Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00026

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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Full Text

Deal of the Day
Chandelier, brass-crystal,
eight lights, $45


arlotte Sun


The country's armed forces ousted Egypt's first democrati-
cally elected president after just a year in power.


GAS PRICES BEGIN TO FALL
! Gasoline prices are on a summer slide, giving U.S. drivers a
: break as they set out for the Fourth of July. THE WIRE PAGE 1


VOL. 121 NO. 185


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


THURSDAY JULY 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net $1.00


Explosion of events for Fourth


Area offers a little Independence Day frivolity for everyone


SUN FILE
PHOTO
Freedom Swim
founder Michael
Haymans
addresses the
crowd prior to
the 1.5-mile
trek across
Charlotte
Harbor last year.


By LORRAINE SCHNEEBERGER
NORTH PORT SUN EDITOR
Whether you want to
celebrate the Fourth by
running an early-morning 5K,
swimming across Charlotte
Harbor, eating crawfish at
a Cajun Fest, cheering on
cowboys at a rodeo, or just
kicking back and watching
fireworks light up the night
sky, numerous activities are
offered today in the region
for the Independence Day
holiday.


North Port
Kick off the Fourth
of July holiday weekend
by participating in the
Firecracker 5K Run. Seventh
annual 3.1-mile race takes
place this morning at the
Morgan Family Community
Center, 6207W. Price Blvd.
Registration at 6:30; race
starts at 7:30. Cost, $20 for
all ages. Awards presented in
categories including Overall,
Masters, Grand Masters,
Senior Grand Masters and


Veterans. Post-race refresh-
ments provided.
The 10th annual
Freedom Festival &
Fireworks, presented by
North Port Parks and
Recreation promises fun and
entertainment for the entire
family. Gates open at 6 p.m.
at North Port High School,
6400 W. Price Blvd. Opening
ceremony at 7 p.m. with
city officials, presentation of
colors byAMVETS Post 312,
FOURTH12


ighthe night


SUN FILE PHOTO BY SANDY PRAY
Partygoers enjoyed the fireworks display during the Military Heritage Museum's 4th of July Party on the Roof in Punta Gorda last
year. This year's event is scheduled to start tonight at 7 on top of the Herald Court parking garage.


Fire destroys couple's new home


By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
NORTH PORT COMMUNITY NEWS EDITOR
NORTH PORT A house a
Virginia couple recently pur-
chased in North Port and planned
to move into in the fall caught fire
early Wednesday morning.
Firefighters responded to the
home at 5781 Barcelona Drive, on
the eastern end of the city, just
after 7:30 a.m. The out-of-state
couple were not at the home.
They were notified by the local


battalion chief after the blaze was
extinguished and the state fire
marshal was on scene.
"They bought the home a few
months ago and planned on mov-
ing here in the fall," North Port
Fire Marshal Mike Frantz said.
"The home was a total loss. The
living room is gone. The only thing
that's all right in the house is the
garage area. That's generally what
goes first in fires. They didn't have
a lot of items in the house because
they hadn't moved in yet."


According to the Sarasota
County Property Appraiser's
website, James and Carolyn Reese
purchased the three-bedroom,
two-bathroom home for $150,000
in February. The 2,669-square-foot
house was built in 1998.
Frantz said the couple called
their insurance company and the
home, in a desolate area of the
city, is boarded up.
"We don't know the cause of
FIRE 16


Truex searching for Englewood clinic options


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
ENGLEWOOD Charlotte
County Commissioner Bill Truex
hopes to find short- and long-term
options for replacing the county's
health department clinic on San
Casa Drive.
Without a replacement, Truex
said, "We're going to have no
place for these folks to go. They're
going to end up (in the emergency


room) with non-emergency issues
because there is no other place for
them to go."
Truex hopes to present viable
solutions to the commission at its
next meeting, scheduled for July 23.
"We're running out of time,"
Truex said.
For those who have depended
upon the Englewood clinic, he said,
"Make sure they are paying atten-
tion to our progress for the solutions
in the short-term and the long-term.


"Their comments and concerns
are welcomed, any ideas or thoughts
they have," Truex said.
The Florida Department of Health
in Charlotte County has state fund-
ing in place to keep the Englewood
clinic's doors open until August -
but Charlotte County health depart-
ment officials have not set a closing
date for the Englewood clinic.
However, the state has ordered
TRUEX|6


Freedom Swim


on despite


no-swim notice
By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE A no-swim advisory
issued for the Port Charlotte Beach Complex
will not halt the annual migration of swimmers
across Charlotte Harbor, known locally as the
Freedom Swim.
Charlotte County Health Department officials
received testing results from beach water samples
taken Wednesday that show an elevated level of
enteric bacteria. Local health officials emphasize
that people still can visit and enjoy the beach. But
Michael Haymans, co-founder of the Freedom
Swim, said July Fourth is the perfect time to
declare independence from government rule.
"I got the heads-up, but they're not stopping
the swim," Haymans said. "It will go on at noon."
Haymans explained that the edict is merely an
advisory and not a prohibition against entering
the water. Haymans said he will not be deterred
and hopes others will follow suit.
"This may keep some people from swim-
ming," he said. "It's not going to keep me from
swimming."
Health officials said residents and visitors are
urged not to wade or swim in the water or engage
in water recreation until the advisory is lifted.
SWIM 16


Police: Suspect

charged in

Slip-Knot burglary

By MERAB-MICHAL FAVORITE
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA-Authorities arrested a sus-
pect Wednesday in connection with the burglary
of the Slip-Knot bar and lounge, according to the
Punta Gorda Police Department.
Tiziano Cardia, 42, an Italian
national, was charged with burglary,
grand theft, petty theft, and molest-
ing a vending machine, authorities
said.
According to the report, around
11 p.m. Saturday night, Cardia used
CARDIA a hammer to shatter a glass door
at the rear entrance of the historic
bar, located at 1601 Tamiami Trail, and removed
about 20 containers of beer from a refrigerator,
including Miller Light, Corona, Michelob Ultra
and Busch. He also broke into a couple of vending
machines, removing coins and cigarettes, a report
states.
Surveillance video showed the suspect walking
around the bar while barefoot, and a crime scene
investigator later found blood on the floor.
BURGLARY 6


INDEX | THE SUN: Obituaries 51 Police Beat 8-9 Legals 8 IViewpoint 10 Opinion 11 THE WIRE: Nation 21 State 51 Business 6-7 |World 9| Weather 101 SPORTS: Lotto 2 CL SIFIED: Comics 9-121 Dear Abby 12 |TV Listings 13
Daily Edition $1.00 --F ,- wLookinsidefor valuable coupons -6 3[- -.j:
High Low A CHARLIE SAYS...
91 74ALUE METER : 941-206-1000 Happy Fourth of July! Stay safe out
7 05252 00025 8 60 percent chance of rain i. .............. .. 4





OurTown Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


FOURTH

FROM PAGE 1

national anthem sung by
the North Port Chorale.
The Boneshakers band
will perform on the main
stage. Free kids area with
bounce houses, obstacles
course, "big kahuna" wa-
ter slide, inflatable joust-
ing and the North Port
Express; family enter-
tainment area with three
cornhole stations; hula
hoop, football and beach
ball stations; a bubble
station; tot play area and
a "Viva Florida" Treasure
Hunt. Vendors onsite
with food and drinks
available for purchase.
Fireworks display at
9 p.m. No dogs, alcohol,
coolers, bicycles, chairs
on the field or soliciting.
Admission is free.

Punta Gorda/
Port Charlotte
Laishley Park,
100 Nesbit St., will
play host to 4th Fest
2013 from 10 a.m. to
11 p.m. Smuggler's
Event Management has
announced that Water-
Mania will return to this
year's event, presented
by the Sun newspapers.
Water-Mania a group
of 12 giant waterslides
- is for both kids and
grownups. There also will
be a large Kid's Fun Zone
with many activities.
Vendors, displays and
distinctive shopping
opportunities will fill


the park grounds, along
with festival food, cold
beer and beverages.
Live music will begin
at noon and continues
throughout the day. The
BoogieMen Rock 'n' Soul
Revue will hit the stage at
6 p.m., and will perform
until the fireworks
display begins at 9 p.m.
Following the fireworks,
Jack Michael & Drive 31
will present a bonus one-
hour concert. Admission
is $3; for $10, you can
purchase a wristband
that permits unlimited
use of the waterslides.
Fishermen's Village,
1200 W. Retta Esplanade,
will hold its annual
July Fourth celebration
from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Family-friendly activities,
including "Metamasque"
face painting and Jeff
the Juggler, will begin
at 11 a.m. Village
restaurants will offer
dining specials. Beans
and Seeds will provide
live entertainment at
center stage from 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m., followed by
Mercy from 5 to 9 p.m.
Fireworks display begins
at 9 p.m. Event admis-
sion and parking are free.
The 22nd annual
Freedom Swim across
Charlotte Harbor will
begin at noon on the
north side of the A.W.
Gilchrist Bridge (south-
bound U.S. 41), and will
conclude at Harpoon
Harry's at Fishermen's
Village. Participants are
to meet at the start-
ing point at 11:30 a.m.
prior to the 1.5-mile
swim; instructions will


SUN FILE PHOTOS
Reynald Richard, a trumpet player with the Naples Dixieland
Jazz Band, performs "Amazing Grace" during last year's Cajun
Fest on Dearborn Street in Englewood. Richard was a former
director for Ray Charles' band.


be given. The Green
Hibiscus Trolley will
provide transportation
between Fishermen's
Village and the swim
starting point from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those
who choose to park on
the public lands on the
east side of the bridges
in Charlotte Harbor
will need to access that
parking off Melbourne
Street, according to
local law enforcement.
For safety purposes, the
"driveways" off U.S. 41
northbound leading to
those public lands will be
cordoned off; there will
be no parking permitted
along the rights of way.
Pedestrians who want to
cross 41 from the public
lands on the east side of
the bridges to the swim
start on the west side
will need to either cross
under the bridges or use
a crosswalk. The nearest
crosswalk is located at
Parmely Street and 41.
Swimming with a bud-
dy and flotation devices
is encouraged; stand-up
paddleboards and kayaks
also welcome.
The Military
Heritage Museum will
hold its "Party on the
Roof" at 7 p.m. on top of
the Herald Court Parking
Garage, 117 Herald
Court. Begins at 7 p.m.
and lasts until the con-
clusion of the fireworks
display. Cash bar, free
hors d'oeuvres and free
parking. The Golden
Hippo will provide musi-
cal entertainment. Tables
and chairs provided;
elevators are available.
Tickets, $20 per person;
$200 for a table of 10.
Reservations required;
call 941-575-9002.
King Fisher Fleet will
offer a sightseeing cruise
to watch the fireworks at
8:30 p.m. at Fishermen's
Village. View the fire-
works from the best seat
in town. Cost is $20 plus
tax for adults; children
11 and younger, $10 plus
tax. Reservations
recommended; call
941-639-0969.
The Bayshore Fourth
of July Celebration
will be held 7 to 9 p.m.
at Bayshore Live Oak
Park, 23157 Bayshore
Road, Charlotte


Harbor. Presented
by Charlotte County
Community Services
and the Charlotte
Harbor Community
Redevelopment Agency.
Pack your own picnic
or purchase food from
onsite food vendors;
gift vendors also avail-
able. Music provided by
Clique. Dance contest at
8:30 p.m., with prizes for
first, second and third
place. After the event,
view the fireworks over
Charlotte Harbor. Free to
the public.

Englewood
Let the good times
roll with the Fourth of
July Cajun Festival, set
for 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. from
the west end of Dearborn
Street at Harbor Lane to
the Magnolia Avenue-
Elm Street intersection
at West Dearborn. The
event kicks off with
a New Orleans-jazz
funeral march to honor
those who fought for
independence and all
veterans. The march
will start at 11 a.m. from
Pioneer Park, the open
lot where the winter
season farmers market
is held at the 300 block
of West Dearborn. The
public is encouraged
to join in. The march
will be led by the VFW
Post 10178 honor guard
and L.A. Ainger Middle
School band director
Tim Ostrow with student
band members. Sarasota
County Commissioner
Charles Hines will lead
the Pledge of Allegiance
afterward. Water slide,
other games and activi-
ties; more than 45 crafts
vendors expected. Live
music includes perfor-
mances by the Gumbo
Boogy Band and Ellie
Lee & the Blues Fury.
Hamburgers, hot dogs,
fries, ice cream and
other fun foods will be
sold, along with soft
drinks, beer, wine and a
"voodoo runner," a rum
drink. The Lemon Bay
Sunrise Rotary, which
sponsors the event, will
serve traditional Cajun
foods, jambalaya, pulled
pork, crawfish, red beans
and rice. No admission
charge.


Liz Cowart pushes her two daughters, Reagen and Reese, as
they compete in the city of North Port-sponsored Firecracker 5K
in 2012 at the Morgan Family Community Center.


A fireworks show,
launched from Blind
Pass Beach on Manasota
Key, will start around
9 p.m. Bring chairs and
blankets. Sponsored by
the Sunrise Rotary.

Arcadia
The Arcadia Elks
1524 will sponsor the
Independence Day
Parade this morning
in downtown Arcadia.
Entries will line up at
9 a.m. at South Orange
Avenue and West Oak
Street, and the parade
steps off at 10 a.m. along
Oak Street. Jackie Tucker
and Buddy Mansfield are
serving as co-chairs of
the parade, and judging
will be by the American
Legion Ladies Auxiliary
Unit K11. There are cat-
egories for floats, march-
ing units, vehicles, horses
and horse units. The
parade will be followed
by a barbecue at the Elks
Lodge, 1024W. Oak St.,
beginning at 10:30 a.m.
The third annual
Workin' Cow Horse Ranch
Rodeo and Old Timers


Roping gets underway at
1 p.m. at the Turner Agri-
Civic Center, 2250 N.E.
Roan St., Arcadia. Tickets,
$10 for adults; $5 for
children 10 and under.
Visit www.turnercenter.
com for more info.
Fireworks will be
held at the Turner
Center, with gates open-
ing at 6:30 p.m. and the
fireworks beginning at
approximately 9:15 p.m.
The facility will be open
for concessions and
restrooms.

Venice
The city's Fourth of
July fireworks display
is planned for 9 p.m.
Sponsored by the
Sertoma Club of Venice,
the fireworks will be shot
from the South Jetty. The
display will be visible
from area beaches and
other locations in the
area. Tarpon Center Drive
will be available for local
traffic only. The jetty will
be closed to boat traffic
at 8 p.m. and open again
around 10 p.m.
Email: lorraines@sun-herald.com


SUBSCRIPTIONS
Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard ...................$15.54
3 Months. ................... $62.75
6 Months. ..................$106.65
1 Year .......................... $186.50
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
Subscribers residing in outlying
areas may incur additional
delivery charge.

DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ................... $16.40
3 Months....................... $74.09
6 Months ................... $119.54
1 Year......................... $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99 per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$111.93 $200.75 $357.50
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months IYear
$56.55 $106.37 $179.03
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $1.75
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday -
Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.
to noon. To subscribe or to report
any problems with your service,
please call or visit your local office.

Englewood: 941-681-3000
120W. Dearborn St.
Charlotte: 941-206-1300
23170 Harborview Rd.,
Port Charlotte
North Port: 941-429-3000
13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port
DeSoto: 863-494-0300
or toll-free at 877-818-6204
108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia


CHARLOTTE EVENTS

PAID ADVERTISEMENTS


Featured Events
DAV Chapter 82 Golf Tourney, DAV Chapter 82 holds golf
tourney at 8:30am, July 13, Kingsway Country Club, 13625 SW Kingsway
Circle, Lake Suzy. Contests for longest drive, closest to the pin. Lunch &
awards presentation at Porky's, 4300 Kings Hwy., PC. $50pp (includes
lunch). Proceeds benefit DAV. Res: 258-1937. Info: 204-4212.
Independence BBQ & Membership Drive@103,
Join us July 6,11am-4pm, American Legion 103, 2101 Taylor Rd., PG, for
food, games & music by"Siren."Burgers, Brats & Dogs at best price in
town! Check out our full bar with smoking & our Huge non-smoking Hall.
Come learn what we have to offer our veterans & our community. Open
to all. 639-6337.
July 4th Celebration on Thursday, Democratic Club
welcomes you, Thursday, July 4,1-4 pm, at Democratic Headquarters,
4300 Kings Hwy., #402, Port Charlotte. $10 members; $15 nonmembers.
"Life Liberty Hot Dogs!"And hamburgers, brats, salads, desserts, music,
silent auction, door prizes. For info, call 941-625-2961 or 941-258-3542.


* TODAY

Deep Creek Elks 2763,
Happy 4TH, Buffet from 2-5 Sausage
and Peppers, Hamburgers etc., Music
3-6 With Heart and Soul
Port Charlotte Elks, 11-9
20225 Kenilworth Blvd, PC 625-7571,
4th of July, Pot Luck BBQ, Bring a Dish
to Share, 3-6
Beans & Seeds Trio, Live
music with Beans & Seeds Trio, 11am-
3pm, Center Court,Fishermen's Village,
941-639-8721.
July 4 Celebration, Live


music, family fun activities, 11am-
9pm, Fireworks over Charlotte Harbor
at 9pm., 941-639-8721
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2,July 4th Picnic 4-7,Music by TaT2,Tiki
open at 3,Duck Race,NoRunMarathon
@25538 Shore DrPG mmbrs & their gsts
Mahjong, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 11:30a-3:30p $2. Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free.Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Chess Club, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St.1p-4p$1.50. Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free. Everyone
Welcome 625-4175


SUN NEWSPAPERS M"
- Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation .4
Chairman ..................................Derek Dunn-Rankin......................941-206-1001
Publisher....................................David Dunn-Rankin......................941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................Chris Porter .................................941-206-1134
Advertising Director..................Leslee Peth............................... 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ........... MarkYero.................. 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor ....................... Susan E. Hoffman..................... 863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager..........Joe Gallimore ........................... 863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor............ Rusty Pray ................ 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar...............................941-429-3003
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................941-681-3000


I NORTH PORT EVENTS
* TODAY

Firecracker 5K Run, 7th Annual Firecracker 5K
Run. 7:30am, Morgan Center, 429-3562.
Table Tennis, 9:00-11am, North Port Senior
Center, 4940 Pan American Blvd.,equipment provided,
$2.00, 423-6398.
North Port Moose, Happy 4th. Lunch 11-2:30.
Dinner 5-7 Liver/Onion, Burgers, Philly's. no bingo.
Member/Qualified, Guest 14156 Tamiami 426-2126


HOLIDAY CLOSURES
Charlotte County
In observance of the Independence Day holiday,
all Charlotte County government business offices and
Punta Gorda city offices will be closed today. All post
offices will be closed as well, along with the county and
circuit courts. Other offices and services will be affected
as well, including:
County Administration Center: closed.
Charlotte County Utilities: Customer service will
be closed; payments accepted by phone at 941-764-
4300, or by electronic billing at www.Charlotte-
CountyFL.gov (select"Pay Water/Sewer" from the "I
want to" list). Standby staff will be on call for utility
emergencies at 941-764-4300.
Mini-Transfer facilities: Both the West Charlotte
and Mid-County are closed.
Charlotte County Landfill on Zemel Road: closed.
Charlotte Harbor Visitor& Convention Bureau
offices: closed. Visitors with questions about things to
do can call 800-652-6090, or visit www.CharlotteHar-
borTravel.com.
Fire/EMS Headquarters will be closed; all other
stations will be open.
Sunshine Ride: closed.
Dial-A-Ride: closed.
Family Services Center: closed.
Charlotte County library administration offices:
closed.
Charlotte County Libraries: closed.
Charlotte County Historical Center: closed.
Harold Avenue Recreation Center: closed.
South County Regional Park Recreation Center:
open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Joseph A. Tringali Recreation Center: closed.
Community Services administration offices:
closed.
Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center
offices: closed.
Port Charlotte Beach Recreation Center: closed.
Skate parks: open.
Pools: open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.


I ENGLEWOOD EVENTS
* TODAY

Ewd Country Liners, 9:30 11:30 AM,
Christ Lutheran Church, 701 N Indiana Ave.
Begin/intetmed. line, dances. Open to all.
Nancy 474-6027
4th of July Party, !0:00 AM 10:00 PM
Am Legion Post 113. 3436 Indiana Rd. Rot West.
697-3616. Picnic Menu-Spec Prices-Music-Corn
Hole.


Charlotte Sports Park offices: closed.
Cultural Center of Charlotte County: closed.
The Charlotte County Sheriff's administrative
office and the four district offices around the county
will be closed. These offices will reopen at 8 a.m.
Friday. There will be no change in county jail visita-
tion hours; check www.ccso.org for the scheduled
visitation hours.

Charlotte County will observe the following garbage-
collection schedule:
No curbside garbage collection today.
Today's scheduled customers will be serviced
Friday.
Friday's scheduled customers will be serviced
Saturday.
There will be no change in service for household
refuse, yard waste or recycling collections for the
residents of the city of Punta Gorda, or for commer-
cial customers with Dumpster collection today.

South Sarasota County
City of North Port and Sarasota County govern-
ment offices, libraries, recreation centers and transit
services will be closed today to observe the national
Independence Day holiday.
Garbage, recycling and yard waste collection
schedules for the holiday will be delayed one day in
both the city of North Port and in unincorporated
Sarasota County (including the community of Warm
Mineral Springs), with collection happening on the
day after the regularly scheduled day. Today's collec-
tion will be done Friday, and Friday's collection will
be done Saturday. Residents are reminded to place
all materials at curbside before 7 a.m.
The landfill administrative office and Chemical
Collection Center at 4000 Knights Trail Road,
Nokomis; and the Chemical Collection Centers at 8750
Bee Ridge Road, Sarasota, and 250 S. Jackson Road,
Venice, will be closed today.
Sarasota County Area Transit (SCAT) buses will not
operate. There will be no mail delivery, and banks
will be closed.


The SUN (USPS743170) is published daily at Sun Coast Media Group, Inc., 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980-2100. Periodicals postage paid at Punta Gorda, FL. Postmaster: Please send address changes to the SUN, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, Florida 33980-2100.


I










For Harpoon Harry's, it's 4th and 20th rolled into one


By BILL JONES
SUN CORRESPONDENT
It all started 20 years ago
Wednesday with Harpoon
Harry's.
On a hot July 3, 1993, a
fledgling business venture
took a major financial risk
in an attempt to turn an
old retail clothing store
into an informal, open
air, food-in-a-basket
restaurant without air
conditioning at the end
of Fishermen's Village in
Punta Gorda.
The entrepreneurs, Ron
Evans and Harry Carson,
needed a hook, so to
speak. So they concocted a
legend about a ruthless but
brokenhearted pirate set
adrift by a mutinous crew
who endlessly wandered
the seas until he met his
wench (an indelicate
nomenclature, to be sure,
but perhaps not neces-
sarily in pirate days) and
settled down.
So they named their res-
taurant Harpoon Harry's,
and their austere, perhaps


even fingers-crossed busi-
ness venture Smuggler's
Enterprises. It worked.
Today, Smuggler's is
a $12 million food and
beverage operation with
five restaurants, several
other businesses and 300
employees. It contributes
up to $70,000 a year to
area nonprofits through
the Charlotte Community
Foundation.
"My father had a vision,
a dream," Chris Evans said
this week. Hid dad, Ron,
he said, had seen a similar
waterfront restaurant in
Fort Lauderdale and was
determined to open one in
Punta Gorda.
People, Chris said, smil-
ing, "thought he was crazy.
But he managed to prove
them wrong."
But his dad, a U.S. Army
Special Forces veteran,
needed an investor for his
restaurant-to-be. Literally,
he came from above.
He was Harry
Carson, founder of a
manufacturing business
in Pennsylvania, who,


as a Punta Gorda winter
resident, frequented Earl
Nightingale's Restaurant,
where Ron Evans was
a partner now the
Captain's Table upstairs
from the clothing store.
Evans shared his passion
for a casual, open air,
waterfront restaurant with
moderately priced food.
Carson bought it, helped
fund it, and Smuggler's was
born.
The business now
includes Harpoon Harry's,
Captain's Table, Laishley
Crab House, John Hall's
Goal Post restaurant,
and the diner at Muscle
Car City in Punta Gorda,
as well as Harbour
Graphic, the Laishley Park
Marina, Smuggler's Event
Management, and a cater-
ing business.
"My father gave
Smuggler's and me
- leadership, guidance,
vision and a solid work
ethic," said Chris Evans,
Smuggler's director of
operations. "It all began
with dad."


His father's vision also
involved giving back to
the community. That
began with the creation of
a Smuggler's foundation
in 2008, which involves
Smuggler's donating one
half of 1 percent of its
gross yearly sales, plus
employee contributions, to
the Charlotte Community
Fund for distribution
among nonprofits.
Despite all the other
businesses he directs,
Evans beams when he
talks about Harpoon
Harry's.
"It's a boater friendly,
tank top, flip flops restau-
rant with basket food," he
said. "Yet it's one of the
longest-running successful
operations in Charlotte
County" now featuring
lunch and dinner as well as
a night club in the evening.
To Corinne Wimberly,
Harpoon Harry's general
manager, the restaurant
and its clientele are like
one big family, built over
the last 20 years.
"Our regulars are


SUN PHOTO BY BILL JONES
Chris Evans, Smuggler's Enterprises'manager of operations,
celebrating Harpoon Harry's 20th anniversary, holds history in
his hands as he displays a photo from Feb. 19, 1964 of the Punta
Gorda Fish Company. Gulf Shore Seafood, Matt Weeks Marine
Service and a Gulf Oil distributor, were situated where Fisher-
men's Village, and Harpoon Harry's, are today.


familiar, friendly faces
with close relationships,"
she said. "They know
each other by name. They
take vacations together,
and boat trips. They go
to each other's backyard
barbecues.
"We have a homey feel.
We're the epitome of a


hometown restaurant. It's
like going back to a town
where you grew up."
An integral part of the
family, she said, is a staff of
50 to 60 who are dedi-
cated to maintaining the
restaurant's family friendly
environment. The staff,
she said, "is amazing."


Accusations fly at Englewood Masonic lodge


By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER
ENGLEWOOD -
Authorities are investigat-
ing allegations of em-
bezzlement at Englewood
Masonic Lodge 360 on
Pine Street, according to
Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office spokeswoman
Wendy Rose.
"A forensic accounting
is underway to determine


what if anything is
missing," Rose said. The
Sheriff's Office is waiting
for the lodge to submit
results of the account-
ing review. She would
not comment further
since it remains an open
investigation.
According to a SCSO
report, JerryWadel, the
lodge's "worshipful mas-
ter," provided detectives
with copies of financial


documents from the
lodge. Two photocopies
of checks were entered
into evidence. The report
suggested that cash was
allegedly stolen from
the lodge. The amount
reported stolen was
redacted from the report,
along with a possible
suspect's name.
Wadel could not be
reached for comment
Wednesday. Other


"'I


f'


members of the lodge
would not comment.
However, the lodge may
be experiencing internal
strife, according to its July
newsletter, "Trestleboard,"
posted online at www.
trowel.com/flamason/
englewood360.
"It saddens me to see
unpleasant rivers of in-
nuendo and sin running
through our lodge," wrote
Ian Fraser, the lodge's


chaplain. "(Wadel) is do-
ing everything he can to
bring this unpleasantness
to an end."
Fraser called upon the
other lodge members
to supportWadel or the
"deceit will destroy us."
According to the lodge's
website, the Englewood
lodge was chartered
on April 26, 1967, with
75 members.
The Masons have 261


active lodges throughout
Florida. Richard Lynn,
state secretary, said the
state's "grand lodge" does
not get involved with the
internal affairs of indi-
vidual Masonic lodges.
However, if charges are
filed and "penal" actions
result from an investi-
gation, then the state
organization will become
involved, Lynn said.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com


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The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 5


Volunteers



give direction



to celebration


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER

PUNTA GORDA-
While most folks are busy
making plans for July
Fourth whether it be
family reunions, cookouts
or mini-vacations Bob
Soriano already knows
what he'll be doing.
The same thing as last
year and the year before
that.
Soriano and nine
others are donating
their time to help direct
the Independence Day
crowds attending 4th
Fest at Laishley Park as
part of the Punta Gorda
Volunteers in Policing
program's Traffic and
Patrol Division.
"It always amazes me
that people give up their
holidays and the op-
portunity to be with their
families," said Soriano,
who is pretty amazing
himself.
At around 7 p.m.
today while the rest of
America is relaxing, grill-
ing and eating Soriano,
as deputy coordinator,
will brief the other volun-
teers on their evening's
duties, which won't end
until after 10 p.m. In the
interim, the volunteers
are charged with keeping
the party moving along
for an expected crowd of
about 5,000.
"They promote these
fireworks as the biggest
and best show ever.
When people hear that,
they come to see it,"
said Soriano, 71. "It's OK
when they're coming
in, but when the last
fireworks explode there
is mad chaos to get out.
Everyone wants to be
the first one out. Our
main concern is keeping
people safe."


In all, six traffic loca-
tions will be covered. At
the busier intersections,
volunteers will be paired
with Punta Gorda police
officers; at other cross-
roads they will be on their
own to direct traffic and
answer questions such as
the best place to park, eat
or enjoy the fireworks.
For free parking at
Smuggler's 4th Fest in
Laishley Park, which has
a $3 admission, Soriano
suggests the empty lots
at Marion Avenue and
Martin Luther King
Boulevard, near the
Charlotte County Justice
Center; the former
Marketplace property
across northbound
U.S. 41 on Marion
Avenue; or the Herald
Court Centre garage,
117 Herald Court.
There are more vol-
unteers on hand for
the Fourth of July. Steve
Fabian, the former Punta
Gorda mayor and council
member, will be one of
four volunteers from the
marine unit stationed
with police officers on
two boats, watching
the waters to assist
those in need as well as
looking for any and all
infractions.
Fabian has been
a volunteer with the
program for 16 years and
is the only active charter
member of the group,
formed in 1997. Today, he
will be riding alongside
participants in the annual
Freedom Swim.
"If people get tired,
I'll pull them out of the
water," said Fabian, who
will then join his wife,
and thousands more, for
the fireworks celebration.
"I love this city and just
want to give back to it."
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Parkinson's
support group
to meet
The next meeting
of the North Port and
South County Parkinson's
Connection will be
1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. July 10
at the Morgan Family
Community Center,
6207W. Price Blvd. The
topic will be "Connection
Sharing & Discussion."
The support group
provides education, sup-
port, coping skills, social
opportunities, qualified
referrals to commu-
nity resources, and good
advice from friends
and experts. All those
with Parkinson's disease
and their families and
caregivers are invited.
No registration is
required. For more
information, call
941-917-4156.

Christmas in
July sidewalk
sale offered
Participating
Fishermen's Village
merchants will take
part in a Christmas in
July Gigantic Sidewalk
Sale from 10 a.m. to
6 p.m. July 13 at the
village, 1200W. Retta
Esplanade, Punta Gorda.
The sidewalk sale will be
held in conjunction with
the Charlotte County
Homeless Coalition's
"Food Storage Wars"
finale jam session July 13
at Harpoon Harry's.
Activities for the day
feature Santa at the
Village from noon to
1:30 p.m.; two harbor
cruises offered by King
Fisher Fleet, one at
2 p.m. and the second at
4 p.m.; live music, raffles,
a look-alike contest, a


silent auction and more
from 1 p.m. to midnight
at Harpoon Harry's; and
discounted merchandise
and restaurant dining
specials at the village.
Advance reserva-
tions for the cruises are
required; call 941-639-
0969. Cruise ticket sales
will benefit the homeless
coalition.
For more information
about the sidewalk sale,
call the village's event co-
ordinator, Hope Petkus,
at 941-575-3067; or visit
www.fishville.com.

Antique dealers at
Farmers Market

The Farmers Market
will play host to various
antique dealers from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 14
at the History Park, 501
Shreve St., Punta Gorda.
In addition to the regular
vendors, antique dealers
also will be on-site. For
more information, call
941-380-6814.

Free film at library
A free feature film will
be held from 10 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. July 11 in
the North Port Library
Juliano Room, 13800 S.
Tamiami Trail.
Join the North Port
"Downton Abbey"
Support Group as they
watch this merchant
and ivory masterpiece
about the "perfect"
butler in a prosper-
ous British household
of the 1930s, starring
Anthony Hopkins and
Emma Thompson. The
movie is based on the
novel by Kazuo Ishiguro.
Preregistration is pre-
ferred at www.sclibs.
net/Calendar, or call
941-861-1307.


OBITUARIES

CHARLOTTE


Joseph B.
Mac Master
Joseph B. "Bruce"
Mac Master, 74, of Punta

of Denver,



Monday,
July 1, 2013.
He was
born to
Malcolm
and Anne Marie
Mac Master of Yardley,
Pa., Oct. 13, 1938.
Bruce was an ardent
entrepreneur and
successfully opened
and operated three
businesses. He could be
loosely called a "renais-
sance man," with his
love of arts being more
to the realm of science,
technology and history.
Throughout his life he
owned several sports
cars, airplanes and boats;
his favorite among these
being his Mooney 231
airplane, which he flew
until 1994. In 2012, Bruce
joined the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office
as a volunteer officer; he
was extremely proud to
be part of this wonderful
organization.
Bruce is survived
by his wife, Rita R.
Mac Master; two daugh-
ters from a previous
marriage, Anita (Curtis)
Doss and Debbie (Bill)
Teter of Colorado; his
brother, David (Sheila);
his sister, Lydia (Don)
McCullough; seven
grandchildren; and six
great-grandchildren. He
was preceded in death
by his son and daughter-
in-law, Joseph B. "Jay"
and Colleen Mac Master
in 1988; and his parents.
Visitation will be held
from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Friday, July 5, 2013, and
from 9:30 a.m. until
the start of the funeral
services at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, July 6, 2013, at
Roberson Funeral Home
Punta Gorda Chapel,
215 Mary St., Punta
Gorda. Committal and
Entombment will follow
at Restlawn Memorial
Gardens cemetery in Port
Charlotte, Fla. In lieu of
flowers, donations can
be made to the M.D.
Anderson Medical Center
in Houston, Texas; and
the Leukemia Society.
Friends may visit online
at www.robersonffi.com
to extend condolences to
the family and sign the
memory book.
Arrangements are by
Roberson Funeral Home
and Crematory Punta
Gorda Chapel.

ENGLEWOOD

Lewis Pierce
Lewis Pierce, 76, of
Placida, Fla., passed
away peacefully Monday,
July 1, 2013, at home.
He was born in
McComb, Miss., and
spent his childhood
between Hammond,
La., Lewiston, La., and
Honduras.
Lewis graduated from
Southeastern College in
Hammond, however was
an avid LSU football fan.
He worked in Industrial
and Commercial Fire
protection and besides
football, loved boating
and bike riding. Lewis
and his wife Carol moved


to Englewood, Fla., with
their son, Robert, in
1995.
He is survived by his
loving wife of 34 years,
Carol Pierce; two sons,
Clyde Lewis Pierce Jr.
and Robert Leo Pierce;
two daughters, Rebecca
Susan Pierce and Alyson
Ann Pierce; sister, Sue
Pierce Perilloux; as well
as many nieces, neph-
ews, great-nieces and
great-nephews. Lewis
was preceded in death
by his father, Clyde Leo
Pierce; his mother, Ivel
Golda Lewis Pierce; and
his sister, Miriam.
Funeral services will
be held at 11 a.m. Friday,
July 5, 2013, at Calvary
Baptist Church in
Englewood. Burial will be
in Louisiana. In lieu flow-
ers, the family requests
that donations be made
to the Calvary Baptist
Church Missions Fund,
75 Pine St., Englewood,
FL 34223. You may ex-
press your condolences
to the family at www.
lemonbayfh.com.
Arrangements are
by Lemon Bay Funeral
Home and Cremation
Services.

Virginia
Humes Ward
Virginia Humes Ward,
a native of Follansbee,
WVa., and a resident of
Englewood,





June 23,
2013, at
Venice
Regional Medical Center
in Venice, Fla.
Her parents were Celia
May James Humes and
George Lee Humes of
Follansbee.
Virginia taught at
Follansbee and Brooke
High Schools for 33
years, was a director of
the Bank of Follansbee
(founded by her grand-
father), and was a
part-time employee of
Follansbee Insurance
Agency (founded by her
father). She was a lifelong
and active member of
Follansbee Presbyterian
Church, and an af-
filiate member of Trinity
Presbyterian Church in
Venice. Virginia also was
a member of the Myakka
Chapter of NASDAR,
Alpha Delta Pi Sorority,
Wellsburg Chapter
Order of Eastern Star,
and Twentieth Century
Club of Follansbee. For
several years she was
Brooke County Chair
of the American Heart
Association.
Virginia is survived by
her sister, Cecelia Lee
Humes Groff; daughters,
Ellen (Louis) Fusco,
Brenda E. Ward and
Marcia (Kevin) Pufpaff;
granddaughter, Erin N.
(Karl Seigfried) Fusco;
dear cousins, nieces and
nephews; and her be-
loved Havanese, Cai. She
was preceded in death by
her husband of 67 years,
Harvey B. Ward; her
sister, Wilma A. Humes;
and her parents.
A memorial service will
be held at 2 p.m Tuesday,
July 9, 2013, at Trinity
Presbyterian Church in
Venice, with the Rev. Dr.
Charles Wiggins presid-
ing. A reception at the
church will follow the
service. Interment will
be at Union Cemetery in
Steubenville, Ohio.


NORTH PORT

There were no deaths
reported in North Port
Wednesday.

DESOTO

There were no deaths
reported in DeSoto
Wednesday.



Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes only. There's no charge
for publishing an abbreviated death
notice. Full obituaries and repeat
death notices will be subject to an
advertising charge.
Obituaries must be received by
2 p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday
publication. For Sunday publication
deadline is noon on Saturday. For
Monday publication deadline is noon
on Sunday. In Loving Memories must
be received by 2 p.m. for Tuesday
through Friday publication. For
Saturday through Monday publica-
tion deadline is noon on Friday
The American flag accompanying
an obituary indicates a veteran of
the U.S. Armed Forces. Please send
emails to obituaries@sunletter.com.
Words of Comfrt


1- Traditihlhl_
Bl *"i t


Words of Comfort
It is good for us that we sometimes
experience adversity and sorrow.
for they often make our hearts
understand that we
arc only trangcr, i L'|
and sojourners here
For a time.
Anonymous
The experience you have here on
earth is only a small fraction of
time. compared to the infinite time
you will spend in heaven. Be
comforted knowing what adversity
you have. is but a wtsp ol time to
the joy that awaits you in heaven.
Michael Dunn-Rankin


Dignified
Disposal
and receive
a free gift

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27200 Jones Loop Road
Punta Gorda, Florida 33982
Call (941) 639-2381
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Cynthia Sue Barber
Cynthia Sue "Cindy" Barber, 45, passed away
at home in Port Charlotte, Fla., Tuesday, July 2,
2013, with family and close friends by her side.
She was born Dec. 22, 1967, in
Traverse City, Mich., to her parents,
.-. Donald R. Kabat Sr. and Eileen
-k ^Merrill Kabat, residing there until
1978, when the family relocated to
Port Charlotte.
S. Cindy married her high school
sweetheart, R. Scott Barber, Oct. 10,
1987, at St. Charles Borromeo in
Port Charlotte. She attended Port Charlotte
High School and Edison Community College;
and had a fulfilling career in financial services
and worked at Landsberg Bennett Private
Wealth Management, Merrill Lynch U.S. Wealth
Management, Bank of America, Barnett Bank,
First Florida Bank, Winn-Dixie and McDonald's.
Cindy loved family, and was the youngest of four.
She will be remembered and missed by her
loving husband, R. Scott Barber; daughter,
Paige Nicole Barber; son, Joshua Lance Barber;
father, Donald R. Kabat Sr. of Port Charlotte;
oldest sister, Laura A. (Mark C.) Andrews of
Royston, Ga.; sister, Lisa E. (Michael) Horan of
Dell Rapids, S.D.; nieces, Heather Brill-Lehn
of Sacramento, Calif., Robin M. Andrews of
Royston, Priscilla K. Donnelly of Port Charlotte,
Amanda L. Scarborough of Colbert, Ga., Rhianna
K. Donnelly of Tampa, Fla., and Emma Barber
of Port Charlotte; nephews, Donald "DJ" Kabat
of Covington, Ga., Benjamin J. Andrews of
Charleston Air Force Base, Eric Barber of Port
Charlotte, and Justin Barber of Port Charlotte;
her in-laws, Raymond and Judy Barber of Port
Charlotte; sister-in-law, Kristen Barber of Port
Charlotte; her brother-in-law, Kip (Debbie)
Barber of Port Charlotte; and her dogs, Ziploc
and Shoeshine. Cindy was preceded in death by
her mother, Eileen Merrill Kabat (Jan. 1, 2003);
and her brother, Donald R. Kabat Jr. (Oct. 23,
1995).
Relatives and friends are invited to a Memorial
Service to celebrate Cindy at 10 a.m. Saturday,
July 6, 2013, at First Alliance Church, 20444
Midway Blvd., Port Charlotte. A reception will
immediately follow in Room Hibiscus C at the
Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center,
75 Taylor St., Punta Gorda, Fla. In lieu of flow-
ers, please make memorial donations to the
Painted Turtle Camp, 1300 Fourth St., Suite 300,
Santa Monica, CA 90401, or you can give online
at www.thepaintedturtle.thankyou4caring.org/
donate. Please visit Cindy's tribute wall at www.
schelmfh.com to share memories and to send
condolences to the Barber family. And please just
simply remember Cindy (aka Mom, Cindy Lou
Who and Taco J Chip) and never forget her laugh,
her selflessness, her spirit and her love of family.

We would like to publicly thank Dr. Mark
Droffner and Dr Scott Lunin for their tireless
efforts in caring for Cindy and our family.


JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
www.j ameswmallonee.com
o(941) 206-2223


I W.Layloriul.l comJII.I Avi t2l4 DArlJ.I..Bnienie


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OurTown Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


Punta Gorda eyes lower mi


e rate


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER

PUNTA GORDA -
Encouraged by this
week's news that prop-
erty values are up in the
city, the City Council is
looking at reducing its
millage rate.
In the face of com-
munity opposition,
Punta Gorda raised the
millage rate last year by
0.5 percent, bringing
it up to 3.2462. But at
Wednesday's session,
a consensus of council
members agreed to
lower the rate to 3.1969.
A mill equals $1 in
taxes per $1,000 of a
property's taxable value.
Once the millage rate


is approved, Truth in
Millage, or TRIM, no-
tices will be mailed to
homeowners in August.
"Now the taxable
value has gone up ...
it's time to lower the
millage rate," Mayor Bill
Albers said.
Councilwoman
Rachel Keesling
added that since the
original 2014 budget
estimate was based on
a 2 percent decline in
taxable values, she said
it would be unfair to
residents not to reduce
the millage rate, in
light of the additional
property-tax revenue.
Keeping the millage rate
the same actually would
result in a tax increase


for homeowners, of-
ficials said.
According to figures
released Tuesday by
the Charlotte County
Property Appraiser's
Office, Punta Gorda
reported $2.3 billion in
gross taxable value, or
a 1.7 percent increase
from the previous year.
Despite the uptick
in property-tax rev-
enues, city officials say
next year's projected
$18.8 million general
fund budget will have
a shortfall of $419,000,
which would be off-
set by cash reserves.
Consequently, officials
urged a cautious ap-
proach in preparing the
2014 fiscal budget.


"We don't give you the
best scenario; we give
you the most conserva-
tive scenario," City
Manager Howard Kunik
told council members.
Councilwoman
Carolyn Freeland also
remains wary of any
predicted economic
rebound.
"I'm uncomfort-
able with anticipating
everything is going to
be rosy," Freeland said.
But after reviewing
several alternatives, in-
cluding possibly keep-
ing the millage rate at
the same level, the City
Council favors a dip.
The council is expected
to vote on a tenta-
tive millage rate at its


meeting set for July 10,
which still allows some
flexibility until the rate
comes up for final ap-
proval in September.
There are other
reasons to continue a
tight rein on spending,
officials said.
Based on 2014 budget
projections, the city
will meet its minimum
5.5 percent target for
reserves in each of its
funds, but this still falls
far short of the national
recommendation of
16.7 percent.
"We're still inching
forward to meet that
national standard for
reserves," Kunik said.
Although Punta
Gorda still has a


looming budget deficit
next year, the city has
steadily reduced its
projected shortfall. Last
year's original budget
estimate included a
$1.2 million shortfall;
this number was revised
to $629,000 earlier this
year, and now stands at
$419,000.
Reductions in the
general fund come from
many sources, officials
said, including the
loss of one full-time
position from each of
the City Clerk, Public
Works, Finance and
Police departments,
along with spending
reductions in other
areas.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


Report: Woman ran elder-care facility without license


By MERAB-MICHAL FAVORITE
STAFF WRITER

PUNTA GORDA A
44-year-old woman was
arrested Tuesday for
allegedly operating a
Punta Gorda elderly care
facility without proper
licensing, according to
the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office.
Stephanie Lynn Taylor,
44, of the 14200 block of
Burnt Store Road, Punta
Gorda, was charged with
owning or operating an


assisted-living facility
without a valid license.
Authorities received a
complaint
April 19
from a
woman
who said
she was
unhappy
S with her
TAYLOR mother's
TAYLOR living con-
ditions at Quality Aging
LLC, also on the 14200
block of Burnt Store
Road. The woman said


the business was owned
and operated by Taylor.
Authorities soon discov-
ered the facility was not
licensed to operate as
an assisted-living facil-
ity, a report stated.
Investigators con-
tacted the Florida
Agency for Health Care
Administration, which
advised it was investi-
gating Quality Aging,
which has been listed as
an accredited business
with the Better Business
Bureau since 2003, as


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Democratic club
holds July
Fourth fundraiser
The Charlotte County
Democratic Club will
hold a July Fourth cel-
ebration fundraiser from
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. today
at the Democratic Party
Headquarters, 4300 Kings
Highway, Unit 402, Port
Charlotte. Come out
and socialize with fellow
Democrats and enjoy an
indoor, yet traditional holi-
day feast with hamburgers,
brats, hot dogs, salads,
beverages and desserts.
Music will be provided by
Louis. There will be a silent
auction and door prizes.
Tickets for members cost
$10; for nonmembers, $15.
For more information or to
purchase tickets, call 941-
258-3542, or Holly Kovacs
at 941-625-2961.

Meals on Wheels
needs volunteers
North Port Meals on
Wheels is entering the
summer season, where
many of the organization's
drivers and cooks have
gone north for the summer.
MOW delivers hot meals to


BURGLARY
FROM PAGE 1

The establishment
opened as the Slip-Not
in 1952, and the name
changed when Scott
Cook bought the property
in 2012. It closed June 25.
When Cook reviewed
the surveillance video, he
identified the suspect as
a former employee who
had worked there about
five months ago, accord-
ing to the police report.


TRUEX
FROM PAGE 1

health department clinics
throughout Florida to
close.
The nonprofit Family
Health Centers of
Southwest Florida has
taken over the health
department's clients in a
Charlotte Harbor clinic.
Family Health Centers
is not opening a similar
clinic in Englewood.


the homebound six days a
week. There is a great need
for drivers, substitute driv-
ers, and kitchen cooks and
helpers. If you would like to
volunteer, for drivers, call
Fay Lee at 941-615-7785; for
cooks and helpers, call Joan
Cain at 941-423-8338.
A driver is required to
drive one morning a week;
cooks/helpers work one
day a week as well.
MOW is also in need
of volunteers to fill the
following board positions:
vice president, treasurer
assistant, secretary as-
sistant, driver coordinator,
cooks/helpers assistant,
routing assistant and
community outreach
coordinator assistant. The
board meets at 10 a.m. on
the third Wednesday of
each month. Meetings last
about two hours. Assistants
would be required to help
where needed and to cover
when the coordinator goes
on vacation. North Port
Meals on Wheels could not
exist without volunteers.
If you are interested in
any of these positions, call
Sharma Bachan, president,
at 941-426-7029 or Geri
Prohaska, secretary, at
941-426-0154.

Cook declined comment
on Wednesday.
"The former em-
ployee was out of town,"
Detective Norman Nahra
explained. "We took a
still photo from the video
footage and started ask-
ing around town."
Authorities realized
the former employee was
innocent, and that the ac-
tual suspect was staying
across from the Slip-Knot
at the Budget Inn Motel,
Nahra said. The motel
manager alerted authori-
ties that Cardia matched

Truex said he and other
health care stakeholders
- representatives from
Englewood Community
Hospital, state health de-
partment, both Charlotte
and Sarasota county staff
- met Tuesday to start
addressing the issues and
to find solutions. Sarasota
County Commissioner
Christine Robinson is
working with Truex.
"Englewood is one
community and views
itself as one community,"
Robinson said. "That


'Swamp People's'
Landry
comes to town
Palm Chevrolet, 1901
Tamiami Trail, Punta
Gorda, will play host to
Troy Landry of the TV
show "Swamp People"
from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
July 12. From 5 p.m. to
8 p.m., there will be live
entertainment, refresh-
ments and giveaways.
Admission to this event is
free. For more informa-
tion, call 941-621-2582.

Kids can 'Discover
Prehistoric Florida'
"Discover Prehistoric
Florida" will be held from
1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
in the children's project
room at the North Port
Library, 13800 S. Tamiami
Trail.
What was it like to live
in prehistoric Florida?
Find out with real arti-
facts from the ancients,
with the USF archaeology
team. This is a free VIVA
Florida event, in celebra-
tion of the state's 500th
anniversary, for ages 5-11.
For more information,
call 941-861-1307.

the burglar's description.
Detectives later recov-
ered property, including
cigarettes and a bottle
of liquor, inside Cardia's
motel room.
Cardia was in the U.S.
on a three-month work
visa, according to Nahra,
but "had never gone
back."
"We have notified bor-
der patrol," Nahra said.
Cardia was taken to
Charlotte County Jail,
where he was held on a
$6,000 bond.
Email: mfavorite@sun-herald.com

makes it a Sarasota and
Charlotte issue."
The federally quali-
fied Community Health
Center of North Port
is already seeing more
than 940 clients from
Englewood, said Sarasota
County Health Officer
Chuck Henry. The clinic
primarily serves lower-
income residents.
Truex is worried
that if the Englewood
clinic closes without a
replacement, the North
Port clinic could find


well as another home
health care business
owned by Taylor on the
100 block of Madrid
Boulevard, Punta Gorda.
AHCA officials told
detectives that Florida
law allows operators to
care for patients in their
home on two condi-
tions: The operator
must live at the home
and cannot care for
more than two patients
at a time. An AHCA
investigation showed
Taylor violated both


FIRE
FROM PAGE 1

the fire," Frantz said.
"We know there was
lightning in the area
(Tuesday) night. We
don't know if it was
electrical. The walls
were fully engulfed
and the trusses were
burned. ... The state
fire marshal will use
forensics to go through
the house and look
through every piece of


conditions, according to
a report.
The manager for
Quality Aging told CCSO
detectives there were
at least three patients,
sometimes four, living
at Quality Aging at one
time. The manager said
health care providers
cared for the patients at
all times, but Taylor did
not live there, a report
stated.
The AHCA sent
Taylor a notice of
unlicensed activity on

debris to try to deter-
mine the cause. The
report will be filed with
the state."
Frantz said the
Wednesday blaze is the
seventh house fire in
the city since January.
"Something we rec-
ommend to everyone is
to buy a fireproof box
and keep important
papers and photos in
it," he said. "The No. 1
thing we hear from
victims of fires is that
'everything' is gone. If
there's a fireproof box


May 29 telling her she
could face fines up
to $1,000 per day of
noncompliance if she
failed to immediately
cease operation of both
businesses.
Taylor turned herself
in Tuesday and was
taken to Charlotte
County Jail, where she
posted $2,500 bond and
was released the same
day. Calls to Taylor and
Quality Aging went un-
answered Wednesday.
Email: mfavorite@sun-herald.com

in the house, then it
usually is still intact. If
you keep photos from
every child along with
Social Security cards,
passports and birth
certificates in a fire-
proof box, it's a pretty
safe place to store
them."
Frantz said fireproof
boxes range from $90
to several hundred
dollars, and can be
purchased at stores like
Lowe's, Staples, Office
Depot or Home Depot.
Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
North Port firefighters gather equipment after a fire ripped through this Barcelona Drive
home in eastern North Port Wednesday morning.


SWIM

FROM PAGE 1

Shellfish collected in
the immediate area
of the Port Charlotte
Beach Complex, lo-
cated at 4500 Harbor
Blvd., should not be
consumed; however it is
safe to fish and con-
sume fin-fish from these
waters.
Tests taken this week
show the water quality
does not meet the safety

itself flooded with new
Englewood clients. He
doesn't see Englewood
residents who have been
using the San Casa clinic
heading to the Family
Health Centers' clinic in
Charlotte Harbor.
"One of the questions
is whether can we pro-
vide transportation on an
interim basis until we get
a long-term fix," Truex
said, "The other question
is whether we can fund
the San Casa clinic for a
period of time."


criteria for enteric bac-
teria, which indicates
the presence of fecal
pollution.
Enteric bacteria can
come from a variety
of sources, including
stormwater runoff,
pet waste, and wildlife
and human sewage. If
high concentrations
of enteric bacteria
are ingested or enter
through an open cut or
sore, health officials said
they may cause human
disease or infection.
Signs will be posted at

Health department
officials are determining
those costs for Truex.
"There are folks
working on a business
plan," Truex said of a
short-term plan. For a
long-term solution, he
and the other stakehold-
ers plan to meet again in
September.
While the fate of the
health department at San
Casa has yet to be de-
cided, the free, volunteer
Englewood Community
Care Clinic is still seeing


the beach advising peo-
ple not to swim in the
water and will remain
in place until follow-up
water-testing results
meet Environmental
Protection Agency
recreational water safety
standards. The health
department plans to
conduct follow-up
water sampling Monday
with results expected
Tuesday.
Staff Writer Adam
Kreger coni, ihi'/ied to
this report.
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com

patients from 5 p.m. to
8 p.m. Monday and
Thursday. The free clinic
operates out of the health
department's facility
during the evenings.
Beth Harrison, the free
clinic's executive director,
said, "We are seeing fewer
people. I am afraid people
think we are closed."
Harrison wants people
to know the free clinic is
ready and able to serve
low-income and unin-
sured patients in need.
Email: reilly@sun-herald.com





The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 7


Sgt. Dave Rockow served in the 82nd Airborne


By DON MOORE
SUN CORRESPONDENT
Dave Rockow has
dedicated his entire adult
life to the military, service
personnel and veterans.
He joined the 82nd
Airborne as an 18-year-
old, spent four years in
the paratroopers, got out,
re-upped in the regular
Army and spent almost 20
years as a National Guard
recruiter. These past three
years, he has worked as an
assistant Charlotte County
Veterans Service officer.
"I was going to join the
Navy when I (turned) 19,
but I went out on a boat
in Lake Erie away from
shore where you couldn't
see land. I didn't swim
very well, so I figured the
Navy was a poor choice
of services. So I joined the
Army," the 53-year-old
Port Charlotte resident
explained.
"When I went to the
recruiting office the guy
showed me a film on the
paratroopers and said
I'd get a $2,000 bonus if
I joined the paratroop-
ers," he said. "I thought
jumping out of an airplane
was cool. I was going to get
paid extra for that.
"My mom wasn't too
thrilled when she heard
I had signed up with the
82nd Airborne.
"I went on active duty
on June 7, 1979. I turned


PHOTO PROVIDED SUN PHOTO BY DON MOORE
Sgt. David Rockow is in full Dave Rockow today at his
dress for this formal picture Charlotte County Veterans
taken before he got out of the Service Center office in Port
82nd Airborne in 1983. Charlotte.


18 when I was in basic
training at Fort Benning,
Georgia," he said.
"We had three weeks
of jump school. You had
Ground Week where you
learned how to jump out
of an airplane and how
to fall. Then you jumped
from a 34-foot tower and
your chute was connected
to a cable. After that you
graduated to a 250-foot-tall
tower," Rockow recalled.
"From there it was the
real thing. We started
jumping from C-123
transports at Benning," he
said. "By that time you had
been so conditioned in
Jump School (that) when
the jump master slapped
you on your rear end you
jumped automatically. In
those first jumps there


was a good deal of space
between you and the next
person jumping. When you
got to the 82nd Airborne it
was how fast could you get
out of the aircraft."
The biggest jump
Rockow ever took part
in was when the 82nd
jumped at Eglin Air Force
Base in 1981.
"In that jump we put
2,500 troopers on the
ground at Eglin. It was
supposed to be the biggest
jump since WorldWar II,"
he said.
Jumping at 1,250 (feet)
a paratrooper will hit the
ground in a minute or
possibly a little more. He's
got a lot of equipment that
goes out the door with him
when he jumps that adds
to his body weight.


"By the time your main
parachute deployed you
were probably down to
about 1,000 feet. The pack
you carried probably gave
you another 100 pounds
of weight," Rockow said.
"If it was under combat
conditions, the idea was
to get you on the ground
as quickly as possible
because the enemy was
probably shooting at you.
"During the four years
I was in the 82nd, I made
43 jumps. That's not a lot.
Some of the jump mas-
ters made thousands of
jumps," he said.
"The closest I ever came
to war was an incident in
1981 where they packed
up the 82nd at Fort Bragg,
North Carolina, put us
aboard transport planes
and were going to send us
to Iraq. Four hours later we
stood down and jumped
from the transports over
Fort Bragg," he recalled.
When Rockow got out of
the paratroopers in 1983
he went back to being a
civilian, but that didn't
last long. He realized he
missed the military life and
decided to go back into the
service.
"I joined the National
Guard in Ohio as a career
counselor at the Military
Enlistment Processing
Station in Cleveland. My
job there was to process
people for the military," he
explained. "I was back in


the military on active duty
working for the guard."
He spent the next two
decades working in the
military as a recruiter and
a processing sergeant.
"Later I became a readi-
ness NCO for a military
police unit in Ohio. I was
one of the people who kept
the Guard unit going when
it wasn't fully operational.
I handled the paperwork
and the equipment for the
unit," he explained.
Rockow retired from
the Army after 26 years of
service in 2009. Because
his parents lived in


Englewood, he came to
Charlotte County. He be-
came associated with the
Charlotte County Veterans
Services four years ago
as an assistant veterans
service officer, working in
the Port Charlotte office.
The former soldier,
recruiter and service of-
ficer has three sons, Ryan,
Benjamin and Jonathan.
Ifyou have a war story
ora friend or neighbor has
one, email Don Moore at
donmoore39@gmail.com or
call him at 941-426-2120.
For more war stories, visit
donmooreswartales.com.


Pfc. David Rockow paints camouflage markings on the face of a
fellow paratrooper before the 82nd Airborne's air drop at Eglin
Air Force Base in Florida's Panhandle in 1980. More than 2,500
paratroopers took part in the exercise. It was supposed to be
the largest airborne jump since World War II.


Charlotte County attorney given ethics award


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER

Charlotte County
Attorney Janette Knowlton
never expected to receive
any special recognition, let
alone from her peers.
But at a Florida
Association of County
Attorneys conference,
that's exactly what
happened. The organiza-
tion's board of directors
awarded Knowlton with
the organization's Ethics
in Government Award,
an award given to an
attorney who consistently
displays the highest level
of ethical standards and
professionalism in
the practice of law in
government.
The Florida Association
of County Attorneys is a
Florida nonprofit cor-
poration whose purpose
is to advise the Florida
Association of Counties'
board of directors on
issues of county interest
and to "provide a forum
for research, advice and
discussion in the develop-
ment of local government
law, including technical
support assistance," ac-
cording to its website.
The attorneys associa-
tion began bestowing the
award in 1996. Knowlton
is the first attorney for
Charlotte County to
receive the recognition.
"It was a complete
surprise to me, and I can
tell you that I am truly
humbled by the award,
especially since it came
from my peers," Knowlton
said Wednesday.
"It's nice to be recog-
nized, but it's even more
satisfying to be able to
shine a positive light on
the county."
After earning her law
degree from Loyola
Marymount University in
Los Angeles, Knowlton,
52, began her career at a
private firm that repre-
sented the Los Angeles
county sanitation district.
She came to Charlotte
County in 2000 as an
assistant attorney, and in
November 2004 became
the county attorney.
Since that time,
Knowlton has seen ethics
charges lodged against
two sitting commission-
ers; a federal lawsuit filed
against the county and
former county commis-
sioner Robert Skidmore
for sexual harassment
and gender discrimina-
tion; and has several


controversial lawsuits
involving water and sewer
service in Rotonda.
Former county
commissioner Adam
Cummings, who prevailed
in an ethics suit that was
filed against him during
his last term in office,
said, "Ethics is Janette's
strong suit."
"No matter what
pressure came to bear on
her, I never doubted she
would do the right thing,"
Cummings said.
The sentiment was
echoed by several com-
missioners, who said
Knowlton demonstrates
pride in her work.
"I'm pleased with the
office's performance,"
said Commissioner Ken
Doherty, noting Knowlton
has assembled what he
believes is professional
and well-rounded team of
attorneys. "We have some
interesting challenges
ahead with Rotonda, but
I'm feeling pretty positive
about it."
Commissioner
Stephen R. Deutsch
agreed.
"She has always been
on the side of caution in
protecting the county,


and I know that's her first
concern," he said. "I don't
always agree with her, but
I think it's absolutely awe-
some and an incredible
recognition when your
peers single you out. For
an attorney, what could
be more valuable than
receiving an ethics award
from your peers?"
Email: bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


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Charlotte to be recognized
with the Ethics in Government
award by the Florida
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OurTown Page 8 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


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3100


LEGAU


FICTITIOUS N
3112


7/4/13
Notice Under Fictitiou
Law Pursuant to Se
865.09, Florida StG
NOTICE IS HEREBY GI
the undersigned, des
engage in business und
titious name of GLASS i
of South Florida located
Kenwood Dr., in the C
Sarasota, in the City
Port, Florida. Thomas L
intends to register the s
with the Division of Cor
of the Florida Depar
State, Tallahassee, Flori
Dated at North Port, Fl
1st day of July, 2013.
/s/Glass Masters of Sou
Thomas L. Serianni J
Publish: July 4, 2013
110833 2911452

L NOTICE 0
FORECLOSE
3122

IN THE CIRCUIT COU
CHARLOTTE COUNTY, F
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
082007CA003405XXXX
BANK OF NEW Y(
TRUSTEE FOR THE CER
HOLDERS CWABS, INC
BACKED CERTIFICATES
2006-23
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARIE BEATRICE JEAN,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF S)
PURSUANT TO CHAP
NOTICE IS HEREBY G
suant to an Order or
Final Judgment of fo
dated 3/4/2008 and
Resetting Sale dated
2013 and entered in
082007CA003405XXXX
Circuit Court of the
Judicial Circuit in and
lotte County, Florida,
BANK OF NEW Y(
TRUSTEE FOR THE CER
HOLDERS CWABS, INC
BACKED CERTIFICATES
2006-23 is Plaintiff ar
BEATRICE JEAN; UNKNC
ANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN
NO. 2; and ALL UNKNC
TIES CLAIMING INTER
THROUGH, UNDER OR A
NAMED DEFENDANT
ACTION, OR HAVING 0
ING TO HAVE ANY RIGID
OR INTEREST IN THE P
HEREIN DESCRIBED, a
dants, I will sell to the hi
best bidder for cash at \
www.charlotte. realforecl
County, Florida, at 11:0(
the 25 day of July, 201
lowing described proper
forth in said Order or F
ment, to-wit:
LOT 19, BLOCK 1010
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVI
SECTION 14, ACCORD
THE PLAT THEREOF R
ED IN PLAT BOOK 5
3A, PUBLIC RECORD
CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAII
INTEREST IN THE
FROM THE SALE, IF AN
THAN THE PROPERTY 0
OF THE DATE OF THE
DENS MUST FILE A CL
IN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
If you are a person v
ability who needs any a
nation in order to part
this proceeding, you ar
at no cost to you, to the
of certain assistance.
contact the Administral
vices Manager whose
located at 350 E. Mario
Punta Gorda, FL 339
whose telephone number
637-2281, at least 7 da
your scheduled court
ance, or immediately up
ing this notification if
before the scheduled ap
is less than 7 days, if
hearing or voice impa
711.
Dated at Punta Gorda
on June 26, 2013.
BARBARA SCOTT
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
As Deputy Clerk
Publish: July 4 and 11,
105230 2911891
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CI
AND FOR CHARLOTTE
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 10005046C
OCWEN LOAN SERVICE
SUCCESSOR I INTE
GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEPHANIE N. BRIGGS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE S
NOTICE IS HEREBY G
suant to a Final Judgme
closure dated May 13.,
entered in Case
10005046CA of the Cir
of the TWENTIETH Judic
in and for CHARLOTTE
Florida, wherein OCWE
SERVICING, LLC SUCC[


INTEREST TO GMAC MORTGAGE,
LLC, is Plaintiff, and STEPHANIE
N. BRIGGS, et al are Defendants,
the clerk will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash, begin-
ning at 11:00 AM at www.char-
lotte.realforeclose.com, in accor-
dance with Chapter 45, Florida
Statutes, on the 12 day of
August, 2013, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 21, BLOCK 623, PUNTA
GORDA ISLES, SECTION
TWENTY, AS RECORDED IN
AVIE PLAT BOOK 11, PAGES 2-A
THROUGH 2-Z-42 INCLUSIVE,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAR-
LOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
and all fixtures and personal prop-
erty located therein or thereon,
which are included as security in
us Name Plaintiff's mortgage.
section Any person claiming an interest
atutes in the surplus funds from the sale,
IVEN that if any, other than the property
siring to owner as of the date of the lis
er the fic- pendens must file a claim within
MASTERS 60 days after the sale.
I at 6488 Dated at Punta Gorda,
County of CHARLOTTE COUNTY, Florida,
of North this 31 day of May, 2013.
* Serianni Barbara T. Scott
said name Clerk of said Circuit Court
portionss By: C.L.G.
tment of As Deputy Clerk
da. If you are a person with a dis-
orida this ability who needs any accom-
modation to participate in this
ith Florida proceeding, you are entitled,
ir at no cost to you, to the provi-
sion of certain assistance.
Please contact the Adminis-
trative Services Manager
F whose office is located at 350
RE oE. Marion Avenue, Punta
Gorda, Florida 33950, and
whose telephone number is
(941) 637-2281, at least 7
days before your scheduled
URT FOR court appearance, or immedi-
LORIDA ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
XXX than seven (7) days; if you are
ORK AS hearing or voice impaired,
RTIFICATE- call 711.
- ASSET Publish: June 27 and July 4, 2013
, SERIES 336737 2909348
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
et al, FLORIDA
ALE CASE NO. 08-2011-CA-002449
"TER 45 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.
IVEN pur- Plaintiff,
Summary ALMIRO GARAY; UNKNOWN
reclosure SPOUSE OF ALMIRO GARAY;
an Order UNKNOWN TENANT 1;
June 25, UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL
asef Ntho. UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
S of the BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
Twentieth AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED
for Char- DEFENDANTSS, WHO (IS/ARE)
wherein NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ORK AS ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
TIFICATE- UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS
., ASSET HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
SERIES ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDI-
nd MARIE TORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR
OWN TEN- OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE
TENANT ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
OWNPA- B SYSTEMS, INC.
GAINST A Defendants
A THIS A NOTICE OF SALE
TO THIS Notice is hereby given that, pur-
RT, TITLE suant to the Summary Final Judg-
TROPERTY ment of Foreclosure entered on
re Defen February 26, 2013, and the
ghest and Order Rescheduling Foreclosure
ghest andSale entered on June 25. 2013,
website of in this cause, in the Circuit Court
lose.co n of Charlotte County, Florida, I will
0 a.m. on sell the property situated in Char-
13 the fol lotte County, Florida, described
rty as sets:
final Judg- LOT 6, BLOCK 4942, OF
, PORT PORT CHARLOTTE SUBDIVI-
SION SION, SECTION 93, ACCORD-
DING TO ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
?ECORD- AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
, PAGE 9, PAGE 1A, OF THE PUBLIC
EDS OF RECORDS OF CHARLOTTE
DS OF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
a/k/a 14337 POCONO AVE.,
MING AN PORT CHARLOTTE, FL
SURPLUS 33981-8325
Y, OTHER at public sale, to the highest and
WNER AS best bidder, for cash, at
LIS PEN www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
AIM WITH- Charlotte County, Florida, at
SALE. eleven o'clock a.m. on July 24,
2013.
ccommoa Any person claiming an interest in
icipate in the surplus from the sale, if any,
e entitled other than the property owner as
p rntisin of the date of th lis pendens must
Please file a claim within 60 days after
tive Ser- the sale.
office Ser Dated, this 26 day of June, 2013.
office isAvenue Barbara T. Scott
n Avenue, Clerk of the Circuit Court
)50, and By: C.L.G.
r is (941) Deputy Clerk
ys before IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
Sappear- AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
hrece tm ACT, IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH
pearace A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
appearance ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO
you are PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEED-
ired, cal ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO
, Florida, COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
Sod' SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.
PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA
COORDINATOR AT 350 EAST
MARION AVENUE, PUNTA GORDA,
FLORIDA 33950, TELEPHONE
2013 NUMBER (941) 637-2281 WITHIN
1 TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE.
- OF THE IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED
RCUIT, IN OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-
COUNTY, 955-8771.
Publish: July 4 and 11, 2013
146641 2911871
ING, LLC IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE
REST TO TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 12-3363-CA
et al DAVID M. EDES and
PAULA HOWARD EDES,
Plaintiffs,


ALE v.
GIVEN pur- ROBERT DAVOLI and
nt of fore- CHERYLANN DAVOLI
2013 and Defendants.
e3 No. AMENDED
cuit Court NOTICE OF SALE
:ial Circuit NOTICE IS GIVEN pursuant to
COUNTY the Final Judgment of Mortgage
EN LOAN Foreclosure dated February 21,
ESSOR IN 2013, and the Order Reschedul-
ing Foreclosure Sale dated June


26 2013 entered in case no. 12-
3363 CA, of the Circuit Court of
the 20th Judicial Circuit, in and
for Charlotte County, Florida,
DAVID M. EDES and PAULA
HOWARD EDES, are the Plaintiffs
and ROBERT DAVOLI and CHERY-
LANN DAVOLI are the defendants.
The Clerk of Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
by electronic sale via the internet
at:
www.charlotte.realforeclose.com
at 11:00 a.m. on July 17, 2013,
the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment and Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale, to wit:
Lot 42, Block 3782, PORT
CHARLOTTE SUBDIVISION
SECTION SIXTY FIVE, accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, record-
ed in Plat Book 6, Pages(s) 3-
A through 3-P, of the Public
Records of Charlotte County,
Florida.
Final payment must be made on
or before 4:00 p.m. of the date of
the sale by cash or cashier's
check, or initiated ACH or Wire
Transfer.
A person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, if you are a
person, with a disability, who
needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to provisions of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact
the Jon Embury, or the current
Administrative Services Manager,
whose office is located at 350 E.
Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda, FL
33950, and whose telephone
number is (941) 637-2110, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or
immediately upon receiving this
notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days, if you are hearing or
voice impaired call 711.
Dated this 27 day of June, 2013.
BARBARA T. SCOTT
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
Publish: July 4 and 11, 2013
362481 2911853

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OTHER NOTICES
S3138


NOTICE OF RECEIPT OF
APPLICATION TO THE
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER
MANAGEMENT
DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that the
Southwest Florida Water Manage-
ment District received an applica-
tion for a water use permit to
withdraw water from wells and/or
surface waters from Application
Number: 2009398.012 Applica-
tion received: July 1, 2013
Predominant use type: ground
water. Total requested withdraw-
al average daily gallons per day is
the same as the previous permit:
This is merely an administrative
modification to extend the permit
10 years. The permit is located
within S10,11,12/T40/R25 of
Charlotte County. The file(s) per-
taining to the project referred to
above is available for inspection
Monday through Friday except for
legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District (Dis-
trict) Tampa Service office locat-
ed at 7601 Highway 301 North,
Tampa, FL 33637-6759 Interest-
ed persons may inspect a copy of
the application and submit written
comments concerning the appli-
cation. Comments must include
the permit application number
and be received within 14 days
from the date of this notice. If
you wish to be notified of agency
action or an opportunity to
request an administrative hearing
regarding the application you
must send a written request ref-
erencing the permit application
number to the Southwest Florida
Water Management District, Reg-
ulation Performance Management
Department, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 or
submit your request through the
Districts website at www.water-
matters.org. The District does
not discriminate based on disabil-
ity. Anyone requiring accommo-
dation under the ADA should con-
tact the Regulation Performance
Management Department at
(352) 796-7211 or 1-800-423-
1476: TDD only 1-800-231-6103
Published 7/4/13 132408
2911344


Classified = Sales

To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE FORECLOSURE
3122 3122


NORTH PORT An
argument over finances
turned violent Tuesday
when a North Port
woman allegedly cut her
husband with a knife and
then fled their home, ac-
cording to the North Port
Police Department.
Autumn Renee Burnett,
27, of Sagebloom Terrace,
was charged with ag-
gravated battery with a
deadly weapon in con-
nection with the alleged
attack. According to a
police report, the couple
were arguing around
7:30 p.m. Tuesday and the
38-year-old victim de-
cided to leave the home
in order to let things cool
down.
The report states the
victim was getting into
his truck, which was
parked in the driveway,
when he felt Burnett hit
his forearm. He then saw
blood "gushing" from his
arm, the report states,
and saw a knife lying on
the ground next to his
feet.
Authorities arrived at
the home a short time
later and the victim
already was being treated
by emergency medical
personnel. Police found
"large amounts" of blood
in the driveway, along
with the knife, the report
states.
The victim was trans-
ported to the North Port
ER, while authorities tried
to locate Burnett, who
had left the home with
her daughter, the report
states. Burnett was found
at a nearby home and
she told them she did
not cut the victim. Police
did not believe her story
and placed her under
arrest around 9 p.m. She
remains at the Sarasota
County Jail without bond.
It previously was
reported that Burnett
was one of several people
in the city who was
taken advantage of by
Janeene Lea Jones, who is
charged with operating a
wide-ranging real estate
scam where, along with
her husband Matthew
Smith, they allegedly
rented out abandoned
and foreclosed homes to
unsuspecting people.
Burnett previously
told the Sun she and
her family had lost all of
their money to Jones and
Smith and were struggling
to hang on.

Fisherman
answers cries
for help at park
ENGLEWOOD A girl
yelling for help Tuesday
evening at Bay Heights
Park, 1000 S. McCall
Road, had her cries heard
by a fisherman who was
able to alert police, ac-
cording to the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office,
which led to the arrest of
the girl's boyfriend.
Logan McKinley Futch,
18, of the 9300 block of
Heartwellville Avenue,
Englewood, allegedly was
witnessed preventing his
17-year-old girlfriend
from exiting a truck they
were in at the park.
A CCSO deputy re-
sponded to a call from
the witness, who told the
deputy he was fishing at
the park when he heard a
commotion coming from
a truck in the parking lot,
a sheriff's report states.
The witness told the
deputy he at first thought
he heard laughter but
realized it was "scream-
ing" from a female saying,
"Let me go; help me,"
according to the report.
The witness claimed he
saw the girl try to exit the
truck twice, but she was


I POLICE BEAT
The information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriff's office, Florida Highway
Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is
determined by the court system.


pulled back in both times
by a male, the report
shows.
The witness called law
enforcement after the
truck left the area, and
a deputy tracked the
vehicle down about a
block away. The deputy
then made contact with
Futch, who reportedly
first told the deputy he
wasn't at the park, but
then stated it was he and
his girlfriend who were
having a "heated verbal
argument."
The deputy then made
contact with Futch's
girlfriend, whom he
observed as having
"several fresh, swollen
and red 'scratches' on her
body," the report states.
She reportedly confirmed
to the deputy what the
witness saw, but said she
didn't want her boyfriend
arrested.
However, based on
all the statements and
evidence, the deputy
arrested Futch Tuesday
evening and charged him
with battery and false
imprisonment.
Futch was taken to the
Charlotte County Jail,
where he was released
Wednesday after posting
$4,500 bond.

Report: Three
nabbed stealing
TVs from Walmart
SARASOTA Three
Charlotte County men
were arrested Tuesday for
allegedly trying to steal
two large televisions from
a Walmart on Cattlemen
Road, according to the
Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office.
Arrested were Sean
Joyce, 26, and Carlos
Richart, 32, both of the
22300 block of Vick Street,
Punta Gorda; and Bruce
Swartz, 27, of the 800
block of Mensch Terrace,
Port Charlotte. Joyce and
Richart were charged with
grand theft and resisting
arrest, while Swartz was
charged with reckless
driving, resisting arrest
and principal to grand
theft. Richart additionally
was charged with two
counts of possession of a
controlled substance and
introducing contraband
into a detention facility
after deputies found pills
in his wallet, a sheriff's
report states.
According to the report,
Joyce and Richart were
spotted by Walmart
security around 6 p.m.
loading 55-inch and 32-
inch TVs into a shopping
cart and leaving the store.
Security had noticed their
suspicious behavior and
phoned authorities, who
were waiting for the duo
when they exited the
Sarasota store.
Swartz, meanwhile, was
waiting in the "getaway
car," according to the
report, and when he was
confronted by deputies,
he fled. A brief high-
speed chase ensued, but
Swartz eventually pulled
over and was taken into
custody.
All three remain at the
Sarasota County Jail on
various bond amounts:
Joyce, $2,000; Richart,
$6,500; and Swartz,
$2,120.

DUI checkpoint
planned
SOUTH VENICE -The
Florida Highway Patrol
is planning a DUI check-
point Friday near the


4500 block of Englewood
Road, according to a
press release, as part of
an effort to enhance the
safety of the motoring
public.
The checkpoint is
scheduled to begin
around 10 p.m. Troopers
will be monitoring the
checkpoint for drivers
who are impaired or not
properly licensed. Florida
law considers a driver
with a 0.08 or higher
blood-alcohol content
to be impaired. Drivers
younger than 21 with a
BAC of 0.02 or higher also
are in violation of Florida
law.

The Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
*Chadwick Joseph Skinner, 40, of
St. Pete Beach. Charge: violation of
probation (original charge: driving with
a suspended license). Bond: none.
Kevin Anthony Willabus, 24,
1100 block of Longfellow Road, Port
Charlotte. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $2,000.
Jamie Maude Yell, 25,18100
block of Bending Willow Court, Punta
Gorda. Charge: purchase or delivery
of schedule I or II narcotics. Bond:
$5,000.
Andrienne Cambareri, 62, Henry
Morgan St., Punta Gorda. Charge:
driving with a suspended license.
Bond:$500.
*Jared Semexant, 28, 20100 block
of Rutherford Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon, criminal mischief and
two counts of battery. Bond: none.
Mark Edward Baten, 21, 20100
block of Dante Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: leaving the scene of a crash
involving property damage. Bond:
$500.
Melissa Anne Russ, 25,21500
block of Mallory Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: failure to appear. Bond:
$10,000.
Robert Dominic Sirangelo, 30,
18100 block of Charter Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: grand theft. Bond:
$2,500.
Judena Mae Shafer, 36, homeless
in Port Charlotte. Charge: petty theft.
Bond: $500.
Aaron Brooks, 43,1200 block of
Marlow St., Port Charlotte. Charge:
out-of-county warrant. Bond: $5,000.
Donald Robert McNeil, 47,200
block of Waterway Circle NE, Port
Charlotte. Charges: possession of
drug paraphernalia, armed burglary,
possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana and grand theft. Bond:
$28,500.
Alisha Denise Herrmann, 23, 2500
block of Luther Road, Deep Creek.
Charges: possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription,
possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Bond: $4,500.
Jamie Omar Sepulveda, 34, 22300
block of Nyack Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: possession of drug para-
phernalia, driving with a suspended
license and possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana. Bond: $2,500.
Brian Jerome Hartmanstorfer, 19,
address withheld. Charge: failure to
appear. Bond: none.
Dominque Jon-Torey Outlaw, 22,
of Lehigh Acres. Charges: possession
of less than 20 grams of marijuana
and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: none.
Jacob Dylan Drummey, 18, of
Fort Myers. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
possession of alcohol by a person
younger than 21. Bond: none.
*Austin Charles Ballentine, 19,
of Estero. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
possession of alcohol by a person
younger than 21. Bond: $3,000.
Gregory Lawrence, 60,600 block
of Old Englewood Road, Englewood.
Charge: battery. Bond: none.
*Ryan Leigh Burlew,31,1600
block of Florence Ave., Englewood.

ARRESTS |9


Woman charged in




alleged stabbing


W_-





The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


Technical Institute



moving to VHS campus


By KIM COOL
STAFF WRITER

VENICE -Venice High
School's campus will soon
gain more than a new high
school and performing
arts center.
The Sarasota County
Technical Institute's South
Instructional Service
Center will move to the
VHS campus from its
Indian Hills Boulevard
campus this fall.
"We expect to be in
the buildings by mid
September or Oct. 1
at the latest," said Dr.
Todd Bowden, SCTI's
executive director of
Career Technical and
Adult Education. "They
(Sarasota County School
District) gave us a deal. It's
all in the family."
The buildings include
VHS Building 30 and two
portables that are adja-
cent to the high school
swimming pool. SCTI will
vacate its four portables at
the Indian Hills campus.
Those buildings will be
demolished, Bowden
said. The TRIAD program
conducted by the YMCA
will remain at the Indian
Hills campus.
Building 30 has
been used for a


performance-based
diploma program, Bowden
said.
For SCTI, all that will be
needed is some fresh paint
and carpeting, he said.
SCTI also will fence its
area to separate it from the
high school for its adult
students, yet allow pool
access for the high school
students, Bowden said.
There will be two parking
lots for SCTI students -
one in front of the building
and one behind it.
"We will put up a mar-
quee and some signage,"
he said. "Our branding
color is royal blue."
The only other expenses
to SCTI will be for utilities
as it is part of the school
system.
"It puts us on the island,"
said Bowden, who has de-
grees from USF and FSU.
"We will be better able to
serve residents. We will be
able to invest in computer
labs. Our Internet connect
was not that good at Indian
Hills. We will have four
classrooms."
"If it deals with career
education of adults," I'm
it, he said.
SCTI is a year-round
school for high school
students and adults.
High school classes


coincide with the regular
academic year and include
courses that will prepare
graduates for careers in
such fields as culinary arts,
medical technology and
cosmetology. According to
its website, students gain
entry-level preparation.
High school classes are
tuition-free. For the com-
ing academic year, courses
will begin on Aug. 19.
Some 650 high school
students attend SCTI each
year, taking course work in
more than 40 areas. High
school students generally
spend one half day at SCTI
and the other half at their
high school.
The new Venice campus,
which is geared for adults,
will continue to offer the
same courses that it did at
Indian Hills, plus en-
hanced computer classes
once the new equipment
is installed. Currently
being offered at the
Indian Hills campus are
apprenticeship classes in
plumbing and electrical
work, English as a second
language classes and driv-
ers education.
For more information
about SCTI's south campus
in Venice, call 941-486-2164
or visit SCTI.edu.
Email: kcol@venicegondolier.com


ACROSS
1 Taj Mahal locale
5 Set to rest,
as doubt
10 BMW competitor
14 Disneyland
shuttle
15 Cheek
application
16 Persian Gulf
country
17 Noel trio
18 Exams
required by
Wharton
19 Hoop edges
20 Antics
23 Popeye's
girlfriend
24 Lend a hand
25 '80s sitcom
32 Sort of serpent
33 Remnant of
a sort
34 Take out
(borrow)
36 Artist Kahlo
39 Alias introducer
40 Dumbbell wt.
41 Set as a price
42 Targets of
many TV
shout-outs
44 Instagram
upload
45 A little rusty,
maybe
49 Memorable
stretch
50 Musical ability
51 Star Trek craft
58 Friendly
exchange
59 Full extent
60 Off the market
62 Off-white shade


63 Pass over in
pronunciation
64 Depressurize
65 Got rid of
66 Be an
obstacle to
67 Expel

DOWN
1 Hotel
convenience
2 Seles rival
3 Aunt Millie's
alternative
4 Key related to C
5 Some socks
6 Bausch's
partner
7 Hula dancer's
gig
8 IRS employees
9 Positive reply


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 9


- 0rossord


Answer to previous puzzle
AMASS MADAM GMC
MOLTO ACUTE RIO
POORRICHARD OLD
*A|C|MF|A I |RMA K ||
STATS ELI JUKE
I SO UPON
ACT FAIRMAIDEN
PLO FINI SNORE
RAMPS ORA STUNS
IMPEl LETS TIS
GOODFRIDAY MASE
PPM0L0 0A A S ~ S |pAC YisE
SATE DRAT
INTL AMS ULTRA
VEE GREATPLAIl -
I N T|LAMATS~u|L|T A
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7/4/13


Look for a third

crossword in .

the Sun Classified

S section. I
.. .. .. .. .


SUN PHOTO BY KIM COOL
Two portables and Venice High School Building 30 will become the new home of SCTI's Venice
program by mid September.


I COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFS


Cultural Center to
introduce
new exhibit
The Cultural Center of
Charlotte County, 2280
Aaron St., Port Charlotte,
will permanently display
an exhibit called "Port
Charlotte: Then & Now"
in the main entrance
atrium. The exhibit was
prepared by the Charlotte
County History Center. It
features pictures of Port
Charlotte in its very early
stages of development,
from A.C. Frizzell's land
sale of 80,000 acres to



ARRESTS
FROM PAGE 8

Charge: violation of probation. Bond:
none.
Chris Wade Budro, 42, of Crosby,
Texas. Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: driving with a
license expired for more than six
months). Bond: $650.
Ernest Barnes Jr., 22, of
Bradenton. Charges: possession of
less than 20 grams of marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $2,000.
Cheryl Whittemore, 43, of
Beverly, Mass. Charges: four counts
of violation of probation (original
charge: four counts of uttering a
worthless check). Bond: $8,000.
Vanier Jean Baptiste, 26, of Alva,
Fla. Charges: possession of cocaine
and possession of drug parapher-
nalia. Bond: $2,000.

The North Port Police
Department reported the
following arrests:
Sjhaquella Deneen Richardson, 40,
1400 block of Hempstead Ave., North


the Mackle Brothers to
construction of a nation-
ally advertised planned
community, through
the growth spurts of the
1950s and 1960s, to life
here today.
A reception to intro-
duce the exhibit will
be held from 4 p.m.
to 6 p.m. July 18 at
the Cultural Center.
During the reception,
visitors will be able to
view an early promo-
tional video featuring
Edward R. Murrow. For
more information, call
941-625-4175.

Port. Charge: battery. Bond: none.
Jason Frederick Depretis, 35,
3800 block of Ribera Ave., North Port.
Charges: dealing in stolen property,
theft of $300-$5,000, and giving false
information given on pawned items.
Bond: $10,500.
Malena Ann Pack, 28,1400
block of Woodcrest Lane, North Port.
Charges: possession of a controlled
substance and fraud. Bond: $1,620.

The Venice Police Department
reported the following arrest:
Robert Boyce Lane, 27, of
Athens, Ga. Charges: three counts of
theft of $300-$5,000. Bond: $4,500.

The Sarasota County Sheriff's
Office reported the following
arrests:
Stephen Roche, 63, 5000 block of
N. Beach Road, Englewood. Charge:
DUI third violation within 10
years. Bond: $2,000.
Joshua P. Kight, 31,100 block
of S. Pearl Ave., Nokomis. Charge:
battery. Bond: none.
Ronald Carter Selway, 28, 3800
block of Richard Road, North Port.
Charge: failure to appear (original
charges: petty theft third offense


Outdoor flea
market set
The Punta Gorda
Historical Society will hold
an outdoor flea market
from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
July 20 at the Historic
Train Depot Antique &
Collectibles Mall, 1009
Taylor Road, Punta Gorda.
Reserve table space to sell
your wares, or come and
check out the treasures
available for purchase.
The museum and antique
mall also will be open. For
more information, call
941-639-6774.

and resisting property recovery).
Bond:none.
Jody Lee Powell, 41, Harbor
Blvd., Port Charlotte. Charge: failure
to appear (original charge: violation
of an injunction). Bond: none.
Jason Edward Mathews, 38,
3500 block of Erie Court, North Port.
Charges: two counts of violation of
probation (original charges: two
counts of grand theft). He was
released on his own recognizance.
Ashley Jean White, 25,1400
block of Lake Breeze Court, North
Port. Charge: possession of narcotic
equipment. Bond: none.
Nikisha Jeanette Curington, 19,
2500 block of Abbeville Road, North
Port. Charge: battery. Bond: $500.
Sean Michael Callahan, 40, 400
block of W. Perry St., Englewood.
Charge: Charlotte County warrant for
battery. Bond: none.
Cody David Enos, 22, 20300
block of Midway Blvd., Port Charlotte.
Charges: driving with a suspended
license and failure to register a motor
vehicle. Bond: $240.

-Compiled by
Merab-Michal Favorite,
Adam Kreger and Drew Winchester


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 It's usually a left
4 Mideast
leadership family
name
9 Send to cloud
nine
14 Multi-platinum
Steely Dan
album
15 Later, to Luis
16 Aviator's number
17 Fate of one with a
cause, perhaps
19 Respected figure
20 Cook up
21 External layer
23 Distance units:
Abbr.
24 Mimic's shtick
26 Classic doctor's
aide
28 Hot-tempered
chef Gordon
31 Slangy transition
word
33 Claustrophobe's
cry
34 Golden St.
region
37 Exmoor heroine
39 Detachable craft
40 "Jerry Maguire"
distributor
42 Video game
initials
43 More wily
45 Actress Watts
46 Take a course or
two?
47 Together
49 Biological food
processor
51 Fashion's Gucci
52 Drink it "and
sleep!" beverage
54 Jim's wife on 'The
Office"
56 1998 Masters
champion
58 "Adeste Fideles,"
e.g.
62 Yale founder Yale
64 Not leave
hanging? (or a
hint to the circled
letters)
66 Mark with a new
price
67 "Someone Like
You" singer
68 Racket
69 Impression
makers


By David Steinberg 7/4/13


70 Better song,
usually
71 Application
datum

DOWN
1 Window segment
2 Open slightly
3 Empty
4 Prince Khan
5 Construction job
worker
6 Ritual including
bitter herbs
7 Anguish
8 Cathedral cap
9 Monster product
10 Short, shortened
11 33-year "60
Minutes" regular
12 Slightly elevated
13 Hits Reply All
instead of Reply,
say
18 Quaint
contraction
22 Freudian article
25 Pie preparation
27 "So that's your
game!"
28 Sings like Snoop
Lion
29 Pungent mayo
30 James Brown
nickname


Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
PAL PUBS ED I TH
ADA AALOU METRO
LO G Y CHROMOSOME
MBUTTERF LY AP ED
SE IOR ASS I C E
SAE A Y OSCA R
CORAL ALTARS
VI LAGEPEOPLE
RACISM VERNE
AGAPE WET TOI
PAN N AN AVENGE
SR TA CBA TTE R I ES
AI SFORAL I B I T
TE ETHE ARA L N I
S EAMS NET S T


(c)2013 Tribune Media Services,
31 Chorus voice
32 Wee hr.
35 Obama's mil. title
36 Sharp-tack
center
38 90 degrees from
norte
41 Willing to please
44 Night class subj.
48 Manet or Monet,
e.g.
50'Titanic" actor
Billy


Inc. 7/4/13
52 Mecca native
53 Hardly
defenseless
54 Brash
55 Tar's direction
57 SFO postings
59 Racing form info
60 Scary-sounding
lake
61 Northern forest
cat
63 Derby, for one
65 Grassy expanse


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


GOING CONCERNS by Bruce R. Sutphin
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com
10 Largest terrier 37 Couldn't stand
11 Exodus author 38 Put on a
12 River pedestal
regulators 43 Royal rod
13 Mental 46 With
measures vampire-like
21 TV "Science dentition
Guy" 47 Coal product
22 Try to bite 48 Eye parts
25 Sculpted form 51 "Yikes!"
26 Three-line 52 Level-headed
poem 53 Questionable
27 Notary need story
28 My Fair Lady 54 Send forth
C director 55 Graceless
29 2012 victor 56 Bubble source
30 Insensitive, 57 If not
for short 58 Original
31 New Haven I Love Lucy
student airer
32 Artist's deg. 61 Drops on
35 The Voice airer blades


IiIAIAMPUII


i ; i:


I






Our Town Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW


Freedom on

4th is about

right choices

OUR POSITION: Celebrate
freedom on the 4th by making
right choices.
here's plenty to do in
the area to mark to-
day's 237 anniversary of
America's independence. For
many it's a day off work, for
others, it's a long day of extra
hard work. For everyone, it's a
reminder that brave patriots
long ago risked everything for
a revolutionary idea. In an era
of monarchy and colonialism,
the concept of a government
of the people was as radical as
it was dangerous. As Benjamin
Franklin told his compatriots
that sweltering summer day in
Philadelphia, "We must all hang
together, or assuredly we shall
all hang separately."
Fireworks displays are set
for Punta Gorda, Englewood,
North Port and Venice, pre-
ceded by festivals full of food,
fun and games. On the shores
of Charlotte Harbor, the 22nd
annual Freedom Swim will
splash off at noon near the base
of the north end of Gilchrist
Bridge. Many private restau-
rants and taverns and civic and
fraternal organizations have
planned picnics, barbecues
and holiday special events.
Punta Gorda's new Fountain of
Freedom, which was dedicated
Wednesday night at Laishley
Park's Veterans Garden, will
draw many visitors in town for
the 4th Fest. In Englewood, the
Cajun Festival on Dearborn
Street will pack the streets
and stalls of Olde Englewood
Village. North Port High
School's stadium will be the
focal point of the city Freedom
Festival.
With celebrations at the top
of our minds, safety should
remain in the back of our
minds. Law enforcement
officials promise vigilance
throughout the holiday and
following weekend on the
road, on the water and onshore.
Increased patrols by local
sheriff's offices and the Florida
Highway Patrol should serve as
a deterrent to those inclined to
get behind the wheel after too
many celebratory toasts. Last
weekend's Operation Dry Water
conducted by the Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office which
netted three arrests was a
stark reminder that boating
under the influence of alcohol
is a danger to your safety and
your liberty.
The proliferation of fireworks
in recent years thanks to a
loosely enforced loophole in
Florida's fireworks law has
resulted in an explosion of
private fireworks displays in
many neighborhoods. While
the recent deluge of rain in the
region has reduce the risk of
fireworks-sparked fires, folks
engaged in the "agricultural
purposes" for which they signed
waivers at the local fireworks
store or roadside tent should
practice safety first. As CCSO
Public Safety Officer Debbie
Bowe said, even innocuous-
looking sparklers which burn
at temperatures ranging from
1,000 degrees to 1,800 degrees
- can be dangerous in young
hands.
Don't let your enthusiasm dim
your self-awareness. Motorists
and celebrants should be cog-
nizant of the unique conditions
on area roadways. There will
be thousands of pedestrians in
places they normally wouldn't
be and distractions drivers don't
have on a normal Thursday
night. If it's all a bit too much
for you, there's always an alter-
native to the raucous outdoor
activities. Fireworks displays
from Boston, New York and
Washington, D.C., are a staple of
4th of July TV programming.
Freedom is about choices.


Celebrate your freedom by
making the right ones.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Tax burden
should be equal

Editor:
The county is considering
whether to give low-income
elderly an extra homestead
exemption, as permitted by
Florida law. I read this news
with mixed feelings, since I
believe that everyone's taxes
are too high, but additionally,
I think that, to the extent pos-
sible, the tax burden should
be distributed as equitably as
possible.
We can see what effects an
inequitable tax burden has
had on our national politics.
We know that only about half
of Americans pay any federal
taxes at all, and it is not diffi-
cult to see that a non-taxpayer
is much less interested in
the state of government than
those who pay for it. This has
led to the rise of the "low-
information voter," whom
I run into nearly every day.
Unfortunately, a lot of our in-
competent politicians stay in
office by constantly pandering
to the low-information voter.
So, let's not slide down that
slope at the county level. If
we are going to grant some
people refuge from taxes,
there will be less revenue
collected, by as much as
$90,000, according to County
Administrator Ray Sandrock.
How shall the county make
up that difference? On the
backs of other taxpayers? I
would argue that if the county
commissioners wish to grant
this charity to some prop-
erty owners, they should find
some savings in the county
budget that, going forward,
will make this tax break
revenue neutral. Let's avoid
creating a "paying class" and a
"free-rider class" at the county
level.
John R. Doner
Port Charlotte

Consumer confidence
not as reported

Editor:
"If you're happy and you
know it clap your hands."
With CNBC reporting
consumer confidence at a
five-year high, there should be
a din heard across the country
with all those happy people.
You can't hear it? No,
neither can most Americans
who are struggling against
high unemployment, rising


insurance costs, rising food
prices, in fact, just about
rising everything. To top it off
we are spying on them, using
the IRS to squelch their free
speech, manipulating their
news, stealing their votes and
undercutting family values.
So, who are these happy
Americans? One has to won-
der. No facts, just a statement
as if it were gospel. If it isn't
you and it isn't me (or anyone
I know) then let CNBC tell us
who these happy Americans
are and why they are happy.
Perhaps they have secure
government or union jobs?
Perhaps they receive benefits
that we so kindly provide?
Whatever the reason, those
happy people must be known
only to certain media outlets.
Hillary Duke
Englewood

'Right' in the eye
of the beholder

Editor:
I have remained silent for
too long. I am puzzled by
my fellow citizens, especially
those who want to infringe
on a woman's right to choose
for or against an abortion.
Abortion can be the most
difficult decision a woman
can make in her lifetime.
She will have to live with the
consequences. No one person
other than those involved will
feel the grief, sorrow or guilt
of that decision.
If she does not abort, will
she be able to rear that child
with love and the financial
ability that child deserves?
Will someone step up and
raise that child in lieu of the
mother's inability? Remember,
talk is cheap.
The Ten Commandments
say do not kill, steal, lie or
covet. Are you a member
of that group that pretends
to follow those tenets only
when they are to your own
advantage? Have you ever
killed in the name of religious
war or in self-defense? Do you
still lie and covet? Do Jews kill
Muslims and vice versa? Do
Muslims kill Christians and
vice versa? Do Catholics kill
Protestants and vice versa?
How can you righteously tell
others not to abort?
Choice is choice. We all
must live with our decisions.
A famous man once said
right is only in the eye of the
beholder because there is
no right or wrong, only that
which we believe.
We all should let her make
the choice. Don't let her
suffer our transgressions.


Your response is not needed,
only your decision to act
responsibly.
Gary Greenberg
Punta Gorda


A very special
wedding anniversary

Editor:
On Sunday, my husband,
Walter, and I went to a local
restaurant to celebrate our
wedding anniversary. We had
a great waitress and she asked
us how many years we have
been married. We told her
57 years.
When our waitress came
back to our table with our
bill, she had a gift card from
the people in the next booth.
They had already left. The
card was from Brenda and
Kim, and my husband and
I would like to thank them.
Their kindness and thought-
fulness were overwhelming.
They made our day.


Only half c
about Consti

Editor:
If they're so smar
can't the justices ag


Stop the march
toward socialism

Editor:
On July 4, we celebrate the
237th anniversary of the birth
of America. The Declaration
of Independence is the most
important document that
articulates the God-given
rights of people over a
government. The 56 signers
of the Declaration were will-
ing to risk all in the name of
freedom and independence;
some gave their lives, some
their wealth, others their
health, but in the end their
strength and determination
made it possible for future
generations to reap the
benefits of a free and inde-
pendent nation.
Ronald Reagan said in a
speech, "Freedom is never
more than one generation
away from extinction. We
didn't pass it on to our
children in the bloodstream.
It must be fought for, pro-
tected and handed down for
them to do the same, or one
day we will spend our sunset
years telling our children and
our children's children what
it was once like in the United
States where men were free."
As you go about celebrating,
take a minute to reflect on
that freedom that we take for
granted.
Today, more then
50 percent of Americans
believe freedom is at risk of
extinction. If you are one of
those who believes, then it is
up to you to stand up against
those who have been con-
spiring for almost 100 years
to destroy the nation from
within. The Bill of Rights has
never been more threatened.
Some believe there is but
three more election cycles
to stop the left's march to
socialism. Now is the time!
Bob Reichert
Punta Gorda


U.S. is now
a police state

Editor:
I'm writing in response to a


Mary Harris letter to the editor published
Punta Gorda June 27 titled, "NSA monitor-
ing can prevent attacks."
I have to wonder if the
:are author has ever read the
tuition U.S. Constitution and Bill
of Rights and understood
the contents, most specifi-
t, why call the Fourth Amendment.
agree on What he suggests is that we


much?
The primary responsibility
of the U.S. Supreme Court is
that of interpreting the law
and the Constitution, the
supreme law of the land. Our
Founding Fathers intended
the appointees to this highest
court to be among the most
intelligent, well-educated
and experienced legal minds
in the land.
So why do they now almost
always disagree in their final
decisions? If they are all so
smart and well-versed in the
Constitution, why are so few
of the Court's decisions the
result of nine-zero or eight-
one votes of the justices?
It appears the justices
demonstrate none of the
attributes listed above, and
the court, once revered as the
pinnacle of blind justice, is
now taking sides along ideo-
logical rather than legal lines
in deciding what is good and
what is evil in our country.
So the rulings are all too
frequently the result of five-
four votes, and only about
half of them care anymore
what the Founding Fathers
intended when they authored
the Constitution.
Noel Hyde
Punta Gorda


snoulda e fine with warrant-
less searches of our commu-
nications, which is in direct
conflict with the Fourth
Amendment. My view is what
our government is doing is
right out of George Orwell's
book "1984," with a little
of the movie "The Matrix"
thrown in for good measure.
With the indefinite deten-
tion clause in the 2012 NDAA
and the Disposition Matrix,
I believe we have become a
police state.
I offer two quotes which
are quite relevant to our cur-
rent situation:
"They who can give up
essential liberty to obtain
a little temporary safety
deserve neither liberty nor
safety." Benjamin Franklin
"The illusion of freedom
will continue as long as
it's profitable to continue
the illusion. At the point
where the illusion becomes
too expensive to maintain,
they will just take down the
scenery, they will pull back
the curtains, they will move
the tables and chairs out of
the way and you will see the
brick wall at the back of the
theater." Frank Zappa
Paige Strike
Punta Gorda


LETTER SUBMISSION POLICY
Letters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to the Editor section is designed as a public forum for community discourse, and the opinions
to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Sun,
included. The phone number and address are not for publication, but must be provided. Due to the Letters to the Editor, 23170 Harborview Road, Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980, or fax to 941-629-2085.
number of letters received, we are able to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters Readers with access to the Internet may email Letters to the Editor at letters@sun-herald.com.


OurTown Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013





:The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 11


Frederick Douglass, self-made man


F rederick Douglass
gave one of the
great July Fourth
orations in American
history. Speaking in
Rochester, N.Y., in
1852, he hailed the
accomplishments and
ideals of the Found-
ers, before denouncing
the nation's departures
from the faith of the
Declaration of Inde-
pendence with the
righteousness and fury
of an Old Testament
prophet.
Congress just placed
a statue of Frederick
Douglass in the Capitol.
It may be the best
thing it does all year.
Douglass is one of
the nation's greatest
champions of freedom.
The former slave fought
for it for himself and
for others, and in his
speeches and writings
left a record of devotion
to liberty that will echo
through all time.


"Not even such justly
canonized Founding
Fathers as Benjamin
Franklin and Thomas
Jefferson," the late
critic Albert Murray
argues, "represent a
more splendid image
and pattern for the con-
temporary American
citizen. On balance,
not even Abraham
Lincoln was a more
heroic embodiment of
the American as self-
made man. After all,
Lincoln, like Franklin
and Jefferson, was born
free."
In his youth as a
slave on the Eastern


Shore of Maryland,
Douglass looked at
the sailboats on the
Chesapeake with envy,
as he wrote later in his
first memoir: "You are
freedom's swift-winged
angels that fly round
the world. I am con-
fined in bands of iron!
0 that I were free! 0,
that I were on one of
your gallant decks, and
under your protecting
wing!"
Douglass forged his
own freedom through
shrewdness and will.
When the wife of a
household he was serv-
ing began innocently
to teach him to read,
her husband rebuked
her: "A n----- should
know nothing but to
obey his master to
do as he is told to do.
Learning would spoil
the best n----- in the
world. Now, if you
teach that n----- how to
read, there would be no


keeping him. It would
forever unfit him to be
a slave."
That was all Douglass
needed to know. "From
that moment, I under-
stood the pathway from
slavery to freedom,"
he said. "I set out with
high hope, and a fixed
purpose, at whatever
cost of trouble, to learn
how to read." He traded
his bread to white boys
in exchange for their
reading lessons, and
devoured the collection
of classic speeches, The
Columbian Orator. Its
writings in opposition
to all oppression "gave
tongue to interesting
thoughts of my own
soul."
In a turning point,
he fought back against
a slave breaker who
sought to beat him.
"You have seen how
a man was made a
slave," he writes of this
act of self-assertion,


"you shall see how
a slave was made a
man." Eventually, his
master hired him out
in Baltimore and took
the proceeds but
not quite all. He might
let him keep 6 cents of
the $6 he earned in a
week. "I regarded it,"
Douglass writes, "as a
sort of admission of my
right to the whole."
By now, he was a
slave only in form, not
in fact, as he puts it.
All that was left was
to make his escape. In
the North, he became a
fierce abolitionist and
an evangelist for work
and self-improvement.
In his most popular
lecture, titled "Self-
Made Men," he de-
clared, "We may explain
success mainly by one
word and that word is
WORK! WORK!! WORK!!!
WORK!!!! Not transient
and fitful effort, but
patient, enduring,


honest, unremitting,
and indefatigable work,
into which the whole
heart is put."
In his legendary July
Fourth oration, he said
this holiday "is yours,
not mine," and lashed
the country for the
national sin of slavery.
But he honored the
country's founding, in
words that will always
be true. "The 4th of
July is the first great
fact in your nation's
history the very
ringbolt in the chain of
your yet undeveloped
destiny," he declared.
"Cling to this day -
cling to it, and to its
principles, with the
grasp of a storm-tossed
mariner to a spar at
midnight."
Rich Lowry is the
editor of the National
Review. Readers may
reach him at comments.
lowry@na tiona review.
com.


The chairman's own methods and style


Among the many
reasons that
Americans hold
the House of Represen-
tatives in low repute -
at historically abysmal
levels, in fact is the
blatantly partisan and
ideological misconduct
of so many commit-
tee chairs. Without any
evident embarrassment
these mighty politi-
cians deny science,
defy mathematics and
dismiss every fact that
contradicts their preju-
dices. But bad as these
chairs tend to be, none
is quite as flamboyantly
awful as Rep. Darrell
Issa, chairman of the
Government Oversight
Committee, a special
investigative panel
whose latest effort to
conjure scandal from
nothingness at the In-
ternal Revenue Service
would provoke his re-
moval by a responsible
leadership.
As we have pointed
out repeatedly in these
pages, and as testimony
by the IRS inspector
general has since con-
firmed, it is now clear
that right-wing groups
were not targeted for
exceptional scrutiny.
Moreover, there was no
political motive in the
agency's treatment of
the tea party and as-
sociated groups seeking
tax exemption (in many
cases illegitimately).
It is now equally
obvious that the be-
havior of Issa himself,
with his attempts to
skew his committee's


investigation and
conceal testimony that
exonerated the agency,
represents the most
serious wrongdoing
in the supposed "IRS
scandal." But this isn't
the first time that the
California Republican,
who happens to be
the wealthiest man in
Congress, has misused
the broad powers of his
chairmanship. Actually,
that is all he does as
he demonstrated in
equally opportunistic
and amateurish ex-
aminations of both the
Benghazi tragedy and
the "Fast and Furious"
affair.
Issa's stewardship of
the House Government
Reform Committee
has failed even by
the standards of the
Republican congres-
sional leadership,
which must have hoped
that he would have
collected some Obama
administration scalps
by now. He delayed the
Fast and Furious probe
solely to extend it into
the election year, blus-
tered against Attorney
General Eric Holder
and accomplished
- nothing.
There is little hope


that Speaker John
Boehner, who has
enough problems
maintaining a sem-
blance of authority and
dignity, will question
Issa's fitness to chair
this important com-
mittee. But still we are
left wondering: What
would become of Issa
if he were subjected to
the Republican style
of investigation? What
if the presumption of
guilt, the preference
for insinuation over
evidence, the omission
of exculpatory facts,
and the promulgation
of conspiratorial specu-
lations that feature in
all of Issa's theatrical
probes were applied to
him?
As the richest mem-
ber of Congress, Issa
seems to enjoy the
same veneer of respect-
ability that great wealth
has provided to many
dubious figures. But his
past includes several
troubling encounters
with law enforcement,
from alleged car thefts
to weapons offenses. So
what would the public
learn from an Issa-style
investigation of Darrell
Issa?
First, the commit-
tee chair would reveal
the troubling findings
about Issa, namely
that he was arrested
not once but twice
for illegal weapons


offenses. Worse yet,
he would explain, Issa
had been convicted the
second time. Then he
would release slightly
redacted copies of
court records on file
in Cleveland Heights,
Ohio, where Issa grew
up, showing an ar-
rest, charges of auto
theft and carrying a
concealed weapon
only one month after
his discharge from the
Army in the winter
of 1972. Those same
records would also
reveal that Issa and
an older brother were
both suspects in the
theft of a "new red
Maserati sports car"
from an auto dealer-
ship and that Issa was
eventually indicted for
larceny.
And then the com-
mittee might leak a
second, even more
damaging set of re-
cords showing that Issa
had been picked up
several months later
on another weapons
charge in Michigan,
where he attended
college. Police arrested
him for possession of
an unregistered hand-
gun, leading ultimately
to his conviction.
What we might not
learn at least not
until the facts were ex-
cavated by less partisan
probers is that Issa
was only 19 years old at


the time; that the first
set of charges in Ohio
was eventually dropped
by prosecutors; and
that the Michigan
charge was a misde-
meanor, punishable by
a $100 fine which
young Issa paid.
Yet whatever Issa did
as a foolish kid could
be made to look quite
sinister by a congres-
sional committee chair
like him, dedicated to
trumping up minor


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him and that those
currently in authority
over him have no ap-
petite for reining in his
abuses of that power.
To find out more
about Joe Conason, visit
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website at www. creators.
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iOurTown Page 12 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


Shop Charlotte

Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecountychamber.org


Hidden Treasures closing after 17 years


By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
NORTH PORT
COMMUNITY NEWS EDITOR

NORTH PORT Pat
Umberg's monthly sales
didn't outweigh the high
rent she pays to run her
consignment shop -
even with more than 1,200
consignors. After 17 years,
she's calling it quits on
Tuesday.
Umberg, the owner
of Hidden Treasures
Consignment at North
Port Plaza, near Abbe's
Donuts, says three major
changes in North Port


- all out of her control
- led to the decrease in
sales.
"When the post office
closed here and moved
out to Sumter Boulevard,
I lost the foot traffic from
people who came to
browse after mailing out
packages and letters," she
said Wednesday.
Umberg saw another
loss in sales when the
state closed a southbound
median along U.S. 41 with
a turn lane into North Port
Plaza.
"People didn't want
to turn around to come


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into the plaza," she said.
"The inconvenience
to them changed their
shopping patterns. With
some of the newer stores
that came in during the
last few years, customers
started to forget about the
older shopping centers
and the mom-and-pop
businesses."
Umberg, who says
she knows all of her
consignors by name,
sells furniture, clothing,
knickknacks, comforters,
antiques and more in her
shop.
Like other consignment
stores in the city, after
the new Goodwill store
opened in the old Publix
building in the Shoppes
of North Port, Umberg
saw a sharp decline in her
clothing sales.
"Between the rent being
high ($4,000 a month) and
the three other obstacles,
I just couldn't keep my
doors open anymore," she
said. "I was working for
my landlord. I used to do
a great business, but it's
dwindled so much that
it's not worth it for me
anymore.
"I absolutely love all of
my customers. I will miss
them all. I'm upset that I
haven't been able to reach
all of my consignors,
but I've gotten most of
them. I'm trying to sell
everything in the store by
Tuesday."


SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH


Pat Umberg, owner of Hidden Treasures Consignment in North
Port, is closing her doors after 17 years in business in the city.


Umberg has slashed
prices, with everything
in the store 10 percent to
50 percent off.
"There's stuff marked
at ridiculous prices,"
she said. "It's all gotta
go before an auctioneer
comes here."
Umberg said some-
thing she will really miss
about being a North Port
business owner is the
community outreach and
giving back as often as she
could to help others.
"Over the years,
I've helped the DASH
(Domestic Abuse Shelter
Homes) when it was in
North Port," she said. "I've
been working with the
Back Pack Angels (giving
personal hygiene products
to homeless students),
and I gave to the Salvation
Army, the Humane Society


... it goes on and on."
Theresa Cline is con-
signor 333, according to
Umberg, who could recall
the number off the top of
her head.
"She's one of my origi-
nal consignors," Umberg
said as she greeted Cline
Wednesday. "She's been
with me since 1998."
Cline said it's a shame
Hidden Treasures is
closing.
"You really could find
some unique things in
this store," Cline said. "I'm
going to miss it."
Umberg plans to keep
the store open from 9 a.m.
to about 4 p.m. through
Tuesday, except for today's
holiday (which likely will
have limited hours) and
Sunday (when it will be
closed).
Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


The Finale-Jam-Thank-You party wraps up the 6 week challenge with live
music from all 5 bands. Find out who won this year's war. Bring a bag of
non-perishable food and enjoy music, trivia and other games,
raffles, look-a-like contest, and silent auction.
Santa visits at I pm to kick off Fisherman's Village Christmas in July!



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For information and links to all the bands and events,
visit cchomelesscoalition.org (Or, call Claudia at 781-799-7570)


Women Nobel laureates


celebrated at library


By TOM CHANG
STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD Denise
DeLong wants to remind
future generations of
women that they have role
models in the world of
science.
DeLong, STEM co-chair
of the Venice branch of the
American Association of
University Women, assem-
bled a display to celebrate
the accomplishments of
nine female contemporary
Nobel laureates such as
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi,
Ada E. Yonath and Elinor
Ostrom.
The display is near the
entrance of Elsie Quirk
Library, 100 W Dearborn
St. in Englewood, for the
month of July to promote
STEM careers for women.
STEM is a hybrid educa-
tion program that incorpo-
rates science, technology,
engineering and math.
"I started with the most
recent winners and worked
backwards," DeLong said.
"I was given a grant by


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the state of Florida AAUW
for $900 to work on the
project. I was surprised at
the number of contempo-
rary women earning these
accolades."
Barre-Sinoussi won the
Nobel Prize for medicine
in 2008 for her part in
discovering HIV Yonath
won the Nobel Prize in
chemistry in 2009 for her
studies on the structure
and function of the ribo-
some. Ostrom won the
Nobel Prize in econom-
ics in 2009 for her work
demonstrating how forests,
fisheries, oil fields or graz-
ing lands can be managed
successfully by the people
who use them rather than
by governments or private
companies.
"Some are doing
research and some are
teaching are the ones
winning these awards,"
DeLong said. "There's not
a lot of publicity there
through regular means
except their peers."
DeLong said through-
out her research she
discovered there wasn't a
comprehensive book that
compiled the accomplish-
ments of the women. She
also had difficulty finding
suitable photos of the
women.
"The information is
scattered," she said. "I
think in order to appeal to
girls we need to have more
interesting books."
Kathy Black, president
of the AAUW in Venice,
said there is some head-
way with interest from
girls, but women still


have a long way to go.
"I think it's getting
better for women in STEM
programs, because there
is more awareness and
emphasis in those fields,"
Black said. "We're seeing
more women in those
fields."
Black said middle school
is the best time to cre-
ate impressions for girls
about a potential career in
science.
"Usually by high school
they start to limit their own
potential," she said.
Black said finan-
cial issues add to the
complications.
"A big problem in our
classrooms is budget cuts,"
she said. "Teachers are be-
ing squeezed as resources
are being depleted. I would
like to see if more money
can be put in education
and see more girls in the
STEM programs."
DeLong said the STEM
events AAUW organized
called Girls, Gadgetry and
Galvanizing Genius have
been a resounding success.
AAUW started the events
because of the declining
role of women in STEM-
related fields.
"We had one female teen
volunteer at the Jacaranda
Library event," she said.
"We had four at the Elsie
Quirk Library event. The
girls were really receptive
to the volunteers. For a girl
to think about these fields,
they have to have role
models."
For more information,
call 941-861-1200.
Email: tdiang@sun-herald.com


PHOTO PROVIDED BY DENISE DELONG


Denise DeLong, STEM co-chair of the Venice branch of the
American Association of University Women, compiled the
accomplishments of contemporary female Nobel laureates
in STEM-related fields at the Elsie Quirk Library on 100 W.
Dearborn St. in Englewood for the month of July. STEM stands
for science, technology, engineering and math.


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Kids try out the ukulele in patriotic program


SUN PHOTOS BY TAMI GARCIA


Alexis Jenkins,17, hosted a free children's program at the North Port Library Tuesday, where
she played patriotic songs on the ukulele and taught those in attendance how to play the
instrument. Jenkins was hosting the program as part of receiving her Gold award project through
Girl Scout Troop 317 in Venice.


North Port Library teen volunteer Roxanne
Smith, 17, performs on her pink ukulele Jimmy Timpson, 6, brought along his own
during Ukulele Day Tuesday at the North Port ukuleleto the free program at the North Port
Library. Library.


Analai
Rodriguez, 2,
waves a
miniature
American
flag while
17-year-old
Alexis Jenkins
plays patriotic
tunes on her
ukulele.


Ares Brill, 6, strums on her ukulele during a free
program with Alexis Jenkins playing patriotic
songs and demonstrating how to play the
instrument.


Alexis Jenkins shows Emalie Dalton, 8, the
proper placement of her fingers on the
ukulele during a free program at the North
Port Library on Tuesday afternoon. The
library is hosting many free youth and adult
activities throughout the summer. For more
information, call 941-861-1300.


Nadia Schmaler and Erin Wideman, both 14, at the Ukulele Day program.


Julia MacDonald, 11, waves an American flag as she sings the national anthem with Alexis
Jenkins, accompanying the audience on her ukulele, during a free program this week at the
North Port Library.


Twelve-year-old Saloni Zobalia waves an American flag while Alexis Jenkins performs patriotic
songs on the ukulele during a free program Tuesday sponsored by the Friends of the North Port
Library.




Alexis Jenkins,
17, hosted a
free program
at the North
Port Library,
demonstrating -
how to play
the ukulele to '
more than 40
who attended. ...


Above: Emalie Dalton,
8, attempts to play the
ukulele, one of many that
children could play Tuesday
at the North Port Library.




















Left: Ten-month-old Noemi
Rodriguez demonstrates
her patriotism by holding a
miniature American flag.


iOurTown Page 14


E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE

Hiring drives
stocks higher


Encouraging news about the
U.S. jobs market trumped
higher oil prices and worrying
developments in Europe's debt
crisis on Wednesday.
Page 6 -


Expert: No Martin DNA
on gun grip


Zimmerman's DNA was not
found under the unarmed teen's
fingernails, a law enforcement
expert said Wednesday in testi-
mony that prosecutors hope will
refute the neighborhood watch
volunteer's self-defense claim.
Page 5 -


10 things to know


1. Egytian army
ousts Morsi
The former president denounces the
move as a "full coup" by the military.
Seepage 1.

2. Income, education
linked to diabetes
A study says that in groups who
disproportionately experience stunted
economic and academic prospects,
high rates of Type 2 diabetes are the
common result. Seepage 1.

3. Obama orders
review of aid to Egypt
Under U.S. law, the government must
suspend foreign aid to any nation
whose elected leader is ousted in a
coup d'etat. See page 4.

4. Martha Stewart
agrees to a pay cut
Her compensation has been reduced to
$1.8 million. Her license fee drops to
$1.7 million. Seepage2.

5. Health care law
delay stirs worries
Questions are being raised about other
potential problems lurking in the
homestretch. See page 1.

6. A balance of grief
and patriotism
Bursting with Americana, Prescott, Ariz.,
is a deeply patriotic, religious town
where even teenage boys sing "Amazing
Grace"in their full voices. Seepage2.

7. Drop in money for
Florida police training
Florida has found its dropping crime
rate is partly responsible for a law
enforcement training trust fund being
at an all-time low. See page 5.

8. Europe wants talks
on trade, surveillance
European countries agreed Wednesday
that talks on a free-trade deal with
the United States should start in
parallel with discussions about NSA
surveillance. Seepage 9.

9. AutoHation June
sales increase
Its June new vehicle sales rose
10 percent to 25,162, helped by a
double-digit increase in demand for
domestic vehicles. See page 2.

10. Supreme Court sets
rules on jurors' phones
The Florida Supreme Court has ruled
that jurors may not take phones into
deliberations. See page 5.


I I i



he Wirer


h eJ t jiwww.sunnewspapers.net
THURSDAY JULY 4, 2013



Egyptian army ousts Morsi


Ex-president denounces event as


By HAMZA HENDAWI, MAGGIE MICHAEL
and SARAH EL DEEB
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

CAIRO Egypt's first democrati-
cally elected president was over-
thrown by the military Wednesday,
ousted after just one year in office
by the same kind of Arab Spring
uprising that brought the Islamist
leader to power.
The armed forces announced
they would install a temporary
civilian government to replace
Islamist President Mohammed
Morsi, who denounced the action
as a "full coup" by the generals.
They also suspended the Islamist-
drafted constitution and called for
new elections.


Millions of anti-Morsi protest-
ers around the country erupted
in celebrations after the televised
announcement by the army chief.
Fireworks burst over crowds in
Cairo's Tahrir Square, where men
and women danced, shouting,
"God is great" and "Long live
Egypt."
Fearing a violent reaction by
Morsi's Islamist supporters, troops
and armored vehicles deployed in
the streets of Cairo and elsewhere,
surrounding Islamist rallies.
Clashes erupted in several provin-
cial cities when Islamists opened
fire on police, with at least nine
people killed, security officials said.
Gehad el-Haddad, a spokesman
MORSI 14


full coup


AP PHOTO


Opponents of Egypt's Islamist leader Mohammed Morsi
celebrate outside the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt,
Wednesday. A statement on the Egyptian president's office's
Twitter account has quoted Mohammed Morsi as calling mili-
tary measures "a full coup."


Gasoline prices begin slide


AP PHOTOS
In this Monday photo, vehicles are reflected in a sign In this Monday photo, a Shell station in North Olmsted, Ohio, sells regular unleaded gasoline for
advertising unleaded gas for $2.99 at a QuikTrip station in $3.09 per gallon with the BP across the street at $3.11. Gasoline prices are on a summer slide,
Greenville, S.C. giving drivers a break as they set out for the beach and other vacation spots for the Fourth of July.


Health care law delay


stirs new worries


By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
WASHINGTON -The sudden delay
of a major part of President Barack
Obama's historic health care overhaul is
raising questions about other potential
problems lurking in the homestretch.
The requirement that many employers
provide coverage is just one part of a
complex law. But its one-year postpone-
ment has taken administration allies and
adversaries alike by surprise.
White House officials said Wednesday
that the delay was firm and won't be
extended after a year and that the
overhaul will still be fully implemented
by the time Obama leaves office. But
the officials, who were not authorized
to discuss internal deliberations on the
record and spoke only on condition of
anonymity, wouldn't rule out delays or
tweaks to other provisions.
The White House action means that
some companies that would have of-
fered health insurance next year to avoid
fines will not do so now. They're mainly
firms with many low-wage workers,
such as restaurants, hotels and tempo-
rary staffing companies. The workers,


however, will still be able to get coverage.
Many may qualify for subsidized insur-
ance through new marketplaces to debut
Oct. 1, less than three months away.
The fact that new problems are
popping up at this late stage could be
a sign of additional troublesome issues
ahead. It underscores a recent warning
by the Government Accountability Office
that the "timely and smooth" rollout
of the new insurance markets can't be
guaranteed, partly because much of the
technology to run them hasn't been fully
tested.
The timing of the announcement was
also widely mentioned.
"It's understandable that when you
announce a change in the law just
before the Fourth of July holiday, it raises
questions," said Drew Altman, presi-
dent of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family
Foundation. "Critics will jump on it and
use it as more ammunition against the
law." The foundation is a research group
that has closely followed the evolution
of the health law since it was signed in
2010.
The development was seen as


Income linked

to diabetes

By MELISSA HEALY
Los ANGELES TIMES WRITER
WASHINGTON -The twin plagues of
economic hardship and low academic
attainment turn out to be an inflamma-
tory problem, not just for society but for
the human bodies beset by them. And
for many, including those in minority
groups who disproportionately experience
stunted economic and academic pros-
pects, high rates of Type 2 diabetes are the
common result, a new study says.
The new research, based on a long-
running study of British government
workers, offers a partial explanation for a
trend that is firmly established in industri-
alized democracies that where calories
are plentifully available, those clinging to
the lower rungs of the economic ladder are
most likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. The
study was published Tuesday in the open-
access journal Public Library of Science
(PLoS) Medicine.
The "Whitehall II" study tracked 6,387
London-based civil servants, who were
between 35 and 55 years old when they
were recruited, for as long as 24 years
starting in 1985. In the study phase
that began between 1991-93, none had


WORRIES 4


DIABETES 14






~Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net NATIONAL NEWS The Sun IThursday, July 4, 2013


PRESCOTT, Ariz. (AP) -
The notoriously rambunc-
tious annual rodeo contest
in Prescott added a solemn
new ritual this week a
cowboy leading a riderless
horse around the outdoor
arena, a fire helmet sitting
on its saddle, fire boots
resting in the stirrups.
Spectators in this Old
West town of 40,000 placed
straw hats over hearts and
cried quietly during the
tribute to the 19 firefighters
who were killed over the
weekend, then went on to
drink, laugh and cheer as
heartily as the miners and
ranchers who patronized
the arena in the 1800s.
Emotional whiplash
has become a matter of
course here as residents try
to move on and enjoy the
biggest tourism week of
the year, while also mourn-
ing the men who were the
town's pride.
The famous saloons on
Whiskey Row continue to
hum, the Fourth of July


BOSTON (AP) For
many New Englanders,
the Fourth of July means
the Boston Pops perform-
ing the "1812 Overture"
on the Charles River
Esplanade and fireworks
booming overhead.
This year, it's also the
city's first large public
gathering since the
Boston Marathon bomb-
ings an attack that
authorities have said the
suspects first considered
staging on Independence
Day.
But as law enforcement


A woman stands with her family during the closing song at a
candlelight vigil, Tuesday in Prescott, Ariz. More than 2,000
people gathered at the vigil to honor the 19 Granite Moun-
tain Hotshot firefighters who were killed by an out-of-control
blaze near Yarnell, Ariz., on Sunday.


fireworks show is going on
as usual, and attendance
is holding steady at the
weeklong "World's Oldest
Rodeo" event, even as
memorials proliferate on
Prescott's elm-lined streets
and relatives fly in for
funerals.
"It's not going to do


anyone any good just
sitting in the house. I think
it's more important to
spend time with people
than anything else," said
financial planner Andrew
Secundy, who cut loose
at the rodeo on Monday
night and mourned at a
twilight vigil on Tuesday.


officials put a ramped-
up security plan in
place Wednesday, many
people in Boston said
they wouldn't give in
to fear of terrorism by
changing their plans or
staying away from public
celebrations.
Catherine Lawrie,
a 54-year-old
Massachusetts Senate
employee, walked down
near the Esplanade
to hear some of the
performers rehearse
Wednesday.
She was disappointed


A mile-high city about
90 miles northwest of
Phoenix, Prescott remains
a modern-day outpost
of the pioneer spirit,
a place where rootin'
tootin' cowboys still have
a foothold. It's that spirit
that will guide officials
as they navigate the days
ahead and figure out
how to honor the elite
Hotshot firefighters who
died Sunday in a nearby
wind-driven wildfire
AP PHOTO that is still burning, said
Prescott Fire Marshal Don


Devendorf.
"The people on the
range, on ranches, they did
whatever they could do. It
wasn't money, but it was
love, it was caring, it was
sweat," Devendorf said as
he walked among thou-
sands of mourners who
filled the Prescott High
School football stadium for
Tuesday's vigil. Nineteen
balloons one for each of
the fallen were released
into the air.


a footbridge to the river
was blocked because of
increased security, but
said Boston looked ready
to host a big party with-
out any worries about
safety.
She also wasn't think-
ing about the bombing
suspects' alleged original
target. "I'm thinking of
independence and what
our country is about,"
Lawrie said.
Boston Pops conductor
Keith Lockhart said the
tight security reminded
him of what it was like


Learn how some very special monkeys
are improving the lives of people
with limited mobility.


during the city's first
July Fourth celebration
following the Sept. 11
attacks. He said before
then, the thought of hav-
ing bomb-sniffing dogs at
the Esplanade was odd.
"The core of terror-
ism is psychological. I
think this is a perfect
time to come together
as Bostonians," he said.
"Events are a good way to
move on from events like
what happened."
East Boston resident
Christy Scott, who
watched the Boston
Marathon from the half-
way point, gathered with
her family Wednesday
to watch the concert
rehearsal. The 41-year-
old wore a bracelet that
said "Boston Strong,"
the slogan that since the
April 15 attack has come
to represent the city's
refusal to give in to the
fear of terrorism.
"Not about to change
our plans and traditions,"
she said. "We're just not
going to live in fear."
Boston University
chemistry professor Sean
Elliott also brought rela-
tives to the area.
"I'm not nervous,"
the 41-year-old said. "I
am sure that the human
spirit will thrive. I'm sure
it will be a great festival
like it is every year."
Authorities have said
the concert and fireworks
display usually attracts
500,000 to 600,000 spec-
tators, but 33-year-old
cab driver Saidon Mayugi
suggested some people
would be hesitant about
being out in a big crowd.


July 4 in Prescott, Arizona:


Balance of grief, patriotism


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NATION

Martha Stewart
agrees to pay cut
(Bloomberg) Martha
Stewart has agreed to
have her annual pay
cut by 10 percent as the
company she created
struggles to curtail losses
amid a shift from pub-
lishing and TV.
Martha Stewart Living
Omnimedia Inc. changed
the compensation
to $1.8 million for its
N71-year-old
chairman
as part of
an option in
a July 2012
agree-
ment that
extended
STEWART her employ-
ment until
2017, according to a filing
today. Her annual license
fee was also trimmed by
$300,000 to $1.7 million,
and the board replaced
an old expense policy that
reimbursed her for chauf-
feur, Internet and home-
security services. It didn't
say what the new expense
policy would cover.
In the past year, the
New York-based company
has suffered from slump-
ing advertising sales at its
magazines and declining
broadcasting revenue
following the cancellation
of "The Martha Stewart
Show." Martha Stewart
Living, which is trying to
focus more on its mer-
chandising business, is
also seeking a permanent
chief executive officer.

Texas House
committee OKs
abortion rules
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) -
Texas Republicans voted
early Wednesday to move
forward with new abor-
tion restrictions, after
limiting testimony at a
public hearing, refusing
to consider Democratic
amendments and im-
posing strict security
precautions to prevent
disruptions from pro-
testing abortion-rights
supporters.
On a party-line vote,
the Republican majority
sent the bill to the full
Texas House for a vote
next week. Gov. Rick Perry
is pushing his allies in
the Legislature to move
quickly after he called
lawmakers back for a
second special session to
pass the bill, which would
limit when, where and
how women may obtain
an abortion in the state.
More than 3,500 people
came to the Capitol and
registered a position on
the bill, and more than
1,100 signed up to testify.
But fewer than 100 people
had a chance to express
their views because
the top Republican on
the committee limited
testimony to eight hours
and refused entreaties to
extend it.

Ex-congressman
Gray dies at 71
(Washington Post)
-William Gray, a
Pennsylvania congress-
man who became the
nation's highest-ranking
African-American elected
official while serving
in the U.S. House of
Representatives and who
later headed the United


Ulibarri and Anya Schultz
- were taken to hospitals,
according to the email.
No children were injured,
a point underscored in the
email to parents with the
subject in all capital letters:
"EVERY CHILD AT CAMP
IS FINE."


Negro College Fund, died
Monday in London. He
was 71.
He collapsed while
attending the Wimbledon
tennis tournament with
one of his sons. A fam-
ily spokesman, William
Epstein, said the cause of
death was not immedi-
ately known.

AutoNation June
sales increase
10 percent
FORT LAUDERDALE
(AP) AutoNation Inc.
said Wednesday that its
June new vehicle sales
rose 10 percent to 25,162,
helped by a double-digit
increase in demand for
domestic vehicles.
Sales of domestic ve-
hicles jumped 15 percent
to 8,130, while sales
of imported cars and
trucks rose 8 percent to
12,460. Sales of premium
luxury vehicles increased
8 percent to 4,572.
The company said its
revenue at stores open
at least a year increased
5 percent. The metric is a
key measure of a retailer's
health, because it ex-
cludes revenue at stores
that recently opened or
closed.
For the second quar-
ter, AutoNation said its
overall sales increased
10 percent from year-
ago levels. Domestic
sales rose 16 percent,
while sales of imported
vehicles rose 7 percent
and premium luxury sales
increased 10 percent.

Computer mouse
inventor dies at 88
(Bloomberg) Douglas
Engelbart, the visionary
electrical engineer who
invented the computer
mouse decades before
the influx of personal
computers into homes
and workplaces, has died.
He was 88.
He died Wednesday at
his home in Atherton,
Calif., the New York Times
reported, citing his wife,
Karen O'Leary Engelbart.
The cause was kidney
failure.
Engelbart's work at
the Stanford Research
Institute, today's SRI
International, resulted
in 21 patents. The last
one, No. 3,541,541, filed
in 1967 and granted in
1970, was for the com-
puter mouse, or as it was
described in technical
terms:
"An X-Y position
indicator control for
movement by the hand
over any surface to move
a cursor over the display
on a cathode ray tube, the
indicator control generat-
ing signals indicating its
position to cause a cursor
to be displayed on the
tube at the corresponding
position."

Youth camp staffer
killed by giant oak
(LA Times) -One staff
member from Camp
Tawonga near Yosemite
National Park was killed
and four others were
injured Wednesday morn-
ing by a massive oak tree
that fell.
Officials from the San
Francisco-based Jewish
camp identified the
staff member as Annais
Rittenberg in a letter
emailed to parents.
The tree "spontaneously
fell" just outside the camp's
dining hall near a campfire
circle about 8:30 a.m. PDT,
according to police and
an email sent to parents
Wednesday afternoon. Four
staff members Lizzie
Moore, Cara Sheedy, Juliet


Wary Boston ups July 4th security


iPage 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


NATIONAL NEWS




SThe Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net





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Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, July 4, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE


WASHINGTON (AP) -
President Barack Obama
urged Egypt's military
Wednesday to hand
back control to a demo-
cratic, civilian government
without delay, but stopped
short of calling the ouster
of President Mohammed
Morsi a coup.
In a carefully worded
statement, Obama said he
was "deeply concerned"
by the military's move to
topple Morsi's govern-
ment and suspend Egypt's
constitution. He said he
was ordering the U.S.



MORSI

FROM PAGE 1

for the Muslim
Brotherhood party, said
Morsi was under house
arrest at a Presidential
Guard facility where he
had been residing, and
12 presidential aides also
were under house arrest.
The army took con-
trol of state media and
blacked out TV stations
operated by the Muslim
Brotherhood. The head of
the Brotherhood's politi-
cal wing was arrested.
The ouster of Morsi
throws Egypt on an
uncertain course, with
a danger of further


GASOLINE
FROM PAGE 1

maintenance work and a fire,
then plunged after the refineries
ramped back up.
Patrick Francis, who owns a
used-car lot in Toledo, Ohio,
filled up his Volvo for $2.89 per
gallon over the weekend as he
was preparing for a family trip
to Hilton Head, N.C. Just three
weeks earlier, he was paying
more than $4.
"I feel blessed," he said. "It's
like a miracle."
Tom Kloza, chief oil analyst
at GasBuddy.com, predicted
the national average will hover
between $3.30 and $3.60 for the
rest of the summer. That would
be somewhat lower than the last
two summers, when gasoline
prices spent part of the season
above $3.70 per gallon.
Oil prices shot up Wednesday
above $101 per barrel, the high-
est since May 2012, as the crisis
in Egypt deepened. Egypt is not
a major oil producer but controls
the Suez Canal, a major shipping
lane for Middle Eastern crude.
While analysts are not


WORRIES
FROM PAGE 1

noteworthy by both
critics and allies of the
new law.
"We are concerned that
the delay further erodes
the coverage that was
envisioned," said Rich
Umbdenstock, president
of the American Hospital
Association, which has
supported the Affordable
Care Act.
Just over a week ago,
Health and Human
Services Secretary



DIABETES
FROM PAGE 1

diabetes. Roughly every
two years thereafter,
researchers weighed
subjects, administered
glucose tolerance tests,
inquired about diabetes
diagnoses and health be-
haviors, and drew blood
samples to test levels of
the inflammatory mark-
ers Interleuken-6 and
C-reactive protein.
The researchers also
set out to characterize
participants' socioeco-
nomic "life course." They
gauged participants'
socioeconomic status
in childhood from their
accounts of the work their


government to assess
what the military's actions
meant for U.S. foreign aid
to Egypt.
Under U.S. law, the
government must sus-
pend foreign aid to any
nation whose elected
leader is ousted in a coup
d'etat. The U.S. provides
$1.5 billion a year to Egypt
in military and economic
assistance that is consid-
ered a critical U.S. national
security priority.
"I now call on the
Egyptian military to move
quickly and responsibly to

confrontation. It came
after four days of mass
demonstrations even
larger than those of the
2011 Arab Spring that
toppled longtime auto-
crat Hosni Mubarak.
Egyptians were angered
that Morsi was giving
too much power to his
Muslim Brotherhood and
other Islamists and had
failed to tackle the coun-
try's mounting economic
woes.
Beyond the fears over
violence, some protesters
are concerned whether
an army-installed admin-
istration can lead to real
democracy.
President Barack
Obama urged the military
to hand back control to


return full authority back
to a democratically elected
civilian government as
soon as possible through
an inclusive and transpar-
ent process, and to avoid
any arbitrary arrests of
President Morsi and his
supporters," Obama said.
The U.S. wasn't tak-
ing sides in the conflict,
committing itself only to
democracy and respect
for the rule of law, Obama
said.
Hours earlier, Egyptian
armed forces ousted Morsi,
an Islamist and Egypt's

a democratic, civilian
government as soon as
possible but stopped
short of calling it a coup
d'etat.
He said he was "deeply
concerned" by the
military's move to topple
Morsi's government and
suspend Egypt's consti-
tution. He said he was
ordering the U.S. govern-
ment to assess what the
military's actions meant
for U.S. foreign aid to
Egypt $1.5 billion
a year in military and
economic assistance.
The U.S. wasn't tak-
ing sides in the conflict,
committing itself only to
democracy and respect
for the rule of law, Obama
said.


expecting a resulting surge in
gasoline prices, they could rise
quickly if the Mideast unrest
does disrupt oil supplies. Gas
could also climb if a hurricane
threatens the heart of the
refining industry along the Gulf
Coast.
This year's early summer de-
cline, while welcome, is smaller
than the seasonal drops of the


Kathleen Sebelius
officially launched the
100-day countdown
to the new insurance
markets. Uninsured
Americans in all 50 states
and Washington, D.C.,
will be able to shop on-
line for health plans, and
most will get government
subsidies to pay their
premiums for coverage
that takes effect Jan. 1.
In an upbeat talk to
reporters, Sebelius gave
no inkling the adminis-
tration was about to slam
the brakes on a major
provision.
Former HHS Secretary

fathers did. A few years
into the study, researchers
classified each partici-
pant's employment grade
- from clerical/support
up to the most senior civil
servants. And 10 years into
the study, they asked
about a participant's high-
est level of educational
attainment. The resulting
answers established
where subjects fell on the
socioeconomic ladder,
and whether their status
had risen or fallen over the
course of their lives.
True to past research,
those on the lower rungs
of the societal ladder were
more likely to develop
Type 2 diabetes during
the study period than
those with more educa-
tion and rosier economic


first democratically elected
president, after just a year
in power. The military in-
stalled a temporary civilian
government, suspended
the constitution and called
for new elections.
Morsi denounced his
ouster as a "full coup"
as millions of his critics
erupted in delirious scenes
of joy in Egyptian cities
after the army chief made
the announcement on
television.
Obama huddled in the
White House Situation
Room on Wednesday

On Monday, army
chief Gen. Abdel-Fattah
el-Sissi had given
Morsi an ultimatum
to find a solution to
meet the demands of
anti-government dem-
onstrators in 48 hours,
but the 62-year-old
former engineer defiantly
insisted on his legitimacy
from an election he won
with 51.7 percent of the
vote in June 2012.
Any deal was a near
impossibility, however,
making it inevitable the
military would move.
As the deadline ap-
proached, el-Sissi met
with pro-reform leader
Mohammed ElBaradei, top
Muslim cleric SheikAhmed
el-Tayeb and Coptic Pope


last two years, when gas prices
also fell between Memorial Day
and Independence Day. Gasoline
is 15 cents more expensive than
it was last year at this time.
Gas prices typically rise in
late winter or early spring when
refineries perform mainte-
nance and switch from making
winter gasoline blends to the
more complex summer blends


Mike Leavitt says the
administration may have
come to a point where
officials realize they
can't get everything to
line up the way it was
envisioned in the highly
complicated legislation,
and they'll start to delay,
change or jettison parts
of it.
"The administration is
clearly feeling disruptive
vibrations and real-
izes too many things are
happening at once," said
Leavitt, who oversaw the
initially chaotic launch of
the Medicare prescription
drug benefit for President

circumstances. They
also had poorer health
behaviors that would help
explain their higher dia-
betes rates: Compared to
those in higher positions
with more education,
they were more likely to
smoke, to be sedentary, to
be obese, and to have an
unhealthy diet.
But irrespective of such
behaviors, the partici-
pants with lower lifetime
socioeconomic status also
showed higher levels of in-
flammation in their blood.
And even after researchers
adjusted for the effects of
smoking, lack of exercise
and bad diets (all of which
would push inflammatory
levels up), higher levels
of inflammation among
those on society's lower


afternoon with Defense
Secretary Chuck Hagel,
Attorney General Eric
Holder and his new
national security adviser,
former U.N. Ambassador
Susan Rice. In his state-
ment after the meeting,
Obama said he expected
the military to protect the
rights of Egypt's men and
women to due process
and peaceful assembly.
He reaffirmed his call for
a democratic Egypt that
involves participation
from secular and religious
parties alike.

Tawadros II, as well as
opposition activists and
some members of the
ultraconservative Salafi
movements. The consul-
tations apparently were
aimed at bringing as wide
a consensus as possible
behind the army's moves.
The Brotherhood
boycotted the session,
according to its political
arm the Freedom and
Justice Party.
In a last-minute state-
ment before the deadline,
Morsi again rejected the
military's intervention,
saying abiding by his
electoral legitimacy was
the only way to prevent
violence. He criticized the
military for "taking only
one side."


required for clean-air rules.
When the nation's refineries
aren't operating at full strength,
supplies drop and prices rise.
Once the maintenance is done,
output rises and prices fall.
"When refineries go down it
can create immediate and severe
havoc," Kloza said. "It's a very
shallow distribution system,
quick to fill and quick to empty."
That's what happened in the
Midwest earlier this year. A fire
broke out at a Marathon refinery
in Detroit in late April while
maintenance was underway at
an Exxon Mobil refinery in Joliet,
Ill., and a BP refinery in Whiting,
AP PHOTO Ind.


Prices soared above $4 per
gallon in parts of Ohio, Michigan,
Wisconsin and Indiana. As the
refineries recovered, prices
quickly fell. By July 3, Ohio prices
were $3.33.
Regional spikes and plunges
are likely to happen more often
in coming years. The number
of U.S. refineries has shrunk by
a quarter since 1993 to 143, but
the nation's refining capacity has
grown 18 percent since then. The
remaining refineries are getting
bigger, so if one goes down, it's a
bigger shock to the system.


But Leavitt says he also
suspects it won't be the
last surprise.
'As time frames close
in, optimism is inevitably
confronted by real-
ism," he said. "This will
likely not be the last
audible called at the line
of scrimmage."
Perhaps most vul-
nerable: the highly
touted online enrollment
capability of the new
insurance markets. If
that doesn't perform as
advertised, consumers
may have to get on the
phone to apply, or use the
mail.

differences in inflamma-
tion, especially among
the most disadvantaged
groups, might reduce
social inequalities in Type
2 diabetes," the authors
wrote. Those might
include weight manage-
ment, physical activity
and smoking cessation
programs, and possibly
anti-inflammatory drugs.
Notably not suggested
were reforms that could
improve the educational
prospects of children
from low-income
families, worker benefits
that could give clerical
and support workers
more flexibility and
control over their work
lives, and tax policies
that fostered social
mobility.


George W Bush. They are
"wisely seeking to reorder
priorities," he added.
Leavitt said he sees the
delay of the employer re-
quirement as a win-win.
On a practical level, it
gives employers and gov-
ernment regulators more
time to work out difficult
issues, and politically the
administration appears
reasonable by listening to
critics at the risk of being
criticized by others for the
delay. Democrats running
for congressional seats
next year are probably
thankful the issue may be
muted.

rungs explained close to a
third of the diabetes cases
that developed over the
years.
Upward social mobil-
ity (yes, even in London)
certainly helped: Among
those who had grown up
in constrained economic
circumstances but at-
tained high educational
levels and bettered their
fathers' occupational
standing, inflammation
levels came down, and
diabetes rates fell below
that of peers who'd been
advantaged since birth.
Downward social mobility
left participants a little
healthier than those who'd
spent a lifetime low on the
ladder, but not much.
"Our results suggest that
tackling socioeconomic


Obama orders US to review aid to Egypt


Customers get
cash instead of
food at Taco Bell
GRAND RAPIDS,
Mich. (AP) -That was
no burrito.
Three people who
ordered food at a
Taco Bell drive-thru in
western Michigan got
something more valu-
able: $3,600 in cash.
A Taco Bell employee
mistakenly passed the
cash to the trio instead of
their food Saturday. The
money was returned a
short time later.
Kennidi Rue told
WZZM-TV and MLive.
com that she and two
friends thought about
keeping the money but
decided they'd feel guilty
if they didn't return it.
Grand Rapids police Capt.
Jeff Hertel confirmed the
incident, saying an officer
was called to assist.
"I thought it was joke,"
said Rue, 18, of Holland,
Mich. "I thought we were
on camera.... The store
manager literally just burst
out in tears. She was so
happy we brought it back."
The money was in a
store bag for deposit at a
bank. A message seeking
comment was left with
Taco Bell.
Rue, boyfriend Grant
Kruse, 20, and another
friend, Luke Postma,
25, got their meal when
they returned the money.
Kruse and Postma are
National Guard members
who were in Grand
Rapids for training.


ALMANAC
Today is Thursday, July 4, the
185th day of 2013. There are
180 days left in the year. This is
Independence Day.
Today in history
On July 4,1776, the
Declaration of Independence
was adopted by delegates to the
Second Continental Congress in
Philadelphia.
On this date
In 1802, the United States
Military Academy officially
opened at West Point, N.Y.
In 1831, the fifth president of
the United States, James Monroe,
died in New York City at age 73.
In 1863, the Civil War Siege
of Vicksburg, Miss., ended as a
Confederate garrison surrendered
to Union forces.
In 1872, the 30th president of
the United States, Calvin Coolidge,
was born in Plymouth, Vt.
In 1912, the 48-star American
flag, recognizing New Mexico
statehood, was adopted.
In 1939, Lou Gehrig of the
New York Yankees delivered his
famous farewell speech in which
he called himself"the luckiest
man on the face of the earth."
In 1942, Irving Berlin's musical
review"This Is the Army"opened
at the BroadwayTheater in New
York.
In 1959, America's 49-star
flag, recognizing Alaskan state-
hood, was officially unfurled.
In 1960, America's 50-star
flag, recognizing Hawaiian state-
hood, was officially unfurled.
In 1982, the space shuttle
Columbia concluded its fourth
and final testflight with a smooth
landing at Edwards Air Force Base
in California.
Today's birthdays
Actress Eva Marie Saint is
89. Actress Gina Lollobrigida
is 86. Playwright Neil Simon is
86. Country singer Ray Pillow
is 76. Singer Bill Withers is
75. Actor Ed Bernard is 74.
Actress Karolyn Grimes is 73.
Broadcast journalist Geraldo
Rivera is 70. Rhythm-and-blues
musician Ralph Johnson is 62.
Rock musician Domingo Ortiz
is 61. Singer John Waite is 58.
Rock musician Kirk Pengilly
(INXS) is 55. Rock musician Matt
Malley is 50. Christian rock singer
Michael Sweet is 50. Actor Al
Madrigal is 42. Actress Jenica
Bergere is 39. Actor-singer John
Lloyd Young is 38. Actress Becki
Newton is 35. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Melanie Fiona is
30. Presidential daughter Malia
Obama is 15.


In this Monday photo, a sign advertising unleaded gas for $2.99 is seen at a
QuikTrip station in Greenville, S.C. Gasoline prices are on a summer slide, giving
U.S. drivers a break as they set out for the beach and other vacation spots for
the Fourth of July.


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE










Expert: No Martin DNA on gun grip


SANFORD (AP)
- Trayvon Martin's
DNA was not found
on the grip of George
Zimmerman's gun, and
Zimmerman's DNA was
not found under the
unarmed teen's finger-
nails, a law enforcement
expert said Wednesday in
testimony that prosecu-
tors hope will refute the
neighborhood watch
volunteer's self-defense
claim.
Zimmerman has
pleaded not guilty to
second-degree murder
and says he shot the
17-year-old in the chest
to protect himself as
Martin reached for his
firearm during a fight.
Florida Department
of Law Enforcement
DNA expert Anthony
Gorgone also testified
that Zimmerman's
DNA was found among
blood on a shirt Martin
was wearing under his


hooded sweatshirt.
While cross-examining
Gorgone, defense at-
torney Don West focused
on the packaging of the
DNA samples, suggest-
ing they could have led
to the samples being
degraded. Gorgone told
him that Martin's two
sweatshirts had been
packaged in plastic while
wet, instead of a paper
bag where they can dry
out, and when he opened
the samples they smelled
of ammonia and mold.
Florida Department
of Law Enforcement
analyst Amy Siewert also
testified that tearing
and residue on Martin's
clothing showed the gun
was directly against him
when it fired.
Prosecutors have
sought to portray
Zimmerman as a vigilan-
te who profiled Martin as
the teen walked home on
a rainy night.


Trayvon Martin's parents, Sybrina Fulton, left, and Tracy
Martin, are seated at the start of George Zimmerman's trial in
Seminole County circuit court, in Sanford, Fla., Wednesday.


They called Gorgone
on the same day they
presented evidence
that they say shows
Zimmerman had aspira-
tions of becoming a
police officer and knew
about Florida's "stand-
your-ground" law, which
says a person has no


duty to retreat and can
invoke self-defense in
killing someone if it is
necessary to prevent
death or great bodily
harm.
Zimmerman had
maintained in an inter-
view with Fox News last
year that he did not know


about the law.
Prosecutors say he
did have knowledge of
it, however, because the
subject was covered in a
college class on criminal
justice Zimmerman
attended.
They called as a
witness Alexis Francisco
Carter, the military
attorney who taught the
class. Carter described
Zimmerman as one of
his better students and
said the neighborhood
watch volunteer got an
"A" in his class.
Under cross-exam-
ination, Carter gave
two definitions of legal
concepts that seemed
to bolster the defense's
case. He explained that
a person can make a
self-defense argument if
the person has a "rea-
sonable apprehension"
of death or great bodily
harm.
"It's imminent fear.


The fact alone that there
isn't an injury doesn't
necessarily mean that
the person didn't have
a reasonable apprehen-
sion or fear," Carter said.
"The fact that there are
injuries might support
there was reasonable
apprehension and fear."
Carter also explained
the concept of "im-
perfect self-defense,"
when a person is being
threatened but then
counters with a force
disproportionately
greater than the force
used against them.
"They would have the
right to defend them-
selves?" said defense
attorney Don West.
"Right," Carter said.
Another instructor,
Seminole County State
College professor Scott
Pleasants, testified that
Zimmerman had taken
his online criminal
justice class.


State sees large drop in money for police


training


TALLAHASSEE (AP)
- As law enforcement
agencies around the
country are starting to
recover from budget cuts
in a struggling economy,
Florida has found its
dropping crime rate is
partly responsible for a
law enforcement training
trust fund being at an
all-time low.
Florida partly relies
on court fees to build its
training trust fund, and
there are fewer offenders
paying into it because
the number of crimes


committed has dropped
18 percent since 2008. It's
a Catch 22 as Florida
officers, deputies and
troopers get better at pre-
venting crime, less money
is available to give them
the latest training, which
they say could make it
harder to keep crime rates
low in the future.
It doesn't help that
another major source of
money for the trust fund
comes from a portion of
traffic tickets issued, and
officers are writing far
fewer since the Legislature


raised fines in an attempt
to increase revenue. The
stiff fines combined with
the bad economy are
making officers more
sympathetic to speeders.
Money available per
officer through the trust
fund is about a third of
what it once was, leaving
some agencies concerned
they'll have to make cuts
elsewhere to keep officers
trained.
"The trust fund issue,
that's unique," said John
Firman, the research
center director at the


International Association
of Chiefs of Police, who
said other states are
starting to see a recovery
that's seeing an increase
in training money. "It's a
fairly significant piece of
where you get your money
from for training, so it's a
big deal."
Florida's fund used to
provide $110 for advanced
and specialized training
for every law enforcement
officer in the state. It was
down to $67 per office
last fiscal year and is now
at $40 per officer for the


fiscal year that began
July 1.
"I can see it being a
problem, especially for
north Florida where
training is limited, where
employees are limited
-you don't have many
- and you try to keep up
as much as you can," said
Jefferson County Sheriff
Hobbs. "It's hard."
Hobbs knows that in
rural Jefferson County,
there are some things
he doesn't have to worry
about as much as his
counterparts in counties


like Miami-Dade or
Broward.
"I don't anticipate
this being a major place
terrorists would want
to strike, so I don't send
nobody out on terrorist
classes," Hobbs said.
But he does need to
train his deputies to
deal with identity theft,
computer crimes, sex
crimes, drugs, school
safety, burglaries and
homicides, not to mention
keeping them updated
with routine training that's
mandated each year.


I HEADLINE NEWS FROM THE STATE


Supreme Court
sets rules on
jurors' phones
TALLAHASSEE (AP)-
Jurors will be prohibited
from taking their smart-
phones and other electronic
devices into deliberations
under a new rule approved
by the Florida Supreme
Court.
The court approved the
rule Wednesday. It also gives
judges the discretion to re-
move phones and electronic
devices from jurors at any
point once they've been
impaneled.
From the time people
show up for jury duty
until the time they are
discharged, they will also
be prohibited from using
smartphones or other de-
vices to transmit or access
data, take photos of videos
of the proceedings, trans-
mitting or texting details
about the case or looking up
information about the case.
Florida misspelled
twice on signs
JACKSONVILLE (AP) -
The Florida Department


of Transportation
had some explaining
to do when Florida
was misspelled on an
Interstate 95 exit sign in
Jacksonville.
First Coast News
reports the signs be-
ing installed along 1-95
were produced by a
sign manufacturer in
Arkansas.
The mistake was spot-
ted on a sign set to go up
at the J. Turner Boulevard
exit. Florida was mis-
spelled twice on one sign.
It says University of North
"Flordia" and "Flordia"
State College South
Campus.
A spokesman for the
sign company told First
Coast News it will fix the
mistakes for free.

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WIRE Page 5


www.sunnewspapers.net


|B Ilr'Rem v ard
All .11-t All 11 .1


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STATE NEWS






Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


Hiring drives stocks higher


NEWYORK (AP) -
Encouraging news about
the U.S. jobs market
trumped higher oil prices
and worrying develop-
ments in Europe's debt
crisis on Wednesday.
Oil climbed above $102
a barrel for the first time
in more than a year as the
political turmoil in Egypt
intensified, raising the
risk of supply disruptions
in the Suez Canal. In
Europe, traders dumped
Portuguese stocks and
bonds as the country's
government teetered on
the edge of collapse.
That news was offset
though by a brighter
outlook on U.S. jobs
ahead of Friday's monthly
employment report. The
stock market opened
lower, then drifted higher
in late morning trading.
By noon, indexes turned
positive.
"The key takeaway is
that jobs matter more
than Egypt," said Alec


Young, a global equity
strategist at S&P Capital
IQ. "Nothing is more
important to the state of
the economy than the
jobs market."
In the U.S., fewer
people sought unem-
ployment benefits last
week and ADP a payrolls
processor, said business-
es added more jobs last
month than analysts had
expected. The govern-
ment's broader monthly
survey of U.S. employ-
ment is scheduled to be
released Friday morning.
Economists predict that
employers added 165,000
jobs in June.
The Dow Jones in-
dustrial average closed
up 56.14 points, or
0.4 percent, to close at
14,988.55.
The Standard & Poor's
500 rose 1.33 points, or
0.1 percent, to 1,615.41.
The Nasdaq composite
gained 10.27 points, or
0.3 percent, to 3,443.67.


Trading closed at 1 p.m.
Eastern Daylight Time
ahead of the July 4th
holiday Thursday. Regular
trading will resume
Friday.
Investors will be watch-
ing the government's jobs
report closely in hopes
of figuring out what the
Federal Reserve will do
next.
Fed chairman Ben
Bernanke said June 19
that the central bank
was considering easing
back on its stimulus
program later this year if
the economy strengthens
enough. The central bank
is buying $85 billion in
bonds every month to
keep interest rates low
and encourage spending.
The Fed may be forced
to keep stimulating the
economy because U.S.
growth remains muted,
said Derek Gabrielsen,
a wealth advisor,
at Strategic Wealth
Partners.


WASHINGTON
(MarketWatch) -The
number of people who
applied last week for new
unemployment benefits
dropped slightly but re-
flected little change in the
pace of hiring and firing in
the U.S.
Initial jobless claims
declined by 5,000 to a sea-
sonally adjusted 343,000
in the week ended June 29,
the Labor Department said
Wednesday. The claims
report was moved up
one day from its normal
Thursday publication
date because of the July 4
holiday.
Economists polled by
MarketWatch expected
claims to total 346,000,
down slightly from 348,000


in the prior week.
The four-week average,
a more reliable gauge
than the volatile weekly
number, edged down by
750 to 345,500. That's the
lowest level in six weeks.
Claims are mainly
a proxy for how many
people lose their jobs and
not a direct gauge of hiring
trends, but the number
of unemployed seeking
benefits usually falls when
work becomes easier to
find.
Applications for first-
time unemployment
benefits have hovered
around 350,000 through
most of 2013, suggesting
little change in the trajec-
tory of a gradually improv-
ing U.S. labor market. The


economy has added an
average of 190,000 net jobs
a month so far this year.
The latest snapshot
on hiring will be issued
Friday, the day after the
July 4 holiday. Economists
predict 155,000 net jobs
were created in June,
a step down from the
preliminary increase of
175,000 in May.
A separate look at hir-
ing, compiled by payroll
processor ADP showed
a net gain of 188,000
private-sector jobs in
June. The ADP data have
tracked fairly closely as of
late with the number of
new private-sector jobs
listed in the government's
official employment
report.


aying your bills and
taking care of other
banking chores is a
pain. Even more painful:
the fees you'll face if you
don't do them when you
need to. But here's good
news from ShopSmart,
the shopping magazine
from the publisher of
Consumer Reports: Banks
have introduced five
services that make those
tasks easier and more
rewarding.
Person-to-person pay-
ments. Pay your friends
the same way you pay your
monthly bills online. All
you need is a name and an
email address to create a
new payee in the person-
to-person section of your
online banking setup. The
feature is called QuickPay
at Chase and Popmoney at
Citibank and other banks.
To send money, you enter
the recipient's name, the
amount to be paid, the
date it should be sent, the
account from which it's to
be taken and a memo to
explain what it's for. Then
you simply click "send."
Electronic check
deposits. More and
more banks are letting
customers use the camera
in their phone or tablet
to photograph checks
and deposit them elec-
tronically using a mobile
banking app. No more
trudging to a branch or
an ATM to deposit them.
But to protect yourself,
consider installing secu-
rity software that detects
and removes malware
and lets you remotely
lock or delete data if your
phone is lost. Also, avoid
public wireless networks
to prevent theft of ac-
count information.
On-the-go account
monitoring. You can use


Consumer

Reports


some 27 million house-
holds pay a fee of $5
to $25 to speed up a
payment. But ShopSmart
points out that you don't
have to spend money
to get payments to post
quickly. Simply schedule
them online to be sure
they will be on time.
Investment advice. A


bank's investment recom-
SHOPSMART mendations might work

Some banks let you simply for you, but you shouldn't
snap a picture of a check base your choice of advis-
to make a deposit, notes er and services on where
ShopSmart, the shopping you keep a checking
magazine from the publisher account. Instead, start by
of Consumer Reports. searching for a qualified
financial planner who is
a smartphone app or a member of the National
mobile websites to keep Association of Personal
track of balances, transfer Financial Advisors
funds, avoid overdrafts, (napfa.org). Members
find ATMs and monitor charge for their services
account activity in real rather than collect sales
time to detect fraud. commissions from the
Online budgeting investment products they
tools. Just use your recommend.
debit card for most of your
day-to-day shopping, and Help with
programs offered by Bank complaints
of America, Citi, Wells
Fargo and many others These new perks are
will help you pinpoint helping consumers take
your budget busters. Also some of the hassle out
look for financial planning of banking. But these
tips and mortgage and kinds of services are
insurance calculators. little consolation if
Discounts from re- you've been hit with an
tailers. Have you noticed unexpected fee or been
retailer ads or coupons in treated unfairly by your
your online bank state- bank.
ment? It's a new type of Fortunately, consumers
promotion that analyzes have a new watchdog
your banking, credit and they can turn to if
social media activity to they're having trouble
offer you personalized resolving a problem with
discounts of, say, 5 to their bank. The federal
20 percent that you can Consumer Financial
click on for on-the-spot Protection Bureau is col-
deals. lecting complaints from
consumers about their
Two services experiences with differ-
to skip ent financial institutions,
including banks. Learn
Expedited payments. more at consumer
To avoid late charges, finance.gov.


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3-yr
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RetInc b 8.64 -.01 +4.5
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 7.83 +.01 +17.3
Alliance Bernstein
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AllianzGI
WellnessD b 31.07 -.06 +18.6
Alpine
DynBal d 11.92 -.02 +10.8
DynDiv d 3.45 -.01 +8.1
Amana
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Income b 38.30 -.03 +15.3
American Beacon
LgCpVlls 25.44 -.02 +18.9
American Cent
CapVallv 7.96 ... +18.6
Eqlnclnv 8.67 -.01 +15.2
Growthlnv 29.71 +.04 +16.6
HiYldMu 9.12 ... +6.1
InTTxFBInv 11.32 +.01 +3.7
Ultralnv 28.95 +.05 +17.9
American Funds
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BalA m 22.12 +.01 +14.9
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CaplncBuA m 54.48 -.16 +11.7
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BBH
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Asset b 56.61 +.10 +18.0
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Berkshire
Focus d 15.22 +.11 +20.2
Bernstein
DiversMul 14.37 ... +2.7
IntDur 13.49 -.03 +4.0
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 13.35 +.02 +4.1
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HiYldBdls 7.99 -.01 +11.0
HiYldSvc b 7.99 -.01 +10.7
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Bruce 421.06 -.87 +13.1
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Focus 33.94 -.05 +11.5


Clipper
Clipper 80.72
Cohen & Steers
Realty 67.97
Columbia
AcornlntZ 42.89
AcornZ 33.72
DivlncZ 16.85
IntlVIB m 12.95
Mar21CB m 14.18
MarGrIA m 24.28
DFA
lYrFixlnI 10.32
2YrGlbFII 10.04
5YrGIbFII 10.98
EmMkCrEql 17.99
EmMktVall 25.80
IntSmCapl 16.83
RelEstScl 27.69
USCorEqil 14.29
USCorEq21 14.18
USLgCo 12.74
USLgVall 26.91
USMicrol 17.46
USSmVall 31.30
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DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.43
EqDrvB m 38.14
GIbOA m 41.16
GIbOB m 36.52
GIbOC m 36.77
GIbOS d 42.50
GrlncS 20.90
HlthCareS d 31.53
LAEqS d 27.27
LC2020S 14.19
StrHiYldTxFS 12.32
Davis
NYVentA m 37.41
NYVentY 37.84
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.32


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-.19 +12.3
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-.02 +6.1
+.03 +12.5
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... +.7
... +.9
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-.05 +21.8
-.21 -2.5
-.02 +10.5
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-.02 +4.3


Dimensional Investme
IntCorEql 10.85 ... +9.8
IntlSCol 16.51 +.06 +11.4
IntlValul 16.62 ... +7.7
Dodge & Cox
Bal 87.41 +.11 +16.0
Income 13.48 -.01 +4.7
IntlStk 36.49 -.12 +10.8
Stock 142.93 +.27 +19.9
Dreyfus
Apprecalnv 46.92 +.02 +16.4
MidCapldx 33.35 +.02 +19.7
MuniBd 11.42 ... +4.2
NYTaxEBd 14.78 ... +3.8
ShTrmlncD 10.62 ... +2.3
SmCoVal 33.62 +.08 +20.5
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 11.96 +.02 +15.6
TMSmCaB m 17.22 +.02 +14.5
FMI
CommStk 26.73 ... +16.6
LgCap 19.73 +.03 +17.0
FPA
Capital d 42.47 -.03 +16.2
Cres d 31.04 ... +12.9
Newlnc d 10.42 -.01 +1.9
Fairholme Funds
Farhome d 36.16 -.28 +10.0
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.69 ... +9.9
IntSmMCoA m 41.67 -.02 +13.1
KaufmanA m 5.80 -.02 +13.8
MDTMdCpGrStB m 35.74-.02 +14.6
StrVall 5.46 ... +17.7
ToRetls 10.97 -.02 +4.1


Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.19
AstMgr50O 17.10
Bal 21.61
BIChGrow 56.36
Canada d 52.07
CapApr 33.62
Caplnc d 9.48
Contra 86.59
DivGrow 33.51
Divrlntl d 31.56
EmergAsia d 27.40
EmgMkt d 21.78
Eqlnc 53.68
Eqlnc II 22.26
FF2015 12.10
FF2035 12.33
FF2040 8.67
Fidelity 39.98
FItRtHiln d 9.90
FocStk 17.48
FourlnOne 31.93
Free2000 12.32
Free2Ol0 14.53
Free2O2O 14.76
Free2025 12.40
Free203O 14.99
GNMA 11.30
GrowCo 106.57
Growlnc 24.62
Hilnc d 9.18
Indepndnc 29.61
IntMunilnc d 10.31
IntRelEst d 10.00
IntlDisc d 34.88
InvGrdBd 7.70
LatinAm d 37.84
LevCoSt d 37.46
LowPriStk d 45.85
Magellan 82.46
MeCpSto 13.69
MidCap d 34.22
Munilnc d 12.94
NewMlle 35.10
NewMktln d 15.99
OTC 72.13
Overseas d 34.44
Puritan 20.68
ShTmBond 8.55
SmCapDisc d 27.45
Stratlnc 10.93
TaxFrB d 11.17
TotalBd 10.56
USBdldx 11.46
USBdldxlnv 11.46
Value 89.57
ValueDis 18.94
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 61.75
IntBondA m 11.39
IntBondB m 11.37
IntlCapAB m 11.23
LrgCapA m 24.38
LrgCapB m 22.83
NewlnsA m 25.63
Newlnsl 25.97
StratlncA m 12.19
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 147.12
Electron d 54.07
Energy d 56.30
Gold d 19.28
Leisure d 116.03
Materials d 73.83
MedDeliv d 65.08
MedEqSys d 32.43
NatGas d 33.24
NatRes d 34.11
Wireless d 8.85
Fidelity Spartan
5001dxAdvtg 57.52
5001dxlnstl 57.53
5001dxlnv 57.51
ExtMktldAg d 46.45


-.01 +6.0
-.02 +10.1
+.01 +12.8
+.04 +19.8
-.26 +5.6
... +19.2
-.02 +10.5
+.24 +17.4
+.03 +17.0
-.12 +10.9
-.58 +6.1
-.33 +3.0
-.03 +17.0
+.02 +16.8
-.01 +9.4
-.01 +12.6
... +12.8
+.02 +16.9
... +5.5
-.01 +21.5
-.03 +14.7
... +5.5
-.02 +9.2
-.01 +10.4
-.01 +11.5
-.01 +11.9
-.03 +3.0
+.19 +20.9
+.01 +20.9
... +9.9
+.04 +17.9
... +3.6
-.03 +15.3
-.13 +11.6
-.02 +4.6
-.19 -2.4
-.01 +21.4
+.01 +19.7
+.09 +13.4
+.01 +20.7
+.04 +19.9
+.01 +4.7
+.04 +20.0
-.08 +8.4
+.29 +20.2
-.07 +12.1
+.01 +12.9
... +1.7
+.04 +24.7
-.01 +6.6
+.01 +4.7
-.02 +4.8
-.02 NA
-.02 +3.3
-.14 +19.9
+.04 +18.7
+.03 +18.2
-.01 +3.6
-.01 +2.8
-.06 +12.9
+.01 +21.0
+.01 +20.0
+.07 +16.7
+.07 +17.1
-.02 +6.3
+.01 +38.3
+.22 +13.8
+.06 +16.0
+.40 -21.5
+.29 +22.2
+.06 +18.7
-.19 +19.8
-.05 +15.8
-.02 +10.1
+.07 +12.1
+.02 +14.6

+.04 +18.9
+.05 NA
+.04 +18.9
+.04 +20.6


IntlldxAdg d 35.58 -.15 +10.4
TotMktldAg d 47.27 +.04 +19.3
First Eagle
GIbA m 50.95 +.05 +12.1
OverseasA m 22.49 -.02 +9.3
First Investors
GlobalA m 7.45 -.02 +12.4
TotaIRetA m 17.87 +.01 +13.5
Firsthand
e-Comm 6.14 +.03 +8.5
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 12.05 +.01 +4.8
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 7.16 +.01 +5.2
EqlnA m 20.23 -.03 +16.8
FLTFA m 11.32 ... +4.0
GrOppA m 24.86 +.07 +17.6
GrowthA m 55.75 +.07 +15.5
HYTFA m 10.29 +.01 +5.5
Income C m 2.28 ... +10.9
IncomeA m 2.26 ... +11.4
IncomeAdv 2.24 -.01 +11.6
NYTFA m 11.53 +.01 +3.5
RisDvA m 43.08 ... +17.6
StrlncA m 10.43 -.02 +7.2
TotaIRetA m 9.93 -.02 +5.2
USGovA m 6.53 -.02 +2.3
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 31.67 -.15 +12.4
DiscovA m 31.21 -.14 +12.1
Shares Z 25.40 -.07 +14.7
SharesA m 25.18 -.07 +14.4
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 12.99 -.05 +6.3
GIBondA m 12.97 -.04 +6.7
GIBondAdv 12.92 -.05 +7.0
GrowthA m 21.12 -.11 +15.0
WorldA m 17.21 -.07 +15.0
GE
S&SUSEq 51.73 +.09 +17.9
GMO
EmgMktsVI 9.98 -.13 +2.2
IntltVllV 21.54 -.02 +9.1
Quill 25.32 +.03 +19.0
QuVI 25.34 +.03 +19.1
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 59.44 +.03 +19.1
EqlncomeAAA m 25.77 -.03 +17.9
Value m 17.56 +.04 +19.5
Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.19 -.01 +9.9
MidCpVals 45.54 -.05 +18.9
ShDuGovA m 10.20 ... +.5
ShDuTFIs 10.55 +.01 +1.9
Harbor
Bond 12.02 -.03 +4.0
CapAplnst 47.19 +.22 +17.4
Intllnstl 62.15 -.15 +10.5
Intllnv b 61.46 -.15 +10.1
Hartford
CapAprA m 40.82 -.01 +15.1
CpApHLSIA 51.02 +.01 +16.7
SmallCoB m 19.03 +.01 +18.9
Heartland
ValuePlus m 33.06 +.04 +14.9
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 14.22 +.01 +18.1
Hodges
Hodges m 29.38 ... +19.1
INVESCO
CharterA m 20.36 ... +14.7
ComstockA m 20.83 -.01 +19.4
ConstellB m 23.19 +.03 +11.9
Divlnclnv b 17.76 -.01 +15.7
Dynlnv b 26.62 ... +17.7
EnergyA m 41.24 +.05 +11.9
Energylnv b 41.09 +.04 +11.9
EqlncomeA m 10.30 ... +14.3
EuroGrA m 34.77 +.06 +14.3
GIbGrB m 24.41 -.02 +11.8
GrowlncA m 24.55 -.01 +17.9
GrwthAIIA m 12.49 -.01 +12.4


HIYMdMuA m 9.51
PacGrowB m 20.45
SmCapEqA m 15.36
Techlnv b 35.16
USMortA m 12.52


+6.5
-.16 +4.6
+.02 +20.0
+.17 +14.5
-.04 +2.7


Ivy
AssetSTrB m 25.88 -.14 +9.9
AssetStrA m 26.76 -.14 +10.8
AssetStrC m 26.01 -.13 +10.0
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.68 -.01 +4.2
CoreBondA m 11.67 -.02 +3.8
CoreBondSelect 11.66 -.02 +4.0
HighYldSel 8.04 ... +10.0
LgCapGrSelect 26.45 +.14 +19.2
MidCpVall 32.48 -.01 +21.5
ShDurBndSel 10.90 ... +1.3
USLCpCrPS 25.81 +.07 +18.1
Janus
BalC m 28.08 +.01 +10.6
ContrT 17.47 -.04 +12.7
EntrprsT 74.59 +.07 +19.9
RexBdS b 10.50 -.01 +4.7
GIbValT d 13.60 -.03 +14.0
HiMdT 9.15 -.01 +10.0
OverseasT 33.02 -.32 -3.3
PerkinsMCVL 24.37 -.04 +13.7
PerkinsMCVT 24.12 -.03 +13.5
PerkinsSCVL 24.41 +.01 +12.9
ShTmBdT 3.06 ... +2.1
T 35.26 +.05 +14.3
USCrT 17.76 +.01 +19.9
VentureT 64.10 ... +22.8
John Hancock
hfBal b 14.15 -.02 +11.2
ifGrl b 14.48 -.01 +12.9
Lazard
EmgMkEqtl d 17.39 -.32 +4.1
Legg Mason/Western
CrPIBdlns 11.26 -.02 +5.6
Litman Gregory
Maslntllnit d 15.81 -.09 +10.6
Long leaf Partners
LongPart 28.93 -.08 +14.5
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 14.88 -.03 +9.6
BdR b 14.82 -.02 +9.2
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 13.82 ... +16.0
BondDebA m 8.07 ... +9.8
ShDurlncA m 4.56 ...+4.2
ShDurlncC m 4.58 -.01 +3.4
MFS
IslntlEq 19.63 -.06 +12.1
MAInvB m 23.70 +.03 +16.4
TotRetA m 16.35 -.01 +11.7
ValueA m 29.40 +.01 +17.8
Valuel 29.54 +.02 +18.1
MainStay
HiMdCorA m 5.99 ... +9.4
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 95.57 -.12 +19.2
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.60 -.01 +7.1
PBMaxTrmS 18.95 -.01 +13.5
WrldOppA 8.05 -.02 +8.4
Marsico
21stCent m 16.28 +.04 +13.5
RexCap m 16.57 -.03 +20.6
Merger
Merger b 15.90 ... +3.0
Meridian
MeridnGr d 44.75 +.04 +19.1
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.57 -.01 +6.4
TotRtBd b 10.57 -.02 +6.2
Midas Funds
Magic m 21.91 +.06 +20.4
Midas m 1.33 +.01 -28.0
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 38.18 -.04 +17.2


Morgan Stanley Instl
MdCpGrl 40.05 -.06 +15.7
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 61.58 +.09 +13.1
Natixis
LSInvBdY 12.09 -.02 +7.0
LSStratlncA m 15.57 -.04 +9.8
LSStratlncC m 15.67 -.04 +9.0
Needham
Growth m 39.74 +.19 +16.5
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 55.86 +.14 +18.3
SmCpGrlnv 22.93 +.08 +18.5
Northeast Investors
Growth 17.96 +.02 +12.3
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.72 +.01 +3.9
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.15 +.02 +9.0
HIthSinces 16.66 -.01 +19.0
PinOakEq 39.46 +.12 +20.3
RedOakTec 12.37 +.06 +20.2
Oakmark
EqlncI 30.72 ... +10.5
Global I 26.97 +.01 +14.8
Intl 22.99 -.09 +14.3
Oakmark I 56.34 +.03 +19.7
Select I 35.56 -.02 +19.3
Old Westbury
GIbSmMdCp 15.63 -.04 +14.7
LgCpStr 10.70 ... +10.5
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 33.41 -.32 +7.2
DevMktY 33.07 -.32 +7.5
GlobA m 70.05 -.04 +14.6
IntlGrY 32.76 -.01 +14.4
MainStrA m 41.57 -.01 +17.9
RocMuniA m 16.08 ... +6.0
SrFIltRatA m 8.35 ... +7.1
StrlncA m 4.14 -.01 +6.8
PIMCO
ComRIRStl 5.65 +.02 +4.1
Divlnclnst 11.51 -.04 +7.5
EMktCurl 10.09 -.02 +2.8
EmMktslns 11.28 -.05 +7.0
ForBdlnstl 10.52 ... +5.9
HiYldls 9.42 -.02 +9.4
InvGrdlns 10.56 -.02 +8.0
LowDrls 10.25 -.01 +2.8
RealRet 11.24 -.04 +5.1
ShtTermls 9.82 ... +1.6
TotRetA m 10.76 -.02 +4.3
TotRetAdm b 10.76 -.02 +4.4
TotRetC m 10.76 -.02 +3.5
TotRetls 10.76 -.02 +4.7
TotRetrnD b 10.76 -.02 +4.4
TotlRetnP 10.76 -.02 +4.6
PRIMECAP Odyssey
Growth 21.12 ... +19.5
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 33.41 -.01 +17.5
Permanent
Portfolio 45.14 +.05 +6.1
Pioneer
PioneerA m 36.94 +.04 +15.0
Principal
LfT20201 13.25 -.02 +12.3
LCGrllnst 11.15 +.01 +19.1
SAMConGrA m 16.12 -.01 +13.9
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 20.87 +.02 +15.3
IntlEqtyC m 6.25 -.01 +10.2
JenMidCapGrZ 35.81 +.02 +17.6
Putnam
GIbUtilB m 10.93 -.01 +6.0
GrowlncA m 17.21 +.01 +18.3
IntlNewB m 15.13 -.05 +9.4
SmCpValA m 13.28 ... +19.9
Reynolds
BlueChip b 65.62 +.05 +17.2


Royce
PAMutlnv d 12.98 +.02 +16.9
Premierlnv d 20.91 +.01 +16.6
ValueSvc m 12.42 -.01 +13.4
Rydex
Electrlnv 55.13 +.29 +6.7
HlthCrAdv b 21.85 -.07 +18.8
NsdqlOOlv 19.19 +.07 +19.3
Schwab
1OOOlnv d 44.04 +.04 +18.7
S&P50OSel d 25.39 +.02 +18.9
Scout
Interntl 33.56 -.10 +10.6
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 38.95 +.07 +18.1
Sequoia
Sequoia 194.67 -.09 +20.6
State Farm
Growth 61.33 -.02 +14.4
Stratton
SmCapVal d 64.72 +.05 +20.9
T Rowe Price
Balanced 21.68 -.01 +12.7
BIChpGr 51.71 +.13 +20.4
CapApprec 24.62 +.02 +15.3
Corplnc 9.64 -.02 +6.3
EmMktStk d 30.04 -.46 +2.9
Eqlndex d 43.53 +.04 +18.7
Eqtylnc 30.04 -.02 +18.1
FinSer 17.88 -.02 +15.2
GIbTech 11.00 +.06 +19.1
GrowStk 42.52 +.10 +19.2
HealthSo 50.24 -.10 +30.1
HiYield d 6.95 ... +10.5
InsLgCpGr 21.61 +.05 +19.5
IntlBnd d 9.31 +.02 +3.0
IntlEqldx d 11.83 -.04 +10.0
IntlGrlnc d 13.53 -.02 +10.6
IntlStk d 14.34 -.05 +9.4
MediaTele 60.57 +.35 +22.5
MidCapVa 27.35 -.04 +16.8
MidCpGr 65.72 +.09 +19.4
NJTaxFBd 11.65 ... +4.3
NewAmGro 40.10 +.12 +18.1
NewAsia d 15.53 -.23 +6.8
NewEra 42.45 +.03 +8.0
NewHonz 40.42 +.09 +27.3
Newlncome 9.44 -.02 +3.6
OrseaStk d 8.78 -.02 +11.3
R2015 13.47 -.01 +11.8
R2025 13.99 -.01 +13.8
R2035 14.46 -.01 +15.1
Rtmt20lO 17.02 -.02 +10.5
Rtmt2O2O 18.89 -.01 +12.9
Rtmt2O3O 20.33 -.02 +14.6
Rtmt204O 20.71 -.01 +15.3
SciTech 31.01 +.09 +15.0
ShTmBond 4.79 ... +1.6
SmCpStk 39.98 +.05 +23.0
SmCpVal d 44.55 +.10 +19.5
SpecGrow 21.18 -.02 +16.3
Speclnc 12.73 -.01 +7.0
SumGNMA 9.68 -.03 +2.7
SumMulnc 11.37 ... +4.9
TaxEfMult d 17.33 +.04 +18.9
TaxFShlnt 5.61 ... +2.1
Value 31.16 +.03 +19.9
TCW
Emglncl 8.58 -.04 +10.0
TotRetBdl 9.98 -.02 +7.0
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 12.40 +.01 +19.2
Target
SmCapVal 24.93 +.02 +18.6
Templeton
InFEqSeS 19.77 -.14 +8.9
Third Avenue
Value d 53.70 -.23 +11.1
Thompson
LargeCap 40.92 +.04 +18.1
Thornburg
IncBldC m 19.42 -.12 +10.9


IntlValA m 27.54 -.07 +7.8
IntlVall d 28.12 -.08 +8.2
Thrivent
IncomeA m 8.97 -.01 +6.3
MidCapGrA m 19.05 +.03 +14.7
Tocqueville
Gold m 35.17 +.57 -16.2
Turner
SmCapGr 38.93 +.07 +18.7
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 24.97 -.11 +12.6
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 6.67 +.13 -18.8
GlobRes m 8.99 +.03 +5.9
USAA
CorstnMod 14.07 -.01 +9.2
GNMA 9.96 -.02 +2.2
Growlnc 18.35 -.01 +16.1
HYOpp d 8.70 ... +11.1
PrcMtlMin 13.96 +.32-21.5
SciTedich 16.85 +.05 +19.1
TaxELgTm 13.30 +.01 +5.6
TgtRt204O 12.12 -.02 +12.0
TgtRt2050 11.79 -.02 +12.6
WorldGro 23.77 +.01 +17.3
Unified
Winlnv m 16.19 -.05 +12.3
Value Line
PremGro b 31.59 -.01 +19.8
Vanguard
50OOAdml 148.94 +.12 +19.0
5001nv 148.94 +.12 +18.8
BallcdAdm 25.37 ... +13.1
Balldxlns 25.37 ... +13.1
CAITAdml 11.28 ... +4.5
CapOp 41.01 ... +19.4
CapOpAdml 94.73 +.01 +19.5
Convrt 13.71 ... +12.4
DivGr 19.03 +.01 +18.7
EmMktlAdm 31.64 -.41 +2.5
EnergyAdm 115.18 +.05 +11.5
Energylnv 61.34 +.02 +11.5
Eqlnc 27.53 +.03 +21.0
EqlncAdml 57.71 +.06 +21.1
ExplAdml 88.53 +.07 +21.5
Explr 95.12 +.08 +21.3
ExtdldAdm 53.71 +.05 +20.8
Extdldlst 53.71 +.05 +20.8
ExtdMktldxlP 132.56 +.13 NA
FAWeUSIns 87.09 -.43 +8.2
FAWeUSInv 17.44 -.08 +8.0
FLLT 11.59 +.01 +4.4
GNMA 10.46 -.04 +2.7
GNMAAdml 10.46 -.04 +2.8
GlbEq 20.43 -.03 +14.6
Grolnc 34.50 +.03 +19.1
GrhldAdm 40.70 +.12 +19.4
Grthlstld 40.70 +.12 +19.4
GrthlstSg 37.68 +.10 +19.4
HYCor 5.92 +9.9
HYCorAdml 5.92 ... +10.0
HItCrAdml 71.05 -.09 +20.9
HlthCare 168.38 -.22 +20.8
ITBondAdm 11.32 -.02 +5.2
ITGradeAd 9.78 -.01 +5.7
ITIGrade 9.78 -.01 +5.6
InfPrtAdm 26.32 -.07 +4.9
InfPrtl 10.72 -.03 +4.9
InflaPro 13.41 -.03 +4.8
Instldxl 147.96 +.12 +19.0
InstPlus 147.97 +.13 +19.0
InstTStPI 36.78 +.03 +19.4
IntlGr 19.40 -.09 +9.9
IntlGrAdm 61.74 -.27 +10.1
IntlStkldxAdm 24.54 -.11 NA
IntlStkldxl 98.12 -.45 NA
IntlStkldxlPIs 98.13 -.45 NA
IntlStkldxlSgn 29.43 -.14 NA
IntlVal 31.85 -.14 +9.4
LTGradeAd 9.89 -.01 +7.8
LTInvGr 9.89 -.01 +7.7
LgCpldxlnv 29.84 +.02 +18.9
LifeCon 17.22 -.02 +8.3


Stocks of Local Interest


52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 11.34 0- 18.26 16.95 -.38 -2.2 V A V +19.2 +14.6 dd
Arkansas Bst ABFS 6.43 23.62 22.80 +.31 +1.4 V A V +138.7 +83.7 dd 0.12
Bank of America BAG 6.90 13.99 12.83 -.07 -0.5 V V V +10.5 +60.7 30 0.04
Beam Inc BEAM 52.69 -0- 69.78 63.53 -.17 -0.3 A V A +4.0 +2.1 25 0.90
Carnival Corp CCL 31.65 39.95 34.85 -.03 -0.1 A A A -5.2 +5.7 18 1.00a
Chicos FAS CHS 14.28 19.95 16.48 -.02 -0.1 V V V -10.7 +12.7 15 0.22
Cracker Barrel CBRL 59.82 100.01 97.94 +.54 +0.6 A A A +52.4 +58.2 20 3.00f
Disney DIS 46.53 0- 67.89 63.61 +.35 +0.6 A A A +27.8 +31.4 19 0.75f
Eaton Corp plc ETN 36.38 0- 69.92 66.22 +.18 +0.3 A A A +22.2 +72.5 17 1.68
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 20.20 0- 44.04 39.25 +.47 +1.2 A A A +34.3 +66.4 39 0.40
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 4.72 1.98 +.02 +1.0 A A A -39.3 -55.6 dd
Harris Corp HRS 39.02 52.23 49.08 -.24 -0.5 V V V +0.2 +22.2 30 1.48
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 6.27 -0 16.41 15.34 -.70 -4.4 V A V +64.6 +108.9 22
iShs S&P U.S. Pfd PFF 37.81 --- 41.09 38.83 -.15 -0.4 V V V -2.0 +5.4 q 2.18e
KC Southern KSU 65.86 -0 118.88 109.97 -.02 ... A A A +31.7 +61.6 30 0.86
Lennar Corp A LEN 28.51 -- 44.40 35.35 +.36 +1.0 V V V -8.6 +13.0 19 0.16
McClatchy Co MNI 1.50 -0- 3.46 2.49 +.03 +1.2 A A A -23.9 +10.8 dd
NextEra Energy NEE 65.95 0- 82.65 80.12 -.22 -0.3 V A V +15.8 +20.4 20 2.64
Office Depot ODP 1.51 -0- 6.10 4.07 +.08 +2.0 A V A +24.1 +79.7 dd
PGT Inc PGTI 2.63 9.25 8.98 +.09 +1.0 A A A +99.6 +180.4 33 ...


52-WK RANGE *CLOSE


YTD 1YR


NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSECHG %CHGWK MOQTR%CHG%RTN P/E DIV

Panera Bread Co PNRA 135.92 194.77 189.52 +.08 ...A A A +19.3 +37.7 31
Pembina Pipeline PBA 24.95 34.70 30.92 -.40 -1.3 A V A +8.0 +30.2 1.62
Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.67 22.72 19.48 -.15 -0.8 V V V -0.7 +5.8 17 1.08
Phoenix Cos PNX 20.51 44.78 42.45 +.46 +1.1 V A V +71.7 +14.1 dd
Raymond James Fncl RJF 30.99 48.22 43.07 -.16 -0.4 A A A +11.8 +26.9 18 0.56
Reliance Steel Alu RS 44.91 0- 72.90 66.00 -.43 -0.6 A A A +6.3 +35.3 13 1.20
Ryder R 32.76 64.68 59.81 -.24 -0.4 V V V +19.8 +73.6 14 1.24
St Joe Co JOE 15.44 24.44 21.65 +.55 +2.6 A A A -6.2 +32.5 cc
Sally Beauty Hid SBH 22.49 31.62 31.01 +.11 +0.4 V A V +31.6 +18.3 22
Simon Property Gp SPG 145.21 182.45 158.98-3.65 -2.2 A V A +0.6 +5.7 46 4.60
Stein Mart SMRT 5.77 14.33 13.68 +.19 +1.4 A A A +81.4 +81.5 24 0.20
Suntrust Bks STI 22.34 32.84 32.92 +.41 +1.3 A A A +16.1 +32.7 9 0.40f
Superior Uniform SGC 10.37 -0- 12.65 11.03 A V A -3.7 -3.3 16 0.54
TECO Energy TE 16.12 -0 19.22 16.71 -.14 -0.8 V V V -0.3 -2.7 18 0.88
Tech Data TECD 42.25 54.60 47.57 +.05 +0.1 A V A +4.5 -1.6 9
Wendys Co WEN 4.09 6.23 5.86 -.05 -0.8 A A A +24.7 +29.0 0.16
World Fuel Svcs INT 33.65 -0- 45.20 40.80 +.28 +0.7 A A A -0.9 +6.7 15 0.15


Save time and money



with these bank perks


New jobless claims fall


LifeGro 24.79
LifeMod 21.37
MidCapldxlP 129.00
MidCp 26.08
MidCpAdml 118.40
MidCplst 26.15
MidCpSgl 37.36
Morg 22.52
MorgAdml 69.84
MuHYAdml 10.76
Mulnt 13.81
MulntAdml 13.81
MuLTAdml 11.21
MuLtdAdml 11.00
MuShtAdml 15.83
Prmcp 82.11
PrmcpAdml 85.21
PrmcpCorl 17.49
REITIdxAd 97.77
STBondAdm 10.49
STBondSgl 10.49
STCor 10.66
STGradeAd 10.66
STIGradel 10.66
STsryAdml 10.68
SelValu 24.80
SmCapldx 45.49
SmCpldAdm 45.54
SmCpldlst 45.54
SmCplndxSgnl 41.03
SmVlldlst 20.34
Star 21.83
StratgcEq 25.35
TgtRe201O 24.73
TgtRe2015 13.94
TgtRe202O 25.11
TgtRe203O 25.08
TgtRe2035 15.25
TgtRe2O4O 25.21
TgtRe2045 15.83
TgtRe205O 25.11
TgtRetlnc 12.21
Tgtet2025 14.45
TotBdAdml 10.67
TotBdlnst 10.67
TotBdMklnv 10.67
TotBdMkSig 10.67
Totlntl 14.67
TotStlAdm 40.59
TotStllns 40.60
TotStlSig 39.18
TotStldx 40.58
TxMCapAdm 81.57
VallcdAdm 26.48
ValldxIns 26.48
Wellsl 24.61
WellslAdm 59.61
Welltn 36.45
WelltnAdm 62.95
WndsllAdm 59.30
Wndsr 17.77
WndsrAdml 59.96
Wndsrll 33.42
Victory
SpecValA f 18.03
Virtus
EmgMktsls 9.62
Wasatch
LgCpVal d 16.07
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 30.31
Growlnv 44.22
Outk2010Adm 13.22
Western Asset
MgdMunlA m 16.32
Yacktman
Focused d 24.01
Yacktman d 22.38


-.03 +13.4
-.02 +11.0
-.03 NA
... +19.5
-.03 +19.7
-.01 +19.7
-.01 +19.7
+.06 +17.5
+.20 +17.7
+5.3
+3.9
+4.0
+4.6
+1.9
+1.0
+.13 +19.2
+.14 +19.3
+.02 +18.6
-.91 +19.2
-.01 +1.8
-.01 +1.8
... +2.7
... +2.8
... +2.8
... +1.1
-.03 +19.4
+.01 +21.0
+.01 +21.2
+.01 +21.2
+.01 +21.2
-.01 +19.6
-.02 +12.0
... +22.3
-.02 +9.6
-.01 +10.8
-.03 +11.8
-.02 +13.6
-.01 +14.4
-.02 +14.7
-.01 +14.7
-.02 +14.7
-.01 +7.7
-.01 +12.6
-.01 +3.5
-.01 +3.5
-.01 +3.3
-.01 +3.5
-.07 +8.0
+.03 +19.4
+.04 +19.4
+.04 +19.4
+.03 +19.2
+.08 +19.2
-.02 +18.5
-.02 +18.5
... +10.9
-.01 +11.0
+.02 +13.7
+.03 +13.8
-.03 +19.0
-.01 +20.0
... +20.1
-.01 +18.9

+.03 +12.4
-.14 +10.2

-.01 +14.2

+.06 +23.2
+.23 +22.2
-.01 +5.2

+.01 +5.4

+.03 +17.9
+.03 +18.3






The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net WIRE Page 7




STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME! our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper. symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks name and symbol on voice mail.



S&P 500 A +1.33 NASDAQ A +10.27 DOW +56.14 6-MO T-BILLS -.01 30-YR T-BONDS A +.01 CRUDE OIL A +164 EURO A +.0022 GOLD A +8.50
1,615.41 3,443.67 14,988.55 .06% 3.49% $101.24 W $1.3000 W $1252.10


Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange


and the Nasdaq.

Tkr Name Last Chg
A-B-C
ADT ADTCprn 39.24 -.35
AES AES Corp 11.83 +.02
AFL AFLAC 56.60 -.19
GAS AGLRes 42.55 -.19
AKS AK Steel 3.05 -.02
ASMI ASM Intl 34.22 +.12
T AT&T Inc 35.62 +.09
ABT AbtLab s 34.25 -.61
ABBV AbbVie n 42.23 +.02
ANF AberFitc 47.55 -.38
ACAD AcadiaPh 17.91 +.22
ACN Accenture 72.68 +.56
ARAY Accuray 5.63 -.03
ACHN Achillion 6.30 +.04
ACT Actavis 123.99 +.16
ATVI ActivsBliz 14.36 +.04
ADBE AdobeSy 46.42 +.39
AEIS AdvEnld 18.34 -.05
AMD AMD 4.06 +.09
ABCO AdvisoryBd 54.84 -.22
ACM AecomTch 31.53 -.03
AET Aetna 62.13 -.30
A Agilent 43.17 +.08
AEM Agnicog 27.87 +.86
APD AirProd 91.39 +.64
AYR Aircastle 16.74 +.46
ARG Airgas 96.30 -.25
ALSK AlaskCom 1.74 +.02
ALU AlcatelLuc 1.76
AA Alcoa 7.71 -.09
ALKS Alkermes 29.21 -.15
ATI AllegTch 26.00 -.08
AGN Allergan 84.24 -.40
ALE Allete 49.59 +.09
ARLP AllnceRes 71.74 +.68
ACG AlliBInco 7.44 +.06
AB AlliBern 20.14 -.71
LNT AlliantEgy 49.69 +.03
ALL Allstate 48.47 -.05
ANR AlphaNRs 5.18 -.15
AOD AlpTotDiv 3.95 -.01
AMLP AIpAlerMLP 17.86 -.06
MO Altria 35.49 +.03
ABV AmBev 36.10 -.37
AMRNAmarin 5.83 +.12
AMZN Amazon 284.03 +.30
AEE Ameren 33.89 -.18
AMX AMovilL 21.19 -.35
AGNCACapAgy 21.93 -.54
ACAS AmCapLtd 12.74 -.03
AEP AEP 44.46 -.02
AXP AmExp 74.58 -.04
AIG AmlntlGrp 44.22 -.67
ARCP ARItCapPr 14.50 -.32
AWR AmStsWtr 54.37 -.05
AMT AmTower 72.38 +.21
AWK AmWtrWks 40.46 +.56
APU Amerigas 49.11 +.20
AMP Ameriprise 81.12 -.70
ABC AmeriBrgn 55.09 +.26
AME Ametek 43.45 +.19
AMGNAmgen 95.81 -.25
APH Amphenol 78.90 +.43
APC Anadarko 86.93 +.16
ANEN Anaren 23.09 +.25
AU AnglogldA 13.85 -.56
BUD ABInBev 87.46 -1.93
NLY Annaly 12.13 -.15
ANH Anworth 5.29 -.11
APA Apache 80.23 -1.90
APOL ApolloGrp 17.67 -.41
AINV Apollolnv 7.78 -.03
AAPL Apple Inc 420.80 +2.31
AMAT ApldMatI 15.00 +.18
WTR AquaAm 30.94 +.21
MT ArcelorMit 11.06 -.15
ACI ArchCoa 3.72 +.03
ADM ArchDan 34.81 -.06
ARNA ArenaPhm 7.16 -.25
ARCC AresCap 17.21 -.04
ARIA AriadP 19.27 -.14
ABFS ArkBest 22.80 +.31
ARMHArmHId 37.81 +1.40
ARR ArmourRsd 4.61 -.07
ARRY ArrayBio 4.91 -.08
ARW ArrowEl 39.98 +.09
ASH Ashland 83.33 -.39
ALC AssistLiv 11.63 -.25
AZN AstraZen 47.88 -.03
APL AtlasPpln 38.15 -.67
ARP AtlasRes 18.97 -2.53
ATML Atmel 7.52 +.04
ATO ATMOS 40.49 -.11
AUQ AuRicog 4.57 +.24
ADSK Autodesk 33.49
ADP AutoData 70.24 +.16
AVGO AvagoTch 38.59 +.11
AVNR AvanirPhm 4.28 -.26
AVY AveryD 43.54 +.16
CAR AvisBudg 30.24 +.03
AVA Avista 26.87 -.05
AVP Avon 20.94 -.35
BBT BB&TCp 34.17 +.01
BCE BCEg 40.75 -.01
BHP BHP BilILt 56.58 -1.25
BP BPPLC 41.18 -.20
BPT BP Pru 97.47 -.03
BIDU Baidu 89.22 -1.09
BHI BakrHu 47.62 +.04
BLL BallCorp 42.08 -.10
BLDP BallardPw 1.85 +.04
BBD BcoBradpf 12.14 -.17
SAN BcoSantSA 6.46 -.09
BSBR BcoSBrasil 5.88 -.07
BKMU BankMutl 5.76 +.11
BAC BkofAm 12.83 -.07
BMO BkMontg 57.68 -.52
BK BkNYMel 28.53 +.11
BNS BkNovag 52.59 -.44
BCS Barclay 17.21 +.18
VXX BariPVix rs 20.12 -.18
BCR Bard 107.30 -.28
BKS BarnesNob 16.95 +.05
ABX BarrckG 14.69 +.18
BEAM Beam Inc 63.53 -.17
BZH BeazerH rs 17.40 -.25
BBBY BedBath 71.94 +.48
BMS Bemis 39.22 -.28
BRK/BBerkHB 112.63 +.11
BRY BerryPet 40.10 +.24
BBY BestBuy 29.42 +.73
BIG BigLots 32.50 +.34
BCRX Biocryst 1.65 +.02
BME BIkHIthSci 31.39 +.12
BX Blackstone 20.51 -.22
BOBE BobEvans 49.08 +.32
BA Boeing 102.89 +1.42
SAM BostBeer 174.58 +.23
BSX BostonSci 9.15 -.02
BYD BoydGm 11.02 -.06
BBEP BreitBurn 15.47 -.73


BGG BrigStrat 20.61
BMY BrMySq 43.32
BRCM Broadcom 33.41
BRCD BrcdeCm 5.74
BPO BrkfldOfPr 16.71
BRKR BrukerCp 15.91
BPL Buckeye 70.41
BKI BuckTch 37.02
BVN Buenavent 14.75
CA CA Inc 28.05
CBL CBL Asc 22.00
CBS CBS B 49.76
CME CMEGrps 75.71
CMS CMS Eng 26.61
CNH CNH Gbl 41.57
CST CST Brds n 31.61
CSX CSX 23.03
CVRR CVR Rfg n 26.94
CVS CVSCare 58.30
CYS CYS Invest 8.96
CVC CblvsnNY 18.76
COG CabotO&G 71.69
CALM Cal-Maine 47.35
CHY CalaCvHi 12.16
CCC Calgon 16.95
CWT CalifWtr 19.59
CPN Calpine 20.51
CLMT CalumetSp 35.41
CARI CamcoF 3.40
CPT CamdenPT 69.95
CPB CampSp 44.22
CNI CdnNRyg 97.87
CNQ CdnNRsgs 29.17
COF CapOne 63.92
CSU CapSenL 24.44
CMO CapsteadM 11.98
CPST CpstnTurb 1.22
BEAT CardioNet 6.23
CFN CareFusion 37.39
CCL Camival 34.85
CRS CarpTech 46.00
CRZO Carrizo 29.50
CAT Caterpillar 81.85
CELG Celgene 120.93
CLDX CelldexTh 18.65
CLSN Celsion 1.19
CX Cemex 10.36
CIG Cemig pf 8.60
CTL CntryLink 35.27
CVO Cenveo 2.08
CSG ChambStn 9.11
CHKP ChkPoint 50.01
CKP Checkpnt 14.46
CHFC ChemFinl 27.37
CHK ChesEng 21.01
CVX Chevron 119.08
CBI ChicB&l 59.93
CHS Chicos 16.48
CIM Chimera 2.87
MY ChiMYWnd 1.66
CHD ChurchDwt 61.49
Cl Cigna 72.92
CBB CinciBell 3.08
CINF CinnRn 46.32
CRUS Cirrus 18.10
CSCO Cisco 24.59
C Citigroup 47.67
CTXS CitrixSys 61.90
CLNE CleanEngy 13.28
CLWR Clearwire 5.00
CLF CliffsNRs 16.08
CLX Clorox 83.23
COH Coach 56.46
KO CocaColas 40.49
CCE CocaCE 34.57
CDE Coeur 12.55
CTSH CognizTech 64.76
RQI CohStQIR 11.05
COLE ColeREI n 11.62
CL ColgPam s 57.82
COBK ColonialFS 13.50
CLP ColonPT 24.01
CMCSAComcast 41.15
CMCSKComc spcl 39.47
CMA Comerica 40.93
CMC CmclMtls 14.46
CYH CmtyHIt 45.60
CTG CmpTask 23.50
CPWR Compuwre 10.39
CMTL Comtech 27.52
CAG ConAgra 35.68
CTWS ConnWtrSv 28.64
COP ConocoPhil 61.84
CNX ConsolEngy 26.56
CNSL ConsolCom 17.64
ED ConEd 57.46
STZ ConstellA 50.46
CTB CooperTire 33.37
CSOD CorOnDem 44.37
GLW Coming 14.28
OFC CorpOffP 26.20
CXW CorrectnCp 32.49
COST Costco 110.91
COTY Coltyn 17.25
COV Covidien 57.76
USLV CSVS3xSlv 5.70
XIV CSVellIVST 20.55
TVIX CSVS2xVx rs 2.97
CREE Cree Inc 67.10
CROX Crocs 16.84
XTEX CrosstxLP 20.91
CCK CrownHold 41.18
CTRP Clrip.com 31.93
CUBE CubeSmart 16.52
CMI Cummins 108.90
CYBE CybrOpt 5.85
CY CypSemi 10.82
CYTR CytRx 2.15
D-E-F
DCT DCT Indl 7.25
DDR DDR Corp 16.57
DNP DNPSelct 9.83
DHI DR Horton 20.96
DTE DTE 65.90
DTZ DTE En 61 25.93
DAN DanaHIdg 20.07
DHR Danaher 63.63
DRI Darden 50.96
DVA DaVitaHIth 113.90
DV DeVry 31.43
DF DeanFds 10.10
DE Deere 80.99
DELL Dell Inc 13.31
DAL DeltaAir 18.41
DNR DenburyR 17.26
DNDN Dndreon 4.30
DVN DevonE 53.50
DEO Diageo 116.02
DO DiaOffs 67.90
DBD Diebold 34.07
DGII Digilntl 9.48
DLR DigitalRIt 60.17
DDS Dillards 82.51


1 ,6 4 0 ................................



1,560 10 DAYS


S&P 500
Close: 1,615.41
Change: 1.33 (0.1%)


3,480 10 DAYS................



',- :' 10 DAYS


Nasdaq composite
Close: 3,443.67
Change: 10.27 (0.3%)


1 ,7 0 0 ........................ ......... ......... ............. ............ 3 ,6 0 0 ............. ........... ............ ............. ............. ... ...........

1 ............. ........... ............ ............. .... .. .... 3 ,5 0 0 ............. ........... ............ .............
16 0 ... .. .... ... 3,500



1,550 .......... ....... .... ............. ............
3,200o ............ ....... .... ............

1500 ..... ... ..3,100 ........... ............ ............. ............. ............

1,450 F...... 3,000 .


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD
Vol. (in mil.) 1,902 898
Pvs. Volume 3,211 1,637
Advanced 1180 1343
Declined 1831 1023
New Highs 53 110
New Lows 39 17


DTV DirecTV 63.08
FAZ DxFinBrrs 33.19
TZA DxSCBr rs 30.22
NUGT DxGIdBII rs 5.65
FAS DxFnBulls 64.56
SPXS DirSPBear 10.68
TNA DxSCBull s 49.58
SPXL DxSPBullIIs 42.23
DFS Discover 48.34
DISCA DiscComA 80.63
DIS Disney 63.61
DG DollarGen 51.11
DLTR DollarTree 52.06
D DomRescs 56.34
DPZ Dominos 60.23
RRD DonlleyRR 14.60
DOW DowChm 32.43
LEO DryStrt 8.39
DRYS DryShips 1.81
DD DuPont 52.40
DUC DufPUC 10.80
DUK DukeEngy 67.39
DRE DukeRlty 15.70
DRRX DurectCp 1.17
DVAX Dynavax 1.06
ETFC E-Trade 12.86
EBAY eBay 53.17
EMC EMCCp 23.97
EOG EOG Res 138.18
ELNK ErthLink 6.44
ETN Eaton 66.22
EOS EV EEq2 11.52
ECL Ecolab 85.83
EIX Edisonlnt 46.61
EW EdwLfSci 65.25
ELN Elan 14.12
EGO EldorGldg 6.12
EA ElectArts 23.31
EMR EmersonEl 55.19
EDE EmpDist 22.39
ELX Emulex 7.62
EEP EnbrdgEPt 31.13
ENB Enbridge 42.00
ECA EnCanag 16.87
ENDP EndoPhrm 37.68
ENR Energizer 100.94
ETP EngyTsfr 50.50
EXXI EngyXXI 23.06
EBF EnnisInc 17.95
ESV ENSCO 56.77
ETR Entergy 69.29
EPD EntPrPt 63.09
EQR EqtyRsd 57.44
ERIC Ericsson 11.43
ET ExactTgt 33.73
XCO ExcoRes 8.05
EXC Exelon 30.08
ESRX ExpScripts 62.37
XOM ExxonMbI 90.69
FFIV F5 Netwks 69.32
FTI FMC Tech 55.85
FNB FNBCp PA 12.51
FB Facebook 24.52
FDO FamilyDIr 63.32
FAST Fastenal 45.29
FDX FedExCp 97.77
FNHC FedNatHId 9.82
FGP Ferrellgs 21.99
FNF FidlNFin 23.80
FIS FidNatlnfo 43.05
FSC FifthStFin 10.57
FITB FifthThird 18.37
FNSR Finisar 16.70
FHN FstHorizon 11.84
AG FMajSilv g 11.01
FNFG FstNiagara 10.19
FRC FstRepBk 39.11
FSLR FstSolar 45.55
FE FirstEngy 36.16
FMER FstMerit 20.57
FLEX Flextrn 7.75
FLO FlowrsFd s 22.09
FLR Fluor 58.27
F FordM 16.43
FTNT Fortinet 17.98
FBHS FBHmSec 39.25
FWLT FosterWhl 20.97
FCX FMCG 27.68
FTR FrontierCm 3.96
FRO Frontline 1.98
FIO Fusion-io 13.70
G-H-I
GOM GMAC 44 24.80
GTAT GT AdvTc 4.17
GDV GabDvlnc 19.16
GGT GabMultT 9.57
GUT GabUtil 6.49
GFA Gafisa SA 2.34
GCI Gannett 25.50
GPS Gap 42.89
GRMNGarmin 35.08
GKNT Geeknet 14.04
GAM GAInv 31.98
GD GenDynam 78.34
GE GenElec 22.91
GGP GenGrPrp 19.94
GIS GenMills 48.95
GM GenMotors 34.14
GEL GenesisEn 51.41
GNTX Gentex 23.33
GPC GenuPrt 82.86
GNW Genworth 11.89
GGB Gerdau 5.89
GILD GileadScis 51.98
GSK GlaxoSKIn 50.61
GRT GlimchRt 10.97
GLUU GluMobile 2.58


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


GOL GolLinhas 2.97 -.12
GFI GoldFLtd 4.90 -.18
GG Goldcrp g 24.88 +.87
GS GoldmanS 150.43 -.49
GT Goodyear 15.38 -.06
GOOGGoogle 886.43+4.12
GRA vjGrace 84.22 -.08
GTI GrafTech 7.02 -.09
GPT GramrcyP 4.73 -.03
GPK GraphPkg 8.02 -.02
GNI GNIron 69.96 +1.57
GXP GtPlainEn 22.63
GMCRGreenMtC 72.39 -.22
GWAYGrnwyMed 11.33 -.47
GEF GreifA 51.31 -2.34
GRIF Griffin h 28.95 -.35
GRPN Groupon 9.14 +.19
BSMX GpFSnMxn 13.63 -.49
TV GpTelevisa 24.06 -.33
GSH GuangRy 19.49 -.76
HCA HCAHIdg 35.49 -1.42
HCP HCP Inc 44.93 -1.07
HDS HDSuppn 19.38 +.27
HAIN HainCel 65.80 -.15
HK HalconRes 5.76 +.02
HAL Hallibrtn 42.65 -.14
HBI Hanesbrds 52.35 +.21
THG Hanoverlns 48.67 -.10
HOG HarieyD 54.67 -.20
HMY HarmonyG 3.71 +.07
HIG HartfdFn 30.29 -.62
HTS HatterasF 24.62 +.07
HE HawajiEl 25.12 +.09
HCN HItCrREIT 66.06 -.81
HCSG HlthCSvc 25.29 +.16
HMA HItMgmt 15.34 -.70
HL HeclaM 2.92 +.04
HLF Herbalife 46.71 +.32
HSY Hershey 89.17 -.64
HTZ Hertz 25.10 +.11
HES Hess 67.20 -.02
HPQ HewlettP 25.18 +.16
HSH Hillshire 32.77 -.08
HTH HilltopH 16.78 +.08
HIMX HimaxTch 5.50 +.04
HFC HollyFront 40.59 +.40
HOLX Hologic 19.03 -.17
HD HomeDp 77.73 +.42
HMC Honda 37.97 -.06
HON HonwIllntI 78.51 +.63
HRL Hormel 38.57 -.44
HPT HospPT 26.15 -.32
HST HostHotls 16.99 -.14
HOV HovnanE 5.52 -.11
HNP HuanPwr 38.96 -.53
HUB/BHubbelB 100.61 -.61
HCBK HudsCity 9.35 -.01
HBAN HuntBncsh 8.20 -.02
HII Huntgtnlng 57.30 +.70
IAG IAMGId g 4.03
IBN ICICI Bk 37.21 -1.06
IGTE iGateCorp 16.64 -.05
ING ING 9.04 -.15
IAU iShGold 12.14 +.08
EWZ iShBrazil 42.04 -.29
EWC iShCanada 26.11 -.07
EWG iShGerm 24.39 -.07
EWH iSh HK 18.15 -.15
EWJ iShJapan 11.45 +.01
EWY iSh SKor 52.42 -.58
EWM iSMalasia 15.48 +.02
EWW iShMexico 64.97 -.11
EWS iShSing 12.62 -.06
EWT iSTaiwn 13.20 -.10
SLV iShSilver 19.02 +.34
FXI iShChina25 31.73 -.29
IVV iSCorSP500162.12 +.17
EEM iShEMkts 37.58 -.35
LQD iShiBxB 113.61 -.33
TLT iShB20T 110.01 -.33
IEF iShB7-10T 102.24 -.20
EFA iS Eafe 57.57 +.02
HYG iShiBxHYB 90.82 +.21
IWM iShR2K 98.28 +.20
PFF iShUSPfd 38.83 -.15
IYR iShREst 66.56 -.29
ITB iShDJHm 22.42 +.16
IDA Idacorp 48.00 +.31
ITW ITW 68.77 -.40
IMMU Imunmd 5.11 -.42
INCY Incyte 23.15 +.20
IBCP IndBkMI 6.00 +.21
NRGY Inergy 15.83 +.02
IR IngerRd 55.97 +.28
INGR Ingredion 67.47 +.41
IRC InlandRE 10.36 -.02
TEG IntegrysE 57.63
INTC Intel 23.76 +.04
ICPT Intercept n 43.94 -.36
IN Intermec 9.84
INAP InterNAP 8.40 -.04
IBM IBM 193.25 +1.75
IGT IntlGame 16.57 -.12
IP IntPap 45.77 +.02
IPG Interpublic 14.87 +.18
INTX Intersectns 9.00 -.03
IPI IntPotash 18.29 -.22
INTU Intuit 62.38 +.01
ISRG IntSurg 499.72 -1.47
INVN InvenSense 15.46 +.15
IVZ Invesco 31.45 -.04
IVR InvMtgCap 15.87 -.37
ISIS Isis 28.50 +.03
ITUB ItauUnibH 12.01 -.06
J-K-L
JDSU JDS Uniph 14.52 +.02
JPM JPMorgCh 52.77 -.03


HIGH
15025.90
6219.88
480.36
9150.09
3455.42
1618.97
1174.07
17138.87
993.14


LOW
14858.93
6170.31
476.36
9074.59
3417.88
1604.57
1165.17
16994.44
984.17


JEC JacobsEng 54.56 -.06
JNS JanusCap 8.35 -.07
JBLU JetBlue 6.16 -.06
JNJ JohnJn 86.78 +.21
JCI JohnsnCll 35.54 -.20
JOY JoyGIbI 48.34 -.01
JNPR JnprNtwk 19.30 +.17
KBH KB Home 18.71 +.03
KFN KKRFn 10.18 -.05
KFH KKRFn 41 27.72 -.07
KNDI KandiTech 5.23 -.11
KSU KC Southn 109.97 -.02
K Kellogg 65.06 -.05
KERX KeryxBio 7.92 +.05
KEY Keycorp 11.43 +.03
KMB KimbClk 97.03 -.01
KIM Kimco 21.44 -.13
KMP KindME 85.65 -.36
KMI KindMorg 38.42 +.14
KGC Kinross g 5.06 +.16
KOG KodiakOg 9.16 -.02
KRFT KraftFGp n 55.51 -.02
KTOS KratosDef 6.50 -.02
KKD KrispKrm 19.00 -.02
KR Kroger 35.60 -.32
KRO KronosWw 15.56 -.45
KLIC Kulicke 11.02 +.04
LTD L Brands 49.20 -.59
LLL L-3 Com 85.60 +.54
LKQ LKQ Cp s 25.99 +.01
LSI LSI Corp 7.24 +.04
LTC LTC Prp 38.88 -1.10
LRCX LamResrch 45.25 +.53
LSTR Landstar 52.18 +.04
LVS LVSands 51.79
LHO LaSalleH 24.66 -.03
LEAP LeapWirlss 7.07 +.38
LEN LennarA 35.35 +.36
LVLT Level3 20.71 +.37
LXP LexRItyTr 11.69 -.09
USA LbtyASE 5.24 +.03
LBTYALibGlobA 76.99+1.34
LRY LibtProp 37.12 -.29
LFVN Lifevantge 2.63 +.13
LLY LillyEli 50.14 -.36
LNC LincNat 36.98 -.42
LNKD Linkedln 188.18 +5.88
LINE LinnEngy 22.79 -4.26
LNCO LinnCo n 26.95 -3.95
LGF LionsGtg 30.29 +.36
LYG LloydBkg 3.88 +.05
LMT LockhdM 107.20 +.80
LPR LonePine g .35 +.00
LO Lorillard s 44.35 -.06
LPX LaPac 15.13 +.05
LOW Lowes 42.32 -.05
LUX Luxottica 51.22 -.00
LYB LyonBas A 66.50+1.09
M-N-O
MTB M&TBk 113.55 -.18
MCGCMCG Cap 5.22 -.01
MDC MDC 32.13 +.13
MDU MDU Res 26.31 +.08
MFA MFAFncl 8.38 -.07
MTG MGIC 6.05 -.01
MGM MGM Rsts 14.93 +.06
M Macys 48.48 +.08
MHR MagHRes 3.88 -.01
MNK Mallinckn 43.10 +.84
MNKD MannKd 6.87 -.36
MFC Manulife g 16.11 +.03
MRO MarathnO 35.17 +.57
MPC MarathPet 70.73 +1.44
GDXJ MVJrGIdrs 36.19 +.35
GDX MktVGold 24.18 +.43
OIH MVOilSvc 43.48 -.12
SMH MV Semi 37.82 +.24
RSX MktVRus 25.18 +.19
PRB MVPreRMu 24.40 +.40
MWE MarkWest 66.27 -.19
MMLP MartinMid 45.22 +.40
MRVL MarvellT 11.93 +.21
MAS Masco 19.96 +.20
MAT Mattel 44.93 -.11
MXIM Maximlntg 27.72 +.17
MDR McDrmlnt 8.31 +.02
MCD McDnlds 100.35 +.42
MUX McEwenM 1.91 +.13
MJN MeadJohn 68.85 -6.05
MWV MeadWvco 34.18 -.09
MTL Mechel 2.81 -.17
MPW MedProp 13.95 -.54
MDT Medtrnic 51.53 -.28
MPEL MelcoCrwn 21.94 -.22
MRK Merck 46.55
MCY MercGn 44.32 -.16
MDP Meredith 47.70 +.30
MTOR Meritor 6.77 -.27
MET MetLife 46.27 -.30
KORS MKors 62.46 +.10
MU MicronT 14.14 -.17
MSFT Microsoft 34.01 +.07
MVIS Microvis 2.54 +.04
MIDD Middleby 175.48 +.83
MSEX MdsxWatr 20.06 +.12
MTU MitsuUFJ 6.41 +.09
MBT MobileTele 18.52 -.07
MOLX Molex 29.38 -.30
MCP Molycorp 5.94 -.07
MDLZ Mondelez 28.58 -.20
MON Monsanto 97.89 -.53
MS MorgStan 24.04 -.40
MOS Mosaic 53.71 +.20
MUR MurphO 61.19 +.30
MYL Mylan 30.47 +.10
MYGN MyriadG 28.49 +.70
NPSP NPS Phm 15.92 +.14


CLOSE CHG. %CHG. WK MO QTR YTD


14988.55
6194.74
479.14
9135.09
3443.67
1615.41
1171.34
17102.78
991.13


+56.14
-18.98
-0.81
-9.64
+10.27
+1.33
+0.66
+11.58
+1.59


NRG NRGEgy 26.26 +.17
DCM NTTDOCO 15.62 -.12
NVE NV Energy 23.51 +.03
NBR Nabors 15.78 -.20
NBG NBGrcers 2.91 -.16
NFG NatFuGas 59.26 +.39
NGG NatGrid 56.62 +.14
NHI NtHlthlnv 60.76 -.93
NOV NOilVarco 70.31 +.28
NNN NatRetPrp 34.99 -.04
NKTR NektarTh 11.98 +.25
NEOG Neogen 56.14 +.21
NTAP NetApp 38.31 +.02
NFLX Netflix 220.91 -.55
NJR NJ Rscs 41.97 +.20
EDU NewOriEd 21.49 -.61
NRZ NewResd n 6.46 +.01
NYCBNYCmtyB 14.19 +.07
NYMT NYMtgTr 6.64 -.07
NYT NY Times 11.98 +.30
NCT Newcastle 5.16 -.01
NFX NewidExp 23.93 -.17
NEM NewmtM 29.02 -.15
NWSANewsCpAn 14.87 -.13
NWS NewsCpBn 14.97 -.02
NEE NextEraEn 80.12 -.22
NI NiSource 28.62 -.08
NLSN NielsenH 33.94 -.03
NKE NikeB s 62.86 +.24
NTT NipponTT 25.72 -.11
NE NobleCorp 37.65 -.30
NBL NobleEn s 61.63 +.59
NOK NokiaCp 3.93 +.10
NDLS Noodles n 45.00 -2.20
NAT NordicAm 7.53 -.01
NSC NorflkSo 71.66 -.58
NU NoestUt 41.38 +.25
NTI NthnTEn n 22.30 -.73
NOC NorthropG 82.93 +.76
NWBI NwstBcsh 13.99 +.08
NWN NwstNG 42.17 +.03
NVS Novartis 70.72 +.06
NVAX Novavax 2.35 +.10
NVO NovoNord 159.35 +.87
NUAN NuanceCm 18.84 +.14
NAD NuvDivA 13.53 -.18
JPZ NuvEqtP 12.55 -.05
NIO NuvMuOpp 13.77 -.16
NQM NvlQI 14.03 -.24
NMA NvMAd 13.14 -.17
NUW NvAMT-Fr 15.79 -.16
NNP NvNYP 14.42 -.22
NPP NuvPP 14.18 -.22
JPC NvPfdlnco 9.29 -.08
NPF NvPMI 13.11 -.22
NPI NuvPI 13.08 -.17
NPM NuvPl2 13.42 -.25
NPT NuvPl4 12.40 -.15
NQU NuvQInc 13.34 -.25
NES NuverraE 2.96 +.06
NVDA Nvidia 14.13 +.04
NXTM NxStageMd 14.24
OCZ OCZTech 1.67 +.06
OGE OGE Egy s 34.26 +.06
OAS OasisPet 40.82 +.48
OXY OcciPet 89.76 -.81
OCFC OceanFst 16.22 +.16
OCN OcwenFn 42.36 +1.21
ODP OfliceDpt 4.07 +.08
OIBR Oi SAs 1.55 -.01
ONB OldNBcp 14.34 +.12
ORI OldRepub 12.99 -.06
OLN Olin 24.00 +.01
OHI OmegaHlt 31.63 -.08
OME OmegaP 9.30
OMC Omnicom 62.48 -.21
ONNN OnSmcnd 8.08 -.02
OKS OneokPtrs 48.61 -.78
ONXX OnyxPh 133.52 -2.06
OPK OpkoHlth 7.18 -.10
OPLK OplinkC 18.48 +.42
OPTR OptimerPh 15.18 +.62
ORCL Oracle 30.70 +.60
OFIX Orthfx 27.38 +.08
OSK OshkoshCp 38.19 -.12
OTTR OtterTail 28.57 +.13
P-Q-R
PCG PG&ECp 44.97 -.02
PNC PNC 73.97 +.12
PNM PNM Res 21.99 -.13
PKX POSCO 64.50 -.76
PPG PPG 149.59 +.51
PPL PPLCorp 29.59 -.16
PCAR Paccar 53.47 -.46
PAAS PanASIv 11.70 +.44
P Pandora 19.43 -.11
PNRA PaneraBrd 189.52 +.08
PKD ParkDrl 5.06 -.03
PH ParkerHan 95.32 -.22
PTEN PattUTI 20.51 +.21
BTU PeabdyE 14.65 -.21
PBA Pembina g 30.92 -.40
PGH Pengrth g 4.82 -.08
PENN PnnNGm 52.10 -.13
PWE PennWstg 10.78 -.25
PNNT PennantPk 11.07 -.00
JCP Penney 16.60 +.05
PAG Penske 30.85 +.20
PNR Pentair 57.93 -.01
PBCT PeopUtdF 14.99
PBY PepBoy 11.65 -.03
POM PepcoHold 19.48 -.15
PEP PepsiCo 80.73 -.95
PPHM PeregrinP 1.49 +.04
PWRDPerfectWId 18.66 -1.16
PRGO Perrigo 122.13 +.12
PETM PetSmarl 68.29 -.03


+14.38%
+16.73%
+5.75%
+8.19%
+14.05%
+13.27%
+14.79%
+14.06%
+16.69%


PBR/A PetrbrsA 13.90 +.13
PBR Petrobras 13.05 +.24
PFE Pfizer 27.65 -.05
PM PhilipMor 87.75 +.19
PSX Phillips66 57.68 +.60
PNX PhnxCosrs 42.45 +.46
PNY PiedNG 33.41 +.09
PFN PimlncStr2 10.26 -.11
PNW PinWst 54.79 -.28
PXD PioNtrl 148.75 -1.15
PBI PitnyBw 14.20 +.12
PAA PlainsAAs 55.64 +.12
PLUG PlugPowrh .28 -.02
PCL PlumCrk 46.39 -.26
PII Polaris 95.83 -.20
POT Potash 38.18 +.40
DBC PwshDB 25.62 +.23
DBB PS BasMet 16.46 -.04
BKLN PS SrLoan 24.76 +.02
PHB PSHYCpBd 18.76 +.02
QQQ PwShs QQQ72.03 +.29
PRAN PranaBio 2.82 +.40
PX Praxair 114.77 +.07
PCP PrecCastpt 230.19 +3.95
PFG PrinFncl 36.97 -.32
PRA ProAssurs 52.14 -.50
PLD ProLogis 37.46 -.53
SH ProShtS&P 29.41 -.04
QID PrUShQQQ 23.20 -.18
SSO ProUltSP 77.58 +.18
TBF ProSht20Tr 31.41 +.02
UPRO PUItSP500s 63.83 +.20
UVXY PrUVxST rs 67.48 -1.62
UCO PrUltCrude 33.09 +1.21
SCO PrUShCrde 33.01 -1.33
AGQ ProUltSilv 17.12 +.57
PG ProctGam 78.57 +.13
SDS PrUShSP rs 40.39 -.05
TBT PrUShL20 rs72.52 +.27
TWM ProUSR2K 17.42 -.05
SPXU PUSSP500 24.08 -.08
SQQQ PrUPShQQQ27.80 -.40
PGRX ProspGIRs .10 -.00
PRU Prudentl 73.84 -.26
PEG PSEG 31.80 -.04
PSA PubStrg 153.26 -1.42
PHM PulteGrp 19.15 +.15
PMM PMMI 7.09 -.07
QEP QEPRes 28.60 +.09
QRE QR Energy 16.03 -1.08
QLGC Qlogic 10.44 +.59
QCOMQualcom 60.91 -.01
STR Questar 23.21 -.25
KWK QksilvRes 1.68 -.05
RFMD RF MicD 5.38 +.02
RAX Rackspace 40.21 +2.13
RDN RadianGrp 11.68 +.12
RSH RadioShk 3.09 -.11
RL RLauren 172.79 +.12
RAVN Ravenlnd s 30.34 +.31
RTN Raytheon 65.15 +.33
O Rltylnco 43.36 +.13
RWT RedwdTr 17.06 -.15
REG RgcyCtrs 51.00 -.33
RF RegionsFn 9.88 +.06
RS RelStlAI 66.00 -.43
RGEN Replgn 8.68 +.10
BBRY RschMotn 9.65 -.05
RSO ResrceCap 6.06 -.04
ROIC RetailOpp 13.49 -.13
RAI ReynAmer 48.60 -.09
RIO RioTinto 40.46 -.23
RAD RiteAid 2.76 +.02
RVBD RiverbedT 15.68 +.09
RHI RobtHalf 31.56 -1.74
ROK RockwlAut 84.79 -.02
COL RockColl 63.57 +.47
ROG Rogers 47.34 -.42
ROP Roper 124.55 -.13
RY RoyalBkg 57.12 -.68
RBS RBScotlnd 8.32 +.09
RCL RylCarb 33.31 -.65
RDS/BRoyDShllIB 65.94 -.12
RDS/ARoyDShllIA 63.41 -.27
RYL Ryland 40.88 +.12
S-T-U
STBA S&TBcp 20.58 +.12
SAI SAIC 13.84 -.09
SAP SAP AG 70.82 -1.14
SCG SCANA 48.56 -.23
SKM SKTIcm 19.47 -.15
SLM SLMCp 22.89 -.10
SM SM Energy 62.66 +.84
DIA SpdrDJIA 149.54 +.61
GLD SpdrGold 120.74 +.69
MDY SPMid 212.98 +.07
SPY S&P500ETF161.28 +.07
XHB SpdrHome 29.61 +.16
KBE SpdrS&PBk 29.33 +.07
JNK SpdrLehHY 39.50 +.15
KRE SpdrS&P RB34.95 +.13
XOP SpdrOGEx 59.02 +.32
XME SpdrMetM 33.13 -.19
SBS SABESPs 9.77 -.17
SBR SabnR 50.78 -.93
SWY Safeway 23.58 -.10
SAIA Saia Inc s 31.60 -.69
JOE StJoe 21.65 +.55
STJ StJude 45.60 -.26
CRM Salesforc s 38.55 +.38
SBH SallyBty 31.01 +.11
SJT SJuanB 16.01 -.03
SNDK SanDisk 61.41 -.18
SD SandRdge 4.90 +.03
SNY Sanofi 50.49 -.40
SLB Schlmbrg 73.01 +.40
SCHWSchwab 21.40 +.10


SDRL SeadrillLtd 40.31 -.18
STX SeagateT 45.10 -.12
SEE SealAir 24.96 +.31
SHLD SearsHIdgs 42.24
SRE SempraEn 80.33 -.07
SNH SenHous 26.15 -.21
SCI ServiceCp 17.91 -.07
NOW ServcNow 41.74 +.53
SHW Sherwin 179.84 +.21
SFL ShipFin 14.91 +.12
SID SiderurNac 2.58 -.03
SLW SilvWhtng 19.25 +.28
SPG SimonProp 158.98 -3.65
SIRI SiriusXM 3.47 +.03
SWKS SkywksSol 21.81 +.23
SWHCSmithWes 10.09 +.12
SMSI SmithMicro 1.13 +.02
SFD SmithfF 32.70 -.07
SJM Smucker 102.59 -.56
SNA SnapOn 90.62 +.12
SODA SodaStrm 67.18 -.23
SLRC SolarCap 23.39 -.21
SON SonocoP 34.91 -.09
SNE SonyCp 21.65 -.16
SOR SourcC 62.31 -.04
SJI SoJerlnd 56.89 -.08
SO SouthnCo 43.40 -.21
SCCO SthnCopper 27.33 +.14
LUV SwstAir 12.71
SWN SwstnEngy 37.63 +.03
SSS SovranSS 67.24 +.47
SE SpectraEn 34.52 -.10
SPR SpiritAero 21.67 -.04
S SprntNex 7.19 +.04
XLB SP Mails 38.46 +.01
XLV SPHIthC 47.57 -.07
XLP SPCnSt 39.93 -.08
XLY SPConsum 57.15 +.26
XLE SP Engy 78.98 -.05
XLF SPDRFnd 19.47 -.06
XLI SP Inds 42.63 +.02
XLK SPTech 30.98 +.18
XLU SP Util 37.01 -.14
SPF StdPac 8.08
SWK StanBlkDk 77.91 +.13
SPLS Staples 15.90 -.40
SGU StarGas 4.96 -.04
SBUX Starbucks 67.30 +.51
STWD StarwdPT 24.89 +.14
STRZAStarz A 21.37 -.16
ST7 StateStr 65.81 -.06
STLD StlDynam 15.17 -.08
SPH SubPpne 46.73 -.28
SUBK SuffolkBcp 16.89
SNHY SunHydrl 32.12 +.03
SU Suncorgs 29.64 +.09
SUNE SunEdison 8.13 -.15
SPWRSunPower 22.16 +.14
STP Suntech 1.01 +.02
STI SunTrst 32.92 +.41
SVU Supvalu 6.71 -.04
SWFT SwiftTrans 15.83 -.02
SYMC Symantec 22.36 -.08
SNV Synovus 2.97 +.02
SYY Sysco 33.75 -.28
TMUS T-MoblUS n 23.05 -.32
AMTD TDAmeritr 24.80 +.27
TE TECO 16.71 -.14
TJX TJX 50.29 +.05
TWTC tw telecom 28.99 +.60
TSM TaiwSemi 18.12 +.12
TLM TalismEg 11.46 -.07
TGT Target 69.38 -.18
TCO Taubmn 76.15 -1.49
TCK TeckRes g 20.36 -.18
VIV TelefBrasil 21.67 -.21
TEF TelefEsp 12.60 -.06
TLAB Tellabs 2.06 +.01
TS Tenadis 43.23 -1.56
THC TenetHItrs 43.64 -1.98
TEN Tenneco 46.10 -.27
TDC Teradata 51.39 +1.37
TEX Terex 27.10 -.10
TNH TerraNitro 216.98 -.53
TSLA TeslaMot 115.24 -2.58
TSO Tesoro 50.38 -.33
TEVA TevaPhrm 38.72 -.32
TXN Texlnst 35.47 +.34
TXRH TexRdhse 25.47 +.04
TGH Textainer 36.19 -.76
TXT Textron 25.64 +.02
TMO ThermoFis 84.95 -.04
DDD 3DSyss 45.12 +.25
MMM 3MCo 109.45 +.72
THI THortong 54.22 +.11
TWC TWCable 112.45+2.98
TWX TimeWarn 60.07 +.55
TKR Timken 58.11 -.29
TIVO TiVoInc 11.31 +.04
TOL TollBros 32.49 +.36
TRU TorchEngy .45
TMK Torchmark 65.83 -.11
TD TorDBk g 79.68 -.61
TOT Total SA 48.19 +.01
RIG Transocn 47.39 -.06
TRV Travelers 80.40 +.58
TY TriContl 18.00 +.04
TYp TiCntl pf 49.00 -1.35
TSL TrnaSolar 6.17 -.09
TRIP TnpAdvis 60.79 +.56
TQNT TiQuint 7.10 +.13
TRST TrstNY 5.60 +.06
TUP Tuppwre 79.26 +.45
TRQ TurqHillRs 5.55 -.01
FOXA 21stCFoxA 29.65 +.44
TWO TwoHrblnv 10.22 -.05
TYC Tycolntls 34.16 -.25
TSN Tyson 26.03 -.30
UBS UBSAG 16.99 +.07


UDR UDR 25.94 -.11
UGI UGICorp 38.91 +.28
UIL UILHold 37.76 +.10
UNS UNS Engy 46.04 +.13
LCC USAirwy 16.75 +.32
UPL UltraPtg 20.18 +.27
UA UndArmrs 60.76 +.74
UNF UniRrst 92.55 -.22
UNP UnionPac 155.30 +.10
UNT Unit 43.44 -.29
UAL UtdContl 31.23 -.26
UMC UtdMicro 2.42 +.07
UPS UPSB 86.16 -.45
URI UtdRentals 50.29 +.30
USB US Bancrp 36.35 +.05
UNG US NGas 19.24 -.10
USO US OilFd 35.84 +.63
X USSteel 18.18 -1.07
UTX UtdTech 94.73 +.93
UNH UtdhlthGp 65.54 +.27
UVV UnvslCp 57.39 -.03
UHS UnivHIthS 65.82 -2.39

V-W-X-Y-Z
VFC VFCp 193.82 +.24
VALE ValeSA 12.74 -.13
VALE/PValeSApf 11.47 -.15
VLO ValeroE 33.69 +.15
VLY VlyNBcp 9.55 +.02
VVTV ValVisA 5.17 +.16
VTI VangTSM 83.39 +.12
VOO VanS&P500 73.85 +.07
VNQ VangREIT 69.16 -.46
VWO VangEmg 37.90 -.30
VGK VangEur 48.27 +.05
VNR VangNatR 26.18 -1.27
VEA VangFTSE 35.77 -.01
VVC Vectren 33.65 +.02
VELT Velti 1.33 -.05
VE VeoliaEnv 11.17 -.21
VZ VerizonCm 51.01 +.38
VIAB ViacomB 68.44 +.90
VVI ViadCorp 26.13 +.56
VPHM ViroPhrm 29.65 +.41
V Visa 187.04 +1.80
VSH Vishaylnt 14.09 +.10
VC Visteon 62.94 +.14
VVUS Vivus 12.31 -.27
VMW VMware 65.59 -.01
VOD Vodafone 28.72 +.06
VMC VulcanM 47.46 -.33
WPC WP Carey 66.94 -.36
WPX WPX Engy 18.87 +.04
WMT WalMart 74.76 +.05
WAG Walgrn 44.12 -.34
WLT WalterEn 10.51 -.28
WCRXWarnerCh 19.49 +.10
WRE WREIT 26.95 -.07
WM WsteMInc 40.18 -.22
WAT Waters 100.47 +.11
WFT Weathflntl 13.84 -.08
WBS WebsterFn 26.23 +.23
WRI WeinRIt 31.17 -.07
WLP WellPoint 81.09 -.29
WFC WellsFargo 41.22
WEN WendysCo 5.86 -.05
WR WestarEn 31.18 -.02
EMD WAstEMki 13.05 -.23
WIA WAstlnfSc 12.05 -.10
WNR WstnRefin 26.60 +.09
WU WstnUnion 16.92 +.12
WBK Westpac 127.31 -2.47
WY Weyerhsr 28.46 -.08
WHR Whrlpl 114.99 -1.36
WWAVWhiteWvn 16.71 -.51
WLL WhitingPet 48.39 +.61
WFM WholeFds 53.03 +.35
WMB WmsCos 32.82 -.16
WIN Windstrm 7.86 +.17
WIT Wipro 7.32 +.01
WEC WiscEngy 40.30 -.12
DXJ WTJpHedg 46.94 -.23
EPI WT India 15.97 -.24
WWD Woodward 40.49 +.17
WWE WIdW Ent 10.47 +.15
XL XL Grp 30.25 -.23
XEL XcelEngy 28.26 +.13
XRX Xerox 9.28 +.05
YHOO Yahoo 25.59 +.60
AUY Yamana g 9.73 +.34
YGE YingliGrn 3.32 -.07
YORWYorkWater 19.28 +.24
YUM YumBmds 71.12+1.02
ZMH Zimmer 75.42 -.66
ZION ZionBcp 29.69 +.15
ZIOP Ziopharm 2.32 +.11
ZTS Zoetis n 29.28 -.42
ZF ZweigFd 12.87 -.02
ZNGA Zynga 3.42 +.15


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cild Issue has been called for
redemption by company, d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly lsted on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does
not meet continued-listing standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading. pf Preferred stock
issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price. rt Right to buy security at a specified price. rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distrib-
uted. wt Warnant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vj Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included, b Annual rate plus
stock. c Liquidating dividend. e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. 1 Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend, t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering
market costs is paid from fund assets. d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges), m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available. p previous day's net asset value. s fund
split shares during the week. x fund paid a distnbution during the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


Interestrates






The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note rose
to 2.51 percent
on Wednesday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


TREASURIES YEST PVS


NET 1YR
CHG AGO


3-month T-bill .05 0.01 +0.04 .08
6-month T-bill .06 0.07 -0.01 .14
52-wk T-bill .13 0.13 ... .20
2-year T-note .37 0.35 +0.02 .31
5-year T-note 1.42 1.38 +0.04 .70
10-year T-note 2.51 2.47 +0.04 1.63
30-year T-bond 3.49 3.48 +0.01 2.74


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.26 3.23 +0.03 2.44
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.73 4.74 -0.01 4.45
Barclays USAggregate 2.36 2.37 -0.01 1.94
Barclays US High Yield 6.60 6.63 -0.03 7.26
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.28 4.30 -0.02 3.58
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.57 1.56 +0.01 .95
Barclays US Corp 3.33 3.36 -0.03 3.22


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar re-
treated against
the euro, British
pound, Japa-
nese yen and
most other ma-
jor currencies
as traders wor-
ried about a re-
surgent Europe-
an debt crisis
favored assets
like gold.



k PIN


N 0


MAJORS CLOSE
USD per British Pound 1.5272
Canadian Dollar 1.0519
USD per Euro 1.3000
Japanese Yen 99.91
Mexican Peso 12.9957


EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST


Israeli Shekel
Norwegian Krone
South African Rand
Swedish Krona
Swiss Franc

ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


3.6377
6.1187
10.1158
6.6904
.9480


1.1038
6.1330
7.7535
60.227
1.2733
1141.28
30.07


CHG
+.0120
-.0024
+.0022
-.69
-.0792


-.0000
+.0001
-.0011
+.0008
+.0030


+.0101
-.0025
-.0000
+.671
+.0017
+2.31
-.00


%CHG
+.79%
-.23%
+.17%
-.69%
-.61%

-.00%
+.06%
-1.11%
+.54%
+.28%


+.92%
-.04%
-.00%
+1.11%
+.13%
+.20%
-.00%


1YR.
AGO
1.5693
1.0125
1.2610
79.87
13.3281

3.9226
5.9610
8.0778
6.9296
.9525


.9724
6.3535
7.7552
54.215
1.2622
1138.40
29.86


Commodities
The price of oil
climbed past the
$101 a barrel
mark amid
concerns over
political unrest
in Egypt. Gold,
silver and
copper rose, but
other metals fell.
Crop prices
were mixed.



e m



ED


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 101.24
Ethanol (gal) 2.47
Heating Oil (gal) 2.95
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.69
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.84

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1252.10
Silver (oz) 19.69
Platinum (oz) 1345.30
Copper (Ib) 3.17
Palladium (oz) 684.10

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.22
Coffee (Ib) 1.21
Corn (bu) 6.78
Cotton (Ib) 0.84
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 305.20
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.35
Soybeans (bu) 15.84
Wheat (bu) 6.58


PVS.
99.60
2.41
2.90
3.65
2.78

PVS.
1243.60
19.30
1366.30
3.14
687.10

PVS.
1.22
1.24
6.73
0.83
295.20
1.34
15.73
6.50


%CHG
+1.65

+1.72
+0.99
+1.97

%CHG
+0.68
+2.03
-1.54
+1.02
-0.44

%CHG
+0.04
-2.38
+0.82
+1.41
+3.39
+0.71
+0.67
+1.27


%YTD
+10.3
+12.7
-3.1
+10.1
+0.9

%YTD
-25.2
-34.8
-12.6
-12.8
-2.6

%YTD
-6.1
-15.8
-2.9
+12.3
-18.4
+16.3
+11.6
-15.5






~Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun lThursday, July 4, 2013


PRESIDENTS
"It is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to
obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection
and favor."
- George Washington: Commander-in-Chief in the American Revolution;
Signer of the Constitution; First President of the United States

"We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human
passions unbridled by morality and religion. Our Constitution was made only for
a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any
other." John Adams: Signer of the Declaration of Independence; One of
Two Signers of the Bill of Rights; Second President of the United States

"Before any man can be considered as a member of civil society, he must be
considered as a subject of the Governor of the Universe."- James Madison:
Signer of the Constitution; Fourth President of the United States

"And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their
only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of
the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed I
tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot
sleep forever."- Thomas Jefferson: Signer and the Principal Author of the
Declaration of Independence; Third President of the United States

"is it not that in the chain of human events, the birthday of the nation is
indissolubly linked with the birthday of the Savior? that it forms a leading event
in the progress of the Gospel dispensation? Is it not that the Declaration of
Independence first organized the social compact on the foundation of
the Redeemer's mission upon earth? That it laid the cornerstone of
human government upon the first precepts of Christianity?"
- John Quincy Adams: Statesman; Diplomat;
Sixth President of the United States

FOUNDING FATHERS
"An appeal to arms and to the God
of hosts is all that is left us!...
Sir, we are not weak if we
make a proper use of
those means which the
God of nature hath
placed in our power...
Besides, sir, we shall
not fight our battles
alone. There is a just
God who presides
over the destinies of
nations and who will
raise up friends to fight
our battles for us... Is
life so dear, or peace so
sweet as to be purchased
at the price of chains and
slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!
I know not what course others may
take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!"
- Patrick Henry: Patriot and Statesman

"To the kindly influence of Christianity we owe that
degree of civil freedom, and political and social
happiness, which mankind now enjoys... Whenever the
pillars of Christianity
shall be overthrown, our
present republican
forms of government -
and all blessings which
flow from them must
fall with them."
- Jedediah Morse: Patriot and
Educator, called "The Father of
American Geography"

"I've lived, sir, a long time, and the
longer I live, the more convincing
proofs I see of this truth: That God
governs in the affairs of men. If a
sparrow cannot fall to the ground
without His notice, is it probable
that an empire can rise without His aid? We've been assured in the sacred
writings that unless the Lord builds the house, they labor in vain who build it. I
firmly believe this, and I also believe that without His concurring aid, we shall
succeed in this political building no better than the builders of Babel.- Benjamin
Franklin: Signer of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution


SUPREME COURT JUSTICES
"The Bible is the best of all books, for it is the word of God and teaches us the
way to be happy in this world and in the next. Continue therefore to read it and
to regulate your life by its precepts."
"Providence has given to our people the choice of their rulers, and it is the duty,
as well as the privilege and interest of our Christian nation, to select and prefer
Christians for their rulers."
- John Jay: Co-Author of the Federalist Papers; First Chief-Justice of the
U.S. Supreme Court

"Human law must rest its authority ultimately upon the authority of that law which
is Divine... Far from being rivals or enemies, religion and law are twin sisters,
friends, and mutual assistants. Indeed, these two sciences run into each other."
- James Wilson: Signer of both the Declaration of Independence and the
Constitution; Original Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court

"One of the beautiful boasts of our municipal jurisprudence is that Christianity is
a part of the Common Law... There never has been a period in which the
Common Law did not recognize Christianity as lying at its foundations... I verily
believe Christianity necessary to the support of civil society."


- Joseph Story: U. S. Supreme Court Justice; "Father of American
Jurisprudence," Placed on the Court by President James Madison


CONGRESS
"We are a Christian people...not because the law demands it, not to gain
exclusive benefits or to avoid legal disabilities, but from choice and education;
and in a land thus universally Christian, what is to be expected, what desired, but
that we shall pay due regard to Christianity?"
Senate Judiciary Committee Report, January 19, 1853

"At the time of the adoption of the Constitution and the amendments, the
universal sentiment was that Christianity should be encouraged... In this age
there can be no substitute for Christianity... That was the religion of the founders
of the republic and they expected it to remain the religion of their descendants."
House Judiciary Committee Report, March 27,1854

EDUCATION
"Let every student be plainly instructed and earnestly pressed to consider well the
main end of his life and studies is to know God and Jesus Christ which is eternal
life (John 17:3) and therefore to lay Christ in the bottom as the only foundation of
all sound knowledge and learning. And seeing the Lord only giveth wisdom, let
every one seriously set himself by prayer in secret to seek it of Him (Proverbs 2,
3). Every one shall so exercise himself in reading the Scriptures twice a day that
he shall be ready to give such an account of his proficiency therein."
Harvard 1636 Student Guidelines
"All the scholars are required to live a religious and blameless life according to
the rules of God's Word, diligently reading the Holy Scriptures, that fountain of
Divine light and truth, and constantly attending all the duties of religion."
Yale 1787 Student Guidelines

SUPREME COURT RULINGS
"There is no dissonance in these [legal] declarations... These
are not individual sayings, declarations of private persons:
they are organic [legal, governmental] utterances; they
speak the voice of the entire people... These, and many
other matters which might be noticed, add a volume of
unofficial declarations to
the mass of organic
utterances that this is a
Christian nation."
Church of the Holy
Trinity v. U.S., 1892
Unanimous Decision
Declaring America a
Christian Nation
Significantly, the U. S.
Supreme Court cited
dozens of court rulings
and legal documents as
precedents to arrive at
this ruling; but in 1962,
when the Supreme
Court struck down
voluntary prayer in
schools, it did so
Without using any such precedent.


"Why may not the Bible, and especially the New
Testament, without note or comment, be read
and taught as a divine revelation in [schools]
its general precepts expounded, its
evidences explained and its glorious
principles of morality inculcated?... Where
can the purest principles of morality be
learned so clearly or so
perfectly as from the New
Testament?"
Vidal v. Girard's
Executors, 1844
Unanimous Decision
Commending and
Encouraging
the Use of the Bible in
Government-Run Schools


FOREIGNERS
"The Americans combine
the notions of Christianity
and of liberty so intimately
in their minds that it is impossible to make them conceive the one without
the other."
"Upon my arrival in the United States, the religious aspect of the country was the
first thing that struck my attention; and the longer I stayed there, the more did I
perceive the great political consequences resulting from this state of things, to
which I was unaccustomed, In France I had almost always seen the spirit of
religion and the spirit of freedom pursuing courses diametrically opposed to each
other; but in America I found that they were intimately united, and that they
reigned in common over the same country."
Alexis de Tocqueville
French observer of America in 1831, author of Democracy in America

There is no country in which the people are so religious as in the United States...
The great number of religious societies existing in the United States is truly
surprising: there are some of them for everything; for instance, societies to
distribute the Bible; to distribute tracts; to encourage religious journals; to convert,
civilize, educate... to take care of their widows and orphans; to preach, extend,
purify, preserve, reform the faith; to build chapels, endow congregations, support
seminaries... to establish Sunday schools... to prevent drunkenness, etc.
Achille Murat
French observer of America in 1832

SCRIPTURE
Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD
Psalm 33:12a

If My people who are called by My name will humble themselves, and pray
and seek My face, and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from
heaven, and will forgive their sin and heal their land.
2 Chronicles 7:14


If you would like to know Jesus as Lord and Savior, call Need Him Ministry at 1-888-NEED-HIM.
Hobby Lobby, Hemispheres and Mardel Stores 7707 S.W. 44th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73179 www.hobbylobby.com/ministryprojects In association with www.wallbuilders.com


iPage 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013





SThe Sun/Thursday, July 4, 2013


WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 9


I WORLD

Chechen rebel
calls for attacks
on Sochi Games
MOSCOW (AP) A
leading Chechen rebel
on Wednesday called
on Islamist militants in
Russia's North Caucasus
to disrupt the upcoming
Olympics in the Black Sea
resort of Sochi, reversing
his previous appeal not
to target civilians in the
region.
Sochi is hosting
the Winter Games in
February, a pet project for
President Vladimir Putin,
who is determined for
them to be a success. The
overall bill for the games
stands at $51 billion,
making them by far the
most expensive Olympics
in history.
Doku Umarov, a widely
known Chechen rebel
leader, urged his fighters
to "do their utmost to
derail" the games, which
he described as "satanic
dances on the bones of
our ancestors."

Reach out and
kill someone
WASHINGTON (Foreign
Policy) From activists
organizing pro-democ-
racy protests on Twitter
to farmers checking crop
prices on their Nokias,
the positive impact that
cell phones have had in
the developing world has
gotten plenty of press.
But it turns out there's a
dark side to wireless con-
nectivity: It can kill you.
A new study by Jan
Pierskalla of the German
Institute of Global and
Area Studies and Florian
Hollenbach of Duke
University looks at the
relationship between mo-
bile phones and political
violence in Africa. They
found that from 2007
to 2009, areas with 2G
network coverage were
50 percent more likely to
have experienced inci-
dents of armed conflict
than those without. The
clearest overlaps between
cell coverage and violence
were observed in Algeria,
the Democratic Republic
of the Congo, Kenya,
Nigeria, Uganda, and
Zimbabwe.
The authors think that
improved cell-phone
coverage helps insurgent
leaders overcome what's
called the "collective-
action problem" that
people are reluctant to
join group endeavors
when there's a high level
of personal risk. But bet-
ter communication helps
leaders recruit reluctant
followers, whether they're
demonstrating for higher
wages or killing people in
the next town.
Still, as Pierskalla
points out, the relation-
ship between cell-phone
coverage and violence is
"specific to regions and
countries that are prone
to violence in the first
place."
Britain's burger
war: Five Guys,
Shake Shack
LONDON (Bloomberg)
- A burger war is
breaking out in Covent
Garden with this week's
arrival from the United
States of two of the most
successful and respected
companies in the
business.
Five Guys, a fam-
ily outfit that started in
1986 in Washington D.C.,
has expanded to more
than 1,000 locations in
the U.S. and Canada.
Danny Meyer created
Shake Shack at a hot-dog


cart in New York and in
2004 won approval for a
permanent kiosk.
Both will compete
with not only each other
but homegrown burger
chains and giants such
as McDonald's and
Burger King in the British
market.


US drone kills
16 suspected
militants
PESHAWAR, Pakistan
(AP) Unmanned
U.S. aircraft fired four
missiles at a house in
northwest Pakistan
before dawn Wednesday,
killing 16 suspected
militants, Pakistani
intelligence officials
said.
The drone strike elicit-
ed a swift condemnation
by the Pakistani govern-
ment, which released
a statement saying the
strikes are a violation of
its sovereignty.
The attack in the Sarai
Darpa Khel area of the
North Waziristan tribal
region also wounded two
suspected militants, said
the officials, speaking on
condition of anonymity
because they were not
authorized to talk to the
media.


Europe wants talks on trade, surveillance


BERLIN (AP) -
European countries
agreed Wednesday that
talks on a free-trade deal
with the United States
should start in parallel
with discussions about
NSA surveillance ad-
dressing concerns raised
by France.
French President
Francois Hollande insist-
ed after meeting German
Chancellor Angela Merkel
and other European
leaders in Berlin that the
trade talks can start only
"at the same time, at the
same date" as talks with
the U.S. on concerns over
its intelligence activities.
That raises questions
as to whether the launch
of the trade talks will go
ahead as originally sched-
uled early next week.
France had called earlier
Wednesday for a two-
week delay.
The head of the


European Union's
executive Commission,
which will lead the trade
talks, said U.S. Attorney
General Eric Holder
had offered to set up "as
soon as possible" U.S.-
European working groups
on intelligence issues.
"We are committed
of course to the Trans-
Atlantic Trade and
Investment Partnership,"
Jose Manuel Barroso said.
"But we expect that in
parallel ... we analyze the
oversight of intelligence
activities, intelligence
collection and also the
question of privacy and
data protection."
For the trade talks
"to be a success, we
need confidence among
partners and confidence
can become better" if
Europe's concerns are
addressed, Barroso told
reporters.
Merkel, whose country


has Europe's biggest
economy, said leaders at a
meeting focusing mainly
on youth unemployment
were "very concerned"
about reports of the U.S.
eavesdropping on its
European allies, and said
the U.S. offer to set up
working groups on the
issue quickly was "very
important."
"Time is pressing,"
she said, adding that it
was the "right idea" to
say those groups should
start work parallel to the
beginning of the trade
talks, whose opening
will follow months of
protracted and painful
efforts to find a common
European stance.
France, whose Socialist
government has appeared
less enthusiastic than
others about the free
trade deal in the past,
was at the heart of those
difficulties insisting


on protections for its
film and other cultural
subsidies.
Reports last weekend
that the U.S. National
Security Agency bugged
EU diplomatic offices in
Washington and infiltrat-
ed its computer network
angered European
officials, who noted that
mutual trust is needed
in talks on such a huge
trade deal. The deal is
expected to boost econo-
mies on both sides of
the Atlantic by removing
tariffs and other barriers
to trade.
French Foreign
Minister Laurent Fabius
acknowledged to parlia-
ment Wednesday that the
free trade deal is "very
important for the United
States and very important
for Europe." But, he
added that the two sides
needed negotiations "in a
climate of trust."






iPage 10 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


WEATHER


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


TODAY



Scattered p.m. storms


910 / 740
60% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperature* Today



S62

82 92 96 97 88
8 a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Indexm number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very Higi; I11+I Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eight weather factors.
AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Wednesday
27
PC I i.. ..
0 50 100150 200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: particulates
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees absent
Grass
Weeds o,
Molds NA.
absent low moderate high veryhigh
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 900/740
Normal High/Low 920/730
Record High 990 (1998)
Record Low 670 (1973)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m.Wednesday 0.01"
Month to date 2.54"
Normal month to date 0.91"
Year to date 23.39"
Normal year to date 21.87"
Record 3.41" (1969)
MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 10.50 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 2.54 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 23.39 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


FRIDAY
,. ,-" "


Scattered storms


900 / 750
80% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today. Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 91/74 storms afternoon
Sarasota 90/76 storms afternoon


SUN AND MOON
The Sun Rise
Today 6:39 a.m.
Friday 6:39 a.m.
The Moon Rise
Today 3:48 a.m.
Friday 4:33 a.m.
New First Full


ul 8 15 22
Jul 8 Jul 15 Jul 22


Set
8:26 p.m.
8:26 p.m.
Set
5:35 p.m.
6:25 p.m.
Last



Jul 29


SOLUNAR TABLE
Minor Major Minor Major
Today 3:16a 9:28a 3:40p 9:52p
Fri. 3:59a 10:11a 4:23p 10:35p
Sat. 4:43a 10:55a 5:07p 11:19p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.


TIDES
High
Punta Gorda
Today 3:06a
Fri. 4:00a
Englewood
Today 1:43a
Fri. 2:37a
Boca Grande
Today 12:48a
Fri. 1:42a
El Jobean
Today 3:38a
Fri. 4:32a
Venice
Today 9:37a
Fri. 12:52a


Low High Low

6:20a 12:45p 9:05p
7:06a 1:26p 9:45p

4:36a 11:22a 7:21p
5:22a 12:03p 8:01p

2:57a 10:27a 5:42p
3:43a 11:08a 6:22p

6:49a 1:17p 9:34p
7:35a 1:58p 10:14p

3:15a --- 6:00p
4:01a 10:18a 6:40p


SATURDAY



Scattered p.m. storms


91 / 740
40% chance of rain

Cleanraterl
90 '77
,: .' ~ % '


St. Petersburg
90/77


SUNDAY



Scattered p.m. storms


920 / 740
50% chance of rain

Plant CityI
S*90 74
| f


MONDAY


-A
Scattered p.m. storms


910 / 720
50% chance of rain


Winter Ha en
,89/74


T lampa Brandon -T-
89/77 90 74 B
Barto
40I 89, 74 "

Apollo Beach Ft. Mead
89 76 i 89/72



Wauchula


Bradenton
89/76
Longboat Key
89/78


90 74


y Limi
J90


Sarasota ......
90/76 ."


Ospre
89/7


Shown is today's weather
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.



Gulf Water
Temperature

840


y Arcadia
6 90,74 a
Venice Hull
S 90/76 North Port Hull
90/75 j 91/73
i Port Charlotte
Sjm... .91/74
Englerood J- --
89 76
PuntaGorda


Placida*
90/75.
Boca Grande
89/77


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2013
Publication date: 7/4/13
MARINE
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland
direction in knots in feet chop
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs
SE 12-22 2-3 Light
Tarpon Springs toApalachicola
SE 15-25 4-7 Moderate


91/73


Fort Myers
91/74 %

Cape Coral
90/74


Sanibel
89/77


AccuWe


FLORIDA CITIES


city
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
85 77 t
89 76 t
90 77 t
89 79 t
89 76 t
89 80 t
91 74 t
89 77 t
88 72 t
88 73 t
88 80 t


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today
Hi Lo W
88 81 t
88 73 t
89 73 t
88 79 t
89 79 t
89 75 t
88 72 t
88 75 t
89 74 t
83 76 t
87 77 t


Fri.
Hi Lo W
88 81 t
89 75 t
90 75 t
88 79 t
89 79 t
89 76 t
90 73 t
88 75 t
91 76 t
87 76 t
86 74 t


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Today
Hi Lo W
89 79 t
87 77 t
90 77 t
91 75 t
90 76 t
85 72 t
89 77 t
88 77 t
89 77 t
88 78 t
89 74 t


Fri.
Hi Lo W
89 79 t
87 77 t
92 76 t
90 76 t
91 75 t
92 73 t
91 77 t
88 77 t
89 78 t
87 78 t
90 74 t


Bonita Springs


THE NATION
-10s I -Os Os I 1
Shown are noon positions
.S len l .
7- Qs


Os 20s 30s 40s I 50s 60s 70s 801 990s
of weather systems and precipitation.Temperature bands are highs for the day.

I- y irnlpeg Odawa -
y8362 8.67 .Mo1plrel
:::... ".-87TO


High ................... 1160 at Needles, CA


City
stone Albuquerque
74 Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
........... Denver
.. A' Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Lehigh Acres Fairbanks
91/73 Fargo
Hartford
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
88 68 t 94 71 t
60 52 sh 64 54 sh
78 69 t 83 70 t
90 72 pc 90 72 pc
91 65 pc 86 60 t
78 71 t 85 71 t
96 64 s 91 62 pc
92 72 pc 93 75 pc
81 69 t 81 69 pc
88 69 t 87 69 pc
84 68 t 84 66 t
83 70 t 87 70 t
82 65 pc 84 67 t
78 69 t 81 69 t
80 69 t 81 69 t
86 72 t 91 72 t
78 69 t 82 69 t
92 67 c 93 69 pc
92 69 pc 95 73 s
90 62 pc 95 65 t
84 63 pc 85 64 s
81 68 t 83 69 t
79 60 pc 82 61 s
73 51 c 71 51 sh
89 66 pc 88 68 pc
89 70 pc 93 71 pc
92 59 t 84 55 t
87 70 s 87 70 pc
93 72 t 93 73 pc
78 67 t 82 68 t


Low .................... 330 at Gordon,WI


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
87 68 t 89 71 t
84 62 pc 86 65 s
80 69 t 81 66 t
112 91 s 108 89 s
79 64 pc 80 65 pc
78 70 t 82 71 t
86 68 t 90 71 t
76 64 pc 80 66 t
85 67 pc 87 68 s
84 71 t 86 72 t
78 68 t 82 68 t
88 74 t 88 77 t
88 73 pc 88 75 pc
87 72 pc 88 73 pc
90 64 pc 90 68 s
86 63 s 89 67 s
90 72 pc 92 74 pc
109 91 s 108 87 s
82 67 t 84 67 t
86 68 c 90 69 pc
78 56 pc 74 56 s
90 71 pc 90 72 pc
89 70 pc 91 71 pc
96 72 s 95 72 t
86 66 t 87 68 pc
93 72 pc 95 71 pc
71 64 pc 70 65 pc
74 58 pc 66 55 pc
74 55 pc 73 56 s
90 75 pc 90 76 pc


WORLD CITIES
Today Fri. Today Fri.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Amsterdam 71 62 pc 73 54 pc Mexico City 75 55 t 70 56 t
Baghdad 111 83 s 113 84 s Montreal 82 70 pc 84 70 pc
Beijing 97 76 s 96 73 s Ottawa 84 67 pc 83 67 pc
Berlin 76 60 pc 78 58 sh Paris 74 56 pc 77 57 s
Buenos Aires 63 54 r 63 50 sh Regina 81 59 pc 85 57 t
Cairo 95 72 s 95 71 s Rio de Janeiro 77 64 s 79 66 s
Calgary 75 51 t 70 49 t Rome 83 63 t 88 65 s
Cancun 88 80 t 89 79 t St. John's 73 56 s 74 57 pc
Dublin 63 47 pc 67 49 pc San Juan 88 78 sh 88 76 pc
Edmonton 70 49 sh 71 49 sh Sydney 70 50 s 68 41 s
Halifax 78 60 pc 80 61 pc Tokyo 84 75 sh 88 75 sh
Kiev 83 63 pc 86 69 pc Toronto 80 68 t 81 68 pc
London 72 55 pc 75 54 pc Vancouver 71 55 pc 72 53 s
Madrid 97 72 pc 97 70 s Winnipeg 83 62 pc 84 62 t
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


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SPORTS


www.yoursun.net www.Facebook.com/SuncoastSports @SCMGSports


Meyer denies he turned
in Florida assistant to
NCAA, *Page 6


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* NBA: Boston Celtics


Celtics

hire

Stevens
By JIMMY GOLEN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON -The Green
are getting greener.
With aging stars Kevin
Garnett and Paul Pierce on
their way to the Brooklyn
Nets and Doc Rivers
already coaching the Los
Angeles
Clippers,
the Boston
Celtics hired
36-year-old
Brad Stevens
from Butler
as their
STEVENS coach on
Wednesday.
The move turns the
tradition-laden franchise
over to a mentor who led
the Bulldogs to back-to-
back NCAA title games but
STEVENSI6

0 TENNIS: Wimbledon


Murray


rallies


to win
By EDDIE PELLS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON -Andy
Murray had all of Britain
on edge for five sets.
Juan Martin del Potro
only took five points to
get the fans buzzing at
Wimbledon.
Two victories in two
very different matches
Wednesday sent Murray
and del Potro on to the
semifinals at the All
England Club.
Murray completed his
seventh career comeback
from two sets down to top
Fernando Verdasco, 4-6,
3-6,6-1, 6-4,7-5.
"Made some bad mis-
takes, poor choices on the
court," Murray said. "And
then, I turned it around
really well after that."
Earlier on Centre Court,
del Potro hyperextended
MURRAY 16

TODAY AT
WIMBLEDON
FORECAST: Partly cloudy. Chance
of rain. High of 75 degrees
TV: ESPN2,7 a.m.; 8a.m. ESPN
KEY MATCHES: Women's semifinals:
No. 4 Agnieszka Radwanska vs. No.
23 Sabine Lisicki; No.15 Marion
Bartoli vs. No. 20 Kirsten Flipkens
ONLINE: http://www.
wimbledon.com


* FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE: Charlotte 15, Palm Beach 0


SUN PHOTO BY KATHERINE GODINA
Charlotte Stone Crabs starter Roberto Gomez throws during Wednesday's game against the Palm Beach Cardinals at Charlotte Sports Park. Gomez pitched a
one-hitter, striking out six and walking two. The Crabs won 15-0.





GOMEZ GOES BIG




WITH A ONE-HITTER


Starter hits
milestone as
Crabs rout Cards
By LAURA MYERS
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE -The
Charlotte Stone Crabs put on a
show for their largest crowd of
the season Wednesday night.
They had season-highs in runs
scored and hits with 15 and 19.
But with Roberto Gomez
on the mound, none of it was


necessary.
In fact, the Stone Crabs could
have stopped after Ryan Brett
scored on a sacrifice fly in the
first inning.
Even though he had a long
break between nearly every in-
ning especially between the
seventh and eighth Gomez
pitched a complete-game
shutout. He allowed one hit and
one walk, both in the second
inning, and went on to retire 21
straight batters before a walk in
the ninth.
The result of Charlotte's
offense and pitching was an


STONE CRABS
AT CARDINALS
WHO: Charlotte (8-5) at Palm Beach (7-5)
WHEN: Today, 6:05 p.m.
WHERE: Roger Dean Stadium, Jupiter
RADIO: stonecrabsbaseball.com

incredibly lopsided 15-0 victory.
In his last outing, Friday
against Bradenton, Gomez
(4-7) pitched a no-hitter into
the sixth inning, at one point
retiring 17 straight. It was hard
to beat that, but he managed it.


"That's his best performance
of the last two years that I've
seen him," Williams said. "All
three pitches. Last game was
very similar. He had more early
contact today, pitch count was
down. He earned the right to go
back out there."
It was the first complete game
and first shutout of Gomez'
career. It came against a lineup
that had averaged 10.3 hits and
5.4 runs in its last 10 games.
The Stone Crabs (8-5) signed
Friday's lineup card for the
pitcher after the game.
CRABS |3


* AUTO RACING: NASCAR Sprint Cup Series


Kahne looks to shake Busch blues


PHOTO BY JEFF ZELEVANSKY/GETTY IMAGES
Kasey Kahne talks to crew members during practice for the
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Pocono Raceway this season in
Long Pond, Penn.


By MATT BAKER
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA After Kasey
Kahne's past two restric-
tor-plate races ended
in disappointment and
dust-ups with Kyle Busch,
Kahne floated a new idea
heading into Saturday's
Coke Zero 400.
"I'm just going to pull
over when he's around
me," Kahne said, joking.
Considering his luck
with Busch in their


last stop at Daytona
International Speedway,
Kahne's proposal might
be an improvement.
Kahne was running
near the front of the pack
33 laps into the NASCAR
Sprint Cup season-open-
ing Daytona 500 when a
car in front of him forced
him to slow. Busch kept
going, nosing Kahne's No.
5 Chevrolet through the
grass and turning Kahne's
potential top-five run into


a 36th-place finish.
The wreck could have
been forgiven easily as
one mistake in a long
season, except the drama
continued.
At Talladega, Busch
nudged Kahne during a
battle for second, trig-
gering a 16-car wreck
and sending Kahne to
the garage in 42nd. The
next week, the two were
dueling for the lead with
KHANEI2


COKE ZERO 400
WHEN: Saturday, 8 p.m.
WHERE: Daytona International
Speedway, Daytona Beach
TRACK: 2.5-mile superspeedway
TV: TNT
DEFENDING CHAMPION:
Tony Stewart
QUALIFYING: Friday, 4p.m. (Speed)
TOP5 IN POINTS:1.Jimmie
Johnson, 610; 2. Carl Edwards,
572; 3. Clint Bowyer, 569; 4. Kevin
Harvick, 544; 5. Matt Kenseth, 528


INDEX I Lottery 2 | Community calendar 2 | Cycling 2 1 Auto racing 2 | Pro baseball 3-4 1 Scoreboard 5 | NHL 5 | NBA 6 | Tennis 6


Thursday, July 4, 2013






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


Florida Lottery
www.flalottery.com
* CASH 3
July 3N .......................... .......... 7-0-9
July 3D .......................... ............. 7-1-2
July 2N .......................... ...8...... 8-4-8
July 2D .......................... ......... 6-8-4
July IN .......................... ......... 4-3-5
July ID .......................... ......... 4-8-1
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
July 3N....................... ......... 1-1-7-4
July 3D ....................... ......... 1-4-7-2
July 2N ....................... ......... 7-6-4-0
July 2D ....................... ......... 9-6-5-8
July 1N ....................... ......... 5-2-9-4
July 1D ....................... ......... 6-2-8-6
D-Day, N-Night
* FANTASY 5
July 3 ...................... 4-20-30-31-36
July 2 ...................... 5-22-27-30-34
July I .................... 12-13-21-27-32
June 30...................3-13-17-25-36
PAYOFF FOR JULY 2
1 5-digit winners........... $202,635.22
236 4-digit winners ..................$138
7,850 3-digit winners ..............$11.50

* MEGA MONEY
July 2 .......................... 19-23-24-43
M egaBall........................... ..............2

June 28 ........................ 12-24-32-43
M egaBall............................ ......... 14
PAYOFF FOR JULY 2
0 4-of-4 MB.........................$550,000
4 4-of-4..................................... $1,443
33 3-of-4 MB .........................$383.50
662 3-of-4 ................................. $57
956 2-of-4 MB....................... $27.50
* LOTTO
July 3 .................3-13-42-47-52-53
June 29..................1-3-5-14-28-32
June 26..............5-13-18-28-31-43
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 29
0 6-digit winners ...................$29M
49 5-digit winners .................$3,720
2,590 4-digit winners .................$54
50,077 3-digit winners .................$5
* POWERBALL
July 3 ................... 3-6-29-40-51
Pow erball............................. .... .4....

June 29................... 8-28-30-53-56
Pow erball.......................... .......... 16
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 29
0 5 of 5 + PB.......................... $50M
0 5 of 5.............................. 1,000,000
0 4 of 5 + PB....................... $10,000
71 4 of 5 ..................................... 100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$60 million
* MEGA MILLIONS
July 2 .................... 36-42-51-52-53
Powerball.......................... .......... 40

June 28........................ 8-15-35-46-52
Powerball........................................38
PAYOFF FOR JULY 2
0 5 of 5 + MB......................... $70M
0 5 of 5.............................. $250,000
1 4of5 + MB......................... 10,000
35 4 of 5 .................................. $150


Corrections
It is the Sun's policy to correct all
errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
Submit a story idea: Email or call Mark
Lawrence 941-206-1175. Must contain
name, address and phone number.
Submit a Recreational Sports or
an Away at College item: Email to
sports@sun-herald.com and BKLE3@aol.
com. The name and number of a contact
person is required.
Submit local golf scores: Email scores
to golfscores@sun-herald.com. Scores
appear in the weekly Herald sections.

SFollow us at
http://www.
facebook.com/
SunCoastSports
Follow us on Twitter @SCMG_Sports.
Check out our blog for the latest
Stone Crabs information:
http://www.suncoastsportsblog.com


Contact us

Mark Lawrence Sports Editor
mlawrence@sun-herald.com
Mike Bambach Deputy SE
mbambach@sun-herald.com

Matt Stevens Assistant SE
mstevens@sun-herald.com


Rob Shore Staff writer
shore@sun-herald.com
Laura Myers. Staff writer
Imyers@sun-herald.com
Greg Zeck. Staff writer
gzeck@sun-herald.com

EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* CYCLING:


Stage winner Mark Cavendish, third from right, and his teammates lead the pack as they chase after the breakaway group during
the fifth stage of the Tour de France with start on Wednesday in Cagnes-sur-Mer and finish in Marseille, southern France.




Inching toward immortals


Cavendish takes

24th stage win

By JOHN LEICESTER
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MARSEILLE, France Mark
Cavendish will never be the greatest
Tour de France rider, because he
will never win the race five times
like Eddy Merkcx of Belgium and
Frenchman Bernard Hinault. Still,
the sprinter with thighs like thick
hams could outdo both those
legends by winning more stages
at cycling's premier race.
By Cavendish's warp-speed
standards, his 24th stage win on
Wednesday was a ride in the park.
The teammates who led Cavendish
to the finish, sucking him along
in their wheels, building up his
speed, were toiling like clockwork.
Stamping on his pedals, head
down, thighs pumping like pistons,
Cavendish then whooshed off alone
for the last 150 meters, leaving
everyone else in his wake.
Cavendish was carrying so
much momentum and this win in
Marseille, France's second-largest
city, was so comfortable that he
was able to sit up in the saddle and
make a hand motion like cracking a
whip as he crossed the line.
One more stage win will tie
Cavendish with Andre Leducq, the
Frenchman who got 25 stage wins
in the 1920s and 1930s, putting him
third on the all-time list. Beyond
Leducq is Hinault, who notched
up 28 wins in the 1970s and '80s.
Merckx's monument is 34, won
from 1969 to 1975. Jacques Anquetil
and Miguel Indurain also won five
Tours, but didn't win as many stages
as Hinault and Merckx. Anquetil
won 16; Indurain got 12. All seven of
Lance Armstrong's Tour wins were


KAHNE
FROM PAGE 1
33 laps left at Darlington
when Busch squeezed
Kahne high into the wall.
The contact did enough
damage to Kahne's Chevy
that he dropped to 17th.
Despite the one-sided
run-ins, Kahne said his
brushes with Busch are
behind him and that he
won't be tempted to re-
turn the favor at Daytona.
"When I'm racing now,
I don't feel like it's a big
deal," Kahne said recently
during a stop at Bucs
practice. "I race him just
like I always have, and
he races me just like he
always has. There were
just three mistakes earlier
in the year."
But those flare-ups
were costly for Kahne,
who's having a solid but
unspectacular season
in his second year with
Hendrick Motorsports.
Those wrecks gave Kahne
two of his worst finishes
of the season and have
helped put one of the
sport's top talents in dan-
ger of missing the Chase
for the Championship


tr niu I


Stage winner Marc Cavendish celebrates on the podium of the fifth stage of the Tour
de France on Wednesday.


AT A GLANCE
TODAY'S STAGE: The sixth stage from
Aix-en-Provence to Montpellier covers a flat
109.7 miles.
TV: NBCSN, 8 a.m.
WEDNESDAY'S STAGE: British sprinter Mark
Cavandish won his 24th career stage at the
Tour de France with a victory over the 142
miles of rolling hills. Simon Gerrans kept the
yellow jersey.
ONLINE: http://www.letour.fr
WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS: See page 5

stripped or doping. This 100th Tour
is the first since Armstrong's fall last
year.
Cavendish says he isn't fixated on
Hinault or Merckx's numbers. He
noted that for many riders, winning
just one stage is a career-defining
feat.
"You have to show the Tour de
France the respect it deserves," he
said.


for the sixth time in 10
seasons.
He'll arrive at Daytona
11th in the standings, one
point behind Joey Logano
for the final guaranteed
Chase spot, though his
lone victory at Bristol has
him in line for one of the
two wild-card berths with
nine races left until the
Chase begins.
Kahne is in better shape
than last year, when he
entered Daytona 14th
in the standings and 74
points out of 10th place.
He rallied to finish a
career-best fourth in the
championship.
"I feel like we're kinda
getting on the verge there
of really needing to get a
ton of points to get back
to where we need to be,"
Kahne said. "I don't feel
any better now than I did
last year at this time."
The 33-year-old
Washington state native is
back in a familiar situa-
tion despite having fast
cars for most of the season
and competing on a team
alongside championship
favorite Jimmie Johnson
and a resurgent Dale
Earnhardt Jr., who sits
sixth in points.


Kahne rose to second
in the standings after a
runnerup finish at Kansas
- his sixth top-11 run in
the first eight races. Since
then, he has been doomed
by inconsistency and bad
luck.
Only Busch, Johnson
and Matt Kenseth have led
more laps than Kahne's
400, but Kahne has
claimed only one check-
ered flag. His car has been
strong only two Cup
regulars boast a better
average starting position
than Kahne (ninth) yet
his finishes haven't been.
He has been outside the
top 15 in eight of 17 races.
Last month at Michigan,
Kahne was leading by
more than three seconds
halfway through when he
blew a tire, slammed into
the wall and had to scurry
from his burning car.
"I think we've been as
good as anyone all season
long," Kahne said. "We
just don't have the results
to show."
Kahne said he hopes his
luck changes with a return
to Daytona, where he has
finished in the top nine
in five of his past six July
races.


But then Cavendish isn't any
other rider. Before this edition, he
collected on average nearly five
wins at every Tour since 2008. In
2009, he got six. He won the last
four sprint finishes on the Champs-
Elysees in Paris, where he is un-
beaten since 2009. While Merckx's
record is still a way off, Hinault and
most certainly Leducq look within
Cavendish's grasp.
"Obviously I aim to win multiple
stages each year. But to set any
goals, any number ... it does one
of two things: It sets you up to fail
for something or it puts like a mark
on what you want to achieve and it
can kind of stop you trying to move
forward," he said.
Were Cavendish to overtake
Hinault, it wouldn't mean he is
a better overall rider than the
famously bad-tempered "Badger,"
who was strong on every terrain.
But in a sprint, Cavendish has no
equal, at least in this generation.


THISWEEK
ON TRACK
NASCAR NATIONWIDE
FIRECRACKER 250
WHEN: Friday, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
RACE DISTANCE: 250 miles,
100 laps
DEFENDING CHAMPION:
Tony Stewart
ONLINE: nascar.com
IZON INDYCAR
POCONO INDYCAR400
WHEN: Sunday, 12:15 p.m. (ABQC)
RACE DISTANCE: 400 miles,
160 laps
DEFENDING CHAMPION:
James Hinchcliffe
ONLINE: indycar.com

FORMULA ONE
GERMAN GRAND PRIX
WHERE: Nuerburgring, Germany
WHEN: Sunday, 8 a.m. (NBC
Sports)
RACE DISTANCE: 191.9 miles,
60 laps
DEFENDING CHAMPION:
Fernando Alonso
ONLINE: formulal.com

NHRA
SUMMIT RACING EQUIPMENT
NHRA NATIONALS
WHERE: Norwalk, Ohio.
WHEN: Sunday, final
eliminations, (ESPN2, 7p.m.)
ONLINE: nhra.com


I COMMUNITY
CALENDAR

BASEBALL
Pro Sports Academy
fundamentals camp: Open to
ages 7-12, Mondays and Wednesdays,
9 a.m.-noon, through July. Cost: $65
per week. Call Ray, 941-505-2551.

Pro Sports Academy
high school prep camp:
Open to ages 13-16, Tuesdays and
Thursday, 9 a.m.-noon, through
July. Cost: $65 per week. Call Ray,
941-505-2551.

FGCU camps: Prospects (Aug.
1-3); youth camp, ages 6-12 (July
15-18). Camps at Swanson Stadium
on FGCU campus. Cost: Aug. prospect
camp: $295/commuters and $395/
resident; July youth camp: $250.
Players must bring own equipment.
To register, logon to collegebaseball-
camps.com/fgcu or contact Jon Moore,
239-590-7059 or jomoore@fgcu.edu.

IRONPIGS tryouts: Travel
teams for 9U, 1OU, 1U, 12U, 13U,
and 14U age groups, Aug. 3-4,10
a.m. to noon, at 1185 O'Donnell Blvd.,
Port Charlotte. No fee for tryouts.
Call Wayne, 941-626-1274 or email
waynelharrell@yahoo.com.

FOOTBALL
North Port Mustangs
registration: Football and cheer-
leading, July 13 (10 a.m. to 2 p.m.)
at Larry Thoennissen Field concession
stand behind the George Mullen
Activity Center. Cost: $185 (football),
$215 (cheerleading); $100 deposit
is required. Open to kids age 5-15.
Original birth certificate required.
Logon to www.northportmustangs.
org or contact Trina at ryan-trina@
comcast.net or 941-815-0804,

Englewood Cats
fundamentals camp: July
8-18 (Monday, Tuesday and Thursday),
6-8 p.m., at Larry Nicol Field, Oyster
Creek Sports Complex, Englewood.
Cost: free. Open to all youth.

Charlotte Warriors
summer clinics: Includes
cheerleading, Tuesdays and Thursdays,
6-8 p.m., through July 17 at Carmalita
Athletic Park, Punta Gorda. Ages 5-15.
Cost: Free and open to the public.

North Port Huskys regis-
tration: Saturdays through July 15,
11 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Morgan Center.
Includes cheerleading. Open to youth
in pre-K (5 years old) through eighth
grade; no weight limits. Cost: $125;
birth certificates required. Call coach
Cody, 941-204-9040.

Make It Count Sports:
Skills camp for third- to eighth-
graders, July 12-18, 6-8 p.m., in
Punta Gorda. Cost: $60. Registration
deadline is July 8. Registration forms
at www.makeitcountssports.com. Call
Elgin, 941-268-1891.


KAYAK
Weeklong camps: July
15-19 at Grande Tours Kayak and
Paddleboard Center in Placida. Ages
7-12. Call 941-697-8825 to register.
Visit www.grandetours.com.

SAILING
Charlotte Harbor
Multihull Association: For
multihull owners or those interested
in them. No dues. Meets first Monday
of each month 6 p.m. at Harpoon
Harry's. Visit http://groups.yahoo.
com/group/CHMA/or call Ron,
941-876-6667.

Englewood Sailing
Association camp: July 22-26,
out of Indian Mound Park, Englewood.
Cost: $125. Register at Englewood
Family YMCA or 941-475-1234. Call
Craig Keller, 941-697-0536, or Hugh
Moore,941-257-8192,or log on to
www.englewoodsailing.org.

SOCCER
Franz Ross YMCA clinic:
July 15-26,5:30-7:30 p.m., at
Charlotte County YMCA, for beginners
and intermediate players ages
7-9 (Tuesday and Friday sessions)


and 10-12 (Monday and Thursday
sessions). Cost: $30 members/$50
non-members. Call 941-629-9622.


The Community Calendarappears daily
as space permits. To haveyouractivity
published, fax (941-629-2085) or e-mail
(sports@sun-herald.com) event details to
the Sports Department at least one week in
advance. Phone calls will not be accepted.
Submissions suitable forpublication will
be edited for length and clarity.


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013






TheSun/ThursdayJuIy4, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


CRABS

FROM PAGE 1
The right-hander has
been inconsistent this
year; Friday's outing
lowered his ERA to 5.10.
Last season, he was 9-3
with a 2.48 ERA at Low-A
Bowling Green. He had a
2.48 ERA in 2011 with the
Gulf Coast Rays as well.
Williams said the
Gomez of the last two
outings was the real
thing.
"The outcomes might
not be the same, but how
he's pitching and the
location of his pitches,
that's how he pitched last
year," he said. "It looks
like he's found the rhythm
right now."
The Stone Crabs' of-
fense fed off that rhythm
all night.
"The tempo of the
game is just great,"
shortstop Jake Hager said.
"You're out there, 1-2-3,
you're right back in and
now you're swinging."
The Stone Crabs broke
the game open with
four runs in the fifth
and added two in the
sixth before an eight-run
seventh.


Hager led the team
with five RBIs; he came
to the plate in the sixth
and seventh inning with
the bases loaded and two
outs, and singled in two
batters both times.
The Stone Crabs sent 13
men to bat in the seventh,
including seven after
there were two outs. The
Cardinals (7-5) switched
pitchers twice during the
inning.
"Hitting's contagious,
they always say that,"
Hager said. "Once
everybody started hitting,
everyone was coming
through."
Charlotte raised its
team batting average
from .265 to .269, one
point away from second
in the Florida State
League.
As yet another Cardinal
pitcher warmed up in the
seventh, Gomez left the
dugout and played catch
with Jake Bailey to keep
warm. He had two long
breaks, but the bullpen
never stirred.
"Obviously, a guy sits
for that long a time, it's
tough to get him back
going," Williams said.
"But the command was
still there."


AP PHOTO
Tampa Bay's Wil Myers heads back to the dugout after striking out against the Houston Astros during the ninth inning of Wednesday's
game in Houston. The Astros won 4-1.






ASTROS SINK RAYS


Charlotte's Jeff Maim runs to first during Wednesday's game
against the Palm Beach Cardinals at Charlotte Sports Park.


Charlotte 15, Palm Beach 0
Jupiter AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Walsh2B 3 0 0 0 0 0 .266
Gil PH 0 0 0 0 1 0 .206
PopkinsDH 4 0 0 0 0 1.338
S.RodriguezCF 4 0 0 0 0 1.234
J.RodriguezlB 3 0 0 0 0 1.268
Stienstra3B 3 0 1 0 0 1 .287
GarciaLF 2 0 0 0 1 1.244
LongmireRF 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242
Mejia SS 3 0 0 0 0 0 .205
RasmusCF 3 0 0 0 0 0 .370
Totals 28 0 1 0 2 6
Charlotte AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Brett2B 5 3 3 3 1 1 .364
HagerSS 4 2 3 5 0 0 .287
VettlesonRF 3 1 0 0 2 1 .272
Shaffer3B 5 1 3 3 0 1 .247
Segovia DH 4 1 1 1 1 2 .269
CasaliC 4 1 2 2 1 0 .297
Malm IB 5 2 1 0 0 0 .246
Argo LF 5 3 4 1 0 1 .328
CarterCF 5 1 2 0 0 1 .248
Totals 40151915 5 8
Palm Beach 000 000 000 0 1 0
Charlotte 100 042 80x -1519 0
LOB-Palm Beach 3,Charlotte 7.2B-Cart-
er (12),Casali (3). 3B-Brett (3). RBI-Hager
5 (18), Brett 3 (11), Shaffer 3 (43), Argo (19),
Segovia (31), Casali 2 (10). RISP- Palm
Beach O for 3, Charlotte 10Ofor 17.
Palm Beach IP H R ERBB SOHR ERA
Sherriff 5 9 5 5 1 3 0 4.95
Miller 1 3 2 2 1 1 0 5.33
Swaggerty .1 3 4 4 1 1 0108.00
Voss .1 3 4 4 2 1 015.15
Lucas 1.1 1 0 0 0 2 0 4.70
Charlotte IP H R ERBB SOHR ERA
Gomez 9 1 0 0 2 6 0 5.10
Umpires- HP: Charlie Tierney 1B: Fran-
cisco Rodriguez. T-2:38 (30 delay).
A-6,218.


Brevard
Daytona
Tampa
Clearwa
x-Dunec
Lakelan
South D


FLORIDA STATE LEAGUE
North Division
W L Pct.
Co. (Brewers) 8 4 .667
a(Cubs) 7 4 .636
(Yankees) 5 6 .455
ater(Phillies) 4 5 .444
din (BlueJays) 4 6 .400
d (Tigers) 4 7 .364
divisionn


W L Pct. GB
Charlotte(Rays) 8 5 .615 -
x-Fort Myers (Twins) 7 5 .583 12
Palm Beach (Cardinals) 7 5 .583 1/2
Jupiter (Marlins) 5 6 .455 2
Bradenton (Pirates) 5 8 .385 3
St.Lucie (Mets) 4 7 .364 3
x-clinched first half
Wednesday's results
St. Lucie at Jupiter, late
Charlotte 15, Palm Beach 0
Brevard County 5, Daytona 1
Lakeland 3,Tampa 2
Dunedin at Clearwater, late
Fort Myers 11, Bradenton 5
Today's games
Clearwater at Dunedin,4:15p.m.
Tampa at Lakeland, 5 p.m.
Charlotte at Palm Beach, 6:05 p.m.
Jupiter at St. Lucie, 6:30p.m.
Brevard County at Daytona, 6:35 p.m.

CRABS PLANNER
Upcoming games for the Stone Crabs:
FRI. SAT. SUN.
at P.Beach at Bradntn at Bradntn
6:35 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 5 p.m.


Carter lifts

Houston with

3-run homer
By JOE SMITH
TAMPA BAY TIMES
HOUSTON -Jake
McGee had a pretty
difficult act to follow,
his Houdini-like escape
Sunday from a bases-
loaded, no-outs situation
in the seventh inning
Sunday.
But McGee, the Rays
hard-throwing lefty
reliever, wasn't as fortu-
nate in a seventh-inning
jam Wednesday against
the Astros. There were
runners at first and third
with no outs in a tied
game, and slugger Chris
Carter who had already
homered earlier in the
game at the plate.
It was a pretty good
battle, with Carter fouling
off two 3-2 pitches from
McGee. But Carter then
delivered the finishing
blow, a mammoth three
run homer to beat the
Rays 4-1 in front of 14,143
at Minute Maid Park.
It snapped the Rays
(45-40) four-game win-
ning streak, and to make


matters worse, dropped
them to 6 1V games behind
the American League East
leading Red Sox, walk-off
winners over the Padres
Wednesday.
Righthander Roberto
Hernandez, pitching on
six days rest, seemed in
control for the first six
innings, which he finished
in just 64 pitches. He gave
up a solo homer to Carter
to lead off the second,
snapping the Rays streak
of 24 consecutive score-
less innings, which had
tied a club record (set in
2008 and 2012). It was also
ended a 22-inning score-
less drought for the Astros
(31-54), bottom dwellers in
the American League West.
The Rays, which had
scored a combined 20
runs in the first two
games, were kept in check
by Astros right-hander Bud
Norris. Tampa Bay did
score one in the first, with
leadoff man Desmond
Jennings the catalyst.
Jennings hit Norris' first
pitch into left center, then
stole second, and even-
tually scored on a Ben
Zobrist sacrifice fly.
First baseman James
Loney picked two more
hits to extend his hitting


RAYS AT ASTROS
WHO: Tampa Bay (45-40) at
Houston (31-54)
WHEN: Today, 2:10 p.m.
WHERE: Minute Maid Park,
Houston
PITCHERS: Chris Archer (2-3,
4.40) vs. Kyle Gibson (1-0, 3.00)
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM,
1480 AM, 1530 AM, 1580 AM

streak to 13 games, and
struggling Matt Joyce got
a single and walk. Kelly
Johnson continued to
play a strong third base,
while Evan Longoria
(plantar fasciitis) serves
as temporary DH. But
the Rays would squander
several chances, stranding
a runner on second in the
second, fifth and sixth.
Hernandez would
get into trouble in the
seventh, giving up a
leadoff double to Brett
Wallace and a single to
Jason Castro, putting
runners on first and third
with no outs. Manager
Joe Maddon would pull
Hernandez, after just 78
pitches, and bring in Jake
McGee, who couldn't hold
on this time.


Astros 4, Rays 1
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
DeJenningscf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .258
Joyce If 3 0 2 0 1 0 .244
Zobrist2b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .265
Longoriadh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .297
Loneylb 4 0 2 0 0 0 .318
W.Myersrf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273
KJohnson3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .239
J.Molinac 3 0 1 0 0 0 .260
a-Scottph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240
Y.Escobarss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .244
Totals 31 1 8 1 3 7
Houston AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Altuve2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .287
Wallacelb 3 0 1 0 0 0 .128
1-Elmorepr-lf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .226
J.Castroc 4 1 1 0 0 0 .265
Carterlf-lb 3 2 2 4 0 0 .231
C.Penadh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .218
J.D.Martinezrf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .247
B.Barnescf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .251
M.Dominguez3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .224
R.Cedenoss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .234
Totals 29 4 7 4 0 3
Tampa Bay 100000000- 1 80
Houston 010000 30x- 4 70
a-grounded out for J.Molina in the 9th.
1-ran for Wallace in the 7th. LOB-Tampa
Bay 7, Houston 2. 2B-Loney (20), Wal-
lace (1), J.D.Martinez (13). HR-Carter (16),
off Ro.Hernandez; Carter (17), off McGee.
RBIs-Zobrist (44), Carter 4 (44). SB-
DeJennings (11), KJohnson (7). CS-J.Mo-
lina (1), Altuve (6). S-Altuve. SF-Zobrist.
Runners left in scoring position-Tampa
Bay 3 (Y.Escobar, Zobrist, KJohnson); Hous-
ton 2 (M.Dominguez, J.Castro). RISP-
Tampa Bay 1 for 6; Houston 2 for 6. GIDP-
DeJennings, Zobrist. DP-Houston 3
(J.Castro, J.Castro, Altuve), (M.Dominguez,
Altuve, Wallace), (R.Cedeno, Carter).
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
HernandezL,4-1064 3 3 0 1 784.95
McGee 1 2 1 1 0 2 27 4.96
JWright 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.95
Houston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
B.NorrisW,6-7 7 6 1 1 3 5105 3.22
CisneroH,5 1 1 0 0 0 1 72.27
VerasS,17-20 1 10 0 0 1 153.50
Ro.Hernandez pitched to 2 batters in the
7th. Inherited runners-scored-McGee
2-2. Umpires-Home, Bob Davidson; First,
Jim Reynolds; Second, John Hirschbeck;
Third, James Hoye. T-2:45. A-14,143
(42,060).


* MLB ROUNDUP



Scherzer sails to 13-0 as Tigers rout Blue Jays


Sabathia earns

win No. 200

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORONTO Max
Scherzer worked into
the seventh inning to
become the first pitcher
in 27 years to get off to
a 13-0 start, leading the
Detroit Tigers to a 6-2
victory over the Toronto
Blue Jays on Wednesday
night.
Alex Avila hit a three-
run homer and Victor
Martinez belted a solo
shot as Detroit beat
Toronto for the eighth
time in 10 meetings.
Scherzer (13-0) al-
lowed two runs and
seven hits, struck out
eight and walked one in
6 1-3 innings. He is the
first pitcher to begin the
season with 13 wins and
no losses since Roger


Clemens won his first 14
decisions for the Boston
Red Sox in 1986.
Scherzer also improved
to 4-0 with a 1.78 ERA in
six career starts against
the Blue Jays. He has 139
strikeouts this season,
second only to Texas'
Yu Darvish among AL
starters.
Bruce Rondon got two
outs in the seventh, Drew
Smyly pitched the eighth
and Joaquin Benoit
finished for the Tigers.
The Blue Jays dropped
to 3-7 since matching
a team record with an 11-
game winning streak.
Both benches and
bullpens emptied after
Tigers outfielder Torii
Hunter took exception to
being hit by a high pitch
from Todd Redmond in
the sixth.
Hunter took a few steps
toward the mound and
gestured at Redmond


after being hit on the left
shoulder. Plate umpire
Mike Estabrook quickly
steered Hunter away and
he was wrapped up by
teammate Prince Fielder.
No punches were
thrown, and the relievers
from both teams were
pointed back to their
bullpens before reaching
the infield.

Yankees 3, Twins 2: At
Minneapolis, CC Sabathia won his
200th career game to stretch his
winning streak over Minnesota
to nearly six years, and Robinson
Cano hit a tying two-run double to
spark New York. Cano fueled the
three-run sixth against Twins starter
PJ Walters (2-5), who was pitching
for his job. Trevor Plouffe homered
against Sabathia (9-6), but the burly
right-hander finished seven innings
with seven hits and three walks
while striking out nine. Mariano
Rivera pitched a scoreless ninth to
notch his 28th save in 29 tries in his
farewell season.


Orioles 4, White Sox
2: At Chicago, Chris Davis hit his
major league-leading 32nd homer,
and then added a tiebreaking
two-run double in the eighth for
Baltimore. Scott Feldman pitched
six solid innings in his debut for
the Orioles, who held on to win for
the fifth time in six games after the
White Sox threatened against Jim
Johnson. Conor Gillaspie and Jeff
Keppinger singled with one out in
the ninth, putting men on first and
second. Johnson struck out Gordon
Beckham looking and retired pinch
hitter Jordan Danks on a bouncer to
the mound for his 29th save in 34
attempts.

Red Sox 2, Padres 1: At
Boston, Jonny Gomes led off the
ninth inning with a pinch-hit home
run, lifting the Red Sox to the victory.
Mike Carp had two hits and scored
a run for Boston, which improved
to 7-1 on its nine-game homestand
that concludes Thursday against the
Padres. Carlos Quentin went 3 for 4
with a double and two singles for the
Padres. San Diego has scored just five


runs in its five-game losing streak.
Gomes sent a 2-2 pitch from Luke
Gregerson (4-4) into the first row of
seats above the Green Monster for
his second game-ending homer of
the season.

Marlins 6, Braves 3: At
Atlanta, Ricky Nolasco tossed seven
strong innings amid persistent trade
rumors, Justin Ruggiano hit a three-
run homer and Miami beat Atlanta.
Marlins manager Mike Redmond said
before the game that Nolasco has not
been affected by trade speculation
and the right-hander supported that
claim by giving up only two runs on
six hits. Nolasco (5-8) had no walks
with seven strikeouts, giving him
1,001 for his career. The Braves led
2-0 before Ruggiano's homer off
Mike Minor (8-4) in the fifth. Miami
added a run in the sixth when Placido
Polanco singled and scored on Adeiny
Hechavarria's double. Jeff Mathis
added a two-run double in the eighth.

Pirates 6, Phillies 5:
At Pittsburgh, Jeff Locke ran his
winning streak to eight games,


Pedro Alvarez hit a three-run
homer and Pittsburgh hung on
to beat Philadelphia. Locke (8-1)
was scored upon for the first time
in four home starts but extended
his unbeaten streak to 16 outings.
Locke, who hasn't lost since his first
start of the season, allowed two
earned runs on seven hits and three
walks over 5 2-3 innings. The Pirates
took the lead with a four-run fifth
punctuated by Alvarez's 21st home
run.

Brewers 4, Nationals 1:
At Washington, Kyle Lohse tossed
eight sharp innings on short rest and
Milwaukee shut down Bryce Harper
and Co. for the second straight night
in a win over Washington.
Lohse (4-6) allowed one run and
four hits, and had a season-high
seven strikeouts against the eager-
swinging Nationals, who barely
avoided back-to-back shutouts and
fell back to .500. Harper, in his third
game back from a knee injury, went
0 for 4 with two strikeouts and
dropped a ball in left field for the
second consecutive game.


SMLB:


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3







Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun IThursday, July 4, 2013


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
GB WCGB L10
5 7-3
5 3/2 6-4
6 2/2 4-6
) 61/2 3 7-3
10 61/2 3-7
Central Division
GB WCGB L10
2 2 7-3
2 2 4-6
51/2 7/2 4-6
8 10 3-7
11 13 3-7
West Division
GB WCGB L10
3 6-4
3 2 7-3
2 82 7 7-3
1212 11 4-6
1812 17 3-7


NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 49 35 .583 6-4 L-1 29-12 20-23
Washington 42 42 .500 7 6 5-5 L-2 23-18 19-24
Philadelphia 40 45 .471 912 81/2 4-6 L-1 19-18 21-27
NewYork 35 45 .438 12 11 6-4 W-2 17-25 18-20
MARLINS 31 52 .373 171/2 161/2 7-3 W-1 18-24 13-28
Central Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 52 31 .627 9-1 W-1 29-14 23-17
St.Louis 49 33 .598 212 3-7 L-2 22-16 27-17
Cincinnati 48 36 .571 412 4-6 W-2 28-14 20-22
Chicago 35 46 .432 16 1112 6-4 L-1 17-22 18-24
Milwaukee 34 49 .410 18 1312 3-7 W-2 19-23 15-26
West Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Arizona 42 41 .506 2-8 L-5 21-16 21-25
Colorado 41 43 .488 112 7 4-6 L-2 25-20 16-23
LosAngeles 39 43 .476 212 8 9-1 W-3 25-21 14-22
San Diego 40 45 .471 3 812 2-8 L-5 25-18 15-27
San Francisco 39 44 .470 3 812 2-8 L-2 24-15 15-29
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesday's results Tuesday's results
Detroit 7,Toronto 6 Milwaukee 4,Washington 0
Boston 4, San Diego 1 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 1
Seattle 9,Texas 2 NY Mets 9, Arizona 1
ChicagoWhite Sox 5, Baltimore 2 Atlanta 11, MARLINS 3
Cleveland 6, Kansas City 5 Boston 4, San Diego 1
N.Y.Yankees 7, Minnesota 3 Cincinnati 3, San Francisco 0
RAYS 8, Houston 0 L.A. Dodgers 8, Colorado 0
Oakland 8, Chicago Cubs 7 Oakland 8, Chicago Cubs 7
L.A. Angels 5, St. Louis 1 L.A. Angels 5, St. Louis 1
Wednesday's results Wednesday's results
Detroit 6, Toronto 2 Milwaukee 4,Washington 1
Baltimore 4, ChicagoWhite Sox 2 Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 5
Boston 2, San Diego 1 MARLINS 6, Atlanta 3
Seattle at Texas, late Boston 2, San Diego 1
N.Y.Yankees 3, Minnesota 2 Arizona at N.Y. Mets, late
Houston 4, RAYS 1 San Francisco at Cincinnati, late
Cleveland at Kansas City, late L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, late
Chicago Cubs at Oakland, late Chicago Cubs at Oakland, late
St. Louis at L.A. Angels, late St. Louis at L.A. Angels, late
Today's games Thursday's games
San Diego (Stults 6-6) at Boston (Webster Milwaukee (D.Hand 0-1) at Washington
0-2), 1:35 p.m. (Jordan 0-1), 11:05 a.m.
Baltimore (Britton 2-2) at Chicago White Arizona (Kennedy 3-4) at N.Y Mets (Gee
Sox (Quintana 3-2), 2:10 p.m. 6-7), 1:10 p.m.
Cleveland (UJimenez 6-4) at Kansas City San Francisco (M.Cain 5-4) at Cincinnati
(Shields3-6),2:10 p.m. (Leake 7-3), 1:10 p.m.
N.Y Yankees (D.Phelps 5-5) at Minnesota Philadelphia (Hamels 2-11) at Pittsburgh
(Gibson 1-0),2:10p.m. (Cole 4-0), 1:35p.m.
RAYS (Archer 2-3) at Houston (Lyles 4-3), San Diego (Stults 6-6) at Boston (Webster
2:10 p.m. 0-2),1:35p.m.
Chicago Cubs (TWood 5-6) at Oakland Chicago Cubs (TWood 5-6) at Oakland
(Straily 4-2), 4:05 p.m. (Straily 4-2), 4:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 8-5) at Toronto (Rogers MARLINS (H.Alvarez 0-0) at Atlanta (Te-
3-3),7:07p.m. heran 6-4),7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 7-3) at Texas (M.Perez L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 2-5) at Colorado
2-1), 8:05 p.m. (Chacin 7-3), 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 11-5) at L.A. Angels St. Louis (Wainwright 11-5) at L.A. Angels
(Blanton 2-10), 9:05 p.m. (Blanton 2-10),9:05 p.m.



* MLB NOTEBOOK



Rangers sign



slugger Ramirez to



minor league deal


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas
- Manny Ramirez is ap-
parently cutting his long
dreadlocks for another
shot at the major leagues.
The Texas Rangers
said Wednesday they
had agreed to terms on
a minor league contract
with the 41-year-old slug-
ger, who hasn't played in
the big leagues since 2011
with Tampa Bay.
Rangers general man-
ager Jon Daniels said part
of the deal was Ramirez,
twice suspended for test-
ing positive for banned
drugs, agreeing to cut
his hair and "comply
with our minor league
rules on appearance and
discipline."
Ramirez was set to
report to Triple-A Round
Rock on Thursday, and
he will be a designated
hitter whenever he is
activated. He played for
three months in Taiwan
before leaving the Rhinos
on June 20.
"It's kind of a no-risk
flier," said Daniels, indi-
cating there was no time
frame for him to be called
up to the majors. "We
like giving guys second
chances. We know on and
off the field the good and
bad in Manny's career.
But we're inclined to
give him an opportunity
here."
Ramirez hit .352 with
eight homers and 43 RBIs
for the Rhinos. The team
tried to keep the 12-time
All-Star, but he wanted
to return to his family in
NewYork.
Daniels said Ramirez
was looking for an oppor-
tunity to play either in the


United States or Japan.
Ramirez was suspend-
ed for 50 games in 2009
while with the Dodgers
after testing positive for a
banned drug. He retired
in April 2011 instead of
serving a 100-game ban
for a second positive
test, but later agreed to a
reduced 50-game suspen-
sion and played in the
minors for Oakland in
2012.
A lifetime .312 hitter,
Ramirez is 14th on the
career home runs list
with 555.

Yankees put Nix on DL,
sign Cruz as replacement:
The NewYorkYankees placed infielder
Jayson Nix on the 15-day disabled
list before their game at Minnesota
because of a strained right hamstring,
and free agent infielder Luis Cruz was
signed to fill in.
Nix didn't play Tuesday against the
Twins but said then he thought he
would be able to play after a day to
rest. Yankees manager Joe Girardi said,
however, an MRI test revealed a more
severe Grade 2 strain than initially
believed, and the team decided to
shut down Nix.
"I think we were all surprised,"
Girardi said, praising Nix's toughness
but stressing the need for precaution
with his injury-ravaged team.

Brewers' Peralta
could miss start, Braun
improving: Milwaukee Brewers
right-hander Wily Peralta is iffy"
to make his next start because of a
strained left hamstring, and Ryan
Braun might be back earlier than
expected after a good round of hitting
in the batting cage.
Peralta was able to work out in the
weight room and play some catch, a
day after the hamstring injury forced
him from the game in the sixth
inning of a win over the Washington
Nationals.


SCOREBOARD


Marlins 6, Braves 3


Boston
Baltimore
NewYork
RAYS
Toronto

Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago

Oakland
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Houston


Miami i
Ruggiano If
Lucas lb
Stanton rf
Ozuna cf
Polanco 3b
D.Solano 2b
Hechavarria ss
Mathisc
Nolasco p
b-Dobbs ph
Quails p
M.Dunn p
Cishekp
Totals 3
Atlanta I
Simmons ss
Heyward rf
J.Upton If
F.Freeman 1ib
McCann c
Uggla2b
B.Upton cf
CJohnson 3b
Minor p
D.Carpenter p
a-J.Schafer ph
Gearrin p
Varvaro p
c-Pastornickyph
Totals 3!
Miami
Atlanta


a-grounded out for D.Carpenter in the 7th.
b-flied out for Nolasco in the 8th.c-ground-
ed out for Varvaro in the 9th. E-Mathis (1).
LOB-Miami 8, Atlanta 6. 2B-Ruggiano
(9), D.Solano (3), Hechavarria (5), Mathis
(5). HR-Ruggiano (12), off Minor; Mc-
Cann (10), off Nolasco. RBIs-Ruggiano 3
(31), Hechavarria (21), Mathis 2 (16), Sim-
mons (26), McCann (27), CJohnson (26).
SB-Ruggiano (9). S-Minor. Runners left
in scoring position-Miami 3 (Polanco,
Nolasco, Lucas); Atlanta 3 (J.Upton, Mc-
Cann, Pastornicky). RISP-Miami 2 for 10;
Atlanta2for6.GIDP-J.Upton.DP-Miami
1 (D.Solano, Hechavarria, Lucas).
Miami IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
NolascoW,5-8 7 62 2 0 7 963.85
Quails 1 10 0 0 0 93.34
M.Dunn 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 72.97
CishekS, 16-182/3 1 0 0 0 1 73.06
Atlanta IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
MinorL,8-4 6 6 4 4 3 91073.15
D.Carpenter 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 1.74
Gearrin 1 2 2 2 1 0 16 3.77
Varvaro 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.88
Inherited runners-scored-Cishek 2-1.
IBB-off Minor (Mathis). HBP-by Ge-
arrin (D.Solano). WP-Minor, Gearrin.
Umpires-Home, Scott Barry; First, Mike
DiMuro; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Alfonso
Marquez.T-2:46.A-26,129 (49,586).


Brewers 4
Milwaukee AB
Aoki rf 5
Segura ss 5
C.Gomez cf 4
Ar.Ramirez3b 3
Lucroy c 4
Weeks2b 3
Haltoni b 4
L.Schafer If 4
Lohsep 2
b-Y.Betancourt ph 1
Fr.Rodriguez p 0
Totals 35
Washington AB
Span cf 4
Werth rf 4
Harper If 4
Zimmerman 3b 4
Ad.LaRochelb 3
Desmond ss 3
Rendon 2b 4
K.Suzuki c 3
Detwiler p 2
Stammen p 0
a-Lombardozzi phi
Abad p 0
Totals 32
Milwaukee
Washington


, Nationals 1
R H BIBBSO Avg.
0 3 2 0 0 .290
0 0 0 0 0 .320
0 1 0 0 1 .308
1 1 0 1 1 .278
1 2 0 0 1 .270
0 0 0 1 0 .226
1 1 0 0 1 .278
1 2 2 0 0 .215
0 0 0 0 0 .133
0 0 0 0 1 .204
0 0 0 00 ---
410 4 2 5
R H BIBBSO Avg.
0 0 0 0 1 .262
0 0 0 0 1 .265
0 0 0 0 2 .272
0 1 0 0 0 .279
0 0 0 1 1 .251
0 1 0 1 1 .276
1 1 1 0 1 .313
0 1 0 0 1 .224
0 1 0 0 1 .091
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .233
0 0 0 0 0 -

000022000- 4100
000000100- 1 51


a-lined out for Stammen in the 8th. b-struck
out for Lohse in the 9th. E-Harper (4).
LOB-Milwaukee 7, Washington 6. 2B- I
Halton (2). 3B-L.Schafer (2). HR-Rendon
(2), off Lohse. RBIs-Aoki 2 (18), L.Schafer
2 (13), Rendon (9). S-Lohse. Runners
left in scoring position-Milwaukee
3 (Weeks, Lohse, Halton); Washington 3
(K.Suzuki, Span, Rendon). RISP-Milwau-
kee 3 for 10; Washington 0 for 5. GIDP-
Lucroy. DP-Washington 2 (Zimmerman,
Rendon, Ad.LaRoche), (Span, Desmond,
Ad.LaRoche).
Milwaukee IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
LohseW,4-6 8 4 1 1 1 7103 3.43
RodriguezS,7-7 1 1 0 0 1 2 22 0.92
Washington IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
DetwilerL,2-7 6 8 4 2 1 3 95 4.04
Stammen 2 1 0 0 1 1 31 3.18
Abad 1 1 0 0 0 1 161.08
Umpires-Home, Dan lassogna; First, Ger-
ry Davis; Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Brian
Knight. T-2:46.A-28,920 (41,418).


Red So
San Diego A
Forsythe 2b
Denorfia rf
Quentin If
Headley3b
Blanks dh
Guzman lb
Grandal c
Ciriaco ss
Amarista cf
Totals
Boston I
Ellsburycf
Victorino rf
Pedroia 2b
D.Ortizdh
Nava If
Carp lb
Saltalamacchia c
B.Snyder 3b
a-J.Gomes ph
Iglesias ss
Totals 3
San Diego
Boston


ox
AB
4
4
4
3
4
3
4
3
3
32


2, Padres 1
R H BIBBSO Avg.
0 0 0 0 1 .247
0 0 0 0 2 .264
1 3 0 0 1 .276
0 1 0 1 0 .219
0 1 1 0 0 .270
0 0 0 1 2 .221
0 1 0 0 1 .226
0 0 0 0 0 .246
0 0 0 0 1 .241
SR H BIBBSO Avg.
0 1 0 0 0 .298
0 1 0 0 1 .285
0 2 0 0 1 .323
0 0 0 2 0 .317
0 1 0 0 1 .285
1 2 0 0 1 .316
0 1 1 0 3 .260
0 0 0 0 2 .250
1 1 1 0 0 .230
0 0 0 0 0 .409
2 9 2 2 9
100000000- 1 60
000100001- 2 90


No outs when winning run scored, a-hom-
ered for B.Snyder in the 9th. LOB-San Di-
ego 6, Boston 9. 2B-Quentin (14), Grandal
(8), Victorino (11), Pedroia (23), Carp (11),
Saltalamacchia (20). HR-J.Gomes (6), off
Gregerson. RBIs-Blanks (32), Saltalamac-
chia (32), J.Gomes (21). SB-Pedroia (13).
Runners left in scoring position-San Di-
ego 4 (Guzman 2, Headley, Ciriaco); Boston
6 (D.Ortiz, Nava 2, Ellsbury, B.Snyder, Saltal-
amacchia). RISP-San Diego 1 for 6; Boston
1 for 13. Runners moved up-Victorino.
GIDP-Blanks. DP-San Diego 1 (Ciriaco);
Boston 1 (Pedroia, Iglesias, Carp).
San Diego IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Volquez 6 7 1 1 1 6104 5.26
Vincent 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 0.00
Gregerson L,4-4 1 1 1 1 0 2 162.78
Boston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Lester 7 6 1 1 1 5102 4.41
Tazawa 1 00 0 0 3 16 284
UeharaW,2-0 1 00 0 1 0 182.00
Vincent pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
Gregerson pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scored-Gregerson
2-0. IBB-off Volquez (D.Ortiz), off Vincent
(D.Ortiz). HBP-by Volquez (Iglesias). Um-
pires-Home, Doug Eddings; First, Dana
DeMuth; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third,
Paul Nauert.T-3:05. A-36,911 (37,499).


Orioles 4, White Sox 2


R H BIBBSO Avg.
1 2 3 1 1 .233
0 2 0 0 1 .295
0 0 0 1 2 .258
0 0 0 0 2 .286
1 1 0 0 1 .242
2 1 0 0 0 .277
1 2 1 0 1 .223
0 1 2 1 2 .162
1 0 0 1 2 .100
0 0 0 0 0 .229
0 0 0 0 0 -
0 0 0 0 0 -
0 0 0 00 ---
6 9 6 412
R H BIBBSO Avg.
0 2 1 0 0 .245
0 1 0 0 0 .227
0 0 0 0 0 .248
1 2 0 0 1 .313
1 1 1 0 2 .262
0 1 0 0 1 .202
1 1 0 0 2 .177
0 2 1 0 2 .333
0 0 0 0 1 .094
0 0 0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 0 0 .312
0 0 0 0 0 -
0 0 0 0 0 ---
0 0 0 0 0 .250
310 3 0 9
000031020- 6 91
001100001- 3100


Yankees 3, Twins 2


Baltimore AB R H BI BBSO Avg. NewYork
Markakisrf 3 2 2 0 2 1 .291 Gardnercf
Machado3b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .320 I.Suzukirf
AJonescf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .293 Cano2b
C.Davisib 4 1 2 3 0 1 .331 Hafnerdh
Wietersc 4 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Almontelf
Hardyss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Overbaylb
McLouthlf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .285 C.Stewartc
Reimolddh 3 0 1 0 0 1 .196 L.Cruzss
a-Dickerson ph-dhO 0 0 0 1 0 .272 D.Adams3b
B.Roberts2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Totals
Totals 34 4 9 4 410 Minnesota
Chicago AB R H BIBBSO Avg. Dozier2b
DeAzacf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .261 Mauerdh
AI.Ramirezss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Doumitc
Riosrf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .268 Morneaulb
A.Dunnib 4 0 1 1 0 0 .199 Plouffe3b
Viciedolf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Arcialf
Gillaspie3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Hickscf
Keppingerdh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .252 Thomasrf
Beckham2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .331 Florimonss
Flowers c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .206 a-Parmeleeph
b-Jor.Danksph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .135 1-E.Escobarpr
Totals 36 2 9 2 0 7 Totals
Baltimore 100100020- 4 90 NewYork
Chicago 100010000- 2 90 Minnesota


b-grounded out for Flowers in the 9th. a-singled for Florimon in the 9th. 1-ran for
LOB-Baltimore 8, Chicago 7. 2B-C.Da- Parmelee in the 9th. E-L.Cruz (1). LOB-
vis (26), McLouth (17), Reimold (3), De Aza New York 4, Minnesota 9. 2B-I.Suzuki (8),
(16), A.Dunn (8), Keppinger (5). HR-C. Cano (17), Mauer (25). HR-Plouffe (8), off
Davis (32), off H.Santiago; Beckham (1), off Sabathia. RBIs-Cano 2 (56), Overbay (35),
Feldman. RBIs-AJones (59), C.Davis 3 Mauer (28), Plouffe (31). SB-Dozier (7),
(83), A.Dunn (55), Beckham (9). SB-Rios Hicks (5). SF-Overbay. Runners left in
(15). S-B.Roberts. Runners left in scoring scoring position-New York 1 (I.Suzuki);
position-Baltimore 5 (Hardy 2, B.Roberts, Minnesota 4 (Florimon, Arcia, Mauer,
AJones 2); Chicago 4 (Gillaspie, De Aza, Morneau). RISP-New York 2 for 4; Min-
Rios, Jor.Danks).RISP-Baltimore 2for10; nesota 0 for 7. Runners moved up-Gard-
Chicago 2 for 10. Runners moved up- ner. GIDP-Florimon. DP-New York 1
Beckham. GIDP-B.Roberts. DP-Chicago (D.Adams,Cano,Overbay)
1 (AI.Ramirez,Beckham,A.Dunn). NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Baltimore IP H RER BBSO NP ERA SabathiaW,9-6 7 7 2 2 3 9121 4.06
Feldman 6 62 2 0 6 983.00 D.RobertsonH,1910 0 0 0 1 172.43
O'DayW,4-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 152.19 Rivera S,28-29 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 1.44
Tom.Hunter H, 111 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.96 Minnesota IP HR ER BBSO NP ERA
JohnsnS,29-34 1 2 0 0 0 1 173.83 Walters L, 2-5 5 43 3 3 3 795.95
Chicago IP H RER BBSO NP ERA Thielbar 2 0 0 0 0 3 21 0.00
H.Santiago 7 5 2 2 2 91233.50 Fien 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.44
LndstrmL,2-3 1/3 2 2 2 0 1 103.31 Perkins 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 1.99
Thornton 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.04 Walters pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. In-
Troncoso 1 1 0 0 2 0 246.52 herited runners-scored-Thielbar 2-1.
Inherited runners-scored--Thornton Umpires-Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Ed
2-2. IBB-off Troncoso (Markakis). Urn- Hickox; Second, Jim Joyce; Third, Cory Bla-
pires-Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Andy ser.T-2S49 A-38,457(39,021)
Fletcher; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Joe
West.T-3:01.A-26,001 (40,615).
Leaders
Tigers 6, Blue Jays 2
Detroit AB R H BI BBSO Avg. AMERICAN LEAGUE
AJacksoncf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .285 ExcludesWednesday'slategames
Tor.Hunter rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .300 BATTING-MiCabrera, Detroit, .364; CDa-
Mi.Cabrera3b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .364 vis, Baltimore, .331; Pedroia, Boston, .323;
D.Kelly3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220 HKendrick, Los Angeles, .323; Machado,
Fielder lb 5 1 1 0 0 3 .268 Baltimore, .320; Loney, Tampa Bay, .318;
V.Martinezdh 4 2 2 2 0 0 .235 Donaldson, 0akland,.318.
Jh.Peralta ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .308 RUNS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 65; CDavis, Bal-
Dirkslf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .241 timore, 61; Bautista, Toronto, 58; AJones,
Infante2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .309 Baltimore, 57; Trout, Los Angeles, 57; En-
R.Santiago2b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .148 carnacion,Toronto,54;DeJennings, Tampa
Avilac 4 1 2 3 0 1 .182 Bay, 53; Machado, Baltimore, 53; Pedroia,
Totals 37 6 8 6 210 Boston,53.
Toronto AB R H BI BBSO Avg. RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 85; CDavis, Balti-
Reyesss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .329 more, 83; Encarnacion, Toronto, 66; Fielder,
Bautista rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .264 Detroit, 63; NCruz, Texas, 61; AJones, Balti-
Linddh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .322 more, 59; DOrtiz, Boston, 57.
Col.Rasmuscf 3 0 2 1 0 1 .248 HITS-MiCabrera, Detroit, 119; Machado,
R.Davislf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .304 Baltimore, 117; Pedroia, Boston, 106;
M.Izturis3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .228 AJones, Baltimore, 104; Trout, Los Angeles,
DeRosa lb 4 0 1 0 0 1 .205 104; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 102; CDavis,
Arencibiac 4 0 0 0 0 2 .216 Baltimore, 101;Ellsbury, Boston, 101.
Bonifacio2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .210 DOUBLES-Machado, Baltimore, 38; CDa-
Totals 35 2 9 2 112 vis, Baltimore, 26; Mauer, Minnesota, 25;
Detroit 041010 000- 6 80 Trout, Los Angeles, 25; Pedroia, Boston, 23;
Toronto 000002000- 2 93 Seager, Seattle, 23; 6 tied at 22.
E-JoJohnson 2 (2), Bonifacio (7). TRIPLES-Ellsbury, Boston,7;Drew, Boston,
LOB-Detroit 7, Toronto 8. 2B-Bautista 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 6; Gardner, NewYork,
(16). 3B-DeRosa (1). HR-Avila (6), off 5; DeJennings,Tampa Bay, 4; Kawasaki, To-
JoJohnson; V.Martinez (7), offJoJohnson. ronto,4;HKendrick, Los Angeles,4; LMartin,
RBIs-V.Martinez 2 (42), Jh.Peralta (37), Texas,4.
Avila 3 (18), Col.Rasmus (43), M.Izturis (20). HOME RUNS-CDavis, Baltimore, 32; MiCa-
Runners left in scoring position-Detroit brera, Detroit, 26; Encarnacion, Toronto, 23;
3 (Infante 2, Fielder);Toronto 3 (Col.Rasmus, ADunn, Chicago, 22; Cano, New York, 20;
Arencibia, DeRosa). RISP-Detroit 3 for 12; NCruz,Texas, 20; Ibanez, Seattle, 20.
Toronto 2 for 8. GIDP-Bautista. DP-De- STOLEN BASES-Ellsbury, Boston, 33;
troit 1 (Mi.Cabrera, Infante, Fielder);Toronto McLouth, Baltimore, 24; RDavis, Toronto,
1 (Reyes, Bonifacio). 21;Trout, Los Angeles,20; Kipnis, Cleveland,
Detroit IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA 19; AIRamirez, Chicago, 19; Altuve, Hous-
SchrzrW,13-0 61/3 7 2 2 1 8113 3.09 ton,18.
B.Rondon 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 6 7.71 PITCHING-Scherzer, Detroit, 13-0; Colon,
Smyly 1 1 0 0 0 2 152.12 Oakland, 11-2; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 11-3;
Benoit 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 1.78 Tillman, Baltimore, 10-2; Masterson, Cleve-
Toronto IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA land, 10-6; Buchholz, Boston, 9-0; Sabathia,
Johnson L,1-3 5 7 6 1 2 5105 4.89 NewYork,9-6.
Redmond 3 1 0 0 0 2 42 3.52 STRIKEOUTS-Darvish, Texas, 151; Scher-
McGowan 1 0 0 0 0 3 18 2.45 zer, Detroit, 139;Masterson, Cleveland, 125;
Inherited runners-scored-B.Rondon FHernandez, Seattle, 123; Sale, Chicago,
1-0. HBP-by Scherzer (Col.Rasmus), by 11l4;Verlander, Detroit, 114; Sabathia, New
Redmond (Tor.Hunter). Umpires-Home, York, 106.
Mike Estabrook; First, Jerry Layne; Second, SAVES-JiJohnson, Baltimore, 29; Rivera,
Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Alan Porter. New York, 28; Nathan, Texas, 27; AReed,
T-3:11 (Rain delay: 0:02). A-28,958 Chicago, 22; Frieri, Los Angeles, 21; Perkins,
(49,282). Minnesota, 20; Balfour, Oakland, 20.
Pirates 6, Phillies 5 NATIONAL LEAGUE
Philadelphia AB R H BI BBSO Avg. ExcludesWednesday's late games.
M.Young3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .285 BATTING-YMolina, St. Louis, .347; Cud-
Utley2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .279 dyer, Colorado,.339; Votto, Cincinnati,.325;
Rollins ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .262 MCarpenter, St. Louis, .321; Craig, St. Louis,
D.Brown If 5 2 3 2 0 0 .280 .320; Segura, Milwaukee, .320; Posey, San
D.Young rf 5 1 3 0 0 1 .267 Francisco,.316.
Mayberrylb 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 RUNS-CGonzalez, Colorado, 63; MCar-
b-Howard ph-lb 1 0 0 0 0 1 .266 penter, St. Louis, 60; Holliday, St. Louis, 59;
Reverecf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .285 Votto, Cincinnati, 58; Choo, Cincinnati, 55;
Ruizc 3 1 1 0 1 1 .266 Goldschmidt, Arizona, 54; JUpton, Atlanta,
Lannanp 1 0 0 0 1 0 .364 53.
a-Frandsen ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .284 RBI-Goldschmidt, Arizona, 69; Craig, St.
Aumontp 0 0 0 0 0 0 Louis, 63; Phillips, Cincinnati, 63; DBrown,
Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia, 60; CGonzalez, Colorado, 60;
c-L.Nixph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 56; Bruce, Cincinnati,
Saveryp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- 56
Totals 38 511 4 3 6 HITS-Segura, Milwaukee, 106; YMolina,
Pittsburgh AB R H BIBBSO Avg. St. Louis, 102; Votto, Cincinnati, 102; MCar-
S.Martelf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .285 penter, St. Louis, 101; Craig, St. Louis, 99;
Mercer ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .273 GParra, Arizona, 98; Bruce, Cincinnati, 94;
McCutchencf 3 2 3 0 2 0 .300 Goldschmidt, Arizona, 94; CGonzalez, Colo-
G.Sanchezlb 3 2 1 0 1 2 .238 rado,94.
R.Martin c 4 1 2 2 0 2 .251 DOUBLES-YMolina, St. Louis, 26; Bruce,
PAlvarez3b 4 1 2 3 0 2 .243 Cincinnati, 25; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 24;
Tabatarf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .271 McCutchen,Pittsburgh,24;GParra,Arizona,
J.Gomezp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 24; Rizzo, Chicago, 24; Posey, San Francisco,
Melanconp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- 23.
Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 TRIPLES-CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; SMarte,
Walker2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Pittsburgh, 8; Segura, Milwaukee, 8; Span,
Locke p 2 0 1 0 1 1 .071 Washington, 7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6;
JuWilsonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 000 Hechavarria, Miami, 5;DWright, NewYork,
Sniderrf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .228 5.
Totals 35 613 5 411 HOME RUNS-DBrown, Philadelphia,
Philadelphia 000102002-5110 22 CGonzalez, Colorado, 22; PAlvarez,
Pittsburgh 000042 00x- 6132 Pittsburgh, 21; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 20;
a-singled for Lannan in the 6th. b-struck Beltran, St. Louis, 19; Bruce, Cincinnati, 18;
out for Mayberry in the 7th. c-grounded Tulowitzki, Colorado, 16.
out for Diekman in the 8th. E-Mercer STOLEN BASES-ECabrera, San Diego, 31;
(7), S.Marte (4). LOB-Philadelphia 9, Segura, Milwaukee, 24; SMarte, Pittsburgh,
Pittsburgh 10.2B-Utley (11), Rollins (18), 23; Revere, Philadelphia, 20; Pierre, Miami,
R.Martin (15). 3B-McCutchen (1). HR-D. 18; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 17; CGomez,
Brown (22), off Grilli; PAlvarez (21), off Lan- Milwaukee, 16.
nan. RBIs-D.Brown 2 (60), Revere (12), PITCHING-Zimmermann, Washington,
Frandsen (13), R.Martin 2 (32), PAlvarez 12-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 11-5; Lynn, St.
3 (56). SB-McCutchen (17). CS-Mc- Louis, 10-3; Corbin, Arizona, 9-1; Lee, Phila-
Cutchen (5). Runners left in scoring po- delphia, 9-2; Marquis, San Diego, 9-4; Ma-
sition-Philadelphia 4 (Lannan 2, Utley, holm, Atlanta, 9-6.
Howard); Pittsburgh 6 (R.Martin, S.Marte STRIKEOUTS-Harvey, New York, 132;
3, PAlvarez, Tabata). RISP-Philadelphia 3 Kershaw, Los Angeles, 126; Samardzija,
for 9; Pittsburgh 4 for 13. Runners moved Chicago, 120; Lee, Philadelphia, 115;Wain-
up-D.Young. GIDP-S.Marte. DP-Phila- wright, St. Louis, 114; HBailey, Cincinnati,
delphia 2 (Rollins, Utley, Mayberry), (Ruiz, li;Latos,Cincinnati,109.
RuizUtley). SAVES-Grilli, Pittsburgh, 28; Kimbrel, At-
Philadelphia IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA lanta,23;RSoriano, Washington,21;Mujica,
LannanL,1/3 511 4 4 3 5 935.15 St.Louis,21
Aumont 1/3 2 2 2 0 0 123.g3
Diekman 12/3 00 0 0 5 23 3.52
Savery 1 00 0 1 1 211.80 On this date
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
LockeW,8-1 52/3 7 3 2 3 2 992.12 July4
JuWilsonH,7 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 202.11 1905 -The Philadelphia Athletics scored
J.GomezH, 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 172.70 two runs in the 20th inning, giving Rube
MelanconH,24 1 00 0 0 1 120.87 Waddella 4-2victoryoverCyYoungofthe
GrilliS,28-29 1 2 2 2 0 1 21 2.15 Boston Red Sox.Bothpitcherswentthedis-
Inherited runners-scored-Diekman 2-1, tance.Young did not allow walk.
Ju.Wilson2-2.1BB-offLocke(Ruiz).HBP- 1908 George Wiltse of the New York
by Aumont (G.Sanchez). WP-Diekman, Giants pitched a 10-inning, 1-0 no-hitter
J.Gomez. Umpires-Home, Paul Emmel; against the Philadelphia Phillies.
First, Chris Conroy; Second, Gary Darling; 1912--GeorgeMullinoftheDetroitTigers
Third, Jerry Meals. T-3:26. A-33,197 celebrated his 32nd birthday by pitching a
(38,362). no-hitter over the St. Louis Browns.


I STANDINGS


of matching Vander Meer,
who threw the second no-
hitter against the Brooklyn
Dodgers in the first night
game at Ebbetts Field.
"It's happened once,"
Bailey pointed out. "There
aren't too many things in
the history of baseball that
have happened only once.
You can't go into the game
thinking about it."


3 R H BIBBSO Avg.
3 1 0 0 1 1 .281
4 1 1 0 0 0 .274
3 1 2 2 1 0 .299
4 0 1 0 0 1 .220
4 0 0 0 0 2 .304
3 0 0 1 0 2 .237
4 0 0 0 0 0 .238
30 0 0 0 0 .000
2 0 0 0 1 2 .186
S3 4 3 3 8
3 R H BIBBSO Avg.
3 1 1 0 2 1 .233
5 0 1 1 0 1 .316
4 0 1 0 0 2 .239
4 0 0 0 0 1 .280
4 1 1 1 0 1 .269
4 0 1 0 0 2 .289
3 0 0 0 1 2 .183
4 0 2 0 0 0 .264
3 0 0 0 0 1 .225
0 1 0 0 0 .233
D 0 0 0 0 0 .213
5 2 8 2 311
000003000- 3 41
001010000- 2 80


* BASEBALL



Baileys



no-no



draws



kudos

By MARK SCHMETZER
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CINCINNATI-Homer
Bailey didn't have much
time Tuesday night to
celebrate his second
career no-hitter. He had to
get up early Wednesday to
tend to his horses.
Cincinnati's Texas-born
right-hander celebrated
his no-no against the
San Francisco Giants by
calling his family while
listening to music, he
said. He also spent time
answering more than 200
text messages from former
teammates and current
and former major-leagu-
ers including fellow
Texan Roger Clemens
while squeezing in a
visit to the two horses he
stables locally.
"I had to get up pretty
early," he said about his
low-key celebration
while speaking to the
media at his cubicle in the
Reds' clubhouse before
Wednesday night's game
against the Giants.
Former teammates
who reached out to Bailey
included pitchers Aaron
Harang and Kent Mercker
and outfielder Laynce
Nix, he said, adding
that Clemens, a special
instructor in Houston's
system, said he was going
to show his young pitch-
ers a video of Bailey's
performance.
"He said, 'Your mechan-
ics and direction were
good,'" Bailey said, quot-
ing Clemens. "I said, 'Go
ahead. They're not in our
division anymore.'"
Houston was a Reds
opponent in the NL
Central before shifting to
the American League this
season.
Bailey hadn't seen any
highlights of his perfor-
mance, the 16th no-hitter
in franchise history and
one walk away from being
a perfect game.
"I had the best seat in
the house," he pointed
out. "I didn't need to
watch TV. (High defini-
tion) can't do justice to
where I was standing.
"When I talked to my
dad, the first thing he said
was, 'How'd it go tonight?
I recorded it and haven't
had time to watch it yet,'"
Bailey added, smiling. "He
was joking."
Bailey, who pitched
the final no-hitter of last
season at Pittsburgh on
September 28 before
logging the first of this
season, did not hear from
his idol, Nolan Ryan -an-
other hard-throwing Texas
right-hander and the
owner of a major-league
record seven no-hitters.
Ryan, now president of
the Texas Rangers, was the
last pitcher before Bailey
to throw two consecutive
no-hitters before another
pitcher accomplished the
feat. Ryan threw the last
no-hitter in 1974 and the
first in 1975.
Bailey's next scheduled
start is Sunday against
Seattle in Cincinnati, the
same city where Reds
left-hander Johnny Vander
SMeer threw the first of his
two no-hitters in consecu-
tive starts in 1938. Bailey
doesn't like his chances


Page 4 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013









* NHL NOTEBOOK




Glendale council vote likely saves Coyotes


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GLENDALE, Ariz. -The
Phoenix Coyotes have spent the
past four years living with the
financial restraints of being run
by the NHL, making the best
of the limited resources before
them.
After Tuesday night's
Glendale City Council vote in
favor of an arena lease agree-
ment with a prospective team
owner, the Coyotes will finally
be on even financial footing
with the rest of the league.
"The only way you can win
long-term is to have a strong
ownership," Coyotes general
manager Don Maloney said.
"Now that we have an owner-
ship in place, it gives us a
chance, gives us a little more of


a chance to show that we know
what we're doing."
The Coyotes had been
searching for an owner since
Jerry Moyes took the team
into bankruptcy in 2009. After
numerous false starts with
potential owners and constant
rumors of relocation, the
Coyotes found a perfect suitor
in Renaissance Sports and
Entertainment.
RSE, headed by George
Gosbee, Anthony LeBlanc
and Daryl Jones, reached an
agreement to buy the team in
May, a deal contingent upon
reaching a lease agreement for
Jobing.com Arena with the city
of Glendale.
After a month of contentious
negotiations that went through


dramatic fluctuations over the that he thinks it will happen by Friday, when 2008-09 season, plagued by multiple concus-
final week, the lease agreement Rask can become a restricted free agent. Even sions and hip and knee injuries that required
went to a vote Tuesday night if they don't meet the deadline, the GM said he surgery.
with the outcome still very still feels like he can get a deal done.
much in doubt. Rask allowed just two goals a game this Ovechkin tops NHL All-Stars,
season while leading the Bruins to the Stanley earning 6th selection: Alex Ovechkin
Kings' Stoll hospitalized after Cup finals. He is 26. is an NHL first-team All-Star for the sixth time,
seizure: Los Angeles Kings center Jarret but his first as a right wing.
Stoll was hospitalized after suffering a Islanders buy out goalie Th Achnnnn rnitc ctr kc th. cnd
lie hT Wasin~pI ton LUI C Ua Iit l I Itar isthe. seon


seizure.
The Los Angeles Times reported that Stoll
fell ill at his Hermosa Beach home.
Kings general manager Dean Lombardi told
the Times that he visited Stoll in the hospital
and the "bottom line is that he's fine. Now the
issue is what caused it."

Bruins GM says deal close for
Rask: Boston Bruins general manager Peter
Chiarelli said he is confident the team will
re-sign goalie Tuukka Rask.
Chiarelli told reporters on a conference call


DiPietro's contract: Rick DiPietro is
now a former NewYork Islanders goalie after
he cleared waivers and had his long contract
bought out by the team.
The Islanders used a compliance buyout to
remove the final eight years of the goalie's deal
from the club's salary cap.
NewYork will pay the 31-year-old DiPietro
$1.5 million for each of the next 16 years -
double the years left on his original 15-year
pact with the Islanders.
The No. 1 pick in the 2000 draft, DiPietro
has been limited to 50 NHL games since the


IIle VV I ]I IIyIIL II ui JILUId uI i L Ir Is ,ne UI
player to make the team at multiple positions,
joining Hockey Hall of Famer Mark Messier, a
four-time selection twice at left wing and
twice at center.
Pittsburgh's Sidney Crosby, a second-time
selection to the first team, is the only other
player in this year's class to have made it before.
The first-timers include Pittsburgh left
wing Chris Kunitz, defensemen P.K. Subban of
Montreal and Ryan Suter of Minnesota, and
Columbus goalie Sergei Bobrovsky, the Vezina
Trophy winner.


I SCOREBOARD

Sports on TV
AUTO RACING
2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
practice for Firecracker 250, at Daytona
Beach, Fla.
4p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for
Coke Zero 400, at Daytona Beach, Fla.
5:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide Series, fi-
nal practice for Firecracker 250, at Daytona
Beach, Fla.
6:30p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, "Happy
Hour Series," final practice for Coke Zero
400, at Daytona Beach, Fla.
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
7 p.m.
ESPN2-Winnipeg at Montreal
CYCLING
8 a.m.
NBCSN -Tour de France, stage 6, Aix-en-
Provence to Montpellier, France
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Open de
France,first round, at Paris
3p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic,
first round, atWhite Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
11 a.m.
MLB -MilwaukeeatWashington
2p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Baltimore at
Chicago White Sox or N.Y. Yankees at Min-
nesota
SUN -Tampa Bay at Houston
4p.m.
WGN -Chicago Cubs at Oakland
7 p.m.
FSFL Miami at Atlanta
8p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Seattle atTexas
or L.A. Dodgers at Colorado
TENNIS
8 a.m.
ESPN -The Wimbledon Championships,
women's semifinals, at London


Glantz-Culver Line


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
National League
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
atWashington -155 Milwaukee +145
Arizona -110 atNewYork +100
at Cincinnati -145 San Francisco +135
atPittsburgh -135 Philadelphia +125
at Atlanta -230 Miami +210
at Colorado -130 Los Angeles +120
American League
at Kansas City -150 Cleveland +140
atMinnesota -115 NewYork +105
Tampa Bay -150 at Houston +140
Baltimore -115 at Chicago +105
Detroit -135 atToronto +125
atTexas -140 Seattle +130
Interleague
at Boston -140 San Diego +130
atOakland -155 Chicago(NL) +145
St. Louis -130 at LA(AL) +120

Pro Baseball
TUESDAY'S LATE MLB LINESCORES
ATHLETICS 8, CUBS 7
Chicago 000 502 000-7131
Oakland 210 200 03x 8100
Rusin, Villanueva (4), B.Parker (7), Russell
(8) and Castillo; Griffin, Blevins (6), Otero
(8), Balfour (9) and D.Norris. W-Otero 1-0.
L-Russell 1-2. Sv-Balfour (20). HRs-Chi-
cago, A.Soriano (10). Oakland, Donaldson
(14), C.Young (8), D.Norris (4).

ANGELS 5, CARDINALS 1
St. Louis 000 100 000 1 91
LosAngeles 050 000 00x 5 91
Lynn, Blazek (7), Mujica (8) and YMolina;
Weaver, Jepsen (8), S.Downs (8), D.De La
Rosa (9) and lannetta.W-Weaver 2-4. L-
Lynn 10-3.

INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Pawtucket (Red Sox) 52 33 .612 -
LehighValley(Phillies) 45 40 .529 7
Buffalo (BlueJays) 43 42 .506 9
Rochester (Twins) 43 45 .489 10/2
Scranton/WB (Yankees) 40 46 .465 121/2
Syracuse (Nationals) 34 50 .405 17/2
South Division
W L Pet. GB
Durham(Rays) 53 33 .616 -
Norfolk(Orioles) 45 40 .529 7/2
Charlotte (White Sox) 38 48 .442 15
Gwinnett (Braves) 37 49 .430 16
West Division
W L Pet. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates) 56 32 .636 -
Louisville (Reds) 43 44 .494 12/2
Columbus (Indians) 39 48 .448 16/2
Toledo (Tigers) 35 53 .398 21

Wednesday's results
Rochester 11, Buffalo 1
Pawtucket 11, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 5
Louisville 4, Indianapolis 3
Columbus 3,Toledo 2
Gwinnett at Norfolk, late
Syracuse at Lehigh Valley, late
Durham at Charlotte, late
Today's games
LehighValleyat Syracuse, 5 p.m., 1st game
Columbus at Toledo, 6 p.m.
Norfolkat Durham, 6:05 p.m.
Louisville at Indianapolis, 6:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Syracuse, 7:30 p.m., 2nd
game


GULF COAS fAGUE


Nationals
Cardinals
Marlins
Mets

Tigers
Astros
Yankees
Braves

Yankees
Pirates
Blue Jays
Phillies

Red Sox
Twins
Orioles
Rays


East Division
W LPct. GB
8 3.727 --
5 5.500 2'/
5 5.500 2/2
2 7.222 5
Northeast Division
W LPct. GB
4 2.667 -
5 3.625 -I
5 5.500 1
3 4.429 1/2
Northwest Division
W LPct. GB
5 2.714 --
5 6.455 2.
4 5.444 2
2 6.250 3/2
South Division
W LPct. GB
5 3.625 --
6 5.545 /2
5 5.500 1
3 6.333 21/2
Wednesday's results


Marlins 6, Mets 2,corp. of susp. game
Mets 5, Marlins 4,8 innings
Cardinals 18, Nationals3
Gulf Coast 4, Blue Jays 1
Tigers 5, Pirates 3
Twins 8, Rays 2,6 innings
Braves 11,Phillies4
Red Sox 3, Orioles 3, tie, 6 innings, susp., rain
Astros l,Yankees0,3 innings, susp., rain
Today's games
Phillies at Braves, 10 a.m.
Gulf Coast at Blue Jays, 10 a.m.
Red Sox at Orioles, 10 a.m.
Astros atYankees, 10 a.m.
Pirates atTigers, 10a.m.
Red Sox 3, Orioles 3, tie, 6 innings, com p. of
susp. game
Marlins at Mets, 11 a.m.
Astros 1, Yankees 0, 3 innings, comp. of
susp.game
Nationals at Cardinals, 12 p.m.
Rays at Twins, 12 p.m.

Soccer
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
vion0rAai .j ju -)A y


Mivontreal 9 4 3 3u 0u 24
NewYork 8 6 4 28 25 22
Philadelphia 7 5 5 26 27 26
Sporting KansasCity 7 5 5 26 23 17
Houston 6 6 5 23 19 18
New England 5 5 6 21 19 14
Columbus 5 7 5 20 21 21
Chicago 5 7 3 18 15 21
Toronto FC 2 8 7 13 17 24
D.C. 2 12 3 9 8 27
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 10 5 3 33 27 16
Portland 7 1 9 30 28 16
FC Dallas 8 3 6 30 27 22
Vancouver 7 5 4 25 26 24
LosAngeles 7 7 3 24 25 21
Colorado 6 7 5 23 21 22
Seattle 6 5 3 21 19 17
San Jose 5 7 6 21 18 27
ChivasUSA 3 10 3 12 15 31
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.

Wednesday's results
Toronto FC 3, Montreal 3, tie
San Jose at Chicago, late
Vancouver at Sporting Kansas City, late
D.C. United at Seattle FC, late
Philadelphia at Real Salt Lake, late
Today's games
Chivas USAat FC Dallas,9 p.m.
New York at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's games
San Jose at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 9 p.m.
Seattle FC at Vancouver, 11 p.m.
NATIONAL WOMEN'S SOCCER LEAGUE
W L T Pts GF GA
SkyBlueFC 8 3 3 27 24 15
Portland 8 3 2 26 18 11
FCKansasCity 7 4 3 24 21 14
Western NewYork 6 2 4 22 22 12
Boston 4 5 3 15 20 21
Chicago 3 6 3 12 13 20
Seattle 2 9 2 8 10 22
Washington 1 7 4 7 10 23
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.


8. Ramunas Navardauskas, Lithuania,
Garmin-Sharp, same time.
9. Cyril Lemoine, France, Sojasun, same
time.
10. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar,
sometime.
11. Samuel Dumoulin, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, same time.
12. John Degenkolb, Germany, Team
Argos-Shimano, same time.
13. MatteoTrentin, Italy, Omega Pharma-
QuickStep, same time.
14. Danny van Poppel, Netherlands,
Vacansoleil-DCM, same time.
15. Simon Gerrans, Australia, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
16. Egoitz Garcia, Spain, Cofidis, same
time.
17. Fabio Sabatini, Italy, Cannondale,
same time.
18. Gert Steegmans, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-QuickStep, same time.
19. Wouter Poels, Netherlands, Vacanso-
leil-DCM, same time.
20. Julien El Fares, France, Sojasun, same
time.
Also
37. Andrew Talansky, United States, Gar-
min-Sharp, same time.
85. Tejay Van Garderen, United States,
BMC Racing, same time.
142. Thomas Danielson, United States,
Garmin-Sharp, same time.
159. Brent Bookwalter, United States,
BMC Racing, 7:43 behind.
184.ChristianVandeVelde, United States,
Garmin-Sharp, 10:08.
Overall Standings
(After five stages)
1. Simon Gerrans, Australia, Orica
GreenEdge, 18 hours, 19 minutes, 15 sec-
onds.
2. Daryl Impey, South Africa, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
3. Michael Albasini, Switzerland, Orica
GreenEdge, same time.
4. Michal Kwiatkowski, Poland, Omega
Pharma-QuickStep, 1 second behind.
5. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Omega Phar-
ma-QuickStep, same time.
6. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky
Procycling, :03.
7. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling,
sometime.
8. Richie Porte, Australia, Sky Procycling,
sometime.
9. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, Team Saxo-
Tinkoff,:09.
10. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic,
Team Saxo-Tinkoff, same time.
11. Alberto Contador, Spain, Team Saxo-
Tinkoff, same time.
12. Michael Rogers, Australia,Team Saxo-
Tinkoff, same time.

Pro football
ARENA FOOTBALL
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Central Division
W L T Pet PF PA
Chicago 8 6 0 .571 776 750
San Antonio 8 6 0 .571 607 675
Iowa 6 9 0 .400 700 719
West Division
W L T Pet PF PA
x-Arizona 12 2 0 .857 914 660
Spokane 10 4 0 .714 935 734
SanJose 10 4 0 .714 785 717
Utah 5 9 0 .357 705 769
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
South Division
W L T Pet PF PA
x-Jacksonville 10 5 0 .667 791 728
Tampa Bay 7 7 0 .500 787 749
Orlando 5 9 0 .357 721 800
NewOrleans 4 10 0 .286 637 812
Eastern Division
W L T Pet PF PA
y-Philadelphia 9 5 0 .643 832 689
Pittsburgh 3 11 0 .214 557 767
Cleveland 2 12 0 .143 633 811
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division

Saturday's games
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Arizona at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Spokane atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m.
San Antonio at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

CFL
EAST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA


Montreal 1 0 0
Wednesday's results Toronto 1 0 0
Washington 1, FC Kansas City 1,tie Hamilton 0 1 0
Boston at Seattle FC, late Winnipeg 0 1 0
Today's games WEST DIVISION
Western NewYorkatChicago,2 p.m. W L T Pts
Saturday's games Calgary 1 0 0
WashingtonatSkyBlueFC,7p.m. Saskatchewan 1 0 0
Boston at Portland, 10:30 p.m. BC 0 1 0
Edmonton 0 1 0
Cycling Today'sgames
TOUR DE FRANCE Winnipeg at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Wednesday Toronto at B.C., 10 p.m.
At Marseille, France Friday's games
Fifth Stage Calgary at Saskatchewan, 9 p.m.
A 142-mile rolling ride from Cagnes-sur- Sunday'sgame
Mer to Marseille, with four minor climbs Edmonton at Hamilton,5 p.m.
en route
1. Mark Cavendish, England, Omega
Pharma-QuickStep,5 hours,31 minutes,51 Transactions
seconds.
2. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky BASEBALL
Procycling, same time. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL-
3. Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Cannondale, ed Detroit RHP Rick Porcello six
sometime. hitting Tampa Bay's Ben Zobr
4. Andre Greipel, Germany, Lotto-Belisol, pitch.
same time. American League
5. Robert Ferrari, Italy, Lampre-Merida, BALTIMORE ORIOLES Op
sometime. DannyValencia to Norfolk(IL).
6. Alexander Kristoff, Norway, Katusha, CHICAGO WHITE SOX --
sametime. Paul Konerko and RHP Jesse Cr
7. Juan Jose Lobato, Spain, Euskaltel- 15-day DL, Crain retroactive t
Euskadi, same time. Selected the contract of LHP Da


-Suspend-
games for
ist with a

)tioned 3B

Placed 1B
ain on the
o Sunday.
vid Purcey


from Charlotte (IL). Recalled INF Brent Morel
from Charlotte.
DETROIT TIGERS Sent OF Matt Tuia-
sosopo to Toledo (IL) for a rehab assign-
ment. Agreed to terms with SS Hector Mar-
tinez on a one-year contract.
HOUSTON ASTROS Agreed to terms
with 1B Chase McDonald on a minor
league contract.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS Placed OF
Peter Bourjos on the 15-day DL, retroactive
to Sunday. Recalled OF Colin Cowgill from
Salt Lake (PCL).
MINNESOTATWINS Agreed to terms
with OF Jermaine Mitchell on a minor
league contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES Sent INF Edu-
ardo Nunez to Charleston (SAL) for a rehab
assignment. Agreed to terms with INF Luis
Cruz on a one-year contract. Placed INF
Jayson Nix on the 15-day DL, retroactive to
Tuesday.
TEXAS RANGERS Agreed to terms
with DH Manny Ramirez on a minor league
contract and assigned him to Round Rock
(PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Designated
RHP Chien-Ming Wang for assignment. Re-
called RHPTodd Redmond from Buffalo (IL).
Signed OF Chaz Frank.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Placed
2BWillie Bloomquist on the 15-day DL, ret-
roactive to Friday. Recalled OF Tony Cam-
pana from Reno (PCL).
CHICAGO CUBS-Added RHP Matt
Guerrier and RHP Pedro Strop to the 25-
man roster. Designated RHP Shawn Camp
for assignment. Optioned LHP Chris Rusin
to Iowa (PCL).
NEW YORK METS Sent RHP Scott
Atchison to the GCL Mets for a rehab as-
signment.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Agreed to
terms with RHP Tyler Viza on a rehab as-
signment.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Optioned
RHP Brandon Cumpton to Indianapolis (IL).
Reinstated OF JoseTabata from the 15-day
DL. Agreed to terms with SS Adam Frazier
and C Andrew Dennis on minor league
contracts.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS As-
signed RHP Cole Kimball outright to Syra-
cuse (IL).
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS Signed RHP Jake
Meiers.
GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS Sold
the contract of LHP Clay Zavada to the San
Diego Padres.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS Signed RHP
RyanWilkinsand lNFGibbyBriones.
Atlantic League
SUGAR LAND SKEETERS Named
ChrisJones general manager.
Can-Am League
NEWARK BEARS- Released RHP James
Schult.
Frontier League
ROCKFORD AVIATORS Signed SS
Brian Bistagne.
FOOTBALL
Canadian Football League
CFL Fined Saskatchewan DB Dwight
Anderson an undisclosed amount.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS-Agreed to
terms with D Nick Leddy on a two-year
contract.
DALLAS STARS- Signed D Jordie Benn
to a three-year contract.
MINNESOTA WILD Waived D Tom
Gilbert.
NEW YORK ISLANDERS Bought out
the contract of G Rick DiPietro.
OTTAWA SENATORS Re-signed G
Nathan Lawson to a one-year, two-way
contract.
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Re-signed G
Cedrick Desjardins and D Matt Taormina to
one-year, two-way contracts.
American Hockey League
SPRINGFIELD FALCONS Named Josh
Tannenbaum manager of media and com-
munity relations, Luke Pawlak coordinator
of creative services and game presentation
and Jamie Gruschow account executive.
ECHL
IDAHO STEELHEADS Agreed with F
Grant Blakey and D James Isaacs.
LACROSSE
National Lacrosse League
BUFFALO BANDITS Named Troy
Cordingley coach.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS Suspended San Jose M Shea Sa-
linas, Montreal coach Marco Schallibaum
one game and fined them undisclosed
amounts. Fined D.C. United coach Ben 01-
sen $2,000 and Toronto coach Ryan Nelson
an undisclosed amount.
NEW YORK RED BULLS Mutually
agreed to cancel the contract of M Juninho.
COLLEGE
NORTHEAST CONFERENCE Added
Saint Joseph's as an associate member in
men's lacrosse.
EMORY & HENRY Named Robert
Richardson men's soccer coach.
FLAGLER Promoted Ryan Erlacher to
associate athletic director.
GOUCHER Named Ceri Miller wom-
en's lacrosse coach.
MINNESOTASTATE-Named Jason Eck
offensive line coach.
ORAL ROBERTS Promoted Kyron
Stokes to women's assistant basketball
coach. Named Janae Voelker director of
women's basketball operations and Jaci
Bigham women's graduate assistant bas-
ketball coach.
QUEENS (N.C.) Named Bart Lundy
men's basketball coach.
RADFORD Named Mackenzie Wart-
enberger cross country and assistant track
and field coach.
WINTHROP Named Michael King
women'sassistant volleyball coach.


I QUICK HITS


CHECHEN REBEL shootout at the Under-20 World Cup
to join Ghana, Chile and Iraq in the
CALLS FOR ATTACKS quarterfinals.
A.I Cafl III AR rPf


S EM AG IH C0 5N 0


MOSCOW (AP)-A
leading Chechen rebel
on Wednesday called
on Islamist militants in
Russia's North Caucasus
to disrupt the upcoming
Olympics in the Black Sea
resort of Sochi, reversing
his previous appeal not
to target civilians in the
region.
Sochi is hosting
the Winter Games in
February, a pet project for
President Vladimir Putin,
who is determined for
them to be a success. The
overall bill for the games
stands at $51 billion,
making them by far the
most expensive Olympics
in history.
Doku Umarov, a widely
known Chechen rebel
leader, urged his fighters
to "do their utmost to
derail" the games, which
he described as "satanic
dances on the bones of
our ancestors."
"We have the obliga-
tion to use all means to
prevent this," he said in
a video posted on a rebel
website on Wednesday.
Umarov last year urged
his fighters to avoid
hitting civilian targets
because Russians in
Moscow were taking to
the streets en masse to
protest against Putin.
Security experts have
said the Islamic insurgen-
cy raging across the North
Caucasus mountains
that tower over Sochi is
a daunting threat to the
games although rebels
have not attacked Sochi
so far. ...
With Spain's crown prince stealing
the show, Madrid made the strongest
impression among the three cities
bidding for the 2020 Olympics.
Madrid, Istanbul and Tokyo made their
pitches to IOC members, hoping to
seize the momentum in the final two
months before the vote.


Having played out a 1-1 draw after
extra time, Colombia was trailing 8-7
in the shootout when defender Daivy
Balanta sent the last penalty over the
crossbar.
South Korea will now play Iraq,
which needed extra time to beat
Paraguay 1-0.
Ghana and Chile will meet in the
quarterfinals after both teams won
their last-16 matches over 90 minutes
earlier in the day. Ghana came from a
goal down to beat Portugal 3-2 while
two late goals earned the Chileans a
2-0 victory over Croatia.
Balanta's spot-kick wasn't the only
one that failed to find the net. Earlier
in the series, Song Ju-hun missed for
South Korea while Felipe Aguilar saw
his attempt saved by goalkeeper Lee
Chang-geun.
Song had given South Korea the
lead in the 16th minute when he beat
goalkeeper Cristian Bonilla with a low
shot after the Colombia defense failed
to clear from the area...
Liverpool has sold England
midfielder Jonjo Shelvey to fellow
Premier League side Swansea for 5
million pounds ($7.6 million). The
21-year-old Shelvey spent three years
at Anfield following his move from
Charlton but was never a first-team
regular.


FOOTBALL

DA says arrest warrant
for 49er Brooks filed in
error: The Santa Clara District
Attorney's Office said it erroneously
filed an arrest warrant for 49ers
linebacker Ahmad Brooks after
allegations that he hit a teammate on
the head with a beer bottle.
Assistant District Attorney Karyn
Sinunu-Towery said Wednesday that
the office is still investigating and will
decide next week whether or not to
bring charges.
She said there is no outstanding
arrest warrant.
Prosecutors filed the warrant
in error on Thursday. According to
police, Brooks hit teammate Lamar
Divens with the bottle three times
and punched him in the face on June
8 ....


New Orleans Saints coach Sean


Payton is moonlighting this week as
SAILI N G Ryan Palmer's caddie at the Greenbrier
Classic in White Sulfur Springs, W. Va.
America's Cup champ With the start of NFL training camp
Coutts defends rules later this month, Payton said he was
changes: Not long after helping planning to spend a week relaxing at
to sail one of the new America's Cup The Greenbrier resort in West Virginia.
catamarans around San Francisco Bay One thing led to another, and Payton


for a few hours, four-time winner
Russell Coutts scoffed at accusations
by two foreign challengers that
defending champion Oracle Team USA
is benefiting from safety changes.
Coutts also defended regatta
director lain Murray, who said he was
frustrated that Emirates Team New
Zealand and Italy's Luna Rossa have
protested his ability to recommend
safety changes following the death of
Andrew "Bart" Simpson in the capsize
of Artemis Racing's 72-foot catamaran
on May 9.
The Kiwis and Italians are unhappy
with Murray's requirement that the
high-performance boats have deeper
rudders with larger winglets to give
them additional stability.
Team New Zealand's protest is set
to be heard Monday.


SOCCER

South Korea beats
Colombia on penalties
at U20 Cup: In Istanbul, South
Korea beat Colombia in a penalty


ended up agreeing to help Palmer,
who gave his regular PGA Tour caddie
the week off. ..
Former Nebraska defensive
lineman Cameron Meredith has been
ticketed on suspicion of misdemeanor
assault for allegedly breaking a man's
jaw and eye socket during a fight
last month. The Lincoln Journal Star
reported that witnesses told police
Meredith and his friends got into a
confrontation with another group of
people in downtown Lincoln, Neb.,
about 2 a.m. June 16 ..
West Virginia and Virginia Tech
renewed their football rivalry for two
games. WVU athletics director Oliver
Luck announced that the schools will
play a two-game series in 2021 and
2022. The first game will be played
in Morgantown on Sept. 18, 2021.
The second game will be played
Sept. 24, 2022, in Blacksburg, Va. The
Mountaineers and the Hokies have
faced each other 51 times since the
series began in 1912. The last time
was in 2005 in Morgantown.


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5


2
2
0
0

s
2
2
0
0






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


MURRAY
FROM PAGE 1
his left knee and crumpled
to the ground on the fifth
point, but shook off the
injury for a 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (5)
victory over No. 4 David
Ferrer.
"To be honest, I didn't
want to retire (being) in
the quarters for first time
at Wimbledon," del Potro
said. "And that's the rea-
son for continuing play.
The doctors gave me good
anti-inflammatories."
Del Potro's next match is
Friday against No. 1 Novak
Djokovic, who took down
No. 7 Tomas Berdych 7-6
(5), 6-4, 6-3 on Court 1.
Murray will play No. 24
Jerzy Janowicz, a 7-5, 6-4,
6-4 winner over Lukasz
Kubot in the first Grand
Slam meeting between
two Polish men.
Going against the
54th-ranked Verdasco,
Murray certainly made
things interesting for the
British fans, looking for
one of their own to call a
Wimbledon champion for
the first time in 77 years.
He dropped the first two
sets, unable to handle
Verdasco's pinpoint serves
that reached as high as
136 mph.
Slowly, though, he crept
back into the match. In
the sixth game of the
fourth set, Murray saved
a pair of break points -
first with a service winner,
then with one of his 13
aces. Three games later,
he broke Verdasco, then
served out the set. In
the fifth set, the players
held serve for 10 straight
games. In the 11th,
Murray broke, then served
out the match at love.
"I played at a very high


level," saidVerdasco,
appearing in a Grand
Slam quarterfinal for the
first time since the 2010
U.S. Open. "'And to not be
able to win is painful, of
course."
It was Murray's second
comeback from two sets
down at Wimbledon, add-
ing to a 2008 victory over
Richard Gasquet.
"Yeah, you're obviously
concerned," Murray said.
"You're more concerned
about losing the match,
not thinking so much
that, I'm going to lose
at Wimbledon. You're
concerned how the match
is going and that you may
lose. But when you've
been in that position a lot
of times, you know how
to think through it and
not get too far ahead of
yourself."
In the earlier match,
it looked as if del Potro
would be done before he
even broke a sweat.
His left knee mummi-
fied in athletic tape, the
6-foot-6 Argentine chased
an overhead into the
corner, but his left foot
slipped out from under
him. His already aching
knee straightened sud-
denly, then bent back-
ward. Del Potro crumpled
to the ground and rolled
twice into the far edge
of the court.
"I don't try (for) a
spectacular fall, but that
was really painful for me,"
del Potro said.
After a break of about
10 minutes, del Potro was
back on the court. He
broke Ferrer twice in the
first set, then moved easily
through the second and
third against one of the
grittiest players in tennis.


AP PHOTO
Jerzy Janowicz of Poland returns to compatriot Lukasz Kubot
during their quarterfinal Wednesday at Wimbledon in London.


I SCOREBOARD

Wimbledon
At The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club, London
Purse: $34.9 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Quarterfinals
Juan Martin del Potro (8), Argentina, def.
David Ferrer (4), Spain, 6-2,6-4,7-6 (5).
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Tomas
Berdych (7),Czech Republic, 7-6 (5),6-4,6-3.
Jerzy Janowicz (24), Poland, def. Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, 7-5,6-4,6-4.
Andy Murray (2), Britain, def. Fernando
Verdasco, Spain, 4-6,3-6,6-1,6-4,7-5.
Doubles
Men
Quarterfinals


STEVENS
FROM PAGE 1
is younger than Garnett
and wasn't yet born when
Bill Russell won his 11th
NBA championship in
1969 (or even when John
Havlicek added two more
in the 1970s).
It's the first time the
Celtics have hired a
college coach since Rick
Pitino in 1997 and their
first coach with no NBA
experience of any kind
since Alvin "Doggie"


Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and Marcelo Melo
(12), Brazil, def. James Blake, United States,
and Jurgen Melzer, Austria, 7-5,6-0,6-7 (0),
6-4.
Women
Quarterfinals
Hsieh Su-wei,Taiwan, and Peng Shuai (8),
China, def. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, and Mir-
jana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia, 6-4,7-5.
Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, and
Kveta Peschke (7), Czech Republic, def. Na-
dia Petrova, Russia, and Katarina Srebotnik
(3), Slovenia, 7-6 (2), 6-3.
Ashleigh Barty and Casey Dellacqua (12),
Australia, def. Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie
Hradecka (2), Czech Republic, 2-6,6-2,6-4.
Shuko Aoyama, Japan, and Chanelle
Scheepers, South Africa, def. Julia Goerges,
Germany, and Barbora Zahlavova Strycova
(16), Czech Republic, 7-6 (6), 5-7,6-4.

Julian, who was hired in
1948 and gave way to Red
Auerbach two years later.
"Though he is young, I
see Brad as a great leader
who leads with impec-
cable character and a
strong work ethic" Celtics
general manager Danny
Ainge said in a release.
"His teams always play
hard and execute on both
ends of the court. Brad is
a coach who has already
enjoyed lots of success,
and I look forward to
working with him towards
Banner 18."


* NBA NOTEBOOK


AP FILE PHOTO
Spurs forward Manu Ginobili shoots as Heat guard Dwyane Wade looks on during Game 5 of the
NBA Finals in San Antonio. Ginobili tweeted Wednesday that he is staying with the Spurs.



Ginobili stays a Spur


Bulls' Rose defends decision to sit out


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN ANTONIO -
Manu Ginobili is sticking
around to see if the San
Antonio Spurs can get
back to the top.
Ginobili tweeted
Wednesday that he is
staying with the team he
has helped win three NBA
titles and nearly a fourth
last month.
"Thrilled to announce
that as I always hoped,
I'm gonna stay with the
(at)Spurs for two more
years," he wrote.
Ginobili, who turns
36 this month, battled
injuries during the season
and said he would think
about retirement after the
playoffs. But he helped


the Spurs come within 28
seconds of the champi-
onship before falling to
the Miami Heat in seven
games, and his return
ensures the longtime Big
Three that includes Tim
Duncan and Tony Parker
will be in place next
season.
Details of the contract
agreement weren't avail-
able, but Ginobili figures
to take a pay cut from the
$14.1 million he made
last season as the Spurs'
highest-paid player.
Duncan did the same
thing last summer, going
from $21.2 million to $9.6
million.
Teams can reach agree-
ments with free agents,
but contracts can't be


signed before July 10.

Rose says sitting out
was right decision: Chicago
Bulls star Derrick Rose said he's still
recovering from knee surgery and
vows to show sitting out last season
was the right decision.
In an interview posted Wednesday
on the team's website, Rose said he
had to be selfish in his rehab as he
tried to work his way back from a torn
anterior cruciate ligament in his left
knee even though sitting out was "one
of the hardest things I've had to go
through in my life."
"I'm not a selfish guy at all, but
having this injury and going through
what I had to go through and being
smart, it's something that I had to be
selfish with," he said, adding that he
thinks fans who questioned him will
realize sitting out was the right call
once they see him playing again.


* NFL: Aaron Hernandez


Cops say evidence found in


Hernandez's secret dwelling


By JAY LINDSAY
ASSOCIATED PRESS
WRENTHAM, Mass.
- Aaron Hernandez's
home address was no
secret after the media
camped outside the
massive house for days,
and cameras caught him
leaving, hands cuffed
behind his back, when he
was arrested for murder.
But police didn't know
about his "flop house."
A tip from a friend
of the former New
England Patriots tight
end led authorities to
the apartment about 11
miles away. Subsequent
searches turned up
boxes of ammunition
and clothing that police

The Celtics gave
Stevens a six-year deal
worth about $22 million,
according to a basketball
official with knowledge of
the deal who spoke on the
condition of anonymity
because the terms were
not public. Ainge met
with Stevens at his home
in the Indianapolis area
along with Celtics owners
Wyc Grousbeck and Steve
Pagliuca and worked
out the deal Wednesday
morning.
"It's a wonderful op-
portunity with a historic


believe could help prove
the murder case against
Hernandez, according to
court documents.
The items were
found June 26, the day
Hernandez
was arrested
for allegedly
orches-
trating the
death of
Odin Lloyd,
according
HERNANDEZ to search
warrant
records filed in
Wrentham court.
Hernandez, 23, has
pleaded not guilty. His
attorneys have said the
evidence against him is
circumstantial and he's
eager to clear his name.

franchise," Butler President
James M. Danko said at an
on-campus news confer-
ence Wednesday night.
"We have done everything
we possibly can to keep
him. Brad is a very bright,
very articulate, and a won-
derful, wonderful person
who's handled this as well
as he's handled everything
else you've seen him do."
Since taking Butler of
the mid-major Horizon
League to the national
championship game in
2010 and again in''11,
Stevens had been courted


A message requesting
comment on the docu-
ments was left Wednesday
with a spokesman for
Hernandez's legal team.
Hernandez's two-
bedroom apartment,
which went for $1,200 a
month, was located in
a three-story complex
in Franklin, a few towns
over from his North
Attleborough house.
Police learned about it
from Hernandez's friend,
Carlos Ortiz. Prosecutors
say Ortiz was with
Hernandez and Ernest
Wallace when they drove
with Lloyd to an indus-
trial park where Lloyd
was shot. Police haven't
said who shot Lloyd.

by Illinois and UCLA,
among others.
"But there are some
brands in sports, and in
the world of basketball
the Celtics are one of
those," athletic director
Barry Collier said, adding
that Stevens' contract ran
through 2025. "That shows
you the faith we had in
Brad and the commitment
we made to him.... I didn't
treat it as inevitable (that
he would leave). I looked at
it like every year Brad was
our coach, it was another
good year for Butler."


* COLLEGE FOOTBALL


Meyer


denies


turning


inUF


assistant

ByJEFF GREER
PALM BEACH POST
Urban Meyer and his
former employer, the
University of Florida,
have shared a few less-
than-desirable headlines
this week.
The former Florida
football coach refused
to comment Monday
on his relationship
with former Gator and
alleged murderer Aaron
Hernandez, whose
possible involvement in a
2007 Gainesville shooting
reportedly has authorities
revisiting details of the
incident, which left two
men wounded.
Now Meyer, currently
the head coach at Ohio
State, is denying any role
in reporting a Florida
assistant coach to the
NCAA for secondary
recruiting violations in
the pursuit of a heralded
high school prospect.
A FoxSports.com report
Wednesday said Meyer
and Ohio State turned
in Gators running backs
coach Brian White, a
former Meyer assistant,
for allegedly contacting
coveted Brooklyn, N.Y.,
running back/receiver/
defensive back Curtis
Samuel during a manda-
tory non-contact period
on the NCAA's recruiting
calendar.
Such a move a coach
reporting a former assis-
tant is uncommon in
college sports, the report
said, though schools
regularly report other
schools for perceived
violations.
Meyer denied to
the Columbus (Ohio)
Dispatch that he had any
role in reporting Florida,
but he acknowledged to
the Gainesville Sun that
Ohio State's compliance
office filed a complaint -
its second against Florida
in two years to the
NCAA.
"It is absolutely not
true that I turned in the
University of Florida,"
Meyer said in a text
message to the Sun.
"Weeks after, I learned
our compliance guy
(without any coach
involvement) forwarded
an article to the confer-
ence office. This is
standard procedure.
Once again, zero coach
involvement."
As the NCAA investi-
gated the claim against
White, the Florida
assistant had to leave
the recruiting trail for
three days. He was
eventually cleared of any
wrongdoing, but a bigger
consequence might have
come from it.
Samuel, a U.S. Army
All-American who has
drawn comparisons
to former Gator Percy
Harvin, didn't list Florida
as a finalist for his future
services. He did list Ohio
State.
That the Buckeyes have
stayed in contention for
Samuel isn't a surprise -
his coach at Erasmus Hall


High School in Brooklyn
told the New York Daily
News that Meyer calls
each week but Samuel
at one point planned to
visit Gainesville. White,
who has coached at eight
schools during a 27-year
career, was Samuel's lead
recruiter.


:Page 6 SP


The Sun /Thursday, July 4, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net




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A weekly section of the Sun family of newspapers Serving readers along the Southwest Florida coast


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Will I I 111-' /111A
.. ,,,, -.- ,, ,,. *// -
Southwest Florida's
ONLY weekly guide to
outdoor recreation








23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-206-1010
WaterLineWeekly@gmail.com

EDITOR
LEE ANDERSON
941-206-1010
WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com

CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Allen
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Jeff Kincaid
Capt. Ed Kopp
Robert Lugiewicz
David H. Martin
Capt. Mike Myers
Terry Myers
Cam Parson
Betty Staugler
Todd Terrill
Tommy Von Voigt
Capt. Cayle Wills

MARKETING
Advertising Director
Leslee Peth
941-205-6400
LPeth@sun-herald.com
Advertising Manager
Mike Ruiz
941-205-6402
MRuiz@sun-herald.com
Display Advertising
Chris Beckett
941-205-6405
CBeckett@sun-herald.com
Boaters' Bargains
941-429-3110
Printed by
Sun Coast Media Group
Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.


Photo provided
Alexandria French caught her
first permit, an impressive
27-pounder, with Capt. Eric
Davis. The fish ate a live crab
7 miles off Captiva.


The dystopia of local


fisheries management


Last Wednesday, the University of
Florida hosted a workshop in Punta
Gorda to discuss the merits of locally
based fisheries management. I have
to admit, it sounds great. Imagine
if a local entity were empowered to
make decisions about our resources.
Instead of having to try to get the
attention of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission,
we could instead take our concerns
directly to someone in this area. And
we wouldn't be saddled with one-
size-fits-all solutions to our unique
fisheries management challenges.
OK let's do it!
Actually, hold on a minute. If


you think about it for more than
30 seconds, it quickly becomes
apparent that localized manage-
ment is not all unicorns and gummy
bears. If we're going to consider
moving forward with the concept
of local fisheries regulations, some
very important questions will need
to be answered in detail first. For
example: Where will we put the divi-
sions between areas do we chop
up the coast by estuary? By county?
By habitat type? How much power
will local boards have will they
be able to determine size limits? Bag
limits? Seasons? Gear restrictions?
Who will collect all the data required


to make responsible decisions? Who
will oversee the local boards to
ensure they're actually using that
data and not being overly generous
or too stingy? When neighboring
management boards disagree, who
will mediate disputes?
This stuff all needs to be figured
out before I can get too excited with
the idea. Otherwise, here's a peek
at the potential future of Southwest
Florida fishing ...
JULY 1, 2020 The season
for spawning-size snook closed
yesterday in the Charlotte Harbor
estuary system. However, the


'retired' snook season is now open
in the Peace and Myakka River
Special Snook Zones, allowing
anglers with valid tags to keep fsh
longer than 44 inches. These larger
snook are believed to no longer be
active spawners, so the Charlotte
Harbor Fisheries Management
Commission has OK d limited harvest.
Anglers chosen in the tag lottery
have already been noticed where
to pick up their tags. As a reminder,
snook must be tagged as soon as
they re brought into the boat, and
possession of tagged snook on


DYSTOPIA 15


IIi I I C

If you have a comment or question for did not predict the last decade and a half cor- just skip ovei it Climate changee has the potential
WaterLine publisher Josh Olive, email him rectly, it might help with balance. An article to massively im1pU IOUN711o10 retreAtion 1SO I feel
at Water LineWeekly@gmail.com. such as this one (http://onforb.es/oHkVUn) obligated I-: include it in the maga -ine evei y nowv
published alongside a pro-AGW article might and then It might he the biggest (alastiophe of all
JOSH: help informing the public that the global time, or it might he no big deal And itimightbe an-
Iused to look forward to WaterLine arriving warming scam is a political issue and the idea thropogenK 1:11 It might not he I don I knowv But I--
v ButtI...
a~ ~ ans vu
on Tursdvs. inc theSun tared teir hatthisis nre ciene isin tsel nroaaa- savou'eah-Autlv n itan threl vulcibeinevit
J(seet olm


new"liberal" propaganda section with
the AP wire stories dominating the news,
WaterLine with its fishing, hunting, boating
and shooting topics was some relief from the
lopsided news in the Englewood Sun. But
now WaterLine has their propaganda section
with the anthropogenic global warming
hoax leading the way. Much of the AGW and
environmental industry is dominated by
NGO's, government organizations and uni-
versities all pandering for research grants or
donations, and most are tax-exempt. If these
articles or any other liberal media stated
that the average worldwide temps have not
risen in almost two decades, they would be
informing us of fact, not opinion. If they
noted that the computer models that are
predicting catastrophes in the distant future


da, not science. But don't look for an honest
assessment from those who are profiting
in this hoax. WaterLine is now a political
propaganda tool and I've skipped reading it
for several weeks until today my mistake.
I suggest that you create another newspaper
for those who want to read about AGW and
rest of that agenda and offer it side by side
with WaterLine, instead of using the popular
WaterLine to misinform and ruin what was
once a sporting news magazine.
CM.Briskey
C.M.:
It's OK for you to not agree with everything we
publish. If you disagree with an article, you have
two really good options: Read it so you can better
understand those with whom you disagree, or


continuously dumping massive I1mountls oi carbon:
dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases into
the atmosphere is Irresponsible to those who come
after us. At the very least moving away rfrom coal
oil and natural gas means less environmental pollu-
tion, which is something every outdoorsman should
be able to get behind
JSI O/ln \ IlI'lit LtO Pj:lPl,5il
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and spelling All i-[[-ri iiiu r FI' i .li w- i h i lliii iii i iii-
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published It-\ I [[,r- i. F i ,lit l r l i r .i niil' ,n I .- nii-I
as a p u b l. I i ,.i i i iiiiiiijiii v i rii i iij ,- I lii 1iIlI
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individual iiiti I [ rl uil i l '..il iir r [ i-I i .i
take no r~ i- ihii .lii[y li r [li- -i. ,,I [ -- ii-iFi-r


A C


Editor's Viewpoint* LEE ANDERSON
Som etim es change is a good thing.......................... ............................... Page 5
Angling 101 ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
Peewee shrim p: Get used to 'em .......................... ................................ Page 8
Angling 201 CAPT.CAYLE WILLS
From our fam ily to yours, thank you .............................................................Page 9
Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS, DVM
Anim al rehab is a lot like w ork................... .......................... .............. Page 10
Fun with Paddling TODD TERRILL
The history of the kayak............................................. ........................... Page 11
At the Range BILLY CARL
Hom e on the ranges..... .................................. ................................ Page 12
Birding ABBIE BANKS
No such thing as a seagull........................................... .......................... Page 14
Knee-deep in bliss ........................................... ........................... Page 17
Tackle Tech JEFF KINCAID
Seats and butts .. .............................................. ........................ ... Page 18
A Life on the Water CAPT. VAN HUBBARD
Our fishing, our voice ......................................... .................................. Page 20
Florida in a sweet state of scallop mania .................................................. Page 21
Tournament Bassin' GREG BARTZ
Little angler, big fish .. .................................... ................................ Page 22
Local boating safety program s........................... ................................ Page 23
Spearfishing allowed off Collier County.................................................... Page 24


Around Charlotte Harbor
* CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
Blackwater
tarpon
Did you notice the change of
seasons which occurred this
week? You won't find it on your
calendar, but tarpon season
changed this week. When July
arrives, Boca Grande Pass tarpon
season unofficially ends.
Now, before anyone reads the
above statement and gets their
knickers in a knot because there
are still plenty of tarpon around,
let me explain. Tarpon fishing in
Boca Grande Pass dates back to
the late 1800s and was originally
a pastime that was enjoyed
primarily by wealthy sportsmen
fishing out of Useppa Island.


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FISH FINDER I Page 6
MAP OF LOCAL WATERS I Page 7

READER PHOTOS I Page 12

SOLUNAR TABLE I Page 23


BULLETIN BOARD I Page 3

TIDE CHARTS I Page 4

SEAFOOD RECIPES I Pages 4,16

FISH PROFILES I Page 4


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LEMONBAY FOOTBALL FISH HINGlOUNEY


The Lemon Bay High SchoolFol Football inshore/offshore fishing
tournament is set for July 6th out of Cape Haze Marina in
Englewood. Pre-registration entry is $350 per boat for up to
four anglers, with a $50 fee for additional anglers. Fees are
$400 per boat the day of tournament registration for up to
four anglers and $50 for additional anglers. Sponsorships
are available. Organized by the Lemon Bay Touchdown Club,
and all proceeds benefit the Manta Ray football program. For
more information, visit www.lbtdclub.com or call Tom Hinck
at 941-716-0442, Dave Nelson at 239-398-4263, Dan Reigle
at 941-716-2795 or Jim Connaghan at 941-209-9646.

SIERRA'S DEER PRAIRIE NORTH WALK
Easy 3 mile-plus walk down to the Myakka River and beyond
in Deer Prairie North in Venice (7001 Forbes Trail, Venice)
on July 6th. Wear sturdy shoes and bring insect repellent,
sunscreen and a light lunch if time allows. Call 941-484-4113
for more information.

A QUIET WALK AT ROTHENBACH PARK
Join Sarasota County volunteers and Florida Native Plant
Society members, Al Squires and Denny Girard, for a stroll
through hardwood hammocks of Rothenbach Park (8650
Bee Ridge Rd., Sarasota) on July 10th from 9 to 11 a.m. You
will enjoy the beauty of majestic oaks in the natural areas of
this multi-use park, and a chance at seeing the sometimes
present white-tailed deer, while learning about the hardwood
hammock habitat and its inhabitants. Register on-line at
www.scgov.net or call 941-861-5000.

ENGLEWOOD FISHING CLUB MEETING
The Englewood Fishing Club will hold its monthly meeting
6:30 p.m. June 11th at the Lemon Bay Park Environmental
Center (570 Bay Park Blvd., Englewood). Featured will be a
presentation by Ernie Fred with Ingman Marine speaking
on" Boat maintenance keep it running and up to date".
Admission is free and open to the public. Further info can be
found on the club's web site: www.EnglewoodFishingClub.net

ORVIS FLY FISHING CLINIC
Class concentrates on two skills that intimidate most new-
comers to the sport: Knots and Casting. The 101 course will
consist of two parts- one hour of casting instruction and one
hour of rigging. Clinic is held on July 13th from 9 to 11 a.m. at
CB's Saltwater Outfitters (1249 Stickney Point Rd. Siesta Key).
Once instruction is completed, each person will receive $25
coupon off any purchase of $50 or more good toward Orvis
Gear and a Free Trout Unlimited and Federation of Fly Fishers
Membership. Call 941-349-4400 for more information.

BEGINNERS FISHING CAMP FOR TYKES
Children ages 5-9 will learn the basics of fishing and have a
chance to fish each day from the pier in this hands-on camp
at the Cape Coral Yacht Club (5819 Driftwood Parkway, Cape
Coral) held July 15th through July 19th from 8 a.m. to noon
each day. They will learn about rods and reels, how to bait
their own hook, casting, and fishing rules and regulations.
The last hourthey will cool down in the pool. Snacks will be
provided. Cost is $70 for cape residents, $105 non-residents.
For more information, call 239-574-0806.

FROG WALK AT SLEEPING
TURTLES PRESERVE NORTH
You are not going to believe how many different frog species
we have that call Sarasota County home. On July 18, from 7
to 8:30 p.m., Sarasota County Environmental Specialist and
Herpetologists will teach you how to recognize their calls
and identify their habitat, at Sleeping Turtles Preserve North
(3462 Border Rd., Venice). As the evening air cools, male
frogs see this as the time to breed. For more information, call
941-861-5000.

INGMAN MARINE'S 5TH ANNUAL
HOOKED ON HABITAT REDFISH TOURNEY
July 20th at Laishley Park Pier. Tournament starts at 6:30
a.m. Scales open at 1:30-3:30 p.m. at Laishley Park Pavilion.
Awards ceremony at 3:30 p.m. $300 per boat (maximum 3
anglers). Late fee of $50 after July 12th. $2,500 first-place
prize. For more information, call 941-639-3162.

FISHERMEN'S VILLAGE 2013
PIRATE FESTIVAL BALL
The Fishermen's Village 2013 Pirate's Ball will be held Friday,
July 26th from 8 to 11 p.m. at the Punta Gorda Isles Civic
Association (2001 Shreve Street, Punta Gorda). The Pirate's
Ball is the kick off event of the 5th Annual Fishermen's Village
Pirate Festival which last year attracted nearly 10,000 patrons
over a three day period. Part of the proceeds from the Pirate's
Ball will benefit "Do the Right Thing", a program sponsored
by the Punta Gorda Police Department. This year's Pirate's Ball
will feature live music by The Brigands, The Bawdy Boys &
The Bone Island Buccaneers. The event will include a costume
contest, a well-stocked Cash Bar and some tasty selections of
finger foods and hors d'oeuvres catered by The Captain's Table.
Tickets for this 18+ Pirate's Ball are $20 ($25 at the door).
Tickets may be purchased on line at www.fishermensvillage-
piratefest.com or by calling 941 575-3067.

FLORIDA YARDS &
NEIGHBORHOODS PROGRAM
Perfect for anyone interested in having a yard that is
environmentally friendly. Learn how proper planting and
mulching can help you save water, time and money on July
26th from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Rotary Park Environmental Center
(5505 Rose Garden Road, Cape Coral). Plus, everyone receives
a free plant or two. Call Rotary Park at 239-549-4606 or visit
www.capeparks.com. Cost is free.

HUGE NATIVE PLANT SALE IN CAPE CORAL
A wide variety of trees, shrubs, plants, grasses, and
groundcovers will be available on July 27th from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. at the Rotary Park Environmental Center (5505 Rose
Garden Road, Cape Coral). Also, there will be information on


ONGOING EVENTS
FREE PADDLE DEMONSTRATIONS: Grande Tours
(12575 Placida Road, Placida) is holding free kayak and
stand-up paddleboard demos from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. every Saturday. Call 941-697-8825 for more
information.
FREE SAFETY CHECKS: The Coast Guard Auxiliary
conducts free vessel safety checks every Saturday
morning from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m. at the Venice boat
ramp (200 N. Seaboard Ave., Venice). They'll make
sure the safety equipment mandated by federal and
state regulations is on board. If an inspected vessel is
found to be safe, a "Seal of Safety"is affixed to it. For
more info or to schedule an appointment, call Patrick
Wheeler at 941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER:
Year-round ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek
on are offered each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State
Park (1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register at 8:30
a.m., tour at 9 a.m. Cost is park fee plus canoe or
kayak rental fee. Bird walks are also offered every
Thursday at 7:30 a.m., and guided scrub jay walks
every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. For more info on any of
these programs, call 941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH: Listed
as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail. Meet
your volunteer guides (weather permitting) at 8:30
a.m. Monday through Friday at the kiosk at Tigertail
Beach. Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail) to 951 South
to Marco Island. Turn right on Kendall Court, the
fifth light after crossing the bridge to Marco Island.
Turn left at four-way stop sign at Hernando Court
to Tigertail Beach. Free parking with beach sticker,
otherwise subject to county parking fee. Water shoes
and binoculars are also suggested. The following walks
in the Naples area are offered at no cost through the
Conservancy of Southwest Florida (1450 Merrihue Dr.,
Naples). For more info, call 239-262-0304 or go to
www.conservancy.org.
BOATERS GATHERING AT NAV-A-GATOR: A boaters'
get-together is held from 1 to 2 p.m. the second
Sunday of each month at the waterfront chickee hut at
Nav-A-Gator Grill/DeSoto Marina (9700 S.W. Riverview
Circle, Lake Suzy). This informal gathering is open to
the public to discuss boats, fishing, the Peace River and
other topics. For more information, call the Nav-A-
Gator at 941-627-3474.


LOVERS KEY STATE PARK
All programs will take place at Lovers Key State Park
(8700 Estero Blvd, Fort Myers Beach). Registration/
reservations are required. Call 239-463-4588. The
park offers many recreational opportunities to visi-
tors with disabilities. Ticket Pricing: $8 for vehicles
with two to eight individuals.
FISHING CLINIC: Learn about area fishing on July
9th from 10 to 11 a.m. and get an understanding
of a variety of tackle and fresh bait rigs, find out
the best places to drop a line, and learn about the
rules and regulations that pertain to game fishing
in Southwest Florida. Reservations required, call
239-463-4588.
WADING TRIP: Learn about the marine species that
make the estuary and barrier island environments
unique, and explore sea grass flats. Seahorses, shrimp,
young fish, and egg casings of all sorts inhabit the
grasses, which attract larger fish, mollusks and
crustaceans, and manatees, dolphins and rays. Guests
will get wet as they venture into the estuary. The
Estuary Wading Trip is sponsored by the Charlotte
Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP).


butterfly gardening, backyard wildlife habitats, and Florida
friendly landscaping practices. Several vendors and native
plants experts will be on hand to help you choose the right
plant for the right place.

DRAGONFLIES AT ENGLEWOOD
SPORTS COMPLEX
Would you believe there are over 50 species of dragonflies
and damselflies that call Sarasota County home? On July
27th, from 10 a.m. to noon, join Sarasota County volunteers
and amateur odonatists (1300 S. River Rd., Englewood)
at Englewood Sports Complex to learn more about these
fascinating creatures and enjoy their vibrant colors and
amazing flight skills. Register on-line at www.scgov.net. Click
Calendar of Events on the left and search 'Nature Walks" or call
941-861-5000 for more information.

BEGINNERS GUIDE TO KAYAKING
Learn basic paddle strokes from an experienced guide at Four
Mile Cove Ecological Preserve Cape Coral (Four Mile Cove
Ecological Preserve, SE 23rd Terrace, Cape Coral). Taught by
GAEA Guides. Fee: $40 residents. $60 non-residents (includes
kayak, equipment). Call for 239-549-4606 more information.

MATLACHA PASS PADDLE
Birds, fish, mangroves and sunshine. Bring your own kayak,
but go with a guide and learn about the nature of the
preserve at Four Mile Cove Ecological Preserve (Southeast
23rd Terrace, Cape Coral) on Aug. 9th at 9 a.m. Meeting
location given upon registration. Fee is $10 for residents and
$15 for non-residents. Register in advance at www.CapeParks.
com or call 239-549-4606.


WHAT'S THAT BIRD?: Volunteer bird interpreters
share their expertise on ID and behavior of raptors,
shorebirds, waterfowl and other avian visitors at
Myakka River State Park (13208 State Road 72,
Sarasota). Volunteers set up scopes and help
people identify birds from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every day
of the week.
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB: We are a scuba dive club
that meets on the 3rd Tuesday of each month. Club
is based out of Punta Gorda. Call 941-740-4245 or
contact www.BottomTimeDiveClub.net.
LEARN TO TIE FLIES: Capt. Harry Hall will offer a free
saltwater fly tying seminar every Wednesday from 4:30
to 6 p.m. at West Wall Boats (787 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte). The public is invited to attend. Call 941-875-
9630 for more info.
BIRD WALK AT LAKES PARK: A bird patrol guide will
lead an easy walk along clear paths of Lakes Regional
Park (7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers) at 8:30 a.m.
on the first Saturday of each month. This free walk
offers an opportunity to see birds in natural vegetation
as your guide points out the many species in what is
a birding hot spot and crucial nesting area for many
birds. Arrive at 8 a.m. at Shelter A7 for a brief intro and
sign in. Wear comfortable shoes and dress for outdoors.
Bring water, hat, sunscreen, binoculars and camera.
Call 239-533-7580 for more info.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASS'N: Members
of this club for multihull owners, sailors or those who
are interested in it exchange ideas about equipping
and sailing boats, share information about anchorages
and cruising destinations, hold informal races that help
to improve their sailing ability, and have local raft-ups.
No dues. The club meets at Harpoon Harry's on the first
Monday of each month at 6 p.m. For more info, visit
http://yhoo.it/XV96fO or call 941-876-6667.
LIVING WATERS: Aquatic Preserves of Florida
A collection of 29 black-and-white photographs by
preeminent Florida photographer Clyde Butcher,
will be on exhibit through Nov. 14th at the Rookery
Bay Environmental Learning Center art gallery (300
Tower Road in Naples). Since 2004 the artistic and
educational exhibition has traveled the state to
increase awareness of and appreciation for Florida's
41 aquatic preserves. The 110,000-acre Rookery Bay
National Estuarine Research Reserve encompasses two
of those aquatic preserves and part of more than five
million acres of diverse water landscape and coastal


areas that are critical to Florida's future. In conjunction
with the exhibit, Rookery Bay will show the companion
one-hour nature film documentary, -Living Waters:
Aquatic Preserves of Florida."Call 239-417-6310 or
visit rookerybay.org for more information. Cost is $3
children ages 6 -12, $5 adults, members free.
VOLUNTEER AT SHAMROCK PARK: Shamrock Park
Nature Center (3900 Shamrock Drive, Venice) holds
its monthly volunteer work mornings from 8 to 10
a.m. on the third Friday of each month. As abilities
and interests allow, volunteer tasks may include trash
collection along trails and within vegetated areas of
the park, light trimming along paved multi-use trail,
organization of storage areas, exotic plant removal
and other maintenance tasks. Long pants, closed-toe
shoes, sun protection, and plenty of drinking water are
recommended. Park staff will provide trash collection
buckets/bags, pickers, gloves, and other tools as
necessary. Meet at the Shamrock Park Environmental
Center. For more information, call Jennifer Rogers at
941-861-5000 or email her atjrogers@scgov.net.
HANG OUT WITH SCRUB JAYS: Spend the morning
with the scrub jays at Oscar Scherer State Park (1843
S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey) from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.
every Sunday. This unique Central Florida experience
includes a nature walk to see the park's diverse
ecosystems, native flora and fauna. Call 941-483-5956
for more info.
SIX MILE CYPRESS SLOUGH PRESERVE: Take a
leisurely stroll on our fully accessible boardwalk trail
anytime dawn to dusk (7791 Penzance Blvd., Fort
Myers). Visit our Interpretive Center to learn more
about the plants and animals that live in the Slough
or just talk to a friendly volunteer. The center is open
Tuesday through Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Parking is $1 per hour per vehicle. Reservations not
required. No groups of eight or more. Call 239-533-
7550 or visit LeeParks.org/sixmile.
KORESHAN STATE HISTORIC SITE STROLL: Walk
or bike the historic site (3800 Corkscrew Road, Estero).
Park fee is $2 for walk or bike; $4 for single occupant
vehicle; $5 for two to eight occupants vehicle and $2
each additional person over eight per vehicle. Call
239-992-0311 for more information.
SUNSET YOGA: Come preform yoga outdoors at
Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park (11135 Gulfshore Drive,
Naples). From 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on May 23 and 30.
Admission to park is $5.


ya


4, po, rs*o Page 3 July 4, 2013





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THURSDAY FR
VENICE INLET 27.1117 N, 8
09:34
2.20
03:10 01:06
1L21 S1.30


1.27 18:04 _-
0.08
MHHW 2.201, MHW 1.932, MSL 1.1


THURSDAY


FR


PUNTA GORDA 26.9283 N,
12:41
04:13 201 04:5
1.17 / 1.20

06:23
Sft-1.12 -


MHHW 1.962, MHW
THURSDAY


20:57
0.06
1.703, MTL1.0
FR


PLACIDA, GASPARILLA SOU
10:12
00:32 1.70 01:27
0.98 /\ 1.01


0.02
MHHW 1.407, MHW 1.175, MSL0.71


THURSDAY


FR


MATLACHA PASS (BASCULE
12:22


21:06
0.02
MHHW N/A, MHW N/A, MSL N/A, M

THURSDAY


IDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
!2.4633 W
10:15 10:53 11:29 12:05 12:43 13:24
2.26 2.30 2.33 2.34 02:42 2.31 03:02 2.25-


03 :59 \ 04:46 \ / 05:29 \ / 06:13 \-06:57 \ / 07:44 \
1.24 18:43-1-24- \ 9;16-119:48 2:6111.17 20:18 1.12 1.7
0.01 -0.03 -0.03 -0.01 20:49 21:19
172, MTL 1.152, MLW 0.371, MLLW 0.000 All measurements in feet; for more info see www. tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov 0.03 0.08
IDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
82.0650 W (ADD 32 MINUTESTO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES) 15:19 15:58 16:40
13:23 14:03 14:40 2.15 2.13 2.08
58 2.06 05:29 2.11 05:46 2.14 05:52 05:57 06:09
S1.21 1.20 1.20 / \ 1.23 /1.\ 29 / \

07:11 \ / 07:55 \ / 081 \ / 07 \ / 09 \ / 10:44 \
1.15 \ 1.15 1.13 -109 .1.01
21:37 22:13 22:46 23:18 23:49
-0.01 -0.03 -0.03 -0.01 0.03
76, MSL 1.070, MLW 0.449, MLLW 0.000
IDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
ND 26.8333 N, 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES) 12:42 13:18 13:56
10:52 11:30 12:07 1.80 1.79 1.75
1.74 02:07 1.77-- 02:38 1.80-- 02:59 03:16 03:32
1.03 1.03 1.03 on 1.04 1.08

:39 / 05:22 \0 / :020 / 06:42 \0 / "7:24 \ / 08,09 V
0.94 0.95 0.93 0.90 0.86 4 0.82
19:19 19:55 20:27 20:57 21:25 21:53
-0.03 -0.06 -0.06 -0.04 -0.01 0.04
784, MTL 0.768, MLW 0.358, MLLW 0.000
IDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
BRIDGE) 26.6333 N,82.0667 W 13:40 14:17 14:52 15:28 16:06
13:02 2.10 2.13 2.14 2.12 2.08
7 2.07 04:17 04:48 05:09 05:26 05:42
I 1.2 1.22 1.22 1.24 1 28


21:46 22:22 22:54 23:24 23:52
-0.04 -0.07 -0.07 -0.05 -0.01
ITL N/A, MLW N/A, MLLW 0.000
iV DFinAY CATIIRDnAV cIIINAnV IMnnAy TIIECAYV WAlEInEcnAV


VENICE INLET


PUNTA GORDA



PLACIDA



MATLACHA


04:13
06:23
12:41
20:57


00:32
03:54
10:12
18:39


02:42
06:21
12:22
21:06


1.17 feet
1.12 feet
2.01 feet
0.06 feet


1.20 feet H
1.15 feet L
2.06 feet H
-0.01 feet L


0.98 feet
0.90 feet
1.70 feet
0.02 feet


1.01 feet H
0.94 feet L
1.74 feet H
-0.03 feet L


1.17 feet
1.07 feet
2.02 feet
0.02 feet


1.20 feet H
1.11 feet L
2.07 feet H
-0.04 feet L


1.21 feet H
1.15 feet L
2.11 feet H
-0.03 feet L


1.03 feet H
0.95 feet L
1.77 feet H
-0.06 feet L


1.22 feet H
1.12 feet L
2.10 feet H
-0.07 feet L


1.20 feet H
1.13 feet L
2.14 feet H
-0.03 feet L


1.03 feet H
0.93 feet L
1.80 feet H
-0.06 feet L


1.22 feet H
1.10 feet L
2.13 feet H
-0.07 feet L


05:52
09:17
15:19
23:18


02:59
06:42
12:42
20:57


05:09
09:09
14:52
23:24


1.20 feet H
1.09 feet L
2.15 feet H
-0.01 feet L


1.03 feet H
0.90 feet L
1.80 feet H
-0.04 feet L


1.22 feet H
1.07 feet L
2.14 feet H
-0.05 feet L


05:57
09:59
15:58
23:49


03:16
07:24
13:18
21:25


05:26
09:51
15:28
23:52


1.23 feet
1.05 feet
2.13 feet
0.03 feet


1.04 feet H
0.86 feet L
1.79 feet H
-0.01 feet L


1.24 feet H
1.02 feet L
2.12 feet H
-0.01 feet L


06:09 1. I-i
10:44 1.: l ti
16:40 2:. :: i


03:32
08:09
13:56
21:53


1.:i:~ i~i
0.:~: I.-.i
1. i--i
0:4 I--i


05:42 1.. -. i
10:36 0:.' -1-
16:06 2.: -i


2 pounds snapper fillets, skinless, boneless A CLIP-N-SAVE FLORIDA
1/2 cup Caesar salad dressing SEAFOOD RECIPE PROVIDED BY
1 cup potato chips, crushed / ? / a
1/2 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese I
Cut fillets into 6 portions. Dip fish in salad dressing. Place fillets Recipe from fl-seafood.com
in a single layer in a microwave-safe dish with thicker portions to Reipe from fl-seafood.com
the outside of dish. Combine crushed chips and cheese; sprinkle
over fillets. Cook in microwave on high for 8 to 10 minutes or
until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork, rotate dish once during cooking. Yields 6 servings.




1-1/4 pounds snapper fillets A CLIP-N-SAVE FLORIDA
1/2 cup pineapple juice, unsweetened SEAFOOD RECIPE PROVIDED BY
1/3 cup fresh lime juice /
1/2 tsp cornstarch, dissolved in 1 tbsp water
1 tbsp cilantro, chopped
Heat pineapple and lime juices to a simmer in a large nonstick skillet Recipefrom
over medium heat. Add fillets and poach 1 minute. Carefully turn fish JustSeafoodRecipes.com
over. Cover and simmer 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer fish to a large plate
and cover to keep warm; reserve juices in the skillet. Stir cornstarch mixture into pan juices. Simmer 1
minute. Pour over fillets. Sprinkle with herbs and serve at once. Makes 4 servings.


1 III 1 '1I '


SIZE LIMIT: Minimum 10 inches in state waters, or brackish water will host large nurrter tr
12 inches in federal waters small snapper. Adults move to deeper 'Vater and
0 r )M Tare found on reefs and rocks.
BAG LIMIT: 5 per person per day (included in o eEsnd rocks.
aggregate snapper bag limit of 10 per person FOOD VALUE: Excellent
per day) FISHING METHODS: Live or cut shrimp nir ;he
AVERAGE SIZE: 6-8 inches near shore, standard bait. but mangroves will readily tal.e


2-4 pounds offshore
FLORIDA STATE RECORD: 17 pounds
HABITAT: Juveniles are found
in estuarine habitats, often
arouniJd man gr:ve rn:, :,: ,
(hren(e the name Any,
trin, e :r pier in ;all


small fish as well. For bigger snapped :in the
reefs, small pinfish or decent-size whitlebat can
be very effective. Snapper are accompiihed tball
thieves, so bring plenty.


00:19
03:10
09:34
18:04


1.27 feet
1.21 feet
2.20 feet
0.08 feet


1.30 feet
1.24 feet
2.26 feet
0.01 feet


1.32 feet H
1.24 feet L
2.30 feet H
-0.03 feet L


1.33 feet H
1.21 feet L
2.33 feet H
-0.03 feet L


02:24
06:13
12:05
20:18


1.34 feet H
1.17 feet L
2.34 feet H
-0.01 feet L


02:42
06:57
12:43
20:49


1.37 feet
1.12 feet
2.31 feet
0.03 feet


03:02
07:44
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change MI6


Sometimes change is good,
sometimes it's bad. In this case,
change is a good thing.
Each week, WaterLine
publisher Josh Olive and I
manage to crank out an issue.
Each week's publication is filled with the
regular elements you have become familiar
with: Tide charts, the FishFinder, our Outdoor
News Bulletin Board, seafood recipes, fish
profiles, reader photos, Boaters' Bargains,
solunar tables and a bunch of other things. Of
course, we always have a wealth of contribu-
tions from our talented columnists as well as
interesting stories from various wire sources.
As much as we like the regular components of
WaterLine, we are always looking for ways to
improve. This could be something as simple
as changing the style of our headlines or the
size of our photos, to adding a new feature
or two.


od thing

Over the years, WaterLine has gone through
a series of minor facelifts, all with the inten-
tion of improving the overall image of the
product. In the next few months, you will
likely notice a few improvements and addi-
tions to WaterLine. We won't be getting rid of
anything, just tweaking small things here and
there. For instance, our columnists will have
their photos updated. I wouldn't dare name
names, but some of them have had the same
mugshot for a few years. We are also going to
introduce some new features one of them
being a fun little thing called Slack Tides,

CHANGE119


DYSTOPIA
FROM PAGE 2
the water is not allowed outside the special
management zones.
In the Barrier Island Zone (the Gulf beaches
from Venice Inlet to Boca Grande Pass) anglers
fishing from shore are now allowed to keep
one snook per day between 20 and 24 inches.
Remember, only artificial lures with single hooks
may be used to harvest snook in the BIZ. If you're
fishing from a boat, all snook must be released.
The federal gag grouper season that would
have opened today has been cancelled due to
the CHMFC's decision to keep gag open in local


waters all winter, as did local fisheries boards
all along the west coast of Florida. The Gulf
Council reported that anglers in state waters had
harvested their entire allocation by February
of this year, thereby ensuring that there would
be no harvest in federal waters. In a related
development, the CHMFCis considering lowering
the size limit on gag from 18 to 16 inches. This
move is expected to have no effect on spawning
populations, since all the breeding-size fish live
in federal waters of the Gulf where no one is
allowed to harvest them anyway.
The board is also announcing a change to
the redfish slot limit. Fish harvested north of
a line drawn from Cape Haze Point to Burnt
Store Marina must measure between 16 and


24 inches. Slot limits in other areas remain
unchanged (17 to 25 inches in Gasparilla Sound,
Bull Bay and Turtle Bay; 20 to 28 inches in
Lemon Bay; 22 to 30 inches in the BIZ; 20 to 27
inches in Pine Island Sound; and 18 to 26 inches
elsewhere). A lottery for tags to harvest a single
fish measuring more than 40 inches will be held
next month; anglers may enter now at
CharlotteHarborFisheriesManagementCommission.
FloridaFisheriesManagement.gov.
Also, all anglers are asked to report any Goliath
grouper sightings to any board member or law
enforcement officer. These fish have become very
rare since too many harvest tags were inadver-
tently issued in 2018, though some juveniles have
been reported in the Punta Gorda canals.


Obviously, this is exaggerated to make a
point, but I think it's clear that local rulemaking
would have some pretty strong negative aspects
to go along with the positive ones. While I do
like the idea of being able to control our own
resources, I don't like the notion of adding more
complication to the rules we anglers already
have to deal with. It's tough enough to keep
track of the regulations now. Do you really
want to see different rules in Sarasota, Chalotte
Harbor and Fort Myers? Divvying up control to
regional boards will just make it harder. And we
only have to follow those rules what about
the officers tasked with enforcing them? It will
be imperative to step carefully lest we end
up stuck in a quagmire of our own making.


www.palmislandmarina.com 1941.697.435617080 Placida Road Capa Haze, FL 33946


pt /,.err*e Page 5 July 4, 2013





A.,i/Mps Page 6 July 4,2013


n.f.laa*inn...Fik.., ,i.. *a*,n
*flhU*BEU~flDMS i iu l*ummgfWui


WiTa_~rW~hrPI~~


H20NLY
Nokomis
941-488-8229


FISHERMAN'S EDGE
Grove City
941-697-7595


The tarpon bite is slowing down.They are still out there, but not in numbers like
they were a month ago. Redfish are swimming in numbers just south of Sarasota
Bay. Trout can be found in 6 feet of water using DOA under a cork. Black drum and
big mangrove snapper are biting consistently around Big Pass.


Recent rains have mucked up the waters, but this week should be better. Before the
rains, tarpon were in and around Boca Grande Pass. There are far fewer people in
the Pass compared to a month ago. Snapper are also in the Pass along with gag
grouper. Spanish mackerel are being reported during incoming tides along the
Placida Trestle. Moderate success for redfish in the back waters. A lot of pictures of
big snook40 inches and larger. Almost all were caught on big pinfish. A lot of shark
are still lingering around. Stump Pass has generated some big flounder.


The past week's weather has limited offshore reports dramatically.
Avoid afternoon rains, and gag grouper action should be good this
week. The season opened July 1. Red grouper can be caught 12-15
miles offshore.


Offshore reports indicated some good gag grouper action 60 miles
out before the rain.


Fat snook are along jetties and beaches
and are extremely active. For the big girls
use big bait.


A lot of pictures of big snook 40 inches and
larger along the beaches. Almost all were
caught on big pinfish.


Before the rain, juvenile tarpon were being caught regularly on shrimp in and Offshore reports have been slim. Good-sized snook are congregating around
around the Myakka River. Redfish are biting on shrimp and artificial along the area passes and beaches and will be there
mangroves near El Jobean. Fish near Stump Pass over the grass for trout on freeline again this week.They have reportedly been
FINE BAIT & TACKLE shrimp or under a cork. The Venice jetties have recently been teeming with Goliath feasting on larger pinfish.
North Port grouper more than 20 pounds and are biting on squid. Cape Haze trout are common
and are feeding on shrimp. North Port canals are filled with bass and are biting on
41-240-5081 shiners. The canals also have sunfish and bluegills that like to eat worms.

Good top water snook bite just off of Burnt Store Marina. Redfish by Boca Grande Minimal reports due to the inclement weather. Sharks are eating more than what they are
Pass were in a feeding frenzy before the rains. Some trout were also feeding along supposed to all around the Harbor. Ladyfish
the backside of the Pass. Water was clear and the trout were biting on Rapala and is a sure way to hook a shark and Placida
CAPT. TED'S TACKLE other artificial. Snook have been spotted in numbers near Gasparilla Island. Bass Sound and the rivers are hot spots.
Port Charlotte have been biting in canals due to the rain. No flounder or cobia reports. Tarpon are
941-627-6800 turning out in canals, but are small.

1 There was way too much rain the past week for an accurate report But expect fishing Weak reports, but offshore fishing will pick up this week. The recent Tarpon can handle the recent influx of
Sto be good starting this weekend. Whitebait will likely be outside of the Harbor and weather stirred up the bottom,and plenty of smaller fish will be fresh water and should have plenty of
along the beaches.The snook bite should be good along those beaches. Threadfin feeding. Larger fish will be feeding on the smaller ones, so go out threadfin to feed on.They may not be huge,
FISHIN' FRANK'S should be active inside the Harbor, and Spanish mackerel and redfish will be and enjoy gag grouper season (min. 22 inches, limit 2). but there will be tarpon in the Harbor. Look
Charlotte Harbor around, especially outside of Pirate Harbor and around the Cape Haze Bar. Sharks are for deeper holes and also the canals. Use
everywhere and are just about the only fish consistent right now. Use frozen or live threadfin as bait if possible this week.
941-625-3888 bait and chum for shark.

Redfish are scattered in the Harbor, and on hot days are hanging out under the man- Bad weather equals few offshore reports. Snook are big and hungry off the beaches.
groves. Shark are still roaming around the west wall and Turtle Bay, more so than the Go grab yourself some live bait like
east wall. Speckled trout are in deeper water. Tarpon are in deeper holes off Burnt greenbacks and catch some. But remember,
LAISHLEY MARINE Store Marina.The cobia bite has slowed, with scattered reports around the 41 bridge, snook season is closed.
Punta Gorda
941-639-3949

The Matlacha Bridge is producing everything from tarpon to pinfish. A lot of shark Offshore reports indicate a lot ofyellowtail snapper and man- If you want to catch something, target
are roaming the area flats. Be on the lookout for blacktips, bonnethead and bulls grove snapper. Gag grouper reports are scattered, but will likely blacktip shark.They are swimming all
more than 7 feet. Redfish are doing greatand are hanging around the potholes, pick up this week. All can be caught starting about 15 miles offshore, throughout Pine Island Sound and make for
D&D BAIT AND TACKLE wedd nd under mnnnwvp, Tirqpt th~ rpd during hiqh tidw Mangrove snapper with th bhiqqgr fich morpnftpn in dopeir wt1er qnnd ~itinq fmiv 7 fich ppr vPccl
14Mt h" [' I "IIIII '- III '"' I"iiii ''iii iiri ily "i Fiji '- "I- ""i '-''Iii lir ili [I ''F 'iiiil ,II
M allacha us. e l.. S l .. n,,n sneun, ,, l ul ,, l,, I. nl '
l snook jrI jr ijS 0 iv, I. I i, l ii'- iJln i I-'-i. ii, I- im i lI r ,II jin hi h'ii- ir ,,Il
239-282-9122 ill'-r cobia h ivn'- I'-'-ri rI-ir[F1 .[iiri- i jr

Snook irni redfi sh h l n'-li,'-'-rln iiin [Iln ii -i- r. l 1iilll- i, ii-Inj ii- jin I- oni ,. gro-r-, Igrouper r '-l, 'r[ l wl I,- Jil i,-r liI r,,l.... i nii-riI -l iiw ll II,- li .r 1 l ,1 -i .in ir-iw ill li.,lv [IJ, IlJ
.-,- i. i. ii n .ii ijh ,ij i f 1ini- i l Njr i <. i, i I- i n- iI- i i i "-. i jll-ii j l,-r iv l, ,Iai'- n ii1'- Blacktip ir l bull
j r iu, i i ,-ii i i I ii I -r ] i ji]i [ I u [lli ,ri iii[i n ] [l' i &I lu iv iii jrin,]ri n I] I r in] ur il sharks jr- i i i I Jliniul '-vI-rv i'-r'- iiil will
OLD PINE ISLAND MARINA Tarpon i'- i'-r'-l iii i[ rill ir1 ii Spanish mackerel r'-lr[ ij'- '-'-rii iiiiiiirij .'-ui irni ii J inr ivriiij fl, iirrii-
S t. J a m e s C it y ,r, r ,- ir'- '- i r r 1 ii ii n ,iliiii li ,,,nii, i- rri, ,, li I ,,iiiiiiiiiiin|, ii l iini,, viii, ii[
239-283-2548



Skies Ire measured total length flomn for ward- Cobia: Min 33 ifork, limit I (imui fish per vessel Redfish:lot 1 -27 lii 1 ..m;. Bsh per vessel) NO-HARVEST SPECIES: Zero: bag limit Ior
most part t :i head to tip of pinhed till) unless Dolphin: Limit 10 Shark: MIn 54 e(ept Atllntik sharpnose. Bo:nef'sh, Goliath Gr:Luper IJewish), Savvsh,
other wise noted All bag limits are per havester blacknose, blacktip, bonnethead, inetooth and Spotted Eagle Rays. Lemon iiSharks, Hlammerhead
per dy Other limits my ipply, Ior most (currenil Flounder: MIm 12, limit 10 smooth dogfish, limit I ima\ 2 ish per vessel) Sharks g(:go to the website listed below for a full
rules visit www MyFW( (om fishing Federal Grouper, Black: Min 22, l mit1 seasoni dosed Sheepshead: Mi 12 linlmit 15 listof ino-harvest species)
regulations mimay dfer frm state regulations Feb 1 March 31 Snapper, Lane: Min 8 i limitfI0 pounis Visit http://bit.ly/1OnYDIz for full rules.

LICENSES Grouper, Gag: Miin 22, limit 2, season opens Snapper, Mangrove: Min. 10, limit 5 FRESHW ATER FISH
Resident saltwater or freshwater: Annual $17, July1ISnapperM n :Mn.1,hmthFR S W T R I
5-year $79. Ifyou fish from shoreonly, a license is Grouper, Red: Min. 20", limit 4, season closed Snapper, Mutton: Min. 16", bag limit 10 Largemouth Bass: South of State Road 80:
required but isfree. Resident licensefor both fresh- Feb. i March 31 Snapper, Red: Min. 16", limit 2,2013 season Max. size 14", bag limit 5 (may possess one over
water and saltwaterfishing: $32.50 annually. Grouper, Scamp: M. limit 4, season open June July 14 (statewaters) June 1-28 in 14") North of State Road 80: Slot 14"-22",
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3 days closed Feb. 1 March 31federa waters g limit(may possess one over )
$17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore fishing Snapper, Yellowtail: Min. 12", limit 10 Sunfish (excluding crappie): Aggregate limit 50
license not available for nonresidents. Black, Gag, Red and Scamp GrouperMangrove, Mutton, Red and Yellowtail Snap- Crappie: Limit 25
Fishing permits: Snook $10/year, lobster $5/ included in aggregate bag limit of 4 per included in and create ba limitof 10Snap- Crappie: Limit 25
year, tarpon $51.50 per fish Hogfish: Min. 12"fork, limit per inc e in aggregate ag lim Butterfly peacock bass: Max. 17", limit 2 (may
year, tarpon $51.50 per fish HogfishMin. 12"fork, limit 5 Snook: Slot 28"-33" (west coast), limit 1, season possess one over 17")
SALTW ATER FISH Mackerel, King: Min. 24"fork, limit 2 closed until at least Sept. 2013 Grass carp: Must be released immediately.
Greater Amberjack: Min. 30" fork, limit 1, Mackerel, Spanish: Min. 12"fork, limit 15 Spotted Seatrout: Slot 15"-20", limit 4 (may Other exotic fishes: Please keep and eat or
season closed June 1 July 31 Mullet: No size limit, limit 50 possess one over 20") otherwise destroy. Do not use as live bait.
Lesser Amberjack/Banded Rudderfish: Permit: Slot 11"-22"fork, limit 2 (may Tarpon: No size limit, tag required to possess Unregulated species: No bag or size limits on
Slot limit 14"-22', aggregate limit 5 possess one over 22") (in south Florida SPZ, min. Triggerfish, Gray: Min14 limit 2, season gar (except alligator gar; possession of this spe-
Black drum: Slot 14"-24", limit 5 (may 22"fork, limit 1 per harvester or 2 per vessel, closed June July cies is illegal), bowfin, pickerel, and all catfish.
possess one over 24") with closed season May 1 July 31) Tripletail: Min. 15", limit 2 Visit http://bit.ly/10nYJQr for full rules,
Bluefish: Min. 12"fork, limit 10 Pompano: Min. 11"fork, limit 6 Wahoo: Limit 2 including special management areas.


/t





,l,,#,sa. Page 7 *July 4, 2013


IA UMOE (iIUIM DW ME M lBIIal




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SARASOTA COUNTY
Blackburn Pt Boat Launch* 800 Blackburn Pt Rd, Osprey
Dallas White Park *5900 Greenwood Ave, North Port
Higel Park* 1330 Tarpon Center Dr,Venice
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/ne. *Loreto Bay Access-O800LoretoCourt, Nokomis
S^* Manasota Beach Park* 8570 Manasota Key Rd
SMarine Boat Ramp Park.301 E.VeniceAve,Venice
S-Marina Park- 7030 Chancellor Blvd, North Port
^* .Nokomis Beach Park* 901 (asey Key Rd
S-Snook Park. 5000 E. Venice Ave, Venice
SDESOTO COUNTY
Brownville Park.1885NE Brownville St
Deep Creek Park. 9695 SW Peace River St
Desoto Park. 2195 NW American Legion Dr
SLiverpool Park. 9211 Liverpool Rd
SNocatee. 3701 SW County Road 760
SLettuce Lake* 8801 SW Reese St
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A, ,i Me Page 8 July 4,2013


m-WamosomBB moBW ad -aieim imnm


IF IAl


If you've spent more than a year or two
fishing in Southwest Florida, you should
be at least somewhat familiar with the
seasonal nature of things here. We're now
getting into the heart of summer, and that
means that a few things have changed
in the last few weeks. The water in the
Harbor is much darker from all the runoff,
the fishing on the beach has gotten much
better, and the big shrimp we enjoyed all
winter and spring are gone.
For a lot of anglers, shrimp aren't a
favorite bait they're basically the only
bait. When the big shrimp head offshore,
out of the reach of the boats that catch bait
shrimp, what's left are the little peewees.
Manning the counter at the bait shop, I get
more complaints about small shrimp than
anything else. Some folks seem to think
we're holding out on them. Maybe they
think we're saving the good shrimp for the
VIP anglers. We're not summer is just the
season of shrimpy shrimp, and no amount
of yelling or whining is going to make a
bunch of handpicks magically appear in our
bait tanks.
So what's a fisherman to do when only
little shrimp are for sale (or, worse yet, no


shrimp at all)? Fortunately, it's not the end
of the world. You have options, each of
which is better than not fishing at all.

OPTION #1 PEEWEE SHRIMP
You must have heard of matching the
hatch. Yet there you are, demanding five
dozen handpicked shrimp. Think about this
for a minute all the shrimp in the Harbor
are small, so the fish are keyed in on small
shrimp. Little shrimp will catch big fish just
fine. Yes, they're a pain to cast. Rig your
shrimp on a jighead or under a popping cork
so you'll have plenty of casting weight.

OPTION #2 FROZEN SHRIMP
A thawed shrimp releases a lot of scent,
which makes it very appealing to lazy fish.
When the temperature's hot, there's not
a whole lot of oxygen in the water. Fish
get lazier and less aggressive. They don't
want to chase a meal down they want a
dinner that's easy to catch. Ya gotta admit, a
frozen shrimp is easy to catch. The one lousy
thing about frozen shrimp is that they tend
to fall off the hook. That's fairly simple to
fix: Pour salt on the frozen shrimp. As they
thaw, the salt will toughen those shrimp


right up. Rock salt is usually the cheapest
option, but table salt will also work. (By the
way, this brining method will work for any
frozen bait, and the salt also seems to act as
a fish attractant.)

OPTION #3 OTHER BAITS
If you don't want to take the time to
brine shrimp, there are other baits that
fish eat besides shrimp. You can catch little
pinfish in a sabiki rig, or throw a castnet for
whitebait, or buy frozen mullet or sardines
(remember they work better brined).

OPTION #4 ARTIFICIAL LURES
Peewee shrimp season is a fantastic time
to learn how to use artificial baits. Because
the fish aren't aggressive, lures that can be
worked slowly are ideal. Soft plastic baits
top the list because they're available in
scented versions, or you can easily add scent
to them. Early in the morning, topwater
lures are also fantastic and it's just a trip
watching fish attack them.

No matter what type of bait you decide
to use, you'll catch more fish if you throw it
where the fish are. Shallow water cools off


nicely at night, and the fish are often most
eager to feed at or soon after first light. It's
also a lot more comfortable for us humans.
Concentrate your efforts around shorelines
that have easy access to deep or moving
water. Deep water is cooler and moving
water is better oxygenated, so the fish will
naturally want to be there after all,
they need to breathe. The best fishing will
be around to the Intracoastal. The closer
you get to the Gulf, the cleaner and cooler
the water is and the more fish there are.
Incoming tides will bring baitfish and mack-
erel, cobia, sharks and tarpon well up into
the Harbor, but when the tide ebbs they'll
go right back out.
If live shrimp are your favorite bait, this is
a tough time of year for you. But try looking
at it as a chance to develop new skills and
learn new techniques for catching fish. If
you can see it that way, peewee shrimp
season isn't such a bad thing.
Robert Lugiewicz is the imonCgei of ishmn
Frank's Bait & Tackle, located at 4425-D
Tamiami Trail in Charlotte Harbor. Call
94-1-625-3888 for more infomition about
the shop or for local fishing info o0 u isit
them o11111e Ot FshIF711011ks co01


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I moved to Port Charlotte in December of
1999 when I got out of the Marine Corps.
Because I've always enjoyed fishing, this area
seemed like a great place to lay down new
roots. And if you fish, then you need tackle
and bait and all the goodies that come with
fishing. When you need all that, you go to a
bait and tackle store.
Growing up in a small town in northwest
Pennsylvania, we didn't have a Walmart. But we
did have a couple of tiny bait and tackle shops,
so I've always preferred getting my hunting and
fishing supplies at stores like that. Even when
I was in California and you couldn't swing a
dead mullet over your head without hitting a
Walmart, I still preferred the smaller local shops.
So, naturally, I ended up at Fishin' Frank's.
After a few years, I was accepted into the
Fishin' Frank's family. Since then, we have been
through some really great and horribly bad
times. The one thing that always astonishes
me is our customer loyalty and support when
those bad times happen across us.
As most of you are probably aware, Fishin'
Frank's was broken into and robbed a few
weeks ago. I arrived at the shop shortly after 6
a.m. to grab bait and chum for a charter that
I had that morning. I arrived to police cars
and a forensic truck in the front parking lot,
which was roped off with that familiar yellow
crime scene tape. I immediately called my
clients, made them aware of the situation and
explained to them that Frank would more than
likely need my help with the video system
and that we would have to reschedule our
fishing trip. Being customers of the shop, they
completely understood.
When we were finally allowed into the
shop, I was floored with what I saw. The
Penn shelves were empty, the Abu Garcia and
Pflueger shelves were bare. The Avet conven-
tional reels were all gone. The Ardent/U.S. Reel
case was bare. The rod racks had empty spots
everywhere. And then came what everyone
else had been feeling since the phone call from
the police at 4 a.m. the feelings of anger
and violation. But that would have to be put to
the side, we had work to do.
I've been with the shop through some
pretty rough times. Hurricane Charley was
the worst. The shop was destroyed. And not
only did Frank and his wife Terri lose the shop,
they also lost their home and most of their
personal belongings. That is a blow that most
people wouldn't recover from, and there was a
few times I heard Frank somberly say,"I don't
know if we'll be back:' But what got us through
Charley was the same thing that quickly
got us through the robbery: The help of our
customers and friends.
After Charley the shop was completely
gutted with the help from friends and
customers. Those same friends and customers
helped rebuild the shop better than it was
before the hurricane. That is what separates
your small local shops and your chain stores.
You didn't see a thousand people from Port
Charlotte donating their time and energy to
rebuild Walmart or Target, but you saw them
doing it to help a small little bait shop.
Another low time was when we lost Captain


Angel. He was a beloved member of our family
and even after two years I'm still waiting for
him to walk through that door of the shop. But
what did walk through the door of that shop
was, again, that love and support from our
customers. They all asked if they could help,
they donated money to help his son and his
wife and her kids.
The robbery was no different. That support
from our customers was immediate and
strong. We put pictures of the suspect and the
vehicle on Facebook and within hours we had
hundreds of phone calls, text messages and
emails identifying both the person and the
vehicle. We had tips pouring in on where they
could both be found. By the end of that day,
the police had a suspect in custody. By the next
morning they had a second suspect arrested
and stopped by to show us that they had
recovered most of what was stolen.
The comments on Frank's Facebook page
are what really surprised me. No, not those
threatening bodily harm to the suspect or those
recommending that he would make great shark
or alligator excrement, but those that said
things like,"How do you steal from Frank? He's
a pillar of our community"and "Frank and his
crew are the best in the area, they're always so
helpful, why would you do this to them?"
Statements like that are humbling. You see,
we don't think we're a pillar of the community.
We just want to take care of our customers,
make sure they leave happy and with what
they need, and to help and teach them how
to fish and to make sure we have a fishery
for the future. The support we get from our
customers each time something happens is
just downright humbling. And it's not just the
big things, it's the little things too. I overheard
one customer tell Frank the other day, "Frank,
I'm sorry about the break in. I told myself that
I have to get down there and do something,
even if it's just to buy a pack of hooks.' He
wanted to do his small part.
After Hurricane Charley nobody said the
themselves, "I've got to get to the big chain
store and help out, even if all I do is buy a roll
of paper towels ..."
I see the support all the time. Charley,
Angel, the robbery are just a few. I see the
support during the good times too. You all
come in droves to our tent sale. Each year it
gets bigger and better and that's because of
you, our customers. Our catfish, stingray and
shark tournament is still going strong even
with the challenges that it has faced and that
is because of you, our customers.
There is no possible way to thank you all to
the level you deserve. But we can try.
Thank you first and foremost to our
customers for your support, your appreciation,
your loyalty and your generosity. Without
you, we wouldn't exist and at the base of
it, you're all the ones that have created the
Fishin' Frank's family. What you all do and
come forward with in our times of need will
always humble us. I could fill an entire edition
of WaterLine listing the things that you have
done and how much we appreciate it all, and
it still wouldn't be enough. All we can do is to
continue to try and make you all happy. If it


wasn't for your tips, catching the robbers and
getting most of our inventory back probably
couldn't have happened.
Thank you to the Charlotte County Sheriff's
Office and the Punta Gorda Police Department.
You all worked tirelessly and quickly to help us.
You knew that time was of the essence if our
stock was to be recovered, and you accom-
plished your mission. Thank you so very much
- you turned what could have been one of
our worst days into what may have been one
of our best.
Thank you, Sean from Soundworkz Customz.
Your cameras caught the shot that we needed
to identify the suspect. You were running
behind in your work but you stopped what you
were doing and jumped in to help. Having a
stereo shop as your next door neighbor isn't


always easy, but you're not just a neighbor -
you're family, too.
Thank you, Frank and Terri. You have helped
each and every member of the Fishin' Frank's
Pirate Crew in one way or another. You guys
don't just own a bait shop, you two are the
parental heads of this family. Sometimes that
family is dysfunctional, sometimes it's peaches
and roses, but either way you always stand by
us and help us every way you can. You've never
given up or thrown in the towel on any of us.
Capt. Cayle Wills owns and operates Bad
Fish Charters on Charlotte Harbor. You can
book him through Fishin'Frank's or contact
him directly at 941-916-4538 or Capt. Cayle@
ReelBadFish.com. You can also visit him
online at ReelBadFish.com or FaceBook.com/
BadFishCharters.


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In keeping with last week's themey il- -T
another quote from Einstein: "The difference
between stupidity and genius is that genius
has its limits." Has anyone noticed how smart
that guy was? If limitation is a measure of
intelligence, I am obviously quite brilliant
myself. The previous article detailed the trials
and tribulations I face just walking in the front
door to work. Peace River Wildlife Center's
lead rehabber, Farrah, is a mastermind herself
when it comes to puzzles. Since we have been
inundated with injured turtles and tortoises
this year, she has gotten quite good at piecing
their broken shells back together, gluing them
in place with zip ties, and taking pictures
to document their healing. It's a wonderful
way to follow the progress as the injury
mends, but one has to wonder just how much
time is she spending getting these National
Geographic-worthy shots.
Today we have a sandhill crane with two
broken bones in her wing, an armadillo with
a chunk gouged out of his shoulder, and a
burrowing owl with a missing wingtip that
need to be examined. All injuries attributed
to"HBC"- hit by car. Every profession
has its own vernacular or abbreviations for
common terms. In wildlife rehabilitation,
we love our initials. Each species name is
whittled down to four letters a sandhill
crane is SACR, a yellow-crowned night heron
is YCNH, a purple ovoid oceanic plover would
be ... well, you get the idea. Conditions are
often shortened also: WNL (within normal
limits), NSF (no significant findings), and
my personal favorite, ADR (ain't doin' right).
Those last ones in each category may or may
not be official designations. So we remove the
armadillo's bandage to find he is healing well.
This in itself is amazing. We don't often see
armadillos that have been injured instead of
having been killed outright after a confronta-
tion with a motor vehicle. Their initial defense
is to hunker down when they hear a car or
truck approach. When said sound gets closer,
the armadillo jumps into the air in an attempt
to startle the intruder and scare it away. This
does not end well for the"little armored one;'
which generally loses in a battle of intimida-
tion versus a machine.
We will continue to keep the wound
clean, treat it with honey, and administer
antibiotics until the lesion has resolved. But
Farrah has to go get her camera to document
the progress before we can continue. In the
meantime, Charlotte County Animal Control
Officer Shonelle arrives with a DOA (dead on
arrival) from a GSW (gunshot wound). We
may be good at what we do, but even we
are rarely able to bring a bird back from the


cruelty. I will necropsy the animal and write
up a report that may help elevate the unsub
(unknown subject) to a perp (perpetrator).
See, the criminal justice community has their
own set of acronyms. I will do anything I can
do to help prosecute someone who is inten-
tionally inflicting pain on innocent animals.
An X-ray of the sandhill crane's wing
reveals the two broken bones are starting to
mend and are still aligned pretty well. The
prognosis is good that this bird will be able
to fly and be releasable. The burrowing owl
is not so lucky. His initial injury was not too
bad; he had a broken bone at the tip of his
wing. Unfortunately, the stress of being in
captivity the first few days led to self-muti-
lation, and he did even more damage to his
own wing. After that, the wingtip had to be
amputated. His cage was modified; he was
monitored more closely and quickly placed
outside with our other resident burrowing
owls in an attempt to make him feel more
at ease. He seems to be doing well out there
and has not complained about the accom-
modations since.
PRWC performs many services. We are
the human equivalent of a doctor's office,
hospital, nursing home, physical rehab
facility, psychology center and medical exam-
iner's station all in one tidy (tiny) package. In
addition to taking in injured and orphaned
wildlife from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (or later) daily,
we have an incredible display of permanent
residents (animals that have been injured too
severely to be released) on exhibit. Our gift
shop manager, Brick, stocks items ranging
from T-shirts to jewelry to toys. Many of
the products sold in the gift shop are hand
crafted by local artisans. Brick also does an
excellent job with our newsletter (to which
you can subscribe by becoming a member
of PRWC) and our website. Check out his
handiwork at PeaceRiverWildlifeCenter.com.
Unlike the rest of us, Brick's talents do seem
limitless. Given the way this article started,
did I just call him stupid? (BTW, all names
have been changed to protect the innocent.)
Peace River Wildlife Center is a nonprofit
organization, dedicated to the care, preserva-
tion and protection of Charlotte County's native
wildlife since 1978. They are open 7 days a
week year-round, including holidays. Tours are
offered from 11 a.m. to 4p.m. PRWCreceives
no government funding and relies entirely on
private donations. For more info, or ifyou would
like to volunteer or make a donation (including
aluminum cans), visit PeaceRiverWildlifeCenter.
com, e-mail PeaceRiverWildlife@yahoo.com or
call 941-637-3830.


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This image of an Inuit hunter and
his kayak was taken in 1854 by
Captain Edward Augustus Ingle-
field, whose expedition charted
previously unexplored areas
along the northern Canadian
coastline. From the collection of
the National Maritime Museum,
Greenwich, United Kingdom.
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It is difficult to imagine that some 12,000
years ago, people from Asia crossed a land
bridge where the Bering Straits are today.
These people were Mongolians from Siberia.
They migrated into North America and settled
in what is now Alaska. The descendants of
these people were known as Inuit (sometimes
called Eskimos, but they don't like that term).
Inuit hunters were in need of a vessel that
was small, stable and easy to maneuver. What
they came up with more than 4,000 years
ago was the kayak a small boat made of
animal skin stretched over a wood or whale-
bone frame. The word kayak is from the Inuit
word "qayaq" which means"man's boat" or
"hunter's boat." A baidarka is a double or triple
kayak used to transport goods, passengers
and hunters. A umiak, or"woman's boat," is
a wide-decked kayak ranging from 17- to 60-
feet long propelled by multiple paddlers using
single-blade paddles. In 1845, John MacGregor
designed a "Rob Roy" canoe based on the Inuit
kayak design. Modern sit-inside kayaks still
resemble the original.
Kayaks, like canoes, have a tapered bow
and stern to allow both forward and reverse
operation with ease. But while a canoe is
tippy, a kayak is inherently very stable. Kayaks
allowed Inuit hunters to access small rivers and
streams otherwise inaccessible by land to pursue
caribou, bear, seals, sea lions and other large
game. Materials to build a frame were not easy
to come by. There was a limited supply of wood
in this frozen environment. Pieces of driftwood
were used, split with stone axes. Whale bone
was also used as support stringers to make a
sturdy frame. The kayak frame was covered with
seal or whale skin sewn together using sinew or
rawhide cord, then the whole works was coated
with the waxy whale fat for waterproofing.
Today's kayaks are made from a variety of mate-
rials plastic, fiberglass, Kevlar, carbon fiber
and wood but the sealskin kayak is one you
won't find in the local shops.
An opening was left on top in the center for
the occupant. This opening featured a sealskin
covering much like a modern spray skirt. In
the cold climate, the Inuit hunters had to stay


as dry as possible. Being wet and cold causes
hypothermia, which often leads to death.
Propulsion of the kayak is accomplished by the
occupant using a double-bladed wood or bone
paddle. Some modern paddles are still wooden,
though more are made from aluminum,
fiberglass or carbon fiber. Today, many kayaks
are available with rudders and some are pedal-
powered using fins or a propeller.
But the basic kayak design persists, and
it allows a person to travel long distance
through open water, shallow bays, inlets,
rivers, streams and creeks. The silent operation
of a kayak enables a hunter to quietly stalk
and approach game, giving the hunter an
advantage. Even prey as large as whales was
taken using kayaks and spears. The kayak was
also used for fishing, movement of goods and
general transportation.
The kayak is still used for many of its
original purposes, but it's also become a purely
recreational sport for hundreds of thousands
of Americans. Kayaking is one of the fastest-
growing watersports, in large part due to the
advantages kayaks offer, such as low mainte-
nance costs, ease of transport and simplicity of
use. A kayak can be launched from any place
the water can be accessed on foot. The health
benefits of kayaking include cardio, upper
body and core exercise. It is low-impact and
calorie-burning, and we can all use some of
that. Plus, the relaxation of being in a kayak on
a beautiful day is unequaled. And we owe it all
to the inventive Inuit people.
Todd Terrill is a retired Sarasota County
Sheriff's Deputy who began kayaking in 2005
and has owned and loved kayaks ever since.
He's paddled everything from mangrove shore-
lines to the open waters of Tampa Bay, plus
freshwater lakes, rivers and stream throughout
Florida. He has been a kayak tour guide for the
past three years with iKayakSarasota.com in
Sarasota and conducts 10 to 15 tours a week,
which puts him in contact with hundreds of
paddlers of all skill levels on a weekly basis. He
is also a Pro Staff member of West Wall Boats
in Port Charlotte. Contact him atprehouk9@
comcast.net.


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_I4P,'Mur elt Page 12 Juliy4, 2013







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Most local gun enthusiasts f -
shoot at the Babcock/Webb public
shooting range in Punta Gorda
but we do have some other
choices. This week I am going to
take a look at some of these other ranges. Before we start
on that, I've had some folks ask why you can't draw from
a holster at Webb's range. When I worked there you could,
but the powers that be decided it was too dangerous and
stopped the practice a while back. I realize where they're
coming from, because as a range safety officer myself, I have
seen a fair amount of unsafe gun handling at the Webb
range. Far too many people fail to get proper training or
never pay attention to safe gun handling practices, and the
state really hasn't got enough RSOs at the range to watch
over this so no drawing from the holster. At some of the
private ranges and gun clubs, it's different. They do expect
completely safe gun handling, and if you mess up you're
never going to shoot there again. The hot-stove rule is in
effect. The state can warn you and maybe make you leave for
the day or in extreme cases, have you trespassed for year
- but at a private range or a gun club they will simply take
your membership away or expel you.
So what other ranges are available in our area and
what are their rules? We have a couple of indoor ranges at
gun shops in the Fort Myers area and one in Murdock at
Point Blank Guns on U.S. 41. Although small, this range is
convenient, fun and safely run. If you have any problems
or questions, the guys in the store will be glad to help you
out and get you started on the right foot. And all the local
indoor ranges, the rules are very strict, and drawing from a
holster is not allowed. A couple of things you notice when
shooting indoors: The light is very different, and you get a
close-quarters feeling along with much louder sound effects.
I don't much care for indoor shooting, but it's a good idea
to experience the differences and broaden your horizons.
Being exposed to different shooting environments is always
a good thing as far as training is concerned. You never know
what the conditions will be should you ever have to defend
yourself in an attack situation.
We also have Hansen Range & Gun Club, which is on Zemel
Road in Punta Gorda just down from the smelly landfill.
Hansen is a private range, but on Monday nights the folks
from International Defensive Pistol Association take over
and you can do shoot-and-move scenarios. I can tell you if
you've never done it, it will rock your world. Multiple and
moving targets, drawing from the holster all the fun
stuff! plus you get to run several different scenarios and
courses each night. It makes stationary target shooting quite
boring, because it takes you out of your comfort zone and
makes you think and react to threats. You must be moving
or you're going to get a little, shall we say, "encouragement."
from the RSO, who is moving along behind you coaching -
and yes, he's timing you. You compete against the clock and
the targets to complete the course. It's scootin'and shooting ,
or hoppin'and poppin'as Dick Marcinko would say. Is it fun?
Does a bear sit in the woods?
To see how it all works, I recommend you go just to watch
the first time. That way you can get the lay of the land, so to
speak. If you already feel good with this type of shooting,
just bring your self-defense handgun and holster rig, about
100 rounds of ammo, your other range gear and a $10 bill,
and you're good to go. Get there at about 5:30 p.m., and
bring some bug spray. Newbies will get a dry run first by the
RSO, who will explain the safety rules. Now this is really not
for true beginners, but most any serious handgun shooter
would not have too much trouble. Your first couple runs can
be somewhat humbling, but once you get in the groove it
feels pretty good.
Lady shooters, don't be intimidated quite a few ladies
shoot there, and you already know you can usually outshoot
the men. Most male shooters have already found out that
once the girls realize this is something they can do just as
well as the men, us guys sometimes are the ones who get
intimidated. The ladies check out the girls on the Glock team
and shooters like Jessie Abbate who does videos for Panteao
defense training, and they get really inspired. Watching Jessie
run a course with a race gun and a camera mounted on her
baseball cap is something to see and, of course, watching
her it's hard to keep your mind on the gun. Pure poetry.
Anyway, you must stay safe and be very conscious of
muzzle discipline, because violations will not be tolerated,
and if you flag anybody you're done for the evening. I've
seen all levels of shooting skills working out here. It's not all
experts, but there are a few who are truly impressive. You're
shooting against the clock and no one else, so even if you're
just an average shooter you don't feel left out. I advise you to
start out slow and make good accurate shots, then speed up
as your skill and comfort increases.
Another range check out is in Arcadia where State Road 70
crosses the Peace River. This is the DeSoto Gun Club range. It
is a members-and-guests-only range, so you will have to join


raiiEUb

in order to shoot here. The club has new membership days
several times a year for new people to join up. This club has
been in existence since the 1950s and has a lot of interesting
things to offer. They do allow drawing from the holster
under some special rules. They have some unique target and
range facilities that are quite different from the Webb range,
you can check these out on their website at DeSotoGunClub.
com. One of the fun things you can do is shoot a handgun
at bowling pins if you've never done this, it's a blast.
They also host competitive shooting events. Safe shooting is
expected and required, and any violation of the safety rules
will result in immediate revocation of your membership.
The chief RSO is a man named Ron Holsing. He is a no-bull
guy, and that's the way a chief RSO should be. I'm sure he
probably occasionally gets called a "range Nazi" behind his
back, like I did when I worked in that capacity, but hey -
that goes with the job. He has to keep the range safe and
when you consider it, that's a heavy weight on anyone's
shoulders. It was very helpful when he patiently answered
my questions in a detailed way when I first joined the range
a year ago. Again, you can get full details on their website
regarding rules and joining. I highly recommend this range
and club.
Farther up the road is the Manatee Gun & Archery Club,
under the direction of chief RSO Gene Pitts. Go north on 1-75 to
State Road 64. Turn right and head east for about 15 miles and
watch for the sign on the left side of the road. This range has
all the usual stuff but has one unique feature that the others
don't: A 1,000-yard rifle range. All you bolt gun and black gun
guys and girls can try your skills at the distances that Carlos
Hathcock and more recently some of our elite shooters in
Afghanistan and Iraq have been making their shots at. When
you first look out there, it's hard to even see the target gong
without a spotting scope. Man, that's over half a mile but
the shot can be made and is made regularly. You can step your
target out to any distance you want to. I got out to about 450
yards with my old Winchester Model 70 in .30-06, but past
that my scope wasn't up to the task and I don't see a new
night force mil-spec optic in my future anytime soon. Please,
dear? It's only $3,500! Oh, well maybe someday. The last
two times I went there they even had some food events going
on, and after shooting for a few hours that was real nice. This
range is well-run and very safe to shoot at totally worth
the drive to get there. I try to get a few people together once
a month or so and make a day of it to shoot pistol and rifle and
swap gun stories and lies. Check out their website at Manatee-
GunClub.com.
Last year I did a column on Quail Creek Plantation. If you
like to break clay birds, this is a place for you. It is located
over by Okeechobee, so you probably would want to get
with some friends and make a day of it. This is a world-class
shooting facility and everything about it is done to please
even the fussiest clients. The two 14-station courses are
carefully carved into some of the most beautiful Florida
hardwood hammocks you will ever see. The stations feature
electronically controlled throwers, so you can set your own
pace and difficulty at each station. You'll get golf-style
shooting cards to carry you around, an highly experienced
gunsmith in his own trailer on site, a high-end gun shop
with shotguns to die for and clothing and shooting acces-
sories, a regular shooting range and a clubhouse with old
Florida style gourmet dining. I had fried quail, collards,
taters, corn on the cob, and real blackberry cobbler for
dessert. Dee-lish! My whole day, including shooting and
lunch, was less than $100. The scenery, facilities and lunch
were worth far more than that, let alone the shooting.
Quail Creek is an absolutely beautiful place. Oh, and while
we were breaking clays, we saw wild turkeys and hogs just
cruising around the area. I can't wait to go back. The two
guys I went with kind of hustled me telling me they hardly
ever did this and were poor shots. The wicked dogs lied, so I
was low man with my old stock fixed-choke,870 Remington
pump gun, but I still had a lot of fun. Check out their website
QuailCreekPlantation.com and get all the details about the
superb facility.
Finally, there is a new trap and skeet club up at
Lakewood Ranch in east Sarasota County. They just opened
up and I don't have any facts on them, but the word is
they're trying to build up a membership, so check it out.
Well, shooters, that's about all I have room for this
week. I know there's a couple more ranges I didn't get to so
maybe will talk about them at a later date. Safe shooting.
Billy Carl is an NRA -certified firearms instructor and is
available for individual instruction in firearms safety and
concealed carry classes. Contact him at 941-769-0767,
jcarll@embarqmail.com or through Sportrap Gun Shop at
941-629-7775.


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ltM*jr ,rsrvt Page 13 July 4,2013


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Here's how it works: Take pictures of
your outdoor adventures. Send your
high-quality digital photos to water-
lineweekly@gmail.com, or send
prints by snail mail to The Charlotte
Sun, 23170 Harborview Road,
Port Charlotte, FL 33980, ATTN:
Josh Olive. Include a self-addressed
stamped envelope if you want your
prints returned to you.
PLEASE don't send us photos of
oversized or other release-only
fish being poorly handled. Photos
of such fish being gaffed, held by the
lower jaw only or obviously damaged
or dead cannot be published, no
matter how big the fish is or how
proud the angler may be.




flaamineEu..fln'Elminnu anme
., epnra*s Page 14 July 4,2013 .-..,u u"


So many birders cringe a bit and then
chuckle when they hear people talking
about sea gulls. I am one of the cringers
and chucklers. I always think about a story
from quite a few years back. When my
grandson was about 6 years old, I took
him to Sandy Point, on the shore of the
Chesapeake Bay in Annapolis, Md., and
taught him to use binoculars. I had a fairly
simple birding guide for him to use. I would
show him a herring gull or a ring-billed gull
_in the book, and he would find and point
suthe bird out on the jetty using his new
S- binoculars. We had a wonderful time and
it was an excellent learning session for my
eager grandson. Naturally, one of the first
things I taught him was that there was no
such species as a sea gull, and to use the
.Photo tL),,:[ D ,Cpn, Il birds'proper names instead.
icarol.naB.r.-:s c-rg Little did I know how the young man
A r gl would take this to heart. Several weeks
.. A herring gull squawks ,later my daughter phoned to inform
S.while eating, warning me that my grandson had gotten into a
away other gulls. confrontation with another boy in school
about the fact there is no such species as
sea gulls. Apparently the other kid didn't
have a bird-crazy grandmother.
There are three common gulls we see
here in this area. Certainly you have heard
the constant and very loud "Har har har
haah" while you are trying to snooze in
your beach chair at Stump Pass State Park.
This call is made by the laughing gull, an
obvious name when you hear them flying
in groups in search of food. This is the most
It's pretty obvious common gull we sight at the beach in this
where the ring-billed area. It is approximately 16 inches in length
gull got its name. and is considered a small gull.
....During the summer, this handsome gull
has a black hood on its head; during the
winter, the head is white. The summer
plumage is called breeding plumage.
The laughing gull has an orange beak in
-. summer and a blackish beak in the winter.
ij Laughing gulls are Florida residents. They
S can be found along the coast of the Gulf of
Mexico and north up the Atlantic Coast.
"A_, Another gull we see frequently is the
ring-billed gull. This gull is very easy to
,identify the name tells it all. The beak
has a black ring encircling the
.....r'4-4 tip. In its summer breeding

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---WWiKmI Bi f-D B'WlDIIaa Ill i-**gi e WIP IkO Ii


Did you notice the change of
seasons which occurred this week?
You won't find it on your calendar,
but tarpon season changed this
week. When July arrives, Boca
Grande Pass tarpon season unof-
ficially ends.
Now, before anyone reads the
above statement and gets their
knickers in a knot because there
are still plenty of tarpon around,
let me explain. Tarpon fishing in
Boca Grande Pass dates back to
the late 1800s and was originally a
pastime that was enjoyed primarily
by wealthy sportsmen fishing out of
Useppa Island. The upscale Gasparilla
Inn opened in 1913, shifting the
center of the tarpon fishing universe
from Useppa to Gasparilla Island. The
Gasparilla Inn hosted the bulk of the
visiting anglers, and many of those
who stayed there in May and June
anticipated as much socializing as
fishing during their visit. The tarpon
"season" wrapped up by the end of
June as the socialites drifted back up
north, many of them leaving in time
to enjoy the summer"season" in the
Northeast.
Since most of those early visiting
tarpon fishermen left the area by
the end of June, the guide business
ground to nearly nothing in July.
Because of the lack of tarpon fishing,
the notion that tarpon season was
over before Independence Day
became accepted, and some people
still believe this to be true.
However, unlike some humans,
tarpon don't have social obligations
in July in the Hamptons or on Cape
Cod, so they aren't in any particular
hurry to depart Southwest Florida at
the end of June. They do tend to thin
out in Boca Grande Pass, but most
tarpon do not leave the area until
the fall. In spite of this, for many
decades up to about 25 or 30 years
ago, few people fished for tarpon in
Charlotte Harbor during the summer
months even though there were
plenty of silver kings present. There
were a few Boca Grande tarpon
guides who had summer clients,
but not many, and there were very
few other fishing guides working
anywhere else in the area.
Those Boca guides who did fish
during the summer often took
their tarpon fishermen up into the
center of the Harbor on "blackwater"
tarpon trips looking for tarpon in
the deep holes or in the mouth of
the Myakka River. The boats were


Ph-:',l,' lI:r- h, .'n b., J.,, h ,'-, -
If anyone remembers the
, good old days of tarpon
fishing and the way things
used to be, it's Capt. Ralph.
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inboard-powered, similar to those
used by today's live bait tarpon
guides (and in some cases the exact
same vessels). The technique used
by most was to slow troll with
spoons or large jigs. If tarpon were
seen rolling, the boats would troll
through the rollers; otherwise, it
was blind fishing in areas where
tarpon might be found. A few of the


guys would anchor and fish dead
bait on the bottom, but the majority
were trollers.
The summer blackwater tarpon
fishery in the Harbor was not
pursued by many anglers. I can
remember seeing at most maybe
six or eight guide boats and two
or three private boats on even the
most beautiful of summer days, and


because there were so few boats
that it was easy to find a wad of
undisturbed fish. In those pre-cell-
phone days, we sometimes wished
that more boats would show up to
help us find the fish in the huge
expanse of Charlotte Harbor.
Fast forward 30 years to 2013,
and the world has changed. While
the crowds never approach the


2 pounds boneless skinless mullet fillets
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
2 cups Cornbread Stuffing (see below)
1/4 cup butter, melted
6 lime wedges
Divide fillets into six portions.
Sprinkle fillets with salt and pepper.
Line 6 greased 10-ounce microwave-
safe cups with fillets, overlapping
ends of fillets. Divide stuffing into six
equal portions and place stuffing in
center of each fillet. Brush tops with
butter. Cook in microwave on high
for 10to 12 minutes, rotating the
custard cups every 3 minutes. Fish
is done when it flakes easily when
tested with a fork. Garnish with lime
wedges. Yields 6 servings.
- Recipe from fl-seafood.com


A CLIP-N-SAVE FLORIDA
SEAFOOD RECIPE PROVIDED BY





CORNBREAD STUFFING
1/2 pound mild pork sausage
1/2 cup celery, chopped
1/2 cup onion, chopped
2 cups toasted cornbread cubes
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/2 tsp poultry seasoning
1/2 tsp sage
Place sausage in 1-1/2 quart microwave-safe dish.
Cover with paper towel. Cook in microwave on high for
2 minutes. Add vegetables to sausage and continue
cooking an additional 2 minutes. Add remaining
ingredients and mix well.


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craziness seen in Boca Grande Pass
in the spring, sometimes we now
see dozens of boats fishing tarpon
in the center of the Harbor. Not
only are there now more people
pursuing these fish, the boats and
the tactics have changed. Most
are now fishing from flats boats or
bay boats (all outboard-powered)
and most are drifting and either
floating live baits or chucking
artificial where rolling fish are
seen. At times there are so many
boats chasing summertime tarpon
that it's tough to get near the fish,
though this problem does become
less of an issue in late summer
and early fall when the fishery is
not prosecuted by many anglers.
Tarpon fishing in the Harbor usually
remains good through September
and some years into October or
early November.
Nowadays it's considered taboo
to fire up a motor near the guys
who are fishing, and if someone in
a cruising boat passes too near, the
anglers working the tarpon pods
tend to get upset. This is quite a
contrast to the fishing in the 1960s
and 1970s, when most of us were
happily trolling right through the
fish. When a boat does motor near
the tarpon they do stop rolling for
a while, but I'm not sure that those
fish are really spooked other-
wise, all those years ago we would
never have caught anything while
trolling. Of course, maybe it was
because we were all using inboards
in those years. With above-water
exhaust systems, inboards tend to
sound quieter to the fish than do
the outboards being used by most of
today's tarpon fishermen. I still have
one of the boats with which I trolled
for tarpon years ago. I suppose that I
could experiment by trolling through
some pods of rolling tarpon to see
if the old techniques still work. The
experiment might be fun, but would
probably not be popular with the
guys drifting live baits. Have a happy
and safe Fourth of July.
Let's go fishing!
Capt Ralph Al/en i Iiis the 1iii'
FiShEi F16Ot of Si tSIt Eii? 0iu0
fis/71i11 cha t ol boos loaICttd ot
FishEtt meiis Viloite AImooin Punto
Goida He is aii aiiaid-il i-i itiaiu
OUtdOOnl ii it. ti plphotollaphElt
aiol is a ptst pEsidEilt of thtE Flo tii
OutdOO I Vi 'tE s A.- ssocialiOln Call
him at 94 1-639-2628 O1 e til
Captati,,,iihi lshEiF Et com


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wauuuammmuu mmlmsu r


By Jeff Klinkenberg
Tampa Bay Times


COPELAND, Fla. The bride wore a long white
dress and muddy boots. She yelled,"Hooteehoo!"
Waiting for her in the distance, the groom
hollered,"Hooteehoo!"back. She homed in on
his shout and sloshed toward him through the
cathedral of cypress trees and cypress knees, ferns
and royal palms that grew in the black water.
Michael Scott Owen and Donna Ann Glann-
Smyth were going to exchange vows in the holiest
place they know, a primeval Florida swamp where
alligators and cottonmouths go with the territory.
In their wedding chapel, a ghost orchid, one
of the rarest of all plants, clung to the trunk of a
pond ash. Poison ivy hung from the curved bough
of what served as their altar, a red maple.
Renee Rau, an ordained minister who also
manages Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve,
asked guests to settle down. The green tree frogs,
performing their unique version of Mendelssohn's
Wedding March, ignored her.
"Ladies and gentlemen"the minister said in a
loud voice,"we will begin."

That they were getting married was something
almost as unlikely as a giant sphinx moth finding
a ghost orchid.
The moth is the only known pollinator of
the famous orchid, which very much resembles
a dancing fairy. The moth flits through the
Fakahatchee on summer nights, filtering the
air for a scent that nothing else apparently can
detect. It's an enormous swamp, more than
70,000 acres, with only the 370 ghosts Owen
has counted. The moth evolved to keep the
ghost orchid in existence. If you ask Owen, he'll
tell you that Glann-Smyth showed up to play
the same role in his life.
Owen, 53, has lived in the swamp for nearly
half his life. He grew up in Pinellas County, gradu-
ated from the University of South Florida and took
his biology degree to perhaps North America's
greatest swamp, a cauldron of endangered
animals and plants, some found nowhere else.
"It's like the Amazon!" he tells people. Most
scientists, by the way, don't talk in exclamation
points. Owen is the exception. As park biologist,
he has led 433 trips into the Fakahatchee. He met
Glann-Smyth on one of those trips.
She lived in Melbourne. A biologist who was a
few classes short of obtaining a medical degree,
she was already a talented naturalist. But the
Fakahatchee was 200 miles away. Should she go?
At the last minute, she made a reservation for a
guided trip. She got the last slot.
It was March 25,2006 trip No. 251, Owen
wrote in his little notebook.
It's natural to be afraid to walk into a swamp
where anything can happen, including a gator
encounter. But Glann-Smyth wasn't nervous.
About half a mile from the nearest road, Owen
showed everybody a ghost orchid. Most were
disappointed. Ghost orchids bloom in the
summer. In March, the dormant period, they look
like whole-wheat spaghetti wrapped around a
limb. Glann-Smyth did not hide her enthusiasm.
Ten minutes later, on her own, she found
another of those nondescript spaghetti strands.


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In Owen's experience, no rookie had ever found
a dormant ghost orchid on her own. Most
swamp newbies are more likely to look down for
venomous snakes than study the high branches
for famous orchids.
Both had recently ended disappointing
marriages. Both were in their 40s and wondering
if they would ever love again. Smitten, Owen
wrote down her name and phone number in his
little notebook and called a few days later.
At first their relationship was long distance.
Eventually she moved to the Fakahatchee. A
few months ago they set a wedding date. They
decided they would marry next to the very
ghost orchid Owen had first shown Glann-
Smyth in 2006. It would be a June wedding,
traditional in every way except for the possi-
bility of seeing a cottonmouth.

Standing in the swamp, holding a bouquet of
baby's breath, Glann-Smyth spoke first.
"The first time we met, Mike was speaking so
loud I thought to myself,'I'm not going to hear
a bird or see a bird:And I noticed that he kept
measuring things with a pole. And then he was
always writing down those measurements in a
little notebook. How odd. And then he talked
about how people who came to the swamp devel-
oped a Faka-habit. How corny can you get?"
She developed a Faka-habit. A Mike Owen
habit, too. Sometimes, when they walked
into the swamp, they separated to cover more
territory. When they wanted to find each other,
they simply yelled, "Hooteehoo!" and the other
would slosh back.
Now, on his wedding day, it was Owen's turn
to say his piece in front of witnesses, including
an 80-year-old friend from Naples who wore a
tuxedo and good shoes and an orchid-crazed
British pal who covered her beauty-shop hairdo
with mosquito netting.
Suddenly, the paparazzi arrived not
shouting, pushy tabloid photographers, but
ravenous deer flies. They began landing on
exposed flesh and savagely biting. From the
swamp cathedral came the sound of slapping.
Owen poked his ever-present measuring stick
in the muddy water, which, by the way, was 18
inches deep. The ghost orchid, by the way, grew
12 inches above the water's surface. Owen, by the
way, had managed to write everything down in
his notebook. But now he talked from the heart.
He talked about intangibles, things that can't
be measured, even by someone like him: "Friend-
ship. Compassion. Love"' He talked about how
one plastic flamingo on the lawn is lonely but
two plastic flamingos on a lawn are a couple. He
talked about how lucky he was to have found a
woman, at his stage in life, like Donna to love and
who would love him back.
His voice broke. A red-shouldered hawk some-
where in the distance cried, too.
The wedding could have stopped there and
been perfect. But the Rev. Renee needed to
make it official.
Owen and Glann-Smyth, being careful not to
drop them, exchanged rings.
They were pronounced husband and wife.
They enjoyed a giant sphinx moth-ghost orchid
kind of kiss. Hooteehoo.


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Seats


Back when fishing rods were
pretty much just sticks, they
didn't have butts or reel seats.
They're not entirely necessary
for a rod to function but they
sure do make using one a lot
easier and more convenient. The
reel seat provides a convenient
and secure place for the reel to be
attached to the rod, and the butt
is the section below the reel seat
that provides leverage for both
casting and fighting fish.
Reel seats can be incredibly
simple. The simplest type is no
reel seat at all the reel is
taped or tied directly to the rod but most
modern rods have a reel seat built in. A typical
reel seat is made of threaded graphite or metal
and has two hoods that the foot of the reel fit
securely into. The reel seat is aligned with the
spine and line guides and securely adhered
to the rod. In many designs, the reel seat is
partially incorporated into the butt and/or the
foregrip. For example, on some rods, the entire
foregrip is threaded. Reel seats are sized to fit
a wide range of reels, but if a reel is grossly
oversized or undersized for a particular rod it
generally won't fit. That's a clue, guys if
the reel doesn't fit, it's probably not suited for
that rod. On baitcasting and jigging rods, the
reel seat often incorporates a trigger grip. This
enables the angler to wrap a finger around the
trigger and maintain a better hold on the rod.
The rod butt is used by different anglers for
different purposes. I use it for two-handed
casting, with my right hand on the reel stem
to act as a fulcrum and my left accelerating
the butt to propel the rodtip forward. I've seen
some folks cast by holding onto just the end
of the butt and swinging the rod forward. This
is not the most effective technique, but use
whatever works for you. When you're fishing
spinning tackle, holding the butt against your
forearm is a very effective way of fighting
a fish. This technique will allow you to put
maximum pressure on the fish while not tiring
coo


and









yourself out. Generally, the more heavy duty
a rod is expected to perform, the longer the
butt. Ultralight rods and pistol-grip casting
rods have short butts, and a fly rod butt is
practically nonexistent. For fighting tarpon
and other big fish on fly, an angler may choose
to add a fighting butt to a fly rod.
A rod butt is usually finished with some
type of padding, most commonly cork or EVA
foam. Cork is traditional and very popular,
but it's a natural material and the good stuff
is relatively expensive. Cork has gaps in it.
Material with smaller gaps is considered to
be of better quality because it won't crumble
readily. High-end cork looks smooth, almost
like matte-finish plastic. Lower-grade cork has
a henpecked or slightly chewed-on look. This
material is often treated with a filler paste
to smooth it out, but the filler will eventu-
ally be worn away by use. Rubberized cork
is made of small cork chips embedded in a
rubber matrix. This offers a grippy surface with
much-improved durability. Some inexpensive
rods use cork laminate over a rubberized cork
base and if it's not done right it will become
unglued and will be extremely messy.
Foam has become more popular because of
rising cork prices. Modern EVA foam is much
denser than the flocked material that was used
years ago, making it much more
durable. Be careful with insect


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PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


uiall richarlu d r-usaniu rur uiealls 4 1-3i o-oo
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL l- AA RIN tA-1


............. .................................. 23' POLAR WALK AROUND CUDDY 2005
Good Cond! Sleeps 2. Head w/sink & fresh water. 70 gal Fuel 23'POLAR WALK AROUND CUDDY 2005
Tank. DF, Am Fm Radio, BBQ Grill. Ready for day or even T-YAMAHA STROKES, HARDTOP, LIFT KEPT.
over night trips. Incl. Alum Trailer. $49,.OQ9- $11,990.00 $34,900. REDFISHYACHT BROKERS
Call BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 941-639-9400 www.redfishyacht .com
bayshoremarinefl.com





n mfto ,iiiSaniom l SilSf iinU n m~ w


CHANGE

FROM PAGE 5

but more on that later. We are also going to
become more involved with the promotion of
WaterLine, and most importantly, giving back
to the community.
This past week WaterLine held its first trivia
contest on Facebook. Each week we will ask
our Facebook followers a question. They'll have
until a specified time to answer, at which time
all correct answers will be placed into a random
drawing. The winner will win some type of prize
each week. Like us at Facebook.com/Water-
LineMagazine for your chance to win a prize.
We will be getting more involved in our
community. We have a few things in the
making, and as we get closer to those events,
we will keep everybody posted. Just know that
giving back to the community is something I try
to do on a regular basis, and getting WaterLine
involved in giving back is the right thing to do.


A,,usrvr/, Page 19 July 4,2013


Josh and I may disagree on a few things
from time to time, but we are both on the
same page when it comes to maintaining and
improving the quality of WaterLine. I can say
that we both have a passion for what we do.
We want that passion to be directly reflected
in WaterLine each and every week.
Of course, feedback is the best way for
us to know if something works or doesn't.
We once made the mistake of running
the FishFinder on the back of a crossword
puzzle. After a bunch of readers cut out
the crossword with a scissors, it didn't take
them long to realize the fishing reports
were basically useless. We only had to make
that mistake once. On the other hand, the
response from our Facebook trivia contest
was well-received. And why not? Who
doesn't like free stuff? Again, check us out at
Facebook.com/WaterLineMagazine.
As always, I urge anyone to contact
WaterLine Weekly and give us your two cents.
Email me at WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com.
And be safe this 4th of July!


Call 941-429
to list your oat _
m -


FL-


24"98 Bayliner, Bravo 3,
300 HP, F/Il, Full cabin, remote spotlight,
hot water, drop in air,
$14,900 (941)-613-1903


ii ilR l:'- --

25 2004 Wellcrail Coaslal: Twin economical 115HP
Yamaha four strokes w/only 110 hrs. Features include;
hardtop, large cockpit for fishing, cuddy cabin that
sleeps 2 & built in head. Boat was just detailed & ready
to go. Asking l6469. $39,900. Call Ray Mason,
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com

"1qllil7,J ;;;


24' 1994 Robalo 2440 Cuddy: Great buy.T-top, rocket
launchers, livewell, galley and head. Powered by Twin
150 Mercs, serviced on a regular basis. Lift kept and
no bottom paint. Asking only $12,900. Call Ray Mason
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com


repellent, spray-on sunscreen and scented
soft plastics, though the chemicals used
in these products may have adverse effects
on EVA and even your rod finish. Sometimes
manufacturers use other materials such as
rubber, leather, woven graphite or plastic. The
foregrip (the section just ahead of the reel
seat) is usually finished in matching material.
Many rod butts end in a butt cap. The butt
cap is made of more durable material -
rubber, plastic, metal or rubberized cork -
and serves to protect the butt from damage.
It's also the part that actually contacts your gut
when you're fighting a fish. In some cases, the
butt cap is weighted to balance out a very light
rod. If you want to get really fancy, some butt
caps are adjustable for weight, allowing an
angler to fine-tune the feel of the rod.
Rods intended for heavy duty are often
equipped with a gimbal butt, which features
four metal prongs. These are intended for use
with a fighting belt or chair the butt fits
securely into the chair's or belt's gimbal and
prevents the rod from twisting. A gimbal butt is
also good for trolling because it keeps the rod
from rotating as you're dragging a bait. A quality
gimbal butt is usually made of aluminum; some
manufacturers use tough plastic. Plastic is fine
for kingfish and the like, but for true heavy-


duty use you'll want the durability of metal.
Big-game rods often have a solid aluminum
butt with a gimbal incorporated into the end.
That's not overkill for marlin, big sharks and
Goliath grouper. Many rods with gimbal butts
are shipped with a foam or plastic cap over
the metal prongs; this cap is for using the rod
without a fighting belt or chair.
Over the past couple years, split grips have
become very popular. Functionally, they're
pretty much the same as any other rod. They
are a bit lighter. Really, the main difference
is that there's less stuff glued to the rod
blank. Since every time you add something
to the blank you decrease the rod's sensi-
tivity, a split-grip rod is at least somewhat
more sensitive than a rod with the butt
fully covered. There are a couple drawbacks,
though: They don't fit into rod holders as
nicely, and some older anglers find the
thinner grip area tough to hold onto.
This wraps up my series on fishing rod
anatomy. Next time, we'll take a look at the
most basic piece of fishing tackle: The hook.
Jeff Kincaid is the owner and operator of
Capt. Ted's Tackle in Port Charlotte. Contact
him at www.CaptnTedsTackle.com or 941-627-
6800, or stop in at the shop (1189 Tamiami
Trail, in front ofl ngman Marine).


24' CHAPARRAL 240, Loaded, full canvas &
screening, new engine 2009. Two biminis,
galley, enclosed head, sleeps 4, fridge,
inside storage, galvanized trailer.
$18,500. (941)-493-8320

e~fC^?t e Beat


6-foot 3-inches of head room. Berth, Galley Flat,
Sink, Chart Table, Head, Dinette, Double Bed.
Engine 40HP Honda OutboardTrailer Tandem Axle
$29,000.00 CRYSTAL CAY CENTER 941-639-6603
www.crystalcay.com "Major Credit Cards Accepted!"




g^-|| -- 1^


24' Seaswirl Striper, WAC, 225 low hr Johnson,
lift kept, no bottom paint.
Call Marlene 941-525-3796 for pricing & showing
information, or the office 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


I.T I IUOR I LU.H I VVIU" DrIVI,
T-SHALLOW DRAFT INBOARDS,
TRAILER. $26,900
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS
941-639-9400 www.redfishyacht.com


twin Yamaha 4 strokes, fully serviced, full enclosure,
livewell, AC, excellent condition. Asking $57,000.
Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason 941-505-7269






25 1 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter Gps with Sonar. Hard
Top, Comes w/Aluminum trailer. Call BAYSHORE
MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


.4'' 1: 1 F :,:,, M .r.:ury .."hp, E:, Opl-,,' 4 100
Exc. fishing boat w/T-Top. Loaded w/ stuff. 2 coolers,TT,
Hydraulic Steering, Incl. Alum.Tandem Trailer. Ready for Offshore
Fishing. Maybe even trips to the Keys. Only 50hrs since new.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


26' 1994 BAYLINER 2655 CIERA S11
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL N1.ti A RIN


26' MacGregor M, 2005 with Honda OB, trailer, mas-
traising system and more! $20,995 Please call Mar-
lene at 941-525-3796 or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


25 1990 GRADY WHITE SAILFISH $27,500
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker IGA'___ n
Located at BEAUTIFUL i. A RI NA-


26' PENNYAN FB Galley Sleeps 4
New Eng. Low Hrs. or trade for
deck boat. $9,200.
941-223-4368


25' 1994 BaylinerTrophy: Popular fishing & 26' Puisuil Denali 2670: Excelleni condilion,T-200
cruising boat, forward & aft sleeping Yamaha four strokes w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure,
accommodations enclosed head, twin 150
outboards. Asking $7500. windlass, elec. head, Garmin GPS and fishfinder.
Call Ray Mason 941-505-7269. Asking $68,500. Call Cpt. Bob Babineau, 941-626-1329.
Details seaamericayachtsales.com Details seaamericayachtsales.com


~', Lee ~nd.er~,:n


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our m


The Fourth of July seems a good time to
reflect and attempt to continue personal
growth. I'm learning a lot, and maybe I'm
remembering more also. Some of what I've
recently remembered is why I dropped out
of fishery management efforts. I've been
reminded that while most of the folks involved
want to do the right thing, many have hidden
agendas to push. It's reality and I certainly
understand we have to promote our personal
agendas, but it just makes an already uphill
road even harder to climb.
I have attended many gatherings recently,
notably three of the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission and two fisheries
stakeholder meetings hosted by the University
of Florida. We all knew there was strong orga-
nized opposition to our Save the Tarpon efforts
to ban the weighted hook (the so-called Boca
Grande jigs). But I feel strongly we are right,
and I'm crazy enough to believe that right will
prevail. I understand those opposing us have
a lot to lose and want to keep their ways and
income. I am still disappointed that so many
folks either do not understand fishing well
enough to see it's a snagging hook device and
situation or are they more concerned with
money so they fight for it anyway? The facts
and science are becoming less cloudy and will
be crystal clear at the September meeting.
The UF meetings were, surprisingly, totally
different. Tuesday evening was at Mote
Marine. The Sarasota Bay participants were
very positive and optimistic. All efforts were
directed at better communication and focusing
on problem areas; consensus was easy. I will
discuss more details when we get our outlines
back with accurate details so I'm sure I get
facts correct. The Wednesday evening meeting
at Laishley Marina was much better attended,
with several times as many very concerned
folks. Many groups and individuals came to
learn and address our issues. One strange thing
did jump out as odd four members of the
most vocal "conservation" advocates asked a
couple of questions at the meet and greet part,
then walked out without participating. These
meetings were directed at exploring more
stakeholder input for fishery management, yet
local representatives of the leading national
conservation organization left without sharing
their input. It was perplexing to me and others.
Anyway, this larger gathering had a totally
different atmosphere. Maybe the best way to
put it is"not as optimistic:'"They came up with
totally different concepts. We did get some
great ideas from several of the smaller groups


when we broke it up, ideas that could help
show the benefits of more stakeholder partici-
pation. I've seen exactly how productive such
stakeholder input can be in the stock enhance-
ment project that Florida Marine Research
Institute created, which I worked with for a
couple decades. The biggest challenge I see for
such groups is that with unselfish and knowl-
edgeable participants willing to compromise
and learn, it works unbelievably well. The
stock enhancement project, which I've been
active in, promoted the creation and evolution
of the best information on stock enhance-
ment and aquaculture in the world today. It's
the thought-out and worked-out example of
unselfish individuals with their specialized
expertise working through the varied interests,
concerns, challenges and problems to solve
complex issues so much better than scientist
and staff alone in their labs.
The even more positive part is that this
all grew from a problem misunderstanding
about Mote's snook releases. A concerned
individual brought Mote's leadership and the
then Marine Fishery Commission together to
promote better communication and under-
standing between the two major players in
management and conservation. The Snook
Foundation came out of this meeting also.
Ken Haddad was head of FMRI then and
started a stakeholder group to explore stock
enhancement issues to rebuild devastated
fish stocks. His thought was to help restock
after devastating freezes or red tides. We
ended up realizing that we had to solve many
of the aquaculture challenges before we
could provide any fish to stock. This evolved
with many meetings and much stakeholder
and expert input into stock enhancement
and aquaculture, compiled with Mote, FMRI
and many other of the world-leading experts
all working together. The work is about to be
used at our state's new hatchery project in
the Panhandle, funded by BP monies, to help
restore North Florida's fisheries.
It works if the people put fish first, not
their agendas. Bottom line is while it's uphill
and not always successful, if you don't try you
can't succeed! Give responsible stakeholders a
voice and let them help improve our manage-
ment options.
Capt. Van Hubbard is a highly respected
outdoor writer and fishing guide. He has been
a professional USCG-licensed year-round guide
since 1976, and has been fishing the South-
west Florida coast since 1981. Contact him at
941-740-4665 or VanHubbard@CaptVan.com.


I~'.
pi't L~




II


.e400


2' wellcraft 26u Aft UaDin35u Mercruiser 26u M' -
Alpha Drive New 60 Gal Fuel Tank Pressure Water
System Stove Top Fridge- Bilge Pump Alum
Tandem Axle Trailer $7500.00 Crystal Cay Center
(941) 639-6603 www.crystalcay.com


27' 2012 CUDA demo offered al 5125,000
Exciting fishing boat w/ ALL amenities for family too!
Rosano 941-315-6989 McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker I
Located in BEAUTIFUL I-I.l R IN'.A--1


Si. a~


28 Larson Express Cruiser 2006 $39,900
Call Dick Horste For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL INIM AT RI NA-I


28 MAMAGAU sport 1-iserman, 1989
(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler I/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, encl. head.
$26,00 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales


7' SUNRUNNER Twin 4 cyl. 28' Regal Express Cruiser 2003 Like New! $49,900
Volvo-Penta OD's, Good Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
condition $6,995, Trailer McCallMarineSales.com
Available 941-268-8570 Licensed Yacht Broker I
__ Located at BEAUTIFUL I-i A RN-


z2 worlna Cat uub uarmin 321u- 4uu I-isn -inaer -vlnH- -
DiveTank Rack 4 Curtains Head Queen Bed Sink
Stereo -Weight 4600 LBS 8'6" Beam -Twin Honda 225
HP Motors 2005 Under 400 Hrs, Just Serviced Alum.
Tandem Trailer Ready to GO. $55,500.00 CRYSTAL CAY
CENTER 941 639-6603 www.CrystalCay.com


Call For details a41-6bz-uuib
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker iI.
Located at BEAUTIFUL -I:N A RI N, VlI


28' 2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin,
310 dual prop AC, GPS, bridge enclosure,
electric head, full galley, 45 mph, only 90 hrs.
lift kept. Excellent condition.
$28,500. 941-639-7890.






28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000,T/250HP,Yamaha's,
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000,
941-966-5400






28 Chaparral 2002: NEW LISTING! Well appointed,
walk thru w/s, 2 staterooms, generator w/2 hrs,
T-5.0 Volvos, just detailed. A lot of boat for $38,900.
Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269.


ut-St


28.5' FOUR WINDS 2005 Cruiser $58,500
Call Richard Rosano For Details! 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker -
Located at BEAUTIFUL I ,R[.M R INA*


29' 1999 Sea Ray Sundancer: New listing,
fully equipped, just detailed. Radar, generator,
full enclosure, powered byT-240HP Mercruisers,
recently serviced and runs great.
Asking $42,500. Call Ray Mason
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com






23' 1997 Pro Line: Hardtop, new upholstery,
rebuilt 200HP Johnson Ocean Pro, super clean
fishing machine. Cuddy cabin sleeps two.
Great boat, great price. Asking $13,900
Call Ray Mason 941-505-7269
seaamericayachtsales.com


29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10,
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator.
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600.


mrfiVis


uall Hicnara Hosano For uetalls 41i-3ib-baaa
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker I____RNA___
Located at BEAUTIFUL I- RI NA-I.%





flan**mnnmefl'in-'inn nam
maI Uuatiiin hseani suliiMmg.un iil


Florida in a



sweet state of


fAubp.,,l Page 21 July 4,2013


Call 941-429'
to list your tItay!



m0u -


By Terry Tomalin
Tampa Bay Times


CRYSTAL RIVER Don Chancey spotted
a window in the weather."l think we might
be able to run out there, find a few scallops
and get back before the storms roll in";'the
charter boat captain said."lt is worth a try.":'
The seawall at the Plantation on Crystal
River was packed with boats early in the
morning. July 1 is the traditional start of
scallop season, but this year, Gov. Rick Scott
opened state waters two days early to boost
local economies.
"We've been packed;'" said Michael Mancke,
director of sales and marketing for the resort
that caters to boaters, anglers and divers.
"Everybody has been getting their limit.":'
Chancey, a Homosassa fishing guide who
hangs up his rods and reels during scallop
season, planned to run south out of the river
mouth and avoid the crowds.
"I've been seeing a lot of scallops the last
couple of weeks while I have been fishing;'
he said. "I know just where to go."
You'll find scallops throughout the Gulf
of Mexico, but you can only harvest these
prized shellfish from the Pasco-Hernando
county line to the west bank of the Mexico
Beach Canal in Bay County.
These tasty mollusks need the right mix of
saltwater and freshwater to survive. If rains
are heavy, too much freshwater can flood
the bay and wipe out a crop. If the water is
too salty, they won't survive, either.
The state's prime scallop grounds -
Steinhatchee, Homosassa and Crystal River
- have the perfect combination of fresh
and saltwater.
These fishing towns go scallop crazy
during the summer months as locals and
tourists flock to the coast in search of the
treasured bay scallop, which cannot be
bought or sold on the commercial market.
There's only one way to get fresh scallops,
and that's where Chancey comes in.
"I prefer a low tide and a sunny day;' he
said as we anchored up on our spot, about 2
miles from the river's mouth. "But some-
times you just have to make the best of
what you have."
High winds, scattered thunderstorms and
poor visibility posed a challenge to Chanc-
ey's crew. Ideally, it's best to hunt scallops
on a slack tide, when the grass blades stand
straight up. That's because bay scallops, like
most wild creatures, are masters of camou-
flage. It takes a keen eye and steady hand


SCALLOP FACTS
Scallop season along Florida's Gulf Coast runs
through Sept. 24. There are advantages to
waiting later in the season. First, the animals
are bigger, which means more meat for the
table. Second, most people think the grass
beds have been picked clean. So on a weekday
in August, you pretty much have the place to
yourself.
It is legal to land up to 2 gallons of whole bay
scallops in the shell, or 1 pint of scallop meat
each day during the open season. Recreational
scallopers are not allowed to possess more than
10 gallons of whole bay scallops in the shell or
a half gallon of meat aboard any boat.
The law requires that a vessel display a
divers-down flag (red with a white diagonal
stripe), whenever divers or snorkelers are in the
water. The flag must be at least 20 by 24 inches
if displayed on a boat; at least 12 by 12 inches
if towed on a float by the diver or snorkeler.
In open waters, vessels must make an effort
to stay 300 feet from a divers-down flag. In a
river, channel or inlet, the distance is 100 feet.
Vessels may operate within those distances,
but only at idle speed.

IF YOU GO
The Plantation on Crystal River offers special
packages forscallopers during the summer. Go to
plantationoncrystalriver.com for information.

to locate these critters as they hide in
the thick beds of eel and turtle grass that
flourish in the shallows.
Once a scallop is spotted, the critter often
tries to run. These mollusks, unlike their clam
and oyster cousins, can swim. By squeezing
their shells together, scallops expel a jet of
water that rockets them across grass beds.
After an hour scouring the grass beds at
three locations, Chancey's scallopers found
several dozen shellfish. But a wall of thun-
derstorms barreled down from the south.
"We better get moving;'" he said. "I would
hate to get caught out here. I don't mind
rain, but I can't stand lightning."
When Chancey reached the river mouth, he
noticed that the pack of boats to the north
had yet to pick up their anchors and head for
port. As the storm approached, several boats
tried to run for it, but one by one they disap-
peared behind a gray curtain of rain.
"We've got enough for lunch" Chancey
said. "It's always better to be safe than
sorry."


'SERVIT*.t


rct.rr YAMAHA


For ALL Your Boating Needs


Certified Technicians Licensed & Insured

Service, Parts & Accessories
visit: Doalldockside.com for SPECIALSI


Port Charlotte 941-697-7029


Nissan 0 Fmtory


cleanest Sea Ray's on the market. Fully Loaded! Radar,
Cold Air Conditioning, Generator, way to much to list a true
must see. Twin 5.7 Bravo Three's Dual Prop's
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


30'u atalina MK2 wing Keel, roller main and Jib,
Diesel powered.
$29K
Call Ed 941-628-0167 or 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


30' Cruiser Ind. Boat
Twin 350s -10' Beam
$18,000.00
CRYSTAL CAY CENTER
941-639-6603 Visit website for more pictures.
www.crystalcay.com


31 Spoilciall 2002 3150: Lill kepI,T- Meicruiser MPIs,
5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
$7,000. $69,000. Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason 941-505-7269

q SOLD!"




32' 2000 CHRIS CRAFT 328 Express Cruiser $39,900
Cal Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com


32' Carver Mariner
(Two to choose from call for pricing)
Call Tod at 941-457-0131 or
Ed at 941-628-0167 or 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


ma .


O. /-lI/-.LII/-f SUUwO, OU Ilip TrdlllIdI,
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
Licensed Yacht Broker $79,000. 941-347-4670
Locatensed acht BEAUTIFUL I email irvina32@centurylink.net

REDUCED!!!!


30' MAINSHIP RUM RUNNER 2004 33' HarrisTri 1983, diesel powered
ECONOMICAL SINGLE DIESEL,CRUISE AT FAST and FUN
16-18KTS, NICE CLEAN BOAT. $93,00 $84,900. $29K
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400 Call Tod 941-457-0131 at
www.redfishyacht.com Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


30' SEA RAY SEDAN BRIDGE Needs world
Call Allen Richards For Details 941-716-
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker B
Located at BEAUTIFUL I.MARIN


31I U t U LM I flN O31 $1 I,Ut
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-3
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker -
Located at BEAUTIFUL G Ls ta ,-,,i


33' WELLCRAFT COASTAL 2004 T-DIESEL
INBOARDS, TOWER W/UPPER HELM,
AIR, GENERATOR. $447,00 $99,500.
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
www.redfishyacht.com






34' Meridian 2007 Sedan Bridge w/diesels: Excellent
condition!T-Cummins, generator, bow & stern
thrusters, two staterooms, cherry cabinets, washed
weekly and maintained by prof, mechanic. Great Loop
boat, must see. Asking $240,000 $195,000 Ray Mason
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com

REDUCED


Call Richard Rosano 941-315-6989 Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL Licensed Yacht Broker I =
I, A lRINA-NA1 Located at BEAUTIFUL G I-MARINA-I


lElinders l -rtM""
Englewood 941-475-7055









Call 941-429 3j0- -
to list your b1h8oatdlS _.!rS -



U-L


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070 Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker Licensed Yacht Broker
Located at BEAUTIFUL [NI A M RINA, Located at BEAUTIFUL G IM A RI NA


JUST REDUCED!


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com


Cakk Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCallMarineSales.com
r- 13311S


Little angler,


If you've read my column for
a while, you know I am a huge
proponent of getting kids into
fishing. Nothing makes me
happier than to see a youngster catching his
first sizeable bass. You don't always have to
be out in a boat to get a quality bass, either.
Hunter Clement showed that with his first big
bass, caught from the shoreline at Saddle Creek.
It's always nice to see parents and grandpar-
ents taking time out of their busy daily sched-
ules to get kids out fishing. In this instance, it's
no different. Lila O'Malley, Hunter's grand-
mother, and her husband John McCorey made
time to take Hunter and his cousin, Brandon
O'Malley, down to an area near Lakeland called
Saddle Creek. There are pits and ponds all
over this property, many of which offer huge
stretches of shoreline where you can drop a
lawn chair and sit back while the kids fish.
I work with Hunter's mom, Tammy, and
she knows my passion for bass fishing. When
she called me and told me about the bass

-THE OR


WATERPRO


M INSHORE
FISHING
S CHARTS


fl LCUSTOM


that Hunter caught, I had to run over to her
desk to get a look at the picture she had.
There was Hunter, holding a 6-pound bass. It's
awesome to see young anglers getting into
the sport, and especially being rewarded with
a nice catch like this. I am sure that is a bass
that will stay with him for a while. I know this
because Tammy said they wanted to mount
his first big fish.
Hopefully, this keeps Hunter driven and in
search of larger bass that are sure to come.
Maybe Missy and I need to get this boy out
on the big water and turn him loose on
Kissimmee. There is nothing like hauling a
10-pound monster out of the lily pads to get
your heart rate moving early in the morning.
Better yet, maybe I can talk Hunter's dad into
getting a boat and showing them
some spots around the local lakes


I CHART L
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PUNTA GORDA, FL 33950
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nlaniEmnnimel'ni-nnaS nam


Ph.:.I.:. pr.:. I.3.e.


RIGINAL-


OF CHARTS
resAW,





nlW.hn me.nFelmin .-m'n name


- but that's a topic for
another day. .
Bobby Lane has done a
great job with getting kids
involved in fishing. The
program he started and
works with continuously
through the Bartow High
School has been something ..
of a marvel. It's great to
go out on the lake and see
those kids fishing in tourna-
ments. Kids from all over
the local Lakeland area are
now competing at their level
through their high schools.
It's awesome. My hat's off
to Bobby for the great work
he has done and to Bartow
High for being the hub that
helps make this successful.
I would have killed for a
high school bass league of some sort back in
my day. To see the college kids now competing
for a spot in the Bassmaster Classic just goes
to show you how the sport of bass fishing has
grown. And it all starts with kids like Hunter.
No child should ever be deprived of a chance
to be outdoors and do something that he or
she likes. Who knows, maybe the future Kevin
VanDam is living under your roof at the ripe age
of eight. You never know unless you give them


fAtji K.*^ Page 23 July 4,2013


.. ii...... .


SARASOTA POWER SQUADRON 941-400-6467
Hurricanes and Boats Sem inar..................................... .................................... 6:30 to 7:45 p.m July 18
Hurricanes and Boats Seminar (advanced) ............................. .................................... 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 1
Mastering the Rules of the Road Seminar................................................................. 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. Aug. 15
VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-485-7245
Call for upcoming courses.
PEACE RIVER SAIL & POWER SQUADRON (PUNTA GORDA) 941-637-0766
Call for upcoming courses.
CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
Call for upcoming courses.
Provided by Greg Scotten



PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
About Boating Safely.................................. July 20, Aug. 17, Sept. 21..... Sarasota ..................941-758-5954
Boating Skills and Seamanship................... Sept. 5............................. Sarasota ...... ........ 941-758-5954
About Boating Safely....................................... Aug. 3....................... ....... Punta Gorda ............941-639-3811
Boating Skills and Seamanship........... ........ Sept. 16........................... Venice ......... ........ 941-426-5523
Boating Skills and Seamanship ........................ Sept. 30 ................................ Englewood .............. 941-758-5954
Provided by Dave Nielsen


riTi nr ^ f ;


:;


SUNDAY
unripe i' 41 ja n'
,un e; 27 p fni
M,:nri:, ie .I 11 3 mi
Moonset: 7:57 p.m.
Moon Phase
0% Waning crescent
Major Times
12:42 a.m. 2:42 a.m.
1:06 p.m. -3:06 p.m.
Minor Times
6:11 a.m. -7:11 a.m.
7:57 p.m. 8:57 p.m.
Prediction: Best


THURSDAY
Sunrise: 6:40 a.m.
Sunset: 8:27 p.m.
* Moonrise: 3:49 a.m.
Moonset: 5:36 p.m.
Moon Phase
11% Waning crescent
Major Times
10:43 a.m.- 12:43 p.m.
11:07 p.m.- 1:07 a.m.
Minor Times
3:49 a.m. 4:49 a.m.
5'36pm -6'36pm
Prediction: Average

MONDAY
..unn e 11 41. a n'
,urie; 2'-7 p fni
Mi,:,:inrire 7 i0' .3 m
Moonset: 8:39 p.m.
Moon Phase
0% New moon
Major Times
1:30 a.m. 3:30 a.m.
1:53 p.m. 3:53 p.m.
Minor Times
7:02 a.m. 8:02 a.m.
8:39 p.m. 9:39 p.m.
Prediction: Best


FRIDAY
Sunrise: 6:40 a.m.
Sunset: 8:27 p.m.
Moonrise: 4:34 a.m.
Moonset: 6:25 p.m.
Moon Phase
6% Waning crescent
Major Times

11:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m.
Minor Times
4:34 a.m. 5:34 a.m.
6-25pm -725pm
Prediction: Good

TUESDAY
,unri r 1 4- f ni
,un ie 2' p fni
M,:,:irni.e 7 54 a mf
Moonset: 9:18 p.m.
Moon Phase
2% Waxing crescent
Major Times
2:16 AM- 4:16 AM
2:39 PM 4:39 PM
Minor Times
7:54 AM 8:54 AM
9:18 PM 10:18 PM
Prediction: Better++


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 6:40 a.m.
Sunset: 8:27 p.m.
Moonrise: 5:22 a.m.
Moonset: 7:13 p.m.
Moon Phase
2% Waning crescent
Major Times

12:18 p.m.- 2:18 p.m.
Minor Times
5:22 a.m. 6:22 a.m.
7-13pm -8-13pm
Prediction: Better

WEDNESDAY
<,ri e 1: 4-' ja n
,unrie ; "7 p fni
M ,:,:,nri, e : a: 4i. 3 n,
Moonset: 9:55 p.m.
Moon Phase
5% Waxing crescent
Major Times
3:01 a.m.- 5:01 a.m.
3:24 p.m. 5:24 p.m.
Minor Times
8:46 a.m. 9:46 a.m.
9:55 p.m. 10:55 p.m.
Prediction: Better


Using our solunar tables: Wild creatures are more in tune with the natural world than we are. The
sun and moon even when they are out of sight exert forces they can feel. Weather and tide will
also play a role, but expect fish and game to be more active during the major and minor solunar times.


the opportunity. I remember
when my son started fishing
with me. He spent more time
sleeping in the boat than he
did fishing, but that was OK.
Just the fact that he liked
being out on the water was
good enough for me. He even
........ .managed to catch the biggest
bass in a tournament one
year with me, weighing in
one better than 7 pounds on a
buzzbait. Go figure.
Bottom line: Get the kids
out fishing. If you don't
have a boat, find a stretch of
shoreline to fish like Hunter
did. That's a great way to go
out and fish without spending
a lot of money on a boat.
Once you hook a bass, the
fight is on. The fish don't
care whether you're standing on the deck of a
bass boat or standing next to Grandpa on the
shoreline. Get them hooked on fishing, and one
day they too will take their kids out and do the
same thing.
Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fisherman
based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes throughout
Florida's Heartland with his wife and tourna-
ment partner, Missy Snapp. Contact him at Greg.
Bartz@SummitHoldings.com.


Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull.
Full New Tanks. Asking $75,000
Call 941-408-9572


42' Pearson 424, Westerbeke diesel, davits,
solar, ready to cruise 1980 at $81,500
Please call Tod at 941-457-0131
or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


---- -

Eddyline Carribean
The next generation of sit on top kayaks. Lightweight,
stable and quick. 12' long and only 451bs
Beautifully finished with high gloss
carbonlite material. $1279
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-



Elie Gulf 120XE 12 foot long, 350 Ib capacity
Stable fishing Ergoflex Seating system,
Bow and Center hatches
$729 Call 941-966-5477
A Silent Sports Outfitter


A


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCallMarineSales.com
Licensed Yacht Broker B__
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44' Marine Trader Trawler: Ready for Restoration
Call CRYSTAL CAY CENTER for Details.
$10,000.00 Ask for Mikes Trawler.
(941) 639-6603 "Major Credit Cards Accepted"
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GREAT BUY!





52' VISTA MOTORYACHT, LIVE ABOARD/CRUISER
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-




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bow mounted anchor system. $1159
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Santa Cruz Sit On Top Fishing Kayak New 2013
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Optional Live bait tank
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IL V.


I]QT





Pg40ueamosoNmModm el ami
n, .E.., .,,u';,k ..a- a*n*.
i4- WWKiBm O, i -Bin W~i ntd I glil a-***id WlWO i


Spearfishing allowed off Collier County


Associated Press

NAPLES For the first time in more than
60 years, spearfishing is now allowed in
state waters in Collier County.
Saltwater species, including the nonna-
tive invasive lionfish, can be targeted with a
spearing device in the county's state waters,
according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission.
The recent repeal of rules that prohib-
ited spearing should facilitate the harvest
of lionfish that are negatively impacting
Florida's native fish and wildlife, the FWC
said in a statement. Spearfishing is among
the most effective methods for lionfish
control and removal, along with the use of
hand-held nets.
The Collier Board of County Commis-
sioners sent a letter to the FWC earlier
this year requesting the repeals to allow
for lionfish harvest after the first one was
documented on Jan. 13 in state waters off
the county. The ban on spearing had been in
place since the early 1950s, well before the
creation of the FWC.
Statewide regulations on the use of
spears will apply in state waters off Collier
County, the FWC noted in its statement.
Those regulations include: Spearing is not
allowed in freshwater or when targeting
freshwater species; within 100 yards of a
public swimming beach, any commercial or
public fishing pier or any part of a bridge
from which public fishing is allowed; within
100 feet of any part of a jetty that is above
the water's surface except for the last 500
yards of a jetty that extends more than
1,500 yards from the shoreline; in Monroe
County from Long Key north to the Dade
County line; and in any body of water
under the jurisdiction of the Department
of Environmental Protection's Division of
Recreation and Parks.


Several species are also off limits.
Those that cannot be speared are: billfish,
spotted eagle ray, sturgeon, manta ray,
sharks, bonefish, tarpon, goliath grouper,
snook, blue crab, Nassau grouper, spotted
sea trout, red drum, weakfish, stone
crab, pompano, African pompano, permit,
tripletail, lobster and many species of


ornamental tropical fish such as surgeon-
fish, trumpet fish, angelfish, butterfly fish,
porcupine fish, cornet fish, squirrelfish,
trunkfish, damselfish, parrotfish, pipefish,
sea horse, puffers and triggerfish, with the
exception of gray and ocean triggerfish.
A recreational fishing license is not
required for anyone targeting lionfish,


but all other spear fishers must have a
recreational fishing license, unless they are
exempt from the requirement. All regula-
tions also apply, including seasons, bag
limits and size limits.
Learn more about Florida's spearing
rules at MyFWC.com/Fishing by clicking on
"Recreational" and "Spearing."


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14 pMurs/^ Page 24 July 4, 2013


IV&









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GRI CRS
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E-UUCUE-I
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HOMES FOR SALE
Z1020




2 ACRES, Venice
3br/2ba home. County
water only 10%/ Down
owner financing. 941-488-
2418 or 496-9252


ENGLEWOOD POOL
HOME 950 BAYSHORE DR.
3/2/3 W POOL ON 1 ACRE.
VAULTED CEILINGS, GRAN-
ITE & SS APPL. TILE ROOF.
WELL KEPT HOME W BEAUTI-
FUL LANDSCAPING. ASKING
$379,000 941-473-4121


"o' -j


POOL HOME ON 1/4 ACRE
LOT WITH SPECTACULAR
LAKE VIEWS.
HOME FEATURES SOARING CATH.
CEILINGS, SLIDERS IN LIVING & MAS-
TER TO LET THE OUTSIDE IN, NEW
ROOF 2012 POOL, CAGE, EQUIP-
MENT & HEATER INSTALLED IN 2010
NEW PAINT INSIDE & OUT.
$189,900. TARPON COAST REALTY
CALL RON MCGURE 941-2234781






HARBOUR OAKS
GATED_COMMUNITY
(Adjacent to Deep Creek)
3Bdrm/2Ba/2CG.
Pool Home! $279,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty




Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN''


NORTH PORT 3/2/2 Furnished!
New Carpet, Tile, Paint.
Newer Roof, A/C, Hot Water.
Tiled Lanai. Community
Pool, Clubhouse, Tennis.
$120,000
MLS C5105704
"Selling With Integrity"
941-629-2100

AG GR IVE


22284 Laramore Ave.
RENTING? WHY? When you
can own this totally
remodeled, light, bright,
open 1100 SF 2/2 on lushly
landscaped corner lot
Public water & sewer. No
deed restrictions. NOT in
flood zone. $78,000.
PATTY GILLESPIE
RE/MAX Anchor
941-875-2755


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


ARCADIA 3/2, 2 story home
w/workshop, orange grove &
5 acres. $150,000 also Up to
20 acres avail. 863-494-5266

S R CED !


44/ rerl trreet
3/2/2 Updated! In Great
Location! $99,900
By Owner 941-677-8550
Or visit www.KL30.com
3/2/CP POOL HOME
Near P.C. Beach Complex.
1849 sq ft. Newer A/C,
Roof, PGT Windows & More.
1 year home warranty.
Offered at $139,900.
Marge Trayner, Bud Trayner
Realty (941) 380-2823


IF


rFJr i ,nM/L I I I
Your search is over. Custom
home in quiet neighborhood
3/2/2 LR/DR/FR/Lrg Kit.
1171 Richter St. $149,000
Bill Norris,
Bob Melvin Properties
941-380-2400


24458 Pine Ridge PI.
Located in Gated Comm. of
Suncoast Lakes! 3Bed/2Ba/2CG
MUST SEE! MLS#C7043725
$189,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty


Remodeled 2/2/2 pool home
with dockage for 65' plus
sailboat, depth maintained by
city. Dead end street in
restricted neighborhood.
REDUCED! 5189,900
Jerry Hayes, 941-456-1155
ReMax Marina Park
PUNTA GORDA, Brick Pool
Home on 5.6 ac; 2400 sq. ft., 1
year home warranty. Fireplace,
laminate floors, fenced, storage.
1 horse per acre. Also a
detached unit with apt, stalls,
tack room, 2-4 c/p & storage.
$299,900. Marge Trayner, Bud
Trayner Realty (941) 380-2823


6 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
PRAIRIE CREEK
PARK BEAUTY!
MANY CUSTOM FEATURES
LIKE NEW 3400SF 3 BDRM,
SPACIOUS MASTER STE & BATH
+ OFFICE, 4 FULL BATHS,
FORMAL DINING RM, LIVING RM,
GREAT RM, LANAI AND OVER-
SIZED 2 STALL ATT GARAGE
$4.59,000 Now $449K
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLIUSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304 j


nv n, v Lwn. ,nnl. O Uv
226 Jennifer Dr., 2523 total
SF, Immac. 3/2/2.5 w/Pool,
Granite, S/S Appl. Near
Beaches. Asking $ 285,000
941-698-9179 941-380-0295


HOMES FOR SALE
Z1020


I ^H
ROTONDA
Like new 3 Bedroom, 2 bath 2
car garage pool home on over-
sized lot. Lots of upgrades
including granite, step & tray
ceilings, Large pavered
pool/patio area with a master
bath to die for! Only 269,900
Tarpon Coast Realty
Call Ron McGurie 941-2234781
"---- I^


157 Cougar Way. Beautiful
completely remodeled.
3/2/2 Pool Home. Peaceful
setting on a double lot.
$229,000
941-626-8200
BAY BRIDGE HOMES LLC
#CBC1254261

YOU WANT ME
to List Your Home

SHELLEE GUINTA
22 YEARS OF AWARD
WINNING EXPERIENCE




ALMAR & ASSOCIATES
941-426-4534


W
VENICE, Pine Brook, By
Owner. 3/2/2, pool, on cul de
sac, partially fenced, ideal for
several cars/boat. 5 mins to
beach/41/I-75. 941-497-6655
S WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


ruNI IA OunUA ISL.SO
Boating Bargain! 2/2/2+,
Lanai, 80' Seawall,15' Dock,
Ready to Update. $200,000.
Marianne Lilly,
REI/MXHarbor 941-764-7585
WaterfrontHomeBuyer.com


0bU+ of frontage. 1+ acre
house, garage, marina, pavil-
lion $225,000. 941-639-6269

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040


LAKE SUZY, 11335 SW
Essex Dr. Located in
Kingsway Golf Course Area.
2+Bed/Den, 2 Bath, 2CG
Single Unit! Meticulas!
MLS#C7043538 $195,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-276-4459
Jill Brouwer Realty



NEED CASH?


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040







THE LANDINGS
Beautiful 4/3/3 Condo, with
private elevator. 2000+ SqFt.
Granite countertops, wood
cabinets, custom tile and car-
pet. 10'-12' ceilings. Minutes
from Boca Grande.
Priced to sell $269,900
Surfside Realty & Co.
Jim Brasse 941-662-5604
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net

MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE



PALM HARBOR HOMES
4/2 Stock Sequoia 2, 200
sq ft $12K OFF!
TEXT: STORE 126A
TO: 313131
For details call John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


r uiil r a.i\l/r l ./ C./ uJ.5L
Riverside Drive WATERFRONT,
Water-views,Gulf access! Pri-
vate Dock & Lift. Call or text
$69,900 941-451-6996


S RESIDENT OWNlu
PUNTA GORDA
8320 RIVERSIDE DR. #64,
55+ RESIDENTIAL OWNED
PARK, 60x14 TURNKEY, 2/2,
W/D, BOAT RAMP, GULF
ACCESS, ASKING $59,000
CONTACT ED RUSSELL
941-380-8879
GATEWAY REAL ESTATE

VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com

Employ Classified!


VENICE, 2BR/2BA
DBL WIDE MOBILE HOME,
CLOSE TO BEACH
FULLY FURN, IN BEAUTIFUL
BAY INDIES $10,000
OR RENT FOR $900/MO
516-728-2991

MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
1095


ARCADIA, 1473 S. E. Plum
Nearly New 3BR/2BA Home
on 1/2 Acre. Fenced in
Rear Yard. Appliances Stay.
Available Now!
Financing Available.
P & I Payments as
Low as $450.00. Mo. WAC.
Ready Now!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122


MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
1095


MOVE IN TODAY!
OWNER RELOCATING, MUST SELL!
PORT CHARLOTTE ADULT COMMUNITY
Spacious 2/2 Double Better Hurry!
Harbor View Park. Huge Lanai.
Fishing Pier. Squeeky clean,
all newer A/C, laminate floors.
$29,996, Call Mike 941-366-6308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


NOKOMIS MFG Home 4 Sale
55+ Condo Park
Excellent Cond.
call Phil Deal 941-485-9685


VILILOC
PUNTA GORDA- CLEAN
2 BDR/1.5BATH, Large
Screen Room, Car Port.
Set Up! Quiet Lot
& Park! $10,900. obo
Call Greg 941-626-7829






RAINFOREST
IMMACULATE!
1500 sq. ft. 3 bedroom.
Nicely furnished.
Oversized lot.
Air in Lanai and More.
$59,995
Call Mike, 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com






SETT NRDA
IMMACULATE 2/2 DOUBLE.
LOTS OF EXTRAS & UPDATES.
NEWER AIR & ROOF.
PUNTA GORDA
BETTER HURRY!
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


THE ARBORS
55+ Community in Osprey
2 Bd/2Ba + carport.
Top of the line Jacobson
Mfg. Home. Like new, neu-
tral colors, all appliances
stay. You own your own lot.
No pets. Community pool.
Really Great Location.
$69,000 NOW $59,000!!
FSBO, Partly owner finance
941-918-1667


HOMES
oll1110 -


NC MOUNTAINS
2.75 ACRES W/MTN VIEWS,
DRIVEWAY, AND
EASY FINANCING $9,500.
ALSO HAVE CABIN
ON 1.53 ACRES W/NEW WELL
AND SEPTIC $62,500
EZ TO FINISH. 828-286-1666


I RII I i.EIur lI~, 33
2011 Camper on 1 acre &
1/4. New Septic sys, water
& elec. Near Lake Chatuge &
hunting & fishing. $69,900
941-698-0960


HOMES FOR RENT
1210





2/2 Oak Forest 55+, PC..........$625
2/2/1 Den, Fenced Yard, PC...$725
2/2/1 Community Pool, PC.....$750
3/2/2 w/Lawn Care, Lk Suzy.$1100
3/2/2 Updated Lg Bonus Rm, DC..$1250
FULL PROPERTY LIST AVAILABLE ONLINE
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE
YOUR PROPERTY

AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS *

2/2/1, Tile Floors,
Bersell Ave., P.C.
$650/mo
3/2/CP, Lanai,
Buckeye Ave., P.C.
$900/mo

*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com





CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
-A-ABring your pets!A-A
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt. only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME
DEEP CREEK- Absolutely
gorgeous 3/2/2 with pool.
1295 (inc discount). View at
flarentals.net or call Realty
Management at 941-625-3131.
ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-o333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com


tor a complete LIST o 10I
eraportcharlotte.com
$1200...3/2/21910SqFt............PC
$950.3/2/2 1464SFComPool..EU
$750.......2/1 840 SqFt......... PC
$700...2/1.5 905 SqFt.................PC
$700..2/1 1031 SqFt..............PC
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!


* 3/2/1 pool screen lanai all
tile fresh paint on golf course
Rotonda $1100
* 1i1cp DUPLEX N. Eng.
water, sewer & lawn inc
quiet on bus route $525

West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-0718
www.rentalsflorida.net

*NEED A RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals,Inc941-625-RENT





Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


HOMES FOR RENT
1210



InvestorsChoice Real Estate
A Falm-ased Business






VENICE
3/2.5 WOODBRIDGE CONDO $2100

2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice
2/2 Homes from ... $1600
3/2 Homes from ... $1800
3/2 Pool Homes from..$2200
Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2/2
SAILBOAT CANAL/ DOCK, SPLIT
PLAN $950/MO 941-875-
9425
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2/2
SAILBOAT CANAL/ DOCK, SPLIT
PLAN $950/MO 941-875-
9425
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/1.5/1
Bachmann Blvd & Atwater
$795 941-426-8714
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2
On lake w/dock, fenced yard,
large lanai, NS. $1050/mo
941-740-6431/941-769-4077
Advertise Today!
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2
Pool, appliances, vaulted
ceilings $1,150 941-766-0780
PUNTA GORDA 2/2/1 PGI,
Greenbelt, beautiful, spac., all
tile,NP/NS,incl.lawncare, Must
See!! $895 941-423-2643


PUNTA GORDA
2/2/CP in Gated Community
w/ Pool & Spa.
Fully Furnished, Lanai,
1000 Sq. Ft. Under A/C,
Washer & Dryer, Utility Shed.
$675. mo. + 1st & Last Sec.
941-204-7548
PUNTA GORDA Beautiful
3/2/2 ranch, canal off Peace
River, 2170 SF, Ig lanai, newer
appliances. $1200 mo. Call
Joe 719-687-4750
PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3/2/2 $1100 mo. unf. or
furn. $1200/mo
annual lease 941-629-3279
PUNTA GORDA, Cleveland
sect, 3/2/2, all appls, all tile,
window treatment, hurricane
shutters $850 mo. owner 718-
465-6388 or (718)864-6482


WE NEED RENTALS
Reduced Mgmt Fees


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240

BEAUTIFUL RIVER
VIEWS EL JOBEAN -
2BR/2BA WITH COVERED
PARKING, POOL, FISHING
PIER,. ANNUAL LEASE
UNFURNISHED W/D INCLUDED
$825/MO INCLDS. WATER,
SEWER & BASIC CABLE
No PETS. 941-766-0504
OR 941-286-4183
DEEP CREEK 2/2 or 3/2, tile
cath. ceil, wood cab. granite,
W/D, lanai $725+ up, pets ok
(941)-626-1514 or 661-4539
* COMM. POOL **
55+ COMMUNITY IN THE
HEART OF PT. CHARLOTTE
1 & 2/BR CONDOS CALL
MARY 941-629-8190


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240

PT. CHARLOTTE*
UPGRADED 2/2 CONDO
WITH COMM. POOL. CLOSE
TO PC AND LAKE SuzY
MARY 941-629-8190
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2 off
Kings Hwy, Pool, Tennis, close to
shopping, water incl. Furn avail
$725/mo 941-286-5003
PORT CHARLOTTE, 2/2 cen-
trally located, newly renovat-
ed, 1st fir, water incl., Sm pets
ok $750 +sec. 941-286-6252
PORT CHARLOTTE, Central
Prom/Parkside Area; Deluxe
refurbished, 1/2 UNF. Condos.
Avail immed. Walk to Hospi-
tals, Promenades, Shopping.
55+, NO PETS, F/L/SD. $550-
$700, 941-276-0327
PUNTA GORDA Isles, Brand
new Magdalena Gardens villa.
3/2/1 $895 (with discount).
View at flarentals.net or call
Realty Management at
941-625-3131 941-625-3131
VENICE ISLAND 55+
2BR/2BA, Pool, 2 Blocks
to beach, shopping, No
pets, smoking $900/ mth
941-493-1036

I DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
WOW% 1300

ENGLEWOOD EAST -
VERY UNIQUE! 2 Bdrm plus,
2 Bath, Carport. $775/mo
+ security. 941-460-0506
I PORT CHARLOTTE
2/1 off Midway & Harbor.
New Bath, Updated & clean.
$645 (941)483-0085
PUNTA GORDA 2/1
Totally remodeled, all tile, W/D
hookup, private driveway,
quiet dead end st. $675/M,
1st & Security. 203-494-8552

APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
L 1320

ENGLEWOOD
AFFORDABLE
1 BEDROOM APTS. 62+
Income limits apply.
1 GROVE CITY
G MANOR
...... 941-697-4677
TDD 614-442-4390
ENGLEWOOD EAST -
VERY UNIQUE! 2 Bdrm plus,
2 Bath, Carport. $775/mo
+ security. 941-460-0506




2br w/ den 2 ba 1300sf,
Swimming pool
941-473-0450

NORTH PORT
Victoria Point Apts at
Sumter & Appomattox
Between US 41 & 1-75.
Accepting Applications
for lBr & 2Br
Conveniently --
located close to schools
shopping, entertainment,
& beaches
941-423-8720
STUDIO APTSV
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY: 1-800-955-8771


Seize the sales
with Classified!
PUNTA GORDA Downtown,
1 bedroom apt., 2nd floor, all
util incl. No pets, $775/mo
Call Jerry 941-391-4856


APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
1320

PUNTA GORDA Downtown,
2 room all utilities included. No
pets, $650/mo Call Jerry
941-391-4856
PUNTA GORDA, 2/1 Com-
pletely tiled, window treat-
ment, on Fairway Dr oppo-
site school, monthly $650,
Call Owner (718)-465-
6388 or (718) 864-6482
VENICE 1BR/1BA, 2 blocks
from beach off Venice Ave.
Incl. washer & dryer.
$650/mo. No Pets/Smoke
941-716-1431


VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$375 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
VENICE ISLAND Efficiency
Clean & neat! Walk to
beaches & downtown. $545
; ALSO 1BR Duplex on Island
Avail. Annual 941-567-6098
VENICE STUDIO
& 1 Bedroom
Accepting Section 8 Vouchers
941-488-7766
VENICE/NO. PORT/ENGLEWOOD
NOW RENTING
VENETIAN GARDENS
55+ All Inclusive,
Independent Living Community,
3 Chef Prepared Meals a Day,
Weekly Housekeeping.
Please call for our Rental Specials.
941-484-6841
VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1-800-955-8771

OPPORTUNITY
VILLA SAN CARLOS II
22250 Vick St.
Affordable-Income based
One bedroom apartments
for 62 or older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!
S941-429-2402 2


MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT


ENGL 55 + park 1/1 part
I ly furn. Encl lanai Clean I
quiet safe park. $600 mo I
L ann. 941-786-7777

ROOMS FOR RENT
LZ 1360


NORTH PORT Furn'd room &
bath. Pool. Utilities incl. House
privileges. Pets OK. $500/mo
941-423-6104 or 941-3560985
( GET RESULTS --
USE CLASSIFIED!
NORTH PORT, off Biscayne.
Full House privileges & cable in
room. $400 mnth & $100 dep
No pets. 941-876-3526
PORT CHARLOTTE Room for
rent, house privileges. $125/wk
+ last wk & Sec. 941-623-2972
PORT CHARLOTTE ROOM-in-
HOME smoke/alcohol free
$400 mo. or $125 weekly
941-268-2160
PT.CHARLOTTE, Clean, Quiet,
$125wk/$450mo, incl Ltil, Furn'd,
Refs. 941-743-3070, 941-740-2565
PUNTA GORDA, Clean, Furn.
Room, Free Wi-Fi,TV. All Inclu-
sive $125/Wk 941-763-9171


LOTS & ACREAGE
L 1500








SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150,000 readers in
Charlotte, Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


NORTH PORT Sumter
Blvd. Great location. New
home area. $6,900 941-
457-6811
* I-NEED A JOB? )i
CHECK THE )
CLASSIFIED! /
NORTH PORT 8 Lot
Property- zoned for
single residential. $30K
By owner 941-429-2223


WATERFRONT
LZl 1515


PUNTA GORDA ISLES cul-de-
sac, Sailboat 105' Seawall, may
finance, $189K, 941-629-6329
BUSINESS RENTALS
1610


CHARLOTTE HARBOR
5,000 sq ft. Office, A/C.
$2500/mo with 1st & Last
941-380-9212
PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
Call for Pricing 941-484-4316

INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620


AmU1m ^ .4 ac by uvwner.
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992
| Classified = Sales |


COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620

VENICE/NOKOMIS, Profes-
sional Building, 919 Tamiami
Trail. Ample Parking, For Sale,
Owner Financing available.
Ernest Ritz 941-928-9002

L WAREHOUSE
I & STORAGE
1640

NORTH PORT 800SF Ware-
house $420/mo+tax. 400SF
$215/mo+Tax 941-661-6720

2000


EMPLOYMENT
EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/ Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.




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8 4

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9 ; 6 8 6 S ZV
9 9 Z tZ61. L 6
6 1. Z 99 S 8 L V


Z99 L96 tVC L

_I.ZL 6 Zg 6 9 981
8 9 S L L 6 Z
:I3MSNV






The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 4, 2013


2000 MEDICAL MEDICAL
2030 2030


EMPLOYMENT

PROFESSIONAL
2010



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
THURSDAY,
JULY 4TH.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Friday,
July 5th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Wednesday, 7/3,
3:30 pm for
Thursday, &
Wednesday,7/3,
4:30pm for Friday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday!

CLERICAL/OFFICE
Z: 2020

CUSTOMER SERVICE
DISPATCHER.
Positive People Oriented
Person Needed. The applicant
will have a Strong Command
of Telecommunication
Techniques and Must be
Computer Literate. Bi-lingual
in Spanish/English a Plus.
Apply at: Young Trucking,
12164 Tamiami Trail.
Punta Gorda
DATA ENTRY Exp needed.
Accuracy in fast paced enviro-
ment. Ability to meet dead-
lines. F/T w/benefits. Send
resume ccwrainsoft@msn.com
Attn Data Entry

Bud your Best
Friend inif the



COMPUTER
LW44OZ2025



The Charlotte Sun
is looking for an
experienced local
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
with a creative flare to
oin our winning team. We
need a designer that
builds ads and promotion-
al materials that "WOW"
our clients! We need to
impress our clients with
design and RESULTS!
Experience with
Photoshop, InDesign and
Illustrator required.
We Offer:
*Competitive pay
*Vacation
*Health Insurance
*Sick & short term disability
*401(k)
*Training
*Advancement opportunities

If we described you, send
your resume to:
Sun Newspapers
Glen Nickerson
Advertising Director
18215 Paulson Drive
Port Charlotte, FI 33954
Fax: 941-258-9540
Email: gnickerson@
sun-herald.com


HARBORCHASE



CARE MANAGERS
FT/PT
ARE YOU A HHA, PRIVATE
CAREGIVER OR NEWLY
LICENSED CNA LOOKING
FOR A CHANGE OR
THAT 1ST OPPORTUNITY.

HARBORCHASE OFFERS
ON THE JOB TRAINING FOR
NEW CARE MANAGERS,
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K
*************** *
PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.
*************** *
FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V

CLINICAL NURSE
MANAGER-MED SURG
Responsible for supervision
of all unit personnel providing
service in the nursing unit.
The position is a key leader-
ship position of the Nursing
Department with compo-
nents of responsibility that
include clinical resource/pro-
fessional leadership, financial
management, education,
human resource manage-
ment and management of
quality of service for the
nursing unit.




Human Resources
Desoto Memorial Hospital
900 N. Robert Ave.
Arcadia, Fl. 34266
OR
Fax Resumes to:
863-494-8400
E-mail: hr@dmh.org
Phone Number:
863-494-8405


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....
VFind a Pet
VFind a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
,Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
,Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


ADVERTISE

In

The Classifieds!


DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
COTA, OT & PT
PT/FT/PRN for
*LPN & RN
PRN/FT/PT all shifts
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766



HARBORCHASE


HARBORCHASE OF VENICE
HAS AN IMMEDIATE OPENING
FOR A DIRECTOR OF
ASSISTED LIVING WITH
MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE
IN THE SENIOR CARE COM-
MUNITY SETTING. IF YOU
ARE AN RN OR LPN, WE'D
LIKE TO DISCUSS THIS
OPPORTUNITY WITH YOU.

THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE
WILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
PROVIDING LEADERSHIP BY
EXHIBITING STRONG CORE
VALUES RESULTING IN TOP
QUALITY RESIDENT CARE,
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION,
STAFF DEVELOPMENT, AND
COMPLIANCE WITH ALL
POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND
STATE REGULATIONS.
SUCCESSFUL SURVEY
EXPERIENCE AND HISTORY,
GOOD FINANCIAL
KNOWLEDGE TO MONITOR
DEPARTMENT EXPENSES,
AND STRONG STAFF
MANAGEMENT EXPERIENCE
IS REQUIRED.
CURRENT CORE TRAINING
CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED.
IF YOU HAVE THE SKILLS,
EXPERIENCE, AND THE
HEART FOR CARING FOR
SENIORS CONTACT US SO
THAT WE CAN DISCUSS THE
POSSIBILITIES!

WE OFFER OUR FULL-TIME
ASSOCIATES AN EXCELLENT
BENEFITS PACKAGE INCLUD-
ING A 401(K) PLAN, ALONG
WITH COMPETITIVE WAGES.
IF YOU ARE ORGANIZED,
MOTIVATED, INNOVATIVE AND
A TEAM PLAYER ABLE TO
INSPIRE OTHERS, CONSIDER
JOINING THE TEAM AT
HARBORCHASE OF VENICE,
WHERE THE
CORE VALUES OF
RESPECT, ATTENTIVENESS,
INTEGRITY, STEWARDSHIP,
AND EXCELLENCE ARE NOT
JUST WORDS.
APPLY AT:
HARBORCHASE OF VENICE
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE FL 34285
PHONE: 941-484-8801
FAX: 941-484-3450
EOE/DFWP/E-VERIFY


PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


MEDICAL
2030


EXPERIENCED
CAREGIVER/MEDICATION
TECHNICIAN
Ideal candidate must have a
valid FL CNA license,
certified and exp. at
assisting with medication.
Please fax your resume to
941-423 5360 interview
in person will be at 4900
S. Sumter, North Port, FL

EXPERIENCED MEDICAL
BILLING person needed!
Well paid position w/great
benefits. Must be able to
multi-task, possess written
& verbal skills. Also needed:
FT/PT Medical Records
person. Email resume:
cmazzarella@sunletter.com

FULL TIME RN
Join the Desoto Memorial
Home Health Care (DMHHC)
team of professionals who
work together to meet the
health care needs of the
community. Prior recent
Medicare OASIS experience
is preferred not required;
Florida RN license required.
Interested applicants should
contact Desoto Memorial
Home Health Care @ 863-
494-8432; ask for Dianna.


Human Resources
Desoto Memorial Hospital
900 N. Robert Ave.
Arcadia, Fl. 34266
OR
Fax Resumes to:
863-494-8400
E-mail: hr@dmh.org
Phone Number:
863-494-8405
INSTRUCTOR, Certified &
Experienced in Phlebotomy &
EKG. Email resume to:
horizonhealthcareinstitute@
yahoo.com or Call
239-939-1992

nItRINO
RN/LPN
EVERY SAT. & SUN.
7AM 3PM

POOL
ALL SHIFTS

QUALITY HEALTH CARE
6940 Outreach Way
North Port
(941)426-8411 or
FAX Resume to
941-423-1572
EOE DRUG FREE
WORK PLACE

SEEKING EXPERIENCED
HOUSEKEEPERS,
Hotel Working Experience
is an Asset.
Please fax your resume to
941-764-8767 interview
in person will be at 24949
Sandhill Blvd, Deep Creek

HORIZON
q^HEALTHCARE
'- INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN
within 11 months
Enrollment ongoing
Call for Class Dates
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start Aug 29 '13
LPN-next class starts
Jan 20th '14
Start Working In 2-5 wks&
Classes Start Each Month
Call For Class Dates
Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
Home Health Aide (75hrs)
Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
EKG Tech (165hrs)
I Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506


L MEDICAL
low4:2030


MED ASST, FT, for busy GYN
office in Venice. Exp. a must!
Fax resume to 941-485-2673

MUSICAL
L71 A2035





Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUNa6

you credit card ..


ADVERTISE!
COOK WANTED for Fri & Sat
Nights & Sat Lunch.
Call 941-474-9802 (Kevin-Jim)
DUNKIN DONUT SERVERS
for Conv. store in Pt Charlotte
Call 941-882-4015
DELIVERY DRIVERS &
PIZZA MAKERS NEEDED
PROFESSIONAL AND
EXPERIENCE A MUST!
Apply in person ONLY
1 lam-4pm
BELLA NAPOLI
992 Tamiami Trail, Unit F
Port Charlotte
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE



RIVER CITY
GRILL
Seeks motivated
and experienced
LEAD
HOST/HOSTESS
HOST/HOSTESS
BUS PERSON
Apply in Person:
2-4pm Only
131 W Marion Ave
SPunta Gorda, FL /

SSKILLED TRADES
L ^ 2050



ITuRINO
A/C LEAD INSTALLER &
INSTALL HELPER
TOP PAY, FULL COMPANY
BENEFITS w/401K
CLEAN DRIVING RECORD!
KOBIE COMPLETE
941-474-3691
BODY MAN FULL TIME
RV, Auto, Truck. RV Expe-
rience helpful. Must be
experienced painter
familiar with all types of
body and fiberglass
repairs DFW, Non-Smoker.
Call Michael
Gentry or Ed Davidson
941-966-2182
or send resume to
jobs@rvworldinc.com


SKILLED TRADES
2050


011BID.COM
LOCAL WORK ALL TRADES

BUS DRIVER NEEDED
Epiphany Cathedral School
has an opening for a full-time
bus driver. Minimum one
year experience driving a
passenger bus and must
hold a valid Florida Class
B CDL with Passenger &
Air Brake Endorsements.
Approximately 5 hrs. a day
depending upon route and
field trips. Employment
contingent upon a successful
background check and
drug/alcohol test.
Send letter of
interest/resume to:
Bus Driver,
316 Sarasota St.,
Venice, FL 34285 or
Fax (941)488-9333.
No telephone calls,
please.
CARPENTERS WANTED
for Boca Grande! Must have
tools & transportation.
Leave msg: 941-475-5095
-- -

FIRE SPRINKLER
FITTERS
FULL TIME, BENEFITS,
DFWP, EOE
E-MAIL RESUME TO
RYAN@BABESPLUMBING.COM



PLUMBERS-
HELPERS
FULL TIME, BENEFITS
DFWP, EOE
E-MAIL RESUME TO
JOEY@BABESPLUMBING.COM
POOL CONSTRUCTION
Pool Chemistry/Repair/
Plumbing/Labor 941-815-3492
PRESSER EXPERIENCED,
needed at Vanity Dry Cleaners,
Call 941-204-3224 for Appt.
RAPIDLY GROWING
PEST CONTROL CO.
SEEKS THE FOLLOWING
FULL TIME POSITIONS
PEST CONTROL/ TERMITE
TECHNICIAN
* LANDSCAPING TECHNICIAN
0 SALESPERSON/TERMITE
INSPECTOR
EXPERIENCED ONLY
NEED APPLY!
CLEAN FL LICENSE REQ.
FOR ALL POSITIONS!
SALARY / SALES
COMMISSION MEDICAL
BENEFITS & PAID VACATION
APPLY AT: 340 TAMIAMI
TRAIL, PORT CHARLOTTE


RE-PIPERS, WANTED FOR
FAST GROWING COMPANY, MUST
HAVE MIN 5 YRS EXPERIENCE,
HAVE GOOD DRIVING RECORD AND
BE WELL GROOMED, THIS DRUG
FREE COMPANY OFFERS
A BENEFIT PACKAGE.
MIKE DOUGLASS PLUMBING
CALL 941-473-2344

REFRIGERATION/
COMMERCIAL TECHNICIAN
* Great Technical Company
* 401K & other retirement
plans available.
* Health Insurance
* On Call incentives
* Top Pay rates for Exp. &
Expertise.
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
2460 Highlands Road
Punta Gorda, Florida


Find it in the





Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


SKILLED TRADES
2050




RV PARTS
ASSOCIATE.
IMMEDIATE OPENING, RV &
TRUCK EXPERIENCED
PREFERRED. FULL TIME.
DFW NON-SMOKER
CALL TIM FINNEGAN AT
941-966-2182
FAX (941) 966-7421 OR
JOBS@RVWORLDINC.COM
SKILLED TECHNICIAN'S
needed for well-established
busy restoration company.
Additional skills a plus. Must
have a Florida drivers's
license, and be able to pass
drug testing. Background
checks are also performed.
Apply in person at:
17436 Seymour Ave.,
Port Charlotte, FL
or Fax Resume: 941-624-5032
SPRAY TECH -
Spray Technician needed
for the Arcadia Municipal
Golf Course.
Chemical applications,
fertilize greens, tees,
fairways and ornamental
areas. High School diploma
required. $8.50/hour.
Must have experience using
mechanically pressurized
spray equipment, hand
operated spray equipment.
Please visit:
www.arcadia-fl.gov
for application.
City of Arcadia is an Equal
Opportunity Employer and
a Drug Free Work Place.

SALES
Low 2070


ADVERTISING
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY
WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR E-MAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM


Advertising Sales
Executive
The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
*Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
Training
Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:
Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.
S...........................
IS IT TIME FOR A
NEW CAREER?
SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER
Come work with the Sun
newspaper classified team,
:located in North Port Florida.:
We are America's Best
:Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
Section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are:
looking for a Full-Time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our classified team.
We are looking for a highly
motivated individual who
:thrives on challenges, loves
learning new skills and
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.
*We offer:
:0 Training
*0 Stable company that is
very Community minded and:
:involved.
* Opportunity to expand your.
business skills

Please email your resume to::
Email: Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
Employer/Drug & Nicotine
Free Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.

Looking for
Adventure?
Find it
in the
Classifieds


MIKE'S MATTRESS
Is Looking for Part/Full Time
Salesperson. Mattress Sales.
Experience a Plus.
Apply in Person
23330 Harborview Rd. PC.
941-629-5550
REAL ESTATE, Busy
Reo Dept. needs Full Time
associate for tracking default
properties start to finish. Real
Estate License, Experience in
Reo and attention to detail a
must. Salaried position. Emai
resume in strict confidence to
ERA@sunline.net
THE FURNITURE
WAREHOUSE a top 100
retailer is seeking highly
professional & engaging
sales associates for Port
Charlotte and Venice
locations. Income from
$25,000 to $40,000 per
year in commissions with a
guaranteed base salary and
comprehensive benefits.
Send resume to
jhughes@furnwarehouse.com
Call 941-780-7895 or apply
online FurnWarehouse.com


IN THE
CLASSIFIED
YOU CAN.....
/Find a Pet
/Find a Car
/Find a Job
/Find Garage Sales
,Find A New Employee
/Sell Your Home
/Sell Your Unwanted
Merchandise
/Advertise Your
Business or Service

Classified -
it's the reliable
source for the
right results


GENERAL
2100


ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT/MINISTRY
MANAGER (FT/PT):
Pine Level UM Church. Good
computer & people skills
required. Send Resume to
9596 N.W. Pine Level St,
Arcadia, Fl. 34266. Fax to:
863-494-5191 or e-mail to:
pinelevelumc@gmail.com.
Questions: 863-494-0044
CONSTRUCTION HELPER,
needed for busy insurance
restoration company. Must
have own hand tools and
must have Florida driver's
license, and be able to pass
drug testing. Apply in person
17436 Seymour Ave,
Port Charlotte, Florida
or Fax Resume to
941-624-5032.
CUSTODIAN/MAINTENANCE
HELPER M-F, 8am-12pm,
$10.00/hr. Need a hard worker
941-629-0444

PUT
CLASSIFIED
TO WORK
FOR YOU!


FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


SALES SALES
2070 2070


GENERAL
2100


DOCK HAND needed at
Marina on Boca Grande.
Call 941-964-0154

HELP WANTED
ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES
The Smart Shopper Group is
expanding in Charlotte and
Sarasota counties and is
looking for motivated
experienced individuals.
SALES MANAGER
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
CIRCULATION MANAGER
Email resume to:
rknight@smartshopg.com
Smart Shopper Group, LLC
2726 Unit D Tamiami Tr.
Port Charlotte, Fl. 33952
941-205-2340
WANTED: 29 SERIOUS
PEOPLE to work from home
using a computer. Up to
$1500/5000 PT/FT
www.ckincome4u.com
INDEPENDENT
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS
NEEDED:
The Charlotte Sun
has home delivery routes
available. Supplement
your income with this
great business
opportunity. Earn
$200-$300/week for a
few early morning hours
of delivery. Reliable
transportation, a valid
Florida driver's license
and proof of insurance
are required.
Apply in person at the
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road,
Port Charlotte, Florida
33980, or online at
www.yoursun.com.
LABORERS to assist roofing
crew. Some Heavy lifting.
Apply Daily 9-6 at Banana Bay
Motel, 23285 Bayshore Road,
Pt. Char. DFWP. CMM Roofing.
TREE CLIMBER & ARBORIST,
Excellent starting pay. Must
have DL 941-769-8319

3000








NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS
L ^ 3010



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
THURSDAY,
JULY 4TH.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Friday,
July 5th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Wednesday, 7/3,
3:30 pam for
Thursday, &
Wednesday 7/3,
4:30pm for Friday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday!


ANNOUNCEMENTS
3010


DOGS OF Venice Mobile Salon
NOW OPEN! Your dog
groomed at home in my mobile
salon. 15 yrs exp. Call Stacy
at 941-786-PUPS(7877)
*** ADOPTION: ***
Adoring Financially Secure
Couple, Beach House,
Disney World, at-home parent
awaits baby.* Kelly&Josh *
*** Expenses paid ***
1-800-552-0045 FLBar42311

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!

HAPPY ADS
W 3015



0

Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638


PERSONALS
3020


ACTIVE SR. white male in PC
seeking female for companion-
ship & leisure. 941-204-1343
ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
Englewood man needs help to learn
how to Twitter, Facebook & do simple
functions on PC. Ken 941-321-0365
HAIR STYLIST, 46, Looking
for Single Male, 46-56, for
Companionship. 941-201-9853
RELAX & UNWIND
CALL FOR DAILY SEPCIALS
941-681-6096

SENSATIONS
STRESS RELEASE
941- 766-7995
3860 RT. 41, 2 MI. NORTH
OF PUNTA GORDA BRIDGE.

SINGLE MAN looking for sin-
gle woman. 941-284-7939
SINGLE WHITE FEMALE 65
looking for single white male
65-78 in Port Charlotte/Arca-
dia. 863-244-4796 and more
Single white male, 63, in
P.C. looking for a female who
loves sailing. 941-769-1115
THE GIRL NEXT door,
941-483-0701 North Port

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!


BURIAL LOTS (2) in Royal
Palm Memorial Gardens.
Includes granite base. $850
941-627-6799
RESTLAWN, Forrest Nelson,
2 burial plots, $995 each. Pt
Charlotte (941)-743-4028
Royal Palm Mem. Gardens. 2
side by side niches Gard. B.
Includes (1) 6x6 bronze & (2)
8x8 granite bases. 65% off
$1400 BO. 941-286-5233
L LOST & FOUND
L ::3090


FOUND DOG Male Boxer in
North Port Charlotte/North
Port area. Call 941-979-1597


SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
3060

CNA & HHA CLASSES:
Days, Eves, Weekends. $449.
Small Class! CPR/First Aid
Incl. 941-966-2600
www.SunCoastCNA.com


CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota, Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570

FLACNA.COM
0 RN/LPN 0 CNA 0
0 HHA 0 MA 0
CEU'S/CPRb oMed
Tech 0 Phlebotomy
State testing onsite.
941-727-2273
BORED WITH TAE KWON
DO & MIXED MARTIAL
ARTS? Try Somthing New.
FREE Classes Available in
Tradional Shaolin Kung Fu
More Info Call 941- 204-2826
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join
the Ranks of Employed Truck
Drivers Nationwide. Located
Punta Gorda FL SunCoast
Trucking Academy. 941-855-
0193 941-347-7445

BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
L 3065

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For more info.
Call 941-474-2473
LIC. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING
941-876-4416
Liberty Community
Church
North Port Charlotte


afid your Best
Miend inM the
[lssfiJs





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 4, 2013


LOST & FOUND
L :3090


FOUND SMALL PARROT, in
the Vicinity of Hwy. 17 &
Bermont Rd. Punta Gorda. Call
to Describe 941-505-1725
LOST CAT Male, Black 4
white paws & white on chest.
Fluffy, has funky left eye/pupil.
Lost near Old Englewood Rd &
Bayshore. Missing since Sat.
6/22 PLEASE CALL 941-475-
2415
LOST CAT Male, SLEEK
BLACK w/ little white on chest,
Missing since 6/12/13 from
Old Englewood Rd & Bayshore
PLEASE CALL 941-475-2415
LOST CAT: Male, Neutered,
Black & White Color, Green
Eyes, Short Hair, No Front
Claws & 1/2 Tail. Lost in the
Vacinity of Kenvil Rd & Ariton
Rd. in North Port 941-564-
6956


E l


LOST COCKATIEL Bird
(941) 600 4719 NP
LOST DOG Golden retriever
mix, Male Answers to Spirit.
He has a Pink nose. Lost in
Sorrento East area in Nokomis
on June 25 during that thunder
storm. Doesn't hear well & has
a bad hair cut. Please call
941-451-9614
LOST DOG IN North Port,
near Tangier area. Male
Pomeranian, 4-51b, very shy.
Name is Peanut.
Please call 515-554-6327!
LOST DOG: Blond Lab (identi-
fying mark on nose). Belted
from Ophelia's Pasta house on
5/26/13. Call Joe or Diana
Reward 941-921-6218
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black
markings on face & back.
Closely shaved hair cut.
Missing since 5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909

ARTS CLASSES
L 3091


MAGIC OF MOSAICS
Classes & Workshops
Rosemary, Artist/instr
941-697-7888/941-258-6873
www.FlamingoFanny.com

COMPUTER CLASSES
3092



Courses & Private Lessons
GoodHands 941-375-8126
EXERCISE CLASSES



GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769
RELIGION CLASSES
LZ 3096


BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309


OTHER CLASSES
:3097


CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.

Find the

perfect

companion

in the

Classifieds!

ALTERATIONS
5005



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
THURSDAY,
JULY 4TH.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Friday,
July 5th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Wednesday, 7/3,
3:30 pm for
Thursday, &
Wednesday 7/3,
4:30pm for -riday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday'

ALUMINUM
S5006


Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages, Scr. lanais, etc...
I APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR
LZ 5020

DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lic 990010103532/Ins
DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596
CARPET SERVICES
5040


CARPET & UPHOLSTERY
Cleaning, Free Estimates
Carpets Dry in 1-3 hours.
Call John 941-883-1381
[ ADULT CARE /
LW ^ 5050


SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483


ADULT CARE



JANIE ON-THE-SPOT. CNA
will care for your loved ones.
Evenings only! 941-276-2157

CHILD CARE
S5051


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law
COMPUTER SERVICE
5053


COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285
1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR,
TUTOR IN YOUR HOME
Reasonable & Prompt!
Sr. Disc. Ask for Stacy



EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./Ins.


Repair and Virus Removal
Free Saturday Class 10:30
Courses & Private Lessons
635 Tamiami TrI N, Nokomis
goodhandscomputers.com


We Come To YOU! *
SUMMER SPECIAL
$25 Flat Rate
CERTIFIED COMPUTER
REPAIR
Free Computer Checkup *
Virus/Spyware/Malware
Removal
941-404-5373
JDS COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
HOUSECALLS!!
941-764-3400
CONCRETE
5057


CONCRETE
Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks,
House Slabs, Etc..
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415
HIGH QUALITY LOW cost
Concrete Driveways, side-
walks and patios! We also do
Residential cleaning. (941)-
815-3451
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553

CLEANING
SERVICES


A CLEAN SWEEP Residen-
tial & Commercial Honest &
Reliable. Serving Sarsota
County. 941-223-0303
MRS. CLEANING UP!
1st class cleaning Service!
Specials Now!
$10 off Window Cleaning
941-204-8057
www.mrscleaningup.com
Lic & Insured


I CLEANING
SERVICES
Lra 5060

A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658


QUALITY CLEANING,
Sr caregiver & organizer
comm.& res. 941-421-9232

ELECTRICAL



DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
'Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646
INTEGRITY ELECTRIC
of Charlotte County.
FULLService Electical.
26 Yrs. Exp! Comm./Res.
(941)-628-1993
Lic# L06000046464

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
5080

BUSH BUSTERS INC. Brush
Mowing, Bush Hogging, ALL
Mulching, Selective Clearing,
Tree & Stump Removal &
MORE! 941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665
HEATING & AIR
5090


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738
PLAY IT SAFE, CALL SAFE
HARBOR AIR for all your
cooling needs. 941-639-2665
lic#CAC1817356
S.O.S. Air
Conditioning
& Heating L.L.C
(941)-468-4956
HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
L 5100

ABBEE PAVERS Driveways,
Pool Decks, Patio. Serving PG
& PC 941-639-5209 Lic. & Ins.
ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
CARPENTER/HANDYMAN
BBB member/lic AAA 1200080
Call Bob at 941-204-4407
COASTAL KITCHENS
countertops/door & cab refacing
Call Victor (941)716-0917
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CONCRETE
Walkways, patios, driveways,
lanai, pool decks, etc.
Veteran & Senior Discounts
941-716-0872
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins


IMPROVEMENT
5100

CUSTOM RESCREENING &
Repair and Pressure Washing.
Visa/MC (941)-979-0922


DAVID J. SHEPARD JR.,
OVER 20YRS IN CHARLOTTE
COUNTY Lic./INS.
Lc #RR282811062
941-627-6954
941-456-6953

FULL SERVICE CLEAN-OUT
REMOVAL SERVICE
Residential/Commercial
CARTING, DUMPSTERS,
GARBAGE/TRASH, WASTE
AST CLEAN-OUTS
941-451-0071
"We Take Your Junk & Clean-Up"
Call for Free Estimates
LICENSED/INSURED
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#60662/Ins.
GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227
HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
SELL'S ALUMINUM L.L.C.-
6" Seamless Gutters.
*Rescreens* Front Entries*36
Yrs. Exp! Greg 941-234-8056
or 941-497-4450 Lic. & Ins.
Servicing Sarasota County


SLIDING GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs. Free
Estimates Lic/Ins. Bob @
941-706-6445
TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/Ins.
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#AAA006387
TOM'S HOME IMPROVEMENT
& HANDYMAN SERVICE.
No JOB to BIG or small!
941-408-3954
WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing, Concrete, Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 11-00002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351

& TREE
: 5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune, install,
design, removal, stump grind-
ing
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com

A JAMISON TREE SERVICE
Complete & Professional
15% Sr Discount!
FREE EST. Lic. & INSURED
ENGL 941-475-6611
OR N. PORT 941-423-0020


LAWN & ORDER
Lawn Service! Free
Estimates & Landscaping!
Free Yard of Mulch with
any service! 941-257-8606


LAWN/GARDEN
&TREE
5110


Baldwin Tree Service -
Quality work @ fair
pricing! Owner operated!
Free Est. 941-786-6099
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
TRUCK FOR HIRE
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE &
GROUND LAWN CARE
*Weekly Monthly *Yearly .
Commercial/Residential e
*Serving Charlotte Co. 12+ Yrs! e
941-613-3613
pctfltree.com Lic./Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding e
Lawn Service e
Bucket Service .
941-613-3613
pctfltree.com Lic./Ins.
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
HILLBILLY HANDYMAN'S
LAWN MOWIN' &
HOME FIXIN '
REAL HONEST WORK WITH
OLD FASHION INTEGRITY!
LIC/INs
CALL BILLY 941-979-7458
HOOPS LAWN SERVICE
Full Lawncare & Landscaping
941-258-8175
JIM BLAIS LAWN MAINT
OVER 15 YRS EXP. NOW
ACCEPTING NEW ACCTS.
941-915-4677
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
PROFESSIONAL Tree Ser-
vice. Stump Removal, Palm &
Hedge Trimming. Free Esti-
mates! 941-624-4204 Lic
#001053
RESIDENTIAL LAWN CARE
Complete Lawn Care, with
Excellent Customer Service,
Hablamos Espanol
941-626-2623/941-564-7858
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/Insured941-484-6042
Classified = Sales
SHARKS TOOTH
CONSTRUCTION &
LANDSCAPE SERVICES
*Pavers* *Lawn Mowing*
Best rates in area!
941-219-8741
www.sharkstoothservices.com
SOD WORK REMOVE &
REPLACE SMALL JOBS OK, ALL
TYPES OF sopD941-716-9912
TJ MILAZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
TJ MILAZZO JR.
941-830-1005
LAND CLEARING, LANDSCAPE
ALL KINDS OF CONCRETE WORK.
BOAT DOCK & SEAWALL REPAIR
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035
VETERANS AFFORDABLE
LAWN & landscaping Com-
mercial & Residential. All
aspects. 941-447-2428
MARINE REPAIR
Z L 5121 00




MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329





Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


PLUMBING ROOFING 6000
5160 5 L 185 6 0


I MASONRY
5129


AST MASONRY, 941-525-2435
Over 20 yrs exp. in pavers,
brickwork, concrete, stucco, stone
& decorative concrete.
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
5130


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a
Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-
883-1231
MOVING HELP
Save $$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins

PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
5140

r-------------------

BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
10/o Off With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L-- ..-------------------
STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINT-
ING Res/Comm. Int/Ext
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER
CT LANE PAINTING
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
FREE ESTIMATES VETERANS &
SENIOR DISCOUNT
941-255-0045 OR
941-628-5297
LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do It!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764

Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates Prompt Service
941-484-4576

ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!
PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-00015
SHAWN CHRISTIE PAINTING &
PRESSURE WASHING
FREE ESTIMATES ~ MENTION THIS
AD TO RECEIVE $10 OFF EVERY
$100 SPENT! LIC/INS
941-321-3573
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lic # AAA009837

PET CARE
L 5155


DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853


ALL PRO WATER HEATERS
Residential-Commercial
QUALITY SERVICE
Affordable Pricing
(941) 468-3439, (239) 5490340
Licensed & Insured
www.allprowaterheaters.com
LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393

POOL SERVICES
:5165


ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Preventative Maintenance
Saves You Money & Avoids
Long Term Problems.
941-426-6500

NEED CASH?
AZTECH POOLS
Personalized
Complete Pool Serv. & Repair
Lic/Ins. 941-585-1711
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps.
*Weekly Maintenance .
941-809-5121 Lic./Ins
Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268

L PRESSURE
CLEANING
5180

BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
SCREENING
S5184


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779 wescreenflori-
da.com Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RANDY HASKETT SCREENING
POOL CAGES, LANAI'S, ENTRY
WAYS, LIC. & INSURED 25YRS.
EXP 941-809-1171
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/Ins.
THE SCREEN GAL & FRIENDS
Quality Rescreening. Guaran-
teed. VISA & M/C accepted.
#CBC1256778
941-626-7282
WRIGHT'S RESCREENING
QUALITY WORK AT GREAT PRICES!
FAST SERVICE! FREE ESTIMATES!
LIC/INS 941-916-2512 OR
941-575-7446
ROOFING
5185


A+ HOME TOWN ROOFER
Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30 Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors & Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh, 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE CCC #1325731 & INSURED
PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lic#1329187


R.L. TEEL ROOFING Reroofs
& repairs. insurance inspec-
tions Veterns Disc. Lic & insu.
941-473-7781 RC29027453
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838
WINDOW CLEANING
z 5225


CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting
Also available Wallpaper
Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845
WES' WINDOW WASHING,
INC. & Wes' Home watch
service Owned by the
Myers Family since 1982
941-625-1783

| WINDOW REPAIR
: 5226


Window & Sliding Glass
Door Repair & Replacement.
Rollers, Locks & Handles
U.S. Window 941-628-8579

6000






MERCHANDISE
GARAGE SALES

6001 Arcadia
6002 Englewood
6003 Lake Suzy
6004 Nokomis
6005 North Port
6006 Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
6007 Punta Gorda
6008 Rotonda
6009 Sarasota
6010 South Venice
6011 Venice
6012 Out Of Area
6015 Flea Market
6020 Auctions
MERCHANDISE
6013 Moving Sales
6025 Arts & Crafts
6027 Dolls
6030 Household Goods
6035 Furniture
6038 Electronics
6040 TV/Stereo/Radio
6060 Computer Equip
6065 Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
6070 Antiques &
Collectibles
6075 Fruits/Veges
6090 Musical
6095 Medical
6100 Health/Beauty
6110 Trees & Plants
6120 Baby Items
6125 Golf Accessories
6128 Exercise/Fitness
6130 Sporting Goods
6131 Firearms
6132 Firearm Access.
6135 Bikes/Trikes
6138 Toys
6140 Photography/Video
6145 Pool/ Spa & Supplies
6160 Lawn & Garden
6165 Storage Sheds/
Buildings
6170 Building Supplies
6180 Heavy Constr.
Equipment
6190 Tools/Machinery
6220 Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
6225 Restaurant Supplies
6250 Appliances
6260 Misc. Merchandise
6270 Wanted to Buy/T rade


MERCHANDISE

NORTH PORT
GARAGE SALES



SALE- --.-
THU.-SAT. 8-2 '. -i.':. *.:n
Luis Terrace. off Cranberry.
Furniture for every room of
house, exercise equip, rugs,
dishes, clothes, knick knacks,
Tv. ENTIRE HOUSE MUST GO!!
PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
6006

m-FRI.-SAT. 8-3 2187 Can-
Unolot Blvd. FISHING ITEMS
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS, AND MIS-
CELLANEOUS ITEMS!!!

PUNTA GORDA
GARAGE SALES
6007


~--
FRI.-SAT. 10-1 3334 Purple
Martin Dr. Unit 122, P.G.I.
King Size Bedroom, Lg
Armoire, 4 Pc. Dinette Sets,
Wicker Chairs, Bar Stools,
Coffee Table, Household, TVs,
Vacuum, Sleeping Bags,
Drapes, & MUCH MORE!!
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!

M OWNING4
FRI.-SAT. 8-3 2136 Harbourl
Dr. Lots & Lots of furniture
and other household items.
Priced to sell.


GARAGE SALES


FRI.-SAT. 8-1 1065 Laurel
Ave. Everything must go,
good condition, tools, bed-
rooms, red leather sofa and
loveseat, & much more
ARTS AND CRAFTS
6025


JAMES DEAN Picture 25 x 37
framed matted Blvd. of Broken
Dreams $100 941-408-0688
SERGER HUSKYLOCK S25,
5-thread, coverstitch+,
$1,200, OBO 941-625-4764
VINTAGE, MAORIWOOD, FIG-
URE NEWZELAND, TEKO War-
rior, $375 941-391-6377
7 DOLLS
6027 S


RAGGEDY ANN 40" rare
Knickerbocker orig. Exc cond
$70, OBO 941-743-9661
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z 6030


BATH TOWELS, S.CURTAIN,
soap dish, rug, etc. Brown. 11
pcs, $45 941-276-1881
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED PILLOWS: Ralph Lauren,
100% cotton cover, washable,
std. pr/ $10 941-276-1881
BED QUEEN steel head & foot
board plus frame. Modern ex.
cond $90 863-517-2496
BIDET WHITE, Kohler w/pip-
ing $100 941-445-4369


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030


BLENDER OSTER 14 speed
w/glass jar. Like new. $30
941-625-5321
BLINDS 2" plantation style
PVC off white 52.5"W X 40"H
$10 941-585-8149
CANNING JARS ASORT.
SIZES ABOUT 90 JARS $40
941-505-1100
CEILING FAN 52" Oiled
Bronze, $20. 941-486-0189
CHANDELIER BEAUTIFUL
Crystal with 8 Candle lites $25
941-766-1198
CHANDELIER PINEAPPLE
Chand, 4 light w/design. $75
941-429-8507
CHANDELIER, Crystal &
Gold. 5 Light w/ 20" Chain,
13" Width. $13. 941-486-0189
CHANDELIER,BRASS-CRYS-
TAL, 8 lights, chain, 15wx30h
$45, OBO 941-697-1110

THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
THURSDAY,
JULY 4TH.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Friday,
July 5th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Wednesday, 7/3,
3:30 pm for
Thursday, &
Wednesday 7/3,
4:30pm for Friday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday!
COFFEE MUGS, Fire King, 24
Total. Very Good Condition!
$135 941-629-5951
DISHES 16pc set New.Stain
glass design border. $10 941-
875-6271
DISHES FOR SIX WHITE W LT
GREEN TRIM SERVICE FOR 6
$20 941-740-1000
DISHWARE PFALTZGRAFF
Folk Art Over 100 pieces, mint!
$395, OBO 941-764-0847
DISHWASHER GE ex condi-
tion used only five months
$275 941-662-9818
DOWN COMFORTER for dou-
ble or Queen bed $30 941-
625-2254
ADVERTISE!
DRYER KENMORE like new 4
temp. $125 941-493-1215
ELECTRIC STOVE GE ex con-
dition,used only five months
$400 941-662-9818
FILE BOX w/ key 18w, 27h,
20d $40 941-249-4601
FLUORESCENT LIGHTS 4 ft
New in box $40, OBO 941-
697-111010
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^ 6030


GAS GRILL Tank included $75
941-627-6281
GIRLS COMFORTER for col-
lege 7-piece Twin XL. Like new
$120, OBO 941-380-6551
HOME INTERIOR print, new
leopard framed print 26"H
x35"W $40 941-228-1745
LADY HARLEY-DAVIDSON
new bed comforter/sheets etc
$395 941-822-1429
LAMPS 2 Black with wood
Trim Nice $10 941-766-1198
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
MICROWAVE GE bisque used
five months,like new $175
941-662-9818
MINIBLIND WHITE aluminum,
1" x 9 ft W x 3 ft L with cord &
valance $20 941-743-2656
MIRROR, 36wx50h Light
maple frame, brass trim, bevel
edges $25 941-743-2656
MIXER KITCHENAID white
with accessories. Like new
$225 941-625-5321
Moving sale, nice, high-end
furniture, call for details. 941-
743-6716 or 941-204-9627.



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)
SUNe




NIGHT LIGHT: Large, heavy
coral/seashell/starfish. Very
Florida. $25 941-276-1881
NUTRITIONAL SCALE Kitrics
digital scale. Like new. $35
941-625-5321
ORIENTAL SILK Bonsai Tree
in black rectangular dish. 1'H.
$10 941-276-1881
REFRIGERATOR "EXTRA"
White $225 941-627-6281
REFRIGERATOR GE ex cond.
needs new $86.00 water valve
$150 941-662-9818
ROLLING BUCKET includes
steamer and mops $75 941-
627-6281
SENTRY SECURITY Safe
New in Box. Fire & water proof.
$20 941-875-6271
SOFA & Love Seat Loose
cushion pastel exc.cond. Pic
avail. $375 414899006
SOFA 7 foot, Light Tan Exc.
Cond. Seldom used $225
941-697-8733
STAIN GLASS HANGING
LAMP STAG STYLE $60, OBO
727-906-1754
STAPLE GUN-ELECTRIC
PowerShot Pro $25 941-575-
4450
STEMWARE, CRYSTAL
18 pcs. 3 sizes. EC.
$35 941-875-6271
TABLE LAMP 36" brown solid
wood, tan shade, brass base,
nice $25, OBO 941-743-2656
TROPICAL ART Predominate-
ly teal,aqua,blues,salmon Pret-
ty pr/ $59 941-276-1881
VACUUM CLEANER Kenmore
Whispertone with attachments
$50 941-575-4450
| Employ Classified!
VACUUM, Kirby Sentra, All
attachments Pd. 2150, $500
828-777-5610 (cell)
WASHER/DRYER WHITE,
gently used $175 941-627-
6281





The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 4, 2013


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
Z ^6030


WATER COOLER like new, hot
and cold w/ bottom storage.
$70, OBO 941-625-9789
WHITE WICKER-LOOK Patio
Chairs. NEW (in orig.wrapping)
4/ $220 941-276-1881
I Advertise Today! |
HOLIDAY ITEMS
6031


XMAS TREE 7.5' in 2 New
XLG totes incld. EC. $25
941-875-6271
FURNITURE
L044 6035


ACCENT TABLE 22"H, 30"
circ. glass top, rustic antique
logs $115 941-485-2030
ANTIQUE DINING Table,gor-
geous,1880's $250 941-661-
2667
ARMOIRE, STANLEY white
wash, 75" T x 42" W, exc
cond $500 941-400-8437
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New-Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED CHILD'S, IKEA,
exc cond. matt. pad & sheets
$150 941-408-6875
BED, BUNK Maple color, Mat-
tresses included good cond.
$175. 941-275-7523
BEDDING 1QUEEN floral
comforter 6m old (NP) i can
send pic $20 941-544-1128


FURNITURE FURNITURE
'0 ^6035 Lo 6035


BISTRO SET Metal Table with
4 wicker stools. New. $150
828-777-5610 (cell)
BOOKCASE 4 shelves
30"x60" cherry color $75
941-766-7466
I Classified = Sales I
CHAIR, LLOYD/FLANDERS
Ex. Cond. Ash Wicker. $300
OBO 941-575-4364
CHINA CLOSET walnut
w/glass doors and shelves.
$150 941-429-8507
COCKTAIL/END TABLES
Beveled Glass White Ped Exc
cond. $125 414-899-0006
COCTAIL & Endtables with
Gold&Silver wood trim Beauti-
ful $490, OBO 941-347-8825
COFFEE TABLE 3 tier
With glass top, new, $165
828-777-5610 (cell)
COFFEE TABLE from ITALY
tiny wood inlays-Work of Art
$110, OBO 941-743-9661
COFFEE TABLE Stanley,
white-washed, w/round glass
insert $150 941-400-8437
COMPUTER CHAIR Black,
adjustable, like new. $30, OBO
941-625-9789
COMPUTER DESK light oak
56wx48hx24d tons of storage
$150 941-474-3194
CONSOLE STEREO Vintage
Solid Wood Exc Cond $75,
OBO 941-549-0898
COUCHES (2) Cresent
Leather Robb & Stuckey
Immaculate MUST SELL
$1000 941-628-9030


COMPUTER DESK Excellent
Condition $20 941-412-7093
CURIO 77X45X17 It wd 4 gls
shIv, 2 Ights lead acc gIs drs
beaut! $395 941-474-3194
DINETTE SET rattan 42"
b/glass, 4 chairs on wheels
w/cushions,6 mo. old
$300 941-460-8338
DINETTE SET Rattan 48",
1/2" thick, celery/sage grn.
seats $225 941-894-4115
DINING ROOM 6chrs,China
Cab,Tbl
w/leaf. $495 941-875-6271
DINING ROOM Double glass
table 40" X 62" all glass sup-
port. 4 all fabric padded
chairs with high backs. Like
new, Island of Venice $750
718-614-5282
DINING ROOM Set
6 padded seat chairs, like new
$125 941-786-5714
DINING ROOM Table Glass
and brass 42X72 $125 941-
493-1215
DINING SET 48X30 table, 6
round chairs, light natural
wood $300 941-882-3139
DINING SET 5 piece Solid
teak wood table and 4 metal
chairs $75 614-202-7567
DINING TABLE Solid Wood
Dining Table w/4 Chairs. $60,
OBO 941-549-0898
END TABLE- Wood $3 734
645-5396
END TABLE dk wd 28x28
inside storage/cane doors exc
cond $85 941-474-3194


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.





Fun By The
2 9 5 6 Numbers

6 3 1 8 5 2 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
7 3 sudoku. This
mind-bending
5 puzzle will have
you hooked from
7 5 1 2 8 the moment you
square off, so

6 9 sharpen your
pencil and put
3 4 6 8 1 your sudoku
S6 8 1 savvy to the test!

5 8 9

2 3 54
Level: Beginner
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

L9 V 9 6 8 9 .L


S 1- 8 9 Z L6
6 L 8 9 99,VZ



9 r 8S 9 6 L 8
SL 6 Z 9 : 1. 9



:-I3MSNV


L FURNITURE
Z6035


END TABLE BAMBOO ,glass
top $30 941-249-4601
ENTERMENT CENTER
in 3pc. Bamboo $400, OBO
941-249-4601
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Beautiful Whitewash $150
941-766-1198
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER-
CHERRY Wood Laminate
GREAT DEAL*Beautiful! $1".,
$75. OBO 941-204-2382
EXECUTIVE DESK
hardwood, 61/2ft x 3ft
$95 941-445-6002
GLASS/BRASS COFFEE
Table 12 sides Ex Cond $300
OBO 941-575-4363
HEADBOARD 54X38 pine
wood full size (NP) can email
pic $35 941-544-1128
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
KITCHEN SET
4 chairs, exc cond
$250 941-786-5714
KITCHEN TABLE smoked
Slass top 4 chairs 6ftx4ft
225, OBO 941-698-1104
LANAI HEAVY Wrought Iron
table round, glass top 4 chairs
$200, OBO 941-743-9661
LG.ORNATE GOLD mirror
4'x2'.beveled glass.new. $75,
OBO 941-235-2203
LIVING ROOM set 3 PC Beige,
leather in decent condition.
$499,OB0 941-240-2554
LOUNGE CHAIR- Overstuffed
beige microfiber. Good condi-
tion. $100 941-766-1536
LOVESEAT, Courtyard
Galleries,pale stripes,
$50 941-423-3707
MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS, BEAUTYREST,
pillow-top king,w box springs &
hdboard $125 941-475-8012
MICROWAVE OVEN Stainless
Steel. 1M watt $25 941-412-
7093
MIRROR CREDENZA &
framed solid wd lots of inside
storage $100 941-474-3194
MIRRORED LAMPS w/Palm
tree Design very Nice $250,
OBO 941-347-8825
OCCASION CHAIR Fauteil
Cabrielle, hardwd arms & legs,
burg cush $75 941-475-8012
PARSONS CHAIRS 6 beige
brocade,new pgi $300, OBO
941-637-4953
PATIO SET TAN TABLE W 4
PVC CHAIRS W STRONG
STRAPS $250 941-740-1000
PEDESTAL TABLE 4 Chairs
& Leaf. Like new $200
941-412-7093
RECLINER ROCKER grey
vinyl. $75, OBO 941-235-
2203
ROCKER RECLINER Tan
Color, Microfiber $50, OBO
941-549-0898
SHADOW BOX Vintage Wood-
en with Mirrors Sides Light Up!
$50, OBO 941-549-0898
SHELF UNIT With Drawer $3
734 645-5396
SLEEP SOFA Great Condition!
Toledo Blade North Port $75
802-579-2477
SLEEP SOFA Multicolor,
queen,exc.cond. $150 941-
255-3353
SLEEPER SOFA QUEEN Ex
Cond Navy/Beige Leaves
$300 414-899-0006
SOFA & CHAIR VERY CLEAN,
CAN EMAIL PICS VGC $150
941-916-2120
SOFA & loveseat Microfiber,
dark tan, lyr old, good cond.
$400 941-697-0597
SOFA CAMELBACK, CLOTH
excel, cond. $125 941-255-
0691


I FURNITURE
4Z6035


SMALL TABLE Wood $1
734 645-5396
SOFA GOOD condition.
$100 941-257-8148
SOFA LEATHER, burgundy,
good condition. $150
941-505-0537
SOFA LEATHER, Camel
Sleeper Nice Cond $375, OBO
941-347-8825
SOFA LEATHER, Camel
Sleeper Nice Cond $375, OBO
941-347-8825
SOFA, FABRIC, green and
beige pattern, excellent $150
941-505-0537
SOFA, Red
5 pc dual recliners $475
941-412-7093
SOFABED QUEEN,GOOD
condition $200, OBO 941-
743-5762
STORAGE BED, new, twin,
white wicker/rattan, incl.
nightstand. $295 828-777-5610
(cell)
SWIVEL ROCKER Ratan Pastl
Pink Exc Cond. Pic Ava $75
414-899-0006
TABLE SMALL DROP-LEAF
$2 734 645-5396
TEA TABLE Wood $5 734
645-5396
ELECTRONICS
L~j :6038


DIGITAL CAMERA
Sony Model MVCFD88
$50 941-445-6002
GPS, GARMIN
Series 205, New
$100 941-232-6296
HOME THEATER RECEIVER
Onkyo, Model TX-SR604 7.1
$60. 941-486-0189
IPHONE4 APPLE16GB-EXC
Flawless COND MUST SELL!
$275, OBO 941-204-2382
NINTENDO DS with camera
Comes with 6 games $100
941-380-6551
NINTENDO W116FIX w/all
accessories, new cond, $125,
941-391-0369
PLAYSTATION 2 20 games &
2 controllers $120, OBO 941-
380-6551
SURROUND SOUND system
New, LG, $200 & Other sound
gear 828-777-5610 (cell)
WINDOWS 7 Laptop HP
Pavilion, 4GB RAM,
441GB, 17" screen. Less
then 1 yr old. $250, OBO
941-626-2130
X-BOX ORIGINAL comes with
11 games & 2 controllers
$80, OBO 941-380-6551
TV/STEREO/RADIO
L : 6040


FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


TV/STEREO/RADIO
6040


19" RCA TV USED THREE
MONTHS AND STORED JUST
LOOK! $20 941-492-3659
22" TV Polar Polaroid 2012
HD-LED $35 941-468-5578
HOME THEATER speaker sys-
tem Bose Cinemate-digital
$300, OBO 941-764-9604
Seize the sales
with Classified!
ROKU 2 streamer never used
because I don't understand-
price firm $25 941-505-1503
T V big 40" mistubishi with
remote $145 941-626-3102
TV 56" RCA HD. Exc. Cond!
Unit Size 52"Wx55"Hx23"D
$375, OBO 941-764-9604
TV STAND EC.Black, Metal
w/glass shelf. $35 941-875-
6271
TV STAND, 60", 3 glass
shelves, silver frame,new $75,
OBO 941-637-4954
TV TOSHIBA HD 30" Flat
screen CRT. Good working
cond. $50 727-515-0058

COMPUTER
EQUIPMENT
6060

COMPUTER LAPTOP, XP,
WIRELESS DVD/rom $85
941-475-7453
COMPUTER, AMD Athlon2
processor. 8GB DDR3, SATA
HD, Win 7, 64 Bit Operating
sys. $500 941-875-2185
DAVE IN-HOUSE-OFFICE com-
puter repair, set-up Serving Char-
lotte Co. 12+ yrs 941-629-6337
GOLF CLUB computer mouse
new looks like a driver $5
941-228-1745
HP DESKTOP Intel i-7, 12 GB
mem;750 HD;Win 7 $295
944-575-2815
MONITOR 17" Great color
picture. Not a new thin LCD.
$15, OBO 941-743-2656
WINDOWS XP Pro With
unused COA Full version Great
shape. $60 239-204-1473
CLOTHING / JEWELRY
L ACCESSORIES
I 6065

14KT GLD ring 1ktdiamond
soitaire-new- jtv tags $499
941-505-1503
BLUE JEAN Jacket Calvin
Klein in great shape like new
Medium $30 941-445-5619
CLOTHING JUNIORS tops
tanks shorts pants 3/5/s/m
(8) $20 941-544-1128
COACH PURSE Genuine.
Beige/Pink leather. Gentlly
used $25 941-697-6977
DOONEY BOURKE purse.
Genuine. Brand new. Call for
details $50 941-828-8806
DRESS BEADED sz.8 ex.
cond. party dress, must see.
$25 941-391-6377
JACKET-US ARMY FIELD OD
green-2 sizes-never worn w
liner $50 941-445-5619
JEWELRY ARMOIRE 40"h
17wl2d Ex cond $90 941-
473-3317
MOVADO WATCH Stainless
steele, ESQ $200, OBO
941-889-9425
NECKLACE & Earrings Trifari
set.Never worn. $30 941-
255-3353
NECKLACE BEV.HILL Gold,
Initial "A" boxed $45 941-255-
3353
PURSE, Authentic Louis
Vuitton $400, OBO
941-525-4115
SHOES US ARMY Black-
dress-never used-still in box-
Size 9R $5 941-445-5619
WEDDING DRESS ivory, size
6,Swarvosky crystals, access
incl. $500 941-400-8437





Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


HIl AND U.IS B Brian ana ire
Challenger ,p
DIRECTIONS: N-- If -Il1
Fill each square with a number, one through nine. ,/if '- l |
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right.
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total in upper and lower right. 12
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THAN ONE SOLUTION. 3
Today's Challenge 12
Time 8 Minutes
6 Seconds 3 11
Your Working
Time Minutes 2 12
Seconds 14 10 11 11 12 BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker
2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved. AND NOW, THE AWARP
FOR THE BIGGEST FOUL-
S1 /| UP OF THE WEEK
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Challenger
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Wednesday's unlisted clue: MONSTER
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: THE CHECKERED
300 game Goal Home run Perfect game
Ace Grand slam Knockout Slam-dunk
Bull's-eye Hat trick No-hitter Spike
Eagle Hole-in-one Perfect 10
2013 King Features, Inc. 7/4


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Yesterday's Cryptoquip: WHEN PEOPLE HAVE
VERY SMALL PALMS AND FINGERS, WHAT
COULD YOU CALL THEM? SLIGHT OF HAND.
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: S equals 0







T0


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463.1638


SUNVES
NEWSPAPER


Surgery to remove scar

tissue can create more


REX MORGAN By Woody Wilson and Graham Nolan


DEAR DR. ROACH: I
have been hospitalized
twice in the past year for
a partial blockage in my
bowel, where there is scar
tissue. I did have a non-
cancerous polyp removed
as well as part of my colon
in 2008, and in 1959, I
had a tumor and ovary
removed. I am 73 years
young. The last time a
doctor suggested surgery
to remove the scar tissue,
my primary care doctor
said it wasn't a good idea
because it would only
make more scar tissue.
What is your feeling about
this? Is there anything I
can do to prevent it from
happening again? A nurse
told me to drink lots of
water and chew my food
till it was mush in my
mouth. I would appreci-
ate any insight I could get
on this. D.S.
ANSWER: It sounds
as though you have had
two episodes of partial
small bowel obstruction
(blockage) due to adhe-
sions (scar tissue causing
the intestines to become
blocked) from your previ-
ous surgery. While surgery
is sometimes necessary, I
agree with your primary
doctor that further adhe-
sions can happen after
the surgery to get rid of
the first adhesions, so
I wouldn't recommend
surgery unless you have
further episodes.
A CT scan is almost
always done during hos-
pitalization to make sure
there isn't another cause
of the partial blockage.
The nurse's advice
for preventing another
episode seems prudent.
Very-high-fiber diets can
be associated with recur-
rences of the obstruction,
so don't overdo it.
DEAR DR. ROACH: Is
there another nail infec-
tion (especially of the big
toenail) that is similar to
nail fungus? If so, what is
the name and treatment
for it?
I have been battling
an infection of both
of my big toenails for
several years. Recently,
I took oral medications
(Lamisil for two months
and itraconazole for three
months), which have
helped very little, if any. I
want to continue fighting
this condition in any way
I can, so I will appreciate
your answer, along with
any suggestions. P.P
ANSWER: Treatment of
toenail fungus is difficult,
and even if the cause is
the most common fungus
treated by the medicines
you have used (called T.
rubrum), at least
oon


Dr. Roach
Readers may
write Dr
Roach at
PO. Box
536475,
Orlando,
FL 32853-6475
25 percent of people
will fail with the most
effective treatments we
have. But other condi-
tions can cause toenails
that look exactly like they
are infected, especially
psoriasis, eczema and
lichen plans. For this
reason, and because both
Lamisil and itraconazole
(rarely) can cause serious
liver damage, I would
recommend an attempt at
diagnosis with nail scrap-
ing for laboratory identifi-
cation before proceeding
further. A dermatologist
can do that for you.
DEAR DR. ROACH: I
recently read an article
that mentioned there are
drugs that may interfere
with memory and possibly
can cause Alzheimer's
disease. The specific drugs
involved were not men-
tioned. My question is
whether you know of any
drugs that may fall into
this category. I am 71 and
find that especially my
short-term memory is not
as sharp as it was, even a
year ago. Thank you for
any information you can
provide me with. L.M.
ANSWER: Alzheimer's
disease almost certainly is
genetic, at least to a large
extent, so medications
can't cause Alzheimer's.
However, literally hun-
dreds of medications can
interfere with memory
and cause symptoms that
look just like Alzheimer's
disease.
Sedatives, antide-
pressants and pain
medications are the most
common, but almost any
medicine you can think
of has the potential. Since
many people in their 70s
are on lots of medications,
it's always worthwhile to
look at each of them peri-
odically and determine if
they are really necessary.
Dr. Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer
individual letters, but
will incorporate them
in the column when-
ever possible. Readers
may email questions to
ToYourGoodHealthmed.
cornell.edu or request an
order form of available
health newsletters at P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Health news-
letters may be ordered from
www. rbmamall. com.


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
HMM&M .THE PAY WELLNES5
'I /A 9 f RESORT IN TUCSON OFFERS
-ri. rI' *J SPA TREATMENTS, HiKE6- I
-J1f tLEALUTIFUL LANDSCAPES


DILBERT By Scott Adams
DATING IN 2018

YOUR ORGANIC PARTS
ARE UNIMPRESSIVE.


(i KNEi I LWJANT
( MY DAY ) TO MAKE
WOULD ) A ROBOT
SCOME. L WITH
u YOU.


BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY


The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


Thur .,-j, Jul, J 201I3


:.:. ',our ..ur'r -",et


I







r*I n I


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii
.w -. W L. V .


t aer deals in the Business & Ser e


blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and

i the Classified Section of the Sun! /


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek V -'
K\ KOWEV.FR WTj T O k \Nt 0U 5"TE.,
SIGeFITiO 50UN1 5f5TEA.,


I I \- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
P rin t y o u r _
answer here: 'I_'IITII


Yesterday's Jumbles:
Answer:


(Answers tomorrow)
SPOIL ADULT SPRAWL TURNIP
When he finally had a chance to go around
the slow car, he couldn't PASS IT UP


Take gum off the drum


Dear Heloise: I took a
load of my best friend's
clothes out of the dryer to
discover he didn't empty
his pockets and a pack of
gum was left in a pocket -
gum on the drum!
I rubbed a little peanut
butter on the drum, wiped
it off with a soft cloth and
then wiped the drum with
a little degreaser. Good as
new! Tammy, via email
I'm glad this worked for
you. Here's another way to
remove gum from a dryer
drum:
The gum needs to be
softened first. Put a couple
of old towels in the dryer.
Let it run on the warm
setting for a few minutes.
Make a paste of 1 table-
spoon of powdered laundry
detergent and water. Next,
scrub the gum stains with
the paste and a nylon-net
scrubbie.
Wipe the inside of the
dryer with a damp towel
until there is no gum resi-
due left. Don't use the dryer
until you run a couple of
old, damp towels inside.
Check all pockets before
putting garments into the
dryer. You never know
where gum, a lipstick or
lip-balm tube or a crayon
might be hiding. Heloise

Reusable straws
Dear Heloise: My wife
and I use the insulated
drink cups that come
with a reusable plastic
straw. Cleaning the straws
became problematic.
One day, I used an
extra-long pipe cleaner.
It works great, and now


Hints from Heloise

we feel more comfortable
knowing the straw is clean
as a whistle. A Reader,
via email

Smelly closet
Dear Heloise: I moved
into a house with a smelly
closet. I put used fabric-
softener dryer sheets into
a mesh bag (in which
oranges come) and hung
it in the closet. It worked
wonderfully. Diane H.
in Kentucky

Handy stroller
Dear Heloise: I read
the hint about a woman
bringing her dog to the vet
in a baby stroller. My older
mother still gets around
pretty well, but she needs
some help with balance. She
takes an umbrella stroller
with her whenever she goes
out. It's a good place to put
her purse and bags so that
she isn't juggling packages.
It gives her an extra bit of
stability, and it's smaller and
easier to maneuver than
a walker, which she really
doesn't need. The stroller
has been a perfect solution
to her staying mobile. -
Nancie Bartley, via email


BLONDIE By Dean Young and John Marshall


HAPPy
BIRTHPAy
B B S Jerry S cot






BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott


Trudeau
HeR IH FLOPA TI5 6OP
F6HTS FRAUD BY PUR61AN
ROlS OF INELIGIBLE YOT-
BRS' SOUS 600DP TO MB!


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE By Lynn Johnston
MITr, WTIU.CH OFR f MND IF I HVE
MEAL, PHIL. L | I c iKe
rl, *lt
A Ai-r R'


JUMBLE.
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 11


T


TV'
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The Sun Classified Page 12 EINIC ads.yoursun.net Thursday, July 4, 2013


Mother-in-law's nightly calls

invade couple's private time


DEAR ABBY: My wife
and I have been married
14 years. During that time
her mother has called
every single day.
Initially, I was OK with
it because we were living
in Florida and she was
in Iowa. However, since
we moved back to Iowa
to be near her (we live
three miles apart), she
continues to call nightly.
Sometimes she'll call
during dinner or during
our "couple's time" after
the kids are asleep. I have
expressed my dissatisfac-
tion with this, particularly
because my wife and MIL
see each other and talk
throughout the day.
Am I out of line to
ask for family/couple
time during which no
outside calls come in,
or am I being unreason-
able? This is a touchy
subject, and I don't
know how to resolve it to
everyone's satisfaction.
- BOTHERED IN THE
HAWKEYE STATE
DEAR BOTHERED:
With whom is this a
touchy subject? Your wife?
Her mother? The two of
them? Considering that
your mother-in-law lives
close by and that she and
your wife talk during the
day, they appear to be
excessively dependent
upon each other.
As a partner in your
marriage, you have the
right to a quiet family
dinner and private time
with your spouse. If your
wife can't bring herself to
get that message across
to her mother, then YOU
should set a time after
which "Mama" should
refrain from calling unless
it's an emergency.
DEAR ABBY: After years
of traveling overseas,
I have finally found a
wonderful way of getting
rid of unwanted foreign
coins the banks won't
exchange. Please let your
readers know they can
put their leftover coins to
good use by mailing them
to UNICEF'S Change for
Good program. PAT IN
COLORADO
DEAR PAT: I'm glad you
wrote because so many
people travel outside the
country during the sum-
mer months.


Dear Abby

Readers, when travelers
return from an interna-
tional vacation, many
are shocked to find that
banks change only foreign
paper currency back into
U.S. money, so they are
left with pockets full of
coins that can't be spent.
UNICEF'S Change for
Good program (which
is supported by some
airlines) collects donated
coins and uses the money
to support disaster relief
programs worldwide, as
well as programs benefit-
ing children in areas that
include education, water
and sanitation, HIV/AIDS
and child protection.
Those interested in
participating in this
worthwhile effort should
send their coins to:
U.S. Fund for UNICEF,
ATTN: Change for Good
Program, 125 Maiden
Lane, NewYork, N.Y.
10038.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I disagree about
privacy. He believes he
should have the password
to my email and Facebook
accounts. I have nothing
to hide, but I think I'm
entitled to my privacy.
Can you settle this for us?
- PRIVATE IN BATTLE
CREEK
DEAR PRIVATE:
Probably not. Everyone
is entitled to privacy, and
being private doesn't
necessarily mean you
have something to hide.
Your husband may want
to look at your post-
ings because he doesn't
completely trust you. Or
he may have no interests
of his own. No third party
can settle this tug-of-war
with so little informa-
tion about what else
may be going on in your
relationship.
TO MY READERS:
Happy Fourth of July,
everyone!


"Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto
my path."-- Psalms 119:105.
Living life without the benefit of the Word of God
is like trying to see in the dark. Read the Bible and let
God lead you.


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz
1THIS IS A IT'S TRADITIONAL THAT WHOEVERR
VEW IMIoWANT i t IN fiT PLACE ON THE FOURTH
\SAME.. OF J< 60ESONTO( 1INTHEPENNANT


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers

2Di1 NQO, W.VCKLE.
SUCKL M UPI Is 6 e4ID-Tv1-l-
PApl7? SEAT CU"10N...










SHOE By Gary Brookins & Susie

GOT ANY BIG IW THINK I'LL CELEBRATE WHAT?!
PLANS FOR BY HAVING A THREESOME ARE YOU
TONIGHT, ROZ? AFTER DINNER. KIDDING?

fr'L I. v


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


I HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).The multimedia artist
Robert Zend suggested, "There are too many people
and not enough human beings." You might disagree
as you see the best part of the human spirit prevail.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). When one opportunity
ends, another opens up. You're focused on the big
picture now and not so worried about the details.
New relationships will be formed.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). In your philosophical
mood, you'll ponder much, so ponder this: Ifyou


you are. If you thinkyou're in love, you are. But if you
thinkyou're wise, this is a sign to get humble.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Courage is tested in the
face of obvious danger and risk. But it is also tested
in smaller, less noticeable ways in the face of the
unknown and unknowable of daily life.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You'll connect via breezy
exchanges.Talking to friends will be easy.Talking to
people you don't know will be exciting. Both will be
beneficial to you and yours in the future.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).When you experience


could own it for yourself. But possession can be ruin-
ous. It comes with too much responsibility.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).When you pick your
battles, don't pick the one going on inside your
own heart. It's better to sit that one out and remain
neutral while the forces settle the score. Be at peace.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).The love you receive will
outlast most everything else in life. Bonus: You don't
have to keep this treasure of love in a locked safe,
because it can't be stolen from you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).You don't need


a little more every day, which makes you feel as
though you are fulfilling a profound purpose of the
human spirit.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). A bell cannot ring
when it is being held; that mutes the vibration, and
no sound will come of it. You'll consider how you
might unclasp your hands and "let freedom ring."
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).You'll get to decide
where to put your time, energy and money. Invest
in goodness. Whatever happens after that will be
an excellent return on your investment, because


think you're happy, you are. If you thinkyou're rich, something marvelous, you sometimes wish you
oon


PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Make no promises.
Happiness is a loose schedule. Having to be certain
places at certain times or worse, having to be
accountable for getting other people where they
need to be ata certain time- will be too limiting.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (July 4). You'll act on behalf of
others and will be promoted to a special position.
This month brings financial luck. Many will seek
your expertise and opinion in August. A special re-
lationship grows closer quickly in September. Aries
and Gemini people adore you.Your lucky numbers
are: 44, 2, 29,47 and 18.


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle. The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

_7 3 8 1 Rating: BRONZE
9 1 7 3 Solution to 7/3/13

2 1 7 5E 1 4 9 3 8 6 7 2 5396
2 1 7 5 0 5 7 8 1 4 2 3 9 6

3 8 1 2 3 6 5 971 84
4 9 1 6 2 8 5 7 3
1 2 6 5 8

6 3 7 8 6 3 9 7 5 2 4 1

6 18 2 9 3 8 4 2 5 9 6 1 7

1 7 9 6 612734958
-
2 76 1 7 /
7/4/13


The Sun Classified Page 12 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 4, 2013


to understand everything. You just need to learn goodness never fails.






Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORTCHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


JUL.4 PRIME TIME
J -. *1 11 iM[.O E a
ABC7 News World News To Be a A Millionaire? Wipeout: Boss and Employee: Motive: Pushover A customs Rookie Blue: Homecoming ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC 95 7 7 7 10 7 7 at6 (N) DianeSawyer Millionaire? Triviagame. (R) Third Shift Outside the office. (R) officer murders a limo driver. (R) AndyandSwarekworkabank at11 (N) KimmelLive
(N) (R) (HD) (HD) robbery. (R) (R)
ABC7 News World News The 7 O'Clock Entertainmnt Wipeout: Boss and Employee: Motive: Pushover Acustoms Rookie Blue: Homecoming ABC7 News (:35) Jimmy
ABC 2I 7 11 7 @6:00pm (N) DianeSawyer News (N)(HD) Tonight(N) (HD) Third Shift Outside the office. (R) officermurders a limodriver. (R) Andyand Swarekworka bank 11:00pm KimmelLive
(N) (HD) (HD) robbery. (R) (N) (R)
WINKNews CBS Evening WINKNews Inside Edition The Big Bang 21/2 Men Peron of Interest: Bad Code (1) Elementary: Dead Man's WINK News alLateShow
CBS 213213 5 5 5 at6pm(N)(HD)News(N)(HD) at7pm(N(HD)Familyreunion. Amygets sick. Beachhouse Reesegetsclsertofinding SwitchAccomplice hunt. (R) 11pm(N)(HD) DanaCarvey.
key. Finch. (R) (HD) (R)
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel: Jeopardy!: The Big Bang 21/2 Men Person of Interest: Bad Code (01) Elementary: Dead Man's 10 News, Late Show
CBS 10i 1 10 10 6pm(N) News(N)(HD) American MilitaryWeek Amygets sick. Beachhouse eesegets closer to finding SwitchAccomplice hunt. (R) 11pm(N) DanaCarvey.
_Heritage (R) (N) key. Finch. (R) (HD) (R)
NBC2News NBC Nightly Wheel: Jeopardy!: Macy's 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular 4th of July Macy's 4th of July FireworksNBC2 News (:35)The
NBC 0232232 2 2 2 6pm(N)(HD News (N)(HD) American MilitaryWeek celebration with performances from various musical Spectacular4thofJul @11pm(N) TonightShow
Heritage (R) (N) sensations. (HD) celebration. (HD) (HD) (R) (HD)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Macy's 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular 4th of July Macy's 4th of July Fireworks NewsChannel (35) The
NBC D 8 8 8 8 8 8at6:00(N) News (N)(HD) 8at7:00(N) Tonight(N)(HD) celebrationwith performances from various musical Spectacular4thofJu 8at11:00(N) TonightShow
sensations. (HD) celebration. (HD) (R) (HD)
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy The Simpson Hell's Kitchen: 6 Chefs Hell's Kitchen: 5 Chefs FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX 4 News Friends Ross
FOX 222222 4 4 4 Community news; weather; Bad check () Playdate group. Compete Relay race amongst Compete, Part 1 of 3 Black news report and weather at Eleven (N) meets Paul.
traffic; more. (N) final sk. (R) (HD) jackets. (R) (HD) update. (N)
FOX136:00 PalickOn TMZ(N) omg! Insider Hell's Kitchen:6Chefs Hell'sKitchen: 5 Chefs FOX13 10:00 NewsThe FOX13 News Access
FOX ( 13113 13 13 13 News(N)(HD) PoliticsPolitics. (N) (H Compete Relay race amongst Compete, Part1 of 3 Black top news stories are Edge(N) (HD) Hollywood(N)
__ ____final sk. (R) (HD) jackets. (R) (HD) updated. (N) (HD) (HD)
BBCWorld Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) A Capitol Fourth Annual July 4th A Capitol Fourth Annual July 4th A Capitol Fourth July 4th
PBS 0 3 3 3 News Business celebration features musical performances celebration features musical performances gala with music and
America Report (N) and fireworks display. (HD) and fireworks display. (HD) fireworks. (HD)
BBCWorld Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) A Capitol Fourth Annual July 4th A Capitol Fourth Annual July 4th The Statue of Liberty ('85)
WEDUI 3 3 3 3 News Business celebration features musical performances celebration features musical performances I*** Legacy oftowering
America Report (N) and fireworks display. (HD) and fireworks display. (HD) tribute to freedom.
21/2 Men 21/2 Men The Big Bang Big Bang Item The Vampire Diaries After Beautyand the Beast Playing WINK News @lOpm (N) (HD) How Met How Met
CW 11 21 6 Alan the Love-makng Halloween threatensguys.School Special Jeremy is withFire Vincent doesn't iust Mother ly Mother
nursemaid. injury. party. trained. (R) (HD) Gabe. (R) moves in. Landmarks
King of Kingof 21/2 Men Engagement The Vampire Diaries After Beautyandthe Beast Playing 21/2 Men Engagement Friends Ross Friends Ross
CW M 9 9 9 4 Queens Big Queens Job Aan the Russell's gifts. SchoolSpecial Jeremy is with FireVincentdoesn't rust Love-makng Father's meetsPaul. visits Marcel.
and Tall. insecurity, nursemaid. trained. (R) (HD) Gabe. (R) injury approval.
Loves Seinfeld Family Feud Family Feud White Collar On Guard Peter White Collar: Where Seinfeld No Scrubs New Baggage (HD) Excused:
MYN 39 1 11 11 14 Raymond: George lazes (VPG) (R) (IVPG) (R) & Neal search for a slled thief. There's a Will Treasure hunt. more kiss hello. babies. (IVPG) Languageof
Ray's on TV about. (HD) (HD) Love!
Access Seinfeld Family Guy Amrican White Collar On Guard Peter White Collar: Where Family Guy American Dad Seinfeld No Sunny Gang's
MYN ) 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) George lazes Peter's Bushvisits &Neal search for a slled thief. There's a Will Treasure hunt. Peter the pirate Police more kiss hello. Christmas. (HD)
___(HD) about. liposuction. Smiths. (HD) (HD) academy.
Family Guy Family Guy The Big Bang Big Bang Item Law & Order Criminal Intent Law& Order Criminal Intent How Met How Met The Office The Office
IND 12 12 4 38 12 Peter's Peter the pirate. Halloween threatensguys. AbatrossJudge lled during TheSaint Forger aids church. Motherly Mother Office robbery. Special
liposuction. party. mockduel. (HD) moves in. Landmarks (HD) seminar.
Without a Trace: Last Call A Withouta Trace: True/False A Criminal Minds Ze's Reprise Criminal Minds Pleasure Is Criminal Minds: Conflicted House: Act Your Age Girl
ION 2 2 2 13261817 criminalinformant disappears. SeretService agent's son Suspectcopies famous killers. MyBusiness Call girl lls Seialkiller targets spring has hardened heart tissue.
(HD) disappears. (H)) executives. (H)D) breakers. (HD) (HD))
A&E 26 26 26 26 39 50181 48 Video evidence. () 48 Stabbing; gunfight. Independence Day ('96) *** Alien spacecrafts destroy entire cities. (HD) Storage NY Storage NY
S56 56 56 3The Walking Dead Group The Walking Dead: TS-19 The Walking Dead: Days Gone Bye The Walking Dead: Guts The Walking Dead Rick (:45) Dead:
AMC 56 56 6 goes to CDC. (R) Mysterious doctor. Zombie epidemic. (R) (HD) Rick's new threat. (R) retreves guns. () Vatos (R)
APL 444444443668130Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman
BET 35 35 35354022 270 Higher **/ AI About the Benjamins ('02, Comedy) ** Witnessing a crime. American Gangster ('07, Drama) *** Detective pursues drug kingpin. (R)
BRAVO 68686 68 51 185(5:00) Scary Movie ('00) Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (R) Matchmaker (R) Tabatha Unfocused. (R) Tabatha: Studio 157
(4:28) Sex Drive (08) **~/2 Colbert Repo(:29) Daily Tosh.0Tay Tosh.OSpelling ILove You, Man ('09) A fiance goes on a few "man Daily Show (R) Colbert Report
COM 6666 66 15 27 190 Virgin's road trip. (R) (R) Show (R) Zonday. bee. dates" to secure a best man for his wedding. (HD) (R)
DISC 4040 44025 43 120 Fast Loud (R) (HD) Fast Loud Riskiest flip. Fast Loud (R) (HD) Fast Loud (R) (HD) Fast Loud (R) (HD) Fast Loud (R) (HD))
E! 46 46 46462726 196 Kardashian (R) (HD) Kardrdashian (R) (HD Karashian (R () Kardashan ( (HD) Kardashian (R) (HD) C. Lately PaulBlart
FAM 55 55 55 1046199 (5:30) National Treasure: Bookof Secrets ('07) National Treasure ('04, Adventure) **1r Treasure hunter protects history. The 700 Club (TVG)
FOOD 3737 37 37 76 164 Chopped (R) (HD) Chopped Brook trout. Chopped: Sticking to It |Chopped (R) (HD) Chopped Yellow rice. Star Live TV demos. (R)
21/2 Men 21/2 Men 21/2Men 21/2 Men Avatar('09, Science Fiction) ***1 In 2154, a former Marine is fitted with an alien body to aid the AvatarAnew
FX 51 5151 51 584953 (HD) (HD) (4HD) (HD) colonization of a distant moon by force, but he begins to doubt the mission.planet.
GSN 17917917917934 179184 Fam. Feud Famn Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Newlywed Newlywed Newlywed Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud Fam. Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73 240 Prairie (TVG) Prairie (TVG) Banner4th of July (13, Drama) Estranged family. Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
HGTV 41 41 41 41 5342 165 Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Addict Addict Raiders (R) Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65128 Pawn StarsrPawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stais Pawn Stars PawnStars PawnStars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars
LIFE 36 36 36 365241140 The Perfect Husband: The Laci Peterson Story Jodi Arias: Dirty Little Secret (13) Murder & trial. Jodi Arias: Beyond (R) (:01) Devious (R) (HD))
NICK 2525 25252444 252Sponge |Sponge VICTOR. Sam&Cat Big Time |Wendell |FullHse Full Hse Nanny Nanny Friends Friends
OWN 585 58 58 47103161 (5:00) The Bodyguard ('92) **1/2 Diva's protector. P.S. I Love You Messages help widow rediscover herself. P.S. I Love You Mystery messages.
QVC 14 1412 9 1413150 (5:00) Food Fest Flameless Candles American West Jewelry A look at history through jewelry. Mally Cosmetics
SPIKE 57 575757296354 Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Impact Wrestling (N) (HD) Cops (HD) Cops(HD)
SYFY 67 676767 64180Twilight Twilight Twilight Twilight Twit Twil i gwilight Tght Tw i light Tlight TwTilight Twilight Twilight
TBS 55 59 59 32 62 52 Queens Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Family Big Bang Big Bang Sullivan & Big Bang Conan Jeff Goldblum.
(5:30) Yankee Doodle Dandy ('42, Musical) -***1/ The Music Man ('62, Musical) ***j % A smooth-talking con man sells Ah, Wilderness ('35) A rebellious teen
TCM 6565 655 3 Composer George M. Cohan rises to fame. (NR) the citizens of River City, Iowa, a grand idea. (G) learns about life in a small town.
TLC 4545 4 445 5772139 money Boo (R) (HD) Honey Boo (R) (HD) Honey Boo (R) (HD) |Honey Boo (R) (HD) Honey Boo New clips. Honey Boo (R) (HD)
Castle: Pretty Dead Pageant Castle: Knockout The Fast and the Furious ('01, Thriller) **1 2 Paul The Hero: Courage Heroes The Hero: Teamwork
TNT 61616161 285551 murder. (HD) Conspiracy. (HD) Walker, Vin Diesel. Street gangs race fast cars. tested. (R) (HD) Temptations& fears. (R)
TOON 1248012412446 20 257Adventure IRegular Regular MAD (R) Crew (R) IRegular King: Pilot King Dad (HD) Dad (HD) Family Family
TRAV 69699 69 66 170 Paradise (R)Paradise (R) Mysteries (R) Mysteries (R) Mysteries (R) Mysteries Round saw.
TRUTV 6363 63 50 30 183Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers () Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) Jokers (R) (:01) Dumbest (R)
TVL 6262 66 2 3154244 MASH MASH MASH MASH Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Queens Queens Queens Queens
USA 34134 33422 52 50 NCIS (HD) NCIS Intruder is killed. NCIS Murdered marine. NCIS (HD) NCIS (HD) NCIS Ray returns. (HD)
WE 17117117 117149 L.A. Hair (R) L.A. Hair (R) L.A. Hair: VIP Blow Out L.A. Hair (N) Curves (N) L.A. Hair (R)
WGN 16 1616 1941 11 9 MLBGame |1Oth (HD) Home Videos (VPG) How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met News (N) Chicago's Funniest Home Videos
CNBC 3939 3839 37 102Greed (R) Greed A radio host. (R) Greed) Greed ( Greed A Ponzi scheme. Cocaine Cowboys ('06)
CNN 3232 3 3 2 1838 looSituation Room (N) Special (R) Special (R) 360 (R) (HD) Special () Special (R)
CSPAN 181818183712 109 Highlights from (R) (10) Newseum () Initiative (:45) Aspen Institute: Citizen (R) Commonwith (10) Highlights from (R)
FNC 664 64 644871 18 Special Report (N) (HD) The FOX Report (N) Factor (N) Hannity (N) (HD) Fox News (R) (HD) Factor (R)
MSNBC 83 83 83 83 40 103 Lockup (R) (HD) Lockup (R) (HP) Lockup (R) (HD) Lockup (R) (HD) Lockup (R) (HD) Lockup (R) (HD()
CSS 288828 28 4970 Rome Brave |WTTShow ~ Minor League Baseball: Charlotte Knights at Gwinnett Braves (ive) UFC Dantanna's SEC
ESPN 2929 292912 58 70 SportsCenter (HD) Hot Dog Eating College Baseball (Taped) (HD) Baseball Tonight (HD) SportsCenter (H1))
ESPN2 30303030 6 59 74 Nation (HD) CFL Football: Winnipeg Blue Bombers at Montreal Alouettes (Live) NFL Live (HD) Nation (H))
FSN 7272 72 72 5677 Stuntbust. Marlins e MLB Baseball: Miami Marlins at Atlanta Braves from Turner Field (Live) Marlins Marlins UFC Unleashed (R)
GOLF 4949 44495560 304 Golf Cntr PGA TOUR Golf: The Greenbrier Classic: First Round (Replay) (HD) PGATOUR Golf: The Greenbrier Classic: First Round (HD)
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 World-Adventure (H) PL World IMobil 2013 Tour de France: Stage 6: Aix-en-Provence to Montpellier (Replay) Faces of
SPEED 488848 48 42 69 83 Practice NASCAR Sprint Practice (Live) (HD) TORC: Off Road Champ.: Crandon (HD) NASCAR Sprint Practice (Replay) Wrecked
SUN 3838401401455776 Prep Zone Scuba Florida Insider Fishing Report (N) Sailing :58 Flat (R) (HD) Florida Insider Fishing Report (R) Sportsman
PhineasTop (:40)Gravity AN.T.Farm Jessie School GoodLuck GoodLuck Austin &Ally Austin &Ally Jessie zard GoodLuck AN.T.Fami Austin&Ally
DISN 1361361361369945 25010 sequences. Falls (R) (HD) Caringfor dan. (R) (HD) Report card. (R) Slumber party. Strict deadline. Kirais signed. love. (R) (HD) Accusedof School musicalAustn's
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Backto the Future (85, Science Fiction) **1 Back to the Future Part II ('89) *** A (:50) Backto the Future Part III ('90, Science Fction) *** (:50) Back to
ENC 150150150150 50350 Michael J. Fox. A time-traveling 1980s teen accidentally time-traveling teen heads into the future to Michael J. Fox. A time-traveling teen heads back to the Old the Future
stops his own parents from meeting. (PG) save his own kids. (PG) Westto save his friend's life. (85)
(:15) Napoleon Dynamite ('04, Comedy) *** Jon Heder, The Dark Knight Rises (12, Action) **** Christian Bale. Eight years after the Atlantic City Hookers ItAin't
HBO 3030230302 17302400 Jon Gries. An alienated teen helps his new friend campaign to Batman's battle with the Joker, the Dark Knight encounters a new terrorist leader known Easy Being a Ho Profession
become the class president. as Bane, who may prove to be the ultimate foe. (HD) examined.
John Adams John Adams: Unnecessary War Adams (:55) John Adams Peacefield The Watch ('12, Comedy) **1'/ A group HBO First Dare to Dream: The Story
HBO2 30303303 303402 Political unrest, want to avoid going to war. (TVPG) Adams and Jefferson mend of dads discover that their neighborhood is LookFilm of the U.S. Women's
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(:15) The Lucky One (12, Drama) ***k Zac Efron, Taylor The Sopranos Members Only Real Time with Bill Maher Ruby Sparks (12, Comedy) *** A Five-Year
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lucky wartime photograph. (HD) retire. (HD) Leiserowitz. (VMA) character who appears in real life. () (12) (R)
(3:30) The Thin Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang ('05) *** A thief (:20) Beasts of the Southern Wild (12, Fantasy) QuvenzhaneThe Sessions (12, Drama) *** John Shame (12)
MAX 3232032032063 320420 Red Line ('99) posing as an actor becomes involved in a Wallis. A sk-year-old Louisiana girl with an ailing father Hawkes. A man in an iron lung decides Sexual
convoluted murder case. (R) attempts to find her mother. he's ready to lose his virginity, addiction.
(5:00) Anchor- (:45) The Chronicles of Riddick ('04) Vin Diesel. Wanted criminal arrives on Final Destination 5 (11) After having a (:35) Pleasure Spa (13, Adult) % An
MAX2 321321321321 321422 man ('04) the planet of Helion Prime and finds himself up against the invading empire of premonition, a young man and his undercover cop investigates an erotic spa to
*A* (HD) genocidal Necromongers. coworkers manage to cheat death. find any illegal activity. (HD)
Heathers (89) (:25) Gone (12, Thriller) **A woman sets Dexter A Beautiful Day Debra Gangs of New York ('02, Drama) *** Leonardo DiCaprio. A young man who
SHO 34034034034019340365 Klling the out for her sister has been taken by a man works as a private investigator. witnessed his father's murder 16 years prior infiltrates a violent and powerful New York
clique, who abducted her. (HD) (R) (HD) gang with plans to exact revenge for his dad's death. (R)
Brokeback Mountain ('05) ***'/2 A ranch hand and a rodeo cowboy Our Idiot Brother ('11, Comedy) **%' An Wet Hot American Summer Love is in the (:40) Reservoir
TMC 350350350350 20350385 meet while herding sheep in Wyoming in 1963 and end up forming a idealistic hippy interrupts the air as teens spend their final day of summerDogs ('92)
romantic bond that lasts throughout their lives, tightly-controlled lives of his sisters. () at Camp Firewood. %
i,:307,PM 7:30 8PM 8:30-9PM 9:30 10-P, 1 P a a a0 I a


Today's Live Sports

8 a.m. ESPN 2013 Wimbledon
Ladies' Semifinals. (L)
9 a.m. GOLF European Tour
Golf Alstom Open de France:
First Round. (L)
12 p.m. ESPN2 2013 Nathan's
Famous Hot Dog Eating Con-
test from Coney Island, N.Y. (L)
2 p.m. SUN MLB Baseball Tam-
pa Bay Rays at Houston Astros
from Minute Maid Park. (L)
3 p.m. GOLF PGA TOUR Golf
The Greenbrier Classic: First
Round. (L)
4 p.m. WGN MLB Baseball Chi-
cago Cubs at Oakland Athletics
from O.co Coliseum. (L)
7 p.m. CSS Minor League
Baseball Charlotte Knights at
Gwinnett Braves. (L)
ESPN2 CFL Football Winni-
peg Blue Bombers at Montreal
Alouettes from Percival Molson
Memorial Stadium. (L)
FSN MLB Baseball Miami Mar-
lins at Atlanta Braves. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. ABC Good Morning
America Scheduled: The Henning-
sens perform; "The Chew" co-host
and chef Carla Hall. (N)
7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
from "Despicable Me 2," actor
Benjamin Bratt; summer safety. (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: Benjamin
Bratt; captains Sig Hansen & Keith
Colburn; Guy Fieri. (N)
9:00 a.m. CW Rachael Ray Sched-
uled: watermelon porcupine; 4th of
July DIY crafts made easy. (N)
9:00 a.m. MYN The 700 Club
Scheduled: a veteran of World
War II reflects on how his faith
protected him. (N)
10:00 a.m. IND The Steve Wilkos
Show Scheduled: a mother
believes her children are being
abused by the babysitter. (N)
11:00 a.m. IND Jerry Springer
Nov. 2011: fake escort profile;
stripper cheats; husband cheats
with stripper.
12:00 p.m. CW The Jeff Probst
Show Scheduled: a woman who
has extremely fragile bones; radio
host Dr. Drew Pinsky.
1:00 p.m. CW The Bill Cunning-
ham Show Scheduled: guests
who think they are destined to be
famous.
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk From June:
Steven Tyler; Angela Hill guest co-
hosts; chef Jason Santos.
2:00 p.m. IND Jerry Springer
Scheduled: a woman wants to
marry her boyfriend but his cheat-
ing hasn't stopped. (N)
2:00 p.m. MYN The Jeremy Kyle
Show Scheduled: Jaqui wants to
prove that Tyrone is her 5-month-
old son's dad.
3:00 p.m. IND The Steve Wilkos
Show Scheduled: a girlfriend ac-
cuses her boyfriend of continuing
to cheat on her. (N)
4:00 p.m. ABC Access Hollywood
Live Scheduled: Daisy Fuentes;
Auti Rivera & Victoria Justice; Katie
Lowes. (N)
4:00 p.m. FOX Maury Scheduled: a
countdown of all the wildest guests
throughout the season.
11:35 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel
Live From June: Miley Cyrus; "The
Heat" actor Marion Wayans; Miley
Cyrus performs.
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman From June: Dana
Carvey; Nick Robinson; Broadway
performance of "Matilda".
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno From June: actor
Henry Cavill; Jessica Buchanan &
Erik Landemalm; She & Him.

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv






The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads yoursu n net Thursday, July 4, 2013


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
i 6070 i


Oak. Asking $700! (Appraised
at $1800) 941-483-4562






I NEED CASH?


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"1800'S STONEWARE jug.
ex.cond.stamped. $85, OBO
941-235-2203
5 DRAWER walnut dresser
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ANTIQUES
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Open Daily.
Schoolhouse Square,
4300 Kings Highway, Unit 300
Call 855-484-7438
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BELT BUCKLE BELL SYSTEM
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CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS,
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$1.50 941-457-0155
COINS PROOF FRANKLIN
HALVES MULTIPLE DATES
$20 941-457-0155
COINS SELLING my v-nickels
wholeale grey sheet bid dates
vary $1 941-457-0155
FENTON CANDLE Holders
Cobalt. Hnd Painted & Signed.
$30 941-875-6271


ANTIQUES
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6070

GEISHA COLLECTION 11
pcs. Plus other oriental pcs.
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GIANT CLAM SHELLS pair
ea. 501bs. 24x16 $400, OBO
941-743-9661
HESS TRUCKS EIGHT + 2
TEXACO TANK BANKS, $30
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ICE CREAM POLAR CHAIRS
ANTIQUE WIRE $60 941-496-
9252
LIFE MAGAZINES 30's,40's &
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gain! EA $2 941-639-1517


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH
2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
DOUBLE TROUBLE


North-South vulnerable. North deals.


NORTH
K K65
J J84
o AJ5
469863
WEST
A A9874
KQ9765
o 7
465


EAST
4 QJ 10 3 2
103
o KQ942
4 7


SOUTH
6 Void
SA2
0 10 8 6 3
4 AKQJ1042


The bidding:
NORTH EAST
Pass Pass
64 Dbl
Pass Pass


SOUTH WEST
54 5c2
Rdbl Pass


Opening leads: Ace of 4
When the opponents bid a slam
voluntarily the chances of them going
down more than one trick are slight.
Therefore, a penalty double makes
little sense. More than 80 years ago
Theodore Lightner proposed that a
double of a slam contract should ask
for an unusual lead, usually dummy's
first-bid suit, and never for the lead of
partner's suit should he have bid one.
What about when a slam has been bid
competitively?
The first round of the auction was
uneventful, as was North's six clubs.
Both the double and redouble were
flights of fancy and this column
would never have seen the light of
day had West started with the king of
hearts, our choice for the opening


salvo. Declarer would have lost at
least one trick in each red suit.
Unfortunately, West thought the
double called for some other lead,
and selected the ace of spades!
Declarer ruffed high, cashed the ace
of hearts, crossed to the table with a
trump to the eight and discarded a
heart on dummy's king of spades.
Dummy's remaining spade was
ruffed high, the board was re-entered
with the nine of clubs and a heart was
ruffed, removing East's last safe exit
card. Reading the hand perfectly,
declarer now led the three of dia-
monds to the jack. East won with the
queen but was endplayed.
A spade would permit declarer to
ruff in hand and discard a diamond
from dummy. Thereafter, a diamond
to the ace followed by a heart ruff
would allow dummy to score the last
two tricks with trumps. If, instead,
East returned a diamond, declarer's
ten (or eight) would win and again
South could claim the rest of the
tricks. Making six clubs redoubled.
Which brings us back to the ques-
tion posed in the opening paragraph.
We think that a double by East in this
situation should simply warn partner
against bidding six hearts; we expect
to beat six clubs! A pass would allow
partner to take further action and,
should partner elect to bid again, our
actual holding would be a boon to
West.
(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this newspaper
or to Tribune Media Services Inc., 2010
Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 75038.
E-mail responses may be sent to goren-
bridge@aol.com.)


7 Little Words

Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

CLUES SOLUTIONS >

1 gets some air (8)

2 placed in order (6)
0
3 in an impassioned manner (10) _____

4 it merged with Exxon (5)

5 providing energy for (8) _

6 wrapped up together (11)

7 sibling's son (6) __


NEP


MO


Wl


VEH


BR


INT


KED


HEW


HES


EM


NG


BIL


ERI


NED


EAT


TLY


EN


RAN


POW


ERT


Wednesday's Answers: 1. CALIFORNIAN 2. CORNIEST 3. ANGLED
4. CARTONS 5. DITCHED 6. SCREECHY 7. UNCURED 7/4


ACROSS
1 Collapsed
5 Arthur Conan -
10 Unskilled
laborer
14 Radiate
15 Figure of speech
16 Lahore
language
17 1
(speed of sound)
18 Perceive
19 Veld prowler
20 Knife holders
22 Blackboard
cleaners
24 Pinch off
25 Hydrotherapy
spot
26 Hassock
30 Sprinkling
34 Enthusiasm,
plus
35 "The Moon Is
Blue" star
37 Poet's black
38 Cast a vote
39 Turn right
40 Tijuana "Mrs."
41 Shortfall
43 Throat clearers
45 Break
46 Spookiest
48 Honored places
50 cit.
(footnote abbr.)
51 31-day mo.


52 Water lilies
56 of hand
60 Foster a felon
61 Type of blockade
63 Easy way out
64 Just
65 Sink unclogger
66 Ancient harp
67 Polar explorer
68 Tendon
69 Tug sharply
DOWN
1 Rare minerals
2 Far East nanny
3 Weakness
4 Rubbing alcohol
5 Suds container
6 Lyric poems
7 Yang
complement
8 Back the wrong
horse
9 Indy racer-
Fittipaldi
10 Throb
11 Pennsylvania
port
12 Garbage bin
output
13 They have their
orders
21 Robbins or
Conway
23 Two-BR unit
26 UV blocker
27 Plains dwelling


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
AHAB J UTE S RE EBA
GALE US E R AVER
OUST REE KS MEET
GLO WWORS ASTY
l-ll --- lllD--
E AR RIDE
IMMERSE ASSAILS
NOONS MJERV NOAH
LOX SC AP TSE
ACI D HE B TEASE
WHEEL IE SP0 N SOR
E A YJN AN A
HORDE P Y SICIST
AM I IMO TACO
ZO N ANO D G GAD
YO GA MES DA OMO
7-4-13 @2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


28 Tots
(Ore-Ida product)
29 When to see
stars
30 Views as
31 "Ghosts" writer
32 Leif's language
33 Pesky insects
36 Notch shape
42 Watered down
43 Uses a ladder
44 Not deep
45 Unyieldingly
47 Dawn goddess


Reproach
oneself for
Kind of chop
Submit
Geog. region
Rani's wear
Compos mentis
Spanish Old
Master
Saddle part
Safari
Cargo hauler


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 4, 2013





Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


ANTIQUES
COLLECTIBLES
6070

NEWSPAPER 100 yr. old.
London Times. TITANTIC Great
gift. $25 941-488-8531
OAK DRESSER with mirror,
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941-496-8349
ORIENTAL MIRROR, Black,
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PERFUME BOTTLE Collec-
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941-889-9425
POCKET WATCH BEAUTIFUL
GOLD ACCENT DIAL MADE
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RECORD ALBUMS Lg asst of
albums,Elvis,C&W,etc. $75
941-624-4617
ROCKWELL VINTAGE plates
orig boxes/papers; BARGAIN
EA $10 941-639-1517
SAILFISH PACIFIC 6' skin
mount $475 941-475-3311
SEWING MACHINE 1920 in
cabinet refurbished $80 941-
625-2254
TAPA CLOTH art from Fiji
framed/mounted under glass
42"X42" $200 941-585-8149
TEA SET CROSBY TWO
POTS/TRAY/CREAMER/SUGA
R BOWL $125 941-275-5837
| Classified = Sales |
VANITY GORGEOUS dark
wood, 4 drawers, marble top.
$399, OBO 941-257-8592
VINTAGE MILKGLASS COL-
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$100 941-575-8881
WINE GLASSES Cranberry
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$125, OBO 941-575-4364
MUSICAL
L7 A60]90


GUITAR INDIANA w/ case,
stand $100 941-889-9425
MEDICAL
L ^ 4:6095


3-WHEEL WALKER w/8" bal-
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SUN



CLASSIFIED


To Place, Correct, or Cancel Ad


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1 e3487 ll- IA' AI






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|o sunnewspapers.net
UPDATED DAILY!!!


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TREES & PLANTS
Z:6110


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BABY ITEMS



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GOLF ACCESSORIES
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EXERCISE/
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TREADMILL Proform 680 LP
Exc. Cond, paid $1000, ask-
ing $250; Weight Set Weber
Pro w/Board, Exc. Cond, $75
941-391-0369
TREADMILL WESLO
Cadence Spacesaver. great
condition. $50 941-475-6006
SPORTING GOODS


::0 6130
AEROBICS STEP bench. Like
new w/riser. $25, OBO

BIG GAME LIFT SYSTEM
700Lb compound Hoist, new
$18, OBO 941-629-9149
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
GOLF CLUBS LADIES, Exc.


GUN SAFE Winchester t-22
safe $499, OBO
941-698-4669


Case, $200, 941-276-6504
JUMBO & standard-size quad
chairs w/carry cases/handles
Pr/. $20 941-276-1881
POOL TABLE united pool
table make offer $450, OBO
941-698-46992
ROLLER BLADES, Girls
size 6, like new. $30, OBO
941-625-9789
ROLLER SKATES "Europa"
RD track control Size 11 $40
941-697-0794
SKIM BOARD Black with blue,
40 x 21. $18 412-418-5784
SNORKLE,FINS,MASK
ADULT size $20
941-475-3311
TREE STAND 12 foot alu-
minum. $75 941-426-6941
North Port
WADERS, MEN'S Neoprene
Boot Foot Chest Waders Size
12, New $50 941-473-4121
/ FIREARMS



CHARLES DALY 1911
45ACP never fired $500;
Rossi 38spcl 2" barrel
$300 neg. 941-286-6510



GUN & KNIFE SHOW
VFW Post #7721
800 Neffs Way
Naples, FL. 34119
Sat 07/13 9-5pm and
Sun 07/14 9-4pm.
Admission $5.00 under 12
FREE & FREE PARKING CWP
Classes $49.95 11am & 1pm
daily. Lee County Gun
Collectors LLC.
(239)-223-3370
BUY-SELL-TRADE
www.gunshowsflorida.com


L FIREARMS
WavaZ6131


Higher Power Outfitters
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
Guns*Ammo*CCW
Financing Available!!
Buy*Sell*Trade
941-347-8445

-.


MORE GUNS,
TOO MANY TO LIST!
SELL, TRADE, BUY*
CALL 941-564-8778
SAVAGE M24, .22 mag over
20ga Survival, $350; REMMING-
TON 742 30-06 $450; REMING-
TON 1100 20ga $550; Sig
1911 .22 $375 941-650-5122

I FIREARMS
ACCESSORIES
t 6132 i

RELOAD EQUIP., Misc.
primers & factory ammo.
22L.R., 30-30, 30-06, 308,
300, H H, 338 Win.mag., 375
Win.mag. Pistol ammo cal.
380, 375, 38, 10 mm., 45
acp. Shotgun ga 12, 28, 410.
Target. 239-209-4020
7 BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
Lw 6135

BICYCLE LADIES Shimano
7-speed racing, used twice,
paid $300, asking $125,
941-391-0369
BICYCLE MEN 26 inch huffy
26" venice $45 941-786-
8706
BICYCLE WOMEN 10
speed. 26' Free Spirit $45,
OBO 906-203-1717
BICYCLE-MAN'S BRITANY,
10 speed, 26" $40 941-485-
0681
BIKE MENS 26" Beach
Cruiser $35 941-625-2779
BIKE RACK for car. Holds 3
bikes. New. $30, OBO 941-
625-9789
BIKE RACK Yakima KJ2 Rack
used 2 times on Camry works
great. $50 941-204-4466
BIKE TREK multi-track
mens 18 spd 27"
$65 941-625-2779
FIRESTONE CRUISER New
Tires/Paint refurbished, NICE!
$100, OBO 307-332-5389
LADYSCHWIN SIDEWINDER
used twice-mt. bike. must sell
medical $99 941-505-1503
MENS BIKE Men's Mtn Tek
Bike -excell cond -pgi $65
727-612-7209
MURRAY MTN Bike Cloud
Nine Seat 21spd, Like New!
$95, OBO 307-332-5389
NEXT MENS Bike w 25cc
helper motor 26"Alum. $300
941-629-1560
RECUMBENT BIKE Alum
frame/Air Shock Rear Suspen.
$499 307-332-5389
WOMEN BICYCLE 24" huffy
24" red venice $45 941-786-
8706
S TOYS
Lwa 66138


FP TRAIN choo choo Sing
and go 4 animals inc. $20
941-496-8765
FP TRAIN Peek A Block
press go 4 blocks inc.
$15 941-496-8765
PHOTOGRAPHY/
VIDEO
6140

TRIPOD VANGUARD VT-558
new in box. $80, OBO Cost
$150 941-697-1110


S POOL/SPA/
& SUPPLIES
6145


HOT TUB LOUNGER
NEVER USED 110 or 220
volt, maint. free cabinet.
Light, Sacrifice $1595
Local: 941-421-0395






**SPAS & MORE**
TRADE-IN'S WELCOME
WE BUY USED &
MOVE HOTTUBS.
***NEWWEBSITE***
www.spasandmoreflorida.com
941-625-6600
POOL PUMP Hayward w/AO
Smith motor. Good Cond. $90
941-697-7634
SPA PUMP & blower&filter
$125 941-661-2547

LAWN & GARDEN
6160


I 4 WALKER MOWERS I
2002 Kohler 23 HP (2) 48",
1998 Kohler 18 HP 48"
2007 Kohler 18 HP 48"
$2,000 EA OBO
Call: 941-628-8079
BAG FOR TORO Walk behind
Triangle Handle NOS $25
941-497-3702
CHAINSAW STIHL MS 361
Farm Boss Chainsaw, 20" Cut
$380 941-628-2311
COVER.LAWN TRACTOR OR
GRILL, LARGE $17, OBO
941-627-6780
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941-468-4372
EDGER 3 HP LOW HOURS
EXCELLENT COND. $50 941-
492-6984
EDGER ECHO Gas Edger
PE 200 $50 941-876-4462
EDGER LAWN Craftsmen
very little use 3hp.gas $95,
OBO 941-625-7678
EDGER, ECHO PE-200
$125 941-661-3298
FENCE BLK VINAL COAT 2
ates 200 ft. exc. cond.
499, OBO 941-743-9661
FLOWER POT SHELFS HAVE
2,HEAVY DUTY $140 941-
627-6780
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be
placed online by you.
One item per ad and the
price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
GAS HEDGE trimmer
Weedeater like new $50 941-
625-2779
(*-NEED A JOB?-)
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
GRILLS 4 BARBEQUE nice
shape, $ 20-40 941-716-
4195e
HEDGE TRIMMER BLACK
DECKER ELECTRIC $30 941-
575-8881





The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 4, 2013


LAWN & GARDEN
6160


JOHN DEERE 48x3 Blades
7-pt GX21784 Set of 3 $33
941-497-3702
LAWN EDGER Walk behind,
Troy Built, brand new 9" 4
wheels $200 941-485-0681

LAWN MOWER JOHN DEERE
d111 42" cut runs strong
$300, OBO 941-628-2903
LAWNMOWER RIDING 42"
Yard Machine 15.5 hp for
parts $125 941-485-0681
LAWNMOWER YARDMAN
self propelled, walk behind
$125 941-716-4195
MOWER BLADES New many
to choose from, $3 to $9 each
941-497-3702
PATIO TABLE & Chairs White
and light colored cushions.
$100 941-697-7385
PATIO TABLE and
chairs,white wickererf.cond.
$125 941-661-2667
PATIO TABLE, Small Ornate,
black iron base w/oval glass
top. $30, OBO 941-626-2832
RIDING MOWER Craftsman
15.5 HP. 42" cut $400
941-875-4485
SEARS WEEDTRIMMER 12
inch wheels,5 H.P. good condi-
tion. $200 941-276-0029
STRING TRIMMER / EDGER
WORX, 18V W/CHARGER $45
941-627-6780
TORO GM 325 Mower, P.S.,
25HP Diesel, Hydro Trans, 72"
deck, Exc. Cond, ,Xtra parts
avail, $6,500 941-650-1258


LAWN & GARDEN
6160


TRACTOR YARDMAN 42"1
cut $400 941-716-4195
TRANSMISSION FOR TORO
20332 w/b s/p mower.NEW.
$35, OBO 207-319-6141
TREE LOPPERS & PRUNERS
2 PAIR 24"& 8" LIKE NEW $20,
OBO 941-627-6780
TRIMMER, RYOBI with Culti-
vator & Edger Attachments
$75 941-473-4121
WAGON, 13 1/2 cu. ft. Pull
Behind Riding Mower $100
941-473-4121
WEED WACKER
Echo Gas Weed Wacker
GT 200R $50 941-876-4462
WEED WACKER Stihl FS 110-
R Low hrs Not used comm
$225 941-661-3298
I BUILDING
SUPPLIES
w 6170

BARREL ROOF tile 500 new
pure white with caps $2, OBO
941-625-7678
BOSTICH 12 unused coils of
nails N80C for all $25 941-
474-7387
HEAVY DUTY metal
shelf brackets, $30.00 for all.
941-623-0346
I Employ Classified! |
TILES POOL/BATH, WHITE
3 DOZ $5 941-575-8881
WOOD PALLETS Free some
oak you pick up Venice
941-488-0667


TOOLS/ MACHINERY
6190


AIR COMPRESSOR Camp-
bell/hausfeld,6access.new
$49, OBO 941-629-9149
FLOOR JACK Craftsman,
New, 3 TON, NICE, EASY TO
USE $80 941-268-9029
GAS DRILL, Echo ED-200
Runs Excellent $225 941-
661-3298
GENERATOR 3000 watt
Honda Engine $150 941-266-
5751
GENERATOR DEVILBISS
5000 watt $75 941-575-
2527
GENERATOR MCCULLOCK
FG 5700AK Brand new Garage
kept $450. 941-496-9873
ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!
JET PUMP SHALLOW WELL
Starite 1/2 hp cast iron, rebuilt
$125, OBO 941-485-0681
METAL CUT-OFF Chop Saw
14" HD 15Amp New Cond.
$65 941-266-4731
MITER SAW Makita 10" car-
bide blade on 115" portable
stand $75 941-585-8149
NAILER ROOFING COIL, 11
auge never used in case
30, OBO 941-637-4953
NAILER, FRAMING, Cordless
w/12,000+ nails, NEW, extra
battery fuel cells $350 941-
628-3613
PRESSURE WASHER 2500
PSI pressure washer, B/S
engine $150 941-266-5751


Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.





Fun By The
8 6 1 2 Numbers

6 2 1 4 9 Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
8 9 6 3 sudoku. This
mind-bending
8 4 9 1 3 7 puzzle will have
you hooked from
7 4 9 5 the moment you
square off, so
1 9 6 sharpen your
pencil and put
5 7 8 3 1 yoursudoku
517 8 3 1 1 Isavvy to the test!

6 1
3 6 4 7 5

Level: Beginner
Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

98 ZLtV9 C1 6
S -I.L 9 9 6 V Z9


96 9 6 6 L 8 SZ
1 9 6 Z V 9 C L
L 6 91. 6y9 g
t, 8 9 6 L 6Z 9


Z L 119 6 8 9 6 10
:bBMIASNV


TOOLS/ MACHINERY
6190


SCREW GUN electric, new in
box B&D-2057-MN $100, OBO
941-628-3613
TABLE SAW CRAFTSMAN 10"
Direct Drive $75 941-764-
0614
TEXTURE GUN and hopper
$65 941-766-7466
TEXTURE PUMP GoldBlat
Texture pump w/2 hopper
guns $150 941-266-5751
TOOL BOX, Craftsman 41"
stainless. New cost 850. Sell
$400 941-268-9029

EQUIP./SUPLIES
Z 6220

OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Pre-owned & new office furniture.
VENICE 941-485-7015
FINGER PRINT SAFE CSS,
NEW, 19" x 14" x 12" not fire
rated, 601bs, $275, OBO 941-
628-3613

RESTAURANT
SUPPLIES
L 6225

JUICER HB96500 CALL FOR
PRICES FOR MIXER & SLICER
$250, OBO 941-275-5837
TABLE/(4)CHAIRS SET(S)
OUTDOOR BURGUNDY GREEN
TOPS $250 941-275-5837
BIRDS
Laws 6231


AFRICAN GREY 15YR SM-
ART AS 5YR OLD, LG&SM
CAGE $650 941-661-8449
CATS
6232


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
Community cats of Charlotte
kittens. Ready for good
homes, call 941-639-6765.
KITTENS Looking for a warm,
loving home. 941-623-6111
DOGS
6233


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
HAVANESE 9 weeks. M/F.
Health certificate. Paper
trained. 941-223-0301.
LAB PUPS AKC, light yellow,
5 males 4 females, shots,
health cert., 239-839-8828
RESCUED BEAGLE Mix
looking for forever home -
adult family. 863-263-5394
for more info.

PET SUPPLIES
& SERVICES
L00a 6236

A & R Aqua Pros Inc
Aquarium Services
Installation-Maintenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
941-441-8658 Lic/Ins
JOGGING STROLLER
Guardian Gear, for dogs up to
401bs. $100 941-400-8437
TOYS (ibatt.oper) SQUEAKY
balls, bone, etc. (6) as new.
$10 941-276-1881


APPLIANCES
6250


AIR CONDITIONER 18000
btu 9.7 eer $250 941-625-
0340
APPLIANCES, 3 all white, GE,
Side by Side Fridge, Glass Top
Stove & Microwave. $800 or
trade for equal value or
greater. John. 941-623-2529
DISHWASHER MAYTAG EX
COND RUNS GREAT LIGHT
ALMOND $75 941-286-4028
DISHWASHER, KENMORE,
portable, exc. cond. $175,
OBO 941-468-0333
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register when
you get to the
sign in page)**
FRIDGE. AMANA 26CF. S/S
w/door ice,water. Exc. cond.
bisque $360 941-391-6377
MICROHOOD NEW CALL FOR
PRICE FOR NEW KITCHEN SET
$300, OBO 941-275-5837
MICROWAVE .9 cu. ft. w/
turntable,works great. $40,
OBO 941-625-9789
MICROWAVE/HOOD, SS, 3
MOS. OLD. FRIGIDAIRE, $150
OBO, (941)627-4177
RANGE, Bisque color, older
but works great. $125
941-697-2800
REFRIGERATOR 3.2 cu.ft.
Like new. $80, OBO
941-625-9789
REFRIGERATOR MAGIC Chef
DORM SIZE 1.7CF BLACK
Like NEW $55 727-906-1754
REFRIGERATOR, AMANA
Bottom Freezer In good condi-
tion! $350 941-475-2630
STOVE/FAN EXC. COND
WORKS GREAT LIGHT
ALMOND $45
941-286-4028
WASHER & dryer Kenmore
washer Frigidaire dryer $250
941-698-1104
WASHER & DRYER REPAIR.
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
941-661-8585
WASHER & Dryer-Pair GE.
Works Good. $150 941-766-
1536
WASHING MACHINE Ken-
more heavy duty super cap.
$125 941-716-4195
| MISCELLANEOUS
Z 6260


AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
TOP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
AIR-PURIFIER LIVING-AIR
Perm-filter $95 941-496-
9252
BASEBALL BOOKS mint hard-
cover collectibles w/dust jack-
ets EA $5 941-639-1517


MISCELLANEOUS

::6260

BASEBALL CARDS 02 Rays
team-23 cards-Gomez, Vaughn
etc $5 941-445-5619
BBQ GRILL PRO-XL,
Good Cond, No Tank. $50,
941-626-2832
BBQ GRILL, gas, Kenmore,
3 burners & cov side burner
$50 941-639-1517
BOAT MOTOR used electric
boat motor aluminum mount
$50 941-468-5578
CANVAS BEACH Bag Guy
Harvey. Canvas. New. $10
941-875-6271
COFFEE MAKER KEURIG
MOD44 perfect $75 941-
496-9252
COMFORTER SET New 8 pc
Comforter Set-brown& blues
$45 727-612-7209
EVENING BAGS. For all four.
EC. Call for detail $15 941-
697-6977 or 941-828-8806
FIRE EXTINGUISHER Kidde
Commercial 4.5" diameter
$25, OBO 941-497-3702
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
FREE MULCH
Venice Englewood North Porth
Port Charlotte 941-475-6611
GENERATOR POWER CORD
25ft. 20amp(NEW)
$40 941-492-6984
GRILL MASTER 4 burner BBQ
"Like New" + side burner.
$150 941-875-1272
GROWLIGHT KIT 1000w
conversion, fan filter, halide
sodium $325 239-204-1473
GUN SAFE Winchester t-22
safe 1 year old $499, OBO
941-698-4669
HAM TOWER, BEAM rotor
down In driveway $450 941-
661-2547
LADDER, 28 ft. Aluminum
Extension ladder $100
941-473-4121
MARILYN MONROE "ORG."
1955 NUDE CALENDAR EX.
$200, OBO 727-906-1754
MASH COLLECTOR Edition
VCR Tapes Used. 70 tapes.
$40 941-286-7229
RECORD PLAYER combo
DVD, cassette. Retro look.
$49, OBO 217-741-2347
SAFE COBALT home/office,
exc cond., 29x19 x22 x275
Ibs, elec. KP. retail $1500.
asking $800 941-626-3938
SCREEN DOOR Panels
Garage Door w/Tracks 16'x7'
$250, OBO 941-473-3317
SHREDDER WORKS perfect-
ly. Must sell. $7 217-741-
2347
SLEEPING BAG Reversible.
Burg/gld. EC. $10 941-875-
6271
| Advertise Today! .
SUITCASE DUFFLE bag on
wheels like new. Blue, 29"
long. $20 941-740-3286
TV-32" COLOR JVC perfect
$65 941-496-9252
VINYL RECORDS From 50's -
70's. 45's and 33's. Buy 1, get
1 free. $1 217-741-2347
WINE COOLER terracotta
like new $15 941-228-1745
XMAS STUFF hundreds of
ornaments. Any 3 for a buck.
$1, OBO 217-741-2347
WANTED TO
BUY/TRADE
6270



Cash paid FOR WWI WWll
Korean Vietnam,German,
Japanese, etc Military items
(941)416-3280





Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


WANTED TO
I BUY/TRADE
I 6270

I NEED girls clothes for school
6-8 for a lot or bundle up to
$10 941-462-9874
WANTED CASH paid non-run-
ning push mowers $20 941-
286-3119

Fmd it in the
lassifieds!


2001 BUICK LESABRE,
ORIGINAL OWNER 97000
Miles $5000 OBO
941-276-2092

7000


TRANSPORTATION

7 BUICK
Law 7020



THE CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING DEPT.
WILL BE CLOSED
THURSDAY,
JULY 4TH.

*We Will Re-Open at
8:00am Friday,
July 5th*
EARLY DEADLINES
FOR CLASSIFIED
LINE ADS ARE AS
FOLLOWS:
Wednesday, 7/3,
3:30 pm for
Thursday, &
Wednesday 7/3,
4:30pm for Friday
We Wish Everyone a
Safe & Happy Holiday!

CADILLAC
7030


2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
70K Miles, Leather, All Power!!
$5,988 941-639-1601 DIr
2005 CADILLAC DEVILLE
1 Owner, $9439 Sale $8495!
941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 CADILLAC CTS
57,556 mi, $13,870
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 CADILLAC DTS
37,885 mi, $17,895
877-219-9139 DIr

7 CHEVY
La ^ 7040


1989 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE Convertible, auto-
matic, red, white top, 22900
miles excellent cond, trades
considered, $15,995, OBO
941-830-8143
2001 CHEVY BLAZER
83k, Loaded, Clean. 1 owner!
$3950 OBO 941-979-6234
2001 CHEVY CAVALIER Z24,
Only 50K Miles! $4,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2002 CHEVROLET Corvette
Z06 Coupe Red with 1 off fac-
tory red leather interior, all
options, air, 6 spd, new tires,
brakes, and service, 44k mi,
doctor's car, garage kept
$24,000 941-662-6107
2004 CHEVY VENTURE
Only 1 owner, FL car, $4996
941-639-1155 ext. 5500 DIr.
2007 CHEVROLET HHR
14,500 mi, Driver pwr & lum-
bar seat, sunroof, etc.
$13,900 941-488-4641


CHEVY GMC
Lem 7040 LJL 7075


2009 CHEW HHR, Low Miles!
Loaded! Sporty! $14,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2010 CHEVY EQUINOX
36,858 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 CHEVY EQUINOX
46,635 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr

SCHRYSLER
7050


1997 CHRYSLER SEBRING
CONV, WHITE $3995
941-639-1155 EXT 5500
2003 CHRYSLER 300M
V6, AUTO, White, 4 door
$7695 941-916-9222 DIr.
2003 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser
LTD, 1 owner Fl car, 64k mi.,
$6943 941-639-1155 ext 5500
2004 CHRYLS. SEBRING, 50K
Miles! Auto, A/C, Full Power!
$6,988. 941-639-1601 PG.
2004 SEBRMG CONVERiBLE
Tan, sporty! $7995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2009 CHRYSLER 300 4 DR,
14,000 mi., great condition,
$16,000. ***SOLD***

| DODGE
7060


2005 DODGE DAKOTA
99,487 mi, $9,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN 18,879 mi,
$19764 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 DODGE
CHALLENGER 13,044 mi,
$40,877 877-219-9139 DIr

FORD
L 7070


1999 FORD MARK III CONV
Van, Red 47k mi $7995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
2000 FORD CONVERSION
VAN, White, Auto,
$6995 941-916-9222 DIr.
2003 FORD TAURUS
4DR Wagon, brown $6995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 FORD FUSION
57,061 mi, $11,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 FORD MUSTANG GT
59,667 mi, $17,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 FORD EXPLORER LS
91,91844 mi, $14,544
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD EDGE AWD
67,067 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 FORD FUSION
42,957 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD E-350
32,039 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD ESCAPE
42,379 mi, $17,587
877-219-9139 DIr



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUNs-e



SClassified = Sales


2011 GMC YUKON
50,330 mi, $31,475
877-219-9139 DIr

7VJEEP
7080


1989 JEEP WRANGLER
69,073 mi, automatic, $1,925
941-677-0199
2003 JEEP LIBERTY
101,067 mi, $7,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4
SPORT, 60K Mi! Auto, A/C, Full
Pwr' $9,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2007 JEEP WRANGLER
39,664 mi, $25,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 JEEP LIBERTY
19,558 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr

S LINCOLN
ot ^ 7090


1997 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
, 174.5 mi, Cold Air, $1,500,
OBO 941-258-2964
1998 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR
gold,2wd,10lk mi, a/c, new tires,
tow pkg, multi-CD, runs good,
$3000, OBO, 941-861-7828
MERCURY
LW411:7100




1996 MERCURY COUGAR
XR7, 105K, Loaded!!, Leather,
$2,000 OBO 941-724-60891m
1999 MERCURY GR. MAR-
QUIS LS, 80K Mi! Lthr., Power!
$4,988. 941-639-1601, DIr.
2003 GRAND Marquis Ulti-
mate Edition, 62K, exta clean
$7800 obo. 239-440-3685.
2003 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS LS Tournament Edi-
tion,Loaded,93,300mi,
$6,900 941-497-7789
SATURN
L7m 7135


2008 SATURN OUTLOOK
68,783 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
|USED SATURN Sedans & |
Wagons $2,150 & UP.
SUV'S $3,695 & UP.
"The Saturn Guys"
Pro Power Auto Sales
4140 Whidden Blvd PC, 33980
941-627-8822

USED CAR DEALERS
L:: 7137


Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here

AUDI
7147


2004 AUDI A4
95,182 mi, $8,975
877-219-9139 DIr

BMW
7148 W


2001 BMW 3251, Red, auto,
cold weather & premium pack-
age, Xenon, 99K, $7000 OBO
845-234-1647
2004 BMW 325i, Auto,
Leather, Loaded, Moonroof!
$6,988 941-639-1601 P.G.
2006 BMW Z4
CONV, 51,715 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr


HONDA
Lwsom: 7160


2004 HONDA CIVIC
48,863 mi, $9,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA ACCORD EXL
46,392 mi, $15,740
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA ACCORD LX
68,377 mi, $10,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA CIVIC
81,420 mi, $9,214
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA CIVIC EX SE
84,061 mi $9,750
941-999-4170
2006 HONDA ACCORD
78,631 mi, $13,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD EXL
29,855 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD
EXL, 78,631 mi, $13,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA CIVIC
88,633 mi, $9,472
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA ACCORD
83,618 mi, $11,324
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA ACCORD
HYBRID, 56,170 mi
$12,876 877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V EXL
47,093 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V EXL,
63,987 mi, $16,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA ODYDDEY
77,129 mi, $20,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $20,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

LENUS OF SARAWSOTA
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
2009 HONDA ACCORD
45,132 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
47,739 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
49,249 mi, $15,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
76,287 mi, $15,478
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD LX
15,766 mi, $15,784
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA FIT
Black, 47,637 mi, $12,846
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
37,069 mi, $17,848
877-219-9139 DIr
I ADV0 ERTISEE I
2010 HONDA ACCORD
LX, 18,403 mi, $16,788
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD LXP
CERT., 14,630 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
24,001 mi, $15,786
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
28,216 mi, $14,245
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC 4DR
35,999 mi, $14,354
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
4DR, 21,446 mi, $14,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
4DR, 35,885 mi, $14,354
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
24,114 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
32,573 mi, $21,950
877-219-9139 DIr


HONDA
7160


2010 HONDA CR-V EX,
31,358 mi, $18,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V EXL,
Black, 51,262 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
29,533 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
32,121 mi, $14,245
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA INSIGHT
39,822 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 22,347 mi, $24,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 46,563 mi, $22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, BIk, 39,941 mi,
$22,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
17,670 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
2 DR CERT., 18,403 mi,
$16,788 877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
42,872 mi, $16,787
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
52,066 mi, $15,478
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT. 20,265 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD EX
39,880 mi, $18,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD EXL
20,361 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
EXL, Black, 26,176 mi,
$22,457 877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC 4DR
23,600 mi, $15,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC 4DR
31,905 mi, $15,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC LX
24,976 mi, $16,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
15,896 mi, $20,451
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
24,410 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
2WD, 23,480 mi, $21,880
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
32,158 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
NAVI, 30,017 mi, $22,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
NAVI, 36,214 mi, $23,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-Z
16,005 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT
16,291 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT
18,356 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
20,639 mi, $25,454
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
42,658 mi, $25,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $27,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

WELvs F NOaOTS
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!


HONDA
7160


2012 HONDA ACCORD
2 DR, CERT., 15,912 mi,
$23,478 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
Cert., 16,771 mi, $21,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
12,100 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
4 DR, CERT., 15,700 mi,
$19,875 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
4 DR, CERT., 24,355 mi,
$18,754 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC EXL,
CERT. 10,861 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC EXL,
CERT. 7,387 mi, $20,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
15,858 mi, $26,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
BROWN, $25,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
CERT, 18,981 mi, $25,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
CERT., 42,791 mi, $21,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CROSSTOUR
35,586 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CIVIC
CERT. 1,774 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT. 5,121 mi, $36,987
877-219-9139 DLR
2013 HONDA PILOT
CERT., 4,900 mi, $37,458
877-219-9139 DLR

HYUNDAI
Lamwa:7163


2000 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
44k mi., Auto, All power $5589
941-639-1155 ext. 5500 DIr.
2006 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Burgundy, Auto, $6995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 HYUNDAI SONATA
4 DR Sedan, 22,800 mi, 4
cyl., FWD, Automatic, AM/FM
Cassette/CD player, Silver,
Auto, A/C, Power Brakes,
Locks, Windows & Steering,
Cruise Ctrl, ABS, tilt,
$10,100 OBO 941-626-6244
2008 HYUNDAI TUCSON
33,492 mi $14,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HYUNDAI SONATA
59,743 mi, $11,477
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
LMTD, 36,466 $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
KIA
Lw 7177


2006 KIA SEDONA EX,
Leather, DVD, Full Power.
$10,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
2009 KIA SORENTO
42,487 mi, $16,758
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 KIA SORENTO
43,961 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
( GET RESULTS -
\ USE CLASSIFIED! )

LEXUS
Low 7178S


1994 LEXUS ES300, 90K Miles!
Leather, Loaded, Moonroof.
$4,988 941-639-1601 DIr.
2002 LEXUS ES300,
Leather, Moonroof, Low Miles!
$10,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.






The Sun Classified Page 18 EINIC ads .yoursun net Thursday, July 4, 2013


LEXUS
L ^ 7178

2007 LEXUS IS350, Only 17K
Miles! Gorgeous! $25,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Famrry
2010 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $26,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WILLDE
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
Employ Classified!
2012 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WIILDE
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
2012 LEXUS HS 250H Sun-
roof, 7,042 mi, $27,950
R77-91 -Q01 2 nir


MAZDA MERCEDES
7180 7190


1996 MAZDA MX-5 MIATA
137,813 mi, $5,877
877-219-9139 DIr
1998 MAZDA MILLENIA
102,450 Mi! Full Power. A/C,
Tape, CD, V6, Sun Roof. Runs
Great! $2,500. 941-485-3056
2001 MAZDA 626 ES, Only
90K Miles! Auto, A/C, Full
Power! $4,988. 941-639-1601, D1.
2004 MAZDA RX8 GT, 6 Speed!
Loaded & Sporty! $11,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2008 MAZDA 3 4 DR Sedan,
74,000 mi, 4 cyl., FWD, auto-
matic, CD player, black, auto,
a/c, cruise, alloy wheels, tint-
ed glass, Great on Gas! New
Tires!, $9,990 941-626-1618
2012 MAZDA MX-5
5Spd, 3,598 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr

Great Deals in
the Classifieds!


2005 MERCEDES C240,
Leather, Moonroof, PW, PL!
$12,988 941-639-1601 DIr.
NISSAN
7200

2006 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5 SE,
All Power Opt! Nie Rd $11,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2008 NISSAN ALTIMA
77,904 mi $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 NISSAN LEAF, Zero Emis-
sions! 100% Electric! $21,988.
941-625-2141 German Farly
| Advertise Today! |
S SUBARU
4041:7207 U

2010 SUBARU IMPREZA
AWD, 27,480 mi, $16,457
R77-91 -Q01 2 nir


TOYOTA
7210

2001 TOYOTA AVALON
XLS, 1 owner, leather, sun
roof. $6975 941-639-1155
2005 TOYOTA HIGH-
LANDER 110,454 mi
$11,243 877-219-9139 DIr
2005 TOYOTA TUNDRA
SR5 117,149 mi, $10,244
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 TOYOTA AVALON
LTD, Lthr., Loaded, Moonroof!
$14,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY
75,652 mi, $13,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 TOYOTA PRIUS, 1
owner, only 47k miles! Leather,
back up camera, $13,900 OBO
John 941-484-2676
PUT CLASSFIEDS
TO WORK
FOR YOU!
FIND A JOB!
BUY A HOME!
BUY A CAR!


TOYOTA
7210

2009 TOYOTA TUNDRA
75,226 mi, $22,415
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 TOYOTA CAMRY
25,820 mi, $16,950
877-219-9139 DIr

GUARANTEED
AUTOMOTIVE FINANCING
RATES AS LOW AS 1.9%!
941-625-2141
VOLKSWAGEN
7220

2007 VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT
75,435 mi, $11,245
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 VOLKSWAGEN R32,
Loaded! Must See! $17,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Fanmy
2012 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA
7,705 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr


L VOLVO
72300

2005 VOLVO S60, 60K Miles!
Leather, Loaded, Moonroof!
$12,988 941-639-1601, DIr
L MISC. IMPORTS
Z ^7240

2011 LEXUS RX350s
STARTING @ $34,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WILDE
LiWVl OIF SA W"S-rk
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAY!
ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES
L 7250

1966 FORD MUSTANG 2 DR
Coupe, 6 cyl., automatic, auto,
a/c, MINT CONDITION,
l 1 Qr 9 A5-47R-.1379


Do 0 [f have



something like



this in @o



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Il


The Sun Classified Page 18 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, July 4, 2013






Thursday, July 4, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19


ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES
7250



SAVE THIS DATE:
FREE OPEN
CRUISE IN
FRI., 7/12/13
10:00AM-1:00PM
3RD NATIONAL
COLLECTOR CAR
APPRECIATION DAY

MUSCLE CAR
| CITY&THE
VETERAN
MOTOR CAR
CLUB OF
AMERICA
INVITE ALL
Q CLUBS &
PRIVATE
OWNERS TO
DISPLAY ANY MAKE,
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NO PRE-REGISISTRA-
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EVENT COORDINATORS
941-575-5959 OR
941-575-0202

BUDGET BUYS
IOZ 7252


1993 HONDA ACCORD,
Auto, Power Windows & Locks!
$988 941-639-1601 DIr. P.G.




AUTOS WANTED
L 7260







$$ TOP CASH $$
FOR CARS & TRUCKS.
DEAD OR ALIVE.
941-485-7515

CASH FOR JUNKERS
Available 24/7
941-286-3122, 623-5550
WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204

F0.da FI


CHECK A JOBTHE
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!


AUTOS WANTED
7260









AUTO PARTS/
ACCESSORIES
7270

100 GAL. steel fuel tank be
prepared, comes w/pump &
filter $275, OBO
941-628-3613
1992 TOYOTA Camry Doors,
(No Door Panels) Buy ALL 4
$150 941-627-9466
(3)BRIDGESTONE AT TIRES
30x10 R15 LT NICE-TIRES
$60 727-906-1754
CORVETTE HOOD hood is
white.Fits 68-71 $200 941-
564-8587
CORVETTE SHOCKS Fits 73-
82 $40 941-564-8587
CORVETTE STEERING Wheel
Fits-80-90 $25 941-564-8587
ENGINE, 06-08 (Chrysler-
Dodge) $1000 OBO, -$50 off if
sold by 7/3 941-204-2382
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
HEADLIGHT 2004 mustang
left headlight $20 941-662-
0713
MERCEDES WHEELS -15" 4
orig. Alu. factory wheels $160,
OBO 941-629-9149
TIRE GOODYEAR Wrangler 2
used p235/65R/17 $50 941-
564-8587
TIRE MICHILIN, 225/60/16
white wall 65 mile warr. Almost
new. $45 941-474-5889
TIRES 4 New BFGoodrich
P235/55R16 96T $350, OBO
941-743-5762
TIRES, USED 4-BF-Goodrich
WL P265/60R18. $60, OBO
941-456-0936
| Classified = Sales |
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TRAILER HITCH
for '05 Dodge Caravan SXT
$50 941-875-2393

VANS
7290


HANDICAP VAN
All Remote control, 14k in
upgrades, $8,500/obo
863-244-3467
2005 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY 99,487 mi,
$8,788 877-219-9139 DIr


VANS
7290


2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-870-4325
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
37,010 mi, $25,748
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 51,264 mi $23,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 52,012 mi $22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
40,748 mi, $27,458
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
53,694 mi, $26,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
Lt Blue, 37,779 mi, $33,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 12,926 mi, $25,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 14,112 mi, $30,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
Touring, 32,164 mi, $35,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
Touring, CERT, 4,761 mi,
$37,950 877-219-9139 DIr

TRUCKS/ PICK-UPS
7300


1994 NISSAN Reg bed, XE
4 cyl, 5 spd manual. a/c,
dependable. 150k $3,700
941-204-0559
1995 GMC SONOMA V6,
4.3Z, Auto tran, Good work
truck! 254K, Cold AC, Tonneau
cover $1500. 941-979-2246
2005 FORD F-250, Diesel,
Ext. Cab, Auto, AC, Bedliner!
$10,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2007 FORD RANGER, Super-
cab, V6, Auto! $15,988. 941-
625-2141 GormanFarriy
2010 TOYOTA TACOMA
SRS, 50,907 mi, $24,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 TOYOTA TUNDRA
6,000 mi, 6 cyl., tow pkg, bed
liner, $24,200, OBO
941-626-7229

SPORT UTILITY/
VEHICLES
L: 7305

1999 FORD EXPEDITION, All
Power Opt! 3rd Row! $5,988.
941-625-2141 GormanFarriy
2004 FORD EXPEDITION,
3rd Row, Leather, All Power!
$10,988 941-639-1601, DIr
2005 HUMMER H2 Leather,
sunroof, Navi, 88,105 mi,
$24,578 877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HUMMER H3
LTHR, NAVI, SNRF, 72,786 mi,
$21,845 877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA PILOT
50,457 mi, $26,574
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 LEXUS RX 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

LE-US OF S oaSOa.
1-877-211-8054
OPEN SUNDAYS!
2011 HONDA PILOT
31,771 mi, $25,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT EXL,
24,057 mi, $28,759
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER
SR5, 22,024 mi, $29,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
10,030 mi, $35,950
877-219-9139 DIr


VEHICLES
7305 1

2012 HONDA PILOT
EXL, 21,954 mi, $25,950
877-219-9139 DIr

BOATS-POWERED
7330


10' PLASTIC FLAT BOTTOM
self bailing fold seats trolling
motor $495 941-822-1429
19' SEAPRO '98 CC, 115hp
Johnson, Trailer, BiminiTop
great condition. $4,000
239-682-8876
20' 1994 BAYLINER Needs
Starter. Make Reasonable
Offer. 5262 Lovett. NP 941-
268-2121
FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your boat
in our indoor showroom!
Sales Service Body
Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-244-5288
CharlotteMarine.com
21' HYDRA SPORT 2002,
CC, 2000HP Evenrud, new
electronics & cushions. Excl.
cond $12,500 251-747-2585


23s 1a 9 UI9IA, iuu ruel
Injected Yamaha, 450 Hours, 2
New Batteries, New Garmin
GPS/Fish Finder, New Radio,
Windlass, Trim Tabs & Canvas.
$8,500 941-505-4246


4' C PnIMrMnnML 2u,
Loaded, full canvas & screen-
ing, new engine 2009. Two
biminis, galley, enclosed head,
sleeps 4, fridge, inside stor-
age, galvanized trailer.
$18,500. (941)-493-8320


26' JOHN ALLMAND, fly
bridge, 351 inboard Ford on
trailer, project boat $2,000
941-628-9629
SAILBOATS
7331


16.5' CRUISING SAILBOAT
Sleeps 2, 7' beam, fast,
stable, very good condition,
4 stroke Mercury, trailer, mod-
ern design, $5600, Lake
Placid 863-465-7554
. i ;


8hp omc, solar panel, bimini,
tiller pilot, vhf. ready to go.
free mooring $4,499, OBO
219-781-9415

MISC. BOATS
a ^ 7333


14' CUSTOM SHALLOW
water fishing boat w/trailer,
like new. Needs motor.
$975 OBO 941-627-9498

S OUTBOARD/
MARINE ENGINES
Z 7334

30HP MARINER,
L/S,Elec start $750
941-661-2667
TACHOMETER Honda analog
$55 239-204-1473


MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
Z 7338

ANCHOR CHAIN 1/4"-
60'excellent condition $100
firm 941-625-8757
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**If you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
IGNITION SWITCH HONDA
with 2 keys. New in packaging.
$125 239-204-1473
KICKER MOUNT OB Up to
15HP All metal No Wood. $65
941-625-0340
PROP MERC 15.5 18 new
$20 941-662-0713
PROP SS 14.5 22 $50 941-
662-0713
PROPELLAR STAINLESS
15x19 Mercury $75
941-475-3311
/ CANOES/ KAYAKS
L ^ 7339


12' KAYAK 2 man inflatable
WestMarine Brandnew. $275
941-764-7375
14' OT SPORT CANOE, 3
SEATS, 1 PADDLES INCLUD-
ED. $325 610-217-9495
14' PERCEPTION KAYAK
2 seater, w/cart, 2 life vests, 2 sets
paddles, $650, 941468-5408

TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
S7341

2 WHITE rims 8"4 bolt like
new $10 each sm.trailer $10
941-204-3274
2013 TRIPLE CROWN
Utility Trailer 6 x 10 Into Price
$1195 941-916-9222 DIr.
ROY'S TRAILER COUNTRY
New- Pre-Owned Cargo- Utility
Trailers Parts Repairs-Tires
Welding 941- 575-2214.
4760 Taylor Rd P.G.

SCYCLES/MOPEDS/
SCOOTERS
L: 7360

1996 MOPED targa 49cc red
motorcycle type/nice $495
941-822-1429
2011 HD, Dyna wide glide,
103 CU", stage 1 kit, race
tuner, too much to list. Fast &
good looking, Adult owned,
professionally serviced.
$15,500 941-626-6868





DIRT BIKE Suzuki 360
New rubber good condition
$600.00 941-628-2903
UTV
7366


2010 BMX UTV 500C
4 seat, 4WD, Must See!!
$4995 941-916-9222


TRAVEL TRAILERS
7370

WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5th whis, Pop-Ups,
Van conversion & passenger
vans. Cash paid on the spot.
for quick sale. Parts &
Service Avail 941-347-7171


2014 WINNEBAGOS
2013 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld of Nokomis Inc.
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

DIESEL MECHANIC
ON DUTY
RV World of Nokomis, Inc
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your RV
on our lot!
Sales Service
Body Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-225-2712
CharlotteRV.com











LUXURY MOTOR HOME,5S
2013 MODELS UP TO 45
COME SEE ........LETS mADE!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

RV Collision Repairs
Customer and Insurance
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182

RV SERVICE SPECIAL $
Lg. Parts Showroom
RV Wash
New tires & balance
RV propane & bottles
Wash & Hand Wax
Water leak test
Roof Reseal
Brake Flush
Factory Warranty
All models
RV World Inc of Nokomis
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182

RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/RADE
CALL: MARK
RV WORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
SATURN TOW-CARS
Starting at $2,150. Blue-Ox
Tow hitches sold & installed.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980
(941) 627-8822.

SRV/CAMPER PARTS
111111 7382


WHEEL COVER 16" CHROME
(4) new for motor home $100,
OBO 941-249-4601




The Sun Classified Page 20 EINIC hi jr~.. Ii Ji~jI -1 L'..' I


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The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


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