Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00082

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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Fear of possible US strike against Syria's regime THEWIREDealtheDay
32-inch TV, $75




aCharlotte SunA
L HERALD


MARCH ON WASHINGTON
Church bells rang out at the National Cathedral and at sites nationwide to
answer a call from one of the most important civil rights speeches in history.
AN EDITION OF THE SUN
VOL. 121 NO. 241 AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY T H U R S DAY A


HASAN SENTENCED TO DEATH
A military jury on Wednesday sentenced Maj. Nidal Hasan to
death for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood. A


,UGUST 29, 2013


Punta Gorda hits pedal


City peddles pedal-power, horsepower


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA Keith
Steele has been following
the City Council closely
these days, even attending
meetings with officials on
a lesser stage. His interest
is singular, focused and
potentially profitable.
On Wednesday, the
council gave final approval
to allow pedicabs and
horse-drawn carriages
to operate within Punta


Gorda. Steele, whose future
is riding on the three-wheel
vehicles powered by the
pedal, is happy with the
outcome.
"The council is looking
at it from the city perspec-
tive, I am looking at it from
the vendor perspective,"
he said. "I think the final
language is lining up pretty
well. I think the council has
been very open-minded."
Indeed, in preliminary
discussions with city
officials, Steele sought to


help shape the ordinance,
and he succeeded. For
example, although signs
and advertising on the
vehicle were prohibited
in an earlier draft of the
ordinance, in the end the
city decided to sanction
them.
Steele envisions his pedi-
cab company as a commu-
nity amenity, operating as
a complimentary service.
With an older population
and with tourists tired
after a day of sightseeing,


the city would benefit by
having pedicabs provide a
welcome free ride.
"It's a service to shoot
you around town," he said.
But in order to make it
his livelihood, he needs to
generate another source of
income.
"It's imperative that I
put business logos on the
outside of my unit," he
said. "They would be very
professional and visible."
PEDAL16


SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH


Sandi Hilliard, director of the North Port Art Center, adjusts a painting by the late Deirdre Bartolotta, 65, pictured in the frame at
the right. The North Port Art Center is sponsoring an open house Sept. 11 with demonstrations and workshops on painting, drawing
and sculpture. The event also will celebrate Bartolotta's birthday. Her passion for art inspired her husband, Peter, to help under-
write a scholarship program at the center. Bartolotta's work now is represented in 26 paintings that adorn the walls of the center.
To date, the art Center has received more than $4,220 in her name in lieu of flowers from her funeral in May. The Sept. 11 open
house begins at 7 p.m. at 5950 Sam Shapos Way. For more information, call 941-423-6460, or visit www.northportartcenter.com.


Crossing guard

with 'heart of gold'

By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
When Isabelle "Izzy"
Feindel moved to Punta
Gorda in 1956, the New
Jersey native opened a
fruit and novelty stand.
Meanwhile, her husband,
Henry "Slim" Feindel,
became an officer with
the Punta Gorda Police
s I Department.
'0 GOLD I6
PHOTO PROVIDED
Isabelle "Izzy" Feindel was hired by the Punta Gorda Police
Department in 1968. She spent much of her 25-year career as
a crossing guard on the corner of McKenzie Street and U.S. 41
in Punta Gorda, where she often handed out goodies to the
students. Izzy passed away Saturday at 87.


Banding together

to help families


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
ENGLEWOOD- By
joining together with
churches, Family Promise
of Sarasota has been able
to help families get back
on their feet.
"It's for families who
have experienced crises,"
said Wendy Fitton,
Family Promise network
manager.
Speaking before Just
Neighbors of Englewood
Tuesday at St. David's
Episcopal Church, Fitton
said, "Why do we help
these families? Because
(families) are a large


number of the homeless."
In Sarasota County
alone, more than
1,300 children were
documented as members
of homeless families.
Nationally, 41 percent of
the homeless population
are families with children,
according to Family
Promise.
Family Promise's
network of churches and
a synagogue in North
Sarasota agree to house,
feed and provide other
help to homeless families
with minor children at
one-week intervals.
HELP 16


FourBLL PREVIEW!


I I 0


Who's ready for some football? Friday's Sun will have a special insert
previewing the scholastic, collegiate and professional seasons.


Hit-and-run


victim pushed


42 feet
By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -A man is accused of driving
off after hitting and injuring a man riding a moped on
Olean Boulevard, according to the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office.
Authorities say the moped's rider, a
55-year-old man, was trying to pull off to
the side of the road when he was struck
and pushed for about 42 feet.
James David Hatcher, 48, of the
22300 block of Oceanside Avenue, Port
Charlotte, was charged with leaving
HATCHER the scene of a crash involving injury in
connection with the incident, which took
place around 11:15 p.m. Tuesday.
"It's a damn shame it happened," Hatcher said
Wednesday when reached by the Sun. "It really sucks. I
just made a bad decision."
The incident began when a deputy noticed a moped
driving southbound on the street without its headlights
on. The deputy motioned for the moped to pull to the

VICTIM 16


Sarasota board,


chief talk trust
By SCOTT LOCKWOOD
STAFF WRITER
SARASOTA COUNTY Trust issues?
In the wake of former Sarasota County Chief
Financial Management Officer Suzanne Gable's
resignation last month amid allegations that her
CPA license was not current, Sarasota County com-
missioners voiced their frustrations and possible
broken trusts namely with Sarasota County
Administrator Randall Reid, late in Wednesday's
commission meeting.
Gable, 56, was hired last September by Reid
and county Chief Financial Planning Officer
Steve Botelho. Reid had hired Gable as director
of Alachua County's Office of Management and
Budget while reorganizing that county's govern-
ment in 2002, when he was county manager there.
Reid then brought her on in Sarasota County, eight
months after he started here last January. Gable
drew a salary of about $107,000, with benefits.
Gable cited family reasons as the main impetus to
her resignation.
Commissioner Carolyn Mason said she thought a
trust had been broken. Commissioner Joe Barbetta
said the morale around Sarasota County has been
bad, and that some county employees are fearful
for their jobs. Commissioner Christine Robinson,
TRUSTI18


INDEX I THE SUN: Obituaries 5 Legals 7-81 Police Beat 8 1 Viewpoint 101 Opinion 11 THE WIRE: Nation 2 State 3,8 |World 51 Business 6-7 |Weather 81 SPORTS: Lotto ~CLASSIFIED: Comics 9-121 Dear Abby 12 TV Listings 13


Daily Edition $1.00


S 1105252 211115111
7105252 00025 8


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:-i' Look insidefor valuable coupons "-"****;.
High LowThis year's savings to date ...
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CALL US AT
941-206-1000


CHARLIE SAYS ...
Who knew coral were so frisky?


www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00






Our Town Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


CHARLOTTE
EVENTS

* TODAY

Project Linus, quilt every Thurs
Hucky's Softball Training 17426 Abbott
Ave Pt, Charlotte Nancy 627-4364
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Cold Sandwiches With Peggy 11-2:30
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2,Dinner 5-8,Bingo 6:30-8:30 @
25538 Shore Dr PG 637-2606 mmbrs
& their gsts
Mahjong, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 11:30a-3:30p $2. Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free.Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Warm Water Exercise,
Aquatic exercise classes, 3280 Tamiami
Trail; STE11; 1 & 2 pm; Tue &Thur; $3/
class, pay by month; info 575-2034
Chess Club, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St.1p-4p$1.50.cultural
Center MembersPLUS free. Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Pinochle, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 5:30p-8:30p $2 Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free 625-4175
All Welcome
Sons Of Italy-Dinner,
Pasta,MeatballsSalad Brd/
Bt,Dessert,Bev/Cofe, 6pm
$7.50Mbrs,$8.50Gsts,Karaoke aft din
3725 Easy St ResvReq.941-764-9003
Yoga Month Kick Off,
Join us as we kickoff The Yoga Month
Challenge. Visit www.theyogasanc-
tuary.biz or call 941.505.9642
Am Legion Post 110,
Karaoke starts at 7:00 PM come join
the fun and have dinner at the "La
Familia Resturant"open until 8:00PM


I NORTH PORT EVENTS


GOVERNMENT

* TODAY
High Tech,High Touch, wrkshp,
8:30am, Morgan Center, 6207 W.
Price Blvd., NP. SCOPE, city convo abt
community&data. Public invited.
429-7000

* EVENTS

* TODAY
Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted
items every Thursday 9-11:30am
(except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove
UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533
Jazzercise, 9-10am at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more info.
Table tennis, 9-11am,
North Port Senior Center, 4940, Pan
American Blvd., equipment provided,
$2.00,423-6398
Turbo Kick, 9:30-10:30am at
the Morgan Family Community Center,
call 941-429-7275 for more info.

SUBSCRIPTIONS
Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard...................... $16.47
3 Months........................... $66.51
6 Months.......................... $113.05
1 Year ............................... 197.69
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
Subscribers residing in outlying
areas may incur additional
delivery charge.

DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card .... .......... .... $16.40
3 Months.................... ...... $74.09
6 Months ................... .... $119.54
1 Year............................. 196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$120.88 $216.81 $386.10
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$58.81 $110.56 $186.19
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $2.00
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday -
Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.
to noon. To subscribe or to report
any problems with your service,
please call orvisityour local office.

Englewood: 941-681-3000
120W. Dearborn St
Charlotte: 941-206-1300
23170 Harborview Rd.,
Port Charlotte
North Port: 941-429-3000
13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port
DeSoto: 863-494-0300
or toll-free at 877-818-6204
108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia


* FRIDAY
Post 103 Cafe, Breakfast 7-11
Fri-Sun. Public welcomed. Come try
ChefTim's fluffy pancakes! 2101 Taylor
Rd.639-6337
Fitness'n' Fun, Exercise to
contemporary Christian music; 11330
Brnt Str Rd, PG; 9 am; Mon, Wed & Fri;
$35 for 10 classes; info 575-2034
Bingo, 2280 Aaron St. Game
Packs start at $12. Over 25 games
with payouts up to $250.
Bingomania, at the Elks
#2153,11a -Ip, 20225 Kenilworth
Blvd., 941-627-4313. All welcome,
smoke-free, free raffles
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Dinner 5-8, AYCE Fried Fish, Prime
Rib, Crab Cakes and more, Music
With Black Velvet from 6:30-9:30,
Reservations Suggested


North Port Moose, 11-2:30
Lunch. Liver/Onions, Burgers,Phillys 5-7,
Meat BINGO 7:30. Member/Qualified
Guest 14156Tamiami 426-2126
Lunch VFW Post 8203,
Lunch 11-2:30 every day except Tues,
Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome
sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special in
canteen
Mexican Dominos,12-3pm
NP Senior Center 4940 Pan American
Blvd 426-2204 Easy to learn so join
all the fun
LAUX 2000 Dinner, Open-
face turkey dinner $6, 4-7pm. QOH
@ 7pm. Members & guests welcome.
401 Ortiz Blvd Np 941-429-1999
VFW Post 8203 Bingo,
Bingo is fun for all ages, come and
enjoy excitement of the game. Come
try your luck, you mite even WIN a
game or two
Zumba, 6:30-7:30pm at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more info.

* FRIDAY
Basic Exercise, $30/8wks
9-10am North Port Senior Center 4940
Pan American 426-2204 Join today &
start feeling better tomorrow


Stretch 'n'Tone, Exercise to
contemporary Christian music; 507 W
Marion, PG; 11 am; Mon, Wed & Fri;
$35 for 10 classes; info 575-2034
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2,Dinner 5-8:30,Music by Andy
6:30-9:30 @25538 Shore Dr PG
637-2606 mmbrs & their gsts
Beans & Seeds Trio, Live
music with Beans & Seeds Trio, 11am-
3pm, Center Court,Fishermen's Village,
941-639-8721.
American Legion 103,
SAL-dinner, fish/shrimp, entree TBA,
5:50p-7p, music by Brian & Mary until
9p. 2101 Taylor Rd, 639-6337
Am Legion Post 110, Live
music and dancing starting at 7:00 PM.,
Enjoy dinner at the La Familia Resturant
Friday Night Dance,
$7 Cultural Center 7p-10p Full cash



Mommy & Me Yoga, 9am
Venice Holistic Community Center, 251
Tamiami Tr S, Venice, FL 34285. $10
Lynne 941-237-6318 www.niuyoga.com
North Port Moose, 11-2
Lunch. Fish, Seafood, Prime Rib 5-8. Dan,
& Sunny Karaoke 7-11. Member/Qualified
Guest, 14156 Taamiami 426-2126
Tai Chi, 10:30am-12pm North
Port Senior Center 4940 Pan American
$/ask Jerry 496-4932 Great for your
balance
Post 8203 Fish Fry, Come
and enjoy the best Fish Fry in town,
your choice of Bake, Fried or Chicken
and all the fixings
Zumba, 6-7pm at the Morgan
Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more info.
Jazzercise, 6:30-7:30pm at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more info.

* SATURDAY
Brunch VFW Post 8203,
Come enjoy Brunch with us, The Chef
will make you a Brunch that you never
can forget in a good way
Jazzercise, 9-10am at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more info.


I ENGLEWOOD EVENTS


* TODAY

Ewd Country Liners,
9:30-11:30 AM, Christ Lutheran
Church,, 701 N Indiana Ave. Begin/
intermed. line dances. Open to all.
Nancy 474-6027
Englewood Bridge CI,
Party bridge is played every Thu
& Mon from 12:15 til 3:30 atThe
Hills Rest. RGCC, 100 Rotonda Cir,
698-7945,$2.
Am Legion Corn Hole, Am
Legion Post 113. Indiana Rd. Rot West
697-3616 5-7PM food served. Indoor
Corn Hole at 7Pm Public Welcome

* FRIDAY
Mommy & Me Yoga, 9am
Venice Holistic Community Center, 251
Tamiami Tr S, Venice, FL 34285. $10
Lynne 941-237-6318 www.niuyoga.com
Crafting Cuties, Love
to Craft? Join us at the Rotonda
W Comm Ctr, 3754 Cape Haze
Dr,Rotonda,Fridays at 9:30 am. Call
Elaine at 697-0212


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event,"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title" as that will be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


Line Dancing, 9:30 to 11:30
American Legion Post 113 3436
Indiana Road Rotonda West Phone Eve
at 941 697 8722
Dessert Game Day, Play
games, enjoy dessert and make
friends at Lemon Bay Woman's Club,
51 N. Maple St; 11:30 3:00, $3,
474-9762
VFW Seafood Night,
4:30-7pm Haddock shrimp scallops
or burger $7-14 VFW 10476 3725
CapeHaze Dr Rotonda 697-1123.
AUCE Buffet $11.00, Am
Legion Post 113 Indiana Rd. Rot West
697-3616.4 to 7 PM All You Can Eat Fish
& More. Music Just Joyce Smoke Free.

* SATURDAY
Cardboard Baot Race,
Cardboard Boat Race. Aug.31, 9am
210Winson Ave. All ages, under 10
free,11-15 $20,16 up $25.416-4114
VFW Seafood Night, VFW
10476 3725 Cape Haze Dr Rotonda
West 4:30-8:00 Seafood, burger or
frog legs $7-14 697-1123


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS


Featured Events

4th Annual Tour de North Port, Oct. 20, by People for
Trees, Inc. 15/35/65-mile on-road bicycle ride thru natural settings,
historical sites, and parks. $40 registration includes breakfast, rest stops,
snacks, lunch, SAG. Scout House (Dallas White Park), 5900 Greenwood Ave.,
NP. 8AM. Register @ www.peoplefortrees.com. 426-9752.
Jazzercise, 9-10a.m. Mon-Fri, Woman's Club Building, 118 Sullivan
St, Punta Gorda. Call for more info 941-916-3271.
Labor Day Picnic @ Am. Legion Post 103, We invite
the public to join us Sept 2nd 12p-4p. Enjoy our fresh grilled Burgers, Brats
& Dogs w/all the fixin's,Cold frosty mugs of beer & full service bar.Music
by the renowned Vince Brown! Come see our newly decorated lounge &
smoke-free hall. 2101 Taylor Rd 639-6337
Singles for Sail (Singles Sailing Club), Please join
us at Portofino Restaurant, 23247 Bayshore Rd., PC, on Thursdays, from
7-8pm, in the 2nd floor bar. Single Sailors with/without Sailboats. Special
membership for Skippers with Boats. The 2nd Thursday of each month is
the Membership General Meeting at Portofino. Call Judy at 655-6984.


Bar Live Entertainment. Band info at
theculturalcenter.com 625-4175 2280
Aaron St.
Rock'N Country, Rock
'N Country (Live Music), 7p -10p,
American Legions 110, 3152 Harbor
Blvd., Port Charlotte, Fl. 33952



North Port Moose, Shawn's
Dinner Smoked Pork 5-7. Member/,
Qualified Guest 14156 Tamiami
426-2126
AMVETS 2000 Euchre,
Euchre $10 entree fee. Lunch avail-
able. Members & guests welcome.
Karaoke by Mark @ 7pm. 401 Ortiz
Blvd NP 941-429-1999
Spaghetti Dinner, VFW
North Port 4:30-7:30pm $8.00
includes Spaghetti Homemade sauce
& meatballs, salad, dessert cont.
Brenda 258-6550
Amer Legion 254 Luau,
American Legion 254 Luau Dinner &
Party 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm Karaoke to
follow. Contact Karen for details @
941-504-4967

* SUNDAY
North Port Moose, New
Menu 12-7.Football package. Bucs games
(no black outs.) Member/Qualified Guest
14156 Tamiami 426-2126
Tony's Great Subs, Come
on in to Post 8203 For Home made
Sauce Meat Balls Subs, if you are lucky
Sausage Subs. They're Great!
SOA 2000, SOA 2000 Fry &
Grill Day 1-5pm. A big variety menu.



Legion $5 Breakfast,
8:00AM-11:45 Am Legion Post 113.
Indiana Rd. Rot West. 697-3616. Great
Value Breakfasts. Smoke Free Public
Welcome
Shipwreck Dance, Pioneer
Days Shipwreck Dance. Elks Lodge,
401 N Indiana $15 a person. 474-8700

* SUNDAY
Kids Fish a thon, Kids Fish a
Thon, Sunday, Sept 1,7am Tom Adams
Bridge 1400 Beach Rd 698-9484
Pioneer Days Festival,
Pioneer Days Festival. Sept 1,2-9 pm on
Dearborn St in Olde Englewood. 376-2159,
2 Parks, Stages,Vendors, Games

* MONDAY
Pioneer Days Parade,
57th Pioneer Days Parade and Festival.
Sept 2, 9am, Dearborn St. in Olde
Englewood. 376-2159
Labor Day Party, AL Post
113 Indiana Rd. Rot. West 697-3616.
An afternoon of Fun, Food and music
by Ritchie


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


LABOR DAY CLOSURES
In observance of the Labor Day holiday, all
Charlotte and Sarasota county government business
offices, as well as Punta Gorda and North Port city
offices, will be closed Monday. All post offices will
be closed as well, along with the county and circuit
courts, and most area banks. Other offices and
services will be affected as well, including:
Charlotte County Administration Center: closed.
Charlotte County Utilities: Customer service will
be closed; payments accepted by phone at 941-764-
4300, or by electronic billing at www.Charlotte
CountyFL.gov (select"Pay Water/Sewer" from the "I
want to" list). Standby staff will be on call for utility
emergencies at 941-764-4300.
Garbage pickup: Curbside collection will occur as
scheduled.
Charlotte Mini-Transfer facilities: Both the West
Charlotte and Mid-County are closed.
Charlotte County Landfill on Zemel Road: open.
Landfill at 4000 Knights Trail Road, Nokomis:
open, but landfill administration office closed.
Sarasota County's Chemical Collection Centers at
8750 Bee Ridge Road, Sarasota; 4010 Knights Trail
Road, Nokomis; and 250 S. Jackson Road, Venice:
regular operating hours.
Charlotte Harbor Visitor& Convention Bureau
offices: closed. Visitors with questions about things to
do can visit www.CharlotteHarborTravel.com, or call
800-652-6090.
Charlotte County Fire/EMS Headquarters will be
closed; all other stations will be open.
Sunshine Ride: closed.
Dial-A-Ride: closed.
Charlotte County Family Services Center: closed.


* SATURDAY
Market@Post 103, Stop by for
best price & selection of fruits, vegs, plants
& more. 2101 Taylor Rd. 639-6337
Post 103 Cafe, Breakfast
7-11 Fri-Sun. Public welcomed. Come
try Chef Tim's fluffy pancakes! 2101



Members & guests welcome 401 Ortiz
Blvd, NP 941-429-1999
AMVETS 2000 LAUX, LAUX
Monthly Meeting @ 2pm. E-Board @
1 pm. Members be at attendance. 401
Ortiz Blvd, NP 941-429-1999

* MONDAY
Basic Exercise, $30/8wks
9-10am North Port Senior Center 4940
Pan American 426-2204 Join today &
start feeling better tomorrow
Mahjong, 9am-12:30pm N Port
Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd
426-2204 Learn a new game/meet
nice people/have a good time
North Port Moose, Have
a Happy/Safe LaborDay Burgers,Hot
Dogs 5-7.WOTM drawing for TV 6
p.m.member/, Qualified Guest 14156
Tamiami 426-2126
Lunch VFW Post 8203,
Lunch 11-2:30 every day except Tues,
Sat, Sun, Take out & Public welcome
sit enjoy Enjoy great food & special in
canteen
NP woodcarvers club,
Monday meetings 12-3pm @
VFW Post, 8203, 4860 Trott Cir. off
Pan American, Blvd. Info Call Ron
257-8480



Spaghetti Nite, Due to
our Labor Day Party, there will be
no spaghetti diner or dance. Please
attend our party starting at noon.

* TUESDAY
Men's Club, Gulf Cove
Methodist Men meet 1 st Tuesday
at 8am, Stefano's Restaurant, 401 S
Indiana, Englewood. 697-8373
Tuesday Taco Nite, AL
Post 113 Indiana Rd. Rot. West.
697-3616. TUE Taco Nite, TUE dollar
beers, 4-7PM.

* WEDNESDAY
Fun With Watercolor,
Watercolor Fun: Carolyn Merenda
Paint-Alongs Wed. ea. wk. 1-4 PM So
Venice Civic Assoc. $85Mo+Supplies.
Info 366-2966
Hold Em & Wing Nite, AL
Post 113 3436 Indiana Rd. Rot. West.
697-3616.5-7 pm 50 cent wings.
Hold-em sign-in 6PM, 6:30 start.
Smoke free.
LEGO Club, First Wed. 6 pm
Elsie Quirk Library, 100 W. Dearborn
St. 861-5000. Kids ages 5 & up create
with Library provided LEGOs

* THURSDAY, Sept. 5
Am Legion Corn Hole,
AL Post 113, Indiana Rd. Rot. West.


Taylor Rd. 639-6337
Acme Bicycle Ride, 8 am615
Cross St, PG, Free, Adults, Helmet Required,
3 Levels, More Info 941-639-2263
Bingo, 2280 Aaron St Game Packs
start at $12. Over 25 games with payouts
up to$250.



Duplicate Bridge, $2/
person 12:30-4:30pm North Port
Senior Center 4940 Pan American Ella
429-8958 If you like bridge/come join
the fun
Rummikub, 12:30-3pm N Port
Senior Center 4940 Pan American Blvd
426-2204 Like cards/but not holding
them/ this is done with tiles
Wings VFW Post 8203,
Come in & enjoy ours Jombo Wings
Hot & Tasty @ VFW post 8203 5-7 pm

* TUESDAY
Shriners Breakfast,
7:30am. Olde World Restaurant NP.
North Port Shrine Club. Every Tuesday.
Shriners, Masons and Spouses invited.
426-0743
Men's Club, Gulf Cove
Methodist Men meet 1 st Tuesday
at 8am, Stefano's Restaurant, 401 S
Indiana, Englewood. 697-8373
Scrabble, 9:30-11:30am North
Port Senior Center 4940 Pan American
426-2204 Whether you are good or
so-so/come have fun
Back Pack Angels, NP
Coalition Homeless/Needy Kids (BPA),
Sept 3 NP Library 10 AM Volunteers
invited., Diane 941 426 5519



697-3616. Food served 5-7PM Indoor
Corn Hole Games 7PM.

* FRIDAY, Sept. 6
Fri. Nite Dinner, Dinner
served from 5-7PM at Post 113,
Indiana Rd. Rot. FL. 697-3616.
BBQ Ribs or Liver or two types of fish
dinners.

* SATURDAY, Sept. 7
$5 Legion Breakfast,
AL Post 113 breakfast 8-11:45 AM.
Great, Value Meal.
VFW Breakfast, All U Can
Eat Breakfast, Sat. Sept. 7, 8-10:30
@ Rotonda VFW, 3725 Cape Haze
Dr., 697-1123, donation$5, Public
Welcome
Closet of Hope, Free
clothing, ID required. Ist & 3rd
Saturday 9:30a-12p. Gulf Cove UMC,
1100 McCall, PC. 697-1747
Learn to Knit, The Knitting
Group teaches ages 9 to adult. Bring
#9 or #10 needles. Elsie Quirk Library,
100 W Dearborn St., 861-5000
VFW 10476 Luau, 5-7 Luau
Party VFW10476 3725 Cape Haze
Drive. Hawaiian food 6:30-10 Dancing
Quiet Fire 697-1123
Karaoke Nite, AL Post 113
3436 Indiana Rd. Rot. West, 697-3616.
Karaoke by Ann & Sonny. Food 6-8PM.


SUN NEWSPAPERS A
-- Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................... Mark Yero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor.........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager ..........Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3003
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


Charlotte County library administration offices: closed.
Charlotte County libraries: closed.
Charlotte County Historical Center: closed.
Harold Avenue Recreation Center: closed.
South County Regional Park Recreation Center in
Punta Gorda: closed.
Joseph A. Tringali Recreation Center: closed.
Charlotte County Parks, Recreation & Cultural
Resources administration office: closed.
Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center
offices: closed.
Port Charlotte Beach Recreation Center: closed.
Charlotte County skate parks: open.
Charlotte County pools: closed.
Charlotte Sports Park offices: closed.
Charlotte County Sheriff's Administrative Office
and four District Offices: closed. The offices will
reopen at 8 a.m. Tuesday. No change in jail visitation
hours.
Edison State College (including the Charlotte
campus): closed. Classes and campus services resume
regular hours Tuesday.
Sarasota County Area Transit: closed; bus service
will not operate.
North Port Area Chamber of Commerce office:
closed.
Sarasota County libraries (including the North
Port and Elsie Quirk libraries): closed.
Sarasota County and North Port recreation
centers and historical resources: closed.
More information for Sarasota County and/or
North Port residents: visit www.cityofnorthport.com,
or contact the Public Works Department's Customer
Service section at 941-240-8050; those living in unin-
corporated Sarasota County can call 941-861-5000, or
visit www.scgov.net.


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


OurTown Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013





:The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 3


Sarasota SWAT delivers sweet reward to kids


By TOM CHANG
STAFF WRITER

The annual discovery
of the gingerbread men is
fast becoming a tradition
for Englewood Elementary
School's kindergarten
students, thanks to the
combined efforts of prin-
cipal Mark Grossenbacher,
school staff, and the
Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office.
Parents like North Port
resident Alicia Playter and
Englewood resident Dori
Mann credit the search
with allowing their children
to be engaged in their
school, community and law
enforcement. Wednesday
morning, the students were
rewarded for their efforts
with a special visit from the
SCSO SWAT team.
"I think it's extremely



Ava Withers,
5, intently
watches
with excite-
ment as the
Sarasota
County SWAT
drives onto
the school's
campus in
its rescue
assault
vehicle.


exciting," Playter said. "My
daughter's (Lily) been very
concerned about the gin-
gerbread men since they
went missing. We drive by
fields and she's like, 'Are
they in there?' She's been
sad at times, because she's
felt bad like they're out at
night homeless."
Grossenbacher reported
the gingerbread men were
reported missing Friday,
asking students, parents
and teachers to help with
the search.
"They walk around
the school to find clues,"
Playter said.
This is Mann's second
time participating in the
event, as her two children
attend the school.
"My son (Adam) has
been searching every-
where," Mann said. "He's
excited. He said if the cops


catch them, they'll be in
jail and bring them to
school. He was wondering
if he can (pry) open the
bars. That was funny."
Liz Cole, who's been
teaching at the school
since 1989, said parents
volunteer to help the kids
throughout the process,
starting with helping to
make the gingerbread.
"(Students) got to squish
down the candy cookie
dough together and they
added their little touches,"
Mann said. "Our class
made an alien gingerbread
man with licorice horns.
All the classes are so
different. There are a lot of
licorice bow ties and those
little (chocolate) kisses
for feet. They have more
candy in one than cookie
dough. They love it."
Cole said each day the
students explored a differ-
ent area of the school in
their search.
"It's really an introduc-
tion where things are for
the kindergartners like the
clinic, the office, art and
music rooms," she said.
"We usually try to only go
to one place per day.
"We have sequencing
activities along with art
and craft projects. The
program has evolved over
the years, adding different
projects every year."
Cole said one of the
gingerbread men was
half-female this year.
"One half had long hair,
the other short hair," she
said. "They wanted to be
sure that both genders
were represented."
Last year, SCSO flew


SUN PHOTOS BY TIM KERN


Randy Tannehill's kindergarten students couldn't wait to finally be able to eat the gingerbread
man that they had worked so hard to create and then searched so hard to find.
Englewood
Elementary
School
Principal
Mark Gros-
lie senbacher
proudly
shows the
kinder-
garten
students
one of the
rescued
gingerbread
men.


a helicopter to school
grounds to deliver the
fugitive sweets. This year,
deputies Brad Pope and
Dan Smith delivered
the goods in their SWAT
vehicle.
"We're always thinking
of something new, and this
provides an opportunity for
those in the community to


see law enforcement in a
positive light," said Deputy
DeWayne Hill, director
of the Sarasota County
Sheriff's Activities League.
"My job is to work with
youth across the county.
We try to take advantage of
as many opportunities that
come up."
Hill said coordinating


events depends on
available volunteers. The
League is a nonprofit wing
of SCSO aimed at address-
ing community needs.
"We're always looking for
volunteers," Hill said.
For more information,
visit sarasotaPAL.org or call
941-474-3118.
Email: tchang@sun-herald.com


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Our Town Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


Spin Depot shut down again P

By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH recent North Port police gaming machine that Chief Assistant State
NORTH PORT investigation, officers there could be a pay- Attorney Craig Schaeffer
COMMUNrITY NEWS EDITOR deemed the Spin Depot out of 215,165 cents said he would be happy to r-
wasn't in compliance (or $2,151.65), which is discuss the issue with the 0
NORTH PORT with the n ewl written more than the 75 cents attnornev fnr Snin Deont


Following a visit from
the North Port Police
Department, the Spin
Depot voluntarily shut
down Tuesday.
Former North Port City
Commissioner Lawrence
Sansone is the owner of
the Spin Depot, which
opened in 2008. He and
his staff disagree that
his arcade should have
been closed for a second
time. The first time oc-
curred when more than
1,000 Internet arcades
were shut down earlier
this year by Gov. Rick
Scott and the Florida
Legislature.
Spin Depot sent an
email Tuesday asking for
a meeting between its
attorney and the Sarasota
County State Attorney's
Office.
"The newly written law
outlawed Internet cafes,
but the Spin Depot is an
arcade, not an Internet
cafe," Sansone said.
"Both types were legal
prior to the new law un-
der completely different
statutes."
However during a


laws.
"Myself and two other
officers went into (the)
Spin Depot (along with
a crime-scene special-
ist who videotaped
the interview), and we
were shown how a new
customer would play the
games," said North Port
Police Lt. Chris Morales.
"The law says games are
supposed to be based
on skill (like skee ball).
The payout is to be no
greater than 75 cents.
Based on these and other
information, the North
Port Police Department
asked (the) Spin Depot
to voluntarily shut down.
They were in no way
deceitful to law enforce-
ment. They believed they
were in compliance, but
based on the law, we
believe there are several
violations.
"No one was arrested,"
he said. "We didn't get
search warrants and
then seize their gaming
equipment."
According to an NPPD
report, the officers
found on a progressive

PES


allowed by law.
Officers also found
winners are directed to a
website where they can
select tools, clothes and
purses that are valued
well over 75 cents.
"The customer can
choose where they would
like the item shipped,"
the report shows. "The
items can only be
ordered through the Spin
Depot. With this infor-
mation, it is determined
that the machines at the
Spin Depot do not fit the
state-statute definition of
amusement games ... The
machines at (the) Spin
Depot do not require
the application of skill to
entitle the person playing
or operating the game
or machine to receive
points or coupons."
The city sent its findings
to the State Attorney's
Office for review.
"They reviewed it and
concurred that (the) Spin
Depot was not in compli-
ance," Morales said. "The
NPPD then ordered (the)
Spin Depot to respect-
fully close their doors."


"Our office did not
order (the) Spin Depot to
be shut down," he said.
"It's not our role to order
a business to be shut
down or to have anyone
arrested. We work with
law enforcement. We
prosecute cases when
we believe someone has
violated the law. This
case is pending, but there
haven't been any arrests."
Spin Depot employee
Lorie Cormier said the
business' attorney will
help straighten out the
matter.
"We have complied
100 percent with the
new laws," she said.
"The North Port Police
Department has indicat-
ed (that), with approval
from the State Attorney's
Office, we can resume
business again."
Morales said as long as
the Spin Depot remains
closed, there shouldn't be
any problems.
"If they do reopen
again, we will go back in
to see if the violations
have been cured," he said.
Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


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SUN
PHOTO BY
CHEYENNE
EMRICH
Spin Depot
in North
Port is
closed
and has a
message
on the door
explaining
to its
customers
that
manage-
ment plans
to reopen
as soon as
possible.


p-


U--


-L
*.?*,.


-


11 \ -,, Ith


:OurTown Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS





The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 5


Assembly


discusses growth,


development


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER

It's not exactly the
sexiest topic of discussion,
but when it comes to
future expansion and land
development in Charlotte
County, officials want
to hear what the public
has to say about growth
management.
It's an area the county
has been focusing on
as staff undergoes an
exhaustive rewrite of the
county's land develop-
ment regulations also
known as LDRs which
many officials acknowl-
edge are outdated and
many developers say are
out of touch with current
economic realities.
It's also one of the
focal areas the Charlotte
Assembly will address
during its two-day com-
munity forum in October.
For the last several
weeks, steering committee
members have pondered
the kinds of questions
they want the 125-mem-
ber assembly to answer
regarding, among other
things, the county's vision
for future development.
With respect to the LDR
rewrite, Punta Gorda City
Manager and steering
committee member
Howard Kunik said this
at a recent meeting: "It is
the blueprint for what this
county will look like in the
future. It will cause a lot of
discussion, but if you take
as an example of what that
blueprint could turn out
to be, all you need to look
at is what Punta Gorda
turned out to be after a
total rewrite of the land
development regulations
in 2004 and 2005. It's
not fun to read, but it is
a blueprint for what the
community wanted that
area to be."
"We have an opportu-
nity through the Charlotte
Assembly to comment
on what we feel the


county should be through
the rewrite of the land
development regulations,"
Kunick added. "That
doesn't mean that once
you rewrite the LDRs,
they cannot be touched.
They can be amended and
tweaked as you go along
but it is a big opportunity
that we should not let go
by."
Land development has
always been a tug-of-war
between those who want
growth and those who
don't between those
who want to protect the
county's small-town char-
acter and environmental
resources, and those who
say the county's codes
inhibit growth by creating
unnecessary governmen-
tal restrictions on builders
and land developers.
"Charlotte County's land
development code has du-
plication of regulations,"
said steering committee
member Andy Dodd. "If
someone else is regulating
something if the water
management district regu-
lates your wetland impact
and U.S. Fish and Wildlife
regulates your protected
species (for instance) -
why are we doing it again
in Charlotte County?"
"Maybe the citizens of
Charlotte County want us
to be more restrictive than
the federal government or
a state agency but things
like that need to be dis-
cussed," Dodd said. 'And
now's the time to do it."
A preliminary draft of
the LDR rewrite was post-
ed in June on the county's
website and officials
are currently accepting
public input. The county
had the first of a series
of stakeholder meetings
early this month and will
continue to hold public
meetings through the end
of the year. Officials have
said they want the rewrite
completed by January
2014.
Email:bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


'Tour de North
Port' participants,
sponsors sought
Registration is open for
the fourth annual "Tour
de North Port" bicycle
ride, presented by People
for Trees Inc., set for
Oct. 20. The organized
on-road ride will begin at
the Scout House adjacent
to Dallas White Park at
5900 Greenwood Ave.,
North Port, taking cyclists
through 15, 35 or 65 miles
of the city's natural set-
tings, historical sites and
parks. The event is not a
race. Registration fee of
$40 includes SAG mobile
support, continental
breakfast, rest stops and
lunch each featuring
homemade snacks and
desserts. The first 200 to
register are guaranteed a
free ride T-shirt.
Check-in, breakfast
and on-site registration
of $45 begins at 7 a.m.
Group starts begin at
8 a.m.; special group and
family discounts avail-
able. Proceeds support
the efforts of People for
Trees, a nonprofit native
tree advocacy group
since 1997, to create
"Tree Wiz," an interac-
tive-learning eco-center
that includes treehouses
and canopy walks.
To register or for more
information, visit www.
peoplefortrees.com.
Interested sponsors and
volunteers may contact
Alice White at 941-426-
9752 or treeladyl2001@
yahoo.com. This year's
Tour de North Port is
also being sponsored
by the city of North Port


Parks and Recreation
Department.

Research:
Friend or Foe?
At 10:30 a.m. Sept. 7 at
the Elsie Quirk Library,
Jeff Cochran will be
speaking on "Research:
Friend or Foe?" The main
talking points will in-
clude good writing tech-
niques, website tips, and
how to make research
user friendly. There will
be a panel of authors who
will help lead this
worthwhile, informative
and entertaining discus-
sion. Join the Suncoast
Writers for this engag-
ing speaker. The Elsie
Quirk Library is located
at 100W Dearborn in
Englewood and the
public is encouraged and
welcome to come. For
further information call
Gaile at 941-918-9737.

Small World
offers enrollment
SmallWorld Christian
Learning Center, 2230
Hariet St. (on the grounds
of First Presbyterian
Church of Port Charlotte),
Port Charlotte, now is
accepting enrollment for
the 2013-2014 school year
for children 2 through
5 years old, along with
those who may need a
voluntary prekindergar-
ten program or after-
school pickup. Space is
limited, so enroll now.
Those who mention this
news brief can receive
$10 off registration. For
more information, call
941-625-3600.


I OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE


Bertha Cvetkovich
Bertha "Bea"
Cvetkovich, 89, of Port
Charlotte, Fla., passed
away Sunday, Aug. 25,
2013, at her home in Port
Charlotte.
Bea was born May 12,
1924, in Monessen, Pa.,
to Joseph and Helen
Relich, and moved to Port
Charlotte 29 years ago
from Detroit, Mich.
She was a member of
San Antonio Catholic
Church, and enjoyed
fun times with family
and friends. Bea will be
missed by all who loved
and knew her.
She is survived by her
sisters, Pearl Cathers
of Belle Vernon, Pa.,
BettyAnn Hazy of
Monessen, and JoAnn
Relich of New York, N.Y.;
brother, Nicholas Relich
of Perryopolis, Pa.; her
God-children, Thomas
Relich of Palm Beach
Gardens, Fla., Mark
Relich of Grosse Ile,
Mich., Kathleen Ribik of
Valparaiso, Ind., and Carl
Cathers of Smithton, Pa.;
and numerous nieces,
nephews, grandnieces
and grandnephews. Bea
was preceded in death
by her loving brothers
and sisters, Mark Relich,
Mildred Marini, Dorothy
Milkovich, George Relich,
Stella Ribik and Cassie
Loulis.
A Memorial Service
will be held at 11 a.m.
Friday, Aug. 30, 2013, at
San Antonio Catholic
Church in Port Charlotte.
Inurnment will be held at
a later date by the family
at Restlawn Memorial
Gardens in Port Charlotte.
Friends may visit online
at www.robersonfh.com
to sign the memorial
book and extend condo-
lences to the family.
Arrangements are
by Roberson Funeral
Home & Crematory, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Santa Teresa
DeFazio
Santa Teresa DeFazio,
90, of Port Charlotte,
Fla., passed away
Wednesday, Aug. 28,
2013. Arrangements are
by Roberson Funeral
Home & Crematory, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Winifred Gaines
Winifred Gaines,
90, of Boulder, Colo.,
and formerly of Punta
Gorda, Fla., passed
away Thursday, Aug. 15,
2013. Arrangements are
by Charlotte Memorial
Funeral Home, Crematory
and Cemetery.

Charles Henry
Robinson
Charles Henry
Robinson, 77, of Port
Charlotte, Fla., went
home to
^. be with his
:', Heavenly
Father, Sunday,
Aug. 18, 2013.
He was born May 15,
1936, in Detroit, Mich.,
to Charles and Valentine
Robinson.
Charles lived in
Algonac, Mich., and Fair
Haven, Mich., for many
years. He was a proud
32nd Degree Mason.
Charles retired in 1998;
he was a machinist. He
proudly served in the
United States Army in a
Tank Division.
Charles never forgot his
friends from Detroit, and
they were always in his
thoughts.
He leaves behind his
wife and companion
of many years, Carol;


daughters, Jodi (John)
andVickie (Kenny); son,
Ty (Judy); brothers, Al
Wilssens of Troy, Mich.,
and Joe (Tiny) Wilssens
of Ocala, Fla.; seven
grandsons; nine great-
grandchildren; and many
nieces and nephews.
A celebration of life will
be held at a later date.


For online condolences,
please visit www.mckee
northport.com.

ENGLEWOOD


Duke Coyne
Duke Coyne, 79, of
Englewood, Fla., passed
away Sunday, Aug. 25,
2013.
He was born
.',-;. Jan. 13, 1934,
in Columbus,
Ohio.
Duke was proud to
serve in the U.S. Army
during the Korean War.
He was owner of Dumar
Paving Company in
Gahanna, Ohio.
Duke is greatly missed
by his wife, Virginia;
daughters, Claudette
(Flip) Austin-Talley
of Lake Hopatcong,
N.J., Judith Sterner
of Oak Ridge, N.J.,
AnnMarie (Jesse)
Medina of Beaumont,
Texas, and Corinne
(Mark) Hollingsworth
of Pickerington, Ohio;
sister, Gloria Weiss of Las
Cruces, N.M.; 10 grand-
children, Sara, Megan,
Courtney, Wayne, Keiko,
Kimmi, Alex, Zachary,
Elliot and Calvin; and
nine great-grandchildren.
A memorial service
will be held at 10 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, at
Community Presbyterian
Church, 405 S. McCall
Road, Englewood. In lieu
of flowers, donations can
be made to Mote Marine
Lab and Aquarium, 1600
Ken Thompson Parkway,
Sarasota, FL 34236; or
Suncoast Humane Society,
6781 San Casa Drive,
Englewood, FL 34224.
Arrangements were
made in Port Charlotte,
Fla.

Paul W. Knight
Retired Warwick Police
Lt. PaulW Knight, 75,
of Englewood, Fla., and
a former
Warwick,
SR.I., resident,
passed away
Saturday,
Aug. 24,
2013, at
Memorial
Hospital in
North Conway,
". N.H., after
S being stricken
at his summer
residence in Freedom, N.H.
He was born in West
Warwick, R.I., the son of
Joseph G.E. and Marion
(nee Evans) Knight.
Mr. Knight was the
husband of Arlene (nee
Caron) Knight for 55 years.
He was a retired lieuten-
ant of the Warwick Police
Department, having
served for 21 years. He
received an Associate
Degree in Criminal
Justice from Salve Regina
University, and served
in the U.S. Navy Reserve
for six years. Mr. Knight
was an avid outdoors-
man and enjoyed hiking,
fishing and hunting,
along with reading and
woodworking.
In addition to his
wife, he is survived by a
daughter, Kim Uustal of
East Greenwich, R.I.; two
sons, retired U.S. Navy
Capt. Russell P. Knight
of East Greenwich, and
Eric J. Knight of Warwick;
two brothers, Alan Knight
of Duanesburg, N.Y.,
and Michael Knight of
Torrington, Conn.; and
eight grandchildren.
Visiting hours will be
from 4 p.m. until the
memorial service at 6 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 1, 2013, at
Henault-Gallogly Funeral
Home, 5 Eddy St., West
Warwick. Interment will be
private. In lieu of flowers,
contributions in his mem-


ory would be appreciated
to: the Christian Church
of Freedom Food Pantry,
12 Elm St., Freedom, NH
03836. For information
and condolences, please
visit www.henault-gallogly.
com.


NORTH PORT


There were no deaths
reported in North Port
Wednesday.

DESOTO

There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Wednesday.
2 5.U4 a *h-a. lBlP^ ^
. Words of Comfort ^
i "I am richer
- tor having known \'",-
.' The world called men. r
^f is brighter by yo- .
,, presence, oh some v.n I ai
y. vou are gone but I k,..-,.
know that you, my f ,-. j
are as close as ea -
-Thomas Gunn '
S*..J. */;"'. H--.^ ^


Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes only. There's no charge
for publishing an abbreviated death
notice. Full obituaries and repeat
death notices will be subject to an
advertising charge.
Obituaries must be received by
2 p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday
publication. For Sunday publication
deadline is noon on Saturday. For
Monday publication deadline is noon
on Sunday. In Loving Memories must
be received by 2 p.m. for Tuesday
through Friday publication. For
Saturday through Monday publica-
tion deadline is noon on Friday The
American flag accompanying an
obituary indicates a veteran of the
U.S. Armed Forces. Please send emails
to obituaries@sunletter.com.


Words of Comfort
Life varies it stories.
Time changes
everything, yet what is
truly valuable what is
worth keeping -
is beyond time.
Ruth Senter

Words of Comfort

Recall it as often you
wish, a happy memory

never wears out.
-Libbie Fudim



^ ksk Larry:

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and Cremation Services PuntaGorda, FL33950JA
www.La ylorunerlco Now Aiva U II I|ILI i=' l ] ab [lZlI ll=le o|ou2 hs DyAt Your Con I [a venec


James W. Ewing II
James W. Ewing II, 66, of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away peacefully Monday, Aug. 26, 2013, at
home.
He was born Nov. 9, 1946, in
Youngstown, Ohio, to Edith and
James W Ewing.
James married his wife of 45 years,
Theresa M. Ewing, April 27, 1968.
e graduated from Austintown
Fitch High School in 1964; received
his Bachelor's degree in Psychology
from Youngstown State University in
S 1974; served in the United States Army
from 1970 to 1973; and worked as a
technician and quality systems analyst
for General Motors Packard Electric
Division in Warren, Ohio, for 33 years. James was
an active member of St. Maximilian Kolbe Catholic
Church in Port Charlotte. He was a fourth-degree
member of the Knights of Columbus, and a volun-
teer for the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.
James was an avid guitarist, vocalist and musi-
cian, most recently performing on his own and as
a member of several musical groups, including the
bands Crossroads and The CU Later Gator Band.
He was a Trumpet player for the United States
Army after playing with the Warren Junior Military
band of Warren. James was a longtime competitive
sailor, and a past commodore of the Pymatuning
Sailing Club in Andover, Ohio. He also raced on
Charlotte Harbor, in addition to coastal cruising
both locally and in far-off places such as the Virgin
Islands. He also enjoyed fishing, pottery, biking,
history, boating, lutherie and reading, and was a
wonderful cook.
James is survived by his wife; two sons, Sean
Paul Ewing of Louisville, Ky., and Daniel James
Ewing of New Port Richey, Fla.; brother, Paul (De)
Ewing of Clemmons, N.C.; sister, Dixie (George)
Matyas of Austintown, Ohio; two sisters-in-law,
Virginia (Robert) Calcagni of Poland, Ohio,
and Mary (Mickey) Davis of Dayton, Ohio; four
grandchildren, Leeanne (Sean) Pugh, Florian
Ewing, Julia Ewing and Madelyn Ewing; one great-
grandchild, Avalynn Mae Pugh; 14 nieces and
nephews; and 19 great-nieces and great-nephews.
He was preceded in death by his parents; and his
mother-in-law and father-in-law, Theresa and
Floyd Leporis.
James was a beloved husband, parent, grand-
parent, uncle and great-grandparent, and will be
greatly missed by family and friends.
A Memorial Mass with military honors by a
U.S. Army Honor Guard will be held at 10:30 a.m.
Friday, Aug. 30, 2013, at St. Maximilian Kolbe
Catholic Church, 1441 Spear St., Port Charlotte,
FL 33948, with a luncheon to follow in the parish
center. Memorial Contributions may be made in
memory of James to the Society of St. Vincent de
Paul, St. Maximilian Kolbe Conference, PO. Box
381238, Murdock, FL 33938-1238. Friends may
visit online at www.robersonfh.com to sign the
guestbook and extend condolences to the family.
Arrangements are by Roberson Funeral Home
Port Charlotte Chapel.





OurTown Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


Sarasota eyes records-policy changes


By SCOTT LOCKWOOD
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY
- A recent event
where someone
took an entire day of
county staff time to
sift through boxes of
public records has
caused the Sarasota
County Commission to
take a look at a public-
records policy that says
citizens can be charged
for staff time spent in
records requests.
Sarasota County
spokeswoman Crystal
Pruitt said several
weeks ago that Lourdes
Ramirez, who may be
considering a run for
a County Commission
seat next year, spent
more than eight hours
in a conference room
going through Sarasota
2050 documents
and was using her
own scanner to copy
documents. Staffers
spent the whole day
with Ramirez, who
mistakenly was not
billed for the time
spent. Commissioners
debated Wednesday
whether she should
be back-billed for that
time, but decided 3-2
not to send Ramirez


PEDAL

FROM PAGE 1

City zoning official Teri
Tubbs confirmed that
Steele played a part in
drawing up the regula-
tions, but said that is par
for the course in Punta
Gorda, where citizen
input is always welcome.
The city also expanded
the area where these
vehicles can operate,


VICTIM

FROM PAGE 1

side of the road, and
the driver slowed down
to comply. That's when
Hatcher's 2005 Mercury
struck the moped from
behind, the report shows.
"I never saw anything,"
said Hatcher.


HELP

FROM PAGE 1

The families arrive at the
church at 5:30 p.m., and
leave the next morning
at 8:30 a.m. At the end of
the week, those families
move to another church
in the network for a week.
Church volunteers assist
and stay with the families.
"Because they are mov-
ing each week, the families
don't get 'planted,'" Fitton
said.
Generally, a family is
knocked off their econom-
ic feet from a health crisis,
job loss or the breakup
of families, Fitton said.
The goal is to get families


GOLD

FROM PAGE 1

In 1968, four years
after Slim's death, Izzy
was hired by his former
employer. Her family likes
to think of her as the city's
first policewoman. Izzy
spent much of her time
with the department as a
crossing guard for school
children on the comer of
McKenzie Street and U.S.
41 in Punta Gorda, and
doing parking enforce-
ment in the city.
Izzy Feindel, 87, passed
away on Saturday.
"She was a God-fearing
woman," said her son,
Patrick, 47. "As I got older, I
was able to appreciate that
she really walked the walk
and stood by her Christian
way."


- whose name was
never mentioned by
commissioners on the
dais a bill.
"We need to be
fair, and she should
have to pay just like
everybody else," said
Commissioner Joe
Barbetta, whose mo-
tion to send Ramirez
the bill ultimately
failed. "I'm hearing
from people who put in
normal public-records
requests including
journalists who
are asking why she is
getting special treat-
ment. It doesn't matter
whether she's running
for office or not ... the
fact remains that the
whole day we were
down a staff person,
our conference room
was tied up, and it took
till now to find out she
wasn't billed."
Ramirez could not be
reached for comment
Wednesday.
An administrative
policy from 2009 says
the county may charge
for clerical and IT time
when citizens make
public-records requests
that require a county
staff member to over-
see someone search-
ing through boxes of

now including downtown
Punta Gorda, the Historic
District and the entire
length of Harborwalk.
However, Tubbs doesn't
foresee horse-drawn
carriages using the
Harborwalk and city
sidewalks.
"I think they will be too
large," she said.
After several years
in the making, the
ordinance set forth other
regulations governing
the operation of these

The moped was "dark-
colored," the report
shows. But deputies
reportedly motioned for
the car to slow down, and
the moped driver tried to
get out of the way.
"That's a dark road,"
said Hatcher. "It's a
shame it happened, and
I really hope the guy is
OK."
The moped driver


housed and back on their
feet in 60 to 90 days. She
said Family Promise has
had an 80 percent to
85 percent success rate.
Family Promise of
Sarasota limits the number
of families it helps at
any given time to three
individual families. It has
helped a family of seven
- two adults and five
children. Any more than
three or four individual
families would prove too
much of a burden for the
volunteering churches,
Fitton said.
"If we get another group
of churches, we can do an-
other rotation of families,"
she said.
The families are
screened carefully,

When Patrick was a kid,
he said, he remembers
helping his mother make
"goody bags" of fruit and
candy that she'd take with
her to work as a crossing
guard to give to students.
Izzy kept open her
fruit stand "for a little
while" into her police
career, Patrick said, and
he recalled a particular
occasion when he and one
of his brothers (Izzy had
five kids) went with their
mother to Arcadia to pick
oranges.
"We loaded the trunk full
of oranges," said Patrick.
"The old 1972 Oldsmobile
that we were driving in, the
back end slumped down.
So when we left the orange
grove, we got pulled over
by the DeSoto County
Sheriff's Office. They
thought my mom was
running moonshine."


records to make sure
that no records are
taken or destroyed.
Commissioners said
the makers of the
requests regardless
if they come from citi-
zens, media or anyone
else should have to
pay for extensive re-
cords searches because
they ultimately cost
the taxpayers money in
lost staff time.
The current IT staff
rate is $41.46 per
hour spent on records
requests, with the
clerical rate being
$24.26 per hour.
Pruitt said the trend
in Sarasota County
has been to promote
transparency in local
government, which
she feels is partly
responsible for the
spike in public-records
requests.
Pruitt said the coun-
ty's Communications
Department has
fielded more than
800 public records
requests since 2007,
and more have been
logged in other areas.
There currently are six
open requests that will
be coordinated for a
response.
Pruitt said the

nonmotorized vehicles,
including permitting, ap-
proved routes, passenger
seating, safety require-
ments and potential
penalties.
"With all the rules
and regulations in this,
you would think we're
transporting nuclear
waste," Mayor Bill Albers
commented recently.
Tubbs added that
Steele isn't the only one
who has shown interest
in the ordinance. TKM

suffered abrasions to his
knee and walked with a
limp, a report stated.
The victim was
transported to Fawcett
Memorial Hospital, but
he was released.
Deputies tracked down
Hatcher at his house,
about a mile from the
crash. Hatcher told the
Sun he was on his way
home Wednesday night


including background
checks, but Family
Promise works with other
agencies for those not
suited for its program.
The program also offers
employment counseling,
work supplies and other
support to families.
As long as the families
are being supported by
Family Promise, they
are required to bank 70
percent to 80 percent
of their paychecks. That
money then can be used
for them to find perma-
nent housing and sustain
themselves.
While Family Promise
is centered on northern
Sarasota County, Pat Knox,
the St. David's Episcopal
Church outreach

ChristinaWeisser, 65,
of Port Charlotte, retired
from the Punta Gorda
Police Department in 2007
after 36 years. She fondly
remembers her co-worker
as honest and kind.
"She was a wonderful
lady, she really was," said
Weisser. "She had a heart
of gold."
If students forgot their
lunch money, Feindel
would give them some.
For special occasions -
like around Halloween
and Christmas she
handed out sweets to the
kids. And, of course, she
often provided fresh fruit
for anyone who wanted it.
"And she always made
sure she carried candy or
something in her patrol
car to give to the kids
when they finished
school," saidWeisser.
That added up to a lot


county usually is able
to turn around an
electronic request via
email within 24 to 48
hours. Some docu-
ments, such as past
employee files, litiga-
tion documents or
older documents, are
stored in warehouses
and boxes have to be
brought to a central
facility. Pruitt said
requests come in to
all of the county's
buildings, which has
resulted in the county
working to come up
with a countywide sys-
tem that will have one
portal for all requests.
Pruitt, who spends
the majority of her
days handling the
requests, said the call
to have someone sit
in during document
reviews is made on
a case-by-case basis.
Procurement and
legal files usually will
require a county staffer
to watch someone
inspect the docu-
ments. As a result of
Wednesday's discus-
sion, the county is
considering changes
to the 2009 policy that
will be discussed at a
later date.
Email: slockwood@sun-herald.com

Stable in Punta Gorda,
which under a special-
use permit has provided
horse-drawn carriages
in the past for small
events at Fishermen's
Village and in North Port,
has inquired about the
measure.
The issue also caught
the attention of local
animal-rights activist Lois
DeGaris of Port Charlotte.
At Wednesday's council
session, DeGaris decried
the abuse of animals in

with dinner for a relative
with special needs.
"Unfortunately, that's
all I could think about,"
he said.
Hatcher was booked at
the Charlotte County Jail
early Thursday and was
released on $2,500 bond.
Sheriff's Office spokes-
woman Debbie Bowe said
it's important for people
to understand they are


manager, sees a real need
in the Englewood area for
similar services. The food
pantries of St. David's,
Englewood Helping Hand
and St. Francis of Assisi
Catholic Church have
seen an increase in the
numbers of families and
other individuals coming
to them. Knox knows
families and individuals
who now are living out
of their vehicles in the
Englewood area.
"This is very frightening
in our community," Knox
said. While thanking the
Englewood community for
its support, she said, "No
matter how much food is
coming into the food pan-
tries, more is going out."
Knox said she'd like to

of money, candy and fruit
handed out.
"She crossed many a
child at McKenzie (Street)
and (U.S.) 41," said
Weisser.
One of those kids was
Albert "Butch" Arenal,
current PGPD chief of
police.
"As a child, I remember
her friendly and endearing
smile and wave as I passed
by her on my way to
school," he said of Feindel.
Arenal attended three
schools in Punta Gorda -
all within a few blocks of
Feindel's crossing. When
he joined the PGPD in
1986, he was glad he'd get
the chance to work with
Isabelle.
"We thank (the Feindel
family) for sharing her
with our community for
so many years," Arenal
said. "Isabelle dedicated


COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


'Remember
the Fallen' 5K
Memorial Run
The North Port Fire
Rescue Honor Guard,
along with Zoomers
Running Club, is host-
ing the third annual
"Remember the Fallen"
5K Memorial Run at
7:30 a.m. Sept. 14 at
the George Mullen
Community Center, off
Sumter Boulevard in
North Port. Inspired by
the events that took place
on Sept. 11, 2001, this will
be a day to remember,
honor and support the
first responders and
members of the armed
services who protect and
serve our community
and country every day. In
attending the event, you'll
be exposed to aspects of
the tradition found within
the fire service.
All ages are welcome.
Awards will be given to
the first male and female
in multiple categories.
Awards three deep will
be given in each age
category, 9 and under
through 80 and over,
as well as Fire Officer
and Firefighter in the
Firefighter Challenge in
full bunker gear. There
will be IPICO chip timing,
fire/police/military

all forms. At the least, she
called for a maximum
outdoor temperature in
which horses would be
forced to work, citing a
95-degree limit imposed
in St. Augustine.
"Why doesn't the ordi-
nance contain rules that
would prohibit owners
from working their horses
at extreme temperatures
or for long periods of
time?" she asked council
members. No such provi-
sion was added.

required by law to stop
and remain at the scene
of a crash if they were
involved, even if the dam-
age appears minimal.
"Even in what may
seem like a minor traffic
crash, there is likely to be
some sort of property or
vehicle damage, and the
driver is required to stop,"
she said.
Leaving the scene of


see a coordinated effort
for a Family Promise
program to be established
in Englewood.


displays, music and food.
Cost is $20 if registered
by Friday, and $25 on
race day, which includes
a T-shirt while supplies
last. To register, go to
www.zoomersrun.com.
Race-day registration
begins at 6 a.m. Sept. 14
at the Mullen Center. For
more information, contact
Richard Yarnall at 941-539-
9993 or email ryarnall@
cityofnorthport.com.

Lions collecting
glasses at Pioneer
Days parade
During the Pioneer
Days Parade, the
Englewood Lions Club
will be collecting used
prescription eyeglasses
and both prescription and
nonprescription sun-
glasses. The glasses will be
cleaned and prepared for
distribution in developing
countries where eye care
is often unaffordable and
inaccessible. The donated
glasses will be shipped to
a regional Lions eyeglasses
recycling center where
they will be categorized
and prepared for dis-
tribution by Lions and
other groups. To donate
used glasses, including
sunglasses and reading
glasses, bring them to the
Pioneer Days Parade.

Tubbs explained after
the meeting that this
issue had not previously
come up, but could be
addressed at the time
a permit application is
submitted. She added
that, with the passage
of the ordinance, other
potential businesses may
be forthcoming as well.
"Now that it's adopted,
I anticipate interest will
pick up as we get closer to
season," Tubbs said.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com

a crash with property
damage can result in a
misdemeanor arrest, and
leaving the scene of
a crash with personal inju-
ries can result in a felony
arrest.
"Regardless of who is at
fault or what the reason
for the crash, leaving the
scene just compounds the
problem," said Bowe.
Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


"It's just going to take a
whole lot of people to get
anything done," she said.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


PHOTO PROVIDED


This photo was taken in 1993, near the end of Izzy's 25-year
career with the Punta Gorda Police Department. Co-workers say
she had a heart of gold.


several decades of her
life to safeguarding the
children of Punta Gorda
on their way to and from
school and enforcing


downtown parking."
Feindel retired from
the PGPD in 1993 after
25 years.
Email: alreger@sun-herald.com


HOW TO HELP
Working with a coalition of churches, Family Promise of Sarasota helps
families get back on their feet in north Sarasota County. For more informa-
tion, visit www.familypromisesarasota.org, or call 941-952-1800.
While no similar program exists in Englewood, those in need or wishing
to donate or volunteer at food pantries can contact:
St. David's Episcopal Church food pantry, located in the church's Jubilee
Center, 401 S. Broadway, Englewood. Open 10 a.m. to noon Monday to
Friday. 941-276-6720.
Englewood Helping Hand, located on the grounds of Englewood United
Methodist Church, 700 E. Dearborn St. Open 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday
to Thursday. 941-474-5864.
St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, 5265 Placida Road, Grove City.
The church's parishioners maintain a food pantry and assist lower-income
residents who qualify for food stamps and other assistance. 941-697-4899.
The Charlotte County Homeless Coalition, 1476 Kenesaw St., Murdock,
offers a shelter for the homeless, a food pantry and other assistance.
941-627-4313.







The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C Our Town Page 7


3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME
3112


8/29/13
Classified = Sales
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Bavfront Health
Laboratory Services located at
1201 Jacaranda Blvd, in the
County of Sarasota, in the City of
Venice, Florida 34292 intends to
register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
110833 2933492
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Health
Park Bavfront Health located at
1201 Jacaranda Blvd, in the
County of Sarasota, in the City of
Venice, Florida 34292 intends to
register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/ Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933503
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Bavfront Health located at 540
The Rialto, in the County of Sara-
sota, in the City of Venice, Florida
34285 intends to register the
said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/ Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
110833 2933481
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Bavfront Heart Institute located at
540 The Rialto, in the County of
Sarasota, in the City of Venice,
Florida 34285 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933506
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Bavfront Home Health located at
420 Tamiami Trail, in the County
of Sarasota, in the City of Venice,
Florida 34285 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/ Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933518
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Bavfront Joint Academy located
at 540 The Rialto, in the County
of Sarasota, in the City of Venice,
Florida 34285 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/ Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933508
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to


engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Bavfront Neurosciences located
at 540 The Rialto, in the County
of Sarasota, in the City of Venice,
Florida 34285 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933510


FICTITIOUS NAME
S3112


Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Bavfront Robotics Institute locat-
ed at 540 The Rialto, in the Coun-
ty of Sarasota, in the City of
Venice, Florida 34285 intends to
register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933511
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Bavfront Spine Academy located
at 540 The Rialto, in the County
of Sarasota, in the City of Venice,
Florida 34285 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/ Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933513
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Bavfront Woundcare & Hyper-
baric Center located at 1201
Jacaranda Blvd, in the County of
Sarasota, in the City of Venice,
Florida 34292 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933523
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Venice Regional
Weight Management located at
1700 E.Venice Ave, in the County
of Sarasota, in the City of Venice,
Florida 34292 intends to register
the said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Naples, Florida, this
27th day of August. 2013.
/s/ Venice HMA. LLC
Publish: August 29, 2013
317666 2933528

INVITATION
TO BID
waZ.3114

Advertisement For Bids
Bids will be accepted for catering
service for the Charlotte County
Family YMCA Edgewater Child
Care Center a child care center
located in Charlotte County, Flori-
da, to provide 135 meals (hot
lunches).
Bid packets and specifications
may be obtained at the center
located at 22416 Glass Lane
Port Charlotte, FL 33980 and/or
call (941) 629-2220. Bids will be
opened at the above address on
September 12th, 2013 at
9:00am.
Publish: August 29, 2013
111390 2933256


NOTICE OF ACTION
S3116


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
Case No.13 -2308 CA
NAJMI REALTY, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIA M. WEESE, PATRICIA E.
WEESE, WILLIS M. WEESE, TRA-
MAR REALTY CORPORATION, PNC
BANK, N.A. as Successor by
Merger to NATIONAL CITY BANK
as Successor by Merger to
FIDELITY BANK AND TRUST, and
VICKIE L. POTTS as CHARLOTTE
COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR
Defendants,
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Willa M. Weese
207 Warwick St.
Port Charlotte, FI. 33952 and
unknown parties may claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees or other claimants by
through under or against a defen-
dant WILL M. WEESE who is
dead or not known to be dead or
alive, or otherwise as the case
may be.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to quiet title to the follow-
ing property in Charlotte County,
Florida:
ZZZ 244123 T 133 24-41-23
T-133


1.25A M/L N1/2 OF NW 1/4
OF SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF NW
1/4
Property Address is: 9076
Swiss Blvd. Rotunda West,
Florida 33982
Has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on Paul A. Ryan, the plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is
25073 Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida, 33950, on or
before September. 30. 2013 and


NOTICE OF ACTION NOTICE TO
3116 CREDITORS
3120


file the original with the clerk of
this court either before service on
the plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
Dated on August 15. 2013
Barbara T. Scott
As Clerk of the Court
By M.B. White
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: August 22, August 29,
Sept. 5, and Sept. 12, 2013.
363381 2930045

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 13000960CA
RICHARD J. RICCA, INDIVIDUALLY;
ANZHELIKA RICCA, INDIVIDUALLY;
Plaintiff(s),
v.
GREAT COUNTRY MORTGAGE
BANKERS, CORP.; et al.,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: GREAT COUNTRY MORTGAGE
BANKERS, CORP.; et al
2850 DOUGLAS ROAD 4 FL
CORAL GABLES, FL 33134
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
on the following described prop-
erty:
LOT 24, BLOCK 558, PUNTA
GORDA ISLES SECTION 20,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 2A
THROUGH 2Z42, INCLUSIVE,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
has been filed against you and
you are required to file your
answer or written defenses, if
any, with the Clerk of the Court,
and to serve a copy thereof upon
the Plaintiffs, whose address is:
26477 Valparaiso Drive, Punta
Gorda, FL 33983, within thirty
days of the first publication of this
Notice, the nature of this pro-
ceeding being a suit for Quiet
Title. Otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
This notice shall be published
once a week for four consecutive
weeks in the Charlotte Sun.
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager, whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950,
and whose telephone number
is (941)637-2281, within two
working days of your receipt
of this Notice of Action; if you
are hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of the Court on the 24 day of July,
2013.
As Clerk of the Court
By: C. Coulter
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: August 8, 15, 22 and
29, 2013
339038 2924744

NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
Wl 3120

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Division PROBATE
File No. 12-1982-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANTHONY B. ANDERSON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of ANTHONY B. ANDERSON,
deceased, whose date of death
was September 10, 2012, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
CHARLOTTE County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which is P.O. Box 511687, Punta
Gorda, Florida, 33951. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is August 22, 2013.
FRANK S. LEONTITSIS
Attorney for ROBIN VAZQUEZ
Florida Bar Number: 47072
Lucas Law Firm P.A.
17833 Murdock Circle Suite B


Port Charlotte, FL 33948
Telephone: (941) 206-2120
Fax: (941) 206-2122
E-Mail:

To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


fleontitsis@lucaslawfirm.org
Secondary E-Mail:
yghilardi@lucaslawfirm.org
ROBIN VAZQUEZ
6230 Scott St., Ste. 211
Punta Gorda, FL 33950
Publish: August 22 and 29, 2013
239255 2929709
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 13-1193-CP
Division PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KATHERINE R. KEHOE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of KATHERINE R. KEHOE,
deceased, whose date of death
was July 12, 2013, is pending in
the Circuit Court for CHARLOTTE
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is P.O. Box
511687, Punta Gorda, Florida,
33951. The names and address-
es of the personal representative
and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is August 22, 2013.
FRANK S. LEONTITSIS
Attorney for JAMES F. RICCIO
Florida Bar Number: 47072
Lucas Law Firm P.A.
17833 Murdock Circle Suite B
Port Charlotte, FL 33948
Telephone: (941) 206-2120
Fax: (941) 206-2122
E-Mail:
fleontitsis@lucaslawfirm.org
Secondary E-Mail:
yghilardi@lucaslawfirm.org
JAMES F. RICCIO
Personal Representative
54 Broadmoor Lane
Rotonda West, Florida 33947
Publish: August 22 and 29, 2013
239255 2929701
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
BETTY S. LEANEY a/k/a
BETTY SHELAH LEANEY,
Deceased
Probate No.: 13- 1200-CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of BETTY S. LEANEY a/k/a
BETTY SHELAH LEANEY,
deceased, File Number 13-1200-
CP is pending in the Circuit Court
for Charlotte County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which is 350 East Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice if
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is August 22, 2013
J. MICHAEL ROONEY
Attorney for Petitioner
Florida Bar No. 157880
Post Office Box 510400
Punta Gorda, Florida,
33951-0400
(941) 639-2591
trabuelaw@yahoo.com
DONALD G. SCHNABEL,
Pers. Rep.
23053 Westchester Boulevard,
Apt. L-502
Port Charlotte, Florida 33980
Publish: August 22 and 29, 2013
121501 2928791
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 12-1202-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA B. HARRIS,
also known as ANN B. HARRIS,
Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of ANNA B. HARRIS, also known
as ANN B. HARRIS, deceased,
whose date of death was June
12, 2013, and the last four digits
of whose social security number


NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
3120

are 6339, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Charlotte County, Flori-
da, Probate Division, the address
of which is 350 East Marion
Avenue, Punta Gorda, Florida
33950. The names and address-
es of the personal representative
and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice has been served must file
their claims with this court WITH-
IN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this Notice is August 22, 2013.
Attorney for
Personal Representative
JEAN M. FINKS, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 843776
P.O. Box 494253
Port Charlotte, FL 33949-4253
Telephone: 941.206.2071
Personal Represenative
LYNN H. DIZNEY
26 Wightman Rd.
New Britain, CT 06052
Publish: August 22 and 29, 2013
113106 2929715
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH L. SPIRIDO,
JOSEPH L/
SPIRYDOWICZ, JR.,
Deceased.
CASE NO.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate
of Joseph L. Spirido a/k/a Joseph
L. Spirydowicz, Jr., deceased,
File Number 13-00077-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Charlotte County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
350 E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950. This
estate is an intestate estate. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
Any interested person on whom
a copy of the notice of adminis-
tration is served must file on or
before the date that is 3 months
after the date of service of a copy
of the notice of administration on
that person any objection that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, the venue, or the
jurisdiction of the court. That per-
sons who may be entitled to
exempt property under s.
732.402 will be deemed to have
waived their rights to claim that
property as exempt property
unless a petition for determina-
tion of exempt property is filed by
such persons or on their behalf
on or before the later of the date
that is 4 months after the date of
service of a copy of the notice of
administration on such persons
or the date that is 40 days after
the date of termination of any pro-
ceeding involving the construc-
tion, admission to probate, or
validity of the will or involving any
other matter affecting any part of
the exempt property. That an
election to take an elective share
must be filed on or before the ear-
lier of the date that is 6 months
after the date of service of a copy
of the notice of administration on
the surviving spouse, or an attor-
ney in fact or a guardian of the
property of the surviving spouse,
or the date that is 2 years after
the date of the decedent's death.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-
tigent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice is
served must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against the dece-
dent's estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is August 22, 2013.
Attorney for


Personal Representative:
/s/
Sandra Sanders, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 0114847
SANDRA SANDERS, P.A.
207 East Magnolia Street,
Suite 6
Arcadia, Florida 34266
Telephone: (863) 491-5003
Facsimile: (863) 993-2894
E-mail:
sandysanders@embarqmail.
com
Personal Representative:


NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
3120


/s/
Mima C. Beams
4404 Twillingate Lane
Louisville, Kentucky 40241
Publish: August 22 and 29, 2013
117280 2930031

ADVERTISE!

S NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2010-CA-000462
CitiMortgage, Inc.
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Craig G. Courtney, Sr and Katina
C. Courtney, Husband and Wife;
Bank of America, National Associ-
ation; Chase Bank USA, N, A.; Tar-
get National Bank/Target Visa.
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order dated June 18
2013, entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000462 of the Circuit
Court of the 20th Judicial Circuit
in and for Charlotte County, Flori-
da, wherein Nationstar Mortgage
LLC, Plaintiff and Craig G. Court-
ney, Sr and Katina C. Courtney,
Husband and Wife are defen-
dant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Barbara
T. Scott, will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash AT
WWW.CHARLOTTE.REALFORE-
CLOSE.COM IN ACCORDANCE
WITH CHAPTER 45 FLORIDA
STATUES at 11:00AM on October
3 2013, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 38, BLOCK 3240, 1ST
REPLAT IN PORT CHARLOTTE
SUBDIVISION, SECTION 51,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 29A
THROUGH 29C, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE SUR-
PLUS FROM THE SALE, IF
ANY, OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
ADA Coordinator;1700 Mon-
roe Street, Suite 1213, Fort
Myers, Florida 33901 (239)
533-1521 at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notifica-
tion of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days. If you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
Dated: July 11, 2013
Barbara T. Scott
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Charlotte County, Florida
C.L.G.
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Publish: August 22 and 29, 2013
118683 2929762
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
CASE No.: 13-620CA
HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION. AS TRUSTEE FOR
FREMONT HOME LOAN TRUST
2006-D, MORTGAGE-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-D,
Plaintiff,
vs,
Dennis Benevides,
Pattie Benevides, Kristina Gilbert
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated June
3rd, 2013 and entered in Case
No. 13-620CA of the Circuit Court
of the 20th Judicial Circuit in and
for Charlotte County. Florida,
wherein, HSBC BANK USA.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR FREMONT HOME
LOAN TRUST 2006-D. MORT-
GAGE-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-D, is Plaintiff and
Dennis Benevides, Pattie Benev-
ides, Unknown Tenant #1 and
Unknown Tenant #2; et al., are
Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash
online at www.charlotte.realfore-
close.com at 11:00 A.M. on the
3rd day of October, 2013, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Summary Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
Lot 34, Block 859, Port
Charlotte Subdivision, Sec-
tion 34. according to the
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page 38A thru
38H, Public Records of
Charlotte County, Florida
Street Address: 21011 Keeler
Ave, Port Charlotte, FL 33954
and all fixtures and personal prop-
erty located therein or thereon,
which are included as security in
Plaintiff's mortgage.


Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus funds from the sale.
if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, Charlotte
County, Florida, this 21 day of
June, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of said Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: August 22 and 29, 2013
349874 2929764


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 7





OurTown Page 8 E/N/C


www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12002371CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff
vs.
TODD CATALINI
A/K A TODD M CATALINI, et al.,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated 15 day of
August, 2013, entered in Civil
Case Number in the Circuit Court
for Charlotte, Florida, wherein
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. the
Plaintiff, and LYNN CATALINI, et
al, are the Defendants, I will sell
the property situated in Charlotte
Florida, described as:
LOT 12, BLOCK 1662, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 21, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
12A THROUGH 12G, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at the
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
, in accordance with Chapter 45
Florida Statutes, at 11.:00 AM,
on 13 day of' September, 2013.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of thesis pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated: August 19. 2013
By: M. B. White
Charlotte County Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
If you are a person with a disabili-
ty who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Administrative Services
Manager, whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and whose
telephone number is (941) 637-
2281, within two working days of
your receipt of this [describe
notice]; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.
Si ou se yon moun ki gen yon
andikap ki bezwen aranjman nen-
pot nan lod yo patisipe nan sa a
pwose dapel, ou gen dwa, san sa
pa koute ou, ak founiti asistans a
seten. Tanpri kontakte Adminis-
tratif Sevis Manadje a, ki gen
biwo sitlye nan 350 Avenue Mari-
on E., Punta Gorda, Florid 33950,
epi ki gen nimewo telefon se
(941) 637-2281, nan de jou k ap
travay yo resevwa ou nan sa a
[avi dekr.]; si ou se odyans oswa
vwa ki gen. pwoblem, rele 711.
Si vous etes une personnel hand-
capee qui a besoln d'une adapta-
tion pour pouvoir participer a
cette instance, vous avez le droit,
sans frais pour vous, pour la four-
niture d'une assistance certain.
S'll vous plait contacter le
Directeur des services admins-
tratifs, don't le bureau est situe au
350, avenue E. Marion, Punta
Gorda, Florlde 33950, et don't le
numero de telephone est le {941)
637-2281, dans les deux jours
ouvrables sulvant la reception de
la present [decrlre avis]; si vous
etes audience ou de la voix
alteree, composer le 711.
Si used es una persona con una
discapacidad que necesita
cualquier acomodacion para
powder participar en este proced-
imiento, usted tiene derecho, sin
costa alguno para usted, para el
suministro de determinada asis-
tencla. Por favor, pongase en
contact con el Administrador de
Serviclos Administrativos, cuya
oficina esta ubicada en 350 E.
Avenida Marion, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33950, y cuyo numero de
telefono es (941) 637-2281, den-
tro de los dos dias habiles sigu-
lentes a la recepclon de esta
describea aviso]; Si usted esta
escuchando o la voz alterada,
Ilame al 711.
Publish: August 22 and 29, 2013
276862 2929906
NOTICE OF
MEETING
3126

Charlotte County
Punta Gorda
Metropolitan Planning
Organization
CALENDAR
The Public is Invited to Attend
Transportation Disadvantaged
Local Coordinating Board
(LCB) General Meeting: Thurs-
day, September 12, 2013,
10:00 a.m. at the East Port
Environmental Campus, Training
Room B, 25550 Harbor View
Road, Port Charlotte, Florida.
No stenographic record by a cer-
tified court reporter is made of
these meetings. Accordingly, any-
one seeking to appeal any deci-
sions involving the matters herein
will be responsible for making a
verbatim record of the
meeting/testimony and evidence
upon which any appeal is to be
based. (SEE.F.S. 286.0105)
Any person requiring special
accommodations to participate in
this meeting, should contact the
Charlotte County-Punta Gorda
Metropolitan Planning Organiza-


tion at least forty-eight (48) hours
prior to the meeting by calling
(941) 883-3535; if you are hear-
ing or speech impaired, call (800)
955-8770 Voice/(800) 955-8771
TDD.
The MPO's planning process is
conducted in accordance with
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 and related statutes. Any
person or beneficiary who
believes he or she has been dis-
criminated against because of
race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, disability, or famil-


MEETING
44^ 3126

lal status may file a complaint
with the Florida Department of
Transportation District One Title
VI Coordinator Robin Parnsh at
(863) 519-2675 or by writing her
at Post Office Box 1249, Bartow,
Florida 33831.
For more information call:
Charlotte County
Punta Gorda MPO
25550 Harbor View Road,
Port Charlotte Florida 33980
Tel: (941) 883-3535
www.ccmpo.com
Publish: August 29, 2013
163352 2933228


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
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/Find a Pet
/Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
'Sell Your Home
.Sell Your Unwanted
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.Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


NOTICE OF SALE
3130


PROMPT WRECKER SERVICE
11139 TAMIAMI TRAIL
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33955
(941) 639-4000
AUCTION DATE 9/18/13
AT 10:00 AM
1998 VOLVO
VIN # 4VG7DEGHXWN753985
1997 LINC
VIN # 1LNLM82WOVY745725
Publish: August 29, 2013
103614 2932951

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NE I WSPAPER


Two arrested in pot bust


ENGLEWOOD Two
were arrested after four
pounds of marijuana -
worth about $18,450 on
the streets was found
in their Englewood home
and vehicles, according
to the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office.
Andrew Arthur Lalor, 39,
and Mary Mae Feustel, 28,
both of the 10100 block
of Tramore Avenue, were
each arrested Tuesday
morning on charges of
possession of over 20
grams of marijuana,
possession of marijuana
with intent to sell or
deliver and possession
of drug paraphernalia
after the Narcotics Unit
executed search warrants.
The marijuana found
was reportedly stored
in vacuum-sealed bags,
which the Sheriff's Office
says are commonly used
during the sale and
delivery of the drug.
On a vacant lot near
the home, marijuana was
located in a trailer and a
van owned by one of the
residents after two K-9s
alerted deputies to the
vehicles.
The investigation into
Lalor and Feustel began
in June.
Both were in the
process of being booked
at the Charlotte County
Jail on Wednesday after-
noon and bond informa-
tion was not available.
Feustel's 8-year-old son
was found in a bedroom
where some of the mari-
juana was located, and
he was released into the
custody of a relative.

Report:
Two cited for
commercial fishing
ENGLEWOOD -Two
local fishermen each
received criminal citations
after it was discovered
they caught 324 fish
totaling 687.5 pounds
without carrying a valid
commercial fishing license,
according to the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office.


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the courtsystem.


Dean Earl Gray, 44,
of the 300 block of
Boundary Boulevard in
Rotonda, and Joseph
Richard Chisholm, 52,
of the 11000 block of
Pendleton Avenue in
Englewood, were each
issued a notice to appear
on charges of commercial
fishing without a salt
water products license -
a second-degree misde-
meanor after their gray
mullet boat was stopped
around 2 p.m. Tuesday
near the Boca Grande
Causeway in Placida.
Sheriff's Office Marine
Patrol deputies were
conducting a vessel safety
check when they discov-
ered onboard 319 mullet
weighing 678 pounds,
two trout weighing four
pounds, two sheepsheads
weighing four pounds
and a jack weighing a
pound and a half.
According to authori-
ties, the men admitted
they intended to sell the
fish.
The entire catch was
seized, and the men are
due in court Sept. 12.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Christopher Ryan Schwartz, 28,
of West Palm Beach, Fla. Charges:
five counts of violation of probation.
Bond: none.
Margarito Rodriguez, 45,
20300 block of Elrose Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: violation of an
injunction for protection against
domestic violence. Bond: none.
*Matthew James Carter, 29,
18000 block of Garvin Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: aggravated battery
on a pregnant victim. Bond: none.
Gregory Bryan Scaffe, 26, of
Palmetto, Fla. Charge: driving with a
suspended license. Bond: $500.
Bernard Richardson Valliere, 23,
5400 block of Chamberlain Blvd.,
North Port. Charge: failure to appear.
Bond:none.
Chelsea Jade Zobuk, 22,


6200 block of Jordan St., North Port.
Charge: violation of probation. Bond:
none.
Jessica Autumn Love, 32,
1800 block of Braddock Ave., North
Port. Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
$1,500.
James Travis Still, 40,10100 block
ofGulfstream Blvd., Englewood.
Charge: nonsupport of dependents.
Purge: $765.
*Terry Michael Adams, 32, of
Bradenton. Charges: two out-of-
county warrants. Bond: none.
Cassidy Ann Ketchum, 24,
22000 block of Catherine Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
possession of cocaine. Bond: none.
Zackary Alaxander Holbine,
21,21300 block of Gladis Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: driving without a
valid license. Bond: $500.
Aaneshia Jer-Mese White, 22,
300 block of S. Manatee Ave., Arcadia.
Charge: driving with a suspended
license. Bond: $500.
Gevans Holorat Joseph,
2200 block of Pellman Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Charge: failure to appear for
a felony. Bond: $20,000.
Gary Henry Bujnowski, 36,
12100 block of Duval Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Charge: illegal dumping.
Bond: $2,500.
Steven Ray Alexander Jr., 27,
3400 block of Highlands Road, Punta
Gorda. Charges: battery, tampering
with a witness, criminal mischief and
false imprisonment. Bond: none.

The Punta Gorda Police
Department reported the
following arrest:
John Eugene Laney, 67, 400 block
of Gold Tree, Punta Gorda. Charges:
DUI and DUI with damage. Bond:
$1,500.

The North Port Police
Department reported the
following arrests:
Robert George Callahan, 19,
4400 block of Adelaide Ave., North
Port. Charge: possession of marijuana.
Bond: $120.
Randal Craig Brendel, 57,
3500 block of Avanti Circle, North
Port. Charge: crimes against a public
servant or family. Bond: none.


David Lindsey Boyd, 48,
5400 block of Trekell St., North
Port. Charge: out of county warrant
(original charges: three counts of
fraud). Bond: $5,000.
James Michael O'Brien, 37,
2400 block of Oracle Lane, North Port.
Charge: Collier County, Fla., warrant
(original charge: withholding child
support). Purge: $240.

The Venice Police Department
reported the following arrest:
Joshua Daniel Moss, 30,
homeless, Venice. Charges: two counts
of indecent exposure. Bond: none.

The Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
William Lukyn Zaleski, 32,
7300 block of Bass St., Englewood.
Charges: petty theft and two counts of
contempt of court (original charges:
resisting in recovery of stolen property
and petty theft). Bond: $9,000.
*Justin Lange Mclntyre, 34,
24800 block of Charleston Circle, Port
Charlotte. Charge: violation ofproba-
tion (original charge: possession of a
controlled substance). Bond: none.
Melissa May Andersen, 22,
200 block of San Remo Ave., North
Port. Charges: two counts of dealing in
stolen property. Bond: $15,000.
Michael Eric Christie, 45,200
block of Manor Road, Venice. Charge:
contempt of court (original charge:
driving without a valid license). Bond:
$4,000.
Nathan A. Meyer, 18, 2300 block
of Mauve Terrace, North Port. Charge:
contempt of court (original charge:
possession of narcotic equipment).
Bond: $1,000.
*Jennafer Anne Bailas, 18,
100 block of Margaret Drive, Nokomis.
Charge: petty theft. Bond: $120.
Matthew M. Lackey, 39,400 block
of Sunset Drive, Englewood. Charge:
violation of probation (original charge:
battery). Bond: $5,000.
Ryan William Montalbano,
19,3000 block of Polka St., North
Port. Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: fleeing to elude).
Bond: none.
Tyler Scott Matthews, 24,
1200 block of Twin Lakes Ave.,
Nokomis. Charge: grand theft. Bond:
$1,500.
Roland Reinhold Risse, 18,
4900 block of Wild Daisy Lane, Venice.
Charge: grand theft. Bond: $1,500.

-Compiled byAdam Kreger and
Drew Winchester


Sarasota County first in nation with


new fingerprint system


PROVIDED BY THE SARASOTA
COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE

SARASOTA COUNTY
- Sheriff Tom Knight is
pleased to announce the
Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office is the first in the
United States to utilize
what's being called the
world's most up-to-date
and accurate fingerprint
matching technology.
The Sheriff's Office
recently upgraded its
10-year old Automated
Fingerprint Identification


TRUST

FROM PAGE 1

who conducted her
own investigation that
revealed Gable hadn't
had a current CPA
license since 2005, said
Gable representing
herself as a CPA was
unacceptable and the
county "needs to start
taking responsibility for
what's happening right
now." Commissioners
also previously indicated
communication issues
with Reid.
Reid said he truthfully
and quickly handled
Gable's resignation. He
said Botelho knew her,
thought she had a CPA
license, and had asked
to hire her. Botelho
said last month he was
shocked to find out
that she did not have
a current CPA license.
Reid acknowledged he
and other staff members


System (AFIS) to the
Morpho Biometric
Identification Solution,
referred to as MorphoBIS,
from MorphoTrak.
AFIS includes tenprint,
palmprint and latent fin-
gerprint processing, and
allows searches of county
criminal databases, the
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement and
the FBI. The MorphoBIS
system architecture
allows the Sheriff's Office
to easily incorporate
additional biometrics in


were deceived by Gable.
"I understand people
being upset, and I
understand discussions
about how to better
communicate, but a
true investigation would
have at least talked to
the people involved
with this," Reid said.
"I'm responsible for the
stuff that goes on, and
I understand we were
deceived."

Beach plan OK'd
In other news
Wednesday: Sarasota
County commissioners
approved a neigh-
borhood-acquisition
program work plan
Wednesday that eventu-
ally could give the public
more beach access at
Blind Pass Beach Park in
Englewood.
Approval of the plan
could lead the acquisi-
tion of a 1.67-acre, Gulf-
to-bay property directly
south of the park on


the future such as face,
tattoo and iris images as
needed.
MorphoTrak has
continued to invest in
increasing algorithm
accuracy and overall
performance for our
AFIS technology, which
translates directly to more
crimes solved, more of-
fenders off the streets and
improved public safety.
"We are already get-
ting hits on crime scene
prints that were previ-
ously unidentified in the


Manasota Key. The land
has a home on it, with
approximately 137 linear
feet of beach frontage on
the Gulf of Mexico.
Sarasota County
Parks and Recreation
Director Carolyn Brown
said the approval of the
Neighborhood Parkland
Acquisition Program
Work Plan would provide
an addition to the Blind
Pass Beach Park and
enhance beach access if
the county ultimately is
successful in purchas-
ing the property. The
property contains beach
and dunes, a small bit of
coastal hammock, and
mangrove along Lemon
Bay. In addition to the
home on the Gulf side,
there is a boat dock
across the road on the
bay.
The parcel was one
of several that were the
target of the county's
Natural Resources and
Recreation Advisory
Board in 1986, but the


old system" said Brenda
Viana, AFIS supervisor.
"Even low quality prints
that couldn't be searched
are being identified on
the new system."
DanielVassy, president
and CEO of MorphoTrak,
said, "As the fingerprint
provider to the FBI and
the majority of the law
enforcement agencies
in the U.S., we are quite
proud that our cutting-
edge technology is
helping to create safer
environments."


county did not buy the
land, and the owners
built a single-family
home on the property.
Blind Pass Beach
Park is in the middle
of Manasota Key, just
about a mile north of the
Charlotte County line. It
extends Gulf-to-bay and
includes picnic shelters,
restrooms, a nature
trail, a playground,
a boat dock, a kayak
launch and the historic
Hermitage complex. The
nonprofit Hermitage
Artist Retreat has leased
the complex since 2001,
and has invested in the
repair of the five build-
ings on the property.
Commissioners
unanimously approved
the work program
with little discussion.
Commissioner Charles
Hines said exposing the
public to the arts and
giving them additional
beach access was a
"win-win."
Email: slockwood@sun-herald.com





The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


Baker Center unveils


GED program


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA- For a
parent like Tiesha Milliner,
29, of Punta Gorda, taking
her pre-K child to the Baker
Center, which offers free
care and education, is an
easy choice to make. But
she's going even further,
by signing up for the Baker
Center's new GED test-
preparation program.
It's all about helping her
daughter.
"I feel like once I have
my GED (diploma), as (my
daughter) gets older and
starts going to a regular
public school and coming
home with homework,"
Milliner said, "I can be able
to sit down and help her
with her homework plan
and her math, or whatever
problems that she's having
in school."
The GED program,
which opened this month,
teaches reading, math and
other skills to adults so that
they can take and pass the
GED, certifying that they
have achieved the equiva-
lent of high school-level
academic skills.
The program is offered
by the Adult Learning
Center, a Charlotte County
Public Schools program.
The center has offices in
the Port Charlotte Town
Center mall and the Family
Services Center in Port
Charlotte, and started a
GED program at the Baker
Center for adults who live
in Punta Gorda and parents
who use the center.
Milliner is happy that the
program, which previously
was available only over
the bridge, is being offered
in the same place where
she takes her daughter for
prekindergarten.
"It really helps with the
scheduling," she said, "and
also, me and my child, we
both can learn at the same


SUN PHOTOS BY IAN ROSS
After a math lesson at the Baker Center Wednesday, teacher
Patrice Saranac checks the work of her student, Erna "Nia"


Gomilla, 55.
time, go to school at the
same time, and just really
benefit from the program."
Going back to school "is
a big step for a person who
dropped of school," said
Mary Chambers, a teacher
at the center. According
to Chambers, it's hard for
someone who dropped out
years ago to believe that
they can pass the tests. But,
for parents, it's worth it to
set a good example for their
children.
"If you're setting that
example, then your child
is going to follow that
example," Chambers said.
That's what Brandy
Goudreau believes too. Her
three children, at 5, 8 and
12 years old, are too old for
the Baker Center, but she,
like Milliner, goes for them.
"I think furthering my
education is the best thing
for my kids," Goudreau
said, "because I (tell) them
how important school
is, and you can't (stress)
something that's important
to your children unless you
do it yourself."
She said studying for the
GED has helped her to con-
nect with her school-age
children.
Before she started
studying, Goudreau, said "I


couldn't sit down with my
kids and do their home-
work with them because
it's been so long. Now my
daughter's sitting down and
doing my homework with
me."
Goudreau said she is very
happy with the quality of
instruction in the program,
which has three staff teach-
ers and utilizes the service
of volunteer tutors.
"This is an awesome
program," Goudreau said.
"I'm so thrilled to even
have known about it. We've
got awesome teachers too.
They're really good."
The Baker Center's pre-K
program is open only to
families who apply and
meet income eligibility.
However, the GED program
is available to any adult,
regardless of income.
The GED program had
10 students enrolled as of
Wednesday, and has room
for up to 24. Those who are
interested can get more
information about join-
ing at the Adult Learning
Center's main office in
the Port Charlotte Town
Center, online at http://
charlottetechcenter.com/
adult-learning-center, or by
phone at 941-255-7555.
Email: iross@sun-herald.com


SCousins Jessica Tuttle, 30, and Brandy Goudreau,
Teacher Mary Chambers reviews multiplication 29, study independently Wednesday for the GED
problems with Kyrsha Taylor, 18, Wednesday test at the Baker Center. Both are enrolled in the
at the Baker Center, to prepare her for the GED Adult Learning Center's GED test-preparation
test. program, which is new to the center.


Projected operating cost of world


rowing championship: $7.7M


By SARA KENNEDY
BRADENTON HERALD

The local partnership
to stage the 2017 World
Rowing Championship is
projecting total operating
expenses of $7.7 million,
county documents show.
The cost of additional
capital improvements
at Sarasota's Nathan
Benderson Park was set
at $15 million, according
to documents approved
separately Tuesday by the
Manatee and Sarasota
county commissions.
A nonprofit founda-
tion that will organize
and stage the event will
be responsible for the
additional capital costs,
according to Sarasota
County spokesman Curt
Preisser.
Sarasota County has
already spent close to
$20 million to transform a
homely borrow pit into a
world-class racing venue.
The lake where the event
would take place is still
under construction.
The championship
would be held in Sarasota
if an international


rowing federation OKs
the partnership's bid next
weekend at its meeting in
South Korea.
Budget documents
approved in principle are
part of a complex legal
agreement defining party
obligations.
The partnership
includes Manatee and
Sarasota counties, the
nonprofit Suncoast
Aquatic and Nature
Center Associates
Inc. and Benderson
Development Co.
The agreement limits
county contributions to
$2.782 million each from
"bed taxes" generated by
tourists and use of other
legally available funds.
Reimbursement up to
that amount is available
for planning, hosting and
staging the event, which
would be managed and
directed by Suncoast
Aquatic and Nature
Center Associates.
The two counties may
contribute in-kind ser-
vices at their discretion.
Benderson
Development agreed
to provide a "financial


backstop" for the
nonprofit foundation's
obligations, according to
Manatee County Assistant
County Attorney Bill
Clague.
Clague said he is still
meeting with Benderson
executives on terms of
the agreement, but he
asked commissioners to
approve it in principle.
"I'm comfortable we'll
get that worked out,"
Clague said. "Everything
else is settled."
SANCA will be charged
with putting on the event,
as well as fundraising
for capital projects, the
agreement said. It will be
expected to sign spon-
sors, find donors and
apply for grants.
A section titled
"Catastrophic Events"
said no party is liable
for failure to perform or
delays caused directly by
hurricane, tornado, fire,
earthquake, civil com-
motion, or disruption of
utility services.
Benderson Park is
located at the intersec-
tion of Interstate 75 and
University Parkway.


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 9


e- Cosw I


ACROSS
1 Sage saying
6 Science-course
parts
10 "Vamoose!"
14 Walled city of
Spain
15 Fort Ontario
16 Handed-down
tales
17 Air-circulation
aid
19 In the thick of
20 Service animal
21 Part of SASE
23 Ping-Pong
surface
28 Abysmal
29 2001-2009
cabinet member
Chao
30 Relatively new
33 Commandments
recipient
34 Some sodas
35 "That's gross!"
38 Face, slangily
39 Recurring
theme
40 Small band
41 "To a" poem
42 Artificial bait
43 Literature
Nobelist Neruda
44 Tower of London
neighbor
46 'Hood greeting
47 Rosebush pest
49 Adolescent
51 Happens by
54 Well-rehearsed
55 Prettify
56 Clog-clearing
company
62 Luxury hotel
chain


63 Gold-reserves
fort
64 Get-go
65 Junction point
66 Columbia
Pictures owner
67 Verges on

DOWN
1 Lunchtime
cheese partner
2 Street sign abbr.
3 Highest sundial
numeral
4 Poorly
5 Racehorses
yet to win
6 "Get yer hands
off!"
7 Comics bark
8 Favoritism
9 On its way


Look for a third

crossword in.

the Sun Classified

S section.
* *"" "" "" "


AFICIONADOS by Fred Piscop
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com
10 Hit hard, as 39 Tight-lipped
brakes 40 "Hooray for me!"
11 Software flaw 42 Little chaps
12 Zodiac beast 43 Seaplane part
13 Boudoir attire 45'60s
18 Acknowledge nonconformist
22 Stein fillers 46 Wine bottle
23 Pianist's pace datum
24 For all to hear 47 Something extra
25 Good pooch 48 Teaser ad
for kids 50 Strong
26 Polygraph adhesive
detections 52 Exasperates
27 Put up a fuss 53 Taboo thing
31 The Clintons, 57 Recycler's unit
circa 1971 58 Undivided
32 Half-_ 59 Luggage-
(coffee mix) inspecting agcy.
34 Most essential 60 Suffix for ballad
36 Dorian Gray 61 Legal
creator guarantees:


37 Tried to win over


Abbr.


Answer to previous puzzle


8/29/13


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Window sill
coolers
5 Waffles no more
9 In an offbeat way
14 Spots teens don't
like
15 Unoccupied
16 Civic, perhaps
17 "Django
Unchained"
co-star
19 Different take
20 Rings of activity
21 Area near a
hangar
23 Thoughtful type
24 "Malice N
Wonderland"
rapper
28 Cinders
29 Cross word
31 Pirouetted
32 Salk vaccine
target
34 Group with a self-
titled bimonthly
magazine
35 'This Boy's Life"
memoirist
39 Beyond bad
41 Bedding item
42 It involves checks
and balances
46 Cenozoic
47 Parisian
possessive
50 Sal Romano
portrayer on
"Mad Men"
52 Stem cell
research
advocate
Christopher
54 Kitchen gadget
55 First name of two
U.S. presidents
56 Lost a lap
59 Super Bowl X
MVP
61 Streisand title role
62 The Gaels of
college sports
63 facto
64 Candy man
65 Tech news dot-
corn
66 Broadway shiner

DOWN
1 _party
2 Boy who had a
legendary
meltdown


By David Poole 8/29/13


3 Tangle up
4 The Pont Neuf
spans it
5 Wastes, mob-
style
6 For
7 Perot, e.g.
8 One who's really
hot
9 Cuttlefish cousins
10 Vertical air
movement
11 It makes SADD
mad
12 Groovy music
collection?
13 However
18 Bit of dangly
jewelry
22 Fracas
24 Islamic branch
25 Norwegian royal
name
26 An official lang. of
Switzerland
27 National econ.
stat
30 Clay, today
32 Spotty pattern
33 CIA forerunner
35 Minute
36 Use a strop on
37 the fields we
go"


Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
AMASS ASTRO FEN
LOCAL CARON EPA
DECRY B AB I ES T IS




AYN ELAPSED ALP
DRI O6 II S E UES
SODOI MEET DUMA

ADO DEBASEMETAL
F I R SAL VE I NANE
SE K TREES ATHOS
E E KT IRIEIEIS MAIT H IOIS


(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


38 Hears
39 Drop in the
ocean?
40 Alt. spelling
43 Sitting at a red
light, say
44 "Days of Our
Lives" network
45 Language that
gave us
"galore"
47 Seiorita's shawl
48 "All the same..."


49 Like some
patches
51 Check for fit
53 Dickens'
Drood
55 Future MD's
class
56 Leb. neighbor
57 Beginning of
time?
58 Half and half
60 Oak Lawn-to-
Chicago dir.


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


8/29/13


I






Our Town Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Chris Porter Executive Editor

Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Relaxing

device ban

makes sense

OUR POSITION: Relaxing
electronic device bans makes
sense in the digital age.
Atrio of teens was sit-
ting in the bleachers at
Charlotte High School
not watching a basketball
game. Instead, their eyes were
trained on cellphones, fingers
tapping away. But the students
weren't taking or making calls,
checking in with parents or
even texting friends or family
outside the gym. They were
"nexting," sending text mes-
sages to each other, while sit-
ting right next to them.
We won't pretend to un-
derstand the sociological
implications of text messages
replacing conversation be-
tween two people seated side
by side, but the phenomenon
of nexting is part of a wider
spread of electronic communi-
cation that our young people
have adopted as an integral
part of their lifestyles. Social
networks, smartphones, tablet
computers none of which
existed when today's high
school seniors were born -
are now woven into the fabric
of their lives.
School administrators have
resisted the spread of elec-
tronic devices onto campuses,
labeling them as distractions
and citing disciplinary issues
connected with their use. Like
the boy sticking his finger in a
leaky dike, though, the policy
was doomed to be overtaken
by reality. Charlotte High
School has been testing out a
new policy on cellphone and
tablet use. The results have
been surprising.
According to a report by
Sun StaffWriter Ian Ross, the
school saw a massive decline
in referrals or disciplinary
actions despite a spike in
student enrollment. Students
may now use their phones,
tablets and music players
between classes, removing
an oft-violated ban on the
devices and resulting in more
than 600 fewer referrals.
Rather than view the lifting
of the ban as a surrender to
modern realities, the school
has embraced the technol-
ogy, allowing students to use
Internet-enabled devices to
research topics during class.
As state schools face a 2015
deadline for offering elec-
tronic textbooks, the easing of
the devices ban is also timely.
And increasingly, knowledge
of smartphone capabilities is a
must in many business envi-
ronments, so restricting its use
in schools rather than incor-
porating them into academic
settings seems counterintui-
tive. The key, just as in a busi-
ness or professional setting, is
understanding and respecting
proper ways to use the de-
vices, and just as importantly,
when to put them down.
Purists will lament such
technological leniency, just
as they mourn the death of
cursive writing instruction
and the use of calculators in
class. We take the opposite
view, that embracing modern
technology and encouraging
students to observe reason-
able guidelines better prepares
them for life after school,
where such technology is not
only ubiquitous, but vital to
productivity and success.
Just as youngsters in previ-
ous generations got a kick out
of spelling words on upside-
down calculators 0.7734 as
hELLO was the forerunner of
nexting we suspect teens
will mature past trite uses for
their devices. Beginning their
mastery of nascent technology


at a young age will empower
them to push forward to
digital discoveries we haven't
yet imagined.


g 1. .....
liT "" "T":'
:: : -_


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Skilled at
'intense dislike'

Editor:
On Aug. 21, I wrote to expose
that most Republicans are bet-
ter at hating than Democrats.
In response, a nice lady wrote
to prove my thesis.
She ignored the facts I
presented, but instead used the
Republican method of char-
acter-assassination to justify
her hatred of me. Even though
this rabid Republican knew
nothing about me, she claimed
I was loony, pitiable, and that I
live in a dark, narrow-minded,
bigoted and hate-filled world.
I never denied that I live in a
nest of those rabid Republicans
here. This lady certainly
expresses her intense dislike
of me, but denies her hatred.
However, intense dislike is
hatred, of which she proved her
superior skill and my original
assertion.
Those rabid Republicans
previously proved their hatred
ofTrayvon Martin, who they
also knew nothing about, by
circulating a picture of a scary-
looking rapper and claiming
it was Trayvon. I proved, by
media watchdogs and an hon-
est assessment of the facts, that
this picture was a lie. But they
still refused to believe the thug
was not Trayvon. Republicans
used character assassination
through many lies to defame
this innocent kid because of
their intense dislike. That's
hatred.
My rabid-Republican
brother insisted I watch "2016:
Obama's America." It was a
home movie by some foreigner
using Republican Joe McCarthy
character assassination against
the president. It listed ancient
acquaintances of President
Obama's and insinuated that
their views proved the presi-
dent guilty by association of
those same evils. I reiterate:
Republicans are more accom-
plished haters.
Wayne Anderson
North Port


Human species
most endangered

Editor:
Endangered! Its a word that
we hear and read about many
times in our daily lives.
There are different kinds
of endangered species in
America. The eagle has been
on the endangered list for


many years. We have other
small birds that we help to
survive. There are a few
endangered animals. Our
oceans have been losing
whales for a long time. Here in
Florida, there is great concern
for turtles and their eggs. Its
a crime to harm or disturb
them. Why are they so impor-
tant to our environment?
Then we have the manatee.
It's a harmless sea creature
that is becoming extinct. Our
society has clubs and organi-
zations to help them all. What
is the world's most endan-
gered species? Do you know?
I do. It's you and me, human
life. Why are we endangered?
Wars, murders, disease and
abortions have destroyed and
are destroying more of us ev-
ery day. Our lives are precious,
because we were made in the
image ofYahuweh, the great
creator who made us and the
universe.
Let's thank and praise him
for another day of life.
Donald Bohr
Port Charlotte

Thanks for
great service

Editor:
Thomas Morin, we just
want to thank you for the
great service that you have
provided to us after you took
over our route. Thank you
for the great service. We are
looking forward to having you
as our carrier for a long time.
Keep up the good work.
Pat, Lloyd Everetts
Port Charlotte

Stop 'illegals'
from voting

Editor:
Big business is at it again.
Yes, Mr. Chairman, ALEC
is alive and well and trying
against all biased odds to pro-
tect the integrity of the ballot
box. Why is the Democratic
tactic of allowing every warm
and not-so-warm bodies to
vote not questioned by editors
but all attempts to minimize
the ability of 12 million or
more illegals along with the
likes of ACORN to vote are not
questioned, but sanctioned?
For one, I wish James
Abraham's conversation
would have included what
minorities will do to stop
babies from having babies?
Race relations are bound to be
more strained as long as more
and more welfare-dependent,
uneducated children are
born into this country. We are


in a race to the bottom and
minorities keep asking what
will the US of A do for me?
Today's headline, "Private
lobbyists get public pensions
in 20 states," is about blatant
political corruption. Most
lobbyists are lost or retired
legislators. Twenty states have
seen fit to rob state coffers
to grant public pensions
to private businesses. Who
benefits? Certainly not the
taxpayer who is being robbed
as sure as if Jesse James stuck
a gun in their face and took
the money. The only two
states mentioned in the article
are New Jersey and New York
because they have seen fit to
question the rip-off.


Praying for 1
of Sgt. Wil

Editor:
What a beautiful
MichaelWilson. He
been a wonderful h
being. I read every
looked at every pic
I found humor in
he played on his fri
sign that was not ti
and maybe disappe
the Peace River. Th
made him seem lik
age Joe.
I pray every day f
and children. Port (
should be so prouc
came together for t
My disturbing th
may have missed t]
for another family.
ily whose husband
The family must liv
the knowledge that
this wonderful mar
MichaelWilson.
The physical abu
God only knows wl
took place in their
have talked to a ver
person. She reassu
most likely help wa
them that night. Go
so let's pray.
Marily



An easy ch
in Egyp

Editor:
Duped into provi
martyrdom to those
the Muslim Brothe
front, General Sisi
military abandoned
and lost the confid
Egyptian people.
Some in Egypt ar
to tyrannical violet
manding complian


oppressive view of Islam. The
Brotherhood wants an Egypt
under Islamic law. Egyptians
fear imposition of Islamic law,
knowing the harsh punish-
ments there imposed, and
rejected the Brotherhood and
President Morsi, bringing
about this latest revolution.
There are other issues, but
much of Egypt's heartbreak
stems from the growth of
militant Islam. Wherever
found, religious fundamental-
ism deforms the conscience,
deadens empathy and lends
"authority" to the brutaliza-
tion of others with different
values.
Last month the military,
reacting to mass public
protest, removed Brotherhood
member Morsi from the
presidency. The Brotherhood
demands his return and
General Sisi will not allow
Morsi back. Both are culpable
in this latest violence. The
Brotherhood provokes and the
military, responsible for calm-
ing the streets, instead, turns
them into a shooting gallery.
But the Brotherhood runs on
ideology and bullets can't kill
that. Ideology dies when the
moderates face what their
silence supports instead of
turning away. Moderates
must publicly reject religious
fundamentalism as they step
into their responsibility for
the future.
Certainly the Egyptian
military is not without fault,
but the theocracy-driven
Brotherhood is no kindred
spirit to a secular America or
the democratic free world.
Ours is an easy choice.
Larry W. Moore
Port Charlotte


Stupid cartoon ideas
masquerade as truth


John Hitzel Editor:
Port Charlotte What makes the Sun differ-
ent is its opinion page, not the
opinions of expert sycophants
family that parade themselves as
son intellectual and open minded
when in reality they are tun-
nel vision manipulators; but
tribute to all the thoughts of everyday
e must have people. It is the only free
human speech I run across.
article and It used to be that society,
ture. communities, formed their
the antics own mores. For the most
ends. The part, since Americans where
ed down overwhelmingly Christian,
eared in lived in isolated communities
ese things and only had the Bible for a
e an aver- book, which they interpreted
themselves, with little berat-
for his wife ing from preachers; the mores
Charlotte they formed were commu-
1 how they nity-oriented and it gave a
his family. cohesion to the whole.
ought is, I In America today, the mores
he concern are a product of a few, cor-
A fam- rect political thinkers that
is dead. becomes a dogma. It does
re with not matter whether or not the
t he killed dogma makes any sense or
n named has a semblance of truth, it
becomes its own inquisition.
ise and Deviate from the orthodoxy of
hat else the witch hunters and you are
life. I scorned.
ry special The only intellectual curios-
red me that ity is what group you choose
is sent to to join, what secular religion
od is good, and beliefs guides all you
think, do or say.
rn Thompson I hate to burst the bubble
Port Charlotte of our so-called elite liberal
readers, but they seem to
believe in only their own ideas
Ioice and freedom of speech.
t You can't really control
thought, you can only bottle
it up like a long dormant
hiding volcano; the dark recesses
e manning of souls eventually explodes
rhood's into an unexpected but
and the surefire reality. Whether it is
d restraint economic, political or social,
ence of the stupid cartoon ideas mas-
querading as truth have dire
ro a itatel consequences.


ice in de-
ice to their


Xavier Narutowicz
Punta Gorda


LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013






The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013 VIEWPOINT www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C Our Town Page 11


Barack Obama:


The sap


resident Barack
Obama's most
telling act on the
international stage may
have come in a meeting
in early 2012 in Seoul,
South Korea, with Rus-
sia's seat-warming presi-
dent, Dmitry Medvedev.
Before the two got
up to leave, President
Obama asked in an
exchange caught on
an open mic that
Moscow cut him some
slack. "This is my last
election," Obama
explained. "After my
election I have more
flexibility." Medvedev
promised to "transmit
this information to
Vladimir," referring, of
course, to the power
behind the throne,
Vladimir Putin.
When he received the
message, Putin must
have chortled at the
heartbreaking naivete
of it. Here was the
leader of the free world
pleading for more time
to get along with his


Russian friends on
the basis of an utterly
risible assumption of
good will. Here was a
believer in the policy of
"reset" who still didn't
get that the reset was
going nowhere. Here
was weakness com-
pounded by delusion.
Putin didn't care
about Obama's flex-
ibility or inflexibility
so much as any op-
portunity to thwart
the United States.
Obama said that Syria
President Bashar
al-Assad had to go;
Putin worked to make
sure he stayed. Obama
said that National
Security Agency leaker


Edward Snowden had
to return to the United
States; Putin granted
him asylum. When a
few weeks ago Putin
related to a group of
Russian students that
he had told Snowden to
stop doing damage to
the United States, the
students did the only
thing appropriate upon
hearing such a patently
insincere claim they
laughed out loud.
Vladimir Putin surely
isn't the only one in the
world who regards the
president of the United
States with barely
disguised contempt.
As the Syria crisis
burns hotter, President
Obama has never
looked so feckless. He
has perfected the art of
speaking reproachfully
and carrying little or no
stick. The grand theory
of his foreign policy
coming into office, that
more national self-
abasement would win
us greater international


good will and respect,
has done the opposite.
Adversaries don't fear
us, and allies don't trust
us.
The administra-
tion has a knack for
believing in the wrong
people. "There is a
different leader in Syria
now," Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton said of
Assad in 2011, touting
his reformist creden-
tials. This was just
before Assad launched
the slaughter of his
opponents in good
earnest. In response,
the administration put
its faith in an interna-
tional peace initiative,
led by the redoubtable
former U.N. honcho
Kofi Annan, that had
zero chance of resolv-
ing the conflict.
When Assad prepared
to use chemical weap-
ons last year, President
Obama warned of a
fearsome "red line,"
with no intention of
following up on it.


When Assad called his
bluff, the president an-
nounced that he would
provide small arms to
the rebels in retaliation,
but he hasn't actually
done it yet. Is it any
wonder that Bashar
al-Assad would, like
Vladimir Putin, think he
had taken the measure
of the man? Last week,
he killed hundreds
in another chemical-
weapons attack.
The sharply worded
warning ignored by
everyone has become
the Obama administra-
tion's characteristic
rhetorical trope. It
warned the military
junta in Egypt not to
crack down on the
Muslim Brotherhood,
which was taken with
all the seriousness
of its admonitions to
Assad to step aside. The
Obama administration
has responded to the
resulting crackdown by
suspending some aid
to Egypt in secret, at


the same time that the
Saudis one of our
closest allies say it
doesn't matter what we
do because they will
replace whatever aid
we cut.
Elsewhere in the
region, Iran progresses
toward a nuclear
weapon, Iraq reverts to
civil war, and al-Qaida
gains in Yemen and
Somalia. In an essay in
Commentary magazine,
analyst Elliott Abrams
argues that the guiding
principle of Obama for-
eign policy is, as he put
in an early speech as a
presidential candidate,
to end the old "habits"
of American interna-
tional activism and
leadership. The new
habit, evidently, will be
tolerating irrelevance
and humiliation.
Rich Lowry is the
editor of the National
Review. Readers may
reach him at comments.
lowry@nationalreview.
com.


Protect water before the well runs dry


Water issues are
back in the
news. Florida
elected officials are
once again vowing to
take action and to pro-
vide funding for water-
related issues.
In one instance, the
state of Florida intends
to sue our neighboring
state, Georgia, over
excessive consumption
of water upstream from
us, in a case to be heard
before the U.S. Supreme
Court. Three states -
Florida, Georgia and
Alabama have been
duking it out in the
federal courts for more
than three decades.
At issue is who is
entitled to the water
from a system of three
rivers: the Apalachicola,
the Chattahoochee and
the Flint. Florida wants
the water to sustain its
seafood industry on
Apalachicola Bay, while
Alabama and Georgia
want to hold the water
upstream in reservoirs
to support continued
growth and recreational
opportunities.
While talks have
ensued over many


S Pajula




years, details are hidden
from public view so
it's difficult to know
whether the confiden-
tial documents show
any compromise among
the three thirsty states.
In the other recent
example, lawmakers
have quickly called for
hearings to address the
damage to the St. Lucie
and Caloosahatchee
estuaries caused by
the heavy release of
less than pristine
water flowing from Lake
Okeechobee. This action
by the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers resulted in
fish kills and toxic water
in the estuaries.
Why was this in-
creased release neces-
sary? The heavy rains
caused the levels in
Lake Okeechobee to
become dangerously


high. We have known
for many years that the
integrity of the Herbert
Hoover Dike was a seri-
ous concern in times
of heavy rain, such as
during Florida's hur-
ricane season. Likewise,
we have known that
the water quality in the
huge lake is severely
degraded.
But until the visual
shock of dolphin,
manatee and pelican
deaths in the Indian
River Lagoon, issues
about water quality, lake
releases and dike im-
provements have been
on the back burner.
Of course, the science
will show many other
factors that contribute
to these adverse effects
- such as nitrogen
from septic tanks,
lawn fertilizer runoff,
and inadequate water
storage, water quality
improvement projects,
treatment of wastewa-
ter, and enforcement.
In both these cases,
the state has shown a
willingness to step up
and fight for Florida's
economic interests,
whether they involve


the seafood industry,
tourism or recreational
fishing. Wouldn't it be
wonderful if the state's
willingness to act
extended to the health
of our wetlands, aquifer,
rivers, lakes and other
natural systems for the
sole purpose of ensuring
a safe and plentiful sup-
ply of clean, fresh water?
One simple and
indisputable fact needs
to be stated: There is no
life without water. Take
a minute to let that sink
in. You will die without
water. You cannot grow
food without water. In
other words, water is
kind of important.
Florida law ac-
knowledges that water
resources belong to all
the people of Florida.
In that regard, the state
has an awesome re-
sponsibility to protect,
conserve, restore, reuse
and responsibly allo-
cate this vital resource.
But with so many
stakeholders and
competing interests,
lawmakers have lacked
the political will to
set an ecologically
sustainable policy and


resist powerful political
pressure to leave it in
place. Political rheto-
ric about lessening
job-killing regulations
enables lawmakers to
justify rescinding septic
tank regulations, water
nutrient standards and
permitting and concur-
rency requirements.
Our actions do have
consequences and
those consequences
come with a hefty price
tag to remedy. It is
less costly to prevent
a water body from
becoming polluted than
to undertake another
multibillion-dollar
restoration effort like
Lake Okeechobee and
the larger Everglades
ecosystem that pro-
vides drinking water for
millions of Floridians.
It will take political
courage, a long-term
commitment and
adherence to sound
scientific and ecological
principles. The funding
and the policy need to
be permanently in place
to ensure a continued
commitment that
prevents misguided
political cowardice to


weaken that obligation.
In 2005, the state was
well on its way to sound
policy and sustainable,
dedicated funding.
However, that funding
was drained slowly, like
a leaky spigot washing
away all the progress
that a diverse group
of stakeholders put in
motion.
It will take a concert-
ed effort to work col-
laboratively with local,
state and federal of-
ficials for sound policy,
rigorous enforcement
and sustained funding.
The time is now and ev-
ery day going forward.
Water policy needs to
be moved up to the top
of the hierarchy of state
issues and stay there.
As Benjamin Franklin
said, "When the well's
dry, we know the worth
of water."
Let's not wait until
the well is dry.
Paula Dockery is a
syndicated columnist
who served in the Florida
Legislature for 16 years
as a Republican from
Lakeland. Readers may
reach her at pdockery@
floridavoices.com.


Te eOew Oa F w eew V W PiswVHew-tma eVnTc


\'- 'AT- rr ]TT

= ._ .:. .:= _::. .. .... ..

It you donl get it n your paper, call 941-206-1010 and ask for it



WALK-IN MEDICAL C re
SFamily Practice Injuries and Illnesses
SCommon Infections Schools/Sports/
SSprains and Strains Work Physicals
EKG Women's Health
SWorkmen's Comp Sore Throat
SLaceration Repair DOT PX
Sonro ipr Oad*0.e 1 j Pbl lza-PntB od
So 9 4 ) 6 7 0 7


HAVING A

HARD TIME

CHEWING?


DR. SUSAN R. BROOKS

Seniors are 629431
r S www.susanrbrooksdds.com
our Specialty General Dentistry
Implants Cosmetic Nitrous Oxide
Dentures & One Day Repair
S* Laser Periodontal Therapy
3440 Conway Blvd. #2A (Behind Post Office) Port Charlotte


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 11


VIEWPOINT





OurTown Page 12 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


CHARLOTTE COUNTY SEEKS
VOLUNTEERS
The Charlotte County Commission is seeking volunteers for the
following appointments:
Ackerman Waterway Unit Advisory Committee: six
volunteers who must be residents of Charlotte County and reside
within the unit. Terms: five regular members to serve a three-year
term from the date of appointment, and one alternate member to
serve a two-year term from the date of appointment. Submit an
application and resume to PublicWorks Department, 7000 Florida
St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email
MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Boca Grande Street and Drainage Advisory Committee:
one volunteer who must be a resident of Charlotte County and
reside within the unit. Terms: one member to serve a three-year
term from the date of appointment Submit an application and
r6sum6 to PublicWorks Department, 7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda,
FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Buena Vista Area Waterway Advisory Committee: two
volunteers who must be residents of Charlotte County and reside
within the unit. Terms: two regular members to serve a three-year
term from the date of appointment Submit an application and
resume to PublicWorks Department, 7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda,
FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Burnt Store Village Street and Drainage Advisory
Committee: two volunteers who must be residents of Charlotte
County and reside within the unit. Terms: two regular members
to serve a three-year term from date of appointment. Submit
an application and resume to Public Works Department, 7000
Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email
MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Charlotte Ranchettes Street and Drainage Advisory
Committee: one volunteer to serve a three-year term from the
date of appointment Applicants must bea resident of Charlotte
County and reside within the unit. Submit an application and
resume to PublicWorks Department, 7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda,
FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Children's Services Council: two volunteers, who must be
residents of Charlotte County and have maintained residency for
24 months. The commissioners will nominate six names to the
governor, and two will be selected by the governor for appoint-
ment. To obtain an application, contact Emily Lewis, Charlotte
County Human Services, 1050 Loveland Blvd., Port Charlotte, FL
33980; call 941-833-6502; email Emily.Lewis@charlottefl.com; or
fax to 941-833-6565.
Construction Industry Licensing Board: one volunteer to
represent the consumer advocate category. Volunteer must be a resi-
dent of Charlotte County for at least two years and have no financial
interest, direct or indirect, in the building trades. Length of term:
four years. Submit an application and resume to Charlotte County
Commission Office, 18500 Murdock Cirde, Room 536, Port Charlotte,


FL33948; call 941-743-1300;or email assistant@charlottefl.com.
Englewood East Non-Urban Street and Drainage
Advisory Committee: two volunteers who must be residents
of Charlotte County and reside within the unit. Terms: one regular
member to serve a three-year term from the date of appointment,
and one alternate member to serve a two-year term from the date
of appointment. Submit an application and resume to Public Works
Department, 7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-
3600; or email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Grove City Street and Drainage Advisory Committee:
two volunteers. Terms: one regular member to serve a three-year
term from the date of appointment, and one alternate member to
serve a two-year term from the date of appointment. Applicants
must be residents of Charlotte County and reside within the unit.
Submit an application and r6sum6to PublicWorks Department,
7000 Florida St, Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or
email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Gulf Cove Street and Drainage Advisory Committee:
one volunteer who must be a resident of Charlotte County and
reside within the unit Term: one alternate member to serve a
two-year term from the date of appointment. Submit an applica-
tion and resume to Public Works Department, 7000 Florida St.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email MSBU-TU@
charlottefl.com.
Gulf Cove Waterway Benefit Advisory Committee: one
volunteer who must be a resident of Charlotte County and reside
within the unit. Term: one regular member to serve a three-year
term from the date of appointment. Submit an application and
resume to Public Works Department, 7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda,
FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Harbour Heights Waterway Advisory Committee: one
volunteer who must be a resident of Charlotte County and reside
within the unit. Term: one alternate member to serve a two-year
term from the date of appointment. Submit an application and
resume to Public Works Department, 7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda,
FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Manasota Key Street and Drainage MSTU Advisory
Committee: one volunteer to serve as an alternate member for a
two-year term from the date of appointment. Applicant must be
a resident of Charlotte County and reside within the unit. Submit
an application and resume to PublicWorks Department, 7000
Florida St, Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email
MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Marine Advisory Committee: three volunteers to serve in
the capacity of member-at-large. Terms are effective Jan. 1,2014,
and shall expire Dec. 31, 2016. Contact Pam Alexander at 941-764-
4909 or Pam.Alexander@charlottefl.com for an application form
to turn in with your r6sum6, or fax your request for a form to
941-764-4108.
Northwest Port Charlotte Street and Drainage Advi-
sory Committee: one volunteer to serve as an alternate member
for a two-year term from the date of appointment. Applicant
must be a resident of Charlotte County and reside within the unit.


Submit an application and resume to PublicWorks Department,
7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or
email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Pirate Harbor Street and Drainage Advisory
Committee: one volunteer to serve as an alternate member
for a term of two years from the date of appointment. Applicant
must be a resident of Charlotte County and reside within the unit.
Submit an application and resume to Public Works Department,
7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or
email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Pirate Harbor Waterway Advisory Committee: one
volunteer who must be a resident of Charlotte County and reside
within the unit. Term is for one regular member to serve a three-
year term from the date of appointment. Submit an application
and r6sum6 to Public Works Department, 7000 Florida St.,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email MSBU-TU@
charlottefl.com.
Placida Area Street and Drainage Advisory
Committee: one volunteer to serve as an alternate member for
a two-year term from the date of appointment. Applicant must
be a resident of Charlotte County and reside within the unit.
Submit an application and resume to Public Works Department,
7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or
email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
SSouth Bridge Waterway Advisory Committee: five
volunteers who must be residents of Charlotte County and reside
within the unit. Terms: four regular members to serve three-year
terms from the date of appointment, and one alternate member
to serve a two-year term from the date of appointment. Submit
an application and r6sum6 to PublicWorks Department, 7000
Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or email
MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Suncoast Waterway Maintenance Advisory Committee:
two volunteers who must be residents of Charlotte County and
reside within the unit Terms: one regular member to serve a
three-year term from the date of appointment, and one alternate
member to serve a two-year term from the date of appointment.
Submit an application and r6sum6 to Public Works Department,
7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call 941-575-3600; or
email MSBU-TU@charlottefl.com.
Enterprise Zone Development Agency: one volunteer
who must be a representative for a business operating in the
enterprise zone area. Term: four years beginning on or after Oct.
16. Submit an application and r6sum6 to Economic Development
Office, 18501 Murdock Circle, Suite 302, Port Charlotte, FL 33948;
call 941-764-4941; or email FloridaEDO@charlottefl.com.
Tropical Gulf Acres Street and Drainage Advisory
Committee: three volunteers. Terms: two regular members to
serve a three-year term from the date of appointment, and one
alternate member to serve a two-year term from the date of
appointment Applicants must be residents of Charlotte County and
reside within the unit Submit an application and resume to Public
Works Department, 7000 Florida St., Punta Gorda, FL 33950; call


COMMUNITY
NEWS BRIEF

Phoenix watch on
Keep your eyes to the
sky and the trees,
fields and wetlands.
The Peace River Wildlife
Center is asking resi-
dents to report sightings
of the nationally re-
nowned and recently
released American bald
eagle, Phoenix. He was
released near Jones Loop
Road, but bald eagles
have relatively large
territories. The center is
interested in tracking his
movements.
As special as he is to
the community, keep
in mind that Punta
Gorda has lots of bald
eagles and Phoenix
looks pretty much like
the rest of the adults.
He does, however, sport
a silver metal band on
his right leg. If you spot
him, report the location
of your sighting to the
PRWC at 941-637-3830
or PeaceRiverWildlife@
yahoo.com. Do not ap-
proach or try to capture
him; he needs to remain
undisturbed.
For Phoenix's story
and many other stories,
facts and photos, "like"
the center on Facebook,
visit www.peaceriver
wildlifecenter.com, and
come in for a tour from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. every
day at 3400 W. Marion
Ave. (Ponce de Leon
Parkway), Punta Gorda.


FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014
BUDGET HEARING
CITY OF NORTH PORT, FLORIDA


City Commissioners
Linda M. Yates, Mayor
Jim Blucher, Vice-Mayor
Cheryl Cook, Commissioner
Rhonda Y. DiFranco, Commissioner
Tom Jones, Commissioner


Appointed Officials
Jonathan R. Lewis, City Manager
Robert K. Robinson, City Attorney
Helen Raimbeau, MMC, City Clerk
Patsy Adkins, CMC, Deputy City Clerk


CITY OF NORTH PORT FLORIDA MISSION STATEMENT
The City of North Port will provide the health, safety and welfare services to our residents which
would not be provided or could not be provided efficiently or equally without the intervention of
government at the local level.
The City will provide said services in a professional and cost effective manner, and only by
listening to those who have put us in the position to serve them, our residents.
AGENDA
NORTH PORT CITY COMMISSION
FISCAL YEAR 2013-14 BUDGET HEARING
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2013
6:00 P.M.
CITY CHAMBERS
4970 CITY HALL BOULEVARD
NORTH PORT, FL 34286
MEETING PROCEDURE: By submitting a "Request to Speak" card to the City Clerk, the Public may comment during
the course of the meeting: (1) Comments on items not scheduled on the Agenda will be heard under Public
Cornmerils: (2) Comments on all scheduled Agenda Items will be heard imme-ialell following the presentation by
Ihe Slaii or Petitioner. Please wait until you are recognized by the Presiding Offiier state your name and address
so that your comments may be properly recorded and limit your remarks to a period of three (3) minutes or less.
The City Commission will act on an Agenda Item after comments from the Staff, Petitioner and Public have been
heard.
Florida's Sunshine Law requires the Commission to discuss this Agenda only in open session. The Commissioners
cannot discuss these items with each other before this meeting is called to order. The Commissioners, individually,
can however, discuss any item with concerned citizens and staff in preparation for the meeting.
CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE -LED BY THE COMMISSION
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. ORDINANCES:
A. First reading of Ordinance No. 2013-20, Adoption and Certification of Ad Valorem Millage Rate of 3.4474 for
Fiscal Year 2013-2014. (Must be read in its entirety)
B. First reading of Ordinance No. 2013-21 Adoption of Fiscal Year 2013-2014 Non-District Budget and Capital
Improvements Program.
C. First reading of Ordinance No. 2013-25, Adoption of City Wide Fee Schedule for Fiscal Year 2013-2014.
2. RESOLUTION:
A. Reading of Resolution No. 2013-R-38, Approving and Certification of the Assessment Rolls for Floribanna and
Sumter Gardens Assessment Areas.
3. PUBLIC COMMENT:
4. ADJOURNMENT:
Florida Statutes requires that "The governing body shall adopt its tentative or final millage rate prior to adopting its tentative or
final budget." (s. 200.065(2)(e)1.,F.S.)
FIRE RESCUE DISTRICT
CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE -LED BY THE COMMISSION
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. ORDINANCE:
A First reading of Ordinance No. 2013-22, Adoption of Fiscal Year 2013-2014 Fire Rescue District Budget.
2. PUBLIC COMMENT:
3. ADJOURNMENT:
ROAD AND DRAINAGE DISTRICT
CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE -LED BY THE COMMISSION
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. ORDINANCE:
A. First reading of Ordinance No. 2013-23, Adoption of Fiscal Year 2013-2014 Road and Drainage District Budget.
2. PUBLIC COMMENT:
3. ADJOURNMENT:
SOLID WASTE DISTRICT
CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE -LED BY THE COMMISSION
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. ORDINANCE:
A. First reading of Ordinance No. 2013-24, Adoption of Fiscal Year 2013-2014 Solid Waste District Budget.
2. PUBLIC COMMENT:
3. ADJOURNMENT:
NOTE: Exhibits and backup up material accompanying Ordinances and Resolutions or any other backup material
concerning an agenda item are available for review in the City Clerk's office.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of these meetings. Accordingly, anyone seeking to
appeal any decisions involving the matters herein will be responsible for making a verbatim record of the meeting/
testimony and evidence upon which any appeal is to be based. (SEE: F.S. 286.0105) Note: Persons with
disabilities needing assistance to participate in any of these proceedings should contact the City Clerk's office 48
hours in advance of the meeting. (SEE: F.S. 286.26)
NONDISCRIMINATION: The City of North Port does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin,
sex, age, disability, family or religious status in administration of its programs, activities or services.
AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990 The North Port City Hall is wheelchair accessible. Special parking
is available on the west side of City Hall and the building may be accessed from the parking area. Persons with
hearing difficulties should contact the City Clerk to obtain a hearing device for use during meetings.
Helen M. Raimbeau, MMC
City Clerk
Publish in the newspaper August 29, 2013


Mobile health


services


offered


at South County


sites in September


Provided by DIANNE SHIPLEY
SARASOTA COUNTY
HEALTH DEPARTMENT
SARASOTA COUNTY
- The Sarasota County
Health Department's
Health In Motion Mobile
Medical Unit staff will
provide free and low-cost
health services at South
County sites during
September.
Services offered
include diabetes educa-
tion and screening, blood
pressure tests, pregnancy
testing, HIV testing,
body mass index (BMI)
measurement, adult im-
munizations and health
education; however, not
all services, including
immunizations, are of-
fered at all sites. Staff also
assists individuals who
lack medical insurance
and do not have a health
care provider to find a
medical home for ongo-
ing health care.
No appointment is
needed. Some services
are free, including HIV
rapid testing with results
in 20 minutes. Other
services are provided on
a sliding-fee scale based
on income. A registered
nurse is available at all
sites.
While these services
are most often provided
in a 40-foot-long bus,
there are times when ser-
vices are provided inside
the facilities visited.
The following is a
schedule of South County
dates and locations for
the mobile unit:

North Port
SSept. 6, 9 a.m.
to noon during the
U.S. Department of
Agriculture food distri-
bution program at St.


Nathaniel's Episcopal
Church, 4200 S. Biscayne
Drive
Sept. 30, 9:30 a.m. to
3 p.m. at the Goodwill
Manasota Center of North
Port, 14809 Tamiami Trail

Englewood
*Tuesday, 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. at the Elsie
Quirk Library, 100W.
Dearborn St.

Venice
*Wednesday, 9:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. during the
USDA food distribution
program at the Venice
Community Center,
326 Nokomis Ave. S.
*Sept. 11 and 25,
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
Salvation Army Family
Store, 1160 U.S. 41
Bypass S.
Sept. 18, 9:30 a.m.
to noon, and Sept. 24,
9:30 a.m. to noon at the
Goodwill Center-The
Rialto, 650 S. Tamiami
Trail
Sept. 24, 1 to 3 p.m. at
the Habitat for Humanity
ReStore, 1400 Ogden
Road
Laurel
*Wednesday, Sept. 18,
2 to 5 p.m. during the
USDA food distribution
program at the Sandra
Sims Terry Community
Center, 509 Collins Road
For more informa-
tion, call the Sarasota
County Call Center at
941-861-5000 (TTY 711
or 1-800-955-8771), or
visit www.sarasotahealth.
org to view the calen-
dar. Anyone without
computer access can
visit a health kiosk at
any Sarasota County
public library or Senior
Friendship Center.


SAVE LIVES. GIVE BLOOD.

............................................................





The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 13


North Port Art Center sells jewelry, plans for pottery show

ETUmmrlqZ 1


SUN PHOTOS BY CHEYENNE EMRICH
North Port Art Center Director Sandi Hilliard checks out some of
the pieces that will be on display for the annual pottery show
from Sept. 21 to Oct. 26. The center is seeking participants. The
cost is $10 to enter per piece. The show will be juried by the
public. Prizes will be awarded during a special reception on
Oct. 26. For more information, call 941-423-6460.


Rosemary McMullen, a volunteer at the
North Port Art Center gift store since April,
organizes a display Wednesday at the
center.


Right: A one-year volunteer at the North Port Art Center, Sandy Wood
straightens out a painting Wednesday as the group prepares for an open house
on Sept. 11 that includes free workshops, demonstrations, entertainment and


No new trial for convicted killer


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY
-A 12th Judicial Circuit
judge denied murderer
John Allen Lee's motion for
a new trial Wednesday after
attorneys for Lee failed to
prove misconduct on the
part of the state.
Judge Peter Dubensky,
often showing frustration
with attorneys for both
sides, heard daylong
testimony from witnesses
who previously testified on
behalf of the state during
the three-week double-
murder trial in March.
Lee, 49, was found
guilty of murdering Tracy
Nabergall and Jason
Salter in Salter's South
Venice home in 2011.
The 12-member jury also
recommended death for
Lee, who nearly beheaded
Nabergall during the
attack.
But Lee's actual guilt
came into question after
Dorothy"Dotty" Stolte,
a longtime Lee friend,
claimed Assistant State
Attorneys Karen Fraivillig
and Andrea McHugh
ordered her to lie on the
stand in March.
Stolte testified Tuesday
at the Sarasota County
Justice Center that Fraivillig
told her the state was
lacking DNA evidence and
needed Stolte to lie to the
jury regarding the murder
weapon, which she had
bought for Lee as a gift
prior to the murder.
Stolte, 64, said Fraivillig
threatened to send her to
prison for six months if she
didn't lie. Stolte also said
Fraivillig warned her in
March that Dubensky was
"in on it."
"I was flabbergasted she
would be so bold and want
me to lie," Stolte added.
Assistant State Attorney
Art Jackman thought it was
crucial that Fraivillig and
McHugh take the stand
to defend themselves, but


Dubensky allowed only
McHugh to testify regard-
ing whether the state with-
held a piece of evidence
from the defense during
the discovery phase.
Jackman said both
Fraivillig and McHugh
"absolutely deny" Stolte's
accusations, which put
their reputations at stake.
Defense attorney
Carolyn Schlemmer argued
that McHugh failed to
notify them of a potential
relationship that devel-
oped between Salter and
Nabergall. Dubensky has
10 days to make a written
ruling.
Dubensky also ruled that
Stolte could not be charged
with perjury following her
assertion she was told to
lie in March, but said she
had no immunity for her
comments onWednesday.
Dubensky read the
March testimony back
to Stolte from the bench,
but Stolte confirmed the
statements she made were
true, even though she
just testified that she was
forced to lie.
Schlemmer and co-
council Jerome Meisner
previously tried to get a
new trial for Lee following
a news story in the Sun, in
which former juror Brad
Bennett spoke about visit-
ing Salter's home following
the conclusion of the trial.
Dubensky shot down
that motion too, saying
that even though Bennett
expressed sympathy for
Salter and Nabergall's
families, it was not a basis
for a mistrial.
Longtime Nabergall
friend Christine Wurst said
the daylong hearing was
"difficult" to sit through,
especially the stories told
by Stolte and her brother,
Steve Stolte, who testified
that Nabergall was having
an affair with Salter.
"At one point I was ner-
vous he (Lee) was getting a
new trial," she said.
Email: dwinchester@sun-herald.com


Dorothy Stolte testifies about her five days in jail prior to the
March 2013 trial of John Allen Lee, where she says she was
threatened by prosecutors into lying under oath, during Wednes-
day's hearing.


Can't find it anywhere?
Don't give up check

the Classifieds!

SUNl

S lUt 1 NEWSPAPERS
Charlotte DeSoto EnglewoodNorth Port Venice


City Commissioners
Linda M. Yates, Mayor
Jim Blucher, Vice-Mayor
Cheryl Cook, Commissioner
Rhonda Y. DiFranco, Commissioner
Tom Jones, Commissioner


POOL PHOTOS
BY ELAINE
LITHERLAND
Convicted killer
John Lee Allen
appears during
a hearing at the
Sarasota County
Courthouse on
a motion for a
new trial based
on prosecuto-
rial misconduct
on Wednesday,
Aug.28,2013.


Appointed Officials
Robert K. Robinson, City Attorney
Helen Raimbeau, MMC, City Clerk
Patsy Adkins, CMC, Deputy City Clerk


CITY OF NORTH PORT, FLORIDA MISSION STATEMENT
The City of North Port will provide the health, safety and welfare services to our residents which
would not be provided or could not be provided eilicienll/ or equally without the intervention of
government at the local level.
The City will provide said services in a professional and cost effective manner, and only by
listening to those who have put us in the position to serve them, our residents.
FIRE RESCUE DISTRICT GOVERNING BODY SPECIAL MEETING
ROAD AND DRAINAGE DISTRICT GOVERNING BODY SPECIAL MEETING
SOLID WASTE DISTRICT GOVERNING BODY SPECIAL MEETING
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 5, 2013
CITY COMMISSION CHAMBERS
4970 CITY HALL BOULEVARD
NORTH PORT, FLORIDA 34286
5:00 PM.
MEETING PROCEDURE: By submitting a "Request to Speak" card to the City Clerk, the Public may comment during the course
of the meeting: (1) Comments on items not scheduled on the Agenda will be heard under Public Comments; (2) Comments on all
scheduled Agenda Items will be heard immediately following the presentation by the Staff or Petitioner. Please wait until you are
recognized by the Presiding Officer, state your name and address so that your comments may be properly recorded and limit
your remarks to a period of three (3) minutes or less. The City Commission will act on an Agenda Item after comments from the
Staff, Petitioner and Public have been heard.
Florida's Sunshine Law requires the Commission to discuss this Agenda only in open session. The Commissioners cannot
discuss these items with each other before this meeting is called to order. The Commissioners, individually, can however,
discuss any item with concerned citizens and staff in preparation for the meeting.
FIRE RESCUE DISTRICT GOVERNING BODY SPECIAL MEETING
CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL LINDA M. YATES, MAYOR
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE LED BY THE COMMISSION
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. Public Hearing on the Fire Rescue District Assessment Methodology.
2. RESOLUTION:
A. Reading of Resolution No. 2013-R-34, providing for the adoption of the North Port Fire Rescue District FY 2014
Non-Ad Valorem Assessment Methodology Final Report and the Levy and adoption of the Fire Rescue District
Non-Ad Valorem Assessment Rates and Certification of Fire Rescue District Non-Ad Valorem Assessment Rolls
for Fiscal Year 2013-2014.
3. PUBLIC COMMENT:
4. ADJOURNMENT:
ROAD AND DRAINAGE DISTRICT GOVERNING BODY SPECIAL MEETING
CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL LINDA M. YATES, MAYOR
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE LED BY THE COMMISSION
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. Public Hearing on the Road and Drainage District Assessment Methodology.
2. RESOLUTION:
A. Reading of Resolution No. 2013-R-32, providing for the adoption of the North Port Road and Drainage District
FY 2014 Non-Ad Valorem Assessment Methodology Final Report and Levy and adoption of the Road and
Drainage District Non-Ad Valorem Assessment Rates and Certification of Road and Drainage District Non-Ad
Valorem Assessment Rolls for Fiscal Year 2013-2014.
3. PUBLIC COMMENT:
4. ADJOURNMENT:
SOLID WASTE DISTRICT GOVERNING BODY SPECIAL MEETING
CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL LINDA M. YATES, MAYOR
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE LED BY THE COMMISSION
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. Public Hearing on the Solid Waste District Assessment Methodology.
2. RESOLUTION:
A. Reading of Resolution No. 2013-R-37, Levy and adoption of the Solid Waste District Non-Ad Valorem
Assessment Rates and Certification of Solid Waste District Non-Ad Valorem Assessment Rolls for Fiscal Year
2013-2014.
3. PUBLIC COMMENT:
4. ADJOURNMENT:
NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF REPORTS The Agenda is a summary of the proposed actions to be taken by the
City Commission. For almost every agenda item, the City staff has prepared materials for Commission
consideration. These materials include staff reports, which explain in detail the item before the Commission and the
reason for the recommendation. The materials may also include resolutions or ordinances, which are proposed for
adoption. All of these materials are available at the City Clerk's Office, during normal business hours, for inspection
and (for a fee) copying. Questions on these materials may be directed to the staff member who prepared them, or to
the City Clerk's Olri.;e, who will refer you to the appropriate person.
AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990 The North Port City Hall is wheelchair accessible. Special parking is available
on the west side of City Hall and the building may be accessed from the parking area. Persons with hearing difficulties should
contact the City Clerk to obtain a hearing device for use during meetings.
NONDISCRIMINATION: The City of North Port does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age,
disability, family or religious status in administration of its programs, activities or services.
No stenographic record by a certified court reporter is made of these recordings. Accordingly, anyone seeking to appeal any of
the decisions involving the matters herein will be responsible for making a verbatim record of the meeting/testimony and
evidence upon which any appeal is to be based. Copies of the recordings are available (for a fee) at the City Clerk's Office.
Helen M. Raimbeau, MMC\
City Clerk
Publish in the newspaper August 29, 2013


Looking for a Friend?
















Find him in the Classifieds J W5SPERS


NOTICE OF DISTRICTS SPECIAL MEETING
FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014
BUDGET HEARING
CITY OF NORTH PORT, FLORIDA





:Our Town Page 14 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net LOCALIREGIONAL NEWS The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


Waiting for




the run


SUN PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS


Despite the rain and lightning that eventually stopped the Hot August Nights 8K Run in down-
town Punta Gorda, a couple hundred runners and walkers showed up and waited for close to
an hour before the official word came from the Foot Landing that the run had to be postponed.
Here, Kevin Burckley, Al Nelson, Eric Ressel and Mark Wegand were tempted to run anyway but
held off despite their guts and brawn.


Angle Nolan and her volunteers from Charlotte "
High, Jaydee Taylor, 14, Breanna Jacobs, 14, and
Whitney McElroy, 17, wear their glow-in-the- Kim Requa, Ken and Melissa Haberkorn have
dark glasses. fun despite the canceled run.


Michael Cox, Ashley Keller and her mother, Linda
Keller, found a spot against the wall at Center Sydney Muster, 14, and her parents, Ben
Court to wait out the rain. Eventually, the run and LeeAnn, wanted to run as a family on
was called and postponed until further notice. Saturday night.


This group
from Body Corp
Boot Camp at
School House
Square in Char-
lotte Harbor
gave the
thumbs down
when the
announcement
was made that
the Hot August
Nights Run was
postponed.


Bernie Serafini, Ginny Bihari, John Green, Janet
Mayl and Suzanne Roberts hang out inside
waiting for the decision on whether the run was
to take place.


This group of runners were looking forward to the night run.



NEWSPAPERS
I I yoursun.com


rWEUARDEN

OW AND GUIDE


201 3


SATURDAY

September 14th

1 Oam-3pm

at the Charlotte Harbor

Event & Conference Center
75 Taylor Street, Punta Gorda

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Is Limited

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Port Charlotte: Punta Gorda:
941 -258-9521 941 -205-6402
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Laurie Myers, her daughter, Taylor, 18, family
friend Erica Glisson, 18, and Trevor Myers, 15, sit
and wait, hoping for the start of the Hot August
Nights run.


Matt and Katie Maurer, Tiffany and Robson
Powers and Nathan Boock wait patiently to
hear if the night run is on or off.


Joe Cellamare found a dry area
to do some stretching just in
case the run was still on.
I ....... "









---











Shop Chaotte
Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecountycham ber.org


Teri Hart, Jackie Wendorf, Laura Rogers and
Susan Flores take advantage of the down
time to visit and catch up.


Englewood Health
Department Clinic
Closing August 31, 2013

FOorida The Florida Department of Health
in Charlotte County (DOH-
H | H Charlotte) will discontinue medical
services at 6868 San Casa in
CharlotteCounty Englewood on August 31. The
Health Department is advising
Englewood patients to contact an alternate provider.
Alternate providers include North Port Health Center,
Family Health Centers of Southwest Florida, or
private providers such as Epiphany Health.
Medical records can be requested from the Health
Department by filling out a medical record release
form. This form is available online or can be picked up
at 6868 San Casa in Englewood until August 31st.
Online forms are on DOH-Charlotte's website:
www.charlottechd.com (click on the forms button).
Patients' new providers can fax the Health
Department an authorization to release a medical
record. Please allow several days for processing.
Women, Infants and Children (WIC) services offered
at 6868 San Casa are unaffected. The Englewood
WIC office will remain open Monday and Tuesday by
appointment. Residents can contact Englewood WIC
at 941-681-3762.
North Port Health Center is located at 6950 Outreach
Way in North Port. Their phone number is 941-861-
3820. Family Health Centers of Southwest Florida is
located at 4300 Kings Highway, Suite 500 in Port
Charlotte. Their phone number for medical services is
866-355-2348.
The Florida Department of Health in Charlotte County
will continue to pursue its mission to protect, promote
and improve the health of all people in Florida through
integrated state, county and community efforts. It will
focus on core public health functions such as
community health promotion and disease control and
prevention. 5045232


:OurTown Page 14 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE

Stocks edge higher


The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 48.38 points,
or 0.3 percent, to close at
14,824.51.
Page 6 -


California launches
drone in fire battle







Firefighters now have a new
weapon: a National Guard
Predator drone.
Page 2 -


10 things to know


1. U.S.: Assad behind
chemical attack
The president says he's still evalu-
ating possible military retaliation,
but said any American response
would send a "strong signal."
Seepage 1.

2. Gas attack victims
retell horrors
"I ran out to see what was going on
and saw people in various stages of
suffocation and convulsions;' says
one resident. Seepage 1.

3. Fort Hood gunman
sentenced to death
Maj. Nidal Hasan could become
the first American soldier executed
in more than half a century,
but a lengthy appeals process is
expected. Seepage 1.

4. Obama: King's
dream not yet reality
Speaking on the 50th anniversary
of the Rev. King's speech, the
president also challenged new
generations to seize the cause of
racial equality. Seepage 1.

5. Fast-food workers
want fries with that
They're planning walkouts to push
for higher wages $15 an hour
but the National Restaurant
Association says it would hurt job
creation. Seepage 6.

6. Twitter, Times
websites hacked
After-effects plague The New York
Times after a Tuesday afternoon
attack on its website. See page 2.

7. Scientists find clue
to memory loss
Researchers discover that a gene in
part of the brain's memory center
starts producing less of a key
protein. Seepage 4.

8. At least 80 die
in Iraq violence
Car bomb blasts and other explo-
sions go through Shiite districts in
Baghdad. Seepage 5.

9. Coral spawning
in Florida Keys
Coral spawning occurs in August
and September after the full moon.
See page 3.

10. Venus Williams
runs out of solutions
The two-time champion tried to
dig herself out after a poor start,
but lost a 3rd-set tiebreaker to
56th-ranked Zheng Jie of China.
See Sports page 4.


M' IN






h e tj re www. sunnewspapers. net
THURSDAY AUGUST 29, 2013



Hasan sentence: Death


Gunman killed 13, wounded more than 30 at Fort Hood in 2009


By MICHAEL GRACZYK
and NOMAAN MERCHANT
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
FORT HOOD, Texas- A
military jury on Wednesday
sentenced Maj. Nidal Hasan
to death for the 2009 shoot-
ing rampage at Fort Hood,
delivering the only punish-
ment the Army believed fit for
an attack on fellow unarmed
soldiers. The sentence also
was one that Hasan appeared
to seek in a self-proclaimed


effort to become a martyr.
The American-born
Muslim, who has said he
acted to protect Islamic insur-
gents abroad from American
aggression, never denied
killing 13 people and wound-
ing more than 30 others at
the Texas military base. In
opening statements, he told
jurors that evidence would
show he was the shooter and
described himself as a soldier
who had "switched sides."
The same jurors who


convicted Hasan last week
needed to agree unanimously
on a death sentence on
Wednesday, though the
42-year-old
faced a mini-
mum sentence
of life in prison.
Kathy Platoni,
an Army reserv-
ist who still
struggles with
images of Capt.
HASAN John Gaffaney
bleeding to death at her feet,


said she was surprised by the
verdict but not opposed to
the punishment.
"What Nidal Hasan wanted
was to be a martyr and
so many of the (victims')
families had spoken to the
issue of not giving him what
he wants because this is his
own personal holy war," said
Platoni, who watched most
of the trial from inside the
courtroom.
"But on the other hand, this
HASAN 14


AP PHOTOS


People gather around the reflecting pool to listen to the speakers during the March on Washington in Washington, Wednesday.


MLK's

By SUZANNE GAMBOA
and NANCY BENAC
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

WASHINGTON -
Standing on hallowed
ground of the civil rights
movement, President
Barack Obama chal-
lenged new generations
Wednesday to seize the
cause of racial equality
and honor the "glorious
patriots" who marched
a half century ago to the
very steps from which
Rev. Martin Luther King
spoke during the March
on Washington.
In a moment rich with
history and symbol-
ism, tens of thousands
of Americans of all


dream inspires new march


backgrounds and colors
thronged to the National
Mall to join the nation's
first black president and
civil rights pioneers in
marking the 50th an-
niversary of King's "I
Have a Dream" speech.
Obama urged each
of them to become a
modern-day marcher
for economic justice and
racial harmony.
"The arc of the moral
universe may bend to-
ward justice but it doesn't
bend on its own," Obama
said, in an allusion to
King's own message.
His speech was the
culmination of daylong
celebration of King's
MARCH 14


In this Aug. 28,1963, file photo, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head
of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses
marchers during his"I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln
Memorial in Washington.


President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama wave as they depart the
Let Freedom Ring ceremony at the Lincoln Memorial Wednesday, in Washington, to
commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and
Freedom.


Fears of Western strike on


Syria s

By ALBERT AJI
and RYAN LUCAS
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
DAMASCUS, Syria -
Fears of a possible U.S.
strike against Syria's
regime over an alleged
chemical weapons attack
rippled across the region
Wednesday, as about
6,000 Syrians fled to
neighboring Lebanon
in a 24-hour period and
Israelis scrambled for gas
masks in case Damascus


;pread in Mideast


retaliates against them.
U.N. chief Ban Ki-
moon pleaded for more
time for diplomacy and
to allow U.N. investiga-
tors to complete their
work. The experts,
wearing flak jackets and
helmets, collected blood
and urine samples from
victims during a visit to
at least one of the areas
hit in last week's attack.
Seven days after
chemical weapons were
purportedly unleashed


on rebel-held suburbs
of the Syrian capital,
momentum grew toward
Western military action
against President Bashar
Assad's regime. At the
same time, Syria's chief
allies, Russia and Iran,
warned of dire conse-
quences for the region if
any armed intervention
is undertaken.
U.S. leaders, includ-
ing Vice President Joe
SYRIA 14


Survivors

retell horrors


of gas attack

By ZEINA KARAM and BASSEM MROUE
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
BEIRUT -The early-morning barrage
against rebel-held areas around the Syrian
capital immediately seemed different this
time: The rockets made a strange, whistling
noise.
Seconds after one hit near his home
west of Damascus, Qusai Zakarya says,
he couldn't breathe, and he desperately





-Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


GROVELAND, Calif.
(AP) Firefighters
battling the giant
wildfire burning in the
Sierra Nevada added a
California National Guard
Predator drone to their
arsenal Wednesday to
give them almost imme-
diate views of any portion
of the flames chewing
through rugged forests
in and around Yosemite
National Park.
The MQ-1 unmanned
aircraft being remotely
piloted hundreds of miles
away quickly alerted fire
bosses to a new flare-up
they otherwise wouldn't
have immediately seen.
"They're piping what
they're seeing directly to
the incident commander,
and he's seeing it in real
time over a computer
network," said National
Guard Lt. Col. Tom
Keegan.
Previously ground
commanders relied on
helicopters that needed
to refuel every two hours.
The 12-day-old Rim
Fire continued to grow,
expanding to 292 square
miles, and containment
remained at 23 percent.
But increasingly confi-
dent fire officials said
they expect to fully sur-
round it in three weeks,
although it will burn for
much longer than that.
"It's looking better
every day," said incident


Firefighter Brandon Wenger stands along Highway
monitoring a backburn during the Rim Fire near Y
National Park, Calif., on Tuesday.


spokesman Glen Stratton.
While unmanned
aircraft have mapped past
fires, use of the Predator
will be the longest sus-
tained mission by a drone
in California to broadcast
information to firefighters
in real time.
The plane, the size of a
small Cessna, will remain
over the burn zone for
up to 22 hours at a time,
allowing fire commanders
to monitor fire activity,
determine the fire's
direction of movement,
the extent of containment
and confirm new fires
ignited by lightning or
flying embers.
The drone is being
flown by the 163rd Wing
of the California National
Guard at March Air
Reserve Base in Riverside


and is operating
Victorville Airpo
in Southern Cal
It generally flew
unpopulated ar
300-mile flight t
Fire. Outside thi
it will be escorted
manned aircraft
Officials were
point out the in
being used only
the effort to con
fire.
In 2009 a NAS
Predator equipp
an infrared ima:
sensor helped tl
Forest Service a,
damage from a
Angeles Nationa
In 2008, a drone
of detecting hot
helped firefightF
movement of a
wildfires stretch


Southern California's Lake
Arrowhead to San Diego.
The Rim Fire started
Aug. 17 and quickly
exploded in size, becom-
ing one of the 10 largest
California wildfires on
record. Its progression
slowed earlier this week
when it moved from parts
of the forest with thick
underbrush that had
not burned in nearly a
century to areas that had
AP PHOTO seen fire in the past two
decades.
S120 while But it will burn for
osemite months, possibly until
California's dry season
ends this fall.
from "My prediction is it
)rt, both will burn until we see
ifornia. rain," said Hugh Safford,
Over a regional ecologist with
eas on its the U.S. Forest Service.
o the Rim That means the smoke
e fire area could continue to foul
ed by a air north of Yosemite in
t. the Lake Tahoe basin and
careful to neighboring Nevada, al-
iages are though residents received
to aid in something of a reprieve
ltain the Wednesday when for the
first time in three days
iA blue sky was sometimes
)ed with visible through the haze.
going The air quality index
he U.S. in the Reno area still had
ssess improved only to the
fire in "unhealthy" level and in
al Forest. Douglas County, Nev.,
capable school children were kept
spots indoors again when the
ers assess index registered in the
series of "hazardous" category
ring from Wednesday morning.


NYPD labels mosques as terror groups


NEW YORK (AP) -
The New York Police
Department has secretly
labeled entire mosques
as terrorist organizations,
a designation that allows
police to use informants
to record sermons and
spy on imams, often
without specific evidence
of criminal wrongdoing.
Designating an entire
mosque as a terrorism
enterprise means that
anyone who attends
prayer services there is
a potential subject of an
investigation and fair
game for surveillance.
Since the 9/11 attacks,
the NYPD has opened at
least a dozen "terrorism
enterprise investiga-
tions" into mosques,
according to interviews
and confidential police
documents. The TEI, as
it is known, is a police
tool intended to help
investigate terrorist cells
and the like.
Many TEIs stretch for
years, allowing surveil-
lance to continue even


though the NYPD has
never criminally charged
a mosque or Islamic
organization with
operating as a terrorism
enterprise.
The documents
show in detail how, in
its hunt for terrorists,
the NYPD investigated
countless innocent New
York Muslims and put
information about them
in secret police files. As
a tactic, opening an en-
terprise investigation on
a mosque is so poten-
tially invasive that while
the NYPD conducted at
least a dozen, the FBI
never did one, accord-
ing to interviews with
federal law enforcement
officials.
The strategy has al-
lowed the NYPD to send
undercover officers into
mosques and attempt to
plant informants on the
boards of mosques and
at least one prominent
Arab-American group
in Brooklyn, whose
executive director has


worked with city officials,
including Bill de Blasio, a
front-runner for mayor.
De Blasio said
Wednesday on Twitter
that he was "deeply
troubled NYPD has
labelled entire mosques
& Muslim orgs terror
groups with seemingly
no leads. Security AND
liberty make us strong."
The revelations about
the NYPD's massive
spying operations are in
documents recently ob-
tained by The Associated
Press and part of a new
book, "Enemies Within:
Inside the NYPD's Secret
Spying Unit and bin
Laden's Final Plot Against
America." The book by
AP reporters Matt Apuzzo
and Adam Goldman is
based on hundreds of
previously unpublished
police files and inter-
views with current and
former NYPD, CIA and
FBI officials.
The disclosures come
as the NYPD is fighting
off lawsuits accusing


it of engaging in racial
profiling while combat-
ing crime. Earlier this
month, a judge ruled that
the department's use of
the stop-and-frisk tactic
was unconstitutional.
The American Civil
Liberties Union and two
other groups have sued,
saying the Muslim spying
programs are unconstitu-
tional and make Muslims
afraid to practice their
faith without police
scrutiny.
Both Mayor Mike
Bloomberg and Police
Commissioner Raymond
Kelly have denied those
accusations. Speaking
Wednesday on MSNBC's
Morning Joe, Kelly
reminded people that his
intelligence-gathering
programs began in the
wake of 9/11.
"We follow leads wher-
ever they take us," Kelly
said. "We're not intimi-
dated as to wherever that
lead takes us. And we're
doing that to protect the
people of New York City."


I NATION


California launches drone


to aid wildfire battle


base model was rated at
26 mpg, according to the
Environmental Protection
Agency's website. Toyota's
2014 base Camry gets a
combined 28 mpg, ac-
cording to the EPA.


New York Times,
Twitter websites
have problems
(Washington Post) -
The New York Times is
still feeling the effects of a
Tuesday afternoon attack
on its website. The hack
was claimed by a group
known as the Syrian
Electronic Army, which
also asserted responsibil-
ity for a similar attack on
the social networking site
Twitter.
Tuesday's intrusions
were the most sophis-
ticated in a series of
attacks on high-profile
Western media organi-
zations, including The
Washington Post and The
Associated Press. The
hackers use the attacks to
broadcast their support of
Syrian President Bashar
al-Assad, although the
group has never been
found to have any official
ties to his regime.
Little is known about
the group, which appears
to be made up of mostly
younger people. To date,
no person has ever been
arrested for being a
member.

More Americans
are living alone,
report finds
LOS ANGELES (La
Times) A growing share
of Americans live alone,
despite the economic
woes lingering after the
recession, a new report
from the U.S. Census
Bureau shows.
People living alone
made up more than
27 percent of American
households last year a
marked increase over the
17 percent who did so in
1970.
"The rise of living
alone is the greatest
social change of the
last 50 years," said Eric
Klinenberg, author
of "Going Solo: The
Extraordinary Rise
and Surprising Appeal
of Living Alone." The
Census Bureau report
underscores that despite
the costs, "Americans will
pay a premium to have
a place of their own," he
said.
Researchers offered
several reasons for the
long-standing trend:
Americans are wait-
ing until later in life to
marry, stretching their
years of singlehood. As a
result, married couples
have become much less
common, dropping from
71 percent to 49 percent
of American households
between 1970 and 2012,
the new report shows.
Elderly people are also
spending more years
alone. "Adults have been
able to live longer, and
as they're healthier, they
can stay in their own
homes instead of moving
in with a family member"
or heading to a nursing
home, said Jonathan
Vespa, one of the demog-
raphers who wrote the
report.
GM boosts
Chevrolet Malibu
fuel economy
SOUTHFIELD, Mich.
(Bloomberg) General
Motors Co., updating the
Chevrolet Malibu after
disappointing sales, said
the 2014 model's esti-
mated fuel economy for
city and highway driving
will increase 12 percent,
beating the Toyota Camry.
The base 2014 Malibu,
which reaches U.S. show-
rooms later this year, will
get 29 miles per gallon in
combined city and high-
way use, Detroit-based
GM said Wednesday in
a statement. The 2013


pen if topoisomerases are
impaired," Zylka said. "We
think there are probably
other drugs or chemicals in
the environment that can
have this same effect. We
believe this is just the tip of
the iceberg..."


Pending sales of
existing homes
drops in July
WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) Fewer
Americans signed
contracts in July to buy
previously owned homes,
a sign that rising mort-
gage rates are starting to
slow momentum in the
housing market.
The index of pending
home sales dropped
1.3 percent, the most
this year, after a
0.4 percent decrease in
June, figures from the
National Association of
Realtors showed today in
Washington. Economists
forecast no change in the
gauge from the month
before, according to a
median estimate in a
Bloomberg survey.
Mortgage rates at a
two-year high and a lim-
ited number of existing
homes are pushing some
prospective buyers out of
the market, threatening
to slow the pace of the
recovery in real estate.

Zeta-Jones and
Douglas 'taking
some time apart'
NEWYORK (AP)-A
spokeswoman for
Catherine Zeta-Jones says
the actress and her hus-
band, Michael Douglas,
"are taking some time
apart to evaluate and
work on their marriage."
Publicist Cece Yorke
said in an email to The
Associated Press on
Wednesday that there
would be no further
comment. A phone call
to a representative for
Douglas wasn't immedi-
ately returned.
People magazine, citing
unnamed sources, first
reported that Zeta-Jones
and Douglas had decided
to spend time apart.
Zeta-Jones, 43, and
Douglas, 68, were mar-
ried in 2000. They have
two children. He battled
throat cancer in 2010
and made headlines this
summer when he spoke
out about one potential
cause, oral sex.

Suspected autism
trigger found in
brain enzymes
MINNEAPOLIS
(Bloomberg) Some cases
of autism may be related
to damage in a key set of
enzymes that are critical
during brain growth and
development, possibly
helping narrow the search
for causes of the condition,
researchers said.
The enzymes known
as topoisomerases work
like scissors and glue
when brain cells known as
neurons are being copied or
expressed, said Mark Zylka,
an associate professor in
the Neuroscience Center
at the University of North
Carolina School of Medicine
in Chapel Hill. When studies
linked mutations in the
enzymes to some patients
with autism last year, the
researchers sought to
determine what exact effect
they had on the brain.
The study found the
enzymes are essential for
the proper functioning
of some extremely long
genes, including dozens of
those that have gone awry
in patients with autism,
Zylka said. The researchers
inhibited the enzymes with
a generic cancer medicine
and found they effectively
silenced about 50 genes
linked to autism, accord-
ing to the study published
Wednesday in the journal
Nature.
"Our study shows the
magnitude of what can hap-










Coral spawning at marine sanctuary


KEY LARGO (AP) -
Divers in the Florida
Keys National Marine
Sanctuary have become
subsea voyeurs of sorts,
witnessing an annual
reproductive phenom-
enon on coral reefs.
Coral spawning occurs
in August and September
a few days after the full
moon. Several dive shops
in the Keys coordinate
nighttime excursions to
witness the spectacle.
"It's like a snowstorm
with gravity reversed and
the snowflakes are minia-
ture peas," said Chris
Gug, a Fort Lauderdale-
based underwater pho-
tographer who witnessed
coral spawning off Key
Largo late Tuesday night.
"It's one of the marvels of
the natural world."


Gametes, or reproduc-
tive cells, are released in
a synchronized mass-
spawning exchange,
enabling eggs and sperm
to enter the water over a
broad geographic area.
When egg and sperm
unite, newly formed
larvae or planulae -
can settle to the bottom
to grow into polyps and
potentially form coral
colonies.
Besides visiting
divers, coral scientists
are descending on Keys
reefs to collect gametes
and transport them to
shoreside laboratories for
research projects.
Officials from the Keys-
based Coral Restoration
Foundation have
partnered with NOAA
Fisheries researchers


to test fertilization of
selective gametes in an
effort to breed coral that
are more resistant to the
impacts of global warm-
ing and disease.
"Sexual reproduction
is a long term goal of our
coral restoration plan,"
said CRF president Ken
Nedimyer. "The idea
is to put the right cor-
als together to ensure
their survival and their
ability to successfully
reproduce."
The CRF/NOAA team
not only collected spawn
from the wild, they also
transported several
threatened staghorn cor-
als to their laboratory
where they observed the
spawning process and
collected gametes for
research.


Insurers curbing costs


as health care costs rise


MIAMI (AP)-As health
care costs rise in Florida,
insurers and hospitals
vested in the success of the
Affordable Care Act, are
coming up with new ways
to cut costs from buying
services in bulk and pilot-
ing programs to lowering
hospital readmission rates
and limiting the number
of doctors within a plan's
network.
Florida's health care
costs are rising an aver-
age of 6.9 percent a year,
higher than the national
average of 6.5 percent.
Health care expenditures
per capital in the state are
$7,156 compared to the
national average of $6,815
during that same time
period, according to the
nonpartisan Kaiser Family
Foundation. Reining in
health care costs, which
have been growing far
faster than inflation and
wages, will be crucial to the
long-term success of the
Affordable Care Act.
President Barack Obama
has repeatedly stressed
that health care reforms
will give more people
access to affordable cover-
age no matter their age,
income or medical history.
Insurers will have to offer


more benefits in some
cases and are restricted
in how much they can
charge older, sicker people.
Insurers are also banned
from turning away those
with pre-existing condi-
tions. But if the federal
health law is successful, it
will mean more customers
for insurers and more pay-
ing patients for hospitals,
giving them more incen-
tive to experiment with
different ways of paying
doctors and delivering care
in an industry with already
shrinking profit margins.
Experts anticipate many
insurers will narrow the
number of doctors in a
certain network to curb
costs.
"In some of these plans
on the exchange they
will go with very skinny
networks because it's an
easy way to control where
individuals are headed
in terms of visitation,"
said Ray Smithberger,
general manager in charge
of Cigna Individual and
Family Plans. Cigna will
offer several plans through
Florida's federally-run
health exchange.
Starting in October, con-
sumers shopping on the
new exchange will be able


to choose from bronze,
silver, gold, platinum and
catastrophic plans that
offer a range of premiums,
deductibles and co-pays
depending on variables
such as how many doctors
you want included in your
network.
That's why Smithberger
says it's important that
consumers look at more
than the bottom line when
choosing plans. It may be
the lowest priced plan, but
it may have a very high
deductible or only offer a
limited number of doctors.
Insurers are also
increasingly relying on
patient-centered medical
homes where doctors
try to care more for all of
a patient's health needs
instead of just treating
whatever condition led to
a doctor's visit that day.
They frequently com-
municate with patients
between visits and often
do things like work out
exercise plans with the pa-
tient or follow-up to make
sure they are complying
with prescriptions. The
primary care doctor also
acts as the central point of
communication between
specialists, nutritionists
and others.


SU N
www.yoursun.com

HEALTH EXPO
SPONSORED BY







EXPO TABLES

AVAILABLE
Contact
Dave Powell: 941-258-9522







Saturday, October 19, 2013
9:OOAM-2:OOPM

Cultural Center of Charlotte County
2280 Aaron St., Port Charlotte

SSeminars By Local Physicians Medical Screenings
SFitness Food and Nutrition Health Children's Health
Wellness Senior Care Health Insurance
SMany More Fun Activities!






S-,
;i I


AP PHOTO


In this Tuesday photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, Annette Robertson photographs
corals discharging gametes in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla.
During the first few days after full moons in August and September corals in the Florida Keys go
through an annual ritual where reproductive cells are released in a synchronized mass-spawning
exchange, enabling eggs and sperm to enter the water over a broad geographic area.



3rd Florida mayor arrested

within the past month


MIAMI (AP) -The
mayor of Homestead
was hauled away from
his home Wednesday in
handcuffs on corruption
charges, including accept-
ing illegal compensation,
becoming the third mayor
of a Miami-Dade County
city to be arrested in the
past month.
Steve Bateman, 58, was
secretly being paid $125
an hour as a consultant
by a health care company
seeking city and county
approval for a sewer con-
nection so it could build
a clinic in Homestead,
said Miami-Dade State
Attorney Katherine
Femandez Rundle.
Bateman lobbied his
own city officials and


County Mayor Carlos
Gimenez without disclos-
ing his financial arrange-
ment with Community
Health Care of South
Florida Inc., a non-profit
firm known as CHI, said
Fernandez Rundle.
"It's another very sad day
for the people of Miami-
Dade County," Fernandez
Rundle told reporters. "At
no time did Bateman dis-
close that these contacts
were done for a private
employer. That should
have been done."
All told, Bateman was
paid $3,625 by CHI for
his work, although the
company had authorized
as much as $120,000 in
payments for a year of
work, according to an


arrest affidavit. Bateman
was jailed on $21,500 bail
but scheduled for release
laterWednesday. He is
charged with two felonies
for accepting illegal
compensation as well as
several misdemeanors,
including unregistered
lobbying.
His attorney, Ben
Kuehne, said Bateman was
"shocked by his sudden
and unexpected arrest."
"He looks forward to
his vindication. He has
served the community for
many years in an honest,
dependable manner,"
Kuehne added in an email.
"He has honestly earned
every dollar he received
through hard work and
dedication to the public."


The joy of tailgating

Join Arian Foster of the Houston Texans
to kick off football season with good eats,
great gear and smart tailgating tips.


o The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


WIRE Page 3


www.sunnewspapers.net


STATE NEWS






Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE


Age-related forgetfulness tied to brain protein
NEWYORK cells and showed that author and neurologist Translational Medicine. a gene that expressed
Bloomberg) Age- inhibiting it in mice at Columbia University The researchers took RbAp48, which declines
elated forgetfulness made the animals for- in New York. The mouse the postmortem brains in function as brains
lay be due to a getful while raising the studies show that that of eight people ages 33 age.
efficiency of a brain protein improved their too little of the protein to 88 who were disease- When the researchers
rotein that helps form memories. That sug- is causing memory loss, free, and examined the suppressed that gene ir
memories, and targeting gests that age-related he said. function of 17 genes healthy young mice, the
he gene that produces memory loss may be The findings also in a part of the hip- mice performed worse
he protein could lead reversible, researchers confirm that age-related pocampus, an area that on object recognition


to new therapies for
old people, research
showed.
Scientists identified
the protein, called
RbAp48, in human brain


HASAN
FROM PAGE 1

is from the bottom of my
heart, he doesn't deserve
to live," she said. "I don't
know how long it takes
for a death sentence to
be carried out, but the
world will be a better
place without him."
Hasan had no visible
reaction when the verdict
was read, staring first at
the jury forewoman and
then at the judge. Some
victims' relatives were



MARCH
FROM PAGE 1

legacy that began with
marchers walking the
streets of Washington
behind a replica of the
transit bus that Rosa
Parks once rode when
she refused to give up
her seat to a white man.
At precisely 3 p.m.,
members of the King
family tolled a bell to
echo King's call 50 years
earlier to "let freedom
ring." It was the same
bell that once hung in
the 16th Street Baptist
Church in Birmingham,
Ala., where four black
girls were killed when a
bomb planted by a white
supremacist exploded in
1963.
Georgia Rep. John
Lewis, a former free-
dom rider and the sole
survivor of the main
organizers of the 1963
march, recounted the
civil rights struggles of
his youth and exhorted



SYRIA
FROM PAGE 1

Biden, have charged
that Assad's government
was behind the Aug.
21 attack that Doctors
Without Borders says
killed at least 355 people.
The White House says
it's planning a possible
military response while
seeking support from
international partners.
The U.S. has not pre-
sented concrete proof of
Syrian regime involve-
ment in the attack, and
U.N. inspectors have not
endorsed the allega-
tions, although the U.N.


FROM PAGE 1

punched himself in the
chest to get air.
Meanwhile, in rebel-held
areas east of Damascus,
hundreds of suffocating,
twitching victims were
flooding into makeshift
hospitals following a simi-
lar rocket barrage. Others
were later found dead in
their homes, towels still on
their faces from their last
moments trying to protect
themselves.
In a series of interviews
with The Associated Press
after the suspected poison-
gas attack on Aug. 21,
witnesses, survivors and
doctors described scenes
of horror they say will
haunt them forever.
Activists and the group
Doctors Without Borders
say at least 355 people


said.
"All of us are living
longer, and we want to
stay engaged in a cogni-
tively complex world,"
said Scott Small, a study

in the courtroom but
also showed no reaction,
which the judge had
warned against before
the verdict.
Officials said Hasan
will be taken back to
a county jail and then
transported on the first
available military flight
to the military prison
at Fort Leavenworth in
Kansas. The timing on
the flight wasn't immedi-
ately clear.
Hasan could become
the first American
soldier executed in more
than half a century. But

American to "keep the
faith and keep our eyes
on the prize."
The throngs assem-
bled in soggy weather at
the Lincoln Memorial,
where King, with soar-
ing, rhythmic oratory
and a steely counte-
nance, had pleaded
with Americans to come
together to stomp out
racism and create a land
of opportunity for all.
White and black, they
came this time to recall
history and live it.
"My parents did their
fair share and I feel like
we have to keep the
fight alive," said Frantz
Walker, a honey sales-
man from Baltimore
who is black. "This is
hands-on history."
Kevin Keefe, a Navy
lawyer who is white, said
he still tears up when he
hears King's speech.
"What happened 50
years ago was huge," he
said, adding that there's
still progress to be made
on economic inequality
and other problems.


envoy to Syria, Lakhdar
Brahimi, said evidence
suggests some kind of
"substance" was used
that killed hundreds.
Two senior Obama
administration officials
said U.S. intelligence
agencies are drawing up
a report laying out the
evidence against Assad's
government. The clas-
sified version would be
sent to key members of
Congress and a declas-
sified version would be
made public.
One of the officials
said the administration
is considering more than
a single set of military
strikes and "the options
are not limited just to

died in the attack that
has provoked interna-
tional condemnation and
shocked a world that had
grown largely numb to
the carnage of Syria's civil
war, which has killed more
than 100,000 people in 2 1/2
years. Fueling the outrage
were online videos that
showed scores of children
killed in the attack.
Convinced that
President Bashar Assad's
regime was responsible
for the attack a charge
Syrian officials strongly
deny- the U.S. and its
allies are now hurtling
toward military action,
though they have not yet
presented concrete proof.
U.N. chemical weapons
experts this week took
biological samples from
several victims a step
U.S. officials said came too
late. But they are not seek-
ing to answer the question
of who was responsible for


memory loss is different
from the deficits seen
in Alzheimer's disease.
The research was
published Wednesday
in the journal Science

because the military
justice system requires a
lengthy appeals process,
years or even decades
could pass before he is
put to death.
In his final plea for
a rare military death
sentence, the lead
prosecutor assured
jurors earlier Wednesday
that Hasan would "never
be a martyr" despite his
attempt to tie the attack
to religion.
"He is a criminal. He is
a cold-blooded murder-
er," Col. Mike Mulligan
said. "This is not his gift


is involved in memory.
That section, called the
dentate gyrus, has been
shown before to change
with age. The strongest
changes were found in

to God. This is his debt
to society. This is the
cost of his murderous
rampage."
For nearly four years,
the federal government
has sought to execute
Hasan, believing that
any sentence short of a
lethal injection would
deny justice to the
families of the dead and
the survivors who had
believed they were safe
behind the gates of Fort
Hood, a sprawling Army
post about 70 miles
north of Austin.
And for just as long,


President Barack Obama speaks on the steps of the I
Memorial to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Wednes
Washington.
Two former presidents, efforts had hell
Bill Clinton and Jimmy just black Amer
Carter, spoke of King's but "In truth, h
legacy and of prob- to free all peop
lems still to overcome. Still, Carter li
"This march, and string of current
that speech, changed that he said wo
America," Clinton de- spurred King tc
dared, remembering the in this day, incl
impact on the world and proliferation of
himself as a young man. stand-your-gro
"They opened minds, a Supreme Cou
they melted hearts and striking down p
they moved millions the Voting Righ
including a 17-year-old and high rates (
boy watching alone in ness among bla
his home in Arkansas." Oprah Winfre
Carter said King's the celebrity co


one day" of assault.
"If there is action
taken, it must be clearly
defined what the objec-
tive is and why" and
based on "clear facts,"
the senior administration
official said on condition
of anonymity because
he wasn't authorized to
discuss internal delibera-
tions publicly.
President Barack
Obama is weighing a
limited response that
focuses on punishing
the Syrian government
for violating interna-
tional agreements that
bar the use of chemical
weapons. Any U.S.
military action, officials
say, would not be aimed

the attack, just whether
chemical agents were
involved.
Witnesses interviewed
by the AP say they can't
prove it but strongly
believe government forces
were responsible, saying
that it is consistent with
the nature of Assad's
regime and that nobody
else had the capability to
fire such weapons.
The U.S. administration,
meanwhile, is said to be
preparing a report for key
members of Congress
laying out the evidence
against the Assad govem-
ment. A declassified
version was to be released
to the public, but so far
that has not happened.
"To suggest that the
rebels did it is simply
ridiculous.... Why would
they hit themselves with
chemicals?" asked Ammar,
30, a resident who said he
miraculously survived the


and water maze tests.
When the researchers
allowed the gene to go
back to normal func-
tion, the mice's memory
improved.

Hasan seemed content
to go to the death cham-
ber for his beliefs. He
fired his own attorneys
to represent himself,
barely put up a defense
during a three-week
trial and made almost
no effort to have his life
spared.
Mulligan reminded
the jury that Hasan was
a trained doctor yet
opened fire on defense-
less comrades. Hasan
"only dealt death," the
prosecutor said, so the
only appropriate sen-
tence was death.


recalled watching the
march as a 9-year-old
girl and wishing she
could be there to see a
young man who "was
able to force an entire
country to wake up,
to look at itself and to
eventually change."
"It's an opportunity
today to recall where
AP PHOTO we once were in this
nation," she said.
.incoln Obama used his
the 1963 address to pay tribute
sday in to the marchers of 1963
and that era the
)ed not maids, laborers, students
ricans, and more who came
e helped from ordinary ranks to
le." engage "on the battle-
sted a field of justice" and
t events he implored Americans
uld have not to dismiss what they
Action accomplished.
uding the "To dismiss the mag-
guns and nitude of this progress,
und laws, to suggest as some
rt ruling sometimes do that
)arts of little has changed, that
ts Act, dishonors the courage,
of jobless- the sacrifice, of those
icks. who paid the price to
y, leading march in those years,"
ntingent, Obama said.


at toppling the Assad
regime or vastly altering
the course of Syria's civil
war, which has already
claimed 100,000 dead.
As the U.S., France
and Britain push for
military action, the
U.N. secretary-general
urged restraint to give
U.N. inspectors time to
finish their investigation,
which began Monday.
"Let them conclude ...
their work for four days
and then we will have
to analyze scientifically"
their findings and send
a report to the U.N.
Security Council, Ban
said. The U.N. said the
analysis would be done
"as quickly as possible."


barrage on Moadamiyeh,
where 80 people were
killed. He declined to give
his full name because he
was afraid for his life.
The rocket assaults came
around the same time on
two suburbs on opposite
sides of the capital:
Moadamiyeh to the west
and several districts to the
east, including Zamalka,
Ein Tarma and Arbeen.
The two areas are around
10 miles apart.
Ammar said he was
awakened by shelling
around 5 a.m., just before
dawn prayers, when he
heard a screeching sound
unlike anything he had
heard before, followed
by the sound of people
screaming on Rawda street
below his apartment. Once
outside, he said, he saw
a gas with a faint green
color. It "stung my eyes like
needles."
"I ran out to see what


Syria's Ambassador
to the U.N., Bashar
Ja'afari, said he sent Ban
a letter demanding that
the inspectors extend
their investigation to
what he described as
three chemical weapons
attacks against Syrian
soldiers in the Damascus
suburbs. He said the
attacks occurred on
Aug. 22, 24, and 25, and
that dozens of Syrian
soldiers are currently be-
ing treated for inhaling
nerve gases.
Ja'afari also blamed
the rebels for any
chemical weapons at-
tack, saying "the Syrian
government is innocent
of these allegations."

was going on and saw
people in various stages
of suffocation and convul-
sions. I tried to help, but
then my legs buckled and I
fell to the ground," he said.
Ammar woke up at a
makeshift hospital, previ-
ously a Red Crescent
center, where he said he
spent five days get-
ting water, oxygen and
injections of atropine,
which can be used to
counteract the effects of
nerve gases.
A week later, Ammar
said he has not fully
recovered. He suffers bouts
of cold sweats, exhaustion,
hallucinations and a runny
nose. Worst of all, he said,
were the nightmares.
"I can't sleep anymore.
I keep seeing the people
who died, the scenes from
the hospital of people
twitching and foaming. I
can never forget that," said
Ammar.


(]
r

d
p

tl
tl


Pa. clown couple
ties the knot,
no foolin'
LANCASTER, Pa. (AP)
- If the key to a long
marriage is laughter,
these clowns are set.
Billy Tedeski and
Patty Kulwicki tied
the knot Friday at an
annual clown festival in
central Pennsylvania.
Reports say Kulwicki
literally reeled
Tedeski in to start the
ceremony a bit the
Pittsburgh couple had
performed at Clownfest
two years ago.
Tedeski wore a fake
nose, black lipstick and
full clown regalia as he
exchanged vows with
Kulwicki at the festival
in Lancaster. The bride
wore the same dress
she'd used in the skit
two years ago, plus a
lace headband to go
along with her flame-
red wig.
Guests got in on the
act and so did the offi-
ciant, a fellow clown.


s



3
te


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


ALMANAC

Today is Thursday, Aug. 29,
the 241st day of 2013. There are
124 days left in the year.
Today in history
On August 29,1943, responding
to a clampdown by Nazi occupiers
during World War II, Denmark
managed to scuttle most of its
naval ships.
On this date
In 1533, the last Incan King of
Peru, Atahualpa, was executed
on orders of Spanish conqueror
Francisco Pizarro.
In 1862, the Bureau of
Engraving and Printing began
operations at the United States
Treasury.
In 1877, the second president
of The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-Day Saints, Brigham
Young, died in Salt Lake City at
age 76.
In 1944,15,000 American
troops marched down the
Champs Elysees in Paris as the
French capital continued to
celebrate its liberation from the
Nazis.
In 1953, an early version of
the animated cartoon character
Speedy Gonzales made his debut
in the Warner Bros. cartoon "Cat-
Tails for Two."
In 1957, the Senate gave final
congressional approval to a Civil
Rights Act after South Carolina
Sen. Strom Thurmond, then a
Democrat, ended a filibuster that
had lasted 24 hours.
In 1958, pop superstar Michael
Jackson was born in Gary, Ind.
In 1972, swimmer Mark Spitz
of the United States won the
third of his seven gold medals at
the Munich Olympics, finishing
first in the 200-meter freestyle.
In 1982, Academy Award-
winning actress Ingrid Bergman
died in London on her 67th
birthday.
In 1987, Academy Award-
winning actor Lee Marvin died in
Tucson, Ariz., at age 63.
In 2005, Hurricane Katrina hit
the Gulf Coast near Buras, La.,
bringing floods that devastated
New Orleans. More than 1,800
people in the region died.
Today's birthdays
Actress Betty Lynn (TV: "The
Andy Griffith Show") is 87. Movie
director William Friedkin is 78.
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., is 77.
Actor Elliott Gould is 75. Movie
director Joel Schumacher is
74. Former White House Press
Secretary James Brady is 73.
TV personality Robin Leach is
72. Actor Ray Wise is 66. Actress
Deborah Van Valkenburgh is
61. Dancer-choreographer Mark
Morris is 57. Country musician
Dan Truman (Diamond Rio) is
57. Actress Rebecca DeMornay
is 54. Singer Me'Shell
NdegeOcello is 44. Rhythm-
and-blues singer Carl Martin
(Shai) is 43. Actress Carla
Gugino is 42. Rock musician
Kyle Cook (Matchbox Twenty)
is 38. Actor John Hensley is 36.
Rock musician David Desrosiers
(Simple Plan) is 33. Rapper A+
is 31. Actress Jennifer Landon
is 30. Actor Jeffrey Licon is 28.
Actress-singer Lea Michele (TV:
"Glee") is 27. Rock singer Liam
Payne (One Direction) is 20.


v


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is

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0


FROM PAGE ONE






The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013 WORLD NEWS www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 5


WORLD

Tepco has
Fukushima water
disposal problem
TOKYO (Bloomberg)
- Tokyo Electric Power
Co. has accumulated the
largest pool of radioactive
water in the history of
nuclear accidents. The
utility must now decide
what to do with it: dump
it in the ocean, let it
evaporate into the air, or
both.
The more than 330,000
metric tons of water
with varying levels of
toxicity is stored in pits,
basements and hundreds
of tanks at the wrecked
Fukushima nuclear plant.
The government said this
week it will take a bigger
role in staunching the
toxic outflow that's grown
to 40 times the volume
accumulated in the
atomic disaster at Three
Mile Island in the U.S.
Processing and dispos-
ing of the water, enough
to fill a very large crude
oil tanker or 132 Olympic-
size swimming pools, will
be one of the most chal-
lenging engineering tasks
of our generation, former
nuclear engineer Michael
Friedlander said.

Militants in
Afghanistan
launch attacks
KABUL, Afghanistan
(LA Times) NATO
forces were struck by
three attacks within 24
hours across Afghanistan,
officials said Wednesday,
as the Taliban redoubled
efforts to drive foreign
combat troops out of the
country ahead of their
planned withdrawal at
the end of 2014.
In recent months,
NATO forces have seen
fewer fatalities as more
foreign troops withdraw
and Afghan forces assume
more responsibility for
the country's security.
But analysts say militants
continue to view attacks
on international coalition
troops as their most effec-
tive path to power.
In the most coordi-
nated attack of the day, a
suicide bomber in eastern
Ghazni province detonat-
ed his vehicle Wednesday
afternoon in the vicinity
of a base shared by Polish
and Afghan forces, coali-
tion spokeswoman Lt.
Col. LaTondra Kinley said.

Egypt police arrest
Brotherhood
members' relatives
CAIRO (AP) Egyptian
authorities detained more
than 60 people associ-
ated with the Muslim
Brotherhood in less
than 24 hours, including
relatives of the group's
leaders, officials said
Wednesday.
The crackdown on the
group, from which ousted
President Mohammed
Morsi hails, started shortly
after the July 3 coup. It in-
tensified this month after
security forces cleared out
two of the group's sit-ins,
killing hundreds and
sparking unrest that killed
more than 1,000 people
in a few days. The Interior
Ministry says more than
100 policemen and sol-
diers have also been killed
since mid-August.
The local media, in
close step with the new
leadership after Morsi, re-
peatedly describe the ac-
tions of the Brotherhood
and its supporters as acts
of terrorism. Many have
been charged with inciting
violence. Security forces


have arrested much of the
Brotherhood's senior and
midlevel leadership, while
others remain in hiding.
Some in Egypt fear
the Brotherhood's once-
powerful political party
and its allies could be
barred from politics and
be forced underground
again.


Iraq bombings, house raid kill at least 80


BAGHDAD (AP) Car
bomb blasts and other
explosions tore through
mainly Shiite districts
around Baghdad dur-
ing morning rush hour
Wednesday in a day of
violence that killed at
least 80, intensifying
worries about Iraq's abil-
ity to tame the spiraling
mayhem gripping the
country.
It was the latest set
of large-scale sectarian
attacks to hit Iraq, even
as the government went
on "high alert" in case a
possible Western strike
in neighboring Syria
increases Iraq's turmoil.
A relentless wave of
killing has left thousands
dead since April in the
country's worst spate of
bloodshed since 2008.
The surge in violence
raises fears that Iraq is
hurtling back toward the
widespread sectarian
killing that peaked in
2006 and 2007, when the
country was teetering on
the edge of civil war.
Most ofWednesday's at-
tacks happened in within
minutes of each other as
people headed to work or
were out shopping early
in the day. Insurgents un-
leashed explosives-laden
cars, suicide bombers and
other bombs that targeted


al-Qaida, which operates
in Iraq under the name
the Islamic State of Iraq
and the Levant. The
group frequently targets
Shiites, which it considers
heretics, and carries out
coordinated bombings
in an attempt to incite
sectarian strife.
Charles Lister, an
analyst at IHS Jane's
Terrorism and Insurgency
Center, said the group
is increasingly showing
"huge confidence and
military capability."
"Both the increasing
frequency, and statisti-
cally, the increasing
deadliness of (their)
AP PHOTO coordinated nation-


People inspect the scene of a car bomb attack in the Sha'ab neighborhood of Baghdad, Iraq,
Wednesday. A coordinated wave of bombings tore through Shiite Muslim areas in and around the
Iraqi capital early Wednesday, killing scores and wounding many more, officials said. The blasts,
which came in quick succession, targeted residents out shopping and on their way to work.


parking lots, outdoor
markets and restaurants
in predominantly Shiite
areas in and around
Baghdad, officials said. A
military convoy was hit
south of the capital.
Security forces sealed
off the blast scenes as am-
bulances raced to pickup
the wounded. The twisted
wreckage of cars littered
the pavement while
cleaners and shop owners
brushed away debris. At


one restaurant, the floor
was stained with blood
and dishes were scattered
on plastic tables.
"What sin have those
innocent people com-
mitted?" asked Ahmed
Jassim, who witnessed
one of the explosions
in Baghdad's Hurriyah
neighborhood. "We
hold the government
responsible."
The northern neighbor-
hood of Kazimiyah, home


to a prominent Shiite
shrine, was among the
worst hit. Two bombs
went off in a parking lot,
followed by a suicide car
bomber who struck on-
lookers who had gathered
at the scene. Police said
the attack killed 10 people
and wounded 27.
There was no immedi-
ate claim of responsibil-
ity for the attacks, but
they bore the hallmarks
of the Iraqi branch of


wide bombings in Iraq
underlines the extent of
their operational reach
and the huge depth
of their resources," he
said.
In one particularly bru-
tal attack, a Shiite family
was shot dead at home
in the largely Sunni town
of Latifiyah, about 20
miles south of Baghdad.
Four children, ages eight
to 16, were killed along
with their parents and
an uncle, police said.
Authorities said they had
previously fled the town
after being threatened
and had returned only
three weeks ago.


Study: Oceans store Earth's excess heat


LONDON
(Bloomberg) The
oceans are becoming a
repository for almost all
the Earth's excess heat,
driving up sea levels
and threatening coast-
lines, according to a
leaked draft of the most
comprehensive United
Nations report address-
ing climate science.
Temperatures in
the shallowest waters
rose by more than 0.1
degrees Celsius (0.18
degrees Fahrenheit) a
decade for the 40 years
through 2010, the study
found. Average sea
levels have increased
worldwide by about
19 centimeters (7.5
inches) since 1901 and
researchers said it's
"very likely" the sys-
tem of ocean currents
that includes the Gulf
Stream will slow in the
coming decades.
The findings are
detailed in a 2,200-page
report that will guide


U.N. envoys as they
devise a new treaty to
fight climate change by
2015. It was obtained
by Bloomberg from
a person with official
access to the report who
declined to be further
identified because it
hasn't been published.
The U.N. declined to
comment.
"The Earth is absorb-
ing more heat than it
is emitting back into
space, and nearly all
this excess heat is
entering the oceans
and being stored there,"
the report's authors
wrote. "Changes have
been observed in ocean
properties of relevance
to climate during the
past 40 years, including
temperature, salinity,
sea level, carbon, pH
and oxygen."
The report, entitled
"The Physical Science
Basis," is the first of
three parts that will
make up the U.N.


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Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate
Change's fifth
Assessment Report,
or AR5, into cli-
mate science. The
research includes a
31-page "Summary
for Policymakers" that
condenses the main
findings of the first part
into a single document
that ministers may
consult when devising a
global policy.
It's "extremely likely"
mankind is responsible
for more than half of the
observed temperature
rises since the 1950s
and it's "virtually
certain" the global rate
of sea-level rise has
accelerated over the
past two centuries, ac-
cording to the summary
document. Those main


points are little changed
from an earlier version
that was leaked by the
blogger Alec Rawls
on the website www.
stopgreensuicide.com in
December.
Jonathan Lynn, a
spokesman for the
U.N. panel, or IPCC,
declined to comment
on the report. "It's still
a work in progress and
may change in the light
of comments from
government and it may
not yet meet the IPCC's
rigorous quality and
accuracy standards," he
said.
The latest version of
the summary includes
a lower forecast for
temperature rise from
2016 through 2035 of 0.3
degrees to 0.7 degrees
Celsius, compared with


0.4 degrees to
1 degree in last year's
version. Both versions
conclude that there's
"very high confidence"
the Greenland Ice Sheet
has lost mass and "high
confidence" the same
has happened to the
Antarctic Ice Sheet. The
two ice sheets contain
more than 99 percent of
the planet's freshwater
ice, according to the
National Snow & Ice
Data Center.
The precise wording
of the summary will be
debated line-by-line
by government envoys
from around the world
at an IPCC meeting
that starts in Stockholm
on Sept. 23. The larger
report is usually only
altered to amend factual
errors and copy edits.


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The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 5


WORLD NEWS






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


Stocks edge higher


NEWYORK (AP) -
The stock market edged
higher Wednesday as
investors continued to
focus on the likelihood
of a U.S.-led attack on
Syria. Energy stocks
rose sharply as the price
of oil increased to the
highest in more than
two years.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average rose 48.38
points, or 0.3 percent, to
close at 14,824.51. The
Standard & Poor's 500 in-
dex gained 4.48 points, or
0.3 percent, to 1,634.96.


The Nasdaq composite
rose 14.83 points, or
0.4 percent, to 3,593.35.
The quick rise in the
price of oil has caused
investors to worry.
Costlier oil almost always
translates into higher fuel
expenses for businesses
and consumers, weighing
on consumer spending
and the economy. While
Syria produces little oil,
a regional conflict in the
Middle East could lead
to supply disruptions
in an area where half
the world's proven oil


reserves lie.
"When you add it all
up the problems in
Libya, Egypt, Syria -
you're looking at
3 million barrels a day
in potential production
outages," said Nick
Koutsoftas, a commod-
ities-focused portfolio
manager at Cohen &
Steers.
Oil rose $1.09, or
1 percent, to $110.10 a
barrel, the highest price
since May 2011. It went
as high as $112 a barrel
overnight.


Fast-food wage protests


slated for Southern cities


DALLAS ((Dallas
Morning News) A
series of rolling strikes
against the nation's fast-
food industry one-day
walkouts that have
attracted hundreds of
workers in New York and
Detroit is scheduled to
move south on Thursday.
In the strikes, which
are making their way
into the South for the
first time, workers and
their backers are pushing
for a "living wage" of at
least $15 an hour.
Dallas, Houston and
Austin, Texas, will be
among more than 45
cities, including Raleigh,
N.C.; Memphis, Tenn.;
and Tampa, Fla., to
take part in the strike.
The pre-Labor Day job
action will take place
the day after the 50th
anniversary of the March
on Washington led by
the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr.
Many workers in
fast food, called "quick
serve" in the trade, earn
minimum wage, which
is $7.25 an hour federally
and many states.


Organizers said the
Dallas turnout might be
small several dozen
workers since the
movement is new to
Texas. But they see it as
significant that workers
here contacted organiz-
ers asking to participate.
"It's significant that
people in a city like
Dallas are organizing
and taking the pretty
significant step of joining
in the national day of
action," said Ginny
Goldman, executive
director of the Texas
Organizing Project,
which advocates for
low- and moderate-wage
workers.
"Many consider
(Texas) to be the low-
wage capital of the
country, where you have
more minimum-wage
workers than any other
state.
"People were seeking
out how they could get
involved," she said.
In the Dallas area,
workers who are
employed at chains
including McDonald's,
Wendy's and Jack in the


Box are expected to walk
off the job for one day.
Organizers declined to
reveal the location of the
picketing and rallies until
just before the strike
begins.
The strikes, which
launched in New York
City last November and
spread to the Midwest,
are being run by local
labor-community-clergy
alliances. The Service
Employees International
Union is providing
financial and technical
support to the cam-
paigns and is helping
train organizers.
What happens with the
wages paid to restaurant
workers makes a differ-
ence in the Lone Star
State.
With 1.07 million
restaurant and food
service workers, Texas
has the second-largest
restaurant workforce in
the nation. And it leads
the nation in projected
restaurant job growth
between 2013 and
2023, according to the
National Restaurant
Association.


op quiz: You and
your SUV are in a
minor, low-speed
accident. Luckily, no one
is injured, but there's
a little damage to your
vehicle more than just
a scratch and maybe
to someone else's car
or property. Should you
inform your insurance
company about it or keep
the matter quiet and pay
any repair costs out-of-
pocket?
Fear of an insurance
rate hike is often the
concern behind that
question, Consumer
Reports notes. But there
are some important
factors to weigh as you
determine your best
course of action.


When to report

Seven in 10 auto ac-
cidents in 2011 involved
another vehicle, accord-
ing to Department of
Transportation data, as
did 52 percent of car
insurance claims filed
in recent years by more
than 31,000 Consumer
Reports subscribers
surveyed last summer. If
your mishap falls in that
category, always report it,
especially if you may have
been at fault, because your
coverage also protects you
against liability for harm-
ing others.
Your insurance company
and some state laws might
require you to report in
such cases. But officially
documenting the facts
is also in your own best
interests whenever you're
involved with a stranger in
a potential damage claim
situation even if you
and another reasonable
person work out a private
arrangement to keep the
insurance companies out
of it.


Consumer

Reports


Repairs often cost more
than people anticipate.
For example, when a 2010
Toyota Corolla rear-ended
a 2010 Toyota RAV4 at
10 mph in testing by
the Insurance Institute
for Highway Safety, the
Corolla had more than
$3,800 in front-end dam-
age and the SUV incurred
more than $6,000 in rear
damage, because of the
vehicles' bumper height
mismatch.
The Corolla's damage
looked minor, and the
RAV4's was almost imper-
ceptible. Even the cheapest
damage in 14 such trials
involving seven vehicle
pairings produced almost
$3,000 in total losses six
times the typical $500
collision deductible.
Even the lack of immedi-
ate injury can be deceiv-
ing. The adrenaline rush
accompanying even a low-
impact crash can mask
injury symptoms, and
soft-tissue damage can
take 24 to 48 hours to show
up. Bogus injury claims are
another possibility worth
considering.
If you don't report and
big costs surprise you later,
your insurance company
might not pay because its
ability to investigate the
claimed damage, when
time was of the essence,
has been lost.


A toss-up

Your toughest decision-
making challenge comes
when the damage is to
your own vehicle and
property. Filing a claim
would probably produce
a tempting payout of
several hundred to more


than $1,000 after the
deductible. You must con-
sider an unknown factor
of how your claim might
impact your premiums.
Unfortunately,
Consumer Reports points
out, it's impossible for
consumers to know in
advance how much their
premiums will increase,
and for how long, to
weigh that against a claim
payout. But among its
subscribers, 7 percent of
claimants felt that their
insurer unfairly raised
their premium as a result
of their claim. Most states
regulate "chargeable"
accidents, which are loss
payouts that auto insur-
ers are allowed to count
against your driving
record in calculating
your risk and setting your
premiums. The rules
vary from state to state,
but payout thresholds of
$500 to $1,000 are typical,
which means that acci-
dents costing the insurer
less than that can't raise
your rate. Major insur-
ers also apply their own
loyalty programs, which
give "accident forgiveness
awards," based on how
long you've been with the
company and your good
driving and payment
record.


When not to

If the damage is minor
and confined to your own
vehicle and property,
maybe from backing into
your fence or garage
door, you're typically not
required to report it to
your insurer if you're not
making a claim. It also
doesn't make economic
sense to do so if the
repair cost is smaller than
or not sufficiently bigger
than your collision cover-
age deductible.


MutualFunds


3-yr
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
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EqGrow b 29.97 +.07 +16.9
Retlnc b 8.55 -.02 +3.3
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 8.17 +.03 +18.2
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 47.07 +.16 +25.8
AllianzGI
WellnessD b 32.32 +.07 +20.1
Alpine
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DynDiv d 3.50 ... +7.4
Amana
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Income b 39.00 +.03 +14.2
American Beacon
LgCpVlls 25.91 +.07 +18.0
American Cent
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HiYIdMu 8.70 -.02 +3.7
InTTxFBInv 11.08 -.02 +2.1
American Century
Eqlnclnv 8.61 +.02 +13.1
Growthlnv 30.30 +.12 +16.0
Ultralnv 30.53 +.11 +18.7
American Funds
AMCAPA m 25.39 +.13 +18.6
BalA m 22.23 +.04 +13.4
BondA m 12.37 -.03 +2.9
CaplncBuA m 54.83 -.09 +9.9
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InvCoAmA m 34.74 +.09 +15.6
MutualA m 32.17 +.02 +15.5
NewEconA m 34.29 +.04 +18.7
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NwWrldA m 53.59 -.25 +5.0
SmCpWldA m 45.54 -.15 +13.2
TaxEBdAmA m 12.22 -.01 +2.9
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Artisan
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IntlVal d 35.40 +.09 +16.9
MdCpVal 25.36 +.07 +19.1
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BBH
TaxEffEq d 19.95 +.02 +18.4
Baron
Asset b 58.39 +.14 +18.2
Growth b 64.78 +.08 +21.2
Partners b 28.36 +.07 +21.5
Berkshire
Focus d 17.35 +.12 +22.1
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 14.27 +.25 +4.8
EqDivA m 21.83 +.06 +14.9
EqDivl 21.88 +.06 +15.2
GlobAIcA m 20.81 +.02 +7.7
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GlobAlcl 20.91 +.02 +8.0
HiYldBdls 8.05 -.01 +10.5
HiYldSvc b 8.06 ... +10.1
Bruce
Bruce 424.45 -.26 +11.5
CGM
Focus 34.35 +.06 +10.5
Clipper
Clipper 81.37 +.21 +16.5


Cohen & Steers
Realty 64.21 -.37 +11.8
Columbia
AcornlntZ 43.35 -.22 +10.3
AcornZ 34.80 +.12 +18.0
DivncZ 16.76 +.03 +16.3
IntlVIB m 13.37 -.05 +5.4
Mar21CB m 14.73 +.08 +12.7
MarGrlA m 24.84 +.15 +16.9
DFA
1YrFixlnI 10.32 ... +.6
2YrGlbFII 10.04 ...+.7
5YrGIbFII 10.97 -.02 +2.3
EmMkCrEql 17.79 -.05 +.1
EmMktVall 25.87 -.09 -2.2
IntSmCapl 17.83 -.11 +12.3
RelEstScl 26.05 -.15 +12.7
USCorEqll 14.62 +.05 +19.2
USCorEq21 14.50 +.05 +19.6
USLgCo 12.94 +.04 +17.8
USLgVall 27.62 +.11 +20.6
USMicrol 17.87 +.08 +21.8
USSmVall 31.96 +.13 +21.7
USSmalll 27.63 +.10 +21.9
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.25 -.03 +1.4
EqDivB m 38.35 +.11 +12.5
GIbOA m 42.40 -.09 +13.9
GIbOB m 37.57 -.09 +13.1
GIbOC m 37.83 -.08 +13.1
GIbOS d 43.80 -.09 +14.2
GrlncS 21.41 +.12 +17.7
HlthCareS d 33.27 +.13 +23.3
LAEqS d 27.29 ... -4.4
LC2020S 14.38 ... +9.5
StrHiY1dTxFS 11.71 -.03 +2.7
Davis
NYVentA m 37.96 +.06 +14.4
NYVentY 38.41 +.06 +14.7
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.24 -.02 +3.2
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEql 11.45 -.02 +9.6
IntlSCol 17.49 -.10 +11.4
IntlValul 17.75 +.01 +7.5
Dodge & Cox
Bal 88.91 +.08 +15.6
Income 13.46 -.03 +4.1
IntlStk 37.80 -.17 +9.7
Stock 145.94 +.29 +19.4
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 10.93 ... +7.0
Dreyfus
Apprecialnv 47.33 +.10 +14.7
MidCapldx 34.10 +.10 +18.8
MuniBd 11.02 -.03 +2.1
NYTaxEBd 14.25 -.05 +1.6
ShTrmlncD 10.60 -.01 +1.9
SmCoVal 35.04 +.13 +20.7
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 11.99 +.02 +14.4
TMSmCaB m 18.43 +.05 +16.5
FMI
CommStk 27.64 +.06 +17.4
LgCap 19.93 +.01 +16.1
FPA
Capital d 44.22 +.36 +17.5
Cres d 31.48 -.01 +12.6
Newlnc d 10.40 -.01 +1.7
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 37.11 +.13 +9.3
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.68 ... +9.1
IntSmMCoA m 42.84 -.33 +12.4
KaufmanA m 6.00 +.03 +12.9
MDTMdCpGrStB m36.98+.09 +14.6
StrVall 5.46 +.01 +14.5
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.23 -.01 +5.4


AstMgr50 17.28 -.01 +9.3
Bal 21.85 +.02 +12.1
BIChGrow 58.84 +.27 +19.8
Canada d 53.94 +.08 +4.0
CapApr 34.29 +.07 +19.0
Caplnc d 9.43 ... +9.2
Contra 88.72 +.25 +16.9
DivGrow 34.49 +.09 +16.5
Divrlntl d 32.48 -.16 +10.0
EmergAsia d 27.14 -.03 +3.1
EmgMkt d 21.03 -.18 -.5
Eqlnc 53.96 +.07 +15.8
Eqlncll 22.28 +.05 +15.5
FF2015 12.26 -.01 +8.7
FF2035 12.63 +.01 +12.0
FF2040 8.88 ... +12.1
Fidelity 38.28 +.14 +16.1
FltRtHiln d 9.93 ... +5.0
FocStk 18.04 +.12 +21.3
FourlnOne 32.62 +.02 +13.8
Free2000 12.37 -.02 +4.9
Free2010 14.72 -.01 +8.6
Free2020 14.98 -.01 +9.7
Free2025 12.64 ... +10.8
Free2030 15.29 -.01 +11.2
GNMA 11.23 -.04 +2.5
GrowCo 111.59 +.64 +20.5
Growlnc 25.00 +.05 +20.3
Hilnc d 9.18 ... +8.8
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IntRelEst d 10.04 ... +11.7
IntlDsc d 35.92 -.21 +10.6
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LatinAm d 36.57 -.06 -6.2
LevCoSt d 38.42 +.10 +21.1
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Magellan 85.59 +.27 +14.4
MeCpSto 13.88 +.04 +20.2
MidCap d 35.46 +.06 +19.8
Munilnc d 12.51 -.01 +2.7
NewMille 36.15 +.08 +19.6
NewMktln d 15.63 -.06 +5.8
OTC 78.48 +.31 +22.2
Overseas d 35.77 -.27 +12.0
Puritan 20.96 +.02 +12.4
ShTmBond 8.55 ... +1.5
SmCapDisc d 28.59 +.04 +25.4
Stratlnc 10.83 -.02 +5.3
TaxFrB d 10.81 -.01 +2.7
TotalBd 10.47 -.03 +3.9
USBdldx 11.35 -.04 NA
USBdldxlnv 11.36 -.03 +2.5
Value 91.91 +.28 +18.8
ValueDis 19.40 +.08 +18.1
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 64.58 +.37 +18.3
IntBondA m 11.34 -.02 +2.8
IntBondB m 11.32 -.03 +2.0
IntlCapAB m 11.32 -.08 +10.9
LrgCapA m 25.18 +.07 +20.7
LrgCapB m 23.55 +.07 +19.7
NewlnsA m 26.28 +.07 +16.4
Newlnsl 26.65 +.08 +16.7
StratlncA m 12.08 -.03 +5.0
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 160.96 +1.73 +40.0
Electron d 55.85 +.56 +15.8
Energy d 59.25 +1.02 +16.2
Gold d 23.92 -.46 -17.8
Leisure d 118.93 +.60 +20.5
Materials d 77.01 -.14 +15.9
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NatGas d 35.67 +.45 +10.7
NatRes d 36.56 +.42 +12.9
Wireless d 8.98 ... +12.8
Fidelity Spartan
5001dAdvtg 58.13 +.17 +17.8
5001dxlnstl 58.13 +.17 NA
5001dxlnv 58.12 +.17 +17.8
ExtMktldAg d 47.90 +.15 +20.2
IntlldxAdg d 37.17 -.14 +9.6
TotMktldAg d 48.14 +.14 +18.3


First Eagle
GIbA m 52.10 +.03 +11.9
OverseasA m 23.02 -.01 +9.3
First Investors
GlobalA m 7.69 ... +11.1
TotalRetA m 18.15 +.02 +13.0
Firsthand
e-Comm 6.94 +.05 +11.1
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 11.62 ... +2.7
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 6.86 ... +2.7
EqlnA m 20.48 ... +15.2
FLTFA m 10.76 ... +1.7
GrOppA m 25.54 ... +16.3
GrowthA m 57.12 ...+15.3
HYTFA m 9.75 ... +2.6
Income C m 2.32 ... +10.0
IncomeA m 2.30 ... +10.7
IncomeAdv 2.28 ...+10.8
NYTFA m 11.13 ... +1.5
RisDvA m 43.95 ... +16.3
StrlncA m 10.37 ...+6.0
TotalRetA m 9.84 ...+4.0
USGovA m 6.50 ...+2.0
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 32.55 ... +11.8
DiscovA m 32.07 ...+11.4
SharesZ 25.96 ...+14.2
SharesA m 25.72 ... +13.8
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondCm 12.69 ... +4.2
GIBondA m 12.66 ... +4.6
GIBondAdv 12.62 ... +4.9
GrowthA m 22.32 ... +15.3
WorldA m 18.13 ... +15.1
GE
S&SUSEq 53.24 +.26 +17.5
GMO
EmgMktsVI d 10.21 +.03 +.1
IntltVIIV 22.67 +.07 +9.0
Quill 24.81 +.01 +17.3
QuVI 24.83 +.01 +17.4
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 60.56 +.02 +17.5
EqlncomeAAA x 26.00 -.07 +16.5
Value m 17.98 +.02 +18.1
Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.19 -.01 +9.0
MidCpVals 46.66 +.12 +17.3
ShDuGovA m 10.18 -.01 +.5
Harbor
Bond 11.94 -.04 +3.0
CapAplnst 49.03 +.17 +17.7
Intllnstl 65.65 -.22 +10.9
Intllnv b 64.88 -.23 +10.5
Hartford
CapAprA m 41.98 +.13 +14.2
CpApHLSIA 52.53 +.16 +15.8
SmallCoB m 19.59 +.07 +19.1
Heartland
ValuePlus m 33.78 +.14 +15.4
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 14.51 +.03 +18.2
Hodges
Hodges m 30.67 +.07 +20.1
INVESCO
CharterA m 20.82 +.07 +14.6
ComstockA m 21.20 +.08 +18.3
ConstellB m 24.71 +.14 +12.9
Divlnclnv b 17.81 -.01 +12.4
EnergyA m 42.98 +.76 +11.5
Energylnv b 42.83 +.76 +11.5
EqlncomeA m 10.42 +.01 +13.3
EuroGrA m 36.29 -.17 +13.3
GIbGrB m 25.61 +.06 +12.2
GrowlncA m 24.92 +.06 +16.8
GrwthAIIA m 12.78 ... +11.4
PacGrowB m 20.29 ... +2.8
SmCapEqA m 15.72 +.05 +20.0
Techlnv b 36.56 +.20 +15.3
USMortA m 12.38 -.04 +2.4


Ivy
AssetSTrB m 27.37 +.02 +10.0
AssetStrA m 28.34 +.03 +10.8
AssetStrC m 27.51 +.03 +10.0
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.59 -.03 +3.4
CoreBondA m 11.58 -.03 +3.1
CoreBondSelect 11.57 -.03 +3.3
HighYldSel 8.06 ... +9.0
LgCapGrSelect 27.08 +.15 +17.8
MidCpVall 33.00 +.03 +20.6
ShDurBndSel 10.89 -.01 +1.1
USLCpCrPS 26.16 +.11 +17.2
Janus
BalC m 28.30 +.02 +9.9
ContrT 17.69 +.04 +11.3
EntrprsT 76.53 +.18 +18.8
FlexBdS b 10.41 -.02 +3.8
GIbValT d 13.73 ... +12.5
HiYIdT 9.16 -.01 +9.1
OverseasT 32.48 -.26 -5.8
PerkinsMCVL 24.65 +.02 +13.1
PerkinsMCVT 24.39 +.02 +12.9
PerkinsSCVL 24.62 +.01 +12.7
ShTmBdT 3.06 ... +1.9
T 36.10 +.10 +13.7
USCrT 18.08 +.04 +18.9
VentureT 66.70 +.42 +23.6
John Hancock
UfBal b 14.38 ... +10.4
UfGrl b 14.82 +.02 +12.2
Lazard
EmgMkEqtl d 17.42 +.07 +1.4
Legg Mason/Western
CrPIBdlns 11.12 -.03 +4.3
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl d 16.42 -.05 +9.4
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 30.45 +.08 +15.6
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 14.75 -.02 +8.2
BdR b 14.69 -.02 +7.9
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 14.06 +.03 +15.0
BondDebA m 8.07 ... +8.8
ShDurlncA m 4.55 +3.7
ShDurlncC m 4.57 -.01 +3.0
MFS
IslntlEq 20.45 -.08 +11.7
MAInvB m 24.14 +.07 +16.0
TotRetA m 16.43 ... +10.8
ValueA m 29.78 +.02 +16.9
Valuel 29.93 +.02 +17.2
MainStay
HiYIdCorA m 6.00 .. +8.6
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 98.62 +.13 +19.7
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.67 -.02 +6.2
PBMaxTrmS 19.59 +.02 +13.0
WrldOppA 8.30 -.05 +7.8
Marsico
21stCent m 16.92 +.09 +13.6
FlexCap m 17.37 +.05 +19.3
Merger
Merger b 16.05 +.02 +2.7
Meridian
MeridnGr d 45.37 +.14 +17.9
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.51 -.03 +5.4
TotRtBd b 10.52 -.02 +5.3
Midas Funds
Magic m 21.89 +.05 +19.4
Midas m 1.69 -.03 -24.5
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 40.85 +.15 +16.9
Morgan Stanley Instl
MdCpGrl 41.93 +.06 +14.5
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 62.71 +.15 +13.5


Natixis
LSlnvBdY 12.02 -.04 +5.8
LSStratlncA m 15.52 -.01 +8.5
LSStratlncC m 15.62 ... +7.7
Needham
Growth m 40.72 +.24 +17.0
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 58.00 +.10 +19.2
SmCpGrlnv 24.05 +.13 +19.9
Northeast Investors
Growth 18.13 +.08 +11.3
Northern
HYFixlnc d 7.46 ... +9.4
Stkldx 20.36 +.06 +17.7
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.32 -.01 +1.8
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.41 +.04 +9.0
HlthSinces 17.33 +.01 +20.4
PinOakEq 40.40 +.10 +20.5
RedOakTec 12.84 +.05 +20.7
Oakmark
Eqlncl 31.96 +.06 +11.7
Global I 27.97 -.02 +14.9
Intl 24.48 -.12 +14.8
Oalkark I 57.68 +.21 +19.6
Select I 36.27 +.15 +19.3
Old Westbury
GlbSmMdCp 15.95 -.03 +13.6
LgCpStr 10.99 +.01 +9.5
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 33.51 -.10 +4.6
DevMktY 33.19 -.10 +5.0
GlobA m 71.52 -.22 +13.3
IntlBondA m 5.97 -.02 +1.8
IntlBondY 5.97 -.02 +2.1
IntlGrY 34.32 -.17 +14.5
MainStrA m 42.48 +.08 +16.4
RocMuniA m 14.59 -.14 +1.5
SrFltRatA m 8.37 ... +6.8
StrlncA m 4.09 ... +5.0
PIMCO
AAstAAutP 10.15 -.04 +4.2
AIIAssetl 11.95 -.04 +5.9
AIIAuthA m 10.14 -.04 +3.8
AIIAuthC m 10.13 -.03 +3.0
AIIAuthIn 10.15 -.03 +4.3
ComRIRStl 5.88 -.02 +2.9
Divlnclnst 11.37 -.03 +5.6
EMktCurl 9.90 ... +1.0
EmMktslns 10.96 -.03 +4.2
ForBdlnstl 10.51 ... +4.9
HiYldls 9.42 ... +8.5
InvGrdlns 10.45 -.03 +6.2
LowDrls 10.23 -.01 +2.5
RealRet 11.14 -.04 +4.0
ShtTermls 9.81 -.01 +1.4
TotRetA m 10.67 -.03 +3.3
TotRetAdm b 10.67 -.03 +3.4
TotRetC m 10.67 -.03 +2.5
TotRetls 10.67 -.03 +3.7
TotRetrnD b 10.67 -.03 +3.4
TotlRetnP 10.67 -.03 +3.6
PRIMECAP Odyssey
Growth 21.83 +.09 +20.5
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 34.14 +.04 +17.4
Permanent
Portfolio 47.55 -.03 +6.4
Pioneer
PioneerA m 37.76 +.11 +14.2
Principal
LCGrllnst 11.56 +.06 +19.0
SAMConGrA m 16.32 +.03 +12.7
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 21.64 +.07 +15.5
IntlEqtyC m 6.45 -.02 +8.9
JenMidCapGrZ 36.97 +.08 +17.9
Putnam
GlbUtilB m 11.15 +.06 +3.7
GrowlncA m 17.60 ... +17.3
IntlNewB m 15.51 -.04 +7.9


SmCpValA m 13.67 +.05 +20.1
Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 29.74 ... +18.4
Reynolds
BlueChip b 67.62 +.27 +16.3
Royce
PAMutlnv d 13.41 +.04 +17.2
Premierlnv d 21.67 +.07 +16.7
ValueSvc m 12.46 +.02 +12.7
Rydex
Electrlnv 54.51 +.62 +6.9
HlthCrAdv b 22.72 +.08 +20.0
Nsdql001v 20.07 +.08 +19.7
Schwab
10001nv d 44.80 +.13 +17.7
S&P500Sel d 25.78 +.07 +17.8
Scout
Interntl 34.07 -.16 +9.0
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 39.46 +.10 +17.1
Sequoia
Sequoia 198.82 +.30 +20.6
State Farm
Growth 61.74 +.18 +13.0
Stratton
SmCapVal d 65.71 +.22 +20.3
T Rowe Price
Balanced 22.10 +.01 +12.0
BlChpGr 53.64 +.30 +20.4
CapApprec 25.06 +.02 +14.8
Corplnc 9.54 -.03 +4.8
EmMktStk d 29.14 -.08 -.4
Eqlndex d 44.18 +.13 +17.6
Eqtylnc 30.40 +.08 +16.6
FinSer 17.85 +.04 +14.8
GlbTech 11.87 +.09 +20.8
GrowStk 43.94 +.20 +19.1
HealthSci 54.24 +.32 +32.4
HiYield d 6.95 ... +9.6
InsLgCpGr 22.65 +.15 +19.9
IntlBnd d 9.43 -.05 +2.1
IntlEqldx d 12.35 -.02 +9.1
IntlGrlnc d 14.11 -.03 +9.4
IntlStk d 14.72 -.03 +7.8
MediaTele 63.49 +.20 +21.8
MidCapVa 27.82 +.05 +16.2
MidCpGr 68.38 +.23 +19.4
NJTaxFBd 11.28 -.01 +2.4
NewAmGro 41.67 +.14 +17.6
NewAsia d 14.89 -.07 +2.7
NewHoriz 42.87 +.25 +27.7
Newlncome 9.33 -.03 +2.7
OrseaStk d 9.19 -.01 +10.6
R2015 13.64 ... +10.8
R2025 14.25 +.01 +12.9
R2035 14.79 +.02 +14.3
Rtmt2010 17.19 ... +9.5
Rtmt2020 19.19 +.01 +12.0
Rtmt2030 20.76 +.02 +13.7
Rtmt2040 21.21 +.04 +14.5
SdTech 32.96 +.17 +15.2
ShTmBond 4.78 ... +1.5
SmCpStk 41.12 +.17 +22.4
SmCpVal d 45.04 +.10 +19.1
SpecGrow 21.75 +.04 +15.5
Speclnc 12.66 -.02 +5.9
SumGNMA 9.55 -.04 +2.1
SumMulnc 10.95 -.01 +2.7
TaxEfMult d 17.81 +.06 +18.0
TaxFShlnt 5.60 ... +1.6
Value 31.72 +.12 +18.8
TCW
Emglncl 8.24 -.03 +6.4
TotRetBdl 9.92 -.02 +6.0
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 12.65 +.04 +18.3
Target
SmCapVal 25.58 +.05 +18.5
Templeton
InFEqSeS 21.04 ... +9.3
Third Avenue
Value d 54.97 -.01 +10.2


Thompson
LargeCap 42.19
Thornburg
IncBldC m 19.38
IntlValA m 28.51
IntlVall 29.13
Thrivent
IncomeA m 8.90
MidCapGrA m 19.91
Tocqueville
Gold m 42.40
Turner
SmCapGr 41.48
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.79


+.16 +18.3
-.03 +9.0
-.27 +7.2
-.28 +7.6
-.02 +5.0
+.08 +14.3
-.94 -14.0
+.18 +19.5
-.12 +12.4


U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 7.86 -.12 -16.0
GlobRes m 9.46 +.03 +6.5
USAA
CorstnMod 14.23 -.01 +8.3
GNMA 9.86 -.03 +1.8
Growlnc 18.88 +.08 +15.6
HYOpp x 8.68 -.04 +10.2
PrcMtlMin 17.13 -.40 -18.6
SdTech 17.59 +.09 +19.5
TaxELgTm 12.81 -.01 +3.2
TgtRt2040 12.39 -.01 +11.2
TgtRt2050 12.08 ... +11.8
WorldGro 24.44 -.07 +16.6
Unified
Winlnv m 15.90 -.13 +9.2
Value Line
PremGro b 32.14 +.07 +18.3
Vanguard
500Adml 151.22 +.45 +17.8
5001nv 151.19 +.44 +17.7
BalldxAdm 25.61 +.02 +12.2
Balldxlns 25.61 +.02 +12.2
CAITAdml 11.09 ... +2.9
CapOp 42.28 +.13 +19.6
CapOpAdml 97.68 +.30 +19.7
Convrt 13.99 +.01 +11.2
DevMktsldxlP 109.27 -.19 NA
DivGr 19.27 +.03 +17.5
EmMktIAdm 31.14 -.15 -.5
EnergyAdm 121.80 +1.87 +12.2
Energylnv 64.87 +1.00 +12.2
Eqlnc 27.74 +.06 +19.0
EqlncAdml 58.16 +14 +19.1
EplAdml 92.50 +.33 +21.6
ExGlr 99.3.35 +35 +21.4
ExtdldAdm 55.43 +18 +20.3
Extdldlst 55.43 +.18 +20.3
ExtdMktldxlP 136.80 +.43 NA
FAWeUSIns 90.05 -.17 +7.0
FAWeUSInv 18.03 -.03 +6.8
GNMA 10.38 -.04 +2.3
GNMAAdml 10.38 -.04 +2.4
GIbEq 20.82 -.01 +13.1
Grolnc 35.05 +11 +18.4
GrthldAdm 41.74 +15 +18.6
Grthlstld 41.74 +15 +18.7
GrthlstSg 38.65 +.14 +18.6
HYCor 5.89 -.01 +8.8
HYCorAdml 5.89 -.01 +8.9
HItCrAdml 73.56 +.01 +21.3
HlthCare 174.33 +.03 +21.3
ITBondAdm 11.18 -.04 +3.8
ITGradeAd 9.71 -.03 +4.5
InfPrtAdm 26.13 -.10 +3.9
InfPrtl 10.64 -.04 +4.0
InflaPro 13.31 -.05 +3.9
Instldxl 150.22 +.44 +17.9
InstPlus 150.23 +.44 +17.9
InstTStPI 37.50 +.11 +18.5
IntlGr 20.50 -.04 +9.7
IntlGrAdm 65.24 -.14 +9.9
IntlStkldxAdm 25.37 -.06 NA
IntlStkldxl 101.44 -.24 NA
IntlStkldxlPIs 101.46 -.24 NA
IntlStkldxlSgn 30.43 -.07 NA
IntlVal 33.40 -.02 +8.5
LTGradeAd 9.64 -.06 +5.4


Stocks of Local Interest


52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG%CHG WK MO QTR%CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 11.34 18.26 16.10 +.05 +0.3 V V V +13.2 +17.6 dd
Arkansas Bst ABFS 6.43 27.48 26.48 +.16 +0.6 A A A +177.3 +181.0 dd 0.12
Bank of America BAG 7.83 -- 15.03 14.12 +.01 +0.1 V V A +21.6 +75.3 25 0.04
Beam Inc BEAM 52.69 69.78 61.08 -.34 -0.6 V ... +7.4 25 0.90
Carnival Corp CCL 32.07 -- 39.95 35.97 -.60 -1.6 V V A -2.2 +12.1 19 1.00a
Chicos FAS CHS 15.27 -- 19.95 15.95 +.62 +4.0 A V V -13.6 -16.6 15 0.22
Cracker Barrel CBRL 60.07 102.95 98.93 +.13 +0.1 V A A +54.0 +60.7 20 3.00f
Disney DIS 46.53 67.89 60.81+.12 +0.2 V V V +22.1 +23.8 18 0.75f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 43.06 70.07 63.81 -.23 -0.4 V V V +17.8 +42.3 17 1.68
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 24.47 44.04 36.97 +.02 +0.1 V V V +26.5 +49.1 33 0.40
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 4.50 2.61 -.35 -11.8 V V A -19.9 -22.1 dd
Harris Corp HRS 41.08 58.50 56.22 +.56 +1.0 V V A +14.8 +21.5 55 1.68f
HIth MgmtAsc HMA 6.97 17.28 12.95 ... ... V V +38.9 +75.5 24
iShsU.S. Pfd PFF 36.93 41.09 37.82 +.09 +0.2 V V V -4.5 +0.8 q 2.13e
KC Southern KSU 72.80 118.88 105.31 -.03 V V V +26.1 +37.6 39 0.86
Lennar Corp A LEN 30.90 44.40 31.62 -.65 -2.0 V V V -18.2 +1.3 17 0.16
McClatchy Co MNI 1.52 -0 3.46 3.22 +.14 +4.5 V A A -1.5 +91.3 dd
NextEra Energy NEE 65.95 -0- 88.39 81.08 +.65 +0.8 A V V +17.2 +22.4 20 2.64
Office Depot ODP 1.51 6.10 4.20 +.12 +2.9 A V A +28.0 +170.2 dd
PGT Inc PGTI 3.00 11.69 9.83 +.19 +2.0 V V A +118.4 +193.0 25


52-WK RANGE CLOSE


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG%CHGWK MO QTR%CHG %RTN P/E DIV

Panera Bread Co PNRA 152.64 -- 194.77 165.21 -1.67 -1.0 V V V +4.0 +8.0 26
Pembina Pipeline PBA 26.50 34.70 30.61 +.03 +0.1 A V +6.9 +15.7 1.68f
Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.67 -- 22.72 19.14 +.15 +0.8 A V V -2.4 +3.7 18 1.08
Phoenix Cos PNX 20.51 0- 44.78 39.28 +.23 +0.6 V V V +58.8 +28.9 dd
Raymond James Fncl RJF 34.40 48.22 41.54 +.05 +0.1 V V V +7.8 +21.6 17 0.56
Reliance Steel Alu RS 49.72 72.90 68.52 +.62 +0.9 V V A +10.3 +32.5 15 1.32f
Ryder R 38.35 64.99 56.28 -.81 -1.4 V V V +12.7 +43.7 13 1.36f
St Joe Co JOE 18.52 --- 24.44 19.63 -.03 -0.2 V V V -14.9 +5.9 cc
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 22.49 31.86 26.06 +.03 +0.1 V V V +10.6 -4.8 17
Simon Property Gp SPG 143.20 0 182.45 145.27 -.47 -0.3 V V V -8.1 -5.3 38 4.60
Stein Mart SMRT 5.77 15.21 12.25 -.11 -0.9 V V V +62.5 +67.0 19 0.20
Suntrust Bks STI 24.67 36.29 32.30 -.14 -0.4 V V A +13.9 +29.8 8 0.40
Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 0- 12.82 12.03 +.19 +1.6 V A A +5.1 +5.7 16 0.54
TECO Energy TE 16.12 ---- 19.22 16.60 -.06 -0.4 V V V -1.0 +0.1 20 0.88
Tech Data TECD 42.25 -- 54.60 49.78 +.53 +1.1 A V A +9.3 +0.2 9
Wendys Co WEN 4.09- 8.08 7.67 +.08 +1.0 V A A +63.1 +77.3 cc 0.20f
World Fuel Svcs INT 33.65 -- 45.20 38.77 +.48 +1.3 A A V -5.8 +4.8 14 0.15


Should you report




that fender bender?


LgCpldxlnv 30.38
LifeCon 17.34
LifeGro 25.24
LifeMod 21.63
MidCapldxlP 132.42
MidCp 26.76
MidCpAdml 121.53
MidCplst 26.85
MidCpSgl 38.35
Morg 23.16
MorgAdml 71.84
MuHYAdml 10.36
Mulnt 13.54
MulntAdml 13.54
MuLTAdml 10.84
MuLtdAdml 10.96
MuShtAdml 15.82
Prmcp 83.76
PrmcpAdml 86.93
PrmcpCorl 17.93
REITIdxAd 92.14
STBondAdm 10.48
STBondSgl 10.48
STCor 10.66
STGradeAd 10.66
STIGradel 10.66
STsryAdml 10.67
SelValu 25.84
SmCapldx 46.66
SmCpldAdm 46.72
SmCpldlst 46.72
SmCplndxSgnl 42.09
SmVlldlst 20.74
Star 22.22
StratgcEq 25.96
TgtRe2010 24.92
TgtRe2015 14.09
TgtRe2020 25.44
TgtRe2030 25.52
TgtRe2035 15.54
TgtRe2040 25.74
TgtRe2045 16.16
TgtRe2050 25.63
TgtRetInc 12.27
Tgtet2025 14.67
TotBdAdml 10.57
TotBdlnst 10.57
TotBdMklnv 10.57
TotBdMkSig 10.57
Totlntl 15.17
TotStlAdm 41.38
TotStllns 41.39
TotStlSig 39.94
TotStldx 41.36
TxMCapAdm 83.16
ValldxAdm 26.81
Valldxlns 26.81
Wellsl 24.60
WellslAdm 59.59
Welltn 36.83
WelltnAdm 63.62
WndsllAdm 60.17
Wndsr 18.10
WndsrAdml 61.06
Wndsrll 33.90
Victory
SpecValA m 18.65
Virtus
EmgMktsls 8.82
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 16.38
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 31.56
Growlnv 46.19
Outk2010Adm 13.30
Western Asset
MgdMuniA m 15.62
Yacktman
Focused d 24.11
Yacktman d 22.53


+.09 +17.8
-.01 +7.3
+.02 +12.3
... +10.0
+.30 NA
+.06 +18.6
+.27 +18.7
+.07 +18.8
+.09 +18.7
+.07 +17.4
+.22 +17.6
-.01 +3.0
-.01 +2.3
-.01 +2.3
-.01 +2.5
-.01 +1.3
-.01 +.8
+.08 +17.6
+.08 +17.7
+.01 +17.9
-.49 +12.9
-.01 +1.5
-.01 +1.5
-.01 +2.3
-.01 +2.4
-.01 +2.4
-.01 +.9
+.02 +19.5
+.11 +20.5
+.1 +20.7
+.11 +20.7
+.10 +20.7
+.03 +18.8
... +11.3
+.06 +21.8
-.01 +8.7
-.01 +9.9
... +10.8
+.02 +12.6
+.01 +13.4
+.03 +13.7
+.02 +13.7
+.02 +13.7
-.01 +6.9
... +11.7
-.03 +2.6
-.03 +2.6
-.03 +2.5
-.03 +2.6
-.03 +6.8
+.12 +18.4
+.13 +18.4
+.12 +18.4
+.12 +18.3
+.26 +18.3
+.07 +17.3
+.07 +17.3
-.02 +9.3
-.05 +9.4
+.02 +12.6
+.04 +12.7
+.14 +18.2
+.08 +19.3
+.28 +19.4
+.07 +18.1

+.03 +11.8
-.12 +4.2

+.06 +13.2

+.14 +22.8
+.25 +22.3
-.03 +4.4

-.02 +3.3
... +16.1
+.01 +16.8







The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper. symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.


S&P 500 +448 NASDAQ +1483 DOW +48.38 6-MO T-BILLS 30-YR T-BONDS +.05 CRUDE OIL +1.09 EURO -0048 GOLD -1.60
1,634.96 3,593.35 14,824.51 .06% 3.74% $110.10 1 $1.3337 $1,419.00




Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange


and the Nasdaq.

Tkr Name Last Chg
A-B-C
ACE ACELtd 87.94 -.51
ADT ADTCpn 40.45 -.02
AES AESCorp 12.86 +.13
AFL AFLAC 57.77 +.01
GAS AGLRes 43.98 -.77
AKS AK Steel 3.46 -.08
ASMI ASM Intl 31.58 -.31
T AT&Tlnc 33.58 -.11
ABT AbtLab s 33.75 -.26
ABBV AbbVie n 42.56 -.07
ANF AberFitc 36.16 +.18
ACAD AcadiaPh 20.11 +.15
ACN Accenture 72.45 +.21
ARAY Accuray 6.65 +.55
ACT Actavis 132.11 +.68
ATVI ActivsBliz 16.39 +.19
ADBE AdobeSy 45.53 +.03
AEIS AdvEnld 18.36 +.34
AMD AMD 3.42 +.03
ABCO AdvisoryBd 57.12 -.24
ACM AecomTch 30.00 +.21
ARO Aeropostl 8.43
AET Aetna 62.79 -.27
A Agilent 46.74 -.23
AEM Agnicog 30.72 -.45
AYR Aircastle 16.17 -.21
ARG Airgas 101.28 +.11
ALSK AlaskCom 3.06 -.09
ALU AlcatelLuc 2.66 +.09
AA Alcoa 7.93 +.01
ALKS Alkermes 31.43+.09
ATI AllegTch 26.81 +.18
AGN Allergan 87.95 -.01
ALE Allete 47.78 +.49
ARLP AllnceRes 77.96 -.27
ACG AlliBInco 6.89 -.07
AB AlliBern 19.38 +.09
LNT AlliantEgy 50.49 +.30
ALL Allstate 47.75 +.18
ANR AlphaNRs 6.12 -.03
AOD AlpTotDiv 3.91 +.02
AMLP AlpAlerMLP 17.48 +.07
ALTR AlteraCp If 34.79 +.26
MO Altria 33.60 -.39
ALVR Alvarinrs .63 +.25
ABV AmBev 34.25 +.20
AMRN Amarin 6.24 -.05
AEE Ameren 33.56 +.03
AMX AMovilL 19.24 -.34
AGNC ACapAgy 22.57 -.38
ACAS AmCapLtd 12.62 .01
AEO AEagleOut 14.65 +.04
AEP AEP 43.01 +.24
AEL AEqlnvLf 19.49 +.38
AXP AmExp 72.01 +.10
AIG AmlntlGrp 46.41 +.25
ARCP ARlCapPr 13.31 -.16
AWR AmStsWtr 54.99 +.25
AMT AmTower 69.09 -.97
AWK AmWtrWks 41.67 +.08
APU Amerigas 43.07 +.14
AMP Ameriprise 86.14 +.71
AME Ametek 43.45 +.18
AMGNAmgen 109.20 +.07
APH Amphenol 76.09 +.92
APC Anadarko 92.58 +1.70
ADI AnalogDev 46.17 +.35
ANEN Anaren 24.93 +.03
AU AnglogldA 13.30 -.72
BUD ABInBev 94.00 -.84
ANN Annlnc 34.11 +.71
NLY Annaly 11.36 -.18
ANH Anworth 4.40 -.06
AON Aonplc 66.95 +.69
APA Apache 79.17 +.60
AINV Apollolnv 7.89
AAPL Apple Inc 490.90 +2.31
AMAT ApldMatI 14.97 -.10
WTR AquaAm 31.52 +.11
MT ArcelorMit 13.17 +.16
ACI ArchCoal 4.63 +.04
ADM ArchDan 34.60 -.03
ARNA ArenaPhm 6.69 -.11
ARCC AresCap 17.56 -.10
ARIA AriadP 18.86 +.08
ABFS ArkBest 26.48 +.16
ARMHArmHId 40.19 +.15
ARR ArmourRsd 4.12 -.02
ARRY ArrayBio 5.66 -.11
ARW ArrowEl 46.38 +.70
ARUNArubaNet 16.76 +.01
ASH Ashland 86.60 +.37
AGO AssuredG 19.97 -.07
ASTX AstexPhm 6.82 +1.34
AZN AstraZen 50.15 -.05
APL AtlasPpln 38.34 +1.05
ATML Atmel 7.38 +.26
ATO ATMOS 41.36 -.16
AUQ AuRicog 4.53 -.18
AMAPAutoNavi 12.54 -2.11
ADSK Autodesk 36.90 -.10
ADP AutoData 70.94
AUXL Auxilium 17.99 +.48
AVGO AvagoTch 38.28 1.73
AVNR AvanirPhm 5.16 +.24
AVY AveryD 43.26 +.08
CAR AvisBudg 27.36 +.09
AVA Avista 26.59 +.13
AVP Avon 19.84 +.04
BBT BB&TCp 34.32 -.17
BCE BCEg 40.50 +.05
BHP BHPBilILt 62.98 +.16
BP BPPLC 42.12 +.65
BPT BP Pru 86.28 -.24
BIDU Baidu 138.98 +3.86
BHI BakrHu 47.19 +.54
BLL BallCorp 44.52 -.55
BLDP BallardPw 1.53 -.07
BBVA BcBilVArg 9.69 +.05
BBD BcoBrad pf 11.48
SAN BcoSantSA 7.23 -.01
BSBR BcoSBrasil 5.69 +.02
BKMU BankMutl 6.26 +.11
BAC BkofAm 14.12 +.01
BMO BkMontg 63.10 +.17
BK BkNYMel 29.75 +.09
BNS BkNovag 55.11 +.05
BCS Barclay 17.62 +.45
VXX BariPVixrs 16.48 -.05
BCR Bard 114.15 +.95
BKS BamesNob 13.88 +.01
ABX BarrickG 19.33 -.34
BAX Baxter 70.72 +.12
BEAM Beam Inc 61.08 -.34
BZH BeazerHrs 17.15 -.37
BBBY BedBath 74.36 +.80
BMS Bemis 40.24 -.20
BRK/BBerkH B 112.20 +.66
BBY BestBuy 35.81 +.79
BIG BigLots 34.12 +.19
BCRX Biocryst 6.55 +.11


BMR BioMedR 18.50
BBRY BlackBerry 10.30
BME BIkHlthSci 32.49
BX Blackstone 21.65
BOBE BobEvans 50.42
BA Boeing 103.27
BWA BorgWarn 96.69
SAM BostBeer 207.56
BSX BostonSci 10.69
BYD BoydGm 11.95
BGG BrigStrat 19.27
BMY BrMySq 42.03
BRCM Broadcom 24.92
BRCD BrcdeCm 7.48
BPL Buckeye 70.27
BVN Buenavent 12.84
CA CA Inc 29.41
CBG CBREGrp 21.82
CBS CBS B 51.58
CMS CMS Eng 26.68
CNH CNH Gbl 46.39
CSX CSX 24.73
CVRR CVR Rfg n 26.56
CVS CVSCare 57.28
CYS CYS Invest 7.77
CVC CblvsnNY 17.90
COG CabotOGs 39.46
CDNS Cadence 13.56
CALM Cal-Maine 45.47
CHY CalaCvHi 12.07
CCC Calgon 17.49
CWT CalifWtr 20.42
CPN Calpine 19.40
CLMT CalumetSp 30.69
CAFI CamcoF 4.13
CPT CamdenPT 62.58
CAM Cameron 57.88
CPB CampSp 44.71
CNI CdnNRyg 94.57
CNQ CdnNRs gs 31.43
COF CapOne 64.04
CSU CapSenL 21.18
CSE CapitlSrce 11.47
CMO CapsteadM 11.76
CPST CpstnTurb 1.13
CAH CardnlHIth 50.02
CFN CareFusion 35.27
CCL Carnival 35.97
CRS CarpTech 54.31
CRZO Carrizo 34.69
CPRX CatalystPh 1.76
CAT Caterpillar 82.45
CELG Celgene 139.10
CLDX CelldexTh 21.88
CX Cemex 11.14
CIG Cemig pf 7.94
CNP CenterPnt 23.20
EBR CenEIBras 2.12
CTL CntryLink 32.71
CVO Cenveo 2.81
CKP Checkpnt 15.46
CHFC ChemFinl 27.33
CHK ChesEng 26.34
CVX Chevron 121.81
CBI ChicB&l 60.97
CHS Chicos 15.95
CIM Chimera 2.91
CHD ChurchDwt 59.83
CIEN CienaCorp 20.11
Cl Cigna 78.45
CBB CinciBell 3.00
CINF CinnFin 45.98
CRUS Cirrus 22.42
CSCO Cisco 23.45
C Citigroup 48.31
CTXS CitrixSys 70.26
CLNE CleanEngy 12.26
CLF CliffsNRs 21.64
CLX Clorox 81.97
COH Coach 52.31
CIE CobaltlEn 24.84
KO CocaCola 38.35
CCE CocaCE 36.80
CDE Coeur 14.95
CTSH CognizTech 73.78
RQI CohStQIR 9.59
COLE ColeREln 11.06
CL ColgPalm s 57.27
COBK ColonialFS 14.54
CLP ColonPT 22.24
CMCSAComcast 4192
CMCSKComcspcl 4049
CMA Comerica 40.96
CTG CmpTask 17.89
CPWRCompuwre 10.82
CMTL Comtech 24.63
CAG ConAgra 33.94
CTWS ConnWtrSv 30.75
COP ConocoPhil 66.77
CNX ConsolEngy 32.11
CNSL ConsolCom 16.78
ED ConEd 56.44
CTB CooperTire 31.00
CSOD CorOnDem 50.40
GLW Coming 14.17
OFC CorpOffP 23.24
COST Costco 110.46
COTYCotyn 15.63
CUZ CousPrp 10.13
USLV CS VS3xSlv 10.19
XIV CSVellVST 24.21
TVIX CSVS2xVx rs1.95
CREE Cree Inc 55.98
CROX Crocs 13.52
XTEX CrosstxLP 18.49
CCI CrwnCstle 69.82
CCK CrownHold 43.80
CMI Cummins 122.76
CRIS Curls 4.21
CYBE CybrOpt 5.89
CY CypSemi 11.48
CYTR CytRx 2.31
D-E-F
DCT DCT Indl 6.74
DDR DDRCorp 15.77
DNP DNPSelct 9.89
DHI DRHorton 17.77
DTE DTE 67.30
DTZ DTE En 61 24.32
DHR Danaher 65.29
DRI Darden 46.36
DV DeVry 29.56
DF DeanFdsrs 18.96
DE Deere 84.12
DELL Dell Inc 13.78
DLPH DelphiAuto 55.31
DAL DeltaAir 19.13
DNR DenburyR 17.46
DNDN Dndreon 2.79
DVN DevonE 57.50
DEO Diageo 123.54
DO DiaOffs 65.27
DRH DiamRk 9.85


1,680, .....................- .........



1,600 ........10 DAYS ..


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD

Vol. (in mil.) 2,714 1,336
Pvs. Volume 3,145 1,494
Advanced 1668 1448
Declined 1384 1052
New Highs 26 33
New Lows 69 26


DKS DicksSptg 46.24 -.34
DBD Diebold 28.87 -.39
DGII Digilntl 9.28 +.24
DLR DigitalRlt 55.27 -.14
DDS Dillards 75.77 -.09
DTV DirecTV 58.34 +.36
NUGT DxGldBII rs 77.73 -6.76
FAZ DxFinBrrs 32.70 -.17
TZA DxSCBrrs 27.25 -.20
EDC DxEMBIIs 20.93 +.06
FAS DxFnBulls 63.48 +.44
DUST DirDGdBr s 26.96 +2.00
TNA DxSCBulls 53.03 +.33
SPXL DxSPBulls 43.99 +.42
DFS Discover 47.36 +.15
DIS Disney 60.81 +.12
DG DollarGen 54.48 -.17
DLTR DollarTree 53.31 -.20
D DomRescs 58.74 +.23
DPZ Dominos 61.80 +.64
RRD DonlleyRR 16.79 -.12
DOW DowChm 37.45 -.11
LEO DryStrl 7.61 -.01
DRYS DryShips 2.45 +.01
DD DuPont 56.79 +.04
DUC DufPUC 10.16
DUK DukeEngy 66.05 +.20
DRE DukeRlty 14.93 -.17
ETFC E-Trade 14.11 +.05
EBAY eBay 50.43 -.18
EMC EMCCp 25.75 +.04
EOG EOG Res 159.46 +3.17
ELNK ErthUnk 4.91 +.01
EMN EastChem 75.25 -.63
ETN Eaton 63.81 -.23
EOS EVEEq2 11.53 -.02
ECL Ecolab 90.83 +.23
ECTY Ecotality If .29 +.08
EW EdwLfSci 70.51 -.66
ELN Elan 15.03 +.15
EGO EldorGldg 8.56 -.27
EA ElectArts 27.13 +.14
EMR EmersonEl 60.49 -.09
EDE EmpDist 21.40 -.13
EEP EnbrdgEPt 30.17 +.23
ENB Enbridge 40.53 -.02
ECA EnCanag 17.21
EXK EndvSilvg 5.14 -.24
ENDP EndoPhrm 40.67 +1.49
ENR Energizer 98.31 +.27
ETP EngyTsfr 52.63 +.27
EBF EnnisInc 17.60 +.42
ESV ENSCO 56.20 -.56
ETR Entergy 62.31 -.25
EPD EntPrPt 59.72 -.01
EAC EricksnAC 15.23 +.33
EL EsteeLdr 65.38 -.08
XCO ExcoRes 7.31 -.02
XLS Exelis 14.99 +.32
EXC Exelon 30.71 +.15
EXPE Expedia 47.00 +.04
EXPR Express 21.10 +1.30
ESRX ExpScripts 63.95 -.08
XOM ExxonMbl 88.84 +2.02
FTI FMCTech 54.73 +.43
FNB FNBCpPA 12.26 +.02
FB Facebook 40.55 +.91
FDO FamilyDIr 71.51 -.03
FAST Fastenal 44.04 +.02
FDX FedExCp 108.50 +.05
FNHC FedNatHId 9.70 +.34
FGP Ferrellgs 22.65 -.57
FBR FibriaCelu 11.47 +.01
FNF FidlNFin 24.04 -.08
FSC FifthStFin 10.37 -.04
FITB FifthThird 18.35 -.08
FHN FstHorizon 11.22 -.04
AG FMajSilvg 14.44 -.42
FNFG FstNiagara 10.38 +.10
FSLR FstSolar 36.92 .08
FE FirstEngy 37.65 +.08
FMER FstMerit 21.69 +.04
FLEX Flextrn 8.90 +.14
FLO FlowrsFds 21.00 +.11
FLR Fluor 64.31 -.42
FL FootLockr 32.57 +.41
F FordM 16.02 +.14
FCE/A ForestCA 17.97 -.03
FST ForestOil 5.62 -.02
FBHS FBHmSec 36.97 +.02
FRAN Francesca 24.12 +.63
BEN FrankRess 45.25 +.05
FREE FrSearsh .18 -.00
FCX FMCG 30.48 -.12
FTR FrontierCm 4.44 -.04
FRO Frontline 2.61 -.35
FIO Fusion-io 10.71
G-H-I
GOM GMAC44 24.94 -.39
GTAT GTAdvTc 6.38 +.07
GDV GabDvlnc 19.42 +.06
GGT GabMultT 9.34 +.03
GUT GabUtil 6.40 -.04
GALE GalenaBio 2.15 -.09
GME GameStop 49.90 +.53
GPS Gap 40.49
GRMNGarmin 39.51 -.22
GKNT Geeknet 15.81 -.28
GNK GencoShip 2.95 -.05
GAM GAlnv 32.87 +.17
GD GenDynam 82.85 -.06
GE GenElec 23.20 +.02
GGP GenGrPrp 19.14 -.08
GIS GenMills 48.74 -.40
GM GenMotors 33.92 +.23
GEL GenesisEn 48.55 +.12
GNTX Gentex 22.56 -.04


S&P 500
Close: 1,634.96
Change: 4.48 (0.3%)


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


GNW Genworth 11.71 +.09
GGB Gerdau 7.32 +.11
GILD GileadScis 60.44 +1.70
GSK GlaxoSKIn 51.64 -.12
GRT GlimchRt 10.05 -.09
GOL GolLinhas 3.59 -.01
GFI GoldFLtd 5.20 -.25
GG Goldcrpg 29.50 -.41
GS GoldmanS 152.97 +.24
GT Goodyear 19.84 +.83
GOOGGoogle 848.55 -1.60
GRA vjGrace 80.55 +.63
GPT GramrcyP 4.04 +.02
GPK GraphPkg 8.41 -.06
GNI GNIron 72.88 +.78
GXP GtPlainEn 22.28 +.08
GMCRGreenMtC 86.66 +2.71
GWAYGrnwyMed 13.77 -.08
GEF GreifA 55.60 +.21
GRIF Griffin h 30.67 -.07
GRPN Groupon 10.04 +.15
GSH GuangRy 24.27 +.20
GES Guess 27.31 +.08
HCAA H HIdg 38.57 +.07
HCP HCPInc 41.20 +.28
HDB HDFCBk 27.85 +.53
HBC HSBC 53.08 +.01
HAIN HainCel 79.94 -.34
HK HalconRes 4.82 +.04
HAL Hallibrtn 48.90 +.77
HALO Halozyme 8.14 +.78
HBI Hanesbrds 60.65 +.30
THG Hanoverlns 54.16 +.25
HOG HarleyD 59.20 +.35
HMY HarmonyG 3.67 -.19
HSC Harsco 23.44 +.01
HIG HartfdFn 29.77 +.10
HTS HatterasF 18.35 -.42
HE HawaiiEl 25.01 +.09
HCN HItCrREIT 61.69 +.18
HCSG HlthCSvc 24.42 +.26
HMA HIlMgmt 12.95
HL HeclaM 3.51 -.14
HLF Herbalife 61.07 -1.47
HERO HercOffsh 7.13 +.14
HSY Hershey 91.08 -1.07
HTZ Hertz 24.15 -.15
HES Hess 76.48 +1.03
HPQ HewlettP 22.61 +.62
HSH Hillshire 32.37 -.02
HTH HilltopH 15.62 +.05
HIMX HimaxTch 5.91 +.12
HFC HollyFront 44.64 -.31
HOLX Hologic 21.70 -.32
HD HomeDp 75.03 +.91
HMC Honda 37.04 -.16
HON HonwlllntI 79.45 +.20
HRL Hormel 40.93 -.38
HPT HospPT 27.40 -.07
HST HostHotls 17.13 +.06
HOV HovnanE 5.17 -.07
HNP HuanPwr 39.55 +.64
HUB/BHubbelB 103.29 +1.12
HCBK HudsCity 9.29 +.06
HBAN HuntBncsh 8.21 +.03
HII Huntgtnlng 64.22 +.40
HUN Huntsmn 17.56 -.26
IAG IAMGIdg 6.16 -.27
IBN ICICIBk 26.26 +.80
IGTE iGateCorp 23.38 +1.84
ING ING 11.14 +.18
IAU iShGold 13.75
EWZ iShBrazil 42.42 -.08
EWG iShGerm 26.01 -.33
EWH iShHK 18.60 -.04
EWJ iShJapan 11.10 +.03
EWY iShSKor 55.90 +.81
EWM iSMalasia 13.91 +.02
EWW iShMexico 61.40 -1.08
EWT iSTaiwn 13.16 +.14
SLV iShSilver 23.43 -.16
FXI iShChinaLC 34.99 -.09
IVV iSCorSP500164.75 +.56
EEM iShEMkts 37.43 +.08
LQD iShiBoxlG 112.94 +.02
EIDO iShlndones 21.92 +.78
TLT iSh20 yrT 105.27 -.86
EFA iSEafe 60.01 -.07
HYG iShiBxHYB 91.06 +.34
IWF iSR1KGr 75.08 +.18
IWO iSR2KGr 117.87 +.40
IWM iShR2K 100.96 +.20
PFF iShUSPfd 37.82 +.09
IYR iShREst 62.62 -.30
ITB iShHmCnst 20.56 -.10
IDA Idacorp 48.39 +.05
ITW ITW 71.60 +.09
IMGN ImunoGn 16.01 +.42
INCY Incyte 35.00 +.88
IBCP IndBkMI 9.17 -.07
NRGY Inergy 13.77 -.04
IR IngerRd 59.22 -.08
INGR Ingredion 61.70 -.72
IRC InlandRE 9.94 +.01
IDTI IntgDv 8.90 +.59
TEG IntegrysE 56.66 +.16
INTC Intel 22.29 +.09
ICPT Intercept n 45.40 +1.25
INAP InterNAP 7.43 +.21
IBM IBM 182.16 -.58
IGT IntlGame 18.75 -.22
IP IntPap 47.00 +.50
IPG Interpublic 15.65 -.01
INTX Intersectns 9.43 +.04
ISIL Intersil 10.66 +.31
INTU Intuit 63.40 -.31
ISRG IntSurg 387.44 +1.22
INVN InvenSense 17.30 -.15


HIGH
14867.40
6330.48
482.37
9343.17
3607.36
1641.18
1200.54
17447.58
1020.25


3,720 .................................



S 10 DAYS


LOW
14760.41
6274.09
476.79
9263.31
3578.80
1627.47
1190.94
17308.23
1012.95


IVZ Invesco 30.49 +.17
IVR InvMtgCap 15.24 -.35
ITUB ItauUnibH 12.07 +.15
J-K-L
JASO JA Solar rs 7.96 +.21
JDSU JDSUniph 13.07 +.01
JPM JPMorgCh 50.58 -.02
JBL Jabil 22.91 +.47
JEC JacobsEng 58.61 +.36
JNS JanusCap 8.49 +.13
JBLU JetBlue 6.22 -.01
JNJ JohnJn 86.53 +.36
JCI JohnsnCtl 40.47 +.36
JOY JoyGlbl 48.89 -2.42
JNPR JnprNtwk 19.01 +.06
KBH KB Home 16.02 -.26
KFN KKR Fn 10.23 -.09
KFH KKRFn41 26.62 +.23
KSU KC Southn 105.31 -.03
K Kellogg 61.08 -.55
KERX KeryxBio 8.61 -.02
KEY Keycorp 11.69 +.04
KMB KimbClk 92.53 -1.00
KIM Kmco 20.16 -.09
KMP KindME 83.35 +.39
KMI KndMorg 37.11 -.01
KGC Kinrossg 5.50 -.14
KRG KiteRlty 5.97
KOG KodiakOg 10.07 +.21
KSS Kohls 50.24 +.40
KRFT KraftFGpn 51.57 -.37
KTOS KratosDef 8.28 +.33
KKD KrispKrm 22.24 +.48
KR Kroger 36.40
KLIC Kulicke 10.99 -.09
LTD LBrands 57.20 +.29
LLL L-3Com 91.09 +.37
LSI LSI Corp 7.53 +.03
LTC LTCPrp 35.40 -.67
LSTR Landstar 56.65 -.08
LVS LVSands 55.98+1.41
LHO LaSalleH 26.79 -.36
LF LeapFrog 9.80 -.13
LEN LennarA 31.62 -.65
LVLT Level3 22.29 +.05
LXK Lexmark 34.80 -.24
USA LbtyASE 5.40 +.01
LINTA LibtylntA 22.27 -.16
LRY LibtProp 34.75 -.38
LIFE LifeTech 74.26 -.16
LFVN Lifevantge 2.38
LLY LillyEli 51.47 +.20
LNC LincNat 42.17 -.16
LINE LinnEngy 24.47 -.10
LYG LloydBkg 4.57 +.13
LMT LockhdM 123.30 +.16
LO Lorillard s 42.07 -.58
LPX LaPac 14.91 +.16
LOW Lowes 46.38 +.38
LUX Luxottica 52.56 -.40
LYB LyonBas A 69.48 +.69
M-N-O
MTB M&TBk 114.49 +.08
MBI MBIA 11.78 -.08
MCGCMCG Cap 4.98 +.06
MDC MDC 28.04 -.44
MDU MDURes 27.43 +.30
MFA MFAFncl 7.30 -.11
MTG MGIC 7.05 +.14
MGM MGMRsts 17.68 +.32
M Macys 44.32 +.85
MHR MagHRes 4.74 +.02
MNKD MannKd 5.80 -.13
MFC Manulifeg 16.24 -.06
MRO MarathnO 34.60+1.22
MPC MarathPet 74.04 +.94
GDX MktVGold 28.30 -.80
OIH MVOilSvc 45.72 +.69
RSX MktVRus 25.84 -.05
PRB MVPreRMu 24.52 -.04
MWE MarkWest 69.22+1.06
MAR MarlntA 40.15 -.27
MMC MarshM 41.15 +.03
MMLP MartinMid 45.66 -.16
MRVL MarvellT 11.84 +.20
MAS Masco 18.51 -.20
MAT Mattel 40.72 +.19
MXIM Maximlntg 27.71 +.22
MDR McDrmlnt 7.64 +.09
MCD McDnlds 96.08 +1.24
MUX McEwenM 2.57 -.04
MWV MeadWvco 36.27 +.03
MPW MedProp 12.00 -.21
MDT Medtrnic 51.56 +.05
MPEL MelcoCrwn 26.71 +.18
MRK Merck 47.09 -.02
MCY MercGn 44.38 +.67
MDP Meredith 43.76 +.26
MTOR Meritor 7.53 -.02
MET MetLife 45.96 +.11
KORS MKors 71.75 +.52
MU MicronT 13.24 +.06
MSFT Microsoft 33.02 -.24
MVIS Microvis 2.11 -.02
MIDD Middleby 184.92 -1.51
MSEX MdsxWatr 20.76 +.04
MM MillenMda 6.61 +.02
MBT MobileTele 20.99 -.01
MOLX Molex 29.33 +.08
MCP Molycorp 6.13 -.04
MDLZ Mondelez 30.55 -.15
MON Monsanto 97.12 -.39
MS MorgStan 25.58 +.13
MOS Mosaic 41.47 +.30
MYL Mylan 35.06 +.30
MYGN MyriadG 26.45 -.44
NPSP NPS Phm 25.16 +.91


CLOSE
14824.51
6305.78
480.87
9309.07
3593.35
1634.96
1196.07
17382.85
1016.50


CHG.
+48.38
-6.05
+1.52
+20.96
+14.83
+4.48
+3.16
+46.61
+3.01


Nasdaq composite
Close: 3,593.35
Change: 14.83 (0.4%)


%CHG.
+0.33%
-0.10%
+0.32%
+0.23%
+0.41%
+0.27%
+0.26%
+0.27%
+0.30%


NQ NQ Mobile 16.76 -.72
NRG NRGEgy 25.98 +.08
DCM NTTDOCO 16.43 -.05
NVE NV Energy 23.69 -.04
NXPI NXP Semi 37.24 +1.77
NBR Nabors 15.71 +.33
NDAQ NasdOMX 29.84 -.10
NBG NBGrcers 3.81 +.11
NFG NatFuGas 66.96 +.91
NGG NatGrid 57.60 +.21
NHI NtHlthlnv 56.88 -.60
NOV NOilVarco 74.46 +1.31
NKTR NektarTh 11.80 -.05
NEOG Neogen 53.99 +.06
NTAP NetApp 41.43 -.04
NFLX Netflix 283.36 +7.32
NJR NJRscs 43.59 -.14
EDU NewOrEd 21.95 -.43
NYCB NY CmtyB 14.96 +.20
NYMT NYMtgTr 6.05 -.01
NCT Newcastle 5.34 +.04
NWL NewellRub 24.99 -.06
NEWL NwLeadhlf .11 -.01
NEM NewmtM 31.34 -.77
NWSANewsCpAn 15.76 +.03
NWS NewsCpB n 15.97 +.03
NEE NextEraEn 81.08 +.65
NI NiSource 29.31 -.10
NLSN NielsenH 34.18 +.42
NKE NikeBs 63.37 +.56
NTT NipponTT 25.76 -.04
NE NobleCorp 38.36 +.18
NBL NobleEns 61.75 +.38
NOK NokiaCp 3.97 -.02
NAT NordicAm 7.92 +.12
NSC NorfkSo 73.08 +.19
NU NoestUt 41.16 -.13
NTI NthnTEn 20.72 -.47
NOC NorthropG 92.95 +.02
NRF NStarRlt 8.66
NWBI NwstBcsh 13.41 +.10
NWN NwstNG 41.54 -.20
NVS Novartis 73.45 -.84
NVAX Novavax 3.02 +.07
NVO NovoNord 170.86 -1.71
NUAN NuanceCm 18.50 -.38
NUE Nucor 45.66 +.13
NAD NuvDivA 12.65 -.10
JPZ NuvEqtP 12.28 +.05
NIO NuvMuOpp 12.69 -.07
NQM NvlQI 13.30 -.07
NMA NvMAd 12.22 -.08
NUW NvAMT-Fr 14.94 -.21
NNP NvNYP 13.23 -.03
NPP NuvPP 13.15 +.03
JPC NvPfdlnco 8.73 +.04
NPF NvPMI 12.40 -.03
NPI NuvPI 12.28 +.04
NPM NuvPl2 12.39 -.06
NPT NuvPl4 11.61 -.03
NQU NuvQInc 12.34 +.04
NES NuverraE 2.21 -.01
NVDA Nvidia 14.80 -.01
NXTM NxStageMd 12.55 +.03
OCZ OCZTech 1.43 -.02
OGE OGEEgys 35.86 +.17
OAS OasisPet 39.57 -.06
OXY OcciPet 88.17 +.82
OCFC OceanFst 16.96
ODP OfficeDpt 4.20 +.12
OIBR OiSA 1.50 -.01
ONB OldNBcp 13.38 +.38
ORI OldRepub 14.40 +.06
OLN Olin 22.83 +.23
OHI OmegaHlt 28.59 -.29
OME OmegaP 9.00 +.03
OVTI OmniVisn 17.98 +.51
ONNN OnSmcnd 7.23 -.05
OKS OneokPtrs 50.69 +.92
ONXX OnyxPh 123.48 +.12
OPK OpkoHlth 8.58 +.08
OPLK OplinkC 18.91 -.24
ORCL Oracle 31.66 -.12
ORBKOrbotch 12.05 +.11
OFIX Orthfx 22.27 -.05
OSK OshkoshCp 45.66 +.42
O7R OtterTail 26.81 -.07
P-Q-R
PNG PAA NGsS 22.64 +1.55
PCG PG&ECp 41.75 +.27
PMCSPMCSra 6.23 +.07
PNC PNC 72.55 +.31
PNM PNM Res 22.33 -.03
PKX POSCO 72.27 +.68
PPG PPG 155.76 -2.00
PPL PPLCorp 31.04 +.29
PCAR Paccar 53.96 +.40
PACT Pactera 6.69 +.19
PAAS PanASIv 12.53 -.35
P Pandora 18.39 +.23
PNRA PaneraBrd 165.21 -1.67
PAMT ParametSd 16.10 +.30
PKD ParkDrl 5.92 +.07
PH ParkerHan 100.63 +.11
PTEN PattUTI 20.04 +.42
BTU PeabdyE 17.89 +.09
PBA Pembinag 30.61 +.03
PENN PnnNGm 52.71 -.26
PNNT PennantPk 11.12 +.06
JCP Penney 12.76 -.41
PAG Penske 39.00 -.16
PNR Pentair 60.58 +.19
PBCT PeopUtdF 14.28 +.01
PBY PepBoy 11.38 +.37
POM PepcoHold 19.14 +.15
PEP PepsiCo 79.37 +.31
PRGO Perigo 118.26 +1.52


YTD
+13.13%
+18.83%
+6.13%
+10.25%
+19.00%
+14.64%
+17.21%
+15.92%
+19.68%


PETM PetSmart 70.30
PBR/A PetrbrsA 14.76
PBR Petrobras 13.96
PFE Pfizer 28.21
PM PhilipMor 82.95
PSX Phillips66 58.03
PNX PhoenxCos 39.28
PNY PiedNG 32.44
PIR Pier1 21.90
PFN PimlncStr2 10.01
PNW PinWst 54.65
PBI PitnyBw 16.85
PAA PlainsAAs 50.90
PLUG PlugPowrh .57
PCL PlumCrk 44.16
PII Polaris 110.79
POT Potash 29.71
DBC PwshDB 27.02
BKLN PSSrLoan 24.66
PIN PSlndia 13.89
QQQ PwShs QQQ75.43
PRAN PranaBio 4.90
PX Praxair 116.41
PCP PrecCastpt 212.39
PRA ProAssurs 48.19
PLD ProLogis 35.66
SH ProShtS&P 28.89
QLD ProUltQQQ 72.99
QID PrUShQQQ 20.97
SSO ProUltSP 79.84
EUM ProShtEM 30.23
EEV ProUltSEM 26.76
RWM ProShtR2K 19.63
UPRO PUltSP500 s66.43
UVXY PrUVxST rs 43.85
SCO PrUShCrde 27.11
AGQ ProUltSilv 25.66
PG ProctGam 76.85
PGR ProgsvCp 25.00
SDS PrUShSPrs 38.94
TBT PrUShL20rs77.77
TWM ProUSR2K 16.35
SPXU PUSSP500 22.78
SQQQ PrUPShQQQ23.87
PSEC ProspctCap 11.09
PRU Prudentl 75.07
PEG PSEG 32.70
PSA PubStrg 152.65
PHM PulteGrp 15.38
PMM PMMI 6.61
QEP QEP Res 27.70
QIHU Qihoo360 77.88
QCOMQualcom 66.56
STR Questar 22.15
ZQK Quiksilvr 4.95
RFMD RF MicD 5.04
RDN RadianGrp 12.79
RSH RadioShk 3.33
RL RLauren 165.55
RAVN Ravenlnds 29.41
RTN Raytheon 75.52
RLGY Realogy n 42.53
RWT RedwdTr 17.57
RGP RegncyEn 27.32
RF RegionsFn 9.44
RS RelStlAI 68.52
RENN Renren 3.35
RTK Rentech 1.95
RGEN Replgn 9.92
RSO ResrceCap 5.84
ROIC RetailOpp 13.09
RAI ReynAmer 47.51
RIO RioTinto 46.20
RAD RiteAid 3.35
RVBD RiverbedT 15.60
ROK RockwlAut 97.04
COL RockColl 71.02
ROG Rogers 55.59
ROP Roper 123.75
RY RoyalBkg 61.53
RCL RylCarb 35.89
RDS/BRoyDShllB 68.86-
RDS/ARoyDShllA 66.06 -
RYL Ryland 34.52
S-T-U
STBA S&T Bcp 22.77
SAI SAIC 15.11
SCG SCANA 48.45
SLM SLM Cp 23.98
SM SM Energy 69.52
DIA SpdrDJIA 148.04
GLD SpdrGold 136.71
MDY SP Mid 217.90
SPY S&P500ETF163.91
XHB SpdrHome 28.58
JNK SpdrLehHY 39.58
KRE SpdrS&P RB35.39
XRT SpdrRetl 77.79
XOP SpdrOGEx 62.76
XME SpdrMetM 36.50
SBS SABESPs 8.48
SBR SabnR 52.50
SWY Safeway 25.80
SAIA Saia Inc s 29.99
JOE StJoe 19.63
CRM Salesforcs 42.78
SLXP SalixPhm 66.47
SBH SallyBty 26.06
SJT SJuanB 17.07
SNDK SanDisk 55.02
SD SandRdge 5.20
SNY Sanofi 49.02
SLB Schlmbrg 82.68 -
SCHWSchwab 20.96
SDRL SeadrillLtd 45.45 -
STX SeagateT 38.87
SHLD SearsHldgs 40.87


1 ,7 0 0 ........... ............ .................... ........... .. .. ........ 3 ,6 0 0 ........................ ............. ............

1 ,6 5 0 ....................... .......... ....... .... .. ......... ...... 3 ,5 0 0 .... ............. ...... .... ......... .....



1,550 3,00: ......................
1,500 3,100:.. .


SRE SempraEn 84.43
SNH SenHous 22.96
SHW Sherwin 169.37
SFL ShipFin 15.67
SID SiderurNac 3.71
SIFY SifyTech 2.05
SIG SignetJwlrs 69.83
SSRI SilvStd g 8.49
SLW SilvWhtng 26.37
SPG SimonProp 145.27
SINA Sina 78.16
SIRI SiriusXM 3.58
SWKS SkywksSol 25.36
SWHCSmithWes 10.80
SMSI SmithMicro .92
SJM Smucker 105.32
SNA SnapOn 94.16
SODA SodaStrm 63.54
SOHU Sohu.cm 63.40
SLRC SolarCap 21.74
SCTY SolarCityn 32.15
SON SonocoP 37.95
SNE SonyCp 20.16
SOR SourcC 60.33
SJI SoJerlnd 58.04
SO SouthnCo 41.64
LUV SwstAiri 12.77
SWN SwstnEngy 38.23
SSS SovranSS 67.40
SE SpectraEn 33.36
SRC SpiritRC n 8.71
S Sprintn 6.66
PSLV SprottSilv 9.79
PHYS SprottGold 11.89
XLB SP Malls 40.37
XLV SP HIthC 49.26
XLP SP CnSt 39.23
XLY SP Consum 57.76
XLE SPEngy 82.46
XLF SPDRFncl 19.49
XLI SPInds 44.16
XLK SPTech 31.38
XLU SP Util 37.49
SPF StdPac 7.09
SWK StanBlkDk 85.18
SPLS Staples 14.12
SGU StarGas 4.84
SBUX Starbucks 70.96
HOT StarwdHtl 63.21
STT StateStr 66.79
STO Statoil ASA 22.65
STLD StlDynam 15.51
STXS Stereotaxs 3.83
SPH SubPpne 46.27
SUBK SuffolkBcp 17.32
SNHY SunHydrl 31.51
SU Suncor gs 34.79
SUNE SunEdison 7.40
SPWRSunPower 21.65
STP Suntech 1.04
STI SunTrst 32.30
SPN SupEnrgy 25.46
SVU Supvalu 7.02
SWFT SwiftTrans 18.25
SYMC Symantec 25.69
SNV Synovus 3.32
SYY Sysco 31.47
TMUS T-MoblUS n 23.14
TCP TC PpLn 48.50
AMTD TD Ameritr 25.70
TE TECO 16.60
TJX TJX 52.80
TSM TaiwSemi 16.26
TLM TalismE g 10.84
TGT Target 63.27
TASR TASER 11.15
TTM TataMotors 22.30
TCO Taubmn 68.62
TCK TeckResg 25.71
VIV TelefBrasil 19.84
TEN Tenneco 46.36
TDC Teradata 58.92
TER Teradyn 15.29
TNH TerraNitro 210.50
TSLA TeslaMot 166.45
TSO Tesoro 46.39
TEVA TevaPhrm 38.21
TXN Texlnst 38.43
TXRH TexRdhse 25.00
TGH Textainer 34.84
TXT Textron 26.81
DDD 3DSyss 50.43
MMM 3MCo 113.00
TIBX TibcoSft 22.69
TIF Tiffany 77.25
THI THortong 54.88
TWX TimeWarn 60.98
TKR Timken 57.16
TIVO TiVoInc 11.58
TOL TollBros 30.64
TRU TorchEngy .45
TMK Torchmark 69.36
TD TorDBk g 83.59
TOT Total SA 56.91
RIG Transocn 45.68
TRV Travelers 79.89
TY TriContl 18.07
TYp TriCntlpf 45.16
TSL TrinaSolar 8.88
TRST TrstNY 5.92
TUP Tuppwre 82.36
TRQ TurqHillRs 5.24
FOXA 21stCFoxA 31.57
TWO TwoHrblnv 9.40
TYC Tycolntls 33.37
TSN Tyson 28.45
UBS UBSAG 19.66
UDR UDR 22.71
UGI UGICorp 39.94


Stocknottck Footnotes: Sock Foonoesld Issue has been called for
redemption by company. d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pf Preferred stock
issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price, rt Right to buy secunty at a specified price, rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distrib-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vI Company in
bankruptcy or receivershp, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in pnce. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus
stock, c Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distnbution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covenng
market costs is paid from fund assets, d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges). m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available. p previous day's net asset value. s fund
split shares dunng the week. x fund paid a distribution dunng the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


Interestrates







The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
rose to 2.78
percent on
Wednesday.
Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .03 0.03 ... .09
6-month T-bill .06 0.06 ... .14
52-wk T-bill .12 0.12 ... .17
2-year T-note .40 0.36 +0.04 .27
5-year T-note 1.58 1.52 +0.06 .68
10-year T-note 2.77 2.71 +0.06 1.64
30-year T-bond 3.74 3.69 +0.05 2.75


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.57 3.52 +0.05 2.45
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.29 5.26 +0.03 4.22
Barclays USAggregate 2.46 2.50 -0.04 1.82
Barclays US High Yield 6.40 6.39 +0.01 6.71
Moodys AAACorp Idx 4.51 4.60 -0.09 3.43
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.70 1.68 +0.02 .95
Barclays US Corp 3.37 3.43 -0.06 2.97


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar
advanced
against the euro,
Japanese yen
and other major
currencies amid
data showing
the recovery in
the U.S. housing
sector remains
on track despite
higher mortgage
rates.







SPIM


MAJORS CLOSE Cl
USD per British Pound 1.5525 -.0
Canadian Dollar 1.0483 -.0
USD per Euro 1.3337 -.0
Japanese Yen 97.71
Mexican Peso 13.2891 +.0
EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel 3.6604 -.0
Norwegian Krone 6.0500 -.0
South African Rand 10.2905 +.0
Swedish Krona 6.5122 -.0
Swiss Franc .9217 -.0


ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.1182
6.1205
7.7555
68.825
1.2773
1113.67
29.98


1 YR.


1YR.
%CHG AGO
-.09% 1.5822
-.05% .9881
-.36% 1.2564
+.62% 78.53
+.21% 13.1912

-.00% 4.0199
-.54% 5.8295
+.93% 8.4078
-.33% 6.6126
-.38% .9559


+.44% .9636
-.02% 6.3541
-.01% 7.7564
+3.63% 55.665
-.44% 1.2528
-.32% 1136.85
-.17% 29.97


Commodities
The price of
crude oil rose to
its highest level
in more than two
years amid wor-
ries about the
prospect of a
U.S.-led military
strike on Syria.
Gold declined.
Corn also fell.






3E2


CE


FUELS
Crude Oil (bbl)
Ethanol (gal)
Heating Oil (gal)
Natural Gas (mm btu)
Unleaded Gas (gal)

METALS C
Gold (oz) 1
Silver (oz)
Platinum(oz) 1
Copper (Ib)
Palladium (oz)

AGRICULTURE
Cattle (Ib)
Coffee (Ib)
Corn (bu)
Cotton (Ib)
Lumber (1,000 bd ft)
Orange Juice (Ib)
Soybeans (bu)
Wheat (bu)


CLOSE PVS. %CHG %YTD


110.10
2.50
3.21
3.57
3.09

CLOSE
419.00
24.39
540.10
3.31
746.05

CLOSE
1.23
1.15
5.04
0.93
308.70
1.37
14.33
6.47


109.01
2.48
3.16
3.53
3.03

PVS.
1420.60
24.65
1532.10
3.33
748.90

PVS.
1.23
1.13
5.00
0.93
306.30
1.35
14.14
6.51


+1.00
+0.32
+1.50
+0.93
+1.99

%CHG
-0.11
-1.05
+0.52
-0.77
-0.38

%CHG
+0.28
+1.28
+0.90

+0.78
+1.11
+1.34
-0.65


I


UIL UILHold 37.83 .46
UNS UNSEngy 46.77 -.06
LCC USAirwy 15.34 -.13
USG USG 23.37 +.31
UPL UltraPtg 21.01 +.04
UA UnderArmr 72.35 +.28
UNF UniFirst 97.10 +.14
UL Unilever 38.65 -.36
UNP UnionPac 154.00 +1.20
UNT Unit 46.77 +.38
UAL UtdContl 27.93 +.22
UMC UtdMicro 1.92 -.01
UPS UPSB 85.64 -.20
URI UtdRentals 55.09 +.87
USB US Bancrp 36.11
UNG US NGas 18.78 +.02
USO USOilFd 39.08 +.21
X USSteel 17.95 -.10
UTX UtdTech 99.98 +.04
UNH UtdhlthGp 71.54 +.02
UVV UnvslCp 49.26 +.03
URBN UrbanOut 41.95 +.50

V-W-X-Y-Z
VFC VFCp 186.59 +.40
VALE Vale SA 14.88 -.07
VALE/PValeSApf 1332 -04
VLO ValeroE 35.77 +.51
VLY VlyNBcp 10.10 +.01
VVTV ValVisA 4.79 +.12
VCLK ValueClick 21.14 -.07
VNQ VangREIT 64.95 -.40
VEU VangAIIW 45.67 -.05
VWO VangEmg 37.19 -.03
VGK VangEur 51.72 -.06
VEA VangFTSE 37.28 -.04
VVC Vectren 33.14 -.08
VELT Velti .37 +.01
VTR Ventas 62.76 -.10
VE VeoliaEnv 15.55 +.59
VRSN Verisign 48.46 -.29
VZ VerizonCm 46.56 -.39
VIAB ViacomB 79.41 +1.09
VVI ViadCorp 22.75 +.25
VPHM ViroPhrm 29.82 -.02
V Visa 175.21 +1.04
VSH Vishaylnt 12.55 -.06
VMW VMware 83.82 +.43
VOD Vodafone 29.41 +.07
VRNG Vringo 3.12 -.14
VMC VulcanM 47.86 +.08
WPC WP Carey 67.05 +.58
WMT WalMart 72.38 -.48
WAG Walgrn 47.07 -.18
WLT WalterEn 12.97 +.14
WCRXWarnerCh 20.99 +.12
WRE WREIT 24.76 -.13
WM WsteMlnc 41.10 -.07
WAT Waters 98.53 +.08
WFT Weathflntl 15.11 +.36
WBS WebsterFn 26.28 +.23
WRI WeinRlt 29.15 -.02
WLP WellPoint 84.83 -.24
WFC WellsFargo 41.25 +.14
WEN WendysCo 7.67 +.08
WR WestarEn 31.32 +.11
EMD WAstEMkt 11.94 +.06
WIA WAstlnfSc 11.44 +.01
WDC WDigital 62.46 +1.02
WU WstnUnion 17.79 +.14
WBK Westpac s 27.98 -.26
WY Weyerhsr 27.66 +.55
WHR Whrlpl 128.84 +.73
WFM WholeFds 51.48 -.38
WMB WmsCos 36.21 +.09
WSM WmsSon 56.97 -2.47
WIN Windstrm 8.05 -.06
WEC WiscEngy 40.96 +.24
DXJ WTJpHedg 44.56 +.37
EPI WTIndia 13.31 -.12
WWD Woodward 39.19 -.06
WDAYWorkdayn 74.76 -1.25
WWE WIdW Ent 9.78 -.05
XL XLGrp 29.88 -.25
XEL XcelEngy 27.88 +.17
XRX Xerox 9.92 +.25
XLNX Xilinx 43.52 +.41
YHOOYahoo 27.11 +.11
AUY Yamanag 11.27 -.25
YELP Yelp 51.67 +.20
YGE YingliGm 4.07
YORWYorkWater 19.71 +.09
YUM YumBrnds 70.78 -.59
ZLC ZaleCp 11.63 +2.67
ZMH Zimmer 78.25 -.09
ZTS Zoetisn 29.57 +.37
ZF ZweigFd 13.02 +.01
ZNGA Zynga 2.88 +.09






iPage 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/STATE NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


TODAY



; \


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature9 Today


FRIDAY
- *


Isolated p.m. storms Partly clo


92 / 740 910 /
40% chance of rain 10% chance

AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 90/74 storms all day possible
Sarasota 91/75 part cldyall day possible


SATURDAY




Partly cloudy


udy


40 910 / 750
of rain 20% chance of rain 25%


Cleamater;
90 76
1 \


Tamna


r"92/77 93 73
-


SSUN AND MOON
82 9699 90 St. Petersburg A
The Sun Rise Set Apollo Beach
8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m. 91/76un Rise et olloBeach
The hghertheAccuWeather.comUV ndex number, Today 7:06 a.m. 7:52 p.m. 91 75
the eater the need for eye and skin protection. 02 Low; Friday 7:07 a.m. 7:51 p.m. ... ....
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 Hiigh; 8-10Very High;1 Extreme. The Moon Rise Set '
RealFeelTemperaturelisthe exclusive Today 1:13 a.m. 3:03 p.m.
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature a. 3:
based on eight weather factors. Friday 2:00 a.m. 3:49 p.m.
AIR QUALITY INDEX New First Full Last Bradenton
Air Quality Index readings as of Wednesday Longboat eyyakka it
31 Key90/78 92/73
0 50 100 150 20 35 Sep5 Sep 12 Sep 19 Sep26 Sarasota% ..
0 50100150200 300 500 91/75 _
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy SO LUNAR TABLE
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300 Osprey A
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous Minor Major Minor Major 90/75 %
Main pollutant: ozone Today 12:57a 7:09a 1:21p 7:33p
Source: scgov.net Fri. 1:42a 7:54a 2:06p 8:17p Venice
19_,_,_M... _. / 175 north Prt


POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees
Grass >:
Weeds o o :o I I
Molds **
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 880/730
Normal High/Low 92/740
Record High 970 (1998)
Record Low 670 (1969)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Wednesday 0.39"
Month to date 9.21"
Normal month to date 7.22"
Year to date 37.44"
Normal year to date 36.40"
Record 1.61" (1974)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 7.38 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 9.21 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 37.44 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour penod ending at 5 p.m.


Sat. 2:25a 8:37a 2:48p 9:00p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.

TIDES


High
Punta Gorda
Today 12:02a
Fri. 1:31a
Englewood
Today 7:53a
Fri. 12:08a


Low High Low

2:47a 9:16a 6:04p
4:16a 10:38a 7:09p

1:03a --- 4:20p
2:32a 9:15a 5:25p


Boca Grande
Today 6:58a 2:41p 11:13p
Fri. 8:20a 12:53a 11:56p 3:46p
El Jobean
Today 12:34a 3:16a 9:48a 6:33p
Fri. 2:03a 4:45a 11:10a 7:38p
Venice
Today 6:08a 2:59p 10:23p ---
Fri. 7:30a 1:1a 11:06p 4:04p


known is ioaays weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.


Gulf Water
Temperature

870


1 .U / b


Engle*ud. ,-
91 76


DlI irl


SUNDAY


MONDAY THE NATION


Bartu
92, 74


Ft. Meade
91/72


Wauchula
92 74


SLimestone
j93 73


rcadia
74Hull
%Hull


92/74 93/73
Port Charlotte
S 92/74

Punta Gorda
,a 92/73


91/76.
Boca GrandeO
89/79


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2013

Publication date: 8/29/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
SSW 4-8 0-1 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola
WNW 7-14 1-2 Light


Fort Myers
90/74

Cape Coral
90/74


9b
Sanibel
89/78


AccuWe


Lehigh Acres
91/73


Bonita Springs r
90/74 .

ather.com


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
90 75 pc
90 76 pc
90 76 pc
90 76 t
92 74 s
88 77 t
90 74 t
90 72 t
92 73 pc
94 73 pc
89 79 t


Fri.
Hi Lo W
92 76 t
90 77 pc
90 77 pc
91 76 pc
93 75 t
90 78 pc
91 74 pc
91 73 pc
92 74 t
92 74 t
89 80 pc


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
89 80 t
92 73 s
91 72 t
89 74 t
89 77 t
90 75 t
92 72 pc
89 72 t
93 74 s
89 77 pc
91 74 pc


Fri.
Hi Lo W
89 79 pc
92 74 t
92 73 t
91 74 t
91 78 pc
90 74 pc
93 73 t
90 72 t
93 75 t
89 76 t
92 76 pc


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Today
Hi Lo W
89 78 t
90 75 pc
91 76 pc
94 75 s
91 75 pc
95 74 pc
92 77 pc
89 74 t
91 73 t
90 75 t
92 74 t


Fri.
Hi Lo W
90 79 pc
91 75 t
91 76 pc
94 76 t
90 76 pc
93 75 t
92 77 pc
91 75 t
91 74 pc
91 76 pc
94 74 t


' E' Pas

S.Chihuri


S Houlon
Montwery
9370 .


*8977::


Fronts Precipitation

Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


High ................ 1070 at Thermal, CA


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


WORLD CI


City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


Today
Hi Lo W
87 65 pc
62 51 c
92 74 pc
86 66 pc
94 64 s
92 73 pc
95 62 s
74 63 pc
82 62 s
78 59 pc
88 66 pc
89 70 t
88 70 s
88 67 pc
82 64 pc
94 74 t
88 66 pc
76 58 pc
102 79 s
95 64 s
97 75 s
86 67 s
80 64 t
62 48 pc
88 68 t
82 62 pc
92 59 t
90 72 s
96 74 pc
90 70 s


Fri.
Hi Lo W
89 66 s
63 52 pc
90 73 pc
87 67 pc
94 64 s
92 74 pc
91 60 s
76 67 pc
84 63 pc
83 62 pc
88 67 pc
87 69 pc
90 70 t
90 69 pc
85 64 pc
91 73 t
89 68 pc
81 58 pc
102 79 s
96 65 s
99 74 pc
85 68 pc
82 62 t
57 35 c
90 67 pc
82 64 pc
91 54 s
89 74 s
97 73 pc
90 72 pc


CITIES


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
70 58 pc 71 61c
111 85 s 112 82 s
82 60 s 80 60 pc
75 56 pc 76 56 pc
73 54 s 73 55 s
98 75 s 98 74 s
83 51 pc 76 48 pc
89 76 t 90 76t
64 53 pc 70 45 pc
77 50 pc 73 46 s
66 57 sh 72 57 c
64 55 t 64 55 sh
72 57 pc 77 59 pc
82 59 t 86 61 pc


Low ..................... 350 atTruckee, CA


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
96 71 pc 96 72 pc
98 74 s 101 73 s
88 70 pc 92 70 pc
96 82 t 98 82 t
89 69 pc 87 68 pc
92 73 pc 93 74 pc
96 77 s 99 77 pc
82 69 s 86 70 t
90 74 t 89 71t
94 73 pc 95 73 pc
94 75 pc 95 74 pc
91 74 pc 92 76 pc
82 68 pc 83 70 pc
84 70 pc 82 67 pc


Oklahoma City 100 74 s 100 74 s


Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC



City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


99 71 s 100 71 s
84 67 pc 86 70 pc
96 82 t 95 83t
86 64 s 87 66 pc
70 58 c 76 59 pc
77 64 sh 79 60 pc
78 63 pc 77 64 pc
88 69 t 89 69 pc
93 72 pc 94 72 pc
98 76 s 98 76 pc
101 76 s 101 75 s
81 69 pc 80 69 pc
73 59 pc 74 58 pc
73 61 sh 73 56 pc
88 69 pc 89 71 pc


Today
Hi Lo W
75 53 pc
79 61 pc
79 57 pc
74 52 pc
90 57 pc
73 65 s
82 62 s
57 54 r
90 77 pc
75 57 pc
90 81 s
82 62 s
70 61 r
86 65 t


Fri.
Hi Lo W
73 54 t
82 64 pc
81 60 t
78 56 pc
85 57 pc
78 65 s
82 62 s
68 59 r
91 77 sh
81 54 s
93 82 pc
84 63 pc
71 54 c
88 66 pc


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Scott promises action after schools summit ends


CLEARWATER (AP) -
A three-day schools sum-
mit ended Wednesday
with promises to fix
Florida's beleaguered
school grading system,
but it's still not clear
what it will mean for
students and teachers
across the state.
Gov. Rick Scott called
for the schools summit
following a summer that
included the abrupt
resignation of Education
Commissioner Tony
Bennett and a backlash
over the state's well-
known A-to-F grading
system that is based
primarily on test results.
During the summit,
a small group of politi-
cians, school superin-
tendents, teachers and
members of education
advocacy groups debated
everything from what
kind of test should be
given students to how to
evaluate teachers.


They came up with a
long list of suggestions,
such as expanding grades
by adding "pluses" and
"minuses" and changing
some of the scores used on
standardized writing tests.
Now it's up to Scott
to decide which recom-
mendations should be
followed.
"It's really up to the
governor now," said
Joanne McCall, vice
president of the Florida
Education Association.
"He put us together and
said he wanted to hear
what we had to say. We'll
see if he does anything."
Scott quickly pledged
to carry out some of the
suggestions through
either executive orders
or by pursuing new laws
during the 2014 session.
"The discussion and
ideas generated this
week will guide our
future decisions and
steps we will take," Scott


said in a statement.
The Scott administra-
tion, however, did not
say which ideas it may
be willing to follow. And
before the governor
makes any decision,
he's planning to have a
private dinner meeting
Thursday with former
Gov. Jeb Bush the
architect of the state's
current system to
discuss education.
State Sen. John
Thrasher, R-St.
Augustine, and Gary
Chartrand, chairman
of the State Board of
Education, are also plan-
ning to attend the dinner
in Miami. Chartrand
said he expected a "good
frank conversation"
about education at the
meeting.
The Florida
Democratic Party labeled
the summit "pure re-
election chicanery," and
said Scott convened it


I OTHER HEADLINE NEWS FROM AROUND THE STATE


Zimmerman's
wife pleads
guilty to perjury
SANFORD (AP) -
George Zimmerman's wife
pleaded guilty Wednesday
to a misdemeanor perjury
charge for lying during
a bail hearing after her
husband's arrest, and she
was sentenced to a year's
probation and 100 hours
of community service.
Shellie Zimmerman, 26,
had been charged with
felony perjury after she
lied about the couple's as-
sets during a bail hearing
following her husband's
arrest for the fatal 2012
shooting of 17-year-old
Trayvon Martin. George
Zimmerman, a neighbor-
hood watch volunteer,
was acquitted last month
of second-degree murder.


Shellie Zimmerman had
been charged with a
felony and, if convicted,
had faced up to five years
in prison and a $5,000
fine. She had given her
bail-hearing testimony
by telephone last year be-
cause of safety concerns
for Zimmerman's family.
As part of the deal,
Shellie Zimmerman
wrote a letter of apology
to Judge Kenneth Lester,
who presided over last
year's bail hearing.

Scott announces
$90M to help
Everglades

FORT MYERS (AP) -
Gov. Rick Scott announced
Wednesday that the state
will spend $90 million
to further hydrate the
Everglades and help


lessen water woes plaguing
southwest Florida.
During a stop in Fort
Myers, Scott discussed a
plan to construct a 2.6-mile
bridge on Tamiami Trail
in Miami-Dade County.
A similar 1-mile bridge
opened in March on that
stretch.
Scott said that by
building an additional
bridge, more water will
flow naturally through the
Everglades. This will keep
nutrient rich water out of
the estuaries. He was joined
during the announcement
by local lawmakers.

Family files lawsuit
over teen's stun
gun death
MIAMI BEACH (AP)
- The family of a teen-
ager who died after being


to mask the large cuts to
public school spending
he proposed during his
first year in office. Scott
is seeking a second term
next year.
The party also
criticized Scott for not
attending the three-day
event. Thrasher, who
did attend the summit,
defended Scott's deci-
sion to bypass it. He said
the governor's presence
would have "overpoliti-
cized it."
Senate President Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville, said in
the wake of the summit
lawmakers will likely
consider changes to
make the grading system
"more transparent" and
"easier to understand."
Florida has had
testing for years: the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test, or
FCAT, which served as
the foundation for the
A-to-F grading system



shocked with a Taser by
Miami Beach police is
suing.
A lawsuit filed Tuesday
claims police violated
18-year-old Israel
Hernandez-Llach's civil
rights. The suit names the
city and Police Chief Ray
Martinez as defendants.
Hernandez-Llach was
a graffiti artist known
as "Reefa." Police said
they spotted him spray-
painting a shuttered fast
food restaurant earlier
this month. He alleg-
edly led police on a foot
chase and ignored their
orders to stop. Police said
he was shocked with a
Taser once in the chest
and then showed signs of
distress.
Hernandez-Llach was
taken to a local hospital,
where he died.


that is used to reward
and sanction schools.
Over the years, however,
the criteria used to grade
schools have changed as
new requirements have
kicked in.
The flurry of changes
has drawn concerns
from school superinten-
dents who have ques-
tioned the continued
validity of the system.
Teachers, meanwhile,
are concerned that their
evaluations now are
linked largely to how
students fare on tests.
Shortly before he
stepped down this
summer, Bennett per-
suaded the State Board
of Education to adopt
a "safety net" provision
that limited a school
grade from dropping
more than one letter
at a time. The move
helped more than 150
schools from avoiding
an "F" grade but it led to



Mother gets
15 years in meth
death of baby
JACKSONVILLE (AP)
- A Jacksonville moth-
er has been sentenced
to 15 years in prison for
the methadone-related
death of her 6-month-
old daughter.
A Duval County judge
sentenced 29-year-old
Jennifer Lacey Frazier
on Tuesday. She plead-
ed guilty last month to
aggravated manslaugh-
ter of a child by way of
culpable negligence.
Police say Frazier
was a methadone user
who mixed the drug in
a container. She told
police she used the
container less than
two hours later to
provide an oral dose of


criticism that the grades
were misleading. Now
the board is contemplat-
ing extending that provi-
sion for another year.
Bennett resigned after
it was reported that his
staff in Indiana, where
he was the top education
official before taking the
Florida job, changed that
state's school grading
formula to benefit a
top Republican donor's
charter school.
Miami-Dade Schools
Superintendent Alberto
Carvalho initially
expressed skepticism
about the summit, but
said he was optimistic
his concerns would be
addressed. Carvalho has
pushed to soften the
impact of the grading
system as Florida moves
from its current school
standards to tough new
standards called the
Common Core State
Standards.



antibiotic and ibupro-
fen mix to her baby,
Jacey.

Jury recommends
death for man who
killed teenager

OCALA (AP) It took
jurors in Ocala some
six hours on Tuesday to
recommend the death
penalty for 21-year-old
Michael Shane Bargo Jr.
in the 2011 slaying of a
teenager.
Prosecutors say Bargo
was a ringleader in
planning and executing
the plan to kill 15-year-
old Seath Jackson at a
home in Summerfield,
and then burn his body
and scatter the ashes.
The jury voted 10-2
in favor of the death
penalty.


,-_ |.-10s -Os O 1Os 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 8 U 90s
SShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Partly cloudy Partly cloudy w, O'___ s
S : 79/57 ,7961:: '"

92 /76 91 /750 To e bo 2
o chance of rain 25% chance of rain 86,7 nwYor
S San Francisco Ddwn B Wasnlngmn
73 95 869
Plant Cityc n C2ty
92:3 Winter Haen Los A n ..
92,74 : Atlanta
I dn.aB n -- .... ... ....... *as


-1











SPORTS


Kurt Busch eyes Indy 500,
Coca-Cola 600 double, *Page 2


* NFL: Tampa Bay

REDSKINS AT BUCS
WHO: Washington (3-0)
at Tampa Bay (1-2)
WHEN: Tonight, 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Raymond James Stadium
RADIO: 620 AM
TV: WFLA
INSIDE: Tweet reveals Tynes'
misery, PAGE 6



Rookie


QB gets


to start


finale

By RICK STROUD
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA During
the five weeks Tampa
Bay players had off
before training camp,
rookie quarterback
Mike Glennon looked
at his smart phone and
found another test of
his football intelligence.
Every 30 minutes or so,
a text arrived from Bucs
backup quarterback Dan
Orlovsky, quizzing him on
some aspect of playing
the position: a formation,
protection, defense or
route combination.
"It was just stuff and
questions about the
offense, and he would
be able to fire it back to
me," said Orlovsky, who is
entering his ninth season
in the league and second
with the Bucs said. "So he's
been impressive in that
role. He's embraced it."
Glennon, a third-round
pick from N.C. State, was
installed as the No. 2
quarterback behind Josh
Freeman prior to training
camp and received the
majority of playing time
during games.
He will make his first
start tonight against the
Redskins in the preseason
finale.
Fast-tracking Glennon
was the idea of coach
Greg Schiano, who said
he won't hesitate to go
with a first-year player
should Freeman falter or
become injured.
"I do think that Mike
will be ready," Orlovsky
said. "He's been impressive
with the way he's handled
himself, with the way he's
handled the offense. He's
not scared to rip it, which
is a good quality. He can.
The ball comes off his
hand really nice.
"I think the biggest

ROOKIE 16


* PREP VOLLEYBALL: Port Charlotte 3, Lemon Bay 1


N P O BY JENNIFER
SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO


Port Charlotte High School's Courtney Robertson returns the ball to Lemon Bay during their match Wednesday in
Port Charlotte. The Pirates won 14-25, 26-24, 25-21, 55-16.




PIRATES PERSEVERE

Port Charlotte rallies after dropping first game to Mantas


By CHUCK BALLARO
SUN CORRESPONDENT
PORT CHARLOTTE Port
Charlotte High School lost the first
game and trailed for much of the
second in its nondistrict contest
against Lemon Bay on Wednesday
night at the Pirate Cove.
But the Pirates came from
behind to win the next three games
for a 14-25, 26-24, 25-21, 25-16
victory in the team's third game in


UP NEXT
Lemon Bay: vs. North Port, Tuesday, 7 p.m.
Port Charlotte: vs. DeSoto County,
Tuesday, 7 p.m.

as many nights.
Port Charlotte (2-1) got huge
nights from seniors Courtney
Robertson (16 kills, six blocks) and
setter Jenna Sutter, whose 68 digs
were the big difference.


Port Charlotte coach Chrissy
Burkhart said her team had to
battle for this one against a peren-
nially strong Lemon Bay squad.
"It's preparation and practice,
and there are times when you're
down and have to come back.
That's what practice is and how we
come through in games like that,"
Burkhart said.
Lemon Bay (0-2) won the first
PIRATES 12


* MLB: Tampa Bay 4, L.A. Angels 1


Archer keeps Angels quiet


Tampa Bay Rays starter Chris Archer throws to the Los Angeles
Angels'J.B. Shuck during Wednesday's game in St. Petersburg.


By MARC TOPKIN
TAMPA BAY TIMES
ST. PETERSBURG-
The Rays are watching
Chris Archer closely,
for any signs he may be
overworked as he heads
into his first significant
September.
But as many other
issues as the Rays have
had with their rotation,
Archer has given them
nothing to worry about
- and plenty to smile
over.
Archer turned in an-
other impressive outing
Wednesday, leading the
Rays to a losing streak-
stopping 4-1 win over


ANGELS AT RAYS
WHO: Los Angeles (59-72) at
Tampa Bay (75-56)
WHEN:Today, 1:10 p.m.
WHERE: Tropicana Field, St.
Petersburg
PITCHERS: Jason Vargas (7-5,
3.77) vs. Jake Odorizzi (0-0,6.00)
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM,
1480 AM, 1530 AM, 1580 AM
TICKETS: 1-888-FAN-RAYS or
ticketmaster.com

the Angels.
Archer worked seven
solid innings, and had
help, of course, as new-
comer David Dejesus


and mainstay Ben
Zobrist sparked their two
rallies and Joel Peralta
and Fernando Rodney
actually finished without
drama.
The Rays had lost three
straight to three different
teams on three con-
secutive days. The win
improved them to 75-56
and remained 212 games
behind the American
League East-leading Red
Sox.
Archer, 24, is ap-
proaching his career
high in innings, the 15713
he threw last season, and
certainly in higher stress
RAYS 3


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL

COLLEGE KICKOFF
The college football season
opens tonight with two top-25
teams in action, No. 6 South
Carolina hosts North Carolina,
and No. 24 Southern Cal visits
Hawaii. For this weekend's
schedule and the Associated
Press'top 25, SEE PAGE 5.

TONIGHT'S
STATE GAME
WHO: Akron at Central Florida
WHEN: 7 p.m.
WHERE: Bright House Networks
Stadium, Orlando
TV: ESPN3
INSIDE: No. 1 Alabama
dismisses talk of 3-peat, PAGE 6



Manziel

must sit


for half


of game

By KRISTIE RIEKEN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOUSTON Johnny
Football's season will start
a little late.
Johnny Manziel was
suspended for the first
half of Texas A&M's
opening game against
Rice on Saturday for
what the school called an
"inadvertent" violation
of NCAA rules by signing
autographs.
The penalty appears to
have brought a quick end
to an investigation that
could have ruined the
seventh-ranked Aggies'
upcoming season.
The school issued a
statementWednesday
saying it declared the
Heisman
Trophy
winner
ineligible
and that the
NCAA agreed
to reinstate
Manziel after
MANZIEL he sits out
sai the first half
against the underdog Owls.
"I am proud of the
way both Coach Sumlin
and Johnny handled this
situation, with integrity
and honesty," Texas A&M
Chancellor John Sharp
said in the statement.
"We all take the Aggie
Code of Honor very
seriously and there is
no evidence that either
the university or Johnny
violated that code."
The quarterback was
beingAinvestigated by
the NCAA for allegedly
accepting money for
signing autographs for
memorabilia brokers, a
violation of NCAA rules
that could have led to a
much longer suspension.
ESPN first reported the
allegations against Manziel
earlier this month.
According to the states
ment, Texas A&M and
the NCAAu"confirmed
there is no evidence
Manziel received money
in exchange for auto-
graphs based on currently
available information and
statements by Manziel."
Conditions for reinstate-
ment include Manziel
discussing his actions
with teammates and A&M
revising how it educates
student-athletes about
signing autographs.
He likely will be replaced
in the starting lineup by
either junior Matt Joeckel
or freshman Kenny Hill.


INDEX I Lottery 2 1 Community calendar 2 1 Preps 2 1Auto racing 2 1 Baseball 3-4 1 Scoreboard 5 1 Tennis 5 1 Quick Hits 5 1 College football 6 | NFL 6


Thursday, August 29, 2013


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SunCoastSports @SunCoastSports


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


Florida Lottery
wwwflalottery.com
* CASH 3
Aug. 28N .................................... 8-9-6
Aug. 28D ................................ 9-2-8
Aug. 27N .................................... 7-4-6
Aug. 27D.................................... 7-9-1
Aug. 26N .................................... 0-9-6
Aug. 26D ............................... ..... 1-0-5
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
Aug. 28N .................................9-5-6-2
Aug. 28D.................................5-9-3-4
Aug. 27N ................. ......... 6-8-1-7
Aug. 27D ................. ....... .1-3-8-4
Aug. 26N................................. 9-9-4-2
Aug. 26D.............................. 11-4-8-1
D-Day, N-Night
* FANTASY 5
Aug. 28 .......................1-18-25-27-32
Aug.27 ..................... 0-12-20-24-35
Aug.26 .......................6-16-18-20-29
Aug.25 ......................... 3-4-24-34-35
Aug.24 ...........................3-4-7-25-27
Aug.23 ......................... 4-5-11-18-28
PAYOFF FORAUG. 27
4 5-digit winners.............$48,904.20
315 4-digit winners ................... $100
8,614 3-digitwinners ...............$10
* MEGA MONEY
Aug.27 ............................. 9-15-35-38
M egaBall......................................... 10

Aug.23 ...........................17-35-37-39
M egaBall.........................................19
PAYOFF FORAUG.27
0 4-of-4 MB .........................550,000
2 4-of-4................................. $2,800
33 3-of-4 MB ......................... 371.50
643 3-of-4................................ $56.50
1,019 2-of-4 MB............................$25
* LOTTO
Aug.28 ....................3-9-11-21-24-49
Aug.24 ................11-24-36-45-46-47
Aug.21 ..................3-6-36-46-48-52
PAYOFF FORAUG. 24
1 6-digit winners ......................59M
37 5-digit winners ..................$5,766
2,198 4-digit winners .................. $81
47,748 3-digit winners .................$5
* POWERBALL
Aug.28 ........................... 6-7-9-19-32
Powerball.................................... 13

Aug.24 ..................... 12-17-25-45-59
Powerball................................... 19
PAYOFF FORAUG. 24
0 5 of5 + PB............................. 92M
0 5 of 5.............................. $1,000,000
5 4of5 + PB......................... 10,000
90 4of5 ....................................$100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$116 million
* MEGA MILLIONS
Aug.27 ......................... 4-7-30-36-38
Powerball........................................ 38

Aug.23 .....................1-9-17-20-53
Powerball........................................ 14
PAYOFF FORAUG. 27
0 5 of5 + MB............................. $51M
0 5 of 5................................. 250,000
1 4of5 + MB......................... 10,000
32 4 of5 ..................................... $150


Correction
A story in Wednesday's edition
incorrectly stated that the boys
golf match between North Port,
Community Christian and Palmetto
was played at Heron Creek Golf&
Country Club. It was played at Bobcat
Trail Golf Club.

How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call Mark
Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must contain
name, address and phone number.
Submit a Recreational Sports or
an Away at College item: Email to
sports@sun-herald.com and BKLE3@aol.
com. The name and number of a contact
person is required.
Submit local golf scores: Email scores
to golfscores@sun-herald.com. Scores
appear in the weekly Herald sections.

Sun Coast Sports Now
Get the latest local sports news:
www.suncoastsportsblog.com


V


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Twitter:
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Contact us
Mark Lawrence Sports Editor
mlawrence@sun-herald.com
Mike Bambach Deputy SE
mbambach@sun-herald.com
Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com
Rob Shore Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* AUTO RACING:



Busch gunning for Indy 500


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLOTTE, N.C.-
Greg Zipadelli, crew chief
both times Tony Stewart
ran the Indianapolis
500 and the Coca-Cola
600 on the same day, is
no fan of the grueling
doubleheader.
It's a position he made
clear last October to
Danica Patrick as she was
trying to put together an
Indy 500 deal that would
interfere with her first
full season of Sprint Cup
racing.
"I think it's the craziest
thing I've ever heard,"
Zipadelli said last year
of Patrick's desire to run
at Indianapolis. "I lived
through it twice with one
of the greatest racers I've
ever seen, and trying to
run both of those races
is just stupid. She needs
to focus on the Cup car if
that's what she wants to
do. If she's here to be in
NASCAR, then she needs
to be here focused on
NASCAR."
Patrick heeded that ad-
vice and halted her plans.
Stewart, the three-time
NASCAR champion, also
took a pass when Roger
Penske in December
offered him a ride in the
500.
Now Zipadelli has a
new problem on his
hands: Kurt Busch,
the newest addition at
Stewart-Haas Racing, said
he's still trying to put to-
gether a deal to run next
year's Indianapolis 500
with Andretti Autosport.
"It's something that's
still on the table," Busch


THIS WEEK ON TRACK


NASCAR
SPRINT CUP ADVOCARE 500
Where: Atlanta Motor Speedway
(tri-oval, 1.54 miles), Hampton,
Ga.
When: Friday, practice (Fox Sports
1,3-4:30 p.m.), qualifying (Fox
Sports 1,7-8:30 p.m.); Saturday,
practice (Fox Sports 2, 3-4 p.m.,
6-7 p.m.); Sunday, race, 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN, 7-11:30 p.m.)
Distance: 500.5 miles, 325 laps
2012 winner: Denny Hamlin
Online: nascar.com

NATIONWIDE GREAT CLIPS-GRIT
CHIPS 300
Where: Atlanta Motor Speedway
(tri-oval, 1.54 miles), Hampton,
Ga.
When: Friday, practice (Fox
Sports 2,9-10:30 p.m.); Saturday,
practice (Fox Sports 2,10:30-
11:30 a.m.), qualifying (Fox Sports
2, 4-5:30 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m.
(ESPN2, 7-10:30 p.m.)
Distance: 300.3 miles, 195 laps
2012 winner: Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
Online: nascar.com

CAMPING WORLD TRUCK CHEV-
ROLET SILVERADO 250
Where: Canadian Tire Motorsport
Park (road course, 2.459 miles,
Bowmanville, Ontario

was introduced at SHR.
"There's certain timelines
that I've agreed to with
Michael Andretti if we're
still going to do the deal.
We're working on things."
Busch is also trying to
put something together
to run the IndyCar season
finale at Fontana, and
said Stewart, his new boss
at SHR, wants to go to the
race with him if he does.
It was enough to make


When: Friday, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying; Sunday, race,
2 p.m. (Fox Sports 1,1-4 p.m.)
Distance: 157.4 miles, 64 laps
2012 winner: Inaugural race
Online: nascar.com

INDYCAR
GRAND PRIX OF BALTIMORE
Where: Streets of Baltimore
(street course, 2.04 miles)
When: Friday, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (NBC Sports
Channel, 6-7 p.m.); Sunday, race,
2:33 p.m. (NBC Sports Channel,
2-5 p.m.).
Distance: 153 miles, 75 laps
2012 winner: Ryan Hunter-Reay
Online: indycar.com

NHRA
U.S. NATIONALS
Where: Lucas Oil Raceway at
Indianapolis, Clermont, Ind.
When: Friday, qualifying;
Saturday, qualifying; Sunday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 1-6 p.m., 5-7
p.m.); Monday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, noon-6 p.m.).
2012 winners: Tony Schum-
acher (Top Fuel), Mike Neff
(Funny Car), Dave Connolly (Pro
Stock), Andrew Hines (Pro Stock
Motorcycle)
Online: nhra.com

director at SHR, wince
several times.
Stewart, the co-owner
at SHR, is sidelined the
rest of the year with a
broken leg suffered in
a sprint car race, and
Zipadelli has said several
times there's not much
anyone can do to limit
Stewart's outside racing
schedule. But run-
ning events away from
NASCAR is obviously a


delicate subject right now.
"There's still the
concern of running
extracurricular races,"
Busch said. "We'll see
what opportunities lay
ahead. Everything has to
be the right situation for
it to happen."
Zipadelli tried to keep
his humor intact when
asked later about the
prospect of having three
SHR drivers interested in
running the Indy 500 next
year.
"Maybe I'll try to do it,
too," he quipped. "They
make it sound so much
fun."

Labonte breaks three
ribs in bike accident:
Bobby Labonte broke three ribs in a
bike riding accident near his North
Carolina home and will miss this
weekend's NASCAR race in Atlanta.
Labonte was scheduled to drive the
No. 51 Chevrolet for Phoenix Racing
at Atlanta Motor Speedway. He'll
be replaced in the car by Mike Bliss.
Labonte's consecutive starts streak
came to an end earlier this season at
704 races when JTG Daugherty Racing
used AJ Allmendinger at Kentucky in
June instead of Labonte.

Scott Jr. to buy Phoenix
Racing: Harry Scott Jr. has reached
an agreement to purchase Phoenix
Racing from James Finch. Scott will
take over control of the Sprint Cup
team on Sept. 10 and use Justin
Allgaier behind the wheel of the No.
51 Chevrolet at Chicago. Allgaier will
also drive at Charlotte and Talladega
with sponsorship in all three races
from Brandt. Scott will continue as a
partner with Nationwide Series team
Turner Scott Motorsports. Allgaier
is running for the Nationwide title
driving for Turner Scott.


SUN PHOTO BY JENNIFER BRUNO
Lemon Bay High School's Jessica Garza and Caitlin Montgomery reach for a return against Port Charlotte on Wednesday.


PIRATES
FROM PAGE 1
game handily and looked
ready to run away and
hide after taking a 12-7
lead midway through the
second game.
But senior Taylor
Lindenberger served a 5-0
run to get the Pirates (2-1)
even, then they took the
lead late on Sutter's serve.
The Manta Rays held
off four game points on
Hayley Smith's serve to tie
the game at 24, but the
Pirates held on and tied
the match.
The third game fea-
tured five lead changes
and seven ties as both
teams served up multiple
runs. But again it was
the Pirates who were
able to make the last run
that counted to take the
lead in the match on the
strength of key blocks
by senior Robertson and
Lindenberger after the
Mantas cut the lead to
22-21.


Port Charlotte cruised in
the fourth game as Sutter,
who played solid defense
all night, served up a 7-0
run to give the Pirates
a lead they would not
relinquish.
"We started off slow
and sometimes it takes
time to get in the groove
and read the other team
and see where you might
do things differently,"
Burkhart said.
Brooklin Sharpe also
had 16 kills to go with five
aces and three blocks.
Jonisha Kowalski led the
Pirates with seven blocks.
The Pirates were miss-
ing senior starter Katie
Stewart, who was out with
a concussion.
Burkhart said she wasn't
really concerned about
the "three in three" her
team had to play.
"I try not to think about
things you can't control,"
Burkhart said. "You'd like
to get some practice in,
but it's not something that
worries me."
For Lemon Bay coach


PREP SCHEDULE
TODAY
Volleyball
DeSoto County at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boys golf
Venice, North Port at Lemon Bay,
3:30 p.m.
Community Christian at DeSoto
County, 4 p.m.
Girls golf
Lemon Bay at Sarasota-Riverview,
3:30 p.m.
Swimming
Bishop Verot at Charlotte, 5 p.m.

FRIDAY
Football
Washburn at Community Chris-
tian, 7 p.m.
Imagine at Community School of
Naples, 7 p.m.


Stacy DeWolfe, it was a
carbon copy of what hap-
pened against Charlotte; a
fast start, all for naught.
"We start off with a
bang, and it isn't that they
fizzle out, they just don't
do their normal approach
and we get passive,"
DeWolfe said.


Lemon Bay at Port Charlotte, 7 p.m.
DeSoto County at Lake Region,
7p.m.
Charlotte at North Port, 7:30 p.m.
Venice at Palmetto, 7 p.m.
Boys golf
Charlotte at Port Charlotte, 3:30 p.m.
North Port at Lemon Bay, 3:30 p.m.

SATURDAY
Cross country
Lemon Bay Invitational, 8 a.m.
Charlotte, Port Charlotte, North
Port at Estero Invite, Estero
Community Park, 8 a.m.
Boys golf
DeSoto County vs. Hardee at The
Bluffs G.C., 1 p.m.


"They think someone
else will get the ball and
get flustered on serve
receive."
Senior Devyn Main lead
Lemon Bay with 10 kills,
six blocks and three aces.
Anna Fetzer had nine digs,
while Caitlin Montgomery
had eight.


* COLLEGE BASKETBALL


Taylor


transfers


to Bob


Jones

By ROB SHORE
SPORTS WRITER
Former North Port
High School basketball
standout Larry Taylor
announced he will to
transfer to Bob Jones
University in Greenville,
S.C., where he will play
basketball and pursue a
nursing major.
He had verbally com-
mitted to transfer to
Rollins College in Winter
Park in June.
"God had different
plans for me, so I'm
headed to Bob Jones,"
Taylor said.
Bob Jones plays in
the National Christian
College Athletic
Association. It has an
enrollment of about 4,000
students. Taylor said it
is one of the best Bible
school's in the nation.
Taylor went to Liberty
University for his fresh-
man season, a year that
saw the Flames earn a
trip to the NCAA tourna-
ment. He was the Sun's
player of the year in 2012.
Taylor said ministry
played a major factor in
his decision and prayer
had played a role in the
process.
"It's something a lot
of people won't under-
stand," he said. "But as a
born-again Christian, I
have to do God's will."
In bypassing Rollins,
Taylor skipped a chance
to play close to home. It
was one of the toughest
parts of his choice to
attend Bob Jones.
"This decision was not
easy," Taylor said. "People
were excited for me to be
closer to home and that
they could see me play.
When I had to call Rollins
and tell them I made a
different decision, that
was touch. Their coach-
ing staff was great. It was
nothing about them, this
was just about me and
my life."


I COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

TODAY
Half Century soft-
ball sign-ups/practice
sessions: 6-7 p.m., Carmalita Park,
Punta Gorda. Cost: $50. Season starts
Sept. 10. Games played on Tuesday
and Thursday nights. Call Bruce,
941-743-9694.

BASEBALL
Englewood Area Youth
Baseball: Volunteers needed to
manage or coach Fall Ball program.
Players age 4-12. Call Bill Stiver,
941-468-3871.

Charlotte Thunder
tryouts: Monday, Wednesday and
Friday nights in August, 6:30-9 p.m.
for the fall season at North Charlotte
Regional Park. Teams will be formed
in 9-,11-,12- and 13-under age
groups (age as of May 1,2014). There
is no fee to tryout. Call Chris, 941-769-
7870 or email cbmoc@gmail.com.

YMCA fall registra-
tion: Ongoing, open to Charlotte
County youth age 5-13. Register
at Franz Ross ParkYMCA or online
at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com. Call


941-629-9622.

TENNIS
Masters Tennis for adults:
Wednesday starting Sept. 18 from 7-9 p.m. to
Nov. 20. Format is played on a smaller 60-foot
court with lower- compression orange balls.
No fee. Balls will be provided along with a
limited number of loaner racquets. Call Art,
941-698-9480. For more on Masters Tennis visit
www.MastersTennisFlorida.com


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013






The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


U FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE: U MLB ROUNDUP


CARDINALS AT
STONE CRABS
WHO: Palm Beach (34-29) at
Charlotte (35-26)
WHEN: Today, 6:30 p.m.
WHERE: Charlotte Sports Park
RADIO: stonecrabsbaseball.com
PROMOTION: Thirsty Thursday,
Dollar Deal Days




Sac fly



sinks



Crabs

STAFF REPORT
PORT ST. LUCIE -The
Stone Crabs jumped to a
1-0 lead in the first inning
and starter Jacob Partridge
pitched the first four
innings without giving up
a run on Wednesday.
Everything appeared to
be going Charlotte's way
against St. Lucie.
But the Stone Crabs
couldn't muster any more
offense, and the Mets took
advantage of a Jeff Malm
error in the fifth to tie the
game at 1 before ending
it in the 10th inning on a
Rylan Sandoval walk-off
sacrifice fly for a 2-1
victory.
Willie Argo's 17th double
of the season led off the
game for the Crabs, and
Jeff Hager advanced him to
third with a sac bunt. Argo
scored on a DrewVettleson
groundout. The Crabs were
0 for 4 with runners in
scoring position.

Mets 2, Stone Crabs 1
Charlotte AB R HRBIBBSO AVG
ArgoLF 4 1 1 0 0 2 .308
HagerSS 3 0 0 0 0 1 .261
VettlesonRF 3 0 0 1 1 0 .279
Shaffer3B 4 0 1 0 0 1 .254
Malm B 4 0 0 0 0 0 .243
Segovia DH 4 0 0 0 0 1 .288
CarterCF 3 0 0 0 1 1 .237
BaileyC 4 0 1 0 0 1 .188
Motter2B 3 0 0 0 1 1 .287
Totals 32 1 3 1 3 8 .266
St. Lucie AB R HRBIBBSO AVG
JohnsonCF 5 1 1 0 0 2 .283
Rivera2B 4 0 1 0 1 1 .290
PlaweckiC 3 0 0 0 0 1 .287
MaronC 2 1 1 0 0 0 .232
BoydDH 3 0 0 0 2 1 .279
Sandoval3B 4 0 0 1 0 2 .249
ThurberRF 4 0 2 0 0 1 .223
Reynolds SS 3 0 0 0 1 0 .223
ShieldslB 4 0 1 0 0 1 .232
GomezLF 4 0 1 0 0 0 .216
Totals 36 2 7 1 4 9 .248
Charlotte 1000000000 -1 3 1
St.Lucie 0000100001 2 7 0
E: Malm (9, fielding). LOB: Charlotte 5. St.
Lucie 10. 2B: Argo (17). Thurber (12), Go-
mez, G (14), Maron (13). RBI:Vettleson (62).
Sandoval (22). SB: Johnson,K (12,2nd base
off Linsky/Bailey). SAC: Hager. SF: Sando-
val. RISP: Charlotte 0for 4. St. Lucie 0 for 8.
Charlotte IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA
Partridge 4 41 0 3 3 03.79
Linsky 3.2 10 0 0 4 03.27
Crawford 0.1 00 0 0 0 01.25
RamseyL,1-1.1 1. 1 1 2 03.28
St. Lucie IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA
Robles 8.0 31 1 3 4 03.72
FontanezW,9-72.000 0 0 4 03.51
Partridge pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
Inherited runners-scored: Linsky 1-1.
IBB: Boyd,J (by Ramsey, M). WP: Partridge,
Ramsey, M, Robles, H. Umpires: HP: James
Rackley 1B: Clay Park.T: 2:49. Att: 891.
FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
North Division
W L Pet. GB
yz-Daytona (Cubs) 37 19 .661 -
Lakeland (Tigers) 30 28 .517 8
Clearwater (Phillies) 31 32 .492 91/2
Tampa (Yankees) 28 34 .452 12
Brevard Co. (Brewers) 28 35 .444 121/2
x-Dunedin (BlueJays) 23 38 .377 161/2
South Division
W L Pet. GB
Charlotte (Rays) 35 26 574 -
Palm Beach(Cardinals) 34 29 .540 2
St.Lucie(Mets) 32 29 .525 3
x-FortMyers(Twins) 31 32 .492 5
Bradenton (Pirates) 29 32 .475 6
Jupiter (Marlins) 31 35 .470 6'/2
x-clinched first half
y-clinched division (refers to second half)
z-clinched playoff spot
Wednesday's results
Tampa 2, Clearwater 0,1 st game
Daytona 6, Dunedin 2,1 st game
St. Lucie 2, Charlotte 1,10 innings
Lakeland 4, Brevard County 3
Jupiter 5, Bradenton 4, 10 innings
Fort Myers 7, Palm Beach 1
Tampa 2, Clearwater 0,9 innings, 2nd game
Daytona 3, Dunedin 0, 2nd game
Today's games
Lakeland atTampa,12 p.m.
Bradenton 2, Fort Myers 0,3 innings, comp.
ofsusp.game
Fort Myers at Bradenton, 6:30 p.m.
Palm Beach at Charlotte, 6:30 p.m.
Clearwater at Dunedin, 6:30 p.m.
St. Lucieat Jupiter,6:35 p.m.
Daytona at Brevard County, 6:35 p.m.
Friday's games
Tampa at Lakeland, 5 p.m ., 1 st game
Palm Beach at Charlotte, 6:30 p.m.
Clearwater at Dunedin, 6:30 p.m.
St. LucieatJupiter,6:35 p.m.
Brevard County at Daytona, 7:05 p.m.
Bradenton at Fort Myers, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa at Lakeland, 7:30 p.m., 2nd game


CRABS PLANNER
Upcoming games for the Stone Crabs:
SAT. SUN. E
End of
atPlm Bch atPlm Bch regular
6:35 p.m. 12:05 p.m. season


Nola


Ramirez,

Ethier homer

as L.A. avoids

series loss
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES Ricky
Nolasco pitched eight
innings of three-hit ball,
Hanley Ramirez and
Andre Ethier hit solo
homers and the Los
Angeles Dodgers beat
the Chicago Cubs 4-0 on
Wednesday.
The first-place Dodgers
earned their 21st victory
in August, tying the Los
Angeles record for most
wins in a calendar month.
They avoided a second
straight series loss by
taking two of three from
the last-place Cubs.
Nolasco (11-9) struck
out a season high-
tying 11, walked one
and permitted only one
runner to get reach third
base. Acquired in a trade
With Florida in early July,
the right-hander won
his sixth straight start in
August.
Dodgers rookie Yasiel
Puig left after four innings
with no immediate ex-
planation. He didn't slide
into second base to try to


sco silences Cubs


on Tuesday night.

Rangers 12, Mariners 4:
In Seattle, Leonys Martin homered
and drove in a career-high four runs
and Texas roughed up Felix Hernandez
in a win over Seattle.
The AL West-leading Rangers
tagged Hernandez (12-8) for nine runs
and 11 hits in three-plus innings.

Athletics 14, Tigers 4: In
Detroit, Brandon Moss homered twice
and drove in six runs to lead Oakland
over Detroit. Moss has three home
AP PHOTO runs in his past two games for the A's.


Los Angeles Dodgers slugger Yasiel Puig reacts after fouling out
during the seventh inning against the Chicago Cubs on Tuesday
in Los Angeles.


break up a double play in
the first inning and visibly
reacted after striking out
in the third.
Edwin Jackson (7-14)
gave up four runs two
earned.

Pirates 7, Brewers 1: In
Pittsburgh, Marion Byrd celebrated
his arrival in Pittsburgh with a
three-run homer, and the Pirates beat
Milwaukee.
Byrd, acquired along with catcher
John Buck from the New York Mets
on Tuesday, hit his 22nd homer of the
season into the bushes in center field
in the seventh inning as Pittsburgh
ended a three-game losing streak.

Phillies 6, Mets 2: In New
York, Cole Hamels pitched seven
strong innings and handed himself


some much-needed run support,
sending Philadelphia over the New
York Mets.
Carlos Ruiz homered and the
Phillies overcame a couple of mental
mistakes by Jimmy Rollins to win for
only the third time in 17 road games.
Hamels hit a two-run single to help
Philadelphia improve to 8-5 under
interim manager Ryne Sandberg.

Red Sox 4, Orioles 3: In
Boston, pinch hitter Mike Carp's bloop
single to left in the eighth dropped
just beyond the glove of Baltimore
third baseman Manny Machado,
scoring Jarrod Saltalamacchia from
second with the tiebreaking run and
lifting Boston over the Orioles.
Shane Victorino drove in a run
for Boston with an RBI single after
collecting a career-best seven RBIs
and hitting two homers in a 13-2 win


Blue Jays 7, Yankees 2:
In Toronto, Edwin Encarnacion hit
a two-run home run, rookie Todd
Redmond snapped a seven-start
winless streak and Toronto beat New
York.
The Blue Jays took two out of three
from the Yankees after losing 12 of
their first 13 meetings this season.
They're 3-3 against New York at home
and 0-10 on the road.

Royals 8, Twins 1: In
Minneapolis, Salvador Perez had four
hits and two home runs, Danny Duffy
pitched 6 2/3 shutout innings and
Kansas City beat Minnesota.
Perez hit two-run shots in the
fourth and eighth innings as the
Royals won their fourth straight.

White Sox 6, Astros 1:
In Chicago, Chris Sale struck out 12
over eight-plus dominant innings and
Avisail Garcia hit a three-run homer to
lead Chicago to a win over Houston.


MLB: not


Reha]


Crain's ]


SBy MARC TOPKIN
STAMPA BAY TIMES
ST. PETERSBURG-
Time is running short,
: and potentially out, on
Sthe chances of Tampa Bay
Si 5 right-hander Jesse Crain
S pitching for the Rays this
season.
: ,, Craln's recovery from
Sthe shoulder strain he
had when acquired from
Sthe white Sox on July 29
Shas stalled, manager Joe
Maddon said, decreasing
aH: t. g r l e the chances the All-Star
.... ... i ., reliever can play the key

"I'd say'hopeful' is a
Wednesrlv can, s p "" ro playhe ka y they
Snice word. I don't know,
SI really don't," Maddon
said. "We'd probably need
S. s c- to see some significant
AP PHOTO movement in the next
week or so."
Tampa Bay's David DeJesus scores past Los Angeles Angels catcher Chris lannetta on a sacrifice fly Crain remains optimis-
by Matt Joyce during the first inning of Wednesday's game in St. Petersburg. tic, saying this week has
RAHamilton (on an 85 mph groundout, allowed the been better than last, but
RAYS changeup) for his 31st run on a sac fly to Kole e
save. Calhoun and retired Chris treated by the slow, day-to-
FROM PAGE 1 The Rays took a 1-0 Nelson. day nature of his rehab.
as 1021 lead in the first and built He has yet to progress
S fhis a 521it tov 4-0 in the frt. Rays 4,Angels 1 past playing catch, having
been in the majors this it to 4-0 in the fourth. LosAngeles AB R H BI BBSO Avg. done so Wednesday for
year. DeJesus got them start- Shuck If 4 0 2 0 0 0 .293 the second straight day,
But the Rays don't see ed with a leadoff double, Aybar ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 274 t o tra
Trout cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .332 and any progression will
Sandy cracks. went to third on Zobrist's Hamilton h 4 0 1 0 3 .236 e based onhow feels
"He seems to be in single and scored on Matt Trumbo lb 3 0 0 0 0 0 .236
Calhoun rf 2 0 0 1 0 0 .238 today, a planned off day,
pretty good order," man- Joyce's sac fly. Nelson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .221 and Friday.
ager Joe Maddon said. DeJesus was in the mid- An.Romine3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 172a
lannetta c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .208 Crainwill accompany
"He's the guy that's really dle of the fourth-inning G. Green 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .269 the team to the West Coast
on the edge of uncharted rally, also, as the Rays Totals 30 1 5 1 0 7 and, meshing with
waters or territory." chased Angels starter Tampa Bay AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
waters or territory. chased Angels starter DeJesusf 3 2 2 1 1 0 .438 Maddon's timetable, said
He looked fine Garrett Richards. Zobrist2b 4 2 1 1 275 his goals to be throwing
Wednesday, retiring 16 Jennings, snapping an Loo 3 0 1 1 1 0 .269 off e
Joycedh 2 0 1 1 1 0 .260 off the mound by the
of the first 18 Angels, 0-for-18 skid, and Jose W.Myers rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .287 Sept. 8 end of the trip.
allowing only singles in Lobaton singled, and Loney lb 4 0 0 0 0 0 .301the best-
DeJenningscf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .248 "That would be the best-
the first and third. By the both moved up on Yunel Lobaton c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .266 case scenario," Crain said.
end of his seven innings, Escobar's bunt. DeJesus, Y.Escobar ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .268 From there, hefigures
Totals 30 4 8 4 3 4 From there, he figures
Archer had allowed only acquired Friday, laced a Los Angeles 000000 100- 1 51 he would need another
five hits, struck out five ball that hit off Richards' Tampa Bay 100300 00x- 4 81 four mound sessions -
and walked none. He im- right leg, caroming far E-Aybar (11), Lobaton (3). LOB--Los
Angeles 3, Tampa Bay 7. 2B-DeJesus (2), spaced a few days apart
proved to 8-5 and lowered enough away for Jennings Joyce (22). RBIs-Calhoun (11), DeJesus to be ready for game
his ERA to 2.81. to score. Zobrist followed (1), Zobrist (63), Longoria (72), Joyce (43). action, having last pitched
SB-Trout (29). S-Y.Escobar. SF-Cal-
Rodney had blown his with a bloop single to houn, Joyce. Runners left in scoring po- June 29.
:eighth save on Tuesday, drive in another run, then sition-Los Angeles 2 (Hamilton, Nelson); "It's been hard to be
and it cost the Rays dearly Aybar, who had the big hit Tampa Bay 4 (Zobrist 2, Joyce, WMyers).
RISP-LosAngelesOfor3;Tampa Bay3 for patient for the last month,
as they turned a 5-1 in Tuesday's ninth-inning 8. Runners moved up-Trumbo. GIDP- let alone the last two
seventh-inning lead into rally, misplayed Evan Joyce. DP-Los Angeles 1 (G.Green, Aybar, months," Cra said. "It's
Trumbo);Tampa Bay 1 (Zobrist, Loney). months, Crain said. "It's
a frustrating 6-5 loss, with Longoria's grounder to Los Angeles IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA definitely frustrating."
help from a rare error by short, making it 4-0. RichardsL,4-631/3 7 4 4 3 2 84 4.16 It's not clear how
Boshers 2/3 00 0 0 0 22.45
centerfielder Desmond The Angels got on the Williams 3 1 0 0 0 2 33 4.69 Crain's status impacts the
Jennings. board in the seventh, Cor.Rasmus 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 7.71 terms of the trade, which
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
But Rodney was back in but Archer limited ArcherW,8pa5 7 5 1 1 0 5 922.81 was announced to be
top form on Wednesday, them to one run after Jo.PeraltaH,34 1 0 0 0 123.00 for players to be named
getting Erick Aybar on a allowing singles to the RodneyS,31/39 1 00 0 0 2 15 3.72
Inherited runners-scored-Boshers 2-0. or cash considerations.
groundout then striking dynamic duo of Trout WP-Richards.Umpires-Home, Laz Diaz; Teams are not allowed
out Mike Trout (on a 98 and Hamilton. Archer First, Mark Wegner; Second, Mike Winters; to structure deals tied to
Third, Tim Timmons. T-2:47. A--13,535
mph fastball) and Josh got Mark Trumbo on a (34,078). performance.


Holmberg starts,
Diamondbacks win
Port Charlotte High School
alum David Holmberg's major
league debut with the Arizona
Diamondbacks did not go as he
would have liked: 3 2/3 innings,
six hits, three walks and three
runs (all earned). The first five
batters reached base four with
hits and the first three scored.
But the Diamondbacks won
10-9 in 10 innings on Tuesday
night against the San Diego
Padres, and considering this
was an emergency spot start,
that's something of a bonus for
Arizona.
Holmberg's tweet-
@David_Holmberg thanking
the Twittersphere for kind words
following the game ended with
#dbackswin.
He did not factor into the
decision the Diamondbacks
and Paadres both used seven
pitchers in the game strug-
gled with his command.
"I was pumped up,"the
left-hander, told MLB.com."It
snowballed a little, but I think
I did a good job of containing
them to three runs. It was a
crazy game, but I'm glad we
came out on top."
Holmberg did find his rhythm
somewhat in retiring the Padres
in order in the third inning. He
only allowed two hits after that
rough start in the first inning -
though one was a ground-rule
double to Padres hurler lan
Kennedy.
Holmberg was optioned
back to Double-A Mobile on
Wednesday. He's ranked by MLB.
com as Arizona's No. 5 prospect.

Rob Shore


patience


Odorizzi back in the
bigs: Right-hander Jake Odorizzi
said his solid June 18 spot start for
the Rays at Fenway Park put him
on a good roll at Triple-A Durham,
where he went 4-5, 2.82 in his next
12 starts, and he is eager to see
the carryover effect when he starts
today.
"I kind of made some minor
adjustments and the results have
been a lot better,"he said."The ball
is coming out really good right now,
and it's a good time that it worked
out to get back up here while I'm
throwing the ball well and see how
everything goes."
Odorizzi, in his fourth stint with
the Rays, said he doesn't know if
he's staying after today or being sent
back down as the Bulls open the
playoffs next week.
The Rays first have to make room
on the roster to add Odorizzi, with
LHP Jeff Beliveau, who was called up
Tuesday, most likely to go.

Rotational matters: The
Rays only announced that lefty David
Price will start Friday and righty Alex
Cobb on Saturday in Oakland, with the
rest of the rotation under discussion.
Roberto Hernandez seems the obvious
choice for Sunday, then it gets
complicated as the Rays have to sort
out how to slot in Jeremy Hellickson,
who was sent to the minors for a few
days' rest, and Matt Moore, who is
coming back from a sore elbow.

Rehab roundup: Moore
hopes to work five innings with a
75-pitch limit tonight in his rehab
start for Triple-A Durham at Gwinnett
(Ga.)."I think the big thing is that
they want me to get up and down as
much as I can with those 75 pitches,"
he said. Moore is confident his elbow
is fine and plans to fly to meet the
team in Oakland on Friday.
Delmon Young is on track to
join the Rays Sunday when rosters
expand, having gone 4 for 20 with
one RBI in five games for Double-A
Montgomery. "I've seen some video,
and I thought the swing looked really
good," Maddon said. ... Designated
hitter Luke Scott (back) went 1 for 4
with a walk for Durham in the first
of a scheduled three-game rehab
before rejoining the Rays on Sunday.

Around the Rays:
Struggling rookie OF Wil Myers was
among Rays taking extra batting
practice Wednesday. ... MLB senior
VP Joe Garagiola Jr. was at the Trop,
but just visiting and not as commis-
sioner Bud Selig's emissary on the
stadium issue.


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .


D tests






www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
GB WCGB L10
S 7-3
2/2 6-4
7'/2 4'/2 5-5
8'/2 5'/2 6-4
19 16 3-7
Central Division
GB WCGB L10
-- 5-5
3 5/2 4 6-4
8'/2 7 4-6
19 171/2 3-7
201/2 19 8-2
West Division
GB WCGB L10
S 7-3
2/2 6-4
18 15/2 5-5
181/2 16 3-7
331/2 31 4-6


NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 80 52 .606 5-5 W-3 46-18 34-34
Washington 67 65 .508 13 7 7-3 W-2 38-29 29-36
Philadelphia 61 72 .459 19/2 13/2 7-3 W-1 35-31 26-41
NewYork 59 72 .450 20/2 14/2 3-7 L-1 27-38 32-34
MARLINS 49 82 .374 301/2 241/2 3-7 L-3 29-39 20-43
Central Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 78 55 .586 7-3 L-1 41-25 37-30
Pittsburgh 77 55 .583 /2 5-5 W-1 43-23 34-32
Cincinnati 75 59 .560 3/2 5-5 W-1 41-23 34-36
Milwaukee 58 74 .439 19/2 16 5-5 L-1 30-35 28-39
Chicago 56 77 .421 22 18/2 3-7 L-1 25-41 31-36
West Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 78 55 .586 6-4 W-1 40-28 38-27
Arizona 68 63 .519 9 5/2 5-5 W-2 38-26 30-37
Colorado 62 72 .463 16/2 13 4-6 L-1 37-28 25-44
San Diego 59 73 .447 18/2 15 5-5 L-2 36-32 23-41
San Francisco 59 73 .447 18/2 15 4-6 W-1 34-35 25-38

AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesday's results Tuesday's results
N.Y.Yankees 7,Toronto 1 Washington 2,MARLINS 1
Oakland 6, Detroit 3,6 innings Milwaukee 7, Pittsburgh 6
Boston 13, Baltimore 2 Atlanta 2, Cleveland 0
Atlanta 2, Cleveland 0 N.Y Mets 5, Philadelphia 0
L.A. Angels 6, RAYS 5 St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 1
ChicagoWhite Sox 4, Houston 3 San Francisco 5, Colorado 3
Kansas City6, Minnesota 1 Arizona 10, San Diego 9,10 innings
Texas 4, Seattle 3,10 innings Chicago Cubs 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Wednesday's results Wednesday's results
Texas 12, Seattle 4 L.A. Dodgers 4, Chicago Cubs 0
Toronto 7, N.Y.Yankees 2 Washington 4, MARLINS 3
Oakland 14, Detroit 4 Pittsburgh 7, Milwaukee 1
Boston 4, Baltimore 3 Atlanta 3, Cleveland 2
Atlanta 3, Cleveland 2 Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Mets 2
RAYS 4, LA. Angels 1 Cincinnati 10, St. Louis 0
ChicagoWhite Sox 6, Houston 1 San Francisco at Colorado, late
Kansas City8, Minnesota 1 San Diego at Arizona, late
Today's games Today's games
Oakland (Colon 14-5) at Detroit (Scherzer Philadelphia (E.Martin 2-2) at N.Y Mets
19-1),1:08 p.m. (C.Torres 2-2), 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 5-2) at Minnesota (De- MARLINS (Koehler 3-8) at Washington
duno 8-7), 1:10 p.m. (G.Gonzalez7-6), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Vargas 7-5) at RAYS (Odor- Milwaukee (Gallardo 9-9) at Pittsburgh
izzi 0-0), 1:10 p.m. (Cole 6-6), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore(Tillman 14-4) atBoston (Lester Cleveland (UJimenez 9-8) at Atlanta
12-7),7:10 p.m. (Medlen 10-12),7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (UJimenez 9-8) at Atlanta Friday'sgames
(Medlen 10-12), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Seattle (E.Ramirez 4-1) at Houston (Lyles N.Y.MetsatWashington,7:05 p.m.
6-6), 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Friday's games MARLINS at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Baltimore at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Kansas CityatToronto, 7:07 p.m. Cincinnati at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
ChicagoWhite Sox at Boston, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Minnesota atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
RAYS at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.



U MLB NOTEBOOK




Reds' Phillips




lashes out




at reporter


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS Cincinnati
Reds second baseman
Brandon Phillips shouted
obscenities Wednesday
night at a newspaper
reporter who commented
on the star's sagging on-
base percentage.
Phillips directed a
short tirade at C. Trent
Rosencrans of the
Cincinnati Enquirer
before the game at St.
Louis.
Phillips let loose at
Rosencrans in the club-
house, then interrupted
manager Dusty Baker's
pregame media session
to make a few more
comments.
The Gold Glove win-
ner stuck his head into
the doorway of Baker's
office and singled out
Rosencrans, saying, "I've
found out your Twitter
name now, dude."
Phillips sarcasti-
cally encouraged Baker
to "Make them happy,
Dusty" and threw in some
expletives for the reporter
who's "worried about my
on-base percentage."
"That ain't my deal,"
Baker said, adding the
dispute was between
Phillips and Rosencrans.
Phillips has a.310 on-
base percentage for the
slumping playoff con-
tenders. He has 95 RBIs
and has batted fourth
for most of the season,
hitting .355 with runners
in scoring position.


pitchers Jenrry Mejia and Jeremy
Hefner had elbow surgery, ending
their seasons. Mejia had a bone spur
removed and hopes to be ready for
the start of next season. Hefner had
Tommy John surgery and will likely
be sidelined at least a year. Both
operations were performed by Mets
medical director Dr. David Altchek.
Mets ace Matt Harvey, also
on the disabled list, is hoping to
avoid Tommy John surgery. He was
diagnosed with a partially torn ulnar
collateral ligament, but tweeted
Tuesday that he'll be back on the
mound next April.
Mets manager Terry Collins
said Harvey was encouraged after
talking to other pitchers who had
similar symptoms or injuries and
didn't require surgery, including
Roy Halladay. The Mets said no
decision will be made until Harvey is
re-examined in a few weeks after the
swelling subsides.

Ex-scout sentenced in
kickback scheme: A federal
judge sentenced a former Chicago
White Sox scouting executive to
two years in prison for accepting
about $440,000 in kickbacks from
Latin American players the team
had signed. Federal prosecutors say
52-year-old David Wilder of San
Francisco pleaded guilty to mail fraud
in February 2011. They said Wilder
got the money from signing bonuses
and contract buyouts that two of the
team's Latin American scouts paid to
secure about two dozen prospective
players. Those scouts also have
pleaded guilty in the case.

Injury report: The Atlanta
Braves activated second baseman
Dan Uggla from the disabled list,
two weeks after he underwent eye
surgery ...


The Cleveland Indians placed
Mets pitchers undergo outfielder Ryan Raburn on the 15-day
elbow surgery: NewYork Mets disabled list (strained left Achilles).


I MLB STANDINGS


KurodaL, 1-10 5 9 7 5 1 4 992.89
Chamberlain 2 0 0 0 1 1 27 4.21
Kelley 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 73.65
Logan 2/3 00 0 0 0 82.70
Toronto IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
RedmndW,2-252/33 2 2 4 7101 4.30
Loup 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 21 2.37
S.Santos 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.40
Oliver 1 1 0 0 0 2 10 4.15
Inherited runners-scored-Logan 1-0.
HBP-by Kuroda (R.Davis). WP-Red-
mond. PB-C.Stewart. Umpires-Home,
Quinn Wolcott; First, James Hoye; Second,
Jim Reynolds;Third, Bob Davidson.T-2:51.
A-36,565 (49,282).


Reds 10, Cardinals 0


Boston
RAYS
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Texas
Oakland
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


MLB SCOREBOARD

Nationals 4, Marlins 3
Miami AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Ruggianocf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .217
Lucas3b-2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .244
Yelichlf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .254
Stantonrf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .252
Morrisonib 4 0 1 0 0 1 .264
D.Solano2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .254
M.Dunnp 0 0 0 0 00 ---
A.Ramosp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Hechavarriass 4 0 0 0 0 1 .227
Mathisc 4 1 2 2 0 1 .196
H.Alvarezp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .294
Webbp 2 0 0 0 0 2 .333
c-Dobbsph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .236
Caminerop 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Polanco3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .252
Totals 37 310 3 2 9
Washington AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Spancf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .271
Zimmerman3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .270
Harper If 4 0 1 1 0 2 .277
Werthrf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .324
Desmondss 4 1 3 1 0 0 .283
Ad.LaRochelb 4 0 0 0 0 2 .238
W.Ramosc 4 0 2 0 0 1 .282
Lombardozzi2b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .253
Strasburgp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167
a-Hairstonph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .180
Stammenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Rendonph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .257
Mattheusp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-Tracyph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .190
Storenp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Clippardp 0 0 0 0 0 0
e-T.Mooreph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .212
R.Sorianop 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 32 410 4 5 9
Miami 000012000- 3101
Washington 011001 10x- 4101
a-struck out for Strasburg in the 2nd. b-
walked for Stammen in the5th.c-grounded
out for Webb in the 6th. d-struck out for
Mattheus in the 6th. e-grounded into a
fielder's choice for Clippard in the 8th.
E-M.Dunn (2), Harper (5). LOB-Miami
9, Washington 10. 2B-Ruggiano (11),
Span (25), Harper (19), Lombardozzi (14).
HR-Mathis (4), off Stammen; Stanton
(17), off Mattheus;Werth (20), off Caminero.
RBIs-Stanton (41), Mathis 2 (25), Harper
(47), Werth (60), Desmond (64), Lombar-
dozzi (18). SB-Desmond (18). S-Span.
Runners left in scoring position-Miami
5 (Yelich 2, Ruggiano 2, D.Solano);Washing-
ton 6 (Werth, Hairston, Lombardozzi, Tracy,
Ad.LaRoche, Zimmerman). RISP-Miami 2
for 11; Washington 1 for 12. DP-Miami 1
(Hechavarria, D.Solano).
Miami IP HR ER BBSO NP ERA
H.Alvarez 12/3 3 1 1 0 3 28 3.90
Webb 31/3 3 1 1 1 2 43 2.85
CamineroBS,1-11 2 1 1 1 1 202.25
M.DunnL,3-4 1 1 1 1 2 2 293.04
A.Ramos 1 10 0 1 1 173.28
Washington IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
Strasburg 2 0 0 0 1 2 22 2.96
Stammen 3 51 1 0 3 423.22
MattheusBS,2-21 42 2 0 0 246.75
StorenW,4-2 1 1 0 0 1 1 205.47
ClippardH,28 1 00 0 0 2 121.94
R.SorianoS,35-411 00 0 0 1 93.65
IBB-off M.Dunn (Werth). WP-Webb.
Umpires-Home, Barry; First, Marquez;
Second, Barrett; Third, DiMuro. T-2:58.
A-24,394(41,418).

Dodgers 4,Cubs 0
Chicago AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
St.Castross 3 0 0 0 1 2 .239
Barney2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .215
Rizzolb 4 0 1 0 0 1 .231
Schierholtzrf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .266
Boguseviclf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .263
Lakecf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .297
Castilloc 3 0 2 0 0 1 .266
Ransom3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .190
EJacksonp 2 0 0 0 0 1 .067
Russellp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Watkinsph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143
B.Parkerp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 31 0 3 0 214
LosAngeles AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Puigrf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .346
Schumakerrf 1 0 1 1 1 0 .272
C.Crawfordlf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .285
H.Ramirezss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .343
Ethiercf 4 1 2 1 0 2 .275
Hairston Jr. b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .231
M.Ellis2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .271
Uribe3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .272
Federowiczc 3 1 1 0 0 1 .234
Nolascop 3 0 0 0 0 0 .133
Jansenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 30 4 6 3 2 8
Chicago 000000000- 0 31
LosAngeles 100120 00x- 4 61
a-struck out for Russell in the 8th. E-E.
Jackson (3), H.Ramirez (11). LOB-Chi-
cago 6, Los Angeles 4. 2B-Castillo (19).
HR-H.Ramirez (15), off EJackson; Ethier
(10), off EJackson. RBIs-Schumaker (28),
H.Ramirez (44), Ethier (47). SB-H.Ramirez
(10). Runners left in scoring position-
Chicago 3 (Ransom 2, Lake); Los Angeles
2 (Ethier 2). RISP-Chicago 0 for 2; Los An-
geles 1 for 5. GIDP-C.Crawford. DP-Chi-
cago 1 (Barney, St.Castro, Rizzo).
Chicago IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
EJcksnL,7-1462/3 6 4 2 2 51244.90
Russell 1/3 00 0 0 0 23.56
B.Parker 1 0 0 0 0 3 19 2.15
LosAngeles IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
NolascoW,11-9 8 3 0 0 1 111173.26
Jansen 1 00 0 1 3 181.92
Inherited runners-scored-Russell
1-0. Umpires-Home, Kerwin Danley;
First, Lance Barksdale; Second, Vic Cara-
pazza; Third, Gary Cederstrom. T-2:55.
A-38,851 (56,000).

Blue Jays 7,Yankees 2
NewYork AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Gardnercf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .268
Jeterss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .226
Grandersondh 3 1 0 0 1 1 .273
A.Sorianolf 3 1 0 0 1 3 .268
A.Rodriguez3b 4 0 1 1 0 3 .282
Overbaylb 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247
Mar.Reynolds2b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .220
I.Suzukirf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268
C.Stewartc 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220
Totals 31 2 5 2 413
Toronto AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Reyesss 4 0 0 1 0 0 .293
Goins2b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .455
Encarnacionlb 4 1 1 2 0 0 .271
Linddh 3 1 0 0 1 2 .281
Lawrie3b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .265
R.Davislf 3 1 0 0 0 0 .263
Arencibiac 4 1 2 0 0 1 .214
Sierra rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .250
Gosecf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .259
Totals 33 710 5 2 5
NewYork 000200000- 2 51
Toronto 421000 00x- 7100
E-C.Stewart (2). LOB-New York 6, To-
ronto 6. 2B-Jeter (1), Mar.Reynolds (9),
Goins (2), Lawrie (14), Arencibia (17). HR-
Encarnacion (34), off Kuroda. RBIs-A.Ro-
driguez (9), Mar.Reynolds (54), Reyes (30),
Encarnacion 2 (99), Lawrie 2 (35). CS-Gose
(1). SF-Reyes. Runners left in scoring
position-NewYork2 (A.Soriano, I.Suzuki);
Toronto 2 (Gose, Sierra). RISP-New York 2
for 6;Toronto 1 for5.
NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA


a-flied out for Frazier in the 7th. b-lined out
for Votto in the 8th. c-flied out for Ludwick
in the 9th.E-C.Izturis (2). LOB-Cincinnati
7, St. Louis 7. 2B-Votto (27), Ludwick (2).
HR-Bruce (26), off Wainwright; Heisey
(9), off Salas. RBIs-Bruce 5 (87), Heisey
(21), Ludwick (3), Frazier (60), H.Bailey (1).
Runners left in scoring position-Cincin-
nati 2 (Choo, Ludwick); St. Louis 5 (Jay 2,
S.Robinson, RoJohnson 2). RISP-Cincin-
nati 5 for 10; St. Louis 0 for 5. GIDP-Bel-
tran, RoJohnson. DP-Cincinnati 2 (Cozart,
Votto), (Phillips, Cozart,Votto).
Cincinnati IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
H.BaileyW,9-1071/350 0 2 71173.55
Hoover 2/3 00 0 0 1 10 3.05
LeCure 1 00 0 1 0 192.98
St. Louis IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
WainwrghtL,15-828 9 9 2 2 532.96
Wacha 4 3 0 0 1 7 65 3.78
Blazek 12/3 0 0 0 1 0 276.97
Salas 11/3 2 1 1 0 1 194.91
WP-Wainwright. Umpires-Home,
Welke; First, Everitt; Second, Bellino; Third,
Dreckman.T-3:00. A-35,698 (43,975).

Braves 3, Indians 2
Cleveland AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .268
Swisherlb 4 1 2 0 0 0 .244
Kipnis2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .285
C.Santanac 3 0 1 0 1 0 .265
A.Cabrerass 3 0 0 0 1 0 .241
Aviles3b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .265
J.Smithp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --
Brantleylf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .273
Stubbsrf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .240
Mastersonp 2 0 1 0 0 0 .500
b-M.Carsonph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Shawp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
R.Hillp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --
Chisenhall3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .216
Totals 32 2 9 2 3 3
Atlanta AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
J.Schaferrf 4 1 3 2 1 0 .275
J.Uptonlf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .261
FFreemanlb 4 0 0 0 1 2 .308
CJohnson3b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .329
McCannc 4 1 2 0 0 0 .272
Uggla2b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .187
B.Uptoncf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .183
Simmonsss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .247
Maholmp 0 0 0 0 1 0 .133
a-EJohnsonph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263
D.Carpenterp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
S.Downsp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Avilanp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Kimbrelp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Terdoslavichph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .279
Totals 33 310 3 5 9
Cleveland 000100010- 2 90
Atlanta 020000001- 3100
Two outs when winning run scored. a-
lined out for Maholm in the 6th. b-struck
out for Masterson in the 7th. c-struck out
for Kimbrel in the 9th. LOB-Cleveland
7, Atlanta 11. 2B-Simmons (19). HR-
Aviles (8), off Maholm. RBIs-Aviles 2 (35),
J.Schafer 2 (18), CJohnson (58).SB-Brant-
ley (14), J.Schafer 2 (15).CS-A.Cabrera (3),
J.Schafer (4). S-Maholm.SF-Aviles. Run-
ners left in scoring position-Cleveland
4 (A.Cabrera, Kipnis, Masterson, Bourn);
Atlanta 5 (CJohnson, FFreeman 2,J.Upton,
Simmons). RISP-Cleveland Ofor 7; Atlanta
3 for 11.GIDP-Swisher, A.Cabrera. DP-
Atlanta 2 (Maholm, Simmons, FFreeman),
(Simmons, Uggla, FFreeman).
Cleveland IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Masterson 6 5 2 2 4 6 98 3.49
Shaw 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 23 3.84
R.Hill 1/3 00 0 0 0 26.03
J.SmithL,5-2 1 41 1 1 1 302.61
Atlanta IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Maholm 6 6 1 1 2 1 92 4.37
D.CarpenterH,62/31 0 0 0 1 91.95
S.DownsH,4 1/3 00 0 0 0 50.84
AvilanBS,1-1 1 2 1 1 1 0 17 1.44
KimbrelW,3-2 1 00 0 0 1 80.99
IBB-off J.Smith (FFreeman), off Maholm
(Stubbs). HBP-by Masterson (B.Upton).
Umpires-Home, Joyce; First, Nelson; Sec-
ond,Wolf;Third,Hickox.T-3:03. A-20,804
(49,586).

Royals 8,Twins 1
KansasCity AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
A.Gordonlf 5 2 2 1 0 0 .270
Bonifacio2b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .232
Hosmerlb 4 1 1 0 1 0 .294
B.Butlerdh 5 2 2 2 0 0 .297
S.Perezc 5 2 4 4 0 0 .281
Maxwellrf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266
Loughrf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .288
Carroll3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .208
A.Escobarss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .235
Dysoncf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .259
Totals 40 813 7 2 3
Minnesota AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Dozier2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241
W.Ramirezrf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .263
Morneaulb 4 1 1 1 0 0 .261
Willinghamlf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .212
Plouffe3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .231
C.Herrmannc 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222
Colabellodh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .192
Thomascf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .228
Florimonss 3 0 2 0 0 1 .228
Totals 32 1 6 1 110
Kansas City 001200032- 8130
Minnesota 000000001- 1 62
E-Plouffe2(11).LOB-KansasCity8, Min-
nesota 5. 2B-Hosmer (27), S.Perez (20),
Dyson (8).HR-A.Gordon (15), offAAlbers;
S.Perez (8), off AAlbers; S.Perez (9), off Fien;
Morneau (16), off Crow. RBIs-A.Gordon
(70), B.Butler 2 (69), S.Perez 4 (60), Morneau
(73). SB-Dyson (26), Florimon 2 (12). Run-
ners left in scoring position-Kansas
City 5 (Carroll 3, Bonifacio, Dyson); Minne-
sota 3 (W.Ramirez, Morneau, C.Herrmann).
RISP-Kansas City 2 for 10; Minnesota Ofor
4. GIDP-A.Gordon, S.Perez, C.Herrmann.
DP-Kansas City 1 (Duffy, A.Escobar, Hos-
mer); Minnesota 2 (Morneau, Florimon,
Morneau), (Florimon, Morneau).
Kansas City IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
DuffyW,2-0 62/3 5 0 0 0 7103 1.10
HochevarH,411/3 0 0 0 0 1 17 1.88
Crow 1 1 1 1 1 2 21 3.12
Minnesota IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
A.AlbersL,2-2 7 63 2 0 2 992.92
Fien 1/3 3 3 3 0 1 13 4.08
Duensing 2/3 1 0 0 1 0 103.66
Swarzak 1 3 2 2 1 0 23 2.96


Cincinnati AB R H
Choocf 4 1 1
Phillips2b 5 2 2
Vottolb 1 2 1
b-C.lzturisph-3b 1 0 0
Brucerf 4 2 2
Heiseyrf 1 1 1
Ludwicklf 4 1 1
c-Paulph-lf 1 0 0
Frazier3b 3 0 0
a-Hnnhnph-3b-lb2 0 0
Cozartss 5 1 3
Haniganc 5 0 0
H.Baileyp 4 0 2
Hooverp 0 0 0
LeCurep 0 0 0
Totals 401013
St. Louis AB R H
M.Carpenter2b 2 0 1
Wong2b 2 0 0
Jaycf 4 0 1
Hollidaylf 2 0 0
Ma.Adamslb 1 0 0
Craigib 2 0 1
S.Robinsonrf 1 0 0
Beltranrf 2 0 0
Kozmalf 2 0 0
Freese3b 4 0 1
RoJohnsonc 4 0 1
Descalsoss 2 0 0
Wainwrightp 0 0 0
Wachap 2 0 0
Blazekp 0 0 0
Salasp 1 0 0
Totals 31 0 5
Cincinnati 6300(
St. Louis 000 0


RedS
Baltimore
McLouth If
Machado3b
C.Davis Ib
AJonescf
Markakisrf
Hardyss
Wieters c
Betemitdh
B.Roberts 2b
Totals
Boston
Ellsburycf
J.Gomes If
Victorinorf-cf
Pedroia 2b
D.Ortizdh
Nava If-rf
Napoli lb
Saltalamacchia
Drew ss
Bogaerts3b
a-Carp ph
1-Middlebrkspr
Totals
Baltimore
Boston


S,


ox 4, Orioles 3


AB R H BIBBSO A
4 0 0 0 0 0
42 2 1 0 0
4 1 2 2 0 1
4 0 0 0 0 0
4 0 1 0 0 1
4 0 0 0 0 2
4 0 0 0 0 1
3 0 0 0 0 1
2 0 2 0 1 0
33 3 7 3 1 6
AB R H BIBBSO A
3 1 2 0 1 0
1 0 0 0 0 0
40 1 1 00
2 0 1 2 2 0
4 0 0 0 0 1
4 0 1 0 0 3
4 0 0 0 0 3
c 4 1 2 0 01
2 2 1 0 2 1
3 0 0 0 0 0
1 01 1 00
-3b0 0 0 0 0
32 4 9 4 5 9
101001000- 3
001000 21x- 4


a-singled for Bogaerts in the 8th. 1-ran for
Carp in the 8th. LOB-Baltimore 4, Boston
9. 2B-C.Davis (37), Markakis (21), Saltal-
amacchia (35), Drew (22). HR-Machado
(12), off Lackey; C.Davis (47), off Lackey
RBIs-Machado (62), C.Davis 2 (120), Vic-
torino (49), Pedroia 2 (75), Carp (31). SB-B.
Roberts (3), Ellsbury 2 (49). CS-B.Roberts
(1). Runners left in scoring position-
Baltimore 2 (Markakis, Wieters); Boston 5
(D.Ortiz 2, Nava 2, J.Gomes). RISP-Balti-
more 0 for 5; Boston 4 for 13.GIDP-Saltal-
amacchia. DP-Baltimore 1 (C.Davis, Hardy,
C.Davis).
Baltimore IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
B.Norris 51/3 4 1 1 4 7105 4.13
Fr.RodriguezH,31 22 2 0 0 104.61
O'DayBS,3-5 1/3 10 0 0 0 52.40
Matusz 2/3 00 0 0 1 11 3.57
Tom.HntrL,3-32/3 2 1 1 1 1 202.70
Boston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Lackey 71/3 7 3 3 1 4 92 3.19
BreslowW,4-22/3 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.14
UeharaS,14-17 1 0 0 0 0 1 91.22
Inherited runners-scored-Fr.Rodriguez
1-0, O'Day 2-2, Matusz 1-0. IBB-off Tom.
Hunter (Drew). Umpires-Home, Hudson;
First, McClelland; Second, Foster;Third, Bell.
T-3:00. A-31,962 (37,499).


BI BBSO Avg.
0 1 1 .278
0 0 2 .265
0 3 0 .312
0 0 0 .172
5 0 2 .270
1 0 0 .229
1 0 1 .227
0 0 0 .231
1 0 1 .230
0 0 1 .215
0 0 1 .248
0 0 0 .202
1 0 1 .163
0 00 --
0 00 --
9 410
BI BBSO Avg.
0 0 0 .314
0 0 0 .172
0 0 2 .271
0 0 0 .285
0 1 0 .271
0 0 1 .317
0 1 0 .278
0 0 0 .310
0 0 1 .217
0 0 2 .265
0 0 1 .188
0 1 0 .242
0 0 0 .140
0 0 1 .091
0 00
0 0 0 .000
038
)0001-10131
)0 000- 0 50


up-Mayberry, A.Brown.
Philadelphia IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
HamelsW,6-13 7 92 2 1 81143.58
RosenbergH, 1 100 0 0 1 164.00
Diekman 1 00 0 0 1 14 3.07
NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
MtsuzkaL,0-241/3 6 4 4 4 51108.68
R.Carson 12/3 2 1 1 0 1 24 8.24
Aardsma 1 2 0 0 0 1 21 4.15
Atchison 11/3 2 1 0 0 1 333.74
Feliciano 2/3 00 0 0 0 43.00
HBP-by Matsuzaka (Ruiz, Mayberry). Um-
pires-Home, Hernandez; First, Eddings;
Second, DeMuth; Third, Nauert. T-3:32.
A-24,447 (41,922).


Page 4 SP


HBP-by Swarzak (Maxwell). Umpires-
Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Porter;
Second, Gibson; Third, Layne. T-2:55.
A-27,379 (39,021).

Rangers 12, Mariners 4
Texas AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
L.Martincf-rf 6 2 2 4 0 1 .269
Andrusss 4 1 3 2 1 0 .264
Rosalesss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .191
Kinsler2b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .279
A.Beltredh 5 1 3 2 0 1 .329
Riosrf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .275
Gentrycf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Morelandlb 5 2 2 1 0 3 .246
G.Sotoc 5 0 2 2 0 1 .210
Dav.Murphylf 5 2 1 0 0 2 .221
Profar3b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .236
Totals 43121712 2 9
Seattle AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
B.Millerss-3b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .264
Franklin2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .227
Seager3b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .277
Ryanss 1 0 0 0 1 1 .194
K.Moralesdh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .281
Ibanezlf 2 0 1 1 2 0 .251
Smoaklb 4 0 0 0 0 2 .252
M.Saundersrf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .235
Ackleycf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .256
H.Blancoc 4 0 0 0 0 2 .158
Totals 35 4 9 4 4 9
Texas 032500 200-12170
Seattle 000011011- 4 91
E-H.Blanco (3). LOB-Texas 7, Seattle 8.
2B-Andrus (16), Profar (10), Ackley (16).
HR-L.Martin (7), off FHernandez; A.Beltre
(28), off Maurer; Moreland (20), off Mau-
rer; Ackley (3), off M.Perez; Seager (21), off
M.Perez. RBIs-L.Martin 4 (35), Andrus 2 (49),
Kinsler (58), A.Beltre 2 (81), Moreland (55),
G.Soto 2 (17), Seager (61), Ibanez (60), Ackley
2 (22). SB-Kinsler (11), Rios (31). Runners
left in scoring position-Texas 3 (Rios,
A.Beltre 2); Seattle 3 (Smoak 2, Ryan). RISP-
Texas 5 for 11; Seattle 1 for 7. GIDP-Kinsler
DP-Seattle 1 (Seager, Franklin, Smoak).
Texas IP HR ER BBSO NP ERA
M.PerezW,8-3 6 5 2 2 2 31003.58
R.Ross 1 00 0 0 1 10 2.67
Wolf 2 4 2 2 2 5 494.14
Seattle IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
F.HernandzL,12-83119 8 1 2 782.97
Maurer 4 63 3 1 4 706.59
Luetge 2 00 0 0 3 23 5.00
FHernandez pitched to 4 batters in the
4th. HBP-by Maurer (Kinsler). Umpires-
Home, Dale Scott; First, Bill Miller; Second,
Todd Tichenor; Third, CB Bucknor. T-3:01.
A-22,420 (47,476).

Pirates 7, Brewers 1
Milwaukee AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Aokirf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .284
Segurass 5 0 0 0 0 0 .301
Lucroyc 3 0 0 0 1 1 .288
Axfordp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ar.Ramirez3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .269
C.Gomezcf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .285
Gindllf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .287
Gennett2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .321
J.Franciscolb 3 0 1 0 1 1 .236
Gorzelannyp 1 0 0 0 0 0 .059
Thornburgp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Y.Betancourtph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211
Badenhopp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Mic.Gonzalezp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Maldonadoc 1 0 0 0 0 1 .174
Totals 33 1 7 0 3 4
Pittsburgh AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
J.Harrison2b 4 3 3 1 0 0 .284
Barmesss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220
Mercer ss-2b 3 1 2 1 1 1 .278
McCutchencf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .323
Byrdrf 4 1 1 3 0 2 .284
P.Alvarez3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .238
G.Sanchezlb 4 0 3 1 0 0 .250
R.Martinc 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241
Tabatalf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .270
Pie If 1 0 0 0 0 1 .400
Mortonp 3 0 0 0 0 1 .111
Mazzarop 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167
b-Lamboph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .211
J.Hughesp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 36 713 7 1 8
Milwaukee 000000100- 1 71
Pittsburgh 100120 30x--7132
a-grounded into a fielder's choice for
Thornburg in the 7th. b-struck out for Maz-
zaro in the 8th. E-Badenhop (1), Barmes
(10), R.Martin (2). LOB-Milwaukee 10,
Pittsburgh 6.2B-Mercer (16). 3B-Tabata
(3). HR-Byrd (22), off Badenhop. RBIs-J.
Harrison (11), Mercer (22), McCutchen (74),
Byrd 3 (74), G.Sanchez (34). SB-C.Gomez
(31), McCutchen (27). CS-Segura (10).
S-Gorzelanny. Runners left in scoring
position-Milwaukee 6 (C.Gomez, Gindl,
Aoki, Segura, J.Francisco 2); Pittsburgh 3
(P.Alvarez, Byrd, Morton). RISP-Milwau-
kee 1 for 8; Pittsburgh 5 for 14. Runners
moved up-P.Alvarez, Tabata. DP-Mil-
waukee 1 (Gorzelanny, J.Francisco).
Milwaukee IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
GorzelnnyL,3-651/394 4 1 5 993.80
Thornburg 2/3 00 0 0 0 21.99
Badenhop 1/3 3 3 3 0 1 11 3.75
Mic.Gonzalez 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 12 4.34
Axford 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 4.45
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
MortonW,6-362/3 51 0 3 2 903.14
MazzaroH,5 11/3 20 0 0 1 202.44
J.Hughes 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.44
HBP-by Morton (Ar.Ramirez). Umpires-
Home, Davis; First, lassogna; Second, Knight;
Third,Carlson.T-2:57.A-20,634 (38,362).


Athletics 14,Tigers 4
Oakland AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Crispcf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .254
a-C.Youngph-cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .191
Donaldson3b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .295
Lowriess 5 3 3 1 0 0 .291
Mossrf 5 3 4 6 0 1 .252
Cespedeslf 5 2 2 1 0 2 .227
S.Smithlf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .240
Bartonlb 4 1 1 0 0 0 .188
b-Freimanph-lb 1 0 0 0 0 1 .284
Callaspodh 5 1 3 1 0 0 .262
Sogard2b 5 0 2 2 0 1 .265
K.Suzukic 5 2 3 1 0 0 .333
Totals 451421 14 0 5
Detroit AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
AJacksoncf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .268
Tor.Hunterrf 5 1 3 1 0 1 .308
Mi.Cabrera3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .357
D.Kelly3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .238
Fielderlb 3 0 0 0 0 1 .262
Tuiasosopolb 2 1 1 0 0 0 .282
V.Martinezdh 4 1 3 0 0 0 .294
Dirkslf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .253
Infante2b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .318
R.Santiago2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .219
Avilac 4 0 2 2 0 0 .201
Iglesiasss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .313
Totals 38 413 4 2 5
Oakland 030043040-14211
Detroit 001000030- 4130
a-popped out for Crisp in the 8th. b-struck
out for Barton in the 8th. E-K.Suzuki (1).
LOB-Oakland 5, Detroit 9. 2B-Donald-
son (27), Lowrie 2 (39), Moss (14), K.Suzuki
(2), Tor.Hunter (31), Avila (10). HR-Moss
(23), off JAlvarez; Moss (24), off Smyly; Tor.
Hunter (15), off Straily. RBIs-Donaldson
2 (77), Lowrie (55), Moss 6 (66), Cespedes
(61), Callaspo (45), Sogard 2 (29), K.Suzuki
(1), Tor.Hunter (67), Dirks (30), Avila 2 (38).
SB-lglesias (4). SF-Donaldson. Runners
left in scoring position-Oakland 3 (Moss,
Lowrie, C.Young); Detroit 5 (Iglesias 2, Dirks,
AJackson, V.Martinez). RISP--Oakland 11
for 21; Detroit 2 for 10. Runners moved
up-Donaldson. GIDP-Barton, Dirks.
DP-Oakland 2 (Sogard, Lowrie, Barton),
(Barton); Detroit 1 (Infante, Iglesias, Fielder).
Oakland IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
StrailyW,7-7 6 8 1 1 2 4103 4.41
AndersonS,1-1 3 5 3 3 0 1 566.47
Detroit IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
FisterL,11-7 513 7 7 0 2 753.81
JAlvarez 21/3 5 5 5 0 1 44 6.14
Smyly 0 22 2 0 0 82.25
Bonderman 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 264.27
Smyly pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. In-
herited runners-scored-Smyly 1-1.
WP-Bonderman. PB-Avila. Umpires-
Home, Gary Darling; First, Jerry Meals; Sec-
ond, Paul Emmel; Third, Will Little. T-2:59.
A-31,973 (41,255).

WhiteSox6, Astros 1
Houston AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Grossmanlf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273
Hoesrf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .276
Altuvedh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .269
M.Dominguez3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .240
Carterlb 4 1 2 1 0 2 .218
B.Barnescf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .237
Elmore2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .243
Villarss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .268
C.Clarkc 2 0 0 0 1 0 .000
Totals 30 1 5 1 213
Chicago AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Le.Garciass 2 2 0 1 2 1 .190
Beckham2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .290
Keppinger3b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .251
A.Dunndh 3 1 0 0 1 1 .231
Konerkolb 3 1 2 1 1 0 .245
A.Garciacf 4 1 3 3 0 0 .292
Jor.Danksrf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .253
Viciedolf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .256
Phegleyc 4 0 0 0 0 1 .213
Totals 29 610 6 8 4
Houston 000000100- 1 51
Chicago 100000 41x- 6100
E-C.Clark (1). LOB-Houston 4, Chicago
9. 2B-Carter (18), Beckham (17), Viciedo
(18). HR-Carter (26), off Sale; A.Garcia (3),
off Harrell. RBIs-Carter (70), Le.Garcia (2),
Keppinger (36), Konerko (44), A.Garcia 3
(19). SB-Le.Garcia (2). CS-Grossman (7),
A.Garcia (2). SF-Le.Garcia,Keppinger. Run-
ners left in scoring position-Houston
1 (Elmore); Chicago 5 (A.Garcia 2, Konerko,
Phegley, Keppinger). RISP-Houston 0 for
2;Chicago 3for 11. Runners moved up-A.
Dunn, Phegley. GIDP-Altuve, A.Garcia,Jor.
Danks. DP-Houston 2 (M.Dominguez, El-
more, Carter), (Villar, Carter); Chicago 1 (Le.
Garcia, Beckham, Konerko).
Houston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Cosart 6 7 1 1 5 4113 1.59
HarrellL,6-15 2 3 5 5 3 0 495.81
Chicago IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
SaleW,10-12 8 4 1 1 2 121072.99
Lindstrom 1 1 0 0 0 1 8 3.04
Sale pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inher-
ited runners-scored-Lindstrom 1-0. Um-
pires-Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Jor-
dan Baker; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third,
Brian O'Nora.T-2:44.A-15,961 (40,615).

Phillies6,Mets2
Philadelphia AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Bernadinacf 6 0 0 0 0 3 .169
Rollinsss 5 0 1 1 1 1 .247
Utley2b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .270
Ruizc 4 2 2 1 0 1 .282
M.Younglb 5 1 2 0 0 0 .269
Asche3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .256
1-Jo.McDnldpr-3bl 1 0 0 0 0 .098
Mayberryrf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .241
Orr f 1 1 1 0 1 0 1.000
a-Rufph-lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .263
Hamelsp 3 0 1 2 0 1 .196
Rosenbergp 0 0 0 0 0 0
c-Frandsenph 1 0 0 1 0 0 .224
Diekmanp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 40 612 6 4 8
NewYork AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
E.Younglf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .246
Lagarescf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .260
A.Brownrf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .274
IDavislb 4 0 1 1 0 3 .205
Atchisonp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Felicianop 0 0 0 0 0 0
Satin 3b-1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280
Flores2b-3b 4 0 1 0 0 3 .250
Ju.Turnerss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .266
Td'Arnaudc 4 0 0 0 0 1 .107
Matsuzakap 2 0 1 0 0 0 .333
R.Carsonp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aardsmap 0 0 0 0 0 0
b-Dn.Mrphyph-2b2 1 1 0 0 1 .272
Totals 35 2 9 2 110
Philadelphia 000131001--6120
NewYork 001000100- 2 93
a-struck out for Orr in the 5th. b-singled
for Aardsma in the 7th. c-reached on error
for Rosenberg in the 9th. 1-ran for Asche in
the 7th. E-Atchison (1), I.Davis (9), Flores
(1). LOB-Philadelphia 14, New York 8.
2B-Rollins (27), M.Young (23), Lagares
(18), A.Brown (5), Ju.Turner (10). HR-Ruiz
(5), off R.Carson. RBIs-Rollins (35), Ruiz
(21), Mayberry (38), Hamels 2 (4), Frandsen
(19), A.Brown (16), I.Davis (30). SB-Rollins
(17), E.Young 2 (31), Dan.Murphy (17). S-
Hamels, E.Young. Runners left in scoring
position-Philadelphia 8 (Ruiz, Bernadina
4, Mayberry 2, Rollins); New York 5 (I.Davis
3, T.d'Arnaud, Satin). RISP-Philadelphia 4
for 18; New York 2 for 11. Runners moved





The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


SP Page 5


TENNIS:


WESTERN CONFERENCE
Venus
W LT Pts GF GA Ve u
RealSaltLake 13 8 6 45 48 33
LosAngeles 12 9 4 40 40 32
Portland 9 412 39 37 26
Colorado 10 7 9 39 33 27
FC Dallas 9 710 37 36 38 V S
Seattle 11 8 4 37 31 26
Vancouver 10 9 6 36 36 33
San Jose 9 10 7 34 28 37
Chivas USA 5 14 6 21 24 45 Tw o-tim e
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Friday'sgames champion
New England at Toronto FC, 7 p.m. '
Portland at Real Salt Lake, 10 p.m. can't get past
Saturday's games
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. Slow start
Seattle FC at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
D.C. United at NewYork, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. By HOWARD FENDRICH
San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m. ASSOCIATED PRESS

NWSL PLAYOFFS NEWYORK -Venus
Championship Williams dug herself out
Saturday's results
Portland atWestern NewYork,8 p.m. of deficits over and over
again, until she simply ran
Tennis out of solutions, exiting
U.S.en the U.S. Open before the
At The USTA Billie Jean King National third round for the third
Tennis Center, NewYork year in a row.
Purse: $34.3 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor At 33, two-time cham-
Singles pion Williams was the
Men
First Round oldest woman in the
MarcosBaghdatis, Cyprus, def. Go Soeda, second round at Flushing
Japan, 6-4,6-3,6-1. Meadows and while she
Alexander Dolgopolov, Ukraine, def.David Meadows, and while she
Goffin, Belgium, 6-2,6-4,6-4. made things interesting
Kevin Anderson (17), South Africa, def. after a poor start to the
Daniel Brands, Germany, 7-5,4-6,6-2,6-3.
Mikhail Youzhny (21), Russia, def. Nicolas match and to the final
Mahut, France, 64, 6-4,7-6 (4). set, she couldn't sustain
Somdev Dewarman, India, def. Lukas 1
Lacko, Slovakia, 4-6,6-1,6-2,4-6,6-4. her solid play all the way
Tim Smyczek, United States, def. James through and lost to 56th-
Duckworth, Australia,3-6, 6-2,6-4,6-1. ranked Zheng Jie of China

Second Round 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (5) on a wet
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (32), Russia, Wednesday.
def. Ashleigh Barty, Australia, 6-4,6-0.
Li Na (5),China, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Swe- The match last 3 hours,
den, 6-1,6-1. 2 minutes making it the
Carla Suarez Navarro (18), Spain, def. longest between women
CoCoVandeweghe, United States, 6-3,6-4. longest between women
Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. in the tournament so far
Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, 6f 7-5. and the third set alone
Laura Robson (30), Britain, def. Caroline
Garcia, France, 6-4,7-6 (5). went 11/2 hours, closing
Zheng Jie, China, def. Venus Williams, when Williams missed a
united States,6-3, 2-6, 7-6(5). volley then a return, on

Transactions the last two points. She
wound up with 44 un-
BASEBALL forced errors in all, half on
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS Placed OF forehands.
Ryan Raburn on the 15-day DL. Purchased During her on-court in-
the contract of OF Matt Carson from Co- terview, Zheng addressed
lumbus (IL). tVIeW, eng adressed
National League the partisan crowd that
ATLANTA BRAVES Activated 2B Dan was pulling for Williams,
Uggla from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF
Todd Cunningham to Gwinnett (IL). saying: "First, I want to
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Optioned C say, 'Sorry, guys."'
Tony Sanchez and LHP Jeff Locke to Al- Rain began falling
toona (EL). Rain began falling
SAN DIEGO PADRES Recalled LHP in the early afternoon,
Robbie Erlin from Tucson (PCL). Optioned jumbling the schedule,
RHP Brad Boxberger toTucson.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Recalled RHP and eight women's singles
Michael Blazek from Memphis (PCL). Op- matches were postponed,
tioned RHP Carlos Martinez to Memphis.
BASKETBALL including Williams'
National Basketball Association younger sister, defending
RoS nBr Ce -- Signed G-F champion Serena, against
FOOTBALL GalinaVoskoboeva. In all,
National Football League there were more than four
CLEVELAND BROWNS Claimed LB
Eric Martin off waivers from New Orleans. hours of delays.
Waived DBTrevinWade. In the handful of
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed CB
Will Blackmon.Waived CB Marcus Burley. matches that were com-
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Claimed pleted by early evening
DL Gilbert Pena offwaivers from Green Bay men in the first round,
and LB Ja'Gared Davis off waivers from the
Houston.ReleasedOLBriceSchwabandCB: women in the second
Ras-l Dowling. 2011French O en
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS Signed 2011 French Open
WR Jordan Norwood. Waived DE Aaron champion Li Na, and 2012
Morgan. Wimbledon runner-up
Canadian Football League A zka Radw k
HAMILTON TIGER-CATS- Released DL Agnieszka Radwanska
Greg Peach.
HOCKEY
American Hockey League I
BINGHAMTON SENATORS Named QUICK HITS
Tim Marksvideo coach.
ECHL
BAKERSFIELD CONDORS Signed LW
Chris Collins. Agreed to terms with D Nick VONN N EARING
Pageau.
GWINNETT GLADIATORS Signed F RETURN TO SNOW
Jeremie Malouin and Kurtis Bartliff.
READING ROYALS Agreed to terms VAIL, Colo. (AP) -
with D Damon Kipp.
UTAH GRIZZLIES Agreed to terms LindseyVonn dropped
with F Adam Pineault, F David Vallorani and into a skier's tuck as if she
D Martin Lee.
SKIING were trying to gain a little
U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association extra speed on a downhill
USSA Named Tiger Shaw chief oper- course.
eating officer, effective Oct. 1.
SOCCER Only, this was simply
Major League Soccer while balancing on a ball
LOS ANGELES GALAXY Signed MF
Landon Donovan to a multiyear contract at a local gym. Soon, that
extension. could actually take place
TURKISH ATHLETICS FEDERATION n snow.
Announced European 100-meter hurdles Vonn's surgically re-
champion Nevin Yanit was banned for two paired right knee is nearly
years after testing positive for banned sub- paired right Knee IS nearly
stances during a competition in February in fully healed and she plans
Duesseldorf, Germany. to ski this weekend in

CENTRAL ARKANSAS Suspended Portillo, Chile.
WR Jacoby Walker, WR Wyatt Hikins, OL For the moment, the
Jordan Kersh and OL CJ. Simon two games i
each and RBWillie Matthews one game. plan is to have Vonn ski
CHARLESTON SOUTHERN Named with the U.S. team, just
Adam Vrable hitting coach and infield in-
structor. Named Drew Woodall student as- a few easy runs to test
sistant baseball coach. : out her knee. But later at
CHOWAN Named Brittany Hall wom- the camp, she's hoping to
en's assistant basketball coach.
FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON Named Julie navigate through some
Flanzerassistantathleticdirectorforsports slalom gates and maybe,

HIGH POINT- Named Will Hayes assis- just maybe knee
tant strength &conditioning coach willing, of course even
HOFSTRA Named Tracy Koch men's
andwomen'sassistantcrosscountrycoach. open it up on the course.
MOUNTST.MARY'S- Named Erin Led- "But my expectations
assistant baseball coach. are sometimes a little
NEW JERSEY CITY Named Rich Al- bit out of whack," Vonn
berto women's assistant soccer coach. said wednesday after a
NEW MEXICO-Named Ed Manzanares sa Wenesayater
theassistantathleticdirectorformajorgifts 30-minute workout.


and Allison Buck interim director of opera- The four-time overall
tions forvolleyball.
PENN Named Dr. Scarlett K. Schmidt World Cup champion is
executive director of athletics develop- eyeing a return to com-
ment.
RADFORD Named Jackie Jenkins vol- petition in late November
unteer assistant softball coach. at a stop in Beaver Creek,
SACRAMENTO STATE Named Nich-
ole Willis and Danielle Kaminaka assistant Colo., which is near her
softball coaches. hometown ofVail.
TEXAS A&M Announced the suspen-
sion of QB Johnny Manziel for the first half
of itsAug. 31 game against Rice. SOCCER
TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN Named An-
drew Carson volunteer assistant baseball Donovan re-signs with
coach/camp coordinator and director of Donovan re-igns ith
baseball operations. Los Angeles Galaxy: In
WRIGHT STATE Named Greg Love- Carson, Clif., Landon Donovan signed
lady baseball coach.otract extension with
a multi-year contract extension with


Tigers
Astros
Braves

z-Pirates
Phillies
Yankees
BlueJays

z-Red Sox
Orioles
Rays
Twins


32 27
27 32
25 34
Northwest Division
W L
32 27
30 29
28 31
27 32
South Division
W L
34 25
30 29
27 32
27 32


3 20.TCU 7-6 323 NR
8 21.UCLA 9-5 286 NR
10 22. Northwestern 10-3 199 NR
23.Wisconsin 8-6 185 NR
GB 24. Southern Cal 7-6 134 NR
- 25. Oregon St. 9-4 129 20
2 Others receiving votes: Michigan St.
4 95, Baylor 92, Virginia Tech 86, Miami 85,
5 Arizona St. 53, Kansas St. 43, Fresno St. 36,
Vanderbilt 19, Washington 17, N. Illinois
GB 16, Mississippi 11, Utah St. 8, Georgia Tech
- 6, Arizona 3, Cincinnati 3, North Carolina 3,
4 Penn St.2,BYU 1.
7
7 Today's games
EAST
Rhode Island at Fordham, 7 p.m.
Jacksonville at Delaware, 7:30 p.m.
Towson at UConn, 7:30 p.m.
SOUTH
North Carolina at South Carolina, 6 p.m.
Presbyterian atWake Forest, 6:30 p.m.
UT-Martin at Chattanooga, 7 p.m.
Robert Morris at E. Kentucky, 7 p.m.
Pikeville at Morehead St., 7 p.m.
Akron at UCF, 7 p.m.
W. Carolina at MiddleTennessee, 7:30 p.m.
S. Utah at South Alabama, 7:30 p.m.
SE Missouri at SE Louisiana, 8 p.m.
Cumberland (Tenn.) at Tennessee Tech, 8
p.m.
Jackson St. atTulane, 8 p.m.
Mississippi at Vanderbilt, 9:15 p.m.
MIDWEST
Liberty at Kent St., 6 p.m.
Illinois St. at Ball St., 7 p.m.
Tulsa at Bowling Green, 7 p.m.
Grand Viewat Drake, 7 p.m.
Indiana St. at Indiana, 7 p.m.
UNLVat Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Northwestern St. at Missouri St., 7 p.m.
GB Hampton atW. Illinois, 7 p.m.
Dayton at Youngstown St., 7:30 p.m.
5 Valparaiso at North Dakota, 8 p.m.
61/ SOUTHWEST
71/2 IncarnateWord at Cent. Arkansas, 8 p.m.
9 FARWEST
12 Utah St.atUtah,8 p.m.
Monmouth (NJ) at Montana St., 9:05 p.m.
GB Sacramento St.at San Jose St., 10 p.m.
_ E. Oregon at Portland St., 10:05 p.m.
1 Rutgers at Fresno St., 10:30 p.m.
ai, Southern Cal at Hawaii, 11 p.m.


z-clinched playoff spot
Wednesday's results
Marlins 3, Mets 2
Nationals 4, Cardinals 0
Phillies 7, Pirates 4
Yankees 3, BlueJays 2,10 innings
Orioles 8,Twins 1
Braves 4,Tigers 0
Astros 5, GulfCoast O
Rays 2, Red Sox 1
Today's games
Marlins at Mets, 10 a.m.
Braves atTigers, 10 a.m.
Yankees at BlueJays, 10 a.m.
Phillies at Pirates, 10 a.m.
Red Sox at Rays, 10 a.m.
Nationals at Cardinals, 11 a.m.
Orioles at Twins, 11 a.m.
Astros at Gulf Coast, noon
Friday's games
No games scheduled


Pro basketball
WNBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pet
x-Chicago 20 8 .714
Atlanta 14 12 .538
Washington 14 15 .483
Indiana 12 15 .444
NewYork 11 17 .393
Connecticut 7 20 .259 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pet
x-Minnesota 21 7 .750
x-LosAngeles 20 8 .714
Phoenix 14 13 .519
Seattle 14 14 .500
SanAntonio 10 18 .357
Tulsa 9 19 .321
x-clinched playoff spot
Tuesday's results
Minnesota 73, NewYork47
Seattle 72, San Antonio 71
Los Angeles 91, Connecticut 78
Wednesday's results
Washington 85, Atlanta 80, OT
Today'sgame
Connecticut at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Friday's game
Indiana at New York, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Tulsa,8 p.m.

Pro football
NFL PRESEASON
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East W L T Pet PF
Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 71
NewEngland 2 1 0 .667 65
N.Y.Jets 2 1 0 .667 78
DOLPHINS 1 3 0 .250 80
South W L T Pet PF
Houston 2 1 0 .667 74
Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 67
Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 67
JAGUARS 0 3 0 .000 40
North W L T Pet PF
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 98
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 79
Cleveland 2 1 0 .667 57
Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 46
West W L T Pet PF
Denver 2 1 0 .667 47
Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 52
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 65
San Diego 1 2 0 .333 62
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Glantz-Culver Line
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atNewYork -125 Philadelphia +115
atWashington-220 Miami +200
at Pittsburgh -145 Milwaukee +135
American League
at Detroit -175 Oakland +165
atTampa Bay -150 LosAngeles +140
Kansas City -115 atMinnesota +105
at Boston -165 Baltimore +155
Seattle -120 atHouston +110
Interleague
at Atlanta -150 Cleveland +140

NCAA FOOTBALL
Today
FAVORITE O T O/U UNDERDOG
atS.Carolina 10V212/2(5712) N.Carolina
at Minnesota 14'/214 (51V/2) UNLV
at Bowling Green3 4(491/2) Tulsa
atUCF 211/222 (55) Akron
at Utah Pk 2'/2 (51) Utah St.
Misisissippi 1 3/2 (53) atVanderbilt
at Fresno St. 11'/210 (54'/2) Rutgers
Southern Cal 20'/223'/2(53) at Hawaii
Friday
at Michigan St. 27 28(441/2) W.Michigan
at Miami 311/232(531/2) FAU
TexasTech 7 6 (591/2) at SMU
Saturday
atWisconsin 44 44'/2(52'/2) UMass
at Michigan 34/231/2(52)Cent. Michigan
at Ohio St. 35 35 (55) Buffalo
at NC State 141/214(621/2) La.Tech
at Maryland 18'/221 (49'/2) FIU
at Iowa 3 3 (531/2) N.Illinois
at Notre Dame 30 29/2(52'/2) Temple
BYU 2'/2 1 (50) atVirginia
Alabama-a 17'/2 20 (45'/2) Virginia Tech
atTroy 61/2 31/2 (63) UAB
at Cincinnati 71/2101/2(501/2) Purdue
Kentucky-b 7/2 4/2 (57) W.Kentucky
at Marshall 1719'/2(68'/2) Miami (Ohio)
Oklahoma St.-c 11 12'/2(60) Mississippi St.
at Oklahoma 22/2 22 (60) La.-Monroe
at S. Miss. 7 8'/2(55'/2) Texas St.
atTexas 41/2 42 (571/2) New Mex. St.
atTexasA&M 27 27(691/2) Rice
at Florida 23231/2(561/2) Toledo
at Arkansas 10'/210'/2(59) La.-Lafayette
atAuburn 17151/2(591/2) Wash.St.
at North Texas 14/2 15 (56'/2) Idaho
Penn St.-d 7 8 (511/2) Syracuse
at Nebraska 27 29(651/2) Wyoming
at New Mexico 3 3'/2 (56) UTSA
Georgia 2/2 1/2 (70) atClemson
LSU-e 3 4'/2 (50) TCU
atWashington 5'/2 3'/2 (52) BoiseSt.
at UCLA 17 21 (66) Nevada
Northwestern 3 6 (571/2) atCalifornia
Sunday
at Louisville 21 21 (58) Ohio
Colorado St.-f 2'/2 2'/2 (49) Colorado
Monday
Florida St. 71/2 10(491/2)at Pittsburgh
a-at Atlanta
b-at Nashville,Tenn.
c-at Houston
d-at E. Rutherford, NJ.
e-at Arlington,Texas f-at Denver
NFL PRESEASON
Today
FAVORITE O T O/U UNDERDOG
Philadelphia 3/2 3/2 (40) at N.Y.Jets
at Cincinnati 2/2 3'/2(37'/2) Indianapolis
Detroit 4'/2 4'/2(39'/2) at Buffalo
Jacksonville 3 3 (391/2) atAtlanta
at Carolina 31/2 31/2(361/2) Pittsburgh
Washington 21/2 2 (371/2)atTampaBay
at Miami 61/2 6 (36) NewOrleans
at New England Pkl (39) N.Y. Giants
Tennessee 6'/2 4 (38'/2) at Minnesota
at St.Louis 8'/2 7 (38'/2) Baltimore
Cleveland +2'/ 2 (39'/2) at Chicago
at Kansas City 2'/2 4 (361/2) GreenBay
Houston 3'/2 21/2(371/2) at Dallas
at Denver Pk Pk (38) Arizona
San Francisco 3 Pk(38'/2) at San Diego
at Seattle 6'/2 7 (36'/2) Oakland

Pro baseball
TUESDAY'S LATE MLB LINESCORES
RANGERS 4, MARINERS 3
Texas 030000000 1 -4100
Seattle 201000000 0-3 90
(10 innings)
D.Holland, Frasor (7), Cotts (8), Scheppers
(9), Nathan (10) and Pierzynski; Iwakuma,
Furbush (7), Medina (8), Farquhar (10) and
Quintero. W-Scheppers 6-2. L-Farqu-
har 0-2. Sv-Nathan (38). HRs-Seattle,
F.Gutierrez (6).
GIANTS 5, ROCKIES 3
San Francisco 300 001 100 5130
Colorado 001 100100--3 81
Petit, S.Rosario (7), J.Lopez (8), S.Casilla (8),
Romo (9) and H.Sanchez; Bettis, Ottavino
(7), Outman (8), Belisle (9) and W.Rosario.
W-Petit 1-0. L-Bettis 0-3. Sv-Romo (32).
HRs-San Francisco, Pence (16), Sandoval
(10).
DIAMONDBACKS 10, PADRES 9
San Diego 300000 042 0-- 9140
Arizona 030031020 1-10121
(10 innings)
Kennedy, Hynes (5), Boxberger (6), Stauffer
(7), Vincent (8), Gregerson (9), Thayer (10)
and Hundley; Holmberg, Collmenter (4),
Roe (8),Thatcher (8),W.Harris (8), Ziegler (9),
Bell (10) and M.Montero, Nieves. W-Bell
5-2. L-Thayer 2-4. HRs-Arizona, G.Parra
(10).
CUBS 3, DODGERS 2
Chicago 001 001 100--3 91
LosAngeles 000 001 010-32 72
Tr.Wood, Strop (8), Gregg (9) and D.Navarro;
Kershaw, B.Wilson (6), Belisario (7), Marmol
(9), P.Rodriguez (9) and A.Ellis.W-Tr.Wood
8-10. L-Kershaw 13-8. Sv-Gregg (27).

GULFCOASTLEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet. GB
z-Nationals 49 9 .845 -
Marlins 25 33 .431 24
Cardinals 24 34 .414 25
Mets 18 40 .310 31
Northeast Division
W L Pet. GB
z-Yankees 35 24 .593 -


Friday's games
EAST
Morgan St. at Army, 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Samford at Georgia St., 7 p.m.
FAU at Miami,8 p.m.
MIDWEST
W. Michigan at Michigan St., 8 p.m.
N. Dakota St. at Kansas St., 8:30 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Texas Tech at SMU, 8 p.m.
Southern U.at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
| FARWEST
N. Arizona at Arizona, 10 p.m.

Saturday's games
EAST
Villanova at Boston College, Noon
William & Mary at West Virginia, Noon
Albany (NY) at Duquesne, 12:10 p.m.
Georgetown at Wagner, 1 p.m.
Holy Cross at Bryant, 3 p.m.
Penn St.vs. Syracuse at East Rutherford, NJ.,
3:30 p.m.
Sacred Heart at Marist, 6 p.m.
SOUTH
Campbell at Charlotte, Noon
Elon at Georgia Tech, Noon
Toledo at Florida, 12:21 p.m.
FIU at Maryland, 12:30 p.m.
LouisianaTech at NC State, 12:30 p.m.
BYU atVirginia, 3:30 p.m.
NC Central at Duke, 4 p.m.
Edward Waters at Alcorn St., 5 p.m.
Virginia Tech vs. Alabama at Atlanta, 5:30
p.m.
Jacksonville St. at Alabama St., 6 p.m.
FurmanatGardner-Webb,6p.m.
Savannah St. at Georgia Southern, 6 p.m.
CCSU at James Madison, 6 p.m.
Reinhardt at Mercer, 6 p.m.
Maine at Norfolk St., 6 p.m.
VMI at Richmond, 6 p.m.
Coastal Carolina at SC State, 6 p.m.
Austin Peay at Tennessee, 6 p.m.
Charleston Southern at The Citadel, 6 p.m.
Washington St. at Auburn, 7 p.m.
Old Dominion at East Carolina, 7 p.m.
Alabama A&Mat Grambling St., 7 p.m.
W. Kentucky vs. Kentucky at Nashville,
Tenn., 7 p.m.
Miami (Ohio) at Marshall, 7 p.m.
McNeese St. at South Florida, 7 p.m.
Texas St. at Southern Miss., 7 p.m.
Warner at Stetson, 7 p.m.
UABatTroy,7p.m.
Georgia at Clemson, 8 p.m.
MIDWEST
Purdue at Cincinnati, Noon
S. Illinois at Illinois, Noon
Buffalo at Ohio St., Noon
UMass at Wisconsin, Noon
UC Davis at South Dakota, 3 p.m.
N.Illinois at Iowa, 3:30 p.m.
Cent. Michigan at Michigan, 3:30 p.m.
Temple at Notre Dame, 3:30 p.m.
Howard at E. Michigan, 6 p.m.
Murray St. at Missouri, 7 p.m.
Butler at S. Dakota St., 7 p.m.
N.Iowa at Iowa St., 8 p.m.
Wyoming at Nebraska, 8 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Rice atTexas A&M, 1 p.m.
Mississippi St. vs. Oklahoma St. at Houston,
3:30 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette at Arkansas, 4 p.m.
Ark.-Pine Bluff at Arkansas St., 7 p.m.
Idaho at North Texas, 7 p.m.
Louisiana-Monroe at Oklahoma, 7 p.m.
Houston Baptist at Sam Houston St., 7 p.m.
Wofford at Baylor, 7:30 p.m.
Concordia-Selma at Abilene Christian, 8
p.m.
Panhandle St. at Lamar, 8 p.m.
New Mexico St. atTexas, 8 p.m.
PrairieViewatTexas Southern,8 p.m.
LSU vs.TCU at Arlington, Texas, 9 p.m.
FARWEST
Colgate at Air Force, 3 p.m.
Langston at N.Colorado, 3:35 p.m.
Nicholls St. at Oregon, 4 p.m.
E.Washington at Oregon St., 6 p.m.
San Diego at Cal Poly, 7:05 p.m.
UTSA at New Mexico, 8 p.m.
E.Illinois at San Diego St., 8 p.m.
Stephen F.Austin atWeber St., 8 p.m.
Appalachian St. at Montana, 9 p.m.
Nevada at UCLA, 10 p.m.
Boise St. at Washington, 10 p.m.
Northwestern at California, 10:30 p.m.


East
Washington
Philadelphia
Dallas
N.Y. Giants
South
New Orleans
Carolina
BUCS
Atlanta
North
Chicago
Detroit
Green Bay
Minnesota
West
Seattle
Arizona
San Francisco
St. Louis


T Pet
01.000
0 .667
0 .500
0 .333
T Pet
01.000
0 .667
0 .333
0 .000
T Pct
0 .667
0 .667
0 .333
0 .000
T Pct
01.000
0 .667
0 .667
0 .000


the Los Angeles Galaxy, keeping the
high-scoring U.S. national team star
with his MLS club.
The Galaxy announced the deal
Wednesday with Donovan, whose
current contract was up at the end of
the season.
The 31-year-old Donovan has been
with the Galaxy since 2005, winning
three of his five career MLS Cup titles
with Los Angeles. He is the third-
leading goal-scorer in MLS history,
trailing leader Jeff Cunningham by just
three goals.
Donovan also is the U.S. national
team's career scoring leader, playing in
the last three World Cups. ...
Late goals from brothers Shola
and Sammy Ameobi gave Newcastle
a 2-0 win over Morecambe as the
Premier League team labored to reach
the third round of the League Cup.
All the Premier League clubs playing
on Wednesday advanced to the third
round, with 2012 runner-up Cardiff
defeating Accrington 2-0, Aston Villa
beating Rotherham 3-0 and Everton
seeing off Stevenage 2-1 thanks to
Marouane Fellaini's extra-time goal.
Stoke progressed with a 3-1 victory
against Walsall.


JUDICIARY

Pa. court tackles issue
of boys on girls'teams:
In Harrisburg, Pa., a state judge has
declined to intervene in the growing
issue of boys playing sports tradition-
ally reserved for girls, saying a previous
court ruling doesn't necessarily prohibit
the Pennsylvania Interscholastic
Athletic Association from banning the
practice.
Commonwealth Court Judge Kevin
Brobson turned down a request by
the PIAA to modify a 1975 state court
ruling requiring schools to let girls play
on boys'teams.


Today'sgame
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y.Jets, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at DOLPHINS, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at BUCS, 7:30 p.m.
JAGUARS at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7:30 p.m.
Tennessee at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Green Bayat Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Baltimore at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Arizona at Denver, 9 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10 p.m.
CFL
EAST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
Toronto 5 3 0 10 244 206
Hamilton 4 4 0 8 203 219
Montreal 3 5 0 6 195 239
Winnipeg 1 7 0 2 167 247
WEST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
Saskatchewan 7 1 0 14 264 177
Calgary 6 2 0 12 258 200
B.C. 5 3 0 10 207 203
Edmonton 1 7 0 2 188 235
Friday's game
Hamilton at B.C., 10 p.m.
Sunday'sgame
Winnipeg at Saskatchewan, 4 p.m.
Monday's game
Edmonton at Calgary, 5 p.m.
Tuesday's game
Montreal at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.


College football Sunday'sgames
APTOP 25 MVSU vs. Florida A&M at Orlando, Fla., 11:45
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press a.m.
preseason college football poll, with first- Ohio at Louisville,3:30 p.m.
place votes in parentheses, 2012 records, Bethune-Cookman atTennessee St., 8 p.m.
total points based on 25 points for a first- FARWEST
place vote through one point for a 25th- Colorado vs. Colorado St.at Denver,6 p.m.
place vote, and final ranking:
Record Pts Pv Monday's games
1.Alabama (58) 13-1 1,498 1 EAST
2.Ohio St.(1) 12-0 1,365 3 Florida St.at Pittsburgh,8 p.m.
3.Oregon 12-1 1,335 2
4.Stanford 12-2 1,294 7 Soccer
5.Georgia(1) 12-2 1,249 t5 Soccer
6. South Carolina 11-2 1,154 8 MLS
7.TexasA&M 11-2 1,104 t5 EASTERN CONFERENCE
8.Clemson 11-2 1,083 11 L T Pt GF GA
9.Louisville 11-2 1,042 13 Montreal 12 7 5 41 41 35
10.Florida 11-2 894 9 NewYork 11 9 6 39 38 34
11. Florida St. 12-2 845 10
daSt. 12-2 845 10 SportingKansasCity11 9 6 39 36 26
12.LSU 10-3 802 14 Philadelphia 10 8 8 38 37 37
13. Oklahoma St. 8-5 755 NR NewEngland 10 9 6 36 34 24
14. Notre Dame 12-1 748 41
.NotreDame 12- 748 4 Houston 10 8 6 36 29 28
5eg l Chicago 10 10 4 34 30 34
16.Oklahoma 10-3 579 15 Columbus 8 12 5 29 29 34
17.Michigan -5 531 24 Toronto FC 4 12 9 21 22 34
18.BNebraska 10-4 382 25
1.bsD.C. 317 5 14 15 41
19. Boise St. 11-2 328 18


www.sunnewspapers.net


SCOREBOARD


Sports on TV
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6p.m.
ESPN North Carolina at South Carolina
8p.m.
FS1 Utah St. at Utah
9:15 p.m.
ESPN Mississippi at Vanderbilt
GOLF
10 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Wales Open,
first round,at City of Newport,Wales (same-
day tape)
3p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Hotel Fitness Cham-
pionship, first round, at Fort Wayne, Ind.
5:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Safeway Classic, first round, at
Portland, Ore.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Oakland at
Detroit
1:10 p.m.
SUN L.A. Angels atTampa Bay
7p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Baltimore at
Boston or Cleveland at Atlanta
7:05 p.m.
FSFL -Washington at Miami
TENNIS
1 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, second round, at New
York
7p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, second round, at New
York


loses in



tiebreaker



U.S. OPEN

TOP PLAYERS ON COURT
TODAY: Men: No. 2 Rafael
Nadal vs. Rogerio Dutra Silva,
No. 4 David Ferrer vs. Roberto
Bautista Agut, No. 7 Roger
Federer vs. Carlos Berlocq;
Women: No. 1 Serena Williams
vs. Galina Voskoboeva, No. 2
Victoria Azarenka vs. Alek-
sandra Wozniak, No. 4 Sara
Errani vs. Flavia Pennetta, No. 6
Caroline Wozniacki vs. Chanelle
Scheepers, No. 7 Petra Kvitova
vs. Bojana Jovanovski.

TODAY ON TV: Tennis Channel,
11 a.m.-7 p.m.; ESPN2, 1-11
p.m.


won in straight sets, as
did 30th-seeded Laura
Robson of Britain. No.
17 Kevin Anderson, No.
21 MikhailYouzhny and
109th-ranked American
wild-card entry Tim
Smyczek were among the
men's winners.
Venus Williams and
Zheng, a former top-15
player who twice reached
Grand Slam semifinals,
played all of two points at
the beginning before their
match was interrupted by
showers.
When they resumed
about two hours later,
at 15-all in the opening
game, Williams' play was
full of mistakes. In the first
set, she only managed to
put 46 percent of her first
serves in play, and she ac-
cumulated 15 unforced er-
rors, 10 more than Zheng.
The American, who owns
seven Grand Slam singles
titles, failed to convert any
of six break points.
And then came the sec-
ond set, and a significant
shift. Suddenly, Williams
looked a lot more like the
player who won the U.S.
Open in 2000 and 2001.
After falling behind by
a break in the third set,
and being two points
away from losing at 5-3,
when Zheng served for the
victory, then again in the
next game -Williams put
up quite a fight to extend
the match, drawing rau-
cous support from fans at
Louis Armstrong Stadium.






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Alabama


TOP TWENTY COUNTDOWN


'Bama dismisses talk of 3-peat


By JOHN ZENOR
ASSOCIATED PRESS
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -
Alabama quarterback AJ
McCarron offers a primer
for what it takes to fit
in with the top-ranked
Crimson Tide football
team.
For starters, don't fixate
on the shot at a historic
three-peat, BCS-or-bust
expectations or the
anointment by pollsters as
the team to beat.
It's all about Virginia
Tech, taking it one game
at a time, staying focused
and all the other cliches
that get trotted out in the
football building each year
about this time. In short,
ignore what coach Nick
Saban puts under the "ex-
ternal factors" umbrella.
"I feel like if you don't
think that way, you're
kind of irrelevant a little
to the team," McCarron
said Monday. "Everybody
needs to have the same
mindset. We can't worry
about what everybody
thinks, what everybody's
predicting. Just go out and
play the game and take
one play at a time, one
game at a time and we'll
be all right."
That starts Saturday in


ROOKIE
FROM PAGE 1
thing for Mike is he's
proven to his teammates
he's got something there
to him. That will be some-
thing he has to continue
every week to prove to
his teammates that if
something does happen,
I'm okay, guys. I think he's
started that journey."
Glennon has not
looked overwhelmed in
the preseason, but his
production has been
nothing to get excited
about. He leads the Bucs
with 334 yards passing
and has three touchdowns
and two interceptions. His
passer rating is 71.1, his
completion percentage
48.1 (26-of-54).
"Seeing all these reps
is a huge help for me
because as a rookie, there
are a lot of guys who
haven't been able to get as
many reps as I've gotten,"
Glennon said. "Those reps
are so important for me
and my development."
Meanwhile, Orlovsky
has accepted his role as
mentor and agreed to the
No. 3 quarterback role
when he restructured his
contract.
"I tell my wife, competi-
tively it (stinks) every day,"
Orlovsky said.
Glennon has been
exposed to critical situa-
tions in each preseason
game. Last week, following
a turnover, he led the Bucs
on a winning 25-yard
drive capped by his
touchdown pass to David
Douglas.
"I guess I will have done
it all after this game,"
Glennon said. "I've come
in and played the second
and third quarters. I got
to play the fourth quarter
last game and finish the
game out, and now I'll get
to start. So I think they set
me up to see all different
sorts of situations."


AP PHOTO
Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron works through a drill during
practice last week in Tuscaloosa, Ala. McCarron and the Crimson
Tide are not focused on a national championship three-peat.


Atlanta with the Hokies,
who are coming off a 7-6
season.
But hard as the coaches
and players try to ignore
it, the Tide is aiming
to make history. Major
college football has had
repeat national champs
10 times since the first AP
poll in 1936. None, how-
ever, has made it three in
a row and none has gone
wire-to-wire at No. 1 since
USC in 2004.
But Alabama has the
expectations born of win-
ning 49 games and three
national titles the last four
seasons. The exception
was a 2010 team that
opened at No. 1 and lost a


IN THE NOW
Today at Sun Coast Sports
Now: Peggy Kirsch, a club pro at
Heron Creek Golf Course in North
Port, recalls meeting legendary
coach Paul "Bear" Bryant in
1979, when she was a student
at Alabama. See why Bryant
offered Kirsch congratulations at
suncoastsportsblog.com.

whopping by the Tide's
current standards three
times.
Right or wrong, that
season became an oft-
cited example of what can
happen if a team buys
into the hype.
"It's an example but


we've been preaching
that for years now,"
McCarron said. "We can't
worry about it. That was
a different team then and
it's a different team now.
Got different players and
different mindsets among
the team as individuals.
We've got to focus on our
goal this year, our purpose
to be out there. You don't
really win the game on
Saturday. You win it every
day before that."
Once again, Alabama
has a chance to make a
statement early. The Tide
has played a ranked team
from a BCS conference
other than the SEC in the
first or second game each
of the past five seasons
and won all of them. The
closest call was when
fifth-ranked Alabama
beat No. 7 Virginia Tech
34-24 to start the 2009 title
season, including a 41-14
rout of No. 8 Michigan last
year in Arlington, Texas.
The Hokies aren't
ranked but Saban calls
them a "good all-around
team."
This time the Tide has
back-to-back potential
statement games, count-
ing the Sept. 14 visit to
No. 7 Texas A&M after an
open date.


* NFL NOTEBOOK



Miami ends struggle


By CHRIS PERKINS
SUN SENTINEL
DAVIE Expect the
Miami tight ends to be
going full speed tonight
in the preseason finale
against New Orleans.
Starter Charles Clay and
reserves Michael Egnew,
Dion Sims and Kyle Miller
need the work.
Teams have to cut their
rosters to the final 53 by 6
p.m. Saturday. That means
as many as 22 Dolphins
could be released, and a
tight end could be among
those cuts.
Coach Joe Philbin
wouldn't provide insight
into how much the tight
ends, or any other players,
would play against the
Saints.
"We're going to look at
the whole scope of things,
and we're going to make
a determination who's
going to play and how
long," he said. "We'll have
a target number of snaps
for the people. Usually we
are pretty close to it, but
sometimes it's flexible."
If the Dolphins elect
to keep three tight ends,
Miller is on the outside.
He wasn't drafted by the
team, such as Clay (sixth
round, 2011), Egnew
(third round, 2012) and
Sims (fourth round, 2013).
And beyond that, Miller,
who is in his second year,
missed part of training
camp with a left ankle
injury.
In a three-man tight
end unit, ideally Clay
would emerge as the
athletic guy, the one who
could stretch the field
and get yards after the
catch. Egnew would be
the blocker and could
occasionally catch passes.


AH IHUIU
Miami Dolphins tight end Dion Sims has a pass broken up
by Texans safety DJ Swearinger during a preseason game in
Houston. Miami lost tight end Dustin Keller for the season and
is struggling at that position.


And Sims would be a
combination of the two.
However, right now
it appears the trio of
Clay, Egnew and Sims
isn't nearly enough to
adequately replace Dustin
Keller, who sustained
a season-ending knee
injury two weeks ago.
Keller was emerging as a
weapon for the offense.
-Chris Perkins, South
Florida Sun Sentinel

Bucs sign WR Norwood:
Tampa Bay signed wide receiver Jordan
Norwood and waived defensive end
Aaron Morgan. Norwood had 36 recep-
tions for 405 yards and one touchdown
over the past two seasons with the
Cleveland Browns.

Jaguars sign Blackmon,
waive Burley: Jacksonville
signed veteran cornerback Will
Blackmon and waived rookie


DOLPHINS AT
SAINTS
WHO: Miami (1-3)
at New Orleans (2-0)
WHEN:Tonight, 7:30 p.m.
WHERE: Superdome
RADIO: No area stations are
full-time affiliates
TV: None

cornerback Marcus Burley.
Blackmon has played in 43 games
over six seasons with Green Bay and
the NewYork Giants. He has 21 tackles,
five fumble recoveries and two forced
fumbles. He has averaged 9.5 yards on
67 punt returns and 20.7 yards on 81
kickoff returns. He spent the preseason
with the Seattle Seahawks before
being waived Tuesday.
Blackmon played three seasons at
Boston College (2002-05), where he
saw action as a defensive back and
receiver.


By RICK STROUD
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA- Lawrence
Tynes sits on a couch
with his right elbow
propped on a pillow, an
intravenous line leading
from his bandaged wrist
down his arm.
The photograph was
tweeted Wednesday by


Tynes' wife, Amanda, who
joined the social medium
only a day earlier.
Responding to Tampa
Bay coach Greg Schiano's
comments that Tynes,
the 35-year-old kicker,
and guard Carl Nicks
are "responding well,"
to treatment for a MRSA
infection, Amanda said


her husband is going
through a "horrible time,"
and anyone who believes
otherwise is mistaken.
"I hear my husband
is responding 'well,' to
treatment," she tweeted.
"LOL! He's NOT respond-
ing at all yet. This is our
#bucslife.'
"Lawrence finally has


the right people in his
corner," Amanda later
tweeted.
Tynes returned to his
home in Kansas City,
Mo., on Friday to receive
additional treatment
for MRSA, an aggressive
staph infection resistant
to most antibiotics.


ALABAMA
The Sun willpreview the Top 20
teams in USA Today's coaches poll
each day counting down to the
college football season openers
today.
COACH
Nick Saban (7th season, 68-13)
2012 REWIND
13-1 overall, 7-1 SEC (1st in West
Division); beat Notre Dame 42-14 in
the BCS championship game
RETURNING STARTERS
6 offense, 7 defense
KEY QUESTION
Will the o-line slump? Gone are
three-fifths of perhaps the best
offensive line in college football
history as Chance Warmack, D.J.
Fluker and Barrett Jones went to
the NFL. But don't expect much
dropoff, if any, even with three new
starters. Junior LT Cyrus Kouandjio
and senior right guard Anthony
Steen are both All-American candi-
dates, and sophomore C Ryan Kelly
is well-regarded as well. He made
the AII-SEC freshman team, playing
behind Jones. Alabama won't have
the experience of last year's unit
did, but redshirt junior Arie Kouan-
djio, Cyrus's older brother, moves
in at left guard with junior Austin
Shepherd the likely heir apparent at
right tackle. Incidentally, all but one
of them is 6-foot-5 or taller, and
they average 308 pounds.
KEY PLAYER
QB A.J. McCarron: Quietly
enters his third season as starter
having completed 66.7 percent
of his passes for 5,956 yards and
49 TDs. He also led the nation in
pass efficiency and proved his


says sorr

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GAINESVILLE Florida
linebacker Antonio
Morrison apologized
Wednesday for "getting
in trouble the past few
weeks," but declined to
discuss details of his two
arrests or what he had to
do as punishment.
Morrison is suspended
for Saturday's season
opener against Toledo.
CoachWill Muschamp
initially suspended the
starting middle linebacker
for at least two games, but
reduced it to one game
Monday.
"First off, I want to
apologize for getting
in trouble the past few
weeks," Morrison said. "It's
sincere for me. I apolo-
gize to my coaches, my
teammates and everybody
for everything that went
wrong. It's behind me. I'm
moving forward from it. I
learned from it. I just want
to play football."
Morrison will be eligible
to play Sept. 7, when the
10th-ranked Gators play at
Miami.
The sophomore from
Bolingbrook, Ill., is
expected to be one of
Florida's top defenders
this season.
The Gators can only
hope he's better at tackling
than apologizing. He
failed to come across as
sincere or remorseful dur-
ing an 8-minute session
with reporters Wednesday.
He brushed aside many
questions, seemed defiant
during some answers and
even had a huge tattoo
on his right arm that read
"Don't Trust Me."

Spurrier, Clowney set for
debut: Steve Spurrier has always
liked the attention South Carolina gets
by starting its season on a Thursday
night.
Having All-America Jadeveon
Clowney on the sidelines, though,
guarantees the Gamecocks will get
plenty of attention whenever they play
this season.
"I told my wife this morning, I
was looking at the paper, all the NFL
guys are playing this Thursday night"'
Spurrier said. "Those dadgum guys are
crowding in on our Thursday nightTV
games."
Don't worry, coach, your ratings will
likely be high among NFL scouts, who'll


1

championship mettle last season.
SEC coaches selected him for
third team all-conference behind
Georgia's Aaron Murray and Texas
AM&'s Jonny Manziel, but he can
go out No.1.
KEY NEWCOMER
RB Derrick Henry: T.J. Yeldon
starts for Alabama, but Henry has
the size (6-foot-3, 238-pounds)
to be a force in short-yardage and
goal-line situations. The freshman
is also surprisingly fast for a big guy
(4.5 in the 40).
KEY NUMBER
7: Alabama offensive linemen
drafted in the last five years, four
in the first round. They're the new
standard.
KEY GAMES
Sept 14 at Texas A&M,
Nov. 9 vs. LSU: These should
decide the SEC West champion,
the first step toward an Alabama
three-peat. The Aggies were the
only team to beat Alabama last
season, so there's added incentive
for the Tide.
WILL CONTEND IF...
Well, there is no if. Alabama will
contend so long as Nick Saban is
still on the premises. What, you
need more? OK, 16 starters were
named to the preseason AII-SEC
first three teams, including seven
first-teamers.
-Austin American-Statesman


y, sort of

tune to watch Clowney.
The 6-foot-6,274-pound junior
and presumptive No. 1 pick in the
next draft steps on the field tonight
against North Carolina for the first time
since the Outback Bowl when he sent
the helmet of Michigan runner Vincent
Smith flying and turned momentum to
the Gamecocks in a 33-28 victory.

UCF focuses on limiting
Akron air-attack: During last
season's 56-14 season-opening win
at Akron, there wasn't much that UCF
wasn't able to do well against the Zips.
Tonight, they meet again to open
2013 with rosters that are mostly intact
from a year ago. The biggest difference
is that while the Knights have a
second-year starting quarterback in
Blake Bortles that is surrounded by
an experienced receiving corps and
massive expectations, Zips'sophomore
Kyle Pohl will be making his first career
start.
Still, UCF coach George O'Leary
has prepared his young secondary
to face another fast-paced air attack
that became the calling card in
Terry Bowden's first season in Akron.
O'Leary said keeping them boxed up is
paramount.

Monk, Casper among
newly enshrined in college
hall:Ty Detmer, Art Monk, Dave
Casper, Charles Alexander, Art Shell and
Jimmy Johnson were among 24 former
players and coaches enshrined in the
College Football Hall of Fame.
The hall has moved from South
Bend, Ind., but the new building
in downtown Atlanta is still under
construction and scheduled to open in
August 2014.
Atlanta was hosting its first
enshrinement ceremony in a hotel
ballroom adjacent to what will be
a 94,256-square foot museum that
organizers believe will host 500,000
visitors each year. Other inductees
included Steve Bartkowski, Jonathan
Ogden, Phillip Fulmer and R.C. Slocum.

B10 is allows stadiums
to show unlimited replays:
The Big Ten is allowing an unlimited
number of replays to be shown on
video boards in football stadiums.
Previously, stadiums were allowed
to show one replay at no less than 75
percent of real-time speed. The new
policy allows for multiple replays at any
speed. Senior associate commissioner
Mark Rudner said the previous policy
was an attempt to "limit the scope
and size"of controversial plays. Rudner
said the Big Ten Football Gameday
Experience Subcommittee believes fans
at the stadium should be able to see
replays the same as people watching
at home.


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK


Gators' Morrison


* NFL: Tampa Bay


Wife tweets photo that reveals Tynes' misery


-Page 6 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, August 29, 2013






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MARINE Inc


*ALL FISHING
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A weekly publication of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. A&'. Serving Southwest Florida outdoor enthusiasts


t .;I
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J?."









Southwest Florida's
ONLY weekly guide to
outdoor recreation









23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-276-9657
Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com

EDITOR
LEE ANDERSON
239-292-9230
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com

CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Allen
Dr. Mark Asperilla
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Capt. Steve Jones
Jeff Kincaid
Capt. Ed Kopp
Robert Lugiewicz
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi
Capt. Mike Myers
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Capt. Cayle Wills

MARKETING
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Printed by
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Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.


Photo provided
Pat Brun with a big, beautiful
snook caught and released at
the beach on the south end of


Gasparilla Island. I


Welcome to our snook special
edition. After you read this week's
magazine, some of you may
wonder why we're putting so much
emphasis on one fish. Snook are a
big deal, that's why. They're one of
our most sought-after gamefish,
right after tarpon. And they've
been off-limits to harvest for more
than three years. In my view, a bit
of celebration is in order.
I know I'm getting some folks
mad at me right now. Not everyone
was behind the decision to re-open
snook season. I understand their


concerns, but I think the FWC is
making the right decision here by
opening harvest. After doing some
fairly intensive studying on the
subject, I do have some reservations
about the current slot limit, which
I've written more about on page 26.
Throughout this publication, you
will read a conservation message.
As long as you keep that message in
mind while you're out fishing, we'll
all be fine and so with the snook
population. If you're going out to
harvest a snook for the table, that's
great. I would encourage you to
keep tabs on those you're sharing
the water with. I believe WaterLine
readers are mostly conservation-


minded, but not everyone out there
is. With law enforcement stretched
thin, many people have gotten into
the habit of just taking whatever
fish they feel entitled to. That's
called poaching, and poachers steal
from you and me and everyone else
who stays with in the law.
The magazine in your hands is
meant as a guide into the world of
snook for those who are new to it and
a reference for those who have snook
experience. Lee and I and the writing
staff have tried to cover all the bases,
from biology and fisheries research
to the nuts and bolts of catching
snook in various conditions and using
various methods. We've also included


a number of recipes. If you don't want
to kill a snook, that's OK: These recipes
will work just as well with snapper or
even grocery-store tilapia.
Charlotte Harbor's snook popula-
tion is doing pretty well. It's not back
to what we had before the Great
Freeze, but it took a long time to
build up to that. Barring more cold
incidents, we'll get there again.
Responsible harvest won't prevent it.
Conservation means you utilize the
resource if it can withstand the pres-
sure. I want you to love eating snook,
because if you do, you'll be one of the
ones who will truly care about their
future. Remember, we're hard-wired
to watch out for our selfish interests.


Keepin'deer healthy


Deer hunting season in Minnesota is a big deal.
Small towns will literally shut down during that
first weekend. It's common for parents take their
kids out of school for this celebrated and antici-
pated event. I get it. It's part about bonding with
family, friends and nature, and part reaping the
rewards of taking down a prized buck. And for those
who have never tasted venison, you should. I had
a Little League baseball coach who would always
end practice with venison that we dipped in a garlic
sauce, and it made those long practices worth it.
If you hunt deer or eat their meat, you have
likely heard of chronic wasting disease. If you
haven't heard of CWD, it is an incurable illness
that infects deer, elk and other cervids. Similar to
mad cow disease, CWD attacks the animal's brain
and nervous system. While Florida does not yet
have a documented case of CWD, 22 states do -
including Minnesota.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation


a r" .r~w,


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Commission has proposed a rule to prevent CWD.
The rule, which the FWC will consider at its Sept. 6
meeting in Pensacola, would prohibit people from
bringing live deer into Florida.
The idea of sickly, salivating zombie-like deer
invading Florida seems like something from the
movies, but CWD is a highly-infectious disease. It
is spread through bodily fluids from the infected
animal. CWD can infect new animals even after
infected animals have been removed. CWD has a
long incubation period, some deer do not show
symptoms for several years. An animal can appear
healthy, while still being infected with this fatal
disease. It should be noted here that there is
currently no evidence that CWD can be transmitted
to livestock or humans.
Florida is one of few remaining states that can
avoid the disease, as of our bordering states don't
have a single case of CWD. All of them already
prohibit live importation of cervids. Admitting an
infected animal is the only way CWD will enter


Florida. Some people say a complete ban on impor-
tation is the only way to protect Florida from this
devastating disease.
Florida does not have a shortage of deer, but
some people want to import deer and elk to stock
their hunting ranches.
Some ask why the deer can't just be tested
before importing them. Currently, there is no
live test for this disease. That means there is no
way of knowing if live deer coming to our state
are sick or healthy. That can't be good.
I'm all for protecting what we have here in
Florida, and I sure do like venison.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission meets Sept. 5 and 6 at the Crowne
Plaza Grand Pensacola Hotel, 200 East Gregory
Street. The meetings begin at 8:30 a.m. The rule
referred to in this article is on the agenda for
Sept. 6. Visit MyFWC.com/wildlifehabitats/health-
disease/cwd for more information or call the CWD
hotline, toll free at 866-293-9282.


Angling 101 ROBERT LUOIEWICZ Svvin r int the ightr Page :5
Too valuable to waste ........................................ ..........................Page 8
Where did the slot limit come from .................... ....................... Page 26
W atch that jaw................................... ................ Page 9
Tackle Tech JEFF KINCAID
Angling 201 CAPT. CAYLE WILLS Wanna catch a snook? Try faking it.......................... .................... Page 27
Peace River serves up loads of snook ........................................ .............. Page 10 iY
No Business TOMMY VON VOIOT
Cane pole snook....................................................................... Page 11 The Skunk Ape Trilogy, Part 2: Beneath the planet of the Skunk Ape...........Page 28
A Life on the Water CAPT VAN HUBBARD Best of The Fumbling Fisherman TOM JOHNSON
Don't pass on surf snook .............................. ......................................Page 12 Snooking, from hooking to cooking ................................ ........ .......... Page 29
East vs. W est ............................................................. .........................Page 13 Snook in fresh w after? You bet......................................................... Page 30


Snook Q & A w ith Dr. Aaron Adam s.......................... .................................Page 14
Snook: It sure ain't no Swedish hip-hop group ............................................ Page 15
Around Charlotte Harbor CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
Under the bridge......................................... ............... Page 16
I'll have the snook (or is that soapfish?).......................................................Page 17
Snook around the w orld ..........................................................................Page 18


Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS, DVM
Did you say snook, or Snooki?.........................................Page 31
At the Range* BILLY CARL
A close look at rifle scopes and sighting.......................................................Page 32
Volusia, Flagler push beach sm oking ban ...................................................Page 33
A scientific call for snook carcasses ............................ ..........................Page 34
Boating safety classes ................................. ............... Page 38


Used boat buyers beware: Don't buy a Sandy boat ......................................Page 19 Slack tides..........................................................Page 40


Snook back making an economic impact....................................................Page 20
Open season............................. .. .... age 21
Mote Marine RACHEL EASTERBROOK
Aquaculture: The salvation of the snook?............................... ......... ....Page 22
Angling 201 *CAPT. JOSH GREER
Snook on fly................................. ....... Page 23
Angling 201 *CAPT. MIKE MYERS
Snook fun on the flats........................................... ............... ............. Page 24


I I~~~i i


BULLETIN BOARD I Page 3

TIDE CHARTS I Page 4

FISH PROFILES I Page 4

SEAFOOD RECIPES I Pages 4,12,
17,25,28,32,35


FISH FINDER I Page 6

MAP OF LOCAL WATERS I Page 7

READER PHOTOS I Page 35

SOLUNARTABLES |Page39


I Iu I A] n




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4u4*sert- Page 3 August 29,2013


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f you have a meeting tournament, estival or other event you want included in the Outdoor ews Bulletin Board,email it to WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com


NINTH ANNUAL FLATS INVITATIONAL
REDFISH CHALLENGE
The event kicks off at The Marina at Cape Harbour (5828 Cape
Harbour Dr. Ste. 200, Cape Coral)at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 30th, with
dinner, an open bar, live music, raffle and Texas Hold 'Em poker
tournament. The fishing tournament begins with a shotgun start
at 7:30 a.m. on Aug. 31st with a kids'fishing tournament from
10 a.m.-noon featuring Ronald McDonald. The first 100 children
to preregister receive lunch with Ronald at noon. Live and silent
auctions, dinner and awards begin at 5 p.m. Cost is $275 per
angler. Call 239-424-8060 for more information.
NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY STROLL
Join the Mangrove Chapter of the Native Plant Society at 9 a.m.
on Aug. 31st for a fun and informational slow stroll on trails of
Ainger Creek (1049 Morningside Drive, Englewood). Meet at the
gate and drive inside the gate as the roadside is private property.
Sunflowers should be everywhere. Everyone is welcome. Wear
shoes that can get wet, a sun hat, sun lotion and bring insect
repellent and drinking water. Contact Denny Girard with ques-
tions at dennyg29@msn.com or call 941-474-8316.
VENICE TRIATHLON 2013
Whether you're a first-timer, or a seasoned pro, all athletes
are welcome! Swim .25 mile in the open waters of the Gulf of
Mexico, bike 14.6 miles on Harbor Dr. through lovely Venice
on a closed course and end with a 3.1 mile run through
Maxine Barritt Parkto Caspersen Beach on Aug. 31st starting
at Sharkys on the Pier in Venice (1600 Harbor Dr. South,
Venice). USAT sanctioned, post race breakfast by Sharky's,
Entertainment, Contact Brad Dailey 941-492-9622 X145. A
one-day membership is an additional $12.
5TH ANNUAL MATLACHA BERT'S
REDFISH CHALLENGE
Come out to beautiful Matlacha and Bert's Bar & Grill (4271 Pine
Island Rd NW, Matlacha) for a unique redfish tournament on Sept.
6th and 7th.There will be a captain's meeting on Sept. 6th at Bert's
at 6 p.m. with live music and a cash bar.Tournament begins on Sept.
7th at first light. Cost is $300 per boat (4 anglers per boat) and first
place earns $1,200, second gets $800 and third gets $500.Winners
are based on combined weight of two legal redfish.The after-party
will include a fish fry, live music, a 50/50 raffle and a silent auction.
Proceeds benefit Pine Island F.I.S.H. Call Jason Snyder at 239-349-
1129 or visit WastedSeamen.com for more information.
BOCA GRANDEYOUTH FISHING TOURNAMENT
Lee County Parks & Recreation and the Boca Beacon will be hosting
the Youth Fishing Tournament. Kids, grab yourfishing pole and
tackle box and come join the family fun on Sept. 7th from 9 to
11 a.m. The tournament is free for boys and girls ages 15 and


under. This is a catch and release tournament and the bait will be
provided by Boca Grande Marina (no lures allowed). Children must
be supervised by a parent/guardian for this event. Registration
is not necessary- just be at the Boca Grande Fishing Pier (North
end of the Island) ready to fish by 9 a.m. Prizes and awards will
be given out. For more information, please contact Joe Wier at
941-964-2564.
CYPRESS LAKE HIGH SCHOOL
FISHING TOURNAMENT
The tournament begins on Sept. 7th with an honor start at 7
a.m. Scales are open from 2 to 4 p.m. at Doc Ford's. Weigh-in
party starts at 4 p.m. with free food, drinks, music, auction,
raffle and of course cash awards to seven teams! Heaviest snook
Calcutta. Proceeds benefit the Panther Baseball Alumni Club. The
captain's meeting will be on Sept. 6th at 6:30 p.m. at Doc Ford's
Bar and Grille on Fort Myers Beach. Register and pay at www.
PantherBaseballAlumni.org or contact Josh Corr at JoshuaTC@
leeschools.net.
BEGINNING FLY FISHING
Learn fly fishing basics at the Yacht Club Community Park (5819
Driftwood Parkway, Cape Coral) on Sept. 9th from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Cost is $30for residents ($15 under 18); $40 non-residents ($20
under 18).The class will cover basics about the rod, reel, line,
different types of flies, leaders and casting. The class will be
taught by local expert Drei Stroman, who has more than 30 years
experience. Call 239-574-0806 or visit yachtclubinfo@capecoral.
net for more information.
ENGINE MAINTENANCE COURSE
IN PUNTA GORDA
The Peace River Sail & Power Squadron is offering the Engine
Maintenance course on Tuesday mornings at the Bayfront Center
in Punta Gorda from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. for 11 weeks starting
on Sept. 10th. Cost is $100for nonmembers or $50 for Power
Squadron members. Please call 941-637-0766 and leave a mes-
sage with your name and contact info. The Engine Maintenance
course stresses the diagnosis of modern systems, basic engine
layout and operation; Gasoline & Diesel, inboard & outboard.
MARINE FISHERIES REGULATIONS AND
MANAGEMENT ANGLER WORKSHOP
Understand how fishery managers use science to set fishing on
Sept. 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Cape Haze Marina (6950 Placida
Rd., Englewood) Topics include: Limits and quotas, the latest
innovations in reducing barotrauma in'no keep'catches, detailed
explanation to help one navigate, Florida's confusing fishing
license requirements, updates in federal and state fisheries rule
changes, law enforcement update, question and answers period
with the experts no question left behind! To register for this


FREE workshop visit https://anglerfisheriesworkshop.eventbrite.
com or call Betty Staugler at 941-764-4346.
BAY LIFE SAFARI AT LEMON BAY PARK
This seining event will explore the sea life near our beaches
with American Littoral Society biologists on Sept. 14th at 9:30
a.m. at Lemon Bay Park and Nature Center in Englewood. We'll
be searching shallow shorelines and sea grass beds; observing,
collecting, and learning about some of the many interesting
fish and other animals that inhabit Sarasota Bay. Wading shoes,
sunscreen and drinking water are recommended. Call 941-488-
8998 for more information. This event is free.
NINTH ANNUAL FILLET & RELEASE
TOURNAMENT BENEFITS HOPE HOSPICE
Head to Matanzas Inn (414 Crescent St., Fort Myers Beach) on
Sept. 14th. More than 50 boats will participate in a one-day,
light tackle, inshore fishing tournament featuring a $7,050 cash
payout (based on the number of entries) and a guest appearance
by the Zig Zag Girlz. Anglers will fish for spotted trout and
redfish. Cost is $250 per team with up to four anglers on each
team. Call 239-463-4763 or 239-940-4473 for more information.
TWO-DAY SAFE BOATING COURSE
The Peace River Sail & Power Squadron is offering the Americas
Boating Course (ABC3) spread over two Saturday mornings
on Sept. 14th and Sept. 21st from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at
the Punta Gorda Boat Club (802 W. Retta Esplanade, Punta
Gorda). The cost is $60 for the first person and $25 for a second
that shares material. Students receive a student manual with
CD. Upon successful completion, you will receive a U.S. Power
Squadron Certificate and a Florida Boaters Card. Please call 941-
637-0766, leave a message with your name, and contact info.
'REMEMBER THE FALLEN'5K MEMORIAL RUN
The NPFR Honor Guard will be hosting their Remember the
Fallen 5K Memorial Run on Sept. 14th at 7:30 a.m. at the George
D. Mullen Center (1602 Kramer Way, North Port). Inspired by the
events that took place on 9/11, this will be a day to remember,
honor and support the first responders and members of the
armed services who protect and serve our community and
country every day. In attending this event, you will be exposed
to aspects of the tradition found within the Fire Service. Show
your support and become part of this memorable event! Cost is
$20 before Aug. 30th, and $25 after Aug. 30th. Call Richard at
941-539-9993 for more information.
JOIN THE LEMON BAY F.I.S.H. PROJECT!
Calling all F.I.S.H.-Folks Interested in Submerged Habitats!
Get a little wet, have a little fun and learn a lot! Join American
Littoral Society Biologist Chuck Idelberger at Lemon Bay Park


and Environmental Center (570 Bay Park Blvd., Englewood )on
Sept. 14th from 9:30 to 11:00 a.m. on a search for marine life in
Lemon Bay. Using hand and seine nets, you will search shallow
waters and sea grass beds, observing, collecting, and discussing
the natural history of many interesting fish species and animals
that inhabit Lemon Bay. Call 941-861-5000 or register online at
www.scgov.net.
AN END OF SUMMER WALK AT
MANASOTA SCRUB PRESERVE
Enjoy a leisurely end of summer walk on the west side of the pre-
serve exploring regions seldom traveled by the regular visitors.
It's a nature walk at Englewood's Manasota Scrub Preserve (2696
Bridge St., Englewood) on Sept. 18th from 9 to 11 a.m., when
amateur botanists and Florida Native Plant Society members
Denny Girard and Al Squires will show plant detectives where
to find plants like wild rosemary thriving within the preserve.
Register online at www.scgov.net or call 941-861-5000.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR PHOTO RELEASE
FISHING TOURNAMENT
Join us on Sept. 20-21 at the Laishley Crab House in Punta Gorda
(150 Laishley Ct, Punta Gorda). Cost is $300 for three anglers
and $400 for four anglers. Fee includes captains meeting is Sept.
20th at 7 p.m. with T-shirts, angler bags and measuring boards.
Fee also includes dinner on Sept. 21st after the tourney awards
along with two beer tickets per angler. Winners will be based on
largest length in snook, redfish and trout. Catch and release only.
Scoring fish will be photographed and sent back to headquarters
to be displayed on live updates for spectators. First place is
$4,000. Second place is $2,000 and third place gets $1,000.
Largest fish in each category gets $450. Call JoEllen Morris at
941-628-2335 or email Beyond BordersOutfitters@yahoo.com for
more information. For registration online check out www.carefl.
org. The tournament is presented by The Center for Abuse and
Rape Emergencies, Inc.
LOW KEYTIKI REDFISH TOURNEY
IN ST. JAMES CITY
Low Key Tiki (3135 Stringfellow Road, St. James City) will host
it's third annual Redfish Tournament which begins at 7 a.m. on
Sept. 21st. Cash prizes, food, music by High Tide. A captain's
meeting will be held on the Sept. 20th at 6 p.m. Pay before Sept.
19th to get in for $50. The day before or the day of event, $55.
For more information, call 239-282-8454.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED ON
NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY
Learn about all the great volunteer opportunities that await you
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'4 MK*ws rt' Page 4 August 29,2013


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06:06 2.08 feet H
15:07 0.50 feet L


09:17 1.92 feet H
18:03 0.44 feet L


00:21 1.07 feet L
06:42 1.63 feet H
15:37 0.40 feet L
22:57 1.15 feet H


02:48 1.27 feet L
08:52 1.93 feet H
18:04 0.48 feet L


07:22 2.06 feet H
16:16 0.43 feet L
23:33 1.44 feet H


10:28 1.90feet H
19:09 0.38 feet L


01:49 1.11 feet L
08:05 1.63 feet H
16:43 0.35 feet L
23:41 1.20 feet H


01:07 1.36 feet H
04:16 1.32 feet L
10:15 1.93 feet H
19:10 0.42 feet L


SIZE LIMIT: Not less than 28"or more than most esteemed table fi
33", measured with the tail squeezed. waters, but be sure to s
SEASON: Closed season in Gulf Dec.-Feb. FISHING METHODS:
and May-Aug. $10 snook permit required to whitebait, sand seatrou
possess when saltwater license required. of those dead, whole o


DAILY BAG LIMIT: 1 per harvester
AVERAGE SIZE: 18"to 27.5"and 33.5"to 40"
STATE RECORD: 44 Ib, 3 oz
HABITAT: Snook are highly structure-
oriented and hang around docks, mangrove
roots and troughs. In winter, snook generally
move upriver. During the summer spawn, they
congregate just off local beaches, especially
near passes. Some fish live offshore or in the
rivers year-round.
LEGAL GEAR: Hook and line only
FOOD VALUE: One of the


02:30 1.38 feet L
08:43 2.09 feet H
17:07 0.38 feet L
23:47 1.49 feet H


03:27 1.33 feet H
05:46 1.27 feet L
11:46 1.91 feet H
20:00 0.33 feet L


03:23 1.10 feet L
09:23 1.65 feet H
17:34 0.32 feet L


01:51 1.42feet H
05:50 1.31 feet L
11:33 1.96 feet H
20:01 0.37 feet L



sh found in Florida
skin before cooking.
Live shrimp, pinfish,
t and ladyfish; also any
r cut. Topwater plugs,


white bucktails, white soft plastics and lipped
jerkbaits are among the more popular artificial.
NOTES: Handle with care the gill plates
have very sharp edges and can cut like a blade.
All snook start out male; most become female
at about 25"to 30" Four other snook species
are found in South Florida (tarpon snook,
swordspine snook, fat snook, largescale fat
snook); all are rare or unknown north of the
Caloosahatchee River. Regulations for common
/, snook apply to all species


.- ------.. -------


03:46 1.30 feet L
09:49 2.15 feet H
17:46 0.35 feet L


03:29 1.36feet H
06:55 1.19 feet L
12:54 1.96 feet H
20:40 0.30 feet L


00:09 1.23 feet H
04:34 1.04 feet L
10:26 1.70 feet H
18:16 0.30 feet L


02:19 1.46feet H
07:01 1.23 feet L
12:36 2.02 feet H
20:43 0.36 feet L


00:02 1.54 feet H
04:43 1.17 feet L
10:39 2.20 feet H
18:17 0.36 feet L


03:31 1.39 feet H
07:49 1.07 feet L
13:46 2.01 feet H
21:14 0.32 feet L


00:31 1.27 feet H
05:26 0.94 feet L
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18:50 0.32 feet L


02:41 1.50 feet H
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13:26 2.06 feet H
21:17 0.38 feet L


00:15 1.60feet H
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03:33 1.44feet H
08:34 0.94 feet L
14:29 2.03 feet H
21:43 0.36 feet L


00:48 1.30 feet H
06:10 0.84 feet L
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19:20 0.36 feet L


02:58 1.54feet H
08:37 0.99 feet L
14:09 2.09 feet H
21:47 0.42 feet L


00:27 1.67 feet H
06:12 0.88 feet I
11:59 2.22 feet H
19:10 0.48 feet I


03:37 1.51 feet H
09:14 0.81 feet I
15:09 2.03 feet H
22:10 0.44 feet I


01:02 1.34 feet H
06:48 0.72 feet I
12:38 1.76 feet H
19:45 0.42 feet I


03:12 1.59feet H
09:15 0.86 feet I
14:48 2.08 feet H
22:12 0.50 feet l


1 cup extra-virgin olive oil A clip-n-save seafood
3 tbsp lemon juice recipe provided by
3 tbsp minced fresh parsley / n


3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp dried basil
1 tbsp ground black pepper
1-1/2 tsp salt
6 6-oz snook fillets, skinned
Whisk together the extra-virgin olive
oil, lemon juice, parsley, garlic, basil,
pepper, and salt in a bowl and pour into
a resealable plastic bag. Add the snook
fillets, coat with the marinade, squeeze out
excess air, and seal the bag. Marinate in the
refrigerator for at least 1 hour. Preheat an
outdoor grill for medium-high heat, and
lightly oil grate. Remove the fillets from
the marinade, and shake off excess. Discard
the remaining marinade. Grill the fillets
until the fish is no longer translucent in the
center, and flakes easily with a fork, 3 to
4 minutes per side, depending on the thick-
ness of the fillets. Serve the fillets topped
with mango salsa. Serves 6.


Adapted from
allrecipes.com




3 large ripe mangos, peeled, pitted and diced
1 red bell pepper, diced
6 tbsp minced red onion
3 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
3 jalapefio peppers, seeded and minced
6 tbsp lime juice
3 tbsp lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste

Combine mango, red bell pepper, red onion,
cilantro and jalapeno pepper in a bowl. Add
lime juice and lemon juice, and toss well.
Season to taste with salt and pepper, and
refrigerate overnight.


iV FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
LET 27.1117 N, 82.46330 W
07:22 08:43 09:49 10:39 11:20 11:59
2.06 23:33 2.09 23:47 2.15 00:02 2.20 00:15 2.23 00:27 2.22
154144- 9 7- 1154 71.60-7- 1.67- O7!%


15:0716:16 1.38 17:07 1.30 17:46 1.17- 18:17-- 1.03- 18:44-- 0.88- 19:10-
0.50 0.43 0.38 0.35 0.36 0.41 0.48
1. MHW 1.932. MSL1.172, MTL1.152, MLW 0.371, MLLW 0.000 -All measurements in feet; for more info see www.tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov
VY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
IRDA 26.92830 N, 82.0650 W (ADD 32 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES)
10:28 11:46 12:54 13:46 14:29 15:09
1.90 03:27 1.91 03:29 1.96 03:31 2.01 03:33 2.03 03:37 2.03
1331.36--1.39- --1:44--1.51 -

05:46 06:55 07:49 0
08:34 09:14
18:0319:09-- 1.27 20:00 1920:40- 1.07- 21:14 0.94 21:43 0.81 22:10
044 0.38 0.33 0.30 0.32 0.36 0.44

2. MHW 1.703. MTL1.076, MSL 1.070, MLW 0.449, MLLW 0.000
VY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
GASPARILLA SOUND 26.83330 N, 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES)
08:05 09:23 10:26 11:16 11:59 12:38
22:57 -- 1.63 23:41 1.65 00:09 -- 1.70 00:31 -- 1.74 -- 00:48 1.76 01:02 1.76
1.15 1.20 1.23 1.27 1.30 1.34

\01:49 03:23 \ / 04:34 \ 0:26 06:10 0648
15:37 16:43 0418:16 0.94 18:50 0.84 19:20 -- 0.72 -- 19:45 -
0.40 0.35 0.32 0.30 0.32 0.36 0.42
7. MHW 1.175. MSL 0.784, MTL 0.768, MLW 0.358, MLLW 0.000
VY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
A PASS (BASCULE BRIDGE) 26.63330 N, 82.0667 W
8:52 10:15 11:33 12:36 13:26 14:09 14:48
.93 01:07 1.93 01:51 1.96 02:19 2.02 02:41 2.06 02:58 2.09 03:12 2.08
1142 -141.50 1.54 1.59

04:16 0550 07 01 07:53 08:37 09:15
18:04 19:10 20:01 13 20:43 1.12-- 21:17 -- 0.99 21:47- 0.86 22:12
0.48 0.42 0.37 0.36 0.38 0.42 0.50

MHW HIA. MSL HIA. MTL HIA, MLW HIA, MLLW 0.000
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seqaerts6 Page 5 August 29,2013


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conducts free vessel safety checks every Saturday
morning from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m. at the Venice boat
ramp (200 N. Seaboard Ave., Venice). They'll make
sure the safety equipment mandated by federal and
state regulations is on board. If an inspected vessel is
found to be safe, a "Seal of Safety"is affixed to it. For
more info or to schedule an appointment, call Patrick
Wheeler at 941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER: Year-
round ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek are offered
each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State Park (1843 S.
Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register at 8:30 a.m., tour at 9 a.m.
Cost is park fee plus canoe or kayak rental fee. Bird walks
are also offered every Thursday at 7:30 a.m., and guided
scrub jay walks every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. For more info
on any of these programs, call 941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH: Listed
as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail. Meet your
volunteer guides (weather permitting) at 8:30 a.m.
Monday through Friday at the kiosk at Tigertail Beach.
Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail) to 951 South to
Marco Island. Turn right on Kendall Court, the fifth light
after crossing the bridge to Marco Island. Turn left at
four-way stop sign at Hernando Court to Tigertail Beach.
Free parking with beach sticker, otherwise subject to
county parking fee. Water shoes and binoculars are also
suggested. The following walks in the Naples area are
offered at no cost through the Conservancy of Southwest
Florida (1450 Merrihue Dr., Naples). For more info, call
239-262-0304 or go to www.conservancy.org.
BOATERS GATHERING AT NAV-A-GATOR: A boaters'
get-together is held from 1 to 2 p.m. the second
Sunday of each month at the waterfront chickee hut at
Nav-A-Gator Grill/DeSoto Marina (9700 S.W. Riverview
Circle, Lake Suzy). This informal gathering is open to
the public to discuss boats, fishing, the Peace River and
other topics. For more information, call the Nav-A-
Gator at 941-627-3474.
WHAT'S THAT BIRD?: Volunteer bird interpreters share
their expertise on ID and behavior of raptors, shorebirds,
waterfowl and other avian visitors at Myakka River State
Park (13208 State Road 72, Sarasota). Volunteers set up
scopes and help people identify birds from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every day of the week.
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB: We are a Scuba dive club
that meets on the 3rd Tuesday of each month. Club is
based out of Punta Gorda. Call 941-740-4245 or contact
www.BottomTimeDiveClub.net.
LEARN TO TIE FLIES: Capt. Harry Hall will offer a free
saltwater fly tying seminar every Wednesday from
4:30 to 6 p.m. at West Wall Boats (787 Tamiami Trail,
Port Charlotte). The public is invited to attend. Call
941-875-9630 for more info.


DIlV WVMLI. MI LLn.L rmn,; n UIIU dtIlUI UlUIUW V1III
lead an easy walk along clear paths of Lakes Regional
Park (7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers) at 8:30 a.m.
on the first Saturday of each month. This free walk
offers an opportunity to see birds in natural vegetation
as your guide points out the many species in what is
a birding hot spot and crucial nesting area for many
birds. Arrive at 8 a.m. at Shelter A7 for a brief intro
and sign-in. Wear comfortable shoes and dress for
outdoors. Bring water, hat, sunscreen, binoculars and
camera. Call 239-533-7580 for more info.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASS'N:
Members of this club for multihull owners, sailors or
those who are interested in it exchange ideas about
equipping and sailing boats, share information
about anchorages and cruising destinations, hold
informal races that help to improve their sailing
ability, and have local raft-ups. No dues. The club
meets at Harpoon Harry's on the first Monday of
each month at 6 p.m. For more info, visit http://
yhoo.it/XV96fO or call 941-876-6667.
HANG OUT WITH SCRUB JAYS: Spend the morning
with the scrub jays at Oscar Scherer State Park (1843
S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. every
Sunday. This unique Central Florida experience includes
a nature walk to see the park's diverse ecosystems, na-
tive flora and fauna. Call 941-483-5956 for more info.
SIX MILE CYPRESS SLOUGH PRESERVE: Take a
leisurely stroll on our fully accessible boardwalk trail
anytime dawn to dusk (7791 Penzance Blvd., Fort Myers).
Visit our Interpretive Center to learn more about the
plants and animals that live in the Slough or just talk to
a friendly volunteer. The center is open Tuesdays through
Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Parking is $1 per hour
per vehicle. Reservations not required. No groups of eight
or more. Call 239-533-7550 or visit LeeParks.org/sixmile.
FREE PADDLE DEMONSTRATIONS: Grande Tours
(12575 Placida Road, Placida) is holding free kayak and
stand-up paddleboard demos from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every Saturday. Call 941-697-8825 for more information.
VOLUNTEER AT SHAMROCK PARK: Shamrock Park
Nature Center (3900 Shamrock Drive, Venice) holds
its monthly volunteer work mornings from 8 to 10 a.m.
on the third Friday of each month. As abilities and
interests allow, volunteer tasks may include trash
collection along trails and within vegetated areas of
the park, light trimming along paved multi-use trail,
organization of storage areas, exotic plant removal
and other maintenance tasks. Long pants, closed-toe
shoes, sun protection, and plenty of drinking water
are recommended. Park staff will provide trash collec-
tion buckets/bags, pickers, gloves, and other tools as
necessary. Meet at the Shamrock Park Environmental
Center. For more information, call Jennifer Rogers at
941-861-5000 or email her atjroqers@scqov.net.


BULLETIN BOARD
FROM PAGE 3

on National Public Lands Day at Oscar Scherer State Park (1843
S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) and other organizations in the area on
Sept. 28th at 9 a.m. Great food, music, and activities with the
opportunity to give back to your community by getting involved
in a work project. Call 941-483-5956 for more information.
INAUGURAL YMCA YOUTH REGATTA
The YMCA Youth Regatta on Sept. 28th is open to six classes,
including Optimist dinghies (green, white, blue and red fleets),
Laser, Laser Radial, Laser 4.7, Sunfish, and Club 420 (non-
spinnaker). Boats and skippers must meet the requirementsfor
each respective class. All competitors must be under 19 years of
age. Registration is open online at www.charlottecountyymca.
com. The entry fee is $15 for single-handed boats and $30 for
double-handed boats. Registration will also will available onsite
raceday at the YMCA Bayfront Center( 750 W Retta Esplanade,
Punta Gorda). Registration will open at 8 a.m. and a skippers
meeting is set for 9:30 a.m. Warning signal for Race 1 is 10:25
a.m. Prizes will be awarded to the top three competitors in each
class and each sailor in the Optimist green fleet will receive a
commemorative medallion. A post-regatta barbecue is included
in the registration fee. Additional barbecue guests are welcome
for a nominal fee. Call Sarah Buck at 941-276-4647 or email
sarahcommodore@live.com.
NEAR SHORE FISHING SEMINAR
Captain George Howell explains how simple it is to fish reefs
that are close to Southwest Florida on Oct. 10th from 6 to
8 p.m. at the Yacht Club Community Park (5819 Driftwood
Parkway, Cape Coral). You don't need a big offshore boat to
enjoy our local reefs. Call 239-574-0806 or visit yachtclubinfo@
capecoral.net for more information.

FWC'S MARINEQUEST OPEN HOUSE
MarineQuest is the annual open house of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission's Fish and Wildlife Research
Institute (100 Eighth Avenue SE, St. Petersburg) on Oct. 19th
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors of all ages welcome to this free
event. Touch tanks with live critters from Tampa Bay, learn about
red tide, manatees and more. For more information call 727-896-
8626 or visit MyFWC.com/MarineQuest. Admission is free!
BEGINNING SALTWATER FISHING
This class will be held on Oct. 19th from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
Cape Coral Yacht Club (5819 Driftwood Pkwy., Cape Coral). The
class is designed for the new and novice angler. This course
will cover all the basics from both boat and land. The topics
include: Rod and reel selection, line, leader and hook selection,
rigging, casting, plus live, dead and artificial baits. The class is
led by Capt. Gary Bonacci and costs $35 for residents and $45 for


nonresidents. Call 239-574-0806 or email thart@ capecoral.net
for more information.

4TH ANNUAL TOUR DE
NORTH PORT BICYCLE RIDE
Presented by People for Trees, Inc. on October 20th at 7 a.m.
An organized on-road 15-, 35-, or 65-mile ride that will take
cyclists through natural settings, historical sites, and city parks.
The pre-registration fee of $40 includes a full continental
breakfast, rest stops with homemade snacks, SAG mobile
support, and lunch with desserts at the ride's end. The first 200
to register are guaranteed a free ride T-shirt. Special group and
family discounts. Ride begins and ends from the Scout House,
Dallas White Park, 5900 Greenwood Ave., North Port. Proceeds
support the efforts of People for Trees, Inc., a nonprofit native
tree advocacy group since 1997, to create"Tree Wiz,"an
eco-center in the treetops! To register or for more informa-
tion visit www.peoplefortrees.com or contact Alice White at
941-426-9752 or at treelady12001@yahoo.com.
ZOMBIE 5KOBSTACLE RUN IN PUNTAGORDA
Run for your life through the 5k course on Oct. 26th at 9 a.m. at
the Laishley Crab House (150 Laishley Ct. Punta Gorda). You will
be challenged by obstacles, but avoid the zombies! The goal isto
get through the zombie-infested course to the finish line. Sign
up as live bait or as a Zombie! Makeup services for Zombies are
available at an additional charge. Please contact Jan Odom for
more information at 941-629-9622.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR NATURE FESTIVAL
The Charlotte Harbor Nature Festival is a regional family-friendly
celebration where people can learn about topics affecting the
natural environment of southwest Florida. It takes place Nov.
23rd at 10 a.m. at the Charlotte Sports Park (2300 El Jobean
Rd., Port Charlotte). There will be a wide variety of activities for
adults and children, which include guided walks in Tippecanoe
Environmental Park, hands-on activities, exhibits, vendors,
music, a Children's Discovery Zone and more. We have established
ourselves as an annual community event that continues to grow
and enrich the lives of our citizens. We hope you will join us at
this 14th annual festival, making it bigger and better than ever.
Admission and parking are both free. There is no rain date. There
is no need to register to attend the festival. Call 941-235-5010
for more information.
FISHIN'FRANK'S FISHING
CLUB FREE MEETING
The Fishin' Frank's Fishing Club holds free meetings on the
second Tuesday and Wednesday of each month at Luigi's
Pizza (3883 South Tamiami Trail. Port Charlotte). Meetings
start at 6:30 p.m. and end by 8 p.m. Wednesday is open
seating (first-come, first-served); call 941-625-3888 to
reserve a seat for the Tuesday meetings. Both nights have
the same topic, but the room only holds 50 people and there
have been times people had to be turned away.


SCharlotte County's most

experienced snook-fishing staff


*Charlotte County's biggest &

best selection of fishing tackle


* More than 800 reels in stock


* More than 650 rods in stock


*Thousands of different lure

models & colors in stock


* More than 250 pairs of Costa

sunglasses in stock


BAIT & TACKLE



4425-D TAMIAMI Tll CIARLOtTE HARBOR

941-625-3888 1 PEUBTi 6B ANEltIY DAY





'4 alM.4rv. 9 Page 6 August 29,2013


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Nokomis
941-488-8229


FISHERMAN'S EDGE
Grove City
941-697-7595


Redfish are feasting on the schools of mullet that are scattered along the beaches.
Pompano have just started showing up by the Venice jetties. Black drum and
mangrove snapper are also plentiful. Look for tarpon around creek mouths. The
silver kings are just hanging out and looking for food.They may only be 40 pounds,
but they are fun to catch.


Watch the weather and go out when you can. A lot of mangrove snapper hanging
out in the area passes. Pompano are swimming along the beaches and Gasparilla
Pass and have been hooked using a pompano jig. Quite a few guides are hammer-
ing the redfish, especially on the outgoing tide near the mangroves. Snook action
around Stump Pass has been good and they tend to favor whitebait (greenbacks).
Trout are biting on top-water lures throughout the flats early in the morning. Shark
are always busy this time of year, and like cut bait.


There are a lot of mangrove snapper just 10 miles offshore.Troll
for kingfish while fishing for grouper in 60 feet of water or more.


Lane snapper have been reported in 90 feet of water along with
some smaller dolphin. Red and gag grouper can be found closer
to shore in water as shallow as 50 feet.


The snook bite is hot, with fish more than
46 inches being commonly reported.Try
using whitebaitaround the Venicejetties.
And remember, snook season opens up on
Sept. 1.


Tarpon are still biting just off the beaches
and guides are tossing D.O.A. Baitbusters in
tannin-stained waters with success. Cape
Haze Point tarpon are being caught with
threadfin as bait.


Keeper-sized redfish are running the Myakka River. Use free-lined shrimp, and be Multiple reports of gag grouper limits have come from offshore Tilapia are biting on nighcrawlers along
sure to chum for best result. On incoming tides, go to Stum Pass for snook using about 10 miles off Venice Beach. Go out to 50 to 110 feetof water for the Myakka River. Look for sandholes
pinfish and cutbait. Try Venice Pier for Spanish mackerel. Reports from Port bigger red grouper using cutbait and pinfish. where the tilapia are and drop the bait in
FINE BAIT & TACKLE Charlotte Beach Complex indicate redfish and trout are being caughton cut ladyfish front of the fish.
North Port and mullet.
941-240-5981

I |J JRedfish are starting to group up everywhere around the Harbor.Jacksand ladyfish Too much rain for solid reports offshore. People seem to be focused Snook during early morning.Try using
are also in those schools of reds.They are eating topwaters and swimbaits. Tarpon on the snook season opening up Sept. 1. top-water plugs, Lil Johns on jigs, and live
are in small schools, but get spooked. D.O.A. Baitbusters are a good way to go for the bait. Artificials are more effective in places
CAPT. TED'S TACKLE silver kings. Trout are hanging out near Bokeelia in Pine Island. Sharks are scattered where water is flowing and salinity is fair.
Port Charlotte around the Harbor of mixed sizes. Use live or frozen baitand drop and wait. Bass Try areas near Stump and Boca Grande
941-627-6800 have plenty of food to choose from and seemed to have faded off on anglers. passes and Turtle and Bull bays. Nearshore
reefs will also be holding snook.

Tarpon are scattered around the Harbor, as are sharks of different sizes. Redfish Travel 12 to 30 miles out and try your luck for gag grouper. Go Snook. Night fishing during the nextweek
I are off the chart, with big schools along the east wall and Pine Island Sound. Lone even farther out, say 25 to 45 miles, and go for red grouper or so should be good.Target the passes and
reds can be found along the west wall near moving water. No cobia reports inshore, and amberjack. Scattered reports are coming in about chicken beaches, and along the mangrove edges.
FISHIN' FRANK'S Pompano are congregating in south Harbor and can be caught using a pompano jig. dolphin and wahoo as close as 30 miles offshore. The phosphate dock near Boca Grande Pass
Charlotte Harbor The Mangrove snapper bite is solid in the passes using cut shrimp. is also a good spot. Use live whitebaitor
941-625-3888 pinfish.

STake some chum with you, because the water is still dark and fish are relying on smell Offshore cobia bite has been scattered. Bring a rod and reel rigged Blacktip sharks have been spotted near
and sound more than sight. Redfish are scattered along the west and east wall ofthe and ready to go ifyou see a brown bomber.Yellowtail snapper are Turtle Bay and have been caught around
Harbor. Deeper holes nearTurtle Bay are sheltering some bigger trout. Tarpon are being caught in 60 feet ofwater using cut bait. At the same depth, Boca Grande Pass at night using cut mullet
LAISHLEY MARINE rolling and are hanging out in deeper holes nearTwo Pines. No cobia reports inshore, anglers are chumming up mangrove snapper. Go outto 100 on the bottom.
Punta Gorda feet of water for big red and gag grouper. Wahoo and peanut
941-639-3949 dolphin are biting in water as shallow as 40 feet.

Redfish have been reported in small numbers in Matlacha Pass, but there are a lot Red and gag grouper as close as 10 miles off Redfish Pass. Fish for some decent-sized trout near
more in Pine Island Sound. Sharks and catfish are in abundance around the mouth Bokeelia, especially around Jug Creek
of the Caloosahatchee River. Mangrove snapper haveen caught near Smokehouse Shoal. Look for potholes in the grass flats,
D&D BAITAND TACKLE PRvilinq ruthrimp npr3nmPtrlrtireP tn nut in irtifiriil lurer nr live shrimp
M atlacha il i in I ^r iniini i ii IIIII ii vii i
239-282-9122 rmi, ,i 1 i

fiii M, rrn iii.- ih ri llr I r i--n iiri-n ] i i .i i i ii ill mangrove snapper I inii -r gag grouper ir- linn.aii nrI .i Ir i ii I w i [i r II vuii, nii. iia i n.i i i redfish sh rni
Snook jr,- ii- ri]r i n. i II n i \ i[ n i i- i]r-n ii i v ii in r rnir [.11- h i l M angrove snapper in I i- ii iilh i n ,rl lVa n, 1.i ,i, VIl ii i rl 1 r1i Ill i i- ,,l v hi1 I u
Tarpon ir- [ill riiiiii ii [lii- ,i i- iil iii [ n iiii- l i. ii- Trout ii J flounder r w h ili-r 11 vI, r irn lj h ,]us1i, hi 1 i I ii [i i rinl hIi ijr i,,r lir [, i[i a
OLD PINE ISLAND M ARINAI r-p r r r- r ir ifi-rr- iI, i'-in i' jtr[ l cobia r ril-p r ,' iiiiiini lriiiiirii ir.iii[ [,ij jri ii ~Iii- i-i t iii ,I I ii- iii iri, I rii- 'r
St. Jam es City H iln i i ii Ifur. iv i in ,i- i u-ll v.iii uwii i .-ii ul l i ii -i
239-283-2548



Szes re imeasuLred ti:otal length (fiom ior vvard- Cobia: Minimum 3 il'k, limil I (mai\ hish Redfish: Slot 1:' -27, lnmit 1 i(n.j; fRih per vessel) NO-HARVEST SPECIES: Zero hbg limit fior
most part of head to tip of pinched tail) unless per vessel) Shark: Min 54"except Atlantic sharpnose Bonefish, Goliath Grouper (Jewfish), Sawfish,
otherwise noted. All bag limits are per harvester
otherwise noted. All bag limits are per harvester Dolphin:Limit10 blacknose, blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and Spotted Eagle Rays, Lemon Sharks, Hammerhead
per day. Other limits may apply; for most current smooth dogfish, limit 1 (max 2 fish per vessel) Sharks (go to the website listed below for a full
rules visit www.MyFWC.com/fishing. Federal Flounder: Min. 12", limit 10 Sheepshead: M 12" limit 15 list of no-harvest species)
regulations may differ from state regulations. Grouper, Black: Min. 22", limit 4, season closed Visit http://bit.ly/lOnYDlz for full rules.

LICENSES Feb. 1-March 31 Snapper, Lane: Min. 8", limit 100 pounds
esde G o A Grouper, Gag: Min. 22", limit 2, season July Snapper, Mangrove: Mn. 10", limit 5 FRESHW ATER FISH
Resident saltwater or freshwater: Annual $17, 1 Dec. 3 in state waters; July 1 until quota met Snapper, Mutton: Min. 16, bag limit 10 Largemouth Bass: South of State Road 80:
5-year$79. Ifyoufish fromshoreonly, a licenses federal waters Max. size 14 bag limit 5 (may possess one over
required but is free. Resident licensefor both fresh- n federalwaters Snapper, Red: Min. 16", limit 2,2013 season Max.size14 bag imit (maypossess one over
water and saltwater fishing: $32.50 annually. Grouper, Red: Min. 20", limit 4, season closed June 1 July 14 in state waters and June 1 June 14") North of State Road 80: Slot 14"-22,
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3 days Feb. 1 March 31 28 in federal waters bag limit 5 (may possess one over 22")
$17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore fishing Grouper, Scamp: Min 16", limit 4, season Snapper, Yellowtail: Min. 12" limit 10 Sunfish (excluding crappie): Aggregate limit 50
license not available for nonresidents.
licensenotavailablerfornon$residents e closed Feb. 1 March 31 Mangrove, Mutton, Red and Yellowtail Snap- Crappie: Limit 25
Fishing permits: Snook $10/year, lobster $5/ per included in aggregate bag limit of 10
year, tarpon $51.50 per fish Black, Gag, Red and Scamp Grouper per included in aggregate bag limit of 10 Butterfly peacock bass: Max. 17", limit 2 (may
included in aggregate bag limit of 4 Snook: Slot 28"-33" (west coast), limit 1, season possess one over 17")
SALTW ATER FISH closed until at least Sept. 2013
SALT WV ATER FISH Hogfish: Min. 12"fork, limit 5 closed until at least Sept. 2013 Grass carp: Must be released immediately.
Greater Amberjack: Min. 30" fork, limit 1, Mackerel, King: Min. 24"fork, limit 2 Spotted Seatrout: Slot5"-20, limit 4 (may Other exotic fishes: Please keep and eat or
season closed June 1 July 31 possess one over 20") otherwise destroy. Do not use as live bait.
Lesser Amberjack/Banded Rudderfish: Mackerel, Spanish: Min. 12"fork, limit 15 Tarpon: No size limit, tag required to possess ua or size limits on
Unregulated species: No bag or size limits on
Slot limit 14"-22", aggregate limit 5 Mullet: No size limit, limit 50 Triggerfish, Gray: Min. 14", limit 2, season gar (except alligator gar; possession ofthis spe-
Black drum: Slot 14"-24" limit 5 (may Permit: Slot 11"-22"fork, limit 2 (may possess closed June July cies is illegal), bowfin, pickerel, and all catfish.
possess one over 24") one over 22") Tripletail: Min. 15", limit 2 Visit http://bit.ly/l1nYJQr for full rules,
Bluefish: Min. 12"fork, limit 10 Pompano: Min. 11"fork, limit 6 Wahoo: Limit 2 including special management areas.


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FRIEDrYl Page 7 August 29, 2013 *iw .uII .S.iw. FU*Nw..Y IUw-









SARASOTACOUNTY FRIENDLY FUN FESTIVE
S* Blackburn Pt Boat Launch 800 Blackburn Pt Rd, Osprey
Dallas White Park. 5900 Greenwood Ave, North Port
SHigel Park *1330 Tarpon Center Dr,Venice /
SIndian Mound Park. 210 Winson Ave, Englewood [m um
e .t Loreto Bay Access 800 Loreto Court, Nokomis H *
-* J Manasota Beach Park. 8570 Manasota Key Rd
SMarine Boat Ramp Park 301 E. Venice Ave, Venice
Marina Park. 7030 Chancellor Blvd, North Port
Nokomis Beach Park* 901 Casey Key Rd
0 ^* Snook Park 5000 E. Venice Ave, Venice

B DESOTO COUNTY
Brownville Park. 1885 NE Brownville St
S.Deep Creek Park. 9695 SW Peace River St
Desoto Park 2195 NW American Legion Dr
SLiverpool Park. 9211 Liverpool Rd
SNocatee .3701 SW County Road 760
I II Lettuce Lake. 8801 SW Reese St \

S CHARLOTTE COUNTY Alligator
Ainger Creek Park- 2011 Placida Rd, Englewood
S/ ButterfordWaterwayPark. 13555 fss,
Marathon Blvd, Port (Charlotte A 0a 6'i
-, .*Darst Park 537 DarstAve, Punta Gorda PEACE
..- L_ t El Jobean Boat Ramp. 4224
El Jobean Rd, Port Charlotte
'- sH .HarbourHeightsPark.27420
Voyageur Dr, Punta Gorda
.Hathaway Park. 35461 Washington Loop, Punta Gorda 'J
Placida Park 6499 Gasparilla Rd, Placida
'' ", .Port Charlotte Beach .4500 HarborBlvd, PortCharlotte
S. \ .' South Gulf CovePark. 10150Amicola St, Port Charlotte A I
S* Spring Lake Park 3520 Lakeview Blvd, Port Charlotte
*Ol apeHaze rT.
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'4 r.varta Page 8 August 29,2013


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A lot of people are very excited
about snook season opening Sunday.
There are also some folks who are
unhappy about it. I can see both
sides of it, but there's one thing
everyone can agree on: These fish
are too valuable to waste. And that
means it's important to be careful
about how you handle them,
whether you're putting the fish back
in the water or in the cooler.
Every fish you hook deserves your
respect. After you have your fun
catching it, it's your job to do right by
it. That means either releasing it and
giving it the best chance to survive
you possibly can, or taking it home
for food and making good use of it.
A successful release starts before
you ever get out on the water.
Heavier tackle is usually necessary,
because snook are so structure-
oriented. A beefy rod will help you
keep the fish out of the mangroves
or pilings, and a 30- or 40-pound
fluorocarbon leader will help resist
not only heavy cover but also the
fish's rough teeth and sharp gills.
Breaking off a fish with a lure in
its face can be a death sentence
- multiple treble hooks can pin
its mouth shut, preventing it from
feeding. Flattening the barbs will
help, not only for the fish's sake but
your own most anglers have


hooked themselves at some point,
and getting them out is much easier
if the barbs are absent. As long as
you keep the line relatively tight,
you won't lose any more fish with
flattened barbs.
If you're fishing from shore
- especially a bridge or pier -
landing the fish can pose a chal-
lenge. From a low pier or seawall,
you should be able to scoop the fish
up with a long-handled landing
net. What's that you didn't
bring a net? Not too smart, was it?
When you go fishing, you need to
be prepared to catch fish. Without
a net, you have to haul the fish up
using the leader, which is a bad plan.
If the leader is chafed or nicked,
it will probably break. If you're on
a higher pier or bridge, a pier net
(basically, a hoop net with three
ropes attached) is the way to go. Pier
nets are a little cumbersome to carry
and use, but there's really no better
way to bring your catch safely up to
you. Don't even think about a bridge
gaff. The slot limit is too tight, and a
gaffed fish rarely survives release.
Being able to land a fish properly
benefits you as much as it does the
fish. When you try to bring in snook
using just your line, the chances
of breaking off are much higher. A
keeper snook usually weighs at least
8 pounds, and it will flop around
as you drag it up, which puts extra
tension on the line. A snapped
leader or pulled knot means you lose
your terminal tackle a waste of
both money and time.
Once you have the snook up
where you can reach it, grasp it by


the lower jaw and the belly near the
anal fin (not just the jaw see the
sidebar for why not). You can use
your bare hand or a lip-gripping tool
to hold the jaw. Avoid squeezing the
belly if you can. Try to avoid laying
it on dry ground, concrete or pier
planking. Fish need their slime, and
rough, dry surfaces tend to wipe the
slime off. Slime is not only a fish's
defense against bacterial and fungal
infections, it also helps the fish swim
using less energy. One of the worst
things you can do is use a towel
to hold the fish, which not only
removes the slime but also abrades
the skin.
When you're landing a snook from
a boat, you can often reach over the
side and lift the fish again, being
sure to support the belly. If you're
not comfortable handling the fish
that way or if it's a larger snook, a
landing net is very useful. Nets with
rubber mesh tend to be easier on the
fish and won't tangle up like cloth
mesh can. I've seen treble hooks get
so stuck in cloth mesh that cutting
the material was the only way to get
them free.
Now that the snook is in hand,
you need to work quickly. Keeping
a fish out of water does it no favors,
especially on a hot, sunny day when
its skin will dry out quickly. If it's
nighttime or overcast, that's better
(but still not good). If you think the
fish might be in the slot, measure
it ASAP Get your photos and then
either release it or stash it in the
cooler. Either way, the time from
taking the fish out of the water to
no longer having it in your hands


should be less than a minute.
Throwing a fish back isn't a literal
term. A belly-flop toss is not condu-
cive to a released fish's survival. If
you're on a bridge or pier, you can
aim the fish nose-down and drop it
back into the water. Be sure you're
dropping the fish into water at least
4 or 5 feet deep (otherwise, the
snook becomes a lawn dart stuck in
the bottom). If you're fishing from
a high bridge more than 20 feet off
the water say, the U.S. 41 bridges
over the Peace River or the El Jobean
bridge you're probably better off
lowering the fish back into the water
using your pier net.
When you're snook fishing from
a boat, you're usually fishing in
shallow water just 2 or 3 feet deep.
Shallow water is plenty warm in
summer, so you may need to take a
moment to revive your fish. Snook
do something cool when you hold
them in the water: They'll gently bite
down onto your thumb and just hold
on. That's a great way to keep your
released fish upright. Usually if you
can keep him right-side-up for a bit,
he'll get enough water pumped over
his gills that he'll swim away on his
own. It might take 15 seconds or five
minutes, but you need to give that
fish time to recover. If he wants to
roll over anyway, point him into the
current and walk slowly with him
or get on your trolling motor at low
speed. If you just let him roll over and
leave, that fish is almost guaranteed
to die. One technique that can work
really well is to temporarily put the
fish into a well-oxygenated livewell.
Of course, if the fish is over or under


slot, this is very illegal. If you choose
to do this, be prepared to explain
your actions to the law. If I were you,
I would babysit the fish with the well
open, and I definitely wouldn't move
to the next spot until the fish was
released.
If you are lucky enough to catch
a slot fish and plan to keep it, you
have two options: You can keep the
fish in your livewell until you get
home, or you can pack it on ice right
away. Be sure you have enough
ice in your cooler, and be sure it's
big enough for a 33-inch fish. It's
amazing to me how many guys will
spend $200 on a rod and reel, carry
$300 worth of fishing lures and balk
about dropping two lousy bucks on
a bag of ice. If you're fishing from a
pier or seawall, keep the cooler in
your car. Once you get a keeper, carry
it back to the vehicle, put it in the
cooler and go home.
I don't advise using a stringer.
Stringers are popular for fishermen
up north. They're not so good down
here, but if you're one of those guys
who insists on using one, you better
keep a close eye on the fish because
chances are it's going to die. That
goes for kayak anglers, too. Better
yet, bungee a cooler to your'yak. If
you're not prepared to keep a snook
either alive or fresh, it's best you not
keep one at all.
Robert Lugiewicz is the manager
of Fishin'Frank's Bait& Tackle,
located at 4425-0 Tamiami Trail in
Charlotte Harbor. Call 941-625-3888
for more information about the shop
or for local fishing info, or visit them
online at FishinFranks.com.





Ajn cereat Page 9 August 29,2013


UMnImInIflnnIkI IU*llnkinn l*l


k I I -


Pn,:,l,:,i proi1,3,3
There's a right way and a
wrong way to hold a snook.


WaterLine Publisher


There's no point in releasing the fish if it dies anyway due to injuries or rough
handling. Most anglers are at least somewhat conservation-minded, understanding that
the fish they release are important to the future of angling. Unfortunately, many don't
grasp how easy it is to inflict fatal damage on some fish. Snook, in particular, are suscep-
tible to injury from a common practice hoisting the fish by the lower jaw.
I blame this on televised bass fishing. How many times have you seen Jimmy
Houston grab a fat largemouth by the lower lip, swing it up for a kiss and then plop it
back into the water? Although this is probably not very comfortable for the fish (would
you want to kiss Jimmy Houston?), it does no lasting physical harm to small or medium
bass. Heavy fish say, 8 pounds or larger are more likely to be injured when
lifted by the jaw alone.
The problem lies in a fish's anatomy. You may have noticed that the mouths of many
predatory fish are extendable. This ingenious adaptation allows the fish to capture prey
using suction. A snook doesn't bite a baitfish or grab it in its jaws. Instead, when a poten-
tial meal is close enough, the snook quickly opens and extends its mouth. This creates a
partial vacuum, which literally sucks the hapless prey into the predator's hungry mouth.
As soon as the baitfish is securely in the snook's mouth, the jaws snap shut and the
excess water is forced out through the gill slits so the prey can be swallowed.
The entire feeding procedure is dependent on speed. The faster a snook's mouth opens
and extends, the stronger the suction force will be. The faster its mouth closes afterward,
the less likely the prey item will be able to scoot back out into open water. If the fish's
ability to rapidly open or close its mouth is impaired, the strategy fails and the snook
starves to death.
And that's exactly what holding a snook by just the lower jaw does. The elegant
engineering of the fish's mouth is useless without strong muscular power behind it.
The ligaments that drive the fish's mouth are in the isthmus the narrow band of
tissue that connect the head and body beneath the gill covers. When a fish is held by
just the lower lip, its weight puts a strain on these ligaments, which are strong but
easily stretched or torn. The heavier the fish, the more the strain and the more likely
they'll be damaged. Minor stretching is survivable, but severe stretching or tearing is a
guaranteed death sentence. According to the FWC's Fish and Wildlife Research Institute,
in a study, 50 of 50 barramundi (a species closely related to snook) died after being held
up by only the lower jaw.
The tragic part is this: It's extremely easy to prevent causing damage to a fish by
simply supporting its belly with your other hand. If you don't strain the isthmus, the
fish is much more likely to survive being caught and released. Although snook are
especially prone to life-threatening injury from jaw-lifting, it's never considered the
best choice with any fish (even bass, Mr. Houston). Supporting the fish's weight in
both hands and keeping it more or less horizontal goes a long way toward reducing
the physical stress of capture and makes survival more likely. Isn't that what catch-
and-release is all about?





V(IMLlCbPul__


SAugust 29,2013


fAl nni ne lm bnn -" um
mu.l***l *slll llI IIIEIIi.MIIEI


r Lh, W -r~n.- .h.: C., -a,I-WiII;
Just another dam snook from
- up the river.


I love fishing up the river for snook. Most
people won't go above the U.S. 41 bridges,
let alone all the way up the Peace River, so
not only are there fewer people, the fish
have much less pressure. People shy away
from the river, and I think it's because they
think it's harder than fishing a dock light or
a bridge light where you can actually see the
fish. Now it's true that you won't see most
upriver snook before you catch them, but
that doesn't mean they aren't there.
We're talking about catching snook in
rivers, so let's split it up by environment.
First and foremost, the rivers are lined
with trees and mangroves, so you can fish
them just like you do the shorelines of the
Harbor. Live bait, either freelined or under
a bobber, works well, as do artificial. The
main thing that you have to worry about is
water clarity, especially for the fall snook
season, because we're probably just coming
out of our rainy season and the river is going
to look like a giant cup of coffee. Because of
that, artificial that make a lot of noise in the
water work well.
The river also has docks and boats that
rarely move. You're going to fish these areas
just like canals. Those same live and artificial
baits you're using in the mangroves are
perfect. The one change that I make is that
I love throwing Rat-L-Trap lures under the
docks. But you have to work that dock longer
than you normally would. Most people,


myself included, will throw under a dock
three or four times and move onto the next
dock in the canals. But upriver, I like to throw
that Rat-L-Trap under a dock 20 or 30 times.
The rattles will actually overload the snook's
senses, and he'll hit that lure just to make
it shut up and go away, much like a nesting
bass or tilapia will strike anything she feels
is a threat to her nest. Fish don't have hands
and arms, so the only way to make things go
away is to eat them.
Fishing the river itself is a good opportu-
nity to break out your trolling plugs. I love
to troll the river for snook, and it'll surprise
you just how productive this technique can
be. A shallow-diving plug in the shallower
sections of the river or a deep diver in the
deeper curves of the river will produce snook
of all sizes. That's part of the beauty of what
makes the river better than a dock light.
On a dock light, the snook are right there in
front of you, and there's no surprise. When
you're trolling the river, you never know what
just hit your line. It can be a small snook, a
monster snook, a redfish or even a tarpon. If
you're way up the river, you can add gar and
bass to that lineup. In a no-wake zone? No
problem break out the plugs. You're going
to go fish the Shell Creek Dam? You can troll
from the Sans Souci trestle all the way to the
dam. And that stretch of river is home for a
lot of snook and small tarpon.
You also have the bridges that you can fish.


The lights from the clearance markers on the
1-75 bridges will almost always hold snook,
so that is a great nighttime spot. And while
you're there, you also have a few dock lights
on the Punta Gorda side of the river to hit.
The Sans Souci trestle up Shell Creek is
one of my all-time favorite daytime places
to fish for snook. I prefer live bait like
greenbacks. I like to fish that trestle on
an incoming tide, and fish just to the left
of the opening for watercraft. A splitshot
a few inches above the bait will get that
greenie down to the bottom, where most
of those snook are hiding. You need to step
up your tackle at the Sans Souci trestle,
though. There are lots of pilings to contend
with; most you can see but there's a line of
pilings between you and the trestle that
you can't see. I prefer a little heavier tackle:
40-pound braided line and at the very least
a 40-pound leader. You have to set your
drag heavy to pull them clear of the pilings,
then you can back off and fight them. They
have soft mouths but rough lips, with the
ability to essentially sand through your
leader, so you need to get them to the boat
quickly and gently two things that really
don't go together when fighting a fish.
One thing to consider if you plan on taking
live bait upriver is to have a recirculating
system on your livewell. When we have a
rainy season like this one, there is a good
chance that most of the river water is going


to be salt-free. If you run all the way out to
the Intracoastal Waterway to get bait, only
to run way back upriver (which I do), most of
your bait is going to be dead.
A recirculating system on your livewell lets
you fill your livewell with the water where
you first caught your bait, and continues to
pump that water in your livewell without
taking in water from outside your boat. This
will keep your bait alive, as long as you don't
black out your livewell. Just be sure that the
high speed pickups on your livewell pumps
don't force water through the pump when
it's turned off. You can check this by running
at speed with your pumps off, and have
someone look in your livewell to see if water
is trickling in. If it is, you might want to
consider a shut-off valve somewhere in your
system to avoid this. The easiest way is to
get a livewell nozzle that has a valve built in.
This way, you're not bringing in any outside
water at all.
Don't shy away from the river. It's quiet
and peaceful, the fish are hungry and it's
gorgeous up there. Some places on that river
will take you a thousand years back in time.
Capt. Cayle Wills owns and operates Bad
Fish Charters on Charlotte Harbor. You can
book him through Fishin'Frank's or contact
him directly at 941-916-4538 or Capt.Cayle@
ReelBadFish.com. You can also visit him
online at ReelBadFish.com or FaceBook.com/
BadFishCharters.


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'l4M. /c.rea Page 11 August 29, 2013


IWanMuEmmuMaumu mm-'hEI b Am.


Ph.:.[.:. pr.:. io e.
A pair of old-
school Calcutta
poles rigged for
swishing snook.


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


Once upon a time let's say from 1940 to
the'70s snook fishing with a cane pole used
to be fairly common. The poles used weren't
exactly the same ones you might catch crappie
with, though. What you needed was a genuine
Calcutta pole, which is the dried culm of a
Southeast Asian bamboo species called Dendro-
calamusstrictus. This bamboo is semi-solid,
giving a Calcutta pole great strength, and the
canes normally grow very straight.
Although the exact method of rigging and
use varied in different parts of the state, the
basic idea was to attach a short length of line or
wire to the end of a pole long enough to reach
the water below a pier or bridge. There were
two basic ways to do it: You could use natural
bait, which might be a live ladyfish, pigfish
or trout, and walk the bait down the pier. Or
you could use a lure a Zara Spook or even a
length of broomstick with a treble hook in the
end and swish it back and forth in a figure-8
or circle in front of a particular piling. The lure
method was called stir-poling or swishing, and
it was meant to annoy a snook into striking
your lure not to eat it but to kill it. Strikes were
explosive, but fights were short.
When a smaller fish was hooked, it could be
lifted using the pole as a lever, usually with help
from the pier railing. Bigger fish were pulled up


by raising the pole straight up, hand over hand.
Snook were not the only fish targeted this way
- Goliath grouper were also caught, more on
bait than on artificial. To land a truly large fish,
the angler had to walk it to shore.
Calcutta pole fishing is still legal, though
in today's world it's not advisable to sling
fish up roughly, since most of them have to
be released. The hard part is finding a proper
Calcutta pole. Local tackle shops used to keep
them in stock, but they're hard to find anymore.
Fishin'Frank's manager Robert Lugiewicz says
that's due to, of all things, the international
drug trade.
"About 10 years ago, they started finding
heroin being smuggled in the poles;' he says.
"After that, U.S. Customs started cutting them
up as soon as they came in."Obviously, a
Calcutta pole is useless for fishing if it's been
chopped into 2-foot sections. "We did get some
in about 2-1/2 years ago,' Lugiewicz adds,"but
that lasted only a few months:'
There's at least one American-owned
company growing Dendrocalamusstrictus in
Mexico, but the canes they produce are not
as strong or as straight as Asian-grown poles.
The main market is in the California tree-nut
industry, where the poles are used for knocking
almonds and pecans from the branches.
Stir-poling is a mostly lost art, though there
are a few fishermen who still practice it. The
toughest part is finding a proper Calcutta pole.


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y.v,.rcs at, Page 12 I August 29, 2013

I 'I 1







. A mm ad]


One of our favorite inshore species are
snook, and everybody has a special place to
catch them. Mine is in the surf and passes. This
is a mostly summertime fishery, so we may be
a little late now, but a few fish will hanging
outside. I'll try to help you understand how to
locate fish and productive fishing spots. I'd like
to remind everybody that most snook are not
slot fish, so we need to be extremely careful
how we handle and release fish.
I understand many of you want a specific
spot to go slay some snook. Sorry It's
not going to work that way. But I'll help you
understand what you need to look for to find
your own fishing locations and achieve snook
success. I want you to feel the pride you expe-
rience by doing it yourself. Just remember
that fish have a mind of their own, and fins
with which to swim. They usually follow
habits, but they can do whatever they please.
These principles apply if you are on a boat
or on shore. Slack current is fine for locating
fish, but they rarely feed well without flow. I
find snook fishing most productive just prior
to and after tide changes. My nick name
for awhile was Captain High Tide, because
I showed up for high water frequently.
Sometimes the tide flow can be too fast,
requiring snook to exert too much effort
holding in position to feed. So I hit the
passes in time to take advantage
of water slowing down or
speeding up, not when the
tide's ripping. Peak tide
flows are the time to
hit the beaches (be ,.


cautious of wave action near the breakers).
Our passes and beaches cover a broad area,
so how can we narrow down the hot real
estate? I'm giving away the farm here, but let's
give it a go. First, look for any activity: Birds
diving, baitfish, striking fish, etc. Then, consider
the wind and current directions, and slowly
explore. This is best done with the fishing gear,
not the trolling motor. Make several casts and
see what happens, and be simple but effective.
Look before you spook the snook. You might
get lucky and still catch fish, but happy fish bite
best. I hate to repeat this so much, but it's the
most important factor in catching, no matter
what the species. We can narrow it down even
farther by looking for structures like fallen trees
or anything else. Shadows are often used by
fish as holding points.
Snook frequently congregate in passes as
they move outside to spawn, and they go
back into the Harbor to fatten up for winter.
They cruise up and down the beaches seeking
food and structure to hold on. Many shore
anglers do great
__ __ .by simply


walking up and down area beaches from May
through September. The secret here is to back
away from the surf and look carefully as you
slowly sneak along. Cast at angles parallel the
beach. Take time to observe the fish, and lead
your cast in front of the target scared fish
swim away. You can look for fish, or hold in
the shade and wait for them to cruise by. Both
work most of the time, anyway. Snook
also eat sand fleas, so carry pompano jigs just
in case, but more about that some other time.
If you're tired of having your baitfish
hooked twice and that big snook shakes
her head as she spits your offering back at
you, remember this: You can prevent this 99
percent of the time with a target bead. Owner
also makes a hook bead, but theirs is too soft
and moves too much for me. Take the plastic
bead and slide it over your hook point and
barb about a quarter inch for whitebait.
Then add your bait. Just be sure to
check this position after each
bite, because the bead
will slide sometimes.
Adjust the position .


mamiMsmRa*lln IFi* E -HI AImIII IE
mou-...*e*.-.........****fi**i


according to the size of your baitfish. The trick
is to have room for minnow movement, while
still being sure it can't slide up far enough to
spin back and snag on your sharp hook point.
Dead fish don't get to breed or grow up
for us. Please don't use dry hands to handle
snook, and avoid contact with dry surfaces.
Support fish for photos and get ready before
you remove fish from water. Refrain from
treble hook lures when you can. I like some
lures, too; just be careful and concerned for
the fish's recovery. I only use Danchi Bleeding
Bait red circle hooks for backcountry fishing.
Remember, fishing is supposed to be fun
and memorable. I've learned that the harder I
try, the less I catch, so just relax and let it flow.
You'll catch more and have more fun. If you're
too busy to go fishing, you're just too busy!
(Cpt lio Hutbbd oti's
U hohi/ itespected
outdoor 11iltti &uId

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BI


A clip-n-save seafood
recipe provided by


2 egg whites
1-1 2 (ups all-purpose flour
1 Isp garlic powder
1 2 tsp salt
1. 2 Isp ground black pepper
1 2 Isp paprika
12 ounlles beer
4 pounds snook fillets or pieces, skinned
1 quart oil or iryilng
In a medium bowl, blend 1-1 4 cups
flour with seasonings. MiW egg whiles
Ilntil dry ingredients. Add beer a little at
a tiIe, stirring well mo(re batter will be
quite thin). In a large, heavy skillet or
deep iryer, heal the oil to 3o5 F. Pal ish
pieces dry on paper towels. Place 1 4 liup
flour o:n a plate. One at a time, dust each
pie(e of fish in flour, then dip into beer
batter and immediately place in holt il.
Fry the ilsh until golden brown, and flesh
is easily flaked with a ifork. Serves 8.


Idapt.d horn






1 tip mayonnaise
1 3 cup sweet pickle relish
1 tbsp minced capers
1 hard-cooked egg, (hopped
salt and white pepper to laste
1 dash Worcestershire sauce
1 dash hot pepper sauce

In a small bowl, mii tl:gether all ingredients,
stirring well. (hill before serving.


MA4


^





gJ.4I., rs Page 13 August 29,2013


W a~EmmoIfI rlialk-'*IEm 'nAm
9aMU .II iIISU I EIUIIl .I.uI.Uhl


We know that both the west and east
coasts of Florida have snook. There's no ques-
tion about that. But what's the difference? Is
an Atlantic snook really any different from a
Gulf snook? Considering there are different
snook rules and regulations between the
coasts, there must be some type of difference.
Ron Taylor, one of the leading scientists for
snook research in Florida, told WaterLine Weekly
that comparing east coast snook to west coast
snook is a lot like comparing dogs to dogs.
"A snook is a snook, and a dog is a dog;'
says Ron, a longtime Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission biologist. "But then
you have to look at the details. A German
shepherd and a poodle are both dogs, but
they are very different. Snook may not differ


much, but they do differ." So maybe more like
the difference between a German shepherd
and a Belgian Malinois.
Taylor has studied marine fisheries in
Florida for more than 35 years. His research
has led to many discoveries about snook,
including his finding that all snook are born
as males and some later become females.
He says that compared with snook from the
Florida Gulf, snook from the Florida Atlantic
have a larger size at age, they are older at
maturity, the females live longer and they
have a lower natural mortality.
"The main reason for the difference is the way
they adapt to their environments;'says Ron.
Where Gulf snook generally live in shallow
water like Charlotte Harbor, Atlantic snook


live in deeper water, or at least have quick
access to deeper water. Gulf snook also tend
to stick around their same old stomping
grounds more than their east coast rivals.
"There was a study a few years back that
tagged snook and took note of where they
recaptured them;' says Ron."Gulf snook were
commonly found in the same area where they
were tagged. Atlantic snook seemed to have
migrated more"'
Although both coasts were affected by the
cold snap in 2010, the West coast and our
Harbor took a big hit. According to Ron, it's
likely our Harbor snook stayed in the area
until it was too late, where the Atlantic snook
migrated and found warmer water.
"Florida Atlantic snook are genetically


quite distinct from Gulf snook," says Ron.
"They are reproductively isolated. Tagging
studies also show that gene flow between
Gulf and Atlantic does not occur and that the
two populations have diverged:'
So, there is a difference between east and
west coast snook. Biologists say that Atlantic
snook are, on average, bigger than those on our
coast, and endure less pressure as many east
coast anglers pursue other species offshore.
East coast snook are a slightly different strain of
Centropomus undecimalis, and they grow faster
and larger than on our side of the state.
Scientific evidence aside, you can catch
some vary large snook on the west coast and
in the Harbor. That's a fact. Just know your
rules and regulations.


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Snook Q & A with Dr. Aaron Adams


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor

Currently, Dr. Aaron Adams is Director of
Operations of Bonefish and Tarpon Trust and
a research associate at the Florida Institute
of Technology. He has been Marine Labora-
tory Senior Scientist and manager of Mote's
Habitat Ecology Program and spent 12 years
conducting various studies pertaining to Char-
lotte Harbor. He has written various books and
has published countless scientific publications.
But at the end of the day, he is a fisherman,
and he recently sat down with WaterLine
to answer some questions about one of his
favorite species of fish.

WaterLine: Let's talk a little about how the
life of a snook begins.

Doctor Adams: Snook spawn during the
summer along the beaches, for the most part,
on the new and full moons from May through
September. The salinity is higher out there
for the sperm to be viable during the rainy
season in the Harbor. Early in the wet season,
snook could be spawning in the Harbor, but
most flock to the beaches. They eject their
egg and sperm into the open water. The eggs
hatch and the larvae make their way into the
estuary less than 24 hours after spawning. In


about two to three weeks they settle in the
mangrove swamps. For the first two years of
a snook's life, it is spent up in these creeks
and swamps where most people don't or
can't get to. Characteristics common to these
areas include good water quality, moderate to
slightly sloped banks, minimum currents, over-
hanging vegetation that provides the shade
that facilitates capture of prey, and some
type of structure, either mangroves, rocks or
pilings, that provides cover. The wading birds
are their biggest predators, like herons and
egrets. As the snook grow, they use a wide
array of habitat. Snook mature after four or
five years and grow up to 26 inches. After they
mature as males, they switch to female as they
get larger. The females all start life as males,
with many converting at 20 inches and above.
They use most of the shallow water habitat.
During the winter, a lot of adults go to the
Caloosahatchee, Myakka and Peace rivers. A
study we did even found snook hanging out
in passes in winter. They utilize most of the
estuary. Schools of reproductively active snook
may contain as many as four or five hundred
individuals that return to the same location
each year to spawn. Small immature snook
are found in a variety of habitats that range
from quiet, mangrove-lined swamps and
bayous to freshwater rivers and creeks. These
young-of-the-year snook remain in this habitat


until they are about 10 to 14 inches long, at
which time they begin to sexually mature and
migrate toward the higher-salinity areas of the
lower estuary. After they become members of
the spawning stocks, they utilize most areas
of the estuary over the course of a year. Snook
show high levels of sight fidelity, they go back
to the same place they spawn. Our Cayo Costa
spawning study showed this. A lot of species
like Nassau grouper do the same thing. Sight
fidelity is a neat thing. That's why protection
of habitat is crucial in keeping the numbers of
snook strong.

WL: How can you tell a male snook from a
female?
DR: There are no physical differences
between male and female snook, so anglers
cannot tell the difference between the sexes.
Snook are protandric hermaphrodites. That
means the males reverse sex and change into
females. This reversal occurs during the fall
after the spawning season, sometimes in a
short span of 90 days. Microscopic observations
of specimens from the Atlantic and Gulf Coast
indicate that the age of individuals at the time
of reversal is between 1 and 7 years. Biologists
have documented this phenomenon by placing
and holding male snook in a pond during the
summer and then during the fall, finding some
females in the group.


WL: How far do snook go offshore?
DR: Most of the population goes as far out
as the beach. People do see them on offshore
reefs, especially on the Gulf Coast about a
couple miles out. These are big snook. Are they
out there throughout the year? Do they spawn
out there? My guess is if they spawn, they are
wasting their time. Larvae can't make it all the
way back like a tarpon larvae can.

WL: Just how devastating was the cold snap
of 2010to out Harbor snook?
DR: Every fish species is cold-blooded and
has a tolerance range. After the temperature
falls to a certain level, I thing somewhere
around 50 degrees or so, they become
dormant. Eventually they die if they don't
get their temperatures higher. The study
we did showed a decline of 60 percent in
selected areas around the Harbor. There have
been some good indications of juveniles
rebounding, and a lot of the younger fish are
under the slot and should be safe when season
opens on Sept. 1, but personally I wanted it
closed for one year or so. The problem with
cold snaps here is that the snook don't have
deep water to protect them. Once the Harbor
drops dramatically in temperature, the snook
are kind of stuck. On the Atlantic side, they can
seek warmer waters by going
deeper. There's not much you


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jnl//..ersvt Page 15 August 29,2013


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be small, but
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what they are.
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can do when a bad cold snap occurs. But they don't happen
too often. The Harbor population in not as healthy as it was
10 year ago. The Harbor is special where the snook have
mangrove shorelines that are protected, unlike Tampa and
other areas where the mangroves were destroyed long ago.
Again, protection of habitat is the key factor. You can't have a
healthy fishery without a healthy habitat.

WL: What is the biggest obstacle you see our Harbor snook
facing in the future?
DR: The biggest problem of Harbor is alteration of
freshwater flow in estuaries. When mangroves get cutoff,
the whole system gets affected. The Harbor is on same path
as other areas that have gone downhill. It has the ability to
go down a different path than places like Chesapeake Bay.
Resource management is key, and getting the commercial
fishermen and citizens on board is also key. Snook use so
much area of the estuary, so we need to protect the entire
estuary. Trust me, I've seen just a small amount of develop-
ment cause a lot of damage.

WL: Are there tagging efforts going on with snook in out
Harbor?
DR: There are a number of tagging efforts out there. Mote
and the FWC are involved, and it is important. By tagging
snook, we can get a better understanding of their behavior.
With that information, we can work on preserving their
habitat. That is extremely important in ensuring the healthy
survival of any species. Again, you can't have a healthy
fishery without a healthy habitat.body copy


Snook: It sure ain't no



Swedish hip-hop group


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor

The English language has a few
common names for the snook. You know,
that beautiful fish with the characteristic
protruding lower jaw, and the prominent
dark lateral line that extends into the
tail. We call that fish a snook, linesider
or robalo. Some call it a pike or sergeant
fish. And if you're old-school, you call it
a snuke or a soapfish (more about the
soapfish name on page 24). Outside of
the good ol' U.S., they have names for it
too: Camorim, brochet and kamuli can
likely be heard by anglers around the
globe when talking about their favorite
fish to catch.
Linesider is self-explanatory. Robalo is
common in Spanish-speaking countries,
although it can also refer to European
bass. Kamuli? Well, let us know what
you come up with on that one. Do some
research on a rainy day. We have plenty
of them this time of year.
And just to clarify, the word snook has
nothing to do with Snooki, the female
reality television personality (whether
you like it or not, more about Snooki on
page 31 thanks, Robin!). Nor does it
relate to snooker, which is a sport likely
invented in India by British Army officers.
Although top professional players can
earn a good living playing snooker, it
has absolutely nothing to do with snook
(many apologies to the snooker fans
around the globe catching kamuli on
their spare time).
There are some people in England who


have Snook as a surname. It goes back to
someone who lived on a projecting piece
of land, called a snoke, or a pointed piece
of land.
And speaking of England, sometimes
people there utter the phrase"cock a
snook.' The phrase dates back to 1791,
and from the looks of things, it basically
is a gesture of putting one's thumb to
one's nose and extending the fingers.
Waggling them is optional, but is
reported to improve the effectiveness
of the insult. Again, nothing to do with
snook, unless of course you hook into one
and it breaks your line weaving through
oyster-embedded pilings. Then you may
want to give it a shot.
What we're talking about here is the
fish we call snook. There is no question
that the word snook is closely related to
the old Dutch word snoek, which means
pike. Of course, Snook is also a current
Swedish hip-hop group (A slang word
for nose in Swedish is"snok"). But then
again, Snook is also a Swiss rock band
from Zirich.
And if you haven't have had enough
snook trivia, Snook is also a city in
Burleson County, Texas, boasting a popu-
lation of around 600. The small town
is reportedly home to the first known
restaurant to serve chicken fried bacon.
Let's just keep this simple. Although a
snook does not entirely resemble a pike,
it makes more sense that snook derived
from the old Dutch word"snoek"than it
did a reality star, an insulting gesture,
chicken-fried bacon or a Swedish hip-hop
group (no offense, Zirich).


(Danish), almindelig snook (Dan-
ish), bicudo (Portuguese), cambriacu
(Portuguese), camburiacu (Portuguese),
camorim (Portuguese), camorim-acu
(Portuguese), camuri (Portuguese),
camurim (Portuguese), camurim branco
(Portuguese), camurim-acu (Portuguese),
camuri-cabo-de-machado (Portuguese),
camurim-preto (Portuguese), cam-
urimpema (Portuguese), camuripeba
(Portuguese), camuripema (Portuguese),
cangoropeba (Portuguese), canjurupeba
(Portuguese), esalho (Portuguese), falso-
robalo-branco (Portuguese), rabalao,
robalo (Portuguese), rabalo-bicudo
(Portuguese), robalo-branco (Portuguese),
robalo-camurim (Portuguese), robalo-
de-galha (Portuguese), robalo-estoque
(Portuguese), robalo-flecha (Portuguese),
robalo-flexa (Portuguese), rolao (Portu-
guese), bima (Papiamento), sapat'i solda
(Papiamento), snoekoe (Papiamento),
binnensnoek (Dutch), snoek (Dutch),
brochet (French), brochet de mer (French),
crossie blanc (French), loubine (French),
kamuli (Galibi), loubin gran lanme (Creole,
French), lubi (Palicur), pakiyau (Wayana),
qu6quere (Spanish), robalito (Spanish),
r6balo (Spanish), robalo (Spanish), robalo
blanco (Spanish), r6balo blanco (Spanish),
r6balo comin (Spanish), robalo (Swedish),
signokou (Djuka), snoek (Sranan), snoekoe
(Sranan), snook (German) and zuchwiak
(Polish).
Florida Museum of Natural History


www.palmislandmarina.com 1941.697.435617080 Placida Road Capa Haze, FL 33946





,,______at Page 16 I August 29, 2013

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If you look under some of the area's
bridges at night this month, you might spot
an assortment of curious characters. You'll
know them when you see them: They're a
somewhat scruffy looking bunch who seem
strangely attracted to the water's edge,
and to the glow of overhead lights. If you
see them early in the morning as sunrise
welcomes a fresh new day, you might
guess by their unshaven faces, their matted
hair, their faintly fishy odor and by their
unfocused gaze that they'd actually spent
the entire night under the bridge, and you
might be correct. However, if you further


guessed that they were homeless folks
or fugitives from justice, you'd (usually)
be wrong: They're probably just die-hard
fishermen who are trying to catch their first
take-home snook since the season closed
over three years ago.
There's a reason why there are so many
snook fishermen putting in long hours
under bridges at night it's because lots
of snook are caught under and around
bridges. Bridge pilings give snook a hiding
place from passing prey. They also give
snook protection from larger predators
(mostly dolphins). The streetlights above


the larger road bridges attract bait to
the surface and create areas of shadows,
which can further conceal lurking snook
or other predators. Bridges are expensive
to build, so they are often built as short as
possible, which means that they are often
placed in areas where the waterway over
which they span is narrower than other
nearby portions of the waterway. This can
result in stronger tidal currents, which in
turn create more swirling, bait-confusing
eddies around which snook can hunt. Here
are a few pointers about targeting snook
around bridges:
Nighttime might be the best time, but
it's not the only time. Snook will feed at
any time, day or night, but more snook are
caught at night under bridges than during
the day. This is probably because forage
items such as small fish, crabs and shrimp
seem to travel on the surface much more
frequently at night than during the day.
Some fishermen also feel that taking snook
on lures is easier at night because the snook
don't get such a good look at the plastic or
metal offerings and are more likely to strike.
One note, though: Nocturnal fishing can
shut down when there is a lot of"fire in the
water" local terminology for biolumnes-
cence due to jellyfish and other creatures
suspended in the water which light up
when bumped or jostled by a passing lure or
by the line tied to the lure.
Tides are critical and will affect snook
under a bridge and how they feed. Gener-
ally, lurking snook will face into the tide
and expect their prey to approach from
upstream.
Not all bridges are equal. Some really
fishy-looking bridges produce poorly,
while other bridges that are unremarkable
in appearance are big snook producers.
There are only two ways to know for sure
about any given bridge: Personal experi-
ence gained through long hours spent
prospecting, or second-hand information
gleaned from other anglers, usually after
they've imbibed too heavily in judgment-
dulling adult beverages.
Shadows can be critical. Prey which
are swimming or drifting on the tide in
the glow of bridge lights can be readily
seen by snook, and at the same time it's
very difficult for prey in the light to see
snook lurking in the shadows. Snook take
advantage of this by lying in the shadow


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right next to the shadow line, usually on
the upstream side where they can see prey
approaching in the light. Note: It's easy
for an angler to see the shadow line at the
surface, but it's usually impossible to see
the shadow line underwater.
Bridges are not great places for light-
tackle fishing. The sharp-edged oysters and
barnacles which adorn most bridge pilings
in Southwest Florida have robbed snook
fishermen of countless trophy fish. Even
with stout gear, you'll still be cut off by a
strong fish that manages to drag your line
around a piling, and with light tackle, you'll
have little chance of success.
Some bridges can be fished effec-
tively without a boat, some cannot. Some
bridges cannot be reached by boat at all,
and some bridges can be fished either with
a boat or without.
Snook are a valuable resource and are
hugely popular, as evidenced by all the
excitement over the Sept. 1 season opening.
One thing that will probably always be
true in Southwest Florida is that snook
fishermen will catch and release a lot of
snook. Whether because the fish are caught
during the closed season, or because they
do not fall into the small legal slot of 28 to
33 inches in length, or because the lucky
angler has already harvested his daily bag
limit of one fish, far more snook are released
than are kept for the table. It's critical to the
success of the fishery that a high percentage
of the released fish are able to survive being
hooked, landed, unhooked and turned loose.
It's far more difficult to gently release a
snook that's caught from a bridge than one
that's been landed from a boat, so please
take care of our fish as best you can. Don't
be "that guy" who swings a snook over the
bridge rail onto the concrete deck, stands
on the fish with one boot while ripping the
hooks out, then kicks the fish over the edge,
leaving a puddle of blood and a smattering
of dislodged scales on the deck. It won't
take too many "that guy" episodes to see our
snook fishery closed again.
Capt Ralph .//llt~ r is the l t' Fishti
(0[)Ij IOIOt~d MIS 11t76tll'01 I IS/ 6 10
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post piteidetlt Of thte F/OI to Olitdoo I V i tt s
associationn C(li haull ot 9-11-639-2628 ot
taill Captau Kito i i F she/Fleet c. n


WaterLine photo by Josh Olive
Looking down on a whipped snook from the
bridge at night. This one's ready for the net.




OPNHUESPCA
Brn hi Edad eev


Visit any one of our Open House
locations for refreshments
and a boat ride.
Saturday, August 31st
10am 4pm
VENICE
990 Laguna Drive
PUNTA GORDA
Laishley Park Marina
120 Laishley Court
Sunday, September 1st
10am 4pm
ENGLEWOOD
Cape Haze Marina
6900 Placida Road


I


I
I


---------





gJ. 4I vraI Page 17 August 29,2013


W a~EmmoImlelW"-ia' kEm nAme
aiMnU.I.InIII.U I EIUInl ...uuEll


I'll have the snook (or is that soapfish?)


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor

A buddy of mine recently returned from
Costa Rica. He asked me why Florida restau-
rants don't serve snook. It turns out he had his
first taste of linesider down there, and he was
impressed. He even said he would take a snook
fillet over grouper any day.
It would be great to go to your favorite
seafood restaurant and order a big ol'fillet of
snook, but you can't. And if you're able to, that
restaurant owner is in big trouble.
Snook was taken off Florida's commercial
fisheries list in 1957. Since then, it's been up to
the angler to bring home the bacon. I like the
fact that you have to go out and catch a snook
and clean it yourself in order to enjoy one of
the finest-eating fish out there. Catching your
own fish and bringing it home for dinner isn't
for everybody, but if you are a regular follower
of WaterLine, you're probably getting excited
just reading this.
Just about everywhere snook call home, you
can find the firm, white flesh at the market
and on menus at seaside cafes. Everywhere
except here, of course. From Belize to Brazil,
Cozumel to Costa Rica, you can find snook on
the table.
It may be popular table fare now, but snook
hasn't always been an angler's favorite. Believe
it or not, there was once a time when you
couldn't give the stuff away. We don't hear
the term too often today, but snook were
commonly referred to as"soapfish." I wouldn't
advise it, but if you want to know why people
called a snook a soapfish, just leave the skin on
a fillet and give it a go.
"People tell me it tastes like soap;'says Brian
Urso, Director of Operations at Andy's Island
Seafood in Matlacha."It's hard to believe that
such a tasty fish could have had such a bad
reputation back in the day. And all they had to
do was peel the skin off the fillets. I've heard
that snook were even used for fertilizer. That's
like using cobia or grouper as fertilizer":
When I first moved to Florida 10 years ago,
snook was the first fish I tasted. I had another
buddy give me a couple pounds of fresh fillets.
When I run into a fish I've never tasted before,
I usually broil it with little seasoning. After
my first taste of snook, I was hooked. Then I
experimented with the remainder of the fillets.
I made a snook omelette, snook gumbo, snook
cakes and I even tried it as sushi (although I
highly recommend cooking snook because it
tends to bring out the rich flavor of the flesh).
I've also heard of people eating the roe of the
snook. From what I could find through various
sources, the roe is not as strong, or fishy, as
mullet roe. But if you do catch a snook with
roe, I would advise you to safely release it.
For one, it's a good idea to help preserve the
species. Two, the time of year snook produce
roe is likely the time when the season is closed.
I don't think the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission would think too
kindly of somebody with a cooler full of fat
females, especially after the cold snap of 2010.
For the past three years, Floridians on the
west coast have been deprived of the roman-
ticized act of going out and catching and
cleaning a snook. On Sept. 1, the season will
again open and we will be able to do so as
long as you have a fishing license and a snook


/,,.


Careful removal of the dark meat
S. on the bloodline will also remove
St many small bones. Notice all the
S skin has been removed.
go84.~ V <4 :


permit. You can bet your bottom dollar if you
decide to go catch one, there will be plenty of
people following suit.
But if you do go, and if you decide to keep a
legal snook, they are simple to clean. If you've
cleaned a sheepshead before, you can easily
clean a snook. There are few rib bones to deal
with, and you can follow your knife smoothly
along the snook's spine. Once you have your
two fillets on the table, you should remove the
skin. Try to cut the skin off, without leaving
spots of skin behind. If you do leave a spot or
two, go back and remove them. Remember,
there is a reason snook were called soapfish.
If you're trying snook for the first time, I
would suggest getting a real taste of the fish,
rather than the seasoning. The flesh is not as
delicate as a trout, or even a redfish. But it's
not as firm as a swordfish. It's firm enough to
do just about anything you want with it. I'm
not going to list any recipes here. There are
enough scattered throughout this issue of
WaterLine.
So if you decide to keep a snook, just know
that you will be eating something that can't be
found on any menu at even the most fanciest
restaurants in Florida (though an all-you-can-
eat Chinese restaurant was busted a few years
back for serving snook on the buffet line). And
take off the skin.


1/4 cup soy sauce A clip-n-save seafood
2 tbsp lemon juice recipe provided by
2 pounds snook fillets
1 medium onion, cut into 6 wedges and separated
3 tsp olive oil, divided
3 medium sweet peppers in mixed colors, sliced into thin rings
1 can (14-1/2 ounces) diced tomatoes, drained
In a small bowl, combine soy sauce and lemon juice. Pour 1/4 cup marinade in a reseal-
able plastic bag; add fish. Seal bag and turn to coat; refrigerate for 20 minutes. Cover and
refrigerate remaining marinade. Meanwhile, in a large nonstick skillet, cook onion in 1
teaspoon oil for 1 minute. Stir in peppers; cook and stir for about 5 minutes longer. Stir in
tomatoes; cook 1-2 minutes longer or until tomatoes are heated through and vegetables
are crisp-tender. Remove from the heat; keep warm. Drain and discard marinade from fish.
In a large nonstick skillet coated with cooking spray, cook fish in remaining oil for about 8
minutes on each side or until fish flakes easily with a fork. Arrange two-thirds of pepper
mixture on a serving platter; top with fish. Top with remaining pepper mixture and drizzle
with reserved marinade. Serves 6.





vynrcvaIt Page 18 August 29, 2013


maUI*imlmRml*I IEHIIII.M AI IIm
mou-...*e*.-.........****fi**i


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher

Most anglers in Southwest Florida can
recognize a snook: Long and silvery, with an
underslung jaw and a distinctive black stripe
running from the gill cover to the middle of
the tail. But would it surprise you to learn
there are no fewer than a dozen species of
snook? All are fish of the American tropics. Five
species live on the Atlantic side; seven on the
Pacific. And while each fish is distinctive, all
are instantly recognizable as snook.
All five of the American species can be found
in Florida waters, though not necessarily in the
same areas. But having several species of snook
available doesn't mean you can bring any more
home: The size and bag limits for snook cover
all species, and it's extremely rare for one of
our "other" snook to reach legal size. Florida is
considered the northern edge of suitable snook
habitat, and the Atlantic species all range
throughout the West Indies and Mexico as far
south as Brazil. Many Caribbean islands are
devoid of snook, since they're generally found
only where there are large estuary systems.
Here's a brief look at snook from all over.
ATLANTIC SPECIES
Common snook (Centroponius undedcialis):
This is the fish you all know and love. It's also
an oddity in the snook family, growing to a
larger size (55 inches and 54 pounds) and
preferring saltier water than any other Atlantic
snook species. Also called thin snook because
of their slender body shape in comparison to
other snook. The only snook caught regularly
in Southwest Florida.
Swordspine snook (C. ensiterus): This fish is
a bit chunkier than the common snook, but
it's much easier to tell them apart by looking


at the anal fin. That's how the swordspine
got its name the second anal fin spine is
greatly exaggerated in length. The smallest of
the Atlantic species, it maxes out at about 14
inches; the usual size is 10 to 12 inches. Sword-
spine snook are usually found in low brackish
water, though they have been recorded from
open waters as deep as 70 feet. Found on
the East Coast as far north as St. Lucle; very
uncommon on the Gulf side of the state.
Tarpon snook (C. pecinatus): This fish
sports an upturned mouth, which suppos-
edly gives them a silver king-like profile. The
body is squarish and oddly contorted, with a
strongly concave belly (more so in juveniles
than adults). They get bigger than swordspine
snook, but not by much the largest adults
might reach 18 inches; average is about 12 to
14 inches. They generally share the sword-
spine's range and habitat.
Fat snook (C. parallels): Reaching a
maximum size of about 28 inches and 11
pounds, this is the only one of our "other" snook
species that can reach legal size. They're not
really fatter than other snook, but they do have
proportionally deeper bodies, which means
they usually weigh more than other snook
species at a given length. Unlike swordspine
and tarpon snook, fat snook are occasionally
caught in local waters. Of all the snook, this
species seems to dislike salty water the most.
Largescale fat snook (C. mexicanus): Until
recently, this species was thought to not
range into Florida, but in 2006 a specimen
was collected near Sebastian Inlet. Since
then, a handful of others have been found. As
the name suggests, this fish has the propor-
tionally largest scales of any snook. According
to a 2002 report by ichthyologist Ivan Sazima,
juveniles bear conspicuous black tips on their
dorsal fins and often join foraging groups of


similarly sized and looking flagfin mojarra.
The snook mingle with the mojarra and
prey on fishes and shrimps attracted to the
digging activity of the mojarra. The resem-
blance to a fish harmless to shrimps and
small fishes allows the snook to approach this
otherwise wary prey, an example of aggres-
sive mimicry.
Mexican snook (C. poeyi): The only Atlantic


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snook not found in Florida, the Mexican snook
is also a relatively large fish, reaching 36 inches
and 20 pounds. Its range is more restricted than
other species, stretching from central Mexico to
Belize. It also reportedly has an odd life history,
preferring to live in a marine or nearly marine
habitat and spawning in low brackish or fresh
water. Unfortunately, little hard
data is available.


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Aljn qere vrt Page 19 August 29,2013


iWanaummunmu-au malmmmhb uam.


PACIFIC SPECIES
Black snook (C. nigrescens): The largest of
the snook clan, known to reach at least 60
pounds and probably a bit larger. Found from
Baja California to Colombia, with the largest
fish reported from Costa Rica and Nicaragua.
Behaves much like the common snook, with
adults found in similar habitat types. More
valued as a source of protein than sport
through most of its range, black snook are
subject to heavy commercial fishing pressure.
Large fish are harpooned so fishermen can
avoid damage to their nets.
Armed snook (C. armatus): A small and
inconsequential species, ranging from Mexico
to Ecuador. Maximum size 14 inches; nonethe-
less, commercially harvested for food.
Blackfin snook (C. medius): This snook
reaches about 25 inches, though 20 inches
is considered large. It prefers estuaries to
marine conditions, though it can be found a
considerable distance upriver to an elevation
of about 800 feet. Ranges from Baja California
to northern Colombia.
Humpback snook (C. unionensis): Another
small species, averaging 10 inches and topping
out at 18. The southernmost of the snook tribe,
it's found from El Salvador to central Peru.
Little information is available, but it appears
this species may be more marine than most
other snook.
White snook (C. viridis): This is the second-
largest Pacific snook. It's been recorded at 44
inches and 47 pounds. It's perhaps the most
marine of all snook species, though it still
utilizes brackish and fresh water habitats.
Ranges from Baja California to northern
Peru and the Galapagos Islands. Sometimes
mistaken for black snook, since they're the
same color despite the names, but black snook
have a less undershot jaw and a generally
more robust appearance.
Yellowfin snook (C. robalito): The smallest
snook of all, reaching only 13 inches. It
ranges from the Gulf of California to northern
Colombia in estuaries and fresh water.

It's also worth noting that two snook rela-
tives are much-wanted game- and foodfish.


The barramundi of Australia and Southeast
Asia looks very much like a heavy-bodied
snook without the stripe. Everywhere it lives,
it's a crowd favorite. It's much larger than
any snook, having been recorded to nearly
100 pounds. Like snook, it transitions easily
between salt and fresh water; most adults live
in fresh. The other fish is even larger Afri-
ca's Nile perch. It's one of the world's largest
freshwater fish, historically reaching lengths
of more than 6 feet and weights of more than
450 pounds. They're heavily harvested for food,
and today Nile perch over 50 pounds are rare.
Locally, blue tilapia are often called Nile perch.
Don't be fooled they're not the same thing!
Anywhere they can be found, snook and
their relatives are appreciated by anglers and
seafood lovers alike.


Used boat buyers beware:


Provided by BoatUS

With the fall boat buying season
approaching, buyers looking for a pre-owned
boat can often find deals as sellers, not
wanting to take on the upcoming expense
of winter storage fees, are in the bargaining
mood. However, Boat Owners Association of
The United States estimates that 65,000 boats
were damaged or lost when Superstorm Sandy
struck. Now, nearly a year later, some of those
boats are being sold on the used boat market,
either in "as is" condition, or after repairs have
been made. That's not necessarily a bad thing
if the seller is truthful about any past damage.
However, the problem exists when sellers fail
to fess up to a boat's true condition. So how
does a used boat buyer go into a purchase
with eyes wide open? The BoatUS Consumer
Affairs Department has these used boat
buying tips each may be an indication the
boat has experienced hurricane damage.
Trace the history: When a car is totaled,
the title is "branded" as salvaged or rebuilt
and buyers know up front that there was
major damage at some point in the car's
history. But few states brand salvaged boats
and some states don't even require titles for
boats."Anyone wishing to obscure a boat's
history need only cross state lines to avoid
detection, which can be a tip-off,"'says BoatUS
consumer affairs director Charles Fort. Also
look for recent gaps in the boat's ownership,
which may mean that it was at an auction or
in a repair yard for a long time.
Ask the seller: In some states, a seller is
not required to disclose if a boat was badly
damaged unless you ask them. If the seller


hems and haws, keep looking.
Look for evidence of storm damage:
A boat you are looking at has an increased
likelihood of having been badly damaged in a
storm if you see two or three of the following:
Recent hull repair: Especially on older
boats, matching gel-coat is very difficult.
Mismatched colors around a repaired area
are often a dead give away, and may signal
nothing more than filler under the gel-coat,
rather than a proper fiberglass repair.
New repairs or sealant at the hull-to-
deck joint: Boats that bang against a dock
or other boats during a storm often suffer
damage here.
Evidence of sinking: Check for consistent
corrosion on interior hardware, such as rust
on all hinges and drawer pulls. You might
be able to spot an interior waterline inside a
locker or in an area hidden behind an internal
structure.
Extensive corrosion in the electrical
system: Corrosion on electrical items, such as
lamps, connectors, and behind breaker panels
might mean the boat sank recently. Does the
boat have all brand new electronics? Why?
Evidence of major interior repairs: Fresh
paint or gel-coat work on the inside of the hull
and the engine room is usually obvious. All
new cushions and curtains can be a tip-off too.
Again, having one or more of these indica-
tors doesn't always signal serious hurricane
damage. The older the boat, the more likely
some of these issues will pop up due to simple
wear and tear. While something can be said
about trusting your gut when seeing these
red flags, make sure you have a professional
inspect any used boat you're considering.


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S s* Page 21 August 29,2013


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Snook back making an economic impact


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor

As we know, there is no commercial harvest
or sale of snook permitted in Florida. Yet, they
help our economy. How? People like to catch
them. Thev really like to catch them. Some even


"When you have had a species like snook have liked to see the snook season delayed for
closed for more than three years, you can surely another year, but as long as people are respon-
expect to see an increase of anglers coming down sible and keeping only snook that are legal, it
when the season opens;'says Dr. Aaron Adams, should be fine:'
Director of Operations at Bonefish & Tarpon Trust But how hard has the closure of the snook
and research associate at the Florida Institute of season hit Southwest Florida? How hard has it hit
Technology. our Harbor? Three years is a long time, but it's not
Although no economic impact study has been like you couldn't catch snook. You just couldn't


season being closed for the past three years, most
will say they have noticed a pinch, but some, like
Capt. Josh Greer, say that's fine.
"If you're honest and you know what you
are doing out there, you can make a living. Or
something close to that;'says Josh, a fourth-
generation Floridian."To be honest, I can give my
clients as much fun catching just about anything


Institute scientists conduct research ana monitoring activities rocusea on
improving the quality of biological and fisheries data being collected on common
snook to ensure that these magnificent fish continue to thrive in Florida's bays
and estuaries for generations to come.
Major programs funded by the snook permit fee are:
* Stock enhancement Researchers are testing techniques to spawn snook in
hatcheries for stock enhancement purposes.
* Snook tagging program Biologists monitor the movements, habitat use,
and survival of adult snook tagged with external dart tags, as well as with
internal ultrasonic transmitters (also known as acoustic tags).
* Fisheries-independent sampling Biologists conduct monthly sampling in
four Florida estuaries where common snook are typically abundant: Tampa
Bay, Charlotte Harbor, and the southern and northern portions of the Indian
River Lagoon.
* Fisheries-dependent sampling This project involves researchers collecting
snook-related information through creel, or angler surveys and through an
angler-based logbook program.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission


e r'www


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


For 10 miserable days in January of 2010,
the Sunshine State was anything but. If you
were here, you remember. If you weren't, here's
a brief picture: Leaden, sunless skies; highs
in the 50s and lows below freezing; tropical
landscaping turned to brown mush; everyone
bundled up in whatever winter-ish clothing
a Floridian happens to own. And oh yeah -
Charlotte Harbor's shorelines and coves were
littered with dead snook, jacks and tarpon.
With huge numbers of dead fish reported
around the state, Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commissioners knew they had
a snook crisis on their hands. They moved
quickly, extending the snook season closure
until September statewide. Ron Taylor, senior
biologist with the FWRI's snook program based
in St. Petersburg, explains why it was so bad for
snook in particular.
"Snook are susceptible to a lethal minimum
temperature, which they cannot withstand,
and that seems to be 52 degrees Fahrenheit;'
Taylor said. "When the water temperature
drops to about 64, 65 degrees, the snook quits
feeding, quits moving, becomes lethargic. At 54
degrees, it's toast upside-down. At 52, life is
going to leave them."
"In 2010, there were areas where the
temperature stayed below 55 for 14 straight
days;' he said. "That has never happened in the
recorded history of Florida;'
Winters had been relatively mild for several
years prior, and snook numbers were high.
Worse, many of them had been overwintering
in relatively shallow water. That's a bad plan
for a tropical fish when the air temperature
plummets, it can get cold quickly on the flats. A
rapid drop in temperature can kill snook even if
it doesn't drop to lethal minimum.
As FWC biologists sifted through the data
they had from snook kill reports and conducted
their usual fish population surveys, it became


apparent that fish on the Gulf Coast had fared
far worse than snook on the Atlantic side. The
reason was water depth. Atlantic snook were
more likely to have rapid access to deep water
refuges, where they found temperatures high
enough to survive. On our coast, most snook
live inshore, and water deeper than 20 feet is
in pretty short supply. Because there was little
warming during the day, the water didn't heat
up. Snook that couldn't find warm pockets
didn't survive.
Despite Atlantic snook breeding popula-
tions failing to meet the goal of a 40 percent
spawning potential ratio (that is, having a
spawning population at least 40 percent of
the size it would be with no human fishing
pressure), the FWC opted to open an abbrevi-
ated Atlantic-only snook season in 2010 from
Sept. 17 to Dec. 15. At the same meeting,
commissioners decided there would be no
spring snook season in 2011 and the idea of
reopening a fall Gulf snook season would be
evaluated in summer 2011.
"I made the argument that I rather err on
the side of being conservative;'then-FWC
Chairman Rodney Barreto said."We need to
make sure that we get it right. If it was up to
me, I would have said let's close the whole
thing. But the Snook Foundation and a whole
lot of other people advocated that the East
Coast was in a lot better shape. Fishermen on
the West Coast said,'We'd rather give up the
season to make sure the stock is strong and
comes back.'"
Commissioners were still feeling conserva-
tive when the time came to decide about a
fall 2011 season on the Gulf Coast, choosing
again to keep it closed. The reasons? They
wanted to give the snook more time to
rebound, but mostly they wanted to see what
the next stock assessment had in store. The
report was expected in early 2012. Mean-
while, Atlantic snook season was returned to
business as usual.
In June 2012, FWC staff presented the


updated stock assessment, which showed
snook populations were improving in the
Atlantic (though still below target numbers)
and weren't in biological jeopardy in the Gulf.
Although FWC staff recommended an open
season, commissioners opted yet again to keep
snook off West Coast tables.
"If we have a bad winter this year, we will
benefit from this caution; if we don't have
a bad winter, we will let all these breeding
fish come through the slot;'said then-Vice
Chairman Kenneth Wright, referring to the
snook slot limit of 28 to 33 inches in Gulf of
Mexico waters. "We'll really have done some-
thing good and we'll have protected some of
these fish:'
The vote to open snook season this
September (actually, since the season was
being kept closed by vote, all they really did
was not vote to prevent it from opening) was a
little anticlimactic. Of course, the vote was held
near the end of a very long day that also saw
nearly eight hours of testimony on Boca Grande
tarpon jigs, and most folks had left by the time
snook came up. Commission Chairman Wright
said it had been their intention all along to
open Gulf snook they were just waiting for
the timing to be right. "We took an action to be
conservative, and it paid off,"Wright said.
What it comes down to is that, despite the
misgivings of some local anglers and charter
captains, there really was no biological
justification for keeping the season closed.
Now the concern is that with so many anglers
out there targeting snook, their numbers will
take a major hit. Even though most fish will
be released, mortality is around 2 percent,
and each snook is caught an average of four
times annually, resulting in an annual release
mortality of 8 percent. Hopefully, a wholesale
slaughter is more nightmare than reality, but
my crystal ball is cloudy. The next full stock
assessment is due in 2015. Maybe by then
we'll know if opening snook this fall was the
right decision.


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Photo illustration
by Josh Olive
Anglers, both locals
and tourists, spend a
lot of money in Florida
pursuing snook.


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rs____,_Mrit Page 22 August 29, 2013

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Aquaculture:


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With a snook in
Sarasota Bay.


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E&Thruf


Their numbers already reduced in the wild
due to years of recreational fishing pressure,
snook suffered a devastating hit after severe
cold weather descended on Florida in January
2010. The record low temperatures resulted
in the loss of thousands of snook about
20 percent of the spawning stock and the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission closed the
fishery that month.
Now, after three years of closure, snook have
been recovering, and the state is reopening the
fishery on Florida's Gulf Coast beginning Sept.
1. "The recovery efforts have gone great;' said
Dr. Kenneth Leber, associate vice president for
the Directorate of Fisheries and Aquaculture at
Mote. "Recent estimates clearly show that the
abundance of adult snook is strong enough to
support a well-managed fishery:'
While the snook population has rebounded
from the deep freeze, the fish's popularity
among recreational anglers means that
advances in captive spawning and rearing
techniques have never been more relevant.
Just a few years prior to the freeze, scien-
tists at Mote Aquaculture Park (located in
eastern Sarasota County) were able to close
the life cycle on snook that is, raise wild
snook to reproductive maturity and then get
them to spawn in specially designed breeding
tanks. Their efforts at fine-tuning the process
continued after the 2010 freeze."One of the
things we're working on is evaluating the
potential of stocking hatchery-reared snook
into the waters of Florida to see if we can help
increase the abundance of snook in localized
areas;' Leber said.
With the ultimate goal of supplementing
the fishery with hatchery-reared snook, Mote
scientists have been focusing on ways to raise
the greatest number of strong, healthy snook.
But getting snook to spawn is just the first
step. After the scientists have snook larvae,
they then have to grow the snook to a suitable
release size and doing so is the focus of
other studies.
can


Mote Postdoctoral scientist Dr. Carlos
Yanes-Roca, an expert in snook larval rearing
and husbandry, regularly conducts experi-
ments on snook larvae to determine which
environmental factors enhance larval growth.
"We just finished a light exposure study, where
we exposed the larvae to different amounts of
light to see which exposure promoted better
growth;' he said. "We've found that 24 hours
of light is much better for the larvae. Their
development and growth increased and this
led to much higher survival levels."
Mote scientists are also working with
Osprey Biotechnics to determine the influ-
ence of probiotics on larval development. By
identifying which bacteria promote growth
of healthy microflora in the snook digestive
system, scientists can increase the chances that
larvae grow to adulthood.
"We're doing experiments with wild snook
larvae to learn more and be able to apply what
we've learned on our lab-reared snook'said
Carole Neidig, staff scientist."We want to do
anything we can to enhance their chances of
making it to fingerling size:'
Mote scientists have also been conducting
pilot stocking experiments to evaluate release
strategies."We've found that we can improve
survival of hatchery snook released into the wild
by 10 times just by choosing the right habitat;'
Leber said."We also know that there are limits
on how many fish you can put in each habitat
before you start to lose hatchery snook.
"The breakthroughs we're making at Mote
Aquaculture Park are solving riddles that
people have been working on for 25 or 30 years
with snook;' Leber said."The progress in the
last 10 years has been enormous, and if we
make the kind of progress I'm expecting in the
next three years, it is going to enable large-
scale snook stock enhancement in Florida:'
Reprinted with permission from Mote Maga-
zine, a quarterly magazine for Mote Members
and supporters. Visit Mote.org/CharlotteHarbor
for more information.


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,Mp I w.rv Page 23 August 29, 2013
~ I


For many anglers, catching a snook any
snook is worthy of celebration. These
fish can be relatively easy to catch, but they
can also be very frustrating (especially when
you can see them just sitting there and they
won't bite). So why would you ever want to
make things more difficult by trying to catch a
snook on fly?
Well, this will be our little secret, but there
are actually a couple of instances where an
angler with a fly rod can outfish one with a
spinning rod. And to make it even easier, you
don't need a boat for either of them. I'm going
to tell you how it's done, but here's the deal: If
anybody asks, you've got to tell them fly fishing
is really hard and you never catch anything. OK?
The first circumstance is when snook are
hanging out on the beaches, getting ready for
the spawn. To do it right, you'll have to get up
pretty early in the morning. The time to be
there is first light, when there's no one else on
the beach (at least not in the water). Having
the sun at your back will help you spot snook,
which are usually right where the waves are
breaking in the first trough. Stay up high on
the beach not only will it make sighting
fish easier, you'll be less likely to spook them.
Most of the time, you'll find snook in small
schools consisting of one or two big females
and several smaller males following behind.
The little guys are both quicker and less
cautious, so they're usually the ones you end
up hooking. There's really no way to avoid that,
so it's a good thing the smaller snook are also
lots of fun to catch.
Even though you need a bit of luck to hook
into one of the larger fish, beach fishing
actually offers your best chance to actually
catch a big snook on fly. That's because there's
really nothing there for the fish to tangle
your line in, which is usually how you lose
the bigger fish. Without mangrove roots or
downed timber to dive into, the snook are at a
disadvantage. If you do find any driftwood or
trees in the water, there's a good chance there
will be snook around that cover but they'll
use it to break you off if they can.
On the beach, the water is a bit murky from
sediment but usually clear in color. The baitfish
living in such areas are mostly white or silvery,
so a fly imitating a small white baitfish is what
you're looking for. There are a whole bunch
of patterns that will work, but Norm Ziegler's
Crystal Schminnow may be the perfect beach
snook fly. It's such a simple pattern that's it's
almost stupid, but it works like nothing else
and it's fairly durable even after a big snook
whacks it. I usually throw a No. 2 or No. 4 size.
While catching beach snook is two tons
of fun, you need to remember that the fish
are there to make baby snook. The faster you
catch and release them, the quicker they can
get back to that. Dragging a big female up
on the sand or keeping her out of the water
for three minutes is not good. It may or may
not kill her outright, but even if she lives her
spawning season is over for the year. And quick


rMW ** a nl "lm
fight times are also important, so don't break
out your 3-weight just because there are no
mangrove roots. Besides, you've got to plan for
the likelihood of wind. A 7- or 8-weight is best
for casting into a breeze, and it'll let you put
more pressure on the fish. You might also want
to use a fighting butt to help you get more
leverage on a big snook.
The other instance where a fly angler can
beat out the other guys is fishing around dock
lights (both above and under water) at night.
You can fish from shore or from a boat, but it's
probably easier to make noise on a boat. And
stealth is everything dock light snook have
usually seen it all, and they're very aware that
people are predators. If you kick the gunnel
or drop your pliers on the deck, it's over. Just
move to the next light.
For snook, 30- or 40-pound leader is the
norm. Around dock lights, I drop down to
20-pound fluorocarbon. If you watch what's
going on for a few minutes before your try to
fish, you'll see that most of the fish attracted
to the light are small baitfish sometimes
only a inch or two long. Size your fly accord-
ingly. Usually a No. 4 is about right. Streamers
that look like glass minnows are good. Shrimp
patterns also work well, if you have the
patience to fish them slowly enough. I don't,
so I stick with baitfish flies.
You may see fish cruising through the
lighted area, sometimes gliding right through
the middle. Most of the time, those are not the
ones you really want to cast to. Not only will
fish rarely strike where the light is brightest,
but also the fish that show themselves are
usually the smaller ones. If you watch closely,
you can sometimes see shadows out near the
edge of the light. That's where you should be
casting, because that's where big fish hang out
and feed. When you cast, take care that your
fly lands as softly as possible, and don't "whip"
the water with false casts. It doesn't take much
to give the big girls lockjaw.
Even if you do everything right and hook
a good-size snook, chances are she'll break
you off. Where there are dock lights, there are
docks. And where there are docks, the snook
will head straight for the pilings. Also, where
there are docks, there are dock owners. Be
courteous to them by not sticking hooks in their
boat upholstery and other such shenanigans.
If they turn off the lights, don't cuss and yell
- those are their lights, not yours. However,
if they tell you to leave or that you can't fish
their dock, you can point out that public water
is public. As long as you're not on their property
or someplace fishing is prohibited by law, you
have the right to fish where you want.
Of course, these aren't the only places you
can catch snook on fly. Any place snook can be
caught on the flats, up against mangrove
shorelines, around canal docks you can
catch them on fly. Generally, you'll catch fewer
than if you throw a topwater plug orjerkbait.
The type of fly you use depends on local condi-
tions, but usually some sort of baitfish pattern


is the right choice. For fishing around docks,
a shorter rod is nice. It won't be in the way as
much, and you're not casting long distances
anyway. When you're fishing around heavy
cover, a 9- or 10-weight rod will let you put a
bit more muscle on the fish.
If you really want to catch a snook on fly,
here's the very best advice I can give you: Don't
bring a spinning rod with you. I can't tell you
how many times I've seen a fisherman get
frustrated with his fly rod and pick up a spin-
ning rod. And every time, when they catch a
fish on the spinning rod they kick themselves
because they really wanted to get a fish on fly.


Do yourself a favor and leave the spinning rod
at home. You can always go back to it for your
next trip if you really want to.
Capt. Josh Greer is a fourth-generation
Floridian, born and raised in South Florida.
Growing up near the ocean and the Gulf of
Mexico, he developed a true passion for the
water. His mild manner and fun-loving attitude
promise an enjoyable experience for you and
your family, and you'll benefit from his 20years
of experience. Contact him at 863-781-1373 or
visit his website, XXLSportfishing.com. You can
also visit him at Fishin'Frank's or Sportrap Gun
Shop when he's not on the water.


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'/4 cwrea Page 24 August 29,2013


Wow, can you believe it? Snook season is
finally here. I really can't think of another
opener that gets me quite as excited as that
of snook season, and this year it has me
somewhat giddy with anticipation. The snook
bite so far this year has been unbelievable,
and now we actually get to keep one for a
change so long as it's in that 28- to 33-inch
range. There are a lot of people out there with
differing opinions about the opening of this
year's snook season, but I'm all for it. If we all
keep only what we need for a meal or two,
and don't get greedy, then there should be
no worries. Let's just pray that we don't have
another winter freeze like the one in 2010 that
killed off so many of our precious snook.
Just remember, the law states that you may
keep only one snook per person per day, and
to keep one you must have a snook permit in
addition to your fishing license. A word to the
wise playing ignorant to an officer will
just make him mad. Know the laws and abide
by them, so your great day of fishing doesn't
turn into a nightmare. With that said, let's talk
about snook on the flats!
Fishing the flats is one of the most exciting
ways to catch snook. Think of the flats as a
great African plain (covered with water), with
tons of places for your prey to hide. You liter-
ally have to stalk your fish and hope it doesn't
see you before you can get off that perfect cast
- you know, the one that lands softly just in
front of its face. Now, one wrong move with
the trolling motor, or if you make a noise in the
boat or flub your cast, it's game over fish
gone. The number-one rule while stalking fish
(especially snook) on the flats is to be quiet.
If you fish for snook on an open flat with
your friends, and they're slamming beer
cans, baits and cooler lids or telling jokes and
goofing off, then chances are the only thing
you're going to catch are small trout and
ladyfish. Snook in open water are very skittish
due to the fact that they taste so good not
only to us, but to dolphins and sharks as well.
Snook hang around the potholes, oyster beds
and sandbars that make up the flats because
those areas hold food for them, but they know
that they're also a food source for those larger
predators. Needless to say, a quiet, stealthy
approach is a must when you're targeting
snook on the flats. Otherwise, they'll just
leave.
At first glance, most of our flats look barren
and lifeless. But pay close attention to the
water and you'll see little things that will catch
your attention things like small schools of
coo


bait, current rips and nervous water. All these
things need to be factored into the equation.
There are almost always snook around bait
schools and nervous water on the flats. Current
rips show you where oyster beds and sand-
bars are, and we all know snook love to hang
out around those areas. Tossing baits in and
around potholes is always a good idea because
snook are notorious for using these slightly
deeper areas as ambush sites. Toss a frisky
greenback into the right hole, and it's snook
on. No area on a flat should be left unchecked,
no matter what. If you keep track of which
areas produce and on which tide they produce
best, you can master the flats in no time, and
then you can spend more time catching and
less time casting.
The best bait for catching snook on the flats
depends on what baits are swimming around.
I know y'all have heard the term "match the
hatch"a thousand times. There's a reason for
that. Snook can be downright finicky, and
if you're not presenting something that at
least somewhat resembles what they've been
eating, you'll probably be eating chicken for
dinner instead of fresh, snowy white snook.
Good live baits for catching snook on the flats
include greenbacks, large shrimp and small
pinfish. For you artificial enthusiasts, keep a
good supply of white or bone-colored topwater
plugs handy, and also try out the MirrOlure
17MR. If you can afford them, also try the
Sebile Stick Shadds. Soft plastics and spoons
also work, but those keeper-size fish really
seem to like those hard baits. Work these baits
in and around the holes and oyster beds and
along the edges of the bars where the water is
flowing. Work these areas well, and the odds
are you'll find a nice keeper snook.
You don't have to go overboard with your
equipment for flats fishing. I use 3000 series
reels spooled with 15-pound braid on 7.5-foot
medium fast rods. This outfit has plenty of
power to handle any snook you happen to
come across on an open flat. I do recommend
using at least a 30-pound fluorocarbon leader,
boosting it up to a 40-pound if the water
is murky, which it is right now. Hook size
depends on the size of bait you're using. As
always, try to present your baits (live or artifi-
cial) as naturally as you can. There's not a lot of
room for errors when it comes to snook fishing,
so make every cast count, and good luck.
Tight lines.
Capt. Mike Myers, owner and operator of
Reelshark Charters, is a full-time Charlotte
Harbor guide. Having fished the waters all


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4 .. .vr ca Page 25 August 29,2013


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


What happens when you have a light on
outside at night? It draws in all sorts of winged
insects. Beetles, moths, mosquitos, katydids
and many other bugs just can't help them-
selves they love a light bulb. If you leave
that light on night after night, pretty soon you
won't have just insects: You'll have insect-
eating predators. Tree frogs, geckos and toads
are big fans of easy meals, and if they're lucky
enough to find a regularly lit bulb, they can
grow fat riding that gravy train.
Putting a light in the water is pretty much
the same thing. The light doesn't directly
appeal to top-level predators. Instead, it
attracts plankton. Little fish eat plankton, so
they come to the lights. And we all know that
bigger fish eat little fish. It doesn't take long
to bring in the whole food chain. When a light
is regularly left on at night, predators will set
up camp nearby. It'd be like if your favorite
restaurant offered you free meals for life -
you probably would hang out there quite a bit.
Lights may be set up for the explicit purpose
of drawing fish in, or they may be there to
illuminate a bridge, pier or whatever. To a
snook (or redfish, or trout, or tarpon), that is
irrelevant. So long as the light shines on or in
the water and is regularly lit after dark, it's an
oasis. They'll be there waiting when the light
comes on. A steady source of calories means
a greater chance of survival, and in the wild
that's really the only game.
Snook are so well-known for this behavior
that underwater fish lights are commonly called


i-,r .,,ii it ''' 1ih.liii Ii ''i,''i i' ,Ii,' i ,Ji i 'jj l, i[
catching snook around lights, see Capt. Josh Greer's
column on page 23.

snook lights. When the purpose is attracting
fish, lights are usually green in color. This isn't
the color most attractive to snook it's the
color most attractive to plankton. Actually, red,
yellow and orange also work, but green light
is visible from farther away underwater. White
light, which comprises all visible wavelengths,
will bring in plankton and small fish as well.
If the goal is attracting fish, an underwater
light is more efficient. When a light is mounted
above water, a percentage of the light will be
lost to reflection. Naturally, there are disadvan-
tages to underwater lighting, mostly relating
to putting light bulbs underwater. Electrical
devices and salt water are never truly going
to be friends, so a properly designed and built
system is paramount.
That's why low-cost underwater lights are
rarely a bargain. Sure, they cost less up front
- but when your light or control box needs to
be replaced in six months, how much money
are you saving in the long run? A quality
single-bulb system will generally run $350
to $450. Naturally, systems with two or more
bulbs cost more, and it would be easy to drop
$1,500 on a high-end underwater lighting
setup. On the low side, you can get portable
systems for less than $50 and permanent
installs for $150. All I can tell you is you get
what you pay for caveat emptor.


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4 8-oz snook fillets A clip-n-save seafood
1/2 tsp salt recipe provided by
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
1/3 cup fresh lime juice
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes

Sprinkle snook with salt and pepper. Grill over medium heat, turning once, until it flakes easily with
a fork (about 10 minutes). In a small saucepan, combine butter, lime juice, cilantro, and red pepper
flakes. Cook over medium heat 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with grilled snook. Serves 4.


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher

If you're planning to bring home a snook for
dinner this fall, you hopefully already know
that there is a slot limit. Your keeper snook has
to measure between 28 and 33 inches from
the tip of its snout to the end of the tail, with
the tail fin squeezed to its maximum length.
But how did fisheries regulators arrive at this
particular slot limit?
Actually, it kind of happened by accident.
Back in 1953, the Florida Marine Fisheries
Commission enacted a minimum size limit of
18 inches on snook. A minimum size limit is
one of the most basic ways to protect a fish
population, by ensuring that more fish grow
to a mature size. There was no bag limit until
1957, when it was set at four per day. Buying
or selling snook was also outlawed. At the
time, it was believed that if commercial pres-
sure were removed, there would be no need for
any additional regulation. And since fish that
were commercially harvested were perceived
to be at greater risk, research funds were real-
located from snook to other species.
The rules didn't change until 1981, when
the bag limit was cut in half. A closed season
in June and July was established the following
year to protect spawning snook. Another
closure for January and February, intended
to prevent people from harvesting cold-
stunned snook was put in place in 1983.
The closures were not made permanent until
1985, when August was added to the off-limits
months.
Also in 1985, the minimum size was raised
to 24 inches again, a move intended to
ensure more fish survived to reproduce. A the
same time, a maximum length of 34 inches
was established to provide additional protec-
tion to larger fish, which had become quite
rare in most areas. An angler could still bring
home one fish bigger than 34 inches, but the
other had to be in the 24- to 34-inch slot. In
1999, the lower end of the slot was raised 2
inches to 26 inches.
So far, so good. You can see how we got from
there to here. But there's something regula-
tors didn't know at the time: Snook are born
male and (usually) change to females as they
grow older. It's called (stick with me here, this
ooo


is a $25 term) protandric hermaphroditism. In
common snook, females smaller than 19 inches
are rare. By the time they reach 24 inches,
about 50 percent of snook have switched from
male to female. At 32 inches, about 80 percent
of the fish have turned female.
No one knew about that. It wasn't widely
known in the scientific community until 1998,
and the first study that really discussed the
ins and outs of it, such as at what size the fish
switch sex, was published in 2000.
You might expect that such information
would be a game-changer. The slot limit,
intended to protect immature fish from
harvest while also keeping some of the big fish
in the water, was instead leading to directed
harvest of fish that had just turned female.
They had probably had multiple chances to
spawn as males, since males can be sexually
mature from less than 10 inches long, but a
fish at the lower end of the slot had only a
50/50 shot of having changed sex. Most would
have never laid eggs.
With that data now available, the obvious
move would be to lower the slot limit. Some-
thing like 20 to 28 inches would have made
good sense: A 20-inch male would have prob-
ably had the opportunity to spawn, and fish
more than 28 inches are distinctly more likely
to be female. A 28-inch snook, protected from
harvest, would have several more productive
spawning seasons ahead of here.
Instead, the FWC has since added 2 inches
to the lower limit and taken one off the top,
in addition to lowering the bag limit to one
fish. With what we now know about snook
biology, that doesn't seem to make a lot of
sense. Adding to the aggravation, very large
snook are totally off-limits. If you catch a new
world-record snook in Florida, you'll be letting
it go. This, despite the fact that truly large fish
are also old, and very likely past their peak
spawning capacity.
So here's an idea: What about a 23- to
28-inch slot, plus a $50 tag to harvest a single
snook over 38 inches? The slot would still be
5 inches, so harvest numbers shouldn't go up,
but we'd be harvesting more males and fewer
females. Plus, being able to take the oldest
and largest fish would open up habitat and
food resources for snook still in their reproduc-
tive prime. Anybody with me?


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'4 *., rea Page 27 August 29,2013


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Snook love whitebait and shrimp. There's
no denying it it's simple fact. But snook
are also readily caught on a variety of artificial
lures, and to me that's a whole lot more fun.
Often, the key is to trigger a reaction strike.
These fish are known to reach out and hit
something just because it aggravates them.
Of course, they're also known to sit there with
their mouths sewn shut while a shrimp tickles
them on the nose. Let's ignore the frustra-
tion factor and put together a tacklebox of
Charlotte Harbor snook lures.
The very first thing I'd put in my snook tack-
lebox is an assortment of swimbaits. These are
no-brainer lures. They look like fish, they swim
like fish, and if you lose one it doesn't break
the bank. Actually, they're probably the most
inexpensive way to fish other than catching
your own bait. They're made in a huge variety
of colors and in sizes from 2 to 7 inches.
I like a slow retrieve with swimbaits. When
you cast it, don't start reeling as soon as it hits
the water. Let it sink a bit let it get down
low to where the snook are. As you reel it,
throw some pauses in there so it can drop, like
a dying baitfish would.
The color and size you use usually depends
on what type of baitfish are in the area. First
you should try to match the bait. If I'm on the
beach at Boca Grande and there are 4-inch
greenbacks swimming around and 6-inch
whiting darting around on the sand, I'm going
to try to match my lure's color and size to one
of those baits. If that doesn't work, then I'll try
to match the other bait.
If I'm still not getting hit, it's time to try a
contrasting color. If your white lure isn't doing
it, go just the opposite and try a root beer color.
White with a red head is also a local standard.
Bone, glow, chartreuse and black back with an
orange belly usually have a place in my box, but
there are really no colors that haven't caught a
snook somewhere at some time.
Snook can get picky. Sometimes you have
to go through the size scale to find what they
want. They might be ignoring 3- or 4-inch baits
but eager to hit a 2-inch version. Size is often
even more important than color, which is why
it pays to have a good selection of swimbaits.
Fortunately, they're cheap.
Sometimes you can't match the hatch
because you can't see what the snook are
feeding on. In that case, you'll need to have
a variety of lures so you can try several out.
You could also try throwing a castnet -
not for the snook, but to see what sort of
baitfish are out there.
Spoons are the next thing I would put in
my tacklebox. They make great search baits
- you can cast and cover a lot of distance,
making it easier to find where the snook are
hanging out. Also, snook love them. Spoons
come in many shapes and weights. I would go
with an eighth- or quarter-ounce Krocodile,


Silver Minnow, Sprite, Aqua Dream or Wahoo.
Sometimes a bit of tinsel or dressing on the
hook will make a big difference. Spoons with
treble hooks tend to spin in the water, so be
sure to use a swivel. I'd rather have the swivel
attached directly to the spoon than between
my line and leader. When your reeling the
spoon in, slow it down or stop it every once
in a while to let it fall. This imitates a dying
baitfish, and that kind of apparent vulner-
ability can trigger the reaction strike you're
looking for predators take advantage of
the weak.
Bucktail jigs are a great and classic choice.
They've been around for a long time and are
very popular with older anglers but sometime
overlooked by the younger crowd.
There are literally thousands of hard lures
on the market topwater lures, subsurface
lures, suspending lures, lipped lures that dive
below the surface, lipless sinking lures that
sink due to weight. As with your swimbaits,
look to match what forage species are in the
area. If there are mullet, don't throw a pinfish
imitation. The more your lure looks like what
the snook are going after already, the more
likely you are to get hit.
Treble hooks are used on almost all hard
lures and many spoons. I don't mind using
lures that have them, but they can be scary
for some people, especially when they're
trying to land a fish and it's shaking its
head, trying to avoid being caught. A lot
of anglers have a legitimate fear of being
hooked because they've been hooked before
or seen somebody else hooked. It's pretty
easy to flatten the barbs of the hooks, or you
can switch the stock hooks out with barbless
treble hooks, regular J-hooks or even circle
hooks. A good pair of needlenose pliers is
very handy for removing hooks from fish (and
from you, if need be). I also suggest carrying
a solid pair of side cutters that are strong
enough to clip through hooks, just in case.
The cutters on your fishing pliers won't do it.
Lures with single hooks, such as swimbaits
or single-hook spoons, are less likely to cause
serious injuries to snook and other fish. Some-
times you'll have a fish miss the lure or get
away because you only have one hook. Guess
what? That's just part of fishing. If you want to
catch them all, use dynamite.
Working a lure for snook is a bit different
from when you're targeting redfish or trout.
Redfish generally feed on the bottom, grub-
bing around in grass or mud. They like a bait
that doesn't move fast or far. Now look at a
snook. That fish is built for speed. Whitebait
are maybe a snook's favorite food. If you've
ever tried to castnet whitebait, you know
how quick they are getting out from under
a falling net. I work a lure slowly for redfish
and trout, but a retrieve like that may not be
fast enough for a snook.


Sometimes you'll have two or three snook
following your lure, which leads to a competi-
tion to see which fish can eat the lure first.
Usually it's the smallest one; smaller fish are
faster, more agile and generally less experi-
enced, so they're more likely to hit lures.
JeffKincaid is the owner and operator of
Capt. Ted's Tackle in Port Charlotte. Contact him
at CaptainTedsTackle.com or 941-627-6800, or
stop in at the shop (1189 Tamiami Trail, in front
oflngman Marine).


JEFF'S TOP
THREE SNOOK LURES
FOR CHARLOTTE HARBOR
1.Sebile Stick Shadd 90
in Amber Fashion color
2. Live Target Mullet wakebait
3. MirrOlure Lil John, Golden Bream, on
a 1/4-oz chartreuse jighead






,a_____,_Isv Page 28 August 29,2013

UI:SIN S e i] TO MMI I' NLlT


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The Skunk Ape Trilogy

Part 2: Beneath the planet of the Skunk Ape


I tried so very, very hard to slip quietly
out of the WaterLine offices without telling
anyone where I was going. I really did.
Unfortunately, news has a way of traveling
fast around a news office. I suppose I should
have seen that sort of thing coming. I made
it all the way to the front door before some
co-workers called me over.
It was Pam Staik, editor of the Punta Gorda
Herald, and Garry Overbey, deputy editor for
the Charlotte Sun.
Me: Hey guys, what's up?
Pam: Oh, not much, we just wanted to wish
you luck on your big new assignment.
Me: (sigh) So you heard? Look, I'm just going
to go talk to some guy and write a little puff
piece to fill some space.
Garry: Yeah, that's cool...so, if you manage
to catch Bigfoot, are you going to keep him as
a pet?
Me: This isn't about Bigfoot. It's the lame
Florida version. Skunk Ape.
Pam: So, if you catch a stump ape -
Me: Skunk!
Garry: So, if you catch a skunk, are you
going to keep it as a pet?
Pam: Oh! You can call him Pepe le Pew!
Me: Look, I know what you two are doing,
and you're not gonna bother me. I haven't
believed in this stuff since I was in junior high.
I didn't even want to go, but Josh gets some
kind of sick pleasure out of sending me off to
the middle of nowhere.
Garry: Alright man, well, have fun chasing
Grape Ape.
Me: Skunk Ape!
I ignored an intern who started heading
my way, and dashed out to the parking lot.
Just as I clicked my seat belt in place, execu-
tive editor Chris Porter pulled into the space
next to mine.
Chris: Hey! Tommy! What's going on man?
Me: Oh, hey Chris! Just heading off on a
little assignment. I'll be back in a couple of
days.
Chris: Great, great...oh, well hey man,
before I forget, the Loch Ness Monster called.
He said he's looking to come in and do a sit-
down interview. He's got a new book coming
out and -
I guess I didn't need to slam the car door as
hard as I did, but I was in a hurry. A hurry to
rush off to the swamp and be miserable. I was
heading to a place called Okalooskapooska. I
wasn't quite sure whether that was the name
of a lake, a town, or some kind of practical
joke. Come to think of it, there are lots of
places around Florida with names that sound
like either a really poor attempt at co-opting
native tongues, or the natives themselves
just having a good laugh at our expense.
I had a map, and a contact. From the looks
of the map, whatever Okalooskapooska was,
it was deep in the middle of nowhere and
surrounded by a bountiful harvest of abso-
lutely nothing. That's pretty much the story of


most of central Florida that hot, muggy,
bleak place that sits between the beaches
and coastal cities. You know, the reasons
why people actually come here (they aren't
coming here for swamp buggy tours, if you
catch my drift). Unless you are in the business
of making money off of a cartoon mouse,
nothing good has ever happened to anyone
in central Florida. My gut told me this would
be no different. My gut was also telling me it
wanted some Mexican food, but that isn't the
best idea when you are about to drive around
for a couple of hours in the middle of August.
What I'm saying here is, sometimes my gut is
an idiot.
I started to get worried when the map had
me leave the main drag and start heading down
a series of back roads. My worry turned to deep
concern when I next had to turn down one of
those creepy farm roads you pass sometimes
way out in the country. You're not supposed to
go down those roads. You are only supposed
to leave those roads. Preferably in a hurry. The
only good reason to head down one of those
roads is if you are tied up in the trunk of a car.
Those roads don't even have actual names. Just
numbers. This one was Farm Road 871. I assume
871 is the number of people that disappeared
without a trace on that road last year.
My deep concern morphed into full-blown
heebie-jeebies when that stupid, stupid
map had me heading down a dirt road for 20
minutes. I was just about to call the whole
thing off, head back to the office, and just


make everything up (I've never done that
before in this column, but it sure felt like a
good time to start). Suddenly, I came upon a
clearing. And in this clearing, a town! Okaloos-
kapooska! It wasn't a joke! Well, technically it
was a total joke, but the town was absolutely
real. Also, small. And gross.
I suppose I should point out that I am using
the word town as loosely as possible. Okaloos-
kapooska consisted of several ramshackle
structures connected by rotting boardwalks.
The buildings were battling the swamp, and
the swamp was clearly winning. I couldn't
help but notice that my Trans Am was the only
vehicle not sporting a camo paint job. Darkness
was descending, and that did nothing for the
already gloomy proceedings.
The largest building was called Okalooska-
pooska Feed & Supply, which also served as
the post office, the police department, and
town hall.
This brings us to my contact. Mr. Billy Bob
Dufur. Because of course that would be his
name. That's the kind of name that can't be
pronounced properly without a mouthful of
chaw. While wearing a Bass Pro Shops jacket.
Billy Bob was milling about in the back of
the store, next to an ice cream cooler that
looked like it was made out of rust and hatred.
Me: Dr. Billy Bob, I presume?
Billy Bob: Ain't no doctor.
Me: No, no; it's a reference ... to ... some-
thing. Nevermind. I'm Tommy. From WaterLine
Magazine.


Billy Bob: You here about the gator hunt?
Me: No, no I'm here about your sighting.
Your Skunk Ape sighting.
Billy Bob tensed up. He was silent for a
moment.
Billy Bob: I think I need a chipwich. You
need a chipwich?
He made his way over to the ice cream
cooler. I was astonished to feel a gust of
cool, refreshing air rush out at me when Billy
Bob opened the door. I had been certain the
machine was well on its way to becoming to
centerpiece of a hoarder's lawn.
Me: You know, I do need a chipwich. Very,
very much.
Billy Bob: Mmhmm. Chipwich is proof of a
higher power. Reagan said that.
Me: Umm, did he? I must have missed that
one...can't say he was wrong, though.
Billy Bob: So, what do you want with Skunk
Ape?
Me: Oh, I lent him some Whitesnake records
a few months ago, and he's been ducking me
ever since.
Billy Bob: White...snipe? Huh?
Me: No, no, snake. I see what you did there...
look, my editor told me you reported a Skunk Ape
sighting. I'm gonna be honest with you. I don't
believe in any of this stuff. I haven't since I was
a kid. But if you give me a good story, I promise
I'm not gonna trash you in print or anything.
Billy Bob: I know what kind of story you want
to write. You want to write that kind of "listen
to the silly redneck" garbage. You're hoping I'd
reek of shine, sit here and tell you about how I
just picked up my sister for a date, when all of
a sudden, in the roadway, it stepped out. And
it looked at us, and we knew by the look in its
eyes, that it was fixin'to do something awful.
Me: Uh, well, kinda...
Billy Bob: Well, I don't blame you. Makes for
a good read. But It isn't that simple. Mostly I've
just found tracks. The supply shed gets tossed
occasionally. Stuff like that. But two weeks ago,
on the way out to my truck, I caught a bit of
somethin'movin'out of the corner of my eye.
By the fence. Just a glimpse. It was tall. Next
morning, I found some hairs and a bit of blood.
Down low, like whatever it was, it tore its leg up.
Me: You actually found some hairs?
Billy Bob: Yup. Stunk like you wouldn't
believe. So I conducted a rudimentary DNA
analysis and was surprised to find -
Me: Wait, you did what?!
Suddenly, the lights in the store dimmed,
then failed. I heard the ice cream cooler
kicking to a halt. Then, silence.
Billy Bob: Uh oh.
Tonmmy Von Voigt really has no business being
in, on or even near the water. His interests are
lni trivia, classic cars and rock n roll music.
If you see him around town, don t even try to
talk to him about hshing, boating or any such
things. It would just be a waste of your time.
If you would like to bother him, e-mail him at
tvonvoigt. ,sun- herald.com.


2 tsp minced fresh ginger recipe provided by
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
1 cup chopped green onion


1 tsp curry powder
2 tsp red curry paste
1/2 tsp ground cumin
4 tsp soy sauce
1 tbsp brown sugar
1/2 tsp salt, divided
1 14-oz can coconut milk
2 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
4 6-oz snook fillets, skinned


- Recipe adapted
from food.cor


Preheat broiler. Heat 1/2 teaspoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add ginger
and garlic; cook 1 minute. Add peppers and onions; cook 1 minute. Stir in curry powder, curry
paste, and cumin; cook 1 minute. Add soy sauce, sugar, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and coconut milk; bring
to a simmer (but do not boil). Remove from heat and stir in cilantro. Brush fish with remaining
1/2 teaspoon oil and 1/4 teaspoon salt and place on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray.
Broil 7 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. Serve fish on a bed of basmati
rice, topped with sauce and garnished with lime wedges.


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'4 pc. revat Page 29 August 29,2013


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inans.au.munmusaumuaummmm.hboum.


Editor'snote: Although Tom
has passed away, his writing is still
in demand. Therefore, we will re-run
one ofhis columns each month.


U'


uu


I


,to cooking


Editor's note: This column was written way
backin 2005, when the slot limit forsnook was
26 to 34 inches.
I recently did two things for the first time.
Number one, I caught a keeper snook on
an artificial lure (hoo-rah!) Number two,
I participated in the snook's pan-to-plate
process in other words, I cooked my first
fish. More on that later.
Remember my stunted efforts to obtain free
promotional fishing gear from manufacturers?
Basically, it was a flop, but a couple of compa-
nies did mail me some nice stuff. Yo-Zuri lures
sent me a 3D Minnow, which I decided to test
from the seawall around the El Jobean Bridge.
It was just after sunset when I climbed down
the rocks to the water's edge.
On my very first cast, a hungry snook (I
didn't know it was snook yet) darted out of the
bridge shadows and clamped his jaws down on
my rig. There were a few adrenaline-pumping
moments as my quarry dodged up and down
the seawall. It was a fun (and a little scary)
battle. Eventually I got him in close.
OK, now what? Here I am alone without
a net. How am I going to yank him onto the
seawall? The snook was still doing a good
share of thrashing. I was running out of time,
so I thought,"Heck, I'll just give him a quick lift
and trust my 10-pound-test line." Amazingly,
it worked. As I pinned him on the cement, I
rummaged through my tackle box and found
my rusty measuring tape (lack of use). It was a
close call size-wise, but he was 26.5 inches and
somewhere around 7 pounds.


Next problem was job-related. They like me
to take pictures of my escapades at WaterLine.
I think they are saving the photos for a "what
not to do" book. I had my camera, but did you
ever try to take a picture of yourself holding
up a squirming fish? I got three flash pictures
of my nose hairs and gave up. I headed home
with my snook.
Now comes part two. I know this is going to
sound weird, but I have never actually cooked
a fish. My wife does all the cooking in my
household. Now hold on. This arrangement
has nothing to do with me clinging to some
Puritan principle that a woman's place is in
the kitchen. The fact is, I tried meal prepara-
tion early in my marriage. But I caused such
rampant destruction that my wife had to take
over. Hey, macaroni and cheese is not as simple
as it's cracked up to be!
You see, I never really had the chance to
graduate into frying fish. For one thing, I am
just getting started as an angler. And when I
was single, I simply ate over the sink. I lived
on canned chili, Oreos, popcorn and beer for
10 years. I had no reason to turn on the oven,
except for the occasional frozen pizza.
Look, I am not proud of my separation from
the stove. And considering my current occupa-
tion, it would behoove me to learn how to cook
fish. But I have some bitter flavor memories
that are blocking my enthusiastic re-entry into
the kitchen.
My mother waited until her children left
home to become a culinary wizard. That's why
I usually steer clear of any restaurant that
advertises food "just like mama used to make."


Friday night was fish night when I was a kid.
There were usually two choices: Thaw out the
anonymous fillets from my dad's fishing trip in
some prior decade, or pull out the fish sticks.
Both tasted like fried furnace filters. They left
your throat feeling like you had just ridden
horseback down a dusty road. Add a few
random fish bones, and you had a meal that
would scare away POWs. So you can under-
stand why I never gained the willingness to try
preparing fish on my own ... until now.
After savoring the many varieties of
saltwater fish taken fresh from the sea, I am
amazed by the unique (and utterly deli-
cious) flavors. I always ask the person I am
fishing with how to prepare my catch. I pass
that information on to my wife, and after
adjusting for my flawed repetition abilities,
she is usually able to cook up a wonderful
feast. Lately, my wife has said that she is
willing to turn the oven mitt over to me
for some exploratory action. This is a major
concession for her, but I'm not sure how to
feel about it. I'm still a little leery of parading
into this hot zone. Maybe she will chain me
to the microwave and I will become the cook
for every meal. Remember the domino effect
of Communism? But I guess it's time for me to
grow up and face the challenge.
I honestly didn't know there were so many
ways to cook fish. Some seem almost foolproof
(a word close my heart). For instance, mahi-
mahi would have been impossible to ruin. A
pan, some butter, a little salt and poof you
have a great meal. Others required more work,
sometimes even reading recipes. But I discov-


ered that the short preparation process was
well worth it. Baked pompano with almonds
is better than any steak I have ever tasted.
That is quite a declaration from a man who
once believed that eating fish of any kind was
meant as a payment for my sins.
Being a computer nerd, I did an online poll
to find out local anglers' (mostly boat guides)
favorite fish to eat. The results (with a 100
percent margin of error) were interesting. It
looks like grouper took the number-one slot.
I guess I expected something more exotic.
There were some top picks that I have not had
the benefit of catching yet, like hogfish and
speckled hind.
My wife was out of town the day after I
hooked my snook. So I insinuated myself
into my neighbor's kitchen with the promise
of a shared meal. They grew up surrounded
by commercial fishermen and have some
kitchen savvy. I know what you are saying:
Frying fish is a snap. Nobody could screw
that up. Well, I came close. Always remember
to zip your Zip-Loc bag full of cornmeal
before you shake up your fillets. But I was
eventually able to prepare my fish and we
had a wonderful dinner.
My wife won't be back for a few more days.
If I catch some fish in the interim, maybe
I'll try cooking them in my own kitchen. You
might hear a bunch of clattering pans as you
drive down the coastline. Don't worry; it's
probably just me making lunch. But I will ask
a tiny favor. If you see a guy with a flaming
beard running down the street, please contact
the appropriate authorities. Thank you.


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g4 cr Page 30 August 29,2013


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher
Everybody knows snook are saltwater fish,
right? Well, if that's what you think, I have bad
news: You're wrong. Snook are quite comfort-
able living in fresh water. In fact, some live
their whole lives in fresh water.
Most fish that live in Charlotte Harbor can
tolerate a fairly wide range of salinities. Fish
that can adapt to changes in salt content are
called euryhaline (yoo-ree-HAY-leen), and that
label applies to most of our inshore gamefish:
Redfish, trout, tarpon, mangrove snapper,
Goliath grouper and even largemouth bass
are euryhaline. Fish that are unable to adapt
to salinity changes are called stenohaline;
examples include marlin and golden shiners.
Not all euryhaline fish are created equal. Toss
a bass into straight seawater or a Goliath into
a freshwater pond, and you'll have a very dead
fish in short order. But some fish are highly
adaptable, moving back and forth from fresh
to salt water with ease. Those fish are called
amphidromous species, and snook are on that
list. They are equally at home in the Gulf of
Mexico and 30 miles up the Peace River. Their
preferred habitat, though, is brackish water.
A lot of people seem to have a misunder-
standing of what "brackish" means. It doesn't
mean murky, dirty or stagnant water; it
simply means water less salty than seawater
but saltier than fresh water. Salt content is
measured in parts per thousand. Fresh water is
less than 0.5 ppt salt. Salt water is more than
30 ppt salt. Anything in the middle is consid-
ered brackish. Water that has between 0.5 and
5 ppt salt is called low brackish. Most snook
species prefer to live in low brackish water.
But the one we all want to catch, the common
snook, tends to be found more often in water
with 10 to 30 ppt salt at least when the
temperature is warm enough for their comfort.


Snook need salt water to spawn, which is
a summertime activity. Over the years, there
have been many reports of snook spawning in
local canals and creek mouths. Fish may actu-
ally be attempting to spawn in such locations,
but snook sperm are not active in fresh or low
brackish water, so the eggs are not fertilized.
Maximum sperm motility is seen in marine
conditions, which is why most spawning activity
takes place in the nearshore Gulf of Mexico.
In winter, adult snook often move into low
brackish or fresh water. Although reasons
for this are not fully explained, they must be
seeking warmer water temperatures. Perhaps
the typically dark bottom and darker water


of local rivers and canals absorbs more heat.
More likely, they are instinctively seeking
refuge in warm-water springs, most of which
have stopped flowing due to development and
overpumping of groundwater.
Not every individual snook follows this
migration pattern of moving upriver in winter
and out to the Gulf in summer. Some seem
perfectly happy staying in one place year-
round, and so there are always fish in the
rivers, hanging out at local bridges, in the
canals and even out on nearshore reefs in the
Gulf. Some have no choice, having been swept
into ponds or backwaters by extra-high tides
or through drainage pipes as juveniles, with


no way out as adults. A few have been stocked
in area ponds and lakes by anglers Webb
Lake had a few before the 2010 freezes killed
them off or even found their way up the
Caloosahatchee into Lake Okeechobee, where
some snook are caught every year (Okeechobee
fish are considered to be in the Atlantic popu-
lation for purposes of size limits and seasons).
Basically, here's what it comes down to:
There might be a snook or two in just about
any Southwest Florida body of water. So if one
whacks a topwater plug at your favorite bass
spot or eats the pinfish you were hoping to
catch a grouper on, try to not be too terribly
surprised.


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r_______r__It Page 31 August 29, 2013

IEEEE::EE E E


IWansEu mmu dr-'mEummmu hAm.


Lee Anderson, our esteemed
WaterLine editor, called me
recently to inform me about a
special issue of WaterLine. I'm
not always in the loop, and this was my
first special assignment. I was so excited
to see his name on the caller ID that I
answered, even though I was at work
at Peace River Wildlife Center in an area
with poor cellular reception while I was
juggling a snarling baby raccoon in one
hand and examining a red-shouldered
hawk's broken wing with the other.
Normally, I'm happily babbling on about
baby birds, fallen falcons or orphaned
opossums when every other writer in
the issue is spouting serious knowledge
about terrorizing tarpons, bodacious
boats or, more recently, fabulous
fashion. Seriously, Lee? Fashion? Josh
had a hand in that decision, didn't he?
I must admit I was even more surprised
when I discovered this issue was focusing
on Snooki. To tell you the truth, I didn't
really know who she was. Of course,
I'd heard the name I'm not from
Minnesota! But I had to Wikipedia her
to find out exactly why she is famous. It
turns out she is famous for, well, being
famous. It seems like there is a lot of
that going around lately. (See Ozzy
Osbourne's entire family. Why couldn't
my father have taken to biting the heads
off bats instead of joining the Navy?)
Even so, this seems like a bit of a stretch,
even for such a progressive magazine
as WaterLine. First there was the bikini
issue, now Snooki. Maybe it's time for
y'all to come in out of the sun.
I understand the in-depth coverage
of sunglasses. My own husband, Dave,
drank that Kool-Aid years ago. I buy
my sunglasses based on price (the
lower the better), and whether or not
they will rip out my hair when I perch
them on top of my head. Some of them
even say they are"polarized" (a highly
valued asset by aficionados of expensive
sunglasses.) As far as I can tell, all that
means is that I can't see the display on my
phone while wearing them. So now my
wonderful husband, who usually leaves
his sunglasses on his chair or the roof
of the car, will wear nothing less than a
$500 pair of Costas. Do you think they call
them that because they"Cost-a" lot when
he sits on them or drives over them? He
swears they enable him to see fish. He is
constantly pointing out these so-called
fish that he sees. "Look at that beautiful
12-inch snook with the star-shaped
birthmark 2 mm from the lateral canthus
of his right eye!" he says. When I fail to
see what he is talking about, he points
it out to me. "See that slight riffle in the
water over there? It's right under that.
The water is just teeming with snook
today." I don't see them. I never do. For
the amazing fish vision (Fision? No, whole
different can of worms. But what a great
brand name for fishing glasses, right?)
these glasses impart, they sure don't


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seem to help him see any better on land.
In his next breath, in that stern Dad voice,
it's,"Where is Kat (our teenage daughter)?
I told her not to wander off. We have to
make strategic plans for our next meal in
2.5 hours." I point out that she's just 2 feet
behind him. "See that ruffle of sand? She's
standing right on top of that."
How many fish are on a team anyway?
Is it like a basketball team, where you've
got five players on the court and another
five on the bench? Or is it more like a
football team, with 45 active players on
the roster for any given game? Wikipedia
defines "teeming" as the precisely vague
number offish needed to keep the wife
from returning to land, home or shop-
ping. It also suggests the word fisherman
is synonymous with big fat liar. And
teenager is defined as a 13- to 19-year-
old human whose eyes are continuously
rolled to the top of his or her head
whenever near his or her parents. The
best thing about Wikipedia is that you
can make your own suggestions and
edits when they have something wrong.
I do that a lot. They must be pretty busy
over there because they haven't actually


made any of the changes I've suggested
yet, but I'm sure it will happen any day.
Speaking offish, I think snook would
make a whole lot more sense for a
special issue of WaterLine than a "Snooki
special." I think I'll give Lee a call and
suggest that. My imminent success with
Wikipedia corrections has given me the
bravado to branch out into other areas of
expertise. I'm sure if Lee and Josh imple-
ment my suggestion, it's only a matter
of time until I'm solving such issues as
Obamacare and which way the toilet
paper should face.
Peace River Wildlife Center is a
nonprofit organization, dedicated to the
care, preservation and protection of Char-
lotte County's native wildlife since 1978.
They are open 7 days a week year-round,
including holidays. Tours are offered
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. PRWCreceives no
government funding and relies entirely
on private donations. For more info, or
ifyou would like to volunteer or make
a donation (including aluminum cans),
visit PeaceRiverWildlifeCenter.com, email
PeaceRiverWildlife@yahoo.com or call
941-637-3830.


ReelShark.com e
941-416-80471 O

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a t rifle s c o e s 1 pound snook fillets, skinned A clip-n-save seafood
i gi n 3 cups spinach leaves recipe provided by
1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese 0/Q I
1/4 cup Kalamata olives, chopped

and sighting alfhs few
Salt and pepper to taste Recipe from it t it.
all-fish-seafood-recipts. im


Summer is almost over. In another month
or so we might see a subtle change in the
weather, and maybe the first cold front will
come sliding down and take away this hot
muggy weather. I know, welcome to the
tropics. I love Florida weather, but I look
forward to the end of summer and the things
that fall may bring, including hunting season.
It'll also be time to pick my muscadine grapes
to make my wine for the winter and to get my
vegetable garden ready to plant. I'll drag out
my trusty Winchester .30-06 and take it to the
range to sight it in. It's kind of a yearly ritual,
and I seldom have to do very much to get
the old girl right on the money. I don't hunt
a lot these days, but each year in the fall, my
friend Dixie Hollins from Crystal River and Boca
Grande calls me and my old pals from high
school about our annual "hoodlum hunt" at his
ranch. It's an event that I look forward to with
much anticipation. It's not just the hunt it's
three days of great fellowship, food and drink,
campfire stories, assorted lies and, yes, some
pretty good hunting for hogs and deer. Before
I go, I want to make sure that my rifle is ready
and capable of putting the shot where it must
go for a clean and sportsmanlike kill. I owe it
to myself and to my quarry to make sure that
this takes place if I should get a shot.
So how do we accomplish this? At first
glance, this subject seems quite simple. But
believe me when I say that it is not. When you
talk about scopes and adjusting and sighting
them, there are a lot of things to consider.
There is so much material that I'm not even
going to try to cover it all in one column. We'll
take it a little at a time. Now, there are still a
few purists who hunt with iron sights and no
scope, but even in Florida where I've never
had a shot on a deer or hog at more than 200
yards most people still use a scope.
No matter what type of sights or scope you
use, to correctly sight in a rifle you need to
take yourself out of the equation as much as
possible. In order to do this, the gun must be
properly supported, or better yet, fixed in some
cooo


sort of a holding device. What we're trying to
achieve is the best shot the gun is capable of,
and no human being can consistently hold a
gun that still. Even if you intend to make the
shots unsupported or freehand, you need to
sight the gun from a solid fixed position. Now,
the cheapest way to do this would be off some
sort of support bags filled with sand, birdshot
or even rice. Once you bed a gun down on
these bags, you'll be able to hold it relatively
still to make your shots. There are a couple of
'em on the market with interesting names. One
is called a monster bag, the other a bully bag.
Some of the better gun and goodies companies
like Midway USA, Ellett Brothers or Brownell's
have them available in their catalogs. I've also
seen some old-time shooters take a piece of
6x6 and cut a V-shaped notch to rest the rifle
on, then set the stock of the rifle on a small
bag or even a folded towel. Doing it this way
is very basic; it'll do the job, but not with a lot
of precision. You may get one group of shots
where you want them, but if you lift the rifle
up and set it back down, it changes everything.
It depends on just how accurate you've got
to be. I've done it this way using just bags for
support and obtained pretty good results out
to about 200 yards.
A better way of doing this would be from a
sighting system, or a bench rest that mounts
the weapon and truly holds it still. These
"sleds" are designed to handle the recoil of a
big-bore rifle and still hold it in a fixed position
from shot to shot. You have to understand that
once you fire the gun, it can't move. If it moves
from the fixed position, the next shot is not
going to sight the same as the previous one.
With the gun mounted in a sled, you can fire
four or five rounds, stop and check your target,
make your scope adjustments and fire again
in the position. With that said, you can get far
more accuracy and make better adjustments
by zeroing in the weapon. These lead sleds can
run in prices ranging from around $60 to $300.
A bonus of owning one of these
systems is that it provides a really


Preheat oven to 400F. Place half the spinach in the bottom of a
casserole dish. Arrange the snook fillets on it, and top with rest of the spinach. Sprinkle with the
rest of the ingredients. Cover and bake at for 20 minutes.

i i, I 't ^ ,

4 6-ounce snook fillets, skinned A clip-n-save seafood
1/4 cup butter, softened recipe provided by
2 tsp chopped fresh chives
2 tsp orange juice
1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans, divided
1/4 tsp salt -Recipe from
Dash coarse ground black pepper all-fish-seafood-recpis.xom

Heat grill. Cut and grease two 12-inch square sheets of heavy-duty foil. With tip of sharp knife,
cut six 2-inch slits across center of foil. In small bowl, combine butter, chives, orange juice and 1. 4
cup of the pecans; mix well. Place foil on gas grill over medium heat or on charcoal grill 4-o-inih
from medium coals. Sprinkle fillets with salt and pepper. Place 2 fillets on each sheet of f:ol; :o:,ok
8-12 minutes or until fish flakes easily with fork, turning once. During last minute of cooking
time, top fish with pecan butter. Remove from heat; place on serving platter. Sprinkle with
remaining pecans and serve immediately. Serves 4.


2 skinned snook fillets, about 1-1/2 pounds each
1-1/2 cups Italian seasoned breadcrumbs
1 cup minced crabmeat
1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced finely
3 tbsp grated Romano cheese
1 clove garlic, crushed
3 tbsp olive oil
1 tomato, quartered in wedges
1/4 cup Italian salad dressing


A clip-n-save seafood
recipe provided by



Recipe adapted tiorn
all-fish-seafood-recpes.icomn


In a bowl, mix breadcrumbs, crabmeat, diced pepper, cheese, garlic and oil. Preheat oven :to
350F. Lay one fillet on a cutting board and score the center about halfway through. Spo:on
breadcrumb mixture into slit and on top of fillet. Cut a slit all the way through second fillet,
leaving about an inch uncut at each end. Lay second fillet on top of first, pressing down slightly
so breadcrumb stuffing is exposed through slit. Transfer stuffed fillets to lightly greased baking
pan. Put the tomato wedges on top and pour the salad dressing over all. Bake 45 to 60 minutes
or until done. Serves 8.


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*uu. Sni...I. U ,r l*un*nn_..uui. ^ im erfL Page 33 August 29,2013



Volusia, Flagler push ca41-42
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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) When Skip
Beeler strolled the smoke-free beaches of Cali-
fornia, he noticed the difference right away.
The beaches seemed more pristine than
the stretch of sand he was accustomed to on
Florida's Atlantic Coast.
"They just looked so much better and so
much cleaner,"said Beeler, who served as
mayor of Cocoa Beach and led an unsuccessful
fight to ban smoking on the beach there.
"We had some areas where it looked like you
were walking through sea shells, but it wasn't
seashells. It was cigarette butts:'
Here in Volusia and Flagler, smoking bans
are gaining momentum. Daytona International
Speedway prohibited smoking in the grand-
stands, a milestone for a sport that once was
closely tied to R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Embry-
Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona State
College and Stetson University have snuffed
out tobacco on campus.
Public health officials would like to extend
those bans even further by prohibiting
smoking on beaches and in parks. They point
to mounds of cigarette butts littering the
beaches and the dangers of secondhand
smoke as reasons why lighting up shouldn't
be allowed on Volusia and Flagler's shoreline.
But even if the political will existed locally
to enact such a ban, cities and counties are
prohibited from restricting smoking outdoors.
Only the state can make those changes.
Counties and cities can post signs asking the
public not to smoke, but state law leaves local
officials powerless to enforce the rules.
Teresa Williams, tobacco prevention
specialist for the Flagler County Health
Department, would like to see that change,
and she suspects many others in the commu-
nity would agree.
"We are starting to see a turn socially
in smoking" she said. "People are almost
becoming closet smokers. I'd like it turned over
to our locals and let them make the decision
for where we live:'
A bill filed in the Florida Legislature last
session would have done just that, but it
stalled. That put a stop to an effort in Flagler
County to nix smoking outside county buildings.
State Sen. Rob Bradey, who sponsored the


solid and stable place to clean your gun. One
of the more popular ones is made by Caldwell
and is priced about mid-range. A cheaper one
I noticed was made by Hyskore. They claim it's
simple to use and allows you to sight your rifle
in five minutes, and it works with both bolt-
action and semi-automatic guns. It also has
a cleaning tray to hold your solvents, patches
and brushes. It was priced at a modest $62.97.
To sight in, you just clamp your rifle into the
sled and tighten down all the holding points.
Get comfortable over your rifle, chamber a
round and get your cheek down on the stock
for a good spot weld. Then take the safety off,
get the crosshairs where you want them and
gently squeeze off the round, or "send it" as
they say in the military. If it seems to you like
I'm jumping too far ahead, I probably am. I just
want to give you a basic view of what has to
be done. I'll go back and start at the beginning
and talk about the scopes themselves.
OK, so you've decided to buy a scope. What
should you look for? One of the first things
you need to determine is what you expect this
scope to do. Is it to be used just at the shooting
range for target shooting? What distances do
you expect to shoot? Maybe it will be used
just for hunting and will be exposed to a much
harsher environment in all sorts of weather.
What about the caliber of the gun? Recoil
makes a difference. In what lighting conditions
do you expect to be shooting? Finally, let's not
forget the big thing the price. What are you
going to have to spend to put this thing on top
of your gun? Well, I can tell you this for sure: As
with most other things, you get what you pay
for. You can spend a little, and you can spend
a lot. Somewhere in the middle, you should be
able to reach a happy medium that will get you
a scope that will do what you want without
breaking the bank.
There's lots more to cover this just got


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bill, said he plans to introduce the legislation
again next session, but doubts it will pass in
the House, which was especially opposed to
giving local governments the ability to snuff
out beach smoking.
For Sally Wood, a Port Orange smoker, it
doesn't make sense to ban smoking outdoors.
She said she always throws away her cigarette
butts and tries to stay away from nonsmokers.
"You are not close enough to anyone to be
bothersome' she said between puffs.
Wood questioned how a ban on smoking at
the beach could affect tourism. Smoking rates
are on the decline nationally, but about two
out of every 10 adults in Volusia and Flagler
light up, according to Florida Department of
Health statistics.
The tourism community doesn't view a
smoking ban for beaches and parks as immi-
nent, said Bob Davis, president and CEO of
the Hotel and Lodging Association of Volusia
County. If local governments could make the
call, Davis said he would poll his membership
and decide how to respond.
Although Wood says she is careful not to
litter, beach cleanup crews report cigarette
butts are the most common type of trash
found on the shore, said Sallie O'Hara, who
coordinates litter pickup events for Friends
of A1A.
"We've got to address smoker behavior not
to dispose of cigarette butts on the beach;'she
said. "It's harmful to our environment and to
human health:'
The butts, which are picked up by the
bucketful during cleanup events, are eaten by
migratory birds and other wildlife, O'Hara said.
Earlier this year, the courts struck down
Sarasota County's prohibition against smoking
on beaches and in parks, along with a $100
fine for violating the ban.
Going forward, local government not the
state should be able to debate the issue,
said Pat Northey, a longtime Volusia County
councilwoman who said she would support a
smoking ban for beaches.
"Whenever you can govern at the local level,
it's the best government, because people who
can't travel to Tallahassee will get an opportu-
nity to express their views;' she said.


us started. Next week, we'll get into a more
technical look at scopes. We'll talk about things
like reticles, optical lenses, objective lenses,
bells, clarity, focus, scope bite, mounting
rings, windage and elevation, point of aim,
point of impact and a lot of other important
considerations. Sound like a lot? It is. My good
friend Bob Clim is coaching me with this article.
Bob has been doing this all his life, and when
it comes to guns, ballistics or pretty much
anything else to do with shooting, he is the
man. His writing, on the other hand not
so much. But the depth of knowledge that
he possesses on these subjects never ceases
to amaze me. I've been around guns since I
was a kid, and I come in contact with a lot of
knowledgeable people, but Bob's technical
firearms skills are unmatched. His under-
standing of ballistics and reloading high-power
rifle cartridges is pretty amazing to see. If you
have any technical questions about scopes or
ballistics, e-mail me and I'll see if I can get Bob
to answer them. If they're about scopes, we'll
work them into the next articles. If they're
about ballistics, I may do a column in the future
with questions and answers specifically about
making bullets do strange and mystical things.
Before closing, I'll give you a little bit of gun
trivia. Most everyone has heard of the saying,
"Let's give them the whole 9 yards:' In World
War II, the Browning .50-caliber machine gun,
aka "Ma Deuce;' had a belt of ammo that was
27 feet long. If you fired the whole box or belt
of ammo on an M2 Browning, you gave the bad
guy the whole 9 yards:'
Safe shooting.
Billy Carl is an NRA-certified firearms
instructor and is available for individual
instruction in firearms safety and concealed
carry classes. Contact him at 941-769-0767,
jcarll@embarqmail.com or through Sportrap
Gun Shop at 941-629-7775.


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Please call for pricing on this boat, available NOW!
We are Charlotte County's Com-Pac dealer.
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20' CUSTOM DUSKY CC NewT-Top incl upper &
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20'Team Sailfish, 1996, with trailer. Center console, live
well, motor Yamaha 130, 2 stroke, w/ SS prop, recently
tuned up trailer. New hubs, brakes, buddy bearings, and
tires, excellent condition, ready to launch and go fishing.
Was $7,900 REDUCED To: $6,900
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Boat &Trailer. Ready to ride! $4,395.
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this Boat is rated for 14 people! Turn Key!
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ndmo*;Smy er-v- ;" *w n oumm


A scientific call for



snook carcasses


Provided by King Fisher Fleet

To help monitor the health of Charlotte
Harbor's snook population with the season
now open, the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission needs the carcasses
of as many harvested snook as possible. If you
harvest a legal-sized snook, you can have the
fish for dinner and still help with the research
project by donating the filleted-out carcass. As
part of an ongoing study involving Charlotte
Harbor snook, the FWC will record the length
of the fish, examine the internal organs to
establish the sex of the fish, then remove
and examine an ear bone called an otolith to
determine the age of the fish.
Please do not harvest snook just for this
project, as the FWC would prefer that catch-


and-release be practiced as much as possible.
But if you do take a fish home for supper, then
the carcass is valuable to the research project.
You can remove the skin and meat, but leave
the internal organs intact and do not break the
backbone. A dropoff station for snook carcasses
has been established with the King Fisher
Fleet at Fishermen's Village Marina in Punta
Gorda, where snook carcasses may be dropped
off between 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days per
week. Other Charlotte County dropoff locations
include Stump Pass Marina (260 Maryland
Avenue, Englewood), Gasparilla Marina (15001
Gasparilla Road, Placida) and Captain Ted's
Tackle (1189 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte). For
more information on this program or to discuss
alternate pickup arrangements, call 941-255-
7403 or 727-896-8626.


a _L. _

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9^s~oasss fss


Research finds



carbon dioxide



harms marine life


Bloomberg News

LONDON Rising levels of carbon dioxide
are harming all forms of marine life because the
oceans are acidifying as they absorb the gas,
German researchers found.
Mollusks, corals and a class of creatures called
echinoderms that includes starfish and sea
urchins are the worst affected by the uptake
of C02 by the seas, according to a study in the
journal Nature Climate Change by researchers at
the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven. The
gas forms carbonic acid when it dissolves in the
oceans, lowering their pH level.
Creatures that show negative effects from
acidification include commercial species such
as oysters and cod. Given the pace at which
carbon-dioxide emissions are growing, human
emissions threaten to trigger extinctions at a
faster pace than die-outs millions of years ago,
according to the researchers.
"There is a danger that we're pushing things
too fast and too hard toward an evolutionary
crisis;' Hans-Otto Poertner, one of the authors,
said in a phone interview. "In the past, these
crises have taken much longer to develop:'
The research will be fed into the United
Nations' most detailed study into the science of
climate change, which is being published in three
parts and an overall summary by the end of 2014,
and is designed to inform international climate
treaty negotiations. The study will be input for the
second part of that report, by the UN's Intergov-
ernmental Panel on Climate Change, due to be
published at the end of March. The first part is
scheduled for publication on Sept. 27.
The researchers examined 167 previous
studies about the effects of acidifying oceans on
153 species, analyzing their findings and using
forecasts of future emissions to predict how they
might be affected as carbon-dioxide emissions


into the atmosphere grow. The oceans absorb
more than a quarter of man-made C02 emissions.
They found that at concentrations of C02 in
the atmosphere of 500 parts per million to 650
parts per million, negative effects outweighed
positive ones for corals, echinoderms, mollusks
and fish though not for crustaceans. At higher
concentrations, all categories of creatures were
harmed. C02 is currently just under 400 parts
per million, rising about 2 ppm to 3 ppm a year.
"All animal groups we considered are affected
negatively by higher carbon-dioxide concen-
trations" Astrid Wittmann, a biologist at the
institute and the report's other author, said in a
statement. "Corals, echinoderms and mollusks
above all react very sensitively to a decline in
the pH value:'
Negative effects include behavioral and
sensory changes that make fish less fearful of
predators, altered metabolism, and a slowing
of the rate at which mollusks can form shells.
Similar sensitivity to rising C02 can be observed
in the fossil records of extinctions that took
place 55 million years ago and 250 million years
ago respectively, Poertner said.
He cautioned that the study has limitations
because "you cannot do sufficiently long studies
to really mimic what will happen in 50 years:'
The research was designed to look solely at the
effects of the acidification caused by the carbon-
dioxide emissions, according to Poertner. When
the warming effects of the gas are also factored
in, it could accelerate negative effects because
the temperature a species can withstand in more
acidic conditions may be lower, he said.
"We are at a risk of causing extinctions;'
Poertner said."We cannot give with any
certainty the year when people will start to
report extinctions due to climate change. It
depends on what temperature change and C02
concentrations we allow:'


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1-1/2 pounds whiting fillets A clip-n-save seafood
2 cups crushed tomatoes recipe provided by
4 scallions, chopped /
1/4 cup lime juice 2,
3 tbsp canned green chilies, chopped
1 clove garlic, peeled and chopped Recipe adapted from www.
3 tbsp cilantro or parsley, chopped all-fish-seafood-recipes.com

Combine all ingredients except whiting and cilantro in a heavy nonstick skillet over medium high
heat. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Mix thoroughly and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to
medium low and simmer 10 minutes. Add whiting to skillet. Cover and simmer 10 minutes or
until fish flakes easily. Serve topped with tomato sauce and cilantro. Serves 4.


2L wUUU neULU VV LKA nUUIIU'.-al I'.:I .,1:,.
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23' 1997 Pro Line: Hardtop, new upholstery,
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Asking $13,900 Call Ray Mason
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'6'
;'"~~~
'iL- ~Ar





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.m.UU ..mmn.nl.. I.......nUwu.m.m


^t4M ,^., Page 35 *August 29,2013


~.iElpi~


'-K I


- .- in .m i


REDUCED!
23'1998 Sea Ray Bow Rider.V8 Mercrusier
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Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [A l N INA .-








24'98 Bayliner, Bravo 3,
300 HP, F/I, Full cabin, remote spotlight,
hot water, drop in air,
$14,900 (941)-613-1903


24' 1994 Robalo 2440 Cuddy: Great buy.T-top, rocket launch-
ers, livewell, galley and head. Powered by Twin 150 Mercs,
serviced on a regular basis. Lift kept and no bottom paint.
Asking only $12,900.
Call Ray Mason 941-505-7269.


v il


f .... ...... .... .. .. .. : .., f ... .
Clean with rasied console.T-Top Rocket launcehers, w/ Float in 8"
of water & can run way offshore. Best of both worlds. Rare Find!
Two live wells, fish boxes, hydrolic steering & more!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


I*M 1
la^K^ -^^^ *'""~~-
ti 20n'"J illrall C.:.ill Twnr i:.:..:.m : 1 I I.HPV Y n-m h
four strokes w/ only 110 hrs. Features include; hardtop, large
cockpit for fishing, cuddy cabin that sleeps 2 & built in head.
Boat was just detailed & ready to go.
Asking $46608 $39,900.
Call Ray Mason,
941-505-7269.


twin Yamaha 4 strokes, fully serviced, full enclosure,
livewell, AC, excellent condition.
Asking $57,000.
Ray Mason 941-505-7269

SOLD ...
h--OLD.li' "s


zo- wor VLat L vv i i L -,,VVI l wvlLII
twin 115hp Yamaha 4-strokes
Just serviced. $24,994.00.
B Ap JM.A INr Call Chris Murray
.A @941-698-4006








25 1 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter GPS with Sonar. Hard
Top, A/C! Comes w/Aluminum trailer. Call BAYSHORE
MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


26' 1989 BOCA GRANDE O,. l- 1 .-,i :':":":'
Call Richard Rosano for Details! 203-912-9511
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt. ONLY
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL INA


24' 2004 TRITO N .UU ""' "v 11111 ""V. I. .. u .J.cI L i"i.U
and out, just waxed, 5.7 Volvo w/289 hrs,
Superbly well kept loaded with extras. Also comes generator w/86 hrs, full camper enclosure.
with a complete full mooring and storage cover. Recent survey rated above average. Asking $34,000.
Also includes trailer. Call Ray Mason
$40,000 Call John @ 941-915-3575 941-505-7269.


24' CHAPARRAL 240, Loaded, full canvas &
screening, new engine 2009. Two biminis,
galley, enclosed head, sleeps 4, fridge,
inside storage, galvanized trailer.
$18,500. (941)-493-8320


26'8"1989 Sea Ray Sundancel 7.4 Meicuriser, Ilew
manifolds, risers & was just fully serviced. Fesh Water
Boat Clean! $10,990. Has been gone thru bow to stern.
Extra's! AC, Full Custom Cover,Tandem trailer. Sleeps 6.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


4' NOMAD NIMBLE 1999, 40HP Honda Outboard. 26' Pursuit Denali 2670: Excellenl condilion,T-200 Yamaha
Tandem axle trailer. Many extras. $29,000. four strokes w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure, windlass,
GV'4stal Cay Cente, elec. head, Garmin GPS and fishfinder. Asking $68,500.
--- wwwc tca om Call Cpt. Bob Babineau,
1W= T-2 ,o R -,* 941-626-1329


Here's how it works: Take
pictures of your outdoor
adventures. Send your
high-quality digital photos to
WaterLineMagazine@gmail.
com, or send prints by snail
mail to The Charlotte Sun,
23170 Harborview Road,
Port Charlotte, FL 33980,
ATTN: Lee Anderson. Include
a self-addressed stamped
envelope if you want your prints
returned to you.
PLEASE don't send us
photos of oversized or other
release-only fish being
poorly handled. Photos of
such fish being gaffed, held by
the lowerjaw only or obviously
damaged or dead WILL NOT
be published, no matter how
big the fish is or how proud the
angler may be.


-i,-
I





namoubUemIunn ;v;. inmnuummm


26 SEA HAY SUNUECK $45,91
Call Meagan McCall at 941-268-3
McCallMarineSales.com
By Appt ONLY! ,
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL .I1.. R l


21 2UUb ULATIMUN
With its beautiful condition and many fine
amenities, this boat is a must-have
for any boating enthusiast.
$34,000 Call John @941-915-3575


mmmmw--
27' 2006 SEA RAY AJ
This 27 Amberjack is the perfect all around
package. Engine has been updated
and shows 30 hrs.
$40,000 CALL JOHN @ 941-915-3575


v1 tJo IIl.fi l-uut 1 V nILII Ii H V LVlIII n -J'iilJJ
Honda 4-strokes yearr Warranty)
Loaded, with aluminum trailer. $95,000.00.
ADEL iM ARIN Call Chris Murray
AM J,- -' -NE s @941-698-4006
9^~ ~S~as~sssss.'^ss*"


28' 2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin,
310 dual prop AC, GPS, bridge enclosure,
electric head, full galley, 45 mph, only 90 hrs.
lift kept. Excellent condition.
$28,500. 941-639-7890.








28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000, T/250HP,Yamaha's,
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000,
941-966-5400








28 Chaparral 2002: NEW LISTING! Well appointed,
walk thru w/s, 2 staterooms, generator w/2 hrs,
T-5.0 Volvos, just detailed. A lot of boat for $38,900.
Call Ray Mason,
941-505-7269.
r


28' CruiserYacht 1998, 5.7 Twin Mere engines,
Full canvas covers, Many extras. $25,000.
CUrystal Cay Cente,
941 -39-6s603
4S *Tti Rold. P.O. "


28 Larson Express Cruiser 2006 $39,900
Call Dick Horste For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL .I G A NA I
I r,11 !R


(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler II/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, encl. head.
$26,980 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales


28 Regal Express Cruiser 2003 Like New! $44,900
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL Ij ..I RI NA-.


28.5' FOUR WINDS 2005 Cruiser $58,500
Call Richard Rosano For Details! 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only L <
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL I Mi .-k I NA I


29'1989 Cruisers
.Very clean with owner having kept her in great condition,
new bottom service, batteries and cockpit carpet are just
a few of the upgrades.
$19,000 Call John @ 941-915-3575








29' 1999 Sea Ray Sundancer: New listing, fully
equipped, just detailed. Radar, generator, full
enclosure, powered byT-240HP Mercruisers,
recently serviced and runs great.
Asking $42,500. Call Ray Mason
941-505-7269.


29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10,
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator.
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600.








29 Larson Cruiser, 2007 EFI 4.3 s Only s29,900.00
New seals in the outdrives. Radar Depth finder GPS
Marine Stereo, Bimini Tops, SS Prop. Full stand up
head w/ shower. Aft cabin with plenty of room. LOADED!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


c:s;si~--


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ammUUImmmunnlUI IumnmnnSmuuamam


di/&m1# rv Page 37 August 29,2013


30' 1999 PURSUIT 3000 OFFSHORE $65,000
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315989 32' Carver 325 aft cabin yacht, all in great condi-
McCallMarineSales.com tion including brand new twin engines. $54,995
By appointment onlIy Call Ed at 941-628-0167
Licensed Yacht Broker or the office at 941-833-0099
Located at BEAUTIFUL I[.t RI NA-' Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


I-





32' Carver Mariner $24,700
Call Tod at 941-457-0131
or 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


30' Cape Dory MS300, Diesel, autopilot, radar
and much more!! 1987 for $59,800
Contact Daryl Hall at 941-685-2399
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers and
RedFish Yachts 941-639-9400


O3L U~MIMII L UU, oU IIuJ Idlal a dl,
AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
$79,000. 941-347-4670
e-mail irvina32@centurylink.net


30 CRUISER IND 1988,Twin 350 s, 10 beam.
Full cabin, bimini top & more. $18,000. 33' 2004 GRADY WHITE
.jtal Cay Cant. Meticulously maintained and upgraded, this owner
9 41T a--esos eo3 knows how to keep his boat right!
"4 22w5~-,,s.,, ...... $129,900 Call John @ 941-915-3575

RFDUEl!l __ __.__ "', "


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070 Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [I .K RINA- Located at BEAUTIFUL (-MARINA-


34' 2006 FOUR WINNS
This is one of the most beautiful boats in its class.
She is in superb condition showing
its high pride of ownership.
$92,000 Call John@ 941-915-3575


OJ wUUUCMOICnlh JI1 oII,Ul
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-3
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL l.A .1AR I


1 piolJiU idll uuZ JOIU; LIII nlP, I, I- lU lItiU lia l ilr'
5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
$70,00. $69,000.
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269


34' 2006 SEARAY 340 SUNDANCER $139,900
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [*,A RINA-I








34' CATALINA 1989, WING KEEL, DIESEL,
DODGER & BIMINI $34,500
CALL TOD AT 941-457-0131 OR
THE OFFICE AT 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS





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SARASOTA POWER SQUADRON 941-400-6467
Mastering the Rules of the Road Seminar (advanced) .............................................................7 to 9 p.m. Sept. 12
Paddle Smart Seminar ................................................................. 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. Sept. 19
Safe Boating Course (2 days).............................. ............................ a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 21

VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-485-7245
Call for information

PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-637-0766
Engine Maintenance Course.......................................................... 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sept. 10
Safe Boating Class (2 Saturdays)........................................ ............... ..............8:30 a.m to 12:30 p.m Sept. 14
Safe Boating Class (7 W ednesdays) ................................... ..................................... 6:30 to 8:30 p.m Oct. 2

CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
ABC Boating Course (5 evenings)............................ ............... ........ 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Sept. 11 (Wed & Mon)
How to Use a Chart Sem inar ................................................... ........... ................. 7 to 9 p.m Sept. 26

-Provided by Greg Scotten




PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
About Boating Safely .................................... Sept. 21 ......................... arasota ...................... 41-758-5954
Boating Skills and Seamanship .................... Sept. 5 ..................................Sarasota ...................... 941-758-5954
Boating Skills and Seamanship .................... Sept. 16 ........................Venice ......................... 941-426-5523
Boating Skills and Seamanship..................... Sept. 30................................ Englewood ................. 941-697-9435

Provided by Dave Nielsen
^-~ -


34' Sea Ray 340 Sportsman 2006
This is the upscale package with lots of
standard gear and over 700hp total $116,900
Contact Tommy Head at 941-769-2594 Punta Gorda
Yacht Brokers & Redfish Yachts 941-639-9400

M 1 EDRUCEDUCED!! M


35 1997 Cruisers 3570: Unique inlerior layoul, pival
mid-cabin stateroom w/walkaround queen berth,
generator, C120 Raymarine chartplotter,
FWC Mercs,V drives, lift kept.
Asking $69i,99. $49,900.
Call Ray Mason (941) 505-7269


35 1999 CARVER MARINER SPORT CRUISER
Listed for $63,500. Call Richard Horste at 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only i ig
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL I- .AHI NA i


re rdUI anudI ul all aIpU, al II
diesel, wheel. $24,995
Call Mike 941-412-6430 or
the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


CakK Dick Horst For Uetails 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL ('G ,I RI NA-N








37' SeaRay 270 aft cabin, Twin diesel,
Genset and much more!
Call Ed at 941-628-0167
or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


twin gas engines, boat is turnkey. $31,900.
Cyrstal Cay Cente,
941 -639-6603
- www.cryltalcay.conm
ra2u -c


39' Mainship Trawler 1998 with single
diesel, AC and currently on the harbor for
your inspection! $99,995 Contact Jim at
941 740-0389 Punta GordaYacht Brokers
and Redfish Yachts 941-833-0099


REDUCED


36' 1998 CARVER Mariner 350,
Twin Merc Cruisers, All Electronics,
Shows Like New!
$69,900. 941-255-5311








36' 2008 TWIN VEE
With a tower, cutty cabin and twin 300 HP
Suzuki engines makes this boat a great find.
$139,000 Call John @ 941-915-3575

I 1 11* .bW I .. ..


39' Mainship Trawler 1999 with Single Diesel
AC, Genset and much more! $99,995 Owner will
consider all offers! ContactTommy Head
941-769-2594 Punta GordaYacht Brokers
and Redfish Yachts 941-639-9400


40' DEFEVER DOWNEAST TRAWLER 1980,
twin diesel, new fiberglass decks,
fuel tanks, water tanks,
$49,000
231-218-9920


36' CruiserYacht Express, $109,000 40 EAGLE TRAWLER 1972 -
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989 Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
McCallMarineSales.com Ford Lehman Fiberglass Hull.
By appointment only Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull
Licensed Yacht Broker Full NewTanks. Asking $75,000
Located at BEAUTIFUL I|-Ml A RI N.\I Call 941-408-9572
___-- i eeiiS~ -


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only iA
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL I.*-t A RI NA-I


41'1989 Egg Harbor
Beautiful condition shows a meticulous
owner that has loved his boat and has it
professionally maintained.
$89,000 Call John at 941-915-3575


--~--LI~L LL~--~~_.


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-r;;l~





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.m.iUU Immn.nl.IU Iumnmnn.U ..m


aMK, es.rr Page 39 'August 29,2013


i i


Call Hichard Hosano For Uetails 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
By appointment only
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL I. a ~ u wA r.l


]JUST
REDUCED!
44 TRAWLER 1979,2-120 Lehmans
Boat & motors need restored. $8,000.
Cyrostal Cay Center
9 41-639-.603
-www-o ry1t.lcay.som
4225 T"lly Rord. P.O. .


48'1999 SUNSEEKER
Very well taken care of and lift kept since 2002, this
boat is loaded with options. Low hours and superb
Yanmar engines. This boat is must-have!
$279,000 Call John @ 941-915-3575


49' 2007 HUNTER
This is a one owner boat and never been chartered.
In superior condition and well-maintained for the
next owner, with many options and amenities.
$295,000. Call John @ 941-915-3575


EDDYLINE SANDPIPER
Only 381bs and 12' long with 3501b capacity.
Anyone can paddle this boat and
take the dog along! $1,299.
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter



S.I-




Elie Gulf 120XE 12 foot long, 350 Ib capacity
Stable fishing Ergoflex Seating system,
Bow and Center hatches
$729 Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


Feel Free Moken 12 Angler Kayak. New kayak:
12'7" long, 56 Ibs, unit-track quick release
system for custom fishing accessories. Kingfisher
seat, Wheel in the keel for easy transport.
$1099. 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


JACKSON ORION KAYAK
Great little kayak for fishing, birding,
photography. 10' long, only 521bs 3001b capacity
Save $100 on year end sale! $799.
Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


52' 2007 BLUEWATER YACHT S297,000 H-: l I ',' I=,, .
THING you need to cruise!! Dick Horste 941-548-6070 KC Fishing Kayak Thermoformed ABS for
McCallMarineSales.com light weight only 631bs. 12 foot long
By appointment ron With mount can add a motor. $1,399.
Located Yacht BEAUTIFULr 94166-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter
Located at BEAUTIFUL G I AR1.I NA1 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


What isa solunar THURSDAY FRIDAY
table? The sun Sunrise: 7:07 a.m. Sunrise: 7:08 a
and moon, even Sunset: 7:53 p.m. Sunset: 7:51 p
when they're out Moonrise: 1:14a.m. Moonrise: 2:02
of sight, exert forces Moonset: 3:04 p.m. Moonset: 3:50
wild creatures can Moon Phase Moon Phas
affect when fish 38% Waning crescent 29% Waning crest
and other animals Major Times Major Time
feed. Weather and 8:10 a.m.- 10:10 a.m. 8:57 a.m.- 10:57
tide also playa role, 8:34 p.m.-10:43 p.m. 9:21 p.m.-11:21
but expect fish to be Minor Times Minor Time
more active during 1:14a.m.- 2:14a.m. 2:02 a.m.- 3:02
the majorand minor 3:04 p.m. 4-04 pm 3:50 pm 4-50


SUIIIJIl lI1me1


SUNDAY
,Sunri; e 7 O' 3 ni
Sune[ 7 -4' p ni
M,:,:inrie 3 43. 3 nli
Moonset: 5:15 p.m.
Moon Phase
14% Waning crescent
Major Times
10:32 a.m.-12:32 p.m.
10:55 p.m.-12:55 a.m.
Minor Times
3:43 a.m.- 4:43 a.m.
5:15 p.m.- 6:15 p.m.
Prediction: Average


Prediction Average+

MONDAY
,lnrI;lie 7 O' j nil
,un ,e[ 7 4:: p ni
M r:,I:i rie 4 3 5 a n
Moonset: 5:54 p.m.
Moon Phase
8% Waning crescent
Major Times
11:18 a.m.-1:18 p.m.
11:40 p.m.-1:40 a.m.
Minor Times
4:35 a.m.- 5:35 a.m.
5:54 p.m.- 6:54 p.m.
Prediction: Good


i.m.
i.m.
a.m.
p.m.
e
scent
is
a.m.
p.m.
is
a.m.
pm


Preaiction- Average

TUESDAY
unrli e 7 1l)j ni
,une[i 7 47 p nm
M,:,:nrin e 5 .?: 3 n
Moonset: 6:31 p.m.
Moon Phase
3% Waning crescent
Major Times
--:--- --:--
12:03 p.m.- 2:03 p.m.
Minor Times
5:28 a.m.- 6:28 a.m.
6:31 p.m.-7:31 p.m.
Prediction: Better


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 7:08 a.m.
Sunset: 7:50 p.m.
Moonrise: 2:51 a.m.
Moonset: 4:43 p.m.
Moon Phase
21% Waning crescent
Major Times
9:45 a.m.- 11:45 a.m.
10:08 p.m.-12:08 a.m.
Minor Times
2:51 a.m.- 3:51 a.m.
4:34 p.m 5'34 p m
Prediction- Average

WEDNESDAY
uriri;e 7 113 fni
run;e, 7 4. p ml
M ::,nri, e i. 1 j n,
Moonset: 7:08 p.m.
Moon Phase
1% Waning crescent
Major Times
12:26 a.m.- 2:26 a.m.
12:48 p.m.- 2:48 p.m.
Minor Times
6:21 a.m.- 7:21 a.m.
7:08 p.m. 8:08 p.m.
Prediction: Best


REDUCED!!

-- ------------


52' VISTA MOTORYACHT, LIVE ABOARD/CRUISER
EVER DREAM OF LIVING ON A BOAT?
THIS IS FORYOU!! 15.5' BEAM, DIESEL
EXCELLENT CONDITION. $4416,00 NOW $92,500
ENGLEWOOD 941-266-6321



s *^*~-- *



Big Tuna by Jackson Kayaks
It's an angler's dream.
The "elite" seating is super comfortable and rotate
to face fishing buddy.
Live bait well, rod holders, stagers
$1599 Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Cuda 12 From Jackson Kayak
New little brother to the Cuda 14. 12'6" long 31"
wide 3501b cap. High/low comfortable seat
rod holders and stagers everywhere. $1199
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


-- -


OCEAN KAYAK TRIDENT 11 $949
CENTRAL COMMAND CENTER FOR ROD MOUNTS
MODULAR FISHING POD, BATTERY BAG,
TRANSDUCER COMPATIBLE
STABLE (400LB CAPACITY) AND QUICK. ONLY 54LBS
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Old Town Predator 13
Award winning new fishing kayak.
13'2" long, 15" adjustable seat,
425# capacity. $1,299
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Santa Cruz Sit On Top Fishing Kayak New 2013
$999
Very Stable, Easy to paddle
Optional Live bait tank
Rod Holders, Storage
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


I


I


s
6 aT






saaMynrcni Page 40 August 29, 2013


!HCY I Ill


WHALE BOY BANDS


It s long been known that male humpback whales
sing to attract females But until recently, it was
thought to be a solo endeavor A new study by
Hawaiian whale researcher Dr Louis Herman
suggests that it s actually a group effort A
whales song can be heard up to 20 miles away,
but when a group sing together they can amplify
the distance reached and draw the girls in from
farther away Each whale sings its own song, so
they don I exactly harmonize but they do
make a much bigger noise Immature males loin
in, lending their voices while also learning from
their elders As to which male actually gets the
girl, the biggest whale in the group usually wins
the contest great singer or not

FISHIN'ON DRY LAND
The boys over at Fishin Frank s have a new toy
A ish-fight simulator Although they bought it
largely to allow their customers to test out new
tackle, it s also huge honkin piles of fun You can
play with a variety o fish Ilargemouth or small-
mouth bass, salmon, larpon, sailish, etc I and
it s a dual-station model, meaning you can go
head-to-head against your buddy whos always
bragging about how quick he can whup em So
far, it s been open for anyone who wants to give it
a go The simulator will be put to good use in late
September, as Frank will be hosting a simulated
tarpon tournament to raise money for the family
of slain CCSO deputy Michael Wilson


LUCKY MISS
A 350-pound blue marlin jumped into a boat
off the Dominican Republic last week, missing
the first male and angler by inches The ish was
hooked aboard the Clearwater-based Marlin
Darlin, a 62-foot Spencer Yachts sporthsherman
owned by Bobby Jacobsen and captained by Eddie
Wheeler It happened near the end of the eight,
when the mate had the ish leadered and was
preparing to bring it in for release Instead, the
marlin leaped into the boat, brushing past the
first mate and nearly skewering the fisherman on
its sharp bill Marlin caught aboard the boat are
usually released, but since this one was severely
injured in leaping aboard it was given to local
fishermen for use as food

SKIMPING ON SHRIMP?


Have you noticed the price of food shrimp edging
upward? A bacterial disease known as early
mortality syndrome (or EMS) is mostly to blame
The disease is not known in wild shrimp but
has been highly destructive to farmed shrimp
in Thailand, China and Vietnam, which are the
worlds main producers Thailand, which raises
more than a fourth of the shrimp eaten in the
U S, expects to export only half of what it did last
year Dwindling supplies are leading to higher
prices according to an Urner Barry index, the
wholesale price for while shrimp has already
doubled This news is cheered on by Gulf Coast
shrimpers, who are unable to compete with the


prices of imported Asian shrimp and are still
struggling to rebound after the 2010 BP oil spill

DEAD FISH CAN BE HAZARDOUS
ROCKLAND, Maine (API Decaying herring inside
the ish hold of an 89-foot trawler created enough
noxious gas to sicken two Maine fishermen and
leave one of them unconscious Fireighters say
the unconscious fisherman was flown by hell-
copter to a hospital and the other is being treated
at another hospital Poisonous hydrogen sulide
bull up in the ish hold after the Starlight trawler
offloaded its herring The first fisherman was
overcome and lost consciousness while climbing
down a ladder into the hold The second became
incapacitated while trying to help him A third
crew member realized what was happening and
used a breathing apparatus to rescue them

PLANNING FOR "WATERWORLD"
According to a draft of the U N s upcoming
climate change report, if greenhouse gas emis-
sions continue to grow at the current pace, sea
level is expected to rise 2 to 3 feet The report
by the Intergovernmental Panel On Climate
Change points to the use of fossil fuels and other
human activity as the cause of climate change,
with the authors stating they are 95 percent
confident that it s us to blame specifically,
its extremely likely that humans caused more
than half of the observed increase in global
average surface temperature from 1951 to 2010
However, the report does offer a silver lining li
global emissions are actually reduced to the level
countries have already commilled to, we might
get only 10 inches more ocean by 2100 (in addi-
tion to the 8 inches seen over the last 100 years)

MORE ARCTIC ICE THAN LAST SUMMER
Every summer, the Arctic ice cap partially melts
Whether you buy into global warming or not, it s
a fact that last year there was less ice than ever
recorded 1 32 million square miles, about
half of the average over the last 30 years But
this year, it s not so bad, with 2 25 million square
miles measured on Aug 21 The melt is expected
to last about another month and may get down


as low at 1 7 million square miles before the ice
begins to grow again as winter sets in Some who
say climate change is hooey are pointing to this
development as strong evidence for their cause

NOT EXACTLY SQUARE GROUPER
A Canadian man thought hed found a new way
to smuggle marijuana, but really it was lust
another way to get himself arrested The man
was spotted on a remote surveillance system
lust after midnight on Aug 20 swimming across
the St Clair River in a Scuba suit He appeared
to be dragging a pipe behind him Saint Clair
County Central Dispatch notified U S Border
Patrol agents, who apprehended the man as he
left the water near Marine City, Mich The pipe
was found tied to a nearby seawall ladder The
agents opened it and found more than 8 pounds
of marijuana inside

LEAVE' EM LAUGHING
Sally called her sister Susie and invited her to
go shopping I can t, said Susie Tom says he
wants to teach me how to fish and were leaving
in 15 minutes I l call you when we get back and
let you know how it went A few hours later,
Sally s phone rang and Susie was on the other
end Oh, Tom s lust so mad at me, she said I did
everything wrong I made too much noise on the
boat I couldn I get my casts where Tom said to I
used the wrong lures, in the wrong colors, and I
reeled them in wrong And worst of all, I caught
more ish than he did


NWO EI


4628 Tamiami Trail ( Corner of US 41 & Kings Highway)
Port Charlotte, FL 33980
(941) 757-8195 www.charlottemarine.com


n enai-mErmelFinbhI-'n nAm
mIut Ne***n**aur Eti*ifIE...m iE


16-






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08/29/13
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


OPEN SUNDAY 1-3 PM
265 FAIRWAY RD
ROTONDA WEST





Completely updated
and move-in ready on
over sized waterfront
lot, This home fea-
tures the addition of a
HUGE Florida Room.
$174,900 -- $1500
BUYERS' REBATE if
purchased through Fla
Golf Properties Inc
941-698-4653

$$ QUICK CASH $$
Any price or condition!
Cash for your house/mobile.
941-356-5308


2 ACRES, Venice
3br/2ba home. County
water only 10% Down
owner financing. 941-488-
2418 or 496-9252






R A D


R.E. AUCTION Turn your

Trash into


BANK OWNED ON SITE
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
North Port
Single Family Home, Gated
Golf Comm. in Heron Creek.
4384 Whispering Oaks Dr.
2 Bdrm, 2 Ba, 1666, Sq Ft
Sale Sat., Aug., 31st 3 PM
FREE COLOR BROCHURE
800-229-9793
auctionservicesintl.com
5% Buyers Premium
Laura Mancinelli
FL-AU4056
ASI FM.AB675
HOMES FOR SALE
1020


cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!

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BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


GATED 5 PRIVATE ARE PRAIRIE
CREEK WEST 2003 SPACIOUS
HOME wrH 3-4 BDRMS ,
CUSTOM FEATURES GALORE, 3
STALL GARAGE+DETACHED 1200
SF CUSTOM GARAGE W FULL BATH
EVERY MAN'S DREAM.BLACK TOP
ROADS & PRIVATE DRIVE.
PLENTY OF PARKING, MINUTES TO
PUNTA GORDA.WAS $489,000
Now $429,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALUSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
V 941-456-8304 I


5-30 ACRES Starting @
$55,000
Punta Gordas's
BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcome,black
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community"!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Prop ertiesforsale.com

ind your Best
Friend in the
Classifieds!


U


SWWS


HOMES FOR SALE
1020







6 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
PRAIRIE CREEK
PARK BEAUTY!
MANY CUSTOM FEATURES
LIKE NEW 3400SF 3 BDRM,
SPACIOUS MASTER STE & BATH
+ OFFICE, 4 FULL BATHS,
FORMAL DINING RM, LIVING RM,
GREAT RM, LANAI AND OVER-
SIZED 2 STALL ATT GARAGE
$159,000--$49,000
NOW $439,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304


BOBCATTRAIL LAKEFRONT
Fero built. Great room plan
with heated pool & spa!
3/2.5 baths/2 car garage.
All tile. Deluxe master, huge
custom closet! Separate
guest wing.
$312,000, MLS# C7045094
"Selling With Integrity"
941-629-2100
AGGRESSIVE

Q NEED A JOB?
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!


Listing Price $535,000 Sol


HOMES FOR SALE
S1020


Heated POOL Home. Storm
Shutters, Covered Lanai.
Well Maintained!
Doris Walters,
Bud Trayner Realty.
941-661-4019


3/2/2 Heated Pool Home
Updated Kitchen -
Wood Cabinets. Beautifully
Landscaped Property
Built in 2004 $239,000
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty

^a WORKS!mu
em^^^^^


UtD C ;thK- :, : UUL
Home, Spacious Family Rm.,
Breakfast Bar, Great Room,
& SO MUCH MORE!! This
Home is a MUST SEE!
$199,900. Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, In


3630 Bonaire Court
Punta Gorda, fl.
33950


Single Family Home
3 bedrooms, 2 baths
d for $500,000







I


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Thursday, August 29, 2013


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-- lb&omr
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,qm





The Sun Classified Page 2 E/N/C


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Thursday, August 29, 2013


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


WATERFRONT WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030 HOMES 1030


FOR SALE
1040

I--------


MAKBUUK UOAK
GATED_COMMUNITY
(Adjacent to Deep Creek)
3Bdrm/2Ba/2CG.
Pool Home! $279,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
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SUNT


your cedit ard~


NUKUMII -5 1 C: Ipot,
fenced yard, quiet area,
W/D hookup, FREE water.
$45,000 Call Chris for appt
727-565-8817

! rzc,. .-I


II v I I I rvnl I
1237 Rice Terrace, Beautifu
3-bd/2ba, 1267 SF move-in
ready home w/2-car garage,
ully fenced back yard & large
screened lanai. $148,000.
Patty Gillespie Remax
Anchor 941-875-2755
IEM m V.*.in I


3153 Oklahoma St.
Beautifully Remodeled 2004
Home, 3 bd / 2 ba / 2 car,
1784 Sft. Under Air, New SS
Appliances, Park Like Setting
With Brick Paver Patio.
Asking $159,900
Bay Bridge Homes


21451 BANCROFT AVE.,
CUSTOM HOME ON TWO PICTUR-
ESQUE LOTS. 28x22 SCREENED
_ANAI WITH SPA! GAZEBO! FRUIT
TREES! WET BAR! SKYLIGHTS!
3UY NOW AND COLLECT
NCOME/RENT 'TIL APRIL (TENANT
N PLACE)! $167,700
PATTY GILLESPIE REMAX
ANCHOR 941-875-2755


22284 Laramore Ave.
RENTING? WHY? When you
can own this totally
remodeled, light, bright,
open 1100 SF 2/1 on lushly
landscaped corner lot
Public water & sewer. No
deed restrictions. NOT in
flood zone. $78,000.
PATTY GILLESPIE
RE/MAX Anchor
941-875-2755


rurl ,nmPLUIi
23204 Rountree Ave.,
Seller has lavished love, time
& money to totally update this
1020 SF 2/2/1 w/scr lanai.
Gorgeous NEW kitchen,
ceramic tile, granite counters.
$9-7,000
PATTY GILLESPIE REMAX
ANCHOR 941-875-2755


rUK I LIMHALU II ,
24458 Pine Ridge PI.
Located in Gated Comm. of
Suncoast Lakes! 3Bed/2Ba/2CG
MUST SEE! MLS#C7043725
$189,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty

Finmd it in the
Classifieds!


PUN IA UKUA
Remodeled 2/2/2 pool home
with dockage for 65' plus
sailboat, depth maintained by
city. Dead end street in
restricted neighborhood.
REDUCED! $189,900
Jerry Hayes, 941-456-1155
ReMax Marina Park


PORT CHARLOTTE
23372 Mullins Ave
Lovely 3/2/2 pool home
in popular Sec 15.
$169,000.
June Poliachik,
Sun Realty, CDPE, SFR
941-916-0100

YOU WANT ME
to List Your Home

SHELLEE GUINTA
22 YEARS OF AWARD
WINNING EXPERIENCE




ALMAR & ASSOCIATES
941-426-4534

WATERFRONT
:HOMES 1030


5242 Neville Terr.
Premier Boating! 16000# Lift
Quick Harbor Access!
4 BR, 3 Bath, Key West Style
Tropical, Builder's Custom
Plan. $398,500.
Marianne Lilly, RE/MAX
Harbor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


PORT CHARLOTTE- Il2'.':
Lake Worth Blvd. 3/2/2
POOL Home! Formal Dining
Rm., Spacious Master, Dock
w/ Electric & MUCH MORE!
Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realy, Inc





PUNTA GORDA ISLES
BY OWNER
Home with a view 3/2
with pool and Boat dock
with lift $423,900.
Tel. 941-637-7713


Find the

new You

in the

Classifieds!


I J


rum IM A unuMJ 1-L
Lowest $ on PGI Canal!
80' Seawall. Cute & Retro.
2/2/2+ Lanai
FREE PGI Map $200,000. obo
Marianne Lilly,
RE/MAXHarbor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


rui i U UAi i n -"-, i i '-I-i
250+' of frontage. 1+ acre
house, garage, marina, pavil-
lion $225,000. 941-639-6269
GOLF COURSE
COMMUNITY
1035






PORT CHARLOTTE- 2 2 in
Gate Maple Leaf Community.
Open Floor Plan. Great Rm.,
Breakfast Bar, Formal Dining
Rm. Furnished Turnkey!
$74,900. Sue Ellen Fumich,
941-276-2894
Coldwell Banker Morris Realty, In

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040



PORT CHARLOTTE
$67,000 SALE! (Full time or
seasonal rental also avail-
able) Lovely 2/2 completely
renovated condo with new
appliances & water heater.
For more information and
showing, please call 205-
451-8917 or 205-299-9149

Great Deals in
the Classifieds!


h Care 245 WK4 Techw 25OSas Carrs 251 Help Wanat
jouihIMny IEmnloyIO m
-- 1COW4Mr


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LOW Uo


PORT CHARLOTTE CONDO
Promenades East. Super
clean 2/2 courtyard view,
inside parking, completely
remodeled. Incl. all appli
ances. $76,000. For showing
call 248-420-5978.

I .. 1


r ii In vi A UU
24120 Green Heron Dr. #6
Beautiful 2/2/2 Villa w/
Outstanding Waterview!
Granite Counters. Like New!
Only $139,900
Jeff Runyan Re/Max Palm
941-979-2843


I1IN\1N1I I .UVVeVC 1
CARING WAY ON CANAL.
SHORT SALE 2BR/2BA WITH
CARPORT, INSIDE LAUNDRY
ROOM. HURRICANE RESISTANT
WINDOWS, HARD WOOD FLOORS,
ALL APPLIANCES INCLD. MOVE IN
CONDITION CITY WATER&SEWER,
BIG PACKAGE @ SMALL PRICE.
$45,000. CARON REALTY,
INC. 941-925-3300
RONNIEC@VERIZON.NET

I 252 Help Wa

ICE

PAC.
-.TAHE

.IAIL.C
Ye, uu


.II

,I'
c*irrcl

*:ur $


PLACE AN AD IN THE

CLASSIFIED SECTION

WHETHER YOU SEEK A JOB

7 OR HAVE ONE TO OFFER


CALL

941-429-3110 AT THE




1U N I NEWSPAPERS
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice


CLASSIFIED!
-- ----------
..........


TODAY!!


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Thursday, August 29, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040

To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net


PUNTA GORDA 2/1 Central air
and heat, small screened lanai,
$700/mo 941-6614482
NEED A JOB? -
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!

MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
1090


VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com

MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
1095

ARCADIA, Nearly New
3BR/2BA Manufactured
Home on 1/2 Acre.
Appliances Stay.
Financing Available!
Ready Now!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122


nuR in run -, -' ..I
carport. 211 Schooner St.
Premier Gated 55+ Comm.,
with marina & resort
amenities! 1344 SF
w/granite & all new appls.
ENJOY THE GOOD LIFE!
PATTY GILLESPIE
REMAX ANCHOR
941-875-2755


RAINFOREST
IMMACULATE!
1500 sq. ft. 3 bedroom.
Nicely furnished.
Oversized lot.
Air in Lanai and More.
$59,995
Call 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com






SETTLE ESTATE29,995
IMMACULATE 2/2 DOUBLE.
LOTS OF EXTRAS & UPDATES.
NEWER AIR & ROOF.
PUNTA GORDA
BETTER HURRY!
Call 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


HOMES FOR RENT HOMES FOR RENT
1210 L 1210


3/2/1 Jockey Club, North Port........$825
2/2/2+Den, Villa, Port Charl............$900
3/2/2 Large Lanai, Port Char.........$1000
3/2/2 Updated, FencedYard, NP..$1150
3/2.5/2 wlLawn & Pool Care, NP...$1500
FULL PROPERTY LIST AVAILABLE ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE
YOUR PROPERTY




0 3/2/2 Canal S. Gulf
Cove 3110sqft $1400
3/2/2 Pool E. Eng SS
appl. Granite $1300
03/2/1 Pool, Rotonda
golf course 2249sf $1150
03/2/2 Pool NP $1050
02/1 cp dwntwn Eng $750
01/1 utilities inc $800

West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net

AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS *
1/1 Duplex,
Coulton Ave., P.C.
$475/mo
3/2/2 Pool,
Hidden Valley Cir, P.G.
$1400/mo

*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
AABring your pets!AA
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME


nd your Best
Friend in the








DEEP CREEK, : 2
Large POOL, Fireplace,
Cul-de-Sac Street, Private
Preserve View. $1350/mo.
Call Donna 941-661-1202




ENGL & PT CHARLOTTE
Beautiful Private 4/2 SGC
$1250; 3/2 DC $1075,
941-321-71400R941-321-7139
ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-0333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com

AIR

ERA'g
For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1200...3/2/1 Pool, Canal, boatlifL...
$1200.3/2/2 Pool serv incl..PC
$750....2/1 Triplex updated..PC
$700..2/1 1031 SqFt............PC
$550..2/1 912 SqFt Duplex..En
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters


ENGLEWOOD 3/2/2 Pool,
1900 SF, Split plan, new car-
pet, 7202 Mamouth St. 34224
1 Yr Lease, $1195/mo 1st,
Last & Sec. 941-214-0766
0 NEED A RENTAL *
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT


InvestorsChoice Real Estate
AFaith-Based Business






VENICE
3/2.5 WOODBRIDGE CONDO $1900
PT. CHARLOTTE
2/2 BIMINI BAY CONDO $700
2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice
2/2 Homes from ... $1600
3/2 Homes from ... $1800
3/2 Pool Homes from..$2200
Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.
NORTH PORT Excellent bar-
gain for 2/2/2 POOL home
$1095 Call RIty Mgt at
941-625-3131 or view at
flarentals.net
PORT CHARLOTTE 21443
Gladis Ave. 2/1/1.5, fresh
water canal, centrally located,
No smoking. $675 mo. Avail-
able 9/1. 941-628-1796
PORT CHARLOTTE, 2 HOUSES
2/2/CP, Tile, CHA. $650. Mo.
+ 1st, Last & Sec. Dep.
Immed. Occp. 941-924-2764
PORT CHARLOTTE, 2/2/1,
ABSOLUTE BEAUTY LAKEFRONT,
FAM. RM, DOCK, NO PETS./
No SMOKE. ANNUAL $850/MO
SEASONAL $1,300/MO
1ST, LAST, & SEC.
(941)-456-3367
PUNTA GORDA 4br/2ba
pool Home available now.
$2000/mo Call for details.
239-404-2161
PUNTA GORDA Gulf Water-
front 2/2/2, appliances, seawall
property-sailboat, lanai, pool.
$1425/mo 941-889-8859 Tod
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2 $1100 mo. unf. or
furn. $1200/mo
annual lease 941-629-3279


WE NEED RENTALs
Reduced Mgmt Fees
www.allfloridarealty.com


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240

DEEP CREEK 2/2 or 3/2, tile
cath. ceil, wood cab. granite,
W/D, lanai $725+ up, pets ok
(941)-626-1514 or 661-4539
DEEP CREEK 2/2 2nd fl
lakefront $625 (inc
discount & water).
View at flarentals.net or
Call RIty Mgt 941-625-3131

LISTING
DEEP CREEK
2/2 Furnished, 1st FL,
Utilities included,
except Cable, $825/Mo,
941-629-8229, 941-661-9570
PORT CHARLOTTE 2nd
Floor, 2/2, New York Section
water, pool, incld. Sm pets ok.
$700 + sec. 941-286-6252
PORT CHARLOTTE Oak For-
est, 55+ 1/1, 2nd Flr w/lanai.
Steps to pool. All appl.
$625/mo 941-235-2379


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240 1

PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2 off
Kings Hwy, Pool, Tennis, newly
remodeled, small pet ok, water
incl. $725/mo 941-286-5003
PUNTA GORDA 1BR Condo
water, cable, pool, tennis &
boat dock. $700/mo +
electric. 941-661-8372

DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
1300

PUNTA GORDA, large 1/1,
exc. cond, super clean, end.
patio, w/d hkup, remodeled.
$550/mo 941-875-5657

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
1320


ENGLEWOOD
AFFORDABLE
1 BEDROOM APTS. 62+
Income limits apply.
o GROVE CITY
MANOR
P.u... 941-697-4677
TDD 614-442-4390
MANASOTA KEY, 1BR/1BA
on priv beach w/big porch.Sm.
pets OK. $1200/mo util. incl.
6 Month min. 941-661-7120
STUDIO APTSV
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY:1-800-955-8771

I I
PUNTA GORDA 2bd/2.5ba
Furnished located directly on
waterway. Over 1,500sf ready
for immediate move-in.
$1,200/mo with lyr lease.
280 Lewis Cir. Punta Gorda
863-494-9693 Pictures and
more info available online at:
PeaceRlverCampground.com/condo
PUNTA GORDA Downtown,
2 room all utilities included. No
pets, $600/mo. Als-o l bde
rom apt., 2nd floo, all ,util
icl. INo ptr, $775'/mo
Call Jerry 941-391-4856
PUNTA GORDA, 2/1 Com-
pletely tiled, window treat-
ment, on Fairway Dr oppo-
site school, monthly $650,
Call Owner (718)-465-
6388 or (718) 864-6482
VENICE ISLAND APTS, 1
Bedroom Available. Close to
Beach & Downtown. No Pets,
No Smoking. 941-234-1454


LOOK
VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$375 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
VENICE DOWNTOWN,
2br Apartment No smoking or
Dogs. $695/mo + deposit.
941-484-6022
S VENICE STUDIO
& 1 Bedroom
Accepting Section 8 Vouchers
941-488-7766
VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1800-955-8771



SAdvertise Today!
WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!
S941-429-2402
C.,__


FOR RENT
1320

VILLA SAN CARLOS II
22250 Vick St.
Affordable-Income based
One bedroom apartments
for 62 or older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771



MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
1340


Z:9
NOCATEE, Doublewide
$450/mo. ALSO KQng Hge
Arnc 2 Bdrm $100/mo.
941-624-0355 or
941-875-5253

EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
1350

HARBOUR HEIGHTS close to
river, newly renovated efficien-
cies w cable & internet, Sunny-
brookMotel 941-625-6400
NOKOMIS Immaculate Effi-
ciency Walk to beach! Util-
ities & Washer/dryer incl.
$695. mo. No smoke, no
pets. 941-488-6565

VACATION/
SEASONAL RENTALS
1390

P.C, Furnished 2/1.5/1 w/
Lanai. Rent Varies by Month.
Avail. 9/1/13 941-628-90161

WANTED TO RENT
S1420


SINGLE WOMAN, 50, Very
Clean, No Pets, No Smoke Liv
ng in Maine, Looking to Move
to Florida. Seeking to Rent
loom in Private Pool Home
w/ Private Bath. References
Available. 336-823-4709

LOTS & ACREAGE
1500








SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150,000 readers in
Charlotte, Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


NORTH PORT Sumter
Blvd. Great location. New
home area. $6,900 941-
457-6811
ROTONDA Pebble Beach
and Lakes. 2 vacant lots
available. Lakes on green-
belt and Pebble Beach on
golf course. Motivated. Will
negotiate. Seller/agent.
941-920-8970


OUT OF TOWN LOTS
S1520


NC MTNS
1.71 PRIME ACRES WITH
STUNNING MTN VIEWS,
LG HARDWOODS, LEVEL
ELEVATED BLDG SITE AND
PAVED ACCESS ONLY $34,900
FINANCING AVAIL.
866-738-5522 BRKR

COMMERCIAL LOT
1530


PUNTA GORDA store for
lease. 2400 square feet.
Great for convenience store.
located on busy street.
Contact Tim Boff
941-815-0618

BUSINESS
FOR SALE
1600

PART TIME Business for
Local area. Nets $57K, Full
Color Publication. Guaranteed
Clients. No Exp Nec. Will Train.
Work from your location.
$24,900 828-667-5371

| BUSINESS RENTALS
Z 1610


NORTH PORT, FOR lease:
Fully furnished & equipped
medical office space.
1000 sq. ft. Off Toledo
Blade. Two exam rooms &
procedure room. If inter-
ested call (863) 381-0120.
PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200

ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
Call for Pricing 941-484-4316

COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620







ARCADIA 4.4 ac By Owner!
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585





ENGLEWOOD 4680
Placida Rd. Retail Space
Available In Small Retail
Center With Direct Access
to Placida Rd. Lighted
Pole Signage Available. $9
PSF NNN, Plus FL Sales
Tax. 734-973-3185


Retail center with
frontage on Placida Rd.
Total of 12 individual suites.
All leases are
NNN + FL Sales Tax
734-973-3185





The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, August 29, 2013


COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620

PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992

& STORAGE
1640

CHARLOTTE HARBOR
Warehouse 5,000 sq ft.
with Office. $2000/mo w/
1st & Last ALSO 800 sqft
avail. 941-380-9212
CHARLOTTE HARBOR, IL,
1 Air Conditioned Office &
1 Bays w small office. Up to
1000 Ft. 941-626-6915
NORTH PORT 800SF Ware-
house $420/mo+tax. 400SF,
$215/mo +tax 941-661-6720

2000






EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/ Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

HELP WANTED
Z 2001


MAID, Required to work in
various Homes each day.
Training will be given. 5
days/week. Hourly pay.
Call 941-539-5134
for interview.

SERVICES
2005


GOLF CLUB MAINTENANCE
WORKERS NEEDED
Please Call 941-697-2414
SClassified = Sales
GOLF COURSE SPRAY
TECHNICIAN
Please Call 941-697-2414

PROFESSIONAL
2010



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
LABOR DAY,
MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 2ND.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Tuesday,
September 3rd*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, 8/30,
3:3U pm for
Saturday, & 4:00 pm
for Sunay, Monday,
& Tuesday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday!


PROFESSIONAL
2010



NOW




WEILER
ENGINEERING
is continuing growth and
expansion in Punta Gorda
and the FI. Keys. We have
available positions for
qualified applicants with
"El's with minimum 3-4
years' experience, Expe-
rienced Const/Utility
Inspectors or P.E., Pro-
ject Manager with experi-
ence" This Candidate
should have strong com-
munication skills and be
able to work with a team
or individually. WEC pro-
vides engineering servic-
es in the areas of site
design, roadway utilities,
structural engineering,
and marinas/waterfront
resorts throughout South-
west Florida and the
Florida Keys.
We offer an extremely
rewarding stable career
with full benefits, and
highly competitive
salaries.
FOR IMMEDIATE
CONSIDERATION,
please e-mail your
resume to Janeen Weiler
at Janeen@
weilerengineering.org


FINANCIAL
2016


RESIDENTIAL LENDER
Englewood Bank & Trust
has an immediate opening
for a highly motivated,
well-organized, Residential
Lender experienced for the
Venice Market Area.
Previous residential lending
experience required with
excellent interpersonal &
communication skills.
Competitive
noncommissioned salary
& benefit package.
Apply in person at:
1111 S McCall Rd,
Englewood 34223 or
e-mail resume to:
esmathews@ebtfl.com
EEO/AA.

CLERICAL/OFFICE
2020


ACCTS PAYABLE Secretary,
F/T position. Must be profi-
cient in excel & word. Please
submit your resume in person.
No phone calls please. 1192
NE Livingston Street, Arcadia,
Florida 34266.
ADMIN. ASST. Computer,
AP and AR experience.
Benefit Package. DFWP.
Fax resume and salary
requirements to
941-205-2135 or email to:
service@raysplumbinginc.com

Need a new

Home?

Look in the
Classifieds!

ASST. OFFICE MANAGER
Prefer degree accoun-
tant or person with good
automotive accounting
background. Great work-
ing conditions. Full Time,
Many fringes, permanent.
Fax resume to
941-918-8511 Please
include desired income.


CLERICAL/OFFICE
S2020


CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The Applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda
OFFICE ASSISTANT, Part
time, experience in Excel,
Word, QuickBooks, multi
task and good phone skills.
Englewood 941-475-7699



OFFICE HELP NEEDED
Computer & bookkeeping
skills. Email resume to
bowersoxinc@comcast.net

MEDICAL
A2030


Busy Cardiology office
seeks an ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT with 5 plus
years experience in
billing and coding,
Human Resources. Must
have organizational skills
and be detail oriented.
Send resume to vicky@
CENTERFOWRPERFORWMEARTS.COM
or Fax 866-906-1238.

BUSY MEDICAL BILLING
OFFICE HAS OPENINGS
for Full-Time (Days)
and Part-Time
(Evenings 5-9p) in AR
and Payment Posting.
Also Need Part-Time
(Evenings 5-9p) for
Authorizations/Eligibility.
Experience Required.
Excellent Benefits for
Full-Time Staff.
Please Send Resume to
medicalbiller448@
yahoo.com


HARBORCHASE
n





RESIDENT
ASSISTANT

FULL TIME
PART TIME / POOL

ARE YOU A HHA, PRIVATE
CAREGIVER OR NEWLY
LICENSED CNA LOOKING
FOR A CHANGE OR THAT
1ST OPPORTUNITY.


HARBORCHASE OFFERS
ON-THE-JOB TRAINING FOR
ANYONE LOOKING FOR AN
OPPORTUNITY IN THE
HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY.
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND
AN EXCELLENT
BENEFITS PACKAGE SUCH AS
MEDICAL, DENTAL,
VISION & 401K
PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS AT 20+
HOURS.
FOR CONSIDERATION
PLEASE APPLY
IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V


MEDICAL
2030


DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
*COTA, OT & PT
for PT/FT/PRN
*RN, LPN & CNAs
PRN/FT/PT all shifts
*Interim Dietary
Manager F/T
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766

RN Full time, Nights, 7P-
7A, exp. pref. on ICU, OB-
L&D, ER & ER, 10A-1OP
Nursing Admin: RN
Night Supervisor, full time,
7P-7A. RN Night Supervi-
sor, per diem, 7P-7A &
Weekend Days, 7A-7P
Med Surg: RN, Full time,
Days- 7A-7P & Full time,
Nights 7P-7A
Social Worker: Per
Diem, exp. pre., MSW req.



Human Resources
Desoto Memorial Hospital
900 N. Robert Ave.
Arcadia, Fl. 34266
OR
Fax Resumes to:
863-494-8400
E-mail: hr@dmh.org
Phone Number:
863-494-8405

Find it in the
Classifieds!


MEDICAL
l 2030


EXPERIENCED
COOK NEEDED
Must Have Minimum 3 Years
Cooking Experience,
in Hospitality or Restaurant
Industries.
Please Fax your Resume
to 941-423 2663.
Interview in Person will be
at: 4950 Pocatella Ave.,
North Port, FL
Between 2PM & 4PM

HORIZON
: HEALTHCARE
INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN
within 11 months
Enrollment ongoing
Call for Class Dates
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Sept 9 '13
LPN-next class starts
Jan 20th '14
Start Working n 2-5 wks!
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506



Great Deals in

the Classifieds!


MEDICAL
L 2030


CNA, for psychiatric office in
Venice, FT, exp req, fax resume
and salary req to 941-412-0477

--. .
LPN for busy Physician's
office. Must be able to
multi-task and be a team
player. Experience
a must. Great Benefits!
Mail Resume to
PO Box 494710
Port Charlotte, FL 33949
MED.SECRETARY/Optical trainee
FT, exp. pref. & organized, ppl
skills Fax PC 941-883-3938






MUSICAL
L 2035





Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUNE'-

pay 4a


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.



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8 5 sudoku. This
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1 3 2 puzzle will have
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2 8 5 9 1 the moment you
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8 352 9

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g L98 tV L 6
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7L ZL96L L6LJ9 C
N 9 6 t L V 8 6 9


8 6 9 9

:Ul3MSNV






Thursday, August 29, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


RESTAURANT/
HOTEL
S2040T


WANTED
EXPERIENCED BARTENDER
Fax resume to 941-639-1625
BARTENDER, Must be Exp.
Apply in Person White Elephant
Pub 1855 Gulf Blvd. Englewood

BUS STAFF
& PART TIME COOKS
NEEDED
for Seasonal Position.
MUST Have Minimum of
2 Years Club Experience.
Apply in Person to
Fill Out an Application at:
Heron Creek Golf & CC,
5301 Heron Creek Blvd.
North Port
COOK/PREP, Days,
No Sunday. Apply within
Wee Blew Inn, Venice.

PUT

CLASSIFIED

TO WORK

FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

EXPERIENCED SERVERS/
BARTENDER NEEDED
F/T Position Sundays are a
Must! Great Perks. Employee
& Spouse golf free when Avail.
Apply in Person Mon-Sat.
266 Rotonda Circle
Ask for Alberto
WAITSTAFF & COOKS, F/T
& P/T. Waterford Golf Club
Restaurant, Venice. Call Nancy
941-468-6419

| SKILLED TRADES
S2050


AC INSTALLERS
Mike Douglass Air Condi-
tioning seeking qualified
A/C Service Technicians.
Min 5 yrs. exp. Must be
well groomed & have clean
driving record. We offer a
Competitive compensation
package including benefits.
This is a drug free work
place.Call 941-473-
2344AC INSTALLERS,

(Healthcare Support)


0-

VWCFineal~tuRmw ilCrn uni

MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN-GROUNDS
Full-Time Position with
Excellent Benefits
Building Maintenance,
HVAC, Electrical,
Plumbing 2 Years Related
Experience / Training
Required
Come Join Our Team!
Email:
ilitchfield@sarasotabayclub.net
DFWP/EOE


AD SL


SKILLED TRADES
2050


Busy Local Cabinet
Company Looking For
EXP. MANUFACTURING
& INSTALLATION HELP.
Reliable Transportation,
Clean Drivers License &
Able To Pass A Drug Test
A Must. Apply Within:
6522 SAN CASA DR.ENG
EXP. SKID STEER OPERA-
TOR Needed ASAP, call
Bryan at 941-915-7095
PLUMBER Construction,
Remodel, and Service Expe-
rience a must. Benefit Pack-
age. DFWP. Ray's Plumbing
941-205-2133
PLUMBER, Exp plumbers
only.New construction through
service, positive attitude and
clean driver's license a must.
Call 941-624-3150
SEAMTRESS WANTED
Experienced only. P/T to F/T
opportunity. Apply in person
10am4pm, Tues-Sat, no phone
calls please. 17218 Toledo
Blade Blvd, #10, Port Charlotte.
TOOL REPAIR, Sales
counter person. Good peo-
ple skills, efficinecy on
computer, dependable &
honest imperative. Insur-
ance and benefits avail.
APPLY IN PERSON: Tropi-
cal Tool Repair. 18480
Paulson Dr, Pt. Charlotte.
See Joe
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!

SALES
S2070


ADVERTISING
ACCOUNT
[EXCUTIV[

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES

WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.

IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


SALES
2070


Advertising Sales
Executive

The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.

If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
Training
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:

Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com

We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.


READY TO MAKE
MORE MONEY?

SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER
Come work with the Sun
newspapers Telephone
Sales, New Business
Developer team
located in
North Port Florida.

We are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a full-time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our telephone sales,
new business developer
team. We are looking for a
highly motivated individual
who thrives on challenges,
loves learning new skills and
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.

We offer:
* Training
* Stable company that
is very Community
minded and involved.
* Opportunity to expand
your business skills

Please email your resume
to:
Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
Employer/Drug & Nicotine
Free Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.


Have A Garage
Sale!


SALES
2070


Charlotte County Water/
Rainsoft, 30 years in
Business, is seeking Exp'd
SERVICE COORDINATOR.
Must be a motivated team
leader, excellent Customer
Service. Email Resume to
ccwrainsoft@msn.com
SALES **
** CASH PAID DAILY**
Excellent workplace! Great
hours & benefits. Base vs.
Generous Commission aver-
age $15+/hr. Port Charlotte
941-625-8800
SHOWROOM
SALES PROFESSIONAL
Needed for Busy Flooring
Store. Experience,
Multi-Tasking & Computer
Skills a Must! Email Resume:
puntagordajob@gmail.com

GENERAL
2100


Maintenance Supervisor
Sun Coast Press is looking for
an enthusiastic individual to
join our team. We are a family
run, well-established & rapidly
growing multi-newspaper
media group and commercial
print operation on the sunny
Southwest Florida Gulf Coast.
We have the following full time
employment opportunity in
our Venice print facility at The
Venice Gondolier.
Job Responsibilities Include:
Lead and assist staff to main-
tain production and building
equipment to manufacturer's
spec. Repair & maintain
production equipment for
two print facilities. Daily
continuous improvement,
leadership, On-Call status
24/7 for emergency repair of
critical equipment
Skills Required: Extensive
experience, preferably 10
years plus, in repair &
maintenance of newspaper or
commercial printing presses.
Supervisory or management
experience in a production
environment preferred.
Ability to troubleshoot, repair,
and maintain according to a
preventative/predictive main-
tenance plan to ensure opti-
mal equipment performance
and minimize downtime of
production equipment.
A thorough understanding of
machine schematics, industry
standards, tolerances, gears,
bearings, drive systems,
electrical, etc.
Community and Urbanite
presses, Martin & Jardis
splicers, and Rima &
Gammerler stackers.
Mueller and Harris
inserters, Quipp stackers,
Dynaric strappers, and Mueller
stitcher/trimmer.
Peripheral equip, such as lift
trucks, compressors, dryers, etc.
Building facilities at all
locations with assistance
from outside vendors.
HVAC, Plumbing, Electrical,
Fire safety, Landscaping, etc.
Good working knowledge
of computers: email,
spreadsheets, word
documents. The ability to
work independently and solve
problems working in a fast
paced, dynamic environment.
Good verbal and written
communication skills.
We offer health insurance,
AFLAC, paid holidays, paid
time off, and 401K. We are a
drug & nicotine free work-
place. Pre-employment drug &
nicotine screening required.
Interested candidates please
send a resume to ccham-
bers@suncoastpress.com or
contact Chuck Chambers at
941-206-1418 to arrange an
interview. Be prepared to
furnish an up to date resume
at time of interview.


I NEED CASH?


L GENERAL
S2100


3AM-12PM 30 PEOPLE NEED-
ED IN OSPREY, CLEANING,
STOCKING, PAINTING.START NOW
EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT-
2394 TAMIAMI TR.PC
941-629-2611
BIKINI DANCERS WANTED
for local sports bar ALSO
Nude dancers needed
for Gentlemans Club.
Please call
941-766-1161

$$ FLOORING INSTALLERS
NEEDED $$
For year-round work!
2 Years Experience. Must have
van, tools, plus Corporation/LLC,
GL insurance, pass background
check, speak English.
Call 855-256-3675 or go to
http://contractor us-installations.co m

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!
LANDSCAPE CREW LEADER,
must have experience (NOT
mowing). Must have good DL.
941-662-8733
MAINTENANCE MAN, P/I
maintenance man for Lake
Suzy condo. Experience &
good people skills a must.
Background check mandatory.
Fax resume to 941-423-8286.
TECHNICIAN, Swimming
Pool. If you are an
upstanding person with
excellent work ethics
applications accepted
between 9 12noon.
$11.00/HR TO START.
Must have Florida drivers
license. MUST HAVE 5 ys
of driving with absolutely
clean driving record.
Howard's Pool World,
12419 Kings Hwy.
Lake Suzy.
NO PHONE CALLS

I LtNICEl >
V Gondolier Sun




THE VENICE GONDOLIER SUN
IS NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS
FOR CARRIERS IN VENICE AND
SURROUNDING AREAS. MUST
HAVE DEPENDABLE VEHICLE, A
VALID FLORIDA DRIVERS
LICENSE AND PROOF OF INSUR-
ANCE.
APPLY IN PERSON:
200 E. VENICE AVE.
VENICE, FL 34285
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....
/Find a Pet
/Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


GENERAL
2100


VETERINARY ASSISTANT
Part time, (13/hrs per wk
$12.00/hr.) for N. Port
office. Must have experi-
ence. send resume and
letter of interest to
Angelanimalclinic@yahoo.com
VETERINARY CLINIC
Kennel/Clinic Closer, 3-7pm,
M-F + weekends. Salary
based on experience & skill.
Pays $8-10, 941-488-1455

WINDOW TREATMENT
& decor company is
seeking individual with min.
3+ yrs. exp. in soft goods
window treatments
and decorating.
eddie@mycreativewindow.com

PART TIME/
TEMPORARY
2110





COME WORK WITH THE SUN
NEWSPAPER CLASSIFIED TEAM,
LOCATED IN NORTH PORT,
FLORIDA. WE ARE AMERICA'S
BEST COMMUNITY DAILY
NEWSPAPER, WITH THE
LARGEST CLASSIFIED SECTION
IN FLORIDA! THIS IS AN
OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITY TO
JOIN A COMPANY WHERE YOU
MAKE THE DIFFERENCE!
WE ARE LOOKING FOR A
PART-TIME PERSON WITH
COMPUTER SKILLS AND A
CHEERY PHONE PERSONALITY
TO JOIN OUR TEAM.
WE OFFER TRAINING IN A
STABLE AND COMMUNITY
INVOLVED COMPANY.
PLEASE EMAIL YOUR RESUME:
HR@SUNLETTER.COM
EOE DFWP
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG &
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED


3000








NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010







100% FREE ATM MACHINE
ATM NETWORK 585-4517
**LIMITED TIME ONLY**
atmasap@att.net
retail/restaurant/marina ect


THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
LABOR DAY,
MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 2ND.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Tuesday,
September 3rd*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, 8/30,
3:30pm for
Saturday, & 4:00 pm
for Sunday, Monday,
& Tuesday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy -oliday!





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, August 29, 2013


ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010




**VENDORS NEEDED**
Food, Gifts, & Spirits for
Bayshore Beer & Wine Fest.
Saturday October 12th.
All Booths $30.00
Call 941-627-1628 ext 101

HAPPY ADS
S3015





Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
S3020


ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
FEMALE HAIRSTYLIST, 46,
looking for Companion, 47-65
Venice-Brad 941-201-9853
FRENCH Hairstylist, looking
for Companion 30-65 yrs of
age. Call 941-228-9270
MASSAGE THERAPY
AND RELAXATION
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classifieds!
RELAXATION AND MORE
CALL TODAY 941-681-6096
RELAXATION
Located in Englewood
Call Stormy 941-549-5520
RETIRED GENTLEMAN, look-
ing for Oriental lady, Trim w/
long black silky hair and like
soft jazz and soft kisses. Call
941-330-4098

SENSATIONS
STRESS RELEASE
941- 766-7995
3860 RT. 41, 2 MI. NORTH
OF PUNTA GORDA BRIDGE.
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR,
SUMMER SPECIALS
941-483-0701 North Port

S SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
K3060



CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
CNA & HHA CLASSES:
Days, Eves, Weekends. $449.
Small Class! CPR/First Aid
Incl. 941-966-2600
www.SunCoastCNA.com
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING -1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570
BORED WITH TAE KWON
DO & MIXED MARTIAL
ARTS? Try Somthing New.
FREE Classes Available in
Tradional Shaolin Kung Fu
More Info Call 941- 204-2826


SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
3060

UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL. SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 941-347-7445
BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
W 3065

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
IADVERTISE!I
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
LOST & FOUND
L : 3090


LOST CAT in the
Cranberry/Tishman area of
North Port. Orange short hair
with white paws. Male
unneutered named Frankie.
Reward. Please call
(941)423-0171





LOST DOG: SHI-TZU MIX
Small Female off white with
grey 15-201bs MISSING
since August 4th from Alton
& Midway/Stanford area Pt.
Charlotte. Pink & tan collar,
microchipped, 9 years old
NEEDS MEDS**REWARD
941-613-4064
LOST DOG: SHI-TZU poodle
mix male champagne color,
approx 22 Ibs MISSING
since August 27th Tuesday,
from Nokomis Suncrest Dr &
Wanda Dr.area Please call
941-275-7148


LOST RX GLASSES Black
Blue Mirror at Light House
Beach. Reward 941-740-0173
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face & back.
Missing from North Port
5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909
ARTS CLASSES
S3091


MAGIC OF MOSAICS
Rosemary, Artist/instr
941-697-7888/941-258-6873
www.FlamingoFanny.com
COMPUTER CLASSES
S3092



Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org


EDUCATION
1 3094


MEDICAL OFFICE
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
at SC gets you job ready. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.
| EXERCISE CLASSES
S3095


GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
RELIGION CLASSES
3096


BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
OTHER CLASSES
3097


CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.
ALTERATIONS
La 5005



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
LABOR DAY,
MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 2ND.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Tuesday,
September 3rd*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, 8/30,
3:30 pm for
Saturday, & 4:00pm
for Sunday, Monday,
& Tuesday
We Wish Everone a
Safe & Happy Holiday!

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!


ALUMINUM
5006


Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages. Scr. lanais, etc...
STRAIGHT LINE
Aluminum Construction
941-475-1931
THE HEIGHTS ALUMINUM,
INC. Screen Rooms *
*Lanais Pool Cages *
Rescreens Seamless
Gutters Soffit* Fascia
Pavers Concrete
941-613-1414 OR
941-492-6064
Lic./Ins. AAA0010565 &
R6ALCL-5AC-33

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!

APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR
5020

DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lie 990010103532/Ins
DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
CABINETRY
5030


CABINETS & FLOORING
Tile*Carpet*Vinyl*
Hardwood*Laminate
Prices That Will Floor You!
941-764-7879

ADULT CARE
5050


SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483
CHILD CARE
5051


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
COMPUTER SERVICE
5053

COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285
1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR,
TUTOR IN YOUR HOME
Reasonable & Prompt! Sr.
Disc. Ask for Stacy
941-451-3186
Seize the sales
with Classified!


COMPUTER SERVICE
5053

EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./lns.
We Come To YOU! *
SUMMER SPECIAL
$30 Flat Rate
CERTIFIED COMPUTER
REPAIR
Free Computer Checkup *
Virus/Spyware/Malware
Removal
941-404-5373
JDS2 COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS!!
941-764-3400 or
941-276-5011
CONTRACTORS
5054


TEDDYS HANDYMAN &
REMODELING, INC.
No Job Too Big or Too Small!
(941)-629-4966 Lic./Ins.
CRC 1327653

CONCRETE
5057


CONCRETE
Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks,
House Slabs, Etc..
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
Custom Design Driveways
Pool Decks Patios.
Decorative Concrete/Natural
Stone. A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES
5060

A CLEAN SWEEP Residen-
tial & Commercial Honest &
Reliable. Serving Sarsota
County. 941-223-0303
A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658
HOMESHEFIELD, Comm &
Residential Cleaning AND
FLOOR CARE: Stripping & Wax
239-400-4113 Lic./Ins.
MRS. CLEANING UP!
1st class cleaning Service!
Specials Now!
$10 off Window Cleaning
941-204-8057
www.mrscleaningup.com
Lic & Insured
r-GET RESULTS-
USE CLASSIFIED!
RESIDENTIAL & OFFICE
CLEANING Consistent,
Thorough, Affordable.
Sarasota, Charlotte, Lee
Counties. Clean Sweep
Call for Free Estimate:
941-391-6645
941-380-0502

ELECTRICAL
5070


DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
"Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646


ELECTRICAL
5070


INTEGRITY ELECTRIC
of Charlotte County.
FULLService Electical.
26 Yrs. Exp! Comm./Res.
(941)-628-1993
Lic# L06000046464
RICHARD CHAFE ELECTRICAL
LLC, Residential & Commer-
cial. 30 Year Master Electri-
cian. 941-661-1940
Lic# ER13014903

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
IM 5080

BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing *
*Bush Hogging *
*ALL Mulching *
SSelective Clearing
*Tree & Stump Removal
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
Lic./Ins

HEATING & AIR
5090


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
INTEGRITY AIR *
Financing Available
FPL Rebates
Residential & Commercial
Sales-Service-Installation
941-465-5208
239-244-9554
Lic/Ins #CACA44874
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738

S.O.S.
A/C &Heat
941-468-4956
16 SEER
AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
LOW AS $2695 INSTALLED
INSTALLED 10 YR WARRANTY
0% APR UP TO 5 YRS TO PAY!
FEDERAL TAX CREDIT AVAILABLE
ST. LIC #CAC1816023

HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
5100

ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
fans, lights, faucets, toilets &
washer/dryer repair, etc...
(941)-661-8585 lic.
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
COASTAL KITCHENS
countertops/door & cab refacing
Call Victor (941)716-0917
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872

CUSTOM RESCREENING
& Repair & Pressure Washing
Visa/MC 941-979-0922

find your Best
Friend In the

DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642






Thursday, August 29, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


S HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
5100

DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins
DRYWALL REPAIRS
WATER DAMAGE ALL REPAIRS
BIG & SMALL! FREE ESTIMATES
941-254-0808
FULL SERVICE CLEAN-OUT
REMOVAL SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
CARTING, DUMPSTERS,
GARBAGE/TRASH, WASTE
AST CLEAN-OUTS
941-451-0071
"We Take Your Junk & Clean-Up"
Call for Free Estimates
LICENSED/INSURED
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#60662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227
HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694

J & J HANDYMAN
941-525-7967, 941-493-6736
Painting, Pressure Washing &
Much More!
Over 30 Years Experience &
Satisified Customers
Serving Venice & Sarasota Areas
NO JOB TOO SMALL OR ODD
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE
LICENSED & FULLY INSURED
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381


SLIDING GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs. Free
Estimates Lic/Ins. Bob @
941-706-6445
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/lns.
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#AAA006387
( -NEED A JOB?-
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
TOM'S HOME IMPROVEMENT
& HANDYMAN SERVICE.
No JOB to BIG or small!
941-408-3954
WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing,Concrete,Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

LAWN/GARDEN
& TREE
L: 5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune,
install, design, removal,
stump grinding.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
TRUCK FOR HIRE
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.


& TREE
S5110AWN/G

FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal *
*Stump Grinding *
*Lawn Service *
*Bucket Service *
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./lns.
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
HILLBILLY HANDYMAN'S
LAWN MOWIN' &
HOME FIXIN '
REAL HONEST WORK WITH
OLD FASHION INTEGRITY!
LIc/INs
CALL BILLY 941-979-7458
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
RESIDENTIAL LAWN CARE
Complete Lawn Care, with
Excellent Customer Service,
Hablamos Espanol
941-626-2623/941-564-7858
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/lnsured941-484-6042
I Employ Classified! I
SOD WORK REMOVE &
REPLACE SMALL JOBS OK, ALL
TYPES OF soD941-716-9912
TJ MILAZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
TJ MILAZZO JR.
941-830-1005
LAND CLEARING, LANDSCAPE
ALL KINDS OF CONCRETE WORK.
BOAT DOCK & SEAWALL REPAIR
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035

L MARINE REPAIR
Z5121




MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329

MASONRY
5129


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
5130


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a
Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-
883-1231
MOVING HELP
$$$ Save $$$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins

PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
5140

r ------------------

BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
100/oOff With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L_ -------------------


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
11Z 5140




50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER

SERVING ENGLEWOOD, NORTH
PORT, PORT CHARLOTTE, VENICE
DANNY MILLER PAINTING, LLC
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING
941-830-0360
FREE ESTIMATES
danspainting4602@comcast.net
LICENSED & INSURED AAA009886
LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do It!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764

Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates Prompt Service
941-484-4576

ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!
PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-00015
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lie # AAA009837
WAYNE PATTON PAINTING
PRESSURE WASHING & REMOD-
ELING. WE DO IT ALL. 30 YRS
EXP. LIC/INS. 941-258-5089
We Do It A Shade Better!
LARRY BATES PAINTING
Free Estimates
Locally Owned & Operated
941-625-1226
Lic/Ins #RRR0002261

PET CARE
5155


DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853

PLUMBING
L 5160


LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
REPIPES, SLAB LEAKS
FULL SERVICE PLUMBING
PRECISION PLUMBING
941-423-3058
#CFC1427378

THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393

POOL SERVICES
5165


ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Preventative Maintenance
Saves You Money & Avoids
Long Term Problems.
941-426-6500
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs. Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps .
*Weekly Maintenance .
941-809-5121 CPC1458222/Ins


POOL SERVICES
5165


Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268

PRESSURE
CLEANING
I 5180

BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736

SCREENING
L 5184


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779 wescreenflori-
da.com Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/Ins.
SELL'S ALUMINUM L.L.C.-
Pool Cage Re-Screens &
S6" Seamless Gutters
FREE ESTIMATES 36 Yrs. Exp!
Greg 941-234-8056 or
941-497-4450 Lic. & Ins.
Servicing Sarasota County
THE SCREEN GAL & FRIENDS
Quality Rescreening. Guaran-
teed. VISA & M/C accepted.
#CBC1256778
941-626-7282
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
WRIGHT'S RESCREENING
QUALITY WORK AT GREAT PRICES!
FAST SERVICE! FREE ESTIMATES!
LIC/INS 941-916-2512 OR
941-575-7446

ROOFING
5185



HOME T11WN4'

Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30 Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors &\Vterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh, 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE C C C #1325731 & INSURED

LEONARD'S ROOFING &
INSULATION INC.
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED
SINCE 1969
Shingle, Tile, Built-Up, Single-
Ply, Metal, Full Carpentry,
Service Available
Reagan Leonard
941-488-7478
LIC # RC 0066574

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187

Reroofing Solutions-Products
for all roof types.
"Why replace when you
can Save it"
A-1 COATINGS
941-426-9354
Lic# CC13-00001693


WAT.E ri co
941-483-4630
Shingles, Slats, Metal, Tile, Repairs
Old Roof Removal Our Specialty
Full Carpentry
*r Free Estimates
LIC #ccc 068184
FULLY INSURED


ROOFING
44 5185


STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838

WINDOW CLEANING
S5225


CLEAR-VIEW WINDOW CLEAN-
ING
i Pressure Washing
SScreen Repair
Commercial & Residential
Licensed & Insured
941-484-5353
TERRY SOWERS
WINDOW CLEANING &
PRESSURE WASHING
Store Fronts, Residential,
and Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES
Accept all Credit Cards
941-697-9439

WINDOW REPAIR
5226


Window & Sliding Glass
Door Repair & Replacement.
Rollers, Locks & Handles
U.S. Window 941-628-8579




6000
qv 1D


MERCHANDISE

GARAGE SALES


6001
6002
6003
6004
6005
6006

6007
6008
6009
6010
6011
6012
6015
6020


6013
6025
6027
6030
6035
6038
6040
6060
6065

6070

6075
6090
6095
6100
6110
6120
6125
6128
6130
6131
6132
6135
6138
6140
6145
6160
6165

6170
6180

6190
6220

6225
6250
6260
6270


Arcadia
Englewood
Lake Suzy
Nokomis
North Port
Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
Punta Gorda
Rotonda
Sarasota
South Venice
Venice
Out Of Area
Flea Market
Auctions

MERCHANDISE

Moving Sales
Arts & Crafts
Dolls
Household Goods
Furniture
Electronics
TV/Stereo/Radio
Computer Equip
Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
Antiques &
Collectibles
Fruits/Veges
Musical
Medical
Health/Beauty
Trees & Plants
Baby Items
Golf Accessories
Exercise/Fitness
Sporting Goods
Firearms
Firearm Access.
Bikes/Trikes
Toys
Photography/Video
Pool/ Spa & Supplies
Lawn & Garden
Storage Sheds/
Buildings
Building Supplies
Heavy Constr.
Equipment
Tools/Machinery
Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
Restaurant Supplies
Appliances
Misc. Merchandise
Wanted to Buy/T rade


ENGLEWOOD
GARAGE SALES
6002


[FRI.-SAT. 9-6 13007
Gallagher. Gillot & David
Furniture, misc.

NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES
6005

[FRI.-SAT. 9AM-3PM
2197 Zuyder Terr. Dishes,
Some crafts, Books, Table
Saw, Sander, Drill press, &
mitre saw. Many more items.
[-FRI.-SUN. 8-? 1205
Ramrod St. Household,
women's clothes, kitchen appli-
ances & much more.
SPT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
6006

-FRI.-SAT. 8-12 674
Chevy Chase St NW. Furni-
ture, tools, fishing equipment,
adult bikes, piano AND MORE!
-FRI.-SAT. 8-5 23327
McCandless. MOVING
SALE- all things must go! Furni-
ture, antiques, etc. Off Kings
Hwy, between Olean & Midway.


"LIQUIDATION SALE"
EVERYTHING MUST GO !!!
SALE DATE: MON, TUES,
WED, THURSDAY ONLY
10:30 AM 3:00 PM -
1205 ELIZABETH ST,
STE J, PUNTA GORDA, FL
(954) 218-6863
MOVING SALE
Furn, poker table w/4 chairs,
16' alum ladder, lanai set. Call
for details, 941-204-6375
ISAT. 7-4:30 297 Tim-
bruce Lane Huge Estate
Sale Collectables, furniture,
piano, antiques, much more!

PUNTA GORDA
GARAGE SALES
6007


ISAT. 8-1 3868 Bor-
deaux Dr., Punta Gorda .
Bed, dresser, end tables,
household items and more
THU-FRI, 8-NOON
5207 Blackjack Circle.
MOVING SALE ALL MUST GO!

You Save

Big Bucks

Shopping
Classifieds!

FLEA MARKET
4 6015








BE YOUR OWN BOSS.
BECOME A VENDOR AT THE
SUN FLEA MARKET
RENT A BOOTH FOR 1 MTH
GET 2ND MONTH FREE
LEASE OPTIONS AVAILABLE.
CALL 941-255-3532
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
OPEN FRI SAT & SUN 9-4PM
18505 PAULSON DR.
PT CHARLOTTE FLORIDA.
ALL VENDORS SUBJECT TO APPROVAL BY
MGMT.

ARTS AND CRAFTS
6025


I NEED HELP... unravel
Macrame Hammock 941-697-
1219
MEMORY BEARS Custom
bears made from loved ones
clothing $50 941-429-0772





The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, August 29, 2013


DOLLS
S6027


CLOWN DOLL Collection
Includes famous clown dolls.
Call for info 941-661-2321
MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls
Have 50 plus in Osprey start at
$15 941-600-1442
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
6030


AREA CARPET plush,nice for
wood floors $85 941-822-
3837
AREA RUG 5x8 w/ rugpad &
Matching 2x3. GUC. Kas.
$200, OBO 941-391-1797

Find it in the


BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED SPREAD white hand
made king or queen $400
941-227-0676
CANVAS WALL DECOR
Fla.colors w/driftwood, shells.
$35 941-505-5747
CARPETS PERSIAN Style,
Brand New 11 x 13 Sage
green $350 941-240-6134
CHANDELIER,BRASS-CRYS-
TAL, 8 lights, chain, 15wx30h
$45, OBO 941-697-1110
CHINA DINNERWARE beauti-
ful serv for 12 w/serving pcs.
$300 941-429-9305

THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
LABOR DAY,
MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 2ND.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Tuesday,
September 3rd*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, 8/30,
F3:30 pm for
Saturday, & 4:00 pm
for Sunday, Monday,
& Tuesday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday!
COFFEE TABLE, end table,
tall table lamp. Good condition
$100 941-698-0694
CONVECTION OVEN: BAKE,
BROIL OR GRILL. FAST & EASY
$50 941-575-8881
DISH SET 44 pc.
Floral/White.
$25 941-875-6271
DISHWASHER AMANA,
white, works good. $50 941-
456-1231
DISPLAY RACK, Double Tier,
2001b capacity. Folds.
$125 941-286-5159
ELECTRIC SKILLET west
bend.hardly used. $15, OBO
941-235-2203
ELECTRIC SKILLET, West
Bend works good. $15, OBO
941-235-2203
ELECTRIC STOVE Amana
glass-top, white, self clean,
great. $75 941-456-1231
ELECTRIC STOVE Like new
with hood Great deal $200,
OBO 575-590-0305
EXTERIOR DOORS metal and
wood/storm screen each $75
941-822-1429
FLOOR LAMP Black rod iron
floor lamp w/3 shelves $7
941-613-2708
FLUORESCENT LIGHTS 4 ft
New in box $40, OBO 941-
697-111010
FRAMED PRINT HOME INTE-
RIOR print rooster 28"H x28"W
new $30 941-228-1745


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
GEORGE FOREMAN GRILL
MACHINE work good in
Osprey $10 941-600-1442
GOTHIC/MEDIEVAL 8 Lights
Chandelier $50 941-763-
0018
GRAND FATHER CLOCK.
HOWARD MILLER MAKE OFFER
862-812-0995
JEWELRY BOX still in box
$40 941-227-0676
JUICER & MEAL MIXERS
BULLET EXPRESS.NOT USED.
$100 941-740-3286
LACE TABLECLOTH 64" x
108" and tablerunners $8.00
$15 941-613-6839
LAMINATE FLOOR Like New
12mm w/pad handscraped
250ft $499 941-429-8507
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS & Box Spring Like
New $100 941-421-4020
MICROWAVE AMANA 30"
over-range, vented,works
good. $35 941-456-1231
MIRROR 3 PIECE Gold
Trim/Flower Petals Big Wall
Clock $40 941-763-0018
MIRROR ROUND 36" DECORA-
TIVE W/ FLOWERS & PELICAN $75
OVAL MIRROR $20.00 LOTS OF
MISC. 941-275-7325



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)
SUNMe




NEW BLOWER squierel cage
220 amp. $150 941-626-
3102
PICTURE 44WX26H.
Vases and Flowers. $25
941-875-6271
PILLOWS ALL sizes, colors
pillow from $3.00 to $5.00
each $5 941-613-6839
REFRIGERATOR 32" Top
freezer, white Ice-Maker $250,
OBO 941-875-9654
REFRIGERATOR GE, white,
top freezer, works good. $50
941-456-1231
RUG HAND knotted, Indo-
Tibetan,6.1+9.3, light beige
$495, OBO 941-639-1646
RUGS ALL sizes in blue shade
$4.00 to $10.00 $10 941-
613-6839


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


SHEETS QUEEN 15" Deep
Vera Wang cream VGC PGI
$60 941-575-2675
SINK/FAUWCET, VANITY,
GOOD,COND,31"H X 31"L X
18"D $90 718-986-3608
STEAM CLEANER SHARK
brand new many attachments
$75, OBO 941-822-3837
STEAM CLEANER SHARK
floor cleaner other parts.
$35, OBO 941-822-3837
TABLE LAMP 36" brwn solid
wood, tan shade, brass base
$25, OBO 941-743-2656
TABLE WROGHTIRON 4
chairs 4by6 glass $75, OBO
941-204-3458
VACUUM, Kirby Sentra, All
attachments Pd. 2150, $500
828-777-5610 (cell)
HOLIDAY ITEMS
6031


COMFORTER SET KING
Snowflakes, snowmen, trees
$20 941-426-0760
LIGHTS XMAX, some unique,
NIB, $1.25 & up,941-624-
0928
FURNITURE
LO 6035


ACCENT CHAIRS very comfy
with green fabric. pics on crg
list $175, OBO 561-222-6431
BAR STOOLS 2 off-white bar
stools. Metal w/vinyl. Like
new!! $50 941-626-5801
BAR STOOLS 3 metal & fab-
ric $75 941-575-8229
BAR STOOLS rattan 30" seat
height backs & arms $80
941-356-0129
BAR STOOLS Steel frames
w/beige mesh seats. $75
941-505-5747
BAR STOOLS Wrought Iron
cream color 29" ex.condition
$125 941-763-2769
BAR, Cherry wood w/brass
rails $200. COMPUTER
DESK $75. 941-625-3165
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED, TEMPEUR-PEDIC Rhap-
sody Queen, w/adj. base, NEW
$1,995 OBO 941-698-9899
BEDROOM SET, Broyhill Full
like New $400, OBO
941-421-4020
BEDS (2) TWIN, BASSETT,
Sealy Posterpedic mattresses
& boxsprings, Ex cond.
$300/ea 941-235-7780
SAdvertise Today!
BEDS 2 Twin beds,mattresses
headboards. $125 941-505-
8832
BISTRO SET Metal Table with
4 wicker stools. New. $165
828-777-5610 (cell)
CHAIR SET, LR Custom
Uphol Dk wood, reddish,
maroon $400 941-575-9800
CHAIR, RATTAN 2 BAR
STOOLS, EX. $25, OBO
941-391-6377
CHAIRS WOOD AMERICAN
COUNTRY NEW COMFORT-
ABLE $85 941-763-2581
CHAIRS WOOD SOLID (2)
LIKE NEW COMFORTABLE $75
941-763-2581
CHEST OF drawers chest of
drawers solid oak ex cond
$100 941-629-7418
COFFEE & 2 END TABLES
Smoky beveled glass inserts
$125, OBO 941-661-7132
COFFEE TABLE 3 tier
With glass top, new, $155
828-777-5610 (cell)
COFFEE TABLE 40"square
glass top. Tropical/island look
$250, OBO 561-222-6431


L FURNITURE
6035


CHAIRS 2 WICKER nice paint-
ed,strong $15 786-306-6335
COMPUTER CHAIR Black,
adjustable, like new. $25, OBO
941-625-9789
COMPUTER DESK computer
desk real nice ex cond $100
941-629-7418
COMPUTER WORK STATION,
36X24 wood-metal exc. cond.
$55, OBO 941-698-8818
COUCH 76" Tropic back-
ground 941-4751268 $150,
OBO 941-475-8147
COUCH MULTI colored $150,
OBO 941-475-8147
COUCH ULTRA soft muted
striped dark colors,like new.
$100 941-235-2613
CURIO CABINET dark wood
w/5 glass shelves & light
$200 941-426-1604
DESK CHAIR Taupe
suede, good, PGI. $45
941-916-1821
DINETTE set with 6 chairs on
rollers ex cond $100 941-
629-7418
DINETTE/CHAIRS, 48" wood
wrought iron frame, very nice
$100, OBO 941-830-8307
DINING BUFFET&TABLE
Montego Collection pedastal
table opens to 65" strong
mahogany expresso color
very good condition $900
941-255-0538
DINING ROOM TABLE GLASS
W/4 CHAIRS GREAT DEAL!
$150 941-924-6109
DINING SET w/6 CHAIRS, Rat-
tan, Biege, Glass Top, 58"x40."
Orig $1100, asking $600 OBO,
941-661-6912 (pix avail)


I FURNITURE
OO 6035


DINING SET beveled Glass
Top w/4 Parsons chairs VGC
$150, OBO 941-698-4768
DINING SET W/HUTCH Table
w/leaf, 4 side, & 2 arm chairs.
Pine. $499 941-626-5801
DINING SET, Rattan,
glass top very nice $295
941-356-0129
ELECTRIC BED Nice quality,
full size, clean, was $1500,
now $450 OBO; trundle bed
$275, 941-698-8969
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Dk wood, Italian, new, Pd
5000 $295 828-777-5610 (Cell)
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
solid oak.doors for tv.storage.
$155, OBO 941-235-2203
HIDE-A-BED COUCH Floral
design in excellent condition.
$150 941-629-6382
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
KITCHEN CHAIRS 2 arm
chairs w/casters beige cush-
ion $20 941-613-2708
LIVING ROOM Set (sleeper)
White couch, love seat, chair/9pil-
lows New $499 941-681-2433
LIVING ROOM set Sofa,
Loveseat, Chair, ottoman. A
Must see! Neutral colors Exc
cond. $550 941-275-7325
MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS/BOXSPRING
FULL set, clean, North Port.
$85 941-276-2337
ORIENTAL MIRROR, w/gold
bamboo trim 28Wx39L. Ex.
Cond. $100 941-575-4364


FURNITURE
6035


PATIO TABLE Set Brown &
Jordon 42"sqGlass,4 swl/rock
$249, OBO 941-676-2711
PRIMITIVE JELLY Cupboard
over 100 yrs. old, door needs
some work, orig. hardware,
$150. Lincoln Rocker, old,
needs canning, $20. Retro
Cabinet sliding glass doors
top, wood doors bottom, $25.
Call 941-625-3918.
PUB SET Black metal w/2
matching chairs and glass top.
$110, OBO 941-426-1604
PUB TABLE oak, leather
seats. 38"round. pics on crg.
list $250, OBO 561-222-6431
RECLINER LA-Z-BOY, beige,
great shape, Iv. msg. $100
941-493-0674
RECLINER, electric, tan,
many positions. Good for heart
patient. $125 941-475-6260
I Classified = Sales |
RECLINER, Lane, taupe
leather good cond. $100
941-235-2613
RECLINER/STRESSLESS
LANE Black Leather
w/ottoman. 2 yrs old. $250
941-830-8606
RECLINER/STRESSLESS
W/OTTOMAN. Dark
Brown leather. $200
941-830-8606
RECLINERS 2 matching rat-
tan arms tropical print very
nice $299 941-356-0129
Riverside Armoire $195;
Bassett Chest of Drawers
$50; Queen Anne Full Length
Dressing Mirror $125; Oak
Coffee Table $15; (2) Neon
Bar Lights $75 each, 214-
998-1429


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.



SLADOKLA


983 2 7

925

5 7 4 8

2 4 3

S25

61 4 5 2

72 9 36

8 2 4 1 _


Level: beginner
Level: Beginner


Fun By The
Numbers

Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
sudoku. This
mind-bending
puzzle will have
you hooked from
the moment you
square off, so
sharpen your
pencil and put
your sudoku
savvy to the test!


Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Z 68 L 9 L C9V
9 L 8VZ7 9 9 6
1V 9 ~ 96 69Z L I.
6 8 ZL S II. 9 E9
9 1 Z 1 6 8 6 L
8 L i, 68 9 s
8 It 6 9 L I. 9 Z
L 9 99 Z 6 L V9
L V E I MSN. 9
:Ul3MSNV





Thursday, August 29, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


Challenger
DIRECTIONS:
Fill each square with a number, one through nine. /N 4;,
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right.
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to 22
total in upper and lower right.
THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge 9 18
Time 3 Minutes
16 Seconds 3 18
Your Working
Time Minutes
Seconds 28 11 9 15 11
2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.
solution -zs 23
Yesterday's 3 7 7 2
Challenger
Answers 23 20 23 2020

Cryptoquip 2011 by King Features Syndicate

8-29


JH W HWGPNM WTSODMM TWGD

LPEA EJSI GWAC SIOPWS


JAHDTSJPAM, EPNKL


QDPQKD


TWKK IDO GDOCK MSODQ?
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: WHEN THEY ENGAGED
IN LOUD REVELRY ON THE MERRY-GO-ROUND,
IT WAS VERY MUCH A CAROUSEL CAROUSAL.
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: Q equals P


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker
WHERE HAVE I GOT
YOU BEEN, LOST
BEETLE 7

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HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne
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MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters
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BRACE LET?


00D.IHEM FINP A WIRE CUTTER,
PUT ON WIS BRACELET ANP
DON'T LJEA\E MY HOUSE FOR
A WEEK.


"I meant to tell you ... he doesn't beg."


SDAVIS CUP
HOST CITIES


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Wednesday's unlisted clue: PEW
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: HILLS, NY
Belgrade Lyon Nice Seville
Boston Malmo Paris Stuttgart
Fort Worth Milan Portland Sydney
London Moscow Prague
2013 King Features, Inc. 8/2E


PICKLES By Brian Crane
4 O'r Yo0 CARE
WWAT PEOPLE 1-MIMIK
ABOOT L0Y0, EARL?

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L\341M PEOPLE SE6
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1, NO CLASS' 7--


B.C. By Mastroianni & Hart


Dist. by Creators


SPORTS
SLEUTH


lohnHartSu dios.comI





The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii


U'7l LY .JL I NEWSPAPERS


t aer deals in the Business & Ser e


blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and A

a the Classified Section of the Sun!


a I 1 6 *3


DEAR DR. ROACH: In
2003, my husband had
a "mild" heart attack
and had one stent
put in. He was put on
Plavix, Lipitor and one
regular-strength aspirin
a day. We used to walk
a few times a week for
exercise. The past year
or so, his leg muscles
have been hurting. He
told his primary care
physician about this
a while ago, but the
doctor just dismissed
it. Lately, the pain has
been much worse. He
sometimes needs a cane
to get around. He went
back to his primary care
doctor and requested
a change in Lipitor (he
doesn't have a choles-
terol problem), hoping
the pain would go away
or lessen with a dif-
ferent drug. Instead of
changing the Lipitor, his
doctor added neurontin,
300 mg several times a
day, for the pain. Does
this make sense to you?
- P.O.C.
ANSWER: There are a
few things to talk about
here. First, even though
your husband's choles-
terol might not be high,
anyone who has had a
heart attack, no matter
how mild, gets treat-
ment with a station drug
to reduce the likelihood
of a second heart attack
and death. So, every-
one who can take one
should.
Second, leg pain in
someone with coronary
artery disease should raise
the possibility of periph-
eral artery disease. This
condition is often not
diagnosed, but it ought
to be. It is caused, like
heart disease, by block-
ages in arteries, but in
this case, the arteries to
the legs. It can be treat-
ed with the same kinds
of medications used for
heart blockages, but also
with stents or surgery if
needed. The condition
is easily diagnosed by
noninvasive vascular
studies.
Third, muscle aches
when taking station drugs
happen, and it's by no
means a rare condition.
However, most often
it happens within six
months of being on the
station. Blood tests to
look for muscle break-
down can identify the
most serious complica-
tions of stations, but the
tests can be normal.
Even so, people still may
get better by changing
stations. Neurontin is a
very helpful medication
for neuropathy, but I'm
oon


Dr. Roach
Readers may
write Dr
Roach at
PO. Box
536475,
Orlando,
FL 32853-6475
not convinced that we
know yet why your hus-
band is having muscle
pains. A repeat visit to
the doctor is in order.
DEAR DR. ROACH: A
couple of years ago, I had
an abdominal ultra-
sound, and I was told I
had an abdominal aortic
aneurism (5.2 cm). A
month ago, I had another
ultrasound, and the an-
eurism is now 6.4 cm. Is
this something that may
need treatment?
I'm 82. -W.H.
ANSWER: The aorta is
the largest blood vessel
in your body, taking all
the blood from your
heart and delivering it to
your body.
An aneurism is a weak
spot in the wall, caus-
ing it to expand like
a tire. The larger the
aneurism, the higher
the risk of rupture.
The risk is very low
below 5 cm, but it goes
up rapidly when the
aneurism is larger than
5.5 cm. Yours is now at a
point where the risk for
rupture is high (about
10 percent likely in the
next year), and most
surgeons would strongly
urge you to undergo
elective repair as soon
as possible. Sometimes
these can be repaired
endovascularly (through
the blood vessel, not by
opening up the abdo-
men), and this may be
less risky, especially
since you are in your
80s.
Because of the large
size, and because it has
grown significantly in
the past couple of years,
I would strongly advise
consulting with a vas-
cular surgeon to discuss
your options as soon as
possible.
Dr. Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer
individual letters, but
will incorporate them
in the column whenever
possible. Readers may
email questions to
ToYourGoodHealth@
med.cornell.edu or
request an order form of
available health newslet-
ters at PO. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Health newsletters may
be ordered from www.
rbmamall.com.


REX MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Graham Nolan
. .I I


ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman


1 JOINED A BOOK CL.B.
GARFIELPi SOON MY
BRAIN WILL EXPANP!



--
5-


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein
IT'S BAP ENOUGH WHAT IINP OF PAP
THAT YOU WATCH 50 WOULP I BE IF I LET
MUCH SPORTS--BUT MY OY WATCH THE
A P1ES'ASON GAME REGULAR SEASON...
ON A SCHOOL NIGHT-









MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
MAR' TRIES
TO SAVE '"SHOL.UL WE STIFLE OUR
SHANNON'S EFFORTS TO HELP ONE
YO5 ANOTHER SF.CAUSE OF AN
LJNTRUE POLC~y TriHAT
S SA-S THE GuEST
15 AL'IA'6S R, HT7

A if I .


WITHOUT T1AININ&
UP TO fIT BY NEXT
WEEK HE'LL BE
RGAPY. I'IGHT, SON2

/ 1I1HT, PAP.



PkW


,.-^
S OF COURSE
NOT, DR.
( MORAN...I
S WOULD EXPECT
SYOu TO!


I'M NOT IISKIN& A
TORN OCULA1? TENPON
BECAUSE HE'S NOT
IN &AMGE HAPE!
I THINK I
3 NEEP THE
POST&AME,
TOO.


rIVT'S WEIRD HOLJ
L THAT MrAKES THE
COFFEE TASTE SO
MUCH BETTER.
", HAT .KES "


Muscle aches may not

be due to station


Thur'i..:,:, A u ,j .t 2' 20 I 3


::,:.. ur ..ur"i net


,T







1=


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463 1638


SSUN AEW
NEWSPA'


BU SINEi ISI&SERVIU tIJ [CEb] I R ECT OR Y


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek FEW E U"STO
A. FEW MORE QUESTIONS AND LT' SEE...I I[E-. OUPR MAAE
YOUR PRFERREI> 5sOPPER AI N ARES5..,WAT \ S OUR
If I had accelerated around 5LON RA T L
that tuLr I jid v'e I 'WILLBE A} I"u5I
r ir C_..


UJ I Idol I tal '
.,I" .a) .

REPYUL 8

p ANICA PATRICK'5 SUCCESS
L Lk L L a AT 5UCH A YOUNG AGE
n WAS A RESULT OF HE
%. MIN& A ----
SUREAS ----
-1 NNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.



(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: AVIAN SKULK ENCORE SPRAIN
Answer: The newlyweds with the flu were -
LOVESICK

Taking a measure of coconut


BLONDIE By Dean Young and John Marshall
LATELY I'VE ( I PUT A FEW I WHAT ABOUT 0 I DECIDED i
BEEN INVESTING BUCKS IN YOU, DAG? TO JUST STICK
IN SPACE UNDERWATER T TO THE tr-


Dear Heloise: How do
you measure coconut?
Tightly packed in the
measuring cup, like
brown sugar; or loosely
measured, like flour
and sugar? Patrick C.,
Colville, Wash.
Good question, Patrick!
Grated or flaked coconut
should be lightly added
to a measuring cup, then
gently patted down. Add
more if needed, and level
off the top.
Don't overfill or crush
the ingredients they
should not be hard to
remove from the measur-
ing cup. When coating
a pan while making a
chocolate cake, flour can
make the cake look, well,
not so pretty. So, instead
of flour, use cocoa! Give it
a try. Heloise

Don't wear
perfume
Dear Heloise: In
response to your recent
column about not
overdoing your perfume,
I have worked in hospital
settings and would like to
remind your readers that
they should refrain from
wearing perfume when
visiting patients. Scents
can be very upsetting
(literally) to anyone who
isn't feeling well.
Many medical facilities
advise staff not to wear
perfume. I can't tell you
how often I get on an
elevator or just walk down
a hallway and am over-
whelmed by the perfume
smell of someone who


Hints from Heloise

had gone ahead of me. -
Virginia P., Baton Rouge,
La.

Handy pantry
funnel
Dear Heloise: Hello!
Today it was time to
empty two partial liquid
laundry detergent con-
tainers into one. I didn't
have a funnel to fit the
detergent bottle.
In the pantry, I spotted
some little kids' cardboard
cone-style party hats left
over from a party. I cut the
pointed end to fit snugly
into the detergent bottle.
No detergent burps or
spills, and the used "fun-
nel" went into the gar-
bage. Mary, via email

Homemade air
freshener
Dear Heloise: Here's an
easy way to make a home-
made air freshener: All you
do is slice some lemons
into a pot of water and let
it come to a boil. Turn the
heat off and let sit on the
stove. The aroma will waft
through your home, giving
a wonderful citrus smell.
- M.G., via email


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE By Lynn Johnston


JUM3BLL
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Thursday, August 29, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11







The Sun Classified Page 12 EINIC ads.yoursun.net Thursday, August 29, 2013


Calls to old girlfriend

put wife on full alert


DEAR ABBY: While
I was out of town, my
husband, "Miles," ran into
his high school girlfriend
at a party hosted by
good friends of ours. She
has been through a bad
divorce, and Miles insists
his desire to keep in
touch with her is merely
concern for a dear friend.
Until I put a stop to it,
he was calling her every
night, talking with her for
at least an hour at a time.
He said there was nothing
more to it.
I have now insisted that
he call her only once a
week and in my presence.
He's complying, but it
distresses me to hear him
enjoy the conversation so
much. Miles truly cares
about her and she makes
him laugh. He says he
loves only me and will
never leave me. He's a
good man and I believe
him, but ...
How should I handle
this? I don't want to forbid
him to talk to her, but I
am feeling very insecure.
Am I foolish to let their
contact continue? We
have been married 30
years. THREATENED
IN KENTUCKY
DEAR THREATENED:
Tell your husband you
know he loves you, has
good morals and would
never leave you, but that
you feel intimidated by
his renewed relationship
with his high school
sweetheart. Tell him you
know he is kindhearted,
but for your mental
health to please consider
winding down these con-
versations. And it would
be a kindness for him to
recommend a counselor
to his friend to help her
resolve her issues.
DEAR ABBY: I'm 27 and
the mother of a 6-year-
old boy. I kiss him on the
mouth and never thought
twice about it until today,
when my husband told
me it's "creepy" that I do it
at my son's age.
In my family we have
always kissed on the
mouth, and I still kiss
my mother this way. Is it
"weird" or inappropri-
ate? I didn't think so,
but now I'm concerned.
- "SMOOCHY" IN
TACOMA, WASH.


Dear Abby

DEAR "SMOOCHY": Did
you also kiss your father
on the mouth? Different
families have different cus-
toms, and if your husband
spent much time around
your family he should have
noticed that. I don't see
anything weird or inappro-
priate about the way you
kiss your child. If your son
reaches an age where it
makes him uncomfortable,
I'm sure he'll let you know.
DEAR ABBY: I work
in customer service and
have noticed that more
than half the people who
write in abruptly end
their emails with "Please
advise."
To me, it seems rude
and demanding. I feel that
if a question has already
been asked, there is no
need to follow up with this
phrase. What is the proper
etiquette for using this
phrase? OFFENDED IN
NEW JERSEY
DEAR OFFENDED:
There is no rule of
etiquette pertaining to the
use of the phrase "please
advise." Many individuals
who write to me for advice
end their letters that way.
It's not offensive; it simply
means the person is asking
for a reply.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother Pauline Phillips.
Write DearAbby at www.
DearAbby.com or PO. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
For everything you need
to know about wedding
planning, order "How to
Have a Lovely Wedding."
Send your name and
mailing address, plus
check or money order for
$7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear
Abby, Wedding Booklet, PO.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in
the price.)


"Faithful is he that calleth you, who also will do it."
- I Thessalonians 5:24.
Cheer up! God has His hand on you and is not going
to leave you stranded. He who hath begun a good
work in you will continue.


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz
SHI I HEAR w1)ELL, E )WON'T NEED ANY'
y'0'tRE MY' 16NALS...('LL JUST FO6 IT 8W
CATCHER.. 'E,AND U0CATC 'EM OMKAV?
eB -ME '1(t, HAT ulAt5THAT
S(ERCRAT E W CISTLIN ?





CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers


I KN WO 4Ar I HAgve
A LOT TO LFAP...


SHOE By Gary Brookins & Susie

SO, YOU'RE BACKTNEVER TAKE
FROA VACATION... RALPH'S
SHOW WAS YOUR i DISCOUNT I


NOT ONLY DID THEY
LOSE MY LUGGAGE,
THEY OFFERED NO
SNACKS...


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


I HOROSCOPE I
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You know you're truly at


opening. And the rules are a little foggy. Just know
that you'll be judged on originality, which is good
because you're highly original.


VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).When the orthodox


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).You'll laugh when PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Resistance is the easiest


methods do not provide a satisfactory answer to it's funny, and you'll laugh when it seems like it choice. Anyone can point fingers and say why things
your questions, it is only natural to seek a different should be funny but isn't really, and when it's not are not working. You'll make the hard choice to align


home when you don't worry about what value you CANCER (June 22-July 22).You need your space, view.
are adding to the situation.Your values inherent. It especially in the morning. It would be ideal if people (Sept. 23-Oct.23Some partners a
especially in the morning. It would be ideal if people LIBRA (Sept. 23-0ct. 23). Some partners are


will never leave you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). There is nothing wrong
with pleasure-seeking. In fact, it may be the very
best thing you could seektoday. It will certainly
make life more enjoyable for you and all around
you.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).The competition is on.
It's not formal, organized or obvious, but it's hap-
oon


avoided you (and you them) until after you've had attuned to what you need and require little or no


funny but others are laughing anyway.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).Thinkcarefully


with others and do something great together.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (Aug. 29).The first part of


before you decide on your next evolution. You may your year will invigorate your personal life with


plenty of time to handle the work that was left over prompting in the service of those needs.Those are reason that you can always go back to the way


from yesterday.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22).The rules of science and
social science are often named after the people


the kind you should seek now. things were, but evolution doesn't work that way.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Most humans are AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You can't judge
capable of the things that few humans do. Circum- yourself on what has yet to be proven. What you


who discovered them. If you were responsible for a stances make a difference in what we ultimately


principle, what would it be?


think you are capable of may be irrelevantto the


produce in our lives, final score. Strive to produce results.


fresh energy. Next, your household gets a makeover
in time for you to do some hosting in November.
Unexpected gifts and money are part of the fun
at the start of 2014. Romance is featured in April.
Cancer and Sagittarius people adore you. Your lucky
numbers are: 3, 21,38, 40 and 28.


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

6 5 3 2 Rating: BRONZE
2 5 9 7 Solution to 8/28/13

18 2 5 3 6 9 7 1
3 4 3 6 7 1 9 2 8 4 5

5 9 3 6 149785 3 2 6
2 572643198
1 5 3 7 8
6 3 8 97 1 2 5 4
4 7 1 6 1 4 91258 63
S714826539
6 5 25 3 4 1 9 6 8 7

3 1 9 6 8 986537412

2 5 1 3 2
8/29/13
8/29/13


The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, August 29, 2013






Thursday, August 29, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORTCHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


AUG. 29 E=fN, E PRIME TIME
ABC7 News Wold News Millionre. To Be a Motive: Ruthless An execuve Motive: The One Who Got (1) Rookie Blue: Decepton ABC7 News (:35)Jimmy
ABC 7 7 7 10 7 7 at6(N) DianeSawyerOscar themed Millionaire? assistant is murdered. (V14) (N) AwayAngie must crackdown a ndyand Swarek cover for at11 (N) KimmelLive
(N) week (R) (HD) kiler. (N) Marlo. (N) (R)
ABC7 News World News The70'Clock NFL Preseason Football: New Orleans Saints at Miami (:01) Rookie Blue: Decepton ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC 2 7 11 7 @6:00pm(N) DianeSawyer News (N)(HD) Dolphins from Sun Life Stadium (Uve) AndyandSwarekcover for @11:00pm KimmelLive
_(N) Marlo. (N) 1(N) (R)
WINK News CBS Evening WINKNews Inside 21/2 Men 21/2 Men (01) Big Brother 15(N) (HD) Elementary: Dirty Laundry WINK News (:35) Late
CBS Ms213213 5 5 5 at 6pm (N) (HD)News(N) (HD) at7pm (N)(HD) Edition (N)(HDWalden's Kate'sfashion manager ofahotel is found atllpm(N) ShowBill
identity. (R) line. dead. (R) (HD) (HD) Murray. (N)
10 News, CBSEvening Wheel Jeopardy!: 21/2 Men 21/2 Men (01) Big Brother 15(N) (HD) Elementary:Dirty Laundry 10 News, (:35) Late
CBS io 10 10 o 0o6pm(N) News(N)(HD) Fortune:Best Teen Walden's Katesfashion anagerof a hotelisfound 11pm(N) ShowBill
Friends Tournament identity. (R) line. dead. (R) (HD) Murray. (N)
NBC2News NBC Nightly Wheel Jeopardy!: Ameica's Got Talent: Live Hollywood Game Night: That Hollywood Game Night: NBC2News (35) The
NBC 2232232 2 2 2 @6pm(N) (HD)News(N)(HD) Fortune:Best Teen ResultsShow Smoveon;OneCelebrityGameShowMusical Portraitofa KillerPartyFinal 11pm(N) TonightShow
_Friends Tournament Direction. stye. (R) night. (N)(HD) (HD() (N) (D)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly Bucs Bonus -NFL Preseason Football: Washington Redskins at Tampa Bay Buccaneers Bucs Bonus NewsChannel (35) The
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:00(N) News (N)(HD) Show (N) from Raymond James Stadium (Uve) Show(N) 8at11:00(N) TonightShow
I(I(HDN)(
FOX 4 News at Six JudgeJudy NFL Preseason Football: Washington Redskins at Tampa Bay Buccaneers from Raymond FOX 4 News at Ten Local
FOX 3222222 4 4 4 Community news; weather; Catshoofng. James Stadium (Uve) news report and weather
traffic; more. (N) (R) update. (N)
FOX136:00 News News TMZ(N) omg!Insider Glee: Wonder-ful Glee club NewGid TheMindy FOX13 10:00 News The FOX13 News Access
FOX 11313 13 13 13 eventsof the day are reported. HarryStyles. (N) performsStevie Wonder. ( Datng Project top news stories are Edge(N) (HD) Hollywood(N)
____(N)(HD) (HD) convention. (R) Halloween updated. (N) (HD) (HD
BBCWodid Nightly The PBS NewsHour Impact Antiques Roadshow: Doc Martin: Born with a The Life of Muhammad: The March Story behind
PBS 3 3 3 3 News Business and legacy of march discussed. Billings, MT Realistic Shotgun Crying baby. (R) Holy Peace Shari'a and 1963 March on Washington.
America Report (N) (N)(HD)) paintings. (R) (HD) more. (R) (H)) (R) (HD)
BBCWodd Nightly The PBS NewsHour Impact WEDU Arts Suncoast The March Story behind In Performance at the Building the DreamANatonal
WEDUI 3 3 3 3 News Business andlegacy of march discussed.Plus (HD) Business 1963 March on Washington. White House Jennifer monumentin honorof MLK.(N)
___America Report(N) (N)(HD) Forum (R (HD)) Hudson. (R (HD)) (HD))
21/2 Men 21/2 Men Big Bang The Big Bang The Vampire Diaries America's Next Top Model WINK News @10pm (N) (HD) How Met How Met
CW 11 21 6 Lovers' Jake's Sheldon Penny's AmericanGothic Old Turntable. (R) (HD) Mother Mother
identies. step-dad. mediates. singing. acquaintances. (1 (HD) Suburban life. Game Night
Queens King of 21/2 Men Engagement The Vampire Diaries America's Next Top Model 21/2 Men Rules Fiends The Friends Joey's
CW I) 9 9 9 4 Shopper Queens Lovers' Audrey is American Gothic Old Turntable. (R) (HD) Jake's Engagement: Gellers'35th. new gir. (1VPG)
stalking. (HD) Flower Power identities. Dumb acquaintances. (R (H1D) step-dad. Cheatng
Loves Seinfeld The Family Feud Family Feud White Collar Pilot, Part 1 WhiteCollar Pilot, Part 2 Seinfeld Scrubs Baggage(HD) Excused:
MYN 3 11 11 11 14 Raymond: "Jerry" pilot. (1VPG) (R) (1VPG) (R) Conman helps FBI catch an Conman helps FBI catch an Susan Promotion Bandana Man
Super Bowl elusive crook. elusive crook foundation. campaign. (R)
Access Seinfeld The Family Guy American White Collar Pilot, Part 1 White Collar Pilot, Part 2 Family Guy American Seinfeld Susar Sunny Public
MYN 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) "Jerry" pilot. Guys join tribe. Dad!: Jack's Conman helps FBI catch an Conman helps FBI catch an Murder Dad! foundation. access show.
(HP)) Back elusive crook elusive crook. mystery. Kidnapped.
Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang The Big Bang Law & Order Criminal Intent Law & Order Criminal Intent How Met How Met The Office: The Office
IND 312 12 4 38 12 Guys join tribe. Murder Sheldon Penny's Fami Values Fanatc Wrongful Ufe Murder evidence. Mother Mother Game Sabre New Oscarcomes
mystery. mediates. singing. murderer. (HD) (HD) Suburban life. Night policies, back.
Without Trace: BaitWoman Withouta Trace: In the Dark Criminal Minds Divining Rd Criminal Minds Profiling 101 Ciminal Minds: Amplificaton House: Nobody's Fault The
ION 2 2 2 13261817 and children missing from Blind teen ges missing while Copycatmurdererterrorizes hescience of criminal profiling Racetocontain chemical team is placed under review.
yacht. (HD) camping. smalltown. (HD) weapon. (HD) (HD)
A&E 262626 26139150 181 First 48 Home invasion. The First 48: Shattered First 48 Brutal shooting. 48 Case reaches trial. Panic 911 (N)(HD) (:01) Panic 911 (R) (HD)
(5:30) Grease (78) *** During the 1950s, a teenager falls National Lampoon's Vacation ('83, Comedy) *** A Manual: Off Manual: The Pitch: SquareTrade
AMC 565656 563053 231 for a squeaky-clean new girl in school. family vacation faces many obstacles. (R) (HD) Roading Brewery(N) Warranty provider. (N)
APL 444444443668 30Stuffers (R) (HD) Swamp'd Swamp'd Swamp'd Swamp'd Swamp'd Swamp'd Swamp'd Swamp'd Swamp'd Swamp'd
BET 353535 3540 22 270106 & Park Top music videos. (N) Big Momma's House ('00) */2 FBI stakeout goes to extremes. Getting Played ('05, Comedy) Filmed seduction.
BRAVO 68 686868 51 185 Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (R) Eat, Drink (N) Housewife Conclusion.
(5:50) South (:21) Tosh.O Chappelle's Chappelle's (:54) Daniel Tosh: Completely (56) Sunny Sunny Last (:58) Tosh.O (R) (:29) Tosh.O (R) The Comedy Central Roast
COM 66 6666 6615 27190 Pk (R) ( () Show Show Serious (R) (HD) wishes. (HD) (HD) of Flavor Flav (R)
DISC 40 40 40 402543120 Tickle (R) Tickle (R Amish Merlin's plan. (R) Amish Mafia: Paradise Airplane Daytime heist. Airplane (N) (HD) Airplane Daytime heist.
E! 46 4646 46 2726196 Kardashians Placenta. E! News (N) (H) Total Divas Surprise. Police (R) (HD) E! Spec. E! Spec. C. Lately News (R)
FAM 55 55 55 5510 46199 (5:30) National Treasure: Bookof Secrets ('07) National Treasure ('04, Adventure) **'/2 Treasure hunter protects history. The 700 Club (TVG)
FOOD 37 3737737 76 164 Chopped Herb stems. |Chopped( (RH) Cutthroat (R) |Chopped Two meats. Chef Wanted (N)(HD) Race Geoduck menu.
(4:30) Iron Man ('08, Action) ~ A1 An Iron Man 2 ('10, Action) *** Tony Stark finds himself surrounded by Wilfred Being Wilfred: WilfredBeing (:31) Iron Man
FX 51 51 51 51 5849 53 arms dealer becomes a superhero. enemies who want the secrets of Iron Man. (PG-13) a hero. Stagnation a hero. 2 (10)
GSN 17917917917934179184 Fam. Feud |Fam Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Newlywed Newlywed |Newlywed Newlywed Fam. Feud Fam.Feud Fam. Feud Fam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73240 Prairie: Founder's Day Prairie (TVG) Love Is a Four Letter Word ('07) Legalistic love. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
HGTV 41 4141415342 165 Renovation (R) (HD) Hunters Hunters Renovation (R (HD) Flop (R) Flop (R) Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
HIST 81 818181 3365 128PawnStars Pawn Stars PawnSt Pawn S Paw PawStas PawnSrs PawnStars PawnStars Hatfields Hatfields (02)TopGear (R) (HD)
LIFE 36 3636 365241 140 Wife Swap (1VPG) Wife Swap (TVPG) Runway Outdoors. (R) Project Runway Raiding a closet. (N) Supermarket: Sauces Double (R
NICK 25 2525 252444252Sponge Sponge Swindle Boy accidentally sells baseball card. Full Hse ~Full Hse Nanny Nanny Friends Friends
OWN 58 5858 5847 103161 Breaking (R) (HD) Breaking (R) (HD) Dateline (HD) Dateline on ID: Taken Dateline (HD) Dateline (HD)
QVC 14 14 12 9 14 13 50JAI John Hardy Barbara Bixby Jewelry Portfolio Silver pieces. Michael Dawkins Judith Ripka Sterling Collection
SPIKE 57 57 57 57 2963 54 Cops s () HD (R) Cops(HD() Cop () (HD) Cops (HD) Impact Wrestling (N) (HD)Fight (N)
SYFY 67 67 6767 64180Land That Time ('09) Land of the Lost ('09, Comedy) Parallel universe. Age of Dinosaurs (13) Dinosaurs in L.A. (NR Land of the Lost ('09) **
TBS 59 59 59 59 32 62 52 Queens Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family |Family Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Jonah Hill. (R)
TCM 65656565 TorhyBlane (:45) Torchy Runs for Mayor ('39) Torchy Smart Blonde (37, Mystery) (:15) The Mystery of the Wax Museum ('33) (:45) I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang
TCM 65 66 6) ** runs against a corrupt mayor. Solvinga murder. Lionel Atwill. Horror in wax. (32, Crime) Escape from prison.
TLC 454545445 157 72 39Toddlers Disco theme. Atlanta (R) Atlanta (R) Atlanta (R) Atlanta (R) 4 Weddings (N)(HD) FourWedd (N)(HD) 4 Weddings (R) (HD)
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TOON 1248012412446 20 257Adventure IRegular Regular MAD (R) Crew (R) IRegular King King Dad (HD) Dad (HD) Family Family
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TRUTV 63 636363 50 30 183 Dumbest ( Dumbest Base-jumper. Dumbest (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (N) Jokers(R) (:01) Top 20 (1
TVL 6262626231 54 244M*A*S*H |M*A*S*H M*A*S*H 30th Reunion "M*A*S*H" reunion. Raymond Raymond: The Letter Raymond Raymond Queens
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CNBC 393938 39 37 102Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Greed A church charity. Greed Southern charm. Greed (R) Mad Money (R)
CNN 32 32323218 38 100 SituationRoom (N) Erin Burnett (N) Cooper 3600 (N) (HD) Piers Morgan LIVE (N) Cooper 3600 (R) (HD) ErinBurnett (R)
CSPAN 18 1818 183712 109 House of Reps (N) Town Hall August (N) Key Capitol Hill Hearings Congress at work. (N) Key Hearings (N)
FNC 64 6464 644871 118 Special Report (N) (D) The FOX Report (N) The O'Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) (H1) On the Record (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 83 838383 40 103 PoliticsNation (N)(HD) Hardball with Chris (N) Chris Hayes (N) (1H) Rachel Maddow (N) Last Word (N) (HD) Chris Hayes (R) (HD))
CSS 28 28 28 28 49 70 The Best |ACC Pre SEC Ftbll College Foolball: Tennessee-Martin Skyhawks at Chattanooga Mocs (Uve) (HD) In Huddle SEC Ftbll
ESPN :"' F'o '" Collee Foolball: North Carolina vs South Carolina (ive) (HD) College Foolball: I Ii::i:: .i Rebels at Vanderbilt Commodores (Wve)
ESPN2 30 30 30 30 6 59 74 US Open Tennis (Wve) 2013 U.S. Open Tennis: Second Round: from USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center (ive) SportsCenter (H))
FS1 48 48484842 69 83 Football Daily (HD) FOX Thursday (HD) ) College Foolball: Utah State Aggies at Utah Utes from Rice Eccles Stadium (live) FOXSports
FSN 72727272 56 77 Marlins Marlins MLB Baseball: Miami Marlins at Washington Nationals (U(veH) ) Marlins Marlins Marlins FOXSports
GOLF 49494949 5560 3041 LPGA Tour Golt Safeway Classic: First Round (ive) (HD) Onthe (HD) Feherty (HD) PGATour GolfCntrl n the
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 (5:30) Pro Fantasy PL World Premier Auctions America (N)
SUN 3838 4014014557 76 Football (Replay) (HD)) Florida Insider Fishing Report (N) New College (HD) Sportsman Florida Insider Fishing Report (R) FOXSports
Good Luck Jessie Jessie Love AN.T. Farm A.T.Famn Phineas and Ferb: Phineas Shake It Up! Good Luck Austin &Aly Good Luck (R) Dogwith Blog
DISN 136136136136 9945 250 College Personality song.(R (HD) Birthdayparty. pANTson fire and Ferb: Mission Marvel StolerBirthday party. Charie (R (H)Ayplays a (1) Stan the
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(3:55) The Stand by Me (86, Drama) Wil Wheaton. Austin Powers: International Man of (35) The Notebook('04, Romance) *** Rachel (:45) 21 Jump
ENC 150150150150 150350 Color Purple Four young boys set out on an adventure Mystery ('97, Comedy) Mike Myers. A McAdams. A woman chooses between a man of whom her Street('12)
('85) into the nearby woods. (R) 1960s spy battles evil in the '90s. parents approve and her first love. A
Ready to Rumble ('00, Comedy) ** David Arquette, The Newsroom: Red Team III Anna Karenina (12, Drama) **1/2 Keira Knightley, Jude (:15) Real Sex Male strip
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their favorite wrestler to fight again. depositions. affair with a count. (R) (HID)
(5:35) Johnson Family (15) Ruby Sparks (12, Comedy) *** Paul Dano, Zoe Life of Pi (12, Adventure) ***A% Suraj Sharma, Irrfan (:15) Tower Heist (11,
HBO2 303303303303 303402 Vacation ('04) An urban family Kazan. A struggling writer develops a female character who Khan. A zookeeper's son is surrounded by loose animals Comedy) -**1 Stealing
takes a roadtrip. appears in real life. (R) (HD) after a shipwreck. (PG) (HD) from a Wall Street thief.
SnowWhite (:25) Anchorman: The Legend of Ron The Sopranos D-Gir A.J. Crazy, Stupid, Love. (11, Comedy) *** Steve Carell, The Newsroom: Red Team III
HBO3 304304304304 304404 & Huntsman Burgundy('04, Comedy) Will Ferrell. Sexist rebels; Christopher revives love. Ryan Gosling. After a divorce, a man solicits the dating Rebecca examines staff's
(12) anchor gets female partner. (HD) advice of his young bachelor friend. depositions.
(5:15) The Thing (11, Horror) Chasing Mavericks (12, Drama) *** Gerard Butler, Strike Back Focus is put on American Reunion (12, Comedy) *** Jason Biggs,
MAX 3232032032063 320420 ** A shape-shifting alien Jonny Weston. A teenager recruits a surfing legend to help a smuggling job. (R) (HD) Alyson Hannigan. A group of friends comes together for
is unleashed. him learn to ride massive waves. their high school reunion in Michigan.
Bulworth The Day After Tomorrow ('04) A climatologist tries to figure out a way tc Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (12, (35) Sex Games Cancun Feature 02 ('06)
MAX2 321321321321 321422 1/2 Senatorsave the world from abrupt global warming while trying to rescue his son Adventure) Dwayne Johnson. Boy searches Chloe, Daniel Anderson. The fun at a
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The Woman in Black (12) **r A (35) People Like Us (12, Drama)*** Chris Pine, Sexy Baby (12, Documentary) **/2 A Polyamory Web Therapy:
SHO 34034034034019 340365young lawyer discovers that a vengeful Elizabeth Banks. A brother and sister meet for the first time documentary denotes a seismic cultural Persuading Love Letters (R
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1 M 6307, 730 8 I ,309r. 9. a0 1 0., a. aim 1 a,:30 a 1- a1, r.1:3


Today's Live Sports

1 p.m. ESPN2 2013 U.S. Open
Tennis Second Round from
USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center. (L)
SUN MLB Baseball Los Ange-
les Angels of Anaheim at Tampa
Bay Rays. (L)
3 p.m. GOLF PGA Web.com
Tour Golf Hotel Fitness Cham-
pionship: First Round. (L)
5:30 p.m. GOLF LPGA Tour
Golf Safeway Classic: First
Round. (L)
6 p.m. ESPN College Football
North Carolina at South Caro-
lina. (L)
7 p.m. ESPN2 2013 U.S. Open
Tennis Second Round. (L)
FSN MLB Baseball Miami Mar-
lins at Washington Nationals. (L)
7:30 p.m. CSS College Football
Tennessee-Martin Skyhawks at
Chattanooga Mocs. (L)
FOX NFL Preseason Football
Washington Redskins at Tampa
Bay Buccaneers. (L)
8 p.m. FS1 College Football
Utah State at Utah. (L)
9:15 p.m. ESPN College
Football Mississippi Rebels at
Vanderbilt Commodores. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morning
America Scheduled: musician
Mandisa performs and premieres
her new music video. (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
a profile on Pharrell; Len Berman;
ambush makeovers; back-to-
school. (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: actor
Ryan Reynolds; NBA legend Sha-
quille O'Neal. (N)
9:00 a.m. CW Rachael Ray From
May: celebrity stylist Brad Goreski;
chef Marc Murphy; Dr. lan Smith.
12:00 p.m. CW The Jeff Probst
Show From April: Melissa Peter-
man describes how her career has
been taking off.
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Sched-
uled: Michael and Clinton are mak-
ing Pan Roasted Rib Eye. (N)
1:00 p.m. MYN The Trisha God-
dard Show Scheduled: a wife
fears that her husband is cheating
on her with her daughter. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Scheduled:
Scott Foley; Jordana Brewster;
Jackie Warner's fitness demo.
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Williams
Show From Jan.: Angela "Big Ang"
Raiola; "Live Like A Star Month";
Cynthia Pasquella.
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors From
Sept. 2012: Guy Fieri's indoor
grilling tips; tummy-tightening
treatment.
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey From
April: a wife says her husband is
too close to his mother.
3:00 p.m. NBC The Dr. Oz Show
From April: Gwyneth Paltrow talks
about the drastic diet changes she
made.
4:00 p.m. ABC Access Holly-
wood Live Scheduled: actor Todd
Bridges; from "True Blood" actor
Rob Kazinsky. (N)
4:00 p.m. FOX Maury Scheduled:
Michelle believes that Dwayne is
having an affair with her sister. (N)
5:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil From April:
parents claim that their daughter
lashes out at them physically.
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled: cel-
ebrating the Late Show's 20th year
with actor Bill Murray. (N)
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno Scheduled: Julie
Scardina; an interview and perfor-
mance from Rod Stewart. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv






The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads yoursu n net Thursday, August 29, 2013


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GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH
@2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
TEST YOUR DEFENSE


Both vulnerable. East deals.


NORTH
J 10
10 7 4
OKQJ64
4AK5
WEST EAS
4752 AA
992 A
0973 0 8
SJ9762 61(
SOUTH
AK98643
KQ6
0A 105
*Q4


The bidding:
EAST SOUTH
1F 14
Pass 24
Pass Pass


WEST
Pass
Pass
Pass


ST
Q
KJ853
2
)83






NORTH
20
4A


Opening lead: Nine of K)
The late Robert Darvas of Hungary
was one of the great composers of
bridge problems. This deal is from
his book "Spotlight on Cardplay,"
written in collaboration with his
compatriot Paul Lukacs. Cover the
South and West hands and decide
how you, East, would defend four
spades after the lead of the nine of
hearts.
With the best hand at the table,


North decided to hope that his
secondary spade honors were enough
for game. With routine defense, they
would have been!
East can see three fast winners.
Since it is obvious that West cannot
have a winner on power, the only
hope for the defense is to promote a
second trump winner. Win the
opening heart lead and continue with
your remaining top heart followed by
the jack, forcing declarer to ruff with
the eight, which holds as West
discards a club. South crosses to
dummy with the king of clubs and
leads the jack of spades. What now?
If you rise with the ace of spades to
lead another heart, declarer ruffs low
and dummy's ten of trumps prevents
West from overruffing, and declarer
has a variety of ways to get home.
You must follow to the jack with the
queen of trumps. Declarer wins with
the king and continues with a trump
to the ten, but you win with ace to
lead a fourth heart, and, whether
declarer ruffs high or low, your
partner's seven becomes the setting
trick! Beautiful.

(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this newspaper
or to Tribune Content Agency, LLC,
2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX
75038. E-mail responses may be sent to
gorenbridge@aol.com.)


7 Little Words
Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter o
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

CLUES SOLUTIONS

1 Italian ice cream (7) _

2 like birds, in a way (9)

3 betraying one's country (10)

4 moved briskly (7) _

5 sticky stuff from pines, say (6) _

6 mattress hated by sheep (5)

7 earth-moving machine (6) _


DRE


US


SE


RED


TOR


SI


THE


DGE


NI


TR


RE


TR


ED


RTA


TO


ONO


EAS


FEA


OTT


NS


Wednesday's Answers: 1. STATISTICAL 2. PUMPED 3. TAKERS
4. DISRUPTED 5. JOPLIN 6. MACEDONIA 7. BUTTERY 8/29


ACROSS
Battery word
Log home
Sour pickle
Culture dish goo
Limber
The chills
Note
Secluded spots
Whit
Chiming
Had top billing
London lav
Square root of
IX
Roof sight
Experience
Rich red
Much teen talk
Aria, usually
Boise's st.
Startled cries
Dickens
Immunity shots
Contemptuous
look
Intertwined
Flower petal
extract
Consumer lures
Grande or
Bravo
Actor Kilmer
Big ape
Plot secretly
Type of rug
Facetious


63 DOS alternative
64 Lunch or brunch
65 George who
was a she
66 Ike's ex
67 Loud reports
68 Blockheads
69 Watch winder
DOWN
1 Seductive
woman
2 Kind of molding
3 The Dalai -
4 Dessert cart
5 Artillery pieces
6 In a tizzy
7 Library sect.
8 Sorts
9 Springtime
activity
10 Holstein homes
11 Frankenstein's
helper
12 Troubadour
prop
13 Heavy metal
21 Solar wind
component
23 Give a hand to
26 Get up
27 Rubens
subjects
28 Ski lifts (hyph.)
29 Single-handed
30 Bobby of Indy
fame


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
SLOBIORALS BRED
AI DA HA I T YEETI
L EE R IlV AN A H A RE
TUR O I E RET
UTA V A
SATE ENS AC R ESS
PRESS I IE R T R IP
ABE E KATS ORO
TONI NE VEN N WADER
ERS|K INE A B L ENE

J A MB SIH A L F P RI C E
ASEA MO TI F TSAR
VA IN ABO VE E LAN
AN NA LOPEDr ANE
8-29-13 @2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Cyborg
Mitt
Percolates
Dazzle
Pre-cable sights
Bawled out
Leads a coup
Brownie
morsels
Zilch
Prohibition
Large
bumbershoot
Two-color
cookie


Make hay
A Guthrie
Thicken, as
cream
Rolling -
(rich)
Creeping plant
Semester ender
Tanker cargo


VVanL llmore puzzes:
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, August 29, 2013


I






Thursday, August 29, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


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$30 941-421-4020
TV, 32in. JVC ,w/Hyper
Surround Sound, remote
$50 941-286-2339
TV, PANASONIC 2, 19' 12'
GOOD COND. $20, OBO
941-391-6377
TV-26" SANYO flat panel
LIKE NEW! EXC.COND. $135
941-505-5747
VHS MOVIE TAPES 90 Tapes
w/covers. All Themes.Good
Condition. $20 941-426-0760

COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
6060

COMPUTER WORK STATION
ADJUSTS, 36 TO 48" HIGH. 3
SHELFS, $40 941-627-6780
DAVE IN-HOUSE-OFFICE corn-
puter repair, set-up Serving Char-
lotte Co. 12+ yrs 941-629-6337
GEEK BATTERY Backup
works great barely used like
new $80, OBO 941-465-8844
GOLF CLUB computer mouse
new looks like a driver $5
941-228-1745
LAPTOP COOLER STAND,
CoolerMaster +usb like new
$30 941-465-8844
MONITOR 17" DELL flat
panel w/adjustable pedastal.
LN $48 941-697-1102
MONITOR, 17" Great picture.
Flat screen CRT, not a thin LCD
$15 941-743-2656
POWER SUPPLY, DELL
cx305n Clean, warranted $10,
OBO 941-445-9069
PRINTER HP 3015 Laser All
in One, copier, fax. $115, OBO
941-416-0038
SATELLITE DISH Hughesnet
/w modem used 1 month
$25, OBO 575-590-0305


SUN



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CLOTHING/ JEWELRY
ACCESSORIES
6065

BEDOUIN DRESS
Vintage/ethnic, black w/color
stitching $125 941-408-6875
CLOTHES, Junior (Sm)-AII
Name Brand 2 Lg Bags filled 2
top $100 941-575-9800
COACH PURSE Gold leather
tote NWT others avail. $175
941-587-8870
JACKET-US ARMY FIELD OD
green-2 sizes-never worn w
liner $50 941-445-5619
JEANS, Levi 505 New. Size
34w34L. $10 941-875-6271
LAB COATS WOMAN'S WHITE
(3) $6, OBO 941-429-8415
LADIES 1ST Gear Leather
Motorcycle Jacket Size S $75
941-661-0054
NEW SHOES US ARMY Black-
dress-leather-still in box-Size
9R $10 941-445-5619
NURSES SCRUBS LADY'S
SIZE MEDIUM NEW $3 941-
429-8415
PURSE VINTAGE Fendi. FF
monogram. Auth. Exc.cond.
$225 941-474-1508
SHOE 7 FOR All Mankind
Somali Ankle Cuff Wedge Size
9 $50 941-763-0018

ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

11 1/21N Vanna White doll
orig. box Lmtd. ed. $10 941-
423-2585
ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
ANTIQUE CHAIR Yunan (Chi-
nese), carved, 39x21x16
$425, OBO 941-408-6875


Great Deals in

the Classifieds!

ANTIQUE CLOCK ANSONIC
CO. PERFECT TIME, CHIMES
$195 941-764-7971
ANTIQUE PEN knives price
for all 8 pen knives. $150,
OBO 941-735-1452
ANTIQUE WRINGER washer
easy $150, OBO 941-979-
5875
BELL (FENTON) glass cobalt
hnd. painted + signed $10
941-585-8149
BIRD'S EYE MAPLE double
bed room set, 2 dressers and
mirrors $225 941-474-4472
BOBBLE HEAD SB XXXVII
Joe Jurevicius #8. $10
941-875-6271
BOBBLEHEADS BUCS,
Jurevicius and Gruden.
$20 941-875-6271
BOOK "LINCOLN" 1924 EDI-
TION GREAT CONDITION $15
941-764-7971
BUCCANEERS SANTA
Tampa Bay Danbury Mint Col-
lectible $25 941-426-0760
CAKE STAND 10"x7" Vintage
Crystal Fostoria with brandy
well $80 941-426-0760
CASH PAID**any old mili-
tary items, swords, medals,
uniforms, old guns. Dom
(941)-416-3280
CHILD'S ROCKER oak
pressed back with cane seat
$175 941-474-4472
CHRISMA BLACK MIKASSA 8
plc extra pieces ex/c $300
OBO 941-575-4364
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
COFFEE TABLE Mersman,
mid-century $65 941-268-
5403
COFFEE TABLE Octagon 2-
Tier Glass Top, Biege, $75,
941-639-2815


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

BABE RUTH Plaque Sultan of
Swat.EC. $15 941-875-6271
COIN 1908S INDIAN PENNY
GRADES XTRA-FINE, MUST
SEE $140 941-457-0155
COINS NICE 1911 UNC.
PENNY COLLECTOR COIN
$20 941-457-0155
COINS NICE 1918 UNC.
PENNY SOME RED MUST SEE
$16 941-457-0155
COINS PROOF FRANKLIN
HALVES MULTIPLE DATES
$16 941-457-0155
CREAM AND Sugar Belleck,
Clearly Cream,1946-55. Per-
fect cond. $20 941-624-2105
DINKY TOY Reconnaissance
Car late 1940's? Nice. $125,
OBO 941-735-1452
DISHES SANGO Classique
set of 6 + extras $75, OBO
941-697-8598
EMENEE ELEC. organ Old
table top mdl. Made in USA.
Works!! $50 941-423-2585
FIESTA JUICE glasses, 6 col-
ors and yellow pitcher,$160.
941-623-0346
FIESTAWARE VINTAGE
Fiestaware about 25 pieces in
Sarasota $5 941-600-1442
GOLF CLUBS 1930s Five
wood shaft-Putter- mashie
niblics $50 941-445-5619
LADYS WATCH/CASE 14k
white gold Jurgensen, unused
$250 941-735-1452
LAMP, STAIN GLASS HANG-
ING STAG STYLE-1950's $59
727-906-1754
LENOX SPICE VILLAGE 24
PIECE 24KT SIGNED WITH
SHELF $110 941-429-8415
LENOX, SUMMER AT STONE
COAST ,,,RARE NO.1024
$450 941-759-0013
LENOX, SUMMER AT STONE
COAST ,,,RARE NO.1024
$450 941-759-0013
LIONEL TRAIN wall map of
railroads, 1950's made Lionel
item. $125 941-735-1452
MEAT GRINDER hand turn
$6 941-227-0676
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
OLD WAGON WHEEL WOOD-
48' Diameter $75, OBO 941-
743-2842
PLATE, Major Kira Nerys of
Star Trek by Hamilton w/cert
$20 941-423-2585
SILVER-CERT 1953 five dol-
lar blue seal faulty alignment
$125 941-697-6592
SILVERWARE NRA engraved,
Sterling, 6 place settings
$375 941-637-9979
STONEWARE JUG
"1800's".malcomb.ex.cond.
$85, OBO 941-235-2203
TAPA CLOTH art from Fiji
framed/mounted under glass
42"X42" $200 941-585-8149
U.S. AIR Force Thunderbirds
Framed 16"by20" pic. w/sig-
natures $25 941-423-2585
VINTAGE SAMSONITE BEIGE
SUITECASES FROM 1960'S
$30, OBO 941-266-7795
WINE GLASSES 12 Cranber-
ry Ex/Condition Etched Grapes
$100, OBO 941-575-4364
MUSICAL
6090


CRATE GX-15R amplifier w/
cables, works but needs some
cleaning $50 941-743-2656
GUITAR AMP. PEAVEY 25W
8" speaker 2 channels,$85.00
941-623-0346
PIANO ONE owner since
'59. $475 941-916-1821
TEISCO DELREY El10 mid-
1960 vintage elec guitar, exc
cond $250 941-743-2656


MEDICAL
l 6095


BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296

FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
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you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**




GUARDIAN 3-IN-1 Elongated
Steel Bedside Commode New
$100, OBO 941-586-8649
LIFT CHAIR RECLNER ELEC-
TRIC. Great up/down orig 900.
$425 941-822-3837
SCOOTER LIFT Harmar, AL-
100, w Harmar class III hitch
adapter. $900 941-505-1548
SHOWER STOOL OR 2
WHEEL WALKER, each $20
941-268-8951
TUB/SHOWER BENCH
Padded transfer bench, leave
msg $45 941-493-0674
WALKER COLLAPSIBLE,
with four feet, leave msg $15
941-493-0674
WHEEL CHAIR by MERITS
Excellent Cond $125
941-268-8951
HEALTH / BEAUTY
6100


HAIRSTYLE & BARBER LIFT
chair v-good condition $110,
OBO 718-986-3608

L TREES & PLANTS
Z 6110


AGAVE/CENTURY PLANTS
12" or less. Larger plants avail-
able. $2 941-496-8349
BANANA Papaya Trees U
Get 2 One of each Sweet Tasty
Fruit $25 941-204-9100
BIRD-OF-PARADISE, TI
amaryllis, date palm, dracena,
ice plant $10 941-882-3139
BROMELIADS/ RAINLILIES
liriope, mexican petunia, oys-
ter, snake $3 941-882-3139
CITRUS TREE Fruited 5G-Pot
Delivered Orange-Grapefruit-
Keylime $40 941-204-9100
CROTON HIBISCUS, olean-
der, pineapple, pencil cactus,
plumeria $10 941-882-3139
DESERT ROSE areca/coleus/
kalanchoe/purple queen/spi-
der/aloe $5 941-882-3139
DESERT ROSES Flowering 4
Years Old From Seed Very
Nice BIG $35 941-204-9100
FIG TREE Sweet Fruiting Plant
For Sale 3 Gallon Pot $20
941-204-9100
FLOWER POT RACKS HAVE
2,HEAVY DUTY, 3 SHELVES
$120, OBO 941-627-6780


TREES & PLANTS
S6110


FROST CLOTH Large
amount. 75'plus $50 941-
828-8820
LARGE STAGHORN Fern With
PUPS, You Move it! $250
941-423-3693
ORCHID LARGE Plants Purple
Flowers $20 941-698-9798
PALM TREE roughly 14 feet
high. In ground -you move
$100 941-624-6980


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL,SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMY PALMS, DUVENIA, FOX
TAIL & MANY MORE PALMS
Sul's NusuRY 941-488-7291
POINCIANA TREES Dwarf
Red full bloom $10 941-697-
0987
POINCIANA TREES Dwarf
Yellow Full Bloom $10 941-
697-0987
BABY ITEMS
6120


BABY CARRIAGE 2 seater
VGC, Navy, clean $30
941-627-6542
CLOTHES, baby girl 0 to 18
month.Over 50. ex. con. $25,
OBO 941-697-1137
CRIB SET Jungle Babies Nojo
COMPLETE Nursery Set. EUC.
$175, OBO 941-391-1797
CRIB, Graco Converts to tod-
dler bed. In great condition.
$85, OBO 239-789-8260
HIGH CHAIR Fisher Price,
Space Saver, Tan tones. EUC.
$35, OBO 941-391-1797
INFANT CAR SEAT Graco Tan
/Sage Green tones. EUC. $35,
OBO 941-391-1797
STROLLER DUO Like New
graco quattro str,neutral.
130 941-429-8507
GOLF ACCESSORIES
6125


CLUB CAR DS
"WHITE" GARAGE KEPT
4 PASSENGER, FOLDING REAR
SEAT, 1 YEAR OLD BATTERIES
HUGE DASH FAN, NEW SEAT,
WINDSHIELD, CHARGER,
LIGHTS AND FULL SERVICE
GREAT CONDITION
$2575 941-830-2415
CLUB CAR DS GOLF CART
Brand New Batteries
(08/2013)
Full service & new blue paint!
New headlights & rear lights
4 passenger w/ new
folding rear seat. Excl. cond.
$2595 941-716-6792
GOLF CART w/out charger or
with $499 941-822-1429
GOLF CART, Yamaha
w/charger, 2 seater $550
941-627-8767
GOLF CLUBS 35 assorted
brands with bag $1. each or all
$25 941-625-2779
GOLF SHOE'S NEW, women
SZ.8 NIKE,BLACK LOAFER
$20, OBO 941-627-6780

EXERCISE/
FITNESS
6128S

AEROBIC STEPPER 3 Tier
like new Cash only priced firm
at $29 941-493-3851
AIR BIKE Proform whirlwind
dual action air bike. Like new.
$100 941-423-0793
BOW FLEX Extreme Hardly
Used Great Condition $275,
OBO 941-204-9258





The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, August 29, 2013


FITNESS
44 6128S

ELLIPTICAL PROFORM 390-
E, 12 PERFORMANCE LEVELS
$285 941-764-7971
EXERCISE BIKE by WESLO
Dual Action,w/Electronics
NICE $60 941-268-8951
EXERCISE BIKE Pro-Form
recumbent w/magnetic resis-
tance $225 941-493-0674
EXERCISE CARDIO FORCE
Exerciser $25, 941-639-2815
SCHWINN RECUMBANT
exercise bike like new. $120
941-626-9027
SKY GLIDER Folds for
storage, hardly used.
$50, OBO 941-766-0857
TREADMILL GOLD gym built
in fan excellent cond $350
941-628-0182
TREADMILL, Gold Gym Maxx
with fan excellent cond $350
941-628-0182
YOGA MATS BRAND NEW
GAIAM YOGA MATS. MANY
COLORS! $20 941-240-6134
SPORTING GOODS
6130


AEROBICS STEP bench. Like
new w/ riser. $20 941-625-
9789
AIRBED QUEEN SIZE IN BOX
NEW $35 941-429-8415
BASEBALL CARDS 1990's,
12,000 CARDS $25 941-
496-8349
BOGA GRIP model 130
new cost 125.00 $85
941-759-0013
CATCHERS MITT RAWLINGS,
like new, $45.00 941-624-
0928
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
FISHING HEAVY ACTION
SABRE ROLLER RODS $50
714-599-2137
GATORS COLLECTABLES
Nice collection 1996 champ. 7
pieces $50 941-276-4721
GOLF CLUBS LADIES Cobra II
Iron & Wood Set. Good Condi-
ton. $150 941-426-0760
RACK FOR Ball storage. BIk
Metal. 42Hx15Dx41W, EC.
$20 941-875-6271
SCUBA TANK, Catalina Alum
80cuft, Full Air, In Hydro, $95-
941-276-5143
S FIREARMS
L 6131


BUYING
WW II Memorabilia
Guns, Bayonets, Daggers,
Swords, Helmets, insignia,
etc. etc. Eric, 941-624-6706
ADVERTISE!



GUN & KNIFE SHOW
German American Club
2101 SW Pine Island Rd,
Cape Coral, FL.
Sat 8/31 9-5pm and
Sun 9/1 9-4pm.
Admission $5.00 under
12 FREE & FREE PARKING
CWP Classes $49.95
11am & 1pm daily.
Lee County Gun
Collectors LLC.
(239)-223-3370
BUY-SELL-TRADE
www.capecoralgunshow.com
Higher Power Outfitters
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
Guns*Ammo*CCW
Financing Available!!
Buy*Sell*Trade
941-347-8445


i FIREARMS
L 6131


MAUSER 30.06 Mod. 98
Matched #'s-200 Rounds
$450.00 941-468-5890




MORE GUNS,
TOO MANY TO LIST !!
SELL, TRADE, BUY*
CALL 941-416-2986
SEmploy Classified! |
RUGER 357 MAG.
Stainless Steel. $400.
**SOLD IN 1 DAY!**
TAURUS, COMPACT, 45,
2 mags, case, 100 rnds,
450.00, 941-286-2339


FIREARMS
ACCESSORIES
6132

GUN SAFE Winchester $250
**SOLD IN 1 DAY!!**

BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
L 614 6135

3 WHEEL bike back
basket/big seat new tires nice
$199 941-626-3102
SAdvertise Today!
3 WHEELER Restored w/ new
tires & tubes looks & rides
great $225 941-474-1776
BICYCLE MENS SCHWINN
1980S WORLD TOURIST 5
SPEED $200 941-275-5837


BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
6135

BIKE AIR PUMP ravX brand
with gauge, 26" tall $35 941-
493-0879
BIKE RACK (THULE) Trunk
Mount 2 Bike Great Condition
$50 941-268-8951
FIRESTONE CRUISER New
Tires/Paint refurbished, NICE!
$95, OBO 307-332-5389
HERMOSA CRUZIN' Frame
Mens 6sd, 26" refurbished.
NICE. $75 307-332-5389
HUFFY MENS Bike w/25cc
helper motor 26". $325
941-629-1560
MENS BIKE 28" 5 SP, EXCEL-
LENT CONDITION, BALLOON
TIRES $110 941-493-0879


BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
S6135

RECUMBENT BIKE Alum
frame/Air Shock Rear Suspen.
$499 307-332-5389
SCHWINN DOUBLE Seat Chil-
dren's Bike Trailer $85 941-
624-6980
| Classified = Sales |

TOYS
Lo 60138


JOHNNY EAGLE Red River
pistol, nice, $55.00 941-624-
0928
MEGABLOKS 1000'S
PIECES/MISC $25 941-924-
6109


VIDEO
6140

HANDYCAM, SONY dcrh21
800xD 20xOptial 8mm W acce
$65 941-421-4020
TRIPOD VANGUARD VT-558
new in box. $80, OBO Cost
$150 941-697-1110

& SUPPLIES
6145


Local manufacturer offer-
ing to sell direct to public
@ wholesale pricing.
Fiberglass swimming
pools, swim spas & hot
tubs. Local: 941-421-0395


..... .......














NEWSPAPERS






Thursday, August 29, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


POOL/SPA/
& SUPPLIES
i 6145


TRADE-IN'S WELCOME
WE BUY USED &
MOVE HOTTUBS.
www.spasandmoreflorida.com
41-625-6600
HOT TUB cover lift Good con-
dition. $50 941-766-0857
PATIO UMBRELLA New
w/tags. Rust/large. $175
941-625-9789
POOL COVER Reel System,
Rocky's Easy roller, 16.5' L
$175 941-412-4695
SHOCK: NO JUGS. USE DRY.
11 BAGS $30 941-575-8881

LAWN & GARDEN
6160


22 IN. Lawn Mower TORO
Recycler Self Propeled elec st.
VG cond $210 941-429-0681
ADVERTISEE]
BLADES 42X2 Star Center
Hole NOS New Old Stock
EACH $10 941-497-3702
BLADES FOR SNAPPER
Riders New Old Stock
$10 941-497-3702
BLOWER ECHO exc.condition
cost $180 sell $80 941-585-
8149
BLOWER/VACUUM
Toro, w/vacuum bag
$15 941-764-0162
CHAINSAW MCCULLOCH
10-10 20"& 16" bar 70cc runs
good $155 941-697-6592
CHAISE LOUNGE, White
Fiberglass. $175
941-639-2815
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941-468-4372
DECORATIVE CLAY Pot
30"diameterX23"tall.Heavy
$60 941-828-8820
DRIVE DISC SNAPPER RIDER
NOS Yard sale pricing $3 941-
497-3702
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be
placed online by you.
One item per ad and the
price must