Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00083

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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Full Text

Syria defiant as UN chemical probe nears end EAGE 1


Deal of the Day
Coach purse, $175


harlotte


CASH HURTING YOUR BI
A new study suggests being short on cash may n
a bit slower in the brain. THE WIRE PAGE


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


In Today's
Classifieds!


-
u n AND WEEKLY
HERALD


RAIN ENFORCEMENT LACKING THEW
ake you Environmental officials claim enforcement of the state's PAGE 1
7 L environmental laws has plummeted under Gov. Rick Scott.
FRI DA Y AUGUST 30, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00


Heightened security


Issues bring out caution flag at county building


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER
In the wake of national news
concerning fatal shootings in
schools, government buildings and
public places across the nation,
Charlotte County has begun to
take steps to heighten security at
the county administration build-
ing in Murdock.
In recent months, a slew of con-
troversial issues has drawn to the
building angry crowds toting signs,
sludge and, as several officials


believe, possibly a concealed
weapon.
"It's just an overall general
increasing sensitivity to security
and what's appropriate and what's
not appropriate," said Charlotte
County facilities, construction
and maintenance director David
Milligan, who oversees and coordi-
nates security at county buildings.
In recent weeks, the county has
stepped up precautions. Front-
desk officers are now asking to
inspect oversize purses or contain-
ers that appear to be out of place


in a government building like
the Styrofoam cooler containing
glass jars of algae-laden water
brought in last year by one resi-
dent who was furious the county
wasn't doing enough to clean up
the lake behind her house.
The same resident wheeled in an
insulated cooler with algae-filled
containers a few months later
during a contentious meeting to
discuss a sewer project in the East
and West Spring Lake area. At that
SECURITY 13


Good doggies


SUN PHOTO BY BETSY WILLIAMS
Lila Eaton, 11, and her dad Roger play with Cherio, belonging to the Rivadeneira family, while their 5-month-old golden doodle,
Sadie, is played with by Kate Cutherbertson, 10, during dog obedience training at South County Regional Park in Punta Gorda.
See more photos on page 12.


FOOTBALL PREVIEW


H D I


Who's ready for some football? Today's Sun includes a special insert
previewing the scholastic, collegiate and professional seasons.


Local school


officials split


on summit's


impact


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER
Within Charlotte
County Public Schools,
teachers and officials
are, with some excep-
tions, skeptical of the
education summit that
took place in Clearwater
earlier this week.
According to
Superintendent Doug
Whittaker, the summit
probably won't intro-
duce much change to
the state's education
system because too
many political figures
opposed to change


were invited.
"They aren't going to
fix it by bringing people
to the table who will do
everything they can to
prevent anything from
being done," he said.
The summit, led by
interim state educa-
tion commissioner
Pam Stewart, ran from
Monday to Wednesday,
and included eight leg-
islators (four each from
the Florida House and
Senate), three school
superintendents, three
past teachers of the year
SUMMIT 14


Watson's passing leaves

void in community


By AL HEMINGWAY
SUN CORRESPONDENT
If you wanted to know anything
about vegetable gardening, Port
Charlotte resident Dale Watson was
the man to ask.
Known affectionately
as the "Jolly Green Giant,"
Watson was so knowl-
edgeable on the subject
that Holly Bates, horticul-
tural program coordinator
at the Charlotte County
WAT Extension Service, said
she would call him if
a question arose that she could not
answer.
"We all looked up to him," she said.
"He was a specialist in his field."
Watson passed away Monday at age
81. His death will leave a huge void in
the community, because he was much
more than a master gardener. He was
a multifaceted individual who was a
staunch advocate for the community
he loved so much. As the president of
the Charlotte County Curmudgeon


Club for the past three years, he
spearheaded many projects to improve
communications between local and
county government and the citizenry
they represented.
Born on April 7, 1932, in Pensacola,
Fla., Watson and his family relocated
often due to his father's employment.
He enlisted in the U.S. Air Force right
after his marriage in 1950 and was
stationed in Phoenix and Iceland. After
his discharge, he returned to Phoenix
to finish his education at Arizona State
University.
He moved to Kansas City, Mo., where
he eventually became a successful
architect. He obtained licenses in
Missouri and Kansas, as well as Florida.
For two decades, he assisted in design-
ing and building hospitals nationwide.
Tiring of the "work-a-day world," as
he put it, he settled in Port Charlotte in
1993 and began to volunteer his time.
In 1994, until his death, he served on
the Charlotte County Construction
Board of Adjustments and Appeals.
VOID 13


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA- In running a
household, it makes sense to use
high-efficiency light bulbs. Over time,
the savings can mean money in your
pocket. Now multiply that return
many times over for an entire city. The
financial rewards can be substantial.
That's what Punta Gorda officials
are exploring following an energy-
conservation audit that ensures sav-
ings. The completed audit, performed
by ConEdison Solutions, identified a
number of cost-cutting measures that
could immediately be initiated and
guarantees that the money saved will
be enough to fund the overall project.
The economic- and environment-
friendly improvements total about
$1.2 million and would result in annual
savings of $75,000, according to the
audit. The up-front costs to purchase
new equipment could be covered by a
combination of grants, ConEd rebates
and municipal leasing, which allows
governments to acquire capital equip-
ment under favorable terms.


Not only would the project result
in significant upgrades of the city's
equipment but also substantially
reduce its utility and operating cost,
said JeffWykoff, program manager for
ConEdison Solutions, who gave council
members a presentation this week.
Improving lighting efficiency is the
surest way to realize savings, he said.
For example, at a cost of $118,125 to
upgrade interior lighting for all city
buildings, Punta Gorda could save
$13,260 in utility costs every year, re-
couping its investment in a little more
than nine years.
Generally, fluorescent lighting would
be installed inside buildings, while LED
lighting, which has a much longer life
span and costs less to operate, would
be used outside.
"We're really looking for wattage
reduction on lighting," Wykoff said.
In contrast, to upgrade the air-
conditioning system in City Hall alone
would require an investment of $79,338
and extend the payback period to more
than 40 years.
GREEN 13


INDEX I THE SUN: Obituaries 5 Police Beat 7 Viewpoint 8 Opinion 9-10 THE WIRE: State2 1 Nation 2,71 Business 5-6 World 8 Weather 81 SPORTS: Lotto 2 CLAS FIED: Comics 9-121 Dear Abby 12 TV Listings 13
Daily Edition $1.00 .... "-" Look insidefor valuable coupons --**.rCHARLE S-
Daily1111111i11111$1.00'- :1 "SUN92>4 This year's savings to date A... LLUSAT CHARLIE SAYS ...
lIIi II92 I7 1 w SNCOUPON E 5i0 CALL UA Who knew my brain
05 ~ VALUE METER 65463 ,: 941-206-1000 and wallet were that clos
7 052 00025 8 Times of clouds and sun-. -.-.-..-.-.- -..-..-.....-.-... 4


VOL. 121 NO. 242


City energy audit could

save some green


e!






Our Town Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


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to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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----*-

Find it A
in the
Classifieds!'
L-



SUNA "
NLAPER


ith school now
back in full
swing, Char-
lotte County Habitat for
Humanity was fortu-
nate to receive a call
from Captain James
Farley of Charlotte
High School's NJROTC
program.
He wanted to sched-
ule a date to come out
and help build. Brenda
Graham, volunteer
coordinator for Charlotte
County Habitat, wel-
comed a total of 26 vol-
unteers as they arrived for
their shifts at the site.
The students worked
alongside Habitat site
supervisors Tom O'Neill
and William Gayle and
future homeowner
Jon Gadomski. Their
goal was to complete
the rough framing and
assemble the interior
walls. This enthusiastic
group of young adults
was a tremendous help
and has already sched-
uled a date to return
next month.


I BOUS COU.PO] I


HABITAT FOR
HUMANITY
ELLEN CARDILLO

"In the past, we have
had other NJROTC
groups, and their
leadership and disci-
pline is outstanding.
We are excited to have
Charlotte High School
join us and encourage
other school groups
to volunteer as well,"
said Mike Mansfield,
CEO Charlotte County
Habitat for Humanity.
Volunteers are the
heartbeat of our orga-
nization. We need your
help to accomplish our
goal of helping one more
qualified family have a
safe, decent, affordable
home in which to live.
We currently have
seven families approved
for home ownership
who are in need of your
help. You can assist by
volunteering on our job
sites, in our office, or


PHOTO PROVIDED
Members of Charlotte High School's NJROTC program helped Charlotte County Habitat for
Humanity on a recent build.


one of our three resale
stores. Donating gently
used items to our resale
stores and monetary
donations are also ways
to ensure these local
families will soon have a


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* GOVERNMENT

* TODAY

Punta Gorda, Development


Review Committee meeting, 9 a.m.,
City Hall Council Chambers, 326 W.
Marion Ave., PG. 941-575-3369

* EVENTS


SUN NEWSPAPERS AS
Member oftheAuditBureau of Circulation f
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................... Mark Yero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor .........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager..........Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray ................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3003
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


----------------------- i


August 30th August 31st September 1 st September 2nd


TAKE AN ADDITIONAL



50% OFF


Our Entire Stock of Already Reduced
Sportswear, Dresses, Swimwear,


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Cannot be combined with any other Cannot be combined with any other
discount No adjustments made on discount. No adjustments made on
previously purchased merchandise. previously purchased merchandise.
Must present coupon to receive Must present coupon to receive
savings. Limit (3 25% off coupons savings. Limit (3) 25% off coupons
per. customer. per customer.


Punta Gorda (in Cross Trail Center) 94
Fort Myers (at College Parkway Center)
Nokomis / Venice 941-488-76
-[ [ j Look for Special C
www.anthonysfla.com & www.facebook.com/
Mon. Fri. 10 7 Sat. 10 6 Su
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discount Selection may vary by store. No adjustments made on previo
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---- -------------- '




L I

1-505-2177
239-275-3111
43
Offers only on
lanthonysfla
. 11 -5
iin Crenshaw, LO. Sport LeggIngs,
Cannot be combined with any other
usly purchased merchandise.A
nt taken off of lowest price.


I HOL^IDYSTOREHUS:Mondayll09/02/1310-5
Te.- F i. 0I 7 Sa .10-6 S n 1-5


* TODAY

Post 103 Cafe, Breakfast,
7-11, Fri-Sun. Public welcome. Come
try ChefTim's fluffy pancakes!
2101 Taylor Rd. 941-639-6337
Fitness'n' Fun, Exercise to
contemporary Christian music.
11330 Burnt Store Rd., PG. 9 am, Mon,
Wed & Fri. $35 for 10 classes. Info,
941-575-2034
Bingo, 2280 Aaron St. Game
packs start at $12. Over 25 games
with payouts up to $250. For more
info, 941-625-4175
Bingo Mania, The Elks #2153,
11 am-1 pm, 20225 Kenilworth Blvd.
All welcome, smoke-free, free raffles.
For more info, 941-627-4313
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Dinner, 5-8. AYCE fried fish, prime
Rib, crab cakes and more. Music with
Black Velvet, 6:30-9:30. Reservations
suggested, 941-764-6925
Port Charlotte Elks, 11-9,
20225 Kenilworth Blvd. Lunch, 11-2.
Dinner, 4-7:30. Full menu, AYCE fish.
Music by Breeze, 6-9. Guests welcome.
941-625-7571
Stretch 'n'Tone, Exercise to
contemporary Christian music. 507 W.
Marion, PG. 11 am, Mon, Wed & Fri.
$35 for 10 classes. Info, 941-575-2034
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch,
11-2. Dinner, 5-8:30. Music by Andy,
6:30-9:30. 25538 Shore Dr., PG.
941-637-2606, membres & their
guests
Beans & Seeds Trio,
Live music with Beans & Seeds
Trio, 11 am-3 pm, Center Court,
Fishermen's Village, 941-639-8721
American Legion 103,
SAL dinner, fish/shrimp, entree TBA,
5:50-7 pm. Music by Brian & Mary
until 9 pm. 2101 Taylor Rd. For more
info, 941-639-6337
Am Legion Post 110,


safe, affordable place to
call home. For additional
information, please
call 941-639-3162, or
visit our website, www.
charlottecountyhfh.org.
Ellen Cardillo is the


Live music and dancing starting
at 7 pm. Enjoy dinner at the La
Familia Resturant. For more info,
941-380-1034
Friday Night Dance,
$7, Cultural Center, 2280 Aaron St.,
7-10 pm. Full cash bar, live entertain-
ment. Band info at theculturalcenter.
com for call, 941-625-4175
Rock'n' Country, Live music,
7-10 pm, American Legion 110.
3152 Harbor Blvd., PC. 941-740-0800

* SATURDAY

Free Tai Chi, Want serenity,
balance, peace? Free Tai Chi and Qigong
w/Richard or Mary, 9:30 am in Gilchrist
Park. For more info, 407-923-8310
Market @ Post 103, Stop
by for best price & selection of fruits,
vegs, plants & more. 2101 Taylor Rd.
For more info, 941-639-6337
Post 103 Cafe, Breakfast,
7-11, Fri-Sun. Public welcome. Come
try ChefTim's fluffy pancakes!
2101 Taylor Rd. 941-639-6337
Acme Bicycle Ride,
8 am, 615 Cross St., PG. Free, adults,
helmet required, 3 levels. More info,
941-639-2263
PG Farmers Market,
8-noon. W. Olympia & Taylor St.
Produce, bakery, plants, seafood,
cheese, citrus, live ent. & much more!
For more inof, 941-391-4856
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Wings and dogs, 12-2 pm. Dinner, 5-8.
BBQ chicken and ribs, filet, crab cakes,
Music with Quiet Fire. Reservations


LABOR DAY CLOSURES
In observance of the Labor Day holiday, all Char-
lotte County government business offices and Punta
Gorda city offices will be closed Monday. All post
offices will be closed as well, along with the county
and circuit courts. Other offices and services will be
affected as well, including:
County Administration Center: closed.
Charlotte County Utilities: Customer service
will be closed; payments accepted by phone at
941-764-4300, or by electronic billing at www.Char-
lotteCountyFL.gov (select "Pay Water/Sewer" from the
"I want to" list). Standby staff will be on call for utility
emergencies at 941-764-4300.
Garbage pickup: Curbside collection will occur
as scheduled.
Mini-Transfer facilities: Both the West Char
lotte and Mid-County are closed.
Charlotte County Landfill on Zemel Road:
open.
Charlotte Harbor Visitor & Convention
Bureau offices: closed. Visitors with questions about
things to do can visit www.CharlotteHarborTravel.
com, or call 800-652-6090.
Fire/EMS Headquarters will be closed; all
other stations will be open.


special events coordina-
torfor Charlotte County
Habitat for Humanity.
She can be reached at
941-639-3162, ext. 413,
or events@charlotte
countyhfh.org.


suggested, 941-764-6925
Bingo, 2280 Aaron St. Game
packs start at $12. Over 25 games with
payouts up to $250. For more info,
941-625-4175
Port Charlotte Elks, 11-9,
20225 Kenilworth Blvd. Lunch,11-2.
Dinner, 4-8, full menu. Texas hold 'em,
1 pm. Guests welcome, 941-625-7571
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch,
11-2. Dinner, 5-8. Music by Sons of
Beaches, 6:30-9:30. 25538 Shore Dr.,
PG. Members & their guests. For more
info,941-637-2606
American Legion 103,
Vet. appr day, lite lunch, 12-3 pm.
2101 Taylor Rd. 941-639-6337
Pinochle, Cultural Center,
2280 Aaron St. 3:30-5:30 pm, $2.
Cultural Center MembersPLUS free.
Everyone welcome. 941-625-4175
Michael Hirst, Live music with
singer/guitarist Michael Hirst,
5-9 pm. Fishermen's Village Center Court,
941-639-8721
Am Legion Post 110,
Live music and dancing starting at
7 pm. Enjoy dinner at the La Familia
Resturant. For more info, 941-380-1034

* SUNDAY

Market @ Post 103, Stop
by for best price & selection of fruits,
vegs, plants & more. 2101 Taylor Rd.
941-639-6337
Post 103 Cafe, Breakfast,
7-11, Fri-Sun. Public welcome. Come
try Chef Tim's fluffy pancakes!
2101 Taylor Rd. 941-639-6337


Sunshine Ride: closed.
Dial-A-Ride: closed.
Family Services Center: closed.
Charlotte County library administration
offices: closed.
Charlotte County libraries: closed.
Charlotte County Historical Center: closed.
Harold Avenue Recreation Center: closed.
South County Regional Park Recreation
Center: closed.
Joseph A. Tringali Recreation Center: closed.
Parks, Recreation & Cultural Resources
administration office: closed.
Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference
Center offices: closed.
Port Charlotte Beach Recreation Center:
closed.
Skate parks: open.
Pools: closed.
Charlotte Sports Park offices: closed.
Charlotte County Sheriff's Administrative
Office and four District Offices: closed. The offices
will reopen at 8 a.m. Tuesday. No change in jail visita-
tion hours.
Edison State College (including the Charlotte
campus): closed. Classes and campus services resume
regular hours Tuesday.


CONTACT US WITH YOUR NEWS: Email Charlotte Sun Editor Rusty Pray at rpray@sun-herald.com, or
call 941-206-1168, or email Deputy Charlotte Editor Garry Overbey at overbey@sun-herald.com or call
941-206-1143. Fax to 941-629-2085. On Saturdays, contact Assistant Charlotte Editor Marion Putman
at mputman@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1183, or the newsroom at 941-206-1100. On Sundays, contact
Garry Overbey or call the newsroom. Circulation director MarkYero, 941-206-1317. Business news email
business@sun-herald.com or call 941-206-1121. Consumer advocacy email dmorris@sun-herald.com or call
941-206-1114. Obituaries call 941-206-1028 or email obituaries@sunletter.com. Religion/church news or
events mputman@sun-herald.com. Editorial letters email letters@sun-herald.com or write: Letter to the
Editor, c/o Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980. Puzzles 941-206-1128. Classified
ads 866-463-1638. Subscriptions For missed papers, or to put your paper on hold, call 941-206-1300. Display
advertising- 941-206-1214


The SUN(USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc.,23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster:Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida33980-2100.


NJROTC gives back to the community


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Featured Event
Labor Day Picnic @ Am. Legion Post 103, We invite
the public to join us Sept 2nd, 12 pm to 4 pm. Enjoy our fresh grilled
burgers, brats & dogs w/ all the fixin's, cold, frosty mugs of beer & full
service bar. Music by the renowned Vince Brown! Come see our newly
decorated lounge & smoke-free hall. 2101 Taylor Rd. 941-639-6337


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Accessories and Petit


E UP TO 80%


I B U CO. UO-ij., I


OurTown Page 2 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


BOPe]


OE.S\






:The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE www.sunnewspapers.net C OurTown Page3


SECURITY
FROM PAGE 1

same meeting, officials
confirmed, at least one
resident was believed to
be carrying a gun, which
is prohibited under
Florida statutes.
According to Charlotte
County Sheriff's spokes-
woman Debbie Bowe,
anyone authorized
to carry a concealed
weapon may not carry
a gun into courthouses,
schools, bars, polling
places, or meetings of
any local governing body
unless they are a certi-
fied law enforcement
professional.
"In today's environment,


I think public safety at a
city or county commission
meeting is substantial,"
said county attorney
Janette Knowlton. "It's
real."

A sign of
the times
Knowlton said discus-
sions about security have
became more urgent
since the near-fatal
shooting of former U.S.
congresswoman
Gabrielle Giffords.
On Jan. 8, 2011, a
week into her third term,
Giffords was shot in
the head by a gunman
at a supermarket near
Tuscon, Ariz., where
she was meeting pub-
licly with constituents.


Thirteen people were
injured during the attack
and six others were killed
in the shooting, among
them federal judge John
Roll.
"It's something that
elected officials always
think about," said
County Commissioner
Tricia Duffy.
Shortly after the
Giffords shooting,
Knowlton said, county
officials took a harder
look at the county's
security strategy.
"There are Fourth
Amendment rights to
protect you against
unreasonable search and
seizure, but there's also
case law that supports
reasonable searches,
as long as it's part of a


general practice and
the purpose is not for
gathering evidence for a
criminal investigation,"
she said.
But one longtime
resident feels the bag
searches are arbitrary
and go too far.
Charlotte County
Airport Authority
commissioner Kathleen
Coppola, who has lived
in Charlotte County
since 1977 and regu-
larly attends county
commission meetings,
was asked to open her
purse at the commis-
sion's last meeting.
What's more, she was
told she was not al-
lowed to bring into the
commission chambers
a small bottle of water


she was carrying in her
purse.
True, there are signs
posted at the entrances
of the chambers stating
no food or beverages
allowed, but they hadn't
been enforced before,
she pointed out.
"Me," she said. "I'm
the big threat that walks
into the building with a
ponytail."
"I've been coming here
for years, and I've always
had a bottle of water that
I have to drink because
I have the rhinitis," she
said. "I was furious."
Knowlton said that
she was unaware at the
time that anyone was
searched, but that the
county is currently work-
ing on creating security


standards and guidelines
that will be made public
once they are adopted.
"Obviously, I don't
think we're going to go
to metal detectors or
anything like that. I don't
think it's feasible, espe-
cially in this building, but
we're trying to tighten up
where we can," Knowlton
said. "It's been an ongo-
ing discussion."
Milligan said security
enforcement will vary
"depending on the de-
mographics of the crowd,
the nature of the meet-
ing, the location, etc."
"We're doing our best,"
Milligan said. "We can no
longer say it can't happen
here because as we've
seen, it can and it has."
Email: bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


GREEN
FROM PAGE 1

Basically it comes
down to replacing aging
equipment with higher-
efficiency equivalents.
That may include
replacing equipment
before it goes bad,
Wykoff said.
"Planned


VOID
FROM PAGE 1

In 1995, he began his
tenure as a master gar-
dener with the Charlotte
County Extension
Service.
It was not until
Watson became a mem-
ber of the Curmudgeon
Club, a group of citizens
whose main purpose is
to make the community
"a better place to live
and work for all," did
his leadership skills and
innovative ideas take
shape.
"He got our website
up and running," John
Hitzel, Curmudgeon
Club member, said. "He
initiated our town hall
meetings where people
could question those
individuals running for
office on all levels of city
and county government.
He treated everybody
with the utmost respect."

I NEWS BRIEF

Draft development
input meeting set
The Charlotte
County Community
Development
Department will hold
a public-input meeting
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Sept. 6 in Room 119 of
the Charlotte County
Administration Center,
18500 Murdock Circle,
Murdock, regarding
the Draft Unified Land
Development Code.
The 10-chapter draft
ULDC will be discussed
over the course of three
months, three chapters
at a time. Chapters 4-6
of the draft ULDC will
be discussed at this
meeting. Each month
there will be a meet-
ing for gathering input
from the public, fol-
lowed by a roundtable
meeting (which, for
September, will be held
Sept. 18) to discuss
those issues identified
during the public-input
meeting.
All interested parties
are invited to partici-
pate in both monthly
meetings. Citizens that
raised issues during
the public-input
meeting should be


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replacements are always
better," he said.
Wykoff emphasized,
however, that the list
of improvements is
like a menu, allowing
the city to pick and
choose which projects to
complete.
"I think your report is
extremely comprehen-
sive," Mayor Bill Albers
said atWednesday's City
Council meeting. "And

Tricia Duffy, Charlotte
County commissioner
for District 5, knew
Watson for six years. She
was impressed by his
knowledge and expertise
on numerous subjects.
"He was very bright
and very well-informed,"
she said. "We had
numerous discussions
pertaining to issues
that affected Charlotte
County. He was just an
all-around good guy
and good leader of the
Curmudgeon Club."
Watson sincerely
cared about the welfare
of Charlotte County. It
was evident when he
wrote a column in the
Sun or was a guest on
Ken Lovejoy's radio show
Charlotte County Speaks
onWCCF 1580 AM for
the past seven years.
"Dale was a gentle
giant," Lovejoy said. "He
always had informative
answers and a smile
on his face. He gave so
much of himself."


from my viewpoint,
it seems the city has
already made some very
good decisions."
Beginning last year,
ConEd surveyed 16 city
facilities and a number
of parks, providing an
energy analysis on all
of the city's energy- and
water-consuming
systems. Wykoff ex-
plained that with special
energy-analysis software

When the topic of vot-
ing in elections arose,
Watson was passionate
about the subject. In a
Sun article published on
Oct. 6, 2012, he wrote:
"Read all you can in the
news and glean every-
thing you can about
the candidate of your
choice. And believe me,
your vote does count!"
Although Watson
posed the hard ques-
tions, he was well-
respected by those
in Charlotte County
government.
"I never considered
him an anti-local
government agent but
rather someone that
challenged government
priorities as well as one
who supported local ini-
tiatives that resulted in
a positive future vision
of Charlotte County,"
Ray Sandrock, county
administrator, said.
"Dale was one of those
people that when he had
a suggestion, it merited


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as well as interviews with
personnel, ConEd can
determine the exact cost
and amount of energy
used by each compo-
nent, and how much
would be saved.
"This project is greater
than the sum of its parts.
We look at how it all goes
together," he said. "Really,
it's a holistic project."
If the city gives the go-
ahead, ConEd would bid

consideration. Dale will
be sorely missed as a
very positive influence
in Charlotte County
government."
Tony Biell, vice
president of the
Curmudgeon Club, said
that Watson's format for
town hall meetings will
be followed.
"He was a smart guy
and a real gentleman,"
he said. "He ran a good
meeting. The procedures
that he established were
excellent. He was a real
contributor to Charlotte
County and his work will
continue through the
Curmudgeon Club."


IAIA






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out all the necessary work [ LINi I iU F'
and oversee the project.
In the coming weeks, Gerid of the clutter,
city staff will draw up a
list of priorities from the
many options presented,
then City Council will
decide whether to turn
the audit into a project.
"We think there is some 'p
stuff here that we really I
should do," said Howard L: L
Kunik, city manager.
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:The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


F -1-7 T.7.


C OurTown Page 3


i


I


FROM PAGE ONE


IVTTuTrln nn il Imp










Gasparilla Inn hiring for season


By TOM CHANG
STAFF WRITER
BOCA GRANDE The
Gasparilla Inn & Club
is hoping to hire up to
50 people for the coming
winter season at a job
fair from 4 to 7 p.m.
Sept. 11 at 500 Palm
Ave., Boca Grande.
The inn's president
and general manager


Jack Damioli said he
doesn't discriminate
when it comes to bring-
ing in new faces to the
Inn. As long as you're
dedicated and hard-
working, he has a place
for you.
"When we find a
qualified candidates,
we'll find places for
them," he said. "We
believe in hiring warm


and welcoming people
and we can train for
job-specific skills."
The inn has been
holding the job fairs at
the beginning and in the
middle of season for the
last four years, Damioli
said.
Kim Pulaskie, director
of human resources at
the inn, said they have
100 people on staff year


round and up to 325 dur-
ing the season that runs
from October to July.
"All four of our depart-
ment managers will be
on-site," Pulaskie said.
Damioli said they will
be looking for a variety
of positions including
painters, custodians,
housekeeping, golf staff,
hospitality and serv-
ers, among others. The


candidate maybe placed
accordingly based on the
interview.
"If we can hire
30 to 50 people from
this job fair, I would
consider that a success,"
Damioli said. "People
should bring their
r6sum6 and be mindful
of appearance like any
job interview."
Pulaskie said


candidates should
make appointments so
organizers can gauge the
number of applicants.
"We're looking to hire
a mix of part time, full
time and seasonal,"
Damioli said.
For more information,
visit www.the-gasparilla-
inn.com, or call
941-964-4570.
Email: tchang@sun-herald.com


Desoto OKs motor coach development


By STEVE BAUER
STAFF WRITER
The DeSoto County
Commission voted 4-1
to approve the rezoning
of nearly 58 acres in the
Sunnybreeze community
to allow the development
of a proposed motor
coach resort.
The vote allows for
rezoning of the property
from Residential Single
Family 3 to a Planned
Unit Development,
which will allow de-
veloper Barry Poole to
build and sell more than
100 fee-simple, deed-
restricted and platted
lots that would house
luxury motor coach
homes on what was once
a nine-hole golf course
between Sunnybreeze
and Liverpool, destroyed


by Hurricane Charley in
2004.
The move was not
without its share of
controversy, however.
Sunnybreeze residents
packed the board's
chamber room, with those
in favor and opposed to
the development sitting
on opposite sides of the
room. Those opposed to
the motor coach com-
munity expressed fears
the development would
destroy their views,
adversely affect property
values, produce heavy
road traffic and become a
low-end RV campground
if it were ever abandoned
by Poole.
Poole's attorney,
GeriWaksler, gave a
PowerPoint presentation
to the board, outlining
Poole's intentions to


ensure his resort is in
complete compliance
with any restrictions
the board chooses to
place on it. She assured
the board it would have
complete control of the
future of the site if Poole
chose to go in a different
direction with the plan.
"If this were to ever be
abandoned, someone
wouldn't just be able to
come in here and start
up their own RV park,"
she said. "This develop-
ment is a deed-restricted
community with platted
lots that are privately
owned. That person
would have to come
back before the board to
change that, and it would
have to be rezoned, so
the county has complete
control over this."
Waksler also pointed


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The developer of Pelican Creek Motor Coach Resort notes the individual properties would be
privately owned, not rented, and could include a small cabin. Drives would be shell, gravel or
concrete, not asphalt, and homesites would be professionally landscaped.


out the development
will not resemble a
traditional RV park; it will
not have community
pool, campfires or other
amenities typically asso-
ciated with a traditional
resort. She said Poole will
create a six-foot berm
between all lots abutting
Sunnybreeze properties,
along with any other
restrictions ordered by
the board. Unlike a
traditional RV park, here
the lots would be owned
by individuals and could


SUMMIT
FROM PAGE 1

and three teachers union
representatives, along
with various other state
education leaders and
stakeholders.
The summit aimed to
address issues in Florida's
accountability measures
for schools, including the
A-to-F grading system
with which schools cur-
rently are measured. That
system has drawn criti-
cism because it relies on
high-stakes tests, which
have changed frequently
over the years with
negative consequences
for Charlotte County
schools. This year, 12 out

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not be rented out.
Waksler's presentation
wasn't enough to change
the minds of several
Sunnybreeze residents,
who expressed their
concerns to the board.
One resident staunchly
opposed to the develop-
ment, Charles Caldwell,
was convinced it's only
a matter of time before
the development will be
accepting daily, monthly
and seasonal lots.
"Why destroy us, why
here?" he asked. "You're

of 14 elementary and
middle schools in the
county dropped a letter
grade.
Whittaker calls it a
"broken system." He said
his main concern with
the summit, which was
supposed to be a forum
on fixing the system, is
that some of the mem-
bers attending it have a
stake in preserving the
status quo.
"Why would you
bring to the party
(state) Senator (John)
Thrasher (R-St.
Augustine), who was
involved from the
beginning in creating
the current system, and
(former) Governor (Jeb)
Bush's representative
Patricia Levesque, who
has adamantly support-
ed the current system
and wants to make it
even more Draconian?"
he asked rhetorically.
Bryan Bouton, presi-
dent of the Charlotte
Florida Education
Association, the local
chapter of the teach-
ers union, is equally
skeptical.
"What they did up
there," said Bouton,
"was they stacked the
agenda, because there
were only (about) eight
people from the world of
education."
Because he thinks edu-
cators were underrepre-
sented, Bouton doesn't
believe the summit will
produce any meaningful
change.
"If you're looking for
any kind of real change?
No. If you're looking for
cosmetic changes? Very
possibly, but they'll be
just that. Cosmetic, like
changing eyeliner. It's
not going to do you any
good."
However, within
the generally dubious
outlook of the Charlotte
County school district,
there is some positivity.
Before getting a chance


going to make a decision
that will benefit one per-
son, but you'll be doing it
at the expense of the com-
munity. I will not live in a
county that won't respect
my property rights."
Another resident
claimed the water pres-
sure in her home would
be adversely affected
by the addition of 100
motor coach sites, and
she also worried about
the possibility of sink-
holes because of the new
construction.

to read a draft summary
of the summit's conclu-
sions, Lee Swift, chair-
man of the Charlotte
County School Board,
also was concerned
about the summit being
too inclusive for its own
good.
"There were (about)
36 people," Swift rea-
soned, "and if you figured
each one of them was
going to get 10 minutes
to speak, that's six hours
of yapping right there."
However, after receiv-
ing the summary, Swift
feels slightly more
optimistic.
"(The document) fairly
accurately represents
some of the problems
with the entire standards
and assessment system
and with the grading
system, and I think, in
broad terms, addresses
some ways that need to
be taken to fix them," he
said.
According to Swift, the
document made helpful
suggestions to facilitate
the introduction of
the new curriculum,
Common Core stan-
dards, such as stressing
the importance of more
professional develop-
ment for teachers to
help get them familiar
with the curriculum. It
also discussed the pos-
sibility of pulling out of
a test for Common Core
that has many educators
and school officials,
including Swift, worried.
All in all, Swift said
the document "doesn't
go quite as far as I
would like to see," but
that, at least, it shows
that the summit is tak-
ing the issue of Florida's
accountability system
seriously.
"They recognized there
was a problem, and they
have to try and fix it
sooner rather than later,"
Swift said.

Email: iross@sun-herald.com


:Our Town Page 4


C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE





The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 5


Bigs, Littles celebrate



back-to-school


SUN PHOTOS BY CHRIS PORTER
The Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Suncoast held a special
back-to-school craft day at Port Charlotte Town Center mall on
Wednesday. Lee-Aunna Williams, 7, works on a bookmark with
her Big Sister Kristin Kern.


Rhonda Bowsell works with her"Little Sister" Katie Schenk, 10.


Jo-Angelina Carmelitano, 12, works with BBBS volunteer Sue
Schmitt. Sue, a retired art teacher from California, helps coordi-
nate craft programs for the organization.


Kyiah Baker, 11, and her"Big Sister" Karen Lawson take a break
from snacks and crafts.


At right:
Jo-Angelina
Carmelitano's
friend Jeff had
a special place
at the back-to-
school party.


r


\~ ***~-k-


Pioneer Days taking off this weekend


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD Bart
Tracy hopes for a flo-
tilla of cardboard boats
Saturday.
"This is a fun specta-
tor event," Tracy said
of the cardboard boat
race at Indian Mound
Park that has become
an Englewood tradition
for more than 15 years.
He's hoping for 25 to 35
participants. This year
will be the second year
the cardboard boat race
will include a separate
"Paddlepalooza" com-
petition for stand-up
paddle-boarders.
Registration will be
8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Saturday
at Indian Mound Park.
Entry fees are $5 for
paddle boarders, free
for children 10 years
old or younger, $20 for
ages 11 to 15 and $25 for
entrants 16 and older.
The entry fees, Tracy
said, help to offset half
the permit and other
costs to stage the boat
race. His Lasbury Tracy
Realty and the Englewood
Area Board of Realtors
pick up the remaining
costs.
Tips on how to build
a cardboard boat can be
found at www.engle
woodpioneerdays.com.
The boat race is only
one of the many activities


_- :.
SUN FILE PHOTO
The "we love cow" girls Kayla Vaughan and Mariah Hacksunda row their boat the Floating Cow
at last year's Pioneer Days cardboard boat races. This year's event takes to the water at 9 a.m.
Saturday.


planned for this weekend.
Other events spanning
the three-day Labor Day
weekend include:
Shipwrecked in
Englewood, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Englewood
Elks Lodge 2378, 401 N.
Indiana Ave. Adult dance
and costume contests.
$15 per person.
Kids Fish-A-Thon,
Sunday, on the public
fishing pier at Tom Adams
Bridge on Beach Road.
Registration, 7 a.m.; fish-
ing starts at 8 a.m.
Diaper Derby, Sunday
at the Lemon Bay
Woman's Club, 51 North


Maple St. Registration,
2 p.m.
Art Open House, free
tours of the Hermitage
Artist Retreat, 6660
Manasota Key Road,
adjacent to the Sarasota
County Blind Pass Beach,
1 to 4 p.m. Sunday.
Pioneer Days Festival
Kickoff, 2 to 9 p.m.
Sunday at Pioneer and
Garrett Parks on West
Dearborn Street. Live
music, kids' and other
activities, vendors and
crafts, beer, food and
other refreshments.
The festival continues
Monday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.


Kids Mad Hatter Run
for kids 17 and under
at 8:30 a.m. Monday, at
the at the corner of West
Dearborn Street and
McCall Road. Popsicles
and medallions will be
presented after the race.
Pioneer Days Parade,
9 a.m. Monday along
Old Englewood Road at
Artists Avenue and West
Dearborn Street to McCall
Road.
For more information
on events, visit www.
englewoodpioneerdays.
com or call Chris Phelps
at 941-474-8700.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Assembly
committee to meet
The Charlotte
Assembly Steering
Committee will meet
from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday in Room B-106
of the Charlotte County
Administration Center,
18500 Murdock Circle,
Murdock. The public is
invited, but there will be
no public input.

Spend 'Tuesdays
with Woody'
The Charlotte County
Library System, a division
of the Charlotte County
Community Services
Department, announced


"Tuesdays with Woody,"
a monthlong retrospec-
tive series on the films of
Woody Allen. The movies
will run at 6 p.m. every
Tuesday in September
at the Mid-County
Regional Library, 2050
Forrest Nelson Blvd., Port
Charlotte.
The selected films
and dates are: Tuesday,
"Love and Death";
Sept. 10, "Annie Hall";
Sept. 17, "Hannah
and her Sisters"; and
Sept. 24, "Crimes and
Misdemeanors." In addi-
tion to screening four of
Allen's films, this series
also will discuss his con-
tribution as a filmmaker,
as well as examining


common themes in
many of his movies.
This program is free
and open to the public.
No reservations needed.
For more information
about all Community
Services programs
and events, visit www.
CharlotteCountyFL.gov,
and select "Library" from
the links on the left.

Free cruise with
new library card
The Charlotte County
Library System, a division
of Community Services,
announced that during
the month of September,
anyone who signs up
for a new library card


will receive a certificate
good for a free sunset
cruise with King Fisher
Fleet at Fishermen's
Village in Punta Gorda.
These certificates must
be used before Oct. 30,
and reservations are
recommended.
People can sign up
for a new library card
at any county library. If
you need assistance in
locating your nearest
library, call 941-613-3200,
or check online at www.
CharlotteCountyFL.gov,
and select the "Library"
link. For additional
information about King
Fisher Fleet, call 941-
639-0969, or visit www.
kingfisherfleet.com.


I OBITUARIES




John Kenneth McCarthy, 64, of Port
Charlotte, Fla., passed away Friday, .
June 21, 2013, in Port Charlotte. *
Military honors by the U.S. Navy and '
interment will be held at 11 a.m. Friday,
Oct. 11, 2013, at Sarasota National Cemetery.
Friends may visit online at www.robersonfh.com
to sign the guestbook and extend condolences to
the family.
Arrangements are by Roberson Funeral Home,
Port Charlotte Chapel.


CHARLOTTE

Donald Day
Armstrong
Donald Day
Armstrong, 84, of Punta
Gorda, Fla., passed
away Friday, Aug. 23,
2013. Arrangements are
by Charlotte Memorial
Funeral Home, Cemetery
and Crematory of Punta
Gorda.

Nina J. Piazza
Nina J. Piazza, 90,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away peacefully
Wednesday, Aug. 28,
2013. Arrangements are
by Roberson Funeral
Home & Crematory, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Willie Cleve
Powell Sr.
Willie Cleve Powell Sr.,
62, of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
closed his eyes in his
last sleep
Sunday,
Aug. 25,
2013,
cradled in
the arms of
his loving,
devoted
wife.
:. He was born
"' Oct. 29, 1950,
'"' in Greenville,
Ala., to Eddie
and Zettie Powell.
Willie had a strong
desire to serve his
country; he joined the
U.S. Army Dec. 15, 1976.
He served in the Gulf
War, Jan. 15, 1991. Willie
was honorably dis-
charged March 9, 2005,
with numerous medals,
badges, citations and
campaign ribbons. His
military education in-
cluded as a Train Crew
member and a Basic
Noncommissioned
Officer Course; his pri-
mary specialties were
Train Crew member,
Equipment Records,
Parts Specialist and
Cannon Crew member.
He truly loved being a
serviceman and serving
his country.
All who knew Willie
knew him affection-
ately as "Rabbit"; he
was a jokester who
loved pulling pranks.
He was fun and loved
being with his family
and friends. Willie's
greatest musical idol
was Sam Cooke. His
memory will forever
live in the hearts and
minds of everyone who
knew and loved him.
Willie leaves to
cherish his memory his
beautiful, loving, caring
and devoted wife,
Kathryn, who is left
with a void that cannot
be filled; eight children;
nine grandchildren;
three great-grand-
children; four sisters;
two god-sisters; two
brothers; two aunts;
five sisters-in-law; five
brothers-in-law; and a


host of nieces, neph-
ews, cousins, and other
sorrowing relatives and
friends. He was pre-
ceded in death by his
son, Willie Cleve Powell
Jr.; siblings, Mattie and
Willie Kal Thornton;
and his parents.
Visitation is from
5 p.m. to 7 p.m. today,
Friday, Aug. 30, 2013,
at Hickson Funeral
Home Chapel, 142 S.
Orange Ave., Arcadia,
Fla. The funeral ser-
vice is set for 11 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 31,
2013, at House of God
Church, 200 S. Alabama
Ave., Arcadia. Burial
will take place at Oak
Ridge Cemetery.
Arrangements are by
Hickson Funeral Home
and Cremation Services
of Arcadia.

Ruth Stewart
Ursillo
Ruth Stewart Ursillo,
86, of Port Charlotte,
Fla., passed away
Monday, Aug. 26, 2013.
Arrangements are by
Coral Ridge Funeral
Home and Cemetery of
Cape Coral, Fla.

ENGLEWOOD
There were no deaths
reported in Englewood
Thursday.

NORTH PORT

Artie M. Angus
Artie M. Angus of
North Port, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Aug. 29,
2013. Arrangements are
by Farley Funeral Home
of North Port.

Angela M.
Smietana
Angela M. Smietana of
North Port, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, Aug. 27,
2013. Arrangements are
by Farley Funeral Home
of North Port.

DESOTO
There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Thursday.



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In Loving Memories must be
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Saturday through Monday publi-
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of the U.S. Armed Forces. Please
send emails to obituaries@
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JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
www.j ameswmallonee.com
(941) 206-2223






Our Town Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME
3112


8/30/13
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health -
Davis Orthopedic located at
1951B Tamiami Trail, in the Coun-
ty of Charlotte, in the City of Port
Charlotte, Florida 33948 intends
to register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA Physician
Management, LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933573
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health -
Neurologic Services located at
713 E. Marion Ave #129, in the
County of Charlotte, in the City of
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950
intends to register the said name
with the Division of Corporations
of the Florida Department of
State, Tallahassee, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA Physician
Management, LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933584
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health -
Seabreeze Behavioral Medicine
located at 3191 Harbor Blvd
Suite A, in the County of Char-
lotte, in the City of Port Charlotte,
Florida 33952 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA Physician
Management, LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933581
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health
Heart Institute located at 809 E.
Marion Ave, in the County of Char-
lotte, in the City of Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA. LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933556
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health
Home Infusion located at 809 E.
Marion Ave, in the County of Char-
lotte, in the City of Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA. LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933551
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Ba front Health
Neurosciences located at 809 E.
Marion Ave, in the County of Char-
lotte, in the City of Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA. LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933562
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that


the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health
Orthopedics located at 809 E.
Marion Ave, in the County of Char-
lotte, in the City of Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA. LLC


FICTITIOUS NAME
z ^3112


Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933559

Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health
Robotics Institute located at 809
E. Marion Ave, in the County of
Charlotte, in the City of Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950 intends to
register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA. LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933566
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health
Wellness & Rehab located at 733
E. Olympia Ave, in the County of
Charlotte, in the City of Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950 intends to
register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA. LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933546
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bayfront Health
Wound Care & Hyperbaric Center
located at 25097 Olympia Ave, in
the County of Charlotte, in the
City of Punta Gorda, Florida
33950 intends to register the
said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA. LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933541
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Joint &
Spine Academy located at 809 E.
Marion Ave, in the County of Char-
lotte, in the City of Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August, 2013.
/s/ Punta Gorda HMA. LLC
Publish: August 30, 2013
317666 2933571

L NOTICE OF ACTION



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION: CIVIL
CASE NO.: 2010-DR-548
In Re: the Marriage of:
William A. Jenks,
Petitioner/Former Husband,
vs.
Irma E. Jenks,
Respondent/Former Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Respondent,
Irma E. Jenks:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Supple-
mental Petition for Modification of
the Final Judgment entered in the
above-styled cause on June 22,
2010 has been filed against you,
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Sandra Sanders, the
Petitioner's attorney, whose
address is 207 E. Magnolia
Street, Suite 6, Arcadia, Florida
34266, on or before September
13, 2013 and file the original with
the clerk of this court either
before service on the plaintiff's
attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
Date on August 13, 2013
MITZIE MCGAVIC
Clerk of the Court
By: Marlene Harris
as Deputy Clerk
PUBLISHED 8/16/13, 8/23/13,
8/30/13 & 9/6/13
117280 2928094

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTNE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09003115CA
SEC.:
CITIMORTGAGE, INC., AS SUC-
CESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN
AMRO MORTGAGE. GROUP, INC.,
Plaintiff,


v.
KIMBERLY G. BROWN; MICHAEL
F. BROWN; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; CITIFI-


L NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

NANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES,
INC.; AND THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, ON BEHALF OF
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICES.
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated May
28, 2013, entered in Civil Case
No. 09003115CA of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Charlotte County,
Florida, wherein the Clerk of the
Circuit Court will sell to the high-
est bidder for cash on 26th day
of September, 2013, at 11:00
a.m, at website:
https://www.charlotte.realfore-
close.com, relative to the follow-
ing described property as set
forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:
LOTS 537, 538, 539 AND 540,
RIDGE HARBOR ADDITION NO. 4,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 69 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale,
ATTENTION:
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact:
Administrative Services
Manager, Charlotte County
350 E. Marion Avenue
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Phone: (941) 637-2281
DATED AT PUNTA GORDA, FLORI-
DA THIS 13 DAY OF JUNE, 2013.
C.L.G.
BARBARA SCOTT
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Publish: August 23 and 30, 2013
329037 2930690
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09005227CA
SEC.:
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
v.
LINDA M. LOWTHER; JEFFREY J.
KARR; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; AND
TENANT 1 N/K/A CELESTE L.
KARR, ,
Defendantss,
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE TS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated May
28, 2013, entered in Civil Case
No. 09005227CA of the Circuit
Court of the Twentieth Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Charlotte County,
Florida, wherein the Clerk of the
Circuit Court will sell to the high-
est bidder for cash on 26 day of
September, 2013, at 11:00 a.m.
at website: https://www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com, relative
to the following described proper-
ty as set forth in the Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT 25, BLOCK 1474, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION SEC-
TION 34, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 38A
THROUGH 38H, INCLUSIVE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
ATTENTION:
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact:
Administrative Services
Manager, Charlotte County
350 E. Marion Avenue
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Phone: (941) 637-2281
DATED AT PUNTA GORDA, FLORI-
DATHIS 14 DAY OF JUNE, 2013
C.L.G.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Publish:
329037 2930358
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
STATE OF FLORIDA.
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 2010-CA003427
WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL
SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERT BAKER A/K/A ROBERT
V. BAKER; THERESA BAKER
A/K/A THERESA S. BAKER; and
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TEN-


ANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if
a named defendant is deceased,
the personal representatives, the
surviving spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and all other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against that defendant,
and all claimants, persons or par-
ties, natural or corporate, or

To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


I NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

whose exact legal status is
unknown, claiming under any of
the above named or described
defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to the Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in this cause, in the
Circuit Court of Charlotte County,
Florida, I will sell the property sit-
uated in Charlotte County, Florida,
described as:
LOT 20, BLOCK 2760, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 33, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
35A THRU 35F, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Property Address:
22137 Midway Boulevard
Port Charlotte, FL 33952
Parcel I .D.. 402214176001
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, online at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
at 11:00 a.m. on October 9th,
2013.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH
THE CLERK OF COURT WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
DATED this 20 day of June,
2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of Circuit Court
By C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons
needing a special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceed-
ing should contact the A.D.A.
Coordinator not later than seven
(7) days prior to the proceeding
via the Florida Relay Service at 1-
800-955-8771.
Publish: 8/30/13 and 9/6/13
107024 2933311

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 12001615CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARIA ELENA LAVASTIDA-ARTI-
GAS AND RAFAEL LAVASTIDA,
et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated August 20, 2013,
entered in Civil Case No.:
12001615CA of the 20th Judicial
Circuit in Punta Gorda, Charlotte
County, Florida, Barbara T. Scott,
the Clerk of the Court, will sell to
the highest and best bidder for
cash online at WWW.CHAR-
LOTTE.REALFORECLOSE.CO
M, in accordance with Chapter
45 Florida Statutes, at 11:00
A.M. EST on the 18 day of Sep-
tember, 2013 the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 48, BLOCK 4925, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 93, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9,
PAGES 1A THROUGH 1Z4, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens. must file a claim within
60-davs after the sale.
Dated this 26 day of August,
2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: M.B. White
Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTI-
TLED, AT NO COST TO YOU,
TO THE PROVISION OF CER-
TAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT THE ADMINISTRA-
TIVE SERVICES MANAGER,
WHOSE OFFICE IS LOCATED
AT 350 E. MARION AVENUE,
PUNTA GORDA, FLORIDA
33950, AND WHOSE TELE-
PHONE NUMBER IS (941)
637-2281, WITHIN TWO
WORKING DAYS OF YOUR
RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE OR
PLEADING; IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 711.
Publish: 8/30/13 and 9/6/13
322180 2933096
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
CHARLOTiE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO, 08-2013-CA-000423
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MELISSA S. CASEY A/K/A MELIS-
SA SUE CASEY, UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT IN POSSESSION 1,
UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES-
SION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
MELISSA S. CASEY A/K/A MELIS-
SA SUE CASEY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure filed June
11, 2013 entered in Civil Case
No, 08-2013-CA000423 of the
Circuit Court of the Twentieth
Judicial Circuit in and for Char-
lotte County, Punta Gorda, Flori-
da, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com in accor-
dance with Chapter 45 Florida
Statutes at 11:00 AM on the 9
day of October, 2013 on the fol-


S NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

lowing described property as set
forth in said Summary Final Judg-
ment:
Lot 7, Block 68, PORT CHAR-
LOTTE SUBDIVISION, SEC-
TION 5, according to the plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 4, Pages 1A through IP,
inclusive, of the Public
records of Charlotte County,
Florida.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated this 14 day of June,
2013.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court
BY: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: 8/30/13 and 9/6/13
338116 2933475

NOTICE OF
MEETING
o3 3126

JOSHUA WATER CONTROL
DISTRICT (JWCD)
MONTHLY MEETING DATES
FOR 2013/2014
The regular monthly meetings
of Joshua Water Control District
for fiscal year 2013/2014 will be
held on the second Tuesday of
each month at 1:00 p.m.
The Annual Landowners' Meet-
ing will be held on Tuesday,
August 12, 2014, in conjunction
with the regularly scheduled
monthly meeting.
All meetings will be held in the
Joshua Water Control District's
office located at 12008 NE High-
way 70, Arcadia, FL 34266.
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
BY: Dana Clement,
Secretary/Treasurer
863-494-5737

NOTICE OF SALE
L: 3130


FIRST INSERTION NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL
PROPERTY
METRO SELF STORAGE
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned self storage
unit(s) will be sold at a public
sale by competitive bidding, in
their entirety to the highest
bidder, on or after date and
time below to satisfy the lien
of Metro Self Storage for
rental and other charges due
from the undersigned. The
said property has been stored
and generally described
below is located at the respec-
tive address. The sale will
begin at the date and time
below on or after on said date
and will continue hour by hour
until all units are sold. Auc-
tioneer Lic# AU4167 and
AB2825, 10% Buyers Premi-
um.
Tuesday September 10th
2013
9:30 AM
1231 Kings Highway
Port Charlotte, FL. 33980
02004 David M Hemmer
02020 Michael S Orzechowski
05056 Tracey L Coccarelli
09016 Savannah J Gardener,
Savannah J Gardner
10025 Marie Claire Depleche
10112 Britni L Finken
11013 Lori J Piccinini
11096 James Nolan Hendricka Jr
12003 Kimberly Dawn Walther
12024 Percy Lee McDuffy
The contents consist of gener-
al, household and miscella-
neous items. The terms of the
sale will be cash only and
must be paid for at the time of
the sale. All goods are sold as
is. Metro Self Storage
reserves the right to withdraw
any or all units for the sale at
any time. All contents must be
removed within 48 hours or
sooner.
1st Publish Date 08/23/13
2nd Publish Date 08/30/13
108437 2930221
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned will sell, to satisfy
lien of the owner, at public sale by
competitive bidding on Septem-
ber 11. 2013 at 11:00 AM or
thereafter at the Extra Space
Storage facility located at:
23215 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, Florida 33980
941-624-2962
The personal goods stored there-
in by the following may include,
but are not limited to general
household, furniture, boxes,
clothing, and appliances.
1. Unit #61, Chris Mattingly
2. Unit #96, Donnashea Anglin
3. Unit #304, Rob Childress
4. Unit #317, Elizabeth True
5. Unit #446, Latoya Manuel
6. Unit # 957, Tiffany Farris
7 .Unit #974, Grady Gaines
8. Unit #1025, Kimberly
Holmstrom
Purchases must be made with
cash only and paid at the time of
sale. All contents are sold as is
and must be removed at the time
of purchase. Extra Space Stor-


NOTICE OF SALE
Z ^3130


902 Taylor Street
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
941-505-8685
The personal goods stored there-
in by the following may include,
but are not limited to general
household, furniture, boxes,
clothing, and appliances.
1. Unit #311 Jerry Smart
2. Unit #677 Rags to Richie's
Purchases must be made with
cash only and paid at the time of
sale. All contents are sold as is
and must be removed at the time
of purchase. Extra Space Stor-
age reserves the right to bid.
Sale is subject to adjournment.
Publish: August 23 and 30, 2013
327454 2930261


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....

'Find a Pet
VFind a Car
*Find a Job
*Find Garage Sales
./Find A New Employee
*Sell Your Home
*Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service


Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned will sell, to satisfy
lien of the owner, at public sale by
competitive bidding on Wednes-
day, September 11, 2013 at
12:30pm at the Extra Space Stor-
age facility located at:
2080 Tamiami Tr.,
Port Charlotte, FL 33948
(941) 625-3597
The personal goods stored there-
in by the following may include,
but are not limited to general
household, furniture, boxes,
clothes, and appliances.
Unit # Name
818 Nicole Broadwell
Purchases must be made with
cash only and paid at the time of
sale. All goods are sold as is and
must be moved at the time of pur-
chase. Extra Space Storage
reserves the right to refuse any
bid. Sale is subject to adjourn-
ment.
Publish: August 23 and 30, 2013
327465 2930765
PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
(941) 639-4000
AUCTION DATE 9/19/13
AT 10:00 AM
1997 UD
VIN# JNAMA20H5VGK60461
Publish: August 30, 2013
103614 2933186
PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
(941) 639-4000
AUCTION DATE 9/19/13
AT 10:00 AM
1997 UD
VIN# JNAMA20H5VGK60461
Publish: August 30, 2013
103614 2933205

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight

Check the
Classifieds
first!

A Whole
Marketplace

of shopping
is right at

your
fingertips!

Where are the
big ones bitingP

Look in the

FishFinder
every Thursday,

only in
OU~rW Ir A,


age reserves the right to bid.
Sale is subject to adjournment.
Publish: August 23 and 30, 2013
111034 2930229
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned will sell, to satisfy
lien of the owner, at public sale by
competitive bidding on Septem-
ber 11. 2013 at 9:30 AM or
thereafter at the Extra Space
Storage facility located at:


OurTown Page 6 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013





The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


C OurTown Page 7


PORT CHARLOTTE
- An angry boyfriend
has been arrested after
allegedly attacking a man
who required emergency
surgery to save his left
eye, according to the
Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office.
Representatives from
Lee Memorial Hospital
confirmed Friday the
victim was still there but
could not comment on
his condition.
James EdwardWutke,
50, of the 20300 block of
Midway Boulevard in Port
Charlotte, was charged
with aggravated battery
causing great bodily harm
after he hit the victim "in
the face over and over with
his fists" around 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday at a residence
on the 21000 block of
Bersell Avenue in Port
Charlotte, the report shows.
Wutke accused the
49-year-old man of sleep-
ing with his 26-year-old
girlfriend. The victim
told deputies the attacker
threatened he'd kill him if
he went near the woman
again.
The victim was trans-
ported to the trauma unit
at Lee Memorial Hospital
in Fort Myers due to head
lacerations and possible
loss of his left eye unless
he underwent surgery,
according to authorities.
Wutke asked if he could
provide authorities with a
sworn statement blaming
his girlfriend for the attack,
but he changed his mind
after perjury was explained
to him, a report stated.
Wutke was held at
the Charlotte County
Jail without bond. His
criminal arraignment is
set for Oct. 21.

Report: Man turns
himself in for
underage drinking
ENGLEWOOD A
Cape Coral man turned
himself in to authorities
Thursday to face charges
related to an incident in
June in which he ran from
a deputy, according to the
Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office.
William James
Campbell, 20, of Cape
Coral, was with a friend
-Tony Schiel, 20, of
Punta Gorda lying on a
blanket under an umbrella
on the beach drinking
Coronas around 2 p.m.
June 10, the report shows.
A deputy spotted the
men, who tried to hide


the beer, leading the
deputy to suspect they
were underage. Both men
admitted to the deputy
they were 20, according
to the report.
The deputy told them
they were under arrest,
and Campbell allegedly
took off running when the
deputy tried to handcuff
him. The deputy pursued
Campbell and deployed
his Taser, but only one
barb hit Campbell in the
back. Campbell allegedly
continued to flee, so the
deputy applied the Taser
directly to his hip.
Campbell still didn't go
down, and he reportedly
ran into the parking lot
and out of sight.
Schiel was appre-
hended at the scene.
Campbell turned himself
in to authorities Thursday
morning.
Campbell was charged
with possession of alcohol
by a person under 21,
possessing an open
glass bottle in a county
park and resisting arrest.
He was booked at the
Charlotte County Jail and
was being held on $1,750
bond Thursday afternoon.
Campbell turns 21 in
four months.

Report: Man
robbed, arrested
PUNTA GORDA- A
man is charged with
giving a false report to
law enforcement after he
became the victim of an
escort service scheme,
according to the Punta
Gorda Police Department.
Joseph August
Tremblay, 64, of the
29000 block of Gondolier
Avenue in Punta Gorda,
was arrested Thursday
after he told police he
was robbed of $360 and
his cellphone by two men
outside a local restaurant,
according to the report.
An investigation would
show he was robbed, but
it was by a prostitute's
boyfriend during a trip to
Bradenton Thursday.
Police say Tremblay trav-
eled out of the county to
meet with a female escort,
who offers her services
via www.backpage.com.
According to the report,
Tremblay was beaten and
robbed in what is believed


to have been a setup.
Tremblay was being
held Thursday at the
Charlotte County Jail on
$1,000 bond.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
William Paul Foley, 49, 26000
block of Sandhill Blvd., Punta Gorda.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: battery). Bond:
none.
Dylan Ryan Ducolon, 19,11300
block of Third Avenue, Punta Gorda.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
$9,000.
Robert Paul Keen, 18, 2000 block
of Broad Ranch Drive, Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: giving false
information to law enforcement).
Bond: none.
Wilson Jose Ortiz, 19,17900 block
of Murdock Circle, Port Charlotte.
Charge: aggravated battery on a
pregnant victim. Bond: none.
Johnson Lesly Joseph, 32,
20200 block of Midway Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Charge: driving with a
suspended license and abusing a
temporary tag. Bond: $3,000.
Angel Leeanna Bryce, 30,
400 block of Dunn Drive N.E., Port
Charlotte. Charge: failure to appear.
Bond: $6,000.
Shelli Lyn Cook, 56,18600
block of Money Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: failure to appear and viola-
tion of probation (original charge:
disturbing the peace). Bond: none.
Amanda Ashley Kinsolving, 26,
2400 block of Aquilos Court, Port
Charlotte. Charges: two counts of
failure to appear. Bond: none.
Matthew Morgan Gleason, 25, of
Lynchberg, Va. Charges: two counts
of violation of probation (original
charges: trespassing, disorderly
intoxication and resisting an officer).
Bond: $1,000.
Christina Marie Lynk, 29, of Fort
Myers. Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: possession of drug
paraphernalia). Bond: $5,000.
Jeremiah Daniel Cook, 34,
homeless in Port Charlotte. Charge:
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription. Bond: $2,500.
Amy Carol Trammell, 36,
homeless from an unknown area
of Florida. Charges: two counts of
possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription and one count
of drug paraphernalia. Bond: $6,000.
Terry Jefferson Phillips, 59,
21500 block of Olean Blvd. Charge:
failure to appear. Bond: none.
Joseph Adam Cavaleri, 32,
2500 block of Sunshine Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Charge: nonsupport of
dependents. Purge: $436.24.
Linda Marie Anderson, 50, 21500
Olean Blvd., Port Charlotte. Charge:
failure to appear. Bond: $6,000.
Compiled by Adam Kreger


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Scavenger hunt to
be held at park
The Bayshore Labor
Day Scavenger Hunt
will be held from 8 a.m.
to 10 a.m. Monday at
Bayshore Live Oak Park,
23157 Bayshore Road,
Charlotte Harbor. This
free event is open to
children 9 years old and
younger. Registration
will begin at 8 a.m. in
the two-story class-
room. Parents and
grandparents are wel-
come to assist younger
children in finding
treasures in the park.
Prizes will be awarded
for the most items col-
lected within an hour.
For more information,
contact Elizabeth
Spicer at 941-627-1628,
ext. 101, or elizabeth.
spicer@charlotte
fl.com.

POW/MIA


Charlotte Chapter will
hold a commemora-
tive program "Never
Forgotten" in
honor of POW/MIA
Recognition Day,
beginning at 1 p.m.
Sept. 21 in Center
Court at Fishermen's
Village, 1200 W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta
Gorda. It will be
followed by a recep-
tion in the museum,
also at the village.
The keynote speaker
will be retired U.S.
Army Sgt. Maj. Martin
Jordan. The program
includes a reading of
the names of Florida's
missing, an explana-
tion of the POW/MIA
Remembrance Tree,
and the setting of the
"Missing Man" table.
The program and
reception are free and
open to the public. For
more information, call
941-575-9002.


Recognition Day
event Scholarship fund-
.. ...... raiser set


Th ne Military Heritage
Museum and the U.S.
Paratroopers Port


The Third Annual
Scholarship Fundraiser


Banquet, sponsored
by the Benjamin J.
Baker Community
Development Corp., is
set for 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Saturday at the Cultural
Center of Charlotte
County, 2280 Aaron St.,
Port Charlotte. Tickets
are $40 per adult, $70
for a couple, $20 for
youth ages 11 to 17,
and $5 for children ages
10 and younger. They
include dinner catered
by the Cultural Center.
For tickets, contact
the Benjamin J. Baker
organization at 941-
916-0282; or mail a
check or money order
payable to BJBCDC to
P.O. Box 511713, Punta
Gorda, FL 33951-1713
(the tickets will be
held at the front door
of the Music Room at
the Cultural Center).
Anyone also can make
a donation to the event
through the mail;
donations are always
welcome.
For more informa-
tion, call 941-916-0282,
or email benjaminbak-
erCDC@gmail.com.


Report: Man nearly



loses eye in attack


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


Look for a third

crossword in

the Sun Classified

section.

...
***** ***** **** ***** **** ***** **** **** *


ROCK CENTER by Jim Page
Edited by Stanley Newman


ACROSS
1 Swedish
supergroup
5 Hypothetical
missing links
11 Miss Teen
14 Bookish person
15 European capital
16 Paste partner
17 Fight between
feuders
19 Gatsby
portrayer, in
headlines
20 Sign up
21 China setting
22 2001 Ken Burns
subject
23 Glanced
wickedly
25 Go next
27 General Grant
subordinate
32 Erstwhile RCA
products
36 Yard sale
staples
37 Puffed up
38 Unenviable
review
40 Hymn cry
42 Grease pencil
43 Livestock locale
44 Be abundant
45 Gigs
49 One with a
Jersey accent?
50 "Enough
already!"
55 Cunning
58 Pirate hideout,
perhaps
60 John Paul's
court successor
61 What a flat lacks
62 What might
come from
day-spa
speakers


64 Material used in
Jurassic Park
65 Antsy
66 Thin coin
collector
67 What's up
68 Portrait
photographer's
woe
69 Film composer
Zimmer

DOWN
1 Benevolent
backer
2 Onetime Einstein
home
3 Ruffian
4 Sort of snake
5 Corroded
6 Cotton fabric
7 School supplies
8 Endgame action
9 Protect, perhaps


Answer to previous puzzle
MAXIM LABS SCAT
AVILA ERIE LORE
CEILINGFAN AMID
DO G STAMPED
TABLETOP LOUSY
ELAINECRECENT
MOSES COLAS E|W|
PUSS MOTIF TRIO
ODE LURES PABLO
ANT|HAMESEY1D UDE
APHID TEENAGED
DROPSIN PAT
DOUPROTO|ROOTER
MNI K N OXONSET

8/30/13


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Use an updraft,
say
5 Pacific veranda
10 Shoe site
14 la Douce"
15 Mission attacked
by Santa Anna
16 "Betsy's
Wedding"
director
17 Alfred E. Neuman
expression
18 "I can't believe..."
20 See 56-Across
22 Winner of a
record 82 PGA
tournaments
23 Cheer from
Charo
24 Bring down
28 Top
30 Book between
Micah and
Habakkuk
31 See 56-Across
38 Id checker
39 Get up
40 Comparative
suffix
41 See 56-Across
46 Mail at a castle
47 SSA IDs, e.g.
48 Discrimination
49 Gay Nineties, e.g.
52 Catherine of "A
Mighty Wind"
56 Some slogans,
and what 20-, 31-
and 41-Across
are?
59 Response to an
awkwardly timed
call
62 Whiff
63 Bed or bar
attachment
64 Discussion group
65 Actress McClurg
66" these
days..."
67 Signal to a
runner
68 Negative
impression?

DOWN
1 Chorus from
adoring fans
2 Hatch of Utah
3 Nitrogen
compound


By Jeffrey Wechsler 8/30/13


4 Unger player
5 'This skull hath
in the earth
...": Hamlet
6 E'en if
7 passage
8 Knock the socks
off
9 Eastern segment
of the Louisiana
Purchase
10 Purse
11 Unoriginal
12 Tribute in verse
13 Word with flung
or reaching
19 Sumatran ape
21 Put in a word or
two?
25 Win by
26 Ancient
Mesopotamian
kingdom
27 Buffing board
29 Flat-bottomed
boat
31 Brought forth
32 Ancient gathering
place
33 Towers (over)
34 Conciliatory
offering
35 Advice after an
injury, perhaps


Thursday's Puzzle Solved
P I ES OPTS ODDLY
ACNE FREE E C 0 UPE
J AM I EFOXX TX WISTW
ARENAS APRON
MUSER SNOOPDO G G
ASH BAH TWI RLED
P0LI0 AARP
TOB I ASWOL FF
EVI L SHEET
BANKING ERA SES
BRYANBATT REEVE
DICER ANDREW
STOOD LYNNSWANN
YENTL 1 0 NA I PS 0
REESE CNET NEON


(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
36 Real end? 51
37 Commercial sign
42 Targets of many 53D
searches 54
43 Unexpected
pleasure 55
44 Marshy 571
wasteland 58 I
45 Red in the face 59
49 Fanfare v
50 Van Gogh's 60 \
"Starry Night i
Over the _" 61


8/30/13
Nighttime
disorder
Dramatic device
Frankincense or
myrrh
Black-ink entry
Lights-out signal
nferno
Rub the wrong
way
Word of feigned
innocence
Subtle assent


10 "Bad idea"
11 Pac-12 team
12 Egyptian port
13 Complete
18 Oldest Brady
Bunch boy
22 Ridicule
24 Takeout spot
26 Calls strikes
28 Vote (for)
29 Top-shelf
30 Coastal
formation
31 Cheese that
rarely spoils
32 Unspeakably
bad
33 What a violin
rest supports
34 Jingled
35 Hot and humid
39 So
40 Female lobster
41 Conscious of


l- wsda css


www.stanxwords.com
43 Spread all
through
46 Epoch when
mammals
appeared
47 Bawled in an
alley?
48 Ark passenger
51 Wintry mess
52 Silicon Valley
car company
53 Bagel flavoring
54 Written
agreements
55 They're in for
a bit
56 Farm sound
57 Dental
procedure
59 Reminiscent of
meringue
62" iron bars a
cage"
63 Pretty wide






Our Town Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Chris Porter Executive Editor

Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Are purchases a

ray of hope for

Charlotte Harbor?

OUR POSITION: Charlotte
Harbor transactions nice, but no
panacea for redevelopment area.

It would be inviting to inter-
pret the recent sale of the
Banana Bay Hotel as the
beginning of a Charlotte Harbor
rebound, but the reality is more
complicated and less optimis-
tic than that. The purchase
price of $1.3 million is double
what the previous owners paid
back in 2002 and another hotel
property across U.S. 41 recently
changed hands, albeit at a sig-
nificant discount to its pre-bust
price.
The dissimilarities of the two
sales don't end there. Banana
Bay is a popular, operating busi-
ness, while the former Harbour
Inn property, which was sold
to WCU2 Holdings LLC for
$1.74 million in January, is a va-
cant, low-lying mess of a parcel.
WCU2 Holdings Principal John
Gentis also owns the vacant
former Raw Bar property next
door. As the company's name
implies, there is no develop-
ment activity in the offing.
A range of factors affect
potential progress in Charlotte
Harbor, many of them out
of the county's control. For
example, potential developers
must contend with the lack of
a central stormwater manage-
ment system in the flood-prone
area. While some progress has
been made in recent years, the
Charlotte Harbor Community
Redevelopment Area has a
half-dozen drainage projects in
its plans, none of which are cur-
rently funded. On-site stormwa-
ter management requirements
would reduce the amount of
buildable land on any given par-
cel. Given the depressed pric-
ing for condo units and slack
demand for office and retail
space, there is little incentive
for property owners to make
game-changing investments in
mixed-use developments.
The Preserve at Charlotte
Harbor is a good example
of the price pressure. Built
in 2006, the seven-building
condominium project that
straddles Melbourne Avenue
fetched prices ranging from
$400,000 to $660,000 apiece for
three-bedroom units. Buyers
included high-profile athletes
from Great Britain, including
soccer star Wayne Rooney and
PGA Tour star Lee Westwood.
Today, units in the complex are
on the market for $139,000.
The county has provided
incentives for developers, such
as raising height restrictions,
extending sewer lines in the area
and including the district in the
Charlotte County Enterprise
Zone. In addition to the con-
struction of Bayshore Live Oak
Park, the county has completed
design and permitting for its
planned Harborwalk Gateway
project on the north side of the
Barron Collier Bridge (U.S. 41
north). The county could and
should fast-track the construc-
tion by fronting the cost of
the project rather than wait
until 2014 for promised funding
from the state Department of
Transportation.
Another challenge for growth
in Charlotte Harbor is its odd lot
sizes, the result of right of way
easements created to accommo-
date the construction of U.S. 41.
Lot consolidation is likely the
only way a developer could take
advantage of the incredible
waterfront vistas on the western
side of Bayshore Road. County
officials have even floated the
idea of vacating Bayshore Road
where it intersects U.S. 41 as
a way of accommodating any
would-be lot consolidation.
We're pleased to see investor
activity in Charlotte Harbor, but
until market conditions improve


and public infrastructure invest-
ments are made, we expect such
transactions to be hodgepodge
for the foreseeable future.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Eternal voyage
of discovery

Editor:
Jesus would never close the
door on anyone: brown, yellow,
black, white, red, gay, lesbian,
trans-gender, bisexual, prosti-
tute, adulterer, etc.
Is not the church building the
house of the Lord?
Where we worship and
preach the word of God the
Father and the Son and the
Holy Spirit?
Did not Jesus say, who has
seen me has seen the Father
and who believes in me
believes in the Father and the
Father is love? There is but one
commandment, the greatest
of all: "Love God with all of
your heart, soul, mind, and
strength." The second is like the
first: "Love your neighbor as
yourself."
Do your best to love all
his children as yourself and
by daily living the will of the
Father in heaven, we can reveal
him to our fellow men.
Moral worth cannot be de-
rived from mere repression -
obeying the injunction, "Thou
shall not." Fear and shame
are unworthy motivations for
religious living. Religion is valid
only when it reveals the father-
hood of God and enhances the
brotherhood of men. Sodom
and Gomorrah were destroyed
by a natural disaster. God does
not punish, ever. The rest of the
story is fabricated, like many
others in the Bible.
All through the ages, gays
and lesbians have been and
will be born. They are all God's
children and have the right to
love. Like all mortal men they
can choose between "eternal
life or death."
Eternal life is our spiritual
rebirth and the beginning of an
eternal voyage of discovery.
Tina Van Polanen
Placida

Better dress codes
needed at schools

Editor:
I take my granddaughter
to and from school every day,
so I see lots of kids of all ages
representing different schools. I
enjoy seeing these bright-eyed
boys and girls out early board-
ing or waiting for the school
bus, many of them our future
leaders.
However, a few of these
kids don't look like they are


attending school for the right
reason: very short, tight shorts
on the young ladies, some with
tops exposing their tummies;
extremely baggy, oversized
shorts and pants exposing
underwear on the young men,
many wearing tank tops or
muscle shirts.
We all pay taxes to these
schools and I, for one, am
happy to do so and believe
strongly in a great education for
our kids. I wonder how parents
can let these kids out the door
looking like this, and most of
all, why would our schools
allow such inappropriate dress
to enter the school doors?
We've all heard the old-
fashioned expression "dress
for success" and it still applies
today. There is no way the kids
dressed like I've just described
are showing up for school for
the right reason to get an
education.
Are there others out there
that agree with my assessment
and, if so, how can we bring
about a dress code for our
schools which simply means
all students must show up for
school looking respectful and
ready to learn?
I should add for those already
concluding this has anything to
A A --- -


do with race, it does
few inappropriately
students represent a


Another vi
of current af

Editor:
One letter-writer w
not the color of Oban
that's a problem for A
It's the blackness tha
soul and the hollow
heart where there sh
abiding pride and lo
country."
Understandable, I
because he was not r
as an American. He d
to kindergarten and
allegiance to the flag
"The Star-Spangled ]
He didn't sit on Gran
to hear stories about
or the Depression, an
people suffered.
When was the last
remember him saying
anything positive for
Seriously. All the great
seems to be able to d
us even further. His'
ship" is leading our s
the abyss.
Surprising that Co
deemed it necessary
lower himself into th
containing Obama a
good Reverends Jess


Regarding George Zimmerman
shooting Treyvon Martin in
proven self-defense. I thought
he was smarter than that.
Yet still no outrage over the
rash of recent black-on-white
killings in the U.S. and else-
where? Hmm.
Doug Campbell
Venice

Another dream
for country

Editor:
Today, after watching ex-
tensive news coverage of the
50-year anniversary speech
of Dr. Martin Luther King, I
realized with amazement that
in the 237-year history of this
wonderful country, America
has yet to produce a single
white person we honor with
the fanfare we bestow on Dr.
King. However I, too, have a
dream that someday this will
be recognized and corrected.
Bob Filkins
Punta Gorda

Rihanna, Shelton
at old arena site?


not. These Editor:
dressed The old circus arena should
dl races. be made into a music-staging
Josie Burch area. This could attract big
North Port names and bring many wanted
dollars to the area. This, in
turn, could also bring in many
iew homebuyers looking for single-
fa irs family homes or condos.
Let's not waste the area.
Venice could have a big name
vrote, "It's each weekend. Imagine names
ma's skin like Taylor Swift, Blake Shelton,
Americans. Rihanna and for the baby boom-
it fills his ers Jefferson Airplane and others.
ness in his George Murray
would be North Port
ve for this

suppose, Singled out for
raised chicken-keeping
didn't go
pledge Editor:
. Or sing I was recently cited by an
Banner." anonymous complaint to
npa's knee the Charlotte County zoning
t the war, commission for "harboring
nd how chickens in a RE-5 zone." I
have two concerns. The lack
time you of clarity over the prohibition
ig or doing of chickens on RE-5 (5-acre
r America? residential lots), and issues with
at uniter the county's policy to receive
do is divide anonymous complaints.
"leader- The article cited for my
ship into violation is in the Code of
Ordinances, Section 3-9-31. I
lin Powell found nothing in the present
to code that expressly prohibits
ie cesspool chickens, or in my case, chick-
md the ens as pets, in a RE-5 zone.
e and Al. I have kept chickens for six


years. No neighbor within a
half-mile of my property has
any complaints about my
chickens. I asked them. The
anonymous complaint did not
give a reason (smell, noise, etc.)
so in my defense I was unable
to remedy any situation short of
having to remove my chickens
from my property. I say remedy
because others in my neighbor-
hood have chickens, goats, bees,
geese, ducks, llamas and burros,
yet because there were no
complaints against them they
can keep their animals. Why
was I singled out?
The anonymous option vio-
lates my Fourth Amendment
right to know my accuser.
I have been singled out as
the only prohibited chicken-
keeper in the neighborhood.
The county's policy to allow
anonymous complaints assists
the efforts of bullies to harass.
Michelle Roth
Punta Gorda

ATV ordinance
needs a tweak

Editor:
I would like to address North
Port's ATV Ordinance 2009-13,
which states that riders must
have permission from land-
owners to ride on undeveloped
or vacant property, and not
within a half-mile radius of a
residence. This is important to
me, because I'm a 14-year-old
and love riding ATVs.
I have been riding since I
was 4 years old and have never
trespassed and have always re-
spected the law. Unfortunately,
the area I have permission to
ride, is just short of the half-
mile radius law. As you can
imagine, this is torture for me.
I have been following the
Sun articles as to this issue and
have been researching support
organizations such as "We Ride
North Port." It bothers me that
some supporters are not even
North Port residents or taxpay-
ers. But they want to come here
and trespass and destroy our
property, using the excuse that it
will raise money for North Port.
I maybe only 14, but I am
aware of the opposite effect. For
example, in 2012 NBC2 conduct-
ed an investigation of the safety
issues of the RedneckYacht Club.
At that time, $29,000 of unpaid
medical bills were owed to
Charlotte County for transport-
ing people to the hospital.
I wish the current ordinance
could be revised to reduce the
radius down to one-quarter
mile and that nonresidents
would stop complaining about
North Port laws and the police
who are just doing their job
enforcing the ordinance.
Christian Shafer
North Port

Conservatives left
off the podium

Editor:
Where are the Republicans,
the conservatives, heck, even
the Democrats? Why aren't they
making a fuss about the lack
of people like Allen West or
Dr. Ben Carson at the Martin
Luther King celebration? In the
choice of only certain people,
the selection committee served
to divide us further.
Was this not obvious to
anyone in charge? Or for that
matter any of the guests?
Did anyone refuse to speak
because of the clear absence of
conservative blacks? Was the
roster questioned? We don't
know. What we do know is that
the celebration was a biased
representation of black leaders.
I don't think Dr. King would
have been proud of this year's
celebration.
Virginia Sparks
Rotonda West


LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
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OurTown Page 8 C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


,.w R51ESIESO1)'






The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013 VIEWPOINT www.sunnewspapers.net C Our Town Page 9


On Syria, some


ions


T here's a lot of
chest-thumping
certainty over
President Obama and
Syria, on both sides:
He must attack. He
shouldn't. It would
dangerously under-
mine U.S. c',edlihty for
the administration to
remain passive. It risks
sucking the country into
another costly, unwin-
nable conflict.
These confident as-
sertions make no sense.
Yogi Berra was right
about predicting the fu-
ture and he was not
dealing with a situation
as devilishly complex as
Syria and its alleged use
of chemical weapons.
Which leaves me with
more questions than
satisfying answers:
What's the goal, what
isn't the goal, and why?
Obama told the "PBS
NewsHour" Wednesday
that he hadn't made
a decision, but the
intent of any action
would be to "send a
shot across the bow" to
Syrian President Bashar
al-Assad "saying, 'Stop
doing this.'"


Of course, one way to
stop Assad from using
chemical weapons on
his own people would
be to get rid of him. But
administration officials
have simultaneously
made clear that regime
change, although the
ultimate aim, is not the
goal of responding to
the latest attack.
Quite the contrary.
It may not be in the
U.S.' interest to have
the Syrian state,
bloodstained as it is,
simply melt away. It
must eventually be
replaced but, as Obama
intimated in the PBS
interview, post-Assad
anarchy could be even
worse than the intoler-
able status quo:
"In a country that has
the largest stockpile of


chemical weapons in
the world, where over
time, their control over
chemical weapons may
erode, where they're al-
lied to known terrorist
organizations that, in
the past, have targeted
the United States, then
there is a prospect, a
possibility, in which
chemical weapons that
can have devastating
effects could be di-
rected at us."
This argument has
been embedded in the
president's rhetoric
from the start of the
violence in Syria. "We
cannot have a situa-
tion where chemical or
biological weapons are
falling into the hands of
the wrong people," he
said a year ago.
Yet its prominence
is intriguing in the
context of chemical
weapons allegedly be-
ing employed by Assad
himself, not because
they fell into the wrong
hands. When Secretary
of State John Kerry
denounced the weap-
ons attack Monday, he
spoke in humanitarian


terms about the "moral
obscenity" of using
chemical weapons.
Obama's different
focus simultaneously
addresses the issue of
why intervention may
be in the U.S.' interest
and why this attack,
which killed hundreds,
merits a response when
Assad has been respon-
sible for killing tens
of thousands through
other means. And it
could serve to allay the
U.S. public's reluctance
to embark on another
overseas adventure,
stressing self-interest
over purely humanitar-
ian concerns.
How should the ques-
tion of maintaining U.S.
c,'edtihiity be factored
into the decision about
what action to take?
In other words, if the
president hadn't repeat-
edly said that the use of
chemical weapons was
a "red line" and "game
changer," would the
calculus of response be
different?
Obama used those
terms in a calculated ef-
fort to deter Syria from


doing what it has now
apparently done twice.
The implications
of an absent or, more
likely, limp response to
the second, far bloodier
attack extend beyond
Syria. Why, for example,
should Iran take U.S.
warnings about nuclear
weapons seriously if
Obama's threats prove
so empty?
At the same time,
maintaining credibility
seems like a danger-
ously flimsy basis for
military action. Perhaps
a finger on the scale,
but not a sufficient
justification in itself.
What's the reason to
believe that the con-
templated action would
achieve the goal of de-
terring future use? What
happens if it doesn't?
Obama told PBS that
if the U.S. chooses to
impose "repercussions,"
the Assad regime "will
have received a pretty
strong signal that, in
fact, it better not do it
again."
This depends on the
strength of the signal,
and the administration


has miscalculated
before. It thought stern
warnings about red
lines would suffice and
were worth the risk of
drawing them publicly.
Now, assuming Assad
is behind the attack,
he knows the conse-
quences of behaving
badly do not include
regime change. Perhaps
he'll calculate that the
less onerous costs are
sustainable. If we don't
understand why Assad
chose to unleash such
a destructive attack -
and with weapons in-
spectors already in the
country how can we
know that a shot across
the bow will work?
So the crucial ques-
tion becomes: What
happens if it doesn't?
The path to escalation
and quagmire is dis-
turbingly well-marked.
Before taking a step
down it, I'd like to hear
a convincing answer.
Ruth Marcus is a
columnist for The
Washington Post.
Readers may reach her
at marcusr@washpost.
com.


Appropriating King,


but for what?


Now it can be
told: All the
prominent
black Republicans in
America really can fit
into one room.
In fairness, it was a
pretty big room.
Republicans, who
got just 6 percent of
the African-American
vote in 2012, saw this
week's 50th anniversary
celebration of the Rev.
Martin Luther King Jr.'s
March on Washington
passing them by. So
they held their own
commemoration. They
sent an invitation "far
and wide," as one party
official put it, asking
black conservatives to
lunch at party head-
quarters. About 150 ac-
cepted the invitation
for chicken, cheesecake
and cheeky suggestions
that the late civil rights
leader would have
supported the causes of
today's conservatives.
Unfortunately, the
Party of Lincoln discov-
ered that its technical
capability was still
rather 19th century.


The wireless sound
system failed, and the
microphone picked up
only every few words.
The national anthem
became: "O'er the ram-
par ... ah ... ah ... nn ...
oof ... nigh ... that ...
ill ... of the ... ay." The
hymn "Lift Every Voice
and Sing" came out, in
part, like this: "Skies ...
ow ... ow ... ing see ...
aw ... ah ... sing a song
... rah ... nah." Its final
verse went something
like, "Lest our hearts ...
drunk ... vil ... eh ... ub
... eh ... eeh ... shadow
... meeeeee."
As the speakers fired
staccato fragments of
the speeches at the par-
ticipants, techs scurried
to repair the system, an
RNC official sighed and


the droning of a power
drill on a nearby floor
added to the mayhem.
"You know,
Republicans can't turn
on a microphone,"
quipped Ada Fisher,
RNC committeewoman
from North Carolina,
when she came onstage
to say the Pledge of
Allegiance.
After a pause, the au-
dio troubles were fixed
for the rest of the event.
But there remained a
good deal of static in
the message that came
out over the next two
hours. Those speaking
to the group agreed
on the desirability of
appropriating King and
the anniversary, but
they proposed different
and contradictory ways.
Robert Brown, who
worked in the Nixon
White House, sug-
gested that King's spirit
might inform leaders in
Congress and the White
House that "this nation
was built on compro-
mise and if we don't
get it all together, we're
going to sink this ship


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and we can't afford to
do that." This received
scattered applause.
A similar response
greeted Rep. Jim
Sensenbrenner, R-Wis.,
who criticized the
Supreme Court decision
that invalidated part of
the Voting Rights Act
and vowed to repair the
law so that it is "imper-
vious to another chal-
lenge that will be filed
by the usual suspects.
I'm with you on that."
The light applause
suggested that most
of those in attendance
were not with him.
But Bob Woodson, a
conservative activist,
got a standing ova-
tion after he said, "We
should not wait for evil
to wear a white face be-
fore we get outraged,"
and urged his listeners
to condemn "corrupt"
black politicians. "I
think if Dr. King were
alive today, he would
step on some of these
sacred issues."
It's anybody's guess
what King would do,
but it seems a bit of

PLEAS

GIVE BLOO

HEP AVLIE


a stretch to think he
would do what T.W.
Shannon, speaker of
the Oklahoma House,
told the audience.
"The key to fulfilling
the dream" of King's, he
said, included "qual-
ity education for all
our children whether
in public or private
schools," a "limited
government" and curb-
ing a "ferocious appetite
for bigger government."
The dream, he went on,
must be protected from
"contaminants of gov-
ernment dependence,
class warfare, socialism
and any other pollutant
that would muzzle the
ring of freedom."
Shannon proceeded
to cite the case of an
Alaska woman who beat
a moose with a shovel
to save her husband -
evidence, he said, of
"the raw heroic nature
of our nation."


RNC officials who
spoke took no position
on the moose, and they
were less creative in
attempting to turn King
into a conservative
Republican. Sharon
Day, RNC co-chairman,
noted that it was a
Republican Congress
that passed the wom-
en's suffrage amend-
ment- in 1919. Reince
Priebus, RNC chairman,
made the requisite
references to the party's
birth and the Great
Emancipator.
"We've lost the
history of this party
because we don't tell
it," he said, "but we're
going to."
Just as soon as he can
get the microphone
working.
Dana Milbank is a
Washington Post colum-
nist. Readers may reach
him at danamilbank@
washpost.com.


f VotedBest Ophthalmologist 2012 824-4500


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CITY OF PUNTA GORDA
326 WEST MARION AVENUE
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33950
The City Council of the City of Punta Gorda, as the governing body of the BURNT
STORE ISLES CANAL MAINTENANCE ASSESSMENT DISTRICT, has tentatively
adopted a budget and levied special assessments on properties in the district for fiscal
year 2013/2014. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the special
assessment will be held on Wednesday, September 4, 2013, at 5:01 p.m., at City Hall,
Council Chambers, 326 West Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida. Any objections of
property owners to an assessment or to the amount thereof will be heard at this public
hearing. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Council, such
person will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose the person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record indicates the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CITY OF PUNTA GORDA
326 WEST MARION AVENUE
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33950
The City Council of the City of Punta Gorda, as the governing body of the PUNTA
GORDA ISLES CANAL MAINTENANCE ASSESSMENT DISTRICT, has tentatively
adopted a budget and levied special assessments on properties in the district for fiscal
year 2013/2014. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the special
assessment will be held on Wednesday, September 4, 2013, at 5:01 p.m., at City Hall,
Council Chambers, 326 West Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida. Any objections of
property owners to an assessment or to the amount thereof will be heard at this public
hearing. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Council, such
person will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose the person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made which record indicates the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
Published Friday, August 30th, 2013 456584


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net C OurTown Page 9


VIEWPOINT





Our TownPage 10 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


VIEWPOINT


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


Obama's limited Syria goals


resident Obama
appears increas-
ingly ready to
launch a military strike
in response to Syr-
ian President Bashar
Assad's apparent use
of chemical weapons
against civilians.
But the goal won't be
to topple the Assad gov-
ernment, even though
Obama has wanted
that outcome for more
than two years. Instead,
White House officials
say, the goal will be
more limited: deter-
rence. The strikes will
be aimed primarily at
deterring Assad from
using chemical weap-
ons again.
But there are other
kinds of deterrence
Obama is hoping for too.
He hopes to deter
other adversaries,
especially Iran, from
concluding that he
doesn't mean it when
he proclaims a "red
line," as he did on
chemical weapons in
Syria last year.
At home, the presi-
dent wants to deter
hawkish critics, led
by Sen. John McCain,


R-Ariz., from pestering
him to do even more.
And Obama hopes
the military can design
the strike in a way that
will deter Assad from
retaliating against U.S.
forces or its allies in the
Middle East.
That's a lot of deter-
rence for any one cam-
paign of missile strikes
to accomplish. Still,
it's important to notice
the larger potential
goals that Obama hasn't
embraced.
Not only is he not
seeking to overthrow
Assad's government
or destroy his armed
forces through U.S.
military action, he's
not even aiming to tip
the balance on Syria's
battlefields decisively
toward the insurgency.
In large part, that's


because the rebels who
are best organized to
take advantage of a
power vacuum at this
point are allied with
al-Qaida, not with us.
McCain and other
hawks have called on
Obama to seize this
moment, when much of
the world is appalled by
Assad's use of chemical
weapons, to intervene
more decisively. The
hawks want Obama to
back up his calls for
Assad's fall with more
direct support for
the rebels, including
continuous operations
by U.S. aircraft (which
is what the deceptively
mild term "no-fly zone"
means in practice).
But that would be
a mistake. Chemical
attacks are an outrage,
but they're not suf-
ficient grounds for the
United States to go to
war. If a no-fly zone
was a bad idea last
month, as military of-
ficers have argued, it's
still a bad idea.
Obama needs to begin
a national conversa-
tion about our inter-
ests in Syria, both to


ensure that war-weary
Americans understand
the reasons a bombing
campaign makes sense
and to limit the pressure
for escalation when the
airstrikes don't end the
war.
Obama made a start
on that conversation
in an interview with
CNN last week, when
he argued that chemi-
cal weapons attacks
touched "core national
interests" in a way that
Syria's conflict had not
before.
He said the United
States has a strong
interest in "making sure
that weapons of mass
destruction are not
proliferating" and also
"to protect our allies
(and) our bases in the
region."
Those things, he
suggested, were worth
fighting for. And though
the United States has
other goals in Syria,
including the protec-
tion of civilians and
Assad's fall, they don't
rise to the level of core
interests, and so are not
worth going to war over.
But the president still


needs to explain his
larger strategy, and how
a bombing operation is
connected to it.
Administration of-
ficials insist that they
do have a grand design
in Syria, even if it hasn't
been notably success-
ful so far. The strategy,
adopted this year after
months of internal
debate, is to train and
equip moderate, pro-
Western factions among
the rebels, and hope
they grow in effective-
ness and influence.
The goal is to help
those rebels tip the
balance in their own
favor, not only in the
war against the Assad
government but also
within the opposition
against factions allied
with al-Qaida.
The best-case scenar-
io is that the govern-
ment will grow weaker,
the moderate rebels
will grow stronger, and
members of those two
camps will agree to a
truce leading to a new
government.
But the moderates
haven't grown strong
enough to exert much


weight yet, either on
the battlefield or in
political negotiations.
That means U.S.
strategy, for now, is
focused primarily on a
narrower, less inspir-
ing goal: preventing
victory for either the
Assad government or
for the al-Qaida camp.
Deterrence, if you like.
As a result, Obama's
immediate goal is to
keep the crisis over
chemical weapons lim-
ited, and to deter Assad
from using them again.
His medium-term goal
is to keep the Syrian civil
war within manageable
bounds in hopes that the
pro-Western rebels will
gain strength.
It's not a promising
picture. The war could
continue for years,
claiming more dead on
all sides. And, in the end,
the moderates may lose.
But the alternatives all
look worse. Deterrence
may be the least bad
option there is.
Doyle McManus is a
columnist for The Los
Angeles Times. Readers
may reach him at doyle.
mcmanus@latimes. com.


One brainy idea to unlock the mystery


Fifty years from
now, when Malia
and Sasha are
grandmothers, their fa-
ther's presidency might
seem most consequen-
tial because of a small
sum $100 million -
for studying something
small. "As humans,"
Barack Obama said
when announcing the
initiative to study the
brain, "we can iden-
tify galaxies light-years
away ... but we still
haven't unlocked the
mystery of the three
pounds of matter that
sits between our ears."
Actually, understand-
ing the brain will be
a resounding success
without unlocking
the essential mystery,
which is: How does
matter become con-
scious of itself? Or
should we say, how
does it become or
acquire conscious-
ness? Just trying to
describe this subject
takes scientists onto
intellectual terrain long
occupied by phi-
losophers. Those whose
field is the philosophy
of the mind will learn
from scientists such as


Princeton's David Tank,
a leader of the BRAIN
Initiative, which aims
at understanding how
brain regions and cells
work together, moment
to moment, throughout
our lives.
If, as is said, a
physicist is an atom's
way of knowing about
atoms, then a neuro-
scientist like Tank is
a brain cell's way of
knowing about brain
cells. Each of us has
about 100 billion of
those, each of which
communicates with an
average of 10,000 other
nerve cells. The goal
of neuroscientists is
to discover how these
neural conversations
give rise to a thought, a
memory or a decision.
And to understand how
the brain functions,
from which we may


understand disorders
such as autism, schizo-
phrenia and epilepsy.
Biological causes
have been determined
for only about 3 percent
of the disorders listed
in the Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of
Mental Disorders. With
"mapping," scientists
may at last establish
connections between
neurotransmitters
and particular mental
disorders. This might
influence how phar-
maceutical companies
direct their research.
And treatments of
post-traumatic stress
disorders might benefit
from learning how the
mind erases disturbing
memories.
Understanding the
brain is, Tank says, dif-
ferent from the Human
Genome Project.
The latter simply
sequenced, and made
straightforward extrap-
olations, concerning a
well-defined group of
3.1 billion "letters" that
comprise the "alpha-
bet" that determines
the growth of a human
being from a single cell
to a complex human


being. We are learning
what each letter does, if
not yet how. In the case
of the brain, "mapping"
is not just trying to
ascertain what particu-
lar parts of the brain do
in response to external
events, but how the
brain parts engage in
"conversation" with
each other, and how
they can change over
time.
Much brain activ-
ity much thinking
- is not, Tank notes,
the result of external
stimuli. So, is the brain
conversing with act-
ing upon itself? This
internal conversation
is at the core of who -
and what we are.
New technologies
enable scientists to
watch the brain in ac-
tion, monitoring neural
activity as it thinks.
Even a decades-old
technology, functional
magnetic resonance
imaging (fMRI) reveals,
Tank says, "what parts
of the brain are active
in particular computa-
tions and behaviors."
In 50 years, fMRI im-
ages will seem as crude
as Magellan's maps.


We will understand
thought processes with
instantaneous cellular
resolution, and hence
the essence of what
brains do, and what
derails them.
Development of the
transistor, progeni-
tor of the Digital Age,
required only advances
in materials science.
There is, Tank says,
"no comparable base
of knowledge for the
brain" because there
is no mechanistic
understanding of
how the brain works.
Pharmacology is grop-
ing for therapeutic ef-
fects because drugs tar-
get particular receptors
the workings of which
are not understood. To
the brain, small pills
can be sledgehammers.
Understanding brain
dynamics will enable
ever more precise
chemical and other
interventions.
If we had to think
about combing our hair
or making toast, we
would never get out of
the house in the morn-
ing. Habits enable us to
function because neu-
rons are "conversing"


with networks involving
thousands of other
cells. But ethicists -
and courts, and poets
- will be warily watch-
ing what is learned
about the neural basis
of choices, habits, love
and other important
things.
Do we have bodies
or are we bodies? What
will become of the
field of psychology as
explorations of brain
anatomy advances
our understanding of
how brain architecture
influences, or even
determines, behavior?
"The devil made me
do it" is no longer
an exculpation. But
what about "My brain
circuitry made me do
it?" Someday debates
about free will may
be resolved by under-
standing that we are
responsible for our ac-
tions because we have
"ownership" of three
especially intricate
pounds of matter.
George Will is a
columnist for The
Washington Post.
Readers may reach him
at georgewill@washpost.
com.


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:OurTownPagel2 C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


Puppy obedience classes


After completing his walk around the adult canine area and
following all the commands, 19-month-old Surfman, a Chesa-
peake Bay retriever, is rewarded with a jump, hug and lots of
petting by his human, Karen Hejzlar.


Paris, a Labrador/ridgeback mix, is rewarded with a treat from
Kate Cuthbertson, 10, for sitting on command.


SUN PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS
Lucia Rivadeneira, 9, uses treats to entice Cherio, her 5-month-
old miniature golden doodle, to keep her eyes on her while
walking the length of the puppy training area. Peace River Dog
Fanciers offers dog obedience training at South County Regional
Park.


Denise McGee and Reagan, a 2-year-old Lab mix, take a break
after their obedience training class on Wednesday.
.^ --i^


Kathy Rivadeneira watches as her daughter Anamaria, 6, works
with her miniature golden doodle named Wags during the
puppy training class.


Lila Eaton, 11, reaches into her pocket for treats while walking
her 5-month-old golden doodle, Sadie, during the Puppy
Kindergarten class taught by Susan Sealing on Wednesday
nights.


Frodo, a 4-month-old mini Australian shepherd, keeps his eyes on his human, Debbie Chiraselto,
awaiting the next command and, of course, the next treat.


Loki, a 5-year-old Rottweiler, helps out the adult canine instructor Lynn Gott with the obedience
training.


iOurTown Page 12 C


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE

Stocks post mild gains







Positive news on the U.S.
economy outweighed worries
about Syria Thursday, sending
the stock market higher for a
second straight day.
Page 5 -

Obamacare's
taxing issues


Michelle Singletary discusses
the penalties for those who can
afford health care but choose to
forgo coverage.
Page 7 -

10 things to know

1. Obama readies
possible solo Syria strike
The administration shared intel-
ligence with lawmakers aimed at
convincing them the Syrian government
used chemical weapons. Seepage4.

2. Fast-food workers
protest low wages
Thursday's walkouts and protests
reached about 60 cities, including New
York, Chicago and Detroit, organizers
said. See page 1.

3. Florida comes in
second for lack of
health insurance
According to new U.S. Census figures
released Thursday, almost 1 in 4 Floridians
lack health coverage.Seepage 1.

4. NFL reaches $765M
deal on concussion-
related lawsuits
The agreement would compensate
thousands of retired players suffering
from dementia and other brain disor-
ders they blame on violent collisions.
See Sports page 1.

5. Why Tylenol caps
are getting new
warning labels
Overdoses from acetaminophen
send 55,000 to 80,000 people to the
emergency room in the U.S. each year
and kill at least 500. Seepage 7.

6. Biden renews call
for gun control
But the vice president's pledge
to seek legislative fixes faces grim
prospects amid the current climate on
Capitol Hill. See page 7.

7. Report: Scott
not enforcing
environmental laws
The Public Employees for
Environmental Responsibility report says
that since Scott took office and Secretary
Herschel Vinyard took over DEP in 2011,
enforcement has dropped by just about
every measure. Seepage 1.

8. Banks earn record
$42.2B in 2nd quarter
Banks' losses on loans tumbled
30.7 percent from a year earlier to
$14.2 billion, the lowest in six years.
And bank lending increased 1 percent
from the first quarter. See page 4.

9. How being short on
cash can make your
brain slower
A study finds that people worrying
about paying bills tend to temporarily
lose the equivalent of 13 IQ points.
See page 7.

10. Tampa church
evicts Boy Scout troop
A Tampa church has told a Boy Scout
troop that it won't renew its sponsor-
ship because of the national organiza-
tion's decision not to ban openly gay
Scouts. See page 2.


Wil





h e tj re www. sunnewspapers. net
FRIDAY AUGUST 30, 2013



UN chemical probe nears end


Defiant Assad vows 'Syria will defend itself


By ALBERT AJI and RYAN LUCAS
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
DAMASCUS, Syria-
President Bashar Assad
vowed Thursday that "Syria
will defend itself" against
Western military strikes over a
suspected chemical weapons
attack, and the U.N. said
inspectors will leave within
48 hours carrying information


that could be crucial to what
happens next.
British Prime Minister David
Cameron argued strongly for
military intervention in Syria
but was rejected in a prelimi-
nary vote in Parliament, while
French defense officials said
openly for the first time that
their military is preparing for a
possible operation. The Obama
administration was briefing


congressional leaders about its
case for attacking Syria.
The U.S., Britain and France
blame Assad's regime for the al-
leged chemical weapons attack
Aug. 21 on rebel-held suburbs
of Damascus. The Syrian gov-
ernment denies the allegations,
saying rebels staged the attack
to frame the regime.
At the United Nations, a
meeting of the permanent


members of the Security
Council on the Syrian crisis
ended after less than an hour
after being convened by
Russia, a staunch ally of the
Assad regime.
As Western leaders made
their case at home for interven-
ing in Syria's 3-year-old civil
war, Assad remained defiant.
ASSAD 14


AP PHOTOS
Protesting fast-food workers fill a McDonald's restaurant on New York's Fifth Avenue, Thursday. Thousands of fast-food workers staged walkouts in dozens
of cities around the country Thursday, as part of a push to get chains such as McDonald's, Taco Bell and Wendy's to pay workers higher wages.


Fast-food workers protest low


By CANDICE CHOI
AP FOOD INDUSTRY WRITER
NEWYORK Fast-food
workers and their supporters
beat drums, blew whistles and
chanted slogans Thursday on
picket lines in dozens of U.S.
cities, marking the largest
protests yet in their quest for
higher wages.
The nationwide day of dem-
onstrations came after similar
actions organized by unions and
community groups over the past
several months. Workers are
calling for the right to union-
ize without interference from
employers and for pay of $15 an
hour. That's more than double
the federal minimum wage of


$7.25 an hour, or $15,000 a year
for full-time employees.
Thursday's walkouts and
protests reached about 60
cities, including NewYork,
Chicago and Detroit, orga-
nizers said. But the turnout
varied significantly. Some
targeted restaurants were
temporarily unable to do
business because they had
too few employees, and others
seemingly operated normally.
Ryan Carter, a 29-year-old
who bought a $1 cup of coffee
at a New York McDonald's
where protesters gathered,
said he "absolutely" supported
the demand for higher wages.
PROTEST 14


David Atten, right, joins others in demonstrating as he presses a sign to
the window of a Church's Chicken during a one-day strike coinciding with
strikes at other fast-food restaurants across the country, Thursday.


Group: Environmental


laws not enforced


under Scott


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
TALLAHASSEE -
Enforcement of the state's
environmental laws has
plummeted under Gov. Rick
Scott and the private company
attorney he picked to lead the
Department of Environmental
Protection, according to a
report to be released Thursday
by a group that represents
government workers who work
in environmental regulation.
The Public Employees for
Environmental Responsibility
report says that since Scott took
office and Secretary Herschel
Vinyard took over DEP in 2011,
enforcement has dropped by
just about every measure. For
example, DEP opened 1,587
cases in 2010 and 663 last year.


Florida Gov. Rick Scott listens to
protesters July 18, in the Capitol in
Tallahassee.
Similar drops were shown in
consent orders, which dropped
from 1,249 in 2010 to 482 last
year, as well as penalties
assessed and fines collected.
SCOTT| 4


By KELLI KENNEDY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
FORT LAUDERDALE -
Florida had the nation's
second-highest rate of
residents without health
insurance with almost 1 out
of 4 Floridians lacking it, ac-
cording to new U.S. Census
figures released Thursday.
Only Texas surpassed
Florida's rate of 24.8 percent
of residents under age 65
without health insurance in
2011, the most recent year
figures are available, the
Census said.
Although that figure
was down slightly from
2010, when 25.3 percent
of Floridians were without
health insurance, the rate
of uninsured residents


has inched up since 2008,
when just over 24 percent
of Floridians were without
health insurance.
The half-decade spike in
uninsured residents comes
as the Republican-controlled
Legislature ruled earlier this
year not to expand Medicaid
coverage to an estimated
1.1 million low-income
Floridians under the federal
health law.
In an unusual alliance,
Gov. Rick Scott, Senate
Republicans, Democrats,
Florida hospitals, health ad-
vocates and a diverse mix of
business and labor groups all
supported a bill that would
have drawn down more
than $50 billion from the
HEALTH 14


wages


Florida is No. 2


in lack of health


insurance





Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL/STATE NEWS


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


Stronger US growth may



lead Fed to slow bond buys


WASHINGTON (AP) -
A stronger-than-expect-
ed rise in U.S. economic
growth last quarter will
likely strengthen the
hand of Federal Reserve
officials who want to
slow the Fed's bond
purchases next month.
The economy grew at
a 2.5 percent annualized
rate from April through
June, the government
estimated Thursday. That
was more than twice the
growth rate in the first
quarter and far above
an initial estimate of a
1.7 percent rate for April
through June.
The Fed is weighing
key measures of the
economy's health before
it meets Sept. 17-18 to
decide whether to scale


back its $85 billion in
monthly bond purchases.
The Fed's bond buying
has helped keep long-
term borrowing rates near
record lows. A stronger
economy would need less
support from the Fed.
Global financial
markets have been under
pressure over specula-
tion that the Fed will
slow its purchases and
send interest rates in the
United States higher. U.S.
rates have already been
rising in anticipation of
a pullback in Fed bond
buying. But the Fed may
decide the economy is
strengthening enough to
withstand higher rates.
Last quarter's faster
growth "should give Fed
officials more confidence


that the recovery is
gathering steam," said
Paul Ashworth, chief U.S.
economist at Capital
Economics.
Other analysts think
the Fed might decide to
maintain the pace of its
bond buying to help fuel
the economy. They think
Fed officials may con-
clude that the still-subpar
U.S. economy could falter
under the weight of higher
interest rates, a slower
housing rebound or a
messy resolution to a fight
over the federal budget.
Almost everyone agrees
that the biggest factor the
Fed will weigh in decid-
ing whether to slow its
bond buying will come
next week: The employ-
ment data for August


- the final jobs report
before the Fed meets.
On Thursday, the
government upgraded
its estimate of growth
for last quarter mainly
because the U.S. trade
deficit narrowed in
June. That occurred
because U.S. companies
exported more goods
than previously thought
and imported fewer. The
narrower trade gap offset
weaker spending by the
U.S. government.
For the second half of
the year, analysts gener-
ally think the economy
will grow at an an-
nualized rate of around
2.5 percent, fueled by
steady job gains and a
diminished impact from
federal spending cuts.


IRS issues tax rules for married gay couples


WASHINGTON (AP)
- The government on
Thursday said that all le-
gally married gay couples
will be able to file joint
federal tax returns even if
they reside in states that
do not recognize same-
sex marriages.
The decision came
in rules issued by the
Treasury Department
and the Internal Revenue
Service designed to
implement the tax
aspects of the Supreme
Court's decision in June
that invalidated a section
of the 1996 Defense of
Marriage Act.
"Today's ruling pro-
vides certainty and clear,


coherent tax filing guid-
ance for all legally mar-
ried same-sex couples
nationwide," Treasury
Secretary Jacob Lew said
in a statement.
"This ruling assures
legally married same-sex
couples that they can
move freely throughout
the country knowing that
their federal filing status
will not change," Lew
said.
Chad Griffin, president
of the Human Rights
Campaign, the nation's
largest gay rights group,
praised the government's
action.
"With today's ruling,
committed and loving


gay and lesbian married
couples will now be
treated equally under our
nation's federal tax laws,
regardless of what state
they call home," Griffin
said in a statement.
The Treasury said
that with the new rules,
same-sex couples will
be treated as married for
all federal tax purposes
including income and
gift and estate taxes.
The rules will cover
all federal tax provisions
where marriage is a factor
including the taxpayer's
filing status, personal and
dependent exemptions
and standard deductions.
The new rules will


cover any same-sex mar-
riage legally entered into
in any state where such
a marriage is recognized.
It will also cover such
marriages recognized by
U.S. territories, foreign
nations and the District
of Columbia.
The government said
that the statute of limita-
tions for filing a refund
claim was generally three
years from the date the
return was filed or two
years from the date the
tax was paid, whichever
was later. As a result, the
government said that
refund claims can still be
filed for tax years 2010,
2011 and 2012.


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I STATE NEWS BRIEFS


Boeing 787
training site opens
at Miami airport
MIAMI (AP) Demand
for more pilots and tech-
nicians in Latin America,
Africa and Europe led
Boeing to locate its newest
787 Dreamliner training
center in South Florida,
company officials said
Thursday at the launch of
the $160 million facility.
The location adjacent
to Miami International
Airport is more convenient
for airlines in those regions
and allows them to cut
training costs, said Sherry
Carbary, vice president of
Boeing Flight Services. She
said the company expects
about 70 percent of the
5,000 people trained at
the center each year will
come from outside North
America.
Miami, she said, has
become "an international
hub for aviation training.
That's why we're here."
The Miami center joins
other Boeing Dreamliner
training centers in
London, Singapore and
Shanghai. It is the largest
of the four, with 17 flight
simulators total including
two for Dreamliners, and
creates 100 new jobs.

USF students
protest change in
library hours
TAMPA (AP) -
University of South Florida
students are protesting over
not being able to study at
the library late at night.
The school's library
hours have been cut due
to financial reasons.
WMNF Radio reports the
students hope to persuade
the university to return to
its previous schedule. The
students plan a "sit-out"
on Thursday outside the
shuttered library where
they used to do late night
studying on the Tampa
campus.
The library is now open
from 7:30 a.m. until mid-
night on Mondays through
Thursday and until 6 p.m.
on Friday. It was previ-
ously open 24 hours a day,
five days a week.
School officials say
some 400-500 students
would study during the
overnight hours and
more during finals.

Lee Co. Sheriff
upset about
Ludacris concert
FORT MYERS (AP) -
Lee County Sheriff Mike
Scott is upset that Florida
Gulf Coast University has
hired Grammy-winning
rapper Ludacris to head-
line a concert in November
at a county-owned park.
The News-Press of
Fort Myers reports Scott
emailed university presi-
dent Wilson Bradshaw
this week regarding the
November event, called
"Eaglepalooza."
In a series of emails
The News-Press obtained
through public records
requests, Scott challenged
President Wilson Bradshaw
to overrule a student
group's decision to bring
the nationally known rap-
per to Southwest Florida.
"I can't for the life of me
begin to imagine why a
black university president
would sanction such vile
content," Scott wrote.
Scott says Ludacris uses
racial slurs in his songs,
glorifies violence and
sings about illegal drugs.
Rapper Kendrick Lamar is
also scheduled to play.
Scott asked his legal
department whether he
could decline requests for
off-duty deputies to work


security detail, like it did
for a Girls Gone Wild
request, or if it could bill
the university for an enor-
mous manpower demand
by citing "the pattern of
local and national trends
for heightened violence at
these hip-hop shows."


Broward
homeowner shoots
would-be robber
OAKLAND PARK (AP)
- A suspected robber is
in the hospital after being
shot by the Oakland Park
homeowner he was trying
to rob.
The shooting happened
Wednesday night near Fort
Lauderdale after 45-year-
old Kevin Madigan broke
into the home of 73-year-
old Charles Rieckman and
took a television.
The Miami Herald
reports the suspect was
putting the TV in his
getaway car when he saw
a neighbor standing out-
side. He attacked her and
tried to take her phone as
she called authorities to
report the robbery.
Rieckman got his gun
and fired several shots
at Madigan, who got
into the car and drove
away. He crashed a short
distance away.
Deputies say he was
taken to the hospital. His
injuries were unclear.
The sheriff's office
says the shooting will be
treated as justifiable.

Man pleads not
guilty in Miami
Facebook killing
MIAMI (AP) -A man
accused of killing his
wife and then posting a
confession and a bloody
picture of her body on
Facebook has pleaded not
guilty in Florida.
Prosecutors say 31-year-
old Derek Medina fatally
shot 26-year-old Jennifer
Alfonso at their South
Miami townhome earlier
this month. A judge on
Thursday set a tentative
trial date of Nov. 4.
Medina is charged with
second-degree murder,
but The Miami Herald
reports prosecutors will
likely seek a first-degree
murder indictment when
the grand jury returns in
September.
Alfonso's relatives didn't
speak in court Thursday.
Medina's attorney
Sam Zangeneh says his
team hasn't decided on a
defense strategy yet.
Court records indicate
Alfonso was shot six to
eight times during an
argument with Medina.

Tampa
church evicts
Boy Scout troop
TAMPA (AP) -ATampa
church has told a Boy
Scout troop that it won't
renew its sponsorship
because of the national
organization's decision not
to ban openly gay Scouts.
The Holy Trinity
Presbyterian Church
sent a letter to leaders of
the troop this week and
referred to the national
organization's decision.
"We underscore our
grief at the decisions
made by the BSA which
have led to this point,"
the letter said.
In May, Boy Scout del-
egates met in Grapevine,
Texas, and by a 61 percent
margin of 1,400 voters
approved the proposal.
The delegation, however,
stopped short of allowing
gay adults to supervise
the youths.
Brian T. FitzGerald,
former scoutmaster for
Troop 4, said there are
about 120 boys in the
Boy Scout troop and Cub
Scout pack who are being
displaced come Dec. 31.
The troop will need
to find a new sponsor
and a new chartering
organization.
The Tampa Tribune
reports the troop has been
in existence since 1916 and


counts itself among the
oldest in Tampa, and one
of the oldest in the state.
FitzGerald says the troop
has had a continuous char-
ter at the church for the past
60 years, long before Holy
Trinity Presbyterian moved
in about four years ago.


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WIRE Page 3


Friday 6pm-midnight






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE


US banks earn record $42.2B in 2nd quarter


WASHINGTON (AP) -
U.S. banks earned more
from April through June
than during any quarter
on record, aided by a
steep drop in losses from
bad loans.
The Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp. says the
banking industry earned
$42.2 billion in the second
quarter, up 23 percent
from the second quarter
of 2012. About 54 percent
of U.S. banks reported
improved earnings from a
year earlier.


Banks' losses on loans
tumbled 30.7 percent
from a year earlier to
$14.2 billion, the low-
est in six years. And
bank lending increased
1 percent from the first
quarter. Greater lending
helps boost consumer
and business spending,
leading to more jobs and
faster economic growth.
Still, the report shows
that the largest banks
continue to drive the
industry's profits while
smaller institutions


have struggled. Banks
with assets exceeding
$10 billion make up only
1.5 percent of U.S. banks.
Yet they accounted for
about 82 percent of the
industry's earnings in the
April-June quarter.
Those banks include
Bank of America Corp.,
Citigroup Inc., JPMorgan
Chase & Co. and Wells
Fargo & Co. Most have
recovered with help from
federal bailout money
and record-low borrowing
rates.


Overall, FDIC Chairman
Martin Gruenberg said
the second-quarter results
"show a continuation of
the recovery in the bank-
ing industry."
One concern is the re-
cent spike in interest rates.
Rates have risen since
Chairman Ben Bernanke
indicated this spring that
the Federal Reserve could
slow its bond purchases
later this year, if the
economy continues to
show improvement. The
bond purchases have kept


long-term interest rates
low.
Higher interest rates
could have mixed impact
on banks. On one hand,
they make it more expen-
sive for banks to borrow.
But they also enable banks
to charge more for loans.
"It's a tricky balance to
strike," Gruenberg said at
a news conference.
Losses on loans fell to
the lowest level since the
third quarter of 2007. Home
equity loans showed the
greatest declines in losses.


US readies possible solo action against Syria


WASHINGTON (AP) -
President Barack Obama
on Thursday prepared for
the possibility of launching
unilateral American
military action against
Syria within days as Britain
opted out in a stunning
vote by Parliament. Facing
skepticism at home,
too, the administration
shared intelligence with
lawmakers aimed at
convincing them the
Syrian government used
chemical weapons against
its people and must be
punished.
Despite roadblocks
in forming an interna-
tional coalition, Obama



ASSAD
FROM PAGE 1

"Threats to launch a
direct aggression against
Syria will make it more
adherent to its well-
established principles
and sovereign decisions
stemming from the will of
its people, and Syria will
defend itself against any
aggression," he said in
comments reported by the
Syrian state news agency.
It's not clear whether
Assad would retaliate



PROTEST
FROM PAGE 1

"They work harder
than the billionaires in
this city," he said. But
Carter said he didn't plan
to stop his regular trips
to McDonald's.
Jobs in low-wage
industries have led the
economic recovery.
Advocates for a higher
minimum wage say that
makes it crucial that they
pay enough for workers
who support families.



HEALTH
FROM PAGE 1

federal government over
the next decade and allow
Floridians to purchase
private insurance. But
leaders in the GOP-led
Florida House refused to
consider that proposal,
saying they didn't want
to take funds tied to
President Barack Obama's
health care overhaul.
Democrats and health
advocates have since held
town halls around the



SCOTT
FROM PAGE 1

The report said the de-
partment essentially has
become nonfunctional
under Vinyard, who
worked for a shipyard
before Scott appointed
him secretary.
"This is nothing more
than that department
taking a blind eye, looking
the other way when these
facilities pollute," said
Jerry Phillips, director of
Florida PEER. "The mes-
sage is out to the employ-
ees that they should not
be aggressive in this area.


appeared undeterred and
advisers said he would
be willing to retaliate
against Syria on his own.
"The president of the
United States is elected
with the duty to protect
the national security
interests in the United
States of America," White
House spokesman Josh
Earnest said.
Even before the vote
in London, the U.S. was
preparing to act without
formal authorization
from the United Nations,
where Russia has blocked
efforts to seek a resolu-
tion authorizing the use
of force, or from Capitol

against any attacks or try
to ride them out in hopes
of minimizing the threat
to his continued rule.
The U.S. has said regime
change it not the objec-
tive of any military action
it may carry out.
The U.N. experts
have been carrying out
on-site investigations
this week to determine
whether chemical
weapons were used
in the attack that the
group Doctors Without
Borders says killed 355
people. Inspectors visited
the eastern suburb of

The restaurant industry
says it already operates
on thin margins and
insists that sharply higher
wages would lead to
steeper prices for custom-
ers and fewer opportuni-
ties for job seekers.
The drive for better
pay comes as the White
House, some members of
Congress and economists
seek to raise the federal
minimum wage. But most
proposals are for a more
modest increase, with
President Barack Obama
suggesting $9 an hour.
The Service Employees

state pushing Scott to call
a special session to discuss
Medicaid expansion, but
Scott has said he isn't
planning to call one since
House leaders haven't
signaled a change of heart.
House Democratic
Leader Perry Thurston,
D-Fort Lauderdale,
warned in a state-
ment Thursday that
Republicans will play a
political price for failing
to expand Medicaid.
"The Legislature's
failure to expand health
coverage continues to
punish working families


We talk to these employ-
ees, we hear from them
and I haven't heard from
a single employee that
enforcement is better now
under Herschel Vinyard.
It's just the opposite."
DEP said it is taking
its responsibility seri-
ously and said the drop
in cases is because of a
focus on prevention.
"Through outreach ef-
forts such as compliance
training events, site visits
and structured meet-
ings, we are preventing
environmental violations
from ever occurring,"
DEP spokeswoman
Reena O'Brien said.
"By working to increase


Hill. But the U.S. had
expected Britain, a major
ally, to join in the effort.
Top U.S. officials spoke
with certain lawmakers for
more than 90 minutes in a
teleconference Thursday
evening to explain why
they believe Bashar
Assad's government was
the culprit in a suspected
chemical attack last week.
Lawmakers from both
parties have been press-
ing Obama to provide a
legal rationale for military
action and specify objec-
tives, as well as to lay out a
firm case linking Assad to
the attack.
In London, Prime

Zamalka, where they
interviewed survivors
and collected samples.
Amateur video posted
online showed U.N.
inspectors in gas masks
walking through the
rubble of a damaged
building. One inspec-
tor scooped pulverized
debris from the ground,
placed it in a glass con-
tainer and wrapped the
container in a plastic bag.
The video corresponded
to other AP reporting of
the events depicted.
U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon urged

International Union,
which represents more
than 2 million workers
in health care, janitorial
and other industries, has
been providing financial
support and training for
local organizers in the
fast-food strikes around
the country.
Walkouts were also
planned Thursday in
Los Angeles, Milwaukee,
Seattle, St. Louis, Hartford,
Conn., Memphis, Tenn.,
and other cities. Organizers
said they expected thou-
sands of workers and their
allies to turn out, but the

and small businesses
throughout Florida.
Governor Scott and other
Republican leaders who
say they want to improve
Florida's business com-
petitiveness and image
can make great headway
by reducing this state's
abysmally high number
of uninsured," he said.
Florida's large numbers
of small businesses, which
currently aren't required to
provide health insurance,
as well as its tourism-
oriented economy with
large numbers of work-
ers in service jobs have


compliance through
assistance efforts, we are
helping to prevent viola-
tions that can damage
our environment before
they occur."
O'Brien said the com-
pliance rate is at its high-
est ever at 96 percent.
"Over the last two
years, compliance rates
have improved dramati-
cally, resulting in a drop
of enforcement cases and
associated fines," O'Brien
said. "It is clear by this
report that PEER shows a
lack of understanding of
the fundamental goals of
this agency."
Phillips dismissed the
explanation.


Minister David Cameron
argued a military strike
would be legal on humani-
tarian grounds. But he
faced deep pressure from
lawmakers and had already
promised not to undertake
military action until a U.N.
chemical weapons team
on the ground in Syria
released its findings about
the Aug. 21 attack.
The prime minister
said in terse comments
after the vote that while
he believes in a "tough
response" to the use of
chemical weapons, he
would respect the will of
the House of Commons.
Caitlin Hayden,

Western powers to hold
off on any military action
until the experts can
present their findings
to U.N. member states
and the Security Council.
Speaking in Vienna, Ban
said the U.N. team is to
leave Syria on Saturday
morning and will imme-
diately report to him. He
also said that he spoke to
President Barack Obama
about ways to expedite
the U.N. probe.
Some of the experts
will take samples to
laboratories in Europe
after leaving Damascus,

number of actual partici-
pants was unclear.
In New York, City
Council speaker and may-
oral candidate Christine
Quinn joined about
300 to 400 workers and
supporters in a march
before the group flooded
into a McDonald's
near the Empire State
Building. Shortly after the
demonstration, however,
the restaurant seemed to
be operating normally,
and a few customers said
they hadn't heard of the
movement. The same was
true at a McDonald's a

contributed to its historic
high rate of the uninsured.
That will change
under the Affordable
Care Act, which requires
business with 50 or
more employees to offer
coverage. But the Obama
administration recently
announced it would
delay that provision for
another year. The law
also requires individuals
to carry health coverage
starting in 2014 or face a
roughly $100 fine.
Individuals can still go
online and shop for insur-
ance on the new state


"If you are to believe
that all of these facilities
suddenly decided that
with Rick Scott and
Herschel Vinyard in that
they were suddenly going
to comply with their
permits is laughable," he
said. "They've been very
open that they've been
trying to basically kill
enforcement and that's
what they're achieving."
The report comes as
Scott has increasingly
been trying to position
himself as strong on the
environment as he seeks
re-election. On Wednesday,
Scott announced a
$90 million commit-
ment for an Everglades


Obama's National Security
Council spokeswoman,
said the U.S. would
continue to consult with
Britain but Obama would
make decisions based on
"the best interests of the
United States."
It was not certain the
U.S. would have to act
alone. France announced
that its armed forces "have
been put in position to
respond" if President
Francois Hollande com-
mits forces to intervention
against Syria. Hollande
does not need French
parliamentary approval to
launch military action that
lasts less than four months.

according to U.N. spokes-
man Farhan Haq, adding
that the team's final
report will depend on the
lab results and could take
"more than days."
The mandate of the
U.N. team is to deter-
mine whether chemical
agents were used in the
attack, not who was
responsible. But Haq
suggested that evidence
collected by investigators
- including biological
samples and interviews
- might give an indica-
tion of who was behind
the attack.

few blocks away.
In Atlanta, a TV station
showed customers and
workers in a McDonald's
going about their busi-
ness as protesters read
a statement inside the
restaurant.
The lack of public
awareness illustrates the
challenge workers face in
building wider support.
Workers participating
in the strikes represent
a tiny fraction of the
industry. And fast-food
jobs are known for their
high turnover rates and
relatively young workers.

exchange starting Oct 1.
The new marketplaces will
have the feel of an online
travel site where residents
can compare different
private insurance plans.
Consumers will be able
to choose from plans that
offer a range of premiums,
deductibles and co-pays
depending on variables
such as how many
doctors that a person
wants included in his or
her network. Residents
making less than $48,000
a year will receive a federal
voucher to help offset
premium costs.


project and last week
announced a $40 million
commitment to a project
to help treat nutrient-rich
water pouring out of Lake
Okeechobee into rivers to
the south.
But Scott has also made
it clear he wants to cut
regulations and make
Florida as business-friend-
ly as he can, and when he
appointed Vinyard, Scott
said he has "a passion for
job creation."
"Hypocritical is
being very kind for the
governor, and I think
it's entirely because he's
running for re-election,"
Phillips said. "He can't
run from these numbers."


ALMANAC

Today is Friday, Aug. 30, the
242nd day of 2013. There are
123 days left in the year.
Today in history
On Aug. 30,1983, Guion S.
Bluford Jr. became the first black
American astronaut to travel in
space as he blasted off aboard
the Challenger.
On this date
In 1861, Union Gen. John C.
Fremont instituted martial law
in Missouri and declared slaves
there to be free. (However,
Fremont's emancipation order
was countermanded by President
Abraham Lincoln).
In 1862, Confederate forces
won victories against the Union
at the Second Battle of Bull Run
in Manassas, Va., and the Battle
of Richmond in Kentucky.
In 1905, Ty Cobb made his
major-league debut as a player
for the Detroit Tigers, hitting
a double in his first at-bat in a
game against the New York High-
landers. (The Tigers won, 5-3.)
In 1941, during World War II,
German forces approaching
Leningrad cut off the remaining
rail line out of the city.
In 1945, Gen. Douglas
MacArthur arrived in Japan to set
up Allied occupation headquarters.
In 1963, the"Hot Line"
communications link between
Washington and Moscow went
into operation.
In 1967, the Senate confirmed
the appointment of Thurgood
Marshall as the first black justice
on the U.S. Supreme Court.
In 1991, Azerbaijan declared
its independence, joining the
stampede of republics seeking to
secede from the Soviet Union.
In 1997, Americans received
word of the car crash in Paris
that claimed the lives of Princess
Diana, Dodi Fayed and their
driver, Henri Paul. (Because
of the time difference, it
was Aug. 31 where the crash
occurred.)

Today's birthdays
Actor Bill Daily is 86. Actress
Elizabeth Ashley is 74. Actor
Ben Jones is 72. Cartoonist
R. Crumb is 70. Olympic gold
medal skier Jean-Claude Killy
is 70. Actress Peggy Lipton is
66. Comedian Lewis Black is 65.
Actor Timothy Bottoms is 62.
Actor David Paymer is 59. Jazz
musician Gerald Albright is
56. Actor Michael Chiklis is 50.
Music producer Robert Clivilles
is 49. Actress Michael Michele
is 47. Rock singer-musician Lars
Frederiksen (Rancid) is 42.
Actress Cameron Diaz is 41.
Rock musician Leon Caffrey
(Space) is 40. TV personality Lisa
Ling is 40. Rock singer-musician
Aaron Barrett (Reel Big Fish)
is 39. Actor Michael Gladis is
36. Rock musician Matt Taul
(Tantric; Days of the New) is 35.
Tennis player Andy Roddick is
31. Rock musician Ryan Ross is
27. Actor Cameron Finley is 26.


Police in Calif.
city warning of
snake scam
FREMONT, Calif.
(AP) Police in a San
Francisco Bay Area city
are warning residents
to be wary of burglary
suspects who are
posing as city animal
control employees
looking for a snake.
Fremont police
spokeswoman Geneva
Bosques says the un-
known suspects struck at
least once on Saturday.
They told the residents
of a home that they were
looking for a poisonous
snake that had bitten a
girl, and needed to come
inside to set traps and
take measurements.
While the residents
were distracted in the
backyard, someone
went into the home
and stole jewelry and
cash. Bosques did not
know the value of what
was taken.
Police are investigat-
ing what appears to be
a second burglary in
Fremont on Saturday
using the same scheme,
and Bosques says the
incidents sound similar
to a recent burglary in
neighboring Union City.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE






The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page5


Stocks post mild gains


NEW YORK (AP) -
Positive news on the U.S.
economy outweighed
worries about Syria
Thursday, sending the
stock market higher for a
second straight day.
The Dow Jones
industrial average added
16.44 points, or 0.1 per-
cent, to 14,840.95, while
the Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 3.2 points, or
0.2 percent, to 1,638.17.
The Nasdaq composite
posted a bigger gain, ris-
ing 27 points, or 0.8 per-
cent, to 3,620.30.
The Dow has gained
64 points over the past two
days, not nearly enough to


make up for its 170-point
loss Tuesday as tensions
over Syria rattled markets.
Verizon
Communications was the
biggest gainer among the
blue chips after Britain's
Vodafone confirmed it
was in talks with Verizon
to sell its 45 percent stake
in their joint venture,
Verizon Wireless.
Verizon rose $1.26, or
2.7 percent, to $47.82.
The U.S.-listed shares of
Vodafone rose $2.39, or
8.1 percent, to $31.80.
While many fund
managers said they're not
looking to jump back into
the market just yet, some


individual companies are
looking attractive again.
"If you're a long-term
investor, it's an opportu-
nity," said Richard Sichel,
chief investment officer
at Philadelphia Trust Co.,
which has $1.9 billion
under management. He
noted a new investment,
the retail chain PetSmart,
as an example.
Wayne Wilbanks, chief
investment officer at
the asset management
firmWilbanks, Smith &
Thomas, said the market
might have fallen too
quickly. He also cautioned
that the gains from the
last two days may not last.


(Bloomberg) Gold
retreated the most in
more than two weeks
Thursday as better-than-
expected U.S. economic
data reinforced the case
for the Federal Reserve to
slow stimulus measures.
U.S. gross domestic
product expanded
2.5 percent in the
second quarter, up
from an earlier esti-
mate of 1.7 percent, a
Commerce Department
report showed. Initial
jobless claims dropped
to 331,000 in the past


week from 337,000 a
week earlier, the Labor
Department said. Gold
rose to a three-month
high Wednesday on
concern that the U.S. and
its allies will launch a
military strike in retali-
ation for Syria's alleged
use of chemical weapons.
"The GDP numbers
are very big, and put
the story of tapering in
September back in the
forefront," Chris Gaffney,
the senior market
Strategist at EverBank
Wealth Management, said


in a telephone interview
from St. Louis. "The
drumming of the Syria
war has receded today,
taking some premium
away."
Gold futures for
December delivery fell
0.4 percent to settle at
$1,412.90 an ounce at
1:55 p.m. on the Comex
in New York, the big-
gest drop since Aug. 13.
The precious metal has
tumbled 16 percent this
year on speculation that
the Fed will slow the pace
of the stimulus.


Namack named a 2013 Five Star wealth manager


N amack Portfolio
Investment Pro-
fessionals, an in-
dependent financial advi-
sory firm with offices in
North Port and Lakewood
Ranch, announces that
its managing principal,
Wendy B. Namack, a cer-
tified financial planner,
has been named a 2013
Five Star wealth manager
by Five Star Professional,
in conjunction with
"Sarasota Magazine,"
for overall client satis-
faction. This year, less
than 7 percent of wealth
managers in the Sara-
sota area were named to
the list, and Namack is
a consistent, multi-year
Five Star award winner,
having earned the ac-
colade since 2010. Now in
her 18th year as a finan-
cial adviser, Namack is
securities and insurance
licensed, and is registered
to practice in 17 states.
Her sole focus has been
helping professionals,
business owners, indi-
viduals and their families
maintain their financial


lifestyle and pursue their
vision, goals, interests
and aspirations.


Tuffy Tire & Auto
Service has a new motto,
"Done Right Period or
We'll Fix It For Free." Only
Tuffy offers a full range of
automotive services with
a one-year/12,000-mile
guarantee on parts and
labor at any store, and
one year of complimen-
tary roadside assistance.
The work will be "done
right period," or the
business will fix it for
free. Tuffy likes to call it
"anywherecare." Visit one
of the convenient area
locations, or www.Tuffy.
com. For more informa-
tion, call the North Port


Tuffy at 941-423-3211 or
visit 14970 Tamiami Trail,
northwest of Sumter
Boulevard. Hours there
are from 7:30 a.m. to
6 p.m. Monday to Friday,
and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday.


Medical Gardens
Hearing Center is proud
to give back to the com-
munities that have sup-
ported its mission for the
past 37 years by spon-
soring a Hearing Aid
Giveaway contest. This
fall, the center will give
one deserving individual
with hearing impairment
the opportunity to win
a pair of digital hearing
aid devices, valued at
$6,990. Between Monday
and Oct. 31, Medical
Gardens will accept
entries through regular
mail, email and on its
Facebook page. Those
interested may submit an
essay of up to 300 words
explaining "How hearing
aids will enhance my (or
my loved one's) life."
Participants must be


18 or older, and should
include their contact in-
formation. The giveaway
is open to all hearing-
impaired residents in
Venice, Englewood, North
Port and Port Charlotte.
Letters may be submit-
ted to: Medical Gardens
Hearing Center, 5900 Pan
American Blvd., Suite
102, North Port, FL 34287.
Email nominations may
be sent to contest@
hear2help.com.


Florida's personal injury
protection, or PIP, law
changed in 2013, requir-
ing an injured policyhold-
er or his family to go to
the ER or to see a doctor/
chiropractor within
14 days of a car accident
- whether the injury
occurred in the family
car or as a passenger in
someone else's car or
lose the right to treatment
under the PIP "no-fault"
policy. To assist you,
Affordable Chiropractor's
Sharon Epperson,
D.C., now accepts PIP/
no-fault injury cases


seven days a week, by
appointment. Affordable
Chiropractor is located at
531 Tamiami Trail (Florida
West Plaza), in northern
Port Charlotte. For more
information, call 941-
286-3498, or visit www.
chirowellcare.com.

Dr. MatthewW.
Kelcourse is the new
owner and primary
veterinarian of Angel
Animal Clinic, 14500
Tamiami Trail, North Port.
In addition to adding a
state-of-the-art, full in-
house diagnostic labora-
tory and digital radiology
lab to create a full-service
general practice, the
clinic also is expanding its
office hours and adding
additional services, such
as orthopedic and spinal
surgery. Appointments
are preferred, but
walk-ins are always
welcome. New hours of
operation are: 8 a.m. to
6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday;
and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday and Saturday.


For more information,
call 941-426-5700.

The Wellness
Sanctuary is owned by
massage therapist Jessica
Breden. She has been a
licensed massage thera-
pist for three and a half
years, and is certified in
neuromuscular and Thai
massage. Thai massage
involves stretching on
a mat on the floor. The
Wellness Sanctuary also
offers hot-stone, Swedish,
deep-tissue, prenatal and
sports massages, and
operates by appointment
only. The sanctuary will
customize your session
for you, whether you
suffer from migraines,
back pain or just the
stress of everyday life. For
more information, call
941-286-7525, or www.
YourWellnessSanctuary.
com.
Steve Sachkar is the
publisher of the North
Port Sun. Email him at
ssachkar@sun-herald.
com, or fax business infor-
mation to 941-429-3007.


MutualFunds


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EqGrow b 30.09 +.12 +6.9
RetInc b 8.57 +.02 +4.4
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 8.25 +.08 +8.1
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 47.65 +.58 +12.9
AllianzGI
WellnessD b 32.46 +.14 +10.6
Alpine
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DynDiv d 3.52 +.02 -2.1
Amana
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American Beacon
LgCpVlls 25.99 +.08 +7.6
American Cent
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HiYIdMu 8.68 -.02 +3.5
InTTxFBInv 11.07 -.01 +4.0
American Century
Eqlnclnv 8.61 ... +6.8
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Ultralnv 30.70 +.17 +8.2
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TaxEBdAmA m 12.21 -.01 +4.3
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Artisan
Intl d 27.13 +.03 +4.8
IntlVal d 35.51 +.11 +10.5
MdCpVal 25.43 +.07 +10.4
MidCap 45.25 +.30 +11.7
BBH
TaxEflEq d 19.95 ... +9.9
Baron
Asset b 58.69 +.30 +7.3
Growth b 65.16 +.38 +9.8
Partners b 28.47 +.11 +7.2
Berkshire
Focus d 17.49 +.14 +16.0
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 14.13 -.14 -3.5
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EqDivl 21.91 +.03 +6.3
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GlobAIcC m 19.36 +.02 +4.3
GlobAlcl 20.93 +.02 +5.3
HiYldBdls 8.07 +.02 +10.9
HiYldSvc b 8.07 +.01 +10.5
Bruce
Bruce 426.63 +2.18 +10.6
CGM
Focus 34.74 +.39 -5.5
Clipper
Clipper 81.45 +.08 +7.4


Cohen & Steers
Realty 64.20 -.01 +5.9
Columbia
AcomlntZ 43.63 +.28 +6.8
AcomZ 35.05 +.25 +9.2
DivlncZ 16.80 +.04 +8.2
IntlVIB m 13.39 +.02 -0.2
Mar21CB m 14.84 +.11 +2.6
MarGrlA m 25.00 +.16 +6.4
DFA
lYrFblnl 10.32 ... +1.4
2YrGIbFII 10.04 ... +1.6
5YrGIbFII 10.98 +.01 +4.0
EmMkCrEql 17.98 +.19 +3.6
EmMktVall 26.09 +.22 +1.7
IntSmCapl 17.85 +.02 +5.4
RelEstScl 26.06 +.01 +5.4
USCorEqll 14.67 +.05 +8.5
USCorEq21 14.56 +.06 +8.6
USLgCo 12.96 +.02 +7.4
USLgVall 27.67 +.05 +8.1
USMicrol 18.07 +.20 +10.0
USSmVall 32.26 +30 +10.0
USSmalll 27.89 +.26 +11.1
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.24 -.01 +3.4
EqDivB m 38.45 +.10 +2.2
GIbOA m 42.78 +.38 +6.1
GIbOB m 37.90 +.33 +5.3
GIbOC m 38.16 +.33 +5.3
GIbOS d 44.18 +.38 +6.4
GrlncS 21.49 +.08 +7.6
HIthCareS d 33.47 +.20 +10.9
LAEqS d 27.18 -.11 -4.9
LC2020S 14.42 +.04 +3.8
StrHiYldTxFS 11.68 -.03 +4.5
Davis
NYVentA m 38.15 +.19 +5.3
NYVentY 38.60 +.19 +5.6
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.25 +.01 +6.8
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEql 11.44 -.01 +3.4
IntlSCol 17.50 +.01 +5.6
IntlValul 17.76 +.01 +1.7
Dodge & Cox
Bal 89.07 +.16 +7.4
Income 13.48 +.02 +6.7
IntlStk 37.86 +.06 +3.4
Stock 146.27 +.33 +6.9
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 10.90 ... NA
Dreyfus
Apprecialnv 47.27 -.06 +6.0
MidCapldx 34.25 +.15 +9.3
MuniBd 11.01 -.01 +3.8
NYTaxEBd 14.23 -.02 +3.8
ShTrmlncD 10.60 ... +3.7
SmCoVal 35.36 +.32 +15.6
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 12.02 +.03 +2.5
TMSmCaB m 18.57 +.14 +4.0
FMI
CommStk 27.73 +.09 +10.5
LgCap 19.95 +.02 +8.4
FPA
Capital d 44.21 -.01 +8.6
Cres d 31.57 +.09 +7.7
Newlnc d 10.41 +.01 +2.5
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 37.33 +.22 +6.0
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.68 ... +9.9
IntSmMCoA m 43.20 +.36 +2.7
KaufmanA m 6.06 +.06 +4.9
MDTMdCpGrStB m 37.16+.18+3.0
StrVall x 5.46 ... +7.5
Fidelity
AstMgr2O 13.25 +.02 +5.1


AstMgr50 17.33
Bal 21.91
BIChGrow 59.25
Canada d 54.21
CapApr 34.52
Caplnc d 9.45
Contra 89.07
DivGrow 34.63
Divrlntl d 32.59
EmergAsia d 27.61
EmgMkt d 21.38
Eqlnc 54.11
Eqlnc II 22.30
FF2015 12.29
FF2035 12.66
FF2040 8.90
Fidelity 38.45
FltRtHiln d 9.94
FocStk 18.14
FourlnOne 32.68
Free2000 12.39
Free2010 14.75
Free2020 15.01
Free2025 12.67
Free2030 15.33
GNMA 11.25
GrowCo 112.49
Growlnc 25.07
Hilnc d 9.19
Indepndnc 31.01
IntRelEst d 10.04
IntlDisc d 36.03
InvGrdBd 7.65
LatinAm d 36.46
LevCoSt d 38.66
LowPdStk d 47.31
Magellan 85.97
MeCpSto 13.92
MidCap d 35.70
Munilnc d 12.51
NewMille 36.40
NewMktln d 15.65
OTC 79.20
Overseas d 35.79
Puritan 21.04
ShTmBond 8.55
SmCapDisc d 28.74
Stratlnc 10.33
TaxFrB d 10.81
TotalBd 10.48
USBdldx 11.37
USBdldxlnv 11.37
Value 92.15
ValueDis 19.44
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 65.10
IntBondA m 11.34
IntBondB m 11.32
IntlCapAB m 11.39
LrgCapA m 25.28
LrgCapB m 23.64
NewlnsA m 26.41
Newlnsl 26.78
StratlncA m 12.08
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 163.07
Electron d 56.25
Energy d 58.68
Godd d 23.88
Leisure d 119.54
Materials d 77.26
MedDeliv d 67.81
MedEqSys d 33.84
NatGas d 35.37
NatRes d 36.33
Wireless d 9.14
Fidelity Spartan
5001dxAdvtg 58.25
5001dxlnstl 58.25
5001dxlnv 58.24
ExtMktldAg d 48.24
IntlldxAdg d 37.15
TotMktldAg d 48.29


+.05 +6.4
+.06 +6.6
+.41 +10.4
+.27 -0.4
+.23 +9.5
+.02 +10.7
+.35 +7.9
+.14 +8.1
+.11 +1.4
+.47 +2.4
+.35 -1.6
+.15 +5.9
+.02 +5.0
+.03 +5.1
+.03 +4.9
+.02 +4.7
+.17 +5.2
+.01 +5.0
+.10 +9.0
+.06 +6.1
+.02 +4.0
+.03 +5.1
+.03 +4.8
+.03 +5.2
+.04 +4.7
+.02 +5.0
+.90 +10.2
+.07 +4.0
+.01 +9.7
+.24 +4.4
... +4.0
+.11 +2.5
+.01 +5.6
-.11 -4.7
+.24 +5.8
+.18 +10.7
+.38 +3.1
+.04 +8.6
+.24 +9.2
... +4.3
+.25 +10.5
+.02 +9.0
+.72 +12.3
+.02 +1.0
+.08 +7.1
... +2.4
+.15 +17.2
+7.7
... +4.5
+.01 +6.3
+.02 NA
+.01 +4.7
+.24 +7.5
+.04 +6.3

+.52 +5.6
... +5.1
... +4.3
+.07 +4.3
+.10 +10.3
+.09 +9.4
+.13 +7.3
+.13 +7.6
... +7.5
+2.11 +19.5
+.40 +8.9
-.57 -0.1
-.04 -3.8
+.61 +15.0
+.25 +8.5
+.37 +12.2
+.16 +7.7
-.30 -3.4
-.23 +0.1
+.16 +7.7
+.12 +7.4
+.12 NA
+.12 +7.3
+.34 +9.9
-.02 +2.1
+.15 +7.8


First Eagle
GIbA m 52.15 +.05 +7.9
OverseasA m 23.04 +.02 +6.8
First Investors
GlobalA m 7.70 +.01 +3.9
TotalRetA m 18.21 +.06 +7.7
Firsthand
e-Comm 7.01 +.07 +12.9
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 11.59 -.01 +4.2
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.82 ... +4.2
EqlnA m 20.53 +.02 +7.0
FLTFA m 10.70 +.02 +3.2
GrOppA m 25.90 +.22 +8.3
GrowthA m 57.40 +.20 +7.3
HYTFA m 9.69 ... +4.5
Income C m 2.32 ... +6.8
IncomeA m 2.30 ... +7.4
IncomeAdv 2.28 -.01 +7.5
NYTFA m 11.08 +.01 +3.5
RisDvA m 44.11 +.08 +8.5
StrlncA m 10.36 ... +7.3
TotalRetA m 9.83 +.01 +6.2
USGovA m 6.49 +.01 +4.1
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 32.71 +.15 +7.1
DiscovA m 32.22 +.15 +6.8
SharesZ 26.11 +.10 +6.1
SharesA m 25.87 +.10 +5.8
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 12.70 +.02 +8.2
GIBondA m 12.68 +.02 +8.7
GIBondAdv 12.64 +.02 +8.9
GrowthA m 22.34 +.05 +4.8
WordA m 18.16 +.05 +6.1
GE
S&SUSEq 53.43 +.19 +7.0
GMO
EmgMktsVI d 10.28 +.07 +0.4
IntltVllV 22.67 ... +0.7
Quill 24.83 +.02 +8.1
QuVI 24.85 +.02 +8.3
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 60.77 +.21 +8.8
EqlncomeAAA m 26.05+.05 +7.8
Value m 18.07 +.09 +9.9
Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.20 +.01 +9.6
MidCpVals 46.83 +.17 +8.3
ShDuGovA m 10.18 ... +2.1
Harbor
Bond 11.96 +.02 +6.4
CapAplnst 49.36 +.33 +8.6
Intllnstl 65.55 -.10 +3.6
Intllnv b 64.78 -.10 +3.3
Hartford
CapAprA m 42.27 +.29 +4.9
CpApHLSIA 52.82 +.29 +6.5
SmallCoB m 19.79 +.20 +6.5
Heartland
ValuePlus m 33.99 +.21 +7.3
Hennessy
ComerGrlnv 14.65 +.14 +1.7
Hodges
Hodges m 30.78 +.11 +4.7
INVESCO
CharterA m 20.88 +.06 +6.6
ComstockA m 21.25 +.05 +8.8
ConstellB m 24.85 +.14 +2.1
Divlnclnv b 17.82 +.01 +4.6
EnergyA m 42.55 -.43 -0.4
Energylnv b 42.40 -.43 -0.4
EqlncomeA m 10.46 +.04 +8.0
EuroGrA m 36.25 -.04 +5.4
GIbGrB m 25.74 +.13 +4.3
GrowlncA m 25.02 +.10 +7.6
GrwthAIIA m 12.81 +.03 +4.1
PacGrowB m 20.42 +.13 +0.6
SmCapEqA m 15.82 +.10 +7.8
Techlnv b 36.87 +.31 +7.5
USMortA m 12.40 +.02 +4.5


Ivy
AssetSTrB m 27.44 +.07 +5.1
AssetStrA m 28.41 +.07 +5.9
AssetStrC m 27.58 +.07 +5.1
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.61 +.02 +6.0
CoreBondA m 11.60 +.02 +5.6
CoreBondSelecti11.59 +.02 +5.8
HighYIdSel 8.07 +.01 +10.2
LgCapGrSelect 27.27 +.19 +8.2
MidCpVall 33.09 +.09 +10.7
ShDurBndSel 10.89 ... +2.5
USLCpCrPS 26.27 +.11 +8.8
Janus
BalC m 28.37 +.07 NA
ContrT 17.75 +.06 +3.0
EntrprsT 76.85 +.32 +8.0
FlexBdS b 10.42 +.01 NA
GIbValT d 13.75 +.02 +6.6
HiYIdT 9.16 ... +10.0
OverseasT 32.90 +.42 -2.9
PerkinsMCVL 24.73 +.08 +6.5
PerkinsMCVT 24.47 +.08 +6.3
PerkinsSCVL 24.74 +.12 +9.2
ShTmBdT 3.06 ... +3.9
T 36.25 +.15 +5.5
USCrT 18.15 +.07 +7.7
VentureT 67.31 +.61 +12.6
John Hancock
LifBal b 14.38 ... +6.1
LifGrl b 14.82 ... +5.9
Lazard
EmgMkEqtl d 17.62 +.20 +2.1
Legg Mason/Western
CrPIBdlns 11.14 +.02 +8.3
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl d 16.46 +.04 +3.3
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 30.39 -.06 +5.8
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 14.76 +.01 +8.8
BdR b 14.70 +.01 +8.5
Lord Abbett
AfliliatA m 14.09 +.03 +5.2
BondDebA m 8.08 +.01 +8.6
ShDurlncA m 4.55 ... +5.7
ShDurlncC m 4.58 +.01 +5.0
MFS
IslntlEq 20.53 +.08 +5.4
MAInvB m 24.20 +.06 +6.3
TotRetA m 16.46 +.03 +5.9
ValueA m 29.88 +.10 +6.6
Valuel 30.03 +.10 +6.9
MainStay
HiYIdCorA m 6.01 +.01 +8.8
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 98.98 +.36 +9.5
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.68 +.01 +5.8
PBMaxTrnmS 19.61 +.02 +5.9
WrdOppA 8.31 +.01 +1.5
Marsico
21stCent m 17.06 +.14 +3.5
FlexCap m 17.48 +.11 +15.3
Merger
Merger b 16.05 ... +3.1
Meridian
MeridnGr d 45.58 +.21 +11.3
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.53 +.02 +8.7
TotRtBd b 10.53 +.01 +8.5
Midas Funds
Magic m 21.92 +.03 +5.8
Midas m 1.69 ... -14.7
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 41.09 +.24 +9.0
Morgan Stanley Instl
MdCpGrl 42.08 +.15 +10.4
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 63.14 +.43 +5.3


Natixis
LSInvBdY 12.03 +.01 +7.9
LSStratlncA m 15.52 ... +9.0
LSStratlncC m 15.62 ... +8.2
Needham
Growth m 41.03 +.31 +9.4
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 58.30 +.30 +7.0
SmCpGrlnv 24.43 +.38 +6.4
Northeast Investors
Growth 18.19 +.06 +2.9
Northern
HYFixInc d 7.46 ... +9.2
Stkldx 20.36 ... +6.8
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.31 -.01 +4.2
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.44 +.03 +7.1
HlthSinces 17.38 +.05 +11.9
Pin0akEq 40.57 +.17 +14.4
RedOakTec 12.89 +.05 +12.8
Oakmark
Eqlncl 32.02 +.06 +6.3
Global I 28.00 +.03 +7.0
Intl l 24.48 ... +10.9
Oakmark I 57.85 +.17 +11.2
Select I 36.42 +15 +12.1
Old Westbury
GlbSmMdCp 16.01 +.06 +9.7
LgCpStr 11.02 +.03 +3.2
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 33.96 +.45 +6.2
DevMktY 33.63 +.44 +6.5
GlobA m 71.64 +.12 +6.4
IntlBondA m 5.97 ... +4.1
IntlBondY 5.97 ... +4.4
IntlGrY 34.34 +.02 +6.9
MainStrA m 42.60 +.12 +6.8
RocMuniA m 14.52 -.07 +3.7
SrFIltRatA m 8.37 ... +6.7
StrlncA m 4.09 ... +5.7
PIMCO
AAstAAutP 10.15 ... +6.1
AllAssetl 11.96 +.01 +6.2
AIIAuthA m 10.14 ... +5.6
AIIAuthC m 10.12 -.01 +4.8
AIIAuthln 10.14 -.01 +6.2
ComRIRStI 5.84 -.04 -4.3
Divlnclnst 11.38 +.01 +8.6
EMktCurl 9.89 -.01 +1.1
EmMktslns 10.97 +.01 +7.3
ForBdlnstl 10.53 +.02 +8.0
HiYldls 9.42 ... +9.4
InvGrdlns 10.46 +.01 +9.7
LowDrls 10.22 -.01 +4.3
RealRet 11.12 -.02 +4.9
ShtTermls 9.81 ... +2.4
TotRetA m 10.67 ... +6.5
TotRetAdm b 10.67 ... +6.7
TotRetC m 10.67 ... +5.7
TotRetls 10.67 ... +6.9
TotRetmD b 10.67 ... +6.6
TotlRetnP 10.67 ... +6.8
PRIMECAP Odyssey
Growth 21.98 +.15 +11.0
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 34.18 +.04 +8.6
Permanent
Portfolio 47.45 -.10 +6.4
Pioneer
PioneerA m 37.87 +.11 +4.7
Principal
LCGrllnst 11.56 ... +9.8
SAMConGrA ml 6.32 ... +5.5
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 21.78 +.14 +6.3
IntlEqtyC m 6.45 ... -0.1
JenMidCapGrZ 37.16 +.19 +9.5
Putnam
GlbUtilB m 11.10 -.05 -2.1
GrowlncA m 17.66 ... +7.6
IntlNewB m 15.53 +.02 +2.9


SmCpValA m 13.76
Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 29.90
Reynolds
BlueChip b 68.18
Royce
PAMutlnv d 13.50
Premierlnv d 21.80
ValueSvc m 12.56
Rydex
Electrlnv 55.02
HlthCrAdv b 22.83
NsdqlOOlv 20.21
Schwab
1OOOlnv d 44.92
S&P50OSel d 25.83
Scout
Intemtl 34.02
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 39.53
Sequoia
Sequoia 199.79
State Farm
Growth 61.62
Stratton
SmCapVal d 66.06
T Rowe Price
Balanced 22.16
BlChpGr 54.01
CapApprec 25.11
Corplnc 9.55
EmMktStk d 29.45
Eqlndex d 44.27
Eqtylnc 30.43
FinSer 17.96
GlbTech 11.97
GrowStk 44.22
HealthSci 54.77
HiYield d 6.95
InsLgCpGr 22.81
IntlBnd d 9.39
IntlEqldx d 12.37
IntlGrlnc d 14.15
IntlStk d 14.78
MediaTele 64.17
MidCapVa 27.90
MidCpGr 68.67
NJTaxFBd 11.27
NewAmGro 41.95
NewAsia d 15.14
NewHoriz 43.26
Newlncome 9.34
OrseaStk d 9.20
R2015 13.67
R2025 14.29
R2035 14.85
Rtmt2010 17.21
Rtmt2020 19.24
Rtmt2030 20.83
Rtmt2040 21.29
SdTech 33.21
ShTmBond 4.78
SmCpStk 41.42
SmCpVal d 45.45
SpecGrow 21.85
Speclnc 12.66
SumGNMA 9.56
SumMulnc 10.94
TaxEfMult d 17.90
TaxFShlnt 5.60
Value 31.83
TCW
Emglncl 8.24
TotRetBdl 9.93
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 12.69
Target
SmCapVal 25.74
Templeton
InFEqSeS 20.98
Third Avenue
Value d 54.98


+.09 +8.4
... +7.1
+.56 +16.6
+.09 +7.7
+.13 +8.0
+.10 +4.9
+.51 +1.2
+.11 +9.7
+.14 +10.2
+.12 +7.4
+.05 +7.4
-.05 +3.6
+.07 +7.0
+.97 +10.9
-.12 +5.1
+.35 +7.8
+.06 +6.8
+.37 +8.9
+.05 +8.3
+.01 +7.1
+.31 -0.3
+.09 +7.2
+.03 +7.2
+.11 +6.4
+.10 +14.3
+.28 +8.8
+.53 +17.3
... +10.1
+.16 +10.3
-.04 +3.4
+.02 +2.1
+.04 +2.6
+.06 +3.1
+.68 +15.0
+.08 +9.6
+.29 +10.9
-.01 +4.1
+.28 +8.9
+.25 +8.3
+.39 +15.7
+.01 +5.3
+.01 +3.4
+.03 +6.4
+.04 +6.7
+.06 +6.9
+.02 +6.1
+.05 +6.6
+.07 +6.8
+.08 +7.0
+.25 +8.7
... +2.9
+.30 +13.1
+.41 +8.6
+.10 +7.0
... +6.6
+.01 +4.4
-.01 +4.7
+.09 +7.6
... +3.1
+.11 +8.0
... +11.3
+.01 +9.1
+.04 +7.7


Thompson
LargeCap 42.30 +.11 +7.2
Thornburg
IncBldC m 19.44 +.06 +6.8
IntlValA m 28.57 +.06 +2.4
IntlVall 29.19 +.06 +2.8
Thrivent
IncomeA m 8.91 +.01 +7.0
MidCapGrA m 20.01 +.10 +8.3
Tocqueville
Gold m 42.33 -.07 +3.4
Turner
SmCapGr 42.01 +.53 +8.3
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.79 ... +7.9
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 7.89 +.03 -4.3
GlobRes m 9.45 -.01 -2.8
USAA
CorstnMod 14.27 +.04 +5.5
GNMA 9.87 +.01 +4.1
Growlnc 18.97 +.09 +5.8
HYOpp d 8.68 ... +11.1
PrcMtlMin 17.16 +.03 -2.7
SdTech 17.70 +.11 +8.8
TaxELgTm 12.80 -.01 +4.7
TgtRt2040 12.43 +.04 +6.5
TgtRt2050 12.12 +.04 +5.4
WorldGro 24.47 +.03 +8.0
Unified
Winlnv m 15.96 +.06 +5.3
Value Line
PremGro b 32.25 +.11 +7.9
Vanguard
50OAdml 151.54 +.32 +7.4
5001nv 151.51 +.32 +7.3
BalldxAdm 25.67 +.06 +7.3
Balldxlns 25.68 +.07 +7.3
CAITAdml 11.09 ... +4.3
CapOp 42.52 +.24 +8.9
CapOpAdml 98.23 +.55 +9.0
Convrt 14.02 +.03 +8.1
DevMktsldxlP 109.27 ... NA
DivGr 19.29 +.02 +8.4
EmMktIAdm 31.41 +.27 +1.2
EnergyAdm 120.75 -1.05 +0.6
Energylnv 64.31 -.56 +0.6
Eqlnc 27.78 +.04 +9.0
EqlncAdml 58.22 +.06 +9.1
ExplAdml 93.28 +.78 +10.1
Explr 100.19 +.84 +9.9
ExtdldAdm 55.83 +.40 +9.7
Exdldlst 55.83 +.40 +9.7
ExtdMktldxlP 137.79 +.99 NA
FAWeUSIns 90.20 +.15 +2.0
FAWeUSInv 18.06 +.03 +1.8
GNMA 10.40 +.02 +4.7
GNMAAdml 10.40 +.02 +4.8
GIbEq 20.89 +.07 +4.1
Grolnc 35.14 +.09 +6.5
GrthldAdm 41.89 +15 +8.1
Grthlstld 41.89 +15 +8.2
GrthlstSg 38.79 +14 +8.1
HYCor 5.90 +.01 +9.2
HYCorAdml 5.90 +.01 +9.3
HItCrAdml 73.67 +.11 +11.8
HlthCare 174.59 +.26 +11.7
ITBondAdm 11.19 +.01 +6.5
ITGradeAd 9.72 +.01 +6.9
InlPrtAdm 26.10 -.03 +3.9
InPrtIl 10.63 -.01 +4.0
InflaPro 13.29 -.02 +3.8
Instldxl 150.54 +.32 +7.4
InstPlus 150.55 +.32 +7.4
InsTStPI 37.62 +.12 +8.0
IntlGr 20.60 +.10 +3.9
IntlGrAdm 65.58 +.34 +4.1
IntlStkldxAdm 25.42 +.05 NA
IntlStkldxl 101.64 +.20 NA
IntlStkldxlPIs 101.66 +.20 NA
IntlStkldxlSgn 30.49 +.06 NA
IntlVal 33.45 +.05 +2.0
LTGradeAd 9.69 +.05 +8.9


Stocks of Local Interest


52-WK RANGE CLOSE
TICKER LO HI


AVHI 11.34
ABFS 6.43 -
BAC 7.83
BEAM 52.69 --0-


CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO


18.26 16.28 +.18
27.48 26.59 +.11
15.03 14.17 +.05
69.78 62.41 +1.33


YTD 1YR
QTR %CHG %RTN


V +14.5
A +178.4
A +22.0
V +2.2


+12.6 dd
+186.9 dd
+77.9 25
+6.1 26


P/E DIV NAME


CarnivalCorp CCL 32.07 -0- 39.95 36.07 +.10 +0.3 V V A -1.9 +7.1 19 1.00a
Chicos FAS CHS 15.27 --- 19.95 15.84 -.11 -0.7 A V V -14.2 -13.8 15 0.22
Cracker Barrel CBRL 60.07 102.95 99.79 +.86 +0.9 V A A +55.3 +59.3 20 3.00f
Disney DIS 46.53 67.89 61.08 +.27 +0.4 V V V +22.7 +24.0 18 0.75f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 43.06 70.07 63.99+.18 +0.3 V V V +18.1 +43.4 17 1.68
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 24.47 44.04 37.46 +.49 +1.3 V V V +28.2 +48.1 33 0.40
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 -0- 4.50 2.55 -.06 -2.3 V V A -21.8 -29.3 dd
Harris Corp HRS 41.08 58.50 56.50 +.28 +0.5 V V A +15.4 +22.0 55 1.68f
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 6.97 17.28 12.93 -.02 -0.2 V V V +38.7 +73.4 24
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 36.93 -- 41.09 37.84 +.02 +0.1 V V V -4.5 +1.0 q 2.13e
KC Southern KSU 72.80 118.88 106.94+1.63 +1.5 V V A +28.1 +36.6 39 0.86
Lennar Corp A LEN 30.90 44.40 32.62+1.00 +3.2 A V V -15.6 -1.5 18 0.16
McClatchy Co MNI 1.52 3.46 3.17 -.05 -1.6 V A A -3.1 +97.5 dd
NextEra Energy NEE 65.95 88.39 80.56 -.52 -0.6 V V V +16.4 +23.2 20 2.64
Office Depot ODP 1.51 -0- 6.10 4.22 +.02 +0.5 A V A +28.7 +174.5 dd
PGT Inc PGTI 3.00 --- 11.69 10.46 +.63 +6.4 A V A +132.4 +201.5 27


52-WK RANGE CLOSE


TICKER LO


YTD 1YR


HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN


P/E DIV


Panera Bread Co PNRA 152.64 -- 194.77 164.99 -.22 -0.1 V V V +3.9 +5.5 26
Pembina Pipeline PBA 26.50 34.70 30.61 A V +6.9 +17.3 1.68f
Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.67 22.72 18.94 -.20 -1.0 -3.4 +4.7 18 1.08
Phoenix Cos PNX 20.51 44.78 39.00 -.28 -0.7 V V V +57.7 +25.7 dd
Raymond James Fncl RJF 34.40 48.22 41.98 +.44 +1.1 A V V +9.0 +20.8 17 0.56
Reliance Steel Alu RS 49.72 0- 72.90 67.90 -.62 -0.9 V V A +9.3 +33.8 15 1.32f
Ryder R 38.35 64.99 56.71 +.43 +0.8 V V V +13.6 +42.3 13 1.36f
St Joe Co JOE 18.52 24.44 19.67 +.04 +0.2 V V V -14.8 +4.1 cc
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 22.49 -- 31.86 26.11 +.05 +0.2 V V V +10.8 -7.2 18
Simon Property Gp SPG 143.20 182.45 146.34+1.07 +0.7 V V V -7.4 -5.5 38 4.60
Stein Mart SMRT 5.77 -0- 15.21 12.65 +.40 +3.3 A V V +67.8 +64.0 20 0.20
Suntrust Bks STI 24.67 36.29 32.42 +.12 +0.4 V V A +14.4 +31.7 8 0.40
Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 12.82 11.72 -.31 -2.6 V A A +2.4 +6.7 15 0.54
TECO Energy TE 16.12 19.22 16.50 -.10 -0.6 V V V -1.6 -0.5 19 0.88
Tech Data TECD 42.25 54.60 49.92 +.14 +0.3 A V A +9.6 +1.2 9
Wendys Co WEN 4.09 8.08 7.64 +.02 +0.3 V A A +62.4 +79.4 cc 0.20f
World Fuel Svcs INT 33.65 -0- 45.20 38.80 +.03 +0.1 A A V -5.8 +5.5 14 0.15


Gold futures drop




most in two weeks


LgCpldxlnv 30.46
LifeCon 17.37
LifeGro 25.30
LifeMod 21.68
MidCapldxlP 133.00
MidCp 26.88
MidCpAdml 122.06
MidCplst 26.96
MidCpSgl 38.52
Morg 23.30
MorgAdml 72.28
MuHYAdml 10.35
Mulnt 13.54
MulntAdml 13.54
MuLTAdml 10.84
MuLtdAdml 10.96
MuShtAdml 15.82
Prmcp 84.00
PrmcpAdml 87.17
PrmcpCorl 17.97
REITIdxAd 92.20
STBondAdm 10.48
STBondSgl 10.48
STCor 10.66
STGradeAd 10.66
STIGradel 10.66
STsryAdml 10.67
SelValu 25.95
SmCapldx 46.98
SmCpldAdm 47.04
SmCpldlst 47.04
SmCplndxSgnl 42.38
SmVlldlst 20.86
Star 22.29
StratgcEq 26.13
TgtRe2010 24.96
TgtRe2015 14.12
TgtRe2020 25.50
TgtRe203O 25.58
TgtRe2035 15.58
TgtRe2040 25.80
TgtRe2045 16.20
TgtRe205O 25.70
TgtRetlnc 12.29
Tgtet2025 14.71
TotBdAdml 10.59
TotBdlnst 10.59
TotBdMklnv 10.59
TotBdMkSig 10.59
Totlntl 15.19
TotStlAdm 41.51
TotStllns 41.52
TotStlSig 40.07
TotStldx 41.49
TxMCapAdm 83.37
ValldxAdm 26.85
Valldxlns 26.85
Wellsl 24.63
WellslAdm 59.68
Welltn 36.89
WelltnAdm 63.72
WndsllAdm 60.32
Wndsr 18.16
WndsrAdml 61.27
Wndsrll 33.99
Victory
SpecValA m 18.72
Virtus
EmgMktsls 8.94
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 16.41
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 31.89
Growlnv 46.43
Outk201OAdm 13.31
Western Asset
MgdMuniA m 15.60
Yacktman
Focused d 24.15
Yacktman d 22.56


+.08 +7.4
+.03 +4.8
+.06 +5.3
+.05 +5.3
+.58 NA
+.12 +9.1
+.53 +9.2
+.11 +9.3
+.17 +9.2
+.14 +6.9
+.44 +7.1
-.01 +4.7
... +4.1
+4.2
+4.3
+2.5
+1.6
+.24 +7.8
+.24 +7.9
+.04 +9.0
+.06 +5.8
... +3.1
... +3.1
... +3.7
... +3.9
+3.9
+2.1
+11 +11.3
+.32 +10.0
+.32 +10.1
+.32 +10.1
+.29 +10.1
+.12 +9.3
+.07 +6.9
+.17 +8.5
+.04 +5.6
+.03 +5.9
+.06 +5.9
+.06 +5.9
+.04 +6.0
+.06 +6.2
+.04 +6.2
+.07 +6.2
+.02 +5.5
+.04 +5.9
+.02 +4.9
+.02 +5.0
+.02 +4.8
+.02 +4.9
+.02 +1.6
+.13 +7.9
+.13 +7.9
+.13 +7.9
+.13 +7.8
+.21 +7.7
+.04 +7.0
+.04 +7.0
+.03 +8.5
+.09 +8.6
+.06 +7.7
+.10 +7.8
+.15 +7.6
+.06 +8.8
+.21 +9.0
+.09 +7.5

+.07 +2.5

+12 +5.9

+.03 +4.7

+.33 +10.4
+.24 +13.2
+.01 +4.1

-.02 +4.8

+.04 +15.4
+.03 +15.2


NAME


AV Homes Inc
Arkansas Bst
Bank of America
Beam Inc






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


STOCKS


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper. symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.



S&P 500 A +3.21 NASDAQ A +26.95 DOW A +16.44 6-MO T-BILLS -.01 30-YR T-BONDS V -.03 CRUDE OIL V -1.30 EURO V -.0093 GOLD -6.10
1,638.17 3,620.30 14,840.95 .05% V 3.71% V $108.80V $1.3244V $1,412.90 V


Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange


and the Nasdaq.

YTD Name Last Chg
A-B-C
+3.9 ABB Ltd 21.61 -.29
-12.4 ADTCpn 40.71 +.26
+19.4 AESCorp 12.78 -.08
+10.4 AGLRes 44.11 +.13
-27.0 AK Steel 3.36 -.10
+1.0 ASM Intl 31.37 -.21
-.2 AT&T Inc 33.65 +.07
+7.6 AbtLab s 33.73 -.02
+24.8 AbbVien 42.62 +.06
-25.1 AberFitc 35.95 -.01
+9.4 Accenture 72.72 +.27
+4.8 Accuray 6.74 +.09
+57.4 Actavis 135.37 +3.26
+57.7 ActivsBliz 16.75 +.36
+21.9 AdobeSy 45.93 +.40
+35.2 AdvEnld 18.67 +.31
+40.8 AMD 3.38 -.04
+21.7 AdvisoryBd 56.95 -.17
+26.1 AecomTch 30.02 +.02
-35.7 Aeropostl 8.36 -.07
+37.7 Aetna 63.76 +.97
+14.3 Agilent 46.80 +.06
-41.9 Agnicog 30.48 -.02
+29.7 Aircasle 16.27 +.10
+11.1 Airgas 101.42 +.14
+63.4 AlaskCom 3.17 +.11
+89.9 AlcatelLuc 2.64 -.02
-10.0 Alcoa 7.81 -.12
-11.6 AllegTch 26.85 +.04
-3.7 Allergan 88.34 +.39
+16.3 Allete 47.64 -.14
+32.2 AllnceRes 76.77 -1.19
-14.6 AlliBInco 6.92 +.03
+13.1 AlliBern 19.71 +.33
+14.1 AlliantEgy 50.09 -.40
+58.5 AllscriptH 14.93 -.06
+19.7 Allstate 48.07 +.32
-37.3 AlphaNRs 6.11 -.01
-3.5 AlpTotDiv 3.89 -.02
+9.5 AIpAlerMLP 17.46 -.02
+3.8 AlteraCplf 35.69 +.90
+8.0 Alfria 33.94 +.34
-80.9 Alvarin rs .71 +.08
-16.7 AmBev 34.97 +.72
-21.1 Amarin 6.38 +.14
+13.2 Amazon 283.98 +2.40
+8.3 Amdocs 36.82 -.05
+9.4 Ameren 33.61 +.05
-16.8 AMovilL 19.26 +.02
-20.6 ACapAgy 22.94 +.37
+5.1 AmCapLtd 12.64 +.01
-28.9 AEagleOut 14.58 -.07
AEP 42.69 -.32
+63.9 AEqlnvLf 20.01 +.52
+26.1 AmExp 72.22 +.21
+32.0 AmlndGrp 46.58 +.17
+2.4 ARItCapPr 13.56 +.25
+11.7 AmStsWtr 53.61 -1.38
-9.8 AmTower 69.69 +.60
+10.2 AmWtrWks 40.92 -.75
+10.3 Amerigas 42.74 -.33
+39.1 Ameriprise 87.11 +.97
+15.7 Ametek 43.48 +.03
+26.3 Amgen 108.86 -.34
+18.0 Amphenol 76.35 +.26
+23.3 Anadarko 91.65 -.93
+28.5 Anaren 24.99 +.06
-57.5 AnglogldA 13.34 +.04
+7.5 ABInBev 93.95 -.05
-17.0 Annaly 11.66 +.30
-21.6 Anworth 4.53 +.13
+.2 Apache 78.64 -.53
-11.0 ApolloGrp 18.61 +.11
-4.4 Apollolnv 7.99 +.10
-7.6 Apple Inc 491.70 +.80
+32.3 ApldMatl 15.14 +.18
+22.5 AquaAm 31.13 -.39
-25.6 ArcelorMit 13.00 -.17
-37.7 ArchCoal 4.56 -.07
+27.1 ArchDan 34.81 +.21
-8.1 ArcosDor 10.99 +.39
-29.6 ArenaPhm 6.35 -.34
+1.5 AresCap 17.77 +.22
-2.9 AriadP 18.63 -.23
+178.4 ArkBest 26.59 +.11
-35.2 ArmourRsd 4.19 +.07
+55.4 ArrayBio 5.78 +.12
+23.3 ArrowEl 46.94 +.56
-18.0 ArubaNet 17.01 +.25
+8.8 Ashland 87.51 +.91
+41.1 AssuredG 20.08 +.11
+136.1 AstexPhm 6.87 +.05
+5.0 AstraZen 49.64 -.51
+22.0 AtlasPpln 38.50 +.16
+14.2 Atmel 7.48 +.10
+17.1 ATMOS 41.13 -.23
-46.0 AuRicog 4.42 -.11
+6.4 AutoNavi 12.07 -.47
+4.7 Autodesk 37.02 +.13
+25.2 AutoData 71.30 +.36
+23.1 AvagoTch 38.95 +.67
+101.8AvanirPhm 5.28 +.12
+24.9 AveryD 43.61 +.35
+37.7 AvisBudg 27.30 -.06
+9.7 Avista 26.44 -.15
+38.8 Avon 19.93 +.09
+18.5 BB&TCp 34.26 -.06
-4.0 BCEg 41.24 +.74
-19.8 BHP BilILt 62.86 -.12
+16.0 BMCSft 45.98 +.01
BP PLC 41.64 -.48
+25.7 BP Pru 86.15 -.13
+39.4 Baidu 139.76 +.78
+14.2 BakrHu 46.65 -.54
+.1 BallCorp 44.81 +.42
+147.1 BallardPw 1.51 -.02
-27.0 BcoBradpf 11.52 +.04
-11.6 BcoSantSA 7.22 -.01
-21.7 BcoSBrasil 5.70 +.01
+45.8 BankMutl 6.27 +.01
+22.0 BkofAm 14.17 +.05
+3.5 BkMont g 63.47 +.37
+16.1 BkNYMel 29.83 +.08
-4.4 BkNovag 55.33 +.22
-47.0 BariPVix rs 16.86 +.38
+18.4 Bard 115.71 +1.56
-6.8 BarnesNob 14.07 +.19
-43.8 BarrickG 19.69 +.36
+5.3 Baxter 70.16 -.56
+2.2 Beam Inc 62.41 +1.33
+3.6 BeazerH rs 17.50 +.35
+32.4 BedBath 74.00 -.36
+20.1 Bemis 40.20 -.04
+24.8 BerkHB 111.99 -.21
+206.8 BestBuy 36.35 +.54
+21.7 BigLots 34.64 +.52
+359.9 Biocryst 6.53 -.02
-13.6 BlackBerry 10.26 -.04
+15.6 BIkHIthSci 32.40 -.09


+41.4 Blackstone 22.05 +.40
+25.2 BobEvans 50.33 +.23
+39.2 Boeing 104.93 +1.66
+36.6 BorgWam 97.84 +1.15
+59.0 BostBeer 213.76 +6.20
+86.0 BostonSci 10.66 -.03
+83.1 BoydGm 12.16 +.21
-8.6 BrigStrat 19.27
+29.6 BrMySq 41.79 -.24
-24.0 Broadcom 25.25 +.33
+42.6 BrcdeCm 7.60 +.12
+54.9 Buckeye 70.35 +.08
-65.3 Buenavent 12.48 -.36
+34.8 CAInc 29.64 +.23
+9.0 CBREGrp 21.69 -.13
+35.5 CBS B 51.57 -.01
+8.9 CMS Eng 26.54 -.14
+14.8 CNH Gbl 46.24 -.15
+25.8 CSX 24.83 +.10
+9.8 CVR Rfg n 27.50 +.94
+19.6 CVS Care 57.82 +.54
-33.4 CYS Invest 7.86 +.09
+19.0 CblvsnNY 17.78 -.12
+58.4 CabotOG s 39.40 -.06
+1.2 Cadence 13.67 +.11
+14.4 Cal-Maine 46.00 +.53
-1.0 CalaCvHi 12.03 -.04
+24.3 Calgon 17.62 +.13
+10.7 CalifWtr 20.31 -.11
+7.8 Calpine 19.54 +.14
+1.5 CalumetSp 30.84 +.15
+103.4 CamcoF 4.15 +.02
-8.3 CamdenPT 62.56 -.02
+1.7 Cameron 57.40 -.48
+24.2 CampSp 43.33 -1.38
+4.1 CdnNRyg 94.76 +.19
+7.8 CdnNRsgs 31.11 -.32
+255.6 CdnSolar 12.09 -.23
+11.1 CapOne 64.38 +.34
+14.7 CapSenL 21.44 +.26
+53.8 CapitlSrce 11.66 +.19
+3.7 CapsteadM 11.89 +.13
+28.1 CpstnTurb 1.14 +.01
+22.1 CardnlHIth 50.28 +.26
+24.7 CareFusion 35.64 +.37
-1.9 Carnival 36.07 +.10
+5.3 CarpTech 54.37 +.06
+65.5 Carrizo 34.62 -.07
+332.2 CatalystPh 1.88 +.12
-7.9 Caterpillar 82.53 +.08
+81.7 Celgene 142.58 +3.48
+17.9 Cemex 11.19 +.05
-26.8 Cemig pf 7.95 +.01
+19.7 CenterPnt 23.05 -.15
-15.4 CntryLink 33.10 +.39
+3.3 Cenveo 2.79 -.02
-27.9 ChambStn 7.21 -.10
+44.7 Checkpnt 15.54 +.08
+16.7 ChemFinl 27.72 +.39
+56.1 ChesEng 25.95 -.39
+11.3 Chevron 120.37 -1.44
+31.0 ChicB&l 60.70 -.27
-14.2 Chicos 15.84 -.11
+12.3 Chimera 2.93 +.02
+11.4 ChurchDwt 59.69 -.14
+29.4 CienaCorp 20.31 +.20
-44.9 CinciBell 3.02 +.02
+18.0 CinnFin 46.20 +.22
-19.1 Cirrus 23.44 +1.02
+19.3 Cisco 23.45 +.01
+22.5 Citgroup 48.47 +.16
+8.5 CitrixSys 71.18 +.92
+1.3 CleanEngy 12.61 +.35
-45.6 CliffsNRs 20.97 -.67
+12.6 Clorox 82.41 +.44
-5.3 Coach 52.58 +.27
+5.1 CocaCola 38.10 -.25
+18.1 CocaCE 37.46 +.66
-40.5 Coeur 14.63 -.32
+.2 CognizTech 74.02 +.24
-5.8 CohStQIR 9.57 -.02
+2.0 ColeREI n 11.12 +.06
+9.5 ColgPalm s 57.25 -.02
+6.9 ColonialFS 14.00 -.54
+3.7 ColonPT 22.17 -.07
+13.6 Comcast 42.44 +.52
+14.0 Comc spcl 40.94 +.45
+35.5 Comerica 41.12 +.16
-.8 CmpTask 18.09 +.20
-.6 Compuwre 10.80 -.02
-3.2 Comtech 24.57 -.06
+15.4 ConAgra 34.04 +.10
+4.1 ConnWtrSv 31.01 +.26
+14.1 ConocoPhil 66.16 -.61
-2.7 ConsolEngy 31.22 -.89
+7.4 ConsolCom 17.08 +.30
+1.2 ConEd 56.20 -.24
+22.3 CooperTire 31.02 +.02
-4.1 CorinthC 2.35 -.26
+72.7 CorOnDem 51.01 +.61
+12.4 Corning 14.18 +.01
-7.2 CorpOffP 23.18 -.06
+12.8 Costco 111.39 +.93
-7.8 Cotyn 16.01 +.38
+21.0 CousPrp 10.10 -.03
+4.2 Covidien 60.17 +.49
-18.5 CSVLgNGs 17.82 +.58
-63.0 CS VS3xSIv 9.65 -.54
+43.0 CSVellIVST 23.72 -.49
+67.0 CreeInc 56.76 +.78
-4.9 Crocs 13.69 +.17
+28.5 CrosstxLP 18.69 +.20
+19.0 CrownHold 43.81 +.01
+13.9 Cummins 123.44 +.68
-21.2 CybrOpt 5.85 -.04
+7.0 CypSemi 11.60 +.13
+25.7 CytRx 2.35 +.04
D-E-F
+4.0 DCT Indl 6.75 +.01
+.3 DDRCorp 15.71 -.06
+4.1 DNP Selct 9.86 -.03
-7.0 DR Horton 18.40 +.63
+11.6 DTE 67.02 -.28
-10.6 DTE En 61 24.41 +.09
+3.3 Darden 46.55 +.19
+27.3 DeVry 30.21 +.65
+23.4 DeanFdsrs 19.23 +.27
-3.0 Deere 83.80 -.32
+35.6 Dell Inc 13.75 -.03
+45.1 DelphiAuto 55.51 +.20
+65.5 DeltaAir 19.64 +.51
+6.3 DenburyR 17.22 -.24
-45.0 Dndreon 2.91 +.12
+9.1 DevonE 56.77 -.73
+6.2 Diageo 123.80 +.26
-5.6 DiaOffs 64.17 -1.10
+9.7 DiamRk 9.87 +.02
+3.1 DicksSptg 46.88 +.64
-6.2 Diebold 28.70 -.17
+.6 Digilnd 9.53 +.25


1,680 ............................ S& P 500

_- .4,-,, Close: 1,638.17
Change: 3.21 (0.2%)
1,600 ........ 10 DAYS .........


3,720 ................................. Nasdaq composite

,- ,4-4,, Close: 3,620.30
Change: 26.95 (0.7%)
3,560 ........ 10 DAYS .........


1 75 0 : ............. ............. ........................................ ............ 3 ,7 0 0 : ............. .. .......... ............. .. ............... ....

1,700 ............,.... ................................ ...... 3,600 ...... .............. .... ....................
f ;3 ,500I;^ Q ............ ............. .. ...M ...... ..... .f. .......... ............
1,6 50 ..3.................
3,6400:: ........ ... .p ............

1 O .. J 3 ,3 0 0! ...... ......... ... ........ .. .......... ............ ....
1,5 500 ... ... ._ ............ .. ......... ........... :.... ............ 0 0 ............. ... ... 1............. ......... ...............................
1 ,5 5 0 3 ,2 00.. . i .. .j .j X .. 3 1 0Am .. .
1,0 3 :100:


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD


Vol. (in mil.)
Pvs. Volume
Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows


2,462 1,292
2,714 1,336
1958 1792


-18.0 DigitalRIt 55.68 +.41
-9.2 Dillards 76.08 +.31
+16.0 DirecTV 58.20 -.14
-85.5 DxGIdBII rs 79.45 +1.72
-46.3 DxFinBr rs 32.48 -.22
-51.1 DxSCBrrs 26.43 -.82
+60.0 DxFnBulls 63.97 +.49
+67.4 DirDGdBr s 26.38 -.58
+71.1 DxSCBullIIs 54.71 +1.68
+51.4 DxSPBulls 44.24 +.25
+23.5 Discover 47.59 +.23
+21.9 DishNetw h 44.36 -.13
+22.7 Disney 61.08 +.27
+23.3 DollarGen 54.37 -.11
+30.7 DollarTree 53.02 -.29
+13.0 DomRescs 58.53 -.21
+42.5 Dominos 62.05 +.25
+89.0 DonlleyRR 16.99 +.20
+16.1 DowChm 37.52 +.07
+.9 DrPepSnap 44.59 -.31
-20.4 DryStrt 7.60 -.01
+48.1 DryShips 2.37 -.08
+26.0 DuPont 56.66 -.13
-17.4 DufPUC 10.13 -.03
+2.9 DukeEngy 65.66 -.39
+6.4 DukeRlty 14.76 -.17
-56.1 Dynavax 1.25 -.01
+109.2 E-CDang 8.68 -.13
eBay 50.99 +.56
+2.2 EMCCp 25.86 +.11
+30.1 EOG Res 157.09 -2.37
+77.9 EPAM Sys 32.20 +1.90
-23.2 ErthLink 4.96 +.05
+18.1 Eaton 63.99 +.18
+10.8 EVEEq2 11.57 +.04
+27.5 Ecolab 91.64 +.81
-10.8 Ecotality If .39 +.10
+1.6 Edisonlnt 45.91 -.45
-21.6 EdwLfSci 70.69 +.18
+188.9 eGain 13.00 +2.18
+49.0 Elan 15.21 +.18
-32.9 EldorGld g 8.64 +.08
+89.9 ElectArts 27.57 +.44
+14.4 EmersonEl 60.61 +.12
+4.2 EmpDist 21.23 +.08
+8.8 EnbrdgEPt 30.35 +.18
-5.6 Enbridge 40.90 +.37
-13.6 EnCanag 17.07 -.14
-34.9 EndvSilvg 5.14
+57.6 EndoPhrm 41.35 +.68
+24.4 Energizer 99.51 +1.20
+22.0 EngyTsfr 52.36 -.27
+14.9 Ennis Inc 17.78 +.18
-6.1 ENSCO 55.67 -.53
-1.1 Entergy 63.02 +.71
+19.0 EntPrPt 59.58 -.14
+83.0 EricksnAC 15.43 +.20
+9.2 EsteeLdr 65.37 -.01
+7.5 ExcoRes 7.28 -.03
+33.0 Exelis 14.99
+12.8 Exelixis 5.16 +.13
+2.3 Exelon 30.42 -.29
-23.4 Expedia 47.09 +.09
+40.4 Express 21.18 +.08
+18.2 ExpScripts 63.85 -.10
+.8 ExxonMbI 87.27 -1.57
+25.6 FMC Tech 53.79 -.94
+15.0 FNBCp PA 12.21 +.07
+55.1 Facebook 41.28 +.73
+12.8 FamilyDIr 71.50 -.01
-4.7 Fastenal 44.46 +.42
+18.4 FedExCp 108.58 +.08
+80.6 FedNatHId 9.66 -.04
+37.7 Ferrellgs 23.20 +.55
+2.0 FidlNFin 24.03 -.01
+.6 FifthStFin 10.48 +.11
+21.0 FifthThird 18.39 +.04
-28.9 FMajSilv g 14.36 -.08
+30.6 FstNiagara 10.36 -.02
+21.6 FstSolar 37.52 +.60
-10.5 FirstEngy 37.36 -.29
+53.4 FstMerit 21.77 +.08
+45.4 Flextrn 9.03 +.13
+35.7 FlowrsFds 21.05 +.05
+8.8 Fluor 63.90 -.25
+1.3 FootLockr 32.54 -.03
+27.4 FordM 16.50 +.48
-18.4 ForestOil 5.46 -.16
+28.2 FBHmSec 37.46 +.49
-5.9 Francesca 24.40 +.28
+10.2 FrankRess 46.18 +.93
-78.3 FrSearsh .19 +.01
-11.1 FMCG 30.42 -.06
-.2 FreshMkt 48.01 -6.27
+4.2 FrontierCm 4.46 +.03
-21.8 Frontline 2.55 -.06
-52.7 Fusion-io 10.84 +.13
G-H-I
+.3 GMAC44 24.96 +.02
+115.8 GTAdvTc 6.54 +.16
+19.8 GabDvlnc 19.38 -.04
+19.7 GabMultT 9.40 +.06
+3.4 GabUtil 6.37 -.03
+101.9 GameStop 50.66 +1.04
+31.2 Gap 40.71 +.22
+1.2 Garmin 41.23 +1.72
+.5 Geeknet 16.18 +.37
+65.1 GenCorp 15.11 +.23
+35.7 Generac 40.88 +.52
+18.2 GAInv 32.90 +.03
+20.7 GenDynam 83.58 +.73
+10.1 GenElec 23.11 -.09
-3.4 GenGrPrp 19.17 +.03
+21.7 GenMills 49.21 +.47
+19.5 GenMotors 34.45 +.53


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


+10.8 GMcvpfB 48.88 +.36
+38.6 GenesisEn 49.51 +.96
+20.8 Gentex 22.77 +.21
+58.3 Genworth 11.89 +.18
-18.5 Gerdau 7.33 +.01
+65.9 GileadSci s 60.93 +.49
+18.7 GlaxoSKIn 51.59 -.05
-9.3 GlimchRt 10.06 +.01
-50.7 GoldFLtd 5.30 +.10
-18.5 Goldcrpg 29.92 +.42
+20.4 GoldmanS 153.63 +.66
+131.1 GoodrPet 21.54 +.34
+47.1 Goodyear 20.31 +.47
+20.9 Google 855.43 +6.88
+20.4 vjGrace 80.95 +.40
+38.8 GramrcyP 4.08 +.04
+31.1 GraphPkg 8.47 +.06
+6.4 GNIron 71.52 -1.36
+9.0 GtPlainEn 22.14 -.14
+114.8 GreenMtC 88.78 +2.12
-11.3 GrnwyMed 13.63 -.14
+25.0 GreifA 55.62 +.02
+13.0 Griffin h 30.50 -.17
+113.6 Groupon 10.38 +.34
-3.1 GpTelevisa 25.75 +.35
+22.5 GuangRy 24.18 -.09
+25.6 Guess 30.82 +3.51
-9.7 HCP Inc 40.78 -.42
+50.9 HainCel 81.83 +1.89
-30.9 HalconRes 4.78 -.04
+39.9 HallibrIn 48.54 -.36
+23.0 Halozyme 8.25 +.11
+71.1 Hanesbrds 61.30 +.65
+40.5 Hanoverlns 54.43 +.27
+22.9 HarleyD 60.00 +.80
-59.5 HarmonyG 3.63 -.04
+.9 Harsco 23.72 +.28
+33.4 HartfdFn 29.94 +.32
-25.2 HatterasF 18.56 +.21
-1.0 HawaiiEl 24.89 -.12
... HItCrREIT 61.28 -.41
+6.2 HIthCSvc 24.66 +.24
+38.7 HItMgmt 12.93 -.02
-40.3 HeclaM 3.48 -.03
+16.5 HercOffsh 7.19 +.06
+26.6 Hershey 91.43 +.35
+50.4 Hertz 24.47 +.32
+43.2 Hess 75.82 -.66
+58.0 HewlettP 22.52 -.09
+15.1 Hillshire 32.38 +.19
+16.5 HilltopH 15.78 +.16
+157.1 HimaxTch 6.17 +.26
-2.5 HollyFront 45.38 +.74
+7.8 Hologic 21.57 -.13
+21.3 HomeDp 75.05 +.02
-.8 Honda 36.66 -.38
+26.1 HonwIllntI 80.06 +.61
+32.4 Hormel 41.33 +.40
+17.1 HospPT 27.43 +.03
+10.0 HostHotls 17.24 +.11
-25.1 HovnanE 5.24 +.07
+6.4 HuanPwr 39.54 -.01
+22.2 HubbelB 103.39 +.10
+13.0 HudsCity 9.19 -.10
+29.3 HuntBncsh 8.26 +.05
+49.1 Huntgtnlng 64.61 +.39
+11.6 Huntsmn 17.74 +.18
-46.2 IAMGId g 6.17 +.01
-39.9 ICICI Bk 26.19 -.07
+54.9 iGateCorp 24.42 +1.04
+17.2 ING 11.12 -.02
-16.0 iShGold 13.67 -.08
-24.3 iShBrazil 42.36 -.06
+4.8 iShGerm 25.89 -.12
-3.7 iSh HK 18.70 +.10
+13.7 iShJapan 11.09 -.01
-9.9 iSh SKor 57.06 +1.16
-6.4 iSMalasia 14.16 +.25
-13.3 iShMexdco 61.16 -.24
-9.3 iShSing 12.42 +.07
-1.8 iSTaiwn 13.37 +.21
-21.7 iShSilver 23.00 -.43
-13.2 iShChinaLC 35.11 +.12
+15.3 iSCorSP500165.04 +.29
-14.9 iShEMkts 37.73 +.29
-6.6 iShiBoxlG 113.05 +.11
-12.4 iSh20yrT 106.11 +.84
+5.4 iS Eafe 59.91 -.10
-2.1 iShiBxHYB 91.43 +.37
+16.3 iSR1KVal 84.69 -.05
+20.9 iShR2K 101.97 +1.01
-4.5 iShUSPfd 37.84 +.02
-3.0 iShREst 62.72 +.10
-.9 iShHmCnst 20.96 +.40
+11.8 Idacorp 48.45 +.06
+18.0 ITW 71.76 +.16
+106.1 Incyte 34.24 -.76
+169.4 IndBkMI 9.44 +.27
+28.4 Inergy 13.79 +.02
+24.2 IngerRd 59.59 +.37
-2.3 Ingredion 62.98 +1.28
+19.9 InlandRE 10.05 +.11
+22.9 IntgDv 8.97 +.07
+7.9 IntegrysE 56.36 -.30
+7.0 Intel 22.06 -.23
+34.7 Intercept n 46.11 +.71
+6.6 InterNAP 7.38 -.05
-4.7 IBM 182.64 +.48
+19.7 IntPap 47.70 +.70
+44.2 Interpublic 15.89 +.32
... Intersectns 9.48 +.05
+6.9 Intuit 63.59 +.19
-21.6 IntSurg 384.60 -2.84
+57.9 InvenSense 17.54 +.24
+18.3 Invesco 30.86 +.37


HIGH
14916.01
6365.82
480.38
9354.71
3635.84
1646.41
1206.10
17516.28
1029.05


LOW
14792.11
6295.74
476.88
9286.24
3587.07
1630.88
1194.28
17347.34
1015.59


-19.3 ItauUnibH 12.07
J-K-L
+73.5 JA Solar rs 7.41 -.55
-3.0 JDSUniph 13.10 +.03
+16.1 JPMorgCh 50.70 +.12
+36.4 JacobsEng 58.08 -.53
+1.2 JanusCap 8.62 +.13
+8.2 JetBlue 6.19 -.03
+23.5 JohnJn 86.57 +.04
+33.2 JohnsnCtl 40.85 +.38
-22.9 JoyGIbI 49.18 +.29
-4.1 JnprNtwk 18.87 -.14
+73.9 K12 35.55 +3.59
+3.6 KB Home 16.37 +.35
+1.8 KBRInc 30.45 +.76
-2.1 KKRFn 10.34 +.11
-4.2 KKRFn 41 26.80 +.18
+28.1 KC Southn 106.94 +1.63
+8.5 Kellogg 60.59 -.03
+232.1 KeryxBio 8.70 +.09
KeyEngy 6.95 -.10
+40.0 Keycorp 11.79 +.10
+10.1 KimbClk 92.95 +.42
+4.6 Kimco 20.21 +.05
+3.8 KindME 82.80 -.55
+7.1 KindMorg 37.84 +.73
-43.3 Kinross g 5.51 +.01
+14.9 KodiakO g 10.17 +.10
+18.4 Kohls 50.88 +.64
+14.2 KraftFGpn 51.93 +.36
+73.0 KratosDef 8.70 +.42
+147.7 KrispKrm 23.23 +.99
+41.4 Kroger 36.78 +.38
-6.3 Kulicke 11.23 +.24
+22.1 L Brands 57.46 +.26
+18.7 L-3Com 90.98 -.11
+6.5 LSI Corp 7.53
+2.3 LTC Prp 36.00 +.60
+6.5 Landstar 55.89 -.76
+22.9 LVSands 56.73 +.75
+5.2 LaSalleH 26.71 -.08
-15.6 LennarA 32.62 +1.00
-3.5 Level3 22.29
+50.1 Lexmark 34.81 +.01
+13.4 LbtyASE 5.41 +.01
+24.8 LibGlobA 78.59 +2.45
+14.6 LibtylntA 22.55 +.28
-3.0 LibtProp 34.70 -.05
+11.9 Lifevantge 2.45 +.07
+4.3 LillyEli 51.45 -.02
+64.0 LincNat 42.48 +.31
+12.2 LinearTch 38.49 -.05
-31.9 LinnEngy 24.00 -.47
+42.2 LloydBkg 4.55 -.02
+32.6 LockhdM 122.34 +.19
-91.1 LonePineg .11 +.01
+9.1 Lorillard s 42.43 +.36
-20.6 LaPac 15.34 +.43
+30.7 Lowes 46.42 +.04
-6.7 lululemn gs 71.13 +1.85
+27.6 Luxottica 52.75 +.19
+23.1 LyonBas A 70.30 +.82
M-N-0
+15.6 M&TBk 113.81 +.02
+9.6 MCG Cap 5.04 +.06
-22.4 MDC 28.52 +.48
+27.7 MDU Res 27.13 -.30
-8.5 MFA Fncl 7.42 +.12
+171.8 MGIC 7.23 +.18
+52.7 MGMRsts 17.78 +.10
+14.3 Macys 44.61 +.29
+19.3 MagHRes 4.76 +.02
+28.6 Manitowoc 20.17 -.33
+154.1 MannKd 5.87 +.08
+20.0 Manulife g 16.31 +.07
+12.7 MarathnO 34.54 -.06
+16.9 MarathPet 73.63 -.41
-38.1 MVJrGldrs 49.00 -.02
-38.5 MktVGold 28.54 +.24
+17.2 MVOilSvc 45.26 -.46
+15.6 MV Semi 37.36 +.31
-13.6 MktVRus 25.83 -.01
-3.3 MVPreRMu 24.51 -.01
+33.6 MarkWest 68.13 -1.09
+8.0 MarlntA 40.25 +.10
+20.5 MarshM 41.52 +.37
+47.5 MarinMid 45.82 +.16
+65.5 MarvellT 12.02 +.18
+14.8 Masco 19.04 +.53
+10.3 Mattel 40.39 -.33
-5.1 Maxdmlntg 27.90 +.19
-30.6 McDrmlnt 7.65 +.01
+7.5 McDnlds 94.86 -.45
-24.8 McEwenM 2.88 +.31
+13.9 MeadWvco 36.31 +.04
-.8 MedProp 11.86 -.14
+26.4 Medtrnic 51.83 +.27
+62.2 MelcoCrwn 27.32 +.61
-34.3 Mellanox 38.99 +1.15
+15.0 Merck 47.10 +.01
+12.5 MercGn 44.66 +.28
+27.1 Meredith 43.79 +.03
+62.6 Meritor 7.69 +.16
+132.9 Methode 23.36 +5.73
+41.0 MetUfe 46.44 +.48
+43.3 MKors 73.15 +1.40
+114.0 MicronT 13.57 +.33
+25.6 Microsoft 33.55 +.53
+15.7 Microvis 2.21 +.10
+47.0 Middleby 188.46 +3.54
+6.4 MdsxWatr 20.81 +.05
+7.2 Molex 29.30 -.03
-34.6 Molycorp 6.17 +.04
+20.6 Mondelez 30.70 +.15


CLOSE
14840.95
6322.14
477.83
9315.82
3620.30
1638.17
1201.33
17438.59
1026.94


CHG.
+16.44
+16.36
-3.04
+6.75
+26.95
+3.21
+5.26
+55.74
+10.44


%CHG.
+0.11%
+0.26%
-0.63%
+0.07%
+0.75%
+0.20%
+0.44%
+0.32%
+1.03%


+3.2 Monsanto 97.25
-17.6 MonstrWw 4.63
+35.5 MorgStan 25.91
-26.6 Mosaic 41.54
+.9 MotrlaSolu 56.19
+28.7 Mylan 35.34
-2.8 MyriadG 26.48
-16.5 NII Hldg 5.95
+181.5 NPS Phm 25.62
+177.6 NQ Mobile 16.77
+13.1 NRG Egy 26.00
+13.7 NTT DOCO 16.39
+29.3 NV Energy 23.46
+44.1 NXP Semi 37.93
+7.3 Nabors 15.50
-76.6 NBGrcers 4.19
+32.0 NatFuGas 66.91
+.6 NatGrid 57.80
-.2 NtHIthlnv 56.40
+8.7 NOilVarco 74.33
+64.1 NektarTh 12.16
+21.0 Neogen 54.85
+24.0 NetApp 41.60
+210.9 Netflix 287.85
+10.3 NJ Rscs 43.71
+12.6 NewOriEd 21.88
-5.6 NewResd n 6.38
+13.3 NY CmtyB 14.84
-2.8 NYMtgTr 6.14
+30.0 Newcastle 5.29
+14.1 NewellRub 25.40
-71.5 NwLeadhlf .11
-31.5 NewmtM 31.83
-.2 NewsCpA n 15.77
+16.4 NextEraEn 80.56
+17.2 NiSource 29.17
+12.9 NielsenH 34.53
+23.0 NikeB s 63.48
+22.9 NipponTT 25.84
+8.0 NobleCorp 37.62
+1.3 NokiaCp 4.00
-10.9 NordicAm 7.80
+17.6 NorflkSo 72.70
+4.8 NoestUt 40.97
-17.5 NthnTEn 20.98
+37.7 NorthropG 93.06
+24.4 NStarRIt 8.76
+11.2 NwstBcsh 13.50
-6.3 NwstNG 41.40
+14.7 Novartis 72.59
+66.7 Novavax 3.15
+4.2 NovoNord 169.99
-18.0 NuanceCm 18.31
-18.3 NuvDivA 12.64
+3.8 NuvEqtP 12.28
-17.7 NuvMuOpp 12.61
-17.3 NvlQI 13.25
-19.8 NvMAd 12.20
-15.2 NvAMT-Fr 14.95
-19.7 NvNYP 13.22
-18.2 NuvPP 13.22
-9.4 NvPfdlnco 8.80
-17.4 NvPMI 12.32
-18.2 NuvPI 12.24
-17.9 NuvPI2 12.48
-18.4 NuvPI4 11.52
-18.9 NuvQInc 12.38
-43.2 NuverraE 2.29
+20.5 Nvidia 14.77
+11.1 NxStageMd 12.50
-24.6 OCZTech 1.44
+26.5 OGE Egy s 35.62
+24.0 OasisPet 39.44
+15.1 OcciPet 88.21
+23.5 OceanFst 16.98
+28.7 OfficeDpt 4.22
-62.6 OiSA 1.50
+12.5 OldNBcp 13.35
+35.5 OldRepub 14.43
+6.9 Olin 23.07
+19.8 OmegaHIt 28.58
+48.4 OmegaP 9.08
+52.5 Omncre 55.06
+30.8 OmniVisn 18.41
+3.7 OnSmcnd 7.31
-6.4 OneokPfrs 50.53
+63.6 OnyxPh 123.60
+76.5 OpkoHlth 8.49
+22.0 OplinkC 19.00
-4.9 Oracle 31.70
+43.9 Orbotch 12.19
-42.6 Orthfx 22.56
+55.2 OshkoshCp 46.02
+7.6 OtterTail 26.91
P-Q-R
+19.1 PAA NGsS 22.68
+11.6 PDL Bio 7.86
+2.8 PG&E Cp 41.32
+24.5 PNC 72.58
+7.8 PNM Res 22.10
-11.7 POSCO 72.51
+15.4 PPG 156.19
+7.6 PPL Corp 30.81
+146.5 PacSunwr 3.92
-33.8 PanASIv 12.39
+102.8 Pandora 18.62
+3.9 PaneraBrd 164.99
+129.3 ParametSd 15.80
+29.8 ParkDrl 5.97
+18.5 ParkerHan 100.80
+6.3 PattUTI 19.80
-35.3 PeabdyE 17.22
+6.9 Pembina g 30.61
+7.4 PnnNGm 52.75
+2.1 PennantPk 11.23


MO QTR
V V
V V
V V
V V
V A
V V
V A
V V
VA


YTD
+13.25%
+19.13%
+5.46%
+10.33%
+19.90%
+14.86%
+17.73%
+16.30%
+20.91%


-37.1 Penney 12.40 -.36
+31.7 Penske 39.62 +.62
+24.1 Pentair 60.98 +.40
+18.2 PeopUtdF 14.29 +.01
+17.6 PepBoy 11.56 +.18
-3.4 PepcoHold 18.94 -.20
+15.9 PepsiCo 79.33 -.04
+16.4 Perrigo 121.04 +2.78
+3.9 PetSmart 71.00 +.70
-25.4 PetrbrsA 14.40 -.36
-29.7 Petrobras 13.68 -.28
+12.0 Pfizer 28.10 -.11
+.3 PhilipMor 83.88 +.93
+8.7 Phillips66 57.72 -.31
+57.7 PhoenxCos 39.00 -.28
+4.4 PiedNG 32.70 +.26
-4.4 PiedmOfc 17.26 +.06
+12.0 Pier1 22.40 +.50
-8.7 PimlncStr2 10.09 +.08
+6.6 PinWst 54.35 -.30
+56.7 PitnyBw 16.67 -.18
+12.8 PlainsAAs 51.05 +.15
+2.0 PlugPowr h .51 -.06
+.4 PlumCrk 44.55 +.39
+32.0 Polaris 111.10 +.73
-27.3 Potash 29.60 -.11
-1.0 PS SrLoan 24.72 +.06
+16.6 PwShs QQQ75.96 +.53
+132.3 PranaBio 5.11 +.21
+6.2 Praxair 116.25 -.16
+12.7 PrecCastpt213.57 +1.18
+12.5 ProAssurs 47.46 -.73
-15.2 ProShtS&P 28.85 -.04
+35.0 ProUltQQQ 73.98 +.99
-30.3 PrUShQQQ 20.67 -.30
+32.7 ProUltSP 80.11 +.27
+51.4 PUItSP500s 66.82 +.39
-78.1 PrUVxST rs 45.85 +2.00
-31.4 PrUShCrde 27.75 +.64
-44.0 ProUltSilv 24.69 -.97
+13.9 ProctGam 77.31 +.46
+19.4 ProgsvCp 25.19 +.19
-28.3 PrUShSP rs 38.79 -.15
+20.8 PrUShL20 rs76.62 -1.15
-37.0 ProUSR2K 15.98 -.37
-40.1 PUSSP500 22.63 -.15
-42.3 PrUPShQQQ23.39 -.48
+2.8 ProspctCap 11.17 +.08
+41.4 Prudentl 75.41 +.34
+5.8 PSEG 32.37 -.33
+5.4 PubStrg 152.81 +.16
-12.7 PulteGrp 15.86 +.48
-17.0 PMMI 6.69 +.08
-8.9 QEP Res 27.58 -.12
+167.6 Qihoo360 79.46 +1.58
+7.8 Qualcom 66.71 +.15
+16.9 QntmDSS 1.45 +.01
+12.2 Questar 22.17 +.02
+18.4 Quiksilvr 5.03 +.08
+13.8 RF MicD 5.10 +.06
-39.6 Rackspace 44.86 +1.14
+116.2 RadianGrp 13.21 +.42
+59.0 RadioShk 3.37 +.04
+10.8 RLauren 166.14 +.59
+126.0 RaptorPhm 13.22 +.50
+11.8 Ravenlnds 29.48 +.07
+31.5 Raytheon 75.68 +.16
+1.5 Realogy n 42.57 +.04
+6.7 RedwdTr 18.03 +.46
+26.9 RegncyEn 27.52 +.20
+33.1 RegionsFn 9.49 +.05
+9.3 RelSdAI 67.90 -.62
+185.7 ReneSola 4.40 +.07
-3.5 Renren 3.33 -.02
+56.5 Replgn 9.83 -.09
+4.1 ResrceCap 5.83 -.01
+2.7 RetailOpp 13.20 +.11
+15.4 ReynAmer 47.80 +.29
-22.0 RioTinto 45.30 -.90
+150.0 RiteAid 3.40 +.05
-20.6 RiverbedT 15.65 +.05
+16.4 RockwlAut 97.77 +.73
+22.8 RockColl 71.43 +.41
+13.6 Rogers 56.39 +.80
+11.2 Roper 124.01 +.26
+2.7 RoyalBkg 61.92 +.39
+7.1 RylCarb 36.40 +.51
-4.0 RoyDShllB 68.02 -.84
-5.2 RoyDShllA 65.35 -.71
-27.4 RoyGIld 59.05 -1.02
-2.8 Ryland 35.49 +.97
S-T-U
+27.4 S&TBcp 23.03 +.26
+34.9 SAIC 15.27 +.16
+5.6 SCANA 48.20 -.25
+40.6 SLMCp 24.08 +.10
+32.0 SM Energy 68.90 -.62
+13.5 SpdrDJIA 148.25 +.21
-16.1 SpdrGold 135.87 -.84
+15.3 S&P500ETF164.17 +.26
+8.7 SpdrHome 28.92 +.34
-2.5 SpdrLehHY 39.69 +.11
+27.5 SpdrS&P RB35.65 +.26
+25.8 SpdrRetl 78.47 +.68
+15.3 SpdrOGEx 62.37 -.39
-19.4 SpdrMetM 36.36 -.14
-39.5 SABESPs 8.42 -.06
+33.3 SabnR 53.04 +.54
+43.9 Safeway 26.03 +.23
+99.3 Saia Inc s 30.72 +.73
-14.8 StJoe 19.67 +.04
+51.6 Saks 15.93 +.02
+3.9 Salesforcs 43.65 +.87
+68.5 SalixPhm 68.19 +1.72
+10.8 SallyBty 26.11 +.05


+25.1 SJuanB 16.77 -.30
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-18.4 SandRdge 5.18 -.02
+3.7 Sanofi 49.14 +.12
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-11.7 SeaWorldnn 29.59 -.11
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-2.9 SenHous 22.96
-38.2 Sequenom 2.91 -.02
+33.9 ShandaGm 4.07 -.48
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-5.2 ShipFin 15.77 +.10
-34.6 SibanyeG n 4.09 +.23
-38.1 SiderurNac 3.65 -.06
+25.5 SignetJwlrs 67.00 -2.83
-41.6 SilvStdg 8.69 +.20
-26.2 SilvWhtng 26.63 +.26
-7.4 SimonProp 146.34 +1.07
+58.4 Sina 79.57 +1.41
+25.6 SiriusXM 3.63 +.06
+27.7 SkywksSol 25.92 +.56
+31.0 SmithWes 11.06 +.26
-39.3 SmithMicro .91 -.01
+22.7 Smucker 105.80 +.48
+20.0 SnapOn 94.81 +.65
+41.7 SodaStrm 63.59 +.05
-8.2 SolarCap 21.96 +.22
+177.0 SolarCityn 33.05 +.90
+27.0 SonocoP 37.76 -.19
+102.9 Sonus 3.45 +.11
+80.2 SonyCp 20.18 +.02
+16.1 SourcC 60.61 +.28
+15.6 SoJerlnd 58.18 +.14
-3.2 SouthnCo 41.44 -.20
-27.6 SthnCopper 27.40 -.02
+24.9 SwstAirl 12.79 +.02
+14.5 SwstnEngy 38.27 +.04
+8.5 SovranSS 67.40
+20.9 SpectraEn 33.10 -.26
-7.0 SpiritRC n 8.68 -.03
+21.8 Sprintn 6.76 +.10
+7.9 SP Matls 40.50 +.13
+23.9 SPHIthC 49.41 +.15
+12.9 SPCnSt 39.39 +.16
+22.3 SP Consum 58.04 +.28
+14.3 SPEngy 81.60 -.86
+19.2 SPDRFncl 19.53 +.05
+16.9 SP Inds 44.29 +.13
+9.4 SPTech 31.55 +.17
+6.7 SP Util 37.27 -.22
-1.1 StdPac 7.27 +.18
+16.1 StanBlkDk 85.85 +.67
+23.2 Staples 14.05 -.07
+17.8 StarGas 4.82 -.02
+32.7 Starbucks 71.18 +.22
+11.5 StarwdHtl 63.97 +.76
+13.7 StlDynam 15.61 +.10
-31.1 Sterlite 5.93 +.37
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+35.5 SuffolkBcp 17.75 +.43
+21.8 SunHydrl 31.76 +.25
+4.0 Suncorgs 34.30 -.49
+134.3 SunEdison 7.52 +.12
+288.3 SunPower 21.82 +.17
+14.4 SunTrst 32.42 +.12
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+103.2 SwiftTrans 18.53 +.28
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+34.7 Synovus 3.30 -.02
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-1.6 TECO 16.50 -.10
+24.9 TJX 53.00 +.20
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-2.9 TaiwSemi 16.67 +.41
-5.4 TalismE g 10.72 -.12
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-20.5 TataMotors 22.83 +.53
-12.9 Taubmn 68.60 -.02
-30.0 TeckResg 25.45 -.26
-17.3 TelefBrasil 19.90 +.06
-3.1 Tellabs 2.21 -.01
+33.8 Tenneco 46.99 +.63
-3.3 Teradata 59.87 +.95
-8.5 Teradyn 15.45 +.16
+4.3 Terex 29.31 -.57
-.5 TerraNitro 212.99 +2.49
+390.3 TeslaMot 166.06 -.39
+5.5 Tesoro 46.46 +.07
+2.2 TevaPhrm 38.18 -.03
+25.0 Texlnst 38.61 +.18
+50.3 TexRdhse 25.25 +.25
+10.6 Textainer 34.80 -.04
+10.6 Textron 27.41 +.60
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+4.9 TibcoSft 23.05 +.36
+34.4 Tiffany 77.07 -.18
+11.6 THortong 54.87 -.01
+27.5 TimeWarn 61.00 +.02
+19.5 Timken 57.14 -.02
-3.5 TiVo Inc 11.88 +.30
-3.5 TollBros 31.19 +.55
-32.9 TorchEngy .45
+35.2 Torchmark 69.63 +.27
+2.1 TorDBkg 85.35 +1.76
+7.7 Total SA 56.01 -.90
-7.5 TowerGp If 14.53 +.53
+1.9 Transocn 45.52 -.16


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+13.0 TriContd 18.14 +.07
-9.7 TriCntlpf 45.16
-14.1 TrimbleNs 25.69 +.43
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-32.7 TurqHillRs 5.12 -.12
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+.1 TwoHrblnv 9.56 +.16
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+49.0 Tyson 28.91 +.46
+23.3 UBSAG 19.41 -.25
-3.9 UDR 22.85 +.14
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+5.6 UILHold 37.82 -.01
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-15.8 USG 23.63 +.26
+15.8 UltraPtg 21.00 -.01
+51.1 UnderArmr 73.32 +.97
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+22.6 UnionPac 154.15 +.15
+3.7 Unit 46.71 -.06
+21.9 UtdContl 28.50 +.57
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+22.8 UtdRentals 55.90 +.81
+13.1 US Bancrp 36.11
+.4 USNGas 18.98 +.20
+15.6 USOilFd 38.58 -.50
-25.2 USSteel 17.85 -.10
+22.5 UtdTech 100.46 +.48
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-.1 UnvslCp 49.84 +.58
+8.0 UrbanOut 42.49 +.54
V-W-X-Y-Z
+23.8 VFCp 186.86 +.27
-31.0 ValeSA 14.47 -.41
-36.0 ValeSApf 12.98 -.34
+4.9 ValeroE 35.80 +.03
+9.4 VlyNBcp 10.17 +.07
+181.1 ValVis A 5.06 +.27
+15.3 VanS&P500 75.18 +.12
-1.1 VangREIT 65.05 +.10
-16.0 VangEmg 37.41 +.22
+5.6 VangEur 51.57 -.15
+5.8 VangFTSE 37.28
+12.2 Vectren 33.00 -.14
-92.2 Velti .35 -.01
+28.2 VeoliaEnv 15.69 +.14
+24.6 Verisign 48.38 -.08
+10.5 VerizonCm 47.82 +1.26
+50.6 ViacomB 79.41
-15.5 ViadCorp 22.96 +.21
-55.0 Vical 1.31 -.01
+33.2 ViroPhrm 30.31 +.49
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+18.3 Vishaylnt 12.58 +.03
-9.9 VMware 84.86 +1.04
+26.2 Vodafone 31.80 +2.39
-8.5 VulcanM 47.65 -.21
+27.5 WPCarey 66.49 -.56
+6.2 WalMart 72.43 +.05
+28.6 Walgrn 47.58 +.51
-63.9 WalterEn 12.96 -.01
+78.7 WarnerCh 21.52 +.53
-5.2 WREIT 24.80 +.04
+21.3 WsteMInc 40.92 -.18
+13.6 Waters 98.93 +.40
+33.5 Weathflntl 14.94 -.17
+30.0 WebsterFn 26.71 +.43
+9.3 WeinRIt 29.26 +.11
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+9.3 WestarEn 31.27 -.05
-20.5 WAstEMkt 12.18 +.24
-12.9 WAstlnfSc 11.42 -.02
+42.9 WDigital 60.72 -1.74
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+1.7 Westpacs 28.05 +.07
-.4 Weyerhsr 27.72 +.06
+27.5 Whrlpl 129.78 +.94
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+10.6 WmsCos 36.22 +.01
+29.9 WmsSon 56.86 -.11
-3.3 Windstrm 8.01 -.04
+10.7 WiscEngy 40.79 -.17
+21.4 WTJpHedg 44.78 +.22
-30.2 WT India 13.52 +.22
+3.8 Woodward 39.58 +.39
+37.1 Workday n 74.71 -.05
+24.6 WIdW Ent 9.83 +.05
+98.3 XOMA 4.76 -.01
+4.1 XcelEngy 27.80 -.08
+47.2 Xerox 10.04 +.12
+22.8 Xilinx 44.02 +.50
-7.9 Xylem 24.95 +.44
+37.2 Yahoo 27.30 +.19
-33.1 Yamanag 11.51 +.24
+48.6 Yandex 32.01 -.40
+185.4 Yelp 53.80 +2.13
+78.7 YingliGrn 4.20 +.13
+13.8 YorkWater 20.00 +.29
+31.4 YoukuTud 23.96 +.24
+6.3 YumBrnds 70.55 -.23
+204.1 ZaleCp 12.50 +.87
+3.5 Zalicus .67 +.03
+244.6 Zillow 95.62 +6.62
+18.3 Zimmer 78.86 +.61
-5.0 Zoetis n 29.47 -.10
+7.2 ZweigFd 13.04 +.02
+23.3 Zynga 2.91 +.03


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cld Issue has been called for
redemption by company. d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock
issue., pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price, rt Right to buy security at a specified pnce. rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued, wd When distrib-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security. vI Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus
stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months, f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred, k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears, m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering
market costs is paid from fund assets, d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available. p previous day's net asset value. s fund
split shares dunng the week. x fund paid a distribution during the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


Interestrates







The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
fell to 2.76
percent on
Thursday. Yields
affect interest
rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME FED
RATE FUNDS
YEST 3.25 .13
6 MO AGO 3.25 .13
1 YR AGO 3.25 .13


TREASURIES YEST PVS
3-month T-bill .02 0.03
6-month T-bill .05 0.06
52-wk T-bill .11 0.12


NET 1YR
CHG AGO
-0.01 .10
-0.01 .14
-0.01 .17


2-year T-note .40 0.40 .. .27
5-year T-note 1.61 1.58 +0.03 .68
10-year T-note 2.76 2.77 -0.01 1.65
30-year T-bond 3.71 3.74 -0.03 2.77


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.52 3.57 -0.05 2.47
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.29 5.29 ... 4.22
Barclays USAggregate 2.50 2.46 +0.04 1.81
Barclays US High Yield 6.40 6.40 ... 6.74
Moodys MAA Corp Idx 4.58 4.51 +0.07 3.41
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.70 1.70 ... .95
Barclays US Corp 3.42 3.37 +0.05 2.95


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar rose
versus the
Japanese yen,
euro and other
major currencies,
getting a lift from
positive news on
U.S. economic
growth and
unemployment
aid applications.






k fl


MAJORS CLOSE
USD per British Pound 1.5500
Canadian Dollar 1.0530
USD per Euro 1.3244
Japanese Yen 98.26
Mexican Peso 13.3477
EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EA
Israeli Shekel 3.6259
Norwegian Krone 6.0902
South African Rand 10.3520
Swedish Krona 6.5829
Swiss Franc .9308


ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.1195
6.1205
7.7549
66.600
1.2752
1112.15
29.95


1YR.
CHG %CHG AGO
-.0025 -.16% 1.5836
+.0047 +.45% .9886
-.0093 -.70% 1.2528
+.55 +.56% 78.70
+.0586 +.44% 13.3124
ST
+.0026 +.94% 4.0316
-.0011 -.67% 5.8256
-.0006 -.62% 8.4019
-.0017 -1.12% 6.6635
-.0106 -.99% .9587


+.0013 +.12% .9651
-.0000 -.00% 6.3529
-.0006 -.01% 7.7556
-2.225 -3.34% 55.695
-.0021 -.16% 1.2530
-1.52 -.14% 1135.01
-.03 -.10% 29.94


Commodities
The price of oil
dipped after
surging earlier in
the week over
worries about a
potential U.S. at-
tack against Syr-
ia. Silver led a
decline in met-
als. Crops were
mixed.





rE


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 108.80
Ethanol (gal) 2.46
Heating Oil (gal) 3.18
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.62
Unleaded Gas (gal) 3.07

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1412.90
Silver (oz) 24.09
Platinum (oz) 1522.40
Copper (Ib) 3.24
Palladium (oz) 736.75

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.24
Coffee (Ib) 1.13
Corn (bu) 4.97
Cotton (Ib) 0.93
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 316.10
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.38
Soybeans (bu) 14.30
Wheat (bu) 6.41


PVS.
110.10
2.50
3.21
3.57
3.09


%CHG
-1.18
-0.36
-0.73
+1.01
-0.91


PVS. %CHG
1419.00 -0.40
24.39 -1.23
1540.10 -1.15
3.31 -1.74
746.05 -1.25


%YTD
+18.5
+12.2
+4.6
+8.0
+9.1

%YTD
-15.6
-20.2
-1.1
-10.9
+4.9

%YTD
-4.9
-21.3
-28.8
+24.2
-15.5
+18.9
+0.8
-17.6


PVS.
1.23
1.15
5.04
0.93
308.70
1.37
14.33
6.47


%CHG
+0.20
-1.27
-1.39

+2.40
+0.95
-0.21
-0.81






The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013 NATIONAL NEWS www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 7


Financial stress may hit



your brain and wallet


WASHINGTON (AP) -
Being short on cash may
make you a bit slower in
the brain, a new study
suggests.
People worrying about
having enough money to
pay their bills tend to lose
temporarily the equivalent
of 13 IQ points, scientists
found when they gave
intelligence tests to shop-
pers at a New Jersey mall
and farmers in India.
The idea is that finan-
cial stress monopolizes
thinking, making other
calculations slower and
more difficult, sort of
like the effects of going
without sleep for a night.
And this money-and-
brain crunch applies, albeit
to a smaller degree, to about
100 million Americans who
face financial squeezes, say
the team of economists and
psychologists who wrote
the study published in
Friday's issue of the journal
Science.
"Our paper isn't about
poverty. It's about people
struggling to make ends
meet," said Sendhil
Mullainathan, a Harvard
economist and study co-au-
thor. "When we think about
people who are financially
stressed, we think they are
short on money, but the
truth is they are also short
on cognitive capacity."
If you are always


thinking about overdue
bills, a mortgage or rent,
or college loans, it takes
away from your focus on
other things. So being late
on loans could end up
costing you both interest
points and IQ points,
Mullainathan said.
The study used tests that
studied various aspects
of thinking including a
traditional IQ test, getting
the 13 IQ point drop, said
study co-author Jiaying
Zhao, a professor of psy-
chology and sustainability
at the University of British
Columbia.
The scientists looked at
the effects of finances on
the brain both in the lab
and in the field. In con-
trolled lab-like conditions,
they had about 400 shop-
pers at Quaker Bridge
Mall in central New Jersey
consider certain financial
scenarios and tested
their brain power. Then
they looked at real life in
the fields of India, where
farmers only get paid once
a year. Before the harvest,
they take out loans and
pawn goods. After they
sell their harvest, they are
flush with cash.
Mullainathan and col-
leagues tested the same 464
farmers before and after the
harvest and their IQ scores
improved by 25 percent
when their wallets fattened.


"It's a very powerful ef-
fect," said study co-author
Eldar Shafir, a Princeton
University psychology
professor. "When you are
dealing with budgetary
finances, it does intrude
on your thinking. It's at
the top of your mind."
In the New Jersey part
of the study, the scientists
tested about 400 shoppers,
presenting them with sce-
narios that involved a large
and a small car repair bill.
Those with family incomes
of about $20,000 scored
about the same as those
with $70,000 incomes on
IQ tests when the car bill
was small. But when the
poorer people had to think
about facing a whopping
repair bill, their IQ scores
were 40 percent lower.
Education differences
can't be a major factor be-
cause the poor only scored
worse when they were
faced with big bills, Safir
said. The more educated
rich may have learned to
divide their attention, but
that wouldn't be a signifi-
cant factor, he said.
The study's authors
and others say the results
contradict long-standing
conservative economic
social and political theory
that say it is individuals -
not circumstances that
are the primary problem
with poverty.


I NATIONAL NEWS BRIEFS


Powers limited,
Obama, Biden seek
action on guns
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Months after gun control
efforts crumbled in
Congress, Vice President
Joe Biden stood shoulder
to shoulder Thursday
with the attorney general
and the top U.S. firearms
official and declared the
Obama administration
would take two new steps
to curb American gun
violence.
But the narrow,
modest scope of those
steps served as pointed
reminders that without
congressional backing,
President Barack Obama's
capacity to make a differ-
ence is severely inhibited.
Still, Biden renewed a
pledge from him and the
president to seek legisla-
tive fixes to keep guns
from those who shouldn't
have them a pledge
with grim prospects for
fulfillment amid the cur-
rent climate on Capitol
Hill.
"If Congress won't
act, we'll fight for a new
Congress," Biden said in
the Roosevelt Room of
the White House. "It's that
simple. But we're going to
get this done."
One new policy will bar
military-grade weapons
that the U.S. sells or do-
nates to allies from being
imported back into the
U.S. by private entities.
In the last eight years,
the U.S. has approved
250,000 of those guns to
come back to the U.S.,
the White House said,
arguing that some end
up on the streets. From
now on, only museums
and a few other entities
like the government will
be eligible to reimport
military-grade firearms.
The ban will largely
affect antiquated, World
War II-era weapons that,
while still deadly, rarely
turn up at crime scenes,
leaving some to question
whether the new policy is
much ado about nothing.
"Banning these rifles
because of their use in
quote-unquote crimes
is like banning Model Ts
because so many of them
are being used as getaway
cars in bank robberies,"
said Ed Woods, a 47-year-
old from the Chico area of
northern California.


J&J tries new
cap to curb fatal
Tylenol overdoses
WASHINGTON (AP) -
Bottles of Tylenol sold in
the U.S. will soon bear red
warnings alerting users to
the potentially fatal risks
of taking too much of the
popular pain reliever. The
unusual step, disclosed by
the company that makes
Tylenol, comes amid a
growing number of lawsuits
and pressure from the fed-
eral government that could
have widespread ramifica-
tions for a medicine taken
by millions of people daily.
Johnson & Johnson says
the warning will appear on
the cap of each new bottle
of Extra Strength Tylenol
sold in the U.S. in October
and on most other Tylenol
bottles in coming months.
The warning will make
it clear that the over-the-
counter drug contains
acetaminophen, an ingre-
dient that's the nation's
leading cause of sudden
liver failure. The new cap is
designed to grab the atten-
tion of people who don't
read warnings that already
appear in the fine print on
the product's label, accord-
ing to company executives.


Feds won't sue
to stop marijuana
use in 2 states
WASHINGTON (AP)
- In a dramatic change
in drug policy, the
Justice Department said
Thursday that it won't
sue to stop the states of
Colorado and Washington
from allowing recreation-
al marijuana use as it is-
sued a sweeping national
policy statement that
outlines its top priorities
for pot enforcement.
The action, welcomed
by supporters of legaliza-
tion, could set the stage
for more states to legal-
ize marijuana. Alaska
is scheduled to vote on
legalizing recreational use
of marijuana next year,
and a few other states
plan similar votes in 2016.
Under the policy, the
top investigative priorities
range from preventing the
distribution of marijuana
to minors to preventing
sales revenue from going
to criminal enterprises,
gangs and cartels and
preventing the diversion
of marijuana outside of
states where it is legal
under state law.


To Be Americans!

SMagician For Kids & Adults Fri Night


Obamacare's taxing issues


Much has been
made of the fi-
nancial hammer
that will fall on people
who can afford to pay
for health care under the
Affordable Care Act but
choose to forgo coverage.
Starting next year,
individuals and their
dependents are required
to have minimum es-
sential health insurance
unless they qualify for
an exemption. That's
why you are hearing so
much about the new
health care exchanges,
which will have open
enrollment from Oct. 1
to March 31.
If you are deemed to be
in the financial position
to pay for coverage or
you don't fall under an
exemption, you'll have to
pay a penalty for being
uninsured, which you
will have to fork over
when you file your federal
income tax return.
The penalty for being
uninsured starts at $95
annually for an individual
and can go up to $285
for a family, or 1 percent
of a family's household
income, depending on
which is higher. The
fee for children is half
the adult amount and
increases every year.
By 2016 the penalty
rises to $695 per adult, or
2.5 percent of household
income, whichever is
higher. The amount you
may owe is based on the
number of months in a
given year you go without
the required coverage.
You won't have to pay if
you are uninsured for less
than three months of the
year.
A fight over the require-
ment for coverage landed
in the Supreme Court,
which ruled that the
penalty amounts to a tax.
"The federal government
does not have the power
to order people to buy
health insurance," Chief
Justice John Roberts said
in upholding the land-
mark law. But, he added,
the government "does
have the power to impose
a tax on those without
health insurance."
Since the penalty
has been judged a tax,
it means the Internal
Revenue Service is


Michelle
Srglejrv


supposed to have the
sledgehammer to carry
out the mandate.
However, the reality -
at least for now is that
the agency only has a soft
mallet.
The law prohibits the
IRS from using its usual
tough collection tools
- getting a lien against
your property or putting
a claim on your wages -
to collect any payment
you owe related to the
individual responsibility
provision.
Still, the IRS may collect
your "shared responsibili-
ty payment" by snatching
part or all of your refund
depending on what you
owe. Additionally, if you
fail to pay the penalty,
interest will accrue, the
IRS says. The interest
charged is the same that
is imposed for taxes that
are paid late. An estimat-
ed 6 million people will
pay a penalty tax because
they are uninsured in
2016, according to the
Congressional Budget
Office and the staff of
the Joint Committee on
Taxation.
Surely the government
will be watching to see
if people figure out how
to game the system by
changing the amount
they instruct their em-
ployers to withhold from
their paychecks, which
would result in their not
getting a refund.
It's through the federal
income tax form that you
will have to indicate if
you have health insur-
ance or are eligible for
an exemption. But this
doesn't go into effect until
you file your 2014 federal
return in 2015.
The health insurance
marketplace will provide
certificates of exemp-
tion, the IRS says. There
are a number of ways
to avoid paying a pen-
alty, including coverage
through an employer, a


Irrl


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LD ~



1


August 31 st & September 1st, 2013
Saturday & Sunday 10am-4pm

Free Admission
Sponsored by

-I VenicedAGondoUier


Located on Miami Avenue in
historic Downtown Venice.
Take Venice Avenue west over the bridge
and turn left onto Highway 41. Go one block
and make a right onto Miami Avenue.

For more information call 941-484-6722 or 813-962-0388


wwwArteivao


Iiit






ill II 'al l
I I' ^ ^ ^


I


o The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


WIRE Page 7


www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


veterans' plan, Medicare
or Medicaid. If you don't
fall into the various
categories to avoid a fee,
you can still request an
exemption. Some indi-
viduals may qualify for an
exemption on religious
grounds or because they
have very low income and
coverage is considered
unaffordable. You won't
face a penalty if you are
not required to file a
tax return because your
income is too low.
The IRS says informa-
tion will be made avail-
able later about how tax
returns will change to
allow people to report
their health insurance
coverage or an exemp-
tion. Health insurers will
be required to provide
everyone that they cover
each year with informa-
tion that will help them
demonstrate they have
coverage, according to
the IRS. So you may
have to attach to your
tax return a form much
like you do now when
you include your W-2 or
a 1099 that reports other
sources of income.
If you have more
questions about tax
issues regarding the
ACA, go to www.
irs.gov. Search for
"Questions and Answers
on the Individual
Shared Responsibility
Provision." You can also
find answers at www.
heathcare.gov.
As it is with so much
concerning the Affordable
Care Act, find out how
it affects you especially
because now it will be
linked to information
you provide on your tax
return.

Readers can write
to Michelle Singletary
by email at michelle.
singletary@washpost.com.







Shop Carlotte

Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecountychamber.org






iPage 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/WORLD NEWS


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


TODAY




Times of clouds and
sun

92 / 740
10% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and Real Feel Temperature Today





84 97 97 90
8 a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3.5 Moderate; 6-7 Hi0i; 8-10 Very High; I11 Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.
AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Thursday


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


,.: "" ,, "".


Partly sunny with a Partly sunny with a
stray t-storm stray t-storm


910/ 740
20% chance of ra


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 91/74 part cldy none
Sarasota 90/75 storms afternoon

SUN AND MOON


The Sun
Today
Saturday
The Moon
Today
Saturday
New


Rise
7:07 a.m.
7:07 a.m.
Rise
2:00 a.m.
2:50 a.m.
First Full


Set
7:51 p.m.
7:50 p.m.
Set
3:49 p.m.
4:33 p.m.
Last


A a.


067_ 0 p
0 I 3 Sep 5 Sep12 Sep19 Sep26
0 50 100 150 200 300 500


0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Thursday
Trees **[ I
Grass 'y,
Weeds *".*".* :
Molds NA. I
absent low moderate hih veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Thursday
Temperatures
High/Low 890/730
Normal High/Low 92/740
Record High 950 (2007)
Record Low 670 (1969)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hoursthrough 5 p.m. Thursday 0.01"
Month to date 9.22"
Normal month to date 7.48"
Year to date 37.45"
Normal year to date 36.66"
Record 1.45" (1972)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.22 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 37.45 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour penod ending at 5 p.m.


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 1:42a 7:54a 2:06p 8:17p
Sat. 2:25a 8:37a 2:48p 9:00p
Sun. 3:07a 9:18a 3:30p 9:41p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 1:31a
Sat. 2:14a


Low High Low

4:16a 10:38a 7:09p
5:50a 11:56a 8:01p


Englewood
Today 12:08a 2:32a 9:15a 5:25p
Sat. 12:51a 4:06a 10:33a 6:17p
Boca Grande
Today 8:20a 12:53a 11:56p 3:46p
Sat. 9:38a 2:27a --- 4:38p
El Jobean
Today 2:03a 4:45a 11:10a 7:38p
Sat. 2:46a 6:19a 12:28p 8:30p
Venice
Today 7:30a 1:11a 11:06p 4:04p
Sat. 8:48a 2:45a 11:35p 4:56p

FLORIDA CITIES
Today Sat.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Apalachicola 92 76 t 91 75 t
Bradenton 90 76 t 90 75 t
Clearwater 90 77 t 89 76 t
Coral Springs 91 76 pc 90 77 t
Daytona Beach 91 77 t 89 75 t
Fort Lauderdale 89 78 pc 90 79 t
Fort Myers 91 74 pc 90 75 t
Fort Pierce 91 75 pc 92 73 t
Gainesville 91 75 t 89 73 t
Jacksonville 91 75 t 89 73 t
Key Largo 89 80 pc 89 81 t


920/ 760
ain 30% chance of rain

Cleamater
90 77

-- Tampa
91/77


J
St. Petersburg p
91/76 90


Longboat Key
90/79


Saraso
90/75


MONDAY


Scattered storms


TUESDAY THE NATION
S -- 0s -Os s I 10s I 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s9 M
A Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Scattered storms 9 864 oawa
S..42........ .Momre l
Bilina o ''8268


91 /760 91 /740
30% chance of rain 50% chance of rain


Plant City
*921 75

n


JBrando
92 73


Yf J
Winter Haven
92, 76

Bartu *--
91,76


ollo Beach .
75 RFt. / ad
S91/72


Bradenton >
90/76
Myakka City
-- 92/73
otak .
6 :i' T


Osprey
90/75 1

Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.

Englk
90 i
Gulf Water
Temperature

86 B
$$K


Venice
490/74



6 ,d a


76 : "

Placida
91/75.
oca Grande
9/78


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2013

Publication date: 8/30/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
WNW 5-10 0-2 Smooth
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola


J
Wauchula
92 74

Limestone
j93 73


Arcadia
92,74 -


North Pot 9Hull
92/74 93/73
i Port Charlotte
%92/74
_ .


Punta Gorda
92/73


Fort Myers
91/74

Cape Coral
91/74


Sanibel
89/78


W 7-14 1-2 Light AccuWe


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
88 78 pc
91 76 t
91 75 t
90 76 t
90 78 pc
90 74 pc
90 74 t
90 72 t
92 76 t
90 76 t
92 75 pc


.-


Lehigh Acres
91/73


Bonita Springs
90/73

ather.com --


City H
Pompano Beach 9'
St. Augustine 9'
St. Petersburg 9
Sanford 9:
Sarasota 9'
Tallahassee 9:
Tampa 9
Titusville 9'
Vero Beach 9
West Palm Beach 9
Winter Haven 9


Today Sat.
i Lo W Hi Lo W
0 79 pc 91 81 t
0 76 t 88 74 t
1 76 t 89 75 t
3 78 t 93 76 t
0 75 t 90 73 t
3 73 t 92 74 t
1 77 t 90 76 t
0 77 t 89 75 t
1 76 pc 91 74 t
1 77 pc 91 78 t
2 76 t 91 74 t


Iran to work with Russia to



stop strike on Syria


TEHRAN, Iran (AP) -
Iranian President Hassan
Rouhani said his country
will press forward with
efforts to ward off mili-
tary action by the U.S.
and its allies against the
Tehran-backed regime of
Syrian President Bashar
Assad, Iranian state TV
reported on Thursday.
The report said the
remarks came late
Wednesday during a
phone conversation
between Rouhani and
his Russian counterpart
Vladimir Putin.
Rouhani was quoted
as saying "military action
will bring great costs
for the region" and "it
is necessary to apply all
efforts to prevent it."
Gen. Mohammad
Ali Jafari, chief of Iran's
powerful Revolutionary
Guards, used stronger
rhetoric while talking to
the Tasnim news website,
saying an attack on Syria
would draw in Israel.
"The Zionists should
know that a U.S. military
attack on Syria will not
save the fake regime
from the resistance but
it means the immediate
destruction of Israel,"
Jafari was quoted as
saying.
According to the state
TV report, President
Rouhani said both Iran
and Russia would work
in "extensive coopera-
tion" to prevent any mili-
tary action against Syria.
Rouhani also called such
military action an "open
violation" of interna-
tional laws.
While condemning
chemical weapons,
Rouhani was quoted as


AP FILE PHOTO


In this Aug. 15 photo, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks during the debate on the
proposed Cabinet at the parliament, in Tehran, Iran. Rouhani said his country will press
forward with efforts to ward off military action by the U.S. and its allies against the Tehran-
backed regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, Iranian state TV reported on Thursday.


saying, "Early judgment
can be dangerous, before
clarification" can be
made of allegations that
Syria used the weapons.
"Western countries
have found some excuse
to prepare the ground
to weaken the stance of
Syria in further talks"
after the Syrian govern-
ment has won the upper
hand in confronting
rebels, Rouhani said.
The president also
predicted regional conse-
quences for any military
strike.
"Syria has a strategic
and sensitive situation,
and any sort of military
invasion would lead to
instability in the entire
Middle East," he said.
Iran has regularly
warned the U.S. over


possible military action
against Syria by calling
it the country's own "red
line" as the U.S. naval
fleet takes positions
near Syria and President
Barack Obama considers
a military response to the
alleged use of chemical
weapons by the Assad
government.
Hossein Naghavi,
spokesman of Iran's
parliamentary commit-
tee on national security
and foreign policy, told
the semi-official Fars
news agency Thursday
that an Iranian parlia-
mentary delegation will
visit Syria Saturday to
study developments and
to express support for its
people and government.
Assad is Iran's main
Middle East ally, and


his downfall would deal
a serious blow to Iran
and its proxy forces,
Hezbollah in Lebanon
and Palestinian Hamas.
Iran does not recognize
Israel.
In a Cabinet meeting
earlier on Wednesday,
Rouhani strongly
condemned the use of
chemical weapons.
"Iran, as a major
victim of chemical
weapons, is a pioneer
in fighting any kind of
inhuman weapons at
the global level, and it
strongly condemns any
use of this weapon," he
said, according to the
president's website.
Rouhani called for
the U.N. to investigate
both sides of the Syrian
conflict.


9 8 u o. : :Tornto
.. ...i ..o 8469
SChicago. WARl
E mm RIV7/1


S 9d uw h-


Kansas City
9/73


San Francisco n
74158

aa s

El Paso
,'\
,Chindj"ba


Fronts

Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-sto
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous state
High .............. 1070 at China Lake, CA


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


Today
Hi Lo W
89 66 pc
63 52 pc
88 73 t
87 67 pc
92 60 pc
93 73 pc
92 60 pc
79 67 pc
86 69 pc
82 65 pc
88 67 pc
84 67 pc
92 73 t
90 71 pc
86 70 pc
88 74 pc
86 71 pc
80 60 pc
104 80 s
96 65 pc
98 73 t
88 71 pc
78 58 t
56 37 c
86 65 pc
82 66 pc
88 54 pc
89 73 s
97 75 s
90 73 pc


Sat.
i Lo W
1 66 t
2 54 c
8 74 t
) 69 pc
1 55 pc
3 73 t
3 61 s
3 69 t
4 69 t
2 67 t
8 69 t
5 70 t
7 68 pc
) 71 t
3 70 t
) 73 t
8 72 t
2 66 t
3 79 pc
359 t
5 72 s
3 69 t
1 60 t
1 39 pc
8 60 t
4 68 t
3 49 s
8 75 pc
7 75 s
) 72 t


WORLD CITIES


city
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


Today Sat.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
73 61 pc 68 54 pc
112 83 s 113 82 s
79 61 s 84 58 s
77 60 pc 73 53 c
73 54 s 75 55 pc
98 74 s 96 73 s
73 45 pc 70 45 s
90 77 t 90 78 t
66 44 pc 60 46 pc
67 48 t 70 48 s
72 57 pc 72 60 pc
73 53 c 69 53 c
73 54 pc 69 49 pc
84 63 pc 88 63 s


* New Yor
83170
ashington
W72 ...


S............


.. ,: : : : : :. .





Low ...................... .. 34 at Poplar, MT

Today Sat.


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


70 pc 86 72 pc
70 pc 85 72 pc
75 s 102 75 s


67 pc 93
77 s 96
76 s 100
71 pc 78
58 pc 70
56 c 80
72 pc 88


Sat.
I Lo W
2 55 t
) 66 t
7 61 t
4 52 c
) 46 pc
1 67 s


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


I WORLD NEWS BRIEFS


Tropical Storm
Juliette hits
Mexico resorts

CABO SAN LUCAS,
Mexico (AP) Tropical
Storm Juliette blew down
trees and power lines
as it blasted across the
tourist resorts at the tip of
Mexico's Baja California
Peninsula, causing at
least one death, officials
said Thursday.
The storm's maximum
sustained winds decreased
to near 40 mph near mid-
day after hitting 50 mph
overnight. It was centered
about 95 miles northwest
of Cabo San Lazaro, but it
was projected to weaken
and curve away from land,
into the Pacific.
The storm flooded low-
lying areas and collapsed at
least one house, according
to civil defense officials.


Pakistan to hold
retrial of doctor
who helped CIA

PESHAWAR, Pakistan
(AP) A senior judicial
official on Thursday over-
turned the prison sen-
tence of a Pakistani doctor
who helped the CIA find
Osama bin Laden and
ordered his re-trial, citing
procedural problems with
the initial trial.
The official, Sahibzada
Mohammad Anis, issued
the ruling because the
person who sentenced Dr.
Shakil Afridi to 33 years in
prison was not authorized
to hear the case, said
Feroz Shah, a government
administrator.
Afridi was convicted in
May 2012 of "conspiring
against the state" by giving
money and providing medi-
cal treatment to Islamic
militants in Pakistan's
Khyber tribal area.


Congo conflict spills
over into Rwanda Putin underwear


KINSHASA, Congo (AP)
- Fighting from the war
in eastern Congo that pits
U.N. and Congolese forces
against rebels spilled over
into Rwanda on Thursday
when 10 shells landed in
a Rwandan border town
and a nearby village,
killing at least one person,
authorities said.
Rwanda, which the U.N.
accuses of backing the
rebels in the neighboring
nation of Congo, blamed
the Congolese military for
the shelling of its territory,
saying it was done with
the intention of dragging
them into the conflict.
Rwandan Foreign
Minister Louise
Mushikiwabo said a projec-
tile fired by Congolese forces
at 9:45 a.m. killed a woman
and seriously injured her
2-month-old baby in a mar-
ket in Rubavu town, located
3 kilometers (2 miles) from
the Congolese border.


artist seeks
French asylum

ST. PETERSBURG,
Russia (Bloomberg) -The
artist who fled Russia
after authorities seized
his paintings depicting
President Vladimir Putin
and Prime Minister Dmitry
Medvedev in women's un-
derwear has begun to take
steps to claim permanent
asylum in France.
"I don't want to return
to Russia," Konstantin
Altunin said in a phone in-
terview from Paris. "I want
to live and work in an
atmosphere of freedom."
Alexander Donskoy,
the owner of the Museum
of Power gallery in St.
Petersburg, Russia's second-
largest city, said Thursday
he has been unable to
secure an attorney to help
retrieve the paintings after
20 lawyers rejected requests
to represent the gallery.


Wa


-1


9










SPORTS


In Today's Sun
A 40-page
football preview


* NFL: Concussion lawsuit


* NFL PRESEASON: Washington 30, Tampa Bay 12


NFL, ex-players


reach settlement


THE DEAL
* NFL pays $765
million plus legal
costs, but admits no
wrongdoing.
* Individual awards
capped at $5 million
for those suffering
from Alzheimer's.
* Individual awards
capped at $4 million
for deaths from
chronic traumatic
encephalopathy.
* Individual awards
capped at $3 million
for players suffering
from dementia.


By MARYCLAIRE DALE
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA-The NFL
agreed to pay more than three-
quarters of a billion dollars to settle
lawsuits from thousands of former
players who developed dementia
or other concussion-related brain
disorders they say were caused by
the on-field violence that fueled
the game's rise to popularity and
profit.
The class-action settlement,
unprecedented in sports, was
announced Thursday after two
months of court-ordered media-
tion and is subject to approval by
a federal judge. It came exactly a
week before the first game of the
CONCUSSIONS | 3


Tampa Bay linebacker Najee Goode intercepts a pass against
Washington and returns it for a touchdown during the second
quarter Thursday at Raymond James Stadium.


That's about as sloppy as you
can play.
GREG SCHIANO Tampa Baycoach


Bucs lay egg in


preseason finale


By RICK STROUD
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA And just like that,
you wanted to take back all those
nasty things you said about Josh
Freeman, didn't you?
All he had to do was stick to the
sideline and let Bucs' fans get a
glimpse of life without him.
Tampa Bay's beleaguered
quarterback was held out of the
Bucs' 30-12 preseason loss to
Washington on Thursday.
The game belonged to rookie
quarterback Mike Glennon, who
made his first NFL start. The future
may belong to him, too, but his
present was pretty awful.
Glennon, the third-round pick
BUCS I 3


BUCS
AT JETS
WHO: Tampa Bay
(0-0) at New York
(0-0)
WHEN: Sept. 8, 1
p.m.
WHERE: MetLife
Stadium, East
Rutherford, N.J.
TV: FOX
RADIO: 103.5 FM,
620 AM, 1580 AM
INSIDE: Miami
wins preseason
finale against New
Orleans. Page 3


* PREP FOOTBALL:
Friday night preview

ONLINE
What are Rob Shore's 10 football
games of the year? Find out at
SunCoastSportsblog.com


Grudge


match


opens


season

Mantas, Pirates
have pointed to
this game
By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
It took only until Week
1 of prep football season
for the meaty parts of the
schedule to arrive.
Tonight's openers
include a rematch of last
season's District 7A-11
district tiebreaker (Lemon
Bay at Port Charlotte), and
a clash of the area's two
most pass-happy offenses
from 2012 (Charlotte at
North Port). Why wait?
Other area games
tonight include Venice at
Palmetto (both eight-win
teams last year), DeSoto
County at Lake Region
and Imagine School at
Community School of
Naples.
The Mantas-Pirates
contest is only improved
by the fact that it is quickly
becoming one of the
area's top rivalry games.
Lemon Bay defeated Port
Charlotte 28-20 in the
regular season last year,
the Mantas' first victory in
the series since 2003.
"That inspires our
kids to keep it going and
inspires their team to step
up," Lemon Bay coach D.J.
Ogilvie said of the rivalry.
"A rivalry is great when it's
competitive. When one
team's the dominant team,
it's not really a rivalry, it's a
butt-whipping."
Those days are gone
GRUDGE | 6

SCHEDULE
Imagine at Community School of
Naples, 7 p.m.
Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte,
7p.m.
DeSoto County at Lake Region,
7p.m.
Charlotte at North Port, 7:30
p.m.
Venice at Palmetto, 7p.m.


0 PREP VOLLEYBALL: Charlotte 3, DeSoto County 1





Beisner sparks CHS

....... ..... ........ .Tarpons offset
Bulldogs' star
by building big
early leads
By CHUCK BALLARO
": e SuN CORRESPONDENT
4l !PUNTA GORDA- If
Charlotte High School vol-
leyball coach Michelle Dill
can get nights of offense
.like Thursday on a regular
basis, the Tarpons will be a
team to reckon with.
S.j unior outside hitter
Marisa Beisner had 14 kills,
__.... 15 digs and served several
long runs as Charlotte with-
stood a dominant perfor-
mance from Tishonna Riley
to earn a 3-1 (25-13, 19-25,
25-17, 25-20) non-district
J.victory against DeSoto
County.
"We've been working on
our offense and it came
together better than the
first two games," Dill said.
"Our serve receive wasn't
very good, but they pulled
it through and hustled after
balls."
Charlotte (2-1) recorded
18 aces, including six by
senior middle hitter Jenny
D'Alessandro. She contrib-
uted 10 kills.
,:. Beisner added four aces
: and was instrumental in
getting the Tarpons out to
quick leads, including an
N 11-2 advantage in Game 1.
TARPONS I 6

UP NEXT
Charlotte: vs. Riverdale, Tuesday,
SUN PHOTO BY KAT GODINA 7 p.m.
DeSoto County: at Port
Charlotte's Marisa Beisner looks to play a tip over the block set up by DeSoto County's Kaitlin Steyer and Casey Hall during Charlotte, Tuesday,7 p.m.
Thursday's match in Punta Gorda. The hosts won the non-district match in four games.

0 MLB: Los Angeles Angels 2, Tampa Bay 0


Punchless Rays hit road in subdued mood


Team loses first home
series since mid-June
By JOE SMITH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
ST. PETERSBURG Evan
Longoria found a silver lining in a
rough week for the Rays in which
he admits "we haven't played well
at all."
"We can only go up," Longoria
said. "We can only get better."
The Rays will need to after
another loss, 2-0 to the Angels
Thursday in front of 15,741 at
Tropicana Field. They received


a solid five-inning spot start by
rookie Jake Odorizzi, but mus-
tered three hits, including squan-
dering another bases loaded
opportunity, for their fourth loss
in their past five games. It marked
the first series loss at home since
June 13-16.
"It's very frustrating," manager
Joe Maddon said. "This whole day
reeked of frustration."
The Rays (75-57) quietly put
on their college football jerseys
Thursday afternoon before
heading out to Oakland to kick off
what could be a telling, 10-game


west-coast trip, starting what they
hope will be another memorable
September run. They'll face an
A's team that, thanks to a walk-off
loss to the Tigers Thursday, is
still percentage points behind
them for the top wild card spot.
But Tampa Bay trails first-place
Boston by 2 1/2 or 3 1/2 games
in the American League East,
wanting to narrow the gap before
hosting them Sept. 14-16.
"We still have a lead in the wild
card, and are still within close
striking distance of Boston with
RAYS | 4


RAYS AT ATHLETICS
WHO: Tampa Bay (75-57) at
Oakland (75-58)
WHEN: Today, 10:05 p.m.
WHERE: O.co Coliseum Stadium,
PITCHERS: David Price (8-5,
3.28) vs. Jarrod Parker (10-6,
3.58)
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM, 1480
AM, 1530 AM, 1580 AM
INSIDE: Stone Crabs earn at
least a tie for South title. Page 3


INDEX I Lottery 2 1 Golf 21 Tennis 21 NFL 3 | Baseball 3-4 | Scoreboard 5 | College football 5 | Quick Hits 5 1 Preps 6


Friday, August 30, 2013


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com
* CASH 3
Aug. 29N .............................. 543...... 5-4-3
Aug. 29D ....................... ......... -7
Aug. 28N ....................... ............. -9-6
Aug. 28D ....................... ............. 9-2-8
Aug. 27N ............................... 7-4-6
Aug. 27D .......................... 91..... 7-9-
D-Day, N-Night

* PLAY
Aug. 29N........................ 0-0-9-9
Aug. 29D ............................. -2-4-2
Aug. 28N .................................9-5-6-2
Aug. 28D ............................. 5-9-3-4
Aug. 27N .......... ...................6-8-1-7
Aug. 27D ............................. -3-8-4
D-Day, N-Night

* FANTASY 5
Aug. 29............................. 3-4-7-9-26
Aug. 28 ....................... 1-18-25-27-32
Aug. 27 ..................... 10-12-20-24-35
Aug. 26 .........................6-16-18-20-29
Aug. 25 ..........................3-4-24-34-35
Aug.24 ....................... 3-4-7-25-27
PAYOFF FOR AUG. 28
2 5-digit winners............ $112,580.37
268 4-digit winners.............. $135.50
8,515 3-digit winners............. $11.50

* MEGA MONEY
Aug. 27 ....... ..................9-15-35-38
M egaBall......................................... 10

Aug. 23 ........................17-35-37-39
M egaBall......................................... 19
PAYOFF FOR AUG. 27
04-of-4 MB ......................... $550,000
2 4-of-4..................................... $2,800
33 3-of-4 MB .......................... $371.50
643 3-of-4.. ..................... $56.50
1,019 2-of-4 MB............................$25

* LOTTO
Aug. 28 ....................3-9-11-21-24-49
Aug. 24 ................11-24-36-45-46-47
Aug.21 ................3-6-36-46-48-52
PAYOFF FOR AUG. 28
0 6-digit winners ............... $2M
40 5-digit winners ...............$2,802
2,326 4-digit winners .................$41
38,621 3-digit winners .................$5

* POWERBALL
Aug.28 ....................... 6-7-9-19-32
Pow erball.......................... .......... 13

Aug. 24 ................ 12-17-25-45-59
Pow erball.......................... .......... 19
PAYOFF FOR AUG. 24
0 5of5+PB ......................$116M
0 5 of 5........................... $1,000,000
8 4of5 + PB...................... $10,000
177 4 of5 ............................... $100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$142 million

* MEGA MILLIONS
Aug.27 ..................... 4-7-30-36-38
Powerball.......................... .......... 38

Aug. 23 ..................1-9-17-20-53
Pow erball.......................... .......... 14
PAYOFF FOR AUG. 27
0 5 of 5 + MB......................... $51M
0 5 of5................................. $250,000
1 4of5 + MB......................... $10,000
32 4of5 ........................ ........ $150


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errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


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ERRANI ERRS, SERENA SAILS


Fourth-seeded

Italian crashes

out in 2nd round

By EDDIE PELLS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK Only a few spots
separate them in the seedings.
Still, the considerable gulf
between No. 1 Serena Williams
and No. 4 Sara Errani was hard
to ignore in their back-to-back
matches Thursday at the U.S.
Open.
Williams, seeking her 17th
Grand Slam title and second
straight at Flushing Meadows,
brushed off an ungainly slide
onto her backside en route to
a typically easy second-round
victory, 6-3, 6-0 over Galina
Voskoboeva in half-full Arthur
Ashe Stadium.
Barely worth talking about by
Williams' standards: "I'll have
to think about it and see what I
can do better, but it was OK," she
said.
Only an hour before on the
same court, a much different
scene: Errani imploded in a 6-3,
6-1 loss to her Italian teammate,
83rd-ranked Flavia Pennetta.
Then, with tears welling in her
eyes, Errani conceded that she's
struggling to handle her high
ranking and the high expecta-
tions that have come with that.
"My problem isn't that I lost.
I've lost a million times in my
life," Errani said. "My problem is
trying to find the desire to fight
and be on the court ready to
fight. For a few weeks, I haven't
felt like I wanted to be on the
court. That's the problem."
That concession was the most
unexpected development on
Day 4 of the U.S. Open, where


the tournament got back on
track after a rainy Wednesday
that postponed eight women's
matches and shuffled the
lineups.
Among the results from
Thursday's full slate:
No. 4 seed David Ferrer
overcame an error-filled second-
set tiebreaker to top Roberto
Bautista Agut 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-1,
6-2.
Second-seeded Victoria
Azarenka defeated Aleksandra
Wozniak of Canada 6-3, 6-1.
-Sixth-seeded Caroline
Wozniacki beat Chanelle
Scheepers 6-1, 6-2 to open the
night session, with No. 2 Rafael
Nadal playing the late match.
Williams got through her win
unscathed, and when she was
done in Ashe Stadium, five-time
champion Roger Federer, the
seventh seed, dispatched Carlos
Berloq 6-3, 6-2, 6-1 in 1 hour, 35
minutes.
"It's one of those matches I ex-
pect myself to win if possible in
straight sets and gain confidence
in the process," Federer said. "All
those things happened, so, yeah,
I'm pleased about it."
American Christina McHale
won a three-setter over Elina
Svitolina, while another U.S.
player, 81st-ranked Allison Riske,
had an easier time in a 6-4, 6-2
victory over Mona Barthel.
"You never know at these
things," Riske said after making
the third round of her second
straight Grand Slam tournament.
"Anything can happen."
No. 26 Sam Querrey lost in
four sets to Adrian Mannarino.
Another U.S. man, 20-year-old
Jack Sock, moved to the third
round with a 7-6 (3), 1-6, 7-5, 6-2
win over Maximo Gonzalez of
Argentina.


AP PHOTO
Sara Errani winds up to return a shot to Italian compatriot Flavia Pennetta
during the second round of the U.S. Open on Thursday in New York. Errani, the
fourth seed, lost 6-3, 6-1.


U.S. OPEN AT A GLANCE
TOP PLAYERS ON COURT TODAY: Men,
Second Round: No. 1 Novak Djokovic vs.
Benjamin Becker, No. 3 Andy Murray vs.
Leonardo Mayer, No. 5 Tomas Berdych vs.
Denis Kudla, No. 6 Juan Martin del Potro vs.
Lleyton Hewitt. Women, Third Round: No. 1
Serena Williams vs. Yaroslava Shvedova, No.


* GOLF ROUNDUP


AP PHOTO
Lexi Thompson, 18, stands with caddie Greg Johnston, during the Safeway Classic at the Columbia
Edgewater Country Club in Portland, Ore. on Thursday. Thompson was one shot off the lead.



Phatlum leads Safeway


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTLAND, Ore. -
Thailand's Pornanong
Phatlum shot an 8-under
64 on Thursday to take
a one-stroke lead over
Lexi Thompson after the
first round of the Safeway
Classic.
The 23-year-old
Phatlum had 10 bird-
ies and two bogeys in
her afternoon round at
Columbia Edgewater.
The 18-year-old
Thompson eagled the
par-5 seventh hole and
had five birdies in her
bogey-free morning
round. She won the 2011
Navistar LPGA Classic for
her lone tour title.
Christie Kerr, the win-
ner in 2008 the last time
the event was played at
Columbia Edgewater, was
at 66 along with Lizette
Salas and Germany's
Sandra Gal.
Second-ranked Stacy
Lewis, returning to play
after withdrawing from
the Canadian Women's
Open last week because
of illness, opened with a
67. She won the Women's


British Open on Aug. 4
at St. Andrews and had
consecutive early season
victories in Singapore and
Phoenix.
Hall of Famers Juli
Inkster and Se Ri Pak also
were in the large group at
67 that included Michelle
Wie, Yani Tseng and Ai
Miyazato. The 53-year-old
Inkster won the last of her
31 tour titles in 2006.
Natalie Gulbis had
a hole-in-one on the
second hole and finished
with a 68.

McCarron cards 64
at Web.com: In Fort Wayne,
Ind.,Scott McCarron took the
first-round lead in the Hotel Fitness
Championship, the opening event in
the new four-tournament Web.com
Tour Finals series.
The 48-year-old McCarron, a
three-time winner on the PGA Tour,
had eight birdies, an eagle and two
bogeys for an 8-under 64 at Sycamore
Hills. He's in the field on a special
medical exemption after finishing
250th in the PGA Tour's FedEx Cup
standings.
The bulk of the field is made up of
top 75 players from the Web.com Tour
money list and Nos. 126-200 in the
FedEx Cup standings. The top 25 on


the Web.com money list are assured
PGA Tour cards for the 2013-14
season, while the other players are
fighting for 25 additional cards.
Bud Cauley, Jason Gore, Troy
Matteson and Scott Harrington were a
stroke back, and Arron Oberholser and
Jeff Klauk shot 66. Former Masters
champion Trevor Immelman opened
with a 67.
McCarron has 11 events remaining
on the medical exemption. Last
October, he had thumb surgery and
admittedly returned too early, playing
the Humana Challenge in January.
"We're athletes and we want to
play," he said.
McCarron eagled the par-515th
- his sixth hole of the day and
played a nine-hole stretch in 7 under.
"It's been a long time since I played
some good golf,"McCarron said. "But
I still know how to. At least I haven't
forgotten that part."

Late surge lifts Kofstad:
In Newport, Wales, Norway's Espen
Kofstad closed with three straight
birdies and an eagle for a 7-under 64
and a two-stroke lead after the first
round of the Wales Open.
England's Chris Wood and
Australia's Richard Green shot 66 on
Celtic Manor's Twenty Ten Course, the
site of Europe's victory in the 2010
Ryder Cup.


3 Agnieszka Radwanska vs. No. 32 Anas-
tasia Pavlyuchenkova, No. 5 Li Na vs. No. 30
Laura Robson, No. 8 Angelique Kerber vs.
No. 25 Kaia Kanepi.

TODAY ON TV: Tennis Channel, 11 a.m.-7
p.m.; ESPN2, 1-11 p.m.


I TENNIS SCOREBOARD


U.S.OPEN
Thursday
At The USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center, New York
Purse: $34.3 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Second Round
Dmitry Tursunov (32), Russia, def. Guil-
laume Rufin, France, 7-6 (4), 1-1, retired.
Janko Tipsarevic (18), Serbia, def. Dudi
Sela, Israel, 6-4,6-4,6-1.
Richard Gasquet (8), France, def. Stepha-
ne Robert, France, 6-3, 7-5, 7-5.
Roger Federer (7), Switzerland, def. Carlos
Berlocq, Argentina, 6-3,6-2,6-1.
David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Roberto Bau-
tista Agut, Spain, 6-3,6-7 (5),6-1,6-2.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. An-
dreas Haider-Maurer, Austria, 6-4,6-4, 7-5.
Jack Sock, United States, def. Maximo
Gonzalez, Argentina, 7-6 (3), 1 -6, 7-5,6-2.
Daniel Evans, Britain, def. Bernard Tomic,
Australia, 1-6,6-3,7-6 (4),6-3.
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def. Nikolay
Davydenko, Russia, 6-1,6-4,6-4.
Tommy Robredo (19), Spain, def. Frank
Dancevic, Canada, 6-4,6-4,6-1.
Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Sam
Querrey (26), United States, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (5),
6-7 (5), 6-4.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (22), Germany, def.
Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 6-3, 6-2,
5-7,6-2.
Milos Raonic (10), Canada, def. Pablo An-
dujar, Spain,6-1,6-2,6-4.
Feliciano Lopez (23), Spain, def. Bradley
Klahn, United States, 6-4,7-6 (4),4-6,7-5.
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain,def. Rogerio Dutra
Silva, Brazil, 6-2,6-1,6-0.
Women
Second Round
Jelena Jankovic (9), Serbia, def. Alisa Kley-
banova, Russia, 6-3,6-2.
Kaia Kanepi (25), Estonia, def. Anna


Schmiedlova, Slovakia, 6-4,6-1.
Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Pa-
tricia Mayr-Achleitner, Austria, 6-2, 6-3.
Sabine Lisicki (16), Germany, def. Paula
Ormaechea, Argentina, 6-2,6-3.
Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Sara Errani (4),
Italy, 6-3,6-1.
Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Sorana Cirstea
(19), Romania,7-5,6-1.
Ekaterina Makarova (24), Russia, def.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-4,
6-4.
Roberta Vinci (10), Italy, def. Lucie Safa-
rova, Czech Republic, 4-6,6-1,6-2.
Angelique Kerber (8), Germany, def. Eug-
enie Bouchard, Canada, 6-4,2-6,6-3.
Christina McHale, United States,def.Elina
Svitolina, Ukraine, 6-4,3-6,7-5.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (27), Russia, def.
Peng Shuai, China, 6-1,4-6,6-4.
Karin Knapp, Italy, def.ElenaVesnina (22),
Russia, 6-1,6-4.
Alize Cornet (26), France, def. Ajla TomIja-
novic, Croatia, 6-2,6-2.
Serena Williams (1), United States, def.
Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 6-3,6-0.
Simona Halep (21), Romania, def. Donna
Vekic, Croatia, 6-2,6-1.
Ana Ivanovic (13), Serbia, def. Alexandra
Dulgheru, Romania, 6-2,6-1.
Petra Kvitova (7),Czech Republic,def. Bo-
jana Jovanovski, Serbia,6-2,6-4.
Alison Riske, United States, def. Mona
Barthel (28), Germany,6-4,6-2.
Maria Kirilenko (14), Russia, def. Michelle
Larcher de Brito, Portugal, 6-3, 6-1.
Julia Glushko, Israel, def. Sachia Vickery,
United States,7-5,6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (2), Belarus, def. Alek-
sandra Wozniak, Canada, 6-3,6-1.
Camila Giorgi, Italy, def. Hsieh Su-wei,Tai-
wan, 6-4,7-6 (8).
Caroline Wozniacki (6), Denmark, def.
Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 6-1,6-2.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def.Victo-
ria Duval, United States, 6-2,6-3.


I GOLF SCOREBOARD


European Tour
WALES OPEN
Thursday
At TwentyTen course at Celtic Manor
Newport, Wales
Purse: $2.8 million
Yardage: 7,378; Par: 71
First Round
Espen Kofstad, Norway 35-29 64
ChrisWood, England 34-32 -66
Richard Green,Australia 33-33 66
MarkFoster, England 33-34 67
TVan DerWalt, South Africa 36-31 67
Gregory Bourdy, France 34-33 -67
EmilianoGrillo, Argentina 36-32 68
Robert Rock, England 36-32 -68
Mikkollonen, Finland 38-31 -69
Peter Uihlein, United States 37-32 69
Maximilian Kieffer,Germany32-37 69
Robert Coles, England 35-34 69
Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 35-34 69
Liam Bond,Wales 33-36 69
Paul McGinley, Ireland 36-34 -70
Gregory Havret, France 33-37 -70
G. Fernandz-Castano, Spain 35-35 70
Simon Wakefield, England 34-36 -70
AlessandroTadini, Italy 37-33 -70
Ricardo Santos, Portugal 38-32 70
Damien McGrane, Ireland 35-35 70
Keith Home, South Africa 34-36 70
Raphael Jacquelin, France 34-36 70
Christian Cevaer, France 37-33 70

LPGA Tour
SAFEWAY CLASSIC
Thursday
At Columbia Edgewater Country Club
Portland, Ore.
Purse: $1.3 million
Yardage: 6,475; Par 72 (36-36)
First Round
a-denotes amateur
Pornanong Phatlum 32-32 64


Lexi Thompson
Sandra Gal
Cristie Kerr
Lizette Salas
Heather Bowie Young
Austin Ernst
Juli Inkster
Eun-HeeJi
llhee Lee
Stacy Lewis
Mo Martin
Sydnee Michaels
Ai Miyazato
SeRi Pak
Gerina Piller
Sarah Jane Smith
Yani Tseng
MichelleWie


Web.com Tour
HOTEL FITNESS CHAMPIONSHIP
Thursday
At Sycamore Hills Golf Club
Fort Wayne, Ind.
Purse: $1 million
Yardage: 7,360; Par 72
First Round
Scott McCarron 32-32 64
Bud Cauley 34-31 65
Jason Gore 31-34 65
Troy Matteson 33-32 65
Scott Harrington 32-33 65
Jeff Klauk 33-33 66
Arron Oberholser 35-31 66
Wes Roach 35-32 6
Len Mattiace 33-34 67
Roland Thatcher 34-33 -67
Trevorlmmelman 32-35 67
Brad Fritsch 34-33 67
JhonattanVegas 33-34 -67
Andrew D.Putnam 35-32 -6;
Will Claxton 36-31 6
Ricky Barnes 33-35 68
BriceGarnett 33-35 68
Jamie Lovemark 33-35 68


33-32 65


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013






The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


* NFL ROUNDUP


Tebow produces


mixed results


Quarterback
throws 2 TDs,
interception in
preseason start

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- Tim Tebow threw two
touchdown passes and
one interception as New
England beat the New
York Giants 28-20 on
Thursday night.
In an up-and-down
performance in both
teams' last preseason
game, Tebow had a
52-yard touchdown pass
and a 13-yard run. He was
6 for 11 for 91 yards. He
also gained 30 yards on
six carries for the Patriots
(3-1).
The third-string quar-
terback also was sacked
four times. But he ended
his game with a 9-yard
touchdown pass with 6
seconds left.
Tebow's future with the
team wasn't much clearer
than before the game
started.

Browns 18, Bears 16: In
Chicago, Brian Hoyer threw for 307
yards and came on down the stretch
for Cleveland. Hoyer was intercepted
twice. But he also led the Browns
(3-1) on a 76-yard touchdown drive
that made it a one-point game in
the fourth quarter. Punter Spencer
Lanning kicked a 40-yard field goal
with just over three minutes.

Chiefs 30, Packers 8:
In Kansas City, Mo., Tyler Bray, an
undrafted rookie out of Tennessee,
threw for 169 yards and three
touchdowns to outshine Chiefs backup
Chase Daniel while giving starter Alex
Smith the night off.

Rams 24, Ravens 21: In
St. Louis, Bobby Rainey scored his first


CONCUSSION
FROM PAGE 1
season, removing a major
legal and financial threat
hanging over the sport.
U.S. District Judge Anita
B. Brody in Philadelphia
is expected to rule on the
settlement in two to three
months but said it "holds
the prospect of avoiding
lengthy, expensive and
uncertain litigation, and
of enhancing the game."
More than 4,500 former
players, some suffer-
ing from depression or
dementia, accused the
NFL of concealing the
long-term dangers of
concussions and rushing
injured players back onto
the field, while glorifying
and profiting from the
bone-crushing hits that
were often glorified.
"Football has been my
life and football has been
kind to me," said former
Dallas Cowboys running
back Tony Dorsett, one of
at least 10 members of the
Pro Football Hall of Fame
who filed suit since 2011.
"But when I signed up for
this, I didn't know some
of the repercussions. I did
know I could get injured,
but I didn't know about
my head or the trauma or
the things that could hap-
pen to me later in life."
The settlement applies
to all 18,000 past NFL
players and spouses of
those who are deceased
- a group that could total
more than 20,000 and
will cost the league $765
million, the vast major-
ity of which would go
to compensate athletes
with certain neurological
ailments, plus plaintiffs'
attorney fees. It sets aside
$75 million for medical
exams and $10 million for
medical research.
The settlement does
not include an admission
from the NFL that it hid


information from play-
ers about head injuries.


two touchdowns of the preseason,
leading a cluster of backups fighting
for jobs on both sides. The Rams (1-3)
avoided their first winless preseason
since 2002.
Texans 24, Cowboys 6:
In Arlington, Texas, Case Keenum and
T.J. Yates each threw a touchdown
pass in their battle for the backup job,
and Cierre Wood and Dennis Johnson
combined for 187 yards rushing to
lead Houston.
Vikings 24, Titans 23:
In Minneapolis, Jake Locker led the
Titans to a field goal as Tennessee
played many of their offensive starters
in the exhibition finale. Locker went 3
for 5 for 31 yards in a rare bit of action
for a starting quarterback in the final
preseason game.
Jaguars 20, Falcons 16:
In Atlanta, Jordan Todman ran for a
touchdown for the second consecu-
tive week, and Mike Kafka threw a
fourth-quarter scoring pass to Jeremy
Ebert to lift Jacksonville (1-3).
Panthers 25, Steelers
10: In Charlotte, N.C., Ted Ginn Jr.
is showing he has something left to
offer Carolina, catching five passes for
149 yards and two touchdowns to lift
the Panthers.

Jets 27, Eagles 20: In
East Rutherford, NJ., Matt Simms,
competing for the Jets'No. 3 quarter-
back job, led four scoring drives and
Kahlil Bell had two touchdown runs
for the Jets.
Lions 35, Bills 13: In
Orchard Park, N.Y., Matt Leinart looked
like someone who's had just three
days practice, going 3 for 10 for 11
yards and two interceptions before
being yanked after five possessions.
That represents a major concern for
Buffalo (2-2).

Bengals 27, Colts 10:
In Cincinnati, Andy Dalton led the
Bengals to a touchdown in his only
drive, and Josh Johnson threw for
another in his bid to win the backup
job for Cincinnati.

Commissioner Roger
Goodell told pro football's
lawyers to "do the right
thing for the game and
the men who played it,"
according to a statement.
Goodell was not made
available for comment.
The NFL's annual rev-
enue is about $9 billion.
In addition to Dorsett,
the plaintiffs include
Super Bowl-winning
quarterback Jim
McMahon, who suffers
from dementia; former
running back Kevin
Turner, who has amyo-
trophic lateral sclerosis,
or Lou Gehrig's disease;
and the family of All-Pro
selection Junior Seau,
who committed suicide.
Turner, who played for
the New England Patriots
and Philadelphia Eagles,
predicted that most of his
peers would support the
settlement.
All former NFL players
are eligible to seek care,
screening or compen-
sation, whether they
suffered a documented
concussion or not. The
amounts they receive will
be based on their age,
condition and years of
play. They do not need
to prove that their health
problems are connected
to playing football.
Players' lawyers said
they expect the fund to
cover ex-athletes' expens-
es up to age 65. Current
players are not covered.
Sports law experts had
thought the lawsuits
might cost the league $1
billion or more if they
went to trial. The NFL had
pushed for the claims to
be heard in arbitration
under terms of the play-
ers' labor contract.
Researchers at the
Boston University Center
for the Study of Traumatic
Encephalopathy, who
have been examining
brains of deceased NFL
players, praised the $10


million set aside for
research.


AP PHO
Miami quarterback Pat Devlin hands off the ball to running back Mike Gillislee during the first
half of Thursday's preseason game against New Orleans in Miami Gardens.




Devlin shines as




Miami nips Saints

ReserveQlB Rookie Ryan Griffin
Reseve^ nniLpuI .....1 ;for31,for1,W


makes last bid
to make the
Dolphin roster
By STEVEN WINE
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI GARDENS
- Drew Brees wore a
uniform and even
eye black but never
played. Ryan Tannehill
also watched from the
sideline, laughing at the
Kiss Cam when it showed
during a timeout on the
scoreboard video screen.
The final preseason
game for the Saints and
Dolphins was for re-
serves, and Miami third-
string quarterback Pat
Devlin led his team to a
24-21 victory Thursday
night.
Devlin threw for
259 yards, including a
56-yard pass to Marvin
McNutt on fourth-and-4
with 3:02 left for the win-
ning score.
Many of the players
who took part will be
out of work by Saturday,
when teams must reach
their 53-man roster limit.
The fans knew it, which
is why the stadium was
two-thirds empty.
The Saints (3-1)
open the season Sept.
8 against Atlanta eager
to rebound from a 2012
season that went wrong



BUCS
FROM PAGE 1
from North Carolina
State, went 4 for 13
passing for 13 yards,
lost a fumble and was
intercepted in the first
half Thursday. Glennon's
turnovers led to 10 of the
Redskins 27 points in the
first half.
The loss dropped the
Bucs to 1-3 in the pre-
season while the Redskins
finished 4-0.
The troubling thing for
coach Greg Schiano was
that Glennon's perfor-
mance (he finished 7 of
16 for 63 yards and an
Int.) may not have been
the worst thing about the
Bucs Thursday.
Sitting most of their
starters on both sides of
the ball, the counterfeit
Bucs could not tackle,
play special teams or hold
onto the football.
"It was not only the
offense but the entire
football team," Schiano
said of the negatives.
"We're not playing very
well; we turned the ball
over; we didn't tackle very
well; we made mistakes
on special teams.
"That's about as sloppy
as you can play."
The Bucs were so badly
outplayed by the Redskins
reserves that they trailed


UVkl IIIII1
AT BROWNS
WHO: Miami (0-0) at
Cleveland (0-0)
WHEN: Sept. 8,1 p.m.
WHERE: FirstEnergy Stadium,
Cleveland
TV: CBS


from the start following
their bounty scandal. The
Dolphins (2-3) open at
Cleveland the same day,
hoping to end a streak of
four consecutive losing
seasons.
By the start of the
season, the final exhibi-
tion game will be long
forgotten. A neutral zone
infraction by the New
Orleans defense on the
first play signaled the
quality of what was to
come.
The game was the
Saints' first in Miami
since they beat
Indianapolis in the Super
Bowl four years ago, but
this New Orleans team
bore little resemblance
to that one. The only
first-teamers to start
were receiver Marques
Colston and center Brian
de la Puente.
Backup quarterback
Luke McCown played
one series, directing a
14-play touchdown drive.
He went 4 for 7 for 44
yards.


iTO


yards and one intercep-
tion to end the Saints'
final scoring threat.
Undrafted rookie Khiry
Robinson ran for 115
yards in 22 carries and
caught six passes for 50
yards, while Mark Ingram
scored on an 8-yard
touchdown run but lost a
fumble.
Right guard John Jerry
was the only Miami first-
teamer to start. Devlin,
just hoping to make the
roster, went 22 for 38
with two touchdowns
and two interceptions.
Rishard Matthews
helped his chances of
winning the No. 4 receiv-
ing job by making three
catches for 37 yards.
Rookie Dion Sims, who is
challenging Charles Clay
for playing time at tight
end, caught four passes
for 36 yards, including
an 8-yard touchdown.
McNutt caught four for
99.
Rookie Mike Gillislee
ran for 47 yards in 14
carries. Rookie kicker
Caleb Sturgis, who won
a job in training camp,
went 3 for 3 on field
goals and finished 9 for 9
in preseason.
Top draft pick Dion
Jordan missed his third
consecutive game
because of a lingering
shoulder injury.


Tampa Bay quarterback Mike Glennon drops back to pass
against Washington during the second quarter Thursday.


at the end of the first half
in total yards (250-35), net
passing yards (153-6) and
first downs (10-2).
The Bucs' lone high-
light was Najee Goode's
37-yard interception
return with 12:20 remain-
ing in the second quarter
- the only time Tampa
Bay crossed the goal line.
"That is a positive, your
exactly right," Schiano
said. "There wasn't a lot of
them in the first half."
The Redskins rested
their top three quarter-
backs Robert Griffin
III, Kirk Cousins and
Rex Grossman. But their
fourth option, Pat White,
outplayed Glennon.
White passed for
153 yards in the first
half and rushed for 22


more, including a 7-yard
touchdown run in which
he dived over safety Keith
Tandy to reach the pylon
with the football.
You knew it might be
a long night for the Bucs
when on the third play,
White hit a short pass
to Desmond Briscoe,
who slipped the tackle
of rookie cornerback
Johnthan Banks and
safety Sean Baker and
raced 66 yards to the
Tampa Bay 9. Two plays
later, Evan Royster bulled
across the goal line from
1-yard for a touchdown.
Even special teams
were woeful. Kicker Derek
Dimke clanged a point
after attempt off the right
upright and missed a field
goal from 45 yards.


* FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE:


CARDINALS AT
STONE CRABS


WHO: Palm Beach (34-30) at
Charlotte (36-26)
WHEN: Today, 6:30 p.m.
WHERE: Charlotte Sports Park
RADIO: stonecrabsbaseball.com
TICKETS: 941-206-3511 or at
box office (opens 9 a.m.)
PROMOTION: Fan Appreciation
Night, Fireworks



Crabs


near


playoff


berth
STAFF REPORT

PORT CHARLOTTE
- The magic number is
down to 1.
Richie Shaffer's two-out
single in the sixth was
all four Charlotte pitch-
ers needed to beat Palm
Beach, 1-0, Thursday at
Charlotte Sports Park.
With the victory
against the second-place
Cardinals, Charlotte's
magic number to clinch
the second-half South
Division title outright
decreases to one.
The Stone Crabs lead
the Cardinals by three
games with three left to
play all against Palm
Beach. The Stone Crabs
can finish no worse than
tied with the Cardinals for
the division title.
The second game of
the series is tonight's
home finale. The final two
games are in Jupiter.
Shay Crawford (3-3)
picked up the win in relief
of starter Felipe Rivero,
who went 4/3% innings.
Nate Garcia completed
the five-hit shutout by
with his 11th save.
The second-half winner
of the South will play
Fort Myers, the first-half
champion in a best-of-
three series.
Stone Crabs 1, Cardinals 0
Palm Beach AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
TilsonCF 4 0 2 0 0 0 .318
PopkinsDH 4 0 0 0 0 2 .314
Wilson2B 2 0 0 0 2 1 .181
RodriguezlB 3 0 0 0 1 1 .281
Wisdom 3B 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275
LongmireRF 4 0 1 0 0 1 .236
MejiaSS 3 0 0 0 0 0 .209
GarciaLF 2 0 1 0 1 0 .216
MonteroC 3 0 0 0 0 1 .204
Totals 29 0 5 0 4 6
Charlotte AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
MotterRF 4 0 1 0 0 0 286
HagerSS 3 1 0 0 0 0 .259
ArgoCF 3 0 1 0 1 1 .308
Shaffer3B 4 0 2 1 0 0 256
SegoviaDH 3 0 0 0 0 0 286
Malm IB 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241
Guevara2B 3 0 1 0 0 0 .254
DePewC 3 0 0 0 0 0 222
QuinonezLF 3 0 0 0 0 0 293
Totals 29 1 5 1 1 2
PalmBeach 000 000 000-0 5 1
Charlotte 000 001 000-1 5 0
E- Mejia (15). LOB- Palm Beach 6, Char-
lotte 6. 2B- Argo (18). 3B- Tilson (1).
RBI- Shaffer (72). Runners in scoring
position- Palm Beach 0 for 6, Charlotte
1 for 7. SB- Guevara (10). GIDP- Mejia,
Tilson, Rodriguez. DP- Charlotte 3 (Hager-
Guevara-Malm, Malm-Hager, Shaffer-Gue-
vara-Malm).
Palm Beach IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA
SherriffL,4-472/3 5 1 0 0 2 02.31
Stock 1/3 00 0 1 0 04.64
Charlotte IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA
Rivero 42/3 4 0 0 2 3 03.40
CrwfrdW,3-321/3 00 0 2 1 0 1.20
BellattiH,2 1 1 0 0 0 2 03.00
Garcia S,11 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.57
HBP- Hager (by Sherriff). Inherited
runners-scored- Stock 1-0, CrawfordS
2-0. Umpires- HP: Charlie Tierney. 1B:
Fernando Rodriguez T- 2:27. A- 2,191.
FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
North Division
W L Pet. GB
yz-Daytona (Cubs) 38 19.667 -
Lakeland (Tigers) 31 28.525 8
Clearwater(Phillies) 31 33.484 10v2
Tampa (Yankees) 28 35.444 13
Brevard County (Brewers) 28 36 .438 13V2
x-Dunedin (BlueJays) 24 38.387 1612
South Division
W L Pet. GB
Charlotte(Rays) 36 26.581 -
Palm Beach (Cardinals) 34 30.531 3
St. Lucie (Mets) 32 30.516 4
x-Fort Myers (Twins) 32 33 .492 5V2
Jupiter (Marlins) 32 35 .478 62
Bradenton (Pirates) 30 33 .476 61/2
x-clinched first half z-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division (refers to second half)
Thursday's results
Lakeland 6,Tampa 3
Bradenton 5, Fort Myers 2, comp. of susp.
game
Fort Myers 2, Bradenton 1,7 innings
Charlotte 1, Palm Beach 0
Dunedin 8,Clearwater0
Daytona 3, Brevard County2
Jupiter 12,St. Lucie3


Today's games
Tampa at Lakeland, 5 p.m., 1st game
Clearwater at Dunedin, 6:30 p.m.
Palm Beach at Charlotte, 6:30 p.m.
St. Lucie at Jupiter, 6:35 p.m.
Brevard County at Daytona, 7:05 p.m.
Bradenton at Fort Myers, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa at Lakeland, 7:30 p.m., 2nd game


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3







Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
GB WCGB L10
5 6-4
S 21/2 5-5
61/2 31/2 5-5
8 5 6-4
18/2 151/2 3-7
Central Division
GB WCGB L10
2 5-5
4 6/2 4 5-5
81/2 6 5-5
20 17/2 3-7
21 18/2 8-2
West Division
GB WCGB L10
5 7-3
3 5-5
51712 141/2 5-5
7 181/2 151/2 3-7
3 331/2 301/2 4-6


NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 81 52 .609 6-4 W-4 47-18 34-34
Washington 68 65 .511 13 6/2 8-2 W-3 39-29 29-36
Philadelphia 61 73 .455 20/2 14 6-4 L-1 35-31 26-42
NewYork 60 72 .455 20/2 14 4-6 W-1 28-38 32-34
MARLINS 49 83 .371 311/2 25 2-8 L-4 29-39 20-44
Central Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St.Louis 78 55 .586 7-3 L-1 41-25 37-30
Pittsburgh 77 56 .579 1 5-5 L-1 43-24 34-32
Cincinnati 75 59 .560 3/2 5-5 W-1 41-23 34-36
Milwaukee 59 74 .444 19 151/2 5-5 W-1 30-35 29-39
Chicago 56 77 .421 22 18/2 3-7 L-1 25-41 31-36
West Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 78 55 .586 6-4 W-1 40-28 38-27
Arizona 68 64 .515 91/2 6 4-6 L-1 38-27 30-37
Colorado 63 72 .467 16 121/2 5-5 W-1 38-28 25-44
San Diego 60 73 .451 18 1412 5-5 W-1 36-32 24-41
San Francisco 59 74 .444 19 15/2 4-6 L-1 34-35 25-39
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wednesday's results Wednesday's results
Texas 12, Seattle 4 L.A. Dodgers 4, Chicago Cubs 0
Toronto 7, N.Y.Yankees 2 Washington 4, MARLINS 3
Oakland 14, Detroit 4 Pittsburgh 7, Milwaukee 1
Boston 4, Baltimore 3 Atlanta 3, Cleveland 2
Atlanta 3, Cleveland 2 Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Mets 2
RAYS 4, L.A. Angels 1 Cincinnati 10, St. Louis 0
Chicago White Sox 6, Houston 1 Colorado 5, San Francisco 4
Kansas City8, Minnesota 1 San Diego 5, Arizona 1
Thursday's results Thursday's results
Detroit 7, Oakland 6 N.Y Mets 11, Philadelphia 3
Kansas City3, Minnesota 1 Washington 9, MARLINS 0
L.A. Angels 2, RAYS 0 Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 0
Baltimore 3, Boston 2 Atlanta 3, Cleveland 1
Atlanta 3, Cleveland 1 Today'sgames
Seattle at Houston, late Philadelphia (Halladay3-4) at Chicago Cubs
Today's games (Samardzija 8-11 ), 2:20 p.m.
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 8-6) at N.Y. Yan- N.Y Mets (Gee9-9) atWashington (Zimmer-
kees (Sabathia 11-11), 7:05 p.m. mann 15-7),7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 8-7) at Toronto St. Louis (S.Miller 12-8) at Pittsburgh (Liria-
(Buehrle 10-7),7:07 p.m. no 14-6),7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 7-7) at Detroit (Por- MARLINS (Fernandez 10-5) at Atlanta
cello 10-7),7:08 p.m. (Teheran 10-7), 7:30 p.m.
ChicagoWhiteSox (H.Santiago 4-7) at Bos- L.A. Angels (Weaver 8-7) at Milwaukee
ton (Dempster 6-9),7:10 p.m. (W.Peralta 8-13),8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Hendriks 0-2) at Texas (Darvish Cincinnati (Arroyo 13-9) at Colorado (Man-
12-5), 8:05 p.m. ship 0-4),8:40p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 8-7) at Milwaukee San Francisco (Lincecum 7-13) at Arizona
(W.Peralta 8-13),8:10 p.m. (Delgado 4-4),9:40 p.m.
Seattle (Walker 0-0) at Houston (Peacock San Diego (Stults 8-11) at L.A. Dodgers (Ryu
34),8:10ip.m. 12-5), 10:10p.m.
RAYS (Price 8-5) at Oakland (J.Parker 10-
6), 10:05 p.m.



SMLB ROUNDUP



Hunter's HR



boosts Detroit



Tigers ace runs in nine innings.
The Royals took all three games at

Scherzer can't Target Field.

earn 20th win Braves 3, Indians 1: In
Atlanta, Brian McCann hit a three-run


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT Torii
Hunter hit a three-run
homer with two outs in
the ninth inning, lifting
Detroit over the Oakland
Athletics 7-6 Thursday
and boosting the Tigers
after Max Scherzer was
denied his 20th win and
Miguel Cabrera limped
off with an injury.
The Tigers scored four
times in the ninth off
Grant Balfour (0-3). A
two-out walk set up Victor
Martinez' RBI single, then
Hunter homered as the
Tigers avoided a sweep.
Scherzer gave up six
runs in five innings. The
no-decision left him with
a 19-1 record.
Cabrera hurt his abdo-
men making an awkward
slide while trying to
stretch a single into a
double in the fifth inning.
He was listed as day to
day with discomfort.
The reigning Triple
Crown winner has been
hobbled this month
with a strain in his groin,
abdominal and hip area.
He's also had a banged-
up left leg.
Cabrera got two hits
before being injured,
increasing his major
league-leading batting
average to .359. He leads
baseball with 130 RBIs,
and his 43 homers trail
only Baltimore's Chris
Davis.


homer, Kris Medlen pitched seven
scoreless innings and the Atlanta
Braves completed a sweep of
Cleveland.
McCann went deep in the third
after Justin Upton kept the inning
going with a two-out single. Upton
had to leave the game in the sixth
after being struck on the left hand by
a pitch, but X-rays were negative. He
is day to day.

Orioles 3, Red Sox 2: In
Boston, Chris Tillman pitched seven
strong innings to earn his 15th victory
of the season and Baltimore beat
Boston to avoid a three-game sweep.
The loss left the Red Sox 212 games
ahead of the Tampa Bay Rays in the
AL East.
Manny Machado had two hits
for the Orioles, including a two-run
double that gave them the lead for
good in the third inning.

Mets 11, Phillies 3: In New
York, Carlos Torres did his best Matt
Harvey imitation, carrying a two-hit
shutout into the seventh inning for
the New York Mets in a victory over
Philadelphia.
Daniel Murphy had four hits as the
Mets broke loose for their most runs
since beating Washington 11-0 in the
first game of a July 26 doubleheader.

Nationals 9, Marlins 0:
In Washington, Jayson Werth and lan
Desmond each hit a three-run homer,
leading Gio Gonzalez and Washington
over Miami.
Werth connected in the sixth and
Desmond went deep an inning later,
breaking open a close game and
powering Washington to its eighth
victory in nine games.


Royals 3, Twins 1: In Brewers 4, Pirates 0: In
Minneapolis, Bruce Chen bounced Pittsburgh, Yovani Gallardo pitched
back with a solid start and Kansas seven sharp innings to beat Pittsburgh
City completed a sweep and won once again and Aramis Ramirez
its fifth straight game, beating homered against his former team as
Minnesota to hand the Twins their Milwaukee downed the Pirates.
fifth loss in a row. Chen (6-2) gave up The Pirates fell one game behind
one run and five hits in 5 2/3 innings. NL Central-leading St. Louis. The
In his past two starts, he allowed 13 Cardinals were idle.


I MLB SCOREBOARD


Boston
RAYS
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto

Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago

Texas
Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


(Aviles,Kipnis,C.Santana).
Cleveland IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
UJimenezL,9-9 7 7 3 3 0 10104 395
RHill 1/3 10 00 0 45.97
Allen 2/3 00 0 0 1 11 2.17
Atlanta IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
MedlenW,11-12 7 60 0 0 6 96 358
D.CarpenterH,7 1 1 1 1 1 1 26 2.09
KimbrelS,43-46 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 0.97
Inherited runners-scored-Allen 1-0.
HBP-by UJimenez (J.Upton). Umpires-
Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Jim Wolf; Second, Ed
Hickox; Third, Jim Joyce. T-2:42. A-22,081
(49,586).


Mets 11, Phillies 3
Philadelphia AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
M.Young3b-lb 4 0 0 0 0 2 266
Frandsenlb 3 0 0 0 0 0 220
DeFratusp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Kratzc 1 0 0 0 0 0 208
Utley2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 272
D.Brownlf 4 0 2 0 0 0 277
Ruizc 3 0 1 0 0 1 283
J.Ramirezp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
b-Rollinsph 1 0 0 0 0 0 247
Rufrf 3 0 0 1 0 3 258
Mayberrycf 2 0 0 0 0 1 239
CJimenezp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Orr3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 333
Jo.McDonaldss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .111
E.Martinp 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Bernadinacf 2 1 1 2 0 0 .173
Totals 33 3 7 3 0 8
NewYork AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
E.Younglf 5 2 3 3 0 1 250
Dan.Murphy2b 5 1 4 2 0 0 277
A.Brown rf 5 1 2 2 0 2 280
Hawkinsp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Dudalb 4 1 1 0 1 2 235
Ju.Turner3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 261
denDekkercf 5 1 0 0 0 2 .000
Reckerc 2 3 1 2 2 1 .198
Quintanilla ss 3 1 0 1 1 1 221
C.Torresp 1 0 0 0 1 1 .167
Ricep 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
a-I.Davisph 1 0 0 0 0 1 204
Germenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Felicianop 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Lagaresrf 0 0 0 0 0 0 260
Totals 3411 11 10 613
Philadelphia 000000120 3 7 0
NewYork 001 212 41x -1111 1
a-struck out for Rice in the 7th. b-flied out for
J.Ramirezin the 9th.E-Quintanilla (9).LOB-
Philadelphia 4, New York 7. 2B-Utley (21),
Ruiz (11), Dan.Murphy 2 (28). 3B-E.Young
(6). HR-Bernadina (4), offGermen; Recker (6),
off E.Martin; A.Brown (5), offJ.Ramirez.RBIs-
Ruf (20), Bernadina 2 (11), EYoung 3 (24),
Dan.Murphy 2 (61), ABrown 2 (18), Recker 2
(18), Quintanilla (19). SB-Dan.Murphy (18),
A.Brown (1), den Dekker (1). S-C.Torres.SF-
Ruf. Runners left in scoring position-Phila-
delphia 2 (Jo.McDonald, D.Brown); NewYork5
(Ju.Turner, Duda, den Dekker, A.Brown, Dan.
Murphy). RISP-Philadelphia 0 for 5; New
York 4 for 13. GIDP-Utley. DP-New York 1
(Dan.Murphy, Quintanilla, Duda).
Philadelphia IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
E.MartinL,2/3 4 4 3 3 3 9 86 639
CJimenez 12/3 4 3 3 1 2 42 253
DeFratus 1 2 4 4 2 2 38 454
J.Ramirez 11/3 1 1 1 0 0 9 8.62
NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
C.TorresW,3-262/3 4 1 1 0 6 95 2.77
Rice 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 43.44
Germen 2/3 3 2 2 0 0 16 352
Feliciano 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.84
Hawkins 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 359
Inherited runners-scored-De Fratus 1-0,
J.Ramirez 1-0, Rice 1-0, Feliciano 1-0. HBP-
by De Fratus (Ju.Turner). Balk-CJimenez.
Umpires-Home, Doug Eddings; First, Dana
DeMuth; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Angel
Hernandez.T-3:12.A-22,008(41,922).
Brewers 4, Pirates 0
Milwaukee AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Gennett2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 336
Segurass 4 1 2 0 0 0 303
Lucroyc 3 0 1 2 0 0 288
Ar.Ramirez3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 268
C.Gomezcf 4 1 2 0 0 0 287
K.Davislf 4 0 1 1 0 0 311
LSchaferlf 0 0 0 0 0 0 221
Gindlrf 3 0 0 0 1 1 278
J.Franciscolb 3 0 0 0 0 1 234
YBetancourtib 0 0 0 0 0 0 211
Gallardop 2 0 0 0 0 1 208
a-Aokiph 1 0 0 0 0 0 284
Kintzlerp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Totals 32 4 10 4 1 4
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Tabatalf 4 0 0 0 0 1 265
Ju.Wilsonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Walker2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 254
McCutchencf 3 0 1 0 1 0 323
PAlvarez3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 236
Byrd rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 284
G.Sanchezlb 2 0 0 0 1 0 248
Buckc 3 0 3 0 0 0 221
Mercerss 3 0 0 0 0 1 275
Colep 2 0 0 0 0 2 200
Morrisp 0 0 0 0 0 0 200
b-Pieph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 364
Totals 30 0 6 0 2 5
Milwaukee 110 100 010- 4100
Pittsburgh 000 000 000- 0 62
a-grounded out for Gallardo in the 8th. b-
flied out for Morris in the 8th. E-Byrd (4),
Cole (1). LOB-Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 5.
2B-K.Davis (8). 3B-McCutchen (4). HR-
ArRamirez (9), off Cole. RBIs-Lucroy 2 (69),
ArRamirez (36), K.Davis (19). SB-C.Gomez
(32). SF-Lucroy. Runners left in scoring
position-Milwaukee3 (Gallardo, J.Francisco,
ArRamirez); Pittsburgh 3 (PAIvarez, Cole, Mer-
cer). RISP-Milwaukee 2 for 7; Pittsburgh O0for
4. Runners moved up-J.Francisco. GIDP-
Segura, Lucroy, Ar.Ramirez, J.Francisco,
McCutchen, PAIvarez, Mercer. DP-Mil-
waukee 3 (Segura, Gennett, J.Francisco),
(Segura, Gennett, J.Francisco), (YBetancourt,
Segura, YBetancourt); Pittsburgh 4 (Walker,
G.Sanchez), (Walker, Mercer, G.Sanchez),
(Mercer, Walker, G.Sanchez), (Mercer, Walker,
G.Sanchez).
Milwaukee IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
GallardoW,10-9 7 6 0 0 1 5 93 439
Kintzler 2 0 0 0 1 0 18 2.70
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
ColeL,6-7 71/310 4 3 1 4 97 3.80
Morris 2/3 00 0 0 0 10 3.12
JuWilson 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.01
Inherited runners-scored-Morris 2-1.
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First, Brian
Knight; Second, MarkCarlson;Third, Gerry Da-
vis.T-2:40.A-23,747 (38,362).
Braves 3, Indians 1
Cleveland AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Bourncf 4 0 1 0 0 1 268
Swisherrf 4 0 0 0 0 3 242
Kipnis2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 285
C.Santanalb 4 0 1 0 0 1 265
Brantleylf 4 0 1 0 0 0 273
YGomesc 4 0 1 0 0 0 288
ACabrerass 4 0 1 0 0 0 241
Aviles3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 262
UJimenezp 2 0 0 0 0 2 000
bChisenhallph 1 1 1 1 0 0 220
R.Hillp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Allenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Totals 33 1 7 1 1 7
Atlanta AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
J.Schaferrf 4 0 0 0 0 4 269
JUptonlf 2 1 2 0 0 0 265
1-F.Freemanpr-lb 1 0 0 0 0 0 308
McCannc 4 1 2 3 0 0 276
CJohnson3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 329
Janish3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 133
Terdoslavichlb-lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 266
EJohnsonlf 1 0 0 0 0 1 250
Uggla2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .185
B.Uptondcf 3 0 1 0 0 1 185
Simmonsss 3 0 2 0 0 0 250
Medlenp 2 1 0 0 0 1 200
a-G.Lairdph 1 0 0 0 0 0 286
D.Carpenterp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Kimbrelp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Totals 31 3 8 3 011
Cleveland 000000 010- 1 70
Atlanta 003000 00x- 3 80
a-flied out for Medlen in the 7th. b-homered
for UJimenez in the 8th. 1-ran for J.Upton in
the 5th. LOB-Cleveland 6, Atlanta 5.2B-C.
Johnson (27), Simmons 2 (21). HR-Chisen-
hall (8), off DCarpenter; McCann (19), off
UJimenez. RBIs-Chisenhall (29), McCann 3
(50). SB-Bourn (20), Kipnis (24). Runners left
in scoring position-Cleveland 3 (Swisher,
Aviles, C.Santana); Atlanta 2 (Terdoslavich,
J.Schafer). RISP-Cleveland 0 for 4; Atlanta
1 for 5. GIDP-Simmons. DP-Cleveland 1


Oakland
Crisp cf
Donaldson
Lowriedh
Moss rf
Callaspo2b
S.Smith If
Barton 1 b
Sogard ss
Vogtc
Totals
Detroit
AJackson c
Dirks If-rf-If
Mi.Cabrera
Tuiasosopo
b-Avila ph
Fielder 1b
V.Martinez
1-Iglesias p
D.Kellyrf-3
a-Tor.Hunte
B.Pena c
Infante 2b
R.Santiago
Totals
Oakland
Detroit


Tigers 7, Athletics 6
AB R H BIBE
5 1 1 0 C
3b 5 1 1 0 C
5 1 3 2 C
4 1 1 2 1
S 4 1 1 0 C
41 1 0 C
3 0 1 1 0
201 1C
4 0 2 0 C
36 612 6 1
AB R H BIBE
:f 41 1 01
5 0 0 0 C
3b 3 0 2 0 C
)lf-3b 1 0 0 0 C
1 0 0 0 C
4 3 3 1 1
dh 5 0 3 1 C
Dr 0 1 0 0 C
b 3 1 1 0 C
erph-rf2 1 1 3 C
3 0 2 1 C
4 0 1 0 C
ss 4 0 1 1 C
39 715 7 ;


ISO
0 1
0 2
0 0
1 2
0 2
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 1
1 9
ISO
0
1 0
0 1
0 1
0 1
0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 3


200220 000- 6120
000102004- 7151


Two outs when winning run scored, a-
grounded out for D.Kelly in the 7th. b-
struck out for Tuiasosopo in the 9th. 1-ran
for V.Martinez in the 9th. E-D.Kelly (1).
LOB-Oakland 7, Detroit 9. 2B-Crisp
(18), Callaspo (19), Sogard (24). 3B-Don-
aldson (3). HR-Lowrie (10), off Scherzer;
Moss (25), off Scherzer; Fielder (21), off
Blevins;Tor.Hunter (16), off Balfour.RBIs-
Lowrie 2 (57), Moss 2 (68), Barton (6), So-
gard (30), Fielder (91),V.Martinez (71),Tor.
Hunter 3 (70), B.Pena (22), R.Santiago (11).
SB-Moss (4). S-Sogard. SF-Barton,
Sogard, B.Pena. Runners left in scoring
position-Oakland 4 (S.Smith, Crisp 2,
Moss); Detroit 3 (R.Santiago, AJackson,
Tor.Hunter). RISP-Oakland 3 for 11; De-
troit 3 for 8.
Oakland IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Colon 5 71 1 0 1 73 2.94
Blevins 1/3 3 2 2 0 0 93.61
OteroH,3 11/3 3 0 0 0 1 25 1.20
DoolittleH,2011/3 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.70
BalfourL,0-3 2/3 2 4 4 2 1 27 2.44
Detroit IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Scherzer 5 8 6 5 1 5101 2.90
Putkonen 2 20 0 0 4 29 2.78
Veras 1 0 0 0 0 012 2.72
BenoitW,4-0 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 1.51
Inherited runners-scored-Otero 2-1,
Doolittle 2-0. Umpires-Home, Jerry
Meals; First, Paul Emmel; Second,Will Little;
Third, Gary Darling. T-3:09. A-39,212
(41,255).

Royals 3, Twins 1
Kansas City AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
A.Gordonlf 4 0 1 1 0 1 269
Bonifacio3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 229
Hosmerib 4 0 1 0 0 2 .294
B.Butlerdh 3 1 0 0 1 1 .295
Maxwell rf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .267
Kottarasc 3 0 0 0 0 0 .172
b-S.Perezph-c 1 0 1 0 0 0 .283
A.Escobarss 4 0 1 1 0 1 235
Getz2b 2 1 1 1 1 1 227
J.Dysoncf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .253
Totals 31 3 6 3 2 9
Minnesota AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Dozier2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 243
Florimonss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .226
Morneaudh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .259
WillinghamIf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .211
Doumitc 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243
Plouffe3b 3 0 1 0 0 2 .232
Colabello b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .186
W.Ramirezrf 1 0 1 0 0 0 272
a-C.Herrmann ph-rf2 0 0 0 0 1 .218
Thomascf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .225
Totals 30 1 5 1 2 8
KansasCity 030000000- 3 60
Minnesota 000001 000- 1 50
a-grounded outforW.Ramirezin the 5th.b-
singled for Kottaras in the 9th. LOB-Kan-
sas City 4, Minnesota 4. 2B-Plouffe (18).
HR-Dozier (14), off B.Chen. RBIs-A.Gor-
don (71), A.Escobar (44), Getz (18), Dozier
(56). SB-A.Escobar (16), Getz (13), J.Dyson
(27). Runners left in scoring position-
Kansas City 2 (Bonifacio, Kottaras); Minne-
sota 2 (Colabello, Plouffe). RISP-Kansas
City 3 for 8; Minnesota 0 for 2. Runners
moved up-B.Butler, Kottaras. GIDP-Kot-
taras, J.Dyson, Thomas. DP-Kansas City
1 (Getz, A.Escobar, Hosmer); Minnesota 2
(Pressly, Florimon, Colabello), (Dozier, Flo-
rimon, Colabello).
Kansas City IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
B.ChenW,6-252/3 5 1 1 1 3 93 2.79
K.HerreraH, 1611/30 0 0 0 1 183.44
W.SmithH,2 1 00 0 0 2 133.04
G.HollandS,36-3810 0 0 1 2 14 1.38
Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
DedunoL,8-8 3 43 3 1 4 71 3.83
Pressly 3 1 0 0 1 0 29 3.70
Thielbar 2 0 0 0 0 2 20 1.05
Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 3 15 2.26
HBP-by Deduno (Maxwell). Umpires-
Home, Alan Porter; First, Greg Gibson;
Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Hunter Wendel-
stedt. T-2:39.A-28,012 (39,021).


Nationals 9, Marlins 0
Miami AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
D.Solano2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .251
Lucas b-3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .240
Stantonrf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .249
Ruggianolf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .218
Polanco3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250
S.Dysonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Cishekp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Pierreph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240
Hechavarria ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .230
Marisnickcf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .184
Mathisc 2 0 0 0 1 2 .194
Koehlerp 2 0 0 0 0 1 .067
Morrisonib 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263
Totals 31 0 4 0 3 8
Washington AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Span cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 271
Zimmerman3b 3 2 3 0 1 0 275
Harper If 3 3 2 2 1 1 .280
Werthrf 4 2 3 3 0 0 .329
Desmondss 4 2 2 3 0 0 .285
Ad.LaRochelb 3 0 0 0 1 0 .237
Roarkp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
W.Ramosc 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276
Rendon2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .258
G.Gonzalezp 2 0 0 0 0 0 .114
Tracylb 1 0 0 0 0 0 .188
Totals 31 912 9 4 2
Miami 000000000- 0 40
Washington 000 204 30x- 9120
a-grounded out for Cishek in the 9th.
LOB-Miami 7,Washington 3.HR-Harper
(19), off Koehler; Werth (21), off Koehler;
Desmond (20), off S.Dyson. RBIs-Harper 2
(49),Werth 3 (63), Desmond 3 (67), Rendon
(27). S-G.Gonzalez. Runners left in scor-
ing position-Miami 3 (Polanco, Lucas 2);
Washington 3 (Werth, Span, G.Gonzalez).
RISP-Miami 0 for 3; Washington 4 for 9.
Runners moved up-W.Ramos. GIDP-
Werth, Desmond, G.Gonzalez. DP-Miami
3 (D.Solano, Hechavarria, Lucas), (D.Solano,
Hechavarria, Lucas), (D.Solano, Hechavarria,
Morrison).
Miami IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Koehler L, 3-9 5 7 6 6 4 1 674.72
S.Dyson 2 5 3 3 0 0 2713.50
Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.61
Washington IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
G.GonzalezW,8-67 3 0 0 3 81083.56
Roark 2 1 0 0 0 0 13 0.93
Koehler pitched to 5 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored-S.Dyson 2-1.
Umpires-Home, Alfonso Marquez; First,
Ted Barrett; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third,
Scott Barry. T-2:25.A-27,374 (41,418).


Corbin, Arizona, 2.79; Greinke, Los Angeles,
2.86; SMiller, St. Louis, 2.90; Bumgarner, San
Francisco, 2.91.
STRIKEOUTS-Kershaw, Los Angeles,
197; Harvey, NewYork, 191;Wainwright, St.
Louis, 184; Samardzija, Chicago, 175; HBai-
ley, Cincinnati, 173; Latos, Cincinnati, 170;
Bumgarner, San Francisco, 168.
SAVES-Kimbrel, Atlanta, 43; Mujica,
St. Louis, 35; RSoriano, Washington, 35;
AChapman, Cincinnati, 33; Romo, San
Francisco, 32; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 30; Cishek,
Miami,28.


I MLB STANDINGS


Orioles 3, Red Sox 2
Baltimore AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
McLouthlf 3 1 0 0 2 0 .268
Machado3b 3 0 2 2 2 0 .298
AJonescf 4 1 2 0 1 2 .297
C.Davislb 5 0 1 1 0 1 .303
Wietersc 4 0 0 0 0 0 .227
Hardyss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .257
Markakisrf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272
Valencia dh 3 0 2 0 0 1 .274
a-Betemitph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
B.Roberts2b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .255
Totals 34 3 7 3 6 6
Boston AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Ellsburycf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .299
Victorinorf 4 1 2 1 0 2 .294
Pedroia2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .301
D.Ortizdh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .310
Navalb 4 1 3 0 0 1 .297
J.Gomeslf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .228
Saltalamacchia c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .270
Drewss 3 0 1 1 0 1 .248
Middlebrooks3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .224
Totals 34 2 8 2 011
Baltimore 002010000- 3 70
Boston 010001000- 2 80
LOB-Baltimore 10, Boston 5.2B-Mach-
ado (45), C.Davis (38), Valencia 2 (9), Nava 2
(23). HR-Victorino(12),offTillman.RBIs-
Machado 2 (64), C.Davis (121), Victorino
(50), Drew (53). SB-Ellsbury (50). Run-
ners left in scoring position-Baltimore
6 (Wieters 2, B.Roberts, C.Davis 2, Betemit);
Boston 3 (D.Ortiz 2, J.Gomes). RISP-Bal-
timore 3 for 12; Boston 1 for 10. Runners
moved up-Markakis, Pedroia. GIDP-J.
Gomes. DP-Baltimore 1 (Hardy, B.Roberts,
C.Davis).
Baltimore IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
TillmanW,15-4 7 6 2 2 0 8111 3.61
Tom.HunterH,172/310 0 0 1 142.67
MatuszH,17 1/3 00 0 0 1 43.55
JiJohnsonS,41-50 1 1 0 0 0 1
11 3.45
Boston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
LesterL,12-8 6 5 3 3 3 4112 3.99
Thornton 1 2 0 0 0 0 21 3.35
Workman 12/3 0 0 0 3 2 43 4.41
Breslow 1/3 00 0 0 0 2 2.12
Inherited runners-scored-Matusz 1-0,
Breslow 2-0. WP-Tillman. PB-Saltal-
amacchia. Umpires-Home, Tim McClel-
land; First, Marty Foster; Second, Wally Bell;
Third, Marvin Hudson. T-3:20. A-33,300
(37,499).


Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .359; Trout,
Los Angeles, .331; ABeltre,Texas, .329; Mau-
er, Minnesota, .324; DOrtiz, Boston, .310;
TorHunter, Detroit, .308; Cano, New York,
.305;JhPeralta, Detroit, .305.
RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 95; CDavis, Bal-
timore, 95; Trout, Los Angeles, 91; AJones,
Baltimore, 88; AJackson, Detroit, 86; Ells-
bury, Boston, 83; Bautista,Toronto, 82.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 130; CDavis,
Baltimore, 121; Encarnacion, Toronto, 99;
AJones, Baltimore, 95; Fielder, Detroit, 91;
Cano, New York, 85; Trumbo, Los Angeles,
84.
HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 173; ABeltre,
Texas, 170; Machado, Baltimore, 167;Trout,
Los Angeles, 163; Ellsbury, Boston, 161;
AJones, Baltimore, 161; Pedroia, Boston,
160.
DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 45;
Lowrie, Oakland, 39; CDavis, Baltimore, 38;
AIRamirez, Chicago, 36; Mauer, Minnesota,
35; Saltalamacchia, Boston, 35; Pedroia,
Boston, 34;Trout, Los Angeles, 34.
TRIPLES-Ellsbury, Boston, 8; Gardner,
New York, 8; Trout, Los Angeles, 8; Drew,
Boston, 6; AGordon, Kansas City, 6; DeJen-
nings, Tampa Bay, 5; Kawasaki, Toronto, 5;
LMartin, Texas, 5; BMiller, Seattle, 5.
HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 47; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, 43; Encarnacion, Toronto,
34; ADunn, Chicago, 30;Trumbo, Los Ange-
les, 29; Bautista,Toronto, 28; ABeltre, Texas,
28; Longoria,Tampa Bay, 28.
STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 50;
RDavis, Toronto, 40; Andrus, Texas, 35; Rios,
Texas, 31; Altuve, Houston, 30; LMartin,
Texas,29;McLouth, Baltimore, 29;Trout, Los
Angeles, 29.
PITCHING-Scherzer, Detroit, 19-1; Till-
man, Baltimore, 15-4; MMoore, Tampa
Bay, 14-3; Colon, Oakland, 14-5; Masterson,
Cleveland, 14-9;CWilson, Los Angeles, 13-6;
Guthrie, Kansas City,13-10.
ERA-AniSanchez, Detroit, 2.61; Darvish,
Texas,2.68; Kuroda, New York, 2.89; Scherz-
er, Detroit, 2.90; Colon, Oakland, 2.94; FHer-
nandez, Seattle, 2.97; Sale, Chicago, 2.99.
STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 225; Scher-
zer, Detroit, 201; FHernandez, Seattle, 194;
Sale, Chicago, 193; Masterson, Cleveland,
188; Verlander, Detroit, 169; DHolland,
Texas, 167.
SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 41; Nathan,
Texas, 38; MRivera, New York, 38; AReed,
Chicago, 36; GHolland, Kansas City, 36; Bal-
four, Oakland, 33; Rodney, Tampa Bay, 31.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING-YMolina, St. Louis, .333; CJohn-
son, Atlanta, .329; McCutchen, Pittsburgh,
323; Cuddyer, Colorado, .322; Craig, St. Lou-
is, .317; MCarpenter, St. Louis, .314; Votto,
Cincinnati, .312.
RUNS-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 100; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 88; Votto, Cincinnati, 88;
Choo, Cincinnati, 87; Holliday, St. Louis, 85;
McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 81; JUpton, At-
lanta,81.
RBI-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 104; Craig,
St. Louis, 96; Phillips, Cincinnati, 95; Bruce,
Cincinnati, 87; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 86;
FFreeman, Atlanta, 85; AdGonzalez, Los
Angeles, 81.
HITS-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 160; Mc-
Cutchen, Pittsburgh, 158; Segura, Milwau-
kee, 158; Craig, St Louis, 154; Votto, Cin-
cinnati, 151; DanMurphy, New York, 150;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 147.
DOUBLES-MCarpenter, St. Louis, 43;
YMolina, St. Louis, 37; Bruce, Cincinnati, 35;
Desmond, Washington, 33; McCutchen,
Pittsburgh, 33; Rizzo, Chicago, 33; GParra,
Arizona, 32.
TRIPLES-SMarte, Pittsburgh, 10; CGo-
mez, Milwaukee, 9; Segura, Milwaukee, 9;
Span, Washington, 9; Hechavarria, Miami,
7; Venable, San Diego, 7; CGonzalez, Colo-
rado, 6; DWright, New York, 6; EYoung, New
York, 6.
HOME RUNS-PAIvarez, Pittsburgh, 32;
Goldschmidt, Arizona, 31; DBrown, Phila-
delphia, 27; Bruce, Cincinnati, 26; CGonza-
lez, Colorado, 26; JUpton, Atlanta, 24; Bel-
tran,St. Louis, 23.
STOLEN BASES-Segura, Milwaukee,
38; ECabrera, San Diego, 37; SMarte,
Pittsburgh, 35; CGomez, Milwaukee, 32;
EYoung, New York, 31; McCutchen, Pitts-
burgh, 27; Revere, Philadelphia, 22.
PITCHING-Zimmermann, Washington,
15-7; Wainwright, St. Louis, 15-8; Liriano,
Pittsburgh, 14-6; JDe La Rosa, Colorado, 14-
6; 8 tied at 13.
ERA-Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.72; Harvey,
New York, 227; Fernandez, Miami, 2.30;


RAYS

FROM PAGE 1

a month of baseball to
play what more can
you ask for?" Longoria
said. "We definitely
haven't been playing
anywhere near where
we're capable of. I think
we just go into the road
trip with the hope we can
figure it out sooner rather
than later and get into a
nice rhythm. Usually the
teams that end up going
the furthest are the ones
that get hot close to the
end. But we've got to stay
positive "
One positive Thursday
was Odorizzi, who
pitched with added veloc-
ity and confidence in his
sixth big-league start,
allowing one run through
five innings.
"He pitched really, re-
ally well," Maddon said.
The Rays didn't give
Odorizzi any support,
going 0 for 8 with runners
in scoring position. They
had Angels lefty Jason
Vargas on the ropes in the
first inning, loading the
bases with one out. But
Sean Rodriguez popped
out and Yunel Escobar
flied out to thwart the
threat.
"It was kind of deflat-
ing a bit," Maddon said.
'And I felt that among
the group. I could feel the
guys were just not quite
right today."
That timely hitting
has been lacking for the
Rays this month; they are
batting .174 with runners
in scoring position in
their 13 August losses,
including stranding the
bases loaded a few times
this series. The Rays had
golden opportunities
Thursday. In the sixth,
Ben Zobrist reached
second with no outs, and
in the ninth, the Rays put
runners on second and
third with two outs, to no
avail.
It's been a group effort.
Longoria and Wil Myers
combined to go 0 for 19
this series, and the start-
ing fifth-through-ninth
hitters on Thursday were
1 for 14.
"I think all of us are
one pitch away from
really turning the corner,"
Myers said.
Longoria said they need
a couple hitters doing it
at the same time, a "spark
to get that fire started
again." He believes the
Rays have the potential
for "one or two more
good runs where we can
really put ourselves where
we want to be."
"I'm just looking
forward to getting on the
road," Longoria said. "And
hopefully changing our
luck."

Angels 2, Rays 0
Los Angeles AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Shuckrf 4 1 2 0 0 0 296
Trumbo b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .236
Aybarss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272
Trout If 2 0 0 0 2 1 .331
Hamilton dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 234
Calhounlb-rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 239
Conger c 3 1 1 0 1 1 253
GGreen2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 256
LJimenez3b 3 0 2 1 0 0 250
Bourjoscf 3 0 0 0 0 1 279
Totals 30 2 6 2 4 6
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
DeJenningsdcf 3 0 1 0 1 0 248
Zobrist2b 2 0 1 0 1 0 276
Longoria3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 267
W.Myersrf 1 0 0 0 3 1 286
S.Rodriguezlb 3 0 0 0 0 1 244
a-Joyceph 1 0 0 0 0 0 259
YEscobarss 4 0 1 0 0 0 268
KeJohnsondh 4 0 0 0 0 1 248
Lobatonc 3 0 0 0 0 1 262
bDeJesusph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .412
Fuldlf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .197
Totals 29 0 3 0 5 7
LosAngeles 010001 000- 2 61
Tampa Bay 000000000- 0 30
a-popped out for S.Rodriguez in the 9th.
b-flied out for Lobaton in the 9th. E-L
Jimenez (1). LOB-Los Angeles 5, Tampa
Bay 8. 2B-Conger (12), LJimenez (4),
DeJennings (25),Y.Escobar (22) RBIs-Cal-
houn (12), LJimenez (3). Runners left in
scoring position-Los Angeles 3 (Bourjos,
Conger 2); Tamr pa Bay 5 (Y.Escobar 3, DeJe-
sus 2). RISP-Los Angeles 2 for 6; Tampa
Bay 0 for 8. Runners moved up-G.Green.
GIDP-Aybar, Zobrist DP-Los Angeles 1
(Aybar,Trumbo);Tampa Bay2 (S.Rodriguez,


Y.Escobar, S.Rodriguez), (S.Rodriguez,
Y.Escobar).
Los Angeles IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
VargasW,8-5 7 20 0 3 71143.54
D La Rosa H, 13 1 0 0 0 1 0 133.39
FrieriS,28-32 1 1 0 0 1 0 31 4.09
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Odorizzi L, 0-1 5 41 1 2 3 83 5.09
AI.Torres 2 2 1 1 1 1 24 1.41
J.Wright 11/3 0 0 0 1 1 192.97
W.Wright 2/3 00 0 0 1 5 4.08
Inherited runners-scored-W.Wright
1-0. HBP-by Vargas (Zobrist). Umpires-
Home, Mark Wegner; First, Mike Winters;
Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Laz Diaz.
T-3:02. A-15,741 (34,078).


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013










QUICK HITS


EX-RAZORBACK
ARRESTED FOR MURDER

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP)
- Police say former Arkansas
football player Josh Melton has
been arrested on a second-
degree murder charge.
Fayetteville police said
Melton was arrested
Wednesday after Melton and
a friend spent Tuesday night
drinking. Authorities said
Melton told police that he and
his friend got into a confronta-
tion after the friend vomited in
Melton's living room.
A police report said Melton
punched the victim several
times. The victim, whose name
hasn't been released, was pro-
nounced dead by emergency
responders.
The report said Melton was
cooperative and concerned and
said he didn't intend to cause
his friend's death.
Melton was an offensive


lineman for the Razorbacks
from 1999 to 2002. He's being
held in the Washington County
jail, and court records don't list
an attorney.


PRO BASKETBALL

Hawks coach Budenholzer
arrested on DUI charge: Atlanta
Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer has apologized
for his arrest on a driving under the influence
of alcohol charge.
According to a report from the Georgia
State Patrol, Budenholzer was pulled over
at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday in Atlanta for not
having working taillights. Trooper J. Nelms said
Budenholzer had bloodshot and watery eyes
"and a strong odor of an alcoholic beverage
coming from his breath."
Budenholzer refused a breath test but
agreed to a field sobriety test, according to the
report. He told Nelms he had only one glass of
wine and that he finished the glass about 15
minutes before being pulled over. Nelms said
in the report that Budenholzer was "polite"
and that his speech patterns were mumbled,
slow and slurred.
Budenholzer issued an apology in a


statement released by his attorney, Michael resume World Cup qualifying next week. victims.
Hawkins. U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann snubbed the Registration for the 118th edition of the
"I take my role as a leader very seri- Americans'all-time leading scorer for the last world's oldest and most prestigious annual
ously and hold myself to a high standard," round of qualifiers, saying Donovan needed to marathon will open Sept. 9, the Boston
Budenholzer said."I apologize to the fans and work his way back onto the team following his Athletic Association said.
to the Hawks organization for any negative offseason sabbatical. "The BAA is aware of the significantly
attention this incident has brought upon But Donovan redeemed himself-- and ;. ,n A


my family and the organization while the
legal process evolves and I contest these
misdemeanor charges."...
The Phoenix Suns traded small forward
Caron Butler to the Milwaukee Bucks for
point guard Ish Smith and center Viacheslav
Kravstov. The move sends Butler to his
hometown team. The 11-year NBA veteran is
from nearby Racine. ...
The Phoenix Suns signed first-round draft
pick Alex Len. The 7-foot-1 Len, the fifth
overall pick in the draft, played two seasons
at Maryland after coming to the United States
from his native Ukraine. He averaged 11.9
points, 7.8 rebounds and 2.1 blocks in his
sophomore season at Maryland.


SOCCER

Donovan back for next round
of WCup qualifying: Landon Donovan
will be back with the Americans when they


then some with his play in last month's
Gold Cup, scoring five goals as the Americans
won the title. He's continued his dazzling play
with the Los Angeles Galaxy, scoring four goals


i csaecni interest
Boston Marathoi
said in a statemr
many marathon


in three games. Boston in 2014,
The Americans resume their qualifying and patience tha
campaign Sept. 6 in Costa Rica, then return demonstrated be
home four days later for a game against occurred this pas
archrival Mexico in Columbus, Ohio. They
currently top the qualifying group from the CYCLING
North and Central American and Caribbean
region. Michael IV
6th stage, N
ROAD RACING Morkov of Denm

Boston Marathon to increase the Spanish uel
field for '14 race: The Boston Marathon in the final miles
will accept an extra 9,000 runners for next maintained the (
year's race, making room for the more than Martin, the w
5,000 people stopped on the course this year broke away near
when two bombs went off and for many ride from Guijue
of those wanting to run as a tribute to the peloton until the


il I r~ite I i y iy IUI tIIe ZU 14
1n" executive director Tom Grilk
ent Thursday. "We understand
ers and qualifiers want to run
and we appreciate the support
it the running community has
because of the bombings that
st spring."




Mlorkov wins Vuelta
libali leads: Michael
lark won the sixth stage of
ta after catching Tony Martin
., while Vincenzo Nibali
overall lead on Thursday.
world time trial champion,
the start of the 108-mile
lo to Caceres and held off the
final sprint.


I SCOREBOARD

Sports on TV
AUTO RACING
3p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practicefor Ad-
voCare 500, at Hampton, Ga.
7p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying
for AdvoCare 500, at Hampton, Ga. (same-
day tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8p.m.
ESPN -TexasTech at SMU
8:30p.m.
FS1 North Dakota St. at Kansas St.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Wales Open,
second round, at City of Newport,Wales
12:30p.m.
TGC -Web.com Tour, Hotel Fitness Cham-
pionship, second round, at FortWayne, Ind.
3p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank Champi-
onship, first round, at Norton, Mass.
6:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Safeway Classic, second
round, at Portland, Ore.
8:30p.m.
TGC- ChampionsTour, Shaw Charity Clas-
sic, first round, at Calgary, Alberta (same-
day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2:10 p.m.
WGN Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs
7p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, St. Louis at Pitts-
burgh or Baltimore at N.Y.Yankees
7:30 p.m.
FSFL Miami at Atlanta
10p.m.
SUN -Tampa Bay at Oakland
SOCCER
10 p.m.
NBCSN MLS, Portland at Real Salt Lake
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, men's second and
women's third round, at New York
7p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, men's second and
women's third round, at New York


Glantz-Culver Line
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atChicago -110 Philadelphia +100
atPittsburgh -135 St.Louis +125
atWashington -175 NewYork +165
at Atlanta -135 Miami +125
Cincinnati -135 at Colorado +125
at Arizona -130 San Francisco +120
atLosAngeles -185 San Diego +175
American League
atNewYork -130 Baltimore +120
atToronto -120 Kansas City +110
at Detroit -145 Cleveland +135
at Boston -185 Chicago +175
atTexas -300 Minnesota +250
Seattle -110 at Houston +100
Tampa Bay -120 at Oakland +110
Interleague
Los Angeles (AL)-125 at Milwaukee +115

NCAA FOOTBALL
Tonight
FAVORITE 0 T O/U UNDERDOG
at Michigan St. 27 28(44/2) W.Michigan
at Miami 311/232(531/2) FAU
TexasTech 7 5 (59/2) at SMU
Tomorrow
atWisconsin 44 44/2(53/2) UMass
at Michigan 341/231/2(52)Cent. Michigan
at Ohio St. 35 34/2(54/2) Buffalo
at NC State 141/214 (62/2) La Tech
at Maryland 18/2 22 (49/2) FlU
at Iowa 3 3 (53/2) N.Illinois
at Notre Dame 30291/2(53) Temple
BYU 2/2 1 (50) atVirginia
Alabama-a 1712 20 (45/2) Virginia Tech
atTroy 6/2 3/2 (63) UAB
at Cincinnati 71/2101/2(501/2) Purdue
Kentucky-b 7/2 4/2 (57) W.Kentucky
at Marshall 17191/2(69) Miami (Ohio)
Oklahoma St.-c 11 12/2(60/2) Mississippi St.
at Oklahoma 221/222 (60) La-Monroe
at Southern Miss.7 8 (55/2) Texas St.
atTexas 41/242/2(57/2) New Mex St.
atTexasA&M 27 27(66/2) Rice
at Florida 23 231/2(561/2) Toledo
at Arkansas 10/210/V2(59) La.-Lafayette
at Auburn 17151/2(591/2) Wash St.
at North Texas 141/215 (56/2) Idaho
Penn St.-d 7 81/2(51/2) Syracuse
at Nebraska 27 30(65/2) Wyoming
at New Mexico 3 3/2 (56) UTSA
Georgia 21/2 11V2(701V2) atClemson
LSU-e 3 412 (50) TCU
atWashington 51/2 32 (52) BoiseSt.
at UCLA 17 21 (66) Nevada
Northwestern 3 6 (58) at California
Sunday
at Louisville 21 20V2 (58) Ohio
Colorado St.-f 212 212 (49) Colorado
Monday
Florida St. 71/2101/2(491/2) at
Pittsburgh
a-at Atlanta
b-at Nashville,Tenn.
c-at Houston
d-at E. Rutherford, NJ.
e-at Arlington,Texas
f-at Denver


Pro baseball
WEDNESDAY'S LATE MLB LINESCORES
ROCKIES 5, GIANTS 4
San Francisco 000 100 030 -4 5 2
Colorado 010 00400x-5 73
Bumgarner, Machi (6), S.Casilla (8) and
Posey, H.Sanchez; Chacin,W.Lopez (8), Out-
man (8), Belisle (8), Brothers (9) and Torre-
alba.W-Chacin 13-7. L-Bumgarner 11-9.


Sv-Brothers (14).

PADRES 5, DIAMONDBACKS 1
San Diego 200 000 030 5110
Arizona 000 001000-1100
Erlin, Stauffer (7), Street (9) and Hundley;
Miley, Bell (8), E.De La Rosa (9) and Nieves.
W-Erlin 2-2. L-Miley 9-9. HRs-San Di-
ego,Venable (20), Guzman (8).
GULF COAST LEAGUE PLAYOFFS
Wild-Card
(Best-of-3)
Pirates vs. Nationals
Today: Pirates at Nationals, 12 p.m.
Red Soxvs. Gulf Coast
Today: Red Sox at Gulf Coast, 12 p.m.

Soccer
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Montreal 12 7 5 41 41 35
NewYork 11 9 6 39 38 34
Sporting KansasCityll 9 6 39 36 26
Philadelphia 10 8 8 38 37 37
NewEngland 10 9 6 36 34 24
Houston 10 8 6 36 29 28
Chicago 10 10 4 34 30 34
Columbus 8 12 5 29 29 34
Toronto FC 4 12 9 21 22 34
D.C. 3 17 5 14 15 41
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 13 8 6 45 48 33
LosAngeles 12 9 4 40 40 32
Portland 9 412 39 37 26
Colorado 10 7 9 39 33 27
FCDallas 9 710 37 36 38
Seattle 11 8 4 37 31 26
Vancouver 10 9 6 36 36 33
San Jose 9 10 7 34 28 37
ChivasUSA 5 14 6 21 24 45
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Today's games
New England at Toronto FC, 7 p.m.
Portland at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m.
Saturday's games
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
D.C. United at New York, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's games
Houston at Chicago, 3 p.m.
Chivas USA at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
NWSL Playoffs
Championship
Saturday, Aug. 31
Portland at Western New York, 8 p.m.

Pro basketball
WNBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pet GB
x-Chicago 20 8 .714 -
Atlanta 14 12 .538 5
Washington 14 15 .483 612
Indiana 12 15 .444 712
NewYork 11 17 .393 9
Connecticut 7 20 .259 1212
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pet GB
x-Minnesota 21 7 .750 -
x-Los Angeles 20 8 .714 1
Phoenix 14 13 .519 612
Seattle 14 14 .500 7
San Antonio 10 18 .357 11
Tulsa 9 19 .321 12
x-clinched playoff spot
Wednesday's results
Washington 85, Atlanta 80, OT
Thursday's results
Connecticut at Seattle, late
Today's games
Indiana at New York, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Tulsa, 8 p.m.
Saturday's games
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Connecticut at Phoenix, 10 p.m.

Cycling
VUELTAAESPANA
Thursday
At Cacres, Spain
Sixth Stage
108-mile ridefrom Guijuelo to Caceres
1. Michael Morkov, Denmark, SaxoBank-
Tinkoff, 3 hours, 54 minutes, 15 seconds.
2. Maximiliano Richeze, Argentina, Lam-
pre-Merida, same time.
3. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Ra-
dioShack-Leopard, same time.
4. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin
Sharp, same time.
5. Juan Flecha, Spain, Vacansoleil-DCM,
sometime.
6. Michael Matthews, Australia, Orica
Greenedge, same time.
7. Tony Martin, Germany, Omega Phar-
ma-Quickstep, same time.
8. Gianni Meersman, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Quickstep, same time.
9. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, BMC, same
time.
10. Graeme Brown, Australia, Belkin,
sometime.

Overall Standings
(After6of 21 stages)
1.Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Astana, 22 hours,
38 minutes, 7 seconds.
2. Christopher Horner, United States,
RadioShack-Leopard, 3 seconds behind.
3. NicolasRoche,Ireland,Team SaxoBank-
Tinkoff,:08.
4. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-
Leopard, :16.


5. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar,
:21.
6. Robert Kiserlovski, Croatia, Ra-
dioShack-Leopard,:26.
7. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, Sky, :28.
8. Daniel Moreno, Spain, Katusha,:31.
9. Rafal Majka, Poland, Team SaxoBank-
Tinkoff,:38.
10. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic,
Team SaxoBank-Tinkoff, :42.

Pro football


East
New En
N.Y Jet
Buffalo
DOLPI
South
Housto
Indiana
Tennes
JAGUA
North
Cincinn
Clevela
Baltimi
Pittsbu
West
Denve
Kansas
Oaklan
San Die

East
Washir
Philade
Dallas
N.Y.Gin
South
NewO
Carolin
BUCS
Atlanta
North
Detroit
Chicag
Green
Minne
West
Seattle
Arizona
San Fra
St. Lou


NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
W L T Pct PF PA
ngland 3 1 0 .750 93 103
ts 3 1 0 .750 105 80
2 2 0 .500 84 101
HINS 2 3 0 .400 104 89
W L T Pct PF PA
on 3 1 0 .750 98 67
apolis 2 2 0 .500 77 89
ssee 1 3 0 .250 90 89
ARS 1 3 0 .250 60 111
W L T Pct PF PA
nati 3 1 0 .750 106 63
nd 3 1 0 .750 75 68
ore 2 2 0 .500 119 97
irgh 0 4 0 .000 56 93
W L T Pct PF PA
r 2 1 0 .667 47 72
sCity 2 2 0 .500 82 60
id 1 2 0 .333 65 79
ego 1 2 0 .333 62 71
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
W L T Pct PF PA
ngton 4 0 0 1.000 106 53
elphia 2 2 0 .500 87 91
2 3 0 .400 78 93
ants 1 3 0 .250 71 85
W L T Pct PF PA
)rleans 3 1 0 .750 97 80
ia 3 1 0 .750 92 68
1 3 0 .250 66 115
0 4 0 .000 65 108
W L T Pct PF PA
S 3 1 0 .750 107 63
o 2 2 0 .500 100 96
Bay 1 3 0 .250 37 71
sota 1 3 0 .250 67 104
W L T Pct PF PA
3 0 01.000 88 30
a 2 1 0 .667 36 31
ancisco 2 1 0 .667 55 37
is 1 3 0 .250 76 94


Thursday's results
Cincinnati 27, Indianapolis 10
Detroit 35, Buffalo 13
N.Y Jets 27, Philadelphia 20
DOLPHINS 24, New Orleans 21
Washington 30, BUCS 12
JAGUARS 20, Atlanta 16
New England 28, N.Y Giants 20
Carolina 25, Pittsburgh 10
Minnesota 24,Tennessee 23
Cleveland 18, Chicago 16
Kansas City30, Green Bay8
Houston 24, Dallas 6
St. Louis24, Baltimore21
Arizona at Denver, late
Oakland at Seattle, late
San Francisco at San Diego, late


Toronto
Hamilton
Montreal
Winnipeg

Saskatche


Calgary
B.C.
Edmonton


CFL
EAST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
5 3 0 10 244 206
4 4 0 8 203 219
3 5 0 6 195 239
1 7 0 2 167 247
WEST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
in 7 1 0 14 264 177
6 2 0 12 258 200
5 3 0 10 207 203
1 7 0 2 188 235


Today's game
Hamilton at B.C., 10 p.m.
Sunday's game
Winnipeg at Saskatchewan, 4 p.m.
Monday's game
Edmonton at Calgary, 5 p.m.


College football
EAST
Delaware51,Jacksonville 35
Fordham 51, Rhode Island 26
Towson 33, UConn 18
SOUTH
E.Kentucky38, Robert Morris 6
MiddleTennessee 45,W. Carolina 24
Pikeville 13, Morehead St.10
S. Utah 22, South Alabama 21
SSE Louisiana 45, SE Missouri 7
South Carolina 27, North Carolina 10
TennesseeTech 63, Cumberland (Tenn.) 7
Tulane 34, Jackson St. 7
UCF 38, Akron 7
UT-Martin 31, Chattanooga 21
Wake Forest31, Presbyterian 7
S MIDWEST
Ball St.51,lllinoisSt.28
SBowling Green 34,Tulsa 7
Grand View21, Drake 16
Indiana 73,lndiana St.35
Kent St. 17, Liberty 10
Minnesota 51, UNLV23
North Dakota 69,Valparaiso 10
Northwestern St. 23, Missouri St. 17
W. Illinois 42, Hampton 9
Youngstown St. 28, Dayton 10
SOUTHWEST
Cent. Arkansas 58, IncarnateWord 7
FARWEST
No scores reported from the FARWEST.

Transactions
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB Suspended Philadelphia minor
league RHP Gustavo Armas (Venezeula
Summer League) 50 gamesfor testing posi-
tivefora metabolite of Nandrolone; Detroit


minor league SS Moises Bello (Venezeula
Summer League) 50 games after testing
positive for a metabolite of Boldenone and
Chicago White Sox minor league C Nicho-
las Parent (Bristol-Appalachian) 50 games
after testing positive for metabolites of
Stanozolol.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS Released RHP
Brett Myers.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Placed 3B
Chris Nelson on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF
LuisJimenezfrom Salt Lake (PCL).
National League
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Recalled LHP
Sam Freeman from Memphis (PCL). Op-
tioned RHP Michael Wacha to Springfield
(Texas) and RHP Michael Blazek to Mem-
phis.
Frontier League
FLORENCE FREEDOM Signed RHP
Andrew Strenge.
NORMAL CORNBELTERS Signed RHP
Matt Suschak.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS Named
JoHanWang athletic trainer, DrewYoder as-
sistant athletic trainer, Keke Lyles director of
athletic performance/assistant coach and
Michael Roncarati strength and condition-
ing coach.
PHOENIX SUNS Signed C Alex Len.
Traded F Caron Butler to Milwaukee for G
Ish Smith and CViacheslav Kravstov.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Named Tyler
Epp vice president of business develop-
ment.
Canadian Football League
CFL Fined Saskatchewan LB Weldon
Brown an undisclosed amountfor an illegal
and dangerous hit to the head of Edmon-
ton QB Mike Reilly during an Aug. 24game.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Signed
DE Greg Peach.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BOSTON BRUINS Signed general
manager Peter Chiarelli to a four-year con-
tract extension through the 2017-18 sea-
son.
COLLEGE
EASTERN COLLEGE ATHLETIC CON-
FERENCE Promoted Katie Boldvich to
assistant commissioner for leagues and
affiliates/senior woman administrator and
Lisa Nurse to director of business services
and human resources. Named Drew Brown
associate commissioner for external affairs
and Owen Salvestrini assistant commis-
sionerfor administration.
FLORIDA ATLANTIC Named Sophia
Witherspoon women's basketball director
of operations.
MANHATTAN Announced the res-
ignation of women's lacrosse coach Diane
Haddeland.
NEW JERSEY CITY Named Anthony
Tuesta men's assistant soccer coach.
RADFORD -Named Chad Wall assistant
director of athleticsfor compliance.
UTSA Named Michelle Cheatham
softball coach.
WASHINGTON & JEFFERSON -
Named Kevin Kustron men's assistant la-
crosse coach.

Boxing
Fight Schedule
Sept. 2
At Cowboys Dancehall, San Antonio, 10,
Luis Collazo vs. Alan Sanchez, 10,for the va-
cant WBA International welterweight title.
Sept. 3
At Takamatsu, Japan, Daiki Kameda vs. Ro-
drigo Guerrero, 12, for the vacant IBF junior
bantamweight title.
Sept. 7
At Scottish Exhibition Centre in Glasgow,
Scotland, Ray Beltran, vs. Ricky Burns, for
Burns'WBO lightweight title.
At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Ca-
lif. (SHO), Seth Mitchell vs. Cristobal Arreola,
12, heavyweights; Rafael Marquez vs. Efrain
Esquivias, 10, junior featherweights.
Sept. 11
At Osaka, Japan, Kazuto loka vs. Kwanthai
Sithmorseng, 12, for loka's WBA World ju-
nior flyweight title; Ryo Miyazaki vs. Jesus
Silvestre, 12, for Miyazaki's WBA World
strawweight title.
Sept. 12
At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (FS2), Shawn
Porter vs. Julio Diaz, rematch, 10, welter-
weights; Marco Antonio Periban vs. Ba-
dou Jack, 10, super middleweights; Hugo
Centeno Jr. vs. Julian Williams, 10, junior
middleweights.
Sept. 14
At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (PPV), Floyd
Mayweather Jr. vs. Canelo Alvarez, 12, May-
weather's WBA Super World and Alvarez's
WBC junior middleweight titles; Danny
Garcia,vs. Lucas Matthysse, 12, super light-
weights; Ishe Smith vs. Carlos Molina, 12,for
Smith's IBF junior middleweight title; Pablo
Cesar Cano vs. Ashley Theophane, 10, wel-
terweights.
Sept. 28
At StubHub Center, Carson, Calif. (HBO), Ju-
lio Cesar Chavez Jr. vs. Brian Vera, 12, super
middleweights; Karim Mayfield vs. Pavel
Miranda, 10, light welterweights.
At San Jose, Costa Rica, Bryan Vasquez vs.
Rene Gonzalez, 12, for the interim WBA
World junior lightweight title.
Oct. 5
At Amway Center, Orlando, Fla. (HBO).
Miguel Cotto vs. Delvin Rodriguez, 12, ju-
nior middleweights.
At Olimpiyskiy, Moscow, Russia, Wladimir
Klitschko vs. Alexander Povetkin, 12, for
Klitschko's IBF-WBA Super World-WBO-IBO
heavyweight titles.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL ROUNDUP



UCF air attack



decimates Zips


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ORLANDO UCF
coach George O'Leary
promised he wouldn't
shy away from letting
quarterback Blake Bortles
throw the ball around
more this season.
In his first outing of
the year, the Knights
second-year starter didn't
disappoint.
Bortles had three
touchdown passes and
threw for a career-high
314 yards as UCF blew
past Akron 38-7 on
Thursday night.
Storm Johnson added
99 yards rushing and two
scores as the Knights won
their eighth consecu-
tive season-opener and
second straight over the
Zips.
It was the first 300-yard
passing game of Bortles'
career and the first by
a Knights' quarterback
since 2009.
"For a first game, it was
a good performance,"
Bortles said. "We were a
little sloppy with some
things, we need to tighten
up some stuff, some
things I definitely need
to be better at, but I felt
good."
Though Bortles
garnered most of the
attention after the vic-
tory, O'Leary said he was
pleased the unit's play in
all phases.
"I think we showed we
have the backs and the
line to move the chains,"
O'Leary said. "Whether
it's run or pass I think we
have the offensive players
who can make big plays."
Akron dropped its 10th
straight game, dating
back to last season.
The Zips put pressure
on Bortles, but never got
traction on offense and
had a pair of turnovers.
Akron also struggled on
third down in the first
half (2 of 6) and failed to
keep UCF's secondary off
balance despite its hurry-
up attack.
Akron coach Terry
Bowden said the missed
opportunities Thursday
were reminiscent of those
that followed them in last
year's 1-11 finish.
"We cause a fumble on
the first play of the game
and maybe if we jump on
that we can make some-
thing, but then (Bortles)
throws a touchdown on
the next play," Bowden
said. "Next series, we
sack him and he gets up
the next play and throws
another touchdown pass.
We were just fighting
uphill after that.
"They were the better
team and they just took it
to us."
Indeed, just about
everything went right for
the Knights in their first


outing of the season.
Bortles found three dif-
ferent receivers for scores
in a first half that saw the
Knights punt on only two
of their six possessions.
He survived a near
disaster when he was
stripped as he drew his
arm back to throw on the
game's opening play. He
fell on the ball, though,
and on the next snap
Bortles' hit a streaking
Breshad Perriman in the
middle of the field with
his first actual pass of the
night.
"That's the second time
that happened," Bortles
said of the fumble fol-
lowed by the touchdown
pass. "Hand was getting
sweaty and it slipped out.
We made something good
out of it."

UCF38,AKRON7
Akron 0 0 0 7-- 7
UCF 14 10 14 0 38
First Quarter
UCF-Perriman 91 pass from Bortles (Mof-
fitt kick), 14:02.
UCF-Hall 19 pass from Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 2:23.
Second Quarter
UCF-Worton 39 pass from Bortles (Moffitt
kick), 6:54.
UCF-FG Moffitt 32, :58.
Third Quarter
UCF-SJohnson 9 run (Quirarte kick), 9:38.
UCF-SJohnson 1 run (Quirarte kick), 2:23.
Fourth Quarter
Akr-I.Davis 11 pass from Hirschman
(Stein kick), :42.
A-35,115.


Akr
First downs 15
Rushes-yards 35-134
Passing 116
Comp-Att-Int 18-25-1
Return Yards 11
Punts-Avg. 7-46.7
Fumbles-Lost 2-1
Penalties-Yards 6-49
Time of Possession 27:21


UCF
23
39-157
319
19-27-0
13
4-40.0
2-0
1-10
32:39


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Akron, Jones 5-54, Hund-
ley 10-50, Pohl 7-17, Chisholm 11-10,
Hirschman 1-5, D'Orazio 1-(minus 2). UCF,
SJohnson 20-99, Stanback 7-38, Thomp-
son 3-16, Hall 1-4, Bortles 6-2, Team 1-0,
Gabbert 1-(minus2).
PASSING-Akron, Pohl 16-21-1-98,
Hirschman 2-4-0-18. UCF, Bortles 18-24-0-
314, Gabbert 1-3-0-5.
RECEIVING-Akron, Bickley 3-26, Traylor-
Bennett 3-25, Frieson 3-10, L.Smith 2-25,
I.Davis 2-13, Hundley 2-0, Goodman 1-10,
Sconiers 1-4, Chisholm 1-3. UCF, Perriman
3-113, Worton 3-60, Hall 3-54, Reese 2-38,
Tukes 2-25, Godfrey 2-13, SJohnson 2-2,
Miller 1-9,Owi 1-5.

No. 6 South Carolina
27, North Carolina 10.: In
Columbia, S.C., Mike Davis ran 75
yards for a touchdown, Connor Shaw
and Dylan Thompson each threw
long scoring passes and All-American
Jadeveon Clowney helped No. 6 South
Carolina's defense hold North Carolina
to its lowest point total under coach
Larry Fedora.
The game was delayed nearly
two hours in the fourth quarter by
rain. The Gamecocks were already in
control by that then.
Clowney did not have a sack and
finished with three first-half tackles.
The Tar Heels'fast-paced offense
wore him down and forced him to
the sideline for several pit stops, yet
he and defense mostly hemmed in
the Tar Heels'fast-paced attack. Shaw
and Thompson ended things early
as South Carolina led 17-0 in the
opening quarter.
Shaw found Shaq Roland for a
65-yard touchdown on the game's
third play. Thompson threw a 29-yard
TD to Kane Whitehurst later in the
quarter.


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


a


ewa






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013


* RACING NOTEBOOK


Ribs


sideline


Labonte

Goodyear tries
new hybrid tire
at Atlanta track
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TRINITY, N.C. Bobby
Labonte was released
from the hospital
Thursday a day after he
broke three ribs in a bike
riding accident near his
North Carolina home.
Labonte suffered no
other injuries. He will
miss this weekend's
NASCAR race in Atlanta.
The 49-year-old
Labonte was scheduled to
drive the No. 51 Chevrolet
for Phoenix Racing at
Atlanta Motor Speedway.
He'll be replaced in the
car by Mike Bliss.
Labonte's consecutive
starts streak came to an
end earlier this season
at 704 races when JTG
Daugherty Racing used
AJ Allmendinger at
Kentucky in June instead
of Labonte.

Rahal to test Indy road
course: Graham Rahal will drive an
IndyCar Series car Wednesday at the
Indianapolis Motor Speedway road
course as part of a test designed to
see if the infield road is suited for an
open wheel race in the future.
Adding a second race to the
schedule at IMS would follow one of
the recommendations from a report
a consulting group the series hired to
evaluate business operations.
The Boston Consulting Group
offered a wide array of suggestions,
including using the speedway for
an IndyCar race on the road course.
BCG found IMS had the potential to
generate a $4.3 million profit.

Goodyear to debut
"zone tread" tires at
Atlanta: Goodyear is using tires
with a new"zone tread"technology
for the first time at this weekend's
race in Atlanta. The manufacturer has
struggled to meet the demands for
grip on tracks such as Atlanta, which
combine high speeds, high cornering
loads and an abrasive surface, while
preserving reliability and safety.
The tires, most recently tested Aug.
6 at Atlanta by 13 teams, combine
two different compounds to create a
rubber capable of withstanding race
conditions while providing the grip
drivers desire.
The inside of the right-side tires
uses the same compound Goodyear
used at Michigan this year, and the
outside uses the compound from
previous Atlanta races.
Jamie McMurray crew chief Kevin
Manion said the tire held up well at
the Atlanta test over long runs.


Charlotte's Jenny D'Alessandro, left, and Haley
Casey Hall during Thursday's non-district game


SUN PHOTO BY KAT GODINA


Charlotte's Meghan McGill digs the ball
during Thursday's match in Punta Gorda.
Charlotte won the non-district contest in
four games.


* PREP ROUNDUP


Manta girls sweep

STAFF REPORT playing very well," Roach
said. "We've managed to
SARASOTA Julianna play a complete 9 holes in
Veloz and Montanna practice only three times
Williamson led Lemon in three weeks."
Bay to a sweep of a The Manta Rays return
tri-match with Riverview to action Tuesday (3:30
and BRaden River on p.m.) againstVenice.
Thursday at Heritage The other matches
Oaks C.C. scheduled for Thursday


Veloz, the Manta
Rays' top golfer, shot a
2-over-par 38. Williamson
contributed a 41, which
coach Darrell Roach
believed was her career-
best 9 hole score in a high
school match.
"Given the limited
practice time. the girls are


were not as fortunate
with the weather.
Community Christian's
boys match with DeSoto
County at Riverview C.C.
was postponed by light-
ning, as was the Lemon
Bay boys' tri-match
against North Port and
Venice. No makeup date
for either was announced.
Lemon Bay 172, Riverview 185, Braden
River 220
at Heritage Oaks CC (par 36), Sarasota
Lemon Bay: Julianna Veloz 38, Montanna
Williamson 41, Candice Weese 46, Lauren
Kelly47.
Riverview: Kadi Pallastrone 39, Nicole
Polivchak 41, Miranda Layton 49, Whitney
Brown 56.
Braden River: Bianca Dean 45, Kennedy
McCarthy 50, Caitlin Roberts 58, Ashley
Berg 67.
Records: Lemon Bay 2-1, Riverview 1-1,
Braden River 1-2.

VOLLEYBALL
Imagine tops Commu-
nity Christian: Imagine School
defeated Community Christian 3-2
(23-25, 25-10, 25-20, 22-25,15-17)
in a non-district match.


GRUDGEE giy

FROM PAGE 1 thi
0 de
W from this series for
now. That it comes in
Week 1 adds to the
intensity of the game.
"It does (put pressure 1
on)," Lemon Bay senior
Josh Schulte said. "This tr
is our one shot. We don't
have time to prepare for N
them, as much as we did ta
last year." B
The game offers an
interesting matchup ya
between the Mantas' e
spread option and the a
Pirates' physical defense. H
Port Charlotte appeared C
vulnerable when Lemon
Bay attacked the edges in
with players such as B
SAustin Hirschy and tph
Dakota Reigle. an
That's one thing the qu
Pirates have tried to
address this week. Po
"It's always a concern," sw
Port Charlotte coach so
SUN PHOTO BY KAT GODINA
Jordan Ingman said of M
Lathem set up a block against DeSoto County's the Mantas' quickness. e
in Punta Gorda. "They're very good at he
what they do. Obviously le
TARP S we have to prepare for
everything. They've had B:
all summer to get ready." p
FROM PAGE 1 On the other side, d,
Riley ignited DeSoto County (1-1) in Game Ogilvie isn't sure how
2 with several big kills, and sophomore physical his Mantas are.
Bethany Bonville's serve highlighted a 10-1 That will be tested against fc
Bulldog run that evened the match. Port Charlotte's defensive 41
front of Calvin Collins, Ian o0
Riley led everyone with 19 kills and Bush and Greg Patton.
added seven digs for the Bulldogs while But it will be a good C
playing the front and back rows with gauge of their ability for W
equal ability. later in the year when "]
"She's a stud. She plays all-around games against physical di
volleyball. She never comes out," DeSoto teams such as Island la
County coach Laura White said. "We Coast will have district te
didn't do it tonight, but on a good night implications.
we can put balls where she can hit them
anywhere in the back."
Charlotte reasserted itself in the final WEEK 1 CAPSULES
two games.
"We've been working on our serving, be- RB
ing more consistent on hard serves," Dill ThH
said. "I tell the girls to be more aggressive NORTH PORT Ih
back there." a13
GabbyWeitzel had 14 digs for Charlotte. WHEN: 7:30 p.m. (3
DeSoto County received seven kills and WHERE: The Preserve, North Port All
seven digs from senior Casey Hall, and 2012 RECORDS: Charlotte 6-5, North of
Courtney Bonville had three aces for the Port 4-6.
Bulldogs. LAST WEEK (PRESEASON): Charlotte ofN
Bulldog[ oT


U ltedu Ddy1nhu N 4-\1- o Ih; IIU ruInt '-
........................... defeated Booker 23-0. an
TALKING POINTS: The Tarpons als
are a passing team again. Just ask pa
t h Bayshore, which watched Tarpons las
-tQB Brennan McGill throw four TD avi
passes, including three to Dwayne SP'
Reynolds. ... The challenge will
PREP SCHEDULE be finding a steady running game. LI
Jakhi Roberts led Charlotte last week p
TODAY with rushing 124 yards, including a
Football 70-yard touchdown ... North Port RB WI
Imagine at Community School of Leonard Faison was cleared to play WI
Naples, 7 p.m. after experiencing concussion-like 20
Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m. symptoms against Booker. Faison Ch
DeSoto County at Lake Region, was the Bobcats'leading rusher in LA
7p.m. 2012 (590 yards, 9 TDs), but had only Co
Charlotte at North Port, 7:30 p.m. one carry against the Tornadoes.... De
Venice at Palmetto, 7 p.m. LB Josh Pollard will be one to watch TA
Boys golf on defense for the Bobcats, taking bo
Charlotte at Port Charlotte, over a young defense ... Tarpons sea
3:30 p.m. senior Trent White was the North dis
North Port at Lemon Bay, 3:30 p.m. Port starting QB before transferring be
SATURDAY to Charlotte on Aug. 19. He will not ne
Crosscountry attend tonight's game. w
Ba
Lemon Bay Invitational, 8 a.m.
Charlotte, Port Charlotte, North DESOTO COUNTY b
PortatEsterolnvite, Estero AT LAKE REGION be
Community Park, 8 a.m. ma
WHEN: 7 p.m.
WHERE: Thunder Field, Eagle Lake Hi
Alyssa Paul lead the Mustangs (0-2) 2012 RECORDS: DeSoto County 4-6, TD
with seven kills and five blocks, Lake Region 2-8.
while Mallory Enzor had 10 aces and LAST WEEK(PRESEASON): DeSoto LB
Brianna Klotzbach added nine. County lost to Port Charlotte 19-14; t
off
Lake Region lost to Fort Meade 14-7
CROSS COUNTRY (called due to lightning). w
Lemon Bay Invitational TALKING POINTS: The DeSoto County pa
Inc
moved: Lemon Bay athletic offense will be leaning on the power
director Tom Catanzarite announced ofFB Terrell Gordon and the speed of ela
that Saturday's Lemon Bay RB Tajahs Jackson and WR Dequan
Invitational meet has been moved Richardson. Richardson was a threat
from on campus to L.A. Ainger against Port Charlotte with 127 yards V
Elementary School in Englewood. He from scrimmage, including a 65-yard WI
said the course at Lemon Bay was touchdown reception. ... With a 28-6 WI
waterlogged, victory against Sebring last season, 20
the Bulldogs snapped a four-game 8-,
C ek losing streak in season openers. ... LA
C ree Lake Region's defense struggled last So
Golf C b season, allowing 30 or more points Sa
Seven times, all losses.... TA


IMAGINE AT
COMMUNITY SCHOOL
WHEN:7 p.m.
WHERE: Schilling Field, Naples
2012 RECORDS: Imagine first varsity
season; CSN 6-4.
LAST WEEK (PRESEASON): Imagine
lost to Carrollwood Day 22-8;
Community School of Naples defeated
Coral Shores 17-0.
TALKING POINTS: The Sharks have
some weapons at their disposal in a
trio of sophomores: QB Corey Allen,


Po
to'
yal
for
las
In(
loc
for
we
Pa
Ru
be
rus
toi


"Every game like this
lives you an idea of where
you're at," Ogilvie said. "I
link Port Charlotte will
definite prepare us for our
district "
Charlotte-North Port
its the area's two most
productive passing
offenses with a twist.
quarterback Trent White
ansferred to Charlotte
n Aug. 19, leaving the
orth Port offense in
ie hands of sophomore
rennan Simms.
White (1,378 passing
yards in 2012) figures to
eventually play receiver
nd defensive back.
e will not suit up for
harlotte tonight.
But Simms looked fine
Sa 23-0 victory over
ooker in the preseason,
growing for 232 yards in
n offense utilizing short,
quick passes.
"He is so poised," North
ort coach Billy Huthman
aid of Simms. "We're just
o proud of the young
ian. He doesn't have the
experience Trent had, but
e just did a great job of
fading the offense."
Tarpons quarterback
rennan McGill (1,401
passing yards, 13 touch-
owns) continues to
lake strides from knee
surgery. He passed for
'ur touchdowns in a
1-19 preseason victory
ver Bayshore.
"He's had a good week,"
harlotte coach Binky
Valdrop said of McGill.
He's getting there. But he
didn't see a lot of pressure
Ist week, so it's hard to
ell."
Email: shore@sun-herald.com


Elijah Mack and WR Stantley
omas. Mack (80 rushing yards
ainst Carrollwood Day) and Thomas
catches, 47 yards) look promising.
en's running (78 yards) is ahead
his passing in his first season
hind center. ... Community School
Naples is led by senior QB Drew
naini, who passed for 2,056 yards
d 21 touchdowns last season. He
o completed 59 percent of his
sses. ... The Seahawks finished
t season winning three of four,
raging 28 points per game in that
an.

EMON BAY AT
ORT CHARLOTTE
HEN: 7:30p.m.
HERE: Pirates Cove, Port Charlotte
12 RECORDS: Lemon Bay 7-4, Port
arlotte 7-3.
ST WEEK: Lemon Bay lost to Barron
Ilier 14-0; Port Charlotte defeated
Soto County 19-14.
LKING POINTS: The Mantas'won
th matchups with the Pirates last
ason, including a 14-0 victory in a
strict tiebreaker for the final playoff
rth.... Lemon Bay is breaking in a
w quarterback, junior Tyler Nelson,
io had 99 yards of offense against
rron Collier. Nelson has similar
ols to the graduated Lucas Sparks,
t needs experience. ... It wouldn't
a surprise to see Austin Hirschy
ike his debut on offense tonight.
schy rushed for 922 yards and 11
s last season, but was limited to
fense last week. ... Hard-hitting
sJosh Schulte and Brian McGill pace
e defense. ... The Port Charlotte
ense clicks with QB Traige McClary,
1o led the area with 15 touchdown
sses. ... Pirates coach Jordan
jman said his team had several
ayers out tonight, but declined to
borate.

ENICE AT PALMETTO
HEN:7 p.m.
HERE: Harllee Stadium, Palmetto
12 RECORDS: Venice 8-4, Palmetto
4.
ST WEEK: Venice defeated
utheast 42-7; Palmetto lost to
rasota-Riverview 13-3.
LKING POINTS: Venice senior Terry
Ik is arguably Southwest Florida's
p running back, rushing for 1,966
rds and 22 TDs last year. He rushed
r 147 yards and four touchdowns
t week against Southeast. ...
dians transfer QB Dominic Marino
oks to be up to speed after passing
r 196 yards on 10 for 10 passing last
eek. ... Marino is the nephew of
Imetto head coach Dave Marino..
tgers-bound RB Josh Hicks should
the Tigers'focal point offensively,
ihing for 1,463 yards and 14
uchdowns last season.
Rob Shore


-Page 6 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Friday, August 30, 2013









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Friday, August 30, 2013





'Page 2 Friday, August 30, 2013


1 FOOTBALL


FIRST AND 10


INSIDE


2-MINUTE DRILL: YOUR GUIDE TO KICKOFF


WHAT TO WATCH FOR
After three years, the Sun's 2
football preview returns.
HIGH SCHOOLS -
All eight teams, including Venice.
HIGH SCHOOL SCHEDULES -
In poster format. 1
THE FLORIDA FIVE n
Previews for Florida, Florida 19
St., Miami, UCF and USF.
COLLEGE SCHEDULES
Schedules for more than 120 1 T
bowl subdivision teams.
THE CONFERENCES
Previews for each of the big 2 6
six conferences.
TAMPA BAY
The Buccaneers beginYear 2 3
of the Greg Schiano era
MIAMI
The Dolphins hope to end 35
their playoff drought.
AROUND THE NFL '1
Quick trips through the AFC I
and NFC.
NFL SCHEDULES -3
Team by team. J I


ONLINE


Like us on Facebook (facebook.com/
SunCoastSports) and follow us on
Twitter (@SunCoastSports).


The college football
season started Thursday.
The high school season
officially begins today
and the NFL season
starts next week.
With that in
mind, the Sun
revives, after a
three-year absence,
its football preview
section.
In the pages to come,
find information on all
three levels, plus sched-
ules for the NFL, colleges
and high schools.
HIGH SCHOOLS
Seniors Dwight and
Dwayne Reynolds return
to Charlotte as the area's
top two receivers. If the
Tarpons have a good
year, the twins' play on
both sides of the ball
will deserve some of the
credit. SEEPAGE 3.
Port Charlotte's Jace
Norus just wants to stay
on the field this season.
If he can, the Pirates
have found the anchor to
their offensive line.
SEE PAGE 5.
Venice grad Dri Archer
has become the MAC's
answer to Reggie Bush
- and a dark horse
Heisman candidate.
SEE PAGE 5.


ON THE COVER HS POSTER SCHEDULE


Illustration: Katherine Godina
Photos: Port Charlotte's Paulsin Heitter (Tom O'Neill),
Charlotte's Dwayne Reynolds (Jennifer Bruno), North
Port's Joshua Pollard (Katherine Godina), Tampa Bay's Eric
Page and U. of Miami's Duke Johnson (Associated Press).


Jake Bennett is one of
the last links to North
Port's early years, but
will see his time at The
Preserve end after this
season. SEEPAGE 7.
Hardee defensive end
Keyon Brown is arguably


Illustration: Katherine Godina
Photos: Lemon Bay's Bobby Caspolich, DeSoto County's
Terrell Gordon, Port Charlotte's Traige McClary, Charlotte's
Brennan McGill (Tom O'Neill), North Port's Leonard Faison
(Katherine Godina).


the top college prospect
area teams will face this
fall. SEE PAGE 9.
Imagine School enters
its first full varsity foot-
ball season in a tough
District 2A-6. As sopho-
more running back Elijah


Mack goes, so will the
Sharks. SEE PAGE 13.

COLLEGES
The search for
playmakers on the
Florida Gators' roster
should start with junior


quarterback Jeff Driskel,
who passed for 1,646
yards and 12 touch-
downs in 2012.
SEE PAGE 19.
Junior
James Wilder
Jr. is part of
Florida State's
"Wild and Free"
tailback tandem,
S but he insists his
wild days are past
him. SEE PAGE 23.
South Florida and
Central Florida will
resume the War on I-4 for
the first time since 2008.
SEE PAGE 31.

NFL
Rookie quarterback
Mike Glennon could
give Josh Freeman extra
motivation to perform
this season. Otherwise,
Glennon gives the Bucs
options. SEE PAGE 33
Deep threat Mike
Wallace will make the
Miami Dolphins more
fun to watch. SEEPAGE
35.
A punter (the Vikings'
Jeff Locke) and a center
(the Cowboys' Travis
Frederick) are two of the
NFC's most intriguing
rookies. SEE PAGE 38.
Rob Shore


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17


Karl Vice


Page 2


Friday, August 30, 2013


~11+1111






Frdy uut30 03Pg


PREP FOOTBALL


CHARLOTTE


FIRST
DOWN
SCHEDULE
Date Opponent
A30 at North Port
S6 Barron Collier
S20 at Venice
S27 Lakewood Ranch
04 at Riverdale
011 Hialeah-American
018 at Fort Myers
025 at Ida Baker
N1 Port Charlotte
N8 at East Lee County

2012 RESULTS (6-
CHS
34 North Port
Brennan McGill hits Kei'onte I
for a 64-yard TD and a 14-po
48 at Riverdale
Tarpons score twice just before h
take lead. Clyde Newton: 293 ya
21 Hialeah
Thoroughbreds score 15 point
1:34.
24 Venice
Payback: Newton plunges into
on 4th down with 10 seconds
31 Fort Myers
Tarpons commit five turnover
trail 36-10 in fourth quarter.
49 Gulf Coast
Charlotte holds Gulf Coast to 1
Newton rushes for 208 yards,
40 Lemon Bay
Newton (204 yards, 2 TDs) an
(148 passing yards, 2 TDs) le
27 at South Fort Myers
Austin Taylor kicks school-rec
57-yard FG; Tarpons blow 27
0 at Port Charlotte
Newton is held to 47yards, an
throws 2 INTs; 1st shutout loss
51 at East Lee County
Team runs for 323 yards (206
Newton) and 19 first downs.
32 Martin County*
McGill passes for career-high
yards with 2 TDs in loss.


2012 FINAL STATIST
Three or more attempts or catch


RUSHING
Name Att.
Clyde Newton 231
Amari Washington 59
Jakhi Roberts 49
Kei'onte Lattimore 19
Zack Kennedy 13
Brennan McGill 24
PASSING
Name C A
B. McGill 78 145
RECEIVING
Name Rec.
Dwight Reynolds 34
Dwayne Reynolds 26
Kei'onte Lattimore 7
Amari Washington 5
Clyde Newton 5


Yds.
1,939
375
245
104
48
-59

Yd
1,40


5)
Opp
1A


Handle with air: Tarpons hope




to max out Reynolds twins


Twin receivers
hope to key an
offense that has
been run oriented
By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER .


'1 PUNTA GORDA One
Lattimore of BinkyWaldrop's top
tlead. priorities for Charlotte High
School's football season
alf to is to use seniors Dwight
rds, 2 TDs. and Dwayne Reynolds
Sin latjudiciously.
It isn't that they can't
handle the workload and
endzonethey will be used just about
o endzone
left. everywhere but he wants
36 them fresh when it matters
16
most.
rs and ms.
"The big thing is not
0 to overuse them early,"
01yards, Waldrop said. "We want
5 TDs. them to be strong at the
0 end, to protect them for the
start of the district schedule.
nd McGill ,,
ad way. And they love to play."
28d It's even more difficult
ord when Charlotte is likely
14 lead. to go to the air more this
13 season than in years past.
dMcGill For the first time since 2006,
since'04. there isn't a Mike Bellamy or
27 Clyde Newton on the roster.
6 from Instead, the Tarpons' best
skill players look to be the
35 twins at wide receiver.
h 309 Dwight led the area last
season with 34 catches
for 607 yards, five of them
Playoffs for touchdowns. Dwayne
was second in the area in
TKS catches (26) and yards (445)
hes and caught four touch-
downs. As sophomores,
. Avg. TD Dwight and Dwayne were
8.4 22 first and third in the area in
6.4 7 receptions, respectively.
5.0 3 Waldrop has seen their
5.5 1 progression as players dur-
S3.7 1 ing that time.
S-2.5 0 "(Dwight is) a lot more
polished with his catches,"
s. TD Int he said. "He's great after
)1 13 6 he catches the ball; he can


Yds. Avg. TD
607 17.9 5
445 17.1 4
221 31.6 3
87 17.4 0
55 11.0 0


beat you deep and beat
you short. Same thing with
Dwayne."
Conveniently, when both
of them are on the field, it
makes it tricky for defenses
to focus on either.
And the twins have a


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO


SECOND DOWN

The top five rivalry games involving area teams this year:


CHARLOTTE AT
FORT MYERS
Oct. 18
There is serious history
between the Southwest
Florida schools. Charlotte
dominated in recent
years, but faltered last
season even with a
breakout performance
by quarterback Brennan
McGill. And for the next
two seasons, this will be a
district game enjoy.


CHARLOTTE
AT VENICE
Sept.20
If Fort Myers is the one
old-timers circle, this one
is right behind. This game
has been decided in the
final 10 seconds in each
of the last two years: a
Venice field goal in 2011
and a Clyde Newton
fourth-down plunge on
the goal line last year.


Dwayne Reynolds
runs a practice drill
at Charlotte High
School during the
preseason. He and
his twin brother are
seniors.


NICKEL PACKAGE


DESOTO COUNTY
AT HARDEE
Nov. 1
This is the oldest
continuous rivalry in the
state and has featured
barnburners over the
years. Remember the
last-second field goal
miss in 2008 that lifted
DeSoto County? Don't be
surprised if this decides
a postseason berth in
District 5A-13.


CHARLOTTE VS.
PORT CHARLOTTE
Nov. 1
Some say a series needs
to be competitive before
it can be considered a
rivalry. But even with
Charlotte's domination
of Port Charlotte (29-3),
the Pirates shut out
the Tarpons 13-0 last
season, hinting that this
game might be in for a
rejuvenation.


PORT CHARLOTTE
VS. LEMON BAY
Aug. 30
Just as Charlotte owned
the Port Charlotte rivalry,
the Pirates had control of
this one. Then Lemon Bay
swept the regular season
and the playoff tiebreaker.
With coaches Jordan
Ingman and D.J. Ogilvie
pointing the programs the
right way, this could be an
interesting rivalry.


ri)


/-.LL / PJ-. FQ- ViAI,,I/EI -

Bri-xi & For-i i/ :ir Ic- yr .pi




S? CHARLOTTE FORMALWEAR TUXED.
LOTTE 941-255-1205- CHARL ii


~F+IIII


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 3


r-F-.





'Pg rdy uut3,21


PREP FOOTBALL


CHARLOTTE


FOUR TO WATCH


MI ., D'AI I.%wNIo()

H1 2. Jhll l l,, i |I.-
li rhy J' [6 PIvlnIi l'
twins in the Tarpons'
defensive backfield, but
the guy makes plays.
He made a decisive
goal-line stop against
Lemon Bay in the
district tiebreaker.


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1[ %& wlliinlir [hi
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workouts, but so did
Hoff (meniscus surgery).
He could be the leader
of the Tarpons'defense
now that he is back on
the field.


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ih r [1 l I ir[,iI-' I r Ii Ii
M. .Ill will cope on his
surgically repaired knee.
If he's right, he could
turn Charlotte into a
passing team again.


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1i i iin. lv iv [ 1i l ii

offense he spent
some time at QB in the
spring when McGill was
out. But he should be an
important ground-
gainer for the Tarpons.


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO


Dwayne Reynolds, left, lines up against his twin brother, Dwight, during a practice drill.




WotMybiA gttt.Ihd


fb EVW~Ihh


muwJ


feroinc@daystar.net

www.feroconstruction.com


MODEL CENTER

1047 Bal Harbor Blvd.

Punta Gorda, FL 33950
OpertMon.-Tues. Thurs. Fri. Sa Sn.

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.4


REYNOLDS
FROM PAGE 3
capable quarterback, Brennan McGill,
who led the area in passing yardage
last season (1,407).
"We're going to take what a defense
gives us," Waldrop said. "But you'd
expect us to throw the ball a little more
this year. We'll see what happens."
That is music to Dwight's ears.
"I'm ready," he said with a big grin.
"To tell you the truth, I've been telling
them to pass the ball since Clyde and
all of them were here. I'm excited this
year they're going to throw the ball
even more, see what we can do with


our hands and feet
after the catch."
But that is only a
part of their value.
Both will play
in the defensive
secondary, Dwight
at corner and
Dwayne at safety,
where he was an
all-area selection
last season. Dwight
earned all-area


I've been
telling them
to pass the
ball since
C/lde and
(ll Of( tlhei
1 ''1 here.
I'm excited
this year


honors at receiver. trley re going
Then both will to throw the
see time on special ball even
teams returning more.
kicks. Dwight even
enters the season Dwight Reynolds
as the Tarpons' Charlotte senior
punter one de-
fenses can't ignore
or risk him taking off the ball.
"We like having a kid back there who
can get those high snaps," Waldrop
said of the 6-foot-2 Dwight. "We'll see
how that plays out."
There is even a package including
Dwight at quarterback the Tarpons
experimented with in the spring.
But if the season goes according
to play, they will be treated with care
early.
The biggest difference this season
is that the Reynolds twins are now
two of the seniors, the veterans in the
locker room. It's a change for both, but
something they are welcoming.
"It's kind of weird, kind of funny at
the same time because I'm getting into
it now that I'm starting to be a leader
at the varsity level," Dwight said. "So
I'm giving them all I know."
Dwayne agreed.
"I've got little freshmen and wide
receivers they didn't know the
routes and what to do," Dwayne said.
"So I sort of had to help them."
That could be just as important to
the Tarpons, if they are to fulfill the
twins' expectations. Dwayne said he
wanted an undefeated season, and
Dwight's hopes were far off.
"I'm trying to have a perfect season,"
Dwight said. "I'm trying to win district,
but even go farther than that."
Contact Rob Shore atshore@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1174.


E FOURTH DOWN

I(LOCATION 125TCnnnnoer St Punta Gorda


THIRD
DOWN

ROSTER


Name
Amari Washington
Dwight Reynolds
Wesley Chery
Willie Emerson
Mike D'Alessandro
Dwayne Reynolds
Trent White
Colton Campbell
Brennan McGill
Chase Shepherd
Jakhi Roberts
Kendall Warren
D'Andre Hicks
Mike Innello
Ty Tyler
MaleekWilliams
T.J. Boston
Zack Kennedy
Sam Spence
Jakari Mayers
Dakari Brown
Alex De Paul
Austin Wise
Trystan Beasley
Marquell Platt
Jobany Nieves
Jeremy DelSole
Jowie Nieves
Chandler Pritchett
Trey Hoff
Gavin Lehrer
Chris Comer
Kordell Slater
Austin Ingle
Travis Matzen
Cainyn Cooper
Grant Polk
Marco Theisen
Zachary Conn
Pat Marlatt
Brent Williams
Andre Cardenas
Tyler Rainville
Jimmy Cornwell
Forrest Palmore
Ryan Adams
Billy Pesti
Zachary Lippel
Nick Hoo
Tyler Loche
Jacob White
Joseph Behling
Austin Roberts
Tony Blanding


Pos.
RB-DB
WR-DB
TE-DB
FB-LB
WR-DB
WR-DB
WR-DB
WR-DB
QB
RB-LB
RB-DB
WR-DB
QB-DB
QB
FB-LB
RB-DB
WR-DB
RB-DB
RB-DB
RB-DB
FB-LB
WR-DB
FB-LB
RB-DB
FB-DB
FB-LB
WR-DB
FB-LB
RB-LB
FB-LB
DE-TE
TE-LB
TE-DE
TE-DB
OL-DE
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-LB
OL-DL
OL-DL
TE-DE
WR-DB
K
K
OL-DL


Class
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Sophomore
Senior
Junior
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Freshman
Sophomore
Senior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Senior
Senior
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Senior
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Junior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Senior
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior


PROJECTED STARTERS


OFFENSE
Pos. Name, Yr.
WR- Dwight Reynolds, Sr.
TE Travis Matzen, Jr.
T- Andre Cardenas, Sr.
T- Zachary Lippel, Jr.
G Forrest Palmore, Sr.
G Grant Polk, Jr.
C- Billy Pesti, Sr.
QB Brennan McGill, Sr.
RB Marquell Platt, So.
WB A. Washington, Sr.
WB Zack Kennedy, Sr.
K Austin Roberts, Jr.


DEFENSE
Name, Yr.
- Gavin Lehrer, Sr.
- Wesley Chery, Sr.
- Ryan Adams, Jr.
- Tony Blanding, Sr.
- Chandler Pritchett, Jr.
- Trey Hoff, Sr.
- Jowie Nieves, Jr.
- Amari Washington, Sr.
- Mike D'Alessandro, Sr.
Dwayne Reynolds, Sr.
Zach Kennedy, Sr.
Dwight Reynolds, Sr.


THE ESSENTIALS


LV%.M I I V11;,I LJV WVvtl p )L., umdu wuu
HOW TO LISTEN: WCCF 1580-AM (split schedule with Port Charlotte)
HOME TICKET PRICES: $5
HOME PARKING COST: $3
BOOSTER CLUB CONTACT: None available.
COACHING STAFF: Binky Waldrop (head coach), Larry Marsh, Tom Mut, Jerry Voss, Wade Taylor, Ray Hixson,
Justin Midgett, Brendan Toop, Matt Galley, Rob Hoff, Duane McCurdy.
DISTRICT: 7A-11 (Region 3), Charlotte, Fort Myers, Port Charlotte, Riverdale.


JOIN SUN SPORTS ONLINE
The Sun sports department is online. Follow our reporters at high school
events across the region on Twitter, Facebook and our upgraded blog, Sun
Coast Sports Now. Make us a part of your day and watch us grow!


Y


FERO CONSTRUCTION, INC.

17506 Brighton Ave., Unit B

Port Charlotte, Florida 33954
(941) 743-3376 FAX (941) 629-9667


Il+llly, II~IA+IIII


Page 4


Friday, August 30, 2013





Frdy uut30 03Pg


E PREP FOOTBALL


E FIRST
DOWN
SCHEDULE
Date Opponent
A30 Lemon Bay
S6 at Braden River
S13 Mariner
S20 Lely
S27 at Lehigh
04 Fort Myers
011 at North Port
018 Riverdale
N1 at Charlotte
N8 at Lakewood Ranch


2012 RESULTS (7-3)
PCHS Opp
27 Golden Gate 0
Defense forces five Titan turnovers.
James Romulus: 89 yards and 2 TDs.
24 at Bayshore 22
Romulus rushes for 175 yards; favorable
call on disputed onside kick secures win.
21 Ida Baker 28
Bulldogs score 15 points in 4th quarter in
comeback; Traige McClarythrows 3 TDs.
32 Palmetto Ridge 20
Pirates hold Bears to 19 rushing yards
and force three turnovers.
29 at Braden River 14
Three big scoring plays, including
49-yard pass to Paulsin Heitter.
20 at Lemon Bay 28
Pirates surrender 264 rushing yards
and commit five turnovers.
29 Mariner 13
Big nights from Keon Suber (114 yards,
2 TDs) and Teddy Spikes (92 yards).
34 at Gulf Coast 13
Pirates score 28 points in final period.
McClary has an 88-yard TD run.
13 Charlotte 0
Defense holds Clyde Newton to 47yards
and intercepts Brennan McGill twice.
14 at North Port 28
After losing district tiebreaker, team
commits 5 turnovers four days later.

2012 FINAL STATISTICS


RUSHING
Name 1
James Romulus 1
Keon Suber
Traige McClary 1
Teddy Spikes
lan Tyler
Paulsin Heitter
Gene Cazeau
Anfernee Romulus
Brion Ashley
PASSING
Name C
Traige McClary 44
Erik Heitter 0
RECEIVING
Name At
Paulsin Heitter
Erik Heitter
John Weisinger
Ty Tyler
Matt Samson
Keon Suber
Teddy Spikes
Corey Allen


Yds. Avg. TD
728 5.6 8
503 8.2 4
439 3.5 4
231 4.5 2
5427.0 1
44 3.4 0
12 4.0 0
2 1.0 0
-4 -4.0 0

Yds. TD Int
893 15 7
0 0 0


Avg. TD
23.8 6
21.6 2
15.6 2
21.3 4
13.7 0
24.5 0
21.5 1
-2.0 0


PORT CHARLOTTE /


Norus hopes for healthy end




to an injury-plagued career


If senior can
stay in lineup,
he can anchor
offensive line
By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -
There is no temptation for
Port Charlotte High School
football coach Jordan
Ingman to play senior Jace
Norus on both sides of the
line, mostly because the
Pirates coach just wants
Norus to play.
"We're trying to get him
through a season," Ingman
admitted.
That would be some-
thing of an accomplish-
ment for a player whose
list of maladies could
nearly match the patient
from the game Operation.
"It's been a struggle,"
Norus said.
Norus has torn knee liga-
ments twice and dislocated
the AC joint in his shoulder
in the spring. Since moving
to Port Charlotte for his
sophomore season, he has
not played more than five
games in a season.
It's unfortunate for a
player Ingman believes
could be his leader on the
offensive line assum-
ing he stays healthy. With
Norus' history, there is
always that caveat.
He played two games his
sophomore year before an
injury ended his season.
He tore knee ligaments
shortly after Ingman took
over the program last year
and missed the spring
game against Bishop Verot.
After limping along dur-
ing his junior season with
shoulder and knee injuries,
a shot to the knee against
Lemon Bay sidelined him
for the rest of the season.
So coaches treat Norus
with kid gloves, but he's
frankly over that.
"It's really frustrating be-
ing watched and everybody
NORUS | 6


Jace Norus has missed significant parts of the past two seasons and offseasons because of injuries. He wants one healthy season
before giving up the game as a player and turning his focus to coaching.


SECOND DOWN

Five former area standouts


DRI ARCHER
RB Kent State (Venice)
The senior starter for
the Golden Flashes
has been mentioned
in some conversations
as a Heisman Trophy
candidate. He led Kent
State with 1,429 rushing
yards and 16 TDs, adding
39 catches for 561 yards
and four TDs. Archer has
become the MAC version
of Reggie Bush.


NICKEL PACKAGE
who are playing on Saturdays this season:


TREY BURTON
WR Florida (Venice)
After struggling to find a
spot in the Florida offense
- his six touchdowns
against Kentucky
notwithstanding the
Indians'legend enters
the season as the Gators'
starting flanker. The senior
has the size (6-foot-2,
224 pounds) to cause
problems for opposing
defensive backs.


MARCUS HARDISON
DE Arizona State (Charlotte)
After spending two
seasons at Dodge
Community College
(Kan.), the former Tarpon
became one of the most
sought-after JUCO players
in the nation. The junior
has size (6-5,290) and
athleticism to become a
mainstay up front for the
Sun Devils.


MARCUS GILCHRIST
DE. Marshall (Port Charlotte)
You'll probably mark
2013 down as a learning
season for Gilchrist on
the Thundering Herd's
defensive line. The
freshman redshirted 2012
and needs to get up to
speed for the Conference
USA school's campaign.


MARCUS SHAW
RB. S. Florida (DeSoto Co.)
The Bulldogs'career
rushing leader earned the
starting job at USF with a
strong training camp. He
rushed for 248 yards last
season, including a career-
high 60 at Cincinnati. That
could only be the start for
his senior campaign.


Lets


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SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 5






'Pg iIIVAjs


PREP FOOTBALL


PORT CHARLOTTE


FOUR TO WATCH


I i.j BUSH
.. enior
Arji dliy [hii- ir-n most
dominant defensive
player. Bush is a hard
guy to move in the
middle of the Pirates'
defensive front, and few
will do so


P v\ II iliJ HITTER
I Junior
H-,i[ -r i, lij-play
threat who aver-
aged 23.8 yards per
reception and caught six
touchdown passes last
season.


I'. HKnoIIs
i.. .i or
Al Ii] i wiiii I'11-ir n Price,
Hobbs is a big part of a
tough Pirate linebacker
corps. He should be
good for at least one
eye-opening hit per
game.


Tr'i. i M( CI.\IW


Mi Il ry i l i l-[ ir- it
quarterback who was a
big part of the Pirates'
resurgence last season.
He led the area in
touchdown passes last
year with 15.


NORUS

FROM PAGE 5
is being precautionary," Norus said. "I
want to go. But it's the thought of going
down again. It's still there, but you can't
think about it on the field."
Ingman would rather not worry
about it, because when healthy, the
5-foot-11, 285-pound senior is the
last person he needs to be concerned
about.
"We ask our center to do a lot of
things in our offense," Ingman said.
"He's got to be able to make calls; he's
got to be able to pull; he's got to be
able to trap. ... We look for a unique set
of talents at each position. He's a big
guy who can move. That's hard to find
at center."
It isn't just his big, mobile frame
that drew Ingman's notice. The Pirates
coach knows he isn't afraid to tell his
linemates when they need to take it up


a notch.
"I know when
we need to step it
up; I know when
we're being slacky,"
Norus said. "I step
up when we start
slacking."
Norus is special
enough that he
already has a place
reserved for him on
the Port Charlotte
coaching staff.
He has already
mentioned a desire
to coach for Port
Charlotte after he's
done playing.


Port Charlotte lineman Jace Norus is one senior who will not be playing offense and defense this
season. "We just want to get him through the season" Pirates coach Jordan Ingman said of his
injury-plagued player.


n'f h


N-"'N X N. N "., ,,o




>11,82TAMIAMI tRAILRO tCHARLOTTE/
y www.msrascaliloonybin.com, /


I know
when we
(need to sep
it up;
I kno11'
when we're
being slacky.
I step up
when we
start
slacking.
Jace Norus
Port Charlotte senior


"I figure my body's taken enough,"
he said. "I want to go (to school) some-
where local, maybe FGCU, and come
back and help out."
He already spends his free time
coaching Pop Warner football. It's just a
desire to be close to the game.
But first he wants one good season.
He feels his body almost owes him.
"I have very high hopes," he said.
"I've done a lot of work on strengthen-
ing my knees and my joints and my
shoulder in the offseason and this past
summer. I have very good intentions of
finishing the season for once."
Ingman would love to see that.
"He deserves to play more than
anybody," Ingman said. "He's battled
through three tough injuries. A lot of
kids would have hung it up."
Norus isn't ready for that. Not yet,
anyway.
Contact Rob Shore atshore@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1174.



FOURTH DOWN
T


T HIRD
DOWN


No. Name
1 Traige McClary
2 Anthony Stephens
3 Jaques Jean-Louis
4 Paulsin Heitter
5 Keon Suber
6 Grady Wells
7 Marlin Pierre
8 Christian Coffelletto
9 lan Tyler
10 Jake Smarjessee
11 Gene Cazeau
12 Malik Vaccaro-Dixo,
13 Anthony Williams
15 Aaron Wertz
16 Taylor Severson
18 Serge Jean-Jacques
21 Mike Bakogiannis
22 Roni Anarumo
23 Martin Luther
25 Andres Hernandez
29 Tyler Rieman
33 lan Bush
40 Jake Hobbs
41 Ryan Harless
48 Robert Duren
49 Darren Price
50 Keyshawn McLeod
51 Benji Neptune
52 Brandon Jean
53 Dylan McCormick
54 Chris Sankus
55 Justin Peacock
56 Steven Marchionni
70 Noah Bayne
71 Alfredo Sostre-Marim,:,
72 Michael Raymond
73 Kezden Jarvis
74 Shacquille Williams
75 Jace Norus
76 Daniel Stenseth
78 Kamali Williams
90 Greg Patton
91 Shaun Sherida
97 Calvin Collins
98 D'mitri Francis
99 Simeon Beckford


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PROJECT:' Sia i(f A


OFFENSE
Name, Yr.
Paulsin Heitter, Jr.
M. Vaccaro-Dixon, Jr.
Michael Raymond, Jr.
Shacquille Williams, Sr.
Chris Sankus, Jr.
Kezden Jarvis, Jr.
Jace Norus, Sr.
- Traige McClary, Sr.
- Keon Suber, Jr.
- lan Tyler, Sr.
- Chris Coffelletto, Jr.
Mike Bakogiannis, Sr.


D iffr>
Name Vi

I hlil Fiilir
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HE ESSENTIALS


LOCATION: 18200 Cochran Blvd., Port Charlotte
HOW TO LISTEN: WCCF 1580-AM (split schedule with Port Charlotte)
HOME TICKET PRICES: $5
HOME PARKING COST: $3
BOOSTER CLUB CONTACT: None
COACHING STAFF: Jordan Ingman (head coach), Jarett DeBus, Carson Bown i i lirI r iiiiii.r r-ij
Griner, Dave Hoffer, Gary Ingman, Jamie Hazeltine, Zach Wheeler, Brad Nocek i iiiiu. P'-rI iii .,ii h'.1,rijli
Tommy Henry.
DISTRICT: District 7A-11 (Region 3), Charlotte, Fort Myers, Port Charlotte, Riv- r.l ji-







You need Southlwest Horlda' ONlY
weekly igulie to outdoor recreation




Every Thursday in the


SEU Ilgav M i l-l II


11101111y.~ ~~0111111


Page 6


Flda, v Au.ust ?I30 2I l


owi~






Frdy uut30 03Pg


PREP FOOTBALL


DOWN


Date Opponent
A30 Charlotte
S6 atLely
S13 at Palmetto Ridge
S20 Palmetto
S27 at DeSoto County
04 at Lakewood Ranch
011 Port Charlotte
018 Sarasota
025 at Braden River
N8 Hardee


2012 RESULTS (4-6)
NPHS Opp
14 at Charlotte 34
The Tarpons jump to a 21-0 lead early
in the second quarter and roll.
42 at Braden River 0
The Bobcat defense holds the Pirates
to 99 yards.
14 at Sarasota 28
The Sailors take the lead for good with 2
TDs in the last 6:32 of the 2nd quarter.
7 at Lely 0
The Bobcat defense limits the Trojans
to four first downs and 73 yards.
28 DeSoto County 17
Ro'Derick Spears'kickoff return for a
touchdown in the second half ices it.
16 East Lake 22
Leonard Faison rushes for 125yards
in the loss.
17 Venice 41
Bobcats can't handle Kale Youtzy (183
rushing yards) and Terry Polk (132).
13 at Palm Harbor Univ. 28
Bobcats wear down after taking 13-7
lead in first quarter.
28 Sarasota-Riverview 31
Dominic Marino throws winning TD
pass late. Faison rushes for 157yards.
28 Port Charlotte 14
Trent White passes for 183 yards in
coach Matt Pryer's final game.

FINAL 2012 STATISTICS


RUSHING
Name Att.
Leonard Faison 84
Robenson Saintard 87
Ro'Derick Spears 30
Trent White 84
Cody Janski 3
Josh Pollard 13
P.J. Swales 4
Teddy Deas 2
Austin Kendrick 2
Robbie Rothman 2
PASSING
Name C A
Trent White 97 200
Josh Pollard 2 4
RECEIVING
Name Att.
Ro'Derick Spears 22
Leonard Faison 21
Sylvester Augustin 18
Robenson Saintard 17
Cody Janski 9
Josh Pollard 5
Philip Swales 2


Yds. Avg.
590 7.0
284 3.3
197 6.6
95 1.1
67 22.3
51 3.9
25 6.3
8 4.0
6 3.0
-11 -5.5


Yds. TD Int
1,378 7 7
24 2 0


Avg. TD
13.0 2
11.8
12.7 1
12.7 2
15.4 0
8.0 0
28.0 0


NORTH PORT


Bennett ready for last act


Bobcats' line

force says time

is now for a

winning mark
By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
NORTH PORT -As
Steve Bennett spun the
cart away from the North
Port High School practice
field, he heard a plaintive
scream from one of the
Bobcats.
The wail was quickly
followed by the identity of
his tormentor.
"BENNETT!"
The North Port trainer
allowed himself a quick
smile and turned the cart
around to face the field
again. He saw his son Jake
lying on top of a teammate
he had just pancaked
into the turf. The younger
Bennett grinned at his
practice mate for a mo-
ment, then helped him off
the grass.
A few seconds later, Jake
Bennett's victim marched
toward Steve's cart sheep-
ishly, silver helmet in
hand.
"Steve, I don't like your
son," he announced with a
pained smile.
Steve Bennett laughed.
He should be used to this
by now.
"I remember from the
time he was little, telling
me, 'Dad, I'm going to be
the strongest Bennett who
ever lived,'" Steve said.
"I used to laugh at him
and tell him, 'That's a tall
order.'"
But the younger Bennett
was always a weight room
junkie, even before he
started going to school
at North Port. The coach
at that time, Sascha
Hyer, would let him
work out with the team
before school even though
Bennett was a middle
school student.
By the time he arrived
as a freshman, he was
stronger than many of the
juniors and seniors.
But many of the North
Port coaches he has seen
over the years and he

BENNETT | 8


North Port senior
Jake Bennett has
been around the
program since
its inception,
and he credits all
of the Bobcats'
past coaches
with helping him
become the player
he is today.


E SECOND DOWN

I ,


NICKEL PACKAGE


Five tough back-to-back games area teams must navigate this season:


LEMON BAY
Island Coast, Sept. 20
at Dunbar, Sept. 27
The Mantas'playoff
prospects come down
to these games. The Lee
County schools present
problems with Island
Coast's power running and
Dunbar's athleticism.


VENICE
Charlotte, Sept. 20
at Plano East, Sept. 27
The best thing about this
back-to-back is it involves
no district games. But
will the Indians be able to
focus on the rival Tarpons
with a trip to Texas the
following week?


NORTH PORT
atLely, Sept. 6
at Palmetto Ridge, Sept. 13
This isn't about the
games, but the travel
- trips to Collier County
in two weeks? That's
340 miles on a bus. And
school charters don't offer
frequent flyer miles.


IMAGINE
St. John Neumann, Oct. 4
at First Baptist, Oct. 18
With a bye in between,
this isn't a back-to-back,
strictly speaking. But it
represents two of their
toughest tests, both in
district play.


DESOTO COUNTY
Frostproof, Oct. 11
Southeast, Oct. 18
The Bulldogs meet
Heartland rival Frostproof
and Tennessee-bound
linebacker Cecil Cherry.
Then district power
Southeast comes to town.


11101111p.~ l~ml0lllll


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 7


. *






YPg ii~~ Agt '


PREP FOOTBALL


NORTH PORT


THIRD
DOWN

ROSTER


Name
Brandon Caster
Leonard Faison
Alex Pinkney
Brennan Simms
Joshua Pollard
Alan Pinkney
Teddy Deas
Austin Kendrick
Jonathan Osinga
Nick Bauer
Corbin Rourke
Zach Wheeler
Christian Vanderveer
Sylwester Augustyn
Kyle Blamberg
Cameron Peters
Auston Saunier
James Inelus
Ronnie Spirk
Nigel Dixon
Aubrey Jackson
Michael MacCormack
Cody Smith
Marquise Faison
Rodney Monclerc
Robbie Rothman
Jovan Parchment
Nick Jusino
Roman Morales
Gevon Rodney
Tyler Cook
Jonathan Howell
Matthew Maborino
Patrick Barlow
Brian Poulin
William Glesge
Jake Bennett
Matt Davis
Jared Bowman
Brannon Scott
Josh DeJesus
Anthony Stone
Zach Hand
Colton Tackett
Justus Shipp
Marcus Kirkland
Brendon Blevins


Pos.
WR-DB
S-RB
WR-RB
QB
FB-LB
WR-DB
WR-DB
QB-DB
WR
WR-DB
TE-DE
LB
QB-LB
WR
DB-WR
K-P
S-WR
RB-DB
LB
WR-DL
LB
LB
RB-LB
RB-LB
WR-DB
P
WR-DB
RB-LB
FB-LB
DB
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
WR
TE-DL
TE-DL


Class
Junior
Senior
Senior
Sophomore
Senior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Senior
Junior
Sophomore
Senior
Senior
Junior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Junior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Junior
Senior
Junior
Senior
Senior
Sophomore
Senior
Senior
Senior
Senior
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Senior


PROJECTED STARTERS


OFFENSE
Pos. Name, Yr.
WR- Sylwester Augustyn, Sr.
WR- Alan Pinkney, Jr.
WR- Teddy Deas, Jr.
T- William Glesge, Jr.
T- Matt Davis, Sr.
G Jake Bennett, Sr.
G Zach Hand, Sr.
C- Brannon Scott, Sr.
QB Brennan Simms, So.
RB Leonard Faison, Sr.
FB -Josh Pollard, Sr.
K- Josh Pollard, Sr.


DEFENSE
. Name, Yr.
-Marcus Kirkland, Jr.
-Roman Morales, Jr.
- Josh DeJesus, Sr.
- Brandon Blevins, Sr.
- Josh Pollard, Sr.
- M. MacCormack, Sr.
- Nick Jusino, Sr.
- Teddy Deas, Jr.
- Kyle Blamberg, Sr.
- Christian Vanderveer, So.
- Austin Kendrick, Jr.
- Robbie Rothman, Jr.


BENNETT


FROM PAGE 7
has seen them all, starting from Mike
Steele's inaugural regime have helped.
"Just the basics because I didn't know
a lot," Jake said. "It helped me a lot. It
didn't give me a huge head start, but
enough that when I got started, I wasn't
lost and knew what was going on."
Bennett will be one of the mainstays
on a Bobcats offensive line that brings
back one of its most experienced
groups. Of the five projected starters -
Matt Davis, Zach Hand, Brannon Scott,
Jake Bennett and Will Glesge four are
seniors.
But Jake has been around the program
so long that calling him a senior almost
isn't enough. It has frustrated him to
see groups at North Port with so much
potential and see
that never realized.
Steve said Jake I do
used to say he remember
needed to be up Sa'ingll 'hell
with the team-
they needed him. go /o u witl/
Jake laughed that th( [ea(lIl, I
off. wasn't going
"I don't recall ever to let us be a
saying that," he said. losin team.
"I do remember
saying when I got Jake Bennett
up with the team, I North Port senior
wasn't going to let
us be a losing team
by the time I got there."
He has one more chance to fulfill that
prophecy. In 11 years, the Bobcats have
never had so much as a .500 season, let
alone a playoff appearance.
But he is desperate for that to change.
"I want to make the district playoffs,"
he said. "That's a big thing for me. And
a winning season there is no way we
shouldn't go 8-2. Or 7-3 at the least."
At 5-foot-11, 235 pounds, Jake brings
an intriguing skill set to guard. His
strength and excellent use of leverage
also makes him a standout wrestler at
North Port.
"The other thing is for a big kid; he's
got really good speed," North Port coach
Billy Huthman added. "It's why we like
to pull him a lot."
Most importantly, he understands the
team concept, especially on the line,
where it is essential. It's something else
he learned from Steve.
It might also be a reason he eschews
any individual goals for the season.
"Not really, I don't think so," he said.
"It's hard to keep stats for offensive
linemen."
Or until they start adding up the
number of players wailing "Bennett!"
from the middle of the field.
Contact Rob Shore atshore@sun-herald.com or941-206-1174.


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North Port senior Jake Bennett, right, brings a combination of strength and his understanding
of how to use leverage to the line. Coaches also praise his speed despite his weighing in at more
than 230 pounds on his 5-11 frame.


E FOURTH DOWN


TH (t ( lNil a.


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Page 8


Fludav AuguSt ?30 I2:03


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Frdy uut30 03Pg


PREP FOOTBALL


LEMON BAY


FIRST
DOWN

Date Opponent
A30 at Port Charlotte
S6 Bishop Verot
S13 LaBelle
S20 Island Coast
S27 atDunbar
010 at Cape Coral
018 Mariner
025 North Fort Myers
N1 at Cypress Lake
N8 at Lake Placid


2012 RESULTS (7-4)
LBHS Opp
34 at Palmetto Ridge 14
Lucas Sparks off to flying start with
159 rushing yards, two TDs.
51 Gateway Charter 7
Mantas defense holds Griffins to 80
yards, two first downs.
13 atLaBelle 14
Muddy field and sloppyplay leads to
seven turnovers.
27 Cardinal Mooney 18
Goal-line stand in 2nd quarter sparks
Manta Rays; Cougars lose for first time.
50 at St. Petersburg Catholic 49
Mantas erase 28-13 gap, win on Austin
Hirschy's conversion with 1:40 left.
28 Port Charlotte 20
Hirschy scores two TDs early, seal win
on Alan Borovsky's late INT
0 Charlotte 40
Tarpons standout Clyde Newton (204
yards) wears down Manta Rays.
0 Clearwater Central Catholic 23
Mantas suffer 2nd consecutive shutout
loss after averaging 33-plus points.
33 Gulf Coast 14
Lemon Bay thinks it clinched playoff
berth. Port Charlotte proves otherwise.
55 Lake Placid 35
Sparks rushes for 185 yards, 4 TDs in
final game at Veterans Stadium.
13 Fort Pierce Central* 41
Mantas lead at half, but can't stop
Marcus Levy (200 rush yards, 3 TDs)
Playoffs

2012 FINAL STATISTICS


RUSHING
Name
Lucas Sparks
Austin Hirschy
Dakota Reigle
Bobby Caspolich
Tyler Nelson
Alan Borovsky
Nick Schofield
Vince Kisiday


PASSING
Name C A
Lucas Sparks 23 52
Tyler Nelson, LB 1 2
RECEIVING
Name Att. Yd:
Vince Kisiday 9 16
Dakota Reigle 5 14
Nicholas Mostyn 4 7
Nick Russo 3 2(
Alan Borovsky 1 2


Yds. Avg. TD
1,124 5.4 16
922 8.2 11
482 7.5 4
270 5.9 6
141 7.4 0
47 4.7 2
30 5.0 0
5 5.0 0


Yd
42


Durable Reigle provides a




gridiron fixture for Mantas

The two-way
senior's goal is
to never be on
the sideline


By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
ENGLEWOOD -As
one of Lemon Bay High
School's handful of
seniors, Dakota Reigle
thinks it's more impor-
tant to do his part, more
important that he never
gets off the field.
Then again, as one
of the Mantas' few true
two-way players last
season, he practically
needed Google Maps to
find the sideline anyway.
Reigle returns to the
fold as a slot on offense
and the free safety on the
defense.
The durable Reigle
managed both last year,
sometimes only coming
off the field for five plays
per game. That was some-
times. The rest of the time,
he never left the field.
He expects more of the
same this season.
"Last year, I could take
breaks when I needed to,"
he said. "But this year,
for myself, I don't want to
come off the field."
That sort of commit-
ment didn't go unnoticed
in the Lemon Bay locker
room as he was named
one of the team's five
captains.
Reigle's versatility hasn't
gone unnoticed by Lemon
Bay coach D.J. Ogilvie,
either. So much so that
the thought of special-
izing Reigle as a player
- allowing him to exclu-
sively play defense, for


s. TD Int example hasn't crossed
27 6 5 his mind.
7 0 0 "It would make him less
valuable," Ogilvie said.
Avg. TD "He plays both sides of
18.6 1 the ball; it's almost like we
28.2 1 have two players. Some
19.3 1 people would say maybe
6.7 1
23.0 1 REIGLE 110


Dakota Reigle returns to
familiar starting roles at
receiver and free safety.
The two-way player often
came off the field for
only a handful of plays
in a game. He expects a
similar workload again
this season.


SECOND DOWN


i- The top five rated recruits yc


KEYON BROWN
Hardee*DE*Nov. 1
(No. 8)
Brown (230 lbs.) is svelte
for a defensive lineman,
and plays with great
quickness from the edge.
No commitment yet, with
offers from Clemson,
Georgia and Miami.


NICKEL PACKAGE


u can watch play this season (based on the Rivals.com spring 2014 rankings for Florida prospects):


RYESHENE BRONSON
Dunbar* WR* Sept.27
(No. 13)
Bronson is a physical
receiver with a big
6-foot-3 frame. He offers
a wide target to throw
to. He has committed to
Florida.


DEMARCUS CHRISTMAS
Manatee* DT. Sept. 6
(No. 15)
Christmas comes early for
quarterbacks. The 6-foot-4,
290-pound beast is one
one of the state's most
highly rated linemen. He
has committed to Florida
State.


JOSHUA HICKS
Palmetto. *RB. Aug. 30/Sept.20
(No. 77)
Hicks possesses sub-4.5
speed and can switch
gears quickly after
breaking through the line
of scrimmage. He has
committed to Rutgers.


KEN DALL SAWYER
E. Lee (o.aDB Sept. 13/Nov. 8
(No. 90)
Sawyer possesses the
requisite ball skills to play
cornerback at the next
level. He has numerous
offers, including Florida
State, Miami and South
Florida.


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SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 9






'Pg 0F ca'Agt '


PREP FOOTBALL


LENION BAY


THIRD
DOWN

ROSTER


Name
Josh Kennedy
Jake Barone-Wiggs
Bob Caspolich
Sean Winterstein
Dan Wescott
Ronnie Blem
Jacob Rasnick
Anthony Marinola
Austin Hirschy
Jeremy Snook
Dakota Reigle
James Deppen
Calvin Strong
Nic Mostyn
Tyler Nelson
Josh Chapman
Nick McGill
Uriah Edwards
Jesse Baer
Ben Hamsher
Austin Oplinger
Sean Connaghan
Brian McGill
Josh Schulte
Harry Sheppard
Joe Adams
Dan Harvey
Jimmy Hinck
Jared Connor
Justin Bosley
Ben Kunkle
Andrew Harris
Billy Riccatano
Mike Wyas
Sean Porter
Sean Reese
Hotchy Lamparello
Brad Krzysiak
Zach Pellicciotti
Caleb McCarthy
Dom Depersia
Hunter Schroll
Dylan Edic
Stephen Swierkosz
Quinn Morrow
Vince Messina
Matt Toor
Ryan Karsten


Pos.
CB-WR
CB-HB
CB-HB
K
DE-CB
CB-WR
K
DE-HB
DE-HB
CB-QB
FS-HB
CB-HB
CB-WR
LB-WR
QB-FS
CB-WR
CB-WR
DE-FB
CB-WR
CB-WR
DE-WR
LB-FB
LB-WR
LB-HB
NG-T
LB-WR
LB-WR
T-DT
FB-DT
G-LB
T-DT
T-DT
T-DT
DT-G
DT-C
G-NG
T-DT
G-DT
G-DT
T-DT
K
DT-C
T-DT
G-DT
DT-C
G-NG
CB-WR
DE-G


aass
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Junior
Sophomore
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Sophomore
Senior
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Senior
Senior
Junior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Senior
Junior
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Sophomore
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Junior


PROJECTED STARTERS


OFFENSE
Pos. Name,Yr.
WR- Nic Mostyn, Jr.
WR- Austin Oplinger, Sr.
SL Bob Caspolich, Jr.
SL Dakota Reigle, Sr.
T- Jimmy Hinck, Jr.
T Caleb McGarity, So.
G Mike Wyas, Jr.
G Stephen Swierkosz, Jr.
C- Quinn Morrow, Jr.
QB Tyler Nelson, Jr.
RB -Uriah Edwards, Sr.
K Josh Kennedy, Jr.


DEFENSE
Pos. Name,Yr.
DE- Austin Oplinger, Sr.
DT- Stephen Swierkosz, Jr.
NT- Harry Sheppard, Jr.
DT- Jimmy Hinck, Jr.
DE- Uriah Edwards, Sr.
LB Brian McGill, Jr.
MLB Josh Schulte, Sr.
LB- Sean Connaghan, Jr.
CB -Josh Kennedy, Jr.
CB- Josh Chapman, Jr.
S Dakota Reigle, Sr.
P -Tyler Nelson, Jr.


REIGLE


FROM PAGE 9
you shouldn't play him both ways. But
him being tired is still better than a lot
of players."
There is more to his versatility.
Lining up in the slot on offense, he is
a threat running the ball (482 yards, 4
touchdowns in 2012) and catching it (5
receptions, 141 yards, 1 TD). But there
is still more.
"What I like most about him is he
blocks and takes pride in it," Ogilvie
said. "A lot of running backs don't
block. He's very good at it and a lot of it
is because he takes pride in it."
Some of that is attributable to
Reigle's coachability and his willing-
ness to do what is asked.
"If you can't block, you can't play on
offense," Reigle acknowledged.


His role on
defense goes
beyond statistics.
As the free safety in
Lemon Bay's three-
man secondary, it's
up to him to make
sure they're lined
up correctly.
Truth be told, it's
his favorite part of
his job. Well, his


From day
one, you
could tell
withi his
athletic
ability, he
was going to
be a guy you
1w r s f anii ar


many jobs. & '
"I don't like to be able
coming off the count Or
field, but if I did D.J. Ogilvie
(pick one over the Lemon Bay coach
other), I'd probably
pick defense," he
said. "It's a lot more fun, a lot more
intense. I don't know I just like


to
1.

ch


hitting."
None of this is a surprise to Ogilvie,
who saw Reigle's potential after coming
to Lemon Bay two seasons ago. Reigle is
one of the few holdovers from Ogilvie's
first year with the Mantas.
"You don't always want to count
on sophomores to be your key guys,"
Ogilvie said. "But from day one, you
could tell with his athletic ability, he
was going to be a guy you were going to
be able to count on."
He is going to be counting on him for
one last season. Reigle put in his time
in the weight room over the summer,
putting on 20 pounds of muscle.
Ogilvie would like Reigle to be more
of a vocal presence on the field and in
the locker room, become even more of
a leader. But that surely starts will him
not coming off the field.
"I feel like if I come off the field,"
Reigle said, "I'm not being a good
leader."
Contact Rob Shore atrshore@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1174.


I l'i SCHULTE

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T.I i NELSON

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Dakota Reigle
returns to familiar
starting roles at
receiver and free
safety. The two-way
player often came
off the field for only
a handful of plays in
a game. He expects
a similar workload
again this season.


TH ( f. llFi i I


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HOW TO LISTEN WNF;11, :i AM
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COACH ING STAFF '1 1 1 lijilih l .1 i, j, I. i 1 fii .i iI 11 ll ".- i Hlli,-r .i I .r ill. j Iiiil- i. ir,-P- ill
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Fidav AuguSt ?0 21il 3


11101111..1 r,~nllOlllll


-.-





Frdy uut3,21 ae1


PREP FOOTBALL


DOWN
S SCHEDULE
Date Opponent Time
A30 at Lake Region 7
S6 at Lehigh 7
S13 East Lee County 7
S20 at Booker 7:30
S27 North Port 7
04 Bayshore 7
011 Frostproof 7
018 Southeast 7
N1 at Hardee 7:30
N8 Braden River 7
2012 RESULTS (5-5)
DCHS Opp
28 Sebring 6
Bulldogs produce 302 rushing yards
and 22 first-half points.
23 Okeechobee 7
Terrell Gordon rushes for 107yards;
Bulldogs score 16 unanswered points.
22 at Frostproof 21
Gordon's 10-yard run (andRosario
Zavala's point-after) is game-winner.
7 at Palmetto 9
Top-ranked Palmetto leads 9-0 at
halftime and holds on.
17 at North Port 28
Two North Port TDs in first 2:25 after
halftime bury Bulldogs.
7 Southeast 23
Seminoles score 21 unanswered points
in second quarter.
35 at Cypress Lake 17
Bulldogs rush for 333 yards, but lose
Terrell Gordon to a knee injury.
20 at Bayshore 21
Failed conversion run costs Bulldogs
when Bayshore scores on 51-yard run.
13 Hardee 21
Reggie Jones completes 10 of 18
passes for 92 yards.
27 Berkeley Prep 19
Bulldogs rush for 280 yards (180 from
Jones) to finish 5-5.
2012 FINAL STATISTICS


RUSHING
Name Att.
Reggie Jones 89
Tajahs Jackson 62
Terrell Gordon 90
Zack Beeles 42
Dequan Richardson 14
Jordan Washington 22
Devontre Tyler 12
Ryan Nurse 9
L. Hightower 5
Nycarion Williams 20
Ulysses Taylor 4
PASSING
Name C A
Reggie Jones 28 67
Kari Williams 5 15
RECEIVING
Name Att.
Kareece Richardson 9
Dequan Richardson 7
Tajahs Jackson 7
Jordan Washington 3
Terrell Gordon 2
Zack Beeles 1
Zach Strube 1


Yds. Avg. TD
577 6.5 8
473 7.6 2
395 4.4 4
177 4.2 0
167 11.9 2
145 6.6 0
121 10.1 0
97 10.8 0
29 5.8 0
13 0.7 0
8 2.0 1
Yds. TD Int
318 2 3
107 1 1


Avg. TD
17.0 1
16.3 0
9.0 1
6.7 0
10.0 0
19.0 0
7.0 1


I SECOND DOWF


DESOTO COUNTY


Williams



ready for



his time in




lead role

By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
ARCADIA- Kari Williams always looked the part.
This season, he could actually seize that part and
make it his.
Williams made his debut in 2010 as an athletic,
but raw freshman quarterback. He had the look of
someone who could start for a while if he got a little
seasoning.
For whatever reason, that never happened.
Williams had to share snaps with Kavauris Polk as
a sophomore and did the same with Reggie Jones last


season, often watching
from the sideline.
But his time could be
now.
"He's doing some good
things," DeSoto County
coach Matt Egloff said.
"He's gotten better, just
all around."
Williams even thinks
that having to fight for
his role had made him a
better player.
"It made me a better


Last year and
before, if I didn't see
a tlhrio', I ranl -
u',itlout pressile or
nothing. N\ou', I'm
able to stay in the
pocket and relax
and get multiple
reads off one play.
Kari Williams


player and better able to UeSoto County quarterback
compete and a willing-
ness to get stronger,"
he said. "I would have been happy (if I'd got the job
before), but I wouldn't have gotten better."
Egloff isn't apologetic for making Williams work for
the spot.
"I don't feel bad about that," he said. "It's a good
life lesson. The world is bigger than Arcadia. He
knows he's going to have to fight for things he
wants."
Williams showed what he could do when given the
chance in a 35-17 victory against Cypress Lake last
season, taking over when Jones was suspended for
the contest.
His numbers weren't eye-popping 64 yards of
total offense. But he completed 4 of 6 passes for
57 yards and rushed for three touchdowns. Just as
important, he ran the offense effectively- almost
elegantly at times after the Bulldogs lost leading
rusher Terrell Gordon in the contest.
Egloff thinks his quarterback might have improved
in that area some more over the summer.
"He's got a pretty good grasp of (the offense)," he
said. "There are still things he doesn't understand,
but he's a long way away from what he was two or
three years ago. He's starting to pull things together
and understand concepts. That's important."
WILLIAMS | 12

NTHE ESSENTIALS
THE ESSENTIALS


LOCATION: 1710 E. Gibson St., Arcadia
ON THE AIR: WFLN 1480-AM, La Zeta 105.3-FM
HOME TICKET PRICES: $5
HOME PARKING COST: $3
BOOSTER CLUB CONTACT: None
COACHING STAFF: Matt Egloff (head coach), Bumper Hay, Darrell Nicklow, Richard Koonce, Leroy Butler,
C.W. Huckaby, Cole Conners
DISTRICT: 5A-13 (Region 4), Bayshore, Booker, DeSoto County, Hardee, Southeast


FOLLOW US ONLINE
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events across the region on Twitter, Facebook and our upgraded blog, Sun W
Coast Sports Now. Make us a part of your day and watch us grow!
cooo


PHOTO BY TOM O'NEILL
DeSoto County's Kari Williams split quarterback duties the past two seasons. He is working to be
the lone starter for the Bulldogs this season.


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Punta Gorda, FL 33950
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SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 11


11101116.7 ~y110111111


p 'MR I






'Pg 2F C.VAjs


i PREP FOOTBALL



S THIRD DOWN
ROSTER


Name
Oscar Alfonso
Dewayne Hearns
Dequan Richardson
Caleb Blackwood
Chace Higgins
Tyvion Rembert
Reggie Jones
Kari Williams
Bay Hale
Julio Gaitan
Tony Lee
Alfredrick Tyson
Angel Torres
Rosario Zavala
Nirion Washington
Jacarius Thomas
Keshawn Smith
Tajahs Jackson
Terrell Gordon
Kei'shean Washington
Zach Beeles
Machale Harville
Ernest Robinson
Deionte Turner
Stefan Williams
Andre Jones
Miguel Rangel
Jorge Hernandez
Arturo Remrez
Garrett Little
Rayshawn Stroman
Patrick Jackson
Hunter Browning
Austin Tompkins
Robert Coccupen
Gerardo Alonso
Jose Mendoza


Pos.
RB-LB
WR-DB
WR-DB
RB-DB
TE-LB
RB-LB
QB-DB
QB-DB
WR-LB
WR-DB
WR-DB
WR-DB
WR-DB
K-P
WR-DB
WR-DB
RB-DB
RB-DB
RB-LB
RB-LB
RB-LB
TE-LB
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-LB
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
K-P


Class
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Sophomore
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Senior
Senior
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Freshman
Senior
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Senior
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Sophomore
Senior
Junior
Sophomore
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Freshman
Senior
Sophomore
Senior
Sophomore


PROJECTED STARTERS


OFFENSE
Pos. Name, Yr.
WR Dequan Richardson, Sr.
WR- Jacarius Thomas, Sr.
T- Miguel Rangel, Sr.
T Rayshawn Stroman, Jr.
G Ernest Robinson, Jr.
G Stefan Williams, So.
QB Kari Williams, Sr.
FB Terrell Gordon, Sr.
WB -Tony Lee, Jr.
WB Tajahs Jackson, Jr.
K Rosario Zavala,Jr.


DEFENSE
Pos. Name, Yr.
DL Machale Harville, Sr.
DL Deionte Turner, Jr.
DL Rayshawn Stroman, Jr.
DL Andre Jones, So.
LB Oscar Alfonso, So.
LB Zach Beeles, Jr.
LB Alfrederick Tyson, Jr.
CB Tajahs Jackson, Jr.
CB -Jacarius Thomas, Sr.
S DeWayne Hearns, Jr.
S Dequan Richardson, Sr.
P Rosario Zavala, Jr.


CHECK OUT OUR BLOG
4 r We've upgraded our blog,
L 1 Sun Coast Sports Now, to
accommodate our high
school coverage and our
M expansion of online local
M E -content over the next year.


DESOTO COUNTY


WILLIAMS

FROM PAGE 11
Williams said his feel for the pocket
has improved, aiding his fit in the
Bulldogs' scheme.
"Last year, I had a hard time staying
in the pocket," Williams said. "Last year
and before, if I didn't see a throw, I ran
- without pressure or nothing. Now,
I'm able to stay in the pocket and relax
and get multiple reads off one play."
If he is given the reins of the
offense, he will have some interest-
ing weapons at his disposal, from the
bullish Gordon to
explosive athletes
such as Jones The world is
and Dequan bigger tthill
Richardson, who Arcadia. He
can be threats to
score when they igO Io'S I( 'S
get the ball. going to hal'e
But there are fight for the
still areas where things he
Williams can wants.
get better. Even w
though he has Matt Egloff
improved his DeSoto County coach
understanding of
coverages, that's
an area where he needs to improve.
"Even though I said he's improving
in coverage, that's still his thing," Egloff
said. "It's not his fault, but we're not a
passing team. We're not real complex
in that stuff. We run, run, run, run,
hopefully put you to sleep and then we
throw it."
Williams tries to take all this in
stride. Even though he is likely to open
the season as the Bulldogs' starting
quarterback, he knows he still will split
time with Jones, who is too explosive
not to create packages for.
But Williams is really to put his head
down and get to work.
"It's my senior year, I can't really say
more," Williams said. "I've got to do
what I've got to do."
Contact Rob Shore at shore@sun-herald.com or 941-206-1174.



FOURTH DOWN


The top five holes area teams must fill:


CHARLOTTE RB
Clyde Newton (2,972 yards, 2
seasons) and Mike Bellamy
before him leave big shoes
to fill. The passing game with
senior QB Brennan McGill and
WRs Dwight Reynolds and
Dwayne Reynolds will fill some
of the void, but the Tarpons
must establish a ground game.


FOUR TO WATCH


Ti i i I I GoIIOIN

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Di i,,'i TURNER

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In,- i j;-rn r



























DeSoto County
quarterback Kari
Williams knows he
needs to work on
his reading and
understanding of
pass coverages, even
though the Bulldogs
once again will be a
run-oriented team.


N r n i Pa. r a.


LEMON BAY QB
It helps consider li1v ii ir
incoming starter ivi-r ri-inii
saw spot duty li&i.i-rn,
But it took Luca'. *.irl ij
full season to ev.Iv,- iiain
the offensive w- ,ni. [no i
was required in [iii- NI ,nir
offense.


NORTH PORT CB
RP-I,I j, ni R,, li-r. l "'-.- if
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DESOTO COUNTY MLB
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:Page 12


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lll0lll~Fl u~ll0llllll





Frdy uut3,21 ae1


PREP FOOTBALL


Date
A30
S6
S13
S20
S27
04
018
025
N1I


I


FIRST
DOWN
SCHEDULE


Opponent
Community School
at Keswick Christian
Bradenton Christian
at Moore Haven
at SW Florida Christian
St. John Neumann
at First Baptist
Marco Island Acad.
at Evangelical Christian


RESULTS & STATISTICS
Not applicable: Imagine played a
limited varsity schedule last year.

I SECOND
DOWN
NICKEL PACKAGE
The five longest road
trips area teams face this
season:
VENICE AT PLANO EAST, TEXAS
(941 miles as the crow flies
1,186 driving miles)
The Indians picked a memorable
way to end a September in which
they also face rivals Manatee and
Charlotte. The visit to football power
Piano East, located north of Dallas,
is the Indians'first out-of-state trip
since opening against Oscar Smith
(Va.) in 2009.

NORTH PORT AT LELY
NORTH PORT AT PALMETTO RIDGE
(87. 9 miles and 84.8 miles)
North Port does the bulk of its
traveling in September with back-
to-back trips to Naples. The Bobcats
should pack their iPods both weeks.

LEMON BAY AT LAKE PLACID
(83.1 miles)
The Mantas end the regular season
with their longest trip: to Lake
Placid's Scarborough Stadium. That is
fair play for a school the opened the
season with a preseason opponent
making the long trip to Englewood
(86.6 miles).

IMAGINE AT KESWICK CHRISTIAN
(79.0 miles)
Keswick Christian in St. Petersburg
was the first opponent for North Port
High School in its debut season in
2001. Now it will serve as the first
road opponent for Imagine School's
first all-varsity season.

IMAGINE AT MOORE HAVEN
(76.4 miles)
The Cunard shipping line used to
advertise "Getting There Is Half
The Fun."That will not be the case
for Imagine on Sept. 20, when the
Sharks make their first trip to Moore
Haven, which won nine game on the
way to the postseason in 2012.


IMAGINE


Mack tightens his grip on




key role with the Sharks

Sophomore
tries to put
past fumbles
behind him


By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
NORTH PORT-In
his freshman season at
Imagine School, tailback
Elijah Mack showcased
a lot that coach Jeppe
Bennetsen liked: Good
size for a young player,
prodigious speed and
excellent vision.
There was only one
problem. Mack had prob-
lems hanging onto the
ball and that so-called
fumble-itis has cost more
than one running back
his starting job.
But the Sharks' coach
thinks those problems
might be behind Mack,
which is good for a player
the team is counting on
as an offensive staple.
"He had a fumbling
trouble last year,"
Bennetsen said. "But he
hasn't shown that in the
spring."
Mack looked sheepish
at the mention of the
fumbles. But he said he
thought the problem had
been sorted out.
It was just thinking too
much, the sophomore
said.
"It took me a while to
think about why it was
actually happening,"
Mack said. "It was all
mental. It wasn't me
sweating; it wasn't me
(not) holding it tight
enough. It was just me
thinking about it."
If Mack has those prob-
lems solved, he could be
a handful for opposing
teams in this, Imagine's
first full varsity season.
He rushed for 211
yards and two touch-
downs in Imagine's
spring game against St.
John Neumann, one of
the teams expected to
MACK | 14


Elijah Mack carries the ball during a drill during a recent practice. The Imagine School sophomore is being counted on for a larger
role in the offense this season, but he must first prove the fumbles of his freshman year are not an issue.


IIQllllyllr ~FOlllll


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 13






'Page 14 Fi ICI.3V Aujus~


U PREP FOOTBALL




DOWN

ROSTER


Name
Dylan Jean
Corey Allen
Elijah Mack
Stantley Thomas
Deejay St. Pierre
Jawaun Haskins
Rodney Lamb
Zefen Bruno
Spencer Smith
Michael Prada
Trejaan Harris
Rashawn Lamb
Jeppe Bennetsen
Justin Montalbano
Brandon Chapman
Tyler Langston
Jacob Hernandez
Cody Oleckna
Mario Escort
Steven Burhalter
Austin Campfield
Patrick Swales
Ricky Rezendez
Jonny Perez
Christian Morales
Chris Parsons


Pos.
WR-S
QB-DB
RB-LB
WR-DB
WR-DE
LB
LB
LB
WR-DE
WR-K
WR-DB
WR-DB
WR
WR-CB
LB
OL-DL
G
OL-DL
OL-DL
C-DE
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL
OL-DL


FOUR TO \WATCH


Class
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Sophomore
Junior
Junior
Freshman
Freshman
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Freshman
Junior
Junior
*Senior
Junior
Junior
Sophomore
Junior
Junior


C, ,, i ALLEN
,' Soph.

Allen has the job of
replacing Anthony
Stephens, who trans-
ferred to Port Charlotte.
But coaches like Allen's
athleticism, leadership
and field intelligence.


A\I ii C XMPFIELD
I. Senior
Campfield will be
expected to lead the
Sharks on both lines. He
is a guy who does all the
little things the coaches
want.


P 'I S\\\I u

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ln m, 'IH.,II


PROJECTED STARTERS


OFFENSE
SName,Yr.
S- Deejay St. Pierre, So.
R- Dylan Jean, So.
- Stantley Thomas, So.
- Rashawn Lamb, Fr.
-Mario Escort, Jr.
- Cody Oleckna, Fr.
-Jonny Perez, So.
- Patrick Swales, Jr.
- Austin Campfield, Sr.
-Corey Allen, So.
- Elijah Mack, So.
- Michael Prada, Jr.


DEFENSE
. Name,Yr.
- Deejay St. Pierre, So.
- Mario Escort, Jr.
- Austin Campfield, Sr.
-Jawaun Haskins, So.
-Rodney Lamb, So.
- Elijah Mack, So.
-Zefen Bruno, So.
- Rashawn Lamb, Fr.
- Stanley Thomas, So.
-Dylan Jean, So.
- nrv Allen So


SLIIl PH-.T-., B, JEjlII IFEP BP llI'..


*homeschoolstudent Imagine School's Elijah Mack plows through the Carrollwood Day School defense.


FOURTH DOWN

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Fudav AuguSt ?0 1.1 2I?


- Wi






Friday, August 30, 2013 Page 15


PREP FOOTBALL


VENICE


FIRST
DOWN
SCHEDULE


Date
A30
S6
S13
520
527
04
010
018
N1
N8


2012 RESULTS (8
VHS
48 Booker
LinebackerJuan Garcia return
interceptions for touchdowns.
24 Riverview
Youtzy and Terry Polk combine
yards and 3 TDs as Indians r
21 Charlotte
A fumble sets up Clyde Newt
game-winning TD with 9 sec
35 Lehigh
Polk runs for 207yards and t
scores.
48 Sarasota
Polk runs for 219 yards and I
touchdowns in the first half.
41 North Port
Defense forces 4 TOs and You
for 170 yards and two touch
27 Manatee
Cord Sandberg and the Hurri
gain 493 yards to rout the hi
45 Chaminade
Venice erupts for 35 second-i
points.
42 Braden River
Pirates clinch playoff berth fi
consecutive season.
31 Naples
Youtzy completes 14 of20 fo
yards in loss.
31 Pinellas Park*
Polk's 68-yard run sets up a 4
go-ahead score in fourth qua
7 Manatee*
Manatee builds a 42-0 lead
minutes left in the first half.


2012 FINAL STATES
RUSHING
Name Att. Yds.
Terry Polk 267 1,966
KaleYoutzy 269 1,545
Isaac Whitney 10 147
Dom Fanti 9 26
Ben Chisholm 14 47
Tyler McKenzie 3 6

ONLINE: Check out our exp
blog SunCoastSportsblog.co


-4)
Opp
0
s a pair of

17
ne for 287
ally.
24
on's
conds left.
14
three

12
four

14
tzy runs
downs.


I


56 For Marino, who threw
'canes for 1,217 yards, 10 touch-
osts. downs and five intercep-
29 tions for Riverview in 2012,
half the move has worked as
well as could be expected.
7 "It's definitely helped
orsixth me grow as a person," said
Marino, the nephew of
42 Palmetto head coach Dave
'r216 Marino. "It wasn't easy,
but there are a lot of great
21 people here. The whole
-yard team coaches, teachers,
rter. faculty, friends at school
56 -they made it real easy to
with nine make the transition. They
were very welcoming. The
*Playoffs people at Riverview were
really understanding too, so
TI it wasn't too bad."
The Rams' loss is the
Indians' gain: Venice has an
Avg. TD accomplished dual-threat
7.4 22 signal caller in addition
S9.1 22 to senior running back
'14.7 3 Terry Polk, who ran for
2.9 1 1,802 yards and 22 touch-
3.4 0 downs as a junior. Coach
2.0 0 John Peacock believes the
offense's newfound diver-
sity will pay dividends.
andedE E
,m VENICE | 16


Dominic Marino calls the play during Venice's spring game in May. Marino gives the Indians a quick-strike capability.


SECOND DOWN

Five opposing teams you should know:


MANATEE
vs. Venice, Sept. 6
The Hurricanes won the
Class 7A state title in 2011
and lost to St.Thomas
Aquinas 35-18 in the state
semis last year. Though
the Indians don't need to
worry about the Hurricanes
as a district foe, it is a
tough date in a brutally
difficult September.
Defensive tackle Demarcus
Christmas has committed
to Florida State.


SOUTHEAST
at DeSoto County, Oct. 18
The Seminoles are looking
for their second consecu-
tive district title and enter
the season as the favorite.
Southeast also is looking
for its sixth consecutive
winning season and will
get to use senior running
back Courtney Allen
(1,334 rushing yards, 17
touchdowns in 2012) as
a playmaker to pace the
offense.


NICKEL PACKAGE


FIRST BAPTIST ACADEMY
vs. Imagine, Oct. 18
The Lions had a huge
season in 2012, going
10-0 in the regular season
and winning twice in the
postseason to advance to
the state semifinals. First
Baptist loses its pair of
1,000-yard rushers, but
returns its leading tackler:
junior linebacker Zack
Williams (87 tackles, 13.5
tackles for loss).


LARGO
at Venice, Oct. 18
This could be the team
shaping up to be Venice's
main rivals in District
6A-12. The Packers are
coming off an 11-1 season
and boast a handful of key
returners, such as seniors
RB Jarvis Stewart (1,186
rushing yards, 17 TDs) and
LB Frankie Hernandez (99
tackles, 17 for loss). Junior
Donovan Hale takes over
at quarterback.


ISLAND COAST
vs. Lemon Bay, Sept. 20
The Gators have posted
four consecutive winning
seasons since their 2008
debut, including an 11-2
playoff run in 2010. A
strong running game
behind junior linemen
Marion Gonzalez, Everett
Wetherell and Mason
Boyd spurred Island Coast
to a 20-7 spring victory
against Fort Myers.


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Opponent
at Palmetto
at Manatee
Riverview
Charlotte
at Piano East (Texas)
Dixie Hollins
at Sarasota
Largo
at Osceola
Bayshore


A change in colors


Marino dons
Venice QB's
jersey after
arriving in the
offseason .
By ROB SMITH
SPORTS WRITER :: ,: -
VENICE Changing .
schools in the middle of
one's junior year isn't an
experience many high
school athletes want to deal
with. '
Doing it as a starting
quarterback comes with
even more complications
and pressures.
But that is the path
Venice High School quar-
terback Dominic Marino
undertook.
Marino transferred to
Venice in January, and the
senior entered fall practice
as the unquestioned starter.


Illlll~y.. Fy~~lllll


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 15





o'F3,.j 16 Fiida3v August 3,: 21:11


PREP FOOTBALL


VENICE


E THIRD
DOWN

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FROM PAGE 15

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Ti r' P olk


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FOUR TO WATCH


D., I I MAi


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Dom Marino
throws one
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completions
during Venice's
preseason
game against
Southeast.


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Frdy uut3,21 ae1


PREP FOOTBALL


FIRST
DOWN


S6 at Clearwater 7
S20 Nicea 7
S27 at Master's 7


HEDULE
012
026
N1


OFFENSE
Name, Yr.
- Alex Parker, Jr.
- S. Higginbotham, Sr.
-Peter DiPiazza, Jr.
- Josh Terry, Jr.
- Erick Hicks, So.
- Michael Wright, Fr.
- Ray Lussier, Fr.


DEFENSE
Pos. Name, Yr.
DL -Erick Hicks, So.
DL Ray Lussier, Fr.
DL Josh Terry, Jr.
LB Austin Beswick, Jr.
LB- S.Higginbotham, Sr.
CB Pete DiPiazza,Jr.
S- Alex Parker, Jr.


THIRD
DOWN
2012 RESULTS (4-5)


CCS Opp
48 Hollywood Christian 33
Will Craft scores school's first TD on pass from Nathanael Vargo.
Peter DiPiazza had2 rushing TD's
0 Donahue 52
Bigger and older opponent beats and beats up Saints; Vargo
and Alex Parker are injured, leaving 9 healthy bodies.
23 Cape Christian 68
With Vargo sidelined, Jacob Foster throws 2 TDs and goes 11
of26 and 162 yards. He runs for 99 yards on 19 carries.
6 Canterbury 74
Game ends at halftime with CCS down to 6 healthy players
against a team that goes on to reach the state final.
12 Nicea 20
Game endsjust before halftime when lights fail at the field.
97 Westwood 83
Vargo returns and accounts for 9 TDs and 177 yards rushing.
CCS finishes with 542 yards of offense.
6 Grace 0
Forfeit victory.
38 Golden Rule 59
Vargo runs five kickoffs back for TDs, but tackling issues
undue the Saints.
48 Miami Christian 12
Saints compile 412 rushing yards to end season on up note.
Vargo runs for 159 yards; Foster runs for 101 yards.


COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN


Parker takes leader's role


atDonahue
at Nicea
Master's


SECOND
DOWN
ROSTER


Name
Cameron Stewart
Scott Higginbotham
Alex Parker
Jacob Foster
Austin Beswick
Peter DiPiazza
Josh Terry
Ray Lussier
Michael Wright
Erick Hicks


Pos.
WR
LB-DB
S/QB
QB
DL/RB
CB/WR
DE/WR
DL/OL
DL/OL
LB


Class
8th
Senior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Junior
Freshman
Freshman
Sophomore


Junior covers for ailing
QB in multiple ways
By CHUCK BALLARO
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PORT CHARLOTTE -With the
graduation of four of its key members
from last year's inaugural seven-man
football team, the Community Christian
Mustangs needed someone to step up
and become the leader.
On a team with one senior, the role is
likely falling to junior Alex Parker.
Parker, who spent much of last
season as a running back on a team that
went 4-5, will take the snaps while last
season's starter, Jacob Foster, recovers
from surgery on his jaw. He is expected
to miss the first half of the season.
Parker has already taken to the
position. At a recent practice, he was en-
couraging his receivers to catch the ball,
to not commit false starts, even watch
his feet as a message to go in motion.
Parker said he's up to the challenge,
knowing he can't play alone.
"The coaches want me to help the
kids. Most of them haven't played and
need someone to lead them," Parker
said. "I can only do as well as my team.
They have to do their jobs so I can do
mine."
For coach Forest Wood, team leader-
ship is a position that comes naturally.
"His character is awesome. Great in
school, great with his family. He's a good
Christian man and not afraid to say so,"
Wood said. "On the field, he has the
(Tim) Tebow attitude. A good Christian
off the field, but on, watch out."
As for his physical gifts, Wood said his
strength is as a ball carrier, always know-
ing when to hit the hole and where and
allowing his blockers to do the work.
He has also become a strong passer.
"He's not as fast as our quarterback
(Nano Vargo) last year, but if you see the
clear path to go through, you're going to
make yardage," Wood said. "His passing
game has improved. His arm is much
better. He can throw 40-yard passes like
it's no problem, where he couldn't last
year."
If Parker is up to the challenge, Foster
could move to receiver upon his return.
Otherwise, Wood said Parker could
return to running back to go along with
his duties as a safety on defense.
Parker came from the 11-man Pop
Warner ranks and was eager to play the
Mustangs' version of the game when the
school added it as a sport last year. He
discovered it was a whole new world.
"It's tough. It's more fast-paced. You're
all over the field, the hitting is harder
and there's more scoring," Parker said. "I


FOUR TO WATCH


Al I. Pi\ll I
,, ,1 *or
He will be the go-to
guy to run and pass the
ball until Jacob Foster
returns from injury. He
will also play safety on
defense. Needs to stay
healthy.


i. T 1i :i:
r i i W or
". u '*Jlih, 1sll [lIllI
and showed promise as
a sophomore at receiver
and defensive lineman.
The junior will be in the
same roles this season.


Pli i DIPI.x//.z
. .. nl J I .ul l ,[
H,- P- -Ii III
season on both sides as
a sophomore. Can play
receiver and cornerback.
Needs to step it up on
a team with almost no
depth.


R LIJSSIER
I .. .. Freshman
One of two freshmen
will be asked to shore
up the offensive/defen-
sive line and protect
Parker. Otherwise, the
Mustangs might not
have a quarterback.


On a team with one senior, the leadership role for Community Christian is falling to junior Alex
Parker, who will start the season at quarterback after spending much of last year as a running back.


remember a game when we won 95-83. I
was on the ground with cramps and my
opponent next to me was also cramping
on the ground."
But with another year under their belt,
he and his teammates feel they can have
a good season, provided there are no
more injuries and Alex can lead the way.
"He's a great leader in football and in
church. He has a stronger arm and his
passes are a lot easier to catch this year,"
junior receiver Josh Terry said.
"He's positive and motivating and has
a strong arm. I think he's going to lead
the team real well," junior running back
Peter Dipiazza said.


FOURTH DOWN
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SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 17





'Pg 8Fia, uut3,21


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:Page 18


Friday, August 30, 2013





Frdy uut3,21 ae1


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


* FIRST DOWN
FOUR QUESTIONS
WHAT'S THE PROGNOSIS ON OFFENSE?
Nowhere to go but up. Last season, the Gators finished
No. 103 overall, No. 76 in scoring and No. 114 in
passing out of 120. The experts say Florida will be
much improved despite returning quarterback (Jeff
Driskel) undergoing a late-July appendectomy, the
featured back (Matt Jones) sidelined by a viral infection
and their best receiver (Andre Debose) blowing out an
ACL and being lost for the season.
Is THERE A TOUGHER SCHEDULE IN THE NATION?
Hard to imagine. Florida plays nonconference games
against Miami and Florida State, and the SEC slate
includes trips to LSU and South Carolina.
Is THERE A SILVER LINING?
Several. Start with the defense, which gave up an
average of 14.5 points per game. The unit returns only
three starters, but the faith is that defensive guru Will
Muschamp turn the talented pieces into a cohesive unit.
WHAT'S THE OUTLOOK?
This is a preseason top-10 team. But it is conceivable
Florida will be a better team but have a worse record.
The upside: Florida's offense can't be any worse.



I SECOND DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH


FLORIDA


Florida offensive
coordinator Brent
Pease, shown during
preseason work-
S'outs last year, says
the Gators will be
much improved this
season, thanks, in
'part, to them being
more comfortable in
his system after a full
yearof work in it.
AP FILE PHOTO




Gators seek playmakers




to jump-start offense


JEFF DRISKEL
Quarterback -Junior
Muschamp said he believes the junior can have a
breakout season after a year in which he threw for only
1,646 yards and 12 touchdowns. That used to be three
games'worth of passing yards in the Fun-and-Gun days
of Steve Spurrier.
DOMINIQUE EASLEY
Defensive line- Senior
The 6-foot-2, 283-pound senior led the Gators with four
sacks last season and has the athleticism to be disrup-
tive. The line can be a roadblock with Easley as anchor.
LOUCHEIZ PURIFOY
Cornerback -Junior
Look for the future NFL first-rounder to also play a lot at
wide receiver.
TREY BURTON
Receiver Senior
Asked what his role will be, the senior from Venice said,
"Hopefully a little bit of everything." Indeed, he's done it
all but should most of his playing time at receiver.


E THIRD DOWN
FOUR NEWCOMERS TO WATCH
ALEX ANZALONE
Linebacker *Freshman
The 6-foot-3, 235-pound outside linebacker should
grow into a middle linebacker and runs like a receiver.
VERNON HARGREAVES
Cornerback. Freshman
Rated the SEC's No. 1 newcomer by Saturday Down
South, he gives Florida the option of multiple coverages
and allows Louceiz Purifoy to play more wide receiver.
DEMARCUS ROBINSON & AHMAD FULWOOD
Receivers Freshman
Robinson is the headliner of the 2013 recruiting class,
a 6-foot-2, 201-pound early enrollee from Georgia.
Jacksonville's 6-5 Fulwood has impressed teammates
with his deceptive speed and smooth route running.

NOTE: This page contains material from Chase Goodbread
of NFL.com and Chris Dufresne of the Los Angeles Times.


By EDGAR THOMPSON
ORLANDO SENTINEL
GAINESVILLE David Pollack, a
highly decorated defender in his day
at Georgia, knows a playmaking wide
receiver when he sees one.
Pollack certainly faced his share when
he lined up against the Florida Gators.
These days, he cannot find a proven
gamebreaker on his former rival's roster.
It's a shocking development for Pollack,
who arrived in Athens in 2001 when
Florida was a wide receiver factory.
"Where's the talent? Where's the
offensive talent?" Pollack, now an ESPN
college football analyst, pondered at last
month's SEC media days. "I can name
three receivers from Alabama and three
from Georgia off the top of my head that
would be the No. 1 guy for Florida."
The last time Florida had a 1,000-yard
wide receiver (Taylor Jacobs, 2002)
Pollack was a sophomore defensive
end in his first of three All-American
seasons. A season earlier, the Gators
had two 1,000-yard pass catchers, Jabar
Gaffney and Reche Caldwell.
In the coming years, several Gators
would approach 1,000 yards, including
former great Percy Harvin, who had 858
receiving yards in 2007.
Since then, the Gators have searched
in vain for a star pass catcher.
"Since Percy, with all due respect
to David Nelson and other guys, they
haven't had one of those guys where you
look over there and worry," CBS college
football analyst Gary Danielson said.
"They haven't had that electric, must-
stop receiver."
The Gators enter this season without
a proven go-to guy, much less a game
changer.
Of Florida's returning wide receivers,
redshirt junior Quinton Dunbar was
the most reliable, and he managed 383
yards on 36 catches (10.6 yard average).
Gators' receivers seldom challenged
defenses downfield, finishing 2012 with
nine receptions of 20 yards or longer.
Dunbar vows this year will be different.


FOUR GAMES TO


\! Mn IMI

The Gators'series with
the Hurricanes comes
and goes. If the SEC
moves to a nine-game
schedule, it's likely
gone for good. Enjoy it
while it lasts.


\ Gio .\1

Annual rivalry at a
neutral site? What's not
to like? Throw in SEC
East title stakes, and
it's not to be missed.


2 FOURTH DOWN


WATCH


1 S. CRoutA
.. i, 11 1-
Steve Spurrier would
like nothing better
than to clinch South
Carolina's second SEC
East title by beating his
old school and alma
mater.


\ *. FLORIDA ST.
.. ... W'D
The Gators knocked
off the Seminoles on
their field a year ago.
FSU looks to return the
favor in Gainesville.


THE ESSENTIALS


HOME: Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, Gainesville COACH: Will Muschamp (3rd season, 18-8)
TICKETS: 1-800-344-2867
RADIO: 620 AM, 930 AM, 1200 AM ONLINE: http://www.gatorzone.com
CONFERENCE: Southeastern Conference PROJECTED SEC FINISH: Third in East Division
2012 REWIND: 11-2 overall, 7-1 SEC (Tied for 1st in East); lost to Louisville 33-23 in Sugar Bowl
WHAT'S NEW: The Gators are reloading on defense, which will again be their best hope for winning
the SEC East Division and advancing to the SEC championship game in Atlanta. What remains are
concerns on offense.
RETURNING STARTERS: 6 offense, 4 defense


"Everybody's got a chip on their
shoulder," he said. "We know what we
can do."
Familiarity with quarterback Jeff
Driskel and second-year offensive
coordinator Brent Pease should help.
But at some point, talent at wide
receiver has to take over. Receivers must
win one-on-one matchups, get open
and make tough catches.
Florida has gone a long stretch with-
out a player who fits the profile.
The Gators signed 14 receivers from
2008 to 2012. Five transferred. Dunbar,
a three-star recruit out of Miami, is the
only one with more than 30 catches or
350 receiving yards in a season.


The 6-foot-2 Dunbar has bulked up
to 194 pounds and is having a strong
camp. Five freshmen have made a
strong impression.
But counting on first-year freshmen
wide receivers is risky business.
"If you haven't been in that situation,
it's a lot different than what you played
in in high school," Pease said. "The
energy level is high, the expectations are
higher, the game is much faster."
Senior Trey Burton, though, hopes
fans and media are not too quick to
judge Florida's receivers. He thinks
they'll be surprised what they see.
"They should expect touchdowns," he
said.


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 19


Il+lllyl ~6111+1111


oIw





'Pg 0F ca'Agt '


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


So(liTH FLORIDA


3 FIRST DOWN
FOUR QUESTIONS
WHAT'S THE GAMEPLAN?
First-year coach Willie
Taggart likes a tough
running game, smart
quarterback and utilizing
tight ends- much like
Jim Harbaugh did at
Stanford and now with the
San Francisco 49ers.
WHO'S UNDER CENTER?
Holdovers Bobby Eveld and Matt Floyd shared playing
time after four-year starter B.J. Daniels suffered a
season-ending injury last fall. The player to watch here
is Penn State transfer Steven Bench, who's eligible
immediately.

CAN THEY STOP ANYBODY?
The defense was a liability last season, finishing with
nine takeaways. The Bulls have a solid front with
DT Ryne Giddins and DE Aaron Lynch, a Notre Dame
transfer, but the secondary lacks playmakers.

WHAT'S THE OUTLOOK?
The Bulls are projected to finish fifth in the AAC, but a
.500 record and a bowl bid are legitimate goals.



I SECOND DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH

RYNE GIDDINS
Defensive tackle Redshirt Senior
Trying to rebound from a junior season in which he was
hampered by a shoulder injury, he has 14.5 sacks and 22
tackles for loss in his career.

MARK JOYCE
Free safety Senior
An important reserve his first two seasons, he was a
first-time starter last year as a junior and made 74
tackles. He has one interception and four pass breakups
in his career.

DEDE LATTIMORE
Linebacker Redshirt Senior
Started every game but one in his career and has played
both inside and outside. The senior has 239 tackles, 13
sacks and 27 tackles for loss in his career.

SEAN PRICE
Tightend *Sophomore
Caught 21 passes last season as a freshman, with all of
the receptions coming in the final six games. He could
be a focal point on offense given coach Willie Taggart's
history of emphasizing the tight end. At Western
Kentucky, tight end Jack Doyle, now a rookie with the
Tennessee Titans, was the Hilltoppers'leading receiver
the past two seasons with 52 and 53 catches.


THIRD DOWN
ea FouR NEWCOMERS TO WATCH

STEVEN BENCH
Quarterback Sophomore
The native of Bainbridge, Ga., a 6-foot-2, 208-pound
sophomore transfer from Penn State, steps into the
starting role.
CHUCK BRESNAHAN
Defensive coordinator
Defense was a liability last season, finishing with nine
takeaways, so Taggart hired Bresnahan, who has eight
years as a defensive coordinator in the NFL.
AARON LYNCH
Defensive end' *RedshirttSophomore
The 6-foot-6, 244-pound transfer from Notre Dame, is
already being mentioned as a potential high first-round
draft pick.
DARIUS TICE & STA'FON MCCRAY
Running backs Freshmen
Running backs coach Telly Lockette said both freshmen
along with freshmen FBs Auggie Sanchez and
Kennard Swanson should play a role in the backfield.


NOTE: This page contains material from Greg Auman,
Tampa Bay Times, and Mike Huguenin, NFL.com


Willie Taggart era begins


Once a fast-rising
program, the Bulls
are trying to end
years of decline
By FRED GOODALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA -Willie Taggart knows what
he's in for at South Florida.
The Bulls once were one of the fastest
rising college football programs in the
nation, but they've mostly been viewed
as underachievers the past five seasons.
Taggart, 37, who starred at quarter-
back and led Bradenton Manatee High
School to a state championship, is
determined to change that perception.
The first-year coach comes to Tampa
after turning around a struggling
program at Western Kentucky, his alma
mater. Before that he was an assistant
at Stanford under Jim Harbaugh, who
led the San Francisco 49ers to the Super
Bowl last season.
Part of the lure was a chance to lead
a BCS program. But Taggart also grew
up in the Tampa Bay Area and found it
difficult resist an opportunity to return
home to continue his career.
He came to Tampa as Western
Kentucky's quarterback in 1998, and he
still has a picture in his office showing
him in his red No. 1 Hilltoppers jersey,
with six USF players working to bring
him down.
His father wore a WKU shirt that
day, and when the Bulls led 17-0, he
remembers a USF fan chiding that
they'd come all that way to get their
butt kicked. A Bulls fan offered Taggart's
sister Charlene a USF towel, and when
Taggart scored late in the first half, she
laid it down at her feet and danced on it
in celebration.
Taggart scored again early in the third
quarter, and he won the game with a
third rushing touchdown in the fourth
quarter of a 31-24 WKU victory, finish-
ing the day with 206 rushing yards. Until
last year, it was the largest deficit over-
come by a USF opponent, and those
moments now rooting for USF are
what the family will enjoy together.
That turnaround that day foreshad-
owed what has been his entire coaching
career. WKU, close to shuttering its
program when he arrived, developed
into a Division I-AA power, winning a
national championship when he was
co-offensive coordinator in 2002. He
spent three years at Stanford, helping
Jim Harbaugh resurrect the Cardinal
program to national relevance.
And WKU had a 20-game losing streak
when he came back as its head coach in
2010; his team last season played in the
school's first bowl game. Given all that,
bringing USF back from a 3-9 record last
season and back-to-back 1-6 marks in
the Big East doesn't seem so difficult.
"We have some players on our
football team that are pretty good, and
obviously we've got to do a great job
recruiting and adding on to it," he said.
"But we're a program that really hadn't
live up to our potential. A big reason
why I'm the head coach now is to try to
get our guys to live up to the potential."
The defection-weakened Big East has
been replaced by the 10-team American
Athletic Conference, and Taggart be-
lieves the Bulls 3-9 a year ago are
good enough to win the title.
"You hear a lot ... our program is a
sleeping giant. It's on us to go out and
do it," Taggart said. "We've got to stop
making excuses or blaming anyone
else.... I'm excited about it. Our players
are excited about it."


-' P ILL P i'H.' I'.


Quarterback Steven Bench warms up before Penn States spring game in April. Bench transferred
to South Florida after spring practice. He's competing with senior Bobby Eveld and redshirt
sophomore Matt Floyd to lead South Florida in coach Willie Taggart's first season.


FOUR GANIES TO WATCH


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FOURTH DOWN


T H N t Ia


HOME: vnaynioidn Janie 'Mlaadiunim ampa COACH: Willie lalart i lt ea'rniI
TICKETS: -i .*' -::c. 51 Pri,:e rarr ar I ...
RADIO: '?.?. FM 122' AM ONLINE: hrip iv ,vv I:,u itfull :C'ni
CONFERENCE: Anier:arin Arrilern,: (riferen,:e PROJECTED AAC FINISH: Fifhr
2012 REWIND: -'? ,werall I-. Biq Ear 'rth
WHAT'S NEW: N11o nimre Bil Eait C,:,rifereri:e The rivly-naed ii)ean Anieriarin Athleirn: Co(rferern,:e
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RETURNING STARTERS: 5 ffenre defensee


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Frdy uut3,21 ae2


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


MIAMI


B FIRST DOWN
FOUR QUESTIONS
Is IT ALL ABOUT THE'U'AGAIN?
No, but Miami is working its way through the alphabet,
and this year it's going to be all about the"D." The
defense struggled last season, ranking No. 116 in the
nation in total defense and No. 82 in scoring defense.
The Hurricanes relied on a lot of freshmen and sopho-
mores, which could pay off this season.
HoW'S THE SCHEDULE?
Miami might lose four games again and still be pretty
good. After the Sept. 2 home opener against Florida
A&M, the'Canes play consecutive road games against
Ohio State, Pittsburgh and Clemson before coming
home for a breather against ... Florida State.
So IS THIS THE YEAR?
Maybe, but Clemson and Florida State will be tough.
Miami enters its 10th ACC season and hasn't won a
conference championship. The last time the Hurricanes
went to a bowl was 2006. Another seven-win season
will not be enough for a success.
WHAT IS THE OUTLOOK?
Offensively, there are few concerns. This team should
win the ACC Coastal title and looks to be one of the top
three teams in the league.



I SECOND DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH
ANTHONY CHICKILLO
Defensive end Junior
Started in each of his first two seasons and the 6-foot-4,
269-pound junior enters the season with nine career
sacks and 13 tackles for loss.

PHILLIP DORSETT
Receiver Junior
He was Miami's leading receiver last year (58 catches,
842 yards and four touchdowns). He can get deep and
can run away from defenders. He has 70-catch potential.
STEPHEN MORRIS
Quarterback Senior
He passed for 3,345 yards, fifth-best single-season
mark in school history and 21 touchdowns. Morris has
a strong arm and good mobility, but needs to improve
his accuracy (58.2 percent last season, 57.7 percent for
his career).
CURTIS PORTER
Defensive tackle Senior
Because of various injuries, the 6-foot-1, 312-pound
senior has been limited to 15 games in his career
because of injuries. He has all-conference potential if he
can remain on the field.



I THIRD DOWN
I FOUR NEWCOMERS TO WATCH

ARTIE BURNS
Cornerback Freshman
The 6-foot-1, 190-pound freshman is in the mix for a
starting corner spot as Miami tries to replace Brandon
McGee, who's now with the St. Louis Rams.
STACY COLEY
Receiver Freshman
His speed makes him a weapon and the 6-foot-1,
180-pound freshman can contribute on kickoff returns
right away.
Gus EDWARDS
Running back Freshman
Duke Johnson is Miami's No. 1 back, but the 6-foot-2,
225-pound freshman could see opportunity in short-
yardage and red-zone situations.
ALEX FIGUEROA
Linebacker Freshman
He enrolled in January as a true freshman and had a
great spring practice he entered fall camp atop the
depth chart at an outside linebacker spot. The 6-foot-3,
231-pounder impressed coaches with his work ethic,
football IQ, toughness and speed. Both of his parents are
Marines.

NOTE: This page contains material from Mike Huegenin
ofNFL.com, Chris Dufresne of the Los Angeles Times and
Michael Casagmrande of the South Florida Sun Sentinel.


Running back Duke
Johnson takes
a handoff from
quarterback Stephen
Morris during a game
last season. Morris
and Johnson are one
of the nation's top
quarterback-running
back duos and a big
reason Miami expects
to contend for its first
ACC title.


AP FILE PHOTO


By any name, Johnson





has 'Canes on bowl path


By TIM REYNOLDS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CORAL GABLES Duke Johnson was
already wide awake at 4 a.m.
Never mind that the wake-up call
wasn't for another 2 hours, or that
Miami's first practice of training camp
was still more than 4 hours away.
"Just that ready to go," Johnson said.
Apparently, even he's eager to see
what he does for an encore.
Johnson ran for 957 yards in his debut
season on only 139 carries. He was the
only player in college football with at
least 900 rushing yards and 800 kickoff-
return yards a year ago, which makes
it easy to see why he was touted as
one of the nation's best freshmen. And
after adding eight pounds of muscle
in the offseason, Johnson thinks he's
well-prepared to handle a much bigger
workload this year, when he's expected
to be Miami's featured back.
"I'm excited," Johnson said. "Just
ready to get out here and play some
football. The whole summer we've been
doing strength and conditioning. Now
it's time to get down to football."
It's obvious that Miami coach Al
Golden will be calling Johnson's number
often this season. What remains unclear
is what name Golden will use when
addressing his running back.
After two years of strife brought on
by the still-unresolved NCAA inves-
tigation into the Hurricanes' athletic
department it is possible that the
association's Committee on Infractions
may announce in the next few days
what penalties, if any, will be levied
against Miami the closest thing to an
in-house controversy seems to be why
Golden insists on calling his running
back by his given name.
He calls him Randy and not Duke, the
name everyone else uses.
'Am I the only one? I thought it was


FOUR GAMES TO WATCH


\ s. FLORIDA

The first meeting
between the teams
since 2008 and the
fourth in the regular
season since 1987.


'! N. CAROLINA
'. 7:30p.m.
Watch out, Tar Heels DE
Kareem Martin will be
a handful for Miami's
offensive tackles.


\i FLORIDA ST.
vuuv. SIBD
This rivalry might
have lost some luster
nationally, but it
remains fierce.


\ I. VIRGNL\ TECH
... ED
The Hurricanes play
seven of 12 games at
home, including the
Hokies for the second
consecutive season, a
quirk of expansion.


FOURTH DOWN


THE ESSENTIALS


HOME: Sun Life Stadium, Miami COACH: Al Golden (3rd season, 13-11)
TICKETS: 305-284-2263. Prices for remaining seats start at $390.
RADIO: 99.3 FM, 820 AM, 1040 AM ONLINE: http://www.hurricanesports.com
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast Conference PROJECTED ACC FINISH: 1st in Coastal Division
2012 REWIND: 7-5 overall, 5-3 ACC (T-lst in Coastal Division); ineligible for postseason
WHAT'S NEW: The Hurricanes are favorites again at least to win the Coastal Division and make it
back to the ACC championship game. The two main reasons: QB Stephen Morris and RB Duke Johnson
return, and 20 starters are back from a year ago, though there are question marks on defense. The
Hurricanes are also eligible for the postseason after consecutive seasons of self-imposed bowl bans in
hopes they would lessen any NCAA penalties from its relationship with booster Nevin Shapiro.
RETURNING STARTERS: 10 offense, 10 defense


his mom," Golden said. "I'll call him
whatever he wants to be called. We're
still going to give him the ball. I don't
care what you call him."
You can call Johnson "all-purpose"
since he was one of only two players
in college football last season to throw
for a touchdown, run for one, catch a
scoring pass and run back a kickoff for
a score. And he did all that while Miami
monitored his number of touches, with
hopes of not overexposing the 5-foot-9,


196-pound speedster.
Expectations for both Johnson and the
Hurricanes are higher this season, and
again, he seems unfazed. In his eyes,
he's just getting started.
"First, I had to put on more weight so
I would avoid injuries and not go down
midseason," Johnson said. "And my
conditioning, but mainly my leadership.
I just have to be more of a leader and
help other guys and bring other guys
along and make this team better."


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 21


1110116.. y~llllI


I





Page 22 Fi ICI3V Aujus~


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


FIRST DOWN


WHAT'S THE PRIMARY CONCERN?
The secondary. UCF must replace one of the best safeties
in school history (Kemal Ishmael) and CB in A.J. Bouye.
CB Brandon Alexander and S Clayton Geathers return,
but freshmen could challenge for those other positions.
WILL THE OFFENSIVE LINE HOLD?
Neither QB Blake Bortles nor RB Storm Johnson will be
able to do anything if the Knights don't firm up their
offensive line following the graduation of Jordan Rae
and Theo Goins. Senior twin brothers Jordan and Justin
McCray will provide leadership at guard, and Joey Grant
switched from defensive line to center this spring and is
a capable replacement for Rae. The question is whether
new projected starters Chris Martin, a redshirt senior,
and redshirt junior Torrian Wilson will produce.
CAN JOHNSON FILL VOID LEFT BY LATAVIUS MURRAY?
Murray, now with the Oakland Raiders, led Central
Florida with 1,106 yards rushing last season as the
Knights averaged 181 rushing yards per game.
WHAT'S THE OUTLOOK?
If Bortles and Johnson come through, Central Florida
could go bowling for the sixth time in nine seasons and
the fourth time in five years.


I SECOND DOWN
m FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH

DEMETRIS ANDERSON
Defensive tackle Redshirt Sophomore
A Florida native who transferred to UCF after his
freshman season at Western Michigan, he sat out
last season and had a strong spring. At 6-foot-3, 203
pounds, he impressed coaches with his strength and
toughness and is being counted on to provide an inside
pass rush.
JEFF GODFREY
Receiver Senior
Made an effective transition from quarterback with 39
receptions for 429 yards last season. The senior also
provides options in the backfield as a runner or a passer.
JUSTIN TUKES
Tight end Junior
The 6-foot-4, 248-pound junior, has good size and
strength but must show he can catch the ball. He had 10
receptions last season for 107 yards and two scores.
TORRIAN WILSON
Offensive tackle Redshirt unior
A big-time recruit out of powerhouse Miami North-
western High School in 2010, he was a first-time starter
at left tackle last season and was named second-team
All-Conference USA. He can really mash people in the
running game.


E THIRD DOWN
FOUR NEWCOMERS TO WATCH
DEMETRIS ANDERSON
Defensive tackle *Redshirt Sophomore
Likely would have been starting had he not been forced
to sit out last season. The Fort Pierce native was twice
named UCF's defensive scout team player of the week
last season.
STORM JOHNSON
Running back RedshirtJunior
The junior transfer from the University of Miami looks
to be the guy to anchor the Knights'rushing attack after
UCF graduated Latavius Murray, a 1,000-yard rusher
who scored 15 touchdowns last season. Johnson has
shown explosiveness.
JASON RAE
Defensive tackle Freshman
The younger brother of former Knights center Jordan
Rae has impressed enough in camp to work his way into
the two-deep. Rae packs a punch for his size Knights
coach George O'Leary called him a"Coke machine."
WILL STANBACK
Running back Freshman
Until a week before signing day, the 5-foot-11,
205-pound freshman had no offers. An O'Leary connec-
tion helped bring him to UCF, and he has stood out as
the top freshman runner.


CENTRAL FLORIDA


Offense will key UCF's




success in its new home

By KYLE HIGHTOWER
ASSOCIATED PRESS _- ,
ORLANDO -With two double-digit :
win seasons during the past three years, .
Central Florida coach George O'Leary
has had plenty to celebrate recently. "
The Knights are no longer jumping to
the Big East Conference they thought \
they were entering, but a new American l
Athletic Conference with one remaining
year of Bowl Championship Series au-
tomatic qualifying status is something.
O'Leary isn't satisfied just having an
opportunity to make a splash this sea-
son with a schedule that also includes
Penn State and South Carolina, though.
He wants to finally see UCF realize the
potential he's been trumpeting.
"I think you're judged on your out of
conference wins," O'Leary said. "I think
the perception, with any conference, is
you're going to have competitive teams.
I think out of conference is where the
nation judges you ... You gotta win
those games. If you want to sit there
and play that way, you've gotta beat
those people. That's what the nature of -
the game is."
To make that next step, UCF will rely .
heavily on junior quarterback Blake
Bortles, who is moving into his second
year as the starter and is on several '
national award watch lists. He'll anchor .
an offense that returns six starters.
O'Leary has been hard on quarter-
backs during his tenure, but he had
little to quibble with Bortles' perfor-
mances last season. Though O'Leary
poked at his decision making at times,
with 25 touchdowns to only seven
interceptions, Bortles had a steady -P FILE PH'l-.'-IT
progression and wasn't afraid to take Ohio State's Ryan Shazier, left, and Curtis Grant, right, stop Central Florida's Josh Reese inside the
chances in the passing attack when it 5-yard line during last season's game between the two teams in Columbus, Ohio. Reese, a wide
was needed. receiver, returns for the Golden Knights.
The 6-foot-4, 227-pound junior
passed for 3,059 yards, 25 touchdowns
with seven interceptions last season. He F O U R G A I E S T O \V A T C H
had 10 games with at least two touch-
down passes, setting a school record -
remember, this is Daunte Culpepper's
alma mater.
Bortles has good mobility and isn't
afraid to tuck and run ... and he can
deliver some punishment when he does
run. He has a strong arm, and with
continued refinement as a passer this ui1IJ
season he could end up high on some
NFL draft boards as a senior. The lrrianyv Li:'ris vill 01 lOrrianr WVil:n Ihe Friday riirir fjanie The rKnichr[ reneiv
This season, Bortles should get a bet reat irn ir tiv, n wOuld fa3:e Jlajdee:r will ,ie IJfls ctar a their reair ivalry'ith uth
boost again from a veteran corps of rie starters at :,rrer Icprev There i rn, i:hari:e r,:, hirre :,n a Fl I nrj t heir firrl
receivers led by Breshad Perriman, son .. :hic ,'ul Jtied t berrer ay 1:1 qa' rnair,:,nariae L,:,ui- neerinr qaqi r rrhe
of NFL player Brett Perrim an. W ith a nrii,:,ra :,:,nl ri,-,:,ut r alrieir,:, than t,:,playv ille i thre AACc ni,:,r Bulls irin:e 21:11:1:3 h,:h
solid build at 6-foot-2, 210 pounds, parrvy fr BlaIe ,,rrtes ,ell a3airr a super- talented tea an d ,as rre :I ees in the
great hands and a knack for making wiiC 'r'.rn lJhrrsr tar 5',urr ar,'li3 a D "Cavr'r Gearrter series 1.1". ,:,ri
the difficult catch look easy, he'll have a rae arv r,, ,n run has huge quer'rns art ,ii te under the gun 1-24 in ,,er rime iJL(
chance to become UCF's biggest threat ajari, r c I ihash,:,uldJ be inh er v,hi,:h,,,ul, aainrr a p. verIful Ic::4 n1 for r11 first
and top wideout 3a rough fr,,rn reenr mean a tnbi da ft r passr, arra ynn aijairisr the Bulls
That will only help Bortles chances
for the Davey O'Brien and Maxwell
awards. Dealing with expectations ap- FOURTH DOWN
pears to be his biggest challenge in his T, H f .
second season.
From his perspective, Bortles said he's HOME: Briqht HOuSe Jlercr\,:s .radiuni Orlanrid COACH: Ge,:,re 0 Leary I .1rh seas,:,n ri.:.i-
ready for the challenge of leading this TICKETS: i.4,,.-:32:- .. iIII Average per-,anie prices tar at r ;. 5 I
team. RADIO: '' 3 fM ONLINE: h rrp v u,: r n hr r,:,:,n
"I think being able to play and per- CONFERENCE: Anr,:an Arthlein: f,:rnerlv in C1.1.A PROJECTED AAC FINISH: o:,urth
form has to do with earning everybody 2012 REWIND: 11:,.4 ,erall -. in I .iI5.A i iri n r ,i i,:,r l- ,,ia ul~ in (.i5.A ririe Qame bear
on the team's respect," he said. "So I Fall 5rare 3:l-1 ,Ir, Beef 0 Bradv F B:il
think this year there's definitely a little Li r I in Fe C r F c'vi
think this year there's definitely a little WHAT'S NEW: ll,:, more C:,ferenri:e .1A IC 1ri rhe Aneri,:an Arthller,: C:,nferenr:e fr,:merilyv the
m ore of that and a little more trust. I've B,, Eas lr arty ria anrd re, :,r erer:e-nare ,uth Fulrida eni,,ve, sme nar,,nal r u,:,:e ,,,vh ti
been able to do that by the guys I'm avirlaici r rcp PC. prran' u he i r: F. l u i
surrounded by." i:,crferern:es the iacr in 2:i i aqain ,rBc,:,c ri:irn (c'ilee arid niinus fc,:rnmer (c'nrifereri:e 1.1A reamn
i,:,ininr then in the AA( ihe I.riqhlr rhae several :,pp:,r runries ti:, rat, niarquee ,inir ir a quir4 v
NOTE: Thispage contains materialfrom Mike Huguenin of sheduie 11.h- i.,h, hii iiiv.- iir.- Iv l,-,-,i iiir.liii ii i ini jii.i Ai ii l. ir.-.- irnd ivi ii.-
NFL.com and Paul Tenorio ofthe Orlando Sentinel. RETURNING STARTERS: ':. offense 5 defense


Illllllllylq ,ll~nl)lllll


i


SPage 22


I


FIudav August 1? 2 3Il ?


I






Friday, August 30, 2013 Page 23


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


FLORIDA STATE


FIRST DOWN
FOUR QUESTIONS
WHAT'S THE BAD NEWS?
Technically, FSU has a lot of holes to fill with only 11
returning starters. The Seminoles lost 11 players to the
NFL, including three first-round choices. Coach Jimbo
Fsher also had to replace six assistant coaches.

WHAT'S THE GOOD NEWS?
The Seminoles are well-stocked at nearly every position.
In Phil Steele's national unit rankings, FSU is No. 2 at
receiver, No. 4 at offensive line and defensive back, No.
8 at defensive line and linebacker and No.1 on special
teams. Plenty of "non-starters" from last season logged
plenty of playing time.

So WHERE'S THE BUZZ?
This is the rare season in which FSU appears to be
gliding beneath the radar. The usual preseason buzz
surrounding the program has been little more than a
murmur -exactly how FSU wants it.

WHAT'S THE OUTLOOK?
With QB EJ Manuel off to the NFL, FSU will be youngest
where it counts most, the only reason the Seminoles
aren't ranked higher. Clemson is the ACC favorite
because the Tigers have an experienced quarterback
(senior Tajh Boyd). That doesn't mean FSU can't win the
ACC. The Seminoles are well-positioned for their first
consecutive 10-win seasons since 1999-2000.



I SECOND DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH

JAMEIS WINSTON
Quarterback Redshirt Freshman
He beat Jacob Coker for the starting job in the preseason
after dazzling everyone in the spring game. Some are
even suggesting the 6-foot-4, 207-pounder could repeat
Johnny Manziel's feat of winning the Heisman Trophy as
a freshman. Winston prefers the comparisons end there.
"If I ever get Manziel disease," he said at ACC media day,
"I want all of you to smack me in the head with your
microphones."
DEVONTA FREEMAN
Running back Junior
He led the team in rushing with 579 yards as a freshman
in 2011 and ranked second last season with 660 yards
while sharing time at the position. He'll share time
again with James Wilder Jr. offering a change of pace.

RASHAD GREENE
Receiver Junior
He led the Seminoles in every receiving category last
season, making 57 receptions for 741 yards and six
touchdowns. Greene also was a dangerous punt returned
last season, returning two for touchdowns.
CHRISTIAN JONES
Linebacker Senior
After starting for two years on the outside, he was
moved to the middle by new defensive coordinator
Jeremy Pruitt during spring practice. He led FSU with 95
tackles last season.



THIRD DOWN
I- FOUR NEWCOMERS TO WATCH

ROBERTO AGUAYO
Kicker Redshirt Freshman
The redshirt freshman made 5 of 6 field-goal attempts
in the spring game, including two from beyond 50.

JEREMY PRUITT
Defensive coordinator
Formerly the secondary coach at Alabama, Pruitt is the
third defensive coordinator at FSU in the past 28 years.
His job is getting the defense to master his system
before the Clemson game.

JEREMY KERR
Tightend Freshman
With Christo Kourtzidis transferring and Kevin Haplea
injured, the 6-foot-6, 250-pound freshman should see
significant playing time as a backup to Nick O'Leary.

MARIO PENDER
Tailback Redshirt Freshman
The redshirt freshman, who missed last season with a
sports hernia injury, could see playing time along with
juniors James Wilder Jr. and Devonta Freeman.


By JOEY KNIGHT
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TALLAHASSEE The moniker is
gaining traction in the Panhandle. With
the incessancy of a tomahawk chop,
its creators want to hammer it into the
Seminole Nation's conscience, to make
it burn in the bronze ears of Bobby
Bowden's statue.
With infomercial zeal, FSU tailbacks
James Wilder Jr. and Devonta Freeman
are plugging a "Wild and Free" backfield,
"WildFree" for short. Wilder has taken
the nickname to his coach for patenting.
"If he runs wild and free, I'm good,"
coach Jimbo Fisher said. "I'll call it
whatever he wants to call it."
The Seminoles have dual-back pack-
ages to accommodate their two top
returning rushers. And with new quar-
terback Jameis Winston taking over, a
"Wild and Free" look early could become
more base formation than buzzword.
Considering Freeman's speed and
low center of gravity, complemented by
Wilder's pile-moving force, the possibili-
ties are intriguing.
So is the nickname.
Off the field, Wilder, a former Plant
High prep All-American, insists the
"Wild" part of his off-field life is gone.
"I have no more strikes. I can't go out
and go do the things I was doing when
I was a freshman and a sophomore,"
said Wilder, 21, a junior and father of
an 8-month-old girl, Nala. "At the same
time, I'm a father now, so I have to ma-
ture up. It's time for me to grow up, and
I can't be going to jail and doing dumb
things like that."
For all his dazzling spurts, Wilder
enters his junior season with three times
as many arrests at FSU (three) as 100-
yard games.
All three occurred within 11 months,
from February 2012 to January of this
year. The most serious was came after he
was accused of shoving a police officer
trying to serve a warrant on an ex-girl-
friend (later reduced to a misdemeanor
resisting-arrest charge). Wilder was in
danger of regressing from can't-miss
player to cautionary tale.
By all accounts, he is contrite about
the recent past, focused on expiation
than excuses. At FSU's recent media day,
Wilder's remorse seemed as profound as
the tattoos slathered on his forearms.
"I'm already on, like, strike three. I
have no more strikes," Wilder said.
The evolution has been noticeable as
Wilder and Freeman find themselves
among the team's elder statesmen.
At media day, Fisher called Wilder
"a very vocal leader and a leader by
example."
"He loves ball. He loves being on that
field. You can't work him hard enough.
You can't practice long enough," Fisher
said.
"I mean, he would've played in the
throwback days when you used to have
those four-, five- or six-hour practices
and been happy."
Now, Seminoles fans are waiting for
Fisher to turn his brawny veteran loose
in a game, to give him a succession of
handoffs and watch him lower his head
for an extra yard, maybe drag a nickel-
back into the end zone the way he did at
Plant.

NOTE: This page contains material from Mike Huguenin of
NFL.com and Paul Tenorio of the Orlando Sentinel.


Florida State
running back
James Wilder Jr.
catches a pass
during a practice
at the team's
indoor training
facility in
Tallahassee in
mid-August.
Wilder, a junior,
insists his
wild off-field
behavior is in
the past and he
is ready for a
breakout junior
season.


FOUR GAMES TO WATCH


Al CLEMSON
I '. Il '
Ganie f the year in rthe
ACC The inner I lely
iinr thpe Alarinti:; and
be,:,npe ihe favorite
for the league's BCS
berth. Clemson WR
Sammy Watkins vs. the
Seminoles'secondary
should make for great
theater.


\S Su1i1 IsIs
I, 1 1 1
What il I happen offi
thie field :,f more
inrerei r ,"n [hir day
FSU will hold "Bobby
Bowden Day"-
former coach Bobby
Bowden returns as part
of the 20-year anni-
versary of the 1993
national title team.


\ M LlMI

F',I.I ha ,: ,ri 9 f
thrre par eiqhrt n r[he
(fer:e ri3varv MMiami
QB Stephen Morris
has a deep group of
receivers, so FSU's
secondary must play
well.


\1 FLORIDA
.. I l l '
Th ionre of the
nasr tSt rivalrine in
the nati:r n Can i l.I
contain Florida's pass
rushers? Can DT Timmy
Jernigan, who grew up
about 45 miles north
of UF's campus, disrupt
the Gators'rushing
attack?


F FOURTH DOWN


THE ESSENTIALS


HOME: Doak Campbell Stadium, Tallahassee COACH: Jimbo Fisher (4th season, 31-10)
TICKETS: 1-888-378-6653. Prices for remaining seats start at $220.
RADIO: 99.3 FM, 820 AM, 1040 AM ONLINE: http://www.seminoles.com
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast Conference PROJECTED ACC FINISH: 2nd in Atlantic
2012 REWIND: 12-2, 7-1 ACC (1st in Atlantic Division); beat Georgia Tech 21-15 in ACC title game; beat
Northern Illinois 31-10 in Orange Bowl
WHAT'S NEW: For only the second time since 1992, Florida State was not chosen to win at least a
share of the Atlantic Division. The season likely will come down to the showdown at Clemson on Oct.
19. The home team has won the last six games in the series, and Florida State hasn't won in Death
Valley since 2001. The Seminoles also play ACC newcomers Pitt (Sept. 1) and Syracuse (Nov. 16).
RETURNING STARTERS: 7 offense, 4 defense


FSU tries to run Wild





and Free through ACC


* Friday, August 30, 2013


Page 23


Il~lllll FFI mmIII


M=imm I






Fillda3 Au.ust ?I 0 20l


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SCHEDULES


AIR FORCE
A31 Colgate 3p.m.
S7 Utah St. 3:30 p.m.
S13 atBoiseSt. 9p.m.
S21 Wyoming TBA
S28 at Nevada 7:30 p.m.
05 at Navy 11:30 a.m.
010 San Diego St. 9p.m.
026 NotreDame 5 p.m.
N2 Army TBA
N8 at New Mexico 9p.m.
N21 UNLV 9:30 p.m.
N30 at Colorado St. TBA
AKRON
A29 at Central Florida 7p.m.
S7 James Madison 6p.m.
S14 at Michigan Noon
S21 La.-Lafayette 6 p.m.
S28 at Bowling Green TBA
05 Ohio 2p.m.
012 at N. Illinois 5p.m.
019 at Miami (Ohio) TBA
026 Ball St. Noon
N2 Kent St. 3:30p.m.
N16 atUMass 1 p.m.
N29 Toledo TBA
ALABAMA


AL
A31
S7
S21
S28
05
012
026
N2
N9
N16
N21
N30


A30
S7
S14
S28
010
019
026
N2
N9
N16
N23
N30


S5
S14
S21
S28
05
012
019
031
N9
N16
N23
N30


A31
S7
S14
S21
S28
05
012
019
N2
N9
N23
N29


A31
S7
S12
S21
S28
012
022
N2
N9
N16
N23
N30


SA30
S7
S14
S21
S28
05
012
019
N2
N9
N30
Dl14


SA31
S7
S14
S21
05
S012
019
026
N2
N9
N16
N30


A31
S14


ARMY
Morgan St. 7 p.m.
at Ball St. Noon
Stanford Noon
Wake Forest Noon
at La.Tech 3:30 p.m.
at Boston College TBA
E.Michigan Noon
atTemple TBA
at Air Force TBA
W. Kentucky Noon
at Hawaii TBA
Navy 3 p.m.
AUBURN
Washington St. 7p.m.
Arkansas St. 7:30p.m.
Mississippi St. 7 p.m.
at LSU TBA
Mississippi TBA
W.Carolina TBA
atTexasA&M TBA
FAU TBA
at Arkansas TBA
atTennessee TBA
Georgia TBA
Alabama TBA
BYU
atVirginia 3:30 p.m.
Texas 7p.m.
Utah TBA


VirginiaTech 5:30p.m. A31
atTexasA&M 3:30p.m. S7
Colorado St. TBA S21
Mississippi TBA S27
Georgia St. TBA 04
at Kentucky TBA 012
Arkansas TBA 019
Tennessee TBA 025
LSU TBA N9
at Mississippi St. TBA N16
Chattanooga TBA N23
at Auburn TBA N30
ABAMA BIRMINGHAM
at Troy 7p.m. A29
at LSU 7 p.m. S7
Northwestern St. TBA S14
atVanderbilt TBA S21
FAU TBA S28
at FlU TBA 05
atUTSA 5p.m. 012
MiddleTennessee 1 p.m. 019
at Marshall Noon 026
at East Carolina TBA N6
Rice 7:30p.m. iN13
Southern Miss. TBA N29
ARIZONA
N. Arizona 10p.m. A31
atUNLV 10:30 p.m. S7
UTSA TBA S21
atWashington TBA 05
at Southern Cal 10:30p.m. i 012
Utah TBA 019
at Colorado TBA 026
at California TBA N7
UCLA TBA N16
Washington St. TBA N23
Oregon TBA N30
at Arizona St. TBA D7
ARIZONA STATE
SacramentoSt. 10p.m. A31
Wisconsin 10:30p.m. S7
at Stanford TBA S13
Southern Cal TBA S20
NotreDame 7:30p.m. S28
Colorado TBA 012
Washington TBA 019
at Wash. St. 10:30p.m. 025
at Utah TBA N2
Oregon St. TBA N16
atUCLA TBA N23
Arizona TBA N30
ARKANSAS
La.-Lafayette 4 p.m. A31
Samford 7p.m. S6
Southern Miss. 12:21 p.m. S14
at Rutgers TBA S28
Texas A&M TBA 05
at Florida TBA 012
South Carolina TBA 026
at Alabama TBA N2
Auburn TBA N9
at Mississippi TBA N16
Mississippi St. TBA N23
at LSU 2:30 p.m. N30

ARKANSAS STATE
Ark.-Pine Bluff 7 p.m. A29
at Auburn 7:30p.m. S7
Troy 7:30 p.m. S14
at Memphis TBA S21
at Missouri TBA S28
Idaho TBA 05
La.-Lafayette 8p.m. 012
at South Alabama TBA 026
at La.-Monroe TBA N5
Texas St. TBA N12
Georgia St. TBA N23
atW. Kentucky 4p.m. N29


A31
S7
S14
S28
05
012
019
026
N5
N12
N19
N29


A31
S7
S14
S28
05
012
019
026
N2
N9
N16
N23


A29
S6
S14
S28
05
018
026
N9
N16
N21
N29
D7


BUFFALO
at Ohio St. Noon
at Baylor 3:30 p.m.
Stony Brook 3:30 p.m.
Connecticut 3:30 p.m.
E.Michigan Noon
atW. Michigan 2 p.m.
UMass 3:30 p.m.
at Kent St. TBA
Ohio 8p.m.
atToledo 7:30 p.m.
at Miami (Ohio) 8 p.m.
Bowling Green TBA
CALIFORNIA
Northwestern 10:30 p.m.
Portland St. 5 p.m.
Ohio St. 7 p.m.
at Oregon TBA
Washington St. TBA
at UCLA TBA
Oregon St. TBA
atWashington TBA
Arizona TBA
Southern Cal TBA
at Colorado TBA
at Stanford TBA
CENTRAL FLORIDA
Akron 7 p.m.
atFlU 8p.m.
at Penn St. 6p.m.
South Carolina TBA
at Memphis TBA
at Louisville TBA
Connecticut TBA
Houston TBA
atTemple TBA
Rutgers TBA
South Florida TBA
atSMU TBA


MiddleTennessee TBA
at Utah St. 8 p.m.
Georgia Tech TBA
at Houston TBA
BoiseSt. 8p.m.
atWisconsin TBA
Idaho St. TBA
at Notre Dame 3:30 p.m.
at Nevada 3p.m.
BALL STATE
Illinois St. 7 p.m.
Army Noon
at North Texas 4p.m.
at E. Michigan 1 p.m.
Toledo 3 p.m.
atVirginia TBA
Kent St. 3p.m.
atW. Michigan 2p.m.
at Akron Noon
Cent. Michigan 8 p.m.
at N. Illinois 8p.m.
Miami (Ohio) TBA
BAYLOR
Wofford 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo 3:30 p.m.
Louisiana-Monroe TBA
WestVirginia TBA
at Kansas St. TBA
Iowa St. TBA
at Kansas TBA
Oklahoma 7:30 p.m.
TexasTech TBA
at Oklahoma St. TBA
atTCU TBA
Texas TBA
BOISE STATE
atWashington 10p.m.
UT-Martin 3p.m.
Air Force 9 p.m.
at Fresno St. 9p.m.
Southern Miss. TBA
at Utah St. 7:30 p.m.
Nevada 8 p.m.
atBYU 8p.m.
at Colorado St. 8 p.m.
Wyoming TBA
at San Diego St.10:30 p.m.
New Mexico TBA
BOSTON COLLEGE
Villanova Noon
Wake Forest 8 p.m.
at Southern Cal TBA
Florida St. TBA
Army TBA
at Clemson TBA
at North Carolina TBA
VirginiaTech TBA
at New Mexico St. TBA
NC State TBA
at Maryland TBA
at Syracuse TBA
BOWLING GREEN
Tulsa 7 p.m.
at Kent St. Noon
at Indiana Noon
MurraySt. 3:30p.m.
Akron TBA
UMass 3:30 p.m.
at Mississippi St. TBA
Toledo TBA
at Miami (Ohio) 8p.m.
Ohio 7:30 p.m.
at E. Michigan 1 p.m.
at Buffalo TBA


DUKE
A31 NCCentral 4p.m. i
S7 at Memphis 4:30 p.m.
S14 GeorgiaTech 3:30p.m. .
S21 Pittsburgh TBA ..
S28 Troy TBA *:
012 Navy TBA ':
019 atVirginia TBA *
026 atVirginiaTech TBA I
N9 NC State TBA ,
N16 Miami TBA ih
N23 at Wake Forest TBA IF
N30 at North Carolina TBA I,
EASTERN MICHIGAN
A31 Howard 6p.m. ".i
S7 at Penn St. Noon
S14 at Rutgers 1p.m. .14
S21 Ball St. 1 p.m. .-
05 at Buffalo Noon *[,
012 atArmy Noon "
019 Ohio 1 p.m. *" i
026 atN. Illinois 3:30 p.m. ,[-.
N2 atToledo 7 p.m. F
N9 W.Michigan 1p.m. hi
N23 Bowling Green 1 p.m. i-
N29 at Cent. Michigan TBA I,
EAST CAROLINA
A31 Old Dominion 7p.m. 1
S5 FAU 7:30p.m. .14
S14 VirginiaTech Noon .i
S28 at North Carolina TBA ...
05 at Mid.Tennessee TBA
012 atTulane 3:30p.m.
019 Southern Miss. TBA
N2 atFlU TBA
N9 Tulsa TBA F
N16 UAB TBA II4
N23 at NC State TBA I-
N29 at Marshall Noon
FAU
A30 at Miami 8p.m.
S5 at East Carolina 7:30 p.m.
S14 at South Florida 7p.m. .
S21 MiddleTennessee TBA .
S28 at Rice 7p.m. ,.,
05 atUAB TBA ,],
012 Marshall 5p.m. ,.-.
026 at Auburn TBA I
N2 Tulane TBA ,
N16 at Southern Miss. TBA I.
N23 New Mexico St. TBA I-;
N29 FlU 3p.m. il,
FIU
A31 at Maryland 12:30 p.m. '.,
S6 Central Florida 8 p.m.
S14 Bethune-Cookman6 p.m. .
S21 at Louisville TBA .
05 at Southern Miss. TBA ,:
012 UAB TBA :
026 LouisianaTech TBA :-
N2 EastCarolina TBA *
N9 at Mid.Tennessee 5 p.m. I
N16 atUTEP TBA i,
N23 Marshall TBA I-
N29 at FAU 3p.m. l
FLORIDA
A31 Toledo 12:21 p.m. :
S7 at Miami Noon
S21 Tennessee TBA 14
S28 atKentucky TBA .
05 Arkansas TBA ..
012 atLSU TBA *:*
019 atMissouri TBA ,:il
N2 at Georgia 3:30p.m. ,.*-.
N9 Vanderbilt TBA I-
N16 at South Carolina TBA i,
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N30 Florida St. TBA i,
FLORIDA STATE
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S14 Nevada 3:30 p.m.
S21 Bethune-Cookman TBA 14
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05 Maryland TBA
019 atClemson TBA
026 NC State TBA
N2 Miami TBA i-
N9 atWake Forest TBA i,
N16 Syracuse TBA Ih
N23 Idaho TBA I-
N30 at Florida TBA I,
FRESNO STATE
A29 Rutgers 10:30 p.m.
S7 Cal Poly 10p.m.
S14 at Colorado 2p.m. 14
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N2 Nevada 7 p.m. i,
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4 at UNLV TBA
1 Toledo Noon
8 at NC State TBA
at Miami (Ohio) TBA
2 atOhio 2p.m.
9 N. Illinois 3p.m.
at Ball St. 8p.m.
6 atW. Michigan Noon
3 UMass 1 p.m.
9 E. Michigan TBA
CINCINNATI
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4 Northwestern St. TBA
1 at Miami (Ohio) TBA
at South Florida TBA
1 Temple TBA
9 Connecticut TBA
0 atMemphis 8p.m.
SMU TBA
6 at Rutgers TBA
3 at Houston TBA
Louisville 7:30 p.m.
CLEMSON
1 Georgia 8p.m.
SC State 12:30 p.m.
9 at NC State 7:30 p.m.
8 Wake Forest TBA
at Syracuse TBA
2 Boston College TBA
9 Florida St. TBA
6 at Maryland TBA
atVirginia TBA
4 GeorgiaTech 7:30p.m.
3 The Citadel TBA
0 at South Carolina TBA
COLORADO
at Colorado St. 6 p.m.
Cent. Arkansas 8 p.m.
4 Fresno St. 2 p.m.
8 at Oregon St. TBA
Oregon TBA
2 at Arizona St. TBA
6 Arizona TBA
at UCLA TBA
atWashington TBA
6 California TBA
3 Southern Cal TBA
0 at Utah TBA
CONNECTICUT
9 Towson 7:30 p.m.
4 Maryland TBA
1 Michigan TBA
B atBuffalo 3:30p.m.
2 South Florida TBA
9 at Cincinnati TBA
6 atCentral Florida TBA
Louisville TBA
6 at SMU TBA
3 atTemple TBA
0 Rutgers TBA
Memphis TBA


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3035 Trail,,PortC arlotte,, 35


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Open 7 DaysAWek-Mon.-^ISat.7a-6m;Sun. :30mvfvi4Spm


Page 24


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SFriday, August 30, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SCHEDULES


NORTHERN ILLINOIS
A31 at Iowa 3:30 p.m.
S14 at Idaho TBA
S21 E.Illinois 7p.m.
S28 at Purdue Noon
05 at Kent St. 3:30 p.m.
012 Akron 5 p.m.
019 atCent.Michigan 3 p.m.
026 E. Michigan 3:30 p.m.
N2 atUMass Noon
N13 Ball St. 8p.m.
N20 atToledo 8p.m.
N26 W.Michigan 7p.m.
NORTH CAROLINA STATE
A31 La.Tech 12:30 p.m.
S7 Richmond 6 p.m.
S19 Clemson 7:30 p.m.
S28 Cent. Michigan TBA
05 atWake Forest TBA
012 Syracuse TBA
026 at Florida St. TBA
N2 North Carolina TBA
N9 at Duke TBA
N16 at Boston College TBA
N23 East Carolina TBA
N30 Maryland TBA
NAVY
S7 at Indiana 6 p.m.
S14 Delaware 3:30 p.m.
S28 atW. Kentucky 7p.m.
05 AirForce 11:30a.m.
012 at Duke TBA
019 atToledo 7p.m.
026 Pittsburgh 1 p.m.
N2 at Notre Dame 3:30 p.m.
N9 Hawaii 3:30 p.m.
N16 South Alabama3:30 p.m.
N22 atSanJoseSt. 9:30p.m.
D14 atArmy 3 p.m.
NEBRASKA
A31 Wyoming 8p.m.
S7 Southern Miss. 6p.m.
S14 UCLA Noon
S21 S.Dakota St. TBA
05 Illinois Noon
012 at Purdue TBA
026 at Minnesota TBA
N2 Northwestern TBA
N9 at Michigan TBA
N16 Michigan St. TBA
N23 at Penn St. TBA
N29 Iowa Noon
NEVADA
A31 at UCLA 10 p.m.
S7 UC Davis TBA
S14 atFloridaSt. 3:30p.m.
S21 Hawaii TBA
S28 Air Force 7:30 p.m.
04 atSanDiegoSt. 9p.m.
019 at Boise St. 8p.m.
026 UNLV TBA
N2 at Fresno St. 7p.m.
N9 at Colorado St. TBA
N16 San Jose St. TBA
N30 BYU 3 p.m.
NEW MEXICO
A31 UTSA 8 p.m.
S7 at UTEP 8 p.m.
S14 atPittsburgh 12:30p.m.
S28 UNLV 8p.m.
05 New Mexico St. 6p.m.
012 atWyoming TBA
019 Utah St. 6p.m.
N2 at San Diego St. TBA
N8 Air Force 9 p.m.
N16 Colorado St. 3p.m.
N23 at Fresno St. 7 p.m.
N30 at Boise St. TBA
NEW MEXIco STATE
A31 atTexas 8 p.m.
S7 Minnesota 8 p.m.
S14 UTEP 8p.m.
S21 at UCLA TBA
S28 San Diego St. 8 p.m.
05 at New Mexico 6p.m.
019 Rice 8p.m.
026 Abilene Christian 8p.m.
N2 at La.-Lafayette TBA
N9 Boston College TBA
N23 atFAU TBA
N30 Idaho TBA
NORTH CAROLINA
A29 at South Carolina 6p.m.
S7 Mid.Tenn. 12:30p.m.
S21 at Georgia Tech TBA
S28 East Carolina TBA
05 at Virginia Tech TBA
017 Miami TBA
026 Boston College TBA
N2 at NC State TBA
N9 Virginia TBA
N16 at Pittsburgh TBA
N23 Old Dominion TBA
N30 Duke TBA


NORTHWESTERN
A31 atCalifornia 10:30p.m.
S7 Syracuse 6 p.m.
S14 W.Michigan 9p.m.
S21 Maine TBA
05 Ohio St. 8 p.m.
012 atWisconsin 3:30p.m.
019 Minnesota TBA
026 at Iowa TBA
N2 at Nebraska TBA
N16 Michigan TBA
N23 Michigan St. TBA
N30 at Illinois TBA
NOTRE DAME
A31 Temple 3:30 p.m.
S7 at Michigan 8 p.m.
S14 at Purdue 8p.m.
S21 Michigan St. 3:30p.m.
S28 Oklahoma 3:30 p.m.
05 at Arizona St. 7:30 p.m.
019 Southern Cal 7:30 p.m.
026 at Air Force 5 p.m.
N2 Navy 3:30 p.m.
N9 at Pittsburgh TBA
N23 BYU 3:30p.m.
N30 at Stanford TBA
OHIO
S1 at Louisville 3:30 p.m.
S7 North Texas 7 p.m.
S14 Marshall 8p.m.
S21 Austin Peay 2 p.m.
05 at Akron 2 p.m.
012 Cent. Michigan 2p.m.
019 at E.Michigan 1 p.m.
026 Miami (Ohio) 2 p.m.
N5 at Buffalo 8p.m.
N12 at Bowling Green7:30 p.m.
N19 Kent St. 8p.m.
N29 UMass TBA
OHIO STATE
A31 Buffalo Noon
S7 San Diego St. 3:30p.m.
S14 atCalifornia 7p.m.
S21 Florida A&M TBA
S28 Wisconsin 8 p.m.
05 at Northwestern 8p.m.
019 Iowa 3:30 p.m.
026 Penn St. 8p.m.
N2 at Purdue TBA
N16 atlllinois TBA
N23 Indiana TBA
N30 at Michigan TBA
OKLAHOMA
A31 Louisiana-Monroe7 p.m.
S7 West Virginia 7 p.m.
S14 Tulsa Noon
S28 at Notre Dame 3:30 p.m.
05 TCU TBA
012 Texas TBA
019 at Kansas TBA
026 Texas Tech TBA
N7 at Baylor 7:30 p.m.
N16 Iowa St. TBA
N23 at Kansas St. TBA
D7 at Oklahoma St. TBA
OKLAHOMA STATE
A31 Mississippi St. 3:30p.m.
S7 at UTSA Noon
S14 Lamar 7:30 p.m.
S28 atWestVirginia TBA
05 Kansas St. TBA
019 TCU TBA
026 at Iowa St. TBA
N2 atTexasTech TBA
N9 Kansas TBA
N16 atTexas TBA
N23 Baylor TBA
D7 Oklahoma TBA
OREGON
A31 Nicholls St. 4p.m.
S7 atVirginia 3:30 p.m.
S14 Tennessee 3:30 p.m.
S28 California TBA
05 at Colorado TBA
012 atWashington TBA
019 Washington St. TBA
026 UCLA TBA
N7 at Stanford 9p.m.
N16 Utah TBA
N23 at Arizona TBA
N29 Oregon St. 7p.m.
OREGON STATE
A31 E.Washington 6 p.m.
S7 Hawaii 8 p.m.
S14 at Utah 10 p.m.
S21 at San Diego St.7:30 p.m.
S28 Colorado TBA
012 atWashington St. TBA
019 atCalifornia TBA
026 Stanford TBA
N1 Southern Cal 9 p.m.
N16 atArizona St. TBA
N23 Washington TBA
N29 atOregon 7p.m.


PENN STATE
at Syracuse 3:30 p.m.
E.Michigan Noon
Central Florida 6p.m.
Kent St. TBA
at Indiana TBA
2 Michigan 5 p.m.
6 at Ohio St. 8p.m.
Illinois TBA
at Minnesota TBA
6 Purdue TBA
3 Nebraska TBA
) atWisconsin TBA
PITTSBURGH
Florida St. 8 p.m.
New Mexico 12:30p.m.
at Duke TBA
Virginia TBA
2 atVirginia Tech TBA
) Old Dominion TBA
6 at Navy 1 p.m.
at Georgia Tech TBA
Notre Dame TBA
6 North Carolina TBA
3 at Syracuse TBA
) Miami TBA
PURDUE
at Cincinnati Noon
Indiana St. Noon
Notre Dame 8p.m.
at Wisconsin TBA
N. Illinois Noon
2 Nebraska TBA
) at Michigan St. TBA
Ohio St. TBA
Iowa TBA
6 at Penn St. TBA
3 Illinois TBA
) at Indiana TBA
RICE
atTexasA&M 1 p.m.
Kansas 7:30 p.m.
Houston 3 p.m.
FAU 7 p.m.
atTulsa 3:30 p.m.
2 at UTSA 4p.m.
) at New Mexico St. 8 p.m.
6 UTEP TBA
I at NorthTexas 7:30p.m.
6 LouisianaTech 7p.m.
1 at UAB 7:30 p.m.
) Tulane 3 p.m.
RUTGERS
) atFresnoSt. 10:30p.m.
Norfolk St. Noon
E.Michigan 1p.m.
Arkansas TBA
at SMU TBA
) at Louisville TBA
6 Houston TBA
Temple Noon
6 Cincinnati TBA
1 at Central Florida TBA
) at Connecticut TBA
South Florida TBA
SMU
) TexasTech 8p.m.
Montana St. 8 p.m.
atTexas A&M TBA
atTCU TBA
Rutgers TBA
) at Memphis TBA
6 Temple TBA
at Cincinnati TBA
6 Connecticut TBA
3 at South Florida TBA
) at Houston TBA
Central Florida TBA
SAN DIEGO STATE
E.Illinois 8p.m.
at Ohio St. 3:30 p.m.
Oregon St. 7:30 p.m.
at New Mexico St. 8 p.m.
Nevada 9p.m.
) at Air Force 9p.m.
6 Fresno St. TBA
New Mexico TBA
at San Jose St. 10:30 p.m.
6 at Hawaii 10:30 p.m.
3 Boise St. 10:30 p.m.
) at UNLV TBA
SAN JOSE STATE
) Sacramento St. 10p.m.
at Stanford 11 p.m.
at Minnesota TBA
Utah St. 9p.m.
at Hawaii TBA
2 at Colorado St. 3:30 p.m.
6 Wyoming TBA
at UNLV TBA
San Diego St. 10:30 p.m.
6 at Nevada TBA
2 Navy 9:30 p.m.
) FresnoSt. 3:30p.m.


SOUTH ALABAMA
A29 S.Utah 7:30 p.m.
S7 atTulane 3:30 p.m.
S14 W.Kentucky 7:30p.m.
S28 atTennessee TBA
05 at Troy 1 p.m.
019 Kent St. TBA
026 at Texas St. 7p.m.
N2 Arkansas St. TBA
N16 at Navy 3:30 p.m.
N23 Louisiana-Monroe TBA
N30 at Georgia St. 2p.m.
D7 Louisiana-Lafayette TBA
SOUTH CAROLINA
A29 North Carolina 6 p.m.
S7 at Georgia 4:30 p.m.
S14 Vanderbilt 7p.m.
S28 at Central Florida TBA
05 Kentucky TBA
012 at Arkansas TBA
019 atTennessee TBA
026 at Missouri TBA
N2 Mississippi St. TBA
N16 Florida TBA
N23 Coastal Carolina TBA
N30 Clemson TBA
SOUTH FLORIDA
A31 McNeese St. 7 p.m.
S7 at Michigan St. Noon
S14 FAU 7p.m.
S28 Miami TBA
05 Cincinnati TBA
012 at Connecticut TBA
026 Louisville TBA
031 at Houston TBA
N16 Memphis TBA
N23 SMU TBA
N29 at Central Florida TBA
D7 at Rutgers TBA
SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
A31 Texas St. 7p.m.
S7 at Nebraska 6 p.m.
S14 atArkansas 12:21 p.m.
S28 at Boise St. TBA
05 FlU TBA
019 at East Carolina TBA
026 North Texas 7p.m.
N2 at Marshall 12:30p.m.
N9 at LouisianaTech 7p.m.
N16 FAU TBA
N23 MiddleTennessee TBA
N30 at UAB TBA
STANFORD
S7 San Jose St. 11 p.m.
S14 at Army Noon
S21 Arizona St. TBA
S28 atWashington St. TBA
05 Washington TBA
012 at Utah TBA
019 UCLA TBA
026 at Oregon St. TBA
N7 Oregon 9 p.m.
N16 at Southern Cal TBA
N23 California TBA
N30 Notre Dame TBA
SYRACUSE
A31 Penn St. 3:30p.m.
S7 at Northwestern 6 p.m.
S14 Wagner 4p.m.
S21 Tulane TBA
05 Clemson TBA
012 at NC State TBA
019 at Georgia Tech TBA
N2 Wake Forest TBA
N9 at Maryland TBA
N16 at Florida St. TBA
N23 Pittsburgh TBA
N30 Boston College TBA
TCU
A31 LSU 9gp.m.
S7 SE Louisiana Noon
S12 atTexasTech 7:30 p.m.
S28 SMU TBA
05 at Oklahoma TBA
012 Kansas TBA
019 at Oklahoma St. TBA
026 Texas TBA
N2 WestVirginia TBA
N9 at Iowa St. TBA
N16 at Kansas St. TBA
N30 Baylor TBA
TEMPLE
A31 at Notre Dame 3:30 p.m.
S7 Houston Noon
S14 Fordham TBA
S28 at Idaho TBA
05 Louisville TBA
011 at Cincinnati TBA
019 Army TBA
026 at SMU TBA
N2 at Rutgers Noon
N16 Central Florida TBA
N23 Connecticut TBA
N30 at Memphis TBA


14242 Tamiami Trail *North Port, FL *941-564-8674


TENNESSEE
A31 Austin Peay 6p.m.
S7 W.Kentucky 12:21 p.m.
S14 atOregon 3:30p.m.
S21 at Florida TBA
S28 South Alabama TBA
05 Georgia TBA
019 South Carolina TBA
026 at Alabama TBA
N2 at Missouri TBA
N9 Auburn TBA
N23 Vanderbilt TBA
N30 at Kentucky TBA
TEXAS
A31 New Mexico St. 8 p.m.
S7 at BYU 7 p.m.
S14 Mississippi 8p.m.
S21 Kansas St. TBA
03 at Iowa St. 7:30 p.m.
012 at Oklahoma TBA
026 atTCU TBA
N2 Kansas TBA
N9 atWestVirginia TBA
N16 Oklahoma St. TBA
N28 TexasTech 7:30 p.m.
D7 at Baylor TBA
TEXAS A&M
A31 Rice 1 p.m.
S7 Sam Houston St. 7 p.m.
S14 Alabama 3:30p.m.
S21 SMU TBA
S28 at Arkansas TBA
012 at Mississippi TBA
019 Auburn TBA
026 Vanderbilt TBA
N2 UTEP TBA
N9 Mississippi St. TBA
N23 at LSU TBA
N30 at Missouri TBA
TEXAS EL PASO
S7 New Mexico 8 p.m.
S14 at New Mexico St. 8 p.m.
S21 UTSA 8p.m.
S28 at Colorado St. 3:30 p.m.
05 LouisianaTech 7:30 p.m.
012 Tulsa TBA
026 at Rice TBA
N2 atTexasA&M TBA
N9 at NorthTexas 3:30p.m.
N16 FlU TBA
N23 atTulane 3:30 p.m.
N30 at Mid.Tennessee TBA
TEXAS SAN ANTONIO
A31 at New Mexico 8 p.m.
S7 Oklahoma St. Noon
S14 at Arizona TBA
S21 at UTEP 8 p.m.
S28 Houston TBA
05 at Marshall 2 p.m.
012 Rice 4p.m.
026 UAB 5 p.m.
N2 atTulsa TBA
N9 Tulane TBA
N23 atNorthTexas 3:30p.m.
N30 Louisiana Tech TBA
TEXAS TECH
A30 at SMU 8p.m.
S7 Stephen F.Austin 7p.m.
S12 TCU 7:30 p.m.
S21 Texas St. 7 p.m.
05 at Kansas TBA
012 Iowa St. TBA
019 atWestVirginia TBA
026 at Oklahoma TBA
N2 Oklahoma St. TBA
N9 Kansas St. TBA
N16 at Baylor TBA
N28 atTexas 7:30 p.m.
TOLEDO
A31 at Florida 12:21 p.m.
S7 at Missouri 3:30 p.m.
S14 E.Washington 7p.m.
S21 at Cent. Michigan Noon
S28 at Ball St. 3 p.m.
05 W.Michigan 3p.m.
019 Navy 7p.m.
026 at Bowling Green TBA
N2 E.Michigan 7p.m.
N12 Buffalo 7:30 p.m.
N20 N.Illinois 8p.m.
N29 at Akron TBA


TROY
UAB 7 p.m.
Savannah St. 7 p.m.
at Arkansas St. 7:30 p.m.
at Mississippi St. TBA
at Duke TBA
South Alabama 1 p.m.
at Georgia St. 2 p.m.
at W. Kentucky 4p.m.
La.-Monroe 7:30 p.m.
at La.-Lafayette7:30 p.m.
at Mississippi TBA
Texas St. TBA
TULANE
Jackson St. 8 p.m.
South Alabama3:30 p.m.
at La.Tech 7:30 p.m.
at Syracuse TBA
at La.-Monroe TBA
North Texas 3:30 p.m.
East Carolina 3:30 p.m.
Tulsa 3:30 p.m.
at FAU TBA
at UTSA TBA
UTEP 3:30p.m.
at Rice 3 p.m.
TULSA
at Bowling Green 7 p.m.
Colorado St. 7 p.m.
at Oklahoma Noon
Iowa St. 7:30 p.m.
Rice 3:30 p.m.
at UTEP TBA
atTulane 3:30 p.m.
UTSA TBA
at East Carolina TBA
Marshall 7:30 p.m.
at LouisianaTech 7p.m.
North Texas TBA
UCLA
Nevada 10 p.m.
at Nebraska Noon
New Mexico St. TBA
at Utah 10 p.m.
California TBA
at Stanford TBA
at Oregon TBA
Colorado TBA
at Arizona TBA
Washington 9p.m.
Arizona St. TBA
at Southern Cal TBA
UNLV
at Minnesota 7 p.m.
Arizona 10:30 p.m.
Cent. Michigan TBA
W. Illinois TBA
at New Mexico 8 p.m.
Hawaii TBA
at Fresno St. 10 p.m.
at Nevada TBA
San Jose St. TBA
Utah St. TBA
at Air Force 9:30 p.m.
San Diego St. TBA
UTAH
Utah St. 8 p.m.
Weber St. 2 p.m.
Oregon St. 10 p.m.
atBYU TBA
UCLA 10 p.m.
Stanford TBA
at Arizona TBA
at Southern Cal TBA
Arizona St. TBA
at Oregon TBA
atWashington St. TBA
Colorado TBA
UTAH STATE
at Utah 8 p.m.
at Air Force 3:30 p.m.
Weber St. 8 p.m.
at Southern Cal TBA
at San Jose St. 9p.m.
BYU 8p.m.
Boise St. 7:30 p.m.
at New Mexico 6 p.m.
Hawaii 4 p.m.
at UNLV TBA
Colorado St. 3:30 p.m.
Wyoming 2 p.m.


VANDERBILT
A29 Mississippi 9:15 p.m.
S7 Austin Peay 7:30 p.m.
S14 atSouthCarolina 7p.m.
S21 at UMass Noon
S28 UAB TBA
05 Missouri TBA
019 Georgia TBA
026 atTexas A&M TBA
N9 at Florida TBA
N16 Kentucky TBA
N23 atTennessee TBA
N30 Wake Forest TBA
VIRGINIA
A31 BYU 3:30 p.m.
S7 Oregon 3:30 p.m.
S21 VMI TBA
S28 at Pittsburgh TBA
05 Ball St. TBA
012 at Maryland TBA
019 Duke TBA
026 Georgia Tech TBA
N2 Clemson TBA
N9 at North Carolina TBA
N23 at Miami TBA
N30 Virginia Tech TBA
VIRGINIA TECH
A31 at Alabama 5:30 p.m.
S7 W.Carolina 1:30 p.m.
S14 at East Carolina Noon
S21 Marshall TBA
S26 atGeorgiaTech7:30 p.m.
05 North Carolina TBA
012 Pittsburgh TBA
026 Duke TBA
N2 at Boston College TBA
N9 at Miami TBA
N16 Maryland TBA
N30 atVirginia TBA
WESTERN KENTUCKY
A31 at Kentucky 7p.m.
S7 atTennessee 12:21 p.m.
S14 atS.Alabama 7:30p.m.
S21 Morgan St. 7p.m.
S28 Navy 7 p.m.
03 at La.-Monroe 8:30 p.m.
015 La.-Lafayette 8p.m.
026 Troy 4 p.m.
N2 at Georgia St. 2 p.m.
N9 at Army Noon
N23 atTexas St. TBA
N30 Arkansas St. 4p.m.
WESTERN MICHIGAN
A30 at Michigan St. 8p.m.
S7 Nicholls St. 7 p.m.
S14 at Northwestern 9p.m.
S21 at Iowa TBA
S28 Kent St. 7p.m.
05 atToledo 3 p.m.
012 Buffalo 2 p.m.
019 Ball ISt. 2 p.m.
026 atUMass 3 p.m.
N9 at E.Michigan 1 p.m.
N16 Cent. Michigan Noon
N26 at N.Illinois 7p.m.
Wake Forest
A29 Presbyterian 6:30 p.m.
S6 at Boston College 8 p.m.
S14 La.-Monroe 12:30p.m.
S21 atArmy Noon
S28 at Clemson TBA
05 NC State TBA
019 Maryland TBA
026 at Miami TBA
N2 at Syracuse TBA
N9 Florida St. TBA
N23 Duke TBA
N30 atVanderbilt TBA
WASHINGTON
A31 BoiseSt. 10p.m.
S14 atIllinois 6p.m.
S21 Idaho St. TBA
S28 Arizona TBA
05 at Stanford TBA
012 Oregon TBA
019 atArizona St. TBA
026 California TBA
N9 Colorado TBA
N15 at UCLA 9p.m.
N23 at Oregon St. TBA
N29 Washington St.3:30 p.m.


WASHINGTON STATE
A31 at Auburn 7p.m.
S7 at Southern Cal 10:30 p.m.
S14 S.Utah TBA
S21 Idaho TBA
S28 Stanford TBA
05 at California TBA
012 Oregon St. TBA
019 atOregon TBA
031 Arizona St. 10:30 p.m.
N16 at Arizona TBA
N23 Utah TBA
N29 atWashington 3:30p.m.
WEST VIRGINIA
A31 William &Mary Noon
S7 at Oklahoma 7 p.m.
S14 Georgia St. Noon
S21 at Maryland TBA
S28 Oklahoma St. TBA
05 at Baylor TBA
019 TexasTech TBA
026 at Kansas St. TBA
N2 atTCU TBA
N9 Texas TBA
N16 at Kansas TBA
N30 Iowa St. TBA
WISCONSIN
A31 UMass Noon
S7 TennesseeTech Noon
S14 atArizonaSt. 10:30p.m.
S21 Purdue TBA
S28 at Ohio St. 8p.m.
012 Northwestern 3:30 p.m.
019 atIllinois 8p.m.
N2 at Iowa TBA
N9 BYU TBA
N16 Indiana TBA
N23 at Minnesota TBA
N30 Penn St. TBA
COLORADO STATE
S1 Colorado 6 p.m.
S7 atTulsa 7 p.m.
S14 Cal Poly TBA
S21 atAlabama TBA
S28 UTEP 3:30 p.m.
012 San Jose St. 3:30 p.m.
019 atWyoming TBA
026 at Hawaii TBA
N2 Boise St. 8 p.m.
N9 Nevada TBA
N16 at New Mexico 3p.m.
N23 at Utah St. 3:30 p.m.
N30 Air Force TBA
SOUTHERN CAL
A29 at Hawaii 11 p.m.
S7 Wash.St. 10:30p.m.
S14 Boston College TBA
S21 Utah St. TBA
S28 atArizona St. TBA
010 Arizona 10:30 p.m.
019 at Notre Dame 7:30 p.m.
026 Utah TBA
N1 at Oregon St. 9p.m.
N9 at California TBA
N16 Stanford TBA
N23 at Colorado TBA
N30 UCLA TBA
BETHUNE-COOKMAN
S1 at Tennessee St. 8p.m.
S7 Virginia Union 4p.m.
S14 at FIU 6p.m.
S21 at Florida State TBA
05 at Delaware St. 2p.m.
012 at Howard 1 p.m.
019 Savannah State 4 p.m.
026 S.Carolina State 4 p.m.
N2 at N.C.Central Noon
N9 Norfolk State 4p.m.
N16 Hampton 4p.m.
FLORIDA A&M
S1 vs. Miss.Valley St.*11:45am.
S7 Tennessee State 2p.m.
S14 Samford 2 p.m.
S21 at Ohio State TBA
05 at Morgan State 1 p.m.
012 at Savannah St. 6p.m.
019 Howard 2 p.m.
026 North Carolina A&T 2 p.m.
N2 at Norfolk St. 2p.m.
N9 at S.Carolina St. 1:30 p.m.
N16 Delaware State 2 p.m.
N23 vs.B.-Cookman* 2 p.m.


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Page 25


IUNS* RIFLES*SHOTGUNS LARGE INVENTORY
OF HIGH QUALITY
DIAMONDS
AND FINE JEWELRY!



SELECTION
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COLLEGE FOOTBALL


SEC


FIRST DOWN
FOUR TEAMS TO WATCH

MISSISSIPPI
The Rebels won seven games in Hugh Freeze's first
season, including the BBVA Compass Bowl. Freeze made
bigger waves with a highly touted recruiting class. Back
are QB Bo Wallace and LB Denzel Nkemdiche.

TEXAS A&M
Alabama might be the team to beat nationally after
claiming three of the past four championships, but
Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel and Texas A&M
are in pursuit. The Aggies were the only team to beat
the Tide last season.

SOUTH CAROLINA
Coach Steve Spurrier, in humble-confident mode: "We
may fall flat on our face, but that's what we're going to
try to do, try to win the conference."

VANDERBILT
Coming off their best record since 1915, the
Commodores finished 9-4. Back-to-back bowl games are
also a first for the Commodores, who have gone from
doormats to respected foe under the ever-confident
James Franklin.



E SECOND DOWN
FOUR GAMES TO WATCH

Sept. 7: South Carolina at Georgia
The SEC opener for both teams that could ultimately
decide the East Division champion. No pressure.

Sept. 14: Alabama at Texas A&M
In one of the most anticipated SEC games in recent
years, Alabama will try to avenge last season's lone loss.

Oct. 12: Florida at LSU
A must-win for the Gators in the middle of a stretch in
which they play at home once in five weeks.

Nov. 9: LSU at Alabama
Possibly the SEC's marquee matchup. The Tigers have
won five of nine with three OT games. The average
regular-season margin in that span is 5.5 points.


THIRD DOWN
AP's PROJECTED ORDER OF FINISH


1. Georgia
2. South Carolina
3. Florida
4. Vanderbilt
5. Missouri
6. Tennessee
7. Kentucky


WEST
1. Alabama *
2. Texas A&M
3. LSU
4. Mississippi
5. Auburn
6. Mississippi State
7. Arkansas
*Conference champion


I FOURTH DOWN
BOWL SCHEDULE
Bowl Date, time Site Opp.
Music City Dec. 30, 3p.m. Nashville ACC
AdvoCareVIOO Dec. 31,12:30 p.m. Shreveport ACC
Liberty Dec.31,4p.m. Memphis C-USA
Chick-fil-A Dec.31,8p.m. Atlanta ACC
Gator Jan. 1,noon Jacksonville Big Ten
Capital One Jan. 1,1 p.m. Orlando Big Ten
Outback Jan. 1,1 p.m. Tampa Big Ten
Sugar Jan. 2,8:30 p.m. New Orleans BCS
Cotton Jan. 3,8 p.m. Arlington Big 12
BBVA Compass Jan. 4,1 p.m. Birmingham AAC
BCStitle Jan. 6,8:30 p.m. Pasadena BCS 1-2


South Carolina's Jadeveon Clowney is hugged by a teammate after a sack against Clemson in November. The junior loves to fish, still says "Yes, sir,"
and "No, ma'am," and is receiving plenty of preseason Heisman candidate buzz.




Clowney prepares for his




final collegiate hit parade


By PETE IACOBELLI THREE OTHERS TO \V


A ,, I I' l I
ROCK IIII.I. 1.,( --llmr
the NFI
W heil l.h.id .,n ( \i, \ l \
is crun, nlIll. \ niu u .iv I, i .ii
team 's U,I nri ,i> k. k, it'ini -
izing its, ilit-. iVtr I,1 .k1 s.
knocking li r lirltil, nill
its ball ,..111 ii-, .in,.l singilr-
handecl\ ..., I i snilE, rii s-t'
to fall api, I. hlint, ililt NI I.
Because ihlt hIr._tl I|n1hi .Is
itsteamsl Iii nn i.l. ll.
players Ihi .ilit. Ir-, ili.in
three y,.ln, im, i ,,.,.l I, inm
high schn .. 1.( 1,iont.r\ is ba>.-k
in South ( .i I liun.i l pupir iiI I.
for his juininI s-.-I stl II t111
for the I ubI-. ( In il n.\ lk l\
would ]lVr hI-iin lihr NI 1
selection iln I l,i s-iii lil s.|I,itI
Inste.t.i. lir's .it b ieu r i' n
m onthsi 1 l i.II.lill h 1,i\
frombrin, ilit. Inii pi.k ill
next ye.nis .lll
Heck. ( I i~ i iV\ u.,ilu.I i.lvi
been dit.liid I l u 11111 nI l
South I'niiii, I hIi ,,lih .. I .nt
where ilus d.hrhlsiI|n,l,-, .i, h
rememberis ilir iIt r-skiiin\
end sendii.in, .1 lItlmt- Ii \in1
the firsi limt1 litl 'SIPllP.li nil
theprat I..- lirlh.I tiiIh li. lr
varsity .i, i iiit i i*i. ii.lri
"YoU w .I.ll srtr.ltI,.hll. n11 1 ,"
ZackSni\.hl-l s,.i. I|. hrrln
watching~ iI.i I, \ti.us
Sndyrsi i'i,ni linr ( I in |lr\
has been in ilir h ,I s Iiiii_|
since g idt.h- s .lih I I 11.11's
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6-foot-, z. l7 1-pi d .\ll-
Americain liis sn I.1 hirrn
able to .lind.l h. II.. llr ni n I ,ii
that comros till hi.in,.. I
Heisman l i tli\ ,. nill'lh'
and the mini irspni'sibh.i
for"ThrE III" ii|, lunmhl'-
inducing,. lint-Im-|-pi|ppin,.
tackle in IlIl.()4iuh.i.k Inil ,I
that is s ill di,.i I-Iititgi. .lis


D,,.I, \ BECKHIL-M

irhe i 2-i:. 2 12-poundr
>iphi.,n ,ire raj:. e,
up 21 :.a hes for 2:,
v3arf arnd fiur i ulr.h.i
iniwrin in the rinal nIive
anTe laNi Cea ri


AT A GLANCE


S i iH JENKINS

I II I lil-li i. l i-r r
i h- 1 F ri hr, -rll ,un I


J1. llu ll, J. I ,


T.]

Hl the
ac thei
I .rehn,

2<:jnir


TH (f (fil l. ,


DEFENDING CHAMPION: Alat,ama
PROJECTED CHAMPION: Alatama
WHAT'S NEW: lhe. .EC i i Caded wvih frehnmen vho have th[e po,
enmerigej a arc Micicippi DoE F:,tert rl njihi:he Di Lia3on:r H,
Laqu'in ireadivell FI:' ridaC (B Verrionr Harlreave and 1 (1 Carl Lawi
anrd Chri Jorine s I ,Miiippi M. reli
WHAT'S NOT: f'linrv i hoeadhliner are on the field tartinrj ar qu
Geo:rijac Aarrni Murray ie.p Ac.Mc J.olrhnnyv Manriel ai3d Albtama
plus a t'urantv i of d3arnleru re,:enier Geori'ia c lcijo Gurlev a3ri Al
ieldj':ri I atiee l:' ei are super: :phin're rtilta 3. D efen elv i
.jijeveon Cl'rneiv and Crimncon hide LB ( .I Monelv lead thre vayv
the 'E. ample hope that the league :an nairitain icr eerri-ve r I
rial rinatrl ihamnipicri hip
LAST WORD: iherei n rellhn vrh:hrn ream girl rc :noe fron
the amount of talrint Ge:rga defere ernd, Garri.n 'i ith


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11101116...~ -~~11~11111


Page 26


Fdav Au.u.t ?.0 2I1 l





Frdy uut3,21 ae2


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


ACC


FIRST DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH
TAJH BOYD
Clemson Quarterback
The reigning conference player of the year has passed
for a 7,724 yards and 69 touchdowns in his first two
seasons and rushed for 10 touchdowns in 2012 more
than all but four ACC players.

JEREMY CASH
Duke Safety
The Ohio State transfer who will look to improve a
defense that allowed at least 41 points to six of its final
seven opponents.

DUKE JOHNSON
Miami Running back
He averaged 6.8 yards per carry as a freshman last year
and will figure more prominently into the passing game
and continue to serve as a lethal kick returned.

SAMMY WATKINS
Clemson 3 Receiver
With DeAndre
Hopkins gone, a
return by the South
Fort Myers graduate
to the stellar
statistics of 1,219
yards on 82 recep-
tions in his freshman
season with the
Tigers is expected.



SECOND DOWN
-FouR GAMES TO WATCH

Aug. 31: Virginia Tech vs. Alabama
The ACC's first chance to raise its profile comes when the
Hokies take on defending national champion Alabama
in the Chick-Fil-A Kickoff at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta.
The league went 4-11 last season against the four other
heavyweight leagues and went winless in four final-
week games with the Southeastern Conference.

Aug. 31: Georgia at Clemson
An old rivalry will be renewed in Death Valley when two
top 10 teams battle in Week 1, the second big ACC-SEC
showdown in the regular season.

Oct. 19: Florida State at Clemson
This game likely will decide the Atlantic Division race
but also the ACC title and possibly even a spot in the
final BCS title game. The home team has won six
consecutive years.

Nov. 30: Georgia at Georgia Tech
Another perception game with the SEC. The preseason
perception: Georgia Tech doesn't have a chance. Georgia
has won four in a row and 11 of 12.



THIRD DOWN
AP's PROJECTED ORDER OF FINISH


ATLANTIC
1. Clemson*
2. Florida State
3. N.C. State
4. Wake Forest
5. Maryland
6. Syracuse
7. Boston College


COASTAL
1. Miami
2. Virginia Tech
3. North Carolina
4. Georgia Tech
5. Pittsburgh
6. Virginia
7. Duke
* Conference champion


B FOURTH DOWN
BOWL SCHEDULE


Bowl
Military
Belk
Russell Athletic
Music City
AdvoCare V100
Sun
Chick-fil-A
Orange


Date, time
Dec. 27, 2:30 p.m.
Dec. 28, 3:20 p.m.
Dec. 28, 6:45 p.m.
Dec. 30, 3:15 p.m.
Dec. 31, 12:30 p.m.
Dec. 31, 2 p.m.
Dec. 31, 8 p.m.
Jan. 3,TBD


Site Opp.
Annapolis C-USA
Charlotte American
Orlando American
Nashville SEC
Shreveport SEC
El Paso ACC
Atlanta SEC
Miami BCS


Clemson quarterback Tajh Boyd returns as the conference's most likely Heisman Trophy contender after earning the ACC's player of the year honors
last year. To deliver on that potential, Boyd and the Tigers must avoid another pratfall in a season of high expectations.




Clemson could give ACC's




reputation a needed boost


By JOEDY McCREARY
ASSOCIATED PRESS
GREENSBORO, N.C.
- The Atlantic Coast
Conference got bigger. Now
it's time to find out if it got
better.
Syracuse and Pittsburgh
are finally in after nearly
two years of Big East purga-
tory, bringing the ACC up
to 14 teams and helping to
solidify its status as a power
conference.
The league has plenty of
things going for it, including
coaching stability.
None of the ACC's
coaches appear to be in
serious danger of being fired
- at least, not yet. Twelve of
the 14 schools have changed
coaches since 2007, and
the other two -Virginia
Tech's Frank Beamer and
Wake Forest's Jim Grobe
- are institutions on their
campuses.
But that's not to say they
aren't feeling any pressure.
A fifth consecutive losing
season for Grobe would
make that 2006 Orange Bowl
run feel like a lifetime ago,
and all eyes in Blacksburg
are on Beamer's overhauled
offensive staff after last
year's out-of-character 7-6
finish.
There's also bowl stability
with the ACC wedded to the
Orange Bowl for at least 13
more years with an attrac-
tive lineup of other bowls
behind it.
The new grant-of-rights
agreement makes it highly
unlikely that anybody fol-
lows Maryland out the door.


THREE OTHERS TO WATCH


Gi i:i \ TECH
Dron r I loo par :Ioa3h
Paul j.l,:,ir n riplr e-
Op,:,p, ri at Ge:orgia e,:h,
which returns virtually
its entire offensive line.
Former backup QB Vad
Lee showed promise,
rushing for nine
touchdowns.


N \I.'i. \ji )
All lhce Inluriec last
,eai,'rin meanI plenty of
players ar ieatr gained
some game experience.
WR Stefon Diggs could
be one of the ACC's top
playmakers. Picked for
fifth in the Atlantic, the
Terps could surprise.


N, 'I:1iii C.ROLrN
The iar HeeIl Ic1) 1),
pIlaverc bur thev have
enriuQh talent tia, -
led by QB Bryn Renner,
TE Eric Ebron and DE
Kareem Martin to
make coach Larry
Fedora's second season
an interesting one.


AT A GLANCE
THE ESSENTIALS
DEFENDING CHAMPION: Florida State PROJECTED CHAMPION: Clemson
WHAT'S NEW: Unlike the ACC's 2003 expansion, nobody's expecting much of a
football upgrade from Syracuse and Pitt. Those schools have combined for two
10-win seasons since 1992 and one outright Big East title in the past 15 years
(Syracuse, 1998). New faces include Boston College coach Steve Addazio, who will
try to turn around a program coming off its first consecutive losing seasons since
1997-98, N.C. State coach Dave Doeren arrives after leading Northern Illinois to
back-to-back Mid-American Conference titles. This is also the last ACC season for
Maryland, which jumps to the Big Ten next year.
WHAT'S NOT: Virginia Tech coach Frank Beamer. The 66-year-old Beamer is
entering his 27th season as coach at his alma mater, and his 33rd as a head coach
overall. The Hokies are coming off a 7-6 season, their worst in 20 years, but with
a career record of 258-127-4, Beamer is the winningest active coach in the Bowl
Subdivision, and he's not slowing down at all.
LAST WORD: "I generally say as long as I've got a good quarterback and I've got
a good kicker, and my health's good, I'm good to go."- Frank Beamer, whose
contract to coach Virginia Tech expires after the 2016 season.


But there's still work to do
as the ACC once again tries
to make itself nationally
relevant on the field and
the league's preseason
favorite, Clemson, has the


and a schedule bookended
by Southeastern Conference
heavyweights Georgia and
South Carolina.
The Tigers shape up as the
ACC's best shot at a serious
national title contender,
with Boyd, the league's
reigning player of the year
throwing to 2011 breakout
star Sammy Watkins.
They made people take
them seriously by beating
LSU in the Chick-fil-A Bowl
in December, and how they
deal with the increased
attention that came along
with that victory could de-
termine whether they're in
contention for their second
ACC title in three years if
not a bigger prize.
"I told them last year
(that) we didn't handle
success very good" in 2011,
coach Dabo Swinney said.
"We're going to have success
again, and how we handle
that is going to determine
our season. And they did a
much better job last year.
"We have to focus on
Clemson and our formula
for success, our prepara-
tion," he added. "That's
what matters."
But the last time Clemson
was picked to win the ACC
(2008) the Tigers stumbled
to a 3-4 start that led to


Associated Press a midseason coaching
best chance to raise the change.
profile of the conference. In the ACC's fight against
The Tigers have the its public perception, the
league's most likely league can ill afford a
Heisman Trophy contender faceplant from its preseason
in quarterback Tajh Boyd favorite.


II~II~II C~FOIIIII


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 27






~Page 28 Friday, August 30


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


BIG TEN


FIRST DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH

MELVIN GORDON
Wisconsin Running back
He showed flashes last season as a redshirt freshman
and erupted for 206 yards on nine carries in the Big Ten
championship game victory against Nebraska. He could
pick up where record-setting Montee Ball left off.

TAYLOR LEWAN
Michigan Offensive tackle
He flirted with the NFL draft before deciding to return
for his senior season. He prepared for his final year by
adopting a strict diet that he said helped increase his
strength and quickness. "I've cheated a couple times,
here and there," Lewan said."I'm a sucker for ice cream."

RILEY BULLOUGH
Michigan State Running back
The race to replace Le'veon Bell remained close, but the
converted linebacker could be the one to step into the
big shoes left by Bell's departure. Despite a shoulder
injury, he seemed to rise to the occasion in fall camp.

ALLEN ROBINSON
Penn State Receiver
Kenny Bell (Nebraska),
Jared Abbrederis
(Wisconsin) and Jeremy
Gallon (Michigan) each
had more than 800 yards
receiving last season.
Robinson, a 6-foot-3
junior, topped them ..
all with 77 receptions ..
for 1,018 yards and 11
touchdowns.




I SECOND DOWN
I FouR GAMES TO WATCH

Sept. 28: Wisconsin at Ohio State
Wisconsin won the Big Ten last season on a technicality
- Ohio State and Penn State were banned from the
postseason. The Buckeyes look to make up for lost time.

Nov. 2: Michigan at Michigan State
The Wolverines are unbeaten at home the last two
seasons under coach Brady Hoke (14-0), but they
haven't won in Lansing since 2007.


Nov. 9: Nebraska
A crucial game in th
won last season ant
Michigan hasn't wo

Nov. 30: Ohio Sta
A great rivalry is be
rivals playing in cor
then a week later ii



I THII
AP's PR
LEGENDS
1. Michigan
2. Nebraska
3. Michigan State
4. Northwestern
5. Iowa
6. Minnesota


FOU


Little Caesars
Texas
Buffalo Wild Wings
Gator
Heart of Dallas
Capital One
Outback


Michigan quarterback Devin Gardner captures a self-portrait from an arm-worn camera as he throws passes in Michigan Stadium during the team's
annual preseason media day in Ann Arbor, Mich.




Ohio State, Michigan


Loaded E


could play it again

3uckeves THREE OTHERS TO WATCH thenplayed q


are the Big Ten's
team to beat
By JAY COHEN
ASSOCIATED PRESS


CHICAGO By every
at Michigan measure, Urban Meyer's first
he Legends Division race. Nebraska season at Ohio State was
d went on to win the division. a smashing success. The
In a conference title since 2004. Buckeyes won all 12 games,
and Braxton Miller developed
te at Michigan into a superstar quarterback
tter than ever. Why? Imagine the along the way.
nsecutive weeks the season-finale That's all gone now,
1 the conference championship, practically ancient history
in football-mad Columbus,
Ohio. The pressure is on for
a blockbuster sequel, even if
RD DOWN Meyer himself is preoccupied
with the opening scenes.
OBJECTED ORDER OF FINISH "Our job is to compete for
championships in November.
LEADERS That's all I want them to
1. Ohio State* think about," Meyer said.
2. Wisconsin It sure is. While Miller, a
3. Penn State Heisman Trophy contender,
4. Indiana and Ohio State begin the
5. Purdue year as the Big Ten favorite,
6. Illinois there are plenty of potential
*Conference champion challengers.
Dynamic quarterback
Devin Gardner thinks he's
ready to lead Michigan back
RT H DO W N to the top of the conference.
Taylor Martinez wants to put
BO HEDULE together another great year in
Date, time Site Opp. his final season at Nebraska.
Dec. 26, 6p.m. Detroit MAC Then there's Wisconsin, com-
Dec. 27,6 p.m. Houston Big 12 ing off a Rose Bowl trip and
Dec. 28, 10 p.m. Tempe Big 12 looking to make a smooth
Jan. 1, noon Jacksonville SEC transition to new coach Gary
Andersen, and Michigan
Jan. 1, noon Dallas C-USA derse and Michi
Jan. 1, 1 p.m. Orlando SEC State and more.
Jan.1,1p.m. Orlando SEC "I like our football team,"
Jan. 1,1 p.m. Tampa SEC Michigan coach Brady
Jan. 1,5 p.m. Pasadena Pac-12 Hoke said. "I usually don't


I 1 l ,i U1 \
The tbiu: iu tbuidinq for
a return : the p i:r--
ea:ori a the HiHo'iers
return 19 starters,
including eight on
defense and standout
WR Cody Latimer.
Indiana has not been
to a bowl in 19 years.


AT A GLANCE


N ,:11i \i !i i .['j
'at FI-r:qeral3d oih has
:ca,: re:l n l:r th ve i ern
10 five ,:ore,: u ive
bowls, has RB Venric
Mark and more depth
but a tough schedule.
At least Ohio State,
Michigan and Michigan
State visit Evanston.


ihe ,
with 2
going
conse
chaml
they're
in tran
new h
tough


THE ESSENTIALS


DEFENDING CHAMPION: Wisconsin PROJECTED CHAMPION
WHAT'S NEW: There are two new coaches this year, with Anderse
Wisconsin and Darrell Hazell going from Kent State to Purdue. The
Nebraska in the Big Ten title game on Dec. 1, but Bret Bielema dec
for Arkansas before Wisconsin's narrow loss to Stanford in the Rose
Andersen, who left Utah State.
WHAT'S NOT: The expectations for Ohio State seldom have been
Buckeyes went 12-0 in Urban Meyer's first season but were not bo
are this year, though, and they have their sights set on Pasadena,
Jan. 6 BCS national championship game at the Rose Bowl.
LAST WORD: "I feel like the second game would be a lot more int
we would know exactly what's on the line, knowing that that wou
we maybe go to the national championship game or the Rose Bom
Bryant, Ohio State safety, on possibility of consecutive OSU-Michig


say that. I said it after the
spring. I will continue to say
it because I like how they've
handled themselves on the
field and off the field so far
this summer. I like their work
ethic, and I like how they've
represented Michigan in a lot


of ways."
Denard Robins
after a stellar car
Gardner is back t
the same sort of
Michigan's backfi
6-foot-4 junior be
season at wide re


uarterbacl I II
T A .


the last five games. He thhi-\\
for 1,219 yards and 11 tou Ii-
ii downs against five inter. I p-
tions, and also had 101 y. 11.I
and seven touchdowns (II1
the ground.
Gardner is a work in
progress "I have to sta II
', ,[iN to checking the ball down
Always want the big play." hII
ieran Badijier said but his teammate .,
25 erinr ar have noticed a change in iIi,
f,,r ther flourih former Detroit prep star siii. i
cutive Big Ten he became the starter belin Id
pionship. But center.
e also a team "He's grown right into II.
isition with a senior safety Thomas Goi ,iii
lead coach and a said. "He's a lot more con-
er schedule. fortable. You can see thai
While Gardner is the
toast of Ann Arbor, he hai.,
a ways to go to match th,
celebrity that Martinez eilii i\
in Nebraska. The senior
hio State star, who accounted for,
in taking over at school-record 3,890 yards, ,I
SBadgers routed offense and 33 touchdox\ iis
:ided to leave last season, spent more ill.II
e Bowl. Enter an hour signing autographI,
during one recent trip to i Iit
higher. The mall.
Iwl eligible. They Martinez has started S'
Calif., for the consecutive games for tll i
Cornhuskers and will lea\
:ense, because the school with several ol -
uld determine if fensive records. While he t\ ill
wl."- Christian go down as one of the be.,i
gan games. players ever at the powei -
-Associated Press house program, he does '
seem too concerned with lii,
legacy headed into his fili.al
on is gone year.
eer, but "I've done a lot so far in m\
o provide career, so I've just got to i, k,
sizzle in this season for what it's %\ Ii in I


field. The
egan last
*ceiver, and


and just enjoy it and jusi
remember everything th,.
happens," Martinez said


Page 28


Friday, August 30 203i ?


11101111y.. C~-"IF~IIIII






Friday, August 30, 2013 Page 29


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


BIG 12


FIRST DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH

JOHNATHAN GRAY
Texas Running back
The second consecutive freshman to lead the Longhorns
in rushing (701 yards on 149 carries last season) might
help Texas look like a real Big 12 title contender.

CASEY PACHALL
TCU
Quarterback
Completed 66
percent of his
passes with 10
touchdowns
when his 2012
season ended following a DUI arrest in early October.
If he returns to form, you can bet on TCU as the Big 12
favorite in 2013.

LACHE SEASTRUNK
Baylor Running back
No one was hotter at the end of 2012. He rushed for
1,012 yards last season and turned heads when he
asserted he could win the Heisman Trophy this season.

JOSH STEWART
Oklahoma State Receiver
Dez Bryant, Justin Blackmon and now Stewart. The
junior finished last season with 101 catches for 1,210
yards and seven touchdowns. He did so despite catching
passes from three different quarterbacks.



I SECOND DOWN
FOUR GAMES TO WATCH

Aug. 31: LSU vs. TCU, Arlington, Texas
These teams haven't met since LSU won 10-7 back in
1968. Shoud be a great defensive struggle at Cowboys
Stadium with early BCS implications.

Sept. 28: Oklahoma at Notre Dame
The Sooners have won once in 10 tries against the
Irish with that win coming in South Bend back in 1956
(40-0, at that). This game should carry some large BCS
bowl implications. Notre Dame won 30-13 last year in
Norman.

Oct. 12: Oklahoma vs. Texas, Dallas
Three of the last four winners of the Red River Shootout
have gone on to win a share of the Big 12. The Horns
have lost three in a row and the last two by a combined
score of 118-38.

Dec. 7: Oklahoma at Oklahoma State
The winner of the Bedlam Series has won a share of the
conference crown in three straight seasons. The Sooners
have lost just once to the Pokes since 2002 (9-1). This
will be the third time in four seasons that they will play
in Stillwater.



THIRD DOWN
| AP's PROJECTED ORDER OF FINISH


1. Oklahoma
2. TCU
3. Oklahoma State
4. Texas
5. Baylor
6. Kansas State


7. Texas Tech
8. West Virginia
9. Iowa State
10. Kansas
The Big 12 does not play a
conference title game


FOURTH DOWN
BOWL SCHEDULE


Bowl
Texas
Pinstripe
Buff. Wild Wings
Alamo
Holiday
Fiesta
Cotton


Date, time
Dec. 27, 6 p.m.
Dec. 28, noon
Dec. 28,10:15 p.m.
Dec. 30, 6:45 p.m.
Dec. 30,10:15 p.m.
Jan. 1,8:30 p.m.
Jan. 3,8 p.m.


Site Opp.
Houston Big Ten
New York American
Tempe Big Ten
San Antonio Pac-12
San Diego Big 12
Glendale BCS
Arlington SEC


-' 7
n..m


AP FILE PHOTO
Though the status of Texas A&M's Johnny Manziel may be uncertain this season, what is a certainty is that points and plays have never been
more plentiful in the Big 12. Five of the conference's 10 teams ran at least 990 offensive snaps last season.




League stands still,




but teams speed up


By STEPHEN HAWKINS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
For the first time in three
years, the Big 12 Conference
has the same teams com-
ing back from the previous
season.
While the seven-time de-
fending national champion
SEC and the Pac-12, among
others, have expanded
during all the shuffling of
conference affiliations the
past few summers, the Big
12 has settled into a 10-team
league.
West Virginia and Texas
Christian had their Big 12
debuts last season, when
each were the reigning
champs of their previous
leagues. Both started the
season in the Top 25 and got
through September unde-
feated. But both finished
4-5 in league play, part of a
four-team tie for fifth place.
"It's as competitive a con-
ference as there is in college
football," said Mountaineers
coach Dana Holgorsen,
whose team lost quarterback
Geno Smith and nine other
offensive starters.
There is no league cham-
pionship game in early
December to determine the
Big 12 champion. Instead,
every team plays the
other nine league schools
in a round-robin schedule
that stretches over three
full months from West
Virginia going to Oklahoma
on Sept. 7, until two final
regular-season games Dec. 7.
The title is seemingly up
for grabs in the league that


THREE


O)M. \[ l' \
AP. Ipr [i- I
, -lllen-l i, h ilu l ia l l i
I [ r-[ i-r ll I l' I_ i i, ry
Jones, but coach Bob
Stoops has recruited
enough talent to keep
the team rolling and
remain a Big 12 title
contender.


OTHERS TO WATCH


T( IJ
The Horrned Fr,:,gs
return nine irarters
fr,:ni a unit that led
the Big 12 in total
defense a staple for
Gary Patterson's teams
through the Frogs'
conference-hopping
since 1996.


Ti \, Ti, ii
hMin kinr tiurv
e.,:ire franr vinh r his
tbii-poa.irn ways from
1999-2002. Now he's
back as coach after
spending last year as
offensive coordinator
at Texas A&M, helping
tutor Johnny Manziel.


AT A GLANCE
THE ESSENTIALS
DEFENDING CHAMPION: Kansas St. PROJECTED CHAMPION: Oklahoma St.
WHAT'S NEW: Seven of the 10 teams had senior quarterbacks last season, so
change is in the air. One of the most experienced quarterbacks hasn't taken a
Big 12 snap: Before transferring to Kansas and sitting out last season, junior Jake
Heaps started 16 of his 22 games at BYU. Texas junior David Ash has started a
league-high 18 games. TCU senior Casey Pachall has 17 starts, but played only the
first four games last season before leaving school for a substance-abuse program.
WHAT'S NOT: Expect more of the same up-tempo offenses this season. Baylor,
Oklahoma State and Oklahoma each ran more than 1,000 offensive plays last
season; West Virginia and Texas Tech were within 10 of reaching that plateau.
All averaged more than 37 points a game. Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy is
talking about going even faster and Oklahoma, even without 50-game quarter-
back starter Landry Jones, doesn't anticipate much difference.
LAST WORD: "I don't think there's any magic formula, but you can't allow
offenses to dictate."- TCU coach Gary Patterson
Associated Press


has lost four teams and
added two since 2010.
Consider the curious case
of Texas, whose coach Mack
Brown responded "Who
knows?" when asked about
being picked fourth in the


Big 12 preseason poll by
media who cover the league
and as high as fourth nation-
ally by at least one national
magazine.
"I do think that we have
the most balanced league


in the country right now,
top to bottom," Brown
said. "Everybody else can
beat anybody else in the
league on a given day, and
that's not happening across
the country.... People are
confused on who they think
may win this conference
championship, and that's a
compliment to our league."
Oklahoma State, with 16
returning starters, is the me-
dia's choice to win the league
een though Cowboys coach
Mike Gundy hasn't named a
starting quarterback.
Gundy has company in
at least one regard. First-
year Texas Tech coach Kliff
Kingsbury joins Gundy as
a former standout quar-
terback coaching at his
Big 12 alma mater. Gundy
took over as the Cowboys'
coach 16 years after his last
game; Kingsbury is back
11 years later. He's 34, the
youngest head coach in any
BCS-automatic qualifying
conference.
Kansas State and
Oklahoma shared the title
last year, with the Wildcats
getting the league's automat-
ic BCS berth because of their
head-to-head victory against
the Sooners. Oklahoma
should be in the mix again
this season, and don't count
out Kansas State.
With Heisman Trophy
finalist quarterback Collin
Klein gone, the Wildcats are
a preseason pick to finish in
the bottom half of the league
- just like the last two years,
when the Wildcats instead
finished in the top two.


ONLINE: Log on to www.yoursun.net for more college
football coverage.


11101111y.. C~-"IF~IIIII


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 29






~Page 30 Friday, August 30, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


PAC 12


FIRST DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH

KA'DEEM CAREY
Arizona Running back
The nation's leading rusher produced 1,929 yards and
a school-record 23 TDs, but got into minor scrapes with
authority during his down time. Carey could still face
discipline from coach Rich Rodriguez, but he is the
Pac-12 ball carrier with the biggest name.

MARCUS MARIOTA
Oregon Quarterback
Oregon coach Mark Helfrich and Stanford coach David
Shaw agree on one thing: the Ducks'sophomore is
the best quarterback in the country even better
than Texas A&M's Johnny Manziel, the former Oregon
commit who won the Heisman Trophy last season. The
Ducks'rangy passer is a strong Heisman candidate after
throwing for 2,677 yards and 32 TDs as a freshman.

WILL SUTTON
Arizona State Defensive tackle
He added offseason muscle and weighed in at more
than 300 pounds in his quest to become the conference's
first repeat Defensive Player of the Year in two decades.

LEONARD WILLIAMS
Southern Cal Defensive end
Destructive last season at defensive tackle, he is poised
for a dominant season after moving to defensive end in
new coordinator Clancy Pendergast's scheme.



I SECOND DOWN
FOUR GAMES TO WATCH

Sept. 21: Arizona State at Stanford
This could be a preview of the Pac-12 championship. The
two teams haven't met since 2010, so there will be a lot of
unfamiliarity in the first conference game of the year for
both teams. Tough turnaround for the Sun Devils, who play
USC a week later in a key South Division game.

Oct. 26: Stanford at Oregon State
Potential trap game for the Cardinal. Stanford has lost two
of its last six trips to Corvallis but risk being overconfident
after winning three consecutive games in the series by a
combined score of 103-36.

Nov. 7: Oregon at Stanford
Stanford beat Oregon 17-14 last season in overtime, but
they realize their meeting is one step in a season-long test
to see if either team is capable of challenging the SEC for a
national title in this Thursday night game.

Nov. 30: USC at UCLA
This too could decide the South Division on the season's
final weekend, giving one of the West Coast's top rivalries
added intrigue. UCLA broke a five-game losing streak to
USC last year, winning 38-28.



T THIRD DOWN
S AP's PROJECTED ORDER OF FINISH


NORTH
1.Oregon*
2. Stanford
3. Washington
4.Oregon State
5. Washington State
6. California


SOUTH
1. UCLA
2. Arizona State
3. Southern Cal
4. Arizona
5.Utah
6. Colorado
* Conference champion


FOURTH DOWN
BOWL SCHEDULE


Bowl
New Mexico
Las Vegas
Fight Hunger
Alamo
Holiday
Sun
Rose


Date, time Site
Dec.21,2p.m. Albuquerque
Dec. 21,3:30 p.m. Las Vegas
Dec. 27,9:30 p.m. San Francisco
Dec. 30,6:45 p.m. San Antonio
Dec. 30,10:15 p.m. San Diego
Dec. 31,2 p.m. El Paso
Jan. 1,5 p.m. Pasadena


Opp.
MWC
MWC
BYU
Big 12
Big 12
ACC
Big Ten


Oregon coach Mark Helfrich looks back at quarterback Marcus Mariota as they run onto the field for the Ducks' spring game. Oregon and Stanford
are the preseason favorites to rule the Pac-12, but everyone thought Southern Cal was a lock at this time last year.





Is a repeat on tap?


By GREG BEACHAM
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Oregon
and Stanford have given no
indication they're ready to
give up their thrones atop the
Pac-12 this fall.
That will not stop the other
10 schools from working
each week to unseat the best
in the West.
The Pac-12 is a deep,
talented conference heading
into the season, featuring
rosters studded with veteran
returnees and emerging
talent. But after Southern
California's much-document-
ed tumble from preseason
hype to late-season embar-
rassment last year, there's
no doubt who's expected to
reign again.
Oregon and Stanford both
return fresh off BCS bowl
victories last season, with the
Ducks taking the Fiesta Bowl
and the Cardinal winning the
Rose Bowl. While the Ducks
are under new coach Mark
Helfrich, not much has really
changed in Eugene, apart
from their new Taj Mahal of a
training center.
"We all have a gauntlet
we've got to run," Stanford
coach David Shaw said.
"That's what makes the sea-
son such a challenge, and so
much fun. Every week it's a
test to see if you can survive."
The Pac-12 features
its usual bumper crop of
exceptional offensive tal-
ent. Southern California
receiver Marqise Lee is back
for his junior season with the
Biletnikoff Award already on
his shelf, while do-everything
star De'Anthony Thomas
should cause another year
of misery for any defense


THREE


AIl./i '' \ l \ iw
1i ,1,1 rI l i inn, r,- [ijlrn
I [.jr[-r I n i lnllii

QB Taylor Kelly (3,039
yards, 29 TDs), leading
rusher Marion Grice
(679 yards, 11 TDs) and
leading receiver Chris
Coyle (696 yards, 5 TDs).


AT A GLANCE


OTHERS T


U( LA
jini Mora ic on a roll.
He ha ta rletrled
lineup thar l :: uld
return to the Pac-12
title game, led by QB
Brett Hundley. He set
a school record as a
freshman (3,740 yards
and 29 TDs passing).


0 WATCH


Lane
under
lepi.l
field
spirit
it. He
coach
and is
welco


THE ESSENTIALS


DEFENDING CHAMPION: Stanford PROJECTED CHAMP
WHAT'S NEW: A conference dominated by 4-3 defensive fronts a
is now populated mostly by 3-4 schemes, creating great opportun
rushing defensive ends and versatile linebackers to become stars.
to Oregon's Mark Helfrich, two other Pac-12 schools have new coa
hired offensive guru Sonny Dykes from Louisiana Tech to replace Je
Colorado hopes to get back to respectability with former San Jose
Mike Maclntyre. Not much is expected from the Bears or the Buffs
Dykes has plenty of talent in place from Tedford's recruiting efforts
WHAT'S NOT: Everybody knows about the Pac-12's prolific passing
it's a fairly well-kept secret that they'll be defended by some of th
secondaries in the BCS this fall. Stanford has a dynamic safety duo
and Jordan Richards, while Oregon's peerless cornerbacks are led I
Olomu and Terrance Mitchell. At Southern California, freshman sal
is being touted for a place in the Trojans'lineage of excellence at t
Ronnie Lott to Troy Polamalu.
LAST WORD: "Stanford and Oregon have absolutely earned the ri
there on top of the list, and everybody else has to go after that ch
UCLA coach Jim Mora


facing Oregon even if a
new coach is orchestrating
the plan.
When Chip Kelly departed
for the Philadelphia Eagles
ahead of NCAA sanctions


that turned out 1
on the beak, Hel
charge but no
coach is ever alo
quest to build a
Ducks always ha


from Nike's Phil Knight, who
wrote most of the checks for
their training center a $68
million palace with Italian
tile showers, Ferrari leather
chairs and six stories of
recruit-enticing opulence.
Helfrich has the talent on
the roster and knowledge of
the offense to help the Ducks


remain contenders.
hrilir hja teen Stanford, UCLA, Oregon
r fire fr delivering State and USC all have the
reiulr orln rie potential to slip past the
while skirting the Ducks to claim the Pac-12
of the rules off of crown.
tends to rub other While every team has
es the wrong way a solid offensive attack,
swearing out his Stanford may have an edge
ime among fans. because of its strong defense.
The Cardinal brings back 17
starters, including 10 on the
defensive side of the ball.
Mora's Bruins are the favor-
ites in the South, but Arizona
PPION: Oregon State and USC should create
half-decade ago a tight race for the opportu-
ities for pass- nity to take on either twin
...In addition tower from the north.
ches. California While Oregon and Stanford
eff Tedford. are the strong favorites in the
State coach North, perennially underes-
this fall, but timated Oregon State returns
s. another strong roster waiting
g offenses, but for the Goliaths to stumble.
e best defensive Washington finally might
Sin Ed Reynolds have the talent and experi-
by Ifo Ekpre- ence to break through into
fety Su'a Cravens the upper echelons in coach
he position from Steve Sarkisian's fifth season.
And who knows what
ght to be up Washington State coach Mike
allenge."- Leach might concoct when
he's not co-writing a book on
Associated Press Geronimo? (He is, really.)
Sophomore quarterbacks
are poised to dominate with
to be a slap Oregon's Marcus Mariota,
rich took UCLAs Brett Hundley, USC's
Oregon MaxWittek and Stanford's
me in his Kevin Hogan.


winner. ine
ive help


Contributing Orlando Sentinel


Page 30


Friday, August 30, 2013


Illlll~y.-r y~011111


S i 11 l iII I. ( \T





:FiaAgs 3,21 ae3


COLLEGE FOOTBALL


FIRST DOWN
FOUR PLAYERS TO WATCH

BLAKE BORTLES
Central Florida Quarterback
He was a revelation for Central Florida last season as a
sophomore, throwing for 3,059 yards and 25 TDs.

TEDDY BRIDGEWATER
Louisville Quarterback
The Heisman contender (3,718 yards, 27 touchdowns,
68.5 percent completions and eight interceptions last
season) has the potential to give the AAC some nice
parting gifts on Louisville's way out.

GARRETT GILBERT
SMU Quarterback
The Mustangs hope the guy who was expected to
replace Colt McCoy at Texas is ready to flourish in coach
June Jones'pass-happy offense.

AARON LYNCH
South Florida Defensive end
The Notre Dame transfer returns to action after sitting
out a season and combines with Ryne Giddins to give
USF the top defensive end combination in the league.



I SECOND DOWN
FOUR GAMES TO WATCH


AMERICAN


AP FILE PHOTO
Central Florida quarterback Blake Bortles guides his team into its first season in the American Athletic Conference and into a renewal of its rivalry
against South Florida.




UCF, USF coaches jump




into War on 1-4 rivalry


AP FILE PHOTO
South Florida wide receiver Andre Davis is one
of the weapons first-year coach Willie Taggart
will put on display against Michigan State.

Sept. 7: South Florida at Michigan State
Penn State lost its home opener last season to Ohio, so
don't discount the possibility of an early-season upset. In
fact, early season is the best chance for an upset against
what will be a heavily-favored Big Ten school. (Central
Florida plays at Penn State a week earlier.)
Oct. 31: South Florida at Houston
The AAC has six bowl slots, so given the preseason
projections this is a game with huge bowl implications for
more than these two teams.
Nov. 21: Rutgers at Central Florida
This game might not determine the conference's ultimate
champion, but Gary Nova against Blake Bortles is a fun
matchup between two quarterbacks who could take the
next steps in their respective development.

Dec. 5: Louisville at Cincinnati
The last week of the regular season features two of the
AAC's top teams possibly playing for a BCS berth not to
mention regional bragging rights.


THIRD DOWN
AP's PROJECTED ORDER OF FINISH


By GREG AUMAN
TAMPA BAY TIMES
Commissioner Mike Aresco touted the
renewed South Florida-Central Florida
rivalry as one of the great new things
to come with the American Athletic
Conference, and as the league hosted its
annual football media day last month,
the two head coaches traded barbs in
what will only build up leading to their
meeting Nov. 29 in Orlando.
UCF coach George O'Leary, asked
about how he has gotten to know USF
coach Willie Taggart, started the fun by
challenging USF's ambitious recruiting
goals, which include keeping a presence
in his backyard.
"I was laughing. He got there and he
said he's going to own the 1-4 corridor,"
O'Leary said. "I said to him, 'Obviously,
you've got to go back and look at your
geography.'?"
Taggart, smiling later in response, said
he knew what he was saying when he
said it, and his goal hasn't changed.
"We're doing a pretty good job at
it, too," said Taggart, who has six of
his 12 commitments for 2014 from
Hillsborough and Pinellas counties.
"We're doing what we said we were
going to do when we came here. I'm a
football coach. I'm not into geography."


AT A GLANCE


The teams are close rivals on more
than just a state map UCF was fourth
in the league's preseason media poll,
one spot ahead of the Bulls. Taggart
said he likes facing UCF every year as a
conference rival.
"I think it's good for the state when
you have something like that, good
for both universities, to go out and
compete against someone you don't like
too well," he said. "It's always good to
compete and have rivalries. I think that's
what college football is all about."
Taggart told the Orlando Sentinel he
is beginning to get a better feel for the
rivalry.
"I think as the season gets closer, I
am starting to sense the displeasure of
Central Florida by all of our fans, and
seeing it from them, too," Taggart said.
"As the season comes, we're a little more
fired up and guys are ready to play each
other."
Then, he added: "It hasn't been that
long, but I'm starting to sense it all and
I'm starting to feel like our fans."
USF beat UCF four years in a row
from 2005-08, but hasn't played UCF
since, replacing the Knights with non-
conference opponents such as Western
Kentucky and Ball State.
O'Leary has lobbied for the series
to be renewed for some time. Asked if


his fans were excited for the renewal,
O'Leary joked, "Excited? They drive me
nuts."
O'Leary sees tangible benefits to the
rivalry, which should result in strong
attendance wherever the game site. USF
sold out the last UCF game in Tampa in
2007, an announced 65,948. The 2008
game in Orlando drew 46,805, UCF's
second-highest total at Bright House
Networks Stadium.
"That, to me, is a natural rival,"
O'Leary said. "It's an 1-4 game. It's a
win-win. Thanksgiving weekend's a
tough weekend to draw, I don't care who
you are, unless you're playing in a rival
game. Georgia-Georgia Tech, Alabama-
Auburn. It used to be Texas-Texas A&M,
I don't know if it still is or not. That's
going to be a win-win from a stadium,
economy, everything concerned."
The Knights, who went 10-4 last
season and lost in the Conference
USA championship, were picked to
finish fourth in the American Athletic
Conference preseason media poll be-
hind favorite Louisville, Cincinnati and
Rutgers but ahead of No. 5 USE
The recruiting battles will continue
all year UCF signed five players from
the Tampa Bay area in February, and
O'Leary has picked up two commit-
ments in those counties for 2014.


THREE OTHERS TO WATCH


1. Louisville
2. Central Florida
3. Rutgers
4. Houston
5. Cincinnati


6. South Florida
7. UConn
8. SMU
9. Memphis
10. Temple


I FOURTH DOWN
BOWL SCHEDULE


Bowl
Beef'O'Brady's
Pinstripe
Belk
Russell Athletic
BBVA Compass
BCS At-Large


Date, time
Dec. 23, 2 p.m.
Dec. 28, noon
Dec. 28,3:20 p.m.
Dec. 28, 6:45 p.m.
Jan. 4, 1 p.m.
TBD


Site
St. Petersburg
New York
Charlotte
Orlando
Birmingham


Opp.
C-USA
Big 12
ACC
ACC
SEC


THE ESSENTIALS
DEFENDING CHAMPION: Louisville PROJECTED CHAMPION: Louisville
WHAT'S NEW: The former Big East is the American Atlantic Conference, which
keeps its automatic bid in the last year of the Bowl Championship Series. It's
fitting that outgoing Louisville is heavily favored to claim it. There are five new
members, giving the AAC 10 teams this season, and three new coaches. Central
Florida, Houston, Memphis and SMU join from Conference USA and Temple from
the Mid-American Conference.
WHAT'S NOT: Louisville (ACC) and Rutgers (Big Ten) are playing their final season
in the conference. A new record book means two USF contributions to Big East
marks could be permanent. QB Matt Grothe is the Big East career leader in total
offense and K Delbert Alvarado has the conference's longest field goal at 56 yards
LAST WORD: "Our conference features legitimate football national champion-
ship contenders, Our BCS representative this year will be a strong team. And I
would remind people we remain a BCS conference this fall."- Mike Aresco, AAC
commissioner
Associated Press and Los Angeles Times


CINi I' i.. Ml


ll v l uln l.-r 'ill- Irul n ',
.j I IL u ll-l [1 J [- Jill
[h l, [ d jr-I [h,,- hlli jI ]
East title last season.
The Bearcats return an
experienced offensive
line and QB Brendon
Kay. Defense is the
question mark.


L, il II i !
Anl i~. r i -Iiuiini
I l iirl i- [ 1 1 l *i i w l i
Aiinin-n in ,l,-[[nnn] _'.8
of 30 first-place votes
in the preseason media
poll, Louisville returns
19 starters, including
12 on defense and QB
Teddy Bridgewater.


M\ i li ii,
The Iigerc are trhirsting
,:to male a riname for
thenpeiles in SEC
country. "We don't
have to be Coke or
Pepsi. We can be
Sprite. I think that's
there for us" coach
Justin Fuente said.


IFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 31


lll0llll.L, ~~~11111





'Pg 2Fia, uut3,21


0 COLLEGE FOOTBALL


NATION


ARMY
THE ESSENTIALS
COACH: Rich Ellerson (5th season, 17
2012 REWIND: 2-10, no bowl
PREVIEW: The Cadets have are too
offensive line, defensive line, quarter
- to expect much more than last ye
Senior RB Raymond Maples is the third
history to rush for 1,000 yards in cons
and ranks sixth on Army's all-time rus
yards).
BOWL PROJECTION*: Poinsettia, D
p.m., San Diego, vs. Mountain West


NAVY


AIR FORCE
THE ESSENTIALS


7-32) COACH: Troy Calhoun (7th season, 34-18)
2012 REWIND: 6-7 overall, 5-3 Mountain West; lost
many holes to Rice 33-14 in Armed Forces Bowl
back, linebacker PREVIEW: Projected by the Associated Press to
ear's result. finish third in the Mountain Division of the 12-team
rd back in Army Mountain West Conference, the Falcons must find
secutive seasons replacements for eight departed offensive starters,
shing list (2,489 including RB Cody Getz (1,248 yards rushing). Jona-
than Lee, who rushed for 548 yards last season while
)ec. 26, 9:30 sharing time for Getz, and he returns.
BOWL PROJECTION: The Falcons should claim one
*if bowl eligible of the Mountain West's six bowl berths New
Mexico, Las Vegas, Idaho, Hawaii, Poinsettia or
Armed Forces.


NOTRE DAME


THE ESSENTIALS
COACH: Ken Niumatalolo (6th season, 40-26)
2012 REWIND: 8-5, lost 62-68 to Arizona State in
Fight Hunger Bowl
PREVIEW: Niumatalolo said at the team's media
day that he wasn't sure if he could remember being
more excited heading into a season, due in part
to sophomore QB Keenan Reynolds, who rescued
the Midshipmen's season by leading them to four
consecutive wins. He finished third on the team in
rushing (649), first in rushing TDs (10) and passed for
898 yards and nine TDs.
BOWL PROJECTION*: Armed Forces, Dec. 30,11:45
a.m., Fort Worth, vs. Mountain West.
if bowl eligible


THE ESSENTIALS
COACH: Brian Kelly (4th season, 28-11)
2012 REWIND: 12-1 overall, lost 42-14 to Alabama
in BCS national championship
PREVIEW: Much of the credit for the Irish's run to
the BCS national championship game can be given
to its stellar defense. The unit returns eight starters
from last season, including DE Stephon Tuitt and NT
Louis Nix. Losing QB Everett Golson for the season
due to a violation of academic rules was a huge blow
for the offense, but senior Tommy Rees showed
last season he could provide a spark. He doesn't
have Golson's arm strength or running ability, so
consistency is the key.
BOWL PROJECTION: BCS at-large.


T'S






GOOD!

SAIL INTO YOUR
ULTIMATE TAILGATE PARTY.


Whether you're cheering from home or at the stadium,
we've got everything you need-including weekly specials
to make your game-day party great. Just sail into your
neighborhood Publix.

Visit publix.com for recipes and grilling tips that will
prepare you for tailgate greatness.






FF Publix.
OFFICIAL SUPERMARKET OF THE TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS


AP PHOTO
Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly talks to his team during a preseason practice in South Bend, Ind.
Kelly guided the squad to a 12-1 record last season and eyes a return to the BCS bowls.


FIRST DOWN
FOUR COACHES ON THE HOT SEAT
RANDY EDSALL
Maryland
He has won three conference games in two seasons
since taking over for popular Ralph Friedgen and it will
not get any easier with the Terps headed to the Big Ten
after this season.

LANE KFFIN
Southern California
He has been hamstrung by a postseason ban and
limited scholarships from the Reggie Bush-related
sanctions, but excuses have a limited shelf life in the
land of Troy, particularly after last season's flameout.

MACK BROWN
Texas
The Longhorns are 11-15 in the Big 12 since playing for
a national title in 2009 and have been ripped by rival
Oklahoma three consecutive years. That will not fly in
Austin for very long.

BOBBY HAUCK
UNLV
A highly-successful coach at Montana, he has struggled
in the move up to the FBS, winning three games in each
of his three seasons.


SECOND DOWN
EIGHT GREAT NAMES

HA HA CLINTON-DIX
Alabama Defensive back

TACO CHARLTON
Michigan Defensive end

SPIFFY EVANS
Boston College* Receiver

CASSANOVA McKINZY
Auburn Linebacker

THOR JOZWIAK
South Florida Offensive lineman

SILVERBERRY MOUHON
Cincinnati. Defensive lineman

PHAROAH McKEVER
North Carolina State Receiver

MUNCHIE LEGAUX
Cincinnati* Quarterback
-John Marshall, Associated Press
coo


SPage 32


Friday, August 30, 2013


1~n)lllll





Frdy uut3,21 ae3


PRO FOOTBALL


FIRST DOWN
FOUR GAMES TO WATCH
Sept. 15: vs. New Orleans Saints
The Bucs will get an early divisional test with their home
opener against the Saints. A win here could help set the
stage for control of the division. The Bucs have not had
much success against the Saints in the past two seasons,
going 1-3 including an embarrassing 41-0 loss on Dec. 16,
2012, at the Superdome.

Sept. 29: vs. Arizona Cardinals
The Bucs will wear their creamsicle jerseys for the annual
"throwback game"that began in 2009 and has become
one the players especially look forward to. The Bucs are
1-3 in throwbacks. The only victory was a memorable one
over the Packers in 2009, and it got former coach Raheem
Morris his first win after an 0-7 start.

Oct. 20: at Atlanta Falcons
The Falcons won the division by six games last season with
a 13-3 record, while the remaining teams battled for a
three-way tie for second place. While Atlanta is still favored
by many to repeat as division champs, expect a lot more
competition from the Bucs, Saints and Panthers.

Nov. 11: vs. Miami Dolphins
Monday night matchup of in-state rivals will feature the
induction of Warren Sapp, the Hall of Fame former Tampa
Bay defensive tackle, into the team's Ring of Honor. The
Bucs, who will retire Sapp's No. 99, should be plenty hyped
for this game considering the stage, opponent and hoopla.



I SECOND DOWN
FOUR NEWCOMERS TO WATCH

MIKE GLENNON
Quarterback N.C. State
The rookie could provide a viable option at quarterback and
not just a backup to Josh Freeman if the team decides to go
in a different direction. While Glennon displays a strong arm,
his mobility out of the pocket has been awkward at best.
JOHNTHAN BANKS
Cornerback. Mississippi State
The Bucs'second-round selection brings youth to complet-
ment veteran Darrelle Revis at corner, and Banks should be
a good fit for Tampa Bay's defensive scheme.
KEVIN OGLETREE
Receiver Dallas (free agent)
The veteran receiver gives Freeman a dependable target.
Ogletree had a strong preseason and is one of the team's
fastest players. He has shown consistency and good hands.

AKEEM SPENCE (ILLINOIS)
Defensive tackle Illinois
The rookie has impressed coach Greg Schiano at tilted nose
tackle. "He's making plays,"Schiano said. "He's doing his job
most of the time ... but he's got to be more consistent at it."



I THIRD DOWN
EH3 s SEASON OUTLOOK
With Freeman entering final year of rookie contract and
Revis beginning six-year, $96 million deal, anything short
of ending six-year playoff hiatus will be major disappoint-
ment. RB Doug Martin comes off outstanding rookie season
(1,454 yards rushing), and WRs Vincent Jackson and Mike
Williams are eager to build on standout seasons.


FOURTH DOWN
THE ESSENTIALS
HOME GAMES: Raymond James Stadium, 4201 North
Dale Mabry Highway, Tampa.
DIRECTIONS: 1-75 to 1-4Westto 1-275 South to Himes
Avenue North or North Dale Mabry.... Or 1-75 North to
1-275 North to North Dale Mabry. Stadium is approximately
one mile north of 1-275, between Himes and Dale Mabry.
PARKING: Lots open 3.5 hours prior to kickoff and all
vehicles are subject to search. Price is $25 per space.
TICKETS: 866-582-2827, buccaneers.com or ticketmaster.com
RADIO: 620 AM, 1580 AM, 103.5 FM
TV: WFLA (Tampa), Fox 4 (Fort Myers)
NFC SOUTH OPPONENTS: Atlanta Falcons (won division
last season), New Orleans Saints, Carolina Panthers
-From Staff Tampa Bay Times, Associated Press reports


TAMPA BAY


Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Vincent Jackson, left, and quarterback Josh Freeman watch the fourth quarter of a preseason game against
the Miami Dolphins at Sun Life Stadium in Miami. Freeman is heading into a boom-or-bust regular season after a shaky preseason.







Boom or bust

Entering final year of contract, Freeman must prove he's the man


By FRED GOODALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAMPA The Tampa Bay
Buccaneers spent gener-
ously to upgrade a porous
defense in hopes of giving
Josh Freeman every oppor-
tunity to be successful.
The fifth-year pro is
entering the final season of
the contract he signed as
a rookie in 2009. He likely
needs to lead the Bucs to the
playoffs to prove he's worthy
of the hefty pay raise he
could command next year.
Tampa Bay hasn't made
the playoffs since 2007 and
doesn't have a postseason
victory since winning the
Super Bowl 11 years ago.
"There's always going
to be pressure, but it's all
internal," Freeman said,
shrugging off the notion
that because of his contract
status there's a greater sense
of urgency to get the Bucs
over the hump.
"When I look at things,
look at what I want to be
and who I want to be as a
player, it exceeds everything
that anybody else could
hope for," the 25-year-old
added. "When I leave the


TRENDING TOPIC TO WATCH
NO HUDDLES
Not a new development, but certainly more widespread than ever. Where once Peyton
Manning and Tom Brady were in the minority as they guided their offenses without
huddling, now nearly every team incorporates some elements of it. Most interesting will
be how it works with non-star quarterbacks such as Andy Dalton, or with inconsistent
ones whose decision making has been questioned did someone say Jay Cutler?
Or how it looks in Philadelphia, where coach Chip Kelly is bringing his go-go-go
offense from Oregon, using Michael Vick to run it and LeSean McCoy as the centerpiece
back.
"It's so hard for defenses to get their calls in, because we are going so fast,"McCoy
said. "And, we are keeping teams off-balance. When you run the ball that much,
defenses don't know what's coming. Plus, we're so spread out, it can be a run play that
turns into a pass."


game, I want to be regarded
as one of the best who ever
played."
Freeman became the first
passer in team history to
throw for 4,000 yards in a
season, and the Bucs offense
also set club records for
points, yards and touch-
downs in 2012.
But the quarterback's in-
consistency also contributed
to a late-season slide that
saw Tampa Bay lose five of
six down the stretch to finish
7-9 and miss the playoffs for
the fifth consecutive year.
The defense was a
problem, too, with a leaky
secondary and anemic


pass rush factoring in the
Bucs nearly setting a league
record for passing yards
allowed.
Enter cornerback Darrelle
Revis and safety Dashon
Goldson, offseason acquisi-
tions expected to make a
difference on defense. The
Bucs hope their arrival will
give Freeman and a potent
offense featuring running
back Doug Martin and
receivers Vincent Jackson
and Mike Williams more
opportunities to shine.
Revis, a three-time All-Pro
who's recovering from knee
surgery that sidelined him
most of last season with the


New York Jets, was obtained
in exchange for the 13th
overall pick in this year's
draft and given a six-year,
$96 million contract.
Goldson, an All-Pro last
season in San Francisco,
signed a five-year, $41.25
million deal as a free agent
after helping the 49ers reach
the Super Bowl.
"The organization did a
good job of bringing guys
in. ... I think we can get it
done," Goldson said. "In San
Francisco, it took time. Here,
it's going to be the same
way. We have a lot to build
on coming off last year."
Here are five things to
watch as Freeman tries
to lead Tampa Bay to the
playoffs for the first time in
his career:

1 REVIS ISLAND
Revis made a name
for himself in six sea-
sons with the Jets because of
his ability to blanket some
of the game's top receivers
in single coverage. The Bucs
have not rushed his return
from knee surgery in hopes
FREEMAN 134
cooo


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 33


1111116., ~-1114111111






:Pg 4F ca'Agt '


E PRO FOOTBALL


TAMiPA B.-1


75-MAN ROSTER


Position
Adams, Michael CB
Allen, Roger G
Baker, Sean S
Banks, Johnthan CB
Barron, Mark S
Black, Ahmad S
Bowers, Da'Quan DE
Byham, Nate TE
Carimi,Gabe T
Carr, Deveron CB
Casillas, Jonathan LB
Clayborn, Adrian DE
Crabtree, Tom TE
Daniels, Jace T
David, Lavonte LB
DeCicco, Dom LB
DePaola, Andrew LS
Dimke, Derek K
Dotson, Demar T
Douglas, David WR
Economos, Andrew LS
Foster, Mason LB
Freeman, Josh QB
Gholston, William DE
Gibson, Gary DT
Glaud, Ka'lial LB
Glennon, Mike QB
Goldson, Dashon S
Goode, Najee LB
Gorrer, Danny CB
Grimm, Cody S
Hayward, Adam LB
Henry, Chas P
Hillis, Peyton RB
Jackson,Vincent WR
James, Mike RB
Johnson, Leonard CB
Joseph, Davin G
Koenen, Michael P
Landri, Derek DT
Larsen, Ted C
Leonard, Brian RB
Levingston, Lazarius DE
Lindell, Rian K
Lorig, Erik FB
Martin, Doug RB
Masifilo, Matthew DT
McCoy, Gerald DT
Means, Steven DE
Melvin, Rashaan CB
Meredith, Jamon T
Morgan, Aaron DE
Neblett,.Andre DT
Nicks, Carl G
Noble, Danny TE
Ogletree, Kevin WR
Orlovsky, Dan QB
Owusu, Chris WR
Page, Eric WR
Penn, Donald T
Remmers, Mike T
Revis, Darrelle CB
Robinson, Mason CB
Scott, Trevor DE
Spence, Akeem DT
Stocker, Luke TE
Tandy, Keith S
Te'o-Nesheim, Daniel DE
Tynes, Lawrence K
Underwood, Tiquan WR
Wallace, Cody C/G
Watson, Dekoda LB
Williams, Mike WR
Wright, Tim TE
Zuttah, Jeremy C


ii


FREEMAN

FROM PAGE 33
that keeping out of preseason games
would enhance the chances of Revis
being fully recovered for the Sept. 8
regular season opener against his old
team.

2 SCHIANO IMPACT
Greg Schiano spent much of
last season his first as a NFL
head coach changing the culture
within a team that lost its final 10
games under predecessor Raheem
Morris. The Bucs improved from four
wins two years ago to seven under
Schiano, who's free now to focus on
coaching rather than selling his pro-
gram to the players. "The biggest thing
is that we all understand each other,"
Schiano said. "This is who we are,
this is what we are, this is how we do
things, and this is how we're going to
win." Schiano said. "The guys believe
it. The staff does, I do, and I think
there's a respect both ways."

RUN DOUGIE RUN
Second-year running back
Doug Martin made the Pro Bowl
as a rookie, rushing for 1,454 yards
and 11 touchdowns, while also finish-
ing third in the NFL behind Adrian
Peterson and Calvin Johnson with
1,926 total yards from scrimmage. If
Freeman is going to fulfill his potential,
the Bucs have to continue to run the
ball effectively.

WHO'S UP FRONT
The offensive line had a shaky
preseason, allowing Tampa Bay's
first three preseason opponents to
sack Freeman nine times. The unit
was expected to be a strength entering
training camp, partly because of the
anticipated return of injured guards
Carl Nicks and Davin Joseph. Joseph is
back. But Nicks is still recovering from
toe surgery, and it's uncertain when
he'll be ready play after being one of
two Buccaneers diagnosed with MRSA
infections.

THE PASS RUSH
Schiano brought in Revis and
Goldson to address needs in
the secondary, however another key
to getting better defensively will be
improving the pass rush. The Bucs had
27 sacks a year ago, third lowest in the
league. Tackle Gerald McCoy is com-
ing off his first Pro Bowl appearance,
and Schiano is hoping to get more
production out of young ends Adrian
Clayborn and Da'Quan Bowers.


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Tampa Bay Buccaneers coach Greg Schiano watches the first half of a preseason game against the
Dolphins in Miami Gardens. Schiano is in his second season as coach of the Bucs.






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:Page 34


Fiidav August ?0 21O?


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Frdy uut3,21 ae3


PRO FOOTBALL


MIAMI


E FIRST DOWN
FOUR GAMES TO WATCH
Oct. 6: vs. Baltimore
After easing into the season with games at Cleveland and
Indianapolis, respectively, the Dolphins face the defending
NFC South champion Falcons and defending Super Bowl
champion Baltimore with New Orleans in between. A win
against Baltimore, which beat Miami 26-10 in the teams'
last regular-season meeting in 2010, would be huge.
Oct. 27: at New England
The defending division champs will present a challenge in
Foxborough. At 36, Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is as
imposing as ever. For the Dolphins, who have struggled to
pressure QBs and create turnovers, a repeat the teams'last
meeting will not cut it. New England won 28-0.
Nov.11: at Tampa Bay
The Dolphins will be caught smack-dab in the middle of
a Warren Sapp sandwich, as the Bucs will retire his No. 99
and induct him into their Ring of Honor. Miami hopes the
Bucs get too caught up in the off-field activity.
Dec. 1: at New York Jets
This game against division rival New York kicks off a trifecta
of toughness for the Dolphins: After the Jets they travel to
Pittsburgh and then host New England.


I SECOND DOWN
FOUR NEWCOMERS TO WATCH
MIKE WALLACE
Receiver Free agent (Pittsburgh)
He wants to lead the NFL in receiving this season and his
role became more crucial with the loss ofTE Dustin Keller
- hurt in an exhibition game at Houston in which he tore
several knee ligaments for the season.

CALEB STURGIS
Kicker. Florida
Fifth-round draft pick beat incumbent Dan Carpenter, whose
hefty contract was terminated after five years with the Dolphins.
In a preseason game against Jacksonville, Sturgis made a 58-yard
field goal and sent all six of his kickoffs into the end zone.
BRENT GRIMES
Cornerback. Free agent (Atlanta)
Made Pro Bowl in 2011 and has 13 career interceptions. Is
recovering from torn Achilles'tendon suffered in the first
game of last season but has had a strong preseason. He has
shown the ability to be a ballhawk.

DANNELL ELLERBE
Linebacker. Free agent (Baltimore)
Another player whose speed and blitzing ability the
Dolphins are banking on. The team's buzzword is turnovers
and Ellerbe and others have said the emphasis on
turnovers is more than any camp they've been in.


THIRD DOWN
BI- SEASON OUTLOOK
It's been 13 years since the Dolphins won a playoffgame, 21
years since they reached the AFC championship game, 29 years
since making Super Bowl and 40 years since their most recent
NFL title. Attendance has declined, and the Miami Heat now
rival Dolphins in popularity in South Florida. But the Dolphins'
offseason was widely judged a success, and they believe
they're ready to win perhaps even in postseason.


FOURTH DOWN
THE ESSENTIALS
HOME GAMES: Sun Life Stadium, 2269 NW 199th St.,
Miami Gardens
DIRECTIONS: 1-75 to 1-595 East, to South on Florida
Turnpike, to exit 2X (Dolphin Toll Plaza), to the East side of
Sun Life Stadium.... 1-75 to 1-595 East, to South on Florida
Turnpike, to exit 47 (27th Ave./University Dr.), south on
27th Ave./University Dr. to the west side of the Stadium
PARKING: Lots open four hours prior to kickoff. Spaces are $25.
TICKETS: 1-888-346-7849, miamidolphins.com or
ticketmaster.com
RADIO: No stations are full-time affiliates
TV:WINK
AFC EAST OPPONENTS: New England Patriots (won
division last season), N.Y. Jets, Buffalo Bills
-From Staff, Associated Press reports


AP FILE PHOTO
Miami Dolphins wide receiver Mike Wallace, left, celebrates his touchdown with teammate Brian Hartline during the first half of a preseason game
against the Texans in Houston. The Dolphins upgraded their receiving corps with Wallace and Brandon Gibson.





Dolphins strive to





increase fun factor

Miami's game plan includes creating turnovers, excitement


By STEVEN WINE
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI Another train-
ing camp practice had just
ended, and Miami Dolphins
quarterback Ryan Tannehill
walked toward a lectern
to field the latest round of
media queries.
"Is this going to be good?"
someone asked as Tannehill
approached a cluster of
microphones.
"It's going to be great,"
Tannehill answered with a
smile, emphasizing the last
word. "Real exciting."
Instead, the interview
session was predictably
humdrum. Tannehill and
the Dolphins are saving any
excitement for the season.
After four consecutive
losing years, the franchise's
longest such skid since the
1960s, the Dolphins should
be more fun to watch in
2013. They upgraded their
unimposing corps of receiv-
ers by acquiring Mike Wallace
and Brandon Gibson, and an
already formidable defensive
front seven became faster
and younger with the addi-
tions of linebackers Philip
Wheeler, Dannell Ellerbe and
Dion Jordan, the No. 3 overall
draft pick. But an unsettled
offensive line raises ques-
tions about the Dolphins'


TRENDING TOPIC TO WATCH
NEW COACHES
Coaching turnover is a given in any sport, and the NFL's carousel nearly spun out of
control during the offseason. Buffalo, Jacksonville, Cleveland, San Diego, Kansas City,
Philadelphia, Chicago and Arizona all made head coaching changes, with all but the
Jaguars (Gus Bradley) selecting offense-minded replacements.
Several of the head men in new spots are proven commodities, although not
necessarily in the NFL. Andy Reid, of course, went to five NFC title games and one
Super Bowl with the Eagles, and he's primed to turn around a Chiefs team that has
far too much talent to be a last-place team. Bruce Arians was NFL Coach of the Year
in Indianapolis as an interim, then got hired in Arizona his first full-time head
coaching gig after nearly three decades as an assistant. Marc Trestman has won
championships in the CFL and brings offensive innovation to Chicago.
Getting their first cracks at being in charge are Bradley, Doug Marrone in Buffalo,
Chip Kelly in Philadelphia, Rob Chudzinski in Cleveland, and Mike McCoy in San Diego.


ability to run and protect
Tannehill, which means they
may again have trouble mov-
ing the ball.
Last year Miami lost five
games by a touchdown or
less, scoring 21 points or less
in all of them, en route to a
7-9 finish. A succession of
low-scoring games is again
likely in 2013.
Here are five things to
watch as the Dolphins try to
win the close ones:

TANNEHILL'S
TARGETS
The quarterback
threw for 3,294 yards last year
- more than fellow rookies
Robert Griffin III or Russell
Wilson but totaled just 12


touchdown passes, including
only three to wideouts. So
Miami upgraded the pass-
catching corps by acquiring
Wallace and Gibson to join
holdover Brian Hartline.
Wallace ranks among the
NFL's fastest players and
totaled 32 touchdown
catches in four years with
the Pittsburgh Steelers, and
he gives Tannehill the deep
threat he lacked last year
when the Dolphins ranked
27th in total yards. New TE
Dustin Keller's season-ending
knee injury eliminates one
important potential pass
target, and Miami is now
expected to use a lot of three-
wide formations.


TACKLE-TO-TACKLE
IMPROVEMENT?
Blocking has been
inconsistent the past several
seasons and remains the
biggest question mark for
second-year head coach
Joe Philbin, who coached
the offensive line as an NFL
assistant. Second-year pro
Jonathan Martin has moved
from right tackle to left tackle
and must prove he's a worthy
replacement for the departed
Jake Long. There's little depth
behind Martin, and the start-
ing job at right guard went
unclaimed during training
camp. Running backs Lamar
Miller and Daniel Thomas
both started slowly this
summer in their competition
to replace Reggie Bush, and
Miami might not muster
the kind of ground game
that would take pressure off
Tannehill.

TAKEAWAYS
WANTED
Miami tied for
fourth-worst in the NFL in
takeaways last year, and
improving that ranking is
Philbin's No. 1 priority. His
staff hung footballs from
the walls of defensive
DOLPHINS 36
cooo


SFriday, August 30, 2013


Page 35


1111116., ~-1114111111





YPg 6Fia, uut3,21


E PRO FOOTBALL


MIAMI *


75-MAN ROSTER


75-MAN ROSTER


Adams, Jeff
Applewhite, Antwan
Barker, Chris
Brenner, Sam
Bumphis, Chad
Carroll, Nolan
Clabo, Tyson
Clay, Charles
Clemons, Chris
Corp, Aaron
Davis, Keenan
Davis, Will
Denney, John
Devlin, Pat
Egnew, Michael
Ellerbe, Dannell
Fields, Brandon
Francis, A.J.
Freeny, Jonathan
Garner, Nate
Gibson, Brandon
Gillislee, Mike
Gray, Jonas
Grimes, Brent
Hartline, Brian
Highsmith, Alonzo
Incognito, Richie
Jenkins, Jelani
Jerry, John
Johnson, Keelan
Jones, Don
Jones, Reshad
Jordan, Dion
Kaddu, Josh
Kovacs, Jordan
Martin, Jonathan
Martin, Vaughn
Matthews, Rishard
McCray, Kelcie
McDonald, Andrew
McNutt, Marvin
Miller, Kyle
Miller, Lamar
Misi, Koa
Moore, Matt
Odrick, Jared
Okpalaugo, Tristan


DOLPHINS
FROM PAGE 35
meeting rooms so players
would become more
accustomed to swiping
at them. Three speedy
newcomers Philip
Ellerbe, Dannell Wheeler
and top draft pick Dion
Jordan are expected to
make the defense more
disruptive. New corner-
back Brent Grimes has 13
career interceptions and
won raves in camp for his
ball-hawking skills.

DOMINATE
UP FRONT
The front seven
has the potential to con-
trol the line of scrimmage,
with the charge being led
by 340-pound nose tackle
Paul Soliai and defensive
end Cameron Wake, who
has 43 sacks in four NFL
seasons. The group is so
stout Jordan will likely
see only spot duty in
passing situations even
when he's fully recovered
from shoulder surgery last
winter.

IS STABILITY A
GOOD THING?
For the first time
in the past three offsea-
sons, the Dolphins con-
ducted no head-coaching


long-term success for a
franchise that hasn't won
a postseason game since
2000.
"We certainly want to
make the playoffs," Ross
said. "But I want to see
growth in the team in
building the foundation
for this season and future
seasons. I don't want to
be a one-shot wonder."


WR
WR
T-
T-
G-
G-
C-
QB-
FB-
WB
WB
K-


No.
24
38
51
23
97
89
58
48
64
79
80
96
53
25
94
AP PHOTO 9
Miami coach Joe Philbin yells from the sidelines during the 17
second half of a preseason game against the Texans in Houston. 22
34
70
AT A GLANCE 33
93
COACH: Joe Philbin (2nd season, 7-9) 85
2012 REWIND: (7-9,2nd in AFC East; missed playoffs for 4th consecutive season) 50
NEW FACES: WR Mike Wallace, DE Dion Jordan, CB Brent Grimes, LB Dannell 91
Ellerbe, LB Philip Wheeler, WR Brandon Gibson, T Tyson Clabo, PK Caleb Sturgis. I11
KEY LOSSES: T Jake Long, RB Reggie Bush, LB Karlos Dansby, LB Kevin 52
Burnett, CB Sean Smith, WR Davone Bess, TE Anthony Fasano, K Dan 72
Carpenter.
STRENGTHS: DE, DT, WR.
WEAKNESSES: OL,TE, RB,CB.


Patterson, Dimitri
Posey, Julian
Pouncey, Mike
Presley, De'Andre
Randall, Kheeston
Robertson, Tracy
Robinson, Lee
Rodriguez, Evan
Samuda, Josh
Shelby, Derrick
Sims, Dion
Soliai, Paul
Spitler, Austin
Stanford, R.J.
Starks, Randy
Sturgis, Caleb
Tannehill, Ryan
Taylor, Jamar
Thigpen, Marcus
Thomas, Dallas
Thomas, Daniel
Trusnik, Jason
Tyms, Brian
Vernon, Olivier
Wake, Cameron
Wallace, Mike
Wheeler, Philip
Wilson, Jimmy
Yeatman, Will

PRO
OFFENSE
- Brian Hartline
- Brandon Gibson
Jonathan Martin
Jeff Adams
Richie Incognito
Dallas Thomas
Mike Pouncey
- Ryan Tannehill
- Jorvorskie Lane
- Lamar Miller
- Daniel Thomas
Caleb Sturgis


search. The quarterback
situation is also settled for
a change, with Tannehill
returning after he became
the first Dolphins rookie
QB to start all 16 games.
And much-maligned Jeff
Ireland is back for a sixth
season as general man-
ager. Owner Stephen Ross
endorsed all three and
said the emphasis is on


EJECTED STARTERS
DEFENSE
DL Olivier Vernon
DL Randy Starks
DL Paul Soliai
DL Cameron Wake
LB Philip Wheeler
LB Dannell Ellerbe
LB- Koa Misi
CB Brent Grimes
CB Dimitri Patterson
S- Chris Clemons
S Reshad Jones
P Brandon Fields


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:Page 36


Friday, August 30, 2013


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:Friday, August 30, 2013 Page 37


* PRO FOOTBALL




1 FIRST DOWN
U FOUR ROOKIES TO WATCH
RB GIOVANI BERNARD, SECOND ROUND, BENGALS
Cincinnati addressed a pressing need when it selected Bernard.
Can be an effective complement to power runner BenJarvus
Green-Ellis, and the threat on passes the Bengals have lacked.

TE ZACH SUDFELD, UNDRAFTED, PATRIOTS
Leave it to Bill Belichick to find a tight end just when
there's uncertainty about Rob Gronkowski's return, and
plenty of certainty Aaron Hernandez won't be back.
Sudfeld has excellent hands, good size and quickness.

CB DEE MILLINER, FIRST ROUND, JETS
Milliner has the task of filling the chasm left by the trade
of Darrelle Revis to the Bucs. While Antonio Cromartie will
assume Revis'role, Milliner likely will be tested often.

PK CALEB STURGIS, FIFTH ROUND, DOLPHINS
Dan Carpenter has been one of the NFL's better kickers for five
seasons, but the Dolphins didn't hesitate to release him and
give the job to the kid from Florida with the big leg.


E SECOND DOWN
FOUR QUARTERBACKS WHO NEED TO PRODUCE

BLAINE GABBERT, JAGUARS
The biggest thing Jacksonville needs to get out of this
season is clarity at quarterback. Gabbert's the starter with
a chance to prove he's the real deal. If he doesn't, it's back
to the draft board next year for the Jaguars.

BRANDON WEEDEN, BROWNS
Operating under a new offense coordinated by Norv Turner,
who has a history of improving untested quarterbacks.
IfWeeden doesn't take the next step in his second pro
season, and at age 30, Cleveland will look elsewhere.
MATT FLYNN, RAIDERS
Couldn't out rookie Russell Wilson with the Seahawks
despite getting a big free agent contract to join them. Now
he is with perhaps the weakest team in football. No one will
have a tougher time succeeding than Flynn.

PHILIP RIVERS, CHARGERS
Rivers can be superb when he has weapons around him,
but the Chargers have had a talent drain in recent years. He
has struggled to make the right decisions and is prone to
turnovers. Needs to avoid forcing things.


E THIRD DOWN
FOUR VETERANS TO WATCH
S MICHAEL HUFF, RAVENS
The replacement for Ed Reed. Doesn't have Reed's 61
interceptions, but at 30, he is younger and faster.

QB ALEX SMITH, CHIEFS
The most accomplished quarterback the Chiefs have
started a season with since Joe Montana in 1993.

S ED REED, TEXANS
Former defensive player of the year and Super Bowl champ,
34, has lost a step and is on PUP list recovering from hip
surgery. Plans to be ready for the opener at San Diego.

WR DARRIUS HEYWARD-BEY, COLTS
Signed for $3 million, with $1.5 million guaranteed, but at
least the Colts were smart enough to make it a one-year deal.



I FOURTH DOWN
FOUR SUPER BOWL CONTENDERS

DENVER BRONCOS
Added Wes Welker to their receiving corps for Peyton Manning,
and are among the hot choices to reach the Super Bowl.

NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
Tom Brady's knee appears to be fine, and if history repeats itself
he'll turn rookie TE Zach Sudfield into the new Wes Welker.

BALTIMORE RAVENS
Will have to handle losing Ray Lewis and Ed Reed, but signed
a variety of well-priced free agents, including Elvis Dumervil.

HOUSTON TEXANS
Odds are with them, but have never won playoffgame.
-From Staff, AP, MCT reports


AFC


AP PHOTO
Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco throws against the Atlanta Falcons during a preseason game in Baltimore. After leading the Ravens to a
Super Bowl victory last season, Flacco signed a six-year deal worth $120.6M in the offseason.




Ravens, Broncos, Patriots



... and Texans? Oh, my!


By SAM FARMER
Los ANGELES TIMES
Houston, we have a
problem.
Every NFL team has ap-
peared in at least one confer-
ence championship game ...
except the Texans.
Pittsburgh has been in 15.
Dallas and San Francisco have
been in 14 each. Conference-
hopping Seattle has appeared
in both the NFC and AFC title
games.
There's a chance that
could change this season, as
Houston has made a slow but
steady ascent into the rarefied
air of the NFL elite.
The Texans, who made
their debut in 2002 and are
the league's youngest fran-
chise, first made the playoffs
in their 10th season and
won a 2011 wild-card game
against Cincinnati with
little-known rookie T.J. Yates
at quarterback before
losing in the divisional round
at Baltimore. Last season,
the Texans won again in the
wild-card round, beating
Cincinnati before losing at
New England.
So for two years in a row,
Houston has been stopped at
the doorstep to the doorstep
of the Super Bowl, despite
winning consecutive AFC
South titles. They finished
12-4 last season, and in the
top 10 in both offense and
defense.
In an AFC that lacks a
wealth of powerhouse teams,
the time is right for the Texans
to finally join the club.
A look at the biggest ques-
tions for the AFC's top five
teams.


TRENDING TOPIC TO WATCH
REQUIRED PADS
Knee and thigh pads have become required equipment and the speed guys aren't
thrilled about it.
"It's not going to stop no injuries,"Tennessee Titans safety Bernard Pollard said of the
player safety measure. "You can put pads on all you want to. If you get hit in the knee
the wrong way you're going to tear an ACL. You're going to sprain something. You're
going to get a contusion."
During pregame warm-ups, league inspectors 32 former players will check for
the pads, noting any violations and giving the info to a team representative so players
can make adjustments. During a game, a player without proper padding must be
removed until the problem is fixed.


DENVER
Can the Broncos live up to the
hype?
Last summer, this team
was in wait-and-see mode,
with everyone wondering
how well Peyton Manning
would rebound from mul-
tiple neck procedures. Well,
Manning was runner-up
to Adrian Peterson for the
most-valuable-player award,
and the Broncos' defense was
even more potent than its of-
fense. Now, the team has slot
receiver Wes Welker to go with
outside starters Demaryius
Thomas and Eric Decker,
promise at running back, and
a truckload of expectations.
They were 13-3 last season,
and anything short of the
Super Bowl will be a disap-
pointment for the bulk of
their fan base.

2 HOUSTON
Andre, check. Now how about
DeAndre?
The Texans have long
searched for a complement
to No. 1 receiver Andre
Johnson, among the best in


the league. They think they've
found one in first-round pick
DeAndre Hopkins, who reeled
in 18 touchdown passes at
Clemson last season and led
the Atlantic Coast Conference
in receiving. Reports are
that Hopkins has picked up
the offense quickly and QB
Matt Schaub said the rookie
doesn't have a "deer in the
headlights" look. Well, that's
a start.

3 BALTIMORE
Will the Ravens'defense be
better without future Hall of
Famers Ray Lewis and Ed Reed?
Set at quarterback with Joe
Flacco signed, Baltimore is
younger and faster with its
new defensive additions, in-
cluding its best pass-rushing
bookend to Terrell Suggs in
Elvis Dumervil. Lardarius
Webb, the team's best corner,
is back after a knee injury
sidelined him for the final 10
regular-season games and the
playoffs. Suggs, who suffered
a torn Achilles' and torn
biceps last season, has recov-
ered, as has DT Haloti Ngata
(knee). Much is expected of


rookie S Matt Elam, a first-
round pick from Florida.

4 NEW ENGLAND
Who will be on the other end
of Tom Brady's passes?
Wes Welker is in Denver,
Rob Gronkowski is recovering
from back surgery and likely
to miss the start of the season.
New England's cast of pass
catchers, once among the
NFL's most potent, is sudden-
ly looking mighty thin when
the season opens. The team's
top returning targets from last
season are Julian Edelman
(21 catches), and running
backs Shane Vereen (eight)
and Stevan Ridley (six). The
addition of Danny Amendola
helps, but it doesn't make up
for losing 82 percent of last
season's receptions.

5 CINCINNATI
Are the Bengals ready for
their close-up?
The Bengals were back
on "Hard Knocks," a prime
showcase for coordinators
Mike Zimmer and Jay Gruden,
both of whom could be head
coaches next season. Marvin
Lewis got the benefit of being
in that spotlight in 2001 as
defensive coordinator of the
Baltimore Ravens. Zimmer
consistently fields one of
the NFL's better defenses.
Gruden, younger brother of
Jon, is heading into his third
season and has what figures
to be his best all-around of-
fense. Will that translate into
respectable numbers? The
Bengals haven't had a top-20
offense in five years. ...


:Friday, August 30, 2013


Page 37


~11)11111





Pae3 iIIVAjs


* PRO FOOTBALL



B FIRST DOWN
FOUR ROOKIES TO WATCH
DB TYRANN MATHIEU, THIRD-ROUND, CARDINALS
"Honey Badger"figures to be nickel back, could be a ballhawk in
the secondary and certainly will have a role as a kick returned.

P JEFF LOCKE, SIXTH ROUND, VIKINGS
Locke sends punts 60 and 65 yards with regularity. Will punt
eight times indoors this season, and could be a big factor.

C TRAVIS FREDERICK, FIRST ROUND, COWBOYS
Cowboys are plugging him right in. "Frederick is doing so
well at center and he's a rookie; we don't want to move
him,"VP Stephen Jones said.

WR TAVON AUSTIN, FIRST ROUND, RAMS
Deep threat runs a 4.34 in the 40, has good moves and is
dangerous in the open field. Sam Bradford has the arm to get
him the ball, and Austin can work out of the slot or outside.


I SECOND DOWN
FOUR QUARTERBACKS WHO NEED TO PRODUCE

CHRISTIAN PONDER, VIKINGS
Ponder must become functional enough in his third season
to allow Adrian Peterson to run even wilder. Otherwise,
there likely will be a new QB in town in 2014.

JAY CUTLER, BEARS
The poster child for inconsistency. Is lights-out good when on,
destructive to the offense when he isn't. To get top dollar, he
needs to lead the team into the playoffs in a tough division.

MICHAEL VICK, EAGLES
Ready to play the way that made him famous, and he's not
worried about injuries that could come as a result. Spent
offseason preparing for more running, training his legs.

TONY RoMO, COWBOYS
Blame for missing the playoffs last year often centers
around him. Has a 1-6 record in elimination games and a
penchant for critical mistakes.



THIRD DOWN
FouR VETERANS TO WATCH
OT JAKE LONG, RAMS
If he's healthy the Rams found some needed protection for
Sam Bradford, who was sacked 35 times last season.

OLB CONNOR BARWIN, EAGLES
The Eagles are going to a 3-4 defense, and to make it work,
rush linebackers like Barwin are essential.

RB ADRIAN PETERSON, VIKINGS
The league's defending MVP says he's better than ever. Can
he top last season's 2,097 yards? Don't bet against him.

WR PERCY HARVIN, SEAHAWKS
Recently had surgery to repair a torn labrum in his hip and is on
PUP list. Dec. 2 against New Orleans is potential return date.



FOURTH DOWN
FOUR SUPER BOWL CONTENDERS
ANYONE FROM THE EAST
The Giants seem to be best flying under the radar, so if you
count them out you might as well pencil them in for the
big game; which they are hosting. If Robert Griffin III stays
healthy it's hard to argue against the Redskins. A bulked-
up Michael Vick for the Eagles and the return of Sean Lee
for the Cowboys could be key factors for teams that haven't
quite been able to put it all together recently.

SEATTLE SEAHAWKS
Russell Wilson silenced doubters and asserted himself among the
league's top passers. Seattle was breathing down the 49ers'neck
last season and could be the team to beat in the NFC West.

SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS
The 49ers, who came alive after the Superdome blackout
and nearly stole the title from Baltimore last season, are
among the favorites to reach the Meadowlands.

ATLANTA FALCONS
If the Falcons are going to reach the Super Bowl, the offense
likely will have to lead way in the NFL's pass-first era.
-From Staff AP, MCT reports


NFC


Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson drops back to pass during the a preseason football game against the Green Bay Packers in Green Bay,
Wis. Wilson is entering his second year as a pro after becoming the only rookie quarterback since the merger with three game-winning passes in
the final two minutes of of regulation or overtime.




NFC's biggest question:




Can it be Super again?


By SAM FARMER
Sll ..\ ( Ih.Is lth- IIt.I i hi



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TRENDING TOPIC TO WATCH THIS SEASON
ZONE READ OFFENSES
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SEATTLE
Can the Seahawks get out of
their own way?
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SAN FRANCISCO
Who will Colin Kaepernick
throw to?
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GREEN BAY

What's that ringing sound?
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4 ATLANTA
Are the Falcons swinging for
the fences?
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NEW YORK
Why do the Giants have their
fingers crossed?


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ERBMR ~~III~IIIII


:Page 38


F,,dav Au.gu t ?.1 21 1






Friday, August 30, 2013


Page 39


TEAM SCHEDULES


Sep. 5
Sep. 15
Sep. 22
Sep. 29
Oct.6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 10
Nov. 17
Nov. 24
Nov. 28
Dec. 8
Dec. 16
Dec. 22
Dec. 29


Sep. 8
Sep. 15
Sep. 22
Sep. 29
Oct.3
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 10
Nov. 17
Nov. 24
Dec.1
Dec. 8
Dec. 15
Dec. 22
Dec. 29


Sep. 8
Sep. 16
Sep. 22
Sep. 29
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Oct.31
Nov. 1C
Nov. 17
Nov. 24
Dec. 1
Dec. 8
Dec. 15
Dec. 22
Dec. 29


Sep. 8
Sep. 15
Sep. 22
Sep. 29
Oct.3
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 1C
Nov.17
Nov. 24
Dec. 1
Dec. 8
Dec. 15
Dec. 22
Dec. 29


Sep. 5
Sep. 15
Sep. 23
Sep. 29
Oct.6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 1C
Nov. 17
Nov. 24
Dec.1
Dec. 8
Dec.12
Dec. 22
Dec. 29


Sep. 9
Sep. 15
Sep. 22
Sep. 29
Oct.6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 1C
Nov. 17
Nov. 24
Dec.1
Dec. 5
Dec. 15
Dec. 22
Dec. 29


at Chicago
Pittsburgh
Green Bay
at Cleveland
New England
at Buffalo
at Detroit
N.Y.Jets
at Miami
at Baltimore
Cleveland
BYE
at San Diego
Indianapolis
at Pittsburgh
Minnesota
Baltimore


1 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.

4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


CLEVELAND BROWNS


Miami
at Baltimore
at Minnesota
Cincinnati
Buffalo
Detroit
at Green Bay
at Kansas City
Baltimore
BYE
at Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Jacksonville
at New England
Chicago
at N.Y. Jets
at Pittsburgh


1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.

1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


DENVER BRONCOS
Baltimore 830 p.m.
at N.Y. Giants 4:25 p.m.
Oakland 8:40p.m.
Philadelphia 4:25 p.m.
at Dallas 4:25 p.m.
Jacksonville 4:05 p.m.
at Indianapolis 830 p.m.
Washington 4:25 p.m.
BYE
at San Diego 4:25 p.m.
Kansas City 4:05 p.m.
at New England 6:30 p.m.
at Kansas City 1 p.m.
Tennessee 4:05 p.m.
San Diego 8:25 p.m.
at Houston 1 p.m.
at Oakland 4:25 p.m.
HOUSTON TEXANS


10:20 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1p.m.
830p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.

830p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1P.M.
1P.M.
1P.M.


BALTIMORE RAVENS
at Denver 830 p.m.
Cleveland 1 p.m.
Houston 1 p.m.
at Buffalo 1 p.m.
at Miami 1 p.m.
Green Bay 1 p.m.
at Pittsburgh 4:25 p.m.
BYE
at Cleveland 4:25 p.m.
Cincinnati 1 p.m.
at Chicago 1 p.m.
S N.Y.Jets 1 p.m.
B Pittsburgh 830 p.m.
Minnesota 1 p.m.
at Detroit 8:40 p.m.
New England 830 p.m.
at Cincinnati 1 p.m.
BUFFALO BILLS
New England 1 p.m.
Carolina 1 p.m.
at N.Y.Jets 4:25 p.m.
Baltimore 1 p.m.
at Cleveland 8:25 p.m.
Cincinnati 1 p.m.
at Miami 1 p.m.
at New Orleans 1 p.m.
KansasCity 1p.m.
I at Pittsburgh 1 p.m.
N.Y.Jets 1 p.m.
4 BYE
Atlanta (Toronto) 4:05 p.m.
at Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
at Jacksonville 1 p.m.
Miami 1 p.m.
at New England 1 p.m.
CINCINNATI BENGALS


AP PHOTO

Houston's Matt Schaub hopes
to lead a Super Bowl run.


INDIANAPOLIS COLTS
Sep.8 Oakland 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 Miami 1 p.m.
Sep. 22 at San Francisco 4:25 p.m.
Sep.29 atJacksonville 1 p.m.
Oct. 6 Seattle 1 p.m.
Oct. 14 at San Diego 8:40 p.m.
Oct. 20 Denver 8:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 BYE
Nov. 3 at Houston 8:30 p.m.
Nov.10 St. Louis 1 p.m.
Nov. 14 atTennessee 8:25 p.m.
Nov.24 atArizona 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 1 Tennessee 1 p.m.
Dec.8 at Cincinnati 1 p.m.
Dec.15 Houston 1 p.m.
Dec.22 atKansasCity 1 p.m.
Dec.29 Jacksonville 1 p.m.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS
Sep.8 Kansas City 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 at Oakland 4:25 p.m.
Sep. 22 at Seattle 4:25 p.m.
Sep.29 Indianapolis 1 p.m.
Oct.6 at St. Louis 1 p.m.
Oct. 13 at Denver 4:05 p.m.
Oct. 20 San Diego 1 p.m.
Oct. 27 San Francisco (London)1 p.m.
Nov. 3 BYE
Nov.10 atTennessee 1 p.m.
Nov.17 Arizona 1 p.m.
Nov.24 at Houston 1 p.m.
Dec.1 at Cleveland 1 p.m.
Dec. 5 Houston 8:25 p.m.
Dec.15 Buffalo 1 p.m.
Dec.22 Tennessee 1 p.m.
Dec.29 at Indianapolis 1 p.m.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS
Sep.8 atJacksonville 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 Dallas 1 p.m.
Sep. 19 at Philadelphia 8:25 p.m.
Sep.29 N.Y.Giants 1 p.m.
Oct. 6 atTennessee 1 p.m.
Oct. 13 Oakland 1 p.m.
Oct. 20 Houston 1 p.m.
Oct. 27 Cleveland 1 p.m.
Nov. 3 at Buffalo 1 p.m.
Nov.10 BYE
Nov.17 at Denver 4:05 p.m.
Nov.24 San Diego 1 p.m.
Dec. 1 Denver 1 p.m.
Dec.8 atWashington 1 p.m.
Dec.15 at Oakland 4:05 p.m.
Dec.22 Indianapolis 1 p.m.
Dec. 29 at San Diego 4:25 p.m.
MIAMI DOLPHINS
Sep.8 at Cleveland 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 at Indianapolis 1 p.m.
Sep. 22 Atlanta 4:05 p.m.
Sep.30 at NewOrleans 8:40p.m.
Oct. 6 Baltimore 1 p.m.
Oct. 13 BYE
Oct. 20 Buffalo 1 p.m.
Oct. 27 at New England 1 p.m.
Oct. 31 Cincinnati 8:25 p.m.
Nov. 11 atTampa Bay 8:40 p.m.
Nov.17 San Diego 1 p.m.
Nov.24 Carolina 1 p.m.
Dec.1 at N.Y.Jets 1 p.m.
Dec.8 at Pittsburgh 1 p.m.
Dec.15 NewEngland 1 p.m.
Dec.22 at Buffalo 1 p.m.
Dec.29 N.Y.Jets 1 p.m.


Sep. 8
Sep.1
Sep. 2
Sep. 2
Oct. 7
Oct.1
Oct. 2
Oct. 2
Nov. 3
Nov.1
Nov.1
Nov. 2
Dec.1
Dec. 8
Dec.1
Dec. 2
Dec. 2


Sep. 8
Sep.1
Sep. 2
Sep. 2
Oct. 6
Oct.1
Oct. 2
Oct. 2
Nov. 3
Nov.1
Nov.1
Nov. 2
Nov. 2
Dec. 8
Dec.1
Dec. 2
Dec. 2


Sep. 8
Sep.1
Sep. 2
Sep. 2
Oct. 6
Oct.1
Oct. 2
Oct. 2
Nov. 3
Nov.1
Nov.1
Nov. 2
Nov. 2
Dec. 8
Dec.1
Dec. 2
Dec. 2


2
2
9

3
0
7

0
7
24


5
22
29



5
3
9

3
0
7

0
7
24
28

5
22
29


Tampa Bay
at New England
Buffalo
at Tennessee
atAtlanta
Pittsburgh
New England
at Cincinnati
NewOrleans
BYE
at Buffalo
at Baltimore
Miami
Oakland
at Carolina
Cleveland
at Miami


OAKLAND RAIDERS


at Indianapolis
Jacksonville
at Denver
Washington
San Diego
at Kansas City
BYE
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
at N.Y. Giants
at Houston
Tennessee
at Dallas
at N.Y. Jets
Kansas City
at San Diego
Denver


1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.

1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


I p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.

4:05 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.


PITTSBURGH STEELERS


Tennessee 1 p.m.
6 at Cincinnati 8:40 p.m.
2 Chicago 8:30 p.m.
9 at Minnesota (London)1 p.m.
BYE
3 at N.Y. Jets 1 p.m.
0 Baltimore 4:25 p.m.
7 at Oakland 4:00 p.m.
at New England 4:25 p.m.
0 Buffalo 1 p.m.
7 Detroit 1 p.m.
24 at Cleveland 1 p.m.
28 at Baltimore 8:30 p.m.
Miami 1 p.m.
5 Cincinnati 8:30 p.m.
2 at Green Bay 4:25 p.m.
9 Cleveland 1 p.m.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS


Houston
at Philadelphia
atTennessee
Dallas
at Oakland
Indianapolis
at Jacksonville
BYE
atWashington
Denver
at Miami
at Kansas City
Cincinnati
N.Y. Giants
at Denver
Oakland
Kansas City


TENNESSEE TITANS


at Pittsburgh
at Houston
San Diego
N.Y. Jets
Kansas City
at Seattle
San Francisco
BYE
at St. Louis
Jacksonville
Indianapolis
at Oakland
at Indianapolis
at Denver
Arizona
at Jacksonville
Houston


10:20 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.

1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.


1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
4:05 p.m.

1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


Sep.8
Sep.15
Sep.22
Sep.29
Oct. 6
Oct.13
Oct. 20
Oct. 24
Nov.3
Nov.10
Nov.18
Nov.24
Dec.1
Dec. 8
Dec.15
Dec.22
Dec.29


Sep.8
Sep.15
Sep.22
Sep.29
Oct. 6
Oct.10
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 4
Nov.10
Nov.17
Nov.24
Dec. 1
Dec. 9
Dec.15
Dec.22
Dec.29


Sep.8
Sep.15
Sep.22
Sep.29
Oct. 6
Oct.13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov.3
Nov.10
Nov.17
Nov.24
Nov.28
Dec. 9
Dec.15
Dec.22
Dec.29


Sep.8
Sep.15
Sep.22
Sep.29
Oct. 6
Oct.13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov.3
Nov.10
Nov.17
Nov.24
Nov.28
Dec. 8
Dec.16
Dec.22
Dec.29


Seattle
at Buffalo
N.Y. Giants
BYE
at Arizona
at Minnesota
St. Louis
at Tampa Bay
Atlanta
at San Francisco
New England
at Miami
Tampa Bay
at New Orleans
N.Y.Jets
NewOrleans
at Atlanta
CHICAGO BEARS
Cincinnati
Minnesota
at Pittsburgh
at Detroit
NewOrleans
N.Y. Giants
at Washington
BYE
at Green Bay
Detroit
Baltimore
at St. Louis
at Minnesota
Dallas
at Cleveland
at Philadelphia
Green Bay


DALLAS COWBOYS


N.Y. Giants
at Kansas City
St. Louis
at San Diego
Denver
Washington
at Philadelphia
at Detroit
Minnesota
at New Orleans
BYE
at N.Y. Giants
Oakland
at Chicago
Green Bay
at Washington
Philadelphia
DETROIT LIONS
Minnesota
at Arizona
at Washington
Chicago
at Green Bay
at Cleveland
Cincinnati
Dallas
BYE
at Chicago
at Pittsburgh
Tampa Bay
Green Bay
at Philadelphia
Baltimore
N.Y. Giants
at Minnesota


1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.

4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
1 p.m.

8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


8:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:30 p.m.

4:25 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.

1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.


NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
Sep.8 at Buffalo 1 p.m.
Sep. 12 N.Y. Jets 8:25 p.m.
Sep. 22 Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
Sep.29 at Atlanta 8:30 p.m.
Oct.6 at Cincinnati 1 p.m.
Oct. 13 NewOrleans 4:25 p.m.
Oct. 20 at N.Y. Jets 1 p.m.
Oct.27 Miami 1 p.m.
Nov.3 Pittsburgh 4:25 p.m.
Nov.10 BYE
Nov.18 at Carolina 8:40 p.m.
Nov.24 Denver 8:30p.m.
Dec.1 at Houston 4:25 p.m.
Dec.8 Cleveland 1 p.m.
Dec.15 at Miami 1 p.m.
Dec.22 at Baltimore 8:30 p.m.
Dec.29 Buffalo 1 p.m.
NEW YORK JETS


Sep.8
Sep. 15
Sep. 22
Sep.29
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 4
Nov.10
Nov.17
Nov.24
Nov. 28
Dec. 8
Dec.15
Dec.22
Dec.29


Sep.8
Sep. 15
Sep. 22
Sep.29
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct.21
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 7
Nov.17
Nov.24
Dec.1
Dec. 8
Dec.15
Dec.22
Dec.29


Sep.8
Sep. 15
Sep. 22
Sep. 30
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov.10
Nov.17
Nov.21
Dec. 2
Dec. 8
Dec.15
Dec.22
Dec.29


Sep.8
Sep. 15
Sep. 22
Sep.29
Oct. 6
Oct. 10
Oct.21
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov.10
Nov.17
Nov.24
Dec.1
Dec. 8
Dec.15
Dec.22
Dec.29


at San Francisco
Washington
at Cincinnati
BYE
Detroit
at Baltimore
Cleveland
at Minnesota
Chicago
Philadelphia
at N.Y. Giants
Minnesota
at Detroit
Atlanta
at Dallas
Pittsburgh
at Chicago


4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.

1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.


MINNESOTA VIKINGS
at Detroit 1 p.m.
at Chicago 1 p.m.
Cleveland 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh (London) 1 p.m.
BYE
Carolina 1 p.m.
at N.Y. Giants 8:40 p.m.
Green Bay 8:30 p.m.
at Dallas 1 p.m.
Washington 8:25 p.m.
at Seattle 4:25 p.m.
at Green Bay 1 p.m.
Chicago 1 p.m.
at Baltimore 1 p.m.
Philadelphia 1 p.m.
at Cincinnati 1 p.m.
Detroit 1 p.m.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS


Atlanta
at Tampa Bay
Arizona
Miami
at Chicago
at New England
BYE
Buffalo
at N.Y. Jets
Dallas
San Francisco
at Atlanta
at Seattle
Carolina
at St. Louis
at Carolina
Tampa Bay


NEW YORK GIANTS


at Dallas
Denver
at Carolina
at Kansas City
Philadelphia
at Chicago
Minnesota
at Philadelphia
BYE
Oakland
Green Bay
Dallas
at Washington
at San Diego
Seattle
at Detroit
Washington


ARIZONA CARDINALS
Sep. 8 at St. Louis 4:25 p.m.
Sep. 15 Detroit 4:05 p.m.
Sep. 22 at New Orleans 1 p.m.
Sep.29 at Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
Oct. 6 Carolina 4:05 p.m.
Oct. 13 at San Francisco 4:25 p.m.
Oct. 17 Seattle 8:25 p.m.
Oct. 27 Atlanta 4:25 p.m.
Nov.3 BYE
Nov. 10 Houston 4:25 p.m.
Nov.17 at Jacksonville 1 p.m.
Nov.24 Indianapolis 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 1 at Philadelphia 1 p.m.
Dec. 8 St. Louis 4:25 p.m.
Dec. 15 at Tennessee 1 p.m.
Dec. 22 at Seattle 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 29 San Francisco 4:25 p.m.
ATLANTA FALCONS
Sep. 8 at New Orleans 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 St. Louis 1 p.m.
Sep. 22 at Miami 4:05 p.m.
Sep. 29 New England 8:30 p.m.
Oct. 7 N.Y.Jets 8:40 p.m.
Oct. 13 BYE
Oct.20 Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
Oct.27 at Arizona 4:25 p.m.
Nov. 3 at Carolina 1 p.m.
Nov.10 Seattle 1 p.m.
Nov.17 at Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
Nov.21 NewOrleans 8:25 p.m.
Dec. 1 at Buffalo (Toronto) 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 8 at Green Bay 8:30 p.m.
Dec. 15 Washington 1 p.m.
Dec. 23 at San Francisco 8:40 p.m.
Dec. 29 Carolina 1 p.m.
CAROLINA PANTHERS


1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.

1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


at N.Y.Jets
NewOrleans
at New England
Arizona
BYE
Philadelphia
at Atlanta
Carolina
at Seattle
Miami
Atlanta
at Detroit
at Carolina
Buffalo
San Francisco
at St. Louis
at New Orleans


1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.

1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
8:40p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


WASHINGTON REDSKINS


8:30 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
1 p.m.

1 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.


Philadelphia
at Green Bay
Detroit
at Oakland
BYE
at Dallas
Chicago
at Denver
San Diego
at Minnesota
at Philadelphia
San Francisco
N.Y. Giants
Kansas City
atAtlanta
Dallas
at N.Y. Giants


7:10 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.

8:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:40 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


PRO FOOTBALL


AP PHOTO

Julio Jones hopes to help
Atlanta haul in a Super Bowl.

GREEN BAY PACKERS


11101111y.~ ~1110111111


at San Diego
Tennessee
at Baltimore
Seattle
at San Francisco
St. Louis
at Kansas City
BYE
Indianapolis
at Arizona
Oakland
Jacksonville
New England
at Jacksonville
at Indianapolis
Denver
at Tennessee


PHILADELPHIA EAGLES
Sep. 9 atWashington 7:10 p.m.
Sep. 15 San Diego 1 p.m.
Sep. 19 Kansas City 8:25 p.m.
Sep. 29 at Denver 4:25 p.m.
Oct.6 at N.Y.Giants 1 p.m.
Oct. 13 atTampa Bay 1 p.m.
Oct. 20 Dallas 1 p.m.
Oct. 27 N.Y.Giants 1 p.m.
Nov. 3 at Oakland 4:05 p.m.
Nov. 10 at Green Bay 1 p.m.
Nov.17 Washington 1 p.m.
Nov. 24 BYE
Dec. 1 Arizona 1 p.m.
Dec. 8 Detroit 1 p.m.
Dec. 15 at Minnesota 1 p.m.
Dec. 22 Chicago 1 p.m.
Dec.29 at Dallas 1 p.m.
ST. Louis RAMS
Sep. 8 Arizona 4:25 p.m.
Sep. 15 atAtlanta 1 p.m.
Sep. 22 at Dallas 1 p.m.
Sep. 26 San Francisco 8:25 p.m.
Oct. 6 Jacksonville 1p.m.
Oct. 13 at Houston 1 p.m.
Oct. 20 at Carolina 1 p.m.
Oct. 28 Seattle 8:40 p.m.
Nov.3 Tennessee 1p.m.
Nov. 10 at Indianapolis 1 p.m.
Nov.17 BYE
Nov. 24 Chicago 1p.m.
Dec. 1 at San Francisco 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 8 atArizona 4:25 p.m.
Dec. 15 NewOrleans 1 p.m.
Dec.22 Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
Dec. 29 at Seattle 4:25 p.m.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS
Sep. 8 Green Bay 4:25 p.m.
Sep. 15 at Seattle 8:30 p.m.
Sep. 22 Indianapolis 4:25 p.m.
Sep. 26 at St. Louis 8:25 p.m.
Oct. 6 Houston 8:30 p.m.
Oct. 13 Arizona 4:25 p.m.
Oct. 20 atTennessee 4:05 p.m.
Oct. 27 at Jacksonville (London)1 p.m.
Nov. 3 BYE
Nov.10 Carolina 4:05 p.m.
Nov.17 at NewOrleans 4:25p.m.
Nov.25 atWashington 8:40 p.m.
Dec. 1 St. Louis 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 8 Seattle 4:25p.m.
Dec. 15 atTampa Bay 1 p.m.
Dec. 23 Atlanta 8:40 p.m.
Dec. 29 at Arizona 4:25 p.m.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS
Sep. 8 at Carolina 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 San Francisco 8:30 p.m.
Sep. 22 Jacksonville 4:25 p.m.
Sep. 29 at Houston 1 p.m.
Oct. 6 at Indianapolis 1 p.m.
Oct. 13 Tennessee 4:05 p.m.
Oct. 17 atArizona 8:25 p.m.
Oct. 28 at St. Louis 8:40 p.m.
Nov. 3 Tampa Bay 4:05 p.m.
Nov. 10 atAtlanta 1p.m.
Nov.17 Minnesota 4:25 p.m.
Nov. 24 BYE
Dec.2 NewOrleans 8:40 p.m.
Dec. 8 at San Francisco 4:25 p.m.
Dec.15 at N.Y.Giants 1 p.m.
Dec. 22 Arizona 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 29 St. Louis 4:25 p.m.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS




SPage 40 Friday, August 30, 2013











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2 Rib Meals.......................................................................................................$4.99
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HOMES FOR SALE
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BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcome,black
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community'!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Prop ertiesforsale.com


6 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
PRAIRIE CREEK
PARK BEAUTY!
MANY CUSTOM FEATURES
LIKE NEW 3400SF 3 BDRM,
SPACIOUS MASTER STE & BATH
+ OFFICE, 4 FULL BATHS,
FORMAL DINING RM, LIVING RM,
GREAT RM, LANAI AND OVER-
SIZED 2 STALL ATT GARAGE
$159,000--$119,000
NOW $439,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALuSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
S941-456-8304


PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


U


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


BOBCATTRAIL LAKEFRONT
Fero built. Great room plan
with heated pool & spa!
3/2.5 baths/2 car garage.
All tile. Deluxe master, huge
custom closet! Separate
guest wing.
$312,000, MLS# C7045094
"Selling With Integrity"
941-629-2100
AGGRE IVE


UeePr LicRciE, :, _
Heated POOL Home. Storm
Shutters, Covered Lanai.
Well Maintained!
Doris Walters,
Bud Trayner Realty.
941-661-4019

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!





DEEP CREEK
3/2/2 Heated Pool Home
Updated Kitchen -
Wood Cabinets. Beautifully
Landscaped Property
Built in 2004 $239,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty


Listing Price $55,000 Sol


Real Estate 1000
Employment 2000
Notices 3000
Financial 4000
Business Service 5000
Merchandise/Garage Sales 6000
Transportation/Boats 7000


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


| v.


F--,-- F 'l .. _. _.r..I
Home, Spacious Family Rm.,
Breakfast Bar, Great Room,
& SO MUCH MORE!! This
Home is a MUST SEE!
$199,900. Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc





HARBOUR OAKS
GATEDCOMMUNITY
(Adjacent to Deep Creek)
3Bdrm/2Ba/2CG.
Pool Home! $279,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
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and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN-




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new Job?

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Classifieds!


Condominium
2 bedrooms, 2 baths
d for $48,500




iF,


L ~ -


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in YOUR Neighborhood!

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Every Saturday in your
Sun Newspaper's Real Estate Classified Section

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Friday, August 30, 2013


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E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 1


r- rrfft






The Sun Classified Page 2 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, August 30, 2013


HOMES FOR SALE
Z1020


INUiuivSII /1i w/carport,
fenced yard, quiet area,
W/D hookup, FREE water.
$45,000 Call Chris for appt
727-565-8817


1237 Rice Terrace, Beautiful
3-bd/2ba, 1267 SF move-in
ready home w/2-car garage,
fully fenced back yard & large
screened lanai. $148,000.
Patty Gillespie Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755

Mwm&z B


iIUnRiM run
3153 Oklahoma St.
Beautifully Remodeled 2004
Home, 3 bd / 2 ba / 2 car,
1784 Sft. Under Air, New SS
Appliances, Park Like Setting
With Brick Paver Patio.
Asking $159,900
Bay Bridge Homes
941-626-8200


runi ~nf rinLU.I Im
21451 BANCROFT AVE.,
CUSTOM HOME ON TWO PICTUR-
ESQUE LOTS. 28x22 SCREENED
ANAI WITH SPA! GAZEBO! FRUIT
tREES! WET BAR! SKYLIGHTS!
BUY NOW AND COLLECT
NCOME/RENT 'TIL APRIL (TENANT
N PLACE)! $167,700
PATTY GILLESPIE REMAX
ANCHOR 941-875-2755


PORT CHARLOTTE
22284 Laramore Ave.
RENTING? WHY? When you
can own this totally
remodeled, light, bright,
open 1100 SF 2/1 on lushly
landscaped corner lot
Public water & sewer. No
deed restrictions. NOT in
flood zone. $78,000.
PATTY GILLESPIE
RE/MAX Anchor
941-875-2755
SlSIFER

ADS SELL


23204 Rountree Ave.,
Seller has lavished love, time
& money to totally update this
1020 SF 2/2/1 w/scr lanai.
Gorgeous NEW kitchen,
ceramic tile, granite counters.
$97,000
PATTY GILLESPIE REMAX
ANCHOR 941-875-2755
| | -I


23372 Mullins Ave
Lovely 3/2/2 pool home
in popular Sec 15.
$169,000.
June Poliachik,
Sun Realty, CDPE, SFR
941-916-0100


HOMES FOR SALE
1020




2 ACRES, Venice
3br/2ba home. County
water only 10%0/ Down
owner financing. 941-488-
2418 or 496-9252

FAiL


PORT CHARLOTTE,
24458 Pine Ridge PI.
Located in Gated Comm. of
Suncoast Lakes! 3Bed/2Ba/2CG
MUST SEE! MLS#C7043725
$189,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty






PORT CHARLOTTE-
1699 SF, Fence, Fireplace, Hot
Tub, SS App., All Uti., Corner Lot,
Palm Trees Galore, Modem Decor,
Quck Access to Verans or 175.
$134,500. Marianne Lilly,
RE~MAXHabor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


PT. CHARLOTTE
CozY 3/2 COMPLETELY
REMODELED, SS APPLIANCES
NEW KITCHEN, PLUMBING,
FLOORING AND GRANITE.
POOL, BRICK PAVERS, PRIV.
FENCE, MORE. $159K
CLOSE IMMEDIATELY!
941-268-8794 OWNER

SEmploy Classified!


Remodeled 2/2/2 pool home
with dockage for 65' plus
sailboat, depth maintained by
city. Dead end street in
restricted neighborhood.
REDUCED! 9189,900
Jerry Hayes, 941-456-1155
ReMax Marina Park

YOU WANT ME
to List Your Home

SHELLEE GUINTA
22 YEARS OF AWARD
WINNING EXPERIENCE




ALMAR & ASSOCIATES
941-426-4534


WE BUY HOUSES
IN ANY AREA,
ANY CONDITION,
FAST ... CASH!!
FOR MORE INFO LOG ONTO
WWW.JEANBUYHOUSES.COM
CALL US AT 941-268-5069.

WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


uULr buvr.
5242 Neville Terr.
Premier Boating 16000# Lift
Quick Harbor Access!
4 BR, 3 Bath, Key West Style
Tropical, Builder's Custom
Plan. $398,500.
Marianne Lilly, RE/MAX
Harbor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


Lake Worth Blvd. 3/2/2
POOL Home! Formal Dining
Rm., Spacious Master, Dock
w/ Electric & MUCH MORE!!
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, Inc


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
BY OWNER
Home with a view 3/2
with pool and Boat dock
with lift $423,900.
Tel. 941-637-7713


. .. ... *



PUNTA GORDA ISLES
Lowest $ on PGI Canal!
80' Seawall. Cute & Retro.
2/2/2+ Lanai
FREE PGI Map $200,000. obo
Marianne Lilly,
RE/'MAXHabor 941-764-585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


rumi n iv-.u n '" i -'.w.r
250+' of frontage. 1+ acre
house, garage, marina, pavil-
lion $225,000. 941-639-6269

GOLF COURSE
COMMUNITY
1035


PORT CHARLOTTE- 2 2 in
Gate Maple Leaf Community.
Open Floor Plan. Great Rm.,
Breakfast Bar, Formal Dining
Rm. Furnished Turnkey!
$74,900. Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Reay, Inc

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040



PORT CHARLOTTE
$67,000 SALE! (Full time or
seasonal rental also avail-
able) Lovely 2/2 completely
renovated condo with new
appliances & water heater.
For more information and
showing, please call 205-
451-8917 or 205-299-9149

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!


Promenades East. Super
clean 2/2 courtyard view,
inside parking, completely
remodeled. Incl. all appli-
ances. $76,000. For showing
call 248-420-5978.


CONDOS/VILLAS MANUFACTURED
FOR SALE HOMES FOR SALE

z 1040- 1 95

PA. -


24120 Green Heron Dr. #6
Beautiful 2/2/2 Villa w/
Outstanding Waterview!
Granite Counters. Like New!
Only $139,900
Jeff Runyan Re/Max Palm
941-979-2843





SUNRISE TOWERS
CARING WAY ON CANAL.
SHORT SALE 2BR/2BA WITH
CARPORT, INSIDE LAUNDRY
ROOM. HURRICANE RESISTANT
WINDOWS, HARD WOOD FLOORS,
ALL APPLIANCES INCLD. MOVE IN
CONDITION CITY WATER&SEWER,
BIG PACKAGE @ SMALL PRICE.
$45,000. CARON REALTY,
INC. 941-925-3300
RONNIEC@VERIZON.NET
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net

Need a new

Home?

Look in the

Classifieds!

MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE



VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com

MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE



ARCADIA, Nearly New
3BR/2BA Manufactured
Home on 1/2 Acre.
Appliances Stay.
Financing Available!
Ready Now!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122


.


IUnRin run I -'. c ,:
carport. 211 Schooner St.
Premier Gated 55+ Comm.,
with marina & resort
amenities! 1344 SF
w/granite & all new appls.
ENJOY THE GOOD LIFE!
PATTY GILLESPIE
REMAX ANCHOR
941-875-2755


VI LL1LGe

PUNTA GORDA- CLEAN
2 BDR/1.5BATH, Large
Screen Room, Car Port.
Set Up! Quiet Lot
& Park! $10,900. obo
Call Greg 941-626-7829


RAINFOREST
IMMACULATE!
1500 sq. ft. 3 bedroom.
Nicely furnished.
Oversized lot.
Air in Lanai and More.
$59,995
Call 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com






SETTLE ESTA
IMMACULATE 2/2 DOUBLE.
LOTS OF EXTRAS & UPDATES.
NEWER AIR & ROOF.
PUNTA GORDA
BETTER HURRY!
Call 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com

HOMES FOR RENT
1210



A

3/2/1 Jockey Club, North Port. $825
2/2/2+Den, Villa, Port Charl ...........$900
3/2/2 Large Lanai, Port Char.........$1000
3/2/2 Updated, FencedYard, NP ..$1150
3/2.5/2 w/Lawn & Pool Care, NP...$1500
FULL PROPERTY LIST AVAILABLE ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE
YOUR PROPERTY





0 3/2/2 Canal S. Gulf
Cove 3110sqft $1400
3/2/2 Pool E. Eng SS
appl. Granite $1300
03/2/1 Pool, Rotonda
golf course 2249sf $1150
03/2/2 Pool NP $1050
*2/1 cp dwntwn Eng $750
01/1 utilities inc $800

West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net

Advertise Today!

AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS *

3/2/CP Waterfront,
Buckeye Ave., P.C.
$850/mo
3/1 Pool,
Gardner Dr., P.C.
$900/mo

*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
AABring your pets!-A
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME




ENGL & PT CHARLOTTE
Beautiful Private 4/2 SGC
$1250; 3/2 DC $1075,
941-321-71400R941-321-7139
ENGLEWOOD 3/2/2 Pool,
1900 SF, Split plan, new car-
pet, 7202 Mamouth St. 34224
1 Yr Lease, $1195/mo 1st,
Last & Sec. 941-214-0766


HOMES FOR RENT
1210


ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-0333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com


For a Complete List Go lo
eraportcharlotte.com
$1200.3/2/1 Pool, Canal, boatlift.FC
$1200.3/2/2 Pool serv incl..PC
$750....2/1 Triplex updated..PC
$700..2/1 1031 SqFt...........PC
$550..2/1 912 SqFt Duplex..Eng
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters
NEED A RENTAL *
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT


InvestorsChoice Real Estate
A FaiM-Bse Business






VENICE
3/2.5 WOODBRIDGE CONDO $1900
PT. CHARLOTTE
2/2 BIMINI BAY CONDO $700
2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice
2/2 Homes from ... $1600
3/2 Homes from ... $1800
3/2 Pool Homes from..$2200
Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.
NORTH PORT 2/1 Nice,
clean house. $700/mo + sec.
City water, sewer. Mature ten-
ants only. 941-426-3575


PORT CHARLOTTE, 2/2/1,
ABSOLUTE BEAUTY LAKEFRONT,
FAM. RM, DOCK, No PETS./
No SMOKE. ANNUAL $850/MO
1ST, LAST, & SEC.
(941)-456-3367
PORT CHARLOTTE, 2/2/1,
ABSOLUTE BEAUTY LAKEFRONT,
FAM. RM, DOCK, NO PETS./
No SMOKE. ANNUAL $850/MO
SEASONAL $1,300/MO
1ST, LAST, & SEC.
(941)-456-3367


PORT CHARLOTTE, 2 HOUSES
2/2/CPe, CHA. $650. Mo.
+ 1st, Last & Sec. Dep.
Immed. Occp. 941-924-2764
PUNTA GORDA 4br/2ba
pool Home available now.
$2000/mo Call for details.
239-404-2161
PUNTA GORDA Gulf Water-
front 2/2/2, appliances, seawall
property-sailboat, lanai, pool.
$1425/mo 941-889-8859 Tod
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2 $1100 mo. unf. or
furn. $1200/mo
annual lease 941-629-3279








FOR RENT



cath. ceil, wood cab. granite,
W/D, lanai $725+ up, pets ok
(941)-626-1514 or 661-4539




Friday, August 30, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


2 3R13CRJLXV 13)HONDAEnI

SBASEIE5RiH



SALE q m ESALE

PRICE ]m J _j PRICE
New 2013 Honda Civic LX 4 dr, auto,, $1999.00 due at signing, $199.00 a month. 36 month lease, 12K per year. Plus tax, title, license and dealer fees, Includes all rebates and incentives. WAC. New 2013 Honda Accord LX, $1999.00 due at signing, $249.00 a month. 36 month lease, 12K per year.
Plus tax, title, license and dealer fees, Includes all rebates and incentives. WAC. New 2013 Honda CR-V LX, Auto, $1999.00 due at signing, $199.00 a month. 36 month lease, 12K per year. Plus tax, title, license and dealer fees, Includes all rebates and incentives. WAC. New 2013 Honda Fit, 5 dr,
H/B, Auto, $1999.00 due at signing, $179.00 a month. 36 month lease, 12K per year. Plust title, license and dealer fees, Includes all rebates and incentives. WAC. All lease stated above have 0 security deposits.
,J", ;^ ,';'ji :"''iii iBIf your symbol from the front page sticky note matches any symbol on this ad you will at least win 3 of the prizes shown. 2 night Bahamas cruise has a cost of $15.95 processing fee and a $59.00 fee per person cost
based on double occupancy, plus port fees and taxes. See dealer for more details. Stack of gold coins is 3 coins with a face value of One US Dollar each. $10,000 scratch-off is not a Florida Lottery. See dealer for more
details. The Mini iPad; odds of winning is 1 in 41,000. You must bring in the front page sticky note and this ad to redeem your prizes. One sticky note per person and 1 per household. Must be 18 years of age or older.
Must present Florida Driver's license or Florida I.D.
Shop PortCharlotteHonda.com
Sales Mon-Sat 8:30am to 8:00 pm T
Sales open every Sunday 11:00 am to 5:00 pm 1252 Tamiami Trail
SERVICE: Mon thru Fri
7:00 am to 6:00 pm US 41, Just North of Town Center Port Charlotte, FL 33953
Sat 7:00 am to 4:30 pm (9f41) 7A 3
Service Closed on Sundays I4 743- 888





The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, August 30, 2013


ICONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240


LISTING
DEEP CREEK
2/2 Furnished, 1st FL,
Utilities included,
except Cable, $825/Mo,
941-629-8229, 941-661-9570
PORT CHARLOTTE 2nd
Floor, 2/2, New York Section
water, pool, incld. Sm pets ok.
$700 + sec. 941-286-6252
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2 off
Kings Hwy, Pool, Tennis, newly
remodeled, small pet ok, water
incl. $725/mo 941-286-5003
PUNTA GORDA 1BR Condo
water, cable, pool, tennis &
boat dock. $700/mo +
electric. 941-661-8372
| DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
1300

PUNTA GORDA 2/1 Central air
and heat, small screened lanai,
$700/mo 941-6614482
PUNTA GORDA, large 1/1,
exc. cond, super clean, encl.
patio, w/d hkup, remodeled.
$550/mo 941-875-5657

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
L 1320


ENGLEWOOD
AFFORDABLE
1 BEDROOM APTS. 62+
Income limits apply.
S GROVE CITY
MANOR
"STu 941-697-4677
TDD 614-442-4390


NEED CASH?
STUDIO APTSI
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY: 1-800-955-8771


PUNTA GORDA 2bd/2.5ba
Furnished located directly on
waterway. Over 1,500sf ready
for immediate move-in.
$1,200/mo with lyr lease.
280 Lewis Cir. Punta Gorda
863-494-9693 Pictures and
more info available online at:
PeaceRiverCarmpground.com/condo
PUNTA GORDA Downtown,
2 room all utilities included. No
pets, $600/mo. Call Jerry
941-391-4856
PUNTA GORDA, 2/1 Com-
pletely tiled, window treat-
ment, on Fairway Dr oppo-
site school, monthly $650,
Call Owner (718)-465-
6388 or (718) 864-6482
VENICE ISLAND APTS, 1
Bedroom Available. Close to
Beach & Downtown. No Pets,
No Smoking. 941-234-1454


LOOK
VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$375 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
VENICE DOWNTOWN,
2br Apartment No smoking or
Dogs. $695/mo + deposit.
941-484-6022
9 VENICE STUDIO
& 1 Bedroom
Accepting Section 8 Vouchers
941-488-7766
VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1-800-955-8771

*^**^ OPPORTUI'TYt


FOR RENT
1320

VILLA SAN CARLOS II
22250 Vick St.
Affordable-Income based
One bedroom apartments
for 62 or older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!
L 941-429-2402


MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
: 1340



NOCATEE, Doublewide
$450/mo. ALSO .gs Hwy.
Arca 2 Bdrm $'100/ma.
941-624-0355 or
941-875-5253

EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
1350

HARBOUR HEIGHTS close to
river, newly renovated efficien-
cies w cable & internet, Sunny-
brookMotel 941-625-6400
NOKOMIS Immaculate Effi-
ciency Walk to beach! Util-
ities & Washer/dryer incl.
$695. mo. No smoke, no
pets. 941-488-6565
S VACATION/7
SEASONAL RENTALS
1390

P.C, Furnished 2/1.b/1 w/
Lanai. Rent Varies by Month.
Avail. 9/1/13 941-628-9016

WANTED TO RENT



SINGLE WOMAN, 50, Very
Clean, No Pets, No Smoke Liv
ng in Maine, Looking to Move
:o Florida. Seeking to Rent
Room in Private Pool Home
w/ Private Bath. Referances
Available. 336-823-4709
LOTS & ACREAGE
1500


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo, or lot with us
and reach over
150I000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!

Seize the sales
with Classified!


LOTS & ACREAGE
Z1500




NORTH PORT Sumter
Blvd. Great location. New
home area. $6,900 941-
457-6811
ROTONDA Pebble Beach
and Lakes. 2 vacant lots
available. Lakes on green-
belt and Pebble Beach on
golf course. Motivated. Will
negotiate. Seller/agent.
941-920-8970
OUT OF TOWN LOTS
L : 1520


UI_)ivCLCnUKLU I -
NC MTNS
1.71 PRIME ACRES WITH
STUNNING MTN VIEWS,
LG HARDWOODS, LEVEL
ELEVATED BLDG SITE AND
PAVED ACCESS ONLY $34,900
FINANCING AVAIL.
866-738-5522 BRKR

COMMERCIAL LOT
1530


PUNTA GORDA store for
lease. 2400 square feet.
Great for convenience store.
located on busy street.
Contact Tim Boff
941-815-0618

BUSINESS
FOR SALE


PART TIME Business for
Local area. Nets $57K, Full
Color Publication. Guaranteed
Clients. No Exp Nec. Will Train.
Work from your location.
$24,900 828-667-5371
| BUSINESS RENTALS


: r 1610 R
NORTH PORT, FOR lease:
Fully furnished & equipped
medical office space.
1000 sq. ft. Off Toledo
Blade. Two exam rooms &
procedure room. If inter-
ested call (863) 381-0120.
PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200



Executive Office Suites
Receptionist, all utilities & other sup-
port services starting at $295/mo.
Omni Executive Center
A Friendly Place to be!
4055 US41
(Across from Bob Evans)
Call Marj or Shirley 941-627-9755
www.omniexec.net
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
Call for Pricing 941-484-4316

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!


COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620


ARCADUIA 4.4 ac by uwner!
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585





ENGLEWOOD 4680
Placida Rd. Retail Space
Available In Small Retail
Center With Direct Access
to Placida Rd. Lighted
Pole Signage Available. $9
PSF NNN, Plus FL Sales
Tax. 734-973-3185
SGETRESULTS
USE CLASSIFIED!


Retail center witn
frontage on Placida Rd.
Total of 12 individual suites.
All leases are
NNN + FL Sales Tax
734-973-3185
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992
WAREHOUSE
& STORAGE
1640

ARCADIA
5911 SW HWY 17


2007 BUILT 2400 SQ FT
STEEL WAREHOUSE/SHOP
CONCRETE FLOOR, 150
AMP ELE, 1/2 BATH ON
WELL AND SEPTIC. ZONED
A-10 $50,000
Fla Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653
CHARLOTTE HARBOR
Warehouse 5,000 sq ft.
with Office. $2000/mo w/
1st & Last ALSO 800 saft
avail. 941-380-9212
CHARLOTTE HARBOR, IL,
1 Air Conditioned Office &
1 Bays w small office. Up to
1000 Ft. 941-626-6915
NORTH PORT 800SF Ware-
house $420/mo+tax. 400SF,
$215/mo +tax 941-661-6720

2000


EMPLOYMENT


2005
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
2035
2040
2050
2060
2070
2090
2100
2110
2115
2120


EMPLOYMENT
Services
Professional
Banking
Clerical
Computer
Medical
Musical
Restaurant/Hotel
SkilledTrades
Management
Sales
Child/Adult
Care Needed
General
Part-time/ Temp
Home Based
Business
Seeking Employment


HELP WANTED
Z 2001


EQUIPMENT OPERATOR,
Consolidated Productions
Groups is seeking a qualified
equipment operator with at
least 5 years experience.
Apply @ 1403 SE. Ohio Ave.
Arcadia (863)993-3660
MAID, Required to work in
various Homes each day.
Training will be given. 5
days/week. Hourly pay.
Call 941-539-5134
for interview.

SERVICES
S2005


FLOOR TECHS FT
Must have knowledge of
working floor cleaning
machines & different
floor surfaces
experience required.
To apply send resume to:
kmargraf@villageontheisle.com
Or fax to: 941-484-0407
VILLAGE ON THE ISLE
EOE/DFWP

PROFESSIONAL
2010



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
LABOR DAY,
MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 2ND.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Tuesday,
September 3rd*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, 8/30,
S3:3 pm for
Saturday, & 4:00 pm
for Sunday, Monday,
& Tuesday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday

CHECK THE
\ CLASSIFIED!
!l.unumull


WEILER
ENGINEERING
is continuing growth and
expansion in Punta Gorda
and the Fl. Keys. We have
available positions for
qualified applicants with
"El's with minimum 3-4
years' experience, Expe-
rienced Const/Utility
Inspectors or P.E., Pro-
ject Manager with experi-
ence" This Candidate
should have strong com-
munication skills and be
able to work with a team
or individually. WEC pro-
vides engineering servic-
es in the areas of site
design, roadway utilities,
structural engineering,
and marinas/waterfront
resorts throughout South-
west Florida and the
Florida Keys.
We offer an extremely
rewarding stable career
with full benefits, and
highly competitive
salaries.
FOR IMMEDIATE
CONSIDERATION,
please e-mail your
resume to Janeen Weiler
at Janeen@
weilerengineering.org


FINANCIAL
2016


RESIDENTIAL LENDER
Englewood Bank & Trust
has an immediate opening
for a highly motivated,
well-organized, Residential
Lender experienced for the
Venice Market Area.
Previous residential lending
experience required with
excellent interpersonal &
communication skills.
Competitive
noncommissioned salary
& benefit package.
Apply in person at:
1111 S McCall Rd,
Englewood 34223 or
e-mail resume to:
esmathews@ebtfl.com
EEO/AA.

CLERICAL/OFFICE
2020


ACCTS PAYABLE Secretary,
F/T position. Must be profi-
cient in excel & word. Please
submit your resume in person.
No phone calls please. 1192
NE Livingston Street, Arcadia,
Florida 34266.



ADMIN. ASST. Computer,
AP and AR experience.
Benefit Package. DFWP.
Fax resume and salary
requirements to
941-205-2135 or e-mail to:
service@raysplumbinginc.com

ASST. OFFICE MANAGER
Prefer degree accoun-
tant or person with good
automotive accounting
background. Great work-
ing conditions. Full Time,
Many fringes, permanent.
Fax resume to
941-918-8511 Please
include desired income.
CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

OFFICE HELP NEEDED
Computer & bookkeeping
skills. Email resume to
bowersoxinc@comcast.net

MEDICAL
Ljm:2030


BUSY MEDICAL BILLING
OFFICE HAS OPENINGS
for Full-Time (Days)
and Part-Time
(Evenings 5-9p) in AR
and Payment Posting.
Also Need Part-Time
(Evenings 5-9p) for
Authorizations/Eligibility.
Experience Required.
Excellent Benefits for
Full-Time Staff.
Please Send Resume to
medicalbiller448@
yahoo.com





Friday, August 30, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


L MEDICAL
low4:2030


Busy Cardiology office
seeks an ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT with 5 plus
years experience in
billing and coding,
Human Resources. Must
have organizational skills
and be detail oriented.
Send resume to vicky@
CENTERORTIFEPERFORIMNARTS.COM
or Fax 866-906-1238.

DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
COTA, OT & PT
for PT/FT/PRN
*RN PRN/FT/PT
available for all shifts
*Interim Dietary
Manager F/T
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766






HARBORCHASE




RESIDENT
ASSISTANT

FULL TIME
PART TIME / POOL

ARE YOU A HHA, PRIVATE
CAREGIVER OR NEWLY
LICENSED CNA LOOKING
FOR A CHANGE OR THAT
1ST OPPORTUNITY.


HARBORCHASE OFFERS
ON-THE-JOB TRAINING FOR
ANYONE LOOKING FOR AN
OPPORTUNITY IN THE
HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY.
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND
AN EXCELLENT
BENEFITS PACKAGE SUCH AS
MEDICAL, DENTAL,
VISION & 401K
PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS AT 20+
HOURS.
FOR CONSIDERATION
PLEASE APPLY
IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V

RN Full time, Nights, 7P-
7A, exp. pref. on ICU, OB-
L&D, ER & ER, 10A-10P
Nursing Admin: RN
Night Supervisor, full time,
7P-7A. RN Night Supervi-
sor, per diem, 7P-7A &
Weekend Days, 7A-7P
Med Surg: RN, Full time,
Days- 7A-7P & Full time,
Nights 7P-7A
Social Worker: Per
Diem, exp. pre., MSW req.




Human Resources
Desoto Memorial Hospital
900 N. Robert Ave.
Arcadia, Fl. 34266
OR
Fax Resumes to:
863-494-8400
E-mail: hr@dmh.org
Phone Number:
863-494-8405


MEDICAL
Wava: 2030




LPN for busy Physician's
office. Must be able to
multi-task and be a team
player. Experience
a must. Great Benefits!
Mail Resume to
PO Box 494710
Port Charlotte, FL 33949
MED.SECRETARY/Optical trainee
FT, exp. pref. & organized, ppl
skills Fax PC 941-883-3938
SClassified = Sales
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Front Desk & Computer Skills
EMAIL: officemgr80@gmail.com




HARB ORCHASE


RN'S/LPN'S
FULL TIME, PART TIME
AND PRN

SKILLED NURSING AND
ASSISTED LIVING

HARBORCHASE offers
an excellent benefits
package such as
Medical, Dental, Vision
& 401K.
PART-TIME TEAM
MEMBERS RECEIVE
BENEFITS AT 20 HOURS.
For consideration please
apply in person to:
HARBORCHASE
OF VENICE
Assisted Living and
Skilled Nursing
950 Pinebrook Road
Venice, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 ph
(941) 484-3450 fax
FOE M/F/D/V

HORIZON
".HEALTHICARE
IF INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN
within 11 months
Enrollment ongoing
Call for Class Dates
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Sept 9 '13
LPN-next class starts
Jan 20th '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks'
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506

MUSICAL
L40vaZ2035





Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUNa


RESTAURANT/
HOTEL
otZ 2040TU


WANTED
EXPERIENCED BARTENDER
Fax resume to 941-639-1625

BUS STAFF
& PART TIME COOKS
NEEDED
for Seasonal Position.
MUST Have Minimum of
2 Years Club Experience.
Apply in Person to
Fill Out an Application at:
Heron Creek Golf & CC,
5301 Heron Creek Blvd.
North Port
COOK/PREP, Days,
No Sunday. Apply within
Wee Blew Inn, Venice.
EXPERIENCED SERVERS/
BARTENDER NEEDED
F/T Position Sundays are a
Must! Great Perks. Employee
& Spouse golf free when Avail.
Apply in Person Mon-Sat.
266 Rotonda Circle
Ask for Alberto


ItIRIN
RIVER CITY GRILL
Seeks motivated and
experienced LINE COOK
Apply in Person: 2-4pm
Only 131 W Marion Ave
Punta Gorda, FL






THE GASPARILLA
INN & CLUB
WE CURRENTLY HAVE
OPENINGS WITHIN THE
FOLLOWING AREA:
TEMPORARY PAINTERS
WORK IS AVAIL IMMEDIATELY
THROUGH EARLY OCTOBER.
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND
BRIDGE TOLLS COVERED.

FOR MORE DETAILS
PLEASE CALL
(941)964-4570
RESUMES CAN BE SENT
DIRECTLY VIA E-MAIL:
KPULASKIE@GASFPRILLAINN.COM
OR VIA FAX TO
(941)964-4571
WAITSTAFF & COOKS, F/T
& P/T. Waterford Golf Club
Restaurant, Venice. Call Nancy
941-468-6419
SSKILLED TRADES
Z 2050


A/C LEAD INSTALLER
WANTED
5 yrs experience. CLEAN
APPEARANCE, DRIVING & CRIMINAL
RECORD. Has own tools. Great
Company & Great Benefits!
Please contact
Cliff's A/C, 941-629-2863

NEED CASH?
AC INSTALLERS
Mike Douglass Air Condi-
tioning seeking qualified
A/C Service Technicians.
Min 5 yrs. exp. Must be
well groomed & have clean
driving record. We offer a
Competitive compensation
package including benefits.
This is a drug free work
place.Call 941-473-
2344AC INSTALLERS,


SKILLED TRADES
2050


EXP. SKID STEER OPERA-
TOR Needed ASAP, call
Bryan at 941-915-7095
FUEL TRANSPORT DRIVER
CLASS A, WITH 2YRS HAZMAT/
TANKER ENDORSEMENTS & EXPE-
RIENCE, PREFERRED w/TWIC
CARD. COVERING ARCADIA -
TAMPA AREAS. PAY STARTS AT
13.50, INCREASE AFTER TRAIN-
ING, PARTIAL UNIFORM PROVIDED.
SEND RESUME TO:
KAREN@BVOIL.COM
OR QUESTIONS 863-494-3246

PLUMBER Construction,
Remodel, and Service Expe-
rience a must. Benefit Pack-
age. DFWP. Ray's Plumbing
941-205-2133
PLUMBER, Exp plumbers
only.New construction through
service, positive attitude and
clean driver's license a must.
Call 941-624-3150
SEAMTRESS WANTED
Experienced only. P/T to F/T
opportunity. Apply in person
10am4pm, Tues-Sat, no phone
calls please. 17218 Toledo
Blade Blvd, #10, Port Charlotte.
TOOL REPAIR, Sales
counter person. Good peo-
ple skills, efficinecy on
computer, dependable &
honest imperative. Insur-
ance and benefits avail.
APPLY IN PERSON: Tropi-
cal Tool Repair. 18480
Paulson Dr, Pt. Charlotte.
See Joe
SALES
2070


ADVERTISING
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM
Seize the sales
with Classified!


SALES
2070


Advertising Sales
Executive
The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
*Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
*Training
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:
Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.


A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!

Fishing For
A New
Career?






Check Out The
Classifieds In The

SUNmfe


SALES
2070


Charlotte County Water/
Rainsoft, 30 years in
Business, is seeking Exp'd
SERVICE COORDINATOR.
Must be a motivated team
leader, excellent Customer
Service. Email Resume to
ccwrainsoft@msn.com

READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?

SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER
Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
located in
North Port Florida.
We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
loves learning new skills and:
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.
:We offer:
0 Training
:0 Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
* Opportunity to expand
your business skills

Please email your resume
to:
Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
SEmployer/Drug & Nicotine
SFree Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....
/Find a Pet
/Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results



PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK

FOR YOU!



FIND A JOB!

BUY A HOME!

BUY A CAR!





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, August 30, 2013


SALES
Lwow 2070


SALES **
** CASH PAID DAILY**
Excellent workplace! Great
hours & benefits. Base vs.
Generous Commission aver-
age $15+/hr. Port Charlotte
941-625-8800
SHOWROOM
SALES PROFESSIONAL
Needed for Busy Flooring
Store. Experience,
Multi-Tasking & Computer
Skills a Must! Email Resume:
puntagordajob@gmail.com
GENERAL
2100


3AM-12PM 30 PEOPLE NEED-
ED IN OSPREY, CLEANING,
STOCKING, PAINTING.START NOW
EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT-
2394 TAMIAMI TR.PC
941-629-2611
Maintenance Supervisor
Sun Coast Press is looking for
an enthusiastic individual to
join our team. We are a family
run, well-established & rapidly
growing multi-newspaper
media group and commercial
print operation on the sunny
Southwest Florida Gulf Coast.
We have the following full time
employment opportunity in
our Venice print facility at The
Venice Gondolier.
Job Responsibilities Include:
Lead and assist staff to main-
tain production and building
equipment to manufacturer's
spec. Repair & maintain
production equipment for
two print facilities. Daily
continuous improvement,
leadership, On-Call status
24/7 for emergency repair of
critical equipment
Skills Required: Extensive
experience, preferably 10
years plus, in repair &
maintenance of newspaper or
commercial printing presses.
Supervisory or management
experience in a production
environment preferred.
Ability to troubleshoot, repair,
and maintain according to a
preventative/predictive main-
tenance plan to ensure opti-
mal equipment performance
and minimize downtime of
production equipment.
A thorough understanding of
machine schematics, industry
standards, tolerances, gears,
bearings, drive systems,
electrical, etc.
Community and Urbanite
presses, Martin & Jardis
splicers, and Rima &
Gammerler stackers.
Mueller and Harris
inserters, Quipp stackers,
Dynaric strappers, and Mueller
stitcher/trimmer.
Peripheral equip. such as lift
trucks, compressors, dryers, etc.
Building facilities at all
locations with assistance
from outside vendors.
HVAC, Plumbing, Electrical,
Fire safety, Landscaping, etc.
Good working knowledge
of computers: email,
spreadsheets, word
documents. The ability to
work independently and solve
problems working in a fast
paced, dynamic environment.
Good verbal and written
communication skills.
We offer health insurance,
AFLAC, paid holidays, paid
time off, and 401K. We are a
drug & nicotine free work-
place. Pre-employment drug &
nicotine screening required.
Interested candidates please
send a resume to ccham-
bers@suncoastpress.com or
contact Chuck Chambers at
941-206-1418 to arrange an
interview. Be prepared to
furnish an up to date resume
at time of interview.

fnd your Best
MFriend in the
Classifeds!


GENERAL 3000
2100 t3


BIKINI DANCERS WANTED
for local sports bar ALSO
Nude dancers needed
for Gentlemans Club.
Please call
941-766-1161
$$ FLOORING INSTALLERS
NEEDED $$
For year-round work!
2 Years Experience. Must have
van, tools, plus Corporation/LLC,
GL insurance, pass background
check, speak English.
Call 855-256-3675 or go to
http://contractor.us-installations.com
GOLF CLUB MAINTENANCE
WORKERS NEEDED
Please Call 941-697-2414
GOLF COURSE SPRAY
TECHNICIAN
Please Call 941-697-2414
LANDSCAPE CREW LEADER,
must have experience (NOT
mowing). Must have good DL.
941-662-8733
MAINTENANCE MAN, P/T
maintenance man for Lake
Suzy condo. Experience &
good people skills a must.
Background check mandatory.
Fax resume to 941-423-8286.


V Gondolier Sun



THE VENICE GONDOLIER SUN
IS NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
FOR CARRIERS IN VENICE AND
SURROUNDING AREAS. MUST
HAVE DEPENDABLE VEHICLE, A
VALID FLORIDA DRIVERS
LICENSE AND PROOF OF INSUR-
ANCE.
APPLY IN PERSON:
200 E. VENICE AVE.
VENICE, FL 34285
No PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
VETERINARY ASSISTANT
Part time, (13/hrs per wk
$12.00/hr.) for N. Port
office. Must have experi-
ence. send resume and
letter of interest to
Angelanimalclinic@yahoo.com
VETERINARY CLINIC
Kennel/Clinic Closer, 3-7pm,
M-F + weekends. Salary
based on experience & skill.
Pays $8-10, 941-488-1455
WINDOW TREATMENT
& decor company is
seeking individual with min.
3+ yrs. exp. in soft goods
window treatments
and decorating.
eddie@mycreativewindow.com
( GET RESULTS -
S USE CLASSIFIED!

S PART TIME/
TEMPORARY
2110




COME WORK WITH THE SUN
NEWSPAPER CLASSIFIED TEAM,
LOCATED IN NORTH PORT,
FLORIDA. WE ARE AMERICA'S
BEST COMMUNITY DAILY
NEWSPAPER, WITH THE
LARGEST CLASSIFIED SECTION
IN FLORIDA! THIS IS AN
OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITY TO
JOIN A COMPANY WHERE YOU
MAKE THE DIFFERENCE!
WE ARE LOOKING FOR A
PART-TIME PERSON WITH
COMPUTER SKILLS AND A
CHEERY PHONE PERSONALITY
TO JOIN OUR TEAM.
WE OFFER TRAINING IN A
STABLE AND COMMUNITY
INVOLVED COMPANY.
PLEASE EMAIL YOUR RESUME:
HR@SUNLETTER.COM
EOE DFWP
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG &
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED


A


PERSONALS
S3020


,-AQ ; ^ ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
FEMALE HAIRSTYLIST, 46,
looking for Companion, 47-65
NOT| ICES Venice-Brad 941-201-9853
NOTICES FRENCH Hairstylist, looking
for Companion 30-65 yrs of
ANNOUNCEMENTS age. Call 941-228-9270
3010 Turn your


trash into


| cash!

1000 FREE ATM MACHINE Advertise
ATM NETWORK 585-4517
**LIMITED TIME ONLY** VOur
atmasap@att.net J
retail/restaurant/marina ect sale!
I sal.e


THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
LABOR DAY,
MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 2ND.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Tuesday,
September 3rd*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, 8/30,
3:3 pm for
Saturday, & 4:00 pm
for Sunday, Monday,
& Tuesday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday


A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!


**VENDORS NEEDED**
Food, Gifts, & Spirits for
Bayshore Beer & Wine Fest.
Saturday October 12th.
All Booths $30.00
Call 941-627-1628 ext 101

HAPPY ADS
3015




Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


Employ Classified!


MASSAGE THERAPY
AND RELAXATION
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041


1|225 US 41UNIT B 3.
I CHARLOTTE TRADE CENTER
N OF 776 941-625-0141
RELAXATION AND MORE
CALL TODAY 941-681-6096
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520
RETIRED GENTLEMAN, look-
ing for Oriental lady, Trim w/
long black silky hair and like
soft jazz and soft kisses. Call
941-330-4098
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR,
SUMMER SPECIALS
941-483-0701 North Port
CARD OF THANKS
3040


I would like to thank
an exceptional group of
people who came to my aid
Saturday 8/24/13 in North
Port. A call to notify NP 911,
emt, med techs whose arrival,
treatment and patience were
second to none! Then & at so
profound it requires special
pronouncement. A religious
avaitor flew in for the occa-
sion. This angel offered to
share her personal oxygen
cylinder with its limited sup-
ply. I surprisingly accepted.
This angel's offer was so con-
spicous that I was asked if I
was known or related to, I
sadly said no. Thank you
much to your flight controller.
Hopefully I will recieve replies
to my cell phone number.
Empathy is alive & well.
Bill Pinto 941-416-5075

Find it in the
Classified!

SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
3060



CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
CNA & HHA CLASSES:
Days, Eves, Weekends. $449.
Small Class! CPR/First Aid
Incl. 941-966-2600
www.SunCoastCNA.com
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING -1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
BORED WITH TAE KWON
DO & MIXED MARTIAL
ARTS? Try Somthing New.
FREE Classes Available in
Tradional Shaolin Kung Fu
More Info Call 941- 204-2826


& INSTRUCTION
3060

UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 941-347-7445

& CHURCHES
3065

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
LOST & FOUND
3090


LOST CAT in the
Cranberry/Tishman area of
North Port. Orange short hair
with white paws. Male
unneutered named Frankie.
Reward. Please call
(941)423-0171





LOST DOG: SHI-TZU MIX
Small Female off white with
grey 15-201bs MISSING
since August 4th from Alton
& Midway/Stanford area Pt.
Charlotte. Pink & tan collar,
microchipped, 9 years old
NEEDS MEDS** REWARD
941-613-4064
LOST DOG: SHI-TZU poodle
mix male champagne color,
approx 22 lbs MISSING
since August 27th Tuesday,
from Nokomis Suncrest Dr &
Wanda Dr.area Please call
941-275-7148
Advertise Today!


LOST RX GLASSES Black
Blue Mirror at Light House
Beach. Reward 941-740-0173
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face & back.
Missing from North Port
5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909
ARTS CLASSES
L ^ 3091


MAGIC OF MOSAICS
Classes & Workshops
Rosemary, Artist/instr
941-697-7888/941-258-6873
www.FlamingoFanny.com
COMPUTER CLASSES
3092



Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org


L EDUCATION
:3094


MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.
| EXERCISE CLASSES
z ^ 3095


GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
RELIGION CLASSES
L Z 3096


BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte

Great Deals in
the Classifieds!

FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
OTHER CLASSES
L ^ 3097


CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.
ALTERATIONS




THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
LABOR DAY,
MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 2ND.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Tuesday,
September 3rd*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, 8/30,
3:30pm for
Saturday, & 4:00pm
for Sunday, Monday,
& Tuesday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday!






Friday, August 30, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


ALUMINUM
5006 U


Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages, Scr. lanais, etc...
STRAIGHT LINE
Aluminum Construction
941-475-1931
THE HEIGHTS ALUMINUM,
INC. Screen Rooms *
Lanais Pool Cages *
Rescreens Seamless
Gutters Soffit Fascia *
Pavers Concrete *
941-613-1414 OR
941-492-6064
Lic./Ins. AAA0010565 &
R6ALCL-5AC-33
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!

APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR


DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lie 990010103532/Ins
DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596

7 CABINETRY
LW 5030


CABINETS & FLOORING
Tile*Carpet*Vinyl*
Hardwood*Laminate
Prices That Will Floor You!
941-764-7879

ADULT CARE
Low 5 5050


SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483

CHILD CARE



ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
COMPUTER SERVICE



COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285
1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR,
TUTOR IN YOUR HOME
Reasonable & Prompt! Sr.
Disc. Ask for Stacy
941-451-3186

PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK

FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./lns.


I COMPUTER SERVICE



We Come To YOU! *
SUMMER SPECIAL
$30 Flat Rate
CERTIFIED COMPUTER
REPAIR
Free Computer Checkup *
Virus/Spyware/Malware
Removal
941-404-5373
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS!
941-764-3400 or
941-276-5011

L CONTRACTORS
L ^ 5054


TEDDY'S HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins.
CRC 1327653

CONCRETE
LW ^ 5057


CONCRETE
Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks,
House Slabs, Etc..
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
Custom Design Driveways
Pool Decks Patios.
Decorative Concrete/Natural
Stone. A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES
r 5060

A CLEAN SWEEP Residen-
tial & Commercial Honest &
Reliable. Serving Sarsota
County. 941-223-0303
A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658
HOMESHEFIELD, Comm &
Residential Cleaning AND
FLOOR CARE: Stripping & Wax
239-400-4113 Lic./Ins.
MRS. CLEANING UP!
1st class cleaning Service!
Specials Now!
$10 off Window Cleaning
941-204-8057
www.mrscleaningup.com
Lic & Insured
c-NEED A JOB? -
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
RESIDENTIAL & OFFICE
CLEANING Consistent,
Thorough, Affordable.
Sarasota, Charlotte, Lee
Counties. Clean Sweep
Call for Free Estimate:
941-391-6645
941-380-0502

ELECTRICAL
Lom 5070


DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
"Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646
INTEGRITY ELECTRIC
of Charlotte County.
FULLService Electical.
26 Yrs. Exp! Comm./Res.
(941)-628-1993
Lic# L06000046464


ELECTRICAL



RICHARD CHAFE ELECTRICAL
LLC, Residential & Commer-
cial. 30 Year Master Electri-
cian. 941-661-1940
Lic# ER13014903

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG



BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing *
Bush Hogging *
*ALL Mulching *
Selective Clearing *
Tree & Stump Removal *
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
Lic./Ins
HEATING & AIR

LZ5090


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
INTEGRITY AIR *
Financing Available
FPL Rebates
Residential & Commercial
Sales-Service-Installation
941-465-5208
239-244-9554
Lic/Ins #CACA44874
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738


A/C & Heat
941-468-4956
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2695 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY!
FEDERAL TAX CREDIT AVAILABLE
ST. LIC #CAC1816023

HOME / COMM.
IIMPROVEMENT


ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
fans, lights, faucets, toilets &
washer/dryer repair, etc...
(941)-661-8585 lic.



BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
COASTAL KITCHENS
countertops/door & cab refacing
Call Victor (941)716-0917
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872

CUSTOM RESCREENING
& Repair & Pressure Washing
Visa/MC 941-979-0922
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
DRYWALL REPAIRS
WATER DAMAGE ALL REPAIRS
BIG & SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES
941-254-0808


IMPROVEMENT
5100


FULL SERVICE CLEAN-OUT
REMOVAL SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
CARTING, DUMPSTERS,
GARBAGE/TRASH, WASTE
AST CLEAN-OUTS
941-451-0071
"We Take Your Junk & Clean-Up"
Call for Free Estimates
LICENSED/INSURED
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#60662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227
HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694

J & J HANDYMAN
941-525-7967, 941-493-6736
Painting, Pressure Washing &
Much More!
Over 30 Years Experience &
Satisified Customers
Serving Venice & Sarasota Areas
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR ODD
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
LICENSED & FULLY INSURED
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381


SLIDING GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs. Free
Estimates Lic/Ins. Bob @
941-706-6445
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/ns.
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#WAAA06387
TOM'S HOME IMPROVEMENT
& HANDYMAN SERVICE.
No JOB to BIG or small!
941-408-3954
WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing,Concrete,Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

L LAWN/GARDEN

: 5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune,
install, design, removal,
stump grinding.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
TRUCK FOR HIRE
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding e
Lawn Service .
*Bucket Service e
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./lns.
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc


& TREE
5110AWN/GARDEN

HILLBILLY HANDYMAN'S
LAWN MOWIN' &
HOME FIXIN '
REAL HONEST WORK WITH
OLD FASHION INTEGRITY!
LIC/INs
CALL BILLY 941-979-7458
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
RESIDENTIAL LAWN CARE
Complete Lawn Care, with
Excellent Customer Service,
Hablamos Espanol
941-626-2623/941-564-7858
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/Insured941-484-6042
SOD WORK REMOVE &
REPLACE SMALL JOBS OK, ALL
TYPES OF SOD941-716-9912


TJ MILAZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
TJ MILAZZO JR.
941-830-1005
LAND CLEARING, LANDSCAPE
ALL KINDS OF CONCRETE WORK.
BoATr DOCK & SEAWALL REPAIR
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035
L MARINE REPAIR
LZ5121




MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329
MASONRY

S5129


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
5130


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a
Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-
883-1231
MOVING HELP
$$$ Save $$$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins

S PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
5140



BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10%/o Off With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L-------------------------

50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER


WALLPAPERING
Z 5140

ALL PHASE HOME TREATMENTS
GET THE BEST FOR LESS!
PAINTING, PRESSURE WASHING,
COATINGS & SEALERS, MORE
LIC/INSU 941-321-0637
SERVING ENGLEWOOD, NORTH
PORT, PORT CHARLOTTE, VENICE
DANNY MILLER PAINTING, LLC
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING
941-830-0360
FREE ESTIMATES
danspainting4602@comcast.net
LICENSED & INSURED AAA009886
LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do It!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764

Need a
new Ride?
Find it
in the
Classifieds!

Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates Prompt Service
941-484-4576
PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-00015
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lic # AAA009837
WAYNE PATTON PAINTING
PRESSURE WASHING & REMOD-
ELING. WE DO IT ALL. 30 YRS
EXP. LIC/INS. 941-258-5089
We Do It A Shade Better!
LARRY BATES PAINTING
Free Estimates
Locally Owned & Operated
941-625-1226
Lic/Ins #RRR0002261

PET CARE
S5155


DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853

PLUMBING
LW404Z5160


LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
REPIPES, SLAB LEAKS
FULL SERVICE PLUMBING
PRECISION PLUMBING
941423-3058
#CFC1427378

THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393

POOL SERVICES
:5165


ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Preventative Maintenance
Saves You Money & Avoids
Long Term Problems.
941-426-6500
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs. Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps *
*Weekly Maintenance .
941-809-5121 CPC1458222/Ins






The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursunnet


Friday, August 30, 2013


POOL SERVICES
Z5165


Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268


BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
L SCREENING
IIIIJIZ5184


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779 wescreenflori-
da.com Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/Ins.
SELL'S ALUMINUM L.L.C.-
Pool Cage Re-Screens &
6" Seamless Gutters
FREE ESTIMATES 36 Yrs. Exp!
Greg 941-234-8056 or
941-497-4450 Lic. & Ins.
Servicing Sarasota County
THE SCREEN GAL & FRIENDS
Quality Rescreening. Guaran-
teed. VISA & M/C accepted.
#CBC1256778
941-626-7282
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
WRIGHT'S RESCREENING
QUALITY WORK AT GREAT PRICES!
FAST SERVICE! FREE ESTIMATES!
LIC/INS 941-916-2512 OR
941-575-7446

L ROOFING
404:5185




Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30 Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors & Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh, 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE C C C #1325731 & INSURED

LEONARD'S ROOFING &
INSULATION INC.
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187

Reroofing Solutions-Products
for all roof types.
"Why replace when you
can Save it"
A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693


WATER R'CO
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
Old Roof Removal Our Specialty
Full Carpentry
Free Estimates
LIc #ccc 068184
FULLY INSURED
FI -, m


S ROOFING
444,4:5185


STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838

WINDOW CLEANING
z 5225


CLEAR-VIEW WINDOW CLEAN-
ING
Pressure Washing
Screen Repair
Commercial & Residential
Licensed & Insured
941-484-5353
TERRY SOWERS
WINDOW CLEANING &
PRESSURE WASHING
Store Fronts, Residential,
and Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES
Accept all Credit Cards
941-697-9439

WINDOW REPAIR
S5226


Window & Sliding Glass
Door Repair & Replacement.
Rollers, Locks & Handles
U.S. Window 941-628-8579

I NEED CASH? I


6000
< v <


MERCHANDISE

GARAGE SALES


6001 Arcadia
6002 Englewood
6003 Lake Suzy
6004 Nokomis
6005 North Port
6006 Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
6007 Punta Gorda
6008 Rotonda
6009 Sarasota
6010 South Venice
6011 Venice
6012 Out Of Area
6015 Flea Market
6020 Auctions
MERCHANDISE
6013 Moving Sales
6025 Arts & Crafts
6027 Dolls
6030 Household Goods
6035 Furniture
6038 Electronics
6040 TV/Stereo/Radio
6060 Computer Equip
6065 Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
6070 Antiques &
Collectibles
6075 Fruits/Veges
6090 Musical
6095 Medical
6100 Health/Beauty
6110 Trees & Plants
6120 Baby Items
6125 Golf Accessories
6128 Exercise/Fitness
6130 Sporting Goods
6131 Firearms
6132 Firearm Access.
6135 Bikes/Trikes
6138 Toys
6140 Photography/Video
6145 Pool/ Spa & Supplies
6160 Lawn & Garden
6165 Storage Sheds/
Buildings
6170 Building Supplies
6180 Heavy Constr.
Equipment
6190 Tools/Machinery
6220 Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
6225 Restaurant Supplies
6250 Appliances
6260 Misc. Merchandise
6270 Wanted to Buy/T rade


SFLEA MARKET
Z 6015







BE YOUR OWN BOSS.
BECOME A VENDOR AT THE
SUN FLEA MARKET
RENT A BOOTH FOR 1 MTH
GET 2ND MONTH FREE
LEASE OPTIONS AVAILABLE.
CALL 941-255-3532
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
OPEN FRI SAT & SUN 9-4PM
18505 PAULSON DR.
PT CHARLOTTE FLORIDA.
ALL VENDORS SUBJECT TO APPROVAL BY
MGMT.

ARTS AND CRAFTS
6025


I NEED HELP... unravel
Macrame Hammock 941-697-
1219
MEMORY BEARS Custom
bears made from loved ones
clothing $50 941-429-0772
AxA&VP. RTBI-I
DOLLS
6027 S


CLOWN DOLL Collection
Includes famous clown dolls.
Call for info 941-661-2321
MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls
Have 50 plus in Osprey start at
$15 941-600-1442
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
L : 6030


ARCHITECTURAL PAINTINGS
Awesome Ig framed art. $499
941-627-3636
AREA CARPET Mahdavi, red,
hand-tufted wool, 8X11' $100
863-494-2956
AREA CARPET plush,nice for
wood floors $85 941-822-
3837
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED SPREAD white hand
made king or queen $400
941-227-0676
CANDLES NEW GLADE
SCENTED LG.SIZE 10 OZ-ENGLE-
WOOD $4.50 941475-7577
CAR PAINTINGS Asst'd nicely
framed car prints, signed.
$100 941-627-3636
CARPETS PERSIAN Style,
Brand New 11 x 13 Sage
green $350 941-240-6134
CEILING FAN 52" Pecan
wood w/caning insets. Venice
$15, OBO 941-544-5755
CHANDELIER,BRASS-CRYS-
TAL, 8 lights, chain, 15wx30h
$45, OBO 941-697-1110
CHINA DINNERWARE beauti-
ful serv for 12 w/serving pcs.
$300 941-429-9305

THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
LABOR DAY,
MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 2ND.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Tuesday,
September 3rd*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, 8/30,
p330m for
Saturday, & 4:00 pm
for Sunday, Monday,
& Tuesday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
z ^6030


CLEVELAND PRINTS Asst'd
views nicely framed art. $100
941-627-3636
COFFEE TABLE, end table,
tall table lamp. Good condition
$100 941-698-0694
CONVECTION OVEN: BAKE,
BROIL OR GRILL. FAST & EASY
$50 941-575-8881
DISH SET 44 pc.
Floral/White.
$25 941-875-6271
DISHES FOR SIX WHITE W LT
GREEN TRIM, VGC $25 941-
740-1000
DISHWASHER AMANA,
white, works good. $50 941-
456-1231
ELECTRIC SKILLET, West
Bend works good. $15, OBO
941-235-2203
ELECTRIC STOVE Amana
glass-top, white, self clean,
great. $75 941-456-1231
ELECTRIC STOVE Like new
with hood Great deal $200,
OBO 575-590-0305
EXTERIOR DOORS metal and
wood/storm screen each $75
941-822-1429
FLOOR LAMP Black rod iron
floor lamp w/3 shelves $7
941-613-2708
FLUORESCENT LIGHTS 4 ft
New in box $40, OBO 941-
697-111010
FRAMED PRINT HOME INTE-
RIOR print rooster 28"H x28"W
new $30 941-228-1745
Classified = Sales

FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
GEORGE FOREMAN GRILL
MACHINE work good in
Osprey $10 941-600-1442
GOTHIC/MEDIEVAL 8 Lights
Chandelier $50 941-763-
0018
GRAND FATHER CLOCK.
HOWARD MILLER MAKE OFFER
862-812-0995
JEWELRY BOX still in box
$40 941-227-0676
JUICER & MEAL MIXERS
BULLET EXPRESS.NOT USED.
$100 941-740-3286
LACE TABLECLOTH 64" x
108" and tablerunners $8.00
$15 941-613-6839



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)
n l


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030


MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS & Box Spring Like
New $100 941-421-4020
MICROWAVE AMANA 30"
over-range, vented,works
good. $35 941-456-1231
MIRROR 3 PIECE Gold
Trim/Flower Petals Big Wall
Clock $40 941-763-0018
MIRROR ROUND 36" DECORA-
TIVE w/ FLOWERS & PELICAN $75
OVAL MIRROR $20.00 LOTS OF
MISC. 941-275-7325
NEW BLOWER squierel cage
220 amp. $150 941-626-
3102
NEW BRANDNAME RAZOR
PACKS ENGLEWOOD $5 941-
475-7577
PAINTINGS ORIENTAL Vin-
tage asst'd, nicely framed art.
$75 941-627-3636
PICTURE 44WX26H.
Vases and Flowers. $25
941-875-6271
REFRIGERATOR 32" Top
freezer, white Ice-Maker $250,
OBO 941-875-9654
REFRIGERATOR GE, white,
top freezer, works good. $50
941-456-1231
RUGS ALL sizes in blue shade
$4.00 to $10.00 $10 941-
613-6839
SHEETS QUEEN 15" Deep
Vera Wang cream VGC PGI
$60 941-575-2675
SHUTTERS INTERIOR white
Plantation shutters $450 941-
625-2123
SINK/FAUWCET, VANITY,
GOOD,COND,31"H X 31"L X
18"D $90 718-986-3608
STEAM CLEANER SHARK
brand new many attachments
$75, OBO 941-822-3837
STEAM CLEANER SHARK
floor cleaner other parts.
$35, OBO 941-822-3837
TABLE LAMP 36" brwn solid
wood, tan shade, brass base
$25, OBO 941-743-2656
TABLE WROGHTIRON 4
chairs 4by6 glass $75, OBO
941-204-3458
VACUUM, Kirby Sentra, All
attachments Pd. 2150, $500
828-777-5610 (cell)
HOLIDAY ITEMS
6031


COMFORTER SET KING
Snowflakes, snowmen, trees
$20 941-426-0760
LIGHTS XMAX, some unique,
NIB, $1.25 & up,941-624-
0928
FURNITURE
4Z6035


ACCENT CHAIRS very comfy
with green fabric. pics on crg
list $175, OBO 561-222-6431
BAR STOOLS 2 off-white bar
stools. Metal w/vinyl. Like
new!! $50 941-626-5801
BAR STOOLS 3 metal & fab-
ric $75 941-575-8229

1 Employ Classified!
BAR STOOLS rattan 30" seat
height backs & arms $80
941-356-0129
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED, TEMPEUR-PEDIC Rhap-
sody Queen, w/adj. base, NEW
$1,995 OBO 941-698-9899
BEDROOM SET 9 piece,
no bed. $125
941-483-1013
BEDROOM SET, Broyhill Full
like New $400, OBO
941-421-4020


FURNITURE
6035


BEDS (2) TWIN complete Mat-
tresses and box springs,head-
boards night stand, Dresser
/mirror $425 941-456-5546
BEDS (2) TWIN, BASSETT,
Sealy Posterpedic mattresses
& boxsprings, Ex cond.
$275/ea 941-235-7780
BISTRO SET Metal Table with
4 wicker stools. New. $165
828-777-5610 (cell)
CHAIR, RATTAN 2 BAR
STOOLS, EX. $25, OBO
941-391-6377
CHAIRS 2 WICKER nice paint-
ed,strong $15 786-306-6335
CHAIRS WOOD AMERICAN
COUNTRY NEW COMFORT-
ABLE $85 941-763-2581
CHAIRS WOOD SOLID (2)
LIKE NEW COMFORTABLE $75
941-763-2581
COFFEE TABLE 3 tier
With glass top, new, $155
828-777-5610 (cell)
COFFEE TABLE 40"square
glass top. Tropical/island look
250, OBO 561-222-6431
COMPUTER CHAIR Black,
adjustable, like new. $25, OBO
941-625-9789
COMPUTER WORK STATION,
36X24 wood-metal exc. cond.
$55, OBO 941-698-8818
COUCH 76" Tropic back-
ground 941-4751268 $150,
OBO 941-475-8147
COUCH MULTI colored $150,
OBO 941-475-8147
COUCH ULTRA soft muted
striped dark colors,like new.
$100 941-235-2613
CURIO CABINET dark wood
w/5 glass shelves & light
$200 941-426-1604
DAYBED WHITE with popup &
mattresses great condition
$250 941-763-2696
DESK CHAIR Taupe
suede, good, PGI. $45
941-916-1821
DINETTE/CHAIRS, 48" wood
wrought iron frame, very nice
$100, OBO 941-830-8307
DINING ROOM TABLE GLASS
W/4 CHAIRS GREAT DEAL!
$150 941-924-6109
DINING SET beveled Glass
Top w/4 Parsons chairs VGC
$150, OBO 941-698-4768
DINING SET w/6 CHAIRS, Rat-
tan, Biege, Glass Top, 58"x40."
Orig $1100, asking $600 OBO,
941-661-6912 (pix avail)
DINING SET W/HUTCH Table
w/leaf, 4 side, & 2 arm chairs.
Pine. $499 941-626-5801
DINING SET, Rattan,
glass top very nice $295
941-356-0129
ELECTRIC BED Nice quality,
full size, clean, was $1500,
now $450 OBO; trundle bed
$275, 941-698-8969
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Dk wood, Italian, new, Pd
5000 $295 828-777-5610 (Cell)
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
solid oak. 53x53x20. storage.
$125, OBO 941-235-2203
FLOOR LAMP pineapple
design, good condition. $12
941-497-1435
FURNITURE COUCHES,
TABLES, MISC $50, OBO 941-
735-2119
HEADBOARD BLACK
wrought iron, King size $50
941-743-2535
HIDE-A-BED COUCH Floral
design in excellent condition.
$150 941-629-6382
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
KITCHEN CHAIRS 2 arm
chairs w/casters beige cush-
ion $20 941-613-2708
LIVING ROOM set Sofa,
Loveseat, Chair, ottoman. A
Must see! Neutral colors Exc
cond. $550 941-275-7325








Friday, August 30, 2013 ads you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


Challenger


DIRECTIONS:
Fill each square with a number, one through nine.
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right.
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to
total in upper and lower right.


8-30
rn


THERE MAY BE MORE 1 6
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge 1 5
Time 4 Minutes
48 Seconds 2 6
Your Working
1 9
Time Minutes
Seconds
Seconds 7 8 5 6 5
2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.
solution S-Z 22
Yesterday's 3 18
Challenger 9
Answers 28a11 i 11

Cryptoquip 2011 by King Features Syndicate


8-30

HAUH CRQQZJ XW

DTMQXG DQUGR

CZV MQTRDVXBHW.


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker


Z T H X B U HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne


MROOXBO

JZTQL EZT


WUE AR'W DQUB-AUBLQXBO?
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: IF A FAMOUS ACTRESS
CAME DOWN WITH MANY THROAT INFECTIONS.
WOULD PEOPLE CALL HER MERYL STREP?
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: W equals S


"WOOF!"


MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters
WT TO NO HANKS I VSENTHIN6SRO, oRIMMA9OV OL' O A
AIcH MANt. Yo THsiueHENapFE THAEsBRACLET
SONE T1? 3OlPuL.XNT INTHE: I4OS5 OR FORTIWO HOURS
UNMPERSTM,. HAS CHANte^ MME

HBI' a ^ r- A A" (7 AH.t'NP


PICKLES By Brian Crane
WVIAT Po0 O0O HAVE -TWEY'RE NO O rtfo
AGAIfw 615EATrPAw'? L PDE cYo IM AklW WAY.
"HEV'RE LiKE AM OLD, SW COMFORTABLE FRIEK)D. CAPR IF You GAt~N
WEI4,foR 90oM'T
S10L)ER ". -RE LIKE
P%41 n O, "0 f'E YWAYV 0 ARE.


I MEAC 1
V-AT AS A
COPAPLIMEA1


B.C. By Mastroianni & Hart


WORD
WORD *HARD TO
SLEUTH
ZQN J F CYVRO LHEB E
XDUROL I E B YV SQLN
KHN E TB Y ENWSTDRO
L J G A E B Y VN I WN W U R
EPKNTK I EGDABZXV
S EQOMS K I I H L LDG E
CAS YWU RL SQ L LP P N
LETARTNECNOCDX J
H F E C EAA B D H WN YY E
XVUG S LQ EEN I GAM I
PNMK J H P F B F U ES C B
Thursday's unlisted clue: FOREST
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Friday's unlisted clue hint: TO KEEP IN YOUR HAND
Beat Find Please Take
Believe Get Say Understand
Concentrate Handle See Win
Explain Imagine Swallow
2013 King Features, Inc. 8/30


Friday, August 30, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9






The Sun Classified P.:I 11: i: I I 1


: ,::. ur ir nret


Alzheimer's disease does

have some genetic link


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REX MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Graham Nolan
[ES, PLEASE WAVE YOUR /'WE WILL! TANK
ATTORNEY REVIEW THE YOU FOR THWI
AGREEMENT! OPPORTUNITY, ,
l / MS. LANNIN'!


-I



eee.
***-


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein

[THERE! FINISHED! O WHAT ON EARTH?
f IT'S A THING PON'TTOUCH
OF BEAUTY! THG SACMEP
-! S IONCO
S 600L I I SHING.


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
STHE NEXT HERE'S HOPING THAT I
MOlnNucIM~lr cANNOlM'S -TR" ian 4


DILBERT By Scott Adams

YOU KEEP GIVING
ME TRIVIAL ASSIGN-
MENTS THAT MAKE
ME DOUBT MY SELF-
WORTH.


YOU'RE WO2SHIPIN& PLEASE TELL ME THIS
AFOOTBAL.L TEAM? ISN'T HAPPENING.
ANP PEYTON FOP&IV/E HEP.
MANNING IS SHE KNOWS
ITS PROPHET. NOT WHAT
SGSHE POGS.


CHILL OUT.
YOU DON'T HEAR
THE MICROWAVE
WHINING ALL DAY
LONG.


a;)





Friday, August 30, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11


JUMBLE

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek A L D F
VA CONLUCTIRG A LITTLE D O YOU 5EI.T\5 GLASS AS TE 7 BOTTOM AILF 15 FULL
EXYPEF,^EN R.EGARKNG ALF FULL OR. HALF EAPTY 7 A >DTRE TOP HALF IS EPTY
PERCEPT IONS

~y~ry 4


BLONDIE By Dean Young and John Marshall


WELL, MOOCH-THERE
ARE ONLY TWO
PAYS LEFT OF OUR
REALL-YVACATION.
REALLY?


I YE Wi 'L fl=41
WORSE By Lynn Johnston

SHF-SRID HE FEI Do yOU THlNK HES
F Gf[TT1E-D ND RECALL GIVEEN UP
NEEDED R SMOKING&?

~IiYSJ


E m ] -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
^ suggested by the above cartoon. Ii11
A: "/^^ ^ 1 7T1 7 MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
AUGGH- IT'S TOO HoT,
(Answers tomorrow) TOO HUMIP, TOO
Yesterday's Jumbles: FENCE THANK PURELY ASSURE BUGGy- ANP THE
Answer: Danica Patrick's success at such a young age
was a result of her being a FAST LEARNER SAND IS ITCHy-

A clean look at wallpaper _FOO


Dear Heloise: I was won-
dering if you had a solution
to clean wallpaper? Thank
you very much. J.S., via
email
You bet I do, and it's
using a cheap cleaning
solution that you can make
at home. If your wallpaper
is washable, it's as simple
as a few drops of mild
liquid dishwashing soap
and a gallon or so of water.
Apply to the wall using a
damp sponge, and do only
one small area at a time.
Then wipe off with clean
water and dry.
To test if your wallpaper
is washable, try in a small,
hidden area first and allow
to dry. If you notice any
changes in the wallpaper
- e.g., it darkens or the
colors run then you can-
not "wash" the wallpaper.
If your wallpaper is not
washable, contact the
installer or manufacturer
to find out its recommen-
dations. If you have any
leftover wallpaper, the in-
formation might be located
on the roll. Heloise

Travel hint
Dear Heloise: I enjoy
your column. A reader
recommended safe ways
to bring seashells into the
country while traveling.
That reminded me of one
of my tricks of traveling.
I take four pencil
boxes with me when I
travel not the long and
narrow boxes, but rather
the plastic boxes that are
approximately 8 inches by
4 inches. You can buy them
at any office-supply store.


Hints from Heloise

I pack them with socks,
underwear, etc. As I travel
and purchase delicate
keepsakes, I wrap them
up and store them in the
boxes. I've been doing it for
years, and I always get my
delicate keepsakes home
without a scratch! Steven
W, Sacramento, Calif.

Yellow stain
follow-up
Dear Heloise: There may
be hope for the woman
who wrote about the
yellow stains on her vinyl
floor left by rubber-backed
carpets. I had this problem,
and I have avoided rubber-
backed carpets ever since.
The once-unsightly stain
on my bathroom floor
is no longer noticeable.
Perhaps time is the major
player, but could sunshine
have helped? My floor is
gray tones, not off-white,
but the yellow rectangle
was once highly visible! -
A Reader, Ishpeming, Mich.
Yes, sunshine may have
helped. However, it also
can hurt, and may darken
or yellow some vinyl,
depending on how much
sun and/or top coating.
- Heloise


TIME
REALLY FLIES
WHEN YOU'RE
HAVING FUN.


E
b


IE


ru
U1


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
OIN, 6NPMAPA I IV4wT 9 PI\ Ae 'SM uE
i To[ wl hM s. SIAW *X? I\ U S. e4 i







The Sun Classified Page 12 EINIC ads.yoursun.net Friday, August 30, 2013


Daughter's body tattoos are

slap in the face to parents
DEAR ABBY: My .
husband and I have two .
beautiful, hardworking
daughters we brought up as
loving, respectful parents.
Recently, "Kellie," 25, got
tattoos covering her right
arm, leg and ankle as well
as her shoulders. They are
,; lb i i ,,, l hP h AT nr,,


long sleeves and long pants.
This has ruined our
relationship because it
shows how little she thinks
of us as parents, and how
disrespectful of our feelings
she is to put the tattoos
where everyone can see
them. She knows we don't
like tattoos because we
have mentioned it to her
and voiced our disappoint-
ment when she got the first
one on her ankle.
I can't sleep at night
or look at my daughter
knowing how little she cares
about our feelings. I feel
it's a slap in the face that
she doesn't honor, respect
or love us. What do you
think? BESIDE MYSELF
IN FORT WORTH
DEAR BESIDE
YOURSELF: I think it is
time you toned down the
high drama. What's done is
done. If you do not ap-
preciate the person your
daughter is beneath her
skin, you will lose her. And
that would be a tragedy!
DEAR ABBY: I have a
20-plus-year high school
friend who is fighting ALS
(Lou Gehrig's disease.) I
have developed a close
relationship with him
and his parents. His mom
has shared some of his
comments with me, but
he hasnt shared those
thoughts with me himself.
The comments are, "I want
to die," or, "I want to go
home to God."
I think listening and
being a supportive friend
is what I can do for him,
but I'm at a loss as to what
to say to his mother. I don't
know what advice to give
her so she can be sup-
portive in her conversations
with her dying son. -
DEEP SORROW IN OHIO
DEAR DEEP SORROW:
I agree that listening and
being supportive is what
you can do best for your
friend. When the son raises
the subject again with his


Dear Abby

mother, she should tell him
that she loves him and will
see that his wishes are car-
ried out, even though losing
him will be losing a part of
herself.
When you see the mother
again, ask if he has an ad-
vance directive for medical
decisions in place. In it, a
person can specify that only
palliative care is preferred.
A group that offers
guidance in drafting these
important documents -
and one to which I con-
tribute is Compassion
and Choices. The toll-free
number is 800-247-7421. If
your friend does not have
an advance directive, it's
important that he make
one now.
DEAR ABBY: Our across-
the-street neighbors feel
they need to mow their
lawn three (excessive) times
a week. This includes using
a weed-eater and two mow-
ers a push mower and a
large riding mower. Quite
often, the husband chooses
to mow after 8 p.m. He
doesn't work and could do
it during the morning hours
if he wants it cooler.
The noise is loud and
extremely disruptive, and
lasts about an hour because
he goes over and over the
same area. We work and
would like to enjoy the
few hours we have in the
evening and relax. Any
ideas?-TIRED OF THE
NOISE IN MONTANA
DEARTIRED OFTHE
NOISE: If you're on speaking
terms with this neighbor,
you should ask him if he
would please manicure his
lawn at a different time be-
cause the noise is disruptive.
If he is unwilling to cooper-
ate, check with the city to
find out if there are any
noise ordinances in place. If
there are, you can report the
noise as a nuisance.


"Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John,
and perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant
men, they marvelled; and they took knowledge of them,
that they had been with Jesus."--Acts 4:13.
Do something Christlike! Love people. It is not
only have we told someone about Jesus, but have we
shown them.


I HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).You can get approxi-
mately the same hamburger on three out of four
corners of the main thoroughfare. In cases where
the differencesrp are minimal, vny'll find it so hard tn


MALLARD FILLMORE By Bruce Tinsley


A coRW Fv ppJb







0213 byKingW tusSydlecf. Word right |se
PEANUTS By Charles Schulz
MHE,5HOATSTOP! |O( ABOUT PLAJi'IN6 JUST A -mTAT THE 5TRAN6E6T LITTLE
COME HERE A LITTLE MORE 1TO R RIGHT? KI I'VE EVER SEEN.., HE
(73 MINiUTE, ILL OKA, ABw ? THArT'S' 14E I M NEVER SAYS AN'THtIN6!


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers



afP)AS- NIUTCO iR. CAL



4 L4i


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


what the other competitors are doing. You discover around. You want the solution that actually is the your desire to be nice. Consider issuing a gracious PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Your cosmic gift ofthe
your own strengths and lead with those. best because it's the right fit for you. invitation for someone to join you on your way to day is poise. Your actions will be graceful; your ges-
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Unfortunately, many LIBRA (Sept. 23-0Oct. 23). You could do it alone, another destination. tures, well received. You could really take advantage
people are self-involved and myopic.That's why but that would be stealing someone's chance to CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). When you make of this by taking a social risk or going dancing.


when you meet a like-minded curious and obser-


help you. Giving you their help will raise their self-


vant type, it's important to befriend that person. esteem and commitment to your relationship.
choose that you're likely not to choose anything.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Don't take anything too LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). The person who is making SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Considerthat the


people laugh, you create such a positive feeling for TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (Aug.30). You'll enjoy a degree
all involved that you want to repeat it over and over. of fame this year. You may have to cope with people
Alas, the laws of comedy dictate that it's only really whose interests are opposed to your own, but this


reve
personally now. Instead, focus on what needs to
h guale noy may be doing so intentionally. As person who is less tha


D


is part of what makes you stand out favorably in
September. October shows you successfully repre-
best senting your talent and the talent of others. Aries
o you and Libra people adore you.Your lucky numbers are:


in competitive environments because you don't do the choice that seems like the best one to everyone between your need to keep things moving and


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

S6 5 8 3 4 Rating: SILVER

9 6 ISolution to 8/29/13

64 5372 8 1 9
0 2 8 1 4 5 19 367
281459367

6 5 1 7 3 9 6 18 2 4 5
3 6 51 289 528941736
916537482
1 4 7 4 7 3 8 2 6 5 9 1

9 2 71 6 2 7 8 3 9 5 41
1 3 5 7 1 9 4 894265173


8 9 3 2 6
8/30/13


The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, August 30, 2013


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know anyone who might have some ideas about...? 6,49,29,4 and 35.






Friday, August 30, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Friday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORTCHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


AUG. 30 E- E PRIME TIME
6_--3 7f* PM 7:30 8PM 8:309fM 9:30 10M 10 :0 1PMln11:30
AB7 News World News Millionre. To Be a Last Man The Shak Tank Christmas tree ()0) 20/20 David Muir updatesABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC M 7 7 7 10 7 7 at6 (N) Diane Sawyer Oscarthemed Millionaire? Standing:The Neighbors rental service. (R (HD) the Marsalis story. (N) (HD) at11 (N) KimmelLive
(N) week. (R) Fight Purse business (R)
ABC7News Word News The 7 O'Clock Entertainment LastMan The SharkTank Christmas tree (f01) 20/20 David Muir updates ABC7 News (35) Jimmy
ABC 7 11 7 6:00pm(N) DianeSawyerNews(N)(HD) Tonight(N)(HD) tanding:The Neighbors rentalservice. ()(HD) theMarsalis story. (N) (HD) 11:00pm KimmelLive
(N) Fight Purse business. (N) (R)
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CBS 1213213 5 5 5 at6pm(N) (HD)News(N)(H) at7pm (N)(HD) Edition(N)(HD) LouisianaKitchenSouthern 'uhaneTVridealong. (R)(HD) Youngdevoutwomandeadin 11pm(N)(HD) James
charm.(R) cemetery. (R) McCartey.
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel Jeopardy!: Undercover Boss Popeyes Hawaii Five-0: Imi loko ka Blue Bloods: Loss of Faith 10 News, Late Show
CBS M 10 10 10 lo 6pm (N) News(N) (HD) Fortune:Best Teen Louisiana Kitchen Southern 'uhane TVridealong. (R) (HD) Young devoutwoman dead in 11pm(N) James
Friends Tournament charm.(R) cemetery. (R) McCartey.
NBC2News NBCNightly Wheel Jeopardy!: BettyWhite's BettyWhite's Dateline NBC (N) NBC2News (35)The
NBC 2232232 2 2 2 @ 6pm(N) (HD)News (N) (HD) Fortune:Best Teen OffTheir OffTheir(R) @11pm(N) Tonight
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NBC I 8 8 8 8 8 8 at 6:00 (N) News (N) (HD) 8 at 7:00 (N) Raymond James Stadium (Taped) Post-Game 8 at 11:00 (N) Tonight
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FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy Simpsons Bones The Maiden in the The Following: Havenport FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX4 News Friends
FOX 3222222 4 4 4 Community news; weather; Busticket. ( Mushrooms The murder of a Roderick makes a decision. news report and weather at Eleven (N) Joey's
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FOX13 6:00 News News TMZ (N) omg! Insider Bones The Maiden in the The Following: Havenport FOX 13 10:00 News The FOX13 News Access
FOX M 1313 13 13 13 eventsof the day are reported. BradPitt. (N) MushroomsThe murder of a Roderick makes a decision. top news stories are Edge(N) (HD) Hollywood(N)
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BBCWorld Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (H) Washington Chadie Rose: Side by Side: The Science, The March Story behind Charlie Rose (N) (HD)
PBS W 3 3 3 News Business Week(N)(HD) TheWeek(N) Art and Impact of Digital 1963 March on Washington.
__America Report (N) Cinema (N) (HD) (R) (HD)
BBCWordd Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) Washington Florida This Side by Side: The Science, Great Performances: Tanglewood 75th Anniversary
WEDU3J 3 3 3 3 News Business Week(N) (HD) Week Art and Impact of Digital Celebration Several orchestras, a pianist, a cellist, a
America Report(N) Cinema (N)(HD) vocalist and other artists perform. (R)
2 1/2 Men 21/2 Men The Big Bang The Big Bang Perfect Score Perfect America's Next Top Model WINK News @10pm (N) (HD) How Met How Met
CW M 11 21 6 Jake's drawing. Mom, ony Injured Penny. Sheldon's sick Fashion Twin-datng Acting skills. (N) (HD) Mother Mother
(HD) younger. models. bankers. Interventon Cupcake
King of King of 21/2 Men Engagement Perfect Score Perfect America's Next Top Model 21/2 Men Engagement Friends Friends Dirty
CW 9 9 9 4 Queens: Fker Queens Sight Jake's drawing Motherhood. Fashion Twin-datng Acting skills. (N) (H)) Mom, only Romantic idea. Joey's girfriend. (WPG)
Upper Gag (HP) (H)) models. bankers. younger. interview.
Raymond Poo Seinfeld Family Feud Family Feud Monk Mr. Monk Gets Drunk Monk Mr. Monk and Mrs. Seinfeld Scmbs New Baggage (HD) Excused
MYN l 11 11 11 14 conversation. "Jerry" gets (VPG) (R) (IVPG) (R) Monksuspects a murder at a Monk Monkfaces his late wifes Kramer's soul joboffer. (TVPG) Blondev.
canned. winery, memory. mate. brunette. (R)
Access Seinfeld Family Guy American Monk Mr. Monk Gets Drunk Monk Mr. Monk and Mrs. Family Guy American Seinfeld Sunny Mac is
MYN aD 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) "Jerry" gets Peter'sTV Dad!Backup Monksuspects a murder at a Monk Monkfaces his late wifesMurder Dad!Sponsor Kramer'ssoul murderer. (H))
(HD) canned. station. bride. winery, memory. mystery. child. mate.
FamilyGuy FamilyGuy The Big Bang The Big Bang Law& Order Criminal Intent: Law& Order Criminal Intent How Met HowMet The Office The Office
IND 321212 4 38 12 Peter'sTV Murder Injured Penny. Sheldon's sick Salomein Manhattan Dead Dramma Giocoso Opera death. Mother Mother SabreCEO. Wedding
station. mystery. girlfriend. (HD) Intervention Cupcake (H)) shower.
Cold Case: November 22nd Cold Case: The Long Blue Cold Case: Into the Blue Cold Case: The Crossing Cold Case: Hoodrats Team Cold Case: Jurisprudence
ION 2 2 2 13 26 1817 Pool hustler killed same day as Line Female cadet. (HD) Female cadet murdered. (HD) Shipboard murder from investigates skateboarder's Murdered teenager unjustly
___Kennedy. 1966. (HD)) murder. (HD) sentenced.
A&E 26262626395018 Storage NY torageNY toageNY StorageNY Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Modem Dad Modem Dad
(5:30) Next of Kin ('89, Drama) A gutsy police officer works The Green Mile ('99, Drama) *** The veteran guard of a prison's death row struggles with a crisis of conscience
AMC 56 5656 563053231outside the law to avenge his brother. when he begins to question whether a kindhearted prisoner murdered two girls. (R)
APL 44 4444 44 3668130Off Hook Off Hook Hillbilly: Catfish Kin (N) Hillbilly (N) (HD) Hillbilly (N) (HD) Hillbilly (N) (HD) |Hillbilly (R) (HD)
BET 353535354022 270106 & Park Rap battles. (N)(HD) |Are We Done Yet? Dream home becomes costly venture. National Security ('03, Comedy) Security guards.
BRAVO 686868 68 51 185(5:30) Panic Room ('02) *** Criminals invade. (R) Scary Movie Killer knows teens' terrible secret. Scary Movie Killer knows teens' terrible secret.
(5:49) Idiocracy ('06, Comedy) k1/% A man travels 500 (:54) National Lampoon's Van Wilder ('02, Comedy) *J1% (58) Tosh.0 (R) Tosh.0 Rantng John Oliver(N) I Love You,
COM 666666 661527 190years into a future world ruled by stupidity. A college student must change his ways. (HD) girls. (HD) Man ***
DISC 4040 40 402543120 Gold Rush (R) (HD) Gold Rush (R) (HD) Gold Rush (N) (H) Gold Rush (N) (HD) Alaskan Fishing fleet. Gold Rush (R) (HD)
E! 464646 462726 196Hal ('01) E! Spec. E! News (N) (1H) Police (R) (H)) Fashion Police (N) (H)) Fashion Police (R) (1H) C.Lately News(R)
FAM 55 55 55 55 10 46 199Twister ('96, Drama) Storm chasers pursue killer tornadoes. Twister ('96, Drama) Storm chasers pursue killer tornadoes. The 700 Club (TVG)
FOOD 37 37 37 37 76 164 Diners (R) Diners (R) Restaurant (( (H) Diners (R) Diners (R) Diners (R Diners (R) Diners (R) |Diners ( Mystery Mystery
2 1/2 Men 21/2 Men Alvin and the Chipmunks ('07, Comedy) ** Jason Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel ('09) *1/ AWhite Chicks ('04) /*1/
FX 51 51 51 51 5814 (HD) (1) Lee. Songwriter discovers musical chipmunks. chipmunk pop group meets female group. Under heavy cover.
GSN 17917917917934 179184 Fant Feud Fam. Feud Minute to Win It (R) The Chase (R) The Chase (R) Baggage Baggage Fam. Feud Fam. Feud
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HIST 8181 81 3365 128American American American American American: Blast Off! (R) American American American American American American
LIFE 36 36 36 365241 140 Hoarders (HD) Hoarders (HD) Hoarders (H) Hoarders (H) Hoarders (HD) (:01) Hoarders (HD)
NICK 25 25 25 25 2444 252 Sponge Sponge TMNT) (R TNT(R) TMNT (1 TMNT (R) Full Hse Full Hse Nanny |Nanny Friends Friends
OWN 585858 58 47103161 A Few Good Men ('92) Oprah Justin Guarini. Oprah Fabio interview. Oprah Stars of 1970s. Oprah (R) (HD) Oprah Fabio interview.
QVC 14 14 12 9 1413 50Shoe Shopping with Jane Fun look at shoes. Perricone MD Computer Lisa Robertson Show Friday Night Beauty
SPIKE 57 5757 572963 54 (4:27) Kick-Ass ('10) Con Air ('97, Action) **% An airplane is hijacked by inmates. (:37) Con Air ('97, Acton) An airplane is hijacked by inmates.
SYFY 6767 6767 64180 Continuum (R) Continuum CPS suit. WWE SmackDown (HD) )Continuum (N) Haven: The Farmer (R)
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Queens Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Shrek An ogre and a donkey escort a princess. Shrek the Third ('07, Fantasy) Search for a king.
(5:30) The Way West ('67) A t A wagon (:45) Carson (R) Paths of Glory ('57, Drama) Soldiers fail an Act of Love ('53) A soldier pretends to be a woman's Lust for Life
TCM 6 6 6 169230rain makes its way to Oregon.impossible WWI mission. husband to hid the fact she is a prostitute. _-,***
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TNT 61 61 61 61 285551 Masked vigilante. Cryogenic killings. (HD) marked for assassination looks for answers. who may be innocent of his crime.
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TVL 62 62 62 62 31 54 244(5:30) M*A*S*H Our heroes go home. IRaymond Raymond (:44) Roseanne (TVG) Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne
USA 34 3434 34 2252 50 SVU Corrupt producer. SVU: Official Story (HD) SVU: Spiraling Down SVU Hate crimes. (HD) SVU: Justice Denied SVU Girl claims rape.
WE 117117117117 l749 Roseanne Roseanne Bridezilla Party crasher. Bridezilla (R) (HD) Bridezillas(N) (HD) Bridezillas (N) (H) Obsessed: Seeing Red
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CNBC 393938 39 37102 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Millions Millions The Profit (R) Greed Stolen numbers. Mad Money (1R
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CSS 28028 28 28 49 70O High School Football: Walton vs Hillgrove (Uve) SSEC Ftbll ~ High School Football: Lassiter vs McEachern (Lve) ISEC Ftbll
ESPN 29 29 29 29 12 58 70 SportsCenter (HD) College F-Ball (HD) College Football: Texas Tech Red Raiders at SMU Mustangs (Lve) (HD1) SportsCenter (H1D)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 US Open Tennis (ive) 2013 U.S. Open Tennis: Men's Second Round/Women's Third Round (Lve) (HD) Olbermann
FS1 48 48 48 48 426983 Football Daily (HD) Sprint Qualify.: Advocare 500 (HD) College Foolball: North Dakota State Bison at Kansas State Wildcats (ive) (H1D)
FSN 72 72 72 72 5677 The Sub Polaris Marlins MLB Baseball: Miami Marlins at Atlanta Braves from Turner Field (lie) Marlins Wrld Poker (Replay)
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SUN 38 38401401 455776 Fishing Bolts (HD) Women's College Soccer (Lve) Inside Rays LIVE! MLB Baseball: Tampa Bay vs Oakland (Lve)
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DISN 136136136136 99 45 25Bob's snoring. project. (R) (H) Report card. (R) Famous school comrades find themselves inside of Chancetogo Outrageous Spencer's nanny. (R) (H) music
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(:20) Rush Hour ('98, Action) -**k- Jackie Chan, Chris The Patriot ('00, Drama) -**k- The son of a war veteran joins the (:50) GoodFellas ('90, Crime) **-** A
ENC 150150150150 150350 Tucker. A Hong Kong detective and LAPD cop search for a Continental Army to fight the British, and when he is taken prisoner, his young man confronts suspicion and violence
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children's failing inner-city school. an alien armada of unknown origins. Revisited girlfriend from a Mexican cartel. (R)
(5:25) Beasts of the Southern The Newsroont Red Team III Sopranos Makingof... Trouble with the Curve (12, Drama) *** Clint The Best Exotic Marigold
HBO3 304304304304 304404Wild (12) Louisiana girl looks Rebecca examines staff's Carmelagets Film's Eastwood, Amy Adams. A baseball scout takes his Hotel Retirees land in shabby
for mother. depositions, advice. production. daughter on what could be his last recruiting trip. ndian palace.
Taken 2: (:50) Prometheus ('12) r*** After ancient cave paintings are found that Stike Back (:50) Strike BackThe team (:40) Strike Back Focus is put Co-Ed
MAX 320 320 320320 63320420 Unrated point to possible alien origins for humanity, an interstellar expedition is Terrorist barely survives an attack. (R) on a smuggling job. (1R (HD) Confidential:
Version (12) embarked upon to learn life's meaning. (R) financier. (D) Blind Date
(5:30) In Time (11, Action) **"* A corrupt The Presence (10, Horror) A woman G.I. Jane ('97, Drama) ** Demi Moore, Viggo (10) The Man with the Iron
MAX2 321321321321 321422 police force chases a man convicted of is stalked by a ghost while visiting a Mortensen. Female soldier is chosen to train as a Navy Fists (12) ** Rogue
stealing a fortune. (PG-13) secluded cabin in the woods. SEAL by a US Senator. (R) (HD) warriors hunt for gold.
Evey Day (:45) Sling Blade ('96, Drama) AA**1 A simple-minded man is released Man on a Ledge (12, Thriller) An (:45) ALL (15) Ray Donovan: Road Trip
SHO 34034034034019 340 365 Television from a mental hospital and befriends a fatherless boy trying to cope with his ex-convict threatens to jump to his death ACCESS Avi transports Suly to Los
writer, mother's abusive boyfriend. (R) (HD) from a Manhattan hotel rooftop. Angeles. (1
(:15) Gone (12, Thriller) *A*A AmandaSeyfried, Daniel W. (08, Drama) **1 Josh Brolin, James Cromwell. A (:10) Gangs of New York ('02, Drama) k***1/ Leonardo
TMC 350 350350 350 20350385 Sunjata. Awoman sets out for her sister who has been taken biography of George W. Bush depicts his early life and his DiCaprio. Young man infiltrates a violent New York gang
by a man who abducted her. time as president. (PG-13) (HD) with plans for vengeance. (1R (HD)
6M 63 7 M3. -, 83 9P: a a a0 a0 1 M a:i


Today's Live Sports

9:30 a.m. GOLF European Tour
Golf ISPS Handa Wales Open:
Second Round. (L)
12:30 p.m. GOLF PGA Web.com
Tour Golf Hotel Fitness Cham-
pionship: Second Round. (L)
1 p.m. ESPN2 2013 U.S. Open
Tennis Men's Second Round/
Women's Third Round. (L)
2:10 p.m. WGN MLB Baseball
Philadelphia Phillies at Chicago
Cubs from Wrigley Field. (L)
3 p.m. FS1 NASCAR Sprint Cup
Practice AdvoCare 500. (L)
GOLF PGA TOUR Golf
Deutsche Bank Championship:
First Round. (L)
6 p.m. CSS High School Foot-
ball Walton Raiders at Hillgrove
Hawks. (L)
6:30 p.m. GOLF LPGA Tour
Golf Safeway Classic: Second
Round from Columbia Edgewa-
ter in Portland, Ore. (L)
7 p.m. ESPN2 2013 U.S. Open
Tennis Men's Second Round/
Women's Third Round. (L)
SUN Women's College Soc-
cer Florida State Seminoles at
Florida Gators. (L)
7:30 p.m. FSN MLB Baseball
Miami Marlins at Atlanta Braves
from Turner Field. (L)
8 p.m. ESPN College Football
Texas Tech Red Raiders at SMU
Mustangs. (L)
8:30 p.m. FS1 College Football
North Dakota State Bison at
Kansas State Wildcats. (L)
9 p.m. CSS High School Foot-
ball Lassiter Trojans at McEach-
ern Indians. (L)
10 p.m. SUN MLB Baseball
Tampa Bay Rays at Oakland
Athletics. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morning
America Scheduled: GMA's Sum-
mer Concert series presents a
performance by Alicia Keys. (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
remembering Princess Diana 15
years after her death; Chris Brown.
(N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: director
Tyler Perry; TV personality Oprah
Winfrey. (N)
9:00 a.m. CW Rachael Ray From
May: fashion expert Gretta Mo-
nahan with underwear tips.
10:00 a.m. CW The Ricki Lake
Show From May: various guests
discuss growing up in extreme
situations.
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Sched-
uled: guest co-host Chef Fabio
Viviani offers viewers some light
recipes. (N)
1:00 p.m. MYN The Trisha God-
dard Show Scheduled: a man
believes that two women are
conspiring against him. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Sched-
uled: singer Marie Osmond; singer
Selena Gomez; music group II Volo.
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Williams
Show From March: a look at the
latest, must-have gadgets.
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors From
April: baby boomers get health
advice; arthritis warning signs;
mommy menu.
4:00 p.m. ABC Access Hollywood
Live Scheduled: actress Lake Bell;
actor Josh Duhamel; chef Scott
Conant. (N)
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled: actor
Denzel Washington; musical guest
James McCartney.
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno Scheduled: Senator
John McCain; Diablo Cody; Booker
T. Jones; Mayer Hawthorne. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv







The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads yoursu n net Friday, August 30, 2013


L FURNITURE
OO 6035


LIVING ROOM Set (sleeper)
White couch, love seat, chair/9pil-
lows New $499 941-681-2433
LOVE SEAT, CHARMING
"Dowton Abby"-style, 60"X21",
Lt Burgandy, Pics Avail $175
OBO, 386-846-0840
LOVESEAT ANTIQUE good
condition newly covered $50
941-380-1157
MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MIRROR, ornate gold 4'x2'.
beveled glass. new. $85, OBO
941-235-2203


FURNITURE FURNITURE
S6035 Lo L 6035


LAMP FLOOR, white, antique,
56" tall $30 941-408-6875
ORIENTAL MIRROR, w/gold
bamboo trim 28Wx39L. Ex.
Cond. $100 941-575-4364
PATIO SET ROUND TABLE W
4 PVC CHAIRS, STRONG
STRAPS $250 941-740-1000
PRIMITIVE JELLY Cupboard
over 100 yrs. old, door needs
some work, orig. hardware,
$150. Lincoln Rocker, old,
needs canning, $20. Retro
Cabinet sliding glass doors
top, wood doors bottom, $25.
Call 941-625-3918.


PATIO TABLE Set Brown &
Jordon 42"sqGlass,4 swl/rock
$249, OBO 941-676-2711
PUB SET Black metal w/2
matching chairs and glass top.
$110, OBO 941-426-1604
PUB TABLE oak, leather
seats. 38"round. pics on crg.
list $250, OBO 561-222-6431
RECLINER LA-Z-BOY, beige,
great shape, Iv. msg. $100
941-493-0674
RECLINER, electric, tan,
many positions. Good for heart
patient. $125 941-475-6260
I Advertise Today!


L FURNITURE
6035


RECLINER, Lane, taupe
leather good cond. $100
941-235-2613
RECLINERS 2 matching rat-
tan arms tropical print very
nice $299 941-356-0129
RECLINERS 2 w/ottomans
ch brown $400, OBO 941-
716-2225
Riverside Armoire $195;
Bassett Chest of Drawers
$50; Queen Anne Full Length
Dressing Mirror $125; Oak
Coffee Table $15; (2) Neon
Bar Lights $75 each, 214-
998-1429


I FURNITURE
4 6035


ROCKER CHAIR Coco brown
941-4751268 $50, OBO
941-475-8147
ROCKER RECLINER,
grey nonsmoker. $75,
OBO 941-235-2203
RUG 11X8 Nourison French
Aubusson Design 100% Wool
$250 941-681-2433
IADVEMRTISE! .
RUG BRN/GREEN fern pat-
tern 5/8 L/N $75 941-661-
7132
SECTIONAL SOFA Ficks
Reed dark wicker rattan VGC
$499 941-627-6542


FURNITURE
6035


SEWING CABINET holds 2
machines for sewing and stor-
age $40 941-613-2708
SEWING MACHINE
CABINET wood $50, OBO
941-698-8818
SHELF 4 BRASS, GLASS,
NEW ,COND, 72"HX33"WX12"D
$95 718-986-3608
SLEEPER SOFA&LOVESEAT
Beige leather, chair, ottoman,
coffee & end tables. exc. cond.
$1,200 OBO 941-627-8767
SOFA & CHAIR VERY GOOD
CONDITION, CAN EMAIL PICS
$150 941-916-2120


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH
2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
WHAT'S THE HURRY?


Both vulnerable. South deals.


WEST
AKQJ
c Q86
098
4Q872


NORTH
AA7
(97542
0 7
K 6 5 4 3
EAST
10 49865
J J10 3
OJ53
4 4J 10 9
SOUTH
4432
SAK
OAK Q 10 6 4 2


*A
The bidding:
SOUTH WEST
10 Pass
4NT Pass
60 Pass


NORTH
1I
50
Pass


EAST
Pass
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: King of A
More contracts are blown at the
first trick than at any other time
during the play. South's six diamonds
was no exception.
South's hand was worth a forcing
two clubs opening bid. The problem
was that it would possibly cost a
round of bidding because of North's
likely two-diamond response, and
perhaps have the final contract
played from the wrong side, so
instead South elected one diamond,
since holding only 20 high-card
points, the auction ending there was
unlikely. When North could respond,
South chose to launch into


Blackwood despite the problem of
the spade holding. Had North
responded five clubs, denying an ace,
South would have settled in five
diamonds and hoped there were not
three fast losers on the hand. When
North showed an ace, however, the
small slam was too tempting to
ignore.
West led the king of spades.
Declarer rose with dummy's ace,
came to hand with the ace of clubs
and exited with a spade. West won
and returned a trump, and at trick 13
declarer surrendered another spade
- down one.
The slam should have been made,
and without any brilliant play. All it
required was for declarer to allow the
king of spades to win the first trick! If
West continued with a spade, declarer
would win, come to hand with the
ace of clubs, ruff the remaining spade
in dummy and the slam was cold as
long as the knave of trumps was no
more than twice guarded.
It would have been no better for
West to shift to a diamond at trick
two. Declarer would win, draw the
remaining trumps, cash the ace of
clubs, return to the table with the ace
of spades and discard the spade loser
on the king of clubs. Either way, 12
tricks were there for the taking.
(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this newspaper
or to Tribune Content Agency, LLC,
2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX
75038. E-mail responses may be sent to
gorenbridge@aol.corn.)


7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter o
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

CLUES SOLUTIONS |

1 placid (6) _

2 Penn athletics team (7)

3 outer edges (7) o_

4 gasoline additive (7)

5 insult comedian Don (7) _

6 Advil alternative (5)

7 overrun (6) _


SE


AKE


KL


GES


OL


ES


VE


FE


RS


ST


ET


RE


NE


RIC


FR


ALE


IN


IN


QU


HAN


Thursday's Answers: 1. TORTONI 2. FEATHERED 3. TREASONOUS
4. TROTTED 5. RESINS 6. SERTA 7. DREDGE 8/30


ACROSS
1 Huff and puff
5 Yanks'
adversaries
9 Walleyed fish
13 High woodwind
14 Video-game
pioneer
16 Like good brandy
17 Confident
18 Kid around
(2 wds.)
19 Await judgment
20 "L'-, c'est moi"
21 Visa and
passport
22 Robust
24 Stash away
26 Blume or Garland
27 Barbecue coals
30 Lamented
34 Zesty dip
35 Dubuque's state
36 Boot bottom
37 Good name for
a cook?
38 UFO pilot
39 Kubrick's
computer
40 "Rabbi Ben -"
42 Tiny stream
43 Honeymoon -
45 Krypton or
xenon (2 wds.)
47 Was the right
size
48 Modem-speed
unit


49 Horrid-tasting
50 Bwana's trek
53 Triumph
54 Collars
58 Well-known
auth.
59 Bete -
61 Woodpecker's
treat
62 New Zealand
bird
63 Meditation
guides
64 Like some
chatter
65 "Mack the Knife"
singer
66 Take it easy
67 Happy tune
DOWN
1 Sit for a portrait
2 Lie adjacent
3 Ibsen woman
4 Grows molars
5 Rafter's
challenge
6 Chopin opus
7 Belfry dwellers
8 B'way posting of
yore
9 Tropical fruits
10 Disney CEO
Bob -
11 Superman's
alias
12 Swirling water
15 Heartless


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
V OLTIC A BIN D ILL
AGARIAG I AGIUE
M E MOIN O K SN I O TA
PEAL IN GG S TAR RED
oL O Mll
ANTE NRA UN ERGO
RUBY SL ANG SOLO
ADA OWlS B OZ
SERAS N EERWO VE
ESS NJ EN R E B TES
RIO 1 V A L
GORILLA CONNIVE
AREAID R 0L U NIX
MEAL ELIOT TINA
POP8-30-13 2013 US, Dist. by Unv. Uclick for UTEM
8-30-13 @2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


23 Tokyo, once
25 S&L offering
26 Topaz or opal
27 German city
28 Passover bread
29 Book jacket ad
30 Gives off steam
31 game(hyph.)
32 Buoy up
33 Edited out
35 Wooden horse
saga
38 In disagreement
41 Balkan nation
43 vous plait


Fork or knife
Hoop site
Very best
Flu bug
Rice wine
Indigo plant
Turkey
Install electricity
Honda rival
Saved by the -
Proofer's word
Not their


VVant more puzzles -
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, August 30, 2013






Friday, August 30, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


L FURNITURE
OO 6035


SOFA & love seat fall colors
$165 941-475-6101
SOFA AND CHAIR pastel
colors, like new $150,
OBO 941-830-8307
SOFA AWESOME rarely used
Like new. Steal it now. $325,
OBO 561-222-6431
SOFA BED
blue and mauve, like new
$25 941-764-0162
SOFA BED QUEEN GOOD
Light Color $150, OBO 941-
743-5762
SOFA BROWN, plush
w/matching pillows- 1 yr old
$300 941-429-9305
SOFA SLEEPER & LOVESEAT
Bed W/Plastic Great Shape
Floral $225 941-460-6006
SOFA SOUTHWEST COLORS
EX. COND. $175, OBO 862-
812-0995
SOFA, LEATHER beige, reclin-
ing good cond. $125 941-
769-7984
SOFA, Like new high end +
coffee & end table $495
941-356-0129
SOLID WOOD Cherry 4x6, 7
Drawer, Desk 1950's Design
Elegant $225 941-681-2433
TABLE + 4 Chairs 3'x3'folding
ames table + 4 black chairs
30 941-828-1129
TABLE SET ROUND WHITE
FORMICA W/ 3 CHAIRS $175
941-763-2581
TABLE, Dining Rm St. Pierre,
dbl-pedestal ,45x72, 20" leaf
$399, OBO 941-766-0857
TV WALL Unit Light Gray
W94XH74 inches custom
made. $300 941-763-2696
WOODEN ROCKER $65
941-575-7270

ELECTRONICS
L6038


CELL PHONE Cosmos 2
w/case (Verizon) Excel Cond
$20 941-626-5468
CONTROLLER, XBOX Orig. &
Spiderman game great cond.
$25, OBO 575-590-0305
ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM,
In Car for Tablets NIB $40
941-627-0212
GARMIN NUVI 660 GPS
USED ONE TIME $150, OBO
941-575-4364
HP 2015 Laser Printer Very
good condition. $65, OBO
941-416-0038


ELECTRONICS
6038


NINTENDO DS Including
Charger, Case, 4 Games. EC
$75 941-875-6271
PEAVEY/DJ/KARAOKE
SETUP everything needed
$425, OBO 941-465-8844
SHARP PHONE fax copy
works well paper rolls941-716-
2225 $35 974-716-2225
SOUND SYSTEM OLIN ROSS,
7 SPEAKERS, REMOTE. $100
941-740-3286
STEREO COMPACT SYSTEM
speakers, turntable, casset,
eqaul. $80 718-986-3608
TRACFONE SAMSUNG
S390G, triple minutes. like
new. $20 941-764-3454
VCR PLAYER & RECORDER 4
Head w/digital track. LN $24
941-697-1102
VIDEO CAM, Flip HD 4gb, Ihr
video, great for kids. Easy to
use. $45 941-624-2105
TV/STEREO/RADIO
6040


CD PLYR SONY 200 CDs, w
remote & manual, excellent,
$120 314-774-7700
CERWIN-VEGA SERIES 30Re
spkrs 3way,12" woofer,exlnt
$80 314-774-7700
Classified = Sales
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
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Click on Classifieds
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At the end...you will NOT be
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T.V. 32" SONY BRAVIA LCD
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0760
TV 27" RCA Scenium 4" deep
Flat Sreen works great $50,
OBO 941-676-2711


SUN


CLASSIFIED


To Place, Correct, or Cancel Ad


CALL




13487 TAMIAl AI


l S r. A



Sus o-"I I F i 8A -



Check Out More SUN Classified Ads Online
| sunnewspapers.net
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TV/STEREO/RADIO
6040


TV 32" VIZIO HD 1080 3YR
orig remote/paperwork $200
941-587-8870
TV PHILIPS HDTV, 17" Flat,
remote control. Works great.
$50 941-408-6875
TV RCA 20' Color W/ Remote
$30 941-421-4020
TV, 32in. JVC ,w/Hyper
Surround Sound, remote
$50 941-286-2339
TV, PANASONIC 2, 19' 12'
GOOD COND. $20, OBO
941-391-6377
VHS MOVIE TAPES 90 Tapes
w/covers. All Themes.Good
Condition. $20 941-426-0760
Seize the sales
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EQUIPMENT
6060

COMPUTER, DELL Flat
w/monitor-desktop black $90
941-473-9269
DAVE IN-HOUSE-OFFICE corn-
puter repair, set-up Serving Char-
lotte Co. 12+ yrs 941-629-6337
GEEK BATTERY Backup
works great barely used like
new $80, OBO 941-465-8844
GOLF CLUB computer mouse
new looks like a driver $5
941-228-1745
LAPTOP COOLER STAND,
CoolerMaster +usb like new
$30 941-465-8844
MONITOR 17" DELL flat
panel w/adjustable pedastal.
LN $48 941-697-1102
MONITOR, 17" Great picture.
Flat screen CRT, not a thin LCD
$15 941-743-2656
POWER SUPPLY, DELL
cx305n Clean, warranted $10,
OBO 941-445-9069
PRINTER HP 3015 Laser All
in One, copier, fax. $115, OBO
941-416-0038
SAMSONITE EXEC Suitcase
Leather/rolling laptop
$50 941-380-1157
SATELLITE DISH Hughesnet
/w modem used 1 month
$25, OBO 575-590-0305
CLOTHING / JEWELRY/
ACCESSORIES
6065

BEDOUIN DRESS
Vintage/ethnic, black w/color
stitching $125 941-408-6875
COACH PURSE Gold leather
tote NWT others avail. $175
941-587-8870
CUT CRYSTAL 16" NECK-
LACE lovely antique estate pc
$40 941-639-1517
JEANS, Levi 505 New. Size
34w34L. $10 941-875-6271
LAB COATS WOMAN'S WHITE
(3) $6, OBO 941-429-8415
LADIES 1ST Gear Leather
Motorcycle Jacket Size S $75
941-661-0054
NURSES SCRUBS LADY'S
SIZE MEDIUM NEW $3 941-
429-8415
PURSE VINTAGE Fendi. FF
monogram. Auth. Exc.cond.
$225 941-474-1508
SHOE 7 FOR All Mankind
Somali Ankle Cuff Wedge Size
9 $50 941-763-0018
SPORTCOATS (2) Size 44L
one beige one navy. Nice! Both
for $25 941-764-3454

ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

11 1/21N Vanna White doll
orig. box Lmtd. ed. $10 941-
423-2585
1ST EDITION Book "YAZ"
Boston Red Sox star! Bargain-
MORE $15 941-639-1517


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
ANTIQUE CHAIR Yunan (Chi-
nese), carved, 39x21x16
$425, OBO 941-408-6875
ANTIQUE CLOCK ANSONIC
CO. PERFECT TIME, CHIMES
$195 941-764-7971
ANTIQUE CRIB w/wheels
2'x4' REDUCED! great for dis-
play. $100 941-639-1517
ANTIQUE TABLES 3 Flint &
Horner GC Make offer $499,
OBO 941-735-2119
ANTIQUE WRINGER washer
easy $150, OBO 941-979-
5875
BABE RUTH Plaque Sultan of
Swat.EC. $15 941-875-6271
BELL (FENTON) glass cobalt
hnd. painted + signed $10
941-585-8149
SEmploy Classified!
BIRD'S EYE MAPLE double
bed room set, 2 dressers and
mirrors $225 941-474-4472
BOBBLE HEAD SB XXXVII
Joe Jurevicius #8. $10
941-875-6271
BOBBLEHEADS BUCS,
Jurevicius and Gruden.
$20 941-875-6271
BOOK "LINCOLN" 1924 EDI-
TION GREAT CONDITION $15
941-764-7971
BUCCANEERS SANTA
Tampa Bay Danbury Mint Col-
lectible $25 941-426-0760
CAKE STAND 10"x7" Vintage
Crystal Fostoria with brandy
well $80 941-426-0760
CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
CHILD'S ROCKER oak
pressed back with cane seat
$175 941-474-4472
CHRISMA BLACK MIKASSA 8
plc extra pieces ex/c $300
OBO 941-575-4364
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
COFFEE TABLE Mersman,
mid-century $65 941-268-
5403
COFFEE TABLE Octagon 2-
Tier Glass Top, Biege, $75,
941-639-2815
COINS NICE RED 1863 INDI-
AN HEAD PENNY MUST SEE
$130 941-457-0155
CREAM AND Sugar Belleck,
Clearly Cream,1946-55. Per-
fect cond. $20 941-624-2105
EMENEE ELEC. organ Old
table top mdl. Made in USA.
Works!! $50 941-423-2585
FIESTA JUICE glasses, 6 col-
ors and yellow pitcher,$160.
941-623-0346
FIESTAWARE VINTAGE
Fiestaware about 25 pieces in
Sarasota $5 941-600-1442
JOHNSON BROS from Eng.
gravy, veg, platters-reduced
ea $20 941-639-1517
LAMP, STAIN GLASS HANG-
ING STAG STYLE-1950's $59
727-906-1754
LENOX SPICE VILLAGE 24
PIECE 24KT SIGNED WITH
SHELF $110 941-429-8415
LENOX, SUMMER AT STONE
COAST ,,,RARE NO.1024
$450 941-759-0013
LENOX, SUMMER AT STONE
COAST ,,,RARE NO.1024
$450 941-759-0013
LOVESEAT VICTORIAN
w/dark wood.Good condition
$50 941-380-1157
MEAT GRINDER hand turn
$6 941-227-0676
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

PLATE, Major Kira Nerys of
Star Trek by Hamilton w/cert
$20 941-423-2585
SILVER-CERT 1953 five dol-
lar blue seal faulty alignment
$125 941-697-6592
SILVERWARE NRA engraved,
Sterling, 6 place settings
$375 941-637-9979
TAPA CLOTH art from Fiji
framed/mounted under glass
42"X42" $200 941-585-8149
U.S. AIR Force Thunderbirds
Framed 16"by20" pic. w/sig-
natures $25 941-423-2585
| Advertise Today!
VINTAGE MILKGLASS 24
PIECES GRAPE PATTERN
$100 941-575-8881
WANTED VINTAGE SAM-
SONITE From 1960's, Beige.
Up to $30. 941-266-7795
WINE GLASSES 12 Cranber-
ry Ex/Condition Etched Grapes
$100, OBO 941-575-4364
MUSICAL
L 6090


CRATE GX-15R amplifier w/
cables, works but needs some
cleaning $50 941-743-2656
GUITAR AMP. PEAVEY 25W
8" speaker 2 channels,$85.00
941-623-0346
PIANO ONE owner since
'59. $475 941-916-1821
TEISCO DELREY El10 mid-
1960 vintage elec guitar, exc
cond $250 941-743-2656
MEDICAL
6095


BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296

FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
GUARDIAN 3-IN-1 Elongated
Steel Bedside Commode New
$100, OBO 941-586-8649
LIFT CHAIR RECLNER ELEC-
TRIC. Great up/down orig 900.
$425 941-822-3837
SCOOTER LIFT Harmar, AL-
100, w Harmar class III hitch
adapter. $900 941-505-1548
SHOWER STOOL OR 2
WHEEL WALKER, each $20
941-268-8951
TUB/SHOWER BENCH
Padded transfer bench, leave
msg $45 941-493-0674
WALKER COLLAPSIBLE,
with four feet, leave msg $15
941-493-0674
WHEEL CHAIR by MERITS
Excellent Cond $125
941-268-8951


HEALTH /BEAUTY
6100


HAIRSTYLE & BARBER LIFT
chair v-good condition $110,
OBO 718-986-3608
PRO 24 RS WOLFE Tanning
Bed Tan w/out harmful Sun!
$400 941-575-9800
TREES & PLANTS
6110


AGAVE/CENTURY PLANTS
12" or less. Larger plants avail-
able. $2 941-496-8349







BANANA Papaya Trees U
Get 2 One of each Sweet Tasty
Fruit $25 941-204-9100
BIRD-OF-PARADISE, TI
amaryllis, date palm, dracena,
ice plant $10 941-882-3139
BROMELIADS/ RAINLILIES
liriope, mexican petunia, oys-
ter, snake $3 941-882-3139
CITRUS TREE Fruited 5G-Pot
Delivered Orange-Grapefruit-
Keylime $40 941-204-9100
CROTON HIBISCUS, olean-
der, pineapple, pencil cactus,
plumeria $10 941-882-3139
DESERT ROSE areca/coleus/
kalanchoe/purple queen/spi-
der/aloe $5 941-882-3139
DESERT ROSES Flowering 4
Years Old From Seed Very
Nice BIG $35 941-204-9100
FIG TREE Sweet Fruiting Plant
For Sale 3 Gallon Pot $20
941-204-9100
FROST CLOTH Large
amount. 75'plus $50 941-
828-8820
LARGE STAGHORN Fern With
PUPS, You Move it! $250
941-423-3693
ORCHID LARGE Plants Purple
Flowers $20 941-698-9798


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL,SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMY PALMS, DUVENIA, FOX
TAIL & MANY MORE PALMS
Sul's NusuR 941-488-7291
PAPAYA PLANT
1 gallon pot
$4 941-697-0794
POINCIANA TREES Dwarf
Red full bloom $10 941-697-
0987
POINCIANA TREES Dwarf
Yellow Full Bloom $10 941-
697-0987
S BABY ITEMS
LZ6120


BABY CARRIAGE 2 seater
VGC, Navy, clean $30
941-627-6542
CLOTHES, baby girl 0 to 18
month.Over 50. ex. con. $25,
OBO 941-697-1137
CRIB, Graco Converts to tod-
dler bed. In great condition.
$85, OBO 239-789-8260

GOLF ACCESSORIES
S6125


CLUB CAR DS
"WHITE" GARAGE KEPT
4 PASSENGER, FOLDING REAR
SEAT, 1 YEAR OLD BATTERIES
HUGE DASH FAN, NEW SEAT,
WINDSHIELD, CHARGER,
LIGHTS AND FULL SERVICE
GREAT CONDITION
$2575 941-830-2415





The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Friday, August 30, 2013


GOLF ACCESSORIES
S6125


CLUB CAR DS GOLF CART
Brand New Batteries
(08/2013)
Full service & new blue paint!
New headlights & rear lights
4 passenger w/ new
folding rear seat. Excl. cond.
$2595 941-716-6792
GOLF CART w/out charger or
with $499 941-822-1429
GOLF CART, Yamaha
w/charger, 2 sweater $550
941-627-8767

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!


GOLF ACCESSORIES
S6125


GOLF CLUBS 35 assorted
brands with bag $1. each or all
$25 941-625-2779
EXERCISE/
FITNESS
S6128S

AB CRUNCHER Black Ab
Cruncher. $5 941-828-1129
AEROBIC STEPPER 3 Tier
like new Cash only priced firm
at $29 941-493-3851
AIR BIKE Proform whirlwind
dual action air bike. Like new.
$100 941-423-0793
ADVERTISE!
BOW FLEX Extreme Hardly
Used Great Condition $275,
OBO 941-204-9258
ELLIPTICAL PROFORM 390-
E, 12 PERFORMANCE LEVELS
$285 941-764-7971


EXERCISE BIKE by WESLO
Dual Action,w/Electronics
NICE $60 941-268-8951
EXERCISE BIKE Pro-Form
recumbent w/magnetic resis-
tance $225 941-493-0674
EXERCISE CARDIO FORCE
Exerciser $25, 941-639-2815
MALIBU PILATES Chair never
used with 3 DVD's $100, OBO
941-429-1683
SCHWINN RECUMBANT
exercise bike like new. $120
941-626-9027
SKY GLIDER Folds for
storage, hardly used.
$50, OBO 941-766-0857
TREADMILL GOLD gym built
in fan excellent cond $350
941-628-0182
TREADMILL PROFORM
fldup $250 954-856-3330


TREADMILL, Gold Gym Maxx
with fan excellent cond $350
941-628-0182
WEIGHTED HULA HOOP 5
LB, GREAT FOR FITNESS $25
941-740-1000
YOGA MATS BRAND NEW
GAIAM YOGA MATS. MANY
COLORS! $20 941-240-6134
SSPORTING GOODS
6130


AEROBICS STEP bench. Like
new w/ riser. $20 941-625-
9789
BACK PACK w/frame Camp
Trails New $85 941-483-
0215
BASEBALL CARDS 1990's,
12,000 CARDS $25 941-
496-8349


SPORTING GOODS
6130


AIRBED QUEEN SIZE IN BOX
NEW $35 941-429-8415
BOGA GRIP model 130
new cost 125.00 $85
941-759-0013
CATCHERS MITT RAWLINGS,
like new, $45.00 941-624-
0928
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
FISHING HEAVY ACTION
SABRE ROLLER RODS $50
714-599-2137
FOOTBALL TABLE, Wood,
good condition. Asking $95
obo. Sandy 941-255-1250
GATORS COLLECTABLES
Nice collection 1996 champ. 7
pieces $50 941-276-4721


SPORTING GOODS
6130


GOLF CLUBS LADIES Cobra II
Iron & Wood Set. Good Condi-
ton. $150 941-426-0760
HIKING BOOTS New,Core-
Tex,size 10 $50 941-483-
0215
RACK FOR Ball storage. BIk
Metal. 42Hx15Dx41W, EC.
$20 941-875-6271
ROLLER SKATES "Europa"
RD track control Size 11 $40
941-697-0794
S FIREARMS
L 6131


BUYING
WW II Memorabilia
Guns, Bayonets, Daggers,
Swords, Helmets, insignia,
etc. etc. Eric, 941-624-6706
USGET RESULTS--
\ USE CLASSIFIED! J


6001 Arcadia Area
6002 Englewood Area
OOn I nkn ,I7V
6 0000 1^H


600G E ..._ _..._. I I RfTES


1 day- $12.30
4 lines ($5.40 ea. add'l line)
2 days $18.80
4 lines ($5.40 ea. add'l line)
3 days -$24.10
4 lines ($5.40 ea add'l line)
7 days -_ 30.55
4 lines ($5.40 ea add'l line)

To place your
ad call:
Arcadia
494-2434
Charlotte
206-1200
Englewood
475-2200
Venice/North Port
207-1200

FREE GARAGE '
SALE SIGN
. WITH ANY AD *


MERCHANDISE


GARAGE SALES
6002

FIFRI.-SAT. 9-6 13007
Gallagher. Gillot & David
Furniture, misc.



SNOKOMIS/OSPREY
GARAGE SALES
6004

DSAT.-SUN. 8-3 403
Birch Ave Nokomis. Car,
trucks,42in tractor, trailers,
furniture, kitchen and house-
hold items, clothing, elec fire-
place, electronics, tools,
dolls w/clothes and carriers.
Tons of stuff! Park on Pine St
as Birch is a very small road.
House is on the left.


GARAGE SALES CREEK GARAGE SALES CREEK GARAGE SALES
6005 6006 6006


m-FRI.-SAT. 9AM-3PM
2197 Zuyder Terr. Dishes,
Some crafts, Books, Table
Saw, Sander, Drill press, &
mitre saw. Many more items.
m-FRI.-SUN. 8-? 1205
Ramrod St. Household,
women's clothes, kitchen appli-
ances & much more.
PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
6006

mFRI 7:30AM 3644 Harbor
IBlvd. Generator, mower,
power tools, fishing poles,
tools, furn,weedwacker-blower
-]FRI-SAT, 8-12, 4382
Meager Circle: Handicap
equipment only, lift chair,
power scooter & accessories.
[-FRI.-SAT. 8-1 21202
UOlean Blvd. Unit C-3.
Garage & Office Closing Sale!!
Many Home /Office Furnish-
ings, Books, Games & MORE!


O-FRI.-SAT. 8-12 674
Chevy Chase St NW. Furni-
ture, tools, fishing equipment,
adult bikes, piano AND MORE!
[-FRI.-SAT. 8-5 23327
LMcCandless. MOVING
SALE- all things must go! Furni-
ture, antiques, etc. Off Kings
Hwy, between Olean & Midway.


FRI.-SAT. 9-3
23194 Midway Blvd
COMPLETE CONTENTS
OF HOME!
Secretary, book case,
Waterford crystal, Hummel
figurines, bedroom set and
much more! SALE BY JIM!




ISAT. 7-4:30 297 Tim-
bruce Lane Huge Estate
Sale Collectables, furniture,
piano, antiques, much more!
ADVERTISE!
-ISAT. 8-3 1318 Amelia
I Ave. Multi Family. Car,
trolling canoe, beer steins, fen-
ton, furn., & household.


[ SATURDAY 9-1 701
Jarvis Street. 3 Family, low
prices, furniture, baby, house-
hold, nice toys & home decor.

GARAGE SALES
6007

E FRIDAY 8-3 4841
S Riverside Dr. Children's
books, Plants, Tent,Generator,
Train Table, Guitars & MORE!
FSAT. 8-1 3868 Bor-
deaux Dr., Punta Gorda .
Bed, dresser, end tables,
household items and more
] THU-FRI, 8-NOON
5207 Blackjack Circle.
MOVING SALE ALL MUST GO!
S. VENICE AREA
GARAGE SALES
L 6010



Everything Must Go!
20 Years Of Collecting.
8/31-9/8 8 a.m.- Until?
55 Stanford Road, Venice


I VENICE AREA
GARAGE SALES
Z6011


|sate aol
SAT. 9:30AM-2PM
624 Alhambra Rd. Venice
(Go West on Venice Ave.
to Harbor Dr. South &
Follow to Alhambra)
Henry Link: Dining Room
Table, Chairs, Buffet, Server
& Armoire. 2 Florida Style
Twin Bed Sets, Mirror, Set of
Mikassa China, Collectables,
Costume Jewelry, Desk,
Computer Table, Bookcase,
Recliner, Lladro Figurines,
Cut Glass, Silver Plate,
Decorative Accessories,
Kitchenware, Linen, Books,
Puzzles, Christmas &
MUCH MORE!!
Sale Conducted by
Palma Sola Sales
(Numbers Given out at 8AM)

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!


SFLEA MARKET
6015








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