Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00047

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


Roberson

By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE In
assessing the 2013 legislative
session, state Rep. Ken
Roberson on Wednesday
said progress was made on a
number of issues, but others
will have to wait their turn.
The House Republican,


assesses

who represents
Charlotte County,
claimed success
on the fiscal front,
saying no tax or fee
increases were part
of the $74.5 billion
ROBERSON balanced budget.
Also, another sales
tax holiday for back-to-school
items is slated for Aug. 2-4.


HE HAS A NAME THEWIREPAGE
The little prince has a name: George Alexander Louis.
.


www.sunnewspapers.net


legislative progress


"The economy is slowly com-
ing back, not as robust as we
would like, but jobs are coming
back too," he told citizens at
a luncheon at the Cultural
Center of Charlotte County, to
which the Charlotte County
Society for Human Resource
Management played host.
Other spending achievements
in Roberson's view include


increases of $1.5 billion for K-12
schools; $480 million for teacher
and state employee pay raises;
and $78 million for Everglades
restoration. It was the first time
in seven years that all state
workers, except for legislators,
got a pay boost, he said.
"If we're going to be
ROBERSON 14


Pump pain pinches plans


Area drivers weathering the storm of rising gas prices


As gas prices continue their
roller coaster ride through
2013, area drivers have been
taking a hit in the wallet of late,
thanks to uncertainty in the
Middle East and skyrocketing
crude oil prices, experts say.
At the RaceTrac on State
Road 776 Wednesday, Robin
Flagel of Englewood, who


North Port resident Laurie Wood fills up her Toyota Tacoma pickup
Wednesday at the Chevron station on Tamiami Trail in North Port, where
regular unleaded was $3.59 per gallon. Wood, angry at the recent rise in
gas prices, called them "ridiculous."


owns a mobile pet-grooming
business, was driving a
Toyota FJ with a trailer.
"I probably put in between
$20 and $30 a day (in gas),"
she said. "I haven't had to


raise prices yet, but if it keeps
going up then yeah."
Area prices for a gallon of
regular unleaded gasoline
averaged $3.60 per gallon
Wednesday, the same as a


week ago, according to Gregg
Laskoski, senior petroleum
analyst for GasBuddy.com.
Laskoski said the national
average is $3.66 per gallon, a
figure that has gone down a
penny in the last week. That
follows a sharp increase from
two weeks ago, when gas
prices jumped more than
10 cents after a hike in crude


PUMP 14


$1.00


Fake


incident,


real


training

ByADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
A local report of a man
with a bomb on an occu-
pied school bus Wednesday
morning concerned some
Charlotte County residents.
Shortly before 9:45 a.m.,
Charlotte County Sheriffs
Office personnel reported the
suspect as being "armed and
dangerous." After pursuing
the vehicle by land and
air through the county, the
situation was under control
around 3:30 p.m.
That's when the "End
scenario!" call rang out.
That's right, it was all a drill.
Debbie Bowe, sheriff's
spokeswoman, explained
it was just a routine SWAT
exercise.
"The SWAT team does
training on a monthly
basis," she said. "What (was)
happening (Wednesday) in
the county (was) a training
exercise."
Around 9:30 a.m., chatter
came across the airwaves
that a witness reported the
suspect on the bus said
he'd blow it up if anyone
was seen near it, and there
appeared to be a cellphone
attached to the device.
The Sun received sev-
eral calls from concerned
residents who didn't know
it was a drill.
Bowe said details about
this particular drill were
kept quiet.
"Those involved knew it
was an exercise, but didn't
know the specifics of the
exercise until it unfolded,"
she said.
SWAT team members
were unavailable for com-
ment Wednesday, as they
were "debriefing" from
their adrenaline-filled day.
Email: akreger@sun-herald.com


Legislature, Charlotte schools oppose new testing


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER
The Florida Legislature and
officials with Charlotte County
Public Schools are concerned
that a new standardized test, to
be implemented in Florida in
the 2014-2015 school year, will
harm schools and students.
"If the state keeps the same
rules (that are currently in
place), it would put our 10th-
graders at risk of not graduat-
ing," Charlotte superintendent


Doug Whittaker said.
The test, created by a national
consortium called the
Partnership for Assessment
of Readiness for College and
Careers, is designed to test the
new Common Core curriculum
that will be introduced this
school year. However officials
are concerned that a test on that
curriculum is too much too soon.
"We have said to the for-
mer commissioner and the
Department of Education for
a couple of years that (PARCC)


was going to be a train wreck,"
Whittaker said. "Let us get
our teachers trained in the
Common Core, let them get
knowledgeable about it, then
test the students."
Another concern is the
amount of time PARCC testing
will take out of the school year.
"(PARCC) doubles, or more
than doubles, the amount of
time we will spend testing,"
said Bryan Bouton, president
of the Charlotte County Florida
Education Association, the


local teachers union. That extra
time spent testing, he pointed
out, reduces the time available
to teach the curriculum to the
students.
Gary Leatherman, a spokes-
man for the Sarasota County
School District, noted similar
concerns about the implementa-
tion of PARCC testing, but point-
ed out that the "potential upside
would be that the diagnostics
that we would get from using the
test could provide us with some
valuable information."


Florida Senate President
Don Gaetz, R-Destin, Fla.;
and Speaker of the House Will
Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel,
Fla., recently signed a written
statement to Tony Bennett,
commissioner of the Florida
Department of Education, that
they wish to withdraw from
PARCC testing.
In the letter, they cited
numerous reasons, including
more time devoted to testing
SCHOOLS14


Survey: Some North Port volunteers feel alienated


By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
NORTH PORT
COMMUNITY NEWS EDITOR
NORTH PORT Some advi-
sory board members say they
don't feel valued or appreciated
by the majority of the North Port
City Commission as volunteers


working to help the city.
Members were surveyed
anonymously earlier this
month by the North Port
Advocacy Alliance, a nonprofit
corporation with a mission
to involve citizens regarding
local issues. The results were
revealed this week. Board


members were asked a bevy of
questions some stemming
from a May workshop when
some commissioners suggested
those who serve be fingerprint-
ed. Others thought members
should be allowed to serve on
only one city board at a time,
and only taxpaying residents


or registered voters could be
appointed to boards.
According to feedback from
the members, commissioners
- mostly named were Mayor
Linda Yates, Rhonda DiFranco
and Cheryl Cook are discon-
nected from them and don't
care about their concerns


because they refuse to meet
with them and/or don't answer
emails or return phone calls.
The alliance sent 116 surveys
to members serving on city
advisory boards from Jan. 1 to
June 30. During this time, the
SURVEY14


CORRECTIONS: A proposed North Port Fire Rescue District assessment methodology would charge owners of improved (with a structure) or unimproved city lots $74.29 for up to 5 acres of property, per 5 acres. A homeowner
with a quarter-acre lot would also pay $74.29. One owning 512 acres of property would pay $148.58 because he has met the threshold of 5 acres. A story in Wednesday's North Port Sun reported otherwise. An article in
Wednesday's Charlotte Sun provided by AMIKids Crossroads about mentoring opportunities included an incorrect phone number. The correct number is 941-916-9664.

INDEX ITHE SUN: Police Beat 3,71 Obituaries 5 Legals 6-7 Viewpoint 81 Opinion 9 1 THE WIRE: Nation 21 State 3,81 Business 5-6 1 World 7 1 Weather 8 1 SPORTS: Lotto LASSIFIED: Comics 10-121 Dear Abby 12 1 TV Listings 13
Daily Edition $1.00 :-*w- Lookinsidefor valuable coupons -**- :
|i| II I I|111 1III |1 '-, Hg Lw :: E COUPON Ths a g I CALL US AT CHARLIE SAYS...
7 111 02 0111111111 8 t 8 i75 : VALUE METER 55 ,1 1 ,: 941-206-1000 I'm feeling alliterative today.
7 05252 00025 8 Partly cloudy, isolated inland rain :L.-...........-----------....-........-.. -- -


VOL b121 iNO. 206
VOL. 121 NO. 206


THURSDAY JULY 25, 2013


AN EDITION OF THE SUN


A











Travel agents weigh in on options


By TOM CHANG
STAFF WRITER

Ed Mass, owner of
Expedia Cruise Ship
Centers in Port Charlotte,
said his agency is having
the best summer ever.
"People are making
decisions (about their
travel) and taking advan-
tage of them," Mass said.
"We booked thousands
this summer, and we offer
our own travel packages
with air, land and sea."
About 70 percent of
Floridians plan to take a
vacation of four or more
days between May to
September, according to a
May report from the AAA
Auto Club Group, a
5 percentage-point
increase from 2012.
"This year marks the


second year that AAA data
shows an increase in the
number of Floridians who
plan to take a summer
vacation a positive sign
for the travel industry,"
Jessica Brady, a spokes-
woman for AAA Travel,
The Auto Club Group,
said in a statement. "A
relaxing vacation at a city
destination or beach is
the number one desire
among Florida travelers
who look to get away
this summer. The great
thing about Florida is that
travelers don't have to go
far to find what they're
looking for in a vacation."
Mass, who's been in the
travel agency business
since 1973, said little has
changed in the industry.
"The reason why travel
is so strong is because


prices have remained
steady over the past 10
years," he said.
Mass said Expedia's cli-
entele spans into places
like Englewood and North
Port.
"People in Port
Charlotte tend to be
well-traveled for the
summer," he said. "They
usually want to get out of
the heat. We have family
packages, and we have a
working relationship with
Disney and we can book
trips to Disneyland and
their cruise lines. We also
book a lot of trips involv-
ing family reunions and
tour groups, which are
popular with the elderly."
Mass said the most
popular destinations his
clients book are cruises
to the Caribbean, Alaska


and the Panama Canal.
Edie Driest, owner
of It's Time to Travel
in North Port, said her
clients aren't comfortable
booking online.
"Shopping around
takes a lot of time, and
that's where I come in,"
Driest said. "I spent a lot
of time doing research.
The majority of my clients
I book tend to go to more
remote locations."
Driest, who's been
serving the North Port
area since 2005, has been
in the travel industry for
more than 30 years.
"I see the same amount
of traffic this year as last
year," she said. "I sense
people are traveling a lot
less since the economy
took a dive. The nature
of vacation is different


than it used to be, and
travelers are more
budget-minded."
Driest said the most
popular destinations
she receives are to Italy,
Hawaii and cruises to the
Caribbean.
"It's healthy to get out
of Dodge," she said. "It
clears your mind and
recharges your soul."
Lorna Hunter, owner
of Creative Travel in
Englewood, said she's
seeing residents opting
to do "staycations" at or
near home.
"I see about 15 percent
of my clients want to
enjoy the local amenities
and travel to Sarasota,
Lido Key or Siesta Key,"
Hunter said. "A lot of
them can't afford to do
a cruise or go far out of


state like Alaska or the
Grand Canyon."
Hunter said some will
travel within the state to
do packages at theme
parks like Disney World or
Busch Gardens.
"There are probably
20 (percent) to 30 percent
who go to Disney, even if
it's a weekend package,"
she said.
Hunter said locals take
advantage of Disney's
discount for Florida
residents.
"We'll have some
people (who) will go
spend a week up North,"
she said. "Most of their
families will come down
here. We get a couple
hundred or more clients
(coming) here all summer
long."
Email: tchang@sun-herald.com


Charlotte School Board advertises tentative budget


By IAN ROSS
STAFF WRITER

PORT CHARLOTTE -
The Charlotte County
School Board voted
Tuesday to advertise the
district's tentative budget
for the 2013-2014 school
year. This is a step the
board must take prior to
the first public hearing


on the proposed budget,
which is July 30.
The School Board
can revise the tentative
adopted budget in August
before holding a final pub-
lic hearing in September,
at which the board will set
the village rates and adopt
the final budget.
This year's tenta-
tive budget proposes a


millage increase of
1.2 percent over last year.
That will increase the levy
by 0.09 mill to a total of
7.581 mills.
A mill equals $1 in taxes
per $1,000 of a property's
taxable value. Under the
proposed rate, the owner
of a home with a taxable
value of $175,000 would
pay about $1,327 in school


taxes, an increase of about
$16 over last year.
The estimated general
fund revenue is $135 mil-
lion, which is $5 million
more than last year. This
increase would provide
for a reserve of funds to
handle possible state
funding shortfalls or
emergencies, as well as
teacher raises.


"We've set aside a
reserve for the teachers'
salary increases. That's not
included in the expendi-
tures, but it's in the reserve
balance," explained Greg
Griner, chief financial
officer for the district.
The total proposed
budget is $245 million.
This year's budget
anticipates a 6.81 percent


increase in revenue per
student over last year, for a
total of $6,800 per student.
The vote to approve the
tentative budget will be
held at 5:30 p.m. July 30
in the School Board
chambers, 1445 Education
Way, Port Charlotte. The
final budget hearing will
be Sept. 10.
Email: iross@sun-herald.com


I CHARLOTTE EVENTS


* TODAY


* GOVERNMENT

Punta Gorda Historic,
Preservation Advisory Board meeting,
8:30 a.m., City Hall Council Chambers,
326 W. Marion Ave., PG. 575-3369.
Mid Charlotte, Stormwater
Utility Advisory Committee meeting,
1:30 p.m., 7000 Florida St., PG.
575-3613.
Community Action,
Agency Advisory Board meeting,
2 p.m., Tringali Recreation Center,


3460 N. Access Rd., Englewood.
883-6505.

* EVENTS
Post 103 Cafe, Breakfast 7-11
Thu-Sun.Public welcomed. Let Chef Tim
cook for you! 2101 Taylor Rd 639-6337
Port Charlotte Elks, 11-9
20225 Kenilworth Blvd, PC 625-7571,
Lunch 11-2, Dinner 4-7:30, Full Menu,
MahJong-Lunch 12-1st game @1
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2, Dinner 5-8, Bingo 6:30-8:30
@25538 Shore Dr PG 637-2606 mmbrs
& their gsts


Mahjong, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 11:30a-3:30p $2. Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free.Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Warm Water Exercise,
Water fitness classes, 3280 Tamiami
Trail, STE 11; 1 & 2pm; Tue & Thur; $3/
class, pay by month; info 575-2034
Chess Club, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St.1p-4p$1.50.cultural
Center MembersPLUS free. Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Pinochle, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 5:30p-8:30p $2 Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free 625-4175
All Welcome


* FRIDAY

* GOVERNMENT

Punta Gorda, Development
Review Committee meeting, 9 a.m.,
City Hall Council Chambers, 326 W.
Marion Ave., PG. 575-3369.

* EVENTS
Post 103 Cafe, Breakfast 7-11
Thu-Sun.Public welcomed. Let Chef Tim
cook for you! 2101 Taylor Rd 639-6337
Fitness'n' Fun, Exercise to


I NORTH PORT EVENTS


* TODAY

* GOVERNMENT
Commission workshop,
on Fleet/Utilities/Capital Improve


SUBSCRIPTIONS
Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $15.54
3 Months............................ $62.75
6 Months......................... $106.65
1 Year ............................... $186.50
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Subscribers residing in outlying areas may
incur additional delivery charge.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ....................... $16.40
3 Months.......................... $74.09
6 Months ....................... $119.54
1 Year........................ ..... 196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$111.93 $200.75 $357.50
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months IYear
$56.55 $106.37 $179.03
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $1.75
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

Sun Newspapers
CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
Delivery should be expected prior
to 6 a.m. Monday through Saturday
and 6:30 a.m. Sunday. Customer
Service hours: 6 a.m. to 5p.m.
Monday- Friday; Saturday and
Sunday 7 a.m. to noon. To subscribe
or to report any problems with your
service, please call 941-206-1300 or
toll-free at 877-818-6204.You may
visit our office at: 23170 Harborview
Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980.


budgets, 9am, North Port City Hall,
Room 244, 4970 City Hall Blvd., off
Sumter. 429-7000
City Commission, special
meeting to consider max millage rate,
4pm, North Port City Hall chambers,
4970 City Hall Blvd.,off Sumter.
429-7000

* EVENTS

Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted
items every Thursday 9-11:30am
(except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove
UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533


Jazzercise, 9-10am at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more info.
Table tennis, 9:00-11am,
North Port Senior Center, 4940 Pan
American Blvd., equipment provided,
$2.00, 423-6398.
Turbo Kick, 9:30-10:30pm at
the Morgan Family Community Center,
call 941-429-7275 for more info.
Current events/conve,
10-11:30am North Port Senior Center
4940 Pan American 426-2204 Bring a
topic or joke join the discussion
North Port Moose, 11-2:30
Lunch.Dinner 5-7 Liver/Onions,


Burgers, Philly's.MEAT BINGO 7:30.
Member/Qualified Guest 14156
Tamiami 426-2126
Tot Time, 10am-12pm at the
Morgan Family Community Center, call
941-429-7275 for more info.
Port Charlotte Elks, 11-9
20225 Kenilworth Blvd, PC 625-7571,
Lunch 11-2, Dinner 4-7:30, Full Menu,
MahJong-Lunch 12-1st game @1
Mexican Dominos,
12:30-3pm North Port Senior Center
4940 Pan American 426-2204 Easy to
learn & lots of fun
LAUX AMVETS 2000,
Country Fried Steak Dinner 4-7pm


I ENGLEWOOD EVENTS


* TODAY

* GOVERNMENT

Punta Gorda Historic,
Preservation Advisory Board meeting,
8:30 a.m., City Hall Council Chambers,
326 W. Marion Ave., PG. 575-3369.
Mid Charlotte, Stormwater
Utility Advisory Committee meeting,
1:30 p.m., 7000 Florida St., PG.
575-3613.
Community Action,
Agency Advisory Board meeting,
2 p.m., Tringali Recreation Center, 3460
N. Access Rd., Englewood. 883-6505.


* EVENTS
Ewd Country Liners,
9:30 to 11:30AM, Christ Lutheran
Church, 701 N Indiana Ave. Begin/
intermed. line, dances. Open to all.
Nancy 474-6027
Singer Dave Moran, Enjoy
kid friendly songs and sing along with
Dave Moran for all ages 11 am Elsie Quirk
Library, 100 W. Dearborn 861-5000
Englewood Bridge Cl,
Party bridge is played every Thu & Mon
from 12:15 til 3:30 at The Hills Rest.
RGCC, 100 Rotonda Cir, 698-7945, $2.
Am Legion Corn Hole,
Am Legion Post 113. Indiana Rd. Rot


West. 697-3616 5-7PM food served.
Indoor Corn Hole at 7PM Public Welcome
Take Off 4, 6-7PM Come take
off lbs by having Fun!337 Boundary
Blvd. Rotonda West 268-5275 Bring a
mat. Fee: $1.00

* FRIDAY

Craft & Card Fun, Make
friends and (hand-made crafts & cards
for our boutique ) 9 Noon Fridays
480 Yale St. Englewood 474-9068
Mommy & Me Yoga,
9am Venice Holistic Community
Center, 251 Tamiami Tr S, Venice, FL


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event,"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title" as that will be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


PAID ADVERTISEMENTS

Featured Events
Free Collector Car Show, Thursday, July 25,5 to 8 PM. Free
Collector Car Show for public to enjoy at Beef'O' Brady's, 1105 Taylor St.,
PG. Hosted by the Veteran Motor Car Club of America members. Info at
941-575-0202.
Amateur Radio Club Meeting, The Peace River Radio
Association meets on the last Thursday of the month at the Church of the
Good Shepherd, 401 W. Henry St., Punta Gorda. This month we will meet
on July 25 at 7:00 PM. The presentation will be "Solar Electric Power
Systems." Information at sharouq@comcast.net or 941-766-9258.

contemporary Christian music; 11330 Native Plant Sale, CHEC,
Brnt Str Rd, PG; 9am; Mon, Wed & Fri; 9-2:30,10941 Burnt Store Rd. PG Plant
$35 for 10 classes; info 575-2034 Native- 575-5435 www.checflorida.org

PAID ADVERTISEMENT


Featured Event
Tour de North Port Bicycle Ride, Register now for the
4th Annual Tour de North Port Bicycle Ride presented by People for
Trees @ www.peoplefortrees.com. 15/35/65 miles thru the city's natural
settings, historical sites & parks. 8AM, Oct. 20, Dallas White Park, 5900
Greenwood Ave. Breakfast, lunch, SAG support, $40. 426-9752.

$6. Karaoke by Holly @ 7pm. fun & experience the races.Don't miss
QOH @ 7pm. 401 Ortiz Blvd NP out snacks Charity Men's Auxiliary @
941-429-1999. VFW Post 8203
Bingo @VFW, Enjoy bingo Karaoke, Thursday 7p-10p Olde
with friends, 6-9pm, VFW NP World Restaurant no cover charge.
A Night At The Races, Come and enjoy the entertainment or
Saturday 7pm-10pm Come join the join in. 426-1155.

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Featured Event
Dinner/Concert Fundraiser, Hope Lutheran Church, 14200
Hopewell Ave., Gulf Cove, PC, presents "The Best of Times" barbershop
quartet July 28 in a fundraiser for the new School of Music. $5 concert
at 4pm; $5 spaghetti dinner at 5pm; $9 for both dinner and concert
followed by Jazz Mass at 6:45pm. For info, call 941-697-2345.


34285. $10 Lynne 941-237-6318
www.niuyoga.com
Line Dancing, 9:30 to 11:30
American legion Post 113 3436
Indiana Road Rotonda West 9:30 to
11:30 Phone Eve at 941-697-8733
Dessert Card Party, Enjoy
cards & yummy dessert at Lemon Bay
Woman's Club, 51 N. Maple St,
11:30 -3, $3.00, 474-9762
VFW Seafood
Night, 4:30-8pm Haddock
shrimp scallops or burger $7-14
VFW 10476, 3725 Cape Haze Dr
Rotonda 697-1123.


* SATURDAY
Hurrican Awareness,
Hurricane Awareness / Preparedness
Event, 10AM-2Pm at the Englewood
Home, Depot 12621 S. McCall Rd
698-4014.
Beginner Tai Chi, Tai Chi,
Engle. Hosp., in Suncoast Auditorium,
every Sat., 10-11:00 AM, $6.00,
941-492-2167
Maine Lobster Fest, Italian
American Club, 3:00, 493-8883, Lobster,
Chowder, Corn, Potatoes, Salad, Key
Lime Pie, Members$25, Guests$30


SUN NEWSPAPERS -
-- Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation 4
Chairman ............................... Derek Dunn-Rankin.................. 941-206-1001
Publisher................................ David Dunn-Rankin.................. 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ..................... Chris Porter .............................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director............... Leslee Peth............................... 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................ Mark Yero................................. 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor...................... Susan E. Hoffman..................... 863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager ..........Joe Gallimore ........................... 863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor............... Rusty Pray................................ 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar........................... 941-429-3003
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .......................... 941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ......................... 941-681-3000


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OurTown Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013





:The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 3


Arrest made in restaurant manager death


SARASOTA- A
"dine-and-dash" led to
the recent death of New
Dynasty Chinese Buffet
manager Taian "Andrew"
Tian, according to
Sarasota County Sheriff's
officials, who announced
Wednesday they had
made an arrest in the case.
Juan De Dios Rodriguez,
20, of Bradenton, was
charged with manslaugh-
ter in connection with
Tian's death, after authori-
ties say Rodriguez and two
other men racked up a
$35 bill at the restaurant,
located on the 4100 block of
Fruitville Road in Sarasota,
and fled the scene July 14.
A report states
Rodriguez, along with
two men identified as
Fernando Rico and Bryan
Lopez, left the restaurant
and were confronted by
Tian, 51, who wanted
them to pay for their meal.
It was then that
Rodriguez punched Tian
in the head, an SCSO re-
port states, and he fell to
the ground. The trio then
fled the scene. Restaurant
patrons found Tian suf-
fering from severe head
injuries in a nearby park-
ing lot a short time later
and called authorities.
Tian died Friday at
Sarasota Memorial
Hospital.
Rodriguez was taken
into custody Tuesday
afternoon in Bradenton,
according to SCSO
spokeswoman Wendy
Rose, while Lopez and
Rico have not been
charged with any crimes.
Rodriguez is being held
at the Sarasota County
Jail without bond. Sheriff
Tom Knight called the
incident a "senseless
tragedy."

Report: Man
violently attacks
woman
NORTH PORT A
couple sat down early
this week to discuss their
breakup after a nearly
two-year relationship,
but the situation turned
violent when talk turned
to seeing other people,
according to the North
Port Police Department.
Stephan Maurice
Breton, 28, of the 5100
block of Greenwood
Avenue in North Port,
was charged with battery
after he allegedly caused
a number of serious
injuries to the 23-year-old
female victim.
According to a report,
Breton visited the victim's
Thisbe Street residence
just after midnight
Monday and was sit-
ting on the victim's bed
discussing their relation-
ship, which had ended
a month ago. The victim
informed Breton that she
had been seeing someone
else, the report states,
which enraged Breton.
Breton threw her to the
bedroom floor, the report
states, and then moved
her to the living room for
unknown reasons, where
Breton grabbed the victim
by the neck and slammed
her into a wall, then took
her into the bathroom
where he "threw her down"
between the toilet and the
bathroom counter.
He pushed her down


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida High way
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


several more times in
the bathroom, the report
states, and the next thing
the victim could remem-
ber was being in her bed,
with Breton choking her
and telling her to shut up,
the report states.
Breton then reportedly
shook her and squeezed
her and left the residence,
but returned after
30 minutes. Still upset,
he flipped the coffee
table in the living room,
then chased the victim to
her bedroom, where he
knocked over a dresser
and a TV, the report
states, then left again.
The victim sustained
injuries to her head, ribs,
neck, right shoulder and
arms, the report states.
It took police a couple
of days to arrest Breton
at his Greenwood Avenue
apartment complex,
where he was found in
another unit. He was taken
to the Sarasota County
Jail around 3:30 a.m.
Wednesday, where he
remains on $100,000 bond.

Report: Driver,
12, hits car; mom
faces drug charges
DEEP CREEK A
California woman was
jailed Tuesday after she
allegedly allowed her
12-year-old son to drive
and he struck a car.
Authorities also found
drugs in her car, ac-
cording to the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office.
Diane Ruth Black, 49,
of Ventura, Calif., was
charged with permitting
an unauthorized minor to
drive, giving false infor-
mation at a crash, posses-
sion of less than 20 grams
of marijuana, possession
of drug paraphernalia,
two counts of possession
of a controlled substance
(amphetamine and
methadone), and three
counts of possession of a
harmful new legend drug
without a prescription
(acyclovir, levothyroxine
and olanzapine).
While driving south-
bound on Nuremberg
Boulevard in Deep Creek,
the driver of an SUV
noticed the 2013 Toyota
in front of her was brak-
ing often and the pas-
senger later identified
as Black motioned for
her to pass, according
to a sheriff's report. She
went to pass on the left,
and the Toyota attempted
to turn left into a drive-
way on the 1400 block of
Nuremberg Boulevard,
striking the SUV.
The driver of the SUV
told authorities the
Toyota driver jumped







Shop Charlotte

Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecountychamber.org


to the back seat, and
the passenger Black
- moved to the driver's
seat. Black claimed to be
driving, but the juvenile
apologized to the woman
for hitting her vehicle, the
report states.
Black was visiting her
son, who lives at the
aforementioned address
with his father. Her son
reported to authorities he
had never driven before,
but did so because his
mother told him to. Black
told her son he could go
to a friend's house if he
drove, according to the
report.
Authorities searched
Black's vehicle and
found a plastic baggie


of marijuana and rolling
papers, along with
96 assorted pills, the
report stated.
She was held at the
Charlotte County Jail
Wednesday on $9,500
bond.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Jasmine Marrero, 32, 5000
block of Southern Pine Court, Venice.
Charge: grand theft. Bond: $2,500.
Cody Barfield, 19,100 block
of Natures Way, Rotonda. Charges:
possession of a synthetic schedule III
narcotic with the intent to sell,
possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana, possession of drug para-
phernalia, driving with a suspended
license and failure to register a motor
vehicle. Bond: $5,500.
Charles Russell Andre IV, 28,
25400 block of Prada Drive, Punta
Gorda. Charge: petty theft. Bond:
$500.
Kelly Ann Grucello, 29,1300 block


J Event Sponsor: $250
Vendor Table
Sponsor's banner placed on site
One promotional item included in
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Two minutes of microphone time
during the program
Logo on all marketing materials
Deadline to be indicated on print
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] Vendors: $50
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of Rock Dove Court, Punta Gorda.
Charge: out-of-county warrant. Bond:
$3,000.
Ashley Nichole Haislipp, 20,
22300 block of New York Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: violation of proba-
tion (original charge: possession of
drug paraphernalia). Bond: none.
Brandi Lynn Drake, 33, homeless
in Port Charlotte. Charges: two counts
of violation of probation (original
charges: petty theft, credit card fraud
and grand theft). Bond: none.
Donald Eugene Frisby, 72,100
block of Sinclair St. SW, Port Charlotte.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Kelly Leann Humphrey, 41, 21300
block of Percy Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: uttering a forged check. Bond:
$2,500.
*Wendy Marie Grundvig, 37,18300
block of Quadrille Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: DUI. Bond: $1,000.
Whitney Junior Charles, 29,21000
block of Glendale Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of an injunction.
Bond: none.
Greg Arcond, 34, 7500 block
of Berwick St., North Port. Charge:


littering more than 500 pounds of
commercial or hazardous waste. Bond:
$2,500.
Tony Dale Harrelson, 56, 5200
block of Corvette Lane, North Port.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Christopher Austin, 30, of Santa
Rosa Correctional Institution, Milton,
Fla. Charge: introducing a cellphone
into a state correctional facility. Bond:
$5,000.
Demarrius Faniel, 21, of Santa
Rosa Correctional Institution, Milton,
Fla. Charge: aggravated battery by a
jail detainee. Bond: none.
Nicholas Anthony Ortiz, 28, 9300
block of Tacoma Ave., Englewood.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
$7,500.
Angela Salanoa, 43,1400 block of
Crest Drive, Englewood. Charge: grand
theft. Bond: $2,500.
Robert Daniel Rogers, 20,
Sylvania Ave., Englewood. Charge:
violation of probation (original
charges: burglary and grand theft).
Bond: none.
ARRESTS| 7


lI Display Sponsor: $100
Display sign at food/drink station
in main event room
One promotional item included in
300 goody bags
Recognition during the program

El Goody Bag Inserts: $25
One promotional item will be
included in 300 goody bags
Inserts must be at Chamber
office by August 16, 2013


's on Back of Card):


Cash: Invoice:_


Please RSVP online, via fax or mail by
Friday, August 9, 2013 to:


North Port Area Chamber of Commerce
15141 Tamiami Trail, North Port, 34287
www. North PortAreaChamber.com


Print Sponsor

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Phone: 941-564-3040


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Our Town Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


Edison State ponders name change again


By ASHLEY A. SMITH
FORT MYERS NEWS-PRESS

FORT MYERS Edison
State College officials are
thinking of changing the
school's name for the
second time in five years.
The college which has
several area sites, includ-
ing a Charlotte campus in
Punta Gorda is looking
to grow its reputation
and recruit students and
faculty outside Florida.
It's a decision officials
at the college will have to
consider after failing to
trademark the college's
name. That's because of
the existence of Thomas
Edison State College, in
Trenton, N.J. That institu-
tion has refused to share the
Edison state college trade-
mark with the Southwest


Florida institution.
"We're at a unique
juncture in our history
to see how we're viewed


Al I IliTTl r i
I

a .'
.. t


and how we
brand our-
selves," said
Edison State
President Jeff
Allbritten,
during a
board of
trustees


ILLDII ElN workshop
meeting Tuesday morning.
"We're fine if we stay in our
corner of the state, but we
have some potential issues
online, and if we start send-
ing mailers in New Jersey,
which I think we will do."
It's not uncommon for
schools to go through
name changes, espe-
cially as their missions
and programs grow and


evolve. The college opened
as Edison Junior College in
1961, changed to Edison
Community College in
1972, and then to Edison
College in 2004. It changed
to Edison State College
in 2008. But this time a
name change was not the
college's first choice.
In 2011, the college
applied for a service mark,
similar to a trademark, from
the U.S. Patent Office. That
office denied the applica-
tion because of the similar-
ity to the New Jersey school,
which holds a trademark.
Edison State officials tried
to reach an agreement with
the New Jersey college that
would allow both schools
to use their names, but
they were unsuccessful.
There is also an Edison
State Community College in


Piqua, Ohio. Turning down
an agreement between two
higher-education institu-
tions is unusual, said Mark
Lupe, general counsel for
the college. He equates the
situation to shared use of
the Block M logo between
the University of Missouri
and University of Michigan.
The officials also could
keep the Edison name for
their brick-and-mortar
presence, but use a sepa-
rate name for the online
program.
"The world is much
smaller, and in today's
world, it's not possible to
do nothing," Lupe said.
"Today, someone sitting
in Berlin would hear of
Edison (State)."
Allbritten said he plans
to talk with each trustee
separately to share ideas


and discuss it again at the
August meeting, but he
feels a regional identifier
would work best. That's
what happened to Brevard
Community College this
month when its name
changed to Eastern Florida
State College.
If a name change does
happen, it would need
only the approval of the
Legislature before it became
official. Changing building
names, stationery and other
Edison State paraphernalia
would happen gradually
over time, and has been
done before, said Teresa
Morgenstem, the school's
director of communications
and public relations.
In other business,
Allbritten talked about
ramping up the college's
effort to recruit students


and creating a "robust
residential" campus.
The school's new
residential hall,
Lighthouse Commons,
has 301 paid applicants
for this fall. The building
has a capacity of 405.
But besides having a
place to stay, Allbritten
said the school has to offer
activities. The college is
launching a feasibility
study to reconsider bring-
ing in athletics.
"It's one piece, but
there are 28 state colleges,
and we're one of five not
involved in athletics. We're
in the minority," he said.
Administrators also
will look at building a
recreational facility that
could be created through
public-private partnership,
Allbritten said.


ROBERSON
FROM PAGE 1

competitive in the global
economy, we've got to have
an educated workforce," he
said, noting that two thirds
of next year's state budget
is earmarked for education
and health care.
Moreover, ethics reform
was enacted, raising
conduct standards for
elected officials, increasing


SCHOOLS
FROM PAGE 1

than currently is used,
no plan for the timely
return of test data, high
computer and bandwidth
requirements for schools,
the cost of assessment
materials, and concerns
about the security of
student data.
"I applaud the speaker
and the senate president


penalties for breaches of
public trust, and strength-
ening campaign finance
laws. Also, election reform
provided county supervisors
of elections more flexibility
regarding early voting.
In addition, Roberson
was instrumental in bring-
ing $500,000 to Charlotte
County to expand its
reclaimed water system for
high-demand areas in West
County.
He also co-sponsored a
bill banning texting while

in saying, 'Let's pull out of
this and think about how
we're going to do this and
do it right,'" Whittaker
said.
But Whittaker cau-
tioned that the letter does
not necessarily spell the
end of PARCC.
"They're just lending
their support to that
idea," he said. "It would
require the state Board
of Education, (whose
members serve) at the will
of the governor, to make


driving. While acknowledg-
ing the new mandate is
not a cure-all for distracted
driving police cannot
stop a motorist for driving
while texting because it is
only a secondary offense
- his hope is that it may
evolve into a primary
offense, similar to the
seat-belt law.
"It sends a message
to young kids that they
shouldn't be doing this,"
he said.
Other initiatives of

changes. And some legis-
lative changes are going to
be necessary as well."
About the Legislature's
wish to cancel PARCC
plans, Bouton said, "I
think it's the greatest
thing since sliced bread."
"The problem is," he
added, "if you withdraw
from PARCC, what are you
gonna do (for testing)?"
The Legislature has
suggested the state create
its own "Florida Plan," to
be implemented by the


importance, however, fell
short of being resolved, he
said. A stalemate on reform-
ing the Florida Retirement
System failed to address
runaway spending. The
state also refused to expand
Medicaid, even though
the federal government
would have fully funded the
expansion for several years.
"The House felt it's not
really prudent to accept
federal funds at this time,"
he said. 'And that's some-
thing that will continue to

2015-2016 school year, as
an alternative to PARCC.
In the meantime,
"they'd have to con-
tinue to use the FCAT,"
Whittaker speculated.
"I'd rather use what we
currently have then try
to throw in some kind of
an interim assessment,
which would kind of go
sideways with everybody."
District officials have
fewer issues with the
Common Core the cur-
riculum PARCC is designed


be discussed."
Florida also decided to
use the health insurance
exchanges provided by the
federal government, rather
than establishing its own
model, to allow residents
to go online to shop for
coverage when the Patient
Protection and Affordable
Care Act, commonly known
as Obamacare, kicks in. He
said this was due partly to
the late arrival of informa-
tion fromWashington, D.C.
"It's going to take some

to test than they do
with PARCC. Common
Core was designed to unify
education goals across
states, making it easier for
students to transfer to and
from schools in other parts
of the country. Forty-five
states and the District of
Columbia are adopting
Common Core.
"Common Core in its
concept is wonderful. It's
something a lot of educa-
tors embrace," Bouton
said. "Not everybody is


time to wrap our arms
around this, but it is the law
of the land," he said.
But the issue that drew
the most public interest,
based on number of emails
received, was the proposal
to abolish permanent ali-
mony, a measure vetoed by
Gov. Rick Scott.
"The only thing I can
say is, 'If you're married, go
home and kiss your wife.'
You don't want to get a
divorce," Roberson said.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com

born, raised and dies in
the same town. We have a
migratory culture."
Whittaker believes the
state could benefit from
Common Core while dis-
tancing itself from PARCC.
"There's two groups of
states," he said. "We're
(currently) in the PARCC
group. There's another
group (of states) who
(uses) Common Core, and
they're developing their
own assessment system."
Email: iross@sun-herald.com


PUMP
FROM PAGE 1

oil prices. Mid-June, crude oil
was trading at $93 per barrel,
compared with $109 last Friday.
Laskoski said crude oil was trad-
ing in the $107-per-barrel range
this week.
"What we're seeing now is the
rate of increase actually flat-
tening out, and that's welcome
news," Laskoski said. "We
might see a nominal increase,
or we may just see things move
very little, depending on what
happens in Egypt, which con-
trols the Suez Canal, that sees
3 million barrels of crude oil
transported each day, or in the
Atlantic Ocean with Tropical
Storm Dorian."
Wednesday in North Port,
most stations along Tamiami
Trail were charging $3.59 for a
gallon of regular gas, with the
North Port Walmart station
trailing just behind at $3.58.
Customers with a Walmart
shopping card could fuel up for
$3.55 per gallon.
North Port resident Pete Orr
was gassing up his GMC truck -
which he uses for his business of


clearing out foreclosed homes -
at the Shell gas station at 14290
Tamiami Trail. Orr spends about
$50 per day in gas, and says he
has spent more than $15,000 in
fuel in the last year by far his
biggest expense.
"It's killing me," Orr said.
Bob Hawley said the increas-
ing gas prices really haven't
impacted how much he drives.
While filling up his 2003 Buick
Rendezvous at the Walmart sta-
tion on Tamiami Trail in North
Port, he added, however, that
the prices have changed how he
travels with his significant other,
who drives a 2006 Lincoln. They
travel more in the Buick, which
Hawley said he didn't buy for
the mileage, but because he
wanted to be able to haul items.
"It's ridiculous where these


- .,SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE
P= ALLEN-EMRICH,
L r eallen@sun-herald.com
F7/ Ryan Thomas pumps
$42.60 worth of regular
unleaded into his Mustang
Wednesday at the North
Port Chevron. Thomas
said gas is cheaper in
North Port than it is in
Fort Lauderdale, where he
lives. He said it costs $55
to fill up there.
prices are going," Hawley said.
"There's a lot of difference
between here and other places
like in Lakeland (Fla.), where it
was 10 to 15 cents less."
At the Englewood Shell
station at 241 S. Indiana Ave.,
the price for a gallon of regular
was $3.58. Tiffany Fesko, a
teacher who lives in Venice,
said "greed" was a big reason
why gas prices are going up.
She said it hurts her during the
busy time of year for teachers,
who are getting things in order
for the upcoming school year.
"When we're off for holidays
and stuff, that's when the gas
prices always go up to the point
where I almost can't even go on
vacation," Fesko said. "I find
myself sometimes having to
ration. I can't do the things I


like to do, because the gas is so
high. I end up sitting at home
or having a 'staycation.'"
Also at the RaceTrac on
S.R. 776 in Port Charlotte, where
gas was $3.59 for regular, Port
Charlotte resident and land-
scape worker Steve Maksymiak
working was filling up a Ford
F-250 truck with three lawn
mowers in the trailer. He said
the gas prices make it hard for
anyone in the lawn business to
make money because custom-
ers, who are used to a set num-
ber, cannot be overcharged.
"When you start getting up
to $3.50, it starts getting tough,"
Maksymiak said. "The cost goes
up, the oil cost and stuff like
that I mean just everything...
to get parts, to get blades and all
that, the factories gotta charge
more, 'cause it's costing them
more to (transport) their things."
At the 7-Eleven at Kings
Highway and U.S. 41, Tom
Boucher of Deep Creek said he
purchased his boat, aWollcraft
Fisherman 232, in 2004, when
gas was "half the price, so I
use it less than half the time."
Regular was also $3.59 per
gallon at the station.
"I'm retired, 71 years old,"
Boucher said. "I'm on a fixed


income and it's not as enjoy-
able as I thought it would be."
Laskoski said if Dorian
approaches the Gulf of Mexico,
it could create a lot of price
volatility, because the storm
will force the evacuation and
shutdown of offshore oil rigs
and refineries, causing a drop
in supply. It typically takes a
week to shut down a refinery,
and as long as two weeks to
bring it back online after a
storm. Still, gas prices should
not hit $4 per gallon anytime
soon, Laskoski said.
"When that happens, that is
when you usually see storm-
related gasoline price spikes,"
Laskoski said. "They would be
short-lived, but they could still
be pretty steep."
Dan Thompson of Englewood
also was getting gas at the
Englewood Shell on Indiana.
"I think it's going to get
higher," he said "I'm retired
from the military ... When I was
in Germany many years ago,
gas cost this much. We're just
catching up with the rest of the
world. I don't think gas will be
cheaper again."
Staff writers Tom Chang and
Ian Ross corn, ihitred to this report.
Email: slodkwood@sun-herald.com


SURVEY
FROM PAGE 1

commission discussed and later
disbanded the Business Economic
Development Advisory Board, the
city's naming committee and the
Tamiami Trail Appearance Review
Board. Commissioners promised
to revamp the BEDAB board and
fill it with mostly residents in lieu
of business professionals and out-
of-town college and health care
representatives. They will discuss a
new BEDAB at a workshop at
9 a.m. Friday.
"We had 72 responses from the
116 surveys that were emailed
to advisory board members,"
said Wendy Namack, one of the
Alliance's founders. "We had a
62 percent response. We found
that the commission's premise
that the same people are serving
on boards and they are firmly
entrenched so others don't have
the chance to serve isn't true.


"Of those who responded,
47 percent have only been on an
advisory board for one (four-year)
term, versus 11 percent who have
been there for eight years or two
terms."
Laura Rummans, a member
of the city's Art Advisory Board,
attended the meeting Tuesday at
the Olde World Restaurant, where
the results were revealed. She said
commissioners refused to meet
with the advisory board.
"We would like guidance from
the commission but we can't get
them to meet with us," she said.
"We (volunteers) feel like we don't
know what our role is anymore."
The Sun emailed all city com-
missioners Wednesday, asking if
they would consider the survey
results at Friday's workshop.
"We are not paying any
attention to our boards,"
Commissioner Jim Blucher wrote.
"The majority of the commis-
sioners believe they need to be
restaffed and they want to give
them better direction. It seems to


SURVEY SAYS
A sampling of responses from the North Port Advocacy Alliance
survey of volunteer advisory board members:
*"I am not one who believes volunteers should expect recogni-
tion. We volunteer to be part of our city and the direction that it
takes, not for recognition. I believe staff and past (commissioners
realize) the value, but the new members of the commission, led
by the mayor, are not viewing the committees the right way.
Dissolving the boards is taking away the voice of concerned
citizens of the city, and creating a dictatorship with only them
deciding everything no check-and-balance."
*"There's no sense in changing what works. The impression
that is given to me in the decisions is that a disgruntled group
of people got their way into power and want to oust the past
members, who they couldn't get along with, in a spiteful manner."
*"The advisory boards currently have vacancies and limiting
membership would further more vacancies. And to limit those who
disagree with them is a violent violation of the First Amendment."


* "The past system worked, but currently the commission is
using its power to limit citizens'involvement. The public doesn't
want the boards closed down."
* "I am pleased to be serving North Port on an advisory board
and hope that I don't have to fear being replaced due to terms
that are not set."
* "Need more interest by the commissioners in getting our
recommendations approved. We currently have been waiting two
years for approval on one of our projects.:'
* "It seems to me that the advisory boards know the needs
of North Port and the majority of our current City Commission
doesn't care what is best for our city."
* "The City Commission is currently making horrible decisions,
and the boards and the citizens of North Port are all up in arms
over what is happening. The City Commission isn't currently doing
what is best. The commission should listen to the boards."
For more information or the results of the survey, visit
http://northportadvocacyalliance.org.
Compiled by Elaine Allen-Emrich


me that anyone who has spoken added. "The joint meetings with DiFranco wrote that she
out against this commission is no the advisory boards does provide had no comment because
longer welcome to serve." an opportunity for board members she needed clarification as
Wrote Yates: "Reviewing the to share their ideas or suggestions to whether responding was a
boards is responsive to providing with commission. Usually that Sunshine Law violation.
clarity members are seeking." is done on an annual basis or as Cook and Commissioner Tom
"Recommendations from advi- requested. Some boards choose Jones did not return emails.
sory boards are considered," she to do a written annual report." Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


I





The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 5


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
MURDOCK The
Charlotte County
Commission wants a bit
more tweaking of an up-
date on the Manasota-
Sandpiper Key Overlay
District before it comes
back for final approvals.
"I feel we are re-
ally good where we are,"
Wayne Largent, chair-
man of the Manasota
Sandpiper Key Advisory
Committee, said after a
board meeting Tuesday.
"We're not as far apart as
I thought we would be."
As Zoning Official
Shawn Cullinan told
commissioners Tuesday,
the revised plan was not
written by county staff
and was a product of
the input of Manasota
Key residents and the
advisory committee.
Largent said commit-
tee members realize
growth is inevitable on
the barrier island, but
they think the zon-
ing plan will keep it
manageable.
However, four issues
remained unresolved:
the use of augur-
ing drilling rather
than driving in pilings
for new construction
-proposed 10-foot
setbacks, the determi-
nation of height, and
potential restrictions
on rebuilding proper-
ties after a hurricane or
other natural disasters.
Commissioner Bill
Truex, who owns Truex
Preferred Construction
in Englewood, said
his research and his
company's work on
Manasota Key found
auguring was a prefer-
able, efficient construc-
tion method, compared
to pile-driving, which
can damage neighbor-
ing properties.
The proposed zoning
plan suggested addi-
tional requirements on
contractors who went
ahead with pile-driving.
The caveat is that
pile-driving is a recog-
nized practice in the
Florida Building Code
and the county cannot
usurp state building
codes, Cullinan and
other county staff said.
Staff also questioned
whether building
requirements should be
incorporated in


a zoning plan.
Commissioners
agreed to keep the
preference of auguring
in the plan.
More of an issue,
especially for owners
of nonconforming lots
zoned for multi-family
development, are
10-foot setbacks and
height determination.
Land use attorney
Robert Berntsson
argued the proposed
setbacks, as written,
were unworkable.
"I am not fighting for
10 stories on the key,
I am not fighting for
concrete-to-concrete
(development), but
what I am fighting for is
the ability to build what
we say you can build on
a multifamily property
- three stories over
parking," Berntsson
told the board. He
believes a compromise
will be reached.
Commissioners
decided to keep the
10-foot setback. They
voted to have staff work
with the committee on
what could be an "ad-
ministrative variance,"
which would free the
property owner from
appearing before the
Zoning Appeals Board
for a variance.
On Manasota Key,
the Federal Emergency
Management Agency
has set four different
height zones for build-
ing. Commissioners
Tricia Duffy and Ken
Doherty, a retired
engineer, thought the
determination in the
plan was too compli-
cated and confusing.
Doherty said a
simplified determina-
tion of height for a
three-story building
over parking could
meet the goals of the
advisory committee.
Commissioners en-
couraged staff to work
with the committee
on a simpler deter-
mination of height
restrictions.
Commissioners also
want protections for
property owners who
want to rebuild after a
major disaster.
The overlay plan will
be rewritten and will
come before commis-
sioners for final
approval on Sept. 24.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Tidewell Hospice
volunteer
orientation
Do you want to make
a big difference for many
people in your commu-
nity and also have the
opportunity to meet
new friends? You can
do that and more when
you become part of
Tidewell Hospice's family
of volunteers. Tidewell
will offer orientation
for new volunteers at
its Englewood admin-
istrative office, 2034 N.
Access Road, on Aug. 1-2.
Attendance both days is
required. Volunteers are
needed in the office, at
the Hospice House, in
private homes for respite
care and as friendly
visitors at area nursing
homes and much more.
To learn more and to
fill out an application
to become a Tidewell
volunteer, visit www.
tidewell.org, or contact


Lynette Melchior
at 941-548-2336.
Application deadline is
July 25.

'North Port
Club Scene'
Community Youth
Development will hold
a free "North Port Club
Scene" event from 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Aug. 2 at the
Gene Matthews Boys
& Girls Club, 6851 S.
Biscayne Drive.
Youth in grades six
through eight are invited
to the North Port Boys &
Girls Club for a fun night
of dancing, games, free
food or just to hang out
with friends. Prizes will
be raffled off throughout
the evening. To get into
any CYD event, kids
must bring a CYD ID or
another type of photo
ID (school ID, yearbook,
driver's license or pass-
port). For more informa-
tion, call 941-423-4545 or
visit www.cydonline.org.


I OBITUARIES


Manasota



Key zoning



plan passes



first test


be private. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorial donations
may be made in mem-
ory of Sandi to Tidewell
Hospice Inc., 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, FL 34238.
Arrangements are
by National Cremation
Society of Port Charlotte.


CHARLOTTE

Jeffrey Scott Acker
Jeffrey Scott Acker,
51, of Cape Coral, Fla.,
went to be with the
Lord, Monday, July 22,
2013. Arrangements are
by Charlotte Memorial
Funeral Home, Crematory
and Cemetery.

Mary Catherine
Albrecht
Mary Catherine "Kathy"
Albrecht, 68, passed away
peacefully Tuesday, July 23,
2013, in her home in Port
Charlotte, Fla.
She was born Jan. 12,
1945, in Pittsburgh, Pa., the
daughter of Martin Duffy
and Bridget McGovern.
In 1962, Kathy gradu-
ated from St. Wendelin
High School. Shortly after,
she moved to California,
where she met her future
husband Arthur Albrecht.
In 1972, they moved to
Florida, were married
in 1977, and have been
together for over 40 years.
While in Florida, Kathy
worked as a bookkeeper/
office manager for several
businesses, including her
husband's company,
Contract Construction
Inc. Kathy's most impor-
tant job was being a wife
and a mother. She enjoyed
dining out with friends
and family, going to the
movies, trips to her cabin
in North Carolina, shop-
ping, ceramics and, most
of all, spending time with
her family.
Kathy is survived by her
husband, Arthur Albrecht;
daughters, Coreen (Erik)
Fassel and Kelly (Justin)
Sollenberger; and grand-
children, Kylie and Jackson.
Visitation is from noon
until the service time at
1 p.m. Saturday, July 27,
2013, at Kays-Ponger &
Uselton Funeral Home,
2405 Harbor Blvd., Port
Charlotte. Entombment will
follow at Restlawn Memorial
Gardens cemetery in Port
Charlotte. Friends and
family are all invited to
the service. Please visit the
online tribute for Mary
Catherine Albrecht at www.
kays-ponger.com to sign the
guestbook and offer your
condolences.
Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

Sandra L. Baker
Sandra L. "Sandi" Baker,
65, of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
passed away Tuesday,
July 23, 2013.
S- She was
*-. 7 born Nov. 14,
1947, in
Warwick, R.I.,
and moved
to this area
in 1988 from
Warwick.
Sandi was a retired Real
Estate Agent for Coldwell
Banker Sunstar Realty. She
was a member of the Deep
Creek Elks, and enjoyed
gardening and cook-
ing. Sandi attended San
Antonio Catholic Church
in Port Charlotte, Fla.
She is survived by her
husband of 22 years,
Abe; daughter, Diane
(Anthony) Milia of North
Scituate, R.I.; son, Kevin
(Debbie) of Melbourne,
Fla.; brother, James (Nan)
Des Jarlais of Gloucester
Point, Va.; aunt and uncle,
Anita and Ed Schreiber
of Punta Gorda; grand-
children, Joshua Baker,
Marissa Baker, Christy
Baker, Casey Baker, T.J.
Milia, Joseph Milia and
Anna Milia; two nieces;
and one nephew.
Memorial services will


golfing and exercising at
the Englewood YMCA. He
was a member of Unity
Church of Peace.
Mr. Hood is survived by
his loving wife of 56 years,
Marion; his children,
Cathleen of McDonough,


William A.
Colandrea
William A. Colandrea, 73,
formerly of Port Charlotte,
Fla., passed away Saturday,
July 20, 2013.
He is survived by his
wife, Carol; son, William
(Marianne) Colandrea;
stepchildren, Salvatore
(Diana) Governara, Gina
(Frank) Esposito and
Michael Governara; nine
grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
A gathering of family
and friends will be from
2 p.m. to 3 p.m., followed
by a Celebration of
Life Service at 3 p.m.,
Saturday, July 27, 2013, at
Landmark Funeral Home,
4200 Hollywood Blvd.,
Hollywood, Fla. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests
donations to Treasure
Coast Hospice, 5090 Dunn
Road, Fort Pierce, FL 34981
(772-403-4510).
Arrangements are by
Landmark Funeral Home.

John E. Filipek
John E. Filipek, 52, of
Port Charlotte, Fla., and
formerly of Hurricane,
WVa.,
passed away
Friday,
July 5,
2013, at the
Emogene
Dolin Jones
Hospice
House in
Huntington, WVa.
He was born May 31,
1961, in Charleston,
WVa., a son of Loyce Jean
Meador Filipek and Walter
V. Filipek of Hurricane.
In addition to his
father, John is survived by
his sisters, Cathie (Tom)
Merriman of Lexington,
S.C., and Linda K. (Tom)
Lightfoot of Chesapeake,
Va.; brothers, Mark
(Glenna Jean) Filipek of
Milton, WVa., and Walter
David Filipek of Cross
Lanes, WVa.; and several
nieces, nephews and ex-
tended family members.
He was preceded in death
by his mother.
As he wished, John was
cremated. A memorial
service to honor his life
will be held at 11 a.m.
Saturday, July 27, 2013, at
Cunningham Memorial
Park, Lower Mausoleum
Chapel, St. Albans, WVa.,
with Pastor Cheryl Carey
officiating. A fellowship
for friends and family
will be held 30 minutes
prior to the service.
Entombment will follow.
In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to
the Emogene Dolin Jones
Hospice House, PO. Box
464, Huntington, WV 25709.
You may share memories
or condolences with the
family at www.chapman
funeralhomes.com.
Arrangements are by
Bartlett-Chapman Funeral
Home of St. Albans.

Zannie Roy Hood
Zannie Roy Hood, 79, of
Port Charlotte, Fla., made
his transition Tuesday,
July23,
2013, after
a long and
valiant
battle with
amyloidosis.
SHe was
bom Aug. 28,
1933, in
"a. LaGrange, Ga.,
"a o tolWilliam R.
H and Betty L.
Hood.
Zannie served in the
U.S. Army during the
Korean Conflict as a tele-
phone installer/repair-
man from 1953 to 1955.
He and his wife Marion
moved to Port Charlotte
24 years ago from Detroit,
Mich. Mr. Hood enjoyed


Ga., and Gary and Victor
of Detroit; grandson,
Braedon of Detroit; two
sisters, Harriet (Henry)
Thompson of Detroit,
and Vesterine (Jerome)
VanHook of Inkster,
Mich.; his aunt, Elease
Lynch of LaGrange;
his sister-in-law, Marie
Rosenborough of Detroit;
four nephews, Timothy,
Brian, Jerome and Kevin;
two nieces, Gladys and
Charlene; and many
grandnieces, grandneph-
ews and cousins.
A Memorial Service
will be held at 2 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013,
at Unity Church of Peace,
1250 Rutledge St., North
Port, Fla., with Military
Honors to follow. In lieu
of flowers, preferred
donations may be made
in loving memory of
Zannie to Tidewell
Hospice Inc., 5955 Rand
Blvd., Sarasota, FL 34238;
or Unity Church of Peace,
P.O. Box 494700, Port
Charlotte, FL 33949. You
may share a memory with
the Hood family at www.
englewoodfh.com.
Arrangements are by
Englewood Community
Funeral Home Inc., with
Private Crematory.

Joseph J. Koris
Joseph J. Koris of Port
Charlotte, Fla., and
Boxford, Mass., passed
away Monday,
^. July 22, 2013.
.,; He was a
World War II
U.S. Marine
Corps Veteran. As a
retired Project Director
for The Badger Company
of Cambridge, Mass.,
he built oil refineries all
around the world.
He was the beloved
husband of Anita (nee
Tomas) Koris for 67 years;
devoted father of Mark J.
(Francine) Koris, M.D.
of Brookline, Mass.,
David J. (Janice) Koris,
Esquire of The Hague,
the Netherlands, and
Cheryl Lawton (Michael)
Malone, Esquire of
Newton, Mass.; and
grandfather of Andrew
and Elizabeth Koris,
Caitlin, Andrea and
Kristiann Koris, Michael C.
Malone, and William and
Kimberly Lawton.
Visitation is from
9:15 a.m. until the funeral
at 10:15 a.m. Thursday,
Aug. 1, 2013, at George E
Doherty & Sons Funeral
Home, 1305 Highland
Ave., Needham, Mass. The


JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
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Funeral Mass will follow
at 11 a.m. at St. Ignatius
Church in Chestnut
Hill, Mass. Relatives and
friends are kindly invited.
Interment will take place
at Newton Cemetery.

Betty Schubauer
Betty Schubauer, 88, of
Port Charlotte, Fla., and
formerly of Hamburg,

away
N.Y., passed

Saturday,
July 20,
2013.
She was
born July 7,
1925.
Betty was
a kindergarten teacher
for many years. When she
was 85, she volunteered
for Meals onnWheels and
worked part time for a
local funeral home. Betty
was a compassionate
woman, with strong be-
liefs in her Catholic faith.
She will be greatly
missed by her husband;
brother; five children;
14 grandchildren; and
18 great-grandchildren.
There will be a memo-
rial service at 10 a.m.
Saturday, July 27, 2013, at
Murdock Baptist Church,
18375 Cochran Blvd., Port
Charlotte.

ENGLEWOOD

Victor Arena
Dr. Victor Arena, 90,
of Rotonda West, Fla.,
passed away Sunday,
July 21, 2013, at Tidewell
Hospice in Venice, Fla.
Arrangements are by
Englewood Community
Funeral Home Inc., with
Private Crematory.

NORTH PORT
There were no deaths
reported in North Port
Wednesday.

DESOTO

Myra A. Bishop
Myra A. Bishop, 80, of
Lake Placid, Fla., passed
away Tuesday, July 23,
2013. Arrangements are
by Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home of Arcadia,
Fla.

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OurTown Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME
3112


7/25/13
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Joseph Family
Health and Wellness located at
12479 S Access Rd Suite 1, in
the County of Charlotte, in the
City of Port Charlotte, Florida
33981 intends to register the
said name with the Division of
Corporations of the Florida
Department of State, Tallahas-
see, Florida.
Dated at Port Charlotte, Florida,
this 23 day of July, 2013.
/s/ Pivotal Health Physical
Medicine LLC
Publish: July 25, 2013
110833 2919477
Notice Under Fictitious Name
Law Pursuant to Section
865.09, Florida Statutes
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of PLKeating Busi-
ness Consulting located at 1617
Bobolink Court, in the County of
Charlotte, in the City of Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950 intends to
register the said name with the
Division of Corporations of the
Florida Department of State, Tal-
lahassee, Florida.
Dated at Punta Gorda. Florida,
this 23 rd day of July.
/s/ Peter L. Keating
Publish: July 25, 2013
110833 2919491

L NOTICE OF ACTION
Z 3116


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
12th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR MANATEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 13DR3541
Division:
Andres R. Squires,
Petitioner
and
Michelle H. Chambers,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR
FINANCIAL SUPPORT)
TO: Michelle Helen Mary Cham-
bers
10018 Freestone Lane
Port Richey FL.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for annulment of marriage
has been filed against you and
that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Andre Squires whose
address is 7615 Partrige St
Bradenton FL 34202 on or before
7-15-13, and file the original with
the clerk of this Court at P.O. Box
25400 Bradenton FL 34206
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail
to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
The action is asking the court to
decide how the following real or
personal property should be divid-
ed: NONE
Copies of all documents in this
case, including orders, are avail-
able at the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office. You may review
these documents upon request.
You must keep the clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record
at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Flori-
da Family Law Rules of Proce-
dure, requires certain automatic
disclosure of documents and
information Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, including dis-
missal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 6/3/13
R.B.SHORE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: s/SONYA AGURE
Deputy Clerk
Publish: July 11, 18, 25 and
August 1, 2013
339038 2913865

NOTICE TO
CREDITORS



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA L. CARTER
Deceased.
File No. 2013-CP-000765


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ANNA
L. CARTER, deceased, whose date of
death was August 6, 2010; is pending
in the Circuit Court for Charlotte County,
Florida, Probate Division, File Number
2013-CP-000765the address ofwhich is
P.O. BOX 511687, Punta Gorda,
Florida 33951. The names and
addresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands


NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
3 3120

against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice
is July 24, 2013
Personal Representatives:
Donna Sherrell
Anna Leftwich Johnson
Arlene Mason
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
Adam R. Miller, Esquire
Florida Bar No: 0903841
218 Harbor Drive South
Venice, Florida 34285
Telephone: (941) 488-9641
E-mail:adam.miller@daystar.net
PUBLISH: July 25, August 1, 2013

I NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CASE NO.2010-CA-05012
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.:
Plaintiff,
vs.
MOLLIE A. MCCARTHY A/K/A
MOLLIE DEGIOVINE, IF LIVING
AND IF DEAD; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF MOLLIE A.
MCCARTHY A/K/A MOLLIE
DEGIOVINE, IF LIVING AND IF
DEAD; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE
PROPERTY;
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in
accordance with the Default Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated
July 16, 2013, in the above-styled
cause, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at
https://www.charlotte. realfore-
close.com, in accordance with
Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, on
August 14, 2013 the following
described property:
LOT 14, BLOCK 380, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 23, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
14A THRU 14E, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Property Address: 950
MENSH TER NW, PORT CHAR-
LOTTE, FL 33948, Charlotte
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
http://www.ca.ciis20.org/
home/main/adarequest.asp
If you are an individual with a
disability who needs an
accommodation in order to
participate in a court pro-
ceeding or other court ser-
vice, program, or activity, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Requests for
accommodations may be pre-
sented on the form below, in
another written format, or
orally. Please complete the
form below (choose the form
for the county where the
accommodation is being
requested) and return it as far
in advance as possible, but
preferably at least seven (7)
days before your scheduled
court appearance or other
court activity. Please see con-
tact information below and
select the contact from the
county where the accommo-
dation is being requested.
To download the correct
Accommodation form, please
choose the County your court
proceedings or other court ser-
vice, program or activity cov-
ered by Title II of the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act is in
so we can route your request
to the appropriate contact:
Charlotte County ADA Title II
Request for Accommodations
Form
WITNESS my hand on 18 day
of Juyi, 2013.
C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk of Court,
Charlotte County
Publish: July 25 and August 1,
2013
322095 2918585
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-2011-CA003456
SEC.:
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MEL-
LON FKA THE BANK OF NEW
YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF


CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST 2006-31CB. MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-31CB,
Plaintiff,
V.
ELIZABETH HOMAN; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM


L NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122


AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES. GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-
TION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMI-
NEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK,
N.A.;
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Sum-
mary Judgment of Foreclosure
dated April 16, 2013, entered in
Civil Case No. 08-2011-CA-
003456 of the Circuit Court of
the Twentieth Judicial Circuit in
and for Charlotte County, Florida,
wherein the Clerk of the Circuit
Court will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash on 14 day of
August, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at
website:
https://www.charlotte.realfore-
close.com, relative to the follow-
ing described property as set
forth in the Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 18, BLOCK 4844, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION GOLF
COURSE SECTION, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 33A
THRU 33G, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE COUN-
TY FLORIDA.
COMMONLY KNOWN AS:
2459 AQUILOS COURT,
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33952
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
ATTENTION:
PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT. If you are a person
with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order
to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please
contact Jon Embury, Adminis-
trative Services Manager,
whose office is located at 350
E. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2110, at least 7
stays before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are bear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
DATED AT PUNTA GORDA, FLORI-
DA THIS 22 DAY OF MAY, 2013
C.L.G.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Publish: July 18 and 25, 2013
329037 2916934
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 08-2012-CA-000217
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
PETER S. ROOT; KATHLEEN A.
ROOT; UNKNOWN TENANT 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS, WHO (IS/ARE)
NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
TORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS; SUNTRUST
BANK
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on
December 18. 2012, and the
Order Rescheduling Foreclosure
Sale entered on July 8, 2013, in
this cause, in the Circuit Court of
Charlotte County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in Char-
lotte County, Florida, described
as:
TRACT 139, LESS THE EAST
104 FEET OF THE SOUTH
208 FEET THEREOF, TOWN
ESTATES UNIT 2, A. SUBDIVI-
SION, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE
27, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
a/k/a 6996 CLEVELAND DR,
PUNTA GORDA, FL 33982
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
at eleven o'clock a.m. on August
7, 2013.
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Punta Gorda, Florida,
the 10 day of July, 2013.
Barbara T. Scott
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: July 18 and 25, 2013
146641 2916858
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
082012CAO0144OXXXXXX
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.


STEPHANIE A. SISCO: UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO, 2; and ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT
TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT,
TITLE. OR INTEREST IN THE
To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE HEARING
3122 3124


PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Summary
Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated April 16, 2013, and
entered in Case No. 08201
2CA001440XXXXXX of the Circuit
Court in and for Charlotte County,
Florida. wherein BANK OF AMERI-
CA, N.A. is Plaintiff and
STEPHANIE A. SISCO; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT
TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO 1-HAVE ANY RIGHT,
TITLE OR INTEREST TN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED,
are Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
website of www.charlotte.real-
foreclose.com County, Florida,
11:00 a.m. on the 14 day of
August, 2013, the following
described property as set forth in
said Order or Final Judgment, to-
wit:
LOT 23, BLOCK E, UNIT 8.
PEACE RIVER SHORES SUBDI-
VISION, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 39A
THROUGH 39B, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A. CLAIM WITH-
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a dis-
ability who needs any accom-
modation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you,
to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
DATED at Punta Gorda, Florida,
on May 22. 2013.
BARBARA SCOTT
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: July 18 and 25, 2013
105230 2916889
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 082012CA002885XXX
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RAYMOND SLADE; et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Summary
Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated April 6, 2013, and entered
in Case No,
082012CA002885XXXXXX of the
Circuit Court in and for Charlotte
County, Florida, wherein BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A., is Plaintiff and
RAYMOND SLADE; MARY SLADE;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO.2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,
OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash website of
www,charlotte.realforeclose.com
County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on
the 15 day of August, 2013, the
following described property as
set forth in said Order or Final
Judgment, to-wit:
LOTS 2, 3 AND 4, BLOCK
1930, PORT CHARLOTTE
SUBDIVISION SECTION 56,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 70A,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM wITHIN
60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a
disability who needs any
accommodation in order to
participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Administrative Services Man-
ager whose office is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, FL 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are bear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
DATED at Punta Gorda, Florida,


on May 23, 2013.
BARBARA SCOTT 1.1.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: July 18 and 25, 2013
105230 2916953


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
TO CONSIDER THE
ADOPTION OF THE FISCAL
YEAR 2013/2014 BUDGET;
AND NOTICE OF REGULAR
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS'
MEETING FOR THE
LAKESIDE PLANTATION
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
The Board of Supervisors of the
Lakeside Plantation Commu-
nity Development District will
hold a public hearing on
August 14, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
at the Lakeside Plantation
Clubhouse, 2200 Plantation
Blvd., North Port, FL 34289
for the purpose of hearing com-
ments and objections on the
adoption of the budgets) of the
District for Fiscal Year
2013/2014. A regular board
meeting of the District will also be
held at that time where the Board
may consider any other business
that may properly come before it.
In addition, the Board will hear
public comment and objections
relative to the levy of a non ad val-
orem assessment pursuant to
Florida Law for the purpose of
funding operations and mainte-
nance and principal and interest
expenses of the District.
A copy of the agenda and budget
(s) may be obtained at the offices
of the District Manager, 13574
Village Park Drive, Suite 265,
Orlando, FL 32837, during nor-
mal business hours.
The public hearing and meeting
are open to the public and will be
conducted in accordance with the
provisions of Florida law for Com-
munity Development Districts.
The public hearing and meeting
may be continued to date, time
and place to be specified on the
record at the meeting.
There may be occasions when
one or more Supervisors, Staff or
other individuals will participate
by speaker telephone.
Pursuant to provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring special
accommodation to participate in
this meeting is asked to advise
the District Office at (407) 841-
5524 at least forty-eight (48)
hours prior to the meeting. If you
are hearing or speech impaired,
please contact the Florida Relay
Service (800) 955-8770, who can
aid you in contacting the District
Office.
Each person who decides to
appeal any decision made by the
Board with respect to any matter
considered at the public hearing
or meeting is advised that person
will need a record of proceedings
and that accordingly, the person
may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings is
made, including the testimony
and evidence upon which such
appeal is to based
George S. Flint
District Manager
Governmental Management
Services Central Florida, LLC
Publish: ?????
297693 2918831

L NOTICE OF
MEETING
^ 33126

Notice of Regular Meeting
And Audit Committee Meeting
Heritage Lake Park
Community Development District
The Regular meeting of the
Board of Supervisors of the Her-
itage Lake Park Community
Development District is sched-
uled to be held Thursday, August
1, 2013 at 12:00 P.M. at 25635
Heritage Lake Boulevard, Punta
Gorda, Florida. Also during this
meeting the Audit Committee will
rank the proposals received to
perform the audit for the fiscal
year ended September 30, 2013,
as previously advertised in accor-
dance with Florida Law. The
meeting is open to the public and
will be conducted in accordance
with the provisions of Florida Law
for Community Development Dis-
tricts. The meeting may be con-
tinued to a date, time, and place
to be specified on the record at
the meeting. A copy of the agen-
da for this meeting may be
obtained from SEVERN TRENT
SERVICES, 210 North University
Drive, Suite 702, Coral Springs,
Florida, 33071.
There may be occasions when
one or more Supervisors will par-
ticipate by telephone.
Any person requiring special
accommodations at this meeting
because of a disability or physical
impairment should contact the
District Office at (954) 753-5841
at least three calendar days prior
to the meeting.
Each person who decides to
appeal any decision made by
the Board with respect to any
matter considered at the
meeting is advised that per-
son will need a record of the
proceedings and that accord-
ingly, the person may need to
ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made,
including the testimony and
evidence upon which such
appeal is to be based.
Cal Teague
District Manager
Publish: July 25, 2013
212694 2919192

Heritage Oak Park
Community Development
District
NOTICE OF REGULAR BOARD
MEETING AND NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING TO RECEIVE
PUBLIC COMMENT ON THE
FISCAL YEAR 2014 PRO-


POSED FINAL BUDGETSS; TO
CONSIDER THE IMPOSITION
OF MAINTENANCE AND OPER-
ATION SPECIAL ASSESS-
MENTS; ADOPTION OF AN
ASSESSMENT ROLL; AND
PROVIDING FOR THE LEVY;


MEETING
144 3126

COLLECTION AND ENFORCE-
MENT OF THE SAME
The Board of Supervisors of the
Heritage Oak Park Community
Development District will hold a
public hearing on Thursday,
August 15, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
at 19520 Heritage Oak Park
Boulevard, Port Charlotte, Flori-
da.
The purpose of this hearing is to
receive public comment and
objections on the Fiscal Year
2014 Proposed Final Budget(s),
to consider the adoption of an
assessment roll, the imposition of
special assessments to fund the
proposed budget upon the lands
located within the District, and to
provide for the levy, collection
and enforcement of the non ad
valorem assessments. The public
hearing is being conducted pur-
suant to Chapters 190 and 197,
Florida Statutes.
The District may also fund vari-
ous facilities through the collec-
tion of certain rates, fees and
charges, which are identified with-
in the budgetss. A copy of the
Proposed Final Budget, prelimi-
nary assessment roll and/or the
agenda for the meeting/hearing
may be obtained at the offices of
the District Management Compa-
ny, Severn Trent Services, 5911
Country Lakes Drive, Ft. Myers,
Florida 33905 during normal busi-
ness hours. In accordance with
Section 189.418, Florida
Statutes, the proposed budget
will be posted on the District's
website
http://heritageoakpark.com/out-
side home.asp at least two days
before the budget hearing date.
The Board will also consider any
other business, which may prop-
erly come before it. The meet-
ing/hearing is open to the public
and will be conducted in accor-
dance with the provisions of Flori-
da Law for Community Develop-
ment Districts. The
meeting/hearing may be contin-
ued to a date, time, and place to
be specified on the record at the
meeting/hearing.
There may be occasions when
one or more Supervisors may
participate by telephone. At the
above location there may be pre-
sent a speaker telephone so that
any interested person can attend
the meeting/hearing and be fully
informed of the discussions tak-
ing place either in person or by
telephone communication.
In accordance with the provi-
sions of the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act, any person requiring
special accommodations at this
meeting because of a disability or
physical impairment should con-
tact the District Management
Company, Severn Trent Services
at (239) 245-7118. If you are
hearing or speech impaired,
please contact the Florida Relay
Service at (800) 955-8770 for aid
in contacting the District Office at
least two (2) days prior to the
date of the meeting/hearing.
Each person who decides to
appeal any decision made by the
Board with respect to any matter
considered at the meeting is
advised that person will need a
record of the proceedings and
that accordingly, the person may
need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is
made, including the testimony
and evidence upon which such
appeal is to be based.
Calvin Teague
District Manager
Publish: July 18 and 25, 2013
122267 2913812

| NOTICE OF SALE
L ^ 3130


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned intends to sell
the personal property described
below to enforce a lien imposed
on said property under The Flori-
da Self Storage Facility Act
Statutes (Section 83.801-
83.809). The undersigned will sell
at public sale by competitive bid-
ding on Thursday, the 15th day
of August, at 3:00pm, on the
premises where said property has
been stored and which are locat-
ed at Quality Self Storage,
3041 S. McCall Road, Engle-
wood, FL 34224 Charlotte
County, the following:
Name: Unit # Contents:
James Hart 441 HHG
Purchases must be paid for at the
time of purchase by cash only. All
purchased items are sold as is,
where is, and must be removed at
the time of the sale. Sale is sub-
ject to cancellation in the event of
settlement between owner and
obligated party.
Dated this July 25, 2013 and
August 1, 2013.
Publish: July 25, August 1, 2013
108827 2919227
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
S & S MONEY AUTO REPAIR
gives Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell these vehi-
cles on 08/21/2013, 09:00 am
at 23371 HARBORVIEW RD PT
CHARLOTTE, FL 33980-2114,
pursuant to subsection 713.78 of
the Florida Statutes. S & S
MONEY AUTO REPAIR reserves
the right to accept or reject
any/or all bids.
2C3HE66GX1H567023
2001 CHRYSLER


Publish: July 25, 2013
341121 2919180
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
STEVE'S TOWING gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles on
08/06/2013, 09:00 am at
19888 Veterans Blvd Punta
Gorda, FL 33980, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. STEVE'S TOWING
reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.





The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 7


NOTICE OF SALE



1G3CW54COL4337259
1990 OLDSMOBILE
Publish: July 25, 2013
274754 2919201
OTHER NOTICES
Z ^ 3138


STATE OF VERMONT
FAMILY DIVISION
Docket No. 80-2-13 RDFA
SUPERIOR COURT
RUTLAND UNIT
Sherry Remich,
Plaintiff
V.
James Remich,
Defendant
SUMMONS AND ORDER FOR
PUBLICATION
To the above-named Defendant:
You are hereby summoned and
required to serve upon John B.
Lamson, Esq., plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is, P.O. Box
1537, Bennington, Vermont
05201, an answer to plaintiff's
complaint in the above-entitled
action within 41 days after the
date of the first publication of this
summons, which is July 18,
2013. If you fail to do so, judg-
ment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint. Your answer
must also be filed with the court.
Unless the relief demanded in the
complaint is for damage covered
by a liability insurance policy
under which the insurer has the
right or obligation to conduct the
defense, or unless otherwise pro-
vided in Rule 13(a), your answer
must state as a counterclaim any
related claim which you may have
against the plaintiff, or you will
thereafter be barred from making
such claim in any other action.
Plaintiff's action is a complaint for
Relief From Abuse, in which plain-
tiff alleges that defendant has
abused her by placing her in fear
of imminent serious physical
harm and that there is a danger of
further abuse and that an order
restricting defendant's contact
with plaintiff is necessary as is an
order awarding plaintiff tempo-
rary rights and responsibilities for
the minor children. A copy of the
complaint is on file and may be
obtained at the office of the clerk
of this court, Rutland County
Courthouse, 9 Merchants Row,
Rutland, Vermont 05701.
It appearing from the testimony
given in open court on Friday,
June 21, 2013, in the above-enti-
tled action that service cannot be
made with due diligence by any of
the methods prescribed in
V.R.C.P.4(d) through (f) inclusive,
it is hereby ORDERED that service
of the above process shall be
made upon the defendant, James
Remich, by publication pursuant
to V.R.C.P. [4(d)(1) and] 4(g). This
order shall be published once a
week for three consecutive
weeks on July 18, 2013, July 25,
2013 and August 1, 2013, in the
Charlotte Sun, a newspaper of
general circulation in Port Char-
lotte, FL, and a copy of this order
shall be mailed to the defendant,
James Remich, if his address is
known.
Dated at Rutland, Vermont this
10th day of July, 2013.
Hon. William Cohen
Presiding Family Division Judge
339038 2916821


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....
'Find a Pet
.Find a Car
VFind a Job
*Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
*Sell Your Home
*Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
'/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED MEETING
EWD
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
The Englewood Water District
hereby gives notice that the Reg-
ular Meeting previously scheduled
for Thursday, August 1, 2013 has
been rescheduled. The new date
is Thursday, August 8, 2013. The
meeting time remains unchanged
at 8:30 a.m.
Taylor Meals, Chair
Board of Supervisors
Englewood Water District
Publish: July 25, 2013
251809 2919209

Turn your


trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!


License controversy


fells Sarasota


finance official


By SCOTT LOCKWOOD
STAFF WRITER
SARASOTA COUNTY
- Sarasota County Chief
Financial Management
Officer Suzanne Gable has
resigned amid allegations
that her CPA license was
not current a move that
could have ramifications
for County Administrator
Randall Reid.
Gable, 56, was hired last
September by Reid and
county Chief Financial
Planning Officer Steve
Botelho. Reid had hired
Gable as director of
Alachua County's Office of
Management and Budget
while reorganizing that
county's government
in 2002, when he was
county manager there.
Reid then brought her on
in Sarasota County, eight
months after he started
here last January.
In Sarasota, Gable
assisted with budgeting
and oversight of perfor-
mance management
and in overseeing the
county's budgets, from
procurement practices
through performance
management and audits.
She drew a salary of about
$107,000, with benefits.
A tip led to an investiga-
tion of Gable's credentials
by the Sarasota Clerk
of Court's office. The
investigation turned up
documents that stated
that Gable's license has
been "null and void" since
it expired on Dec. 31,
2005. In order to maintain
a certified public accoun-
tant license, 80 hours of
continuing education is
required every two years.
In her resignation letter
dated July 8 the same
day she was confronted
by county officials about
her CPA license Gable
said she was resigning
because: "Urgent fam-
ily matters are requiring
my attention back in
Gainesville." She did
not mention any issues
pertaining to her CPA
license in the letter. Gable
could not be reached for
comment Wednesday.
"It's very, very easy
to look to see if they've
got an active CPA
license," said County
Commissioner Christine
Robinson, who began her
own investigation into
Gable after the last set
of County Commission
meetings July 9-10.
Botelho saidWednesday
he was shocked when he
first was told that Gable
did not have an active
CPA license. He was under


ARRESTS
FROM PAGE 3
Solomon Victor Brodie, 34,W. Fray
St., Englewood. Charges: three counts
of possession of drug paraphernalia;
two counts each of possession of
methamphetamine with the intent
to sell and possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription;
possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession of marijuana
with the intent to sell. Bond: $24,000.
*Samantha Christine Caudill, 19,W.
Fray St., Englewood. Charges: possession
of methamphetamine with the intent to
sell, possession ofa controlled substance
without a prescription and possession of
drug paraphernalia. Bond: $8,500.
Alexander Abreu, 40, of Clewiston,
Fla. Charge: driving with a suspended
license. Bond: $500.
Kevin Michael Brodeur,51,29900
block of Bermont Road, Punta Gorda.
Charge: shooting or throwing a deadly
missile into a dwelling or a vehicle.
Bond: none.
The Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Susan Rae Benedict, 41,200 block
ofAllamanda Circle, Venice. Charge:
trespassing. Bond: $500.
Shery Cecelia Chapman, 45,300
block of Briarwood Road,Venice.
Charge: possession of an open container
on a public right of way. Bond: $120.
Ryan Joseph Roland, 32,1500


block of Bayshore Road, Nokomis.
Charge: violation of probation (original


the impression that she
had one from the day she
was hired by the county
and from her work in her
former job, where the CPA
designation was used for
years. Botelho said the res-
ignation will not have any
impact on the preliminary
$1.03 billion budget that
will be presented to the
County Commission on
Aug. 20.
"It caught me off guard
and when I told the
administration, they were
caught off guard," Botelho
said. "It was a shock to all
of us."
Robinson said Gable,
who faced no competi-
tion during the hiring
process, was touted as
a CPA when she was
hired something that
was important to both
the commission and the
public, who wanted a
certified CPA in the Office
of Financial Planning.
The incident could
prove to be trouble for
Reid, of whom commis-
sioners were critical for
lack of communication
in their performance
evaluations of the county
administrator earlier in the
year. Robinson said it runs
much deeper than that for
her because she was not
given the full truth.
"I'm more upset that I
wasn't told there was an
investigation, and I wasn't
told that she didn't have
her CPA license since
2005," Robinson said. "I
also wasn't told that when
she was confronted with it
that she resigned. I wasn't
told any of those things ...
I was told something very
different than that."
Reid was unavailable
for comment Wednesday.
Gable's husband Ed
remains employed by
Sarasota County as its
General Services director.
The county's procure-
ment, or purchasing,
system came under
scrutiny after the March
2011 arrest of county
employee Rodney Jones
on corruption charges.
After Jones' departure,
more than a dozen
other county employees,
including former county
administrator Jim Ley,
either resigned, retired or
were fired as a result of
various probes. At least
four of the departures
were related to county-
issued credit card misuse.
When Reid was hired
in January 2012, he was
tasked with rebuilding the
top of county government
after the scandal.
Email: slockwood@sun-herald.com

charge: DUI). Bond: none.
Corey Alexander Blair, 21,2800
block of Fiesta Drive, Venice. Charges:
violation of probation and contempt
(original charges: trafficking in stolen
property and operating a motorcycle
without a valid license). Bond: none.
Jefferson Shawn Eckford, 35,500
block of Palmetto Drive, Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of probation (original
charge: battery). Bond: none.
Christopher Lee McCausland, 28,
200 block of El Prado St., North Port.
Charge: violation of probation (original
charge: battery). Bond: none.
Eric Reno Barrett, 46, Mango
Street, Englewood. Charge: violation
of probation (original charge: battery).
Bond: $25,000.
Alissa Michelle Hecker, 21,5500
block of Varet Road, Venice. Charge:
violation of probation (original
charge: DUI). Bond: $5,000.
*Gina Maria Ludlam,34,1000
block of Nantucket Road, Venice.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Christine Ruth McMasters, 39,
1100 block of E. Oak St., Venice.
Charge: petty theft. Bond $1,000.
The North Port Police
Department reported the
following arrests:
Bo Tyler Andrews, 23,700 block
of Marlin St., Punta Gorda. Charges:
fraud and driving with a suspended
commercial license. Bond: $1,000.
FrederickJ. Vansickle, 43,4200
block ofLubec Ave., North Port.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.


- Compiled byDrew Winchester
andAdam Kreger


- SdaCroSw2Ad


ACROSS
1 Kindergarten
lesson
5 Office fill-in
9 Removes, as
rind
14 Really steam
15 Antioxidant
berry
16 Big name in
chips
17 Triple-decker
snack
18 -Cola
19 Duck and
dodge
20 Big Apple
landmark
23 MIT student's
stat
24 Scale note
25 Flow slowly
26 Fine glass
30 Trike rider
32 Shoot (for)
33 Predicament
36 Settle up
by mail
40 Gaining unfair
advantage
44 Southeast
Asian capital
45 Candle
remnant
46 Scooby-
(toon dog)
47 Brief respite
49 Conquerors of
1066
52 Whisk wielder
55 Caviar source
58 Yahoo! rival
59 Control on
old TVs
64 Whirlpool
alternative


65 Snack in a shell
66 The King and I
setting
68 Gotten up
69 Feels off
70 Logical flaw
71 Run-down
72 Furthermore
73 Part of BTU

DOWN
1 In the past
2 Snide comment
3 Religious
leader
4 Pleasure boats
5 Type of nail
6 Earth sci.
7 November
parade sponsor
8 Billy Joel's
instrument


SLook for a third

crossword in .

the Sun Classified

Section.

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .....
"*** "* "** "** *


SHIP SHAPE by David W. Cromer
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com
9 Docking station 38 Desktop image
10 Got to volunteer 39 Ref's decisions


11 Chopin piece
12 Narrow shelf
13 Take a
47 Across
21 Granola
ingredient
22 Diner order
26 Bucks or clams
27 Short version of
Margaret
28 Bordeaux
buddy
29 Microscope part
31 Miner's load
34 Camp driller:
Abbr.
35 More than
impress
37 Award that's
worn


41 Pent up
42 Korean
carmaker
43 Cable movie
channel
48 Any NFLer
50 Kin of ole
51 Chinese pork
dish
52 Scorches
53 Pal from the
'hood
54 Obliterate
56 Ready to use
57 Web commerce
60 Clownish
61 Rights org.
62 Deprivation
63 Spanish artist
67 Came upon


Answer to previous puzzle


7/25/13


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 'The Walking
Dead" network
4 Home of
William, known
for his logical
"razor"
9 Dubuque native
14 John of England
15 "Guess again!"
16 Aria response,
perhaps
17 Poet's eye
18 *Union VIP
20 Image on Irish
euro coins
22 Weigh station
unit
23 Kitchen
extension?
24 *You might sleep
through it
27 Abates
30 Feedback for a
masseuse
31 Tip for smokers
33 Jos6's hooray
34 It may contain a
$10 bottle of
water
37 Bicker
39 *Self-esteem
essential
41 Super 8, e.g.
42 The Big Easy, to
locals
43 "Yuck!"
44 S.A. country
46 Inc. cousin
47 Silk Road desert
49 *1998 Sandra
Bullock film
55 Peas, at times
57 "Deathtrap"
playwright Levin
58 Horseradish, e.g.
59 Swimming
infractions, and
what the first
words of the
answers to
starred clues can
all have
63 An invitation
might include
one: Abbr.
64 Small landmass
65 Prepare to be
dubbed
66 Casual top
67 Sculpted works
68 Apres-ski drink
69 Intensify, with
"up"


By Matt Skoczen and Patti Varol 7/25/13


DOWN
1 Sign of tropical
hospitality
2 Parable message
3 Hooded slitherer
4 Hooter
5 Tiny Tim's
surname
6 Early computer
language
7 'That's !"
8 Ball club VIP
9 Skeptic's reply
10 Speak with style
11 Besides Derek
Jeter, only Major
Leaguer whose
3,000th hit was a
homer
12 City map abbr.
13 Here-there link
19 Change in
Albania?
21 Laud
25 Tropical capital
26 Seven-time A.L.
batting champ
28 Really bummed
29 Observe
32 Skater known as
"America's
sweetheart"
34 Puts in storage
35 Word shouted at
church


Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
C 0 PSEI SP 0 T ABAB
AV I AN YOKO K KARO0
AITL SJH PI AP T I P


CREE PONTE
S TIL EIS O 0 S E


G ULAG MOUSETRAP
SPI RED RANCHO
T I NE RETRO EURO
SERAPH BUL GED
OPERATE ION SLEDS

TOD SAHARAN EMU
I D 0 L BOAR GAMES
C L I L 0 RI UNITS
SELL EPPS PARER


(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.


36 Actress Gardner
38 Bitterness
39 Kelly's possum
40 Like star-crossed
lovers
41 Ham it up for a
shooter
45 P-like letters
48 "You ready?"
answer
50 Grand _
51 Had to say
"Oops," say


7/25/13


52 Vital conduit
53 Clan symbol
54 High-end
56 Ball club
whose colors
are blue and
orange
59 Little white lie
60 Sch. with a Mesa
campus
61 Box office buy:
Abbr.
62 Slick


I I


I






Our Town Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, July 25, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Chris Porter Executive Editor

Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

More flattering

name-dropping
he positive press about
real estate and retirement
opportunities in our region
keeps rolling in.
The latest: top-10 rankings for
Punta Gorda and Venice on the
Wall Street Journal Market Watch
and Huffington Post websites.
Venice took the fifth spot on the
Huffington Post's list of "Top 10
Most Relaxing Places to Retire."
"In many ways, (Venice is)
the ideal retirement commu-
nity: There's a low cost of living,
small-town feel, outdoor and
indoor recreational activities, and
convenient access to shopping
and services. Residents can enjoy
beautiful beaches, warm weather,
golf and more, all in close proxim-
ity to downtown," the HuffPo
wrote.
Thank you very much.
The Market Watch story about
retirement "hot spots" came from
RealtyTrac, an online foreclosure
marketplace.
In the "Top 15 Best Places to
Retire for Real Estate Investment,"
Punta Gorda took eighth place
and Venice tenth. The story noted
the warm temperatures, attrac-
tive housing prices, favorable
return-on-investment rates and
high average ages (44 percent of
Punta Gorda's population is of
retirement age and 52 percent of
Venice's, according to RealtyTrac.)
As the baby boomer retire-
ment wave picks up speed, the
positive press will help put us
on "must-see" retirement lists. It
also confirms what we already
know: This is a pretty nice place
for retirees, or anyone else. Now,
we only hope that Englewood,
Port Charlotte and North Port can
get in on the spin-off of positive
vibrations. Naturally, if retirees
come to the area, they may be
inclined to visit the communities
in between these "hot spots" and
find the beauty, affordableness
and amenities aren't confined to
Venice and Punta Gorda.


... and speaking of

glowing publicity
p unta Gorda received a dif-
ferent kind of exposure in a
National Geographic article
posted Tuesday on the travel and
adventure website. In an ar-
ticle titled, "Florida's Radioactive
Fountain of Youth May Prolong
Life," writer Jackie Snow described
the city's infamouss downtown
water fountain that carries the
ominous warning, "exceeds the
maximum contaminant level for
radioactivity."
Rather than coming off as a
gotcha-style expose of govern-
ment malfeasance, though, Snow
talked to many locals who have
long imbibed from the isotope-
laden fountain and swear by its
health benefits, including its high
levels of magnesium. The writer
notes that the radiation warn-
ing may be overkill, given that
the Environmental Protection
Agency's radiation limit for drink-
ing water is based on drinking a
liter a day for 70 years.
"I drank out of that well every
day," longtime Punta Gorda
resident Gussie Baker told Snow,
who chronicled the 78-year-old's
childhood swimming lessons at
the long-gone Hotel Charlotte
Harbor, whose pool was filled with
the same water that flows from
the fountain via an artesian well.
Featuring a video of Punta
Gorda's revitalized downtown
- with the unfortunate excep-
tion of the undeveloped Punta
Gorda Mall property adjacent
to the fountain- the National
Geographic article also highlight-
ed the city's historical connection
to Juan Ponce de Leon. The
publicity may not recreate the
long lines that used to form at the
fountain in bygone days, but at
a time when the city's municipal
water quality is being hotly
debated, it's ironic that untreated


water flowing from a primordial
underground reservoir is making
positive international news.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Truth isn't
being told

Editor:
With regard to the item;
"Could have been me" (July 20),
where President Obama tries
to give weight to the "injustice"
delivered by the jury in the
Trayvon/Zimmerman case, he
is, simply put, "pathetic." But
given the fact that the media
(the Sun and it's editor, too)
will not publish the facts of the
case, put them (you) into the
same category.
Why do you refuse to show
photo's of Martin at 17? Too
graphic? And, what about his
arrest record? Too damning?
Columnist Leonard Pitts
called Martin a "murdered
child." He's another one that
refuses to tell the truth. And,
for what reason, lose popularity
among his readers?
There is nothing more
powerful then the truth. Try it
sometime.
Patrick Dickson
Port Charlotte

One word
under limit

Editor:
"God Bless the United States
of America."
Seven words that have a spe-
cial meaning to many, but not
apparently to the editor of this
paper. A recent letter I wrote
appeared in the July 4 edition
of the Sun. It was printed, but
without those seven powerful
words. My letter exceeded the
250 word limit by six. I'm sure
that there was room if one
wanted to include that closing
statement. If the editor chose to
exclude those words for "politi-
cal correctness," I can't agree.
Has the 250 rule been bent/
broker before? Yes, we all know
it has. I've had letters printed
in the past that were longer. I
personally take offense to the
deletion of the phrase. History
is replete with the reference to
God as the foundation of the
founding of this nation. Your
paper gladly ran a full page
ad paid for by Hobby Lobby,
Oklahoma that referenced the
many times that God was re-
ferred to by our first presidents,
the Founders, Supreme Court
justices and others.
One quotation by Jedediah
Morse, patriot and educator,
said this: "To the kindly influ-
ence of Christianity we owe
that degree of civil freedom and


political and social happiness,
which mankind now enjoys
... Whenever the pillars of
Christianity shall be over-
thrown, our present republican
forms of government and all
blessings which flow from
them must fall with them."
Is America heading in that
direction? I pray not! God bless
the United States of America.
Bob Reichert
Punta Gorda

Ruling opens
dangerous door

Editor:
Justice did not prevail.
It opened the door for more
of these acts of violence under
the "stand your ground" law.
Zimmerman knew of this law.
He had the gun to protect
himself, even when he was told
to stand down.
The "6-foot, 2-inch punk"
had candy and a drink, and
was talking to his girlfriend on
his way home. We're all aware
of this, but here's what comes
next.
This ruling has opened the
door for this law to work either
way. So when a black man
shoots and kills a white boy for
appearing to be staking out his
neighborhood at night, I'm sure
the outcome will be the same.
Right?
When will the prejudice end
in this country? Repeal this law!
Pam Forshey
Englewood

Many questions
about abortion law

Editor:
Abortion, the law, it's legal!
Men and women who are
against abortion, do you really
think you can stop abortions
or will you just drive them
underground? Prohibition did
not stop drinking. The war on
drugs has not stopped the use
of drugs. Would you rather
have our sisters, daughters,
mothers receive help at hos-
pitals, clinics, doctor offices
or by some untrained person
in less-than-ideal conditions,
possibly leading to mutilation
or death ?
Wealthy women will travel
to other states or countries to
obtain their abortions. Do you
really want to discriminate
against poor women. Are you
willing to step up and adopt a
baby with a major disability?
Would you set up a trust to
take care of them or would
you pass the responsibility for
their care onto others?
Would you insist that 12- to


14-year-old victims
or incest have a ch
the child be beaten
abandoned? Please
tistics of people inc
pedophiles, wife ab
suicides who were
and abused. Do yo
on your conscience
you be dooming a c
horrendous life?
Some things are
not being born. Wo
choose that life for
Let's not choose fo:
they are not trying
for you. If you did
law, would you inc
the women who ar
have had an aborti
and poor, and char
with murder? Have
thought this throun


Tom Begany
above and b


sof rape
ild? Would
i, abused,
check sta-
carcerated,


difference to many of us.
Here are just a few examples
of racism, as I see it. A white
woman cannot enter a "Black
Beauty Contest," but any color
can enter the "Miss America
Contest." There are more than
60 proclaimed "black col-
leges" in the U.S., yet if there
were an all-white college that
would be considered a racist
college. Then there is the
Black History Month. I could
go on and on.
Now, maybe Eric Holder,
Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson,
(who are in my opinion the
racists) should let the court of
law make their decision and
abide by their ruling. We have
had more racial problems
during this president's time
in office than we have experi-
enced in many years.
Sylvia Warren
Englewood

Members of Congress
will be repealed

Editor:
Recently, Speaker of the
House John Boehner, when
asked about the record low
approval of the present
Congress, said: "This Congress
should not be judged by the
laws it creates, but by the laws
it repeals." What an absurd


users and statement.
unwanted This comes from the
u want that speaker of the House, the
e? Could third highest position of our
child to a government. In the history of
past speakers, Democrat and
worse than Republican, there was always
uld you a person who sought to find a
yourself? way to compromise a position
r others, of debate in order to fulfill the
to choose responsibility of this position.
change the John Boehner has not
arcerate done this. He is what we now
e found to have in Congress, a non-
on, wealthy compromising obstructionist
*ge them who only seeks to disrupt
you really the law making process in
gh? Washington, regardless of the
John Vacha betterment of the American
Port Charlotte people. Next election, I think
this kind of attitude will reap
what it sowed, repeal-ment.
y goes Marvin D. Myszka
beyond North Port


Editor:
I would like to thank
and commend your car-
rier, Thomas Begany, for his
outstanding service, consci-
entious and going above all
expectations to deliver our
North Port Sun newspaper on
Saturday.
The day before our street
was closed for repairs. Mr.
Begany got out of his vehicle
and walked down our street
hand delivering the Saturday
Sun to all his customers, tak-
ing about 10-15 minutes out
of his early-morning schedule.
Thank you to the North Port
Sun for hiring such compo-
nent carriers like Mr. Begany,
and would hope you rec-
ognize Mr. Begany in some
manner.
Fred Tower III
North Port

Observations
on black, white

Editor:
I am so tired of hearing the
"whites" being called racists.
Now the president expresses
his views on the Martin
case. I believe Ambassador
Christopher Stevens and
Sean Smith's mothers loved
their sons every bit as much
as Trayvon Martin's mother
loved Trayvon. However,
when the four Americans
were murdered in Benghazi,
I didn't see much concern
from the White House. Even
the "then" Secretary of State,
Hillary Clinton, said "They
are dead, what difference
does it make?" It made a big


Time to stop
the 'race-baiting'


Editor:
Trayvon Martin apparently
had issues with non-blacks
such as George Zimmerman,
who he called a "cracka." This
was further evidenced by the
condition of Zimmerman's
nose and the back of his head.
Racism perhaps? Normal
reaction? I might have done
the same thing in younger
days if I was repeatedly told
about some race that had been
keeping my kind in bondage
for the last 300 years and
was still doing it thanks to
race-baiters like Jesse Jackson
and Al Sharpton and a willing,
biased media.
So, I believe Martin's
reaction should have been
expected at a probability much
higher than from a white
person facing Zimmerman. Is
that racist thinking?
And then Zimmerman
was, in my opinion, inviting
trouble out of ignorance. He
had no outward sign of being a
security watch, did not identify
himself to Martin, was much
at a disadvantage physically,
but carried a hidden weapon.
Two conclusions: We need
to quit the race-baiting, and
there needs to be rules, backed
by state law, for security
guards carrying weapons. The
importance of this is increased
by recent interests and laws
allowing concealed carry and
what is referred to as "stand
your ground."
Peter Wohld
Port Charlotte


LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013





The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 9


Suicide by the government


he case of the city
of Detroit isn't
much of a murder
mystery. Various sus-
pects have been fin-
gered in its demise: The
global economy. The
fall of the auto industry.
The decline of manu-
facturing generally. But
it's simpler than that.
Detroit died of its own
hand.
The city undertook
a controlled experi-
ment in what happens
if you are governed by
a toxic combination
of Great Society big
spenders, race hustlers,
crooks, public-sector
unions and ineffectual
reformers. It spent and
misgoverned itself into
the ground. It tried to
defy the axiom of the
late economist Herb
Stein that "if something
cannot go on forever,
it will stop." Detroit's
bout of self-destruction
lasted for a few decades,
and now may finally


stop only when there is
little left to destroy.
The city was at the
pioneering edge of
urban liberalism and
discovered that all the
social spending in the
world doesn't deliver
order, family stability,
education, economic
dynamism or effective
governance. In the
hands of Detroit's rotten
political class, it proved
inimical to all of those
things.
The city's downfall
started long before any-
one imagined that the
Big Three would ever
be anything but over-
whelmingly dominant.


Hardly anyone had
heard of Toyota in 1967
when riots ripped the
city and a long crime
wave began that made
it unlivable. According
to Henry Payne of
The Detroit News, the
murder rate climbed
from 13 per 100,000
residents in 1966 to
51 per 100,000 by 1976.
It was the city's dys-
function that made it
unappealing to the auto
companies rather than
the diminished state of
the auto companies that
made the city dysfunc-
tional. The city's mayor
for 20 years, Coleman
Young, was an ethi-
cally challenged black
nationalist who hated
the suburbs. Under
Young, journalist Zev
Chafets writes, Detroit
had "all the trappings of
a third world city the
showcase projects, an
external enemy and the
cult of personality." And
this was in the good old


days of the 1970s and
1980s.
By this point, Detroit
had already reached
terminal velocity on its
own. GM had nothing to
do with the City Council
promising benefits to
retirees that it couldn't
possibly pay. Chrysler
didn't disgracefully mis-
manage city agencies.
Ford didn't disastrously
degrade the city's hu-
man capital.
Detroit is a city that
has celebrated and
feasted on government
for decades and yet is
incapable of the most
basic function of govern-
ment. Crimes basically
aren't solved. The clear-
ance rate is 8.7 percent.
The report of the city's
emergency manager says
this is driven by the po-
lice department's "lack
of a case management
system, lack of account-
ability for detectives,
unfavorable work rules
imposed by collective


bargaining agreements
and a high attrition
rate in the investigative
operations unit."
This in a city that
needs a first-rate police
force. Its crime rate is
five times the national
average. Henry Payne
notes that 80 percent of
the city's children grow
up fatherless, and that of
the 50 percent of black
men who are high-school
dropouts, more than
70 percent don't have a
job, and 60 percent have
done time.
The city rewards
anyone who can't
escape its boundaries
- more than a million
people have since 1950,
when it had 1.8 million
residents with stifling
taxes in a futile attempt
to keep up with spend-
ing. It has the highest
per capital tax burden
in Michigan, despite
the low per capital
income of its residents.
It can't even collect its


taxes well. An Internal
Revenue Service audit
called its tax system
"catastrophic."
None of this is the
product of the "creative
destruction" of capital-
ism; it is the destructive
destruction of corrupt
statism. Despite global-
ization, urban America
is alive and well outside
of Detroit. Pittsburgh
experienced similar
economic dislocation
when the steel industry
collapsed, but hasn't
descended into an
urban dystopia. Cities in
the South like Houston
and Raleigh, N.C., are
economically vibrant
and attractive to new
residents.
The way Detroit was
once, a very long time
ago.
Rich Lowry is the
editor of the National
Review. Readers may
reach him at comments.
lowry@nationalreview.
com.


warmed-over


s messa


T don't normally do
I this," President
Obama's senior
adviser Dan Pfeiffer
wrote in the subject
line of an email blast to
reporters Sunday night.
This was tantalizing.
What would this top
White House official be
doing? Singing karaoke
on the North Lawn?
Getting a "POTUS"
tattoo on his arm?
Reality was rather
more prosaic. Pfeiffer
was announcing the
rollout of a series of
economic speeches
Obama would begin on
Wednesday roughly
the 10th time the White
House has made such
a pivot to refocus on
jobs and growth. What
would set this one
apart is that Obama is
reprising a speech he
made eight years ago,
when he first became
a senator; Pfeiffer
included a link to clips
from that speech, set
in part to mood music
from the Canadian
electronic group
Kidstreet, the same
music used in an Apple
ad last year.
But even a reincar-
nated Steve Jobs would
have trouble marketing


this turkey: How can
the president make
news, and remake the
agenda, by delivering
the same message
he gave in 2005? And
in the same place -
Galesburg, Ill.
White House officials
say this shows Obama's
consistency. "We plead
guilty to the charge
that there is a thematic
continuity that exists
between the speech
the president will give
in Galesburg, at Knox
College ... and his
speech in Osawatomie
(Kansas, in 2011) and
his speech back at Knox
College in 2005," White
House press secretary
Jay Carney said.
Yes, but this also risks
sending the signal that,
just six months into his
second term, Obama
is fresh out of ideas.
There's little hope of
getting Congress to act


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on major initiatives and
little appetite in the
White House to fight
for bold new legislation
that is likely to fail.
And so the president,
it seems, is going into
reruns.
In fairness, the 2005
speech was on the
timeless theme of the
need for education,
training, regulations
and tax changes to
preserve the middle
class. "The true test of
the American ideal," he
said then, is "whether
we build a community
where, at the very least,
everyone has a chance
to work hard, get
ahead and reach their
dreams."
That message was so
good he repeated it in
2011 in Kansas, where
he said, "This country
succeeds when every-
one gets a fair shot,


when everyone does
their fair share, when
everyone plays by the
same rules."
But while that mes-
sage remains relevant,
Obama is now facing a
Republican opposition
that, by House Speaker
John Boehner's own
account, is measur-
ing its success by how
many laws it can undo.
There's no longer seri-
ous talk about a grand
bargain that could
reform entitlement
programs and the tax
code. Legislators and
administration officials
have little hope of
doing more than short-
term skirmishing over
the debt ceiling and
mindless spending cuts
in the "sequester."
If he's to break
through the resistance,
Obama needs some
bold new proposals.


What's the teore?

Check SUNSPORTS every day to find out.




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SFamily Practice Injuries and Illnesses
Common Infections Schools/Sports/
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EKG Women's Health
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That's why his speech
returning to the oldies
would seem to confirm
that the White House
has given up on big
achievements.
To build interest
in the new series of
speeches, the White
House scheduled an
invitation-only briefing
(RSVP required) for
Monday, then set cloak-
and-dagger ground
rules requiring that the
briefers not be quoted,
even anonymously.
Reporters protested,
but they needn't have
worried: The official
who gave the briefing
made clear that there
would be no new poli-
cies announced, at least
not major ones and not
initially.
Pfeiffer told me
Tuesday that the
president, in his se-
ries of speeches, will


eventually get around
to ideas about "some
things Congress could
do, things they should
do but probably won't
in the near term, and
executive actions the
president can take
himself."
I admire Pfeiffer's
pluck in trying to
generate enthusiasm
for what is largely a
news-free initiative.
And it's smart politics
for Obama to keep his
emphasis on economic
matters. But it would be
easier to rally enthu-
siasm if he gave sup-
porters something big,
bold and new to reach
for, rather than leftover
proposals coupled with
lofty ideals.
Dana Milbank is a
Washington Post colum-
nist. Readers may reach
him at danamilbank@
washpost.com.


BUIN


G I L






4 0 I I ILP T A T
(BHN0 BCLQOS


IMonday Friday 10 a.m.


6 p.m.; Saturday 10:30


4 p.m.I


Looking for a Friend?
















Find him in the Classifieds SUN s i^ -


INTERESTED PARTIES PUBLIC INPUT

UNIFIED LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE REVISIONS


Charlotte County Community Development will conduct a series of public input meetings pertaining
to changes to Charlotte County's Unified Land Development Code; the meetings will take place in
August, September and October 2013.

The first August meeting for public input from interested parties will take place on Friday, August 9,
2013 from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. in Room #119 of the Charlotte County Administration Center, 18500
Murdock Circle, Port ( h.ii lI.lic Florida.

A roundtable meeting will be conducted on August 21, 2013 from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. in Room B- 106
of the Charlotte County Administration Center, 18500 Murdock Circle, Port ( lui I. iic, Florida, to
discuss in further detail specific items brought forth at the August 9th meeting.

The purpose of these meetings is to gather public input regarding the proposed revisions to the
County's Land Development Code. The public is invited to attend, and to provide comments and
concerns for consideration.


Contact: Matt Trepal, Principal Planner
Phone: 941.764-4934
Email: Matthe,. ITicp.ii, li h.iicFL.com

Publish: July 25, 2013 and August 6, 2013
-^i-I


I I


Ale

-4










Ahoy, mateys! Kids have fun at pirate show


James Chartier of Showtime for Kids hosted "A Pirate's Treasure Adventure"
recently at the North Port Library. More than 50 were in attendance during
the free program, sponsored by the Friends of the North Port Library. Here,
Nicholas Hauck, 6, and his sister Grace, 4, laugh during the event.


Makhai Victor, 4, performs a magic trick with James Chartier of Showtime for Kids during"A Pirate's Treasure Adven-
ture" at the North Port Library on Saturday afternoon. The program was a Viva Florida event to commemorate the
500th anniversary of the state's discovery.


Rylan Bauwin, 3, raises his hand, hoping to be chosen to perform magic tricks
with James Chartier of Showtime for Kids.


Children laugh as James Chartier of Showtime for Kids performs magic tricks and makes animals out of balloons.


Melissa Weber with her two daughters,
Tamarind, 3, and Dori, 5.


9-
James Chartier of Showtime for Kids presents Marco the Monkey as part of"A
Pirate's Treasure Adventure" at the North Port Library.


Sammy Steele, 4, laughs while James Chartier of Showtime
for Kids performs magic tricks.


Ares Brill, 6, throws her hands in the air during
"A Pirate's Treasure Adventure" at the North Port
Library recently, where children were encour-
aged to participate.


Abbey Walsh, 8,
and her 6-year-
old sister Grace
were just two
of many who
attended the
free pirate show
at the North Port
Library. Kids
were entertained
with pirate
tales, a magic
show and animal
balloon making,
while learning
about the impor-
tance of reading.


Alaina
Seriannni, 5,
pretends to
use a spyglass
during the
pirate show,
where audi-
ence partici-
pation was
encouraged.


iOurTown Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE

Senate passes bill on
student loan rates


Borrowing for tuition, housing
and books would be less
expensive for college students
and their parents this fall but
the costs could soon start
climbing.

Page 2 -


Spiny lobster season
opens in Florida


Thousands of snorkelers and
divers are taking to the waters
off South Florida Wednesday
and today in hopes of catching
the tasty crustaceans.
Page 3 -

10 things to know


1. House rejects
challenge to HNSA
surveillance
After a fierce debate and a narrow
vote, the government can keep
collecting hundreds of millions of
Americans' phone records. See page 2.

2. Train derails,
killing at least 35
One survivor says the passenger
train in Spain was traveling at high
speed and rounding a curve when
it jumped the tracks. Seepage 7.

3. Pope consoles
the downtrodden
His session with drug addicts in
Brazil is meant to drive home the
message that the church must
focus on the poor and those who
are suffering. Seepage 1.

4. Where NSA leaker
hopes to stay
At least for now, Snowden wants
to remain in Russia, studying its
language and culture, his lawyer
says. See page 7.

5. Endangered: door-
to-door mail delivery
The service could be virtually
phased out by 2022 in the U.S.
under a cost-cutting proposal
before a House panel. Seepage 1.

6. Will and Kate
pick a name
The royal couple's newborn son
will be called George Alexander
Louis and be known as "His
Royal Highness Prince George of
Cambridge." Seepage 1.

7. Weiner presses on
"This is not about me" but about
voters, the disgraced pol says in
response to calls that he abandon his
campaign for NYC mayor. See page2.

8. Witness to Till
lynching dies
Willie Louis died July 18 at age 76
in Chicago. See page 2.

9. Little violence, but
lots of tweets
Fears of widespread unrest after
the Trayvon Martin verdict proved
unfounded. See page 8.

10. Who could be next
ambassador to Japan
If confirmed, Caroline Kennedy
would be the first woman in a post
to strengthen a vital Asian tie.
See page 2.


he Wiree


1rh t^Je www.sunnewspapers.net
THURSDAY JULY 25, 2013




Postal changes mulled

Front-door mailboxes may soon go the way of the dinosaur


By ANDREW MIGA
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER


WASHINGTON
Americans for
generations have come
to depend on door-to-
door mail delivery. It's
about as American as
apple pie.
But with the Postal
.Service facing billions
of dollars in annual
APPHOTO losses, the delivery ser-
AP PHOT vice could be virtually
This Dec. 5, 2011 file photo shows letter carrier Diosdado phased-out by 2022 un-
Gabnat moving boxes of mail into his truck to begin der a proposal a House
delivery at a post office in Seattle. panel was considering


Wednesday. Curbside
delivery, which includes
deliveries to mailboxes
at the end of driveways,
and cluster box delivery
would replace letter
carriers slipping mail
into front-door boxes.
The proposal is part
of broader legislation
by Rep. Darrell Issa,
R-Calif., chairman of
the House Oversight
and Government
Reform Committee,
designed to cut costs
at the cash-strapped
agency by up to


$4.5 billion a year. The
Postal Service had a $16
billion loss last year.
The agency has been
moving toward curbside
and cluster box delivery
in new residential
developments since
the 1970s. The Postal
Service in April began
deciding whether to
provide curbside or
cluster box delivery for
people moving into
newly built homes,
rather than letting the
POSTAL 14


AP-' 'ul IUT
Pilgrims wait in the rain for the arrival of Pope Francis outside the Aparecida Basilica in Aparecida, Brazil, Wednesday. Pope Francis, the first pontiff
from the Americas, will fly over farmland and sugar cane fields to visit the mammoth basilica that holds the statue of this particular Brazilian Mary.


Pope


Shun materialism


By NICOLE WINFIELD
and JENNY BARCHFIELD
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS
RIO DE JANEIRO -Pope
Francis made an emotional
pleaWednesday for Roman
Catholics to shun materialism in
the first public Mass of his initial
international trip as pontiff, then
returned to Rio de Janeiro for a
meeting with drug addicts heavy
in symbolism.
The session was meant to
drive home the message that the
humble pope has repeatedly deliv-
ered during his short papacy: that
the Catholic Church must focus on
the poor, those who are suffering
and the outcasts of society.
During his speech at the
hospital, Francis was expected
to stick with the theme of faith
and sacrifice that he spoke about
earlierWednesdayin his hom-
ily in Aparecida, a small town
halfway between Rio and Sao Pope Francis greets pilgrims from his popemobile as he arrives to the Aparecida Basilica in Aparecida, Brazil,
Paulo that is home to one of the Wednesday. Tens of thousands of faithful flocked to the tiny town of Aparecida, tucked into an agricultural
region halfway between Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, where he is to celebrate the first public Mass of his trip
POPE 14 in a massive basilica dedicated to the nation's patron saint.


Media blitz

coming for

health exchange

By KELLI KENNEDY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
MIAMI In less than three months,
uninsured Floridians will be able to pur-
chase medical insurance online under
a new federal health law. Making sure
average citizens understand how it works
will be a Herculean task accompanied by
a massive marketing blitz promoting the
biggest expansion of the social safety net
since Medicare.
Hundreds of thousands of Florida
residents making less than $48,000 a
year will be eligible for federal money to

HEALTH 14


British prince gets a name


By JILL LAWLESS and
CASSANDRA VINOGRAD
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

LONDON The
little prince has a name:
George Alexander Louis.
The announcement
Wednesday that Prince
William and his wife,
Kate, had selected a
moniker steeped in
British history came as
royal officials suggested
the new parents are
seeking quiet time away
from the flashbulbs and
frenzy that accompanied
the birth of their first
child.
While the news
put to rest intense


curiosity over what
name the couple would
choose, the timing and
interest
around it
show how
the 2-day-
old future
heir is
already on
his way to a
GEORGE lifetime of
fanfare and
public glare.
Kensington Palace on
Wednesday said William
and Kate were "delighted
to announce" their son's
name, adding that the
baby will be known as "His
Royal Highness Prince
George of Cambridge."


The name George -
borne by six previous
kings befits the boy
now third in line to the
British throne and was
a favorite among British
bookmakers. It was the
name chosen for his reign
by Queen Elizabeth II's
father, George VI, who
rallied the nation during
World War II.
Alexander is a name
shared by three medieval
Scottish kings, and the
name Louis could be
a tribute to Lord Louis
Mountbatten, uncle to
the queen's husband,
Philip, and the last British

PRINCE 14





Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


WASHINGTON (AP)
- Borrowing for tuition,
housing and books would
be less expensive for college
students and their parents
this fall but the costs could
soon start climbing under a
bill the Senate passed over-
whelminglyWednesday.
The bipartisan proposal
would link interest rates on
federal student loans to the
financial markets, provid-
ing lower interest rates right
away but higher ones if
the economy improves as
expected. The measure was
similar to one that already
had passed the Republican-
led House and leaders from
both chambers said they
predicted the differences to
be resolved before students
start signing loan docu-
ments for fall term.
Liberal members of the
Democratic caucus were
vocal in their opposition
over the potentially shifting
rates included in the Senate
measure, which passed
with support from both
parties, 81-18.
"We can do much better
than this," said Sen. Jack


In this June 23 file photo, the U.S. Capitol is seen
in Washington, D.C.


Reed, D-R.I.
Undergraduates this fall
would borrow at a 3.9 per-
cent interest rate. Graduate
students would have access
to loans at 5.4 percent,
and parents would borrow
at 6.4 percent. The rates
would be locked in for
that year's loan, but each
year's loan could be more
expensive than the last.
Rates would rise as the
economy picks up and it
becomes more expensive
for the government to
borrow money.
Rates on new subsidized


Stafford loans do
6.8 percent July 1
Congress could n
on a way to keep
at 3.4 percent. W
congressional ac
would stay at 6.8
- a reality most
ers called unacce
although deep di
emerged even ar
as to how to rem
The comprom
came together di
last few weeks w(
good deal for all
through the 2015
year. After that, ii


rates are expected to climb
above where they were
when students left campus
in the spring, if congressio-
nal estimates prove correct.
"That's the same thing
credit card companies said
when they sold zero-
interest rate credit cards.
... The bill comes due,"
said Sen. ElizabethWarren,
D-Mass. 'All students will
end up paying far higher
AP PHOTO interest rates on their loans
than they do now."
Warren was among the
liberal Democrats who
)ubled to labeled the White House-
because backed proposal a bait-
tot agree and-switch measure that
them would lure in new borrow-
[ithout ers with low rates now but
tion, rates would cost future students.
percent Throughout the morning
lawmak- and afternoon, they stood
table, to oppose the compromise.
differences "The bill before us
nong allies today offers students and
edy it. families lower student
ise that loan interest rates in the
during the near-term but we can fully
would be a expect higher student loan
students interest rates in the years
Academic to come," said Sen. Tammy
interest Baldwin, D-Wis.


Witness to Till lynching dies in Illinois


CHICAGO (AP) -
Hearing the screams of
14-year-old lynching
victim Emmett Till from
inside a Mississippi barn
left a teenage field hand
with an unbearable
choice. He could tell a
courtroom and risk pay-
ing for it with his life or
keep quiet and let those
screams eat away at his
conscience.
Grisly photos of
Till's mutilated body,
discovered three days
later by a fisherman in
the Tallahatchie River,
left Willie Louis with no
doubt about what he
would do: testify at the
trial of two white men ac-
cused in the black teen's
slaying.
"In the pictures, I saw
his body, what it was
like. Then I knew that I
couldn't say no," Louis
recalled in a 2004 "60
Minutes" interview about
the testimony he gave
half a century earlier.
Louis died July 18 at age
76 at a hospital in a sub-
urb of Chicago, the city
he fled to in fear of his
life after the 1955 trial, his
wife, Juliet Louis, said in
an interview Wednesday,
a few hours before her
husband's funeral service.


Till's torture and killing
in the Mississippi Delta
galvanized the civil
rights movement. The
Chicago boy was visiting
an uncle and had been
warned by family to be
on his best behavior in
the segregated South. On
Aug. 28, 1955, two white
men abducted him from
his uncle's home because
he had whistled at one of
their wives. They admit-
ted to the kidnapping, but
claimed they just wanted
to scare the
boy and
that they
eventually
m. turned him
loose.
When
his body
REED was pulled
from the
river, his left eye and an
ear were missing, as were
most of his teeth; his
nose was crushed, and
there was a hole in his
right temple. His body
had been weighted down
with a cotton gin fan tied
around his neck with
barbed wire.
The only witnesses
prosecutors had were the
boy's uncle and a cousin,
and all they could say was
that they had seen Till


taken away. Then, news
reporters helped track
down Willie Louis, who
had heard the beating
taking place for hours.
Despite his testimony,
an all-white jury took
barely an hour to acquit
the two men, Roy Bryant
and his half-brother J.W
Milam.
A few months later,
after assurances they
couldn't be tried again,
the two men confessed to
the killing in a magazine
article for which they
were paid a few thousand
dollars for the "true" story.
For his own safety,
Louis had to be smuggled
out of his native
Mississippi and taken to
Chicago. Then known as
Willie Reed, he changed
his last name, and
was put under police
protection.
Louis, a central figure
in one of the most pivotal
moments in America's
troubled history with
race, soon drifted into
obscurity.
For years, he told his
story to no one, not even
his future wife, who had
followed the trial closely
as an 11-year-old growing
up in Till's home city.
"I never really put that


together that he was actu-
ally the young man that
testified at the trial," she
said of her husband.
"We thought he was
crazy. I know my mom
said they going to kill him
too."
The couple met in
the early 1970s at a
hospital they worked at
on Chicago's far South
Side when Louis cheekily
asked the nurse's aide for
a kiss as they were lifting
a patient together onto a
gurney.
"So I went over to the
other side and kissed him
on the jaw. And that's how
we started seeing one
another," she said with a
laugh.
They married in 1976,
but it wasn't until eight
years later that she
discovered the connec-
tion with the Till case
when one of Louis' aunts
mentioned it.
She was shocked but
understood that talking
about it was painful for
him.
"He used to have real
nightmares and things,"
Juliet Louis said. "All his
life it bothered him. When
he would talk about it,
sometimes tears would
be in his eyes."


House rejects effort to halt NSA program


WASHINGTON (AP)
- The House narrowly
rejected a challenge to
the National Security
Agency's secret collection


of hundreds of millions of
Americans' phone records
Wednesday night after
a fierce debate pitting
privacy rights against the


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government's efforts to
thwart terrorism.
The vote was 217-205
on an issue that cre-
ated unusual political
coalitions in Washington,
with libertarian-leaning
conservatives and liberal
Democrats pressing for
the change against the
Obama administration,
the Republican estab-
lishment and Congress'
national security experts.
The showdown vote
marked the first chance
for lawmakers to take
a stand on the secret
surveillance program
since former NSA sys-
tems analyst Edward
Snowden leaked classified
documents last month
that spelled out the
monumental scope of the
government's activities.
Backing the NSA
program were 134
Republicans and 83
Democrats, including
House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, who
typically does not vote,
and Democratic leader
Nancy Pelosi. Rejecting
the administration's
last-minute pleas to spare
the surveillance operation


were 94 Republicans and
111 Democrats.
It is unlikely to be the
final word on government
intrusion to defend the
nation and Americans'
civil liberties.
"Have 12 years gone
by and our memories
faded so badly that we
forgot what happened
on Sept. 11?" Rep. Mike
Rogers, R-Mich., chair-
man of the Intelligence
Committee, said in plead-
ing with his colleagues to
back the program during
House debate.
Republican Rep. Justin
Amash of Michigan, chief
sponsor of the repeal
effort, said his aim was
to end the indiscriminate
collection of Americans'
phone records.
His measure, offered
as an addition to a
$598.3 billion defense
spending bill for 2014,
would have canceled the
statutory authority for
the NSA program, ending
the agency's ability to
collect phone records and
metadata under the USA
Patriot Act unless it identi-
fied an individual under
investigation.


Senate passes bill



on student loan rates


- Americans are fed up
with the federal govern-
ment snooping on their
phone calls, emails and
Internet use, and they
want curbs on what can
be monitored, majorities
say in a new McClatchy-
Marist poll.
The July 15-18 survey
also found widespread


I NATION

Weiner faces
growing calls to
quit mayor's race
NEW YORK (AP) -
Anthony Weiner pressed
ahead with his bid for
mayor Wednesday despite
growing calls for him
to drop out over a new
sexting scandal, saying
the campaign is too im-
portant to abandon over
"embarrassing personal
things" becoming public.
Rivals, newspaper
editorial
pages and
at least one
former New
York con-
gressional
colleague
urged the
WEINER Democrat
WEINER to quit the
race a day after he ac-
knowledged exchanging
raunchy messages and
photos online even after
the same sort of behavior
destroyed his congressio-
nal career two years ago.
"I think he should pull
out of the race. I think he
needs serious psychiatric
help," Rep. Jerrold Nadler,
D-N.Y.
Weiner brushed off
such calls as he prepared
to testify at a public
housing hearing and
participate in a candidate
forum in the evening.

Authorities see
no sheen near
burning Gulf rig
NEW ORLEANS (AP)
- An out-of-control
natural gas well burned
Wednesday off Louisiana
hours after it ignited fol-
lowing a blowout, though
authorities said there was
no sign of a slick on the
surface of the water.
The Bureau of Safety
and Environmental
Enforcement says it
saw no sheens near the
well during flyovers
Wednesday morning. The
lack of sheen indicates
the gas is burning off
without releasing oil or
other hydrocarbons -
which are sometimes
found in gas wells into
the water.
The fire broke out
late Tuesday following a
blowout in the morning,
authorities said.


Kennedy picked
as ambassador
to Japan
WASHINGTON
(Washington Post) -
President Barack Obama
nominated Caroline
Kennedy, daughter of
former president John E
Kennedy, to be ambas-
sador to Japan.
Kennedy, whose early
and strong support for
Obama's 2008 bid gave
his candidacy a key
boost in helping him
win the nomination over
then-front-runner Sen.
Hillary Rodham Clinton,
had been expected
to get a top job in the
administration.
Wednesday's official an-
nouncement, anticipated
for several months, comes
after Tokyo recently gave
its approval to receive
the first woman as U.S.
ambassador to Japan.
Washington, to show
how much it values the
bilateral relationship,
has usually sent highly
regarded elder statesmen
to the country.

Poll: Americans
want curbs on
feds' snooping
WASHINGTON (MCT)


corporations beginning to
make good on pledges to
hire hundreds of thousands
of veterans, federal tax in-
centives for employers and
allowances for veterans to
receive professional licenses
based on military training.


opposition to the Insider
Threat Program revealed
in a recent McClatchy
story a sweeping,
unprecedented Obama
administration initiative
that has federal em-
ployees and contractors
watching for "high-risk
persons or behaviors"
among co-workers.

You may be safer
living in the city,
study finds
LOS ANGELES (LA
Times) -Want to keep
your family safe? Then
raise your kids in the city.
It may sound counter-
intuitive, but researchers
found people living in
densely populated urban
areas in the United States
are 20 percent less likely
to die from a serious
injury than people who
live in rural parts of the
country.
So much for fresh air
and open spaces.
"The findings defi-
nitely surprised me," said
lead researcher Sage
Myers, who teaches
at the University of
Pennsylvania and prac-
tices emergency room
medicine at the Children's
Hospital of Philadelphia.
"Homicide rates are
higher in cities, and
people think of those
more emotional and sen-
sationalized dangers, but
the risk of motor vehicle
accidents and machinery
accidents is much higher
in rural areas," she said.

Man injured when
bridge jumper
lands on him

MISSOULA, Mont.
(AP) -A western Montana
man floating on an inner
tube suffered broken
bones in his legs and
torn ligaments in his
knees when another man
jumped from a bridge and
landed in his lap.
Andy Hill of Missoula
and his wife were floating
under a bridge on the
Clark Fork River near East
Missoula Sunday when
the man landed on him,
KECI-TV reported.
"Suddenly I had intense
pain and was under
water," Hill said.
"There was a guy on
my lap and he rolled off
my lap and he just kept
apologizing saying 'I'm
sorry, I'm sorry, I'm sorry,'"
Hill said. The man swam
Hill to shore, still on the
inner tube, and the man's
friend helped Hill as well.
Hill suffered broken
bones in both lower legs
and a cracked femur in
his left leg and will likely
spend the rest of the sum-
mer in a wheelchair or on
crutches.
But he's been able to
keep his sense of humor.
"Who does this happen
to?" asked Hill, laughing. "I
don't know of anybody this
has ever happened to."

Unemployment
among recent
veterans drops

LOS ANGELES (LA Times)
- Unemployment among
recent veterans has fallen
sharply and now is the same
as for the rest of the U.S.
population, hovering just
above 7 percent, new
federal statistics show
The figures suggest that
a vexing and stubborn
trend of higher joblessness
among veterans who left
the military after September
2001 has been reversed. It
now appears that veterans
are being hired at a faster
rate than non-veterans.
Advocates credited a
variety of public and private
efforts, including major U.S.





SThe Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


STATE NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 3


HEADLINE NEWS

FROM AROUND THE STATE


Depression
forms off
coast of Belize
MIAMI (AP) A
tropical depression has
formed off the coast of
Belize and forecasters
say it is expected to bring
as much as five inches
of rain to parts of Belize,
Guatemala and northern
Honduras.
The National Hurricane
Center in Miami said the
Atlantic season's second
tropical depression
formed Monday. The
depression has winds of
35 mph. Some weaken-
ing is expected after the
depression moves over
Belize on Monday, but
it could strengthen on
Tuesday if the center
emerges in the Bay of
Campeche. Forecasters
say the rains could cause
flash flooding, especially
in mountainous areas.

Water high at Lake
Okeechobee
WEST PALM BEACH
(AP) High water levels
have triggered weekly
inspections of Lake
Okeechobee's aging
earthen dike.
Officials with the Army
Corps of Engineers say
water levels rose above
15.5 feet Monday. That's
the benchmark for weekly
inspections of the dike
that protects surround-
ing communities from
flooding.
Corps spokeswoman
Jenn Miller told The Palm
Beach Post that there are
no areas of concern along
the Herbert Hoover Dike.
Local officials say high
water levels increase the
risk of the dike failing.
The corps has rein-
forced a 21-mile stretch
of the dike and plans
to replace culverts and
other structures that have
weakened since the dike
was built in the 1930s.
Rocks and boulders are
stockpiled near the lake
in the event of a breach.
Lake Okeechobee cov-
ers 730 square miles.

Death row inmate
to appeal to US
Supreme Court
STARKE (AP) -The
attorney for a man
scheduled to die by lethal
injection says he will ask
the U.S. Supreme Court
to review the case.
John Errol Ferguson is
set for execution on
Aug. 5.
Ferguson's attorney
Christopher Handman
wrote in an email to
The Associated Press on
Tuesday that his client
has a "documented
history of severe mental
illness" and shouldn't be
executed.
Ferguson was convicted
of killing eight people
in South Florida in two
separate incidents in 1977
and 1978.
Scott announced the
new execution date for
the 65-year-old Ferguson
on Tuesday.

Man indicted for
selling fake Viagra
PENSACOLA (AP) -A
Pensacola man is being
charged by federal authori-
ties with selling counterfeit
Viagra.
The U.S. Attorney's office
announced Tuesday that
53-year-old Robert Galea
was indicted earlier this
year by a federal grand jury.
He is charged with traf-
ficking in fake versions of
the brand name drug and
trying to deliver the mis-
branded versions through
the mail. He had his first


appearance in federal court
last week. The indictment
alleges that Galea obtained
the counterfeit drugs from
other countries including
India.


Beaches to be on
Google Maps
ST. PETERSBURG (AP)
- Florida's 825 miles of
beaches are coming to a
computer near you.
Visit Florida, the state's
tourism and marketing
arm, begins a four-month
journeyWednesday to
capture 360-degree images
of the state's beaches.
These photos will be inte-
grated into Google Maps.
Two-personVisit Florida
teams were trained by
Google Map experts to cap-
ture the images. The teams
will walk about 50 miles
of beach each week with a
backpack that has a camera
system on top. The camera
has 15 lenses, angled in
different directions, so it can
capture a complete picture
of a location. The images are
then stitched together into a
360-degree photo.


Spiny lobster season opens in Fla.


KEY BISCAYNE (AP) -
Florida's two-day spiny
lobster season is one of
the state's most popular
recreational events each
year and one of its
most dangerous.
Thousands of snorkel-
ers and divers are taking
to the waters off South
Florida Wednesday and
today in hopes of catch-
ing the tasty crustaceans,
but if past years are any
indication, some people
will be seriously hurt and
possibly die in the effort.
One person has died in
each of the last two years.
A combination of inad-
equate diving equipment
and divers overexerting
themselves as they chase
after lobsters can create
a problem underwa-
ter, said Jorge Pino, a
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Commission spokesman
and officer.
"Once that happens,


they panic and it's all
over. And by the time
somebody can get to
them it's just too late," he
said.
To prevent casualties,
dozens of law enforce-
ment officials were on
hand Wednesday to cau-
tion divers about boater
safety and to ensure they
followed the rules set by
the FWC.
Steve Fenby said he
almost ran over a diver
while driving slowly un-
der a bridge because the
diver's boat did not have
a divers-down flag a
red flag with a diagonal
stripe- to warn him of
the swimmers nearby.
"That's a big problem
out here," he said.
"That's the reason why
most people get run
over and killed down
here because they're
ignorant."
At least a dozen


boaters had been
stopped less than 10
hours after the season
officially opened on
midnight Wednesday.
Pino let two boaters off
the hook with a verbal
warning. One boater was
speeding in a manatee
zone and another was
operating his vessel with
a divers-down flag up, a
$90 violation.
The divers-down flag is
just one of nearly a dozen
requirements that lobster
divers must follow. The
others include: Boaters
must have a measuring
device onboard and lob-
sters must be in the water
when they are measured
- the shell part of the
lobster must be at least
three inches; divers can't
take egg-bearing females
- turn over the lobster to
see the bright orange eggs
- and lobsters must be
in their entire condition


before being taken to
shore.
Those looking to catch
dinner must also have
a recreational saltwater
fishing license and a
spiny lobster permit.
Both can be purchased
online. And recreational
divers can take up to six
lobsters per person per
day in Monroe County
in the Florida Keys and
a dozen in most other
parts of Florida.
Violators can be cited
or even arrested. In
June, two men accused
of poaching almost 500
spiny lobsters out of
season were arrested
and charged in Miami-
Dade County with
multiple misdemeanor
charges. The limits are
set to ensure that the
spiny lobster's popula-
tion doesn't shrink and
FWC is strict about
enforcement.


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Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, July 25, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE


Perfect fit: Wonderbra maker to buy Maidenform


NEWYORK (AP) It's
the perfect fit.
Two of the world's top
bra makers are coming
together in the biggest
development in the
$11.5 billion underwear
industry in years.
HanesBrands, which
makes the Wonderbra,
said Tuesday that it
agreed to buy bra and
underwear company
Maidenform Brands Inc.
for about $547 million.
The deal would add
brands like Maidenform,
Flexees and Self
Expressions to the
HanesBrand roster that
includes Playtex, Bali,
Champion, Wonderbra
and its namesake Hanes.
The merger comes as
traditional bra and un-
derwear makers are fac-
ing tough competition


from specialty stores
such as Victoria's Secret
that focus on frilly
designs and newer rivals
like Spanx that make
shapewear that promises
to control and smooth
out bulges.
"Maidenform has great
brands that consum-
ers trust," said Hanes
CEO Richard A. Noll.
"Combining the comple-
mentary strengths
of both companies
creates a lot of growth
opportunities."
Bras, which are as
much about fashion as
they are about func-
tion these days, are the
biggest sellers in the
intimate apparel arena,
making up about 48 per-
cent of all sales, accord-
ing to research firm IBIS
world. Panties make up


--t A'iED


AP PHOTO


This file photo taken May 2, 2005, shows women's lingerie on
display in Houston. HanesBrands was to buy underwear maker
Maidenform Brands Inc. for approximately $547.6 million on
Wednesday.


about 24.8 percent of
sales, sleepwear makes
up about 22 percent and


shapewear 5.2 percent,
according to IBIS
figures.


Coca-Cola, PepsiCo see soda declines continue


NEWYORK (AP) It
seems that not even
Beyonce or new, lower-cal-
orie options can convince
Americans to drink more
soda.
Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo
Inc. and Dr Pepper Snapple
Group Inc. all sold less soda



POSTAL
FROM PAGE 1

developers decide.
"A balanced approach
to saving the Postal
Service means allow-
ing USPS to adapt to
America's changing use
of mail," Issa said. "Done
right, these reforms can
improve the customer ex-
perience through a more
efficient Postal Service."
About one in three
mail customers has
to-their-door delivery,
Issa said. The shift


POPE
FROM PAGE 1

most important shrines
in Latin America. The
pontiff urged Catholics
to resist the "ephemeral
idols" of money, power and
pleasure.
Thousands packed into
the huge Basilica of the
Shrine of Our Lady of
Aparecida in an agricul-
tural region of verdant
fields. Tens of thousands
more braved the cold
rain outside to catch
a glimpse of the first
pope from the Americas
returning to a shrine of
great meaning to the


HEALTH
FROM PAGE 1

help purchase their own
insurance through online
health exchanges under
the Affordable Care Act.
The new marketplaces,
which are open for
enrollment this October,
will have the feel of an
online travel site where
individuals and families
can compare different
private insurance plans.
Health insurers will
spend millions on ads
pushing their plans and
the federal government is


PRINCE
FROM PAGE 1

Viceroy of India before
that nation gained its
independence in 1947.
William's father, Prince
Charles, was close to
Mountbatten, who was
assassinated by the Irish
Republican Army in
1979.
The announcement of
the name, just two days
after the baby's birth, was
quick by royal standards.


in the second quarter in
North America, dashing
hopes for the moment that
splashy new marketing and
different sweetener mixes
could get drinkers back.
Coca-Cola Co. said it sold
4 percent less soda in North
America, while PepsiCo Inc.


would include safe and
secure delivery areas,
Issa said, especially for
elderly customers who
receive Social Security
checks and prescriptions
through the mail.
Sue Brennan, a Postal
Service spokeswoman,
said, "While converting
delivery away from the
door to curb or central-
ized delivery would
allow the Postal Service
to deliver mail to more
addresses in less time,
doing so is not included
in our five-year plan."
Brennan said the
agency's five-year plan


continent and to Francis.
Before the Mass, Francis
stood in silent prayer in
front of the 15-inch statue
of the Virgin of Aparecida,
the "Black Mary," his eyes
tearing up as he breathed
heavily. He later carried
it in his arms. Francis has
entrusted his papacy to the
Virgin Mary and, like many
Catholics in Latin America,
places great importance in
devotion to Mary.
After his Mass, the pope
blessed the tens of thou-
sands gathered outside the
basilica and announced
that he would return to
Aparecida in 2017, the
year that marks the 300th
anniversary of a fisherman
finding the Black Mary

also launching a multi-
million dollar campaign,
targeting libraries, gyms
and concerts. Health
clinics and nonprofits
will also be joining the
advertising mix.
That means Florida
residents are about to
get hit with a ton of
information designed to
walk them through the
enrollment process, but
the feds and insurers
must also find a way to
package the informa-
tion so it doesn't end up
confusing residents even
more.
"People are a little
bit intimidated not

Elizabeth and Philip, the
Duke of Edinburgh, took
a month before settling
on the name Charles
for the Prince of Wales.
Charles and his then-
wife, Princess Diana,
took a week before
settling on William's four
names.
While it is normally
the case that a king rules
under his given name,
precedent shows that the
prince is not hidebound
by George. The first name
of George VI was actually
Albert, but he picked his


simply said its decline for
the region was in the "mid-
single digits." Dr Pepper
sold 3 percent less of the
fizzy drinks.
Coca-Cola, based in
Atlanta, blamed the slug-
gish sales on a cold, wet
spring. But the declines


does call for shifting
20 percent of business
address deliveries from
door-to-door to curbside
and cluster box delivery
through 2016.
Rep. Steve Lynch,
D-Mass., said the plan
to move some 30 million
residential addresses
from to-the-door to
curbside and cluster box
service would be virtu-
ally impossible in dense
urban areas such as his
hometown of South
Boston crowded with
triple-deckers three
apartments stacked on
top of each other.


statue in a nearby river.
Later in Rio, Francis
arrived outside the simple
white and yellow hospital
in a closed car in a cold
rain, and bounded out of
his vehicle not bothering
to wait for an umbrella.
He entered a small chapel
where a group of young
Franciscan friars waited
excitedly, then headed
back out into the rain to
greet a group of people in
wheelchairs.
The pope smiled widely
and spoke in an animated
manner with each person
in the group, while a crowd
held back by metal barriers
nearby snapped photos
and reached out to touch
the pontiff, who returned

knowing what to expect,
not knowing what the
outcome will be but
the resource will hope-
fully allay some of the
fears," said Renard
Murray, a regional
administrator with the
Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services.
The federal govern-
ment's marketing strat-
egy includes everything
from door-to-door walks,
working with churches,
partnering with local
mayors and a massive
social media presence,
including phone apps,
Facebook, Twitter and
Flickr campaigns.

fourth name to use as
sovereign in honor of his
father, George V
Palace officials say
William and Kate are
spending "private and
quiet time for them
to get to know their
son." Some of their
discussions may revolve
around figuring out how
to shield him from in-
tense public and media
interest.
The young prince's
relationship with the
media, at least, appeared
to have gotten off to a


continue a years-long
trend. According to the
industry tracker Beverage
Digest, per capital soda
consumption in the U.S.
has been slipping steadily
since 1998 amid concerns
that sugary drinks fuel
weight gain.


"You'd have to knock
houses down in my
neighborhood to build
cluster boxes," Lynch
said. "This will not work."
It might work in places
like Manhattan with big
apartment buildings, he
said.
The financially be-
leaguered U.S. Postal
Service, an independent
agency, gets no tax
dollars for its day-to-day
operations, but is subject
to congressional control.
The Postal Service is
pursuing a major restruc-
turing throughout its
retail, delivery and mail


the reach and grabbed
hands and arms.
Before the pope spoke,
former drug addicts stood
up and told their stories
as the pontiff looked on
seated just meters away.
After the first former
addict spoke, his voice full
of nerves and emotion,
Francis stood, crossed the
gap between them and
embraced the man, patting
him on the back of his head
with his right hand, and
accepted a hand-made
card from the man.
A second addict who
stood up thanked all the
hospital workers and after
he spoke walked over to
the pope and shared a
long embrace. The man,

Recently, Murray was
wrapping up a presen-
tation for students at
Florida International
University in Miami,
one of nearly a dozen
presentations he'd done
over three days, along
with a half dozen media
interviews.
In Broward County,
state Rep. Richard Stark
is working with several
other lawmakers on a
campaign to help edu-
cate and enroll residents.
Stark, who is also an
insurance agent, is
already getting calls from
confused constituents
and insurance clients.

good start a good sign
for a royal family that has
had tense moments with
the press.
The baby slept
through his first photo
op Tuesday outside
London's St. Mary's
Hospital, while his
parents beamed as
they chatted easily with
reporters.
"I thought, is this an
Oscar-winning perfor-
mance?" said Ingrid
Seward, editor-in-chief
of Majesty magazine.
"But I think they were so


Another problem is that
people now have so many
more choices when it
comes to drinks. An endless
array of bottled waters,
teas of many colors, even
energy shots and "relax-
ation" drinks are vying for
the attention of the thirsty.


processing operations.
Since 2006, it has reduced
annual costs by about
$15 billion, cut its work-
force by 193,000 or 28
percent, and consolidated
more than 200 mail-
processing locations.
The service's losses are
largely due to a decline
in mail volume and a
congressional require-
ment that it make ad-
vance payments to cover
expected health care
costs for future retirees.
About $11.1 billion of last
year's losses were due
to payments for future
retiree health costs.


sobbing, kissed the pope's
right hand. A rosary
dangled in the former
addict's left hand.
During his homily in
Aparecida, Francis urged
Catholics to keep their
values of faith, generosity
and fraternity.
"It is true that nowadays,
to some extent, everyone,
including our young
people, feels attracted by
the many idols which take
the place of God and ap-
pear to offer hope: money,
success, power, pleasure,"
he said. "Often a growing
sense of loneliness and
emptiness in the hearts of
many people leads them
to seek satisfaction in these
ephemeral idols."

"All these people
started saying, 'I
thought I didn't have
to do anything, that I
would just start getting
Obamacare," said the
Weston Democrat.
Seventy-eight percent
of uninsured adults don't
know about opportuni-
ties that will be available
to them in 2014 under
the Affordable Care
Act, according to Enroll
America, a nonprofit
group sponsoring a
national campaign that
includes home visits and
passing out brochures
at farmers markets and
churches.

genuinely overjoyed that
they wanted to show off
the baby."
After leaving the
hospital, the couple in-
troduced their son to his
uncle, Prince Harry, and
to great-grandmother
Queen Elizabeth II, who
was keen to see the baby
before she starts her
annual summer vacation
in Scotland later this
week. Then they headed
to see Kate's parents in
their village near London
- pretty much like any
regular family.


The bra and un-
derwear industry has
growth spurts when
new trends come along.
Think: boy shorts three
years ago, for example,
or shapewear over the
past two years. But when
it comes to what they're
wearing underneath
their clothes, Americans
have cut back on their
shopping habits since
the recession.
"It used to be women
invested in their in-
timates, now they're
investing either in their
bra wardrobe or panty
wardrobe," said Marshal
Cohen, chief industry
analyst with The NPD
Group. "The economy
changed the way we
buy; we're not buying
everything all at once
anymore."


Sentence:
Christmases
in jail
COLUMBUS, Ohio
(AP) -A central Ohio
judge has ordered a
woman to spend the
next five Christmases
in jail as part of her
sentence for issuing
state ID cards and
driver's licenses to
immigrants who entered
the country illegally.
Prosecutors say
44-year-old Betina
Young a former
license agency employee
- accepted payments
from applicants to
falsify records showing
they had verified their
immigration status. She
has pleaded guilty.
The Columbus
Dispatch reports that
Judge Michael Holbrook
put Young on proba-
tion Monday for five
years ordering that
she spend a minimum
of three days in jail each
Christmas while on
probation.
If she violates proba-
tion, she could go to
prison for 15 years.


ALMANAC

Today is Thursday, July 25,
the 206th day of 2013. There are
159 days left in the year.
Today in history
On July 25,1963, the United
States, the Soviet Union and
Britain initialed a treaty in
Moscow prohibiting the testing
of nuclear weapons in the atmo-
sphere, in space or underwater.
The treaty was formally signed
on August 5, 1963.
On this date
In 1866, Ulysses S. Grant was
named General of the Army of
the United States, the first officer
to hold the rank.
In 1898, the United States
invaded Puerto Rico during the
Spanish-American War.
In 1909, French aviator Louis
Bleriot became the first person to
fly an airplane across the English
Channel, traveling from Calais to
Dover in 37 minutes.
In 1943, Benito Mussolini was
dismissed as premier of Italy by
King Victor Emmanuel III and
placed under arrest. However,
Mussolini was later rescued by
the Nazis and re-asserted his
authority.
In 1946, the United States
detonated an atomic bomb
near Bikini Atoll in the Pacific in
the first underwater test of the
device.
In 1952, Puerto Rico became a
self-governing commonwealth of
the United States.
In 1956, the Italian liner
Andrea Doria collided with the
Swedish passenger ship Stock-
holm off the New England coast
late at night and began sinking;
at least 51 people were killed.
In 1960, a Woolworth's store
in Greensboro, N.C., that had
been the scene of a sit-in protest
against its whites-only lunch
counter dropped its segregation
policy.
In 1978, Louise Joy Brown, the
first"test tube baby,"was born in
Oldham, England.
In 1984, Soviet cosmonaut
Svetlana Savitskaya became the
first woman to walk in space as
she carried out more than three
hours of experiments outside the
orbiting space station Salyut 7.
In 2000, a New York-bound Air
France Concorde crashed outside
Paris shortly after takeoff, killing
all 109 people on board and four
people on the ground; it was the
first-ever crash of the supersonic
jet.
Today's birthdays
Actress Barbara Harris is 78.
Rock musician Jim McCarty (The
Yardbirds) is 70. Rock musician
Verdine White (Earth, Wind &
Fire) is 62. Actress-singer Bobbie
Eakes is 52. Actress Katherine
Kelly Lang is 52. Actress Illeana
Douglas is 48. Country singer
Marty Brown is 48. Actor Matt
LeBlanc is 46. Actor D.B. Wood-
side is 44. Actress Miriam Shor
is 42. Actor Jay R. Ferguson
("Mad Men") is 39. Actor James
Lafferty is 28. Actress Shantel
VanSanten is 28. Actor Michael
Welch is 26. Classical singer Faryl
Smith is 18.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE






The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page5


Grim Caterpillar outlook




tugs stocks mostly lower


NEWYORK (AP) A
gloomy outlook from
Caterpillar, the world's
largest construction
equipment company,
tugged the stock market
lower Wednesday.
The meager drop
gave the stock market
two consecutive days of
losses, the first time that's
happened all month.
Caterpillar's earn-
ings fell 43 percent in
the second quarter as
China's economy slowed
and commodity prices
sank. The company also
warned of slowing rev-
enue and profit, and its
stock dropped $2.08, or
2 percent, to $83.44.
Slight losses spread
across a wide variety of
companies, with nine of
10 industry groups in the
Standard & Poor's 500


index ending lower.
The holdouts were
technology companies,
which got a lift from
Apple's surging stock.
Despite reporting
lower quarterly earnings
Tuesday, the maker of
tablets, smartphones and
computers still managed
to beat analysts' esti-
mates, thanks to rising
shipments of iPhones.
Apple jumped $21.52, or
5 percent, to $440.51.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average fell 25.50
points, or 0.2 percent, at
15,542.24.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index fell 6.45
points, or 0.4 percent, to
1,685.94. The technology-
heavy Nasdaq composite
index edged up 0.33
of a point, or less than
0.1 percent, to 3,579.60.


Although far from a
blockbuster earnings
season, the larger trend
for corporate profits looks
good. Analysts forecast
that second-quarter
earnings for companies
in the S&P 500 increased
4.2 percent over the same
period last year, accord-
ing to S&P Capital IQ. At
the start of the month,
they were looking for
earnings to rise 2.8 per-
cent. More than six out of
every 10 companies have
surpassed Wall Street's
profit targets.
"Yes, they're beat-
ing expectations, but
expectations are so low,"
said Brad McMillan,
chief investment of-
ficer at Commonwealth
Financial. The overall
number masks some wor-
risome trends, he said.


Sales of new US homes surge


WASHINGTON
(MarketWatch) Sales
of new homes in the U.S.
surged in June to reach
the highest level in more
than five years, a sign
that a spike in interest
rates may have done
little to deter buyers.
Sales of new homes
last month rose to a
seasonally adjusted
annual rate of 497,000,
a level of demand last
seen in May 2008, the
Census Bureau said
Wednesday. Economists
polled by MarketWatch
had forecast sales to
rise to an annual rate of
483,000.
Yet sales in May
were revised down to a
459,000 annual rate from
an initially reported


476,000, based on more
complete information.
And sales for April and
March were also marked
slightly lower.
New-home sales are
38 percent higher com-
pared to one year ago,
reflecting an ongoing
recovery in the real-
estate market after sales
fell to a modern record
low in 2011. Ultra-low
interest rates, a pickup
in hiring and a gradu-
ally improving economy
have all helped to drive
demand.
Even a spike in mort-
gage costs since late
spring interest rates
have jumped nearly a
full percentage point
- doesn't appear to
have stanched the flow


of would-be buyers. It's
possible some buyers
moved up their purchas-
es to lock in attractive
rates before they rose,
analysts say.
In any case, econo-
mists point out that
interest rates remain
extremely low by his-
torical standards: less
than 4.5 percent for a
30-year fixed mortgage,
compared to 6 percent-
plus over the past
half-century.
Still, there's a chance
that sales could fall in
the next few months.
Some buyers may wait
to see if rates fall again,
analysts say, and higher
mortgage costs could
price some buyers out of
the market.


MPG promises exaggerated?


When comparing
the fuel econ-
omy of cars,
consumers often rely
on window stickers that
display mpg estimates
from the Environmen-
tal Protection Agency.
But Consumer Reports'
testers have found that
the figures for certain
vehicles can be far
higher than many driv-
ers will actually get. And
the largest differences
involve some of the most
fuel-efficient cars, par-
ticularly hybrids.
When Consumer
Reports compared the
EPA estimates of 315
vehicles with the results
of its real-world fuel
economy tests, testers
also found notable gaps
in cars that use small
turbocharged four-cyl-
inder engines, intended
to provide the power of
larger engines and the
gas mileage of smaller
ones.


Sticker shock

In Consumer Reports'
testing, hybrids gener-
ally get some of the best
overall gas mileage num-
bers in their classes, led
by models such as the
Toyota Prius (44 mpg)
and hybrid versions of
the Honda Civic (40),
Ford Fusion (39) and
Toyota Camry (38). But
an owner expecting to
get the same mpg shown
on the window sticker
and in advertising might
be disappointed.
Of the recently tested
hybrids, 55 percent
fell short of their EPA
combined city/highway
estimates by 10 percent
or more, with hybrids
built by Ford showing
the largest discrepancies.
At 34 mpg overall, the
Lincoln MKZ Hybrid is


Consumer

Reports


invitingly thrifty. But
it gets 11 mpg, or 24
percent, less than its
45-mpg EPA figure. The
C-Max and Fusion hy-
brids fall 10 and 8 mpg,
respectively, below their
advertised 47 mpg.
Similarly, the Volkswagen
Jetta Hybrid also falls 8
mpg short. For consum-
ers who buy the MKZ,
for example, that can
amount to paying $1,510
more in gas over five
years than they might
have expected (assuming
gas costs $3.50 per gal-
lon and the car is driven
12,000 miles annually).
Similarly, Consumer
Reports found that
28 percent of cars with
small turbo engines also
fell short of their EPA
estimates by 10 percent
or more. Those include
models such as the Buick
Encore, Ford Fusion and
Nissan Juke.


What's going on?

EPA estimates don't
always reflect real-world
driving performance
largely because they are
based on outdated tests
designed to measure ve-
hicles with conventional
powertrains in particular
driving situations rather
than in today's increas-
ingly sophisticated
gas/electric systems.
In fact, according to
Mike Duoba, a research
engineer at Argonne
National Laboratory who
works on keeping the
tests up to date, the EPA
tests "were originally
designed to test emis-
sions, not fuel economy.
They wanted to test a
variety of speeds


and accelerations."
The EPA test for
city fuel economy is
conducted at very low
speeds, with gentle ac-
celeration and minimal
idling. The highway test
includes quite a bit of
stop-and-go driving,
with a maximum speed
of 60 mph and an aver-
age speed of 48.
Hybrids are most
efficient in those condi-
tions. With a light foot
on the throttle, the latest
models can often cruise
in electric mode up to
about 60 mph, so they
can perform portions
of the EPA tests without
consuming a drop of gas.
By contrast, Consumer
Reports' highway mpg
tests are performed by
driving at a steady 65
mph, reflecting a driver
cruising on an interstate
highway. In that situ-
ation, a hybrid is con-
stantly running its gas
engine, so it doesn't get
the full benefit of using
its electric power. Thus,
it gets fewer mpg than in
the EPA test.
Similarly, small turbo-
charged engines rarely
need to spool up their
turbos to develop suf-
ficient power for the EPA
tests. Consumer Reports'
test calls for larger
throttle openings so that
cars can accelerate from,
say, 20 to 40 mph within
500 feet, which results
in more turbo use and
more air and fuel being
pumped into the engine.
Consumer Reports
has discussed its find-
ings with the EPA, and
the agency says it is
reviewing its tests and
is considering updating
them. Meanwhile, con-
sumers should be aware
that they might not get
the efficiency promised
on the window sticker.


MutualFunds
3-yr
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
Advance Capital I
Balanced b 18.66 -.08 +11.2
EqGrow b 30.46 -.21 +16.4
RetInc b 8.67 -.04 +4.3
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 8.20 -.05 +16.4
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 46.59 -.30 +23.8
AllianzGI
WellnessD b 32.99 -.04 +19.9
Alpine
DynBal d 12.30 -.08 +9.8
DynDiv d 3.61 -.02 +7.2
Amana
Growth b 29.71 -.11 +11.6
Income b 39.78 -.16 +14.0
American Beacon
LgCpVlls 26.81 -.12 +17.9
American Cent
CapVallv 8.36 -.04 +17.8
Eqlnclnv 8.93 -.04 +14.3
Growthlnv 30.89 -.08 +15.0
HiYldMu 8.89 -.04 +5.2
InTTxFBInv 11.20 -.03 +3.1
Ultralnv 30.35 +.01 +16.7
American Funds
AMCAPA m 25.56 -.09 +17.1
BalA m 22.85 -.10 +14.2
BondA m 12.49 -.05 +3.7
CaplncBuA m 56.17 -.20 +10.8
CapWIdBdA m 20.13 -.12 +3.4
CpWIdGrIA m 41.31 -.02 +11.8
EurPacGrA m 44.22 +.02 +7.9
FnlnvA m 47.64 -.22 +15.8
GIbBalA m 28.74 -.04 NA
GrthAmA m 40.64 -.14 +15.8
HilncA m 11.35 -.03 +9.1
IncAmerA m 19.69 -.09 +13.1
IntBdArnA m 13.46 -.03 +1.8
InvCoAmA m 35.48 -.06 +15.0
MutualA m 32.86 -.16 +15.4
NewEconA m 34.65 +.02 +18.2
NewPerspA m 35.42 -.06 +13.5
NwWrldA m 55.76 -.14 +6.2
SmCpWdA m 46.41 -.19 +13.2
TaxEBdAmA ml12.40 -.04 +4.1
WAMutlnvA m 37.14 -.13 +18.0
Artisan
Intl d 27.44 +.02 +13.9
IntlVal d 35.08 +.04 +15.5
MdCpVal 25.77 -.15 +18.4
MidCap 44.83 -.20 +19.9
BBH
TaxEffEq d 20.42 -.11 +18.3
Baron
Asset b 58.88 -.18 +16.7
Growth b 64.47 -.37 +18.6
Partners b 28.76 -.26 +19.7
Berkshire
Focus d 15.96 +.13 +18.1
Bernstein
DiversMul 14.31 -.02 +2.4
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 13.93 -.21 +3.2
EqDivA m 22.62 -.11 +15.5
EqDivl 22.67 -.11 +15.8
GlobAlcA m 21.23 -.07 +8.3
GlobAlcC m 19.75 -.06 +7.5
GlobAlcl 21.33 -.06 +8.6
HiYldBdls 8.18 -.03 +11.1
HiYldSvc b 8.18 -.03 +10.7
Bruce
Bruce 429.06 -3.06 +12.8
CGM
Focus 36.31 -.14 +10.2


Clipper
Clipper 84.68 -.29 +16.5
Cohen & Steers
Realty 69.99 -1.42 +15.3
Columbia
AcornlntZ 44.45 -.19 +10.9
AcornZ 35.27 -.24 +16.8
DivlncZ 17.40 -.07 +17.0
IntlVB m 13.75 -.01 +6.0
Mar21CB m 14.75 -.06 +10.3
MarGrlA m 25.27 -.09 +16.1
DFA
1YrFixInI 10.32 +.7
2YrGIbFII 10.04 +.8
5YrGIbFII 11.03 -.02 +3.0
EmMkCrEql 18.93 -.10 +2.3
EmMktVall 27.34 -.17 -.5
IntSmCapl 18.00 -.04 +11.6
RelEstScI 28.53 -.61 +16.5
USCorEqll 14.97 -.07 +18.5
USCorEq21 14.89 -.08 +18.9
USLgCo 13.31 -.05 +17.6
USLgVall 28.48 -.20 +20.1
USSmVall 33.18 -.21 +20.8
USSmalll 28.36 -.17 +20.7
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.58 -.06 +3.6
EqDivB m 39.78 -.25 +12.7
GIbOA m 43.45 -.11 +14.1
GIbOB m 38.53 -.10 +13.2
GIbOC m 38.80 -.09 +13.2
GIbOS d 44.87 -.11 +14.4
GrlncS 21.93 -.09 +17.0
HIthCareS d 33.53 -.02 +23.4
LAEqS d 28.35 -.37 -4.0
LC2020S 14.63 -.05 +9.5
StrHiYldTxFS 12.01 -.05 +4.4
Davis
NYVentA m 39.31 -.18 +14.3
NYVentY 39.76 -.19 +14.6
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.35 -.03 +4.2
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEql 11.56 -.03 +9.1
IntlSCol 17.47 -.07 +10.8
IntlValul 17.93 -.02 +7.1
Dodge & Cox
Bal 90.85 -.16 +15.2
Income 13.54 -.03 +4.6
IntlStk 38.91 +.07 +10.0
Stock 150.32 -.24 +18.8
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 11.04 ... +8.2
Dreyfus
Apprecralnv 48.77 -.08 +15.1
MidCapldx 35.02 -.28 +18.3
MuniBd 11.22 -.04 +3.4
NYTaxEBd 14.53 -.05 +2.9
ShTrmlncD 10.63 -.01 +2.2
SmCoVal 35.69 -.24 +19.2
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 12.45 -.06 +14.3
TMSmCaB m 18.11 -.08 +13.8
FMI
CommStk 27.88 -.09 +16.0
LgCap 20.52 -.06 +15.9
FPA
Capital d 44.06 -.25 +15.2
Cres d 31.82 +.01 +12.7
Newlnc d 10.41 -.01 +1.8
Fairholme Funds
Farhome d 37.74 -.43 +9.1
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.83 -.02 +9.8
IntSmMCoA m 44.39 -.12 +12.2
KaufmanA m 6.05 -.04 +12.6
MDTMdCpGrStB m37.60-.14 +13.4
StrVall 5.64 -.03 +16.3


Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.36
AstMgr50 17.52
Bal 22.23
BIChGrow 59.01
Canada d 54.98
CapApr 35.24
Caplnc d 9.67
Contra 89.72
DivGrow 35.28
Divrlntl d 33.35
EmergAsia d 28.86
EmgMkt d 22.81
Eqlnc 55.95
Eqlnc II 23.09
FF2015 12.41
FF2035 12.82
FF2040 9.02
Fidelity 41.76
FItRtHiln d 9.99
FocStk 18.26
FourlnOne 33.30
Free2000 12.47
Free2010 14.89
Free2020 15.17
Free2025 12.82
Free2030 15.52
GNMA 11.29
GrowCo 111.88
Growlnc 25.73
Hilnc d 9.36
Indepndnc 31.18
IntMunilnc d 10.21
IntRelEst d 10.35
IntlDisc d 36.84
InvGrdBd 7.72
LatinAm d 39.02
LevCoSt d 39.08
LowPriStk d 47.92
Magellan 86.92
MeCpSto 14.39
MidCap d 35.75
Munilnc d 12.69
NewMlle 36.76
NewMktln d 16.20
OTC 76.16
Overseas d 36.24
Puritan 21.29
ShTmBond 8.56
SmCapDisc d 29.09
Stratlnc 11.04
TaxFrB d 10.96
TotalBd 10.59
USBdldx 11.46
USBdldxlnv 11.46
Value 94.01
ValueDis 19.96
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 63.92
IntBondA m 11.41
IntBondB m 11.40
IntlCapAB m 11.78
LrgCapA m 25.79
LrgCapB m 24.14
NewlnsA m 26.59
NewlnsI 26.95
StratlncA m 12.32
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 160.92
Electron d 55.52
Energy d 58.71
Gold d 22.11
Leisure d 116.91
Materials d 77.30
MedDeliv d 68.77
MedEqSys d 34.11
NatGas d 35.00
NatRes d 35.78
Wireless d 9.10
Fidelity Spartan
5001dxAdvtg 59.80
5001dxlnstl 59.80
5001dxlnv 59.79
ExtMktldAg d 48.74


-.04 +5.7
-.06 +9.5
-.09 +12.1
-.12 +18.2
-.17 +5.2
-.04 +17.6
-.03 +10.0
-.22 +16.4
-.14 +15.5
-.03 +10.1
-.03 +5.4
-.08 +1.9
-.25 +15.5
-.10 +15.1
-.05 +8.7
-.05 +11.6
-.03 +11.7
-.22 +15.8
... +5.3
-.06 +20.8
-.12 +13.6
-.03 +5.2
-.05 +8.5
-.06 +9.5
-.05 +10.6
-.06 +10.9
-.04 +2.8
-.18 +19.5
-.08 +19.7
-.04 +9.7
-.10 +16.2
-.02 +3.0
-.06 +13.1
-.06 +10.6
-.03 +4.5
-.50 -4.1
-.14 +19.2
-.18 +18.9
-.29 +13.0
-.04 +19.5
-.16 +18.0
-.04 +3.8
-.13 +18.8
-.09 +7.9
+.22 +18.9
-.09 +11.1
-.08 +12.2
-.01 +1.7
-.18 +24.0
-.04 +6.4
-.04 +3.9
-.04 +4.7
-.04 NA
-.04 +3.2
-.61 +18.2
-.03 +17.5
-.43 +16.5
-.03 +3.4
-.03 +2.7
-.03 +11.6
-.06 +19.9
-.06 +18.9
-.05 +15.8
-.05 +16.1
-.05 +6.1
-.37 +40.0
-.92 +11.2
-.76 +14.5
-.96 -17.8
-.91 +19.0
-.55 +15.4
-.28 +22.2
-.13 +17.8
-.50 +8.8
-.53 +10.8
-.07 +12.3
-.22 +17.7
-.23 NA
-.23 +17.6
-.35 +19.2


IntlldxAdg d 37.76 -.09 +9.5
TotMktldAg d 49.42 -.22 +18.0
First Eagle
GIbA m 53.14 -.28 +11.9
OverseasA m 23.46 -.10 +9.8
First Investors
GlobalA m 7.84 -.01 +11.2
TotalRetA m 18.39 -.03 +12.7
Firsthand
e-Comm 6.58 +.07 +8.7
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 11.77 -.06 +3.8
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 6.98 -.03 +4.1
EqlnA m 21.12 -.09 +15.5
FLTFA m 11.01 -.05 +3.0
GrOppA m 25.84 -.12 +15.3
GrowthA m 58.21 +.03 +14.3
HY TFA m 9.99 -.05 +4.2
Income C m 2.37 -.02 +10.7
IncomeA m 2.35 -.01 +11.2
IncomeAdv 2.33 -.02 +11.4
NYTFA m 11.29 -.04 +2.6
RisDvA m 45.22 -.16 +17.1
StrlncA m 10.58 -.03 +7.0
TotalRetA m 9.97 -.04 +4.9
USGovA m 6.51 -.02 +2.0
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 33.19 +.02 +11.9
DiscovA m 32.70 +.02 +11.6
Shares Z 26.53 -.04 +14.0
SharesA m 26.29 -.04 +13.7
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 13.16 -.04 +6.0
GIBondA m 13.14 -.04 +6.4
GIBondAdv 13.09 -.04 +6.7
GrowthA m 22.59 +.07 +14.6
WorldA m 18.39 +.03 +14.7
GE
S&SUSEq 54.45 -.15 +16.8
GMO
EmgMktsVI d 10.66 -.07 +1.6
IntltVllV 22.83 ... +8.6
Quill 25.78 -.02 +18.0
QuVI 25.79 -.02 +18.1
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 62.06 -.46 +17.3
EqlncomeAAA m 26.94 -.16 +16.7
Value m 18.28 -.14 +17.7


Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.34
MidCpVals 47.75
ShDuGovA m 10.20
Harbor
Bond 12.05
CapAplnst 49.23
Intllnstl 65.69
Intllnv b 64.95
Hartford
CapAprA m 42.77
CpApHLSIA 53.62
SmallCoB m 19.72
Heartland
ValuePlus m 34.56
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 14.86
Hodges
Hodges m 30.65
INVESCO
CharterA m 21.09
ComstockA m 21.93
ConstellB m 24.34
Divlnclnv b 18.54
EnergyA m 42.90
Energylnv b 42.75
EqlncomeA m 10.73
EuroGrA m 36.36
GIbGrB m 25.61
GrowlncA m 25.85
GrwthAIIA m 12.99
HiYldMuA m 9.22
PacGrowB m 21.26


-.02 +9.8
-.49 +17.2
... +.5
-.06 +3.8
+.01 +16.4
-.04 +9.6
-.04 +9.2
-.19 +13.9
-.21 +15.3
-.13 +17.2
-.26 +13.5
-.08 +16.6
-.21 +17.5
-.05 +13.7
-.09 +18.4
-.01 +11.0
-.12 +14.6
-.65 +9.7
-.64 +9.8
-.04 +13.5
-.18 +12.7
... +11.1
-.11 +16.7
-.07 +11.6
-.05 +5.2
-.14 +4.0


SmCapEqA m 16.02 -.15 +18.6
Techlnv b 36.63 +.05 +12.8
USMortA m 12.47 -.04 +2.5
Ivy
AssetSTrB m 27.38 -.03 +10.0
AssetStrA m 28.33 -.03 +10.8
AssetStrC m 27.51 -.03 +10.0
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.68 -.03 +4.1
CoreBondA m 11.67 -.03 +3.7
CoreBondSelect 11.66 -.03 +3.9
HighYIdSel 8.21 -.03 +9.7
LgCapGrSelect 27.41 -.07 +17.6
MidCpVall 33.87 -.20 +20.5
ShDurBndSel 10.91 ... +1.3
USLCpCrPS 27.07 -.14 +16.9
Janus
BaIC m 28.71 -.06 +10.0
ContrT 18.23 -.09 +11.6
EntrprsT 77.79 -.23 +18.6
FlexBdS b 10.52 -.03 +4.6
GlbValT d 14.04 -.05 +13.7
HiYIldT 9.33 -.02 +9.8
OverseasT 35.34 -.19 -3.9
PerknsMCVL 25.40 -.13 +13.1
PerknsMCVT 25.13 -.14 +12.9
PerknsSCVL 25.48 -.15 +12.4
ShTmBdT 3.07 ... +2.1
T 36.59 +.01 +13.1
USCrT 18.54 -.06 +18.7
VentureT 66.67 -.32 +22.4
John Hancock
LifBal b 14.65 ... +10.6
LifGrl b 15.12 ... +12.1
Lazard
EmgMkEqtl d 18.35 -.12 +3.3
Legg Mason/Western
CrPIBdlns 11.26 -.04 +5.2
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl d 16.80 +.06 +10.0
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 30.48 -.17 +14.0
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 15.12 -.06 +9.1
BdR b 15.05 -.07 +8.8
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 14.52 -.07 +14.7
BondDebA m 8.22 -.03 +9.5
ShDurlncA m 4.57 ... +4.0
ShDurlncC m 4.60 ... +3.3
MFS
IslntlEq 20.74 -.01 +11.0
MAInvB m 24.89 -.03 +15.5
TotRetA m 16.86 -.05 +11.2
ValueA m 30.91 -.09 +17.3
Valuel 31.06 -.09 +17.6
MainStay
HiYldCorA m 6.09 -.02 +9.3
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 101.29 -.46 +18.6
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.85 -.04 +6.8
PBMaxTrmS 19.79 -.03 +12.3
WrIdOppA 8.48 -.02 +7.3
Marsico
21stCent m 16.94 -.06 +11.3
FlexCap m 17.44 -.04 +19.8
Merger
Merger b 16.03 -.02 +2.9
Meridian
MendnGr d 46.32 -.28 +17.7
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.59 -.03 +6.3
TotRtBd b 10.59 -.03 +6.0
Midas Funds
Magic m 22.73 -.17 +19.4
Midas m 1.55 -.05 -25.4
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 39.47 +.03 +15.2
Morgan Stanley Instl
MdCpGrl 41.44 -.05 +14.0


Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 64.01 -.24 +13.1
Natixis
LSInvBdY 12.25 -.06 +6.9
LSStratlncA m 15.91 -.07 +9.5
LSStratlncC m 16.00 -.07 +8.7
Needham
Growth m 41.59 -.15 +16.0
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 58.40 -.38 +17.7
SmCpGrlnv 24.10 -.03 +18.0
Northeast Investors
Growth 18.72 -.12 +10.8
Northern
HYFixlnc d 7.61 ... +10.2
Stkldx 21.02 ... +17.6
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.49 -.04 +3.0
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.33 +.02 +7.8
HlthSinces 17.64 -.01 +20.4
PinOakEq 41.29 -.11 +19.1
RedOakTec 12.99 +.08 +19.2
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.10 -.11 +10.7
Global I 28.47 +.05 +14.0
Intl I 24.67 +.07 +13.8
Oakmark I 59.16 -.17 +18.8
Select I 37.54 -.09 +18.7
Old Westbury
GIbSmMdCp 16.37 -.04 +13.6
LgCpStr 11.22 -.02 +8.6
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 35.06 -.18 +6.0
DevMktY 34.71 -.18 +6.4
GlobA m 73.09 +.03 +12.9
IntlBondA m 6.20 ... +3.8
IntlBondY 6.20 ... +4.1
IntlGrY 34.45 -.10 +13.6
ManStrA m 43.09 ... +15.9
RocMunlA m 15.43 -.09 +4.3
SrFRtRatA m 8.40 ... +7.1
StrlncA m 4.20 ... +6.6
PIMCO
AAstAAutP 10.40 ... +5.9
AllAssetl 12.28 ... +7.6
AIIAuthA m 10.39 ... +5.5
AIIAuthC m 10.39 ... +4.7
AIIAuthln 10.40 ... +6.0
ComRIRStlI 5.76 -.08 +3.1
Divlnclnst 11.64 -.06 +7.2
EMktCurl 10.22 -.05 +2.4
EmMktslns 11.42 -.08 +6.6
ForBdlnstl 10.59 -.02 +6.2
HiYldls 9.59 -.03 +9.2
InvGrdlns 10.61 -.05 +7.7
LowDrls 10.27 -.03 +2.8
RealRet 11.27 -.10 +5.2
ShtTermls 9.83 -.01 +1.5
TotRetA m 10.78 -.05 +4.1
TotRetAdm b 10.78 -.05 +4.3
TotRetC m 10.78 -.05 +3.3
TotRetls 10.78 -.05 +4.5
TotRetrnD b 10.78 -.05 +4.2
TotlRetnP 10.78 -.05 +4.4
PRIMECAP Odyssey
Growth 22.03 +.01 +18.7
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 34.80 -.21 +16.4
Permanent
Portfolio 46.55 -.39 +6.0
Principal
LCGrllnst 11.62 -.05 +17.7
SAMConGrA m 16.72 -.07 +12.9
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 21.92 -.08 +14.1
IntlEqtyC m 6.61 -.02 +9.1
Putnam
GIbUtilB m 11.43 -.07 +5.3
GrowlncA m 18.15 -.11 +17.3
IntlNewB m 15.99 -.08 +8.3
SmCpValA m 13.94 -.11 +18.4


Stocks of Local Interest


Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 30.30 ... +17.6
Reynolds
BueChip b 68.54 -.38 +15.3
Royce
PAMutlnv d 13.63 -.08 +15.8
Premierlnv d 21.90 -.17 +16.0
ValueSvc m 13.04 -.09 +13.1
Rydex
Electrlnv 56.69 -.82 +4.1
HlthCrAdv b 23.09 -.03 +20.4
Nsdql001v 19.85 +.06 +17.4
Schwab
10001nv d 46.00 -.19 +17.4
S&P500Sel d 26.52 -.10 +17.6
Scout
Interntl 35.23 -.09 +9.5
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 40.83 -.11 +17.1
Sequoia
Sequoia 199.61 -.93 +19.8
State Farm
Growth 64.07 -.28 +13.2
Stratton
SmCapVal d 67.60 -.54 +19.6
T Rowe Price
Balanced 22.45 -.09 +12.0
BChpGr 54.00 -.23 +19.1
CapApprec 25.46 -.03 +14.8
Corplnc 9.69 -.05 +6.1
EmMktStk d 31.27 -.28 +1.6
Eqlndex d 45.45 -.18 +17.4
Eqtylnc 31.41 -.17 +16.7
FinSer 18.80 -.09 +14.7
GlbTech 11.63 +.12 +17.9
GrowStk 44.17 -.18 +17.8
HealthSc 53.65 -.19 +31.8
HiYield d 7.11 -.01 +10.5
InsLgCpGr 22.71 -.09 +18.3
IntlBnd d 9.43 -.07 +2.7
IntlEqldx d 12.54 -.02 +8.9
IntlGrlnc d 14.37 -.01 +9.4
IntlStk d 15.11 -.05 +8.2
MediaTele 63.61 -.11 +20.6
MidCapVa 28.61 -.20 +15.7
MidCpGr 68.40 -.35 +18.0
NJTaxFBd 11.39 -.06 +3.4
NewAmGro 41.83 -.13 +16.7
NewAsia d 16.23 -.03 +6.3
NewEra 44.53 -.56 +6.1
NewHonz 42.31 -.21 +25.9
Newlncome 9.44 -.04 +3.4
OrseaStk d 9.33 -.02 +10.3
R2015 13.90 -.06 +10.9
R2025 14.53 -.07 +12.7
R2035 15.10 -.07 +14.0
Rtmt2010 17.49 -.07 +9.7
Rtmt2020 19.56 -.09 +12.0
Rtmt2030 21.18 -.10 +13.5
Rtmt2040 21.65 -.10 +14.2
SciTech 32.45 +.11 +13.4
ShTmBond 4.79 -.01 +1.6
SmCpStk 41.76 -.28 +21.4
SmCpVal d 46.49 -.37 +18.1
SpecGrow 22.21 -.11 +15.1
Speclnc 12.89 -.06 +6.7
SumGNMA 9.63 -.03 +2.4
SumMulnc 11.10 -.05 +3.9
TaxEfMult d 17.99 -.10 +17.2
TaxFShlnt 5.62 ... +2.0
Value 32.79 -.18 +18.8
TCW
Emglncl 8.71 ... +9.2
TotRetBdl 10.00 ... +6.8
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 12.96 -.06 +17.9
Target
SmCapVal 26.11 -.17 +17.6
Templeton
InFEqSeS 21.17 +.09 +8.6
Third Avenue
Value d 56.54 -.14 +10.3


Thompson
LargeCap 43.09 -.15 +17.1
Thornburg
IncBldC m 20.02 -.10 +10.1
IntlValA m 29.18 -.02 +7.5
IntlVall d 29.81 -.01 +7.9
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.01 -.04 +6.0
MidCapGrA m 19.95 -.13 +13.4
Tocqueville
Gold m 39.39 -1.73 -13.7
Turner
SmCapGr 40.85 -.24 +16.6
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.97 +.07 +12.1
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 7.32 -.23 -16.1
GlobRes m 9.32 -.14 +5.6
USAA
CorstnMod 14.45 -.05 +8.5
GNMA 9.92 -.02 +2.0
Growlnc 19.33 -.06 +15.0
HYOpp d 8.85 -.02 +10.9
PrcMtlMin 15.72 -.73 -18.6
SPTech 17.61 +.04 +17.8
TaxELgTm 13.01 -.06 +4.6
TgtRt2040 12.62 -.06 +11.0
TgtRt2050 12.32 -.06 +11.5
WorldGro 24.92 -.03 +15.8
Unified
Winlnv m 16.62 -.01 +10.9
Value Line
PremGro b 32.81 -.22 +18.2
Vanguard
500Adml 155.56 -.59 +17.7
5001nv 155.55 -.59 +17.5
BalldxAdm 26.07 -.10 +12.3
Balldxlns 26.07 -.10 +12.3
CAITAdml 11.17 -.03 +3.9
CapOp 42.85 +.02 +17.9
CapOpAdml 98.99 +.05 +18.0
Convrt 14.14 -.01 +11.2
DivGr 19.81 -.05 +17.8
EmMktlAdm 33.26 -.29 +1.4
EnergyAdm 121.06 -1.23 +10.1
Energylnv 64.47 -.66 +10.1
Eqlnc 28.69 -.12 +19.7
EqlncAdml 60.13 -.25 +19.8
ExplAdml 92.89 -.48 +19.9
Explr 99.79 -.52 +19.7
ExtdldAdm 56.42 -.40 +19.4
Extdldlst 56.42 -.40 +19.4
ExtdMktldxlP 139.25 -.98 NA
FAWeUSIns 92.22 -.38 +7.3
FAWeUSInv 18.46 -.08 +7.0
FLLT 11.36 -.05 +3.5
GNMA 10.43 -.04 +2.5
GNMAAdml 10.43 -.04 +2.6
GIbEq 21.33 -.07 +13.3
Grolnc 36.11 -.13 +18.0
GrIhldAdm 42.22 -.06 +17.6
Grthlstld 42.22 -.06 +17.6
HYCor 6.03 -.02 +9.7
HYCorAdml 6.03 -.02 +9.8
HItCrAdml 75.00 -.09 +22.3
HlthCare 177.75 -.21 +22.2
ITBondAdm 11.34 -.06 +5.0
ITGradeAd 9.83 -.04 +5.5
InfPrtAdm 26.34 -.21 +5.0
InfPrtl 10.73 -.08 +5.0
InflaPro 13.42 -.10 +4.9
Instldxl 154.53 -.59 +17.7
InstPlus 154.54 -.59 +17.7
InstTStPI 38.46 -.16 +18.1
IntlGr 20.69 -.05 +9.2
IntlGrAdm 65.84 -.17 +9.3
IntlStkldxAdm 25.98 -.10 NA
IntlStkldxl 103.88 -.43 NA
IntlStkldxlPIs 103.89 -.43 NA
IntlStkldxlSgn 31.16 -.13 NA
IntlVal 33.87 -.03 +8.5
LTGradeAd 9.89 -.09 +7.7
LgCpldxlnv 31.18 -.11 +17.6


52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 11.34 18.26 16.87 +.36 +2.2 A V V +18.6 +28.3 dd
Arkansas Bst ABFS 6.43 24.00 21.32 -.31 -1.4 V A V +123.2 +92.6 dd 0.12
Bank of America BAG 6.90 15.03 14.71 -.23 -1.5 V A A +26.7 +111.3 26 0.04
Beam Inc BEAM 52.69 -0- 69.78 64.19 -.88 -1.4 V A A +5.1 +8.9 25 0.90
Carnival Corp CCL 31.65 39.95 36.92 +.20 +0.5 A A A +0.4 +18.4 19 1.00a
Chicos FAS CHS 14.33 -- 19.95 16.82 +.04 +0.2 A A V -8.9 +16.5 16 0.22
Cracker Barrel CBRL 59.82 102.95 96.10 -1.39 -1.4 V A A +49.5 +65.5 19 3.00f
Disney DIS 46.53 67.89 64.64 +.19 +0.3 V A A +29.8 +35.9 20 0.75f
Eaton Corp pic ETN 38.00 69.92 68.08 -.87 -1.3 V A A +25.7 +73.9 18 1.68
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 20.20 44.04 41.65 -.74 -1.7 A A A +42.5 +93.6 42 0.40
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 4.50 2.73 +.36 +15.2 A A A -16.3 -37.1 dd
Harris Corp HRS 39.02-0 52.91 52.80 +.38 +0.7 A A A +7.8 +32.3 32 1.48
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 6.27 17.28 15.02 -.19 -1.2 V V V +61.2 +108.6 22
iShs U.S. Pfd PFF 37.81 41.09 39.06 -.14 -0.4 V A V -1.4 +5.4 q 2.18e
KC Southern KSU 68.69 -- 118.88 110.81 -2.44 -2.2 V A A +32.7 +63.8 41 0.86
Lennar Corp A LEN 28.51 -0-- 44.40 33.92 -1.35 -3.8 V V V -12.3 +14.9 19 0.16
McClatchy Co MNI 1.50 -0- 3.46 3.06 +.03 +1.0 A A A -6.4 +96.8 dd
NextEra Energy NEE 65.95 85.88 83.76 -1.04 -1.2 V A A +21.1 +24.8 21 2.64
Office Depot ODP 1.51 6.10 4.31 -.09 -2.0 V A A +31.4 +131.6 dd
PGT Inc PGTI 2.63 0 10.14 10.03 +.05 +0.5 A A A +122.8 +215.8 37


52-WK RANGE CLOSE


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG%CHGWK MOQTR%CHG%RTN P/E DIV

Panera Bread Co PNRA 138.54 -0- 194.77 169.62-12.39 -6.8 V V V +6.8 +27.5 27
Pembina Pipeline PBA 25.60 34.70 31.41 -.25 -0.8 A A A +9.7 +24.0 1.62
Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.67 22.72 20.12 -.36 -1.8 V V +2.6 +9.8 17 1.08
Phoenix Cos PNX 20.51 -0 44.78 42.83 -.15 -0.3 V A V +73.2 +31.8 dd
Raymond James Fncl RJF 30.99 48.22 43.81 -.32 -0.7 A A A +13.7 +35.7 18 0.56
Reliance Steel Alu RS 44.91 72.90 68.79 -.79 -1.1 V A A +10.8 +49.1 14 1.20
Ryder R 33.93 64.68 61.66 -.96 -1.5 V A A +23.5 +84.2 14 1.36f
St Joe Co JOE 16.41 24.44 22.25 -.03 -0.1 V A A -3.6 +33.0 cc
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 22.49 31.86 29.60 -.22 -0.7 V V V +25.6 +16.1 21
Simon Property Gp SPG 145.21 182.45 164.41 -1.57 -0.9 V A A +4.0 +9.3 47 4.60
Stein Mart SMRT 5.77 15.21 14.01 -.27 -1.9 V A A +85.8 +96.0 24 0.20
Suntrust Bks STI 22.34 -0 36.29 35.09 -.07 -0.2 A A A +23.8 +54.4 9 0.40f
Superior Uniform SGC 10.08 -0- 12.43 10.85 +.02 +0.2 A V A -5.2 -3.4 16 0.54
TECO Energy TE 16.12 -- 19.22 17.46 -.27 -1.5 V A A +4.2 +3.0 19 0.88
Tech Data TECD 42.25 54.60 50.94 +.27 +0.5 A A A +11.9 +7.1 9
Wendys Co WEN 4.09 7.60 7.12 -.11 -1.5 A A A +51.5 +63.4 cc 0.20f
World Fuel Svcs INT 33.65 -0- 45.20 40.01 -1.61 -3.9 V A A -2.8 +5.9 15 0.15


ifeCon 17.57
ifeGro 25.78
ifeMod 22.01
MidCapldxlP 134.50
MidCp 27.19
MidCpAdml 123.44
MidCplst 27.27
MidCpSgl 38.95
Morg 23.53
MorgAdml 72.99
MuHYAdml 10.54
Mulnt 13.67
MulntAdml 13.67
MuLTAdml 10.99
MuLtdAdml 11.01
MuShtAdml 15.84
Prmcp 85.26
PrmcpAdml 88.48
PrmcpCorl 18.21
REITIdxAd 100.63
STBondAdm 10.51
STBondSgl 10.51
STCor 10.69
STGradeAd 10.69
STIGradel 10.69
STsryAdml 10.69
SelValu 26.09
SmCapldx 47.66
SmCpldAdm 47.72
SmCpldlst 47.72
SmCplndxSgnl 42.99
SmVlldlst 21.40
Star 22.54
StratgcEq 26.60
TgtRe2010 25.25
TgtRe2015 14.32
TgtRe2020 25.90
TgtRe2030 26.05
TgtRe2035 15.89
TgtRe2040 26.33
TgtRe2045 16.53
TgtRe2050 26.22
TgtRetlnc 12.40
Tgtet2025 14.95
TotBdAdml 10.67
TotBdlnst 10.67
TotBdMklnv 10.67
TotBdMkSg 10.67
Totlntl 15.53
TotStlAdm 42.44
TotStllns 42.44
TotStlSig 40.96
TotStldx 42.42
TxMCapAdm 85.26
ValldxAdm 27.82
Valldxlns 27.82
Wellsl 25.04
WellslAdm 60.67
Welltn 37.67
WelltnAdm 65.06
WndsllAdm 62.20
Wndsr 18.64
WndsrAdml 62.88
Wndsrll 35.05
Victory
SpecValA f 18.94
Virtus
EmgMktsls 10.11
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 16.84
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 31.33
Growlnv 45.98
Outk2010Adm 13.38
Western Asset
MgdMuniA m 15.95
Yacktman
Focused d 24.75
Yacktman d 23.11


-.07 +7.6
-.10 +12.3
-.09 +10.2
-.91 NA
-.18 +17.9
-.84 +18.0
-.18 +18.0
-.27 +18.0
-.05 +16.1
-.13 +16.3
-.04 +4.4
-.04 +3.3
-.04 +3.4
-.04 +3.7
... +1.7
... +1.0
-.13 +17.6
-.13 +17.7
-.02 +17.3
-2.12 +16.6
-.02 +1.8
-.02 +1.8
-.01 +2.6
-.01 +2.7
-.01 +2.7
... +1 .1
-.04 +18.4
-.39 +19.4
-.39 +19.6
-.39 +19.6
-.35 +19.6
-.14 +18.1
-.08 +11.3
-.16 +20.8
-.09 +8.9
-.05 +10.0
-.10 +10.9
-.11 +12.5
-.07 +13.3
-.12 +13.6
-.07 +13.6
-.12 +13.6
-.04 +7.3
-.07 +11.7
-.03 +3.3
-.03 +3.3
-.03 +3.2
-.03 +3.3
-.07 +7.0
-.18 +18.1
-.19 +18.0
-.17 +18.0
-.19 +17.9
-.35 +17.9
-.16 +17.7
-.16 +17.7
-.11 +10.5
-.25 +10.5
-.11 +13.0
-.19 +13.1
-.26 +17.9
-.07 +18.8
-.24 +18.9
-.15 +17.8

-.08 +11.1

-.06 +10.1

-.08 +13.5

-.17 +21.0
-.16 +20.4
-.06 +4.7

-.06 +4.5

-.12 +16.5
-.10 +17.0






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper. symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.



S&P 500 -6.45 NASDAQ +.33 DOW -25.50 6-MO T-BILLS 30-YR T-BONDS +.07 CRUDE OIL -1.84 EURO -.0037 GOLD -15.40
1,685.94 '3,579.60 15,542.24 .06% 1 3.65% $105.39 $1.3195 $1,319.70




Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange


and the Nasdaq.

Tkr Name Last Chg
A-B-C
ACE ACE Ltd 91.88 -1.35
AES AES Corp 12.42 -.34
AFL AFLAC 60.90 +1.18
GAS AGL Res 45.33 -.63
AKS AK Steel 3.45 -.11
ASMI ASMIntl 37.88 +1.19
T AT&T Inc 35.40 -.41
ABT AbtLab s 36.45 -.23
ABBV AbbVie n 43.64 -.67
ANF AberFitc 49.24 -.13
ACAD AcadiaPh 18.99 -.23
ACN Accenture 73.72 -.53
ARAY Accuray 6.09 -.03
ACT Actavis 126.75 +.34
ATVI AcfvsBliz 15.39 +.17
ADBE AdobeSy 47.80 -.27
AEIS AdvEnld 21.71 -.28
AMD AMD 3.63 -.03
ABCO AdvisoryBd 56.70 -.35
ACM AecomTch 34.34 -.10
AET Aetna 65.61 +.26
AFFX Affymetrix 3.78 -.08
A Agilent 46.76 +.29
AGIO AgiosPh n 31.28
AEM Agnico g 28.17 -2.01
AYR Aircastle 17.63 -.05
ARG Airgas 101.08
AKAM AkamaiT 43.87 -.38
ALSK AlaskCom 2.51 -.16
ALU AlcatelLuc 2.14
AA Alcoa 8.05 -.09
ATI AllegTch 26.92 -.97
AGN Allergan 90.42 -.17
ALE Allete 52.40 -1.02
ARLP AllnceRes 73.90 -1.13
ACG AlliBInco 7.28 -.08
AB AlliBern 22.42 -.24
LNT AlliantEgy 53.19 -.58
MDRXAllscriptH 15.60 -.15
ALL Allstate 50.99 -1.09
ANR AlphaNRs 5.51 -.37
AOD AlpTotDiv 4.03 -.01
AMLP AIpAlerMLP 17.95 -.07
ALTR AlteraCp If 35.11 -.36
MO Altria 35.57 -.42
ABV AmBev 36.18 -.94
AMRN Amarin 5.30 -.01
AMZN Amazon 298.94 -2.12
AEE Ameren 35.58 -.23
AMX AMovilL 21.00 -.29
AGNC ACapAgy 21.35 -.72
ACAS AmCapLtd 13.68 -.22
AEO AEagleOut 19.04 +.07
AEP AEP 46.38 -.72
AXP AmExp 75.36 +.95
AIG AmlntlGrp 45.96 -.64
ARCP ARItCapPr 14.44 -.10
AWR AmStsWtr 60.43 -.72
AMT AmTower 73.94 -.81
AWK AmWtrWks 42.82 -.68
APU Amerigas 46.37 -.17
AMP Ameriprise 86.24 -.43
ABC AmeriBrgn 56.77 -.86
AME Ametek 45.78 -.16
AMGNAmgen 106.60 -.02
APH Amphenol 77.91 -.01
APC Anadarko 89.53 -1.62
ADI AnalogDev 48.23 -.15
ANEN Anaren 24.17 +.02
AU AnglogldA 13.74 -.68
BUD ABInBev 89.33 +.77
NLY Annaly 11.72 -.29
ANH Anworth 4.98 -.15
APA Apache 82.51 -1.06
AINV Apollolnv 8.15 -.12
AAPL Apple Inc 440.51+21.52
AMAT ApIdMatl 16.10 -.16
WTR AquaAm 33.15 -.85
MT ArcelorMit 12.89 -.15
ACI ArchCoal 3.90 -.30
ADM ArchDan 36.07 -.49
ARNA ArenaPhm 6.87 -.06
ARCC AresCap 17.61 -.02
ABFS ArkBest 21.32 -.31
ARMH ArmHId 39.68 -2.17
ARR ArmourRsd 4.49 -.09
ARRY ArrayBio 6.07 -.07
ARW ArrowEl 44.93 +1.68
ARUN ArubaNet 17.39 -.52
ASH Ashland 86.43 -1.96
AGO AssuredG 22.60 -.19
AZN AstraZen 50.55 -.31
APL AtlasPpln 39.15 -.16
ATML Atmel 7.74 -.01
ATO ATMOS 43.82 -.32
AUQ AuRicog 4.82 -.40
ADSK Autodesk 36.86 +.38
ADP AutoData 72.22 -.27
AVGO AvagoTch 36.89 -.72
AVNR AvanirPhm 4.60 -.27
AVY AveryD 43.93 -.69
CAR AvisBudg 30.99 -.82
AVA Avista 28.44 -.45
AVP Avon 23.07
BBT BB&TCp 35.68 -.05
BCE BCE g 41.26 +.24
BHP BHP BilILt 63.30 -1.55
BMC BMCSft 45.58 -.08
BP BP PLC 43.44 -.11
BPT BP Pru 90.11 -.95
BIDU Baidu 113.37 +3.53
BHI BakrHu 47.76 +.01
BLL BallCorp 45.49 -.16
BLDP BallardPw 2.04 -.08
BBVA BcBilVArg 9.02 +.18
BBD BcoBrad pf 12.87 -.47
SAN BcoSantSA 6.99 +.15
BSBR BcoSBrasil 6.42 +.01
BKMU BankMutl 6.60 -.06
BAC BkofAm 14.71 -.23
BMO BkMont g 63.42 +.21
BK BkNYMel 31.92 -.29
BNS BkNova g 56.54 -.14
VXX BariPVixrs 15.96 +.21
BCR Bard 112.54 -.84
BKS BarnesNob 18.05 -.19
ABX BarrickG 17.17 -.93
BAX Baxter 73.62 -.67
BEAM Beam Inc 64.19 -.88
BZH BeazerHrs 17.87 -.68
BBBY BedBath 75.94 -.17
BMS Bemis 41.36 +.11
BRK/BBerkH B 116.46 -1.75
BBY BestBuy 29.33
BIG BigLots 36.09 +.11
BCRX Biocryst 4.50 -.02
BMR BioMedR 21.04 -.46
BBRY BlackBerry 9.00 -.02
BME BIkHIthSci 33.84 -.19
BX Blackstone 23.75 -.24
HRB BlockHR 30.63 -.33


BOBE BobEvans 51.12 -.43
BA Boeing 106.95 -.84
BWA BorgWarn 92.17 +.57
SAM BostBeer 179.35 -.52
BSX BostonSci 9.61 -.09
BYD BoydGm 10.94 -.28
BDN Brandyw 14.15 -.19
BGG BrigStrat 21.25 -.15
BMY BrMySq 44.59 -.60
BRCM Broadcom 27.01 -4.82
BRCD BrcdeCm 6.45 -.14
BPL Buckeye 71.81 +.54
BKI BuckTch 37.27 +.01
BVN Buenavent 14.73 -.47
CA CAInc 29.88 +.12
CBG CBRE Grp 24.36 -.01
CBS CBS B 52.48 +.01
CIT CITGrp 50.19 +.08
CMS CMS Eng 27.98 -.41
CNH CNH Gbl 44.57 -.11
CSX CSX 24.94 -.33
CVRR CVRRfgn 27.57 +.45
CVS CVSCare 61.66 -.23
CYS CYS Invest 8.39 -.27
COG CabotO&G 71.71 -.56
CDNS Cadence 15.40 -.18
CALM Cal-Maine 50.36 -1.46
CHY CalaCvHi 12.66 -.03
CCC Calgon 17.63 -.28
CWT CalifWtr 21.26 -.35
CPN Calpine 20.12 -.22
CLMT CalumetSp 33.66 +.46
CAFI CamcoF 3.92 +.02
CPT CamdenPT 72.06 -1.68
CAM Cameron 63.57 -.81
CPB CampSp 46.41 -.92
CNI CdnNRyg 99.32 +.41
CNQ CdnNRsgs 32.75 -.48
CP CPRwyg 123.58 -3.06
COF CapOne 68.72 -.29
CSU CapSenL 24.18 -.18
CSE CapitlSrce 12.16 +.19
CMO CapsteadM 11.42 -.26
CPST CpstnTurb 1.44 -.04
CFN CareFusion 38.78 +.01
CCL Carnival 36.92 +.20
CRS CarpTech 48.91 -1.60
CRZO Carrizo 30.96 -1.12
CAT Caterpillar 83.44 -2.08
CELG Celgene 135.99 +.91
CTIC CellTher rs 1.09 -.01
CLSN Celsion 1.27 +.05
CX Cemex 11.36 -.10
CVE CenovusE 29.57 -1.80
CTL CntryLink 35.87 -.07
CVO Cenveo 2.17 -.01
CHTR CharterCm 128.22 +.45
CHKP ChkPoint 55.15 +1.32
CKP Checkpnt 16.94
CHFC ChemRnI 30.91 +.21
CHK ChesEng 22.20 -.12
CVX Chevron 126.37 -.89
CBI ChicB&l 61.28 -.97
CHS Chicos 16.82 +.04
CIM Chimera 2.97 -.10
CHD ChurchDwt 63.39 -.72
CIEN CienaCorp 22.96 +.04
CBB CinciBell 3.44 -.06
CINF CinnFin 48.68 -.84
CRUS Cirrus 19.41 +.19
CSCO Cisco 25.59 +.03
C Citigroup 52.19 -.69
CTXS CitrixSys 67.49 +1.42
CDTI CleanDsl 1.85 +.61
CLNE CleanEngy 12.74 -.45
CLF CliffsNRs 18.30 -.63
CLX Clorox 85.12 -.48
COH Coach 59.36 -.09
CIE CobaltlEn 28.28 -.50
KO CocaColas 40.86 -.10
CCE CocaCE 37.50 +.01
CTSH CognizTech 71.75 -.55
RQI CohStQIR 11.09 -.18
COLE ColeREl n 10.80 -.23
CL ColgPalms 58.47 +.06
COBK ColonialFS 14.15 +.05
CLP ColonPT 24.44 -.59
CMCSAComcast 44.96 -.18
CMA Comerica 42.86 -.02
CTG CmpTask 18.58 +.41
CPWRCompuwre 11.10 +.11
CMTL Comtech 27.14 -.16
CAG ConAgra 36.73 -.21
CTWS ConnWtrSv 29.27 -.36
COP ConocoPhil 65.59 -.53
CNX ConsolEngy 28.30 -.95
CNSL ConsolCom 17.57 -.30
ED ConEd 59.63 -.77
STZ ConstellA 50.90 -.60
CTB CooperTire 33.54
CSODCorOnDem 44.15 +.11
GLW Corning 15.14 +.12
OFC CorpOffP 27.59 -.96
COST Costco 117.90 -1.20
COTY Cotyn 17.13 +.07
XIV CSVellIVST 25.57 -.33
MLPN CSCush30 2029.75 -.21
TVIX CSVS2xVx rs 1.91 +.04
CROX Crocs 16.98 -.33
XTEX CrosstxLP 21.60 -.26
CCK CrownHold 44.27 -.08
CMI Cummins 116.24 -1.43
CYBE CybrOpt 5.72 -.02
CY CypSemi 12.59 -.19
CYTR CytRx 2.44 -.04
D-E-F
DCT DCT Indl 7.69 -.17
DDR DDRCorp 17.31 -.37
DNP DNPSelct 10.14 -.05
DHI DR Horton 21.20 -.60
DTE DTE 69.65 -1.19
DTZ DTE En 61 25.98 +.08
DAN DanaHIdg 20.67 -.30
DHR Danaher 67.63 -.27
DRI Darden 48.38 -.83
DV DeVry 30.04 -.74
DF DeanFds 10.80 +.25
DE Deere 82.59 -1.31
DELL Dell Inc 12.92 +.04
DLPH DelphiAuto 55.49 +.86
DAL DeltaAir 20.80 +.35
DNR DenburyR 17.35 -.61
DNDN Dndreon 4.40 -.11
DVN DevonE 56.34 -1.06
DEO Diageo 123.05 -1.37
DO DiaOffs 71.50 -.65
DRH DiamRk 9.90 -.23
DBD Diebold 33.16 -.21
DGII Digilnt 9.98 -.26
DLR DigitalRIt 63.14 -1.11
DDS Dillards 82.80 +.16
DTV DirecTV 63.68 -.92
FAZ DxFinBrrs 28.24 +.68


1,720 .............................



1,640 ........ 10 DAYS


S&P 500
Close: 1,685.94
Change: -6.45 (-0.4%)


3,640 ........... ...............



3,520 ........10 DAYS


Nasdaq composite
Close: 3,579.60
Change: 0.33 (flat)


1 ,70 0 ...... ........... ............ ............. i ............. ............ ....... 3 ,7 0 0 ............ ............ ............. ............. ............ ..........

1 5. ... 3 ,6 0 0 ........... ............ ............. ............
1 ,6 0 0 . . . . .. 3 ,57 0 0 i . *.. . .



550 .... .................... 3.o .. .. .
1 ,5 0 0 .. . ... .......... ... ......... ... ........ 3 3 0 .... .. .. .

1,500 3, 400. C "... '.... .."-

1,450 .............. ...... ...... ..... 3 ,100 ..F...


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD
Vol. (in mil.) 3,278 1,711
Pvs. Volume 3,020 1,562
Advanced 752 977
Declined 2324 1473
New Highs 206 241
New Lows 60 13


TZA DxSCBrrs 25.68 +.64
NUGT DxGIdBII rs 7.33 -1.23
FAS DxFnBull s 74.91 -2.06
SPXS DirSPBear 9.33 +.09
DUST DirDGldBr 76.80 +9.61
TNA DxSCBull s 57.75 -1.51
SPXL DxSPBulls 48.10 -.58
DFS Discover 50.43 -.28
DISH DishNetwk 44.79 -.59
DIS Disney 64.64 +.19
DG DollarGen 54.23 +.41
DLTR DollarTree 52.88 -.26
D DomRescs 58.85 -1.01
DPZ Dominos 61.01 +1.58
RRD DonlleyRR 15.65 +.07
DOW DowChm 34.37 -.18
DPS DrPepSnap 46.32 -1.36
LEO DryStrt 7.96 -.07
DRYS DryShips 2.04 -.05
DD DuPont 57.38 +.26
DUC DufPUC 10.60 -.05
DUK DukeEngy 70.50 -.81
DRE DukeRlty 17.00 -.48
DANG E-CDang 8.05 +.11
ETFC E-Trade 13.62 +.01
EBAY eBay 52.10 +.46
EMC EMC Cp 26.75 +1.42
EOG EOG Res 144.07 -4.57
ELNK ErlhLink 6.30 -.07
ETN Eaton 68.08 -.87
EOS EVEEq2 11.83 -.02
ECL Ecolab 93.68 -1.09
EW EdwLfSci 70.18 -.68
ELN Elan 14.73 +.63
EGO EldorGId g 7.67 -.44
EA ElectArts 25.41 +1.59
EMR EmersonEl 60.00 -.23
EDE EmpDist 24.05 -.11
EEP EnbrdgEPt 32.65 +.25
ENB Enbridge 44.83 -.55
ECA EnCanag 17.22 -.39
EXK EndvSilvg 3.85 -.26
ENR Energizer 105.80 +.15
ETP EngyTsfr 51.74 +.28
EBF Ennis Inc 18.43 -.21
ETR Entergy 70.42 -1.91
EPD EntPrPt 63.65 +.05
EVC Entravisn 5.21 -.69
EQR EqtyRsd 57.44 -1.31
ERIC Ericsson 11.68 +.02
EL EsteeLdr 64.71 -.24
EVR Evercore 45.29 +1.11
EXAS ExactSci h 13.17 -.31
XCO ExcoRes 8.42 -.17
EXEL Exelixis 5.16 -.28
EXC Exelon 31.18 -.92
EXPE Expedia 63.78
ESRX ExpScripts 66.82 -.45
XOM ExxonMbI 94.99 -.21
FFIV F5Netwks 81.42 +1.51
FTI FMCTech 56.11 -.99
FNB FNBCp PA 13.29 +.07
FB Facebook 26.51 +.38
FDO FamilyDIr 68.11 +.07
FAST Fastenal 45.45 -.94
FDX FedExCp 105.88 -.91
FNHC FedNatHId 10.45 +.01
FGP Ferrellgs 22.59 -.12
FNF FidlNFin 24.49 -.11
FSC FiflhStRn 10.85 -.06
FITB FiflhThird 19.59 +.17
FHN FstHorizon 12.55 +.18
FMD FstMarbhd 1.75 -.04
FNFG FstNiagara 10.78 +.07
FSLR FstSolar 46.76 -1.24
FE FirstEngy 38.24 -.93
FMER FstMerit 22.61 +.31
FLEX Flextrn 8.13
FLO FlowrsFd s 23.24 -.06
FLR Fluor 62.29 -.66
FL FootLockr 35.65 -.69
F FordM 17.37 +.43
FST ForestOil 4.98 -.19
FTNT Fortinet 21.35 -.08
FBHS FBHmSec 41.65 -.74
FREE FrSea rsh .28 -.01
FCX FMCG 28.88 -1.11
FSL Freescale 15.87 -.32
FTR FronterCm 4.28 +.03
FRO Frondine 2.73 +.36
FULT FultonFncl 12.80 +.16
G-H-I
GOM GMAC44 25.25 +.06
GNC GNC 46.64 -.36
GTAT GTAdvTc 4.95 -.11
GDV GabDvlnc 20.30 +.49
GGT GabMultT 9.93 -.01
GUT GabUtI 6.59 -.09
GALE GalenaBio 1.68 -.05
GME GameStop 43.24 +.82
GCI Gannett 26.15 +.20
GPS Gap 44.81 -.06
GRMNGarmin 36.91 -.59
GKNT Geeknet 14.66 +.18
GAM GAInv 33.30 -.21
GD GenDynam 85.31 +1.28
GE GenElec 24.62 -.09
GGP GenGrPrp 21.39 -.25
GIS GenMills 51.06 -.40
GM GenMotors 37.14 +.53
GEL GenesisEn 51.77 +.54
GNTX Gentex 22.03 -1.32
GNW Genworth 13.31 -.09
GGB Gerdau 6.45 +.05
GILD GileadSci s 59.88 +.76
GSK GlaxoSKIn 51.66 +.20
GRT GlimchRt 11.66 -.36


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


GFI GoldFLtd 5.80 -.22
GG Goldcrpg 28.36 -1.45
GS GoldmanS 165.04 -1.22
GDP GoodrPet 16.46 +.52
GT Goodyear 16.96 -.20
GOOGGoogle 902.90 -.90
GRA vjGrace 83.78 -.96
GPT GramrcyP 4.74 +.01
GRAM GranaM n 21.13
GPK GraphPkg 8.85 +.13
GNI GNIron 72.35 -.76
GXP GtPlainEn 24.17 -.36
GMCRGreenMtC 74.56 +.20
GWAYGrnwyMed 10.94 -.80
GEF GreifA 55.65 -.39
GRIF Griffin h 32.30 -.07
GRPN Groupon 8.70 -.16
TV GpTelevisa 26.10 +.12
GSH GuangRy 20.90 -.26
HCP HCP Inc 44.96 -1.31
HAIN HainCel 72.80 -.57
HK HalconRes 5.55 -.18
HAL Hallibrin 44.82 -.76
HBI Hanesbrds 57.58 +4.22
THG Hanoverlns 53.40 -.15
HSOL HanwhaSol 3.89 -.12
HOG HarleyD 55.86 -.10
HLIT Harmonic 7.70 +.74
HMY HarmonyG 3.81 -.18
HSC Harsco 25.40 -.54
HIG HartfdFn 31.21 -.36
HTS HatterasF 20.25 -2.46
HE HawaiiEl 26.57 -.43
HCN HItCrREIT 65.68 -2.17
HCSG HIlhCSvc 24.70 -.16
HMA HItMgmt 15.02 -.19
HR HIthcrRlty 26.56 -.15
HL HeclaM 3.19 -.12
HLF Herbalife 58.06 -1.05
HERO HercOffsh 7.09 -.60
HSY Hershey 92.87 -.72
HTZ Hertz 26.76 -.62
HES Hess 72.63 -.80
HPQ HewlettP 26.11 +.38
HSH Hillshire 34.80 -.19
HTH HilltopH 17.11 -.10
HIMX HimaxTch 7.59 +.32
HOLX Hologic 22.54 -.41
HD HomeDp 80.27 +.08
HMC Honda 38.83 -.20
HON HonwIllntI 83.01 -.26
HRL Hormel 41.16 -.25
HPT HospPT 28.02 -.76
HST HostHotls 18.04 -.31
HOV HovnanE 5.54 -.14
HNP HuanPwr 40.62 -1.30
HUB/BHubbelB 107.62 +.03
HCBK HudsCity 9.68 -.02
HBAN HuntBncsh 8.59 +.13
HII Huntgtnlng 63.34 +.08
HUN Huntsmn 17.65 -.07
IAG IAMGId g 5.15 -.29
IBN ICICI Bk 34.68 -.83
IGTE iGateCorp 21.53 -.25
ING ING 10.13
IRBT iRobot 33.40 -5.17
IAU iShGold 12.82 -.23
EWZ iShBrazil 44.29 -.87
EZU iShEMU 34.99 +.24
EWQ iSFrance 25.17 +.22
EWG iShGerm 26.36 +.07
EWH iSh HK 19.23 +.07
EWJ iShJapan 11.87 -.11
EWY iSh SKor 55.50 -.17
EWW iShMexico 67.21 -.45
EWT iSTaiwn 13.72 -.10
EWU iSh UK 18.92 -.06
SLV iShSilver 19.47 -.30
FXI iShChinaLC 34.34 -.36
IVV iSCorSP500169.47 -.60
EEM iShEMkts 39.69 -.41
LQD iShiBoxlG 114.71 -.56
ACWI iSh ACWI 52.61 -.21
TLT iSh20yrT 107.52 -1.38
EFA iSEafe 61.06 -.08
HYG iShiBxHYB 92.95 -.79
REM iShMtgRE 12.25 -.35
IWM iShR2K 103.59 -.87
PFF iShUSPfd 39.06 -.14
USMV iSUSAMinV 33.68 -.22
IYR iShREst 68.04 -1.35
ITB iShHmCnst 22.55 -.67
IDA Idacorp 52.08 -.85
ITW ITW 71.41 -.19
ILMN Illumina 81.57 +7.80
IBCP IndBkMI 8.03 +.09
NRGY Inergy 15.91 -.09
INFN Infinera 11.78 +.17
IR IngerRd 60.55 -.47
INGR Ingredion 63.77 -.44
IRC InlandRE 10.45 -.19
TEG IntegrysE 62.09 -.83
INTC Intel 22.93 +.18
ICPT Intercept n 47.21 -.25
ITMN InterMune 12.81 -.20
INAP InterNAP 8.71 -.06
IBM IBM 196.61 +1.63
IGT IntlGame 18.83 +.53
IP IntPap 47.21 +.33
IPG Interpublic 15.76 -.02
INTX Intersectns 9.42 +.14
INTU Intuit 63.11 -.66
ISRG IntSurg 383.96-10.66
IVZ Invesco 32.69 -.29
IVR InvMtgCap 16.34 -.46
ISIS Isis 28.51 -.61
ITUB ItauUnibH 12.86 -.39


HIGH
15602.60
6546.98
507.29
9682.11
3606.28
1698.38
1243.04
18006.00
1055.85


LOW
15496.84
6436.49
498.01
9586.39
3573.53
1682.57
1227.69
17828.23
1042.38


J-K-L
JDSU JDS Uniph 14.62 +.09
JPM JPMorgCh 56.63 -.04
JEC JacobsEng 59.39 -.09
JNS JanusCap 9.71 -.06
JBLU JetBlue 6.63 -.09
JNJ JohnJn 92.36 -.06
JCI JohnsnCtl 41.07 +.01
JONE JonesEn n 13.83
JOY JoyGlbl 48.37 -1.72
JNPR JnprNtwk 21.66 +.32
KBH KB Home 18.00 -.98
KFN KKRFn 10.77 -.23
KFH KKR Fn 41 27.59 -.16
KNDI KandiTech 4.73 -.18
KSU KCSouthn 110.81 -2.44
K Kellogg 66.87 -.36
KERX KeryxBio 8.80 +.31
KEG KeyEngy 6.50 -.11
KEY Keycorp 12.37 +.08
KMB KimbClk 97.85 -.35
KIM Kimco 22.55 -.60
KMP KindME 85.82 +.04
KMI KindMorg 38.76 -.54
KMI/WSKindrM wt 5.30 -.08
KGC Kinross g 5.36 -.31
KOG KodiakO g 9.40 -.05
KSS Kohls 53.59 +.05
KRFT KraftFGp n 56.44 -.76
KTOS KratosDef 7.03 -.03
KKD KrispKrm 19.65 -.01
KR Kroger 39.13 +.20
KLIC Kulicke 11.44 -.13
LTD L Brands 52.64 -.53
LLL L-3 Com 92.59 -.41
LDK LDK Solar 1.62 -.08
LSI LSI Corp 7.42 -.18
LTC LTCPrp 39.47 -1.08
LSTR Landstar 51.60 -.37
LVS LVSands 54.95 -.76
LHO LaSalleH 26.79 -1.08
LEAP LeapWirlss 17.12 -.08
LM LeggMason 34.03 -.85
LEN LennarA 33.92 -1.35
LVLT Level3 21.59 -.16
LXP LexRltyTr 12.76 -.13
USA LbtyASE 5.53 -.02
LBTYALibGlobA 80.44 -.57
LRY LibtProp 38.95 -1.38
LFVN Lifevantge 2.48 -.02
LLY LillyEli 52.55 +1.56
LLTC LinearTch 39.58 -.85
LINE LinnEngy 26.54 -1.10
LMT LockhdM 119.12 +1.20
LO Lorillard s 44.41 +.33
LPX LaPac 17.20 -.44
LOW Lowes 44.75 -.35
LL LumberLiq 92.61 +6.00
LUX Luxottica 52.31 +.05
LYB LyonBas A 67.42 -.48
M-N-0
MTB M&TBk 118.43 -.27
MCGCMCG Cap 5.34 -.08
MDC MDC 31.70 -1.99
MDU MDU Res 28.14 -.42
MFA MFAFncl 7.83 -.25
MTG MGIC 7.49 +.14
MGM MGM Rsts 16.07 -.05
M Macys 48.30 -.49
MHR MagHRes 3.82 -.11
MFB MaidenBrd 23.36 +4.27
MTW Manitowoc 20.03 -.41
MNKD MannKd 7.16 +.14
MFC Manulifeg 17.92 +.02
MRO MarathnO 36.81 -.92
MPC MarathPet 70.39 -1.38
GDX MktVGold 26.95 -1.40
OIH MVOilSvc 45.58 -.69
SMH MVSemi 38.07 -.47
RSX MktVRus 26.94 -.24
PRB MVPreRMu 24.60 +.02
MWE MarkWest 67.31 -.38
MAR MarlntA 40.37 -.58
MMC MarshM 41.53 -.20
MMLP MartinMid 46.12 -.20
MRVL MarvelIT 11.98 -.01
MAS Masco 20.57 -.55
MXIM Maximlntg 27.16 -.44
MDR McDrmInt 8.78 -.12
MCD McDnlds 96.66 -.10
MUX McEwenM 2.06 -.12
MJN MeadJohn 70.67 -.94
MWV MeadWvco 36.28 -.17
MTL Mechel 2.98 -.22
MPW MedProp 14.88 -.54
MDCOMediCo 29.73 -1.58
MDT Medtrnic 55.09 -.39
MRK Merck 47.77 -.16
MCY MercGn 45.05 -.68
MDP Meredith 47.40 -.29
MTH Meritage 45.03 -1.98
MTOR Meritor 7.72 -.13
MET MetLife 49.07 -.28
KORS MKors 63.89 +.49
MU MicronT 13.11 -.54
MSFT Microsoft 31.96 +.14
MVIS Microvis 2.30 -.10
MIDD Middleby 185.48 +.92
MSEX MdsxWatr 21.20 -.12
MOLX Molex 29.78 -.05
TAP MolsCoorB 49.89 -.74
MCP Molycorp 7.39 -.52
MDLZ Mondelez 30.80 -.28
MON Monsanto 101.74 -2.16
MCO Moodys 64.68 +2.37
MS MorgStan 27.73 -.08
MOS Mosaic 52.38 -1.07


CLOSE
15542.24
6442.17
499.70
9605.04
3579.60
1685.94
1229.85
17862.42
1043.83


%CHG.
-0.16%
-1.12%
-1.54%
-0.56%
+0.01%
-0.38%
-0.80%
-0.43%
-0.80%


MSI MotrlaSolu 56.04 -3.94
MWA MuellerWat 7.47 -.37
MYL Mylan 32.38 +.06
NPSP NPS Phm 18.48 +.40
NQ NOQ Mobile 12.78 +.70
NRG NRG Egy 27.43 -.51
DCM NTTDOCO 15.36 -.24
NVE NV Energy 23.62 -.03
NXPI NXP Semi 33.52 -.36
NBR Nabors 15.09 -.20
NBG NBGrcers 3.48 +.05
NFG NatFuGas 62.48 -.95
NGG NatGrid 59.00 -.04
NHI NtHIthlnv 64.02 -1.55
NOV NOilVarco 72.37 -.37
NKTR NektarTh 11.94 -.06
NEOG Neogen 56.21 -2.04
NTAP NetApp 41.27 +.36
NFLX Netflix 241.30 -8.96
NJR NJ Rscs 44.73 -.71
EDU NewOriEd 21.75 -.17
NRZ NewResdn 6.52 -.11
NYCB NYCmtyB 14.80 -.27
NYMT NYMtgTr 6.33 -.15
NCT Newcastle 5.77 -.12
NFX NewfdExp 26.48 -.41
NEWL NwLead hlf .16 +.00
NEM NewmtM 29.61 -1.53
NWSANewsCpAn 15.71 +.06
NWS NewsCpBn 15.92 +.07
NEE NextEraEn 83.76 -1.04
NI NiSource 30.59 -.56
NKE NikeB s 62.63 -.56
NTT NipponTT 26.69 -.20
NE NobleCorp 39.67 -.72
NOK NokiaCp 4.01 +.03
NAT NordicAm 10.24 +.25
NSC NorflkSo 74.66 -2.21
NU NoestUt 44.17 -.75
NTI NthnTEn 24.25 -.94
NOC NorthropG 90.30 +1.54
NRF NStarRIt 9.78 -.24
NWBI NwstBcsh 14.19 -.04
NWN NwstNG 44.45 -.60
NVS Novartis 72.71 +.01
NVAX Novavax 2.48
NVO NovoNord 165.58 +1.14
NUAN NuanceCm 19.08 +.12
NUE Nucor 45.84 -.66
NAD NuvDivA 12.87 -.17
JPZ NuvEqtP 12.64 -.02
NIO NuvMuOpp 13.10 -.22
NQM NvlQI 13.59 -.13
NMA NvMAd 12.50 -.16
NUW NvAMT-Fr 15.56 -.04
NNP NvNYP 13.81 -.08
NPP NuvPP 13.45 -.11
JPC NvPfdlnco 9.39
NPF NvPMI 12.49 -.19
NPI NuvPI 12.44 -.11
NPM NuvPl2 12.75 -.09
NPT NuvPl4 11.78 -.10
NQU NuvQInc 12.67 -.16
NVDA Nvidia 14.21
NXTM NxStageMd 13.94 +.06
OCZ OCZTech 1.62
OGE OGE Egys 36.92 -.40
OXY OcciPet 91.00 -1.03
OCFC OceanFst 17.49 +.05
ODP OfficeDpt 4.31 -.09
OIBR OiSAs 2.07 +.12
ONB OldNBcp 14.97 -.02
ORI OldRepub 13.87 -.14
OLN Olin 23.95 -.38
OHI OmegaHIt 32.90 -1.20
OME OmegaP 8.66 -.14
OCR Omncre 53.13 +2.39
ONNN OnSmcnd 8.04 -.08
OKS OneokPtrs 51.57 -.60
ONXX OnyxPh 130.74 +.43
OPK OpkoHlth 7.57 -.15
OPLK OplinkC 19.72 +.33
ORCL Oracle 32.39 +.32
OFIX Orthfx 28.21 -.37
OSK OhkshCp 40.62 -1.17
OTTR OfterTail 30.93 -.71
OC OwensCorn 39.35 -.48
P-Q-R
PCG PG&ECp 45.14 -.38
PNC PNC 77.10 -.04
PNM PNM Res 23.34 -.60
PKX POSCO 72.27 -.20
PPG PPG 157.08 -2.05
PPL PPLCorp 31.16 -.45
PACW PacWstBc 35.47 +.70
PCAR Paccar 56.20 -1.05
PEIX PacEthn rs 4.45 +.32
PAAS PanASIv 12.67 -.60
P Pandora 17.89 -.05
PNRA PaneraBrd 169.62-12.39
PKD ParkDrl 6.21 -.10
PH ParkerHan 101.31 -1.41
PTEN PattUTI 21.39 -.40
BTU PeabdyE 16.38 -.76
PBA Pembinag 31.41 -.25
PGH Pengrthg 5.73 -.17
PENN PnnNGm 49.52 -.46
PWE PennWstg 12.39 -.38
PNNT PennantPk 11.73 -.10
JCP Penney 15.92 -.18
PAG Penske 33.69 +.26
PNR Pentair 59.88 +.21
PBCT PeopUtdF 15.40 -.15
PBY PepBoy 12.29 -.08
POM PepcoHold 20.12 -.36
PEP PepsiCo 85.64 -.56
PRGO Perrigo 130.01 +.73


YTD
+18.61%
+21.40%
+10.29%
+13.76%
+18.55%
+18.21%
+20.52%
+19.12%
+22.90%


PETM PetSmart 71.15 -.62
PBR/A PetrbrsA 14.70 -.22
PBR Petrobras 14.31 -.33
PFE Pfizer 29.28 -.14
PM PhilipMor 88.54 -.24
PSX Phillips66 58.84 -.65
PNX PhnxCos rs 42.83 -.15
PNY PiedNG 34.60 -.48
PFN PimlncStr2 10.36 -.09
PNW PinWst 58.80 -1.17
PBI PitnyBw 14.54 +.02
PAA PlainsAA s 55.22 -.62
PCL PlumCrk 48.75 -.78
P11 Polaris 107.61 +1.59
PLCM Polycom 9.50 -1.69
POT Potash 37.94 -.16
PWER Power-One 6.34
BKLN PS SrLoan 24.96 -.03
QQQ PwShs QQQ74.50 +.24
PX Praxair 118.06 +1.06
PCP PrecCastpt 233.26 -2.48
TROWPriceTR 75.61 -3.98
PRA ProAssurs 53.79 -.77
PLD ProLogis 39.86 -.41
SH ProShtS&P 28.12 +.09
QID PrUShQQQ 21.62 -.12
SSO ProUltSP 84.67 -.64
UPRO PUItSP500s72.65 -.81
UVXY PrUVxST rs 42.00+1.03
UCO PrUltCrude 35.79 -1.30
AGQ ProUltSilv 17.91 -.54
PG ProctGam 80.27 -.68
PGR ProgsvCp 25.85 -.24
SDS PrUShSP rs 36.89 +.26
TBT PrUShL20 rs75.56 +1.87
SPXU PUSSP500 21.03 +.20
SQQQ PrUPShQQQ24.99 -.25
PSEC ProspctCap 10.96 -.14
PGRX ProspGIRs .08 -.00
PRU Prudentl 78.40 -.53
PEG PSEG 33.82 -.65
PSA PubStrg 159.12 -3.82
PHM PulteGrp 18.45 -.89
PMM PMMI 6.81 -.03
QEP QEP Res 30.26 -.23
QIHU Qihoo360 60.00 +2.31
QLIK QlikTech 31.47 +.71
QCOMQualcom 61.39 -.91
STR Questar 23.45 -.42
KWK QksilvRes 1.58 +.01
RFMD RF MicD 5.58 +.14
RDN RadianGrp 13.87 +.04
RSH RadioShk 2.65 -.13
RL RLauren 179.13 -1.01
RAVN Ravenlnds 31.14 -.02
RTN Raytheon 69.75 +.04
RLGY Realogy n 46.65 -2.42
RWT RedwdTr 16.61 -.14
RGP RegncyEn 28.10 +.08
RF RegionsFn 10.22 -.20
RS RelStlAI 68.79 -.79
SOL ReneSola 4.31 -.15
RGEN Replgn 9.77 +.03
RSO ResrceCap 6.47 -.08
ROIC RetailOpp 13.78 -.35
RVLT RevolutnL 4.78 -.42
RAI ReynAmer 50.35 -.44
RIO RioTinto 45.19 -.91
RAD RiteAid 2.90 +.03
RVBD RiverbedT 17.36 +.27
RHI RobtHalf 36.83 +.99
ROK RockwlAut 92.02 -1.02
COL RockColl 71.11 +.43
ROG Rogers 52.25 +.07
ROP Roper 131.76 -.24
RY RoyalBk g 62.84 -.38
RCL RylCarb 36.37 -.30
RDS/BRoyDShllB 71.25 +.04
RDS/A RoyDShllA 68.55 +.14
RYL Ryland 39.74 -1.45
S-T-U
STBA S&T Bcp 24.62 +1.17
SAI SAIC 14.84 +.21
SCG SCANA 51.87 -.91
SLM SLMCp 24.56 -.23
SM SM Energy 65.27 -1.71
DIA SpdrDJIA 155.10 -.26
GLD SpdrGold 127.48 -2.23
MDY SP Mid 223.63 -1.71
SPY S&P500ETF168.52 -.62
XHB SpdrHome 30.19 -.64
SJNK SpdrShTHiY 30.68 -.04
JNK SpdrLehHY 40.39 -.29
KRE SpdrS&P RB37.41 +.17
XRT SpdrRetl 80.35 -.53
XOP SpdrOGEx 61.58 -1.25
XME SpdrMetM 35.75 -1.26
STM STMicro 8.59 -.23
SBR SabnR 51.29 +.24
SWY Safeway 25.51 -.06
SAIA Saia Inc s 31.09 +.04
JOE SLJoe 22.25 -.03
SKS Saks 15.21 -.15
CRM Salesforcs 42.01 -.53
SLXP SalixPhm 71.90 +2.59
SBH SallyBty 29.60 -.22
SJT SJuanB 16.43 -.04
SNDK SanDisk 60.73 -1.45
SD SandRdge 5.36 -.19
SNY Sanof 52.85 +.14
SRPT SareptaTh 37.68 -8.75
SLB Schlmbrg 82.85 -.72
SCHWSchwab 22.11 -.37
SDRL SeadrillLtd 42.55 -.63
STX SeagateT 44.19 -1.12
SEE SealAir 26.73 -.30
SHLD SearsHIdgs 42.12 -.69


SRE SempraEn 85.96 -.89
SNH SenHous 26.35 -.59
SQNMSequenom 4.69 +.18
SHW Sherwin 172.06 +.26
SFL ShipFin 15.84 +.06
SID SiderurNac 2.85 -.11
SLW SilvWhtn g 22.77 -.83
SPG SimonProp 164.41 -1.57
SIRI SiriusXM 3.68
SWKS SkywksSol 24.51 +.26
AOS SmithAOs 41.21 +1.01
SMSI SmithMicro 1.26 -.01
SJM Smucker 109.51 -.17
SNA SnapOn 94.96 -.05
SODA SodaStrm 58.94 -.36
SLRC SolarCap 22.81 -2.22
SCTY SolarCity n 40.03 -.78
SON SonocoP 38.19 +.03
SONS Sonus 3.48 -.03
SNE SonyCp 22.81 -.20
SOR SourcC 64.89 +.41
SJI SoJerlnd 61.16 -.65
SO SouthnCo 45.04 -.58
SCCO SthnCopper 27.96 -1.17
LUV SwstAirl 13.76 -.13
SWN SwstnEngy 37.58 -.74
SSS SovranSS 69.84 -1.49
SE SpectraEn 35.71 -.27
SPR SpiritAero 24.08 +.27
SRC SpiritRCn 9.60 -.12
S Sprint n 5.77 -.08
PHYS SprottGold 10.97 -.23
XLB SP Mats 40.26 -.38
XLV SPHIthC 50.56 -.08
XLP SP CnSt 41.36 -.27
XLY SP Consum 59.25 -.20
XLE SP Engy 82.66 -.93
XLF SPDRFncl 20.64 -.15
XLI SP Inds 45.06 -.35
XLK SPTech 31.62 +.21
XLU SP UlI 38.85 -.60
SPF StdPac 8.21 -.43
SWK StanBlkDk 82.51 -1.38
SPLS Staples 16.12 -.44
SGU StarGas 4.97 -.08
SBUX Starbucks 66.61 -1.05
HOT StarwdHtl 63.32 -2.54
STWD StarwdPT 25.60 -.26
STT StateStr 69.67 -1.53
STLD StlDynam 15.45 -.20
SPH SubPpne 48.46 -.02
SUBK SuffolkBcp 18.68 +.05
SNHY SunHydrl 32.18 +.17
SU Suncorgs 31.83 -.47
SUNE SunEdison 9.66 -.34
SPWRSunPower 25.26 -.53
STP Suntech 1.50 +.06
STI SunTrst 35.09 -.07
SVU Supvalu 7.91 +.18
SWFT SwiftTrans 16.75 -.03
SYMC Symantec 24.12 +.20
SNV Synovus 3.36 +.09
SYY Sysco 34.43 -1.08
TMUS T-MobIUS n 24.21 -.01
TCP TCPpLn 50.08 +.15
AMTD TD Ameritr 26.73 -.47
TEL TE Connect 50.76 +2.81
TE TECO 17.46 -.27
TJX TJX 51.60 -.34
TSM TaiwSemi 17.02 +.28
TTWO TakeTwo 16.59 +.11
TLM TalismEg 11.79 -.08
TGT Target 73.32 +.07
TCO Taubmn 79.15 -1.46
VIV TelefBrasil 21.82 -.63
TEN Tenneco 48.84 -.76
TDC Teradata 57.71 +.35
TER Teradyn 17.29 -.42
TEX Terex 28.64 -.80
TNH TerraNitro 216.56 +1.56
TSLA TeslaMot 121.70 -1.04
TSO Tesoro 53.36 -.70
TEVA TevaPhrm 41.27 +.03
TXN Texlnst 38.93
TXRH TexRdhse 23.66 -.48
TGH Textainer 35.49
TXT Textron 27.92 -.99
TMO ThermoFis 90.61 +1.09
DDD 3DSyss 46.15 -.97
MMM 3MCo 116.33 -.42
TIBX TibcoSft 23.97 +.11
THI THortong 56.70 -.33
TWX TimeWarn 62.30 -.54
TKR Timken 59.94 -.79
TIVO TiVolnc 11.38 -.25
TOL TollBros 32.31 -2.12
TRU TorchEngy .45
TMK Torchmark 69.76 -.58
TD TorDBkg 85.37 +.14
TOT Total SA 52.97 +.17
TSS TotalSys 27.19 +1.19
TTHI TransitnTg 4.44 +.47
RIG Transocn 49.20 -.86
TRV Travelers 82.18 -.03
TY TriCont 18.59 -.13
TYp TriCntl pf 49.04
TSL TrinaSolar 7.13 -.14
TRIP TripAdvis 61.14 +.48
TQNT TriQuint 6.79 -.07
TSRX TriusTher 11.44 -.03
TRLG TrueRelig 31.85
TRST TrstNY 6.12 -.13
TUP Tuppwre 82.50 +2.52
FOXA 21stCFoxA 30.48 -.38
TWO TwoHrblnv 9.98 -.14
TYC Tycolnds 34.94 +.08
UDR UDR 25.35 -.58
UGI UGlCorp 41.18 -.55
UIL UlLHold 40.37 -.87


UNS UNSAEngy 50.79 -.84
LCC USAirwy 18.50 +.45
USU USECrs 13.35 +.89
USG USG 25.61 -.63
UPL UltraPtg 21.22 -.48
UA UnderArmr 61.83 -.07
UNF UniFirst 100.52 -.08
UN UnilevNV 40.79
UNP UnionPac 159.40 -2.26
UNT Unit 46.04 -.14
UAL UtdContl 34.97 +.41
UPS UPSB 86.98 -.53
URI UtdRentals 55.44 -.51
USB US Bancrp 37.54
UNG US NGas 19.64 -.15
USO USOilFd 37.40 -.69
X USSteel 18.68 -.40
UTX UtdTech 104.99 -.13
UNH UtdhlthGp 72.53 -.16
UVV UnvslCp 61.51 -.05

V-W-X-Y-Z
VFC VF Cp 196.71 +.53
VALE ValeSA 14.23 -.23
VALE/P Vale SApf 12.80 -.17
VLO ValeroE 34.60 -.73
VLY VlyNBcp 9.82 -.07
VVTV ValVis A 6.10 -.07
BSV VangSTBd 80.23 -.12
VTI VangTSM 87.21 -.35
VNQ VangREIT 71.06 -1.41
VWO VangEmg 39.92 -.49
VGK VangEur 51.69 +.13
VEA VangFTSE 37.89 -.04
VVC Vectren 35.93 -.84
VELT Velt 1.12 +.01
VE VeoliaEnv 12.93 -.10
VZ VerizonCm 50.38 +.02
VIAB ViacomB 72.61 -1.11
VVI ViadCorp 26.17 -1.00
VPHM ViroPhrm 34.30 +.05
V Visa 186.75 -1.83
VSH Vishaylnt 15.12 +.06
VVUS Vivus 13.40 -.34
VMW VMware 83.20+11.92
VOD Vodafone 29.61 -.24
VRNG Vringo 3.07 +.17
VMC VulcanM 48.93 -.74
WPC WP Carey 67.72 -1.43
WMT WalMart 78.23 -.32
WAG Walgrn 51.08 +.07
WLT WalterEn 11.53 -2.56
WCRXWarnerCh 20.08 +.03
WRE WREIT 27.68 -.54
WM WsteMInc 42.31 -.12
WAT Waters 100.31 +1.14
WFT Weathflntl 13.84 -.43
WBS WebsterFn 27.83 -.05
WRI WeinRIt 31.36 -.94
WLP WellPoint 87.44 -.07
WFC WellsFargo 44.31 -.26
WEN Wendys Co 7.12 -.11
WR WestarEn 33.46 -.35
EMD WAstEMkt 12.93 -.09
WIA WAstlnfSc 12.01 -.04
WDC WDigital 67.53 -.30
WNR WstnRefin 29.05 +.55
WU WstnUnion 17.44 +.06
WBK Westpac 136.56 -.72
WY Weyerhsr 28.86 -.47
WHR Whrlpl 129.82 -1.22
WWAVWhiteWvn 19.24 +.15
WFM WholeFd s 54.49 -.58
WMB WmsCos 33.44 -.85
WIN Windstrm 8.15 -.03
WEC WiscEngy 43.01 -.63
DXJ WTJpHedg 48.51 -.16
EPI WT India 16.61 -.14
WWD Woodward 41.49 -.90
WWE WIdW Ent 10.80 -.21
WYN Wyndham 61.24 +1.33
XL XLGrp 31.80 -.44
XEL XcelEngy 29.68 -.44
XRX Xerox 9.83 +.04
XLNX Xilinx 45.51 -.32
YHOO Yahoo 27.84 +.48
AUY Yamana g 10.77 -.62
YNDX Yandex 30.86 -.59
YGE YingliGrn 3.97 -.14
YORWYorkWater 21.29 +.12
YOKU YoukuTud 19.35 -.40
YUM YumBrnds 71.45 +1.02
ZHNE ZhoneTch h 3.01 +.79
ZMH Zimmer 84.04 -.46
ZION ZionBcp 30.06 +.16
ZTS Zoetsn 29.90 -.16
ZOLT Zoltek 13.63 -2.97
ZF ZweigFd 13.42 -.01
ZNGA Zynga 3.28 +.01


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cld Issue has been called for
redemption by company, d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the Amencan Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock
issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price., r Right to buy security at a specified price. rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distnb-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security. vI Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlning for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus
stock, c Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred, k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covenng
market costs is paid from fund assets. d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available. p previous day's net asset value. s fund
split shares during the week. x fund paid a distribution during the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


Interestrates


5 121



The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note rose
to 2.59 percent
Wednesday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


TREASURIES YEST PVS


NET 1YR
CHG AGO


3-month T-bill .02 0.01 +0.01 .09
6-month T-bill .06 0.06 ... .14
52-wk T-bill .12 0.11 +0.01 .17
2-year T-note .35 0.31 +0.04 .22
5-year T-note 1.38 1.31 +0.07 .54
10-year T-note 2.59 2.51 +0.08 1.39
30-year T-bond 3.65 3.58 +0.07 2.45


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.40 3.33 +0.07 2.19
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.16 5.11 +0.05 4.24
Barclays USAggregate 2.31 2.30 +0.01 1.72
Barclays US High Yield 5.82 5.83 -0.01 7.10
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.31 4.29 +0.02 3.27
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.57 1.53 +0.04 .80
Barclays US Corp 3.18 3.17 +0.01 2.98


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar rose
against the
euro, British
pound and other
major
currencies. The
dollar climbed
back above the
100 Japanese
yen level, up
from the 95-yen
level during
mid-June.





ETA


MAJORS CLOSE
USD per British Pound 1.5313
Canadian Dollar 1.0317
USD per Euro 1.3195
Japanese Yen 100.17
Mexican Peso 12.6362


CHG
-.0075
+.0036
-.0037
+.72
+.1410


EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST
Israeli Shekel 3.5853 -.0011
Norwegian Krone 5.9302 -.0018
South African Rand 9.7921 -.0010
Swedish Krona 6.5157 -.0017
Swiss Franc .9376 -.0031


ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


1.0917
6.1405
7.7579
59.136
1.2690
1119.80
29.95


%CHG
-.49%
+.35%
-.28%
+.72%
+1.12%

-.39%
-1.07%
-.98%
-1.11%
-.29%


+.0158 +1.45%
-.0010 -.02%
+.0003 +.00%
-.510 -.86%
+.0060 +.47%
+3.01 +.27%
-.01 -.03%


lYR.


1YR.
AGO
1.5504
1.0220
1.2061
78.18
13.7154

4.0728
6.1149
8.5325
6.9788
.9957


.9777
6.3872
7.7580
56.150
1.2621
1149.25
30.14


Commodities
The price of
crude oil fell
after a weak
report on
Chinese
manufacturing
activity raised
worries about
demand.
Natural gas and
the wholesale
price of gasoline
also fell.




Cl


FUELS
Crude Oil (bbl)
Ethanol (gal)
Heating Oil (gal)
Natural Gas (mm btu)
Unleaded Gas (gal)

METALS (
Gold (oz) 1
Silver (oz)
Platinum (oz) 1
Copper (Ib)
Palladium (oz)

AGRICULTURE
Cattle (Ib)
Coffee (Ib)
Corn (bu)
Cotton (Ib)
Lumber (1,000 bd ft)
Orange Juice (Ib)
Soybeans (bu)
Wheat (bu)


CLOSE PVS. %CHG %YTD


105.39
2.33
3.05
3.70
3.05

CLOSE
319.70
20.01
455.20
3.18
744.40

CLOSE
1.22
1.21
5.08
0.86
318.00
1.46
13.93
6.53


107.23
2.37
3.07
3.74
3.06

PVS.
1335.10
20.25
1442.10
3.20
738.55

PVS.
1.22
1.26
5.23
0.86
326.90
1.42
14.63
6.54


-1.72
-0.29
-0.73
-1.20
-0.14

%CHG
-1.15
-1.15
+0.91
-0.52
+0.79

%CHG
-0.27
-3.85
-2.73
+0.08
-2.72
+2.78
-4.79
-0.08


+14.8
+6.5
+0.1
+10.4
+8.6

%YTD
-21.2
-33.7
-5.4
-12.6
+5.9

%YTD
-6.4
-15.7
-27.2
+14.1
-15.0
+25.8
-1.9
-16.0






The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013 WORLD NEWS www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 7


I WORLD

Hezbollah chief:
EU yielded
to US, Israeli will
BEIRUT (AP) -The
leader of Lebanon's
Hezbollah on Wednesday
ridiculed a European
Union decision to place
the group's military wing
on a terror list, accusing
the body of capitulating
to U.S. and Israeli pres-
sures by blacklisting it.
Sheik Hassan Nasrallah
said the decision is
"worthless" and makes
EU countries partners in
any future Israeli aggres-
sion against Lebanon or
his militant group.
The EU's 28 foreign
ministers made the
announcement Monday
after prolonged diplo-
matic pressure from the
U.S. and Israel, both
which consider Hezbollah
a terrorist organization.
"I did not feel for one
moment that this was a
sovereign European deci-
sion, but rather one that
was dictated to them,"
Nasrallah said, speaking
to supporters in Beirut via
satellite link.
Spain passenger
train derails, killing
at least 35
MADRID (AP)--A
passenger train derailed on
a high-speed stretch of track
in northwestern Spain on
Wednesday night, killing at
least 35 people and leav-
ing dozens injured in the
country's worst rail accident
in decades, officials said.
Officials gave different
death tolls in the immediate
aftermath of the accident.
Alberto Nunez Feijoo,
president of the region
of Galicia, said at least 35
people aboard the train
were killed. Spain's leading
Cadena SER radio station
cited the president of the
Galicia's main court, Miguel
Angel Cadenas, at the scene
saying 56 people were
killed, but that could not be
independently confirmed.

Official: Man
fatally stabs 2
gov't staff in China
BEIJING (AP)-Aman
who was told by officials
they couldn't register his
fourth child because he
didn't pay a penalty for
breaking China's family
planning laws stabbed to
death two government
workers and injured four
others, state media and an
official said.
Footage of police trying
to subdue the man outside
a family planning office in
southern China's Guangxi
region while he still bran-
dished a machete was
widely available on Chinese
news websites and shared
on social mediaWednesday,
The incident this week is
one of a string of grievances
against symbols of authority
in China that have turned
violent in recent months.

Egypt imposes
tough Gaza
restrictions
GAZA CITY Gaza Strip
(AP) Egypt's new govern-
ment has imposed the
toughest border restric-
tions on the Hamas-run
Gaza Strip in years, sealing
smuggling tunnels, blocking
most passenger traffic and
causing millions of dollars
in economic losses.
Some in Hamas fear the
movement is being swept
up in the same Egyptian
military campaign that
earlier this month toppled
the country's democrati-
cally elected Islamist
president, Mohammed
Morsi- like the Gaza rulers


part of the region's Muslim
Brotherhood. Egypt's
military has said the Gaza
restrictions are part of its
security crackdown in the
Sinai Peninsula and has
not suggested it is trying to
weaken the Hamas govern-
ment or bring it down in the
process.


Lawyer: Snowden to stay in Russia


MOSCOW (AP) -
Edward Snowden may
be settling in for a
long stay in Russia,
his lawyer indicated
Wednesday, saying
the National Security
Agency leaker plans
to start studying the
Russian language and
culture and that, for the
time being, Russia is his
final destination.
Anatoly Kucherena's
comments came after
the lawyer met with
Snowden in the transit
zone of Moscow's
Sheremetyevo inter-
national airport amid
Russian news reports
that Snowden was about
to receive documents
that would allow him to
leave the airport where
he's apparently been
marooned for more than
a month.
Some Russian news
agencies cited unidenti-
fied sources as saying
Kucherena would
deliver the documents
to Snowden, but the
lawyer later said there
was no such paperwork.
Snowden has applied


In this image provided by Human Rights Watch, NSA leaker Edward Snowden, center, a
news conference at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport with Sarah Harrison of WikiLeaks,


for temporary asylum in
Russia.
In a meeting with
human rights activists
two weeks ago, Snowden
reportedly said he
eventually wanted to
visit Venezuela, Bolivia
and Nicaragua, all of
which have offered
him asylum. But
Kucherena cast doubt


on those intentions after
Wednesday's meeting.
"Russia is his final
destination for now. He
doesn't look further into
the future than that,"
Kucherena said on state
television.
The lawyer said that
Snowden is staying in
the transit zone "for
now" and "intends to


Snowden, who
revealed details of the
NSA's wide-ranging
spying activities target-
ing data and phone
communication, is
believed to have been
staying at the transit
zone of Moscow's
SSheremetyevo airport
a since June 23, when he
arrived on a flight from
Hong Kong.
Kucherena told
journalists that he has
brought fresh clothes
for Snowden along
with several books
for the American to
read, including one by
AP PHOTO Anton Chekhov and
attends a Fyodor Dostoyevsky's
.... ... novel "Crime and


letr, Friaay.


stay in Russia, study
Russian culture."
The American applied
for temporary asylum
in Russia last week after
his attempts to leave the
airport and fly out of
Russia were thwarted.
The United States
wants him sent home
to face prosecution for
espionage.


School principal arrested in children


NEW DELHI
(Washington Post) -
Police on Wednesday
arrested the principal
of the school in eastern
India where 23 children
died last week after
eating a free lunch that
was contaminated with
pesticides.
Meena Kumari had fled
soon after the children
fell ill on July 16 at their
rural school in Bihar
state. On Wednesday,
members of a special


investigative team de-
tained her as she was
going to a local court in
the town of Chapra to file
an application for bail in
anticipation of an arrest.
Investigators have
said that Kumari bought
ingredients for the school
lunch from her husband's
grocery store. Forensic
analysts said that the
food contained poison-
ous pesticides. Kumari's
husband has not been
arrested.


About 50 children,
most of them between
ages 5 and 12, fell sick
immediately after
eating the lunch and
were rushed to the local
hospital, but the facility
was not equipped to treat
all of them, some state
health officials said.
The school lunches
were part of a nationwide
midday-meal program
that covers more than
120 million schoolchil-
dren and was launched


a decade ago to boost
school attendance and
nutrition levels. But
cases of food poisoning
and unhygienic school
kitchen conditions are
common in India.
Kumari "is in police
custody, and they are
questioning her," said
Nitish Kumar, the chief
minister of Bihar, at
a news conference
in Patna, the state
capital. "All possible
angles will be probed


Punishment."
The novel is about
the mental anguish
and moral dilemmas
of a poor ex-student
who kills a pawn-
broker for her cash,
and Kucherena said
Snowden might find
it interesting. But the
lawyer told Rossiya-24:
"I'm not implying he's
going through a similar
mental anguish."


s deaths

by investigators. After
all, this huge tragedy
is not merely due to a
coincidence or mere
negligence. The children
had complained about
the food, but in spite of
their resistance, the food
was served to them. The
forensic report also says
that there was a high
concentration of pesti-
cide. Whoever is guilty,
whatever their motive
is, will be brought to
justice."


'The Smurfs 2' star finds magic

in everyday life with his family.


LOS ANGELES (LA
Times) On a mission
to hunt down long-
elusive Nazi fugitives,
Operation Last Chance
was launched in major
German cities Tuesday
by the Simon Wiesenthal
Center.
The center's director
for Israel, Efraim Zuroff,
pronounced the quest to
bring the remaining war
criminals to justice dur-
ing a news conference in
Berlin and in a campaign
manifesto issued in
Jerusalem.
Some 2,000 posters
have been affixed to
walls, billboards and
transit stops in Berlin,
Hamburg and Cologne,
offering rewards of as
much as 25,000 euros
($33,000) for informa-
tion resulting in the
capture, conviction and
yearslong incarceration
of those who provided
the manpower for the
Holocaust's killing
machines.
The campaign aims
to ferret out what Zuroff
said are at least 60 Nazi
officials still alive and in
sufficiently good health
to be prosecuted. The
posters, displaying a
chilling black-and-white
image of the railroad
entrance to the World
War II-era Auschwitz
death camp, declare that
the quest for justice is
"Late, but not too late."
The reinvigorated
effort to bring fugitives
to justice was inspired
by the 2011 conviction
of Ukrainian-born John
(nee Ivan) Demjanjuk on
thousands of counts of
complicity in murder for
the deaths that occurred
among Jewish prisoners
during his service at the


Treblinka, Majdanek
and Sobibor death
camps. His conviction
in a Munich courtroom,
which Demjanjuk was
appealing when he died
at 91 last year, was the
first achieved without
eyewitness testimony
to a direct role in the
killings.
"Ivan Demjanjuk
was the first Holocaust
perpetrator to be
convicted in Germany
in decades solely on
the basis of his service
in a death camp. This
conviction paves the way
for additional prosecu-
tions of individuals who
served in death camps,
as well as the members
of the Einsatzgruppen,"
Zuroff said, referring to
the Nazi regime's mobile
killing units.
Zuroff, the Los
Angeles-based Simon
Wiesenthal Center's
chief Nazi hunter since
the 2005 death of the
organization's founder,
said there were five key
objectives in the effort to
locate and prosecute the
remaining fugitives:
The passage of time
in no way diminishes the
guilt of the killers.
Old age should not
afford immunity to
murderers.
Every Nazi victim
deserves that an effort
be made to hold their
killers accountable.
The operation will
serve as a reminder
of the importance of
Holocaust crimes and a
warning to contempo-
rary anti-Semites and
racists.
Trials are helpful in
the ongoing struggle
against Holocaust denial
and distortion.


Nazi hunters

launch German

campaign


o The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


WIRE Page 7


www.sunnewspapers.net


WORLD NEWS






iPage 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER/STATE NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


TODAY




Partly cloudy, isolated
inland rain

88 / 750
20% chance of rain


FRIDAY


Sun & clouds,
scattered rain

88 / 740
50% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 88/75 storms all day possible
Sarasota 89/78 storms all day possible


ME SUN AND MOON
a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m. TheSun Rie Set
he higher theAccuWeather.com UVIndexm number, Today 6:49 a.m. 8:20 p.m.
he greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; Friday 6:50 a.m. 8:20 p.m.
*3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme. The Moon Rise Set
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive T 1 p ,
.ccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature Today 10:28 p.m. 9:53 a.m.
ased on eightweatherfactors. Friday 11:07 p.m. 10:54 a.m.
AIR QUALITY INDEX Last New First Full
.ir Quality Index readings as of Wednesday --
630 50 100150200 300 500
o so 10o i50 200 300 500 Jul29 Aug 6 Aug 14 Aug 20


0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: particulates
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees absent
Grass .
Weeds absent
Molds*o IM
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 900/760
Normal High/Low 92/740
Record High 970 (1998)
Record Low 680 (1978)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m. Wednesday 0.00"
Month to date 6.41"
Normal month to date 6.49"
Year to date 27.26"
Normal year to date 27.45"
Record 2.05" (1980)

MONTHLY RAINFALL


Record/Year
7.07/1979
11.05/1983
9.26/1970
5.80/1994
9.45/1991
23.99/1974
14.22/1995
15.60/1995
14.03/1979
10.88/1995
5.53/2002
6.83/2002
(since 1931)


Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 8:43a 2:30a 9:09p 2:56p
Fri. 9:40a 3:28a 10:05p 3:53p
Sat. 10:35a 4:23a 10:59p 4:47p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 6:15a
Fri. 6:42a
Englewood
Today 4:52a
Fri. 5:19a
Boca Grande
Today 3:57a
Fri. 4:24a
El Jobean
Today 6:47a
Fri. 7:14a
Venice
Today 3:07a
Fri. 3:34a


Low High Low

12:16a 5:32p 11:37a
12:49a 6:25p 12:39p

9:53a 4:09p 11:05p
10:55a 5:02p 11:37p

8:14a 3:14p 9:26p
9:16a 4:07p 9:58p

12:45a 6:04p 12:06p
1:18a 6:57p 1:08p

8:32a 2:24p 9:44p
9:34a 3:17p 10:16p


SATURDAY




Sun & clouds,
scattered rain

870/ 730
50% chance of rain


Cleanwaterl
90/78o






St. Petersburg
90/77


J I
Tampa
89/76


SUNDAY




Scattered rain &
storms

90 / 740
40% chance of rain

Plant City
-'91'755

JBrandun 1
92 74


MONDAY THE NATION


Scattered rain &
storms

910/740
40% chance of rain


Winter Hawen
90, 75


--


4' %
Bartuo
91, 75


Apollo Beach Ft. Mea
90 77 90 a74
- ,.,*--


Bradenton
89/78
Myakka C
Longboat Key M 91/76
89/79


Sarasota J
89/78

Osprey
90/78


Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.



Gulf Water
Temperature

860


-:44
I


Wauchula
90 75


SLimestone
a90 75


Arcadia
90 75


Venice
S90/77 North Poi 9Hull
91/76 90/75
Port Charlutte
I ,88 75
EngleA.od. -. --
90/77 -. r J
Punta Gorda
adical 90/75


90/76.
Boca Grande4
88/78


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2013

Publication date: 7/25/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
WSW 7-14 1-2 Light
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola


Fort Myers
88/75

Cape Coral Lehigh Acres
88/75 89/74


Sanibel
87/78


W 8-16 1-3 Light AccuWe


Bonita Springs j
88/75 .. .. .


ather.com


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today Fri.
i Lo W Hi Lo W
2 75 t 92 74 t
9 78 t 91 76 t
) 78 t 91 77 t
) 75 pc 90 74 t
) 74 t 90 74 t
) 76 pc 89 75 t
8 75 t 91 75 t
9 71 t 89 71 t
) 73 t 94 71 t
) 73 t 92 73 t
7 81 pc 87 77 t


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
88 82 pc
90 75 t
90 75 t
90 74 t
89 75 pc
88 76 pc
90 72 t
90 71 t
90 75 t
90 75 t
91 75 t


Fri.
Lo W
77 pc
74 t
74 t
74 t
75 t
75 t
71 t
72 t
74 t
74 t
77 t


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
88 75 pc 88 75 t
89 74 t 89 74t
90 77 t 91 75t
90 76 t 93 75 t
89 78 t 91 76t
94 72 t 95 72 t
89 76 t 91 76t
88 74 t 89 74t
89 72 t 90 72 t
88 75 pc 89 74t
90 75 t 92 74t


-0s *Os Os I 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 190s M
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.
battlee WnnIg
^ .i .... '. ': ^ '' 7655 .Montreal .
ings M'' nepoell Toronlo 354

SChicago 7M ..

* s FnFrancisco' .'.:: ::'. e r. ; 7860 rWainihgt6l :::
6R '5 ,:a.. ..... ,, .. .... .. .
Kansas City
i L. .. . 8 7 .. ..a. .


i. u^ ^ *:::. ::
,.... ElP ls

S Miamn
.onrerrey '89/75

Fronts Precipitation
*** &.&& TT 7 ] M F- E5 3 6
Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states yesterday)


High ................... 1090 at Needles, CA


8
Th
th
3
Re
A
b

A
Air


WORLD C


City
Amsterdam
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Dublin
Edmonton
Halifax
Kiev
London
Madrid


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
84 68 t 90 69 t
72 61 pc 71 60 pc
88 70 t 90 72 pc
82 62 pc 82 65 pc
86 59 pc 85 56 s
90 66 pc 91 69 s
98 67 pc 99 67 s
74 64 r 74 64 r
74 55 s 81 66 pc
74 53 s 80 59 s
80 56 s 85 63 s
84 66 t 86 67 pc
79 63 s 81 63 c
79 58 s 83 60 s
75 58 s 81 63 pc
90 70 t 89 70 pc
78 57 s 83 62 pc
74 54 pc 78 57 c
102 79 pclO 76 t
88 59 t 87 59 t
84 67 pc 80 57 t
78 60 s 81 64 pc
75 53 t 67 48 pc
75 52 pc 77 54 s
78 52 t 69 50 s
72 59 c 81 61 c
91 57 pc 93 59 s
87 74 s 88 74 s
100 76 s 100 77 s
78 60 s 81 66 pc

CITIES
Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
76 64 sh 82 66t
111 83 s 112 82 s
94 74 c 87 76 r
81 60 c 84 65 pc
57 48 s 59 46 s
94 73 s 96 73 s
69 51 t 79 51 pc
90 74 pc 92 73 pc
70 56 sh 70 56 sh
72 50 s 77 50 c
71 62 r 69 61 r
74 62 sh 75 61 sh
75 59 sh 81 61 pc
97 68 s 95 66 s


Low ....................... 370 atW alden, CO


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
94 68 pc 94 72 pc
86 67 pc 84 60 t
85 63 pc 87 68 s
105 89 pc 104 90 s
82 65 pc 82 65 pc
81 61 s 86 63 s
88 68 pc 88 68 s
76 66 s 81 61 t
82 61 t 73 54 pc
92 69 t 93 71 pc
85 61 s 88 65 s
94 77 pc 95 77 t
74 66 r 79 67 c
82 72 r 83 68 pc
93 74 pc 87 69 r
86 66 t 84 55 t
79 66 c 82 67 c
105 89 t 105 88 s
76 56 s 81 63 s
74 59 c 75 60 c
86 56 s 84 54 s
74 62 r 79 65 r
84 66 t 88 67 pc
91 70 t 96 72 s
83 65 s 85 69 t
100 77 s 99 78 s
75 67 pc 75 67 pc
69 55 pc 67 55 pc
81 57 s 80 55 s


Washington, DC 82 67 pc 83 68 pc


City
Mexico City
Montreal
Ottawa
Paris
Regina
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
St. John's
San Juan
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Winnipeg


Today
Hi Lo W
75 53 t
73 54 s
76 55 s
83 65 sh
67 45 pc
71 63 sh


Fri.
Hi Lo W
77 53 t
77 59 s
78 60 s
90 69 t
69 50 s
71 63 sh
90 72 s
75 53 c
88 77 pc
66 43 pc
90 75 t
78 63 s
74 56 s
67 47 s


Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Fears over Zimmerman


verdict riots prove overblown


TODAY, JULY 25


TAKE AN EXTRA


ENTIRE STOCK

PERMANENTLY REDUCED

HANDBAGS JEWELRY WATCHES

LADIES ACCESSORIES LINGERIE

MEN'S APPAREL HOME


TAKE AN EXTRA


O ^ENTIRE STOCK
% PERMANENTLY
REDUCED
LADIES APPAREL
JUNIORS APPAREL

1 OFF CHILDREN'S APPAREL
LADIES, MEN'S &
CHILDREN'S SHOES


I a n 1 se I Is lyoldm e .


(AP) -The predic-
tions were dire: Black
people would bum and loot
America's cities if George
Zimmerman was found not
guilty. White people every-
where would be attacked
in revenge for the killing of
Trayvon Martin.
Judging from water-
cooler conversations, social
media and viral emails,
many people took these
warnings seriously -yet
they proved to be largely
wrong.
Community leaders and
scholars say the overwhelm-
ingly peaceful response
to the Zimmerman
verdict reflects increased
opportunities for African-
Americans, the powerful
image of a black president


voicing frustration with the
verdict, and the modem
ability to create change
through activism and social
media rather than a brick.
"There was the assump-
tion that black people,
Latino people, inner-city
people are inherently vio-
lent, and that's the farthest
thing from the truth," says
Kevin Powell, whose BK
Nation advocacy group
helped organize peaceful
marches involving thou-
sands of people in New
York City. "They need to
stop racially stereotyping
people," Powell says. "It's
the same thing George
Zimmerman was engaging
in. To automatically assume
an explosion from the
Zimmerman verdict I
don't think they understand
black people."
The talk of violence
originated long before the
verdict with some conserva-
tive commentators, who


7 wJ' ,I said riots should be blamed
on liberals who distorted
. facts to make Zimmerman
S L'' look guilty. "Media's dishon-
...5 est motives in Trayvon
II YouSpend Here It Stays Here Martin case could end in
S www.puntagodchambercom riots," read one headline on
|_ _Glenn Beck's website.

Premie Lase 6u *rey rvie


Speculation intensified
when news broke that
Florida police were prepar-
ing for possible unrest.
Pundits highlighted dozens
of tweets from average citi-
zens threatening violence if
Zimmerman was acquitted.
Reminders circulated about
a handful of "this is for
Trayvon" assaults by black
people when the case first
gained national notice.
"I fully expect organized
race rioting to begin in
every major city to dwarf
the Rodney King and the
Martin Luther King riots,"
wrote former police officer
Paul Huebl. "If you live in
a large city be prepared to
evacuate or put up a fight to
win. You will need firearms,
fire suppression equipment
along with lots of food and
water."
In the week after the
verdict, amid peaceful
protests involving tens of
thousands of people across
the country, there was some
violence.
In Oakland, protesters
broke windows, vandalized
a police car and started
street fires. In Los Angeles,
people splintered off two
peaceful protests to smash
windows, set fires, attack
pedestrians and assault po-
lice with rocks and bottles.
About 50 teenagers took
the subway to Hollywood
to rob pedestrians; 12 were
arrested.
Individual attacks were
reported in Mississippi,
Milwaukee and Baltimore,
where black people were
accused of assaulting
two white people and a
Hispanic in Martin's name.
Overall, the response to
the Zimmerman verdict was
nothing like the massive
1992 Los Angeles uprising
that killed 53 people.


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature


Month 2013
Jan. 0.43
Feb. 2.12
Mar. 1.98
Apr. 3.06
May 2.76
Jun. 10.50
Jul. 6.41
Aug.
Sep.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Year 27.26


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis











SPORTS


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SuncoastSports @SCMG_Sports


Donovan's two goals lead
U.S. into Gold Cup final,
*Page 5


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* NFL: Tampa Bay Buccaneers



Bucs reward Williams


Receiver signs
six-year deal
worth $40.25M
By STEPHEN F. HOLDER
and RICK STROUD
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA- Mike
Williams could be a Buc
for life.
The talented young
receiver and the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers agreed to
a six-year contract exten-
sion that the club said is
worth $40.25 million, a


big reward for a home-
grown player who has
consistently produced.
Of that sum, $15 million
is guaranteed, mostly
through base salaries and
roster bonuses.
Players reported for
training camp this morn-
ing, and signing Williams
to his extension wraps up
the team's most signifi-
cant piece of outstanding
business before getting
back to football. It also
eliminates any chance of
a distraction for Williams.
"I'm relieved," Williams
said. "It was in the back


INSIDE
Bucs will wait to determine
Revis'playing time, PAGE 6

of everybody's mind.
Everybody kept bringing
it up. If I dropped a pass
(people would ask), am I
thinking about that? I just
want to go out and play,
and now that's what I can
do."
The Bucs and Williams'
agent have been in
discussions for more
than a year, general
manager Mark Dominik


said, aiming to strike a
deal that would prevent
Williams from becoming
a free agent next spring.
"I'm excited for Mike,
I'm excited for our
football team and I'm
excited for our commu-
nity, because he's a big
part of why we're building
an explosive offense,"
Dominik said. "Mike just
finished his third season
and is already in our
top 10 as far as scoring
touchdowns."
Despite the long
WILLIAMS 16


AP FILE PHOTO


Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Mike Williams makes a
catch against the Denver Broncos last season. Williams agreed
to a six-year deal worth $40.25 million Wednesday.


* MLB: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 1


AP PHOTO
Tampa Bay Rays utilityman Ben Zobrist bunts to load the bases in the third inning of Wednesday's game against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park in Boston.




DOUBLE DOSE OF DAZZLE

Escobar shows snazzy glove work, Price quiets Red Sox


By MARC TOPKIN
TAMPA BAY TIMES
BOSTON Shortstop Yunel
Escobar made the dazzling play
that had people talking, tweeting
and tuning in to the highlight
shows after Wednesday's game.
But David Price deserved the
headlines after another stellar
performance in leading the Rays
to a 5-1 win over the Red Sox.
The Rays moved back to within
a half-game of American League
East-leading Boston with a


chance to take over first in to-
night's series finale with Jeremy
Hellickson facing John Lackey
- as they won for the 19th time
in their past 22 games and 22nd
in 27, improving to 60-42. Since
a 14-18 start, they are a major-
league-best 46-24 and overall are
on a pace for 95 wins.
Escobar made arguably the
Rays' most dazzling play of the
season to start a double play in
the fourth. He went to his left to
snare Dustin Pedroia's grounder


then in one smooth motion
flipped it behind his back
directly from his glove to second
baseman Ben Zobrist, who made
a barehanded grab and relayed
to first.
Escobar punctuated the play
with his now standard celebra-
tory move, a mock 3-point shot
from the outfield grass. His
teammates opted for more tra-
ditional congratulations, taking
turns high-fiving as he came off
DOUBLE 13


RAYS AT RED SOX
WHO: Tampa Bay (60-42)
at Boston (61-42)
WHEN: Today, 7:10 p.m.
WHERE: Fenway Park, Boston
PITCHERS: Jeremy Hellickson (9-3,4.62)
vs. John Lackey (7-7, 2.95)
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM, 1480 AM,
1530 AM, 1580 AM
INSIDE: Rays top pitching prospect
undergoes Tommy John surgery, PAGE 3


By GREG ZECK
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE Coming
off his best start of the season,
Charlotte pitcher Felipe Rivero
entered Wednesday's game look-
ing to build some momentum.
And through the first five
innings against Dunedin, he was
well on his way.
But it came to an abrupt
end in the fifth and sixth when


Rivero allowed seven runs, help-
ing the Blue Jays win 8-5 over
the Stone Crabs at Charlotte
Sports Park to split a four-game
series.
Leading up to the trouble-
some two innings, Rivero had
looked as good as he had all
season, according to Charlotte
manager Brady Williams.
"His overall stuff, and
demeanor, command, it was


probably one of his best out-
ings," Williams said. "Even
though the linescore doesn't
say it, his pitch count was low
and there was a lot of easy outs.
There was just a couple mistakes
where you kind of tip your hat to
their hitters."
Rivero cruised through the
first in eight pitches, and had a
double play in the second before
CRABS 13


STONE CRABS AT
YANKEES
WHO: Charlotte (18-13) at Tampa (14-15)
WHEN: Today, 7 p.m.
WHERE: Steinbrenner Field, Tampa
RADIO: stonecrabsbaseball.com
TICKETS: 813-673-3055
INSIDE: Crabs starter Hahn dealing with
"dead arm," PAGE3


* NFL COUNTDOWN:
Jacksonville Jaguars

32 TEAMS
IN 32 DAYS
Counting down to the Aug. 8
NFL preseason openers, The Sun
will feature an NFL team each day
through Aug. 7.
Friday: Pittsburgh Steelers
Today: Jacksonville Jaguars
Wednesday: Green Bay Packers
Tuesday: Indianapolis Colts
Monday: Detroit Lions



Jaguars


starting


from


scratch

By MARK LONG
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JACKSONVILLE It's
hard to believe the
Jacksonville Jaguars
reached two AFC cham-
pionship games in the
1990s.
Since, they have
reached the playoffs
twice, the last time fol-
lowing the 2007 season.
Don't expect them to
return any time soon.
After the worst season
(2-14) in franchise history,
the Jaguars fired general
manager Gene Smith and
coach Mike
Mularkey
and started
revamping
the roster.
New gen-
eral man-
ager Dave
BRADLEY Caldwell and
first-year
coach Gus Bradley parted
ways with more than two
dozen veterans and
several others could be
on the chopping block as
training camp opens today.
The turnover has left
the Jaguars with one of
the youngest teams in the
league.
Although coaches and
players believe anything
could happen in 2013, the
reality is that the Jaguars
are in the early stages of
another rebuilding proj-
ect. They want to mold
the roster through the
draft, which takes time,
and owner Shad Khan is
willing to be patient.
That could mean an-
other long season for the
Jaguars, who have missed
the playoffs 11 of the last
13 years.
"The stage we're in at
this point is going to be a
JAGUARS16


INDEX I Lottery 2 1 Community Calendar 2 1 Auto racing 2 1 College football 2 1 Baseball 3-4 1 Scoreboard 5 | Quick Hits 5 | Soccer 5 | NFL 6


Thursday, July 25, 2013


* FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE: Dunedin 8, Charlotte 5


Rivero unravels after strong start, Crabs lose






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, July 25, 2013
ECOLLEGEFOOTBALL


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com
* CASH 3
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PAYOFF FOR JULY 23
1 5-digitwinner.............$193,873.69
299 4-digit winners..............$104.50
8,756 3-digit winners ...............$9.50
* MEGA MONEY
July 23.................. ...... 5-14-17-21
M egaBall.............................. .....6....

July 19........ .....6-24-30-39
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PAYOFF FOR JULY 23
0 4-of-4 MB ...................... $550,000
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957 2-of-4 MB....................... $25.50
* LOTTO
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0 6-digit winners........................ $38M
35 5-digit winners.................. $5,076
2,001 4-digit winners ..................$72
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PAYOFF FOR JULY 20
0 5 of 5 + PB......................... $141M
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* MEGA MILLIONS
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PAYOFF FOR JULY 23
0 5 of5 + MB.....................$13M
0 5 of 5 ............. ............ $250,000
1 4of5 + MB.....................$10,000
25 4 of 5 .................................. $150

Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call Mark
Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must contain
name, address and phone number.
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an Away at College item: Email to
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com. The name and number of a contact
person is required.
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to golfscores@sun-herald.com. Scores
appear in the weekly Herald sections.

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Follow us on Twitter @SCMGSports.
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Stone Crabs information:
http://www.suncoastsportsblog.com


Contact us

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mlawrence@sun-herald.com

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mbambach@sun-herald.com

Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com


Rob Shore Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
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Imyers@sun-herald.com
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gzeck@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL:



MEYER'S IRE

Ohio State coach faces new

questions about discipline


By JAY COHEN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO Urban
Meyer was hailed as a
savior when he agreed
to take over Ohio State
in the wake of the tattoo
scandal that sullied the
program. That support
became even more fren-
zied when he coached the
Buckeyes to a 12-0 record
in his first season.
Like Meyer said
Wednesday at the Big
Ten media days, it's been
a great year right up
until last weekend.
Running back Carlos
Hyde, star cornerback
Bradley Roby and two
freshmen were disci-
plined by the school after
a run of legal problems
that brought to mind the
end of Jim Tressel's time
in Columbus, and once
again raised questions
about Meyer and how he
disciplines his players.
"When a mistake
happens or something
happened, you have to
react and get it done,"
Meyer said. "So I'm disap-
pointed. I think furious
might be the word that
would best describe when
I first got the phone call,
because, like I said, for 12
months it's been really,
really good."


Hyde, who had a team-
high 17 touchdowns last
season, was suspended
indefinitely after he was
named a person of inter-
est in an investigation
into an alleged assault of
a woman at a downtown
Columbus bar early
Saturday morning. Roby
was one of the players
selected to represent
Ohio State at the kickoff
event in Chicago, but he
was pulled after he was
arrested in Bloomington,
Ind., and accused of
misdemeanor battery.
Tight end Marcus
Baugh also was suspend-
ed from all team activi-
ties, and Meyer decided
to send defensive line-
man Tim Gardner back
home to Indianapolis.
Baugh was arrested last
weekend for underage
possession of alcohol and
possessing a fake identi-
fication, and Gardner was
charged Saturday night
by Columbus police with
obstruction of official
business.
"I don't know that you
can really blame a guy
going out and making
a poor choice on coach
Meyer because of free
will," offensive tackle Jack
Mewhort said. "He did
not walk in with us every-
where we go, telling us to


* AUTO RACING:


AP FILE PHOTO
Jimmie Johnson, left, talks with crew chief Chad Knaus prior to
the 2012 Sprint Cup race at Phoenix International Raceway.


Knaus appears


calm, carries on


By JENNA FRYER
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Chad Knaus, with five
championships and
62 victories as Jimmie
Johnson's crew chief,
always appears unflap-
pable at the race track.
He walks with con-
fidence and seems to
effortlessly lead his team
through times of crisis.
Is it really just a facade?
That's the impres-
sion Knaus gave this
week leading up to the
Brickyard 400, where they
seek a record-tying fifth
victory at Indianapolis
Motor Speedway.
"It's kind of funny, I
always am in just a semi-
state of a little bit of fear,"
Knaus admitted. "I'm not
going to lie I fear the
fact that one day, we'll
never win a race again. I
fear the fact that one day
I won't work with Jimmie
again. I fear the fact that
one day, I won't have
this amazing facility at
Hendrick Motorsports to
work in. And I try to work
as hard as I can every
single day to go out there
and win races, because
I know at some point in
time, it's going to go away.
And you just can't take
anything for granted."
Johnson and Knaus
have taken nothing for
granted since they were
paired by Rick Hendrick as
the nucleus of the startup
No. 48 team in 2002.
Knaus was relentless in


his preparation and had
Johnson in Victory Lane
10 races into their rela-
tionship. There were three
wins that rookie year and
a shot at a championship,
which made Knaus push
even harder.
But in 2005, tension
fueled in part by Knaus'
relentless drive, nearly
fractured the team. A tire
issue caused Johnson
to crash in the finale,
finish fifth in the stand-
ings and led Hendrick to
force his driver and crew
chief to examine their
relationship.
Five championships
and 44 wins later, the
two are the longest active
crew chief and driver
pairing in NASCAR and
show no signs of letting
up. Johnson heads into
Sunday's race with four
victories and a 56-point
lead over Clint Bowyer in
the standings.
"It's like any other
relationship, it grows and
there's an ebb and flow
of good times and bad,"
Knaus said.
"Now we are to the
point where I can under-
stand how off we are with
the race car based on his
body language and what
he says and his feedback.
And he can definitely see
with my feedback and
my body language and
the tone of my voice, he
knows what's happening
from my perspective. It's
a lot of different levels, it's
pretty good for us."


Ohio State coach Urban Meyer speaks during a news conference
at the Big Ten football media day Wednesday in Chicago.


do this and that. He has a
set of core values in place
and we know them and
we're told them every day.
We know as players that
if we violate them we're
going to be held account-
able for our actions."
The off-the-field
problems come with
Meyer facing questions
about his relationship
with Aaron Hernandez
while the tight end
played for him at Florida.
Hernandez has been
arrested and charged with
murder in Massachusetts.
Asked what it was like
to hear his name men-
tioned in connection with
Hernandez in the wake
of the charges, Meyer
responded: "I felt awful.
It's a sick feeling. Your
thoughts and prayers
are with the family of
the victims. Every player
situation, every recruit
situation, all I know is (it)
will always be in the back
of my mind. That's all I
can say."
Ohio State was barred
from postseason play
last year as part of its



THIS WEEK ON
TRACK
NASCAR SPRINT CUP
BRICKYARD 400
Where: Indianapolis Motor
Speedway (oval, 2.5 miles)
When: Friday, practice (Speed,
11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.); Saturday,
practice (ESPN2, 9-11 a.m.), qual-
ifying (ESPN, 2-4 p.m.); Sunday,
race, 1 p.m. (ESPN, noon-5 p.m.)
Distance: 400 miles, 160 laps.
Defending champion:
Jimmie Johnson
Online: www.nascar.com

NATIONWIDE INDIANA 250
Where: Indianapolis Motor
Speedway (oval, 2.5 miles)
When: Friday, practice (Speed,
10:30-11:30 a.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, noon-2 p.m.);
race, 4:30 p.m. (ESPN, 4-7 p.m.).
Distance: 250 miles, 100 laps.
Defending champion:
Brad Keselowski
Online: www.nascar.com

FORMULA ONE
HUNGARIAN GRAND PRIX
Where: Hungaroring (road
course, 2.72 miles), Budapest
When: Friday, practice (NBC
Sports, 8-9:30 a.m.); Saturday,
practice, qualifying (NBC Sports,
8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(NBC Sports, 7:30-10:30 a.m.;
1-4 p.m.).
Distance: 190.53 miles, 70 laps.
Defending champion:
Lewis Hamilton
Online: www.formulal.com

NHRA MELLOYELLO DRAG
RACING SONOMA NATIONALS
Where: Sonoma (Calif.) Raceway
When: Friday, qualifying;
Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2,
7-9:30 p.m.); Sunday, final elimi-
nations (ESPN2, 8-11 p.m.).
Defending champion:
Antron Brown (Top Fuel), Johnny
Gray (Funny Car), Allen Johnson
(Pro Stock), Eddie Krawiec (Pro
Stock Motorcycle)

ALSO
Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car
Series: Brickyard Grand Prix,
Friday (Speed, 7:30-11 p.m.),
Indianapolis Motor Speedway,
www.grand-am.com
ARCA Racing Series: Barbera's
Autoland 150, Sunday, New
Jersey Motorsports Park, Millville,
N.J., www.arcaracing.com
U.S. Auto Racing Club: Silver
Crown, Saturday, Lucas Oil
Raceway, Clermont, Ind.,
www.usacracing.com
World Of Outlaws:
Sprint Car, Saturday, Drum-
mondville, Quebec, and Sunday,
Cornwall, Ontario. Late Model,
Saturday, Fairbury, Ill.,
www.worldofoutlaws.com


punishment for a mem-
orabilia-for-cash scandal
that led to the resignation
of Tressel. Luke Fickell
coached the Buckeyes for
a year before Meyer took
the reins of the storied
program after taking a
season off.
Meyer spent six years at
Florida, winning national
titles in 2006 and 2008.
He also had 25 players
account for 31 arrests
during his tenure with the
Gators.
While Meyer said he
isn't worried about his
reputation, he acknowl-
edged that the criticism
over disciplinary issues
still stings.
"I'm a human, so it
does," he said. "I don't
read. I don't really get
involved with following
stuff, because I think
people need to get facts
before they start just
making accusations and
those type of things. I'm
human and I think that
is something that I'm
constantly evaluating and
making sure we are doing
the right thing."


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


BASEBALL

Charlotte Thunder fall
tryouts: Starting July 29, 6:30 p.m.
to 9 p.m., North Charlotte Regional
Park. Tryouts will be ongoing Monday,
Wednesday and Friday nights in
August, 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Teams
will be formed in 9-,11-,12- and
13-under(age as of May 1, 2014).
There is no fee to tryout. Call Chris,
941-769-7870 or email cbmoc@gmail.
com.

Pro Sports Academy
fundamentals camp: Open to
ages 7-12, Mondays and Wednesdays,
9 a.m.-noon, through July. Cost: $65
per week. Call Ray, 941-505-2551.

FGCU camps: Prospects (Aug.
1-3). at Swanson Stadium on FGCU
campus. Cost: Aug. prospect camp:
$295/commuters and $395/resident;
July youth camp: $250. Players must
bring own equipment. To register,
logon to collegebaseballcamps.com/
fgcu or contact Jon Moore, 239-590-
7059 or jomoore@fgcu.edu.

IRONPIGS tryouts: Travel
teams for 9U,10U,11U,12U,13U,
and 14U age groups, Aug. 3-4,10
a.m. to noon, at 1185 O'Donnell Blvd.,
Port Charlotte. No fee for tryouts.
Call Wayne, 941-626-1274 or email
waynel harrell@yahoo.com.

BASKETBALL
Rising Stars clinic: Second
and fourth Thursday of each month
through Aug. 22 from 6-8 p.m. at the
Morgan Family Community Center
in North Port. For kids K-5. Cost: $5
drop-in fee or $25 for entire session.
Call 941-429-7275 or wivist www.
cityofnorthport.com to register.

BOXING
Youth and adult classes:
Male and female. Monday-Friday, 6-8
p.m., at 24710 Sandhill Blvd. in Deep
Creek. Training and/or competition.
Member of USA Boxing. Call 239-292-
9230 or visit CharlotteHarborBoxing.
com, www.facebook.com/
CharlotteHarborBoxingGymnasium.

CHEERLEADING
YMCA fall registration:
ongoing, open to Charlotte County
youth age 5-12. Register at Franz
Ross Park YMCA or online at Charlot-
teCountyYMCA.com. Call 941-629-
9622.

FALL SPORTS
YMCA registration:
ongoing for soccer, T-ball, kickball;
open to Charlotte County youth
age 3-5. Register at Franz


Ross Park YMCA or online at
CharlotteCountyYMCA.com. Call
941-629-9622.


KICKBALL
CC Adult Sports: Games at
7 p.m. and 8:15 p.m. on Thursdays
at Englewood Sports Complex adult
softball fields. Call 941-209-5924.

SAILING
Charlotte Harbor
Multihull Association: For
multihull owners or those interested
in them. No dues. Meets first Monday
of each month 6 p.m. at Harpoon
Harry's. Visit http://groups.yahoo.
com/group/CHMA/ or call Ron,
941-876-6667.

Punta Gorda Sailing
Club: Racing and cruising programs
for all ages. Call Bill, 781-910-3217 or
visit pgscweb.com.

SOCCER
YMCA fall registration:
ongoing, open to Charlotte County
youth age 5-13. Register at Franz
Ross Park YMCA or online at Charlot-
teCountyYMCA.com. Call 941-629-
9622.

SWIMMING
Charlotte County
Swimming: Year-round USA
Swimming team provides instruction
and competition ages 5 and up.
Visit www.ccswim.org or call Susan,
941-628-1510.

TENNIS
Tennis instruction: Age
5 to adult, at Franz Ross ParkYMCA.
Register at CharlotteCountyYMCA.com
or call 941-629-9622.

Rotonda QuickStart:
Free lessons for parents and kids
(12-under), 10-11 a.m. Saturday,
Rotonda Park. Rackets and balls
provided. Call 941-698-9480.

WEIGHT TRAINING
Port Charlotte Jr.
Pirates: Conditioning program
for Port Charlotte High School-zoned
eighth-grade students interested
in playing football. Monday and
Wednesday, 6-7:30 p.m., at the
school's weight room. Cost: $30.
Call Terry 863-990-8272 or Jordan
941-626-7140.

To haveyouractivitypublished,
fax (941-629-2085) or e-mail (sports@
sun-herald.com) event details to the Sports
Department at least one week in advance.
Phone calls willnot be accepted. Submis-
sions suitable for publication will be edited
for length and clarity.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


COLLEGE FOOTBALL
NOTEBOOK


Clowney


contact


Raises


questions

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBIA, S.C.-
South Carolina's athletic
compliance department
is looking into contact
between defensive end
Jadeveon Clowney and
rap mogul turned sports
agency head, Jay-Z.
Spokesman Steve Fink
said Wednesday the
department was aware of
reports about conversa-
tions between Jay-Z and
Clowney, the 6-foot-6,
274-pound lineman who's
considered the top pick in
next year's NFL draft.
Athletes are permitted
under NCAA rules to
talk with agents, just not
reach agreements about
future representation.

Clemson's Boyd leads
preseason all-ACC team:
Clemson quarterback Tajh Boyd
led the Atlantic Coast Conference's
preseason all-league team. Boyd,
voted the league's preseason player
of the year, was selected along with
teammates receiver Sammy Watkins
and kicker Chandler Catanzaro for the
ACC's preseason favorite. Florida State
had a league-best six players selected
to the team, which includes Miami
running back Duke Johnson.






The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


* FLORIDA STATE L


Arm f



Charl

By GREG ZECK
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTT
When Jesse Hahn wa
removed from Sundo
game after pitching t
innings, the Charlott
Stone Crabs brass wz
forced to hold its bre
for one of their top
pitchers.
Turns out, there's r
ing serious when it c
to the right-hander's
after he was remove
"arm soreness."
"I've just been dea
with fatigue, dead ar
Hahn said. "I'm not I
to throwing this man
innings. I haven't thr
this many innings sih
my junior year of col
three years ago. That
it is as of now."
Team doctors exar
Hahn on Monday an
determined the diag
He did not undergo
MRI.
Hahn was selected
the Rays in the sixth
of the 2010 MLB dra
Tommy John surgery
that year forced him
miss the entire 2011
paign, but Hahn retu
with Hudson Valley 1
year, going 2-2 with
ERA in 52 innings.
Hahn has been sol
this season, putting
2-1 record and 2.111
64 innings.
Typically, the Rays
ganization is comfort
with a 20 percent inc
in a pitcher's innings
between years, but F
was hopeful at the st



CRABS

FROM PAGE 1
an unearned run cai
on a sacrifice fly by I
Hobson plated one.
But in the sixth, Ri
quickly became unra
when, after walking
Mooney, Mike Crous
a sharp grounder to
Shaffer.
Shaffer made a thr
to second where Mo
collided with second
man Jonathan Quin
Mooney stayed dowi
several minutes and
to be carted off the f
and an ambulance w
called.
On the next pitch,
two runners on, Hob
sent a bomb over the
field fence that blew
game open.
"(Rivero) was pretty
much cruising along
Williams said. "He m
have felt he was loos
enough. It was a stril
obviously, but it didi
miss his barrel."
Charlotte had an

FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
North Division
W L
Daytona (Cubs) 16 12
Brevard County(Brewers)15 15
Clearwater(Phillies) 15 15
Tampa(Yankees) 14 15
Lakeland (Tigers) 13 14
x-Dunedin (BlueJays) 11 19
South Division
W L
Palm Beach (Cardinals) 18 11
St. Lucie (Mets) 17 12
Charlotte (Rays) 18 13
x-Fort Myers (Twins) 16 15
Jupiter (Marlins) 16 16
Bradenton (Pirates) 10 22
x-clinched first half
Wednesday's results
Lakeland 8, Bradenton 1
Clearwater 5, Jupiter 2
St. Lucie at Daytona, ccd., rain
Dunedin 8, Charlotte 5
Fort Myers 3, Brevard County2,1
Palm Beach 4,Tampa 2
Today's games
Jupiter at Dunedin, 6:30 p.m.
St. Lucie at Lakeland, 6:30 p.m.
Bradenton at Brevard County, 6:3
Daytona at Palm Beach, 6:35 p.m
Charlotte atTampa,7 p.m.
Clearwater at Fort Myers, 7:05 p.m
Friday's games


Jupiter at Dunedin, 6:30 p.m.
Bradenton at Brevard County, 6:3
Daytona at Palm Beach, 6:35 p.m
Charlotte at Tampa, 7 p.m.
Clearwater at Fort Myers, 7:05 p.m
St. Lucie at Lakeland, 7:11 p.m.

CRABSPLANNER
Upcoming games for the Ston
SAT. SUN.
atTampa atTampa atL
6 p.m. 1 p.m. 6:


LEAGUE: E MLB ROU


fatigue hits


)tte's Hahn

of the year to throw 100
innings.
E -- Hahn said he's been told
as by the organization not to
ay's push too hard and is not
sure when he'll take the
two
te mound.
"I'm getting up to my
ath inning limit, and I have
room to skip starts," Hahn
said. "Seeing as how I have
noth- dead arm right now, they
have no problem with my
homes skipping starts or taking
arm the time I need to rest."
d for
Charlotte makes roster
ling move: Prior to Tuesday's game
im' against Dunedin, Charlotte announced
used infielder Enmanuel Paulino was Texas Rangers
Iy transferred to Princeton while Jonathan Arlington, Tex
ow Quinonez was added from Hudson Texas beat Nev
nce Valley.
liege Quinonez, who did not play in
's all the 6-5 win, was hitting .337 for the
Renegades with one home run and
mined eight RBs in 25 games. He is the fifth
id Venezuelan player listed on the Stone
nosis. Crabs roster.
an Paulino was hitting .261 in eight
games with Charlotte but made two BY THE Assc
[by errors in six games. Between Charlotte,
round the Gulf Coast League Rays and the ARLINGTC
ft. Dominican Summer League Rays, Matt Garza p
y later Paulino is hitting .309 in 21 games the eighth in
to this year. Rangers debi
cam- run he allow
irned Crabs celebrate July after his thro
ast birthdays: With their last home and Texas be
a 2.77 game in the month, the Stone Crabs YorkYankees
had a cake to celebrate the four players Wednesday r
lid on the roster with July birthdays. Garza (1-0)
up a Outfielder Drew Vettleson and his 11 starts 1
ERA in pitcher Felipe Rivero turned 22 while for the Chica
Brandon Gomes, with the team on a fore being tro
or- rehab assignment is 29. Additionally, to the Range
table Jesse Hahn turns 24 on Tuesday. long coveted
crease Early reports indicated the cake was hander. He w
tasty, though Hahn's first name was 1.24 ERA his
Iahn mistakenly spelled"Jessie"on it. for Chicago,
art Email: gzeck@sun-herald.com last five.
After giving:
opportunity in the seventh tive singles t
to respond after Rivero game in a Ra
surrendered four more Garza retired
runs, but DrewVettleson next 16 battle
me grounded into a double Gardner's coi
K.C. play with the bases loaded Gardner s cof
that saw catcher Derrick leading off tl
vero Chung touch the plate and A.J. Pierzyi
aveled then hitVettleson in the in two runs f
Peter back on his throw to first including a t
se hit The call drew the ire of ing solo hom
Richie Williams. bo ttom ofitt
"It was a judgment call Andy Pettitte
row and the rulebook states Murphy also
reliever Shaw
oney that you can't run on the the eighth.
base- line there, which is crazy The Range
onez. to me," Williams said. "I terested in
n for haven't seen that play
had called, it was unfortunate, Tampa Bay t]
field and it ruined that whole to Chicago a
vas inseason. They
as inning." about him la
Williams said recent before he mi
with Hudson Valley call-up last two mon
)son Quinonez was a bright stress react
e right spot. elbow. He mi
the "I know he plays all over seven weeks
the place, but he looked because of a
ty pretty comfortable at sec- lat muscle.
," ond base," Williams said
lust of Quinonez, who had two Athletics 4
;e RBIs and turned a pair of Houston, Coco Cris
ke, double plays. "He swings homer n ono s
homer in Oakland's
n't the bat, and he looks like i the
11 inning to spark the
he's a pretty good player. trailed by two bef
Email: gzeck@suni-herald.com

E Dunedin 8, Charlotte 5 D S
Dunedin AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Pet. GB Berti2B 4 1 0 0 1 0 .249 U
571 MooneyDH 1 1 0 0 1 0 .244
500 2 OpitzPR-DH 1 2 1 2 00 286 FROM PAGE1
.500 2 CrouseCF 5 1 0 0 0 1 .254
.483 212 HobsonlB 3 1 3 6 1 0 .212 thefield.
.481 212 KnechtLF 5 0 2 0 0 0 .236 Price conti
.367 6 Pierre3B 4 0 1 0 0 0 .193
S DominguezSS 3 1 0 0 1 0 .185 remarkably
Pet, GB ChungC 4 1 2 0 0 0 .281 ing since reti
621 Newman RF 3 0 1 0 0 1 .257 the disabled
.586 1 Totals 33 810 8 5 2
.1 3 Charlotte AB R H BI BBSO Avg. 97-pitch COn
500 3%2 BrettDH 4 1 2 1 0 1 .346 holding the
.313 912 HagerSS 3 0 0 0 0 2 .271
VettlesonRF 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 onerun, on
Shaffer3B 3 0 0 1 0 0 .257 fly ball overt
MalmLF 4 1 0 0 0 1 259 Monster, whi
SegovialB 4 1 1 0 0 1 .279:
CarterCF 4 2 2 0 0 0 .246 to4-1, 1.75ii
DePewC 4 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Pricethrev
1 innings Quinonez2B 4 0 1 2 0 0 .250 balls in the fi
Totals 3457406
Dunedin 000103400 -8102 nings and 25
Charlotte 100010300 -571 He, too, go
5p.m. E-Dominguez(1),Hobson(6);Shaffer(16). with the othe
S LOB-Dunedin 6, Charlotte 4. SB-Brett 2 joining him l
(21). 2B-Opitz (6), Knecht (16); Carter Joining
n. I(14) Brett (8). 3B-Knecht (2). HR-Hob- jump on the


son (16). RBI-Hobson 6 (51) Opitz 2 (10); It was the
Shaffer (54) Quinonez (2), Brett (19).RISP- th t 32
5 p.m. Dunedin 3 for 8, Charlotte 4 for 9. DP- the pas g
Dunedin 1 (Chung-Hobson), Charlotte 1 starter has al
(Hager-Quinonez-Segovia). or fewer runs
Dunedin IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA The
Bibenz-Dirkx 6.1 7 5 3 0 5 0 2.75: e ayst
Browning 1.2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0.00 offFelix Dou
Mayer 1 00 0 0 0 0 2.93 three-run ral
Charlotte IP H R ER BBSO HR ERA t actua
ne Crabs: Rivero 6.1 68 7 3 1 1 4.13 that actually
Ramsey 2.2 4 0 0 2 1 0 2.31 botched bun
MON. WP-Bibenz-Dirkx. HBP-Mooney (by After one-(
Rivero). Hager (by Browning) Umpires-
Lakeland HP:CharlieTierneylB:FernandoRodriguez. by Desmond
30 p.m. T-2:48.A-1,355. and new No.


NDUP


starter Matt Garza throws to the New York Yankees during Wednesday's
is. Garza, making his debut with the Rangers, pitched into the eighth in
SYork 3-1.




rza rocks debi

on breaks ankle amid stellar


OCIATED PRESS
)N, Texas -
pitched into
ning of his
ut, the only
ed unearned
wing error,
at the New
3-1 on
night.
) was 6-1 in
this season
go Cubs be-
aded Monday
rs, who had
the right-
Nas 5-0 with a
last six starts
winning the

g up consecu-
o start his first
ngers jersey,
S15 of the
rs before his
or on Brett
mebacker
ie sixth.
nski drove
or Texas,
iebreak-
ner in the
e sixth off
(7-8). David
homered, off
vn Kelley in

rs were
Garza when
raded him
after the 2010
also inquired
st summer
ssed the
nths with a
n in his right
missed the first
this season
strained left


,Astros 3: At
p hit a two-run
three-run seventh
Athletics. The A's
re an RBI double by


ILE


nued his
harp pitch-
urning from
list with a
nplete game,
Sox to the
a Mike Napoli
he Green
Ale improving
n five starts.
w only four
rst three in-
for the game.
t to celebrate
er starters
for a group
mound.
29th time in
ames a Rays
lowed three
S.
ook the lead
bront with a
ly in the third
started with a
t play.
out singles
Jennings
2 hitter Evan


Eric Sogard with one out cut the lead
to 3-2 and chased starter Bud Norris.
John Jaso had a solo homer in the first
inning for the A's, who have won 11 of
12 against Houston this season.

Angels 1, Twins 0: At
Anaheim, Calif., Jered Weaver
outpitched Mike Pelfrey with eight
innings of two-hit ball and Albert
Pujols drove in the only run, leading
the Angels to a victory over the Twins.
Weaver (5-5) struck out nine and
walked one in his first home start
against the Twins since his no-hitter on
May 2, 2012. The three-time All-Star
retired 19 consecutive batters during
one stretch.

Indians 10, Mariners 1: At
Seattle, Scott Kazmir allowed one hit
over his eight innings, Michael Bourn
hit his first career grand slam and the
Indians routed the Mariners. The only
hit Kazmir (6-4) gave up was a clean
leadoff single to center by Justin Smoak
in the fifth. Kazmir struck out seven,
walked two and allowed an unearned
run. He threw 103 pitches and was
relieved by Vinnie Pestano in the ninth.

Royals 4, Orioles 3: At
Kansas City, Mo., Eric Hosmer hit two
home runs and Alcides Escobar drove
in the winning run in the ninth to lift
Kansas City. David Lough singled and
scored the game-ending run when
Escobar doubled off the fence in left
center with one out in the ninth.

Tigers 6, White Sox 2: At
Chicago, Prince Fielder, Austin Jackson
and Torii Hunter homered, and Anibal
Sanchez pitched six scoreless innings to
help Detroit overcome Miguel Cabrera's
absence. Cabrera, the reigning AL MVP
and baseball's first Triple Crown winner
in 45 years last season, left Monday's
game in the bottom of the fifth inning
with a left hip flexor injury.

Braves 8, Mets 2: At New
York, Tim Hudson took a shutout into
the eighth inning before getting spiked
at first base and suffering a broken
ankle. Evan Gattis, Dan Uggla and
Andrelton Simmons all homered. But

Longoria and an errant
pickoff throw put Rays
on first and third, they
tried their something-of-
a-favorite safety squeeze
play.
Zobrist got down a bunt
that was a bit hard, and
Jennings, who broke late
anyway, stopped and went
back to third.
That left the Rays with
the bases loaded, and
rookie Wil Myers took
advantage, slicing a single
to right-center that scored
two. Zobrist then stole
third, which was big be-
cause he scored on Luke
Scott's sacrifice fly.
The Rays added two
runs in the eighth, with
Scott's hustle a big part of
it. The veteran DH raced
down the line after a
fielder's choice grounder
to beat the relay on what
would have been an
inning-ending double play.
Myers became the first
rookie in Rays history to
have six straight multi-hit
games; Delmon Young
had five in 2007.


the nasty-looking injury
who will have surgery, le
NL East leaders without a
winner who was on a roll
(8-7) was working on a fi
when EricYoung Jr. hit a
that was knocked down I
baseman Freddie Freema
took Freeman's toss at thE
before Young arrived, and
outfielder stepped on the
Hudson's lower right leg,
Achilles, driving the pitch
ankle awkwardly into the

Pirates 4, Natio
At Washington, Pirates le
Francisco Liriano did not
until the sixth inning and
homered off an otherwise
Stephen Strasburg. The N
0-6 since the All-Star bre
a grand total of 13 runs ii
and have lost 11 of their

Brewers 3, Pad
Milwaukee, Kyle Lohse pi
innings and Carlos Gome
hits and drove in two run
the Brewers. It was the B
win since left fielder Ryan
suspended Monday for th
of the 2013 season for vio
Major League Baseball's d

Dodgers 8, Blu
10 innings: At Toron
hit a two-run homer to h
Angeles'five-run 10th inr
Dodgers completed a thr
sweep. Yasiel Puig also w
the 10th for the streakin
who have won six straight
to go from last in the NL
21 to first place.

Cardinals 11, P
St. Louis, Jake Westbrook
innings and contributed
with his second career ste
Louis. Matt Adams had tv
three RBIs and Shane Rol
run triple in the fifth was
the game for the Cardina
since the All-Star break a
majors with a 61-37 reco


Rays 5, Red So


Tampa Bay A
DeJennings cf
Longoria 3b
Zobrist 2b
W.Myers rf
Scott dh
S.Rodriguez If
Loney lb
J.Molina c
Y.Escobar ss
Totals
Boston
Ellsburycf
Victorino rf
Pedroia 2b
D.Ortiz dh
Napoli lb
J.Gomes If
Drew ss
Saltalamacchia c
Iglesias 3b
Totals
Tampa Bay
Boston


RH
1 1
1 1
S12
40 2
1 1
1 1
40 2
4 0 1
4 0 1
S5 11
SRH
40 0
40 0
4 01
30 0


1 5
00300
00000


E-Doubront (1). LOB-
Boston 3. 2B-Napoli (2
(14), off Price. RBIs-W.My
(39), Loney (46), J.Molina (
SB-DeJennings (16), Zob
(4). S-Zobrist. SF-Scott
in scoring position-Tam
S.Rodriguez, Longoria, Y.E
1 (Saltalamacchia). RISP-
8; Boston 0 for 3.GIDP-J.
DP-Tampa Bay 1 (Y.Es
Loney); Boston 1 (Doubron
Tampa Bay IP H R ER
PriceW,5-5 9 5 1 1
Boston IP H R ER
DoubrntL,7-462/3 6 3 3
Beato 2/3 1 1 1
Thornton 2/3 3 1 1
D.Britton 1 1 0 0
Inherited runners-score
Thornton 1-1. Umpires-
Vanover; First, Brian Gorma
nyGonzalez;Third,Tony Ra
A-36,514 (37,499).


MLB: "


S Elbow


surgery


sidelines


prospect

By MARC TOPKIN
TAMPA BAY TIMES
BOSTON -Top
pitching prospect Taylor
Guerrieri will be sidelined
for at least a full year
after having Tommy John
reconstructive elbow
surgeryWednesday.
Guerrieri, a 20-year-old
n right-hander, had sailed
AP PHOTO through the first half of his
first full season at Class A
game in Bowling Green, going 6-2,
ning as 2.01 in 14 starts. But he
was given two weeks off
due to what the team said
u t ^ was fatigue then lasted
only two innings in his
July 15 return before leav-
ing with elbow stiffness.
Guerrieri visited noted
start orthopedic Dr. James
to Hudson, Andrews on Wednesday at
ves theu his clinic near Pensacola
ayes the then had what the team
uvedseran termed successful surgery
urhitter to repair a torn ulnar
ur-htter collateral ligament.
grounder The normal rehab and
y Braves first recovery time is at least 12
an. Hudson months; Guerrieri could
e bag just get back into games by the
the speedy end of the 2014 season or
e back of in the instructional league,
near his but he realistically won't
her's right pitch competitively until
ground. 2015. Assuming he regains
his form, Guerrieri, the
nals 2: Rays' top pick in the 2011
ft-hander draft, likely is at least
allow a hit three years away from
I Pedro Alvarez the majors whenever he
e-dominant returns.
nationals fell to "It's a tough year," farm
ak scoring director Mitch Lukevics
n that span said. "We will do every-
last 13 games, thing we can to get him to
the big leagues."
res 1: At Left-hander Jake
tched seven McGee, who had similar
z had four surgery as a 21 -year-old at
is to lead Double A, said it's tough
rewers'first to deal with being out so
n Braun was long and important to not
he remainder rush the rehab process,
olations of but the success rate is
drug policy. encouraging.
"You come back just as
e Jays 3, good," McGee said. "I've
to, Mark Ellis heard he throws pretty
highlight Los hard, so even if he drops
ning as the a couple miles an hour
ee-game when he comes back it's
ent deep in not going to hurt him a
g Dodgers, lot."
it and 23 of 28 Right-hander Alex
West on June Colome, who pitched
earlier this season for the
Rays, is on the disabled
hillies 3: At list at Triple-A Durham
pitched seven with an elbow strain but is
offensively expected back before the
al toleadSt. end of the season.
wo hits and
binson's three- Cobb, Gomez rehab
his third hit of update: The right index finger
I blister that forced right-hander Alex
s, who are4- Cobb (concussion) from his Tuesday
nd lead the
nd lead the rehab start after two pitches likely will
rd. cause further delays in his return; his
next bullpen session and start (planned
ox 1 for Sunday) are expected to be pushed
BI BBSO Avg. back at least a day or two.
0 1 2 .268
0 0 1 .276 Right-handerBrandonGomes (lat
o o o .269 strain) felt good despite poor results in
S1 0 271 hisTuesday rehabouting andislikely to
o o 1 .256 make another Friday.
1 0 1 .316
1 0 0 .240
0 0 0 246 More prospect woes:Tim
5 2 A Beckham, the most advanced infield
BI BBSO Avg.
0 .301 prospect, was placed on the temporary
0 0 0 .287 inactive list at Durham. Team officials
o o .303 : said only that he had to go home for
1 0 1 .266 "personal reasons."Beckham, thetop
0 0 1 .240 pick in the 2008 draft, served a 50-game
0 0 0 259 suspension last year for a failed test for a
o o 1 .343 drug ofabuse, reported to be marijuana.
30020- 5110
30100- 1 S51 Busting Longo's slump:
Tampa Bay 8, Evan Longoria was moved up to second
6). HR-Napoli
'ers 2 (21), Scott in the order as manager Joe Maddon
13), Napoli (63). attempted to"unlodge"him from an
rist (8),W.Myers extended slup hitting .167 over his
t. Runners left : mp, g


pa Bay 4 (Scott, previous 23 games, though with four
scobar); Boston homers.
Tampa Bay 4 for
Molina, Pedroia. Hopefully he's going to see a
scobar, Zobrist, different group of pitching,"Maddon
t, Drew, Napoli)
BBSO6 NP ERA* said. "t's kind of like rearranging the
0 4 97 3.75 chairs on the deck. Just see if it presents
BBSO NP ERA differently. I know he's hit a couple
0 0 8 1.69 homers, but I really want to get him
0 0 153.98 unearthed and get him rolling in the
ed-Beato 1-0, right direction."
-Home, Larry Maddon had no concerns moving
n; Second, Man- rookie Wil Myers into the cleanup spot.
"He kinda digs it a lot,"Maddon said.


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3






www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


I MLB STANDINGS


Boston
RAYS
Baltimore
NewYork
Toronto


Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago


Oakland
Texas
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston



Atlanta
Philadelphia
Washington
NewYork
MARLINS


St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Milwaukee


Los Angeles
Arizona
Colorado
San Francisco
San Diego


AMERICAN
East Di
GB W
2 -
3 1/2
31/2
5 7
14/2
CentralD
GB W
5 31/2
8
12
16
West Di
GB W
I -
3
5 11
5 11
24/2

NATIONAL
East Di
GB W
I -
85
5 9
11
19
Central
GB W
2 -
5 11/2
51/2
17
20
West Di
GB W
-
1
5
7
9


AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tuesday's results
LA. Dodgers 10,Toronto 9
Boston 6, RAYS 2
N.Y.Yankees 5,Texas4
Kansas City 3, Baltimore 2
Detroit 6, Chicago White Sox 2
Houston 5, Oakland 4
Minnesota 10, L.A. Angels 3,10 innings
Seattle 4, Cleveland 3
Wednesday's results
Oakland 4, Houston 3
L.A. Angels 1, Minnesota 0
Cleveland 10, Seattle 1
L.A. Dodgers 8,Toronto 3,10 innings
RAYS 5, Boston 1
Texas 3, N.Y.Yankees 1
Kansas City4, Baltimore 3
Detroit 6, ChicagoWhite Sox 2
Today's games
N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 9-6) at Texas
(D.Holland 8-5),2:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 10-7) at Chicago White
Sox (Peavy 7-4),2:10 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 3-7) at Toronto (Buehrle
5-7),7:07 p.m.
RAYS (Hellickson 9-3) at Boston (Lackey
7-7), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 8-3) at Kansas City
(Guthrie9-7),8:10p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 10-6) at Oakland
(Straily6-3), 10:05p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 7-6) at Seattle (lwaku-
ma9-4), 10:10p.m.
Friday's games
Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
RAYS at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Kansas Cityat Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.


U MLB NOTEBOOK


A-Rod




now h(



Chicago OKs

$500 million

in renovations

for Wrigley


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TAMPA-Alex
Rodriguez reported back
to the New York Yankees'
minor league complex
Wednesday, three days
after he was diagnosed
with a strained left quad-
riceps on the final day of
his injury rehabilitation
assignment.
Injuries have kept him
away from the team since
last year's playoffs. Now
he faces discipline from
Major League Baseball,
possibly up to a lifetime
ban, for his reported
ties to a clinic accused
of distributing banned
performance- enhancing
drugs.
"The likelihood of a
severe punishment for
Rodriguez is very high,"
former Commissioner Fay
Vincent said Wednesday.
Lawyers for MLB and
the players' association
resume discussions about
the Biogenesis investiga-
tion today.
"I feel great," said
Rodriguez, who spent
about four hours at the
complex. "That's all I've
got to say."
The third baseman,
who turns 38 on Saturday,
had been recovering from
hip surgery in January. He
hit .250 (8 for 40) with two
homers and eight RBIs in


MLB SCOREBOARD

SLEAGUE Indians 10, Mariners 1
vision Cleveland AB R H BI BBSO Avg. Sa
CGB L10 Str Home Away Bourn cf 4 2 2 4 1 1 .292 Ev.
5-5 L-1 34-19 27-23 Swisherib 4 1 1 0 1 0 .242 He
8-2 W-1 34-19 26-23 Kipnis2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .295 QL
7-3 L-2 29-20 28-25 A.Cabrerass 4 4 2 3 1 0 .251 Alo
31/2 4-6 L-1 28-23 25-25 C.Santanadh 5 0 3 2 0 1 .272 Gy
11 1-9 L-7 25-27 20-28 Avileslf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Ver
Division Mar.Reynolds3b 4 1 1 0 1 2 .214 Gu
CGB L10 Str Home Away Y.Gomesc 4 1 2 0 1 0 .270 Hu
6-4 W-4 29-19 27-25 Stubbsrf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .242 O'S
31/2 6-4 W-1 30-19 23-29 Totals 371013 9 6 6 Tha
8 4-6 W-2 26-24 21-27 Seattle AB R H BIBBSO Avg. a-[
12 6-4 L-1 23-24 20-31 B.Millerss-3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Sta
16 4-6 L-3 21-25 18-34 Franklin 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .266 To
division Seager3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Mi
CGB L10 Str Home Away Ryanss 0 0 0 0 1 0 .194 We
5-5 W-1 30-15 29-27 K.Moralesdh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .280 Ao
12 3-7 W-1 29-23 27-22 Bayl If 4 1 0 0 0 0 .208 Sec
81/2 8-2 L-1 27-26 21-27 Smoaklb 3 0 1 0 1 2 .267 Luc
81/2 4-6 W-1 27-28 20-24 M.Saunderscf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .223 C.G
22 2-8 L-1 18-37 16-29 En.Chavezrf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .274 J.F
H.Blancoc 3 0 0 0 0 1 .162 Y.B
LLEAGUE Totals 30 1 2 0 4 8 Gir
vision Cleveland 301041 001-10132 He
CGB L10 Str Home Away Seattle 010000000- 1 21 Lol
5-5 W-1 31-15 26-29 E-Mar.Reynolds (9), A.Cabrera (4), Ax
8 4-6 L-4 26-21 23-31 M.Saunders (1). LOB-Cleveland 7, Seattle b-L
9 1-9 L-6 27-24 21-29 6. 2B-A.Cabrera (21), C.Santana 2 (26), Tot
11 5-5 L-1 20-30 24-23 Y.Gomes (7). HR-Bourn (3), off Noesi; Sa
19 5-5 L-1 21-27 16-35 A.Cabrera(8),offNoesi.RBIs-Bourn4(25), Mi
Division A.Cabrera 3 (38), C.Santana 2 (45). S-Kip- a-p
CGB L10 Str Home Away nis. Runners left in scoring position- gr(
7-3 W-3 31-17 30-20 Cleveland 6 (Mar.Reynolds 2, Swisher, in
7-3 W-4 32-18 28-21 A.Cabrera2,Y.Gomes);Seattle4(En.Chavez, Die
6-4 L-1 32-17 25-27 B.Miller, M.Saunders 2). RISP-Cleveland 6 Gu
11/2 4-6 L-1 22-26 22-28 for 17; Seattle 0 for 6. GIDP-Swisher, Mar. HR
1412 5-5 W-1 26-28 16-30 Reynolds, Y.Gomes, En.Chavez.DP-Cleve- ley
division land 1 (A.Cabrera, Kipnis, Swisher); Seattle 3 Ao
CGB L10 Str Home Away (Seager, Franklin, Smoak), (Ryan, Franklin, S-
8-2 W-6 27-23 26-24 Smoak), (Ryan, Franklin, Smoak). tio
4V2 5-5 W-1 28-21 24-27 Cleveland IP HR ER BBSO NP ERA ork
8V2 5-5 W-1 29-24 20-29 KazmirW,6-4 8 1 1 0 2 7103 3.96 2,.
101/2 6-4 W-1 28-23 18-31 Pestano 1 1 0 0 2 1 29 4.18 0 f
1212 4-6 L-1 27-23 18-34 Seattle IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA fer
J.SndrsL,9-9 42/3 9 6 5 3 5104 4.48 Al(
NATIONAL LEAGUE Noesi 21/3 2 3 3 2 1 445.64 We
Tuesday's results Luetge 2 2 1 1 1 0 24 5.51 Sa
Cincinnati 9, San Francisco 3,1st game Inherited runners-scored-Noesi 2-2. O'S
Pittsburgh 5,Washington 1 Umpires-Home, Lance Barrett; First, Bill Tha
L.A. Dodgers 10,Toronto 9 Welke; Second, Adrian Johnson;Third, Mark Sta
N.Y Mets 4, Atlanta 1 Ripperger.T-2:49. A-25,688 (47,476). Mi
San Diego 6, Milwaukee 2 Lol
St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 1 Braves 8,Mets2 Ax
MARLINS4,Colorado2 Atlanta AB R H BIBBSO Avg. He
Arizona 10,ChicagoCubs4 Simmonsss 5 1 2 2 0 0 .244 InI
San Francisco 5, Cincinnati 3,2nd game Heyward cf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .223 IBI
Wednesday's results J.Uptonrf 5 0 1 1 0 0 .251 O'|
Pittsburgh 4,Washington2 F.Freemanib 4 0 0 0 0 2 .303 Hir
L.A. Dodgers8,Toronto3,10innings McCannc 3 1 0 0 0 0 .286 Da
Atlanta 8, N.YMets 2 Gattislf 4 2 2 1 0 1 .262 A-
Milwaukee3, SanDiegol Constanzalf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222
St. Louis 11, Philadelphia 3 Uggla2b 4 1 2 3 0 1 .203
Colorado 2, MARLINS 1 CJohnson 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .325 Lo
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, late 1-Janishpr-3b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 C.C
Cincinnati at San Francisco, late T.Hudson p 2 0 0 0 1 1 .158 Pu
Today'sgames Avilanp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Ad
Atlanta (A.Wood 0-2) at N.Y Mets Waldenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- H.F
(Z.Wheeler 3-1),12:10 p.m. b-ReJohnsonph 1 1 0 0 0 0 .250 Eth
Pittsburgh (AJ.Burnett 4-7) at Washington Ayala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- A.E
(G.Gonzalez 7-3),12:35 p.m. Totals 35 8 8 7 3 7 Scd
San Diego (Volquez 7-8) at Milwaukee (Gal- NewYork AB R H BIBBSO Avg. Uri
lardo8-8),2:10p.m. E.Younglf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 M.I
MARLINS (Eovaldi 2-1) at Colorado Dan.Murphy2b 3 0 2 2 1 1 .273 To
(Nicasio6-4),3:10p.m. D.Wright3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .304 To
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 9-6) at St. Louis Byrd rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .277 Re
(Lynnll-5),7:15p.m. I.Davislb 3 0 0 0 1 2 .175 Me
Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 2-6) at Arizona Nieuwenhuiscf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .196 1-F
(Miley6-8),9:40p.m. Germenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- BaL
Cincinnati (Latos9-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Gre- a-A.Brown ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 En.
inke8-2),10:10p.m. Edginp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Lin
Friday'sgames Atchisonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Co
N.Y Mets at Washington, 1:35 p.m., 1st c-Satinph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .343 M.I
game Reckerc 2 1 1 0 1 1 .169 Are
N.Y Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m., 2nd Quintanilla ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .225 2-E
game Hefnerp 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Th,
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:08 p.m. Lagares cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Lav
PittsburghatMARLINS,7:10p.m. Totals 30 2 6 2 311 To
St. Louis at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Atlanta 010050002- 8 80 Lo
MilwaukeeatColorado,8:40p.m. NewYork 000000020- 2 62 To
San Diego at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. a-flied outfor Germen in the7th.b-ground- 1-r
Cincinnati at L.A.Dodgers, 10:10p.m. ed into a fielder's choice for Walden in the for
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco,10:15 p.m. 9th. c-struck out for Atchison in the 9th. Ad
1-ran for C.Johnson in the 9th. E-Dan. na
Murphy 2 (14). LOB-Atlanta 4, New York An
4.2B-Dan.Murphy2(25).HR-Gattis(15), (14
off Hefner; Uggla (20),off Hefner; Simmons 2
(11), off Hefner. RBIs-Simmons 2 (35), J.P
J.Upton (47), Gattis (39), Uggla 3 (47), Dan. 2
Murphy 2 (43). Runners left in scoring 2
tu H fS 1 position-New York3 (Byrd, Nieuwenhuis, SF
D.Wright). RISP-Atlanta 2 for 4; New York sit
r t 1 for 7. GIDP-Heyward, D.Wright, I.Davis, C.C
Lagares. DP-Atlanta 3 (Simmons, Uggla, Tor
w a t F.Freeman), (Simmons, Uggla, F.Freeman), An
S1 (F.Freeman, Simmons, F.Freeman); New ne
SYork 1 (Dan.Murphy, I.Davis). GIl
S w aits Atlanta IP HR ER BBSO NP ERA M.
T.HdsnW,8-772/3 4 2 2 3 9107 3.97 Lo
Avilan 0 1 0 0 0 0 61.35 Nc
iWalden 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 62.51 P.R
13 minor league games Ayala 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 3.60 Wi
before the leg injury. NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA Be
Hefner L, 4-8 41/3 6 6 5 1 3 894.17 Lea
Germen 22/3 0 0 0 1 3 40 1.42 Jar
Selig touts anti-drug Edgin 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.10 To
effort: Commissioner Bud Selig Atchison 1 2 2 0 1 0 24 3.80 E.R
defended baseball's fi st Avilan pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. In- De
defended baseball's fight against herited runners-scored-Avilan 2-2, Jar
performance-enhancing drugs, and Walden 1-0, Germen 1-0. HBP-by Edgin J.P
declined to discuss the recent suspen- (McCann). PB-Recker. Umpires-Home, Be
Chad Fairchild; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Ini
sion of Ryan Braun or whether other Eric Cooper; Third, Paul Schrieber.T-3:03. 1-0
stars will also face penalties. A-28,194 (41,922). E.R
Litt
The Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Pirates 4, Nationals2 lin.
was suspended for the rest of the Pittsburgh AB R H BI BBSO Avg. (49
season Monday, a total of 65 games, Walker2b 4 1 1 0 0 240
for violating baseball's anti-drug McCutchendc 4 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Oa
policy. He is the first player to be PAlvarez3b 3 2 1 1 1 1 244 Cri
G.Jonesib 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Jas
punished as part of an investigation G.Sanchezib 1 0 0 0 0 1 .224 D.N
of the now-closed Biogenesis Clinic, Sniderrf 3 0 1 0 0 1 224 DC
b-Tabataph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Lo
which reportedly provided PEDs to as J.Harrisonrf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Ce
many as 20 other players. McKenryc 4 0 1 2 0 2 .193 Mo
Since testing was first imple- Barmesss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Re
Since testing was first imple Lirianop 3 0 0 0 0 3 .107 S.S
mented in 2004,32 major league Ju.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 So
players have been suspended for Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 To
Totals 33 4 5 4 113 Hc
using banned substances. Washington AB R H BIBBSO Avg. Vill
"Ittookalongtime,"Seligsaid. Hairstonlf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .167 Alt
Rendonss 4 0 1 0 0 1 273 J.C
"I'mproudofwhatwe'vedone, we Zimmerman3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .269 Ca
will continue to enforce the program." Werthrf 3 1 1 2 1 1 .298 Co
Ad.LaRochelb 4 0 0 0 0 2 .242 WE
W.Ramosc 4 0 1 0 0 1 .289 ME
Pedroiagets $110M, Spancf 4 0 0 0 0 1 263 M.
eight-yeardeal: TheBoston Lombardozzi2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Kra
Red Sox and All-Star second baseman aK.Suzukiph 0 0 0 0 0 0 221 To
Dustin Pedroia finalized a $110 Storenp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Oa
million, eight-year contract through Abad p 0 0 0 0 0 0 Hc
the 2021 season. Pedroia had been Pittsburgh 010000 003- 4 50 1O
signed for 2014 at $10 million under Washington 000000002- 2 51 (1;
his old deal. "This is my home"said a-sacrificed for Strasburg in 8th. b-was hit (2
bya pitch for Snider in 9th.E-Rendon (10). off
the 5-foot-8,165-pound infielder, LOB-Pittsburgh 4, Washington 5. 2B- (6)
who was the AL Rookie of the Year Walker(12).HR-P.Alvarez(26),offStrasburg; So
an AL MP in 2 He is Werth (15), offJu.Wilson.RBIs-Walker(28), SB
in 2007 and ALin 200n 2008. He is P.Alvarez (64), McKenry 2 (12), Werth 2 (41). po
batting .306 this season and has a S-K.Suzuki. Runners left in scoring posi- arc
0 batting average in sen sasns tion-Pittsburgh 1 (Barmes); Washington 2 1 f
.303 batting average in seven seasons. (Werth, Rendon). RISP-Pittsburgh 1 for 4; up
WashinatonOfor3.GIDP-Soan.DP-Pitts- Oa


Wrigley renovations get burgh 1 (Walker,G.Sanchez). Gri
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA Ble
final approval: Chicago's City LrnoW,10-4 72/3 2 0 0 3 81102.23 J.C
Council gave final approval to a $500 Ju.WilsonH,9 1/3 2 2 2 0 0 13 2.18 Co
MelanconS,3-4 1 1 0 0 0 1 100.93 Hc
million renovation of historic Wrigley Washington IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA B.N
Field that includes itsa 5,700-square- Strasburg L,5-8 8 2 1 1 0 12118 2.85 Bla
foot electronic Jumbotron in left Storen 2/3 2 3 3 1 1 26 5.40 An
foot electronic Jumbotron in left A 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 91.64 W.
Abad 1/3 10 0 0 0 91.64 W.
field above the ivy-covered outfield Ju.Wilson pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Ver
walls as well as improved facilities Inherited runners-scored-Ju.Wilson Ini
1-0, Abad 2-2. IBB-off Storen (P.Alvarez). Bla
for the players in the bowels of the HBP-by Abad (Tabata). Umpires- by
99-year-old ballpark and a hotel Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Mike Winters; Jor
across the street. Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Tim Timmons. on
across the street. T-2:53. A-33,636 (41,418). T-


Brewers 3, Padres 1


n Diego J
Cabrera ss
adley3b
aentin If
)nso lb
orko 2b
nablecf
uzman rf
undleyc
Sullivan p
ayerp
Denorfia ph
suffer p
tals
Iwaukee J
eeks2b
ki rf
gura ss
croy c
Gomez cf
rancisco lb
etancourt 3b
ndl lf
nderson p
hse p
ford p
L.Schafer ph-lf
tals


BI BBSO
0 0 1
0 0 1
0 0 1
0 1 1
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 1
1 0 2
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
1 1 9
BI BBSO
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 2
0 2 1
2 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
2 3 6


n Diego 001000 000- 1 51
Iwaukee 002000 10x- 3 90
)opped out for Thayer in the 8th. b-
ounded into a double play for Axford
the 8th. E-Headley (6). LOB-San
ego 4, Milwaukee 9. 2B-Headley (20),
uzman (14), Lucroy (12), C.Gomez 2 (22).
R-Hundley (8), off Lohse. RBIs-Hund-
' (25), C.Gomez 2 (48). SB-Alonso (6),
ki (13), C.Gomez (22). CS-Gyorko (1).
-Lohse. Runners left in scoring posi-
n-San Diego 3 (Alonso, O'Sullivan, Gy-
ko); Milwaukee 7 (Lohse 2, Y.Betancourt
J.Francisco 2, Weeks). RISP-San Diego
or 5; Milwaukee 3 for 12.GIDP-L.Scha-
. DP-San Diego 1 (Gyorko, Ev.Cabrera,
onso); Milwaukee 1 (Lucroy, Lucroy,
eeks,J.Francisco).
n Diego IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
SullivanL,0-261/373 2 3 4 974.73
ayer 2/3 1 0 0 0 2 15 2.76
suffer 1 10 0 0 0 84.26
Iwaukee IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
hseW,7-7 7 51 1 0 61123.37
fordH, 16 1 0 0 0 0 1 73.38
ndrsnS, 11-141 0 0 0 1 2 242.15
herited runners-scored-Thayer 1-1.
3-off O'Sullivan (Gindl). HBP-by
Sullivan (Aoki). Umpires-Home, John
rschbeck; First, James Hoye; Second, Bob
vidson; Third, Jim Reynolds. T-2:50.
-25,551 (41,900).

Dodgers 8, Blue Jays 3,10 innings,
s Angeles AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
rawforddh 6 1 2 0 0 1 .283
igrf 5 2 3 2 1 0 .376
.Gonzalezlb 5 1 2 0 1 1 .301
Ramirezss 6 1 1 0 0 2 .381
hiercf 6 1 4 2 0 0 .275
Ellisc 5 0 1 0 0 1 .266
humakerlf 4 0 1 0 1 2 .265
be3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .265
Ellis2b 5 1 1 2 0 2 .273
tals 45 816 7 4 9
ronto AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
yesss 4 0 0 0 1 0 .312
e.Cabreralf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .277
R.Davispr-lf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .287
utistarf 4 0 2 0 1 1 .255
carnacionib 4 0 0 0 1 0 .263
iddh 5 0 0 0 0 4 .295
l.Rasmuscf 3 1 0 0 1 3 .265
Izturis2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .248
encibiac 4 0 1 0 0 0 .225
Bonifaciopr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211
olec 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143
wrie3b 3 0 1 2 1 0 .208
tals 35 3 5 2 6 9
sAngeles 011000001 5- 8163
ronto 000020010 0- 3 52
an for Me.Cabrera in the 8th. 2-ran
Arencibia in the 9th. E-Uribe (4),
.Gonzalez (9), H.Ramirez (6), Encar-
cion (7), Col.Rasmus (4). LOB-Los
geles 13, Toronto 8. 2B-C.Crawford
1), Puig (9), H.Ramirez (14), Ethier
(23), Lawrie (5). HR-M.Ellis (5), off
erez; Puig (9), off J.Perez. RBIs-Puig
(22), Ethier 2 (36), Uribe (30), M.Ellis
(33), Lawrie 2 (20). SB-R.Davis (27).
-Uribe. Runners left in scoring po-
ion-Los Angeles 9 (M.Ellis, Ethier,
Crawford, Schumaker 2, Puig, A.Ellis 3);
ronto 3 (Reyes 2, M.Izturis). RISP-Los
geles 2 for 17; Toronto 2 for 8. Run-
rs moved up-Ad.Gonzalez, Lind.
DP-M.Ellis. DP-Toronto 1 (Lawrie,
lzturis, Encarnacion).
sAngeles IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
dlasco 52/3 22 2 4 5 98 3.72
odriguez 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 2.27
throw 1/3 0 0 0 1 0 10 3.18
lisario 0 2 1 1 1 0 12 3.60
agueW,5-3 2 00 0 0 1 175.45
nsen 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.32
ronto IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
;ogers 710 2 2 1 4104 3.74
labar 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 2.60
nssenBS,2-20 1 1 1 0 1 2 192.51
erezL,1-2 1 4 5 5 2 1 35 1.96
lisario pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
herited runners-scored-P.Rodriguez
0, Withrow 1-0, League 2-0. HBP-by
;ogers (A.Ellis). Umpires-Home, Will
tie; First, Paul Emmel; Second, Dan Bel-
o;Third, Mike Everitt.T-3:44.A-35,368
9,282).

Athletics 4, Astros 3
ikland AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
spcf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .260
soc 3 1 2 1 1 1 .271
Norrisc 1 0 0 0 0 0 .204
'naldson3b 2 0 0 0 2 2 .307
wriess 4 0 0 0 0 1 .283
spedeslf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .227
)ss1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232
ddickrf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .216
mithdh 2 1 0 0 2 1 .252
gard2b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .263
tals 33 4 6 4 510
ouston AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
arss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .333
uve2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .282
astrodh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .264
rterlf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .223
rporanc 3 1 1 2 0 1 .273
allacelb 4 0 1 0 0 1 .210
axwellcf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .238
Dominguez3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .231
aussrf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .175
Elmoreph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .269
tals 34 3 7 3 111
ikland 100000 300- 4 60
ouston 000102000- 3 70
grounded out for Krauss in the 7th.
'B-Oakland 8, Houston 6. 2B-Jaso
2), Reddick (13), Sogard (17), J.Castro
7). HR-Jaso (3), off B.Norris; Crisp (10),
f Blackley; Altuve (4), off Griffin; Corporan
, off Griffin. RBIs-Crisp 2 (38), Jaso (21),
gard (16), Altuve (32), Corporan 2 (15).
-Altuve (24). Runners left in scoring
sition-Oakland 3 (Lowrie, Moss, Sog-
d); Houston 1 (Wallace). RISP-Oakland
or 6; Houston 1 for 4. Runners moved
'-Carter, Corporan.
ikland IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
ffinW,9-761/3 63 3 0 8 95 3.84
vinsH,4 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 83.38
havezH,1 2/3 1 0 0 1 1 192.91
okS,2-5 11/3 00 0 0 1 132.25
uston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Jorris 61/3 43 3 3 71193.93
ckleyL, 1-1 1/3 1 1 1 0 1 55.23
ibriz 2/3 00 0 1 0 11 5.55
Wright 2/3 1 0 0 1 1 174.14
ras 1 00 0 0 1 10 3.05
herited runners-scored-Cook 2-0,
ckley 1-1. HBP-by Griffin (Corporan),
B.Norris (Donaldson). Umpires-Home,
dan Baker; First, Tim McClelland; Sec-
d, Mark Wegner; Third, Marvin Hudson.
-3:10. A-24,831 (42,060).


Detroit
AJackson cf
Tor.Hunter rf
TuiasosopolIf
DirkslIf
Fielder 1lb
V.Martinezdh
Jh.Peralta ss
D.Kelly3b
H.Perez2b
Avila c
Totals
Chicago
De Azacf
AI.Ramirez ss
Rios rf
A.Dunn lb
Konerkodh
Keppinger2b
Gillaspie 3b
Viciedo If
Phegleyc
Totals
Detroit
Chicago


Tigers 6, White Sox 2


AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
5 1 2 1 0 0 .272
5 2 2 1 0 1 .309
2 1 0 0 1 1 .302
2 0 0 0 0 1 .248
4 1 2 3 0 0 .269
4 0 0 0 0 0 .267
4 0 1 0 0 1 .302
4 1 1 0 0 0 .242
4 0 2 0 0 0 .250
4 0 1 1 0 1 .185
38 611 6 1 5
AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
4 0 3 0 1 1 .280
5 0 1 1 0 0 .280
5 0 0 0 0 2 .274
4 0 1 0 0 2 .210
3 0 1 0 1 0 .248
4 0 1 0 0 1 .240
4 0 0 0 0 2 .249
4 2 3 1 0 0 .244
4 0 1 0 0 1 .261
37 211 2 2 9
310011000- 6111
000000101- 2111


E-Avila (4), AI.Ramirez (17). LOB-De-
troit 6, Chicago 10. 2B-Jh.Peralta (27), De
Aza (21). HR-Fielder (17), off Joh.Danks;
AJackson (6), off Joh.Danks; Tor.Hunter (9),
off Joh.Danks; Viciedo (9), off Putkonen.
RBIs-AJackson (25), Tor.Hunter (47),
Fielder 3 (74), Avila (24), AI.Ramirez (24),
Viciedo (31). SB-De Aza (12). Runners left
in scoring position-Detroit 4 (D.Kelly,
Avila, AJackson, Jh.Peralta); Chicago 7
(A.Dunn, Gillaspie 2, Rios 4). RISP-Detroit
2 for 7; Chicago 1 for 10. GIDP-Rios. DP-
Detroit 1 (Jh.Peralta, H.Perez, Fielder).
Detroit IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Ani.SnchzW,8-7 6 6 0 0 1 5101 2.68
B.Rondon 1 2 1 1 1 1 16 5.54
Smyly 1 1 0 0 0 3 15 1.80
Putkonen 1/3 1 1 1 0 0 63.05
Coke 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 5.64
Benoit 2/3 00 0 0 0 9 1.54
Chicago IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Joh.DanksL,2-8 711 6 6 1 31094.81
Purcey 1 00 0 0 0 16 3.60
Troncoso 2/3 00 0 0 1 6 5.71
Veal 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 56.55
Coke pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inher-
ited runners-scored-Benoit 1-0.WP-B.
Rondon, Smyly. Umpires-Home, Gary
Darling; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Bruce
Dreckman; Third, Chris Conroy. T-2:55.
A-26,793 (40,615).

Rangers 3,Yankees 1
NewYork AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Gardnercf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .280
I.Suzukirf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276
Cano2b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .302
Overbaylb 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250
V.Wellsdh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .239
Nunezss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .235
Lillibridge3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .154
Mesalf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .143
C.Stewartc 2 0 0 0 0 1 .234
a-Hafnerph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .209
Au.Rominec 0 0 0 0 0 0 .165
Totals 33 1 6 1 0 6
Texas AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Kinsler2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .280
Andrusss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .247
N.Cruzrf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .273
A.Beltre3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .309
Pierzynskidh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .283
Je.Bakerlf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .326
Dav.Murphylf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .226
Morelandlb 4 0 0 0 0 1 .253
G.Sotoc 3 0 1 0 1 1 .194
Gentrycf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .230
Totals 32 3 9 3 2 2
NewYork 000001000- 1 60
Texas 100001 01x- 3 92
a-grounded out for C.Stewart in the 8th.
E-A.Beltre (10), Garza (1). LOB-New
York 5, Texas 8. 2B-Je.Baker (5). HR-
Pierzynski (10), off Pettitte; Day.Murphy
(11), off Kelley. RBIs-Cano (70), Pierzyn-
ski 2 (36), Day.Murphy (33). SB-Gardner
(17), I.Suzuki (15), Gentry (9). S-Andrus.
Runners left in scoring position-New
York 4 (V.Wells 2, Mesa, Nunez); Texas 5
(Je.Baker, Andrus, Moreland, A.Beltre 2).
RISP-New York 1 for 7; Texas 2 for 10.
GIDP-Overbay. DP-Texas 1 (Andrus,
Kinsler, Moreland).
NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Pettitte L, 7-8 6 8 2 2 1 2 94 4.39
Kelley 2 1 1 1 1 0 35 3.49
Texas IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
GarzaW, 1-0 71/3 5 1 0 0 5 95 0.00
CottsH,9 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 15 1.52
NathnS,32/341/3 1 0 0 0 0 5 1.73
Pettitte pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. In-
herited runners-scored-Kelley 2-0. Um-
pires-Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Vic
Carapazza; Second,Wally Bell;Third, Kerwin
Danley.T-2:43. A-42,360 (48,114).

Cardinals 11, Phillies 3
Philadelphia AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Rollinsss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .258
M.Young3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280
Utley2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .286
D.Youngrf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .279
DeFratusp 0 0 0 0 0 0
c-Frandsenph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .283
Diekmanp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ruf lb 4 1 1 0 0 0 .289
L.Nixlf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .194
Mayberrycf-rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .255
Ruizc 4 0 1 1 0 0 .252
Lannanp 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235
a-Jo.McDonald ph 0 0 0 0 0 .100
J.Ramirezp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
M.Martinezcf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .167
Totals 34 3 9 3 1 2
St. Louis AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
M.Carpenter2b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .326
S.Robinsoncf-rf 5 0 3 3 0 1 .268
Beltranrf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .301
Jaycf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .249
Craiglf 4 2 2 0 1 0 .337
Y.Molinac 5 2 3 1 0 0 .339
Freese3b 2 1 1 1 2 0 .277
Siegristp 0 0 0 0 0 0
d-T.Cruzph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .208
Ca.Martinezp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ma.Adamsib 4 1 2 3 0 1 .307
e-B.Petersonph-lbl 0 1 1 0 0 .167
Kozmass 4 1 1 1 1 2 .241
Westbrookp 1 1 0 0 1 0 .208
b-Descalsoph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .272
Totals 3811 1611 6 5
Philadelphia 000010200-3 90
St. Louis 021150 02x-11161
a-grounded into a double play for Lannan
in the 5th. b-grounded out for Westbrook
in the 7th. c-was hit by a pitch for De Fratus
in the 8th. d-singled for Siegrist in the 8th.
e-singled for MaAdams in the 8th. E-
Freese (4). LOB-Philadelphia 6, St. Louis
11. 2B-Mayberry (17), Craig (24), YMolina
(30), Freese (15), MaAdams (11). 3B-S.
Robinson (1). RBIs-Mayberry (27), Ruiz (8),
M.Martinez (1), M.Carpenter (49), S.Robinson
3 (11),Y.Molina (53), Freese (34), Ma.Adams 3
(29), B.Peterson (2), Kozma (31). SB-West-
brook (1). S-Westbrook. Runners left in
scoring position-Philadelphia 4 (Rollins,
Jo.McDonald, M.Young, LNix); St. Louis 5
(Freese, Beltran 2, Kozma, M.Carpenter).
RISP-Philadelphia 2 for 10; St. Louis 9 for
20. GIDP-Ruf, LNix, Jo.McDonald. DP-
Philadelphia 1 (D.Young, D.Young, Ruiz); St.
Louis 3 (Kozma, M.Carpenter, MaAdams),
(M.Carpenter, Kozma, Ma.Adams), (Siegrist,
Kozma, MaAdams).
Philadelphia IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
LannanL,2-4 4 84 4 2 3 884.13
J.Ramirez 1 45 5 2 0 41 8.00
DeFratus 2 00 0 2 2 38 5.09
Diekman 1 42 2 0 0 27 4.50
St.Louis IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
WestbrkW,7-4 7 93 3 0 2 902.95
Siegrist 1 00 0 1 0 170.64
Ca.Martinez 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 5.56
HBP-by De Fratus (M.Carpenter), by Siegrist
(Frandsen). Umpires-Home, Sam Holbrook;
First, Andy Fletcher; Second, Joe West; Third,
Adam Hamari.T-306.A-44,317 (43,975).


Rockies 2, Marlins 1
Miami AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Hechavarria ss 5 0 1 0 0 3 .252
Yelichlf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .375
Stantonrf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .235
Lucasib 5 0 2 0 0 0 .270
Polanco3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .256
Marisnickcf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000
D.Solano2b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .279
Mathisc 4 0 2 0 0 0 .214
Ja.Turnerp 2 0 1 0 0 1 .143
a-Dobbsph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .221
Webbp 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
DaJenningsp 0 0 0 0 0 0
c-Ruggianoph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .201
A.Ramosp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 110 1 2 9
Colorado AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Fowlercf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .278
LeMahieu2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .284
C.Gonzalezlf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .298
Tulowitzkiss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .328
Cuddyerrf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .328
Heltonlb 4 1 1 0 0 1 .259
Arenado3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .241
Torrealbac 2 1 1 0 1 0 .283
J.DeLaRosap 1 0 0 0 0 0 .059
Escalonap 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Outmanp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
W.Lopezp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Blackmonph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255
Belislep 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 28 2 7 2 4 6
Miami 000000010- 1101
Colorado 010010 00x- 2 71
a-was hit by a pitch for Ja.Turner in the 7th.
b-flied out for W.Lopez in the 7th. c-struck
out for DaJennings in the 8th. E-Hecha-
varria (7), Tulowitzki (3). LOB-Miami 12,
Colorado 8. 2B-Helton (9). RBIs-D.So-
lano (7), LeMahieu (13), Arenado (30). SB-
Hechavarria (7), Cuddyer (7). CS-C.Gon-
zalez (2). S-J.De La Rosa. SF-LeMahieu.
Runners left in scoring position-Miami
6 (Polanco, Hechavarria, Yelich, Stanton 2,
Ruggiano); Colorado 6 (J.De La Rosa, Are-
nado 3, C.Gonzalez 2). RISP-Miami 1 for 9;
Colorado 2 for 8.
Miami IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
Ja.TurnerL,3-3 6 62 2 2 4 802.49
Webb 2/3 1 0 0 1 0 10 3.15
DaJennings 1/3 00 0 0 0 33.10
A.Ramos 1 00 0 1 2 22 3.31
Colorado IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
J.DLRosaW,10-56 50 0 1 5 962.97
EscalonaH,7 1/3 2 0 0 0 1 124.50
OutmanH,7 1/3 00 0 0 1 54.62
W.LopezH,5 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 24.25
BelisleH,15 1 3 1 1 0 1 244.29
BrothersS,6-7 1 0 0 0 1 1 11 1.27
Inherited runners-scored-DaJennings
2-0, Outman 3-0, W.Lopez 3-0. IBB-off
Ja.Turner (Torrealba). HBP-by Escalona
(Dobbs).WP-Ja.Turner. Umpires-Home,
Dan lassogna; First, Brian Knight; Second,
Mark Carlson; Third, Gerry Davis. T-2:54.
A-30,900 (50,398).

Royals 4, Orioles 3
Baltimore AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
McLouthlf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .285
Machado3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .304
Markakisrf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .286
AJonescf 4 1 0 1 0 0 .291
C.Davisib 3 0 0 0 1 1 .311
Wietersc 4 1 2 2 0 0 .247
Hardyss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .253
Urrutiadh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .313
B.Roberts2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .253
Totals 32 3 8 3 2 3
Kansas City AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
L.Caincf-rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .256
Hosmerib 4 2 2 3 0 0 .287
B.Butlerdh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .274
S.Perezc 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278
M.Tejada3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .280
Loughlf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .294
A.Escobarss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .246
Getz2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .208
EJohnsonrf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .203
Dysoncf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Totals 34 4 9 4 0 4
Baltimore 000200010- 3 81
Kansas City 100000021- 4 92
One out when winning run scored. E-
Machado (7), Getz (2), Hosmer (6). LOB-
Baltimore 6, Kansas City 5. 2B-McLouth
(21), B.Butler (19), A.Escobar (15). HR-Wi-
eters (14), off E.Santana; Hosmer 2 (11),
off W.Chen 2. RBIs-AJones (71), Wiet-
ers 2 (48), Hosmer 3 (44), A.Escobar (34).
S-Machado 2. Runners left in scoring
position-Baltimore 3 (AJones, Urrutia,
C.Davis); Kansas City 2 (S.Perez, Getz).
RISP-Baltimore 0 for 6; Kansas City 0
for 2. GIDP-Machado, Hardy, Urrutia,
Getz. DP-Baltimore 1 (Hardy, B.Roberts,
C.Davis); Kansas City 3 (E.Santana, Getz,
Hosmer), (A.Escobar, Getz, Hosmer),
(A.Escobar, Hosmer).
Baltimore IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
W.Chen 71/3 7 3 3 0 3107 2.78
O'DayL,5-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 182.20
Kansas City IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
E.Santana 8 7 3 1 2 3 98 3.06
HochevarW,3-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 1.95
IBB-off E.Santana (Markakis). Umpires-
Home, Bill Miller; First, Todd Tichenor; Sec-
ond, CB Bucknor;Third, Dale Scott.T-2:32.
A-17,410 (37,903).

Angels 1,Twins 0
Minnesota AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Thomas If 3 0 0 0 1 2 .238
Bernier2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250
Morneaudh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .269
Doumitc 2 0 0 0 2 0 .237
1-Carrollpr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .223
C.Herrmannrf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .346
Plouffe3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .254
Colabellolb 3 0 0 0 0 1 .118
Hickscf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .199
Florimonss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .232
Totals 28 0 2 0 310
Los Angeles AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Shucklf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .288
Troutcf 30 0 0 0 2 .321
Pujolsdh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .254
Trumbolb 40 2 0 0 0 .250
H.Kendrick2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .304
Callaspo3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .256
lannettac 3 0 0 0 0 2 .210
Cowgillrf 30 2 0 0 0 .500
SAybarss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .282
Totals 30 1 7 1 1 5
Minnesota 000000000- 0 20
LosAngeles 100000 00x- 1 70
1-ran for Doumit in the 9th. LOB-Min-
nesota 5, Los Angeles 7. RBIs-Pujols
(60). SB-Bernier (1), Hicks (8), Shuck (4).
Runners left in scoring position-Min-
nesota 3 (Doumit, Florimon, C.Herrmann);
Los Angeles 3 (H.Kendrick, Callaspo, Trout).
RISP-Minnesota 0 for 4; Los Angeles 1
for 5. DP-Minnesota 1 (Pelfrey, Florimon,
Colabello); Los Angeles 1 (Frieri, Trumbo,
Aybar,Trumbo).
Minnesota IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
PelfreyL,4-8 6 5 1 1 1 5 945.15
Swarzak 2 20 0 0 0 303.36
LosAngeles IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
WeaverW,5-5 8 20 0 1 91142.98
FrieriS,25-27 1 00 0 2 1 203.71
HBP-by Pelfrey (Trout), by Frieri (Bernier).
Umpires-Home, Mike Muchlinski; First,
Scott Barry; Second, Alfonso Marquez;
Third, Ted Barrett. T-2:43. A-38,209
(45,483).

On this date


By PaulMontella, Associated Press
1961 En route to his 61-homer season,
Roger Maris of the New York Yankees hit
four homers against the ChicagoWhite Sox
in a doubleheader to give him 40 for the
year.TheYankees took both games,5-1 and
12-0, and Maris moved 25 games ahead of
Babe Ruth's 1927 pace.
1962 Stan Musial of St. Louis became
the all-time RBI leader in the NL. His two-
run home run, in a 5-2 loss to Los Angeles,
gave him 1,862 RBIs, passing Mel Ott.


Page 4 SP






The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


I SCOREBOARD

Sports on TV
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Edmonton at Montreal
GOLF
Noon
ESPN2 -The Senior British Open Champi-
onship, first round, at Southport, England
3p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Canadian Open, first
round, at Oakville, Ontario
6:30p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Boise Open, first
round, at Boise, Idaho (same-daytape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, N.Y. Yankees at
Texas or Detroit at Chicago White Sox
3:10 p.m.
FSFL Miami at Colorado
7p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Tampa Bay at
Boston or Philadelphia at St. Louis
7:10 p.m.
SUN -Tampa Bay at Boston
9:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Arizona
VOLLEYBALL
8p.m.
NBCSN --World Series of Beach Volleyball,
women's Grand Slam quarterfinals and
men's Grand Slam pool play, at Long Beach,
Calif

Glantz-Culver Line
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at New York -105 Atlanta -105
atWashington -130 Pittsburgh +120
atMilwaukee -150 San Diego +140
atColorado -160 Miami +150
at St. Louis -170 Philadelphia +160
at Arizona -175 Chicago +165
atLosAngeles -130 Cincinnati +120
American League
atTexas -150 NewYork +140
Detroit -135 atChicago +125
atToronto -200 Houston +185
atBoston -135 Tampa Bay +125
Baltimore -110 at KansasCity +100
atOakland -115 LosAngeles +105
at Seattle -165 Minnesota +155

Baseball
TUESDAY'S LATE MLB LINESCORES
MARLINS 4, ROCKIES 2
Miami 001020010-4121
Colorado 010001000-2 50
Fernandez, M.Dunn (8), Cishek (9) and
Mathis; Chacin, Outman (8), Escalona (8),
Belisle (9) and W.Rosario. W-Fernandez
6-5. L-Chacin 9-5. Sv-Cishek (19). HRs-
Miami, Stanton (11). Colorado, Helton (7).
DIAMONDBACKS 10, CUBS 4
Chicago 001000021 4 7 0
Arizona 00001333x -10 14 2
TrWood, Guerrier (6), H.Rondon (7),
Bowden (7) and D.Navarro; Corbin, Bell
(7), D.Hernandez (8), Sipp (9) and Nieves.
W-Corbin 12-1. L-TrWood 6-7. HRs-
Chicago, Schierholtz (12), Lake (2). Arizona,
Prado (9).
GIANTS 5, REDS 3
San Francisco 310 010 000 5 92
Cincinnati 020 010 000 3100
(Second Game)
G.Reynolds, Hoover (6), Partch (7), M.Parra
(9) and C.Miller, Mesoraco; Zito, Dunning
(5), Mijares (6), S.Casilla (6), J.Lopez (8),
Romo (8) and Posey W-S.Casilla 4-2. L-G.
Reynolds 0-1. Sv-Romo (24).
ASTROS 5, ATHLETICS 4
Oakland 101 000 020-4 93
Houston 100 010003-5 81
J.Parker, Doolittle (8), Balfour (9) and Jaso,
D.Norris; Cosart, Cisnero (8), Fields (9)
and J.Castro. W-Fields 1-1. L-Balfour
0-2. HRs-Oakland, Moss (17). Houston,
M.Dominguez(12).
TWINS 10, ANGELS 3
Minnesota 001000110 7 -10 150
LosAngeles000200001 0 3 10 0
(10innings)
Gibson, Burton (7), Fien (8), Perkins (9),
Roenicke (10) and C.Herrmann; Hanson,
S.Downs (6), D.De La Rosa (7), Jepsen (8),
Richards (9), Frieri (10), Buckner (10) and
Conger, lannetta.W-Perkins 2-0. L-Frieri
0-2. HRs-Minnesota, C.Herrmann (2), Flo-
rimon (6). Los Angeles, Pujols (17),Trumbo
(22).
MARINERS 4, INDIANS 3
Cleveland 120 000 000 3113
Seattle 103 000 00x-4 90
McAllister, Albers (6), Allen (8) and Y.Gomes;
E.Ramirez, Medina (6), Wilhelmsen (9) and
Zunino. W-E.Ramirez 1-0. L-McAllister
4-6. Sv-Wilhelmsen (23). HRs-Cleveland,
Y.Gomes (7)

GULF COAST LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet. GB
Nationals 24 5 .828 -
Cardinals 14 14 .500 912
Marlins 12 17 .414 12
Mets 7 21 .250 161/2
Northeast Division
W L Pct. GB
Tigers 16 9 .640 -
Yankees 15 12 556 2
Astros 14 13 .519 3
Braves 10 16 385 61/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct. GB
Yankees 15 12 556 -
Pirates 15 13 536 V2
BlueJays 13 14 .481 2
Phillies 9 18 333 6
South Division
W L Pet. GB
Red Sox 17 12 586 -
Orioles 15 14 .517 2
Rays 13 16 .448 4
Twins 13 16 .448 4
Wednesday's results
Mets 3, Marlins 0,1 st game
Nationals3, Cardinals 1,1st game
Marlins 4, Mets 2,2nd game
Pirates 8,Yankees 6,11 innings
Twins 3, Orioles 1
Astros 1, Braves 0,5 innings, susp., rain
Gulf Coast at Tigers, ppd., rain
Nationals 3, Cardinals 0,2nd game
Rays 9, Red Sox 6
BlueJays 10, Phillies 9,10 innings
Today's games
Tigers at Gulf Coast, 11 a.m., 1st game
Mets at Marlins, noon
Cardinals at Nationals, noon
Braves at Astros, noon
Astros 1, Braves 0,5 innings, comp. of susp.
game
Orioles at Twins, noon
Yankees at Pirates, noon
Gulf Coast vs. Tigers at Gulf Coast, 1:30 p.m.,
2nd game
Red Sox at Rays, 6:30 p.m.
BlueJays at Phillies,7 p.m.
Friday's games
Marlinsvs Cardinals at Marlins, 10 a.m.


Pirates at Blue Jays, 11 a.m., 1st game
Tigers at Astros, noon
Nationals at Mets, noon
Gulf Coast at Braves, noon
Phillies at Yankees, noon
Orioles at Rays, noon
Red Sox atTwins, noon
Pirates at Blue Jays, 1:30 p.m., 2nd game

Soccer
CONCACAF GOLD CUP
Semifinals
Wednesday's results
At Arlington, Texas
United States 3, Honduras 1
Panama vs. Mexico, late


Championship
Sunday
At Chicago
U.S. vs. Mexico-Panama winner, 4 p.m.

MLS
Eastern Conference
W L T Pts GF GA
Sporting KansasCity 10 5 6 36 31 20
Montreal 9 5 5 32 31 29
NewYork 9 7 5 32 29 24
Philadelphia 8 6 7 31 32 30
Houston 8 6 5 29 22 19
NewEngland 7 7 6 27 25 18
Chicago 7 9 3 24 24 29
Columbus 6 9 5 23 23 25
Toronto FC 2 10 8 14 17 28
D.C. 2 14 4 10 9 33
Western Conference
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 11 6 4 37 33 20
Portland 8 210 34 30 18
LosAngeles 10 8 3 33 32 25
Vancouver 9 6 5 32 33 28
FCDallas 8 5 8 32 27 27
Colorado 8 7 7 31 26 24
Seattle 7 7 4 25 22 21
San Jose 6 9 6 24 21 32
Chivas USA 4 11 5 17 18 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Saturday's games
Columbus at Toronto FC, 2 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Real Salt Lakeat NewYork, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 7 p.m.
New England at D.C. United, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Houston, 9 p.m.
Portland at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's game
Chivas USAat Seattle FC, 11 p.m.
NATIONALWOMEN'S SOCCER LEAGUE
W L T Pts GF GA
FCKansasCity 9 4 5 32 29 17
SkyBlueFC 9 4 4 31 25 18
Portland 9 4 3 30 21 15
Western New York 7 4 6 27 28 17
Chicago 6 6 4 22 20 23
Boston 5 7 5 20 24 27
Seattle 4 10 3 15 16 28
Washington 1 11 4 7 11 29
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Wednesday's result
FC Kansas City 3, Boston 0
Today's game
Chicago at Seattle FC, 10 p.m.
Saturday's game
Boston atWashington, 7 p.m.
Sunday's games
FC Kansas City at Sky Blue FC, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Portland, 7 p.m.

Basketball
WNBA
Eastern Conference
W L Pet GB
Chicago 12 5 .706 -
Atlanta 11 5 .688 1/2
Washington 9 9 .500 3/2
Indiana 7 9 .438 412
NewYork 7 10 .412 5
Connecticut 4 12 250 7/2
Western Conference
W L Pet GB
Minnesota 14 3 .824 -
Los Angeles 12 5 .706 2
Phoenix 9 9 .500 51/2
Seattle 6 10 375 7/2
Tulsa 6 13 316 9
San Antonio 5 12 .294 9
Tuesday's result
NewYork 77, Indiana 72
Wednesday's results
Washington 82, Chicago 78
Minnesota 81, Phoenix 69
Atlanta 74, Connecticut 65
Today's games
NewYorkat San Antonio, 12:30 p.m.
Indiana atTulsa, 12:30 p.m.
Seattle at Los Angeles, 3:30 p.m.

Football
AFL
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L T Pet PF PA
y-Chicago 10 7 0 .588 933 882
San Antonio 9 8 0 .529 740 856
Iowa 6 11 0 .353 782 829
West Division
W L T Pet PF PA
y-Arizona 14 3 0 .8241119 821
x-Spokane 13 4 0 .7651137 853
x-SanJose 12 5 0 .706 968 837
Utah 6 11 0 .353 848 942
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
South Division
W L T Pet PF PA
y-Jacksonville 11 6 0 .647 889 839
TampaBay 7 10 0 .412 915 928
Orlando 6 11 0 .353 894 990
NewOrleans 5 12 0 .294 791 998
Eastern Division
W L T Pet PF PA
y-Philadelphia 12 5 0 .7061024 797
Cleveland 4 13 0 .235 801 999
Pittsburgh 4 13 0 .235 683 953
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Friday's game
Pittsburgh at Spokane, 10 p.m.
Saturday's games
Tampa Bay at Jacksonville, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Arizona at Iowa, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Utah,9 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
CFL
East Division
W L T Pts PF PA
Toronto 2 2 0 4 118 116
Winnipeg 1 3 0 2 91 109
Montreal 1 3 0 2 90 112
Hamilton 1 3 0 2 79 136
West Division
W L T Pts PF PA
Saskatchewan 4 0 0 8 151 67
B.C. 3 1 0 6 104 84
Calgary 3 1 0 6 125 109
Edmonton 1 3 0 2 72 107
Today's game
Edmonton at Montreal, 730p.m.
Friday's game
Calgary at Winnipeg,8 p.m.
Saturday's game
Saskatchewan at Hamilton, 730p.m.
July 30
B.C. at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.

NFL CALENDAR
Aug. 3 Pro Football Hall of Fame induc-
tions, Canton, Ohio.
Aug. 4 Hall of Fame Game: Dallas vs.
Miami.
Aug. 8 First weekend of preseason
games.
Aug. 27- Roster cutdown to 75 players.
Aug. 31- Roster cutdown to 53 players.
Aug. 29- Preseason schedule ends.
Sept. 5 2013 season begins, Baltimore
at Denver.
Sept. 8-9 First weekend of regular-sea-
son games.


Tennis
BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC
U.S. Open Series event
At TheTaube Family Tennis Center,
Stanford, Calif.
Purse: $795,000 (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
SSecond Round
Varvara Lepchenko (6), United States,def.
Tamira Paszek,Austria,6-4,6-4.


Sorana Cirstea (5), Romania, def. CoCo
Vandeweghe, United States,6-3,6-3.

ATLANTA OPEN
U.S. Open Series event
At The Atlanta Athletic Club
Norcross, Ga.
Purse: $623,730 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
First Round
Matthew Ebden, Australia, def. Ivo Karlo-
vic, Croatia, 6-2,0-0 retired.
Christian Harrison, United States, def.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-1,6-7 (7), 6-2.
Second Round
Lleyton Hewitt (7), Australia, def. Rhyne
Williams, United States, 7-6(6), 6-4.
Ivan Dodig (3), Croatia, def. Ricardas Be-
rankis, Lithuania, 6-1,6-7 (3), 6-3.
James Blake, United States, def.Tim Smy-
czek, United States, 7-6 (3), 4-6, 7-6(4).
Michael Russell, United States, def. Mardy
Fish (6), United States, 4-6,6-2, 7-5.
SUISSEOPEN
At Roy Emerson Arena
Gstaad, Switzerland
Purse: $614,700 (WT250)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Second Round
Juan Monaco (4), Argentina, def. Guill-
ermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-1,6-2.
Feliciano Lopez (5), Spain, def. Andrey
Kuznetsov, Russia, 6-4, 6-3.
Mikhail Youzhny (6), Russia, def. Pablo
Andujar, Spain, 6-3,4-6,6-3.
Stanislas Wawrinka (2), Switzerland, def.
Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 7-5,7-6 (4).

BAKU CUP
At BakiTennisAkademiyasi
Baku, Azerbaijan
Purse: $235,000 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
First Round
Chanelle Scheepers (3), South Africa, def.
Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 3-6,
6-3,64.
Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Po-
Iona Hercog (6), Slovenia, 7-6 (7), 4-6,6-3.
Elina Svitolina (7), Ukraine, def. Aleksan-
dra Krunic, Serbia, 6-3,4-6,6-2.
Kateryna Kozlova, Ukraine, def. Eleni
Daniilidou, Greece, 6-2,3-6,6-4.
Second Round
Ons Jabeur, Tunisia, def. Bojana Jova-
novski (1), Serbia, 6-2, 7-5.
Donna Vekic (2), Croatia, def. Tetyana
Arefyeva, Ukraine, 6-1,6-2.
Alexandra Cadantu (4), Romania, def.
Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 5-7,6-1,6-3.

Transactions
BASEBALL
Major League Baseball
MLB-Suspended Cleveland minor
league SS Rubiel Martinez (DSL Indians)
and New York Yankees minor league LHP
Anderson Severino (DSL Yankees) 50
games each after testing positive for me-
tabolites of stanozolol.
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Signed 2B Dustin
Pedroia to an eight-year contract begin-
ning in 2014 and continuing through the
2021 season.
MINNESOTA TWINS-Placed C Joe
Mauer on the paternity list. Recalled C Drew
Butera from Rochester (IL).
NEW YORK YANKEES-Placed INF Luis
Cruz on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July
23. Recalled INF David Adams from Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS-Selected INF
Adam Rosales from Sacramento (PCL). Des-
ignated INFVinnie Catricala for assignment.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Activated OF David
DeJesus from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF
Dave Sappelt to Iowa (PCL).
LOS ANGELES DODGERS-Reinstated
LHPTed Lillyfrom the 15-day DL. Placed OF
Matt Kemp on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
July22.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS-Signed G Ricky
Ledo.
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS-Waived
F-C Dwayne Jones, G Scott Machado and G
Kevin Murphy.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS-Placed LB Dan
Giordano on the PUP list. Waived/failed
physical LBTim Fugger.
ATLANTA FALCONS-Signed QB Sean
Renfree. Agreed to termswith CB Desmond
Trufant on a four-year contract.
CLEVELAND BROWNS-Signed FB
Brock Bolen and LB Justin Cole. Waived OL
Dominic Alford and WR Kennan Davis.
DALLAS COWBOYS-Released WR La-
vasierTuinei. Signed DT Landon Cohen and
DE George Selvie.
DETROIT LIONS-Signed WR Chaz
Schilens.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS-Agreed to
terms with LB BjoernWerner.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS-Claimed S
Ray Polkoffwaivers from Seattle.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS-Signed WR
Mike Williams to a six-year contract. Signed
G Jeremy Lewis. Placed RB Jeff Demps on
the reserve/did not report list. Activated
P Michael Koenen from the reserve/non-
football injury list. Placed K Connor Barth
on the reserve/non-football injury list. Acti-
vated TE Luke Stocker and DEMarkusWhite
from the PUP list.
TENNESSEE TITANS-Signed RB Jackie
Battle and TE DeMarco Cosby Waived RB
Alvester Alexander and QB Nathan Enderle.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS-Agreed to
termswith F Brad Winchester on a one-year
contract.
DALLAS STARS-Named James Patrick
assistant coach.
FLORIDA PANTHERS-Agreed to terms
with C Scott Timmins on a one-year con-
tract.
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS-Signed D
Paul Ranger to a one-year contract. Pro-
moted video analyst Chris Dennis to assis-
tant coach.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS-Named
Pace Sagester media relations manager.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
NEWYORK RED BULLS-Signed F Brad-
ley Wright-Phillips.
SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC-Waived F
Sammy Ochoa.
VANCOUVER WHITECAPS-Signed F
Kenny Miller to a six-month contract exten-
sion.
COLLEGE
BAYLOR-Named Kassi Duncan and
Emily Maike acrobatics & tumbling assis-
tant coaches.


FORDHAM-Named John Krasinski as-
sistant athletic director for athletic perfor-
mance and Zac Conner assistant strength
and conditioning coach.
GEORGE WASHINGTON-Named Ma-
ria Fuccillo women's assistant tennis coach.
INDIANA STATE-Promoted assistant
coach Brian Sheppard to offensive coordi-
nator.
RANDOLPH-MACON-Named Katie
Gebhard women's assistant soccer coach.
SAN FRANCISCO-Named Seth Ether-
ton pitching coach.
ST. AUGUSTINE'S-Announced the
resignation of men's basketball coach Lon-
nie Blow, Jr. to accept the same position at
Virginia State.


* SOCCER:




Donovan, U.S. give





Honduras the boot


FROM WIRE REPORTS

ARLINGTON, Texas
- Landon Donovan has
seen a lot of soccer, hav-
ing played in three World
Cups, won five Major
League Soccer titles and
scored more goals and
registered more assists
than any player in U.S.
history.
But he has never seen
anything like the tear the
national team has been
on the last three weeks,
with the Americans scor-
ing 25 goals in five wins
heading into Wednesday's
Gold Cup semifinal
against Honduras at
Cowboys Stadium.
"I've never been part
of a run like this," said
Donovan, who scored
five of those goals and
assisted on six others. "It's
a lot of fun, not only the
goals, but we're creating
lots of chances and that's
enjoyable."
Thanks to Donovan, the
run continues. He scored
two goals and set up
another, and the U.S. beat
Honduras 3-1 to advance
to Sunday's CONCACAF
Gold Cup final.
The U.S. struck first
when Donovan found
Eddie Johnson running
through the middle of
the Honduran defense.
Johnson took a dribble
and powered a shot
past goalkeeper Donis
Escober, giving the U.S. a
lead 11 minutes into the
game.
In the 27th minute,
Johnson started an-
other scoring sequence
with a pass to mid-
fielder Alejandro Bedoya.
Donovan received


AP PHOTO


Honduras'Andy Najar (14) and United States' Stuart Holden (11)
battle for control of the ball during the first half Wednesday.


Bedoya's short chip off his
chest in the middle of the
goal box and poked a shot
past Escober.
Nery Medina of
Honduras made it a
one-goal game in the
52nd minute, heading
in a cross from Marvin
Chavez. The Americans
countered a minute later
when Bedoya ran down
a long ball from Clarence
Goodson and crossed it
to Donovan, who scored
from a few yards out.
The Americans will play
the winner Wednesday's
second semifinal between
Panama and Mexico at 4
p.m. Sunday in Chicago's
Soldier Field. The U.S.


has won a team-record 10
consecutive games.
Donovan has five goals
in the tournament, tying
him with teammate Chris
Wondolowski for most in
the Gold Cup. Although
assists aren't an official
statistic in the Gold Cup,
Donovan has set up seven
goals, including four in
the last two games.
Entering the game, he
was the only U.S. player
to play every minute
of the tournament. He
finally was subbed out in
the 72nd minute, having
earned a rest.
Conub ihiting The
Associated Press and Los
Angeles Times


I QUICK HITS


WAYWARD SKYDIVER KNOCKS
SHORTSTOP OUT FOR SEASON

ST. LOUIS (AP) It was the most
unusual error on a baseball field.
A skydiver parachuting in before
a summer league game accidentally
kicked shortstop Mattingly Romanin in
the face, knocking him to the ground
and, it turns out, ending his season. The
20-year-old Romanin said Wednesday
he had a concussion and was trying to
take the bizarre mishap in stride.
He and his Hannibal Cavemen
teammates, part of the Prospect League,
a summer wood-bat league for col-
lege players, were on the field before
Saturday's game when three skydiv-
ers dropped onto Clemens Field in
Hannibal, Mo. One of the divers veered
too close to Romanin, who was knocked
over. His immediate response: "Wow,
really? That just happened?"
Romanin played all nine innings in
Hannibal's 7-3 loss with a headache,
but the headaches worsened. He said a
doctor on Monday determined he had
a concussion. After consulting with his
coach at Chicago State, he decided to
shut down for the summer. Romanin
also suffered a concussion in the spring
after being hit in the head by a pitch.
"Obviously I was a little upset and
kind of frustrated about how the whole
situation developed," he said. "It was a
freak accident. It happens."


Top vote-getter Elena Delle Donne is questionable
for Saturday's WNBA All-Star Game after sustaining a
concussion in the third quarter of Chicago's 82-78 loss to
Washington. All-Star Ivory Latta had 18 points and 13
assists as the host Mystics rallied from a 21-point to beat
the Eastern Conference-leading Sky...
In Minneapolis, Lindsay Whalen had 18 points and
seven assists to lead Minnesota past Phoenix, 81-69....
Angel McCoughtry scored 22 points, Alex Bentley added
17 and the host Atlanta Dream snapped a four-game losing
streak with a 74-65 victory over the Connecticut Sun.


COLLEGES

Prosecutors refile charge in FIU player
death: Miami-Dade prosecutors had to temporarily drop
the murder charge against a former Florida International
University student accused of fatally stabbing a member
of the school's football team. But state attorney's office
spokesman Ed Griffith said the case has been refiled and
25-year-old Quentin Wyche has agreed to surrender.
Wyche's attorney have argued his client acted in self-
defense during a fight when he stabbed 22-year-old FlU
player Kendall Berry in March 2010. ...
Stanford forward Andy Brown's basketball playing
career is over after tearing an anterior cruciate ligament in
his knee for the fourth time since 2009. Brown tore the ACL
in his right knee during a team workout Tuesday morning.
Brown's previous ACL tears were in his left knee.


CYCLING

Probe: Pantani, UIIrich doped in 1998:
A French inquiry into sports doping uncovered proof
that 1998 Tour de France champion Marco Pantani and
runner-up Jan Ullrich used the banned blood-booster EPO.
Tho uron u4t ;dm rovo,,,i I .k 4 od ,. Wh kt ,,v ^ I nnn ui,, ortod-^


Ie IpU r dlt io Vdu VVi wldl dlat many dave long suspected:
Use of the banned substance EPO was rife in cycling in the
COLLEGE BASKETBALL late 1990s, before there was a test for the drug. Pantani

Former Creighton coach 'Red' died in 2004 at 34 of an accidental drug overdose. Ullrich
McManus dies: Creighton University said former has admitted to blood doping and last year was stripped
head basketball coach John "Red" McManus died Tuesday. of his third-place finish in the 2005 Tour. American Bobby
He was 88. He led the Bluejays to national prominence Julich, the 1998 third-place Tour finisher, has admitted to
during his tenure from 1959-1969, coaching them in two EPO use during that year's Tour....
NCAA tournaments. Among his top players were two future A day after retiring, Stuart O'Grady also admitted to
NBA members, Paul Silas and Bob Portman. using EPO during the 1998 Tour de France. The 39-year-old
Australian rider, a six-time Olympian and Tour stage
PRO BASKETBALL winner, announced his retirement after finishing his 17th
Tour de France, which ended Sunday.
Heat schedule may open vs. Bulls: The
Miami Heat will get their 2013 NBA championship rings in HOCKEY
front of the Chicago Bulls on Oct. 29. Their fans then will
get to enjoy their Christmas dinner watching the Heat at Red Wings new arena approved
the Los Angeles Lakers. At least that's the preliminary word despite Detroit's bankruptcy: A state board
based on the nearly completed draft of the 2013-14 NBA unanimously gave the go-ahead for a new Red Wings
schedule sent this week to teams and league broadcast hockey arena in downtown Detroit to be paid for in part
partners, the South Florida Sun Sentinel reported. The final with tax dollars as the broke city works through bankruptcy
2013-14 schedule is expected to be released next week.... proceedings. Gov. Rick Snyder and others defended against
Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant and potential criticism that the $650 million project should
Minnesota Timberwolves center Kevin Love said they will be entirely financed with private money because the city
return to play for Team USA. Both were members of the can't provide basic services and its retirees are facing cuts
U.S. team that won gold last year in the London Olympics. in their pensions. The arena is designed to be a catalyst for
Durant set a record for most points scored in an Olympic more development, officials said. Fifty-six percent of the
tournament with 156 at London.... overall project cost is private and 44 percent public.






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, July 25, 2013


U NFL: Tampa Bay Bucs notebook


U NFL NOTEBOOK


* AARON HERNANDEZ
CASE


Belichick talks Hernandez I ::


Tampa Bay cornerback Darrelle Revis works with
director of sports medicine and performance, du
workout in May. The Bucs will wait to determine
time in the preseason after he recovered from a b




Bucs wi



wait and



with Rei


All-Pro corner
works way back
from torn ACL
By STEPHEN F. HOLDER
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA Tampa Bay
Buccaneers coach Greg
Schiano expects corner-
back Darrelle Revis to
want to play in preseason
games. But whether
the All-Pro coming off
knee surgery does is not
ultimately his decision,
and Schiano said he is
undecided.
Revis, who has recov-
ered from a torn ACL and
was cleared Wednesday
to participate in the first
training camp practice
this morning, might
not see the field in the
preseason as he continues
to work back. He was
exempt from the team's
rigorous conditioning test
Wednesday as the Bucs
continue to be judicious
with his workload since he
was obtained from the Jets
in April.
"I think a lot of it
depends on how he looks
out there," Schiano said of
Revis' participation in the
preseason. Then, Schiano
said, he, Revis and general
manager Mark Dominik
will get together with
trainer Todd Toriscelli and
doctors to determine how
Revis is feeling.
"I think he probably
wants to play, wants to be
with his new teammates,
play in this new scheme,"
Schiano said. "We're going
to balance it all out. We're
going to make sure we do
everything we can so on
opening day, he's ready to
play in New York."
The Bucs will be cau-
tious with other injured


WILLIAMS
FROM PAGE 1
process, doing the deal
means the Bucs made
good on a promise to
commit to in-house
players who deserve new
deals.
The Bucs have awarded
huge contracts to several
outside acquisitions in
the past two years -
specifically Vincent
Jackson, Carl Nicks,
Dashon Goldson and
Darrelle Revis but
Williams could be the first
of several players drafted
by the team to receive


players, incl
guard Carl N
gurad Davin
defensive en
Clayborn. TI
in capacities

McCoy loo
What was perhaps:
at One Buc Place p
much does defense
McCoy weigh?
U.iiI t in I ffnr ,


AP FILE PHOTO
Todd Toriscelli,
ring an optional
Revis' playing
torn ACL.



II



see.





uding left
licks, right
Joseph and
id Adrian
they'll practice
S, too.

)king svelte:
s the biggest mystery
in Wednesday? How
ive tackle Gerald


Redskins plan
to take it easy
with Griffin III

FROM WIRE REPORTS
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- Calling it a "sad day
on so many levels," New
England Patriots coach
Bill Belichick spoke with
the media for 22 minutes
Wednesday about Aaron
Hernandez, the former
Patriots tight end who
was charged last month
with murder.
Belichick, who has often
been stone-faced with the
media in the past, looked
to be deeply affected by
the incident. Belichick
opened his first news con-
ference since the arrest by
reading a statement during
which he sent out the
organization's "thoughts
and prayers" to the family
of Odin Lloyd, the semipro
football player whom
Hernandez has been
charged with murdering.
"A young man lost
his life and his family
suffered a tragic loss and
there's no way to under-
state that," Belichick said.
Belichick, who makes
personnel as well as
coaching decisions for
the Patriots, said he
was "personally disap-
pointed and hurt" by the
Hernandez situation.
"Personally, I'm chal-
lenged by decisions that
affect the team on a daily
basis and I'm not perfect
on that either, but I always
try to do what I think is
best for the football team,"
Belichick said.
By Barbara Barker,
Newsday


New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick speaks to
Wednesday in Foxborough, Mass. Belichick broke hi
weeks after former Patriots tight end Aaron Hernai
charged with murder.


Redskins will go easy
with RG3: Robert Griffin III
put on his knee brace and passed
perfunctory Washington's condi-
tioning test on the eve of training
camp, then declared he has "nothing
left to prove"- at least physi-
cally in his return from major
knee surgery. That's doesn't mean
he's all the way back. Griffin said he
won't participate in 11-on-11 drills
in the early days of camp and likely
won't play in any preseason games.
The quarterback who likes to keep
the throttle wide open is going to
have to exercise a bit more patience
as he and coach Mike Shanahan try
to work together to get him on the
field for the regular season opener
Sept. 9.

Jags claim Polk off
waivers: Jacksonville claimed
undrafted rookie safety Ray Polk off
waivers from Seattle. The move leaves
the Jaguars roster at 90 players. The
6-foot, 219-pound Polk played in 40
games at Colorado and recorded 237
tackles, three tackles for loss and one
interception. His most productive
season came as a junior in 2011 when
he had 80 tackles, tied for second most
on the team. His father, Raymond Polk,
was drafted by the Los Angeles Raiders
in the 12th round in 1985.


Colts agree to
Werner: Indianapo
draft pick Bjoern Wern
it to training camp on
weekend. Werner, the
pick in April, agreed to
principle, becoming th
Colts'seven draft picks
A person familiar w
said Werner agreed to
contract worth $7.896
receive a $4.12 million
Werner played defe
Florida State, but the (
star will switch to outs
in Indianapolis. He wa
Defensive Player of the
then skipped his senio
enter the draft.

Falcons, Trufa
on contract: Rooki
Desmond Trufant has sii
deal with Atlanta and w
to report for the start of
Trufant's agent, Doug Hi
The Associated Press tha
was for $8.16 million w
guaranteed. Trufant wa:
players to report to dorr
training facility in Flowe
Camp officially begins o
the first practice.


viumipie e uirIs y t puir tes tu get
the newly-svelte McCoy to give up the JAGUARS UNDERPRESSURE
number were playfully rejected, but J54UU III
this much is certain: McCoy is notice- The Jaguars have been
ably slimmer. And he thinks that will FROM PAGE 1 one of the least-disruptive
help him produce more, despite playing rebuilding process," Khan said. defenses in the NFL the last five
a position were size and strength are "We're in a very, very different seasons going a paltry 24
essential, position. The fans, I think, we tried several times to improve
1i actually came in 10 pounds lower have to absolutely balance hopes r t h
than my goal weight,"McCoy said. and expectation. I think we the pass rush, but whiffed in
"People always keep asking me,'What definitely want to be better, but he draft land in free agency.
are you going to do different after you it's going to take a little bit of Caldwell and Bradley have
made the Pro Bowl?'Like I said a long time." retooled the line aga, sign-
g time. ing Roy Miller and Sen'Derrick
time ago, that's in the past. The only Five things to know as Marks, claiming Kyle Love and
way to repeat or keep it going is to Jacksonville opens camp today Brandon Deaderick off waiv-
work harder than every before. (The for its third rebuilding project ers, moving Alualu to end and
team) gave me a (target) weight and since 2008. thrusting second-year player
said come in at this weight.I said,'TI'I Andre Branch into a starting
show you.' came in 10 pounds lighter GABBERT'S LAST role. If those moves pay divi-
McCthan they wanted me 300 pounds."C H HANCE dends, Bradley's press-coverage
McCoy, listed at 6-4 and 300 pounds, scheme could work in Year 1.
said he has lost about 25 pounds Quarterback Blaine
since the start of the team's offseason Gabbert has shown little SPEED THRILLS
program in early April. That takes into improvement in two seasons.
account some postseason weight gain But the Jaguars aren't ready When Caldwell and
that happened while relaxing after the to give up on the 10th overall Bradley evaluated the ros-
Pro Bowl, he said. McCoy estimated he's draft pick in 2011, saying he ter, the biggest thing that stood
down about 10 pounds from his 2012 hasn't been afforded the best out was team speed or lack
playing weight, situation. They point to three thereof. With Jones-Drew, plod-
coaching staffs in as many ding tight end Marcedes Lewis
Better options: Josh Freeman years, an inexperienced receiv- and little breakaway speed at re-
promised fewer mistakes on the ing corps, a porous offensive ceiver, the Jaguars were far from
so-called option routes that proved line and the fact that he played the kind of team that would
problematic last season. Missed most of last season without scare defenses. So Jacksonville
reads by Freeman and his receivers star running back Maurice drafted Michigan star Denard
resulted in a numberof Freeman's 17 Jones-Drew. Nonetheless, Robinson and former South
interceptions. He hopes to change that everyone agrees that this is a Carolina standout Ace Sanders.
in his second year in coordinator Mike make-or-break season for the Both are expected to boost the
ins o y former Missouri standout. If team's return game and provide
Sullivan's offense.
kind of a whirlwind Gabbert doesn't show signs of offensive coordinator Jedd Fisch
Lastyear was kinfawhirlwind developing into a franchise with some creative options.
he said,"trying to pick things up and QB the team certainly will
learn things onthefly." switch to Chad Henne and LONDON CALLING?
draft another quarterback in L
Bucs bit: The Bucs filled a roster April. The Jaguars will play the
spot by re-signing G Jeremy Lewis. first of four home games
....................................... MJD'S RECOVERY in London in October. Khan
extensions. agreed to play one home game a
extensions. Jones-Drew, who is year for the next four years, cre-
The 26-year old coming off a significant ating speculation that he might
Williams was the Bucs foot injury, has been cleared to eventually move the franchise
fourth-round draft choice :
in 2010, passed up by practice. His recovery is a key overseas. NFL Commissioner
in 2010, passed up by story line. The 5-foot-7 dynamo Roger Goodell wants a team
many because o carac- has been the centerpiece of one in London, but many believe
ter concerns. ButWilliams of the league's worst offenses the logistics of playing so far
has been a mainstay the last four years, running for from the states make it a long
tor the Bucs, starting 47 4,735 yards and 29 touchdowns shot. Khan made it clear last
games and recording 193 against stacked fronts. But miss- week that while he wants to
receptions for 2,731 yards ing 10 games in 2012, showing increase the Jaguars' local and
and 23 touchdowns in up out of shape for offseason international profile, he has no
three seasons.He ranks conditioning and entering the plans of relocating. And he's
behind only the Cowboys final year of his contract have made several financial com-
first-round choice Dez raised questions about his mitments to the city, including
Bryant in receiver pro- short-term health and long- multi-million-dollar upgrades to
draft classroom theterm future in Jacksonville. EverBank Field.
draft class.
Jackson's arrival allowed I H
Williams to thrive in 2012, BREAKING NEWS!
when he caught 63 passes
e e cauh 6 Log onto www.sunnewspapers.net for the latest updates.
for 996 yards I


Aug. 9 Miami
Aug. 17 at N.Y. Jets
Aug. 24 Philadelphia
Aug. 29 at Atlanta
REGULAR SEASON
Sep. 8 Kansas City
Sep. 15 at Oakland
Sep. 22 at Seattle
Sep. 29 Indianapolis
Oct. 6 at St. Louis
Oct. 13 at Denver
Oct. 20 San Diego
Oct. 27 San Francisco (London)
Nov. 3 BYE
Nov. 10 at Tennessee
Nov. 17 Arizona
Nov. 24 at Houston
Dec. 1 at Cleveland
Dec. 5 Houston
Dec. 15 Buffalo
Dec. 22 Tennessee
Dec. 29 at Indianapolis


7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.

1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:05 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.

1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
8:25 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.


iPage 6 SP


The Sun /Thursday, July 25, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


cause

hearing


delayed

By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATTLEBORO, Mass. A
judge on Wednesday gave
AP PHOTO prosecutors more time
reporters to present evidence to a
s silence four grand jury in their murder
ndez was case against former New
England Patriots tight end
Aaron Hernandez.
o contract Hernandez was in court
is' first-round for what was
er will make supposed to
time this be a prob-
24th overall able cause
Sa contract in hearing, but
ie last of the prosecutors
sto reach a deal. said the
Yith the contract grand jury is
a four-year HERNANDEZ still consid-
5 million and will ering the
n signing bonus. evidence against him.
nsive end at Judge Daniel O'Shea
German-born considered defense
ide linebacker objections to a delay but
s the ACCs decided to reschedule
e Year in 2012, the hearing for Aug. 22.
)r season to Hernandez will continue
to be held without bail
until then.
nt agree Hernandez has pleaded
e cornerback not guilty to murder in
gned a four-year the death of Odin Lloyd,
vas the first player a 27-year-old Boston
training camp. semi-professional football
endrickson, told player.
at the contract Bristol County Assistant
ith $43 million District AttorneyWilliam
s one of the first McCauley said additional
ms at the team's evidence includes boxes
ry Branch, Ga. of ammunition found at a
n Thursday with condominium Hernandez
leased and a magazine for
a .45-caliber Glock in a
-Associated Press Hummer registered to him.


32 TEAMS IN 32 DAYS:
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS
2012 REWIND
Record: 2-14 (worst record in franchise history),
4th inAFC South
Postseason: Missed playoffs for fifth consecutive
season (2007)
2012 LEADERS
Passing: Chade Henne (2,084 yards, 11 TDs)
Rushing: Maurice Jones-Drew (414 yards, 1 TD)
Receiving: Cecil Shorts (979 yards, 7 TDs)
NEWCOMERS TO WATCH
Rookies: OT Luke Joeckel (Texas A&M), S Johna-
than Cyprien (FLU), CB Dwayne Gratz (Connecticut)
Veterans: DTs Roy Miller (Tampa Bay Buccaneers)
and Sen'Derrick Marks (Tennessee Titans), LB Geno
Hayes (Chicago Bears)
Coaches: Gus Bradley (head coach), Jedd Fisch
(offensive coordinator), Bob Babich (defensive
coordinator)
KEY LOSSES
CB Derek Cox (signed with San Diego Chargers), DT
Terrance Knighton (signed with Denver Broncos),
LB Daryl Smith (signed with Baltimore Ravens), WR
Laurent Robinson (released)
TRAINING CAMP
When: Today (rookies and veterans)
Where: Florida Blue Health & Wellness Practice
Fields, Jacksonville
NEEDS
Settle on starting QB, whether it's former top-10 draft
pick Blaine Gabbert or backup Chad Henne, and find
out if RB Maurice Jones-Drew is healthy (foot surgery)
and able to run behind offense's newzone-blocking
scheme. Bolster a defense that ranked 30th in league
and allowed franchise-record 444 points.
EXPECTATIONS
The Jaguars expect to be more competitive than last
season (not too difficult), but No. 1 item to figure out is
whether they need to draft a quarterback next April.
PRESEASON





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to


x


-^ -' .-.-.


Laishley
MARINE INC


* Styles & Prints May Vary* All Your Favorite Clothes Priced Below $76 is Tax Free for the weekend.
May not be combined with any other coupon or discount voucher of any kind


M
M


Punta Gorda, FL 33950


A weekly publication of Sun Coast Media Group, Inc. Serving Southwest Florida outdoor enthusiasts


I\ I


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We Know You Want To Be n Style
w Let's set Ready 941 School ether 941 639-386
Sporw- aCo p ~ny Mon..-Sat. 8 AM 6 P
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Southwest Florida's
ONLY weekly guide to
outdoor recreation








23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-206-1010
Publisher@WaterLineWeekly.com

EDITOR
LEE ANDERSON
941-206-1010
Editor@WaterLineWeekly.com

CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Allen
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Jeff Kincaid
Capt. Ed Kopp
Robert Lugiewicz
Nicole Miers-Pandolfi
Capt. Mike Myers
Terry Myers
Betty Staugler
Todd Terrill
Tommy Von Voigt
Capt. Cayle Wills

MARKETING
Advertising Director
Leslee Peth
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Printed by
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Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.


WaterLine photo by Josh Olive
Punta Gorda Herald editor
Pamela Stalk and Sun Sports
assistant editor Matt Stevens
show off the latest in casual
outdoor attire. See page 19
for more.


Stuck in the office


In terms of fishing, this was a rough week. Not
because I got skunked, but because I wasn't able
to make a single cast. I always keep a cheap rod
and reel locked in the bed of my truck. If I see a
promising canal, I'll simply pull over and see if
anything is biting. This week was all about being
a desk jockey, stuck in the office. There was an
unusual amount of work this week at WaterLine,
and it had to be done. It is what it is. But it's
weeks like this one that humble me and make me
really appreciate those times when I am able to
get out on the water.
Occasionally WaterLine does special feature
editions. The most recent one was our tarpon
special. We will have a snook special coming up
next month. But this week we feature outdoor
apparel. We take a look at what people wear
when they are outdoors doing whatever it is
they like to do. I was in charge
of writing about footwear


and swimsuits. Josh tackled sunglasses, tech-
nical fishing wear and leisure clothing. We both
did our share of research, and I especially liked
learning about the evolution of the swimsuit.
I have nothing but for respect for those ladies
back in the day. Their swimwear looked more
like snowwear, and I'm sure they would have
been tarred and feathered if they wore today's
bikinis back then.
We will also introduce a new columnist this
week. Her name is Nicole Miers-Pandolfi. She
is owner of SUP Englewood and she specializes
in stand-up paddleboarding. She has plenty
of writing experience, and she has a knack for
taking quality photos. She also likes to fish on her
paddleboard something I would like to try. It
beats sitting in the office all day.
I was able to get out on the water for a few
hours this week, but without a rod and reel. I
tagged along with Florida Sea Grant agent Betty


r Things I want to d
my shortcomings. It'll be a learning arrived the radar looked lik
", experience, that much is certain. Rorschach test made from
J A 'a I want to try eating a plecos- We had breakfast at Bob Ev


Maybe I'm just in need of a little
excitement, but lately I've been
thinking about all sorts of things I'd
like to take a shot at. I'm actually
planning to do one of them today
- I think my front yard fly casting
practice has gone on long enough,
and it's time to take this show on
the water. One of our writing staff
has graciously invited me aboard his
boat to attempt actually catching
a fish any sort offish on a
noodle rod. If it goes well, I'll tell you
about it next week. If it goes poorly,
there's no need to make him look
bad for what will undoubtedly be


tomus. Plecos are those dark brown
suckermouth catfish that have been
common in the Peace River for the
last 10 or 12 years. When I was
younger, I read about South American
Indians cooking plecos. They gut the
fish, stuff them with banana leaves
and roast them in the shell. It's alleg-
edly very good, but I want to know for
sure. Also on my culinary samplings
list: Toadfish and hardhead catfish.
Hey, I ate ladyfish and survived, so
how bad can they be?
I want to catch a good-sized bull
shark. Capt. Robert Moore made me
an offer to do just that last week,
but when the appointed morning


Staugler as she removed abandoned crab traps
from the Peace River. But common to the week's
theme, we basically got skunked. The next day,
Betty was kind enough to let us know she went
out again, this time landing her share of traps.
Thanks, Betty. (It is important to remember that
crab traps are protected by law. It's a third-degree
felony to tamper with someone else's traps (or
their content), lines, or buoys. Only individuals
participating in an organized trap removal
program and who have an authorized permit
from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission may handle and remove derelict
traps, even if it is apparent the traps are not being
actively fished.)
With that said, sit back and check out this week's
issue of WaterLine. There is a little something for
everybody. Fishing, paddleboarding, boating -
and, of course, bikinis. I'm going to plan a day out
on the water with my rod and reel.





lo, soonish


;e a
salsa.
vans and


called it a day. Don't get me wrong
- Capt. Moore is good company,
but I was hoping for something with
a toothier grin.
When snook season opens, I want
to harvest one. I've had the oppor-
tunity before but always let the fish
go. If we (Lord forbid) happen to
have anothre bad winter and see
significant cold kill, they might close
snook for good. Everybody tells me
how delicious they are, so I think I
ought to try it once when it's legal.
Watch this will be the year I
completely forget how to catch a
snook.
I want to become a better pistol


shot. I'm OK with a rifle and have
limited interest in shotgunning,
but I feel like I ought to put in a
little time with a 9mm or .40-cal.
Shooting a handgun is one of those
things that takes solid instruction
and lots of practice. Maybe I should
concentrate on getting comfortable
with my fly rod first.
What do you want to do? I'm sure
you have a list, or could come up
with one in short order. Finding the
time is always tough, but I'm real-
izing that if you don't set aside the
time to do what you love, something
else will come along and fill those
hours. Budget your time, get done
what needs to be done, and then go
have some fun. If you don't make it
happen, it never will.


1i0:12 1 T i'i ..p


lournevy r hool.; oie for Huni, nityv
Angling 101 ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
Piri in he o eI- r -hinebt ln
Angling 201 CAPT. MIKE MYERS
11( till (arpri i, nlei


Exploring the world of SUP NICOLE MIERS-PANDOLFI
E pl,:irin t ihe world d o:I f .1UP


aSlack Tides
hce: Oddities, rumors,
allegations, suggestions,
Pj.^.i suppositions, tidbits,
random thoughts and
the occasional outright
Page "1 lie.


W hat to w ear out there.............................................. ........................... Page 13
Want to keep your cool in the summer heat? Cover up............................. Page 14
Around Charlotte Harbor CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
Something smells fishy... and it's not a fish .............................................. Page 15


A Life on the Water CAPT. VAN HUBBARD ,,-
FW C, citizens need m ore dialogue ......................... ....... ...................... Page 11
Boat Maintenance CAPT. ED KOPP
WaterLine crossword puzzle.................................................... Page 12 The endless battle against corrosion.......................... ..........................Page 23


Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS, DVM
Baby birds need their feather mom s.................................................. ....... Page 24
Expert fishing tips.................................................... .......................... Page 24
Group gives vets missions in the'Glades................................................... Page 26


Don't get burned in the summer sun ....................................................... Page 15 Residents ofJaws'home seek an end to shark tournament................... Page 27
The long road of sw im suit evolution............................................................Page 16 Boat safety program s................................. ........................................ Page 30


Tackle Tech* JEFF KINCAID
The best pair of sunglasses you've ever worn............................................ Page 18
Style & comfort........ ...................................... ......................... ... Page 19
If the shoe fits, w ear it ............................................... ........................... Page 20
Red snapper season m ay reopen........................... ................................ Page 21
Tournament Bassin' GREG BARTZ
W hen things change, adapt or fail..............................................................Page 22


r ~ I~~LLLi~l~


BULLETIN BOARD I Page 3
TIDE CHARTS |I Page 4

FISH PROFILES I Page 4

SEAFOOD RECIPES I Page 4


FISH FINDER I Page 6
MAP OF LOCAL WATERS| Page 7

READER PHOTOS i Page 28

SOLUNAR TABLES I Page 31





P5u ns Ei5Nm3Ml l mmm. IaDm
---WWKB BB mJf---B *--****i i e mWgin


i you have a meeting,tournamentlestival or other event vou want included in the Outdoor Hews Bulletin Boardemailit to-WateriineMagazine@gmail.com


LOVERS KEY WADING TRIP
Join a park naturalist on July 25th at Lovers Key State Park
(8700 Estero Blvd, Fort Myers Beach) to learn about the marine
species that make the estuary and barrier island environments
unique, and explore sea grass flats. Seahorses, shrimp, young
fish, and egg casings of all sorts inhabit the grasses, which
attract larger fish, mollusks and crustaceans, and manatees,
dolphins and rays. Guests will get wet as they venture into the
estuary. The Estuary Wading Trip is sponsored by the Charlotte
Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP). For more informa-
tion call 239-463-4588.

FISHERMEN'S VILLAGE 2013
PIRATE FESTIVAL BALL
The Fishermen's Village 2013 Pirate's Ball will be held Friday,
July 26th from 8 to 11 p.m. at the Punta Gorda Isles Civic
Association (2001 Shreve Street, Punta Gorda). The Pirate's
Ball is the kick off event of the 5th Annual Fishermen's
Village Pirate Festival which last year attracted nearly 10,000
patrons over a three day period. Part of the proceeds from
the Pirate's Ball will benefit "Do the Right Thing", a program
sponsored by the Punta Gorda Police Department. This year's
Pirate's Ball will feature live music by The Brigands, The
Bawdy Boys & The Bone Island Buccaneers. The event will
include a costume contest, a well-stocked Cash Bar and some
tasty selections of finger foods and hors d'oeuvres catered by
The Captain's Table. Tickets for this 18+ Pirate's Ball are $20
($25 at the door). Tickets may be purchased on line at www.
fishermensvillagepiratefest.com or by calling 941-575-3067.

FLORIDA YARDS & NEIGHBORHOODS PROGRAM
Perfect for anyone interested in having a yard that is
environmentally friendly. Learn how proper planting and
mulching can help you save water, time and money on July
26th from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Rotary Park Environmental Center
(5505 Rose Garden Road, Cape Coral). Plus, everyone receives
a free plant or two. Call Rotary Park at 239-549-4606 or visit
www.capeparks.com. Cost is free.

HUGE NATIVE PLANT SALE IN CAPE CORAL
A wide variety of trees, shrubs, plants, grasses, and groundcov-
ers will be available on July 27th from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Rotary Park Environmental Center (5505 Rose Garden Road,
Cape Coral). Also, there will be information on butterfly garden-
ing, backyard wildlife habitats, and Florida friendly landscaping
practices. Several vendors and native plants experts will be on
hand to help you choose the right plant for the right place.

DRAGONFLIES AT ENGLEWOOD
SPORTS COMPLEX
Would you believe there are over 50 species of dragonflies
and damselflies that call Sarasota County home? On July
27th, from 10 a.m. to noon, join Sarasota County volunteers
and amateur odonatists (1300 S. River Rd., Englewood)
at Englewood Sports Complex to learn more about these
fascinating creatures and enjoy their vibrant colors and
amazing flight skills. Register on-line at www.scgov.net.
Click Calendar of Events on the left and search 'Nature Walks"
or call 941-861-5000 for more information.

NATIVE PLANT WALK IN PUNTA GORDA
Join the Mangrove Chapter of The Native Plant Society on a
fun and informational slow stroll on trails of Hathaway Park
(3561 Washington Loop Road, Punta Gorda) on July 27th
from 9 to 11 a.m. to learn about Florida native plants from
local experts as we walk along Shell Creek. Wear shoes that
can get wet, a sun hat, sun lotion and bring insect repellent
and drinking water. Due to a parking fee, you may want to
carpool on your own. Contact Denny Girard with questions at
941-474-1492 or dennyg29@msn.com.

BIRD HOUSE WORKSHOP
On Aug. 2nd from 9 a.m. to noon at Rotary Park
Environmental Center in Cape Coral (5505 Rose Garden Road,
Cape Coral.) We supply the design, materials and instruction;
you sand, assemble and paint your own birdhouse. This is
a great project for parent/grandparent and a child or for
anyone interested in garden art or providing a home for
wildlife. Bring your own hammer, please. The cost is $35 for
residents and $53 non-residents (Includes all the supplies).
Call 239-549-4606 for more information.

BEGINNERS GUIDE TO KAYAKING
Learn basic paddle strokes from an experienced guide at Four
Mile Cove Ecological Preserve Cape Coral (Four Mile Cove
Ecological Preserve, SE 23rd Terrace, Cape Coral) on Aug. 4th
at 9 a.m. Taught by GAEA Guides. Fee: $40 residents. $60
non-residents (includes kayak, equipment). Call for 239-549-
4606 more information.

MATLACHA PASS PADDLE
Birds, fish, mangroves and sunshine. Bring your own kayak,
but go with a guide and learn about the nature of the pre-
serve at Four Mile Cove Ecological Preserve (Southeast 23rd
Terrace, Cape Coral) on Aug. 9th at 9 a.m. Meeting location
given upon registration. Fee is $10 for residents and $15 for
non-residents. Register in advance at www.CapeParks.com
or call 239-549-4606.

2013 GREAT BAY SCALLOP SEARCH
SEEKS CAPTAINS, SNORKELERS
Join Florida Sea Grant, UF/IFAS Charlotte County Extension, on
Aug. 10th from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. by participating in the 2013
Great Bay Scallop Search, a resource-monitoring program in
which volunteers snorkel looking for scallops in select areas
within Lemon Bay and Gasparilla Sound. Volunteer boat
captains and snorkelers are needed to monitor and document
the health and status of the bay scallop population. Up to 40
boats are needed with as many as 150 volunteer participants to
search selected sites in Lemon Bay and Gasparilla Sound for the
elusive "bay scallop." If this event sounds interesting, call Betty
Staugler at 941-764-4346 or email her at staugler@ufl.edu.


GARDENING FOR BUTTERFLIES
AT ROTARY PARK
Bring your yard to life with beautiful butterflies on Aug. 10th
from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Rotary Park Environmental
Center in Cape Coral (5505 Rose Garden Road, Cape Coral.)
Learn all about butterflies found in this area and how you
can attract them to your yard. A plant list will be provided,
plus receive tips on how to keep the ants and wasps off of
your caterpillars naturally so they have a better chance at
becoming butterflies. This class will include a walk thru of
the Tom Allen Memorial Butterfly House at Rotary Park.
Bring your own drinking water and wear walking shoes,
please. The cost for this class is $10 for residents and $15
non-residents. For more information, call 239-549-4606.

HAMMERHEAD ADVENTURE RACE
The Race Boca Grande Hammerhead Adventure Run is Aug. 10th
at 8 a.m. and is approximately 3.5 miles. The race consists of
obstacles, beach, downtown area, mud, ice, and water. Register
the day of the race at the Boca Grande Community Center
Boca Grande (131 First St., Boca Grande) until 7:45 a.m. Call
941-964-0827 for more information.

LEARN ABOUT FLORIDA'S REPTILES FOR FREE
Learn about the turtles that call Southwest Florida home
and the differences between turtles & tortoises on Aug. 12th
from 1 to 2 p.m. at Rotary Park Environmental Center in Cape
Coral (5505 Rose Garden Road, Cape Coral.). There will be live
specimens to see. Please RSVP. For more information, call
239-549-4606.

48TH ANNUAL ST. PETE OPEN WORLD'S
LARGEST SPEARFISHING TOURNAMENT
The St Pete Open is hosted and run by our all-volunteer
membership on Aug. 17th. Weigh-in is at 6 p.m. at the
Magnuson Hotel & Marina Cove in St Petersburg (6800 Sunshine
Skyway Ln., St. Petersburg). The St Pete Open is the world's
largest spearfishing tournament. At a typical SPO, we enjoy
the company of roughly 300 participants, with spectators
numbering in the thousands. The awards ceremony is on Aug.
18 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Check out StPeteOpen.com or call
1.-800-227-8045 for more information.

ANTIQUE FISHING SHOW, SALE & AUCTION
If grandpa's old tackle box, or even some of your own tackle
from the'30s,'40s or'50s, is gathering dust in your attic
or garage, you can consign it to have it auctioned off to
top-paying collectors. The member only auction is attended
by over 100 of the state's top collectors. Free appraisals will
be given Aug. 23th, 24th from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Dolphin
Beach Resort (4900 Gulf Blvd., St. Petersburg). Admission
is only $5 for adults. Free admission with an appraisal. Call
407-496-7940 for more information.

NINTH ANNUAL FLATS INVITATIONAL
REDFISH CHALLENGE
The event kicks off at The Marina at Cape Harbour (5828 Cape
Harbour Dr Ste 200, Cape Coral)at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 30th, with
dinner, an open bar, live music, raffle and Texas Hold Em'poker
tournament. The fishing tournament begins with a shotgun
start at 7:30 a.m. on Aug. 31st with a kids'fishing tournament
from 10 a.m.-noon featuring Ronald McDonald. The first 100
children to preregister receive lunch with Ronald at noon. Live
and silent auctions, dinner and awards begin at 5 p.m. Cost is
$275 per angler. Call 239-424-8060 for more information.

ENGINE MAINTENANCE COURSE
The Peace River Sail & Power Squadron is offering the Engine
Maintenance course on Tuesday mornings at the Bayfront Center
in Punta Gorda from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. for 11 weeks starting
on Sept. 10th. Cost is $100 for non-members or $50 for Power
Squadron members. Please call 941-637-0766 and leave a mes-
sage with your name and contact info. The Engine Maintenance
course stresses the diagnosis of modern systems, basic engine
layout and operation; Gasoline & Diesel, inboard & outboard.

BAY LIFE SAFARI AT LEMON BAY PARK
This seining event will explore the sea life near our beaches
with American Littoral Society biologists on Sept. 14th at 9:30
a.m. at Lemon Bay Park and Nature Center in Englewood. We'll
be searching shallow shorelines and sea grass beds; observing,
collecting, and learning about some of the many interesting
fish and other animals that inhabit Sarasota Bay. Wading shoes,
sunscreen and drinking water are recommended. Call 941-488-
8998 for more information. This event is free.

4TH ANNUAL TOUR DE
NORTH PORT BICYCLE RIDE
Presented by People for Trees, Inc. on October 20th at 7 a.m. An
organized on-road 15, 35, or 65-mile ride that will take cyclists
through natural settings, historical sites, and city parks. The
pre-registration fee of $40 includes a full continental breakfast,
rest stops with homemade snacks, SAG mobile support, and
lunch with desserts at the ride's end. The first 200 to register
are guaranteed a free ride t-shirt. Special group and family
discounts. Ride begins and ends from the Scout House, Dallas
White Park, 5900 Greenwood Ave. North Port. Proceeds support
the efforts of People forTrees, Inc., a non-profit native tree
advocacy group since 1997, to create "Tree Wiz", an eco-center
in the treetops! To register or for more information visit www.
peoplefortrees.com or contact Alice White at 941-426-9752 or at
treeladyl2001@yahoo.com.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED ON
NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY
Learn about all the great volunteer opportunities that await
you on National Public Lands Day at Oscar Scherer State
Park (1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) and other organiza-
tions in the area on Sept. 28th at 9 a.m. Great food, music,
and activities with the opportunity to give back to your
community by involved in a work project. Call 941-483-5956
for more information.


R OBRAHE TTOLRAHC MULTihul I ASS N ; k d 1RIDAY FITNE k


.n/'tnLM L I It nA Un ULI[InULL ,bN, I; IIU I
of this club for multihull owners, sailors or those who
are interested in it exchange ideas about equipping
and sailing boats, share information about anchorages
and cruising destinations, hold informal races that help
to improve their sailing ability, and have local raft-ups.
No dues. The club meets at Harpoon Harry's on the first
Monday of each month at 6 p.m. For more info, visit
http://yhoo.it/XV96fO or call 941-876-6667.
HANG OUT WITH SCRUB JAYS: Spend the morning
with the scrub jays at Oscar Scherer State Park (1843
S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. every
Sunday. This unique Central Florida experience includes
a nature walk to see the park's diverse ecosystems, na-
tive flora and fauna. Call 941-483-5956 for more info.
SIX MILE CYPRESS SLOUGH PRESERVE: Take a
leisurely stroll on our fully accessible boardwalk trail
anytime dawn to dusk (7791 Penzance Blvd., Fort
Myers). Visit our Interpretive Center to learn more
about the plants and animals that live in the Slough
or just talk to a friendly volunteer. The center is open
Tuesday through Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Parking is $1 per hour per vehicle. Reservations not
required. No groups of eight or more. Call 239-533-
7550 or visit LeeParks.org/sixmile.
VOLUNTEER AT SHAMROCK PARK: Shamrock Park
Nature Center (3900 Shamrock Drive, Venice) holds its
monthly volunteer work mornings from 8 to 10 a.m. on
the third Friday of each month. As abilities and interests
allow, volunteer tasks may include trash collection
along trails and within vegetated areas of the park, light
trimming along paved multi-use trail, organization of
storage areas, exotic plant removal and other maintenance
tasks. Long pants, closed-toe shoes, sun protection, and
plenty of drinking water are recommended. Park staff
will provide trash collection buckets/bags, pickers, gloves,
and other tools as necessary. Meet at the Shamrock Park
Environmental Center. For more information, call Jennifer
Rogers at 941-861-5000 or email her atjrogers@scgov.net.
KORESHAN STATE HISTORIC SITE STROLL: Walk
or bike the historic site (3800 Corkscrew Road, Estero).
Park fee is $2 for walk or bike; $4 for single occupant
vehicle; $5 for two to eight occupants vehicle and $2
each additional person over eight per vehicle. Call
239-992-0311 for more information.


rnluI ri 1',1,N VV/M'LI. JUoin O)Usa LUUIIty rlurN )
staff each Friday for a fitness walk through Rothenbach
Park (8650 Bee Ridge Rd., Sarasota) from 8:30 to 9:30
a.m. The pace will be geared toward fitness, aiming for
a 20-minute-mile pace. The walk will cover approxi-
mately 3 miles in one hour of brisk walking. Enjoy the
beautiful scenery and wildlife, but keep up the pace.
Wear appropriate workout clothing, including good
walking shoes, and bring your water bottle. Meet in the
pavilion near the playground. Call 941-861-5000.
FREE PADDLE DEMONSTRATIONS: Grande Tours
(12575 Placida Road, Placida) is holding free kayak and
stand-up paddleboard demos from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every Saturday. Call 941-697-8825 for more information.
FREE SAFETY CHECKS: The Coast Guard Auxiliary
conducts free vessel safety checks every Saturday morning
from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m. at the Venice boat ramp (200
N. Seaboard Ave.,Venice). They'll make sure the safety
equipment mandated by federal and state regulations is
on board. If an inspected vessel is found to be safe, a "Seal
of Safety"is affixed to it. For more info or to schedule an
appointment, call Patrick Wheeler at 941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER:
Year-round ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek on are
offered each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State Park (1843
S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register at 8:30 a.m., tour at 9
a.m. Cost is park fee plus canoe or kayak rental fee. Bird
walks are also offered every Thursday at 7:30 a.m., and
guided scrub jay walks every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. For more
info on any of these programs, call 941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH: Listed
as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail. Meet
your volunteer guides (weather permitting) at 8:30
a.m. Monday through Friday at the kiosk at Tigertail
Beach. Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail) to 951 South
to Marco Island. Turn right on Kendall Court, the
fifth light after crossing the bridge to Marco Island.
Turn left at four-way stop sign at Hernando Court
to Tigertail Beach. Free parking with beach sticker,
otherwise subject to county parking fee. Water shoes
and binoculars are also suggested. The following walks
in the Naples area are offered at no cost through the
Conservancy of Southwest Florida (1450 Merrihue Dr.,
Naples). For more info, call 239-262-0304 or go to
www.conservancy.org.


ya


aiKr,,s*o Page 3 July 25, 2013






jje ,p/wsa v Page 4 July 25, 2013




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THUh dAY FRIDAY
VENICE INLET 27.11170 N. 82A.46330 W
14:22
n.l0 4 2.21 03:43


.1 62


c&Lr-\ .-


1.74


ft 08:41 21:43 /
o0 f-0.85 0.28


SATURDAY


15:18
1.96


09:41 22:15
0.77 0.49


04:14
1.86


16:18
1.71


SUNDAY


04:47
1.96


10:44 __ 22:45
0.70 0.69


11:53
0.65


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


05:26 06:10 07:03
17:24 2.03 18:48 2.07 21:05 2.09 23:56
--- 7 \ --1.29 --- -- 1.21--- \ 1.27-


214 1- 23:41 00:08 ^-
23:8814 13:09 1.04-- 14:33 -- 1.17 15:52--
0.59 0.51 0.40


MHHW 2.201. HW 1.932. MSL1.172, MTL1.152, MLW 0.371, MLLW 0.000 -All measurements in feet: for more info see www.tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


PUNTA GORDA 26.92830 N. 82.0650 W (ADD 32 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES)
06:24 17:34 06:51 18:29 07:22 19:26 07:56
21.46 2.03 1.58 1.80 1.69- 1.57 1.79 20:29
/ N 1.35


11:43


00:44
0.26


12:43
0.71


01:17-
0.46


MHHW 1.962. MHW1.703. TL1.076, MSL 1.070, MLW 0.449. MLLW 0.000
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY


PLACIDA, GASPARILLA SOUND 26.83330 N. 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES)

03:41 14:58 04:09 15:52 04:40 16:52 05:16 18:04 05:58
1.22 1.73 1.31- 1.54- 1.41 1.34 1.50 1.1556
1.22 1.1


.rN/ \


o 09:10


0.67


- 22:23
0.21


10:12
5 0.61


22:54
0.37


_11:19.
0.56


23:26
0.53


12:32
0.52


23:58
0.67


-13:51
0.46


06:47
19:40 1.-60
1.02 34


00:34
0.80--


07:45
21:38
0.99 z


N


15:11
0.39


01:17
-0.90-


MHHW 1A07, HW 1.175. MSL 0.784, MTL 0.768, MLW 0.358, MLLW 0.000
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
MATLACHA PASS (BASCULE BRIDGE) 26.6333 N. 82.0667 W
05:51 17:08 06:19 18:02 06:50
,1.45 2.05,, 1.56 1.82 1.67


SUNDAY


19:02
1.58


07:26
1.77


20:14
1.37-


MONDAY


08:08
1.85


TUESDAY


21:50


08:57
1.89


WEDNESDAY


23:48


09:55
1.93


0- 1 v v 03:01 V 03:44
1:37 12:3 01:21- 13:46 01:53 14:59 02:2516:18 0.95 17:38 1.07 -18:51

0.06 0.25 0.44 0.67 0.63 0.61 0.80 0.55 0.46 0.36
MHHW HIA. HHW HIA. HSL NHIA MTL HIA, HLW HIA. HLLW 0.000


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


VENICE INLET


03:14
08:41
14:22
21:43


1.62 feet
0.85 feet
2.21 feet
0.28 feet


1.74 feet
0.77 feet
1.96 feet
0.49 feet


1.86 feet
0.70 feet
1.71 feet
0.69 feet


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MATLACHA


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3 shallots, sliced recipe provided by

6 tbsp light soy sauce
3 tbsp oyster sauce
Banana leaf


Scale fish and remove heads and entrails. Wash well and place in a bowl. Stir together soy sauce,
pepper and oyster sauce. Pour over fish and marinate 30 minutes. Stuff fish body cavities with
sliced shallots. Wrap the sea perch in banana leaf and then in aluminum foil. Roast over a charcoal
fire 15 minutes. Remove fish from wrappings, arrange attractively on a platter. Pour tamarind
sauce over fish and serve. Serves 6.

TAMARIND SAUCE
1/2 cup tamarind juice
3 tbsp turbinado or brown sugar
2 tbsp light soy sauce
4 small chilies, diced finely
2 shallots, diced finely

In a pot, simmer tamarind juice, sugar and soy sauce until thickened. Remove from heat, transfer
to a small bowl, and add chilies and shallots.
Recipe adapted from all-fish-seafood-recipes.com


SIZE LIMIT: 12 minimum total length was ought off For I Myers Locally, rarely
BAG LIMIT: 10 per harvester per day VL U fu insh':'e
(indlided in aggregate snapper bag limit of FOOD VALUE: Perhaps the best of the snap-


10o per person per diay)
AVERAGE SIZE: Less than half pound near
shore, 1 to 3 pounds over reefs
FLORIDA STATE RECORD: 8 lb,.9 oz
HABITAT: Reefs and rocky areas Although
yellowlall are nmore
commonn in South / / /
Florda,. Ihe stale
record


pers Regarded for its mild and sweet flesh
FISHING METHODS: Inshore juveniles will
readily strike at any live or dead balt Larger
fish (often called flags I require light lines
and spea1lized techniques for consistent
success The fish are often chummed to the
suir fae and caught on the same bait used
as chum Their natural diet is higher .i
in ctrstaceans than in
/', smaller fish /


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2-
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SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY


08:35
1.86


-13:47_
0.65


WEDNESDAY


09:19
1.90


01:48
0.65


21:49
1.17


2


_14:56
0.59


02:19
0.82


10:11
1.92


16:12
0.54


02:47
0.97


SUNDAY


17:31
0.46


MONDAY


\-Z
18:45-
0.36


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


23:19
1.02



16:24--
0.30


PUNTA GORDA


00:09
06:24
11:43
17:34


0.06 feet
1.46 feet
0.79 feet
2.03 feet


PLACIDA


0.26 feet
1.58 feet
0.71 feet
1.80 feet


03:41
09:10
14:58
22:23


0.46 feet
1.69 feet
0.65 feet
1.57 feet


1.22 feet
0.67 feet
1.73 feet
0.21 feet


Iii,', li-i-i
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I 2.1i-i-i


1.31 feet
0.61 feet
1.54 feet
0.37 feet


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:14'


I I ii ,[


00:17
05:51
11:37
17:08


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1.41 feet
0.56 feet
1.34 feet
0.53 feet


0.06 feet
1.45 feet
0.79 feet
2.05 feet


0.25 feet
1.56 feet
0.72 feet
1.82 feet


0.44 feet
1.67 feet
0.67 feet
1.58 feet


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tM.erques Page 5 July25, 2013


hmUnWElmmm mDlm aiuimmlo ami


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor


~j~i.?~


The 5th Annual Hooked on Habitat redfish tournament
received a helping hand this year. Ingman Marine jumped
on board as the primary sponsor for the one-day event held
last Saturday at Laishley Park. Nearly 50 teams entered the
tournament, and the event generated an estimated $20,000
for the Charlotte County Habitat for Humanity.
"We basically doubled everything from last year,"
says Mike Mansfield, CEO of Charlotte County Habitat
for Humanity. "The sponsors, the volunteers all doubled
in size. This event will help us build houses for those in
need from Englewood to Punta Gorda."
Of the 47 teams, it was Capt. George Williamson and
Team Farr Law Firm that walked away with bragging
rights. Each team was allowed to weigh two redfish.
Capt. George's team totaled 14.09 pounds. Capt. J.R.
Pittman of Team Ingman Marine earned second-place
honors with a weight of 13.87.
"This tournament is about helping out Habitat for
Humanity";' said Gary Ingman, owner of Ingman Marine.
"They make a difference in lives, and we believe in what
they do. Plus it gives us an excuse to get out there and
fish. Not a bad day.":'
Mansfield says he was introduced to Gary through
Gary's son, Jordan.
"Jordan is the head coach of the Port Charlotte High
School football team, and he brings kids from school out
to help us build houses each Wednesday;' says Mike. "So
when I found out Gary wanted to get involved with this
tournament, I was thrilled.":'
Capt. Joe Becker and Team Executive Air placed third
with a weight of 13.74. Gary and Jordan came in 34th
and weighed only one fish, but said this year was not
about the competition.
"We are already looking forward to next year,"says
Gary."Maybe we will do a little bit better, but this was just
a fun time for a good cause. Everybody wins at this one.":'


-i .-.-
SA z.* ~


Photo by Gary Jngman
Jordan Ingman, right, casts
d during the 5th annual Hooked
on Habitat redfish tourna-
ment sponsored by Ingman
Marine. The event was esti-
/ mated to have raised $20,000
for the Charlotte County
Habitat for Humanity. Capt.
David Hutcherson looks on.


www.palmislandmarina.com 1941.697.435617080 Placida Road Capa Haze, FL 33946


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ae 2l203I Sa i5 mMi iliII m i i**


-77
,I "' r'


[VTTYITW~Th'~,i


M
H20NLY
Nokomis
941-488-8229


Redfish are swimming in numbers just south of Sarasota Bay. Black drum and
big mangrove snapper are biting consistently around Big Pass. Tarpon are being
caught along the passes north of Lemon Bay. Pompano have been regularly caught
near the Venice Inlet and Dora Bay.


Gag grouper are being reported 30 miles out. Barracuda and red
grouper can be caught 12-15 miles offshore. Larger mangrove
snapper are being caught as near as 15 miles offshore, but be
warned, watch out for Goliath grouper, as they have been stealing
the snapper from angler's lines before they can reel them in.


I KII LIAP1
Snook are along jetties and beaches and
are chewing. For the big girls use whitebait.
Season opens Sept. 1, so try to be a little
more patient.


Lemon Bay fishing has been good in the backcountry, with bigger redfish and King mackerel have been caught 30 miles offshore this week. Be Anglers are catching gag grouper from
snook biting. Trout fishing has been mediocre at best. The Spanish mackerel sure to use a wire leader so the kings don't get away. Mangrove the shore off Boca Grande beaches and
bite has increased the past week, with schools commonly reported along the flats. snapper action has been really good and should stay that way nearby waters. You don't have to go out too
FISHERMAN'S EDGE Sharks are still swimming in the bays and passes and can be caught on live or frozen throughout the week. African pompano have been consistently far to land a keeper gag.
Grove City bait. showing up 60 miles offshore.
941-697-7595

Pompano have been biting on Silly Willy's off Manasota and Englewood beaches. Travel 35 miles outand more for grouper, using squid. Anglers are There are plenty of blacktip and bull
Stump Pass has been producing big snook on cut mullet. Venice Jetties have also reporting they are catching their limiton gags within a couple of sharks out there.Try fishing for them
produced some big snook. Anglers have been catching ladyfish, redfish and jacks hours. Spanish mackerel are also out there, so bring a spoon and near piers along the Myakka River. Use
FINE BAIT & TACKLE off Venice Beach all using shrimp as bait.Take advantage of the fresh water and troll while fishing for grouper. cut bait and simply drop and wait. If you
North Port target bass using worms in North Port lakes and canals. aren'tgetting any signs of activity, move to
941-240-5981 another spot.

Redfish are in the south Harbor near Burnt Store and Two Pines. The snook have
been scattered around the Harbor and may congregate back out at the beaches after Head out 20-30 miles for gag grouper and mangrove snapper. Trout may not be plentiful in the rivers,
the recent full moon. Tarpon are also being spotted along the beaches. Sharks are Live bait works best, but you can use frozen squid. Be sure to share but they are chewing in numbers around
CAPT. TED'S TACKLE all throughout the Harbor, especially near the passes. Bass have been biting in the the wealth, the saline water of Gasparilla Sound.Try
Port Charlolte lakes and freshwater canals, but the recent full moon may change their patterns, using Zara Spooks.
941-627-6800

The tarpon bite is off the charts. They are scattered around the Harbor and off the Offshore action is good about 15-20 miles out for gag grouper. Patrol the east and westwall of the Harbor
beaches. Use crabs, threadfin or DOA Bait Busters. Bonnethead and blacktip shark Kingfish have been reported 30 miles offshore. Chicken dolphin for redfish. Also the western part of Pine
are feeding in the lower Harbor while snook and whiting are chewing baitfish off have been spotted under weedlines 33-35 mles offshore, with the Island Sound. Use crabs, frozen shrimp, cut
FISHIN' FRANK'S the beaches. occasional blackfin tuna and sailfish farther out. sardines and ladyfish.They may start to
Charlotte Harbor move if the water keeps warming up.They
will likely hang around if the afternoon
941-625-3888 rains cool the water temperature a bit.


LAISHLEY MARINE
Punta Gorda
941-639-3949


SD&D BAITAND TACKLE
11 Mallacha
239-282-9122




OLD PINE ISLAND MARINA
St. James City
239-283-2548


The west wall and Turtle Bay are turning up redfish and snook. Because the water
is still murky, the fish are relying more on scent than sight. Use anything like Gulp!
baitand fish slow, making sure the fish get a good whiff of the bait. Devilfish Key has
been another hotspot for snook and reds..


Redfish are swimming around oyster bars, so look out for their tails and go after
them.They are also being caught near Smokehouse Bay. Sharks are swimming
everywhere, but seem to be feeding near bridges. Trout have taken to deeper water.
The tarpon hite h beehn quiet Snook ire rnnqreqgtinq neir juct honut nv ind All
lll I- jrnjrnll ||ijri I I jI \I ,,jrii l j [ .i lJniri n, I l, ,- ,ir [I 111-n r 1 -i [ I



I i- snook lii i- ij li--rii ,ni ru- iiir uiijii iiii i ,ijuinrl ji l i --ril, i I jr- [
, ,iiin, ,, l ji lj I vi- ,lir inip l i i 1ii iiin.i,- Redfi sh l l .iuri,, I- I,-njilv
inj iin ii iini, [l .- r ii O- III J.ii ji n v- i in.- trout liii- i ij ,lu inli -il Tarpon r- liill iii
iio- 'i juin u.tn uii I r i -n -ii .. lnin- ,ir ] li- r[


Offshore has been pretty good 60 miles offshore or more for
mangrove snapper, gag grouper and yellowtail snapper.
Reports of peanut dolphin are also coming in.


Offshore gag grouper in 50-80 feet of water.


A II- ri ll In-i irji .-r rn-[inI r .:ll miiii- ,ni1 innIr iij r, in ll nI I~.-I lrin ii
f'


Inshore sharks are swimming in numbers.
They are very comfortable with the fresh
water and have no problems finding food,
so they stick around in the Harbor. No
secret to catching these guys. Just use some
type ofcutbait and a strond leader.


With all the freshwater, catfish are almost
guaranteed. Like shark, use cutbait, just
smaller chunks of it. Remember, sailcats
mil, fnr fine tihbl fire luitwitch nut fnr
i[ rn



Blacktip iir, bull sharks ijr, r uni, li,
li j[ tjr l l 1'i 1 liI' l ii -r i
lih 1 [ l 1 1 1 11- in-a -i l lh ull[ l


di- 1T1I


Sizes jre ilmeasuIred ilto:al length (ifom [orwvard-
most part of head to tip of pinched tail) unless
otherwise noted. All bag limits are per harvester
per day. Other limits may apply; for most current
rules visit www.MyFWC.com/fishing. Federal
regulations may differ from state regulations.

LICENSES
Resident saltwater or freshwater: Annual $17,
5-year $79. If you fish from shore only, a license is
required but is free. Resident license for both fresh-
water and saltwater fishing: $32.50 annually.
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3 days
$17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore fishing
license not available for nonresidents.
Fishing permits: Snook $10/year, lobster $5/
year, tarpon $51.50 per fish

SALTWATER FISH
Greater Amberjack: Min. 30" fork, limit 1,
season closed June I July 31
Lesser Amberjack/Banded Rudderfish:
Slot limit 14"-22", aggregate limit 5
Black drum: Slot 14"-24", limit 5 (may
possess one over 24")
Bluefish: Min. 12"fork, limit 10


Cobia: Minimum 33 [or),k, Ilmi 1 (m\ u hsh
per vessel)
Dolphin: Limit 10
Flounder: Min. 12", limit 10
Grouper, Black: Min. 22", limit 4, season closed
Feb. 1 March 31
Grouper, Gag: Min. 22", limit 2, season July
1 Dec. 3 in state waters; July 1 until quota met
in federal waters
Grouper, Red: Min. 20", limit 4, season closed
Feb. 1 March 31
Grouper, Scamp: Min. 16", limit 4, season
closed Feb. 1 March 31
Black, Gag, Red and Scamp Grouper
included in aggregate bag limit of 4
Hogfish: Min.12"fork, limit 5
Mackerel, King: Min. 24"fork, limit 2
Mackerel, Spanish: Min. 12"fork, limit 15
Mullet: No size limit, limit 50
Permit: Slot 11"-22"fork, limit 2 (may possess
one over 22")


Redfish: lot 1: -27, lim 1 (mi. ;. flih per vessel)
Shark: Min. 54"except Atlantic sharpnose,
blacknose, blacktip, bonnethead, finetooth and
smooth dogfish, limit 1 (max 2 fish per vessel)
Sheepshead: Min.12", limit 15
Snapper, Lane: Min. 8", limit 100 pounds
Snapper, Mangrove: Min. 10", limit 5
Snapper, Mutton: Min. 16", bag limit 10
Snapper, Red: Min. 16", limit 2,2013 season
June 1 July 14 in state waters and June 1 June
28 in federal waters
Snapper, Yellowtail: Min. 12", limit 10
Mangrove, Mutton, Red and Yellowtail Snap-
per included in aggregate bag limit of 10
Snook: Slot 28"-33"(west coast), limit 1, season
closed until at least Sept. 2013
Spotted Seatrout: Slot 15"-20", limit 4 (may
possess one over 20")
Tarpon: No size limit, tag required to possess
Triggerfish, Gray: Min. 14", limit 2, season
closed June July
Tripletail: Min.15", limit 2


Pompano: Min. 11"fork, limit 6 Wahoo: Limit 2


NO-HARVEST SPECIES: Ze:ro bg limit for
Bonefish, Goliath Grouper (Jewfish), Sawfish,
Spotted Eagle Rays, Lemon Sharks, Hammerhead
Sharks (go to the website listed below for a full
list of no-harvest species)
Visit http://bit.ly/1OnYDlz for full rules.

FRESHWATER FISH
Largemouth Bass: South of State Road 80:
Max. size 14", bag limit 5 (may possess one over
14") North of State Road 80: Slot 14"-22",
bag limit 5 (may possess one over 22")
Sunfish (excluding crappie): Aggregate limit 50
Crappie: Limit 25
Butterfly peacock bass: Max. 17", limit 2 (may
possess one over 17")
Grass carp: Must be released immediately.
Other exotic fishes: Please keep and eat or
otherwise destroy. Do not use as live bait.
Unregulated species: No bag or size limits on
gar (except alligator gar; possession of this spe-
cies is illegal), bowfin, pickerel, and all catfish.
Visit http://bit.ly/lO0nYJQr for full rules,
including special management areas.


A,, piMs, s* Page 6 July 25, 2013





ea, t esas Page 7 July25, 2013 .MwS.EwUlSM,, I uu...u mi









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Pinfish have got to be one of the top live
baits for use in Charlotte Harbor. Part of this
is the fact that they're everywhere: On the
grassflats, under the piers, on the reefs -
anywhere there's a bit of cover. Every single
tarpon, redfish, snook and grouper out there
has eaten pinfish. Snapper and trout eat the
smaller ones. Even pelagic open-water fish
like cobia, blackfin tuna, kingfish and Spanish
mackerel seem fond of them. I would go so far
as to call them the other whitebait.
If pinfish got to be 5 pounds, nobody would
ever go swimming in the Gulf again. Pinfish
are like piranhas when they're in a feeding
mode, they're very aggressive. And they're
always hungry. Anyone who use shrimp for
bait is well aware of their nipping and pecking
attacks, which can leave you with a bare
hook in a matter of moments. Many anglers
using lures have been surprised to reel in
hyper-aggressive pins, which will sometimes
attack an artificial bait considerably larger
than themselves. They're just nasty little guys.
Maybe it's a Napoleon complex.
Fortunately for us, pinfish stay small. That's
another reason they make such good bait:
The average pinfish, at about 3 to 5 inches, is
just about bite-size for a good snook or red.


Either


Inshore, it's rare to find pinfish longer than
8 inches, though they can top a pound in
deeper water (on some of the Tampa Bay
headboats, they call the big ones"rainbow
porgies").
Pinfish can be used live, dead or as cutbait.
As live baits, they're hardy both in the livewell
and on the hook, and they're fairly tolerant
of fresh water. As dead baits, they have high
appeal to all the same fish that eat them alive.
Cut, they still seem to have plenty of charm to
gamefish, despite not being particularly oily or
bloody. Flounder are especially fond of pinfish
chunks, and the heads seem particularly
intriguing to snook for some reason.
To rig a live pinfish, you can use the "redfish
candy" method we've talked about before:
Using a jighead, skewer the baitfish through
one side of the body and out the other. This
works really well on silver-dollar-size pins,
especially if you pitch the bait up under the
edge of the mangroves. Alternatively, you can
put the hook sideways through the snout or
just ahead of the dorsal fin. Through the nose
is usually best, because pinfish are highly
active baits and you'll probably need to reel it
in and recast it at least once.
Live pinfish can be tricky baits. Remember


that these fish like cover, and that's just what
they'll try to find. A pinfish that's hiding in the
grass or rubble isn't a very good bait, because
the target fish can't find it. To keep your bait
where it can be seen (and eaten), use a float
or popping cork set shallow enough that the
pinfish can't reach the bottom.
One really nice thing about pinfish is that
they're not very hard to get. They can be easily
chummed and castnetted on the flats, but
even if you don't throw a net they're usually
very willing to hit a small baited hook. They
like shrimp, but cut squid is much tougher
and stays on the hook a lot better. Even a bare
sabiki rig will work sometimes (though you'll
fill the livewell faster if you put a bit of squid
on each hook). And since pinfish are found in
lots of places, there are lots of places where
you can go get bait. If you find yourself using a
lot of pinfish, you can invest in a pinfish trap.
By law, a pinfish trap must not exceed 2 feet
in any dimension, with a throat or entrance
not exceeding 3 inches in height by 3/4 inch
in width. The Key West type traps have a more
convoluted entrance, which seems to keep
pinfish in better, but they're a bit more expen-
sive that the standard plastic-coated wire traps
that have a simple funnel entry.


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Almost any bigger fish will eat a pinfish,
but they're not the only ones you can eat
pinfish, too. Though they may not be as tasty as
a snapper, pinfish are certainly edible. Cleaning
them is a lot like cleaning bluegill lots of
work for a little meat. The texture and flavor are
a bit like grunts, only not as good. Pinfish are
actually closely related to sheepshead, which
are one of the finest eating fish that swims, so
it's actually kind of a shame they don't taste
better. Then again, if you add enough Old Bay,
who's gonna notice? If you're ever in need of
protein, pinfish will get the job done.
Pinfish, like shrimp and greenbacks, are
one of the standard baits used for many types
of fishing in Southwest Florida. Right now,
they're perhaps the best of those three the
greenbacks are small and you have to go all the
way out to the beaches to find them, and the
shrimp are all peewees. But pinners are going
strong, so planning to use them for bait on your
next fishing trip is probably not a bad thing.
Robert Lugiewicz is the manager of Fishin'
Frank's Bait & Tackle, located at 4425-D
Tamiami Trail in Charlotte Harbor. Call
941-625-3888 for more information about
the shop or for local fishing info, or visit them
online at FishinFranks.com.







Visit any one of our Open House
locations for refreshments
Sand a boat ride


BRING THE FAMILY!
Saturday, July 27 10am 4pm
VENICE
990 Laguna Drive
PUNTA GORDA
Laishley Park Marina
120 Laishley Court
Sunday, July 28h 10am 4pm
ENGLEWOOD
Cape Haze Marina
6900 Placida Road
-----.J









































As we all know, Southwest Florida is home
to to one of the many migratory stops tarpon
use along their long and winding route
to God only knows where well, I guess
the tarpon know too. Our stop is known by
people all around the globe as Boca Grande
Pass, but we around here just refer to it as
"the Pass." During the months of May and
June, the Pass holds the largest concentra-
tion of tarpon found on the planet, which is
why it's also known as "The Tarpon Capital
of the World.' It has been estimated that
somewhere between 20,000 and 40,000
tarpon move in and out of Boca Grande Pass
each day in May and June. A lot of people
have it in their heads that May and June
is tarpon season. I'm here to tell you that
these months are not the true tarpon season
around these parts, although they are the
craziest part of it for sure.
How did this happen? It's simple. It's
partially because there are so many tarpon
in such a small area during that time of the
year. But another part of it because so many
"out-of-town" fishing guides from Tampa,
Port Richey, Naples and Daytona guides
who only know how to fish the Pass have
made their clients believe that the only
time they stand a chance of catching one
of our beloved silver kings is when they're
stacked in the Pass. If Boca Grande and
Charlotte, Lee and Sarasota counties would
market our beach, Harbor and backcountry
tarpon fishing half as much as they glorify
that Pass, we'd have a much, much longer
tarpon season around here. I truly believe
that most out-of-state fishermen (all
potential vacationers) are unaware of the
fact that our local guides start putting their
clients on tarpon as early as March and keep
jumping those tarpon all the way through
October. Technically, tarpon can be targeted
year-round in our area, but March through
October is when we can routinely catch the
big boys. I don't know about you, but an
eight-month tarpon season sounds a lot
better than the two-month one we over-
glorify now. I also feel that our local economy
would benefit greatly from a longer tarpon
season can't hurt, that's for sure.
So are you scratching your head right now
and thinking,"I didn't know tarpon are still
around. Where are they and how do I catch
them?" I'm glad you asked.
Each morning as I head out to my first spot
of the day with my clients, I always keep
one eye out on the water for rolling tarpon,
even if my trip is for shark or backcountry
fish. If the tide is going out first thing in the
morning, I'll take a run down the beach in
hopes of spotting a pod or two. If the tide is
coming in, I'll take a look around the lower
half the Harbor. Around the new and full
moons, the tarpon will also still stack in the


Pass this time of year, though not in the
numbers that made the Pass famous but
still very fishable nonetheless. When you're
looking for tarpon off the beach or in the
Harbor, all you're looking for is rolling fish.
If you happen to sight a school of threadfins
or greenbacks while you're driving around,
go ahead and spend some time inspecting
the area. Tarpon like to hang around their
food source, so finding bait makes a great
starting point for your search. Other good
places to start your hunt are the Boca Grande
range marker and the area known as The
Hill, just inside Boca Grande Pass. Starting in
late August, the 20-foot holes in the upper
Harbor also often hold tarpon.
Baits of choice can vary greatly this time
of year. Right now I'm using small blue crabs,
threadfins and DOA Bait Busters. As fall
approaches, I'll move away from the crabs
and threadfins and start using sugar trout,
ladyfish and all kinds of artificial. Basically
you're just trying to match the hatch, so
figuring out what they're feeding on will
really enhance your chances of catching
one of these magnificent fish. As far as
tackle, let me recommend big spinning reels
attached to 7-foot medium-heavy rods. I
use 5000 series Daiwa Saltist reels spooled
with 40-pound moss green Power-Pro line
and Shimano Tallus rods. A fluorocarbon
leader is a must. Depending on water clarity,
I use a 6- to 8-foot piece of 40- to 60-pound
fluoro. Hooks size depends on the size bait
you choose to throw. I'll use a 3/0 or 4/0
circle hook for crabs and threadfins and
6/0 or 8/0 circle hooks for ladyfish, sugar
trout and big pinfish. Just try to match your
hook to your bait so that it looks as natural
as possible. Toss your baits in front of or
around the tarpon school. Don't cast directly
into the school or you'll just spook the fish.
Remember, tarpon chase bait bait doesn't
chase the tarpon.
Tarpon season on right now, my friends,
and will be going strong for quite a few more
months. If you'd like to try fish for tarpon
this time of year, I hope some of my advice
helps you out. If you would rather learn from
someone who has experience, your best bet
is to hire a local guide. We would love to
teach you what you need to know. One way
or another, just get out there and try. It's
worth a shot.
Tight lines.
Capt. Mike Myers, owner and operator of
Reelshark Charters, is a full-time Charlotte
Harbor guide. Having fished the waters all
along the Southwest Florida coast for more
than 35 years, he has the experience to put
anglers on the fish they want. His specialties
are sharks, tarpon and Goliath grouper. For
more info, visit ReelShark.com or call Capt.
Mike at 941-416-8047.


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,H,/u .e Page 10 luly 25, 2013


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What's SUP? Stand-up paddleboarding
is the fastest growing craze in water sports
today. Paddleboarding is an eco-friendly
way to explore the water, regardless of your
activity level. SUP is a low-impact activity and
is only as physically demanding as you want
it to be. It is an enjoyable way to strengthen
large and small muscle groups while utilizing
your core for stability. Fitness is one piece
of SUP, and the workout provides total body
muscle engagement.
I fell in love with SUP years ago, mainly
because of the wildlife that I can view
from my paddleboard. I have an intense
appreciation for the nature and wildlife that
surrounds our coastline. Paddleboarding
around our estuaries provides relaxation
and entertainment. As an eco-friendly
water sport, one can view nature without
disturbing anything in the area.
I love sharing SUP and my enthusiasm for
it is contagious! Over a year ago, I started a
local paddleboarding business and began


instructing others. SUP Englewood was born
on the beaches of Manasota Key. I started
out by providing free paddleboard demos
and lessons to engage the community. Soon,
people were discussing the business and
providing referrals to friends for rentals and
guided tours. As SUP Englewood continues
to grow, our goal remains to educate others
about the new water sport and teach impor-
tant safety information.
Other activities can be performed in
conjunction with paddleboarding, creating
a platform for other water sports. This
includes fishing, racing, fitness, as well as
touring and surfing. Many paddlers find
SUP appealing for the touring aspect of
the sport. Eco-touring on a paddleboard
offers flexibility to paddlers, allowing for
optional stances; such as sitting, kneeling
or standing on the board.
In the Gulf, one can attempt paddle
surfing some light waves which is perfect
for learning. SUP surfing is attracting some


surfers as the paddle enhances speed to catch
waves. The standing position is also more
useful for finding swells off in the distance.
While paddleboarding can provide a light
workout, SUP fitness classes take things to a
different level. Many paddleboarders utilize
their boards as an exercise mat and perform
physically demanding workouts on the water.
SUP Englewood hosts SUP Yoga Classes on the
water three times per week. Paddleboards are
anchored in the water during the class and
yogis practice in the bay.
SUP Racing is the competitive side of
paddleboarding, and races are held around
the world. Racing boards are a different style
from the cruising models, and are longer and
narrower. These characteristics of the board
help the racers to pick up speed. SUP racing is
an intense total body cardio workout.
SUP Fishing is catching the attention
of kayak fishermen, however, some are
uncertain about trying this new sport. Fishing
paddleboards are usually wider in shape,


providing more stability. csories are a.
must on fishing %io'nt ~.-te-and rod
- mountssre esseinital'~~]einT.steep view-
point is the maine adynttageto SUP fishing, as
you can clajly see fisI rnd the underwater
structure beneath your board. Some fish-
ermen have hesitations regarding this new
sport because it does require some balance.
However, you have to be up for this challenge
to experience the benefits.
Paddleboarding is a versatile sport offering
a pleasurable outdoor experience for all
activity levels. SUP offers something for
everyone in the family to appreciate. Try out a
new water sport while exploring the wildlife
that surrounds our gulf coast.
Nkicol Alits- Pontidoli is O, i1Eti of SUP
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How much can anyone get done with huge
responsibilities and minimal time?
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission has to cover so much: Fresh-
water and saltwater fisheries, both game
and non-game wildlife, hunting seasons and
regulations, state forests and management
areas, endangered species like manatees
and sea turtles, and even trying to combat
invasive species. Our Commissioners and
their staff have a full plate! According to
their website, the FWC employs about 2,080
full-time employees, most of them being
something else besides law enforcement
officers. Budgets have been tightened,
but the commitment by those employees
remains strong.
We all want to make a difference, share
our voices and help protect and improve the
management of our fisheries. Let's start at
the top to get an understanding of what the
FWC is up against. We need to understand
that the FWC commissioners usually meet for
three days at a time, about five times each
year. Keep in mind that because of Florida's
Sunshine laws, they can legally discuss
anything about their jobs only during these
meetings. Yes, we are quick to judge them for
this and that, but they have an impossible job
to start with. Fifteen days each year to cover
and regulate everything!
At each meeting, they have to cover
freshwater and opening topics the first day,
saltwater the second day and game and
non-game management areas and more on
the third day. Is it time to consider that we
stretch these meetings out to a full week?
The travel time would be the same, but
twice the amount of time could really help
out. The Commissioners could start early on
Monday, even if it's noon, get the prelimi-
nary duties done and be ready to dig right
back in Tuesday morning. This would provide
more time for them to talk and communi-
cate their concerns not to mention ours.
It's unreasonable for the Commissioners or
the public to effectively communicate our
messages in just three days, as Commis-
sioners need the opportunity to work
out their individual concerns. Right now,
everyone and everything is rushed. Let's
explore the options to make more time so
we make better-informed assessments.
If you're interested in impacting decision-
making, start with the staff and the Commis-
sioners. The staff does as directed by the
Commissioners, but Commissioners work from
recommendations by the staff. Just a nice,
simple system; jump in and paddle hard if
you want to be heard. Once a project makes
the agenda for rulemaking, it stays there for


a while. I'm serious about getting involved
early and staying up with progress if you
expect to make a change. It's not my way -
it's the system. Let's face it, lobbying is how
things get done!
I do understand that the spring meet-
ings need to be in Tallahassee because the
Legislature is in session and staff needs to be
there. But why have three of the four recent
meetings been in the Panhandle? While I do
understand the commission wants to visit
around our state, they need to consider a
few things. We spend a full day of driving,
then the day of meetings, and then another
day driving to get home all for three
minutes of speaking time. Something's not
right about that. Florida is a big state, and
central locations need to be a significant
consideration for meeting sites. Plus, the FWC
should consider focus discussions for a specific
meeting to ensure that stakeholders get more
involved. For example, snook, tarpon and
crawfish issues need to be scheduled and held
in south Florida for stakeholders convenience,
when possible not Pensacola.
Here is another interesting fact. The latest
data available on the FWC website shows we
have about 750 law enforcement officers in
Florida, responsible for patrolling a popula-
tion, according to the 2012 Census, of 19.3
million residents. Now, add in a significant
snowbird influx during the winter months,
which brings not quite a million more people
into the state (although the local population
seems to about double). Then add in the
average 1.6 million tourists in the state at
any given time (probably closer to 2.5 million
in season). Clearly, depending on the time of
year, we have a whole bunch of people here
- too many for the law enforcement officers
to adequately cover. Now, factor in all the
duties that the officers are responsible for
enforcing, and you see where I'm going. How
much can our understaffed and underpaid
officers do? Just exactly how much can we
expect anyone (short of Superman) to patrol
in these conditions?
So, while I do agree that the combination
of state agencies works at the administra-
tive levels, I'm not as sure it works as well
for enforcement officers. There's just too
much to know. It's not easy to understand
tides and exactly when you can cut through
the back ways between Bull and Turtle bays
safely. Just exactly how many barnacles
need to be showing on the incoming tide for
the specific boat you are running tonight? If
you mess up, you spend the night embar-
rassed and donating pint after pint to the
mosquitoes. Do you realize how many
specific rules and laws our FWC officers are


responsible for knowing and enforcing? your efforts and concern to protect our fish
Printed out on standard letter paper in small and fisheries.
type, the rules make a foot-high stack. Capt. Van Hubbard is a highly respected
We can't fix everything at once, but we outdoor writer and fishing guide. He has been
do need to work more effectively to improve a professional USCG-licensed year-round guide
the system. Steer it to work for the people, since 1976, and has been fishing the South-
with us moving forward toward ever-better west Florida coastsince 1981. Contact him at
stewardship of our resources. Thank you for 941-740-4665 or VanHubbard@CaptVan.com.





j1 p4Irsan t, Page 12*


Outdoor attire


ACROSS
1 Two-piece swimsuit
6 Magazine writers
13 Greek god of love
14 Give'em what _
16 No longer living
17 City on U.S. 41 south of Venice
19 Attire for a cruise ship
21 Natural clothing fiber
24 Exclamations of relief
25 Rural high school subject
26 Bounty
27 1 told you _
28 Friendly greetings
31 Popular sunglass lens color
34 Star of 1942's Jungle Book
35 Willow branch
38 19th letter of the Greek alphabet
41 An evil deed
42 A trip by sea
44 Basic outdoor footwear
46 Keeps the sun off your head
47 Enthusiasm, especially religious
48 Long-snouted toothy fish
49 Borden's spokescow
50 Synthetic fiber often used for clothing
54 Homer Simpson's catch phrase
55 Not applicable
56 Evergreen tree
57 A hole in the water into
which you throw money
59 To add more elements to an outfit
62 What goes must come down
63 Stereo sound adjuster
65 Big snake or feathery stole
66 Up to a certain point in time
68 Perspiring
72 Frequency modulation
74 Thigh bones
75 Old name for malaria: Fever and
77 Number of years lived
79 Yes vote
80 Danish prince
82 Bright and cheerful
83 Perhaps


DOWN
1 Place for bathing suits
2 Heat radiation
3 Knockout
4 This going to be a problem
5 Just in case
6 Intentional fold
7 Country bordering Vietnam and Thailand
8 The trend is bikinis is to mix and
9 Strongly held beliefs
10 Broken glass polished by waves
11 Sticky substance made from coal,
wood or peat
12 Pierre is the capital of_
15 Ready not
18 Sunglass lenses that cut glare
20 Pants that end above the knee
22 Yummy noise: nom nom
23 Simple tops
29 Kimono sash
30 Chemical to block UV light
32 Fabric that lets air through
33 Eye shades
36 Bay, sea or calico
37 Euro backer
39 Sobering organization
40 Unshod
43 Opposite of NW
45 When the sun is out
46 _said, she said
51 The loneliest number
52 How to address a knight
53 Three-sided polygon
57 Often worn as a mask on the water
58 Cloth fiber made from wood
60 Sears, Roebuck &_
61 dress should always be comfortable
64 Keep it on the _
67 I Fell
69 Crooked or twisted
70 Short syllable followed by a long one
71 Two-stringed zither
73 Big -
76 And much, much more
78 Stop and _
80 Short laugh
81 Expression of sorrow


Stumped? The answers are on page 15.


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so o* Page 13 July 25,2013 .-a in.n u m .uFk n -


WaterLine photo by Lee Anderson
Whether you're on the beach or in
the boat, dressing for the occasion
is a big part of the experience.













I I



r



By Josh Olive
V WaterLine Publisher

Sometimes we take for
granted what we wear
when we're out on the
boat or at the beach.
But the fact is that outdoor
apparel has changed dramati-
cally over time. If you haven't
been paying close attention, you
might be missing out on the latest
advances in technical outdoor gear, foot-
wear and sunglasses. As we dive headlong
into the hottest part of the Southwest Florida
summer, we though it was time to take a closer i
look at what to wear out there. m l
For some people, clothing and fashion are
more or less synonymous. Although we wouldn't
expect to find that philosophy among too many
hardcore fishermen, there are a whole lot of folks
who go out on the water with no fishing rods at
all (I know, it's hard to believe). In a nod to them,
we've got a feature on the latest in resortwear,
which is a fancy term for clothes that bridge
the gap between casual and classy the kind
of thing you might wear if you were boating to
L dinner or going on a cruise.
For others, it's all about the practicality. I
myself lean more that way, so I've decided to
share what I've learned about dressing for boating
and fishing from that perspective. When I'm on
the water, everything I wear has been chosen for
a specific reason, and appearance is at the bottom
of the list (good thing, too no matter how I
dress, no one's mistaking me for a GQ model).
Naturally, if you spend a lot of time on the water,
you are probably already aware of the importance
of dressing correctly. But I'm always amazed at
how many people I see on the water who seem
to have just grabbed whatever and thrown it on.
If they would just put a little more thought into
how they dressed, they would find that they could
be more comfortable in the summer heat and
have a much better time out there.
Anyone who ventures outside in Florida needs
a good pair of sunglasses. Years ago, I used to
wear the inexpensive plastic glasses sold at the
big-box stores. I thought I was being smart by not
spending money on overpriced glasses. Then I wore
-d a pair of Costas for the first time, and it suddenly
became very clear why they're so popular it
was like seeing an HDTV picture for the first time.
Jeff Kincaid has spent a lot of time researching
how to choose the right sunglasses, and we picked
his brain a little about what he's learned.
SAnd of course, you can't go anywhere without
something on your feet. So Lee Anderson will be
looking at the latest in shoes for outdoor wear,
including those funky ones with the toes that
have become very popular with runners.
Of course, you can't talk about outdoor apparel
without discussing swimwear. The young ladies
on this page are showing off the current trend in
bikinis, which is to wear tops and bottoms that
don't match. Swimwear hasn't always looked like
._this, though, and we've got an interesting article
about how ladies' bathing suits have evolved over
the years.
I hope you enjoy this special edition of the
I ,magazine. We had a lot of fun putting it together.
-,.-. And if you hate it, I hope at least your wife likes it.


I ., \ -x


t





.i /MK^,a Page 14 July 25,2013


Want to keep your cool


in the summer heat:.


I IIITI I II IL h
weatdis6 kilte oay'3 way ot coo iny6'. 1o t t. U t 6eev U31meis, mo t dmoecueswill nave emipera ures cios o


effectiveness of sweating is evaporation. So the real
question is, how does evaporation cool you down?
Sweat is mostly water, and molecules in water are in
constant motion. The temperature of water gives us an
idea of the average motion of the water molecules. Each
water molecule bounces off its neighbors, sometimes
gaining energy from the collision, and sometimes losing
energy to other molecules. At any given time, however,
some molecules carry more energy than others. That


N




'~* K


the average, but some will be much hotter or colder
than the average on occasion. When water evaporates,
some of the molecules fly out of the liquid into the air.
Hotter molecules have more energy and are moving
around faster, which means that they are more likely
to fly away and leave the cooler molecules behind. The
evaporating molecules in your sweat actually carry the
heat of your body into the air.
-American Institute of Physics


,jfr


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Here's your WaterLine publisher, ',
all dolled up to go fishing. -
.*. ^i:
i **


I


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


People who spend only a little time in
the summer sun don't need to worry too
much about keeping their skin protected
from damaging ultraviolet radiation. As
long as they apply sunscreen properly,
they'll be OK. But what if you spend
hours and hours out there, day after
day? If fishing and boating are your
profession or your passion, you may find
yourself in that category. And for you,
sunscreen may not be the best option.
Not only does it get expensive to apply,
and reapply, and reapply, sunscreens
often have questionable chemicals in
them. If you're slathering that stuff on
once in a while, you're probably going
to be just fine but if it's a daily thing,
your exposure level is much higher.
There's also the fact that sunscreen
does absolutely nothing to keep you any
cooler in the sweltering heat. In fact,
some sunscreens can clog sweat glands,
making it even harder for you to keep
from overheating. As we move into the
hottest and most humid part of the year,
that can be a real bad thing. But your
other alternative covering up can
also quickly lead to overheating.
The good news is that there have
been major advances in outdoor apparel
over the past few years that have done
much to solve these age-old problems,
allowing us to both cover up and stay
cool at the same time. One of the biggest
-. breakthroughs has been polyester micro-
fiber cloth, which has become hugely
popular among serious outdoor enthu-
siasts. Because of its tight weave, this
material physically blocks the sun better
than most cotton T-shirts, especially the
lightweight, light-colored cotton you
might choose to wear for comfort on
a hot day. Even better, poly microfiber
wicks moisture (sweat, that is) away
from your skin and quickly releases it to
the atmosphere through evaporation.
This has the effect of keeping you drier
and cooler drier because the sweat
evaporates away, and cooler because
the evaporation process lowers your
surface temperature by a few degrees
(see the sidebar to learn how). I used to
wear quick-dry nylon shirts with mesh
backs on the water, but I was amazed at
the difference when I tried microfiber
for the first time. I was noticeably less
sweaty while on the boat and I also was
less thirsty afterward, which I attribute
to staying cooler. I almost always wear
microfiber on the water now, unless I
need a breast pocket to hold something.
Another reason microfiber shirts have
gained popularity is that it's possible
to print designs on them using the
dye-sublimation process. With dye sub,
the design is printed using specialized
inks and transfer paper, then applied
to the fabric with a heat press. This
method is superior to silk-screening
in many regards: The printed design
becomes part of the cloth, so it never
fades. Nor does it affect the material's
breathability. Also, since designs are
printed onto transfer paper instead of
made into screens, it's economical to
make one-of-a-kind shirts. The very
popular RedZone shirts are printed
locally using the dye-sub process. The
most popular brands of microfiber shirts
are Denali and Hanes. I have worn both
and have found the Denali garments to
be of consistently higher quality, both
in terms of material and workmanship.
Unfortunately, Denali has had some
supply problems in the past, which
has led some shirt printers to switch to
Hanes in order to keep product in stock.
Poly microfiber has found its way into
other products as well. You may have
noticed an increase in the number of folks
out on the water who look like they're
on their way to rob a bank. Those masks
aren't about hiding identities, though -
they're about sun protection. There are
many similar masks on the market, but
the type you'll see most often is the Buff.
Buff is brand name, though many people


use it as a generic term for any sort of
sun-protection mask. Buff manufactures
several different products, though for
Southwest Florida outdoorsmen the UV
Buff is almost universal. A Buff is a very
personal item of clothing, and as such
there are dozens of colors and patterns
available (also printed using dye subli-
mation). No matter how masculine or
feminine you are, there's one that will suit
you don't let being girly keep you from
protecting yourself.
Although I do wear a Buff, I've noticed
that I often fog up my sunglasses on
humid days. This has been a tricky
problem to overcome, but I've found
that if I bunch up a bit of the material
below my nose and breathe through
my mouth, the problem goes away. In
winter, this is rarely a problem, but this
time of year I fight it a little bit every
time I go out on the water. I still wear
the Buff, though, because I'd rather deal
with fogged shades than skin cancer.
Microfiber sun-blocking gloves are also
popular. Most are fingerless, leaving your
digits exposed to the sun but making
tasks such as casting or tying knots
much easier. Buff makes these too, but
I haven't tried theirs. I have worn the
Dr. Shade brand gloves and like them
a lot, though the rubbery plastic used
for grip on the palm surface tends to
peel off after a bit of use. Even with the
plastic missing, I don't notice a problem
with grip. My first pair of sun gloves was
a different brand, and I switched to Dr.
Shade because their glove offered more
wrist coverage. If possible, try the gloves
on before you buy them, and be sure to
wear your sun-protective shirt. Any skin
exposed between the garments will need
sunscreen, so some overlap is desired.
Although cotton shorts are OK for boat-
or shore-based angling, they aren't very
breathable. I don't like the feel of sweat
trickling down my body anywhere, but
even more than that I can't stand when
it finds somewhere to collect and stay.
Cotton shorts tend to be sweat collectors.
For that reason, I almost always choose
nylon to go out on the water. Plus, if they
get wet from a rain shower or splashed
water, they dry much more quickly. I
mostly wear shorts, but when I've got
a long day planned on the water, I go
with long pants to keep the sun off my
legs especially in the harsh summer
sun. Rather than buy both shorts and
pants, I got pants with zip-off legs. The
zippers are a bit of a pain to attach, but
they detach quickly and easily. Zipping
up the legs before you put the pants on is
far simpler. As an added advantage, they
only cost a few dollars more than shorts
by the same manufacturer.
To top it all off, you'll want a hat of
some sort. I hear lots of really good
things about the Tilley Airflo hats, and
you really ought to go try one on, but I
unfortunately look like an idiot wearing
one. OK, maybe I just feel like I look like
an idiot. Instead, I wear a baseball-style
cap. But as with everything else, there
are some caps that are better than
others. Wool, cotton or canvas are heavy
and get sweat-soaked quickly. I have a
cap made of stretchy breathable synthetic
mesh that has become a favorite. As an
added bonus, the underside of the bill is
black, which cuts down on glare. I've seen
similar caps being sold as golf caps, but
I've found it to be perfect for any outdoor
activity to the point I don't really
want to wear any of the dozens of caps
I've collected over the years.
That pretty much has it covered -
with no skin exposed to the sun, there's H
no need to worry about sunburn and
all the nasty things that go along with
it. Of course, you'll also need pair of
sunglasses and some type of footwear
to finish the outfit, but those are such
specialized items we'll look at those
separately. I know that a lot of you
prefer to display as much skin as possible
when you're having fun outdoors, but
for those of you who spend many hours
under the Florida sun, staying under
cover may be the best way to go.


\1 j


..............

















In the old days, we had special clothes that we
wore when we were fishing. Nowadays, there
are still special clothes that are worn for fishing,
but man, what a difference. In the old days,
we wore our crummiest clothes when we went
fishing because no one would be crazy enough
to wear nice stuff around mud, water and slimy
fish. Our fishing shirts (which did double-duty
as lawn mowing shirts and car repairing shirts)
were armpit-stained, faded T-shirts. Whether
wearing long pants or shorts, we'd choose the
rattiest and most tattered ones for fishing, and
as long as the holes weren't too large or too
critically placed, no one really cared. Speaking
of holes, fishing shoes were aged sneakers that
usually sported a few punctures. If our tootsies
poked through the toes of our Keds, it wasn't
a problem because water would drain out
much faster, and the extra ventilation on the
stinky footwear didn't hurt a thing either. I can
remember the dog sniffing my fishing shoes,
gagging, then running off to roll in a roadkilled
opossum to mask the stink-foot smell. The only
piece of apparel which might have smelled as
bad as fishing shoes were fishing hats, which
were shapeless, dingy, sweat-stained and never
laundered, except when an unexpected thun-
derstorm gave them a drenching. A good fishing
hat was a very personal piece of gear which
might see duty for many seasons until it finally
disintegrated or was lost overboard.
During the last few decades something has
changed with fishing clothing. Now, rather than
donning our nastiest clothes to go fishing, it
seems like we get all dressed up before heading
out to sea. Tournament anglers wear brightly
colored and logo-adorned attire from head to
toe, and the clothing usually matches their
colorfully wrapped boats. Sometimes even
the truck that's used to pull the boat trailer
is wrapped to match. It's not just the tourna-
ment guys who are now wearing fancy fishing
clothes. Tackle shops and department stores
everywhere are selling fishing shirts that are
brightly colored, collared and multi-pocketed.
Fishing shirt features can include air-circulating
vents, quick-dry fabrics, built-in sun protection,
built-in insect protection, and a host of straps,
snaps, flaps, d-rings and other adornments that
perform functions known only to the designers.
Fishing pants are designed much the same way,
and some of them allow you to use zippers to
remove the legs if you decided mid-trip that you
wanted to wear shorts instead of long britches.
(Back in the day we had the same feature, but
it required the use of a filet knife and could only


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be done one time per pair of pants).
There are actually purpose-designed fishing
shoes nowadays. Arch-supported, non-skid,
quick-drying, odor-suppressing fishing shoes.
Hats have changed too: Lawrence of Arabia could
fend off the desert sun while wearing some of
the flap-equipped headgear that's seen on the
water nowadays. Plenty of anglers still favor the
old-school baseball style cap, but nowadays, the
typical hat is not allowed to build character by
seasoning for a few years. It seems like every
fishing tournament, guide service, tackle shop
and construction company in the country is
giving away hats as promotional items, and
it's usually pretty easy for an angler to sport
a new hat. Of course, this situation is much to
the delight of the embroidery companies who's
sewing machines are stitching logos onto hat
crowns as frantically as woodpeckers on caffeine.


There is a whole new genre of fishing clothing
on the market that has been spawned by
increased awareness of the need for sun protec-
tion. The gangster-looking neck wraps which
cover ears, noses, cheeks and necks are called
buffs and are becoming very popular among the
younger anglers. Fingerless fishing gloves that
protect the backs of the hands from the sun are
also showing up on the water with frequency.
The youngsters who wear this stuff are probably
way smarter than us older guys, most of whom
are unlikely to protect ourselves from the sun
until skin cancer has eaten important append-
ages completely away.
I must admit that in recent years, I have
taken to wearing a collared shirt when fishing,
and sometimes it is in a color other than khaki
or tan. This is mostly due to the efforts of Mrs.
Capt. Ralph who has much more fashion sense


than I, and who seems determined to change
my ways. Her strategy is sneaky: she's been
watching a fishing show that features a blond-
haired, camera-friendly, nattily dressed host,
and during the show she'll casually remark
that "he sure looks nice when he's out fishing",
or, more diabolically,"l bet the girls all like
him:'Then, a few days later, I discover some
new, colorful fishing shirt in the closet that I
find myself actually wearing. I draw the line at
hair dye, though.
Let's go fishing!
Capt. Ralph Allen runs the King Fisher Fleet of
sightseeing and fishing charter boats located at
Fishermen's Village Marina in Punta Gorda. He is
an award-winning outdoor writer and photogra-
pher and is a past president of the Florida Outdoor
Writers Association. Call him at 941-639-2628 or
email Captain@KingFisherFleet.com.


Don't get burned in the summer sun


McClatchy-Tribune
News Service
Summer just isn't as fun
without time in the sun. But
according to the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention,
the UV rays can damage unpro-
tected skin in fewer than 15
minutes of exposure. And with
a 2005 study estimating that
approximately 1 in 5 Americans
will develop skin cancer in their
lifetime, protecting children's
skin is a parental priority.
"You would not send your
child to play out in the cold or
snow without proper clothing;'
explains Sandy Johnson, M.D.,
a dermatologist in Fort Smith,
Ark. and spokesperson for the
American Academy of Derma-
tology. "The same rules apply
when going out in the sun."
It's also important to start
healthy habits early because
sun damage is cumulative
throughout your lifetime,
according to Hoover, Ala.-
based dermatologist Elizabeth


Martin, M.D.
"Skin is like an elephant; it
never forgets;' she says.
There are countless myths
about sun protection. At the
top of Johnson's list is the
ability to tan.
"A tan is your body trying to
protect itself and therefore is
bad. It is like your body telling
you that your meat is being
cooked;' she says.
Find your child's freckles
cute? It's actually a sign of sun
damage, says Martin: "Any
change in skin color is sun
damage. Period."
Even indirect sunlight can
cause significant damage.
Martin explains that cloudy
days won't provide protection
from harmful UV rays and
warns that families should
be especially careful when
bringing babies to the beach.
Even if they're under a tent,
the light can reflect off the
water and sand.
There are two main types
of sunscreen: chemical and


physical. Chemical sunscreens
are absorbed by the skin to
degrade the sun's UV rays,
while physical sunscreens, also
referred to as physical block,
sit on top of the skin and act as
a physical barrier.
For parents concerned about
chemical exposure, Johnson
recommends a physical
sunscreen with titanium
dioxide and zinc oxide, which
she considers the safest ingre-
dients for all ages.
Not all sunscreens are
created equally. And while
parents don't have to read
scientific studies to find the
best one, they should be
vigilant.
"Be a label reader";'says
Martin. You'll want to look for
a "broad spectrum" sunscreen,
which protects against both
UVA and UVB rays.
SPF, which stands for sun
protection factor, can also be
confusing. Don't go for less
than SPF 30, says Martin, and
be aware that the ratings can


be misleading. For example,
an SPF 60 is not twice as much
protection as an SPF 30.
"The additional amount of
protection you get is minimal;'
she notes, adding that it often
gives parents a false sense of
security.
That means it's critical
to apply and reapply at the
appropriate times. A good rule
of thumb according to Johnson
is to apply the sunscreen 30
minutes before any sun expo-
sure. (That means slathering it
on before you get to the pool.)
Reapply every two hours -
and more often if your child is
especially active or will be in
water. In these cases, it's best
to look for a water-resistant
sunscreen.
The U.S. Food and Drug
Administration recently tight-
ened its regulations on the
"water resistant" label and
now requires manufactures to
explicitly indicate how long
that resistance lasts (either
40 or 80 minutes). Parents


should reapply according to the body are protected. Some
the product's label. areas Martin sees parents
When applying sunscreen, often miss: the lips, which
make sure to do so liberally, need full coverage like all
Johnson suggests a brush-on other parts, and the area
block to ensure all areas of around the eyes.
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By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor

Believe it or not, the ancient Romans
wore swimsuits that closely resembled
today's bikini. The swimsuit has evolved
over hundreds of years and has endured
revolutions, depressions and wars. But in
the end, they prevailed. Let's take a closer
look at the evolution of the swimsuit.

THE BEGINNING
When we think of swimwear, more
often than not, the bikini comes to mind.
Although the bikini was coined in the
1940s, history tells us that something like
the bikini was worn in ancient Roman
times. During those days, bathing was
primarily a public ordeal, and was reserved
for the beautiful, rich and powerful. Old
paintings reveal that women did wear a
bikini-like suit during the height of the
Roman Empire. However, after the fall
of the Empire, fashionable suits seemed
to be of little importance in society.
Remember, the history of the swimsuit
has changed over time, and many of those
changes are a direct reflection of what
was going on in civilization at the time.
During the heyday of the Roman Empire,
things were good. After the fall, things
weren't so good. Bathing fashion was not
a top priority; survival was. Perhaps those
bikini-like suits were still worn by the
few, but for most, public bathing virtually
disappeared for a few hundred years.

THE REJUVENATION
Nudity was the norm for men during
the 1600s and 1700s in Europe. Suits
were worn, and each country and town
decided its own rules, but until laws
mandated some type of clothing, nudity
was common while bathing and swim-
ming. In 1860, men were banned from
swimming in the nude in England. There
were some protests, but health issues
likely played a role in requiring clothing
while bathing or swimming in public
areas. The women during this time
donned bathing gowns. These gowns
were typically full-length dresses with
weights attached to the hems so that
they would not reveal anything once
in the water. They also commonly wore
socks and hats. Men during this time


wore a tight-fitting woolen suit, similar
to long underwear.
Swimsuits during this time exposed
very little skin. They were essentially full
dresses. During the Victorian era, many
beach resorts were equipped with bathing
machines, designed to make it impossible
for the opposite sexes to catch a glimpse
of each other.

BATHING IN AMERICA
Around 1900, with the influx of immi-
grants came their culture and traditions.
Bathing was one of them. And around this
time a leotard-type top with shorts, socks
and a hat became the popular choice of
suits among women. The suits revealed
knees and arms the first time such a
display of skin was shown in public since
the Roman days. The men generally wore
tank tops and shorts. The public still
discouraged the display of skin, and in
1907 a lady named Annette Kellerman
paid a price for wearing such a suit.
Annette was an Australian swimmer who
came to the U.S. to perform underwater
ballet in glass tanks for the public. Her suit
revealed her arms, legs and her neck, and
she was charged with indecent expo-
sure. The suit was infamous during this
time and was appropriately dubbed "the
Annette Kellerman."
But despite the opposition, the tighter
suits were popular among the nation's
youth. The women's social revolution
during the 1920s saw women wearing
non-traditional clothing. Flappers were
setting the mark in fashion, including
swimwear. The suit of the 1920s was a
dress-style skirt with a low neckline and
bare shoulders. Legs were displayed for
the first time, with necklines becoming
increasingly lower.
New materials like latex and nylon were
also introduced, resulting in suits that
hugged the body and revealed even more
skin. But just as people were indulging
in bathing and swimwear much like the
Roman Empire era, The effects of the Great
Depression and World War II shifted priori-
ties in society.

ITSY BITSY TEENIE WEENIE
In 1946, a French man named Louis
Reard and Jaques Heim invented the bikini.
The suit was advertised as the"Atome" and


was dubbed the world's smallest bathing
suit. Reard renamed the suit the bikini after
the South Pacific island Bikini Atoll, site of
atomic bomb tests during the time. It is
believed that Reard wanted to make the
same impact on the world with his bikini
that the atomic bomb had made.
Although it was discouraged by most
Catholic countries around the world, the
bikini caught on. With the U.S. in post-war
celebration, it found a home among young
women.

POST-BIKINI
Actors like Rita Hayworth and Esther
Williams helped embed the bikini into
popular culture. But perhaps the most
notorious bikini was a white one worn by
actress Ursula Andress in the 1962 James
Bond film, Dr. No. Just one glimpse of that
suit makes you understand why bikini sales
skyrocketed after the film was released.
Bikinis gradually became smaller and
skimpier. Even the one-piece swimsuits
started pushing the envelope, revealing
hips. The one-piece did its best at the time
to keep up with the more popular bikini.

MODERN DAY
Since the 1960s, we have seen many
variations of the bikini and the one-piece.
We have witnessed the thong, the mono-
kini, G-string and the men's Speedo and
surf trunks. Today's suits look similar to the
prototypes of yesterday, with moderate
differences. There are animal prints, tacky
accessories even shiny metallic print.
Swimwear will always remain a fashion
statement, but today's suits are also a bit
more practical. Less and less do you see
fur-coated bikinis or one-pieces with plastic
rings. Some women even wear different
colored tops and bottoms.
"Right now, in 2013 the biggest thing
in swimwear are fringes;' says Cortney
Pez, manager of Splash Sun Fun in Venice.
"Things are always changing, though.
What's popular one summer isn't the next.
It's always changing":'
Swimwear will continue to evolve, as
it always has. The styles of today will be
a little bit different than the styles of
tomorrow, and they will reflect what is
going on at the time in civilization. As
for how future designers will add to the
history of the swimsuit: Only time will tell.


P.,:,i,:,
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Woman in a
swimsuit in
Florida in
1968.


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A quality pair of sunglasses is
indispensable for anyone who
K spends time outdoors. You're
born with one pair of eyes and
you have to live your whole life
with them -the better you
take care of them, the more
likely they will be there when
you need them. It's true that good sunglasses are expensive,
but $200 for a quality pair is a minor expense when you're
talking $6,000 per eye for laser surgery to repair the damage
that can be done to unprotected eyes. This is a philosophy I've
practiced my entire life as soon as I could afford a decent
pair of sunglasses, I got a decent pair of sunglasses. And in
the course of doing dumb things, I've broken many sunglass
lenses. Believe me, I was very thankful it was the lens that
took the hit and not my eye.
Generally, glasses that are higher priced have better
polarization, better materials and better warranties. If you
think good glasses are expensive, price a pair of prescription
polarized sunglasses; $700 is not unheard of, depending on
the brand ouch! For a lot of people, sunglasses are mostly
about fashion. But if you're really going to get the best pair
possible, functionality has to be at least as important as
styling. The primary considerations are fit, lens color, lens
material and polarization.
Fit is really key. If the frames don't fit your face, you won't be
looking through the lenses the way they're meant to be looked
through. Your facial features Square forehead or rounded?
Narrow or wide nose bridge? mean that some frames will
fit really well and others poorly. The goal is to have the lenses
lined up with your eyes and have as much light as possible
reach your eyes through the lenses rather than coming in
around the lenses. Light that comes in from the top or sides is
called light leakage, and it's a major distraction.
You can go to an optometrist to determine which glasses
fit you best, or you
can go to a
retail


shop that has a good selection of sunglasses and try on several.
If the glasses have to stretch to fit your face, or your eyelashes
touch the backs of the lenses, or if they put pressure on your
temples, nose or brow, those glasses don't fit. When you're
wearing sunglasses that fit properly, you won't be continually
pushing them back up on your nose or adjusting them. They
should become part of your face, so you don't even notice you're
wearing them until you take them off.
No one has perfect facial symmetry. If you just can't get
your glasses to fit right, you can take them to an optical
center for fitting. With plastic frames, heat can be a problem.
They may be fitted just right, but if you leave them on your
dashboard in the hot summer sun, they'll go back to their
original shape. Heat can cause plastic frames to stretch, warp
or become lopsided. If you hang your glasses by a strap from
the rearview mirror, you may find over time that the weight
of the lenses will pull the earpieces straight. You may not
even notice, because it happens gradually, but that can ruin
the way your glasses fit.
Lenses can be made of plastic or glass. In decent
sunglasses, plastic lenses are made from polycarbonate,
which is very tough and virtually unbreakable but prone
to scratches. Poly lenses are getting better every day, but
cutting-edge poly lenses are expensive. Yes, you can get a
pair of poly lens glasses for $15, but the lenses will be of
much lower quality than the lenses in a $150 pair. If you have
a tendency to drop your sunglasses often, poly might be a
better choice as it's less likely to break. Glass lenses are more
optically clear and less prone to defects such as warpage and
waviness. They're also more scratch-resistant. Just like poly-
carbonate, glass is made in different grades. High-end glass is
very clear and very tough, so the lenses can be made thin and
light in weight -but of course it's more expensive. Cheaper
glass has to be thicker to stand up to day-to-day abuses, so
lower-quality lenses are noticeably heavier.
No matter what your outdoor activities, lens color will make
a difference to you. If you're an angler or a boater and need to
be able to see into the water, choose a lens that is similar in
color to the water you'll be in. When your lens color is similar
to the water color, you'll see the water itself less and be able
to more easily see things in the water fish, underwater
structure, whatever. For the iced tea-colored water of Charlotte
Harbor, amber has long been a popular choice. Other brownish
tints copper, bronze, rose, etc. are also good options.
Copper was actually developed for redfish tournament
anglers, but it's also great for driving in fog or heavy rain
because brake lights just jump out at you. If you're going
offshore, gray would be a better choice.
If you're not concerned with being able to see
' into the water, color still matters, but for
different reasons. What you want is to
block as much light as possible while
still being able to see comfortably.


Blocking light reduces eyestrain, but blocking too much light
will increase it again. Many lenses include a mirror finish
which is intended to further reduce light by reflecting it
away before it even enters the lens. The best lens color for
light reduction is gray with silver or blue mirror. You'll get a
bit more light with copper or amber with green mirror, and
a bit more still with copper or amber with silver mirror, then
unmirrored copper or amber, then yellow, then clear. I drive
with silver mirror over gray, unless it's foggy or rainy; then I
wear amber lenses because I can see better.
Polarized lenses block glare and light reflected off the
water's surface. (For a full explanation of how this works, go
to http://bit.ly/18BiGx7.) Again, this is important whether
you fish or not, because glare will fatigue your eyes and cause
you to squint. Squinting leads to crow's feet, but even if you're
OK with wrinkles, you won't be able to enjoy seeing all the
things you go out on the water to see manatees, dolphins,
ospreys, horseshoe crabs, starfish and all the other amazing
things you'll come across. Some lens makers coat both sides of
the lenses, which seems to give the best polarization results.
To check for good polarization, hold up two lenses so you
are looking at one through the other and then rotate one
clockwise. With good polarized lenses, when you get to about
90 degrees, you'll have almost no light coming through the
lenses what one lens doesn't block, the second lens will.
With cheap lenses, you'll have a dark spot in the middle but
be able to see light around the edges.
Once you have a pair of glasses that you love, some
common sense maintenance will keep them around for a long
time. Don't slide them up onto your forehead when you don't
need them. Putting sunglasses on your head stretches the
frames because your head is wider than your face at eye level
- plus if you look up, they'll fall off the back of your head.
Instead, fold them and put them in your pocket or hang them
from the neck of your shirt. Or get a neck strap Cablez are
nice and quite durable.
Avoid harsh chemicals, both on your fingers and when you
clean your lenses. Common materials such as gasoline and
spray-on sunscreen can damage lenses by accident, and using
glass cleaner (ammonia), Formula 409 or other such products
can destroy them. If your glasses need cleaning, rinse them in
tap wat and wipe them with a microfiber or soft cotton towel
(not paper towels they're made of wood!). if you need to
use a cleanser, Dawn is good. Better yet, check the glasses
manufacturer's website and see what they suggest.
Once you wear a good pair of sunglasses out on the water,
you'll find it really hard to go back to lower-quality lenses. If
you take good care of your new glasses, you shouldn't have to
put the cheap ones on again.
Jeff Ki(cll IS tthe Oil inet nu Opetol of (opt'p Tetis TickA/
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Some call it resort wear. Some call it cruise wear. Some just
call it casual attire. Whatever you want to call it, this style of
clothing has become massively popular with both men and
w women here in the subtropical climate of the Sunshine State.
Jeff Anderson, who with his wife Nichole owns the Palms on the
Pier Boutique in Punta Gorda's Fishermen's Village, knows it's hard
to define, but he knows it when he sees it and when he sells it.
"Resort wear is casual to dressy clothing;'" he says. "It wouldn't be
considered business attire. You can wear it boating, you can wear
it out to dinner. In some cases it would even include mother-of-
the-bride type dresses. It crosses over many boundaries, but what
it all has in common is it tends to be a little more relaxed:'
One of the boundaries crossed is the age gap. You can see
resort wear on men and women of all ages at least all ages
past about 25. "We see a lot of women from their 30s up to
their 60s and beyond. Most women in their 70s and even into
their 80s are of the mindset that they're 40 or 50 years old," says
Anderson. "They're not dressing like they used to they're
dressing younger. They're taking better care of themselves,
they're working out, they're eating right, so they want to look
good. They don't want to wear matronly clothes. They want a
more youthful look. Our clothing lines look great on the younger
women who have good figures, but they're also made to look
good on women who are a little older and maybe not as trim as
they used to be. The women in Missy sizes from 10 to 16, they
maybe want a garment with a little more sleeve, maybe it's
designed to blouse a little more:'
Troy Young, the owner of Captain's Landing, also in Fishville,
A agrees that resort wear has cross-generation appeal. His shop
specializes in menswear, but the casual feel is similar.
"The guy who shops here is the guy who wore a suit and tie
his whole working life;says Troy. "Then he comes down here
and still wants to be stylish and look good, but he wants to relax
and be comfortable. We also see the guy who grew up wearing
Quiksilver T-shirts and boardshorts, but now is grown up needs a
more mature but still cool look:'
Both say casual styles haven't changed much in the last few
years. "It's been pretty casual less embellished and more
basic than it was a few years back" says Jeff. "The trend is
toward multipurpose garments, something a lady can wear to
go on the boat, or relax around the house, or maybe go out for
lunch downtown:'
For gentlemen, tucked shirts and big florals are out. "The
oversize hibiscus prints are not really happening right now," says
Troy. "Foliage prints are still good, but they're more abstract.
And tight or small prints have become popular. The shirts are
now made with straight bottoms, so they look good not tucked
in. You can still tuck if you want, but if you look around you'll see
everyone is wearing them out now."
One thing that has been trending for both men and women is
ease of care. "Polynosic fabric, which is a polyester/rayon blend,
has really taken off," says Troy. "It has a silky brushed feel to it,
but it's really easy to take care of cold wash, tumble dry low,
take it out and wear it. No pressing or dry cleaning. Who wants
an ironing board anymore?"
Palms on the Pier shoppers also want to avoid the dry
cleaners. "Everything we sell can be washed'Jeff says. "And with
most of our brands, the clothes are pre-washed and pre-shrunk,
so it's ready to go."
"Polyester used to be taboo. It was hot, thick and just old-
fashioned,"Troy adds. "But now polyester is woven so it breathes
and has sweat-wicking capabilities, so it's great for outdoor use."
The women shopping at Jeff's store seem a little more fond of
their natural fibers. "Cotton is still very popular," he says. "A lot
of women still like the feel of it. Synthetics are more popular in
dressier styles, though." Troy offers lightweight lawn or Egyptian
cotton to his customers who aren't ready for the synthetic fiber
revolution yet.
Of course, resort wear has always been known for a tropical
color palette. But at least in women's clothing, it's not like that
year-round.
"Color trends are all based on season," says Jeff. "As we move
into fall, even in Florida we'll see more traditional fall colors.
People come down here and say, 'I want to see bright colors,
because this is Florida.' Well, even with clothes made for Florida,
in fall you're still going to have your neutral colors: Tans, browns,
blacks, maybe some white. I think a lot of people are surprised
to see those traditional northern colors, but that's because in
the industry as a whole there are always seasonal differences.
The colors start to brighten up in January and February."
Men can wear bright colors too, at least on top. Troy says
shorts and pants are still pretty much the basic colors they
always have been, but shirts can be blue, teal, salmon, mango
and other brilliant hues. "When people come down to Florida,
they feel it's OK to wear colors like that," he says. "A lot of our
customers who have a home down here and one up north will
say, 'I can't take that home with me.' But they'll wear it all the
time here. When people come down they see the colors and like
it, because they don't see them everywhere else. They go to the
department store and they see gray, blue, brown and white."
"Things just seem to be getting more casual," says Jeff. "We
always hope in fashion that people are going to start dressing
nicer again you feel good when you get a little dressed up.
But Florida is Florida. You can go to see a Broadway show in your
casual cotton clothes, and sitting right next to you might be a
woman in a silk gown and her husband in a tux. It's really kind
of odd, but that's just how it is."
COpIOIIIs IUIIIIh'i 866--163- 16-13 CophitoIIlISoIhI4 conm
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Punta Gorda Herald editor Pamela
Staik wears a sundress from Palms
on the Pier Boutique. Sun Sports
assistant editor Matt Stevens wears
an outfit from Captain's Landing.


S 1 '





tvsu~ioLr(vn Page 20 July 25,2013


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wIat'tiherne tning' Ecofmo
that we all share with footwear? We all have
to wear them; or at least most of us.
The focus here is outdoor footwear. What
most people look for in outdoor footwear is
practicality. Most guys are not going to wear
a pair of $1,000 designer shoes while wading
through the flats. And you won't see too many
women sporting 6-inch stilettos walking
along beaches or docks.
Let's start with one of the most common
types of outdoor footwear the basic
sandal. Flip flops are basically soles attached
by a strap of some type. They are as basic
as footwear comes, and date as far back as
10,000 years. They are lightweight, easy to
slip on and off and are ideal for a long day on
a boat or a lazy day on the beach. They also
come in a wide range of colors and styles.
But they do have drawbacks. The traditional
sandal has little covering the top of the foot.
So if you are prone to sunburn, you better use
sunscreen.


' Where ire milAy vtrifetis oftrltltaditional I-
sandal. Footwear like rocss came onto the
scene at the Fort Lauderdale Boat Show in
2002 and was a big hit. They are still popular
today. They are essentially rubber sandals
that cover most of the foot. The Croc is
comfortable, and practical like its predecessor
- although some critique its fashion appeal.
For on the boat or on the beach, the sandal
and all of its variants are ideal. But if you are
wade fishing or walking the beach on low
tide, sandals are notorious for slipping off
your feet and disappearing into the mud.
Tennis shoes and traditional boat shoes
like Sperry will generally stay on your feet,
but you will get them dirty I can't imagine
what a day of doing the stingray shuffle
through the flats would do to a nice pair
of white shoes. In this case, something in
between a sandal and a tennis shoe would
do nicely. Minimalist shoes have become
practical and trendy the past few years.
Vibram Five Fingers was introduced in 2005. It


is marted toward lelrsiald'ylcft racers
and maintains a grip on slippery decks while
keeping somewhat of a barefoot feeling.
There are a few minimalist shoes out there,
but the Vibram has one key distinction: It has
individual sections for the toes. The sections
are supposed to give extra grip, and are
supposed to enhance the barefoot experi-
ence. They come with either one or two Velcro
straps, and should be able to handle marching
through the mud without slipping off. Some
people even jog in them. But they do cost
more than the traditional flip-flops.
Of course, there are times when you need
something even more durable than a sandal
or shoe. Let's say you find yourself trodding
through the mangroves or over a jagged
oyster bed. Then you would probably be best
suited by wearing a pair of boots, but that is a
topic for another day.
When it comes down to choosing the
proper footwear for a day outdoors, it comes
down to practicality. Do you want something


11u In just slipoh and sl o? Do yo want
something that goes nicely with your outfit?
Should you really wear those leather or suede
shoes knowing they will get wet and dirty?
Your best bet is to head to your local outdoor
apparel store and see what works best for
you. Ask questions, and don't be afraid to try
a few pairs on.
"It really does come down to individual
preference" says Vickie Metzler, store
manager at Laishley Marine in Punta Gorda.
"Our most popular brands are Teva and Keens,
but it all depends on many factors. During
the colder winter months Sperry seems to
be popular. During the summer its sandals.
You should always do a little research before
buying footwear":'
On a final note, clean off your shoes after
you are done with them for the day. We rinse
our boats, kayaks, fishing poles and every-
thing else off after we use them. Do the same
with footwear. They will last longer, saving
you money.





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By Janet McConnaughey
Associated Press


NEW ORLEANS Fishing regula-
tors have voted to increase this year's
red snapper quota by 2.5 million
pounds and to start a recreational
season Oct. 1 if the anglers'share of
the catch so far allows it.
The Gulf of Mexico Fishery
Management Council increased this
year's quota on July 17 from 8.46
million to 11 million pounds for one
of the Gulf's most popular eating
and sports fish. A recreational season
would get up to 21 consecutive days.
The length is uncertain because
recreational anglers have regularly
exceeded their 49 percent share of
the total annual quota. Their catch
through June will be subtracted
from the increased recreational
quota of 5.9 million pounds when
figures become available in mid-
August. If some of their quota
remains, there would be a second
season.
Commercial boats are assigned 51
percent of the annual total.
Decades of overfishing had
depleted the species when the first
recovery plan for red snapper went
into effect in 1990. The total quota
had been about 9.1 million pounds
for years when regulators cut it to
5 million pounds. It has risen
steadily since.
Council member Kay Williams, of
Vancleave, Miss., wanted this year's
total set to 12.1 million pounds-
the highest choice on the agenda.
She said the lower quota penalizes
commercial boats and people who
buy red snapper for failure to control


the recreational sector.
"We just took a million pounds
away from the commercial industry,"
said Williams, who cast the only
"nay" in a 15-1 roll-call vote.
Last year, recreational anglers
were assigned just under 4 million


I -
pounds and caught 5.8 million
pounds. In 2011, the recreational
quota was 3.9 million pounds; the
catch 4.6 million, according to the
website for the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration's
fisheries division.


"I think we came a lot closer in the
last couple of years than before";' Roy
E. Crabtree, regional administrator
for NOAA Fisheries, said during the
meeting.
He said part of the reason for
the underestimates is that the


average fish size increased faster
than expected. That's beginning to
stabilize, he said.
Each commercial fishing boat is
assigned an individual weight quota.
Those for 2013 will be increased when
the final rule is published, "hopefully
sometime in September," NOAA Fish-
eries spokeswoman Kim Amendola.
Recreational anglers and head
boats that take groups of anglers
into the Gulf don't have weight
quotas. Rather, they have daily per-
person bag limits and specific dates
when they can take red snapper.
Each state sets its own season
and daily bag limit for state waters;
only Mississippi's and Alabama's
seasons and bag limits match those
in federal waters. Taking those into
account, NOAA Fisheries sets the
season for federal waters based on
estimates of when the recreational
quota will be met.
This year, it originally set four
seasons one each for Texas,
Louisiana, and Florida, and one for
Mississippi and Alabama. Texas and
Louisiana challenged that plan, and a
federal judge threw it out. The federal
season wound up running June 1-28 in
federal waters off all five states.
The Louisiana Department of
Wildlife and Fisheries has had
agents at marinas check the catch
this season. The total through June
has been well under NOAA Fisheries'
preseason estimates, Assistant
Secretary Randy Pausina, the state's
top fisheries official, said Tuesday.
"If you're looking at pounds, we
are at 65 percent of what they said
we would harvest in this state'" he
said.


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When things change,


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SiMM SD i5Ofl mumMm.5.nnii


When you go out and practice in
preparation for a big tournament, you
really have to keep an eye on the weather
to see if you may need to adjust where
and how you fish. I know this from past
experience, but I relearned it last weekend
when winds caused my main area to become
dirty and completely changed my pattern.
Expectations run high when you go out
the weekend prior to the tournament and
find one honeyhole after another. The water
was gin clear. You could count spots on a
bluegill if he sat still long enough. We had
caught two bass better than 4 pounds and
a few others as we patrolled a large section
of kicker trails inside some heavy grass. It
got to the point that I had to bury the hook
point deep in my swimbait because I didn't
want to actually hook any more fish.
Naturally, on tournament morning, my
emotions were all jacked up. I couldn't
wait to get on the lake and back into the
area that we had found during practice.
When our number was drawn, I was off and
running. I was happy to see that no one
was headed in that direction we would
have the area all to ourselves. With the
sun still low, I had a hard time seeing into
the water itself. That was expected, but as
the sun got higher, I still couldn't see the
bottom of the lake. Uh-oh.


I covered more than 200 yards of
grass and open areas covered with
lily pads and did not raise one fish. The only
thing that was different was the clarity of the
water. We had been casting big swimbaits
during practice and raising fish everywhere.
On the day of the tournament, we weren't
catching anything. Based on the clarity of the
water, I should have done one of two things.
I should have switched to a bait that I could
flip in those same areas and slow down my
presentation, or I should have moved some-
place where the water was clearer.
Yours truly sometimes doesn't make adjust-
ments as fast as he needs to. Fortunately, my
wife switched over to a worm and started
casting into the grass. She managed to get
one in the livewell before I decided to move.
I made an 11-mile run to a place that I was
hoping had enough water clarity to catch
some bass. This area has always been very
good to me in the past. When we pulled up, I
saw that the hydrilla was topped out and that
I couldn't get as close to the pads as I wanted.
We managed to get two bass from that
spot before I decided to make another
run. We went 2 more miles down into


the Kissimmee River and fished the
entrance to Camp Mack. We have
usually picked up a few small bass in this
area, so I thought we would fill out the limit
and move on. We saw one fish break on the
surface chasing some bait and I told Missy to
throw back to him. Sure enough, she hooked
up and landed a 3.5-pounder. We had three
good fish in the boat and now only needed
one more to round out our limit.
We ran back to Toho and fished in some
areas where we have always been able to
catch fish. We didn't expect anything great,
but at this point, the storms were rolling
in and we needed one more bass to have
a limit so why not hit an old haunt or
two? It takes only one word to describe
what happened for the next three hours:
Nothing. We couldn't get bit, much less
land a fish, for the rest of the tournament.
By the time 3 p.m. rolled around, I was one
frustrated angler.
Sometimes I wonder if putting in practice
time a week before the tournament is
a good idea. With the way the weather
changes here in Florida, conditions in any
given area can change in a heartbeat. That's


what happened to us. One weekend we
had crystal clear water and just raised bass
all day. The next weekend the one that
counted we boated only three fish. I
really can't blame my misfortune on anyone
but myself. I know what to do when things
turn for the worse my biggest issue
is putting the new plan into effect soon
enough and then sticking with it.
There are always going to be hurdles
when you fish, whether you fish tourna-
ments or just want to have fun. How you
overcome them and make the necessary
changes to have a successful day is what
makes it all worthwhile. If you don't adjust
properly, knowing you can do better is what
brings you back out the next weekend. I
know the tough days are what make me
come back out and work even harder the
next time I have a chance to get to the lake,
tournament or no tournament.
Greg Bartz is a tournament bass
fisherman based in Lakeland. Greg fishes
lakes throughout Florida's Heartland
with his wife and tournament partner,
Missy Snapp. Contact him at Greg.Bartz@
SummitHohlidos (coml


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Used boats have rust. New
boats will rust. But not all
boats must rust. If Dr. Seuss
were a boater, I'm sure that he
would have written that book.
We all have fought corro-
sion, the rust and crust
monster: Rust streaking down
your boat's side from a cleat or
transom eye, or your latches
and hinges getting so crusty
they stop functioning. It's a
constant battle, which starts with
and thorough washing and follow
with treating the metal surfaces v
quality anti-corrosion spray.
I don't mean to sound like a bro
record, but you have to wash your
thoroughly with clean fresh water
boat soap not dish soap! af
every use. I like a product called B
Zoap, with a Z. Don't forget to rins
out every compartment that you u
including the anchor locker and bi
When you think you are finished r
off the boat, rinse it off again.
When you have finished washin
boat, get out your can of spray silica
and give all of the moving mechan
parts latches, hinges, pop-up c
etc. a quick shot of this stuff. Th
silicone will displace any remaining
water and leave a lubricating film
these parts. Don't stop at the meta
parts. A shot of silicone will do woi
for moving plastic parts, like fold-i
navigation lights and antennas. Si
spray spreads out pretty thin, so yo
need a small shot of spray to be ef
tive. People often ask me if they ca
WD-40. The answer is no. WD-40 h
place and works great in certain in
- but on a boat, use a silicone spr
I also like to shoot some silicon
any 12-volt light sockets and behi
rocker switches that are starting 1
intermittently. Silicone spray will
ally displace any existing corrosio
get switches and lights working a
I like to keep a can of silicone spray
the boat. In a pinch, a shot of silic
has fixed more than one nonfunct


The endless


Tarpon Redflish Snook Sharks
ntnr Tn. Pp- R mk R Bace. Ppm it


Suatui ruti b eaci naa rumi t
All other inshore & nearshore fish
on spinning or flvfishing tackle
"if it swims here, we can catch it!"




corrosion Concealed Carry



proper light. And don't forget to tilt your motor quickly corrode any metal in the cabin. Basic Handgun Instruction
is up up and give the mounting bracket Using these products and procedures is .MRA certified Firea.rms inmu
vith a and trim and tilt system a nice coat of especially important if your boat will be B L LY
silicone spray. While you're there, spray stored for a while. Cover it well and keep B L Y C A
3ken up around the steering components and it in a marina, your garage or someplace 941-769-0767- jcarll@embarqmail.com
boat even under the cowling, else out of the elements. Sportrap Gun Shop, 941-629-7775


r and
after
oat
se
used,
lge.
insing

g your
cone
iical
leats,
he
g
on
al
nders
down
licone
ou only
fec-
an use
as its
stances
ray.
e in
ind
to work
actu-
n and
gain.
ay on
:one
tioning


I use Yamaha silicone spray every
time I wash my boat, but there are other
products that are specifically designed
for corrosion control and prevention. I
use them when I am performing a more
thorough cleaning of my boat. Boeshield
T-9 and CorrosionX are two products that
also come in aerosol spray form and work
really well in the battle against corrosion.
These formulas are much more heavy-
bodied then silicone and tend to stay put
and last much longer. Because of this I
tend to use them in less visible places:
The underside of latches and hinges,
outboard motor steering arms and large
electrical connections like navigation
light sockets and battery switches.
A good coat of wax on every part of
your boat will go a long way towards
preventing corrosion on all surfaces. Wax
on metal rails, Bimini and T-top frame-
work, and all other metal parts will help
to prevent corrosion between washing
and polishing.
Corrosion will also creep into items that
you may have stored on your boat, like
tools, air-horn cans and flare guns. If you
store these items in your boat, seal them
in a large plastic zip-top bag and throw
in a silica gel packs (like the ones that
come with your new shoes). If you have a
cabin on your boat, you can get silica gel
in quart-size pails. Put one in the cabin to
absorb moisture from the air, which can


The battle to keep your boat trailer
systems working is even worse than your
boat itself. Use the same products and
procedures as you use on your boat, but
be aware that since a trailer is dipped
in salt water frequently, you'll have to
stay right on top of things. Despite your
best efforts, you'll probably eventually
lose the fight, but if you keep up with
maintenance your trailer will last much
longer than if you don't.
Rust and corrosion still happens, no
matter how much effort we may put into
cleaning and prevention. A lot times I
will see rust streaking down the side of
a boat from a through-hull or cleat no
matter how much the parts have been
cleaned and sprayed. A lot of this is
due to these parts being installed with
non-stainless steel nuts, washers, or hose
clamps on the inside of the hull.
Maybe Dr. Seuss was a boater. The
more that I think about it, he would have
had lots of time to think up his next book
while trying to keep his boat clean.
Capt. Ed Kopp has been with Marine
Dynamics in Englewood for many years
and is experienced in all facets of the
marine business. He also draws from the
knowledge and experience of his friends
in the marine industry. Ifyou have any
questions about this article or any other
marine subject, contact Ed at 941-716-
2493 or Ed@MarineDynamics.com.


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faepru ant Page 24 July 25,2013


Baby birds need their



feather moms


Baby bird season is finally starting to slow
down for us at Peace River Wildlife Center. It
begins in April each year, and the onslaught,
lasts well into August. It's our own version of
AA. Not Alcoholics Anonymous, but Abductees
Abound. All baby birds are better off raised
by their parents. That way they receive the
proper nutrition and life lessons for the best
chance at a long and productive life. Some
baby birds do need medical intervention and
would not survive if some caring stranger did
not bring them to PRWC. Unfortunately, many
uninjured babies are stolen from their homes
and brought to us by well-meaning people
who have actually kidnapped fledglings at an
important juncture in their lives.
Let's look at what happens to a baby bird in
the wild. Most birds lay numerous eggs, usually
one a day, but do not begin sitting on the eggs
until the last one has been laid. So, a few eggs
in a nest with no parent are not necessarily
abandoned. The parents may be out searching
for food, storing up energy for the long period
that awaits them when they cannot leave the


nest after the eggs hatch. After the eggs hatch,
one or both parents, depending on the species,
will feed the babies. Often, the parents will
feed an entire clutch the same way each time.
One baby, usually the first born, will be fed
first. If there is enough food, the second baby
will be fed, and so on. This ensures that when
there is insufficient food to successfully raise all
the chicks, the strongest has a good chance at
survival. It also goes a long way to explain the
size difference between me and my older sister,
the first born, and obviously mom's favorite.
In larger clutches, the babies begin a wran-
gling dance as they get older. As their little
fuzzy butts begin to grow and they start to
move around the ever-shrinking nest, a smaller
sibling can be inadvertently (or intentionally)
kicked out of the nest. If the nestling baby
appears uninjured from the fall, which is often
the case, it can simply be returned to the nest.
It is an old wives'tale that a mommy bird will
smell the human on the baby and reject it.
Very few birds have any sense
of smell at all, but most do have


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V v4, -"i J'4-- -


Soilletliles we get so wrapped up Ill going
out and trying ,to ath fish that we forget
the fish we pursue live in a beautiful and
immiiensely cool habitat filled with m31azing
(reatires :1 f illaly killlds Soilletllme Is ii(e 11 :o
stop casting for a few llmilnutes and just wvvah
what s going on aroIlild youL the crabs
scittling in the sand. the needlefish swim-
ming across the sur a(e, the star fish railingg
around the seagrass, the (onchs gliding
across the mud riot only is this relating and
interesting illn its owi right, but it also teaches


you to observe what s happening in the
water while you re fishing This is a really good
thing to do, because lif you can learn to do it
efficiently, it will become second nature to
you YOU II become imuch better tuned in to1:
what s going on out there, which really good
anglers generally are When you observe,
you II star tIo get feel for how the mullet
move, where the bailtish school and when,
what the crabs are doing and those things
will informal your angling Basically the more
you know, the better you II be


2 1 -pound whole spiny lobsters, spill lengthwise A clip-n-save seafood
1 lbsp butter recipe provided by
I lbsp celery, finely (hopped


1 shallot, finely chopped
I1 sp flour
1 Isp dry mustard
1 4 Isp cayenne pepper
1 4 cip milk
1 2 cup crab meat, Ilaked
I lbsp butter, melted
3 lbsp dry breadcrumbs
paprika
salt and black pepper I:o lasle


- Rc'c (lp tW
[1"t.- '[St- 'Ii/ lf


Rinse lobster body cavily thoroughly; then set aside. In a small skillet, satile (elery and shallot
in bulltter until soil. Stir in the flour, dry mustard, cayenne and milk; simmller until thlkened
(2 to 3 minutes). Add crab meat and spoo,:n nmlture into: the lobster body cavity. Brush lobster
meat with melted butler. Sprinkle bread crumbs, paprika, salt and pepper over crab and
lobster meat. Bake on oven-proof pan at 400 F for 15 to 20 minutes until cooked through and
lightly browned. Yields 2 ser vings.


iellent


SIZE LIMIT: n a FOOD VALUE: Ei
BAG LIMIT: 10 per harvester per day or uO FISHING METHO
per vessel per day, whichever is less casting to fish loco
floating ,:bjects S
AVERAGE SIZE: ) to 15 pounds ,oatigobjes S
I *dolphin) form den


FLORIDA STATE RECORD: 77 lb, 12 oz
HABITAT: Offshore
waters

Li=moi^om^


hooked fish in the
school near the b:
months, large nui
found within 30 I


IDS: Irolling, also sight-
aled near vveedlines or
caller fish chicken
ise schools Keeping a
water will often keep the
'at During the simmer
nbers of dolphin are often
miles of shore


S.C
A,


W


I





fl anainenm wmll nhm mnn- emer


very strong maternal instincts, and they want
that baby back.
The next stage of growth for the babies is
the fledgling stage. Here, they are starting to
grow flight feathers on their wings and begin-
ning to flex the muscles to use them. They will
often perch on and walk around the edge of
the nest at this time. They may even hop onto
nearby branches like the tiny daredevils that
they are. These are the baby birds most often
found on the ground. Placing them back into
the tree near the nest is ideal. It is often a
matter of days until these babies begin to fly
on their own. The parents must teach them to
avoid predators and how to hunt for the proper
food at this time.
What happens to baby birds that have been
brought to PRWC? Those that have been injured
by the fall or have been caught by a dog or
cat are treated for broken bones, infections,
etc. They are placed into "nests" (tissue-lined
plastic bowls) in one of four incubators to help
control their body temperature and are fed a
species- and age-specific diet and any medica-
tions they may require. Most baby birds need to
be fed every 15 minutes or so. Their metabolism
is quite amazing. It seems they double in size
almost daily at this stage. It is no surprise for
anyone feeding the babies that as soon as the
food goes in one end, it seems to come out the
other. And don't worry about setting an alarm
to remind yourself they will let you know
when they want food! The noise can be almost
deafening at times. Just about the time you get
finished feeding all the hungry gaping beaks,
it's time to start over again.
As the hatchlings and nestlings turn to
fledglings, they start to pop out of their nests
and start zooming around in the incubators.
Then they have to be moved to bigger cages
to keep from hurting themselves and others.
They still have to be hand fed, but now they
try to fly out of the cage as soon as their
bellies are full, which makes feeding their
roommates a challenge. Visitors in the office
are often offended by having doors slammed


A ,i /uKea* s Page 25 July 25,2013


in their faces after someone yells,"BIRD!"We
are a well-oiled machine when it comes to an
escaped fledgling in the hospital. All doors
remain closed until the errant escapee has
been returned to his cage.
After the fledglings have started to show
some interest in picking at food on their own
and have some flight feathers, they are moved
to an outdoor habitat. They still need to be
supplemented with hand feeding until we are
sure they are eating well on their own. As soon
as they have all of their flight feathers on their
wings and tails and can fly around the outdoor
cage, they are released. Although cages are
cleaned numerous times daily, each time the
group is moved to a different housing, the cage
they were in is cleaned and disinfected for the
next batch.
The baby birds go through the same stages
whether they are in captivity or in the wild,
but they are at a distinct advantage if they can
remain with their parents in the wild. We do
the best we can to feed the birds a scientifically
balanced diet to the nestlings. As the insect
eaters age, it is more difficult for us to replicate
the diet they would receive in the wild. We
purchase crickets and mealworms to feed them,
but their parents would be feeding them and
teaching them to hunt for hundreds of different
things. We do what we can for the little guys
and send them on their way with a silent wish:
Grant me the serenity to accept the things I
cannot change; courage to change the things I
can; and wisdom to know the difference.
Peace River Wildlife Center is a nonprofit
organization, dedicated to the care, preserva-
tion and protection of Charlotte County's native
wildlife since 1978. They are open 7 days a
week year-round, including holidays. Tours are
offered from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. PRWC receives
no government funding and relies entirely
on private donations. For more info, or if you
would like to volunteer or make a donation
(including aluminum cans), visit PeaceRiver-
WildlifeCenter.com, email PeaceRiverWildlife@
yahoo.com or call 941-637-3830.


Call 941-429 g
to list your boattay! __
b t .- -






REDUCED!

A.-


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STROKER ENGINE, LOW HOURS.
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kll dh


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a-



2005 11ft Boston Whaler
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aZl~'L~t


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1o nuudU IO a i 9,,UU
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Located at BEAUTIFUL I-M A RINA-I


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Group gives




vets missions




in the 'Glades


By Susan Cocking
The Miami Herald

When 30-year-old Iraq war veteran Jorge
Martinez left the Marine Corps, he suffered from
post-traumatic stress disorder. The vet wanted
to readjust to civilian life and get involved in
social activities, but being amid large crowds
made him uncomfortable.
Then, a little over a year ago, Martinez met
Tom Rahill the leader of a loose confedera-
tion of outdoors people calling themselves
the Swamp Apes through the recreational
therapy program at a Veterans Administration
hospital. At first, it would appear the two men
had little in common: Rahill, a 50-something
engineer from Plantation, Fla., had never
served in the U.S. military. Martinez, though a
Homestead, Fla., native, had never been to the
Everglades.
But, both say, the partnership has helped
them immensely and the Everglades
ecosystem has benefitted as well.
Since 2009, Rahill has been recruiting war
veterans to volunteer with the Swamp Apes,
clearing paddling and hiking trails in Everglades
National Park and hunting for exotic Burmese
pythons in the Everglades outside the park.
"The goal of the Swamp Apes is to serve
veterans and thank veterans for their service
to our country;' Rahill said. "This is an extreme
adventure. It matches the level of adrenaline
some veterans have experienced in an active
war zone. It's adrenaline with a purpose."
Martinez agreed, adding that volunteering in
the Everglades gives vets an outlet for their well-
honed drive to accomplish a mission.
"In the military, we are trained that you have
a goal, a mission to accomplish that's similar
to what Tom is offering;' he said."We just get
it done. In the military, no matter what you
encounter, you have to keep moving forward."
On a spring Sunday, about a half-dozen former
servicemen joined Rahill in the park, using hand
tools to clear obstacles from the Bear Lake Canoe
Trail near Flamingo. The narrow, muddy stream
that flows a little more than 1.5 miles to Bear
Lake was blocked by deadfalls, along with the
hiking trail that runs parallel to it.
The Swamp Apes paired up in canoes, using
hatchets and hand saws to cut a thick button-
wood that had fallen across the stream and
then heaved the sawed logs into the woods
on the other side of the hiking trail. Then they
resumed paddling until they encountered
another obstacle and repeated the process. The
volunteers didn't use buzz saws or motorboats
in deference to the park's tranquil, primitive
atmosphere. It was slow, hot work, but no one
complained.
At one point, the group paused to make way
for a kayaker returning from Bear Lake to the
put-in. Matt Taffney from Boynton Beach said he
was grateful for their work.


"They did a good job;'Taffney said as he
pulled his kayak out of the water.
What the members of the Swamp Apes
really look forward to is hunting for pythons.
They accompany Rahill, who has a permit to
remove the huge invasive reptiles from state-
owned lands.
"An adrenaline rush;'Marine Corps veteran
Jacinto Molina said.
Martinez says he has caught seven pythons
- including one longer than 12 feet while
hunting with Rahill. He caught his first a few
months ago in south Miami-Dade County unas-
sisted.
Martinez said he spotted the snake as he
bumped down a dirt road in his truck on his way
to meet Rahill.
"My heart was pumping out of my chest;' he
said.
When he tried to catch the seven-footer, it
darted into the wheel well of his truck, making
for the engine compartment.
"I just pulled it out by the tail;' he said.
Realizing he didn't have a bag in which to
stow it, Martinezjumped into the truck with the
snake coiled around one arm.
"I drove with him wrapped around my arm.
I started honking, calling Tom,'Hey I got it," he
recalled, laughing.
Martinez, Molina and two other vets, Steve
Verbovszky and Joshua Acevedo helped Rahill
search for pythons a few weeks ago in a large,
undeveloped tract called the Frog Pond a
former farm near Homestead General Avia-
tion Airport owned by the South Florida Water
Management District. The group was accompa-
nied by Jeff Fobb, a captain with Miami-Dade
Fire Rescue's Venom One snakebite response
team. Fobb was off duty that day invited
because of his python wrangling skills.
After four hours of trekking from tangles of
poisonwood and willow to dry prairies pocked
with limestone solution holes and finally
through an abandoned mango grove, the men
spotted 10 snakes seven black racers, one
garter snake and two unidentified, but no
pythons.
Despite being hot, sweaty and snake-less,
Acevedo, a 27-year-old Marine Corps veteran
who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, said he
enjoyed the experience.
"I never messed with snakes in my life, but I'm
getting into hunting;' he said. "A lot of people
are afraid of them. I don't fear them. Ever since
I got back from Iraq, I get into long walks being
by myself. With people in big groups, I get
agitated. I feel uncomfortable. But I'm out here
in a nonviolent, nonaggressive environment.":'
Rahill jokes that as he gets"older and fatter,";'
he'd like to see the Swamp Apes become a
permanent, nonprofit, veteran-run organization
with some source of funding to keep it going.
Said Rahill:"This, to me, is important to the
interest and perpetuation of the Everglades."


a


5.0 Mercrusier w/ 500hrs. Very Good Condition. Sleeps 2.
Head w/ sink & fresh water. 70 gal Fuel Tank. Depth Finder,
Am/Fm Radio, BBQ Grill. Ready for day or even over night
trips. Has A Really nice Aluminum Trailer.


21 GS 201 HURRICANE 2003 S12,500
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker -
Located at BEAUTIFUL I-. AR IN.A.-i-


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$8,000.00. Call Chris Murray @
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....-"S .t For Details!


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DdZyriuer uy r IIr IdI wil n new
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ABL 0~. .N Call Chris Murray
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22 2003 PROLINE WALK-AROUND Mere 200sl V6
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McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker M a
Located at BEAUTIFUL A m RI NA.I


4-stroke. Loaded with options
trailer included. $27,995.00.
ARBE.....M. RINF Call Chris Murray
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22' Starwind Sloop (2 to choose from), just serv-
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Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


a i


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.o Iv. Hoo.a n ay toVv nia i. vu IVl eIr lUolI
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PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


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1 cup orange juice A clip-n-save seafood
2 tbsp honey recipe provided by
1/4 cup canola oil
1 tsp salt f
4 medium carambolas (star fruit), sliced IL


1 cup orange sections
1 cup pink grapefruit sections
1 pound cooked spiny lobster tail meat, sliced
1 cup canned black beans, rinsed and drained
salad greens, chilled


- Recipe from
fl-seafood.com.


For dressing, bring orange juice to a boil in a saucepan, reducing liquid by half. Cool in a small
bowl. Whisk in the orange juice, honey, oil and salt. Set aside. On individual plates, arrange
carambola slices, orange and grapefruit sections, lobster and black beans on salad greens. Drizzle
with orange salad dressing and serve. Serves 4.


22 2009TAHOE q8i. Under 20 hrs. and new Irailer. 23' POLAR WALK AROUND CUDDY 2005
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niammii .-m lams mr ium-'. rn,


Aif *F ,I r* Page 27 July 25,2013


Residents of laws' canII9442 9 i
to list your boat toda!

home seek an end to



shark tournament __


Annie Linskey
Bloomberg News

On Martha's Vineyard, the Massachu-
setts island where the aquatic villain in the
1975 film "Jaws" menaced swimmers, some
residents now say sharks need protection from
humans.
Voters in the town of Oak Bluffs passed
a measure calling for the
annual Monster Shark Tour-
nament that begins Friday to "The
be the last contest where the
fish can be killed and strung i
up by their tails, a tradition are
that draws thousands to
the island home of financier draw
Steven Rattner and actor Ted
Danson. Though nonbinding, LI11hlr
the measure is pitting resi-
dents against merchants and I Ic
big-game fishermen who
travel from as far as Texas o fT r
to chase some of the ocean's
largest predators. [hil1
"It has turned into a
spectacle and a frat-party
scene;' said Gail Barmakian, me
one of five selectmen repre-
senting Oak Bluffs, which IuJ
sits on a harbor lined with
gingerbread-style homes i
and is scented by clams
frying at nearby restaurants.
The town becomes unrecognizable during the
four-day tournament, she said, with drunks
sleeping on sidewalks and broken beer bottles
piled under benches.
To pay for police and municipal resources
strained during the contest, Oak Bluffs has
added a $225 docking fee for the tournament
and an extra $40 daytime mooring fee for
spectators. Last year, police made 21 arrests,
according to the Martha's Vineyard Times.
In a nation so fascinated by sharks that more
than 1 million viewers tuned into the Syfy
channel this month for"Sharknado;'a disaster
movie that combines the menace of killer fish
with cyclonic weather, the island's shift in atti-
tude represents a victory, even if symbolic, said
Wendy Benchley, the widow of"Jaws"author
Peter Benchley.
"We love our monsters;'said Benchley, presi-
dent of the board of the New York-based Shark
Savers conservation group. "But the culture has
changed. To have a kill tournament at this time
in the life of the ocean just sends the message
to the public and the youth that it is OK to kill
our apex predators that are in trouble around
the world."
Peter Benchley set the novel in the fictitious
summer resort town of Amity, N.Y., on Long
Island. Director Steven Spielberg moved the
location to New England and shot most of the
film on Martha's Vineyard, where President
Obama vacations with his family and the
average price of a home was $1 million last year.
Steve James, owner of the Boston Big
Game Fishing Club, which runs the tourna-
ment, said conservationists'concerns are
misguided. The sharks caught aren't endan-
gered and only 16 were taken last year, he
said. Moreover, accusations about revelry
should be leveled at 20-something partiers,
not the fishermen who rise at dawn to chase
the elusive shark, James said.
"They try to make it seem like there is a
dead shark hanging on every pylon in Oak
Bluffs;'James said in a telephone interview.
Should the town selectmen enforce the
catch-and-release measure next year, he
threatened to tell contestants to drop their
captured sharks near the shoreline.
"How exciting would it be to have hundreds
of sharks in Oak Bluffs Harbor?" he said with
a laugh. "That is what catch-and-release is
about."
Protests began after a photograph from the
2005 tournament broadcast by national media


]!


al


brought attention to shark fishing and scrutiny
from animal-rights activists, according to
James. The picture showed a 1,191-pound tiger
shark caught by a fisherman that was brought
to the dock minutes after the tournament
deadline had expired.
Since then, groups such as the Washington-
based Humane Society and New Zealand's
Earthrace Conservation have shown up
in Martha's Vineyard to
protest. Even Nigel Barker,
%a former judge on the
television reality show
I "America's Next Top Model;'
has joined the fray. In 2008,
he watched the tournament
and chronicled the daily
weigh-in on his blog.
,'ed in] a "The sharks are unceremo-
niously hanged, drawn and
Quartered in a public display
of butchery that mirrors
erI'yI medieval public executions;"
Barker wrote.
irIroI Big-fish tournaments,
regardless of type, always
include a weigh-in,
according to James. The
shark meat, he said, is cut
up so it can be grilled and
eaten.
'io Entry fees are $1,475
per boat, and about 80 are
expected to participate this
year. Fishing begins at 7 a.m. Saturday and at
6:30 p.m. July 20.
At night, fishermen typically walk down
the sidewalk from boat to boat trying to glean
insight about water conditions and types of
chum, or shark bait, said Danny Evans Jr., 47,
a machine-shop owner from Brockton, Mass.,
who has participated in the tournament
for almost two decades. He's baffled by the
souring relations with the town.
"Mentally, you are running a marathon;'
he said, describing the concentration and
second-guessing that occurs while fishing.
Time drifting on the water is punctuated by
the physical challenge of reeling in a shark
weighing hundreds of pounds.
"You have to have your wits about you;' he
said in a telephone interview before taking
his 58-foot vessel to the Vineyard. He said he's
spent as much as $1,500 in fuel in a single day.
"It is very expensive;' he said.
Contest rules allow participants to catch
only three types of shark: the thresher, with its
distinctive, ribbon-like tail; the shortfin mako,
the fastest species; and the porbeagle, a stout-
bodied fish favored by sportsmen.
Overfishing last year prompted the federal
government to prohibit commercial opera-
tors from taking the porbeagle, said Karyl
Brewster-Geisz, the branch chief for the Highly
Migratory Species Management Division of the
National Marine Fisheries Service. Recreational
fishermen are allowed one per trip, she said.
The other two types aren't restricted.
For businesses in Oak Bluffs, the tourna-
ment is a boon. They capitalize by selling shot
glasses with sharks emblazoned on the side,
baseball caps with brims that look bitten and
shark-themed bottle openers.
Nancy's Restaurant, a dockside establish-
ment where the president and first lady
Michelle Obama dined in 2011, makes twice
as much money during shark week than on a
typical weekend, said Dave Gaffey, the general
manager. The restaurant displays an exact
replica of a 1,221-pound mako landed in the
2001 tournament above the front door. The
beast's jaws, teeth included, hang inside.
Not all store owners like the event. Luke
DeBettencourt, owner of The Corner Store,
which sells dry goods, said shoplifting spikes.
"Do you think that they would let this
happen in Edgartown?" he asked, referring to
a sister village known for its annual regatta.
"They would not have it."


24' 1994 Robalo 2440 Cuddy: Great buy.T-top, rocket
launchers, livewell, galley and head. Powered by Twin
150 Mercs, serviced on a regular basis. Lift kept and
no bottom paint. Asking only $12,900. Call Ray Mason
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com


25 2005 Puisuil 2470 Walkaiound: New lisling,
twin Yamaha 4 strokes, fully serviced, full enclosure,
livewell, AC, excellent condition. Asking $57,000.
Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason 941-505-7269


I


Clean with rasied console.T-Top Rocket launcehers, w/ Float in 8"
of water & can run way offshore. Best of both worlds. Rare Find!
Two live wells, fish boxes, hydrolic steering & more!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


24' CHAPARRAL 240, Loaded, full canvas &
screening, new engine 2009. Two biminis,
galley, enclosed head, sleeps 4, fridge,
inside storage, galvanized trailer.
$18,500. (941)-493-8320


6-foot 3-inches of head room. Berth, Galley Flat,
Sink, Chart Table, Head, Dinette, Double Bed.
Engine 40HP Honda OutboardTrailer Tandem Axle
$29,000.00 CRYSTAL CAY CENTER 941-639-6603
www.crystalcay.com "Major Credit Cards Accepted!"


4' IdUM flr L.U OI VVIUEi DE IVI,
T-SHALLOW DRAFT INBOARDS,
TRAILER. $26,900
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS
941-639-9400 www.redfishyacht.com


twin 115hp Yamaha 4-strokes
Just serviced. $24,994.00.
ABEL- j INF Call Chris Murray
.- .. @941-698-4006






25 1 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter GPS with Sonar. Hard
Top, A/C! Comes w/Aluminum trailer. Call BAYSHORE
MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com






26 8" 1989 Sea Ray Sundancel 7.4 Meicuiisei, Nfle
manifolds, risers & was just fully serviced. Fesh Water
Boat Clean! $10,990. Has been gone thru bow to stern.
Extra's! AC, Full Custom Cover,Tandem trailer. Sleeps 6.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


26' PENNYAN FB Galley Sleeps 4
New Eng. Low Hrs. or trade for
deck boat. $9,200.
941-223-4368


Pt'MI


25 1990 GRADY WHITE SAILFISH $27,500
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker irM
Located at BEAUTIFUL I-M A RI.NA.I





REDUCED!!!!
25' 1994 BaylinerTrophy: Popular fishing &
cruising boat, forward & aft sleeping
accommodations, enclosed head twin 150
outboards. Asking $7600. NOW $4950.
Call Ray Mason 941-505-7269.
Details seaamericayachtsales.com


26' Puisuil Denali 2670: ExcellenI condilion,T-200
Yamaha four strokes w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure,
windlass, elec. head, Garmin GPS and fishfinder.
Asking $68,500. Call Cpt. Bob Babineau, 941-626-1329.
Details seaamericayachtsales.com


26 Wellcrail 260 All Cabin350 Mercruiser 260 HP -
Alpha Drive New 60 Gal Fuel Tank Pressure Water
System Stove Top Fridge- Bilge Pump Alum
Tandem Axle Trailer $7500.00 Crystal Cay Center
(941) 639-6603 www.crystalcay.com


REDUCED'




25 2004 Wellcrail Coaslal: Twin economical 115HP 27' 2012 CUDA demo offered al $125,000
Yamaha four strokes w/only 110 hrs. Features include; Exciting fishing boat wall amenities for family too!
hardtop, large cockpit for fishing, cuddy cabin that Rosano 941-315-6989 McCallMarineSales.com
sleeps 2 & built in head. Boat was just detailed & ready .i enilhdYc iB k
to go. Asking $64,500. $39,900. Call Ray Mason, Licensed Yacht Broker
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com Located in BEAUTIFUL I M A RI[ N.]
coo


MdiL-


























27' Conch 2007 C.C., with new twin 250hp
Honda 4-strokes yearr Warranty)
Loaded, with aluminum trailer. $95,000.00.
A.IELk. ARINE Call Chris Murray
-.1- g, :...... @941-698-4006


28 HAMPAGEU port 1isnerman, 1989
(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler I/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, encl. head.
$26,900 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales


IOUIIEUIIWIEI I E l. m..yi. 1 .... r---.------------------IM-----
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
Volvo-Penta OD's, Good McCallMarineSales.com
condition $6,995, Trailer icensedYacht Broker
Available 941-268-8570 Located atBEAUTIFUL A RI


-4---


Dive Tank Rack 4 Curtains Head Queen Bed Sink
Stereo -Weight 4600 LBS 8' 6" Beam -Twin Honda 225
HP Motors 2005 Under 400 Hrs, Just Serviced Alum.
Tandem Trailer Ready to GO. $55,500.00 CRYSTAL CAY
CENTER 941 639-6603 www.CrystalCay.com


Call For Details 941-662-0015
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL -tI U RINA-








28' 2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin,
310 dual prop AC, GPS, bridge enclosure,
electric head, full galley, 45 mph, 45 mph, only 90 hrs.
lift kept. Excellent condition.
$28,500. 941-639-7890.








28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000,T/250HP, Yamaha's,
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000,
941-966-5400







28 Chaparral 2002: NEW LISTING! Well appointed,
walk thru w/s, 2 staterooms, generator w/2 hrs,
T-5.0 Volvos, just detailed. A lot of boat for $38,900.
Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269.


28.5' FOUR WINDS 2005 Cruiser $58,500
Call Richard Rosano For Details! 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker _r__
Located at BEAUTIFUL -T MA RI NA I


29' 1999 Sea Ray Sundancer: New listing,
fully equipped, just detailed. Radar, generator,
full enclosure, powered byT-240HP Mercruisers,
recently serviced and runs great.
Asking $42,500. Call Ray Mason
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com







23' 1997 Pro Line: Hardtop, new upholstery,
rebuilt 200HP Johnson Ocean Pro, super clean
fishing machine. Cuddy cabin sleeps two.
Great boat, great price. Asking $13,900
Call Ray Mason 941-505-7269
seaamericayachtsales.com


29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10,
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator.
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600.


29' Larson Cruiser, 2007 EFI 4.3 s Only $29,900.00
New seals in the outdrives. Radar Depth finder GPS
Marine Stereo, Bimini Tops, SS Prop. Full stand up
head w/ shower. Aft cabin with plenty of room. LOADED!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


28 Larson Express Cruiser 2006 $39,900 30' 1999 PURSUIT 3000 OFFSHORE $69,900
Call Dick Horste For Details 941-548-6070 Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL M.mA RINA. Located at BEAUTIFUL lM A- RIN..-I


I
I





3u Catalina IVIK2 wing Keel, roller main ana JID,
Diesel powered.
$29K
Call Ed 941-628-0167 or 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


30' Cruiser Ind. Boat
Twin 350s -10' Beam
$18,000.00
CRYSTAL CAY CENTER
941-639-6603 Visit website for more pictures.
www.crystalcay.com







30' ISLAND HOPPER $34,500
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker L u L
Located at BEAUTIFULG ,.s -iT iX.I


32' Carver 325 aft cabin yacht, all in great condi-
tion including brand new twin engines. $54,995
Call Ed at 941-628-0167
or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers








32' Carver Mariner
(Two to choose from call for pricing)
Call Tod at 941-457-0131 or
Ed at 941-628-0167 or 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers

-fca. .||p 2^^** "^


U U/MIMl-IIMA UUJ, U IIp IdlIllldmal,
AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
$79,000. 941-347-4670
email irvina32@centurylink.net


w =lA KAY =UA.N b,,,t .e .w...,U,,, co h3arris ir 1r i uI8,iesei puowereu
Call Allen Richards For Details 941-716-4051 FAST and FUN
McCallMarineSales.com $29K
Licensed Yacht Broker Call Tod 941-457-0131 at
Located at BEAUTIFUL A RINA.-I Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers

i.... .LREDUCED!!! I --


J' zuuu LA I -SN J i $11,uuu 33' WELLCRAFT COASTAL 2004 T-DIESEL
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989 INBOARDSOWERW/UPPER HELM,
McCallMariSaeso AIR, GENERATOR. ,4..7,99. $99,500.
Licensed Yacht Broker _r_ REDFISH YACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
Located at BEAUTIFUL -M AR INA' www.redfishyacht.com


Here's how it works: Take
pictures of your outdoor
adventures. Send your
high-quality digital photos to
Editor@waterlineweekly.
corn, or send prints by snail
mail to The Charlotte Sun,
23170 Harborview Road,
Port Charlotte, FL 33980,
ATTN: Lee Anderson.
Include a self-addressed
stamped envelope if you want
your prints returned to you.
PLEASE don't send us
photos of oversized or
other release-only fish
being poorly handled.
Photos of such fish being
gaffed, held by the lower jaw
only or obviously damaged
or dead WILL NOT be
published, no matter how big
the fish is or how proud the
angler may be.


26 2004 WORLD CAT 270SD Twin F225 Suzuki Eng.
CLEAN! 58,900 Call Meagan McCall 941-268-3198
McCal/IMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL M. 13 i 1.-1


31 Sporiclail 2002 3150: Lill kepl,T- Mercruiser MPIs,
5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
70,000, $69,000. Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason 941-505-7269


31' IRWIN 1985, CLEAN BOAT,
READY TO CRUISE,
INCL. INFLATABLE W/MOTOR $19,900.
REDFISHYACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
www.redfishyacht.com


34 iviEHuianl. Iuu, bCuani II IUCs vreu.ieei. tA.c.diCI
condition!T-Cummins, generator, bow & stern
thrusters, two staterooms, cherry cabinets, washed
weekly and maintained by prof, mechanic. Great Loop
boat, must see. Asking $240,000 $195,000 Ray Mason
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com

REDUCED!m





34'1987 SEA RAY Express Cruiser $19,900
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL -MA R INA-1
.".,,w- W I.


McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL II. A IRLNA- I
coo


Call 941-429 1 -
to list your boat tlay -'


























Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com


36- DORAL 2008 ELECTRONICS, AIR, GEN,
CAMPER CANVAS, WELL BUILT BOAT.
$170,00 $129,900.
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
www.redfishyacht.com


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989 Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
insed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
ated at BEAUTIFUL [I MARINA, 1 Located at BEAUTIFUL MARINAJ

JUST REDUCED!


34' CATALINA 1989, WING KEEL, DIESEL,
DODGER & BIMINI $39,500
CALL TOD AT 941-457-0131 OR
THE OFFICE AT 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS







34' CruiserYacht Express, $109,000
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker ____
Located at BEAUTIFUL -i.MA RI NA- -%







34' SEA RAY SUNDANCER 2006
SPORTSMAN PKG. AIR, GEN, LOADED, CLEAN.
REDUCED TO $116,900
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
www.redfishyacht.com


Cakk Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker n
Located at BEAUTIFUL r t .ARIN Al


37' SeaRay 270 aft cabin, Twin diesel,
Genset and much more!
Call Ed at 941-628-0167
or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


Engines New Bridge Capt Chairs Pressure Water System -
Radio Radar & GPS Boat is Turn Key!. To many upgrades to
list. $27,900. CRYSTAL CAY CENTER 941-639-6603
www.crystalcay.com "Major Credit Cards Excepted"


SARASOTA POWER SQUADRON 941-400-6467
Hurricanes and Boats Seminar (advanced) ................................ ................................. 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 1
Mastering the Rules of the Road Seminar............................ .................................. 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. Aug. 15
VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-485-7245
Call for information

PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-637-0766
Safe Boating Class ........................................ ...................... .............................. 8:30 a.m to 5 p.m Aug. 17
CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
ABC Boating Course (5 evenings)....................................................... 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Sept. 11 (Wed & Mon)
Provided by Greg Scotten



PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
About Boating Safely................................ Aug. 17, Sept. 21 ..................Sarasota .................. 941-758-5954
Boating Skills and Seamanship..................... Sept. 5 .......................... ....... 941-758-5954
About Boating Safely............................... Aug. 3............................... Punta Gorda ................941-639-3811
Boating Skills and Seamanship................. Sept. 16............................ Venice..................... 941-426-5523
Boating Skills and Seamanship................. Sept. 30............................ Englewood.............. 941-697-9435
-Provided by Dave Nielsen


35 1997 Cruisers 3570: Unique inletiol layoul, plivale 39' MAINSHIP TRAWLER 1999 AIR,
mid-cabin stateroom w/walkaround queen berth,
generator, C120 Raymarine chartplotter, FWC Mercs, GENERATOR,ELECTRONICS,READY TO CRUISE
V drives, lift kept. Asking $69,99e. $49,900. $44 ,000. $99,999. REDFISH YACHT BROKERS
Call Ray Mason (941) 505-7269 941-639-9400
details seaamericayachtsales.com www.redfishyacht.com


Pearson snoal arant sloop, all reaone,
diesel, wheel. $24,995
Call Mike 941-412-6430 or
the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


REDUCED _





36' 1998 CARVER Mariner 350, 40' DEFEVI
Twin Merc Cruisers, All Electronics, twin d
Shows Like New!
$69,900. 941-255-5311


ER DOWNEASTTRAWLER 1980,
iesel, new fiberglass decks,
uel tanks, water tanks,
$49,000
231-218-9920


----- .-.-~. ... ...


vI- --. I, __





















































































What is a solunar THURSDAY FRIDAY
table? The sun Sunrise: 6:50 a.m. Sunrise: 6:50 a
and moon, even Sunset: 8:21 p.m. Sunset: 8:21 p
when they are out Moonrise: 10:28 p.m. Moonrise: 11:08
of sight, exertforces Moonset: 9:54 a.m. Moonset: 10:55
wild creatures can Moon Phase Moon Phas
feel.Theseforces 88% Waning gibbous 80% Waning gib

and other animals Major Times Major Time
feed. Weather and 3:50 a.m. 5:50 a.m. 4:40 a.m. 6:40
tide also play a role, 4:15 p.m.- 6:15 p.m. 5:05 p.m. 7:05
but expect fish to be Minor Times Minor Time
more active during 9:54a.m. 10:54a.m. 10:55 a.m.- 11:55
the majorand minor 10:28 p.m -1128pm 11:08 PM 12-08


ar LIIIJi II Ime


SUNDAY
funnif i'i:' :1 ,i ni
,nrie 6 .,1 ,p ni,
Moo:nri.,e -- --
Moonset: 12:50 p.m.
Moon Phase
61% Waning gibbous
Major Times
6:17 a.m.- 8:17 a.m.
6:41 p.m.- 8:41 p.m.
Minor Times
:-- :- -
12:50 p.m.- 1:50 p.m.
Prediction: Average


Preiction- Average

MONDAY
,uJnrl i e 11 ni,
U,,jnie[ : 1' n pni,
M i::rin:, ;e 12' '5 a n,
Moonset: 1:46 p.m.
Moon Phase
50% Last quarter
Major Times
7:04 a.m. 9:04 a.m.
7:28 p.m. 9:28 p.m.
Minor Times
12:25a.m.- 1:25 a.m.
1:46 p.m. 2:46 p.m.
Prediction: Average


i.m.
i.m.
p.m.
a.m.
e
bbous
es
a.m.
p.m.
is
5a.m.
am


Prediction- Average

TUESDAY
uJrir,' 11 .'. ,i ni,
,Uniel :!: 1:!: p ni
Mn,:,i ri,:, e 1 05 ,I ni
Moonset: 2:39 p.m.
Moon Phase
41% Waning crescent
Major Times
7:52 a.m.- 9:52 a.m.
8:15 p.m.- 10:15 p.m.
Minor Times
1:05 a.m.- 2:05 a.m.
2:39 p.m.- 3:39 p.m.
Prediction: Average+


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 6:51 a.m.
Sunset: 8:20 p.m.
Moonrise: 11:46 p.m.
Moonset: 11:54 a.m.
Moon Phase
71% Waning gibbous
Major Times
5:29 a.m. 7:29 a.m.
5:53 p.m. 7:53 p.m.
Minor Times
11:54 a.m.- 12:54 p.m.
11:46pm -12-463am
Prediction- Average

WEDNESDAY
ujnriie i. a,. ,i ni
,Uniel : 1:!: pn,
M ,:,:inri e 1 4:!. ,i ni
Moonset: 3:31 p.m.
Moon Phase
32% Waning crescent
Major Times
8:39 a.m.-10:39 a.m.
9:03 p.m.- 11:03 p.m.
Minor Times
1:48 a.m.-2:48 a.m.
3:31 p.m.- 4:31 p.m.
Prediction: Average+


%-rv /-U.. l... l .in .vv in ... l., a -
Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull.
Full New Tanks. Asking $75,000
Call 941-408-9572


42' Pearson 424, Westerbeke diesel, davits,
solar, ready to cruise 1980 at $81,500
Please call Tod at 941-457-0131
or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker _rn_
Located at BEAUTIFUL ,.It A RI N.-*


44' Marine Trader Trawler: Ready for Restoration
Call CRYSTAL CAY CENTER for Details.
$10,000.00 Ask for Mikes Trawler.
(941) 639-6603 "Major Credit Cards Accepted"
Visit Website for More pictures: www.crystalcay.com

GREAT BUY!






52' VISTA MOTORYACHT, LIVE ABOARD/CRUISER
EVER DREAM OF LIVING ON A BOAT?
THIS IS FORYOU!! 15.5' BEAM, DIESEL
EXCELLENT CONDITION. $115,000
FNGI FWOOD Q41-966RR-691


55' SEA RAY 1996 T-Cat 776HP, CUSTOM
INTERIOR, BRIDGE AIR, SHOWS LIKE NEW!
$224,900 REDFISH YACHT BROKERS
941-639-9400 www.redfishyacht.com








Big Tuna by Jackson Kayaks
It's an angler's dream.
The "elite" seating is super comfortable and rotate
to face fishing buddy.
Live bait well, rod holders, stagers
$1599 Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Cuda 12 From Jackson Kayak
New little brother to the Cuda 14.12'6" long 31"
wide 3501b cap. High/low comfortable seat
rod holders and stagers everywhere. $1199
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Eddyline Carribean
The next generation of sit on top kayaks. Lightweight,
stable and quick. 12' long and only 451bs
Beautifully finished with high gloss
carbonlite material. $1279
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter








Elie Gulf 120XE 12 foot long, 350 Ib capacity
Stable fishing Ergoflex Seating system,
Bow and Center hatches
$729 Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


Feel Free Moken 12 Angler Kayak. New kayak:
127" long, 56 Ibs, unit-track quick release
system for custom fishing accessories. Kingfisher
seat, Wheel in the keel for easy transport.
$1099. 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter








K12 Angler from KC Kayaks
Custom fishing kayak. Hull provides
most stable & comfortable experience.
12' long, 34' wide 58#
$1329 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter

-





OCEAN KAYAK TRIDENT 11 $949
CENTRAL COMMAND CENTER FOR ROD MOUNTS
MODULAR FISHING POD, BATTERY BAG,
TRANSDUCER COMPATIBLE
STABLE (400LB CAPACITY) AND QUICK. ONLY 54LBS
941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


PACK ANGLER CANOE BY OLD TOWN $1049
Made of super tough and super light Royalex
only 331bs, 600 Ib capacity, 12' long contoured seat,
work deck, rod holder
bow mounted anchor system. $1159
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Santa Cruz Sit On Top Fishing Kayak New 2013
$999
Very Stable, Easy to paddle
Optional Live bait tank
Rod Holders, Storage
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter







Twin Heron by Old Town $664
New for 2013. Removable front seat for solo
paddling 13' 6" long, 64 Ibs, 5001b capacity.
$759. Angler model $759
Call 941-966-5477 A Silent Sports Outfitter


Call 941-429 1 -

to list your boat tli __ -'


liQT





Py 5 onEmllndmom iu mm*IU mi
a.. ws.....w, s...........lai eD *****im


srrmi~ I~ii~ nI~


UF'S ROBOTIC BOAT TOPS COMPETITION


i- _


An autonomous boat built by a team of University
of Florida students took first place and a $3,000 prize in
the International RoboBoat Competition, held July 8-14
in Virginia. The team had originally planned to build a
lawnmower, but the mower competition was canceled.
Boats entered in the engineering competition, hosted
by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems
International, were required to overcome obstacles
and perform several tasks on their own, with no
intervention or remote controls allowed. The UF team
spent about $6,000 creating their 6-foot vessel, dubbed
the PropaGator, though many parts were donated.
To duplicate their effort would take about $15,000 in
parts not to mention the 5,000 hours of design and
construction. Could this be the next big thing will
your next boat be able to truly pilot itself?

MERMAID BANNED FROM FLA. POOL
LITHIA, Fla. (AP) A woman has been banned
from swimming in her community's pool because she
wants to wear a mermaid tail. Jenna Conti, who lives
in Lithia's FishHawk Ranch subdivision, had been in
the Aquatic Club pool with her custom-made tail once
before with the staff's approval. But last week, em-
ployees told her it violated a policy against swim fins.
Last week, the FishHawk Community Development
board voted to keep her out of the pool because of
the swim fin policy. The Tampa Bay Times reports that
Conti's dream is to swim at the Florida Aquarium,
which features mermaid performers. The full-time hair
stylist hasn't been a mermaid for very long. She and
her 10-year-old son saw the mermaids at the Tampa
Bay Renaissance Fair earlier this year, and she says she
was "enthralled."


CHESAPEAKE CRAB NUMBERS DROP
Last year, the Chesapeake Bay population of blue
crabs was estimated to be 765 million good news
for crabbers and crab lovers, since the numbers have
seen two decades of decline. The survey for 2013 is
in, and it shows a huge drop the population now
stands at 300 million. The main driving factor seems
to be the disappearance of juveniles, which went from
581 million to 111 million. Who's to blame? According
to the Smithsonian's Environmental Research Center,
it's probably cannibalistic adult crabs eating their
offspring. The survey is also a bummer for anglers in
Maryland and Virginia, who have been enjoying a boom
of redfish, which rely on crabs as a food source. In 2012,
Virginia anglers caught and released something like 2.5
million redfish, up from 28,500 in 2010. And Maryland
fishermen reeled in 300,000 reds last year, more than
100 times the number taken in both 2010 and 2011.


FISH OIL LINKED TO CANCER
(AP) Taking fish-oil supplements or even eating
too much fatty fish may be linked to an increased risk
for prostate cancer, according to a new study from the
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The
result confirms findings from an earlier study by the
same team, but they are puzzling, given fish oil's sup-
posed anti-inflammatory effect, which would protect
against cancer. The study analyzed levels of omega-3
fatty acids the type of oil found in some fish in
the blood of 834 men who developed prostate cancer
race- and age-matched with 1,393 men who did not.
Men who had the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids


had a 43 percent increase in risk for prostate cancer and
71 percent increase in risk for the high-grade prostate
cancer that is the most likely to be fatal. Researchers
could not offer a biological reason for the link, and
called for more study.

HOW IS A MARLIN LIKE A FLOUNDER?
A team of Canadian biologists, trying to sort out the
relationships between tunas and billfish, discovered
something unexpected. Chris Moyes and his colleagues
from Queen's University performed DNA sequencing
on tissue samples from a variety of billfish and tuna
species. They compared the sequences both with each
other and with previously available sequences, looking
for similarities which would indicate a genetic relation-
ship. The more similar the DNA is, the more closely
related the fishes are. The team was surprised to find
that tunas and billfish are only distantly related, but
they were astonished to learn that billfish are closely
related to flatfishes such as flounder, sole and halibut.
The study shows that the previous method of determin-
ing relationships between living things looking for
physical similarities is deeply flawed.

AND TUNA ARE COUSINS OF SEAHORSES
In a related story, Peter Wainwright, an evolution-
ary biologist at the University of California, Davis,
and a team of researchers have found that tunas
are more closely related to seahorses than to billfish
and barracuda. The researchers weren't looking at
specific groups offish -they were putting together an
evolutionary family tree of all spiny-rayed fish, a group
which includes more than 18,000 living species. "There
are all these sorts of relationships no one had any
inkling of,"says Wainwright. "For a fish fanatic like me,
these results are sort of life-changing. Until now, we
really had no idea how these huge groups offish were
related."Continued genetic research will undoubtedly
reveal more such surprises in the years to come.

WHY IT'S CALLED THE TREASURE COAST
Proving that there are still riches for the taking off
Florida's Atlantic coast, a treasure hunter found a cache
of 48 gold coins off the coast of Wabasso Beach, Fla.,just
south of Sebastian Inlet on July 13. The coins, which are
believed to have been part of the cargo of a fleet of 11
Spanish ships that wrecked here in 1715, were located
just 200 feet from shore. Capt. Greg Bounds and the crew


of the Capitana usually come up with beer can, fishing
weights and other junk, but the gold haul with an
estimated value of a quarter-million dollars will
probably be enough incentive to keep them looking.


LEAVE'EM LAUGHING
A religious man takes his boat out on the Gulf of
Mexico. A huge storm comes along and capsizes his ves-
sel, leaving him stranded at sea. As he clings to the hull,
he prays for God to send him a miracle. A few hours later,
another boater finds him. "Get in, get in!"the other boater
says. The religious man replies,"No I have faith in God.
He will grant me a miracle."The other boater, unable to
convince the man to come aboard, calls in a report to the
Coast Guard. After a few minutes, another boater sees the
overturned hull and speeds over. "Come on,"he yells,"get
in the boat!""No, I can't,"says the religious man."I'm wait-
ing for God to send me a miracle, and I know He will."The
second boater also radios in to the Coast Guard and is told
a helicopter is on the way. Ten minutes later, the chopper
arrives. A ladder drops down and a Guardsman yells over
a bullhorn,"Sir, we're coming to rescue you!"The religious
man yells back,"God is going to send a miracle go
away!"but they can't hear him over the chopper. Another
Guardsman begins descending the ladder, but the boater
lets go of his hull and begins drifting quickly away. Before
the helicopter pilot can move toward him, he's seized by
a massive cramp. Unable to swim or even move, he sinks
and drowns before rescuers can reach him. A moment
later, he opens his eyes at the Pearly Gates. He looks up
at St. Peter and says,"I thought God would grant me a
miracle, but instead He let me down:'." St. Peter chuckles
and responds,"I don't know what you're complaining
about. We sent you two boats and a helicopter."


NO OFFRIN


S rin N
3^^^


4628 Tamiami Trail ( Corner of US 41 & Kings Highway)
Port Charlotte, FL 33980
(941) 757-8195 www.charlottemarine.com


hl--


A.IM .,,l Page 32 July 25, 2013


,3'






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Fmditinthe

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$$ QUICK CASH $$
Any price or condition!
Cash for your house/mobile.
941-356-5308

HOMES FOR SALE
1020


OPEN:FRI-SAT-SUN 12-3
Beautifully Remodeled
3br/2ba/lcg home, newly
tiled Scr. lanai with
fenced yard on corner lot.
$128,000. 941-716-1476




















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first!
A WholeR
Marketplace
of shopping
Ds eight
your
fingertips!


SABALL TRACEcE
Gated Community
Open Sun. 1-4
5261 Sabal Trace Dr.
North Port
3/2/2 Heated Pool
Home Beautiful Modern,
located in a Beautiful Gated
Community with low HOA fees!
$239,901 Price Negotiable
Owner/Agent, Steven Bailey
@ 941-786-4632 for gate
code. Special private show-
ings any day of the week!
Horizon Realty
International


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
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Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
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Realtors Welcome!
Advertise Todav! I


HOMES FOR SALE
S1020


GATED 5 PRIVATE ACRE PRAIRIE
CREEK WEST 2003 SPACIOUS
HOME wrITH 3-4 BDRMS,
CUSTOM FEATURES GALORE, 3
STALL GARAGE+DETACHED 1200
SF CUSTOM GARAGE W FULL BATH
EVERY MAN'S DREAM.BLACK TOP
ROADS & PRIVATE DRIVE.
PLENTY OF PARING, MINUTES TO
PUNTA GORDA.WAS $489,000
Now $429,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALuJSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
S 941-456-8304


5-30 ACRES Starting @
$39,900
Punta Gordas's
BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcome,black
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community'!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Prop ertiesforsale.com


U


HOMES FOR SALE
1020







$4,9.




VENIC~E SORS RA


6 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
PRAIRIE CREEK
PARK BEAUTY!
MANY CUSTOM FEATURES
LIKE NEW 3400SF 3 BDRM,
SPACIOUS MASTER STE & BATH
+ OFFICE, 4 FULL BATHS,
FORMAL DINING RM, LIVING RM,
GREAT RM, LANAI AND OVER-
SIZED 2 STALL ATT GARAGE
$459,000 Now $449K
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
Classifie941-456-8304
I Classified Sales I


HOMES FOR SALE
1020














iAS I"GA GIL L


BOBCAT TRAIL LAKEFRONT
Fero built. Great room plan
with heated pool & spa!
3/2.5 baths/2 car garage.
All tile. Deluxe master, huge
custom closet! Separate
guest wing.
$312,000, MLS# C7045094
"Selling With Integrity"
941-629-2100
AGGRESSIVE


I 2087 Tocobaga Lane
Calusa Lakes Unit 2
Venice, Fl.
9 34275

III kSingle Family Home
VmI 3 bedrooms, 2 baths
Listing Price $359,900 Sold for $345,000









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Thursday, July 25, 2013


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E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 1


S....MSoNS...*....






The Sun Classified Page 2 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 25, 2013


HOMES FOR SALE
Z1020




2 ACRES, Venice
3br/2ba home. County
water only 10%/ Down
owner financing. 941-488-
2418 or 496-9252


ENGLEWOOD POOL
HOME 950 BAYSHORE DR.
3/2/3 W POOL ON 1 ACRE.
VAULTED CEILINGS, GRAN-
ITE & SS APPL. TILE ROOF.
WELL KEPT HOME WITH
BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPING.
BOB LORENCE,
MICHAEL SAUNDERS & CO.
239-682-2106


POOL HOME ON 1/4 ACRE
LOT WITH SPECTACULAR
LAKE VIEWS.
HOME FEATURES SOARING CATH.
CEILINGS, SLIDERS IN LIVING & MAS-
TER TO LET THE OUTSIDE IN, NEW
ROOF 2012 POOL, CAGE, EQUIP-
MENT & HEATER INSTALLED IN 2010
NEW PAINT INSIDE & OUT.
$189,900. TARPON COAST REALTY
CALL RON McGURIE 941-2234781


HARBOUR OAKS
GATEDCOMMUNITY
(Adjacent to Deep Creek)
3Bdrm/2Ba/2CG.
Pool Home! $279,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty




Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
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you cedt ar


NOKOMIS 2, 2, 1 w, ,: p,:,t,
fenced yard, quiet area,
W/D hookup, FREE water.
$45,000 Call Chris for appt
727-565-8817


Great Deals in

the Classifieds!






NORTH PORT 3/2/2 Furnished!
New Carpet, Tile, Paint.
Newer Roof, A/C, Hot Water.
Tiled Lanai. Community
Pool, Clubhouse, Tennis.
$120,000
MLS C7045105
"Selling With Integrity"
941-629-2100

AG RESSIVE
M


HOMES FOR SALE
1020



LO OK
ENGLEWOOD,
LIKE NEW 3/2/1
Galley Kitchen, New Flooring
Come See! 941-223-0572
Imma w m i


3153 Oklahoma St.
Beautifully Remodeled 2004
Home, 3 bd / 2 ba / 2 car,
1784 Sft. Under Air, New SS
Appliances, Park Like Setting
With Brick Paver Patio.
Asking $159,900
Bay Bridge Homes
QA1-.RO-R.Ro


PORT CHARLOTTE
22284 Laramore Ave.
RENTING? WHY? When you
can own this totally
remodeled, light, bright,
open 1100 SF 2/2 on ushly
landscaped corner lot
Public water & sewer. No
deed restrictions. NOT in
flood zone. $78,000.
PATTY GILLESPIE
RE/MAX Anchor
941-875-2755
Employ Classified!
I ]


FU I U RLU II IT,
24458 Pine Ridge PI.
Located in Gated Comm. of
Suncoast Lakes! 3Bed/2Ba/2CG
MUST SEE! MLS#C7043725
$189,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty


PUNTA GORDA King's Gate
Golf Gated Community 2/2/2 sin-
gle family home, awesome price.
Cash buyer only. 941441-5577


Remodeled 2/2/2 pool home
with dockage for 65' plus
sailboat, depth maintained by
city. Dead end street in
restricted neighborhood.
REDUCED! $189,900
Jerry Hayes, 941-456-1155
ReMax Marina Park


ROTONDA
Like new 3 Bedroom, 2 bath 2
car garage pool home on over-
sized lot. Lots of upgrades
including granite, step & tray
ceilings, Large pavered
pool/patio area with a master
bath to die for! Only 269,900
Tarpon Coast Realty
Call Ron McGurie 941-223-4781


YOU WANT ME
to List Your Home

SHELLEE GUINTA
22 YEARS OF AWARD
WINNING EXPERIENCE



21
ALMAR & ASSOCIATES
941-426-4534


HOMES FOR SALE
Z1020


157 Cougar Way. Beautiful
completely remodeled.
3/2/2 Pool Home. Peaceful
setting on a double lot.
$229,000
941-626-8200
BAY BRIDGE HOMES LLC
#CBC1254261


VENICE, Pine Brook, By
Owner. 3/2/2, pool, on cul de
sac, partially fenced, ideal for
several cars/boat. 5 mins to
beach/41/I-75. 941-497-6655
S WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


ruN I aUunuA I
Boating Bargain! 2,
Lanai, 80' Seawall,1
New Tile & Car
$200,000.
Marianne Lill'
RE/MAX Harbor 941-3
WaterfrontHomeBuy


MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
1090

PUNTA GORDA 1/1 35' Park
Model trailer home, A/C, New
appl. $5,000 OBO 941-249-
2228 or 941-467-6717
VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com

MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
S1095


ARCADIA, 1473 S. E. Plum
Nearly New 3BR/2BA Home
on 1/2 Acre. Fenced in
Rear Yard. Appliances Stay.
Available Now!
Financing Available.
SLES P & I Payments as
/2/2+, Low as $450.00. Mo. WAC.
22+,k Ready Now!
etDock, Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122


i64-7585
yer.comr

ki


UNT IA LUKUa '.rell A.reeK
250+' of frontage. 1+ acre
house, garage, marina, pavil-
lion $225,000. 941-639-6269
I Advertise Today! I



[ 1040


LAKE SUZY, 11335 SW
Essex Dr. Located in
King sway Golf Course Area.
2+Bed/Den, 2 Bath, 2CG
Single Unit! Meticulas!
MLS#C7043538 $195,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-276-4459
Jill Brouwer Realty
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net

MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE


ARCADIA 1994 16ft travel
trailer. Not furnished, located
at Park Place #33 Call 863-
266-2962 ask for Santos
PALM HARBOR HOMES
Factory Liquidation Sale
TEXT: STORE 126A
TO: 313131
For details call John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


PUNTA GORDA 1 I;:"-.
Riverside Drive WATERFRONT,
Water-views,Gulf access! Pri-
vate Dock & Lift. Call or text
$69,900 941-451-6996


MOVE IN TODAY!
OWNER RELOCATING, MUST SELL!
PORT CHARLOTTE ADULT COMMUNITY
Spacious 2/2 Double Better Hurry!
Harbor View Park. Huge Lanai.
Fishing Pier. Squeeky clean,
all newer A/C, laminate floors.
$29,996, Call Mike 941-366-6308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com






PUNTA GORDA- CLEAN
2 BDR/1.5BATH, Large
Screen Room, Car Port.
Set Up! Quiet Lot
& Park! $10,900. obo
Call Greg 941-626-7829






RAINFOREST
IMMACULATE!
1500 sq. ft. 3 bedroom.
Nicely furnished.
Oversized lot.
Air in Lanai and More.
$59,995
Call Mike, 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com






SETTLE ESTATE%29,995
IMMACULATE 2/2 DOUBLE.
LOTS OF EXTRAS & UPDATES.
NEWER AIR & ROOF.
PUNTA GORDA
BETTER HURRY!
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


THE ARBORS
55+ Community in Osprey
2 Bd/2Ba + carport.
Top of the line Jacobson
Mfg. Home. Like new, neu-
tral colors, all appliances
stay. You own your own lot.
No pets. Community pool.
Really Great Location.
$69,000 NOW $59,000!!
FSBO, Partly owner finance
941-918-1667


OUT OF AREA
HOMES
^^^lll0 ^'


OWNER LIQUIDATING A
1232 SF CABIN SHELL ON
1.53 PRIVATE
ACRES HAS NEW SEPTIC,
WELL AND PAVED ACCESS
$62,000
NEEDS FINISHING. 828-286-
2981 BRKR


IIn In 'ucH nul o
2011 Camper on 1 acre &
1/4. New Septic sys, water
& elec. Near Lake Chatuge &
hunting & fishing. $69-900
$64,900 941-698-0960

HOMES FOR RENT
1210





2/2/1 Updated, comm pool PC.. $750
3/2/2 Duplex, PG .....................$925
2/2/1 CP Updated, fenced yard.......$750
3/2/2 w/Lawn Care, Lk Suzy.$1100
3/2/2 Updated Lg Bonus Rm, DC..$1250
FULL PROPERTY LIST AVAILABLE ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE
YOUR PROPERTY

AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS *

1/1 Condo,
Gertrude Ave., P.C.
$400/mo
3/2/1 Lanai,
Frizzell Ln., P.C.
$850/mo

*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!

CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
AABring your pets!-A
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME

ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-U333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com


For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1250...3/2/1 Pool, Canal, boat lit ....PC
$1250.3/2/2 Pool&bwncareincl..PC
$950..3/2/2 1464 SF Com Pool.EU
$750...2/1/CP 840 SqFt................PC
$700..2/1/CP 1031 SqFt.........PC
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters


HOMES FOR RENT
1210


NEED A RENTAL
Paradise Properties &
Rentals, Inc 941-625-RENT


InvestorsChoice Real Estate
A Faffh-B aed Business


VENICE
3/2.5 WOODBRIDGE CONDO
PORT CHARLOTTE
3/2 CANNOLOT BLVD.


$1995
$850


2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice
2/2 Homes from ... $1600
3/2 Homes from ... $1800
3/2 Pool Homes from..$2200
Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.
NORTH PORT 3/2/2
Newer home, great location,
lots of extras, $1,000/mo +
1st, last, sec 941-625-9065
NORTH PORT 8599 Culebra
Ave. 3/2/1 w/fam. room. $775
mo. Credit/Criminal Check. Req.
Call 941-628-9810 to view.



PORT CHARLOTTE 2/1
Dunn Drive, Quiet, Nice yard,
carport, pets ok $600.
561-351-5390 561-351-5390
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2/1
11895 Foresman Blvd
lst,Last,& Sec.No Smokers,
No pets. $650 941-468-4096
PORT CHARLOTTE
2/2/2 SAILBOAT CANAL/
DOCK, SPLIT PLAN $850/MO
941-875-9425
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2
screened lanai, fenced, plus
gated Boat & RV parking.
$925/mo 941-661-9702
PORT CHARLOTTE Gulf Cove
area, 3/2/2, completely updat-
ed, pets ok, $975 + sec. annu-
al rental 239-292-5571


PORT CHARLOTTE, 2 HOUSES
2/2/CP, Tile, CHA. $650. Mo.
+ 1st, Last & Sec. Dep.
Immed. Occp. 941-924-2764
PORT CHARLOTTE, 2/1 +
Living/Family Rm. Close to
Hospitals. $600. mo No Pets.
954-415-9929/941-204-3197
PUNTA GORDA 2/2/1 PGI,
Greenbelt, beautiful, spac., all
tile,NP/NS,incl.lawncare, Must
See!! $895 941-423-2643


WE NEED RENTALS
Reduced Mgmt Fees
www.allfloridarealty.com




3/211 pool scr lanai, 2249
sf, tile, fresh paint, on golf
course Rotonda $1100
2/2 Eng, living rm, family
rm wood floors 2200 sqft
FULL BASEMENT lawn serv. &
all utilities incl'd $1100
1/1/cp Duplex N. Eng.
water sewer lawn inl. $525
West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net
VENICE 2/1/cp Move-in Ready.
All appl, W/D, CHA, 2 sheds.
N/S, Refs. & Bkgrd Ck.
$800+Sec. 941-488-1514
VENICE 3/2/1 totally remod.
stained concrete floors, gran-
ite, etc., W/D, pets OK,
$1125/mo 941-740-0761


I





Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240

CAPE HAZE RESORT, 2/2
fully furn. Weekly & Monthly
Rates avail through 2013.
724-344-1020
DEEP CREEK 2/2 or 3/2, tile
cath. ceil, wood cab. granite,
W/D, lanai $725+ up, pets ok
(941)-626-1514 or 661-4539
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2 Pool,
Tennis, water incl. Peace River
Elem/PC Middle Schools. Furn
avail $695/mo 941-286-5003
PORT CHARLOTTE
Westchester Condo 2/2,
fully renovated. Water incl,
$650/mo. 1st, Last, Sec.
1/1 Promenades, water
incl. $525/mo 1st, Last, Sec.
941-380-9212

TOWNHOUSES
FOR RENT


PLACIDA, Landings at Coral
Creek, 4/3/3 unfurn., Annual-
Rental only $1700/mo
724-344-1020
7 DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
Q 13001

EAST ENGLEWOOD 2/1
w/w carpet, W/D hook-up,
lawn care. no pets $600 mo.
941-769-6548 days /
941-639-8829 evenings.
PORT CHARLOTTE 1Bd/1Ba,
close to shopping, $550/mo,
1st, last, sec, 941-255-0163
PUNTA GORDA,
1 Bedroom Efficiency. Nice
Yard. Close to 1-75. Pets OK.
$500. mo. 941-637-4668
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT



ENGLEWOOD
AFFORDABLE
1 BEDROOM APTS. 62+
Income limits apply.
O GROVE CITY
MANOR
% ?N? 941-697-4677
TDD 614-442-4390

NORTH PORT
Victoria Point Apts at
Sumter & Appomattox
Between US 41 & 1-75.
Accepting Applications
for 1Br & 2Br
O Apartments
Conveniently .". .
located close to schools
shopping, entertainment,
& beaches
941-423-8720
STUDIO APTSV
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY: 1-800-955-8771


PUNTA GORDA 2/2, 2nd
floor w/lift, quiet area. 5 mins
from hospital. No pets. $800/mo
incl. utilities. 941-661-5666
PUNTA GORDA Downtown,
1 bedroom apt., 2nd floor, all
util incl. No pets, $775/mo
Call Jerry 941-391-4856

PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!
FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!
PUNTA GORDA Downtown,
2 room all utilities included. No
pets, $650/mo Call Jerry
941-391-4856
VENICE ISLAND APTS, 1
Bedroom Available. Close to
Beach & Downtown. No Pets,
No Smoking. 941-234-1454


FOR RENT
1320



VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$375 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
VENICE ISLAND Efficiency
Clean & neat! Walk to
beaches & downtown. $545
; ALSO 1BR Duplex on Island
Avail. Annual 941-567-6098
VENICE STUDIO
& 1 Bedroom
Accepting Section 8 Vouchers
941-488-7766
VENICE/NO. PORT/ENGLEWOOD
NOW RENTING
VENETIAN GARDENS
55+ All Inclusive,
Independent Living Community,
3 Chef Prepared Meals a Day,
Weekly Housekeeping.
Please call for our Rental Specials.
941-484-6841
VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1-800-955-8771


VILLA SAN CARLOS II
22250 Vick St.
Affordable-Income based
One bedroom apartments
for 62 or older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!
6 1 941-429-2402 %m

MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
: 1340

PUNTA GORDA RV Resort,
Mobile home, 1 bdrm, large
lanai. 55+ comm, No Pets,
$600/mo + $30.00 cable.
941-639-7758

EFFICIENCIES
FOR RENT
L 1350

HARBOUR HEIGHTS close to
river, newly renovated efficien-
cies w cable & internet, Sunny-
brookMotel 941-625-6400
ROOMS FOR RENT
L 1360

PORT CHARLOTTE, Clean &
Quiet Furn. Room. Sngl Working
Man $130wk+Dep 941-626-2832
ENGLEWOOD 3/2/2
Room mate to share beautiful
home. Full use of entire
house. Rent includes all utili-
ties. $700 941-474-4276
PORT CHARLOTTE room
in home smoke/alcohol free
Ref. Working person only
$400 mo. 941-268-2160


PORT CHARLOTTE, Clean, Quiet,
$125wk/$450mo, incl Util, Furn'd,
Refs. 941-743-3070, 941-740-2565
RENTALS TO SHARE
: ^ 1370

DEEP CREEK Roomate want-
ed 40+ private master BR w/
private bath, fully furn. No
pets/smoking in house. $500
mo. with all utilities incl. Call
Val 941-764-1635 after 5pm.


VACATION/
SEASONAL RENTALS
1390

PUNTA GORDA-Peace River
Shores, 3/2/2, clean & spa-
cious, lake view, walk to River,
hot tub, golf cart, cable & wire-
less included. 941-815-0711
LOTS & ACREAGE
Z1500


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150,000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


NORTH PORT Sumter
Blvd. Great location. New
home area. $6,900 941-
457-6811

WATERFRONT
1515


REDUCED!"
LEMON BAY at your front
door. Build your dream
home on 100 x 287 lot.
Walk to beach. A steal at
$99.999. Call Diane
Newland 941 223 5387
Palm Realty Group

BUSINESS RENTALS
Z 1610

ENGLEWOOD 1150 sqft
office space w/ 3 offices,
recpt. area, conf. room. Close
to Dearborn St. $750/mo
941-650-5084
ENGLEWOOD 3600sf Build-
ing. For Lease or Sale!
2391 S, McCall Rd
Great Location! 941-408-4596
PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200


NEED CASH?
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
Call for Pricing 941-484-4316
COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620


AMrQRUIA 4.4 ac By uwner!
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992


WAREHOUSE
& STORAGE
1640

CHARLOTTE HARBOR
Warehouse 5,000 sq ft.
with Office. $2200/mo w/
1st & Last 941-380-9212
NORTH PORT 800SF Ware-
house $420/mo+tax. 400SF
$215/mo+Tax 941-661-6720
Seize the sales
with Classified!
PORT CHARLOTTE 1/2
Acre fenced & secure on
41 in Murdock. All or part.
Call Ed 941-661-4393

2000


EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/ Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment


2000


EMPLOYMENT

PROFESSIONAL
Z 2010


CAM Portfolio Manager -
Full time position in
Punta Gorda with Gate-
way Management Must
have CAM license and
strong computer skills.
Email resume to
kwgateway@daystar.net

CSR/AGENT Needed for
Established, Busy Insurance
Office to Work In-House.
Send Resume to:
lemployee77@gmail.com

CLERICAL/OFFICE
S2020

CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda


L MEDICAL
omwa:2030



HARBORCHASE



CARE MANAGERS
FT/PT
ARE YOU A HHA, PRIVATE
CAREGIVER OR NEWLY
LICENSED CNA LOOKING
FOR A CHANGE OR
THAT 1ST OPPORTUNITY.

HARBORCHASE OFFERS
ON THE JOB TRAINING FOR
NEW CARE MANAGERS,
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K

PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.

FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V


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shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.




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The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 25, 2013


S MEDICAL
low4:2030


CAREGIVER
GROUP HOME
IMMEDIATE OPENING
941-628-9030

CNA/HHA's
NEEDED FOR IMMEDIATE
PLACEMENT!
NEW OFFICE! NEW OPPORTUNI-
TIES! NEW PAY PLANS!
SIGN ON BONUS!
MAJOR MEDICAL, & 401K & LIFE
INSURANCE
CALL TODAY,
WORK TOMORROW!
Call Mon. Fri., 8a-4pm.
941-764-0880 or
941-480-0880
ALL STAT HOME HEALTH

COOK
FULL TIME
11:30AM-8PM
MUST BE FLEXIBLE.

LOOKING FOR A PERSON
WHO IS HIGHLY MOTIVAT-
ED, THRIVES ON CHAL
LENGES AND ENJOYS WORK-
ING IN A POSITIVE TEAM
ENVIRONMENT TO JOIN
OUR SKILLED HEALTH CARE
CENTER. LONG TERM
HEALTH CARE EXPERIENCE
WITH KNOWLEDGE OF
THERAPEUTIC DIETS AND
HEALTH CARE REGULATIONS
IS A REQUIREMENT FOR
THIS POSITION.

PLEASE APPLY
QUALITY HEALTH CARE
6940 Outreach Way
North Port
(941)426-8411 or
FAX Resume to
941-423-1572
EOE DRUG FREE
WORK PLACE

DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
0COTA, OT & PT
for PT/FT/PRN
*RN, LPN & CNAs
PRN/FT/PT all shifts
*Interim Dietary
Manager F/T
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766

FULL TIME MA OR LPN
NEEDED. CARDIOLOGY
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED.
PLEASE FAX RESUME:
1-866-906-1238
OR EMAIL: VICKY@
CENTERFORTHEPERFORMINGHEARTS.COM

(Healthcare Support)





Enriching The Lives Of
Seniors Everyday!

CNA
CLUB CARE Home Health
Minimum 1 Year
CNA Experience
All Shifts Per Diem

Jacaranda Trace
3600 William Penn Way
Venice, FL 34293
(941) 408-2064
jlitchfield@
sarasotabayclub.net
EOE/DFW
ClubCare License Number
299991503


MEDICAL MEDICAL
L ma2030 L 2030


MDS RN Part Time
2 days/week 12:00 8:30PM
Must have MDS experience.
To apply send resume to:
ktolley@villageontheisle.com,
fax to: 941484-9402 or visit
VILLAGE ON THE ISLE
910 Tamiami Tr, Venice, FL 34285
EOE Drug FreeWorkplace
PROVIDING SERVICE
WITH OUR
"M IRWT AND J4Vm'S



Heritage Health Care
Center of Venice is hiring
C.N.A.'s
* Florida Certification
required
* Long Term Care Experience
preferred
* Full-Time & Part-Time
Applicants send resume
to payroll@
heritagehealthofvenice.com
HERITAGE HEALTH
CARE CENTER
A PROUD MEMBER OF THE
CONSULATE HEALTH
CARE FAMILY









GET RESULTS
USE CLASSIFIED!

ai
HARBORCHASE



RN'S/LPN'S
FULL TIME, PART TIME
AND PRN/POOL
SKILLED NURSING AND
ASSISTED LIVING

HARBORCHASE offers
an excellent benefits
package such as
Medical, Dental, Vision
& 401K.
PART-TIME TEAM
MEMBERS RECEIVE
BENEFITS AT 20 HOURS.
For consideration please
apply in person to:
HARBORCHASE
OF VENICE
Assisted Living and
Skilled Nursing
950 Pinebrook Road
Venice, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 ph
(941) 484-3450 fax
FOE M/F/D/V

HORIZON
HEALTHCARE
"y_ INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN
within 11 months
Enrollment ongoing
Call for Class Dates
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Aug 6 '13
LPN-next class starts
Jan 20th '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks'
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506


INSURANCE CLERK,FULL
TIME LOTS OF EXPERIENCE
A MUST. for walk in clinic in
South Venice. Good computer
skills necessary. Good salary
& benefits. Call 941-223-9929

-II1RtINO
RECEPTIONIST,
FULL TIME FOR BUSY
DOCTORS OFFICE.
MUST BE ABLE TO MULTI TASK &
HANDLE BUSY PHONES.
EXP REQUIRED. MAIL RESUME TO:
EMPLOYMENT:
PO Box 494710,
PORT CHARLOTTE, FL 33949

MUSICAL







Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN&s




RESTAURANT/
HOTEL


SERVERS/BARTENDER, FT
Sunday are a Must.
Apply in Person:
Monday- Saturday
The Palms Pub:
266 Rotonda Circle
Ask for Alberto or Cathy

SKILLED TRADES
2050


011BID.COM
LOCAL WORK ALL TRADES

S-titNi
A/C INSTALLER
MUST HAVE EXPERIENCE IN
NEW CONSTRUCTION AND
REPLACEMENT OF CURRENT
SYSTEMS. CLEAN DL AND BE
ABLE TO PASS A DRUG AND
BACKGROUND CHECK. TOP PAY
AND BENEFITS. APPLY AT
1205 D. ELIZABETH ST.
PUNTA GORDA, 637-9800.
ASE Certified Mechanic,
Must have 2 yrs experience,
$14.90/hr 40hrs/wk
Equal Opportunity Employer,
A Drug-Free Workplace,
Visit:
www.arcadia-fl.gov
for application
BODY MAN FULL TIME
RV, Auto, Truck. RV Expe-
rience helpful. Must be
experienced painter
familiar with all types of
body and fiberglass
repairs DFW, Non-Smoker.
Call Michael
Gentry or Ed Davidson
941-966-2182
or send resume to
jobs@rvworldinc.com


SKILLED TRADES
2050


A/C SERVICE/INSTALLER,
Exp. a Must. DFWP, 941-475-
0680 islandair@comcast.net
BODY MAN FULL TIME
RV, Auto, Truck. RV Expe-
rience helpful. Must be
experienced painter
familiar with all types of
body and fiberglass
repairs DFW, Non-Smoker.
Call Michael
Gentry or Ed Davidson
941-966-2182
or send resume to
jobs@rvworldinc.com
CARPENTERS WANTED
for Boca Grande! Must have
tools & transportation.
Leave msg: 941-475-5095
CARPENTERS WANTED,
Boca Grande Must have
tools & transportation
941-698-0630
Leave Message.
ELECTRICIANS & HELPERS
Comm. or Res. exp. req., FT,
DFWP 941-474-3104
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR -
F/T, Insurance, 401(k), Holi-
day, and Vacations. Experi-
ence preferred in grove care &
equipment operation. Must be
motivated and dependable.
Transportation available from
various locations in 3 counties.
EOE/DFWP.
Apply @ Orange-Co LP,
12010 NE Hwy 70, Arcadia.
AU FREDERICK DERRcCOMPA
EXPERIENCED LEAD
PIPELAYER
for well established local
construction company.
Benefits,apply in person to:
3801 North Orange Avenue
Sarasota, FL. DFWP EOE


I'RBING
FIRE SPRINKLER
FITTERS
FULL TIME, BENEFITS,
DFWP, EOE
E-MAIL RESUME TO
RYAN@BABESPLUMBING.COM


OStRING

FIRE SPRINKLER
FITTERS
FULL TIME, BENEFITS,
DFWP, EOE
E-MAIL RESUME TO
RYAN@BABESPLUMBING.COM
( NEED A JOB?
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
LOADER OPERATOR F/T,
Insurance, 401(k), Holiday, and
Vacations. Experience pre-
ferred in grove care & loader
operation. Must be motivated
and dependable. Transporta-
tion available from various
locations in 3 counties.
EOE/DFWP.
Apply @ Orange-Co LP,
12010 NE Hwy 70, Arcadia.

S ilIN ]

PLUMBERS -
HELPERS
FULL TIME, BENEFITS
DFWP, EOE
E-MAIL RESUME TO
JOEY@BABESPLUMBING.COM


tiBINO

PLUMBERS -
HELPERS
FULL TIME, BENEFITS
DFWP, EOE
E-MAIL RESUME TO
JOEY@BABESPLUMBING.COM

ROOFER, Experienced
Must have clean DL,
transportation & tools.
No drugs! 941-473-7781


SKILLED TRADES
2050


ROOFER, EXPERIENCED
with VALID drivers license
Call 941-628-0251
SKILLED TECHNICIAN'S
needed for well-established
busy restoration company.
Additional skills a plus. Must
have a Florida drivers's
license, and be able to pass
drug testing. Background
checks are also performed.
Apply in person at:
17436 Seymour Ave.,
Port Charlotte, FL
or Fax Resume: 941-624-5032

UPHOLSTERER
$$$ NEEDED $$$

ESTABLISHED HIGH END
LOCAL MOTOR HOME
MANUFACTURER SEEKS
EXPERIENCED
UPHOLSTERER TO JOIN
OUR WINNING TEAM!
BUSINESS EXTRA FINE,
PERMANENT, STEADY
WORK FLOW. MUST HAVE
KNOWLEDGE OF INDUSTRI-
AL SEWING MACHINES,
CREATIVE UPSHOLSTERY
DESIGN A PLUS. MARINE
EXP. ALSO WELCOMED!

JOB OPPORTUNITY
WON'T LAST!!
GREAT WORK ENVIRONMENT!
REPLY IMMEDIATELY TO
SCHEDULE INTERVIEW
941-485-0984
PREFERENCE GIVEN TO
NON SMOKERS. DFWP

SALES
2070


ADVERTISING
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
* AGGRESSIVE
* COLD CALLING PRO
* DEAL CLOSER
* STRONG WORK ETHICS
* MONEY MOTIVATED
* EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
* PEOPLE PERSON
* COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES

WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


SALES
2070


Advertising Sales
Executive

The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.

If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
* Competitive salary plus
commission
* Vacation
*Health insurance
* Sick and short term
disability
STraining
*Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:

Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.



IN THE
CLASSIFIED
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/Find a Pet
/Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
/Find A New Employee
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/Sell Your Unwanted
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/Advertise Your
Business or Service

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it's the reliable
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right results



A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!







Thursday, July 25, 201 3 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


SALES
Lwow 2070



Advertising Executives

The Smart Shopper
Group is expanding in
Sarasota county and
is looking for
motivated experienced
individuals.

Sales Manager

Account Executives

Circulation Manager

Email resume to:
rknight@smartshopg.com

Smart Shopper Group,
LLC
2726 Unit D Tamiami Tr.
Port Charlotte, Fl. 33952

941-205-2340
AUTO SALES
EXPERIENCED ONLY!
LOOKING FOR A MOTIVATED
AUTO SALES PROFESSIONAL.
GREAT PAY + VOLUME BONUS.
HEALTH INS. 5 DAY WK. APPLY
CHARLOTTE COUNTY FORD
3156 TAMIAMI TR, PT. CHARL.
MIKE ELAM 941-625-6141
MIKE'S MATTRESS
Is Looking for Part/Full Time
Salesperson. Mattress Sales.
Experience a Plus.
Apply in Person:
23330 Harborview Rd. P.C.
941-629-5550



o, J,


RV SALES PRO.
Excellent income poten-
tial (100K+) selling the
best name brands in the
industry. Exp. preferred
but will train right per-
son. DFW Non-Smoker,
FT, benefits.
CALL STEVE ERDMAN OR
BOB HAMILL AT
(941) 966-2182 OR FAX
(941) 966-7421. OR
JOBS@RVWORLDINC.COM

L4QQK]
SALES
PROFESSIONALS
Needed For High Volume
Car Dealership.
Must be Self Motivated.
Full Training Available
Advancement Opportunities.
Aggressive Pay! 4 Locations!
GENE GORMIAN
PREMIER
1305 S. Tamiami Trail
Punta Gorda, FL
(941)-639-7300



TOP SALES PROFESSIONAL
Top Closer, Good with
People to Sell
Manufactured Homes,
Experience Necessary.
Earn Top Commissions.
Fax Resume to:
941-639-0722 or Email to:
phcenter@embarqmail.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


SALES **
** CASH PAID DAILY**
Excellent workplace! Great
hours & benefits. Base vs.
Generous Commission aver-
age $15+/hr. Port Charlotte
941-625-8800

CARE NEEDED
2090

NURSERY ROOM TEACHER
Apply within: Our Little World
1603 Casterock Ln,
Port Charlotte


PRESCHOOL DIRECTOR,
Top Preschool In North Port
Has Career Position:
Managing, Staffing, Marketing
& Growing The School. BA Or
Equiv, Director Credential,
VPK Endorsement. Send
Resume: chiplindaj@aol.com
ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!

GENERAL
S2100



LOOK
AUTO DETAILER
EXP. NECESSARY
Must Have
Clean Driver's License.
Great Hours.
Advancement Opportunities
GENE GORMAN
PREBIEB
1305 S. Tamiami Trail
Punta Gorda, FL
(941)-639-7300


SALES SALES
2070 2070


GENERAL
2100



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY!!
Turn key thrift store. Plenty
of stock & fixtures. We can
also continue to supply you
with merchandise. Call Brad
@ 941-592-3349
CONSTRUCTION HELPER,
needed for busy insurance
restoration company. Must
have own hand tools and
must have Florida driver's
license, and be able to pass
drug testing. Apply in person
17436 Seymour Ave,
Port Charlotte, Florida
or Fax Resume to
941-624-5032.
GOLF COURSE
MAINTENANCE
Full & Part Time.
Fax Resume to 941-766-8047
LANDSCAPE INSTALLER
and NURSERY HELPER Pt.
Charlotte area. 941-662-8733
LOCAL YACHT
BROKERAGE &
NEW BOAT DEALERSHIP
seeks hourly shop employ-
ee to do "get ready" boat
detailing, light mechanical
and building maintenance.
Must have good driving
record & reliable transporta-
tion. Call Ed or Jim:
941-833-0099

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!


GENERAL
2100


NORTH PORT YMCA
is looking for a certified
school bus driver for our
aftercare program. Hours
M-F 2:00-3:45. Need to be
able to pass a physical and
obtain First Aid/CPR certs.
Contact Michelle
at 941-240-8877
for further information

DESOTO
_- J
Now interviewing for general
line tech positions, alignment
tech and quick lane manager
position call 800-880-3099 x
224 or email:
shawn@desotoautomall.com
P/T MAINTENANCE/
JANITORIAL TECHNICIAN
Must have knowledge of
minor electrical, plumbing &
irrigation. Fax Resume to:
941-575-2148
RAIN SOFT & HOME DEPOT
Mature people oriented
individuals. Must have excel-
lent people skills & winning
personality. Marketing exp
A+. Retirees Welcome!
Great part time job! Salary,
Commisions, & more! Call
Mike 941-206-3888
SERVICE TECH NEEDED
Excellent Driving Record.
We Train. Great Benefits.
Apply. Econo Pest,
3790 N. Access Rd Eng& mod.
TECHNICAL PERSON
needed to test telephones
Call 941-485-1478


TRANSIT DRIVER, Hiring tran-
sit bus drivers with clean dri-
ving record. Must have CDL
with passenger and air brake
endorsements. Apply at
www.ameditrans.com


~H42LW 2fw2


Want to know what's going on out on the

water? Then you need to read Southwest Florida's"


GENERAL
2100


WANTED SALON Manager
and stylists for new salon in
Punta Gorda. 239-245-4189

PART TIME/
I TEMPORARY I


COUNTER HELP, Weekends
$9.00hr. Non Smoker,
18+ yrs of age.
Achieve Fitness
4300 Kings Hwy Unit A
941-627-5509
L SEEKING
EMPLOYMENT
Z^ 2120

AUTO BODY REPAIR tech
with 30 yrs exp. looking for
work! Call 317-487-9185
3000








NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS
S3010


**** ADOPTION:****
Adoring Financially
Secure Couple yearn for
1st baby. Expenses paid.
1-800-552-0045
FLBar42311
**Christine & Greg**
Classified = Sales


Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


';'1;-~~I





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 25, 2013


S HAPPY ADS
3015




Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
:3020


ACTIVE SR. white male in PC
seeking female for companion-
ship & leisure. 941-204-1343
ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
RELAX & UNWIND
CALL FOR DAILY SPECIALS
941-681-6096
SENSATIONS
STRESS RELEASE
941- 766-7995
3860 RT. 41, 2 MI. NORTH
OF PUNTA GORDA BRIDGE.
SINGLE W M 52, Looking for
Single W F 38-52 Yrs Old,
for Friendship/Relationship
Call 941-661-0232
L CARD OF THANKS
FWh 3040 i^


0 BLESSED APOSTLE St.
Jude, who labored zealously
among the Gentiles in many
lands, and performed numer-
ous miracles in needy and
despairing cases, we invoke
you to take special interest in
us and our needs. We feel that
you understand us in a particu-
lar way. Hear our prayers and
our petitions and plead for us
in all our necessities especial-
ly.. May we be patient in all
learning God's holy will and
courageous in carrying it out.
Amen. H.G.E.
ADVERTISE!
THANK YOU S I Jude I
or answering my prayers.
GJF
THANK YOU
St. Jude and St. Teresa
for answering my prayers. D.B.

I SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
La: 3060



CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
CNA & HHA CLASSES:
Days, Eves, Weekends. $449.
Small Class! CPR/First Aid
Incl. 941-966-2600
www.SunCoastCNA.com
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570

F LACNA.COM
RN/LPN CNA 0
SHHA MA *
CEU'S/CPR Med
Tech 0 Phlebotomy
State testing onsite.
941-727-2273
BORED WITH TAE KWON
DO & MIXED MARTIAL
ARTS? Try Somthing New.
FREE Classes Available in
Tradional Shaolin Kung Fu
More Info Call 941- 204-2826


SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
3060

UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 941-347-7445
BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
LW4! 3065

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
LIC. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING
941-876-4416
Liberty Community
Church
North Port Charlotte

LOST & FOUND
S3090


LOST CAT: Grey & white
male. In South Venice near
Colonial Road.
K~f.^^di^J


LUOTI l UOrTI Ir.L DIru
(941) 600 4719 NP
LOST: DOG 7/18/13 AT
3:45PM. LOST IN NORTH
PORT NEAR CHAMBERLAIN
/MuSIc LN SMALL BLACK/TAN
TERRIER MIX ANSWERS TO
"PEPPER". HAS COLLAR AND
TAGS. PLEASE CALL 24/7 IF
YOU SEE HIM 941-456-
4448.
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face & back.
Closely shaved hair cut.
Missing since 5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909
ARTS CLASSES
L 3091


MAGIC OF MOSAICS
Classes & Workshops
Rosemary, Artist/instr
941-697-7888/941-258-6873
www.FlamingoFanny.com
WATERCOLOR PAINTING
On yupo, classes start Monday
Aug 5, at 1-5pm. Some sup-
plies provided Creative classes
in Venice. Call Barb Raymond
@ 941-961-9723.
|COMPUTER CLASSES
: 3092



Repair & Virus Removal
Computer Classes & Lessons
941-375-8126 goodhands.org


L EDUCATION
11,1Z 3094


MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medical
Office Assistant! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED. Online training
gets you job ready ASAP. HS
Diploma/GED & PC/Internet
needed. (888)528-5547.
| EXERCISE CLASSES
z 3095


GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
RELIGION CLASSES
3096


BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309

Get the
Word out -
Advertise
in the
Classified!

OTHER CLASSES
3097


CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124


ALUMINUM
5006 U


Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages, Scr. lanais, etc...
THE HEIGHTS ALUMINUM,
INC. Screen Rooms *
Lanais Pool Cages *
Rescreens Seamless
Gutters Soffit Fascia .
Pavers Concrete .
941-613-1414 OR
941-492-6064
Lic./Ins. AAA0010565 &
R6ALCL-5AC-33
L APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR
Z 5020

DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lic 990010103532/Ins
DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
ADULT CARE
:5050 CO


SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483
CHILD CARE
LW :5051


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
| COMPUTER SERVICE



COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
QA1 .45AA4R.AR


1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR,
4 0 TUTOR IN YOUR HOME
Reasonable & Prompt!
Sr. Disc. Ask for Stacy
,t 941-451-3186
EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tr'h 1 0n Vr Fyni


FINANCIAL

L BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
4010


WE CAN HELP!
GOOD BAD CREDIT, BANK-
RUPTCY, NEED CASH FAST!
PERSONAL LOANS, BUSINESS
START UP AVAIL. LOANS
FROM $4K NO FEES!
FREE CONSULTATIONS,
QUICK, EASY &
CONFIDENTIAL. CALL 24HRS
TOLL FREE 888-220-2239


5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.


(941)-830-3656 Lic./Ins.

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!

We Come To YOU! *
SUMMER SPECIAL
$30 Flat Rate
CERTIFIED COMPUTER
REPAIR
Free Computer Checkup *
Virus/Spyware/Malware
Removal
941-404-5373
JDS COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS!!
941-764-3400

L CONCRETE
444::5057


CONCRETE
Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks,
House Slabs, Etc..
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415


L CONCRETE
:5057


RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES


A CLEAN SWEEP Residen-
tial & Commercial Honest &
Reliable. Serving Sarsota
County. 941-223-0303
A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658
MRS. CLEANING UP!
1st class cleaning Service!
Specials Now!
$10 off Window Cleaning
941-204-8057
www.mrscleaningup.com
Lic & Insured
RELIABLE CLEANING
Service, Husband/Wife team.
Homes, Condos, Mobiles,
941-286-5920 941-276-4935
Lic./ns.
RESD)ENI.L & OFFICE CLEANING
Consistent, Thorough, Affordable.
Sarasota-Charlotte-Lee County
Cal for Free Es*te Clean Sweep
941-391-6645/941-380-0502
ELECTRICAL
L ELER5070 L


DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
"Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646
INTEGRITY ELECTRIC
of Charlotte County.
FULLService Electical.
26 Yrs. Exp! Comm./Res.
(941)-628-1993
Lic# L06000046464

HInd your Best
friend I n the
Classhfieds!

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
5080


BUSH BUSTERS INC.
Brush Mowing *
*Bush Hogging *
*ALL Mulching *
Selective Clearing *
*Tree & Stump Removal .
"We Can Do Anything!"
941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
Lic./Ins
HEATING & AIR
5090


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738
S.O.S.
Air Conditioning
& Heating LLC
941-468-4956

HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT


ABBEE PAVERS Driveways,
Pool Decks, Patio. Serving PG
& PC 941-639-5209 Lic. & Ins.


I HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT


ACER GRANITE CORP
FINE COUNTERTOPS,
KITCHENS & BATHS
941-624-5958
ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244

I NEED CASH?
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
CARPENTER/HANDYMAN
BBB member/lic AAA 1200080
Call Bob at 941-204-4407
COASTAL KITCHENS
countertops/door & cab refacing
Call Victor (941)716-0917
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872

CUSTOM RESCREENING
& Repair & Pressure Washing
Visa/MC 941-979-0922
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins


DAVID J. SHEPARD JR.,
OVER 20YRS IN CHARLOTTE
COUNTY Lic./INs.
Lic #RR282811062
941-627-6954
941-456-6953

FULL SERVICE CLEAN-OUT
REMOVAL SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
CARTING, DUMPSTERS,
GARBAGE/TRASH, WASTE
AST CLEAN-OUTS
941-451-0071
"We Take Your Junk & Clean-Up"
Call for Free Estimates
LICENSED/INSURED
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#60662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227
HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
SELL'S ALUMINUM L.L.C.-
6" Seamless Gutters.
*Rescreens* Front Entries*36
Yrs. Exp! Greg 941-234-8056
or 941-497-4450 Lic. & Ins.
Servicing Sarasota County


SLIDING GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs. Free
Estimates Lic/Ins. Bob @
941-706-6445
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/Ins.
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#AAA006387
TOM'S HOME IMPROVEMENT
& HANDYMAN SERVICE.
No JOB to BIG or small!
941-408-3954






Thursday, July 25, 201 3 ads .you rsun net F/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


S HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
5100

WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing, Concrete, Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

& TREE


A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune,
install, design, removal,
stump grinding.
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com
A JAMISON TREE SERVICE
Complete & Professional
15% Sr Discount!
FREE EST. Lic. & INSURED
ENGL 941-475-6611
OR N. PORT 941-423-0020
JAMISON-TREESERVICEINC.COM


LAWN & ORDER
Lawn Service! Free
Estimates & Landscaping!
Free Yard of Mulch with
any service! 941-257-8606
Employ Classified!
AMERICAN IRRIGATION
Call 941-587-2027
FREE ESTIMATES!!!
Licensed & Insured
Charlotte Co. lic#AAA-11-
00010. Serving Charlotte
and Sarasota Counties


LAWN/GARDEN
& TREE
5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
Baldwin Tree Service -
Quality work @ fair
pricing! Owner operated!
Free Est. 941-786-6099
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
TRUCK FOR HIRE
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE &
GROUND LAWN CARE
*Weekly Monthly *Yearly *
Commercial/Residential e
*Serving Charlotte Co. 12+ Yrs! e
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding *
*Lawn Service *
*Bucket Service *
941-613-3613
pcftree.com Lic./Ins.
HILLBILLY HANDYMAN'S
LAWN MOWIN' &
HOME FIXIN '
REAL HONEST WORK WITH
OLD FASHION INTEGRITY!.
LIC/INs
CALL BILLY 941-979-7458
HOOPS LAWN SERVICE
Full Lawncare & Landscaping
941-258-8175
JIM BLAIS LAWN MAINT
OVER 15 YRS EXP. NOW
ACCEPTING NEW ACCTS.
941-9154677


& TREE
5110

GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
PROFESSIONAL Tree Ser-
vice. Stump Removal, Palm &
Hedge Trimming. Free Esti-
mates! 941-624-4204 Lic
#001053
RESIDENTIAL LAWN CARE
Complete Lawn Care, with
Excellent Customer Service,
Hablamos Espanol
941-626-2623/941-564-7858
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/Insured941-484-6042
SHARKS TOOTH
CONSTRUCTION &
LANDSCAPE SERVICES
*Pavers* *Lawn Mowing*
Best rates in area!
941-219-8741
www.sharkstoothservices.com
TJ MILAZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
TJ MILAZZO JR.
941-830-1005
LAND CLEARING, LANDSCAPE
ALL KINDS OF CONCRETE WORK.
BOAT DOCK & SEAWALL REfJIR
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035
VETERANS AFFORDABLE
LAWN & landscaping Com-
mercial & Residential. All
aspects. 941-447-2428


LAWN/GARDEN
&TREE
S5110

SOD WORK REMOVE &
REPLACE SMALL JOBS OK, ALL
TYPES OF SOD941-716-9912
MARINE REPAIR
Z5121



MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329
MASONRY
Lava 5129


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
5130

ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a
Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-
883-1231
MOVING HELP
Save $$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
5140



BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10/oOff With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L- ..-------------------
STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINT-
ING Res/Comm. Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER
LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do It!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764
Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates ~ Prompt Service
941-484-4576
PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-00015


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
Z 5140

SHAWN CHRISTIE PAINTING &
PRESSURE WASHING
FREE ESTIMATES ~ MENTION THIS
AD TO RECEIVE $10 OFF EVERY
$100 SPENT! LIC/INS
941-321-3573
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lic # AAA009837
WAYNE PATTON PAINTING
PRESSURE WASHING & PAINTING
WE DO IT ALL. 30 YRS EXP.
LIC/INS. 941-258-5089
We Do It A Shade Better!
LARRY BATES PAINTING
Free Estimates
Locally Owned & Operated
941-625-1226
Lic/Ins #RRR0002261

PET CARE
S5155

DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853
7 PLUMBING
5160

LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
REPIPES, SLAB LEAKS FULL
SERVICE PLUMBING CFC1427378
Precision Plumbing 941-423-3058
THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393


9 adlines


a ''orld News


issifieds

9 -t.,:hion


5-.'o vie Revie i


Subscribe to the


^S U N o- NEWSPAPERS
Charlotte DeSoto Englewood North Port Venice

Call

'941-429-3110


C, Today!!


rancial


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torlals


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Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7





The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 25, 2013


POOL SERVICES
Z5165


ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Preventative Maintenance
Saves You Money & Avoids
Long Term Problems.
941-426-6500
AZTECH POOLS
Personalized
Complete Pool Serv. & Repair
Lic/Ins. 941-585-1711
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps.
*Weekly Maintenance e
941-809-5121 Lic./Ins
Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268

L PRESSURE
CLEANING
5180

BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
SCREENING
LOZ5184


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779 wescreenflori-
da.com Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RANDY HASKETT SCREENING
POOL CAGES, LANAI'S, ENTRY
WAYS, LIC. & INSURED 25YRS.
EXP 941-809-1171
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/Ins.
THE SCREEN GAL & FRIENDS
Quality Rescreening. Guaran-
teed. VISA & M/C accepted.
#CBC1256778
941-626-7282
WRIGHT'S RESCREENING
QUALITY WORK AT GREAT PRICES!
FAST SERVICE! FREE ESTIMATES!
LIC/INS 941-916-2512 OR
941-575-7446
7 ROOFING
L404:5185


A+ HOME TOWN ROOFER
Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30 Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors & Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh, 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE CCC #1325731 & INSURED


Fmd it in the

Classified!

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838
WINDOW CLEANING
Z 5225


CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting
Also available Wallpaper
Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845


S WINDOW REPAIR
Z 5226


Window & Sliding Glass
Door Repair & Replacement.
Rollers, Locks & Handles
U.S. Window 941-628-8579

6000






MERCHANDISE
GARAGE SALES


6001
6002
6003
6004
6005
6006
6007
6008
6009
6010
6011
6012
6015
6020


Arcadia
Englewood
Lake Suzy
Nokomis
North Port
Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
Punta Gorda
Rotonda
Sarasota
South Venice
Venice
Out Of Area
Flea Market
Auctions


MERCHANDISE
6013 Moving Sales
6025 Arts & Crafts
6027 Dolls
6030 Household Goods
6035 Furniture
6038 Electronics
6040 TV/Stereo/Radio
6060 Computer Equip
6065 Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
6070 Antiques &
Collectibles
6075 Fruits/Veges
6090 Musical
6095 Medical
6100 Health/Beauty
6110 Trees & Plants
6120 Baby Items
6125 Golf Accessories
6128 Exercise/Fitness
6130 Sporting Goods
6131 Firearms
6132 Firearm Access.
6135 Bikes/Trikes
6138 Toys
6140 Photography/Video
6145 Pool/ Spa & Supplies
6160 Lawn & Garden
6165 Storage Sheds/
Buildings
6170 Building Supplies
6180 Heavy Constr.
Equipment
6190 Tools/Machinery
6220 Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
6225 Restaurant Supplies
6250 Appliances
6260 Misc. Merchandise
6270 Wanted to Buy/T rade

GARAGE SALES
6002 1

[-mFRI.-SAT. 8-2:30
7065 Regina Dr
Lots of clothes (mens/wm)
kitchen items, much more.
Seize the sales
with Classified!
m FRI.-SAT. 8-4 874 Calle
IMenuda. in Mobil Gar-
dens. Large assortment.
| LAKE SUZY AREA
GARAGE SALES
6003

[-FRI-SAT-SUN, 8-2,
13000 SW Penbrook Circle
S., furn, tools, clocks, mirrors,
french chairs & much more.
NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES
L 6005

F FRI. 8:00-3:00
3085 Pan American
Blvd. MOVING, yard equip,
furn., books & much more.


PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
6006

r-IFRI. 7-? 1026 Red Bay
iTerr. Huge Multi-Family
Sale! Household Goods, Crafts,
Holiday Items, Tools & MORE!
FRI.-SAT 321 San Ambro-
sio St. Boys clothes,
shoes, (great shape), house-
hold, electrical, bar stools,
yard, gas cans, tons of CD's &
DVD's. Hunter Fan & lots more.
[-FRI.-SAT. 8-2
868 Dolphin Av Nw.
Moving Sale Lots of House-
hold, tools and misc. items
FRI.-SAT. 9-2 144 Water
side St. Bicycle, small work-
out gym, printer, clothes,
misc. Rain or Shine!! I
FRI.-SAT. 9-4 26077 Con-
cepcion Dr. HUGE NEW SALE!
Furniture, appliances, tools,
ladders. U name it, we have it!
-] FRI.-SAT. 9-4
2772 Cabaret St.
Quality Antiques & Used
Furn! Small Rolltop Desk,
Qn. Solid Oak Hdbrd., Signed
Lithographs, Twin 1920's
Beds, Twin Matt. Set,
Glassware, Silverware, Tools,
Lthr. Reclincer (Like New.)
1998 Honda Prelude, &
MUCH...MUCH MORE!!
Dealers Welcome!
THU.-SAT. 8-1 21363 Mee-
han Ave. jewelry, dvds and
player, cds, twin mattresses,
antiques, postcards, furniture,
household, plants, tools,
fishing rods,2013 motorcycle,
150hp boat

SPUNTA GORDA
GARAGE SALES
6007



de e.ll
701 Aqui Esta,
Buttonwood Village #89
July 26th & 27th, 9a-3p
Mid Century Modern,
Antiques & Vintage Items
Nice Furniture and lots of
Treasures!
[1FRI-SAT, 8-NOON, 1410
Kittiwake Drive, PGI. Hshld
items, incl. decorative items,
tools & linens. DOWNSIZING.
-FRI. 8-11 & SAT 8-10
12923 Ryan Blvd. ESTATE
SALE Assisted by the Isles
Girls & Guys. (Dir: Bal Harbor
to Deborah to Carmichael,
Turn right on Ryan. Follow
Ryan to cul-de-sac.) Carved
Folding Screen; Coffee Ser-
vice; Antique Sewing Machine;
Area Rug; 2 "East Lake"
Antique Loveseats & Rocker;
Brass Candlestick Holders;
Bookcases; Tall Chest; Coffee
Table; Tilt-Round Table; China;
Drop-Leaf Table; Mirror; "Hard-
en" Dining Room Buffet; &
100" Long Dining Room Table
w/6 Chairs; Hutch; Queen
Bed; Round Bedside Table; 2
Twin Beds; Solid Maple Dove-
tailed Chest; Sony TV; Linens;
Round Glass-Top Kitchen Set
w/4 Chairs; Secretary Desk;
Miscellaneous Garage; Kitchen
& Lanai Items including Power
Tools; Coleman 6250 Genera-
tor; Treadmill; Craftsman Tool
Chest; Assorted Pictures. Buy-
ers are responsible for
removal of purchased items.
Our cashier has a list of inde-
pendent, qualified movers.


FRI. 8-2 27110 Jones Loop
Rd Unit 114 ONLY. House-
hold, Christmas, Kitchenware,
Clothing, TV sets & more!
[-FRI.-SUN. 8AM-3PM
18347 Troon Ave. 60" TV,
Hot Tub, Antiques, clothes,
and much more.
F-1 THU.-SAT. 8-? 8045
i Hillman Ave. (Off River-
side) TOOLS & FURNITURE
SALE! Come Check Us Out!!


PUNTA GORDA
GARAGE SALES
6007

[-THU.-WED 10-6 Tamiami
Trail. yard sale, tools,
household items, office furni-
ture, paintings, & much more!
S VENICE AREA
GARAGE SALES
Z6011

[-ESTATE SALE FRI.-SAT.
1.8:30-4 817 Gulf Coast
Blvd. Unique fainting couch,
leather recliner, handi-capable
equip, red hat items, baby
items, household items, patio
& antigravity chairs, lots of
clothes (petite), shoes sizes 5
& 6 1/2, lamps, end tables,
craft items, bedding, table
clothes, wood TV trays, Christ-
mas items, too much to list.
I|mESTATE/MOVING SALE|
FRI., SAT. 9-3, &
SUN. 10-1, 241 S. Harbor
Dr. Full contents of home.
Treasures for all!! 1926
Historic Venice Island home.
m-|SAT. 8-? 1565 Piedmont
IRd. (Across from Sham-
rock Park) Wall pictures, rugs,
barstools(6), sofa table, linens,
sweeper, glassware, crocks,
tools, clothing. EVERYTHING!

LOQQK
STARTING FRIDAY, 7/19
9:00AM-5:OOPM
10 DAY TOOL & MISC. SALE!
(Alley Running Between
Richard's Health Food Store
& Crowder's Hardware
on Venice Island)
Call 941-496-4599
For Directions


S FLEA MARKET
Z6015







BE YOUR OWN BOSS.
BECOME A VENDOR AT THE
SUN FLEA MARKET
RENT A BOOTH FOR 1 MTH
GET 2ND MONTH FREE
LEASE OPTIONS AVAILABLE.
CALL 941-255-3532
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
OPEN FRI SAT & SUN 9-4PM
18505 PAULSON DR.
PT CHARLOTTE FLORIDA.
ALL VENDORS SUBJECT TO APPROVAL BY
MGMT.

ARTS AND CRAFTS
S6025

BOOKS ASST. A&C, Ceram-
ics, Patterns, choose 4,
Venice $1 941-486-1968
LIGHT BOX 24" x 24", 4 bulbs
this size $150.00 new, your
cost $55 941-505-0081

Great Deals in
the Classifieds!

QUILTS HANDMADE Patch-
work $200 414-899-0006
SCRAPBOOKING TABLE and
Hundreds supplies Too much
to list $200 754-242-2372
YARN YARN Many colors to
choose from $1/skein.
734-645-5296


DOLLS
6027S


BOYDS BEARS Boyds Bears
collectibles. X-cellent condi-
tion.OBO $50 941-697-0987
SANTA CLAUS Doll I have two
dolls. $25.ea call for info. $25
941-457-0018
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
z ^ 6030


FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
*-- in n- l"-i


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.



SLADOKLA
Fun By The
7 4 Numbers

2 1 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
9 8 5 3 sudoku. This
mind-bending
9 8 1 5 puzzle will have
you hooked from
5 3 9 2 the moment you
square off, so
6 sharpen your
pencil and put
-7 6 8 your sudoku
7 6 1 savvy to the test!

5 1 2 7

3 1
Level: Advanced
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

9 L 8 9 L 6 9
L g Z 8L 6 9 "t
6 8 9 9 7 Z L I-
ZL 696 I9 Z
I Z6 98 LV 9 9



LZ 69 MSN9

:HIMSNV





Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


Challenger
DIRECTIONS: ,
Fill each square with a number, one through nine.
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right. 7-Z5
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to
total in upper and lower right.


THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge 1
Time 4 Minutes
26 Seconds 1
Your Working 2
Time Minutes
Seconds 14 7 9 4


8
9
11
6
6


2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved. rI ,5 ,-,. .. wr nID -- iLE
oln 7- CATALOG IS PERFECT "GIRTH"2 "BLUE
5 FOR SOMEONEOF "BIG i
Yesterday's 5 5 S 23 YOUR GIRTH IG-
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Answers 1s 14 22 32 21

Cryptoquip 2011 by King Features Syndicate

7-25

EGIDB B D E P L N L QC IV D HAGARTHE HORRIBLE ByChrisBrowne
14Yy pIp PAPW f.56'cPdl.E A 60
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Yesterday's Cryptoquip: WHEN THE SIXTIES ---
WAR VETERAN REVEALS ALL IN HIS MEMOIR, I --
EXPECT HE COULD USE A 'NAM DE PLUME.
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: I equals T
THE WIZARD OF ID By Brant Parker and
MARMADUKE By Brad Anderson FTfRTT a CARFU-, WIZAI
AWEN, I 60TTA -TTmR T FM










MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Pe







"Don't turn your back on me when I'm i
talking to you!" R

SPORTS WINNERS OF
T S ENGLAND'S
SLEUTH EPSOMDERBY PICKLES By Brian Crane
D E V S P M J H A E BY V T Q AHAPPEtP
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Q P E Y O R T N P W L H TAO TALK 1- G6 AP!
KS II HVF I E C B Z YWVG
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Wednesday's unlisted clue: SNORING
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: FRENCH CITY OF LIGHT
Camelot Kris Kin Pinza Trigo
Diomed Manna Pour Moi Troy '
Galileo Oath Secreto Workforce
Grundy Orby Sinndar
2013 King Features, Inc. 7/2 2013John L Hart FLP Dist by Creators 4',!


I HlandLoiscmn / 2 m
BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker






ThISn Casfe ae1 II Iir.I ~ t '.


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii
" "W- Q L6,


t aer deals in the Business & Ser e


blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and

i the Classified Section of the Sun!


a I .


Inflammation of rib

cartilage called devil's grip


DEAR DR. ROACH: I was
diagnosed with costochon-
dritis about 33 years ago.
Up until last year, I had had
little pain with it. But this
year, the pain is really bad.
I am 78 years old. Does age
matter? What, if anything,
triggers the pain, and what
can help my pain? Is heat
or cold better? D.B.
ANSWER: Costochondritis
("costo" means "rib,"
"chondro" is "cartilage" and
"itis" means "inflammation")
is thus inflammation of
the cartilage of the rib. This
condition can be caused
by a virus called Coxsackie
B virus, and has several
other names including
epidemic pleurodynia,
Bornholm's syndrome
and, my favorite, Devil's
Grip, which gives a colorful
understanding of how
it can make your chest
feel. The pain can last for
weeks, and tends to hurt
more with breathing.
This syndrome of pain at
the rib cartilage sometimes
can have recurrences,
although 33 years later is
longer than I have heard
of. Since chest pain can
have multiple causes, and
sometimes we never figure
out where it comes from,
it's possible that this is
something else causing the
same or similar symptoms.
Chest pain in any 78-year-
old, even chest pain that
seems clearly to be coming
from the ribs, should
prompt at least a consid-
eration of heart problems.
See a cardiologist to rule
them out.
DEAR DR. ROACH: Does
the water in coffee and
tea count as some of the
water a person is supposed
to drink daily? People are
often told to drink eight
cups daily. C.L.
ANSWER: People often
are told to drink eight cups
of water daily, but there is
nothing magic about that
number. The amount that
is optimal for health varies
tremendously from person
to person, based on an
individual situation.
An athlete exercising
in the hot, dry sun may
need much more than
eight cups. Eight cups is
too much for some people
with kidney disease.
It's important to take in
enough fluid, especially in
hot weather, but a bet-
ter way of monitoring is
just to make sure you are
making urine throughout
the day. Tea and coffee
are perfectly good ways of
getting enough fluid. Most
people get all the electro-
lytes (sodium, potassium
and others) they require
from food, but again,
athletes (who need more)
and people with kidney
oon


Dr. Roach
Readers may
write Dr
Roach at
PO. Box
536475,
Orlando,
FL 32853-6475
disease (who may need
less) may need to be very
careful with supplemental
electrolytes.
DEAR DR. ROACH: After
reading yet another letter
to your column from a lady
suffering from urinary tract
infections, I feel I must tell
you of my experience with
this problem.
For many months I
had infections and the
treatments helped but the
infections kept recurring.
One day my doctor's nurse
asked me if I took baths
or showers. I said I always
took baths. She suggested
I try showers only, and see
if that helped. I did, and
the infections stopped,
and now after some 40
years I have had only one
infection after being in a
family hot tub.
This seems like such
a simple solution that at
least other women could
try it at no cost or inconve-
nience. Could you please
suggest it in your column?
- E.R.
ANSWER: I am always
happy to provide possible
solutions to common
problems, especially when
they don't involve medi-
cations or procedures.
I looked this up, and it
seems to be consistent
advice, but I hadn't heard
it. Thank you for writing.
TO READERS: Recurring
vaginal infections are
often troubling to women.
The booklet on that topic
explains them and their
treatment. Readers can
order a copy by writing:
Dr. Roach- No. 1203,
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Enclose a
check or money order (no
cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6.
Can. with the recipient's
printed name and address.
Please allow four weeks for
delivery.

Dr. Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer
individual letters, but
will incorporate them
in the column when-
ever possible. Readers
may email questions to
ToYourGoodHealthmed.
cornell.edu or request an
order form of available
health newsletters at PO.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Health news-
letters may be ordered from
www. rbmamall. com.


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
'I TOOK SOME MUCH-NEEPEP THAT'S \AH
TIME TO MOURN. IT' PFFER- I'M HERE./
ENT FOR EV/ER'YONE...
BUT TAKE THE TIME.


TAKE WHAT 0YOu CAN FROM THERE 5 SOME-)
'vOUR EXPERIENCES HERE THING HEAL-ING
'-,THE ATMOSPHERE t5 \ ABOUT BEiNG
A4 &BENEFICIAL-.. ARo NCL? THE
< ?t id? 5 ," NATuRE.


YOU SAID
YOU WOULD
KILL A CO-
WORKER
IF YOU
KNEWJ YOU
WOULDN'T
GET CAUGHT.

^)


IT WAS
HARD TO
KNOW WHA
ANSWER
THEY LJERE
LOOKING
FOR.


YOU'RE THE FIRST
EMPLOYEE IN COMPANY
HISTORY TO FAIL THE
ONLINE ETHICS COURSE.


I PROTEST THE
GRADING SYSTEM!
ETHICS ARE SUB-
I-' JECTIVE. THERE ARE
S NO RIGHT ANSWERS!


The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


Thuri.jr- Jul, 25 201 3


:,:.:. our .ur"i net


r






Thursday, July 25, 2013 ads .you rsun net EINIC The Sun Classified Page 11
U


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463.1638


SUNPA'
NEWSPAPER!


BUSNS &1IIII*! A1[ SR ICE DIRECTOR W


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
RKVE. (OU AD A. ?CISION beCAU
OR AOING AOTREZ E-XTE-R
Ouc5h!No fair! WECKTTOK "1 I JUST
Ready There's no way UPCOtK&G n OTCON
to get you're in imaiy Take. U
\ this is an illegal 2
\ )..dy..',V It,. nti.


"7 1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

AnswerK T ""
here: I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CHOKE DAISY SLEEPY FATHER
Answer: Even though it was plugged in, the electric
guitar without strings was "CHORD-LESS"

Evacuation plan


Dear Heloise: I just had
the frightening experience
of needing to evacuate my
home because of a fast-
moving brush fire.
As soon as I saw the
smoke and firemen, I gath-
ered our five cats and put
them in a small bathroom.
I got out the cat carriers
and got the cats loaded and
stacked by the front door.
Before I could gather up
anything else, a fireman
was insisting that I had to
leave immediately.
If the cats weren't already
in their carriers, I would
have had to leave them.
They would have been
hiding, and I never would
have been able to get ahold
of them.
Thank goodness all was
well, and we all returned
to our home that evening,
but my ordeal would have
been much worse if I had
been worried about the
cats' safety. JudyW,
Monrovia, Calif.
What an ordeal! Glad
that everything was OK!
Hopefully readers will see
this and take to heart your
words of wisdom. Thanks
for sharing, Judy! Heloise

Easy-cut brownies
Dear Heloise: Cut
brownies that have
cooled about four to five
minutes with a serrated
plastic knife for clean-
cut squares. Any of the
disposable tableware
types will do. I discovered
this several years ago,
but have never seen it in
print. Carmen White,
Clearfield, Pa.


Hints from Heloise

Clothesline drying
Dear Heloise: Now
that summer is here,
I am looking forward
to hanging my clothes
outside on the line. It
saves money, and I just
love hanging the clothes
up while enjoying the sun
and warmth!
I live in the snow
belt, and we have a very
short summer. For those
people who would like
to hang clothes outside
but think they don't have
the time, you could hang
them out in the after-
noon or early evening
and then take them down
the next day. Even if it
should rain overnight,
it won't hurt. It actually
adds to the wonderful
fresh smell. Colleen in
Pennsylvania

Personal planner
Dear Heloise: Each
year, a ritual of separat-
ing my daily planner is
carried out. The pages are
torn out and shredded,
or sensitive material is
marked out. The binding
and covers are recycled.
- Margarette in Texas


--FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE By Lynn Johnston
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE By Lynn Johnston


Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11







The Sun Classified Page 12 EINIC ads.yoursun.net IL' Jul L~ LIJ I


Readers take
for being too
DEAR ABBY: I have
read you for years, and I
must take issue with your
answer to "Needs the
Right Words" (March 17).
He asked about his son
and his son's half-brother
visiting his beach house.
(He didn't want the half-
brother included.)
While you addressed the
writer's needs, and yes, he
is entitled to his feelings,
I think you should have
taken this a step further.
Once you become a
father, it is not all about
"you" anymore. The
12-year-old boy is now,
and forever will be, his
son's half-brother. Unless
this man wants to distance
himself from his son and
cause permanent damage
to their relationship, he
needs to get some therapy
so he will be able to think
of that boy in a different
way and can deal with him
in the future. He is not in a
"good place" as he stated
if seeing this boy causes
such an emotional issue.
The two boys seem to have
a good relationship, and a
future with his son will -
and should include the
half-brother, even if the
visits are short ones.
Someday that boy will
be a grown man, and he
will recognize the kind-
ness shown to him. The
boy is not responsible for
his mother's behavior and
the father needs to realize
that. DEBORAH IN
CHANDLER, ARIZ.
DEAR DEBORAH:
You are right. It would
have been better for all
concerned if I had been
harder on the father and
more sensitive to the feel-
ings of the boys involved,
which many readers
pointed out to me:
DEAR ABBY: I almost
always agree with your
answers, but your answer
to that letter was off the
mark. It's admirable that
his son has such a close
relationship with his half-
brother, and not allowing
the boys to do something
they enjoy together for a
weekend is wrong. That
the writer admits he still
has problems with the
past is his problem, not
the kids'.
Since he admits it


Abby to task MALLARD FILLMORE By Bruce Tinsley

easy on dad A-





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Q02013 byKg FeMatures Syncfcle. no World gts r es


Dear Abby

brings up feelings he
THOUGHT he had put
behind him, he should
get professional help to
finally deal with those
unresolved issues. Also,
if he doesn't want the
12-year-old in his house
for one weekend of fun,
then he should take his
wife away for a romantic
weekend and let the boys
use the beach house in
his absence. It's all about
compromise, not the ulti-
matum. BEEN THERE,
DONE THAT IN KANSAS
DEAR ABBY: Tell that
man to get a psychothera-
pist! The child isn't re-
sponsible for his mother's
behavior. The man needs
to expand his heart. When
he's an old man he will
never regret hosting the
boy, but he WOULD regret
having hurt a child and
perhaps alienating his
own son in the process.
You called that one wrong,
Abby! LESLIE R.,
CHAMPAIGN, ILL.
DEAR ABBY: I agree
with your advice more
often than not, although I
suspect we are at oppo-
site ends of the political
spectrum. That father
needs to grow up and put
the feelings of his son
and his son's half-brother
before his own. It's time
people learned once more
what it means NOT to be
selfish and think of their
own feelings, but the
feelings of others. Please
reconsider your response.
- PAULW, JOHNSON
CITY, TENN.
DEAR PAUL: I have, and
I regret my initial answer.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at www.
DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.


"And he arose, and rebuked the wind, and said unto
the sea, Peace, be still. And the wind ceased, and there
was a great calm." Mark 4:39.
Is your life in great turmoil? There is one who can
bring you great calm in the midst of the storm. Turn it
over to Jesus.


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz


'<~M NT/PR^.W
1!K





9607


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers


(SIGR) POOR SHOE. ALWAYS
GOING THROUGH LIFE WITH

MOROSE-COLORED GLASSES.





^ .'.-
,) )^^BJ^H


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle soluti 11 1 h t11 h ( i Ii i\ s I I11,11


HOROSCOPE


ARIES (March 21-April 19). Getting on the same
page in relationships is the challenge of the day.


I today, what you have to say is so crucial to the group ofyour love of humanity.You believe people are


inat you may nave to break this rule.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).The audience you want


capable of reaching their full potential.


SAGITTARIUS(Nov.22-Dec.21).The nrlriir,,v.'v i PISCES ,l.'-i r h in i r. firilrin,
in trying to impress someone will ha%'.. i Ip ..n.. i..-i"..-l-r ...,.-[ .i i hi l [.i ijr r..i


LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). As a socially sophisticated accomplishing the exact opposite. In. r i r


may not be the audience vou currently have. But if person, vou realize that sometimes when DeoDle are the only winner is the one who forfeit:


Someone may be thinking ofyou as a sweetheart
you give more to the people who are already listen- telling secrets, they actually mean to be overheard. (APRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.19). Expet us..r.- ar.-
while you are still working out the logistics of
uoyo tg ni you will attract the ones who a r


jhi- 'ji I,,ijll I h.. ', v.,i toj h -,, r., 1.1.; fil l., .,v-r-
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TAURUS(April 20-May 20).You'llderive pleasure LEO (July23-Aug.22).lt isverytempting to get SCORPIO(Oct. 24-Nov. 21).You havean impulse minds, because it will be too much w,"ri r..,, 1 *.. Ir..rrjivI.Iirfij.-ri..-.I.-.rI..r I,..- I .-ri.- I II i -.
from helping others, and it wouldn't occur to you to caught up in the high praise ofothers and run with to make bold moves tonight, butwill you? Much fill the role, and you'll wind up resentinul A-..---..rI.-..rI.Irr,- : i-,-- v...ith-I[,v ri v,.Ijr
want a reward. But you'll be rewarded anywaywith it, but this is not gracious.You will be most proud of depends on your confidence in the moment, which AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).Just ab., i. vr','r ..,- iri,.--- I jI. i. i-.i..ri--,: ,,,I:I.- : ,i v..-Ir lp-:r..ri


the highest esteem of your peers.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). If you're speaking more


what you do from a humble place.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Your tendency to hold


depends on your habits earlier in the day.The
attention you give to yourself in the a.m. builds


speaks logically, butyou do something It, i -+ I ] Ii, 11.'I i ji..ll .iii I- j,.ll ..- ,..i[ [.[.l.. ..- ri j
apart: You paint pictures with your w .r.- ri i ir,.i h...1. i r i l.-i I r.- iA.rii,.-rin, iin. .-. .- .ii..r.


than you're listening, you're talking too much. But everyone to a high standard is an outcropping


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number :.n .ci::e nr .:,il, .ne in li- r...
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination I: :.' e i- Izi l Ti- lt fi:,m,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold harderr
Rating: BRONZE

2 5 6 18 3
356 1 42978
8 4 5 1 7 6 2 8 6 3 7 1 4 5


4 3 6 5 1 7 4 5 9 8 623
8 1 9 63942 857
7 8 2_3 75 6 4 19
9 2 8 1 5 41 7 8 9 2 3 6

4 5 1 7 91 3 9 7 4 5 6 2
5 495263781
7 2 9 3 6 1 267815394

C7/25/13
7/25/13


The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thur'.,j,, Jul, 2' 21l3


p.m. success. makes your personality charismatic.






Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORTCHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


JUL.2 5 E.=f e PRIME TIME
ABC7 News World News Millionre.: To Be a Wipeout: Cat-Face Shirt! Cat Motive: Out of the Past (01) Rookie Blue: Skeletons ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC S 7 7 7 10 7 7 at 6(N) Diane Sawyer Cruise In and Millionaire? lovers gather for new obstacles. News shop owner killed. (N) Possiblecopycat case link. (N) at11 (N) KimmelLive
(N) Win (R) (N) (HD) (HD) (HD) (R)
ABC7 News World News The 7 O'Clock Entetainment Wipeout: Cat-Face Shirt! Cat Motive: Out of the Past (i1) Rookie Blue: Skeletons ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC ( 7 11 7 @6:00pm(N) DianeSawyerNews(N)(HD) Tonight(N)(HD) loversgather fornew obstacles. Newsshop owner killed. (N) Possiblecopycatcase link.(N) @11:00pm KimmelLive
(_N) (N)(HD) (HD) (HD) (N) (R)
WINKNews CBS Evening WINKNews Inside The Big Bang 21/2 Men (01) Big Brother 15(N) (HD) Elementary: Right Risk WINK News a Late Show
CBS 213213 5 5 5 at6pm (N) (HD) News (N) (HD) at7pm (N)(HD) Edition (N) (HD Theory (R)(HD)Walden's Sherlock looks into plane crash. 11pm (N) (HD) RegisPhilbin
ex-wife. (R) (R) (HD) (N)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel: Bed & Jeopardy! (N) The Big Bang 21/2 Men (01) Big Brother 15 (N) (HD) Elementary: Right Risk 10 News, Late Show
CBSM 1 o 10 lo6pm(N) News(N)(HD) Breakfast(R) (HD) Theory (R) (HD)Walden's Sherocklooks into plane crash. 11pm (N) RegisPhilbin
ex-wife. (R) (R) (HD) (N)
NBC2News NBC Nightly Wheel: Bed & Jeopardy! (N) The Winner Is: Million Dollar The Winner Is: Million Dollar Hollywood Game Night: NBC2News (:35)The
NBC 20232232 2 2 2 6pm(N)(HD News (N)(HD) Breakfast(R) (HD) Surprise (R) (HD) Shock(N)(HD) SaturdayNight Reunion Two @11pm(N) TonightShow
teams compete. (HD) (N)(HD)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment The Winner Is: Million Dollar The Winner Is: Million Dollar Hollywood Game Night: NewsChannel (35) The
NBC W 8 8 8 8 8 8at 6:00(N) News (N) (HD) 8 at7:00 (N) Tonight(N)(HD) Surprise (R) (HD) Shock(N) (HD) SaturdayNight Reunion Two 8at 11:00(N) TonightShow
teams compete. (N)(HD)
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy Simpsons Hell's Kitchen: 2 Chefs Compete; Winner Chosen FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX 4 News Friends
FOX 3222222 4 4 4 Community news; weather; Daughter's Marge's former Finalists prepare during a live cooking presentation; winner news report and weather at Eleven (N) Telemarketing
traffic; more. (N) dog. (R) date. of job is named. (N)(HD) update. (N)
FOX 13 6:00 News News TMZ (N) omg! Insider Hell's Kitchen: 2 Chefs Compete; Winner Chosen FOX 13 10:00 News The FOX 13 News Access
FOX i13 13 13 13 13 events of the day are reported. Angie Harmon. Finalists prepare during a live cooking presentation; winner top news stories are Edge(N)(HD) Hollywood(N)
___(N)(HD) (N) of job is named. (N) (HD) updated. (N) (HD) (HD)
BBCWorid Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) Antiques Roadshow: Biloxi, Doc Martin: Preserve the Queen& Country: The Queen & Country: Traveller
PBS 0 3 3 3 News Business MS Markevaluates pottery and Romance A new doctor. (R) ueen's Possessions Portraits; Commonwealth summit. (R)
America Report (N) a linocut. more. (R) (HD) (HD)
BBCWorid Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) WEDU Arts Suncoast AntiquesRoadshow: Vintage Extraordinary Women: Secretsof the Dead: Bones
WEDUI 3 3 3 3 News Business Plus(HD) Business Hartford Puzzle and more. (R) Coco Chanel Chanel founder.of the BuddhaTruth sought. (R)
America Report (N) Forum (HD) (HD)
Two&Half 21/2 Men The Big Bang Big Bang The Vampire Diaries Into the Beauty and the Beast: Never WINK News @lOpm (N) (HD) How Met How Met
CW ( 11 21 6 Men Bad Charlie Sheldon drives. Theory Wild Expediton; rivalry; Turn Back Cat's shocking family Mother Mother 46
influence, impotent. Penny's lie. confrontation. secrets. Showdown Minutes
Queens King of Two& Half Engagement The Vampire Diaries Into the Beauty and the Beast: Never 21/2Men Rules Friends Friends
CW I) 9 9 9 4 Swimming Queens Holly Men Bad Dinner date. Wild Expedition; rivalry; Turn Back Cat's shocking fami Charlie Engagement: Telemarketng. Monica makes
poolmelee. movesin. influence. (HD) confrontation. secrets. impotent. Game On (VPG) jam.
Raymond Ray Seinfeld Dirty Family Feud Family Feud White Collar Taking Account White Collar. As You Were Seinfeld Scrubs Baggage (HD) Excused (R)
MYN ( 11 11 11 14 takesblame. talk taped. (IVPG) (R) (IVPG) (R) Jones' former classmate goes Prvat-ecurity company Insidestock Engagement (HD)
missing. investigated. tip. surprise.
Access Seinfeld Dirty Family American White Collar Taking Account White Collar. As You Were Family Guy American Seinfeld Sunny New
MYN 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) talk taped. Renaissance Dad!:Haylias Jones' former classmate goes Prate-securitycompany Peter's past life.Stan's Inside stock reputations.
(HD) rumble. (HD) missing. investigated. discovery. tip. (HD)
Family Family Guy The Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Law & Orden Criminal How Met How Met The Office The Office The
IND 321212 4 38 12 Renaissance Peter's past life. Sheldon drives. Theory Intent: Lonelyville Strangled Intent Secrets in the condo Mother Mother 46 "Lonely party boat. (HD)
rumble. Penny's lie. blonde. (H) H) Showdown Minutes Hears."
Without a Trace: Between the Without a Trace: Suspect Criminal Minds Omniore Criminal Minds House on Fre Criminal Minds: Conflicted House: Ugly Deformed teen
ION 2 2 2 13261817Cracks Missing young model. Teen vanishesfrom private Boston killer ends 10-year Serialarsonist terrorizes town. eri killer targets spring suffers heart attack. (HD)
(HD) school.(HD) hiatus. (HD) (HD) breakers. (HD)
A&E 2626 263950 181 48 Murder on tape. (R) 48 Cell phone traced. Beyond Deputy Lyle. Beyond (N) (HD) My Life as (N) (HD) (01) Beyond (R) (HD)
(4:30) Blood Diamond ('06) rk***1 Two Demolition Man ('93, Action) **1/2 A 1990s policeman chases a Showville: Holland, Michigan Small Town Small Town:
AMC 55656 5 30 53 231 men seeka diamond during a war. crime lord from his era while in a future world. (R Talent show. (R) (R) (HD) Inipi (1R
APL 44 44 44 36 68 30River (R) (HD) River Serpentine killer. River Monsters Famous monster. (R) (HD) Off Hook Off Hook River Famous monster.
BET 35 35 35354022 270106 & Park Top music videos. (N) Lakeview Terrace Property feud with cop becomes deadly. Civil Brand Slave labor causes prison takeover.
BRAVO 68 686 68 51185 Below Deck Below Deck Hypnotist. (33) Below Deck (R) New York Wedding. (R) Housewife Reconcile. Housewife Watch What Property
S 6 6 190(:56) South Pr (:27) Tosh.O Colbert Repod (:28) Daily Chappelle's Chappelle's (59) Sunny Sunny (VMA) Tosh.0 () (HD)Tosh.0 (R) Daily Show (N) Colbert Repo
COM 6661(R) (1) (HD) (R) Show (R) Show Show (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD)(N)
DISC 40 40 40402543 120 Airplane (R) (HD) Airplane (R) (HD) Property Property Property Property Airplane Police officers. Property Property
E! 464646462726 96 Summer Catch ('01) ** E! News (N)(HD) Kardashian (R) (HD) Kardashian ((HD) E! Spec. (N)(HD) C. Lately News (R)
FAM 55 55 55510 46199 Vineyard (R) (HD) Melissa Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Three wizards journey to save the world. The 700 Club (TVG)
FOOD 3737 37 37 76164 Chopped: Crunch Time Chopped Pink candy. Chopped (R) (HD) |Chopped Large cake. Food Court (R (HD) Star Buitoni products.
X-MenOrigins Wolverine X-Men: The Last Stand ('06, Action) ** A "cure" for mutants AngerMatin Wilfred: Wilfred: Wilfred: EasyA
FX 51 51 5151 584953 Mutant's revenge. provokes Magneto's Brotherhood to war against humanity. and Ed. Intuition (N) Delusion (R) Intuition (R) Virginity lie.
GSN 17917917917934179184Fam. Feud |Fa Feud Fam. Feud Fam.Feud Newlywed |Newlywed |Newlywed Newlywed Fam. Feud Fam.Feud Fam. Feud Fam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Prairie Nancy connives. Prairie: Growin' Pains The Lost Valentine (11) Husband goes MIA. (HD) Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
HGTV 41 414141 534265 Love It (R) (HD) Hunters Hunters Addict Addict Raiders (N) Hunters Hunters House (N) Hunters
HIST 81 818181 33165 128PawnStars PawnStars Pawn Stars PawnStars Duck (HD) Duck (HD) Duck(H) Duck(H) Duck (HD) (:31) Duck God, Guns God, Guns
LIFE 36 36 36365241140 Swap (VPG) Runway Introductions. Runway Parachute. (R) Project Runway Expensive jewels. Supermarket: Cakes Double (R
NICK 225 25 252444 252 Sponge |Sponge Sam&Cat Hathaways BigTime (N) FullHse Full Hse Nanny Nanny Friends Friends
OWN 58585858 147103161 Undercover (HD) ET on OWN Addiction. ET on OWN Weight. (N) William, Kate & the Royal Baby (N) William, Kate & the Royal Baby (R)
QVC 141412 9 1413 150 JAI John Hardy Jewelry John Hardy products. Dooney & Bourke Stylish handbags. philosophy- beauty Beauty products.
SPIKE 57 5757 572963 54 Cops() |C(HD) Co H) Cops (HD) Cops (H) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Impact Wrestling (N) (H) |lnk Master (R) (HD)
SYFY 67 67 6767 64180 Batman Returns ('92, Action) *** Batman battles a grotesque Penguin. Batman & Robin Mr. Freeze and the evil Poison Ivy plague Gotham City.
TBS 55 59 59 32 62 52 Queens Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family |Family Big Bang Big Bang Sullivan & |Big Bang Conan Steven Ho. (N)
m e Scape- The Old Dark House ('63, Horror) A car The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie ('69, Drama) 1'/ Dead Poets Society A charismatic teacher at an urbane
TCM 65 65 65 6 1230goat ('59) salesman finds his client dead. Eccentric teacher influences her pupils. (PG) preparatory school inspires his students.
TLC 44545 45455772 139Toddlers Dallas area. |SayYes Say Yes Say Yes |SayYes Wedding ((HD) Wedding Helicopter. (N) Wedding (R) (HD)
(5:30) Mission: Impossible 11 ('00, Action) r**1 Tom Cruise.The Hero: Sacrifice Repel off (,0) Mission: Impossible 111 ('06, Thriller) r*** A former secret agent's The Hero:
TNT 61 61 66 1 61 28 5551 A rogue agent becomes a terrorist. (R) building. (N) (HD) peaceful life is interrupted by a friend's kidnapping. Sacrifice
TOON 1248012412446 20 257 Adventure Regular Regular MAD (R) Crew (R) Regular King King Dad (HD) Dad (HD) Family Family
TRAV 69 69 69 66 170 Bizarre Foods: Delhi v Food () v Food (R) Mysteries (R) Mysteries (N) Mysteries (R) Faked Out Faked Out
TRUTV 633 66350 30 183 Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Dumbest (R) Dumbest (R) Dumbest (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) (:01) Dumbest (R)
TVL 6262 66 2 31 54 244MASH MASH MASH |MASH Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Queens Queens Queens Queens
USA 343 34 34 22152 50 The 40-Year-Old Virgin ('05) Virgin & celibate. (R) Summer (N) Notice (N) (D) (:01) Graceland (N) (HD) (:02) Summer (R)
WE 117117117117 749Roseanne |Roseanne Pllatinum |Platinum LA. Hair (R) L.A.Hair (N) GlamGold (N) Platinum L.A. Hair
WGN 161616 19 41 11 9 Home Videos (1VPG) Home Videos (VPG) How I Met How IMet Lead-Off MLB Baseball: Chicago vs Arizona (live) (HD)
CNBC 393938 39 37102 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Greed (R) Mob Money (R) Greed A lottery winner. Mad Money (R)
CNN 3232 3 3321838 100 Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett (N) Cooper 3600 (N) (HD) Piers Morgan LIVE (N) Cooper 3600 (R) (HD) Erin Burnett (R)
CSPAN 18181818 37 12109 U.S. House of Representatives (N) Tonight from Washington Public policy. (N) Washington (N) Capital News Today
FNC 644664 644871 118 Special Report (N) (HD) The FOX Report (N) The O'Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N)(HD) On the Record (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 838383 83 40103 PoliticsNation (N)(HD) Hardball with Chris (R) Chris Hayes (N) (HD) Rachel Maddow (N) Last Word (N) (HD) Chris Hayes (R) (HD)
CSS 22 28 28 4970 Rome Brave GolfWeekl SEC Talk Ftbl College Football: LSU vs Tennessee (Replw) TBA Dantanna's SEC
ESPN 29 29 29291258 70 SportsCenter (HD) X Games Anthology Baseball Tonight (HD) SportsCenter (HD)
ESPN2 3 30 30 6 59 74 Horn (HD) Interruptn Greatest CFL Football: Edmonton Eskimos at Montreal Alouettes (Ive) |NFL Live (HD) Greatest
FSN 7272 72 72 56 77 Marlins Insider Bull Riding (Relay) West Coast (R) (HD) |Ult.Dodgeball (Replay) Road to (HD) Dolphins Dolphins
GOLF 4949 4495560 304 Golf Cntl PGA Web.com Tour (aped) (HD) |PGA TOUR Golf: RBC Canadian Open: First Round (Replay) (HD) Golf Cntrl
NBCS 71 71 7171546190 rossover Crossover PL World Mobil 1 Volleyball: World Series of Beach Volleyball FIVB World League (Replay) Mobil 1
SPEED 4848 48 48 42 6983 NASCAR (HD) PassTime PassTime ARCA Auto Racing: Chicago (Replay)(HD) MotoGP Champion Car: Challenger (HD)
SUN 38 3840140145 5776 Florida (N) RaysLIVE! MLB Baseball: Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox (live) (HD) Rays LIVE! Florida Insider Fishing Report (1R
GoodLuck JessieGirl GoodLuck Dogwith a Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2 (11, Family)* Bridgit JessieChess ShakeltUp! GoodLuck Dogwitha
DISN 1361361361369945 25Gabe's new scouts.(R) (H) Charlie: Go Blog Stan's Mendler, Emily Osment. Proud parents of Chihuahua litter contest. (R) (HD) Failinggrade. Charlie:Go BlogStan's
Crush. Teddy! issues. keep up with puppies and save owners. (R) Tddy! training.
(4:45) The Benchwarmers ('06, Comedy) Three That's My Boy (12, Comedy) **1/2 Todd Bridges, Andy Beetlejuice ('88, Comedy) An obnoxious Straw Dogs
ENC 1501501550 0350 Speechless nerdy guys battle Little League teams and Samberg. An irresponsible father attempts to reconnect family and a sleazy demon make death a Movestirs
('94) **12 bring aspiration for kids. with his estranged son. () living hell for two ghosts. danger.
Cowboys& Aliens ('11, Action) **%' Daniel Craig, The Newsroom: The Genoa Magic Mike ('12, Comedy) **'/ Matthew Real Sex Learn to spice up
HBO 3030230302 17302400 Abigail Spencer. A man with no memory stumbles upon a Tip Troubling story seems more McConaughey, Channing Tatum. A veteran dancer at a sex with savory food.
hardened desert town in the Old West. like. (R) strip club attempts to find a life outside of stripping.
(5:30) Being Flynn (12, (:15) This Means War ('12, Action) **1/ Reese The Bourne Legacy (12, Action) *** Jeremy Renner, (:20) Battle for Tobacco
HBO2 303303303303 303402 Drama) **1 Boy meets his Witherspoon, Chris Pine. Two CIA operatives discover that Rachel Weisz. A new agent escapes termination and seeks Road: Duke vs. Carolina
long-absent father. they are dating the same woman. (PG-13) to expose CIA crimes. (PG-13) Football rivalry. (HD)
(5:45) Battleship (12, Action) r**1 Liam Neeson, Taylor The Sopranos Chasing It Real Time with Bill Maher Pitch Perfect (12, Comedy) *** Anna Kendrick,
HBO3 30430430304 304404 Ktsch. An international fleet of ships battles an alien armada o Tony's bad luck; Marie's Scheduled: John Hargrove. Skylar Astin. An all-girls a capella singing group attempts
unknown origins. (PG-13) troubled son. (HD) (IVMA) (HD) to defeat their male rivals. (P-13) (HD)
(5:40) RockOf Ages ('12) ** In 1987 Los (:45) He Got Game ('98) **12 A governor offers clemency to a convicted Snow White and the Huntsman (12, Fantasy) **1/
MAX 3232032032063 320420 Angeles, two young people fall in love while murderer if he can talk his son, a high-school basketball star, into going to Kristen Stewart. Snow White is joined by a hunter on a
they are chasing fame. college at the politician's alma mater. campaign to kill her stepmother. (PG-13)
(:05) Saving Private Ryan ('98, Drama) ** -** Tom Hanks, Matt Damon. A squad of Crazy, Stupid, Love. ('11, Comedy) *** Steve Carell, Zane'sSex Zane's Sex
MAX2 321 32132132 321422 soldiers risk their lives to locate a private whose brothers were killed in combat so that he can Ryan Gosling. After a divorce, a man solicits the dating Trading Spaces John's secret.
return home as the last surviving son. (R) advice of his young bachelor friend. (HD)
(:55) Beware of Mr. Baker ('12) Bob Adcock. The Three Musketeers ('11, Adventure) **1/ Luke (:25) Judge Dredd ('95, Action) In a domed Polyamory: Web Therapy
SHO 340340340340 19 34365 A detailed look is taken inside the life of Evans, Milla Jovovich. A young swordsman joins forces city of the future, a respected Street Judge is PotPoluck (R) (R)
drummer Ginger Baker. with a trio of guards to defend Louis XIII. framed for murder.
(5:15) Gang in Blue ('96, (:55) 29 Palms ('02, Thriller) Chris O'Donnell. The Tortured (12, Horror) A couple The Darkest Hour (11) ** In Moscow, Meeting Evil
TMC 350350350350 20 350385Action) ** Policeman takes Asecretagentdiscovers organized crime ata seeks revenge when their son's killer gets a two Americans discover aliens harvesting (12) Unlikely
on racial violence. Indian casino, reduced sentence in trial. energy to hunt humans. hero.
6, 6:30 7, *, -7:308 a a- a a 83 *99:0 a10 ,, 10 a30 11.- 1:3I ar-


Today's Live Sports

12 p.m. ESPN2 The 2013
Senior Open Championship
First Round from Southport,
England. (L)
3 p.m. FSN MLB Baseball
Miami Marlins at Colorado
Rockies. (L)
GOLF PGA TOUR Golf RBC
Canadian Open: First Round
from Oakville, Ontario. (L)
7 p.m. SUN MLB Baseball
Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red
Sox from Fenway Park. (L)
7:30 p.m. ESPN2 CFL Football
Edmonton Eskimos at Montreal
Alouettes. (L)
9:30 p.m. WGN MLB Baseball
Chicago Cubs at Arizona Dia-
mondbacks. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
cooking advice with Chef Mark
Bittman; Investing 101. (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: actor
Stanley Tucci; the set of the Tony
Award winner "Kinky Boots." (N)
9:00 a.m. MYN The 700 Club
Scheduled: an author talks about
how she lost everything at the
edge of stardom. (N)
10:00 a.m. IND The Steve Wilkos
Show Scheduled: women are
worried that their boyfriends are
cheating on them.
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Sched-
uled: guest co-host actress and
comedian Maragaret Cho. (N)
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Sched-
uled: Mario Batali shows off his
version of some breakfast recipes.
(N)
1:00 p.m. CW The Bill Cunning-
ham Show From April: loved ones
come to Bill for help getting their
family out of gangs.
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Scheduled:
chef Rachael Ray gives a cook-
ing demo; comedy legend George
Wallace. (N)
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Williams
Show Scheduled: from "Anthony
Eats America" host Anthony Ander-
son. (N)
2:00 p.m. IND Jerry Springer From
October 2011: escort's big secret;
woman mad at her pimp/fiance.
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors From
March: beauty buys for $10; make-
it-yourself makeup; Ashley Borden.
3:00 p.m. CW Steve Harvey Sched-
uled: a mother turns to Steve for
help with her pampered son. (N)
3:00 p.m. IND The Steve Wilkos
Show Scheduled: two women for
results about the father of their
children. (N)
4:00 p.m. ABC Access Hollywood
Live Scheduled: R&B singer Jason
Derulo; "Summer Camp" host Matt
Rogers. (N)
4:00 p.m. CW Anderson Live From
March: routine beauty treatments
gone wrong; actress Fran Drescher.
4:00 p.m. FOX Maury From Feb:
families went home to deal with
the truth of cheating scandals.
5:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil From Oct.
2012: family of human trafficking
victim comes face to face.
11:00 p.m. TBS Conan Scheduled:
Steven Ho; Peter Sarsgaard. (N)
11:35 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel
Live From July: actor Kevin Nealon;
actor Michael B. Jordan; Karmin
performs.
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled: TV
personality Regis Philbin; ventrilo-
quist Terry Fator. (N)
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno Scheduled: actress
Cate Blanchett; actor Michael B.
Jordan; Court Yard Hounds. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv






The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads yoursu n net Thursday, July 25, 2013


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030


APPLIANCES, Stove,
Microwave & Dishwasher
Brand New Whirlpool .
White. Stove is Electric.
$800 941-661-0298
AREA CARPET plush nice
for wood floors $85
941-822-3837
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030

BEDSPREAD KING CHENILLE
Lt Blue. Excellent Condition.
$20 941-426-0760
BLENDER + juicer, both work
great $5 941-627-6542
BOOKS, COLLECTION OF
signed, first edition. $30 each.
540-383-1655
BOWL, Crystal Desert/fruit
pedestal Mint condition. $35
941-764-0326
CELL PHONE AT&T Nokia
w/car/AC chargers Multi features
As new boxed $35 941-276-1881
-GET RESULTS ---
USE CLASSIFIED!


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030

CHINA CABINET/BUFFET
DREXEL HERITAGE $500,
0B0 862-812-0995
COMFORTER KING bed,
w/extras. Fish decor. $25
941-698-4157
COMFORTER SET KING
Snowmen/snowflakes.
$20 941-426-0760
COMFORTER SET TWIN
Sheets/Blanket. Clean. Nice.
$25 941-426-0760
CROSS ABOUT 12by 8 heavy
$8 941-227-0676
1 Advertise Today!


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030

CRYSTAL STEMWARE Mint
Cond. $35 941-875-6271
DEHUMIDIFIER,
WHIRLPOOL 25 pints Like
New $40 941-473-4121
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIES!
DINING SET Rattan glass top
48" 4 chairs on castors $199
941-627-6542
DISHES FOR six White with
green trim, excellent $20
941-740-1000
DRESSER BROWN Great
Condition/Drawers. $50 954-
290-8194


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030

DISH SET 44 pc. Floral/White.
$25 941-875-6271
FANS 2 indoor-outdoor,
quiet $40 941-575-0970
FLOORMATE, HOOVER
Make cleaning hard floors
easy. $50 941-916-9026
GLASS TABLE Top 72x48
$50, OBO 941-204-3458
HARD-SIDED SAMSONITE
Luggage, metal hndls, 29" &
22".pr/ $169 941-276-1881
HOME INTERIOR print new
rooster framed print 28"H
x28"W $30 941-228-1745


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^ 6030

LAMINATE FLOOR Like New
12mm w/pad 2 styles 250ft
$499 941-429-8507
LAMPS 2 Ginger jar type 27"
tall mauve/rose colored $10
941-627-6542
LIGHT, Hanging ceiling
vintage custom made leaded
glass $245 214-906-1585
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS COVER KING
size. Good Cond. $15 941-
916-9026


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH
@2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
THE GREATER THREAT


Neither vulnerable. South deals.


WEST
4J9862
V875
053
4Q 73


NORTH
6A4
16432
SAQ42
46J 94
EAST
AK 10 7
SK QJ 10
0J 10 9 7
482
SOUTH
bQ53
,A9
SK86
4AK 1065


The bidding:
SOUTH WEST
1NT Pass
20 Pass
Pass Pass


NORTH
26.
3NT


EAST
Pass
Pass


Opening lead: Six of 6
Finesses might start out "free," but
there can be a price to pay. Consider
this deal.
With a shabby four-card major and
a balanced hand, North might well
have opted for a raise to three no
trump rather than go through the
process of looking for a 4-4 heart fit.
However, here that would have made
no difference to the final contract.
West led a low spade and declarer
seized the chance to make sure of two


tricks in the suit by playing low from
dummy. East won with the king and
shifted to the king of hearts. Declarer
held up the ace but was forced to win
the heart continuation. The fate of the
contract now depended on the club
finesse. Declarer crossed to dummy
with the ace of spades and ran the
jack of clubs. West won with the
queen and returned a heart, and the
contract failed by one trick, declarer
losing a spade, three hearts and the
queen of clubs.
Unlucky perhaps, since the
contract would have succeeded if
East held the queen of clubs or West
the king of spades. We would have
felt a bit better disposed toward
South had the contract not been cold
on any lie of the cards!
The heart suit was more of a
danger than spades. To neutralize the
threat in that suit, declarer should rise
with the ace of spades at trick one and
immediately run the jack of clubs
into the safe hand West. No matter
what West does after winning the
queen, declarer banks nine tricks -
one spade, one heart, three diamonds
and four clubs.

(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this newspaper
or to Tribune Media Services Inc., 2010
Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 75038.
E-mail responses may be sent to
gorenbridge@aol.com.)


7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

CLUES SOLUTIONS >

1 foot bone (10)

2 using a colander (9)

3 gives too much value (9) ____

4 small and timid (5)

5 in an elegant manner (10) _

6 from Ankara, perhaps (7)

7 horse event (8) __


ESS


MET RSAL


ATES ULLY


ISH


NI


RAI


NG


STEF


AGE MOU


TA


DR


ATA


OV


ST


SY


ERR TURK


Wednesday's Answers: 1. PROFUSION 2. WINDSURFING 3. UNCOUNTABLE
4. ENHANCEMENT 5. FLOGGED 6. BEADIEST 7. HAMPTON 7/25


ACROSS
1 Hanker after
6 Goat cheese
10 Intuition
14 Procrastinator's
motto
15 Companion of
anon
16 Dash
17 Cherish
18 Dryer residue
19 The very
essence
20 Bland
21 Famous bridge
(2 wds.)
23 Microchip base
25 Oakland
lineman
26 Wrigley Field
player
27 Complaint
29 Overact
32 Sen. Kefauver
33 Whisper sweet
nothings
36 Underhand
throws
37 "Mean Woman
---p
38 Greet the moon
39 Colorful carp
40 Submarine
outlets
41 Ms. Zellweger
42 Degas
contemporary
43 Long, long time


44 Squire around
47 Freeloaders
51 Like mental
telepathy
54 "Present!"
55 Soldering tool
56 Contends
57 Fridge maker
58 Blackberry stem
59 Coup d'-
60 Women's
quarters
61 Lose, as skin
62 Dock denizens
63 Champing at
the bit
DOWN
1 up
(won't say)
2 Arm bones
3 Coral formation
4 Jury decisions
5 Prior to
6 Law breaker
7 Malicious
8 Handle the bar
9 Major highways
10 Carrot or spud
11 Homer opus
12 Tack
13 Put in a log
21 Tar
22 Drowses off
24 Stage prompt
27 NASA outfit
(hyph.)
28 Hwys.


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED


REPEAT ALP PLOW
PRESTO MA R OWE
MANTLE EPA OONA
EEFHASnENPIFE FFER
O GRES PRS DIARnY
PEEGR NI~|~s DlA DD Y|
T DI N
INC EMO E Y E YAM
CA TALOG LES PSI
PLY NPR BEAD
SNIPE LI I LADLE
C I DERV I NEAR
AV I AJAVERU BBED
L EO S SE T ID E A T E
ANT E TR YNM EiDiL E Y
7-25-13 @2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Wapiti
Pasture sound
Ginza purchase
She, to Marie
Came out on
top
Be billed
Bravo, in Spain
Touching the
floor (2 wds.)
Accomplice
"Shucks!"
Fish eggs
Sighed loudly
Lamprey


Heroic tales
Actress Miles
Hag
Endures
Courage
Ocean birds
Like an
underbelly
Coolidge or
Gam
Carnivore's diet
Gleeful shout


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 25, 2013






Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
z ^6030


MINIBLIND WHITE aluminum,
1"x 9ftWx3ft L with cord &
valance $20 941-743-2656
MIRROR, 36wx50h Light
maple frame, brass trim, bevel
edges $25 941-743-2656



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
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Convenient *
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SUN




ORIENTAL SILK Bonsai Tree
in black rectangular dish. 1'H.
$10 941-276-1881
PATIO TABLE & 4 chair
Good condition $50,
OBO 979-482-9853
PATIO TABLE & three chairs,
rustic wood design $30 941-
626-0304
PERCOLATOR, Vintage
Copper Old+never used,rare.
$50 941-421-9984
QUEEN BED Queen Bed
$200.00 like new $200 941-
629-2034
SHEET SET: Twin, Martex
100%cotton.All natural.New in
pkg. $18 941-276-1881
SPEAKER PHONES Philips
Cordless Hi Def Voice, as new
in box $25 941-276-1881
STEAM CLEANER,
Shark Extra Pads. Used little.
$25 941-916-9026
STEAM CLEANER, shark
floor cleaner other part. $35,
OBO 941-822-3837
STOVE G.E. bisque,,elec.
like new cond. $400 941-662-
9818
TABLE LAMP 36" brown solid
wood, tan shade, brass base,
nice $25, OBO 941-743-2656
TV 20", no remote, great for
video games $40 941-769-
1163
VACUUM, Upright all tools.
A-1 Does floors & rugs $35
941-204-7881
WASHER & DRYER good
condition. $250 941-661-
0298
| Classified = Sales |


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030


WATER COOLER like new,
hot and cold w/ bottom stor-
age. $60 941-625-9789
WINDOW FAN twin fans 2
speed reversible, new in box
$22 941-505-0081
WINE GLASSES, Waterford
Brookside (8) new in box nice
gift $70 214-906-1585

HOLIDAY ITEMS
Z 6031


BUCCANEERS SANTA NFL
Danbury Mint X-mas Collectible
$25 941-426-0760
GOEBEL WHT china orn
dated vintage collectible orig
boxes EA $10 941-639-1517
FURNITURE
Lmmm::6035


ARMCHAIR PEMBROKE in
paisely print. Nice accent pc.
$150 941-637-0581
ARMOIRE & End Tables Wood
& Black Ornate Very large
$150 941-493-3851
BAR 9' L-Shaped w/stor.
cube/shelves $300 941-257-
8148
BAR STOOLS All 4 with high
backs 2 with arms $200
941-257-8148
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED ROLL-A-WAY
New condition $100.00
941-475-7970
ADVERTISEDE.
BED KING pure latex Bliss
Nature chiropractic mattress
$499 941-698-4699
BED, Child's, IKEA, exc cond,
mattress pad & sheets incl.
$125 941-408-6875
BED, King Size Cherwood
Pillow Soft Mattress W/Box
Spring. Rattan Headboard &
Railing. Can Deliver, NP Area
$165 315-270-2059
BED, King Tempurpedic,
Adjustable, Massage,
Protective Cover.
$600. obo 941-876-4479
BED, MAHOGONY 5PC
SLEIGH BEDROOM SET
$200/OBO 941-979-5331
BEDROOM SET dresser,mir-
ror, chest, 2nightstands, dou-
ble bed $300 941-769-1163
BEDROOM SET QUEEN
Formica marbelized (7 pcs)
white $499 941-627-9910


SUN


CLASSIFIED


To Place, Correct, or Cancel Ad


CALL







1348 IA- II






Check Out More SUN Classified Ads Online
|o sunnewspapers.net
UPDATED DAILY!!!


S FURNITURE
4Z6035


BEDROOM SET Queen plat-
form,dresser,mirror,ns,black
wood. $399 941-475-5676
BEDROOM SET
Solid wood, off white,
6 pieces, Queen
$150 941-697-1704
BEDS, Platform 2 twins
w/drawers. Good condition.
$100 941-764-0326
BLANKET CHEST, Wicker
white 33 x 29 x 15 excellent
condition $60 214-906-1585
BOOK CASE 48 tall adj
shelves can be used for stereo
$40 941-613-2854
| Employ Classified! I
BOOKCASE, 4 shelves,
24"wide, Mexican pine. $80
941-408-6875
CABINET ILLUMINATED
CURIO white wash finish $100,
OBO 208-705-2537
CHAIR LEATHER Club chair
with ottoman $250 941-475-
7970
CHAIR, Oak Arm Chair
Dining, solid $25 941-3560129
CHAIR, Swivel w/matching
foot stool. Plaid. Mint condi-
tion. $50 941-764-0326
CHINA CABINET 79x43x18
light color with interior light
$99 214-906-1585
CHINA CLOSET very good
condition $165 941-408-
4409
CHINA CLOSET walnut
w/glass doors and shelves.
$150 941-429-8507
CLUB CHAIR Off white Ethan
Allen chair in good condition
$30, OBO 979-482-9853
COCTAIL & Endtables with
Gold&Silver wood trim Beauti-
ful $490, OBO 941-347-8825
COCTAIL & Endtables with
Gold&Silver wood trim Beauti-
ful $490, OBO 941-347-8825
COFFEE & 2 END Glass
top/antiqued ivory base
tables. $200. 941-505-1768
COFFEE TABLE & End Tables
Glass 3 pc set. Perfect condi-
tion. $75 941-429-9305
COFFEE TABLE 2 end tables
white washed rattan $60
941-627-6542
COFFEE TABLE ATOMIC
RETRO Glass Top metal rings
$150, OBO 208-705-2537
COFFEE/GAME TABLE w/
chess/b-gammon /checkers+
built in $40 941-769-1163
COMPUTER CHAIR Black,
adjustable, like new. $30, OBO
941-625-9789
COUCH & LOVE SEAT
Leather good Condition $499
941-391-3866
COUCH SOUTHWEST COL-
ORS EX. COND. $250, OBO
862-812-0995
COUCH TAN W/recliners non-
smokers dave $200, OBO
941-626-4921
CURIO CABINET Oak,
Octagonal, good condition
$75 941-468-5040
CURIO-CORNER DK rattan
w/drawer, no glass, open
shelves. $150 941-475-5676
DAY BED with trundle two
mattresses bed cover pillows
$225 214-906-1585
DESK CHAIRS (2)
1 metal,1 wood
$15 941-662-7114
DESK Solid Maple Wood Wall Desk,
80" H x 72" W x 29" D, w/Hutch &
Free Computer, access+printer,
$850, 941473-1985
DESK SOLID wood desk with
shelves. Heavy. $50 734-
645-5296
DESK SOLID Wood Exc Con
moving must sell $150, OBO
414-899-0006
DESK, L shape, for computer
and lots of storage, exel cond.
$295 941-485-6145


S FURNITURE
Z6035


CHANDELIER GOTHIC 8
Lights $100 941-763-0018
DINING ROOM Set Formal,
Table, Leaf, 8 chairs & hutch.
$1,000 SECTIONAL SOFA,
Seats 6, 4 recline, one con-
sole $700 941-505-1768
DINING ROOM set Glass/
travetine table six parson
chairs $450, OBO 941-505-0785
DINING SET 48X30 table, 6
round chairs natural light wood
$300, OBO 941-882-3139
DINING SET-36X60 glass
table, 4 parson chairs, excel-
lent. $199 941-475-5676
DINING TABLE with four
chairs. Nice. $75
734-645-5696
DISPLAY CABINET nice size
72x24x9.5 light color interior
light $75 214-906-1585
DRAFTING TABLE 24"x32"
Folding model $15, OBO 941-
412-7050
DRESSER & SHELF Ethan
Allen $55 941-662-7114
DRESSER 5 drawers oak
veneer, call PM $50 941-716-
5088
DRESSER SOLID wood with
shelves. Heavy. $50
734-645-5296
END TABLES, COFFEE, SOFA,
carved wood/smoke glass
$200 941-626-6827
HEADBOARD BEAUTIFUL
QUEEN Wood 54" X 63" ONLY
$45 941-493-3851
HEADBOARD KING French
Provencal, solid wood $25
941-629-7056
HUTCH AND Buffet China
Cabinet/small $35, OBO 941-
697-1704
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
KITCHEN ISLAND (on wheels)
Exc Cond Solid Oak $175,
OBO 414-899-0006
LAMPS YELLOW 2 w/pink
shades $40, OBO 208-705-
2537
LANAI SET white wrought iron
yellow cushions/tbls $275
941-391-2436
MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS PAD MAGNETIC
KING Size by nikken used
$100, OBO 941-426-2046
MATTRESS, Queen, Sealy
Pillowtop, New $250
262-965-5220
MATTRESS/BOXSPRING
QUEEN set, lightly used, ex.
cond. $125 941-475-6865
MATTRESSES & Boxes 2
sets twins,super clean, King
Koil $150 941-475-5676
PATIO SET PVC 4 chairs
w/thick cushions & 64x42 oval
table $150 941-661-0054
PATIO SET Tan table w 4 PVC
chairs w straps, vgc $250
941-740-1000
POST PINEAPPLE bed bom-
bay twin mahogany $300,
OBO 941-586-4300
RECLINER LAZYBOY Brown-
Good condition $75 954-290-
8194
RECLINER ROCKER tan
leather excellent condition like
new $199 214-906-1585
RECLINERS 2 w/ottomans
each brown $225, OBO 941-
716-2225
ROCKER RECLINER, grey
non-smoker. Good cond. $75,
OBO 941-235-2203
ROOM DIVIDER 3-panel
divider $200, OBO 208-705-
2537
SLEIGH BED, K, high rise pil-
low-top mattress/box inc. LN
$499 941-764-7397
SOFA & CHAIR EXCELLENT
CONDITION, CAN EMAIL PICS
$150 941-916-2120


L FURNITURE
4Z6035


SOFA 3 cushion sage green
ex cond. $125 941-743-
0451
SOFA 3 SEAT fabric Cushion
Brown Flower $50 941-763-
0018
SOFA AND LOVE SEAT BAM-
BOO for lanai with Rug $325
941-575-8229
SOFA BED queen navy blue
leather $250, OBO 941-505-
0785
SOFA FLORAL pattern,
exc.cond. $100, OBO 941-
255-0691
SOFA Reclines on both ends,
leather look, brown
$140 cash only 941445-7147
SOFA TABLE BLACK TRIAN-
GLE unique shape $200, OBO
208-705-2537
SOFA, 2 CHAIRS & Ottoman,
brown, leather, like new, ask-
ing $1200 941-505-1376
SOFA, Like new, high end +
coffee & end table $499, OBO
941-356-0129
SOFA, LR SET LEATHER, 2
CHAIRS, OTTOMAN NEUTRAL
COLOR $499 941-235-3166
SOFA, navy blue leather non-
smoker.3 cushion.ex.cond.
$495, OBO 941-235-2203
SOFA/LOVESEAT WHITE
wicker/floral print-3tables
$425 941-39-1-2436
SOFAS (2) LT BEIGE LEATHER
3 CUSHION LIKE NEW EACH
$225 941-249-3564
TABLE 3 TIER swing smoked
Slass tops and wood rings
150, OBO 208-705-2537
TABLE SET WHITE OAK &
Smoked glass coffee & end
CLEAN! $50 941-544-0042
TABLE, COCKTAIL Lexington
leather w/iron base 6 drawers
$200, OBO 941-505-0785
TABLE, GLASS 40x80
w/6 black laquer chairs
w/white fabric inserts. $175
941-637-0581
TABLE, KITCHEN, smoked
lass top 4 chairs 6ftx4ft
125, OBO 941-698-4699
TABLE, Mexican
Pine, 28.5Wx30Tx21D
$80 941-408-6875
TABLE, Vintage rattan dining
4 chairs round 48 inches $99
214-906-1585
TABLES DOLPHIN BASE
Glass top 3 pc set $350 941-
391-2436
TIKI BAR with Stools made of
Bamboo good condition $260
941-575-8229
TUB KENMORE ELITE white,
stainless $125 941-408-4409
TV CONSOLE w/end storage
by Hooker $325, OBO 941-
505-0785
TV STAND Black wood
w/glass doors 33x20x18 FIRM
for $25 941-493-3851
WALL CLOCK, Mirror 3 PIECE
Gold Trim/Flower Petals $40
941-763-0018
ELECTRONICS
LW :6038


CHARGER, NINTENDO DS,
Case, 4 Games. EC $75 941-
875-6271
DVD PLAYER blueray wifi built
in, 1080 HDMI Nice $30 941-
697-8292
PHONE FAX copy SHARP
works well paper rolls941-716-
2225 $35 974-716-2225
PS3 w/four games. Exellent
Condition. $200 941-416-
4994
SPEAKER SYSTEM,
Multimedia New in box.
3 pc. $50 941-421-9984
VCR PLAYER & Recorder, 4
head with digital track. Remote
LN only $26 941-697-1102
| Advertise Today! |


ELECTRONICS
:60380


X-BOX ORIGINAL Comes
with 25 games $150, OBO
941-380-6551
XBOX KINECT w/game.
Used 3 times. Have all pack-
aging. $65 941-416-4994
| TV/STEREO/RADIO

Z:6040

19" RCA TV USED THREE
MONTHS AND STORED JUST
LOOK! $10 941-492-3659
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
SONY HDTV 32" remote, NOT
FLAT, HDMI, heavy, works per-
fect $45 941-626-0304
SPEAKERS FISHER 2, 8
ohm, nice wood finish $40
941-575-0970
T V big 40" mistubishi with
remote $145 941-626-3102
TOWER 40' antenna tower
stop paying cable $399 941-
343-7863
TV STAND Quality
Metal/Glass. $35 941-875-
6271
TV STAND SILVER W/GLASS
SHELF 57LX17HX18W LIKE
NEW $75 941-249-3564
TV/VCR Combo, 20" Pana-
sonic w/remote control. $30
941-966-9468

COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
Lift 6060

DAVE IN-HOUSE-OFFICE com-
puter repair, set-up Serving Char-
lotte Co. 12+ yrs 941-629-6337
FLAT MONITER, Dell 17" w/
adjusted pedestal. Like New.
$48. Pd. $179 941-697-1102
GOLF CLUB computer mouse
new looks like a driver $5
941-228-1745
KEYBOARD DELL UBS,
Black/white slim design $15
941-505-6911
LAPTOP APPLE Power Book
G4, good condition $200
863-491-4080
MONITOR 17" Great color
picture. Not a new thin LCD.
$15, OBO 941-743-2656
PRINTER EPSON 730,Wire-
less and Airprint $40 941-
875-4464
PRINTER: LEXMARK Z55.
PERFECT copies and condition
$25 941-276-1881
SAMSUNG LASER Printer
B/W All In One. Print,
Copy,Scan and Fax. New
Drum-Duplex & ADF.
$125 941-697-7888
USB HUB 4 ports, Belkin
F5U021 $15 941-505-6911
WINDOWS 7 Upgrade 64-Bit.
In original box w/ product key.
$50, OBO 941-623-6128
WINDOWS XP Pro With
unused COA Full version Great
shape. $60 239-204-1473







The Sun Classified Page 16 EINIC ads .yoursun net Thursday, July 25, 2013


EQUIPMENT
W426060

WIRELESS ROUTER, Linksy's
all in one, 2.4 GHZ, Only $28.
Cost $90+ 941-697-1102
CLOTHING / JEWELRY
ACCESSORIES


15 YOUNG MEN'S POLO'S
NAME BRAND $100 863-990-
1730
BLUE JEAN Jacket Calvin
Klein in great shape like new
Medium $20 941-445-5619
Designer
Urban Hip-Hop Style
Boys Clothes.
Great For Back To School.
Boys Size 7.
Jeans, Shorts & Shirts.
MINT CONDITION!
Rocawear, Sean John,
Ed Hardy. Coogie &
Much More.
Will Sell Individually or
Packaged Deal.
Priced To Sell.
Items Starting at $5.
Call For Appointment
(941) 815-6757 Nicole
DRESS BEADED sz.8 ex.
cond. party dress, must see.
$25 941-391-6377
DRESSES & JEANS PACK-
AGE/SIZES8-12 $150 863-
990-1730
HAND BAGS. Five hand bags.
call for e-mail. $10 941-457-
0018
JACKET-US ARMY FIELD OD
green-2 sizes-never worn w
liner $50 941-445-5619
JEWELRY BOX Got 3 J.B.
$10.00ea. call for more info.
$10 941-457-0018
JUNIOR NAME Brand clothes
Hollister,aeropostle, etc size s
$40 941-575-9800
LADIES 1ST Gear Leather
Jacket Size S $75 941-661-
0054
NEW SHOES US ARMY Black-
dress-leather-still in box-Size
9R $10 941-445-5619
WEDDING DRESS 1960 Big
skirt w/long veil $100 414-
899-0006
WEDDING DRESS Cream,
size 8 EX COND $40, OBO
941-391-6377
WEDDING DRESS NEW sz 4
wht strapless tie back have
pics $175 941-623-2063
WEDDING DRESS Sz4 Wht
Davids Bridal St.Tropez have
pics $250 941-623-2063
Classified = Sales

ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES


ALWAYS BUYING
ANTIQUES, ART, SILVER
NEW ENGLAND ANTIQUES
(941) 639-9338
ANTIQUE CRIB Reduced love-
ly 2X4 pc great for dolls or dis-
play $115 941-639-1517
AVON COLLECTIBLES
CARS, Trucks. Not open 7 Pics
$25, OBO 941-391-6377
BABE RUTH Plaque Sultan of
Swat.EC. $15 941-875-6271
BEANIE BABIES 36 total, all
with tags price for each
$2.50 941-697-8292
BEARS BOYDS-ALL 200
bears from 93-05 $200 941-
575-6241
BETAMAX TOSHIBA. good
condition. antique! $25, OBO
217-741-2347
BOMBAY MISC. furniture
dark wood $150, OBO 941-
586-4300
CABINET, Pine Box
Unique original finish
$125 941-697-8292
CHAINSAW MCCULLOCH
10-10 70's restored chain
brake $215 941-697-6592


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

BUNNYKINS 7 Piece Set
$150, OBO 941-539-7468
CHAIR, Antique Yunan (Chi-
nese), carved, 39x21x16
$475 941-408-6875
CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
85 issues. Great Gift Your
choice $20/ea 941-488-8531
All war News- Venice***
COLLECTIBLE KNIVES Wild
West,set of 7, with display
board $200 863-491-4080
COLLECTIBLE POCKET
KNIVES Set of 5,w/display
board $150 863-491-4080
COMICS COLLECTION must
go! 1970s & up your choice
only 2 for $1 941-474-1776
DOLL, 11 1/2in Vanna White
orig. box Lmtd. ed. $15
941-423-2585
DRESSER, Walnut 5 drawer
some marble.ex.cond. $350,
OBO 941-235-2203
GIRAFFE COLLECTIBLES
Over 150 pieces.
941-875-9705
GRAND FATHER CLOCK.
HOWARD MILLER MAKE OFFER
862-812-0995
HAND CARVED Teak Chess-
board $350, OBO 941-539-
7468
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2.5"
Pewter Ornament. $15, OBO
941-875-6050
HARLEY DAVIDSON 4-pc
mini Pewter Train Set $50,
OBO 941-875-6050
HARLEY DAVIDSON. 3" Logo
Nightlight. $15, OBO 941-
875-6050
HARLEY ORNAMENTS. '71
Super Glide. '06 Street Bob.
$23, OBO 941-875-6050
HULL ART Water Lily Bud
Vase 1940 $50 941-697-
0987
ICE BOX Oak Replica like new
25h X 16DX 22w $150 941-
697-8292
JUG, Ig. 1800's malcomb
stoneware.ex.c. $85, OBO
941-235-2203
JUKEBOX, WURLITZER
1950's good condition $499,
OBO 941-467-6077
KEROSENE LAMP Old Glass
Beauty $15 941-347-8003
NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
NRA AWARD Silverware Ster.
19 pcs.perfect $475 941-
637-9979
ORIG. SUPERMAN watch
circa 1949, works, orig. band,
Exc. $225 941-735-1452
PLATE, Major Kira Nerys of
Star Trek by Hamilton w/cert
$20 941-423-2585
PLATTERS, 2 Vintage
Depression Glass pink + light
green $50 941-421-9984
POCKET WATCH BEAUTIFUL
GOLD ACCENT DIAL MADE
1800'S $210 941-268-9029
QUADRUPLE PLATED Silver
Wedding Cup $150, OBO
941-539-7468
QUEEN ANNE Chair Beautiful
carved arms & legs, uphol-
stered. $175 941-268-5403
QUILTING FRAMES
Over 100 years old.
$100 941-833-8370
RECORD ALBUMS LP Collec-
tion must go! your choice -
only 2 for $1 941-474-1776
SAFE, Made 1888
28X18 outside measurement
$499 941-268-9029
SCYTHE FULL SIZE Great
Cond. $40 941-347-8003
SILVER-CERTIFICATE TWO
dollar block of 4 1953 red seal
nice note $50 941-697-6592
SLOT MACHINE 1947 Mills
Golden Nugget, 25 cent, with
cabinet $1700 Venice
941-485-4225


COLLECTIBLES
6070

SKILLET, Vintage Wagner
Cast Iron 3" deep. Nice.
$50 941-421-9984
STEAK KNIVES BRIDDEL orig
box, silver overlay bakelite
handles $70 941-639-1517
U.S. AIR Force Thunderbirds
Framed 16"by20" pic. w/sig-
natures $25 941-423-2585
US COINS 92 SILVER PRE-
MIER PROOF SET NICE CAMEO
SET $35 941-268-9029
WOODEN CABBAGE Slicer
Old Excellent Cond. $35 941-
347-8003
L MUSICAL
W40:6 6090


CASIO KEYBOARD w/stand
and music. $75 941-629-
2034
CD's CLASSICAL 13 beauti-
ful assorted artists $9 941-
496-9252
DRUM SET Sound Percussion
$85 941-575-8229
GUITAR ALVAREZ Acou/Elec
Very Nice w/ hard shell case
$190 941-637-0515
GUITAR LESSONS
Electric & acoustic. Rock & roll
or Blues $10.00 Half hour. Call
for info. 941-474-0906
KEYBOARD 76 KEY YAMAHA
w/std or trade for spinet piano
$200 941-625-2550
ORGAN FREE! Full 2 octave
pedal board organ. You haul it.
941-505-1768
PIANO, WERLITZER,
Good Condition!
$750. 941-764-6504
MEDICAL
L7ma6095


3 WHEEL WALKER w/Large
Wheels, basket,hand brakes
$65 941-268-8951
AIR MATTRESS MEDICAL For
any paralysis. Good condition.
$25 941-321-9686
BATHTUB & SHOWER
GRAB BARS INSTALLED
Don't Wait to Fall to Call!
Free In-Home Evaluation
22 Years Experience
CALL JIM'S
BATHROOM GRAB BARS, LLC
941-626-4296
BED FOAMS 3, 2 back & 1
leg. Like new w/fabric covers.
$30 for all. 941-492-3659
BODY MASSAGE Homedics,
programmable mat with heat,
Venice $50 941-486-1968
ELECTRIC LIFT CHAIR
Recliner. Great up/down Orig.
900. $425 941-822-3837
FOOT MASSAGE with heat
FOOT PLEASER HOMEDICS.
Venice $30 941-486-1968
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


MEDICAL
6095


OSTOMIE SUPPLIES,
ASSORTED FREE! 941-639-
5801 OR 941-276-3610
POWER SCOOTER Pride
GoGo. Good condition. $399,
OBO 941-806-9674
RECLINER LIFT, leather,
Back up battery, NEW $500
941-485-6185
SCOOTER BOB CAT new
$499 941-227-0676
SCOOTER, Golden XL, New
Condition, new battery, carries
3001bs. $499 941-625-1337
WALKER BASKET new, use
on 4 leg walker w/plastic
insert $5 941-505-0081
WALKER NEW walker with
basket and seat $15 941-
806-9674
WHEELCHAIR Tuff Care Elec-
tric Wheelchair. Works like
new. $100, 941-637-4900
HEALTH / BEAUTY
z 6100


FACIAL STEAMER Like new.
$25, OBO 941-625-9789
FACIAL STEAMER Like new.
$25, OBO 941-625-9789
FACIAL STEAMER Like new.
$25, OBO 941-625-9789
FOOT SPA Mult. settings, like
new w/ remote. $50, OBO
941-625-9789
MASSAGER FINGERS Knead-
ing KS-8001, neck, back,
Venice $40 941-486-1968
PERSONAL TANNING Bed
Pro24 RS Wolfe Great! $400
941-575-9800
REBOUNDER GOOD quality
$75, OBO 941-875-3710
TABLE NAIL TECH Call for e-
mail & pix $150 941-457-
0018
TREES & PLANTS
L6110


ASSORTED PALMS 4' locally
grow many to choose from
;12 941-637-0357
ADVERTISED!


TREES & PLANTS
Z6110


BAMBOO CLUMPING vari-
eties in pots 2-5 ft.tall $25
941-697-7375
BROMELIAD/ RAINLILIES
liriope/mexican petunias/oys-
ter/snake $3 941-882-3139
CANARY ISLAND date 4'
5gal locally grown from $15
941-637-0357
CITRUS TREE 4' Tall Fruited
in a 5Gal Pot Delivered To U
$40 941-204-9100
CRANBERRY HIBISCUS 3 ft
in 3 gal pot. Edible leaves. $6
941-258-2016
DESERT ROSE areca/coleus/
kalanchoe/purple queen/spi-
der/ti $5 941-882-3139
DESERT ROSE Flowering 4
Years Old From Seed Very
Nice BIG $35 941-204-9100
FIG TREE Sweet Fruiting Plant
For Sale 1 Gallon Pot $15
941-204-9100
FOXTAIL PALMS 4' locally
grown from $12 941-637-
0357
HELICONIA 3-4 ft. Blooms
are like bird-of-paradise. $6
941-258-2016
HUGE PLANT SALE Running
out of space! HELP! $4.97
941-916-2869
JACARANDA TREE Healthy,
strong. 3 ft in 3 gal pot $10
941-258-2016
JAPANESE JADE plants beuti-
ful clones $25 941-586-4300
MIMOSA TREE OR RATTLE-
BOX TREE w/red blooms. 3ft
$6 941-258-2016
NIGHT BLOOMING Cereus
Stems Selenicereus cactus
stems $10 941-257-8168
ORCHID LARGE Plants Purple
Flowers $25 941-698-9798


VIBURNUM GREAT FOR
PRIVACY HEDGE 3-15GAL,
BARREL,SYLVESTER PALMS
PIGMY PALMS & MORE
Su's NusuRY 941-488-7291
POINCIANA TREES
3'-5', $10
941-697-0987
ROSE OF Sharon 4 Unique
Flowering Shrubs 6' Many Col-
ors $20 941-204-9100


TREES & PLANTS
Z ^ 6110


STAGHORN FERN, HUGE
Plant Huge and beautiful
$300, OBO 841-257-8168
L BABY ITEMS
4 ^ 6120


BABY STROLLER. GRACO
New. $25 941-426-4561
BABY SWING $15 941-426-
7260
BOOSTER SEAT $5 941-
426-7260
CAR SEAT $10 941-426-
7260
CHILD SWIM vest new $8
941-227-0676
CLOTHING TWIN boy's new-
born to 2T and toys,baby
items $1 941-429-8507
DUO STROLLER Like New
raco quattro str,neutral.
140 941-429-8507
TEDDY BEAR 32" $7 941-
426-7260
GOLF ACCESSORIES
6125


2003 CLUB CAR DS
FOUR PASSENGER, "BEIGE"
NEW JULY 2013 BATTERIES
NEW FLIP REAR SEAT, RECENT
SERVICE, NEW LIGHTS,
WINDSHIELD AND TOP
LIKE NEW $2975
941-716-6792


CLUB CAR DS
"WHITE" GARAGE KEPT
4 PASSENGER, FOLDING REAR
SEAT, 1 YEAR OLD BATTERIES
HUGE DASH FAN, NEW SEAT,
WINDSHIELD, CHARGER,
LIGHTS AND FULL SERVICE
GREAT CONDITION
$2675 941-830-2415


Need





a





Friend?






Look in the


Classifieds






SUN.
NEWSPAPERS


I


The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 25, 2013






Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


GOLF ACCESSORIES
Z 6125


23 ASSORTED Golf Clubs
$15 for all. $1 941-875-6271
6 V GOLF CART
BATTERIES
SET/6 LEADING BRANDS
STARTING AT $399!
US MADE W/12MO WARR.
EXCHANGE/CASH&CARRY
941-769-1431
GOLF BAG/11 clubs Spalding
Bag. Brown. $12 941-875-
6271
GOLF CART w/out charger or
with $499 941-822-1429
LADIES GOLF SHOES 7M
NEW FOOTJOY WHITE/TAN
SADDLE $20 941-492-3659
STAND BAG CALLAWAY New
Royal/Black, HyperLite 3.0.
$75 941-475-6865

E EXERCISE/
FITNESS


ART EASEL, Solid oak,
adjustable table floor. Like
New $26. 941-697-1102
BAYOU FITNESS Total Trainer
Power Pro Home Total Gym
$499.99 941-763-0018
CYCLE TRAINER,
Golds Gym Cycle Trainer
390R- used 20min or less
$225 941-697-1704
EXERCISE BIKE by STAMINA
Dual Action, Good Condition
$60 941-268-8951
EXERCISE BIKE, seated
bicycle rider Hardly used
$250 941-492-2382
RECUMBANT BIKE & ROWER
$250.00 Nordic trac $50 VG
cond. 941-625-5858
RECUMBENT EXERCISE
BIKE W/Electronics, Great
Cond $135 941-268-8951
| Employ Classified! |
TREADMILL Image 10.0 with
incline $150 941-626-2276
TREADMILL PRO FORM
Cross Walk 380 $100 941-
637-2602 Punta Gorda

SPORTING GOODS



2 GUYS GUN
SHOW

July 27th & 28th
Bradenton
Bradenton Auditorium
1005 Barcarrota Blvd
(Off US 41 business,
behind South Florida
Museum)
Buy-Sell-Trade
New-Used
FREE Parking
Sat 9-5 and Sun 9-3
727-776-3442
www.nextgunshow.com
BOGAGRIP 27"LONG.EXC.
Big fish! $65 941-266-4731
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
JUMBO & standard-size quad
chairs w/carry cases/handles
Pr/. $19 941-276-1881
POOL CUES prof. 2, 2 canon
cobra 18oz w/case $250,
OBO 941-429-2236
ROD&REEL SHAMANO spin-
ning 7'.Braid line. $65 941-
266-4731
ROLLER BLADES, Girls
size 6, like new. $30, OBO
941-625-9789
THULE CARGO Box 2100xt
holds 21 Cu. Ft. 110 LBS.
$350 941-830-0420
WATER SKIS Obrien Odyssey
Skis 67" great shape $90,
OBO 941-460-0241


I FIREARMS TOYS
L a 6131 6138


Higher Power Outfitters
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
Guns*Ammo*CCW
Financing Available!!
Buy*Sell*Trade
941-347-8445





MORE GUNS,
TOO MANY TO LIST!
SELL, TRADE, BUY*
CALL 941-564-8778
NAZI WALTHER 6.35MM
w/ammo captured 5/1945
Horhausen, Ger. by PFC Brown-
stein. $550 941-661-4910
S&W 629-6 44MAG SS
$800 WW2 Mlcarbine,
M1903 30-06 sportirized,
springfield 1884 trapdoor
Winchester 1890 22 pump,
BO 941-234-7966

I FIREARMS
ACCESSORIES
ot 6132

AMMO 30-06 per 20 Rd,
9mm per 50 rd, also AK & AR
$20 941-457-0275
AMMO: 4 BOXES of JHP 44
special $120. 941-639-0766
Punta Gorda
MEC 9000 reloaders 1 28
gauge, 1 20 gauge, Hor-
nady/Pacific 366 12 gauge,
extras $350ea 941-380-6604

S BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
a 16135

26" WOMAN'S Diamond
Black 6 Speed Venice $50
941-929-8115
3 ELECTRIC Scooters need
work, take all 3 $50, OBO
208-705-2537
3 WHEEL bike back basket
big seat good tires black
$225 941-626-3102
3 WHEELER Restored w/new
tires & tubes looks & rides
great $225 941-474-1776
3 WHEELER Trike w/basket
Venice $175 941-929-8115
ADULT TRIKE Trail Mate USA
Desoto Classic w/ Lg Seat &
Basket $95 941-544-0042
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
ANTIQUE KIDS Trike AMF
American made red kids tricy-
cle Clean! $40 941-544-0042
BICYCLE MEN 26 inch huffy
26" venice $39 941-786-
8706
BICYCLE MEN'S. 26". bas-
ket. older Murray. working.
$25, OBO 217-741-2347
BICYCLE-MAN'S BRITANY,
10 speed, 26" $40 941-485-
0681
BICYCLE/MENS/SCHWINN
1980S WORLD TOURIST 5
SPEEDS $200 941-275-5837
BIKE RACK (THULE) Trunk
Mount 2 Bike Great Condition
$50 941-268-8951
BIKE RACK for car. Holds 3
bikes. New. $25
941-625-9789
DAHON FOLDING bikes 2 16
in. wheels $50 941-637-0357
DOHAN III Folding Bike 3
Speed Venice $50 941-929-
8115
LADIES 26" Mongoose moun-
tain bike Brand New! Never
used! $100 941-575-9800
MIAMI SUN 3 Wheel Trike
Nice w/basket Venice $200
941-929-8115
TREK MYSTIC PINK Girls Trek
20 in bike CLEAN! Cost $179
new! First $40 941-544-0042
WOMEN BICYCLE 24" huffy
24" red venice $39 941-786-
8706


LEAPSTER LEARNING sys-
tem Comes with 16 games
$100, OBO 941-380-6551
V-SMILE CYBER pocket
system Comes with 10
games $90 941-380-6551

PHOTOGRAPHY/
VIDEO
6140

ASAHI PENTAX Film Cam
35mm Spotmatic II w/case.
Addl lenses & many extras.
$100, OBO 941-580-2333






VHS VIDEOS: LINE DANCE
Partner, Country, Big Band. As
new/boxed. 4/ $10 941

POOL/SPA/
& SUPPLIES
OW4 6145


HOT TUB LOUNGER
NEVER USED 110 or 220
volt, maint. free cabinet.
Light, Sacrifice $1595
Local: 941-421-0395






**SPAS & MORE**
TRADE-IN'S WELCOME
WE BUY USED &
MOVE HOTTUBS.
www.spasandmoreflorida.com
941-625-6600
LOUNGE CHAIR 2 Zero-gravi-
ty nice W/pillow (149ea new)
asking $100 941-623-2063
POOL FILTER Cartridge for
Silver Bullet used 1wk $25
941-456-5059
LAWN & GARDEN
6160


BAG FOR TORO Walk behind
Triangle Handle NOS $25
941-497-3702
BLADES 42X2 Star Center
Hole NOS New Old Stock $10
941-497-3702
CHAINSAW HOMELITE super
XL 16'bar runs good vintage
$65 941-697-6592
CONCRETE EDGING 21-18
in 41-10 in curved 74 ft. total
$75 941-276-0029
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941-468-4372
DRIVE DISC SNAPPER RIDER
NOS Yard sale pricing $3 941-
497-3702
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be
placed online by you.
One item per ad and the
price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


LAWN & GARDEN
6160


GAS GRILL LP 48000btu
w/side burner. $50. 941-
505-1768
GRILL PROPANE FLAT GRID-
DLE TOP SOLD AT SEARS FOR
500. $150 941-268-9029
HUSKY WAGON 10GCU Tilt,
ike new $175
*********SOLD********

JOHN DEERE Garden/Dump
trailer $125 941-474-1776
LAWN EDGER Walk behind,
Troy Built, brand new 9" 4
wheels $200 941-485-0681
LAWN TRACTOR Craftsman
1825HP 42" RIDING MOWER.
$750 941-979-5585
LAWNMOWER PUSH High-
wheel, Englewood $60 941-
716-4195
LAWNMOWER RIDING 42"
Yard Machine 15.5 hp for
parts $125 941-485-0681
LAWNMOWER SELF-PROP.
Craftsm. 22" Orig. $279.
$180 941-412-7050
MOWER BAG FOR YARD MAN
WALK BEHIND NEW $25 941-
249-3564
MOWER BLADES New many
to choose from, $3 to $9 each
941-497-3702
PATIO SET Couch, 2 chairs, &
glass top table. Good Cond
$65 Ft Ogden 941-276-1716
RIDER LAWNMOWER Mur-
rey, bagging system $400
941-716-4195
RIDER MOWER 38"CUT 12.5
HP. CUTS NICE $395.
941-626-3102
SNAPPER RIDING MOWER
needs some work, runs, $200
Call 941-276-0424.
SUNLAWN EM2 Rechargable
Reel Lawn mower w catcher
$50 941-613-2854
TRANSMISSION FOR TORO
21332 w/b s/p mower.NEW
$35, OBO 207-319-6141
WASHING MACHINE GE
sup.cap. Englewood $145
941-716-4195
WEED EATER Black n Decker
18 volt $30, OBO 941-204-
3458


ALUMINUM HURRICANE
PANELS, (30), 16"x84" Each.
$30. Each 941-629-4720
AUTO GATE OPENER Comm,
LiftMaster, Chamberlain $175,
OBO 941-650-1258
Advertise Today!
CLEAR STORM PANELS (4).
New. 16" X 84", $50. Each.
941-629-4720
DOOR EXTERIOR STEEL
36X80 PAINTED WHITE NEW
$75 941-249-3564
DOOR INSERTS
24 x 66, $50
941-697-0987
DOOR, Commercial Steel
36x80 exc. cond. $75, OBO
941-650-1258
DRAWER GLIDES Blumotion
5/8 under full 21 softclose
w/LD $30 941-613-2854
FAUCET FOR BATHROOM
new single handle $25 941-
228-1745
HURRICANE PANELS for 3
Windows, 77"x53", 2 Win-
dows, 50"x54",, 1 Window
62"x41", 3 Windows 40"x53",
$700 for ALL. 941-724-4564
KITCHEN SINK Kohler bisc
color (dbl) ex.cond $25 941-
830-4892
SHUTTERS, ALUMINUM
FRONT DOOR, 5 PIECES $200
941-743-0226
WINDOWS, Aluminum
(4) call for sizes each
$25 941-830-4892


VACUUM PUMP /A/C FOR
HOUSES $295 941-626-3102
WOOD PALLETS Free some
oak you pick up Venice
941-488-0667

I HEAVY/CONST.
EQUIPMENT
6180

GENERATOR 4400 watts
push button electric start nice
or trade $295 941-626-3102

|TOOLS/ MACHINERY
Z:6190


12 CRYSTAL Doorknob Sets
complete lockset w/ keys
$350, OBO 941-257-8168
ARM SAW RADIAL Crafts. slid-
ing radial arm saw w/ table.
$49, OBO 941-889-7277
BANDSAW SKILL want to
trade for biscuit joiner $50
941-420-2443
CRAFTSMAN 12 inch band-
saw Tilting head, stand includ-
ed...rarely used $85 941-876-
4313
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY
Bench Vise $25 941-575-
9988
DRYWALL JACK panel lift by
Telpro, 11'5" reach $225
941-628-2311
FLOOR JACK Craftsman,
New, 3 TON, NICE, EASY TO
USE $80 941-268-9029
GENERATOR MCCULLOCK
FG 5700AK Brand new Garage
kept $400. 941-496-9873
GENERATOR, Generac
7550 EXL 15 HP
Like New Well Maintained
$600 941-483-3563
GRINDER/THIN-LINE BENCH
6" Delta Model #23-660 $60,
OBO 941-882-3139
JET PUMP SHALLOW WELL
Starite 1/2 hp cast iron, rebuilt
$125, OBO 941-485-0681
LADDER Hybrid Climbtex-12
Positions, Aluminum. $120,
OBO 941-743-2842
LADDER, Gorilla 4 in 1 with
static hinge kit. Like new. $50
941-764-0326
MEASURING TAPE KESON
200' Feet/inches/8ths $20,
OBO 941-763-0442
MITER SAW 12" SLIDING
Dbl. bevel w/carbide blade NIB
$160 941-585-8149
MITER SAW CRAFTSMAN 10"
compound H.duty 2HP $60
941-266-4731
MITRE SAW, 12" Craftsman
12" Compnd Mitre Saw, Exc
Condx $100 941-580-2333
NYLON ROPE Double braided
3/8'x600' ft. 55001b.rating.
$100 941-441-6967
PRESSURE WASHER Clean
Force elec 1800psi 1.6gpm
$75, OBO 941-639-1371
PRESSURE WASHER, Landa,
11HP, Wisconsin Engine, High-
Volume. Comm. Unit on
Wheels. $125 941-276-7623
RATCHETING WRENCHES,
(8) CRAFTSMAN. NEW COST
85 SELL $55 941-268-9029
SAW DRILL 2 light new crafts-
man cordless tools $125
941-268-9029
SNAKE PULLER 20 GB
CABLE Electrical Wire $10,
OBO 941-763-0442
STEEL ANVIL
22"x10"x41/2" $425,
OBO 941-257-8168
STUD GUN star power,shoots
nails into concrete/steel $50
941-343-7863
TILE CUTTER Work Force 7
5/8" Blade $25 941-473-
4121
TOOL BOX, Craftsman 41"
stainless. New cost 850. Sell
$400 941-268-9029


TOOLS/ MACHINERY
6190


AIR COMPRESSOR ELEC-
TRIC $99.99 941-227-0676
WEED TRIMMER Sears 12
inch wheels,5 H.P.walker
$200, OBO 941-276-0029
WORKBENCH W/VISE, made
of oak flooring, on wheels, 6 ft
w/10 drawers & some tools,
$125, OBO Ven. 941-493-5672

| OFFICE/BUSINESS
EQUIP./SUPLIES


OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Pre-owned & new office furniture.
VENICE 941-485-7015
PANASONIC FAX with two
fresh ink cartridges $20 941-
740-1000
TYPEWRITER, ELECTRIC
BROTHERS Like New-hardly
used. $50 941-629-2034

SUPPLIES
va ^6225

JUICER HB96500 CALL FOR
PRICE FOR MIXER & SLICER!
$250, OBO 941-275-5837
MEAT SLICER COMMERCIAL
12inch EURODIB with Sharpen-
er $445, OBO 941-224-6031
TABLE/(4)CHAIRS SET(S)
OUTDOOR GROSFILLEX BUR-
GUNDY $250 941-275-5837

CATS
6232


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
FREE: VERY NICE CATS!
Owner died. Have Maine Coon
kittens, black fluffy ones,
Manx, Calico. 941-270-2430.
DOGS



NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
BLUE HEALER MIX 7mths
old, shots, spayed, health
cert. $200. (941)-408-4596
DOBERMAN puppy European
Red Male, docked & cropped,
12 wks, 347-453-0472
HAVANESE, AKC, Males &
females, Health Cert., paper
trained $500 941-876-3526
POODLE PUPPIES, Stan-
dard, 8 wks old, 4 blk, 2
apricot, $800 941-426-1299
SHIH TZU Puppies 8 wks 2
Females 941-391-5969
Yellow Lab pups rescued and
looking for homes also res-
cued female, mixed breed per-
fect for seniors. All vet'd (863)-
263-5394
YORKIE PUPS, 9 wks,
6-10lbs as adult, vet cert,
Perkie! $500 941-201-2978
YORKIES,(PARTI) AKC, 8 wks
old, shots, health cert, tiny, M
& F, $500 & up, 9414754913

PET SUPPLIES
& SERVICES
Lowaz 6236


A & R Aqua Pros Inc
Aquarium Services
Installation~Maintenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
941-441-8658 Lic/Ins





The Sun Classified Page 18 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 25, 2013


PET SUPPLIES
& SERVICES
Z 6236

BIRD CAGE extra large rod
iron 6 ft tall bird cage 3 ft wide
$200, OBO 317-366-8214
CAGE measures 21 x 24 x 30
inches. New! $45 941-629-
7056
DOG CAGE X Large, Wire,
Good Condition. $35 941-
625-6738


MOBILE SALON
DOGS OF VENICE, providing
full service dog grooming at
your home in my mobile
salon. 15 years exp. Call
Stacy 941-786-7877
OUTDOOR DOG Enclosure
8x10 $150 941-867-3737
PET BARRIER CAR Heavy
Duty Expendable. $15 941-
875-6271
PET DOOR small, fits in patio
door. flap 8"x 11". Easy install.
$50 941-764-7397
APPLIANCES
L :6'6250


A/C 18000 BTU by LG 9.7
EER 220V $265 941-625-
0340
DISHWASHER KENMORE
ELITE stainless steel tub $125
941-408-4409
DISHWASHER MAYTAG LT
ALMOND EX COND $75 941-
286-4028
DISHWASHER WHITE GE Pro-
file. very clean, excellent cond
$40 941-697-7558
DRYER FRIGIDAIRE dryer
$125 941-698-4699
DRYER GE ELEC. Used 4
times $400 941-412-7050
DRYER KENMORE white,
new, Englewood $145 941-
716-4195
DRYER WHITE Admiral
$150 941-257-8148
ELECTRIC RANGE GE white
newer $300 941-257-8148




FAN FOR STOVE ALLURE
BRAND LT ALMOND HIGH
SPEED $40 941-286-4028
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register when
you get to the
sign in page)**
FRIDGE MAYTAG
icemaker,water $425, OBO
941-467-6077
MICROWAVE .9 cu. ft. w/
turntable,works great. $40,
OBO 941-625-9789
MICROWAVE OVER the
range white GE $40 941-697-
7558
MICROWAVE PANASONIC
NEW KITCHEN SET/CALL FOR
PRICE! $100 941-275-5837
REF. AMANA 26CF. S/S
w/door ice,water. Exc. cond.
bisque $360 941-391-6377


APPLIANCES
6250


REFRIG. AMANA White, Bot-
tom Freezer, Good condition!
$300 941-475-2630
REFRIGERATOR 23 cu ft white
siddeby side 7 yrs old, very good
cond. $125 412-956-0128
REFRIGERATOR 3.2 cu.ft.
Like new. $80, OBO
941-625-9789
REFRIGERATOR KENMORE
white side by side $200 941-
257-8148
REFRIGERATOR WHITE very
clean. $125 941-564-8587
REFRIGERATOR with ice
maker; STOVE self cleaning
glass top with above
MICROWAVE, and DISHWASH-
ER All sears, all Kenmore all
black $1200 941-426-9570
OR 609-576-4862 NORTH
PORT
REFRIGERATOR, GE Bisque
side-by-side ice maker $325,
OBO 941-204-7881
REFRIGERATOR, Whirlpool
white 65.5wx32.75x31
$125 941-343-7863
REFRIGERATOR, White,
good condition. $250 OBO
941-625-3335
REFRIGERATOR FOR Dormito-
ry Igloo Blk.3.2cu.EC. $40
941-875-6271
STOVE $99, MICROWAVE
$75, DRYER $55. ALL GE
Call or text: 941-661-0883
STOVE RCA glass top black
very clean $75, OBO 941-
391-6570
STOVE WHITE Stove very
clean. $75 941-564-8587
WASHER & DRYER New,
Whirlpool washer #4880 & gas
dryer #4800. Set came w/
new hm $400 941-488-4061
WASHER & DRYER REPAIR.
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
941-661-8585
WASHER & DRYER White
Westinghouse Great cond.
$350 941-426-9570
| Classified = Sales |
WASHER ADMIRAL. Runs,
but isn't agitating. Needs part.
$50 941-416-4994
WASHER GE Like new $275
941-412-7050
WASHER KENMORE white
front load $275 941-257-
8148
WASHER/DRYER 3 yr old
Fridgidaire washer/dryer-front-
load. Excellent condition.
$200 812-486-6997
MISCELLANEOUS
L ^ 6260


AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
TOP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
ANTENNA, OUTDOOR opt. for
dig. recept., w/2 10' alum.
poles $65, OBO 941-623-7265
BAKERS RACK Wine rack
combo. Black with wood draw-
ers. $30, OBO 217-741-2347
BOOKS HARD cover books all
assortments. Only .50 a book!
941-613-0202
BOOKS W/COVERS Cussler,
Patterson, Higgins, Clancy,
more Ea $2 941-639-1517
CHAIRS FOLDING 2
Blue/Wht very nice strudy
$50 941-623-2063
COFFEE TABLE Glass on
wicker, like new, nice! T.
BAHAMA $75 941-661-2667
DEHUMIDIFIER, STAINLESS
Steel Case/Coils, ArrowDry-
ers, $200 941-475-6865


MISCELLANEOUS
Z6260


DUFFEL BAG, 3 WOMEN'S
manican hd + $75 941-697-
2213
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
FLAG SET, 40 flags plus nice
set in organizer $150, OBO
941-575-0970
FLORIDA LICENSE PLATE
1966 clean $30 941-496-
9252
FREE MULCH
Venice Englewood North Porth
Port Charlotte 941-475-6611
FRESH JUMBO SHRIMP
$5.00 per lb.
941-249-4665
GLASSES BEER (15) Stella
Artois 12oz. NIB $20 all
*-*SOLD**
GROWLIGHT KIT 1000w
conversion, fan filter, halide
sodium $275 239-204-1473
HOME SCHOOL Curriculum
Many subjects, like new $25
863-491-4080
LADDER 9-15 ft. Little Giant
Ladder System, Model 17.
$150 941-497-6520
MAGAZINES 150 $15, OBO
941-806-9674
OIL 18GAL delo 400, 15w-40
motor oil w/pump in 55gal
drum $195 941-505-0081
PATIO HEATER. LP 41,000
BTU. $45. 941-505-1768
RACK FOR Ball storage.Blk
Metal.42Hx15Dx41W, EC.
$20 941-875-6271
ROPE, Nylon Double braided
3/8"X600'ft 5500LB rating.
$100 941-441-6967
RUBBER-MATT FOR Dart-
Game 2'x10' $22 941-496-
9252
SLEEPING BAG
Reversible.Burg/gold.
EC. $10 941-875-6271
TANK BBQ EMPTY for spare
$6 941-496-9252
TELEPHONES (2) Cordless
with answering sys. AT&T
$25 941-585-8149
TOW BAR $20 941-575-
0970
TRANSMISSION COOLER
for '03-'05 Honda Pilot. New
OEM $125 941-475-6865
TROLLING MOTOR Minn-Kota
5spd,301b thrust works great
$90, OBO 941-460-0241
TROLLING MOTOR Minn-Kota
5spd,301b thrust works great
$90, OBO 941-460-0241
TROLLING MOTOR Minn-Kota
5spd,301b thrust works great
$90, OBO 941-460-0241
WINE COOLER terracottaI
like new $15 941-228-1745

WANTED TO
BUY/TRADE


WANTED; NON RUNNING
walk behind mowers CASH
PAID $20 941-286-3119

7000


TRANSPORTATION

BUICK0
Low 7020


1999 BUICK LESABRE
Custom, 96,162 mi, $3,975
877-219-9139 DIr


BUICK
7020


2005 BUICK LACROSSE CXL,
75K, Ither, chromes, clean $9995
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2006 BUICK LUCERNE Non
smoker, always garaged,
37,600 mi, exc. cond,
$10,295 941-268-6863
2007 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
CXL, 54,850 mi, $11,478
877-219-9139 DIr
L CADILLAC
o ^ 7030


2005 CADILLAC DEVILLE
1 Owner, $7950
941-979-6234
2006 CADILLAC CTS BIk,
57,556 mi, $13,870
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 CADILLAC DTS, Luxu-
ry 3 Model. All Accessories.
Always Garaged! 82K Mi! New
Tires! $13,750. 941-697-1131
2007 CADILLAC DTS
37,885 mi, $17,895
877-219-9139 DIr

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

2007 CADILLAC DTS clean
car fax, exc. cond., garage
kept, loaded, Sunroof, 37K
miles, $17,000 941-286-1359
2007 CADILLAC DTS, Only
50K Mi! Lthr, Loaded, Full Pwr!
$16,988 941-639-1601 DIr
2013 CADILLAC CTS
11,000 MILES $30,911
877-211-8054 DLR

CHEVY
7040


1997 Chevy Cavalier Con-
vert. New top Nice car
$1950/obo 941-214-0889
2000 CHEVY IMPALA LTD
low mi, Ither, sunroof $5995
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2002 CHEVY SUBURBAN
$12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2004 CHEVY CAVALIER LS, 2
Dr. Coupe' Great on Gas! $3,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2008 CHEVROLET HHR LT
Panel, 56,188 mi, $9,600
941-627-8822 DLR
2008 CHEVY AVEO LS, 30K
mil, auto, all power, $10,500
Jeffsautosales.net 941-629-1888
2010 CHEVY COBALT LT
41K mi, loaded, nice $13,995
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2010 CHEVY EQUINOX
46,635 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 CHEVY EQUINOX
SILVER, 36,858 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CHEVROLET HHR LT,
White, 67K mi, new tires
$10,500 941-467-4226
2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU
$15,990
877-211-8054 DLR

CHRYSLER



2002 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Gold, 69,720 mi, $6,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2003 CHRYSLER 300M
V6, AUTO, White, 4 door
$5932 941-916-9222 DIr.


CHRYSLER



2003 CHRYSLER Sebring
LXI Coupe, V-6, Full Power,
$4,850 941-429-8204
2004 CHRYSL. SEBRING, 50K
Miles! Auto, A/C, Full Power!
$6,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
2004 SEBRING ONVERIRLE
Tan, sporty! $5993
941-916-9222 DIr.
2005 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE
LTD, 65K, leather, loaded, sweet
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2007 CHRYSLER 300, All Power
Opt Excellent Condition! $11,988
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2008 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
Lmtd, 22,337 mi, $11,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 CHRYS. 300, Loaded,
Leather! Absouletyl Gorgeous!
$16,988. 9416391601, Di.
2009 CHRYSLER 300 Touring,
13K, leather, sun roof, navigation
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
| DODGE
7060


2002 DODGE INTREPID SE,
Only 89K Miles! Clean! $4,988
941-6252141 Gorman Family
2005 DODGE DAKOTA
Grey, 85,852 mi, $9,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN 18,879 mi,
$19,764 877-219-9139 DIr

FORD



1998 Ford Conversion Van.
Explorer limited Super Nice!
$4500/obo 941-214-0889
1999 FORD MARK III CONV
Van, Red 47k mi $7995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
2000 FORD CONVERSION
VAN, White, Auto,
$6995 941-916-9222 DIr.
2003 FORD TAURUS
4DR Wagon, brown $5673
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 FORD EXPLORER
68,859 mi, $14,411
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 FORD EXPLORER LS
Sport Trac, 91,844 mi,
$12,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2008 FORD F-150
44,793 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EDGE AWD
67,067 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD FUSION
38,441 mi, $16,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD FUSION S, 17K
mi., owner, loaded $15,995
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2011 FORD EDGE AWD
41,269 mi, $29,548
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD E350
32,039 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD ESCAPE
42,379 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN IT V 4 i'i'fcH


FORD
7070


2012 FORD FOCUS 40,563
mi, $15,411
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD FUSION
13,084 mi, $18,746
877-219-9139 DIr

GMC
S/7075


2008 GMC ENVOY Silver,
69,097 mi, $11,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 GMC YUKON
SLT, 50,330 mi, $27,950
877-219-9139 DIr





2002 JEEP GRAND CHERO-
KEE, 4x4, Auto, A/C, All Power.
$5,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2003 JEEP LIBERTY Sport,
Black, 101,067 mi, $7,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 JEEP WRANGLER
39,664 mi, $25,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 JEEP LIBERTY
19,558 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr

LINCOLN



1997 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
174.5 mi, Cold Air, $1,000
941-258-2964
2007 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
21K, Designer, everything, mint
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888



MERCURY
L 7100


1989 GRAND MARQUIS
Super Nice Low miles.
$1950/obo 941-214-0889
1999 MERCURY GR. MAR-
QUIS LS, 80K Mi! Lthr., Power!
$4,988. 941-639-1601, DIr.
2006 MERCURY MONTEGO
1 owner, 32K mi, leather, Perfect
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
OLDSMOBILE
7110


2001 OLDSMOBILE AURORA
3.5, great condition, loaded,
leather. $5500 941-637-9637
PONTIAC
7130


1998 PONTIAC FIREBIRD, T-
tops, cold A/C, loaded $4995
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
1998 PONTIAC GRAND
PRIX GT 95k miles, Silver, GC,
$2650 (941)-626-3102
1999 Pontiac Grand AM
Coupe cold AC, Sunroof,
$1950/obo 941-214-0889
2005 PONTIAC GR PRIX
$8,998
877-211-8054 DLR
2007 PONTIAC SOLSTICE
47,574 mi, $14,578
877-219-9139 DIr

SATURN



| USED SATURN Sedans &
Wagons $2,150 & UP.
SUV'S $3,695 & UP. I
"The Saturn Guys" I
Pro Power Auto Sales
4140 Whidden Blvd PC, 33980
941-627-8822






Thursday, July 25, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19


USED CAR DEALERS
Z 7137


BUY HERE, PAY HERE *
DOWN PAYMENT AS LOW AS $400
OVER 20 CARS
941-575-7076
spgautosales.com

Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here

BMW
7148


2000 BMW Z3, Roadster, 68K
mi, white w/beige leather, mint
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2004 BMW 325i, Auto,
Leather, Loaded, Moonroof!
$6,988 941-639-1601 P.G.

HONDA
7160


2003 HONDA ACCORD Ex,
pwr, sunroof, super nice $8995
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2005 HONDA ACCORD
100,318 mi, $9,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD EXL
V6, 29,855 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD
EXL, 78,631 mi, $10
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CIVIC LX,
Blue, 116,268 mi, $8,860
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CR-V EXL,
53,461 mi, $15,478
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ODYSSEY
44,245 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CIVIC EX,
134,333 mi, $8,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V EXL,
63,987 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V EXL,
BLUE, 47,093 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA ODYDDEY
77,129 mi, $20,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
46,992 mi, $17,859
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
52,427 mi, $13,770
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA ACCORD
82,126 mi, $14,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC
MT, 20,781 mi, $13,870
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $20,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WILDE

1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
2009 HONDA ACCORD
$14,988
877-211-8054 DLR
2009 HONDA ACCORD
45,132 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
47,339 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
76,267 mi, $15,478
877-219-9139 DIr
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!
2009 HONDA ACCORD LX,
15,766 mi, $15,784
877-219-9139 DIr


2009 HONDA ACCORD LX,
49,249 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CIVIC
44,739 mi, $12,875
877-219-9139 DIr
I AxD VEpV RTEI= Z I
2009 HONDA CIVIC
87,452 mi, $11,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA FIT Black,
47,626 mi, $12,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA PILOT
61,956 mi, $21,587
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
18,403 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
37,069 mi, $17,848
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
53,717 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
57,510 mi, $16,587
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
Black, 40,702 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
CERT., 14,630 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
LX, 58,015 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
Red, 24,003 mi, $15,786
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
22,301 mi, $21,760
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
26,737 mi, $18,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V LX,
12,055 mi, $19,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V LX,
43,160 mi, $17,988
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CROSSTOUR
44,564 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
32,121 mi, $12,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 46,563 mi, $22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, BIk, 39,491 mi,
$22,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
35,083 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD EX
39,880 mi, $18,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD EXL
20,361 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD EXL
26,176 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD SE
17,840 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
55,008 mi, $13,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC EX
20,898 mi, $16,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC LX
23,500 mi, $15,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
36,214 mi, $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
15,896 mi, $20,451
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
24,410 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
2WD, 23,480 mi, $21,880
877-219-9139 DIr


2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
32,158 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EXL,
30,017 mi, $22,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
EXL, 31,933 mi, $23,541
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT
Sport, 16,291 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
LX, 20,639 mi, $25,454
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $27,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC


1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
2012 HONDA ACCORD
2 DR, CERT., 15,912 mi,
$23,478 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
2,607 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
20,220 mi, $20,457
877-219-9139 DIr
| Employ Classified!
2012 HONDA ACCORD
22,460 mi, $20,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
12,100 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
18,535 mi, $17,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
CERT., 15,700 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC Cert.,
LX, 10,349 mi, $16,547
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC EXL,
CERT. 10,861 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC LX
31,372 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC SI 4
DR, CERT., 7,387 mi,
$20,457 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
CERT., 42,791 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
EXL, 15,858 mi, $26,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA FIT
Sport, 31,172 mi, $16,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ACCORD
5,975 mi, $220,780
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CR-V LX,
5,931 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT., 4,900 mi, $34,950
877-219-9139 DLR
2013 HONDA PILOT
Touring, 5,121 mi, $36,987
877-219-9139 DLR

L HYUNDAI
mw40:7163


2006 HYUNDAI ELANTRA |
Burgundy, Auto, $6987
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 HYUNDAI SONATA Ltd,
33K mi, loaded, sunroof, $12,995
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2009 HYUNDAI SANTA-FE low
mi, pearl white, loaded $15,995
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
30,922mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, 23,392 mi, $16,680
877-219-9139 DIr


HONDA HONDA
L mw7160 L 7160


L HYUNDAI
OW4: 7163


2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
LMTD, 36,466 $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
17,741 mi, $22,874
877-219-9139 DIr

L INFINITI
004 7165 T


2013 INFINITI G37
$29,990
877-211-8054 DLR


7s 7177


2006 KIA SEDONAEX,
Leather,, DVD, Full Power
$9,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
2007 KIA RONDO EX, V6,
50K Miles! Auto, Full Power!
$9,988 941-639-1601, DIr
2009 KIA SORENTO
Snrf, 42,487 mi, $16,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 KIA FORTE KOUP, SX,
17K, sunroof, loaded, must see
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2011 KIA SORENTO
43,961 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr

LEXUS



1994 LEXUS ES300, 90K Miles!
Leather, Loaded, Moonroof.
$4,488 941-639-1601 DIr.
2002 LEXUS ES300,
Leather, Moonoonf, Low Miles!
$10,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2004 LEXUS ES 330
76,390 mi, $13,380
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 LEXUS RX 330
31K $19,990
877-211-8054 DLR

NEED CASH? I
2007 LEXUS LS 460
$29,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 LEXUS IS 350
56,832 mi, $24,587
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 LEXUS LS 460
$32,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2010 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $26,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC


1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
2010 LEXUS IS 250
23,528 mi, $24,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

LEkJUW OF WS -DTW
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
MAZDA

7180


1996 MAZDA MX-5 MIATA
137,813 mi, $5,877
877-219-9139 DIr
1999 MAZDA 626 4DR.
Cold air, Good Car
$1950/obo 941-214-0889
2005 MAZDA TRIBUTE S, 68K
mi, loaded, very clean $9995
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2008 MAZDA MIATA
12,000 Miles $18,990
877-211-8054 DLR


MAZDA
7180


2012 MAZDA MX-5
5Spd, 3,598 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr

MERCEDES
7190


1988 MERCEDES-BENZ 300E
98K mi, Exc. Cond., Garage-
Kept, $3,900. 941-697-3660
2002 MERCEDES CLK430
48K $14,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2002 MERCEDES SLK 230
Kompressor, retractable hard-
top roadster, very clean,
silver, 67,120 mi. $7850
941-575-1697
MITSUBISHI



2003 MITSUBISHI GALANT
4 dr, 1 owner, garage kept, 4
cyl, extra clean, auto, air,
silver $4495 941-661-4463
NISSAN
0 ^ 7200 A


2006 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5 SE,
All Power Opt Nice Ride' $10,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2007 NISSAN ALTIMA
$12,990
877-211-8054 DLR
2008 NISSAN ALTIMA
2Dr, Red, 6Spd, 77,904 mi
$13,875 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 NISSAN LEAF, Zero Emis-
sions! 100% Electric! $19,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Farly
SPORTS CARS



1974 CHEVROLET I
Corvette 4 spd, new paint,
air, $7,995 941-204-9415
2003 CHEVY CORVETTE
Anniversary Edition 33K Miles
877-211-8054 DLR

SAAB
Low 7206


2003 SAAB 9.3 CONV., Only
79K Miles! Sweet Ride!
$8,488. 941-639-1601 DIr.

SUZUKI



2004 SUZUKI XL-7
33,000 MILES $11,990
877-211-8054 DLR
STOYOTA
L 0 :7Y7210


2001 TOYOTA COROLLA LE
98k mi, exc mechanical,
$3,800 941-743-0805
2001 TOYOTA ECHO
112,294 mi, $4,985
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 TOYOTA RAV4
67,906 mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 TOYOTA SIENNA
124,434 mi, $9,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 TOYOTA SIENNA
68,384 mi, $11,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 TOYOTA TUNDRA
SR5, 117,149 mi, $9,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 TOYOTA SCION
XA. 101,449 mi, $6,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY
LE, 75,652 mi, $13,475
877-219-9139 DIr


TOYOTA
7210


2009 TOYOTA CAMRY
41,727 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE, Auto., 67K mi, $9,850
Great Shape! 941-639-0477
2009 TOYOTA TUNDRA
75,226 mi, $22,415
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 TOYOTA TUNDRA
50,970 mi, $21,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 TOYOTA CAMRY
25,820 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr


GUARANTEED
AUTOMOTIVE FINANCING
RATES AS LOW AS 1.9%!
941-625-2141

VOLKSWAGEN
111Z 7220


2007 VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT
75,435 mi, $9,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 VOLKSWAGEN R32,
Loaded! Must See! $16,988.
941-625-2141 GormaiFamly
2012 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
7,705 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr

S VOLVO
o ^ 72300


2001 VOLVO V70XC WAG.
Loaded, Must See! Excellent
Cond! $6,500. 941-426-3660
2004 VOLVO S80
57K $10,998
877-211-8054 DLR
2005 VOLVO S60, 60K Miles!
Leather, Loaded, Moonroof!
$12,988 941-639-1601, DIr

SMISC. IMPORTS
L: 7240


2011 LEXUs RX 350s
STARTING @ $34,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WILDE
LEmrvs O sFa5RsoTA
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!

S BUDGET BUYS
,:: 7252


1985 CHEVROLET G20
VAN, Looks good, drive any-
where. $1500 239-281-1574
1996 DODGE 2500,
5.9L. Great Work Truck!
$1988 941-639-1601, DIr.
1998 MERCURY GR. MAR-
QUIS, Only 99K Mi! Cold A/C
$2,988 941-639-1601 DIr. P.G.




AUTOS WANTED
L7260


CASH FOR JUNKERS
Available 24/7
941-286-3122, 623-5550

a ic
k* k



L ~





The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 25, 2013


AUTOS WANTED
7260


WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204

=:0 0 r i


$$ TOP CASH $$
FOR CARS & TRUCKS.
DEAD OR ALIVE.
941-485-7515

AUTO PARTS/
ACCESSORIES


1992 TOYOTA Camry Doors,
(No Door Panels) Buy ALL 4
$150 941-627-9466
EDELBROCK TORKER Intake
65-79 Pontiac 389-455 eng.
$125 208-705-2537
EXHAUST TIPS corvette,
chrome, good cond. dave
$75, OBO 941-626-4921
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
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(LOCAL) then click on
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PER WEEK
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FREON R12 six(6) 12oz origi-
nal cans plus hose $125 941-
698-1251
TIRE GOODYEAR wrangler
on rim P255/70r16 $100
941-626-4117
TIRES GOODYEAR Wrangler
2 Used p235/65R17 $70
941-564-8587
TIRES P205/65R15,
195/60R16, P215/60R16,
P225/60R16 $20, OBO
941-650-1258
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TRUCK TIRES 4-Tires off
F150 10-15m left. $60, OBO
941-456-0936
TRUCK TIRES Used 4-Tires
P265/60R18 W L. $60, OBO
941-456-0936
VANS
7290


1996 DODGE CARAVAN
Good work truck! 180K miles,
$750 FIRM 941-639-2239
2001 DODGE GR. CARAVAN
7 Passenger, 102K Mi.
$3,850.
410-629-0678 (Placida)
2002 DODGE HIGHTOP
Conversion Van, $4,500
941-698-0884
2003 KIA SEDONA Ex,
62,126 miles, $4,900
941-627-8822 DLR
2004 DODGE GR.CARAVAN,
LTD, low mi, leather, DVD $8995
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888


VANS
Lao 7290


2005 CHEVY UPLANDER
LS, 62k, 3rd row, loaded $9995
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2005 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY 99,487 mi,
5,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2005 GRAND CARAVAN
SXT JADE, 79K.EQUIPPED
WITH LIFT & SCOOTER.
READY TO GO SHOPPING!
CALL 941-224-6031 FOR A
TRIAL SPIN. $10,900 OBO
LOOKS, RUNS LIKE NEW.
2006 FORD E350
Green, 56,996 mi, $11,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ODYSSEY
61,981 mi $22,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 NISSAN QUEST
51,000 mi, AM/FM cas-
sette/CD player, DVD, backup
assist with voice, nitrogen
tires, fully equipped, dealer
maintained., $16,500
941-764-7397
2010 CHRYSLER JOURNEY
35,415 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-8704325
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
54,240 mi, $24,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 37,010 mi, $25,748
877-219-9139 DIr
Advertise Today!.
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 51,264 mi $22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 52,012 mi $22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 63,694 mi, $22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 12,926 mi, $22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 8,142 mi, $35,680
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., Touring, 32,164 mi,
$32,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
Touring, CERT, 4,761 mi,
$37,950 877-219-9139 DIr

STRUCKS/PICK-UPS
Z 7300


1994 NISSAN, runs great,
Rhino bedliner, 148K miles,
$2700. Call 941-204-0559.
1995 NISSAN PICKUP,
4CYL, 5SPD, Needs nothing,
very good cond., A/C, $3500
941-625-0353 After 3PM.
1998 CHEVY SILVERADO ,
ext. cab, V8, 131,916 mi,
$4,850 941-627-8822 DIr
2000 CHEVROLET S-10
LS, V6, Ext. cab, 67k mi,
Reduced $4500 941474-1640
2002 FORD RANGER XLT,
Super cab, Tan, garage kept,
6 cyl, air, auto, ex clean senior
owned $4995 941-661-4463
2005 FORD F-150
5.4 TRITON, 115,595 mi,
$11,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2005 FORD F-250, Diesel,
Ext. Cab, Auto, AC, Bedliner!
$10,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2007 FORD F-150 Lariat,
4dr, leather, nav system,
LOADED! 32K mi, 1 owner,
same as new, $23,000 OBO
941-769-1467 941-769-1466
2007 FORD RANGER, Super
Cab, V6, Auto! $13,988. 941-
625-2141 GonmanFamly
2008 CHEVROLET, Diesel,
4wd & tow., ext. cab, RolnLok
cover, liner, Westin Rails, 5th
wheel hitch, 77k mi., $29k
941-661-4323, after 6pm.


TRUCKS/ PICK-UPS
7300


2008 FORD RANGER XLT,
4dr, 34K 6 cyl, perfect $16,995
JeffsAutoSales.net 941-629-1888
2011 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER
SR5, 22,024 mi, $26,950
877-219-9139 DIr

SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
7305

1999 FORD EXPEDITION, All
Power Opt! 3rd Row! $4,988.
941-625-2141 GormaiFarily
1999 SUBARU FORESTER ,
AWD, 5 speed, 113k mi,
$4,000 OBO 941-423-8880
2000 FORD EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer, 103k mi. V6,
good tires, clean ride, $4300
obo 941-286-3273
2002 KIA SPORTAGE 5spd,
cold a/c, exc cond., runs
great. $2,550 941-623-5204
2003 HYUNDAI SANTA-FE
SUV, 102,324 mi, $6,200
941-627-8822 DLR
2005 DODGE DURANGO LTD,
Either, DVD, 3rd row, Hemi $10995
JeffsAutoSales.net941-629-1888
2009 HUMMER H3
LTHR, NAVI, SNRF, 72,786 mi,
$17,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA PILOT Tour-
ing, 50,457 mi, $26,574
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 LEXUS RX 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

i e-e-3 &W P R A, SP--
WiIL E

1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAYS!
2011 FORD ESCALADE XLT,
4x4, Like New. Sweet! $15,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2011 HONDA PILOT
EXL, 24,057 mi, $25,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT EXL,
42,658 mi, $25,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT EXL,
Cert., 14,840 mi, $27,584
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
10,030 mi, $33,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
EXL, 21,954 mi, $25,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
Gray, 25,232 mi, $31,474
877-219-9139 DIr

SBOATS-POWERED
L ^ 7330


10' PLASTIC FLAT BOTTOM
self bailing fold seats trolling
motor $495 941-822-1429
14' 1" MITCHELL 9.9 Merc 4
stroke bimini, trolling motor
$1500 obo. 941-639-0567.
16' STUMP JUMPER, w/20
HP Mercury & trailer $2,500
OBO Call Scott 941-685-7740
18' 2004 CENTURY, cc, 115
hp 4-stroke eng. 84 hrs on eng.
$11,900 941-488-2428
20' 1994 BAYLINER Needs
Starter. Make Reasonable
Offer. 5262 Lovett. NP 941-
268-2121


24' LMHAPAKAL Z4U,
Loaded, full canvas & screen-
ing, new engine 2009. Two
biminis, galley, enclosed head,
sleeps 4, fridge, inside stor-
age, galvanized trailer.
$18,500. (941)-493-8320
Seize the sales
with Classified!


[BOATS-POWERED
7330


FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your boat
in our indoor showroom!
Sales Service Body
Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-244-5288
CharlotteMarine.com


27' SUNRUNNER twin 4 cyl.
Volvo-Penta OD's, Good cond.
$5,995, Trailer Avail 941-2688570
S SAILBOATS
7331


15' ANCHOR boat,trailer
and all equip. $499, OBO
941-467-6077
16.5' PRECISION CRUISING
SAILBOAT, Sleeps 2, 7'
beam, fast, stable, excellent
cond., 4 stroke Mercury, trailer,
modern design, $4900,
Lake Placid, FL 863-465-7554

L PERSONAL
WATER VEHICLES
7332

SEADOOS (2), 2000, GTX
Bombadiers, w/trailer, powered
by Rotax marine engines, can
hold up to 3 passengers, needs
nothing $4,500. 941-456-5198

I OUTBOARD/
MARINE ENGINES
LZ 7334

BRITISH SEAGULL 1976 2
hp Rare $200 941 416-5215

BOAT STORAGE/
DOCKING
L:: 7336

BOAT DOCK For Rent, 25', in
Punta Gorda. Can Accommo-
date Larger Boat. Water & 30
Amp Electric Service on Sail-
boat Canal. Wood Thrush Dr.
(Off Aqui Esta.) $200. mo.
Contact Gene (941)-575-0306
PC BOAT SLIP deep draft up
to 50' sailboat access, 5 min.
to harbor. Call 941-626-8846.

MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
L 7338

BOAT MOORING whips brand
new piling mount whips $150,
OBO 941-429-2236
DOCK & Post Bumper Closed-
cell foam in polyester cover 9'
long. $35 941-697-2163
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
Z 7338

FUEL TANK 20 GAL Steel with
gage line & primer bulb VGC
40 941-697-2163
IGNITION SWITCH HONDA
with 2 keys. New in packaging.
$110 239-204-1473
PROP YAMAHA New Aluim
Cupped High Perform.13
1/4X17 $85 941-266-4731
SUPPORT POLE BOAT
COVER adjustable cost $30
sell $10 941-585-8149
TEMPO FUEL tank 15 gal.
above deck.neverused $100,
OBO 941-626-4117
| CANOES/KAYAKS



10' WALDON KAYAK, Very
stable & maneuverable. Good
Cond. $150 941-661-7906
12' PELICAN 3 rod holders
like new $499.99, OBO 941-
586-4300
17' SEA NYMPH CANOE no
leaks, aluminum $150, OBO
941-204-3644

O/B MARINE
ENGINE REPAIR
L 7340

TRAILER, black, single axle,
6' x 14', 6'2" high, enclosed
w/loading ramp & spare tire.
2" ball, 1 mo old. Like new.
$3500 John 315-270-2059

F TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
4 7341

2008 6.5 X 16 TANDEM AXLE
UTILITY TRAILER $995
941-916-9222
2013 TRIPLE CROWN
Utility Trailer 6 x 10 Into Price
$1195 941-916-9222 DIr.
ROY'S TRAILER COUNTRY
New- Pre-Owned Cargo- Utility
Trailers Parts Repairs-Tires
Welding 941- 575-2214.
4760 Taylor Rd P.G.
UTILITY TRAILERS Great Prices
WEST COAST TRAILER
(941) 698-9902

CYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS I
L: 7360

1996 MOPED TARGA 49cc
red motorcycle type/nice
$395 941-822-1429
2001 HONDA SHADOW Spirit
750 w/saddle bags, sissy bar.
$2000 OBO 941-275-7668
2002 883 Sportster 9k miles
HD bags & other extras.
$3,700 OBO 941-628-5230
2003 HONDA SHADOW Spir-
it Mint condition, many extras,
only 2900 miles $3600/obo
941-321-0637
2005 SCOOTER CPI, 49CC,
Excellent Condition. $650
OBO 941-743-7056
2012 PUMA FALCON 150
SCOOTER 2200 MILES,
$1600 814-241-3016

UTV
L aw 7366


2010 BMX UTV 500C
4 seat, 4WD, Must See!!
$4995 941-916-9222

CAMPERS/
TRAVEL TRAILERS
L 7370

WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5th whls, Pop-Ups,
Van conversion & passenger
vans. Cash paid on the spot.
for quick sale. Parts &
Service Avail 941-347-7171


MOTOR HOMES/
RVs
:Z^ 7380V


3013 PARr, TiAILEPS
UP TO 40 FEET
PERFECT 2ND HOME!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

2014 WINNEBAGOS
2013 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld of Nokomis Inc.
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!
FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!

DIESEL MECHANIC
ON DUTY
RV World of Nokomis, Inc
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your RV
on our lot!
Sales Service
Body Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-225-2712
CharlotteRV.com











LUXURY MOTOR HOMES
2013 MODELS UP TO 45
CoME SEE........ Lrs TRADE!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

RV Collision Repairs
Customer and Insurance
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RVWORLD Inc. of Nokomis
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182

RV SERVICE SPECIAL $
Lg. Parts Showroom
RV Wash
New tires & balance
RV propane & bottles
Wash & Hand Wax
Water leak test
Roof Reseal
Brake Flush
Factory Warranty
All models
RV World Inc of Nokomis
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182

RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/RADE
CALL: MARK
RV WORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
SATURN TOW-CARS
Starting at $2,150. Blue-Ox
Tow hitches sold & installed.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980
(941) 627-8822.




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