, but the
gleaming white and newly built
$6.4 billion eastern span of
the San Francisco-Oakland Bay
Bridge opened to traffic.
Page 2 -


10 things to know


1. Key senators reach
deal on using force
against Syria
The resolution would bar U.S.
ground troops from combat opera-
tions and sets a 90-day deadline on
any action. Seepage 1.

2. Syrian regime
accused of hiding
equipment, troops
The main Western-backed opposi-
tion group says the army moved
soldiers and heavy weapons into
residential areas. Seepage 3.

3. Train safety takes a
back seat
Technology to stop head-on train
crashes may not be used until
2020. Seepage 1.

4. H-word use among
blacks goes on trial
A federal jury has rejected a black
manager's claim that it was used as
a term of endearment. Seepage 1.

5. Microsoft to buy
Nokia's phones
It will purchase Nokia's line-up of
smartphones and a portfolio of
patents for $7.2 billion.
Seepage 1.

6. Guess where
Dennis Rodman is
again?
He's visiting his'friend' Kim Jong
Un in North Korea. Seepage 3.

7. Sinai is new theater
for jihad
Sinai's instability is becoming more
regionalized and threatens to turn
into an outright insurgency.
Seepage 3.

8. Part-time jobs have
their heyday
In June, employers reduced
full-time jobs by 240,000 jobs, yet
added 360,000 part-time jobs.
See page 5.

9. Associate degrees
exhibit value
Students who earn them often
earn more in their first year out of
college than those with four-year
degrees, a study says. See page 5.

10. Quick, get back to
riding your bicycle
A study says that participants
in the Tour de France show a
mortality rate 41 percent lower
than a control group. See page 2.


I' I






h e ij re www. sunnewspapers. net
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 4, 2013



Syria-strike support grows


House Speaker John Boehner backs Obama plan


By DAVID ESPO
and BRADLEY KLAPPER
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
gained ground Tuesday
in his drive for congres-
sional backing of a military
strike against Syria,
winning critical support
from House Speaker John
Boehner while administra-
tion officials agreed to
explicitly rule out the use
of U.S. combat troops in
retaliation for a chemical
weapons attack.
"You're probably going
to win" Congress' backing,
Rand Paul of Kentucky, a
conservative senator and
likely opponent of the
measure, conceded in a
late-afternoon exchange
with Secretary of State
John Kerry.
The leader of House
Republicans, Boehner
emerged from a meeting
at the White House and
said the United States has
"enemies around the world
that need to understand
that we're not going to tol-
erate this type of behavior.
We also have allies around
the world and allies in the
region who also need to
know that America will be
there and stand up when
it's necessary."
Boehner spoke as
lawmakers in both par-
ties called for changes in
the president's requested
legislation, rewriting it to
restrict the type and dura-
tion of any military action
that would be authorized,
SYRIA 14


AP PHOTOS
President Barack Obama speaks to media, as House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio looks toward him in the Cabinet Room
of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, before a meeting with members of Congress to discuss the situation in Syria.


--ls~ _-- -.......- --...o-
Secretary of State John Kerry, center, flanked by Joint Chiefs Secretary of State John Kerry shows frustration
Chairman General Martin E. Dempsey, left, and Defense Tuesday at questioning from Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.,
Secretary Chuck Hagel, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing
Tuesday during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing about President Obama's request for congressional
on Syria. authorization for military intervention in Syria.


Train safety move delayed decades


By JOAN LOWY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
WASHINGTON It was
an accident investigators
say didn't have to happen:
Five years ago a commuter
train collided head-on with
a freight train near Los
Angeles, killing 25 and injur-
ing more than 100.
Technology is available
to prevent the most cata-
strophic collisions, but the
railroad industry and its
allies in Congress are trying
to push back a deadline for
installing the systems until
at least 2020.
The National
Transportation Safety Board
had urged as far back as 1970
that railroads install technol-
ogy to prevent the most cata-
strophic types of collisions,
including head-on crashes.
The technology is known as
positive train control or PTC.


NY case


were in place five or six
years ago," Kohler said in
an interview. "It would have
helped me."
Under a law enacted by
Congress a month after the
accident, the systems are
supposed to be up and run-
ning by Dec. 31, 2015. But
only a handful of railroads
are expected to meet that
deadline. The rest of the
industry says despite spend-
ing billions of dollars on the
systems, they face logisti-
cal and technical hurdles
AP PHOTO and need more time. Four


This Sept. 14, 2008, file photo shows investigators photographing the
inside of a mangled Metrolink commuter train in Chatsworth, Calif.


"It absolutely has to be
done, and the sooner the
better," said Frank Kohler,
a former critical care nurse
who was a passenger on the
commuter train. He awak-
ened an hour and a half after


the accident, on the ground
with his head split open.
He's unable to work and
suffers from a low tolerance
for stress, headaches and
memory loss.
"I wish (the safety systems)


puts N-word use


among blacks on trial


By LARRY NEUMEISTER
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

NEWYORK In a case
that gave a legal airing to
the debate over use of the
N-word among blacks, a
federal jury has rejected
a black manager's argu-
ment that it was a term
of love and endearment
when he aimed it at a
black employee.
Jurors awarded $30,000
in punitive damages
Tuesday after finding
last week that the
manager's four-minute
rant was hostile and


discriminatory, and
awarding $250,000 in
compensatory damages.
The case against
Rob Carmona and the
employment agency he
founded, STRIVE East
Harlem, hinged on what
some see as a complex
double standard sur-
rounding the word: It's
a degrading slur when
uttered by whites but can
be used at times with
impunity among blacks.
But 38-year-old Brandi
Johnson told jurors that
being black didn't make
it any less hurtful when
Carmona repeatedly


targeted her with the slur
during a March 2012
tirade about inappropri-
ate workplace attire and
unprofessional behavior.
Johnson, who taped the
remarks after her com-
plaints about his verbal
abuse were disregarded,
said she fled to the
restroom and cried for
445 minutes.
"I was offended. I was
hurt. I felt degraded. I
felt disrespected. I was
embarrassed," Johnson
testified.
The jury ordered

N-WORD 14


senators with industry ties
recently introduced a bill to
extend the deadline an ad-
ditional five to seven years.
The delays show how
a powerful industry can
stall regulations it doesn't
like, even after they're
enacted into law. The NTSB
TRAIN 14


Microsoft in


$7.2B deal


with Nokia
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REDMOND, Wash. Microsoft Corp.
is buying Nokia Corp.'s line-up of smart-
phones and a portfolio of patents and
services in an attempt to mount a more
formidable challenge to Apple Inc. and
Google Inc. as more technological tasks get
done on mobile devices instead of personal
computers.
The 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion) deal
announced late Monday marks a major
step in Microsoft's push to transform itself
from a software maker focused on making
operating systems and applications for
MICROSOFT14





Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL/WORLD NEWS


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


WORLD

Panel seeks review
of 30 Nazi-era war
crimes cases
LUDWIGSBURG,
Germany (MCT) -Thirty
cases linked to deaths at
the Nazi-era Auschwitz
concentration camp
should be reopened for
possible prosecution, a
German national inves-
tigative body recom-
mended Tuesday.
"This shows that,
even 68 years after the
end of World War II,
that no one can wipe
the slate clean on the
judicial process," said
Baden-Wuerttemberg
Justice Minister Rainer
Stickelberger, announcing
the decision.
Investigators said the
30 cases focus on as many
individuals still living in
Germany. Investigations
are still ongoing into
seven suspects living
abroad, in Israel, Croatia,
Austria, Brazil, the United
States, Poland and
Argentina. The location
of another two suspects
could not be determined.
The oldest person pos-
sibly facing charges was
born in 1916. The young-
est in 1926.

South Korea: North
could launch a
nuclear weapon
SEOUL (Bloomberg)
- North Korea has the
ability to "weaponize"
its nuclear technology
and put a warhead on a
missile, the South Korean
Defense Ministry said,
contradicting the U.S.
position that the country
is years away from gain-
ing the technology.
The report presented
earlier Tuesday to law-
makers said the North
can turn its nuclear
devices into weapons at
any time. After details of
the study became public,
the ministry toned down
the findings, saying in
an e-mailed statement
that the report meant
that the possibility of a
North Korean ballistic
missile being paired with
a nuclear warhead was
"high."

Report: Growth
up in advanced
economies
WASHINGTON (LA
Times) Growth picked
up in the second quarter
in the U.S., Europe and
other major advanced
economies but has
slowed in China and
other key emerging
nations, which will lead
to sluggish global output,
the Organization for
Economic Cooperation
and Development said
Tuesday.
Concerns about a
pullback on stimulus
efforts by the Federal
Reserve has triggered
financial market tur-
bulence in emerging
economies such as India
and Indonesia and fueled
currency depreciation
and an outflow of capital
because of rising borrow-
ing costs, the group said
in a new report.

UN: 2 million
have fled Syria
BEIRUT (LA Times) -
As the United States de-
bates whether to strike at
Syria, the United Nations
said Tuesday that the
number of Syrians who
have fled their homeland
has exceeded 2 million, a
figure rising daily as the
conflict in that country


continues to rage.
The U.N. and refugee
agencies highlighted the
gloomy milestone in a bid
to spur international sup-
port and fundraising for
relief efforts. At a crucial
moment, the U.N. said,
humanitarian agencies
have less than half of the
funds required to meet
basic refugee needs.


First vehicles cross SF-Oakland



Bay Bridge's new span


SAN FRANCISCO
(AP) There was little
fanfare, but the gleaming
white and newly built
$6.4-billion eastern span
of the San Francisco-
Oakland Bay Bridge
opened to the public as
vehicles began cross-
ing it after more than a
decade of construction
delays.
Part old and part new,
part permanent and part
temporary, the hybrid-
ized bridge opened late
Monday night in time
for Tuesday's morning
commute. The open-
ing followed a five-day
closure for the entire
bridge.
Drivers began lining
up their cars hours
earlier in an attempt to
be among the first on
the new span, and CHP
officers led a line of
vehicles across at about
10:15 p.m. several hours
before the estimated
opening time and the
expected commuter
crunch on Tuesday
morning.
The new span re-
places a structure that
was damaged during
the 1989 Loma Prieta
earthquake, which


AP PHOTO
In this photo taken on Monday provided by the Bay Area Toll Authority, a phalanx of police
officers lead a procession across the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge to mark the east span's
opening in San Francisco.


struck as millions tuned
in to watch Game 3 of
the "Bay Bridge World
Series" between the
Oakland Athletics and
San Francisco Giants.
The replacement span
is designed to withstand
the strongest earth-
quake estimated by
seismologists to occur
at the site over a 1,500-
year period.


"Despite the journey's
length, it has been
completed before
the arrival of our
next big earthquake,"
said Steve Heminger,
executive director
of the Metropolitan
Transportation
Commission. "And
thank goodness for
that."
The bridge's


pedestrian and bike sec-
tions were set to open
later Tuesday.
At a modest inaugural
ceremony, the new, self-
anchored suspension
bridge with its looming,
single white tower was
praised as a dramatic
safety upgrade over its
predecessor. It also was
held up as a beautiful
example of public art.


Moon mission to study dust


(San Francisco
Chronicle) When the
Apollo 17 astronauts flew
home from the moon 41
years ago, they left behind
an enduring mystery.
Eugene Ceman, com-
mander of that final moon
mission, had observed
a strange sight from the
lunar module: streamers
of unknown particles were
glowing faintly in the sun-
light some 60 miles above
the moon's horizon.
The lunar atmosphere,
Cernan knew, was
considered far too thin
to hold suspended dust,
and none of the earlier
Apollo mission's crews had
observed anything like it -
although cameras aboard
three earlier unmanned
Surveyor spacecraft had
recorded similar particles
glowing as close as a mile
from the surface.
Now a $280 million
robotic satellite mission,
designed, built and man-
aged from Mountain View,
Calif. by engineers and
scientists at NASAs Ames
Research Center, will try to
solve that puzzle and also
determine for the first time
just how thin the moon's
atmosphere really is, what
chemicals it contains, and
how the atmosphere varies
with time.
If the particles are


A full moon sets over Forest Park in Portland, Orego


indeed dust in the lunar at-
mosphere, scientists have
warned, the tiny grains
could thwart future efforts
to view distant space from
the airless moon with small
but powerful telescopes.
The jagged edges of the
particles -microscopically
small as they are could
rip the space suits of future
human explorers and even
clog the instruments on
robotic landers.
The Ames spacecraft is
named LADEE, an acro-
nym for Lunar Atmosphere
and Dust Environment
Explorer, and is set to be
launched aboard an Air
Force Minotaur V rocket
Friday at 8:27 p.m. PDT
from the space agency's
facility inWallops Island,
Va., where it will be near
midnight 11:27 p.m.
EDT. The robotic satellite


will first fly arou
Earth for 30 day
ries of long lopii
and then orbit t
for 40 days while
bound engineer
out all its instru
During its full
science mission
will fly for 100 d
near-circular lu
varying from 12
miles above the
surface. At the e
programmed to
a final plunge o
moon's rocky su
gathering science
the way.
In the heady
the Apollo mooi
astronauts had t
with interfering
dust on the surf
LADEE's orbitin:
will probe the ui
particles that ap


be floating high and low
inside the tenuous lunar
atmosphere.
"They're all a mystery,"
said physicist Greg Delory,
the mission's deputy
project scientist.
Among possible expla-
nations for the phenom-
enon are that extremely
fine dust particles on the
moon's surface are being
somehow lofted into
AP PHOTO the thin atmosphere by
electrical forces generated
)n, Aug.21. by the sun's ultraviolet
nd the radiation.
's in a se- There could also be
ng orbits, particles of elements like
he moon sodium and potassium
e earth- that may make up uniden-
rs check tified components of the
ments. atmosphere and that are
I-scale also capable of glowing
i, LADEE from the sun's radiation,
ays in a and even electrically-
nar orbit charged water molecules.
to 93 LADEE's ultraviolet and
lunar visable light pectrometers
nd it is are designed to detect
i die in them all, Delory said.
nto the The spacecraft also
irface carries a highly sensitive
ce data all dust detector to measure
the size of even the finest
days of dust particles and deter-
n landings, mine their mass at varied
o cope altitudes high into what
moon scientists call the moon's
ace. Now exospheree" were the
g mission atmosphere is so thin it
known merges with the vacuum of
pear to interplanetary space.


Egypt closes Al-Jazeera affiliate TV station


CAIRO (LA Times) -An
Egyptian court on Tuesday
ordered the closing of
four television stations,
including an Al-Jazeera
affiliate, in an escalating
government crackdown to
silence media criticism and
intimidate journalists.
The military has been
sensitive to media cover-
age since a coup in July
overthrew Islamist presi-
dent Mohammed Morsi.
Officials have accused
international journalists
of unfair reporting and
pressured local publica-
tions and television outlets
to endorse the interim's
government's repres-
sion of Morsi's Muslim
Brotherhood movement.
Three of the stations
ordered shut down are
run by Islamists, including
Ahrar 25, which has ties to
the Brotherhood. The Al-
Jazeera affiliate appeared
to be targeted as part of a
broader move against the


company's Qatar-based
global network. Qatar
was a crucial political
and financial ally to the
Brotherhood following
Morsi's election last year.
Authorities recently
raided Al-Jazeera's of-
fices in Cairo and
expelled three journalists
working for its separate
English-language channel.
Officials blamed Al-
Jazeera, which has focused
extensively on protests by
the Brotherhood against
the government, for
spreading "rumors and
claims that are harmful to
Egyptian national security
and threaten the country's
unity."
The official state news
agency said Tuesday's
court ruling accused the
four stations of "insulting
the armed forces ... and
inciting foreign countries
against Egypt."
After the court decision,
Al-Jazeera posted on its


website that its "coverage is
fair and balanced."
Government pressure on
the media has intensified
since security forces last
month killed at least 1,000
Brotherhood sympathiz-
ers and anti-military
protesters during raids and
attacks on demonstrations.
Most of the Brotherhood
leadership, including Morsi
and the group's supreme
guide, Mohammed Badie,
are in jail awaiting trials on
murder-related charges.
"The Egyptian govern-
ment is widening its cen-
sorship campaign against
critical media in Egypt
to undermine coverage
of Muslim Brotherhood
protests," said Sherif
Mansour, Middle East and
North Africa coordinator
for the NewYork-based
Committee to Protect
Journalists. "Like their
predecessors, authorities
apparently fail to grasp
that the attempted


suppression of dissenting
voices only compounds
the dissent."
Journalists have been
assaulted by supporters
of both the military and
the Brotherhood. Egypt's
volatile political terrain,
which has split the nation
into warring camps, has
threatened freedom of
expression and objective
reporting. The military has
spurred a wave of nation-
alism that swiftly labels
protesters "terrorists" or
"enemies of the state."
"I don't understand
the rationale behind
such court orders. They
are impossible to imple-
ment," Khaled Dawoud,
a leading member of the
liberal Dostour Party,
told the Ahram Online
news website regarding
Tuesday's ruling. "If they
ban a channel, other
channels will come up and
find a country to broadcast
from."


I NATION/HEALTH

Syria uncertainty
hangs over
Obama's trip
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Deep uncertainty sur-
rounding military action
against Syria hangs over
President Barack Obama's
three-day overseas trip
to Sweden and Russia,
which takes him away
from Washington just as
he's seeking support on
Capitol Hill for a strike.
Before his scheduled
departure Tuesday night,
Obama urged lawmakers
meeting with him at the
White House to support
his plan to punish Syria
for allegedly using chemi-
cal weapons to attack its
own people. The presi-
dent won the backing
of House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, and
Democratic Leader Nancy
Pelosi of California,
though that hardly
guarantees support in
the fractured House of
Representatives.

Study: Tour de
France racers live
longer lives
BERLIN (Bloomberg)
-Tour de France cyclists
outlived ordinary men by
six years in a study that sug-
gests the strain of intense
workouts may not be so bad
for the heart after all.
The study examined
786 French cyclists who
had taken part at least
once, between 1947 and
2012, in the grueling
bicycle race that has been
compared to climbing
Mt. Everest three times or
running a marathon for
three weeks.
Researchers compared
the cyclists with the rest
of the population of
French men the same
age. About a quarter of
the riders had died by
Sept. 1, 2012 a mortal-
ity rate 41 percent lower
than in the control group,
said Xavier Jouven of the
Sudden Death Expertise
Center in Paris. Jouven
said the cyclists' compar-
ative longevity surprised
him and his colleagues.

Katie Couric
engaged to
boyfriend Molner
NEWYORK (AP) -
Katie Couric is getting
married to her financier
boyfriend John Molner.
Couric's spokesman
Matthew Hiltzik con-
firmed the engagement
Tuesday morning follow-
ing a report by People
magazine.
Molner gave 56-year-

the former
host of
"Today" a
diamond
ring over the
weekend

MOLNER Hampton.
Molner, 50,
is a partner at investment
firm Brown Brothers
Harriman, who oversees
mergers and acquisitions
advisory work for the
firm's corporate clients.
The couple have dated
for nearly two years.

Rim fire almost
third largest in
Calif. history
LOS ANGELES (LA
Times) The massive
Rim fire is on its way
to becoming the state's
third largest in history
as it burns into Yosemite
National Park.
At 235,841 acres, or
roughly 368 square
miles, the Rim fire was


75 percent contained
Tuesday and fewer than
4,400 acres from moving
from fourth to third place
on the list of California's
largest wildfires.
The No. 3 spot belongs
to the Zaca fire, which
in July 2007 burned 375
square miles in Santa
Barbara County.





SThe Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 3


I WORLD

Pakistani girl shot
by Taliban opens
British library
LONDON (LA Times)
- Malala Yousafzai, the
Pakistani teenager who
was shot in the head
last year for advocating
education for girls like
herself, honored her
own weapon of choice
Tuesday: the book.
The 16-year-old, who
was hospitalized in
Britain after being shot by
the Taliban, was chosen
to deliver the opening
speech for a new public
library in Birmingham,
England, that is being
touted as the largest in
Europe.
In a warmly received
address outside the
new 10-story build-
ing, whose more than
1 million books include
a collection of the first
folios of Shakespeare's
works, Malala declared
that "books are the only
weapon that can defeat
terrorism."
She also delivered an
affectionate salute to
"Brummies," as residents
of Birmingham are
known, for their support
in the months after her
shooting, when she was
flown there for special-
ized surgery.

Rodman in North
Korea to visit his
'friend' Kim
PYONGYANG, North
Korea (AP) Former
NBA star Dennis
Rodman landed Tuesday
in North Korea and said
he plans to hang out
with authoritarian leader
Kim Jong Un, have a
good time and maybe
bridge some cultural
gaps but not be a
diplomat.
Rodman was greeted
at Pyongyang's air-
port by Son Kwang
Ho, vice-chairman of
North Korea's Olympic
Committee, just days
after Pyongyang rejected
a visit by a U.S. envoy
who had hoped to bring
home Kenneth Bae, an
American missionary
jailed there. The North
abruptly called off the
official visit because it
said the U.S. had ruined
the atmosphere for
talks by holding a drill
over South Korea with
nuclear-capable B-52
bombers.
Rodman said the
purpose of his visit was
to display his friendship
for Kim and North Korea
and to "show people
around the world that
we as Americans can
actually get along with
North Korea."


Syria said to be hiding weapons, moving troops


BEIRUT (AP) -As the
Obama administration
tries to prod Congress
into backing armed
action against Syria, the
regime in Damascus is
hiding military hardware
and shifting troops out
of bases into civilian
areas.
Politically, President
Bashar Assad has gone
on the offensive, warn-
ing in a rare interview
with Western media
that any military action
against Syria could spark
a regional war.
If the U.S. undertakes
missile strikes, Assad's
reaction could have
a major effect on the
trajectory of Syria's civil
war. Neighboring coun-
tries could get dragged
into a wider conflict,
or it could be back to
business as usual for a
crisis that has claimed
the lives of more than
100,000 people over 2 1V2
years.
The main Western-
backed opposition
group says that dur-
ing the buildup last
week to what seemed


AP FILE PHOTO
This Dec. 4,2011, photo provided by the Syrian official news agency SANA, shows Syrian
soldiers kneeling next to a multiple rocket launcher as they fire missiles during a maneuver at
an unknown location, in Syria.


like an imminent
U.S. attack, the army
moved troops as well
as rocket launchers,
artillery and other heavy
weapons into residen-
tial neighborhoods in
cities nationwide. Three
Damascus residents,
speaking on condition
of anonymity for fear


of reprisals, confirmed
such movements.
One man said two
members of the elite
Republican Guards
broke into an empty
house he owns and
showed him an official
document stating they
were authorized to do so
because Syria is at war.


A woman in another
area said soldiers moved
into a school next to her
house.
A U.S. official con-
firmed there are indica-
tions that the Syrian
regime is taking steps
to move some of its
military equipment and
bolster protection for


defense facilities.
The official, who
was not authorized to
discuss intelligence
matters and spoke on
condition of anonymity,
said that at this point,
the U.S. has the informa-
tion it needs to maintain
a good handle on what
the regime is doing to
prepare.
The trend inside Syria
is likely to continue in
the coming days now
that the regime has won
a reprieve with President
Barack Obama's decision
to seek congressional
approval for military
action.
"The Syrian regime
knows there are 30 to 40
potential targets for U.S.
airstrikes, and they have
had ample time to pre-
pare," said Hisham Jaber,
a retired Lebanese army
general and director of
the Middle East Center
for Studies and Political
Research in Beirut. "Half
of them, if not more,
have been evacuated,
moved or camouflaged.
This is the natural thing
to do."


Egypt's Sinai emerges as new theater for jihad


CAIRO (AP)-An
Egyptian doctor once
close to Osama bin
Laden is bringing to-
gether multiple al-Qaida-
inspired militant groups
in Egypt's Sinai to fight
the country's military,
as the lawless peninsula
emerges as a new theater
for jihad, according to
Egyptian intelligence and
security officials.
There have been other
signs of a dangerous shift
in the longtime turmoil
in the peninsula border-
ing Israel and the Gaza
Strip since the military's
July 3 ouster of Islamist
President Mohammed
Morsi, the officials say.
With the shifts, Sinai's
instability is becoming
more regionalized and
threatens to turn into an
outright insurgency.
Sinai has seen an influx
of foreign fighters over
the past two months,
including several hun-
dred Yemenis. Several
militant groups that long
operated in the area
to establish an Islamic
Caliphate and attack
their traditional enemy
Israel have joined others
in declaring formally that
their objective now is to
battle Egypt's military.
Also, Sinai has become
the focus of attention
among major regional
jihadi groups. A leader of
al-Qaida's Iraqi branch,


Abu Mohammed al-Ad-
nani, last weekend called
on Egyptians to fight the
military, as did al-Qaida's
top leader, Ayman
al-Zawahri. The militant
considered the most
dangerous man in the
Sahara one-eyed terror
leader Moktar Belmoktar,
a former member of
al-Qaida's North Africa
branch joined forces
with a Mali-based jihadi
group last month and
vowed attacks in Egypt.
Topping the most
wanted list in Sinai is
Ramzi Mawafi, a doctor
who joined al-Qaida in
Afghanistan in the 1990s.
Mawafi, 61, escaped
from an Egyptian prison
in 2011 in a massive
jailbreak that also sprung
free Morsi and more
than a dozen Muslim
Brotherhood members
during the chaos of the
uprising against autocrat
Hosni Mubarak.
Mawafi is now be-
lieved to be in Sinai


coordinating among
militant groups and help-
ing arrange money and
weapons, security offi-
cials told The Associated
Press. The four officials
were from military intel-
ligence, the military and
the security forces and
spoke on condition of
anonymity because they
were not authorized to
speak to the press.
Sinai's disparate
militant groups are now
"on the same page, in
full cooperation in the
face of the same threat,"
Gen. Sherif Ismail, a
recently retired security
adviser to the governor
of Northern Sinai, told
the AP He said the
groups are inspired
by al-Qaida, but not
necessarily linked to the
mother group.
Morsi's fall opened
the way for an escala-
tion by Sinai's jihadis.
Most militants had seen
Morsi as too willing to
compromise in bringing


rule by Islamic Shariah
law in Egypt. But his
removal by the military,
backed by liberals,
was seen as an attack
on Islam. More im-
portantly, it ended the
policy Morsi pursued
during his year in office
of negotiating with Sinai
armed groups, restrain-
ing security operations
against them in return


for a halt in attacks on
the military.
Now, the military has
stepped up operations.
On Tuesday, helicopter
gunships struck sus-
pected militant hideouts
in several villages near
the borders with Israel
and Gaza, killing at least
eight and wounding 15,
the state news agency
MENA announced.


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Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IWednesday, September 4, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE


Whales get suntans too, study finds


(LA Times) -We're
not the only ones who
get summer tans. So do
whales and their DNA
gets damaged in the pro-
cess too, scientists say. The
new findings, published
Friday in the journal
Scientific Reports, could
lead to better sunscreens
and other sun protection
products for humans.
The study authors
already knew that the
UV radiation in sunlight
caused some whales' skin
to react like human skin,
forming sunburn-like blis-
ters. But was this response
similar at a molecular
level, too?
To find out, the team
analyzed skin samples
from the backs of 106 blue
whales, 23 sperm whales
and 55 fin whales during
their annual migration


SYRIA

FROM PAGE 1

possibly including a ban
on U.S. combat forces on
the ground.
A new resolution was
written Tuesday by Sens.
Bob Menendez, D-N.J.,
and Bob Corker, R-Tenn.
It could get a vote by the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee Wednesday.
Menendez is the chair-
man and Corker is the top
Republican on the panel.
"There's no problem in
our having the language
that has zero capacity for
American troops on the
ground," said Secretary
of State John Kerry, one
of three senior officials to
make the case for military
intervention at the com-
mittee's hearing.
Kerry had said earlier
in the hearing that he'd
prefer not to have such


TRAIN

FROM PAGE 1

has investigated 27
train crashes that took
63 lives, injured nearly
1,200 and caused mil-
lions of dollars in dam-
age over the past decade
that officials say could
have been prevented
had the safety systems
been in place.
"This is not an issue



N-WORD

FROM PAGE 1

Carmona to pay $25,000
in punitive damages and
STRIVE to pay $5,000.
Outside court after
her victory, Johnson said
she was "very happy"
and rejected Carmona's
claims from the witness
stand Tuesday that the
verdict made him realize
he needs to "take stock"
of how he communicates
with people he is trying
to help.
"I come from a differ-
ent time," Carmona said
hesitantly, wiping his
eyes repeatedly with a
cloth.



MICROSOFT
FROM PAGE 1

desktop and laptop com-
puters into a more versatile
and nimble company that
delivers services on any
kind of Intemet-connected
gadget.
Microsoft, which is
based in Redmond,
Wash., is being forced to
evolve because people
are increasingly pursu-
ing their digital lives on
smartphones and tablet
computers, causing the
demand for PCs to shrivel.
The shift is weakening
Microsoft, which has
dominated the PC software


from the Arctic Ocean
to the sunnier Gulf of
California, which lasts
from February to April.
In all three species, the
number of cells that pro-
duce the pigment melanin
increased over this time
period as UV radiation
levels rose, similar to what
happens in humans. Blue
whales, the palest of the
three species, showed
the greatest increase in
melanin-producing cells,
or melanocytes, most
likely because they had so
few of them to begin with,
said Mark Birch-Machin,
a molecular biologist at
Newcastle University in
England and a co-author
of the study.
On the other hand,
the slightly darker
sperm whales showed
a more subtle increase


in melanocytes, prob-
ably because they spend
more time socializing at
the sunlit ocean surface,
Birch-Machin said. Their
bodies had already pro-
duced more melanocytes
as a result.
The number of mela-
nocytes didn't change in
the pitch-black fin whales.
They had the highest
baseline level of these
cells, which could be
because they spend most
of the year in the Gulf
of California. "They've
already become acclima-
tized to this amount of UV
exposure," Birch-Machin
said.
The researchers also
examined the DNA in the
animals' mitochondria,
the tiny "battery packs"
that provide energy to
cells. Mitochondrial DNA


is damaged in sunburned
human skin. And the
same is true for whales,
the researchers found:
Blue whales suffered
the worst mitochondrial
DNA damage, followed
by sperm and fin whales.
The results suggest that
melanin protects whales
against UV radiation, just
like it does in humans.
The team also looked
at three genes that help
combat cell stress in
humans. Sperm whales
showed the highest ex-
pression of these genes,
which may act as a
"second line of defense,"
since boosting melanin
production may not be
enough to counteract the
increased UV radiation
at the ocean surface,
Birch-Machin said. In
contrast, blue whales


A protester is removed by security as he interrupts testimony by Secretary of State Joh
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, and Joint Chiefs Chairman General Martin E. Dempsey
Hill in Washington, Tuesday, during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on


language, hypothesizing
the potential need for
sending ground troops "in
the event Syria imploded"

where the industry
is trying to get out of
this mandate," said
Ed Hamberger, presi-
dent and CEO of the
Association of American
Railroads. "We have
invested too much in
it already, and it is in
our best interest to
get it done as soon as
possible."
But safety, labor and
passenger advocates
are skeptical that most
railroads will ever

"So now, now you're
sorry?" Johnson said
outside court, saying she
doubted his sincerity
and noting Carmona had
refused to apologize to
her in court last week.
She said he should have
been sorry on March 14,
2012, "the day when he
told me the N-word eight
times."
Her lawyer, Marjorie
M. Sharpe, said she
hoped the case sent a
strong message to those
who "have tried to take
the sting out of the
N-word.... It's the most
offensive word in the
English language."
Carmona left the
courthouse without im-
mediately commenting,


market for the past
30 years, and empowering
Apple, the maker of the
trend-setting iPhone and
iPad, and Google, which
gives away the world's
most popular mobile
operating system, Android.
Nokia, based in Espoo,
Finland, and Microsoft
have been trying to
make inroads in the
smartphone market as
part of a partnership
forged in 2011. Under the
alliance, Nokia's Lumia
smartphones have run
on Microsoft'sWindows
software, but those
devices haven't emerged
as a popular alternative to
the iPhone or an array of
Android-powered devices


or to prevent its chemi-
cal weapons cache from
falling into the hands of a
terrorist organization.

implement the system
without more govern-
ment pressure.
"When they are push-
ing for a five-year exten-
sion with no changes
you have to wonder if
they aren't hoping that
some deregulatory White
House will come along
before then and just lift
the burden," said Ross
Capon, president and
CEO of the National
Association of Railroad
Passengers.

as did all eight jurors.
In closing argu-
ments, Sharpe had said
Carmona's use of the
word was intended to
offend "and any evidence
that defendants put forth
to the contrary is simply
ridiculous."
"When you use the
word (N-word) to an
African-American, no
matter how many alter-
native definitions that
you may try to substitute
with the word (N-word),
that is no different than
calling a Hispanic by
the worst possible word
you can call a Hispanic,
calling a homosexual
male the worst possible
word that you can call
a homosexual male,"


spearheaded by Samsung
Electronics' smartphones
and tablets.
Microsoft is betting it
will have a better chance
of narrowing the gap if it
seizes complete control
over how the mobile
devices work with its
Windows software.
"It's a bold step into the
future a win-win for
employees, shareholders
and consumers of both
companies," Microsoft
CEO Steve Ballmer said in
a statement.
The acquisition is being
made at the same time
that Microsoft is looking
for a new leader. Just 10
days ago, Ballmer, 57, an-
nounced he will relinquish


"President Ob
not asking Amer
to war," Kerry sa
strongly worded


may not need to rely on
these genes since they
get so little sun, while
the deep pigmentation in
fin whales may provide
enough protection.
The correlation
between whale and
human responses to sun
exposure was "very clear
and very pronounced,"
Birch-Machin said.
But other associations
were less clear. The
study didn't quantify the
difference between the
damage UV radiation
causes in humans versus
whales, so it's possible
the damage in whales
is "a hundredfold less
than what you'd see in
any human being," said
Dr. David Fisher, chair-
man of dermatology at
Massachusetts General
Hospital in Boston.


statement. He added,
"This is not the time for
armchair isolationism.
This is not the time to be
spectators to slaughter."
Obama said earlier in
the day he was open to
revisions in the relatively
broad request the White
House made over the
weekend. He expressed
confidence Congress
would respond to his
call for support and said
Assad's action "poses a
serious national secu-
rity threat to the United
States and to the region."
The administration
says 1,429 people died
from the attack on
AP PHOTO Aug. 21 in a Damascus
suburb. Casualty esti-
in Kerry, mates by other groups
, on Capitol are far lower, and Assad's
Syria. government blames the
episode on rebels who
ama is have been seeking to
ica to go overthrow his govern-
id in a ment in a civil war that


opening


"It's one thing to say
we can't get it all done by
the end of 2015. It's quite
another thing to say we
want a blanket, industry-
wide pass for five more
years," he said. "That's
suggestive of bad faith."
"For every day that
it is delayed, the threat
of another accident
remains," NTSB member
Robert Sumwalt said.
Railroads have
invested heavily in
making their case to

Sharpe told jurors.
But Carmona's law-
yers said the 61-year-old
black man of Puerto
Rican descent had a
much different experi-
ence with the word.
Raised by a single
mother in a New York
City public housing
project, he became
addicted to heroin in his
teens and broke it with
the help of drug coun-
selors who employed
tough love and tough
language.
Carmona went on
to earn a master's
degree from Columbia
University before
co-founding STRIVE in
the 1980s. Now, most
of STRIVE's employees


the CEO reins within the
next year in a move that
many analysts regarded as
Microsoft's tacit admission
that the company needed
an infusion of fresh blood
to revitalize itself.
The deal could fuel
speculation that Nokia's
CEO, former Microsoft
executive Stephon Elop,
will emerge as a top can-
didate to succeed Ballmer.
Elop will step aside as
Nokia's president and CEO
to become executive vice
president of Nokia devices
and services in preparation
for joining Microsoft once
the acquisition closes.
Chairman Risto Siilasmaa
will stay in his current role
and assume the duties of


began over two years ago.

Congress. Last year, the
industry spent nearly
$47 million lobbying
the federal government,
according to the po-
litical money-tracking
website OpenSecrets.
org. The industry's 329
registered lobbyists
include former Sens.
Trent Lott, R-Miss., and
John Breaux, D-La., and
former Mississippi Gov.
Haley Barbour, as well
as dozens of former
House and Senate aides.

are black women, his
attorney, Diane Krebs,
told jurors in her open-
ing statement.
"And Mr. Carmona is
himself black, as you
yourselves can see,"
Krebs said.
In his testimony,
Carmona defended
his use of the word,
saying he used it with
Johnson to convey that
she was "too emotional,
wrapped up in her, at
least the negative as-
pects of human nature."
Then he explained
that the word has
"multiple contexts" in
the black and Latino
communities, some-
times indicating anger,
sometimes love.


interim CEO.
Microsoft hopes to
complete the deal early
next year. If that time-
table pans out, about
32,000 Nokia employees
will transfer to Microsoft,
which currently has about
99,000 workers.
The proposed price
consists of 3.79 billion
euros ($5 billion) for the
Nokia unit that makes
mobile phones, includ-
ing its line of Lumia
smartphones that run
Windows Phone software.
Another 1.65 billion euros
($2.2 billion) will be paid
for a 10-year license to
use Nokia's patents, with
the option to extend it
indefinitely.


ALMANAC

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 4,
the 247th day of 2013. There are
118 days left in the year. Rosh
Hashana, the Jewish New Year,
begins at sunset.
Today in history
On September 4,1888,
George Eastman received a
patent for his roll-film box
camera, and registered his
trademark: "Kodak."
On this date
In 1781, Los Angeles was
founded by Spanish settlers
under the leadership of Governor
Felipe de Neve.
In 1886, a group of Apache
Indians led by Geronimo (also
known as Goyathlay,"One Who
Yawns") surrendered to Gen.
Nelson Miles at Skeleton Canyon
in Arizona.
In 1893, English author Beatrix
Potter first told the story of Peter
Rabbit in the form of a "picture
letter" to Noel Moore, the son of
Potter's former governess.
In 1917, the American Expedi-
tionary Forces in France suffered
their first fatalities during World
War I when a German plane
attacked a British-run base
hospital.
In 1948, Queen Wilhelmina of
the Netherlands abdicated after
nearly six decades of rule for
health reasons.
In 1951, President Harry S.
Truman addressed the nation
from the Japanese peace treaty
conference in San Francisco in
the first live, coast-to-coast
television broadcast.
In 1957, Arkansas Gov.Orval
Faubus used Arkansas National
Guardsmen to prevent nine
black students from entering
all-white Central High School in
Little Rock. Ford Motor Co. began
selling its ill-fated Edsel.
In 1962, The Beatles, with
new drummer Ringo Starr,
recorded "Love Me Do"at EMI
Studios in London. (The more
familiar version with substitute
drummer Andy White and Starr
on tambourine was recorded a
week later.)
In 1971, an Alaska Airlines jet
crashed near Juneau, killing all
111 people on board.
In 1972, U.S. swimmer Mark
Spitz won a seventh gold medal
at the Munich Olympics, in the
400-meter medley relay."The
New Price Is Right,"hosted by
Bob Barker, premiered on CBS.
In 1998, Internet services
company Google filed for incor-
poration in California.
Today's birthdays
Actress Mitzi Gaynor is 82.
Singer Merald"Bubba" Knight
(Gladys Knight & The Pips) is
71. World Golf Hall of Famer
Raymond Floyd is 71. Actress
Jennifer Salt is 69. World Golf
Hall of Famer Tom Watson
is 64. Rock musician Martin
Chambers (The Pretenders) is
62. Actress Khandi Alexander
is 56. Actor-comedian Damon
Wayans is 53. Rock musician
Kim Thayil is 53. Actor Richard
Speight Jr. is 44. Actor Noah
Taylor is 44. Actress lone Skye
is 43. Actor Wes Bentley is 35.
Actor Max Greenfield is 34.
Singer Dan Miller ("Making the
Band") is 33. Singer Beyonce
Knowles is 32.


Skyscraper
accused of
melting Jaguar
LONDON (AP) -
Motorists may want
to think twice about
parking in front of
the half-built London
skyscraper known as
the Walkie-Talkie.
That's because the
glare off the skin of
the new building is so
intense that at least
one Jaguar owner says
it caused part of his
vehicle to melt.
And that's not all:
Locals say the build-
ing's heat also burned
a hole in the welcome
mat of a barber shop
across the street.
"We were working
and just saw the
smoke coming out of
the carpet," said shop
owner Ali Akay. "This
is a health and safety
issue. They should have
looked into this before
they built it."


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE






The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013 BUSINESS NEWS www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 5


The rise of part-time jobs


WEST PALM BEACH,
Fla. (Cox Newspapers)
- Until recently, Matt
Emkey and Joseph
Allen were among the
8.2 million people
working part-time and
wanting full-time work.
Before the recession,
only 4.4 million people
were stuck in part-time
jobs. But part-time jobs
are being added at a
steady clip, disguised in
an unemployment rate
that has fallen from 7.9
to 7.4 percent this year.
During that time,
766,000 part-time jobs
were created, while only
222,000 full-time jobs
were created.
"On average, workers
are working a whole lot
fewer hours than they
did in the past. That
usually translates into
a lot more part-time
employment," said Ali
Bustamante, a Florida
International University
visiting professor who
authored the annual
Labor Day report,
"The State of Working
Florida."
While it's not unusual
to have high part-time
employment percent-
ages during a recession,
economists with the
Federal Reserve of San
Francisco noted that the
high rates have persisted
during the recovery.


The numbers of those
working part-time for
economic reasons,
rather than because they
want to, has been at its
highest point ever dur-
ing this downturn, the
Fed's report showed.
Emkey has recently
joined that group, after
losing his job as organist
and music director at the
Cathedral of St. Ignatius
and Loyola in June. He
cobbles together gigs
playing weddings and
funerals, and looks for
full-time work, even if
not as a musician.
"I'm looking for
anything that's going to
provide decent income
and health insurance,"
he said.
Partner Allen moved
from a full-time New York
City retail job in March
but had to transfer into
a part-time position at
J.Crew locally. He finally
found a full-time job
with Saks Fifth Avenue
on Palm Beach about a
month ago.
Having a full-time
worker in the household
makes a big difference,
especially for health
benefits. But many
families are surviving
on part-time paychecks
in households that were
founded on full-time
incomes.
"It means you have


a lot more people out
there who are struggling
to make ends meet," said
David Cooper, economic
analyst for the Economic
Policy Institute.
Is it the fault of the
poor economy? Or the
fault of Affordable Care
Act deadlines that caused
some employers to cut
hours before June 31?
Yes, economists say.
In June, employers
reduced full-time jobs
by 240,000, yet added
360,000 part-time jobs.
Economists and politi-
cians have pointed to
deadlines for ACA that
required employers to
provide health care for
any full-time worker on
the rolls at that point. The
deadline was extended at
the last minute.
Wells Fargo Economic
Group senior economist
MarkVitner attributes
some of the part-time job
growth this year to the
new ACA rules, especially
the extreme opposite
numbers seen in June.
But he and other
economists mostly
blame the economy.
"It's a problem that's
driven by the weakness
of the recovery," Cooper
said. "If businesses felt
they had more custom-
ers and could take on
more full-time workers,
they would."


SHOP



FORA




CAUSE


WASHINGTON
(Stateline.org) Students
who earn associate
degrees and occupational
certificates often earn
more in their first year
out of college than those
with four-year college
degrees, according to a
new study examining the
average salaries of gradu-
ates in five states.
For the study, College
Measures, a partnership
between the American
Institutes for Research
and Matrix Knowledge
Group, worked with
Arkansas, Colorado,
Tennessee, Texas and
Virginia to obtain data
on how much graduates
from two- and four-year
colleges in those states
earned in their first year
after graduation. College
Measures aims to im-
prove the decision-mak-
ing process for students,
parents and policymakers
for a more efficient and
productive higher educa-
tion system.
"The findings chal-
lenge some conventional
wisdom, showing for
example that what you
study matters more than
where you study," Mark
Schneider, president of
College Measures, said.
"Higher education is one
of the most important
investments people make.
The right choices can lead
to good careers and good
wages while the wrong
ones can leave graduates
with mountains of debt

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and poor prospects for
ever paying off student
loans."
Schneider said states
tend to put a lot of money
into the flagship universi-
ties, the best-known
research institutions in
each state. But his study
indicates state legisla-
tors should focus more
attention and funding
on community colleges,
which "can represent a
good way for residents of
a state to get the training
that they need to get into
the local labor market
and earn a reasonable
wage."
Schneider said that
regional four-year public
colleges should also take
a cue from community
colleges and think more
about how they can
best train students to fill
the needs of local job


markets.
Among the lessons of
the study:
Short-term credentials,
such as two-year degrees
and technical certificates,
can be worth more than
bachelor's degrees in
early years. The study
found that in Texas, those
who graduated with tech-
nical associate's degrees
earned over $11,000 more
on average in their first
year after graduation
than those with four-year
degrees.
Those who graduate
from flagship campuses
who entered the job mar-
ket directly after gradu-
ation did not earn more
than graduates of regional
college campuses.
In all five states, those
who graduated with en-
gineering degrees earned
the most.


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Study: Associate degrees

can top 4-year degree value


I I


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


WIRE Page 5


www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


Syria impedes stock gains


NEWYORK (AP) -The
stock market logged
modest gains Tuesday as
renewed worries about a
U.S.-led attack on Syria
dampened an early rally.
Stocks surged in the
opening minutes of
trading as worries of
an imminent attack on
Syria appeared slimmer
after President Barack
Obama announced over
the weekend that he
would seek congressio-
nal approval for a strike.
The stock market gave
much of its early gain
after the top Republican


in Congress said he
would support President
Obama's call for the U.S.
to take action.
Speaking in the late
morning, House of
Representatives Speaker
John Boehner said the
use of chemical weapons
must be responded to.
"Key Republicans seem
to agree with Obama on
Syria," said JJ Kinahan,
chief derivatives strategist
for TD Ameritrade. "It
puts us in a difficult situ-
ation as to what might
happen from here."
The Dow Jones


industrial average closed
up 23.65 points, or
0.2 percent, to 14,833.96.
The index had climbed
as much as 123 points in
early trading.
The Dow was held back
by Microsoft and Verizon,
which both slumped after
announcing deal news.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index gained 6.80
points, or 0.4 percent,
to 1,639.77. The Nasdaq
composite climbed 22.74
points, or 0.6 percent, to
3,612.
The stock market also
got an early boost from a


report showing that U.S.
manufacturing expanded
last month at the fastest
pace since June 2011. The
report was better than
economist had expected,
according to estimates
compiled by data pro-
vider FactSet.
In corporate news,
CBS surged $2.40, or
2.7 percent, to $53.50
after the broadcaster
and Time Warner Cable
reached an agreement
that ended a blackout
of CBS and CBS-owned
channels such as
Showtime.


In one way or another, they're connected


Interesting how seem-
ingly unrelated events
occur and as we con-
template them individu-
ally, we realize in a weird
way they are interlinked.
Examples: received
an email from the
gentleman who heads
up my high school
reunion every five years
reminding us that "we
are closing in on Social
Security and we've come
into maintenance mode
with our bodies gotta
keep moving, gotta keep
the mind thinking. "
Another email pointed
out the atrocious use
of the English language
today, "I noticed your
using the word "perusal,"
and it brought to mind
the number of times I
hear educated profes-
sionals misuse words or
use nonexisting words on
TV." I would add it isn't
just the educated profes-
sionals who slaughter the
spoken or written word.
Still another email
from some folks who
avoided the "we're from
Microsoft and your
computer is sending out


bad stuff" scam. In days
gone past we might have
called our local constab-
ulary and it would have
taken a report and had
the perpetrator picked
up by sundown.
As disparate as these
three items seem, they
are all connected via
our binary buddies. My
schoolmate friend who
is in reality a rocket
scientist is able to con-
tact all his high school
classmates via one email.
We communicate among
ourselves much more
than we ever did when
it was necessary to write
a letter on actual paper
and mail it with the
USPS.
Doubt that? Take a
quick look at Facebook
or Twitter "going to


bed now" or "took the
dog for a walk."
And criminals no
longer need to be local.
The poor sap who steals
some pipe to turn in for
scrap value is a piker
compared to the orga-
nized crime rings that rip
off thousands of unsus-
pecting or trusting folks
for hundreds of dollars at
a time while sitting safely
in Estonia or some other
distant locale.
On the other hand, our
calculating companion
also offers us tremen-
dous opportunity for
control of our personal
circumstances. With
Social Security such a
big question for those
hoping to actually
receive it soon, surf over
to www.socialsecurity.
gov where we can look at
our benefits and differ-
ent projections based on
how and when we want
to receive our benefits.
Medical issues can be
researched at our leisure
on sites such as www.
webmd.com or www.
mayoclinic.com. Trying to
find a lost friend or family


member? Type their name
in the search field of
Google, Yahoo or Bing.
Need to communicate a
topic to a business, friend
or government agency?
Specificity, clarity and
syntax will help get your
point across. Don't be
afraid to consult www.
merriam-webster.com to
find the exact word that will
elucidate the critical points
we are trying to illustrate.
If we don't remember sen-
tence structure from high
school, surf over to www.
quia.com/rr/126726.html
to practice identifying how
sentences are put together.
By now we are all
aware of the scams
perpetrated by nefarious
characters and can log
a report with the FBI at
www.fbi.gov/scams-
safety/fraud/
internet fraud/
internet fraud.
Court Nederveld
owns his own com-
puter consulting andfixit
service Bits, Bytes &
Chips Computer Services.
You can reach him at
adakeep@hotmail.com or
941-626-3285.


Dear Dave: My wife
and I make together
about $100,000 a
year, almost $50,000 in an
IRA and no debt except for
our home. The problem
is I've had several health
issues lately, and we've
diverted a lot of money
we'd put into saving and
investing toward medical
bills. We also have two kids
in high school who want to
go to college. Do you think
we should cash out the IRA
to help send our boys to
school? Jeff
Dear Jeff: You guys make
$100,000, and expenses
at a good in-state school
would be roughly $17,000 a
year. If I were you, I'd trim
the household budget and
make the kids get to work
Look around and see what
you can sell, too.
Providing an education
for your kids is a noble
pursuit, but you're low on
money right now because
of health problems and
medical bills. You didn't do
anything wrong to create
this scenario. It was just a
case of life happening. So,
you shouldn't feel ashamed
to sit down with your kids
and say, "Okay, serious
talk time. You guys know
what's happened recently,
so if you want to go to
college, you need find a
good, affordable institu-
tion and start applying for
every available scholarship.
You also need to plan on
working after school and
on weekends now and
when you're off at college
- and saving money like
crazy. Your mom and I will
help out some, but we all
have to pull together to
make this happen."
There's a better way to
do this than borrowing
money and going into
debt. There will be times
when it's not easy, but


walking around with
student loans hanging over
your head or nothing set
aside for retirement is
no fun, either! Dave

Dear Dave: My mom
has about $35,000 worth
of debt from a $17,000 car
and $18,000 in student
loans. She makes $20,000 a
year. How can she get out
of this mess? Christina
Dear Christina: No one
needs a car that's worth
nearly all of their yearly
income. That's just ridicu-
lous. Sell the car! That will
get rid of almost half her
debt, then find her a little
$2,000 beater to drive until
she can save up for a better
car.
Remember this simple
rule: Never buy a car that
costs more than half of
your annual income. Also,
never go into debt to buy a
car. Automobiles go down
in value like a rock
We also have an income
issue here. Your mom has
to do something in the
short term to get her in-
come up and pay off debt.
A part-time job nights and
weekends would be a really
good idea. Then, she needs
to address her long-term
situation with an eye to-
ward a decent job.Whether
it's more formal education
or technical training in a
particular field, she needs
to find a career that will
significantly increase her
income. Dave
Follow Dave on the Web
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MutualFunds
12-mo
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
Advance Capital I
Balanced b 18.30 ... +9.9
EqGrow b 29.66 -.03 +19.8
Retlnc b 8.54 -.02 -1.7
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 8.19 +.05 +24.0
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 47.54 +.47 +26.8
AllianzGI
WellnessD b 32.47 +.27 +23.6
Alpine
DynBal d 11.81 -.02 +5.1
DynDiv d 3.50 +.02 +9.4
Amana
Growth b 29.17 +.15 +9.6
Income b 39.10 +.15 +18.4
American Beacon
LgCpVlls 26.01 +.11 +26.0
American Cent
CapVallv 8.05 +.03 +21.9
HiYldMu 8.69 ...-4.8
InTTxFBlnv 11.08 ... -3.0
American Century
Eqlnclnv 8.58 ... +12.9
Growthlnv 30.54 +.24 +13.6
Ultralnv 30.88 +.30 +19.1
American Funds
AMCAPA m 25.56 +.18 +25.1
BalA m 22.26 +.05 +13.5
BondA m 12.33 -.04 -2.5
CaplncBuA m 55.09 +.22 +9.0
CapWIdBdA m 19.78 -.09 -4.2
CpWIdGrlA m 40.77 +.39 +18.9
EurPacGrA m 43.58 +.53 +15.7
FnlnvA m 46.58 +.30 +20.4
GIbBalA m 28.39 +.10 +11.2
GrthAmA m 40.32 +.39 +23.9
HilncA m 11.17 ... +7.4
IncAmerA m 19.21 +.02 +11.7
IntBdAmA m 13.38 -.02 -1.6
InvCoAmA m 34.86 +.13 +19.6
MutualA m 32.18 +.04 +17.2
NewEconA m 34.83 +.44 +31.5
NewPerspA m 34.78 +.38 +18.6
NwWrldA m 54.40 +.50 +9.3
SmCpWIdA m 46.22 +.57 +24.2
TaxEBdAmA m 12.18 -.03 -3.7
WAMutlnvA m 36.02 +.07 +19.0
Artisan
Intl d 27.18 +.33 +20.6
IntlVal d 35.56 +.35 +28.9
MdCpVal 25.26 +.03 +27.8
MidCap 45.36 +.42 +23.9
BBH
TaxEffEq d 19.97 +.08 +18.9
Baron
Asset b 58.51 +.24 +24.7
Growth b 64.59 +.18 +26.2
Partners b 28.39 +.20 +34.2
Berkshire
Focus d 17.61 +.19 +17.2
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 14.22 +.13 +12.7
EqDivA m 21.84 +.04 +13.6
EqDivl 21.89 +.04 +13.9
GlobAlcA m 20.86 +.11 +10.1
GlobAlcC m 19.38 +.09 +9.2
GlobAlcl 20.96 +.11 +10.4
HiYldBdls 8.07 +.01 +9.4
HiYldSvc b 8.08 +.01 +9.2
Bruce
Bruce 424.98 +.57 +10.7
CGM
Focus 34.76 +.45 +33.3
Clipper
Clipper 81.56 +.46 +23.8


Cohen & Steers
Realty 63.25
Columbia
AcornlntZ 43.90
AcornZ 34.80
DrvlncZ 16.75
IntlVIB m 13.44
Mar21CB m 14.95
MarGrlA m 25.14
DFA
1YrFxlnl 10.32
2YrGlbFII 10.04
5YrGIbFII 10.95
EmMkCrEql 18.27
EmMktVall 26.53
IntSmCapl 18.03
RelEstScl 25.64
USCorEqll 14.65
USCorEq21 14.53
USLgCo 12.98
USLgVall 27.82
USMicrol 17.89
USSmVall 31.89
USSmalll 27.59
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.22
EqDivB m 38.43
GIbOA m 42.95
GIbOB m 38.05
GIbOC m 38.31
GIbOS d 44.36
GrlncS 21.57
HlthCareS d 33.58
LAEqS d 27.66
LC2020S 14.43
StrHiYldTxFS 11.65
Davis
NYVentA m 38.30
NYVentY 38.76
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.21


-.47 -0.5
+.44 +17.5
+.17 +21.9
... +15.4
+.22 +17.1
+.16 +22.2
+.28 +18.7
... +0.3
... +0.3
-.03 -0.8
+.18 +2.2
+.30 +2.2
+.38 +30.1
-.24 -1.0
+.07 +24.4
+.08 +26.5
+.06 +19.2
+.23 +31.3
+.13 +31.2
+.20 +31.9
+.14 +29.9

-.02 -3.1
+.15 +11.7
+.45 +25.6
+.39 +24.6
+.40 +24.6
+.46 +25.9
+.18 +24.5
+.33 +32.2
+.39 -7.6
+.06 +9.1
-.04 -6.2

+.26 +22.9
+.27 +23.2

-.04 -2.9


Dimensional Investme
IntCorEql 11.53 +.20 +22.4
IntlSCol 17.63 +.29 +24.5
IntlValul 17.85 +.30 +22.6
Dodge & Cox
Bal 89.18 +.40 +21.0
Income 13.45 -.03 +0.1
IntlStk 38.15 +.60 +24.2
Stock 146.71 +1.15 +28.6
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 10.87 ... +0.8
Dreyfus
Apprecialnv 47.34 +.19 +8.4
MidCapldx 33.69 -.07 +22.9
MuniBd 10.97 -.04 -4.9
NYTaxEBd 14.18 -.05 -5.7
ShTrmlncD 10.59 -.01 +1.0
SmCoVal 34.88 +.18 +34.1
Eaton Vance
DwBldrA m 12.01 +.05 +14.1
TMSmCaB m 18.37 +.06 +24.0
FMI
CommStk 27.44 -.01 +20.3
LgCap 19.95 +.06 +19.5
FPA
Capital d 43.91 -.01 +14.9
Cres d 31.57 +.09 +16.2
Newlnc d 10.41 ... +0.7
Fairholme Funds
Farhome d 38.05 +.67 +26.4
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.70 +.01 +6.5
IntSmMCoA m 42.99 ... +20.2
KaufmanA m 6.10 +.07 +26.0
MDTMdCpGrStB m3718+25 +241
StrVall 5.43 -.01 +10.8
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.23 ... +2.8


AstMgr50 17.33 +.06 +8.8
Bal 21.92 +.07 +11.7
BIChGrow 59.51 +.54 +22.8
Canada d 54.34 +.34 +4.8
CapApr 34.66 +.36 +21.9
Caplnc d 9.46 +.01 +7.8
Contra 89.57 +.87 +18.2
DivGrow 34.67 +.25 +20.6
Divrlntl d 32.76 +.48 +18.8
EmergAsia d 28.21 +.41 +7.1
EmgMkt d 21.65 +.10 +4.1
Eqlnc 54.08 +.13 +20.6
Eqlnc 1 22.27 +.05 +17.9
FF2015 12.29 +.04 +7.1
FF2035 12.69 +.08 +13.3
FF2040 8.92 +.06 +13.4
Fidelity 38.59 +.33 +15.9
FltRtHiln d 9.94 ... +4.2
FocStk 18.30 +.27 +25.7
FourlnOne 32.70 +.21 +16.8
Free2000 12.38 +.01 +2.5
Free2010 14.75 +.05 +6.9
Free2020 15.02 +.06 +8.2
Free2025 12.68 +.06 +10.4
Free2030 15.35 +.08 +11.1
GNMA 11.20 -.04 -3.6
GrowCo 113.42 +1.03 +21.3
Growlnc 25.08 +.10 +23.8
Hilnc d 9.20 +.01 +6.1
Indepndnc 31.14 +.33 +26.3
IntRelEst d 10.12 +.11 +25.0
IntlDisc d 36.24 +.57 +20.2
InvGrdBd 7.62 -.03 -2.5
LatinAm d 36.80 +.20 -15.3
LevCoSt d 38.54 +.21 +31.4
LowPriStk d 47.23 +.25 +25.8
Magellan 86.32 +.67 +21.1
MeCpSto 13.96 +.07 +22.3
MidCap d 35.58 +.19 +24.7
Munilnc d 12.47 -.04 -4.4
NewMille 36.51 +.33 +24.8
NewMktln d 15.60 -.04 -4.1
OTC 79.30 +.70 +30.2
Overseas d 35.94 +.52 +22.2
Puritan 21.08 +.10 +11.8
ShTmBond 8.55 ...+0.4
SmCapDisc d 28.31 +.04 +35.1
Stratlnc 10.81 -.02 +0.5
TaxFrB d 10.78 -.03 -4.3
TotalBd 10.44 -.03 -2.0
USBdldx 11.32 -.04 -3.1
USBdldxlnv 11.33 -.03 -3.2
Value 91.79 +.31 +28.9
ValueDis 19.44 +.08 +23.0
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 65.29 +.43 +17.0
IntBondA m 11.31 -.02 -1.4
IntBondB m 11.30 -.02 -2.1
IntlCapAB m 11.48 +.14 +16.5
LrgCapA m 25.34 +.15 +27.8
LrgCapB m 23.70 +.14 +26.8
NewlnsA m 26.59 +.29 +18.6
Newlnsl 26.95 +.28 +18.8
StratlncA m 12.06 -.03 +0.2
Fidelity Select
Biotedc d 164.55 +3.37 +53.6
Electron d 56.01 +.31 +19.5
Energy d 59.00 +.52 +18.0
Gold d 23.85 +.26 -37.8
Leisure d 119.71 +1.08 +29.2
Materials d 77.46 +.42 +16.5
MedDeliv d 67.99 +.55 +21.6
MedEqSys d 33.84 +.22 +27.1
NatGas d 35.53 +.17 +15.1
NatRes d 36.54 +.39 +15.4
Wireless d 9.24 +.13 +18.7
Fidelity Spartan
5001dxAdvtg 58.31 +.24 +19.2
5001dxlnstl 58.32 +.25 +19.2
5001dxlnv 58.31 +.25 +19.1
ExtMktldAg d 47.85 +.18 +27.2
IntlldxAdg d 37.40 +.64 +20.7
TotMktldAg d 48.25 +.20 +20.6


First Eagle
GIbA m 52.25 +.36 +12.8
OverseasA m 23.12 +.23 +12.4
First Investors
GlobalA m 7.71 +.07 +17.6
TotalRetA m 18.16 +.03 +12.9
Firsthand
e-Comm 7.04 +.10 +10.5
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA x 11.52 -.08 -5.7
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA x 6.77 -.05 -5.7
EqlnA m 20.53 +.08 +18.0
FLTFA m 10.64 -.05 -7.6
GrOppA m 26.01 +.27 +22.8
GrowthA m 57.48 +.34 +17.1
HYTFA m 9.65 -.04 -7.8
IncomeC x 2.31 -.01 +10.2
IncomeA x 2.29 -.01 +10.9
IncomeAdv x 2.27 -.01 +11.2
NYTFA x 11.00 -.08 -6.1
RisDvA m 44.16 +.15 +21.3
StrlncA m 10.33 ...+3.4
TotalRetA m 9.80 -.03 -1.7
USGovA m 6.45 -.02 -3.3
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 32.83 +.20 +19.4
DiscovA m 32.34 +.20 +19.0
SharesZ 26.17 +.11 +20.2
SharesA m 25.92 +.11 +19.8
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 12.76 +.06 +3.2
GIBondA m 12.74 +.06 +3.6
GIBondAdv 12.70 +.07 +3.9
GrowthA m 22.33 +.20 +26.1
WorldA m 18.17 +.15 +25.8
GE
S&SUSEq 53.58 +.42 +23.7
GMO
EmgMktsVI d 10.45 +.11 -0.7
IntltVIIV 22.74 +.36 +20.6
Quill 24.80 +.01 +12.1
QuVI 24.82 +.02 +12.2
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 60.68 +.34 +24.2
EqlncomeAAA m 26.04+.12 +20.9
Value m 18.08 +.15 +25.6
Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.21 ... +7.9
MidCpVals 46.74 +.22 +25.3
ShDuGovA m 10.18 -.01 -0.4
Harbor
Bond 11.92 -.03 -1.2
CapAplnst 49.76 +.54 +18.8
Intllnstl 65.80 +.81 +17.4
Intllnv b 65.03 +.80 +17.0
Hartford
CapAprA m 42.43 +.45 +35.0
CpApHLSIA 52.89 +.48 +30.5
SmallCoB m 19.67 +.12 +26.3
Heartland
ValuePlus m 33.48 +.16 +18.7
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 14.57 +.11 +20.5
Hodges
Hodges m 30.76 +.23 +41.3
INVESCO
CharterA m 20.88 +.10 +19.9
ComstockA m 21.30 +.13 +27.8
ConstellB m 25.00 +.24 +19.0
Divlnclnv b 17.73 -.05 +11.2
EnergyA m 42.82 +.33 +14.7
Energylnv b 42.66 +.32 +14.7
EqlncomeA m 10.46 +.03 +18.1
EuroGrA m 36.47 +.44 +19.7
GIbGrB m 25.84 +.29 +16.0
GrowlncA m 25.04 +.12 +24.2
GrwthAIIA m 12.83 +.08 +11.5
PacGrowB m 20.68 +.45 +14.3
SmCapEqA m 15.64 +.04 +24.2
Techlnv b 36.88 +.25 +9.9
USMortA m 12.36 -.05 -2.6


Ivy
AssetSTrB m 27.80 +.37 +19.1
AssetStrA m 28.79 +.39 +20.0
AssetStrC m 27.94 +.37 +19.1
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.54 -.04 -2.0
CoreBondA m 11.54 -.04 -2.3
CoreBondSelect 11.53 -.04 -2.1
HighYldSel 8.04 +.01 +7.4
LgCapGrSelect 27.46 +.33 +14.2
MidCpVall 32.95 +.05 +23.7
ShDurBndSel 10.88 -.01 -0.3
USLCpCrPS 26.31 +.18 +22.4
Janus
BalC m 28.37 +.07 +11.1
ContrT 17.81 +.12 +31.4
EntrprsT 76.57 +.39 +23.5
FlexBdS b 10.40 -.02 -1.1
GIbValT d 13.75 +.06 +15.0
HiYldT 9.17 ... +7.2
OverseasT 33.02 +.35 +14.0
PerIknsMCVL 24.62 +.04 +17.9
PerIknsMCVT 24.35 +.03 +17.6
PerIknsSCVL 24.38 -.03 +19.4
ShTmBdT 3.06 ... +0.8
T 36.30 +.26 +16.0
USCrT 18.17 +.11 +20.0
VentureT 66.93 +.37 +27.4
John Hancock
LifBal b 14.45 +.07 +11.7
LifGrl b 14.91 +.10 +16.0
Lazard
EmgMkEqtl d 17.72 ... +0.9
Legg Mason/Western
CrPIBdlns 11.10 -.04 -1.5
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl d 16.59 +.20 +24.8
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 30.62 +.27 +22.6
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 14.75 +.01 +5.7
BdR b 14.69 +.01 +5.4
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 14.04 ... +23.7
BondDebA m 8.08 ... +7.4
ShDurlncA m 4.55 ... +2.2
ShDurlncC m 4.58 ... +1.6
MFS
IslntlEq 20.50 +.22 +18.9
MAInvB m 24.24 +.16 +19.4
TotRetA m 16.44 +.03 +12.4
ValueA m 29.95 +.14 +23.3
Valuel 30.10 +.14 +23.6
MainStay
HiYldCorA m 5.98 ... +6.3
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 98.70 +.40 +25.1
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.66 +.01 +4.6
PBMaxTrmS 19.66 +.15 +19.4
WrldOppA 8.36 +.11 +16.6
Marsico
21stCent m 17.18 +.19 +23.2
FlexCap m 17.58 +.19 +21.6
Merger
Merger b 16.07 +.03 +2.6
Meridian
MendnGr d 45.15 +.03 +17.3
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.49 -.03 +1.4
TotRtBd b 10.49 -.04 +1.0
Midas Funds
Magic m 22.04 +.24 +21.0
Midas m 1.69 +.02 -34.2
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 41.51 +.40 +29.5
Morgan Stanley Instl
MdCpGrl 42.12 +.18 +27.6
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 63.04 +.31 +24.9


Natixis
LSlnvBdY x 11.95 -.07 +1.0
LSStratlncA m 15.51 +.02 +8.4
LSStratlncC m 15.60 +.02 +7.6
Needham
Growth m 40.99 +.38 +24.3
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 57.75 +.13 +24.7
SmCpGrlnv 24.40 +.24 +24.8
Northeast Investors
Growth 18.29 +.20 +10.4
Northern
HYFixlnc d 7.46 ... +8.0
Stkld 20.34 ... +19.2
Nuveen
NYMunlBdl 10.28 -.03 -5.6
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.45 +.03 +20.6
HlthSinces 17.38 +.08 +28.0
PinOakEq 40.42 +.12 +23.0
RedOakTec 12.86 +.06 +26.1
Oakmark
Eqlncl 32.02 +.14 +15.8
Global I 28.09 +.37 +33.7
Intl I 24.56 +.36 +37.6
Oakmark I 58.05 +.33 +25.7
Select I 36.51 +.27 +26.0
Old Westbury
GIbSmMdCp 16.04 +.13 +19.6
LgCpStr 11.11 +.14 +17.6
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 34.14 +.20 +6.3
DevMktY 33.81 +.19 +6.6
GlobA m 71.88 +.84 +23.3
IntlBondA m 5.95 -.02 -3.8
IntlBondY 5.95 -.01 -3.5
IntlGrY 34.64 +.51 +23.9
ManStrA m 42.68 +.29 +17.6
RocMunlA m 14.50 -.05 -9.5
SrFltRatA m 8.37 ... +6.8
StrlncA m 4.08 -.01 +0.9
PIMCO
AAstAAutP 10.11 -.02 -2.3
AIIAssetl 11.94 -.01 +1.4
AIIAuthA m 10.10 -.02 -2.6
AIIAuthC m 10.08 -.03 -3.4
AIIAuthln 10.11 -.02 -2.1
ComRIRStl 5.81 +.03 -14.5
Drlnclnst 11.34 -.02 -0.7
EMktCurl 9.86 -.03 -1.9
EmMktslns 10.92 -.03 -5.4
ForBdlnstl 10.48 -.04 +2.5
HiYldls 9.43 ... +6.3
InvGrdlns 10.41 -.04 -0.6
LowDrls 10.21 -.01 -0.3
RealRet 11.02 -.06 -7.9
ShtTermls 9.80 -.01 +0.6
TotRetA m 10.62 -.03 -2.3
TotRetAdm b 10.62 -.03 -2.1
TotRetC m 10.62 -.03 -3.0
TotRetls 10.62 -.03 -1.9
TotRetrnD b 10.62 -.03 -2.2
TotlRetnP 10.62 -.03 -2.0
PRIMECAP Odyssey
Growth 22.00 +.17 +30.2
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 34.09 +.08 +21.6
Permanent
Portfolio 47.45 +.25 -0.5
Pioneer
PioneerA m 37.92 +.17 +19.5
Principal
LCGrllnst 11.67 +.10 +19.8
SAMConGrA m 16.39 +.09 +14.5
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 21.81 +.17 +23.5
IntlEqtyC m 6.49 +.11 +18.8
JenMidCapGrZ 37.08 +.16 +16.7
Putnam
GlbUtilB m 11.03 -.01 +8.9
GrowlncA m 17.63 ... +28.2
IntlNewB m 15.66 +.24 +17.0


SmCpValA m 13.62 +.08 +29.4
Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 29.83 ... +18.6
Reynolds
BlueChip b 68.04 +.58 +19.1
Royce
PAMutlnv d 13.36 +.06 +24.5
Premierlnv d 21.59 +.04 +20.6
ValueSvc m 12.42 ... +17.1
Rydex
Electrlnv 54.91 +.43 +12.4
HlthCrAdv b 22.90 +.20 +29.9
Nsdql001v 20.19 +.11 +11.7
Schwab
10001nv d 44.92 +.18 +19.6
S&P500Sel d 25.86 +.11 +19.0
Scout
Internal 34.21 +.44 +14.3
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 39.41 ... +20.4
Sequoia
Sequoia 200.01 +1.48 +25.9
State Farm
Growth 61.55 ... +15.0
Stratton
SmCapVal d 65.46 +.29 +28.8
T Rowe Price
Balanced 22.20 +.12 +12.7
BIChpGr 54.38 +.62 +21.2
CapApprec 25.14 +.07 +16.9
Corplnc 9.51 -.03 -1.8
EmMktStk d 29.93 +.25 -1.2
Eqlndex d 44.32 +.19 +18.9
Eqtylnc 30.47 +.08 +21.5
FinSer 17.96 +.15 +30.0
GlbTech 11.99 +.10 +19.1
GrowStk 44.44 +.45 +19.4
HealthSa 54.96 +.74 +36.4
HiYeld d 6.96 ... +8.9
InsLgCpGr 22.95 +.26 +24.3
IntlBnd d 9.32 -.05 -4.6
IntlEqld d 12.45 +.21 +19.7
IntlGrlnc d 14.22 +.21 +19.9
InlStk d 14.87 +.18 +12.9
MediaTele 64.24 +.41 +23.0
MidCapVa 27.86 +.14 +21.8
MidCpGr 68.50 +.41 +25.6
NJTaxFBd 11.24 -.03 -4.9
NewAmGro 42.15 +.42 +21.1
NewAsia d 15.32 ... +1.8
NewHonz 43.00 +.24 +31.3
Newlncome 9.31 -.03 -2.8
OrseaStk d 9.25 +.13 +19.0
R2015 13.68 +.05 +10.3
R2025 14.32 +.08 +14.2
R2035 14.90 +.11 +17.0
Rtmt2010 17.21 +.04 +8.0
Rtmt2020 19.27 +.09 +12.4
Rtmt2030 20.89 +.14 +15.8
Rtmt2040 21.36 +.17 +17.7
SaTech 33.09 +.14 +23.1
ShTmBond 4.78 ... 0.0
SmCpStk 40.98 +.12 +25.3
SmCpVal d 44.94 +.23 +23.0
SpecGrow 21.94 +.20 +19.2
Speclnc 12.63 -.03 +1.9
SumGNMA 9.51 -.04 -3.9
SumMulnc 10.91 -.03 -5.3
TaxEfMult d 17.96 +.16 +19.8
TaxFShlnt 5.60 ... -0.3
Value 31.93 +.16 +28.4
TCW
Emglncl 8.19 -.01 -2.1
TotRetBdl 9.87 -.03 +3.0
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 12.68 +.05 +20.7
Target
SmCapVal 25.43 +.03 +26.2
Templeton
InFEqSeS 21.01 +.22 +19.2
Third Avenue
Value d 55.46 +.59 +22.4


Thompson
LargeCap 42.35 +.24 +27.1
Thornburg
IncBldC m 19.41 +.03 +9.5
IntlValA m 28.83 +.48 +14.5
IntlVall 29.47 +.49 +15.0
Thrivent
IncomeA m 8.88 -.03 -0.8
MidCapGrA m 19.97 +.09 +16.9
Tocqueville
Gold m 42.29 +.34 -35.6
Turner
SmCapGr 41.81 +.34 +26.8
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.86 +.21 +18.0
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 7.88 +.06 -33.6
GlobRes m 9.46 +.05 +0.7
USAA
CorstnMod 14.26 +.02 +7.8
GNMA 9.85 -.02 -2.8
Growlnc 18.98 +.12 +20.0
HYOpp d 8.69 +.01 +9.7
PrcMtlMin 17.14 +.17 -37.7
SaTech 17.81 +.24 +20.8
TaxELgTm 12.75 -.05 -4.4
TgtRt2040 12.43 +.07 +12.8
TgtRt2050 12.13 +.09 +14.0
WorldGro 24.52 +.23 +23.1
Unified
Winlnv m 16.06 +12 +11.9
Value Line
PremGro b 32.16 +.10 +17.6
Vanguard
500Adml 151.70 +.63 +19.2
5001nv 151.68 +.64 +19.0
BalldxAdm 25.60 ... +11.2
Balldxlns 25.60 ... +11.2
CAITAdml 11.06 -.03 -2.2
CapOp 42.66 +.41 +35.0
CapOpAdml 98.56 +.96 +35.1
Convrt 13.97 ... +16.4
DevMktsldxlP 110.13 +1.93 +20.9
DivGr 19.33 +.07 +18.8
EmMktlAdm 31.84 +.22 -1.1
EnergyAdm 121.18 +.91+11.3
Energylnv 64.54 +.49 +11.2
Eqlnc 27.70 +.02 +19.0
EqlncAdml 58.07 +.04 +19.1
ExplAdml 92.65 +.54 +31.8
Explr 99.52 +.59 +31.6
ExtdldAdm 55.35 +.21 +27.6
Extdldlst 55.35 +.21 +27.6
ExtdMktldxlP 136.61 +.52 +27.6
FAWeUSIns 90.98 +1.38 +14.7
FAWeUSInv 18.21 +.27 +14.5
GNMA 10.39 ... -3.2
GNMAAdml 10.39 ... -3.1
GlbEq 20.98 +.22 +21.1
Grolnc 35.16 +.16 +19.5
GrthldAdm 42.00 +.30 +16.4
Grthlstld 42.00 +.30 +16.4
GrthlstSg 38.90 +.29 +16.4
HYCor 5.90 ... +4.6
HYCorAdml 5.90 ... +4.7
HItCrAdml 73.90 +.60 +29.9
HIthCare 175.13 +1.42 +29.8
ITBondAdm 11.17 ... -3.1
ITGradeAd 9.71 ... -0.9
InfPrtAdm 26.02 ...-6.8
InfPrtl 10.60 ... -6.8
InflaPro 13.25 ... -6.9
Instldxl 150.71 +.64 +19.2
InstPlus 150.72 +.63 +19.2
InstTStPI 37.59 +.15 +20.8
IntlGr 20.73 +.31 +19.3
IntlGrAdm 65.99 +1.01 +19.5
IntlStkldxAdm 25.64 +.39 +15.0
IntlStkldxl 102.52 +1.53 +15.0
IntlStkldxlPIs 102.54 +1.53 +15.0
IntlStkldxlSgn 30.75 +.46 +15.0
IntlVal 33.65 +.53 +21.1
LTGradeAd 9.69 ... -6.0


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSECHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 11.34 18.26 16.17 +.09 +0.6 A V V +13.7 +15.8 dd ... Panera Bread Co PNRA 152.64 -0- 194.77 164.28 +.26 +0.2 A V V +3.4 +4.4 26
Arkansas Bst ABFS 6.43 27.48 24.76 -.12 -0.5 V A A +159.3 +176.2 dd 0.12 Pembina Pipeline PBA 26.50 34.70 30.89 -.19 -0.6 V V A +7.9 +20.8 1.68f
Bank of America BAG 7.93 15.03 14.25 +.13 +0.9 A A +22.7 +79.0 25 0.04 PepcoHoldings Inc POM 18.67 22.72 18.60 -.34 -1.8 V V -5.2 +3.9 17 1.08
Beam Inc BEAM 52.69 -0- 69.78 62.18 -.47 -0.8 V V V +1.8 +9.3 26 0.90
Carnival Corp CCL 32.07 -- 39.95 35.98 -.11 -0.3 V V A -2.1 +7.3 19 1.00a Phoenix Cos PNX 20.51 44.78 38.04 +14 +0.4 A V V +53.8 +23.0 dd
Chicos FAS CHS 15.27 19.95 15.41 -.19 -1.2 V V V -16.5 -15.8 15 0.22 Raymond James Fncl RJF 35.05 48.22 41.71 -.12 -0.3 V V V +8.3 +20.7 17 0.56
Cracker Barrel CBRL 60.07 0- 102.95 98.32 -.10 -0.1 V V A +53.0 +58.4 20 3.00f Reliance Steel Alu RS 49.72 0- 72.90 66.20 -.49 -0.7 V V A +6.6 +33.9 14 1.32f
Disney DIS 46.53 67.89 60.93 +.10 +0.2 A V V +22.4 +24.6 18 0.75f Ryder R 38.35 64.99 55.46 -.15 -0.3 V V V +11.1 +42.9 12 1.36f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 43.06 70.07 63.08 -.24 -0.4 V V V +16.4 +46.0 17 1.68 St Joe Co JOE 18.76 -- 24.44 19.53 +.22 +1.1 A V V -15.4 +1.6 cc
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 24.94 44.04 36.79 -.05 -0.1 V V V +25.9 +46.0 33 0.40 Sally Beauty HId SBH 22.49 31.86 26.04 -.09 -0.3 V V V +10.5 -5.1 17
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 -0 4.50 2.41 -.01 -0.4 V V A -26.1 -21.7 dd
Harris Corp HRS 41.08 58.50 57.56 +.93 +1.6 A A +17.6 +23.4 56 1.68S Simon Property Gp SPG 143.20 182.45 144.44-1.19 -0.8 V V V -8.6 -4.6 37 4.60
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 6.97 17.28 12.84 -.02 -0.2 V V V +37.8 +68.3 23 Stein Mart SMRT 5.77 15.21 12.06 -.09 -0.7 V V V +59.9 +55.7 19 0.20
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 36.93 41.09 37.65 -.09 -0.2 V V V -5.0 +0.9 q 2.08e Suntrust Bks STI 25.14 36.29 31.90 -.12 -0.4 V V A +12.5 +29.4 8 0.40
KC Southern KSU 72.80 118.88 105.99 +.57 +0.5 A V +27.0 +38.1 39 0.86 Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 12.82 12.08 +.21 +1.8 A V A +5.5 +5.2 16 0.54
Lennar CorpA LEN 30.90 44.40 31.59 -.22 -0.7 V V V -18.3 -0.4 17 0.16 TECO Energy TE 16.12 19.22 16.29 -.24 -1.5 V V V -2.8 -0.1 19 0.88
McClatchy Co MNI 1.52 -0- 3.46 3.13+.03 +1.0 A A A -4.3 +92.5 dd
NextEra Energy NEE 65.95 88.39 79.77 -.59 -0.7 V V V +15.3 +23.1 20 2.64 Tech Data TECD 42.25 54.60 49.41 +.25 +0.5 A V A +8.5 +1.6 9
Office Depot ODP 1.51 -0- 6.10 4.17 -.02 -0.5 V V A +27.1 +177.5 dd Wendys Co WEN 4.09 8.08 7.69 +.13 +1.7 A A A +63.6 +79.4 cc 0.20f
PGTInc PGTI 3.00 11.69 10.44 +.26 +2.6 A V A +132.0 +221.1 27 ... World Fuel Svcs INT 33.65 0- 45.20 38.50 +.35 +0.9 A A V -6.5 +4.8 14 0.15


Time for some



serious talk


LgCpldxlnv 30.48
LifeCon 17.33
LifeGro 25.20
LifeMod 21.61
MidCapldxlP 132.74
MidCp 26.83
MidCpAdml 121.83
MidCplst 26.91
MidCpSgl 38.44
Morg 23.34
MorgAdml 72.39
MuHYAdml 10.32
Mulnt 13.50
MulntAdml 13.50
MuLTAdml 10.80
MuLtdAdml 10.95
MuShtAdml 15.82
Prmcp 84.35
PrmcpAdml 87.54
PrmcpCorl 18.03
REITIdxAd 90.73
STBondAdm 10.48
STBondSgl 10.48
STCor 10.65
STGradeAd 10.65
STIGradel 10.65
STsryAdml 10.67
SelValu 25.94
SmCapldx 46.51
SmCpldAdm 46.58
SmCpldlst 46.58
SmCplndxSgnl 41.96
SmVlldlst 20.60
Star 22.20
StratgcEq 25.94
TgtRe2010 24.90
TgtRe2015 14.08
TgtRe2020 25.41
TgtRe2030 25.48
TgtRe2035 15.51
TgtRe2040 25.68
TgtRe2045 16.12
TgtRe2050 25.58
TgtRetlnc 12.26
Tgtet2025 14.65
TotBdAdml 10.58
TotBdlnst 10.58
TotBdMklnv 10.58
TotBdMkSig 10.58
Totlntl 15.33
TotStlAdm 41.49
TotStllns 41.49
TotStlSig 40.04
TotStldx 41.47
TxMCapAdm 83.36
ValldxAdm 26.83
Valldxlns 26.83
Wellsl 24.60
WellslAdm 59.59
Welltn 36.78
WelltnAdm 63.53
WndsllAdm 60.29
Wndsr 18.18
WndsrAdml 61.34
Wndsrll 33.97
Victory
SpecValA m 18.64
Virtus
EmgMktsls 8.97
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 16.40
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 31.83
Growlnv 46.62
Outk2010Adm 13.26
Western Asset
MgdMuniA m 15.54
Yacktman
Focused d 24.15
Yacktman d 22.56


+.13 +19.6
+5.8
... +14.4
... +10.1
+.52 +25.5
+.11 +25.3
+.48 +25.4
+.10 +25.4
+.15 +25.4
+.17 +18.4
+.52 +18.5
-.03 -4.4
-.04 -3.1
-.04 -3.0
-.04 -4.6
-.01 -0.3
... +0.3
+.69 +26.4
+.72 +26.5
+.14 +25.9
-.80 -0.4
-0.1
-0.1
+0.8
+0.9
+0.9
-0.2
+.13 +30.0
+.15 +26.7
t.16 +27.0
+.16 +27.0
+.14 +26.9
+.03 +26.0
... +12.5
+.08 +27.3
+6.2
+8.9
... +10.7
... +14.0
... +15.5
... +16.5
... +16.5
... +16.5
+3.6
+12.3
-2.4
-2.4
-2.5
-2.4
+.23 +14.9
+.17 +20.7
+.17 +20.7
+.17 +20.7
+.17 +20.6
+.34 +20.4
+.04 +23.1
+.04 +23.1
+5.7
+5.7
+13.8
... +13.9
+.17 +21.1
+.13 +29.1
+.45 +29.2
+.10 +21.0

+.08 +18.7

-.04 -5.4

+.02 +19.5

+.21 +28.2
+.44 +17.2
-.02 +0.1

-.06 -5.6

+.01 +20.0
+.01 +20.8






The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME!


our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the


The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper. symbol to nlane@sun-herald.con
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.


i, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock


S&P 500 +6.80 NASDAQ A +22.74 DOW +23.65 6-MO T-BILLS -.01 30-YR T-BONDS A +.08 CRUDE OIL +.89 EURO 4 -.0024 GOLD A +15.90
1,639.77 3,612.61 14,833.96 .04% V 3.79% 0 $108.54 $1.3170 $1,412.00


Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange
and the Nasdaq.


PE/PPE Name Last Chg
A-B-C
... ADTCpn 39.14 -.69
dd 11AESCorp 12.70 -.01
15AGL Res 43.31 -.64
dd 2 AKSteel 3.35 -.01
... 22ASM Intl 31.22 -.05
15 AT&TInc 33.32 -.51
...... AbtLab s 32.93 -.40
.. AbbVie n 42.59 -.02
20 AberFitc 34.93 -.38
25 Accenture 73.08 +.83
dd ... Accuray 6.56 -.06
41 Actavis 136.94 +1.76
21 ActivsBliz 16.98 +.66
24AdobeSy 45.88 +.13
20AdvEnld 18.16 -.07
dd ... AMD 3.27
41 AdvisoryBd56.20 +1.43
14 AecomTch 28.63 -.50
dd ... Aeropostl 7.86 -.27
26 Agilent 46.93 +.29
14Aircastle 16.53 +.23
33Airgas 103.25 +1.60
18AlaskCom 2.84 -.23
.. AlcatelLuc 2.86 +.28
8 Alcoa 7.72 +.02
16AllegTch 26.58 -.13
28Allergan 89.82 +1.44
21 Allete 46.77 -.43
16AllnceRes 75.40 +.12
q ...AlliBInco 6.88 -.04
9 AlliBern 19.60 +.27
19AlliantEgy 48.79 -.82
dd 19AllscriptH 14.59 +.05
12 Allstate 48.46 +.54
dd 2 AlphaNRs 6.24 +.16
q... AlpTotDiv 3.92 +.01
q ... AlpAlerMLP17.31 -.01
22 AlteraCp If 35.88 +.71
18Altria 33.83 -.05
.....AmBev 34.57 -.21
.. ... Amarin 6.31 +.01
dd 92Amazon 288.80 +7.82
14Ameren 33.23 -.58
.AMovilL 19.24 -.06
5 ACapAgy 22.51 -.25
33 AmCaptd 12.68 +.20
13AEagleOut114.37 -.10
14AEP 42.16 -.64
11AEqlnvLf 20.20 +.39
26 AmExp 72.43 +.52
7 AmlntlGrp 47.67 +1.21
dd ... ARItCapPr 13.03 -.38
25 AmStsWtr 51.69 -.91
78 AmTower 69.23 -.26
27 AmWtrWks40.29 -.45
15Amerigas 42.07 -.43
22 Ameriprise 87.08 .93
...Ametek 42.60 -.32
21Amgen 111.01 +2.07
33 Amphenol 75.35 -.42
43Anadarko 92.71 +1.29
21 Anaren 24.77 +.19
...... AnglogldA 13.61 +.24
..... ABlnBev 94.84 +1.49
49Annlnc 35.14 +.44
4 Annaly 11.56 -.11
4 Anworth 4.53 +.10
8 Apache 84.79 -.89
5 Apollolnv 7.80 -.09
39 Apple Inc 488.58 +1.36
dd 17ApldMatl 15.11 +.10
... AquaAm s 24.50 +.20
dd ... ArcelorMit 13.27 +.51
dd 4 ArchCoal 4.57 +.10
12ArchDan 35.40 +.19
dd ... ArenaPhm 6.57 +.16
11AresCap 17.54 -.04
dd ... AriadP 19.20 .60
dd ... ArkBest 24.76 -.12
... ArmourRsd 4.11 -.07
dd ... ArrayBio 5.81 +.20
17ArrowEl 46.12 -.30
cc 23Ashland 87.47 +.26
52AsscdBanc15.80 -.15
5 AssuredG 19.98 +.09
... AstraZen 48.96 -.25
dd 38AtlasPpln 38.30 -.50
dd 37Atmel 7.30 +.04
18ATMOS 39.64 -.71
dd 5 AuRicog 4.28
31 Autodesk 37.13 +.38
28AutoData 71.41 +.25
dd ... AvanirPhm 5.39 +.29
16AveryD 42.89 +.13
33AvisBudg 27.58 +.81
15Avista 25.92 -.35
dd 9 Avon 19.75 -.02
20BB&TCp 33.81 -.15
.. 16BCEg 42.56 +1.60
16BMCSft 46.13 +.13
.. BPPLC 41.33 +.03
.. BPPru 85.00 -.38
...Baidu 136.17 +.64
20BakrHu 46.85 +.36
.. BallCorp 44.29 -.13
...... BallardPw 1.48 +.02
...... BcoBradpfll.81 .20
..... BcoSantSA 7.23 +.12
... .. BcoSBrasil 5.81 +.04
46BankMutl 6.08 +.14
13BkofAm 14.25 +.13
.. 13 BkMontg 63.21 +.38
12 BkNYMel 30.12 +.38
14BkNovag 55.63 +.13
q ... BariPVix rs16.41 -.63
20 Bard 114.66 -.21
dd 15 BamesNob13.75 +.08
dd 7 BarrickG 19.51 +.36
16 Baxter 69.54 -.02
22 Beamlnc 62.18 -.47
dd ... BeazerHrs17.12 +.18
29 BedBath 73.76 +.02
19 Bemis 39.87 +.08
.. BerkHB 112.08 +.86
dd 11 BestBuy 36.99 +.99
13 BigLots 34.40 -1.02
dd ... Biocryst 6.48 +.10
cc 83BioMedR 18.26 -.15
dd 26 BioScrip 11.42 -.78
dd ... BlackBerry10.21 +.09
q ... BlkHIthSci 32.41 -.11
20 Blackstone22.14 +.30
16 BlockHR 27.88 -.03
dd 20 BobEvans 49.55 +.52
26 Boeing 105.01 +1.09
49 BorgWam 96.81 +.23
86 BostBeer 218.67 +6.83
.. 24 BostonSci 10.90 +.32
dd 31 BoydGm 11.90 -.22
dd 17 BrigStrat 19.07 -.02
27 Brinker 39.91 -.08


Interestrates


flu



The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
rose to 2.86
percent Monday.
Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.



PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6MOAGO 3.25 .13
1YRAGO 3.25 .13


18BrMySq 41.72 +.03
12 Broadcom 25.18 -.08
12BrcdeCm 7.53 +.13
17 BrkfldOfPr 16.07 +.03
19 Buckeye 69.93 -.07
... Buenavent 12.72 .09
16CAInc 29.39 +.14
... CBLAsc 19.17 -.03
39CBREGrp21.98 +.11
54CBS B 53.50 +2.40
19CMSEng 26.16 -.37
43CNHGbl 46.05 +.17
... CSX 24.91 +.30
..... CVR Rfgn 27.43 +.21
20CVS Care 58.52 +.47
dd 3 CYS Invest 7.53 -.15
cc 11CblvsnNY 17.76 +.03
... CabotOG s39.93 +.80
76 Cadence 13.27 -.20
dd ... Caesars 21.05 -.42
15Cal-Maine 45.83 +.20
q... CalaCvHi 12.18 +.06
22Calgon 17.23 +.03
.. CalifWtr 19.66 -.29
15 CalumetSp30.42 -.15
...CamcoF 4.13 -.06
... CamdenPT60.65 -1.14
24 Cameron 57.77 +.98
17CampSp 42.75 -.43
.. 26 CdnNRy g 94.60 +.87
..... CdnNRsgs31.18 +.56
dd 6 CdnSolar 13.22 +.71
dd ... CapSenL 20.56 -.26
6 CapsteadM11.73 -.01
dd ... CpstnTurb 1.11 -.01
21 CardnlHth 50.22 -.06
22 CareFusion35.73 -.12
15Carnival 35.98 -.11
46CarpTech 53.92 +.15
19Carrizo 34.88 +.62
28 Caterpillar 82.51 -.03
51 Celgene 143.01 +3.03
......Cemex 11.26 +.02
......Cemigpf 7.96 +.01
19CenterPnt 22.76 -.17
9 CntryUnk 32.91 -.21
dd 5 Cenveo 2.90 +.10
15Cerners 46.91 +.85
dd 14Checkpnt 14.82 +.15
39ChemFinl 27.27 +.03
dd 9 ChesEng 26.16 +.35
15Chevron 120.55 +.12
32 ChicB&l 60.45 +.62
21 Chicos 15.41 -.19
..5 Chimera 2.93 -.01
.. ChurchDwt59.17 -.18
dd ... CienaCorp 20.68 +.76
dd 7 CinciBell 3.00 +.01
25CinnFin 45.80 +.12
34 Cirrus 22.38 -.12
14 Cisco 23.48 +.17
.. Citigroup 49.37 +1.04
36CitrixSys 71.20 +.43
dd 40CleanEngy12.59 +.01
dd ... CliffsNRs 21.32 +.45
18Clorox 82.72 +.02
23 Coach 53.16 +.35
dd ... CobaltlEn 24.66 +.26
.. CocaCola 37.90 -.28
21 CocaCE 38.54 +1.14
cc 26Coeur 14.49 +.05
35 CognizTech74.49 +1.19
q... CohStQIR 9.52 -.19
... .. ColeREln 11.11 +.07
.. ColgPalms57.45 -.32
dd ... ColonialFS13.94
.. ColonPT 21.94 -.15
33Comcast 42.74 +.65
.. Comerica 40.73 -.11
13CmtyHIt 39.45 +.19
33 CmpTask 17.80 -.08
dd 23 Compuwre10.70 +.03
11 Comtech 24.01 +.04
18ConAgra 33.90 +.08
25 ConnWtrSv30.59 +.13
11 ConocoPhil66.79 +.49
20ConsolCom16.73 +.05
17ConEd 55.50 -.73
31 ConstellA 55.18 +.93
14 CooperTire31.66 -.16
dd ... CorOnDem51.28 -.23
8 Corning 13.92 -.12
dd 23CorpOffP 22.70 -.08
26 CorrectnCp32.46 -.48
36Costco 111.98 +.11
.. ...Cotyn 16.14 -.16
.. CousPrp 9.88 -.05
17Covidien 59.59 +.19
q ... CSVellVST24.34 +.93
q ... CSVxSht rs19.16 -1.51
29Cree Inc 54.60 -.89
81 Crocs 13.49 +.03
dd ... CrosstxLP 18.72
19CrownHold43.85 +.39
.. Ctrip.com 46.50 +.48
45 Cummins 124.13 +.93
dd ... CumMed 5.19 +.39
dd ... CybrOpt 5.89 +.04
cc 16CypSemi 11.08 -.24
dd ... CytRx 2.34 -.03
dd ... Cytoldnet rs7.65 -2.82
D-E-F
cc ... DCTIndl 6.69
dd ... DDRCorp 15.37 -.15
q ... DNPSelct 9.77 -.10
30 DRHorton17.80 -.05
19 DTE 65.86 -1.01
...... DTE En6124.33 -.06
15 Darden 46.21
7 DeVry 30.48 +.47
...... DeanFdsrs18.84 -.32
24 Deere 84.06 +.42
dd ... Delcathh .42 +.01
10 Dell Inc 13.77
15 DeltaAir 19.84 +.11
23 DenburyR 17.33 +.04
dd ... Dndreon 2.92 +.08
dd 9 DevonE 57.23 +.14
...... Diageo 123.35 +.67
7 DiaOffs 63.46 -.57
35 DicksSptg 46.97 +.56
dd 14 Diebold 28.08 -.20
24 Digilntl 9.33 +.04
49 DigitalRIt 54.10 -1.50
81 Dillards 76.49 +.23
...DirecTV 58.57 +.39
q ... DirSPBr rs 49.97 -.68
q ... DxGIdBII rs78.34 +2.31
q ... DxFinBr rs 32.34 -.70
q ... DxSCBrrs27.11 -.50
q ... DxFnBulls64.08 1.43
q ... DirDGdBr s26.65 -.79
q ... DxSCBull s53.15 +.92


1,680 ................................ S P 500
1,680 S&P 500
1 4.:, Close: 1,639.77
Change: 6.80 (0.4%)
1,600 ...... 10 DAYS ....


3,720 ..... ...................... Nasdaq composite
,- ,, Close: 3,612.61
Change: 22.74 (0.6%)
' -* *,1 10 DAYS


1 ,7 5 0 : ................................................................... ............... 3 ,7 0 0 ............ ............. ..................................

1,700 .... 3,600.

1,650 :: I"." ""3........... ...." "..V... ...... ...
3,400; ..... .... ....... ........ .
6 0 0 .... ........ ......... .......... .. ........ ..... ...... ............. : :::.. .. .. ....:..... .

1,550 3,200; M J .
1 5 : . . . . 0 : . . . . . .


StocksRecap
DOW
NYSE NASD DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
Vol. (in mil.) 3,552 1,581 NYSE Comp.
Pvs. Volume 2,633 1,249 NASDAQ
Advanced 1671 1640 S&P 500
Declined 1403 884 S&P 400
New Highs 51 82 Wilshire 5000
New Lows 61 29 Russell 2000


q ... DxSPBulls44.34 +.59
55 Discover 47.76 +.51
23 DishNetw h45.80 +.84
29 Disney 60.93 +.10
33 DollarGen 53.88 -.09
12 DollarTree 52.53 -.17
18 DomRescs57.78 -.57
62 Dominos 61.46 +.02
10 DonlleyRR16.43 -.25
22 DowChm 37.44 +.04
19 DrPepSnap44.60 -.16
q ... DryStri 7.49 -.06
dd 2 DryShips 2.33
23 DuPont 56.39 -.23
q ... DufPUC 10.30 +.10
.. DukeEngy 64.96 -.64
dd ... DukeRlty 14.39 -.20
dd ...E-CDang 8.14 +.33
dd ... E-House 6.18 +.12
dd ... E-Trade 14.54 +.50
29 eBay 50.32 +.33
22 EMCCp 25.99 +.21
38 EOG Res158.43 +1.38
dd 6 ErthUnk 4.95 +.03
... Eaton 63.08 -.24
q ... EVEEq2 11.65 +.06
40 Ecolab 92.58 +1.23
... EdwLfSci 70.56 +.18
dd ... Elan 15.27 +.03
19 EldorGldg 8.75 +.20
44 ElectArts 27.36 +.72
23 EmersonEl60.70 +.33
16 EmpDist 20.92 -.25
... EnbrdgEPt29.82
...... Enbridge 40.62 -.33
11 EnCanag 17.08 -.02
dd 13 EndoPhrm41.83 +.74
17 Energizer 95.33 -3.50
19 EngyTsfr 51.50 +.23
12 EnnisInc 17.72 -.09
... ENSCO 54.47 -1.09
9 Energy 62.54 -.69
32 EntPrPt 58.64 -.78
... EricksnAC 14.94 -.38
...... Ericsson 12.39 +.61
... Exelis 14.79 +.08
dd ... Exelixis 5.24 +.23
8 Exelon 30.09 -.40
29 Expedia 47.27 +.51
31 Expdlntl 41.46 +.90
13 ExpScripts 64.50 +.62
14 ExxonMbl 87.15 -.01
... FMCTech 54.29 +.66
20 FNBCpPA12.14 +.07
cc ... Facebook 41.87 +.58
28 FamilyDlr 69.53 -1.66
28 Fastenal 45.00 +1.01
23 FedExCp 107.60 +.24
... FedNatHId 9.75 -.13
21 Ferrellgs 23.42 +.14
23 FidlNFin 24.55 +.84
8 FifthStFin 10.41 +.05
... FifthThird 18.31 +.02
dd 25Finisar 21.15 +.68
... FstHorizon11.05 -.01
11 FstNiagara10.01 -.09
6 FstSolar 36.87 +.15
10FirstEngy 36.94 -.53
17FstMerit 20.96 -.20
11 Fextrn 8.94 -.04
... FlowrsFds20.50 -.29
18 Fluor 63.54 +.11
43 FootLockr 32.08 -.12
15 FordM 16.34 +.15
ForestOil 5.39 -.17
... FBHmSec 36.79 -.05
... Francesca 24.02 -.10
... FrankRes s46.62 +.46
......FrSearsh .18 -.01
.FMCG 31.12 +.90
7 FrontierCm 4.38 +.05
dd ... Frontline 2.41 -.01
17 FultonFncl 11.83 -.26
dd ... Fusion-io 10.58 -.11
G-H-I
...... GMAC44 24.94 -.12
dd 12GTAdvTc 6.71 +.25
dd ... GTxInc 1.50 -.05
q ... GabDvlnc 19.25 -.06
q ... GabMultT 9.35 +.02
q ... GabUtil 6.28 -.08
...... GafisaSA 2.46 +.15
12 Gannett 24.48 +.39
24 Gap 40.72 +.28
15 Garmin 41.46 +.69
... Geeknet 17.17 +.49
q ...GAlnv 32.99 +.24
dd 13 GenDynam84.35 +1.10
22 GenElec 23.06 -.08
... GenGrPrp 19.03 -.15
20 GenMills 49.19 -.13
...GenMotors34.14 +.06
55 GenesisEn48.82 +.15
25 Gentex 22.87 +.34
9 Genworth 11.95 +.15
...... Gerdau 7.34 +.16
16 GileadSci s60.92 +.65
...... GlaxoSKIn 51.77 +.88
dd ... GlimchRt 9.83 -.07
...... GoldFLtd 5.15
dd 22 Goldcrp g 29.85 +.35
8 GoldmanS154.76 +2.63
26 Goodyear 20.28 +.16
30 Google 860.38 +13.48
31 vGrace 80.52 +.17
... GramrcyP 3.99 -.10
49 GraphPkg 8.34 +.03


TREASURIES YEST PVS


NET 1YR
CHG AGO


3-month T-bill .01 0.02 -0.01 .09
6-month T-bill .04 0.05 -0.01 .13
52-wk T-bill .12 0.12 ... .16
2-year T-note .42 0.40 +0.02 .22
5-year T-note 1.68 1.65 +0.03 .59
10-year T-note 2.86 2.79 +0.07 1.55
30-year T-bond 3.79 3.71 +0.08 2.67


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.60 3.50 +0.10 2.38
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.33 5.30 +0.03 4.21
Barclays USAggregate 2.48 2.48 ... 1.80
Barclays US High Yield 6.36 6.38 -0.02 6.74
Moodys AAACorp Idx 4.49 4.52 -0.03 3.43
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.75 1.69 +0.06 .88
Barclays US Corp 3.39 3.39 ... 2.94


...GNIron 72.36 +1.85
14 GtPlainEn 21.69 -.23
35 GreenMtC 85.16 -1.15
dd ... GrnwyMed 14.07 +.45
12GreifA 54.12 +.25
...Griffin h 30.66 -.08
dd ... Groupon 10.20 +.04
...... GpFSnMxn13.34 -.30
...... GuangRy 25.41 +1.41
48 GulfportE 59.74 +.74
... HCA Hldg 38.68 +.49
39 HCPInc 40.49 -.24
...... HDFCBk 27.59 -1.39
68 HainCel 81.88 +.10
40 HalconRes 4.74 -.01
31 Hallibrtn 48.30 +.30
dd ... Halozyme 8.55 +.24
27 Hanesbrds60.74 +1.26
13 Hanoverlns51.99 -1.28
52HareyD 61.07 +1.09
...... HarmonyG 3.61 -.01
dd 12 Harsco 23.78 +.25
8 HartfdFn 30.20 +.60
4 HatterasF 18.06 -.24
15 HawaiiEl 24.22 -.79
cc 35 HItCrREIT 60.84 -.60
27 HlthCSvc 24.13 -.08
22 HItMgmt 12.84 -.02
cc 14 HeclaM 3.52 +.10
... Herbalife 59.90 -1.11
dd ... HercOffsh 7.27 +.07
39 Hershey 91.04 -.91
48 Hertz 24.60 +.57
16 Hess 75.99 +1.14
dd 5 HewlettP 22.37 +.03
...Hillshire 31.78 -.53
...HilltopH 15.90 +.24
43 ... HimaxTch 6.48 +.41
... HollyFront 44.64 +.16
dd 17 Hologic 21.20 -.14
40 HomeDp 73.90 -.20
......Honda 36.49 +.55
32 Honwlllntl 80.98 +1.41
...Hormel 41.26 -.17
27 HospPT 26.54 -.48
... HostHotls 17.04 +.01
dd ... HovnanE 5.11 -.04
...... HuanPwr 38.78 -.75
... HubbelB 99.63 -1.73
7 HudsCity 9.24 +.05
... HuntBncsh 8.24
... Huntgtnlng 63.59 +.27
43Huntsmn 17.53 +.03
7 IAMGIdg 6.04 +.02
...... ICICIBk 25.49 -.53
33 iGateCorp 23.90 +.55
... ... ING 10.98 +.11
q .iShGold 13.71 +.18
q ... iShGSCI 34.18 +.63
q...iSAstla 24.17 +.69
q ... iShBrazil 42.92 +.53
q ... iShCanada27.58 +.19
q .iShEMU 35.15 +.47
q... iShGerm 25.80 +.14
q .iShHK 19.25 +.44
q ...iShltaly 13.30 +.26
q ... iShJapan 11.14 +.27
q ... iSh SKor 57.78 +.55
q ... iSMalasia 14.31 -.13
q ... iShMexico 61.62 +.05
q .iShSing 12.43 +.03
q... iSPacxJpn 45.44 +1.14
q .iSTaiwn 13.68 +.20
q .iSh UK 18.95 +.30
q ... iShSilver 23.39 +.79
q ... iShS&P10073.63 +.25
q... iShChinaLC36.23 +1.10
q ... iSCorSP500165.22 +.82
q ... iShEMkts 38.26 +.24
q ... iShiBoxlG112.24 -.44
q ... iSh20yrT104.22 -1.49
q ... iShl-3yTB 84.25 -.03
q .iSEafe 60.31 +1.14
q ... iSCorSPMid118.18 +.04
q ... iShiBxHYB90.39 -.48
q ... iShR2K 101.06 +.68
q iSh3-7yTrB119.63 -.25
q... iShShtTrB110.26 +.01
q ... iShUSPfd 37.65 -.09
q ...iShREst 61.72 -.52
q ... iShHmCnst20.53 -.03
17 Idacorp 46.83 -1.04
24 ITW 71.49 +.02
10 ... IndBkMI 9.99 +.49
16 Inergy 13.28 -.46
dd .. Infinera 10.14 +.87
...Infosys 45.45 -.92
26 ngerRd 60.53 +1.39
13 ngrmM 22.03 -.07
25 Ingredion 63.13 +.19
54 InlandRE 9.65 -.16
dd 19 IntgDv 8.87 +.16
18 IntegrysE 54.59 -1.33
13 Intel 22.07 +.09
...... Intercept n 46.78 +1.04
dd ... InterNAP 7.35 +.06
16 IBM 183.96 +1.69
43 Interpublic 16.04 +.32
.. Intersectns 9.38 +.23
47 IntSurg 385.17 -1.35
... nvenSense17.75 -.12
23 Invesco 30.59 +.23
dd ... Isis 26.80 +.97
..... ItauUnibH 12.26 +.09
J-K-L
dd ... JA Solar rs 7.48 +.40
27 JDS Uniph 12.93 +.10


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar was
mixed against
other major
currencies. It
rose against
the euro and
Swiss franc, but
it fell against the
British pound
and Canadian
dollar.






kI


140


HIGH
14933.35
6350.00
481.70
9400.75
3637.06
1651.35
1200.97
17555.29
1026.84


LOW
14777.48
6239.90
471.89
9296.27
3593.62
1633.41
1170.62
17345.37
1009.00


15JPMorgCh51.13 +.60
16 Jabil 22.76 -.06
23 JacobsEng58.57 +.29
10JanusCap 8.36
27 ... Jarden s 47.43 +4.48
14JetBlue 6.10 -.05
dd ... JinkoSolarl8.27 +2.32
17JohnJn 86.42 +.01
20 JohnsnCtl 40.73 +.20
15JoyGlbl 49.56 +.44
16JnprNtwk 19.45 +.55
dd ... KBHome 16.26 +.23
10KKRFn 10.09 -.08
...... KKR Fn 4126.56 -.27
74 KCSouthn105.99 +.57
17 Kellogg 60.75 +.04
dd ... KeryxBio 8.87 +.34
27 27KeyEngy 7.07 +.40
...Keycorp 11.68 +.01
18 KimbClk 92.64 -.84
77Kimco 19.89 -.14
42 KindME 81.51 -.05
... KindMorg 37.57 -.36
dd 8 Kinross g 5.57 +.07
48 KodiakOg 10.06 +.07
14 Kohls 51.40 +.09
... KraftFGp n52.36 +.59
dd 10 KratosDef 8.46 +.02
... KrispKrm 18.99 -.73
20 Kroger 36.82 +.22
12 Kulicke 11.11 +.05
39 L Brands 57.43 +.07
11 L-3Com 90.56 +.23
27LKQCps 29.00 -.24
16 LSI Corp 7.52 +.11
25 LTC Prp 35.14 -.29
31 Landstar 54.79 +.14
... LVSands 57.92 +1.57
... LaSalleH 26.51 -.02
6 27 LeapFrog 8.91 -.71
... LennarA 31.59 -.22
dd ... Level3 22.70 +.34
10 Lexmark 33.86 -.30
q ...LbtyASE 5.43 +.05
dd ... LibGlobA 78.94 +1.26
31 LibtylntA 22.79 +.21
31 LibtProp 33.96 -.64
21 LifeTech 74.58 +.17
... Lifevantge 2.42 +.01
11 LillyEli 51.31 -.09
12LincNat 42.62 +.58
23 LinearTch 38.88 +.55
dd 13LinnEngy 24.23 +.12
16 LockhdM 123.63 +1.21
...... LonePineg .11 -.01
... Lorillard s 42.08 -.22
... LaPac 15.20 +.24
31 Lowes 45.61 -.21
...... Luxottica 52.30 +.29
...LyonBasA70.47 +.32
M-N-O
26M&TBk 114.17 +.83
.. MBIA 12.35 +.52
6 MCGCap 4.92 +.03
...MDC 27.71 -.12
cc 17MDURes 26.24 -.46
7 MFA Fncl 7.20
dd ... MGIC 7.23 +.01
dd ... MGMRsts17.97 +.28
27Macys 44.28 -.15
...MagHRes 4.84 +.19
50 Manitowoc 19.97 -.01
dd ... MannKd 5.90 .11
... 8 Manulifeg 16.59 +.16
9 MarathnO 35.17 +.74
.. MarathPet 73.44 +.93
q ... MktVGold 28.40 +.27
q ... MV OilSvc 45.34 +.38
q... MktVRus 25.86 +.05
q ... MVPreRMu24.54 -.01
cc 100MarkWest 67.80 +1.01
41 MarlntA 40.30 +.31
23MarshM 41.54 +.31
28 MartinMid 45.33 -.16
9 MarvellT 12.26 +.15
cc 36Masco 19.08 +.16
24 Mattel 40.82 +.32
24 Maximlntg 28.16 +.32
dd 4 McDrmlnt 7.39 -.11
21 McDnlds 94.52 +.16
22 McGrwH 59.92 +1.55
dd ... McEwenM 2.78 +.07
31 MeadWvco36.35 +.50
20 MedProp 11.60 +.05
15 Medtrnic 52.09 +.34
.. MelcoCrwn27.88 +.69
13 Merck 47.21 -.08
15MercGn 43.84 -.04
19 Meredith 42.96 -.05
dd 8 Meritor 7.55 +.10
11 MetUfe 47.09 +.90
..MKors 74.43 +.34
25 Microchp 39.19 +.38
dd 14MicronT 14.01 +.44
14 Microsoft 31.88 -1.52
dd ... Microvis 2.10 -.04
48 Middleby 189.51 +3.57
25 MdsxWatr 20.25 +.23
.....MitsuUFJ 6.09 +.26
... .. MobileTele20.58 -.58
.. Molex 29.03 +.01
dd ... Molycorp 6.23 +.13
.. Mondelez 30.79 +.12
25 Monsanto 99.18 +1.29
29 21 MonstrBev54.02 -3.37
dd ... MonstrWw 4.41 -.09
8 MorgStan 26.27 +.51


MAJORS


CLOSE CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
14833.96 +23.65 +0.16% A V V +13.20%
6270.98 +21.10 +0.34% V V A +18.17%
472.90 -4.97 -1.04% V V V +4.37%
9333.49 +62.83 +0.68% A V A +10.54%
3612.61 +22.74 +0.63% A V A +19.64%
1639.77 +6.80 +0.42% A V A +14.98%
1181.48 -2.39 -0.20% V V A +15.78%
17424.03 +71.90 +0.41% A V A +16.20%
1016.26 +5.36 +0.53% A V A +19.65%


11Mosaic 41.19 -.46
12 MurphO 59.80 +1.62
...... MurpUSA n37.51 +.56
22 Mylan 35.71 +.37
17 MyriadG 26.54 +.37
dd 2 NlIHIdg 6.13 +.15
dd ... NPSPhm 25.76 +.66
cc ... NQMobilel6.92 -.02
14NRGEgy 26.10 -.15
... 12NTTDOC016.17 +.14
23 NV Energy23.43 -.02
12 Nabors 15.42 +.02
...... NBGrcers 4.04 +.03
24 NatFuGas 65.44 +.16
......NatGrid 58.03 +.47
23 NtHlthlnv 53.85 -1.05
23 NOilVarco 75.68 +1.38
dd ... NektarTh 12.44 +.26
64Neogen 54.19 +.09
25NetApp 41.82 +.28
cc ... Netflix 289.00 +5.09
16NJRscs 42.50 -.58
... NewOriEd 21.39 +.16
11 NYCmtyB 14.56 -.09
...NYMtgTr 6.10 +.06
... 1 Newcastle 5.43 +.16
17 NewellRub25.72 +.42
...... NwLeadhlf .13 +.01
dd 9 NewmtM 31.47 -.05
...... NewsCpAnl5.78 +.08
18 NextEraEn79.77 -.59
26 NiSource 29.13 -.13
...NikeBs 64.29 +1.47
... 12 NipponTT 25.54 +.16
7 NobleCorp37.04 -.16
...... NokiaCp 5.12 +1.22
dd 6 NordicAm 7.75 +.06
21 NorflkSo 72.57 +.41
20 NoestUt 40.34 -.63
... NthnTEn 20.94 +.11
15 NorthropG 93.14 +.87
dd ...NStarRlt 8.61 -.15
30 NwstBcsh 13.43 +.09
15NwstNG 40.42 -.62
... Novartis 74.69 +1.71
dd ... Novavax 3.20 +.05
...... NovoNord165.57 -1.37
16 NuanceCm19.13 +.04
q ... NuvDivA 12.61 +.02
q ... NuvEqtP 12.27 +.01
q ... NuvMuOppl2.62 -.07
q ... NvlQI 13.22 -.03
q ...NvMAd 12.10 -.07
q ... NvAMT-Fr14.84 -.13
q ...NvNYP 13.16 +.03
q ...NuvPP 13.13 -.09
q ... NvPfdlnco 8.83 -.02
q ...NvPMI 12.20 -.06
q ... NuvPI 12.22 -.04
q ...NuvPl2 12.36 -.09
q ...NuvPI4 11.55 +.01
q ... NuvQInc 12.25 -.10
dd ... NuverraE 2.42 +.12
15Nvidia 14.76 +.01
dd ... NxStageMd12.33 -.02
dd ... OCZTech 1.38 -.02
.. OGE Egys34.77 -.44
14 OcciPet 88.47 +.26
16OceanFst 16.72 +.41
42OcwenFn 52.32 +1.88
dd ... OfficeDpt 4.17 -.02
... OldNBcp 13.16 +.02
38OldRepub 13.99 -.21
28Olin 22.99 -.11
27 OmegaHlt 27.74 -.66
16OmegaP 9.21 +.26
180mniVisn 15.36 -.10
dd 8 OnSmcnd 7.30 +.06
.. OneokPtrs 50.09 +.50
dd ... OnyxPh 123.74 +.16
dd ... OpkoHIth 9.19 -.05
190plinkC 18.73 +.14
17 Oracle 32.02 +.16
dd 330rbotch 11.96 -.12
10Orthfx 22.15 +.08
9 OshkoshCp45.14 +.22
19OtterTail 26.21 -.07
P-Q-R
12 PG&E Cp 41.01 -.35
18PNC 72.48 +.21
27PNMRes 21.36 -.55
... 7 POSCO 73.43 +1.41
39 PPG 157.21 +1.00
9 PPLCorp 30.61 -.09
dd ... PacSunwr 3.08 -.18
dd 9 PanASIv 12.45 +.23
dd ... Pandora 18.82 +.40
46 PaneraBrd164.28 +.26
dd ... ParametSdl4.88 -1.04
cc 23 ParkDrl 5.70 -.04
29 ParkerHan100.99 +1.04
...PattUTI 19.11 -.48
dd 6 PeabdyE 17.32 +.12
...... Pembina g 30.89 -.19
...... Pengrthg 5.70 +.20
46 PnnNGm 53.21 +.62
9 PennantPk11.03 -.06
dd 8 Penney 12.72 +.24
33Penske 40.06 +1.03
cc 31 Pentair 60.63 +.52
31 PeopUtdF 14.27 +.05
24PepBoy 11.20 -.03
14 PepcoHoldl8.60 -.34
19 PepsiCo 80.20 +.47
44 Perrigo 122.00 +.45
41 PetSmari 70.28 -.15
...... PetrbrsA 14.38 +.12


1YR.
CLOSE CHG %CHG AGO


USD per British Pound 1.5563 +.0026 +.17% 1.5892
Canadian Dollar 1.0536 -.0006 -.06% .9858
USD per Euro 1.3170 -.0024 -.18% 1.2597
Japanese Yen 99.47 +.12 +.12% 78.27
Mexican Peso 13.4193 +.0810 +.60% 13.1840
EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel 3.6528 -.0026 -.95% 4.0200
Norwegian Krone 6.0756 +.0002 +.12% 5.8094
South African Rand 10.3288 -.0008 -.83% 8.4030
Swedish Krona 6.6217 -.0005 -.33% 6.6924
Swiss Franc .9363 -.0020 -.19% .9534


ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.1047 -.0087 -.79% .9752
6.1209 +.0010 +.02% 6.3414
7.7547 -.0000 -.00% 7.7565
67.735 +1.715 +2.53% 55.535
1.2784 +.0042 +.33% 1.2451
1101.30 +1.30 +.12% 1131.15
29.76 -.02 -.07% 29.89


...... Petrobras 13.60 +.08
13 Pfizer 28.01 -.20
21 PhilipMor 83.40 -.04
... Phillips66 58.11 +1.01
dd ... PhoenxCos38.04 +.14
20 PiedNG 32.26
... PiedmOfc 16.94 -.24
q ... PimlncStr2 9.97 -.05
18 PinWst 53.12 -1.15
7 PitnyBw 16.34 +.02
... PlainsAAs 50.56
dd ... PlugPowrh .54 +.01
31 PlumCrk 43.72 -.59
...Polaris 109.86 +.65
dd 6 Polycom 9.95 +.02
17 PorGE 28.53 -.28
...Potash 29.66 +.02
q... PwshDB 26.80 +.14
q ...PSlndia 13.89 -.65
q ... PwShs QQQ75.90 +.43
25 Praxair 117.47 +.07
28 PrecCastpt213.86 +2.62
15PrinFncl 41.38 +.72
... ProAssur s47.50 +.36
dd ... ProLogis 35.30 +.06
q ... ProShtS&P28.81 -.12
q ... ProUItMC 98.65 -.07
q ... PrUShQQQ20.73 -.21
q ... ProUItSP 80.28 +.71
q ... Pro7-10yrT49.66 -.52
q ... PUItSP500 s67.01 +1.00
q ... PrUVxST rs43.38 -3.57
19 ProctGam 77.75 -.14
q ... PrUShSP rs38.68 -.40
q ... PrUShL20 rs78.69 +1.94
q ... ProUSR2K16.29 -.21
q ... PUSSP50022.55 -.33
q ... PrUPShQQQ23.42 -.39
... 9 ProspctCap11.13 +.06
13Prudentl 75.92 +1.04
10 PSEG 32.14 -.28
67PubStrg 152.40 -.27
... PulteGrp 15.39
q ... PMMI 6.66 +.02
... QEPRes 27.98 +.66
cc ... Qihoo360 81.55 +3.62
28 Qualcom 66.75 +.47
14 QstDiag 59.00 +.38
9 Questar 21.66 -.26
dd 2 QksilvRes 1.66 -.01
dd 72Quiksilvr 5.02 +.07
dd 8 RFMicD 4.93 -.03
dd ... RadianGrp 13.62 +.07
dd 2 RadioShk 3.41 +.14
35 RLauren 167.12 +1.71
18 Ravenlnds 30.52 +1.31
15 Raytheon 75.69 +.28
dd ... Realogyn 41.95 -.38
33 Rlylnco 38.87 -.63
9 RedwdTr 18.04 +.25
cc ... RgcyCtrs 46.61 -.94
cc 34 RegncyEn 26.90 -.13
... RegionsFn 9.35 -.05
18 RelStlAI 66.20 -.49
dd ... ReneSola 5.48 +.71
... Replgn 9.71 -.05
18 RepubSvc 32.16 -.35
6 ResrceCap 5.83 +.01
... RetailOpp 12.82 -.12
... ReynAmer 47.39 -.24
...... RioTinto 47.61 +2.50
dd ... RiteAid 3.54 +.08
cc 17 RiverbedT 15.40 -.04
37 RockwlAut 98.00 +.77
19 RockColl 70.68 -.09
42 Rogers 55.70 +.23
40 Roper 124.62 +.92
... 14 RoyalBkg 62.16 +.41
19 RylCarb 36.90 +.21
... RoyDShllB67.33 +.18
... Ryland 35.47 +.65
S-T-U
17S&TBcp 22.45 -.03
11 SAIC 15.15 +.08
16SCANA 47.30 -.82
65 SM Energy68.74 +.42
q ... SpdrDJIA148.11 +.26
q ... SpdrGold 136.42 +1.80
q ... SPMid 215.10 -.35
q ... S&P500ETF164.39 +.74
q ... SpdrHome 28.57 +.02
q ... SpdrS&PBk29.87 -.02
q ... SpdrLehHY39.34 -.12
q ... SpdrS&P RB35.05 -.07
q ... SpdrRetl 78.09 +.21
q ... SpdrOGEx 62.66 +.66
q ... SpdrMetM 36.20 +.23
...... SABESPs 8.38 -.15
...SabnR 52.02 -.01
13 Safeway 25.85 -.05
... Saialncs 30.27 +.26
cc ... StJoe 19.53 +.22
... Saks 15.91 -.02
dd ... Salesforcs49.58 +.45
.. SalixPhm 66.58 -.36
35 SallyBty 26.04 -.09
...SJuanB 16.49 -.16
23 SanDisk 55.31 +.13
dd 6 SandRdge 5.25 +.10
... 10Sanofi 47.64 -.14
26 Schlmbrg 82.42 +1.48
26 Schwab 21.15 +.27
... SeadrillLtd 47.02 +.76
11 SeagateT 38.67 +.35
dd 17 SearsHldgs44.84 +.60
17 SempraEn 83.40 -1.02
21 SenHous 22.23 -.52


Commodities
The price of oil
rose after House
Speaker John
Boehner and
other Congres-
sional leaders
said that they
would support
President Ba-
rack Obama's
call for a military
strike in Syria.





It-


dd... Sequenom 2.98 .06 18 UILHold 36.81 -.95
35 ServiceCp 18.07 -.01 16 UNS Engy 44.83 -.90
...... ServcNow 46.90 +.02 14 US Airwy 16.39 +.23
38 Sherwin 171.08 -1.32
6 Shipin 15.40 -.06 dd ... USG 23.85 +.51

......SideurNac3.79 +.22 dd 7 UltraPtg 20.92 +.22
32 SilvWhtn g26.74 +.39 ... UnderArmr74.13 +1.49
74 SimonProp144.44 -1.19 28 UniFirst 96.49 .61
SiriusXM 3.64 +.06 ..... UnilevNV 37.60 -.03
23 SkywksSol 25.41 +.05
27 SmithWes 11.04 +.10 35 UnionPac153.74 +.20
dd 1 SmithMicro .90 +.01 14 Unit 45.30 -.75
30SmithfF 33.68 .15 dd 23 UtdContl 28.65 .19
24 Smucker 105.39 -.75 28 UPS B 85.96 +.38
33 SnapOn 93.45 -.15 UtdRentals55.65 +.88
.. SodaStrm 63.55 +1.06 Ud ls.65 .
.. SolarCap 21.85 -.10 20 US Bancrp36.06 -.07
..... SolarCityn29.49 -1.85 q ...US NGas19.25 +.30
17 SonocoP 37.21 -.02 q ... US OilFd 38.76 +.28
dd ... Sonus 3.43 -.02 dd15USSteel 18.20 +.30
. SonyCp 20.41 +.45
21 ... SouFun 47.12 +5.35 21 UtdTech 102.66 +2.56
q ...SourcC 60.05 +.28 23 UtdhlthGp 72.56 +.82
21 SoJerlnd 56.92 -.84 ... UnvslCp 48.85 -.17
17 SouthnCo 41.09 -.53 25 UrbanOut 41.76 -.17
21 SwstAirl 12.82 +.01
dd 16 SwstnEngy38.34 +.14 V-W-X-Y-Z
53 SovranSS 66.62 +.35 32VFCp 189.05 +1.84
21 SpectraEn 32.81 -.30
...SpectPh 7.29 -.37 Ve S +.
dd ... SpiritRCn 8.75 +.04 ... ValeSApf13.59 +.61
dd ... Splunk 55.24 +.03 28ValeroE 36.30 +.77
.....Sprintn 6.68 -.03 13VlyNBcp 10.03 -.06
q ... SPMatls 40.67 +.24 dd ... ValVisA 4.97 +.08
q... SPHIthC 49.54 +.32
q ... SP CnSt 39.48 -.03 34 ValueClick 20.61 -.55
q ... SPConsum58.09 .41 q ... VanS&P50075.29 +.44
q ...SPEngy 82.17 .60 q ... VangREIT 63.94 -.56
q ...SPDRFnc9.60 +.16 q ... VangEmg 37.94 +.22
q SPInds 44.32 +.28 q ... VangEur 51.78 +.74
q... SPTech 31.43 +.03
q ...SP Util 36.87 -.43 q ... VangFTSE37.54 +.69
...StdPac 7.15 +.01 17Vectren 32.14 -.46
27 StanBlkDk 86.22 .96 dd ... Velti .36 +.01
dd 9 Staples 13.83 -.08 .....VeoliaEnv 15.86 +.44
StarGas 4.73 -.07 cc 17 VeriFone 19.74 -.08
60 Starbucks 71.60 +1.08
15 StateStr 67.56 +.84 31 Verisign 48.56 +.57
11 StlDynam 15.22 -.04 19VerizonCm46.01 -1.37
dd ...Stereotaxs 3.76 .24 cc ... VerixPh 75.38 +.23
dd ... StratHotels 8.26 .15 .. ViacomB 79.91 +.35
12SubPpne 44.91 -.89 80ViadCop 2236 -21
dd ... SuffolkBcp 17.14 +.13 80Viad orp 22.36 -.21
58 SunHydrl 31.36 +.72 dd ... Vical 1.25 -.04
17 Suncorgs 34.36 +.49 dd 77 ViroPhrm 30.01 -.14
dd ... SunEdison 7.22 -.14 43 Visa 177.02 +2.60
.. SunPower 22.13 +.64 14Vishaylnt 12.05 -.20
dd ... Suntech 1.01 -.02
... SunTrst 31.90 -.12 dd ... Vivus 12.90 +.37
14 SupEnrgy 24.61 +.05 69 VMware 84.63 +.48
dd 4 Supvalu 7.10 -.07 ......Vodafone 32.01 -.34
46SusqBnc 12.70 .09 dd 75VulcanM 48.49 +.69
SSwERCmTR8.57 +.06 37 WP Carey 65.59 -.14
.. SwiftTrans 18.11 +.15
17 Symantec 26.08 .47 18 WalMart 72.68 -.30
dd ... Synovus 3.20 .01 19Walgrn 48.74 +.67
17Sysco 32.18 +.16 dd 2 WalterEn 13.41 +.47
..... T-MoblUSn24.04 +.69 6 WarnerCh 21.76 +.31
22TCPpLn 47.22 -1.10 13WREIT 24.20 -.16
17TCFFncl 13.89 -.16
19TDAmeritr25.94 +.27 18WsteMlnc 40.15 -.29
12TECO 16.29 -.24 26 Waters 99.98 +1.13
.. TJX 53.13 +.41 dd 17Weathflntl 14.99 +.08
...... TaiwSemi 16.90 .34 ... WebsterFn25.85 -.61
... 11TalismEg 10.66 -.06 52 WeinRlt 27.76 -.64
17 Target 63.59 +.28
... TataMotors22.31 -.01 14WellPoint 86.28 +1.14
44Taubmn 66.77 -.64 20WellsFargo41.39 +.31
..8 TeckResg 26.01 +.77 cc 30 Wendys Co 7.69 +.13
25 TempurSly 39.75 +1.24 18WestarEn 30.51 -.60
42 Tenneco 46.91 +.78
36Teradata 58.70 +.14 q ... WAstEMkt 12.07 -.09
... Terex 28.28 -.72 q ... WAstlnfSc 11.58 +.05
.. TerraNitro211.87 -1.95 1OWDigital 63.26 +1.26
dd ... TeslaMot 168.94 -.06 13WstnUnion17.53
...Tesoro 47.02 +.93 .. Westpacs 28.84 +.80
... TevaPhrm 38.35 +.13
19Texlnst 38.64 .44 .. Weyerhsr 27.10 -.28
31 TexRdhse 24.95 +.10 18Whrlpl 128.56 -.09
18Textainer 34.58 -.28 40 WholeFd s 53.31 +.56
42Textron 27.28 +.34 24WmsCos 35.93 -.31
cc ... 3DSyss 52.94 1.54 9 Windstrm 8.17 +.10
223MCo 113.22 -.36
36TibcoSft 23.07 .53 .. WiscEngy 40.33 -.71
28THortong 54.86 +.07 q ... WTJpHedg45.48 +1.65
28TimeWarn61.36 +.83 q ... WTIndia 13.44 -.44
41Timken 56.18 +.12 23Woodward38.65 +.09
..TiVo nc 11.85 +.18 12ldEnt 9.90 13
... TollBros 30.51 -.10
..... TorchEngy .45 ... 12XLGrp 30.13 +.57
... Torchmark69.17 +.28 17XcelEngy 27.49 -.43
.. 14TorDBkg 85.83 +.31 12Xerox 10.12 +.14
..... TotalSA 55.12 -.19 25Xilinx 44.62 +1.20
cc 4 Transocn 45.32 +.19 X m 2
14 Travelers 80.57 +.67 Xyem 25.08 +30
q ...TriContl 18.21 .02 53Yahoo 27.78 +.66
..... TriCntlpf 45.44 +1.45 16Yamanag 11.50 +.12
18TrimbleNs25.19 -.06 dd ... Yelp 52.37 +.39
dd ... TrinaSolarlO.23 +.84 dd ... YingliGrn 4.69 +.39
10TrstNY 5.86 +.02
22 Tuppwre 81.37 +.60 26 YorkWater19.33 -.19
... 21stCFoxA31.71 +.38 28YumBrnds 70.00 -.02
...21stCFoxB31.79 +.40 dd ... Zalicus .83 +.13
5 TwoHrblnv 9.43 -.08 18Zimmer 78.91 -.18
dd 12Tycolnls 32.93 -.11 ... ZionBcp 28.35 +.38
20 Tyson 28.84 -.11
..13UBSAG 19.82 +.52 ..... Zoetisn 29.43 +.28
... UDR 22.24 -.35 q ... ZweigFd 13.08 +.08
16 UGI Corp 38.49 -.71 dd ... Zynga 2.87 +.04
Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cld Issue has been called for
redemption by company. d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and eamings in Canadian dollars. h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pf Preferred stock
issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
pnce. rt Right to buy security at a specified price, rs Stock has
undergone a reverse sock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distrib-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vI Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus
stock, c Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months, f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred, k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears, m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend, Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-dlstribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covenng
market costs is paid from fund assets, d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available. p previous day's net asset value. s fund
split shams dunng the week. x fund paid a distnbution dunng the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 108.54
Ethanol (gal) 2.48
Heating Oil (gal) 3.15
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.67
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.86


METALS
Gold (oz)
Silver (oz)
Platinum (oz)
Copper (Ib)
Palladium (oz)


CLOSE
1412.00
24.38
1538.20
3.30
716.20


AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.26
Coffee (Ib) 1.13
Corn (bu) 4.98
Cotton (Ib) 0.93
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 330.00
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.33
Soybeans (bu) 14.36
Wheat (bu) 6.37


PVS.
107.65
2.43
3.14
3.58
3.02


%CHG %YTD
+0.83 +18.2
+0.08 +13.3
+0.37 +3.4
+2.37 +9.4
-0.84 +1.9


PVS. %CHG
1396.10 +1.14
23.46 +3.92
1527.10 +0.73
3.23 +2.22
722.10 -0.82


PVS.
1.23
1.12
4.95
0.93
320.40
1.37
14.24
6.43


%CHG %YTD
-0.49 -2.9
+0.62 -21.6
+0.61 -28.7
... +24.2
+3.00 -11.7
-3.21 +14.2
+0.81 +1.2
-1.05 -18.2






iPage 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/STATE NEWS


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


TODAY


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


Scattered p.m. storms Scattered p.m. storms Scattered p.m. storms Scattered p.m. storms


92 / 750
60% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature9 Today





85 97 i 98 93
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number,
the greaterthe need for eye and sIn protection. 0-2 Low;
3.5 Moderate; 6.7 High; 8.10 Very High; 11 Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.

AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Tuesday
32
0 50 100150200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: particulates
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Tuesday
Trees *. j/
Grass
Weeds oD*.* .
Molds N.A I
absent low moderate hih veryhig
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Tuesday
Temperatures
High/Low 880/740
Normal High/Low 920/740
Record High 950 (1996)
Record Low 680 (1979)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Tuesday 0.52"
Month to date 1.80"
Normal month to date 0.83"
Year to date 39.32"
Normal year to date 38.02"
Record 3.07" (1977)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year


0.43 0.77
2.12 0.73
1.98 0.75
3.06 0.81
2.76 3.08
10.50 13.44
7.38 5.43
9.29 8.36
1.80 5.05
5.71
0.02
1.78
39.32 45.93


7.07/1979
11.05/1983
9.26/1970
5.80/1994
9.45/1991
23.99/1974
14.22/1995
15.60/1995
14.03/1979
10.88/1995
5.53/2002
6.83/2002
(since 1931)


Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


92 / 750
30% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft.Myers 91/76 storms afternoon
Sarasota 91/76 part cldy none


SUN AND MOON
The Sun Rise
Today 7:09 a.m.
Thursday 7:10 a.m.
The Moon Rise
Today 6:20a.m.
Thursday 7:14 a.m.


Set
7:45 p.m.
7:44 p.m.
Set
7:07 p.m.
7:43 p.m.


New First Full Last



Sep5 Sep12 Sep19 Sep26

SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 5:11a 11:22a 5:33p 11:44p
Thu. 5:54a 12:06p 6:17p
Fri. 6:41a 12:28a 7:04p 12:26p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 3:36a
Thu. 3:49a
Englewood
Today 2:13a
Thu. 2:26a
Boca Grande
Today 1:18a
Thu. 1:31a
El Jobean
Today 4:08a
Thu. 4:21a
Venice
Today 12:28a
Thu. 12:41a


Low High Low

9:15a 3:11p 10:12p
9:52a 3:49p 10:35p

7:31a 1:48p 8:28p
8:08a 2:26p 8:51p

5:52a 12:53p 6:49p
6:29a 1:31p 7:12p

9:44a 3:43p 10:41p
10:21a 4:21p 11:04p

6:10a 12:03p 7:07p
6:47a 12:41p 7:30p


92 /750
60% chance of rain

Clearwater
91/76
J ^ *.f


J
St. Petersburg
91/76


90 / 740
60% chance of rain

Plant City
'91 74
( /


SUNDAY THE NATION
S-10s -Os 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 8O s 900 s


Scattered storms


900 /730
60% chance of rain


Winter Hawon
91, 75


Tampa JBrandon ....
91/77 92 74 .
Bartu -
S91 74 '

Apollo Beach Ft. Mad
91 75 90/74
---- "-'----
.:..- .......
f -


qBradenton
91/77
d_ tonMyalka Cit
Longboat Key* Mya92'75
91/78 92
e .....-.. i J


Sarsaraso
3drd.Tuld- -
91/76

Osprey -'. -'
91/76 *


Shown is today's weather
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.



Gulf Water
Temperature

890


Venice
S91/77


North Port
92/76


Wauchula
92 75

Limestone
j92 75


Arradia
92 75

HHull
92/75


Port Charlotte
S 92/75
Englewoodd J- .....
91 77 : Puna
Punta Gorda


Placida%
91/77.
Boca Grande %
91/80


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2013

Publication date: 9/4/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
E 6-12 1-2 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
E 3-6 1-2 Smooth


Cape
91/7


Sanibel
91/79


AccuWe


Fort Myers A.
91/76

Coral Lehigh Acres
6 92/74


Bonita Springs a_
92/75 ..... ..


ather.comn .


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
90 73 pc
91 77 pc
91 76 t
90 80 pc
91 75 t
90 82 pc
91 76 t
90 75 t
92 71 pc
92 72 pc
88 82 pc


Thu.
Hi Lo W
89 73 t
92 77 pc
91 77 pc
91 78 pc
92 75 pc
90 80 pc
91 75 pc
90 74 pc
92 72 t
93 73 pc
88 81 pc


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
i Lo W
) 82 pc
1 75 t
) 75 t
) 75 t
) 81 pc
2 76 t
) 71 t
) 74 t
1 74 t
3 73 pc
) 75 t


Thu.
Hi Lo W
89 82 pc
92 74 t
92 74 t
90 76 pc
91 79 pc
92 75 pc
92 72 t
89 74 t
93 75 t
88 73 t
89 74 t


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Today
Hi Lo W
89 82 pc
89 73 t
91 76 t
91 75 t
91 76 pc
92 72 pc
91 77 t
89 74 t
90 75 t
90 81 t
91 75 t


Thu.
Hi Lo W
90 80 pc
91 75 pc
91 77 pc
92 75 t
92 76 pc
93 73 t
91 77 pc
89 74 pc
91 75 pc
90 79 pc
93 75 t


Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.
/Seaie.: Winppe4 Oa '
:. ., '-- o ,..8,6 a .

90* o ,UMinneapolls Torornmo 72/48
Minneapo is --
::' 7 8M1 Yor '
.. ot 82167
claso Datroit
.San Fran.csco Ch'a 8057
970'8 Washington \
SKansas City
SS: -o .. 0


SLouA-ngeles
81'72
El Paso


Leor
S .Chsnuana "'94
*sins'


Allania
S.. .. .. :


Miami
'90/8


Fronts Precipitation
w- A. & ] &E&-w -& E MiM
Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


High ...................... 1070 atYuma,AZ


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


WORLD CI


City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


Today
Hi Lo W
90 65 s
61 51 sh
89 69 s
83 60 s
90 65 s
90 66 s
91 67 pc
80 63 s
74 57 s
75 52 s
82 54 s
87 66 s
83 61 s
82 59 s
76 61 s
90 70 pc
82 60 s
78 54 s
98 77 s
93 65 s
89 67 s
80 57 s
71 47 pc
64 42 sh
77 55 s
80 58 s
88 59 t
89 71 sh
94 75 pc
82 61 s

CITIES
Today
Hi Lo W
77 61 pc
114 81 s 1
76 61 t
73 55 sh
59 52 pc
94 72 s
83 53 pc
90 77 t
69 51 pc
83 50 pc
72 55 sh
59 50 r
79 59 s
90 59 s


Thu.
Hi Lo W
89 66 pc
61 50 pc
89 68 pc
85 53 pc
95 68 t
90 67 pc
91 60 pc
71 53 pc
66 46 pc
65 40 pc
82 53 pc
89 64 pc
76 60 s
83 55 pc
69 49 s
92 69 pc
78 53 s
69 38 pc
98 73 s
95 66 pc
88 65 pc
72 52 s
74 59 pc
60 45 pc
86 64 pc
75 45 pc
93 58 pc
89 71 s
94 76 t
82 57 s


Thu.
Hi Lo W
81 63 s
111 79 s
74 60 sh
77 57 s
66 54 sh
94 74 s
81 52 pc
90 78 t
61 42 pc
80 52 s
62 48 sh
63 48 c
81 61 s
84 57 pc


Low .................... 310 at Brimson, MN


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA


Today
Hi Lo W
94 68 s
88 64 s
86 60 s
98 83 pc
89 72 s
83 62 s
89 67 s
80 61 s
83 61 pc
93 70 pc
86 60 s
90 75 t
82 67 s
80 67 pc


Thu.
i Lo W
3 67 pc
3 65 pc
7 64 pc
1 81 s
5 74 s
7 64 s
1 70 s
) 56 s
2 68 pc
3 67 pc
3 64 s
) 75 t
) 55 pc
5 69 s


Oklahoma City 94 68 s 95 68 s


Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today
Hi Lo W
75 56 t
72 48 pc
69 46 pc
85 59 s
80 53 pc
74 67 sh
84 68 s
70 60 sh
90 77 t
76 48 s
85 78 t
77 56 pc
71 57 sh
70 48 pc


Thu.
Hi Lo W
74 54 t
63 43 pc
63 44 pc
88 59 s
89 59 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly doudy, c-doudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow luries, sn-snow, i-ice.


I HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE STATE


Researchers finish
grave excavation
phase at Dozier

MARIANNA (AP) -
University of South
Florida researchers are
wrapping up the first
phase of their grave
excavations at a former
reform school that had a
history of extreme abuse.
Two skeletons have
been exhumed and will
be taken back to the
Tampa university to be
studied after digging ends
Tuesday.
Researchers believe
about 50 people were
buried in the cemetery
at the former Arthur G.


Dozier school. They'll
return to the site in the
fall to resume excavation.
The goal is to try to
identify those buried in
the graves and how they
died. Ten families have
contacted the school
with hopes DNA will help
identify relatives who
died at the reform school.

Man gets life for
killing store owner

BELLE GLADE (AP)
-A former high school
football star has been
sentenced to life in prison
for fatally shooting a
South Florida grocery
store owner.


A Palm Beach County
judge sentenced 21-year-
old Corey Graham Jr. on
Tuesday. The Palm Beach
Post reports that he was
convicted last month of
first-degree murder with
a firearm. Graham had
once been a standout on
the football field at Glades
Central High School.
Authorities say Graham
was wearing a mask
in January 2012 when
he robbed 49-year-old
Jimmy McMillan's Belle
Glade store. The owner
was later found lying on
the floor. The impover-
ished community rallied,
and tips led to Graham's
arrest.


Residents said
McMillan often gave
credit to people without
cash and cooked meals
for unemployed.
The store was started in
the 1940s by McMillan's
ancestors.

Teen dies
in tubing accident

SEMINOLE (AP) -
Pinellas County Sheriff's
deputies say a 15-year-
old girl who was injured
while tubing on a lake has
died.
Katie Yale died Tuesday
morning. A second teen
involved in the accident
is still recovering from


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you are under no obligation.
These revolutionary 100% Digital instruments use the latest technology
to comfortably and almost invisibly help you hear more clearly. This
technology solves the "stopped up ears", and "head in a barrel" sensation
some people experience.
If you wish to participate, you will be required to have your hearing tested
in our office FREE OF CHARGE to determine candidacy and review your
results with the hearing instruments with our hearing care specialist.
At the end of this evaluation, you may keep your instrument, if you so
desire, at a tremendous savings for participating in this field test. Special
testing will be done to determine the increased benefits of this technology.
Benefits of hearing aids vary by type and degree of hearing loss, noise
environment, accuracy of hearing test, and proper fit. This is a wonderful
opportunity to determine if hearing help is available for your hearing loss
and get hearing help at a very affordable price.

WISH TO BE INCLUDED IN THIS FIELD TEST


NOW Through September 11, 2013

Call today to make your reservation for the Hearing Aid Field Test


Arcadia
Desoto Plaza
(863) 535-5674


Port Charlotte
Town Center Mall
(Inside Sears)
(941) 315-8644


Venice
Inside Wal-mart
(941) 451-7069


Englewood
Merchants Crossing
(941) 526-0186


minor injuries received
on Labor Day.
According to deputies,
Yale and the 13-year-old
were tubing on Lake
Seminole behind a
19-foot motorboat when
a man on a Sea-Doo
crashed into them.
Deputies say 21-year-
old Ryan Godcharles
of Naples was driving
the Sea-Doo. He wasn't
injured.
Alcohol doesn't ap-
pear to be a factor in the
crash. Deputies are still
investigating.


Lightning may be
the cause of large
Naples fire

NAPLES (AP)-A
lightning strike may
have been the cause of
a fire that caused about
$2 million in damages to
a North Naples YMCA.
The Naples Daily News
reports that the gym was
just closing on Monday
afternoon because of the
holiday when an employ-
ee felt a jolt of lightning
hit the building.
There are more than
6,000 members at the
YMCA, which also
houses a day care for
100 preschoolers.
The three-alarm fire
burned for hours on
Labor Day. No one was
injured and officials say
the building is a complete
loss.

Norwegian opens
new routes to
California, Florida

STOCKHOLM (AP) -
Budget airline Norwegian
Air Shuttle says it will
open new routes from
Scandinavian countries
to Los Angeles, San
Francisco and Orlando in
the spring 2014.
It said Tuesday it


will be the first airline
to offer direct flights
from Stockholm and
Oslo to the three U.S.
destinations and from
Copenhagen to Los
Angeles.
The fast-growing
airline, which is based
in a suburb of Oslo,
mainly flies in Europe
but in recent months has
launched long-distance
flights to New York and
Southeast Asia.
In November it will
also start flying from
Oslo, Stockholm and
Copenhagen to Fort
Lauderdale, Fla.


12 test positive
for tuberculosis
in Marion County

OCALA (AP) -Twelve
people have tested
positive for tuberculosis
exposure after com-
ing in contact with a
TB-infected high school
student in north Florida.
Marion County health
officials say the 12 had
been in close contact
with a North Marion
High School student who
tested positive in July.
They say the 12 have
not come down with the
disease and are not con-
tagious, but could if they
don't receive preventative
treatment.
Tuberculosis is an air-
borne disease that usually
affects the lungs but can
affect other organs.
Symptoms include
a cough lasting more
than three weeks, night
sweats lasting more than
a week, unexplained
weight loss, a productive
cough or coughing up
blood. The side effects
of TB include fatigue,
shortness of breath,
and/or chest pain or
tightness. It is poten-
tially fatal if untreated.


0.


'i
-r
i


93/75


e(
76


''











SPORTS


Wednesday, September 4, 2013


Stewart calls injury a small
bump in the road, *Page 5


* FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE PLAYOFFS: Charlotte 1, Fort Myers 0


SUN PHOTO BY KAT GODINA
Charlotte Stone Crabs starter Felipe Rivero throws against Fort Myers during the first game of a first-round Florida State League
playoff series Tuesday at Charlotte Sports Park.




Crabs get cooking


Charlotte's recipe of pitching and defense pays off with win


By DAWN KLEMISH
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PORT CHARLOTTE Charlotte
endured an ugly first half. It took
several adjustments, a lot of effort
and plenty of wins, but the Stone
Crabs slid into the Florida State
League playoffs with 10 wins in
the final 15 games of the season.
After that, Charlotte has a very
specific agenda and it showed
Tuesday night during a 1-0 win
against Fort Myers at Charlotte
Sports Park.
The victory puts the Stone Crabs


STONE CRABS AT MIRACLE
WHO: Charlotte at Fort Myers
WHAT: First-round, best-of-three playoff
series, Game 2, Charlotte leads 1-0
WHEN: Today, 7:05 p.m.
WHERE: Hammond Stadium, Fort Myers
RADIO: stonecrabsbaseball.com
TICKETS: 239-768-4210 or at the box office,
112 hours before game through fifth inning

within one game of their third FSL
South Division title in five years.
Charlotte advanced to the FSL


Championship in 2009 and 2010,
losing both times to the Tampa
Yankees.
"It was pitching and defense
tonight," Charlotte manager Brady
Williams said. "It's a recipe you
always talk about."
Left-hander Felipe Rivero led
the charge, using his 24th start to
earn his team-best 10th victory.
Rivero, who entered the game
with 15 /3 consecutive scoreless
innings, let that streak ride by
keeping the Miracle off the
CRABS13


* PREP VOLLEYBALL: DeSoto County 3, Port Charlotte 2



Bulldogs,



Riley battle


By GARY BROWN
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PORT CHARLOTTE -
When DeSoto High School
middle hitter Tishonna
Riley is on, she's almost
impossible to stop.
That was the case
Tuesday night against Port
Charlotte, as Riley made
30 kills. And the Bulldogs
needed every one of them
in a hard-fought 25-20,
12-25, 25-20, 15-25, 15-10
victory against the Pirates.
"I don't think this was
my best game," Riley, a se-
nior, said. "I think I played
better against Charlotte
last week. But tonight we
won, and the big key was
teamwork."
"When Tishonna is
hot, the other team
better watch out," DeSoto
County coach LauraWhite
said. "I think probably the
30 kills is the most ever
by a DeSoto player. The
Florida Southern coach
has shown an interest in


ratess


UP NEXT
Port Charlotte: vs. North Port,
today, 7 p.m.
DeSoto County: at Sebring,
Thursday, 7:30 p.m.
Inside: North Port sophomore
quarterback Simms shows poise
of veteran, PAGE 6

her."
With the teams splitting
the first four games, the
fifth saw five ties before
the Bulldogs pulled away
for the victory. Sophomore
Bethany Bonnville served
the final five points with
Riley notching a key kill.
Bonnville had 11 service
points and 33 assists.
"Bethany was another
key for us," White said.
"She played both setter
and outside hitter for us.
We were up and down.
We've some problems
passing the ball, but we're
getting better."
BULLDOGS16


By CHUCK BALLARO
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PUNTA GORDA -
Riverdale High School
used big runs to overpow-
er Charlotte in the first
two games before rallying
from behind late to com-
plete a 3-0 win (25-14,
25-13, 25-23) Tuesday in
the District 7A-11 opener
for both teams.
"Our hitting was better.
They made some errors
that gave us some free
points," Riverdale coach
Roni Hipp said. "We
didn't think it was going
to be easy. Our service-
return game broke down
in the third game, which
gave us problems."
Riverdale (4-0, 1-0)
posted a 13-2 run in the
first game and a 10-2 run
and a game-clinching
10-1 run in the second.
Charlotte (2-2, 0-1)
charged back in game
three, keeping pace with
the Raiders the entire


UP NEXT
Charlotte: at Fort Myers,
Tuesday, 7 p.m.

game, which included
14 ties and seven lead
changes, before painstak-
ingly building a 21-17
lead.
But Riverdale put up a
quick run to tie it at 21,
tied it again at 23 and
held on to win when the
game-tying point for
Charlotte was overruled.
"The girls got fired
up. We really had the
momentum, we made
some lineup changes that
worked, but there were
tough calls and we made
some errors in the end to
lose that one," Charlotte
coach Michelle Dill said.
Riverdale got great
work from senior middle
hitter Chenelle Walker,
who led with 11 kills and
TARPONS16


* TENNIS: U.S. Open


Serena sails through quarters


Serena Williams serves to Carla Suarez Navarro during
quarterfinal match Tuesday at the U.S. Open in New


By HOWARD FENDRICH
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK From an
ace on the first point to a
stinging return on the last,
SerenaWilliams was close
to perfect in the U.S. Open
quarterfinals.
The score said it all
Tuesday night: 6-0, 6-0.
Yes, Williams is looking
better and better with
AP PHOTO
AP PHOTO each match at the year's
g their last Grand Slam tourna-
York. ment. With two more wins


- no matter the exact
scores she'll earn a fifth
title at Flushing Meadows
and 17th major champi-
onship overall.
The No. 1-ranked and
No. 1-seeded Williams
shut out 18th-seeded
Carla Suarez Navarro of
Spain, the first "double
bagel" in a quarterfinal
at Flushing Meadows
since 1989, when 18-time
major title winner Martina
Navratilova did it to


Manuela Maleeva.
"When you play against
Serena," Suarez Navarro
said, "you know these
things can happen."
Williams won 53 of 71
points and dominated
pretty much every statisti-
cal category. The first set
took all of 19 minutes. The
second was slower, lasting
33 minutes, but no less
lopsided.
Williams was asked
SERENA13


U.S. OPEN
AT A GLANCE
TOP PLAYERS ON COURT
TODAY: Quarterfinals: Men, No.
2 Rafael Nadal vs. No. 19 Tommy
Robredo, No. 4 David Ferrer vs.
Richard Gasquet; Women, No.
2 Victoria Azarenka vs. Daniela
Hantuchova, No. 10 Roberta Vinci
vs. Flavia Pennetta.
TV: Tennis Channel, 11 a.m.-7
p.m.; ESPN2, Noon-11 p.m
ONLINE: www.usopen.org


INDEX I Lottery 2 1 Colleges 2 | Community Calendar 2 1 NFL 2 1Collegefootball 3 | Baseball 3-4 | Scoreboard 5 | Quick Hits 5 1 Preps 5-6


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* PREP VOLLEYBALL: Riverdale 3, Charlotte 0


Tarpons drop



7A-11 opener






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IWednesday, September 4, 2013


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com
* CASH 3
Sept. 3N ......................... ........ 7-3-1
Sept. 3D ..................................... 3-4-8
Sept. 2N ..................................... 2-9-9
Sept. 2D ..................................... 9-3-4
Sept. N ...................................... 1-8-2
Sept. 1D ......................... ............ 7-7-7
D-Day, N-Night

* PLAY
Sept. 3N .......................... 6-7-8-8
Sept. 3D ........................ 8-8-7-2
Sept. 2N ..................................0-0-6-9
Sept. 2D ......................... 3-5-7-2
Sept. 1N ....................... 7-0-0-3
Sept. D ................................ 3-3-5-8
D-Day, N-Night

* FANTASY 5
Sept. 3............................. 2-5-9-12-36
Sept. 2....................... 18-19-20-31-32
Sept. 1....................... 14-15-18-27-32
Aug.31 ......................... 4-6-21-28-31
Aug.30 .......................5-13-19-31-35
PAYOFF FOR SEPT. 2
4 5-digit winners ..............$48,618.61
228 4-digit winners ..............$137.50
7,017 3-digit winners .............$12.50

* MEGA MONEY
Sept. 3...........................2-11-20-42
M egaBall......................... ................ 22

Aug. 30 ..........................7-1 7-41-42
M egaBall.........................................17
PAYOFF FORAUG. 30
0 4-of-4 MB ......................... 00,000
7 4-of-4....................................... $875
62 3-of-4 MB .........................$216.50
765 3-of-4..................................... $52
1,506 2-of-4 MB.......................$18.50
* LOTTO
Aug.31 ................10-11-12-17-28-46
Aug.28 ....................3-9-11-21-24-49
Aug.24 ................11-24-36-45-46-47
PAYOFF FORAUG. 31
1 6-digit winners ........................ 3M
37 5-digit winners .................4,189
2,455 4-digitwinners .............$49.50
45,244 3-digit winners .................$5

* POWERBALL
Aug.31 ........................2-7-25-40-56
Powerball................................... 20

Aug.28 .......................6-7-9-19-32
Powerball................................... 13
PAYOFF FORAUG. 31
0 5of5+ PB........................... 116M
0 5 of 5.............................. 1,000,000
5 4of5 + PB.........................$10,000
177 4 of5 .................................. $100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$169 million

* MEGA MILLIONS
Sept. 3.........................4-13-14-28-41
Powerball........................................ 28

Aug.30 ..................6-19-24-43-44
Powerball........................................ 33
PAYOFF FOR AUG. 30
0 5 of 5 + MB............................. 77M
0 5 of 5................................. 250,000
0 4 of 5 + MB......................... 10,000
37 4 of5 ..................................... $150


Corrections
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errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
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Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must contain
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EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* AWAY AT COLLEGE


More court time pleases Latham


By BARBARA BOXLEITNER
SUN CORRESPONDENT
An injury limited Alyssa
Latham's time on the vol-
leyball court last season.
This year the sopho-
more setter is healthy
and contributing to the
State College of Florida,
Manatee-Sarasota indoor
team.
"I'm feeling great," the
Charlotte High School
graduate said. "I'm just
happy to play again."
Latham played with a
torn labrum she thought
happened during the 2012
preseason. She also dealt
with a stressed capsule
in her shoulder she was
told occurred because of
repeated wear over time.


She kept playing for set-
ting purposes, but then-
coach Carmine Garofalo
substituted for her when it
was her turn to serve.
"My arm (shoulder)
would dislocate," she said.
"I never served."
In 19 matches, Latham
had 85 assists, second on
the team. She added 35
digs.
She underwent surgery
in November and had
three pins placed in the
shoulder.
Latham went to physi-
cal therapy for at least
three months and spent
the summer doing a lot
of running and stretching
exercises for the arm.
She was able to resume


playing this preseason.
Though she said she
doesn't have full range
of motion, she is able to
serve again. She still ices
the shoulder after vol-
leyball activity and goes
regularly to the trainer for
stretching exercises.
"Sometimes it will get a
little irritated," she said.
The Manatees have
learned a new offense
under Dr. LonniWilson,
first-year coach, and
started the season 3-1.
"We play more of a com-
plex offense," she said.
Wilson is glad to have
Latham in action.
"She looks great," he
said. "She's very consistent
as a setter.


"She's a good athlete,"
Wilson said, "and she's
a great student. She's a
leader. We're really thank-
ful for the quality of girls
we have on the team."
After this season,
Latham wants to continue
her career, preferably at
a state program. Ideally,
she said, she would like
to keep playing with
teammate Kelly Rossip,
a returning sophomore
middle hitter/blocker out
of Port Charlotte High
School. She and Rossip
have been coaches for the
Coastline Volleyball club,
co-founded and co-direct-
ed byVenice High School
graduate Kristen Batt.


* NFL NOTEBOOK



Watkins gets second chance


Miami signs

former

1st-round pick

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DAVIE Former first-
round draft pick Danny
Watkins said he's grateful
for a fresh start with the
Miami Dolphins after be-
ing cut by the Philadelphia
Eagles.
Watkins signed a
$555,000, one-year
contract with Miami and
joined the team Tuesday.
"It's the most exciting
time in my life again," he
said after practice. "I've
had a grin on my face
since this morning. It's
been great."
Watkins, a guard, spent
two seasons with the
Eagles and started 18
games before losing his
job early last year. He was
a surprise choice with the
23rd overall selection at
age 26 when the Eagles
made him the oldest first-
round pick at that time
since 1980.
Watkins will provide
depth behind starting
guards Richie Incognito
and John Jerry. Miami
waived second-year
center Josh Samuda.

Bucs place Gorrer on
IR/designated to return
list: Tampa Bay placed cornerback
Danny Gorrer on the injured reserve/
designated for return list and re-signed
defensive tackle Gary Gibson.
Gorrer started one of six games he
appeared in last season. The fourth-
year pro was sidelined by a groin injury
during training camp.
Gibson appeared in 16 games with
one start for Tampa Bay last season. He
was released last weekend when the
roster was trimmed to 53 players.
The Bucs also juggled the practice
squad, signing wide receiver Skye
Dawson and releasing offensive
lineman Jace Daniels.

Falcons sign Trueblood:
Atlanta signed offensive tackle Jeremy
Trueblood, who started 84 games in
seven seasons with Tampa Bay.
The Falcons signed the 30-year-old
Trueblood to add experience behind
second-year right tackle Lamar Holmes,
who has moved up as the starter after


AP FILE PHOTO
Danny Watkins, shown during a drill at the Eagles'camp in
Philadelphia, signed a one-year contract with the Miami Dolphins
on Tuesday after being cut by the Eagles last weekend.


playing in only one game in his 2012
rookie season.
Trueblood, cut by the Washington
Redskins on Aug. 27, played in 101
games with the Buccaneers. He played
in nine games with one start in 2012
after making 15 starts in 2011.

Redman to start at RB
for Steelers: Pittsburgh running
back Isaac Redman spent most of the
preseason on the bench as a precaution
after tweaking his neck during practice.
That didn't stop coach Mike Tomlin
from making Redman the starter
for Sunday's season opener against
Tennessee.
The Steelers cut Jonathan Dwyer -
their leading rusher last season and
handed the starting job to Redman
while second-round pick Le'Veon Bell
recovers from a sprained right foot.
Redman has been effective when
healthy. He ran for 410 yards in 2012
and can be effective in the passing
game. Redman caught four passes for a
career-high 105 yards in a 26-23 loss to
the Titans last October.

Browns reach deal with
Cundiff: Cleveland reached
agreement on a contract with former
Pro Bowl kicker Billy Cundiff. The
Browns needed a kicker just four days


before playing Miami after terminating
veteran Shayne Graham's contract and
releasing rookie Brandon Bogotay.
Cundiff made all six field-goal tries for
the Browns in 2009. He was cut last
month by the Jets.

Saints bring back
Meachem: New Orleans brought
back receiver Robert Meachem, shortly
after his release by the San Diego
Chargers. The Saints announced that
Meachem has been signed to a one-
year contract for which financial terms
have not been released. Meachem was
the Saints'first-round draft choice in
2007 and left for San Diego as a free
agent last season.

Cowboys acquire DE
Rayford: Dallas acquired
defensive end Caesar Rayford from the
Indianapolis Colts. The Cowboys sent a
conditional draft pick to Indianapolis.
The 27-year-old Rayford, a veteran
of the Arena and Canadian leagues,
signed with the Colts in May. He
had five sacks and 11 tackles in the
preseason.

Pats sign TE Mulligan:
New England Patriots have signed
tight end Matthew Mulligan, who was
released on Saturday by the Green Bay


BUCS AT JETS
WHO: Tampa Bay (0-0)
at New York (0-0)
WHEN: Sunday, 1 p.m.
WHERE: MetLife Stadium,
East Rutherford, N.J.
TV: FOX
RADIO: 103.5 FM, 620 AM,
1580 AM

DOLPHINS
AT BROWNS
WHO: Miami (0-0)
at Cleveland (0-0)
WHEN: Sunday, 1 p.m.
WHERE: FirstEnergy Stadium,
Cleveland
TV: CBS
RADIO: 103.5 FM, 620 AM,
1580 AM

Packers after signing as a free agent
in April. He spent the 2008 season on
Miami's practice squad after joining
the Dolphins as a rookie free agent
out of Maine. He played the next three
seasons with the NewYork Jets and last
season with the St. Louis Rams.

Colts continue fine-
tuning roster: Indianapolis
promoted tight end Dominique Jones
to the active roster and signed rookie
tight end Justice Cunningham to the
practice squad.
Jones played in four games and
made one catch last season with Indy
but was waived Saturday.
Cunningham, the final pick in April's
draft, was released Monday after Indy
acquired linebacker Cam Johnson
in a trade from San Francisco. Indy
now has two"Mr. Irrelevants"on its
practice squad Cunningham and
quarterback Chandler Harnish.
Indy also released rookie safety John
Boyett, a sixth-round pick, one day
after he was arrested on three charges
including public intoxication.

Cushing signs extension
with Texans: Houston linebacker
Brian Cushing signed a six-year contract
extension.
A person familiar with negotiations
confirmed the deal. The person spoke
on the condition of anonymity because
the team has not made an announce-
ment. The deal is worth $55.6 million,
with $21 million guaranteed.
Cushing was in the last year of the
deal he signed as a rookie in 2009. The
26-year-old linebacker returned to the
field this summer after sustaining a
season-ending knee injury in Week 5 of
last season.


* STATE COLLEGES


Freshmen shin


STAFF REPORT
Jameis Winston had a
lot to live up to with all
the hype surrounding
his collegiate debut. The
Seminoles redshirt fresh-
man quarterback deliv-
ered against Pittsburgh
on Monday night.
Winston tossed four
touchdowns and
completed 25 of 27
passes for 356 yards in
the Seminoles' 41-13
rout of the Panthers. For
his efforts, Winston was


named the Atlantic Coast
Conference rookie of
the week and the Athlon
Sports ACC freshman of
the week.
The dual-sport threat
from Hueytown, Ala.
-Winston is also an
outfielder on the school
baseball team became
the third FSU fresh-
man to start a season
opener. In addition to his
aerial attack, the 6-foot-4,
227-pound Winston ran
for 25 yards and a touch-
down. His 92.6 completion


for Seminoles


percentage set an FSU
single-game record, top-
ping Danny Kannell's 87.5
performance against N.C.
State in 1995.
"It's Monday Night
Football," Winston said.
"We come in and play
Monday Night Football in
a pro stadium? I was so
pumped for that."

SOCCER
FSU's Kirsten Crowley had quite a
weekend on the pitch. The redshirt
freshman from Panama City played


every minute of the No. 3 Seminoles'
wins against No. 8 Florida and No. 17
Central Florida.
Crowley was a big part of FSU's
defensive line, which posted shutouts
against the Gators (3-0) and Knights
(1-0) while allowing a combined six
shots on goal. She also scored her first
collegiate goal, a golden goal in the
96th minute to lift the Seminoles past
the Knights on Sunday.
Her outstanding play earned her
ACC co-player of the week, a spot on
TopDrawerSoccer.com's team of the
week and the Sunshine Soccer News
women's player of the week from
Soccer News Net.


I COMMUNITY
CALENDAR


BASEBALL
Englewood Area Youth
Baseball: Fall Ball registration Sept.
9 and 11,6-7:30 p.m. at the Englewood
Sports Complex in the upstairs meeting
room above the concession stand at
the Cal Ripken fields. Call Bill Stiver,
941-468-3871.

Port Charlotte Little
League free clinic: Saturday
from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at Harold Avenue
baseball fields for ages 8-14. Bring
lunch and drink. Call Lou, 941-629-
1220 or email louagosto@embarqmail.
com to reserve a spot.

CYCLING
Breast Cancer Awareness
Ride: Oct. 12,10 a.m. ride starts
at the Bicycle Center, 3795 Tamiami
Trail, Port Charlotte. Registration $30
in advance, $40 at the door. Choose
the distance: 10,25, 50 miles or
anything in between. Register at www.
bicyclecentercc.com, or at the store.
Call 941-627-6600 or email kim@
bicyclecentercc.com.

FALL SPORTS
YMCA"AII Sport"
registration: Ongoing program
features soccer, T-ball and kickball.
Open to Charlotte County youth ages
3-5. Register at Franz Ross Park YMCA
or online at CharlotteCountyYMCA.
com. Call 941-629-9622.

FOOTBALL
Florida Veterans tryouts,
registration: For semi-pro team.
Saturday from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Franz
Ross Park, 19333 Quesada Ave., Port
Charlotte. Registration is $35. Call
Brian,941-815-3887.

Buffalo Bills Backers:
Meets for every Bills game at Buffalo
Wings and Rings, corner of Price and
Toledo Blade in North Port. Everyone is
asked to bring a non-perishable food
item for the North Port Salvation Army
food bank. Call Betty, 941429 6835.

GOLF
Deep Creek Open: Sept.
21-22 at Deep Creek Golf Club. Flighted
stroke play open to men and women.
$100 golfer. Register by calling
941-625-6911 or Online at www.
deepcreekgolf.com.

RUNNING
"Let's Do This!" training
squad: For area women to train
for the Women's Running 5K or
half-marathon event on Nov. 24. Starts
Saturday at 7 a.m. at Gilchrist Park (by
gazebo) in Punta Gorda. Squad meets
weekly for group runs and follows a
training schedule of two additional days
a week.

SOFTBALL
Morning Senior League
sign-ups: Games played on
Monday and Thursdays 9 a.m.
beginning Sept. 16 at Carmalita Park
in Punta Gorda. Open to those age 55
and older. Call Chuck, 941-625-2109,
or Jim, 941-766-7482, to sign up
before Sept. 10. Number of teams
will be determined by the number of
individuals who sign up.

60-Plus Slow Pitch
League sign-ups: Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 5 p.m. at Carmalita
Complex, Punta Gorda. Those turning
60 by January are eligible. Games
are in the evening; season starts
second week of September. Call Vince,
941-624-3630.

SWIMMING
Charlotte County
Swimming: Year-round USA
Swimming team provides instruction
and competition ages 5 and up.
Visit www.ccswim.org or call Susan,
941-628-1510.

TENNIS
Masters Tennis for
adults: Wednesdays starting Sept.
18 from 7-9 p.m. to Nov. 20. Format
is played on a smaller 60-foot court
with lower- compression orange
balls. No fee. Balls will be provided


along with a limited number of loaner
racquets. Call Art, 941-698-9480. For
more on Masters Tennis visit www.
MastersTennisFlorida.com

The Community Calendarappears daily
as spacepermits. To haveyouractivity
published, fax (941-629-2085) or e-mail
(sports@sun-herald.com)eventdetails to
the Sports Departmentat least one weekin
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.
Submissions suitable forpublication will be
editedforlength andclarity.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013






The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


Charlotte's Richie Shaffer swings during Tuesday's playoff game against the Fort Myers Miracle at
Charlotte Sports Park.


CRABS

FROM PAGE 1
board on two hits
through six innings.
The 22-year-old got
into a jam once, when he
allowed a one-out single
and followed that with
a wild pitch to move the
runner to second during
his sixth and final inning.
Rivero righted his own
ship shortly afterward,
and escaped without
damage by inducing
a pop fly from Byron
Buxton and a groundout
to first from Dalton Hicks.
He departed after the
frame, having thrown
12 of 22 first pitches for
strikes.
"The biggest thing for
him is that he's matur-
ing," pitching coach Bill
Moloney said. "At some
point he's going to realize
he's got big-league stuff,
harness that and use it to
his advantage."
Rivero's counterpart
Matt Summers matched
his efforts and effective-
ness early, and held the
Stone Crabs scoreless


through five innings.
First baseman Jeff Malm
got to the right-hander
in the sixth, roping a
line-drive to right-center
that scored Jeff Hager
from second base to put
Charlotte ahead for good.
Malm's RBI was his lone
hit of the game, and one
of five Summers allowed,
but he made it count to
give Charlotte a 1-0 edge
in the best-of-three series.
Fort Myers collected three
hits, and Miracle hitters
were left scratching their
heads about Rivero, who
had a 1-0 record and 0.96
ERA against them in three
regular-season starts.
Rivero's relievers were
solid in his wake to keep
any potential comeback
at bay. Andrew Bellatti
tossed two hitless innings
and struck out one to
make way for Nate Garcia,
who used a handful of
tricky curves to earn his
14th save of the season.
Fort Myers took 10 of
12 games from the Stone
Crabs en route to a first-
half divisional champion-
ship but struggled in the
second half, finishing 51/2


games behind Charlotte
and dropping 3 of 4 to the
Stone Crabs.
With Tuesday's win,
Charlotte has shut out the
Miracle during three of
the past four meetings.
Stone Crabs 1, Miracle 0


Fort Myers
Pettersen SS
Wickens 3B
Buxton CF
Hicks 1B
VargasDH
Koch C
Kvasnicka RF
Goncalves LF
Michael 2B
Totals
Charlotte
Argo LF
Hager SS
Vettleson RF
Shaffer3B
Malm lB
Segovia DH
Guevara 2B
DePew C
Carter CF
Totals
Fort Myers
Charlotte


AB R H RBI BBSO AVG
4 0 1 0 0 0 .250
4 0 1 0 0 1 .250
3 0 1 0 1 0 .333
4 0 0 0 0 1 .000
4 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 0 1 0 .000
3 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 0 1 2 .000
3 0 0 0 0 1 .000
29 0 3 0 3 5 .103
AB R H RBIBBSO AVG
4 0 1 0 0 0 .250
4 1 0 0 0 0 .000
4 0 2 0 0 1 .500
4 0 1 0 0 0 .250
2 0 1 1 1 0 .500
3 0 1 0 0 0 .333
3 0 0 0 0 0 .000
3 0 0 0 0 1 .000
3 0 0 0 0 3 .000
30 1 6 1 1 5 .200
000000000-0 3 0
00000100X-1 6 1


SERENA

FROM PAGE 1
whether she'd describe her
performance as close to
flawless.
"Of course not," the
defending champion said
with a laugh. "I played
good, though. I played
really good. I was just
more focused than
anything. You know, I like
to believe there is room
for improvement."
That might be bad
news for her opponent in
Friday's semifinals, 2011
French Open champion Li
Na of China.
Asked in an on-court
interview if her game is
peaking, Williams replied:
"No. Not yet. I hope not.
I'm just trying to do the
best that I can."
Through five matches,
Williams has dropped a
total of 13 games so far.
For comparison's sake,
know this: Suarez Navarro
lost more games than that
in her previous match
alone, 15, while elimi-
nating No. 8 Angelique
Kerber.
That victory, and her
seeding, should have
demonstrated that Suarez


Navarro is quite capable
of playing well, too.
But not on this evening.
Not against Williams, who
is 65-4 with eight titles in
2013.
Going back to the start
of Wimbledon last year,
the 31-year-old American
is 96-5 with 13 trophies,
including from three of
the past five Grand Slam
tournaments plus the
London Olympics.
"The conditions were so
tough, so it definitely was
not her best tennis today,"
Williams said about
Suarez Navarro, who
was playing in her third
career major quarterfinal
Tuesday, which happened
to be her 25th birthday.
Tough conditions,
huh? That swirling wind
in Arthur Ashe Stadium
sure did not appear to
bother Williams one bit.
She wound up with a
20-3 edge in winners. She
made fewer unforced
errors, 12-9. She won 23 of
26 points on first serves.
"I've been playing
here for, like, 50 years,"
Williams said with a laugh.
"I've kind of gotten used
to the conditions. Even
though it's difficult to play
each year, I'm getting a


I TENNIS SCOREBOARD

U.S. Open
At The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, NewYork
Purse: $34.3 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Fourth Round
Mikhail Youzhny (21), Russia, def. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, 6-3,
3-6,6-7 (3),6-4,7-5.
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 6-3,


little bit better with it."
When Williams did face
a break point for the first
time, 42 minutes and 11
games into the match, she
came up with a big serve
and raced forward for a
simple putaway that she
punctuated with a yell.
Moments later came
a second break chance,
but even with Williams
stumbling to the court,
Suarez Navarro dumped
the ball into the net.
It was that kind of night.
"She's the best player in
the sport," Suarez Navarro
said. "When you look at
the draw, you don't want
to see Serena there."
Before the match, pic-
turing in her mind what
it might be like to step
out in the largest arena in
Grand Slam tennis, under
the lights at night, against
Williams, Suarez Navarro
came up with a couple of
possible scenarios.
"I imagined a movie in
which I won. I also imag-
ined a movie in which I
played well, but she ended
up winning," she said. "I
was dreaming so many
things."


6-0,6-0.
Stanislas Wawrinka (9), Switzerland, def. Tomas Berdych (5),
Czech Republic, 3-6,6-1,7-6 (6), 6-2.
Women
Fourth Round
Victoria Azarenka (2), Belarus, def. Ana Ivanovic (13), Serbia, 4-6,
6-3,6-4.
Quarterfinals
Li Na (5), China, def. Ekaterina Makarova (24), Russia, 6-4, 6-7 (5),
6-2.
Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Carla Suarez Navarro (18),
Spain,6-0,6-0.


E: Hager (1, fielding). LOB: Fort Myers 5.
Charlotte6. RBI: Mam (1). RISP: Fort Myers
0 for 3. Charlotte 1 for 4. DP: 2 (Rivero-Hag-
er-Malm, Shaffer-Guevara-Malm). GIDP:
Wickens, Michael.
Fort Myers IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA
SummersL,0-1 6 5 1 1 1 4 01.50
Duffey 2 1 0 0 0 1 00.00
Charlotte IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA
RiveroW,1-0 6 2 0 0 3 2 00.00
BellattiH, 1 2 00 0 0 1 00.00
GarciaS,1 1 10 0 0 2 00.00
WP: Rivero. Umpires: HP: Ryan Additon.
1 B: Charlie Tierney 2B: John Libka. 3B: Alex
Ziegler. T:2:23. Att: 622.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK



Notre Dame's Kelly sings



a different rivalry tune


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOUTH BEND, Ind.
- Notre Dame coach
Brian Kelly reversed fields
on Tuesday, calling the
Fighting Irish series against
Michigan "a great and
historic rivalry."
The proclamation in the
opening statement during
his weekly news confer-
ence was contrary to what
he said during a telecon-
ference Sunday, when he
said: "I really haven't seen
it as one of those historic,
traditional Notre Dame
rivalries," going on to call it
a "big regional game."
Many Notre Dame fans
probably agree more with
his statement Sunday,
considering the Irish have
played Navy (86 games),
Southern California (84),
Purdue (84), Michigan
State (76) and Pittsburgh
(68) far more often than
the 40 times they've faced
the Wolverines.
But nationwide, out-
side of the annual Notre
Dame-USC game, few of
the other rivalry games
get the same attention as
the Fighting Irish vs. the
Wolverines. The scrutiny
Kelly's statement Sunday
received is proof of that.
After all, it's Michigan's
winged helmet against
Notre Dame's golden hel-
mets; "Hail to the Victors"
vs. the "Notre Dame
Victory March;" the school
with the best all-time win-
ning percentage in college
football (Michigan, at .735)
vs: No. 2 (Notre Dame, at
.734).
The series started
pleasantly enough,
with Michigan students
traveling to South Bend in
1887 to teach Notre Dame


INSIDE
Associated Press Top 25, USA
Today/Coaches Poll, PAGE 5

students how to play the
game. The relationship
turned sour after Notre
Dame beat the Wolverines
11-3 in 1909, ending an
eight-game losing streak.
The game was canceled
the next season when the
Irish wouldn't play without
two players Michigan
contended were ineligible.
The Wolverines can-
celed the series, but
things worsened when
Michigan coach Fielding
Yost left Notre Dame's
Knute Rockne off his
All-American team in 1913.
It escalated when Yost and
Rockne had a dispute at
a track meet in 1923, and
then Yost urged Big Ten
teams not to play Notre
Dame and several other
independents because he
said they didn't follow the
Big Ten's eligibility rules.
After Rockne died
and Yost retired, the two
schools agreed to play
each other in 1942-43.
The Wolverines won the
first game 32-20, as the
Irish gave up their most
points in 37 years. The next
season, top-ranked Notre
Dame beat No. 2 Michigan
35-12. Michigan coach
Fritz Crisler called the Irish
a dirty team after the game
and vowed never to play
Notre Dame game again.
The series finally re-
sumed in 1978 and they've
played most years since.
But Notre Dame athletic
director Jack Swarbrick
handed Michigan athletic
director Dave Brandon a
letter on the field before


last season's game, cancel-
ing scheduled games in
2015-2017.

Tennessee's Maggitt
nears return:Tennessee linebacker
Curt Maggitt is getting closer to
returning from a torn anterior cruciate
ligament in his right knee.
Maggitt worked out in full pads and
wasn't wearing a green non-contact
jersey. Tennessee coach Butch Jones
called it a"significant"step but added
that he wouldn't decide on the junior's
availability for Saturday's game with
Western Kentucky until seeing "how
he progresses throughout the course of
the week."
Maggitt, a starter each of the last two
years, tore his ACL last November in a
51-48 four-overtime loss to Missouri.
Jones said defensive end Jacques
Smith will have pins removed from his
fractured right thumb today and "there
is a possibility he may be able to play
Saturday."

Spartans not talking QB
ahead of USF game: Mark
Dantonio wouldn't identify Michigan
State's starting quarterback for
Saturday's game with South Florida.
Still, the same two names are listed
atop the depth chart this week: Senior
starter Andrew Maxwell and sophomore
backup Connor Cook, who were 17 for 37
combined for just 116 yards in a 26-13
win overWestern Michigan last Friday.
Freshmen Tyler O'Connor and Damion
Terry did not play.
Dantonio said he wouldn't answer
questions about ranking the players, in
part to avoid a "media circus."

Illinois adds South
Florida: Illinois said it will face an
opponent its never played before when
it takes on South Florida in 2017 and
2018.
Illinois will play the Bulls in Tampa on
Sept. 9,2017. The teams will then play in
Champaign on Sept. 15, 2018. Starting
this season South Florida is a member of
The American Athletic Conference. The
Bulls had been members of the Big East
since 2005.


$20 $16


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3






Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


I MLB STANDINGS


Boston
RAYS
NewYork
Baltimore
Toronto


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


AMERICA
East
GB \
3 -
6
S 8
S 8/2
S 19
Central
GB \
3 -
S 71/2
S 8'/2
19/2
I 24
West I
GB 1
7 --
7 --
14/2
I 17/2
I 34
NATIONS
East


W L Pet GB \
Atlanta 85 53 .616 -
Washington 70 68 .507 15
Philadelphia 63 76 .453 22/2
NewYork 62 75 .453 22/2
MARLINS 51 85 .375 33
Centra
W L Pet GB \
Pittsburgh 81 57 .587 -
St. Louis 79 59 .572 2
Cincinnati 78 61 .561 3/2
Milwaukee 59 79 .428 22
Chicago 58 79 .423 22/2
West
W L Pet GB \
Los Angeles 82 55 .599 -
Arizona 69 67 .507 12/2
Colorado 65 74 .468 18
San Diego 61 76 .445 21
San Francisco 61 76 .445 21

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday's results
N.Y.Yankees 9, ChicagoWhite Sox 1
Detroit 3, Boston 0
Minnesota 10, Houston 6
Kansas City3, Seattle 1
Baltimore 7, Cleveland 2
Oakland 4,Texas 2
Toronto 4, Arizona 1
L.A. Angels 11, RAYS 2
Tuesday's results
Cleveland 4, Baltimore 3
N.Y.Yankees 6, ChicagoWhite Sox 4
Boston 2, Detroit 1
Kansas City 4, Seattle 3
Minnesota at Houston, late
Toronto at Arizona, late
RAYS at LA. Angels, late
Texas at Oakland, late
Today's games
Minnesota (Hendriks 1-2) at Houston (Lyles
6-7), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 12-6) at Oakland (J.Parker
10-6),3:35 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 11-7) at Arizona (Delgado
4-5), 3:40 p.m.
Baltimore (Z.Britton 2-3) at Cleveland
(McAllister 7-8), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (EJohnson 0-0) at N.Y.
Yankees (Sabathia 12-11),7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 11-7) at Boston (Dempster
7-9),7:10 p.m.
Seattle (T.Walker 1-0) at Kansas City
(E.Santana 8-8), 8:10 p.m.
RAYS (Hellickson 10-8) at L.A. Angels
(Weaver 9-7), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday's games
Seattle at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
ChicagoWhite Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
RAYS at LA. Angels, 10:05 p.m.


U MLB:


Moore (




overdu(

BY THE TAMPA BAY TIMES

ANAHEIM, Calif -
Left-hander Matt Moore
was eager to finally get
back on the mound for
Tuesday's start, saying
the longer-than-expected
month he missed with
a sore elbow seems like
even more.
"It feels like a while," he
said. "This is the first time
I've ever had to sit out
and watch like this."
Moore is confident the
elbow issues that surfaced
during the July 28 game
in New York are gone and
that one so-so rehab start
Thursday for Triple-A
Durham is enough for
him to resume pitching at
the All-Star level he was.

A bad night: Consider this
epic performance in Tampa Bay's 11-2
loss to Anaheim on Monday: Angels
starter Garrett Richards walked seven
- yes, seven in a four-inning
span and the Rays got exactly none of
them home.
Combined with an ineffective start
by rookie Chris Archer, and a bad night
by a now taxed bullpen so much
so that outfielder Sam Fuld pitched in
the eighth inning and the result
was another night of frustration.
The sinking Rays lost for the fifth
straight time (while scoring seven
runs) and eighth in their past nine


RAYS AT ANGELS

WHO: Tampa Bay (75-61)
at Los Angeles (64-72)
WHEN: Today, 10:05 p.m.
WHERE: Angel Stadium of
Anaheim
PITCHERS: Jeremy Hellickson
(10-8, 5.21) vs. Jered Weaver
(9-7,3.30)
TV: ESPN/Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 220 A 1220 AM, 1480
AM, 1530 AM, 1580 AM


I





al


CRamos 1/3 1 1 1 19 4.63 NJones pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Lueke 21/3 3 1 1 1 3 49 5.60 Inherited runners-scored-NJones 2-2,
Fuld 1/3 00 0 0 0 50.00 Veal 2-1, Lindstrom 2-2. HBP-by Sale
LosAngeles IP H R ER BBSONPERA (Jeter). Umpires-Home, Dan Bellino; First,
oRichardsW, 6 5 R 1 7 603 4A6 Bruce Dreckman; Second,Tim Welke;Third,
RichardsW,5-6 5 21 1 7 6103 4.06
Cor.Rasmus 1 2 1 1 1 1 214.26 Mike Everitt.T-3:06.A-33,215(50,291).
Boshers 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.15
Brasier 2 20 0 1 1 244.50 Calendar
B.Gomes pitched to 4 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored-B.Gomes 1-0, Oct.23:World Series begins,cityof Ameri-
C.Ramos 2-1, Lueke 3-2, Fuld 2-0. IBB- can League champion.
off Archer (Conger), off B.Gomes (Trout). Nov. 11-13: General managers meeting,
HBP-by Lueke (LJimenez). Umpires- Orlando
Home, Dale Scott; First, Bill Miller; Second, Dec. 2-5: Major League Baseball Players
Todd Tichenor; Third, CB Bucknor.T-3:58. Association executive board meeting, La
A-37,557 (45,483). Jolla, Calif.


Braves 3, Mets 1


SCOREBOARD

AN LEAGUE Red Sox 2, Tigers 1
divisionn Detroit AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
WCGB L10 Str Home Away AJacksoncf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .274
8-2 W-1 46-25 37-32 Tor.Hunterrf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .304
2-8 L-5 44-26 31-35 Mi.Cabrera3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .355
2 6-4 W-2 42-28 32-36 Fielderlb 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269
22 4-6 L-1 38-29 35-35 V.Martinezdh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .297
13 6-4 W-1 35-34 28-41 1-Worthpr-dh 00 0 0 0 0 -
I Division Infante2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .319
CGB L10 Str Home Away Tuiasosopolf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .272
G- 5-5 L-1 44-7 3 1 Dirkslf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .256
5-5 L-i 44-27 37-31
3 4-6 1 4 7 373 B.Penac 4 0 1 0 0 1 .311
3 4 6 W 47 32 Iglesiasss 4 0 1 1 0 3 .318
4 82 W-3 37-33 35-33 Totals 36 1 9 1 012
15 4-6 W-2 28-36 32-40 AB RH BIBBSO Avg
192 4-6 L-5 32-34 24-47 ictorinocf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .293
Division Navarf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .298
WCGB L10 Str Home Away Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .299
8-2 W-4 43-25 36-33 D.Ortizdh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .310
5-5 L-2 39-29 40-29 :Carplb 3 0 0 0 0 2 .302
11 9-1 W-5 32-37 32-35 a-Napoliph-lb 1 0 1 0 0 0 .249
14 3-7 L-3 31-38 31-38 :J.Gomesf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .232
30/2 3-7 L-1 22-48 23-44 :Drewss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .246
ALLEAGUE D.Rossc 2 0 0 0 0 1 .190
divisionn Middlebrooks3b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .224
WCGB L10 Str Home Away Totals 30 2 6 2 3 8
8-2 W-2 51-19 34-34 Detroit 010000000- 1 90
71/2 6-4 W-1 40-31 30-37 :Boston 00002000x- 2 61
15 5-5 L-1 36-32 27-44 a-singled for Carp in the 8th. 1-ran for
15 4-6 L-3 28-38 34-37 V.Martinez in the 8th.E-Middlebrooks (9).
25'/2 3-7 W-2 29-39 22-46 LOB-Detroit 8, Boston 8.2B-AJackson
I Division (24), Iglesias (15), Drew (23). RBIs-lglesias
WCGB L10 Str Home Away (25), Middlebrooks 2 (34). SB-Middle-
5-5 W-2 45-25 36-32 brooks (2). Runners left in scoring posi-
4-6 L-2 41-25 38-34 tion-Detroit 4 (Fielder, Mi.Cabrera 2,
5-5 W-2 43-23 35-38 B.Pena); Boston 4 (Victorino 2, Drew 2).
18/2 3-7 L-5 30-40 29-39 RISP-Detroit 2 for 8; Boston 2 for 9. Run-
19 4-6 L-1 27-43 31-36 ners moved up-Mi.Cabrera.
Division Detroit IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
WCGB L10 Str Home Away ScherzerL,19-2 7 5 2 2 3 8111 2.88
7-3 W-5 43-28 39-27 Coke 1/3 00 0 0 0 44.91
71 4-6 L-2 39-30 30-37 Putkonen 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 102.70
13 6-4 L1 40-30 25-44 Boston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
16 4-6 W-1 37-32 24-44 LesterW,13-8 78 1 1 0 91113.88
6 5-5 L-1 3-3 27-1 Workman H,1 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.46
1BreslowH,13 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 72.20
NATIONAL LEAGUE TazawaH,22 1/3 00 0 0 1 42.66
OUeharaS, 17-20 1 00 0 0 2 91.16
an Monday's results Scherzer pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Atlanta 13, N.Y Mets 5
Atlanta 3, ets5 Inherited runners-scored-Coke 2-0, Put-
itcunari 75, SMi. Lu2 konen 2-0, Tazawa 1-0. HBP-by Scherzer
MPittsgh 5Miwauk 3 (D.Ross). Umpires-Home, Paul Schrieber;
MAR S4, icago bs3 First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Mike Muchlin-
Ln Dodgers ,Colorando81 ski; Third, Eric Cooper. T-2:56. A-32,071
(37,071).
Toronto 4, Arizona 1
Philadelphia 3,Washington 2 Indians 4 Orioles 3
WashngtonPhlael 6 Baltimore AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Washington 9,Philadelphia6 B.Roberts2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .247
Atlanta 3,N.YMets1 Machado3b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .296
Cincinnati St Loubs lC.Davislb 3 0 0 0 2 1 .296
MARLINS at Chicago Cubs, late AJonescf 4 0 1 0 0 1 293
Pittsburgh 4, Milwaukee3 Wietersc 3 0 0 0
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, late MoWietersedh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .232
Toronto at Arizona, late bMorsedh 3 0 1 0 0 0 .231
SanFrancisco nDiego, te b-Betemitph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
San Francisco at San Diego, late Markakis rf 4 i i 0 0 i 272
"Markakis rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .272
S Today's games ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 259
N.Y Mets (Gee 10-9) at Atlanta (Loe 0-1), ardys 4 1 2 0 0 29
12:10p.m. Totals 35 3 8 3 4 8
MARLINS (Flynn 0-0) at Chicago Cubs Cleveland AB RH BIBBSO Avg.
(Samardzija 8-11), 2:20 p.m.Cleveland AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .262
Toronto (Buehrle 1-7)at Arizona (Delgado S erlb 4 0 0 0 0 .239
4-5), 3:40 p.m. iseb 4 0 0 0 0
San Francisco (Lincecum 8-13) at San Diego C.Santanadh 1 0 0 2 0 .262
(Stults8-12),6:40pm. C.Santanadh 2 1 0 0 2 0 .262
(Stults 8-12), 6:40 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 15-8) at Phila- Brantleylf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .278
delphia (Halladay3-4),7:05 p.m. Kubelrf 0 0 2 0 .400
St. Louis(S.Miller12-9)(atCincinnati(Arroyo lM.Carsonprrf 01 0 00 0000
13-10), 7:10 p.m.- 0 0 0 0 0 000
Pittsburgh (Liriano 15-6) at Milwaukee c-o irezp 0 0 0 0 0 .000
(W.Peralta8-14),8:10p.m. Stubbsrf 0 0 0 .237
YGomesc 3 0 1 2 0 1 .288
L.A. Dodgers (Volquez 9-10) at Colorado Ch 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0
(J.DeLaRosa 15-6),8:40 p.m. hisehll3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .26
Thursday's games a-Avilesph-3b i 0 0 0 0 0 .261
Thursday'sgames :Totals 26 4 5 4 5 4
St. Louisat Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. T Bals 24 5
Baltimore 000000003- 3 80
Arizona atSan Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Cleveland 00010300x- 4 51
a-grounded out for Chisenhall in the 6th.
c-grounded out for M.Carson in the 8th.
1-ran for Kubel in the 6th. E-Chisenhall (9).
LOB-Baltimore9, Cleveland 6.2B-Kipnis
......................................... (32), Brantley (24), Kubel (1), YGomes (13).
HR-McLouth (11), off C.Perez. RBIs-
McLouth 3 (33), As.Cabrera 2 (49),Y.Gomes
2 (31). CS-Machado (7). S-Brantley.
SF-As.Cabrera 2. Runners left in scoring
position-Baltimore 5 (Hardy, Morse 2,
O Machado, Betemit); Cleveland 4 (C.Santana,
a g e r Y.Gomes 2, Bourn). RISP-Baltimore 1 for 9;
Cleveland 1 for 6.
:8 Baltimore IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
TillmanL,15-551/3 5 4 4 5 3102 3.71
McFarland 2 0 0 0 0 1 22 4.59
Stu rn1 :Stinson 2/3 00 0 0 0 85.19
Cleveland IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
U.JimenezW,10-9640 0 2 4 903.79
games (scoring 19 total), dropping Allen 1 1 0 0 1 0 182.40
1J.Smith 1 00 0 1 2 182.52
to 75-61. C.Perez 1 3 3 3 0 2 27 3.66
Inherited runners-scored-McFarland
Rested, ready: Jeremy 1-0. IBB-offTillman (Kubel, Kubel).WP-J.
y Smith. Umpires-Home, Ted Barrett; First,
Hellickson rejoined the team on Mike DiMuro; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Al-
Monday and will go back into the fonso Marquez.T-2:54.A-9,962 (42,241).
rotation today. i Yankees 6,White Sox 4
Chicago AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Angels11, Rays 2 DeAzalf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .271
Tampa Bay AB R H BIBBSO Avg. Beckham2b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .283
DeJesusIf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .290 AI.Ramirezss 4 0 1 2 0 0 .285
Zobrist2b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .275 A.Dunndh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .228
KeJohnson2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Konerkolb 3 0 0 0 1 1 .244
Longoria3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .263 A.Garciacf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .289
Scottlb 1 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Gillaspie3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .242
Joycedh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Jor.Danksrf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .248
a-D.Youngph-dh 2 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Phegleyc 3 0 0 0 0 1 .209
Loneylb 1 0 0 0 2 0 .304 c-Le.Garciaph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .188
b-Rdrigezph-ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Totals 34 4 7 4 210
WMyersrf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .280 NewYork AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Lobatonc 1 1 1 0 3 0 .266 Gardnercf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .271
DeJenningscf 2 0 2 0 2 0 .251 Jeterdh 3 2 0 0 0 .224
YEscobarss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .265 Cano2b 4 1 0 0 0 .305
C.Gimenez3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 A.Sorianolf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .261
Totals 32 2 6 2 9 8 A.Rodriguez3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .275
LosAngeles AB R H BIBBSO Avg. V.Wellsrf 3 1 1 0 0 0 243
Shuckrf-lf 6 2 2 1 0 0 .297 b-Grandersonph-rfl 1 1 0 0 .268
Aybarss 4 2 2 4 0 1 .270 Mar.Reynoldslb 4 0 0 0 0 2 .221
c-G.Greenph-2b 1 1 0 0 .250 Nunezss 4 0 2 2 0 0 .255
Troutlf 4 2 2 0 1 1 .335 CStewartc 2 0 0 0 0 25
Cowgilrf 0 0 0 0 0 0 298 :a-Au.Romineph-c2 0 0 0 0 2 .224
J.Hamiltondh 5 0 1 1 0 3 .236:Totals 3469518
Calhounlb 41 1 1 1 .265 sChago 100020100- 4 72
Conger 4 0 2 1 1 1 261 NewYork 010000 05x- 6 91
LJimenez3b 3 0 0 00 .253
An.Romine2b-ss 4 1 3 0 1 1 .250 a-struck out for C.Stewart in the 7th. b-
Bourjoscf 4 2 2 i 1 1 279 singled for V.Wells in the 8th. c-struck out
Totals 3911 1611 5 9 for Phegley in the 9th. E-Beckham (8),
Tampa Bay 100001000 2 6 0 Gillaspie (12), Nunez (11). LOB-Chicago 5,
LosAngeles 10130510x -11161 NewYork6. 2B-Beckham (18),Cano (29),
SNunez 2 (13). 3B-AI.Ramirez (1). HR-De
b-flied out for Loney in the 7th. c-homered Aza (15), off Kuroda RBIs-De Aza (56),
for Aybar in the 7th. E-LJimenez (2) AI.Ramirez 2 (43), A.Dunn (80), A.Soriano 2
LOB-Tampa Bay 12, Los Angeles 11.2B- (39),Granderson (10), Nunez2 (22).SB-De
Lobaton (4, J.Hamilton (2), AnRomine Aza(19),V.Wells(6),Nunez(9). Runnersleft
(1). 3B-Aybar (4). HR-Zobrist (11), off .in scoring position-Chicago 3 (Gillaspie
Green m scoring position-Chicago 3 (Gillaspie
Richards; Aybar (5), off Archer; G.Green 2 AI.Ramirez) New York 3 (C.Stewart, Jeter,
off Lueke. RBls--Zobrist 2 (65), Shuck (37), AuRomine)
Aybar 4 (50), G.Green (7), J.Hamilton (61), York 3 for 11. DP-New York 1 (Nunez,
Calhoun (17), Conger (20), LJimenez (5), ARodriguez
Bourjos (12). SB-Trout 2 (31), An.Romine Chicago IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
(1), Bourjos (6). SF-LJimenez. RISP-- Sale 71/3 5 3 2 1 61142.97
Tampa Bay 1 for 11; Los Angeles 8 for 17. NJonesL,4-5 0 22 2 0 0 93.99
Runners moved up-DeJesus, Zobrist, VealS 1-1 1/3 1 1 1 0 1 135.91
Shuck, Aybar, LJimenez. GIDP-W.Myers, Lindstrom 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 72.96
C.Gimenez. DP-Los Angeles 2 (LJimenez, NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
An.Romine,Calhoun),(LJimenez,Calhoun). Kuroda 61/3 7 4 4 2 7 95 2.99
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Tampa Bay IP HRERBBSONPERA Claiborne 2/3 00 0 0 0 82.74
Archer L, 8-6 32/3 9 5 5 1 4 90 3.14 aaborne 2/ 30 0 0 0 8
W.Wright 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 1i03.99 LoganW,5-2 1 00 0 0 1 11 3.08
WW..ght. / 0 0 0 0 1073.99 M.RiveraS,40-451 00 0 0 2 132.12


a-grounded out for Medlen in the 7th.
LOB-New York 8, Atlanta 5. 2B-Dan.
Murphy (32), Duda (14). 3B-E.Young (7).
HR-Gattis (16), off C.Torres; Simmons
(13), off C.Torres. RBIs-Dan.Murphy (67),
Gattis (48), Simmons 2 (49). SB-E.Young
(35).RISP-NewYork for9;Atlanta 0for1.
Runners moved up-Dan.Murphy, Satin 2.
DP-Atlanta 1 (Uggla,F.Freeman).
NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
C.TorresL,3-3 773 3 1 6972.89
Rice 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.71
Black 1/3 00 0 0 1 33.86
Atlanta IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
MedlenW,12-127 7 1 1 0 9953.48
S.DownsH,6 1/3 00 0 1 0 62.31
AyalaH,5 2/3 00 0 1 0 182.28
KimbrelS,44-471 1 0 0 0 2 130.94
Inherited runners-scored-Ayala 1-0.
WP-C.Torres. Umpires-Home, Marty
Foster; First, Wally Bell; Second, Marvin
Hudson; Third, Tim McClelland. T-2:42.
A-21,221 (49,586).

Reds 1, Cardinals 0
St.Louis AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
M.Carpenter3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .313
Beltranrf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .308
Hollidaylf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .284
Craiglb 4 0 0 0 0 2 .314
Y.Molinac 3 0 0 0 0 1 .325
Jaycf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .266
Wong2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .167
b-S.Robinsonph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279
RJackson2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Descalsoss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .239
c-B.Petersonph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143
Siegristp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Wachap 2 0 0 0 0 1 .077
Manessp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
d-Freeseph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .261
2-Kozmapr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .212
Totals 28 0 2 0 212
Cincinnati AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Choocf 1 0 0 0 3 0 .285
B.Phillips2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .267
Vottolb 4 0 1 0 0 1 .306
Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .268
Ludwicklf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .274
1-B.Hamiltonpr 0 1 0 0 0 0
M.Parrap 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
A.Chapmanp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Frazier3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .231
Cozartss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .252
Haniganc 3 0 1 0 0 1 .212
H.Baileyp 2 0 0 0 0 0 .157
a-Heiseyph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .247
Totals 28 1 5 1 3 6
St. Louis 000000000- 0 20
Cincinnati 000000 10x- 1 50
a-struck out for H.Bailey in the 7th. b-flied
out for Wong in the 8th. c-struck out for
Descalso in the 8th. d-walked for Maness
in the 8th. 1-ran for Ludwick in the 7th.
2-ran for Freese in the 8th. LOB-St. Louis
4, Cincinnati 6.2B-Frazier (26). RBIs-Fra-
zier (62). SB-M.Carpenter (3), B.Hamilton
(1). Runners left in scoring position-
St. Louis 2 (Craig, Holliday); Cincinnati 2
(H.Bailey, Heisey). RISP-St. Louis 0 for 3;
Cincinnati 1 for 5. Runners moved up-
Hanigan. GIDP-Craig, B.Phillips. DP-St.
Louis 1 (Descalso, Wong, Craig); Cincinnati
1 (Cozart, B.Phillips,Votto).
St. Louis IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Wacha 6 3 0 0 2 3 80 3.20
ManessL,5-2 1 21 1 0 1 202.18
Siegrist 1 00 0 1 2 18 0.60
Cincinnati IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
H.BaileyW,10-107 2 0 0 1 81063.42
M.ParraH,14 1 00 0 1 1 173.55
ChpmanS,34-391 00 0 0 3 142.82
HBP-by H.Bailey (Jay). WP-Wacha. Um-
pires-Home, Cory Blaser; First, Tim Tim-
mons; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Mark Weg-
ner. T-2:42. A-20,219 (42,319).


Royal
Seattle
B.Miller2b-ss
FGutierrez rf
Seager3b
Ibanezdh
2-Sanders pr-dh
Smoaklb
Zuninoc
En.Chavez If
A.Almonte c
Ryan ss
a-K.Morales ph
1-Franklin pr-2b
Totals
Kansas City
A.Gordon If
Getz2b
Bonifacio 2b
Hosmerdh
B.Butler lb
C.Pena 1 b
Moustakas3b
S.Perez c
Lough rf
J.Dyson cf
A.Escobar ss
Totals
Seattle
Kansas City


s 4, Mariners 3


R H BIBBSO Avg.
0 0 1 0 0 .266
1 1 0 0 2 .247
1 2 0 1 .282
0 2 0 0 0 .252
0 0 0 0 0 .234
0 2 0 0 0 .249
0 1 0 0 1 .236
0 0 0 0 1 .271
1 1 0 0 1 .235
0 0 0 0 0 .192
0 1 0 0 0 .278
0 0 0 0 1 .219
310 3 0 7
R H BIBBSO Avg.
1 1 1 0 0 .268
0 0 0 0 0 .225
1 1 0 0 0 .232
0 1 0 3 0 .299
0 1 1 0 1 .287
0 0 0 0 0 .209
1 1 0 0 0 .240
1 3 2 0 0 .282
0 0 0 0 2 .284
0 1 0 1 1 .265
0 0 0 0 0 .236


4 9 4 4 4
000002100- 3100
100110 01x- 4 91


a-singled for Ryan in the 7th. 1-ran for
K.Morales in the 7th. 2-ran for Ibanez in the
8th. E-Getz (4). LOB-Seattle 7, Kansas
City 6. 2B-Smoak (17), Moustakas (21).
HR-Seager (22), off B.Chen; A.Gordon (16),
off E.Ramirez; S.Perez (10), off E.Ramirez.


Pirates 4, Brewers 3


NewYork AB
E.Young If 3
Dan.Murphy2b 4
Satin 3b 4
Blackp 0
Dudalb 3
T.dArnaudc 4
Lagaresrf 4
den Dekker cf 4
Quintanilla ss 4
C.Torresp 3
Ricep 0
Ju.Turner3b 1
Totals 34
Atlanta AB
B.Upton cf 4
J.Upton rf-lf 4
F.FreemanIb 4
McCannc 4
CJohnson3b 4
Janish 3b 0
Gattis If 3
S.Downsp 0
Ayalap 0
Kimbrel p 0
Uggla2b 2
Simmonsss 3
Medlen p 2
a-J.Schaferph-rf 1
Totals 31
NewYork
Atlanta


R H BIBBSO Avg.
1 2 0 1 0 .256
0 1 1 0 0 .282
0 0 0 0 1 .289
0 0 0 00 -
0 1 0 1 2 .240
0 0 0 0 1 .159
0 1 0 0 2 .269
0 1 0 0 3 .222
0 2 0 0 0 .225
0 0 0 0 2 .111
0 0 0 00 -
0 0 0 0 0 .256
1 8 1 211
R H BIBBSO Avg.
0 2 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 3 .264
0 1 0 0 1 .306
0 0 0 0 0 .270
0 0 0 0 2 .331
0 0 0 0 0 .147
1 3 1 0 0 .247
0 0 0 00 -
0 0 0 00 -
0 0 0 00 -
1 0 0 1 1 .184
1 1 2 0 0 .249
0 0 0 0 0 .191
0 0 0 0 0 .273
3 7 3 1 7
000001000- 1 80
000000 30x- 3 70


a-grounded out for Cole in the 7th. b-was
intentionally walked for J.Harrison in the
8th. c-flied out for Barmes in the 8th. d-
walked for Kintzler in the 8th. e-homered
for Mazzaro in the 9th. LOB-Pittsburgh
8, Milwaukee 4. 2B-Byrd (30), Segura
(19), Gennett (6). HR-McCutchen (18), off
Gallardo; Snider (4), off Henderson. RBIs-
McCutchen (75), Byrd 2 (78), Snider (24),
Segura (46), Lucroy 2 (75). Runners left in
scoring position-Pittsburgh 5 (R.Martin
2, J.Harrison, G.Sanchez 2); Milwaukee 2 (Ar.
Ramirez, K.Davis). RISP-Pittsburgh 2 for 8;
Milwaukee 2 for 4. Runners moved up-R.
Martin, Aoki, Lucroy. GIDP-McCutchen,
Lucroy. DP-Pittsburgh 2 (Cole, Morneau),
(Mercer, Morneau); Milwaukee 1 (Gennett,
J.Francisco).
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Cole 6 5 2 2 1 5 92 3.74
MazzaroW,7-2 2 1 1 1 1 1 262.43
MelacnS, 11-13 1 1 0 0 0 1 140.87
Milwaukee IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Gallardo 7 5 2 2 3 61044.31
Kintzler 1 2 1 1 2 0 37 2.76
HendersonL,3-51 11 1 0 2 192.28
IBB-off Kintzler (PAlvarez). WP-Gal-
lardo. Umpires-Home, James Hoye;
First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Bob Davidson;
Third, Quinn Wolcott. T-3:01. A-25,558
(41,900).

Nationals 9, Phillies 6
Washington AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Span cf 6 2 3 0 0 0 278
Zimmerman3b 5 1 1 0 1 2 .278
Harper If 5 2 0 0 1 2 .275
Werthrf 5 1 2 1 0 0 321
Desmond ss 4 0 2 1 1 0 .287
Ad.LaRochelb 2 1 1 1 3 0 .234
W.Ramosc 2 1 1 4 2 0 275
1-Kobernuspr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .174
J.Solanoc 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184
Rendon2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 256
G.Gonzalezp 3 0 0 0 0 1 .106
Mattheusp 0 0 0 0 0 0
d-C.Brownph 1 1 1 1 001.000
Storenp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Clippardp 0 0 0 0 0 0
e-T.Mooreph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .217
R.Sorianop 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 39 911 8 9 7
Philadelphia AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
C.Hernandez2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 222
Galvisss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .201
Frandsenib 4 1 1 0 1 0 .221
Ruizc 3 1 0 0 1 1 .280
Ruflf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .250
Asche3b 4 1 3 3 0 0 .266
Mayberryrf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .228
M.Martinezcf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .176
E.Martinp 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
DeFratusp 0 0 0 0 0 0
a-Orrph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250
Roblesp 0 0 0 0 0 0
b-Kratzph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .209
c-Utleyph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .270
Lu.Garciap 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Saveryp 0 0 0 00 ---
Rosenbergp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
f-Rollinsph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244
Totals 35 6 8 5 4 8
Washington 030022101- 9113
Philadelphia 000203010- 6 81
a-singled for De Fratus in the 5th. b-was an-
nounced for Robles in the 6th.c-singled for
Kratz in the 6th. d-homered for Mattheus
in the 7th. e-struck out for Clippard in the
9th.f-popped out for Rosenberg in the 9th.
1 -ran forW.Ramos in the 7th. E-Desmond
(16), Zimmerman (20), W.Ramos (8), Asche
(4). LOB-Washington 13, Philadelphia 6.
2B--Span (26), Ad.LaRoche (17). HR-W.
Ramos (10), off E.Martin; C.Brown (1), off
Lu.Garcia; Asche (3), off Clippard. RBIs-
Werth (66), Desmond (69), Ad.LaRoche (56),
W.Ramos 4 (38), C.Brown (1), Asche 3 (17),
M.Martinez (3), Utley (53). SB-Span (12),
Harper (8). Runners left in scoring posi-
tion-Washington 7 (G.Gonzalez, Rendon
2, Ad.LaRoche, J.Solano 2, Werth); Phila-
delphia 3 (Ruf, C.Hernandez, Frandsen).
RISP-Washington 3 for 13; Philadelphia
3 for 9. Runners moved up-Zimmerman.
GIDP-Rendon, Frandsen, M.Martinez.
DP-Washington 2 (Zimmerman, Ren-
don, Ad.LaRoche), (Desmond, Rendon,
Ad.LaRoche); Philadelphia 1 (C.Hernandez,
Galvis, Frandsen).
Washington IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
GnzlzW,9-6 52/3 5 5 1 3 61183.49
MattheusH,6 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 87.09
StorenH,18 1 00 0 0 1 95.16
ClippardH,29 1 1 1 1 0 1 21 2.32
R.SorianoS,37-431 1 0 0 1 0 113.53
Philadelphia IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
E.MartinL,2-442/3 4 5 5 5 2 866.90
DeFratus 1/3 00 0 1 1 74.70
Robles 1 22 01 1 300.00
Lu.Garcia 2 3 1 1 2 1 315.48
Savery 2/3 1 1 1 0 1 81.98
Rosenberg 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 183.09
Inherited runners-scored-Mattheus
1-1, De Fratus 3-1, Rosenberg 1-1. IBB-
off E.Martin (Rendon). HBP-by E.Martin
(Werth). WP-G.Gonzalez 2, Mattheus 2,
Rosenberg. Balk-Robles. Umpires-
Home, Paul Emmel; First, Chris Conroy;
Second, Gary Darling; Third, Jerry Meals.
T-3:38. A-28,826 (43,651).


RBIs-B.Miller (28),Seager2 (64),A.Gordon
(73), B.Butler (70), S.Perez 2 (62). SB-
Bonifacio (24). Runners left in scoring Leaders
position-Seattle 5 (Ryan, En.Chavez
3, F.Gutierrez); Kansas City 3 (A.Gordon, ExcludesTue
Moustakas, Lough). RISP-Seattle 0 for 9; AMERIC
KansasCity2for 6.Runners moved up-B. BATTING-MiCab
Miller, Smoak. GIDP-B.Butler 2, Mousta- LosAngeles,.335;A
kas. DP-Seattle 3 (B.Miller, Ryan, Smoak), er, Minnesota,.324
(B.Miller, Ryan, Smoak), (Seager, Franklin, Peralta, Detroit,.30
Smoak). RUNS-MiCabrera
Seattle IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA timore, 95; Trout, L
E.Ramirez 61/3 7 3 3 3 3101 5.07 Baltimore, 90; AJa
Furbush 2/3 0 0 0 1 0 16 3.27 bury,Boston, 87; Er
Medina L, 4-4 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 2.56 RBI-MiCabrera,
KansasCity IP HR ER BBSO NP ERA Baltimore, 122; En
B.Chen 6 6 2 2 0 2 85 2.81 AJones, Baltimore,
K.HerreraH,181/3 2 1 1 0 1 103.57 Cano,NewYork,89
CollinsBS,5-5 1 2 0 0 0 1 173.78 HITS-ABeltre,Tex
HochevarW,4-22/3 0 0 0 1 6 1.81 troit, 173; Machad
G.HollandS,38-4010 0 0 2 12 1.31 Los Angeles, 170;
Furbush pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. In- AJones, Baltimore
herited runners-scored-Medina 1-0, 165.
Collins 2-1, Hochevar 2-0. WP-Medina. DOUBLES-Machi
Umpires-Home, Lance Barksdale; First, rie, Oakland, 41; C
Gary Cederstrom; Second, Angel Her- droia, Boston, 36;
nandez; Third, Kerwin Danley. T-2:42. JCastro, Houston,3
A-13,638 (37,903). Saltalamacchia, Bo


sday'slate games
:AN LEAGUE
rera, Detroit, .355; Trout,
ABeltre,Texas, .327; Mau-
; DOrtiz, Boston,.310;Jh-
5; Cano, NewYork,.305.
, Detroit, 95; CDavis, Bal-
.os Angeles, 95; AJones,
ckson, Detroit, 89; Ells-
ncarnacion,Toronto, 83.
Detroit, 130; CDavis,
carnacion, Toronto, 101;
98; Fielder, Detroit, 93;
; DOrtiz, Boston, 85.
xas, 174; MiCabrera, De-
o, Baltimore, 173; Trout,
Ellsbury, Boston, 165;
, 165; Pedroia, Boston,

ado, Baltimore, 46; Low-
Davis, Baltimore, 38; Pe-
AIRamirez, Chicago, 36;
5; Mauer, Minnesota, 35;
ston, 35.


Pittsburgh AE
Tabata If 4
Pie If
N.Walker2b 4
McCutchen cf 4
Morneaulb 3
Byrd rf 3
R.Martin c 4
J.Harrison 3b 3
b-P.Alvarez ph-3b C
Barmesss 3
c-G.Sanchezph 1
Mercer ss 0
Colep 2
a-GJonesph 1
Mazzaro p C
e-Snider ph 1
Melancon p C
Totals 34
Milwaukee AE
Aoki rf 3
Segura ss 4
Lucroyc 4
Ar.Ramirez3b 4
C.Gomezcf 4
Gennett2b 4
K.DavisIf 4
J.Francisco 1b 3
Gallardop 2
Kintzler p C
d-Gindl ph C
Henderson p C
Totals 32
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee


Around the league: Rockies
outfielder Carlos Gonzalez aggravated
the sprained joint on his right middle
finger during a minor league rehab
assignment and likely will have to deal
with the nagging injury for the rest of
the season ... The Pirates activated
Jason Grilli from the disabled list, and
the 36-year-old right-hander knows he
has some work to do before reclaiming
his spot as the team's closer.


SR H BIBBSO Avg.
4 0 0 0 0 1 .276
0 0 0 0 1 .250
4 0 0 0 1 1 .261
4 3 2 1 1 0 .320
0 3 0 1 0 .444
0 2 2 1 0 .288
4 0 0 0 0 1 .238
0 0 0 0 1 .268
D 0 0 0 1 0 .232
0 0 0 0 1 .219
0 0 0 0 0 .250
D 0 0 0 0 0 .271
0 0 0 0 2 .185
0 0 0 0 0 .238
D 0 0 0 0 0 .167
1 1 1 0 0 .221
0 0 0 0 0 --
14 8 4 58
SR H BIBBSO Avg.
1 1 0 1 0 .287
4 1 2 1 0 1 .304
4 0 1 2 0 0 .287
4 0 0 0 0 2 .262
4 0 0 0 0 1 .284
4 0 1 0 0 0 .331
4 0 0 0 0 3 .280
0 1 0 0 0 .239
0 1 0 0 0 .220
0 0 0 0 0
D 1 0 0 1 0 .253
0 0 0 0 0 -
3 7 3 2 7
101000011- 4 80
200000010- 3 70


SMLBROUNDUP



Boston



edges



Detroit

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON Jon Lester
outdueled Max Scherzer
and Boston beat Detroit
2-1 on Tuesday night, end-
ing the Tigers right-hand-
er's chance to become
just the second pitcher to
open a season with a 20-1
record.
Lester (13-8) improved
his ERA to 1.71 in his past
six starts. He allowed one
earned run and eight hits
with a season-high nine
strikeouts and no walks.
Scherzer (19-2), who
won his first 13 decisions,
lost for the first time since
July 13 when the Texas
Rangers beat him 7-1.
Roger Clemens is the
only pitcher to start off at
20-1 and ended up 20-3
with the New York Yankees
in 2001. Rube Marquard
was the only other pitcher
with a 19-1 record, but lost
his next decision in 1912
with the New York Giants.
Boston scored on Will
Middlebrooks' two-run
single in the fifth after
Detroit's Jose Iglesias
doubled in a run in the
second in the matchup of
division leaders.

Indians 4, Orioles 3: In
Cleveland, Ubaldo Jimenez pitched
six shutout innings while Yan Gomes
and Asdrubal Cabrera drove in two
runs apiece for Cleveland. Jimenez
(10-9) has allowed three earned runs
or less in eight consecutive starts. The
right-hander held Baltimore to four hits
and worked out of a bases-loaded jam
in the sixth.

Yankees 6, White Sox 4:
In NewYork, Eduardo Nunez's two-run
double capped a five-run eighth inning
that rallied NewYork. Derek Jeter
got the Yankees started on a vintage
comeback, and pinch hitter Curtis
Granderson tied the score with an RBI
single. NewYork, which began the day
21/2 games out of a wild-card spot, won
for the 12th time in 14 home games.

Royals 4, Mariners 3: In
Kansas City, Mo., Salvador Perez drove
in Mike Moustakas with two outs in the
eighth inning, and Kansas City survived
after blowing a three-run lead. Luke
Hochevar (4-2) got two outs earlier in
the eighth to leave runners stranded
on second and third, and Greg Holland
pitched a perfect ninth for his 31st
straight save and 38th on the year.

Reds 1, Cardinals 0: In
Cincinnati, Billy Hamilton earned his
first major league steal and came
around on Todd Frazier's double in the
seventh inning, sending Cincinnati
to its second consecutive win against
St. Louis. Hamilton set a professional
record by swiping 155 bases in the
minors last year.

Nationals 9, Phillies 6: In
Philadelphia, Wilson Ramos hit a three-
run homer and Corey Brown also went
deep to back Gio Gonzalez. Still clinging
to postseason hopes, the Nationals
overcame a sloppy effort that included
three errors, four unearned runs and
four wild pitches. They remained 712
games behind Cincinnati for the second
wild-card spot.

Braves 3, Mets 1: In Atlanta,
Kris Medlen pitched seven innings
while Andrelton Simmons and Evan
Gattis homered to help Atlanta win its
second consecutive game. The Braves
have won 20 of 24 atTurner Field to
improve the major leagues' best home
record to 51-19.

Pirates 4, Brewers 3: In
Milwaukee, pinch-hitter Travis Snider
homered in the ninth inning to clinch
the Pirates'first non-losing record in
21 seasons. It was victory No. 81 for
Pittsburgh, ensuring it will not finish
with a losing record for the first time
since it went 96-66 in 1992.






The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


* AUTO RACING:





Stewart calls broken leg a small bump


By JENNA FRYER
ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANNAPOLIS, N.C.-
Tony Stewart, upbeat and
noticeably thinner, won
his first race since break-
ing his leg in a sprint car
accident when he beat
an employee around the
office at Stewart-Haas
Racing in his wheelchair.
His injury? The three-
time NASCAR champion
called it "a small bump
in the road" and expects
to be back in a race car
in time for next year's


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2:20 p.m.
FSFL Miami at Chicago Cubs
7 p.m.
ESPN Detroit at Boston
10p.m.
ESPN -Tampa Bay at LA. Angels
TENNIS
Noon
ESPN2 U.S. Open, quarterfinals, at New


York
ESPN2 -
York


7p.m.
- U.S. Open, quarterfinals, at New


College football
THE AP TOP 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press
college football poll, with first-place votes
in parentheses, records through Sept. 2,
total points based on 25 points for a first-
place vote through one point for a 25th-
place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1.Alabama (58) 1-0 1,497 1
2. Oregon 1-0 1,355 3
3.OhioSt.(1) 1-0 1,330 2
4.Clemson (1) 1-0 1,304 8
5. Stanford 0-0 1,277 4
6. South Carolina 1-0 1,181 6
7.TexasA&M 1-0 1,085 7
8. Louisville 1-0 1,073 9
9.LSU 1-0 971 12
10. Florida St. 1-0 953 11
11. Georgia 0-1 894 5
12. Florida 1-0 875 10
13. Oklahoma St. 1-0 780 13
14.Notre Dame 1-0 707 14
15.Texas 1-0 674 15
16.Oklahoma 1-0 612 16
17. Michigan 1-0 583 17
18. UCLA 1-0 387 21
19. Northwestern 1-0 320 22
20.Washington 1-0 315 NR
21.Wisconsin 1-0 287 23
22. Nebraska 1-0 219 18
23. Baylor 1-0 150 NR
24.TCU 0-1 148 20
25. Southern Cal 1-0 135 24
Others receiving votes: Miami 127, Mis-
sissippi 50, Arizona St. 48, Michigan St. 42,
Cincinnati 27, N. Illinois 27, Fresno St. 22,
Virginia Tech 12, Bowling Green 9, Georgia
Tech 8, Arizona 6, Penn St. 4, Boise St. 3,Vir-
ginia 2, Arkansas 1.

USA TODAY TOP 25
The USA Today Top 25 football coaches
poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Sept. 2, total points based
on 25 points for first place through one
point for 25th, and previous ranking:
Rec. Pts Pvs
1. Alabama (58) 1-0 1,545 1
2. Ohio State (3) 1-0 1,444 2
3.Oregon 1-0 1,420 3
4. Stanford 0-0 1,292 4
5.Clemson 1-0 1,275 8
6. South Carolina 1-0 1,220 7
7.TexasA&M (1) 1-0 1,181 6
8. Louisville 1-0 1,051 9
9. Florida 1-0 974 10
10. Florida State 1-0 946 12
11.LSU 1-0 926 13
12.Georgia 0-1 875 5
13. Notre Dame 1-0 840 11
14. Oklahoma State 1-0 798 14
15.Oklahoma 1-0 666 16
16.Texas 1-0 660 15
17. Michigan 1-0 623 17
18. UCLA 1-0 368 21
19. Nebraska 1-0 357 18
20. Northwestern 1-0 348 22
21.Wisconsin 1-0 301 23
22. Southern Cal 1-0 176 24
23.Washington 1-0 145 NR
24.TCU 0-1 140 20
24. Miami 1-0 140 NR
Others receiving votes: Baylor 125; Michi-
gan State 67; Mississippi 54; Fresno State
46; Northern Illinois 31; Arizona State 28;
Cincinnati 19; Arkansas 12; San Jose State
12; Georgia Tech 10; Arizona 7; Boise State
5; Virginia Tech 5; Central Florida 4; Arkan-
sas State 3; Kansas State 3; Texas Tech 3;
Bowling Green 1; East Carolina 1; Missouri
1; North Carolina 1;Utah State 1.
Monday's late summary
No. 11 FLORIDA ST. 41, PITTSBURGH 13
FloridaSt. 7 21 6 7 41
Pittsburgh 7 3 3 0 13
First Quarter
Pitt-Garner 4 pass from Savage (Blewitt
kick), 10:50.
FSU-O'Leary 24 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 4:11.
Second Quarter
FSU-O'Leary 2 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 13:41.
Pitt-FG Blewitt 28,9:18.
FSU-Winston 5 run (Aguayo kick), 2:13.
FSU-Greene 23 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), :38.
Third Quarter
FSU-FG Aguayo 22,11:08.
Pitt-FG Blewitt 39,4:43.
FSU-FG Aguayo 28,1:12.
Fourth Quarter
FSU-O'Leary 10 pass from Winston
(Aguayo kick), 9:32.
A-65,500.
FSU Pitt
Firstdowns 24 16
Rushes-yards 34-156 27-96
Passing 377 201
Comp-Att-Int 27-29-0 15-28-2
Return Yards 57 0
Punts-Avg. 2-37.0 3-54.3
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 7-70 4-26
Time of Possession 35:08 24:52
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Florida St., Wilder 10-58, Free-
man 9-52, Winston 8-25, Abram 2-13,
R.Green 5-8. Pittsburgh, Boyd 3-54, Ben-
nett 9-35, Conner 9-34, Ibrahim 1-0, Savage
5-(minus27).
PASSING-Florida St., Winston 25-27-0
356, Coker 2-2-0-21. Pittsburgh, Savage
15-28-2-201.
RECEIVING-Florida St., Greene 8-126,
Benjamin 5-73, Shaw 4-94, O'Leary 4-47,
Abram 2-11, Freeman 2-11, IJones 1-15,


Daytona 500.
How much extracur-
ricular racing comes with
his NASCAR schedule
remains to be seen.
On pace to run more
than 100 races this
year, Stewart admitted
Tuesday that fatigue
had set in around
the NASCAR race at
Indianapolis in late July.
That was two weeks
before the sprint car
crash at Iowa, where he
broke the fibula and tibia
in his right leg.


C.Green 1-0. Pittsburgh, Street 6-141,
nett 3-8, Boyd 2-26, Garner 2-11, Holtz
Parrish 1-7.

Basketball
WNBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pet
z-Chicago 21 8 .724
Atlanta 15 13 .536
Washington 14 15 .483
Indiana 13 15 .464
NewYork 11 19 .367
Connecticut 7 22 .241
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pet
x-Minnesota 22 7 .759
x-LosAngeles 21 9 .700
Phoenix 15 13 .536
x-Seattle 15 15 .500
SanAntonio 11 19 .367
Tulsa 10 20 .333
x-clinched playoffspot
z-clinched conference
Monday's result
Atlanta 92, Los Angeles 82
Tuesday's results
Nogamesscheduled
Today's games
Indiana at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

Pro football
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East W L T Pet PF
Buffalo 0 0 0 .000 0
DOLPHINS 0 0 0 .000 0
NewEngland 0 0 0 .000 0
N.Y.Jets 0 0 0 .000 0
South W L T Pet PF
Houston 0 0 0 .000 0
Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 0
JAGUARS 0 0 0 .000 0
Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0
North W L T Pet PF
Baltimore 0 0 0 .000 0
Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 0
Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 0
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 0
West W LT Pet PF
Denver 0 0 0 .000 0
KansasCity 0 0 0 .000 0
Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0
San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0
S NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East W L T Pet PF
Dallas 0 0 0 .000 0
N.YGiants 0 0 0 .000 0
Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 0
Washington 0 0 0 .000 0
South W L T Pet PF
Atlanta 0 0 0 .000 0
Carolina 0 0 0 .000 0
NewOrleans 0 0 0 .000 0
BUCS 0 0 0 .000 0
North W L T Pet PF
Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0
Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0
Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0
Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 0
West W LT Pet PF
Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0
San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 0
Seattle 0 0 0 .000 0
St.Louis 0 0 0 .000 0
Thursday's game
Baltimoreat Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday's games
Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago, 1 p.m.
New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
BUCS at N.Y. Jets, 1 pm.
Kansas City at JAGUARS, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 1 p.m.
DOLPHINS at Cleveland, 1p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Green Bayat San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y GiantsatDallas,8:30 p.m.
Monday's games
Philadelphia atWashington, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at San Diego, 10:20 p.m.

Baseball
FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE PLAYOFF
(Best-of-3)
Dunedin vs. Daytona
Tuesday: Dunedin at Daytona, late
Today: Daytona at Dunedin,TBA
x-Thursday: Daytona at Dunedin,TBA
Fort Myers vs. Charlotte
Tuesday: Charlotte 1, Fort Myers 0
Today: Charlotte at Fort Myers,TBA
x-Thursday: Charlotte at Fort Myers, TB
x-if necessary
SOUTHERN LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Birmingham vs. Tennessee
Thursday:Tennessee at Birmingham,8
Friday:Tennessee at Birmingham,8:05
Saturday: Birmingham atTennessee,
x-Sunday: Birmingham atTennessee,3
x-Monday: Birmingham atTennessee,
Mississippi vs. Mobile
Thursday: Mississippi at Mobile, 8:05 p
Friday: Mississippi at Mobile, 8:05 p.m.
Saturday: Mobile at Mississippi, 7 p.m.
x-Sunday: Mississippi at Mobile,TBA
x-Monday: Mississippi at Mobile,TBA
x-if necessary
MIDWEST LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
First Round
(Best-of-3)
Cedar Rapids vs. Quad Cities
Today: Cedar Rapids at Quad Cities, 8 p
Thursday: Quad Cities at Cedar Ra
7:35 p.m.
x-Friday: Quad Cities at Cedar Rapids,
p.m.
South Bendvs. Great Lakes
Today: South Bend at Great Lakes, 7:05
Thursday: Great Lakes at South Bend,
x-Friday: Great Lakes at South Bend, 7
Bowling Green vs. FortWayne
Today: FortWayne at Bowling Green, 8
Thursday: Bowling Green at Fort Wa
7:05
x-Friday: Bowling Green at Fort Wa


At his first public
appearance since the
accident, Stewart said
he was planning to cut
his schedule even before
the injury, which has
required two surgeries
and left him homebound
for almost a month.
"I am going to get back
in a (sprint) car eventu-
ally. There's no time
frame on when I'm going
to get back in one, but
I'm definitely going to
cut back the amount of
races, just on scheduling


purposes more than
anything," he said.
Using a wheelchair to
navigate his way around
the race shop Tuesday,
Stewart said he planned
to return to the track this
weekend at Richmond
and hinted he'll use
a motorized scooter
because he's not yet
ready to use the crutches
he received last week.
This is the first sig-
nificant injury for the
42-year-old owner/driver
of SHR since his move


Ben- 7:05 HOUSTON ASTROS- Acquired C Matt
z1-8, Clinton vs. Beloit Pagnozzi from Atlanta Braves for cash con-
Today: Beloit at Clinton, 7:30 p.m. siderations.
Thursday: Clinton at Beloit, 7:30 p.m. KANSAS CITY ROYALS Recalled LHP
x-Friday: Clinton at Beloit, 7:30 p.m. Donnie Joseph and INF Johnny Giavotella
from Omaha (PCL) and RHP Wade Davis
Soccer and RHP Louis Coleman from Wilmington
(Carolina). Purchased the contracts of INF
GB MLS Pedro Ciriaco and INF Carlos Pena from
EASTERN CONFERENCE Omaha. Designated OF Edinson Rinconing
5/2 W L T Pts GF GA for assignment. Placed LHP Noel Arguelles
7 Montreal 12 7 6 42 41 35 onthe60-dayDL.
712 NewYork 12 9 6 42 40 35 OAKLAND ATHLETICS- Recalled LHP
10/2 KansasCity 12 9 6 42 38 27 Tommy Milone from Stockton (Cal) and
14 Philadelphia 10 8 9 39 37 37 RHP Evan Scribner from Sacramento (PCL).
New England 10 9 7 37 35 25 Purchased the contract of RHP Pat Neshek
GB Houston 10 8 7 37 30 29 from Sacramento. Designated LHP Hideki
Chicago 10 10 5 35 31 35 Okajima for assignment. Released C Luke
11/2 Columbus 8 13 5 29 29 35 Montz.
612 TorontoFC 4 1210 22 23 35 SEATTLE MARINERS Recalled RHP
712 D.C. 3 18 5 14 16 43 Erasmo Ramirez, RHP Chance Ruffin, RHP
12 WESTERN CONFERENCE Hector Noesi, INF Carlos Triunfel from Ta-
12/ i2 W LT Pts GF GA coma (PCL). Selected the contract of LHP
Re Sat Le 4 8 48 52 JamesPaxtonfromTacoma.AddedTacoma
LosAngeies 13 9 4 43 43 32
Seattle 12 8 4 40 32 26 hitting coach Howard Johnson to its staff.
Seattle 12 8 4 40 32 26ational Leaue
Portland 9 512 39 39 30 NationalLeague
Colorado 10 8 9 39 34 29 ATLANTA BRAVES Recalled OF Evan
Vancouver 10 9 7 37 38 35 GattisfromGwinnett(IL).
FC Dallas 9 710 37 36 38 PITTSBURGH PIRATES Recalled RHP
San Jose 9 11 7 34 28 40 Jared Hughes,OF Andrew Lambo, LHPJeff
Chivas USA 5 14 7 22 26 47 Locke and C Tony Sanchez from Altoona
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point (EL). Activated RHP Jason Grilli from the
for tie. 15-day DL.
Today's games SAN DIEGO PADRES Signed OF Will
Houston atColumbus,7:30 p.m. Venable to a two-year contract extension
Chivas USA at Seattle FC, 10 p.m. through the 2015 season. Recalled RHP An-
PA Saturday's games thony Bass, RHP Brad Boxberger and RHP
P Columbus at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 Brad Brach from Tucson (PCL).
0 p.m. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS- Recalled 1B
0 Vancouver at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Brock Peterson and INF Ryan Jackson from
0 Chicago at Seattle FC, 10p.m. Memphis (PCL) and RHP Michael Wacha,
PA Coloradoat LosAngeles, 10:30 p.m. LHP Tyler Lyons and RHP Carlos Martinez
SToronto FC at Portland, 11p.m. from Springfield (Texas). Purchased the
0 Sunday's games contractor C AudryPerezfrom Memphis.
0 NewYorkatHouston, p.m WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Selected
0 MontreaatNew Engand, 7:30 p.m. the contract SS Zach Waiters from Syracuse
PA (Phil hia atI San Jose,p.m. (L). Recalled OF Corey Brown, LHP Xavier
0 Phiadephia at San Jose, 11 pCedeno, INF-OF Jeff Kobernus and OF Eury
0 Perez from Syracuse.
0 Glantz-Culver Line MidwestLeague
0 QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS An-
PA MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL nounced the resignation of executive di-
0 National League rector of Modern Woodmen Park Stefanie
0 FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE Brown.
0 atAtlanta -155 NewYork +145 American Association
0 atChicago -170 Miami +160 LINCOLN SALTDOGS Traded 1B lan
at San Diego 105 SanFrancisco 105 Gac to Southern Maryland for a player to
PA Washington -125 at Philadelphia +115 benamed.
0 atCincinnati -125 St.Louis +115 ST. PAUL SAINTS Traded RHP An-
0 Pittsburgh 155 at Milwaukee +145 thony Claggett to York for a player to be
0 atColorado 120 LosAngees +110 named.Traded INF Brian Burgamyto Sugar
PA American League Land for future considerations.
0 atHouston -110 Minnesota +100 SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS Exercised
0 Texas -120 atOakland +110 the 2014 contract options on RHP Cody
0 atNewYork -175 Chicago +165 Hall, RHP Mike Hepple, RHP John Holdz-
0 atCleveland 135 Baltimore +125 kom, LHP Mike Jefferson, RHP Kyle Kings-
PA at Boston -35 Detroit +125 ley, LHP Ryan Lucero, RHP Andy Noga, RHP
0 atKansasCity 165 Seattle +155 Preston Olson, RHP Joe Zeller, C Alberto
0 atLosAngeles-145 TampaBay +135 Espinosa, C Adrian Martinez, INF Leugim
0 Interleague Barroso, INF Anthony Kaskadden, INF Luke
0 atArizona -125 Toronto +115 Murton, INF Jeff Squier, OF Peter Barrows,
PA NCAA FOOTBALL
PA NCAA FOOTBALL OF Yusuke Inoguchi, OF Sam Judah and OF
0 Tomorrow
0 Eliezer Mesa.
0 FAVORITE O T O/U UNDERDOG ASKTA
BASKETBALL
0 atE.Carolina 161/2201/2(54) FAU
0 a) F National Basketball Association
0 Friday PHOENIX SUNS Announced the
at Boston Coll32 3 (4812) Wake Forest PHOEAnnouncd the
UCF 2324/(53) atFU team and F Michael Beasley agreed to ter-
Saturday minate his contract.
Florida 3 3 49) at Miami TORONTO RAPTORS Waived G-F
atKentucky 131/217(56'/2) Miami (Ohio) Quentin Richardson.
FOOTBALL
at Mich St. 22231/2(431/2) S. Florida FOOTBALL
Oklahoma St. 31/226 (60) at UTSA National Football League
Houston 2 3 (67'/2) atTemple ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed LB
atOhio 6/2 51/2(56/2) North Texas Kenny Demens, DT Anthony McCloud and
atN.Carolina 21/221'/2(67) MidTenn. WR Sam McGuffietothe practicesquad.
Cincinnati 16 7/2 (54) at Illinois ATLANTA FALCONS Signed OT Jer-
atOklahoma 1820/2(57/2) W.Virginia emy Trueblood. Waived OT Terren Jones.
atGeorgia 5 3 (56) S.Carolina Reached an injury settlement with G Phil-
at Ohio St. 24 28(542) SanDiegoSt. lipkeith Manley.
Utah St. 9/2 9/2 (60) at Air Force BUFFALO BILLS Signed K Dan Car-
atTulane 7 6 (50/2) S.Alabama peter.
Oregon 26211/2(61) atVrginia CLEVELAND BROWNS Agreed to
Duke 71/2 6 (491/2) atMemphis termswith K BillyCundiff. Placed OL Jason
at Nrthwestern 912 12 (57) Syracuse Pinkston on injured reserve/designated.
atlndiana 4 13 (66) Navy DALLAS COWBOYS Acquired DE
at Nebraska 30 28'/2(59'/2) So.Miss. CaesarRayford from Indianapolisforan un-
Texas 31/2 7 (55) at BYU disclosed draft pick.
FS atLSU 3434/2(61'/2) UAB INDIANAPOLIS COLTS Signed TE
at Missouri 12/2 17(661/2) Toledo Dominique Jones from the practice squad.
atTulsa 10 10 (53) Colorado St. Signed TE Justice Cunningham to the prac-
at Auburn 4 13(61'/2) Arkansas St. tice squad.
at Ball St. 11 7/2(60/2) Army KANSAS CITY CHIEFS-- Placed S Sand-
at Penn St. 28 23(48/2) E.Michigan ers Commings on injured reserve. Signed
at Baylor 24V/227'/2(66) Buffalo S Bradley McDougald. Signed G Rishawn
Bowling Green 2/2 7/2(44/2) at Kent St. Johnson to the practice squad.
atTennessee 1313/2(55/2) W.Kentucky MIAMI DOLPHINS Signed G Danny
at KansasSt. 16 10 (60) La.-Lafayette Watkins to a one-year contract. Waived C
at MichiganPk 3'/2 (51) Notre Dame Josh Samuda.
atOregonSt. 28 27 (53) Hawaii NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Signed
Minnesota 21 161/2(51)at N Mexico St. TE Matthew Mulligan. Signed OT Jordan
atWyoming 22 27/2(64/2) Idaho DeveyandOT RJ. Dill to the practice squad.
at UTEP 8 6'/2 (48) New Mexico NEW ORLEANS SAINTS Signed WR
8:05 atSothrnCal 20/215 (53) Wash St. Robert Meachem to a one-year contract.
Arizona 17'/210'/2(61) atUNLV Placed LB Jonathan Vilma on injured re-
5:15 at Stanford 18/226/2(48/2) SanJoseSt. serve.
3. NFL SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Signed TE
7:15 Tomorrow DerekCarrier to the practicesquad.
FAVORITE O T O/U UNDERDOG TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS-Placed CB
i.m. at Denver 8/2 7/2 (48) Baltimore Danny Gorrer on the injured reserve/return
Sunday list. Re-signed DT Gary Gibson. Signed WR
New England 62 91/2(50/2) at Buffalo Skye Dawson to the practice squad. Re-
at Pittsburgh 6/2 7 (42) Tennessee leased OLJace Daniels.
atNewOrleans 3 3 (54) Atlanta Women'slndoorFootball League
Tampa Bay 21/2 3 (40) at N.Y.Jets WIFL Sinned R Maenan I arsn and


p.m.
pids,
7:35


7:05
:30
1:05
yne,
lyne,


KansasCity 2'/231/2(41) atJacksville WRCourtneyLarsen.
atChicago 3 3 (42) Cincinnati HOCKEY
atCleveland PkPk(41) Miami American Hockey League
Seattle 3/2 3 (45) at Carolina CHICAGO WOLVES Signed D Brent
at Detroit 3 4/2(46/2) Minnesota Regner.
atlndianapolis 61/2 9'/2 (47) Oakland COLLEGE
at St. Louis 51/2 42 (41) Arizona SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE Named
at San Francisco51/2 4/2(48/2) Green Bay Conner Moreno assistant director of opera-
at Dallas 3 3 (481/2) N.Y.Giants tions
Monday BENTLEY Named Kerry Hausdorf
atWashington 4/2 3/2 (51) Philadelphia women's lacrosse coach.
Houston 212 312 (44) at San Diego LEHIGH Named Kyle Griffin men's as-
Transactions sistant basketball coach.
SAINT FRANCIS (PA) Named Dani-
BASEBALL elle Hemerka women's assistant basketball
American League coach.
CLEVELAND INDIANS Activated OF SAINT ROSE Named Greg Roman
Ryan Raburnfrom the 15-dayDL. women's tennis coach.


to NASCAR in 1999. His
streak of 521 consecutive
starts came to an end
with the injury.
Stewart is accustomed
to racing as many as six
days a week, not to men-
tion keeping busy with
his business ventures as
co-owner of the NASCAR
team, owner of his sprint
car teams and owner
of multiple race tracks.
Stewart joked that his
days since the accident
have been a lazy loop of
watching "Oprah" while


he recovers at the North
Carolina home of long-
time business manager
Eddie Jarvis.
The reality is that he's
been entertained by a
steady stream of visitors.
He has also kept busy
with SHR co-owner Gene
Haas' urgent desire to
expand the organization
to four teams to accom-
modate Kurt Busch.
Haas presented Stewart
with his plan the day af-
ter Stewart was released
from the hospital.


* PREP ROUNDUP



Venice rolls past



Lemon Bay girls


STAFF REPORT
ENGLEWOOD Grace
Gildner shot a 1-over-
par 36 to earn medalist
honors and lead Venice
High School past Lemon
Bay, 153-186, in a girls
golf match at Lemon Bay
Golf Club on Tuesday.
Gildner's total was one
shot better than team-
mate Lexie Flerlage.
JuliannaVeloz (40) had


Lemon Bay's best score.
Lemon Bay returns to
action Thursday for a tri-
match against Cardinal
Mooney and Lakewood
Ranch at Bent Tree CC in
Sarasota.

VENICE 153, LEMON BAY 186
at Lemon Bay G.C., Englewood (par 35)
Venice: Grace Gildner 36, Lexie Flerlage 37,
Victoria Cangero 40, Allyson Guthrie 40.
Lemon Bay: Julianna Veloz 40, Montanna
Williamson 47, Candice Weese 49, Marisa-
bel Rodriguez 50.
Records: Venice 3-0, Lemon Bay 2-2


I QUICK HITS


AMERICA'S CUP federation announced the country
wants to be one of the 13 to co-host
CHAMPION ORACLE the 2020 European Championship.
DOCKED 2 POINTS Federation secretary general Rudolf
Rpnka saidT I iweHav it will d rlcare


SAN FRANCISCO (AP)
- Defending champion
Oracle Team USA was
docked two points
in the America's Cup
finals against Emirates
Team Zealand and a key
sailor was expelled in the
harshest penalties levied
in the 162-year history of
sailing's marquee regatta.
The penalties were
announced Tuesday by an
international jury that has
spent four weeks inves-
tigating illegal modifica-
tions of prototype boats
used in warmup regattas
last year and earlier this
year.
Oracle Team USA,
owned by software
billionaire Larry Ellison
of Oracle Corp., must
win 11 races to retain the
oldest trophy in interna-
tional sports. Team New
Zealand must still win
nine races to claim the
silver trophy.
The first two races are
scheduled for Saturday
on San Francisco Bay.
Dirk de Ridder, who
trims the wing sail on the
high-performance, 72-
foot catamaran, is barred
from sailing in the re-
gatta, and two shore crew
members also have been
expelled. Grinder Matt
Mitchell has been barred
from the first four races.
Sailor Kyle Langford was
given a warning, and
another sailor, identified
only as Sailor X, had his
case dismissed.


SOCCER
U.S. women rout
Mexico: In Washington, Abby
Wambach extended her world record
with her 161st international goal,
Sydney Leroux scored four times in the
first half, and the next generation for
U.S. women's soccer blended nicely
with the old guard as the Americans
thumped Mexico 7-0 in a friendly at
RFK Stadium....
The Czech Republic's football


its interest to UEFA by the Sept. 12
deadline and the detailed final bid
will be submitted by April 25. The
country needs to build a new stadium
that seats at least 30,000.


COLLEGES

UNC panel pushes
eligibility reforms: A panel
created by the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill said the Tar
Heels and other schools should require
academically at-risk students to sit
out of games during their first year.
The panel was reviewing the balance
between academics and athletics
at UNC, which has faced a series of
athletics-related scandals. Its report,
issued 28 recommendations to the
school covering everything from
improved oversight and academic
support for athletes to maintaining
"responsible"spending for athletics
operations.

BASKETBALL

Spain seeks 3rd straight
Euro title: Spain is favored to
win a third consecutive European
basketball championship despite
the absence of Pau Gasol and Serge
Ibaka and the shooting ofJuan Carlos
Navarro when the 24-team tourna-
ment starts today in Slovenia. Spain
is trying to become the first winner
of three straight European titles since
Yugoslavia in 1977. ...
Phoenix and Michael Beasley
reached an agreement to terminate
the contract of the troubled forward.
The move will cost the franchise $7
million, a $2 million savings from
what Beasley would have been due
had he simply been waived. It also
represents a significant reduction
in what the hit on the team's salary
cap would have been. Beasley was
arrested a month ago in suburban
Scottsdale on charges of felony
marijuana possession and possession
of drug paraphernalia....
Boston Celtics forward Jared
Sullinger pleaded not guilty to
domestic violence-related charges
after allegedly repeatedly pinning his
girlfriend to a bed and the floor. Bail
for Sullinger, 21, was set at $5,000
after his plea on charges including
assault and battery and intimidation
of a witness.


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Page 6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IWednesday, September 4, 2013


BYTHE NUMBERS
1 Are you impressed with the 12 touchdown passes
area quarterbacks produced in the season opener?
Well, you should be after a strong first week by
North Port's Brennan Simms (four), Charlotte's Brennan McGill
(three) and Traige McClary (three). Last year's total after Week
1? One TD pass.


CONVENTIONAL WISDOM

1. Port Charlotte (1-0)
Last week: Defeated Lemon Bay 45-6.
This week: at Braden River.
The buzz: The Pirates didn't disappoint in their
opener, showing a diversified offense (210 yards rushing,
231 passing) and a stingy and opportunistic defense
(allowed 25 rushing yards, forced five turnovers). If there is
pressure on the Pirates now, it is to maintain this high level
of play.


2. Charlotte (1-0)
Last week: Defeated North Port 37-35
This week: vs. Barron Collier.
The buzz: Is there anything here to worry about?
Not so far. Quarterback Brennan McGill passed efficiently
(11-17, 258 yards, 3 TDs) and led the Tarpons on a late
drive for the final field goal. Tarpons ground out a decent
running game, too.


3. North Port (0-1)
Last week: Lost to Charlotte 37-25.
This week: at Lely.
The buzz: Judging by early returns, the Bobcats
are going to be a fun team to watch. If defense improves a
little bit, they are a real threat to earn a playoff spot out of
District 7A-10.


4. DeSoto County (0-1)
Last week: Lost to Lake Region 19-18.
This week: At Lehigh.
The buzz: The Bulldogs offered flashes last week
- Terrell Gordon's 120 rushing yards and Kari Williams
being an all-around threat. But they also need to cut out
the 15 penalties that hampered them Friday.


5. Lemon Bay (0-1)
Last week: Lost to Port Charlotte 45-6.
This week: vs. Bishop Verot.
The buzz: There is a good football team here
hidden among the opening week loss. Don't be surprised
if it gets well this week against Bishop Verot.


6. Imagine School (0-1)
Last week: Lost to Community School of Naples
45-0.
This week: at St. Petersburg-Keswick Christian.
The buzz: After seeing their opener called due to
not having enough healthy players, this week could be a
numbers game for the Sharks.


THE POWER OF THREE

Leonard Faison,
NORTH PORT
The Bobcats'running back made
a name for himself last season as a
versatile playmaker who could eat
yardage on the ground or through
the air. More of that in a 37-35 loss to
Charlotte with 82 yards rushing, seven
catches for 120 yards and a combined
four touchdowns.

Jacques Jean-Louis,
PORT CHARLOTTE
Jean-Louis established himself
as a top deep threat against Lemon
Bay with three catches for 159 yards,
including touchdown grabs of 80 and
50 yards. He also sports a ludicrous
average per catch of 53 yards (small
sample size, but still).

Austin Roberts,
CHARLOTTE
It took one game for the Charlotte
to test kicker Austin Roberts with a
game-winning try of 23 yards. Not a
stretch for most kickers, but in his first
regular-season start for the Tarpons, the
moment didn't get to Roberts and he
came through.


* PREP FOOTBALL


SUN PHOTO BY ROB SHORE

North Port sophomore Brennan Simms, left, has plugged into the Bobcats'offense smoothly since taking over
as the starting quarterback two weeks ago. Simms had four touchdown passes Friday night against Charlotte.




UNEXPECTED STARTER


No growing pains yet for North Port's sophomore QB


By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER

Brennan Simms has been
North Port High School's
starting quarterback for a
little more than two weeks,
but Bobcats coach Billy
Huthman already talks about
him like he's a veteran.
"He's a sophomore, but he
doesn't act like a sophomore,"
Huthman said.
There are a handful of
giveaways to his youth the
baby face, a soft voice more
suitable to a sophomore than
a senior and a skinny frame
that belies the years not spent
in a weight room.
But then you ask him what
he sees when he looks at
game film.
"I have a lot of the time in
the pocket because of my
line," Simms said.
He might walk like a sopho-
more and talk like a sopho-
more. But recognizing the
guys who keep you upright?
That's a veteran move.
So far, he has played like
a veteran. In a 37-35 loss to
Charlotte on Friday, he com-
pleted 17 of 28 passes for 215
yards and four touchdowns.
The story is old hat by
now. Simms was set to be the
junior varsity starter in with


INTELLIGENCE REPORT
How did your team's Week 4 opponent
fare on Friday night? Find out in the
Intelligence Report with thumbnail
glances of future opponents.
See www.suncoastsportsblog.com


senior Trent White return-
ing for his senior season.
But White unexpectedly
transferred to Charlotte days
before a preseason game
against Booker.
Unfazed by the unexpected
start, he passed for 232 yards.
"Easy," Simms said causally.
But as Huthman acknowl-
edged, he was only going to
be playing junior varsity to
make certain he would get
practice reps.
Since then, Simms has
made the grade.
"(He's been) unbelievable,"
the Bobcats coach said. "I
just always knew he had it in
him. With the other quarter-
back (White), he had to play
a role on the team because
(White) was a senior. But he's
surpassed my expectations
offensively."
It isn't just Simms'
physical attributes that
leave Huthman brimming
with optimism. He is also
encouraged by the way his


new quarterback breaks
down film and processes
information.
"Watching film, he knows
everything that Lely's doing,"
Huthman said, referencing
this week's opponent. "He
really prepares himself."
That left his ability to de-
velop chemistry with existing
players in the Bobcat offense,
such as Sylwester Augustyn
or Teddy Deas, as the only
major question concerning
his ascendancy to starting
varsity quarterback.
But Simms doesn't see that
as an issue either.
"We had chemistry before
that with Sly and Teddy,"
Simms said. "We were all on
the same Pop Warner teams,
so we already had that."
Is his arm big enough for
the Bobcats' pass-happy
offense? You bet.
"It's not that much pres-
sure on me," Simms said. "I
just have to get it to the skill
players and they do most of
the work. Most of my passes
are 10-yard passes, then they
run 20 yards (more)."
Now, he's giving credit to
his skill players. Told you he
had veteran stuff.
Contact Rob Shore atshore@sun-herald.com
or941-206-1174.


I AREA STATS


RUSHING
Player
Terrell Gordon, DeS
Brennan Norus, PC
Leonard Faison, NP
Marquell Platt, Cha
Kari Williams, DeS
Josh Pollard, NP
Jakhi Roberts, Cha
lanTyler, PC
GradyWells, PC
MalikBryant,NP
Dwight Reynolds, Cha
Bobby Caspolich, LB
Austin Hirschy, LB
Jake Hobbs, PC
Traige McClary, PC
Tajahs Jackson, DeS
MaleekWilliams,Cha
Elijah Mack, Ima
Christian Coffelletto, PC
Dequan Richardson, DeS
StantleyThomas, ma


Ltt. Yds Avg. TD
18 120 6.7 1
9 102 11.3 2
13 82 6.3 1
8 66 8.3 1
7 59 8.4 1
6 52 8.7 0
6 50 8.3 0
2 34 17.0 0
5 28 5.6 0
2 24 12.0 0
2 17 8.5 0
5 16 3.2 0
3 16 5.3 0
2 16 8.0 1
5 15 3.0 0
3 15 5.0 0
2 10 5.0 0
12 8 0.7 0
1 8 8.0 0
1 6 6.0 0
12 5 0.4 0


Anthony Stephens, PC
Brandon Chapman, ma
Alan Pinkney, NP
Paulsin Heitter, PC
Jake Barone-Wiggs, LB
Amari Washington, Cha
Brennan McGill, Cha
Brennan Simms, NP
Tyler Nelson, LB
Rosario Zavalas, DeS
Michael Prada, Ima
PASSING
Player Corn
Brennan McGill, Cha
Traige McClary.PC
Brennan Simms, NP
KariWilliams, DeS
Tyler Nelson, LB
Dakota Reigle, LB
Josh Pollard, NP
StantleyThomas, ma


p. Att. Yds TD Int.
11 17 258 3 0
10 16 231 3 1
17 24 214 4 0
6 15 133 1 1
7 20 116 1 2
0 1 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 0


RECEIVING
Player
Leonard Faison, NP
Paulsin Heitter, PC
Dwight Reynolds, Cha
Teddy Deas, NP
Nic Mostyn, LB
JaquesJean-Louis
Dwayne Reynolds, Cha
SlyAugustyn, NP
Dakota Reigle, LB
Dequan Richardson, DeS
Austin Pollard, NP
Tony Lee, DeS
Jakhi Roberts, Cha
Amari Washington, Cha
Keshawn Smith, DeS
Josh Kennedy, LB
Tajahs Jackson, DeS
Alan Pinkney, NP
JacariusThomas, DeS


Yds Avg.
120 17.1
72 10.3
129 21.5
45 11.3
28 7.0
159 53.0
82 27.3
28 9.3
76 38.0
40 20.0
13 6.5
58 58.0
25 25.0
20 20.0
13 13.0
12 12.0
10 10.0
8 8.0
7 7.0


GAME OF THE WEEK
Barron Collier at
Charlotte: The Tarpons don't get
any kind of breather this week after a
37-35 scare at North Port last week.
Cougars come in with a defense that
has allowed a combined six points
in the classic and season opener. But
Tarpons have scored 78 points in that
span. Something's got to give.

KEEP AN EYE ON
Venice at Manatee:
Massive game for the Indians, who
some fancy at Hawkins Stadium this
week. Hurricanes are coming off
a 44-14 rout of Gilman (Md.) and
this might be a week for an upset.
The game will feature two big-time
groundgainers in Venice's Terry Polk
(246 yards, 2 TDs) and Manatee's
Trevon Walters (109 yards, 2 TDs).


STATE RANKINGS
CLASS 8A
Rec. Pts Pry
1.Manatee(12) 1-0 156 2
2.Apopka (4) 1-1 126 1
3.Plant 0-0-1 108 3
4.Oviedo 1-0 100 5
5.CypressBay 0-0 92 4
6.Dr. Phillips 1-0 75 8
7. Fort Pierce Central 1-0 60 7
8. Miramar 1-0 50 9
9.FirstCoast 1-0 44 6
10. South Dade 1-0 29 NR
Others receiving votes: Vero Beach 21,
West Orange 7, Deerfield Beach 6, Christo-
pher Columbus Catholic 3, Sandalwood 2,
Lake Brantley1.
CLASS 7A
Rec. Pts Prv
1.St.ThomasAquinas(16) 1-0 160 1
2. KissimmeeOsceola 1-0 136 2
3.Dwyer 0 128 3
4. Lincoln 2-0 120 4
5.East Lake 1-0 93 5
6. Sickles 1-0 70 7
7.Fletcher 1-0 59 8
8.Lakeland 1-0 54 9
9. Plantation 1-0 35 NR
10. Royal Palm Beach 1-0 7 NR
Others receiving votes: Fleming Island
6, Boyd Anderson 6, Countryside 2, Port
Charlotte 2, Ridge Community 2.
CLASS 6A
Rec. Pts Prv
1.Miami Central (15) 1-0 159 1
2.Armwood(1) 1-0 144 2
3.Jefferson 1-0 116 4
4.Columbia 1-0 106 7
5.Largo 1-0 101 6
6. Mainland 1-0 75 9
7.Venice 1-0 47 NR
8.LakeGibson 1-0 33 NR
9.Ocala Vanguard 1-0 32 NR
10. Miami Northwestern 0-1 15 3
Others receiving votes: Heritage 10,
South Fort Myers 8, Miami Carol City 8,
Homestead 6, Gainesville 6, Winter Haven
5, Citrus 3, Naples 3, Hallandale 2, New
Smyrna Beach 1.
CLASSSA
Rec. Pts Prv
1.Miami Jackson (8) 1-0 134 4
2. Pensacola Catholic 1-0 119 7
3.West Florida (2) 1-0 117 8
4.Godby(6) 0-1 112 1
5.Wakulla 1-0 81 9
6.Plantation Am.Heritage 0-1 75 T5
7.Palm Bay 1-0 58 10
8.Immokalee 0-1 42 T5
9.Lakewood 0-1 40 2
T10. Merritt Island 1-0 19 NR
T10. Cardinal Gibbons 1-0 19 NR
Others receiving votes: Pasco 16, North
Marion 14, Ponte Vedra 14, Astronaut 10,
Bishop Kenny 7, Dunbar3.
CLASS 4A
Rec. Pts Prv
1.MiamiWashington (16) 1-0 160 1
2. Ft. Lauderdale University 1-0 142 2
3. Bolles School 1-0 125 3
4. Madison County 1-0 116 4
5.Cocoa 0-0 43 5
Others receiving votes: Raines 36, East
Gadsden 12, Glades Central 6.
CLASS3A
Rec. Pts Prv
1.ClrwtrCent.Catholic (11) 1-0 149 1
2.DelrayAmer. Heritage 1-0 141 2
3.Trinity Christian (3) 1-0 135 3
4. OcalaTrinityCatholic(2) 1-0 112 4
5.CardinalMooney 1-0 30 NR
Others receiving votes: Pahokee 19, Tam-
pa Catholic 18, Fort Meade 12,Westminster
Christian 12, Frostproof 6, Melbourne Cen-
tral Catholic 6.
CLASS 2A
Rec. Pts Prv
1.UniversityChristian(14) 1-1 158 1
2.Warner Christian (1) 1-0 140 2
3.N.Florida Christian(1) 1-0 124 3
4.Champagnat Catholic 1-0 73 NR
5. Dade Christian 1-0 67 NR
Others receiving votes: Glades Day 42,
First Baptist 22, Northside Christian 8, Vic-
tory Christian 6.
CLASS 1A
Rec. Pts Prv
1.Northview(14) 1-0 158 1
2.UnionCounty(2) 1-0 139 3
3.Trenton 0-0 107 2
4.Blountstown 1-0 105 4
5.Lafayette 0-0 86 5
Others receiving votes: Dixie County 12,
Newberry 9,Taylor 9, Liberty County 8, Port
St. Joe 7.


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TARPONS

FROM PAGE 1
four blocks and outplayed
her counterpart, Jenny
D'Allessandro, when the
two were on the court
together.
Senior McKenzie Chili
had nine digs, while
Jessica Fabian had five
blocks.
Charlotte was led by
junior hitter Marisa
Beisner with 12 kills and
six of the team's 11 aces.


D'Alessandro had eight
kills. Sophomore Jesse
Valerius led with 15 digs,
while Gabrielle Weitzel
had 13.
Dill said it's still early,
but the Tarpons have a
lot of work to do before
their next game, a district
battle at Fort Myers on
Tuesday.
"We need to work on
serve-receive passing and
get more players involved
instead of our two main
hitters," Dill said.


BULLDOGS

FROM PAGE 1
The Bulldogs (2-1) gradually pulled
away in the first game as Riley had seven
kills and Micaela Roberts added five
service points. Courtney Robertson had
five of her 14 kills in the first game for
the Pirates (2-2).
Port Charlotte dominated the second
game, leading almost from the start.
Taylor Lindenberger had two kills and
four service points for the Pirates.
The Bulldogs won the third game as
Riley had six kills and Casey Hall made
four service points.
The Pirates quickly returned the fa-
vor in the fourth game, with Robertson
getting four kills and Jenna Sutter
seven service points.Port Charlotte
scored 12 straight points to finish the
game.
"The problem for us tonight was
mental," Pirates coach Chrissy Burkhart
said. "When our players did what they
were supposed to do, we were able to


PREP SCHEDULE
all times p.m. unless noted
TODAY
Volleyball
North Port at Port Charlotte, 7
Boys golf
Charlotte at North Port, 3:30
Swimming
North Port at Venice Relays, 4
THURSDAY
Volleyball
Southwest Florida Christian at Community Christian, 6
Lemon Bay at Hardee, 7:30
DeSoto County at Sebring, 7:30
Venice at Evangelical Christian, 7
Boys golf
Charlotte at Lemon Bay, 3
Community Christian at First Baptist, 4
Girls golf
Lemon Bay at Cardinal Mooney, 3:30
Lake Placid at DeSoto County at The Bluffs GC, 4

control her (Riley) somewhat. When they
didn't do what they were supposed to do,
they couldn't. We also couldn't get the
ball enough to Courtney."


Can't find it anywhere?
Don't give up check

the Classifieds!

SUN=
UCharlotteDeoEnPAPEERS
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venimce


Page 6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Wednesday, September 4, 2013





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E/N /C/'.' September 4-10, 2013


GO OUT AND ABOUT


*Wednesday

DJ SCUBE STEVE, 8 p.m.- close. Cornhole
contest 8 p.m. close. Rattler's Old West Saloon,
111 W. Oak St., Arcadia.

I -_ i
I I
Waterfront dining, open to the public
I SAVE $5 OFF
I $25 or more
Offer not available on daily SUMMER Specials or our
Sunday Brunch $10.95 all you can eati 18% Gratuity added before
discount, must present coupon prior to ordering. Expires 9/01/13
Burnt Store Marina
S3200 Matecumbe Key Rd., Punta Gorda
941-639-3650

- I

LIVE MUSIC WITH DANE, 5 p.m. -
7 p.m. $5 Philly cheesesteak sandwiches. Engle-
wood VFW, 550 N. McCall Rd., Englewood.
941-474-7516.
SPOTLIGHT, (live music), 6 p.m.- 10 p.m.
Englewood Moose 1933, 55 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. 941-473-2670.
JAZZ JAM, 6:30 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Cactus
Jack Southwest Grill, 3448 Marinatown Lane,
North Fort Myers. 239-652-5787.
BELLY DANCING, 6:45 p.m. Greek Grill
and Gallery, 14828 Tamiami Trail, North Port.
941-423-6400.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.- close.
Spankey's Bowling Alley, 299 S. Indiana Ave.,
Englewood. 941-240-2675.
KARAOKE, with Mark McKinley. 7 p.m. -
10 p.m. North Port Family Restaurant, 14525
Tamiami Trail, North Port. 941-426-9885.
KARAOKE, with DJ Rockin' Ray, 8 p.m.
Porky's Roadhouse, 4300 Kings Highway, Port
Charlotte. 941-629-2114.
KARAOKE, with DJ John. 9 p.m. mid-
night. Applebee's, 19010 Murdock Cir., Port
Charlotte. 941-766-0666.
KARAOKE, with Billy G., 6 p.m. -
10:30 p.m. F. 0. E. Eagles #3296, 23111 Harbor-
view Rd., Port Charlotte. 941-629-1645.
KITT MORAN, (jazz), 6 p.m.-9 p.m. J.D.'s
Bistro Grille, 1951 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte. 941-255-0994.
BIG DOGS LIVE TRIVIA
CHALLENGE, 7 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Free to play.
Top three teams share $100 in gift certificates.
Chubby'z Tavern, 4109 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte. 941-613-0002.
TRIVIA WITH MIKE, 7 p.m. 9 p.m.
Happy hour all night. Beef'0' Brady's, 1105
Taylor Rd., Punta Gorda. 941-505-2333.
NEXXLEVEL, (live music), Dean's South of
the Border, 130 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda.
941-575-6100.
KARAOKE WITH VALLERIE,
5:30 p.m. close. Allegro Bistro, 1740 E. Venice
Ave., Venice. 941-484-1889.


FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH
PAVILION, 8 a.m. and 7:45 p.m. Certified
yoga instructor with 35 years of experience.
Venice Beach Pavilion.

*Thursday

KARAOKE WITH MIZ EDNA, 8 p.m.-
close. Rattler's Old West Saloon, 111 W. Oak St.,
Arcadia. 863-494-6803.
NEXXLEVEL, (live music), 7 p.m.- 11p.m.
The Lock and Key, 2045 N. Beach Rd., Englewood
Beach.
KATE KEYS, (live music), 6:30 free concert.
Beyond The Sea Restaurant and Supper Club, 3555
S. Access Rd., Englewood. Call
941-474-1400 for reservations.
BINGO, 7:15 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Play
for $1. Proceeds to benefit children's charities.
Rotonda Elks, 303 Rotonda Blvd. East, Rotonda.
941-697-2710.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, registration
5 p.m., play from 6 p.m. -11 p.m. The End Zone,
2411 S. McCall Rd., Englewood. 941-473-ZONE.
LEMON BAY BARBERSHOP
CHORUS, 6:30 p.m. Rehearsal open to the
public. Christ Lutheran Church, 701 N. Indiana Ave.,
Englewood. 941-429-0215.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, 6:15 p.m.
Englewood Moose 1933, 55 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. 941-473-2670.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.- close.
Olde World Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami Trail,
North Port. 941-426-1155.
KARAOKE, 8 p.m.- 11 p.m. Buffalo Wild
Wings. 4301 Aiden Lane, North Port.
941-429-9722.
KARAOKE BY DJ DON AND JO, 6 p.m. It's
pasta night at the Sons of Italy, $7.50 for members,
and $8.50 for guests. Sons of Italy, 3725 Easy St.,
Port Charlotte. Call for reservations,
941-764-9003.
KARAOKE, 6 p.m.- 9 p.m. With DJ Don. The
Portside Tavern, 3636 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte. 941-629-3055.
GUITAR ARMY, 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Gilchrist
Park, Punta Gorda.
MUTTINI MINGLE, 5:30 p.m.- 8 p.m.
Social time for people and their pets. Live music by
Michael Hirst. Fishermen's Village, 1200 W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda. 941-575-7599.
TWO CAN JAM, (live music), 5 p.m.- 9 p.m.
Tiki Bar, next to the Four Points by Sheraton in
Punta Gorda.
MARCIA, (live music), 6 p.m. The Celtic Ray,
145 E, Marion Ave., Punta Gorda. 941-916-9115.
FLURGIN'S BOURBONAUTS, (live
music), 10 p.m. The Celtic Ray, 145 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda. 941-916-9115.
ARCHER, (live music), Dean's South of the
Border, 130 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda.
941-575-6100.
CLASSIC GOLD ENTERTAINMENT,
('50s/Elvis Music), 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Allegro
Bistro, 1740 E. Venice Ave., Venice. 941-484-1889.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH
PAVILION, 8 a.m. and 7:45 p.m. Certified yoga
instructor with 35 years of experience. Venice
Beach Pavilion.


* Friday

DERRICK SCOTT BAND, (live music)
8 p.m. Rattler's Old West Saloon, 111 W. Oak St.,
Arcadia. 863-494-6803.
THE FLASHBACKS/SONNY AND
SABLE, (live music), 6:30 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
Blue Lagoon Restaurant, 2000 Oyster Creek Dr.,
Englewood. 941-475-1030.
M/C SQUARED, (live music), 6 p.m. -
10 p.m. Englewood Moose 1933, 55 W. Dearborn
St., Englewood. 941-473-2670.
COPPERHEAD, (classic/southern rock),
7 p.m. 11 p.m. The White Elephant, 1855 Gulf
Blvd., Englewood. 941-475-6801.
MARTY MOSS, (live music), 6:30 p.m.
Ricaltini's Bar and Grill, 1997 Kentucky Ave.,
Englewood. 941-828-1591.
THE SENSATIONS, 6:30 p.m. no cover
charge. A talented trio playing all of your fa-
vorites. Beyond The Sea Restaurant and Supper
Club, 3555 S. Access Rd., Englewood. Call
941-474-1400 for reservations.
ESCAPE, (live music), 6:30 p.m.- 10:30 p.m.
Englewood Eagles #3885,250 Old Englewood
Rd., Englewood. 941-474-9802.
JIMMY JAY, (live music) 6 p.m. 9 p.m.
La Stanza Restaurant, 285 W. Dearborn St,
Englewood. 941-475-1355.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.- close.
Armadillo's, 622 N. Indiana Ave., Englewood.
941-474-2356.
KARAOKE, 9 p.m. The New Faull Inn,
2670 Placida Rd., Englewood. 941-697-8050.
BINGO, 5:45 p.m. warm-up with games to
follow, pks start at $20. Proceeds go to children's
charities. Englewood Elks, 401 N. Indiana Ave.,
Englewood. 941-474-1404.
NEXXLEVEL, (live music), 10 p.m.- 2 a.m.
The Sandy Parrot, 17200 S. Tamiami Trail, Fort
Myers.
TRIVIA NIGHT, (live music), 8 p.m. Open
late for dining and enjoyment. Nav-A-Gator,
9700 SW Riverview Cir., Lake Suzy.
941-627-3474.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 12:30 p.m. -
4 p.m. Olde World Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami
Trail, North Port. 941-426-1155.
KARAOKE, 7 p.m. 10 p.m. The Olde World
Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami Trail, North Port.
941-426-1155.
KARAOKE, with Mark McKinley. 7 p.m. -
10 p.m. North Port Family Restaurant, 14525
Tamiami Trail, North Port. 941-426-9885.
BINGO, 11 a.m. All proceeds benefit the
Charlotte County Homeless Coalition. Port
Charlotte Elks Lodge #2153, 20225 Kenilworth
Blvd., Port Charlotte. 941-627-4313 ext. 115.
BINGO, 5:30 p.m. Port Charlotte VFW Post
5690, 23204 Freedom Ave., Port Charlotte.
941-467-4447.
SHAWN BROWN, (live music), on the pa-
tio from 5 p.m. 8 p.m. The Portside Tavern, 3636
Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte. 941-629-3055.
KARAOKE WITH THE CONNEC-
TION, 8 p.m.- midnight. Nemos in Bowland,
3192 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte. 941-625-
4794.
AMERICAN MADE BAND, (live music),
7 p.m. 11 p.m. Wyvern Rooftop, 1010 E. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda. 941-639-7700.
PAUL DUFFY, (live music), 6 p.m. The
Celtic Ray, 145 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda.
941-916-9115.
FRANKIE AND THE 45'S, (live music),
10 p.m. The Celtic Ray, 145 E. Marion Ave.,
Punta Gorda. 941-916-9115.
10,000 VIEWS, (live music), Dean's South
of the Border, 130 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda.
941-575-6100.
STORM SURGE, (live music), 7 p.m. -
11 p.m. Tiki Bar, next to the Four Points by
Sheraton in Punta Gorda.
CHEEZE'N' KRACKERS, 5 p.m. 9 p.m.
Fishermen's Village Center Stage, 1200 W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda.
DJ CHANGE, 9 p.m. midnight. In
partnership with Hot 101.5, the Seminole Hard
Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa is bringing rockin'
entertainment to it's sexy nighttime pool par-
ties. The first 500 guests at poolside parties get
complimentary liquor samples. Free and open
to the public ages 21 and older. Seminole Hard
Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa Poolside, 5223
North Orient Rd., Tampa.


KARAOKE WITH DJ JOHN, 9 p.m.-
midnight. Applebees Venice, 4329 Tamiami Trail,
Venice. 941-497-7740.
SEAMUS MCCARTHY BAND, (live
music), 9 p.m. -1 a.m. Tap and Cork, 101 W. Venice
Ave., Venice. 941-375-2695.
FREEYOGA AT VENICE BEACH PA-
VILION, 8 a.m. Certified yoga instructor with
35 years of experience. Venice Beach Pavilion.

* Saturday

DERRICK SCOTT BAND, (live music)
8 p.m. Rattler's Old West Saloon, 111 W. Oak St.,
Arcadia. 863-494-6803.
EZ STREET, (live music), 6:30 p.m.
Ricaltini's Bar and Grill, 1997 Kentucky Ave.,
Englewood. 941-828-1591.
BANDANA, (live'70s rock), 7 p.m. -10 p.m.
Beyond The Sea Restaurant and Supper Club,
3555 S. Access Rd., Englewood. Call
941-474-1400 for reservations.
SMOKIN J'S, (live music), 6 p.m.- 10 p.m.
Englewood Moose 1933, 55 W. Dearborn St.,
Englewood. 941-473-2670.
JIMMY JAY, (live music) 6 p.m. 9 p.m. La
Stanza Restaurant, 285 W. Dearborn St., Engle-
wood. 941-475-1355.
ALL YOU CAN EAT BREAKFAST,
8 a.m. -10 a.m. $5. Englewood VFW, 550 N. Mc-
Call Rd., Englewood. 941-474-7516.
GATOR CREEK BAND, (live music),
6:30 p.m. -10:30 p.m. Englewood Eagles
#3885,250 Old Englewood Rd., Englewood.
941-474-9802.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 5 p.m.- close.
Spankey's Bowling Alley, 299 S. Indiana Ave.,
Englewood. 941-240-2675.
BINGO, 1 p.m. VFW, 550 N. McCall Rd.,
Englewood. 941-474-7516.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, registration
5 p.m., play from 6 p.m. -11 p.m. The End Zone,
2411 S. McCall Rd., Englewood. 941-473-ZONE.
SEAMUS MCCARTHY BAND, (live
music), 2 p.m. 5 p.m. Nav-A-Gator, 9700 SW
Riverview Cir., Lake Suzy. 941-627-3474. Cover
charge: canned goods and nonperishable food
items.
NAME THE GAME, 8 p.m. Open late for
dining and enjoyment. Nav-A-Gator, 9700 SW
Riverview Cir., Lake Suzy. 941-627-3474.
KARAOKE, 7 p.m.- 10 p.m. North Port
Family Restaurant, 14525 Tamiami Trail, North
Port. 941-426-9885.
NORTH PORT FARMERS/CRAFT
MARKET, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. 14942 Tamiami Trail,
North Port. 941-240-6100.
KITT MORAN, (jazz), 7 p.m.-10 p.m.J.D.'s
Bistro Grille, 1951 Tamiami Trail, Port Char-
lotte.941-255-0994.
KARAOKE, Port Charlotte VFW Post 5690,
23204 Freedom Ave., Port Charlotte.
941-467-4447.
HOPE ACADEMY OF MUSIC OPEN
HOUSE, 9 a.m.- 11 a.m. Instructors will be
on hand to answer questions and to schedule
lessons. Private lessons will be available on Sat-
urday's beginning at 8 a.m.lnstruments include
flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon,saxophone, French
horn,trombone, baritone horn, tuba, percussion,
violin, viola, cello, string bass and guitar. Food
soft drinks and coffee will be served. Live Dix-
ieland music will be performed for the guests.
Hope Academy of Music, 14200 Hopewell Ave.,
Port Charlotte. 941-697-2345.
KARAOKE WITH THE CONNECTION,
8 p.m.-midnight. Nemos in Bowland, 3192 Har-
bor Blvd., Port Charlotte. 941-625-4794.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, noon-
4:30 p.m. Dean's North of the Border, 23064 Har-
borview Dr., Port Charlotte. 941-240-2675.
KARAOKE WITH DJ DON, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Portside Tavern, 3636 Tamiami Trail, Port Char-
lotte. 941-629-3055 or www.theportside.com.
BATTLE OF THE DECADES PARTY,
9 p.m. DJ featuring music from the'70s;80s and
'90s. Come dressed for the occasion that will
feature a dance-off, drink deals and prizes. The
Celtic Ray, 145 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda.
941-916-9115.
PAUL COTTRELL, (live music), 5 p.m.-
9 p.m. Fishermen's Village Center Stage, 1200 W.
Retta Esplanade, Punta Gorda.


OUT AND ABOUT 14


ARCADIA' S

OLDE TOWN

MARKET


S--ANTIQUES

and much, much more!


Downtown Arcadia, 'W OakStreet

1st Saturday 9MONTHiLy

September 7 85 to 31 i
Antiques, Collectibles, Crafts, Bicycles,
Specialty Items, etc., etc., etc... and much more
Call for information 863-494-2038
September 21st Old Fashion Ice Cream Social and Car Show
5044959 November 9th Appraisal Day.


Let's Go!




September 4-10, 2013 E/N/C/V


Enter our pet photo contest


For those of you who now wait for the
monthly edition of Let's Go! Pets,today is
your day. You will find in today's Let's Go!
Pets that we are holding a photo compe-
tition. Send the cutest photo of your pet
dressed in their best Halloween costume,
Christmas get-up, Fourth of July outfit or
any other holiday attire and your pet may
be featured on the cover of Let's Go! Pets.
It is $10 to enter. Winner will receive
a portion of the money collected and


the rest will be donated to the animal
shelter/rescue of their choice. Read page
three in today's Let's Go! Pets for all of
the details on how to enter.
You'll notice we have our own movie
review in for this week. Check it out
and if you decide to see "The World's
End" let us know if the review was
helpful. Also, if you have your own
recommendation for movies, send it to
us at letsgo@sun-herald.com. Collec-


tively we can steer our neighbors into
seeing only the best of the movies
showing at the theater.
Today's issue is all about finding
great pizza in Southwest Florida. Our
writer traveled from Port Charlotte
to Venice in search of some delicious
pizza spots and her findings made me
hungry! Hopefully it will inspire you
to try out one of her suggestions, let
them know Let's Go! sent you.


Area offers eclectic choices this week


Venice Art Center reopened yesterday
after its summer holiday. Stop by to
pick up a class and show schedule for
the coming season. The center is at
390 S. Nokomis Ave., on the island. Call
941-485-7136 and/or visit:
VeniceArtCenter.com
In Bradenton, the South Florida
Museum offers "The Changing Arctic
Landscape" a traveling photographic
exhibit featuring historic photos of the
Arctic with contemporary photos of the
same place. The show was put together
by the University of Alaska. The museum


is at 201 W. 10th St., off SR 64 in down-
town Bradenton. It is open daily, except
Monday. For information, call 941-746-
4131 or visit:
SouthFloridaMuseum.org.
Also there is the Bishop Planetarium
and Snooty, the oldest manatee in
captivity, in his own aquarium. He
was 65 this past July. If you missed his
birthday party, stop in and visit him
now when there are fewer visitors.
Think of it as an opportunity for quality
time with Snooty.
To the south, in Fort Myers, "Burt & Me"


continues through Oct, 5 at the Broadway
Palm Dinner Theatre. The story is about
two high school sweethearts united by
a love of basketball and Burt Bacharach
("Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head,"
"Do You Know the Way to San Jose?"and
"Always Something There to Remind
Me"). All that plus hot fudge on the
dessert bar. Dinner and show tickets are
$45. Opening Oct. 10 is"Cats."You may
want to order tickets for that one right
now. Call 239-278-4422 or visit: Broad-
wayPalm.com.
Email: kcool@venicegondolier.com


Saturday, September 21, 2013
Port Charlotte Beach Complex, 4500 Harbor Blvd., Port Charlotte
Cocktails at 6 PM & Dinner at 7 PM
Purchase a $10 wristband and enjoy the open bar 6-10 PM
Get a taste of New England with our 13th Anniversary specials for only $75, Twin
Lobsters (each 11/4 Ib.), or Steak & Lobster, with all the fixings! Other entries include
One 1/4 Ib. Maine Lobster for $60, And for $50 Steamer Pot, Sirloin steak, Chicken


With Phil sn, Auctioneer Extrordinaire
Music by Jeff Collins "The Golden Hippo" Proceeds Benefit Charlotte
Dancing, Raffles, Auctions and "Mystery Gift" County Historical Center programs.
Trip to Key West Live Auction Item

C Tickets must be purchased before September 18, 2013
Make your reservation today: 941-629-7278 i -
e ?n Visa/MC accepted by phone. Tickets will not be available at the door.
SUN We Mosaic
SU NEWSPAPERS


BOGO
BUY ONE GET ONE
DINNER ONLY
Must order a beverage with dinner. In-house dining only.
Nightly Dinner Specials not included in BOGO Promotion.
Not available on holidays.
Please present coupon or mention this ad prior to ordering.
Not valid with any other promotion. Expires September 30, 2013.
- -- -- -


For Any Occasion
Call for Details

941639-080

131 West Marion Avenue
Punta Gorda


WWW.RIVERCITYGRILLPG.COM


A Section of he Sun
Your weekly guide to
entertainment, travel and
arts in Southwest Florida
Let's Go! on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/SunCoast
LetsGo

President
David Dunn-Rankin

Publisher
Carol Moore
941-681-3031
cymoore@sun-herald.com

Editor
Casey Ortlieb
941-681-3006
cortlieb@sun-herald.com

Let's Go!
letsgo@sun-herald.com
120 W. Dearborn St.
Englewood, FL 34223
www.sunnewspapers.net

Please submit information
at least two weeks before the
event. To send items for the
calendar, please include the
time, location, cost of tickets
and where to get them, and
a telephone number to call
for more information.


i


I .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .


Let's Go!





E/ I Ir/C/'' September 4-10, 2013


G O OUT AND ABOUT/MOVIES


OUT AND ABOUT
From page 2

* Saturday

PUNTA GORDA FARMERS MARKET,
8 a.m.- 1 p.m. Taylor Street and W. Olympia
Avenue, Punta Gorda.
TROPICAL AVE. BAND, (live music),
7 p.m. -11 p.m. Tiki Bar, next to the Four Points by
Sheraton in Punta Gorda. TORCHED, (live
music), Dean's South of the Border, 130 Tamiami
Trail, Punta Gorda. 941-575-6100.
MYAKKA RIVER BLUE GRASS BAND
FREE CONCERT, (live music), 2 p.m. 4 p.m.
Grab your chairs and saunter over to the Punta
Gorda Historical Society's Train Depot where you
can sit back and listen to traditional bluegrass
music. Volunteers will be selling water and cold
drinks or bring your own beverage. Proceeds will
be used for the Depot Museum and Mall and both
will be open for perusal. The Train Dock, 1009
Taylor Rd. and Carmalita Street in Punta Gorda.
Call 941-639-6774.
SEAMUS MCCARTHY BAND, (live
music), 7 p.m. -10 p.m. British Open Pub, 2053
Tamiami Trail S., Venice. 941-492-9227.
VENICE FARMERS MARKET, 8 a.m.-
noon. Centennial Park, Downtown Venice. Local
produce, plants, flowers, crafts, jewelry, soaps,
imported oils, seafood, pastries and more.
ENTERTAINMENT BY VALLERIE
AND NEIL, 6:30 p.m. close. Allegro Bistro,
1740 E. Venice Ave., Venice. 941-484-1889.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH PA-
VILION, 8 a.m. Certified yoga instructor with 35
years of experience. Venice Beach Pavilion.

i Sunday

BLUE PLATE DINNER, 4 p.m.- 6 p .m. $6.
Karaoke from 4 p.m.- 7 p.m. VFW, 550 N. McCall
Rd., Englewood. 941-474-7516.
BREAKFAST AT ENGLEWOOD ELKS,
8 a.m.- noon. $6.50 all you can eat. Englewood
Elks, 401 N. Indiana Ave., Englewood. 941-474-
1404.


OPENING THIS WEEK


Riddick I Runtime: 1 hr. 43 min.
| Rated R for some sexual content/
nudity, language and strong
violence.
Left for dead on a sun-scorched planet, fugitive
Riddick (Vin Diesel) fights for survival against alien
predators more lethal than any human he has yet
encountered. His only hope for escape is to acti-


SUNDAY BBQ WITH THE MASONS,
11:30 a.m.- 2 p.m. Enjoy 14 of a chicken, beans,
coleslaw, potato salad, dessert and a drink. The
cost is $8. Take-out is available and this event is
open to the public. Come meet a Mason. Engle-
wood Masonic Lodge #360, 265 Pine St., Engle-
wood. For more information call 941-830-1249.
"ENGLEWOOD'S BEST SUNDAY
BRUNCH'" 10:30 a.m.- 3 p.m. One free Mimosa,
Salty Dog or Bloody Mary with brunch. Beyond the
Sea Restaurant and Supper Club, 3555 S. Access
Rd., Englewood. 941-474-1400.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, registration
5 p.m., play from 6 p.m. 11 p.m. The End Zone,
2411 S. McCall Road, Englewood. 941-473-ZONE.
TRU KOUNTRY BAND, (country), 1 p.m. -
4 p.m. The Shell Factory, 2787 N. Tamiami Trail, Fort
Myers. 239-677-9734.
JOHN RENO, (live music), 2 p.m.- 5 p.m.
Nav-A-Gator, 9700 SW Riverview Cir., Lake Suzy.
941-627-3474. Cover charge: canned goods and
nonperishable food items.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 12:30 p.m. -
4 p.m. Olde World Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami
Trail, North Port. 941-426-1155.
BIG SUNDAY BREAKFAST, 9 a.m.-
11 a.m. All-you-can-eat breakfast for $6. Amvets
Post 312,7050 Chancellor Blvd., North Port.
941-276-1300.
OPEN MIC NIGHT, 8 p.m. The Celtic Ray,
145 E. Marion Ave., Punta Gorda.
941-916-9115.
SON OF BEACHES, (live music), Dean's
South of the Border, 130 Tamiami Trail, Punta
Gorda. 941-575-6100.
FARMERS MARKET, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. His-
tory Park, 501 Shreve St., Punta Gorda. Shop
for vegetables, meats, plants, gifts and more.
Most Sundays you will be treated with live music
by Dave Heveron. Don't forget about Miss Starr's
garden tours when the market closes at 1 p.m.
Even with our hot Florida weather, the gardens
flourish. If you attended the tour in the past, you'll
be surprised at what now awaits in the garden.
A $5 suggested donation gets you a plant to take
home. This Sunday a host of antique dealers will
be in attendance as well. History Park, 501 Shreve
St., Punta Gorda. 941-380-6814.



vate an emergency beacon, but that brings with
it a different problem: mercenaries. The first ship
carries an especially violent and lethal group; the
second is led by a man from Riddick's past. With
time running out, Riddick realizes that neither
group will leave without his head as trophy.

The Ultimate Life I Runtime: No time
stated. I Rated PG for a brief battle
scene and mild thematic elements.
Between the pressures of running his grandfa-
ther Red Stevens'foundation, being sued by his
greedy extended family, and seeing his beloved
Alexia leave on an extended mission trip to Haiti,
Jason Stevens'world is unraveling. But then
he discovers his late grandfather's journal and
through his grandfather's writings is transported
back to 1941 ...just after the great depression ...
and experiences first hand Red Stevens'incred-
ible rags-to-riches life. With everything he loves
hanging in the balance, Jason hopes he can
discover the ultimate life. "The Ultimate Life"
reminds us some things are worth more than
money.

OTHER MOVIES PLAYING
THIS WEEK
Closed Circuit I Runtime: 1 hr. 36
min. I Rated R for language and brief
violence.
A terrorist attack in London results in the
capture of suspect Farroukh Erdogan (Denis
Moschitto). The attorney general appoints
Claudia Simmons-Howe (Rebecca Hall) as special
advocate on Erdogan's legal team. On the eve of
the trial, Erdogan's lawyer dies, and a new defense
attorney, Martin Rose (Eric Bana), steps in. Martin
and Claudia are former lovers, a fact which must
remain hidden. As Martin assembles his case, he
uncovers a sinister conspiracy, placing him and
Claudia in danger.


BANDANA BAND, (live music), 1 p.m. -
4 p.m. Snook Haven, 5000 E. Venice Ave., Venice.
941-485-7221.

SMonday

TRIVIA, 6 p.m. -10 p.m. The End Zone, 2411
S. McCall Rd. Englewood. 941-473-ZONE.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.- close.
Bandito's, 5665 S. McCall Rd., Englewood.
941-240-2675.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, noon-
4:30 p.m. Armadillo's Billiard & Brew, 622 N.
Indiana Ave., Englewood. 941-474-2356.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m. -
close. Olde World Restaurant, 14415 Tamiami
Trail, North Port. 941-426-1155.
JOYFUL RINGERS, 4 p.m. 6 p.m. The
Joyful Ringers Handbell Choir invites prospec-
tive bell ringers to join them in their 2012-13
season. North Port High School Music Suite,
6400 W. Price Blvd., North Port. 941-423-
0706.
NORTH PORT CHORALE REHEARS-
AL, 6:30 p.m. 9 p.m. A community chorus that
residents are invited to join. North Port High
School Music Suite, 6400 W. Price Blvd., North
Port. 941-961-9557.
TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER, Port Char-
lotte VFW Post 5690, 23204 Freedom Ave., Port
Charlotte. 941-467-4447.
JEFF HUGHES, (live music), Dean's
South of the Border, 130 Tamiami Trail, Punta
Gorda. 941-575-6100.
OPEN MIC NIGHT, 6:30 p.m.- 8:30 p.m.
Center stage. Come read, sing, listen and enjoy.
Presented by The Peace River Center for Writers.
Fishermen's Village Center Stage, 1200 W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda. 941-637-3514.
DUAL-SAX RON AND THE HOR-
NETS, (jazz), 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Allegro
Bistro, 1740 E. Venice Ave., Venice. 941-484-
1889.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH
PAVILION, 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. Certified yoga
instructor. Venice Beach Pavilion.



Getaway I Runtime: Not specified.
| Rated PG-13 for intense action,
violence and mayhem throughout,
some rude gestures and language.
Though he used to race cars for a living, Brent
Magna (Ethan Hawke) is now pitted against the
clock in the most important race of his life; an
unseen criminal (Jon Voight) has kidnapped Brent's
wife, and to get her back, he must follow the man's
instructions to the letter. Brent commandeers
the ultimate muscle car a custom Ford Shelby
GT500 Super Snake and, with a tech-savvy
young passenger (Selena Gomez), sets out on a
high-speed chase to rescue his beloved.
One Direction: This is us I Runtime:
1 hr. 35 min. I Rated PG for mild
language.
"One Direction: This is us"is a captivating and
intimate all-access look at life on the road for the
global music phenomenon. Woven with stunning
live concert footage, this inspiring feature film tells
the remarkable story of Niall, Zayn, Liam, Harry
and Louis'meteoric rise to fame, from their humble
hometown beginnings and competing on the
X-Factor, to conquering the world and performing
at London's famed 02 Arena. Hear it from the boys
themselves and see through their own eyes what
it's really like to be One Direction.
The Mortal Instruments: City of
Bones I Runtime: 2 hr. 10 min. I
Rated PG-13 for intense sequences
of fantasy violence and action, and
some suggestive content.
Set in contemporary NewYork City, a seemingly
ordinary teenager, Clary Fray (Lily Collins), discovers
she is the descendant of a line of Shadowhunters,
a secret cadre of young half-angel warriors locked
in an ancient battle to protect our world from
demons. After the disappearance of her mother
(Lena Headey), Clary must join forces with a
group of Shadowhunters, who introduce her to a
dangerous alternate New York called Downworld,


*Tuesday

FREE LINE DANCE, 7 p.m. 9 p.m.
Rattler's Old West Saloon, 111 W. Oak St.,
Arcadia.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.-
close. Nikki's Place, 1599 South McCall Rd.,
Englewood. 941-234-2675.
BLACK VELVET, (live music), 6:30 p.m. -
9:30 p.m. with a soaring eagle drawing at
7 p.m. Englewood Eagles #3885,250 Old Engle-
wood Rd., Englewood. 941-474-9802.
OPEN MIC NIGHT, 6 p.m. Lake View
Restaurant, 5605 S. McCall Road, Port Char-
lotte. 941-697-9200.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM POKER,
7 p.m. Porky's Roadhouse, 4300 Kings Highway,
Port Charlotte. 941-629-2114.
BINGO, 11 a.m. All proceeds benefit the
Charlotte County Homeless Coalition. Port
Charlotte Elks Lodge #2153, 20225 Kenilworth
Blvd., Port Charlotte. 941-627-4313 ext. 115.
FREE TEXAS HOLD'EM BY POCKET
ROCKETS POKER LEAGUE, 6 p.m.-
close. Dean's North of the Border, 23063 Har-
borview Blvd., Port Charlotte. 941-743-6100.
KOOL KATS DUO, (live music), 1 p.m.-
3:30 p.m. Afternoon Tea Dance at the Cultural
Center of Charlotte County, 2280 Aaron St.,
Port Charlotte.
TORCHED, (live music), Dean's South of
the Border, 130 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda.
941-575-6100.
THE GIFTED GATOR EVENT, 10 a.m.-
2 p.m. Ashley Williams'gift boxes make any tiny
favor a treasure. Ashley will demonstrate how
to make mini boxes using simple origami paper-
folding of greeting cards. Free and open to the
public. The Gifted Gator, PGICA 2001 Shreve St.,
Punta Gorda. 941-637-1655.
JAZZ IZZ IT, (jazz), 6 p.m. 9 p.m. The
Allegro Bistro, 1740 E. Venice Ave., Venice.
941-484-1889.
FREE YOGA AT VENICE BEACH
PAVILION, 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. Certified yoga
instructor.


filled with demons, warlocks, vampires, were-
wolves and other deadly creatures. Based on the
worldwide best-selling book series.
The Worlds End | Runtime: 1 hr.
49 min. I Rated R for pervasive
language and sexual references.
Gary King (Simon Pegg) is an immature
40-year-old who's dying to take another stab at
an epic pub-crawl that he last attempted 20 years
earlier. He drags his reluctant buddies back to
their hometown and sets out for a night of heavy
drinking. As they make their way toward their
ultimate destination the fabled World's End
pub Gary and his friends attempt to reconcile
the past and present. However, the real struggle
is for the future when their journey turns into a
battle for mankind.
You're Next I Runtime: 1 hr.
34 min.l Rated NR for language,
strong bloody violence and some
sexuality/nudity.
One of the smartest and most terrifying films in
years,"You're Next" reinvents the genre by putting
a fresh twist on home-invasion horror. When a
gang of masked, ax-wielding murderers descends
upon the Davison family reunion, the hapless
victims seem trapped ... until an unlikely guest of
the family proves to be the most talented killer of
all.
Jobs I Runtime: 2 hr. 5 min. I Rated
PG-13 for some drug content and
brief strong language.
Directed by Joshua Michael Stern, written by
Matthew Whiteley, shot by Oscar-winning cinema-
tographer Russell Carpenter and produced by Mark
Hulme,"Jobs" details the major moments and
defining characters that influenced Steve Jobs on a
daily basis from 1971 through 2001."Jobs" plunges
into the depths of his character, creating an intense
dialogue-driven story that is as much a sweeping
epic as it is an immensely personal portrait of Steve
Jobs'life.


Let's Go!





September 4-10, 2013 E/N/C/V


MOVIES GO


Kick Ass 21 Runtime: 1 hr. 47 min.
| Rated R for strong violence, perva-
sive language, crude and sexual
content and brief nudity.
Dave (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), aka Kick-Ass,
and Mindy (Chloe Grace Moretz), aka Hit Girl, are
trying to live as normal teenagers and briefly form
a crimefighting team. After Mindy is busted and
forced to retire as Hit Girl, Dave joins a group of
amateur superheroes led by Col. Stars and Stripes
(Jim Carrey), a reformed mobster. Just as Dave
and company start to make a real difference on
the streets, the villain formerly known as Red Mist
(Christopher Mintz-Plasse) rears his head yet again.
Lee Daniels' The Butler I Runtime:
2 hr. 12 min. I Rated PG-13 for
thematic elements, sexual mate-
rial, language, disturbing images,
smoking and some violence.
"Lee Daniels' The Butler"tells the story of a
White House butler who served eight American
presidents over three decades. The film traces the
dramatic changes that swept American society
during this time, from the civil rights movement
to Vietnam and beyond, and how those changes
affected this man's life and family. Forest Whitaker
stars as the butler with Robin Williams as Dwight
Eisenhower, John Cusack as Richard Nixon, Alan
Rickman as Ronald Reagan, James Marsden as
John F. Kennedy, Liev Schreiber as Lyndon B.
Johnson, and many more.
Paranoia I Runtime: 1 hr. 46 min.
| Rated PG-13 for violence, some
sexuality and language.
In this high-stakes thriller, Adam Cassidy
(Liam Hemsworth) is a charming, blue collar
guy trying to get ahead in his entry-level job at
Wyatt Telecom. But after one costly and illegal
mistake, Adam is confronted by ruthless CEO
Nicholas Wyatt. He won't turn Adam in under
one condition: Adam must agree to infiltrate the
competition as a corporate spy. Adam soon finds
himself packaged for success, surrounded by
glamorous boardrooms, expensive cars, and a life
he only dreamed of. But behind the scenes, Wyatt
is pulling the strings stopping at nothing, even
murder, to win a multi-billion dollar advantage.
Realizing he's nothing more than a pawn in his
boss's ruthless game, Adam's only way out is to
go in deeper.
We're the Millers I Runtime: 1 hr.
49 min. I Rated R for crude sexual
content, pervasive language, drug
material and brief graphic nudity.
Small-time pot dealer David (Jason Sudeikis)
learns the hard way that no good deed goes
unpunished; trying to help some teens, he is
jumped by thugs and loses his cash and stash.
Now, David's in big debt to his supplier and to
wipe the slate clean he must go to Mexico to
pick up the guy's latest shipment. To accomplish his
mission, Dave devises a foolproof plan: He packs a
fake family into a huge RVand heads south of the
border for a wild weekend that is sure to end with
a bang.
Elysium I Runtime: 1 hr. 49 min. I
Rated R for strong bloody violence
and language throughout.
In the year 2159, humanity is sharply divided
between two classes of people: The ultrarich live
aboard a luxurious space station called Elysium,
and the rest live a hardscrabble existence in
Earth's ruins. His life hanging in the balance,
a man named Max (Matt Damon) agrees to
undertake a dangerous mission that could
bring equality to the population, but Secretary
Delacourt (Jodie Foster) vows to preserve the
pampered lifestyle of Elysium's citizens, no matter
what the cost.
Planes I Runtime: 1 hr. 32 min. I
Rated PG for some mild action and
rude humor.
From above the world of"Cars"comes"Disney's
Planes'an action-packed 3D animated comedy
adventure featuring Dusty (Dane Cook), a plane
with dreams of competing as a high-flying air
racer. But Dusty's not exactly built for racing-and
he happens to be afraid of heights. So he turns to
a seasoned naval aviator who helps Dusty qualify
to take on the defending champ of the race circuit.


Dusty's courage is put to the ultimate test as he
aims to reach heights he never dreamed possible,
giving a spellbound world the inspiration to soar.
The Smurfs 2 1 Runtime: 1 hr.
45 min. I Rated PG for some rude
humor and action.
In this sequel to Columbia Pictures/Sony
Pictures Animation's hybrid live action/animated
family blockbuster comedy"The Smurfs:'the evil
wizard Gargamel creates a couple of mischievous
Smurf-like creatures called the Naughties that
he hopes will let him harness the all-powerful,
magical Smurf-essence. But when he discovers
that only a real Smurf can give him what he
wants, and only a secret spell that Smurfette
knows can turn the Naughties into real Smurfs,
Gargamel kidnaps Smurfette and brings her to
Paris, where he has been winning the adoration of
millions as the world's greatest sorcerer.
2 Guns I Runtime 1 hr. 49 min. I
Rated R for violence throughout,
language and brief nudity.
For the past year, DEA agent Bobby Trench
(Denzel Washington) and U.S. Navy intelligence
officer Marcus Stigman (Mark Wahlberg) have
been working undercover as members of a
narcotics syndicate. The twist: neither man knows
that the other is an undercover agent. When
their attempt to infiltrate a Mexican drug cartel
and recover millions goes haywire, the men are
disavowed by their superiors. Trench and Stigman
must go on the run lest they wind up in jail or in a
grave.
The Conjuring I Runtime 1 hr.
51 min. I Rated R for sequences of
disturbing violence and terror.
Before there was Amityville, there was
Harrisville. Based on a true story,"The Conjuring"
tells the horrifying tale of how world-renowned
paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren
were called upon to help a family terrorized by a
dark presence in a secluded farmhouse. Forced to
confront a powerful demonic entity, the Warrens
find themselves caught in the most terrifying case
of their lives.
Grown Ups 21 Runtime: 1 hr.
41 min. I Rated PG-13 for some male
rear nudity, language and crude and
suggestive content.
The all-star comedy cast from Grown Ups returns
(with some exciting new additions) for more
summertime laughs. Lenny (Adam Sandier) has
relocated his family back to the small town where
he and his friends grew up. This time around, the
grown ups are the ones learning lessons from their
kids on a day notoriously full of surprises: the last
day of school.
Despicable Me 21 Runtime: 1 hr.
38 min. I Rated PG for rude humor
and mild action.
Now that Gru (Steve Carell) has forsaken a life
of crime to raise Margo, Agnes and Edith, he's
trying to figure out how to provide for his new
family. As he struggles with his responsibilities as
a father, the Anti-Villain League an organiza-
tion dedicated to fighting evil comes calling.
The AVL sends Gru on a mission to capture the
perpetrator of a spectacular heist, for who would
be better than the world's greatest ex-villain to
capture the individual who seeks to usurp his
power?
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters |
Runtime: 1 hr. 46 min. I Rated PG for
fantasy action violence, some scary
images and mild language.
Though Percy (Logan Lerman),the half-human
son of Greek god Poseidon, once saved the world,
lately he's been feeling less than heroic. However,
he doesn't have much time to brood the
enchanted borders that protect Camp Half-Blood
are dissolving, and a horde of mythical beasts
threatens the demigods'sanctuary. In order to save
Camp Half-Blood, Percy and his friends embark
on a journey to the Sea of Monsters aka the
Bermuda Triangle to find the magical Golden
Fleece.


Not allmovies will be available in your area, and
there are more moviesshowing atlocaltheaters
than those listed. Please check your local theater for
listings andshowtimes. Information providedby
Fandango.


'ol rim ill be iii picsscd 1b tei
Nchv &- Iiiio cca Bocci Ro\ alc GColf
anid Dininig E.\pc icnlcc!

Nightly Nine & Dine

Only $25! Includes 9 hole of golf
AND t a$15 f ood0 voucher for the Boca
Ro\ itle reCitIturint.
Tee Times are between 4 & 5pm
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!
Lun b all\ I lam-3|pim Dinnlicr \\.cl-Frl 5- 8301pr-


Let's Go!








GO DINING OUT



Life is definitely good at TT's Tiki Hut


E/I/C- I/,' September 4-10, 2013


If you like a refreshing drink, food, social-
izing, relaxing, live music and a beautiful
sunset, TT's Tiki Bar at the Four Points by
Sheraton in Punta Gorda is the perfect
venue. Located at 150 W. Retta Esplanade,
the tiki hut was the brainchild of Sheraton's
owner, Jose Suriol, two years ago.
The unique tiki bar is a mini mockup of a
tropical island, complete with sand, high-
lighted at night with flame torches, and
comfortable Adirondack chairs surround
gas firepit tables. Recently, there have been
some new additions to what has become
one of the most popular gathering places
in Charlotte County. Serviced by a friendly
staff, the tiki hut is open from 11 a.m. to
11 p.m. daily (later if customers prefer).


A misting system was added around the
bar area to keep the customers cool on
a hot day. The system drops the outside
temperature 5 to 10 degrees. Twelve
picnic tables with bistro-style umbrellas
provide customers a nice, shady place
and a gorgeous view of Charlotte Harbor.
A volleyball court and cornhole game is
available to the public on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
For your listening and dancing plea-
sure, live bands perform at the newly
built mini tiki hut and adjacent dance
floor. The bands perform Thursday, Friday
and Saturday evenings and have been
drawing large crowds. There's plenty of
space for those who wish to bring their
own chairs.
Afull bar is available that includes 14


beers on tap. Some specialty drinks are
offered as well as a "Buccaneer Brew."
A tiki menu offers several items such as
crazy TT's burger, TT's footlong Vienna beef
hot dog, pulled pork sandwich and turkey
or chicken wrap, all served with tiki frips
(round, crisp French fries). Also popular
are Buffalo wings your way, and chips and
salsa.
"TT's tiki hut is a great destination point
for locals and visitors" Bruce Mullins,
food and beverage director, said."It's
family friendly, and future plans include a
children's playground. Docks are presently
being built that will provide access for
boaters."
Themed barbecues are held every other
Sunday from 6 to 9 p.m. Look for dates and
menus on the Tiki Hut at Four Points by


Sheraton Facebook page.
Kelly Williamson was a regular customer
at the tiki hut before she accepted her
present position as director of sales at
Four Points by Sheraton. Her first job in the
hospitality business was at a Sheraton in
Virginia, and she subsequently worked for
other major chain hotels."I've come full
circle in the past 12 years,"Williamson said.
"I'm happy and excited to be back with the
Sheraton."
Williamson has developed a new
hotel special,"Fan of the Band."People
attending a band performance can avoid
driving home that night. A special price of
$79 for a room is offered.
For more information, call 941-637-
6770, or go to www.fourpoints.com/
puntagorda.


Punta Gorda, Port Charlotte, North Port, Englewood & Venice 4
BEAUTY INSIDE AND OUT
!I ,di1 1.. I, : n: ..:e.ire.: ,iJ beautifully manicured setting, is the I .
i[..' s, I ..11! ..,,hh' G_ Iu b in south Sarasota County. This st',.ly
,re..,v a .p .i. i, _,a ,II ,, 1966 offers recently renovated gre.:.
Id i'.'. C 'Ic CI II .I Ille statuesque mature oak, cypress, IIdl
Ph l I.CC II n I' i, e m In \hole, par 72 championship golfcou: .n ioce
S, G, I, .i. lush surroundings and elegant homes of the gated
"It'smmmm"I rct a comfortable distance from the greens. Golfers enjoy
I1, .: 1 I. I ckdrop of the preserves while seeing otters, eagles, and
aandhill ranes in their environment.
The semi-private Boca Royale Golf & Country Club is open to the public and offers newly
renovated practice facilities with putting green, sand bunker, and a pitching and chipping area.
U.S.G.A. golf professional Adrian Matern and assistant professional Scott Holcomb offer lessons to
both members and the golfing public. Holcomb, who has been with Boca Royale since 2009, said the
whole experience begins when golfers are welcomed in the parking lot by courteous staff and proceed
to the pro shop and out to the beautiful grounds. After enjoying the outdoors, golfers are invited inside
to the Georgian style clubhouse for exceptional dining and picturesque views.
"It's not about hitting the drivers and it's not about making par," said Holcomb. "It's about enjoying
all the other things along the way."
Golfers have a choice of five tees ranging from the Diamond Tees, measuring 6,357 yards, to the
Bronze Tees, measuring 4,891 yards. Matern, who qualified for the PGA in South Africa, says that
although it is considered a short course, it has earned its reputation as a true local challenge. "It is
truly a shot-makers layout," Matern said. "With towering oaks hugging narrow fairways, our sharp
doglegs and false carries demand the full attention of even the most skilled golfers."
Memberships are available to non-residents of the Boca Royale community and can be purchased
for single, family, and seasonal terms. A variety of plans offer benefits including member-only golf
tournaments, driving range rights, Bocce, clay tennis courts, and a private fitness center.
Boca Royale's clubhouse offers fine dining at the Fairway Dining Room and a casual dining
experience at the 19th Hole. Boca Royale Golf& Country Club is located at 1601 Englewood Road in
Englewood. For information or tee times call the golf pro shop at 941-474-7475.


rPLAYERV
FFRIENDLY


i.t Ip ,I(8 57 1 ,

2 .o n o. A F


Swww.myakkapinesgolfclub.com
941-474-1753

GOLF MEMBERSHIP ON YOUR MIND?
CHECK OUT OUR ONE YEAR GOLF PASS
it INCLUDES golf cart fees
Single: $2,495 + tax

Equity Memberships
are a great value, too!

SEPTEMBER GOLF SPECIAL TWILIGHT
7:15 a.m.- 3 p.m. $27.50 after pm: $18.
includes cart (rates are per person plustax)
Myakka Pines Golf Club 2250 South River Road, Englewood


I LET'S.GO llOiCALGLFCUS


Let's Go!


i: I I I i I/ '. / I i I I I, I


Open


to Public

Call us for Tee Times!


-sunii ouie
GO L F COURSE
September 2013
18 holes with cart
all day every day $15 + tax

9 holes with cart
all day every day $10 + tax

Annual Golf Memberships
$250 + tax
*No other discounts with this special offer
TEE TIMES 888-663-2420


Dlrr


~'~
cli~


I'




September 4-10, 2013 E/N/C/V


DINING OUT GO


out with...

S B. DEBBIE
FLESSIIEP


Karen Evanicki


y DEBBIE FLESSNER among tourists and locals alike. This past
S CORRESPONDE winter, during season, the line to get in the
restaurant for dinner stretched down the
block most nights. That's why its owners,


Just like the kid who has the cutest boy or
girl in town living right in their own neigh-
borhood, Karen Evanicki's favorite restaurant
is located just a few doors down from her own
business.
As the owner of Zak's Clothing, which sells
resort wear items, Evanicki used to have her
shop in a different spot on Venice Island for
about 13 years. Now she's in the first block of
Venice Avenue.
"I have been in this location fora little over
three years,"she said."Here you get more of
the foot traffic and more visibility."
But she said one of the best parts about
being where her shop is right now is its
proximity to the Made In Italy restaurant.
According to her, she first starts thinking
about going over there when she's walking
into her shop in the morning and can smell
the fresh bread baking in the restaurant's
brick oven.
"At lunch, I go over there and get a bowl
of soup to go, and they give you some of
the bread with it"she said."Their soups are
always homemade, and they always have
their salads at lunch, too. I love them because
they're so fresh, like someone grabbed the
vegetables out of the garden and put them in
a bowl."
Evanicki said that even though she likes
every entree she has tried at Made in Italy,
the wood-fired pizza, and the unique way the
restaurant serves it, remains her favorite.
"We go there with couples in the evening
and everyone orders a different pizzashe
said."They sell it by the yard and on a board,
and everyone can get what they like."
Made in Italy has only been open fora year,
but has already developed a loyal following


Let's Go!


Giuseppe Del Sole and Alessandro Di Ferdi-
nando decided to expand right into the space
next door.
By late September or early October, the
pair plans to open an "aperitivo"adjacent to
the existing restaurant.
"In Italy, before we go to dinner, we go to
an aperitivo,"Del Sole said."We'll be making
fresh fruit martinis and Bellinis, and wine and
beer here. And we will be serving finger food
for people, who instead of waiting outside,
they can come in a have a drink."
Though the new space will have table
and bar seating, it will also be set up with
comfortable sofas and soft music, in a lounge-
type atmosphere.
Evanicki said that she's happy about the
new area of the restaurant opening up and
plans to start extending her own shop hours
in the evening this winter, to take advantage
of all those Made in Italy customers walking
by her place.
"Going into the season, they're so crowded
there at night"she said. "Sometimes we just
go over there for a glass of wine. I really like
it because I almost feel like I'm in a big city
there, the waiters are wonderful and they're
(the owners) such nice people."
Zak's Clothing is at 101 West Venice Ave.,
#2, in Venice and is open Monday through
Saturday, from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For
more information, call 941-485-6900. Made
in Italy is at 117 West Venice Ave., and is open
Monday through Thursday, from 11 a.m. to
10 p.m., Friday and Saturday, from 11 a.m. to
10:30 p.m. and Sunday, from 11 a.m. to
10 p.m. For more information on Made in
Italy, visit the website at www.madeinitaly-
venice.com, or call 941-488-8282.


"Fan of the Band" Hotel Rate Special
only $79 p/night call for details
Thurs., Sept. 5 Two Can Jam 5-9pm
Fri., Sept. 6 Storm Surge 7-11pm
Sat., Sept. 7 Tropical Ave. 7-11pm


k -.
---.

Next Io the
FOUR\

POINTS


941.637.6770


"3 lIon ion- i I ]l


S www.FourPointsPuntaGorda.com BY SHERATON Punrr Gordo, FL
.. ,iiiii::::: .............. .






















Alexandra, Tania, Laura, Sandra, Daniel
and Erika enjoy an afternoon out at La
Michoacana Paleteria in Arcadia.

.
Hlt'J *i *- ^


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le


Cornhole
Volleyball Court
Shaded Picnic Tables
Live Entertainment
New Dance Floor
Misters to Keep You Cool
www.FourPointsPuntaGorda.com


FO U R\ 941.637.6770


PO INTS jji anPan, ia]l,
BY SHERATON Puna Godado F
..E![[[[[ .E:! EE: ...T:............


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PUNTA GORDA, FL
For more information contact Denise Dull at 941-626-9439
or Kris Peterson at 941-815-1888 or ask at any participating bar


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.......................


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E/ 'I I/C/'' September 4-10, 2013


GO DINING OUT


By NANCI THEORET
SUN CORRESPONDENT

I was knowingly entering a battle-
ground. One, where at every turn I


was bound to encounter the opinion-
ated arguments for or against thin or
thick, Chicago vs. New York, coal- or
wood-fired. Yet, I willingly accepted
the challenge logging at least 150


Pops at Edison

THE RAT PACK
October 12, 2013, 6:30 PM
PARK OPENS AT 5:30 PM


Tickets
Now available at PuntaGordaChamber.com.
General Entry: $20 in advance/
$25 at door. Bring Your Own Chair.
Stage Front Tables:* $350 for table of 8. $375
for table of 10. Tables & Chairs Provided. Tables of 8
and 10 are eligible for a decorating competition using
the "Rat Pack" theme.
We have a list of Chamber member caterers and
restaurants who can cater your table's food should you
prefer to have it provided. Call the Chamber office at
(941) 639-3720.


Sponsored by:
Punta Gorda
Charter of Cmerrne
Charr or of commerce


SUNi Cn
America's BEST Community Daily clearchannet


Ieekmore
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f IN[cHOtApoiuFD


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1. NISSAN
Where locals buy!
WWW.uHRBORNISM,.COM


Charlotte Regio
Medical Cent(
We know you by hea


-c PR
=S FAR
CENTLNN


FRANK SINAIKA (Bill ltabile), SAMMY UAVIS, JK
(Steve Roman), DEAN MARTIN (William Cintron)


EDISON STATE
COLLEGE


HARBOR
STYLE-

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onal iR Patr River
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miles, spending more than $200 and
ingesting countless calories and carbs
all for the sake of research, eager to
quell the fears of anyone who's faced
those five little words: "Let's go out for
pizza."
During the past month, I've tasted
my way from Punta Gorda to Venice in
search of the best locally made pizza.
Most were good, very good. A few
places are permanently crossed off my
list one was way too salt, the other
too soggy. Like Goldilocks, I found
plenty of pies that were just right. On
one occasion I simply couldn't find a
prospective contender, giving up after
30 minutes of exhausting consultation
with (and a few choice words at) my
GPS. Another was closed for summer-
time renovation and vacation.
Let the cheese fly in honor of tomor-
row's National Cheese Pizza Day. But
please, bring on the pepperoni and
sausage and feel free to disagree. I
know you will.
Uncle Nick's, Port Charlotte: Owner
Nicholas Wrasse turned to social media
to inform his followers of the Let's Go!
Facebook posting asking for recom-
mendations. Within hours a dozen
or so trumpeted Wrasse's pies, many
driving the point home with multiple
exclamation marks. I discovered during
my initial reconnaissance mission
this uncle doesn't make house calls to


Rotonda West and is strictly carryout
or delivery within nine miles. My
cover was blown one Sunday night as
a suspicious delivery driver saw me
snapping pictures of the Tamiami Trail
building and I found myself face-
to-face with a flour-covered Wrasse,
working solo.
A former regional manager for one
of the national chains, Wrasse has
been making pizza since he was 16 and
started Uncle Nick's (he has 10 nieces
and nephews) two years ago. His
pizza is neither Chicago nor New York,
but his own style, achieved through
trial and error. Most popular are the
"Full House' a combo of veggies and
meats, and the "Meat Grinder,"which
I ordered in keeping with my inten-
tional apples-to-apples comparison.
I managed one very hot bite before
I reluctantly put the box in the car
for the 30-minute ride home. The
hand-tossed crust was great and not
too thick that it offset the generous
toppings of pepperoni, sausage, bacon,
ham and beef, the latter a curious
option I discovered available at a
number of pizzerias. Uncle Nick's is
definitely worth a return visit but next
time I'll find a nearby park bench to
enjoy it piping hot.
Made in Italy, Venice: The show is
half the fun of ordering a pizza at this
West Venice Avenue restaurant.


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September 4-10, 2013 E/N/C/V


DINING OUT GO


I marveled at the dexterity and speed
as a cook artistically assembled six pies
before sliding them on a wooden board
into the terrazzo-clad wood-burning
oven. It was here, I first questioned
my unscientific wisdom of sticking
to similar pizzas: Pepperoni isn't
even an option at Made in Italy. The
closest I could get to the meat lovers
of other parlors was the "Salsiccia," a
simple combo of sauce, mozzarella and
sausage that emerged from the oven
an oozing liquid canvas swirl of orange
and red dotted with bite-sized sausage
pieces.
The restaurant's cheese and cured
meat options are plentiful and unique:
fior di latte, ricotta, goat, Brie and
Stracchino cheeses plus prosciutto,
pancetta and speck. I was wistfully
eyeing the"Tartufella"and its mouth-
watering melding of mozzarella,
porcini mushrooms, sausage, shaved
Parmesan and truffle oil. Mmm, truffle
oil and pizza. Speaking of oil, be sure to
ask for a splash of crushed red pepper-
spiced oil; perfect for dipping leftover
crust.
Bocco Lupo, Port Charlotte: I was
eager for a return visit to the brothers
Valentino's Little Italy inspired pizzeria
in the Carousel Plaza. My first experi-
ence was pizza nirvana and I wasn't
disappointed. David and Dennis Valen-
tino created Bocco Lupo in homage to


the famed New York parlors of their
childhood (think century-old and still
in business Lombardi's) and the secret
of their tasty pies are the top-quality
ingredients and the "Wolf,"the 1,200-
degree coal-fired oven that on my visit
had been burning 1,010 days. High-
protein, high-gluten flour gives each
pizza a crunchy and chewy crust; fresh,
high-milk-fat mozzarella delivers more
flavor than most mozzarellas.
The Italian was piled with homemade
sausage, meatballs and Bocco Lupo's
signature nickel-size pepperoni disks
that pucker up and attain nice smoky
charred edges in the oven. It was every
bit as good as I remembered, not too
saucy and each bite echoing the quality
of the ingredients. Bocco Lupo offers
nearly a dozen toppings and eight
specialty pizzas like the New Jersey
Tomato Pie (upside down with cheese
first and a sweeter sauce) and The
Spaniard (spicy chorizo, queso fresco
and a sprinkle of cilantro) that can be
ordered in personal size.
Mama Maria's Pizza, Venice: Like
many of the meat-lover pizzas I tried,
Mama's Meat Lovers was loaded with
pepperoni, disk-like slices of sausage,
ham, bacon and salami. The heft of
the meat, including a hint of maple
(perhaps bacon, the maple kind) didn't
overpower the crust. Oh, the crust. It
was hands-down my favorite, each bite


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akin to just-out-of-the-oven Italian
bread. Crunchy on the outside, soft and
moist inside. Not oily or overly chewy.
Again, I wish I'd strayed from my
meat-to-meat comparison as Mama
Maria's offered some interesting
toppings and specialty pies. Never have
I seen chicken cutlet, grilled shrimp or
chicken and steak offered as topping
options. The "White Roman"with
sausage and broccoli rabe also sounded
divine. Definitely a consideration for
next time. Pizza by the slice is often
available Monday through Saturday.
Barbarino's Restaurant, Englewood:
My husband and I stumbled upon this
Italian restaurant by accident while
combing Dearborn Street one late
Sunday afternoon looking for any open
eatery. He still raves about the pizza; I
remember liking it a lot and was more
than willing to return. Unfortunately,
it's been closed this summer for vaca-
tion and renovation.
The New Faull Inn, Grove City: If
you happen to be anywhere near
this Englewood-area restaurant on a
Saturday night, be sure to order its all-
you-can-eat pizza. Faull Inn prepares


personal pies to your exacting specifi-
cations. They're great and the price is
right; I've never been able to order a
second.
Suffice to say, I'm probably going to
forgo pizza for a while. Hmmm, wonder
where I can find a really good cheese-
burger.














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E/N' /C/1' September 4-10, 2013


GO THE ARTS


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR
From Truvy's beauty shop to the sewers
of Manhattan, The Players offers a season
of Broadway and Hollywood hits on its
main stage.
The season begins Sept. 18 with "Steel
Magnolias"which plays through Sept. 29.
The film version featured Dolly Parton as
Truvy, owner of the beauty salon in which
all the action takes place. The sometimes
hilarious and sometimes poignant story
begins on Shelby's wedding day. All the
scenes take place at Truvy's as the story
evolves over the next few years.
Gershwin's "Crazy For You"'a tap-
dancing extravaganza, increases the pace
Oct. 23-Nov. 3. The musical by George and
Ira Gershwin has the classic boy meets girl
story but with a mix of Broadway and the
Old West. What makes the show ever-
lasting is the music. Among the songs are
"Nice Work if You Can Get It""They Can't
Take That Away from Me,"lI Got Rhythm,"


"Someone to Watch Over Me" and "K-ra-zy
for You."
"White Christmas;'with music by
Irving Berlin, is based on the old black-
and-white post-war film that starred
Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye and was
set in a charming old New England ski
lodge. The lodge is owned by the former
commanding general of the two men.
When they learn the inn is failing, the two
men literally assemble the troops and put
on a Broadway-calibre show to save the
inn. "White Christmas" is just one of the
many songs which include "Count Your
Blessings Instead of Sheep,""Gee, I Wish
I Was Back in the Army,""Love, You Didn't
Do Right By Me,""Heat Wave,""Blue Skies,"
and "Sisters." "White Christmas"will play
on the main stage Dec. 4-15.
Rogers & Hamerstein's "Carousel"fills
the theater with more classic Broadway
music and two love stories Jan. 9-19.
Some of the best-known musical numbers
include"If I Loved You,""June is Bustin'


Out All Over," and "You'll Never Walk
Alone."
March 19-30, the Players presents"Dirty
Rotten Scoundrels" based on the film of
the same name with Steve Martin and
Michael Caine as the scoundrels who make
their money by conning women.
Closing the Broadway season is
"Urinetown,"which is a spoof of musicals
as much as it is a spoof of politics, corpo-
rations and capitalism. "Urinetown"will
run April 16-27.
Single tickets are $25 for adults and
$12 for children. Preview subscriptions are
$98 per person for Wednesday perfor-
mances before opening night. Regular
series tickets for the same seats and same
performance time are $122.50 for adults.
A Silver Flex Pass contains seven tickets
for $140, good in any combination for any
of the shows.
Evening shows are Tuesday-Thursday
plus Saturday. All evening shows are at
7:30 p.m. with matinees at 2 p.m. each


Sunday plus the second Saturday of each
show's run.
Friday will feature a special "Pageant
Show" once a month as well as sessions
of Drag Queen Bingo, featuring Beneva
Fruitville.
Coming up Backstage at the Players will
be Paul Rudnick's "The New Century,"Julie
Jensen's "Last Lists of My Made Mother,"
and "Denial" by Peter Sagal. Dates are yet
to be announced.
Jeffery Kin is the company's artistic
director and Michelle Bianchi Pingel is the
theater's managing director.
The theater is at 838 North Tamiami
Trail in Sarasota. Most evening perfor-
mances begin at 7:30 p.m. with Sunday
matinees at 2 p.m. Single tickets and
subscriptions are available.
For specific performance dates, times
and prices, call the box office at
941-365-2494 or visit: ThePlayers.org.
Email: kcool@venicegondolier.com


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September 4-10, 2013 E/N/C/V


THE ARTS GO


'Sinners'- hilarity and paranoia at LBPH


By CHRIS KOURAPIS
SUN CORRESPONDENT

Norm Foster's"Sinners"is a farce that will
appeal to theater goers who enjoy stories
about normal people caught up in insane
situations. After acting as Elwood P. Dowd in
a community theater production of"Harvey,"
Foster, a prolific playwright currently billed
as the Neil Simon of Canada, discovered that
he preferred writing to acting and went
on to write his first play,"Sinners."Charlie
Tyler, who will be portraying Peter Kramer, a
furniture store owner having an affairwith
the local minister's wife in "Sinners,"also acted
as Elwood P. Dowd in "Harvey" last season
at Lemon Bay Playhouse. "Elwood Dowd
was relaxed,an easy character to portray,"
explained Tyler."Kramer, on the other hand,
freaks out when he finds himself faced with
his worst fears of being discovered. He's like
an express train out of control, climbing out
windows hoping to escape when the Reverend


shows up unexpectedly."
"Sinners"director Michele Strauss describes
the play as"dark and twisted"and beyond
physical comedy."It's hard to find humor in
morbid situations, but in this play, all the
tidbits come together in mixed humor. The
actors'facial expressions make it all possible."
Aden Leonard, as Carolyn Cavanaugh, the wife
of Police Chief Roy Cavanaugh, provides comic
relief."I'm like the church lady in "Saturday
Night Live"or Carol Lawrence as"Mamashe
said. Co-Director for"Lemon Drops"the Lemon
Bay Playhouse summer children's theater, Patty
Tuff, will portray Diane Gillis, who mistakes
Peter Kramer for the Reverend. In a hilarious
exchange, Diane begs Peter for advice as she
suspects that her husband is having an affair.
Her character vulnerable, nervous and
funny turns into a lioness, according to
Tuff."If the audience hates me, then I've done
myjob,"exclaimed Michelle Neitzel who plays
Monica Lloyd, the Minister's adulterous wife.
Neitzel, a versatile actress who portrayed


Elaine Harper In "Arsenic and Old Lace"and
M'Lynn Eatenton in"Steel Magnolias"last
season finds acting challenging, yet thera-
peutic.
In his 103rd acting role, Paul Mullen will
portray both Roy Cavanaugh and Minister
Lloyd. As the town's police chief, Mullen sees
himself as a sort of"Columbo-type character
without the raincoat."As the Reverend, he
makes a brief cameo appearance in Act I. The
plot takes many twists and turns especially
when what was supposed to be a wonderful
couple of days together for sinners Peter
Kramer and Monica Lloyd turns into chaos
as the Reverend comes home early from an
out-of-town trip. 2013-14 season tickets for
Lemon Bay Playhouse cost $108. Purchase
tickets for all seven shows for the price of six. A
flex subscription pass costs $68, and purchasers
may choose four plays they wish to see.
Brochures are available at the box office and
online at www.lemonbayplayhouse.com.
"Sinners"runs Sept 4-22. Curtain times are


7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, and
2 p.m. on Sunday. Single tickets are $18. Call
the box office at 941-475-6756 or visit Lemon
Bay Playhouse at 96 W. Dearborn St., Engle-
wood.

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E/'IN/C/1' September 4-10, 2013


GO ROAD TRIP


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Leave the little ones at home and

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strap on your fear tolerance outfit
before you dare enter Busch Gardens
Tampa Bay's Howl-O-Scream event this
year.
The behind-the-scenes plotters and
planners upped the scare ante this year
for the park's annual adult-oriented
Halloween extravaganza.
Referring to this year's event change
as a new"experiment"the Busch



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designers are promising "The most
personally invasive haunted attraction
in Howl-O-Scream history."
According to the release, visitors
will become "test subjects"whose fear
tolerance and mental endurance will be
challenged.
"The test subjects endure psycholog-
ical experiments and must face fear-
inducing elements from roaches and
snakes to needles and darkness."
There is an extra charge to partici-
pate in the experiment $50 for the
first person and $10 each for three
additional subjects in the same reserva-
tion. Nowhere in the release was there
anything about group medical care
or funeral rates for those who do not
survive the experiment. One can opt out
at any point however. The Experiment
is in the Egypt area of the park near
the mummies and so on. Howl-O-Scream
admission is additional and required.
If you choose not to participate in
The Experiment, there are still plenty of
things to do during the nightly ordeal:
Circus of Superstition 3-D, Blood Asylum,
Zombie Mortuary, Ultimate Gamble:
Reversal of Fortune in a casino run by
werewolves and Nevermore where one
can meet the creatures that haunt the
spooky manor of Lenore.
How-O-Scream begins Sept. 27 and
28 and will be repeated Oct. 3-5, 10-12,
17-19 and 24-26. Howl-O-Scream oper-
ates from 7:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. Tickets are
$47 per person per day. On Thursdays,
friends can purchase four tickets for $30
each ($120.) Annual pass holders can
purchase Howl-O-Scream tickets for $37


per person. There also are several VIP
packages for the special event.
The park's coasters will operate during
the Howl-O-Scream event. Costumes are
not allowed. Consider that this event
"contains intense adult content such as
violence, gore and blood."
For more information, call 888-800-
5447 or visit: HowlOScream.com.
For those who prefer not to partici-
pate in such blood and gore, visit Busch
Gardens Tampa Bay by day to check out
the newest member of its zoo, a baby
Grevys zebra born recently at the park.
While all zebras have their own unique
striped fur, the baby zebra's pattern is
very similar to that of its mother.
Kasi, the baby cheetah that inspired
Cheetah Hunt, the first triple-launch
coaster, is a full-grown cheetah these
days but still spends much of his time
with his canine friend Mtani. Those
two are always worth a trip to Busch
Gardens.
Consider Howl-O-Scream as the trick
part of Halloween season and the Busch
Gardens zoo inhabitants as the season's
treat.
There are all sorts of ticket deals and
combinations for Busch Gardens Tampa
Bay as well as duo deals in conjunction
with its sister SeaWorld Orlando. Exam-
ples include the $50 per person weekday
Florida resident deal at either park, the
$79 Any Day ticket and the $89 Pay for
a day and play all year deal. For more
information, call 888-800-5447 or visit:
SeaWorldParks.com/en/Busch
Gardens-Tampa.
Email: kcool@venicegondolier.com


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September 4-10, 2013 E/N/C/V


LIVE MUSICGO


The Soul Sensations


By DEBBIE FLESSNER
SUN CORRESPONDENT

If you watched any replays of the
recent Video Music Awards on MTV, then
you know that when it comes to music,
they just aren't making them the way
they used to.
That's why it's so enjoyable to watch a
band with great harmonies and skilled
musicians. A band that plays songs in
which you cannot only hear every word,
you probably know every word. A band
like The Soul Sensations.
For those of us who grew up in the
'60s and'70s, the juggernaut that was
Motown was a big part of our lives. There
is no other record label in history that has
had as much influence on the style and
substance of America's musical landscape
than Berry Gordy's Hitsville U.S.A., and
even in today's R&B music, its effects are
being witnessed.
The Soul Sensations is a musical group
that primarily plays songs from that
era, but also ventures into more modern
songs, too. Dana Merriwether is a vocalist
in the band, along with her mother Katt
Hefner. She says she was exposed to the
performing arts, and the Motown style of
music, at a young age.
"I grew up listening to that type of
music as a teenager'"she said. "My
mother sang with her brothers in a group
called The Versatiles, and in our home,
you either played an instrument, danced
or sang. We have a very musical family."
Performing alongside Merriwether and
Hefner, the third vocalist is the person
who started the band in 2007, Randall
Morgan. Like most of the members of the
group, Morgan has a day job his just
happens to be in orthopedic surgery. All
week long, he operates on broken bones
and talks to patients, but on the week-


ends, he puts his smooth-as-silk voice to
another use.
"When the Motown Sound came around
in '58 and'59, I was all on that," he said.
"I went to Grinnell College (in Iowa) as an
undergrad, and I had a band called Randy
and the Ascots. On the weekends in
college, when I wasn't playing basketball
and baseball, I did that."
Fast forward a few years, and Morgan
is enjoying himself on the Suncoast
with his newer band. In addition to
Morgan, Merriwether and Hefner, the
other members of the group are: Errol
Wise, drummer and musical director;
Clay Cropper, lead guitar and synthe-
sizer; Mike Gunderman, rhythm guitar;
Tom Ellison, saxophone; Wayne Levy,
keyboards and synthesizers; and Thomas
Presha, bass.
All of the members in the band come
from extensive and prestigious musical
backgrounds. Together, they have created
a rich sound and a fun show, which for
many people, will be full of sentimental
memories.
The Soul Sensations have been playing
venues from Tampa south, both nightlife
spots and private parties. But Morgan
says they're ready to add some new dates
to the schedule.
"The sound that we have, we're really
working to play in the party clubs," he
said. "On Sept. 6, we're playing at the Fox
Jazz Cafe in Tampa, which is an upscale
spot. Hopefully, we'll soon be playing
regularly at some of the biggest and
nicest places around."
The Soul Sensations' next show after
Tampa is on Friday, Sept. 20 at Prana
Restaurant & Lounge in Sarasota. For
more information about the band, and
how to book them or where to see them
perform, visit the website at www.
soulsensationsmusic.com.


Top of Billboard Chart on September 4

'60s
1963 -"My Boyfriend's Back" by The Angels
1968 "People Got To Be Free" by The Rascals

'70s
1973 "Brother Louie" by The Stories
1977 "Best Of My Love" by The Emotions

'80s
1980 -"Sailing" by Christopher Cross
1987-"La Bamba"by Los Lobos

Famous Flips
Double-sided hit songs on 45 rpm records were extremely popular from the mid-1950s
through the early 1970s. It was a bonus to find two songs receiving radio airplay at the
same time, many reaching number one. Elvis, Connie Francis, Ricky Nelson, the Everly
Brothers and others had double hits reaching into the early'60s. Prime examples are
Nelson's "Travelin'Man/Hello, Mary Lou"and the Everly Brothers'"Walk Right Back/Ebony
Eyes"singles.
When the Beatles arrived in 1964 with "I Want to Hold Your Hand,'it was paired with
another hit, "I Saw Her Standing There:' Many other Beatles 45s followed the same
format, including "I Feel Fine/She's a Woman"and "Hey Jude/Revolution:' The Monkees
joined the bandwagon with "I'm a Believer/Steppin' Stone"; the Troggs paired "Wild Thing"
and "With a Girl Like You;"and the Beach Boys had a few early dual hits such as "Surfer
Girl/Little Deuce Coupe,"covering cars and surfing on one record.
In the late '60s and early'70s, Creedence Clearwater Revival had several twin spins
including "Down on the Corner/Fortunate Son"and "Green River/Commotion.' Singer/
songwriter Carole King released"lt's Too Late" backed by"I Feel the Earth Move"while
John Denver had great success with "I'm Sorry/Calypso:' Don McLean followed "American
Pie"with the dual hit"Vincent (Starry, Starry Night)/Castles in the Air." By the late'70s,
45 records, along with the two-hit specials, were disappearing as albums gained in
popularity.

MoadnsG o8B
Last week, this musical trivia question was asked: Name the pop/rock legend who had
numerous hit songs in the early'60s, then joined supergroup The Traveling Wilburys on their
1988 album.
Answer: Roy Orbison. The first reader to get it right was
Jack Melton of Port Charlotte.
This Week's Question: The lyrics"what goes up must come down"are from a 1969 hit song.
Name the song and the group.
Ifyou think you have the right answer, email it to upbeat@sun-herald.com no later than noon
this Friday, and we'll publish your name as the winner with the correct answer in next week's
issue ofLet's Go! Please include your name and city.


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--


Let's Go!




E/N' /C/1' September 4-10, 2013


G O LIVE MUSIC


PROVIDED BY THE NORTH PORT
CONCERT BAND

In partnership with The Patterson Founda-
tion's Legacy of Valor Campaign, the North
Port Concert Band and the North Port Art
Centerwill combine artistic talents as the
band opens their new season on Thursday





MARINA REfTAURANT TAVERN


evening, Oct. 31, by honoring our veterans
with an evening of American music by great
all-American composers. Come and celebrate
our wonderful musical heritage in an evening
of music by Gershwin, Copeland, Bernstein
and others. The Art Centerwill present A
"Patriotic Art Show"which will be on display
in the lobby of the PAC before the concert and
during intermission.


VENICE'S
WATERFRONT
LANDMARK
SINCE 1976.


The partnering of the concert band and
the North Port Art Center is one of a number
of patriotic-inspired events that will be held
throughout the region in conjunction with
The Patterson Foundation's Legacy of Valor
Campaign, which honors veterans and their
families throughout Southwest Florida. For
more information about Legacy of Valor,
please visit www.freedompassiton.org.


Individual concert tickets will be available
online at www.northportcencertband.org or
at the Box Office, 6400 West Price Blvd., North
Port and by calling 941-426-8479 or 866-406-
7722. The Box Office opens Oct. 1, Monday
through Friday 10 a.m to 1 p.m. Season
tickets packages are available online now.
For more information about the upcoming
season check the website.


'Tis the 69th season for Sarasota

Concert Association


By KIM COOL
FEATURES EDITOR

Bringing the best of the classical music
world to the Sarasota area is the mission of
the Sarasota Concert Association.
Internationally acclaimed pianist Marc-
Andre Hamelin will open the SCA's 69th Great
Performers Series season on Jan. 6 at the
Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall in Sarasota.
According to a release from SCA, the Canadian
pianist is"celebrated for his fresh readings of
the established repertoire, as well as for his
intrepid exploration of lesser-known works
of the 19th and 20th centuries."Hamlin has
recorded more than 50 CDs and appeared
with major orchestras in NewYork, Chicago,
Detroit, Boston, Portland, Quebec, Berlin,
London, Melbourne and Milan. In 2011, he
received a lifetime achievement award from
members of the German press.
The Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio,
with guest violinist Nokuthula Ngwenyama,
will perform on Jan. 27. The trio, consisting
of pianist Joseph Kalichstein, violinist Jamie
Laredo and cellist Sharon Robinson, made its
debut at the inauguration of Jimmy Carter in
1977. Ngwenyama won the Primrose Interna-
tional Viola Competition and the Young Artists
International Auditions at age 17.
On Feb. 5, the all-string, 17-member East
Coast Chamber Orchestra comes to the Van
Wezel. The group has played with orchestras
in major cities across the U.S., debuted in New
York in 2004 and toured the U.S. in 2006.
Russia's St Petersburg Philharmonic, dating
to 1882, continues the season on Feb. 19.
During the era of the Cold War, the orchestra
was known as the Leningrad Philharmonic.
It regained its original and present name in
1991.
The 126-year-old Detroit Symphony


conducted by Leonard Slatkin and featuring
piano soloist Olga Kern, concludes the SCA
season March 3.
Kern won the 11th International Van
Cliburn Piano Competition in 2001. She made
her Carnegie Hall debut in 2004.
Concerts are at 8 p.m. in the Van Wezel,
777 North Tamiami Trail, Sarasota.
Subscription tickets for all five concerts are
$255, $226, $185 and $145 r p person. For
subscriptions, single tickets or information,
call 941-955-0040 or visit: SCASarasota.org.

Munchtime Musicales
Beginning Nov. 20, Munchtime Musicales
is the community outreach arm of SCA. Free
concerts by top area musicians are held on
selected Wednesdays from November through
April. Coffee and tea are often served. Many
'Munchtime"fans show up with bag lunches
to eat before the informal concert begins.
These concerts are free and there are no
reserved seats. Music ranges from jazz to folk,
pop and classical.
Concert pianist Grigorios Zamparas will
perform on Nov. 20.
Popular local baritone Bill Schustik will sing
on Dec. 11, followed on Jan. 15 by the Jerry
Eckert Jazz Trio and, on Feb. 19, piano duets
played by Lee Dougherty Ross and Joe Holt.
Studio artists from the Sarasota Opera will
perform March 19, which is about midway
through the opera's winter season.
The Munchtime series concludes April 16
with a performance by the Gloria Musicae
Singers.
All performances are at noon, either in
Holley Hall or the David Cohen Hall at the
Beatrice Friedman Center, 709 North Tamiami
Trail, just south of the municipal auditorium.

Email: kcool@venicegondolier.com


UNIVERSITY OF


Sarasota Open House
Thursday, October 3
5:30 7:30pm


North Port Open House
Thursday, October 10
5:30 7:00pm


IOLIH T-FLOKIL.A
A.P !-0..T t I.-.tJ.-A.TEE

V,


8350 N. Tamiami Trail Sarasota 1 5920 Pan American Blvd. North Port


OCT.

03


OCT.

10


Let's Go!


cMwrrzcqV*rypwTyzQww





THURSDAY

November 7, 2013

4:00-7:00 Fm







PORT


CHARLOTTE


Wednesday, September 4,2013 A weekly section of the Sun


Nicole Noles
Editor's Corner
nnoles@sun-herald.com




Legacy of literacy
here in Port Charlotte
W come to the September Big
Picture issue featuring local
authors. In this edition, we
feature many talented writers right
here in town, as well as organizations
that support them.
On the front, we highlight the Peace
River Center for Writers, a group that
works out of the Edison campus but
is open to all writers in the area who
want to improve their wordsmith
skills.
Also on the front, we have a roman-
tic memoir based on the real-life love
affair and marriage of a local couple
that spanned an ocean and overcame
age barriers and a hard but humorous
look at a career in a maximum
security prison.
On page four, we turn from poetry
to prose as a local author rediscovers
his gift for writing poetry and another
spins her genealogical interest in her
roots into a fantastic world of fiction.
In the mood for a little true crime?
Petite Salon owner and hairdresser
Nancy Panoch wanted answers to the
whispered conversations she heard
among family members growing up.
She discovered a family secret, which
created more questions than answers,
but ultimately became a book. Find
out more on page 8.
Local writers who feel bewildered
by the publishing world can find
some local help with Book Broker
owner James Abraham, who helps
authors negotiate the self-publishing
maze. Read more about his business
on page 8.
And last, but not least, a Pirate grad
turns his school spirit into a written
piece of Port Charlotte High School
history. If you've lived here long
enough, you may recognize some
name dropping on page 11.
Whatever genre catches your
fancy, there's sure to be a local author
weaving words about it. Please enjoy
this month's Big Picture issue on local
authors, and perhaps you will find the
inspiration to craft some well-written
prose of your own.
Happy reading (and writing!)


Scribes and storytellers

Peace River Center for Writers binds wordsmiths together


HERALD PHOTO BY SHIRLEY GEORGE
The Peace River Center for Writers at Edison State College board of directors, from left,
standing, are president John Pelot, Jay Lamborn, Bill Van Glabek, and Carl Parrot. Seated are
Doug Houck, Leonard Pasco, Catherine Bukovitz and Kristiana Gregoire.


ROMANCE / MEMOIR

Love letters cross

an ocean, create

a lifetime bond
By BARBARA BEAN-MELLINGER
HERALD CORRESPONDENT
Theirs is a love story for the ages, on
par with "Romeo and Juliet," but with
a much better outcome. Star-crossed
only due to the thousands of miles
separating them, the lovers in "Life of
Love for Atema and Atepa" never gave
up, instead persevering until they
could spend their lives together.
Local author Dedeth Ford, or
"Atema" in her book, compiled the
couple's letters into a book so people
could come to know Patrick, her
husband until his death in 2011.
LOVE 14


By SHIRLEY GEORGE
HERALD CORRESPONDENT
Everyone has a story to tell, or so the
axiom goes. If you've ever wanted to
write a memoir, novel, poem or song but
need assistance or support, the Peace
River Center for Writers is the organiza-
tion to join.
The PRCW is an independent, non-
profit organization dedicated to writers
and the written word. The center's
mission is to help people develop skill in
using the written word in any form; to
provide effective and timely support for
writers; to provide educational literary
and informational services and events;
to encourage dialogue and communica-
tion among the public at large.
Carol Mahler, teacher, author and
storyteller, realized her dream of a forum
for aspiring writers when she founded
the PRCW in April 2002. Mahler and a
dedicated group of volunteers worked
tirelessly to get the organization up and
running. Originally located at the Trabue
Land Office at the Punta Gorda History
Park on Shreve St., the center thrived
and membership increased. Poetry, fic-
tion and nonfiction writing classes were
SCRIBES 2


AUTOBIOGRAPHY / MEMOIR


HERALD PHOTO BY BARBARA PIERCE
Michael Boccia describes daily life in a
maximum security prison in his book"On the
Count: Madness, Humor and Mental Health
Care in a Maximum Security Prison." Boccia
worked in the New York prison system as a
forensic psychologist.


Find out what it's

like'on the inside'
By BARBARA PIERCE
HERALD CORRESPONDENT
Every day, Mike Boccia's life was in
danger. Every day, behind the towering
walls of a maximum-security prison,
Boccia put his life on the line as he
faced the challenges of working in this
violent community.
"On the Count: Madness, Humor
and Mental Health Care in a Maximum
Security Prison," Boccia's book de-
scribes his experiences as a forensic
psychologist in the maximum security
prisons of New York.
"They're all true stories," Boccia said.
"In the book, there's a lot of danger, and
there's a lot of humor. The prisons
INSIDE 12


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PIRATE PRIDE


INSIDE: Port Charlotte author recalls career in prison system

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SCRIBES: Peace River Center for Writers educates authors


-,

PEP RALLY,

PAGE 12


FROM PAGE 1

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PORT CHARLOTTE HERALD A MhIfI hi R fp .Iln Ai Pil l :iir l -i l n ll illi USPS 743170 1 '.1 1 1r 1.illlr ll 1.I ily Ii y I .I 1 111. [ RilW i iII Iiin III. I
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SEE


PCMS TERRIERS


SIXTH-GRADE DANCE,

SEE PAGE 13


I I


N N




:'. il, .1i.i September 4, 2013


HERALD PHOTO BY NATALIE SHARBAUGH
Peter Dotalo and his daughter, Amanda, adopted Bella, a 10-week-old female pit mix puppy,
from the Animal Welfare League of Charlotte County.



Dotalos find puppy



love at the shelter


By NATALIE SHARBAUGH
ANIMAL WELFARE LEAGUE
The Dotalos of North Port have
always had a dog. After their 12-year-
old German shepherd, Smokey, passed
away several months ago, the family
couldn't ignore the void in their lives. It
was finally time to find another pet.
Peter Dotalo, his wife and their
daughter, Amanda, were determined to
find a new dog. After a friend at work
told Amanda about the Animal Welfare
League shelter in Port Charlotte, the
family decided to take a trip and visit
with the adoptable dogs.
The family wasn't exactly sure of the
kind of dog they wanted, so they kept
an open mind. There were many dogs
available for adoption at the Animal
Welfare League shelter, and the Dotalos
were able to interact with each one.
But after meeting a 10-week-old puppy
named Bella, it was nearly impossible
for them to consider anything else.
"We knew she was going to be the
one," said Peter.
"It was an automatic connection,"
added Amanda. "She was too cute to
not adopt her."
The Dotalos adopted Bella. At home,
their new puppy can look forward to

I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEF
Girls Night Out to host
Bar Stool Open Oct. 5
On Oct. 5, GNO (Girls Night Out) will
again partner with nine Punta Gorda
bars in celebrating the 6th anniversary
of "The Bar Stool Open" benefiting
Dollars For Mammograms. To date, this
event, and the generosity of its partici-
pants, has afforded more than 2,500
women the opportunity to utilize mam-
mogram services that they would not
have otherwise been provided. Dollars
For Mammograms has also been able to
expand from the traditional screening
mammogram into diagnostic mam-
mograms and breast ultrasounds, which
could not have been done without the
help and donations from the communi-
ties the organization serves.
Join the celebration by stopping in at
any of the following participating loca-
tions: Ice House Pub, River City Grill,
Sheraton Four Points "TT's Tiki Bar,"
Phil's 41, Beef'O'Brady's Punta Gorda,
Deans's South of the Border, Jack's on
Marion, the Celtic Ray or The Office
and register your foursome ($100 entry


lots of love and attention. Peter plans
on beginning training immediately.
Amanda plans on bonding with the new
family member.
"I'm going to spend every minute
with her," Amanda said.
The family was pleased with their
experience at the Animal Welfare
League and found the staff to be very
friendly and helpful.
They found that adopting an animal
instead of buying one can be a reward-
ing experience. Peter also wishes that
everyone understood the importance
of training a dog and giving it the love it
needs.
"It's a shame that pit bulls get such
bad names because people abuse
them," continued Peter. "A dog is what
you make it."
Judging by the love and training Bella
will receive in her new home, there's
no doubt she's going to grow up to be a
great dog.
Thousands of Charlotte County's
homeless animals are brought to the
AnimalWelfare League each year. Many
are still patiently waiting for a new
home. If you are interested in adopting
a pet, please visit the shelter at 3519
Drance Street in Port Charlotte, or log
on to www.awlshelter.org to learn more.


fee). The event is a nine hole miniature
golf tournament that offers anyone the
opportunity to play and win prizes. The
day begins with a shotgun start at your
registering location at 10:30 a.m. and
ends with a wrap-up party at 6 p.m. at
the Celtic Ray. Prizes will be awarded
throughout the day for best and worst
finishing scores. Can't play that day?
Stop in at any of the participating
locations and make a donation.
"Dollars for Mammograms" is a
501(c)(3) public foundation established
solely for the purpose of providing no-
cost mammograms to area women who
are uninsured or underinsured and can-
not afford the cost of a mammogram.
They are serviced by an all-volunteer
Board of Directors and have no paid
positions. Their ability to run their
organization on low operating costs al-
lows 95 percent of all funds raised used
by recipients of their services. All funds
generated by this event stay local. For
more information, go to www.dollarsfor
mammograms.org, or contact Denise
Dull at 941-626-9439 or Kris Peterson at
941-815-1888.


We Invate tfcou


5Otk OnLiversaty


Celbrattin oat


Good Shepherd


Day School

f you value private education and/or God's children
growing up in an ever-changing world with ever-changing
needs, you will see the value of supporting Good Shepherd
School's excellence in education in an environment that
reflects the love and wisdom of God. We meet each student
where they are and challenge them to grow as a
Part of a larger whole in a variety of ways.

R n Am p
.. _Rii.. :-:- A,,.&


I'


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o

E
E
E
E
I
IL
IL

I







N

IA
IN
I

4

a
s
d
u
I-


MUSC Art
Physical Education
/ Foreign Language Chapel
Theological Reflection
Brain-Based Learning

For more information on how to be a part
of our continuing success story
Visit our web site at
goodshepherdpg.com
Call 941-639-2757 or email us at:
church@goodshepherdpg.com


Ve would like to honor Good Shepherd Day School's
50th Anniversary of service and care in this community
/ith the following gift:*
Donors' names will be printed in a Souvenir Booklet to be distributed at
ur 50th Anniversary Celebration in November.

] Friend (up to $99) D Grand Member ($1,000-$2,499)
] Supporter ($100-$249) D Celebrated Member ($2,500-$4,999)
] Sponsor ($250-$499) D Revered Member ($5,000-$9,999)
] Donor ($500-$999) D Ultimate Member ($10,000 and up)


AME

ADDRESS

Vail form/gift to:
3ood Shepherd Day School
101 W Henry St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950
/e will gladly honor your desire to remain anonymous in your donation of any
mount that would be listed simply as "anonymous." Thanks in advance for
supporting our 50 years celebration. Your gift is 100% tax deductible. This project
headlines September 15, 2013. Return this form by mail, give us a call, or drop
s an e-mail today to claim your membership class.
- I


Herald Page 3


I





Wednesday, September 4,2013


Passion for poetry produces prolific outlet for Pasco


By SHIRLEY GEORGE
HERALD CORRESPONDENT


Leonard "Dobie" Pasco is multi-
talented, but his demeanor exudes
modesty. He was born and raised
in Sharpsville, a small steel town in
Western Pennsylvania. After serving
four years in the U.S. Air Force in ra-
dar repair, Pasco earned a bachelor's
degree in art history at Michigan State
University, and a master's degree in
Special Education at the University of
Tennessee.
When Pasco had been in the Air
Force only a few weeks, he rode
onto the base in a convertible with
three pretty blonde girls. "The guys
cracked up. From that day on, I was
nicknamed Dobie, as in the TV series,
'The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis.'"
Pasco has worked as a disability
examiner for Social Security Disability,
a Child Support Enforcement
Investigator in juvenile justice and
several other social service related
positions.
Also, he has experience as an auto
mechanic, paid volunteer fireman,


construction worker and retail.
Although Pasco wrote some poetry as
an undergraduate student, his main
creative activity was painting. He took
a hiatus from his poetry for many
years. But a few years ago, Pasco
returned to writing poetry in earnest,
and it has become his passion.
Genres of his poems range from
profoundly serious to humorous and
anywhere in between.
Pasco has been a member of the
Peace River Center for Writers for
several years and currently serves on
the board of directors. He is a regular
reader at the PRCW open mic held
the second Monday of each month at
Fishermen's Village. Additionally, he
is a member of the North Port Poetry
Workshop and the Sun Coast Writers
Guild in Englewood.
"I cannot build houses or cure
illnesses," Pasco said.
"But I try to bring a laugh or smile
to people through my poetry. Also,
I try to make things better, in some
small way, by offering insights for
dealing with difficult matters in this
sometimes scary world."


a .


HERALD PHOTO BY SHIRLEY GEORGE
Leonard "Dobie" Pasco, a regular reader at the open mic, entertains the audience with his poems.
The event, held at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at Fishermen's Village, is spon-
sored by the Peace River Center for Writers and is open to the public.


Author's imagination and inspiration generates novels


By SHIRLEY GEORGE
HERALD CORRESPONDENT


Lisa Ashley's vivid imagination was
sparked as a young child when her
mother told her make-believe bedtime
stories. Those stories inspired Ashley to
"write stories in her head," but she had
to learn to write before she could put
them on paper. It would be many years
before her creativity came to fruition.
Ashley has written 10 novels in various
genres, self-published four and a fifth
will be available soon.
"The Scottish side of my ancestry
intrigued me so I started writing my
fantasy of what it would be like to
travel back in time to Scotland," Ashley
said.
Most of Ashley's novels are about
fantasy or romance that usually include
time travel and/or the paranormal, but
her latest project is a science fiction book.
Ashley, an Indiana native, lived in


PHOTO PROVIDED


Port Charlotte resident Lisa Ashley's heritage
provided the inspiration for her series of novels
set in Scotland.

various areas of the country, East and
West coast. She and her husband
moved from Virginia to Port Charlotte
to be near family.


"My goal in Florida was to find writ-
ing groups, make some contacts and
seek encouragement. I found all, and as
a bonus, I was lucky to find an excellent
teacher who helped me to edit my own
books. I'm not an expert by any means,
but I do get a lot of positive feedback
on my work," Ashley said.
Ashley says she chose to self-publish
because her novels would contain "the
words as she wrote them." She currently
uses Createspace, and her books are
available on Amazon and Kindle.
Ashley's modern-day fantasy in-
cludes four stand-alone stories, but
are best read in order. They are about
a race of beings, Tuatha de'Danann,
whose creator brought them to earth to
protect it from outside forces. Readers
follow the same group of people, only
adding those who are essential to a
final plan that only the Gods might
know. The novels are:
"When in Time"- The Tuatha


guardians are in search of documents
stolen from their sacred tomes.
Believing they are the only ones who
can travel through time in search of the
documents, they find there is a human
being who can find them.
"Through Time"- Still in search of
their documents, the Tuatha guardians
meet another woman who has special
capabilities. They must make a deci-
sion because this could be detrimental
to the human race.
"Tuatha Guardians" Two more
women are found to have good and
bad qualities, but which group are they
supporting?
"Tuatha Origins" -An extended
story of the lives of the Tuatha creator,
and how and why the Tuatha and
humans came to be on earth.
"It's an indescribable feeling to be a
published author," Ashley said.
"I intend to keep writing and
publishing."


LOVE: Relationship blossoms across ocean despite age, distance


FROM PAGE 1


"He was so humble and he had such
a beautiful heart and mind. It's a story
about culture, family, children, different
generations and two people separated
by opposite sides of the world," Ford said.
Ford grew up in the Philippines, work-
ing in the rice paddies, cooking over
firewood and walking miles for water.
She dreamed of a better life. To make
it happen, she attended college and
graduated with a degree in agriculture.
Still, she felt that while there was a soul
mate for her, he wasn't in her village or
even in her country. On a whim, Ford
included her photo and information in a
magazine and Patrick saw it thousands
of miles away, in Colorado.
Patrick was the first man to write to
Ford after seeing her profile and, she


wrote, he was the only man she contin-
ued to write to.
"I fell in love just reading his letter," she
said. "We continued to exchange letters
for about a year. When he came to meet
me, we found out that we had kept all the
letters we had written to one another."
"I am 54 years old," Patrick wrote in
his first letter. "... perhaps the differ-
ence in our ages will be a problem ... if
so, please tell me when you answer and
I will understand."
"I'm almost 28 years old this coming
July," Dedeth responded. "For myself, I
don't mind the age but a good relation-
ship and happy family are best for me."
After a year of exchanging letters, the
couple met face-to-face. They married
and returned together to Colorado. In
1994, they moved to Port Charlotte to
be near Patrick's father. Ford became a


dental assistant and continues to work in
that field. They had a daughter, Phaedra.
Patrick had put together a scrapbook
that contained their letters.
"He must have made it for a reason,"
Dedeth thought. "We talked about
someday helping the people in my vil-
lage. I hope this book will raise money
to have a medical clinic in the school."
"Life of Love for Atema and Atepa"
is available online though Amazon,
Books-A-Million and Barnes and Noble.
Prices range from $17.66 for paperback
to $28.99 for hardcover. Nook book and
Kindle editions cost $3.99. For more
information, visit www.dedethford.com.


PHOTO PROVIDED


Dedeth Ford's book is a love story based on
letters she exchanged with her late husband,
Patrick, from the Philippines to Boulder, Colo.


'WE'VE


2529 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA
941-639-2020


330 NORTH BREVARD
(NEXT TO FARM CREDIT)
ARCADIA
863-993-2020


' .



m
i)'


FREE

EYE EXAM

FOR NEW PATIENTS


complete medical exam with one
of our board certified eye doctors
includes prescription for
eyeglasses, and tests for cataracts,
glaucoma and other eye diseases.
Offer applies to new patients
59 years and older.
Coupon Expires 10/15/2013


Herald Page 4





:'\. il., -i., September 4, 2013


FOR ALL YOUR LANDSCAPE NEEDS
Mulch (bag & bulk) Gravel Pond Supplies Tables Figurines Benches
Topsoil Potting Soil Fountains Tools Boulders Cement Fountains
Sod (piece & pallet) Stepping Stones & Flagstones Railroad Ties Fill Dirt
River Rock Shell Pavers & Retaining Walls (all available bag and bulk)

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2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
I590 Prineville St..Port Charlotte 7621 Sawyer Circle, South Gulf Cove

I 941-629-6665 941-698-9769


THEME CROSSWORD


'TIS THE SEASON


By James Barrick


ACROSS
1. Fruit of the
rowan tree
5.Consider
9.Play and rain
14.Junior worker
18. Sheriff Taylor's
boy
19. Island near Sicily
20.A Bronte
21.OT book
22. Resort to: 3 wds.
24. Misses the mark:
2 wds.
26. Bloc


DOWN
1.Chesterfield
2.A mineraloid
3.Brook
4.Articles of faith
5.Bangladesh city,
once
6. Actress -
Sommer
7.WWII abbr.
8.Music maker
9.Challenges
10. Collect
11.Tip
12.Old English
measure


27. Follower of
a kind of
naturalism
29. Early movie
30. Einstein's wife
31.Ranges
32. Halyard
33. Nonplus
36. Animal refuges
37. Flamboyant
41."-, poor Yorick!"
42. Place for
frequent fliers
43."-- with
flowers"


13. Kind of blood
pressure
14. Austrian
composer
15. Frenzied
16. Amos or Spelling
17. Punta del -
19. Minister's house
23. Cotillion
25. Oval fruit
28. Casus belli, e.g.
31.Comics hero
32. Nobleman
33. African language
group
34. Martian


44. Bird genus
45.Naught
46. Come together:
3 wds.
49. Kindled
50. K- records
51. Boeotian hunter
52. Improbable or
difficult
53. Cadastral map
54. Releases
56.Aquarium fish
58. Habilitate
60. Fails miserably
61. Stabs


35.Straggles: 2 wds.
36. Nimbi
37. Water arum
38.Come to nothing:
2 wds.
39. Dickens' -
Heep
40. Barista's offering
42. Clasps
43. Poles on ships
46. Makes
47."The Sheik of-"
48.Semi-aquatic
creature
53. Somewhat, in
music


62. Freshwater food
fish
63.- -weensy
65.Audio
component
66.Worldly
69. For grades 1-12
70.Slagheap
71."lphigenia in-"
72. Gold, in
Guadalajara
73. MacGraw or
Fedotowsky
74. Lose favor:
3 wds.


55. Braxton or Childs
56. Ink
57. Afore
58. Club performer
59. Faux pas
61.Unbridgeable
gaps
62. Fresh team of
horses
63. Chaff
64. Barkin or Burstyn
65. Like some roofs
66.- and Caicos
67. Bucco of "The
Sopranos"
68. Clayey deposit


78. Native American
79. Lawmaker: Abbr.
80.The Ram
81. Ring site
82. Protection: Var.
83.Backed
85. Scare anagram
86.Allergic reactions
88. Sorority member
89. Emporia
90.Gun maker
91.Out of view
94. City in Australia
95. Praises
99. Collapses: 2 wds.


70. Worked at
71." of God"
74. Danish island
group
75. Depots
76. Cousin to
surrealism:
2 wds.
77.Jolly
82. Getty or Parsons
84.Peacock
markings
85.Trust
86. Style or type
87.Offerings
89. Roadside sign


101.Drop off: 2wds.
103.Oculus shape
104.Great
105. Marriage
106.- -in-a-mist
107.Tractor-trailer
108.Strengthen
109. Film industry
mascot
110.Town in
Oklahoma


90. Eyes in emoticon
91. Far-out ships
92. Hub
93. Criticize
94. Do a kitchen job
95. Muse of history
96. Sign gas
97. Hindu mother
goddess
98. Hurried
100. Perfectly
102. Black bird


Answers on page 14.
1 2 7 9 10 11 12 13 31 4 15 161 7 Cats n Dogs to holdfundraiser
18 1 I 1 19 120
s 1 2Cats n Dogs, 2826 Tamiami Trail, Port
22 25 Charlotte, will hold a Yappy Hour fundraiser
26 27 28 29 for Brody, a 4-year-old mixed-breed pup,
30 31 -from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. today. Brody,
33 3435 36 37 -- 8 0 who was adopted through Big Dog Ranch
41 42 43 4 Rescue, needs both of his anterior cruciate
S4 ligaments (ACLs) replaced through surgery,
45 I I I or he will lose the use of his back legs. There
s 512 53 will be raffles and refreshments. Pets and
54 5 6 5- 5- ----8 59 well-mannered humans are welcome. All
160 61 6 proceeds will benefit Brody's vet expenses.
S I I For more information, call Cats n Dogs at
6 941-627-4093.
69 70 71 72
7 74 1 1 77 Salty Paws to host'Muttini
8081 82 Mingle'Thursday

Salty Paws, 1200 W. Retta Esplanade,
8 I | Punta Gorda, will host Muttini Mingle, "A
91 92 93 9 96 7 98 Pawtastic Yappy Hour," from 5:30 p.m. to 8
99 00 101 p.m. Sept. 5. Come and mingle with others
103 1 104 105 106 who love their pets as much as you love
107 -108109 110 yours. Singer and guitarist Michael Hirst
will provide live music. For more informa-
9-1 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Dist. by Universal Uclick tion, call Salty Paws at 941-575-7599.


BIZ BITS


Bob White
Advertising Manager
bwhite@sun-herald.com






Bank to celebrate


Grandparents' Day


Sunday is National Grandparents' Day, and
Charlotte State Bank & Trust is marking the
occasion by giving away a grandparents' gift
basket at each of the bank's five offices.
Customers and visitors are invited to sign up
for the drawing at any office:
Punta Gorda office, 2331 Tamiami Trail,
Punta Gorda
Murdock office, 1100 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte
Parkside/Midtown office, 3002 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte
Peachland office, 24163 Peachland Blvd., Port
Charlotte
Charlotte Harbor office, 23112 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor.
Bank lobbies are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Friday, and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. The drawing
will be held on Thursday, and winners will be
notified in time to pick up their prize prior to
Grandparents' Day.

H & R Block ribbon cutting

H & R Block will be having a ribbon-cutting
today at 5:30 p.m. H & R Block is located
at 1942 Kings Highway in Port Charlotte.

Cultural Center to hold
annual flea market

The Cultural Center of Charlotte County, 2280
Aaron St., Port Charlotte, will hold a Community
Flea Market from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 14-15.
Everyone is welcome to sell items at the flea
market. The flea market will be indoors in the
conference center. Tables are $35 each, or $60
for three tables (plus tax). To reserve a table, call
941-625-4175, ext. 230, or visit the administra-
tion office. The Cultural Center will offer a bake
sale and caf6 specials. Call 941-625-4175.


I COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT


PHOTO PROVIDED


Christine Rice, owner of Bel Canto Music Lessons, is currently accepting new students. Rates
for lessons are as follows: 30-minute lessons are $25 (30-minute lessons are only available in
Port Charlotte and North Port) and 60-minute lessons are $45. You can reach Christine at
941-275-7688 to set an appointment for your first lesson. You can also reach Christine via email at
belcantolessons@gmail.com or visit herwebsite at belcantolessons.net.


SComplete Auto Repair
"Quality Service at Affordable Prices"


SFull Transmission Service
Automatics and Manuals
Clutches, Manual, Differentials
Off Road/On Road Vehicles


I* .- ^



On Veterans 1/2 Mile
North of Atwater
Senirc anrl \/Vteranc


Call For Appointment One Year Warranty
On Parts And Labor

20120 Veterans Blvd.
Port Charlotte, FL 33954
941-623-2926


1/2-( c
201

*D1


Monday- Friday
8am 5pm
Saturday 9am 1 pm


Discounts ron@mycompleteautorepair.com
www.mycompleteautorepair.com
M.W. "Quality Service at Affordable Prices"


C _____ ___ I


_____ ___


_ _


Herald Page 5


$10 FF AY SEVIC








Do you remember wiien?


Do you remember when?


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Janine Smith

WK)tiote


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I




I' 1,11i .,i., September 4, 2013 Herald Page 7



Chamber members network at JD's Bistro
T he Charlotte County Cham-
ber of Commerce held their
monthly networking meeting
at JD's Bistro and Grille on Aug.
15, with dozens of area business
members in attendance. The
monthly meetings are open to all
chamber members; the next meet-
ing will be at Bocca Lupo on Sept.
11. You can contact the chamber
to make reservations by calling r
941-627-2222 or 941-639-2222.

HERALD PHOTOS BY
DONNELL BATES
Pastor Sammie Brooks from
Grace Presbyterian Church is
seen here at JD's Bistro and
Grille trying out the grand
piano with emcee for the day Attending the networking lunch for August is Sue
Jim Carroll of Legal Shield. Carron from Sleep Inn and Suites.




















Maryanne Henry, Sales and Marketing for JD's Bistro and Grille, is seen here with chamber
member Rick lImberger of Glass & Mirror Inc. From Panther Hollow

Szafranski attended the
monthly meeting with
Dr. Ashley Reynolds, also
from Panther Hollow
Dental Lodge.
LEFT: From the
Thrift Depot,
Alexis Louis and
Zack Heavener are
seen here arriving
at the monthly
networking lunch
on Aug. 15.


DONATIONS NEEDED!
"Your donation makes a big difference"
Please Donate Clean, Usable Items.


Call To Schedule A Pickup For
Large Furniture & Appliances
(941) 637-1981

SALVATION ARMY
THRIFT STORES
S1048 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda
Open: Mon.- Sat. 9am 5pm





:'. ,. .iii.n September 4, 2013


Joseph Usher was 'Accountable; but was he guilty?


Making a good book easier with professional help


By RENEELePERE
I I ( I.. .' ., ,

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HEP-LD PHC.',T-., B, PC-.BEPT IIELSC'.'Il
Nancy Panoch holds her book "Accountable: The Joseph Usher Story." Panoch spent a year writing the book then spent another year or more
editing. "Accountable: The Joseph Usher Story," was published in March. You can find it on Amazon, and on Sept. 24 you will be able to buy it at


Barnes and Noble.

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Petite Beauty Salon owner Nancy Panoch chats with clients while she puts perm rollers in Evelyn
Jean Nolan's hair. Panoch has been a stylist since 1964, and Petite Beauty Salon has been in the
same location since 1989.


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From left, Sandy Gessler, Judy Stranach, Dorothy Radii and Nancy Panoch talk about Panoch's book
"Accountable: The Joseph Usher Story," and life at Petite Beauty Salon. The salon is open Monday
through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is located at 4014-B Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte.


By BARBARA BEAN-MELLINGER
HERALD CORRESPONDENT

It used to be that hopeful authors
sent their manuscripts to publisher
after publisher, gathering enough
rejection notices to wallpaper a room.
The lucky few finally received a "yes,"
while the others gave up, stuffing their
precious work into the back of a drawer
to gather dust.
Now, self-publishing has come into
the mainstream, and many authors
don't even bother with traditional
publishers. Not only can they have
their manuscripts published, but
they maintain control over both their
content and their profits.
James Abraham started reading at
the age of four and never stopped. He
became a journalist first writing,
then editing for numerous news-
papers and magazines, including the
Charlotte Sun.
Ten years ago, Abraham noticed
digital publishing was starting to pick
up.
"I was reviewing many self-published
books for the columns I wrote, and I
realized I could help these authors,"
Abraham said.
That's when he started Book Broker
Publishers of Florida in Port Charlotte.
Right from the start, however,
Abraham designed his business differ-
ently from the ones on the Internet.
He knew that these authors needed
more than just a way of bringing their
manuscript to print. First, they needed
someone to help them make it a good
book.
"When you're writing your book,
you're airing a part of yourself," said
Abraham. "Their books are something
special to them; they're close to their
hearts. I honor that by working closely
with authors. My focus is on helping
them create a good book."
Most online publishers are wonderful
when they're writing up your contract,
he said. But when you have questions
during the process they're not so
helpful.
Being a local business, Abraham said,


PHOTO PROVIDED


James Abraham, center, with participants from a recent Success Camp for Writers 10-week class.


authors can call him and come in and
talk about their book at any point in
the process. Some come in with just
an idea of their book, and he helps
them with its structure, coaching them
along the way. Others come in with a
complete manuscript but, like most
books, it needs a professional touch.
Editing and proofreading are givens,
but sometimes the manuscript really
needs repair in its structure, dialogue
or character development.
Realizing he was spending quite a
lot of time helping authors frame their
books, or doing extensive restructuring
and repairing, Abraham started offer-
ing Success Camp for Writers about five
years ago. During the 10-week course,


Abraham and guest speakers discuss
character development, dialogue, plot,
pacing and other elements of putting a
book together.
Book Broker Publishers of Florida is
different, too, in how and how much
they charge their authors for publica-
tion. The company's typical charge
is $1,800 for a 200-page book, which
includes editing, proofreading and
100 copies of the book. Authors pay
$600 when they sign the contract, $600
when their manuscript is finalized and
the remaining $600 upon delivery of
the books.
If a book needs extensive work
beyond normal editing, Abraham
informs the author of that up front, and


quotes what the price will be for that
additional service.
"There are no surprises," Abraham
said. "I treat them the way I would want
to be treated."
With so many online publishers
today, anyone can publish a book. But
that doesn't mean the book will be
market quality, he said. For that, you
need a professional. Every writer, no
matter how good, needs a professional
editor, he stressed.
"Reading and writing changed my
life," said Abraham. "I want to do that
for other readers and writers."
For more information visit www.
mybookbroker.com or call 941-258-4920.
Email: barbara.mellinger@gmail.com


A Miami girl's Florida was full of exotic flowers, palms


Aldo Leopold wrote in his Sand
Country Almanac, "Someone once said
that we cannot make it without the
ground and the ground is so rich and
intricate, that we will spend the rest
offorever simply trying to understand
what it is saying to us."

My first view of Florida was in
1946, while looking out the
window of our car heading
down desolate Highway 27 toward
Miami. Dad yelled out, "Girls, look at
that alligator!" And sure enough, there
was a three-foot long alligator attempt-
ing to cross the highway. Great introduc-
tion to Florida! (He made the crossover.)
Dad was a colonel in the Army
during World War II when he moved
my mother, my sister Martha, and I
to Miami Beach based on orders from
higher-ups. The Army had requisi-
tioned the King Cole Hotel and that
would be our new living quarters for
an indeterminate period of time. I
was 5 years old, but in my mind's eye
today, I can still see that alligator on
the highway and swaying palm trees
from my hotel bedroom window each
morning and night.
In 1949, Dad retired out of Fairbanks,
Alaska, and moved the family to
Maryland to be close to Walter Reed
Hospital since my mother had been
diagnosed with cancer. Dad wanted
the very best of care for her. But in
1953, my mother, Grace, died after
many months of pain. Dad remarried


Mary Kleiss



Columnist Mary Kleiss writes about
Parkside businesses. Contact her at
mkleiss@msn.com.


two years later, and we all moved to
California for a year until Dad decided
that Miami would be a better place,
financially, to live. Horse racing might
have had a little something to do
with the move, as dad's hobby was
mathematically betting on horses, and
Miami had great tracks Tropical
Park, Hialeah with its gorgeous pink
flamingos and fantastic landscaping,
Gulfstream, Hallendale. Occasionally
Dad would hit Flagler Dog Track and
another dog track on the south end of
Miami Beach, but though Dad did OK,
he suspected that the dogs were doped.
So in early 1957, we hit the road
again and settled in Coral Gables, a
suburb of Miami. When I think back to
those years, I realize what an awesome
place Miami was while growing up -
Crandon Park, Matheson Hammock,
Miami Beach, Fairchild Tropical
Gardens and trips to the Keys. And the
foliage! Poinciana trees, frangipani, and
the gorgeous orchid trees lined the mid-
way from Miracle Mile onto CoralWay,
all the way to downtown. I think that
was when my love affair with Florida's
gorgeous plants and trees began.


"It's not native plants for the sake of native plants. It's
because when grown in the right environment with
their associates, they are the most beautiful."

Darrel Morrison, Professor Emeritus, University of Georgia


In 1978 when my husband, Joe, the
kids and I moved into our almost new
home in Port Charlotte, I decided that
we should do our own landscaping.
Joe was an old farmer from Tuscola,
Ill., and was all for it. We were both
working then, and several years passed
before we could begin the huge project.
We didn't want the typical island that
every other home seemed to possess,
but a rectangular area that would take
up most of the front yard, thus less
lawn mowing for Joe. I decided to take
a night course in Xeriscaping. The ex-
tensive, months-long course included
drafting a yard plan, making landscap-
ing estimates, along with numerous
sheets of descriptions of native and
tropical plants. Taking that course and
becoming a certified Xeriscapist was
the best decision of my life!
Hurricane Andrew hit Miami and
truckloads of palm trees, shrubbery
and plants salvaged from the hur-
ricane showed up for sale at various
locations. I was sick at heart seeing
the poor scrawny queen palms and


others abruptly torn out of their home.
I purchased five queens and a pygmy
palm for the base, thinking that I would
always have a little bit of Miami and
Homestead to view each day.
We did not have a set budget; I'd buy
here and there when I spied something
that would get along with the rest of
the crowd. Our biggest problem was
finding the native plants to surround
the palms.
Our wish list, many of which we were
going to have to weed out, included
counties, a true Florida native; bird of
paradise; crape myrtle; bougainvillea;
Senegal date palm; queen sago palm;
split leaf philodendron; dwarf orange
tree; sprengeri; allamanda; pittospo-
rum; juniper; umbrella tree; frangipani,
poinciana, azaleas and lots of mulch.
We certainly had a bunch to weed out.
Joe was going to do the labor, which if
we would have to hire out, would be
lots of moola. Poor Joe! And this was
only the front!
Stay tuned for more adventures in
Florida landscaping.


Herald Page 9


11-1 ..................................................................................................................................................................................








ROTC cadets give back to the community with blood


HEP-LD PH-,Ti-.-S B, BETS, \VILLI-rS,1


Port Charlotte High's kickoff blood drive, hosted by the Junior Naval ROTC, was held Thursday and
Friday during school hours. Wearing the "Be Awesome Today" shirts from Florida Blood Centers,
Steven Mashke, Greg Adams, Vincent Magenti, Justin Osinga and Karl Hughes, alumni from
Lemon Bay, North Port and Port Charlotte High schools, came out to support and donate blood
before heading off to the Air Force.


Donor Service Specialist Kevin Dawson does the intake on first-time donor, PCHS junior Dakota
Robinson on Thursday.


Ali Freda, senior; Alyssa Gowan, junior; and James Holmberg, sophomore, were among the blood
donors that phlebotomist Andrea Sweet assisted on the Big Red Bus on Thursday at PCHS.


Phlebotomist Danny Gonzalez takes blood from PCHS senior Forest Burke.


Donating for the 12th time, senior Richard Wessel is assisted by phlebotomist Stephanie Anglero
and Pageen Jessie in the Big Red Bus


First-time donor Araya Barnes, junior, gets her photo taken for proof and memories by her
support person, PO 1st Class Brianna Spieldenner, junior.


Ensign Carly Cheatham escorts junior Alex Brown to the Big Red Bus, first making a stop to check
out the Pirate shirts and hats being sold by Cadet Seaman Alexis Lynch from the school store.


r:

3%"5





:'. ,il. ,.i.n September 4, 2013


PCHS grad compiles Pirate



history into treasure trove of trivia


By BARBARA BEAN-MELLINGER
HERALD CORRESPONDENT

Pirate Henderson McCullough was
elected MVP in football for the 1984-85
school year.
Tracy Herman was the first Pirate
Homecoming Queen.
By the 1990-91 school year, its 10-
year anniversary, Port Charlotte High
School was the largest high school in
the county.
Facts like these make Dan McIntosh's
book, "Yes, I Am A Pirate: The History
of Port Charlotte High School" a treat
to read not just for the school's
alumni but for anyone interested in the
county's history.
The book is packed with information
and data from every year, beginning
with the school's opening in 1980-81
through the 2010-2011 school year.
"It started as a way to consolidate
athletic records and have them all in
one place," McIntosh said, who was a
PCHS teacher and Dean of Students
when he began working on the book
for the school's 30th anniversary. He
is now an assistant principal at Port
Charlotte Middle School.
Working with PCHS athletic direc-
tor James Vernon, McIntosh was able
to include team records for many
sports, coaches' names and significant
achievements. For example, the boys
cross country team won the county
title in 2001-02 under coach Darrell
Milstead.

More Pirate tales to
tell than just athletics
Mclntosh soon realized he had much
more than athletic records to include.
Culling through yearbooks, he found
other tidbits that had been lost through
the years or were scattered, and
brought them together in one book.
Every year lists the graduating seniors,
including his own name in 1998.
Having moved to Port Charlotte


at the age of five, McIntosh grew up
attending Charlotte County schools -
Liberty Elementary, Murdock Middle
School and PCHS. His Pirate Pride
is evident in the painstaking way he
sought to round out the information
for each year. Extracurricular activities
and their sponsors are also listed.
For anyone who has ever wondered,
"What was the name of that teacher
who" ... a list of teachers and their
subjects is given for each year, too.
Photos throughout the book show
Pirate spirit in action in class, in
the community, on stage and on the
athletic fields and courts.
Mud wrestling. Painted faces. Proud
graduates in caps and gowns.
Cheerleaders, mascots and drum ma-
jors. Class clowns and valedictorians.
Buildings being built and traditions
along with them.
The 2004-05 chapter includes details
not likely found in many school histo-
ries. After Hurricane Charley forced the
closing of four county schools, includ-
ing Charlotte High School in Punta
Gorda, their students came to share
the PCHS campus. PCHS students at-
tended school from 6 a.m. to noon that
year, while CHS students attended at
PCHS from 1:00 p.m. to 7 p.m. Though
the schools are traditionally fierce
rivals, T-shirts for their joint football
game read, "Divided by a river, united
by a storm."
At the back of the book are write-
ups on the school's award-winning
band, The Pride of Port Charlotte, the
Naval Junior ROTC program, the world
champion Model United Nations team,
athletic records and a Hall of Fame
that includes both John Hall, the first
PCHS grad to play for the NFL, as well
as Anthony Cicchella, the school's first
principal.
The sale of "Yes, I Am A Pirate" has
raised approximately $1,200 for the
school. To purchase a copy, contact
Daniel McIntosh at 941-255-7460.
Email: barbara.mellinger@gmail.com


HERALD PHOTO BY BARBARA BEAN-MELLINGER


Daniel Mclntosh, assistant principal at Port Charlotte Middle School, holds his PCHS diploma and
the book he wrote on PCHS Pirate history.


Working the
check-in for
the blood drive
in the ROTC
room are Cadet
Seaman Ethan
Popka, Petty
Officer 1st Class
Owayne Perry
and Cadet
Seaman Nicole
Torres.
RIGHT: PCHS
junior Alexis
Rodriguez
leaves the
Big Red Bus
sporting Pirate
colors over her
needle mark.


In a last-minute effort to build up her iron, senior Tashae White has a slice of pizza being handed
out by Cadet Seaman Ken George, before heading to the Big Red Bus to donate.


Herald Page 11


I4[








Pirates show their spirit with first pep rally of the year


HER-LD PH-.,T-.S B. BETS, \ ILLI-F,,1


Using only their faces, the search for gummy bears in a bowl of chocolate pudding was the game
of the day during the first Port Charlotte High School Pep Rally of the 2013-14 school year held
Friday. Madison Myers and Michael Goggans volunteered to represent their freshman class.


Who's got Pirate pride? Seniors do!


Junior Robert Senters and senior Jeffrey Burrell take their Pirate pride seriously.


Sporting her Pirate pride, assistant principal
Allison Portwood sports a Pirate skull on her
cheek and matching her skull earrings.


The Pirate drumline kept the rally going with
their talented percussion skills.


A group of junior Pirates get ready for the first pep rally of the year.


Senior varsity cheerleader Katie Hinds and Riena Casa cheer on the seniors at the pep rally.

Tuesday September 10th, 5:30-8:30pm
Enjoy Live Music Performed by Master Guitarist,
I iClosed For Business
Claudio Baltierra 9/15-9/30
Reopening 10/1
I Enjoy Our Homemade $5 Off Check
Daily Lunches & Dinners $5off Check
Iof $35 or Morel
ij' Tues.-Sat. 11:30-9pm


The Pirate varsity football team gathers at center court to be recognized and encouraged to go
win their first game of the season.




:'\. ,il. .i.n September 4, 2013


Terriers get in step with first dance of the year


The back-to-school dances at Port Charlotte Middle School
are also meant for the sixth-graders, their first of many
middle school dances. Sixth-graders had their dance on
Wednesday. Ashlyn Garrity was enjoying herself at her first
middle school dance.


Jordan Dawkins gets help wheeling
around the dance floor from a
couple of classmates, Tyri Gainer
and Luke Ulmanice.


Andrea Lafferty and Walter Johnson were definitely having a great time
at their first middle school dance.


Line dancing brought the chaperones out to the dance floor: Marjorie Johnson, VE specialist;
Carol Tallada, paraprofessional; and Tracy Herman, media specialist.


Getting wild and crazy are Savanah Valenti and Dancing to the "Cotton-Eyed Joe" line dance is
Bailee Drake. Nicholas Lippel, and behind him is Dylan Greamo.
cooo


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Herald Page 13








Purse auction benefits Animal Welfare League


HEP"LD PH,':.T':S B. BETS, \VILLI-I,1S


Shirley Mahan, Betty Wagner and Holly Gunsher pick out their favorite purses they were hoping
to get in the live auction.


Sharon Thomas, Executive Director of the Animal Welfare League was happy to see Gaby Childs,
Maura Matzko, Barbara Ringwalt and Diane Hoffer come out for the Happy Hour Handbag
Exchange, a AWL benefit, at D'Vines Wine & Gift Emporium in Port Charlotte. The event included
a wine tasting, live and silent auction of purses and the sale of donated purses, all to benefit
the AWL. These particular women were also promoting the upcoming Black and Gold Gala in
November, another AWL benefit.


Animal Welfare League volunteers Bruce Klemish and Linda Bigelow work the meet-and-greet
table outside D'Vines and also encouraged attendees to adopt a pet.


Regine Ebanks and Patrice Weston brought in purse donations for the auction portion of the
benefit, and were also planning to possibly purchase purses to take home in support of the AWL.






Tuesday,
September 10. 12:00pm
109 Taylor Street Punta Gorda


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Surgery He has now added ORA-Guided technology with VerifEye
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your surgery and enhance the quality of your
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may have cataracts, join Dr. Aaron Judd for
this informative seminar


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Supporting the AWL benefit, Yvonne Sprunger checks out the boxes of donated purses that AWL
volunteer Carla Beyer was offering.


Answers
to
puzzle
on
page 5.


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:'\. iln. -i., September 4, 2013


Charlotte Premier dominates Braden River


.J. .:** 'ja,\



HERALD PHOTOS BY MONICA AMAYA
Logan Cook, No. 20 for the Charlotte Premier U-19 boys team, plays defense for his team during a
recent soccer game against the Braden River"Rage" team at North County Regional Park.


Tyler Sultan, No. 15 for the Charlotte Premier U-19 boys team, dribbles the ball down the field.


GOLF SCORES
All golf scores must be
emailed to golfscores@
sun-herald.com.

* DEEP CREEK
GOLF CLUB
* Quota Results
Aug. 17
Individual Winners:
1.) Greg Leet, +10.
2.) Clay Shasteen, +8.
3.) Dave Parker, +5.
4.) Rob Carvill, +4.
5.) Lee Bennett, +3.
Team Results:
1.) Clay Shasteen and
Rob Carvill, +12.
2.) Greg Leet and
Terry Cullen, +7.
3.) Lee Bennett and
Tosh Warren, +4.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
* Hole No. 2: Bill
Connelly.
* Hole No. 8: Jean Guy
Gagnon.
* Hole No. 11:Tom Natoli.
* Quota Results
Aug. 20
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:


* Hole No. 11: Joe Gonia.
* Hole No. 14:
Mark Cleary.
* Quota Results
Aug. 21
Individual Winners:
1.) Erik Heitter, +5.
2.) Jim Payne, +4.
3.) Gene Almodovar, +3.
4.) Larry Colbert, +3.
Team Results:
1.) Tosh Warren and
"The Fred"+3.
2.) Tim Sowinki and
Greg Leet, +2.
3.) Bob Donahue and
Paul Sprunk, +2.
CLOSESTTO THE PIN:
* Hole No. 7: Erik Heitter.
* Hole No. 14:
Larry Colbert.

* ROTONDA
GOLF &
COUNTRYCLUB
* White Marsh Nine
Scramble
Aug. 26
1.) Bob Zimmerman,
Jim Shaw and
Dave Metcalf, 37.
2.) Bob Scheeler,


Robert Bowen,
Larry Altenburg and
Richard Barry, 37.
Closest to Pin:
* Hole No. 3: Bob
Scheeler.
* Hole No. 8: Bob
Scheeler.

* BURNT
STORE GOLF &
ACTIVITY CLUB
* Scramble
Aug.17
1.) Patrick Cataldo,
Richard Tolson,
Mark Vandederkhove
and Lynn Hunter.
2.) Debra Burns,
Tom Fitzpatrick and
Carl Millerschoen.
3.) Phil Leonard, Mary
Welch and Gordon Fogg.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Jerry Hunter, Robert Paul,
Barbara Berman and
Cheryl Fogg.
SLadies'League
Aug. 21
1.) Babe Ahrens,
Cheryl Fogg, Lynn Hunter
and Barb Whelan.


* Men's League
Aug.21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Carl Millerschoen.
2.) Ron Olsen.
3.) Bernie Punt and
Tommy Shannon.
FLIGHT B:
1.) Bob Bottel.
2.) Victor Smith.

* TWIN ISLES
COUNTRY CLUB
* Ladies 18-Hole Results
Odd-holes only
Aug. 21
FLIGHT A
1.) Pam Solinger, 34.
2.) Linda Seber, 37.
FLIGHT B
1.) Sue Galvin, 41.
2.) Eileen Roehrig, 43.
FLIGHT C
1.) Lorrie Ross, 41.
T- 2.) Ina Bice and
Judy Vanderweele, 42.
* Men's Day Results
Individual Points Quota
Aug. 23
1.) Butch Seber,-1.
2.) Ron Frazier,-2.
3.) Don Ross,-7.


-j -.. 1, -.-y -y .... : :



Sean Moulton, No. 6 for the Charlotte Premier U-19 boys team, fights for possession of the ball
during a recent soccer game against the Braden River"Rage" team at North County Regional
Park. Charlotte Premier won 4-1.


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1 11,e s I


LEFT:
Daniel
Rovegno,
No.13 for the
Charlotte
Premier U-19
boys team,
fights for
control of
the ball. The
Charlotte
Premier team
is coached
by Shane
Leggett.










LEFT:
George Agsar,
No. 41 for
the Charlotte
Premier U-19
boys team,
fights to stop
the advances
of a Braden
River "Rage"
player.


Herald Page 15


.
., .. .... = .:*


...
.. .- .


~t~51~








Bandits have tough opening weekend

Bandits have tough opening weekend


By CHUCK BALLARO
1 l11- I \\ 1, 11

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Port Charlotte Pee-Wee Rolando Francis eludes
a tackler.


HEP"LD PH:.',TI:..S B. CHLICK B"LL P,'-.
Port Charlotte Junior Midget Marc Jean-Louis
looks for running room in their game against
Riverdale on Saturday.

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The Port Charlotte Pee-Wee defense stuffs a Riverdale runner.


From left, Pee-Wee cheerleaders Nea Pelekoudas, Nicole Levitt and Brooklin Bowman after their
game against Riverdale on Saturday.


Port Charlotte Pee-Wee Dominic Johnston reaches out to try to catch a pass.


Port Charlotte Pee-Wee Anthony Bertucci calls signals in their game against Riverdale.










I


S

U TA


GO R D A


Wednesday, September 4,2013 Since 1893


GO


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HERALD PHOTO BY BOB MA
VIP executive director Susan Bledsoe demon
states the reading magnification equipment
available at the center.


Bar," 45*4"

IM %W
.TRWIr Wite


ii' ilk

BY BOB MASSEY, PGH CORRESPONDENT
Ile harlotte County's organization for
the blind and visually impaired is in
Danger of closing its doors.
Le At least that's the word from Susan
S Bledsoe, executive director of Visually
Impaired Persons of Charlotte County
(VIP).
She has spent months trying to rally the
support especially financial of local
eye doctors to save the center, which has
been relying solely on donations for its
existence. Thus far, few physicians have
been willing to pitch in to support the
organization.
But that might be less because they don't
care and more because ofVIP's potentially
sordid recent past.
SSEY
-A history of helping
it VIP is a nonprofit organization that
was founded in 1987. Its original purpose
was to establish a center for rehabilita-
4 tion services for visually impaired county
S residents.
Within a year, the first VIP office was
opened in Punta Gorda, and rehabilitation
classes were held at the new location. In
1991, the peer support group was

| SURVIVE I P16


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HEP- LD PHi-.,Ti-. B. P-P..IEL" STlK
Jennifer French, an instructor at The Yoga
Sanctuary, holds up a memory book that
was signed during the 2012 Yoga Month
Challenge. Last year, $3,000 was raised for
the Peace River Wildlife Center, and the
studio hopes to break that record this year.
SEE PAGE 4.

T\i..()I 1 C()NII.NI1

Editor's insights .... ... 2
Business news ... .. .2-5
4) Years Ago ........... 6
School Buzz ........... 7
Tarpon Page......... 8-9
Sports. ......... 10-12
Golf scores ........... 10
Community beat... 13-16


I Find us on

Facebook

CLICK LIKE'ON THE
PGH FACEBOOK PAGE


L UPCOMING EVENT
IN PUNTA GORDA.


Fl I

EDITOR'S INSIGHTS

INITA (i()l)A


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BUSINESS

IINIA (iO)D)A


Conquistadors Don Roll and Lindsay Harrington
pose with Punta Gorda's Charlotte State Bank &
Trust's branch manager Alyson Burch.


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LEFT:
Conquistador
crew member
Bob August
joins bank
staff members
Marian Pritt,
Devon Gaboury,
Lucretia
Rapsawich,
branch manager
Alyson Burch
and fellow crew
member Gill
Baillargeon in
the ship docked
in the Charlotte
State Bank &
Trust's parking
lot for a picture.


Charlotte State Bank

welcomes Conquistadors


Donnell Bates


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HEP-LO PH'.,T-.S B. Dll llIELL B-TES
Charlotte State Bank & Trust staffers Don
Martin, Marian Pritt and vice president Chris-
tine Hause pose with Punta Gorda Mayor Bill
Albers and Conquistador Ray Dion.


PUNTA GORDA HERALD M MhIf IP R -l INi1 A'iia Phir pi iin I I d IIIII USPS 743170 1lI t '. 1r i, ilbl i.l I'r.Inl v II I ly Il i i.. i li i:,r...ll i.i m.. : I I-I
S ^ f ^ ^ ^ Hirl,,,rvni-iH irIii l llrl,,[- H irl,,,r I.1 H:.:'l-u:l.I :
Derek Dunn-Rankin i liii in ll lrl n _.1. I11111 ADVERTISING
David Dunn-Rankin rn ,-lnn .n ullnl inr 11' Il : Leslee Peth,% i Adv-rr ~ll, Ilri-, [iir IP;H Fllull'l nr _' I, ,
Chris Porter f .,. ,Ilir .- I 1:t J M ike Ruiz, PI1-Jiwl Advi: ir.j ,imi r _'i.i.4 ,. :'1
SNEWSPAPERS RustyPray I irliir- h.llr '.i I I.: Colleen Daymude, lAviprInviri .i. ,rinm iiyiI- :'I.4.
Pam ela Staik Puii[i i;,..nlr Hiii1 r, IM alI r I _. 11 i 1, Lo i W white Advli niirh A, ,,,,ur .,,uii f.-.
Charlorre DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice nll ,.1,,lhr ,l,.i, ,, I,,r ,,, CIRCULATION
23170 Harbo:rview R:oad, Charl:otte Harb:or, FL 33980 20o-1000 Donna L. Davidson ,.ji ,11. i 1J Mark Yero, ,, iri. l ., i ,, Ir. i .


Fun heats up



in Punta Gorda


Enjo! phloto.s of centc s on tlhe

Punta CGoda Herald Faccbook jace





i:' i. ,i .i. September 4, 2013




A new board for the chamber


Herald Page 3


Annual awards banquet is Sept. 14 at Isles Yacht Club


he Punta Gorda Chamber of
Commerce is just 10 days away
from its annual awards banquet,
which is set for Sept. 14 at the Isles
Yacht Club, 1780 W. Marion Ave., Punta
Gorda.
This is truly one of our favorite
chamber events of the year, as we
thank those who have supported the
organization during the past 12 months
and present the new board of directors
to the membership.
Although he is already "officially" the
chairman of the board, Jose Morillo of
Charlotte Regional Medical Center will
assume his new role at the banquet.
Given our past speeches, we expect to
hear from him what might be expected
in the coming year for the chamber.
Call the chamber office at 941-639-
3720 to make reservations for this event
- space is limited.
I also wish to congratulate the 16
finalists for the prestigious Donna
Heidenreich Business of the Year
Awards, which will be given out during
the banquet. Nominees for this year's
awards are the Animal Welfare League
of Charlotte County, Fishermen's
Village, Punta Gorda Airport, Punta
Gorda RentAll, Peace River Wildlife
Center, Turning Heads South at Shawn
and Company Salon & Spa, The Other
West Coast Media Productions, Inc.,
Presley Beane Financial Services,
Simply Sweet, The Foot Landing, Spa
One, The Medicine Shoppe, Salty Paws,
Michael Saunders & Company, The
Sentry Tax Group and the Punta Gorda
Police Department.


John R. Wright


JohnR. Wright is president of the
Punta Gorda Chamber ofCommerce.
Sendyour emailstojrwright@
puntagorda-chamber.com.


Kickstart Pies & Plates
The clock is ticking for Pies & Plates'
venture to bring the business to the
Herald Court Centre parking plaza.
To support the effort, the restaurant
is asking for people to pledge money,
at any amount, on the Kickstarter
wesbite, www.kickstarter.com. If
successful, those who pledge will be
entitled to a reward redeemable at Pies
& Plates. That being said, no pledge will
be debited to a credit card if the total
amount required for the project is not
reached.
The project will end at exactly
1:18 p.m. on Sept. 14, so now is the
time to visit the website, www.kick
starter.com, and get involved.
Just click on the link to "Discover
Great Projects" at the top of the home
page, and then type in "piesandplates"
without spaces to find out more
information.

Entrepreneurial
Academy returns
The chamber is also going into
its fourth year of presenting its


Entrepreneurial Academy, which is set
to start in September. The classes this
year have been condensed to a series
of five lessons on Saturday mornings in
Punta Gorda, after which participants
will be armed with a load of important
information about how to start up a
new business in the area.
Co-hosted with SCORE, a national
organization that provides free small
business advice to entrepreneurs, and
sponsored by Enterprise Charlotte
Economic Council, the cost is a mere
$150.
This program is open to new and
existing business owners alike, and the
goal is to train entrepreneurs how to
operate a more lucrative business.
Call the chamber at 941-639-3720
or visit the chamber's website, www.
puntagordachamber.com, for more
information.

Other happenings
Even though we are at the beginning
of September, there is a lot going on
in Punta Gorda. Here are some other
things to check up on:
Our new operations at the Visitor
and Newcomer Center, located off exit
161 of Interstate 75 at Jones Loop Road,
is going gangbusters. Get you business
out there and widen your marketing
outreach. To have your rack cards out
there is $300, or $150 if you are mem-
bers of one of the following organiza-
tions: Punta Gorda, Charlotte County,
North Port or Englewood chambers
of commerce, or if you are a member


of the Charlotte County Hospitality
Committee.
On Sept. 28, the Punta Gorda
Chamber, in conjunction with The
Foot Landing and the Punta Gorda
Historical Mural Society, is planning a
4.4 mile run/walk around the murals of
Punta Gorda. Participants will gather
beads along the route. Following the
run/walk, the chamber is hosting
a community picnic and an "It's a
Knockout" competition. What's that?
Well, it's a fun challenge where teams
of six compete against each other in
six fun-filled games to reach the finals
and get crowned the "It's a Knockout
Champions of 2013." Team registration
is only $50, and the only rule is your
team must have a minimum of two
ladies. There is no better way of getting
your business or community name out
there. Contact the chamber for more
information or to register.
The annual Pops at Edison Concert
is set for Oct. 12 at Edison State
College, Charlotte Campus, located at
26300 Airport Road, Punta Gorda. The
event is set to start at 5:30 p.m. This
year's entertainment will be a tribute to
"The Rat Pack" of Frank Sinatra, Dean
Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. Tickets
start at $20 and can be purchased by
contacting the chamber. Stage-front
tables of eight and 10 are also available.
For all other upcoming events, visit
the Punta Gorda chamber's website.
With one simple click, you can register
for the chamber's weekly newsletter,
"The Friday Facts." You'll never be out
of the loop again.


Sandra's hosts chamber luncheon


Lori White






embers of the Punta Gorda
Chamber of Commerce
gathered Aug. 28 for the
monthly networking luncheon, which
was held at Sandra's Restaurant, lo-
cated at 111 W. Olympia Ave.
For more information about
chamber happenings, visit www.
puntagordachamber.com.


HERALD PHOTOS BY LORI WHITE
FROM THE LEFT: Rainer and Sandra Ruhland, the owners of Sandra's Restaurant in downtown Punta Gorda, were happy to greet members of the
Punta Gorda Chamber of Commerce. Cathy Fuller, Mike Miro and Julia Pirone, all servers from Sandra's Restaurant, pose for a photo during the
networking luncheon on Aug. 28. Maryanne Henry, the sales manger at JD's Jazz & Dining, poses for a photo with Linda Grother, owner of JD's,
during the event. Jessica Eilerman, the officer of program management from Florida Department of Financial Services, was the guest speaker.






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Wednesday, September 4,2013


Yoga Month Challenge helps wildlife refuge


ince 2008, Americans have taken
to mats with bolsters, blocks and
blankets for a little "me" time each
September in celebration of National
Yoga Month, a designation made of-
ficial by the Department of Health and
Human Services. And not four days
into the month, the tradition stretches
forward in Punta Gorda at The Yoga
Sanctuary.
Throughout September, people are
encouraged to embrace yoga, chal-
lenging themselves to attend classes
and learn about the benefits of yoga to
one's health and well-being. The studio,
located in downtown Punta Gorda at
112 Sullivan St., has been participating
for 5 years now and has worked the
celebration into an annual event called
the Yoga Month Challenge.
Just like elementary school children
participate in jog-a-thons to raise
money for health organizations, The
Yoga Sanctuary is encouraging its
students to gain sponsorships from
family, friends and co-workers as they
attempt to make it to as many yoga
classes as their schedules and bodies
- will allow. Donation canisters are set
up at the studio throughout the month,
enabling folks to drop off some much-
needed money for the Peace River
Wildlife Center, a local nonprofit and
wildlife refuge, located at 3400 Ponce
de Leon Parkway. The rehabilitation
center offers help to injured, sick and
orphaned native animals.
Last year, $3,000 was raised for the
cause during the challenge.
"It's a yoga-thon," explained Jennifer
French, an instructor at the studio and
director of teacher development.


Pamela Staik
[mmTaa


Pamela Stalk is the editor of the
Punta Gorda Herald. Contact her at
pgherald@sun-herald.com.


Those who attempt the yoga
challenge will have their progress
documented on a poster board, with
star-shaped stickers illustrating how
many times an individual has hit the
mat during the month of September.
Formally, the studio has established a
challenge of 20 yoga classes in 30 days.
But, as French explains, it's really up to
the individual.
"This is a personal challenge. Some
people may only attend one class a
week, so their challenge may be to
attend two classes a week," French
said, adding that the studio's teachers
want people to "experience the trans-
formative power of an ongoing yoga
practice."
Those who complete the 20-class
mark will be eligible to have their
name entered into a raffle for prizes,
with the big prize called the "Relax &
Refresh Package." Also, all challenge
participants will be invited to a special
celebration at the culmination of the
monthlong event on Sept. 30, where
they will be recognized for their efforts
and raffles will be conducted.
By the looks of the turnout to the
Aug. 29 kickoff class, the community
seems ready to take on the yoga-thon
challenge. Here, participants crowded
into the studio's lower-level yoga room


HERALD PHOTOS BY PAMELA STAlK


FROM THE LEFT: The Yoga Sanctuary's Jennifer French and Anna Martin pin up the Yoga Month
Challenge poster just before the kickoff class met on Aug. 29. Bonnie Yonker, the owner of The
Yoga Sanctuary, and Dr. Robin Jenkins, a volunteer veterinarian with the Peace River Wildlife
Center, pose for a photo with "Falco," a kestrel, North America's smallest falcon. Donations
brought into the studio during the month of September will be given to the wildlife refuge to
help take care of injured, sick and orphaned native animals.


for the free community class, which
offered gentle stretches, mediation
time and the opportunity to learn
about the Peace River Wildlife Center
from volunteer veterinarian Dr. Robin
Jenkins. She even brought a buddy with
her "Falco," an adolescent kestrel
with quite the spunky personality.
Following the session, a canister in
the lobby quickly filled with donations
for the center, where food, medicine,
equipment and volunteers are always
needed.
"Aside from the obvious thousands of
dollars we receive each year from this
event, it raises awareness in the com-
munity about the Peace River Wildlife
Center," Jenkins said. "A lot of the yoga


practitioners have become volunteers,
a couple of them have joined the
board. This has become one of our
greatest assets."
And helping out a worthy cause fits
right in with the practice yoga.
As French explained, giving back to
the community ties into karma yoga,
the yoga of action, which promotes
doing things for others.
"This is our way of giving back to the
community a community that has
always supported us," she said.
Even though the challenge has
already started, people are still able to
sign up for the project. Call 941-505-
9642 or visit www.theyogasanctuary.biz
for more information.


Dr. Guarino's office crosses the bridge


Donnell Bates


Donnell Bates is a freelance
photographer. Contact her at
donnellbates@hotmail.com.


he Charlotte County Chamber of
Commerce welcomed Dr. John
Guarino to Port Charlotte on
Aug. 7 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony
witnessed by family, friends and
supportive chamber members.
Guarino's practice is now located at
22625 Bayshore Road in Port Charlotte
after having recently moved from Punta
Gorda.
After the ceremony, guests were
invited to enjoy snacks and beverages
and take a tour of the new office.

HERALD PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
RIGHT: Dr. John Guarino poses with his staff
while holding his new chamber plaque before
the ribbon-cutting ceremony on Aug. 7. From
left are Tori Foley, Katrina Torres, Marueen
Guarino, Dr. Guarino, Brooke Bulifant
and Yvonne Senecal.


Dr. John Guarino's parents, Joe and Dottie
Guarino, attend their son's ribbon-cutting
ceremony at his new office in Port Charlotte.
RIGHT: Dr. John F. Guarino is all smiles during a
ribbon-cutting ceremony while family, friends
and chamber members look on.


LEFT: Dr. John
Guarino is
surrounded by
his family in his
office before the
ribbon-cutting
with his sons,
Jake and Johnny,
wife Maureen
and daughter
Jillmarie.


' WE'VE


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PUNTA GORDA
941-639-2020


330 NORTH BREVARD
(NEXT TO FARM CREDIT)
ARCADIA
863-993-2020


z
a)


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Herald Page 4


.P~~i'





:'\. il. .,i.n September 4, 2013


LEFT: Skip
McTighe
said that the
advertising he
placed on his
Epcar has gotten
him numerous
jobs.





Skip McTighe, Charlotte County's



own'Master Crackologist'


Charlotte County has its own
"Master Crackologist."
And what is a "Master
Crackologist?" Just ask Skip McTighe,
and he will tell you. He ought to know,
he coined the term and had it trade-
marked in the state.
When the Punta Gorda resident was
visiting his son in McCall, Idaho, years
ago, he watched his next door neighbor
repair a nasty crack in his driveway.
Suddenly, a thought occurred to him:
"Why can't I do this back in Florida?"
Through his "personal observations,"
he had noticed quite a few cracks on
swimming pool decks, driveways,
lanais and docks. Unfortunately, the
sealant that his son's neighbor used
would not work in the Sunshine State
because of the tropical climate. When
paint was applied to the repair, it would
bleed through.
Then McTighe struck pay dirt.
While talking to his brother one
day, a retired airline pilot, he learned
that there was a material used in


the manufacture of
airplane engines that
was perfect for his
needs an adhesive-
type product that can
withstand temperatures
from 30-below zero to
170 degrees Fahrenheit.
"It is very flexible,"
he said. "It expands
and contracts with
the movement of the
concrete and forms an
adhesive bond. It's a
great, great product."
McTighe called it
FlexSeal. He will not


reveal where he obtains the material,
but insists that it is not local.
"You can't buy it at any Home
Depot," he said. "It's a specialty
product."
Since 2002, McTighe's business,
Concrete Maintenance Systems, Inc.,
has taken off. He has more than 2,000
repairs to his credit and provides a
3-year warranty on all his work as he
travels throughout Southwest Florida.
"I make a channel cut with a high-
speed angle grinder," he said. "I apply
the FlexSeal, tool it off flat and texture
it. When I am done, and a coat of paint
is applied, it blends in and the crack
disappears. Now it doesn't go away
naturally, but it seals and will never
crack again. It's a six-step process."
McTighe said he has used FlexSeal
on the side of his house and repaired
a crack in his driveway more than 10


not re-crack.


Al Hemin way


1 I H1 rr1 I, ,il m i h I u writer.
I X ai,,nhI I IhIll I I.hpll nn,.ill ,h i,.
gmail.com.

years ago. The average size crack he re-
pairs is anywhere from 75 to 80 inches
in length. It normally takes him about 3
hours to finish a job, he said.
On his website, McTighe has a 5-min-
ute video demonstrating his six-step
crack repair method at a driveway in
Cape Coral. He also offers interested
individuals the opportunity to start
their business with no franchise fees.
"Last year, I successful completed
204 jobs," he said. "I get about 60
percent of them through referrals."
Concrete Maintenance Systems has
only two employees Skip and his
wife, Anita, who is a jack-of-all-trades.
She answers the phone, does secretarial
work, schedules his


appointments and does
all the bookkeeping.
"I'm from the old
school," he said. "I treat
people like they treat
me. We answer all calls
promptly, give free
estimates and do qual-
ity work. That's why
our business is such a
success."
McTighe also does
his own advertising.
He affixed a yellow


rubber ducky on top of
his vehicle with a sign
that reads: "Got Quacks!" And if that
is not enough, it comes complete with
sound.
That's right. The duck quacks.
"My wife thinks I'm crazy," he
laughed. "But, believe it or not, it has
gotten me jobs. I was in a bank one
day, and a woman poked her head in
and said, 'Who has the car with the
duck on top of it." I told her I did. She
gave me a thumbs-up and said that it
was great advertising."
So if a car with a yellow rubber
ducky on top saying "Got Quacks!"
should be seen in Charlotte County,
don't snicker or poke fun at it. It's not
a crackpot driving the car. It's Skip
McTighe, "Master Crackologist." If a
crack should appear in your driveway,
pool deck or lanai, he's definitely the
man to call.
For more information, visit www.
endcracks.com or call 941-639-4520.


HERALD PHOTOS BY AL HEMINGWAY


"Master Crackologist"Skip McTighe stands alongside his yellow rubber ducky advertising on his
vehicle. To date, he has repaired more than 2,000 cracks in Southwest Florida.


u:'n to the experts


We Install
and Service
Your Residential
and
Commercial
Air Conditioning and
Heating Units With
Honesty & Reliability


Tuesday September 10th, 5:30-8:30pm
Enjoy Live Music Performed by Master Guitarist,
Closed For Business
Claudio Baltierra 9/159/30
I Reopening 10/1
SEnjoy Our Homemade $ Off hk
Daily Lunches & Dinners
Iof $35 or Morel
Tues.-Sat. 11:30-9pm


Skip McTighe does a channel cut
before putting the FlexSeal in the
crack. The flexible material forms a
lasting bond that he guarantees will


Herald Page 5










FROM OUR ARCHIVES




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I:'l i .1.ii September 4,2013 Herald Page











SCHOOL BUZZ

PUNTA GORDA

FROM THE LEFT: Mikehla Hicks and Sarah Weaver fly across the stage like Peter Pan would during the Improv Night at Punta Gorda Middle School on
Aug. 26. John Tietsworth, Isabella Smith and Molly Dillon perform during one of the improve games.



Students take stage for Improv Night

Members of the Punta Gorda 3Middle School's Jr Thespian Troupe 88922 took the stage
for the first time for an improvisational show on Aug. 26. The Improv Night was under the direction of Rudy
Wolfahrt and featured the talents of seventh- and eighth-grade students at the school.


HERALD PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS
LEFT: Aiden Drudi is taken on a trip across the
stage when Isabella Smith tries to convey the
character she was representing during one of
the improve games Aug. 26.


Drama teacher and improve director Rudy
Wolfahrt explains to the audience about
improve and the love his students in Punta
Gorda Middle School's Jr. Thespian Troupe
88922 have of theater.


Lila Coffey, Olivia Palmer and Taylor Wikoff
work out a jailhouse skit together during the
Improv Night at Punta Gorda Middle School.


LEFT: Almost
oblivious to
each other,
Joey Giordano
and Meghan
Hagerty
take on their
separate roles
during the
"151 improve
game:'


FROM THE LEFT: Jennifer Lena and Nicole Burg take on the "late night awards" skit using movie
lines submitted by the audience before the start of the show. Tyler Coward stirs a large bowl of
cake mix while Reed Taillon took on the role of a screaming, demanding sergeant during the
Improv Night on Aug. 26.


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Wednesday, September 4,2013


TARPON PAGE

PUNTA GORDA


Tarpon Page contributors are students at Charlotte High School. The content displayed on these pages are part of grading requirements for Kelli Lipe's yearbook class. Send feedback to tarponbuzz@gmail.com.


HERALD PHOTO BY SARAH KITTREDGE


New assistant principal Lyman Welton used to work at L.A. Ainger
Middle School as a STEM instructor. He's happy to join the Charlotte
High School Tarpon community.


HERALD PHOTO BY ERIKA LIEBENGOOD '
,. HERALD PHOTO BY KAITLYN MOSLEY
Former substitute teacher Lyman Nelson is HERALD PHOTO BY AITLYN MOSLEY
happy to join the Charlotte High School Tarpon Kevin Stevens instructs Charlotte High School's"Aviation
faculty as a chemistry instructor. Safety Tech" course.


HERALD PHOTO BY HANNAH RYALS
New teacher Betsy Piotrowski hopes to develop her student's
love of reading and writing.


HERALD PHOTO BY JILL SERRANO


New teacher Keith Larkins, a Tarpon graduate
himself, is pleased to come back to Charlotte High
School to teach math.


HERALD PHOTO BY LAUREN SKEOCH
New math teacher Chad Mansfield settles into
Charlotte High School and to Charlotte County.


Meet the new faculty members at Charlotte High


HERALD PHOTO BY JESSICA BENNETT


New to Charlotte High School from Puerto Rico
is Luis Ateca-Torres, a physics teacher. Here, he
works with a student on an in-class assign-
ment.


HERALD PHOTO BY PEYTON BETHEL
Coleen Beisner, a Charlotte High School
graduate, is happy to join the faculty as an
American government instructor.


HERALD PHOTO BY DRUONA GRACE
Patricia Copley recently moved to Charlotte
County and is one of Charlotte High School's
newest English teachers.


Physics is
Luis Ateca-Torres' forte
By JESSICA BENNETT
CHS JUNIOR
In addition to all the new Tarpons swimming through the
halls this year, Charlotte High School has also gained some
new teachers and staff members. New to the school's science
department, the state of Florida and the United States is
physics instructor Luis Ateca-Torres.
"Well, I originally taught physics in Puerto Rico, where
I come from,"Ateca-Torres said. He pursued his teaching
career in the U.S. to benefit his disabled wife.
Coming from a different country, Ateca-Torres feels the
change isn't that different, except for the language. English
is Ateca-Torres'second language, and he is quickly adjusting
to speaking English.
"We learn English in school but don't practice it, so all the
information in our mind (is) in the back"'he said.
Since joining the faculty, Ateca-Torres said the Tarpon
family has been very welcoming.
"... they (colleagues) help you. They're open to helping
you all the time' he said, later adding the people he works
with are "very, very smart and nice."
Although he is not involved with any of the school's
sports teams or clubs, he seems eager to get involved. The
Tarpon family is very open and inviting.
With the new school year and many adjustments for
Ateca-Torres, the staff at CHS will surely be standing by his
side.

Coleen Beisner teaches
American government

By PEYTON BETHEL
CHS SENIOR
The faculty at Charlotte High School plays a major role
in the school's atmosphere and reputation. Many new staff
members were once Tarpon athletes, stars on the stage or
academic scholars. One such success story is Coleen Beisner,
a longtime member of the Tarpon family who joins the
faculty this year as an American government teacher.
"I have wanted to be a teacher since I was probably 5
years old'"Beisner said."I used to play with my younger
sisters, and I would be the teacher and they would have
to complete assignments. I also grew up in my mom's
classroom."


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Beisner is a floater at Charlotte High, meaning she does
not have a particular classroom to teach in and teaches her
classes in numerous rooms every day.
"I'm disappointed that there aren't enough classrooms at
the school, but it doesn't hinder how I feel about teaching
here,' Beisner said."I'm very happy to work at Charlotte High
School."
She added,"Being a Tarpon means you are a part of a
family and a lifelong tradition. People will always love blue
and gold."

English department
welcomes Patricia Copley
By DRUONA GRACE
CHS JUNIOR
Every school year, the Charlotte High School family
welcomes new people to campus. Whether they are new
students or new faculty, they're welcomed with open arms.
This year, Patricia Copley, a freshman English teacher, is one
of the new faculty members on campus.
Copley recently moved to Charlotte County in June, just
two months before the 2013-14 school year began.
"I've researched it for several years before I decided to
come to this school, and I heard of all the good things and
that it was very community based, family oriented,"she said.
"That was probably the main reason why I came."
Copley has been teaching for 20 years. She knew she
wanted to become a teacher in the sixth-grade because she
had such great teachers and they inspired her to go in that
direction.
However, the one who inspired her most was her mother.
"My mom inspired me to become a teacher because she
was in the Holocaust, and she only got to go to eighth-grade
and she really valued education,"Copley said."And so she
really took pride in me that I was going to school to be
a teacher, and so I kind of taught her. It was kind of neat
teaching her literature and all those things she didn't get
to read."
Just like she was inspired by great teachers, Copley strives
to help her students be the best they can be in life. By the
end of the year, she hopes they will have a true "appreciation
for literature."

Lyman Welton becomes
Tarpon assistant principal
By SARAH KITTREDGE
CHS JUNIOR
With every new year comes new students and new
teachers. This year, the Charlotte High School Tarpon family
has opened its arms to new assistant principal Lyman
Welton.
"I love my job, and I know it's new and I know it can be
a bit of a honeymoon period, but I really do like it,"Welton
said.
In his previous job, Welton was a STEM (science,
technology, engineering and math) teacher at L.A. Ainger
Middle School for the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grades.
The purpose of the course is to prepare students for a future
job, so they have an idea of what they want to do for a living
by the time they get to high school. The goal is for them to
shape a course schedule around that specific job.
When speaking about his favorite part of his new job,
Welton said he enjoys being in contact with a diverse group
of people, from administration at the school and district
levels to teachers, parents, cafeteria workers, bus drivers,
custodians and students.
"... I really like the variety that may be the thing I
enjoy the most. And, also, I like the pace. Sometimes it's a
little exhausting when I go home. It's a very fast-paced job,
but I enjoy that."
This is Welton's first assistant principal's position. He has
a master's degree in clinical psychology. For about 15 years
he specialized in helping individuals and families solve


problems. He worked at Murdock Middle School for about 8
years, and most of the time he was the behavior specialist
and discipline advisor.
When asked why he picked Charlotte High, Welton said
that he liked the fact that it's prestigious and would be
difficult to find another school in the district that has the
same history and community support. Also, he loves the
natural lighting in the art rooms and the fact that they
have access to kilns. He likes the way the science rooms are
set up, and the support the athletic program has from the
community.
He even appreciates the cell phone policy that allows
students to use them in the hallways and during lunch.
"I think the more we integrate technology into the
educational setting, the better ... for them',he said.
Welton has several goals in mind that pertain to his
leadership. First, he is able to clearly convey the direction
the school is going and what the vision is for Charlotte High.
Second, he can provide for the teacher's needs, whether
that is giving them classroom materials, fixing schedules
or removing obstacles. Finally, he is able to provide initial
training, professional fulfillment along with education
so that growth is always happening with teachers and
students.

Lynn Nelson joins science
department
By ERIKA LIEBENGOOD
CHS SENIOR
New teachers have arrived at Charlotte High School this
year. Lynn Nelson, once a substitute teacher, is now a full-
time teacher, taking on chemistry and the other sciences.
"During the times I substituted I learned information and
decided to share that information with the students,"stated
Mr. Nelson.
Nelson has been a substitute teacher at Charlotte High for
years and has 1 year of being a full-time teacher under his
belt. CHS is an appealing school to teach at because it is the
closest school to where he lives and he enjoys being part of
the Tarpon community.
Nelson was retired before coming to CHS. He brings with
him education and life experiences, both of which are sure
to encourage the students at CHS enrolled in his classes.

Aviation class taught by
Kevin Stevens
By KAITLYN MOSLEY
CHS SENIOR
Charlotte High School's new Aviation Safety Tech
instructor Keith Stevens teaches ninth-graders for the
first-time this year. His class is called "Aviation Safety Tech,"
and he plans on teaching until the end of the year.
"I'll probably teach aviation safety at the (Charlotte
Technical Center) next semester,' Stevens added.
He didn't know he wanted a career in aviation until he
took a job at an airport.
"A couple of weeks into the job at the airport, my boss
took me up for a flight and I realized this is what I want to
do the rest of my life,"Stevens said.
After graduating from Fort Dodge High School in 1980,
Stevens majored in aerospace engineering at Iowa State
University. He then continued his education through the U.S.
Air Force, and he taught students how to fly airplanes.
While in the Air Force, Stevens had the opportunity
to parasail from 500 feet in the air to the ocean to learn
survival skills. He also scuba dived the Great Barrier Reef,
climbed the Great Wall of China and has been to Japan,
Thailand and Australia, which is his favorite place to visit.
"Fly the (Lockheed) SR-71 'Blackbird'- I tried to get
to that, but they had cancelled the program right when I
applied. I never got to that. I regret that," Stevens said.
He likes teaching "Aviation Safety Tech"because it's very
tactile.


"I hope to give ninth-graders a little bit of insight in the
aviation (field) and give them some direction," Stevens said.


Betsy Piotrowski focuses
on reading and writing
By HANNAH RYALS
CHS JUNIOR
Many teachers are new to the Charlotte High School
Tarpon family, and one of them is Betsy Piotrowski.
Although she has taught at Charlotte High before, this is her
first year as a permanent hire.
Piotrowski, an English teacher, has high expectations for
her students and hopes to develop their love of reading and
writing.
"Once they figure it out, reading can become a great joy
for students,"she said.
With high expectations comes some challenges.
"One of the hardest things about being a teacher is
challenging students not to give up on themselves and
encouraging them to be the best they can be,"she said.
Piotrowski shared the best advice she received from
veteran teachers: "Just be as prepared as you can with your
subject matter so that you're confident when dealing with
your students, and start out firm so you don't have to try to
get tougher later."
Teaching is her third career, having been a govern-
ment employee and a grants writer prior to entering the
classroom. She really likes helping people learn and has a
love of reading and writing.
"I'm very proud and I'm very happy to be teaching at
Charlotte High School"'Piotrowski said."l have two kids that
are both Tarpons, and this is just a great place to be."

Math inspires Keith Larkins
By JILL SERRANO
CHS JUNIOR
Teachers are the No. 1 thing students need in school
because they hold the key to student learning. Some teachers
were once substitutes that ended up loving teaching and the
interaction with kids more than they would have ever thought.
Keith Larkins, one of Charlotte High School's new math
teachers, is a prime example.
Larkins fell in love with teaching during his college years.
"I taught in college and really liked working with children,;
he said.
He has been substituting since his college years at Florida
Gulf Coast University, where he received his bachelor's degree.
His degree prepared him to be able to teach the subjects he
enjoys algebra and geometry.
However, the experience and credential didn't prepare him
for some of the things he would face as a high school teacher.
"My biggest pet peeve in this position would be students
talking while I'm talking,"he said.
It's only the beginning for Larkins, but being new doesn't
stop him from trying to get involved and leave his mark as
more than a teacher at Charlotte High.
"I'm working on having an Ultimate Frisbee and a men's
volleyball team here,"Larkins said.
Being a former Tarpon football player, Larkins has a lot of
ambition and high hopes for what he wishes to do for sports
at Charlotte High. He also feels the same for what he wants to
achieve for his students.
"Something that makes me the happiest about teaching
is getting to see a student understand something they didn't
before because of me,"he said."Something I would like to get
out of this school year would be seeing most of my students
pass their exams."
While all these things are great to want as a teacher, they
don't come easily. There is stress involved, and Larkins has
learned all about it first-hand.
"First day was definitely stressful in general just
trying to adjust and all the normal first-day stressors,'
cooo


Larkins said.

Chad Mansfield enjoys
teaching math
By LAUREN SKEOCH
CHS JUNIOR
One of the many new faculty members at Charlotte High
School this year is a math teacher named Chad Mansfield.
Originally from Decatur, Ill., he is now becoming a familiar
face in the halls of the Punta Gorda school.
Mansfield was a teacher in Illinois until the state laid off
17,000 teachers. He moved to Florida, and he then began
his teaching career again at DeSoto County High School.
He wanted to work somewhere that was closer to home,
though, so he made the switch and began teaching at
Charlotte High.
"I like everything about teaching, really,"he said."I mean,
I enjoy teaching ... Honestly, I didn't know what I was going
to do until college my junior year," Mansfield said.
Mansfield studied at Eastern Illinois University. He has
taught variations of math, but he mostly teaches geometry
and algebra. Mansfield has taught math for students in the
seventh- through the eleventh-grades. He likes the students
that he teaches at Charlotte, and he hopes to continue
teaching at Charlotte High School for a long time.
The transition from schools has been different for
Mansfield.
"Yeah, there are no lockers"'he said."That's different.
Other than that, it's basically the same in terms of how
things run ... It was hard learning the new computers and
software and stuff. But other than that, yeah, I like it."

Sarah Pinkston fills
agriculture position
By ASHLEY STRIKER
CHS SENIOR
During her first year of teaching, Sarah Pinkston was
already teaching five different subjects within seven class
periods.
The common thread was that all five subjects were
agriculturally related.
Considering it was always her favorite subject in school,
Pinkston didn't mind.
"I've always liked kind of sharing what I know with
people and showing) people how to do things,"she said.
"... I acted as kind of a counselor/mentor in middle school
and high school when I was younger."
She added,"My favorite was agriculture. I took it all 4
years (of high school) ..."
It's no wonder why she was picked to take on the agricul-
tural department at Charlotte High School. In fact, another
teacher sought her out for the position, and Pinkston visited
the school and has dedicated herself to it ever since.
"My favorite thing is the diversity of students I get and
kind of learning from them,"she said.
One major rule in Pinkston's class is respect.
"I told all of my classes respect is the biggest thing in my
class;' she said. "Respect yourself, respect each other, respect
teachers and respect the environment."

Math department gains
Zoe Shasteen
By ALLISON LEONARD
CHS SENIOR
With a new school year comes change. New students fill
the halls, new schedules are released and new teachers make
a home at Charlotte High School. This year Zoe Shasteen is
welcomed as one of Charlotte High's newest math teachers.
Shasteen found that math was her favorite subject when
she took algebra in high school. Before coming to Charlotte
High, Shasteen taught at Port Charlotte Middle School.
"It's middle to high school ... it's almost like I can't


compare it because they're so different,"Shasteen said on her
transition to teaching high school.
There are many rewarding aspects about teaching, ranging
from making bonds with students to helping students
completely understand what they are learning. One of
Shasteen's favorite moments when teaching is when a student
finally understands a concept that they have been struggling
to comprehend.
"When a student is having trouble with a topic and all of a
sudden they get it ... like a light bulb just went off," Shasteen
said.
One of the largest parts of being a Tarpon is keeping
up with the school's tradition. Cheering at football games,
attending pep rallies and being the best you can be are all
parts of the Tarpon tradition. Shasteen looks forward to being
a part of all of the Tarpon traditions this year.
"This school has true tradition," Shasteen said.

Barbara McCauley feels
at home as a Tarpon
By MORGAN TRACY
CHS JUNIOR
As a new teacher at Charlotte High School, Barbara
McCauley seems to be adapting well to the Tarpon family.
She enjoys teaching and is excited about the year ahead
of her.
"Wow, this is definitely the thing I'm supposed to be
doing"' McCauley said.
A University of Florida graduate, McCauley said she has
had numerous teaching jobs across Florida, so she is well-
experienced with the life of a classroom teacher.
"I've always felt like I was a part of the Tarpon family,"
she said, adding that her daughter graduated from CHS."I
definitely know I'm in the right place."
All teachers have different methods in the classroom.
Regardless of the style, the job still needs to be done. Some
teachers are stricter about class work and how you choose
to spend your time in the classroom. McCauley, for one, does
not mind the cell phone policy in the school. Actually, she
is all for it.
McCauley believes that technology is a big part of our
world now, especially if the student is more of a visual
learner.
"You are the choices you make,"McCauley said."As long
as you come in prepared with your work done, you won't
have any problems in my class."


Sarah Pinkston, the new Charlotte High School
agriculture teacher, is excited to share her love
of the subject with students.


HERALD PHOTO BY ALLISON LEONARD
New Charlotte High School math teacher Zoe
Shasteen enjoys getting to know the students.


Barbara McCauley, a new teacher at Charlotte
High School and a longtime Tarpon supporter,
is excited to work with students through her
new job.


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Herald Page 8


:', ,il,,. ,-i. September 4, 2013


Herald Page 9




















SPORTS

PUN1IA (i)RD)A




RIGHT: Megan McCormick, No. 7, Abby Massey,
No. 11, Becca Parnell, No. 4, Sarah Neal, No. 13,
and Kaylee Brannon, No. 10, celebrate when
the final point was scored in the 2-1 win over
DeSoto County High School on Aug. 29.


Tarpons hold on to beat scrappy Bulldogs


HERALD PHOTOS BY STEVE KNAPP


Charlotte High School's Mykelli Taylor gets one of her team's leading 8 kills in the win over DeSoto
County High School. The score was 2-1 on Aug. 29.


he undefeated junior varsity
volleyball team from DeSoto
County High School came to
Punta Gorda to meet the 1-1 Charlotte
High School Tarpons on Aug. 29. It
was a night of comebacks and excit-
ing games. When the dust settled, the
Tarpons emerged with the 2-1 win.
The Bulldogs had never been tied
or trailed in a match this season and
started the first game as if they were
going to continue that roll. Behind the
serving of Sarah Bennett and Cassidy
Furr, the Bulldogs took a quick 6-1
lead. The Tarpons battled back and
took a 12-11 lead. The game was tied
four times after that lead with neither
team able to open more than a 3-point
lead. The Tarpons rallied at the end to
pull out a 25-22 win.
The second game started with the
Tarpons pulling out to that same 6-1
lead that the Bulldogs had enjoyed in
the first game. That lead eventually
grew to 10-1 behind the serving of
sophomore Sarah Neal.
DeSoto County experienced
problems with serves, serve returns,
running into the net and a lack of
communication. Suddenly, the tide
turned and the Tarpons struggled and
the Bulldogs started their comeback.
An 18-9 run tied the contest at 19
apiece.
With the Tarpons leading at match
point 25-24 and a chance to end the
match, a net serve gave the Bulldogs
a point to tie the game. The Bulldogs
scored the next 2 points to take an
exciting 27-25 win in game two.
"Our serve was killing us," Neal said.
"We always have that problem. We get


Steve Knapp




lr,1 .Ir, rir r .I. t, i' I ail


excited and pumped up .d1111 ilii \
start messing up."
Mykelli Taylor, who led ili I..inm
with 8 kills, said, "We w,-Inl'l I.ilknI._
or communicating in th, ..umIin \\-
weren't playing as a team \\. kind I 1
fell apart."
Tarpon coach Jill Danmiu Ii .siid.
"That was when we got I, mti Us II,.
we thought we could gei 11 .I d'ni, hl.
at the end, we missed thi,, -. i L u. I.II
serves and lost the gam, I 'i i -In \-
body into the game tonilhl ild i 111.11 i,
hard to do with 16 play-.i, I iliiink \.
will have a pretty good ir.um ili, \,i-. "
In the deciding game. iliI. lii. 'iii
took a 7-2 lead before DI' iii i ( I iLt\
came backto tie it at 1]1 I Iinmlt liht
comeback attempt fell sint I .I, Ni-.ll
finished off the Bulldogs l\ ilh ,-.i uin.i
the final points in a 15-11 l\I. I ii \
Kaylee Brannon led tlih Ir.im in IIIl
16 digs followed by Neal', 1' ( .i1111
Giacolone had a good nilll Iln im inIti
setter's position, gathering 11 .issisis
Behind Taylor's 8 kills w MI, I-, gn
McCormick with 6.
The next home match IIi Ili,
Tarpons will be Sept. 12 .i, th11\- Ii i
LaBelle High School, will iII,. .mun,-,
starting at 6 p.m. LaBell- di.hII- -.d iI ih
Tarpons on Aug. 27 in t,\ I I \i \. II i-'
games 23-25 and 20-2_'


I GOLF SCORES


All golf scores
must be emailed to
golfscores@sun-herald.
com.

* BURNTSTORE
GOLF & ACTIVITY
CLUB
Scramble, Aug. 17
1.) Patrick Cataldo, Richard
Tolson, Mark Vandederkhove
and Lynn Hunter.
2.) Debra Burns,
Tom Fitzpatrick and Carl
Millerschoen.
3.) Phil Leonard, Mary
Welch and Gordon Fogg.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN: Jerry
Hunter, Robert Paul, Barbara
Berman and Cheryl Fogg.
*Ladies'League,
Aug.21
1.) Babe Ahrens, Cheryl
Fogg, Lynn Hunter and Barb
Whelan.
Men's League,
Aug.21
FLIGHT A:
1.) Carl Millerschoen.
2.) Ron Olsen.
3.) Bernie Punt and Tommy
Shannon.


FLIGHT B:
1.) Bob Bottel.
2.) Victor Smith.
* DEEP CREEK GOLF
CLUB
SQuota Results,
Aug. 17
Individual Winners:
1.) Greg Leet, +10.
2.) Clay Shasteen, +8.
3.) Dave Parker, +5.
4.) Rob Carvill, +4.
5.) Lee Bennett, +3.
Team Results:
1.) Clay Shasteen and Rob
Carvill, +12.
2.) Greg Leet and Terry
Cullen, +7.
3.) Lee Bennett and Tosh
Warren, +4.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Hole No.2: Bill Connelly.
Hole No. 8: Jean Guy
Gagnon.
*Hole No. 11:Tom Natoli.
*Quota Results
Aug. 20
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:


*Hole No. 11:Joe Gonia.
Hole No. 14: MarkCleary.
*Quota Results
Aug. 21
Individual Winners:
1.) Erik Heitter, +5.
2.) Jim Payne, +4.
3.) Gene Almodovar, +3.
4.) Larry Colbert, +3.
Team Results:
1.) Tosh Warren and "The
Fred," +3.
2.) Tim Sowinki and Greg
Leet, +2.
3.) Bob Donahue and Paul
Sprunk, +2.
CLOSEST TO THE PIN:
Hole No.7: Erik Heitter.
Hole No. 14: Larry Colbert.

* ROTONDAGOLF&
COUNTRY CLUB
*White Marsh Nine
Scramble, Aug. 26
1.) Bob Zimmerman, Jim
Shaw and Dave Metcalf, 37.
2.) Bob Scheeler, Robert
Bowen, Larry Altenburg and
Richard Barry, 37.


Cl...,. I F.r-Il
H..I h[1.. l. '.-.I l, r
H.&I I. ..... ..I '.. h l~r

* TWIN ISLES
COUNTRY CLUB
Ladies 18-Hole
Results
Odd-holes only,
Aug. 21

1 if in, .. ,iI r J
2 1 1 lm il i '..l.-r ."

1 I_ II I ri i
Fli.Hi IH
1 'i .. rri : ..--
T 1 Il1 1'~.. o 11,
Vancr .-1,i J1
Men's Day Results
Individual Points
Quota
Aug.23
1 l .1, I, l-r .I
2 n :I,,i f[ -wr-[
3 (i,,i, : .. -





'\. ,il,. -i., September 4, 2013


North Port Bobcats take down Tarpons


Charlotte High School's junior varsity football team took on the North Port High School Bobcats

during an Aug. 29 game. North Port defeated Charlotte with a score of 15-7.


Tami Garcia



Tami Garcia is a freelance
photographer. Contact her at
TamiBul@msn.com.


ON THE COVER:
HERALD PHOTO BY TAMI GARCIA
Matt Weber, No. 25 for Charlotte High School,
goes after North Port High School's Anthony
Brown, No. 10, as he carries the ball down field.

LEFT: A referee calls Charlotte High School's
quarterback Michael Innello's play a touch-
down, while North Port High School's Rayquan
Shipp, No. 4, goes for the tackle.


RIGHT: The
Charlotte High
School Tarpons'
junior varsity
football team
take to the
field during a
home game
against the
North Port High
School Bobcats
on Aug. 29.


HERALD PHOTOS BY TAMI GARCIA


Emmanuel Levi, No. 76 for Charlotte High School, runs after North Port High School's Rayquan
Shipp, No. 4.


RIGHT: Charlotte High School's Joseph Behling,
No. 11, kicks the ball to North Port High School
in the second quarter of a junior varsity foot-
ball game, with teammate Malik Gainer,
No. 4, running nearby.

LEFT: Charlotte High School Tarpons' G'Vonte
Price, No. 8, goes for the tackle against North
Port High School's Anthony Brown, No. 10.

BOTTOM: Charlotte High School's Malik Gainer,
No. 4, makes his way through a slew of North
Port High School players.


Tiyan Bush, No. 15 for the Charlotte High
School Tarpons'junior varsity football team,
carries the ball down field while D'Vonte Price,
No. 9, looks on.


Brian Ireland, No. 74 for Charlotte High School,
attempts to fend off North Port High School's
Devon Gouvia, No. 72.


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LEFT: Tiyan
Bush, No.15
for Charlotte
High School,
makes his
way towards
the goal line
during a
home game
against North
Port High
School.


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Herald Page 11











Ladies' running group coming to PG



Being gfab nd .50 iis an acc mplishl ent


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PHi.: Ti.: S PP'.i-DED
Traci Myers, left, and her assistant, Michele Galuppi, will help local women train for a 5K race or a
half marathon.

"After talking with her, I knew I wanted to train
with a group of women, to encourage and
support each other. And I found that
I also wanted to train other women."
Traci Myers,
ll '.i W ,ill\ -ll Ilil [i I lli I I- l l l 11r 1ii 1, 1 1 1


Tarpon football quarterback named Plaver of the Game' bv hospital
PROVIDED B


PROVIDED BY
CHARLOTTE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER
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PHi. Ti.: PP:'. IIDED


Brennan McGill, a Charlotte High School senior, was named "ER Extra Player of the Game" by Char-
lotte Regional Medical Center for his participation in the Aug. 23 varsity Tarpon football game.
McGill, shown second from the right, is joined in this photo by Oscar Gamble, director of Charlotte
Regional's Rehab & Wellness Center; coach Binky Waldrop; and Chris Loftus, the COO of Charlotte
Regional Medical Center.





:'\. il. .1i., September 4, 2013


_r _

COMMU N ITY

BEAT IN PUNTA GORDA


Local authors

publish book

about favorite

their local

kayaking spots


HERALD PHOTO BY AL HEMINGWAY
Authors Ed and Deb Higgins pose for a photo
with their new book, "Paddles in Paradise,"
which deals with their kayaking experiences.


Paddling in Paradise


To Deb and Ed Higgins, kayaking
is much more than a leisurely
jaunt on a Sunday afternoon.
To them it's almost like a religion.
By paddling on a stream or creek,
they can leave civilization behind and
venture out to experience life the way
nature intended it be.
That's when the two had a brain-
storm why not write a book and
pass along the knowledge that they
had learned to make it easier for local
paddlers to enjoy kayaking.
The finished product hit selected
newsstands on June 1. Titled "Paddles
in Paradise: A guide to casual kayaking
and canoeing around Punta Gorda
Florida ... and beyond," it covers 25
different locations where kayakers can
go and see firsthand what the Higgins'
call "paradise."
Because the book is increasing in
popularity, they are planning to do a
sequel adding even more sites.
Originally from Lynn, Mass., the
Higgins' moved to Punta Gorda almost
6 years ago. Ed retired as chief of the
Lynn Fire Department and Deb worked
for the city in the comptroller's office
and the fire department as well.
"We were looking to move south
when we retired to get away from the
snow and cold," Ed Higgins said. "We
had a 2-year plan, and we were looking
at places in Arizona and New Mexico.
Then I visited a friend who had retired
to Punta Gorda and said to Deb, 'why
not hi-i i-''
An ardent fisherman and pilot, Ed
also did some canoeing but had never
been in a kayak until he relocated to
the Sunshine State. After joining the
Punta Gorda Boat Club, the couple was
introduced to the sport by Ron and Jan
Norvelle.
After a few excursions, they were
hooked.
"Instead of renting, we purchased
two good 14-foot kayaks and joined the
Port Charlotte Kayak Club to familiarize
ourselves to the area," Ed Higgins said.


SAl Hemin way


1I HK rrH,ilu I m r. f I Il writer.
I I /II oxr r a fri, rI II I il I .!I
gmail.com.

"It's very informal. They would select a
site on Wednesday and go paddling on
Sunday."
That, however, was not enough for
them. The pair wanted to expand their
adventures and seek out other areas
where they could kayak and explore.
"I spend hours on the computer
looking for kayaking blogs to find new
places to go," Deb Higgins said.
Although they discovered some gems,
they noticed that the websites were
lacking pertinent information such as
launch sites, parking, restrooms, picnic
areas and the difficulty of paddling the
creek, stream or river. That's when the
concept of a book became a reality.
"My favorite kayaking spot is
Fisheating Creek in Glades County," Ed
Higgins said. "It's at the end of Bermont
Road in Palmdale, about an hour from
Punta Gorda. It is a black water cypress
swamp, which I refer to as my spiritual
place."
"As I have said many times about
many a river we were on, this is where
I go to church," Ed Higgins continued.
"Well, Fisheating Creek is our St. Peter's
Basilica."
Ed Higgins said that he and his wife
are partial to remote areas that have
remained in pristine condition and are
teeming with wildlife. Silver River in
Marion County is another example, he
said, of that unique feeling of "being
one with nature."
According to Deb Higgins, wild
rhesus monkeys have inhabited the
area since the 1930s when a local
entrepreneur named Col. Tooey, a glass
bottom boat operator, brought them in
to an island for sightseers to view.


PHOTOS PROVIDED


Ed Higgins maneuvers his kayak along Fisheating Creek in Palmdale. BELOW LEFT: A barred owl
peers out from its perch atop a tree on Telegraph Creek, a tributary of the Caloosahatchee River.
BELOW: RIGHT: A rhesus monkey looks down upon the paddlers on the Silver River.


"He didn't realize that they could
swim," she said. "So, they swam off the
island and are now all over the place.
They jump from tree-to-tree and are
quite a sight."
Ed Higgins has seen the sport grow
considerably since they took up perma-
nent residence in Florida.
"I'm not sure if it's the economy or
the price of gas that boaters pay," he
said. "But we used to have about 14 on
an outing, now we have 35 or more."
The book not only focuses on the
various locations kayakers can travel
to but it also delves into the cost of
purchasing a kayak and paddle. Once
a year, the couple will give lessons and


teach novice kayakers how to enjoy the
sport that has brought them so much
serenity.
"When we are out in these places, the
outside world disappears," Ed Higgins
writes in the book's introduction. "Time
slows down. The sounds, the smells,
the silence and the beauty are breath-
taking. We are kids again. Everything
is new and exciting. We are no longer
jaded by all of our life and work experi-
ences. We are seeing everything with
new eyes, with new wonder."
For more information, visit the
Higgins' website at www.paddlesin
paradise.com or send an e-mail to
paddlesinparadise@gmail.com.


Charlotte libraries offer

cruise with membership


PROVIDED BY
THE CHARLOTTE COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM
he Charlotte County Library
System, with the assistance of
King Fisher Fleet, is offering free
sunset cruise certificates for anyone
who signs up for a new library card
during the month of September.
King Fisher Fleet is based out of
cooo


Fishermen's Village, 1200 W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda. Certificates
must be used before Oct. 30.
Sign up for a library card at any
Charlotte County Library. The Punta
Gorda Library is located at 424 W
Henry St. For more information about
this program, call 941-613-3200 or
visit the library system's website, www.
charlottecountyfl.gov.


Herald Page 13








New artists join Sea Grape fold


New artists join Sea Grape fold


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PHC,.TC.,S PPC'.IDCED
James Ellsworth is one of the newest members
of Sea Grape Gallery artists. A sample of his
work, shown here, illustrates his talent for
woodworking.

LEFT: Beverly Yankwitt enjoys creating abstract
art in mixed media. A sample piece of art from
the new Sea Grape Gallery artist is shown here.


I SEEN AROUND TOWN


Donnell Bates


I, II :,' I .p i I, I It !,


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I'uIIIi. ( ,iiil. See more on page 15.
HEP-LD PHC',T-C.,S B, DC.'IIELL B-TES
RIGHT: Spending the evening at Fishermen's
Village during the holiday weekend are
Debra and Al Trudeau, who are
shown here at Center Court.


RIGHT:The Blackman family from Cape Haze
enjoys a night out ar Harpoon Harry's during
the holiday weekend. From left are Jaycinth,
Nicholas, Gabrielle and Nigel Blackman, Denise
Melvelle and Matthew and Dr. Noel Blackman.


One of the Judges' Choice Winners from the Car and
Bike Show on Aug. 24.


PHO(-)T(-S PRC)vIDED
Mike Buonaiuto
and Nate Frankoski
stopped by Muscle Car
City recently during
their cross-country
bike tour that started
from Florida Atlantic
University in Boca
Raton on Aug. 24. They
will be riding 3,700
miles to Los Angeles to
raise $37,000 for the
Breast Cancer Research
Foundation. The riders
have been friends since
their 55-day ride from
Key West to Toronto for
the Wounded Warrior
Project. For more
information on their
efforts, visit www.
bikingforboobies.com.



Car, bike show


benefits DAV


PROVIDED
BYARTRIMBACK

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'\. ,il,. -i., September 4, 2013


SEEN AROUND TOWN CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14


LEFT: At
Harpoon
Harry's, the
band Nexx
Level played
for the crowd
who gathered
to celebrate
the unofficial
end of summer.
Here, lead
singer Troy
Nichols
interacts with
fan Jose Torres.


HERALD PHOTOS BY DONNELL BATES
Visiting Fishermen's Village in Punta Gorda for the holiday weekend are Julie and Tom Windon
and Jeanne and John Trimpe.

RIGHT:
Visiting
relatives
in Punta
Gorda for
the holiday
weekend
are Ed
and Luan
Peszak, who
are from
Indinapolis.
Here, the
couple
enjoys a
night out .
at Dean's
South of the a
Border. I


At Center Court in Fishermen's Village, Mike and Donna Hirst played ballads and old favorites
for the crowd during the Labor Day weekend celebration.


Line dancing is always a fun way to pass the time. Showing off their best moves at Center Court in
Fishermen's Village are Val Rankin, Jan Lombardi and Norman Bodeau.


At Dean's South of the Border, Punta Gorda residents Mike and Sue Smith enjoy a night out
during the holiday weekend.


Entertaining folks at Dean's South of the Border are the Jungle Boyz from Cape Coral,
who played Motown hits and reggae music.







Tuesday,
September 10. 12:00pm
109 Taylor Street Punta Gorda


For nearly two years, Dr. Jonathan Frantz has offered Bladeless Laser Cataract
Surgery. He has now added ORA-Guided technology with VerifEye
with real-time measurements to further customize
your surgery and enhance the quality of your
vision. If you have been diagnosed or think you
may have cataracts, join Dr. Aaron Judd for
this informative seminar.


Jonathan M. Frantz, MD, FACS Cataract & LASIK Specialist
T. Aaron Judd, OD Board-Certiped Optometrist

FRkN TZ Call for a reservation:
C...cataractcenter 505-2020
***.....*' BetterVision.net


)1


I


r


Herald Page 15







I. -


HEP"LD PH .,T. B. B, 8.B SSE ,


Charlotte County VIP works to renew lost accreditation


SURVIVE

FROM PAGE 1

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DONATIONS NEEDED!

"Your donation makes a big difference"
Please Donate Clean, Usable Items.


Call To Schedule A Pickup For
Large Furniture & Appliances

(941) 637-1981

SALVATION ARMY

THRIFT STORES
1048 Tamiami Trail, Punta Gorda
Open Mon -Sal 9am- 5pm








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classified


Arcadia Englewood North Port Port Charlotte Punta Gorda Venice


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1000 OPEN HOUSE
1010


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"We Are Pledged To The Letter And
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1600 Business For Sale
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1650 Farm/Ranches


09/04/13
OPEN SUNDAY 1-3 PM
265 FAIRWAY RD
ROTONDA WEST





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BUYERS' REBATE if
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HOMES FOR SALE
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: 1020


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HOMES FOR SALE
S1020


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CREEK WEST 2003 SPACIOUS
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EVERY MAN'S DREAM.BLACK TOP
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ALUSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304

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GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
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Listing Price $149,000 Sold


Real Estate 1000
Employment 2000
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Financial 4000
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Merchandise/Garage Sales 6000
Transportation/Boats 7000

I PHOTO


HOMES FOR SALE
S1020


6 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
PRAIRIE CREEK
PARK BEAUTY!
MANY CUSTOM FEATURES
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ALUSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
S 941-456-8304


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Wednesday, September 4, 2013


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S NU NEWSPAPERS





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PREVENT Serious
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many other services Special 17 941-468-4956 Installed
CALL TODAY! Must mention coupon when calling 44 St. Lic # CAC1816023 10 Year Warranty
9412578483 9417161476 State Certifed ntrar A 056738
Lic.#CAC1814367 Kevin Woods Owner 10.P pTo ay


) AliConditioning


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www.integrityiscool.com insrallers & recns.



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Licensed & Insured #CACA44874

AUII


* Soffit & Facia


MM Edward Ross
Construction
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No Job Too Big
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Pool Cages Screen
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Screen Entries
screens
Garage Screens
Handrail
Hurricane Shutters
Window Replacement
Over 30 Yrs Exp
in Venice Area
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Lic#CBC059107


)1 Alminu


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1 11 I.- II -- -I--I-


A&RAQUA PROS INC.
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Installation
Maintenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
Serving Charlotte &
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Since 1994
(941) 441-8658
Lic./Ins.


The State of Florida Requires
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Be advised to
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on the Web at
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Repair
35 Y-rEV rn


Complete Auto &
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Transport & Towing
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Welding, Metal
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I buy unwanted
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941-626-3724
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)u! IV


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S K
iMi VYW
o MJVWF


iL


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CIEaig(


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SOLUTIONS
941-276-0599
Over 33 Years Experience
For all your cabinet and
countertop needs
Call for a FREE estimate
Former Owner of A-1 Cabinets
Lic#22535

3516900


(LA & POLISH,


L#204& Ins


The"Original"r A A Full Service
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Residential & Office Cleaning in emoval
COMMERCIAL CLEANING sarasota, Charlotte&Lee County Serice
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The Sun Classified Page 2 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun.net


Wednesday, September 4, 2013


'1


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SU NEPAPERS
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- ggegate


DRIEWA S

SI.DEW IS "L


Lic# 0001 O117


BLUE PARROT ENT.
ALL CONSTRUCTION
Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
SNew Existing
Specializing In:
Additions, Remodeling, Garages
SKitchens, Baths & Disability Accessible
STile/Stone, Wood, Laminate Flooring
Windows & Doors
Insurance Claims
"Just Call and Ask!" 941-662-0266
Lic.#CBC1258748 Insured


KRAUTH
Licensed e.
CONSTRUCTION INC. &Isud BdB
Specializing in
new home
construction,
additions,
remodeling,
detached
garagesA Green
941-809-0473 Bde
www.krauthcon.com #CRC1327,


- Bor


I "N N


S *
KITCHENSine t





Refacing


I I .. 11 FfOO fl I


Sliding COMPLETE
Glass Door DRYWALL
Repairs Finish
94176 65* Patchwork
941-06-6445 All Textures
*Wheels Popcorn
Removal
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* Locks & Lock Sets Mt Pott
Free Estimates Matt Potter
Since 1981 941-232-8667
... ... Free Estimates


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941-429-3110 SUN A
Email: special@sunnewspapers.net


SGARY
DRAKE
Dryer Vent
Cleaning
And Inspection
Prevent Fires
Go GREEN!
Phone 941-204-6468
Over 30 Years Experience
Lic#773-00006427 / Ins.


I------------- H I I AL A 1AL


Motrts Sm&6,ef

*esreaening *fllyMbbkSelbg i*Jistn(Clnti
* Rf Coating Pflbing Ptfurs abIUeAlmpair
*DriallRepir *fntlrtPainting tacf*ric Fihtfums
Sutterleaniing *RotBWodRqpairs *lhprlamtCeaing
Venice Native
Serving Sarasota County
941.485.2172


A Better
landsman
Your Total Home
Maintenance Provider
Courteous, Prompt, Dependable
& Affordable Service
noting Drywall CALL DON
ors Carpentry 94 -585-3760
)rs Senior Safety 25+ Ye
o25+ Years
Call Dave experience
11-539-1694 I IIs


U.l I


Bill's Handyman ID
Service H
SCeiling Fans
SLights I
* Faucets
* Clogged
Drains
* Toilets
* Washer & Dryer Repair
* 15+ Yrs Experience
941-661-8585
Licensed


Place

Your Ad
Here!
in color!

Call
420-3110


J&J
HANDYMAN
Painting
'Pressure
Washing
and Much More!
Over 30 Years
Experience & Satisfied
Customers
Serving Venice &
Sarasota Areas
941-525-7967
941-493-6736
Lic. & Full Insured
Call For FREE Estimate


aIclTlm.


CIoncretieI cc)rConrcre


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Wednesday, September 4, 2013


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The Sun Classified Page 4 EINICIV ads.yoursun.net Wednesday, September 4, 2013


11


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Remode & Finsh Wor
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Caint DorWido & Fre s..ts


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RI WRIGHT & SON I I
LANDSCAPING, INC.
Ne AcVIBURNUM GREAT
"WE CAN DO ANYTHING!" enice Mowing FOR PRIVACY
S Englewood Mulch
Bush Hogging Nh Port Stone HEDGE!
*Brush Mowing Pt. Charlotte Instltion Pigmy Palms
Tree, Lot & Vegetation Rotonda Trees
Mulching GulCove Shrubs Italian Cypress
Tree, S.G.C.
ee, Stump Removal Locall Owned & Operated
SSelective Clearing Great Equipment
Great Work Ethic
9 6 Satisfied Customers
FREE ESTIMATES
941-426-7844
Lie. Ins.



GOOD SERVICE IS
GOOD BUSINESS
Residential
Complete Lawn Care Service
Top Notch Professional Equipment
SExcellent Customer Service









Mobile Marine M ilN t
Mechanic Inc. Packing Loading
Since 1992 Pain i

30 Years Exp.
& Outboards & PWCs s o
Generators & Associated Items
GM EFI EngineSae & Service
941-625-5329
_, ,IJIM 223-6870
S41 525245 JFRich40@gmail.net R



Serving Englewood
North Port, Port Charlotte
& Venice AAL PHreasASI
Locally owned& operated HOME TREATMENTS
ANNY Inteor/Exterior
M ILLER I Repaints & New Construction Pantng
M ILLER UPressureCleaning Pressure Cleaning
PAINTING, LLC FREE ESTIMATES Coatings/Sealers
Trust an expert who is and more!
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR licensed & insured!
FREE ESTIMATES WEDO ITA SHADE BETTER! 941-321-0637
danspainting4602@comcast.net Big orsmall. 941-408-0711
Licensed & Insured Give Us a CalLicensed & Insured
#AA009886 941-625-12 R RO02261


SUN wv
SU N --NEWSPAPERS




Find the people here to keep your home, business and transp
Include Your Business in This Directory. Call 86t


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941-475-0058
LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS
$25-$30
TRIM BUSHES
PLANT DESIGN
WEEDING & MULCHING
Serving Englewood, Cape Haze
and Rotonda only
PROMPT, DEPENDABLE SERVICE
46 YEARS EXPERIENCE
LIC. & INSURED

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OUR FULL LINE
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789 TamimiITrai
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Honest, Reliable
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Very Low Rates
20 Years Experience
Lic. & Ins.
941-237-1823
FI Mover Reg. No. IM1647


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The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun.net


Wednesday, September 4, 2013


I_


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ortation running smoothly.
6.463.1638



WILLY D'S AMERICA N
HOME IMPROVEMENTS, INC. IRRIGATION W
FREE ESTIMATES Dave Beck
William Daniels, Owner .RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL
S. 13, YEARS EXPERIENCE The HaIdyman,
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t, MAINTENANCE
FULLYLICENSED& INSURED Kitchen &
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32 43 E CHLND SERVING SARASOTA & CHARLOTTE C c
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941-'41171- 6CRC 1327942
I 941-587-2027 Licensed & Insured
www.americanirrigationfl.com Member BBB




Discount Rock TJ ILAZZO JR. IEN

S941-830-1005 IANISC
Full Line of Rock
SShel as el as Land Clearing,
Rat Curbing and Pavers Landscape Design,
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Some restrictions may apply Work, Trimming
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Wednesday, September 4, 2013


HOMES FOR SALE
1020








FU A T




AND11 A GAS lG[RNILLA LiLi
OVERLO KING'THE THDI
HOLE!!! DEBRAiLL~
60-5842
PRDNIALFOIARAT


DEEP CREEK, : 2
Heated POOL Home. Storm
Shutters, Covered Lanai.
Well Maintained!
Doris Walters,
Bud Trayner Realty.
941-661-4019





DEEP CREEK
3/2/2 Heated Pool Home
Updated Kitchen -
Wood Cabinets. Beautifully
Landscaped Property
Built in 2004 $239,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty

[ -- H .: 1


ulltr .,,r.n- -_ _, rV VL
Home, Spacious Family Rm.,
Breakfast Bar, Great Room,
& SO MUCH MORE!! This
Home is a MUST SEE!
$199,900. Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realt, Inc



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
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(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN A


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ads.yoursun.net


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


INOUIUIviI _", C,': poir [,
fenced yard, quiet area,
W/D hookup, FREE water.
$45,000 Call Chris for appt
727-565-8817

I I.. M !


1237 Rice Terrace, Beautiful
3-bd/2ba, 1267 SF move-in
ready home w/2-car garage,
ully fenced back yard & large
screened lanai. $148,000.
Patty Gillespie Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755
MMML m. r- k.A I


NORTH PORT
3153 Oklahoma St.
Beautifully Remodeled 2004
Home, 3 bd / 2 ba / 2 car,
1784 Sft. Under Air, New SS
Appliances, Park Like Setting
With Brick Paver Patio.
Asking $159,900
Bay Bridge Homes
941-626-8200

CLASSIFIE


21451 BANCROFT AVE.,
CUSTOM HOME ON TWO PICTUR-
ESQUE LOTS. 28x22 SCREENED
LANAI WITH SPA! GAZEBO! FRUIT
TREES! WET BAR! SKYLIGHTS!
BUY NOW AND COLLECT
INCOME/RENT 'TIL APRIL (TENANT
IN PLACE)! $167,700
PATTY GILLESPIE REMAX


PORT CHARLOTTE
22284 Laramore Ave.
RENTING? WHY? When you
can own this totally
remodeled, light, bright,
open 1100 SF 2/1 on lushly
landscaped corner lot
Public water & sewer. No
deed restrictions. NOT in
flood zone. $78,000.
PATTY GILLESPIE
RE/MAX Anchor
941-875-2755


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


PORT CHARLOTTE
23204 Rountree Ave.,
Seller has lavished love, time
& money to totally update this
1020 SF 2/2/1 w/scr lanai.
Gorgeous NEW kitchen,
ceramic tile, granite counters.
$97,000
PATTY GILLESPIE REMAX
ANCHOR 941-875-2755

NEED CASH?
%J 1


PORT CHARLOTTE
23372 Mullins Ave
Lovely 3/2/2 pool home
in popular Sec 15.
$169,000.
June Poliachik,
Sun Realty, CDPE, SFR
941-916-0100





PORT CHARLOTTE,
24458 Pine Ridge PI.
Located in Gated Comm. of
Suncoast Lakes! 3Bed/2Ba/2CG
MUST SEE! MLS#C7043725
$189,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty

fOJ1UO^


PORT CHARLOTTE-
1699 SF, Fence, Fireplace, Ho
ub, SS Appl., All Util., Comer Lot,
Palm Trees Galore, Modem Decor,
Qick Access t Verans or 175.
$134,500. Marianne Lilly,
RF/MAXHarbor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


PT. CHARLOTTE
CozY 3/2 COMPLETELY
REMODELED, SS APPLIANCES
NEW KITCHEN, PLUMBING,
FLOORING AND GRANITE.
POOL, BRICK PAVERS, PRIV.
FENCE, MORE. $159K
CLOSE IMMEDIATELY!
941-268-8794 OWNER


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


Remodeled 2/2/2 pool home
with dockage for 65' plus
sailboat, depth maintained by
city. Dead end street in
restricted neighborhood.
REDUCED! 189,900
Jerry Hayes, 941-456-1155
ReMax Marina Park





RESORT COMMUNITY






RENTALS FROM $850/MO
JUST $299 1ST MTH RENT.
950 RIDGEWOOD AVE
VENICE, FL 34285
941-485-5444
Aged Qualified


WE BUY HOUSES
IN ANY AREA,
ANY CONDITION,
FAST ... CASH!!
FOR MORE INFO LOG ONTO
WWW.JEANBUYHOUSES.COM
CALL US AT 941-268-5069.

WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


5242 Neville Terr.
Premier Boating! 16000# Lift
Quick Harbor Access!
4 BR, 3 Bath, Key West Style
Tropical, Builder's Custom
Plan. $398,500.
Marianne Lilly, RE/MAX
Harbor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


^-* -- ---
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
BY OWNER
Home with a view 3/2
with pool and Boat dock
with lift $423,900.
Tel. 941-637-7713

Seize the sales
with Classified!


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 5


WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


I I


"UN IH LaUr1U ISLES
Lowest $ on PGI Canal!
80' Seawall. Cute & Retro.
2/2/2+ Lanai
FREE PGI Map $200,000. obo
Marianne Lilly,
REV/MAXHarbor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com

AM66-4


, n nn, n, .n .,,..,, "., .. .
250+' of frontage. 1+ acre
house, garage, marina, pavil-
lion $225,000. 941-639-6269

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040


ONLY 581
(MIS STATISTICS)
HOUSES, VILLAS, CONDOS
ARE AVAILABLE
AS OF TODAY
IN BEAUTIFUL
VENICE, FLORIDA
CALL US FOR SHOWINGS
ORTO LIST
We do all of Venice -Area
941-485-4804 Sales
941-484-6777 Rentals
1-800-464-8497





0.
PORT CHARLOTTE
$67,000 SALE! (Full time or
seasonal rental also avail-
able) Lovely 2/2 completely
renovated condo with new
appliances & water heater.
For more information and
showing, please call 205-
451-8917 or 205-299-9149


-romenades East. Super
clean 2/2 courtyard view,
inside parking, completely
remodeled. Incl. all appli-
ances. $76,000. For showing
call 248-420-5978.


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040


24120 Green Heron Dr. #6
Beautiful 2/2/2 Villa w/
Outstanding Waterview!
Granite Counters. Like New!
Only $139,900
Jeff Runyan Re/Max Palm
941-979-2843

mp--



SUNRISE TOWERS
CARING WAY ON CANAL.
SHORT SALE 2BR/2BA WITH
CARPORT, INSIDE LAUNDRY
ROOM. HURRICANE RESISTANT
WINDOWS, HARD WOOD FLOORS,
ALL APPLIANCES INCLD. MOVE IN
CONDITION CITY WATER&SEWER,
BIG PACKAGE @ SMALL PRICE.
$45,000. CARON REALTY,
INC. 941-925-3300
RONNIEC@VERIZON.NET
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net


FOR SALE
1090

MOBILES HOMES with land.
Ready to move in. Owner
financing with approved credit.
3BR 2BA, no renters.
850-308-6473
LandHomesExpress.com

Need a

new Job?
Look in the
Classifieds!

PALM HARBOR HOMES
4/2 Stock Sequoia
2,200sq ft $12K OFF!
FOR FREE PHOTOS...
John Lyons for details
1-800-622-2832 ext 210

VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com


Thinking a


SU NEWSPAPERS






The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun.net


Wednesday, September 4, 2013


MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
1095


$39,995
2/2, CORIAN COUNTERS.
COMPLETELY FURNISHED.

Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com
ARCADIA, Nearly New
3BR/2BA Manufactured
Home on 1/2 Acre.
Appliances Stay.
Financing Available!
Ready Now!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122


uvn In rvn i W i..I
carport. 211 Schooner St.
Premier Gated 55+ Comm.,
with marina & resort
amenities! 1344 SF
w/granite & all new appls.
ENJOY THE GOOD LIFE!
PATTY GILLESPIE
REMAX ANCHOR
941-875-2755


RAINFOREST
IMMACULATE!
1500 sq. ft. 3 bedroom.
Nicely furnished.
Oversized lot.
Air in Lanai and More.
$59,995
Call 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


VENICE 2/2
Beautifully furnished,
includes gas grill & com-
puter. 1 block to heated
pool & tennis. Only 3
miles to gulf beaches!
$14,500 941-244-0514

HOMES FOR RENT
1210





3/2/1 Jockey Club, North Port.........$825
2/2/2+Den, Villa, Port Charl........... $900
3/2/2 Large Lanai, Port Char.........$1000
3/2/2 Updated, FencedYard, NP ..$1150
3/2.5/2 wlLawn & Pool Care, NP...$1500
FULL PROPERTY LIST AVAILABLE ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE
YOUR PROPERTY





0 3/2/2 Canal S. Gulf
Cove 3110sqft $1400
* 3/2/2 Pool E. Eng SS
appl. Granite $1300
03/2/1 Pool, Rotonda
golf course 2249sf $1150
03/2/2 Pool NP $1050
02/1 cp dwntwn Eng $750
1/1 utilities inc $800

West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net


CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BRI2BAI2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
-AABring your pets!AA
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECOND 8 WELCOME
ENGLEWOOD 3/2/2 Pool,
1900 SF, Split plan, new car-
pet, 7202 Mamouth St. 34224
1 Yr Lease, $1195/mo 1st,
Last & Sec. 941-214-0766
ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-0333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com




ERA '
For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1200...3/2/1 Pool, Canal, boatlifL...F
$1200.3/2/2 Pool serv incl..PC
$750....2/1 Triplex updated..PC
$700..2/1 1031 SqFt............PC
$550..2/1 912 SqFt Duplex..En
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters
NEED A RENTAL *
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT


InvestorsChoice Real Estate
A FalthtBased Business


VENICE
3/2.5 WOODBRIDGE CONDO
PT. CHARLOTTE
2/2 BIMINI BAY CONDO


$1900

$700


2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice
2/2 Homes from ... $1600
3/2 Homes from ... $1800
3/2 Pool Homes from..$2200
Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.


PORT CHARLOTTE, 2/2/1,
ABSOLUTE BEAUTY LAKEFRONT,
FAM. RM, DOCK, NO PETS./
No SMOKE. ANNUAL $850/MO
1ST, LAST, & SEC.
(941)-456-3367
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2
First/Last/Sec. $750/mo
2159 Broom Court
DEEP CREEK 3/2/2
First/Last/Sec. $1000/mo
53 Callao Street
941-276-0213
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2.5/2
2850 sq ft pool home on lake!
Very open w/great kitchen &
brkft nook, formal Ir, dr &
great room, fp in great room &
master. Furn/unfrn. $1600 w/
lawn & pool serv. incl. Security
syst. No smoking. Avail 10/1
6-12 mo lease 941-661-1399

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!


NORTH PORT 2/1 Nice,
clean house. $700/mo + sec.
City water, sewer. Mature ten-
ants only. 941-426-3575
PORT CHARLOTTE Nice
clean 3/2 with shed, CHA,
$800/mo 1st, last + Small
dep 941-276-3291
PORT CHARLOTTE, 3/2/1
Renovated, fenced yd, pet ok,
near schools. N/S. $1000/Mo,
1st, L/S. 941-875-5013
PORT CHARLOTTE, Super
Clean 3/2/1 Renovated,
N/S. Nice area. $1100/Mo,
1st, L/S. 941-875-5013




PT CHARLOTTE & ENGL
Beautiful Private 3/2 DC
$1075; 4/2 SGC $1250;
941-321-71400R941-321-7139
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2 $1100 mo. unf. or
furn. $1200/mo
annual lease 941-629-3279
GET RESULTS-
USE CLASSIFIED!


WE NEED RENTALS
Reduced Mgmt Fees
www.allfloridareal.com
(41)629-1121


ROTONDA I -.'. nri.u
al,Pebble Beach. Newly
remodeled, great golf
course/water view from Ig
lanai, vaulted ceilings, w/in
closet, w/d & appliances, no
pets/smokers. $1,050 941-
964-2305
SOUTH VENICE Lovely
clean 3/2/1 5 mins from
beach. W/D hookup $900/mo
+sec. 941-875-5657



PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2/2 Shed, new carpet,
$1200/mo
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
2/2 1096 sq. ft. $725/mo
Debbye Fitzpatrick
941-268-6030

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240





ANNUAL &
SEASONAL RENTALS
IN BIRD BAY VILLAGE
Venice, FL
BIRD BAY REALTY, INC.
941-484-6777 or
800-464-8497

AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS *

2/2 No Pets
Quesada Ave., P.C.
$550/mo
2/2 55+ Comm.,
Forrest Nelson Blvd., P.C.
$600/mo

*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com

LLISTING
DEEP CREEK
2/2 Furnished, 1st FL,
Utilities included,
except Cable, $825/Mo,
941-629-8229, 941-661-9570


HOMES FOR RENT HOMES FOR RENT
1210 L 1210


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240

DEEP CREEK 2/2 or 3/2, tile
cath. ceil, wood cab. granite,
W/D, lanai $725+ up, pets ok
(941)-626-1514 or 661-4539


OSPREY CLEAN BRIGHT &
SPACIOUS 2/2 + GARAGE
SCR LANAI, STEP IN SHOWER,
POOL, TENNIS, FROM $1235
INCLUDES WATER /CABLE
NON-SMOKING BUILDING.
941-966-9763
PORT CHARLOTTE 2nd
Floor, 2/2, New York Section
water, pool, incld. Sm pets ok.
$700 + sec. 941-286-6252
PUNTA GORDA 55+ 2/2
with view of the harbor. Pool &
clubhouse priv. W/D hkup
$1100/mo 941-276-0213

DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
1300

PUNTA GORDA 2/1 Central air
and heat, small screened lanai,
$700/mo 941-661-4482

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
1320


ENGLEWOOD
AFFORDABLE
1 BEDROOM APTS. 62+
Income limits apply.
GROVE CITY
MANOR
RN 941-697-4677
TDD 614-442-4390





NOW ACCEPTING
WAITING LIST
APPLICATIONS 941-473-0450

STUDIO APTS
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY:1-800-955-8771


PUNTA GORDA Downtown,
2 room all utilities included. No
pets, $600/mo. Call Jerry
941-391-4856
PUNTA GORDA, 2/1 Com-
pletely tiled, window treat-
ment, on Fairway Dr oppo-
site school, monthly $650,
Call Owner (718)-465-
6388 or (718) 864-6482
VENICE ISLAND APTS, 1
Bedroom Available. Close to
Beach & Downtown. No Pets,
No Smoking. 941-234-1454


LOOK
VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$375 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
VENICE ISLAND Efficiency
1 & 2 br, Immed. occup.
No pets, 1 yr lease
941-416-5757or 323-6466
VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1-800-955-8771



VILLA SAN CARLOS II
22250 Vick St.
Affordable-Income based
One bedroom apartments
for 62 or older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
ARCADIA Beautiful 5 acre
building site on Peace
River/Thornton Creek in
Sunnybreeze Golf Course
subdivision. Oak trees, palm
trees, pond, property is on
water. New well, site is
ready to build your dream
home. Lovely sunset views.
Must see to appreciate.
Come take a look.
$199,000 231-499-9574


NORTH PORT Sumter
Blvd. Great location. New
home area. $6,900 941-
457-6811


FOR RENT
1320

VENICE STUDIO
& 1 Bedroom
Accepting Section 8 Vouchers
941-488-7766
WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!
941-429-2402


MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
1340



NOCATEE,
Doublewide $450/mo.
941-624-0355 or
941-875-5253

ROOMS FOR RENT
1360


MURDOCK, Furnished, eff.
rm, all utl incl., handicap access.
Close to YMCA. bkgrd ck. N/S
$115 wk. 614-879-6656
PORT CHARLOTTE Clean cozy
Private bath, furn room, NS
$125/Wk+Dep.941-266-5293
PORT CHARLOTTE, full
house privileges, $425/M or
$110/W Rdy. 6/1 941-6244442

VACATION/
SEASONAL RENTALS
1390


P.C, Furnished 2/1.5/1 w/
Lanai. Rent Varies by Month.
Avail. 9/1/13 941-628-9016

LOTS & ACREAGE
1500


NC MTNS
1.71 PRIME ACRES WITH
STUNNING MTN VIEWS,
LG HARDWOODS, LEVEL
ELEVATED BLDG SITE AND
PAVED ACCESS ONLY $34,900
FINANCING AVAIL.
866-738-5522 BRKR
LAND & CABIN PACKAGE
ON CUMBERLAND
PLATEAU!
30 acres and 1200 sq. ft.
cabin $79,000. Minutes from
4 State Parks & TN River. Call
877-282-4409.

COMMERCIAL LOT
1530


PUNTA GfORDA store for
lease. 2400 square feet.
Great for convenience store.
located on busy street.
Contact Tim Boff
941-815-0618

BUSINESS RENTALS
1610


NORTH PORT, FOR lease:
Fully furnished & equipped
medical office space.
1000 sq. ft. Off Toledo
Blade. Two exam rooms &
procedure room. If inter-
ested call (863) 381-0120.
PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200
SEmploy Classified!


Port Charlotte
Executive Office Suites
Receptionist, all utilities & other sup-
port services starting at $295/mo.
Omni Executive Center
A Friendly Place to be!
4055 US41
(Across from Bob Evans)
Call Maj or Shirley 941-627-9755
www.omniexec.net
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
Call for Pricing 941-484-4316

COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620


House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585





ENGLEWOOD 4680
Placida Rd. Retail Space
Available In Small Retail
Center With Direct Access
to Placida Rd. Lighted
Pole Signage Available. $9
PSF NNN, Plus FL Sales
Tax. 734-973-3185


LOTS & ACREAGE
1500


NORTH PORT Residential
Lot Parcel # 1130213112
Section 45 Asking $7000.
321-725-5208

LOUT OF TOWN LOTS
S1520





Wednesday, September 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 7


COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620


Retail center with
frontage on Placida Rd.
Total of 12 individual suites.
All leases are
NNN + FL Sales Tax
734-973-3185
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992


ADVERTISE

In

The Classifieds!

WAREHOUSE
& STORAGE
1640

ARCADIA
5911 SW HWY 17


2007 BUILT 2400 SQ FT
STEEL WAREHOUSE/SHOP
CONCRETE FLOOR, 150
AMP ELE, 1/2 BATH ON
WELL AND SEPTIC. ZONED
A-10 $50,000
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653


WAREHOUSE
& STORAGE
1640

CHARLOTTE HARBOR
Warehouse 5,000 sq ft.
with Office. $2000/mo w/
1st & Last ALSO 800 sft
avail. 941-380-9212
NORTH PORT 800SF Ware-
house $420/mo+tax. 400SF,
$215/mo +tax 941-661-6720

2000


EMPLOYMENT
EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/ Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

Need a new
Home?
Look in the
Classifieds!


PROFESSIONAL
2010



NOWl




WEILER
ENGINEERING
is continuing growth and
expansion in Punta Gorda
and the FI. Keys. We have
available positions for
qualified applicants with
"El's with minimum 3-4
years' experience, Expe-
rienced Const/Utility
Inspectors or P.E., Pro-
ject Manager with experi-
ence" This Candidate
should have strong com-
munication skills and be
able to work with a team
or individually. WEC pro-
vides engineering servic-
es in the areas of site
design, roadway utilities,
structural engineering,
and marinas/waterfront
resorts throughout South-
west Florida and the
Florida Keys.
We offer an extremely
rewarding stable career
with full benefits, and
highly competitive
salaries.
FOR IMMEDIATE
CONSIDERATION,
please e-mail your
resume to Janeen Weiler
at Janeen@
weilerengineering.org


FINANCIAL
2016

RESIDENTIAL LENDER
Englewood Bank & Trust
has an immediate opening
for a highly motivated,
well-organized, Residential
Lender experienced for the
Venice Market Area.
Previous residential lending
experience required with
excellent interpersonal &
communication skills.
Competitive
noncommissioned salary
& benefit package.
Apply in person at:
1111 S McCall Rd,
Englewood 34223 or
e-mail resume to:
esmathews@ebtfl.com
EEO/AA.

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!


CLERICAL/OFFICE
S2020

ACCTS PAYABLE Secretary,
F/T position. Must be profi-
cient in excel & word. Please
submit your resume in person.
No phone calls please. 1192
NE Livingston Street, Arcadia,
Florida 34266.

ASST. OFFICE MANAGER
Needed for our NOKOMIS
/OSPREY OFFICE, Prefer
degree accountant or
person with good automo-
tive accounting back-
ground. Great working
conditions. Full Time,
Many fringes, permanent.
Fax resume to
941-918-8511 Please
include desired income.
CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda
PART TIME OFFICE
help needed with strong
customer service & basic
computer skills. DFWP
Apply at:
Southern Oxygen Welding
129 Carmalita St.
Punta Gorda OR online:
www.southernoxygen.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


CLERICAL/OFFICE
2020


OFFICE HELP NEEDED
Computer & bookkeeping
skills. Email resume to
bowersoxinc@comcast.net
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Busy Property Management
office seeks Maintenance
Coordinator. Must have prior
experience in property man-
agement, strong computer,
phone and organizational
skills. Real Estate License a
plus. Salaried position,
Mon-Fri. Email resume to
era@sunline.net.
NO Phone Calls Please.

NEED CASH?
MEDICAL
S2030


CNA'S, HHA'S and
Caregivers
Find new clients by
advertising your services
in the Senior Directory
every Wednesday in
The Sun Newspapers.
This feature publishes in
Charlotte, Sarasota, and
Desoto Counties.
Market yourself reach
150,000 readers!


, SUN NEWSPAPERS
Charloite DreSlo Englewood Nuorh Port Vence
Call 941-429-3110
for more information


I.. I


SSenior Livin

H^^^^ ftT~rfl~i jij^^^


.


C ~ HOURS
iCharlotte Mon.-Fri. 9am 6pm
Sat. 9am 1pm Sun. Closed
Pharmacy 3231 Tamiami Trail, Suite G
310%.AYourFriendlyPharmacy' Port Charlotte, FL, 33952
We Do Accept All Insurances
Over 250 Generics For $1.99
Free Home Delivery
We Compound Fast Service

941-889-7239


First surgeon in
Southwest Florida offering
Bladeless Laser Cataract Surgery
F--T Nk Z r7


-r i-XI-l *j1 Ie-I
CataractCenter

109 Taylor Street *
(941) 505-2020
BetterVision.net


Punta Gorda


Gulfwinds
Where Compassion & Care is Always There.
Rates as low as $1,500/Month
We provide the following
Assisted Living in a homey atmosphere
Assistance with all activities of daily living
Medications Bathing Dressing
Ambulating Showering
Three daily nutritional meals and snacks
Laundry and linen services
Entertainment and activities
Cleaning rooms Fully sprinklered building
GulfwiNds AssisTEd LiviNq FAciliTy
www.gulfwindsalf.com
2745 E. Venice Ave., Venice, FL 34292
Tel: 941-488-5970
li. # A17804


I ..-


Port Charlotte
Villa San Carlos II
AFFORDABLE

Income based 1 bedroom
For 62 or older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404 TTY-1-800-955-8771


PREVENT Serious Bathroom Falls
Let Us Install A
Safety Shower & Bathtub
GRAB BAR
Recommended by Doctors and
Physical Therapists
Various Lengths 18" thru 36"
2 Post Stair Railings Over 20 years Experience
& Hallway Bansters Available Don't Wait To Fall to Call!
Jim's Bathroom Grab Bars, LLC
941-626-4296 oeatHW*
jimsbathroomgrabbarsagmail.com or k !.


T ai r* s
0
inteSno ietr


S Alzheimer's
AL* e Care
SAssisted .ii, I i'n'ln | Core
ECC LICENSED
Safe & Secure Memory Care Living
Personalized Care Plans
Respite Stays
Private Accommodations
941-575 9390
S www.palmsmemorycare.com
2295 Shreve Street, Punta Gorda, FL 33950


0


AO


I I I -


CLASSIFIED
WORKS!J


CLASSIFIED
ADS SE^LL


i o


I







The Sun Classified Page 8 EINICIV ads .yoursun net Wednesday, September 4, 2013


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.


CLUES ACROSS
1. Feminist Lucretia
5. Lacrimal gland fluid
9. Airborne (abbr.)
12. Double-reed instrument
13. De Mille (dancer)
15. Bur plant: __ vera
16. Represent by drawing
17. Roy Harold Scherer
19. Point that is one point N of
due E
20. Causing vexation
21. Belonging to a thing
24. Leg joint
25. Suffragette Anthony
27. Form a sum
28. Point midway between E
and SE
31. Convert a hide into leather
32. Radical derived from
butane
34. Priest's liturgical vestment
35. Goat and camel hair fabric

CLUES DOWN
1. "Rounders" actress Gretchen
2. Off-Broadway theater award
3. Grave
4. Court game
5. Pitch
6. Sense of self-esteem
7. Mandela's party
8. Lights again
9. Likewise
10. Film set microphone pole
11. "Housewives'" Leakes
14. A torn off strip
15. Promotions
18. A. Godfrey's instrument
22. Bill in a restaurant
23. Cozy
24. Knocking out
25. Polio vaccine developer
26. Numeral system
28. Former gold coin worth $10


36. Sticky
38. Talk
39. Committed information rate
40. Strong twisted cotton
thread
42. 33Y rpms
43. Honey (abbr.)
44. Founding Father Franklin
45. Frees from pain or worry
47. Tennis player Bjorn
48. Not inclined to speak
49. Shoulder blade
53. Express pleasure
56. One week before Easter
60. Attired
62. Chew the fat
63. Weighing device
64. Captain _, British pirate
65. Tropical American cuckoo
66. Any place of bliss or
delight
67. Remain as is


29. Swats
30. Flows back or recedes
31. Rotation speed indicator
33. Respect beliefs of others
37. Original matter
41. Cologne
44. Small round soft mass
46. Kisses noisily
47. Large passenger vehicle
49. Prevents harm to creatures
50. Songwriter Sammy
51. Jai _, sport
52. Payment (abbr.)
54. Settled onto
55. Incline from vertical
57. Father
58. Brew
59. Strong desire
61. Insecticide


MEDICAL
2030



11
HARBORCHASE




RESIDENT
ASSISTANT

FULL TIME
PART TIME / POOL

ARE YOU A HHA, PRIVATE
CAREGIVER OR NEWLY
LICENSED CNA LOOKING
FOR A CHANGE OR THAT
1ST OPPORTUNITY.


HARBORCHASE OFFERS
ON-THE-JOB TRAINING FOR
ANYONE LOOKING FOR AN
OPPORTUNITY IN THE
HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY.
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND
AN EXCELLENT
BENEFITS PACKAGE SUCH AS
MEDICAL, DENTAL,
VISION & 401K
PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS AT 20+
HOURS.
FOR CONSIDERATION
PLEASE APPLY
IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V




HARBORCHASE


RN'S/LPN'S
FULL TIME, PART TIME
AND PRN

SKILLED NURSING AND
ASSISTED LIVING

HARBORCHASE offers
an excellent benefits
package such as
Medical, Dental, Vision
& 401K.
PART-TIME TEAM
MEMBERS RECEIVE
BENEFITS AT 20 HOURS.
For consideration please
apply in person to:
HARBORCHASE
OF VENICE
Assisted Living and
Skilled Nursing
950 Pinebrook Road
Venice, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 ph
(941) 484-3450 fax
FOE M/F/D/V

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!

Seize the sales
with Classified!


MEDICAL
l 2030


DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
*COTA, OT & PT
for PT/FT/PRN
*RN PRN/FT/PT
available for all shifts
*Interim Dietary
Manager F/T
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766

MED.SECRETARY/ Optical trainee
FT, exp. pref. & organized, ppl
skills Fax PC 941-883-3938
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
/CNA, Full Time, Back
Office help needed for
busy MD practice.
Previous medical exp and
EMR exp needed. Fax
Resume: 941-629-2036

MEDICAL OFFICE
is looking for MA, LPN
and front office staff.
Full time positions
Mon Fri 8:30am-5:00pm
MUST have EMR
experience!
Please email your resume
for review to:
cmazzarella@sunletter.com
Advertise Today!

HORIZON
HEALTHCAREE
S INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN
within 11 months
Enrollment ongoing
Call for Class Dates
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Sept 9 '13
LPN-next class starts
Jan 20th '14
Start MWorkinghi 2-5 wks!
Classes StartEach Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506

MUSICAL
2035





Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUNi


your cedit ard~


RESTAURANT/
HOTEL
2040


WANTED
EXPERIENCED BARTENDER
Fax resume to 941-639-1625


COME JOIN
OUR TEAM
THE BURNT STORE GRILL
is looking for full and Part
time experienced team
members We are seeking:
* FOOD SERVERS
* LINE COOKS
APPLY IN PERSON ONLY
3941 TAMIAMI TR
PUNTA GORDA
COLONIAL-BURNT STORE PLAZA
BETWEEN PUBLIX & HOME DEPOT
COOK/PREP, Days,
No Sunday. Apply within
Wee Blew Inn, Venice.

COOKS, PART TIME &
BUS STAFF
NEEDED
for Seasonal Position.
MUST Have Minimum of
2 Years Club Experience.
Apply in Person to
Fill Out an Application at:
Heron Creek Golf & CC,
5301 Heron Creek Blvd.
North Port
EXPERIENCED SERVERS/
BARTENDER NEEDED
F/T Position Sundays are a
Must! Great Perks. Employee
& Spouse golf free when Avail.
Apply in Person Mon.-Sat.
266 Rotonda Circle
Ask for Cathy

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!


RIVER CITY GRILL
Seeks motivated and
experienced LINE COOK
Apply in Person: 2-4pm
Only 131 W Marion Ave
Punta Gorda, FL

WAITSTAFF & COOKS, F/T
& P/T. Waterford Golf Club
Restaurant, Venice. Call Nancy
941-468-6419

/ SKILLED TRADES
S2050


A/C LEAD INSTALLER
WANTED
5 yrs experience. CLEAN
APPEARANCE, DURING & CRIMINAL
RECORD. Has own tools. Great
Company & Great Benefits!
Please contact
Cliff's A/C, 941-629-2863

AC INSTALLERS
Mike Douglass Air Condi-
tioning seeking qualified
A/C Service Technicians.
Min 5 yrs. exp. Must be
well groomed & have clean
driving record. We offer a
Competitive compensation
package including benefits.
This is a drug free work
place.Call 941-473-
2344AC INSTALLERS,

AUTO MECHANIC,
Full Service Garage.
Must Have Own Tools.
Interview By Appt Only.
(941)-276-5777
CARPENTER, EXPERIENCED
only for residential builder
on Boca Grande (toll paid).
Must have own tools and
valid Florida driver's license
clean for prior three years.
Apply in person
370 E. Railroad Ave,
Boca Grande Sept 4th and
5th 9:00 2:00pm only.
NO phone calls. DFWP


The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun.net


Wednesday, September 4, 2013






Wednesday, September 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 9


SKILLED TRADES
2050


EQUIPMENT OPERATOR,
Consolidated Productions
Groups is seeking a qualified
equipment operator with at
least 5 years experience.
Apply @ 1403 SE. Ohio Ave.
Arcadia (863)993-3660
FLOOR TECHS FT
Must have knowledge of
working floor cleaning
machines & different
floor surfaces
experience required.
To apply send resume to:
kmargraf@villageontheisle.com
Or fax to: 941-484-0407
VILLAGE ON THE ISLE
EOE/DFWP

FUEL TRANSPORT DRIVER
CLASS A, WITH 2YRS HAZMAT/
TANKER ENDORSEMENTS & EXPE-
RIENCE, PREFERRED w/TWIC
CARD. COVERING ARCADIA -
TAMPA AREAS. PAY STARTS AT
13.50, INCREASE AFTER TRAIN-
ING, PARTIAL UNIFORM PROVIDED.
SEND RESUME TO:
KAREN@BVOIL.COM
OR QUESTIONS 863-494-3246

PLUMBER Construction,
Remodel, and Service Expe-
rience a must. Benefit Pack-
age. DFWP. Ray's Plumbing
941-205-2133

SEAMTRESS WANTED
Experienced only. P/T to F/T
opportunity. Apply in person
10am4pm, Tues-Sat, no phone
calls please. 17218 Toledo
Blade Blvd, #10, Port Charlotte.
GET RESULTS
USE CLASSIFIED!

SALES
L 2070


ADVERTISING
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE
SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.

DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
* AGGRESSIVE
* COLD CALLING PRO
* DEAL CLOSER
* STRONG WORK ETHICS
* MONEY MOTIVATED
* EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
* PEOPLE PERSON
* COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES

WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.

IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


Advertising Sales
Executive

The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.

If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
* Competitive salary plus
commission
* Vacation
*Health insurance
*Sick and short term
disability
* Training
*Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:

Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com

We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.

Charlotte County Water/
Rainsoft, 30 years in
Business, is seeking Exp'd
SERVICE COORDINATOR.
Must be a motivated team
leader, excellent Customer
Service. Email Resume to
ccwrainsoft@msn.com


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....

/Find a Pet
/Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results



PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK

FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


ENGLEWOOD





YOUR
HOMETOWN DEALER
SEEKS ENERGETIC SALES
PEOPLE TO JOIN OUR TEAM.
EXPERIENCE IS A PLUS.
WE OFFER A GREAT PAY
PLAN, HELATH BENEFITS
AND EMPLOYEE DISCOUNTS.

APPLY IN PERSON
ENGLEWOOD FORD
1908 S. McCALL RD.
ENGLEWOOD, FL


READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?
SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER
Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
located in
North Port Florida.
We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
loves learning new skills and:
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.
:We offer:
:e Training
i Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
* Opportunity to expand
your business skills

Please email your resume
to:
Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
Employer/Drug & Nicotine
Free Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.

CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
SALES **
** CASH PAID DAILY**
Excellent workplace! Great
hours & benefits. Base vs.
Generous Commission aver-
age $15+/hr. Port Charlotte
941-625-8800


Seeking Experienced
Furniture Sales Person,
strong closer in Port
Charlotte. For more info
call 941-457-7711

CHILD/ADULT
CARE NEEDED
2090

PRESCHOOL TEACHER
Apply Within:
Tiny Hands Preschool
20150 Midway Port Charlotte

GENERAL
L 2100


BIKINI DANCERS WANTED
for local sports bar ALSO
Nude dancers needed
for Gentlemans Club.
Please call
941-766-1161


SALES SALES
2070 L 2070


GENERAL
2100


Drivers-HIRING EXPERI-
ENCED / INEXPERIENCED
TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up
to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 year OTR exp. req.
Tanker training available. Call
Today: (877)882-6537.
www.OakleyTransport.com
$$ FLOORING INSTALLERS
NEEDED $$
For year-round work!
2 Years Experience. Must have
van, tools, plus Corporation/LLC,
GL insurance, pass background
check, speak English.
Call 855-256-3675 or go to
http://contractor us-installations.corn

GOLF CLUB MAINTENANCE
WORKERS NEEDED
Please Call 941-697-2414
INSIDE SALES Support,
Immed open for positive, out-
going, exc comp skills, proac-
tive. Must drive. FT exc benef
incl 100% health ins. In person
only 4372 N Access Rd Eng
Maintenance Supervisor
Sun Coast Press is looking for
an enthusiastic individual to
join our team. We are a family
run, well-established & rapidly
growing multi-newspaper
media group and commercial
print operation on the sunny
Southwest Florida Gulf Coast.
We have the following full time
employment opportunity in
our Venice print facility at The
Venice Gondolier.
Job Responsibilities Include:
Lead and assist staff to main-
tain production and building
equipment to manufacturer's
spec. Repair & maintain
production equipment for
two print facilities. Daily
continuous improvement,
leadership, On-Call status
24/7 for emergency repair of
critical equipment
Skills Required: Extensive
experience, preferably 10
years plus, in repair &
maintenance of newspaper or
commercial printing presses.
Supervisory or management
experience in a production
environment preferred.
Ability to troubleshoot, repair,
and maintain according to a
preventative/predictive main-
tenance plan to ensure opti-
mal equipment performance
and minimize downtime of
production equipment.
A thorough understanding of
machine schematics, industry
standards, tolerances, gears,
bearings, drive systems,
electrical, etc.
Community and Urbanite
presses, Martin & Jardis
splicers, and Rima &
Gammerler stackers.
Mueller and Harris
inserters, Quipp stackers,
Dynaric strappers, and Mueller
stitcher/trimmer.
Peripheral equip, such as lift
trucks, compressors, dryers, etc.
Building facilities at all
locations with assistance
from outside vendors.
HVAC, Plumbing, Electrical,
Fire safety, Landscaping, etc.
Good working knowledge
of computers: email,
spreadsheets, word
documents. The ability to
work independently and solve
problems working in a fast
paced, dynamic environment.
Good verbal and written
communication skills.
We offer health insurance,
AFLAC, paid holidays, paid
time off, and 401K. We are a
drug & nicotine free work-
place. Pre-employment drug &
nicotine screening required.
Interested candidates please
send a resume to ccham-
bers@suncoastpress.com or
contact Chuck Chambers at
941-206-1418 to arrange an
interview. Be prepared to
furnish an up to date resume
at time of interview.


L GENERAL
S2100


GOLF COURSE SPRAY
TECHNICIAN
Please Call 941-697-2414
INSTRUCTIONAL AIDE,
ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION
(PT) Open Until Filled.
Please visit:
http://sfsc.interviewexchange.com
for detailed position
posting. 863-784-7132.
EA/EO/VETERAN'S PREF.
A0_ SOUTH
LORI DA

S JENICE iL
V Gondolier Sun




THE VENICE GONDOLIER SUN
IS NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
FOR CARRIERS IN VENICE AND
SURROUNDING AREAS. MUST
HAVE DEPENDABLE VEHICLE, A
VALID FLORIDA DRIVERS
LICENSE AND PROOF OF INSUR-
ANCE.
APPLY IN PERSON:
200 E. VENICE AVE.
VENICE, FL 34285
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
VETERINARY ASSISTANT
Part time, (13/hrs per wk
$12.00/hr.) for N. Port
office. Must have experi-
ence. send resume and
letter of interest to
Angelanimalclinic@yahoo.com
VETERINARY CLINIC
Kennel/Clinic Closer, 3-7pm,
M-F + weekends. Salary
based on experience & skill.
Pays $8-10, 941-488-1455

PART TIME/
TEMPORARY
2110





COME WORK WITH THE SUN
NEWSPAPER CLASSIFIED TEAM,
LOCATED IN NORTH PORT,
FLORIDA. WE ARE AMERICA'S
BEST COMMUNITY DAILY
NEWSPAPER, WITH THE
LARGEST CLASSIFIED SECTION
IN FLORIDA! THIS IS AN
OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITY TO
JOIN A COMPANY WHERE YOU
MAKE THE DIFFERENCE!
WE ARE LOOKING FOR A
PART-TIME PERSON WITH
COMPUTER SKILLS AND A
CHEERY PHONE PERSONALITY
TO JOIN OUR TEAM.
WE OFFER TRAINING IN A
STABLE AND COMMUNITY
INVOLVED COMPANY.
PLEASE EMAIL YOUR RESUME:
HR@SUNLETTER.COM
EOE DFWP
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG &
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED


3000








NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010






II
100% FREE ATM MACHINE
ATM NETWORK 585-4517
**LIMITED TIME ONLY**
atmasap@att.net
retail/restaurant/marina ect


Add a
only


photo for
$10.00!


Please call
(866)-463-1638



PERSONALS
S3020


ABSOLUTE RELAXATION
WITH BRANDI *SPECIALS*
941-875-2964
ACTIVE sr. male seeks active
sr. female for companionship
& friendship. 941-204-1343
ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
FEMALE HAIRSTYLIST, 46,
looking for Companion, 47-65
Venice-Brad 941-201-9853
FRENCH Hairstylist, looking
for Companion 30-65 yrs of
age. Call 941-228-9270
MASSAGE THERAPY
AND RELAXATION
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041



1225 US 41 UNIT B3.
CHARLOTTE TRADE CENTER
N OF 776 941-625-0141
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
RETIRED GENTLEMAN, look-
ing for Oriental lady, Trim w/
long black silky hair and like
soft jazz and soft kisses. Call
941-330-4098
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR,
SUMMER SPECIALS
941-483-0701 North Port


ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010


ADOPT: A Childless
Couple seeks to adopt
Loving home with tenderness,
warmth, happiness. Financial
security. Expenses paid. Regis
& David (888)986-1520 or text
(347)406-1924.
www.davidandregisadopt.com
Adam B. Sklar FL # 0150789
ADOPTION
Childless, loving couple
pray to adopt. Stay at home
mom, successful dad, great
dogs & devoted grandparents.
Legally allowed expenses paid.
Bill & Debbie 800-311-6090.
Attorney Susan Stockham
Bar # 0342521


**VENDORS NEEDED**
Food, Gifts, & Spirits for
Bayshore Beer & Wine Fest.
Saturday October 12th.
All Booths $30.00
Call 941-627-1628 ext 101

HAPPY ADS
3015





Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.






The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun.net


Wednesday, September 4, 2013


CARD OF THANKS
3040


I would like to thank
an exceptional group of
people who came to my aid
Saturday 8/24/13 in North
Port. A call to notify NP 911,
emt, med techs whose arrival,
treatment and patience were
second to none! Then & at so
profound it requires special
pronouncement. A religious
avaitor flew in for the occa-
sion. This angel offered to
share her personal oxygen
cylinder with its limited sup-
ply. I surprisingly accepted.
This angel's offer was so con-
spicous that I was asked if I
was known or related to, I
sadly said no. Thank you
much to your flight controller.
Hopefully I will recieve replies
to my cell phone number.
Empathy is alive & well.
Bill Pinto 941-416-5075

L SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
a:3060



CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
CNA & HHA CLASSES:
Days, Eves, Weekends. $449.
Small Class! CPR/First Aid
Incl. 941-966-2600
www.SunCoastCNA.com
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING -1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
BORED WITH TAE KWON
DO & MIXED MARTIAL
ARTS? Try Somthing New.
FREE Classes Available in
Tradional Shaolin Kung Fu
More Info Call 941- 204-2826
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR TRAINING!
Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excava-
tors. 3 weeks hands on pro-
gram. Local job placement
assistance. National Certifica-
tions. GI Bill benefits eligible.
1-866-362-6497.
START A NEW CAREER
HOME INSPECTORS LICENSING COURSE
SPECIAL $1200! (SAVE $500)
Only 5 Seats Available
Sarasota Start Date 9/26/13
Ed Klopfer Schools
941-379-2378
www.edklopfer.com



UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 941-347-7445

BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
La 3065

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473


BURIAL LOTS/
CRYPTS
3070

RESTLAWN, Forrest Nelson,
2 burial plots, $995 each. Pt
Charlotte (941)-743-4028

LOST & FOUND
S3090


FOUND: DOG. FEMALE
Small Black Terrier on Hibiscus
St. in PGI on Monday 9/2.
Please call 913-486-8036
LOST CAT: FEMALE, ALL
BLACK, some white on feet
and white belly lost since
August 16th from Engle-
wood Wentworth & Artist
area. Please call 941-681-
2272.
LOST DOG: SHI-TZU poodle
mix male champagne color,
approx 22 Ibs MISSING
since August 27th Tuesday,
from Nokomis Suncrest Dr &
Wanda Dr.area Please call
941-275-7148
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face & back.
Missing from North Port
5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909

ARTS CLASSES
S3091


MAGIC OF MOSAICS
Classes & Workshops
Rosemary, Artist/instr
941-697-7888/941-258-6873
www.FlamingoFanny.com

COMPUTER CLASSES
3092



Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org
EDUCATION
3094


AIRLINE CAREERS
begin here Get FAA approved
Aviation Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing & finan-
cial aid for qualified students.
Job placement assistance. Call
AIM 866-314-3769.
MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.

EXERCISE CLASSES
S3095


GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769


RELIGION CLASSES
Z3096


BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309


OTHER CLASSES
3097


CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

5000







BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.

CHILD CARE
S5051


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
COMPUTER SERVICE
5053


COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285
1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR,
TUTOR IN YOUR HOME
Reasonable & Prompt! Sr.
Disc. Ask for Stacy
941-451-3186

Need a

new Ride?

Find it

in the

Classifieds!

We Come To YOU! *
SUMMER SPECIAL
$30 Flat Rate
CERTIFIED COMPUTER
REPAIR
Free Computer Checkup *
Virus/Spyware/Malware
Removal
941-404-5373

CONCRETE
7 5057


CONCRETE
Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks,
House Slabs, Etc..
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES
5060

A CLEAN SWEEP Residen-
tial & Commercial Honest &
Reliable. Serving Sarsota
County. 941-223-0303


CLEANING
SERVICES
1 5060

HOMESHEFIELD, Comm &
Residential Cleaning AND
FLOOR CARE: Stripping & Wax
239-400-4113 Lic./lns.
HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
5100

CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins

TOPP'S INC. FENCE
941-429-0800
PVC
ALUMINUM
CHAIN LINK
"NOW HIRING"
LICENSE #AAA0010261

TAKE THE CHALLENGE!
OXIDIZES HOME I
INLINE WATER 30-DAY
BACTERIA & MONEY BACK
CHLORIDE GUARANTEE
RESIDUE I
WATER CREEK INLINE SOLUTIONS
FLOW-BITE IS A SUPPLEMENTAL
DEFENSE SYSTEM THAT TAKES A
BITE OUT OF INLINE WATER BACTERIA
BUILD-UP & RESIDUE.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE
VISIT US ON OUR WEBSITE:
WWW.WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
INFO@WATERCREEKINLINESOLUTIONS.COM
"FEED THE BEAR"
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351


& TREE
: 5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
SOD WORK REMOVE &
REPLACE SMALL JOBS OK, ALL
TYPES OF SOD941-716-9912
PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
LOZ 5140

ALL PHASE HOME TREATMENTS
GET THE BEST FOR LESS!
PAINTING, PRESSURE WASHING,
COATINGS & SEALERS, MORE
LIC/INSU 941-321-0637
WAYNE PATTON PAINTING
PRESSURE WASHING & REMOD-
ELING. WE DO IT ALL. 30 YRS
EXP. LIC/INS. 941-258-5089
We Do It A Shade Better!
LARRY BATES PAINTING
Free Estimates
Locally Owned & Operated
941-625-1226
Lic/Ins #RRR0002261

PRESSURE
CLEANING
5180

BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736

ROOFING
5185


PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lc#1329187
Classified = Sales


6000






MERCHANDISE


GARAGE SALES

6001 Arcadia
6002 Englewood
6003 Lake Suzy
6004 Nokomis
6005 North Port
6006 Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
6007 Punta Gorda
6008 Rotonda
6009 Sarasota
6010 South Venice
6011 Venice
6012 Out Of Area
6015 Flea Market
6020 Auctions
MERCHANDISE
6013 Moving Sales
6025 Arts & Crafts
6027 Dolls
6030 Household Goods
6035 Furniture
6038 Electronics
6040 TV/Stereo/Radio
6060 Computer Equip
6065 Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
6070 Antiques &
Collectibles
6075 Fruits/Veges
6090 Musical
6095 Medical
6100 Health/Beauty
6110 Trees & Plants
6120 Baby Items
6125 Golf Accessories
6128 Exercise/Fitness
6130 Sporting Goods
6131 Firearms
6132 Firearm Access.
6135 Bikes/Trikes
6138 Toys
6140 Photography/Video
6145 Pool/ Spa & Supplies
6160 Lawn & Garden
6165 Storage Sheds/
Buildings
6170 Building Supplies
6180 Heavy Constr.
Equipment
6190 Tools/Machinery
6220 Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
6225 Restaurant Supplies
6250 Appliances
6260 Misc. Merchandise
6270 Wanted to Buy/T rade



GARAGE SALES
6002

-THU.-FRI. 8-? 10260
Deerwood Ave. LOTS OF
TOOLS, books, household
items and much more!
L AUCTIONS
S6020


VISIT THE
VENICE AUCTION
EVERY THURSDAY AT
5:00PM 1250 US 41
BYPASS SOUTH
VENICE see our website
for pictures
VeniceAuction.com
941-485-4964
JOE LARAVIERE AB2444
AU3066 10% BP

HOUSEHOLD GOODS
6030


ARCHITECTURAL PAINTINGS
Awesome Ig framed art. $499
941-627-3636
AREA CARPET Mahdavi, red,
hand-tufted wool, 8X11' $100
863-494-2956
AREA CARPET Plush, nice for
wood floors. $85 941-822-
3837
BAMBOO RUG 4'X6' SPA LT
GREEN WITH BANDED EDGES.
$25 910-988-1213


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BEDSPREADS TWIN custom
made rose/cream stripe $40,
OBO 941-587-8271
BEDSPREADS TWIN custom
made rose/cream stripe $40,
OBO 941-587-8271
CANDLES NEW GLADE
SCENTED LG.SIZE 10 OZ-ENGLE-
WOOD $4.50 941475-7577
CANNER-COOKER PRESTO-
16 Qt. $25 941-629-2345
CANNING JARS Quart size-
$6.00/doz. $6 941-629-
CAR PAINTINGS Asst'd nicely
framed car prints, signed.
$100 941-627-3636
CEILING FAN 20" reversible
white or wood grain NEW $25
941-493-3851
CEILING FAN 52" Pecan
wood w/caning insets. Venice
$15, OBO 941-544-5755
CELL PHONE AT&T Nokia
w/car/AC chargers Multi features
As new boxed $35 941-276-1881
CHANDELIER PINEAPPLE
Chand, 4 light w/design. $75
941-429-8507
CHEESE GRATER Pampered
Chef Deluxe new in box $10
941-255-3353
CHINA DINNERWARE Beauti-
ful serv for 12+ serve dishes
$350 941-429-9305
CLEVELAND PRINTS Asst'd
views nicely framed art. $100
941-627-3636
COFFEE TABLE, end table,
tall table lamp. Good condition
$100 941-698-0694
CONVECTION OVEN: BAKE,
BROIL OR GRILL. FAST & EASY
$50 941-575-8881
COOKIE PRESS Set Pam-
pered Chef. Excellent Boxed
$20 941-255-3353
DISHES Antique by Limoges, yel-
low daisy pattern w/gold trim, 104
pcs, $375 OBO, 941-639-2815
DISHES FOR SIX WHITE W LT
GREEN TRIM, VGC $25 941-
740-1000
DRYER 1 YEAR OLD
WHIRLPOOL CABRIO GREAT
COND. $200 941-391-7460
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**




Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUNCe-

k- ^ L LSFil-R







Wednesday, September 4, 2013 ads .you rsun net EINICIV The Sun Classified Page 11


DIRECTIONS:
Fill each square with a number, one through nine.
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right.
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to
total in upper and lower right.
THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION. I-
Today's Challenge
9 3
Time 9 Minutes _
4 Seconds


14
10
108


18


Seconds 121121161161141 BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker
2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved. WOW! 6(ZMO' 1NEW
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Challenger i Y 2
Answers 34 25 29 25 33

Cryptoquip 2011 by King Features Syndicate


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne


MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters

ATTILA, DO NO THANKS,
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Tuesday's unlisted clue: KIPLING
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Wednesday's unlisted clue hint: Native American Smoke-


Blog
Books
Chat
Email


Gestures
Magazines
Music
Newspaper


Sign language
Signs
Speech
Telegram


Telephone
Texting
Whistling


2013 King Features, Inc. 9/4


PICKLES By Brian Crane
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Today's Cryptoquip Clue: L equals G


Wednesday, September 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 11







The S a d 1


Look for the g

Directory pul

f Saturdays ii



SUNNE
NEWSPAPERS


Yreat deals in the Business & Service

blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and

i the Classified Section of the Sun!


N -[ O


Saliva lack can


cause constipation


DEAR DR. ROACH: In
2003, I had surgery for
throat cancer, followed
by radiation treatments.
I have been negative ever
since. My salivary and
thyroid glands were dam-
aged. Does the thyroid
gland control bowel
movements? I've been
constipated a lot. I've
tried different laxatives
without good results.
-J.
ANSWER: Radiation
therapy, though it can
be lifesaving, often has
side effects. In the case of
head and neck cancers,
you have had two com-
mon side effects: damage
to salivary glands and
to the thyroid gland.
Both can affect bowel
function.
There are three major
salivary glands: the
parotid (in the cheeks),
the submandibular
(under the jaw) and the
sublingual (under the
tongue). Low amounts
of saliva can cause
severe dental damage,
but saliva is helpful in
several other ways: Saliva
has enzymes that help
break down food, and
the liquid swallowed
helps the food move
through the digestive
tract. Without adequate
saliva whether it's due
to radiation treatment,
medical conditions like
Sjogren's disease or a side
effect from medication
- constipation is more
likely.
Low thyroid levels are a
frequent cause of con-
stipation, and radiation
damage to the thyroid
predisposes you not only
to low thyroid levels but
also to thyroid cancer,
so your thyroid gland
needs to be periodically
examined. You should
have a lab test to check
your thyroid function.
Most constipation
improves with increased
dietary fiber and water.
DEAR DR. ROACH: I'm
an 80-year-old woman
with very few ailments.
The only medication I
take is for low thyroid.
About two weeks ago, I
woke up feeling tired,
lightheaded and with a
poor appetite. My grand-
daughter took me to my
primary care doctor, who
did a checkup, including
a urine test. He told me
that my symptoms were
due to the "super moon."
It affects people in flat-
roof dwellings, and he
said my symptoms would
last only three days.
I had to laugh when he


Dr. Roach
Readers may
write Dr
Roach at
PO. Box
536475,
Orlando,
FL 32853-6475
told me this. He didn't
prescribe anything, and
I did feel better after
three days, like he said.
My family says I should
change doctors. Have
you ever heard of "super
moon" ailment? E.E
ANSWER: It grieves
me to dash this romantic
notion, but at least four
studies have looked at
whether any behavior
changes or medical
illnesses occur more or
less frequently according
to the moon cycle, and
there is no correlation.
As far as changing your
doctor goes, maybe he
felt laughter was the best
medicine.
DEAR DR. ROACH:
I have only one ques-
tion: Is it inevitable for
a woman to gain weight
at menopause? I am
approaching that time in
my life, and my friends
are all telling me that
weight gain cannot be
avoided. L.S.
ANSWER: Because of
the hormonal changes
around menopause,
many women do indeed
gain weight. In fact,
many women gain
weight in the abdomen,
rather than in the hips
and thighs, and abdomi-
nal fat is more closely
associated with heart
disease, so it's important
to try to avoid it.
Fortunately, weight
gain is not inevitable.
Increasing exercise (my
favorite recommendation
remains walking) and a
diet low in red meat but
high in vegetables, fruits,
fish, nuts and whole
grains not only help with
weight management but
can improve how you
feel.
Dr Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer
individual letters, but
will incorporate them
in the column whenever
possil~,. Readers may
e-mail questions to
ToYourGoodHealth @med.
cornell.edu or request an
order form of available
health newsletters at PO.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Health news-
letters may be ordered
from www.rbmamall.
comn.


REX MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Graham Nolan


MV BROTHER ANP 1 MAPE
OUR OWN EXCITEMENT







(Wr' ^...b


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein
PO I HAVE TO 0 6 RALLY? COOL!
TO SCHOOL TOPAY?, ANP I PON'T HAVG
NO. TO BAKE COOKIES
_, FOR YOUR AFTGE?-
SCHOOL SNACK.


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella


DILBERT By Scott Adams
THE BIG TECH FIRMS
SAY THEY NO LONGER
CARE ABOUT HIRING
PEOPLE WHO HAVE
PRESTIGIOUS DEGREES.


WE CAN USE ALL THAT
EXTWA TIME TO CLEAN
THE BATHROOMS.
UH...


ONE TIME WE
EXCHANGE
DNPERWEAR
I BELIEVE
O k 'THAT THIS
QUALIFIES
A5 ANIMAL )
t ABUSE
% ,-r


I'LL LET YOU PO THE
TOILETS. NATG?...


E
8 OBVIOUSLY. THEY'RE
TRYING TO SUCKER THE
REST OF US INTO HIRING
IDIOTS WHILE THEY
VACUUM UP THE PEOPLE
5 FROM TOP SCHOOLS.


__


The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C/V


W,:w


::,:.. ur..ur",r net






Wednesday, Setme ,21 dIoru~ ENCVTeSnCasfe ae1


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463.1638


SSUN4 -NEWSPAPERS


IU B1USIN SISI& SEV I DIE [T O I I YA ]


JUMBLEs
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Cl
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek -WE LE I G
WE'RE. LEANJNG
ASOUTi A 1ALS
r, t,, ... we we.re ai to et IN SCHOOL. .. <


~~jI


' NO WONCER KEWPIE
SANIL YOUR FAT0 WELL
GET /kLOG 50 WFLL! i
i


BLONDIE By Dean Young and John Marshall
HI... ARE NO, ACTUALLY I WORK SO EVERY NOW ANO THEN I DROP
YOU NEW ON ANOTHER FLOOR, BY TO STOCK UP ON GOODIES
HERE? BUT I HEARD RAVE I FOR MY
REVIEWS ABOUT YOUR C COMPANY
BREAK ROOM Y-
VENDING
I ^ MACHINES_ _


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer \\ \ MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
here: L IOU
(Answers tomorrow) /
Yesterday's Jumbles: VENOM STALL ETHNIC UNJUST e *
Answer: The guest's rude comments about the lodg-
ing establishment were "INN-SULTS"

The purpose behind scalding milk I


Dear Heloise: Why do
some instructions call
for scalded milk? What
is the purpose? Thanks
in advance! Pat W.,
Harrisonburg, Va.
Very good question,
and one I had to think
about. Older recipes
said to scald milk to kill
bacteria and an enzyme
that prevented thickening
in recipes. Today, most
milk is pasteurized, so the
bacteria and enzyme are
already gone.
Also, scalding milk
raises the temperature,
which helps dissolve yeast
and melt butter when
added to bread recipes.
How do you scald milk?
Heat the liquid until just
below the boiling point,
or 180 degrees. After
scalding, a recipe typically
will state that you let the
milk cool to 110 degrees
before adding it to the
other ingredients. Scalded
milk helps make cakes
spongy and breads light.
- Heloise

Seeding lemons
Dear Heloise: Being
from the South, we like
to serve iced tea and
have lemon available, but
how do you get rid of the
seeds? I tried those little
mesh-covered things you
can put over a lemon,
but it was way too messy.
I now take one of those
battery lights that you can
buy for a couple of dollars.
I place it on my counter,
turn on the light and,
while holding the lemon,
shine the light through the


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
SNMMI STECmU R o 5\1e W6 06-E TO W "r-W Wis
1\ SC FU-LLO,0 LAff ,, [ Sm "\kY-e PERZ r


Hints from Heloise

rind. Voila! I can see the
lemon seeds and pluck
them out for seedless
lemons. Works great! -
David S. in Houston
This is one way, or if
you cut the lemon into
serving slices, use a
vegetable peeler and "pick
out" the seeds. Heloise

Simply saute
Dear Heloise: I've just
started cooking and want
to know what exactly is
sauteing? Judy K. in
Pennsylvania
Sauteing is when you
cook foods quickly over
pretty high heat! You use
a small amount of fat or
broth.
Leave space between
food pieces, and place only
one layer of food at a time.
Both meats and vegetables
can be sauteed. You want
the same-size beef, fish
fillets or chicken breasts.
Try sauteing vegetables
like mushrooms, bell
peppers and snap peas.
Whatever the food, stir it
frequently so it browns
evenly. Heloise
P.S.: I even saute
Romaine and iceberg
lettuces, as well as apple
slices!


DOONSBURY By Garry Trudeau
AwpAS m5 TeOP coN- "'M 6UESSI N BOEHNER
ORESIONALA, CAUCUS S ABOUT TO HfIP OUT
conYvENesirTsANsUA, I JUST HOW HARP IT I
RETREAT IN WILAMS- r, BE TO ReSTORI UNItTY..."
o"t SURO ,7


Wednesday, September 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 13


~


JI







The Sun Classified Page 14 EINICIV ads.yoursun.net Wednesday, September 4, 2013


Grandma weig

to sever contact
DEAR ABBY: Two years
ago one of my granddaugh-
ters was molested by her
mother's (my daughter's)
then-boyfriend, whom they
were living with. When the
girl's father found out, he
called the police and the
man was arrested, tried
and convicted.
Abby, while he was out
on bail, my daughter mar-
ried him! She doesn't be-
lieve the molestation took
place. If I were in her shoes,
I would certainly believe
my 8-year-old daughter
over a boyfriend about
something so damaging.
I cut off contact with this
daughter, as did her sisters.
She occasionally calls my
husband (who is not her
father) when she wants
something, and I have
received a few texts, which
I ignore.
Am I doing the right
thing? I sometimes feel
guilty, but it angers me that
she didn't stand behind her
daughter and has made
no effort to see either of
her girls over the past two
years. I see them often
because their dad knows
I stand with the girls
100 percent. GRANDMA
IN OHIO
DEAR GRANDMA: The
answer to your question
depends upon why your
daughter hasn't seen her
children in two years. If it's
because their father won't
allow it, then her estrange-
ment from her daughters
isn't her fault. If it has been
her choice, however, then
stop feeling guilty.
DEAR ABBY: I need your
opinion about my ex-hus-
band and his lack of respect
for boundaries. He moved
out of our home two years
ago, but never changed his
mailing address. We have
been officially divorced for
six months. He feels it's OK
to come to our "married
house" anytime he wants.
We have two teenage chil-
dren who refuse to spend
the night with him.
When he comes to my
house, he goes through the
mail, opens the cabinets
and refrigerators, even goes
into my room when I'm


hs her decision

t with daughter


-l-







Dear Abby

not home and watches TV.
I am dating someone new
and don't feel comfortable
with this setup. I'm worried
it will cause problems with
my new friend, and I don't
know how to stop this
madness.
We currently have the
"married house" on the
market, and I want to make
sure he knows he won't
be welcome in my new
home if not invited. How
do I avoid conflict with him
and my kids? REALLY
DIVORCED IN ST. LOUIS
DEAR REALLY
DIVORCED: You should
have set clear boundar-
ies the day your divorce
became official, but it's still
not too late to do so. Tell
your ex to notify the post
office and his credi-
tors of his change of
address, and that if his mail
continues to show up at
your house, after a month it
will be returned to the post
office with the notation
"not at this address."
You should also inform
him and your children that
you do not want him in
your house in your ab-
sence. If he doesn't respect
your wishes, then change
the locks. The time he
spends with your teenage
children should also be
elsewhere. He may not like
the fact that you are estab-
lishing your independence,
but you have a right to your
privacy.
TO MY JEWISH
READERS: Sundown starts
Rosh Hashana, the Jewish
New Year. It is the begin-
ning of our time of solemn
introspection. I would like
to wish you all "Leshana
tova tikatevu" may you
be inscribed in the Book
of Life and enjoy another
good year.


'And Jesus said unto them, Because of your unbelief:
for verily I say unto you, if ye have faith as a grain of
mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain. Remove
hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing
shall be impossible unto you." Matthew 17:20.
Take another look at this and never again make
little of your faith, no matter how small it may look to
you. It is mountain moving use it and a miracle is in
the making.


MALLARD FILLMORE By Bruce Tinsley


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz
I JVuT WANTED oJ 10 KNOW
]EAR PePPERMtNT PATTY, TAT I AP'EcdATD YoUR
I HOPE Y'OV MAD A COAI6 CLEAR ACRO5 Trow
NICE WALK OME, 70 ELP OUR TEAM.
--_ INCEREltS,


Batiuk & Chuck Ayers


- I OfAfTel TO TrAK
I'm SURf. Il LEAREWDT)P- MA>EH
F....T OF AL'TI.f, CH IL-DRM...
, .. AD HAD A
c HAecE. TO SA46 A
,,1, FO CURaTaO ~ACH"
v APART


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

2 9 7 -4 Rating: GOLD

7 1 6 Solution to 9/3/13
961784253
-- -^425963718

4 5 1 4 2 5 9 6 3 7 1 8
4 5 1 7 3 8 1 5 2 4 6 9
7 9 6 3 8 1 7 4 2 9 6 3 5
254631897
8 4 2 6 693578142

5 7 389216574
546897321
4 8 7 172345986

6 3 9 5
9/4/13

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


why you do what you do. You are simply responding
to a voice inside that is urging you forward, nudging


ARIES (March 21-April 19).You have an advantage, you toward greatness.
but you won't press it.You don't like to see greed CANCER (June 22-July22). Because
in others, and you despise it in yourself.That's why and dearest have shown you both th
you'll wield just enough power to get what you
their worst, it's sometimes easiest to
want and no more.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). People will tryto tell those you don't know well.
you who you are because it's a quirk of human LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). It's easier to se
nature to incorrectly assume this kind of knowledge. and expectations when you're starting
But they don't really know. people than to try to change a current
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Series ofsmall actions dynamic.The bottom line is that peo
will add up to something remarkable, but that's not you the way you let them treatyou.
oon


your nearest
eir best and
be nice to

et boundaries
ig fresh with
it relationship
pie will treat


VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Pride is a function of
placing a high value on what you've done and who
you are. Vanity is putting effort into the way you
want others to see you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).You can't rewrite
yesterday's loss, but tomorrow is yours to win if
you plan well enough. Think about what could go
wrong, and address each scenario.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Can a person protect
his or her own innocence? Just knowing that there's
something more to know puts a crack in the protec-


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You may not be
able to decide what's best for you until after you've
made a few mistakes. That's just what it takes to get
to know yourself.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.19). Some suggest that
there are only two choices: to do it the way it's been
done, or to revolt. You'll find a third choice, though:
Do it the way it's been done, but with a twist.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.18). Nobodyshould live in
a vacuum, norshould they live without a vacuum.
Being aware of the whole picture is as important as


tive eggshell of the innocent, cleaning the small picture of your own home.


PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Most people don't
listen. So if you listen very well, you'll find that you
learn enough to stand out in a very positive way
with the ones you've heard and understood.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (Sept. 4).You'll play a key role
in someone's happiness over the next six weeks.
Your handling of confidential matters earns you
trust and money. You'll apply your maturity and
experience to win a prize in October. November and
May bring your best financial opportunities. Leo and
Gemini people adore you.Your lucky numbers are:
12,49,38,6 and 20.


HOROSCOPE I


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun.net


Wednesday, September 4, 2013






Wednesday, September 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 15


Wednesday Television
VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORTCHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


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SPIKE 57 57 57 57 2963 54 Bar Rescue: Tiki Curse Bar Rescue (R) (HD) Pitch Black ('00) ***A Flesh-eating creatures pursue survivors. Pitch Black r** Monsters after dark.
SYFY 67 6767 67 64180 Ghost Mine (R) Ghost Mine (R) Ghost Mine (R) Ghost Mine (N) Ghost Mine (N) Ghost Mine (R)
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Family Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Mike Tyson. (N)
Gaily, Gaily ('69) ** A journalist decides to devote his Captains of the Clouds ('42, Drama) ** A bush pilot The Black Swan ('42, Adventure) *** Never Get
TCM 665 6565 16 life to reforming Chicago's shady politics. (R) joins the Royal Canadian Air Force. (NR) An ex-pirate rescues a damsel. Rich (41)
TLC 45454545 5772139 Tiaras Pageant prince. Cheer Feedback. (R) Honey Boo Here Comes Honey Boo |Cheer New stunt. (N) Honey Boo Cheer New stunt. (R)
Castle: Headhunters Castle Novelist murder. (HD) Castle: Nanny McDead Nanny Castle Prep school murder. Castle: Hell Hath No Fury Dirty The Mentalist Jane quits
TNT 61616161 285551 Castle's partner. (HD) in dryer. (HD) (HD) politics. (HD) CBI. (HD)
TOON 1248012412446 20 257 Titans Go! TitansGo! TitansGo! LEGOYoda The Yoda Grandpa King King Dad (HD) Dad (HD) Family Family
TRAV 69696969 66 170 Bizarre: Philippines (R) v Food (R) v Food (R DigFellas DigFellas Toy Hunter Toy Hunter Paradise (R) Paradise (R)
TRUTV 63636363 5030 183 S. Beach S. Beach Dumbest (R) Guinness World: Viva! Guinness World (R) Guinness Slicing team. World's Dumbest... (R)
TVL 62626 2 62 31 54 244Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Raymond |Raymond Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Queens
USA 34 3434 34 22 52 50 NCIS: Agent Afloat NCIS: Capitol Offense NCIS: Restless (HD) Pains Molly's behavior. NCIS: Safe Harbor Suits Vindication. (R)
WE 117117117117 49Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Tamar&Vince (R) Tamar&Vince (R) Tamar&Vince (R) Tamar&Vince (R)
WGN 16161619 41 11 9 Home Videos (IVPG) Home Videos (IVPG) Rules Rules Rules Rules WGN News at Nine (N) Home Videos (IVPG)
CNBC 39 3938 39 37102 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Marijuana Inc (R) The Profit Family fights. Greed: Fools Gold (R) Mad Money (R)
CNN 323232321838100 Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett (N) Cooper 360 (N) (HD) The Flag September 11. (N) The Flag September 11. (R)
CSPAN 18 181818 3712 109 U.S. House of Representatives (N) Tonight from Washington Public policy. (N) Washington (N) Capital News Today
FNC 64 64 64 64 4871 1 Special Report (N) (HD) The FOX Report (N) The O'Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N)(HD) On the Record (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 83838383 40 103 PoliticsNation(N)(HD) Hardball with Chris (N) All in with Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow (N) Last Word (N) (HD) All in with Chris Hayes
CSS 28128128 28 49 70 The Best |Dawg Rep. Talkin Football College Football: Mississippi vs Vanderbilt (HD) College Football (Replay) (HD)
ESPN 29 292929 1258 70 SportsCenter (HD) MLB Baseball: Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox from Fenway Park (ve) MLB Baseball: Tampa Bay vs Los Angeles (HD)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 US Open Tennis (ive) 2013 U.S. Open Tennis: Men's & Women's Quarterfinals (live(HD) HSportsCenter (HD)
FS1 48 4848 48 4269 83 V UFC Prelims (ive) UFC Fight Night: Teixeira vs. Bader (ive) (HD) The Ultimate Fighter: History in the Making (N)
FSN 72~7272 2 72 5677 Access Game 365 MLB Baseball: Miami Marlins at Chicago Cubs (Replay) (HD) SEC Gridiron Live (HD) WrId Poker (Replay)
GOLF 49494949 5560 304 Golf Cnt Tour Wkly School(N) Quest PGATour |The Greatest Game Ever Played ('05) Rookie in U.S. Open. Golf Cntrl GreatGame
NBCS 71 71 71 71546190(5:30) Pro Crossover Star: Brand NFL (HD) Star: Super Sunday Still Standing NFL Turning Point (HD) NFL Turning Point (HD)
SUN 3838 40140145 57 76 College Football: Toledo Rockets at Florida Gators (Replay) (HD) Rays LIVE! MLB Baseball: Tampa Bay vs Los Angeles (HD)
Good Luck Jessie Chess AN.T.Farm Good Luck Toy Story 2 ('99, Comedy) ***12 Buzz (:40) Jessie AN.T.Farm Dog with a Austin &Ally AN.T.Farm:
DISN 13613613613699 45 250 Amyhas a contest. (R) (HI) The Chaie: Go and the other toys set out to rescue Woody Medieval Scaretactics. Blog Food Austin's gig. (R) replicANT (R)
baby. (R) supermodel. Teddy! from a greedy toy collector. times. (R) (R) truck job.
(:05) Red Dawn ('84, Action) Patrick Swayze, C. Thomas From Russia with Love ('63, Action) *** Sean Hope Springs (12, Comedy) **1/2 A Stepmom
ENC 150150 50 150350Howell. Teenagers band together to defend their town and Connery. Agent Bond becomes caught in a trap while married couple seeks help from a specialist Familyfaces
country from foreign invaders. trying to steal a top secret machine. (PG) to rekindle their romance. death.
Million Dollar Baby ('04) *** A Hard Knocks'13: Training Life of Pi (12, Adventure) ***-1% Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Boardwalk Har Knocks'13: Training
HBO 30302302302 17302400 retired boxer goes against his better Campwith the Cincinnati Khan. A zookeeper's son is surrounded by loose animals Notable events. Camp with the Cincinnati
judgement and begins to train a woman. Bengals (R) (HD) after a shipwreck. (PG) (HD) (R) Bengals (R) (HD)
(10) American Dreamz ('06, Comedy) -**k- Hugh Grant. A Life Is But a Dream (10) Author Charlie The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (12, Comedy) Judi (:40) Meet the
HBO2 303303303303 303402 manipulate Midwestern girl and a sweetArabian man Wilkins rows 3,000 miles across the Dench, Bill Nighy. Believing it to be an upscale hotel, Fockers('04)
compete on singing show. (HD) Atlantic Ocean in 30 days. (NR) retirees land in a shabby Indian palace. -**1
(:05) The Debt (11, Drama) ***r Helen Mirren, Tom The Sopranos House Arrest Boardwalk Empire: Sunday Boardwalk Empire: The Pony Boardwalk Empire: The
HB3 304304304304 304404 Wlknson. In 1997 two retired agents receive shocking news Tony ries legitimate business. BestGyp loos to get Joe's Billiethinks about being film Milkmaid's Lot Bootegger
about a former partner. (R) (HD)D) blessing. (HD) star. (HD) arrested. (HD)
(:20) Strike Back Vacation (10) Strike Back The team Strike Back Focus is put on Cowboys & Aliens (11, Action) **1'/ Daniel Craig, Dirty Blondes from Beyond
MAX 3232032032063320420 interrupted; financier. (R) (H) barelysurvives an attack. (R) a smuggling job. (R) (HD) Abigail Spencer. A man with no memory stumbles upon a (12) Female aliens land on
(HD) hardened desert town in the Old West. planetEarth.
(4:45) Jaws (:50) Match Point (05, Drama) -k***1 A social-climbing and engaged This Means War (12, Action) -**k- Two Jump Off (:10) Garden State ('04)
MAX2 321321321321 321422 (75) Shark British ex-tennis pro falls for an American actress dating his rival, who is soon CIA operatives discover that they are dating Dmitri ** Emotionally-detached
attacks. to be his brother-in-law. (R) (HD) the same woman. (HD) threatened. man returns home.
(5:30) Gangs of New York ('02) -***k- Leonardo DiCaprio, Justin ALL ACCESS Inside the NFL: 2013 Week 60 Minutes Sports (HD) Inside the NFL: 2013 Week
SHO 34034034034019 340365 Brennan. A young man infiltrates a violent New York gang with plans for #1 (N) (HD) #1 (R) (HD)
vengeance. (R) (HD)
How to Lose Friends and Alienate People ('08, 360 (12, Drama) -**k- Anthony Hopkins, Ben Foster. Save the Date (12, Comedy) A woman Hannah
TMC 350350350350 20 350385Comedy) **% Simon Pegg. A British journalist struggles Various individuals living around the world are drawn goes to her sister for emotional support Takesthe
to become successful in the United States. together. (R) (HD) after leaving her boyfriend. Stairs ('07)
6a6: 7a : 8a 8 0a a0* a:a 1 a


Today's Live Sports

12 p.m. ESPN2 2013 U.S.
Open Tennis Men's & Women's
Quarterfinals. (L)
2 p.m. FSN MLB Baseball
Miami Marlins at Chicago Cubs
from Wrigley Field. (L)
5 p.m. FS1 UFO Fight Night
Prelims Teixeira vs Bader from
Mineirinho Arena in Belo Hori-
zonte, Brazil. (L)
7 p.m. ESPN MLB Baseball De-
troit Tigers at Boston Red Sox
from Fenway Park. (L)
ESPN2 2013 U.S. Open Ten-
nis Men's & Women's Quarter-
finals. (L)
FS1 UFC Fight Night Teixeira
vs. Bader from Mineirinho Arena
in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. (L)
10 p.m. ESPN MLB Baseball
Tampa Bay Rays at Los Angeles
Angels. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morning
America Scheduled: the new
cast of "Dancing With The Stars"
revealed live. (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
actress Valerie Bertinelli; singer Mel
B.; Laura Mvula performs live. (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: actor
Zachary Quinto; singer Mel B.;
singer Tamar Braxton. (N)
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Sched-
uled: guest co-host Marysol Castro;
reality star Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi.
11:00 a.m. CW Dr. Phil Scheduled:
estranged mother lives in the flood
tunnels beneath Las Vegas strip. (N)
11:00 a.m. IND Jerry Springer
From May 2011: a woman has
the audience help her choose
between three sexy guys.
12:00 p.m. CW The Jeff Probst
Show Scheduled: Jeff goes back
over his favorite animal related
stories. (N)
1:00 p.m. MYN The Trisha God-
dard Show Scheduled: Trisha
recaps stories of accidents caught
on camera. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk From Au-
gust: interview and performance
by The Backstreet Boys.
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors
Scheduled: how botox may help
pets; three surprisingly common
causes of death. (N)
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey Sched-
uled: Hottest Husband in America;
writer Jen Ator; TV host Stacy Kaiser.
3:00 p.m. IND The Steve Wilkos
Show From Feb.: a woman says
her boyfriend is cheating on her
with his own sisters.
3:00 p.m. NBC The Dr. Oz Show
From January: Charlie Sheen
discusses his life of extravagance
with Dr. Oz.
4:00 p.m. CW Anderson Live From
March: a look at real life video
vigilantes; "Top Chef" star Padma
Lakshmi.
4:00 p.m. FOX Maury Oct. 2012:
women are desperate for proof of
their partners' paternity.
5:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil Scheduled: Dr.
Phil offers the estranged mother of
four a route to sobriety. (N)
11:00 p.m. TBS Conan Scheduled:
Mike Tyson; Katie Aselton; Spin
Doctors perform. (N)
11:35 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel
Live Scheduled: from "Cloudy With
A Chance Of Meatballs" actor Bill
Hader. (N)
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled: actor
Tim Robbins; commentator Herm
Edwards; Passion Pit live. (N)
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno Scheduled: actress
Christina Applegate; actor Rob
Corddry; White Lies performs. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv







The Sun Classified Page 16 EINICIV ads .yoursun net Wednesday, September 4, 2013


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HOOVER FLOOR SCRUBBER
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JUICER & MEAL MIXERS
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VINTAGE CANNING Jars
Blue $4 941-629-2345


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH
@2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
DRAW THE RIGHT INFERENCE


East-West vulnerable. North deals.


WEST
4632
KKJ98
075
*AK94


NORTH
AKQ7
Z5432
0 A Q 10 9
476


SOUTH
A A J 10 9 8 4
SAQ10
OJ2
SJ 3


The bidding:
NORTH EAST
Pass Pass
3A Pass
Pass Pass


EAST
A5
576
0K8643
4 Q 10 8 5 2


SOUTH
14
46


WEST
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: King of 6

Most critical decisions come in the
play. Here is a typical; example.
For the jump raise of opener's suit,
North should really have four-card
support. However, in standard
methods there is no good bid on the
hand, and North's choice was
probably the least of evils. South had
a sound distributional raise to game.


West led the king of clubs and East
signaled encouragement with the
eight. West did not know it, but the
fate of the hand hinged on the next
play. East was unlikely to hold a
doubleton club; it was far more likely
that the encouraging eight showed
possession of the queen. So West
boldly underled the ace of clubs.
In with the queen of clubs, East
had little difficulty in funding the
heart shift. South had no option but to
finesse the queen. West won with the
king and exited with a trump, and in
the fullness of time the defenders
collected the king of diamonds for a
one-trick set.
Note that declarer will make the
contract if West cashes a second club
or shifts to a diamond at trick two.
Declarer will take the finesse and,
even though it loses to East and East
shifts to a heart, declarer is a tempo
ahead. South rises with the ace of
hearts, draws trumps and takes two
heart discards on the diamonds to
land 10 tricks.

(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this newspaper
or to Tannah Hirsch c/o Tribune
Content Agency, LLC., 16650
Westgrove Dr., Suite 175, Addison, TX
75001. E-mail responses may be sent to
gorenbridge@aol.com.)


7 Little Words
Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter o
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

CLUES SOLUTIONS |

1 part of a sentence (9)

2 turns suddenly (7)

3 moving very fast (7) _

4 held tightly (8)

5 like Texas' star (4) _

6 radioactivity units (6)

7 celebrity chef Mario (6) __


ED


DIC


ES


CU


zo


CLE


NE


LI


ATE


BA


NCH


ES


PRE


OMI


SWE


TA


RV


LO


RI


NG


Tuesday's Answers: 1. NOMINEES 2. CONSTRICTS 3. HARPER
4. PERMEATED 5. DILUTES 6. SHINGLING 7. MISQUOTED 9/4


ACROSS
1 Foreign visitors?
5 Driver with a
handle
9 Marshal's star
14 Hindu attire
15 Berne's river
16 Really stupid
17 Took a gander
18 Orchard unit
19 Kind of
blockade
20 Lord's estate
22 Squirms
24 Discrete
26 "Who sat down
beside -..."
27 Raw deal
(2 wds.)
30 Some voices
35 They can be
split
36 "Run Run"
37 Talking bird
38 Wrench target
39 Padded
envelopes
42 JFK lander
43 Neat
45 Slue
46 Chick's cry
48 Let loose
50 Sleeve parts
51 Noon on a
sundial
52 Faint flicker
54 North African
port


58 Pet in a cage
62 Crocus "bulbs"
63 Annoying
plumbing
problem
65 Rochester's
Jane
66 Speckled fish
67 Latin I verb
68 Links org.
69 Sweater letter
70 Crooner-
Martin
71 Gourmet's
interest
DOWN
1 Secondhand
2 Dunaway of
films
3 Utah city
4 Pistol or sword
5 Forty winks
6 Wearing less
7 Prior to
8 Coral formation
9 Notebook
10 Reshuffled word
11 Brubeck of jazz
12 Troublesome
bug
13 Electric
swimmers
21 Pang
23 "-- You
Knocking"
25 Factory
machinery


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
K IICIKIEASEIFIL II NIG
E L IAITW IN I D| EID
BOIDIY GUA RD BOL |lTS
A N E E D I EIERN E|S
BARONET ALIVE
i AIRI _BE IA 1L S
GY0ISGTIECI C L I|P
WHALE WARN SNYC
H OILIEIKO RIOREA E RRS
O U\D LI MOS SWE| EE
RATAT A RHIO
ATT N BiOOK I \NG
D C E EYASE AN D|E E
H OINIO RIGIAIR DIEIN I DAIS
AIN I MAIP APIL l CO TIs
ANEIT IA bPALI C OIO T

9-4-13 @2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Congo language
180-degree
maneuver (hyph.)
Theme
Implored
Youngsters
Mooring site
Goes
backpacking
Similar
Buzzing about
Hotfoot it
Upper limit
Reflexive
pronoun


Senor's daily
custom
Undermine
Dalai Lama's
city
Takes steps
Petty in "Point
Break"
Hot rum mixture
Malamute's load
Spelling error
Thus
Leafed through
WNW opposite


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun.net


Wednesday, September 4, 2013






Wednesday, September 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 17


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WINE CELLAR Haier, tbltop,
thermoelectric,holds11 btls.
$50 910-988-1213
FURNITURE
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3 PIECE oak lighted wall unit
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941-204-8537
OFFICE CHAIR BRAND NEW,
memory foam, black leather,
high back $90 941-743-2656
PATIO SET ROUND TABLE W
4 PVC CHAIRS, STRONG
STRAPS $250 941-740-1000
PRIMITIVE JELLY Cupboard
over 100 yrs. old, door needs
some work, orig. hardware,
$150. Lincoln Rocker, old,
needs canning, $20. Retro
Cabinet sliding glass doors
top, wood doors bottom, $25.
Call 941-625-3918.
RECLINER BY NORWALK
green, comfy, good buy,
$50, OBO 941-587-8271
RECLINER LA-Z-BOY, beige,
great shape, Iv. msg. $150
941-493-0674
RECLINER LEATHER Large
Brown 45" Wide & Excellent
Cond. $300 941-474-1640
RECLINER LEATHER stress-
less like new tan $175 941-
505-5632
RECLINER RELAX &
OTTOMAN HEAT MASSAGE bk
lea. $100 941-473-9269
RECLINER, electric, tan,
many positions. Good for heart
patient. $125 941-475-6260
RECLINER, Lane, taupe
leather good cond. $100
941-235-2613
RECLINERS 2 matching rat-
tan arms tropical print very
nice $299 941-356-0129
ROCKER RECLINER,
grey nonsmoker. $75,
OBO 941-235-2203
ROCKER RECLINERS WOW 2
Rocker Recliners $150 941-
235-1710
ROCKING CHAIR LIKE
NEW,ALL DARK HARDWOOD
$85 941-408-8353
SEWING CABINET holds 2
machines for sewing and stor-
age $40 941-613-2708
SLEEPER SOFA Rust color
micro-fiber. Queen size $195
941-223-8159
SLEEPER SOFA&LOVESEAT
Beige leather, chair, ottoman,
coffee & end tables. exc. cond.
$900 OBO 941-627-8767
SAdvertise Today!
SOFA & CHAIR VERY GOOD
CONDITION, CAN EMAIL PICS
$150 941-916-2120
SOFA & love seat fall colors
$165 941-475-6101
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Chocolate leather w/wood &
nail head trim, coffee table &
end table. Like new $500
941-637-9575


L FURNITURE
6035


SOFA BROWN 1 yr old-
PLUSH/COMFY $300 941-
429-9305
SOFA 2 DUAL RECLINING
SOFAS W/MASSAGE BEIGE
$200 941-624-0376
SOFA BEIGE luxury microfiber
from model home 90"L $300
941-527-8177
SOFA GREAT condition, great
price-must see $100 941-
235-1710
SOFA, LEATHER beige, reclin-
ing good cond. $125 941-
769-7984
SOFA, Like new high end +
coffee & end table $495
941-356-0129
SOLID WOOD Cherry 2x4, 7
Drawer, Desk 1950's Design
Elegant $200 941-681-2433
STONE TOP table black bass
4 charis $300 941-249-4601
TABLE + 4 Chairs 3'x3'folding
Same table + 4 black chairs
30 941-828-1129
TABLE BEVELED 42" oval
glass top/rattan bottom, pics
avail $90 941-527-8177
TABLE SET ROUND WHITE
FORMICA W/ 3 CHAIRS $175
941-763-2581
TABLES COFFEE/2END/1"
bevld gls/white stn. Will sep
$300 941-624-0364
TRUNK HAND PAINTED flori-
da scene palm trees,ocean
$125 941-429-9048
TV WALL Unit Light Gray
W94XH74 inches custom
made. $300 941-763-2696
TWIN HEADBOARDS 2 Rat-
tan Matching Headboards
$30, OBO 843-735-8912
WOODEN ROCKER $65
941-575-7270

ELECTRONICS
L4 6038


5 CD/DVD player Sony
w/remote.#DVP-NC85H. Wrks
perft. $50 941-624-2105
CELL PHONE Cosmos 2
w/case (Verizon) Excel Cond
$20 941-626-5468
ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM,
In Car for Tablets NIB $40
941-627-0212
GARMIN NUVI 660 GPS
USED ONE TIME $150, OBO
941-575-4364
GPS TOM TOM with car charg-
er. Touch screen. $50, OBO
941-475-2727
GPS TOMTOM One, Excel
Cond. $40 941-626-5468
HOME THEA Sys. SONY
#VIS1000,w/S-AIR,5 spkrs
etc. $250 941-624-2105
HP 2015 Laser Printer Very
good condition. $65, OBO
941-416-0038
MEDIA STAND Black with
glass doors, $10 941-204-
8537
MODEL BOAT remote control
Europa with servo. $25 941-
764-7957
SOUND SYSTEM OLIN ROSS,
7 SPEAKERS, REMOTE. $100
941-740-3286
TRACFONE SAMSUNG
S390G, triple minutes. like
new. $20 941-764-3454

I NEED CASH? I
VIDEO CAM, Flip HD 4gb, lhr
video, great for kids. Easy to
use. $45 941-624-2105
TV/STEREO/RADIO
S6040


CD PLYR SONY 200 CDs, w
remote & manual, excellent,
$120 314-774-7700
CERWIN-VEGA SERIES 30Re
spkrs 3way,12" woofer,exlnt
$80 314-774-7700


TV/STEREO/RADIO
S6040


DVD/CD/SURROUND
SOUND Samsung Wireless
$125 863-990-1021
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
TV 61" JVC flat screen, extra
lamp, remote, manual. $350,
OBO 941-456-1049
TV ARMOIRE Solid wood!
70"Hx51"Wx24D" pics avail
$150 941-626-9111
TV, 32in. JVC ,w/Hyper
Surround Sound, remote
$50 941-286-2339
VHS MOVIE TAPES 90 Tapes
w/covers. All Themes.Good
Condition. $20 941-426-0760

L COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
6060

COMPUTER DESK + 3 shelf
printer stand + 5 shelf book-
case $70 941-527-8177
COMPUTER, DELL Flat
w/monitor-desktop black $90
941-473-9269
DAVE IN-HOUSE-OFFICE corn-
puter repair, set-up Serving Char-
lotte Co. 12+ yrs 941-629-6337
GOLF CLUB computer mouse
new looks like a driver $5
941-228-1745
MONITOR 19" SCREEN,
speakers, mouse,key board
and wires.$60 941-623-0346
MONITOR, 17" Great picture.
Flat screen CRT, not a thin LCD
$15 941-743-2656
PRINTER & Fax Machine Both
HP Brand $15 or $10 Each
OBO 843-735-8912
PRINTER HP 3015 Laser All
in One, copier, fax. $115, OBO
941-416-0038
PRINTER LEXMARK Z55
PERFECT copies and condition
$20 941-276-1881
SAMSONITE EXEC Suitcase
Leather/rolling laptop
$50 941-380-1157
CLOTHING / JEWELRY
ACCESSORIES
6065

CUT CRYSTAL 16" NECK-
LACE lovely antique estate pc
$40 941-639-1517
HANDBAG BROWN, GEN-
UINE leather Euro Wellness
$50 941-255-3353
HANDBAG VERA Bradley look
alike.Flowers & birds $20
941-255-3353

JACKET-US ARMY FIELD OD
green-2 sizes-never worn w
liner $50 941-445-5619
NEW SHOES US ARMY Black-
dress-leather-still in box-Size
9R $10 941-445-5619
PURSE VINTAGE Fendi. FF
monogram. Auth. Exc.cond.
$225 941-474-1508
SPORTCOATS (2) Size 44L
one beige one navy. Nice! Both
for $25 941-764-3454


COLLECTIBLES
6070

11 1/21N Vanna White doll
orig. box Lmtd. ed. $10 941-
423-2585
1ST EDITION Book "YAZ"
Boston Red Sox star! Bargain-
MORE $15 941-639-1517
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
ANTIQUE CRIB w/wheels
2'x4' REDUCED! great for dis-
play. $100 941-639-1517
ANTIQUE ROCKER,
w/ New Cane Seat $50
941-764-7050
ANTIQUE TABLES 3 Flint &
Horner GC Make offer $499,
OBO 941-735-2119
ANTIQUE WRINGER washer
easy $150, OBO 941-979-
5875
BELL (FENTON) glass cobalt
hnd. painted + signed $10
941-585-8149
BIRD'S EYE MAPLE double
bed room set, 2 dressers and
mirrors $225 941-474-4472
CAKE STAND 10"x7" Vintage
Crystal Fostoria with brandy
well $80 941-426-0760
CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
CHAIR VINTAGE Victorian
retied/reuphol & ft stool $175
941-626-9111
CHILD'S ROCKER oak
pressed back with cane seat
$175 941-474-4472
CHRISMA BLACK MIKASSA 8
plc extra pieces ex/c $300
OBO 941-575-4364
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
COFFEE TABLE ANTIQUE
Octagon 2-Tier Glass Top,
Biege, $75 OBO 941-639-2815
COIN 1848 LARGE CENT AU-
50 VERY NICE $110 941-457-
0155
COIN 1908S INDIAN PENNY
GRADES XTRA-FINE, MUST
SEE $140 941-457-0155
COINS NICE 1920 LINCOLN
PENNY MINT STATE63+ $25
941-457-0155
COINS NICE RED 1863 INDI-
AN HEAD PENNY MUST SEE
$130 941-457-0155
COMIC BOOKS 50 FROM
THE 1990 EXCEL.COND.
$40, OBO 941-627-6780
CREAM AND Sugar Belleck,
Clearly Cream,1946-55. Per-
fect cond. $17 941-624-2105
DISHES, DRAGON WARE Set-
cups/saucers/plates/teapot-
grey/bk $175 941-473-9269
FIESTA VINTAGE juice glass-
es, 6 very old glasses EC
$120. 941-623-0346
GOLF CLUBS 1930s Five
wood shaft-Putter- mashie
niblics $50 941-445-5619
HESS TRUCKS 8 trucks from
94 06 New ea. $50, OBO
941-626-5099
Seize the sales
with Classified!
JOHNSON BROS from Eng.
gravy, veg, platters-reduced
ea $20 941-639-1517
LENOX, SUMMER AT STONE
COAST ,,,RARE NO.1024
$450 941-759-0013
LENOX, SUMMER AT STONE
COAST ,,,RARE NO.1024
$450 941-759-0013
LOVESEAT VICTORIAN
w/dark wood.Good condition
$50 941-380-1157
MOVING BOXES, 19 Small,
24 Medium & 12 Large. $1.00
Each. 941-391-5064
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531


SUN


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A

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Wednesday, September 4, 2013


COLLECTIBLES
6070

PLATE, Major Kira Nerys of
Star Trek by Hamilton w/cert
$20 941-423-2585
STATUES EMMETT Kelly Jr
over 60 on hand Boxed, sold
by each $50 941-626-1454
STUDENT DESK, 1900s,
44"X30"X23" all wood, leather
top $300 941-882-3139
TAPA CLOTH art from Fiji
framed/mounted under glass
42"X42" $200 941-585-8149
TIFFANY STYLE chandelier.
Large, entry, dining, ??. Great
colors. $130 941-235-2500
TRAIN PLATES 16 TO SELL
FAMOUS TRAINS & ARTISTS
$300, OBO 941-488-1853
I Classified = Sales I
U.S. AIR Force Thunderbirds
Framed 16"by20" pic. w/sig-
natures $25 941-423-2585
VINTAGE MILKGLASS 24
PIECES GRAPE PATTERN
$100 941-575-8881
WANTED VINTAGE SAM-
SONITE From 1960's, Beige.
Up to $30. 941-266-7795
MUSICAL
L 6090


AMP HUGHES Kettner ATS
120 combo 3 channel $325,
OBO 941-882-2906
AMP PEAVEY GUITAR. EC
$80.00 941-623-0346
CRATE GX-15R amplifier w/
cables, works but needs some
cleaning $50 941-743-2656


MUSICAL MEDICAL
L 6090 L 6095


CD HOLDER black guitar, 39
h x 16 w. $20 910-988-1213
LOWERY ORGAN w bench
excel.cond. don't miss this one
$250 941-697-7653
ORGAN, KAWAI, XR7000,
Pearl White, exc. cond.
$2,450 OBO 941-451-3756
TEISCO DELREY El10 mid-
1960 vintage elec guitar, exc
cond $250 941-743-2656
S MEDICAL
6095


FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


BATTERYCHARGER JAZZY
Scooter 24V new $25 941-
650-3714
CPAP RESPIRONICS Rem-
star Pro 2 with heater $60
941-391-4628
HOSPITAL BED, Electric,
w/Custom Mattress, $450
941-536-8844, 941-536-1942
LIFT CHAIR RECLINER
ELECTRIC. Great up/down orig
900. $425 941-822-3837
MOBILITY SCOOTER Pride
Jet III Ultra, Excellent cond.
$575/firm 941-232-8342

Looking for

Adventure?

Find it

in the

Classifieds
POWER CHAIR JAZZY LG.size
Red nice, needs batteries
$395
SCOOTER, GO GO with
ramp, like new w/head & tail
lights & extra basket. $795
OBO 941-743-0226
SHOWER STOOL OR 2
WHEEL WALKER, each $20
941-268-8951
WALKER COLLAPSIBLE,
with four feet, leave msg $15
941-493-0674
WHEEL CHAIR by MERITS
Excellent Cond $125
941-268-8951


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.





Fun By The
5 6 9 Numbers

2 5 8 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
4 7 sudoku. This

4 2 puzzle will have
you hooked from
28 6 the moment you
square off, so
9 6 4 5 sharpen your
pencil and put
7 4 your sudoku
savvy to the test!

5 9 2 3

1 7
Level: Intermediate
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

9 6 L 1, 8 1. L
t,, I. S Z 6L 8 9 9
8 Z S 1 9 6 6 V

L 9 L8 9 9 6

6 g6 9L 6tS9 L N.

9 L Z 6 t I. S 9 9

L6E 6 8 L9

:bI3MSNV


HEALTH/ BEAUTY
: 6100


MASSAGE CHAIR HOMEDICS
deep kneading Shiatsu reclin-
able $100 941-882-3139
PRO 24 RS WOLFE Tanning
Bed Tan w/out harmful Sun!
$400 941-575-9800
TREES & PLANTS
6110


FLOWER POT RACKS HAVE
2,HEAVY DUTY, 3 SHELVES
$120, OBO 941-627-6780
FROST CLOTH Large
amount. 75'plus $50 941-
ORCHID LARGE Plants Purple
Flowers $20 941-698-9798


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL, SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMY PALMS & MORE
Sui's NusuR 941-488-7291
PAPAYA PLANT
1 gallon pot
$4 941-697-0794
STAGHORNS 3 7' & 4'
ACROSS VERY HEALTHY
$450, OBO 727-365-9230
BABY ITEMS
L 6120


GRACO TRAVEL Lite Crib
New in Box $60 941-627-
STROLLER DUO Like New
graco quattro str,neutral.
$130 941-429-8507
GOLF ACCESSORIES
S6125


CLUB CAR DS
"WHITE" GARAGE KEPT
4 PASSENGER, FOLDING REAR
SEAT, 1 YEAR OLD BATTERIES
HUGE DASH FAN, NEW SEAT,
WINDSHIELD, CHARGER,
LIGHTS AND FULL SERVICE
GREAT CONDITION
$2575 941-830-2415

find your Best
Idend in the
Classifleds!
CLUB CAR DS GOLF CART
Brand New Batteries
(08/2013)
Full service & new blue paint!
New headlights & rear lights
4 passenger w/ new
folding rear seat. Excl. cond.
$2595 941-716-6792
GOLF CART, Green E-Z-Go, 6
Brand New Batteries, Weather
Zip-Up End., Overhead Fan,
Ball Washer & Charger.
$2,000. 941-429-1400
GOLF SHOE'S NEW, women
SZ.8 NIKE,BLACK LOAFER
$20, OBO 941-627-6780
EXERCISE/
FITNESS
6128

AB CRUNCHER Black Ab
Cruncher. $5 941-828-1129
BOW FLEX Extreme Hardly
Used Great Condition $275,
OBO 941-204-9258
BOWFLEX Includes all acces-
sories. Great condition! $400
941-661-0474
EXERCISE BIKE by WESLO
Dual Action,w/Electronics
NICE $60 941-268-8951
EXERCISE BIKE HEALTH
RIDER works upper and lower
$75 941-286-9988
EXERCISE BIKE Pro-Form
recumbent w/magnetic resist-
ance $225 941-493-0674


FITNESS
44 6128

EXERCISE BIKE, (HEALTH
RIDER) seated bicycle Hard-
ly used $175 941-492-2382
EXERCISE CARDIO FORCE Exer-
ciser $25, OBO 941-639-2815
LEG MAGIC incl CD exercise
Instruct.Great Cond $30 941-
626-5468
MALIBU PILATES Chair never
used with 3 DVD's $100, OBO
941-429-1683
TREADMILL GOLD gym built
in fan excellent cond $350
941-628-0182
TREADMILL PROFORM
fldup $250 954-856-3330
TREADMILL, Gold Gym Maxx
with fan excellent cond $350
941-628-0182
WEIGHTED HULA HOOP 5
LB, GREAT FOR FITNESS $25
941-740-1000
SPORTING GOODS
6130


AEROBICS STEP bench. Like
new w/ riser. $20 941-625-
9789
BACK PACK w/frame Camp
Trails New $85 941-483-
BOGA GRIP model 130
new cost 125.00 $85
941-759-0013
CANVAS CHAIRS, Jumbo & stan-
dard-size w/carry cases/handles
Pr/. $18 941-276-1881
CAST NET 10'.
$100 941-639-1060
ELLIPTICAL MACHINE Pro-
Form 14.0 CE in "as new" con-
dition $499 941-882-3139
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
FOOTBALL TABLE, Wood,
good condition. Asking $95
obo. Sandy 941-255-1250
HIKING BOOTS New,Core-
Tex,size 10 $50 941-483-
0215
MOTORCYCLE HELMETS
full face and 1/2, SMLXL, vg
cond. $30 941-235-2500
PACKERS CHEESEHEAD NIB
from Packers Pro Shop Never
worn $20 941-637-8181
ROLLER SKATES "Europa"
RD track control Size 11 $40
941-697-0794
FIREARMS
L4 6131


38 SW Hammerless Pistol,
Never been fired, $450 OBO
941-575-4475 after 3PM
BUYING
WW II Memorabilia
Guns, Bayonets, Daggers,
Swords, Helmets, insignia,
etc. etc. Eric, 941-624-6706



GUN & KNIFE SHOW
American Legion Post 24
2000 75th St. W
Bradenton, FI., 34209
Sat 9/7 9-5pm and
Sun 9/8 9-4pm
Admission $5.00 under
12 FREE & FREE PARKING
CWP Classes $49.95
11am & 1pm daily.
Lee County Gun
Collectors LLC.
(239)-223-3370
BUY-SELL-TRADE
www.gunshowsflorida.com
Higher Power Outfitters
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
Guns*Ammo*CCW
Financing Available!!
Buy*Sell*Trade
941-347-8445


L FIREARMS
L 6131


REMINGTON 308, Semi
Auto, $550. obo, 22 LR & 22
MAG. REVOLVER, $250. obo
(941)-661-0474
TAURUS, COMPACT, 45,
2 mags, case, 100 rnds,
450.00, 941-286-2339
BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
4 6135

BICYCLE/MENS/SCHWINN
1980S WORLD TOURIST 5
SPEED $200 941-275-5837
| Employ Classified!
BIKE RACK (THULE) Trunk
Mount 2 Bike Great Condition
$50 941-268-8951
TREK MENS 21 speed,made
in wisconsin. $150 941-769-
1367
TOYS
L 6138


SLOT MACHINE Tairyo
w/Tokens 32H x 18.5w x 15d
FUN!! $250 941-661-3298
S POOL/SPA/
& SUPPLIES
6145


Local manufacturer offer-
ing to sell direct to public
@ wholesale pricing.
Fiberglass swimming
pools, swim spas & hot
tubs. Local: 941-421-0395






**SPAS & MORE**
TRADE-IN'S WELCOME
WE BUY USED &
MOVE HOTTUBS.
www.spasandmoreflorida.com
941-625-6600
PATIO UMBRELLA New
w/tags. Rust/large. $175
941-625-9789
SHOCK: NO JUGS. USE DRY.
11 BAGS $30 941-575-8881
LAWN & GARDEN
6160


22 IN. Lawn Mower TORO
Recycler Self Propeled elec st.
VG cond $210 941-429-0681
BENCH BLACK Metal,with
cushion $30 941-624-4617
BLADES 42X2 Star Center
Hole NOS New Old Stock
EACH $10 941-497-3702
BLOWER ECHO exc.condition
cost $180 sell $80 941-585-
8149
CHAIRS WHITE, with
cushions,set of 2,each
$15 941-624-4617
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be
placed online by you.
One item per ad and the
price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**






Wednesday, September 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 19


LAWN & GARDEN
6160


CHAISE LOUNGE, White Fiber-
glass. Indoor/Outdoor Cost $750,
Asking $150 OBO 941-639-2815
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941-468-4372
DECORATIVE CLAY Pot
30"diameterX23"tall.Heavy
$60 941-828-8820
GRILL CHARCOAL OR WOOD
BURNING. $75 941-639-1060
HEDGE TRIMMER 16" Black
and Decker, electric $12 941-
627-6212
JOHN DEERE 48x3 Blades
7-pt GX21784 Set of 3 $33
941-497-3702
LAWN MOWER Murray, rid-
ing mower, 46". Good condi-
tion! $600 OBO 941-661-0474
LAWN MOWER TORO 22"
Self-propelled/Recycler, $125
941-639-1324
LAWNMOWER TORO selfpro-
pelled,bagger mulcher,Engle-
wood $150 941-716-4195
MOWER BLADES 2 NEW 21"
5/8" Star Hole $10 941-697-
0940
MOWER BLADES New many
to choose from, $3 to $9 each
941-497-3702
PATIO SET 7pc w/6 Chairs, Cast
Alum, Orig $1000, Asking $650
OBO, 941-661-6912 (pix avail)
PROPANE TANK aluminum,
20 LB, OPD, good cond. $80
941-548-1333
ROTOTILLER, Great Cond.
$250 941-255-3455
SNAPPER RIDER Drive Disc
NOS Yard sale pricing $8 941-
497-3702
TRANSMISSION FOR TORO
21332 w/b s/p mower. NEW.
$35, OBO 207-319-6141
WASHING MACHINE GE
sup.cap. Englewood $145
941-716-4195
WEED WACKER Grasshog
Type I 120 Volt $25 941-627-
6212
WEED WACKER, Worx with
charger and 6 rolls of line $35
941-235-1303
WEEDEATER, Craftsman
w/Rototiller Attment w/Elec.
Starter $250 941-255-3455
WEEDEATERS HOMELITE,
Echo ... gas,Englewood $45
941-716-4195
WEEDTRIMMER SEARS 12in
wheels,5HP walker $200,
OBO 941-276-0029

BUILDING
SUPPLIES
6170

150 AMP FPE indoor Panel
W/Breakers (used)good condi-
tion $125 941-883-1463
DOOR HANDLES, Kwickset
and smart key locks, new in
box with receipts (2) $50 each
941-391-0042
FAUCET FOR BATHROOM
new single handle $25 941-
228-1745
GENERATOR NEW never
used in box $300, OBO 941-
735-2119
GLASS SHOWER DOORS -
STD SIZE HEAW DUTY $35,
OBO 727-365-9230
GROUT STEAM CLEANER
ELECTRIC,LIKE NEW. $75,
OBO 941-740-3286
SHOWER DOORS Like new,
standard size, etched heron.
$50 941-276-2337
SINK KHOLER KITCHEN
White double sink and drainer.
43x22 $250 941-575-6283
STORM SHUTTERS (12)
Alum. 15x96", $300 941-
TREATED LUMBER 6x6 7
pcs 6' to 8' long $30 941-
828-8820


SUPPLIES
6170

WOOD PALLETS Free some
oak you pick up Venice
941-488-0667
TOOLS/ MACHINERY
6190


3/8 CRAFTSMAN Drill
w/battery and charger Like
new $30 941-639-5537
AIR COMPRESSOR 3 gal
$35, OBO 941-204-1005
BELT SANDER/SKIL Model
1400 4"x21" belt. $40 941-
626-2843
CHAIN SAW Huskqvanna
350, 18" w/extra chain,Lowes
$165 941-627-6212
DEHUMIDIFIER EBAC Triton
Industrial,as new, $499 314-
774-7700
DRILL/HAMMER 1/2" VRS
Dewalt like new. $65 941-
626-2843
DRYWALL JACK panel lift by
Telpro, 11'5" reach $195
941-628-2311
DRYWALL JACK panel lift by
Telpro, 11'5" reach $225
941-628-2311
ENGINE HOIST If no answer
please leave message. $150,
OBO 941-276-6871
GENERATOR 6250WATT
10hp b/s eng run 2.5hr
$397.86 941-875-6322
GENERATOR BRIGGS and
Stratton 5250 w/ power cord.
$450, OBO 239-283-1776
HAMMERDRILL 1/2 INCH -
ANTIQUE ENGLEWOOD
$100, OBO 941-475-7577
JORGENSEN SPREADER
clamps Four 12" and 6" new.
$100 941-764-7957
KARCHER 360 Electric
Washer $40 941-639-5537
MITER SAW CRAFTSMAN 10"
compound H.duty 2HP $45
941-266-4731
PNEMATIC STAPLER for
installing wood floors with mal-
let $60 941-276-0814
POWER CORD, 100' Like
new, contractor grade, 12-3,
15 amp. $45 941-629-6096
PRESSURE WASHER MAC
1000 3 HP hand held exc.
cond. $35 941-626-2843
ROTO ZIP Spiral Saw Used
once $45 941-639-5537
ROUTOR CRAFTSMAN with
bits exc. cond. $40 941-
626-2843
Advertise Today!
SAW CRAFTSMAN ROTOZIP
Spiral used very little $50
941-697-0940
SAW CRAFTSMAN SABER
Many blades $35 941-639-
5537
WATER PUMP 1 HP Electric
$35, OBO 941-204-1005

FARM EQUIPMENT
6195


WELL EQUIPT Aerorator,
pump, lots to go $250, OBO
941-735-2119

OFFICE/BUSINESS
EQUIP./SUPLIES
LZ 6220

OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Pre-owned & new office furniture.
VENICE 941-485-7015
DISPLAY TABLES custom
built light color 6 each @ $75
941-628-0182
JEWLERY CASE countertop
white base with lock & key
$250 941-628-0182
TABLE 3 TIER display custom
built tan color.2 left each $150
941-628-0182


SUPPLIES
6225

CAFE CHAIRS ROUND SEAT
HAIRPIN BACK ALL NATURAL
WOOD EA $60 941-275-5837
JUICER HB96500 CALL FOR
PRICE FOR 12" GLOBE MIXER
$100, OBO 941-275-5837
TABLE/(4)CHAIRS SET(S)
OUTDOOR RESIN BURGUNDY
$250, OBO 941-275-5837
BIRDS
6231


16 finches, Cages: 20 Ig
breeding, 2 flight, 2 little, &
many accessories. $500
for all. 941-575-0148
LOVE BIRDS, $20 EACH,
Hand-Fed, North Port,
828-421-8178

CATS
6232


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
DOGS
6233


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
HAVANESE 9 weeks. M/F.
Health certificate. Paper
trained. 941-223-0301.
JACK RUSSELL PUPS 7 wks
old 2 males $350 each. 1
female $400. Smooth coat,
short legs, 1st shots & Cert.
Ready at 8 wks 941-855-1529
LAB PUPS AKC, Im/1F, Choc.
Shots & Health Cert's. $300-
$400. 863-767-0458


& SERVICES
Z6236

CAT DOOR for slider, wht
w/hardware 80"x11.5" $125,
OBO 941-527-8177
DOG CARRIER cage nice
cats,metal $40 786-306-
DOG CRATE for medium
sized dog. Nice cond. $50
941-697-2385
IGUANA SUPPLIES Many
items, still in packages. $25
941-204-8537
APPLIANCES
L 6250


FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
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and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
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APPLIANCES
6250


A/C WINDOW unit
12000BTU'S Leave message
$350, OBO 941-276-6873
DRYER KENMORE 7.0 cu.ft.
electric, works good $100,
OBO 941-625-3741
DRYER MAYTAG super
capacity elec,very good $150
314-774-7700
DRYER WHITE very clean.
$100 941-726-1522
ELEC. RANGE Immaculate!!
Kenmore w/glass top. White.
$450 941-626-5801
FRIGE GE Wht 25.2cf,
water/ice new icemaker $200
941-626-9111
MAYTAG DRYER super
capacity elec,very good, $165
314-774-7700
MICROWAVE 1 cu. ft. w/
turntable,works great. $30
941-625-9789
MICROWAVE PANASONIC
Call for price for washer/dryer
set! $100 941-882-3139
RANGE ELEC SPECTRA S/C
S/S WHITE-WORKS GOOD (PG)
$100 717-451-2019
REFRIGERATOR WHITE
very clean. 2 Years old. $150
941-726-1522
REFRIG, GE PROFILE S/S,
BISQ, EX-CON $300 941-766-
9742
REFRIGERATOR 2.7 cu.ft.
New cond. white frig/freezer.
$79 941-629-6096
REFRIGERATOR 4 cu.ft.
Like new. $70, OBO
941-625-9789
REFRIGERATOR KENMORE
$225 941-223-5159
SMALL FREEZER White.
33Hx24Dx21W. Good working
order $25 941-743-2535
STOVE G.E. SS elec range, 7
elements,conv/reg oven
$495 941-625-2123
STOVE GE glass top, SC,
White, Good Condition $120
414-322-4233
STOVE NEW, WHITE,COIL
burners $175 941-483-0215
WASHER AND dryer Ken-
more,white,very good condi-
tion. $100 941-276-4352
WASHER AND dryer
Whirlpool, white, good condi-
tion $200 330-397-9996
WASHER MAYTAG super
capacity, very good $125,
OBO 941-822-5226
WASHMASHINE KENMORE
super cap. Englewood $140
941-716-4195
WATER COOLER like new, hot
and cold w/ bottom storage.
$60 941-625-9789
Find the
perfect
companion
in the
Classifieds!

MISCELLANEOUS

S62602

AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
TOP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
ANCHOR ROPE & chain
150'rope, 30'5/8 chain. Never
used $90 941-743-2535
AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC Cig-
arette roller King/100's New
$65 941-681-2433
BIG SPIDER BLACK JUMPING
& SCARY 4 HOLLOWEEN. NIB
$55, OBO 941-627-6780


MISCELLANEOUS
S6260


BLIND HEMMER, Industrial
w/110 motor & table $425
941-661-2950
BOOKS MANY to choose
from-$1 each-History, Movie,
Mystery $1 941-445-5619
BOOKS&LIT, Abeka Home-
school, math, Physics, lots to
see $100 941-575-9800
BRASS ALL sizes &clean $1
941-697-3160
CAR RAMPS steel ec
w/externders for lower cars
$35 941-629-9552
CARRY CASE with handle-
water-proof $22 941-496-
9252
COFFEE POT Farberware-per-
fect 12-cup $22 941-496-
9252
CRAB TRAPS new, galv.
comp w/ rope,float,zinc,rebar
$35 941-830-0998
DESK CHAIR, blk leather hi-
back wheels. Canadian. Wood
frm/arms $50 941-235-2500
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
FOOSE BALL Table $25
941-979-5875
LADDER 8' Wearner Fiber-
glass-aluminium $75 941-
496-9252
LIFE VESTS high quality, gov-
m't specs, SMLxxL $20 941-
235-2500
LIVE BLUE CRABS
12390 Placida Rd, Placida
FL 33946 941-697-3181
MATTRESS QUEEN Set
Brand New. Memory Foam
$295 941-223-8159
MIRROR CONVEX ROUND-
NEW-IN-BOX $22 941-496-
9252
PRESSURE WASHER
Husky,1750 near mint cond
$100 941-629-9552
RADIO GRUNDIG Short Wave
$75 941-483-0215
SCENTED CANDLES NEW
GLADE SM.SIZE 2 OZ. ENGLE-
WOOD $1 941-475-7577
STEELCASE OFFICE chair
looks new full adjust $150
941-629-9552
TELEPHONE/CORDLESS
(2) with answering sys. AT&T
20 941-585-8149
WINE COOLER terracotta
like new $15 941-228-1745

WANTED TO
BUY/TRADE
6270



Cash paid FOR WWI WWII
Korean Vietnam,German,
Japanese, etc Military items
(941)416-3280


7000







TRANSPORTATION

BUICK
7020


1999 BUICK LESABRE
Custom, 96,162 mi, $2,950
877-219-9139 DIr


2002 BUICK CENTURY tour-
ing. Beautiful and well main-
tained! $4400 941-763-0608


BUICK
7020


2006 BUICK LUCERNE CXL,
6 cyl., well maint. new tires, 1
yr. old batt. 103K, $7,850 obo
private party. 941-235-5551.
2007 BUICK LUCERNE
54K $14,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 BUICK ENCLAVE
66,323 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr

CADILLAC
7030


1994 CADILLAC SEDAN
DEVILLE, green, (sharp). Call
941-637-6966.
2001 CADILLAC ELDORADO
ECS 34.6K mi. leather, 12 disc
CD $8.5/9.0K 941-286-4625
2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE
Sedan, 66k mi., Carriage Roof,
Clean $5950 941-979-6234
2005 CADILLAC
ESCALADE 78,719 mi,
$18,759 877-219-9139 DIr
2008 CADILLAC SRX
$18,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 CADILLAC SRX
76,278 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr

CHEVY
L 7040


2002 CHEVY SUBURBAN
$9,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 CHEVY COBALT
57,548 mi, $13,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 CHEVY COBALT,
PW, PL, Cruise! New Tires!
$9,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2010 CHEVY EQUINOX
32,719 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr

CHRYSLER
L7050


1992 CHRYSLER LEBARON
CONV., Runs good, decent
car $900 941-473-4737
2002 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Gold, 69,720 mi, $4,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2003 CHRYSLER 300M
V6, AUTO, White, 4 door
$5932 941-916-9222 DIr.
IADV 1RTE S 'I
2004 CHRYSL. SEBRING, 50K
Miles! Auto, A/C, Full Power!
$5,988. 941-639-1601 PG.
2004 SEBRING CONV.
Tan, sporty! $5993
941-916-9222 DIr.
2005 PT CRUISER CONV., Only
58K Miles! $7,988. 941-625-
2141 C.C. #1 Used CarDeaer
2007 CHRYSLER PT
CRUISER, automatic,
$5,500 941-391-0506
2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING
59,217 mi, $12,874
877-219-9139 DIr
20002 CHRYS. SEBRING
LXI CONV. 71K Mi! $4,988.
941-625-2141 CC#1UsedCarDIr

DODGE
7060


2002 DODGE Grand Caravan,
White, 82k mi., 1 owner, Very
Nice. 941-497-6794
2004 DODGE INTREPID
Gold, 4 door., roomy & clean,
runs great!! Mattas Motors
941-916-9222 DIr.
2005 DODGE RAM 150
60,570 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 DODGE MAGNUM,
Low Miles! Black Beauty!
$11,988 941-639-1601 P.G.






The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C/V


ads.yoursun.net


Wednesday, September 4, 2013


DODGE
7060


2010 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN 18,879 mi,
$16,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2010 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN 52,042 mi,
$16,745 877-219-9139 DIr
2011 DODGE RAM 150
21,486 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr

FORD
7070





GENE GORMAN 'S
DIRT CHEAP CARS
COME MEET OUR NEW
SALES MANAGER,
BRANDON!
GUARANTEED AUTOMOTIVE
FINANCING. RATES AS
LOW AS 1.9%!
3305 Tamiami Tr. South
Punta Gorda
941-639-1601

LGG K
GENE GORMAN 'S
DIRT CHEAP CARS
COME MEET OUR NEW
SALES MANAGER,
BRANDON!
GUARANTEED AUTOMOTIVE
FINANCING. RATES AS
LOW AS 1.9%!
3305 Tamiami Trl. South
Punta Gorda
941-639-1601
2003 CHEVY MALIBU
66K Mi., $4819. Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 dlr
2003 FORD TAURUS
4DR Wagon, brown $5673
941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 FORD MUSTANG CONV.,
67K Mi! Loaded! $12,988.
941-625-2141 #1 Used Car Dealer
2007 FORD EDGE
70,744 mi, $17,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 FORD FLEX
87,327 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139
2009 FORD MUSTANG
85,356 mi, $11,477
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EDGE 48,500
mi, white Ltd Ed.,leather, all
options, exc. cond. $21,000,
OBO 941-625-2210
2011 FORD EDGE Sport
AWD, 41,269 mi, $29,548
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD E350
32,039 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD FOCUS 40,563
mi, $15,411
877-219-9139 DIr




Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
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and click on Classifieds
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SUNi-e




GMC
La 7075 0


2010 GMC SIERRA
EXT. CAB $22,990
877-211-8054 DLR


S JEEP ACURA
L ^ 7080 L 7145


2007 JEEP COMMANDER
61,978 mi, $13,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 JEEP LIBERTY, 4x2
Sport! 40K Mi! Black on Black!
$15,988. 941-639-1601, DIr

LINCOLN
7090


1999 LINCOLN CONTINEN-
TAL FL car, very good cond.
$1700 OBO 941-889-7090
2002 LINC. CONTINENTAL
CE ED. 1 Owner FL car.
Immac. $4850 OBO
941-979-6234

MERCURY
7100


2006 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS GS,45242 mi, ex
cond,$11,500 941-613-2940
2007 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS GS, Burgandy,
Well cared for, 1 owner,
over $100k mi Runs
great, 25mpg, $5695.
By Owner 419-346-2881
PONTIAC
7130


2001 PONTIAC TRANS AM
WS6 RAM AIR $8,998
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 PONTIAC SOLSTICE
47,574 mi, $12,950
877-219-9139 DIr

SATURN
L 7135


2004 SATURN L-300 (BEST)
1 Sr. Owner, Low miles
Garage kept, 26 mpg
All Records from day 1,
Like buying a new car.
No Dissapointments
$5975/obo Call Joyce
941-468-3375
2008 SATURN VUE AWD,
74,158 mi, $10,872
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 SATURN VUE AWD,
78,769 mi, $10,985
877-219-9139 DIr

PRO POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd
Port Charlotte, 33980
98 SL2 Sedan $1,950
98 SW2 Wagon $2,500
97 SW2 Wagon $2,600
01 SL1 Sedan $2,800
04 Ion Sedan $3,400
08 Aura Sedan $8,099
04 Vue SUV $3,600
05 Vue SUV $4,949
08 Vue SUV $7,800
Used Saturn Parts & Service
941-627-8822

USED CAR DEALERS
7137


Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here

ACURA
7145


2006 ACURA RSX
49,712 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 ACRUA 3.2 TL
51,007 mi, $18,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 ACURA MDX
$21,990
877-211-8054 DLR
-GET RESULTS --
USE CLASSIFIED!


2010 ACURA TSX
27K $21,411
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 ACURA RDX
27K $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR

BMW
7148


2005 BMW 325, Loaded!
Extra Clean! $9,988. 941-625-
2141 C.C. #1 UsedCar Dealer
2008 BMW 3281C
$27,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 BMW 3281C
$29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 BMW 3281C
$33,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 BMW 528XI
15K $43,990
877-211-8054 DLR

HONDA
7160


2001 HONDA CR-V 138k mi,
cool a/c, good tires, exc. cond.,
$4,500 941473-3693
2003 HONDA ACCORD
106,328 mi, $8,997
877-219-9139 DIr
2003 HONDA ACCORD
92,037 mi, $9,989
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 HONDA ACCORD EX-L
V6 Sedan, White, 53K mi, Garage
Kept, $11,200, 941-505-1952
2004 HONDA CR-V
31,080 mi, $13,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 HONDA CR-V
93,961 mi, $8,759
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA S2000
CONV, 76,126 mi, $19,784
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD
EXL, 43,715 mi, $14,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CR-V
70,203 mi, $13,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CR-V EXL,
53,461 mi, $15,478
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CR-V EXL,
88,964 mi, $13,574
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA PILOT
70,206 mi, $16,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V
58,909 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V
76,548 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA ODYSSEY
53,402 mi, $14,578
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
15,806 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
52,427 mi, $13,770
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
56,639 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC EX
49,638 mi, $13,425
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CR-V EX
31,370 mi, $15,478
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $20,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

LEJ=xu OF ARA.SOTA
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!


HONDA
7160


2008 HONDA ELEMENT
89,473 mi, $10,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
76,267 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA FIT
52,258 mi, $13,654
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
82,631 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
16,263 mi, $17,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
17,479 mi, $15,784
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
28,458 mi, $15,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
34,750 mi, $18,477
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
57,510 mi, $16,587
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
8,425 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
EX, 20,934 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
35,247 mi, $14,540
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
53,716 mi, $13,375
877-219-9139 DIr
Classified = Sales I
2010 HONDA CIVIC LX
4DR, 41,141 mi, $13,
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
17,197 mi, $21,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
43,160 mi, $17,988
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
AWD, 39,878 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
41,800 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
41,836 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA INSIGHT
47,269 mi, $12,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
41,342 mi, $20,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
11,413 mi, $17,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
20,361 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
33,735 mi, $16,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
39,880 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
LX, 23,325 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
9,479 mi, $17,844
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
17,347 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
33,798 mi, $18,576
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
Blue, 33,892 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
34,492 mi, $18,478
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EXL,
31,197 mi, $23,578
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EXL,
31,933 mi, $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr


HONDA
7160


2011 HONDA CR-V LX,
35,911 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT
21,915 mi, $15,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT Sport,
28,178 mi, $15,784
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
17,863 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $27,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

LEJXUS O1F SARASOT
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
2012 HONDA ACCORD
19,987 mi, $20,477
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
35,722 mi, $20,798
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
6,052 mi, $23,411
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT., 18,517 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT., 20,220 mi, $20,457
877-219-9139 DIr
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT., 23,491 mi, $21,477
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
Grey, 12,764 mi, $19,887
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD SE
CERT., 30,522 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
14,558 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
31,372 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
32,173 mi, $17,859
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
45,716 mi, $14,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC CERT.
18,158 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA FIT
19,541 mi, $15,747
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT LX
18,149 mi, $29,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
CERT. 6,023 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CR-V
3,326 mi, $32,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT., Touring, 1,755 mi,
$36,547 877-219-9139 DLR

S HYUNDAI
7163


2010 HYUNDAI TUCSON
26,314 mi, $20,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT
21,447 mi, $11,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
14,854 $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
Lmtd, 36,466 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HYUNDAI SONATA
9,920 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
17,741 mi, $22,874
877-219-9139 DIr


L INFINITI
L 7165T


2008 INFINITI M35 Loaded! A
Must Drive! $20,988. 941-625-
2141 C.C.#1 Used Car Dealer
2009 INFINITI G37
CPE 23K $26,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 INFINITI G37
$29,990
877-211-8054 DLR

LEXUS
7178


1994 LEXUS ES300, 90K Miles
Leather, Loaded, Moonroof.
$3,488 941-639-1601 DIr.
2002 LEXUS ES 300
$10,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2002 LEXUS ES300,
Leather, Moonroof, Low Miles!
$11,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2004 LEXUS ES 330
76,390 mi, $10,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 LEXUS RX 330
46K $22,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 LEXUS IS 250
41,575 mi, $19,870
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 LEXUS RX 350
42K $22,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS IS 350
56,858 mi, $21,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 LEXUS ES 350
CERTIFIED $27,911 0%APR*
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $26,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

LEXUS OF SARA.S TA
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
2011 LEXUS ES 350
CERTIFIED $28,911 0%APR*
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 LEXUS RX 350
CERTIFIED $33,911, 0%APR*
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 LEXUS ES 350
CERTIFIED $33,911 0%APR*
877-211-8054 DLR
2012 LEXUs ES 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
lWIL."JE
LEXUSJ OF MARASdDTA
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
2012 LEXUS RX 350
CERTIFIED $36,911, 0% APR*
877-211-8054 DLR

MAZDA
7180


1991 MAZDA MIATA Silver
convertible, 42K mi, Garage
kept, new tires & belts.
$5,900 941-228-0159


Fmd it in the

Classified!

2008 MAZDA MIATA MX-5
Red, 66,100 miles, $11,000
Great condition 941-830-0930
MERCEDES
7190


2002 MERCEDES C320
88K, Silver, Gray Ithr, garage
kept, serviced locally MUST
SEE! $7900 941-769-2431
2003 MERCEDES C230
70,503 mi, $9,547
877-219-9139 DIr






Wednesday, September 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C/V The Sun Classified Page 21


MINI COOPER
7192


2006 MINI COOPER S TYPE,
60K Miles! Loaded! $13,988.
941-639-1601 DIr.

S MITSUBISHI
S7195


2010 MISTUBISHI GALANT
4 Door., Low Miles! Sharp!
$11,488. 941-639-1601, DIr.

NISSAN
7200


2005 NISSAN 350Z
49,364 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 NISSAN SENTRA
75,058 mi, $6,978
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 NISSAN PATHFINDER
111,232 mi, $9,974
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 NISSAN VERSA, 4 Dr.
35K Mi! $9,988. 941-625-
2141 C.C. #1Used Car D.
2011 NISSAN VERSA Htch-
back, 44,197 mi, $11,787
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA
29,204 mi, $19,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 NISSAN MURANO
12K $29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2013 NISSAN TITAN
13,908 mi, $25,477
877-219-9139 DIr

SPORTS CARS
LW 7205


1990 CHEVY CORVETTE
Cony, Both Tops 6 speed,
78K mi, Great Car, $11,990
941-740-5500

SAAB
L 7206


2003 SAAB 9.3 CONV.,
Only 79K Miles! Sweet Ride!
$7,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.

TOYOTA
7210


2002 TOYOTA SOLARA
CONV., 185k mi., new tires,
$4500 941-484-5550
2005 TOYOTA SEQUOIA
118,719 mi, $13,245
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 TOYOTA RAV4
$12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 TOYOTA RAV4,
63,660 mi, $15,477
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA AVALON
35K $15,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 TOYOTA CAMRY
44,325 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA RAV 4
64,804 mi, $13,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA TACOMA
77,343 mi, $19,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 TOYOTA TUNDRA
33,628 mi, $24,385
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 TOYOTA CAMRY
41,727 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 TOYOTA SCION XD
64,277 mi, $10,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 TOYOTA TUNDRA
76,110 mi, $22,415
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA SIENNA
59,109 mi, $22,547
877-219-9139 DIr


TOYOTA
7210


2011 TOYOTA AVALON
16K $27,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2011 TOYOTA SIENNA
34,351 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 TOYOTA RAV4
2,026 mi, $25,747
877-219-9139 DIr

SVOLKSWAGEN
S7220


2007 VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT
75,435 mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 VOLKSWAGEN GOLF
4,101 mi, $29,875
877-219-9139 DIr

VOLVO
S7230


2008 VOLVO XC90
$23,990
MISC. IMPORTS
7240


2011 LEXUs RX 350s
STARTING @ $34,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WMILIE
LEJXUS OF SIJR1IO3TP I
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!

ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES
S7250

1976 MG MGB Convertible,
30K miles exc cond FUN CAR,
$6,500 941-255-7878
1988 CHEVY CAMARO IROC
T top, white, 305 cub." engine,
91K. $3250 941-627-6212

BUDGET BUYS
L 7252


1998 MERCURY GR. MAR-
QUIS, Only 99K Mi! Cold A/C
$2,988 941-639-1601 DIr. P.G.




AUTOS WANTED
7260









WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204






SEmploy Classified!
$$ TOP CASH $$
FOR CARS & TRUCKS.
DEAD OR ALIVE.
941-485-7515


AUTOS WANTED
7260


CASH FOR JUNKERS
Available 24/7
941-286-3122, 623-5550


ACCESSORIES
7270

ENGINE 74 VETTE, 350 runs,
complete $499 786-306-

FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
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and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
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FULL JEEP Cover In Box 09
Wrangler Green $125, OBO
941-204-9258
P/U TOOLBOX toolbox for
ranger,small pickup $100,
OBO 941-380-6042
POWER MIRROR new,Dr.
side,for 01-08 Chrys. minivan
$90, OBO 941-626-5099
PRIUS TRAILER Hitch Fits
Totota Prius 2011 Brand New
$125 941-204-9258
QUADRAJET, CARBS GM
good, original $55 786-306-
6335
TAILLIGHT FORD p/u 97 to
03,dr. side used,exc.cond.
$25, OBO 941-626-5099
TIRES 4EA. P275/65R18
Gdyr Wrnglr SR-A Hv 5K
miles on tires rated 50K
miles All Season Tires $150
941-661-0999
TIRES, BRIDGESTONE
205 55 R16
Almost new $200
941-249-3435
WATER PUMP housing for Big
BIk. Chrys.Exc.cond $75, OBO
914-626-5099
VANS
7290


2003 CHEVY VENTURE, All
Power! Loaded, 3rd Seat!
$2,488. 941-639-1601, DIr.
2005 DODGE CARAVAN, 28K
Mi! Handicap Access. $8,988.
941-625-2141 #1 Used Car DIr.
I Advertise Today!
2006 FORD FREESTAR,
Leather, TV, Fully Loaded!
$7,988 941-639-1601 DIr
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
56,867 mi $24,587
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
61,981 mi $22,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 CHRYSLER JOURNEY
35,415 mi, $13,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 CHRYSLER SEBRING
27,824 mi, $13,776
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-870-4325
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
50,833 mi, $23,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
52,012 mi $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.


CLUES ACROSS
1. Academy of Country Music
4. Company that rings receipts
7. An explosion fails to occur
10. Bleats
12. Opening
13. European sea eagle
14. River in Flor