Charlotte sun herald

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Charlotte sun herald
Uniform Title:
Charlotte sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : 1995)
Running title:
Sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Sun Coast Media Group
Place of Publication:
Charlotte Harbor, FL
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Charlotte Harbor (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Charlotte County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Charlotte -- Charlotte Harbor

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued on microfilm from Crest Technologies.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 103, no. 225 (Aug. 13, 1995)-
General Note:
"An edition of The Sun Herald."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 36852667
lccn - sn 97027762
ocm36852667
System ID:
AA00016616:00006

Related Items

Related Items:
DeSoto sun herald
Related Items:
Englewood sun herald
Related Items:
North Port sun herald
Preceded by:
Sun herald (Charlotte Harbor, Fla. : Charlotte ed.)


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Full Text

Gov. Scott reaches outside Florida for jobs HAGE 3


De


harlotte Sun"
HERALD


al of the Day
Patio table and four-
chairs, $100
^ ^ In Today's
OlassOifieds!


NSA SURVEILLANCE
Lawsuits over government surveillance face legal obstacles.
THE WIRE PAGE 1


S IT'S ALL IN THE RESULTS
S Tiger Woods seeks his first major title since the 2008 U.S. Open.
SPORTS PAGE 1


VOL. 121 iNO. 164
VOL. 121 NO. 164


AMERICA'S BEST COMMUNITY DAILY


THURSDAY JUNE 13, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


Springs could close July 1



Day spa agreement up for discussion again today


By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH
NORTH PORT COMMUNITY
NEWS EDITOR
NORTH PORT If no
agreement is reached
today by the North Port
City Commission, the


gates at Warm Mineral
Springs Day Spa likely
will close temporarily, the
electric will be shut off
and the overnight guard
will go home.
The city and Springs
joint owner Sarasota


County would have to
secure the buildings sur-
rounding the unmanned
sinkhole on June 30, as
the more than 40 em-
ployees there wouldn't
return the next day. The
governments' 30-month


management agreement
with Springs operator
Cypress Lending expires
in 17 days.
Some city commis-
sioners hope to prevent
closing North Port's only
tourist attraction. At 9 a.m.


today, commissioners will
hammer out a 19-point,
short-term operation
agreement for the 81-acre
Springs. Proposed is a
12-month lease, with a
revenue-sharing agree-
ment of 10 percent of


the monthly gross. There
is also a draft interlocal
agreement with long-term
options, including a com-
petitive bidding process. If
the city approves it, then

SPRINGS 16


SUN FILE
PHOTO
This tarpon
was caught
using a Boca ..
Grande Pass
jig. The jig
has become
the focus
of a major
debate in
the fishing
community.






1




I,



FWe -t o
.--



-'; -


= mn



FWC changes tarpon rules


By JOSH OLIVE and
LEE ANDERSON
STAFF WRITERS
LAKELAND -The
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
voted 4-3 to move forward
with new rules that would
change the definition of


snagging as it relates to
tarpon and would limit a
specific type of fishing gear
in Boca Grande Pass.
Wednesday morning's
draft rule hearing in
Lakeland was attended by
an estimated 250 people,
most of whom left shortly
following the commission's


vote later in the afternoon.
The proposed change
to the snagging definition
is intended to eliminate
fishing methods that hook
tarpon without the fish
being enticed or attracted
to the hook. Most anglers
consider snagging or
intentional foul-hooking


to be unsporting. The gear
restriction would prohibit
the use of a weight attached
to and suspended from the
bend of a hook, with the ra-
tionale being that such a rig
is more likely to snag fish.
The rig commonly called
TARPON 16


Convicted


rapist


sentenced


to life

By MERAB-MICHAL FAVORITE
STAFF WRITER
PUNTA GORDA The Fleming Island,
Fla., man found guilty in April of raping an
11-year-old girl was sentenced to life in prison
Wednesday at the Charlotte County
Justice Center.
Twentieth Circuit Judge George
Richards sentenced Christopher
Maurice Roberts, 37, to a manda-
tory term of two life sentences -
one for each count of sexual battery
on a victim younger than 12 plus
CHRISTOPHER 15 years in prison for the charges
M. ROBERTS of lewd or lascivious battery on a
victim younger than 16 and lewd
or lascivious exhibition. All of his sentences are
concurrent.
Roberts maintained his innocence prior to the
sentencing, painting himself as a family man.
"I'm not a sexual predator," Roberts said. "I'm
not a monster. That's not me."
During his trial, Roberts claimed the charges
were a case of mistaken identity by the victim,
who told authorities she walking to a gas station
to buy a soda when Roberts offered her a ride.
He then took her to a home in Port Charlotte
where both he and his father Christopher
James Roberts, 54, of Jacksonville allegedly
committed sex acts with her.
During the trial, the victim testified that the
younger Roberts had propositioned her to work
as a prostitute.
The elder Roberts has not gone to trial yet
on his one charge of sexual battery on a victim
younger than 12. His next court appearance is
scheduled for Aug. 15.
In addition to prison time, Richards said the
LIFE 16


By BILL JONES
SUN CORRESPONDENT
You can relax, Southwest
Florida. Your blood won't be
sucked out by the gallon, nor
your small pets carried away
by an invading airborne ar-
mada of giant, overaggressive
super-mosquitoes.
That's not quite the message,
however, of a media frenzy in
the Gainesville and Orlando
areas that has reached all the
way to the NBC "Today" show
in New York predicting an
imminent Florida invasion of
giant, bloodsucking gallinip-
per mosquitoes Psorophora
ciliata, to be exact.
They're about the size of a
quarter, 20 times bigger than
Florida's normal-sized Asian


tiger mosquitoes, easily can
penetrate skin through cloth-
ing, and allegedly were named
long ago because they could
suck a gallon of blood with one
bite.
There will be a "bumper
crop" of them this year in
Florida, scientists warn,
spawned via last year's tropi-
cal storms and this spring's
heavy rains, such as the recent
Tropical Storm Andrea. So you
better load up on the DEET and
beware of insect drones.
Beth Kovach, mosquito
control biological specialist
for Charlotte County, smiles
reassuringly when she says,
that, well, those reports just
may be blown somewhat out
ATTACK 16


Protesters support physical education


By ADAM KREGER
STAFF WRITER
MURDOCK Dozens of
protesters gathered at the
Charlotte County School Board
meeting Tuesday night to voice
their opposition to the district's
decision to include elementary
physical education teachers in
next year's budget cuts.
About 50 protesters many
donning red "Charlotte teach-
ers believe in Charlotte kids"
shirts or holding signs reading
sentiments like "Save PE for
me" filled the meeting room
at the district office building in
Murdock. Eight addressed the
board during the citizen com-
ment portion of the meeting.
Jennifer Mahler, mother of
two daughters in Charlotte
County schools, told the board
she fears that, without PE.
SUPPORT16


.


PHOTO
PROVIDED
Alexandria
Harris, a rising
second-grader at
Neil Armstrong
Elementary
School in Port
Charlotte,
addressed the
Charlotte County
School Board at a
meeting Tuesday
to show her
concern about
possibly losing
P.E. classes next
year. Her mother,
Kathlyn Casale
(a third-grade
teacher at Neil
Armstrong), was
one of six others
to address the
board.


INDEX I THE SUN: Police Beat 3,9 Obituaries 5 Legals7-81 Viewpoint 10 Opinion 11 THE WIRE: Nation2,5 State 3 World6,8 IBusiness6-7 Weather 81 SPORTS: Lotto CLASSIFIED: Comics 9-121 Dear Abby12 TV Listings13
Daily Edition $1.00 ---Lookinsidefor valuable coupons CHARLIE SAYS ...
SII 111 111 High Low SUN COUPON This year's savings todat CALL US AT rwellwould
h 7 S COUPON ,: CALL$9US4AT I wonder what Mr. Orwell would
111111111 9 VALUE METER ,14 941-206-1000 have to say about all this.
7 05252 00025 8 50 percent chance of rain ...... ... .... ..


AN TUITION Of Ti5 '"


'/'


$1.00


Giant mosquitoes not

likely to attack


A











Shoes for Kids? We've got something for that


hen we see a
good idea for
helping some-
one out, we just love to
jump on the effort.
By "we," I mean we
at the Sun Newspapers,
although you could
certainly extend that at-
titude to our community
at large.
And by "jump," I mean,
we like to take part, pro-
mote and do anything we
can to help.
Take Shoes for Kids. I'd
classify this idea as great.
Why? Well, first of all,
the Kiwanis identified a
need a few years ago that
no one else had thought
of. For many reasons,
kids in our community
may need a decent pair
of sneakers. Their
families are too poor to
have a good pair, or they
have a pair that are inap-
propriate for activities,
or they mess them up on
the way to school. Maybe
they just lost one, who
knows? They're kids, and
regardless of the reason,
they have a need.
Christy Smith and the
Port Charlotte Kiwanis
found out about this
need and took on this
project a few years ago.
The Kiwanians asked the
community to donate
shoes, mostly sneakers,
and the club collected
them and turned them
over to our schools at the
beginning of the school
year. The school office
keeps the sneakers, or


gets them to a school
nurse, and the kids get
them when they need
them.
That aspect moves
this program from good
to great in my mind. It
encourages people to
donate something they
know can help, and
the donation stays in
the community, going
right to the place where
it's needed. Not a huge
amount of effort un-
less you're Christy Smith
and her helpers but a
big help. (Actually, you
can give money too, at
the address near the end
of this column.)
So, as Christy and the
Kiwanians get ready to
kick off Shoes for Kids
this year (it officially
starts Sunday), we at the
Sun thought we'd add
an extra incentive to get
a head start and kick
things off. Actually, our
Charlotte office manager,
Robin Marotta, came up
with this one:
If you drop off a pair of
brand-new sneakers at
a Sun Newspaper office
beginning today, we'll
give you a "Sun Dining &


SHOES FOR KIDS
DROP-OFF SPOTS
Port Charlotte
*Beall's, Port Charlotte Town Center mall,
1441 Tamiami Trail
Charlotte County Public Schools, 1445
Education Way
Temple Shalom (9 a.m.-noon), 23190
Utica Ave.
First Presbyterian Church of Port Charlotte,
2230 Hariet St.
Port Charlotte United Methodist Church,
21075 Quesada Ave.
Coldwell Banker Sunstar Realty, 1951
Tamiami Trail
Premier Title of Florida, 17827 Murdock
Circle (Suite A)
Charlotte State Bank, 1100 Tamiami Trail
Charlotte State Bank, 3002 Tamiami Trail
Charlotte State Bank, 23112 Harborview
Road
Charlotte State Bank, 24163 Peachland
Blvd.
Charlotte County Chamber of Commerce,
2702 Tamiami Trail
Panther Hollow Dental Lodge, 19240
Quesada Ave.
h2u Affiliate of Fawcett Memorial Hospital,
3280 Tamiami Trail, Suite 493 (Promenades)
Kays-Ponger & Uselton Funeral Home,
2405 Harbor Blvd.
Encore National Bank, 2120 Kings Highway
Fawcett Hospital, 21298 Olean Blvd.
Ocean Partners Real Estate, 1680 El Jobean
Road
About Hair Salon (closed Monday), 19112
Cochran Blvd.


Entertainment Coupon
Book" while supplies last.
This little booklet has
some great coupons for
discounts at many of the
best restaurants in Port
Charlotte, Englewood,
North Port, Arcadia,
North Port and Punta
Gorda.


I CHARLOTTE EVENTS


GOVERNMENT
* TODAY
Marine Advisory,
Committee meeting, 9:30 a.m.,
18500 Murdock Circle, Room 119, PC.
764-4909.
Deep Creek Non-Urban,
Street & Drainage Unit Advisory
Committee meeting, 11 a.m., 7000
Florida St., PG. 575-3613.,

* EVENTS
* TODAY
Crafty Ladies, Handcrafted
items every Thursday 9-11:30am


(except holidays). Oaks Cove, Gulf Cove
UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-5533
Register for VBS, Mon-Fri
June 17-21,6-8:30pm, grades K-5.
Register at www.gulfcoveumc.com.
Gulf Cove UMC, 1100 McCall, PC.
697-1747
Deep Creek Elks 2763,
FLOE Meeting @ 7
Punta Gorda Elks, Lunch
11-2,Dinner 5-8,Bingo 6:30-8:30
mmbrs & their gsts,C.B.O.D. Meeting
5:30 mmbrs only @25538 Shore Dr. PG
637-2606
Mahjong, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 11:30a-3:30p $2. Cultural


Center MembersPLUS free.Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Punta Gorda Kiwanis,
Meets every Thursday for lunch
11:30AM-1:00PM at Laishley Crab
House. 100 E. Retta Esplanade. Call Jim
Finch:661-4021
Warm Water Exercise,
Aquatic fitness classes, 3280 Tamiami
Trail; STE 11; 12 & 1pm; Tue &Thur; $3/
class, pay by month; info 575-2034
Chess Club, Cultural Center
2280 Aaron St.lp-4p$1.50.cultural
Center MembersPLUS free. Everyone
Welcomed 625-4175
Dems Meet & Greet,


Just Counters & other stuff Inc., 1489
Market Circle, No. 309
Calusa Bank, 1850 Tamiami Trail
Panera Bread, 1808 Tamiami Trail
Foot and Ankle Center of Port Charlotte,
3406 Tamiami Trail, Suite 1
Dean's North of the Border, 23064 Harbor-
view Road
Charlotte County Utilities, 25550 Harbor-
view Road, Suite 1

Punta Gorda
Church of the Good Shepherd, 401 W.
Henry St.
Peace River Baptist (9 a.m.-noon), 478
Berry St.
Coldwell Banker Sunstar Realty, 2825
Tamiami Trail
Eastside Baptist Church (9 a.m.-2 p.m.),
6220 Golf Course Blvd.
Charlotte State Bank, 2331 Tamiami Trail
Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 211 W.
Charlotte Ave.
Kays-Ponger & Uselton Funeral Home, 625
E. Marion Ave.
Palm Chrysler, 2323 Tamiami Trail
Palm Hyundai, 1950 Tamiami Trail
Punta Gorda City Hall, 326 W. Marion Ave.
Punta Gorda City Hall Annex, 326 W.
Marion Ave.
Punta Gorda Public Works, 3130 Cooper St.
Genesis Full Service Salon, 2001 Rio De
Janeiro Ave. (Deep Creek)
Calusa Bank, 3105 Tamiami Trail
Dean's South of the Border, 130 Tamiami
Trail
Deep Creek Community Church, 1500
Cooper St.


So here's a way you can
feel good by giving, plus
you get something in
return.
Christy and the
Kiwanians set a goal
of 4,500 pairs of new
sneakers. The deadline
for giving is July 21. If
you can't get to a Sun



Democratic Precincts Meet & Greet,
Democratic Hq., 4300 Kings Hwy.,
Schoolhouse Sq. unit 402,941-258-
3542.4-6 pm.
Pinochle, Cultural Center 2280
Aaron St. 5:30p-8:30p $2 Cultural
Center MembersPLUS free 625-4175 All
Welcome
Sons Of Italy Dinner, Past
a,Meatballs,Salad,Desert,Bev/Coffee,
6pm,$7.50mbrs,8.50Gsts,Karaoke,3725
Easy St.Call for Res/Info 941-764-9003

* FRIDAY
Fitness "n" Fun, Exercise to
contemporary Christian music; 11330


office, there are about 50
other collection spots in
the area.
If you would like more
information about the
project, or want to help,
contact Christy Smith
at 941-637-5611, or visit
www.shoesforkids
project.org. You can send


Brnt Str Rd, PG; 9 am; Mon, Wed & Fri;
$35 for 10 classes; info 575-2034
Native Plant Sale, CHEC,


Punta Gorda House, 312 Sullivan St.
Foot and Ankle Center of Punta Gorda, 352
Milus St.
Burnt Store Presbyterian Church, 11330
Burnt Store Road
Lutheran Church of the Cross
(8 a.m.-1 p.m.), 2300 Luther Road (Deep Creek)

Englewood
St. Francis of Assisi Church, 5265 Placida
Road
Englewood United Methodist Church, 700
E. Dearborn St.
Coldwell Banker Sunstar Realty, 1231
Beach Road
Lemon Bay Funeral Homes and Cremation
Services, 2 Buchans Landing
Treasured Memories Scrapbooks and More,
2670 S. McCall Road, Unit 1
Surfside Realty & Surfside Insurance, 2270
S. McCall Road

North Port
Calusa Bank, 14942 Tamiami Trail

Sun Newspaper locations
Get a free Sun coupon book ONLY at these
locations:
Charlotte Sun, 23170 Harborview Road
*Englewood Sun, 120 W. Dearborn St.
North PortSun, 13487 Tamiami Trail (Shoes
collected in North Port will go to the North Port
Kiwanis program)
Punta Gorda Herald, The Purple House, 312
Sullivan St.
The Arcadian, 108 S. Polk Ave. (Shoes
collected at The Arcadian will stay in DeSoto
County)


monetary donations to
Sunrise Kiwanis of Port
Charlotte, 1489 Market
Circle, Unit 308, Port
Charlotte, FL 33953.

Chris Porter is executive
editor of the Sun. Email
him at porter@sun-
herald.com.


9-2:30,10941 Burnt Store Rd.
PG Plant Native 575-5435 www.
checflorida.org


SUBSCRIPTIONS
I HIDTU PL DT EVEMNTC


Home Delivery Rates:
Newspaper designated market:
City Zone- Carrier home
delivered 7 days.

Rates as follows
plus 7% Florida Sales Tax:
Monthly Bank/
CreditCard......................... $15.54
3 Months........................ $62.75
6 Months.......................... $106.65
1 Year ............................... $186.50
Does not include Waterline and TVTimes.
Above rates do not include sales tax.
Subscribers residing in outlying
areas may incur additional
delivery charge.


I MUln rUII n LVLlII


*GOVERNMENT
* TODAY
City Commission, 9am,
meeting on Warm Mineral Springs Day
Spa, North Port City Hall, 4970 City
Hall Blvd., off Sumter Blvd. 429-7000
Public Utility, Advisory Board
meeting, 9:30am, North Port City Hall,
Room 302, 4970 City Hall Blvd., off
Sumter Blvd. 429-7000
Tobacco Use Forum, 2pm,
Morgan Family Community Center,
6207 W. Price Blvd., North Port. Free;
open to all. 941-806-8452,


* EVENTS
* TODAY
Jazzercise, Jazzercise 9-10am at
the Morgan Family Community Center,
call 941-429-7275 for more info.
Table Tennis, 9:00-11am,
north port senior center, 4940 pan
American blvd., equipment provided,
$2.00,423-6398
Turbo Kick, Turbo Kick
9:30-10:30am at the Morgan Family
Community Center, call 941-429-7275
for more info.
Computer Assistance,


10-11amNP Senior Center 4940 Pan
American 426-2204 Get lonl comp
assist, Android phone help call Bill
904-616-3695/app
Current Event Conver,
10-11:30am North Port Senior Center
4940 Pan American 426-2204 Bring in a
topic or joke & join in the discussion
North Port Moose, Lunch
11-2:30.Liver/Onion,Burgers, 5-7. Meat
Bingo/xtraGame 7:30 Member/Qualified,
Guest.14156Tamiami426-2126
Mexican Dominos, 12:30-
3pm North Port Senior Center 4940 Pan


American 426-2204 Come learn the
game & join in on all the fun
LAUX Amvets 2000, LAUX
serving Meatloaf dinner 4-7pm. $6
members & guests welcome QOH @
7pm. 401 Ortiz Blvd NP 941-429-1999
Basketball Clinic, 6pm,
Morgan Center, 429-3555.2nd & 3rd
Thurs. each month, Jun 13-Aug 22.
Kindergarten-5th grade.
Zumba, Zumba 6:30-7:30pm at
the Morgan Family Community Center,
call 941-429-7275 for more info.
Youth Fun Run Series,


7pm, Dallas White Park, 941-429-PARK.
registration fee $5 for entire series,
June 13,20 & 27.

* FRIDAY
Basic Exercise, $30/8wks
9-10am North Port Senior Center 4940
Pan American Mary Ann 423-6398
Join today & feel better
North Port Moose, Lunch
11-2. Fish, Seafood, Prime Rib 5-8.
Bad, Moon Karaoke 7-11. Member/
Qualified Guest, 14156Tamiami
426-2126


DESOTO COUNTY RATES
Monthly Bank/
Credit Card ................... .... $16.40
3 Months..................... ..... $74.09
6 Months ...................... $119.54
1 Year............................. $196.70
Arcadian home delivery
$29.99per year.

Mail subscription rates: Rates
as follows (advance payment
required):
7 Days
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$111.93 $200.75 $357.50
Sunday Only
3 Months 6 Months 1Year
$56.55 $106.37 $179.03
Single Copy rates
Daily $1.00 Sunday $1.75
Unclaimed account balances
under $10, inactive for 15
months, will be used to purchase
newspapers for classroom use.

CUSTOMER SERVICE POLICY
HOURS: 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday -
Friday; Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.
to noon. To subscribe or to report
any problems with your service,
please call or visityour local office.

Englewood: 941-681-3000
120W. Dearborn St
Charlotte: 941-206-1300
23170 Harborview Rd.,
Port Charlotte
North Port: 941-429-3000
13487 Tamiami Trail, North Port
DeSoto: 863-494-0300
or toll-free at 877-818-6204
108 S. Polk Avenue, Arcadia


I ENGLEWOOD EVENTS


GOVERNMENT
* TODAY
Marine Advisory,
Committee meeting, 9:30 a.m.,
18500 Murdock Circle, Room 119,
PC. 764-4909.
Deep Creek
Non-Urban, Street & Drainage
Unit Advisory Committee meeting,
11 a.m., 7000 Florida St., PG.
575-3613.


* EVENTS
* TODAY
Ewd Country Liners, 9:30
to 11:30 AM, Christ Lutheran Church,,
701 N Indiana Ave. Begin/intermed.
line dances. Open to all. Nancy
474-6027
Line Dancing (Beg ), 9:30
To 11:30 Dance Etc Oaks Plaza 3372
N Access Rd Englewood Phone Eve at
941-697-8733


Storytime, Thursdays 11 am
Elsie Quirk Library, 100 W. Dearborn
St. 861-5000. Stories, puppets, music
for children ages 2-5
Englewood Bridge, Party
bridge is played every Thu & Mon from
12:15 til 3:30 at The Hills Rest. RGCC,
100 Rotonda Cir, 698-7945, $2.
Kiwanis Meeting, Join
others to make our community a
better place! 6 PM Thurs, June 13 at


- Notice to Calendar Event Submitters -


The Sun revised the calendar events we publish in
the paper and display online. All events must be entered
by the person submitting them through our website.
It's easy. Go to www.yoursun.com, select an edition and
click on the "Community Calendar"link on the left. Click
"Submit Event,"and fill out the appropriate information.
The"Print edition text" area of the form is for
information intended for the print edition of the
paper. Information outside of the "Print edition text"
area will appear online only. Please don't repeat the
"Event Title" as that will be included automatically.
We will print a maximum of four lines per event (the
Event Title plus 120 additional characters, to be included
in the "Print edition text"field, up to three lines deep)
at no cost to the event submitter. Your contact number
must be included in these 120 characters.
You may, however, purchase additional space for $10
per day, per event, per community edition. Simply choose
"Paid Listing"on the Submit Event page. All paid listings
will run in the location designated for the event type.


If you do not have the ability to enter your events via our
website, we can type them in on your behalf at the rate of
$5 per event, per community edition, but this fee does not
guarantee your event will make the printed version. Please
call 941-206-1180 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays to make a
payment or to have us enter your event.
The Sun reserves the right to exclude any submitted
event that does not meet our specifications or that
requires excessive editing. There is no expressed or
implied guarantee that any free listing will be included
in any event calendar or run in any specific location.
This is on a first-come, first-served basis. Be sure to
review the "Important Tips"on the Submit Event page
to help ensure you get the most information in without
exceeding the line limit.
Remember to save the confirmation email you receive
after submitting each event. If you made an error or
the event gets canceled, simply click on the "Withdraw
submission"noted at the bottom of that email, follow the
provided instruction and then resubmit the event.


Royal Palm Marina, 779 W Wentworth
St. 875-2330

* FRIDAY
Gardening Fun, Bring your
gloves and work and learn in the
garden with us 8 -10:30 Fridays 480
Yale St. Englewood 474-9068
Craft and Card Fun, Make
friends, crafts & cards 9 Noon.
Garden Club, 480 Yale St. Englewood.,
941 474-9068
Register for VBS, Mon-Fri
June 17-21,6-8:30pm, grades K-5.
Register at www.gulfcoveumc.com. Gulf
Cove UMC, 1100 McCall, PC. 697-1747
Yoga for Everyone, Join
us for stretching and rejuvenation!,


M-W-F 9-10 am Englewood Sports
Complex, $4. 475-1180
Crafting Cuties, Love to
Craft?Join us at Rotonda W Comm.Ctr,
3754 Cape HazeDr, Rotonda, Fridays at
9:30. Contact Elaine 697-0212.
Line Dancing, 9:30 to 11:30
American Legion Post 113 3436
Indiana Rd, Rotonda West Phone Eve
at 941 697 8733
Dessert Card Party, Enjoy
cards & yummy dessert at Lemon Bay
Woman's Club, 51 N. Maple St, 11:30 -
3, $3.00,474-9762
VFW Seafood Night,
4:30-8pm Haddock shrimp scallops
or burger $7-14VFW 10476 3725
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SUN NEWSPAPERS
-_-Member of the Audit Bureau of Circulation .4
Chairman .................................. Derek Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1001
Publisher................................... David Dunn-Rankin..................... 941-206-1003
Executive Editor ........................ Chris Porter ................................. 941-206-1134
Advertising Director.................. Leslee Peth.................................. 941-206-1262
Circulation Director ................... Mark Yero.................................... 941-206-1300
Arcadian Editor.........................Susan E. Hoffman........................863-494-0300
DeSoto General Manager ..........Joe Gallimore ..............................863-494-0300
Charlotte Sun Editor.................. Rusty Pray................................... 941-206-1168
North Port Sun Publisher ..........Steve Sachkar..............................941-429-3003
North Port Sun Editor................Lorraine Schneeberger................941-429-3003
Englewood Sun Publisher .........Carol Y. Moore .............................941-681-3031
Englewood Sun Editor...............Clinton Burton ............................ 941-681-3000


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PAID ADVERTISEMENTS


Featured Events
Republican Social Mixer, Join fellow GOP members for a
fun and casual evening out on Monday, June 17, 5-7pm, at St. Andrews
South Golf Club, 1901 Deborah Dr., PG. Complimentary hors d'oeuvres
with a full service cash bar featuring "happy hour"pricing. Info at
276-4872 or www.charlottecountyrepublicanclub.com.
Singles For Sail Membership Meeting, Join us at
Portofino (inside bar area), 23247 Bayshore Road, Punta Gorda, Thursday,
June 13,7-8 p.m., for Membership Meeting of Singles For Sail. For info,
call 941-655-6984.


OurTown Page 2 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013





:The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 3


Emaciated horses lead to arrest


By MERAB-MICHAL FAVORITE
STAFF WRITER

PUNTAGORDA- A
man was arrested
Tuesday on animal cru-
elty charges
after
authorities
4 found five
emaciated
horses on
his farm,
Saccord-
VITON ing to the
Charlotte
County Sheriff's Office.
Victor Jesus Viton, 51,
of the 12500 block of
State Road 31, Punta


Gorda, was charged
with five counts each
of tormenting, mutilat-
ing or killing an animal
and animal neglect.
Authorities investi-
gated after receiving an
anonymous tip that he
wasn't taking care of his
livestock in September.
Lt. Brian Jones,
spokesman for Charlotte
County Animal Control,
seized the horses -
which had well-defined
ribs and problems with
their hooves and teeth -
Sept. 20.
"It was obvious Viton
had owned the animals


for some time," Jones
said. "My guess is that it
was a matter of finances.
He just couldn't afford
to take care of them
anymore."
Jones said the property
had little grazing area
and Viton was forced
to feed them "a cheap
sustenance that didn't
sit well or provide much
nutrients."
Charlotte County
Animal Control worked
with the Lee County
Sheriff's Office because
it didn't have any way to
seize the large animals,
Jones said.


The LCSO transported
the horses in a livestock
trailer to Lee County,
where they were rehabili-
tated and later adopted.
Viton was taken to
the Charlotte County
Jail, and was released
Wednesday after posting
$15,000 bond. Attempts
to reach him for com-
ment Wednesday were
unsuccessful.

Man accused of
neglecting dog
A Port Charlotte man
is facing animal cruelty
charges after authorities


say he wasn't meeting the
needs of his miniature
Doberman pinscher
named Mini, according
to the Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office.
Bruce Michael
Paddock, 41, of the 21300
block of Percy Avenue,
was arrested Tuesday
on charges of failure
to appear, tormenting,
mutilating or killing
an animal, and animal
neglect. Authorities said
the dog was suffering
from malnourishment
and internal parasites,
Jones said.
Jones said the dog


had defined ribs and
looked emaciated when
authorities found him
at Paddock's residence.
The dog also suffered a
deformity because of an
untreated spinal injury,
according to Jones, who
added the dog is being
taken care of by a foster
family.
Paddock was taken to
the Charlotte County Jail,
where he was released
Wednesday after posting
$6,000 bond. Attempts
to reach Paddock
Wednesday were
unsuccessful.
Email: mfavorite@sun-herald.com


Third day focuses on graphic evidence in child sex abuse trial


By DREW WINCHESTER
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY -
The relationship between
North Port resident
Anthony Hanifan and
Massachusetts resident
Jason Clark, both accused
of creating their own child
pornography and sharing
it with each other, evolved
quickly in October 2011,
according to a federal
investigator.
They went from total
strangers to allegedly
sharing images of them
sexually abusing chil-
dren within three days,
after a few emails were
exchanged and a single
phone call made between
the two.
But, Hanifan, 38, had
been sharing images and
a video of himself sexually
abusing a 21/2-year-old
girl in his care since at
least March of the same
year, said FBI Special
Agent Corey Monahan,
who testified Wednesday
at the Sarasota County
Courthouse that using a


forensic examination of
Hanifan's iPhone he was
able to track the defen-
dant's online activity.
The six-member jury,
which also has two alter-
nate members, had the
chance to see those im-
ages and watch the video
that Hanifan shared with
at least three people other
than Clark, 31, including
sending the material to
someone in Great Britain,
Monahan testified in
front of 12th Circuit Judge
Donna Padar Berlin in the
trial's third day.
The video found on his
phone could not be seen
by the audience while it
played for jurors, who
remained mostly stone-
faced while watching
the video, but you could
hear Hanifan allegedly
abusing the toddler, who
could also be heard in the
background.
It was just one piece of
day-long evidence against
Hanifan, who is facing
multiple charges, includ-
ing two counts each of
molestation of a victim


younger than 12, sexual
battery on a child younger
than 12 and cruelty
toward a child, and five
counts of transmission of
child pornography.
Hanifan could face
up to life in prison if he
is convicted on all 11
charges, according to Sgt.
Jason Richter, a detec-
tive with the North Port
Police Department, who
conducted a three-and-a-
half-hour interview with
Hanifan when he was
arrested in October 2011.
Richter, along with Sgt.
Michael Laden, also a
detective with the NPPD,
slowly drew information
out of Hanifan during
their interview, which was
played, in part, for jurors
on Wednesday.
Expected to finish
today, the first part of the
interview showed Hanifan
saying that he and Clark
"role-played," with
Hanifan telling detectives
he knew the difference
between fantasy and the
real world.
But as the questioning


progressed, it became
clear their shared fanta-
sies involved under-age
children, with Hanifan
admitting they fantasized
about using the 10-year-
old daughter of Clark's
girlfriend in their sexual
encounters.
During Monahan's
testimony, he read emails
between Clark and
Hanifan extracted from
Hanifan's phone, in which
Hanifan told Clark he was
happy to have a "pedo
friend," meaning another
pedophile, Monahan said.
Hanifan was not present
in the courtroom for a
second day, electing to
wait out the proceedings
in a courthouse cell.
Hanifan's attorney, John
Scotese, who also served
as co-counsel for Michael
King, the man found
guilty of killing North Port
mother Denise Amber Lee
in 2008, declined to com-
mentWednesday. Scotese
said he might make a
statement after the jury


POOL PHOTO BY THOMAS BENDER


Anthony Hanifan, 38, right, enters the courtroom late
Wednesday afternoon in Sarasota. He is accused of taking
photos of himself molesting a toddler in his care.


makes their decision.
The state is expected
to rest their case against
Hanifan today and closing
arguments are also ex-
pected to wrap up. Clark,
meanwhile, is charged
in a Massachusetts
federal court for his
alleged actions, which
include having sex with
a child and possession of


child pornography. Part
of his plea deal includes
testifying against Hanifan.
If accepted by a federal
judge, Clark is facing 15 to
30 years in federal prison.
State Attorney Ed
Brodsky was also pres-
ent in the courtroom
for part of the afternoon
proceedings.
Email: dwindester@sun-herald.com


SCSO: DNA connects burglar to crime


SARASOTA COUNTY
- The Sarasota County

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ARRESTS19











Fallen corrections officer remembered


By MERAB-MICHAL FAVORITE
STAFF WRITER

PUNTAGORDA-
Lightning struck all around
the perimeter of Charlotte
Correctional
Institution
Tuesday
evening.
There was
no lapse in
-k time before
the thunder
LATHREM arrived. The
storm was
already there.
Thunder roared as
Gerald Bums, a former
corrections officer at the
facility related the horrific
murder scene he witnessed
at the prison a decade ago.
"I saw something that
night that I hope none
of the rest of you will
never see," Bums said.
"Something I will take with
me to my grave. I feel like it
happened yesterday."
Burns was speaking at a
memorial service for Darla
Lathrem, a corrections
officer who was just 38
years old when she was
murdered at the Charlotte
County prison on June 11,
2003. Each year, the prison


holds a memorial service
on the anniversary of her
death.
Rain began pour-
ing down when Nancy
Behrens, another former
corrections officer on duty
at the time of Lathren's
death, came forward to
speak about her co-worker.
Behrens said she will never
be the same after what she
saw that night. Her face
was soaked with rain and
tears as she spoke.
"I've never seen anything
so horrible in my life," she
choked. "They didn't have
to do that to her; they didn't
have to take it that far."
Lathrem was supervis-
ing five inmates on a
construction detail inside
the facility when she and
inmate Charles Fuston
were attacked and killed
during a botched escape
attempt by three inmates,
Dwight Eaglin, Stephen
Smith and Michael Jones.
Eaglin and Smith are now
on death row. Jones took a
plea deal in exchange for
life in prison, and later died
while incarcerated.
The dozens of people
in attendance Tuesday
could barely hear Lathrem's


father, David Lathrem, a
Baptist minister, over the
rumble of the thunder as
he delivered an invocation.
Darla Lathrem was the
first officer to be killed at
CCI, and the first female
correctional officer killed in
Florida.
Bums said he made a
promise to David the day
after Darla's murder: He
would make sure a memo-
rial was put in front of the
prison in her honor.
That memorial, a
marble bench with Darla's
name engraved on it, was
covered in fresh flowers,
and someone had placed a
rosary and a cross on it. All
the items were soaked with
rain during the ceremony.
While the droplets
poured, no officer in
attendance made a move
for shelter. They just stood
there, soaked to the bone,
while honoring their fallen
friend.
Richard Johnson, assis-
tant warden at the prison,
apologized to guests for
the weather. Darla's family,
however, seemed to see the
stormy weather as a good
omen.
"It was like this the night


SUN PHOTO BY MERAB-MICHAL FAVORITE
Col. Darryl Collins, chief of security at Charlotte Correctional Institution, and other law enforce-
ment from across the county took a few moments Tuesday evening to remember Darla Lathrem,
a CCI corrections officer who was killed in 2003.


she died," Lindsay Best,
Darla's older sister, said. "I
remember because light-
ning was dancing across
the sky, just like tonight."
Best said she took it as
a sign her younger sister
was looking down on the
remembrance.
"You know she really
loved her job," Best said.
"She loved the prison-
ers, called them by their
names instead of by their


numbers, and she felt sorry
for them."
Darla's other sister, Carol
Miller, said their mother
tried to convince Darla that
she shouldn't take the posi-
tion, but Darla didn't listen.
"She had a great work
ethic," Miller said. "She re-
ally enjoyed working there."
Miller said inmates at the
prison called Darla, who
stood at 6 feet, 3 inches tall,
"The Gentle Giant."


"You know, even after she
was killed, they would ask
for her and ask where she
was," Miller said.
All of Darla's family
seemed to be in good
spirits during the event.
"It still hurts," David said.
"I think about her every
day, but I know she is in a
better place. It seems like
she is talking to us from up
there tonight."
Email:mfavorite@sun-hera.com


Sarasota looks at $103M budget increase


By SCOTT LOCKWOOD
STAFF WRITER

SARASOTA COUNTY -
Sarasota County commis-
sioners spentWednesday
discussing the ins and outs
of the preliminary fiscal
year 2013-14 budget of just
over $1 billion about
$103 million higher than
the adopted FY 12-13
budget.
County Administrator
Randall Reid attributed
the increase in the budget







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Where Shopping Makes Cents
charlottecountychamber.org


- its highest since FY
2010-11 -to an expansion
of capital projects, such as
roads, bridges, the Siesta
Key Beach improvement
project and the revamp-
ing of the Fire/EMS radio
network The proposed
FY 13-14 budget shows
the county spending
$155.4 million on capital
projects, compared to
$65.3 million this year.
"The first thing we did
was try and reallocate
capital projects and try
and include the right
amount of money for each
project," Reid said. 'A lot
of the projects were using
'placeholders' (partial dollar
amounts) that were done
when the penny sales tax
first passed (in 2006), so we
had to rectify that and try



- 3tt-?


and get the right amounts
in."
Earlier this year, the com-
mission prioritized roads
and bridges as their main
focus in capital projects.
The other part of the jump
in the budget comes from
the possible addition of
more staff for the county
payroll. Reid said some of
those staff members would
be related to maintenance
and buildings in an effort to
keep the county's current
standard of service. More
employees, such as build-
ing inspectors, athletic field
maintenance positions
and others, would also be
added.
"It's just growth," Reid
said. 'As the economy
picks up, there will be more
activity. When building


inspections are up, we'd
need more inspectors ...
but those are paid for by
the building industry."
The budget shows the
county would have 3,399
full-time employees,
up 101 fromlastyear.
Commissioners wanted
more information on the
proposed positions and
continued the discussion
to their June 21 budget
meeting. A discussion on
employee raises the first
in four years for non-bar-
gaining employees, which
is included in the budget
-was also postponed until
next Friday.
One of the key compo-
nents of the preliminary
budget is the fact that the
county village rate will not
go up meaning property


taxes will not increase for
a second consecutive year.
Last year, the millage went
up 1.6 percent due solely
to a hike in the Mosquito
Control rate a raise
officials said was necessary
because the old rate would
only take care of about
a quarter of the services
needed to control mosqui-
toes in the county.
The tentative village for
FY2013-14 is 4.0512. One
mill equals $1 in taxes for
every $1,000 of a property's
taxable value. Under the
current millage rate, the
owner of a home assessed
at $100,000, less a $50,000
homestead exemption,
pays $202.56.
Sarasota County has the
third-lowest millage rate
in the state, trailing only


Monroe County (3.1229)
and Okaloosa County
(3.2899), according to
officials. The state average
is 7.6528. Sarasota County's
figure doesn't include city,
School Board or special as-
sessment taxes. The county
projects it will receive
$151.1 million from the tax
"The services that
this county government
provides are phenomenal,
and we provide them at
a very, very low property
tax rate," Commissioner
Charles Hines said.
"Luckily, we're living off
reserves that we had when
the property values were so
high. I want our citizens to
realize they're getting some
incredibly high-quality
services."
Email slodwood@sun-herald.com


Kids call for Englewood Beach cleanup


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By STEVE REILLY
STAFF WRITER

ENGLEWOOD -A small
group of local teens and a
Fortune 200 company will
team up to clean Charlotte
County's public Englewood
Beach Tuesday.
Caitlyn and Isaiah
Lovelace, along with
Clayton, Nicholas and
Alyssa Crawford, are the


core of Englewood group
Kids Creating Change.
Caitlyn formed Kids
Creating Change without a
school, church or any other
organizational sponsorship.
Caitlin, now 13, formed the
group three years ago just
to do the right thing.
"This is started by kids,
started by ourselves," she
said. "It's just the right thing
to do.We look for things


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*f FLORIDA
S HAND CENTER


Call (877) 753-4405 or visit MyFloridaHand.com


that we can change in
the community and do it.
Anyone can do it."
Nicholas the senior
member of the group at age
15 said members vote on
what community projects
they want to tackle.
They are calling for an
Englewood Beach cleanup,
starting at 6 p.m. Tuesday at
the public beach Pavilion 2
beside the basketball court.
The cleanup is expected to
continue until sunset.
"This time, we decided
to do a beach cleanup
that's a little bit different,"
Caitlin said. She's elicited
the assistance ofWaste
Management.
Waste Management will
provide gloves, trash bags
and hand sanitizer for the
cleanup, and will provide
pizza, other treats and
drinks for participants.
Other activities such
as learning how to make
artwork from recyclable
materials are planned.
"Our local district gets
involved with grassroots ef-
forts," said CyndeeWooley,


Waste Management
spokeswoman.
"They approached
us," Wooley said of
Kids Creating Change,
which is as grassroots
as a grassroots group
can get. Working with
young people in general,
Wooley said, offers an
educational opportunity
about recycling, electron-
ics disposal, landfills and
other aspects of waste
management.
For Caitlin and the
others, the beach cleanup
also has an environmental
benefit. They will be
picking up trash, filling in
holes dug on the beach and
flattening abandoned sand
castles that can prove to
be a hazard for nesting sea
turtles.
Anyone who intends to
join the beach cleanup is
asked to call 941-681-2434,
so Waste Management
can determine how much
equipment it needs to
bring and how many pizzas
to buy.
Email:reilly@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTO BY STEVE REILLY
These young people are the core of Kids Creating Change. Alyssa
Crawford, Caitlyn and Isaiah Lovelace, and Clayton and Nicholas
Crawford are calling upon young people like themselves, as well
as adults, to join them and Waste Management for an Engle-
wood Beach cleanup at 6 p.m. Tuesday.


:OurTown Page 4 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


(13~





The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 5


I OBITUARIES

Rose Rita Paras
Rose Rita Paras, 90, of Port Charlotte, Fla., passed
away Monday, June 10, 2013.
She was bor Oct. 23, 1922, to Joseph and Rose M.
Doria in Bayonne, N.J.
At 18 months old, she moved to
Staten Island, N.Y, where she grew
up. Rose graduated from Curtis High
School in January 1940, then the Staten
Island Hospital School of Nursing in
0 September 1943, as a registered nurse.
She joined the U.S. Army Nurse Corps
in October 1944, as a second lieuten-
ant. Rose served in the United States
.. and Europe from 1944 to 1946, and was
'! .-s : promoted to first lieutenant while serving
on a hospital train in Europe. After the war,
Rose did postgraduate work at Margaret
Hague Maternity Hospital in Jersey City, N.J., New
York University and Marymount College.
Sept. 6, 1948, Rose married Bruno Albert Paras,
son of John and Aniela Paras of Staten Island. They
lived in Oswego, N.Y, while Bruno attended college,
then moved to Arlington, Va., in 1951, where Bruno
had a long career as an industrial arts teacher. While
inVirginia, Rose worked for the Arlington, Va., Nurse
Association, and Arlington Public Schools as a nurse.
She then worked for the Head Start program for
10 years, and as an occupational health nurse with
the U.S. Postal Service, until her retirement in 1980,
when she and Bruno moved to Port Charlotte.
Rose had a very active retirement life in Port
Charlotte, belonging to theWomen's Overseas League,
theVeterans Council, the Charlotte Harbor Yacht
Club, the Catholic Council ofWomen, Senior Friends,
and many other retirement organizations. She was
also a founding member of St. Maximilian Kolbe
Catholic Church in Port Charlotte, where she was
founder of theWomen's Guild.
Rose is survived by her two children, son, Charles
(Peggy) E. Paras of La Plata, Md., and daughter,
Patricia A. (Charles) Williams; three grandchildren,
Gustin and Samuel Paras, and Nicole C. Williams of
Alexandria, Va.; brother, Joseph J. Doria; and sister,
Beatrice Doria.
A Memorial Mass will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday,
June 27, 2013, at St. Maximilian Kolbe Catholic
Church in Port Charlotte. The Mass of Christian Burial
will be held at St. Ann's Catholic Church in Arlington.
Interment with military honors will follow at
Quantico National Cemetery in Quantico, Va. Friends
may visit online at www.robersonfh.com to sign the
memory book and extend condolences to the family.
Arrangements are by Roberson Funeral Home Port
Charlotte Chapel.


CHARLOTTE


Jeanne A. Elwell

Jeanne A. Elwell, 95,
of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Sunday,
June 9,
2013.
She was
born Aug. 2,
1917, in
Detroit,
".' Mich.
Jeanne
was the first
woman deputy sheriff in
Indiana, working with
the Madison County,
Ind., Sheriff's Office. She
also worked in produc-
tion with General Motors
in Anderson, Ind., until
1972, when she and her
loving husband Eugene
moved to Florida to
enjoy their retirement.
Jeanne taught ceramics
for 30 years in North
Fort Myers, Fla. Besides
ceramics, her favorite
hobby was exploring
Florida by taking day and
overnight trips with her
friends and husband,
and keeping track of her
experiences in a journal.
She is survived by her
husband of 74 years,
Eugene; daughter, Deni
(Richard) Grimes of
Englewood, Fla.; son,
William R. (Mary) Elwell
of Cranberry Township,
Pa.; grandchildren,
Kenda, Kari, Kelly, Tara
and Tyler; and great-
grandchildren, Kyle,
Klayton, Bailey, Chase,
Jet, Kenlee, Kenna and
Scarlett. Jeanne was
preceded in death by her
daughter, Linda L. Clark.
A private memorial


service will be held at
a later date, and her
ashes will be interred
in her hometown of
Knightstown, Ind.
Arrangements are
being made in Port
Charlotte.

Raymond J.
Montero

Raymond J. Montero,
45, of Port Charlotte, Fla.,
passed away Saturday,
June 8, 2013, in Port
Charlotte.
He was born Sept. 27,
1967, in Bronx, N.Y., to
Jesus Montero and Lucy
Martinez Montero.
Raymond came to Port
Charlotte from Long
Island, N.Y., in 1977. He
was a past teacher and
coach at Port Charlotte
High School, and cur-
rently was employed at
Palm Auto Mall in Punta
Gorda, Fla., in car sales.
Raymond was an avid
fisherman.
He is survived by his
two children, Phillip
Montero of Tallahassee,
Fla., and Chase Montero
of Orlando, Fla.; his
parents, Jesus and
Lucy Montero of Port
Charlotte; his brother,
Jay Montero of Port
Charlotte; his two sisters,
Kathy (Karl) Butigian
of Port Charlotte, and
Jeanie Montero, also of
Port Charlotte; and his
fiance, Shelly Watkins.
A Memorial Funeral
Mass will be held at
11 a.m. today, Thursday,
June 13, 2013, at St.
Maximilian Kolbe
Catholic Church, 1441
Spear St., Port Charlotte,
FL 33948. Please visit


the online tribute for
Raymond J. Montero
to sign the guest book
and offer condolences
at www.kays-ponger.
com. In lieu of flow-
ers, donations in his
memory may be made
to St. Maximilian Kolbe
Catholic Church.
Arrangements are by
Kays-Ponger & Uselton
Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, Port
Charlotte Chapel.

ENGLEWOOD

There were no deaths
reported in Englewood
Wednesday.

NORTH PORT

There were no deaths
reported in North Port
Wednesday.

DESOTO

Lorraine Perita
Lefebvre
Lorraine Perita
Lefebvre, 89, of Lebanon,
Conn., passed away
peacefully
Tuesday,
April 23,
2013, at
her home
in Arcadia,
Fla.,
with her
husband
Richard Lefebvre by her
side.
She was an active
member of St. Francis
Catholic Church in
Lebanon for many years.
Lorraine is survived


by her beloved husband
of 22 years, Richard
Lefebvre of Arcadia; sons,
Tom Collelo of Texas,
Wayne Woodward of
Lebanon, and Eugene
Woodward of Vermont;
daughter, Christina Kolar
of Lebanon; and adopted
son, David Woodward of
Ashford, Conn.
I love you, Mom
- R.E.L.

Cassandra
McNealy
Cassandra McNealy,
39, of Punta Gorda, Fla.,
passed away Saturday,
June 8, 2013, in Venice,
Fla. Arrangements are by
Hickson Funeral Home
and Cremation Services,
Arcadia, Fla.
Words of Comfort
May the longtime
sun shine upon you,
all love surround
you, and the sweel
light within you
guide your way on. |
Traditional
Blessing


Obituaries are accepted from
funeral homes only. There's no charge
for publishing an abbreviated death
notice. Full obituaries and repeat
death notices will be subject to an
advertising charge.
Obituaries must be received by
2 p.m. for Tuesday through Saturday
publication. For Sunday publication
deadline is noon on Saturday. For
Monday publication deadline is noon
on Sunday. In Loving Memories must be
received by 2 p.m. forTuesday through
Friday publication. For Saturday through
Monday publication deadline is noon on
Friday The American flag accompanying
an obituary indicates a veteran of the
U.S. Armed Forces. Please send emails to
obituaries@sunletter.com.


Race Unity Day




celebrated


Pauline
Vaas plays
the conga
with Tony
Ballard. The
event was
sponsored
by the
Baha'isof
North Port.


SUN PHOTOS BY DALLAS EMRICH


Dr. Deri Joy Ronis, left, receives the Race Unity Day Exemplary Service Award for 2013 from North
Port resident Al Sensley of the Baha'i Faith Saturday at the Morgan Family Community Center.


.a k


Above: From left, Carlos
Quiroga-Lassepas plays guitar
while Lisamarie Dawnmoth,
Lucy White and Virgil Breaker
sing a spiritual song for the
group during Race Unity Day,
held at the Morgan Center.

Left: Local resident Rick
Jimison of the Baha'i Faith
addresses the crowd during
the daylong event in North
Port.


-Wa



RLf(
; &;a q


JAMES W. MALLONEE, P.A.
LAW OFFICE
JAMES W. MALLONEE
PROBATE WILLS/TRUSTS
GUARDIANSHIPS REAL ESTATE
Office Hours Monday thru Friday, 9:00AM to 5:00PM
946 Tamiami Trail, #206, Port Charlotte, FL 33953
901 Venetia Bay Blvd. #360, Venice, FL 34285
(941) 207-2223
S www.jameswmallonee.com
(941) 206-2223


ri


, ik


4--,





OurTown Page 6 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


FROM PAGE ONE


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


Suspect: Struggle resulted in victim's death


By STEVE BAUER
STAFF WRITER

ARCADIA- A Fort
Myers man is in custody
for allegedly slaying of
an Arcadia
resident. The
shooting
occurred
after an
altercation
over a gun.
According
LAR to an Arcadia
Police
Department report, Keith
Lamont Clark, 28, told of-
ficers 29-year-old Rashard
Watson's death occurred



SPRINGS
FROM PAGE 1

it goes to county commis-
sioners for a vote.
"The city attorney
made this clear in the last
meeting, the short-term
lease that Commissioner
(Cheryl) Cook presented,
that was approved (by
the city), will allow the
Springs to stay open for a
year," City Commissioner
Rhonda DiFranco wrote in
an emailWednesday.
The concern with
Cook's proposal to offer
a short-term contract
only to Cypress, county
officials say, is it's illegal.
By law, the county must
offer a competitive bid-
ding process, outlined in a



TARPON

FROM PAGE 1

the Boca Grande Pass jig
fits that description.
About an equal number
of people spoke out both
in favor of and in op-
position to the proposed
regulations. Many who
wanted the draft rule shot
down called for additional
scientific studies to prove
that tarpon are being
snagged.
Gary Ingman, owner
of Ingman Marine and a
founder of the Professional
Tarpon Tournament Series,
was among those speaking
to commissioners.
"We need a study
once and for all to find a
solution," he said. "Our
community is fighting. If
you don't conduct a study,
there will still be a rift in
our community. Right now
there isn't enough evi-
dence to make a decision.
Our community needs
your help to settle this
rift. We need to increase
tourism, and we need your
help."
A study already was


LIFE

FROM PAGE 1

younger Roberts is
barred from contacting
the victim, and will
have to register as a
sexual predator and
pay court costs.
The defendant's
attorney, Steven Burch,


ATTACK
FROM PAGE 1

of proportion, particu-
larly if they involve the
Charlotte area.
"This is nothing
new," she said. "It
happens every year,
and this year we've
just seen the normal
number, nothing out of
the ordinary."
Besides, Kovach
said, gallinippers
aren't usually found in
built-up areas like Port
Charlotte and Punta
Gorda.
The few that are
trapped are found
primarily in wet,


after Watson was involved
in an earlier confrontation
with an unknown man at
Louis Anderson Park in
Arcadia. Clark claims he
returned to his girlfriend's
residence on the 1600
block of Pleasant Circle in
Arcadia shortly after the
altercation, when he was
pursued by a group of men
who also arrived at the
residence. Clark claims he
went into the house and
heard gunshots coming
from an area behind the
building, the report shows.
He also reportedly said
he sawWatson enter the
home, and the two began

proposed interlocal agree-
ment city commissioners
recently rejected.
"This will allow us to
continue in the negotia-
tions without disrupting
the operations," DiFranco
wrote. "However proceed-
ing with the county's
(proposed) interlocal
will close the Springs
for at least four months
until a (competitive) RFP
(request for proposal)
is negotiated ... I really
would not think that the
county would allow the
Springs to close with the
short-term lease in place
if we were participating
in negotiations for (the)
long term. Or I hope
they wouldn't, since this
gesture is merely (allow-
ing) the operations of the
Springs to continue."

done in 2002-2004, looking
at both foul-hooking and
post-release mortality
rates. That study has been
under fire because two
of the experts quoted -
Philip Motta and Justin
Grubich since have
said their statements in
the study are not correct.
However, outgoing FWC
Chairman Kenneth Wright
didn't offer much hope
that a new study would be
forthcoming.
"We do not have to put
ourselves to the burden of
proving... this device is
snagging fish," he said. "I
think we've got evidence
that is compelling that
we need the rule. I have
the opinion, and so do
two Ph.D.s (Motta and
Grubich), that this device
is more likely to catch a
fish by snagging it than by
fish eating it."
Commissioner Ron
Bergeron disagrees.
"I think we need more
scientific evidence in order
to dictate the gear we can
use for tarpon. To me, it's
a big enough issue (to
warrant a new study) it
affects the economy, it
affects businesspeople."

said he filed a written
appeal in the case
Wednesday.
The younger Roberts
has several charges
pending against him
from two other cases,
including living off
the earnings of a
prostitute, driving with
a suspended license,
possession of drug
paraphernalia and two


rural areas like off
Bermont Road and
around Washington
Loop, east of Punta
Gorda. And aerial
spraying, which picks
up this time of year,
controls most of the
springtime mosquito
population.
Except, perhaps, a
recent onslaught of salt
marsh mosquitoes in
the South Gulf Cove
area. "That," Kovach
said, "was a huge
battle" against winds
and tides that resulted
in a large volume
of citizen calls to
Mosquito Control.
Salt marsh mosqui-
toes, she explained, lay
their eggs on dry land,


to fight over a gun in
Watson's possession.
The report continues
that Clark said Watson
fired approximately three
shots, and then fell to the
ground. Clark said after
Watson fell, he fled the
area on foot. Watson's
girlfriend, Latricia Brown,
told officers she witnessed
Clark and Watson fighting,
then heard two gunshots
and watched Clark leave
the house, according to
the report. She then went
inside the home and found
Watson on the kitchen
floor. He was pronounced
dead at the scene.

Commissioners tried
to work on an agreement
earlier this week, but
failed.
"Most of the com-
missioners were pretty
close, but we just couldn't
get there on Monday,"
Commissioner Jim
Blucher said. "I'm hopeful
we will reach a consensus
because a lot of conces-
sions have been made."
One compromise made
for North Port Mayor
Linda Yates doesn't allow
the extraction of the water
or minerals from the
Springs.
This week, resident
Pete Pederson asked
commissioners why they
were against the gift shop
selling bottled water or
the products made with
minerals from the Springs,

Professional
Tarpon
Tourna-
ment Series
host Joe
Mercurio
speaks
before the
Florida Fish
and Wildlife /
Conser-
vation .
Commission
Wednesday.



One of those who would
feel the pain is a small
Florida tackle maker.
"I sell these jigs for a
living," said Red Flower,
owner of Outlaw Jigs.
"These jigs give me
40 percent of my income,
and without them I'll lose
my business."
But a shortage of money
is a big part of the problem
for the FWC as well.
"There's no $250,000
for an additional study,"
Wright said. "If we don't fix
this now, we will be putting
it on the back burner. It's
been 10 years since we
looked at it, and it will be
another 10."

counts of possession of
a controlled substance.
Richards told
Burch and prosecutor
Stephanie Powers that
he wants to see the
other cases resolved as
soon as possible, before
the younger Roberts is
transferred from the
Charlotte County Jail to
a state prison facility.
Email: mfavorite@sun-herald.com


and they hatch in water
when the winds blow
the tides in.
"But we've got it
under control," Kovach
said.
Eradicating gallinip-
pers, she said, elicits
little, if any, call volume.
It's just a normal part
of thorough mosquito-
control procedures in
Charlotte County.
However, should you
encounter one de-
spite their size, aggres-
siveness and painful
bite gallinippers,
scientists say, at least
don't carry diseases like
West Nile virus, and
they help control other
mosquito species by
feeding on their larvae.


The report also states
witnesses saw Clark flee
to his girlfriend's house,

was fol-
lowed by
Watson
and several
other men.
Witnesses
told police
Watson
WATSON Watson
and the
other men then entered
the residence, followed
shortly by the sound
of gunshots. They then
spotted Clark running out
of the house, the reports
shows.

especially if it's profit-
able. Yates said during
the meeting that Cypress
Lending, which makes the
products, never got the
city or county's "permis-
sion" to do it.
Springs general manag-
er Gene Vaccaro said this
weekYates is incorrect.
"We were making these
products before the city
and county bought the
property in 2010," he
said. "We didn't need
to ask for permission
because it wasn't included
in the (30-month) lease
agreement with them.
A DEP (Department
of Environmental
Protection) representative
said since we are only
extracting 5 to 15 gallons
of water out of there a
day, that it's fine. It's water


However, as
Commissioner Brian
Yablonski pointed out, the
only change that actually
would be required to make
the Pass jig compliant with
the proposed rule would
be moving the hook.
"We're talking about
centimeters and inches,"
he said. "Wouldn't you be
able to move the hook if
you're enticing the fish (to
bite)? With a small tweak
in the gear, I'm thinking we
can eliminate a lot of the
social conflict here."
Approval of the draft
rule will have no immedi-
ate impact on tarpon
fishing. Commissioners


SUPPORT

FROM PAGE 1

teachers, "the responsibil-
ity (of ensuring physical
activity) is now going to
rest on the shoulders of
teachers who do not have
the skills or ability to be
able to perform the duties
needed for the active
children of this district."
Thirty minutes of daily
structured recess would
put schools in compliance
with the state's require-
ments for physical activity,
but classroom teachers
would have to ensure this
is followed.
"I am glad that some
light has been put on this
critical issue, and look
forward to correcting it to
include a dedicated RE.
teacher for each school,"
Mahler said, followed by
applause from the crowd.
"Our children deserve this
bare-minimum resource."
Superintendent Doug
Whittaker addressed their
concerns at the end of the
meeting, assuring them
their input is valuable.
'A final decision has not
been made," Whittaker


A second man con-
nected to the incident,
Jeremy Cross, had a
gunshot wound to his leg
and was treated at DeSoto
Memorial Hospital for
minor injuries. No one has
been charged in connec-
tion with his injury.
Clark was apprehended
the following morning
while hiding in the back
seat of a vehicle heading
toward the Charlotte
County line. According
to the report, a Guardian
.32 ACP was discovered
under the front passenger
seat within arm's reach
of where Clark was lying.

that runs off... into the
Gulf. No one asked me
about what we do with the
minerals or how profitable
it is, before voting to stop
it."
Yates repeatedly has
suggested the city could
run the Springs and
charge residents less
to access it. However
DiFranco doesn't see it as
a viable option.
"As for Mayor Yates' posi-
tion, as I see it, the Springs
may close for a short time,
however all jobs will be lost
and city employees will
take over," DiFranco wrote.
"However I agree with
the city attorney, that the
county would most likely
put a restraining order on
the property and close it if
we took over running the
operation."


The two other occupants
in the car with Clark were
released. Arcadia Police
Marshal Matt Anderson
would not comment
about whether the
weapon was the same
used to shoot Watson.
Clark was charged with
second-degree murder
and possession of a
firearm by a convicted
felon, and is being held
at the DeSoto County
Jail without bond. His
arraignment hearing
is set for 9 a.m. July 15
at the DeSoto County
Courthouse.
Email:sbauer@sun-herald.om

Other provisions in the
draft allow for operations
of a caf6 or a restaurant to
be run at the Springs (the
organic Caf6 Evergreen is
there now). Any expenses,
repairs and revenue
generated would be split
between the city and the
county. Entry pricing
would remain the same
($15 for Sarasota County
residents; $20 for nonresi-
dents). The licensee would
be required to provide
monthly income state-
ments, and maintenance
and operations of the
facilities would be the
licensee's responsibility.
Also, no changes to the
premises could be made
without written consent
by both the city and
county.
Email: eallen@sun-herald.com


SUN PHOTOS BY JOSH OLIVE
Save the Tarpon chairman Capt. Tom McLaughling speaks at
Wednesday's meeting.


will investigate such data
as they have available to
them before their next
meeting in September. A
final rule will be presented
- and voted on at that
time.
"We still have some
work to do from now until
September," said com-
missioner Leisa Preddy. "I
have never been involved
in something like this.
This debate has pitted

said. "If there is a way we
can find a quarter of a mil-
lion dollars, which is what
the savings are in (cutting)
elementary PE...."
The five PE. teachers
whose positions were cut
have been placed in other
jobs within the district.
Whittaker will present
his budget recommenda-
tions to the board in June.
A preliminary budget
will be prepared in July,
and a final budget will be
submitted in September,
he said.
Board member Barbara
Rendell pointed out
that the district has lost
$41 million in revenue
and has left hundreds of
positions vacant over the
past five years.
"No one on this School
Board wants to make deci-
sions that harm students
in anyway," she said. "Yet
we have been forced to do
that."
Whittaker compared
finding money to balance
the district budget to find-
ing meat on a skeleton.
"We still have to pay for
electricity, we still have to
transport kids, we still have
to pay maintenance on
buildings," he said. "There


people against each other
who have known each
other for decades. It has
split friendships. This
was an extremely difficult
decision, but our number
one goal is to protect the
resource. Everybody here
can agree that we have to
protect the tarpon. It's just
that each side has a slight
difference of opinion."
Email:jolive@sun-herald.com
Email:landerson@sun-heraldcom

is a lot we can't cut."
Kathlyn Casale, a
third-grade teacher at Neil
Armstrong Elementary
School in Port Charlotte
and mother of a student
at the school, said she
does not feel qualified
to go into a storage shed
and pick out equipment
to teach students physical
education.
"Yes, the state says I am
certified to do so," she told
the board. "But one PE.
class does not equate what
Coach (Dana) Kramer can
do for our children."
Kramer took to the
podium to say, in a similar
sentiment to one from
"Harry Potter" author J.K.
Rowling: "The time has
come when people must
chose between what is
right and what is easy."
The 20-year Charlotte
County PE. teacher told
the board, "I strongly
implore you to re-evaluate
your position on elemen-
tary education."
Whittaker said a revenue
bump could come from
the state this summer, as
it has in the past, but the
district can't assume so
and budget for it.
Email: alkeger@sun-herald.com







The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C Our Town Page 7


NOTICE OF ACTION NOTICE OF
3116 FORECLOSURE
3122


3100








LEGALS



FICTITIOUS NAME
3112


6/13/13

NOTICE OF ACTION
3116


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
20 JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR Charlotte COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 13-1785-CA
Division:
Daniel Hunt,
Petitioner,
and
Jessica Hunt,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL
SUPPORT)
TO: Jessica Hunt
Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and
that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Daniel Hunt, whose
address is 345 Boundary Blvd.,
Unit A. Rotonda West, FL
33947 on or before 7/2/13 and
file the original with the clerk of
this Court at 350 E. Marion Ave.
Punta Gorda, FL, 33950, before
service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to do
so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
This action is asking the court to
decide how the following real or
personal property should be divid-
ed:
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these
documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti-
fied of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Fail-
ure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 5/28/13.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: C. Coulter
Deputy Clerk
Publish: June 13, 17, 24, and
July 1, 2013
339038 2903026
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
Twentieth JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR Charlotte COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 13-1107-CA
Division: Civil Division
Karen Mary Williams,
Petitioner,
and
Thomas W.L. Williams,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DIS-
SOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL
SUPPORT)
TO: Thomas W.L. Williams
3333 Shasta Way SPC 52 Kla-
math Falls OR. 97603-4452 Kla-
math County
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and
that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Karen Mary Williams,
whose address is 28403 E. Twin
Lakes Dr Punta Gorda, FL
33955 on or before 06/26/13
and file the original with the clerk
of this Court at 350 E. Marion
Ave. Punta Gorda, FL, 33950,
before service on Petitioner or
immediately thereafter. If you fail
to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the peti-
tion.
This action is asking the court to
decide how the following real or
personal property should be divid-
ed: none
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's
office. You may review these
documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of
the Circuit Court's office noti-
fied of your current address.
(You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address


on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Fail-
ure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated: 5/21/13.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: D. Chazotte
Deputy Clerk
Publish: May 23, 30, June 6, 13,


2013
339038 2894784

S NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 12-1117-CA
WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, a national banking
association,
Plaintiff,
v.
CHARLOTTE COMMONS, LLC,
a Florida limited liability company;
RICHARD L. TRZCINSKI, an indi-
vidual; SABBIA MONTI PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a
Florida non-profit corporation;
and UNKNOWN OWNERS/TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN,
pursuant to Chapter 45, Florida
Statutes, and Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure entered
in this cause on May 23, 2013, in
Case No.: 12-1117-CA of the Cir-
cuit Court of Twentieth Judicial
Circuit in and for Charlotte Coun-
ty, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
a national banking association, is
the Plaintiff, and CHARLOTTE
COMMONS, LLC, a Florida limited
liability company; RICHARD L.
TRZCINSKI, an individual; and
SABBIA MONTI PROPERTY OWN-
ERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Flori-
da non-profit corporation, are
Defendants, I will sell the property
situated in Charlotte County, Flori-
da described as:
See Exhibit A attached
hereto and made a part
hereof by reference as if
fully set forth herein for
legal description.
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at
www.charlotte.realforeclose.c
om, in accordance with Chapter
45 Florida Statutes, on June 21,
2013, at 11:00 a.m.
Any persons claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date
of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated this 3 day of June, 2013.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BARBARA T. SCOTT
By: C.L.G.
Deputy Clerk
ATTN.: PERSONS WITH
DISABILITIES: If you are a
person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provi-
sion of certain assistance.
Please contact Jon Embury,
Administrative Services Man-
ager, whose of?ce is located
at 350 E. Marion Avenue,
Punta Gorda, Florida 33950,
and whose telephone number
is (941) 637-2110, at least 7
days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immedi-
ately upon receiving this noti-
fication if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call
711.
IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT
PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY
BE ADDITIONAL MONEY
FROM THE SALE AFTER PAY-
MENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE
ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM
THE SALE PROCEEDS PUR-
SUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDG-
MENT.
IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE
LIEN HOLDER CLAIMING A
RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING
AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITH THE
CLERK NO LATER THAN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF
YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM,
YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED
TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS.
IF YOU ARE THE PROPERTY
OWNER, YOU MAY CLAIM
THESE FUNDS YOURSELF.
YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO
HAVE A LAWYER OR ANY
OTHER REPRESENTATION
AND YOU DO NOT HAVE TO
ASSIGN YOUR RIGHTS TO
ANYONE ELSE IN ORDER FOR
YOU TO CLAIM ANY MONEY
TO WHICH YOU ARE ENTI-
TLED. PLEASE CHECK WITH
THE CHARLOTTE COUNTY
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT,
CHARLOTTE COUNTY JUS-
TICE CENTER, 350 E. MARION
AVENUE, PUNTA GORDA, FL
33950, TELEPHONE (941)
637-2199, WITHIN TEN (10)
DAYS AFTER THE SALE TO
SEE IF THERE IS ADDITIONAL
MONEY FROM THE FORECLO-
SURE SALE THAT THE CLERK
HAS IN THE REGISTRY OF THE
COURT.
IF YOU DECIDE TO SELL YOUR
HOME OR HIRE SOMEONE TO
HELP YOU CLAIM THE ADDI-
TIONAL MONEY, YOU SHOULD
READ VERY CAREFULLY ALL
PAPERS YOU ARE REQUIRED
TO SIGN, ASK SOMEONE
ELSE, PREFERABLY AN
ATTORNEY WHO IS NOT
RELATED TO THE PERSON
OFFERING TO HELP YOU, TO
MAKE SURE THAT YOU
UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU ARE
SIGNING AND THAT YOU ARE
NOT TRANSFERRING YOUR
PROPERTY OF THE EQUITY IN
YOUR PROPERTY WITHOUT


THE PROPER INFORMATION.
IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO
PAY AN ATTORNEY, YOU MAY
CONTACT FLORIDA RURAL
LEGAL SERVICES PUNTA
GORDA OFFICE, 226 TAYLOR
STREET, ROOM 210, PUNTA


GORDA, FL 33950 TELE-
PHONE (941) 505-9007, TO
SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FINAN-
CIALLY FOR THEIR SERVICES.
IF THEY CANNOT ASSIST
YOU, THEY MAY BE ABLE TO
REFER YOU TO A LOCAL BAR
REFERRAL AGENCY OR SUG-
GEST OTHER OPTIONS. IF
YOU CHOOSE TO CONTACT
ONE OF THESE SERVICES FOR
ASSISTANCE, YOU SHOULD
DO SO AS SOON AS POSSIBLE
AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS
NOTICE.
EXHIBIT "A"
PARCEL 1
Tract D and Tract E, Plat of J.C.
Center, a Commercial Subdivi-
sion, lying in Section 6, Township
40 South, Range 23 East, Char-
lotte County, Florida, as recorded
in Plat Book 19, Page 4, of the
public records of Charlotte Coun-
ty, Florida.
and
PARCEL 2
A portion of Section 6, Township
40 South, Range 23 East, Char-
lotte County, Florida, being more
particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest cor-
ner of said Section 6; thence
North 00 18' 38" East, along the
West line of said Section 6, a dis-
tance of 1180.35 feet; thence
South 890 41' 22" East, a dis-
tance of 35.00 feet to the East
right of way of Loveland Boule-
vard, as recorded in O.R. Book
750, page 2141 and the Point of
Beginning; thence continue South
890 41' 22" East, a distance of
20.00 feet; thence South 00 18'
38" West, a distance of 235.59
feet; thence North 57 28' 29"
East, a distance of 32.98 feet;
thence North 47 52' 30" East, a
distance of 100.46 feet; thence
North 57 31' 04" East, a dis-
tance of 119.44 feet; thence
North 53 10' 43" East, a dis-
tance of 43.70 feet; thence North
6230' 50" East, a distance of
25.09 feet; thence North 41 14'
44" East, a distance of 128.02
feet; thence North 22 40' 19"
East, a distance of 61.36 feet;
thence North 06 39' 13" East, a
distance of 48.66 feet; thence
North 600 41' 52" East, a dis-
tance of 424.49 feet; thence
North 84 31' 04" East, a dis-
tance of 51.80 feet to the point
of curvature of a circular curve
concave Northeasterly having as
elements a radius of 221.98 feet,
a central angle of 51015' 49", a
chord length of 192.05 feet and a
chord bearing of South 88 56'
25" East; thence along arc of said
curve a distance of 198.61 feet
to the end of said curve; thence
North 54 24' 44" East, a dis-
tance of 88.76 feet; thence North
370 56' 20" East, a distance of
202.74 feet; thence North 58
08' 41" East, a distance of
286.61 feet to the point of curva-
ture of a circular curve concave
Northwesterly having as elements
a radius of 215.34 feet, a central
angle of 30 07' 21", a chord
length of 111.92 feet and a chord
bearing of North 48 40' 35"
East; thence along arc of said
curve a distance of 113.21 feet
to the point of curvature of a cir-
cular curve concave Northwester-
ly, having as elements a radius of
554.11 feet, a central angle of
22 17' 43", a chord length of
214.26 feet and a chord bearing
of North 290 13' 54" East; thence
along arc of said curve a distance
of 215.62 feet to the end of said
curve; thence North 08 59' 42"
East, a distance of 189.21 feet;
thence North 17 14' 06" West, a
distance of 211.69 feet to the
point of curvature of a circular
curve concave Southwesterly hav-
ing as elements a radius of
505.48 feet, a central angle of
03 06' 55", a chord length of
27.48 feet and a chord bearing of
North 46 32' 39" West; thence
along arc of said curve a distance
of 27.48 feet to the end of said
curve and the Southeasterly
boundary of lands described in
O.R. Book 2508, pages 1063 -
1066, public records of Charlotte
County, Florida; thence along said
Southeasterly boundary the fol-
lowing (5) courses: North 090 27'
25" East, a distance of 21.89
feet; North 18 25' 29" East, a
distance of 20.96 feet; North 46
10' 06" East, a distance of 67.94
feet; North 52 24' 54" East, a
distance of 32.60 feet; thence
North 64 41' 52" East, a dis-
tance of 43.74 feet to the West
right of way of Veterans Boule-
vard (also known as Hillsborough
Extension) as recorded in O.R.
Book 941, Pages 1706 1711,
public records of Charlotte Coun-
ty, Florida; thence South 28 40'
58" East, along said right of way
a distance of 96.86 feet to the
point of curvature of a circular
curve concave Westerly having as
elements a radius of 940.00 feet,
a central angle of 54 31' 32", a
chord length of 861.13 feet and a
chord bearing of South 01 25'
06" East; thence along arc of
curve and said right of way, a dis-
tance of 894.50 feet to the point
of tangency; thence South 25
51' 13" West, a distance of
871.99 feet to the point of curva-
ture of a circular curve concave
Easterly having as elements a
radius of 910.00 feet, a central
angle of 450 14' 09", a chord
length of 699.94 feet and a chord
bearing of South 03 11' 06"
West; thence along arc of curve
and said right of way, a distance
of 718.46 feet to the point of
reverse curvature of a circular
curve concave Northwesterly hav-
ing as elements a radius of 50.00
feet, a central angle of 83 25'
12", a chord length of 66.54 feet


and a chord bearing of South 22
18' 11" West; thence along arc of

To view today's legal notices
and more visit,
www.floridapublicnotices.com


S NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
3122

said curve, a distance of 72.80
feet to the point of tangency and
the North right of way of Peach-
land Boulevard as recorded in
O.R. Book 941, Pages 1706 -
1711, public records of Charlotte
County, Florida; thence South 64
00' 43" West along said North
right of way, a distance of 205.36
feet to the point of curvature of a
circular curve concave North-
westerly having as elements a
radius of 640.00 feet, a central
angle of 26o 18' 34", a chord
length of 291.30 feet and a chord
bearing of South 77o 10' 00"
West; thence along arc of said
curve and said right of way, a dis-
tance of 293.88 feet to the point
of tangency; thence North 890
40' 44" West, along said right of
way, a distance of 817.84 feet to
the point of curvature of a circular
curve concave Northeasterly hav-
ing as elements a radius of 50.00
feet, a central angle of 890 59'
22", chord length of 70.70 feet
and a chord bearing of North 440
41' 03" West; thence along arc of
said curve, a distance of 78.53
feet to the point of tangency and
the East right of way of Loveland
Boulevard as recorded in O.R.
Book 750, Page 2141; thence
North 00 18' 38" East, along
said right of way, a distance of
1070.36 feet to the Point of
Beginning.
ALL OF THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PARCEL BEING
NOW KNOWN AS FOLLOWS:
All of Charlotte Commons,
according to the map or plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
21, Page 12, of the Public
Records of Charlotte County,
Florida.
LESS and EXCEPT Lot 9, Char-
lotte Commons, according to the
map or plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 21, Page 12, of the
Public Records of Charlotte Coun-
ty, Florida.
and
PARCEL 3
LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PRESER-
VATION AREA LYING IN SECTION
6, TOWNSHIP 40 SOUTH, RANGE
23 EAST, CHARLOTTE COUNTY,
FLORIDA,
A TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATED IN THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, COUNTY OF CHAR-
LOTTE, LYING IN SECTION 6,
TOWNSHIP 40 SOUTH, RANGE
23 EAST AND BEING FURTHER
BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCING AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION
6; THENCE N. 000 18' 34" E.
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SECTION 6, FOR 4,169.41 FEET;
THENCE N. 90o 00' 00" E., FOR
922.37 FEET; TO A POINT OF
CURVATURE AND THE POINT OF
BEGINNING OF THE HEREIN
DESCRIBED PARCEL; THENCE
SOUTHERLY 25.54 FEET ALONG
THE ARC OF A NON-TANGENTIAL
CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE RIGHT
HAVING A RADIUS OF 83.85 FEET
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF
17o 27' 00" AND BEING SUB-
TENDED BY A CHORD WHICH
BEARS S. 06o 38' 55 W., FOR
25.44 FEET TO A POINT OF COM-
POUND CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHERLY 61.29 FEET ALONG
THE ARC OF A TANGENTIAL CIR-
CULAR CURVE TO THE RIGHT
HAVING A RADIUS OF 397.79
FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 08o 49' 38" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 190 47' 14" W.,
FOR 61.22 FEET; TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY
31.16 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF
A TANGENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE
TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS
OF 618.59 FEET THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02o53' 11"
AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD WHICH BEARS S. 250 38'
39" W., FOR 31.16 FEET TO A
POINT OF REVERSE CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY
42.36 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF
A TANGENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE
TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS
OF 1,143.29 FEET THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02o 07' 23"
AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD WHICH BEARS S. 26o 01'
33" W. FOR 42.36 FEET; TO A
POINT OF COMPOUND CURVA-
TURE; THENCE SOUTHERLY
107.19 FEET ALONG THE ARC
OF A TANGENTIAL CIRCULAR
CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A
RADIUS OF 967.09 FEET
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF
06 21' 02" AND BEING SUB-
TENDED BY A CHORD WHICH
BEARS S. 21 47' 20" W. FOR
107.14 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 27.88 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 64.47
FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 24 46' 33" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 06 13' 33" W.
FOR 27.66 FEET; TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 17.71 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.87
FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 190 56' 59" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 16 08' 14" E.,
FOR 17.62 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 44.09
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO


THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF
317.93 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 07 56' 47" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 30 05' 07" E.,
FOR 44.06 FEET; TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 32.25
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF
145.76 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 12 40' 32" AND


NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE FORECLOSURE
3122 3122


BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 400 23' 46" E.,
FOR 32.18 FEET TO A POINT OF
REVERSE CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHEASTERLY 21.34 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
63.51 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 190 15' 13" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 370 06' 26" E,
FOR 21.24 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 26.86 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
80.08 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 190 12' 52" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 17 52' 23" E.,
FOR 26.73 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 51.89 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 301
.10 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 090 52' 30" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 03 19' 42" E.,
FOR 51.83 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 44.96 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
549.24 FEET, THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 04 41' 24" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 03 57' 15" W.,
FOR 44.95 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 34.88 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
330.49 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 06 02' 51" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 090 19' 23" W.,
FOR 34.87 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 39.24 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
141.22 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 150 55' 19" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 20 18' 28" W.,
FOR 39.12 FEET TO A POINT OF
REVERSE CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHERLY 37.51 FEET ALONG
THE ARC OF A TANGENTIAL CIR-
CULAR CURVE TO THE LEFT HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 128.95 FEET
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF
16 40' 01" AND BEING SUB-
TENDED BY A CHORD WHICH
BEARS S. 190 56' 07" W., FOR
37.38 FEET TO A POINT OF COM-
POUND CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHERLY 28.73 FEET ALONG
THE ARC OF A TANGENTIAL CIR-
CULAR CURVE TO THE LEFT HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 147.59 FEET
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF
11 09' 16" AND BEING SUB-
TENDED BY A CHORD WHICH
BEARS S. 06 01' 28" W., FOR
28.69 FEET TO A POINT OF COM-
POUND CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHERLY 39.11 FEET ALONG
THE ARC OF A TANGENTIAL CIR-
CULAR CURVE TO THE LEFT HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 273.79 FEET
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF
08 11' 02" AND BEING SUB-
TENDED BY A CHORD WHICH
BEARS S. 03 38' 41" E., FOR
39.07 FEET TO A POINT OF COM-
POUND CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHERLY 33.07 FEET ALONG
THE ARC OF A TANGENTIAL CIR-
CULAR CURVE TO THE LEFT HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 151.51 FEET
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF
12 30' 26" AND BEING SUB-
TENDED BY A CHORD WHICH
BEARS S. 13 59' 25" E., FOR
33.01 FEET TO A POINT OF COM-
POUND CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHEASTERLY 24.16 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 80.58
FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 17 10' 51" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 28 50' 04" E.
FOR 24.07 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 41.63
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF
116.45 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 200 29' 06" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 47 40' 02" E.,
FOR 41.41 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 88.42
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF
529.58 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 090 33' 57" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 62 41' 34" E.,
FOR 88.31 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE EASTERLY 31.58 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF
488.90 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 03 42' 02" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH. BEARS S. 690 19' 33" E.,
FOR 31.57 FEET TO A POINT OF
REVERSE CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHEASTERLY 12.38 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
75.02 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 090 27' 21" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 66 26' 54" E.
FOR 12.37 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 28.36
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF


361.84 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 04 29' 24" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 590 28' 31" E.
FOR 28.35 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 43.24


FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
841.48 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 02 56' 38" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 55 45' 30" E.
FOR 43.23 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 28.05
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
1,196.04 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 01 20' 37" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 53 36' 53" E.
FOR 28.05 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 32.22
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
1,579.18 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 01 10' 09" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 52 21' 30" E.
FOR 32.22 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 24.04
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
280.01 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 04 55' 09" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 490 18' 51" E.
FOR 24.03 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 20.10
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
195.66 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 05 53' 08" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 43 54' 42" E.
FOR 20.09 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 14.78
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
43.30 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 190 33' 23" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 31 11' 27" E.
FOR 14.71 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 28.68 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
164.30 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 10 00' 11" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 16 24' 40" E.
FOR 28.65 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 36.43 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
193.88 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 10 46' 02" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 06 01' 33" E.
FOR 36.38 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 33.16 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
160.50 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 11 50' 17" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 05 16' 37" W.
FOR 33.10 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 42.15 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
495.59 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 04 52' 22" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 13 37' 56" W.
FOR 42.14 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 25.86 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
186.42 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 07 56' 56" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 20 02' 35" W.
FOR 25.84 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY
25.53 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF
A TANGENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE
TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS
OF 2,236.09 FEET THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 000 39' 15"
AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD WHICH BEARS S. 24 20'
41" W. FOR 25.53 FEET TO A
POINT OF COMPOUND CURVA-
TURE; THENCE SOUTHWESTER-
LY 16.07 FEET ALONG THE ARC
OF A TANGENTIAL CIRCULAR
CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A
RADIUS OF 886.44 FEET
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF
01 02' 20" AND BEING SUB-
TENDED BY A CHORD WHICH
BEARS S. 25 11' 28" W. FOR
16.07 FEET TO A POINT OF COM-
POUND CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHWESTERLY 31.98 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
980.03 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 01 52' 10" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 26 38' 43" W.
FOR 31.97 FEET TO A POINT OF
REVERSE CURVATURE; THENCE
SOUTHWESTERLY 54.81 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF
2,879.59 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 01 05' 26" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 270 02' 05" W.
FOR 54.81 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY
50.92 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF
A TANGENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE
TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS
OF 682.91 FEET THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 16' 20"
AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD WHICH BEARS S. 24 21'


12" W. FOR 50.91 FEET TO A
POINT OF COMPOUND CURVA-
TURE; THENCE SOUTHERLY
29.61 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF
A TANGENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE
TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS
OF 230.73 FEET THROUGH A


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 7





OurTown Page 8 E/N/C


www.sunnewspapers.net


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


NOTICE OF NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE MEETING
3122 3126


CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 21' 12"
AND BEING SUBTENDED BY A
CHORD WHICH BEARS S. 180 32'
26" W. FOR 29.59 FEET TO A
POINT OF COMPOUND CURVA-
TURE; THENCE SOUTHERLY
16.89 FEET ALONG THE ARC OF
A TANGENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE
TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS
OF 50.89 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 19 00' 39" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 050 21' 31" W.
FOR 16.81 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHERLY 18.06 FEET
ALONG THE ARC OF A TANGEN-
TIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO THE
LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 58.30
FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 17 45' 05" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 13 01' 22" E.
FOR 17.99 FEET TO A POINT OF
COMPOUND CURVATURE;
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 32.19
FEET ALONG THE ARC OF A TAN-
GENTIAL CIRCULAR CURVE TO
THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF
89.70 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 200 33' 48" AND
BEING SUBTENDED BY A CHORD
WHICH BEARS S. 32 10' 48" E.
FOR 32.02 FEET; THENCE N. 50
50' 42" E., FOR 161.86 FEET;
THENCE N. 33 02' 12" E. FOR
130.23 FEET; THENCE N.08 08'
03" E., FOR 167.26 FEET;
THENCE N. 02 43' 40" E. FOR
153.01 FEET; THENCE N. 080
40' 24" W. FOR 92.06 FEET TO
THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF VETERANS BOULEVARD;
THENCE N. 28 40' 48" W.
ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE FOR 815.80 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
BEARINGS ARE BASED ON THE
WEST LINE OF SECTION 6 AS
HAVING AN ASSUMED BEARING
OF N. 00 18' 34" E.
TOGETHER WITH non-exclusive
easements for the benefit of the
above described parcels for
drainage and surface water runoff
as created by and set forth in the
Declaration recorded in Official
Records Book 2310, page 959 of
the Public Records of Charlotte
County, Florida and described on
Exhibit "C" thereof as "Mainte-
nance Area #1", "Berm Mainte-
nance Area" "Parcel P" and "Con-
servation Easement #4";
the above described Parcels
being hereinafter referred to as,
the "Real Property".
TOGETHER WITH:
The following described personal
property in which Borrower now
or at any time hereafter has any
interest (collectively, the "Per-
sonal Property"):
All goods, building and other
materials, supplies, inventory,
work in process, equipment,
machinery, fixtures, furniture, fur-
nishings, signs and other person-
al property and embedded soft-
ware included therein and sup-
porting information, wherever sit-
uated, which are or are to be
incorporated into, used in con-
nection with, or appropriated for
use on above described Real
Property or any existing or future
improvements on the Real Prop-
erty (which Real Property and
improvements are collectively
referred to herein as the "Sub-
ject Property"); together with all
rents and security deposits
derived from the Subject Proper-
ty; all inventory, accounts, cash
receipts, deposit accounts,
accounts receivable, contract
rights, licenses, agreements,
general intangibles, payment
intangibles, software, chattel
paper (whether electronic or tan-
gible), instruments, documents,
promissory notes, drafts, letters
of credit, letter of credit rights,
supporting obligations, insurance
policies, insurance and condem-
nation awards and proceeds, pro-
ceeds of the sale of promissory
notes, any other rights to the pay-
ment of money, trade names,
trademarks and service marks
arising from or related to the own-
ership, management, leasing,
operation, sale or disposition of
the Subject Property or any busi-
ness now or hereafter conducted
thereon by Borrower; all develop-
ment rights and credits, and any
and all permits, consents,
approvals, licenses, authoriza-
tions and other rights granted by,
given by or obtained from, any
governmental entity with respect
to the Subject Property; all water
and water rights, wells and well
rights, canals and canal rights,
ditches and ditch rights, springs
and spring rights, and reservoirs
and reservoir rights appurtenant
to or associated with the Subject
Property, whether decreed or
undecreed, tributary, non-tribu-
tary or not non-tributary, surface
or underground or appropriated
or unappropriated, and all shares
of stock In water, ditch, lateral
and canal companies, well per-
mits and all other evidences of
any of such rights; all deposits or
other security now or hereafter
made with or given to utility com-
panies by Borrower with respect
to the Subject Property; all
advance payments of insurance
premiums made by Borrower with
respect to the Subject Property;
all plans, drawings and speclflca-
tions relating to the Subject Prop-
erty; all loan funds held by
Secured Party, whether or not
disbursed; all funds deposited
with Secured Party pursuant to
any loan agreement; all reserves,
deferred payments, deposits,
accounts, refunds, cost savings
and payments of any kind related
to the Subject Property or any
portion thereof; together with all
replacements and proceeds of,
and additions and accessions to,


any of the foregoing; together
with all books, records and files
relating to any of the foregoing.
Published June 6 and 13, 2013
355093 2900644


Charlotte County -
Punta Gorda
Metropolitan Planning
Organization
CALENDAR
Bicycle/Pedestrian Advisory
Committee (BPAC) Meeting
Thursday, June 20, 2013,
3:00 p.m., at the Cultural
Center of Charlotte County,
President's Room, 2280 Aaron
Street, Port Charlotte, Florida.
No stenographic record by a cer-
tified court reporter is made of
these meetings. Accordingly, any-
one seeking to appeal any deci-
sions involving the matters herein
will be responsible for making a
verbatim record of the
meeting/testimony and evidence
upon which any appeal is to be
based. (SEE.F.S. 286.0105)
Any person requiring special
accommodations to participate in
this meeting, should contact the
Charlotte County-Punta Gorda
Metropolitan Planning Organiza-
tion at least forty-eight (48) hours
prior to the meeting by calling
(941) 883-3535; if you are hear-
ing or speech impaired, call (800)
955-8770 Voice/(800) 955-8771
TDD.
The MPO's planning process is
conducted in accordance with
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of
1964 and related statutes. Any
person or beneficiary who
believes he or she has been dis-
criminated against because of
race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, disability, or famil-
ial status may file a complaint
with the Florida Department of
Transportation District One Title
VI Coordinator Robin Parrish at
(863) 519-2675 or by writing her
at Post Office Box 1249, Bartow,
Florida 33831.
For more information call:
Charlotte County-Punta
Gorda MPO
25550 Harbor View Road,
Suite 4, Port Charlotte,
Florida 33980
Tel: (941) 883-3535
www.ccmpo.com
Publish: June 13, 2013
163352 2903104

NOTICE OF SALE
3130


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
STEVE'S TOWING gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to
sell these vehicles on
06/25/2013, 09:00 am at
19888 Veterans Blvd Port Char-
lotte, FL 33954, pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. STEVE'S TOWING
reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.
4T1BF18B5XU353173
1999 TOYOTA
Published: June 13, 2013
274754 2903040
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: ABLE
WRECKER & ROAD SERVICE LLC
gives Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell these vehi-
cles on 06/27/2013, 08:00 am
at 5135 NE Cubitls Avenue ARCA-
DIA, FL 34266, pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. ABLE WRECKER &
ROAD SERVICE LLC reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
4CDR6BR29R2304336
1994 WINNEBAGO MOTOR HOME
Publish: June 13, 2013
108133 2903049
ASIC Us
HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!

OTHER NOTICES
3138


DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND
SECURITY
FEDERAL EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT AGENCY
Proposed Flood Hazard Deter-
minations for the Unincorpo-
rated Areas of Charlotte
County, Florida, and Case No.
13-04-3688P. The Department
of Homeland Security's Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) solicits technical informa-
tion or comments on proposed
flood hazard determinations for
the Flood Insurance Rate Map
(FIRM), and where applicable, the
Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report
for your community. These flood
hazard determinations may
include the addition or modifica-
tion of Base Flood Elevations,
base flood depths, Special Flood
Hazard Area boundaries or zone
designations, or the regulatory
floodway. The FIRM and, if applic-
able, the FIS report have been
revised to reflect these flood haz-
ard determinations through
issuance of a Letter of Map Revi-
sion (LOMR), in accordance with
Title 44, Part 65 of the Code of
Federal Regulations. These
determinations are the basis for
the floodplain management mea-
sures that your community is
required to adopt or show evi-
dence of having in effect to quali-
fy or remain qualified for partici-
pation in the National Flood Insur-
ance Program. For more infor-
mation on the proposed flood
hazard determinations and infor-
mation on the statutory 90-day
period provided for appeals,


please visit FEMA's website at
www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm
/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Infor-
mation eXchange (FMIX) toll free
at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-
2627).
Published: June 6 and 13, 2013
265682 2900717


Charlotte Assembly steering




committee selected


By BRENDA BARBOSA
STAFF WRITER

MURDOCK -
Twenty-five people
from distinct walks of
life will serve on the
steering committee
for October's Charlotte
Assembly.
The Charlotte County
Commission unani-
mously approved the
list of nominations
at its regular agenda
meeting Tuesday.
Commissioners each
selected five different
candidates resid-
ing within Charlotte
County who represent
a diverse cross-section
of the community. From
doctors and business
leaders to teachers and
retirees, the group is


tasked with selecting
100 people from the
community to par-
ticipate in the three-day
assembly.
With the help of a
professional facilitator
from Florida Gulf Coast
University's Institute
of Government, the
committee also will
develop a list of specific
questions around major
topics of discussion
selected by the com-
mission, including
economic development,
public safety, growth
management, quality of
life, and efficient and
effective government.
"I have to tell you, it
was so hard to narrow
it down (to 25), because
there are so many tal-
ented people who care


about Charlotte County,"
Commissioner Stephen
R. Deutsch said.
Among Deutsch's
five nominations is
businessman Joe Tiseo,
owner of several Pic 'n
Run convenience stores
in Port Charlotte.
Tiseo said he vol-
unteered for the post
because "I would rather
be given a seat at the
table in helping craft
policy rather then being
limited to three min-
utes at the podium.
"I think it is our civic
duty to get involved,
and you should not de-
pend on someone else
to do all the lifting,"
Tiseo added.
The 125 assembly
members, which in-
cluded the steering


committee, will be bro-
ken up into five separate
groups and assigned
a facilitator, Assistant
County Administrator
Kelly Shoemaker said.
In prior assemblies,
there was one facilita-
tor assigned to lead the
discussion, and staff
had the responsibility of
gathering the informa-
tion. This time, staff will
not be involved in the
discussion, Shoemaker
said.
"We wanted to step
out of the process a
little bit more and really
allow it to be driven by
the citizens," she said.
Charlotte County
has had four previous
assemblies in 1996,
1998, 2001 and 2007.
Email: bbarbosa@sun-herald.com


Punta Gorda reconsiders pension cuts


By GARY ROBERTS
STAFF WRITER

PUNTA GORDA -
Last year, in response to
the stagnant economy
and a desire to trim
costs, city officials
closed the defined
benefit pension plan for
new general employ-
ees. But now that the
recovery is unfolding,
ever slowly, the City
Council is considering
an about-face in order
to attract employees
who could choose a
more favorable retire-
ment plan elsewhere.
In previous years, the
city's contribution has
increased for its three
pension plans po-
lice, fire and general
employees. However,
a recently completed
analysis by the city's
actuary showed costs
are expected to drop
over the next 10 years.


The study projected
that the city's cost for
general employees
will decrease from 28
percent of payroll in
2014, to 14 percent by
2024; the firefighters'
plan will see a similar
decrease, from 28 per-
cent to 14 percent, over
the same period; while
the city's contribution
for police would be re-
duced from 29 percent
to 23 percent of payroll.
So, with brighter days
ahead, the City Council
is asking staff to come
up with ideas about
how to revise the gen-
eral employee pension
plan without adding
to the city budget. And
part of this directive is
to allow new employees
into the defined benefit
plan.
"We need to do
something for new
employees," Mayor Bill
Albers said during a


discussion at last week's
City Council meet-
ing. "As the economy
continues to improve,
they're going to go to
places offering better
pensions."
Consequently, the
city is exploring a host
of alternatives regard-
ing the pension plan
for general employees,
who are not unionized.
These options, among
others, include joining
the Florida Retirement
System or adopting a
"hybrid" plan for new
and existing general
employees.
The hybrid pension
plan would offer a
somewhat lower contri-
bution from employees
in conjunction with a
much lower multiplier
- or the percentage
of their pay they re-
ceive for each year of
service. City Manager
Howard Kunik said


general employees
have expressed con-
cern over the current
requirements.
"We have heard from
some employees ... that
taking 8.1 percent out
of their paycheck is a
burden. They would
consider a lower mul-
tiplier if it meant less
out of their paycheck,"
Kunik said.
Another option is
joining the FRS, which
is mandatory for all
county, school district
and state employees.
The final decision,
said Councilwoman
Kim Devine, should be
mutually beneficial to
employees and the city.
"Our employees are
our greatest asset,"
Devine said. "We have
to be competitive to at-
tract quality employees.
Good people are hard
to find."
Email: groberts@sun-herald.com


Jeff Steinberg: Tiny person, giant heart


By TOM CHANG
STAFF WRITER

Jeff Steinberg is no
stranger to adversity.
Performing for more
than 40 years, Steinberg
was born with no arms
and malformed legs,
but that didn't stop him
from taking charge and
sharing about his life
experiences through
humor and song. He
took the moniker, "Tiny


Giant," based on his
4-foot, 6-inch stature
and living larger than
life. He will be ap-
pearing at Englewood
United Methodist
Church for all Sunday
services to deliver his
Father's Day message.
"It means a lot for
people to hear Jeff's
story," said Vic Willis,
pastor at EUMC. "He
helps put things in per-
spective the way people


PHOTO PROVIDED
On Father's Day, June 16, internationally acclaimed singer
and humorist "Tiny Giant" Jeff Steinberg and his ministry
team will deliver a special message for the 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. worship services at Englewood United Methodist
Church, 700 E. Dearborn St.


can rise above and
beyond their situation."
Born to Jewish
parents, Steinberg
experienced multiple
orthopedic surgeries
since the age of 2. He
was taught to wear a
brace on his right leg
and received his first
prosthetic arm when
he was 4. He completed
public school when he
was 19, growing up as
a ward of the state of
Pennsylvania since he
was 9, according to his
website, tinygiant.com.
"We tend to adjust
our vision based on
what is around us,"
Steinberg said. "A lot
of times, we lower our
expectations. I want
people to know that
you can do so much in
spite of what's going on
around us. If we look
in the mirror and think
no better, we'll never
amount to what God
meant us to be."
Now in Orlando,
Steinberg takes his
message to whomever
will listen, helping to
raise more than
$250,000 to help people
with disabilities. He's
traveled all over the
world with his team,
performing in Germany,
England, Canada and
the Bahamas. He even
appeared at a rally with
Mother Teresa, accord-
ing to his website.
"I'm married, a father
and a grandfather
with four children and
six grandchildren,"
Steinberg said. "I'm
looking to challenge
dads to see themselves
that we're masterpieces
in progress, that God


designed us to be fear-
fully and wonderfully
made."
Willis said he heard
about Steinberg from a
fellow pastor in Punta
Gorda.
"He's a delightful guy,"
Willis said. "He exudes
faith and enthusiasm.
He has a real positive
spirit. I've talked to a
few who have experi-
enced him in concert.
He helped them with
their lives and put
things into perspective."
Steinberg recalled
a time when a young
child approached him.
"The child asked
me about why I have
a hook," he said. "I
replied, 'Because I have
no hands.' He followed
up asking why I have
no hands, I replied,
'Because I chewed on
my fingers down to the
nub.'"
Steinberg said he's
looking forward to
coming to Englewood.
"I always like to help
in any way I can,"
Steinberg said. "I want
to show people that
they can do whatever
it takes to get the job
done, and faith plays a
part."
Steinberg has released
numerous albums and
has an autobiography
called "Masterpiece in
Progress."
EUMC is located at
700 E. Dearborn St. in
Englewood. Services
will be 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
and 11 a.m. All are
invited.
For more information,
visit englewoodumc.net
or call 941-474-5588.
Email: tchang@sun-herald.com





The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 9


Second Cafe Evergreen



to open in former



Nokomis post office


By ROGER BUTTON
STAFF WRITER

NOKOMIS Choosing
the oldest building along
U.S. 41 between Venice
and Tampa, the original
Nokomis post office, for
his new three-part project
was a dream come true.
A second Caf6
Evergreen organic
restaurant will open in
late summer at 801 S.
Tamiami Trail, next to
Captain Eddy's. Owner
Ted Weinberger has been
a concessionaire at the
Warm Mineral Springs
Day Spa in North Port,
where he opened and
operates the first Caf6
Evergreen.
"You could eat in my
restaurant for seven
days, and you would get
healthier, and if you pre-
fer, you can buy produce
from my stand, prepare,
cook and see the healthy
benefits," he said.
Divided into three parts,
all adjoining, the Nokomis
eatery will feature a juice
bar, a restaurant and a
produce stand.
The organic juice bar
will open at 9 a.m. in
the historic post office,
and customers can enjoy
organic coffee, espresso,
green teas, wheat-grass
juice and kefir water.
Adjoining will be a full-
service restaurant with
takeout service, seating
50 with an outside patio
dining area. Everything,
Weinberger said, will be
made from scratch -
with no preservatives or
salt, but instead creative
spices and organic fresh
herbs.
Grass-fed beef burg-
ers will be a feature of
the menu, along with


SUN PHOTO BY ROGER BUTTON
Cafe Evergreen's second location at 801 S. Tamiami Trail (at
Pocono Trail), Nokomis, will open this summer in the old post
office building, built in 1923.


brisket, chicken dishes,
wild cod, Alaskan salmon
and fresh, locally caught
fish. Open from 11 a.m.
to 9 p.m. every day, the
restaurant also will serve
sandwiches, wraps and
soups. Organic beer and
wines will be supplied
from area wineries.
The third section in
an attached garage,
open from 9 a.m., will
be Weinberger's organic
produce stand with
Asian vegetables, locally
grown on organic farms;
as well as flowers and
fruit trees. It's the same
produce used within his
restaurant.
From Milwaukee, Wis.,
Weinberger studied
international business
and political science in
college. For 27 years, he
has worked and managed
major chain restaurants,
including Applebee's,
Chili's and Bennigan's.
Coming to Florida, he
wanted to focus on the
healthy side of food, so he
opened a steak and sea-
food restaurant in Winter
Haven. Five years later,
he came to Nokomis, fell
in love with the building,


and for a year has been
planning his second Caf6
Evergreen.
Property owner Dan
Simic, who, with his
family, owns and operates
adjoining Rum Runner
Antiques, said, "It is very
exciting to see this old
building, which we have
completely restored to its
former glory, being used
again, and I am sure it
will be a great success for
Weinberger."
Like many others,
Weinberger is awaiting
the outcome of the Warm
Mineral Springs dispute
between its owners the
city of North Port and
Sarasota County, to see if
his first location can re-
main open after June 30.
If the two bodies can't
sign an interlocal agree-
ment, the spa and the
restaurant will be forced
to shut down, possibly
just temporarily.
North Port commis-
sioners are meeting today
to review a new proposal
to submit to the county.
If the county agrees, the
bodies can move forward.
If not, they could land in
court.


SUN PHOTO BY LOUISE HALL
Ted Weinberger, owner of the organic Cafe Evergreen at Warm Mineral Springs Day Spa, is flanked
by his wait staff in April at the North Port location.


ARRESTS

FROM PAGE 3

5400 block of Colfax Terrace,
Port Charlotte. Charge: violation
of probation (original charges:
trafficking in stolen property and
fraud in dealing with regulated
metals). Bond: none.
Alton Trevor Watson, 32, 800
block of Cavert Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charge: violation of pretrial-release
conditions. Bond: none.
Octivia Brown, 19, 20300
block of Wilkie Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: burglary with
assault or battery. Bond: none.
Craig Robert Porter, 30, of
Grove City, Fla. Charges: posses-
sion of a controlled substance
without a prescription and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Bond: $3,500.
Hudson McBain Erdman, 32,
9300 block of El Campo Ave.,
Englewood. Charges: burglary
of an unoccupied structure and
grand theft. Bond: $7,500.


Christopher Lynn Jackson,
42, 700 block of Liberty St.,
Englewood. Charge: petty theft.
Bond: $500.

The North Port Police
Department reported the
following arrests:
Brandon Joseph Leonard, 32,
20900 block of Cascade Ave., Port
Charlotte. Charge: battery. Bond:
$750.
Thomas Dominici, 54, 3200
block of N. Biscayne Drive, North
Port. Charge: DUI. Bond: $500.

The Venice Police
Department reported the
following arrest:
Barbara M. Raskowski, 30,
900 block of Kimball Road, Venice.
Charges: five counts of possession
of a controlled substance without
a prescription, and possession of
marijuana. Bond: $8,000.

The Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office reported the
following arrests:
Vitaly Pavel Fenin, 30, 20700


block of Mountain Whistler Ave.,
Venice. Charge: contempt (original
charge: driving with a suspended
license). Bond: $3,000.
James Edward Slack Jr., 27,
900 block of N. Gondola Drive,
Venice. Charge: violation of
probation (original charge: battery
on a law enforcement officer).
Bond: none.
Gary Stevie Bussells, 57, Old
Englewood Drive, Englewood.
Charge: violation of probation
(original charge: criminal
mischief). Bond: none.
Chaquita C. Davis, 52, 4300
block of Via Del Santi Drive, Venice.
Charge: aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon. Bond: none.
Linda L. Lang, 49, 11700 block
of Valoon Ave., Port Charlotte.
Charges: habitually driving with a
suspended license and possession
of a controlled substance. Bond:
$3,000.

Compiled by
Merab-Michal Favorite,
Lorraine Schneeberger
and Drew Winchester


- 0esa CrsswrI


ACROSS
1 Careless
4 Gets rid of
9 Barely enough
14 Recipe phrase
15 Brown shade
16 One of the
Honeymooners
Kramdens
17 Essence of a
knock-knock
joke
18 Tough tests
19 Office machine
giant
20 Dapper one
23 Like some letters
24 Disapproving
sounds
28 Painter Cezanne
29 Move
emotionally
32 _-in (sure
victor)
33 School
support grp.
36 Tusked critter
38 how!"
39 Snazzy threads
42 Tribulation
44 Crime buster,
informally
45 Say further
46 Night fliers
48 Commands
respect
50 Nonchalance
54 Out for a bit
56 Expensive
spreads
59 Feature of
spring fashions
62 Aspect
65 In again, after
being out
66 Largest US
union
67 Big name in
rock history


68 G sharp's
equivalent
69 Indefinite
number
70 Spicy
71 Apple
attachments
72 French article


DOWN
1 Eagerly
accepts
2 Bryn Mawr
graduate
3 Paradise
4 Cartoonist
Adams
5 Throng
6 Virtual
greetings
7 Distribute
sparingly,
with "out"
8 Insolence


CREATORS SYNDICATE 2013 STAr





Look for a third

crossword in .

the Sun Classified

section.
"""" """" """" """*


FASHION IQ by Fred Jackson III
Edited by Stanley Newman
www.stanxwords.com
9 Jazz instruments 39 Get out of the


10 Paper
processors
11 Auto option,
for short
12 Barracks VIP
13 Cowboy
nickname
21 One of the
Honeymooners
Kramdens
22 Geological
layers
25 "Fancy _!"
26 Cain, first of all
27 Put on the
canvas
30 Beef cut
31 Debt
acknowledgment
34 Kids' game
35 Italian designer
37 Rural cable
channel


market
40 Ferret's foot
41 Best-case
42 Wine and dine
43 Rent
alternative
47 "Amen!"
49 Come to an
agreement
51 Musically
discordant
52 Unperturbed
53 Opinion pieces
55 Culturally
pretentious
57 "Get outta here!"
58 Traffic noise
60 Pt6d de foie
61 Great weight
62 Turkey topper,
traditionally
63 Draught choice
64 Walgreens rival


NLEY NEWMAN STANXWORDS@AOL.COM 6/13/13


Answer to previous puzzle


6/13/13


Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis


ACROSS
1 Desktop offering
an AppleCare
warranty
5 Man of la casa
10 Chew
14 Wine lover's
destination
15 Micronesian
nation once
called Pleasant
Island
16 San _, Italy
17 Tennis player's
meal request?
19 Announce
assuredly
20 Ping-Pong
player's
etiquette?
22 Worshipers of
Quetzalcoatl
25 Fry's former BBC
comedy partner
26 Renaissance
painter Uccello
27 Genuine article?
30 Close of "Albert
Nobbs"
31 Coin first minted
in 13th-century
France
32 Movie trainer of
Daniel-san
35 Clause joiners
36 Runner's music
choice?
39 Grammy winner
Erykah
41 Corners
42 Producer of wall
flowers
45 Area of activity
47 Old speedster
48 Bath-loving
Muppet
50 Make even
smoother
52 Span that can't
be shrunk
53 Golfer's bank
advance?
57 Ovid's others
58 Football player's
map?
62 "Oh, criminy!"
63 Totally enjoy
something, with
"up"
64 Muddy up
65 Quest after
66 Event with
buckjumpers
67" said!"


By Julian Lim
DOWN
1 IRS concern
2 Familiar face in
Tiananmen
Square
3 Homer's
doughnut
supplier
4 Trustbuster's
target
5 High-horse sorts
6 Rank above
viscount
7 Feature of
Manet's "The
Luncheon on the
Grass"
8 Provo neighbor
9 Bucolic
10 Like table salt
11 Interminable
12 Language family
spanning two
continents
13 Declines
18 Washington city
21 Badger
22 Copycat
23 Tween
heartthrob Efron
24 Immediately
27 Little ones
28 Damages
29 Spew out
33 Freud's I


6/13/13
Wednesday's Puzzle Solved
CDSIF|ALCO SWEDE
LE Y UR I AH LONER
AN s TEV EMART IN
WI TNES S N OTIN I CE
AREA BR IS CIS
TO MBOSL E Y NT



H ISS CAR YVGRANT


SEG HEAD ALEE
MER L I NOLSEN ODE
0 SCA TOTED RES
STETS SOAR'S EDA


(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.


34 Fifi's here
37 Gamble
38 Small flash drive
capacity
39 Where some
commuters
unwind
40 Biological rings
43 Flight connection
word
44 "Sure thing!"
46 A or B on a test,
maybe: Abbr.


6/13/13


49 E-filed document
51 Shelve
52 Increase
54 "Later!"
55 Like many
snowbirds: Abbr.
56 Wiesel who
wrote "The Night
Trilogy"
59 Promising paper
60 Brief
dissimilarity
61 Brownie, for one


I






Our Town Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


VIEWPOINT


Derek Dunn-Rankin Chairman
David Dunn-Rankin Publisher
Chris Porter Executive Editor


Brian Gleason Editorial page editor
Stephen Baumann Editorial writer


Email letters to letters@sun-herald.com


I OUR VIEW

Irresponsible

actions threaten

Springs operation

OUR POSITION: A lot of talk,
but no rational action by the North
Port City Commission.

20, 19, 18, 17, 16...
he utter nonsense that
characterizes the debate
over the future of Warm
Mineral Springs continued for
more than three hours in North
Port Monday.
And it will continue today, three
days closer to the likely closure of
the Springs.
To what good end?
Sarasota County and North
Port residents may have been
asking themselves that question
for more than six months now.
They may have asked it after city
commissioners reneged on a
previous agreement to seek bids
on the management, stabilization
and long-term redevelopment
of the jointly owned public
property. They may have asked it
after another agreement received
preliminary approval one day and
was overturned the next. Or after
buyout options were offered and
rejected by both sides.
We are no closer to an agree-
ment than we were eight months
ago, when two new members
were elected to the city board. Still
talking, with 18 days left until the
two-and-a-half-year management
contract with Cypress Lending
ends.
How did that happen?
We can see only two
possibilities.
North Port Mayor Linda Yates
never liked the idea of the county
and city spending $5.5 million on
the Springs. But the purchase was
hammered out, essentially, before
she took office. At this point,
Yates is philosophically opposed
to contracting with a private
vendor who may profit from the
operation. On Monday, she spoke
passionately about turning Warm
Mineral Springs into a public park
run by city employees until, per-
haps, the day-to-day work could
be hired out. She believes the city
(and presumably the county) can
reap profits from such things as
merchandising while keeping the
Springs open at a lower rate.
Her claims are dubious; she's
essentially done her business plan
on a scratch pad. Beyond that,
though, her position has zero
support on either board. So her
continuing insistence is nothing
less than obstructionism and
petulance. If the contract runs
out, the city might step in to run
it. And Yates would prevail.
And as for the two other com-
missioners obstructing a le-
gitimate process, Commissioners
Cheryl Cook and Rhonda
DiFranco insist they are funda-
mentally opposed to any new
development on the site.
But development was never a
given. The long-term bid process
was an exercise that might or
might not have brought a
long-term agreement. It might
have attracted proposals for
Disney-Springs orVegas-Springs
or Quaint-Lil'-Ol'-Springs. Or
nothing whatsoever; right now,
one would-be operator maintains
he has no interest in building.
Besides, the City Commission
always retained veto power over
any actual proposal.
The sum? Nothing has been
achieved. Except Warm Mineral
Springs is another day nearer
to closing and we are, perhaps,
another day closer to a nasty,
costly lawsuit that might result in
court receivership and the sale of
a public asset.
At this point, we can only hope
the place remains open, that a
one-year contract can be devised
and all parties can step back from
the brink. But that's not saying
much.
The entire episode has made
no sense, except to those laboring
under a weird combination of
political dogmatism, insecurity
and irrational fears of outside
powers. If the Springs closes, it will


be because the City Commission
has been irresponsible, negligent
and downright bizarre.


LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR

Don't overlook
current generation

Editor:
I revere the generation that
saved us in World War II. I am
a veteran of a later "conflict
era." Those who came back
fromWorldWar II either
returned to jobs they held be-
fore the war or took advantage
of the GI Bill and got a degree,
qualifying them for much
better positions. Then they
worked for 30-35 years in the
best and most expansionary
economic era that America
has ever experienced.
Their jobs included a
traditional retirement plan.
They could retire to Florida,
Oklahoma, Texas or to home
towns if they wanted to pay
the state tax.
They were and are the
"Greatest Generation" but
they lived in the "Greatest
Times," so far. I am an opti-
mist and I feel the U.S. can
and will be great again. New
business and new innova-
tions will fuel our economy
to new heights. What about
the returning veterans from
today's wars? Can they expect
the support of the community
that the World War II guys got?
After their meager education
benefits, can they expect to
be streamlined into jobs? Can
they think that they can get
employment that lets them
support a family on only their
income?
Most but not all of the
Greatest Generation were
drafted. Our current soldiers
are volunteers. Who deserves
the most credit and support?
Can't we make more pro-
grams available to our recent
veterans to return them to
the profit of our economic
system?
Don't disregard the "great-
est," but don't forget the
"current."


No more n
for digress


psychiatrist. However, I sub-
mit he needs a good English
teacher.
He would learn that the al-
leged "uncountable scandals"
cannot have "denigrated"
either the government or
the position of president.
A person can denigrate
another person, institution,
etc. It means "to attack the
reputation of; to defame."
Something inchoate like a
scandal simply cannot get the
job done.
Likewise, it's impossible
for a country to "digress." He
cites his Vietnam service and
then says, "It's unimaginable
how far we have digressed."
To digress is to "turn aside
from the main subject of a
discussion or argument."
Hence, a country cannot
digress unless it speaks with
one voice.
His statement also makes
no sense in that during the
Vietnam era the country
was even more divided and
polarized than it is now, with
hundreds of thousands of
citizens regularly marching
against the government's
odious war policies.
Then there is, "Time to end
all 'speculation.'" His point
seems to be that the time
for speculation about the
alleged "Obama scandals" is
over. Like Darrell Issa saying
"in all likelihood" the orders
to have the IRS harass tea
party groups came from
"Washington" and "we are
getting to prove it."
I could go on, but I don't
wish to "digress" or "deni-
grate" any further.


Security agei
need broad p(

Editor:
Everyone is up in
the recent story con
ing the government
access to some pho
llt-jlll-j 1r" trt r.t L UII


intnllltllt IrecorI. LU
Ed Badenellmost Republicans a
Punta Gorda using this as an issue
the Democrats and
dent. They also real
eed information the gov
sion is getting is also ava
on most public sites


Editor:
This lonely liberal voice
hardly knows where to start
in responding to the semi-
illiterate, reactionary rants
you published last week.
We could start with,
"Liberals have brain disor-
der." It's not surprising that
the writer knows a good


Internet.
Whatever steps th
agencies are getting
these tools has dim
the terrorists from e
another 9/11 attack
2000. There was a ti
after the Twin Towe
destroyed that ever
giving these agenci(


blame for not having the
information to prevent this
attack.
Now after several years,
lest we forget, the cry over
our "civil rights and privacy,"
some of us are up in arms.
After the Boston attack,
which was carried out
supposedly by a couple of
low-tech young brothers, we
should realize how vulnerable
we could be without all the
intelligence these agencies
could get their hands on.
I've got nothing to hide.
I've got no ties to any terror-
ist organizations, no bomb-
making websites that I've
been looking at.
With this technological age
we live in, give these security
agencies all the tools that are
available. The bad guys are
already using them.
Frank Gallucci
Port Charlotte


The whole story
really stinks

Editor:
So, if monitoring of our
phone calls is simply business
as usual, no story here, then
why was there the need of a
court order dated April 25,
2013 and ending July 19, 2013?
It doesn't seem that it has
been a common practice.
If you listen to the presi-
dent, in the most convincing
of tones and the sincerest of
expressions, he will tell you
that all of this is for your own
good. In order to protect you
from the bad guys, we need all
tha information w.ra rcan alean


Tom Flynn about you. Huh?
Punta Gorda We need to engage some
common sense. Information
about 99 percent of us will do
ncieS nothing at all to identify the
powers bad guys. Because we aren't
doing anything wrong. So
that line of reasoning doesn't
arms over pass the smell test. In fact
icern- the whole story stinks to high
having heaven.
ne and Merideth White
ckily, Englewood
re not
ie to slam
the presi- 'Natural' diet
ize the comes naturally
vernment
ilable
inlable Editor:
Son the A study published in
the New England Journal
ie security of Medicine suggests that
;with a Mediterranean diet is
finished superior to a low fat diet in
enjoying high-risk cardiac patients.
since Dr. Dean Ornish, who
me right gained wealth and notoriety
rs were with his low-fat diet books,
yone was took exception. He said the


es all the


study encouraged the low-fat


ly/Wtvb
N641- Or


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to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as for grammar and spelling. All and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The newspaper takes
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OurTown Page 10 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


L


diet group to eat things like
bread, potatoes, pasta and
rice, which he says increases
the risk of cardiovascular
disease. According to his
reasoning, the Japanese
people who have the longest
life expectancy in the world,
shouldn't be eating their
staples of rice and noodles.
What is common to
longevity around the world,
aside from clean water and
sanitation, is eating a variety
of whole, unadulterated
foods developed over our
evolutionary history. To
suggest that complex carbo-
hydrates risk cardiovascular
disease, or that some foods
are superior to others, is the
ultimate in pseudo-science
and food-faddism. We and
what we eat developed
symbiotically.
The Inuit people, who ate
primarily seal and whale
meats and fats with very
little fruits and vegetables,
had longevity with an
absence of heart disease and
cancer until "civilization"
arrived. Why? The fats, oils,
and foods they consumed
were not concocted in some
laboratory. They didn't eat
meat from animals fed
food that was foreign to
them, consisting of animal
by-products and wastes,
GMOs,or laden with antibi-
otics, chemicals, hormones
and pesticides.
After billions spent on
food science "research," we
get, "What makes for a long
life is hard to untangle."
Indeed, when science
serves commerce.
Arthur J. St. Lawrence
Punta Gorda

Jails need better
triage system

Editor:
In the last few years, the
arrest records of the citizens
in Charlotte County and
in Florida have increased
dramatically, and now with
the potential of driving
under influence levels being
lowered, there may be more
people being incarcerated in
this county.
With the recent event of an
inmate committing suicide in
jail and other difficult events
that are occurring in jail in
DeSoto County and Manatee
County, beating deaths and
illnesses, it is my belief that
our jails are going to need a
much better triage system,
which would include a nurse
practitioner or a physician
triaging a patient prior to
incarceration.
Many people have mental
health issues and physician
issues and require constant
use of medications. What
happens is these inmates
come in and have no me-
dial evaluation and all of a
sudden all medications are
stopped. Someone who is
seriously depressed, psy-
chotic, or is under control
with medications and has
their medicine stopped can
suddenly become seriously
depressed, which can lead
to a suicide or uncontrolled
physical and emotional
activity.
Over the years, many psy-
chological institutions have
been cut back or discon-
tinued due to finances, and
the jails are now becoming
our psychiatric institutions.
Everybody says triage will
cost us more money, how-
ever, in the case of a suicide
that occurred due to error
in judgment of the jailers,
this would end up costing us
more in insurance premiums
and legal fees.
Louis D. Rosenfield
Port Charlotte





The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


VIEWPOINT


www.sunnewspapers.net E/N/C OurTown Page 11


A new plan for holding back the tide


he National Mall
has monuments to
heroism, freedom
and sacrifice. Pretty soon
it will also have a monu-
ment to failure.
Drive on 17th Street
NW, just south of
Constitution Avenue,
and you'll see concrete
footings, a mound of dirt
and jersey barriers all
part of an oft-delayed
project to build a flood
wall to protect downtown
Washington from a rising
Potomac River.
The flood wall, and
similar initiatives else-
where, amount to tacit
acknowledgments that
the fight against climate
change, the cause celebre
of the environmental
movement for more than
a decade, has failed in its
primary purpose. In the
race to prevent disaster,
it's already too late.
Among climate-change
activists, the realization
is spreading that the
combination of political
inaction on greenhouse
gases, plentiful new
petroleum supplies and
accelerating changes in
weather patterns means


there is no escaping
more life-altering floods,
droughts and fires.
Although ongoing efforts
to reduce carbon emis-
sions could mitigate even
worse catastrophe, mo-
mentum has shifted in
part to preparing for the
inevitable consequences
of a warmer planet.
Perhaps the most vivid
example of this came
Tuesday afternoon, when
New York Mayor Michael
Bloomberg rolled out his
$19.5 billion plan to "pre-
pare for the impacts of a
changing climate," with
proposals ranging from
coastal levees to the pro-
tection of hospitals. Last
year, Bloomberg cited
climate change as his
main reason for endors-
ing President Obama's
re-election, praising


Obama's "major steps to
reduce our carbon con-
sumption." But speaking
Tuesday from a Brooklyn
greenhouse damaged last
fall by Hurricane Sandy,
Bloomberg addressed the
inevitability that rising
temperatures and sea
levels would bring even
worse.
"By mid-century, up
to a quarter of all New
York City's land area,
where 800,000 residents
live today, will be in the
flood plain," he said, and
"40 miles of our water-
front could see flooding
on a regular basis just
during normal high
tides." We no longer have
the luxury of ideological
debate, he said. "The
bottom line is we can't
run the risk."
Andrew Light, a global-
warming specialist at
the liberal Center for
American Progress, ex-
plained to me the recent
shift toward efforts to
adapt to climate change
rather than merely
seeking to prevent it.
"We're starting to see
very strong evidence of
climate-related extreme


events happening sooner
than we thought with
only a 1-degree (Celsius)
rise in temperature," he
said, "and a more refined
science saying now that
we will more than likely
edge up to or cross the
2-degree threshold."
Climate activists had
long sought to limit
the temperature rise to
2 degrees, but this now
seems both impractical
and insufficient. "Our
best-case scenario now
is we could delay by a
couple of decades the
point at which we cross
the threshold," Light
said. This means that
cutting carbon emissions
is still important but that
it's also time to prepare
for what's coming.
Among the needed
adaptations: flood walls
and expanded coastal
wetlands, fortified
subway systems, buried
power lines, houses with
detachable foundations,
roads rebuilt on higher
ground, drought-resis-
tant crops and changes
to hydroelectric facilities
and nuclear power-plant
cooling systems. States in


the Southwest may need
pipelines and desaliniza-
tion plants for drinking
water.
Low-lying and poorer
parts of the world will
have it much worse. But
even in the United States,
vast coastal areas New
Orleans, the Florida Keys
and elsewhere along the
Gulf of Mexico, North
Carolina's Outer Banks,
parts of Long Island -
eventually may need to
be abandoned to higher
seas. As a start toward
depopulating those
areas, the federal govern-
ment may need to cut off
disaster insurance.
Obama created an
"Interagency Climate
Change Adaptation
Task Force" in 2009 to
examine everything
from agriculture to
sewer system failures and
public-health conse-
quences, but much of the
work remains theoretical.
Bloomberg's new plan,
with 250 specific recom-
mendations and a hefty
price tag, puts climate-
change adaptation into a
more concrete realm.
The businessman-


mayor called it "a battle
that may well define our
future for generations
to come" and outlined
changes to building
standards, telecommu-
nications, transportation
and a dozen other areas.
"Waves that do reach
our shore will find a
strong line of coastal
defenses, reinforced
dunes and widened
beaches, levees, flood
walls and bulkheads,
and tide gates and surge
barriers," Bloomberg
said. "New grade infra-
structure will absorb
water, it will divert it into
higher-capacity sewers,
and our critical systems
will operate with less
interruption throughout
the storm and bounce
back quicker if they do
go down."
Bloomberg spoke
confidently, as if he were
a general laying out a
military plan. But he
was really talking about
limiting casualties.
Dana Milbank is a
Washington Post colum-
nist. Readers may reach
him at danamilbank@
washpost.com.


We're surrendering our civil liberties


It will not be with
guns.
If ever tyranny
overtakes this land of
the sometimes free and
home of the intermit-
tently brave, it probably
won't, contrary to the
fever dreams of gun
rights extremists, involve
jack-booted government
thugs rappelling down
from black helicopters.
Rather, it will involve
changes to words on pa-
per many have forgotten
or never knew, changes
that chip away until
they strip away precious
American freedoms.
It will involve a trade
of sorts, an inducement
to give up the reality of
freedom for the illusion
of security. Indeed, the
bargain has already been
struck.
That is the takeaway
from the latest contro-
versy to embroil the
Obama administration.


Leonard
Pitts



Yes, it is troubling to
learn the National
Security Agency has been
running a secret program
that reputedly gives it
access to Americans' web
activity emails, chats,
pictures, video uploads
- on such Internet
behemoths as Google,
Facebook and Apple. Yes,
it is troubling to hear
that "George W" Obama
has routinely renewed
a Bush-era program
allowing the feds to more
easily graze the "meta-
data" of phone activity
(time and date, numbers
dialed, etc.) of millions of


Verizon customers.
But what is most
troubling is that
Americans are not
particularly troubled by
any of it. According to
a new poll by the Pew
Research Center and the
Washington Post, most
of us 56 percent are
OK with the monitoring
of metadata, a process
then-Sen. Joe Biden
called "very, very intru-
sive" back in 2006.
According to the
same poll, nearly half
- 45 percent also
approve allowing the
government to track
email content and
other online activity. And
62 percent feel it is more
important to investigate
terrorist threats than to
safeguard the right to
privacy. That approval is
consistent across party
lines.
We are at war against
terror, the thinking goes,


so certain liberties must
be sacrificed. It's the
same thing people said
when similar issues arose
under the Bush regime.
It doesn't seem to matter
to them that the "war" is
open-ended and mostly
metaphorical, meaning
that we can anticipate no
formal surrender point at
which our rights will be
restored.
For what it's worth,
we've seen similar
ambivalence toward
the excess of another
open-ended metaphori-
cal conflict, the War on
Drugs. It has also played
havoc with basic civil
rights, the courts essen-
tially giving police free
reign to stop whomever
whenever without need-
ing a warrant or a reason.
And never mind
that this violates those
words on paper many
of us have forgotten
or never knew the


Fourth Amendment to
the Constitution. Never
mind that it was de-
signed specifically to bar
government from peek-
ing through the blinds
or snatching you up on a
whim. Never mind that
it's a bulwark against the
unfettered power of the
state.
People think tyranny
will be imposed at the
point of a gun. Paranoids
look up in search of black
helicopters. Meanwhile,
the architecture of
totalitarianism is put into
place all around them,
surveillance apparatus so
intrusive as to stagger the
imagination of Orwell
himself.
The point is not that
one has nothing to
hide. The point is that
whatever you have is
none of the government's
business absent probable
cause and a warrant. The
point is that one should


never repose unfettered
power with the state.
We should know this,
yet we fall for the same
seductive con every time:
We are afraid, but the
state says it can make us
safe. And all it will take
is the surrender of a few
small freedoms.
It makes you want
to holler in frustration,
especially since the
promise is so false. Yes,
the state can interdict
a given terrorist plot,
but even if it took every
last freedom we have,
it could not guarantee
complete security. That
is a plain truth with
which we must make
peace.
We will never be "safe."
But we just might, if we
have the courage, be free.
Leonard Pitts Jr. is a
columnist for The Miami
Herald. Readers may
reach him at lpitts@
miamiherald.com.


Why president Obama became a snoop


Before Barack
Obama became
president, he rev-
eled in the irresponsibil-
ity of his powerlessness.
He could denounce Bush
administration coun-
terterrorism initiatives
from a glorious position
of civil-libertarian purity
and posit the need to
strike a perfect balance
"between privacy and
security."
Then he got elected
president, and the mere
posturing had to end. He
had to grow up. Invested
with responsibility for
keeping the country safe
and, no doubt, informed
of potential threats in
hair-raising terms on a
daily basis, he jettisoned
his innocent civil-
libertarianism. In light of
what were dire and real
threats to our security, he
had no choice but to use
the surveillance powers
of the government to foil
them.
Now, President Obama
thinks the Goldilocks
balance he has always
spoken of is struck by a
vast National Security
Agency monitoring
program that vacuums
up the phone records of
all Americans. There is
poetic justice in hearing
the president excoriated


in exactly the same terms
as President George W
Bush by the very same
people who worked to
get him elected to end
the terrible abuses of the
Bush-Cheney regime.
They are venting their
sense of betrayal, but the
fact is that in least this
respect Obama grew
up and they didn't.
As president, he
didn't have the luxury
of turning his back on
Bush policies merely
because they were Bush
policies. In his press
conference Friday, he
said of the NSA program
that upon taking office,
he concluded "on net,
it was worth us doing."
Whereas his allies can
either pretend that the
terror threat doesn't
exist or that there are
easy and simple ways of
combatting it, he has to
deal with it in the real
world. As he said of the
programs on Friday,


"My assessment and my
team's assessment was
that they help us prevent
terrorist attacks." Finally,
he can't celebrate leaker
Edward Snowden, who
portrays himself as a
brave freedom fighter,
then runs off into the
arms of dictatorial China
to hide after violating
our laws.
There seems little
question that the NSA
programs are consti-
tutional and legal. The
Internet element is
directed at foreigners
overseas to whom our
Fourth Amendment
doesn't apply. In The
New Republic, Robert
Chesney and Benjamin
Wittes write of this part
of the Snowden leak,
"There is nothing in the
story that does not reflect
exactly what someone
who understands the law
of this area would have
predicted." Although,
they note, that didn't
stop The Washington
Post from publishing
what online platforms we
are monitoring, useful
information for anyone
trying to evade our
surveillance.
As for the phone
program, it involves
metadata i.e., phone
numbers dialed, and for


what duration, and from
where that courts have
held aren't protected by
the Fourth Amendment
the same way that the
actual content of con-
versations are. Congress
authorized the program,
albeit somewhat vaguely,
in Section 215 of the USA
Patriot Act. The question
here isn't if Obama is
lawless or shredding the
Constitution any more
than it was if George W
Bush was. It is whether
the program is propor-
tionate and wise.
The metadata are fed
into the maw of govern-
ment algorithms. It is
only anomalies that,
assuming a court warrant
can be obtained, get
more attention. But the
government is nonethe-
less sweeping up the re-
cords of Americans who
have done nothing to
earn anyone's suspicion.
The information lands
on the desktops of the
likes of Edward Snowden,
who it turns out isn't a
very reliable custodian of
sensitive data. Defenders
of the program say that
there has not yet been a
demonstrated instance
of abuse. But at the time
of the Internal Revenue
Service scandal, this isn't
so reassuring.


The Snowden leak
was wrong, but at least
it makes possible an
open debate about the
program that might
lead to useful tightening
and new controls. Years
ago, Barack Obama's
contribution to that
debate might have


been as hyperbolic and
irresponsible as that of
his disappointed friends.
Now, evidently, he knows
better.
Rich Lowry is the editor
of The National Review.
Readers may reach him
at comments. lowry@
nationalreview. com.


PORT CHARLOTTE/PUNTA GORDA DESOTO COUNTY
THE ANIMAL WELFARE LEAGUE ANIMAL SHELTER
3519 Drance St. (863) 993-4855
(941) 625-6720

ENGLEWOOD SUNCOAST ENGLEWOOD EARS ANIMAL
HUMANE SOCIETY RESCUE SOCIETY -
6781 San Casa Dr. 145 W. Dearborn St.
(941) 474-7884 (941) 475-0636











YMCA campers having a fun summer


Despite the heat, basketball is a favorite
among the older campers at the Dotzler YMCA Brooks Ackerman, 13, takes his hoop-shooting
Outdoor Center in Charlotte Harbor. seriously.


SUN PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMS
Jacob White, 7, jumps into the pool, while fellow camper, Bradley Morey, 7, is still undecided.



I~1


Ryan Cox, 6, fills his water bottle at the Dotzler
YMCA Outdoor Center.





Alexander Crandall,
13, circles the tire
swing waiting his
turn, while Brittany
Beverlin, 13, enjoys
her ride courtesy
of fellow camper
Steven Clemente,
13.












Campers
also got to .
spend time
at the Char-
lotte Harbor
Center
pool and
playground.
Alexis
Dellapen, 9,
and Morgan
Meves, 9,
ride the
teeter-
totter, with
camp coun-
selor Adam
Rodriguez
hitching
along.


John Perez-Dunn, 12, dribbles during a game
of basketball Wednesday at the YMCA camp.
w E r -: ma m em m


Charlotte County YMCA camp counselor John Giamanco and his group take a break from the heat
to just sit and talk under the big white tent at the Dotzler YMCA Outdoor Center in Charlotte
Harbor, where kids from all over the county and from the North Port YMCA are bused in daily for
camp this summer.




YMCA camp
counselor
Evan Willis
with Lexis
Raissnider,
7, and Wyatt
Cains, 7, in
the pool at
the Charlotte
Harbor Center.


Counselor-in-training Cory Gouge takes a ride on the modern version of a merry-go-round with
the campers, at the Charlotte Harbor Center playground.

YMCA
campers line
up to board
the bus that
will take
them from
the Dotzler
YMCA
Outdoor
Center in
Charlotte
Harbor over
the bridge
to the YMCA
Bayfront
Center in
Punta Gorda
., for lunch.


Parker
Barnard,
10, Harlie
Fileman,
11, andlan
Zeides, 12,
take advan-
tage of the
outdoor
water
trough.


iOurTown Page 12 E/N/C www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


LOCAL/REGIONAL NEWS






INSIDE

Scott reaches
out-of-state for jobs


Lately, Governor Rick Scott has
added a new tactic in his drive
to add jobs: Poaching.
Page 3 -


Dow Jones dips
below 15,000


The Dow had its first three-day
stretch of losses this year and is
down 1.7 percent for the week.
Page 6 -


10 things to know


1. Surveillance
defended
The NSA's director tells Congress
that information collected through
the agency's programs disrupted
dozens of terrorist attacks.

2. Raid highlights
sectarian hatred
The killing of 60 Shiite fighters by
Sunni rebels comes at a time that
the West is worried about extrem-
ists' role in the war.

3. Why Turkey's
leader is proposing a
referendum
Erdogan is hoping to end almost
two weeks of protests, but
demonstrators continue to gather
in Istanbul.

4. Extraordinary
surgery for 10-year-old
Amid a debate over how organs are
allocated, an adult donor is found
for a Pennsylvania child's double-
lung transplant.

5. What's causing
alarm in Cuba
Rising sea levels could seriously
damage 122 Cuban towns or even
wipe them off the map, scientists say.

6. Accused captor
pleads not guilty
Ariel Castro, accused of holding
three women captive in Cleveland
for years, pleads not guilty to rape
and kidnapping. The defense hints
his plea could change if the death
penalty is ruled out.

7. How American
families are changing
Young fathers are doing more
around the house, from packing
school lunches to doing laundry,
research shows.

8. Driven to
distraction
A study finds that new tech-
nology that lets drivers use
voice commands to text is more
distracting than talking on the
phone but is being marketed as
a safer alternative.

9. A major player
abandons 3-D
ESPN says there are too few
viewers to justify continuing its 3-D
TV broadcasts.

10. Laughter's now a
sign of the apocalypse
"This is the End" is the funniest of
several contemporary flicks that
poke fun at disaster movies, says
AP Entertainment Writer Jake
Coyle.


heWire re
h t^re |www.sunnewspapers.net
THURSDAY JUNE 13, 2013




NSA legal quagmire


Security issues among obstacles to phone record lawsuits


ByMARKSHERMAN
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
WASHINGTON The govern-
ment's massive collection of
Americans' phone records is draw-
ing protests and lawsuits from civil
liberties groups, but major legal
obstacles stand in the way. Among
them are government claims that
national security secrets will be
revealed if the cases are allowed
to proceed, and Supreme Court
rulings that telephone records, as
opposed to conversations, are not
private to begin with.
Justices have written recently
about the complex issues of
privacy in the digital age, and the


Pa. girl gets adult lungs


Sarah Murnaghan, 10, beats medical rules to get second chance


By MARYCLAIRE DALE
and MALCOLM RITTER
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITERS

PHILADELPHIA- A
10-year-old girl whose efforts
to qualify for an organ dona-
tion sparked debate over how
organs are allocated was get-
ting a double-lung transplant
Wednesday after a match with
an adult donor was made.
Sarah Murnaghan, who
suffers from severe cystic
fibrosis, was receiving her new
lungs Wednesday at Children's
Hospital of Philadelphia, fam-
ily spokeswoman Maureen
Garrity said. Murnaghan's
relatives were "beyond ex-
cited" about the development
but were "keeping in mind
that someone had to lose a
family member and they're
very aware of that and very
appreciative," Garrity said.
No other details about the
donor are known, includ-
ing whether the lungs came
through the regular donor
system or through public
appeals.
Murnaghan's health was
deteriorating when a judge
intervened last week, giving
her a chance at the much
larger list of organs from adult
LUNGS14


AP FILE PHOTO
In this May 30 file photo provided by the Murnaghan family, Sarah Murnaghan, left, lies in her hospital bed next
to adopted sister Ella on the 100th day of her stay in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Murnaghen, whose
efforts to qualify for an organ donation drew public debate over how donated lungs are allocated received a
transplant Wednesday at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, her family said.


By CARLA K. JOHNSON
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
CHICAGO An
unusually massive
line of storms packing
hail, lightning and
tree-toppling winds
was rolling through
the Midwest on
Wednesday and could
affect more than one
in five Americans from
Iowa to Maryland.
Meteorologists were
even warning about


the possibility of a
weather event called
a derecho, which is
a storm of strong
straight-line winds
spanning at least 240
miles. The storms are
also likely to generate
tornadoes and cause
power outages that will
be followed by oppres-
sive heat, said Russell
Schneider, director of
the National Weather
Service's Storm
Prediction Center in


Norman, Okla.
The weather service
said two tornadoes
touched down in
northern Iowa late
Wednesday afternoon.
In Illinois, emergency
officials in Winnebago
County reported
several small torna-
does touched down
briefly. No damage was
reported.
"We're becoming
increasingly concerned
that a major severe


weather event will
unfold," Schneider
said. "The main thing
is for folks to monitor
conditions and have
a plan for what to do
if threatening weather
approaches."
For the first time
this year, the center
was using its highest
alert level for parts of
Iowa, Illinois, Indiana
and Ohio. In Chicago,
Wednesday night's
White Sox game


against the Toronto
Blue Jays was post-
poned in anticipation
of bad weather and
airlines canceled more
than 120 flights at
O'Hare International
Airport.
Northwestern
University can-
celed classes and
finals scheduled for
Wednesday night
on its Chicago and
STORMS 14


Voice-operated texting technology still risky


By JOAN LOWY
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
WASHINGTON -
Dashboard technol-
ogy that lets drivers
text and email with
voice commands -
marketed as a safer
alternative actu-
ally is more distracting
than simply talking on
a cellphone, a new AAA
study found.
Automakers have
been trying to excite
new-car buyers,


especially younger
ones, with dashboard
infotainment systems
that let drivers use
voice commands do
things like turning on
windshield wipers,
posting Facebook
messages or ordering
pizza. The pitch has
been that hands-free
devices are safer
because they enable
drivers to keep their
hands on the wheel
and their eyes on the
road.


But talking on a
hands-free phone isn't
significantly safer for
drivers than talking on
a hand-held phone,
and using hands-free
devices that translate
speech into text is
the most distracting
of all, researchers
reported in a study
released Wednesday. AP PHO]
Speech-to-text systems
that enable drivers to Russ Martin of triple A, is assisted by Joel Cooper, left,
send, scroll through, hooking the electroencephalographic (EEG)-configured
skull cap to the research vehicle in support of their new
TEXTING 14 study on distracted driving in Landover, Md., Tuesday.


high court could have the last
word on challenges filed by the
American Civil Liberties Union
and others.
The Obama administration
has said the collection of phone
records telephone numbers and
the time and length of calls is
necessary to protect Americans
from terrorism and that it does
not trample on their privacy. The
National Security Agency collects
millions of phone records from the
United States each day, but says
it only accesses them if there is a AP PHOTC
known connection to terrorism.
The ACLU this week filed the Director of the National Security Agency (NSA), Gen. Keith B. Alex-
ander, testifies about NSA surveillance before the Senate Appro-
NSA 14 priations Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday.


Storms roll into Midwest





-Page 2 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


NATIONAL NEWS


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


I NATION

Castro pleads
not guilty in Ohio
kidnap case
CLEVELAND (AP)-A
man accused of holding
three women captive
in his home for about a
decade pleaded not guilty
Wednesday, and the defense
hinted that it would like to
avoid trial with a plea agree-
ment if the death penalty
were ruled out.
Attorney CraigWeintraub
addressed the death
penalty issue after his client,
52-year-old Ariel Castro,
pleaded not guilty to hun-
dreds of charges including
rape and kidnapping.
Castro, with his hands
and ankles shackled, kept
his chin tucked on his
chest through the court
appearance. He didn't speak
or glance at his attorneys
standing by his side.
Weintraub said the
defense was working to
avoid an "unnecessary trial"
involving the death penalty.
Current charges Castro
faces involving an alleged
forced miscarriage don't
include death penalty speci-
fications, but the prosecutor
says that's under review.


80 homes burned
near Colo. Springs
COLORADO SPRINGS,
Colo. (AP) -Apair of
U.S. Defense Department
cargo planes was mobilized
Wednesday to help battle
wildfires in Colorado and
elsewhere in the West as
crews surveyed the damage
from a large blaze burning
near Colorado Springs
that already has destroyed
dozens of homes.
Authorities initially
estimated between 40 and
60 houses burned in Black
Forest, a heavily wooded
residential area northeast
of Colorado Springs. El
Paso County Sheriff Terry
Maketa said Wednesday he
believes around 80 have
been lost, and he wouldn't
be surprised if the figure
reaches or tops 100.

NJ town approves
boardwalk ban on
saggy pants
WILDWOOD, N.J. (AP)
-Wearing your pants
too low in one New Jersey
shore resort town is about
to get expensive.
Wildwood has passed a
law banning overly saggy
pants, providing for fines


SAVOR
SARASOTA
RESTAURANT WEEK


During Savor Sarasota Restaurant Week, you're
invited to sample multi-course meals featuring the
cuisine Sarasota County is famous for- all for
only $15 for lunch and $29 for dinner.

scrvorsarmsotacon for more



VISIT

SARASSTA
CO UNTY FLORIDAS GULFCOAST


of between $25 and $200
for violators.
The law was passed
Wednesday. It prohibits
pants that droop 3 inches
below the waist, exposing
skin or underwear.
Mayor Ernest Troiano
says many longtime visi-
tors to the popular shore
town have complained
about having to look at
people's rear ends "hang-
ing out" while walking the
boardwalk.

Oldest man in
history dies at 116
TOKYO Japan's
Jiroemon Kimura, recog-
nized by Guinness World
Records as the oldest man
in recorded history, has
died. He was 116.
Kimura died of natural
causes in the hospital in
his hometown of Kyotango,
western Japan, at
2:08 a.m Wednesday, the
local government said
in a faxed statement.
Hospitalized for pneumonia
on May 11, over the past
few days his response,
blood-sugar level and urine
production had declined,
according to the statement.
A date for his funeral is yet
to be set. Born on April
19,1897, when Queen
Victoria still reigned over
the British Empire, Kimura
became the oldest man in
recorded history on Dec.
28, 2012, at the age of 115
years and 253 days.


Top military leader disputes


diplomat on Benghazi


WASHINGTON (AP)
- The chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff
said Wednesday that
four members of Army
special forces in Tripoli
were never told to stand
down after last year's
deadly assault on the
U.S. diplomatic mis-
sion in Benghazi, Libya,
disputing a former top
diplomat's claim that the
unit might have helped
Americans under siege.
Army Gen. Martin
Dempsey said timing
and the need for the unit
to help with casualties
from Benghazi resulted


in orders for the special
forces to remain in Tripoli.
Four Americans, includ-
ing U.S. Ambassador
Chris Stevens, died in two
separate attacks several
hours apart on the night
of Sept. 11.
Gregory Hicks, a former
diplomat in Tripoli at the
time of the attack, told a
House panel last month
that the unit was told to
stand down.
Dempsey said that was
not the case.
"They weren't told to
stand down. A'stand
down' means don't do
anything," he said. "They


were told that the mission
they were asked to per-
form was not in Benghazi,
but was at Tripoli airport."
Republicans insist that
the Obama administra-
tion is guilty of a cover-up
of the events despite a
scathing independent
report that faulted the
State Department for
inadequate security at
the diplomatic mission.
GOP lawmakers also have
questioned why the mili-
tary couldn't get aircraft or
forces to Benghazi in time
to thwart the second attack
after the first incident that
killed Stevens.


WASHINGTON (AP)-
In a case that could end
with the Supreme Court
deciding how much free
speech to allow on its own
doorstep, a federal judge
has thrown out a law
barring processions and
expressive banners on the
Supreme Court grounds.
The ruling is so broad
that it could criminalize


preschool students parad-
ing on their first field trip
to the high court.
Harold Hodge Jr. was
arrested on the Supreme
Court plaza in January
2011 while wearing a
sign that criticized police
treatment of blacks and
Hispanics.
He claimed the law
violates the constitution,
and U.S. District Judge
Beryl Howell agreed. She
ruled Tuesday that the
statute ran afoul of the
First Amendment's free
speech protections.
The Rutherford Institute,
a civil liberties organiza-
tion which challenged the
law on Hodge's behalf,


said that ruling "throws
a lifeline to the First
Amendment at a time
when government officials
are doing their best to
censor, silence and restrict
free speech activities."
A spokesman for the
U.S. Attorney's office in
Washington said the
office was reviewing the
decision.
If the Obama adminis-
tration appeals, the case
could reach the Supreme
Court, historically the
guardian of free speech
rights. That could create
the ultimate not-in-my-
backyard case, except it
would be more about the
court's front yard.


Border security at issue

in immigration bill


629.3443
3443 Tamiami Tr., Suite D
Located in Professional Gardens


WASHINGTON (AP) -
Senate debate on far-reach-
ing immigration legislation
tumedWednesday to border
security, with Republicans
arguing that the bill needs
much stronger provisions
in that area and Democrats
suggesting that some in
the GOP are just out to kill
the legislation.
This discordant note
burst into view just a
day after senators voted
overwhelmingly to offi-
cially open debate on the
landmark bill. It has been
a top priority for President


Barack Obama, but the lat-
est dispute underscored the
political obstacles standing
in the way of enactment.
The measure sets out a
13-year journey to citizen-
ship for some 11 million
immigrants in the country
illegally, allowing the
process toward citizenship
to begin only after certain
border security goals have
been met. But critics say
those border "triggers"
aren't strong enough, and a
number of Republicans are
proposing amendments to
strengthen them.


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The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


STATE NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 3


STATE Urn found in
Intracoastal


Florida officials
encourage lionfish
harvests
TALLAHASSEE (AP)- A
temporary rule making it
easier to catch lionfish in
Florida waters will soon be
permanent.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission on
Wednesday adopted
changes that will waive the
recreational license require-
ment for divers harvesting
lionfish using pole spears,
handheld nets, Hawaiian
slings or other devices
specifically designed for
catching lionfish. The new
rule also excludes lionfish
from the commercial and
recreational bag limits,
allowing people to take as
many of the invasive fish as
they can.
The FWC put a tem-
porary rule in place last
August. The newly adopted
rule will take effect before
the temporary rule expires,
so there will be no lapse in
the expanded permissions.

Aussie swimmer
sets off from
Cuba for Florida
HAVANA (AP) -
Australian endurance
athlete Chloe McCardel
jumped feet-first into
calm, balmy waters off
Cuba on Wednesday and
began stroking steadily out
to sea in a bid to make a
record swim from Havana
to Florida without a
protective shark cage.
A smiling, upbeat
McCardel arrived in the
morning at a rocky jetty
in Havana's Hemingway
Marina in a pink 1950s
Chevy convertible.
McCardel expects to
take about 60 hours to get
to the Florida Keys, a little
more than 100 miles to the
northeast, braving sharks
and jellyfish along the way.

Missing Pa. mom
who was found in
Florida gets jail
PENSACOLA (AP)
-A mother who disap-
peared from her central
Pennsylvania home in
2002 and was later de-
clared legally dead before
resurfacing in Florida
has been sent to jail on a
probation violation.
The Pensacola News
Journal reports that Brenda
Heist, who's known in the
Santa Rosa County court
system as Kelsie Smith,
was sentenced Tuesday to
a year in jail.
She pleaded no contest
to failing to check in with
authorities in the Tampa
area after leaving the
Pensacola area following
her April release from jail.
She'd been on probation
for using someone else's
identification during a
traffic stop.

Arkansas man
drowns off
Panama City Beach
PANAMA CITY BEACH
(AP) An Arkansas man
drowned while swimming
in the Gulf of Mexico off
Panama City Beach.
Authorities say 68-year-
old Douglas Eugene
Cotnam of Mountain Pine
was pulled from the water
around 3 p.m. Tuesday.
Panama City Beach
Police Chief Drew
Whitman says double red
flags warning of hazard-
ous swimming conditions
were posted shortly after
Cotnam was pulled from
the water. It is a violation
of a Bay County ordinance
to enter the Gulf when
double red flags are flying.
The News Herald of


Panama City reports
Cotnam was taken to a
county pier where an
ambulance was waiting.
A man drowned nearby
on Saturday and rescuers
pulled about two dozen
people from the water be-
tween Friday and Monday.


waterway
NORTH MIAMI
BEACH (AP) Someone
riding a wave runner
found a brass um float-
ing in the Intracoastal
Waterway near North
Miami Beach.
The urn, filled with
ashes, was turned over
to Geronimo Mena
Jr. at Guiding Light
Cremations in Hollywood
after it floated to the
surface near the 163rd
Street Bridge last week
Mena said he believes
someone may have at-
tempted a burial at sea,
but the urn surfaced
because there was air
inside.

Man executed for
prison guard's
murder
STARKE (AP) -A
Florida man was
executedWednesday for
the murder of a guard
during a botched 1987
prison van ambush
intended to free an
imprisoned friend.
WilliamVan Poyck, 58,
was pronounced dead
at 7:24 p.m., 23 minutes
after the injection process
began at Florida State
Prison.
"Set me free," were his
final words.
Van Poyck's case
garnered international
attention because he
published three books
and maintained a blog
while on death row.
The family of the slain
guard, Fred Griffis, has
said in interviews that
they were frustrated that
news stories focused on
Van Poyck, the crime and
his writings and not
Griffis.


TALLAHASSEE -A
candidate in a sour
economy, who is now
governor in a still-recov-
ering Florida, Rick Scott
has made job creation his
signature political theme.
But lately, Scott has
added a new tactic in his
drive to add jobs:
Poaching.
Florida's Republican
chief executive has sent
letters to hundreds of
business leaders in five
states with Democratic
governors, urging them to
flee what he condemns as
higher taxes and costlier
regulatory environments
and bring their companies


k


7


to the Sunshine State.
Looking to make good on
his 2010 campaign promise
of creating 700,000 jobs in
Florida over seven years,
Scott's "one-way ticket"
campaign is targeting com-
panies in California, Illinois,
Maryland, Connecticut and
Minnesota for relocation
pitches.
"They constantly seem
like they want to raise taxes,
raise taxes, raise taxes,"
Scott said. "That's great for
us. They're making it more
difficult for their companies
to compete. We want them
all to come to Florida."
Companies in California,
led by Democratic Gov.


Jerry Brown, are among the
most diverse and potentially
lucrative in Scott's sights.
But a spokesman
for Brown's Office of
Business and Economic
Development shrugged off
the impact of the governor's
appeal.
Besides, BrookTaylor said
Scott's pitch was nothing
new. Texas Republican Gov.
Rick Perry attempted a
similar come-on earlier this
year with radio ads blasted
around the state.
"Gov. Scott is not the
first Rick to roll into town,"
Taylor said. "But when
you're the largest job-cre-
ating state in the nation,


it's no surprise people take
notice. Still, no governor
has poached his way to
success when it comes to
jobs."
Connecticut's
Commissioner of
Economic and Community
Development, Catherine
Smith, said that she was
forwarded Scott's letter
from a CEO in her state
who attached a comment
in his email.
"He said, 'pretty bla-
tant,'" Smith recalled. "But
I can't tell how much this is
about getting companies
to move to Florida or the
governor just getting atten-
tion in the media."


Attorneys grill potential jurors in Zimmerman trial


SANFORD (AP) -
Attorneys trying to
seat a jury in George
Zimmerman's trial for
shooting an unarmed
teen stopped question-
ing a man in his 20s
Wednesday after he gave
answers that indicated he
wouldn't be impartial.
The juror, known as
"R-39" because potential
panelists can be identi-
fied only by their num-
bers, said that "murder is
murder," even if it's self-
defense. Zimmerman, 29,
is pleading not guilty to
second-degree murder,
claiming he shot 17-year-
old Trayvon Martin last
year in self-defense.
The potential juror left
the Florida courtroom
without defense attorneys
asking questions.
Attorneys had inter-
viewed 18 potential jurors
by lunch breakWednesday
on the third day of selec-
tion. By the end of the day


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Tuesday, more than
70 jury candidates had
been dismissed.
The four potential jurors
questioned Wednesday
morning also included
a white woman in her
mid-20s who expressed
concerns about her safety
if picked; a black woman
in her 20s who lived
nearby the shooting but
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that was portrayed in the
media after the shooting
happened there.
In the jury selection
process established by
Circuit Judge Debra
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individually about pretrial
exposure and have not
been dismissed for cause


or hardships, they will
be brought together
as a group for broader
questioning by lawyers
on both sides. Thus far,
Zimmerman's attorneys
have been unable to find
potential jurors who
hadn't heard something
about the fatal shooting
of Martin.


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Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013 FROM PAGE ONE


WASHINGTON (AP) -
The government reported
Wednesday that the U.S.
budget deficit widened in
May by $139 billion. But
the annual deficit stayed
on track to finish below
$1 trillion for the first time
since 2008.
Steady economic
growth and higher tax
rates have boosted the
government's tax revenue.
At the same time, govern-
ment spending has barely
increased.
With the May increase,
the deficit through the
first eight months of
this budget year totaled
$626 billion, according to
the Treasury. That's down
$218 billion lower than the
same period last year.
The Congressional
Budget Office estimates
the deficit won't grow
much before the budget
year ends on Sept. 30.
It forecasts an annual
deficit of $642 billion. If
correct, that would be well
below last year's deficit of
$1.09 trillion and the low-
est in five years. It would



NSA

FROM PAGE 1

most significant lawsuit
against the phone record
collection program so
far. The suit demands
that the courts put an
end to the program
and order the admin-
istration to purge the
records it has collected.
Conservative lawyer
Larry Klayman also
has filed suit over the
program.
Before either suit
gets a full-blown court
hearing, the administra-
tion could try to employ
two powerful legal tools



LUNGS

FROM PAGE 1

donors.
"Some people would
look at this and say it's
evidence that if you get a
PR campaign, a congress-
man and federal judge
to pay attention, you're
going to have far greater
access to a transplant,
but I don't think that's
true," said ethicist
Arthur Caplan of the
NYU Langone Medical
Center in New York of
the Murnaghans' public
stance.
The Newtown Square,
Pa., family received word
about the donor lungs
Tuesday night, Garrity



STORMS
FROM PAGE 1

Evanston campuses, and
a symphony concert
at the city's downtown
Millennium Park was
also canceled. The Metra
commuter rail service
announced on its web-
site that it had halted all
inbound and outbound
trains from Chicago
because of the storm.
The storms were
expected to push into
northwest Indiana later.



TEXTING
FROM PAGE 1

or delete email and
text messages required
greater concentration
by drivers than other
potentially distracting
activities examined in
the study like talking on


the phone, talking to a
passenger, listening to a
book on tape or listening
to the radio.
The greater the
concentration required
to perform a task, the


AP FILE PHOTO
In this Monday, Aug. 8, 2011, file photo, a statue of former Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin
stands outside the Treasury Building in Washington.


still be the fifth-largest
deficit in U.S. history.
The federal deficit
represents the annual
difference between the
government's spending
and the tax revenues it
takes in. Each deficit con-
tributes to the national
debt, which recently


it has used in the past
to block challenges to
closely held surveillance
programs.
In February, the
Supreme Court shot
down an effort by U.S.
citizens to challenge the
expansion of a surveil-
lance law used to moni-
tor conversations of for-
eign spies and terrorist
suspects by finding that
the Americans could not
show that the govern-
ment would eavesdrop
on their conversations.
In legal terms, they did
not have standing to sue,
the justices said in a 5-4
decision.
The ACLU and
Klayman both say they

said. The surgery began
just after 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday and was
expected to take at least
six hours, she said.
Murnaghan's mother,
Janet, said in a Facebook
post that the family was
"overwhelmed with emo-
tions" and thanked all her
supporters.
"Today is the start of
Sarah's new beginning
and new life!" she wrote,
adding that the donor's
family "has experienced
a tremendous loss,
may God grant them
a peace that surpasses
understanding."
During double
lung transplants,
surgeons must open
up the patient's chest.
Complications can

The Northern Indiana
Public Service Co., the re-
gion's largest utility, said
it was increasing staff at
its customer call center
and scheduling extra
work crews to handle any
outages.
In Pennsylvania,
Pittsburgh was adding
public safety and public
works personnel and
repositioning some
equipment to prepare
for possible flooding or
downed trees and wires,
the Pittsburgh Post-
Gazette reported.
All told, the area

more likely a driver is to
develop what research-
ers call "tunnel vision"
or "inattention blind-
ness." Drivers will stop
scanning the roadway
or ignore their side
and rearview mirrors.
Instead, they look
straight ahead, but fail
to see what's in front of
them, like red lights and
pedestrians.
"People aren't seeing
what they need to see to
drive. That's the scariest
part to me," said Peter
Kissinger, president
and CEO of the AAA


topped $16 trillion. At
the same time, a smaller
deficit has taken pressure
off of negotiations to raise
the federal borrowing
limit.
So far this budget
year, revenue has risen
15 percent to $1.8 trillion.
The government is taking


are or were customers
of Verizon, which was
identified last week as
a phone company the
government had or-
dered to turn over daily
records of calls made
by all its customers. In
so doing, they said it is
a simple matter of fact
that records of their calls
have been seized by the
government.
"We meet even the
standard the govern-
ment has been foisting
upon the courts for the
past decade," said the
ACLU's Jameel Jaffer.
But American
University law professor
Steven Vladeck said the
challengers might face

include rejection of the
new lung and infection.
Murnaghan's family
and the family of another
cystic fibrosis patient at
the same hospital chal-
lenged existing transplant
policy that made children
under 12 wait for pedi-
atric lungs to become
available or be offered
lungs donated by adults
only after adolescents
and adults on the waiting
list had been considered.
They said pediatric lungs
are rarely donated.
On June 5, federal
Judge Michael Baylson in
Philadelphia ruled that
Murnaghan and 11-year-
old Javier Acosta of New
York City should be
eligible for adult lungs.
The Organ

the weather service
considers to be under
heightened risk of dan-
gerous weather includes
74.7 million people in
19 states.
Tornadoes and a
derecho can happen
at the same time, but
at any given place
Wednesday the straight-
line winds are probably
more likely. Straight-line
winds lack the rotation
that twisters have, but
they can still cause
considerable damage
as they blow down trees
and other objects.

Foundation for Traffic
Safety, the group's safety
research arm. "Police
accident investigative
reports are filled with
comments like the
'looked, but did not see.'
That's what drivers tell
them. We used to think
they were lying, but now
we know that's actually
true."
There are about
9 million cars and trucks
on the road with info-
tainment systems, and
that will jump to about
62 million vehicles by
2018, AAA spokeswoman


in more money because
of higher rates that went
into effect on Jan. 1.
Modest economic growth
has also boosted tax
revenue.
And this month the
government is expect-
ing large dividend
payments from Fannie


a different problem.
"They're not suing
Verizon. They're suing
the government for
something a third party
did. And so the issue is
not their ability to prove
that their communica-
tions were involved. It's
how they can object to a
third party's cooperation
with the government
in a suit against the
government, rather than
the third party," Vladeck
said.
Another issue the
administration could
try to use to derail the
suits is the jeopardy to
national security that
would result from allow-
ing them to proceed, the

Procurement and
Transplantation Network
says 33 children under
age 11 are on the waiting
list for a lung transplant.
The network added
Murnaghan to the
adult waiting list after
Baylson's ruling. Her
transplant came just two
days before a hearing
was scheduled on the
family's request for a
broader injunction.
Critics warned there
could be a downside to
having judges intervene
in the organ transplant
system's established proce-
dures. Lung transplants are
difficult procedures and
some say child patients
tend to have more trouble
with them than adults.
Cystic fibrosis causes

"Be prepared to move
away from windows,"
Schneider said. Listen for
weather warnings and
go into a basement, if
possible, and get un-
derneath a study object
like a table, he said, if
a tornado warning is
issued. "You want to
know where your family's
at so everyone can get to
safety successfully."
Last year, a derecho
caused at least $1 billion
in damage from Chicago
to Washington, killing
13 people and leaving
more than 4 million

Yolanda Cade said, citing
automotive industry
research. At the same
time, drivers tell the AAA
they believe phones and
other devices are safe to
use behind the wheel if
they are hands-free, she
said.
"We believe there is
a public safety crisis
looming," Cade said.
"We hope this study will
change some widely
held misconceptions by
motorists."
AAA officials who
briefed automakers,
safety advocates and the


Mae and Freddie Mac,
which will keep the
deficit from growing.
Fannie is expected to pay
$59.4 billion; Freddie is
expected pay $7 billion.
The mortgage giants are
profitable again and are
paying dividends to the
government in return for
the loans they received
during the financial crisis.
While revenue has in-
creased greatly, spending
has only risen 0.8 percent
this year to $2.43 billion.
Military spending has
dropped 4.3 percent, re-
flecting the winding down
of the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan. Spending on
unemployment benefits,
which had swelled as mil-
lions lost their jobs during
the Great Recession, fell
25.3 percent compared
with the same period a
year ago.
Across-the-board
government spend-
ing cuts that began on
March 1 are expected to
lower spending further in
the remaining months of
this budget year.


so-called state secrets
doctrine.
Seven years ago,
allegations that phone
companies were allow-
ing the government to
siphon huge quanti-
ties of customer data
without warrants led
to dozens of lawsuits
against the companies
and the government. In
the lone surviving case
against the govern-
ment, James Clapper,
director of national
intelligence, said that
the government risks
"exceptionally grave
damage to the national
security of the United
States" if forced to fight
the lawsuit.

a sticky mucus to build
up in the lungs, clogging
them and leading to life-
threatening infections. It
also clogs the pancreas so
the body can't properly
digest food. The disease
occurs when someone
inherits a flawed gene
from each parent. A few
decades ago, children
with the disease seldom
survived elementary
school. Today nearly half
reach age 18, but few live
past 40.
A lung transplant
doesn't cure cystic
fibrosis, but over half the
people with the disease
who get lung transplants
survive at least five years,
according to the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation
website.

people without power,
according to the weather
service. Winds reached
nearly 100 mph in some
places and in addition to
the 13 people who died
from downed trees, an
additional 34 people died
from the heat wave that
followed in areas without
power.
Derechoes, with winds
of at least 58 mph, occur
about once a year in
the Midwest. Rarer than
tornadoes but with
weaker winds, derechoes
produce damage over a
much wider area.

National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration
on the study's findings
said they want to limit
in-vehicle, voice-driven
technologies to "core
driving tasks."
The Alliance
of Automobile
Manufacturers was
skeptical. "We are
extremely concerned that
it could send a mislead-


ing message, since it
suggests that hand-held
and hands-free devices
are equally risky," the
association said in a
statement.


US budget deficit widens $139B in May


company wants its staff
to look"nice and proper,"
but can't stop men
from wearing "women's
clothes" if that's what they
want because it would be
discrimination.
He didn't rule out a
change of the company's
uniform policy.


ALMANAC

Today is Thursday, June 13,
the 164th day of 2013. There are
201 days left in the year.
Today in history
On June 13,1983, the U.S.
space probe Pioneer 10, launched
in 1972, became the first space-
craft to leave the solar system as it
crossed the orbit of Neptune.
On this date
In 1842, Queen Victoria became
the first British monarch to ride
on a train, traveling from Slough
Railway Station to Paddington in
25 minutes.
In 1927, aviation hero Charles
Lindbergh was honored with a
ticker-tape parade in New York
City.
In 1935, James Braddock
claimed the title of world heavy-
weight boxing champion from
Max Baer in a 15-round fight in
Long Island City, N.Y.
In 1942, the first of two four-
man Nazi sabotage teams arrived
in the United States during World
War II. (The eight were arrested
after one of them went to U.S.
authorities; six of the saboteurs
were executed.)
In 1944, Germany began
launching flying-bomb attacks
against Britain during World
War II.
In 1966, the Supreme Court
ruled in Miranda v. Arizona that
criminal suspects had to be
informed of their constitutional
right to consult with an attorney
and to remain silent.
In 1971,The New York Times
began publishing excerpts of the
Pentagon Papers, a secret study of
America's involvement in Vietnam
from 1945 to 1967 that had been
leaked to the paper by military
analyst Daniel Ellsberg.
In 1993, Canada's Progressive
Conservative Party chose Defense
Minister Kim Campbell to succeed
Brian Mulroney as prime minister;
she was the first woman to hold
the post.
In 1996, the 81-day-old
Freemen standoff ended as 16
remaining members of the anti-
government group surrendered
to the FBI and left their Montana
ranch.
Today's birthdays
Actor Bob McGrath is 81.
Artist Christo is 78. Magician
Siegfried (Siegfried & Roy) is
74. Singer Bobby Freeman is
73. Actor Malcolm McDowell is
70. U.N. Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon is 69. Actor Richard
Thomas is 62. Actor Jonathan
Hogan is 62. Comedian Tim
Allen is 60. Actress Ally Sheedy
is 51. TV anchor Hannah Storm
is 51. Rock musician Paul
deLisle (Smash Mouth) is 50.
Singer David Gray is 45. Actor
Jamie Walters is 44. Country
singer Susan Haynes is 41.
Actor Ethan Embry is 35. Actor
Chris Evans is 32. Actress Kat
Dennings is 27. Actresses Mary-
Kate Olsen and Ashley Olsen
are 27.




Swedish train
drivers wear
skirts to work

STOCKHOLM (AP)
Commuters on a
train line in northern
Stockholm were met with
an unusual sight this
week male train drivers
and conductors wearing
skirts to work
Train driver Martin
Akersten says he and
more than a dozen others
at the Roslagsbanan line
have started wearing
skirts in the summer
as a protest against the
train company's uniform
policy, which doesn't
allow shorts.
The 30-year-old
Akersten said Sunday the
response from customers
has been only positive.
Arriva, the company
that runs the train line,
hasn't stopped the
drivers. Arriva spokesman
Tomas Hedenius says the


Page 4 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


FROM PAGE ONE





The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


NATIONAL/WORLD NEWS


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 5


WORLD I NATION


Greece in deep
crisis over state
broadcaster
ATHENS, Greece
(AP) Greece's fragile
coalition government is
in a deep crisis, with the
dominant conservatives
rejecting pleas from their
minority partners to save
state ERT broadcaster
from closure.
Prime Minister Antonis
Samaras on Wednesday
ruled out any climb-down
from his decision to
immediately close ERT,
axing 2,600 jobs. He said
in a speech that "the sin-
ful ERT is done with."
Earlier, his two center-
left minority partners -
without whom Samaras
has no parliamentary
majority demanded
that ERT be turned on
again, a day after it was
taken off the air.

Mandela
'responding better'
to treatment
JOHANNESBURG After
days of somber news, as
South Africa's former lead-
er Nelson Mandela clung
to life in intensive care,
a sliver of hope emerged
Wednesday:
He was
responding
better to
treatment
for a lung




Earlier in the day,
Zuma's spokesman,
Mac Maharaj, had told
a radio interviewer that
Mandela's health was
unchanged, and that
he remained in serious
but stable condition in a
Pretoria hospital.

In village, statue
of dog seeks to
inspire hope
(Yomiuri Shimbun) -
Women look at an iron-
wire statue made in
the likeness of a famous
bronze statue "Chuken
Hachiko" (faithful dog
Hachiko) outside JR
Shibuya Station in Tokyo
- at a nursing facil-
ity in litate, Fukushima
Prefecture, Japan.
Most of the village's
residents were forced to
evacuate after the out-
break of the crisis at the
Fukushima nuclear power
plant in March 2011.
The Shibuya Koen-
dori shopping district
association donated the
1.6-meter-tall statue
(about 5 feet) to enshrine
the hope that the dog will
patiently wait for residents
to return to the village, just
like Hachiko waited for his
master to return every day,
even after his death.

Iran nuke policy
'unchangeable,' no
matter who wins
TEHRAN, Iran (AP)
- Just hours after Iran's
presidential candidates
bickered over nuclear
policies during a televised
debate, the country's
foreign minister stepped
in with a comment of his
own: Nothing will change
regardless of the winner.
It's a political fact of
life in Iran, where the
president is squarely
on the world stage but
holds little power to
sway key policies such
as Tehran's nuclear
development or rela-
tions with the West. Yet
as the six candidates -
including a current and
former nuclear negotia-
tor wrapped up their
campaigns Wednesday,


perhaps no issues define
their immediate chal-
lenges more than the
nuclear standoff with
Washington and its allies
and the related economic
sanctions strangling Iran's
economy.


Orwell's '1984'
soars on Amazon
after NSA leak

(Bloomberg News) -
Sales of George Orwell's
novel "1984," featuring
a futuristic totalitar-
ian state, jumped on
Amazon.com's website
following reports of a
classified program that
lets the U.S. government
collect personal data.
One edition of the
book, originally published
in 1949, moved to the
No. 3 spot on Amazon's
Movers & Shakers list,
which tracks dramatic
increases in sales volume
over a 24-hour period.
That made it the 100th-
best-selling book on
the site late Tuesday, an
increase from its previous
rank of 11,855.

Activists target
Amazon.com over
foie gras sales
(Seattle Times) -
Mercy for Animals, an
activist group known for
its undercover videos of
alleged animal abuse by
suppliers to some of the
world's largest retail-
ers, now is going after
Amazon.com Inc.
The nonprofit wants
Seattle-based Amazon to
stop selling foie gras and
has created a website,
AmazonCruelty.com, to
generate public outrage
via social media.
The site features a
three-minute video,
recorded with a handheld
camera by a Mercy for
Animals investigator,
that claims to show duck
"torture" by New York
producer Hudson Valley
Foie Gras, whose prod-
ucts are sold on Amazon.

IBM said to start
job cuts
NEWYORK
(Bloomberg) IBM
Corp. began cutting U.S.
jobs Wednesday as part of
a plan announced in April
to spend $1 billion glob-
ally to trim its workforce,
according to a person
familiar with the move.
The reduction targets
employees with a range of
seniority, from rank-and-
file workers to executives,
said the person, who
asked not to be named
because the information
is private. Some U.S. em-
ployees began to receive
notifications of the cuts
Tuesday night, according
to Lee Conrad, a coordi-
nator for AllianceIBM, an
employee group.
IBM, the world's largest
provider of computer
services, announced the
job-cutting effort after
releasing disappointing
first-quarter results in
April.

Jennifer Lopez:
'We're realizing
our power'
WASHINGTON (AP)
- Jennifer Lopez says
Latinos in the United
States are starting to
realize their power in
politics and media, and
that makes the timing
good for her latest un-
dertaking:
Lobbying
for greater
S diversity in
TV pro-
gramming.
The
enter-
LOPEZ trainer spoke
Wednesday
at the Cable Show,
a communications
convention, ahead of
new programming set
to launch July 18 on
the NUVOtv network.
Lopez serves as chief


creative officer of the
English-language Latino
channel.
"It's an extension of
who I am as an artist,"
she said about her new
role in an interview with
the Associated Press.


NSA leaker:'Not avoiding justice'


HONG KONG (AP)
- The former CIA
employee who leaked
top-secret information
about U.S. surveillance
programs said in a new
interview in Hong Kong
on Wednesday that he
is not attempting to
hide from justice here
but hopes to use the
city as a base to reveal
wrongdoing.
Edward Snowden
dropped out of sight after
checking out of a Hong
Kong hotel on Monday.


The South China
Morning Post newspaper

and inter-
view him on
Wednesday.
It provided
brief ex-
cerpts from
the inter-
view on its
SNOWDEN website.
It said
Snowden, who has
been both praised and
condemned for releasing
documents about U.S.


telephone and Internet
surveillance programs,
said he was "neither a
traitor nor hero. I'm an
American."
Asked about his choice
of Hong Kong to leak the
information, Snowden
said, "People who think
I made a mistake in
picking Hong Kong as a
location misunderstand
my intentions. I am not
here to hide from justice;
I am here to reveal
criminality."
The newspaper quoted


him as saying that he had
several opportunities to
flee from Hong Kong,
but that he "would rather
stay and fight the United
States government in the
courts, because I have
faith in Hong Kong's rule
of law."
"My intention is to ask
the courts and people of
Hong Kong to decide my
fate," he said.
Snowden said he plans
to stay in the city until
he is "asked to leave," the
newspaper said.


** The Annual Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of March 23, 2013; 0.60% APY on balances of $0.00 $9,999.99; 0.90% APY on balances of $10,000.00 -
$1,000,000.00. The APY is guaranteed for 91 days from the date the account is opened. After 91 days, the interest rate and APY will be variable, established by
BankUnited, N.A. (BankUnited) in its sole discretion and may change at any time. Minimum to open the account is $100.Account must be opened with new money
not already on deposit at BankUnited. Maximum balance per account is $1,000,000.00. BankUnited reserves the rightto limit the number of accounts opened.A
$15 monthly maintenance fee will be assessed if the daily balance falls below $2,500.00. A $15 early closeout fee will be assessed if the account is closed within
six months of opening date. Fees may reduce earnings. Transaction limitations apply. Additional fees, terms and conditions apply. Please refer to our Depositor's
Agreement and applicable Schedule of Fees for additional information. BankUnited reserves the right to cancel or modify this offer at any time without notice.
Offer is for consumer accounts only. Please contact a BankUnited representative for additional details.
BankUnited, N.A.
Member FDIC .R


Diltard's


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Page 6 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


BUSINESS NEWS/STOCKS


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


Dow dips below 15,000


NEWYORK (AP) -
Video-game shops,
restaurants and retailers
led the stock market lower
Wednesday.
Without any good news
to drive the market up,
investors grappled with
the question hanging over
financial markets: When
will the Federal Reserve
and other central banks
pull back their economic
stimulus programs?
Markets have turned tur-
bulent in recent weeks as
traders start preparing for
a time when the Fed and
central banks in Europe
and Japan aren't pumping
as much money into the
financial system.
"There's nothing con-
crete out there to turn us
around today," Russell
Croft, co-portfolio manager
at the Croft Value Fund in
Baltimore. "So naturally
enough, people are back to


thinking about the Fed."
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 126.79 points,
or 0.8 percent, to close at
14,995.23. The Dow had
its first three-day stretch
of losses this year and is
down 1.7 percent for the
week.
A rout in global markets
helped pull the Dow down
116 points Tuesday. The
selling started after the
Bank of Japan decided
not to make any new
attempt to spur growth in
the world's third-largest
economy.
In other trading
Wednesday, the Standard &
Poor's 500 index fell
13.61 points, or 0.8 percent,
to 1,612.52. All 10 indus-
try groups in the index
dropped, led by consumer-
discretionary and utility
companies.
Two of the top-per-
forming stocks in the S&P


500 this year, Netflix and
BestBuy, led consumer-
discretionary companies
down. Netflix lost $6.82,
or 3 percent, to $207.64.
BestBuy dropped $1.01,
or 4 percent, to $26.88.
GameStop fell $1.13, or
3 percent, to $36.69.
The S&P 500, the stock-
market benchmark for
most investment funds,
has lost 3.4 percent since
reaching a record high on
May 21. The next day, Fed
chairman Ben Bernanke
said the central bank could
decide to scale down its
bond-buying program in
the coming months if the
economy looks strong
enough.
Since then, the discus-
sion among investors has
centered on what will
happen when the Fed
shifts course. "'Tapering' is
definitely the word of the
month," Croft said.


I BUSINESS BRIEFS


Inflation at 53-year
low belies U.S.
demand strength

WASHINGTON
(Bloomberg) Some Fed
policymakers are citing
the lowest inflation rate
in at least five decades
as an alarm bell for the
economy. Economists at
UBS Securities say the
figure isn't as troubling as
it appears.
Consumer prices
climbed 1.1 percent in the
12 months through April,
according to a measure
watched by the Fed that
excludes food and fuel
- matching the smallest
increase since records
began in 1960. That's down
from 1.9 percent in the
year ended April 2012.
Most of the decline
is in industries such as
apparel and health care,
where consumer demand


is growing, said Sam
Coffin, an economist at
UBS Securities. Among the
reasons for slowing infla-
tion are improved efficiency
and a stronger dollar, which
puts downward pressure on
prices of imported goods
such as cars and clothing.
"If anything, the price
softening is helping to
support demand," and
the dollar is set to rise
further, said Coffin, who is
based in Stamford, Conn.
"Households are getting a
little bit more purchasing
power out of their income
growth."


Pandora buys
station to get radio
content rates

LOS ANGELES
(Bloomberg) Pandora
Media Inc., the biggest
online radio service, has
bought a station in South


Dakota to gain the same
access to music and rates as
terrestrial competitors.
Buying KXMZ-FM
in Rapid City qualifies
Pandora for the same rights
and prices enjoyed by
competitors such as Clear
Channel Communications
Inc., CBS Corp. and
Cumulus Media Inc.,
Pandora's assistant gen-
eral counsel, Christopher
Harrison, said in a letter
posted on TheHill.com., a
Washington news website.
The acquisition may lead to
cost savings of less than 1
percent of revenue, Pandora
said Tuesday in a regulatory
filing. Terms of the deal
weren't disclosed.
Pandora pays agencies
such as the American
Society of Composers,
Authors and Publishers and
Broadcast Music Inc., which
represent artists and rights
holders, to use songs for its
service.


FROM CONSUMER REPORTS


In its first-ever lab analysis of
ground turkey products, Consumer
Reports found potential disease-
causing organisms in most of the
samples it tested, more than half of
which proved resistant to more than
three antibiotic drug classes.
Consumer Reports tested
257 samples purchased from stores
nationwide. Its findings strongly sug-
gest that there is a direct relationship
between the routine use of antibiotics
in animal production and increased
antibiotic resistance in bacteria on
ground turkey- in other words, that
antibiotics fed to turkeys are creating
resistance to related antibiotics used in
human medicine.


Reports' findings

At stores nationwide, Consumer
Reports purchased samples of raw
ground turkey meat and patties, in-
cluding products from major retailers
and store brands, and tested them for
the presence of five bacteria: entero-
coccus, E. coli, staphylococcus aureus,
salmonella and campylobacter. Below
are some key findings:
Overall, 90 percent of the samples
had one or more of the five bacteria for
which they were tested.
Bacteria on ground turkey prod-
ucts labeled "no antibiotics," "organic"
or "raised without antibiotics" were
resistant to fewer antibiotics overall
than bacteria found on conventional
products.
Bacteria related to fecal contami-
nation were found on the majority of
samples. Sixty-nine percent of ground
turkey samples harbored enterococ-
cus, and 60 percent E. coli.
Three ground turkey samples
were contaminated with methicillin-
resistant staphylococcus aureus
(MRSA).
Salmonella, which is one of the
top causes of foodbome illness, was
found in 12 of the samples tested
(5 percent) and two-thirds of them
were multidrug resistant; government
studies typically find higher rates of
salmonella, at around 12 percent.
Processing plants are permitted by the
government to have product contami-
nation rates as high as 49.9 percent.


Consumer


Reports


Consumer Reports also found
bacteria had higher rates of resistance
to classes of antibiotics approved
by the FDA to promote growth and
prevent disease in healthy turkeys
compared to classes of drugs not
approved for those uses.


What consumers can do

Common slip-ups while handling
or cooking can put consumers at
risk of illness. Although the bacteria
Consumer Reports found are killed by
thorough cooking, some can produce
toxins that may not be destroyed
by heat, so take the following
precautions:
Choose meaningful labels while
shopping for turkey:
Buy turkey labeled "organic" or "no
antibiotics," especially if it also has a
"USDA ProcessVerified" label, which
means that the agency has confirmed
that the producer is doing what it says.
Consider other labels, such as "ani-
mal welfare approved" and "certified
humane," which mean that antibiotics
were restricted to sick animals only.
Be aware that "natural" meat is
simply minimally processed, with no
artificial ingredients or added color.
It can come from an animal that ate
antibiotics daily.
Tips for safer preparation and
handling:
Buy meat just before checking out,
and place it in a plastic bag to prevent
leaks.
If cooking meat within a few
days, store it at 40 degrees or below.
Otherwise, freeze it. (Note that freezing
may not kill bacteria.)
When cooking ground turkey, use a
meat thermometer to ensure it reaches
the proper internal temperature of
at least 165 degrees to kill potentially
harmful bacteria.
Wash hands and all surfaces after
handling ground turkey.
Don't return cooked meat to the
plate that held it raw.
Refrigerate or freeze any leftovers
within two hours of cooking.


MutualFunds
3-yr
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EqGrow b 28.74 -.27 +14.5
Retlnc b 8.77 -.02 +5.5
Alger Group
SmCapGrB m 7.63 -.07 +13.6
Alliance Bernstein
SmCpGroA m 42.88 -.42 +20.9
AllianzGI
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Alpine
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American Beacon
LgCplls 25.44 -.16 +16.4
American Cent
CapVallv 7.93 -.06 +15.9
Eqlnclnv 8.61 -.07 +13.5
Growthlnv 29.60 -.26 +14.0
HiYdMu 9.38 -.02 +7.2
InTTxFBlnv 11.48 -.02 +4.4
Ultralnv 28.77 -.23 +15.1
American Funds
AMCAPA m 24.70 -.21 +15.3
BalA x 22.21 -.26 +13.7
BondA m 12.62 -.04 +4.6
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FnlnvA x 45.80 -.54 +15.1
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MutualA m 31.74 -.23 +14.6
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NewPerspA m 34.13 -.31 +13.6
NwWrldA m 54.41 -.36 +7.7
SmCpWIdA m 44.54 -.37 +13.2
TaxEBdAmA m 12.87 -.02 +5.8
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Artisan
Intl d 26.60 -.08 +15.4
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MdCpVal 24.28 -.21 +16.6
MidCap 41.96 -.50 +18.5
BBH
TaxEffEq d 19.58 -.09 +17.5
Baron
Asset b 55.71 -.46 +14.4
Growth b 61.31 -.47 +16.7
Partners b 26.76 -.35 +16.5
Berkshire
Focus d 14.84 -.17 +16.4
Bernstein
DiversMui 14.56 -.01 +3.3
BlackRock
Engy&ResA m 13.28 -.09 +1.0
EqDivA m 21.87 -.15 +15.0
EqDivl 21.93 -.15 +15.4
GlobAIcA m 20.75 -.07 +8.0
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GlobAlcl 20.86 -.08 +8.3
HiYdBdls 8.09 ... +11.8
HiYdSvc b 8.09 -.01 +11.5
Bruce
Bruce 424.97 -1.82 +14.1
CGM
Focus 34.25 -.30 +8.3


Clipper
Clipper 80.53 -.79 +15.6
Cohen & Steers
Realty 66.81 -.92 +13.3
Columbia
AcornlntZ 43.11 -.17 +12.3
AcornZ 33.10 -.34 +15.0
DivlncZ 16.95 -.13 +16.2
IntlVIB m 13.11 -.08 +5.9
Mar21CB m 14.04 -.16 +8.8
MarGrlA m 25.45 -.35 +14.9
DFA
1YrFixlnI 10.32 ... .8
2YrGIbFII 10.04 ... +1.0
5YrGIbFII 11.05 ... +3.6
EmMkCrEql 18.71 -.09 +4.5
EmMktVall 27.12 -.16 +1.8
IntSmCapl 16.90 -.08 +11.3
RelEstScl 27.07 -.38 +14.8
USCorEqll 14.16 -.12 +16.7
USCorEq21 14.03 -.11 +16.8
USLgCo 12.70 -.11 +16.2
USLgVall 26.84 -.22 +17.6
USSmVall 30.72 -.26 +18.0
USSmalll 26.28 -.20 +18.0
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.71 +.02 +5.3
EqDivB m 38.46 -.30 +11.8
GIbOA m 41.51 -.22 +14.2
GIbOB m 36.84 -.20 +13.3
GIbOC m 37.10 -.19 +13.4
GIbOS d 42.85 -.22 +14.5
GrlncS 20.90 -.20 +14.9
HlthCareS d 31.43 -.30 +19.8
LAEqS d 29.39 -.43 -1.2
LC2020S 14.30 -.06 +9.6
StrHYldTxFS 12.71 -.04 +6.5
Davis
NYVentA m 40.27 -.30 +12.9
NYVentY 40.74 -.31 +13.1
Delaware Invest
AmerGovtA m 8.45 -.02 +5.1
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEql 11.00 -.04 +9.6
IntlSCol 16.60 -.05 +11.2
IntlValul 16.91 -.15 +7.5
Dodge & Cox
Bal 87.25 -.31 +13.7
Income 13.71 -.02 +5.4
IntlStk 37.02 -.10 +10.3
Stock 141.89 -.64 +16.4
DoubleLine
TotRetBdN b 11.23 ... +9.6
Dreyfus
Apprecia 47.58 -.31 +15.2
MidCapldx 32.90 -.31 +16.2
MuniBd 11.64 -.02 +4.9
NYTaxEBd 15.07 -.03 +4.5
ShTrmlncD 10.68 ... +2.6
SmCoVal 32.54 -.27 +15.5
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m 12.05 -.07 +13.6
TMSmCaB m 16.86 -.14 +11.1
FMI
CommStk 26.68 -.22 +14.2
LgCap 19.77 -.12 +15.2
FPA
Capital d 44.98 -.41 +13.6
Cres d 31.18 -.12 +12.2
Newlnc d 10.56 ... +2.1
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d 36.81 -.27 +9.0
Federated
HilncBdA m 7.76 +.01 +10.8
IntSmMCoA m 41.84 -.26 +12.4
KaufmanA m 5.69 -.07 +11.4
MDTMdCpGrStB m3554-29 +115
StrVall 5.50 -.04 +16.6
ToRetls 11.12 -.02 +4.9


Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.26
AstMgr50 17.17
Bal 21.56
BIChGrow 55.74
Canada d 52.56
CapApr 32.98
Caplnc d 9.59
Contra 85.65
DivGrow 33.51
Divrlntl d 32.05
EmergAsia d 28.25
EmgMkt d 22.34
Eqlnc 53.50
Eqlnc I 22.15
FF2015 12.17
FF2035 12.38
FF2040 8.70
Fidelity 39.99
FltRtHiln d 9.95
FocStk 16.97
FourlnOne 32.01
Free2000 12.38
Free2010 14.61
Free2020 14.84
Free2025 12.46
Free2030 15.06
GNMA 11.44
GrowCo 105.20
Growlnc 24.60
Hilnc d 9.31
Indepndnc 29.45
IntMunilnc d 10.46
IntRelEst d 9.82
IntlDisc d 35.46
InvGrdBd 7.81
LatinAmd 39.94
LevCoSt d 37.17
LowPriStk d 45.47
Magellan 82.00
MeCpSto 13.70
MidCap d 33.42
Munilnc d 13.21
NewMille 34.78
NewMktln d 16.30
OTC 70.40
Overseas d 35.06
Puritan 20.68
ShTmBond 8.57
SmCapDisc d 27.24
Stratlnc 11.11
TaxFrB d 11.40
TotalBd 10.70
TxMgdStk 16.00
USBdldx 11.59
USBdldxlnv 11.59
Value 88.86
ValueDis 18.86
Fidelity Advisor
EqGrowB m 60.87
IntBondA m 11.51
IntBondB m 11.50
IntlCapAB m 11.37
LrgCapA m 24.31
LrgCapBm 22.78
NewlnsA m 25.33
Newlnsl 25.66
StratlncA m 12.39
Fidelity Select
Biotech d 142.09
Electron d 52.21
Energy d 55.99
Gold d 22.71
Leisure d 114.98
Materials d 74.82
MedDeliv d 65.07
MedEqSys d 32.45
NatGas d 33.28
NatRes d 34.23
Wireless d 8.82
Fidelity Spartan
5001dxAdvtg 57.36
5001dxlnstl 57.36
5001dxlnv 57.35


-.03 +6.0
-.08 +9.5
-.15 +11.5
-.57 +16.1
-.60 +3.5
-.46 +15.1
-.01 +10.8
-.75 +15.1
-.27 +14.0
-.09 +10.7
-.18 +7.5
-.11 +3.3
-.35 +14.0
-.16 +13.7
-.05 +8.7
-.06 +11.2
-.05 +11.2
-.40 +14.2
... +5.7
-.21 +17.6
-.20 +13.2
-.03 +5.3
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-.07 +9.5
-.06 +10.4
-.08 +10.6
-.03 +3.6
-1.17 +17.4
-.16 +18.0
... +10.9
-.31 +14.1
-.01 +4.2
-.05 +14.3
-.14 +11.3
-.02 +5.4
-.40 -1.4
-.30 +17.1
-.26 +17.2
-.69 +10.5
-.09 +18.1
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-.03 +5.4
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-.15 +11.5
-.01 +2.0
-.20 +21.1
... +7.7
-.03 +5.5
-.03 +5.6
-.13 +14.1
-.03 NA
-.03 +4.1
-.67 +16.4
-.14 +15.3
-.63 +14.9
-.03 +4.3
-.02 +3.5
-.04 +12.1
-.18 +17.9
-.17 +17.0
-.23 +14.4
-.23 +14.7
-.01 +7.3
-3.26 +33.8
-.78 +9.7
-.43 +12.7
+.14 -17.8
-.82 +17.2
-.52 +15.7
-.13 +16.2
-.22 +14.5
-.29 +6.8
-.22 +9.1
-.08 +12.7
-.47 +16.3
-.47 NA
-.47 +16.3


ExtMktldAg d 45.56 -.41 +16.8
IntllcdAdg d 36.25 -.11 +10.6
TotMktldAg d 46.99 -.39 +16.4
First Eagle
GIbA m 51.09 -.19 +11.3
OverseasA m 22.61 -.03 +9.4
First Investors
GlobalA m 7.56 -.01 +11.4
TotalRetA m 17.96 -.10 +12.4
Firsthand
e-Comm 6.17 -.08 +7.4
FrankTemp-Frank
FedTFA m 12.36 -.02 +5.7
FrankTemp-Franklin
CATFA m 7.33 -.02 +6.0
EqlnA m 20.34 -.13 +15.3
FLTFA m 11.62 -.03 +4.9
GrOppA m 24.39 -.28 +14.4
GrowthA m 55.86 -.39 +13.4
HYTFA m 10.62 -.02 +6.7
IncomeC m 2.32 -.01 +11.2
IncomeA m 2.30 -.01 +11.9
IncomeAdv 2.28 -.01 +12.0
NYTFA m 11.80 -.03 +4.3
RisDvA m 43.06 -.30 +15.9
StrlncA m 10.57 +.01 +7.8
TotalRetA m 10.06 -.02 +6.0
USGovA m 6.58 -.01 +2.6
FrankTemp-Mutual
DiscovZ 31.96 -.16 +11.6
DiscovA m 31.50 -.16 +11.2
SharesZ 25.42 -.18 +13.0
SharesA m 25.20 -.18 +12.6
FrankTemp-Templeton
GIBondC m 13.10 +.03 +6.3
GIBondA m 13.08 +.04 +6.8
GIBondAdv 13.04 +.04 +7.0
GrowthA m 21.56 -.13 +14.3
WorldA m 17.51 -.10 +14.3
GE
S&SUSEq 51.42 -.44 +14.9
GMO
EmgMktsVI 10.38 -.04 +3.1
IntltVllV 21.90 -.13 +9.3
QuIll 25.57 -.10 +17.6
QuVI 25.59 -.10 +17.7
Gabelli
AssetAAA m 58.85 -.47 +16.5
EqlncomeAAA m 25.99 -.20 +16.0
Value m 17.20 -.19 +16.6
Goldman Sachs
HiYieldls d 7.30 ... +10.8
MidCpVals 45.07 -.42 +15.1
ShDuGovA m 10.19 -.01 +.5
Harbor
Bond 12.25 -.03 +4.9
CapAplnst 46.64 -.44 +14.1
Intllnstl 64.72 -.15 +11.5
Intllnv b 64.02 -.15 +11.1
Hartford
CapAprA m 40.79 -.41 +12.6
CpApHLSIA 50.88 -.46 +13.9
SmallCoB m 18.49 -.20 +14.7
Heartland
ValuePlus m 32.81 -.25 +11.7
Hennessy
CornerGrlnv 14.11 -.14 +14.0
Hodges
Hodges m 28.68 -.34 +14.3
INVESCO
ComstockA m 20.78 -.16 +16.7
ConstellB m 23.12 -.25 +9.1
Divlnclnv b 17.71 -.09 +14.4
Dynlnv b 26.18 -.22 +13.9
EnergyA m 41.16 -.34 +9.1
Energylnv b 41.01 -.34 +9.1
EqlncomeA m 10.30 -.08 +12.4
EuroGrA m 35.28 -.01 +14.5
GIbGrB m 24.84 -.13 +11.1
GrowlncA m 24.40 -.22 +14.8
GrwthAIIA m 12.60 -.06 +11.3
HiYIdMuA m 9.87 -.03 +7.9


PacGrowB m 20.47 -.09 +4.0
SmCapEqA m 14.98 -.12 +15.6
Techlnv b 34.60 -.37 +11.4
USMortA m 12.68 -.02 +3.3
Ivy
AssetSTrB m 26.48 -.08 +10.3
AssetStrA m 27.37 -.08 +11.1
AssetStrC m 26.61 -.08 +10.3
JPMorgan
CoreBdUlt 11.82 -.02 +4.9
CoreBondA m 11.81 -.02 +4.5
CoreBondSelect11.81 -.01 +4.7
HighYIdSel 8.16 +.01 +10.8
LgCapGrSelect 25.99 -.36 +16.0
MidCpVall 31.91 -.28 +18.0
ShDurBndSel 10.92 -.01 +1.5
USLCpCrPS 25.56 -.26 +14.9
Janus
BalC m 28.07 -.13 +9.6
ContrT 17.37 -.12 +10.7
EntrprsT 73.21 -.52 +17.1
FlexBdS b 10.59 -.01 +5.4
GIbValT d 13.57 -.04 +13.1
HiYIdT 9.30 +.01 +11.2
OverseasT 33.54 -.33 -3.6
PerlnsMCVL 24.11 -.19 +11.0
PerldnsMCVT 23.87 -.18 +10.8
PerldnsSCVL 23.76 -.18 +9.6
ShTmBdT 3.07 ... +2.4
T 34.76 -.26 +11.4
USCrT 17.62 -.18 +17.0
VentureT 63.02 -.58 +19.4
John Hancock
LifBal b 14.27 -.07 +10.3
LiGrl b 14.52 -.09 +11.4
Lazard
EmgMkEqtl d 17.93 -.08 +5.0
Legg Mason/Western
CrPIBdlns 11.40 -.02 +6.3
Litman Gregory
Maslntllntl d 16.29 +.08 +11.1
MasValue d 14.79 -.11 +12.7
Longleaf Partners
LongPart 29.49 -.24 +11.8
Loomis Sayles
Bdlnstl 15.25 -.02 +10.4
BdR b 15.19 -.02 +10.1
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m 13.83 -.11 +12.7
BondDebA m 8.18 -.01 +10.4
ShDurlncA m 4.60 ... +4.6
ShDurlncC m 4.63 ... +3.9
MFS
IslntlEq 20.06 -.04 +12.3
MAInvB m 23.69 -.18 +14.4
ValueA m 29.60 -.19 +15.9
Valuel 29.75 -.20 +16.1
MainStay
HiYldCorA m 6.08 ... +10.2
Mairs & Power
Grthlnv 96.23 -.65 +17.1
Manning & Napier
PBConTrmS 13.77 -.05 +7.3
PBMaxTrmS 19.02 -.15 +12.0
WrldOppA 8.22 -.02 +8.4
Marsico
21stCent m 16.11 -.19 +9.7
FlexCap m 16.53 -.18 +19.2
Merger
Merger b 15.90 -.02 +2.9
Meridian
MeridnGr d 43.85 -.29 +16.0
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdl 10.74 -.03 +7.3
TotRtBd b 10.75 -.02 +7.1
Midas Funds
Magic m 21.72 -.15 +18.5
Midas m 1.56 ... -25.2
Morgan Stanley
FocGrB m 37.60 -.32 +13.5


Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp 61.74 -.46 +11.2
Natixis
LSInvBdY 12.43 -.02 +8.2
LSStratlncA m 15.98 -.03 +10.7
LSStratlncC m 16.07 -.03 +9.8
Needham
Growth m 39.27 -.40 +14.3
Neuberger Berman
Genesislnstl 54.82 -.37 +15.4
SmCpGrlnv 22.31 -.17 +14.7
Northeast Investors
Growth 17.98 -.15 +9.7
Northern
HYFixlnc d 7.58 ... +11.5
Stkldx 20.09 -.17 +16.1
Nuveen
NYMuniBdl 10.96 -.02 +4.8
Oak Associates
BIkOakEmr 3.11 -.03 +6.8
HlthSinces 16.77 -.06 +18.1
PinOakEq 38.76 -.27 +16.7
RedOakTec 12.34 -.07 +17.0
Oakmark
Eqlncl 30.70 -.16 +9.0
Global I 27.12 -.28 +13.5
Intl 23.43 -.31 +14.2
OakmarkI 56.23 -.41 +16.6
Select I 35.07 -.31 +15.4
Old Westbury
GlbSmMdCp 15.90 -.12 +13.3
LgCpStr 10.75 -.09 +9.6
Oppenheimer
DevMktA m 34.19 -.05 +7.4
DevMktY 33.83 -.06 +7.7
GlobA m 70.25 -.48 +13.1
IntlBondA m 6.22 ... +5.5
IntlBondY 6.22 +.01 +5.8
IntlGrY 33.31 ... +14.5
MainStrA m 41.55 -.26 +15.5
RocMuniA m 16.71 -.06 +7.1
RochNtlMu m 7.46 -.04 +9.2
StrlncA m 4.22 ... +7.9
PIMCO
AAstAAutP 10.55 -.01 +7.1
AIIAssetl 12.30 -.02 +8.4
AIIAuthAm 10.54 -.01 +6.6
AIIAuthC m 10.53 -.01 +5.9
AIIAuthln 10.55 -.01 +7.2
ComRIRStl 5.95 -.02 +5.6
Divlnclnst 11.74 -.01 +8.7
EMktCurl 10.27 ... +3.7
EmMktslns 11.50 +.01 +8.2
Roatlncl 8.77 ... +4.7
ForBdlnstl 10.61 ... +6.4
HiYdls 9.55 +.01 +10.5
InvGrdlns 10.81 -.04 +9.4
LowDrls 10.33 -.02 +3.3
RealRet 11.45 -.10 +5.9
RealRtnA m 11.45 -.10 +5.5
ShtTermls 9.85 -.01 +1.7
TotRetA m 10.93 -.04 +5.2
TotRetAdm b 10.93 -.04 +5.4
TotRetC m 10.93 -.04 +4.5
TotRetls 10.93 -.04 +5.7
TotRetrnD b 10.93 -.04 +5.4
TotlRetnP 10.93 -.04 +5.6
PRIMECAP Odyssey
Growth 20.69 -.22 +16.4
Parnassus
Eqlnclnv 33.35 -.11 +15.3
Permanent
Portfolio 46.68 -.01 +6.5
Principal
LCGrllnst 10.99 -.11 +15.9
SAMConGrA m 16.10 -.11 +12.2
Prudential Investmen
BlendA m 20.67 -.17 +12.1
IntlEqtyC m 6.34 -.02 +9.8
Putnam
GlbUtilB m 11.08 -.07 +6.2
GrowlncA m 17.36 ... +15.8


IntlNewB m 15.45
SmCpValA m 13.01
Pyxis
PremGrEqA m 28.78
Reynolds
BlueChip b 64.93
Royce
PAMutlnv d 12.87
Premierlnv d 20.80
ValueSvc m 12.28
Rydex
Electrlnv 54.09
HlthCrAdv b 21.89
Nsdql001v 19.10
Schwab
10001nv d 43.84
S&P500Sel d 25.32
Scout
Interntl d 34.38
Sentinel
CmnStkA m 38.84
Sequoia
Sequoia 192.84
State Farm
Growth 62.20
Stratton
SmCapVal d 63.97
T Rowe Price
Balanced 21.92
BChpGr 50.89
CapApprec 24.52
Corplnc 9.83
EmMktStk d 31.04
Eqlndex d 43.61
Eqtylnc 30.11
FinSer 17.64
GlbTech 10.87
GrowStk 41.69
HealthSci 49.56
HiYield d 7.05
InsLgCpGr 21.14
IntlBnd d 9.65
IntlEqldx d 12.04
IntlGrlnc d 13.78
IntlStk d 14.67
MediaTele 58.70
MidCapVa 27.20
MidCpGr 64.48
NJTaxFBd 11.90
NewAmGro 39.16
NewAsia d 15.84
NewEra 43.35
NewHoriz 39.22
Newlncome 9.57
OrseaStk d 8.95
R2015 13.54
R2025 14.03
R2035 14.48
Rtmt2010 17.14
Rtmt2020 18.97
Rtmt2030 20.37
Rtmt2040 20.72
SciTech 30.66
ShTmBond 4.81
SmCpStk 38.87
SmCpVal d 43.80
SpecGrow 21.17
Speclnc 12.91
SumGNMA 9.79
SumMulnc 11.65
TaxEfMult d 17.12
TaxFShlnt 5.66
Value 31.04
TCW
Emglncl 8.76
TotRetBdl 10.18
TIAA-CREF
Eqlx 12.33
Target
SmCapVal 24.50
Templeton
InFEqSeS 20.47


-.03 +10.1
-.11 +15.8
... +15.4

-.62 +13.6
-.11 +13.8
-.16 +13.7
-.10 +10.5
-.89 +3.9
-.19 +17.3
-.21 +16.4
-.36 +16.0
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-.03 +10.5
-.27 +15.8
-.76 +19.3
-.35 +12.4
-.56 +16.7
-.13 +11.5
-.60 +16.9
-.11 +13.5
-.04 +7.6
-.15 +3.9
-.36 +16.1
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-.11 +12.0
-.09 +16.5
-.47 +15.6
-.61 +27.1
-.01 +11.5
-.25 +15.6
... +5.5
-.03 +10.2
-.05 +10.5
-.04 +9.7
-.72 +18.9
-.24 +13.8
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-.02 +5.1
-.42 +14.2
-.02 +8.2
-.30 +6.2
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-.03 +4.5
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-.14 +12.8
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... +1.9
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-.04 +7.6
-.04 +3.2
-.03 +5.8
-.16 +15.9
... +2.5
-.27 +16.9
+.03 +11.1
-.02 +7.9
-.11 +16.3
-.23 +15.3
-.09 +10.0


Third Avenue
Value d 53.35 -.55 +10.0
Thompson
LargeCap 40.69 -.42 +15.0
Thornburg
IncBldC m 19.85 -.05 +10.8
IntlValA m 28.36 -.13 +7.9
IntlVall d 28.99 -.12 +8.4
Thrivent
IncomeA m 9.12 -.02 +7.4
MidCapGrA m 18.84 -.18 +11.8
Tocqueville
Gold m 40.56 +.18 -12.9
Turner
SmCapGr 38.32 -.34 +14.8
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.15 -.06 +12.2
U.S. Global Investor
Gld&Prec m 7.46 +.04 -16.7
GlobRes m 9.34 -.04 +5.2
USAA
CorstnMod 14.32 -.04 +8.6
GNMA 10.03 -.01 +2.6
Growlnc 18.33 -.15 +13.4
HYOpp d 8.83 -.02 +12.0
PrcMtlMin 15.98 +.07 -19.0
SciTech 16.75 -.16 +16.4
TaxELgTm 13.60 -.03 +63
TgtRt2040 12.24 -.08 +10.9
TgtRt2050 11.91 -.09 +11.2
WorldGro 24.09 -.14 +16.5
Unified
Winlnv m 16.47 ... +12.3
Value Line
PremGro b 31.42 -.23 +17.2
Vanguard
500Adml 149.27 -1.22 +16.3
5001nv 149.23 -1.23 +16.2
BallcdAdm 25.50 -.15 +11.8
Balldxlns 25.50 -.15 +11.8
CAITAdml 11.48 -.02 +5.2
CapOp 40.46 -.42 +15.8
CapOpAdml 93.44 -.99 +15.9
Convrt 13.73 -.07 +11.2
DivGr 19.21 -.11 +16.8
EmMktlAdm 33.09 -.13 +3.2
EnergyAdm 116.50 -1.00 +9.1
Energylnv 62.05 -.54 +9.1
Eqlnc 27.61 -.20 +18.7
EqlncAdml 57.89 -.41 +18.8
ExplAdml 86.52 -.70 +17.6
Explr 92.96 -.76 +17.5
ExtdldAdm 52.64 -.47 +16.9
Extdldlst 52.64 -.47 +16.9
ExtdMktldxlP 129.91 -1.17 NA
FAWeUSIns 90.07 -.35 +8.3
FAWeUSInv 18.03 -.07 +8.0
FLLT 11.82 -.02 +5.2
GNMA 10.58 -.02 +3.3
GNMAAdml 10.58 -.02 +3.4
GlbEq 20.55 -.09 +13.2
Grolnc 34.64 -.26 +16.4
GrthldAdm 40.50 -.43 +16.4
Grthlstld 40.50 -.43 +16.5
HYCor 6.01 -.01 +11.0
HYCorAdml 6.01 -.01 +11.1
HItCrAdml 70.73 -.41 +19.8
HlthCare 167.62 -.99 +19.8
ITBondAdm 11.55 -.05 +6.5
ITGradeAd 9.96 -.03 +6.9
ITIGrade 9.96 -.03 +6.8
InfPrtAdm 26.74 -.21 +5.5
InfPrtl 10.89 -.09 +5.5
InflaPro 13.61 -.11 +5.4
Instldxl 148.32 -1.22 +16.3
InstPlus 148.33 -1.22 +16.4
InstTStPI 36.73 -.31 +16.6
IntlGr 20.00 -.05 +10.5
IntlGrAdm 63.64 -.17 +10.6
IntlStkldxAdm 25.36 -.11 NA
IntlStkldxl 101.43 -.40 NA
IntlStkldxlPls 101.45 -.40 NA
IntlStkldxlSgn 30.42 -.12 NA


IntlVal 32.50 -.12 +9.3
LTGradeAd 10.14 -.11 +9.8
LgCpldxlnv 29.87 -.25 +16.1
LifeCon 17.42 -.07 +7.8
LifeGro 25.12 -.15 +11.8
LifeMod 21.67 -.12 +10.0
MidCapldxlP 127.52 -1.25 NA
MidCpAdml 117.04 -1.15 +16.2
MidCplst 25.85 -.26 +16.2
MidCpSgl 36.93 -.36 +16.2
Morg 22.38 -.21 +14.7
MuHYAdml 11.01 -.03 +6.1
Mulnt 14.05 -.02 +4.7
MulntAdml 14.05 -.02 +4.7
MuLTAdml 11.45 -.02 +5.4
MuLtdAdml 11.07 ... +2.2
MuShtAdml 15.87 -.01 +1.1
Prmcp 81.74 -.80 +16.4
PrmcpAdml 84.81 -.84 +16.5
PrmcpCorl 17.45 -.15 +15.9
REITlIdAd 96.56 -1.38 +14.9
STBondAdm 10.54 -.01 +2.2
STBondSgl 10.54 -.01 +2.2
STCor 10.73 -.01 +3.1
STGradeAd 10.73 -.01 +3.2
STIGradel 10.73 -.01 +3.2
STsryAdml 10.70 ... +1.3
SelValu 24.52 -.16 +16.0
SmCapldx 44.52 -.42 +17.1
SmCpldAdm 44.57 -.42 +17.2
SmCpldlst 44.57 -.42 +17.2
SmCplndxSgnl 40.16 -.37 +17.2
SmVlldlst 19.95 -.19 +15.6
Star 22.14 -.12 +11.2
StratgcEq 25.05 -.22 +18.5
TgtRe2010 24.84 -.11 +9.0
TgtRe2015 14.00 -.07 +9.9
TgtRe2020 25.21 -.14 +10.6
TgtRe2030 25.16 -.15 +12.0
TgtRe2035 15.29 -.09 +12.7
TgtRe2040 25.27 -.16 +12.9
TgtRe2045 15.86 -.11 +12.9
TgtRe2050 25.16 -.17 +12.9
TgtRetlnc 12.33 -.04 +7.5
Tgtet2025 14.50 -.08 +11.3
TotBdAdml 10.79 -.03 +4.2
TotBdlnst 10.79 -.03 +4.2
TotBdMklnv 10.79 -.03 +4.0
TotBdMkSig 10.79 -.03 +4.2
Totlntl 15.16 -.06 +8.2
TotStlAdm 40.53 -.34 +16.5
TotStllns 40.54 -.34 +16.5
TotStlSig 39.12 -.33 +16.5
TotStldx 40.51 -.34 +16.3
ValldxIns 26.64 -.17 +16.0
Wellsl 24.96 -.13 +10.9
WellslAdm 60.47 -.31 +11.0
Welltn 36.81 -.23 +12.7
WelltnAdm 63.59 -.39 +12.8
WndsllAdm 60.17 -.36 +16.6
Wndsr 17.68 -.13 +16.5
WndsrAdml 59.67 -.45 +16.7
Wndsrll 33.90 -.20 +16.5
Victory
SpecValA f 17.79 -.13 +9.2
Virtus
EmgMktsls 9.95 +.01 +11.7
Wasatch
LgCpVald 16.16 -.08 +11.9
Wells Fargo
Discovlnv 29.39 -.27 +18.7
Growlnv 43.21 -.36 +18.7
Outk2010Adm 13.38 -.05 +5.7
Western Asset
MgdMuniA m 16.79 -.04 +6.3
Yacktman
Focused d 23.85 -.14 +15.4
Yacktman d 22.22 -.14 +15.8


Stocks of Local Interest
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR 52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG %RTN P/E DIV NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG%CHG WK MO QTR%CHG %RTN P/E DIV

AV Homes Inc AVHI 11.33 16.13 14.05 -.04 -0.3 V A A -1.2 +22.4 dd ... Panera Bread Co PNRA 135.40 0- 194.77 188.58 -1.99 -1.0 V A A +18.7 +32.2 31
Arkansas Bst ABFS 6.43 O 20.37 19.29 -.24 -1.2 V A A +102.0 +64.8 dd 0.12 Pembina Pipeline PBA 24.15 34.70 31.32 -.54 -1.7 V V V +9.4 +29.4 1.62
Bank of America BAC 6.90 13.99 13.06 -.06 -0.5 V V A +12.5 +80.8 30 0.04 Pepco Holdings Inc POM 18.67 0 22.72 20.02 -.17 -0.8 V V V +2.1 +10.4 17 1.08
Beam Inc BEAM 52.69 -0 69.78 64.48 -.86 -1.3 V A +5.5 +9.4 25 0.90
Carnival Corp CCL 31.65 --- 39.95 32.72 +.38 +1.2 V V -11.0 +3.4 17 1.00a Phoenix Cos PNX 20.51 44.78 43.87 +14 +0.3 A A A +77.4 +31.7 dd
Chicos FAS CHS 13.52 --- 19.95 16.91 -.15 -0.9 V V A -8.4 +21.8 16 0.22 Raymond James Fncl RJF 30.99 48.22 41.45 -.59 -1.4 V V V +7.6 +29.6 17 0.56
Cracker Barrel CBRL 58.72 100.01 96.54 -.91 -0.9 V A A +50.2 +68.0 20 3.00f Reliance Steel Alu RS 44.91 72.90 63.94 -.69 -1.1 V V V +3.0 +40.7 13 1.20
Disney DIS 45.58 67.89 62.99 -.81 -1.3 V V A +26.5 +40.9 19 0.75f Ryder R 32.76 64.68 61.35 -.18 -0.3 V V A +22.9 +49.6 15 1.24
Eaton Corp plc ETN 36.38 69.92 63.52 -1.04 -1.6 V V A +17.2 +65.0 17 1.68 St Joe Co JOE 14.32 24.44 20.13 -.12 -0.6 V V V -12.8 +33.7 cc
Fortune Brds Hm&Sec FBHS 19.27 44.04 38.40 -.22 -0.6 V V A +31.4 +77.6 38 0.40 Sally Beauty Hid SBH 22.49 31.42 30.08 -.01 ... A A +27.6 +14.8 21
Frontline Ltd FRO 1.71 0- 4.72 1.77 -.04 -2.2 V V V -45.7 -53.4 dd
Harris Corp HRS 39.02 52.23 49.05 -.75 -1.5 V V A +0.2 +27.5 30 1.48Simon Property Gp SPG 145.21 -- 182.45 159.67-2.55 -1.6 V V A +1.0 +12.8 46 4.60
HIth Mgmt Asc HMA 6.27 14.62 15.51+1.58 +11.3 A A A +66.4 +112.3 22 Stein Mart SMRT 5.77 13.48 13.33 +.07 +0.5 A A A +76.8 +91.4 23 1.00e
iShs S&P U.S. Pfd PFF 38.12 -0- 41.09 38.71 -.42 -1.1 V V V -2.3 +8.6 q 2.23e Suntrust Bks STI 21.16 32.84 31.33 -.37 -1.2 V A A +10.5 +47.8 8 0.40f
KC Southern KSU 65.04 118.88 107.53 -1.81 -1.7 V V V +28.8 +66.5 29 0.86 Superior Uniform SGC 10.37 --- 12.65 11.00 ... ... V V -3.9 +5.4 16 0.54
Lennar Corp A LEN 24.38 --- 44.40 36.72 +.10 +0.3 V -5.0 +45.1 11 0.16 TECO Energy TE 16.12 19.22 17.18 -.12 -0.7 V V V +2.5 +2.1 18 0.88
McClatchy Co MNI 1.50 ---- 3.46 2.20 -.01 -0.5 V V V -32.7 +4.2 dd
NextEra Energy NEE 65.95 82.65 77.75 -1.12 -1.4 V V A +12.4 +22.1 19 2.64 Tech Data TECD 42.25 54.60 49.18 -.07 -0.1 V A A +8.0 +5.0 9
Office Depot ODP 1.51 --- 6.10 4.19 -.09 -2.1 V A A +27.7 +111.9 dd Wendys Co WEN 4.09 6.23 5.93 -.02 -0.3 A V A +26.2 +36.2 0.16
PGT Inc PGTI 2.50 9.25 8.19 +.07 +0.9 V V A +82.0 +185.9 30 ... World Fuel Svcs INT 33.65 -0 45.20 39.43 -.68 -1.7 V V V -4.2 +8.4 15 0.15


Turkey testing shows



reasons for concern







The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net


WIRE Page 7


STOCKS LISTING CHANGE REQUESTS WELCOME!

The Sun Newspaper is tweaking the way stocks are listed in the daily paper.
We will continue to run a wide range of stocks, but we're trying to eliminate stocks


our readers don't want. If you do not see your stock in the paper, please let us
know and we will put it in the listings. Email the name of the company and the
symbol to nlane@sun-herald.com, or call 941-206-1138. You can leave the stock
name and symbol on voice mail.


S&P 500 V -13.61 NASDAQ V -36.52 DOW V -126.79 6-MOT-BILLS A +.01 30-YR T-BONDS A +.05 CRUDE OIL A +.50 EURO A +.0020 GOLD A +14.80
1,612.52 3,400.43 14,995.23 V .08% 3 3.37% $95.88 $1.3331 $1,391.80 +



Money Markets


CombinedStocks
From the New York Stock Exchange


and the Nasdaq.

Tkr Name Last Chg
A-B-C
ADT ADTCpn 39.15 -.77
AES AESCorp 12.18 -.13
AFL AFLAC 56.08 -.33
GAS AGLRes 41.98 -.13
AKS AKSteel 3.41 +.01
ASMI ASMIntl 34.04 -.13
T AT&Tlnc 35.62 -.14
ABT AbtLab s 36.44 -.39
ABBV AbbVie n 42.77 -.82
ANF AberFitc 49.11 -1.16
ACAD AcadiaPh 17.76 -1.09
ARAY Accuray 5.76 -.08
ACT Actavis 123.79 -1.30
ATVI ActivsBliz 14.18 -.02
ADBE AdobeSy 42.72 -.40
AEIS AdvEnld 17.55 -.39
AMD AMD 3.90 -.06
ABCO AdvisBd s 52.80 -.62
ACM AecomTch 30.10 -.32
AET Aetna 61.37 -.41
A Agilent 43.92 -.48
APD AirProd 94.79 -.11
AYR Aircastle 14.96 -.03
ARG Airgas 96.82 -1.56
AKAMAkamaiT 42.52 -1.32
ALSK AlaskCom 1.75
ALU AlcatelLuc 1.76
AA Alcoa 8.18 -.05
ATI AllegTch 27.13 +.22
AGN Allergan 100.24 -.15
ALE Allete 47.69 -.71
ARLP AllnceRes 70.23 -.77
ACG AlliBlnco 7.44 -.06
AB AlliBern 24.53 -.25
LNT AlliantEgy 48.54 -.52
MDRXAllscriptH 13.22 -.53
ALL Allstate 47.02 -.23
AOSL AlphaOmg 7.10 -.89
ANR AlphaNRs 6.16 -.09
AOD AlpTotDiv 4.02 -.01
AMLP AlpAlerMLP 17.44 +.04
ALTR AlteraCp If 31.50 -.65
MO Altria 35.60 -.12
ABV AmBev 35.89 -.20
AMRN Amarin 6.81 -.21
AMZN Amazon 271.67 -3.11
AEE Ameren 33.18 -.65
AMX AMovilL 19.86 -.07
AGNC ACapAgy 24.49 -.18
ACAS AmCapLtd 13.04 -.09
AEO AEagleOut 19.00 -.27
AEP AEP 45.20 -.16
AXP AmExp 74.72 -1.80
AIG AmlntlGrp 44.66 -.26
ARCP ARItCapPr 14.23 -.33
AWR AmStsWtr 52.95 -.07
AMT AmTower 74.60 -1.22
AWK AmWtrWks 40.49 +.63
APU Amerigas 46.80 -.09
AMP Ameriprise 81.11 -1.41
ABC AmeriBrgn 54.75 -.06
AME Ameteks 42.22 -.26
AMGNAmgen 96.37 -1.56
APH Amphenol 76.09 -.66
APC Anadarko 85.88 -.32
ADI AnalogDev 44.15 -.87
ANEN Anaren 23.87 -.18
AU AnglogldA 16.37 -.15
BUD ABInBev 92.68 -.08
NLY Annaly 13.03 -.25
ANH Anworth 5.56 -.07
APA Apache 84.45 +.05
AIV Aptlnv 28.25 -.63
AINV Apollolnv 8.03
AAPL Apple Inc 432.19 -5.41
AMAT ApldMatl 15.25 +.06
WTR AquaAm 30.73 -.12
MT ArcelorMit 11.87 -.22
ACI ArchCoal 4.43 -.13
ADM ArchDan 32.89 -.23
ARNA ArenaPhm 8.38 -.39
ARCCAresCap 16.47 .01
ARIA AriadP 18.02 -.92
ABFS ArkBest 19.29 -.24
ARMHArmHld 40.10 -.03
ARR ArmourRsd 4.59 -.10
ARRY ArrayBio 4.58 -.12
ARW ArrowEl 39.09 -.73
ARUN ArubaNet 14.13 -.07
ASH Ashland 85.47 -.60
AZN AstraZen 50.98 +.04
APL AtlasPpln 37.70 +.18
ATML Atmel 7.57 -.23
ATO ATMOS 40.74 -.23
AUQ AuRicog 4.98 +.06
ADSK Autodesk 34.93 -.40
ADP AutoData 67.33 -.34
AVGO AvagoTch 35.98 -.31
AVNR AvanirPhm 4.15 -.07
AVEO AVEO Ph 2.53 -.25
AVY AveryD 42.69 -.28
CAR AvisBudg 31.56 -1.48
AVA Avista 26.50 -.35
AVP Avon 22.73 -.62
BBT BB&TCp 32.96 -.35
BCECE E g 43.05 -.63
BGCP BGCPtrs 5.74 +.01
BMC BMCSft 45.12 -.08
BP BPPLC 42.77 -.32
BPT BP Pru 91.73 +.33
BIDU Baidu 97.51 -1.92
BHI BakrHu 45.35 -.12
BLL BallCorp 42.44 -.46
BLDP BallardPw 1.99 +.03
BBD BcoBradpf 14.31 -.21
SAN BcoSantSA 7.02 +.01
BSBR BcoSBrasil 6.73 -.06
BKMU BankMutl 5.61 -.07
BAC BkofAm 13.06 -.06
BMO BkMontg 58.50 -.52
BK BkNYMel 29.06 -.43
BNS BkNovag 55.30 -.51
BCS Barclay 18.34 -.42
VXX BariPVixrs 21.20 +1.18
BCR Bard 105.11 +.40
BKS BarnesNob 21.30 -1.38
ABX BarrickG 19.77 +.12
BAX Baxter 69.75 -.02
BEAM Beam Inc 64.48 -.86
BMS Bemis 38.89 -.19
BRK/B BerkH B 112.95 -.56
BBY BestBuy 26.88 -1.01
BIG BigLots 32.64 -.98
BCRX Biocryst 1.68 -.01
BIIB Biogenldc 206.55-16.48
BMR BioMedR 19.96 -.27
BME BlkHthSci 31.42 +.01
BX Blackstone 20.74 -.26
HRB BlockHR 28.83 -.57
BOBE BobEvans 47.37 +.20
BA Boeing 100.88 -.87


SAM BostBeer 165.06 +8.57
BSX BostonSci 9.42 -.02
BYD BoydGm 11.85 -.34
BDN Brandyw 13.04 -.22
BGG BrigStrat 20.47 -.29
BMY BrMySq 46.57 -.72
BRCM Broadcom 33.30 -.84
BRCD BrcdeCm 5.83 +.06
BPL Buckeye 67.35 +.24
BKI BuckTch 37.15 -.05
CA CA Inc 28.25 -.36
CBG CBREGrp 22.56 -.34
CBS CBS B 45.92 -1.17
CHG CH Engy 64.72 -.23
CMS CMSEng 26.52 -.44
CNH CNHGbl 42.10 -1.31
CSX CSX 24.85 +.08
CVRR CVRRfgn 30.49 -.06
CVS CVSCare 58.38 -.29
CYS CYS Invest 9.91 -.11
CVC CblvsnNY 13.93 -.21
CDNS Cadence 14.74 -.03
CALM Cal-Maine 46.45 -.09
CHY CalaCvHi 12.41 +.02
CCC Calgon 17.18 -.21
CWT CalifWtr 19.67 -.07
CPN Calpine 20.93 -.33
CLMT CalumetSp 35.50 +.76
CAFI CamcoF 3.22 -.10
CPT CamdenPT 64.87 -.86
CPB CampSp 44.26 +.21
CNI CdnNRyg 98.00 -.54
CNQ CdnNRsgs 28.38 -.51
CSIQ CdnSolar 9.06 -.25
COF CapOne 61.38 -.08
CSU CapSenL 25.80 +.16
LSE Caplease 8.51 -.07
CMO CapsteadM 12.10 -.15
CPST CpstnTurb 1.29 +.02
CAH CardnlHIth 47.16 +.17
BEAT CardioNet 5.29 +.30
CFN CareFusion 37.50 -.48
CCL Carnival 32.72 +.38
CRS CarpTech 47.26 -.02
CRZO Carrizo 26.12 -.01
CPRX CatalystP h 1.04 -.03
CTRX Catamarns 53.85 -.14
CAT Caterpillar 83.21 -.31
CLDX CelldexTh 15.84 +.31
CLSN Celsion 1.41 -.18
CX Cemex 10.25 -.24
CIG Cemig pf 9.30 -.24
CNP CenterPnt 23.07 -.05
CENX CentAl 9.59 -.21
CTL CntryUnk 35.39 -.10
CVO Cenveo 2.14
CERE Ceres 3.90 +1.70
CKP Checkpnt 14.37 -.22
CHFC ChemFinl 25.61 -.39
CHK ChesEng 21.08 -.22
CVX Chevron 119.97 -1.48
CBI ChicB&l 57.89 -.84
CHS Chicos 16.91 -.15
CIM Chimera 3.00 -.02
MY ChiMYWnd 2.15 +.20
CHD ChurchDwt 60.97 +.09
CIEN CienaCorp 20.02
CBB CinciBell 3.14 +.05
CINF CinnFin 45.64 +.13
CRUS Cirrus 17.69 -.33
CSCO Cisco 23.99 -.08
C Citigroup 49.44 -.51
CTXS CitrixSys 61.95 -.84
CLNE CleanEngy 12.86 -.09
CLWR Clearwire 4.37 +.02
CLF CliffsNRs 17.37 -.13
CLX Clorox 84.38 -.09
COH Coach 57.72 -.73
CIE CobaltlEn 25.14 -.75
KO CocaColas 40.39 -.12
CCE CocaCE 35.90 -.02
CTSH CognizTech 64.00 -.43
RQI CohStQIR 10.96 -.05
CL ColgPalm s 58.16 -.46
COBK ColonialFS 13.71 -.37
CLP ColonPT 22.75 -.17
CMCSAComcast 3952 -64
CMCSKComcspcl 3811 -83
CTGX CmpTask 23.56 +.16
CPWRCompuwre 10.85 -.08
CMTL Comtech 26.52 -.16
CAG ConAgra 33.79 -.24
CTWS ConnWtrSv 28.32 +.14
COP ConocoPhil 60.88 -1.03
CNX ConsolEngy 31.81 -.54
CNSL ConsolCom 17.06 +.17
ED ConEd 56.77 -.38
STZ ConstellA 51.51 -.65
CTB CooperTire 34.66+10.10
COCOCorinthC 2.35 -.11
CSOD CorOnDem 42.03 +2.00
GLW Corning 14.78 -.21
OFC CorpOffP 25.31 -.29
CXW CorrectnCp 33.76 -1.16
COST Costco 109.40 -.62
COWNCowenGp 3.23 -.03
XIV CSVelIVSt 20.01 -1.22
TVIX CSVS2xVxrs 3.34 +.33
CROXCrocs 16.37 -.11
XTEX CrosstxLP 20.05 -.10
CCI CrwnCstle 68.00 -1.35
CCK CrownHold 41.93 -.60
CMI Cummins 115.74 -1.69
CYBE CybrOpt 6.50 +.23
CY CypSemi 10.37 -.24
CYTR CytRx 2.21
CYTK Cytokinetic 1.40 +.13
D-E-F
DCT DCTIndl 7.10 -.10
DDR DDRCorp 16.90 -.17
DNP DNPSelct 9.88 -.11
DHI DRHorton 22.49 +.17
DTE DTE 66.35 -.65
DTZ DTE En 61 25.55 -.01
DHR Danaher 61.40 -.81
DRI Darden 52.67 -1.56
DF DeanFds 9.71 -.43
DE Deere 84.32 -.92
DCTH Delcath .43 -.03
DELL Dell Inc 13.37
DLPH DelphiAuto 50.00 +.10
DAL DeltaAir 18.07 -.45
DNR DenburyR 17.90 -.11
DNDN Dndreon 4.23 +.21
DVN DevonE 54.54 -.50
DEO Diageo 117.97 -.37
DMNDDiamondF 18.97 -.21
DO DiaOffs 66.58 -.93
DBD Diebold 31.85 -.29
DGII Digilntl 9.51 -.23
DLR DigitalRt 58.60 -1.71
DDS Dillards 83.02 -.41
DTV DirecTV 60.16 -1.23


1,680 ................................. S P 500
1,680. S&P 500
1 '.*:, S Close: 1,612.52
Change: -13.61 (-0.8%)
1,560 ...... 10 DAYS ...

1 ,6 8 0 ..................... ............ ............ ............... ...... ... ....







1,440 .... ...... ..........


1 ,3 6 0 ...... ........ ..... ..... ...... ............ ......
D J F M A M J


StocksRecap

NYSE NASD
Vol. (in mil.) 3,146 1,568
Pvs. Volume 3,320 1,555
Advanced 584 746
Declined 2523 1730
New Highs 41 95
New Lows 412 36


FAZ DxinBrrs 34.71 +.96
TZA DxSCBrrs 32.57 +.84
NUGT DxGldBIIrs 9.78 +.19
FAS DxFnBulls 62.97 -1.84
SPXS DirSPBear 10.88 +.26
TNA DxSCBulls 46.95 -1.37
SPXL DxSPBulls 42.27 -1.08
DFS Discover 47.47 -.79
DISCADiscComA 73.57 -.30
DISH DishNetwk 37.71 -1.46
DIS Disney 62.99 -.81
DOLE DoleFood 12.59 +.13
DG DollarGen 51.09 -.58
DLTR DollarTrs 48.56 -1.27
D DomRescs 55.32 -.01
DPZ Dominos 59.43 -.17
RRD DonlleyRR 12.81 +.16
DOW DowChm 33.79 -.21
LEO DryStri 8.40 -.22
DRYS DryShips 1.78
DD DuPont 54.23 -.62
DUC DufPUC 11.14 -.21
DUK DukeEnrs 66.59 -.62
DRE DukeRlty 15.29 -.35
DVAX Dynavax 1.38 -.09
ETFC E-Trade 11.50 -.03
EBAY eBay 50.75 -1.30
EMC EMCCp 24.33 -.34
EOG EOGRes 129.63 +.52
ELNK ErthLink 6.00 -.07
ETN Eaton 63.52 -1.04
EOS EVEEq2 11.42 -.12
ECL Ecolab 84.25 +.55
EIX Edisonlnt 46.32 -.48
EW EdwLfSci 68.27 -.02
ELN Elan 13.10 -.46
EGO EldorGldg 7.41 +.03
EA ElectArts 21.54 -1.06
EMR EmersonEl 55.89 -.54
EDE EmpDist 21.73 -.12
EEP EnbrdgEPt 30.01 +.75
ENB Enbridge 42.95 -.38
ECA EnCanag 17.61 -.38
ENDP EndoPhrm 38.12 -.09
ENR Energizer 99.77 +.02
ETP EngyTsfr 49.49 -.29
EBF EnnisInc 16.84 +.06
ESV ENSCO 57.52 -1.37
ETR Entergy 67.71 -.95
EPD EntPrPt 59.44 +.14
EQIX Equinix 188.73-7.74
EQR EqtyRsd 54.75 -.37
ERIC Ericsson 11.65 -.03
EL EsteeLdr 67.42 -.33
EXAS ExactSci h 13.05 -.38
ET ExactTgt 33.57 -.05
XCO ExcoRes 7.71 -.20
EXEL Exelixis 4.62 -.15
EXC Exelon 30.40 -.80
XIDE ExideTc .22
EXPE Expedia 56.37 +.53
ESRX ExpScripts 61.89 -.27
XOM ExxonMbl 89.74 -.72
FTI FMCTech 54.56 -.45
FNB FNBCpPA 11.27 -.14
FB Facebook 23.77 -.26
FCS FairchldS 12.80 -.49
FDO FamilyDIr 62.04 -.93
FAST Fastenal 47.71 -.77
FDX FedExCp 97.49 -.55
FNHC FedNatHId 9.94 +.04
FGP Ferrellgs 22.18 +.18
FNF FidlNFin 23.98 -.32
FSC FifthStin 10.14 -.19
FITB FifthThird 18.32 -.02
FHN FstHorizon 11.11 -.17
FNFG FstNiagara 9.53 -.17
FSLR FstSolar 46.66 -5.63
FE FirstEngy 37.87 -.70
FMER FstMerit 18.77 -.20
FLEX Flextrn 7.64 -.14
FLO FlowrsFds 32.82 -.32
FLR Fluor 60.21 -1.36
FL FootLockr 34.16 -.42
F FordM 15.37 -.14
FST ForestOil 4.29 -.11
FBHS FBHmSec 38.40 -.22
FCX FMCG 29.59 +.27
FTR FrontierCm 4.15 +.11
FRO Frontline 1.77 -.04
FCEL FuelCellE 1.41
FIO Fusion-io 13.98 -.48
G-H-I
GOM GMAC44 24.66 -.41
GTAT GTAdvTc 3.94 -.19
GDV GabDvlnc 19.46 -.32
GGT GabMultT 9.11 -.15
GUT GabUtil 6.34 -.12
GFA GafisaSA 3.02 -.01
GALE GalenaBio 2.06 -.10
GME GameStop 36.59 -1.13
GCI Gannett 19.85 -.32
GPS Gap 40.63 -.41
GRMNGarmin 34.09 -.26
GKNTGeeknet 12.94 +.07
GAM GAlnv 31.86 -.30
GD GenDynam 78.30 +.13
GE GenElec 23.50 -.08
GGP GenGrPrp 20.15 -.29
GIS GenMills 48.46 +.13
GM GenMotors 33.45 -.48
GEL GenesisEn 51.07 -.36
GNMKGenMark 12.24 -.93
GNTX Gentex 22.62 -.14
GNW Genworth 10.70 -.18
GGB Gerdau 5.65 -.11
GIMO Gigamon n 28.47


DOW
DOW Trans.
DOW Util.
NYSE Comp.
NASDAQ
S&P 500
S&P 400
Wilshire 5000
Russell 2000


GILD GileadScis 51.17 -1.27
GSK GlaxoSKIn 52.41 +.60
GRT GlimchRt 10.92 -.14
GOL GolLinhas 3.98 +.23
GFI GoldFLtd 5.94 +.02
GG Goldcrpg 28.03 +.26
GS GoldmanS 161.86 -1.45
GT Goodyear 14.93 +.33
GOOGGoogle 871.98 -7.83
GRA vjGrace 82.20 -.80
GPT GramrcyP 4.42 -.03
GNI GNIron 71.12 -.28
GXP GtPlainEn 22.32 -.26
GWAYGrnwyMed 11.58 -.65
GEF GreifA 53.04 +.03
GRIF Griffin h 29.62 -.03
GRPN Groupon 6.95 -.17
BSMX GpFSnMxn 14.48 -.50
TV GpTelevisa 23.30 -.55
GSH GuangRy 21.94 -.25
HCA HCAHIdg 39.53 -.20
HCP HCPInc 45.36 -.52
HAIN HainCel 66.24 -.08
HK HalconRes 5.13 -.02
HAL Hallibrtn 41.61 -.43
HBI Hanesbrds 50.38 +.33
THG Hanoverlns 48.18 -.10
HOG HarieyD 52.45 -.60
HIG HartfdFn 29.43 -.33
HTS HatterasF 25.22 -.12
HE HawaiiEl 24.35 -.32
HCN HItCrREIT 65.50 -1.32
HCSG HlthCSvc 22.44 -.23
HMA HItMgmt 15.51 +1.58
HTA HlthcreTr 11.40 -.04
HL HeclaM 3.50
HLF Herbalife 45.27 +1.89
HSY Hershey 87.67 -.24
HTZ Hertz 24.73 -.93
HES Hess 66.82 -.47
HPQ HewlettP 24.91 +.67
HSH Hillshire n 33.53 -.23
HTH HilltopH 16.03 -.17
HIMX HimaxTch 6.21 -.31
HFC HollyFront 45.27 +.19
HOLX Hologic 22.01 +.15
HD HomeDp 76.40 -1.21
HMC Honda 36.42 -.39
HON HonwlllntI 77.32 -.84
HRL Hormel 39.50 -.14
HSP Hospira 35.25 -.83
HPT HospPT 26.41 -.47
HST HostHotls 16.42 -.44
HOV HovnanE 5.91 +.07
HNP HuanPwr 37.17 -.36
HUB/BHubbelB 96.06 -.10
HCBK HudsCity 8.27 -.06
HBAN HuntBncsh 7.59 -.09
HII Huntgtnlng 55.27 -.76
HUN Huntsmn 17.78 -.35
IAG IAMGIdg 5.28 +.11
IGTE iGateCorp 14.86 -.07
ING ING 8.98 -.13
IAU iShGold 13.49 +.09
EWA iSAstla 23.27 -.01
EWZ iShBraz 47.29 -.94
EWC iSCan 27.09 -.30
EWG iShGer 26.23 -.15
EWH iSh HK 18.79 +.03
EWJ iShJapn 10.95 +.03
EWY iShSKor 54.67 -.45
EWW iShMexico 64.14 -1.16
EWS iShSing 13.01 -.12
EWT iSTaiwn 13.42 -.07
SLV iShSilver 21.02 +.11
TIP iShBTips 113.70 -.88
FXI iShChina25 34.59 -.23
IW iSCorSP500162.60 -1.37
EEM iShEMkts 39.11 -.27
LQD iShiBxB 115.61 -.40
TLT iShB20T 112.33 -1.63
SHY iShB1-3T 84.33 -.01
EFA iS Eafe 59.55 -.07
HYG iShiBxHYB 91.65 +.07
IWF iSR1KG 73.29 -.71
FLOT iShFItRNt 50.61 -.05
IWM iShR2K 96.76 -.97
PFF iShUSPfd 38.71 -.42
IYR iShREst 65.93 -.98
ITB iShDJHm 22.90 -.10
IDA Idacorp 47.63 -.67
ITW ITW 69.40 -.70
INCY Incyte 20.55 +.11
IBCP IndBkMI 6.02 -.02
NRGY Inergy 23.18 -.04
IR IngerRd 55.90 -.54
INGR Ingredion 67.98 -.41
IRC InlandRE 9.84 -.06
TEG IntegrysE 56.47 -.50
INTC Intel 24.46 -.25
ICPT Interceptn 31.10 -.63
INAP InterNAP 7.88 -.22
IBM IBM 201.20 -2.78
IGT IntlGame 17.27 -.28
IP IntPap 44.03 -1.28
IPG Interpublic 14.29 -.05
INTX Intersectns 8.70 -.26
ISRG IntSurg 495.44 -4.13
IVZ Invesco 33.16 -.46
IVR InvMtgCap 18.00 -.17
IRM IronMtn 28.88 -.27
ITUB ItauUnibH 13.96 -.20
J-K-L
JASO JA Solar rs 6.72 -.36
JDSU JDS Uniph 14.04 -.49
JPM JPMorgCh 53.18 -.31
JEC JacobsEng 55.04 -1.02


HIGH
15241.28
6326.72
485.93
9328.14
3459.18
1637.71
1174.81
17267.12
987.96


3,520 "----......... -...........-



3,360 ...... 10 DAYS ...


Nasdaq composite
Close: 3,400.43
Change: -36.52 (-1.1%)


3 ,6 0 0 ............. .....................................................
3,500
3,400
3 ,3 0 0 ........................................ ... .............
3 ,2 0 0 .. .i............ .. .i............ i.......... .. .:.,#
3 ,1 0 0 ........ .i....... .. ...... ............ .. .. .. ... .. .. .... }.. .
3,200....... ..........
3,10 0 .. .... .. .
3,000O
2,900 F


LOW
14981.21
6212.47
477.25
9180.55
3395.91
1610.92
1153.78
16983.98
971.41


JNS JanusCap 8.33 -.25
JBLU JetBlue 6.37 +.03
JNJ JohnJn 83.74 -.95
JCI JohnsnCtl 36.52 -.56
JNPR JnprNtwk 18.39 +.09
KBH KBHome 20.15 -.23
KKR KKR 19.35 +.09
KFN KKRFn 10.65 +.03
KFH KKRFn41 26.38 -.07
KLAC KLATnc 55.18 -.10
KNDI KandiTech 6.62 -1.13
KSU KCSouthn 107.53 -1.81
K Kellogg 62.84 -.16
KERX KeryxBio 6.98 -.37
KEY Keycorp 10.48 -.26
KMB KimbClk 96.81 -1.14
KIM Kimco 21.69 -.15
KMP KindME 82.11 -.29
KMI KindMorg 37.63 -.56
KMI/WSKindrMwt 535 -18
KGC Kinross g 5.88 -.06
KOG KodiakOg 8.80 +.07
KRFT KraftFGp n 53.45 -.69
KTOS KratosDef 6.59 +.24
KKD KrispKrm 17.30 -.29
KR Kroger 34.30 -.28
KLIC Kulicke 11.50 -.18
LTD LBrands 50.01 -.06
LLL L-3Com 85.96 -.10
LDK LDKSolar 1.37 -.09
LSI LSI Corp 7.18 +.03
LTC LTC Prp 39.77 -1.23
LRCX LamResrch 46.38 -.48
LSTR Landstar 52.61 -.47
LVS LVSands 55.38 -.76
LHO LaSalleH 24.25 -.69
LM LeggMason 32.44 -.90
LPS LenderPS 31.87 -.61
LEN LennarA 36.72 +.10
LVLT Level3 21.07 -.48
USA LbtyASE 5.20 -.06
LBTYAUbGlobA 72.59 -.56
LBTYKUbGlobC 68.25 -.02
LINTA UbtylntA 22.20 -.42
LRY UbtProp 37.62 -.83
LFVN Ufevantge 2.23 -.03
LLY UllyEli 51.78 -.16
LNC UncNat 34.76 -.61
LINE UnnEngy 32.69 -.34
LGF UonsGtg 26.81 -1.60
LYV UveNatn 16.17+2.33
LYG UoydBkg 3.74 -.07
LMT LockhdM 107.05 +1.09
LO Lorillard s 42.92 +.04
LPX LaPac 15.90 -.36
LOW Lowes 40.61 -.28
LULU lululemngs64.30 -3.55
LUX Luxottica 50.95
LYB LvonBasA 64.12 -.07
M-N-O
MTB M&TBk 102.06 -.84
MBI MBIA 13.29 -.36
MCGCMCG Cap 4.87 -.15
MDC MDC 33.83 -.09
MDU MDU Res 25.02 -.29
MFA MFAFncl 8.48 -.12
MTG MGIC 6.07 -.12
MGM MGMRsts 14.76 -.03
M Macys 48.06 -.25
MHR MagHRes 3.68 -.16
MTW Manitowoc 18.59 -.41
MNKD MannKd 7.64 -.01
MFC Manulifeg 15.48 -.36
MRO MarathnO 33.40 -.63
MPC MarathPet 79.28 -.58
GDX MktVGold 28.35 +.22
OIH MVOilSvc 42.32 -.40
SMH MVSemi 37.36 -.45
RSX MktVRus 24.49 -.14
GDXJ MktVJrGId 11.33 -.07
PRB MVPreRMu 24.93 -.00
MWE MarkWest 66.02 -.46
MAR MarlntA 40.59 -.25
MMC MarshM 39.82 -.40
MMLP MartinMid 42.20 -.01
MRVL MarvellT 10.96 +.09
MAS Masco 19.88 +.33
MAT Mattel 43.97 -.76
MXIM Maximlntg 26.91 -.52
MDR McDrmlnt 8.91 -.19
MCD McDnlds 98.24 +.01
MUX McEwenM 2.27 -.04
MWV MeadWvco 35.14 -.32
MTL Mechel 2.94 -.02
MPW MedProp 14.62 -.29
MDT Medtrnic 51.61 -.46
MPEL MelcoCrwn 24.00 +.15
MRK Merck 47.25 -.31
MCY MercGn 42.25 -.60
MDP Meredith 41.22 -.06
MTOR Meritor 6.98 -.13
MET MetLife 44.47 -.01
KORS MKors 60.53 -.74
MCHP Microchp 36.34 -.43
MU MicronT 12.49 -.32
MSFT Microsoft 35.00 +.16
MVIS Microvis 3.30 +.10
MAA MidAApt 64.23 -.46
MIDD Middleby 166.01 -.16
MSEX MdsxWatr 19.36 +.01
MTU MitsuUFJ 6.13 -.07
MOLX Molex 29.04 -.31
MCP Molycorp 5.69 -.20
MDLZ Mondelez 29.53 -.27
MON Monsanto 103.46 -1.05
MCO Moodys 61.04 -2.48
MS MorgStan 25.57 -.52


CLOSE
14995.23
6223.16
478.04
9189.44
3400.43
1612.52
1155.90
17003.61
972.31


CHG.
-126.79
-43.35
-4.11
-66.04
-36.52
-13.61
-11.39
-144.43
-9.14


%CHG.
-0.84%
-0.69%
-0.85%
-0.71%
-1.06%
-0.84%
-0.98%
-0.84%
-0.93%


MOS Mosaic 57.40
MWA MuellerWat 6.81
MYL Mylan 30.82
NIHD NIl Hldg 6.83
NPSP NPS Phm 15.50
NRG NRGEgy 26.44
DCM NTT DOCO 15.08
NVE NV Energy 23.51
NXPI NXP Semi 29.38
NBR Nabors 15.83
NBG NBGrcers 5.58
NFG NatFuGas 59.69
NGG NatGrid 58.21
NHI NtHlthlnv 59.62
NOV NOilVarco 69.21
NAV Navistar 30.74
NKTR NektarTh 9.52
NEOG Neogen 54.87
NTAP NetApp 38.34
NFLX Netflix 207.64
NJR NJ Rscs 43.97
EDU NewOriEd 21.97
NRZ NewResdn 6.26
NYCB NY CmtyB 13.13
NYMT NYMtgTr 6.72
NCT Newcastle 5.02
NWL NewellRub 26.53
NFX NewfldExp 22.37
NEM NewmtM 33.33
NWSA NewsCpA 30.94
NWS NewsCpB 31.11
NEE NextEraEn 77.75
NI NiSource 28.14
NKE NikeBs 61.41
NTT NipponTT 25.88
NE NobleCorp 37.30
NBL NobleEns 57.20
NOK NokiaCp 3.49
NAT NordicAm 8.19
NSC NorfkSo 75.65
NU NoestUt 41.13
NOC NorthropG 82.61
NRF NStarRlt 8.32
NWBI NwstBcsh 12.33
NWN NwstNG 42.73
NVS Novartis 72.59
NVAX Novavax 1.91
NVO NovoNord 167.75
NUAN NuanceCm 18.89
NUE Nucor 43.92
NAD NuvDivA 13.84
JPZ NuvEqtP 12.29
NIO NuvMuOpp 13.97
NQM NvlQI 14.29
NMA NvMAd 13.54
NUW NvAMT-Fr 15.93
NNP NvNYP 14.90
NPP NuvPP 14.48
JPC NvPfdlnco 9.33
NPF NvPMI 13.49
NPI NuvPI 13.25
NPM NuvPl2 13.66
NPT NuvPl4 12.65
NQU NuvQInc 13.75
NES NuverraE 3.28
NVDA Nvidia 14.05
NXTM NxStageMd 13.48
OCZ OCZTech 1.32
OGE OGE Engy 66.48
OAS OasisPet 40.65
OXY OcciPet 90.95
OCFC OceanFst 14.40
OCN OcwenFn 44.16
ODP OfficeDpt 4.19
OIBR OiSAs 1.96
ONB OldNBcp 13.21
OLN Olin 24.18
OHI OmegaHlt 31.23
OME OmegaP 9.79
ONNN OnSmcnd 7.87
OKS OneokPtrs 50.19
ONXX OnyxPh 87.00
OPK OpkoHlth 6.68
OPLK OplinkC 17.83
ORCL Oracle 33.52
OFIX Orthfx 27.99
OSK OshkoshCp 37.11
OTTROtterTail 27.80
P-Q-R
PCG PG&ECp 44.33
PNC PNC 70.84
PNM PNM Res 21.94
PKX POSCO 68.84
PPG PPG 150.95
PPL PPL Corp 28.45
PACB PacBiosci 2.68
P Pandora 15.10
PNRA PaneraBrd 188.58
PKD ParkDrl 4.34
PH ParkerHan 96.88
PAYX Paychex 36.56
BTU PeabdyE 17.05
PBA Pembinag 31.32
PGH Pengrth g 5.02
PENN PnnNGm 54.60
PWE PennWstg 11.12
PNNT PennantPk 11.11
JCP Penney 17.80
PAG Penske 31.41
PNR Pentair 58.05
PBCT PeopUtdF 13.64
PBY PepBoy 12.05
POM PepcoHold 20.02
PEP PepsiCo 82.11
PPHM PeregrinP 1.62
PKI PerkElm 32.59
PRGO Perrigo 116.47


YTD
+14.43%
+17.27%
+5.51%
+8.83%
+12.62%
+13.06%
+13.28%
+13.39%
+14.48%


PETM PetSmart 67.55 -.64
PBR/A PetrbrsA 16.91 -.48
PBR Petrobras 15.68 -.51
PFE Pfizer 28.43 +.01
PM PhilipMor 91.65 +.42
PSX Phillips66 63.31 -.65
PNX PhnxCosrs 43.87 +.14
PNY PiedNG 33.62 -.35
PPC PilgrimsP 13.84 +.03
PFN PimlncStr2 10.20 -.33
PNW PinWst 56.18 -.48
PBI PitnyBw 14.31 -.46
PAA PlainsAAs 54.88 +.07
PLUG PlugPowrh .50 -.01
PCL PlumCrk 46.70 -.82
PII Polaris 94.00 -.62
POR PortGE 29.70 -.08
POT Potash 40.40 -.40
DBC PwshDB 26.02 +.03
DBA PSAgri 25.58 -.20
PGF PSFinPf 17.65 -.22
BKLN PSSrLoan 24.94 -.03
PGX PwShPfd 14.11 -.17
PCY PShEMSov 27.96 +.32
QQQ PwShs QQQ71.85 -.84
PX Praxair 114.98 +.91
PCP PrecCastpt 216.29 -3.03
PLD ProLogis 37.12 -.34
SH ProShtS&P 29.54 +.24
QLD ProUItQQQ 66.17 -1.58
QID PrUShQQQ 23.55 +.53
SSO ProUItSP 77.57 -1.27
TQQQ ProUPQQQ 68.00 -2.44
TBF ProSht20Tr 30.94 +.45
UPRO PUItSP500 s63.73 -1.71
UVXY PrUVxST rs 77.25 +8.04
SVXY PShtVxSTs 78.68 -5.01
PG ProctGam 77.60 -.52
PGR ProgsvCp 24.65
SDS PrUShSP rs 40.78 +.67
TBT PrUShL20rs70.22 +1.97
TWM ProUSR2K 18.28 +.34
SPXU PUSSP500 24.51 +.61
SQQQ PrUPShQQQ28.52 +.94
PSEC ProspctCap 10.22 +.08
PRU Prudentl 71.01 +.08
PEG PSEG 32.07 -.33
PSA PubStrg 147.71 -1.28
PHM PulteGrp 20.01 -.10
PMM PMMI 7.22 -.04
QEP QEPRes 29.02 -.44
QCOMQualcom 61.11 -.55
PWR QuantaSvc 26.24 -.52
STR Questar 23.49 -.36
QCORQuestcor 45.22+3.11
ZQK Quiksilvr 6.34 -.17
RFMDRFMicD 5.00 -.11
RDN RadianGrp 12.88 -.10
RSH RadioShk 3.44 -.12
RL RLauren 172.46 -1.32
RMBS Rambus 8.55 +.52
RAVN Ravenlnds 29.94 +.18
RTN Raytheon 66.71 +.17
RSOL RealGSolar 2.95 +.03
RLGY Realogyn 46.86 -1.17
O Rltylnco 43.09 -.60
RHT RedHat 46.40 +.16
RWT RedwdTr 18.50 -.15
RF RegionsFn 9.07 -.12
RS RelStlAI 63.94 -.69
RENN Renren 3.37 +.01
RGEN Replgn 7.74 -.30
BBRY RschMotn 13.56 -.10
RSO ResrceCap 6.09 -.12
ROIC RetailOpp 13.83 -.12
RAI ReynAmer 47.55 +.02
RIO RioTinto 42.09 +.12
RAD RiteAid 3.02 +.02
RVBD RiverbedT 15.86 +.18
ROK RockwlAut 84.26 -1.05
COL RockColl 64.63 -.25
ROG Rogers 47.99 -.42
ROP Roper 119.57 -1.73
RY RoyalBkg 57.80 -.47
RBS RBScotlnd 9.84 -.39
RCL RylCarb 33.39 -.12
RDS/BRoyDShllB 68.29 -.19
RDS/ARoyDShllA 65.72 -.27
ROYL RoyaleEn 2.87 +.35
RYL Ryland 40.08 -.45
RHP RymanHP 34.23 +.23
S-T-U
STBA S&TBcp 19.31 -.18
SAI SAIC 13.59 -.28
SBAC SBA Com 73.98 -.49
SCG SCANA 48.57 -.58
SGOCSGOCO 3.02 +.72
SLM SLMCp 23.34 -.02
SM SM Energy 61.61 -.25
DIA SpdrDJIA 149.86 -1.34
GLD SpdrGold 134.25 +1.00
SPY S&P500ETF161.75 -1.35
XHB SpdrHome 29.75 -.06
KBE SpdrS&PBk 27.82 -.33
JNK SpdrLehHY 39.89 -.14
XRT SpdrRetl 76.81 -.92
XOP SpdrOGEx 59.45 -.60
XME SpdrMetM 35.81 -.27
SBR SabnR 53.34 +.58
SWY Safeway 23.11 -.20
SAIA Saia Inc 46.28 -.57
JOE StJoe 20.13 -.12
STJ StJude 44.67 +.84
CRM Salesforcs 37.58 -.01
SBH SallyBty 30.08 -.01
SJT SJuanB 15.55 -.11
SNDK SanDisk 58.93 -.34


SD SandRdge 4.67 -.15
SNY Sanofi 53.52 +.53
SLB Schlmbrg 70.95 -.49
SCHWSchwab 19.59 -.13
SDRL SeadrillLtd 39.30 -.19
STX SeagateT 43.57 -.37
SHLD SearsHldgs 45.07 -1.07
SRE SempraEn 78.36 -1.18
SNH SenHous 25.34 -.67
SQNMSequenom 4.21 +.21
SCI ServiceCp 17.57 -.12
NOW ServNown 38.37 -1.58
SHW Sherwin 178.22-3.22
SFL ShipFin 16.44 -.16
SID SiderurNac 2.79 +.02
SLW SilvWhtng 23.17 +.34
SPG SimonProp 159.67 -2.55
SINA Sina 55.85 -1.83
SIRI SiriusXM 3.24 -.10
SWKS SkywksSol 20.72 -.62
SMSI SmithMicro 1.22 -.01
SFD SmithfF 32.75 +.04
SJM Smucker 100.83 +.32
SNA SnapOn 89.16 -1.15
SODA SodaStrm 70.64 -3.14
SLRC SolarCap 22.82 -.15
SCTY SolarCity n 34.28 -.20
SON SonocoP 34.60 -.12
SNE SonyCp 20.28 -.02
SOR SourcC 62.12 +.46
SJI SoJerlnd 57.30 -.50
SO SouthnCo 43.92 -.34
SCCO SthnCopper 29.27 -.42
LUV SwstAirl 13.87 -.08
SSS SovranSS 63.48 -1.31
SE SpectraEn 33.68+3.36
S SprintNex 7.35
XLB SP Mails 39.61 -.20
XLV SPHIthC 47.88 -.49
XLP SPCnSt 40.38 -.20
XLY SPConsum 55.49 -.62
XLE SP Engy 79.36 -.49
XLF SPDRFncl 19.44 -.21
XLI SPInds 42.96 -.30
XLK SPTech 31.26 -.21
XLU SP Util 37.34 -.37
SPF StdPac 8.38 -.10
SWK StanBlkDk 78.68 -.86
SPLS Staples 15.54 +.02
SGU StarGas 4.86 +.01
SBUX Starbucks 64.45 -.97
HOT StarwdHtl 66.07 -.80
STWD StarwdPT 24.93 -.24
STT StateStr 64.91 -1.21
STLD StlDynam 14.44 -.09
SPH SubPpne 46.50 +.01
SUBK SuffolkBcp 16.06 -.16
SNHY SunHydrl 30.84 -.52
SU Suncorgs 30.26 -.23
SUNE SunEdison 7.86 -.37
SPWRSunPwrh 19.12 -.94
STP Suntech 1.00 +.03
STI SunTrst 31.33 -.37
SPN SupEnrgy 26.22
SVU Supvalu 6.18 -.24
SWFT SwiftTrans 16.59 -.30
SYMC Symantec 22.18 +.17
SNV Synovus 2.65 -.07
SYY Sysco 34.16 +.03
TMUS T-MoblUSn 21.30 -.14
AMTD TD Ameritr 23.55 -.08
TE TECO 17.18 -.12
TJX TJX 49.98 +.09
TSM TaiwSemi 18.36 -.16
TTWOTakeTwo 15.37 -1.44
TLM TalismEg 11.36 -.18
TGT Target 69.43 -.57
TCO Taubmn 77.08 -.32
TCK TeckResg 23.58 -.31
TLAB Tellabs 2.17 -.05
TEN Tenneco 44.50 -.14
TDC Teradata 55.86 -.67
TEX Terex 31.44 -.86
TNH TerraNitro 200.94 -3.88
TSLA TeslaMot 97.73+3.26
TSO Tesoro 57.28 +.27
TEVA TevaPhrm 39.08 -.75
TXN Texlnst 34.79 -.47
TXRH TexRdhse 24.06 -.24
TGH Textainer 37.85 +.23
TXT Textron 26.12 -.51
TMO ThermoFis 84.35 -1.07
DDD 3DSyss 45.57 -.85
MMM 3M Co 109.03 -1.19
TIBX TibcoSft 20.70 -.43
THI THortong 52.70 -.55
TWX TimeWam 56.16 -.73
TKR Timken 56.50 -1.08
TWI TitanIntl 17.99 -.09
TIVO TiVo Inc 10.88 +.09
TOL TollBros 31.75 -.05
TRU TorchEngy .45
TMK Torchmark 64.50 +.13
TD TorDBkg 79.09 -1.03
TOT Total SA 49.55 -.30
TSS TotalSys 22.94 -.25
RIG Transocn 48.32 -1.19
TRV Travelers 81.45 -.63
TY TriContl 18.07 -.15
TYp TriCntl pf 51.00 -.50
TSL TrinaSolar 5.52 -.19
TSRX TrusTher 8.73 -.01
TRST TrstNY 5.39 -.08
TUP Tuppwre 79.43 -2.50
TRQ TurqHillRs 6.20
TWO TwoHrblnv 10.53 -.16
TYC Tycolntls 33.31 -.40
TSN Tyson 25.42 -.08
UBS UBSAG 17.37 -.31


UDR UDR
UGI UGICorp
UIL UILHold
UNS UNS Engy
LCC US Airwy
ULTA UltaSalon
UPL UltraPt g
UA UndArmr s
UNF UniFirst
UN UnilevNV
UNP UnionPac
UNT Unit
UAL UtdContl
UPS UPS B
URI UtdRentals
USB US Bancrp
UNG US NGas
USO USOilFd
X USSteel
UTX UtdTech
UNH UtdhlthGp
UVV UnvslCp
UNM UnumGrp
URBN UrbanOut


23.74 -.08
38.10 -.38
38.73 -.36
45.94 -.42
16.88 -.04
96.64+12.51
21.12 -.44
59.04 -.56
94.54 -.86
40.43 +.12
154.32 -.50
44.33 -.14
32.04 -.41
85.51 -.14
48.82 -1.02
35.40 -.01
20.13 +.23
34.03 +.24
17.20 +.06
92.68 -1.00
63.83 -.10
59.41 -.03
28.01 -.20
41.18 -.86


V-W-X-Y-Z
VFC VFCp 189.58+1.52
VALE Vale SA 13.71 -.27
VALE/PValeSApf 1271 -32
VLO ValeroE 37.96 -.52
VLY VlyNBcp 8.96 -.02
VVTV ValVisA 5.01 +.12
VNDA VandaPhm 13.00 +.44
VTI VangTSM 83.29 -.71
VOO VanS&P500 74.09 -.58
VNQ VangREIT 68.15 -.94
VWO VangEmg 39.46 -.27
VEA VangFTSE 36.85 -.02
VVC Vectren 33.28 -.11
VELT Velti 1.55 -.08
VE VeoliaEnv 12.29 +.01
PAY VeriFone 16.17 -.62
VZ VerizonCm 49.90 -.28
VIAB ViacomB 65.26 -1.46
VVI ViadCorp 25.08 -.28
VPHM ViroPhrm 27.36 -.44
V Visa 179.15 -.51
VSH Vishaylnt 14.03 -.22
VVUS Vivus 14.01 -.59
VMW VMware 70.54 -.28
VOD Vodafone 28.12 -.69
VMC VulcanM 53.09 +.32
WPC WP Carey 64.28 -.72
WPX WPXEngy 18.91 +.11
WMT WalMart 74.84 -.41
WAG Walgrn 49.34 -.20
WLT WalterEn 14.03 -.65
WCRXWarnerCh 19.51 -.07
WM WsteMlnc 40.14 -.12
WAT Waters 97.18
WFT Weathflntl 13.55 -.10
WBS WebsterFn 23.49 -.33
WRI WeinRlt 31.16 -.78
WLP WellPoint 78.07 -.31
WFC WellsFargo 40.27 -.39
WEN WendysCo 5.93 -.02
WR WestarEn 31.06 -.43
EMD WAstEMkt 13.24 +.14
WIA WAstlnfSc 12.25 -.07
WU WstnUnion 16.54 +.01
WBK Westpac 128.82 -1.01
WY Weyerhsr 27.79 -.90
WHR Whrlpl 122.85 -1.25
WWAVWhiteWvn 17.05 +.20
WWAV/BWheWBn 16.75 +.22
WFM WholeFd s 50.72 -.53
WMB WmsCos 34.03 -.05
WIN Windstrm 8.09 +.12
WEC WiscEngy 40.38 -.51
DXJ WTJpHedg 44.22 +.06
EPI WT India 16.52 -.04
WWD Woodward 40.05 -.64
WDAYWorkdayn 61.90 +.21
WWE WdW Ent 9.72 +.05
XL XLGrp 30.84 +.12
XEL XcelEngy 28.77 -.21
XRX Xerox 8.85 -.25
XLNX Xilinx 37.79 -1.37
YHOO Yahoo 25.89 -.51
AUY Yamanag 11.21 +.32
YNDX Yandex 26.01 -.06
YGE YingliGrn 2.74 -.09
YORWYorkWater 19.03 +.01
YUM YumBmds 71.70 -.06
ZMH Zmmer 77.01 -.38
ZION ZonBcp 27.14 -.70
ZTS Zoetisn 31.53 -.17
ZF Zweigrs 13.06 -.12
ZNGA Zynga 2.82 -.06


Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes. cld Issue has been called for
redemption by company, d New 52-week low. ec Company for-
merly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Mar-
ketplace. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does
not meet continued-lsting standards. If Late filing with SEC. n -
Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low fig-
ures date only from the beginning of trading, pf Preferred stock
issue. pr Preferences. pp Holder owes installments of purchase
price rt Right to buy security at a specifed pnce. rs Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year.
s Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi -
Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distrib-
uted. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock, u New 52-week
high. un Unit,, including more than one security, vI Company in
bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankrupt-
cy law. Appears in front of the name. Stocks in bold are worth at
least $5 and changed 5 percent or more in price. Underlining for 50
most actively traded stocks of the day. Dividend Footnotes: a -
Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b Annual rate plus
stock, c Liquidating dividend, e Amount declared or paid in last 12
months. f Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent
dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no
regular rate. I Sum of dividends paid ths year. Most recent dividend
was omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year, a cumulative
issue with dividends in arrears. m Current annual rate, which was
decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p Initial divi-
dend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r- Declared or paid in
preceding 12 months plus stock dividend t Paid in stock, approxi-
mate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q Stock is
a closed-end fund no P/E ratio shown. cc P/E exceeds 99. dd -
Loss in last 12 months. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covenng
market costs is paid from fund assets d Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f front load (sales charges). m Multiple fees are
charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption
fee. NA not available. p previous day's net asset value. s fund
split shares dunng the week. x fund paid a distribution dunng the
week. Source. Morningstar and the Associated Press.


Interestrates


1a



The yield on the
10-year Trea-
sury note rose
to 2.23 percent
Wednesday.
Yields affect in-
terest rates on
consumer loans.


PRIME
RATE
YEST 3.25
6 MOAGO 3.25
1 YR AGO 3.25


FED
FUNDS
.13
.13
.13


NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG AGO
3-month T-bill .05 0.04 +0.01 .09
6-month T-bill .08 0.07 +0.01 .14
52-wk T-bill .12 0.12 ... .17
2-year T-note .33 0.32 +0.01 .29
5-year T-note 1.14 1.11 +0.03 .74
10-year T-note 2.23 2.19 +0.04 1.66
30-year T-bond 3.37 3.32 +0.05 2.77


NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG AGO
Barclays LongT-Bdldx 3.10 3.06 +0.04 2.48
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 4.51 4.48 +0.03 4.42
Barclays USAggregate 2.16 2.16 ... 2.00
Barclays US High Yield 6.30 6.06 +0.24 7.84
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.24 4.24 ... 3.67
Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.36 1.35 +0.01 .98
Barclays US Corp 3.07 3.05 +0.02 3.32


Foreign
Exchange
The dollar fell
against the
yen and at one
point was close
to its lowest
level against
the Japanese
currency since
early April.
The dollar rose
against the
Canadian dollar.





k fl


IAM


MAJORS


1YR.
CLOSE CHG %CHG AGO


USD per British Pound 1.5676 +.0
Canadian Dollar 1.0211 +.0
USD per Euro 1.3331 +.0
Japanese Yen 95.71
Mexican Peso 12.8757 +.0
EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLE EAST


Israeli Shekel
Norwegian Krone
South African Rand
Swedish Krona
Swiss Franc

ASIA/PACIFIC
Australian Dollar
Chinese Yuan
Hong Kong Dollar
Indian Rupee
Singapore Dollar
South Korean Won
Taiwan Dollar


3.6234
5.7562
10.0847
6.5074
.9222


1.0541
6.1440
7.7646
57.795
1.2553
1132.11
29.88


1.5570
1.0270
1.2498
79.49
14.0192

3.8757
6.0131
8.4183
7.0742
.9610


1.0068
6.3750
7.7586
55.805
1.2844
1168.30
29.99


+.0006
+.0006
-.0004
+.0010
+.0026


-.0042
+.0060
-.0001
-.546
+.0025
+1.49
-.00


Commodities
Prices for crude
oil and natural
gas rose for the
first time in
three days.
Gold, silver and
other metals al-
so rose. Prices
for corn and
wheat fell.


FUELS CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl) 95.88
Ethanol (gal) 2.43
Heating Oil (gal) 2.90
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.78
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.81

METALS CLOSE
Gold (oz) 1391.80
Silver (oz) 21.80
Platinum (oz) 1482.30
Copper (Ib) 3.23
Palladium (oz) 755.25

AGRICULTURE CLOSE
Cattle (Ib) 1.20
Coffee (Ib) 1.23
Corn (bu) 6.51
Cotton (Ib) 0.90
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 292.60
Orange Juice (Ib) 1.49
Soybeans (bu) 15.41
Wheat (bu) 6.83


PVS.
95.38
2.44
2.86
3.72
2.82

PVS.
1377.00
21.65
1479.90
3.19
750.75

PVS.
1.20
1.28
6.60
0.88
302.60
1.52
15.41
6.97


%CHG
+0.52
+0.12
+1.32
+1.42
-0.46

%CHG
+1.07
+0.70
+0.16
+1.00
+0.60

%CHG
-0.14
-3.88
-1.33
+2.27
-3.30
-2.08
+0.02
-1.97







~Page 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013 WEATHERIWORLD NEWS


TODAY


Scattered rain/storms


90 / 720
50% chance of rain


CONDITIONS TODAY
UV Index and RealFeel Temperatures Today



2; j

87 98 98 91
8a.m. 10a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
The higierthe AccuWeathercom UV IndexT number,
the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low;
3-5 Moderate; 6-7 Higi; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.
RealFeel Temperature is the exclusive
AccuWeather.com composite of effective temperature
based on eigt weather factors.
AIR QUALITY INDEX
Air Quality Index readings as of Wednesday
47
rF I
0 50 100150200 300 500
0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
Main pollutant: ozone
Source: scgov.net

POLLEN INDEX
Pollen Index readings as of Wednesday
Trees N.A
Grass NA.
Weeds NA.
Molds NA.
absent low moderate high veryhig
Source: National Allergy Bureau

ALMANAC
Punta Gorda through 5 p.m. Wednesday
Temperatures
High/Low 920/730
Normal High/Low 92 /720
Record High 970 (2010)
Record Low 670 (1971)
Precipitation (in inches)
24 hours through 5 p.m.Wednesday 0.00"
Month to date 6.19"
Normal month to date 2.70"
Year to date 16.54"
Normal yearto date 14.74"
Record 1.30" (1988)

MONTHLY RAINFALL
Month 2013 2012 Avg. Record/Year
Jan. 0.43 0.77 1.80 7.07/1979
Feb. 2.12 0.73 2.43 11.05/1983
Mar. 1.98 0.75 3.28 9.26/1970
Apr. 3.06 0.81 2.03 5.80/1994
May 2.76 3.08 2.50 9.45/1991
Jun. 6.19 13.44 8.92 23.99/1974
Jul. 5.43 8.22 14.22/1995
Aug. 8.36 8.01 15.60/1995
Sep. 5.05 6.84 14.03/1979
Oct. 5.71 2.93 10.88/1995
Nov. 0.02 1.91 5.53/2002
Dec. 1.78 1.78 6.83/2002
Year 16.54 45.93 50.65 (since 1931)
Totals are from a 24-hour period ending at 5 p.m.


FRIDAY


Mainly dry


91 / 71
10% chance of rain


AIRPORT
Possible weather-related delays today Check
with your airline for the most updated schedules.
Hi/Lo Outlook Delays
Ft. Myers 92/73 storms afternoon
Sarasota 90/75 storms afternoon

SUN AND MOON


The Sun
Today
Friday
The Moon
Today
Friday
First



Jun 16

SOLUN
mi.


Rise
6:34 a.m.
6:34 a.m.
nol_


Set
8:23 p.m.
8:23 p.m.
Q-.f


J
St. Petersburg
91/76


SATURDAY




Isolated p.m. rain


92 / 730
20% chance of rain


'Brandon
94 72
B8


MONDAY THE NATION


SUNDAY



I
Scattered p.m. storms


93 / 730
40% chance of rain

Plant City
95' 72


1 94, 73

Apollo Beach Ft.
9175 Ft. Mea
91/75 94/71
---------...------ _


tise aet
10:49 a.m. 11:52 p.m.
11:42 a.m. none
Full Last New %Bradenton a
90/76
SLongboat Key 91/72 My
D 0y 89/77 91/2
Jun23 Jun30 Jul8 Sarasota .
90/75
IAR TABLE spr
..- .Ospey .. A


ilnor ivlajor Milnor Major
Today 10:05a 3:54a 10:27p 4:16p
Fri. 10:54a 4:43a 11:16p 5:05p
Sat. 11:42a 5:30a ---- 5:53p
The solunar period schedule allows planning
days so you will be fishing in good territory or
hunting in good cover during those times. Major
periods begin at the times shown and last for
1.5 to 2 hours.The minor periods are shorter.

TIDES


High
Punta Gorda
Today 7:50a
Fri. 8:25a
Englewood
Today 6:27a
Fri. 7:02a
Boca Grande
Today 5:32a
Fri. 6:07a
El Jobean
Today 8:22a
Fri. 8:57a
Venice
Today 4:42a
Fri. 5:17a


Low High Low

1:25a 6:03p 12:22p
2:02a 6:57p 1:33p

10:38a 4:40p
12:18a 5:34p 11:49a

8:59a 3:45p 10:39p
10:10a 4:39p 11:19p

1:54a 6:35p12:51p
2:31a 7:29p 2:02p

9:17a 2:55p 10:57p
10:28a 3:49p 11:37p


89/75


Shown is today's weather.
Temperatures are today's
highs and tonight's lows.



Gulf Water
Temperature

830


Forecasts and graphics, except for the
WINK-TV 5-day forecast, provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. @2013

Publication date: 6/13/13
MARINE


Wauchula
93 73

Limestone
j93 71

... .....
rcadia
2,72' -


.. o. m rey
'5:::!V

Fronts

Cold Warm Stationary Showers T-st
U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous stat
High ................... 1090 at Needles, CA


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia, SC
Columbus, OH
Concord, NH
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Duluth
Fairbanks
Fargo
Hartford
PI^1^.


Today
Hi Lo W
97 68 s
70 52 pc
94 68 t
86 60 t
85 54 t
94 66 t
75 48 pc
66 52 r
66 56 r
72 53 pc
78 57 t
94 63 t
78 53 pc
78 59 t
72 55 t
98 67 t
76 59 r
66 51 r
97 77 s
94 61 pc
83 63 pc
77 56 r
73 46 pc
76 49 s
78 60 pc
62 52 r
PFT AP 4t


S"""a neleia o6 46
Wind Speed Seas Bay/Inland Sanibel Honolulu 87 74
direction in knots in feet chop 90/77 Houston 95 75
Cape Sable to Tarpon Springs Bonita Springs Indianapolis 82 57
SSW 3-6 0-1 Light 90/72
Tarpon Springs to Apalachicola t. WORLD CITIES


W 7-14 1-2 Light AccuWeather.com ~'


FLORIDA CITIES


City
Apalachicola
Bradenton
Clearwater
Coral Springs
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Fort Pierce
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key Largo


Today
Hi Lo W
91 77 t
90 76 t
91 77 t
89 74 t
96 73 t
88 76 t
92 73 t
90 71 t
94 72 t
94 73 t
86 78 s


Fri.
Lo W
72 t
75 pc
77 pc
74 pc
74 t
76 pc
73 pc
71 pc
70 t
69 t
77 pc


City
Key West
Kissimmee
Lakeland
Melbourne
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Okeechobee
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
88 79 pc 88 79 pc
92 73 t 92 72 pc
94 72 t 92 72 pc
90 73 t 91 74 pc
88 76 t 89 75 pc
89 72 t 88 73 pc
94 72 t 92 71 t
88 70 t 90 70 pc
94 73 t 93 73 pc
89 76 t 90 70 t
94 77 t 96 74 t


City
Pompano Beach
St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Sanford
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Vero Beach
West Palm Beach
Winter Haven


Today
Hi Lo W
87 76 t
92 74 t
91 76 t
96 74 t
90 75 t
94 74 t
91 75 t
90 74 t
90 72 t
86 74 t
95 73 t


Fri.
Hi Lo W
88 75 pc
89 75 t
91 76 pc
93 74 pc
89 74 pc
95 67 t
91 76 pc
89 73 pc
91 73 pc
89 75 pc
93 73 pc


pc
pc
pc


Fri.
Lo W
68 pc
53 s
66 s
56 pc
50 t
64 pc
50 s
55 r
47 t
47 t
51 t
60 s
55 s
56 s
46 pc
63 s
50 s
46 r
77 s
55 s
67 c
48 s
51 pc
49 s
64 pc
52 r
45 t
73 pc
76 pc
59 s


dston
75
Mm6.....

Precipitation

orms Rain Flurries Snow Ice
:es yesterday)
Low ................. 300 at Angel Fire, NM


City
Jackson, MS
Kansas City
Knoxville
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Montgomery
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk, VA
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Washington, DC


Today Fri.
Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
96 72 pc 93 66 pc
85 67 pc 87 72 pc
86 61 t 83 60 pc
102 77 s 97 76 s
75 62 pc 78 62 pc
82 61 t 82 63 s
92 69 pc 89 69 pc
72 51 pc 67 50 s
79 57 pc 78 65 pc
96 71 pc 93 64 pc
86 61 t 84 62 s
93 78 pc 93 76 t
67 56 r 73 60 pc
97 68 t 80 64 pc
96 73 s 95 72 s
85 66 pc 86 68 pc
78 58 t 75 60 pc
107 83 s 105 80 s
74 55 r 74 49 t
68 52 pc 58 51 r
66 52 c 69 50 c
68 54 r 65 53 r
95 65 t 82 60 s
92 56 s 75 53 s
86 63 pc 83 68 pc
93 75 t 93 75 s
69 60 pc 70 61 pc
67 51 pc 69 51 s
66 50 pc 64 49 c
87 62 t 78 60 pc


Today Fri. Today Fri.
City Hi Lo W Hi LoW City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Amsterdam 65 53 r 66 54 c Mexico City 73 54 t 76 55t
Baghdad 103 80 s 102 79 s Montreal 72 55 pc 73 52 t
Beijing 89 69 pc 89 70 pc Ottawa 68 53 pc 72 50 pc
Berlin 74 58 sh 72 53 pc Paris 65 49 r 69 53 c
BuenosAires 70 46 pc 57 46 pc Regina 75 57 t 67 51 t
Cairo 89 69 s 90 69 s Rio de Janeiro 80 68 t 79 67 pc
Calgary 61 42 sh 61 43 sh Rome 82 59 s 83 62 s
Cancun 90 73 pc 90 74 pc St.John's 45 41 r 52 44 c
Dublin 57 47 sh 63 48 r San Juan 88 78 pc 88 79 t
Edmonton 62 43 sh 65 46 sh Sydney 68 52 c 66 52 c
Halifax 58 47 c 56 48 sh Tokyo 73 70 r 82 73 sh
Kiev 74 56 pc 81 59 pc Toronto 70 53 pc 73 52 pc
London 63 48 sh 67 51 sh Vancouver 65 52 pc 64 50 c
Madrid 91 64 pc 93 66 pc Winnipeg 76 53 pc 75 62 c
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.


Bill O'Reilly



invites you to volunteer



and explains how it can be



easier than you may think.


Turkish gov't offers



referendum to protesters


ANKARA, Turkey (AP)
- The Turkish govern-
ment is open to holding
a referendum over an
Istanbul development
plan that has had a
central role in nearly two
weeks of mass protests,
a spokesman for Prime
Minister Recep Tayyip
Erdogan's party said
Wednesday.
The announcement
following talks between
Erdogan and a group
of activists amounts to
the first big gesture by
his government to end
a standoff with protest-
ers in Istanbul's Taksim
Square and around the
country.
But on a more defi-
ant note, Justice and
Development Party
spokesman Huseyin Celik
also said the govern-
ment would not allow
the ongoing sit-in in
Gezi Park, next to the
square, to continue "until
doomsday" a sign that
authorities' patience is
running out.


WORLD

Activists: Syrian
rebels fight
Shiites, 60 killed
BEIRUT (AP) Syrian
rebels have battled Shiites
in a village in the country's
east, killing over
60 people including
civilians, activists said
Wednesday. The fighting
highlights the increasingly
sectarian nature of the
country's civil war.
Activists say the dead
were mostly pro-govern-
ment militiamen, without
specifying whether the
noncombatants had been
killed deliberately or were
caught in the crossfire.
But a Syrian government
official denounced the


The prospect of a
referendum amounts
to a political gamble
by Erdogan, who has
drawn the ire of pro-
testers over his alleged
authoritarian streak. He
appeared to be betting
that his strong base of
support would vote for
the plans.
The protests erupted
May 31 after a violent
police crackdown on a
peaceful sit-in by activists
objecting to the project
to replace Gezi Park with
a replica Ottoman-era
barracks. They then
spread to 78 cities across
the country and have at-
tracted tens of thousands
of people nearly every
night.
Celik said the refer-
endum would be on the
Ottoman-era barracks.
But he said it would
exclude the planned
demolition of a cultural
center that the protest-
ers also oppose; Celik
said the center was in an
earthquake-prone area,


attack on the Shiite-section
of Sunni-majority Hatla
village as a "massacre" of
civilians.

Baby Bounce:
Royal infant may
help UK economy

LONDON (AP) -British
officials are hoping that the
impending royal birth will
produce a bouncing baby
buoy for the economy.
With the Duchess of
Cambridge due to give birth
to an heir to the throne next
month, it's time for citizens
and groups to consider how
to best mark the moment.
Happy occasions often
boost consumer confi-
dence, sparking a spring


and needed to come
down.
Erdogan hosted the
11 activists including
academics, students and
artists in his offices
in Ankara. Some leaders
of civil society groups,
including Greenpeace,
had said they would not
participate because of an
"environment of violence"
in the country.
Meanwhile, police and
protesters retrenched
after fierce overnight
clashes in Taksim Square.
In Ankara and Istanbul,
thousands of lawyers
railed against the alleged
rough treatment of doz-
ens of their colleagues,
who police briefly
detained in Istanbul on
the sidelines of Tuesday's
unrest.
Sema Aksoy, the deputy
head of the Ankara law-
yer's association, said the
lawyers were handcuffed
and pulled over the
ground. She called the
police action an affront to
Turkey's judicial system.


in the step that leads right
to the shopping mall for
street party snacks, sum-
mer frocks and suntan
lotion. And happy national
occasions with the royal
family and a new heir hit an
emotional jackpot in Britain
- boosting national pride
along with tea, cakes and
commemorative china.
"Royal fever is more
intense now, actually,"
said Pauline Maclaran, a
professor of marketing and
consumer research at Royal
Holloway and the co-author
of "Tiaras, Tea Towels and
Tourism: Consuming the
British Royal Family," which
will be published by the
University of California
Press.


Scattered p.m. storms


92 / 74
50% chance of rain


Winter Haven
95, 73

Srt .
larton --


Clearwater
91 77


Tampa
91/75


-10s -Os O 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80 I 90s
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

S1ealVle Winnipeg
S- 6853 .Montreal
B ill n g s "; : 7 ro '
.San 79F5n7 .' c.sYo
': : : .C"" nicago.1 3 :1'i .,
.... 77M7 .. ,
.7J_ 7U ".:
E7'1 Kansas Cily IIS?
IM5967


SElI P1 50 B 94151


Venice Hll
90/75 North Po r Hull
91/73 92/72
Port Charlotte
90/72
Engleouud A- "
90/75 J.
90/5 + Punta Gorda
,^aoi 92/71


ria uaa*
90/74.
Boca Grande
89/77


Fort Myers I
92/73 t -

Cape Coral Lehigh Acres
91/73 91/71


iPage 8 WIRE www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


9


WEATHER/WORLD NEWS











SPORTS


www.yoursun.net


www.Facebook.com/SuncoastSports @SCMG_Sports


Bucs near contract
extension with WR
Williams, oPage 6


Sports Editor: Mark Lawrence


* MLB: Boston 2, Tampa Bay 1


Aceves, N;

By MARK DIDTLER
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PETERSBURG -Alfredo
Aceves threw six solid innings,
Daniel Nava homered and the
AL East-leading Boston Red Sox
beat the Tampa Bay Rays 2-1 on
Wednesday night.
Aceves (3-1), recalled before the
game from Triple-A Pawtucket, al-
lowed one run, four hits and four
walks. This is the right-hander's
third stint with the Red Sox this
season.
Nava put the Red Sox up 2-0 on
a third-inning, two-run homer
off Chris Archer (1-2), who gave
up two runs, four hits, four walks


ava help Sox stop Rays


ROYALS AT RAYS
WHO: Kansas City (30-33)
at Tampa Bay (35-30)
WHEN:Today, 7:10 p.m.
WHERE: Tropicana Field, St. Petersburg
PITCHERS: Ervin Santana (4-5, 2.99) vs.
Jeremy Hellickson (4-2, 5.18)
TV: Sun Sports
RADIO: 620 AM, 1220 AM, 1480 AM, 1530
AM, 1580 AM
TICKETS: 1-888-FAN-RAYS

and struck out seven over four
innings. The Rays right-hander
exuberantly left the mound after
striking out Nava with the bases


loaded to end the fourth.
Evan Longoria got the Rays
within 2-1 on a solo homer in the
sixth. He has gone deep in three
consecutive games after homering
just once over his previous 26.
Andrew Bailey, the fourth
Boston reliever, pitched the
ninth for his seventh save in nine
opportunities. After Craig Breslow
allowed a two-out double in the
eighth Kelly Johnson, Koji Uehara
entered and struck out Longoria.
Jacoby Ellsbury extended his
hitting streak to 11 games with a
single and scored on Nava's two-
out shot in the third. He also stole
RAYS 3


* GOLF: U.S. Open


TODAY'S FIVE THINGS
TO WATCH
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ll l i JIl r lrhl i ,i i I 1- I [ 1 ,1 r [ i ,,ir -l- rv


HISTORY





UFF


For Woods, it S

all in the results
By DOUG FERGUSON
A U"MIH11I', II
\1Il)1I ()Ill. I',H
THE PHOTO OF BEN HOGAN HITTING
HIS 1-IRON INTO THE 18TH GREEN .T
MERION IN THE 1950 U.S. OPEN IS
A\IONG THE MOST F.MOIJS IN GOLF
HISTORY, CAPTURING THE PIJRE SING
ONE OF THE GREATEST PLIERS WH'EN
THE PRESSURE OF M.AOR CH.AIPION-
SHIP WAS A.T ITS PEAK.

Ini -.Il.I n|I Im .l llllt* .11 l. si,\ i|., \Vn n..I
III, ul. in ,. IM ab ut ih,. ,.sull.



ii illi i ll i. l ll I r IN l I l iIllt I t I
N I I 1111. .1 \ ,I i 1 1 1.1. ll i 1 1, 11 11 11," \\i i .1.
-. .111 11. 1 11.d. -\ I f Ind 1 n.h. 1.1i Ik1 ,.1. 11i
l( < I .i III I 11 1 111Nil1 .11 11.11,.I ll l. li II



, ll. 11 't. l. 1 l it i. lhI Ili l I \ 1u 11 ir
N111'l l .1 IIII .I 1 il H I llld1 .1m1 II/ 1 l M lls I l .
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WOODS 16


AP PHOTO
Tiger Woods chips onto the 17th green during practice for the U.S. Open on Wednesday at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pa.
Unique to Merion are the wicker baskets painted orange and red attached to the pins, instead of the traditional flag.


* STANLEY CUP FINALS


AP PHOTO
NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman smiles during a news conference
before Game 1 of the NHL Stanley Cup Finals between the Chicago
Blackhawks and the Boston Bruins on Wednesday in Chicago.


NHL hopes to


stay in Phoenix,


says Bettman


By NANCY ARMOUR
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO -The
Phoenix Coyotes are
about to be in limbo no
more.
Where they'll end up,
however, is up to the
Glendale City Council.
NHL Commissioner
Gary Bettman said
Wednesday he didn't
want to give a timetable
for a decision, preferring
to let the process play out
without added pressure
on negotiations between
the new ownership group
and city officials. But
the City Council has a
meeting June 25, and the
NHL's Board of Governors
meets two days later.
"Maybe," Bettman said
when asked if a deci-
sion needs to be made
before the board meeting.
"Stuff's going to happen."
The NHL has delayed
the release of next season's
schedule until next month,
in part because it needs to
know where or if the
Coyotes are playing.
"Obviously we're getting
to the point where some


BRUINS AT
BLACKHAWKS
TO OUR READERS: Wednesday
night's game was not complete
in time for this edition
WHO: Boston at Chicago
WHAT: Stanley Cup Finals, Game 2
WHEN: Saturday, 8 p.m.
WHERE: United Center, Chicago
TV: NBC

decisions are going to
have to be made, both
by the city of Glendale
and by us," Bettman said
before Game 1 of the
Stanley Cup finals. "We
haven't set a deadline,
but the time is getting
shorter. ... We're still fo-
cused on making it work
with the Coyotes staying
in Arizona."
The NHL has operated
the Coyotes since they
were purchased out of U.S.
Bankruptcy Court in 2009
following former owner
Jerry Moyes' attempt to
sell the team to Blackberry
founder Jim Balsillie,
who wanted to move the
franchise to Hamilton,
NHL15


* MIAMI HEAT: Commentary


'Cleveland LeBron'

conundrum strikes


By MARLA RIDENOUR
AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
before Game 3 of the
NBA Finals, a televi-
sion camera caught
LeBron James sitting alone
on the Miami Heat bench
with his eyes closed.
Whether he was medi-
tating or visualizing or
clearing his thoughts, no
one knew. One reporter
who has covered him for
years had never seen him
take that pose before.
Watching at home, I felt
like the NBAs four-time
Most Valuable Player was
mulling which persona he
wanted to assume against
the San Antonio Spurs.
Cleveland LeBron or
Miami LeBron?
Dominating LeBron or
Distributing LeBron?
Selfish LeBron or
Selfless LeBron?
That's not to say
Cleveland LeBron would
always be the preferred
choice. Cleveland LeBron
never won anything. On
many nights, Cleveland
LeBron stood around and
dribbled while his team-
mates waited for him to
do something and all that


HEAT AT SPURS
WHAT: NBA Finals, Game 4, San
Antonio leads series 2-1
WHO: Miami at San Antonio
WHEN: Today, 9 p.m.
WHERE: AT&T Center, San Antonio
TV: ABC
RADIO: 770 AM

produced was lethargy.
But the Miami Heat
would take that one-man
band version right now,
especially coming off
the 36-point pounding it
suffered in San Antonio. It
might be thrilled if James
stood behind the 3-point
arc, bouncing the ball
and surveying the scene,
poised like a lion ready to
strike, then unleashing his
fury in a flash.
It would love it if the
L-Train were steamrolling
the Spurs.
James seems caught in
a conundrum. Should he
be the Heat's facilitator be-
cause he promised the Big
Three would win "not two,
not three, not four, not five,
not six, not seven" champi-
onships and thus far they
LEBRON 12


INDEX I Lottery 21 NBA 2 | Prep sports 2 1 College baseball 3 | Pro baseball 3-4 | Scoreboard 5 1 Auto racing 5 1 Quick Hits 5 | Golf 6 1 NFL 6


Thursday, June 13, 2013


1, ."




'.


\






Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


Florida Lottery
wwwflalottery.com
* CASH 3
June 12N................... .............4-1-7
June 12D................................ 8-8-0
June 11N.................................... -7-8
June 11D.................................... -7-1
June 10N.................................... 7-4-7
June 10D...........................1..... -1-1
D-Day, N-Night
* PLAY
June 12N................................. 4-5-2-1
June 12D................................. 6-0-8-4
June 11N................................. 2-6-7-7
June 11D................................3-3-8-2
June 1 N.................................6-9-5-1
June 10D.............................. 5-2-9-3
D-Day, N-Night
* FANTASY 5
June 12 .........................7-9-17-18-24
June 11 .......................5-13-24-25-32
June 10.......................3-14-19-23-26
June 9 .........................3-16-19-27-36
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 11
4 5-digit winners .............$51,031.19
247 4-digit winners ...................$133
8,283 3-digit winners ...................$11
86,160 2-digit winners......free ticket
* MEGA MONEY
June 11 ............................. 1-24-32-43
M egaBall......................................... 14

June 7 ........................... 9-21-28-37
M egaBall......................................... 12
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 11
0 4-of-4 MB ......................... 800,000
2 4-of-4............................... 3,165.50
38 3-of-4 MB .........................365.00
684 3-of-4................................ 60.50
977 2-of-4 MB.......................... 29.50
* LOTTO
June 12 ...............................................
June 8 ......2.......21-24-34-41-47-52
June 5 .............1.3-19-22-44-46-52
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 8
0 6-digit winners ......................$20M
25 5-digit winners.............. $6,497.50
1,684 4-digit winners ...................$84
34,914 3-digit winners ..............$5.50
* POWERBALL
June 12 ..................... 16-22-23-42-55
Powerball........................................ 32

June 8 ..................... 2-11-22-26-32
Pow erball........................................ 19
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 8
0 5 of 5 + PB.............................. 60M
0 5 of5 .............................. 1,000,000
6 4 of5 + PB.......................... 10,000
138 4 of 5 ................................... $100
ESTIMATED JACKPOT
$70 million
* MEGA MILLIONS
June 11 ..................... 15-40-45-50-53
Powerball........................................ 28

June 7 ..................... 1-10-37-48-55
Powerball........................ ................21
PAYOFF FOR JUNE 11
0 5of5+ MB............................ $21M
0 5 of5................................250,000
1 4of5 + MB....................$10,000
46 4of5 ................................... 150


Corrections
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errors of fact. To report an error, call or
email the sports department.


How to...
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EMAIL: sports@sun-herald.com
FAX: 941-629-2085


* REDSKINS CONTROVERSY



Another school changes it colors


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DRIGGS, Idaho An Idaho
high school will drop its longtime
"Redskins" nickname, logo and
mascot in a move its top admin-
istrator says was made to show
respect for Native Americans.
The decision at Teton High
School in Driggs is a way to
encourage students and the
community to see beyond skin
color and stereotypes, said Monte
Woolstenhulm, superintendent of
District 401. Motivation also came
from renewed efforts nationally
to change nicknames and logos
deemed offensive to many Native
Americans.
"Students need to be taught to
see people beyond the color of
their skin," said Woolstenhulm,
who was a student at the school.
"They need to get to know who
people are without using nick-
names or assumptions based on
outward appearances."


Woolstenhulm expects the
decision will draw some criticism,
but dropping the name won initial
approval from the school board
earlier this week.
Last month, 10 members of
Congress sent letters to the owner
of the Washington Redskins NFL
and the league commissioner urg-
ing the team to change the name.
The letter to team owner Daniel
Snyder said that "Native Americans
throughout the country consider
the 'R-word' a racial, derogatory
slur akin to the 'N-word' among
African Americans.
Snyder has vowed he will never
change the nickname.
At the college level, the NCAA
warned more than a dozen schools
in 2005 to change American Indian
nicknames or logos or face sanc-
tions. Some have followed the
warning, including North Dakota,
once known as the "Fighting
Sioux," while others have gotten
permission from tribes to keep


* NBA FINALS:


LEBRON
FROM PAGE 1
have just one? Should he
assume that role because
the clock might be ticking
on close friend Wade's bad
knee? Should he go against
how he believes the game
should be played?
Or should James forget
about his teammates and
channel the Cleveland
LeBron who poured in 48
points in Game 5 of the
2007 playoffs against the
Pistons in Detroit?
Considering that he's
scored 50 points in the
first three games of the
Finals, the basketball
world would be fine with
the latter.
The issue of him being
more of a distributor than
an aggressor came up
after Game 1 and James
had his answer ready.
"I've done more and lost
before," he said, according
to the Associated Press.
That could be the crux of
James' issue.
James has yet to score
20 points in the Finals af-
ter running off 33 consec-
utive games of 20 or more
during the regular season.
He's averaging 16.7 points
and 12.3 rebounds in the
Finals, 10 points below his
season average.
"I can't have a perfor-
mance like that and expect
to win the game," James
said Tuesday after scoring
15 points on 7-of-21 shoot-
ing. Nine points came in
the final 1:36 of the third
quarter, which means for
the other 46:24 he was
virtually no threat. "I've
got to shoot the ball better,
and I've got to make better
decisions. I'm not putting
the blame on anybody; I'm
owning everything I did."
Ex-Cav Danny Green,
the Spurs' 3-point whiz,
delivered the most telling
remarks about James.
"LeBron has kind of
stopped himself out there
and we're getting a little
lucky," Green said.
James' lack of energy
prompted one ques-
tioner to ask Dwyane
Wade if James was sick.
Presumably that's not the
reason.
But it seems almost
impossible to compre-
hend that the NBAs best
player is having a crisis
of confidence. Yet he's
shooting 39 percent in the
Finals, 23 percent (7 of 30)
outside the paint. In Game
3, he did not go to the free-
throw line for the first time
since Dec. 2, 2009, when
he was with the Cavs.
It might not be his
confidence as much as the
conundrum.
James seems to have
conditioned himself to be
happiest when he's merely
one of the Big Three. He
seems to be trying to move
away from his old moniker
of "The Chosen One." He
doesn't want to do it alone.


BASEBALL
Pro Sports Academy
fundamentals camp: Open
to ages 7-12, Monday and Wednesday
weekly throughout June and July, 9 a.m.
to noon. Cost: $65 per week. Call Ray,
941-505-2551.

Pro Sports Academy high
school prep camp: Open to ages
13-16, Tuesday and Thursday weekly
throughout June and July, 9 a.m. to
noon. Cost: $65 per week. Call Ray,
941-505-2551.

FGCU camps: Prospects (June
24-37 or Aug. 1-3), youth camp ages
6-12 (July 15-18). All camps at Swanson
Stadium on FGCU campus. Cost: June
prospect camp: $395/commuters and
$495/resident; Aug. prospect camp:
$295/commuters and $395/resident;
July youth camp: $250. Players must
bring own equipment To register, logon
to collegebaseballcamps.com/fgcu or
contact Jon Moore at 239-590-7059 or
jomoore@fgcu.edu.

IRONPIGS tryouts: Travel
teams for 9U,10U,11U,,12U,13U,
and 14U age groups, 10 a.m. to noon
Aug. 3-4 at 1185 O'Donnell Blvd., Port
Charlotte. No fee for tryouts. Call Wayne,
941-626-1274 or email waynel harrell@
yahoo.com

BASKETBALL
FGCU girls camp: At Alico
Arena, June 24-26, open to girls entering
grades 5-12. For beginners, intermediate
and advanced players. Daily schedule:
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (first two days), 10
a.m.-5 p.m. (third day). Cost: $345
(resident); $295 (commuter). To register,
logon to http://www.fgcuathletics.com/
wbasketball/camp/.

Rising Stars clinic: 6-8 p.m.
second and fourth Thursday of each
month through Aug. 22 at the Morgan
Family Community Center in North Port.
For kids K-5. Cost: $5 drop-in fee or $25
for entire session. Call 941-429-7275
or wivist www.cityofnorthport.com to
register.

FISHING
Charlotte High School
Redfish Roundup:12th
annual event June 22. Cost: $300 for
three-angler teams with a late fee of
$50 added after June 18. First prize is
$5,000 and there is a total purse of more
than $12,000. Call 941-637-5953 or
941-380-8099.

FOOTBALL
Flag football tourna-
ment:June 29-30 in Punta Gorda.
Youth, adults and a women's divisions.
Visit www.makeitcountsportcom or call
Elgin Hicks, 941-268-1891.

North Port Mustangs
registration: Football and
cheerleading, June 29 and July 13,10
a.m. to 2 p.m., at Larry Thoennissen Field
concession stand behind the George
Mullen Activity Center. Free physical will
be offered June 29. Cost: $185 (football),
$215 (cheerleading); $100 deposit is
required. Open to kids age 5-15. Original
birth certificate required. Logon to www.
northportmustangs.org or contact Trina
Willis at ryan-trina@comcast.net or
941-815-0804,

Englewood Cats funda-
mentals camp: June 17-27
and July 8-18 (Monday,Tuesday and
Thursday), 6-8 p.m., at Larry Nicol


Tony Parker watches fthe San Antonio Spurs practice Wednesday
after an MRI revealed Parker has a strained hamstring.



Hamstring may



sideline Parker


FROM WIRE REPORTS


SAN ANTONIO -
The only thing the San
Antonio Spurs can do is
wait.
An MRI on Wednesday
revealed guard Tony
Parker suffered a Grade
1 right hamstring strain
in the second half of the
Spurs' victory against the
Miami Heat in Game 3
of the NBA Finals. He is
listed as day-to-day and
likely a game-time deci-
sion for tonight's Game 4
at AT&T Center.
The Spurs lead the
series 2-1.
"I was just hoping it
was not a tear or a de-
fect," Parker said. "So the
good news, it's not a tear.
It's not a defect. So that's
good news. Now, I just
have to see how I'm going
to feel (Thursday)."
Parker initially left the
game because of pain
with 5 minutes, 7 seconds
left in the third quarter.
He then played two min-
utes in the fourth before
being taken out with the
game already in hand.
Parker did not practice
Wednesday.
The Spurs were 11-5
without Parker this sea-
son. He was also bothered
by a calf injury in the
second round against the
Golden State Warriors.
"I'll do different stuff
to see how I feel," Parker
said. "It depends on when
I wake up (Thursday) and
how I feel."
A hamstring injury
forced former Los Angeles
Lakers guard Magic
Johnson to miss the last
two games of the 1989
Finals when they were
swept by the Detroit
Pistons.
If Parker is unable to
play, it would be a tough
blow to the Spurs.
They would have to
turn to backup Cory
Joseph, who has averaged
just 10.6 minutes in the
postseason. The
Shandel Richardson,
South Florida Sun Sentinel


NBA Finals stuck in
blowouts: So far, the NBA Finals
have featured drubbings, not drama.
Spurs guard Tony Parker opened the
NBA Finals with a memorable shot at the
end of Game 1.
San Antonio's 92-88 victory gave
hope that the series against the
defending champion Miami Heat was
going to be full of close games.
It hasn't quite worked out that way
so far. What followed Parker's sensational
shot in Game 1 a twisting, ducking,
barely shot clock-beating jumper off the
glass was a 19-point Heat blowout
in Game 2 and the Spurs coasting to a
113-77 win Tuesday night to take a 2-1
series lead.
The blowouts have sent the stars
on both teams to the bench early and
allowed guys such as DeJuan Blair and
James Jones to run out the clock.
"We both answered the losses very
well. We both have not answered the
wins very well,'Tim Duncan said."That's
one thing Pop always points out- you
have to be able to bring that same
energy with wins and not be satisfied
with yourself."
Heat forward Chris Bosh described
the series as"bipolar basketball"with
wild swings about which team seems to
be in total command.
"Can the Spurs bounce back? Aw,
man, is Miami serious?"Bosh said."You
just have to deal with it."

Heat's defensive issues:
Before the blowout loss in Game 3, the
Heat had only given up more than 100
points once in their previous 18 playoff
games.
So while manyWednesday pointed
the finger at LeBron James for his lack
of scoring, Bosh bemoaned the Heat
defense that surrendered a Finals-record
16 3-pointers and let the Spurs shoot 49
percent from the floor.
"It's not offense end that's really
hurting us"'Bosh said."It's everything
that's happening on defense right now."
Spurs guard Danny Green has hurt
the Heat, hitting 163-pointers this
series. Miami's Dwyane Wade, who has
been chiefly matched up with Green,
said the Heat must do a better job of
defending pick-and-rolls.
The Heat arrived in San Antonio
allowing an average of 87.7 points,
second in the playoffs behind NewYork.
"We've always really prided ourselves
on being a defensive-first team"Bosh
said."We have to get stops. All of those
things go together. In order for everyone
to play well not only LeBron we
have to play better defense, team-wise."
-Associated Press


their names.
Meanwhile, Woolstenhulm said
maintenance crews will begin
removing Redskins logos and signs
from around the school this sum-
mer. Uniforms for all athletic teams
and cheer squads will be phased
out and the school newspaper,
"The War Cry," will be renamed.
The process for picking a new
nickname and mascot will begin
next fall, he said.
Brody Birch, school athletic
director and football coach, said
the decision is unfortunate for
students and alumni who identi-
fied with the nickname. Though he
also understands how the name
can do more harm than good.
"You have people who are indif-
ferent and then you have people
(asking) 'What are we doing" Why
are we caving in?" Birch said. "It's
not going to change what we are
at Teton High School or what our
values are."


GOODELL DEFENDS
REDSKINS NAME
NEW YORK (AP) NFL
Commissioner Roger Goodell
said Wednesday the Washington
Redskins nickname is a "unifying
force that stands for strength,
courage, pride and respect":'
Goodell was responding to
a letter from 10 members of
Congress who want the name
changed because it is offensive
to many Native Americans.
Goodell cited the nickname's
origins and polls that support
its popularity. He wrote that
he understands the feelings
surrounding it are complex
and could change, but he also
point out fan pride in the team's
heritage.
The name is the subject of a
legal challenge from a group
seeking to have the team lose its
trademark protection.


I COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Field, Oyster Creek Sports Complex,
Englewood. Cost: free. Open to all youth.

Englewood Cats registra-
tion: Football and cheerleading, 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., June 22, at Larry Nicol
Field, Oyster Creek Sports Complex,
Englewood. Cost: $100/child (not
required at the time of registration).
Additional fees may apply. Original
birth certificate required for first-time
registrants. Visit www.englewoodcats.
com.

Imagine School at
North Port: Varsity football
fundraising luncheon, June 22,11
a.m. to 1 p.m., at Carrabba's Italian
Grill in Port Charlotte. Team players
will be serving. There will also be
raffles. Tickets, $12 each, must be
purchased in advance. Contact Tina at
941-376-2279.

Port Charlotte Bandit
registration: Includes cheer-
leading, ages 5-15,10 a.m.-2 p.m., June
22. Cost: $150. Visit www.portcharlot-
tebandits.com or call Les, 941-629-8604.

Charlotte Warriors regis-
tration: Includes cheerleading, 6-8
p.m., June 27; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on June 29
at Carmalita Athletic Park, Punta Gorda.
Ages 5-15. Cost: $150. Registration
forms at www.charlottewarriors.com or
call Kelly at 941-286-5082.

GOLF
Provo Open: 8:30 a.m. shotgun
start July 13,The Hills at Rotonda Golf
& Country Club. Four-player, best ball
scramble. Cost: $85 player, $325 team.
Call Dennis, 941-697-0779 or email
denpro@embarqmail.com.

RUNNING
FGCU cross country
camp: June 24-28 at FGCU. Cost: $465
(resident camp), $355 (day camp -
commuters). Conducted by FGCU coach
Cassandra Goodson. Group/individual
instruction, including race strategy,
injury prevention and nutrition.

SOCCER
North Port Soccer: Pancake
breakfast fundraiser Saturday, 8 a.m. to
9:45 a.m., at Buffalo Wings & Rings. Door
prizes, raffles and a 50/50. Admission is
$5. For information, contact Catherine at
ca.Anderson8@yahoo.com.

SOFTBALL
Hucky's Softball Training
Inc. camp: June 27-29,8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Call Amanda Huckestein-Wathen,
941-276-8919.

SWIMMING
Charlotte County
Swimming:Year-round USA
Swimming team provides instruction
and competition ages 6 and up.
Visit www.ccswim.org or call Susan,
941-628-1510.

North Port Family YMCA
camp: 1-5 p.m. June 17-21 at Dallas
White Park. Cost: $50 members; $60
nonmembers. For registration, informa-
tion call Gene 942-429-2269.

FGCU swimming camps:
June 22-26 at the FCGU Aquatic Center.
$545 (resident), $385 (commuter), $200
(half-day). Conducted by FGCU coach
Neal Studd. Group/individual instruction,
including race strategy, injury prevention
and nutrition.


AP PHOTO


Page 2 SP www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013








COLLEGE WORLD SERIES:



Young stars make LSU a threat to win title


By BRETT MARTEL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BATON ROUGE, La.-
Alex Bregman had already
made up his mind to turn
down the Boston Red Sox
and enroll at LSU as he
watched upstart Stony
Brook celebrate a College
World Series berth follow-
ing their upset of the Tigers
in Baton Rouge last year.
The next day, Bregman
logged on to the social
media site Twitter and
guaranteed the Tigers
would get to Omaha in
2013, when he would be
their new shortstop.
"I knew I would be able
to make a difference and



RAYS

FROM PAGE 1
two bases in the game,
giving him 29 for the year.
Ellsbury has scored a run
in 10 consecutive games,
and stolen a base five
straight games.
Tampa Bay loaded the
bases by drawing three
walks from Aceves in
the second, but failed to
score when Yunel Escobar
hit an inning-ending
grounder.
Aceves worked out of
a two-on, no-out jam in
the third by striking out
Johnson and getting a
double-play grounder by
Longoria.
Rays first baseman
James Loney made a
strong defensive play
in the first, diving to his
right to take away a po-
tential two-out RBI single
from David Ortiz.
NOTES: Red Sox RHP
Clay Buchholz played
catch for the first time
since leaving his start
last Saturday with neck
stiffness. He might
return to the rotation
Sunday or Tuesday....
Rays LHP David Price, on
the 15-day disabled list
since May 16 with a left
triceps strain, will throw
in a simulated game
Thursday.... The Red Sox
optioned RHP Jose De
La Torre to Pawtucket ...
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Pro Bowl defensive tackle
Gerald McCoy threw the


expected I could do even
more than I've done so far,"
said Bregman, named the
national freshman hitter
of the year by the National
Collegiate Baseball
Writers Association and
All-America by Baseball
America. "I'm just happy
we're in Omaha and that's
the main reason I came to
school. I just wanted to win
a national championship."
Thanks to a foundation
of youth that includes
players like Bregman,
freshman outfielder Mark
Laird and the sophomore
ace of the pitching staff,
Aaron Nola, LSU (57-9) will
be among the favorites in


ceremonial first pitch.
He was first scheduled
to do it May 25, but was
delayed that day getting
to the ballpark due to a
minor vehicle accident
in which no one was
injured.

Red Sox 2, Rays 1
Boston AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Ellsburycf 3 1 1 0 2 1 .283
Navarf-lf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .299
Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .327
D.Ortizdh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .309
Napolilb 3 0 0 0 0 2 .259
Carplf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .330
1-Victorinopr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282
Saltalamacchiac 4 0 0 0 0 2 .278
Middlebrooks3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .196
Drewss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .223
Totals 32 2 5 2 411
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
Joycerf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .259
Zobrist2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273
KJohnsonlf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .257
Longoria3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .305
Loneylb 4 0 1 0 0 0 .321
2-Fuldpr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .190
DeJenningscf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .251
Scottdh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .207
Lobatonc 3 0 0 0 1 1 .286
Y.Escobarss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .251
Totals 31 1 6 1 410
Boston 002000000- 2 50
Tampa Bay 000001000- 1 61
1-ran for Carp in the 8th. 2-ran for Loney in
the 9th. E-Lobaton (2). LOB-Boston 8,
Tampa Bay 7. 2B-Joyce (10), KJohnson
(7).HR-Nava (9), off Archer; Longoria (13),
off Aceves. RBIs-Nava 2 (44), Longoria
(39).SB-Ellsbury2 (29), Napoli (1), Fuld (3).
Runners left in scoring position-Boston
5 (D.Ortiz, Napoli, Nava 2, Carp);Tampa Bay
6 (YEscobar 2, Longoria 2, Zobrist, Loba-
ton). RISP-Boston 1 for 7;Tampa Bay 0 for
7. GIDP-Longoria. DP-Boston 1 (Drew,
Pedroia, Napoli).
Boston IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
AcevesW,3-1 6 41 1 4 3 845.58
TazawaH,10 1 00 0 0 2 122.43
BreslowH,4 2/3 1 0 0 0 2 192.04
UeharaH,11 1/3 00 0 0 1 32.36
A.BaileyS,7-9 1 10 0 0 2 142.21
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
ArcherL,1-2 4 4 2 2 4 71034.80
Farnsworth 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 196.11
J.Wright 2/3 00 0 0 1 143.73
McGee 2/3 00 0 0 1 185.76
Jo.Peralta 1 10 0 0 0 20 1.72
AI.Torres 1 00 0 0 1 90.00
Inherited runners-scored-Uehara 1-0.
HBP-by Farnsworth (Napoli). Umpires-
Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second,
Tom Hallion;Third, Chris Guccione.T-3:22.
A-15,091 (34,078).


. -.... ..


AP PHOTO
Tampa Bay Rays shortstop Yunel Escobar attempts to throw
Boston Red Sox's Dustin Pedroia out at first base during the
third inning of a Wednesday's game in St. Petersburg. Pedroia
was safe at first.

RAYS SIGN RHP JOHN FARRELL
ST. PETERSBURG The Tampa Bay Rays signed John Farrell not the
manager, but the team's 21st-round pick in this year's amateur draft.
The right-handed pitcher from William & Mary is not related to Red Sox
manager John Farrell, who was at Tropicana Field on Wednesday for the
final game of a three-game series with the Rays.
By the way, the father of the Rays' new prospect is also named John
Farrell.



LOOKING FOR
SOMETHING?
Find it in the CLASSIFIED!

SUNeif


Omaha after tying a school
record for wins. The Tigers
open play on Sunday
against UCLA, and the so-
far unbeatable Nola (12-0),
will be on the mound.
Mason Katz is among
the four-year seniors who
would have comprised the
first class since 1982 not to
make at least one trip to
Omaha during their LSU
careers had the Tigers not
made it this year.
"Those were pieces we
were missing from last
year," Katz said.
Nola was 7-4 as a fresh-
man. This season, he has
been arguably the best
pitcher in college baseball,


COLLEGE WORLD
SERIES
At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
Double Elimination
x-if necessary
Saturday's games
Mississippi State (48-18) vs.
Oregon State (50-11), 3 p.m.
Indiana (48-18) vs. Louisville
(51-12), 8 p.m.
Sunday's games
North Carolina (57-10) vs. N.C.
State (49-14), 3 p.m.
UCLA (44-17) vs. LSU (57-9), 8p.m.

not losing a game in the
Southeastern Conference,
then going 2-0 so far in


the NCAA tournament.
While Nola's fastball can
reach the low- to mid-90s,
he does not have to try to
overpower hitters because
he is seemingly able to
put his fastball, breaking
ball and off-speed pitches
wherever he wants.
But what also impresses
Nola's coaches and
teammates is the hurler's
unshakable confidence
and mental toughness.
For coach Paul Mainieri,
one of Nola's defining mo-
ments came in the NCAA
regional round, when
three errors committed
behind him allowed Sam
Houston a five-run first


SMLB ROUNDUP


AP PHOTO
Milwaukee's Carlos Gomez is congratulated by teammate Logan Schafer after Gomez scored on a
sacrifice fly by Jonathan Lucroy during Wednesday's game against the Miami Marlins in Miami.




Brewers bash Marlins

Royals ruin Verlander's seven scoreless innings


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI Kevin Slowey
said the short rest didn't
affect his performance.
But it certainly didn't
help.
Slowey (2-6) allowed six
runs five earned and
nine hits in five innings
on three days' rest for the
Miami Marlins in a 10-1
loss to the Milwaukee
Brewers on Wednesday
night.
"Today's game had less
to do with rest and more
to do with me executing
pitches," Slowey said.
He was on short rest
after he pitched seven
scoreless innings of relief
to earn the victory in
Saturday's 2-1, 20-inning
win over the Mets.
"We asked him to do a
lot after throwing (seven)
innings in New York and
come back on three days'
rest, but a testament to
him, he gave us every-
thing he could," Marlins
manager Mike Redmond
said.
"Just didn't have his
good command, but still
ended up going out there
and giving us five innings.
He wanted to go out there
and pitch that fifth to
save the bullpen. He did
everything he could."
Slowey is 0-4 with an
8.89 ERA in his past six
starts.
Carlos Gomez had
another impressive
performance in his
breakout season with four
hits, including two triples,
drove in three runs, and
scored three runs to lead
the Brewers.
"He had a very big


night, two triples," said
Jonathan Lucroy, who
drove in four runs.

Reds 2, Cubs 1: At Chicago,
Mike Leake combined with Aroldis
Chapman on a three-hitter and Todd
Frazier hit a tiebreaking home run in
the seventh inning against Travis Wood,
leading Cincinnati to its record 12th
straight win at Wrigley Field. Leake
(6-3) won for the fourth time in five
decisions, allowing Nate Schierholtz's
second-inning home run into the
right-field bleachers, his eighth of the
season. Chapman struck out two in a
perfect ninth for his 17th save in 19
chances.

Padres 5, Braves 3: At San
Diego, Edinson Volquez struck out a
season-high nine in seven innings as
he rebounded from the worst start
of his career and led San Diego over
the NL East-leading Atlanta and to a
three-game sweep. Chris Denorfia hit
a two-run homer for the Padres, who
have won six of eight. They swept the
Braves in San Diego for the first time
since May 19-21,2005. The Braves were
swept for the second time this season.

Pirates 12, Giants 8: At
Pittsburgh, Starling Marte had a career-
high four hits and scored four times for
Pittsburgh. Neil Walker and Alex Presley
homered for Pittsburgh. Jordy Mercer,
Andrew McCutchen and Gaby Sanchez
had three hits each as the Pirates set
season highs for both runs and hits.

Mets 5, Cardinals 1: At New
York, Dillon Gee had his third straight
stellar start, Lucas Duda hit one of three
Mets homers and NewYork scored the
most runs allowed by Shelby Miller
in his young career. David Wright and
Marion Byrd also connected for the
Mets, who snapped a three-game
skid and improved to 2-6 in June.
Duda drove in two runs, including a
first-inning single that scored Daniel
Murphy from first base.


Royals 3, Tigers 2, 10
innings: At Kansas City, Mo.,
Lorenzo Cain hit a tying, two-run
homer off Jose Valverde with two outs
in the ninth inning and Eric Hosmer had
a winning single in the 10th, helping
Kansas overcome Justin Verlander's
seven scoreless innings. Verlander did
not allow a batter past first base, giving
up three singles, striking out eight and
walking two in a 117-pitch outing,
his second-highest total this season.
Verlander has a 15-2 record with a 2.56
ERA in 25 starts against the Royals.

Angels 9, Orioles 5:
At Baltimore, Erick Aybar hit a
bases-loaded triple and Albert Pujols
homered during a six-run seventh
inning, helping Los Angeles stop a four-
game losing streak. Los Angeles trailed
4-2 before getting five hits three for
extra bases and two walks in the
seventh against three pitchers.

Indians 5, Rangers 2: At
Arlington, Texas, Jason Kipnis had a
home run among his three hits and
Cleveland got a series-clinching victory.
A night after ending an eight-game
losing streak, and a span of 12 losses
in a row away from home, the Indians
made it consecutive victories to clinch
their first road series in a month. They
had gone 0-4-1 in series since taking
two of three May 10-12 at Detroit,
the only American League team with
a better home record than Texas this
season.

Twins 4, Phillies 3: At
Minneapolis, Clete Thomas had a
career-high four hits for Minnesota
and came home on a wild pitch for the
go-ahead run in the eighth inning, and
the Twins stuck the Phillies with their
fifth straight loss. Thomas went 4 for
4 with two RBI doubles. He drove in
Oswaldo Arcia both times, including
in the eighth when his drive off the
tall wall in right field against Antonio
Bastardo (2-2) tied the game.


inning. Nola responded
with six shutout innings.
In the super re-
gional, Nola went against
Oklahoma ace Jonathan
Gray, the third overall pick
in the draft. He pitched a
two-hit shutout in a 2-0
win and Katz will never
forget a conversation
he had with Nola in the
tunnel behind the dugout
around the sixth inning.
"I went down there and
said, 'Hey, we're going to
get a run.' And he goes,
'Well, if you score one,
we win,"' Katz recalled.
"That's who Aaron is. He
always keeps us in the
game.


* FSL:


YANKEES AT
STONE CRABS
WHAT: Doubleheader
WHO: Tampa (27-36)
at Charlotte (28-34)
WHEN: Today, first game starts
at 4 p.m.
WHERE: Charlotte Sports Park
RADIO: stonecrabsbaseball.com
TICKETS: 941-206-3511 or at
the stadium box office from
9 a.m. until end of second game



Weather


plagues


Crabs

By LAURA MYERS
SPORTS WRITER
PORT CHARLOTTE
-Wednesday's game
between the Charlotte
Stone Crabs and Tampa
was postponed due to
inclement weather. It will
be made up as part of a
doubleheader beginning
today at 4 p.m.
The game never had
a chance to begin, as a
thunderstorm descended
around 5:15 p.m. and
never let up. It was called
just after 6 p.m.
Parker Markel was
scheduled to start for
the Stone Crabs on
Wednesday, and Roberto
Gomez was slated to
come in behind him, in
order to get the starters'
work in before the All-
Star break, which begins
Friday.
The Stone Crabs said
Markel will start game
one today, and Jesse
Hahn will start game two.
Market has fallen
victim to a postponed or
cancelled game on his
scheduled day to start no
less than six times this
season.
Email: lmyers@sun-herald.com

Florida State League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Dunedin (BlueJays) 3329.532 -
Clearwater(Phillies) 3430.531 -
Daytona (Cubs) 32 29.525 1/2
Brevard County (Brewers) 3330.524 /2
Lakeland (Tigers) 2934.460 412
Tampa (Yankees) 2736.429 61/2
South Division
W LPct. GB
xz-Fort Myers (Twins) 42 20.677 -
St. Lucie (Mets) 33 30.524 9/2
Jupiter (Marlins) 3331.516 10
Charlotte (Rays) 28 34.452 14
Palm Beach (Cardinals) 2836.438 15
Bradenton (Pirates) 25 38.397 17'/2
x-clinched first half
z-clinched playoff spot
Wednesday's results
Fort Myers 6, Daytona 3,1 st game
Lakeland 4, Bradenton 1, comp. of susp.
game
Lakeland 3, Bradenton 2,7 innings
Tampa at Charlotte, ppd., rain
Brevard County 2, Jupiter 0
Palm Beach 5, Dunedin 3
Clearwater 6, St. Lucie 0
Fort Myers at Daytona, 2nd game, late
Thursday's Games
Dunedin at Palm Beach,12:05 p.m.
Tampa at Charlotte, 4 p.m., 1st game
Bradenton at Lakeland, 6:30 p.m.
Tampa at Charlotte, 6:30 p.m., 2nd game
Jupiter at Brevard County, 6:35 p.m.
St. Lucie at Clearwater, 7 p.m.
Fort Myers at Daytona, 7:05 p.m.

CRABS PLANNER
Upcoming games for the Stone Crabs:


MON. TUE. WED.
at St. Lucie at St. Lucie at St. Lucie
6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 3


.'l ^ .". ..." .," .. .....






www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


I STANDINGS


Boston
NewYork
Baltimore
RAYS
Toronto

Detroit
Cleveland
Kansas City
Minnesota
Chicago

Oakland
Texas
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
GB WCGB L10
S 7-3
2/2 6-4
3/2 1 6-4
5 21/2 5-5
31112 9 5-5
Central Division
GB WCGB L10
S 6-4
4'/2 5/2 2-8
51/2 61/2 7-3
6 7 6-4
71/2 81/2 4-6
West Division
GB WCGB L10
-- 7-3
/2 4-6
10 9 5-5
11 10 3-7
17 16 3-7


NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 39 27 .591 5-5 L-3 21-7 18-20
Washington 31 32 .492 6/2 7 4-6 L-1 18-13 13-19
Philadelphia 31 35 .470 8 8/2 5-5 L-5 16-15 15-20
NewYork 24 36 .400 12 12/2 3-7 W-1 13-20 11-16
MARLINS 19 46 .292 191/2 20 5-5 L-1 11-22 8-24
Central Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 42 23 .646 5-5 L-1 19-12 23-11
Cincinnati 40 26 .606 2/2 5-5 W-3 22-11 18-15
Pittsburgh 39 26 .600 3 5-5 W-2 23-11 16-15
Milwaukee 27 38 .415 15 12 6-4 W-1 16-20 11-18
Chicago 25 38 .397 16 13 2-8 L-3 14-21 11-17
West Division
W L Pet GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Arizona 36 29 .554 5-5 L-1 17-14 19-15
Colorado 35 30 .538 1 4 7-3 W-2 21-14 14-16
San Francisco 33 31 .516 2/2 5/2 4-6 L-2 21-11 12-20
San Diego 32 34 .485 4/2 7/2 6-4 W-3 19-14 13-20
Los Angeles 28 36 .438 7/2 10/2 5-5 W-1 19-19 9-17
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesday's results Tuesday's results
Baltimore 3, L.A. Angels 2 Pittsburgh 8, San Francisco 2
RAYS8, Boston 3 MARLINS 5,Milwaukee4
Cleveland 5,Texas2 St.Louis9, N.Y. Mets 2
Detroit 3, Kansas City2 Cincinnati 12, Chicago Cubs 2
Minnesota 3, Philadelphia 2 Minnesota 3, Philadelphia 2
Toronto 7, ChicagoWhite Sox 5,10 innings Colorado 8,Washington 3
Oakland 6, N.Y.Yankees 4 L.A. Dodgers 5, Arizona 3
Seattle 4, Houston 0 San Diego 3, Atlanta 2
Wednesday's results Wednesday's results
L.A. Angels 9, Baltimore 5 Cincinnati 2, Chicago Cubs 1
Kansas City3, Detroit 2,10 innings San Diego 5, Atlanta 3
Boston 2, RAYS 1 Pittsburgh 12, San Francisco 8
Cleveland 5,Texas2 Milwaukee 10, MARLINS 1
Minnesota 4, Philadelphia 3 N.Y Mets 5, St. Louis 1
Toronto at Chicago, ppd., rain Minnesota 4, Philadelphia 3
N.YYankees at Oakland, late Washington at Colorado, late
Houston at Seattle, late Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late
Today's games Today's games
N.Y Yankees (Kuroda 6-5) at Oakland St. Louis (Wainwright 9-3) at N.Y Mets (Har-
(J.Parker 5-6),3:35 p.m. vey 5-0),1:10 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 4-3) at Baltimore (Gaus- Cincinnati (Latos 6-0) at Chicago Cubs (Sa-
man 0-3), 7:05 p.m. mardzija 3-7),2:20 p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 4-5) at RAYS Washington (Detwiler 2-4) at Colorado
(Hellickson 4-2), 7:10 p.m. (Francis 2-4), 3:10 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 2-4)atTexas(Darvish 7-2), San Francisco (M.Cain 4-3) at Pittsburgh
8:05 p.m. (Morton 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lee 7-2) at Minnesota (Correia Philadelphia (Lee 7-2) at Minnesota (Correia
5-4),8:10 p.m. 5-4), 8:10p.m.
Friday's games Friday's games
Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Washington at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at RAYS, 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto atTexas, 8:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
ChicagoWhite Sox at Houston, 8:10 p.m. St. Louis at MARLINS, 7:10 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at LA. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.


U MLB:


A scuffle breaks out after Los Ang
Zack Greinke was hit by a pitch d
Tuesday's game against the Arizo




Throwba



throw


Coaches get

in middle

of brawl

By HOWIE RUMBERG
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kirk Gibson and Mark
McGwire gripped each
other's tops and faced off
nose to nose as the nasty
brawl escalated.
No, this wasn't 1989.
It was Tuesday night.
When Ian Kennedy hit
fellow starter Zack Greinke
with a pitch and a melee
broke out between Arizona
and Los Angeles, several
stars from another genera-
tion were right in the thick
of it.
There was McGwire,
Los Angeles' hitting
coach, clutched in a tense
standoff with equally solid
Diamondbacks third base
coach Matt Williams. Big
Don Baylor, Arizona's hit-
ting coach, held his ground
among a surge of Dodgers.
Don Mattingly wrestled
someone to the ground
as he tried to get at fellow
manager Gibson. Williams
had Mattingly in a bear
hug at one point.


SCOREBOARD

Brewers 10, Marlins 1
Milwaukee AB R H BIBBSO
Aokirf 4 2 2 1 0 1
Segurass 4 2 1 1 1 0
Y.Betancourtss 0 0 0 0 0 0
C.Gomezcf 5 3 4 3 0 0
Ar.Ramirez3b 3 1 1 0 0 1
Bianchi3b 1 0 0 0 0 0
Lucroyc 3 0 1 4 0 1
L.Schaferlf 4 0 0 0 0 2
J.Franciscolb 4 0 0 0 0 1
Gennett2b 4 1 1 0 0 0
Figarop 3 1 2 0 0 1
b-Weeksph 0 0 0 0 1 0
Gorzelannyp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Badenhopp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 351012 9 2 7
Miami AB R H BIBBSO
Pierrelf 4 0 1 0 0 0
Lucas3b 4 0 2 0 0 1
Stantonrf 4 0 1 1 0 0
Ozunacf 4 0 0 0 0 0
Dietrich2b 3 0 0 0 0 1
Dobbslb 3 0 0 0 0 0
Hechavarriass 3 0 0 0 0 0
Brantlyc 3 0 0 0 0 0
Sloweyp 1 0 0 0 0 1
Olmosp 0 0 0 0 0 0
a-Olivoph 1 0 0 0 0 1
DaJenningsp 0 0 0 0 0 0
A.Ramosp 0 0 0 0 0 0
c-Ruggianoph 1 1 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 1 5 1 0 4
Milwaukee 301114000-1
Miami 000000 001-
a-struck out for Olmos in the 6th. b-w
for Figaro in the 8th.c-singled for A.R
in the 9th. E-Lucas (1), Dietrich (2). L
Milwaukee 3, Miami 3.3B-C.Gomez
Lucroy (4). HR-Segura (10), off SI(
RBIs-Aoki (14), Segura (30), C.G,
3 (36), Lucroy 4 (37), Stanton (12).
Ar.Ramirez (1). SF-Aoki, Lucroy. Rui
left in scoring position-Milwauk
(J.Francisco, L.Schafer, Segura); Mia
(Dietrich). RISP-Milwaukee 2 for 8; ,
0 for 4. GIDP-Aoki, Ozuna. DP-Mi
kee 1(Segura, Gennett, J.Francisco);
1 (Dietrich, Hechavarria, Dobbs).
Milwaukee IP HR ER BBSO NF
FigaroW,1-0 7 3 0 0 0 4 88
Gorzelanny 1 00 0 0 0
Badenhop 1 2 1 1 0 0 16
Miami IP H RERBBSONF
SloweyL,2-6 5 96 5 0 668
Olmos 1 3 4 3 1 0 19
DaJennings 2 00 0 1 1 26
A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP-by Slowey (Ar.Ramirez). Umpi
Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Gary C
strom; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, I
Barrett. T-2:31. A-13,468 (37,442).

Padres 5, Braves 3
Atlanta AB R H BIBBSO
Simmonsss 5 1 1 0 0 2
Heywardrf 5 0 2 0 0 2
J.Uptonlf 4 1 2 2 1 1
F.Freemanlb 4 0 2 0 0 0
Gattisc 4 0 0 0 0 1
B.Uptoncf 3 0 0 0 0 1
D.Carpenterp 0 0 0 0 0 0
a-McCannph 1 0 0 0 0 1
A.Woodp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Uggla2b 3 1 1 0 1 2
CJohnson3b 3 0 0 0 1 1
Maholmp 2 0 1 0 0 1
J.Schafercf 2 0 1 1 0 1
Totals 36 310 3 313
San Diego AB R H BIBBSO
Ev.Cabrerass 2 2 1 0 2 1
Denorfiacf-rf 4 1 1 2 0 0
Headley3b 4 1 1 0 0 1
Quentinlf 3 1 0 0 0 0
Blanksrf-lb 3 0 0 1 1 1
Forsythe2b 4 0 1 2 0 2
Guzmanlb 4 0 2 0 0 0
Venablecf 0 0 0 0 0 0
Grandalc 4 0 1 0 0 1
Volquezp 2 0 0 0 0 1
Thatcherp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Thayerp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Gregersonp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Laynep 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vincentp 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 5 7 5 3 7
Atlanta nn01 00nn11-


U MLB NOTEBOOK


Avg.
.303
.339
.218
.326
.292
.250
.265
.225
.206
.167
.333
.211
.000

Avg.
.245
.333
.230
.314
.222
.210
.198
.236
.000
.203

.219

0120
1 52
walked
amos
OB-
2 (8),
owey.
omez
CS-
nners
kee 3
mi 1
Miami
Iwau-
Miami

'ERA
S3.47
S1.98
S3.38
'ERA
S4.10
S6.75
60.96
S4.36
res-
Ceder-
Lance


Avg.
.253
.215
.254
.314
.256
.161
.000
.253
.193
.317
.161
.298
Avg.
.295
.282
.227
.260
.285
.333
.240
.228
.186
.118
.000



I1A1


SSan Diego 300020 00x- 5 71
Sa-struck out for D.Carpenter in the 8th.
/,E. E-Uggla (10), Guzman (3). LOB-Atlanta
9, San Diego 6. 2B-Heyward (7). HR-J.
S / Upton (15), off Thatcher; Denorfia (4), off
Maholm.RBIs-J.Upton 2(31),J.Schafer(9),
Denorfia 2 (21), Blanks (22), Forsythe 2 (3).
SB-Ev.Cabrera (30). S-Volquez. Runners
left in scoring position-Atlanta 5 (Gattis,
F.Freeman,J.Upton 2, McCann); San Diego 3
S(Grandal, Denorfia 2). RISP-Atlanta 2 for 9;
San Diego 3 for 6. Runners moved up-C.
SJohnson. GIDP-F.Freeman. DP-Atlanta
AP PHOTO 1 (Simmons, Uggla); San Diego 2 (Headley,
Forsythe, Guzman), (Forsythe, Guzman).
geles Dodgers starting pitcher Atlanta IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
MahlmL, 7-5 52/3 7 5 4 3 4 99 3.65
during the seventh inning of D.Carpenter 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 15 1.42
ona Diamondbacks. A.Wood 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.35
San Diego IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
VolquezW,5-5 7 6 1 1 3 91065.87
Thatcher 1/3 1 1 1 0 1 11 2.41
k s j i ThayerH,13 2/3 00 0 0 2 103.30
GregrsnH,11 2/3 21 1 0 0 102.01
Layne 0 1 0 0 0 0 31.59
VincentS, 1-1 1/3 00 0 0 1 50.00
Layne pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inher-
ited runners-scored-D.Carpenter 3-0,
Thayer 1-0, Layne 1-0,Vincent 2-0. HBP-by
Maholm (Quentin).WP-Thayer.PB-Gran-
d o w n I dal. Umpires-Home, Brian O'Nora; First, Bill
Welke; Second, Adrian Johnson;Third, Fieldin
Culbreth.T-2.54.A-22,316(42,524).
Gibson, McGwire and
Reds2,Cubsl
Diamondbacks assistant Cincinnati AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
hitting coach TurnerWard D.Robinsonlf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .317
who was nearly thrown Choo c 3 1 1 0 1 2 280
Vottolb 4 0 0 0 0 1 .323
over a railing near the Phillips2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .293
Arizona dugout-were Brucerf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .272
h e ec Frazier3b 311 1 11 .248
amongthe sixejectedfrom Mesoracoc 4 0 1 0 0 0 .248
the game. C.Izturisss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .164
"Eve hi ha ene Leakep 3 0 0 0 0 2 .161
"Everything happened
Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
so fast," Mattingly said. "It Totals 32 2 6 2 3 6
ust ets a little craz out Chicago AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
justgetsa ecrzyOu DeJesuscf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .262
there." Valbuena 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .238
Things got out of hand b-Hairston ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .157
Rizzolb 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248
in the seventh inning of Sweeney If 3 0 1 0 0 1 .345
the Dodgers' 5-3 victory, c-A.Sorianoph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267
wh enne hit Greinke Schierholtz rf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .293
when ennedyhitGrei S.Castross 3 0 0 0 0 1 .238
in the shoulder- the ball Castilloc 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246
caromed off his helmet. Barney2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .203
cTr.Wood p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .296
That was payback for Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Greinke hitting catcher a-Borbon ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .212
Greggp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Miguel Montero in the top Totals 30 1 3 1 1 8
of the inning after Kennedy Cincinnati 000001 100- 2 60
Chicago 010000000- 1 30
hit Dodgers rookie Yasiel Chicago 010000000- 1 30
Y a-struck out for Russell in the 8th. b-struck
Puig with a ball that caught out forValbuena in the 9th.c-grounded out
Puig's nose in the sixth. for Sweeney in the 9th. LOB-Cincinnati 6,
Chicago 3.2B-D.Robinson (3), Choo (17).
Generally, coaches try to HR-Frazier (8), offTr.Wood; Schierholtz (8),
remain peacemakers when off Leake. RBIs-Phillips (53), Frazier (36),
benchesclearafterSchierholtz (24). SB-Choo (6). Runners
benches clear afteraplayer left in scoring position-Cincinnati 3 (Phil-
is hit with a pitch. Not this lips, Leake, Bruce). RISP-Cincinnati 1 for 8;
time, with two sides full of Chicago 0 for 0. GIDP-C.lzturis. DP-Chi-
cago 1 (Barney, S.Castro, Rizzo).
gritty former players. Cincinnati IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
"We're certainly not LeakeW,6-3 8 3 1 1 1 61032.76
ChpmnS,17-191 00 0 0 2 82.17
going to try and jeopardize Chicago IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
anybody's career.We Tr.WoodL,5-5 7 42 2 2 41022.65
Russell 1 10 0 1 1 14 1.46
respect those guys too Gregg 1 10 0 0 1 110.96
much," Gibson said. "They IBB-off Russell (Phillips). Umpires-
responded and things just Home, John Tumpane; First, Mark Carlson;
oSecond, Brian Knight; Third, Jerry Meals.
got out of control." T-2:28. A-24,749 (41,019).


Mets 5, Cardinals 1
St. Louis AB R H BIBBSO Avg. San Franc
M.Carpenter2b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .324 An.TorreslI
Beltranrf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Abreu2b
Hollidaylf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Poseyc
Craiglb 4 1 1 1 0 0 .312 Pencerf
Y.Molinac 4 0 3 0 0 0 .358 Arias3b
Freese3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .281 Beltlb
Jaycf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 J.Perezcf
Kozmass 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 S.Rosariop
S.Millerp 2 0 0 0 0 1 .071 d-Noonan
a-Wiggintonph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .196 B.Crawford
Manessp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Zitop
Mujicap 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mijaresp
Totals 33 1 6 1 2 7 a-Pillph
NewYork AB R H BIBBSO Avg. R.Ramirez
Valdespin2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .228 J.Lopezp
Quintanillass 4 0 0 0 0 4 .295 G.Blancoc
D.Wright3b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .279 Totals
Dan.Murphylb 4 1 1 1 0 0 .286 Pittsburgl
Dudalf 3 1 2 2 0 0 .231 S.Martelf
Byrdrf 3 1 1 1 0 2 .245 Mercerss
Buckc 3 0 0 0 0 0 .217 McCutcher
Nieuwenhuiscf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .083 G.Sanchez
Geep 2 0 0 0 0 2 .100 R.Martinc
Ricep 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- P.Alvarez3
b-Satinph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Walker2b
Lyonp 0 0 0 0 0 0 --- Ingerf
Parnellp 0 0 0 0 0 --- Ju.Wilson
Totals 31 5 6 5 012 c-GJones
St.Louis 000001000- 1 61 Watson p
NewYork 200101 10x- 5 60 Grilli p


Pirates 12, Giants 8
isco AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
f 4 3 1 0 1 0 .270
5 3 3 0 0 1 .400
5 0 2 2 0 1 .299
4 2 2 1 1 0 .294
5 0 2 3 0 0 .250
4 0 2 0 1 0 .251
3 0 2 1 0 0 .500
S 0 0 0 00 0 -
ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .197
ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .287
2 0 0 0 0 0 .200
0 0 0 0 0 --
1 0 0 0 0 0 .148
p 0 0 0 0 00 -
0 0 0 000 -
f 1 0 0 0 0 0 .264
39 815 7 3 3
h AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
5 4 4 0 0 1 .289
5 2 3 0 0 1 .278
ncf 5 2 3 3 0 1 .297
lb 4 0 3 1 1 0 .252
4 1 1 2 1 0 .251
b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .215
4 1 2 3 0 0 .257
3 0 0 0 0 2 .210
S 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265
0 0 0 00 ---
0 0 0 0 0 --


a-struck out for S.Miller in the 7th.b-struck Liriano p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .077
out for Rice in the 7th. E-Freese (4). b-Presleyph-rf 2 1 1 1 0 0 .294
LOB-St. Louis 7, New York 2. 2B-Y.Mo- Totals 4012 18 11 2 6
lina 2 (21), D.Wright (9). HR-Craig (6), off San Francisco 100120 220- 8151
Gee; Duda (11), off S.Miller; D.Wright (9), off Pittsburgh 103042 11x-12181
S.Miller; Byrd (9), off Maness. RBIs-Craig a-grounded out for Mijares in the 6th. b-
(48), D.Wright (35), Dan.Murphy (29), Duda homered for Liriano in the 6th. c-grounded
2 (22), Byrd (30). Runners left in scoring out for Ju.Wilson in the 7th.d-struckout for
position-St. Louis 2 (S.Miller, Jay); New S.Rosario in the 9th. E-Arias (1), Mercer
York 1 (Dan.Murphy). RISP-St. Louis 1 for (3). LOB-San Francisco 8, Pittsburgh 6.
6; New York 1 for2. 2B-Abreu (2), Pence 2 (20), McCutchen
St.Louis IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA (18), G.Sanchez (10), PAlvarez (4). HR-
S.MillerL,7-4 6 5 4 4 0 10 96 2.21 Presley (1), off R.Ramirez; Walker (5), off
Maness 1 1 1 1 0 1 14 3.44 R.Ramirez. RBIs-Posey 2 (37), Pence (32),
Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 1.57 Arias 3 (8), J.Perez (2), McCutchen 3 (33),
NewYork IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA G.Sanchez (21), R.Martin 2 (20), PAlvarez
GeeW,5-6 62/3 6 1 1 2 71074.84 (38),Walker 3 (19), Presley(1).SB-S.Marte
RiceH,6 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 24.18 2 (20). SF-J.Perez. Runners left in scor-
Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.12 ing position-San Francisco 4 (Arias, Zito,
Parnell 1 0 0 0 0 0 92.93 Belt, J.Perez); Pittsburgh 3 (PAlvarez 3).
Inherited runners-scored-Rice 1-0. RISP-San Francisco 5 for 14; Pittsburgh 8
Balk-Mujica. Umpires-Home, Greg for17. Runners moved up-Abreu, Posey,
Gibson; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Hunter R.Martin. GIDP-B.Crawford 2, R.Martin.
Wendelstedt; Third, Alan Porter. T-2:33. DP-San Francisco 2(J.Perez, J.Perez, Arias),
A-23,331 (41,922). (B.Crawford, Belt); Pittsburgh 2 (Liriano, Mer-
cer, G.Sanchez), (Liriano, Mercer, G.Sanchez).
Royals 3, Tigers 2,10 innings San Francisco IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Detroit AB R H BIBBSO Avg. ZitoL,4-5 42/311 8 8 1 4 864.79
A.Garciacf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .288 Mijares 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 62.31
Tor.Hunterrf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .296 R.Ramirez 1 43 3 1 02511.12
Mi.Cabrera3b 3 0 0 0 2 2 .358 J.Lopez 2/3 00 0 0 0 81.69
Fielderlb 4 0 2 1 1 0 .286 S.Rosario 11/3 2 1 1 0 2 206.75
V.Martinezdh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .235 Pittsburgh IP HR ER BBSO NP ERA
Jh.Peraltass 3 0 0 0 1 1 .329 LirianoW,5-2 684 4 3 2912.36
Tuiasosopolf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .349 Ju.Wilson 1 4 2 2 0 0 24 2.41
D.Kellylf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Watson 1 32 2 0 0134.70
B.Penac 4 0 2 1 0 0 .299 Grilli 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.94
R.Santiago2b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .163 R.Ramirez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Totals 32 2 7 2 411 Inherited runners-scored-Mijares 2-2.
KansasCity AB R H BIBBSO Avg. PB-R.Martin. Umpires-Home, Marvin
A.Gordon If 4 0 0 0 1 1 .299 Hudson; First, Tim McClelland; Second,
Hosmer lb 5 1 2 1 0 2 .274 MikeMuchlinski; Third, Wally Bell.T-3:16.
S.Perezc 4 0 1 0 0 0 .315 A-19,966(38,362).
B.Butlerdh 3 0 1 0 1 2 .269
L.Caincf 4 1 1 2 0 3 .285 Twins4,Phillies3
Lough rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Philadelphia AB R H BIBBSO Avg.
Moustakas3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .184 M.Young3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .275
EJohnson2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Reverecf 4 1 3 1 01 .254
a-M.Tejadaph-2b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .333 Rollinsss 4 1 2 0 0 0 263
A.Escobarss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Howardlb 3 0 0 0 1 .252
Totals 35 3 8 3 2 9 D.Brown If 3 0 0 1 0 1 .281
Detroit 100010000 0--2 72 D.Youngdh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .225
KansasCity 000000002 1--3 80 Mayberryrf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .266
Two outs when winning run scored. a- Galvis2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .214
singledforEJohnson inthe8th.E-Fielder Lerudc 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000
(3), Mi.Cabrera (6). LOB-Detroit 8, Kansas Totals 33 3 7 3 1 9
City 6. 2B-A.Garcia (3), Tuiasosopo (6), Minnesota AB R H BI BBSO Avg.
B.Pena (4). HR-L.Cain (3), off Valverde. Carroll3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .215
RBIs-Fielder (52), B.Pena (12), Hosmer a-Parmeleeph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .224
(21), L.Cain 2 (30). SB-Hosmer (5). S- Mauerc 2 0 1 0 2 0 .332
Tor.Hunter, R.Santiago 2, A.Escobar. Run- Doumitrf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .224
ners left in scoring position-Detroit Dozier2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228
5 (V.Martinez, Tor.Hunter 2, Tuiasosopo, Willinghamdh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .217
D.Kelly); KansasCity 1(Moustakas).RISP- Morneaulb 3 0 0 0 1 0 .293
Detroit 2 for 11; Kansas City 2 for 4. Run- Arcia If 4 3 3 0 0 0 .274
ners moved up-A.Gordon. GIDP-A. Thomascf 4 1 4 2 0 0 .294
Garcia,V.Martinez, A.Escobar. DP-Detroit E.Escobar2b-3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .243
2 (Fielder), (Jh.Peralta, R.Santiago, Fielder); Florimon ss 4 0 0 1 0 2 .232
Kansas City 2 (A.Escobar, E.Johnson, Hos- Totals 33 412 3 3 2
mer), (A.Escobar, EJohnson, Hosmer). Philadelphia 200010000- 3 70
Detroit IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA Minnesota 000101 02x- 4120
Verlander 7 3 0 0 2 8117 3.41 a-lined into a double play for Carroll in
SmylyH,7 1 2 1 1 0 0 15 2.11 the 8th. LOB-Philadelphia 5, Minnesota
VlvrdeBS,3-12 2/3 1 1 1 0 1 15 4.15 9. 2B-M.Young (8), Willingham (12), Ar-
Coke L,0-4 1 2 1 1 0 0 15 5.49 cia (7), Thomas 2 (2). RBIs-Revere (7),
KansasCity IP H RER BBSO NP ERA D.Brown (48), D.Young (15), Thomas 2 (2),
Shields 7 72 2 2 61102.79 Florimon (21).S-E.Escobar.SF-D.Brown.
Collins 1/3 0 0 0 2 1 192.53 Runners left in scoring position-Phila-
Hochevar 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 132.63 delphia 2 (Mayberry, D.Brown); Minne-
G.HollandW,2-11 0 0 0 0 2 111.88 sota 6 (Arcia2, Mauer, Carroll 2, Morneau).
Smyly pitched to 1 batter in the9th.nher- RISP-Philadelphia 2 for 5; Minnesota 3
ited runners-scored-Valverde 1 -1, Coke for 13 Runners moved up-Doumit, Flo-
1-0, Hochevar 2-0. HBP-by Shields (Tor. rimon. GIDP-Carroll. DP-Philadelphia 2
Hunter).Umpires-Home, Dana DeMuth; (Galvis, Rollins, Howard),(De Fratus, Rollins).
First, Paul Nauert; Second, Doug Eddings; Philadelphia IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA
Third, Jordan Baker. T-3:20. A-24,564 Cloyd 5 6 1 1 3 2 99 341
(37,903). SaveryH,1 1 3 1 1 0 0 253.00
StutesH, 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.69
AngelsB9,OriolBes BastardoL,2-2BS,3-41/33 2 2 0
LosAngeles AB R H BIBBSO Avg. 0 73.18
Troutcflf 5 0 0 0 297 DeFratus 1 00 0 0 0 91.64
Shuck f 3 1 1 0 1 0 277 Minnesota IP H RER BBSO NP ERA
Trumbolb 1 1 0 0 0 .263 Pelfrey 7 5 3 3 1 71126.12
Pujolsdh 5 1 3 2 0 0 .249 Fien 1/3 20 0 0 1 74.26
1-B.Harrispr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .218 DuensingW,2-12/300 0 0 1 53.70
Hamiltonrf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .217
HKendrick2b 4 0 2 1 0 PerkinsS,15-17 1 00 0 0 0 82.55
H.KendricCallaspo3b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .324 Savery pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Bas-
Hawpell b 1 1 0 0 2 .000 tardo pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.Inher-
awporsf 1 0 0 0 0 1 30 itedrunners-scored-Stutes1-0,Bastardo
Conger 4 2 2 1 0 .269 1-0, De Fratus 2-1, Duensing 2-0. WP-De
Congerc 4 2 2 0 1269 Fratus. Umpires-Home, David Rackley;
Aybar ss 4 1 2 3 0 1 .263
Totals 37 9 12 8 4 5 First, Bruce Dreckman; Second, Gary Dar-
Baltimore AB R H BBSO Avg. lingThird,PaulEmmel.T-2:55.A-28,910
McLouthlf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .289 (3
Machado3b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .317
Markakisrf 4 0 1 1 0 0 293 Onthisdate
AJonescf 4 2 1 2 0 0 .301
C.Davislb 4 1 2 2 0 0 .338 ByPaulMontella, Associated Press
Hardyss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 1905 Christy Mathewson of the New
Dickerson dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .264 York Giants pitched his second no-hit
Flaherty2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .172 game, beating the Chicago Cubs and
Teagardenc 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Mordecai Brown 1-0. Mathewson and
a-Wietersph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Brown matched no-hitters for eight in-
Totals 37 5 10 5 1 6 nings.The Giants got two hits in the ninth
LosAngeles 001100601- 9121 for the win.
Baltimore 200101010- 5102 1912- Christy Mathewson recorded his
a-struck out for Teagarden in the 9th. 1-ran 300th career victory with a 3-2 triumph
for Pujols in the 9th. E-Hamilton (5), Hardy over the Chicago Cubs.
(6), Flaherty (2). LOB-Los Angeles 6, Balti- 1921 Babe Ruth of the New York Yan-
more 6. 2B-Pujols (14), H.Kendrick 2 (10), kees pitched the first five innings and hit
Machado (28), C.Davis (21), Dickerson (3). two home runs in an 11-8victory over the
3B-Aybar (1). HR-Conger (4), off Ham- DetroitTigers.
mel; Pujols (11), off Strop; C.Davis (21), off 1948 Babe Ruth Day at Yankee Stadi-
Williams; AJones (14), off Williams. RBIs-- um drew 49,641 fans who saw Ruth's No.
Pujols 2 (40), Hamilton (21), H.Kendrick 3 retired and the Yankees beat the Cleve-
(33), Conger (9), Aybar 3 (17), Markakis (38), land Indians 5-3.
AJones 2 (45), C.Davis 2 (54). CS-McLouth 1957 Ted Williams of the Boston Red
(2). SF-Hamilton. Runners left in scoring Sox hit three home runs and drove in five
position-Los Angeles 3 (Callaspo 3); Bal- runs in a 9-3 victory over the Cleveland
timore 2 (Teagarden, Flaherty). RISP-Los Indians as Williams became the first AL
Angeles 2 for 6; Baltimore 0 for 7. Runners player to have two three-homer games
moved up-Hamilton, Markakis, AJones, in a season.
C.Davis. GIDP-Pujols. DP-Baltimore 2 1973 -The Los Angeles Dodgers'infield
(Machado, Flaherty, C.Davis), (C.Davis). of Steve Garvey (first base), Davey Lopes
LosAngeles IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA (second base), Ron Cey (third base) and
WilliamsW,5-2 6 9 4 4 1 4 90 3.15 Bill Russell (shortstop) played togetherfor
D.DeLaRosa 1 00 0 0 1 163.90 thefirsttimeina 16-3losstothePhiladel-
Jepsen 1 1 1 0 0 0 18 3.18 phia Phillies.The quartetwould set a ma-
Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.00 jor league record for longevity by playing
Baltimore IP H R ER BBSO NP ERA 8 1/2 years in the same infield.
Hammel 6 7 4 4 2 1104 5.24 2003-RogerClemensreached300wins
Strop L,0-3 1/3 3 4 4 1 0 20 7.58 and became the third pitcher with 4,000
Patton 12/3 1 0 0 0 4 21 4.66 strikeouts, leading the New York Yankees
Matusz 1 1 1 0 1 0 23 3.86 over the St. Louis Cardinals 5-2. Clemens,
Hammel pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. the21stpitchertomakeitto300,allowed
Inherited runners-scored-Strop 2-2. two runs in 6 2-3 innings and struck out
IBB-off Williams (Flaherty), off Matusz 10, raising his total to 4,006. Clemens
(H.Kendrick). Umpires-Home, Andy joined Nolan Ryan (5,714) and Steve Carl-
Fletcher; First, Rob Drake; Second,JoeWest; ton (4,136) in the 4,000-strikeout club.
Third, Sam Holbrook. T-3:13. A-25,964 Today's birthdays: Drew Smyly 24; Jona-
(45,971). than Lucroy 27; Pedro Strop 28.


KC teen



throws



pitch via



telerobot

BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND, Calif.
-From some 1,800
miles away in Kansas
City, Mo., 13-year-old
Nick LeGrande threw
out the ceremonial
first pitch before the
Yankees-Athletics game
Wednesday night.
Into the glove of As
reliever Ryan Cook, in
Oakland. It was all made
possible by a telerobotic
pitching machine, and is
believed to be a baseball
first when it comes to
ceremonial first pitches.
LeGrande is an As fan
with a rare blood disorder
called severe aplastic
anemia, and the former
Little Leaguer's illness
no longer allows him to
attend games.
"That a boy, Nick,
pretty good arm there,
bud," Cook said.
"Congratulations, bud,
you're in the big leagues."
LeGrande and his
family, including parents
Mike and Shari, were
taken to a mini base-
ball stadium. It was
constructed by Google
at its Kansas City offices
- a location close to
LeGrande's home and
Children's Mercy Hospital,
where he receives treat-
ment. Nick's friends,
doctors and former
teammates were all set to
be in attendance.
At the same in the
Bay Area, a telerobotic
pitching machine was
placed on the pitcher's
mound at the Oakland
Coliseum to follow the
teen's movements. The
technology allowed
LeGrande to simultane-
ously throw tand watch it
happen from afar.
"Unbelievable," As
manager Bob Melvin said.
"Hopefully it makes his
day a good day."
In explaining the
process, Google said that
LeGrande would use
an Android application
allowing him to control
the movements of the
robot in Oakland. That
robot was equipped with
a camera, livestreaming
a view of the ballpark to
LeGrande in Kansas City.
Fans cheered and
jumped to their feet as
the right-hander threw
his pitch.

Giants' Kontos
suspended for 3 games:
San Francisco pitcher Giants George
Kontos has been suspended for three
games by Major League Baseball,
which said he intentionally threw
a pitch at Pittsburgh's Andrew
McCutchen. Giants manager Bruce
Bochy has been banned for one. MLB
senior vice president Joe Garagiola
made the decision the day after
Kontos was ejected from the Pirates'
8-2 win for hitting McCutchen with a
pitch in the eighth inning.

Kinsler cleared to start
rehab games: Texas Rangers
second baseman and leadoff hitter
lan Kinsler, out since May 18 with
bruised ribs, has been cleared to begin
a rehabilitation assignment of at
least three games at Double-A Frisco
starting tonight.... Boston Red Sox
pitcher Clay Buchholz, 9-0 with a big
league-best 1.71 ERA, has resumed
throwing. However, the date for his
next start has not been finalized.
Red Sox manager John Farrell said
Buchholz might pitch Sunday.


Puig scratched with
strained shoulder: Rookie
Yasiel Puig was scratched from the
Los Angeles Dodgers'starting lineup
Wednesday night with a strained
right shoulder. He participated in the
seventh-inning brawl that occurred
during Tuesday night's game and was
one of six players and coaches ejected.


Page 4 SP









* AUTO RACING:


SHE'S GOT NEXT


Kenzie Ruston's on the rise for Turner Scott


By LUKE MEREDITH
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DES MOINES, Iowa -
Kenzie Ruston stood out
on the podium when the
NASCAR Next field was
revealed last weekend at
Iowa Speedway.
Ruston didn't make
it there because she's a
woman.
The 21-year-old Ruston
has established herself
as one of the brighter
prospects in the sport. She
is currently eighth in the
NASCAR K&N Pro Series
East standings, and last
week NASCAR selected her
as one of 13 young drivers
to be highlighted through
its Next promotional


SCOREBOARD


program.
"It's a validation of her
talent and her ability, and
even more than that, her
potential," Turner Scott
Motorsports co-owner
Harry Scott said.
Ruston's goal her rookie
season with Turner Scott
Motorsports was to push
for top-5 finishes by the
end of the year. But she's
already had three so far,
each time eclipsing the
previous record K&N finish
for a woman (sixth place
by Danica Patrick in 2010).
"I definitely didn't expect
this this early. But it's
definitely a plus. Coming
into this year, I just really
wanted to run for Rookie
of the Year. Hopefully I can


S rt n TV winner,3 p.m.
Sports on TV
Game 12 Game 8 winner vs. Game 10
GOLF winner,8 p.m.
9 a.m. June 22
ESPN USGA, U.S. Open Championship, x-Game 13 Game 6 winner vs Game 9
first round, at Ardmore, Pa. winner, 3 p.m.
3pm.x-Game 14 Game 8 winner vs. Game 10
NBC USGA, U.S. Open Championship, winner,8p.m.
first round, at Ardmore, Pa. If only one game is necessary, it will start at
5p.m. 8:30 p.m.
ESPN USGA, U.S. Open Championship,, Championship Series
first round, part II, at Ardmore, Pa. (Best-of-3)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL June24: PairingsTBA, 8p.m.
7 p.m. June 25: PairingsTBA,8 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Boston at Bal- x-June26:PairingsTBA,8 p.m.
timore
SUN -Kansas CityatTampa Bay Pro basketball
NBA BASKETBALLPr baske
9p.m. NBAFINALS
ABC Playoffs, finals, game 4, Miami at (Best-of-7;x-if necessary)
San Antonio San Antonio 1, Miami 1
Game 1: San Antonio 92, Miami 88
Glantz-Culver Line Game 2: Miami 103, San Antonio 84
Tuesday's result: Miami at San Antonio,
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL late
National League Today's game: Miami at San Antonio, 9
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE p.m.
St. Louis -110 at NewYork +100 Sunday's game: Miami at San Antonio, 8
Cincinnati -125 atChicago +115 p.m.
atColorado -130 Washington +120 x-June18:SanAntonioatMiami,9 p.m.
at Pittsburgh -105 San Francisco -105 x-June20:San Antonioat Miami,9 p.m.
American League
atOakland -115 NewYork +105 WNBA
Boston -110 atBaltimore +100 EASTERN CONFERENCE
atTampaBay -135 KansasCity +125 W L Pct GB
atTexas -230 Toronto +210 Atlanta 4 1 .800 -
Interleague Chicago 4 1 .800 -
Philadelphia -135 atMinnesota +125 Washington 3 1 .750 /2
NewYork 3 2 .600 1
NBAFINALS Connecticut 2 3 .400 2
FAVORITE LINEO/U UNDERDOG Indiana 1 4 .200 3
at San Antonio 11/2(187) Miami WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pet GB
Minnesota 3 1 .750 -
Baseball Los Angeles 2 1 .667 V/2
San Antonio 2 3 .400 1'/2
TUESDAY'S LATE MLB LINESCORES Seattle 1 2 333 1'/2
BLUEJAYS7,WHITESOX5 Phoenix 1 3 .250 2
Toronto 020020001 2 7130 Tulsa 1 5 .167 3
Chicago 010400000 0 5113 Tuesday's results
(10 innings) Minnesota 87, San Antonio 72
Wang, Cecil (8), Janssen (10) and Arencibia; Wednesday's result
Quintana, NJones (7), Thornton (8), A.Reed Connecticut 73, Indiana 61
(9), Troncoso (10) and Flowers. W-Cecil Friday'sames
2-0. L-Troncoso 0-1. Sv-Janssen (13). Seattle at Atlanta,7:30 p.m.
HRs-Toronto, Encarnacion (18), Bautista Connecticut at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
(15). Chicago, A.Dunn (17), Gillaspie (4). Minnesota atTulsa,8 p.m.
ATHLETICS 6, YANKEES 4 Los Angeles at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
NewYork 000000022 4100
Oakland 11030100x 69 0
Sabathia, Claiborne (7), Chamberlain (8) HocKey
and C.Stewart; Colon, Doolittle (7), Blevins
(8), Cook (8), Balfour (9) and D.Norris. W- NHL
Colon 8-2. L-Sabathia 6-5. Sv-Balfour STANLEY CUPFINALS
(16). HRs-Oakland, Crisp (8), D.Norris (3). (Best-of-7;x-if necessary)
MARINERS 4, ASTROS 0 Boston vs. Chicago
Houston 000000000 02 2 Wednesday's result: Boston at Chicago,
Seattle 11000101x 47 1 late
B.Norris,W.Wright (8)and J.Castro; Harang Saturday's game: Boston at Chicago, 8
and Shoppach.W-Harang3-6.L-B.Norris p.m.
5-6. HRs-Seattle, Ibanez (13). June 17: Chicago at Boston, 8 p.m.
REDS 12, CUBS2 June 19: Chicago at Boston, 8 p.m.
Cincinnati 012006030 -12161 x-June 22: Boston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Chicago 000101000 25 4 x-June 24:Chicago at Boston,8 p.m.
Cingrani, M.Parra (8), Partch (9) and Hani- x-June26: Boston at Chicago, 8p.m.
gan; Garza, H.Rondon (6), Putnam (8), Vil-
lanueva (8), B.Parker (9) and Castillo. W- Football
Cingrani 3-0. L-Garza 1-1. HRs-Cincin- Fo a
nati, Frazier (7), Votto (11), Paul (5), Cozart ARENAFOOTBALLLEAGUE
(6). Chicago, Ransom (7). NATIONAL CONFERENCE
ROCKIES 8, NATIONALS 3 Central Division
Washington 020000010 380 W L T Pet PF PA
Colorado 00005003x 8140 Chicago 7 5 0 583 672 640
Haren, E.Davis (6), Abad (7), Storen (8) and San Antonio 5 6 0 .455 455 534
K.Suzuki; Chacin, Corpas (6), Outman (7), Iowa 5 7 0 .417 563 562
W.Lopez (7), Scahill (9) and W.Rosario. W- West Division
Chacin 4-3. L-Haren 4-8. HRs-Colorado, W L T Pt PF PA
Colvin2(2),C.Gonzalez(18). Arizona 11 1 0 .917 813 546
PADRES 3, BRAVES 2 Spokane 9 3 0 .750 813 634
Atlanta 100001000 26 0 San Jose 8 3 0 .727 588 553
San Diego 11100000x 35 0 Utah 4 7 0 .364 553 577
THudson, Avilan (8), Varvaro (8) and Mc- AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Cann; Cashner, Thatcher (9), Gregerson South Division
(9) and Hundley. W-Cashner 5-3. L-T. W L T Pet PF PA
Hudson 4-6. Sv-Gregerson (3). HRs-San Jacksonville 8 4 0 .667 631 570
Diego,Headley(6). TampaBay 7 5 0 .583 687 645
DODGERS 5, DIAMONDBACKS 2 Orlando 3 8 0 273 554 648
Arizona 000020010 34 0 NewOrleans 2 9 0 .182 471 651
LosAngeles 00000203x 55 0 Eastern Division
Kennedy, Ziegler (7), D.Hernandez (8), Pat- W L T Pet PF PA
erson (8) and M.Montero; Greinke, Howell Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 653 581
(8), Guerrier (8), Jansen (9) and Federow- Pittsburgh 3 8 0 .273 447 599
icz. W-Guerrier 2-2. L-D.Hernandez 2-3. Cleveland 2 9 0 .182 480 640
Sv-Jansen (3). HRs-Arizona, Kubel (4). Saturday'sgames
Los Angeles, Ethier (5). Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Orlando, 7:30 p.m.
COLLEGEWORLD SERIES San Antonio at Chicago, 8 p.m.
At TD Ameritrade Park, Omaha, Neb. Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
(Doubleelimination;x-if necessary) San Jose at Iowa, 8:05 p.m.
Saturday's games Spokane at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Game 1 Mississippi State (48-18) vs. Or- Jacksonville at Utah,9 p.m.
egon State (50-11),3 p.m.
Game2--Indiana(48-18) vs. Louisville (51-
12),8p.m. Soccer
Sunday's games
Game 3 North Carolina (57-10) vs. N.C. 2014WORLD CUP QUALIFYING
State (49-14),3 p.m. NORTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA AND
Game 4 UCLA (44-17) vs. LSU (57-9), 8 THECARIBBEAN
p.m. FINAL ROUND
June 17 Topthree qualify
Game 5 Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, GP W D L GF GA Pts


3p.m. United States 5 3 1 1
Game 6 -Game 1 winner vs.Game 2 win- Costa Rica 5 2 2 1
ner,8p.m. Mexico 6 1 5 0
June 18 Honduras 5 2 1 2
Game 7 Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, iPanama 5 1 3 0
3p.m. Jamaica 6 0 2 4
Game 8 Game 3 winner vs.Game 4 win- Fourth-place team advances to
ner,8p.m. Oceaniawinner
June 19 Tuesday's results
Game 9 Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 loser, At Seattle
8 p.m. United States 2, Panama 0
June 20 At Mexico City
Game 10 Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 Mexico0,Costa Rica 0
loser, 8 p.m. At Tegucigalpa, Honduras
June 21 Honduras 2,Jamaica 0
Game 11 Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 June 18


6 3 10
5 3 8
3 2 8
6 6 7
5 5 6
2 8 2
playoff vs.


get that Rookie of the Year
and maybe something
more," Ruston said.
Ruston's quick rise hasn't
surprised those who've
watched her outperform
expectations at every level.
Ruston, a native of El
Reno, Okla., grew up as a
self-described "tomboy"
in a family full of dirt bike
racers. Kenzie's father,
Darren, wouldn't let her
get on dirt bikes, instead
signing her up to race
Bandelero cars at Texas
Motor Speedway.
It took one race for
Ruston to realize she
wanted much more out of
the sport than some week-
end fun. Even though she
blew the lead when she


At Sandy, Utah
United States vs. Honduras, 9:11 p.m.
At San Jose, Costa Rica
Costa Rica vs. Panama, 10 p.m.
Sept. 6
Costa Rica vs. United States
Mexicovs. Honduras
Panama vs. Jamaica
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
EASTERN CONFERENCE


Montreal
NewYork
Philadelphia
Hniqn


W LT
8 2 2
7 5 4
6 5 4
822
754
654


Pts GF GA
26 22 15
25 23 19
22 22 24
" 19 14


SportingKansasCity 6 5 4 22 18 13
NewEngland 5 4 5 20 15 9
Columbus 4 5 5 17 16 16
Chicago 3 7 3 12 11 19
Toronto FC 1 7 5 8 12 19
D.C. 110 3 6 6 24
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
FC Dallas 8 2 4 28 23 17
Real Salt Lake 8 5 3 27 24 16
Portland 5 1 8 23 24 16
Seattle 6 4 3 21 19 15
LosAngeles 6 6 2 20 22 18
Colorado 5 4 5 20 15 12
Vancouver 4 5 4 16 18 20
San Jose 3 6 6 15 13 23
Chivas USA 3 8 2 11 13 26
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point
for tie.
Saturday's games
FC Dallas at Portland, 5 p.m.
Toronto FC at D.C. United, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 9 p.m.
New England at Vancouver, 10 p.m.

Tennis
ATP AEGON CHAMPIONSHIPS
AtThe Queen's Club, London
Purse: $1.03 million (WT250)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Second Round
Tomas Berdych (2), Czech Republic, def.
Thiemo De Bakker, Netherlands, 6-1,6-4.
Marin Cilic (5), Croatia, def. Ivan Dodig,
Croatia, 6-3,6-4.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (7), Ukraine, def.
Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 6-3,4-6,6-4.
Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Grigor
Dimitrov (10), Bulgaria, 6-4,6-3.
Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Lukas
Rosol (12), Czech Republic, 7-6 (2), 7-5.
Daniel Evans, Britain, def. Jarkko Niemin-
en (13), Finland, 6-4, 6-7 (6), 6-4.
Grega Zemlja (16), Slovenia, def. Sergiy
Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 7-5,6-4.
Kenny De Schepper, France, def. Rohan
Bopanna, India, 6-4,6-3.
Marinko Matosevic, Australia, def. Mi-
chael Llodra, France, walkover.
Andy Murray (1), Britain, leads Nicolas
Mahut, France, 6-3,2-2, susp., rain.
Feliciano Lopez, Spain, leads Julien Ben-
neteau (11), France, 7-6 (5), 2-0, susp., rain.
Denis Istomin (14), Uzbekistan, tied with
Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, 6-6, susp., rain.
WTAAEGON CLASSIC
At Edgbaston Priory Club, Birmingham,
England
Purse: $235,000 (Intl.)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Second Round
Sorana Cirstea (3), Romania, def.Tsvetana
Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-4.
Sabine Lisicki (5), Germany, def. Kristyna
Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-2.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def. Laura
Robson (7), Britain, 6-3, 6-4.
Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, Croatia, def. Yanina
Wickmayer (9), Belgium, 6-4, 6-0.
Kristina Mladenovic (12), France, def. Jo-
hanna Konta, Britain, 6-4,6-1.
Bojana Jovanovski (13), Serbia, def. An-
drea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-1,
6-4.
Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, def. Heather
Watson (14), Britain, 6-4, 6-3.
Maria Sanchez, United States, def. Alison
Van Uytvanck, Belgium, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Magdalena Rybarikova (16), Slovakia,
def. Mathilde Johansson, France, 7-5, 6-7
(4),6-4.
Ekaterina Makarova (2), Russia, def. Ma-
rina Erakovic, New Zealand, 6-4, 6-1.
Francesca Schiavone (15), Italy, def. Nadi-
ya Kichenok, Ukraine, 7-6 (4), 6-2.
Kirsten Flipkens (1), Belgium, def. Ajla
Tomljanovic, Croatia, 4-6,6-4,7-5.
ATP GERRYWEBER OPEN
At GerryWeber Stadion, Halle, Germany
Purse: $1.03 million (WT250)
Surface:Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Second Round
Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, def. Kei Nishikori
(4),Japan, 6-1,6-7 (4),6-3.
Gael Monfils, France, def. Jan Hernych,
Czech Republic, 6-2,6-3.
Mischa Zverev, Germany, def. Mirza Basic,
Bosnia-Herzegovina, 7-6 (5), 6-3.
Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Stebe
Cedrik-Marcel, Germany, 6-3,6-3.
WTANUERNBERGER
VERSICHERUNGSCUP
At Tennis-Club 1. FC Nuernberg eV,
Nuremberg, Germany
Purse: $235,000 (Intl).
Surface: Red Clay-Outdoor
Singles
First Round
Jelena Jankovic (1), Serbia, def. Arantxa
Rus, Netherlands, 6-4,6-2.
Polona Hercog, Slovenia, def. Klara Zako-
palova (2), Czech Republic, 6-3,4-6,6-1.


Kenzie Ruston, left, with fellow NASCAR Next drivers Brett
Moffitt, center, and Ryan Gifford at Iowa Speedway in Newton,
Iowa.


spun out on the final lap,
the 13-year-old Ruston -
who had tried every other
sport, including cheerlead-
ing was hooked.
Ruston has finished
higher than her starting
position four times in six
races this season. It likely
would have been five, but
Ruston's right front tire


Simona Halep (7), Romania, def. Grace
Min, United States, 6-0,7-5.
Estrella Cabeza Candela, Spain, def. Ter-
eza Martincova, Czech Republic, 6-2,6-3.
Second Round
Jelena Jankovic (1), Serbia, def. Johanna
Larsson, Sweden, 6-2,6-0.
Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def.
Alize Cornet (3), France, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Julia Go-
erges (4), Germany, 6-1,7-5.
Lucie Safarova (5), Czech Republic, def.
Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, 6-4, 6-2.
Lourdes Dominguez Lino (6), Spain, def.
Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 6-1,6-4.
Simona Halep (7), Romania, def. Estrella
Cabeza Candela, Spain, 6-2,6-1.
Annika Beck (8), Germany, def. Karin
Knapp, Italy, 6-4,6-2.

Auto racing
2013 NASCARSPRINT CUP
Schedule (winner)
x-non-points race
Feb. 16 x-The Sprint Unlimited (Kevin Har-
vick)
Feb. 21 x-Budweiser Duel 1 (Kevin Harvick)
Feb. 21 x-Budweiser Duel 2 (Kyle Busch)
Feb. 24 Daytona 500(JimmieJohnson)
March 3 Subway Fresh Fit 500, Avondale,
Ariz. (Carl Edwards)
March 10 KobaltTools400,LasVegas (Matt
Kenseth)
March 17 Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn.
(Kasey Kahne)
March 24 Auto Club 400, Fontana, Calif.
(Kyle Busch)
April 7 STP Gas Booster 500, Ridgeway,Va.
(JimmieJohnson)
April 13 NRA 500, Fort Worth, Texas (Kyle
Busch)
April 21 STP 400, Kansas City, Kan. (Matt
Kenseth)
April 27 Toyota Owners 400, Richmond,Va.
(Kevin Harvick)
May 5 Aaron's 499, Talladega, Ala. (David
Ragan)
May 11 Bojangles'Southern 500, Darling-
ton, S.C. (Matt Kenseth)
May 18 x-Sprint Showdown (Jamie Mc-
Murray)
May 18 x-NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race
(JimmieJohnson)
May 26 Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C.
(Kevin Harvick)
June 2 Dover 400, Dover, Del.(Tony Stew-
art)
June 9 Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. (Jim-
mieJohnson)
Sunday Quicken Loans 400, Brooklyn,
Mich.
June 23 Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma,
Calif.
June 29 Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky.
July 6 Coke Zero 400 powered by Coca-
Cola, Daytona Beach, Fla.
July 14 New Hampshire 300, Loudon, N.H.
July 28 Crown Royal Presents The Your
Hero's Name Here 400 at The Brickyard, In-
dianapolis
Aug. 4 Pennsylvania 400, Long Pond, Pa.
Aug.11 Cheez-lt 355 at The Glen,Watkins
Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 18 Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn,
Mich.
Aug. 24 Irwin Tools Night Race, Bristol,
Tenn.
Sept. 1 AdvoCare 500 at Atlanta, Hampton,
Ga.
Sept. 7 Federated Auto Parts 400, Rich-
mond,Va.
Sept.15 GEICO400,Joliet, IIl.
Sept. 22 Sylvania 300, Loudon, N.H.
Sept. 29 AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 6 Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City,
Kan.
Oct. 12 Bankof America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 20 Camping World RV Sales 500, Tal-
ladega, Ala.
Oct. 27 Goody's Fast Relief 500, Ridgeway,
Va.
Nov. 3 AAATexas 500, Fort Worth,Texas
Nov. 10 AdvoCare 500,Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 17 Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead,
Fla.

Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX-Recalled RHP Al-
fredoAcevesfrom Pawtucket (IL).Optioned
RHP Jose De La Torre to Pawtucket.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX-Signed SS Tim
Anderson to a minor league contract and
assigned him to Bristol (Appalachian).
CLEVELAND INDIANS-Signed RHP
Trevor Frank, C Shane Rowland, INF Grant
Fink and INF Mike Giuffre to minor league
contracts.
TAMPA BAY RAYS-Signed RHP John
Farrell.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS-Placed RHP Zach Put-
nam on the 15-day DL. recalled LHP Brooks
Raleyfrom Iowa (PCL).
SAN DIEGO PADRES-Recalled OF Jaff
Decker from Tucson (PCL). Placed OF Cam-
eron Maybin on the 15-day DL, retroactive
toJune10.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS-Selected
RHP Ross Ohlendorf from Syracuse (IL).
Optioned RHP Nathan Karns to Harrisburg
(EL).Transferred RHP Christian Garcia to the
60-day DL.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS-Signed QB
Mike Glennon to a four-year contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
PHILADELPHIA FLYERS-Acquired D
Mark Streit from the New York Islanders for
F Shane Harper and a 2014 fourth-round
draft pick.


blew out last weekend at
Iowa, sending the No. 34
car into the wall and out of
the race after 48 laps.
Ruston said that while
she's hopeful of landing
a sponsor to run at least
part-time in Trucks in
2014, another year run-
ning in the K&N series is a
much more likely scenario.


I QUICK HITS


LEFFLER KILLED
AFTER ACCIDENT IN
DIRT TRACK RACE

BRIDGEPORT, N.J.
(AP) NASCAR driver
Jason Leffler died after
an accident Wednesday
night at a dirt car event at
Bridgeport Speedway.
The 37-year-old Leffler,
a two-time winner on the
Nationwide Series, was
pronounced dead shortly
after 9 p.m., New Jersey
State Police said.
Bridgeport Speedway is
a 5/8-mile, high-banked
dirt oval.
Leffler finished last
Sunday at Pocono in his
first NASCAR Sprint Cup
start of the year.


NBA
Nets hire Kidd to coach:
The Brooklyn Nets hired Jason Kidd as
their coach Wednesday, bringing the
former star back to the franchise he
led to its greatest NBA success.
Kidd retired earlier this month after
one season with the New York Knicks,
his 19th in the NBA. The Nets decided
to hire him to replace P.J. Carlesimo
despite his absence of coaching
experience.
The move reunites Kidd with
the franchise he led to consecutive
NBA Finals in 2002-03. He spent 612
seasons with the Nets and is their
career leader in numerous categories.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Miami gets its day
in NCAA court: After more
than two years of investigation,
mudslinging and another investiga-
tion, one of the most talked-about
NCAA compliance cases will head to



NHL

FROM PAGE 1

Ontario. After numerous
suitors fell through, the
NHL finally reached agree-
ment last month to sell
the team to Renaissance
Sports & Entertainment, a
group headed by Canadian
investors George Gosbee,
Anthony LeBlanc and
Daryl Jones.
But their deal is con-
tingent upon reaching a
new lease agreement for
Jobing.com Arena, and
negotiations with Glendale
continue to drag on.
"This is really going to be
a decision that the city of
Glendale is going to have
to make," Bettman said.
Added deputy com-
missioner Bill Daly, "They
know what our decision
timeline is and what are
the decisions we have
to make. There's no
misunderstandings."
Phoenix ranked second-
to-last in attendance this
season, drawing fewer
than 14,000 fans per game.
That was about 81 percent
capacity of Jobing.com
Arena, well below the
regular-season league
average of 97 percent. But
that isn't an indication that
a franchise can't succeed in
Arizona, Bettman said.


NASCAR SPRINT
CUP SERIES
QUICKEN LOANS 400
WHERE: Michigan International
Speedway (oval, 2.0 miles),
Brooklyn, Mich.
WHEN: Sunday, 1 p.m.
TV:TNT
QUALIFYING: Friday, 3:30-5 p.m.
TV: Speed
RACE DISTANCE: 400 miles, 200
laps.
DEFENDING CHAMPION: Dale
Earnhardt Jr., who ended a
143-race winless streak dating to
his June 2008 victory at the track.
FAST FACTS: Jimmie Johnson leads
second-place Carl Edwards by 51
points. Johnson and Matt Kenseth
are tied for the victory lead. Kyle
Busch and Kevin Harvick have each
won twice.... Earnhardt has only
the two Michigan victories in 192
starts for Hendrick Motorsports. He
won 17 times in 291 starts for Dale
Earnhardt Inc.... Greg Biffle won the
August race at the track.
ONLINE: nascar.com


its version of court.
The University of Miami will
meet with the NCAA's Committee
on Infractions starting today in
Indianapolis. The hearings are
expected to span three days -
longer than the typical one to two.
Former Hurricanes booster-turned-
whistleblower Nevin Shapiro made
new allegations against the program
in the pages of Sports Illustrated
published Wednesday.
His claims involving coaches
feeding him insider information to
help his gambling habit won't be part
of this week's hearings, though. That's
because Shapiro said he refused to
meet with NCAA investigators after
they declined to pay his lawyer, Maria
Elena Perez, to attend the interview.
Michael Casagrande,
South Florida Sun Sentinel


GOLF

Former PGA Tour player
Miller Barber dies: Miller
Barber, the unique-swinging golfer
who made the most combined starts
on the PGA and Champions tours, has
died. He was 82.
Barber, nicknamed "Mr. X,"played
in 1,297 tournaments on the PGA
Tour and 50-and-over circuit. He won
11 times in 694 PGA Tour starts and
added 24 victories in 603 events on
the Champions Tour.
"We are saddened,"PGA Tour
Commissioner Tim Finchem said in a
statement. "Golf has lost a great man
and competitor."


MEDIA
ESPN to pull plug on 3-D broad-
casts: ESPN will stop broadcasting
in 3-D by the end of the year, the
network said, dealing a major blow to
a technology that was launched with
great fanfare but has been limping
along for years. The network said
there were too few viewers.

"We actually believe that
if you gave the community
an owner, not the league,
who said, 'I'm commit-
ted to being there,' this
franchise could be suc-
cessful from a business
standpoint," Bettman said.
"We've seen what the fan
base there can do with
the uncertainty.... If there
was certainty surrounding
the franchise, its fortunes
would improve dramati-
cally and immediately just
by virtue of putting in a
real owner."
But the league won't let
the uncertainty drag on
any longer.
Asked what the NHL will
do if the new owners and
city officials can't reach
an agreement, Bettman
said he wasn't going to
get into speculation. But
mothballing the team is
one option. So is moving
it, and Bettman indicated
there are cities that could
take control of the Coyotes
this summer and be ready
to play in October.
"There are a myriad of
options," he said. "The
focus, at least for the time
being, remains on having
the Coyotes in Arizona.
Obviously, we'll have lots
of choices, options and
decisions. If we get to that
point and hopefully we
won't then we'll focus
on which one is the best."


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


www.sunnewspapers.net SP Page 5






~Page6 SP www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013


* NFL: Bucs notebook



New deal




'very close'



for Williams


Rookie QB

Glennon signs
4-year contract

By RICK STROUD
TAMPA BAY TIMES
TAMPA -As Mike
Williams fielded questions
from reporters following
a mandatory minicamp
practice Wednesday, a
Bucs teammate walked by
and shouted one request.
"Pay the man," he said.
And, in fact, it appears
that Williams is closer to
getting paid.
Negotiations on a new
contract between the
Bucs and Williams, which
accelerated following free
agency and the NFL draft,
may produce an agree-
ment within weeks if not
days.
"All I can say about
that is that it's very close,"
Williams said Wednesday.
Williams, selected in the
fourth round in 2010, has
averaged 64 catches in his
first three seasons and had
a career-best 996 yards
and nine touchdowns in
2012. He is set to become a
free agent at the end of the
2013 season.
Bucs general manager
Mark Dominik would like
to get a deal completed
before training camp.
As a rookie, Williams
had 964 yards receiving
(14.8 avg.) and 11 touch-
downs. But following the
NFL lockout in 2010, he
slumped to only three
touchdowns and a pedes-
trian 11.9 yards per catch.
Williams is scheduled to


Bucs announce
tickets sales for
home opener
Tickets for the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers regular-season home
opener against New Orleans will
go on sale at10 a.m. June 19, the
team announced.

earn $1.4 million in base
salary this season, part of
his rookie deal over four-
years for $2.3825 million.
The past few seasons,
Dominik has structured
contracts with little to no
signing bonus and high
base salaries that are
guaranteed for the first two
years of the deal.
Williams and fellow
receiver Vincent Jackson
were among the top
receiving tandems in the
NFL in 2012.

Bucs sign Glennon: Bucs
third-round draft choice, quarterback
Mike Glennon from N.C. State, has
signed a four-year contract. The Bucs
now have their entire six-man rookie
class under contract well before the
team reports for training camp in late
July. Glennon started 26 games at
N.C. State, completing 60.4 percent of
his attempts for 7,411 yards and 63
touchdowns.

Banged-up Bucs: DE Da'Quan
Bowers and Barron left practice early
Wednesday because of heat exhaustion.
... Guards Davin Joseph and Carl Nicks did
not practice as they recover from injuries.
"They're coming along,"Schiano said.
"We're not going to rush them this time
of year, especially guys who missed so
much time last year. We want to make
sure that these guys are ready to go but
they're doing well."


AP PHOTO
Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Mike Williams runs after
making a reception during Tuesday's minicamp workout in
Tampa. Williams said Wednesday he is "very close" to a new
contract with the Bucs.


U NFL NOTEBOOK


Belichick refuses to


fall into Tebow trap


BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- One day of practice
wasn't enough for Patriots
coach Bill Belichick to
share his thoughts on
new backup quarterback
Tim Tebow.
Two days?
Not a lot to go on there,
either, as Tebow spent
much of Wednesday's
session watching Tom
Brady and Ryan Mallett
run drills while he tried
to absorb the new system
after he signed with New
England this week.
"We're not going to get
into a minute-by-minute
evaluation of a player,"
Belichick said. "I don't
think that's the way to go,
especially at this time of
year."
Robert Kraft wasn't
as reluctant to size up
Tebow's much maligned
throwing motion after the


second day of the three-
day minicamp.
"He's a lot better than I
am," the Patriots' 72-year-
old owner said, his grin
growing as he spoke.
Late in the session,
Tebow played in 11-on-11
situations and was hit-or-
miss. He threw an ac-
curate, low pass that wide
receiver Chaz Schilens, in
for a tryout, caught while
hitting the ground. But
a few plays later, Tebow
threw one that landed at
the feet of a defender, who
booted it back toward the
line of scrimmage.

Jags' Brackett has groin
surgery: Jacksonville tight end
Brett Brackett will be sidelined until
training camp following groin surgery.
Coach Gus Bradley said Brackett
had surgery after getting a second
opinion on his injured groin, but
should be ready for camp, which
starts July 26.


SU.S. OPEN: Key hole


AP PHOTO
David Howell, of England, repairs a divot on the 13th green during a practice for the U.S. Open on Tuesday at Merion Golf Club in
Ardmore, Pa.


No. 13 could be trick or treat at Merion


ARDMORE, Pa. -Your golf
course isn't thoroughly modern
unless it has a "signature hole."
Preferably with a spurting foun-
tain or a railroad tie or a terraced
sequence of superfluous traps.
Historians believe the concept of
the "signature hole" was invented at


SHORT, YET ELEGANT
You stand on the tee and you can see the whole
thing, with the white frame clubhouse down there
to the left, with a grandstand by the green, and
Cobbs Creek to the right. Well, you can almost see
the whole thing. Much of the green is obscured
by a yawning bunker, one of the "white faces of
Merion."But what really makes 13 so elegant is that
it spans only 115 yards, on the U.S. Open scorecard,
and, on at least one day this week, might only take
up a football field.


WOODS
FROM PAGE 1
He had to make another
birdie on the 18th hole
of the playoff to go extra
holes before finally beat-
ing Rocco Mediate.
"I think there was a
lot of people pulling for
Tiger," said Rory Mcllroy,
who was 19 at the time, a
rookie on the European
Tour who failed to qualify
for the U.S. Open. "He
was playing on a broken
leg pretty much, so I was
definitely pulling for
Tiger. It was probably one
of the best performances
golf has ever seen, if not
sport in general."
Hard as it might have
been to believe that day,
it also was the last major
Woods won.
He had one more
chance at a major after his
season-ending knee sur-
gery, losing a two-shot lead
to Y.E. Yang in the 2009
PGA Championship. After
two darks years brought on
by the collapse of his mar-
riage and more injuries to
his left leg, he had at least a
share of the 36-hole lead in
two majors last year, and
he had an outside shot at
the Masters in April going
into the final round.
Majors don't come
as easily as they once
seemed to for Woods,
though he never looked at
them that way.
"It wasn't ever easy,"
he said. "I felt it was still
difficult because the
major of the majors, three
of the four always rotated.
It was always on a new
site each and every year.
Augusta was the only one
you could rely on from
past experiences. A lot of
majors that I won were on
either the first or second
time I'd ever seen it."
Woods won four majors
on courses he had never
played Medinah for the
1999 PGA Championship,
Valhalla for the PGA
Championship the
following year, Bethpage
Black in the 2002 U.S.
Open and Royal Liverpool


the same meeting where the "face
of the franchise" and the "state-
ment game" were also hatched.
Anyway, most signature holes are
done with a doctor's sloppy scrawl.
Merion Golf Club's par-3, 115-yard
13th hole is pure calligraphy.
Short holes are changeups.


Anybody can keep moving the
tee back, as Oakmont did on a
288-yard par-3 at the 2007 Open.
It takes fancy footwork to make a
midget par-3 competitive.

By Mark Whicker,
The Orange County Register


A CHANGE IS GONNA COME IT DOESN'T NEED A NAME


It slopes gently downhill and to the right,
favoring a cut shot, but it changes personality
with each different pin placement. On Tuesday, the
pin was on the right front. Bo Van Pelt launched
a pitching wedge that nestled up nicely. But he
got nothing from the audience. "That wasn't even
worth a clap?"Van Pelt wondered. Jay Hahn, one
of the volunteer marshals knew why. "They're only
giving it up if you get one within four feet today,"
he said. Tough room, Philadelphia.


"With a wedge in your hand, the 13th is a pretty
good scoring opportunity,"Steve Stricker said. The
seventh at Pebble Beach is 109 yards and straight
down into the Pacific golf on the rocks. Royal
Troon has the Postage Stamp, the 123-yard No.
8 with plagues visiting any ball that doesn't land
safely. The 17th at TPC Sawgrass, the island hole at
The Players and a signature for those who haven't yet
mastered cursive, is 137 yards. The 13th doesn't have
a popular nickname, but it has the smallest green on
the course and a hopeless dropoff in back.


U.S. OPEN
WHO: U.S. Golf Association
WHERE: Merion Golf Club, East
Course, Ardmore, Pa.
WHEN: Today-Sunday.
TV: ESPN (Today-Friday, 9
a.m.-3 p.m., 5-7 p.m., 8-11
p.m.) and NBC (Today-Friday,
3-5 p.m., Saturday-Sunday,
DEFENDING CHAMPION:
Webb Simpson
TIGER WATCH: Tiger Woods
hasn't won a major in five
years. He won the 2008 Open at
Torrey Pines for the last of his 14
major victories. He also won in
2000 at Pebble Beach and 2002
at Bethpage. Woods has four
victories this year to increase his
PGA Tour total to 78, four short
: of Sam Snead's tour record.
THE COURSE: Merion is hosting
..,, .. ...............H ....:.,. ........
its fifth Open. Olin Dutra won
in 1934, Ben Hogan in 1950,
Lee Trevino in 1971 and David
Graham in 1981. The clubs uses
AP PHOTO red wicker baskets instead of
Steve Stricker hits an approach shot on the 14th hole during flags on the pins.
practice for the U.S. Open on Tuesday at Merion Golf Club in ONLINE: usopen.com and
Ardmore, Pa. Stricker was in college when he played the 1989 pgatour.com
U.S. Amateur at Merion.


for the 2006 British Open.
Merion is new not only
to him, but just about
everyone.
It last hosted a U.S.
Open in 1981, when David
Graham putted for birdie
on every hole and closed
with a 67. Phil Mickelson,
Jim Furyk and Steve
Stricker played Merion, but
they were all college kids
at the 1989 U.S. Amateur.
A few others competed in
the 2005 U.S. Amateur or
the 2009 Walker Cup.
But never at a U.S.
Open.
"I don't remember
much about it from
that long ago," Stricker
said. "But I remember at
least that it was a great,
old course with a lot of
history to it, one that I
enjoyed playing back in
'89 and no different than
today. It's a great test."
It figures to be a differ-
ent test this week.
For all the history of
Merion, this week seems
like a recurrence of the
troublesome weather
that has followed the PGA


Tour around this season.
The course has received
some 5 inches of rain
since Friday, so much that
it was closed for practice
one day on the weekend,
and play was stopped
three times on Monday.
It was packed under
mostly sunny skies
Tuesday in what amount-
ed to a crash course for
so many players with the
start of the U.S. Open
only two days away.
"Played the golf course
last Wednesday, which
has proved kind of
invaluable now," Graeme
McDowell said. "I flew
in yesterday with the
intention of playing 18
holes late last night, but
that didn't happen. So I'm
kind of adjusting my plan
here at the minute. I'm
going to play nine holes
this afternoon and nine
holes tomorrow."
Phil Mickelson spent
two days at Merion last
week, which also proved
invaluable. He left town
Monday for San Diego to
practice in California's dry


weather, though he was
planning on being home
Wednesday, anyway, to
watch his oldest daughter
speak at her eighth-grade
graduate ceremony.
Woods stopped at
Merion on the way to the
Memorial, and wondered
how much he got out
of that practice round.
It rained practically the
entire time, so the ball
wasn't flying very far in
the air or when it hit the
ground. Woods was trying
to figure out how much
the ball would run along
the canted fairways in dry
conditions.
Now, he might not find
out.
"I thought it might be
totally different," Woods
said. "As I explained at
Memorial, I thought the
ball would be running out
and we would hit differ-
ent clubs and different
shapes. But it's going to
be the same as what we
played" in his practice
round two weeks ago.


:Page 6 SP


www.sunnewspapers.net


The Sun /Thursday, June 13, 2013




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Will I I 111-' /111A

Southwest Florida's
ONLY weekly guide to
outdoor recreation




I..l I "II



23170 Harborview Road
Port Charlotte, FL 33980

PUBLISHER
JOSH OLIVE
941-206-1010
WaterLineWeekly@gmail.com

EDITOR
LEE ANDERSON
941-206-1010
WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com

CONTRIBUTORS
Capt. Ralph Allen
Abbie Banks
Greg Bartz
Billy Carl
Capt. Josh Greer
Bill Hempel
Capt. Van Hubbard
Robin Jenkins, DVM
Jeff Kincaid
Capt. Ed Kopp
Robert Lugiewicz
David H. Martin
Vince Molnar
Capt. Mike Myers
Terry Myers
Cam Parson
Betty Staugler
Tommy Von Voigt
Capt. Cayle Wills

MARKETING
Advertising Director
Leslee Peth
941-205-6400
LPeth@sun-herald.com
Advertising Manager
Mike Ruiz
941-205-6402
MRuiz@sun-herald.com
Display Advertising
Chris Beckett
941-205-6405
CBeckett@sun-herald.com
Boaters' Bargains
941-429-3110
Printed by
Sun Coast Media Group
Some of WaterLine's subject matter con-
sists of the writers'opinions. We do our
best to be accurate in matters of fact in
this publication, but matters of opinion
are left to each individual author.


WaterLine photo by Josh Olive
A Pass crab (more properly an
iridescent swimming crab)
paddles along the surface of
Boca Grande Pass. To learn
more about these crustaceans,
turn to paae 13.


Angling 201 *CAPT. MIKE MYERS
lea(h anjd te tLjuijw h
Angling 101 ROBERT LUGIEWICZ
Here l:nie hr rainv iyea j;:n


Finding what we're seeking


Find something you like to do and
make it your career. Sounds easy.
Too easy, at least to me. I really
like spicy chicken wings washed
down with a Guinness or two, but
somehow I doubt I want to make it a
career. I also like working out at the
boxing gym, but I know how that
occupation would end up for me.


Not good. Some people find their
special job one that seems more
like pleasure than a pain in the you
know what. Monica Dorken seems
to be one of those who found what
they were looking for.
For the past 20 years, Monica
has worked at the Charlotte Harbor
Environmental Center. She is the
educator and program coordinator
at the Alligator Creek Preserve.
She loves the outdoors, and she
loves working with children. She is


retiring from her position this week
due to health problems, and the
void will be a tough one to fill.
For those who don't know, CHEC
does some pretty neat things. What
I'm most impressed with is its Youth
Environmental Education program,
which Monica played a major role
in getting off the ground. Some
of WaterLine's readers know who
Monica is, especially if you grew
up here. Each year, CHEC provides
all fourth-graders in the Charlotte


County public school system a
two-day exploration program -
one day on land, one day on the
water. She also helped set up a
shallow-water wading program for
second-graders. I can't imagine how
many young lives she has positively
influenced. Some may have gone on
to become marine biologists, charter
captains or veterinarians. Regard-
less, she introduced the outdoors to

FINDING 129


I I II I I I
I I II


I If you have a comment or question for
WaterLine publisher Josh Olive, email him
at WaterLineWeekly@gmail.com.


F


Josh:
Imagine my surprise to find a picture of
my son, Lewis Hall, in the June 6 issue
of WaterLine. This sported his catch of a
6-pound bass, which he caught in Tiger
Bay Slough on Tiger Bay Ranch in DeSoto
County. Also, I enjoyed seeing my nephew
Richard Hall's picture on the same page,
proudly showing off his catch of a large
snook. Tiger Bay Ranch, which has been in
our family for four generations, is a private
preserve in which we protect and conserve
wildlife. We all take much pleasure in the
ranch's natural beauty. Thanks for this
special issue. We look forward to receiving
and reading WaterLine each week.
-M. Lewis Hall, Jr.

M.:
We at WaterLine love our involvement with
the fishing community, and providing proud
anglers a place to display their catches is one of
my favorite things about the magazine. We'll be
making some additions to our publication over
the next few months, bringing in some new
things that we haven't had before, but publish-
ing photos from our readers will always be a
major part of what we do.
Josh Olive, WaterLine Publisher


JOSH:
I have to commend you for your courage to
jump into the tarpon debate in the Pass.
Truly, I was impressed. When we talked some
months back, I know you didn't approach the
issues with a particular mind set. There are
too many people out there who don't want to
be confused with facts because their mind is
made up. I don't envy the flack you are going
to get from friends and enemies alike. I found
your article particularly enlightening since
recently I was having a friendly discussion
with one of my neighbors about Pass jigs and
snagging. To be clear, I'm not a fan of combat
fishing or anything that has the potential to
disrupt my favorite species'desire to con-
gregate in our area. I have had a prejudice
against the type of fishing in the Pass that
could harass or snag tarpon. However, my
neighbor brought up a few valid points to me
the other day. Occasionally I end up snagging
fish accidentally when I am fly fishing. He
said he thinks the tarpon may swipe at the jig
and miss, getting foul hooked. That sounded
reasonable. Then he said if they are snagging
fish, they should be able to catch fish all the
time, when in fact sometimes they catch fish
and sometimes they don't. Hmmm? I ended
up walking away questioning my stand. Your
article reaffirms my opposition to the Pass jig.
If the fish are feeding by striking the jig, why
does the weight have to be below the hook,
why does it have to be on the bottom and why


DAN:
It's possible hes eight I ve tried interviewing
tarpon, but they don I say much And I would like
to know why there are s:omletimes lew hookups
when fish are stacked deep and why jig anglers
can go foir a l:ng time with inoI hsh hooked and
then in the span :f l few minutes there are
multiple hsh o:n all over the FPss o: he clear I m
not opposed to:1 the FPss jig at least no:t yet
Nothing has been po:ven and until themes clear
proof whether :r inot the Ig snags tarp:on this
debate will never be truly settled But I do believe
the points I brought up in last week s column are
valid, and that if the Iig is entirely on the up-and-
up hook placement should I matter It Imy all be
moot anyway depending o:n what the FWC has
done at their meeting this week In the absence
of hard p:roo:,i the commissioners will probably be
compelled :to- go with what evidence they have
JO1si O/n \ I'llh tllWl PolIlS611i
Letters are I-' l ii. i .. I ..lly ,, ii ll ,r-rn i J[-l ,iil. -,i i In i[
we do havi ..n rii Pii-'i r i-.-i I 11 [i [,, i lh n i "
words. Let[rr, ll.iv I, hl lIl l,,r linill r wt Ill r ,r jinii ur
and spelling All lmlle -r iiur Ii- iil i 1111111 w ill l l-
- not inini l '.I l jil-,nu, ,r I ,ll I-ni ll ij[,- l w il ,l i[ I-,
published. I II r. [,, [I.llii Pi.lihl. r -.r i [ in l iii .il
as a public h,. i, hir ..... n .ITy ,h..ii l ihi "I" ."'6
and state n i .r i j1l i l r, 1l[[ r% Iv' [hi,.r- iI [ [ -
individual n i< Wr [ rl_.ir i i- .l ..ij I 11 r i [ M h.- i 1 1.ri,,.I
take no re; ', i llril .ir r [I. ... ,iiio i I nii o i- 1i[[, r


pJage Annual shark
tourney shows no
pae: sign of slowing down


Pjle '


Peace River Wildlife Center ROBIN JENKINS, DVM
Rehabber on the run, or got rats?........................ ............................... Page 10
Fun With Paddling TODD TERRILL
W which kayak is right for you?................................ ... ............................ Page 11
Putting her outdoor life on canvas......................... ........... ............... Page 12
W hat the heck is a pass crab? .......................... .................... ... ........ Page 13
Flatsmasters fish third event of Redfish Series.............................................Page 14
Around Charlotte Harbor CAPT. RALPH ALLEN
Lionfish are coming, but their cousins already live here..... .................Page 20
A Life on the Water CAPT. VAN HUBBARD
W indy weather challenges fisherm en........................................................Page 21
Expert fishing tips .................................................................... Page 21
Readers Write CAPT. RHETT MORRIS & JOELLEN MORRIS
The unwritten code............................. ...... ................ Page 22
Wade Fishing CAM PARSON
Fishing at the spillways? You're dam right ...................................................Page 23
Sailing 101 PETER WELCH
Sailing fun for all ages and income es ...........................................................Page 24
Searching for super-strength sunscreen?.....................................................Page 26


Fishin'Frank held the first
Fishin' Frank's shark, catfish and
stingray tourney in 1985.


Tournament Bassin' GREG BARTZ
'Tis the season to beware ..................
Cleanup work after BP oil spill ends in three tajtev
Two men charged with poaching nearly 51~00 pny Il:t-LIer
Diving for giant prehistoric sharks teeth
U.S. seeks to remove protections for gray ,:olve;


Local boating and safety programs.......
Cameron urges research .... ...............
UNO researcher: Tarpon spawn off Louisiana


I I


BULLETIN BOARD I Page 3

TIDE CHARTS I Page 4


SEAFOOD RECIPES I Page 4,14,20

FISH PROFILES I Page 4


don't you feel the fish immediately?
Dan Ferraris


1


T0i1 T2114i l 'd b iR


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Rjl~cIK'
RpcI 3':

RjcIe 31:
RjcIe 31
RjcIe 32.


FISH FINDER ae i

MAP OF LOCAL WATERS Ie i

READER PHOTOS ial :

SOLUNAR TABLES PI je


-~--1


&i
6d .


Fr,:,ni the Pultiher ,Je.l.






i e Page 3 June 13,2013


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The Englewood Fishing Club will hold its monthly meeting on
June 13th at 6:30 p.m. at the Lemon Bay Park Environmental
Center (570 Bay Park Blvd., Englewood). Featured will be a
presentation by Rachael Kraemer with Mote Marine Laboratory
speaking on "The culture of the silver king". Admission is free
and open to the public. Further info can be found on the club's
web site: www.englewoodfishingclub.net

PROFESSIONAL TARPON
TOURNAMENT SERIES
The event is held in Boca Grande Pass on June 15th and 16th
(five 3-hour Sunday Tournaments). It will be filmed and
broadcasted worldwide as a 13-week television series. This catch
and release style tournament series is conducted in a sporting
manner with an emphasis on promoting conservation and the
sport of Tarpon fishing in Boca Grande. This is the largest and
richest live-release tarpon tournament in the world with over
$500,000 in cash and prizes awarded. To reserve a charter for
your team of 3 anglers with captain, visit: http://bit.ly/ZfDxw7.
See more at: http://bit.ly/YbaE3T or call 347-674-PTTS.

NORTH PORT KIDS FISHING CLINIC
The Kids Fishing Tournament and Fishing Clinic will be held
from 8 a.m. to noon June 15th at McKibben Park (5500 Trekell
St., North Port).Youth ages 12 and under can learn the basics
of environmental stewardship, fishing ethics, angling skills and
safety. There will be prizes, raffles, food and refreshments. Free
fishing pole, tackle box and T-shirt for the first 200 children. Call
the Early Bird Kiwanis at 941-474-4747 or North Port Parks and
Recreation at 941-429-PARK (7275).

PUNTA GORDA ELKS'CLUB
FISHING TOURNAMENT
Youth ages 14 and under are welcomed to fish in a fun
tournament on June 15th at the Punta Gorda Elks'Lodge (25538
Shore Drive, Punta Gorda). Check-in starts at 8 a.m. Fishing will
be from 9 to 11 a.m. There will be prizes awarded along with a
complimentary lunch from 11 a.m. to noon. Each child should
bring their own fishing polle. Call 941-639-0187.

DRAGONFLIES AT MYAKKAHATCHEE
CREEK ENVIRONMENTAL PARK
Would you believe there are over 50 species of dragonflies and
damselfliesthat call Sarasota County home? On June 15th from
10 a.m. to noon, join Kathy and Don Hess, Sarasota County
volunteers and amateur odonatists, at Myakkahatchee Creek
Environmental Park (6968 Reisterstown Rd., North Port) to learn
more about these fascinating creatures and enjoy their vibrant
colors and amazing flight skills. Register on-line at www.scgov.
net or call 941-861-5000 for more information.

SARASOTA SCULLERS
LONG SKINNY BOAT CAMP
Get your child involved in the sport everyone in Sarasota
is talking about starting June 17th from 8 a.m. to noon at
Blackburn Point Park in Osprey Osprey. Middle and High
School age children learn the basics of rowing on the beautiful
intracoastal waterways of Sarasota. It's a nature lesson and an
exercise program all in one activity. At the end of the 10-day
session the rowers will compete in a mini regatta and they and
their families will enjoy a picnic lunch. Cost is $265 for 10 days.
Call 941-966-2244 for more information.

ENGLEWOOD SAILING ASSOCIATION CAMPS
Englewood Sailing Association is offering two summer sailing
camps for youth ages 9-15. Register at the Englewood Family
YMCA. The week-long camps are June 17th-21st and July
22nd-26th and run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily from Indian
Mound Park in Englewood.The rate per camper is $125.
Instructors are certified through U.S. Sailing. The ability to
swim is a prerequisite. Call Hugh Moore at 941-257-8192 or the
Englewood YMCA at 941-475-1234.

ADVENTURE CAMPS AT BOCA GRANDE
Adventure camp is for children ages 11-15 and are held from
9 a.m.to4 p.m on June 17th through 21st and July 15th
through 19th. Space is limited to the first 12 participants.
Includes kayaking, snorkeling, sailing, skateboarding,
paintball orfishing. At Boca Grande Community Center (131
First St W, Boca Grande). Cost is $100 each session. Call
941-964-2564.

KAYAK KAMP FOR KIDS
Join Grande Tours Kayak & Paddleboard Center of Placida for
an exciting week long camp with unique hands-on learning
experience. The camp is held June 17th through 21st, and
July 15th through 19th. Ages 7-12 are invited to register. Our
kayaks act as a means to instill an understanding and sense of


LV"aNN YULVI U10 VV UV tf I 0 f IV I[LU UIt UI dV~d I tfl VV IIIIt I U
fun. All camps take place at our water side facility in Placida
(12575 Placida Rd. Placida).Visit www.grandetours.com and
click on Kids Kamps or call 941-697-8825.

KIDS ALL-AMERICAN FISHING DERBY
Come to the Cape Coral Yacht Club Pier on June 18th from 8-11
a.m for a youth fishing derby (5-15 years). The derby includes:
Angler education, awards, lunch and a goodie bag. Children
must bring their own fishing rod and tackle. Bait will be
provided. Call 239-574-0806 for more information.

CHEC SEAGRASS ADVENTURE WADING TRIP
Join Bobbi Rodgers and the Charlotte Harbor Environmental
Center and the Charlotte County Natural Resource Department
at Cedar Point Park (2300 Placida Rd, Englewood) on a Seagrass
Adventure Wading Trip into Lemon Bay in search of marine
organisms such as sea horse, crabs and juvenile fish on June
19th from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Registration is required, so call
941-475-0769.

EVENING NATURE WALK AT SLEEPING
TURTLES PRESERVE SOUTH
You are not going to believe how many frog species we
have that call Sarasota County home. On June 20th from 7
to 8:30 p.m., Sarasota County Environmental Specialist and
Herpetologist Brian Pavlina will teach you how to recognize
their calls and identify their habitat, at Venice's Sleeping Turtles
Preserve South (2800 N. River Rd., Venice). As the air cools into
night, male frogs see this as the time to breed. Register on-line
at www.scgov.net or call 941-861-5000 for more information.

CHARLOTTE HARBOR'S FUTURE WORKSHOP
What are the biggest issues in Charlotte Harbor's fisheries?
How could stakeholder's involvement improve local fisheries
management? We need your input to answer these questions
and to identify local perspectives on fisheries. June 20th at
6 p.m. at Rutenberg Community Park (6500 S Pointe Blvd.,
Fort Myers). Call Chelsey Crandall at 813-690-2334 or contact
kicksea@ufl.edu.

YOUTH MANATEE EDUCATION PROGRAM
This summer education program provides families free
admission for children ages 12 and younger when accompanied
by a paying adult on June 21st at 10 a.m. at the Rookery Bay
National Estuarine (300 Tower Rd., Naples). Includes manatee
presentation and film with other activities. Call 239-417-6310
for more information.

CHARLOTTE HIGH SCHOOL
REDFISH ROUNDUP
The 12th Annual tournament to benefit Charlotte High School.
June 22 at Laishley Park in Punta Gorda. Competition bgins at
safe light. Weigh-in at 3:30 p.m. Awards follow weigh-in and
buffet. $50 late fee after June 18. $5,000 first place; $1,250
second place; $750 third place; $400 fourth place; $300 6yh-
10th place. Call 941-637-5953 for more information.

REGATTA POINTE MARINA RIVER REGATTA
Come enjoy the 5th annual River Regatta. All races are held on
the Manatee River. Event scheduled for June 29th at 10:30 a.m.
and is hosted at and staged by Regatta Pointe Marina (1005
Riverside Dr., Palmetto). Race day will include complimentary
beer & entertainment. Early registration is $45 if received by
June 24th; late registration is $55. Call 941-729-6021 for more
information.

CHARLOTTE HARBOR'S FUTURE WORKSHOP
What are the biggest issues in Charlotte Harbor's fisheries?
How could stakeholder's involvement improve local fisheries
management? We need your input to answer these questions
and to identify local perspectives on fisheries. June 26th at
6 p.m. at Lashley Park Municipal Marina (120 Lashley Court,
Punta Gorda). Call Chelsey Crandall at 813-690-2334 or contact
kicksea@ufl.edu.

LEMON BAY HIGH SCHOOL
FOOTBALL FISHING TOURNEY
The Lemon Bay High School Football inshore/offshore fishing
tournament is set for July 6th out of Cape Haze Marina in
Englewood. Pre-registration entry is $350 per boat for up to four
anglers, with a $50 fee for additional anglers. Fees are $400 per
boat the day of tournament registration for up to four anglers
and $50 for additional anglers. Sponsorships are available.
Organized by the Lemon Bay Touchdown Club, and all proceeds
benefit the Manta Ray football program. For more information,
visit www.lbtdclub.com or call Tom Hinck at 941-716-0442,
Dave Nelson at 239-398-4263, Dan Reigle at 941-716-2795 or
Jim Connaghan at 941-209-9646.


ONGOING EVENTS
FREE PADDLE DEMONSTRATIONS: Grande Tours
(12575 Placida Road, Placida) is holding free kayak and
stand-up paddleboard demos from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
every Saturday. Call 941-697-8825 for more information.
LIVING WATERS: Aquatic Preserves of Florida
A collection of 29 black-and-white photographs by
preeminent Florida photographer Clyde Butcher, will
be on exhibit through Nov. 14th at the Rookery Bay
Environmental Learning Center art gallery (300 Tower
Road in Naples). Since 2004 the artistic and educational
exhibition has traveled the state to increase awareness
of and appreciation for Florida's 41 aquatic preserves. The
110,000-acre Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research
Reserve encompasses two of those aquatic preserves
and part of more than five million acres of diverse water
landscape and coastal areas that are critical to Florida's
future. In conjunction with the exhibit, Rookery Bay will
show the companion one-hour nature film documentary,
-Living Waters: Aquatic Preserves of Florida."Call 239-
417-6310 or visit rookerybay.org for more information.
Cost is $3 children ages 6 -12, $5 adults, members free.
FREE SAFETY CHECKS: The Coast Guard Auxiliary
conducts free vessel safety checks every Saturday morn-
ing from 8:30 to 11:45 a.m. at the Venice boat ramp (200
N. Seaboard Ave., Venice). They'll make sure the safety
equipment mandated by federal and state regulations is
on board. If an inspected vessel is found to be safe, a "Seal
of Safety"is affixed to it. For more info or to schedule an
appointment, call Patrick Wheeler at 941-412-1026.
PADDLING AND BIRDING AT OSCAR SCHERER:
Year-round ranger-led paddle tours of South Creek
on are offered each Wednesday at Oscar Scherer State
Park (1843 S. Tamiami Trail, Osprey). Register at 8:30
a.m., tour at 9 a.m. Cost is park fee plus canoe or kayak
rental fee. Bird walks are also offered every Thursday at
7:30 a.m., and guided scrub jay walks every Sunday at
8:30 a.m. For more info on any of these programs, call
941-483-5956.
CONSERVANCY WALK AT TIGERTAIL BEACH: Listed
as Site #73 on the Great Florida Birding Trail. Meet your
volunteer guides (weather permitting) at 8:30 a.m.
Monday through Friday at the kiosk at Tigertail Beach.
Directions: U.S. 41 (Tamiami Trail) to 951 South to
Marco Island. Turn right on Kendall Court, the fifth light
after crossing the bridge to Marco Island. Turn left at
four-way stop sign at Hernando Court to Tigertail Beach.
Free parking with beach sticker, otherwise subject to


county parking fee. Water shoes and binoculars are also
suggested. The following walks in the Naples area are
offered at no cost through the Conservancy of Southwest
Florida (1450 Merrihue Dr., Naples). For more info, call
239-262-0304 or go to www.conservancy.org.
BOATERS GATHERING AT NAV-A-GATOR: A boaters'
get-together is held from 1 to 2 p.m. the second
Sunday of each month at the waterfront chickee hut at
Nav-A-Gator Grill/DeSoto Marina (9700 S.W. Riverview
Circle, Lake Suzy).This informal gathering is open to the
public to discuss boats, fishing, the Peace River and other
topics. For more information, call the Nav-A-Gator at
941-627-3474.
WHAT'S THAT BIRD?: Volunteer bird interpreters share
their expertise on ID and behavior of raptors, shorebirds,
waterfowl and other avian visitors at Myakka River State
Park (13208 State Road 72, Sarasota). Volunteers set up
scopes and help people identify birds from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. every day of the week.
BOTTOM TIME DIVE CLUB: We are a scuba dive club
that meets on the 3rd Tuesday of each month. Club is
based out of Punta Gorda. Call 941-740-4245 or contact
www.BottomTimeDiveClub.net.
LEARN TO TIE FLIES: Capt. Harry Hall will offer a free
saltwater fly tying seminar every Wednesday from 4:30
to 6 p.m. at West Wall Boats (787 Tamiami Trail, Port
Charlotte). The public is invited to attend. Call 941-875-
9630 for more info.
BIRD WALK AT LAKES PARK: A bird patrol guide will
lead an easy walk along clear paths of Lakes Regional
Park (7330 Gladiolus Drive, Fort Myers) at 8:30 a.m. on
the first Saturday of each month. This free walk offers
an opportunity to see birds in natural vegetation as your
guide points out the many species in what is a birding
hot spot and crucial nesting area for many birds. Arrive
at 8 a.m. at Shelter A7 for a brief intro and sign in. Wear
comfortable shoes and dress for outdoors. Bring water,
hat, sunscreen, binoculars and camera. Call 239-533-
7580 for more info.
CHARLOTTE HARBOR MULTIHULL ASS'N: Members
of this club for multihull owners, sailors or those who
are interested in it exchange ideas about equipping and
sailing boats, share information about anchorages and
cruising destinations, hold informal races that help to
improve their sailing ability, and have local raft-ups.
No dues. The club meets at Harpoon Harry's on the first
Monday of each month at 6 p.m. For more info, visit
http://yhoo.it/XV96fO or call 941-876-6667.


LOVERS KEY STATE PARK
All programs will take place at Lovers Key State Park
(8700 Estero Blvd, Fort Myers Beach). Registration/
reservations are required. Call 239-463-4588. The
park offers many recreational opportunities to visitors
with disabilities. Ticket Pricing: $8 for vehicles with
two to eight individuals.
WADING TRIP: Join a park naturalist from 10 to
11 a.m. on June 13th to learn about the marine
species that make the estuary and barrier island
environments unique, and explore sea grass flats.
Seahorses, shrimp, young fish, and egg casings of all
sorts inhabit the grasses, which attract larger fish,
mollusks and crustaceans, and manatees, dolphins
and rays. Guests will get wet as they venture into
the estuary. The Estuary Wading Trip is sponsored
by the Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program
(CHNEP).
BEGINNING BIRDING: Explore the prime birding
areas of Lovers Key State Park on June 14th and 27th


at 10 a.m. with a park ranger. Learn how to identify
the birds you see and where to go in the park for
great birding. A limited number of binoculars will be
provided.
SHORELINE EXPLORATION TALK: Join a park
naturalist for an intriguing and interesting talk on
June 20th at 10 a.m. about the treasures that wash up
along the shore of Lovers Key State Park. Learn about
seashells, crustaceans, starfish and other creatures
that can be found on our shore.
BLACK ISLAND KAYAK TOUR: Join a park ranger
for a relaxing 112 mile kayak tour on June 21st at 10
a.m. Learn the history of Black Island and experience
some of the wildlife that call the waterways of Lovers
Key home. Bring your own kayak or rent one from the
park concession.
WALK ON THE WILD SIDE: Take a mile-long guided
hike on June 28th at10 a.m. along our Black Island
Trail with a park ranger to learn about the fascinating
vegetation and wildlife that reside in this maritime
hammock.


O 5 o Fully-staffed Gel
Coat and Fiberglass oAS
Repair, Restoration,
and Fabrication
Department.
Specializing in WES.
*YAMAHA Minor, Structural 4UG-MrATs
Repower Specialists and Accident
Call KG 7 Days aWeek Repairs.
941-628-5000





.Mp'rae, Page 4 June 13,2013


THURS AY FRIDAY
ure 1i lii FT EI7 1117 i 01 2 7 AM W


SATURDAY SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


VtIitII LN I LI.IIlI I/1, L.405 VV 07:50 08:33
v m mL 1 i 16:02 17:07 06:32 07:10
04:50 2.05 05:23 1.89 05:56 1.70 1.74 18:23 1.86 19:55 2.01 21:38 2.17 23:12
1.45 05:23 1.541.63 1.521.37 ---------1.32 1.33
1/-^y \ 75 ^vy\ Z s z\ 4f:-S- Z )y \


/ 09:33 10:39
23:05 1.06 2
0.12 0
MHHW 2.201, MHW 1.932, MSL 1.172, MTL 1.152, MLW 0.3


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


PUNTA GORDA 26.9283 N, 82.0650 W (ADD 3:


18:26
2 ft07:55 1.89
1.31

12:28
> -1.04-
01:28
0.03


02:07
0.13


08:28 1921
.401.74


13:39
1.00


11:53 02:35
3:43 0.98 013:13 01:06 14:30 01:50164
3:43 0.98 00:24 0.4 0.62 0.62 0.81 15:41 0.99 16:44
D.26 0.43 0.36 0.09
371, MLLW 0.000 All measurements in feet; for more info see www. tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov
SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY
2 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR EL JOBEAN TIDES) 11:03 11:47
09:04 20:23 09:41 21:36 12 23:01 1.8500:41 2.00
- 1.49 1.58 1.60 1.40-- 1.26 1.19


14:59 05:39
0.2 6 16:20 04:09 17:35 04:53 03
02:46 0.92 03:26 -- 0.77 0.59 0.57 0.77 18:43 19-- :4493
0.26 0.41 0.57 0.080.33 19:44
0.08


MHHW 1.962, MHW 1.703, MTL1.076, MSL 1.070, MLW 0.449, MLLW 0.000
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY


SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


PLACIDA, GASPARILLA SOUND 26.8333 N, 82.2667 W (ADD 28 MINUTES TO TIMES FOR LEMON BAY TIDES) 08:29 09:12
05:17 15:30_ 05:5216:23_ 06:29 17:28 07:08 18:48 07:48 20:25 1.55 226 1.68____
1.08 1.15 1 20:25 1.55 122:06 23:37
1.08 / 58 1.15 4 124- 114 1.03 0.98 0.98


/ 09:56
Sr 0.85-


12:26
0.76-


23:36


13:50
00:57 0.65 -- 01:40
0.27 0.40


0 4- 03:08
15:09 02:24____ 0 08
0.48 0.54 16:20 -- 0.68-
0.28


17:23
0.07


MHHW 1.407, MHW 1.175, MSL 0.784, MTL 0.768, MLW 0.358, MLLW 0.000


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


MATLACHA PASS (BASCULE BRIDGE) 26.6333 N, 82.0667 W
07:27 17:40 08:02 18:33 08:39
r1.28-1.87-- 1.37 1.71-- 1.47 -
^- \


12:23 13:33
1.00 0.97-
02:03


02:42
0.17


19:38 09:18 20:58
-1.53 1.58 1.35-
7> fN ^


14:53 16:17
0.90 03:24 0.77
0.32


09:58 10:39
1.70 22:35 1.84 00:16
1.22 1.16


-04:07-
0.48


17:36_
0.57


MHHW N/A, MHW N/A, MSL N/A, MTL N/A, MLW N/A, MLLW 0.000


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


MONDAY


11:22
1.99


_04:51 05:35
0.65 18:47 0.80 19:50
0.33 0.08
0.08


TUESDAY WEDNESDAY


VENICE INLET


04:50
09:33
15:06
23:05


1.45 feet
1.11 feet
2.05 feet
0.12 feet


1.54 feet
1.06 feet
1.89 feet
0.26 feet


05:56 1.63 feet
11:53 0.98 feet
17:07 1.70 feet


PUNTA GORDA



PLACIDA


01:28
07:55
12:28
18:26


05:17
09:56
15:30
23:36


0.03 feet
1.31 feet
1.04 feet
1.89 feet


1.08 feet
0.85 feet
1.58 feet
0.05 feet


0.13 feet
1.40 feet
1.00 feet
1.74 feet


05:52 1.15 feet
11:06 0.82 feet
16:23 1.44 feet


0.26 feet
1.49 feet
0.92 feet
1.58 feet


0.15 feet
1.24 feet
0.76 feet
1.29 feet


0.41 feet
1.60 feet
0.77 feet
1.40 feet


0.27 feet
1.33 feet
0.65 feet
1.14 feet


04:09
10:21
17:35
23:01


01:40
07:48
15:09
20:25


0.59 feet
1.72 feet
0.57 feet
1.26 feet


0.40 feet
1.44 feet
0.48 feet
1.03 feet


04:53 0.77 feet
11:03 1.85 feet
18:43 0.33 feet


02:24
08:29
16:20
22:06


0.54 feet
1.55 feet
0.28 feet
0.98 feet


04:51 0.65 feet
10:39 1.84 feet
18:47 0.33 feet


Vegetable oil, for frying A CLIP-N-SAVE FLORIDA
4 large russet potatoes SEAFOOD RECIPE PROVIDED BY
2 cups all-purpose flour //
1 tbsp baking powder .
1 tsp salt, plus more for seasoning
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper, plus more for seasoning Recipe from
1 large egg, lightly beaten FoodNetwork.com
1 (12-ounce) can soda water
1/2 cup rice flour, for dredging
2 (8-ounce) white fish fillets, cut in half on an angle
Malt vinegar, for serving
Tartar sauce, for serving
Heat 3 inches of oil in a deep fryer or Dutch oven to 325 F. Peel the potatoes and cut them into
chips, about the size of your index finger. Put the potatoes in the oil. Fry the chips for 2 to 3
minutes; they should not be crisp or fully cooked at this point. Remove the chips with a spider
strainer or slotted spoon, to a paper towel-lined platter to drain. Crank the oil temperature up
to 375 F. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, pepper, and egg. Pour
in the soda water and whisk to a smooth batter. Spread the rice flour on a plate. Dredge the fish
pieces in the rice flour and then dip them into the batter, letting the excess drip off. Put the
chips in the bottom of the fryer basket and carefully submerge in the hot oil. Carefully wave
the battered fish into the bubbling oil before dropping them in on top of the chips. Fry the fish
and chips for 4 to 5 minutes until crispy and brown. Remove the basket and drain the fish and
chips on paper towels; season lightly with salt. Serve wrapped in a newspaper cone with malt
vinegar and/or tartar sauce. Serves 4.
ooo


J I :^l1l 1111r :i T Y L i


I


Size Limit: Minimum 16"in the Gulf
Bag Limit: 2 per harvester per day (included in
aggregate snapper bag limit of 10 per harvester
per day), zero bag limit for charter capt. or crew
Season: 2013 season is June 1 to July 14 in state
waters; June 1 to June 28 in federal waters
Average Size: 5 to 10 pounds
Florida State Record: 46 pounds, 8 ounces
Habitat: Offshore around
structure including
artiihjal ani natural
ree4 Red ripper
unlil.e nmny
o:her


snappers, are rarely found in shallow water
Food Value: Excellent one of the mc;i
commercially sought fish in the South At arii
Fishing Methods: Live or cut bait fished on or
near the bottom is the most common me th,:d
Reds will take a variety of baits, including (cu
squid and shrimp, but the largest fish are uluajly
taken on live baitfish. Jigs, bare or tippec with
natural baits, are also used by some angler;
(must use circle hooks when using
i natural bt i I


J-
01:25
-0.03


00:24
06:32
13:13
18:23


0.43 feet
1.74 feet
0.84 feet
1.52 feet


01:06
07:10
14:30
19:55


0.62 feet
1.86 feet
0.62 feet
1.37 feet


01:50
07:50
15:41
21:38


MATLACHA


0.81 feet
2.01 feet
0.36 feet
1.32 feet


02:35
08:33
16:44
23:12


0.99 fE,-
2.17fE,[
0.09 fE,-
1.33 fE-i


01:25
07:27
12:23
17:40


-0.03 feet L
1.28 feet H
1.00 feet L
1.87 feet H


0.06 feet
1.37 feet
0.97 feet
1.71 feet


0.17 feet
1.47 feet
0.90 feet
1.53 feet


00:41
05:39
11:47
19:44


03:08
09:12
17:23
23:37


03:24
09:18
16:17
20:58


1.19fE,[
0.93 fE-i
2.00 fE-i
0.08 fE-i


0.68 fE-i
1.68fE-[
0.07 fE-,
0.98 fE-[


0.32 feet
1.58 feet
0.77 feet
1.35 feet


04:07
09:58
17:36
22:35


0.48 feet
1.70 feet
0.57 feet
1.22 feet


00:16
05:35
11:22
19:50


1.16fE,[
0.80 fE-i
1.99fE-[
0.08 fE,-


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e/VML, teuI Page 5 June 13, 2013


Is the jig staying or going?


As I write this, the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion meeting is still two days away.
This is the meeting where the
commissioners will discuss the fate
of the Boca Grande Pass tarpon jig.
But as you read it, that meeting
is already in the past. I envy you a
little, because you have the luxury
of viewing this column through the
lens of certainty. I, on the other
hand, am making semi-random
guesses.
If you haven't been paying atten-
tion, I'll catch you up real quick. The
proposed draft rule would enhance
the definition in the tarpon chapter
of "snagging" or"snatch hooking"
and prohibit the use and posses-
sion of gear rigged with a weight
attached to the bottom of the hook
in Boca Grande Pass.
My first guess is that the commis-
sioners voted to approve the draft
rule. Further, I will guess that
they've amended the draft rule's
language to prohibit any rig in which
the weight is below the hook, rather
than only a rig where it's attached to
the bottom.
I'm going to guess that there were
two main themes among those who
spoke: The jig defenders probably
focused mostly on the fact that
there is no iron-clad proof that the


jig snags tarpon without the
fish being somehow involved
in hooking themselves, and
the folks who want the jig
to go away probably
cited regulations
from other areas
that have deemed
bottom-weighted
rigs to be snagging
devices. I'll also
guess that the over-
whelming majority
of comments came from
members of the intimately involved
groups: The Professional Tarpon
Tournament Series, Save the Tarpon,
the Florida Tarpon Anglers Associa-
tion and maybe the Boca Grande
Fishing Guides Association (if there
are any members left).
I'll venture to guess nothing that
was said at the meeting came as a
surprise to the commissioners, and
that they came to the meeting with
their minds already made up.
Here's another guess: There were
more than a couple complaints
voiced about such a local issue being
addressed at a Lakeland meeting.
Now, I could see how I might be
wrong about one or two of these.
If someone brings some "surprise"
evidence that indicates the jig
is significantly more likely to be
attacked by tarpon, whether out of
hunger or irritation, than to snag
them, the FWC might feel that


there's need for
more study on this
issue. Here's a fun one
to guess about: Would they
temporarily bar jig fishing while the
study is being carried out?
Let's move forward with the
assumption that the vote went
against the jig, and proceed with
some predictions about future
possibilities. I think at their
September meeting, the FWC will
have a final vote on the rule and it
will get passed, going into effect
Jan. 1,2014. I think that will trigger
the following effects: About a third
of the current jig-fishing fleet will
disappear; the rest will rely on the
other ways they already know to
catch tarpon or will learn them
quickly. Those who go will mostly
be the less professional guides, the
ones who don't know the area well
enough to have any other tricks.


There
will be at
least one and
possibly several
lawsuits filed against
the FWC, claiming the ruling
is arbitrary and capricious. A really
good lawyer might even be able to
make that stick, but I'm not sure.
One thing I'm pretty certain of is
that the PTTS won't die just because
the jig does. Gary Ingman has told
me that come what may, he intends
that the tournament should survive.
Without Pass jigs, someone will
probably come up with another arti-
ficial bait that can be fished success-
fully hey, I've seen Capt. Ray Van
Horn's Carolina rig put five tarpon in
the air in a few hours, on par with
what the jig fishermen were doing in
the Pass that day. And if not, I have
no doubt they'll fish some sort of
natural bait. And with the FWC also
set at this meeting to explicitly allow
temporary tarpon possession for the


purpose of measuring length
and girth, the PTTSs new
estimated-weight
system will probably
be the way it's
., i done from now on.
L. And for the record,
S I'm fine with that.
If the jig gets
the boot, there will
be a lot of people
cheering about that.
I won't be one of them.
I have deep concerns that the jig
might be snagging fish, but I can
also empathize with the captains
who will lose a major portion of
their income if they can't figure out
another way to fish, and the small
manufacturers and tackle shops
that will lose sales. I recognize that
many of those guides were taking
most of the money back home with
them, and that this will probably
ultimately be better for the local
economy, but I just can't celebrate
over a man losing his job.
One last guess: Lost in the discus-
sions about tarpon, tarpon, tarpon
has been that the FWC is going to
decide whether to lift the executive
order that has kept snook season
closed on the Gulf coast since 2009.
I'll guess that there's going to be an
open snook season here on Sept.
1. I know some people who would
be only too happy to trade all this
tarpon talk for a couple snook fillets.


Hey, knucklehead:


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher

There was story I saw on NBC-2
a couple weeks back about some
kids who caught a big bull shark at
the Bayshore Pier in Port Char-
lotte. I didn't actually see it on the
newscast; a friend emailed me the
video. As I was watching it, I noticed
the fish didn't look quite right. A
closeup of the shark's teeth showed
dentition that was all wrong for a
bull shark. As I watched the video for
a second time, looking a little closer,
I realized there was a problem: It
wasn't a bull shark at all. It was a
lemon shark. A few years ago, that
would have been all right but not
anymore, because in March of 2010,
the FWC prohibited the harvest of
lemon sharks in Florida waters.
Now, some folks have been quick
to defend the kids who killed that


shark, saying that they're just kids
who didn't know any better. And
they could have been out vandal-
izing or smoking meth or other
much worse things. And at least they
didn't waste the fish (in the video,
they're shown cooking and eating
some of the meat).
I get all that. But none of it
matters. They broke the law. I don't
care if they thought it was a legal
shark. It wasn't.
When you harvest a fish, it's up
to you to be able to identify it and
know that it's legal to take. If you're
killing a shark, you had better know
how to tell a dusky from a bull. Bull
sharks are legal, duskies aren't. If
you're not sure how to tell them
apart, look it up on your phone.
If you can't figure it out, then the
answer is really simple: Don't kill the
fish. Err on the side of caution. It's
better to let it go and find out it was


a bull than to harvest it and find out
it's a dusky. Don't take your buddy's
word for it, either. Here's a tip:
Anybody who identifies any shark as
a"sand shark" doesn't have a clue.
Apparently, these kids weren't
the only ones who mistook lemon
sharks for bulls. I hear a rumor that a
couple of lemon sharks were brought
in during a recent shark tournament.
I don't know if this is indicative of
an unusually high number of lemon
sharks in Charlotte Harbor this
summer or what, but it's a problem.
Lemon sharks aren't that hard to
identify: They have two dorsal fins
that are nearly the same size. The
only other local shark that shares
that feature is the nurse shark,
which has a very distinctive face and
barbels next to its mouth. The Fishin'
Frank's shark tournament entry
forms have a very clear illustration
of a lemon shark's fins and a clear


statement that they're a protected
species. How much does it have to
be beat into someone's skull before
they have to be held responsible for
their own actions?
Sharks aren't the only fish anglers
have a tough time with. Permit
and pompano look very similar,
yet the regulations are different.
It would be very easy to mistake
small permit for pompano, and if
you run across a school of them and
take a limit of six, you actually have
three times the legal limit because
you're allowed only two permit. I get
photos all the time of small Goliath
grouper misidentified as gag. How
about telling a small kingfish from
a big Spanish mackerel? And do you
think you can tell a lesser amberjack
from a young greater amberjack?
If you can't, you might not only
harvest fish that are undersize but
you might accidentally take five


times the legal limit. Oops.
Education is the best solution for
staying out of such messes, but it's
up to you as an angler to learn it.
If you want to go out and harvest
fish, educate yourself. Otherwise,
you have no one but yourself to
blame if you get a citation. We'll do
our best to help you out if you'll pay
attention Robert Lugiewicz had
a shark identification column a few
weeks back, and we've had pieces
specifically on how to tell permit
from pompano and kings from
Spanish (Goliaths are easy they're
the only grouper we have with a
paddle-shaped tail).
Know the laws and know your
fish. Or take the easy way out and
just release them all. And if you get
caught with a fish you never should
have put in the cooler, it's on you
and I'm having a hard time digging
up any sympathy.


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A.i /,.s ,,,* Page 6 June 13,2013


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Nokomis
941-488-8229


FISHERMAN'S EDGE
Grove City
941-697-7595


Redfish are thinning out, but scattered reports are coming in. A lot of pompano are
in Dona Bay, and have been caught using a pompano jig. Spanish mackerel and
bonita are plentiful.They are chasing baitfish, troll a spoon or a threadfin. Sharks
and tarpon are cruising along the beaches. Tarpon are chewing on crabs more than
threadfin and are thick off of Caspersen Beach.


The most redfish reports in the area have come from inside Lemon Bay on the east
side. They are tailing along the oyster bars. Pompano have been caught along
Englewood beach. Try using pompano jigs. Flounder as big as 16 inches are swim-
ming near Boca Grande Pass. Bigger snook have been seen and caught along the
beaches, along with whiting. Blacktip sharks have been reported in numbers near
the Placida Trestle.


Amberajck and red grouper are being reported 10 to 30 miles
offshore. Lane and mangrove snapper and cobia are also in the
mix. Few reports of red snapper.


Red snapper have been caught 60 miles offshore and beyond.
Larger mangrove snapper are also being hooked in numbers.


Plenty of snook are swimming off the area
beaches. Use live shrimp or artificial.


Tarpon are a safe bet in and around Boca
Grande Pass. Use a pass crab or other live
bait.You done have to fish in the Pass, the
tarpon are hanging around other passes
and off the beaches.


Harbor sharks are feeding on pinfish and cutbait and will stay active this week. Kingfish have been reported offshore as close as 10 miles, especially Fish the Myakke River nearTarpon Point for
Redfish have been reported around piers using shrimp. Harbor piers in the morning off of Gasparilla and Stump passes.The red snapper season is open snook.They have been hanging around
have produced trout, although they are small.The big ones have moved into deeper and the fish have been caught as close as 60 miles out using squid there the past week and should stick
FINE BAIT & TACKLE water. Smaller tarpon have been caught in the Myakka River. Canals are producing and finger mullet. around. Fish the mangroves using live
North Port bass with the freshwater and rain moving in. shrimp or whitebait.
941-240-5981

I |Since the water temperature has dropped, fish are coming out from under structure. Too windy and rainy. Catfish. More specifically, sailcats. Use a
Target redfish and snook on topwater in the mornings. Cobia are still around, but steel leader and a 3/0 hook and use a big
it is hard to spot them during and after the rain. Trout are hiding in deeper water. piece of shrimp and squid or ladyfish head
CAPT. TED'S TACKLE Sheepshead are on the flats and are best caught with cut shrimp under a cork. or mullet chunk. Drop bait and wait.
Port Charlotte Sharks are scattered around the Harbor and are biting on live and dead bait.
941-627-6800

Cobia and shark can be found around the Harbor. Sharks are plentiful.The brown The recent tropical storm put a damper on reports. Spanish Mangrove snapper on nearshore and off-
Sbombers will take a little more effort to find and catch. They can be found cruising mackerel are running offshore and in passes. shore reefs. Chum, then chum some more.
under bridges and along sand bars. Keep an artificial eel handy. Big black drum are The mangs tend to swim in numbers during
FISHIN' FRANK'S congregating in the canals of Punta Gorda Isles. Snook and redfish are along the the summer months.
Charlotte Harbor west and eastwalls, but the bigger ones are south in Pine Island Sound because of
cooler and cleaner water. Look for tarpon to return to shallower waters this upcom-
941-625-3888 ing week.

Q J |Redfish and snookare moving in numbers on potholes and around Harbor bars. The red grouper bite is going good. So is the gag, but season does Plenty of Spanish mackerel from the area
The snook are feeding like crazy and are getting ready to move out to the beaches to not open until July 1.The bigger grouper can be found in more than beaches to five miles out.They should be
spawn.Take advantage of the bite while it lasts, and use live shrimp or whitebait. Use 120 feet ofwater near structure. Watch out for barracuda.They running the same pattern this week. Look
LAISHLEY MARINE top-water tactics early in the morning. Trout are hanging out in deeper water and have a habit of going after your catch. for schools of bait and diving birds and toss
Punta Gorda beaches.The rain drove the tarpon a bit offshore, but look for them to rebound this a spoon.
941-639-3949 week. For a good time, target jacks in the canals.

The recent rain pushed the tarpon back into deeper waters and out of Pine Island A few red grouper reports, but the rain prevented anything Blacktip and bull shark are roaming the
Sound. But look for the silver kings to make their way back this week. Use crabs consistent. flats and the passes. Use live, cutor frozen
if possible, if not, use threadfin or other live bait.The snook bite has been on fire bait.
D&D BAIT AND TACKLE thrnuqhnijt thp nound ndqrppnhrkle rp op ,tnrhnir~ fnrhuit iv"chrimp ic lon 3
M atlacha 1'","1' R iIi, h Redfisiih ir i i ll, ii ir, rn iniii o lillr h r n l- iii iin l ]rh
0Ilr troutlill r-n- ii in ., ,, i [-lni i 1[ii l- ,r Ili]i] r in r I ,- Ihli.r 1- ,,i [hit l- ]r II I
239-282-9122 ,i.,ri j., i i, ,..,, ji,

SRedfish [ n hii i iii -i- iiv innj ii r.iiir n-pir i Ii jVh 1- r n .iri i [l- i i i in li. n- 11 i I l .n rii i Mangrove snapper r ri lJinrjiii 111u II V iui l \l- h -vr w llhr -i ll h1 i li i
ii rii in l l I- lirii ini injirnii l ilNi- l I inrii .Iijrni ii i lh r snookok nl [, 4iup i ir, l .Ii ijr i H lFn i 'i Ii t- lr I ei ii i lvin iIjnIlii i r iii l shark Ih n liirno I i-m1 [ niin nl ii l.rjnirml
ij [[l -nh ltripletail irn-l r[ iiirniii n iijr r-r rhi- i jr i ii- ii iilhl- i. i -u J iv1 M, ,I n j1 rl i. IJ i ln-llJl iilji i:ln porgies i ir rn- I, jj-i u li[ iri 1ill, l f IP i, i. i rll I:Vl l ii Iinj lurii ii Ihhi-
OLD PINE ISLAND M ARINA ,,,li i i li l -u i r[ l >iir ih riirflh i-il 'iriiih I Ir iil Trout ipirr l l ii j r i ,riili iiiii i li ri Grunts iir- Il ,I I, i ni n ,1ii a l iii] iiI inii iprli, l r iril iiiiu-v l iii liijii ir
St. James City '"" .l lll..l II ,,[, ,ii ,aui ir ,,,
239-283-2548 "



Sizes are imejsured i:tial length (fromii wa- Cobia: Min i 33 ifrk.hlmitI im 11ufi sh per vessel Redfish: S t 1l: -7i Iml 1 i(mn.j. fish per vessel) NO-HARVEST SPECIES: Zer:o bag limit for
most piarI o' head o iUp of pin(hed tall) unless Dolphin: Limit 10 Shark: MIn 54 e\(epl Allinlic sharpno:se. Bo:nefish. Go:lilalh Grouper IJewfish. Sawish.
other wise noted All hbg limits are per harvester blickneose, blacip, bo:nnethead, hinel:oth and Spolted Eagle Rays, Lem:n iSharks. Hlimmerhead
per day Other limits nmy apply, io:r most cirrenll Flounder: Mm 12, limit 10 smooth dogfish, limit 1 im1a\ 2 ish per vessel) .Sharkis (go: tlo the website listed below for a full
rules visit www MyFW( coiIn fishing Federal Grouper, Black: Min 22. limit, 4iseas:oni dosed Sheepshead: Min 12. limit 15 listIf ino-harvesl species
regulations ma.y differ flrom state regulations Feb 1 March 31 Snapper, Lane: Min8 limitl I ponis Visit http://bit.ly/1OnYDlz for full rules.
Snapper, Lane: Mm 8. hlmit 1I00 pounds
LICENSES Grouper, Gag: Mn 22, limit 2 season opens Snapper, Mangrove: Min. 10, Imit 5 FRESHW ATER FISH
Resident saltwater or freshwater: Annual $17, Snapper, Mutton: Min. 1 bag limit Largemouth Bass: South of State Road 80
5-year $79. Ifyoufish from shore only, a license is Grouper, Red: Min. 20", limit 4, season closed Snapper, Mutton: Mn.16", bag limit 10 Largemouth Bass: South of State Road 80:
required but isfree. Resident licensefor both fresh- Feb. 1 March 31 Snapper, Red: Min. 16" limit 2,2013 season Max. size 14" bag limit 5 (may possess one over
water and saltwater fishing: $32.50 annually. G Sca M l open June 1 July 14 (state waters) June 1-28 in 14") North of State Road 80: Slot 14"-22,
Grouper, Scamp: Min. 16, limit 4, season federal waters bag limit 5 (may possess one over 22")
Nonresident saltwater or freshwater: 3 days closed Feb. 1 March 31federa waters (may possess one over
$17,7 days $30, annual $47. Free shore fishing Snapper, Yellowtail: Min. 12", limit 10 Sunfish (excluding crappie): Aggregate limit 50
license not available for nonresidents. Black, Gag, Red and Scamp Groupera Rd a Y S C L
Fishing permits: Snook $1 0/year, lobster $5/ included in aggregate bag limit of 4 per included in aggreate ba limitof 10p rppe
year, tarpon $51.50 per fish Hogfish: Min. 12"fork, limit per inc in aggregate ag lim Butterfly peacock bass: Max. 17", limit 2 (may
SHogfish n. fork, limit 5 Snook: Slot 28"-33" (west coast), limit 1, season possess one over 17")
SALTW ATER FISH Mackerel, King: Min. 24"fork, limit 2 closed until at least Sept. 2013 Grass carp: Must be released immediately.
Grass carp: Must be released immediately.
Greater Amberjack: Min. 30" fork, limit 1, Mackerel, Spanish: Min. 12"fork, limit 15 Spotted Seatrout: Slot 15"-20", limit 4 (may Other exotic fishes: Please keep and eat or
season closed June 1 July 31 Mullet: No size limit, limit 50 possess one over 20") otherwise destroy. Do not use as live bait.
Lesser Amberjack/Banded Rudderfish: Permit: Slot 11"-22"fork, limit 2 (may Tarpon: No size limit, tag required to possess Unregulated species: No bag or size limits on
Slot limit 14"-22, aggregate limit 5 possess one over 22") (in south Florida SPZ, min. Triggerfish, Gray: Min. 14 limit 2, season gar (except alligator gar; possession of this spe-
Black drum: Slot 14"-24" limit 5 (may 22"fork, limit 1 per harvester or 2 per vessel, closed June July cies is illegal), bowfin, pickerel, and all catfish.
possess one over 24") with closed season May 1 July 31) Tripletail: Min. 15", limit 2 Visit http://bit.ly/l1nYJQr for full rules,
Bluefish: Min. 12"fork, limit 10 Pompano: Min. 11"fork, limit 6 Wahoo: Limit 2 including special management areas.


/t~





/MaL, ,,r Page 7 June 13,2013 w w s .wBauw


I MOE( a iU IM a 1EIm W UM MmlIII



inlet MARINAl

FRIENDLY FUN FESTIVE
SARASOTA COUNTY
SBlackburn Pt Boat Launch *800 Blackburn Pt Rd, Osprey
SDallasWhite Park 5900 Greenwood Ave, North Port
SHigel Park* 1330 Tarpon Center Dr,Venice
SIndian Mound Park 210 Winson Ave, Englewood [i J '
/. Le Loreto Bay Access *800 LoretoCourt, Nokomis
l4* Manasota Beach Park. 8570 Manasota Key Rd
SMarine Boat Ramp Park.301 E. VeniceAve, Venice
Marina Park- 7030 Chancellor Blvd, North Port
.Nokomis Beach Park* 901 (asey Key Rd
Snook Park. 5000 E. Venice Ave, Venice
S" DESOTOCOUNTY
B-rownville Park 1885 NE Brownville St
SDeep Creek Park. 9695 SW Peace River St
Desoto Park. 2195 NW American Legion Dr
Liverpool Park. 9211 Liverpool Rd
SNocatee. 3701 SW County Road 760
Lettuce Lake 8801 SW Reese St

SAingerCreekPark.2011PlacidaRd, Englewood y RIVER
S -ButterfordWaterwayPark.13555
S: : MMarathon Blvd, PortCharlotte A P"
SDarst Park.537 DarstAve, PuntaGorda ^- f

IN ee El Jobean Rd, PortCharlotte ,
0 t Harbour Heights Park* 27420
S T. Voyageur Dr, Punta Gorda
Hathaway Park.35461 Washington Loop, Punta Gorda
*Ef C J .Port Charlotte Beach *4500 Harbor Blvd, Port Charlotte o
= ----- wa$ .e* South GulfCove Park .10150AmicolaSt, PortCharlotte A a o
x CapeHae Spring Lake Park 3520 Lakeview Blvd, Port Charlotte ; \ -
Cape Haze
Marina o
ICW#8 o ,, *
-0.5 0 0.5 1 2 5
0 Pe
NAUTICAL MILES r O




CHOO Gasparia Pass
91 22.0^ 0 ; a 16 O P'^



Sound IHarbor


L-DENN Devilfsh a Bay 0 F Bay
Key PinesCa ,> 'W




























$350/Boot (4 anglers) + $50/additional angler for pre-registration.
LOGRAND SLAM SPONSOR 51 000DONATE Y MARYNTA $00 This map is not 9 7 ,e?) a .
CV.


Captov PassrCn cvaA ahleaL


for each fish weighed Boat Entry wonavigation
4N RA 250 pup.031- s







OR CALL: TOM HINCK 9417160442 DAVE NELSON 239398 FU4263 DAN REIG E 9417162795



BOAT ENTRY D
$350/Boot (4 anglers) + $50/additional angler for pre-registration. I
$400/Boot (4 anglers) + $50/additional angler for day of tournament registration. Redhsb >Pass
SPONSORSHIPS
GRAND SLAM SPONSOR 51 000 MANTA S500 This map is not
.p: :r .-r, ;.i Ir. r, ri.:. r.:: .: -: i-, h ,;'.Sporsor Name on intendedfor
logo/Name on Banner, Sponsor name announced *,:' ;i iih 4 anglers inavga ol
for each fish weighed, Boat Entry navigational aRs
STING RAY $250 purposes.
GIANT MANTA $750 Sponsor name on cozie cups Refer to a
Sponsor logo on fishing shirts. Sponsor Logo/Name }'\ "r
on Banner. Sponsor Name announced nautical chart
for each fish weighed. Boat Entry for navigation ) Lc

FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.LBTDclub.COM ifraon
OR CALL: TOM HINCK 941.716.0442. DAVE NELSON 239-398-4263 DAN REIGLE 941-716-2795 ^ 1

















































I'm not really sure why, but more and
more lately I find myself taking long trips
back into my past daydreaming, if you
will remembering all the cool stuff that
I've been taught over the years. Maybe it's
all these new gray hairs that I keep accruing
on a daily basis that's making me so senti-
mental lately, or maybe it's the fact that
two of my three children are now adults.
My middle child will be off to Army basic
training in just four short weeks. Man, I can
feel those gray hairs growing just thinking
about that one. Again, not sure why I keep
looking back on my life so much lately,
but I'm glad it's happening. Because of all
this daydreaming I've been doing one very
important thing has come to light for me, I
owe a bunch of very special people out there
a great big"thank you."
Thank you to Mr. Atherton, my 7th grade
band teacher, for teaching me to play guitar.
Thank you to Mr. Wilson, my high school's
dean of students, for teaching me that I
can do it. Thank you to Charlie Gattuso, for
teaching me how to make a living by taking
people fishing. Thank you to Mom and Dad,
for teaching me family values and morals
and for being great parents. Thank you to
my wife and kids, for teaching me why life
is great. And thank you to all of my school
teachers from pre-K through college for just


teaching me. Thank you all.
All of us have teachers in our lives. Some
of our teachers teach us important lessons;
others teach us things without us even
knowing were learning something. My list
above barely scratches the surface of the
teachers I have had over the years. I wish
I could thank them all, but WaterLine only
gives me one page to write on.
So you're now probably wondering why
I'm writing about teachers and flashbacks
instead of fishing. The answer is simple: This
past week I had the privilege of teaching
one of our community's schoolteachers and
her husband a little bit about how to fish our
waters. When the Turners booked their trip,
they made it very clear to me that first and
foremost they wanted to learn how to fish
the waters in and around Charlotte Harbor.
They also said whatever species I thought
would give them the best chance at a great
day on the water was fine with them. Let's
see, late May in Southwest Florida; what fish
would give these nice people the best bang
for their buck? That's a no-braier the
infamous silver king.
I really tried hard to teach the Turners
as much as I could about tarpon fishing in
our area. Their trip got a little crazy, and
I'm pretty sure a lot of the stuff I tried to
teach them was lost in the chaos that arose


during their battles in the fighting chair. I'm
going to try to run down some of the most
important things they needed to remember
to make tarpon fishing on their own produc-
tive. I hope they read this, because they paid
for the following information with sweat
and sore muscles.
Things you should remember about tarpon
fishing the beach: Start your day out early,
because the first few hours of daylight are
usually when the best bite happens. When
you find a school of fish, make sure you
stay in front of it. Turn your boat motor off
and stalk the fish with your trolling motor,
making as little noise as possible. You never
want to chase the school from behind
because you will just spook them, and scared
fish won't bite. Toss your bait of choice (crab,
greenback, pinfish) out in front of the school
and let the fish come to your bait. Pitching
your bait on top of their heads usually
means no bite. Be patient, pick your shots
and make them count. Well-placed baits give
you a much better chance of getting the fish
to eat them. After the hook-up, remember
to pull back easy on the rod and don't reel
against the drag. Bend that rod and make it
work for you by applying as much pressure
as you can to that fish. The shorter you can
make the battle, the better it is for the fish.
One thing you will learn about tarpon


fishing is that things can get real crazy real
fast. Here are a few more pointers that
might be helpful to you: If a shark decides
he wants to eat your tarpon while you're
fighting it, break the fish off. Sharks eat
tarpon and there is nothing we can do to
stop that if your fish does get devoured,
don't get too upset. You're watching Mother
Nature at her finest. Also, if a tarpon jumps
into your boat, get the heck out of its way.
A 100-pound tarpon can hurt you, so let
it wear itself out before you toss it back
overboard. Whatever you do, don't jump
overboard because that could make you
lunch for the sharks.
Remember, we are all always students and
we can all be teachers. Learn as much as you
can about as much as you can and teach it
back to as many as you can. You may never
hear the thank you, but I guarantee your
students will be saying it.
Tight lines.
Capt Alike Alye)t oi11h e ond opeiytoi of
Reei/ShIk C h0t7 i S iS hill-tim1e Cha/iotte
HO'uOIl Hot 0 l itf/ hshet/ thetl 11ate 011il
tiloii the Southli est Fo 1101i coast foir t101i
thao 35 )-tas ht hae s the et\petieace to put
tiut?1'1 s on tle /hs they lii l t His Speci'oties
1t. shatiks toipoln Oid Goliath oigoupei FoI
1101re ilfo i st Reei'Shak c 01110 cll C(opt
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Ifcae you hadn't noticed, it's been rainig
a little bit lately. Actually, it's been raining
a lot. This is not a new thing Southwest
Florida summers are generally pretty wet. But
even though this is old hat, the differences
between fishing in the dry season and the
rainy season are significant enough that we're
going to talk about them anyway.
When the rainy season first gets started,
there's often a hot bite up the river and in the
canals. That's because the first strong flows
dump a lot of food into the water every-
thing from insects and lizards caught in flood-
waters to algae and tadpoles that have been
living in the ditches. A lot of little freshwater
fish also become part of the feeding bonanza.
Powerful river currents sweep a lot of those
fish into saltier water at the river's mouth,
where they become easy prey. Redfish, snook,
tarpon and most other saltwater gamefish
tolerate fresh water well, but most freshwater
species do quite poorly with salt in the water.
A lot of this happens around dams and
spillways, where water flow drops disori-
ented critters practically into big fish's
waiting mouths. The Shell Creek dam and
the spillways on most area canals can
provide fast and furious action. But as with
most good things, this doesn't last very long.
A couple weeks after the rains really get
going, the supply of dazed forage fish and
half-drowned beetles tapers off. With the
feast over, the gamefish move back into the
Harbor. However, they don't necessarily go
back to where they were before.
During the dry season, the Harbor's water
is clear (OK, clearish) and salty. When the
rains are coming down daily, brown-tinted
water pouring out of the rivers darkens up
the Harbor quickly. Darker water absorbs
more heat, and with summer's torrid
weather here, there's more heat to absorb.
Fish need oxygen, and warm water doesn't
hold as much. Also, a lot of our common
baitfish species don't like fresh water
anyway. With the temperature spiking, fish
migrate en masse towards the Gulf in search
of oxygen and food.
This is not great news for those of you
who like to fish the U.S. 41 bridges, the
Laishley pier, Bayshore or El Jobean. It
means there will be fewer fish to catch in
those spots. Notice that I didn't say there
won't be anything to catch. There are always
fish there, but they might not be as plentiful
as you'd like.
As you move down the Harbor toward the
Gulf, you'll generally find more fish. I like to
draw an imaginary line from the mouth of
Alligator Creek to the radio tower on the west
wall, then start fishing south of it. That's not


to say u can't sometime have a phenomenal
time fishing north of this line. Sometimes
you can, especially on a strong incoming
tide. The tideline, which usually is marked
by floating weeds or scum, can be a great
place to find fish as they follow the flow of
clean salty water far up into the Harbor. This
usually works better on the east side of the
Harbor. Because of the orientation of the river
mouths, water on the west wall tends to be
more fresh and hold fewer fish.
When the rivers are high, their flow doesn't
end at the river mouths. You can actually see
the water pushing out through Boca Grande
Pass when the rivers approach flood stage.
That water will be mostly salt water, but if
you were to break out a refractometer and
measure the salt content, you'd find it to be
lower than normal. The prevailing current
carries this water south along the coastline.
Anywhere you find flowing water, you'll
usually find fish. Water pushing out through
the passes attracts predators, which hang
out along dropoffs, behind pilings and
in other sheltered spots to ambush fish,
shrimp and crabs flushing past them. Larger
trout virtually vanish from the flats and
backcountry, turning up along the beaches
where they gang up in schools of 10 to 100,
sometimes in water up to 20 feet deep over
sandy or rocky bottom.
Offshore anglers should pay attention, too.
The outflowing fresh water has only a minor
effect on reef fishing, maybe pushing some
grouper and snapper off the nearshore reefs.
But the nutrients floodwaters carry into the
open Gulf, which is mostly empty aquatic
desert, can lure some pelagic fish closer to
shore. Small mahi in particular are more
common in summer, and some blackfin tuna
might make a showing with the schools of
bonito. Whale sharks, the largest fish in the
sea, sometimes come within a few miles of
our coast in search of richer feeding grounds.
As the rains take away some fishing oppor-
tunities, they create others. We need the rain
anyway if we're going to have an abundance
of fish, birds and other wildlife. After all, the
mixing of fresh and salt water is what creates
an estuary like Charlotte Harbor in the first
place. There will still be plenty of fish, but
you may have to go to where they are instead
of having them right in your backyard. If you
love a tight line as much as I do, that's not
really a bad thing.
Robert Lugiewicz is the manager of Fishin'
Frank's Bait & Tackle, located at 4425-D
Tamiami Trail in Charlotte Harbor. Call
941-625-3888 for more information about
the shop or for local fishing info, or visit them
online at FishinFranks.com.


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Something is afoot at WaterLine. Josh s .
Shas been trying to surprise me with a drop-in
visit to Peace River Wildlife Center. Being
on call 24/7 for medical matters and having
duties that span surgery to scullery, I don't
keep regular office hours at PRWC. As a matter
of fact, it seems like I have been everywhere
but there lately, to which a frustrated Josh
will attest. I'm not sure if he thought my staff
was trying to protect me or hold me captive,
but upon being told I was not present the
third time he made the trip all the way down
Marion Avenue, Josh threw a temper tantrum
the likes of which are usually reserved for
toddlers and tarpon fishermen whose tactics
have been called into question. And if there
was any question as to whether or not our
beloved publisher was truly a fisherman, the
staff at PRWC can set the record straight-
apparently he's got quite the salty vocabulary.
So now he is sulking and ratted me out to
MIS-ter AN-der-son, who is now The One
looking for me. Just don't send Tommy after
me, please. That kid scares me. (Publisher's
note: I would think you and Tommy would get
along well, considering that you seem to have
an equally tenuous grasp on reality.)
So where have I been instead of sitting
around trading fish tales with the entire
WaterLine staff? One word: Road trip. I have
been driving back and forth picking up supplies
from AnimaLuvers, Cross Ties, Home Depot and
the like. It seems as though every time I get
back from a supply run, the staff is sending me
back out for something else. You don't suppose
they are just trying to get rid of me, do you?
There has been a lot of leftover cake mysteri-
ously appearing in the office lately. No one
claims to know anything about it, but they do
seem to change the subject awfully fast when
I ask. When the cat's away, the mice will play.
Those little rats are having parties while I'm out
running errands. Or are they celebrating the
very fact that I'm not there?
Speaking of rats, we spend an inordinate
amount of money at PRWC on the frozen
rats and mice that get delivered every week,
those being the menu items of choice for our
raptors. So when I heard of a source for some
discount rodents in Plant City, it was time for
another road trip. That is one long drive with
a truck bed full of rapidly thawing rodents.
Now, I'm not one to exceed the speed limit,
but if ever there was a time I was tempted,
this was it. I normally drive a Chevy Volt
(averaging over 200 mpg!), but I really needed
the truck for this one. There comes a point in
one's life where saving gas takes a back seat
to having said gas-saver reek of rodent. The
only problem is that the controls on the truck
steering wheel are opposite almost every
control on my car. I've got the cruise control
set so I can take in the scenery instead of
staring at the speedometer while I drive, but
every time I see a cop, I turn down the radio.
I'm not even speeding, it's just reflex. Some
coo


remnants of guilt left m the days
of my misspent youth .se. Whatever
the reason, it seems to bewo6rking for me: I
haven't gotten ticketed yet for playing Pablo
Cruise too loudly.
And then there are the airport runs. As I
have mentioned before, wildlife rehabilita-
tion facilities work closely together for the
good of our patients. I recently went to the
airport in Fort Myers to pick up a tropical bird
that was flown down to us for release after
having been rescued in New York. This week
I shipped one of our resident one-winged
burrowing owls to a facility in South Carolina
to be part of a breeding program they have
there. By the way, if you have never been up
close and personal with a burrowing owl, you
may not know that they make a noise that
sounds just like a rattlesnake. So along with
all the requisite"Live Animal" and "This Side
Up" notifications, I added"Owl: Sounds Like
a Rattlesnake"to a sticker on the outside of
the carrier in which the owl travelled. I didn't
want the owl's trip delayed while TSA agents
searched for the snakes on the plane that
weren't really there.
Some of the other"relaxing" things I do
on my"time off" include driving to Venice
for free produce (I'm a sucker for the F word),
a trip to Sarasota to consult with a newly
forming rehab facility, and releasing recov-
ered animals in the far reaches of Charlotte
county and beyond. Is it any wonder why I
drive a fuel-efficient car? Whatever it is that
Josh and Lee have in mind for me, they are
just going to have to be a little more cunning
to catch me. For all I know, they are trying to
tender my pink slip. They can't fire me if they
can't find me. If they really were good at their
craft, they would know to lure me out with
something I can't resist a wounded animal
or free rats. I may not be easy, but I am cheap.
Peace River Wildlife Center is a nonprofit
organization, dedicated to the care, preser-
vation and protection of Charlotte County's
native wildlife since 1978. They are open 7
days a week year-round, including holidays.
Tours are offered from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. PRWC
receives no government funding and relies
entirely on private donations. For more info,
or ifyou would like to volunteer or make a
donation (including aluminum cans), visit
PeaceRiverWildlifeCenter.com, email PeaceRiv-
erWildlife@yahoo.com or call 941-637-3830.





St^ Page 11* June 13,2013


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FUN III PA D ING T | .......ll .


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Potential paddlers


should ponder before


making a purchase


Choosing a kayak is much like buying a
vehicle, only on a less expensive scale. To
begin you need to answer some basic ques-
tions: How much do you want to spend ?
What are you going to do with it fish or
paddle for pleasure? Do you want a single
or tandem? What size do you need? How
will you transport it? I am going to help you
answer each of these questions.
There are numerous brands and types of
kayaks available. They can be purchased
from big box chain stores or independent
dealers. They range in price from $299 to
well over $2,000. I recommend you shop
around and research on the Internet. You'll
have to go with what your budget can
take, but as with any other purchase, for
the most part you get what you pay for.
Typically, the only difference in a "fishing"
model kayak is the addition of accessories
such as rod holders, anchor trolleys and
storage compartments. Most kayaks can be
used for both fishing and pleasure paddling.
However, there are some kayaks designed for
the fisherman and others designed specifi-
cally for touring and distance paddling.
Single versus tandem kayak may seem
obvious: Will you be paddling with one or
two people aboard? You'll need a tandem
for two adults to paddle together, though
a small child may fit with an adult on a
single kayak. For added versatility, there
are tandem kayaks which can easily be
converted to a single. As to size of the
kayak, I do not recommend an adult use a
kayak less than 12 feet in length. Manu-
facturers list the weight capacity of each
kayak offered. Overloading a kayak typically
results in disaster, involving at minimum
getting yourself and all your gear wet,


or at worst serious injury. The longer the
kayak, the better it tracks along a straight
line in the water. Added length also means
more capacity for gear and extra stability.
The tradeoff is that longer kayaks are less
maneuverable.
Transportation of your kayak is often over-
looked. I have seen a 14-foot kayak perched
atop a compact car, held on with ropes and
duct tape. Inexpensive transport, yes, but
not the best choice. The bed of a standard
pickup will accommodate two or more kayaks
using proper tie-downs. Bed extenders that
fit into a trailer hitch will increase the carry
length of a truck bed. There are several
rooftop-mounted systems for kayak carrying,
each of which has its own merits. No matter
the system you choose, using good tie-down
straps is a must. Take it from personal experi-
ence, seeing a kayak going backwards at 70
miles an hour on the Interstate is both heart-
stopping and dangerous.
I hope this is helpful in your kayak shop-
ping, and happy paddling. If you have any
question, don't hesitate to email me.
Todd Terrill is a retired Sarasota County
Sheriff's Deputy who began kayaking in
2005 and has owned and loved kayaks
ever since. He's paddled everything from
mangrove shorelines to the open waters of
Tampa Bay, plus freshwater lakes, rivers and
stream throughout Florida. He has been a
kayak tour guide for the past three years
with iKayakSarasota.com in Sarasota and
conducts 10 to 15 tours a week, which puts
him in contact with hundreds of paddlers of
all skill levels on a weekly basis. He is also
a Pro Staff member of West Wall Boats in
Port Charlotte. Contact him at prehouk9@
comcast.net.


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j^ M, Pu Page 12. une 13,2013


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By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


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"Kaleidoscope"
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VVallerLne phl, Ct., Cnri Pc'rler
Englewood artist Kelly Reark displays
one of her works, Reigning Silver,
which depicts a tarpon at night.


ims3ge ':' ri.hl.A3,
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"Breath Takina"


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"Reel Dreams"


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Kelly Reark paints lots of things -
horses, Native Americans, sea turtles, pet
portraits, maybe even your grandmother if
that's what you want but no matter how
many other subjects she puts on canvas, she's
got a reputation.
"I'm kind of known as the tarpon lady:' says
the South Florida native."I've painted hundreds
of them."
Maybe that has something to do with her
dad, Mike Reark is the skipper of the Salty
Cracker, a traditional Boca Grande Pass guide
boat, Kelly grew up fishing and hunting with
her parents and other family members, so it's
not really shocking that she gravitates toward
images of tarpon.
"They're really the only big game fish we
have here," she says. "There aren't any marlin, so
tarpon are what we've got:'
Kelly loved painting from the time she was just
a little girl. "I've painted and drawn my whole
life,' she says. "It runs in the family. My dad did
illustrations and logos for local businesses in his
spare time. And my mom's mother was a painter.
She used to say she got her master's degree in
being a housewife and then learned to paint."
She's also related to a well-known writer and
illustrator Edward Gorey, who is her first cousin,
twice removed.
But a career in art wasn't exactly what she had
planned. After college, she came to Englewood
to do one of her favorite things a little fishing
Switch Dad.
"And then I just stayed," she says. "Nat Italiano
(of Italiano Insurance Services) offered me a job
as a secretary and I said OK. I've been selling real
estate, but in the last six months I've decided to
go into art full-time. It's what I really want to do."
Fish may be her specialty, but they're not the
only thing she portrays not by a long shot.
"I've been working a on a new cowboys and
Indians of Florida series," she says. "I really like
the history. I'm a native Flordian, and I can
understand why everybody wants to come here
to retire."
With so many potential subject, Kelly
says choosing what to paint next is a difficult
decision.
"I have way more ideas than I have time to
create," she says. "And I don't want to try to get
rich from my paintings. I want to get my artwork
hanging on as many walls as possible. I never
want my work to be unaffordable."
Fortunately, she's got a rock-solid partner in
this venture: Her spouse, David Borza.
"I'm really blessed to have a husband who is
behind me and lets me be the artist I want to
be" says Kelly. "I couldn't do it without him I
just couldn't."
When Kelly produces a painting, she's not just
putting pigment on the canvas she's putting
herself into her art.
"We've always done outdoor stuff as a family,"
she says."Over the years, I've painted a lot of
those memories. Art makes people happy, and
I'm a happy person, so I just want to show that to
the world:'
Her work also reflects her surroundings.
"There's so much natural color here, not like up
north where there's a lot of black and white, so
my paintings are just naturally colorful."
Kelly's prints and a few originals are available
at her website, DragonflyExpressions.com. "The
prices shown include shipping, so locals get a
better deal," she says. She's also creating unique
painted silk pieces, which can be hung or worn
as scarves. You can see them at the Antique
Boutique, located at the historical train depot in
downtown Boca Grande.
"I actually prefer to work on commission,"
she says."And I really enjoy painting in larger
formats. It's just fun." In fact, she's painted
a few murals, including one at the Lasbury-
Tracy Real Estate building on Indiana Ave. in
Englewood. If you have a wall that just needs
something special, Kelly's services might be just
what you're looking for. You can contact her at
941-268-7876 or KellyReark,, gmail.com.


. elUE


11111111111





f ,,eess r Page 13* June 13,2013


-WWamosemomarm-m a*--ie* iWiaa


By Josh Olive
WaterLine Publisher


If you listen to people talk about tarpon
fishing, it probably won't be long before
someone mentions using crabs for bait.
Although there's always a chance a tarpon
will inhale a crab, there are certain times
when crabs aren't just a bait option, they're
the bait option. Fortunately for anglers,
it's not usually a big mystery when these
times might be. Just look around you: If the
surface of the water is dotted with little crabs
paddling away furiously, that's the right time
to put one on a hook.
Generally speaking, this is a Boca Grande
Pass phenomenon (though it also happens
in Tampa Bay's Egmont Channel and, to a
lesser extent, smaller local passes). The crabs
that are so abundant aren't the familiar
blue crabs. Locals call them pass crabs; in
other places, they're known as iridescent
swimming crabs (or Portunus gibbesii, if
you prefer binomial nomenclature). They're
much smaller than blue crabs, rarely growing
larger than 3 inches measured from point to
point across the top of the shell. Compared
side by side, they also have a slimmer build
than a blue crab, longer claws, and a lot
more pinkish or purple coloration.
You may hear people call them calico crabs,
but that's actually yet another species of
swimming crab. Calico crabs are much darker
in color, usually olive green or rusty brown,
and heavily patterned with tan or cream-
colored spots. You might occasionally see a
calico in the passes, but you're more likely
to find them on the beach. Calico crabs are
midway in size between blue and pass crabs,
but are even better on the table than blues.
If you've ever waded in shallow water
around here, you've probably seen small blue
crabs scuttling about on the bottom. But pass
crabs are rarely seen except on summer hill
tides around the news and full moons, when
they ride strong outgoing currents into the
Gulf. They don't usually live in the grassflat
or oyster bed habitats where blue crabs are
common, preferring to spend their time on
open sandy or muddy bottom. Some suppose
that the crabs in the passes are pulled from
the bottom by the powerful water flow, but
they're actually taking advantage of the tidal
energy to carry them out to sea.
Tarpon that are actively feeding on crabs
eat them almost delicately. They rise to the
surface and slurp them one at a time, like
an enormous brook trout taking mayflies,
or sometimes roll gracefully with open
mouth and suck them down on the move.
This contrasts with the way they explosively
pound big blue crabs under the U.S. 41
bridges the sound that makes is much
like someone dropping bowling balls from
30 feet up.
When silver kings are focused on eating
crabs, they'll usually ignore a pinfish, squir-
relfish or shrimp. That's OK, though, because
it's usually not too hard to collect yourself
a few of these tarpon bonbons. Most of the
local tackle shops sell fine-mesh nets with
5-foot handles. In a pinch, you can use your
baitwell net or even a baseball cap. I caught
a dozen or so with my bare hands on Sunday
morning, but I would recommend a net if
you're trying to get tarpon bait as quickly
as possible. And don't get greedy, because


another thing that sets pass crabs
apart from blue crabs is how quickly they die
in captive conditions. Blue crabs will live for
days on damp sand or newspaper or even
weeks if they're kept in clean water and fed.
Pass crabs, on the other hand, generally
won't survive overnight no matter what you
do. Even the bait shops have a hard time
keeping them alive, which is why you'll prob-
ably never find them for sale.
If you have sensitive fingers, a pinch from
a pass crab can range from unpleasant to
downright painful. Occasionally, they'll
draw blood. The best way to hold the crab to
prevent a pinch is by the claws themselves or
by grasping the crab from the back they
can't quite reach behind themselves. Many
anglers break off the claws as they drop crabs
in the livewell, which makes them easier to
reach in and collect for bait use. If you watch
the way a declawed crab swims, it's not quite
the same, but they still seem to work alright.
If you choose to remove the claws, snap them
off with a downward motion. Twisting can
remove more tissue than intended, which can
kill a crab quickly.
If there are no pass crabs available, small
blue crabs make a good substitute (but
remember, crabs are more likely to be eaten
when there are lots of them around). To
successfully presenting a crab, it needs to
be able to swim. Free-lining is the usual
method. Insert the hook where the fourth
leg meets the body and bring it straight up
through the top shell. When the fish eats it,
you'll know it. A tarpon sucks a crab down
into its throat, where it can be crushed
using specialized plates. Circle hooks work
particularly well with crabs and prevent
most accidental deep hooking.
Whether you want to use them for tarpon
bait or just enjoy them for their own innate
awesomeness, iridescent swimming crabs are
one of our more interesting critters. They're
also a lot of fun for kids, who are more or less
guaranteed to have a blast spotting them and
scooping them up from the surface. That's
a fantastic way to introduce youngsters to
tarpon fishing, and to let them contribute to
the overall effort by catching the bait. What
could be better?


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. Mprsa.,, Page 14 June 13,2013


Flatsmasters 2013 FLATSMASTERS REDFISH SERIES
FIlats asteCHARLOTTE HARBOR DIVISION EVENT #3 RESULTS


fish third event


of Redfish Series


i Team Outback Steakhouse with their
winning 15.76-pound bag of reds.


Team JT's Custom
Pools shows off 14.66
pounds of redfish.


PLACE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
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13
14
15
16
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CAPTAIN
Josh Corr
Greg Todd
Justin Cauffman
Steve Matthews
Kyle Potts
Jason Tari
Eddie Barnhill
JR Pittman
Lyn Bevis
Dave Hutcherson
Derek Carlson
Brent Schuman
Jason McMahon
Anthony Oeschger
Jason James
JC Savasuk
Clay Rebol
Craig Felker
Billy Schafer
Kevin Williams
Dave Lowery
Jim Smith
David Lassey
Dave Stephens
Brian Turner
Andy Wirgan
Eric Davis
JeffWatkins
Rich Planer
Shane Earhart
Steve Bair
Steve Johnson
Michell Smith
Rick Jordan
Zach Grantham
John Perry
Jay Peterson
Keegan Weeks
Jay Withers
Brian Harris
James Hensler
Dusty Hormann
Heath Daughtry
Tom Eggleston
George Patton
Wayne Kerry
Mike Myers
Ed Glorioso
Brock Horner
Larry Smith
Dennis Westby
Timothy Taylor
Austin Muehling
Brian Cochrane
Ken Wells
Nick Drangle
Anthony Renne
Dale E Hadley
Mark Friga
Bobby Attix


TEAM NAME
Team Outback Steakhouse
Team JM Todd
Team RedZone
Team Lowrance
Team Towboat US Charlotte Harbor
Team JT's Custom Pools
Team Barnhill Fisheries
Team Ingman Marine
Team Laishley Marine
Team Budweiser
Team Actioncraft/San Carlos Marine
Team Schuman/Mullins
Team JMI Flooring
Team Beckman Concrete
Team Flatts Factor
Team DM Construction
Team All County Appraisal
Team Felkers Cooling
Team I'll Trade you for it
Team SW Florida Cable Const.
Team Miller Lite
Team Coors Light
Team Appliance Works
Team Marketplace Home Mortgage
Team Skeeter/Flatts Factor
Team USSI
Team Absolut Vodka
Team Watkins Tire & Auto
Team Doc Planer
Team Offshore Performance
Team Rapid Graphix
Team Vision Home Inspections
Team Underwater Fish Light
Team Spin Depot
Team Melon1
Team Gator Water
Team Jay's Masonry
Team Anchor Tree Service
Team RedZone
Team Renegade
Team Blacktip Bait & Tackle
Team Lakemasters
Team Ocean Grip
Team CRVS (Charlotte RV Storage)
Team Brandwear
Team Charlotte Co. Ford
Team WaterLine
Team Orr & Orr
Team Rockport Rattler
Team Tarpon Coast Insurance
Team Aladden Air
Team Tore-UP
Team Certified Refrigerant Svcs
Team Late Start
Team Waste Management
Team Fade to Red
Team Knot Reel
Team Props Plus
Team Cuz I Can
Team Renegades




I if


ANGLER#2
Brandon Tanksley
Matt Hamilton
Kris Howell
Paul Lambert
Chris Magnano
Billy Barton
Shane Dooley
Scott Banes
Bobbi Bevis
Chris Slattery
Jason Shimko
Justin Mullin
John Gordan
Greg Riddle
Anthony Bartucci
Jared Davis
Ryan Kennedy
Brett Ferrero
Brad Opsahl
Chad Steele
Tyler Gulau
Dale Hadley
Joe Tanksley
George Franz Ill
Charles Greco
Zach Denby
Matt Persons
JeffWatkins Jr
Jason Dill
Billy Glass
Mike Bair
Richard Martiniuk
Derek Molle
Joe Lorenz
Robert Aulbach
Denny Mahle
Bonnie Peterson
Fred Gill
Lee Crosby
Troy Gale
Christopher Muglio
Jeremiah Melchor
Richard Linkenhoker
Debbie Eggleston
Mike Dykes
Steve Culver
Josh Olive
Dean Wilson
Timothy Wright
Tommy Jacobs
Robert Craft
Thomas Taylor
Cal Young
Jeff Albritton
Brandon Bahr
Justin Ownby
Pasquale Gadaleta
Dale Taylor
Billy Kinkade
HC Beynon


2 eggs A CLIP-N-SAVE FLORIDA
1 tsn lemnn npnnpr SEAFOOD RECIPE PROVIDED BY


. Wl, .... .. i, .
1 tsp garlic pepper
1 cup ground almonds
2 cups freshly grated Parmesan cheese, divided
8 snapper fillets
1/4 cup all-purpose flour for dusting
6 tbsp butter
salt to taste
8 sprigs parsley
8 lemon wedges
Smoked paprika


- Recipe from AIIRecipes.com


Beat the eggs with the lemon pepper and garlic pepper until blended; set aside. Stir together
ground almonds with 1 cup of Parmesan cheese in a shallow dish until combined; set aside.
Dust the snapper fillets with flour, and shake off excess. Dip the snapper fillets in egg, then
press into the almond mixture. Melt butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook
snapper in melted butter until golden brown on both sides, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Reduce
heat to medium, and season fillets with salt if desired. Sprinkle the snapper with the remaining
Parmesan cheese, cover, and continue cooking until the Parmesan cheese has melted, about 5
minutes. Transfer the snapper to a serving dish, garnish with parsley springs and lemon wedges
and dust with paprika to serve. Serves 8.


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ANGLER#3
Mike Garcia

Dustin Tillet
Don Lambert
Brandon Buckner


Chris Newberry
Bing Blackburn
Kaelyn Olayer
Chris Verbeeck


Tyler Marks

Tony Favara
Steve Hickox
Karl Butigan
Sean McLaughlin
Darin Waldeck
John Baxter
Steve Gross
Joe Tanksley Ill


Ryan Jamieson
Patrick McCaffery
Josh Watkins
Tim White
Miles Meredith
Jason Reynoso
Richie Martiniuk

Chris Schilling
Dillon Myers

Nick McGraw
Robert Carter

Keith McMenamy
Jerry Simmons


David Orley
Joe Bryan
Don Gasgarth
Thomas Kasprzak
John Hanck
Kasey Funston
David Jacobs
Dalston Crafts
David Summers

Jimmy Davis

Allysa Ownby
Ignazio Galadeta
Eddie MacDonald
Traci Robbins


RED1
8.04
7.92
7.87
7.98
7.66
7.37
8.38
7.06
7.23
7.18
6.83
.91
7.33
7.04
7.07
7.31
6.61
6.44
6.34
6.63
6.45
6.23
5.97
6.06
5.89
6.63
6.26
5.53
5.80
5.52
5.72
6.46
5.71
5.48
4.98
4.48
4.82
4.41
4.05
7.15
5.90
5.16
3.04
4.26
3.18
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00


RED 2
7.72
7.78
7.14
6.96
7.11
7.29
5.97
6.96
6.64
6.35
6.66
6.49
5.87
6.04
5.94
5.60
6.26
6.36
6.11
5.68
5.63
5.73
5.86
5.37
5.33
4.52
4.87
5.27
4.99
5.24
4.49
3.60
4.10
3.99
4.00
4.32
3.63
3.53
3.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.98
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00


TOTAL
15.76
15.70
15.01
14.94
14.77
14.66
14.35
14.02
13.87
13.53
13.49
13.40
13.20
13.08
13.01
12.91
12.87
12.80
12.45
12.31
12.08
11.96
11.83
11.43
11.22
11.15
11.13
10.80
10.79
10.76
10.21
10.06
9.81
9.47
8.98
8.80
8.45
7.94
7.77
7.15
5.90
5.16
5.02
4.26
3.18
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00


U


LLC


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...*...-*-.....f....m ***--
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Mu ,a l* Page 15 June 13,2013


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iflhuS*EUflSDMS uur mmnDm*ui ii


EJII


By Lee Anderson
WaterLine Editor

Fishin' Frank Hommema held the first Fishin'
Frank's shark, catfish and stingray tourna-
ment back in 1985. Not too much has changed
in more than a quarter-century. The main
purpose of the event remains the same to
have a good time fishing with family and
friends, while at the same time taking some
shark home to the dinner table.
Frank's original plan for the tournament was
to give the adults a chance to fish for big rays
and sharks, while the kids could simply fish
for sailcats off docks, piers or canals. He says
getting kids involved in fishing is high on his
priority list, and this year's tournament held
over the weekend made him especially proud.
Two high school students walked away with
the top-two finishes in the sailcat division, and
both fish were caught in canals.
"What we want to do with this event is get
away from a competitive tournament and more
toward a friendly and fun event for everybody,"
Frank says. "I like the fact that kids dominated
the sailcat division. That's what we're trying to
go for here. I think the past few years or so it's
become more of a tournament atmosphere. It
was fun this year, and that's what we're going to
get back to again starting next year."
Fifteen-year-old Nick Knowlton's cat topped
the scale at 5.60 pounds (gutted) and he
walked away with $1,000 for his effort. Fellow
Charlotte High School classmate John Wieber
came in second with a weigh of 5.04 and
pocketed $680. Not too bad for a couple of
high school kids.
"We've been looking forward to this for a
while"' Nick says. "It's fun, especially when you
win. I'll probably just use the money to buy
more fishing gear."
Although the big sailcats were impressive,
people came to see the sharks. The winning
shark, a bull shark, measured just short of 77
inches from the tip of the nose to the fork of
the tail and was caught by Mike Cianci. He
caught the big bull shark around midnight just
inside Boca Grande Pass.
"I used a 400-pound leader, but it was still
a pretty good fight'says Mike, who has fished
the tournament before. "The fishing is fun, but
I really like the tournament because all the
meat goes to a good cause."
After the tournament, some people take
their shark home for food, and some choose not
to. Ollie Tipton and George Gooding have been
volunteering at the event for more than a decade.
They clean the unwanted fish and give the meat
to anybody who wants it. They are not part of any
nonprofit organization they simply clean the
fish and give the meat out for free.
"Some people considered this tournament a
massive fish kill in the late 1990s,0Ollie says."A
group of us got together and started taking the


THE 2013 FISHING' FRANK'S
SHARK, SAILCAT AND
STINGRAY TOURNAMENT
Name Length Prize
Shark:
1.) Mike Cianci 76-3/4" $1,000
2.) Joshua Smith 68-5/8" $680
3.) Dennis Ray 63-7/8" $340
Name Weight Prize
Catfish:
1.) Nick Knowlton 5.60 $1,000
2.) John Weiber 5.04 $680
3.) Clint Jeff 4.76 $340
Name Width Prize
Stingray:
1.) Sean Pack 42-3/4" $725
2.) Jeremy Bingman 37-1/4" $475
3.)JamieJones 36-1/4" $240

unwanted fish and giving it to those who need
it. We always end up running out of fillets."
With 243 entries this year, Ollie and George
had their hands full.
"It takes a while to clean the sharks and
sailcats, and the meat goes quick;' George
says. "We don't charge a dime for the meat. It's
worth a million dollars when you hand a kid a
bunch of meat and see that smile."


Research also plays a role in the tournament,
and samples are taken from many of the fish.
"I've been coming here for a long time'says
Gregg Poulakis, a biologist for the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission. "Since the
sharks are dead, some volunteers come and take
samples for aging records and mercury levels. We
come here on our own time and collect data. It's
a good time. I'll be back next year."
Only bull sharks were sampled during the
tournament. Nurse, lemon and hammerhead
sharks are prohibited.
"I try to stay in the middle when it comes to
any politics of the tournament;' Frank says."l
don't get emotionally involved. You can keep
legal sharks and take some meat home. And
the researchers can collect some data. I just
want people to have a good time while being
responsible."
Frank says he has a couple of changes in mind
for next year's tournament. One of those is a
low-cost youth division. For the other changes,
he says people will have to wait and see.
"We're all here to have fun. That's number
one;' Frank says. "We would have liked a
better turnout, but times are still tough. Either
people are working, or they are looking for
work. But the main thing here is to have a
good time and get family and friends together.
Next year we have a couple of things planned
to get it back to the way it first started get
the whole family involved"'


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up /,ewa.rs Page 16 June 13,2013


*i.,SU*EI fSD iuiuE..m i.iau* *mi
---WWKBBBnrf---BW *--****giWWIr


tjn,.r.rsut Page 17 June 13,2013


flnaminnflndrinhinna naatm
WfltimiiflflbS uummum.5.uBoui


The Punta Gorda Isles


=


Here's how it works: Take pictures
of your outdoor adventures.
Send your high-quality digital
photos to waterlineweekly@
gmail.com, or send prints by
snail mail to The Charlotte Sun,
23170 Harborview Road, Port
Charlotte, FL 33980, ATTN: Josh
Olive. Include a self-addressed
stamped envelope if you want your
prints returned to you.
PLEASE don't send us photos of
oversized or other release-only
fish being poorly handled.
Photos of such fish being gaffed,
held by the lower jaw only or
obviously damaged or dead cannot
be published, no matter how big
the fish is or how proud the angler
maybe.






A ea rs r Page 18 June 13,2013


fnlaWainn.oll IFkinn e*aim
iflhuS*EUmflSMSm i uuum lo.ai Dumin


t&jMor.rrt Page 19 June 13,2013


fnlaainnfl nderinhi-nn, nme


Matt Stevens,
former"Man
on the Pier"
columnist, with
a 40-inch cobia
caught from the
southbound U.S.
41 bridge.


Here's how it works: Take
pictures of your outdoor
adventures. Send your
high-quality digital
photos to waterline-
weekly@gmail.com, or
send prints by snail mail
to The Charlotte Sun,
23170 Harborview
Road, Port Charlotte,
FL 33980, ATTN:
Josh Olive. Include a
self-addressed stamped
envelope if you want your
prints returned to you.
PLEASE don't send us
photos of oversized or
other release-only fish
being poorly handled.
Photos of such fish being
gaffed, held bythe lower
jaw only or obviously
damaged or dead cannot
be published, no matter
how big the fish is or
how proud the angler
may be.


















As many of us have heard, lionfish
are coming soon to a reef near you.
Lionfish, colorful reef fish that are
natives of the western Pacific Ocean
and the Indian Ocean, have in recent
years somehow become established
in the waters of the Caribbean.
The gaudy lionfish have long been
popular in the aquarium trade and
may have gotten their start in the
Atlantic Ocean by escaping from a
saltwater aquarium or, more likely,
by being dumped into the sea
by disenchanted aquarists. We'll
probably never know exactly how
it first happened, but at least two
lionfish must have been involved
in the beginning and they must
have found each other in the wild
because lionfish are reproducing
so successfully that the population
is growing at a rapid rate and is
spreading quickly. There are now
reefs in the Florida Keys and in the
Bahamas where divers routinely see
dozens of lionfish, and significant
numbers have been reported on
some reefs and wrecks in the Gulf off
the Southwest Florida coast. Fortu-


,srMu/^ Page 20 June 13,2013


Lionfish are coming, but their



cousins already live here


nately, lionfish seem to prefer water
that is high in salinity and have not
appeared in the brackish estuaries,
though it's easy to imagine that a
stray could be encountered inshore.
An encounter with a lionfish in
Charlotte Harbor would probably
be most likely during the winter
months when the water in the
Harbor becomes more salty.
There are several reasons why the
appearance of lionfish in local waters
is troubling. Chief among these is
that lionfish are voracious predators
of small fish, and it's feared that they
may eat enough smaller specimens
of our native species to affect the
populations on our reefs. Secondly,
the rapid spread of lionfish indicates
that there isn't anything eating very
many of them, and a lack of natural
predators in our waters might mean
that the lionfish population could
really explode. Another reason for
concern is that lionfish are venomous
to humans. The spines in their dorsal
fins contain a toxin that is typically
not lethal, but which can cause
severe amn, swellina. nausea and


potential respiratory distress in any
human who has the misfortune to
be pricked.
It's interesting to note that while
much media attention has been
paid to the venomous lionfish
spines, the symptoms which are
reported to result from a lionfish fin
poke are actually very similar to the
symptoms experienced by the unfor-
tunate people who suffer jabs from
the saltwater catfish and stingrays
which are common in local waters.
It's my unscientific observation that
the venom carried by stingrays must
be more potent than that carried
by saltwater catfish, because the
victims of stingray stings seem to be
suffer more than victims of catfish
stings. Unfortunately, diligent
research on my part (OK, I clicked
around on the Internet for a few
minutes) has failed to turn up any
comparison of the relative effects of
lionfish, catfish and stingray venoms
on human victims. A similarly
diligent search (OK, I asked a couple
of my fishing buddies to volunteer)
also failed to turn up anybody


willing to be poked by specimens of
all three species so we can find out
which is worse.
One thing that I did learn about
lionfish venom is that it's not as
toxic as the venom carried by some
of their relatives: The stonefish
and the scorpionfish. Stonefish
do not live in local waters, but at
least one species of scorpionfish is
quite common here and is capable
of delivering a toxin that's nastier
than lionfish toxin. You say you've
never seen a scorpionfish? Are you
sure? Check out the accompanying
photo of a scorpionfish which was
recently taken in 50 feet of water in
the Gulf off Fort Myers. Scorpionfish
boast a great camouflage and are
somewhat similar in appearance
to toadfish. Scorpionfish spend
most of their lives lying motion-
less on the bottom, where their
camouflage makes them resemble
an algae-covered rock. When an
unsuspecting prey-sized fish, crab
or shrimp ventures too near, the
scorpionfish lunges toward the


mouth to inhale the unlucky entree,
in much the same way that grouper
or snook capture their prey. Because
scorpionfish are so well-hidden
when lying on the bottom, divers
don't usually see them. Because
scorpionfish are relatively small fish
(the 10-inch specimen in the photo
is one of the biggest I've seen), they
are not often caught by anglers who
usually target larger fish with baits
too bulky to tempt a scorpionfish.
Local doctors confirm that the
sea creatures which result in the
most emergency room visits over
the years have been catfish and
stingrays. In a few years, maybe
they'll add lionfish to the list.
Let's go fishing!
Capt Ralph .Allt rIiis the i '11
F, shti Fleet Oif sihttltse'i? 00i
fis/hi ? chat t0 boOOts locatEid ot
F, sth5Etie i s Villote A I, 11o 1i Punto
Go da Ht is il. an l ai 1-il i l1lifli
o000tdoo it iiti0 p0lhototl/aphEt
an.'d is I post p~rsidEitt f the FIot oi(
Outdoo 00 1,st S .-1SSO(cialOl Call
him it 9- 1-639-2628 o0 t lul
(nntain,..'lA'nnfjsthp flt (nim


.WhSa.moso.*-*i5am3Mo Amu**m
---WWKBBB~f---BW *--****gfiWWI


II 1 0 I0 p

1/2 tsp cumin seeds A CLIP-N-SAVE FLORIDA
112 ton rnriander seds SEAFOOD RECIPE PROVIDED BY


1/2 tsp dried hot pepper flakes
1/2 tsp caraway seeds
1/2 tsp dried mint leaves
4 6-ounce snapper fillets
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
1/2 cup raisins (optional)
1/4 pine nuts
1 cup fish stock or bottled clam juice
Parsley and lemon for garnish


--Recipe from
FL-Seafood.com.


Preheat oven to 400 F. In a skillet over medium heat, roast cumin and coriander seeds and
pepper flakes for 2 to 3 minutes until fragrant. Remove from heat; grind spices in a spice grinder
or with a mortar and pestle. Rub spice mix on the fillets. Let stand 10 minutes. In a small bowl,
toss together the garlic, onion, tomatoes, raisins (if desired) and pine nuts. Spoon half of this
vegetable mixture into a greased flat ovenproof dish; place fillets on top of the vegetable layer
then top the fillets with remaining half of the vegetable mixture. Pour fish stock or clam juice
over fillets. Bake for 20 to 30 minutes until fillets are cooked through. Garnish with parsley and
lemon. Yields 4 servings.


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ejuerrs Page 21 June 13, 2013 .W".E...w O .u





It's a plain fact that fish often bite well sales) and make pancake throws with the
just before or during stormy weather. Why is castnet. Seriously, every time you throw
the bite better as weather confronts us? My the baits get smarter and you catch fewer.
grandmother, Verna Hubbard, taught me an Please don't educate our minnows they
old saying almost 60 years ago. It goes like are smart enough, and I'm too tired to work
this: Wind from the North, good for neither that hard.
man nor beast; wind from the East, fish bite This is a great time to experiment and
the least; wind from the South blows the bait learn to fish with lures. Soft plastics are
into the fish's mouth; wind from the West, the easiest to start with. Take it easy and
fish bite the best. I understand you may think don't over-work the lure. You are supposed
this is crazy at first, but they didn't have TV to be mimicking a crippled minnow, not
weathermen here in the 1950s, so you had to an Olympic runner. Braided lines are very
pay attention to the wind directions. And it sensitive, so take it easy. The rod moves the
works. Consider that the steady high pressure same amount as the lure; twitch, don't jerk.
days feature north or east wind flows; fish Observe the action before you spend time
don't feed aggressively then, do they? Now casting. Let out a couple of feet and experi-
the south and west wind directions are when ment with your lure while you can see it. Slow
our fronts approach and pass through, and the presentation down don't race it past
there are excellent fish bites on these sudden hungry fish (except mackerel). Remember
changes. That silly saying was meant to that our water is getting warmer and many
teach us to fish the barometer changes. The fish slow down, especially on the shallow
old-timers devised ways to remember, then flats. You need to draw them to your lure with
devised tools to pass on the important info erratic action. Weedless rigging is frequently
and I thank them. necessary because of all the floating grass.
Please don't be stupid and risk your life, Fish are holding deeper on hot sunny days,
even for great catching. If it's blowing a gale especially in the afternoons. Fish will move
with lighting all around, don't go out! But back onto flats in the early morning or after
when it's just breezy and light rain, you can a rain shower cools the water. Take advan-
frequently enjoy good fishing. It's obvious tage of shallow evening tides to locate the
the fish don't mind us getting wet; they are deeper areas where fish concentrate to await
swimming all the time. incoming flows.
Our bite cranked right up until the weather Snook should get red hot as they march
went ballistic, and let loose last Wednesday back towards the Gulf on these big moons.
evening about dark. Of course this was a Have the time of your life if you get'em
tropical system and blew southwest, but going, but remember that this is our future
when the winds hardened down and howled, stocks: Handle with care! It's easy to catch
the tarpon headed offshore to ride the blow hungry fish if you have your game on. Just
out. The longer it blows the farther they go, set up for photos prior to removal from water.
and they take a few days to come back. It Think about how to expedite the process and
used to be special to be there at the begin- release a healthy fish. Be sure to keep the
ning of their offshore journeys; now you can fish off hot, dry decks and wet your hands
get lucky and have a few minutes before a before touching fish. If snook season opens in
swarm of chasers overcome the event and September, you may want to catch that fish
create chaos immediately. If skippers main- again for dinner.
tain composure and allow the fish to perform Trout are the ticket for fresh fish dinners.
naturally, it's a thing of beauty and everyone They are running all over the place but they
can enjoy the dance. One idiot and the chaos won't stay long now. Those soft plastic baits
overcomes the moment; then fish freak out, are a great tool to locate and track traveling
starting to run and then scatter. So if you trout. Try varied colors and slowly tease your
are blessed to encounter such a moment in lures above the grassy edges. Carry plenty
tarpon paradise, don't be the idiot to blow of ice; trout die easily in livewells and spoil
up the event. And when they re-enter Boca quickly.
Grande Pass, be there or miss out! Again if If you like mullet, the rains pushed fish out -H
the system stays organized and boats mesh of the creeks and they are tasty now because
smoothly, everyone catches fish. Disruption is they are getting some meat back after their
simply destructive to catching. winter spawn. Castanets are required here, but
Inshore fish moved around dramatically we have liberal bag limits and tasty fish for a
also. Several inches of rain is a big factor fish fry or the smoker. I immediately put em
inside then add the sandy Gulf waters and in a cooler half full of ice and saltwater to chill
fish backed up. Snook head back upstream em rapidly.
into the calmer, cleaner waters until things Find time to share with family and friends
settle. The marina pet snook population on our beautiful local waters. If you're too
quadrupled overnight when the weather busy to go fishing, you're just too busy!
hit. Minnows were already getting tougher Cap0t -1011 H1lrubaid is hi h17/) i.espectle
because it's time for them to spawn, but outdoor 0IIiter ond hllshing guice. tHe hais been
this turmoil really makes bait even harder o piofessionol USI(6-i tenseld Eo -iour guide
to catch. Try smaller pinfish if you catch smce 19.76. ond has been ishino the South-
Fi some;: they're good baits also. Take your I'est F0,o1do coast since 1981 Contact hul 71 t
r rm time to chum longer (good for Magic Chum 94 1--74(0- o 'a&lHuobd '0Captlb corn


Here's a good rule to remember: Fish won't
eat your bait if they can't find it. Sounds
simple, but it's easy to forget. As the
river water darkens up Charlotte Harbor,
predatory fish will rely increasingly in
listening for their food rather than seeing
it. You can take advantage of that by using
lures that have built-in noisemakers or by
adding them yourself. If you prefer live
bait, the easy way to do this is to use a
popping cork. Don't pop it too loudly or too
often not at first, anyway. If you aren't
getting results with a subtle approach, then
get more aggressive. Rockport Rattler and
a few other brands ofjighead with built-in
rattles can be found on tackle store shelves.
If you already have a favorite jighead you
want to use, get some tiny glass rattles that
you can insert into more or less any soft
plastic bait. The rattle will be fairly quiet,


but it can be just the thing for helping fish
find your offering on a calm day with dark
water. If the wind is picking up and tossing
waves around, go bolder. A Rat-L-Trap or
other lipless crankbait will broadcast a clear
message to any hungry fish that there's
something nearby; whether they choose to
check it out is up to them. Many other hard
plastic baits feature loud internal rattles.
You can also go topwater with a chugger,
popper or propeller bait. These lures are all
designed to move water and make noise
in the process. Just like a popping cork,
start subtle and see how that works before
you start ripping the lure across the water.
Adding a bit of scent won't hurt, either. And
be sure to pause your lure frequently, giving
the fish plenty of time to home in on the
signal, find your lure and make an attempt
to kill it. Fish on!


(Sr a I
free ,arket ana//'5
ca// me Ztoday at-
(941) 915-3575
(888) 891-8569
captainjohn@knotlO.com
www.Knot Sem


H I'm Captain John Howe of Knot 10 Yacht Sales,
. i if you're looking to buy or sell a boat in Southwest
FI. *ida, let me go to work for you.


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i .. ..... I i 1 I :"'i 1990BeneteauOceanls390FL $76,900
I... l", 2008Fountain38 ExpressCruiserFL$199,900
2001 Carver44CockpitMY $199,000 .1 ,, 1I ,,,,,.
1990 Post Marine 44 Sport Fisherman FL | $149,000 2006Albln 35Tournament Express 1 $180,000
2007Tiara 43 Sovran IPS 600 FL 1 $378,000 2002 Sea Ray 320 Sundancer $69,500
2008 Luhrs41 Hardtop I $310,000 2006 Wellcraft 290 Coastal FL $115,000
2003 Silverton 410 Sport Bridge FL | $194,500 2006 Glastron GS 2791 $39,000





^ ,,r.uerer Page 22 June 13,2013


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As the sun breaks over the glassed surface
of the Boca Pass, a calm tranquility washes
over you, along with the crisp scent of fresh
dew and a hint of salt. Terns call out over-
head, in the pursuit of their first meal of
the day. Ripples extend out, giving way to a
heightened sense of surrounding as your eyes
search for the culprit. A flash of silver catches
in your peripheral vision and you finally catch
a glimpse of your main objective, tarpon. If
anyone has had the pleasure of witnessing
this particular moment in a new day, when it
seems the possibilities are endless and a child-
like excitement seizes you, than you know how
rare and precious it is. Sadly, it seems each
year, that these moments are becoming more
of a myth or memory of times past. It saddens
me to think of how times have changed, and
people along with it.
Having fished more than 20 years on the
pristine waters of Charlotte Harbor, Boca
Grande and the Florida Keys, I have witnessed
some truly amazing events, whether it be a
client's joy in finally fulfilling their goal of
landing their first silver king, or spending
all day catching redfish and snook with kids.
You wouldn't know the difference, seeing the
excitement on a youthful face, pulling in each
fish no matter what the size. It's reflecting
on moments like this that send me into an
emotional spiral. I feel very privileged to
work in an industry where I get to help create
and share moments like these with families,
which ties you to them in a way that makes
you feel very honored and humbled. At the
same time, I am saddened for future genera-
tions and plagued with questions. Will these
moments be ones we talk of to the dismay
of our children, rolling their eyes as we start
off on another"back in my day" tangent? Or
will they get to witness it firsthand? Unless a
change is made, I am scared that the former
is looking more realistic.
As a fisherman, there was always a code
of conduct you followed on the water. No
one gave you a book, or told you what it
was, or even wrote it down for that matter.
It was simple: Give a wide berth, don't steal
another man's fishing hole, and, above all,
be respectful of each other. After all, we all


started in this industry for the same reason ...
we loved the water. Period. It doesn't matter
what age you were when you got your first
fishing pole, or what your parents did. You
were drawn to the ocean and all the excite-
ment that it held. It's the modern American
mindset that got in our way, taking us from
a simple love and understanding to what we
see today. It's tough to point fingers and throw
blame, since our entire society is focused on
"keeping up with the Joneses;'with everyone
rushing about striving for bigger, better things
and feuding about how to obtain them. We
are all guilty of it, myself included. But what
I do pride myself on is that every day when I
wake up, haul my boat to the same boat ramp,
throw my net to catch bait in the same areas,
and pick my clients up at the same spot as I
did 20 years ago, I try to conduct myself in
a manner that living legends like Capt. Phil
O'Bannon would expect.
That being said, I understand times have
changed. And just like everything else in this
world, the fishing industry has too. It has


evolved and changed, and we are constantly
learning that what we did yesterday may not
have been correct. But by definition, to learn
is to gain knowledge or skill by study, under-
standing or experience. What I do not under-
stand is how we have vastly changed the way
we treat each other on the water. It saddens
and frustrates me when I see fellow boaters and
anglers tearing wide open through a flat within
casting distance of a fishing boat, or cut in front
of a drifting boat waiting to get into position on
a school offish. When did this behavior become
acceptable? More people need to take consid-
eration in the fact that 30 seconds of operating
your boat in a disrespectful manner can destroy
what another fisherman has spent the last two
hours of his time working on.
Realistically, I guess I shouldn't be surprised
that the mindset most drivers have behind
the wheel of their cars is now crossing over
to their boats as well. Boat accidents may not
be as common as car accidents, but a majority
of the time they are far more detrimental to
those involved. An example would be the recent


accident that took place in Bull Bay, almost
claiming the lives of a captain and his client.
Boat safety, as well as the respectful and ethical
operation of a vessel, should be held to upmost
importance. As captains, we all have a duty to
lead by example. Just as people look to us for
advice on fishing locations, equipment and tech-
niques, they are also observing how we operate
our vessels and the protocol we follow when
around other boaters. So I pose this question to
my fellow captains: Are your everyday actions
and attitude on the water what you would like
to see for future generations?
We all have different styles of fishing that
we prefer, and our own opinions of what
equipment and techniques work best. But
that is not the only aspect that defines us
and sets us apart as captains. After all, as I
previously stated, we all share a common love
and passion for what we do. Regardless of our
disagreements, two wrongs do not make a
right. I for one am ready to see a change -
not only in how we operate our vessels, but in
how we treat each other.


riRINE CONTRACTING GROUP
C&D MARINE
*Seawalls Caps Docks
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#1 GUN SHOP

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Phone: 941.889.7065
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OVER 100 YEARS OF WEAPON EXPERIENCE!


mm





e,, klu Page 23* lune 13,2013


- .-J~-


We have had a decent amount of rain
over the course of the last two weeks.
It will mess up fishing for just a little
while in the upper parts of the Harbor,
but not for long. The salinity will go
down a little and fish will start to move
farther south towards Boca Grande Pass
and Pine Island. If you're an avid snook
S angler like me, right now is the time to
look for the nearest dam.
Areas such as the Shell Creek dam
and the dam near the Biscayne boat
ramp will have a lot of flowing water.
When there is an excess amount of
water being dumped over, baitfish get
dumped too. Snook, tarpon, and even
the occasional redfish will congregate
almost right up into the waterfall and
ambush whatever flows over. And when
the bite is on, it can be like catching fish
in a barrel.
Dams won't be the only source of
flowing water to produce fish. Drain
pipes at the end of canals will usually
hold a fish or two if the water is flowing
pretty well. Water that is rushing
around boulders, large pilings and piles
of rip-rap will almost always have a fish


of some sort hiding on the back end
waiting to ambush a free meal. Quite a
few of these places are overlooked by
most anglers. Some are right on U.S. 41
in Port Charlotte and there are a few on
State Road 776.
Rapala X-Raps, 4- to 6-inch swimbaits
and lipless crankbaits are among the
best lures. Natural colors, like a mullet
or greenback pattern, or black over
gold will usually produce fish. The old
faithful red head and white body also
is reliable even in the slowest of bites.
Try throwing these lures at a 45-degree
angle right up into the wash and begin
your retrieve. Experiment with various
speeds and pause lengths to get a
pattern on their feeding habits.
The lures you choose to throw should
be able to run at least a foot or two
under the surface while also keeping
the slack out of your line. Any of the
baits mentioned above will do the job.
Although some heavy weedless rigs may
work, the excess slack does not let you
achieve a good hook set.
If you're looking for a few bigger bass,
try some of the canals and dams in the


North Port area. Fresh water dumping
over into a freshwater canal or lake will
hold even more bass than usual. All
of the same baits will work. Throwing
a bigger bait will usually result in
calling out a bigger fish. Anything
that resembles a bream or shiner will
make for a quick hook up. Medium to
medium-heavy gear should be used in
any of these applications you never
know how big the fish is going to be.
Don't really know for a place to look?
Try Google Maps. Any smartphone will
have you looking at a possible fishing
area within a matter of a minute or two.
Search the area directly around you all
the way up to around 10 miles or more
away. Watch the weather a few days
ahead of time to see what rain we will
be getting. You want to get out on the
days when the water is flowing at its
best, which is usually the first three days
after a good chunk of stormy weather.
Cam Parson has been fishing the
shallows of Charlotte Harbor since he
was a young child and has gotten pretty
aood at it. Email him at cparson 12r
goiui comn


\WaterLine r ph.:..:
bi RoDert Luglie icz
Water spills over the
Shell Creek dam,
bringing tasty morsels
to fish waiting below.


1 .I .m m kI i I n iT mI m
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If your copy of





doesn't show up, call

941-206-1300
right away and we'll

get it to You ASAPI


DAVE MARTIN'S
Blue Ice Marine Services, LLC
Marine A/C & Refrigeration
SCruise Air Norcold All other makes
Emergency Service 7 Days
Licensed (941) 626-8040 Insured


*css asa sI


Bennett Marine Construction, Inc.
Seawalls Boat Docks Boat Lifts
"Serving the Gulf Coast Since 1961"
Call 941-697-3882 Englewood
www.bennettmarineconstruction.com
FREE ESTIMATES


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Bimini Tops Boat Cushions
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941 255-0970 Leonard&Snue Bolard


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L.Si REDUCED! LU


SJig


14' 1986 SEA TRACKER
Completely Re-done and ready to go!
Includes 55hp Yamaha and trailer $6,900
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC
941-286-5855 pedersonmarine.com


Sailing fun



for all ages


d incomes
organizations. The area of the Harbor used is
free of most powerboat traffic and close to
safe harbor in case of sudden squalls. Training
begins with the sailing basics and safety rules
on shore. Some degree of sailing proficiency
can be learned during the first day of lessons.
The student is expected to do a large share of
the work required to rig, launch, secure and
store the boat at day's end.
Class sessions are tailored for the student
group. Youth and first-timers (of any age) get
safety, basic sailing class and on-water coaching.
After a week, they can sail with supervision.
The skill and proficiency of intermediate
sailors varies widely. The instructor may call for
on-water and classroom demonstrations, then
plan training after that. The training duration
varies with the student's goals and
skills. Handicapped students should


If you live in Charlotte or
adjacent counties, it's quick,
fun and easy to be a summer I
sailor. There are three organiza-
tions on Charlotte Harbor that
make learning easy. There are similar oppor-
tunities in Englewood and Lee and Sarasota
counties. In the January 10th WaterLine
edition, I encouraged you to get started sailing
via crewing on someone else's boat. Now it's
June, and the temperatures are conducive to
small boat sailing for you or your children.
In most cases, solo sailing begins on the first
day in view of a coach in a safety boat. It's
happening on the Harbor right now.
The basics of this process are similar for all
three organizations. The instructors all have
U.S. Sailing instructor certification, follow a
process refined over the years, and are able to
quickly right a capsized boat and pull a student
aboard. The boats used vary depending on
the student's physical size and skill level, and
may be used in racing events against similar


16' Cobia 1988 Center Console
Single Axle Trailer
48 HP Johnson
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Major Credit Cards Accepted
a


I u I rI ulmI JIul,
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19' 2002 Carolina Skiff 198 V-Series
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16' DIAMONDBACK AIRBOAT CHEVY 383 19 2007 Monterey 194FS
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TRAILER INCLUDED! $24,900. (Possible Owner PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC
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"II lliLL~iLB yld= =,iBiLI


-;7 Li --r^
16 Milchell Cenler Console 1984 19 2012 CLEARWATER BAY BOAT 11". H FI' i, 1
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75 HP Evinrude.$1,900.00 Visit ourWeb Site @ Left over- Beautiful layout for fishing. All composite
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-- -


17' Com-Pac Suncats 2004 USED and 2013 'i r-ismaster -' uw ODrnini Iop new BaUtery riis
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and equipment lists: Trailer $6,500.00 CRYSTAL CAY CENTER
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18 ft Robalo 2012 $29,900 1998 20'TTOP 20 CC SUNBIRD NEPTUNE
Call Dick Horste For Details 941-548-6070 1998 JOHNSON 115HP, 2002 MAGIC TILT
McCall Marine Sales, LLC TANDEM AXLE ALUMINUM TRAILER, KEPT ON BOAT
LicensedYacht Broker SPAR I LA LIFT &WELL MAINTAINED. MUST LET GO DUE TO
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Located at BEAUTIFUL $7500 PLEASE CALL 941-681-0725/330-559-5026


18' 1990 COUGAR TUNNEL RACE BOAT $15,900
Call Jerry For Details 941-786-7777
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G AS PAR ILLA
Located at BEAUTIFUL


18' 1999 Bayliner Trophy Cuddy Cabin
1802 Includes 2007 Alum Continental
Trlr. JUST REDUCED to $6900
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC
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28'2003 Regal Commodore $57,000
Dick Horste 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G AS PA R.L LA
Located at BEAUTIFUL sLS h


2':' s r.ur.n l C nlr er C.:.r.i: :.r r : II1
T-Top Leaning Post Electronics Box -150 HPYamaha with
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$34, 900.00 CRYSTAL CAY CENTER 941-639-6603
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l" ,.,_.









Sailing against the
current at the Port Char-
lotte Beach Complex.


Call 941-429 -1

to list your boatioay_ __--'-





~O~;Pi~JUN


20'Team Sailfish, 1996, with trailer. Center console, live 21'5 1999 sea Hay Cuaddy, .0 Mercrusier. w/ 50unrs. very
well, motor Yamaha 130, 2 stroke, w/ SS prop, recently Good Cond! Sleeps 2. Head w/sink & fresh water. 70 gal Fuel
tuned up trailer. New hubs, brakes, buddy bearings, and Tank. DF, Am Fm Radio, BBQ Grill. Ready for day or even
tires, excellent condition, ready to launch and go fishing. over night trips. Incl. Alum Trailer. $42,3000.9 $11,990.00
Was $7,900 REDUCED To: $6,900 Call BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777
941-626-4571 or 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com

REDUCED!! \


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use boat controls customized to suit their level
of mobility and training that is appropriate for
their skills and goals.
The YMCA team is in startup mode. They've
completed one beginners'week course and are
planning equipment and course expansion. The
Charlotte Harbor Community Sailing Center has
recently relocated to the Port Charlotte Beach
Complex on Harbor Boulevard. The beach
complex location facilitates sailing in a shel-
tered lagoon for beginners and in the Harbor
for intermediate and CHCSC member sailing,
along with a place for parents to observe the
training. The Charlotte Harbor Youth Sailing
training launches from the Port Charlotte Yacht
Club and sails on the Harbor. This helps teach
some advanced boat control skills. You should
contact one of the three above-mentioned
training providers for the best fit for your
objectives.
Alicia Muscato learned to sail at the Venice
Youth Boating Association at age 8. As her skills
progressed, she began racing the Optimist
pram and then the Laser class boats. She has


won the under-18 class in regattas at St. Pete,
Lake Eustis, and Fort Lauderdale. She has
completed U.S. Sailing instructor certification
and now at 17 years old is one of the youth
sailing instructors at CHYS. This type of success
can be appreciated by college admissions
offices and future employers. The day I met
her, she was supervising six students who were
putting Optimist prams away at the end of the
day's lessons. Not every youth student is going
to seek this success. However, the nature of the
sport and training is going to give all students
increased confidence, responsibility and team-
work skills, plus knowledge of nature and the
physics of sailing. Oh, and let's not forget the
ability to have fun on the water at low cost.
Summer sailing is for people of all ages. We
live in one of the best sailing venues in the
world. Don't miss out. Contact one of the listed
organizations now.
Peter Welch is a boat builder and former fleet
captain for racing for the Punta Gorda Sailing
Club. Readers may reach him atpwcboats@aol.
com or 941-575-8665.


wb I


20'2 1999 Proline, Mercury 150hp w/trailer.
This boat was just rebuilt and is ready fo the water.
Center console, includes bimini top. $9,950.00
Call BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777
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22' 1982 Mako 224 CC
Includes 1995 Quickload trlr.
Extra motor for parts and prop $6300
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC
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-.'-.. -...3.--------------------............
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$17990.00. Almost like new cond. for half the price!. Lowrance color fish finder / GPS, VHFRadio, Biml-
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BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com @ www.l7Marinellc.com 941-575-4835


21' 1988 MAKO $7,900 Greal fishing boal! 22' 201 HURRICANE SUNDECK SPORT
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070 Call For Details 941-662-0015
McCall Marine Sales, LLC McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker GASPARILLA Licensed Yacht Broker GA-SPA R
Located at BEAUTIFUL Located at BEAUTIFUL


L LA


' a .

, ? -7 A an. .nnnln A



20 1Q MAKOn rnt r~nfi o 13 0


Sale!! Depthfinder, Bimini Top. Make a
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627
bayshoremarinefl.com







21'2000 Wellcraft Center Console. $44008
Solid vessel with plenty of power. 200hp John
starter and hydraulic steering. Live Well Fish Bo
storage. FullTransom.Very Clean Boat. Incl. Al
Call for more information. Call BAYSHOR
941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.


aieal vl,,u, u. 1%1U1i,' i/iA-i uer ell I uoi i zVil jl,,ivvu
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
n offer today! McCall Marine Sales, LLC
-57 Licensed Yacht Broker A-SPAR LLA
Located at BEAUTIFUL ~^'=^^BjHHB






EDUCED! U..
6O $12,900 23 2003 Proline Walkaround. S17,000.
son with a new Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-548-6070
oxes and Tons of McCall Marine Sales, LLC
luminumTrailer. AL PA R I L LA
E MARINE Licensed Yacht Broker jAS' 'IL
com Located at BEAUTIFUL -m.,


21'GS 201 HURRICANE 2003 $13,900
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker A-SPA RI LA
Located at BEAUTIFUL .WW ,


1 Knc VVCOI UIJ ;oJ-,UU
Call For Details 941-662-0015
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker ASPA R ILLA
Located at BEAUTIFUL S S '


23' 2012 SEA HUNT, 225 TRITON
CENTER CONSOLE. 150 Yamaha 4 Stroke
Low Hrs, GPS Chartplotter, New Tandem Trailer,
Lift Kept! Perfect!
Priced to Sell $38,000 941-916-1814


23' Com-Pac 1999, in great condition, OB and
Trailer at $14,995. Please call Mike at
941-412-6430 or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


!


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inUaUU mLiieeilimU M UmEBeIOI.uiiee


11 A. euesa Page26* June 13,2013


Searching for


Call 941-429
to list your boat


super-strength 0iimE




sunscreen?


By Kate Santich
Orlando Sentinel

Those of us who work out in the great
outdoors need a superhero sunscreen that can
withstand prolific perspiration.
But now the federal Food and Drug
Administration tells us there's no such thing as
sweatproof, waterproof or sun block. Recent
FDA rules on sunscreen labeling say the most
a product can claim is"broad-spectrum"--
protecting against both UVA and UVB radia-
tion and water or sweat "resistant;' which
should be reapplied every 40 to 80 minutes.
Some lesser sunscreens must even carry a
skin-cancer warning. The rules actually went
into effect last summer, but as consumers stock
up on new products, this may be the first time
they'll see the label changes.
Of course, that's assuming consumers are
buying sunscreen at all. Despite the estimate
that nearly 77,000 Americans will be diag-
nosed with melanoma in 2013, researchers
from Yale University recently reported that
35 percent of people who spend more than
an hour a day in the summer's sun never use
sunscreen.
And perhaps most shocking, even 27 percent
of those who have had melanoma report never
using sunscreen.
"It's incredibly disturbing that even after
getting the disease once, some survivors
continue these practices which would put
them at greater risk of getting it again;'said
author Dr. Anees Chagpar, associate professor


of surgical oncology at Yale Cancer Center and
director of the Breast Center at Smilow Cancer
Hospital at Yale-New Haven.
Dr. Joshua Fox, medical director of Advanced
Dermatology P.C. in New York and New Jersey,
agreed. "Survivors are nine times as likely as
the general population to develop a new mela-
noma. Of the seven most common cancers,
melanoma is the only one whose incidence
is increasing, and it is the one for which we
can provide the most definitive guidance on
prevention;' he said. "Clearly, more and better
education is called for."
You'd think most people would know the
prevention strategy by now: Stay out of the
sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when rays
are strongest, or use sun-protective clothing or
broad-spectrum sunscreen, re-applying at least
every two hours and more often if you swim
or sweat. For whatever reason, they're just not
taking it to heart.
Perhaps they think sunscreen is too pricey.
But you don't have to spend a small fortune
to get a good product. In Consumer Reports
latest ratings on sunscreens, issued last
week, Target's Up & Up Sport SPF 50 spray
and Walmart's Equate Ultra Protection SPF 50
lotion earned the highest scores in tests yet
were among the least expensive.
The full report, which includes ratings of the
12 sunscreens tested, is featured in the July
2013 issue of Consumer Reports and is avail-
able at ConsumerReports.org.
For more information on the FDA labeling
rules, go to FDA.gov/sunscreen.


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-69
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G A-SPAR IL
Located at BEAUTIFUL


23 POLAR WALK AROUND CUDDY 2005
T-YAMAHA STROKES, HARDTOP, LIFT KEPT.
$34,900. REDFISHYACHT BROKERS
941-639-9400 www.redfishyacht .com


I; J-
24'98 Bayliner, Bravo 3,
300 HP, F/I, Full cabin, remote spotlight,
hot water, drop in air,
$14,900 (941)-613-1903


24' 1994 Robalo 2440 Cuddy: Great buy.T-top, rocket
launchers, livewell, galley and head. Powered byTwin
150 Mercs, serviced on a regular basis. Lift kept and
no bottom paint. Asking only $12,900. Call Ray Mason
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com


24 1998 Sea Ray SunDance
Comes with a nice trailer.Two Bir
. ^g^H^^^


mini tops Full enclosier. Mid


Cabin, Fresh Water, Head. Ready for the water, needs nothing.
Runs Strong! Great Price!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com






24' 1999 Glastron GS249
220 hp Volvo Penta with 304 hrs.
Garmin 182c, Stereo, VHF, Stove,
Bimini & Cover $9,900
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC


24' 2000 Aquasport 225 Explorer
200 HP Yamaha SX200X 2 stroke with
420 hours. Lift kept in very good condition
with all accessories included!
$19,900 Call 941-875-3271


21' Paramount CC1985 Completely Rebuilt Mull & eck --
New Upholstery Alum.T-Top Garmin GPS Plotter Depth
Sounder -VHF Radio AMFM CD Player Alum Trailer -
225 HP Merc. Fuel Injected Motor, 3.0 Fresh Rebuild on
Power Head New Gear Case SS Prop New SW Panel -
Like New Fast, 60 MPH. $12,900.00
CRYSTAL CAY CENTER 941-639-6603

,.



24 CHAPARRAL 240, Loaded, full canvas &
screening, new engine 2009. Two biminis,
galley, enclosed head, sleeps 4, fridge,
inside storage, galvanized trailer.
$18,500. (941)-493-8320




-U

24' GLAS-PLY 1982 SEDAN
CRUISER JOHNSON V6 225HP
1995 160 GAL. FUEL CAP.
$9,500, OBO 941-625-7900

rSaLy e e td


6-foot 3-inches of head room. Berth, Galley Flat,
Sink, Chart Table, Head, Dinette, Double Bed.
Engine 40HP Honda OutboardTrailer -Tandem Axle
$29,000.00 CRYSTAL CAY CENTER 941-639-6603
www.crystalcay.com "Major Credit Cards Accepted!"






24' Seaswirl Striper, WAC, 225 low hr Johnson,
lift kept, no bottom paint.
Call Marlene 941-525-3796 for pricing & showing
information, or the office 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


z24lr NOunlI uH SI VwIUvl I B IVI,
T-SHALLOW DRAFT INBOARDS,
TRAILER. $26,900
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS
941-639-9400 www.redfishyacht.com


-u


25' 1990 GRADY WHITE SAILFISH S27,500
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G ASPA R LA
Located at BEAUTIFUL


Twin Mercury 150hp In almost new condition!
Very clean! Includes Tandem aluminum trailer,
Radar, Hard Top, Rocket Launchers.
Great for offshore and trips the keys!
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


$6,495. Hard Top, Hydrolic Steering Live Well, Sleeps Two.
Great Fishing Boat! Make us an Offer!
BAYSHORE MARINE
941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


IP"f


--1





PI laI


S'Ti



I hope everyone survived S I
our first tropical storm of
the season unscathed. While
Andrea did bring much-
needed rain to some of our
lakes, we always have to
keep in mind that storms
like this can also bring some
danger into our lives. For me,
Andrea brought images of
some things that we all need to be aware of.
Living in Lakeland, I spent the day
listening to tornado watches and warn-
ings all afternoon. While Lakeland didn't
receive a direct hit by any of these twisters,
some areas to our south and west did
feel the wrath of a tornado or two. While
looking online and listening to the news, I
saw countless pictures of boats on trailers
flipped over, patios torn from houses, pieces
of roofing pulled off, flooding and other
such means of destruction.
The images that stuck with me, being
a water lover and having my boat parked
outside of our home, were the boats that
were turned over while they sat on their
trailers. I never thought of this as a risk
before in any sort of situation, but after
giving it some thought, I can see how
this would happen. Boats don't weigh as
much as a car well, most don't and
the sides on a boat and the shape of the
gunwale make it a perfect candidate to be
lifted and turned over right where it sits.
With that being said, I don't think my wife
is going to pull the BMW out to sit in the
driveway during a storm just so I can stash the
Ranger under cover, but I started to wonder
if there was a way that I could make my
boat more secure from something like that
happening. Outside of parking the boat closer
to the house to prevent the wind from getting
under it, I couldn't come up with anything.
About the only solution to the problem
would be to rent a storage unit and park the
boat in there to prevent the elements from
getting to it. What it really makes me want
to do is add on to the garage, but I don't
think Mama is going to go for that. As an
interim solution, finding a spot to get your
boat out of the weather is your best option.
Maybe you know a friend with a business,


Call 941-42901 10----

i 01is listyvour oattoday! ----- -

iasotn tn IB .

reason 0I rIU---^^r ^^^^


a warehouse, a barn anything large
enough to hold your boat. The only other
option is park it close to the house and hope
the trees stay standing.
I've written numerous times about safety,
maintenance and all the little things to make
sure that your weekends on the water are
not spoiled by some sort of neglect. Well,
when we hit hurricane season, maybe this is
the time to rent a storage unit to hold your
boat for six months of the year. The cost of a
storage unit is far less expensive and painful
than having to go through an insurance
claim, which is sure to raise your rates. With
storage unit facilities seemingly everywhere,
it should be fairly easy to find a company
that has storage to hold your boat, no matter
what size. It's just another option to help
keep something important to you safe.
From now until October, you can expect
to see plenty of active weather. Plan your
fishing and boating outings accordingly.
While our boats spend time in our driveways
while we work Monday through Friday, keep
an eye on the weather and make sure you
do what you can to protect your fun-on-the-
water investment. I plan on having some
older branches removed from the old oak
trees in the yard, just to make sure none of
them get snapped off and land on the boat.
Andrea should serve as a reminder that
the storms that churn from the Gulf of
Mexico for the month of June, and those
coming off the African coast after that, can
bring much worse weather. Everyone stay
safe and be careful, and protect your invest-
ment as best you can.
Greg Bartz is a tournament bass fisherman
based in Lakeland. Greg fishes lakes throughout
Florida's Heartland with his wife and tourna-
mentpartner, Missy Snapp. Contact him at
Greg.Bartz@SummitHoldings.com.


34' CruiserYacht Express, $109,000
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G AS PA R LL
Located at BEAUTIFUL


25' 1995 Monterey 256 Cruiser
Stove, Refrig, water heater, shore power
and more! Spend This Weekend Cruising!
$16,900
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC
941-286-5855 pedersonmarine.com






25 2001 Acadia Pilolhouse: Lobsler boal design, great
weekender powered by a 170HPYanmar diesel. 4-4.5
MPG, cabin sleeps two, A/C, enclosed head, small gal-
ley. Asking $53,900. Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason 941-505-7269
TF!m


26' MacGregor M, 2005 with Honda OB, trailer, mas-
traising system and more! $20,995 Please call Mar-
lene at 941-525-3796 or the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers






26' PENNYAN FB Galley Sleeps 4
New Eng. Low Hrs. or trade for
deck boat. $9,200.
941-223-4368


REDUCED!




25 2004 Wellcrall Coastal: Twin economical 115HP 26' Pursuil Denali 2
Yamaha four strokes w/ only 110 hrs. Features include; Yamaha four strokes
hardtop, large cockpit for fishing, cuddy cabin that
sleeps 2 & built in head. Boat was just detailed & ready windlass, elec. hea
to go. Asking $4,600, $39,900. Call Ray Mason, Asking $68,500. Call C
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com Details seaa
....- ......- i h


670: Excellenl condilion,T-200
w/285 hrs, hardtop w/enclosure,
d, Garmin GPS and fishfinder.
:pt. Bob Babineau, 941-626-1329.
americayachtsales.com
I, Hii M


.r C%ar


r ~~ 1. -: rr~ Fa.C--


2'. ~ :i-x 2 :. i99 WAC 2H,. HP .:. r.I.:.r,.:.r B:.r,l I999 27' 2002 SPORT-CRAFT 27 Sport Cat $29,900
Low hours on rebuild. Full Canvas New clear vinyl. Live Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
Well. Interior Cushion Great Shape PortiPotti Bildge McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Pump Garmin Depth Sounder & GPS New CD Radio with
Aux Marine Radio Boat in Exc. Cond! Boat Only is LicensedYacht Broker G ASPAR LA
$9900.00 Boat &Tandem AluminumTrailer is $11,200.00 Locatedat BEAUTIF
CRYSTAL CAY CENTER (941) 639-6603 Located at BEAUTIFUL a
PENDING!! -
7r 7-.


25'1" 2004 Proline Walk Around Cuddy Wilh Nice
Honda 225hp Just Reduced! $34,990.00GREAT SHAPE!
Like New! 300hrs. Chart plotter Gps with Sonar. Hard
Top, Comes w/Aluminum trailer. Call BAYSHORE
MARINE 941-627-5777 bayshoremarinefl.com


z, nlllF E l IOi ve uuo U. l IIIIIIII wiJ VIIII UII IIt un
End. GPS, Stereo, Pressure Water, Fridge, Microwave
A/C Motor: 250 HP I/O Dual Props, Bow Thruster
$4,009. $28,900 CRYSTAL CAY @ (941) 639-6603
We accept all major credit cards


- Js


25 7 ."' Si .. i .:.. M r..ury .'. .hp Eh I OpI. '.1111
Exc. fishing boat w/T-Top. Loaded w/ stuff. 2 coolers,TT,
Hydraulic Steering, Incl. Alum.TandemTrailer. Ready for Offshore
Fishing. Maybe even trips to the Keys. Only 50hrs since new.
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


26' 1994 BAYLINER 2655 CIERA $11,995
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G.A PAR LLA
Located at BEAUTIFUL


28 11 Regal Express Cruiser 2003 Like New! $57,000
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker ( A-S PA R I L L
Located at BEAUTIFUL !W -


Call ruir e UtaIIsb I-OOD-UU 10
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker CAS PA R L LA
Located at BEAUTIFUL I'
~ulnnr-coo


M





iUanamii-mfilrmeil"Inmi n I rnuN
...rtm...narrms *ummaum..u*ouuu


u a./,mrrs es Page28. June 13,2013


Cleanup work


Call 941-429
to list your boat


after BP oil spill OjEitiL


ends in 3 states


NEW ORLEANS (AP) Cleanup work has
ended in three of the states affected by BP
PLC's massive 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico, the company said Monday.
The London-based oil giant said the Coast
Guard has concluded "active cleanup opera-
tions" in Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, but
the work continues along 84 miles of Louisi-
ana's shoreline.
The cleanup by BP contractors ended last
Friday in Alabama, on June 1 in Florida and
on May 1 in Mississippi, according to company
spokesman Jason Ryan.
The Coast Guard will continue responding to
reports of oil washing up anywhere along the
Gulf Coast. BP said it will take responsibility for
removing any oil that came from its blown-out
Macondo well.
"This is another important step towards
meeting our goal of returning the shoreline
to as close to pre-spill conditions as possible
while managing the scale of the response to


meet conditions on the ground;' Coast
Guard Capt. Duke Walker said in a
statement.
BP said it has spent more than $14 billion
on response and cleanup activities, with more
than 48,000 people involved in those efforts at
the height of the spill's aftermath.
"The transition is a significant milestone
toward fulfilling our commitment to clean the
Gulf shoreline and ensuring that the region's
residents and visitors can fully enjoy this
majestic environment;' Laura Folse, BP's execu-
tive vice president for response and environ-
mental restoration, said in a statement.
BP said teams surveyed nearly 4,000 miles
of shoreline after the spill, identifying roughly
1,100 miles affected by oil and 778 miles that
needed to be cleaned.
The April 2010 well blowout triggered
an explosion that killed 11 workers on the
Deepwater Horizon rig and spilled millions of
gallons of oil into the Gulf.


28' 2001 SEA SPRITE aft cabin,
310 dual prop AC, GPS, bridge enclosure,
electric head, full galley, 45 mph, only 90 hrs.
lift kept. Excellent condition.
$28,500. 941-639-7890.






28' 2003 Rinker Captiva 282
Perfect Party Boat! Low Hours!
Has all the Extras! $24,900
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC
941-286-5855 pedersonmarine.com


41-
...


23' 1997 Pro Line: Hardtop, new upholstery,
rebuilt 200HP Johnson Ocean Pro, super clean
fishing machine. Cuddy cabin sleeps two.
Great boat, great price. Asking $13,900
Call Ray Mason 941-505-7269
seaamericayachtsales.com


29' 6" REGAL COMMODORE 2002 Twin 10,
AC, Radar, GPS, Canvas Camper Covers.
Electric Toliet, TV, VCR, Windless, Generator.
Loaded. $41,000 508-942-4600.

a -


28' Boston Whaler Conquest 2000, T/250HP,Yamaha's,
A/C, genset, Furuno radar, color fish finder, Northstar
GPS chart, Standard Horizon VHF, Clarion CD/stereo,
Simpson Lawrence windless, twin spotlights, outrig-
gers, custom canvas, pristine condition, $69,000,
941-966-5400






28 Chaparral 2002: NEW LISTING! Well appointed,
walk thru w/s, 2 staterooms, generator w/2 hrs,
T-5.0 Volvos, just detailed. A lot of boat for $38,900.
Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason, 941-505-7269.


Call iHcnara Hosano tor uetalls a41-31b-b698
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker Gf ASPARILA
Located at BEAUTIFUL


3u zuuz Sea nay unaancer w$z,99u. une or me
cleanest Sea Ray's on the market. Fully Loaded! Radar,
Cold Air Conditioning, Generator, way to much to list a true
must see. Twin 5.7 Bravo Three's Dual Prop's
BAYSHORE MARINE 941-627-5777 bavshoremarinefl.com


fl m an a6 oH a mi Ian a-m


z 11l mu argyu lwiQU Wl


poaching nearly 500


spiny lobsters


z tCommoaore negal. 1988 New b.u IVy 30' Catalina Mk2 wing keel, roller main and Jib,
Mercruisers. Less than 30 hours. 3 new batteries. ee oere
Full enclosure. Auto Pilot. Much more. $9,900.00 Diesel powered.
CRYSTAL CAY CENTER $29K
941-639-6603 Visit website for more pictures. Call Ed 941-628-0167 or 941-833-0099
www.crystalcay.com Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


28 Larson Express Cruiser 2006 $39,900
Call Dick Horste For Details 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker (.ASPA RI LLA
Located at BEAUTIFUL m -


Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC


MIAMI (AP) Two men accused of poaching
almost 500 spiny lobsters out of season were
arrested and charged in Miami-Dade County
with multiple misdemeanor charges, wildlife
officials said Friday.
Javiel Vergel, 37, and Eriel Casana Menendez,
39, were arrested Sunday and charged with
possession of lobster tails out of season,
according to a report released by the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
The commission report stated the men
"grossly exceeded" the daily bag limit of six
lobsters per day per person, which is for the
regular lobster season that runs Aug. 6 through
March 31. Also, lobster tails can't be separated
from the body before bringing them ashore.
The men had 468 wrung lobster tails.
Of the illegally harvested lobsters, 283 lobsters
were under size and one was an egg-bearing
female, which are illegal to harvest in Florida.
The men were also found in possession of
one undersized stone crab claw and one queen
conch. Stone crab season is currently closed,
coo


and queen conch is illegal to possess in state
waters, the commission noted in its report.
The FWC received information from a local
law enforcement agency alleging that Vergel
and Mendenz were acting suspiciously while
loading a boat onto a trailer at a boat ramp
in Miami. Upon further investigation, they
discovered a garbage bag full of lobster tails,
wildlife officials said.
FWC officers discovered more grocery bags
full of spiny lobster tails stowed in various
compartments on the boat.
Vergel and Menendez, both of Hialeah, were
released on Monday after posting $5,000, jail
records show. It was not immediately known if
either have an attorney.
"The possession of more than 450 illegally
harvested lobster tails is a serious viola-
tion;' said FWC Maj. Alfredo Escanio."This
incident demonstrates how strong working
relationships with other law enforcement
agencies can help the FWC protect our natural
resources."


2S nAM-'AEit sport lisnerman, 19s9
(Nokomis), T/270 Chrysler I/B,Garmin color
plotter, V berth & pilot berth, end. head.
$26, 00 Reduced to $21,000 Bob Nordstrom
CPYB. 978-852-4844 World Class Yacht Sales






28FT 2006 Larson 290 Cabrio $39,900
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC


Licensed Yacht Broker
Located in BEAUTIFUL


QASPARILLA
= E[S: .


ECONOMICAL SINGLE DIESEL,CRUISE AT
16-18KTS, NICE CLEAN BOAT. $ 88, $84,900.
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
www.redfishvacht.com


Call Allen Mlcnaras -or uetalls y41-/1b-4Ub1
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
LicensedYacht Broker G A SPA R I LLA
Located at BEAUTIFUL





nlanmiin m mlrmerinE-'nn a, m
uwuu &iir..~ignlr a *uOrrImuuu


Diving for


prei




shar


By Susan Cocking
The Miami Herald

ENGLEWOOD BEACH Paul Reinckens
kicked slowly over the sandy bottom 30
feet deep in the Gulf of Mexico looking for
triangular objects not an easy task, with
visibility a mere 4 feet and this dive being his
first underwater fossil hunt. But suddenly,
there it was: A hard, brownish-gray chevron
lying on the sand.
Elated, Reinckens picked it up, stuck it in a
mesh bag and continued looking. A few minutes
later, he found and pocketed a similar object.
"It's fun!" said the Long Island, N.Y., volun-
teer firefighter, as he climbed back on board
the dive boat Aris-Ta-Kat."l got the bug!"
What Reinckens and several other divers
from captain Jamie Bostwick's boat found off
Englewood Beach were full or partial teeth
from prehistoric megalodon sharks, the largest
fish ever to swim in the world's oceans.
Megalodons, which grew to 60 feet and up
to 77 tons, roamed the ocean, eating whales
and dugongs (relatives of the manatee)
from 17 million years ago until they became
extinct about two million years ago. Each
had as many as 270 teeth up to 7 inches long,
adding up to a vast treasure trove for fossil
hunters and collectors.
"There's a big addiction to hunting for mega-
lodon sharks'teeth;' Bostwick said."Once you
find a big one, you're hooked. When you get a
tooth, it's permanent. It's a piece of history:'
Megalodon sharks'teeth were not the only
finds that day. Paul Steffen of Punta Gorda
found an earbone and a tooth from an ancient
whale. Dave Flinchbaugh of Port Charlotte
found the tibia of a prehistoric horse.
"Anything you see that's black, you want
to flip;' Flinchbaugh, 71, explained of his
hunting technique.
The six-person party on board the Aris-Ta-
Kat was hunting south of Venice, renowned
as the "Sharks Tooth Capital of the World:'
Swimmers, snorkelers, scuba divers and beach-
combers regularly turn up fossil shark teeth
- bull, lemon, dusky, great white, seven-gill,



FINDING
FROM PAGE 2
countless children and adults.
She calls CHEC her second home, and really,
it is. Her husband, Richard, also works full-time
at CHEC. When they're not working, they can be
found on their sailboat at Burnt Store Marina.
Since the two came down from Chicago in
1993, they have only lived on their boat,
Mariah. Sounds like a nice gig to me. After a
day's work of teaching kids about the outdoors,
you can come home, take a seat on the deck
and catch supper and a sunset. Of course, I'm
sure it wasn't all unicorns and lollipops.
CHEC is a nonprofit organization, largely
dependent on grants. If grants disappear, so do
the jobs. Monica told me there was a span of
many years where she was told,"your job might
not be here next year." But each year it was.
Regardless of job security, she kept on
giving back to what she loved doing. In the
early years of her career, she helped clear the
land for the new nonprofit organization. She
personally chopped down Brazilian pepper
trees and other foliage. I can't imagine the bug
bites she has accumulated over the years. She


s teeth


sand tiger, mako and thresher, among others.
But"megs"are king, fetching from a few bucks
to tens of thousands of dollars, depending on
their size and condition. At Venice's annual
Shark Tooth Festival in April, several meg chop-
pers sold for around $2,000 each.
Perhaps the most popular fossil hunting
area is the "Bone Yard" the nearshore
waters from the Venice jetty and pier to about
1.5 miles out. But ancient bones and teeth are
also spread out about 11 miles to the south,
which was where Aris-Ta-Kat's crew dived.
"The beach gets the teeth after they roll
up;' Bostwick said. "Here, it's before they roll
up. If they're encased in clay, they are the
best preserved. They are worth more if the
enamel is shiny."
Fossil hunters, unlike most Floridians, pray
for hurricanes because they flush sharks'teeth
up from the clay bottom where they can be
readily spotted. Following Hurricane Debbie's
passage last summer, a meg tooth was found
in the parking lot of the Venice jetty.
Another popular hunting area is west-
central Florida's upper Peace River, which
would have been a shallow saltwater bay
millions of years ago when sea levels were
much higher than today. Paleontologists
believe those waters served as birthing and
nursery sites for the big sharks.
Joshua Frank of Naples, who serves on the
board of the Fossil Club of Lee County, goes
scuba diving in search of sharks'teeth every
chance he gets. He posts videos of his finds
on YouTube.
"I've liked collecting sharks'teeth since I was
a kid;' Frank said."Finding out I could dive for
them makes for fun on the weekends:'
On his trip aboard the Aris-Ta-Kat, Frank
uncovered three pieces of a tooth from an
ancient mammoth and seven meg teeth. His
fellow divers gathered around admiring them.
Flinchbaugh, who became a certified diver
at age 65, sells fossils to supplement his retire-
ment income.
"At my age, when I croak, my kids will have a
garage sale and they might make a nickel or a
dollar,' he said.


even donated her first car to CHEC. When I say
her first car, I mean it. Remember, she lived in
Chicago and never really needed to buy a car
of her own. Plus she lives on a sailboat. When
she finally did buy a vehicle, she bought a 1995
Geo Metro. Before she knew it, the car turned
into the unofficial CHEC vehicle, and she was
always carrying cast nets and other marine-
related things in the back. The smell got so
bad, she eventually got rid of it. Then there
was Hurricane Charley in 2004. I'm pretty sure
Monica and Richard were working 24 hours
straight for a month after that storm passed
through. But I don't think she called it work. I
don't think she ever has.
Her achievements at CHEC are too lengthy
to list in this column, and the list of lives she
has positively influenced is probably longer.
Although she may officially be retired as
educator and program director, I'd be willing to
bet some chicken wings and a Guinness you'll
find her at the Alligator Creek Preserve more
days than not. It's what she loves to do.
As always, I urge anyone to contact
WaterLine Weekly and give us your two cents.
Email me at WaterLineMagazine@gmail.com.
Without our readers, there is no WaterLine.
Thank you for reading.


Ap.uM ,a Page 29 June 13,2013


Call 941-429-r13 t_
to list your hboaltld' rS----- -
Sl r-A


&A d


31' 2000 Angler 3100 CC 33' Harris Tri 1983, diesel powered
Twin 250 Yamaha 250 0X66 Motors FAST and FUN
T-Top, Out Riggers, trim tabs, $22,000 $29K
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC Call Tod 941-457-0131 at
941-286-5855 pedersonmarine.com Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


Ji auuu ECHOIEc i 31 I5,IUUU 33' WELLCRAFT COASTAL 2004 T-DIESEL
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989INBOARDSTOWERW/UPPER HELM,
McCall Marine Sales, LLC INBOARDS, TOWER W/UPPER HELM,
AIR, GENERATOR. 447,009. $99,500.
LicensedYacht Broker G ^ASPAR IL A REDFISH YACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
Located at BEAUTIFUL II www.redfishyacht.com


5KW Kohler gen set, cherry interior loaded
w/amenities, radar, autopilot, 1.2MPG at 24 cruise.
70,000. $69,000. Details seaamericayachtsales.com.
Ray Mason 941-505-7269






32' 2000 CHRIS CRAFT 328 Express Cruiser $39,900
Cal Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker riASPAR I LLA
Located at BEAUTIFUL



-


32' Carver Mariner
(Two to choose from call for pricing)
Call Tod at 941-457-0131 or
Ed at 941-628-0167 or 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


32 LIM.LINI' I UU3O, OU np Tammar,
AC, heat, in mast furling, 1 owner,
$79,000. 941-347-4670
email irvina32@centurylink.net


C-inrMI AVUUW IulLV.Il MLL. Uptinu o 03o
Call Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
ised Yacht Broker GASPARILL
-.J f i- AI-I TiP i WW *MW


Udal nluliaId nudsaIu rui uediibs a41-l-o-o6o
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G AS PA RIL LA
Located at BEAUTIFUL


SALE
PENDING!!




34' Meridian 2007 Sedan Bridge w/diesels: Excellent
condition!T-Cummins, generator, bow & stern
thrusters, two staterooms, cherry cabinets, washed
weekly and maintained by prof, mechanic. Great Loop
boat, must see. Asking $40,000 $195,000 Ray Mason
941-505-7269. Details seaamericayachtsales.com


34' 2006 SEARAY 340 SUNDANCER $144,900
Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Brokei G^ASPAR I L LA
Located at BEAUTIFUL


34' CATALINA 1989, WING KEEL, DIESEL,
DODGER & BIMINI $39,500
CALL TOD AT 941-457-0131 OR
THE OFFICE AT 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS

w a.




4' Stamas 2003 Hardtop Cruiser: Fully equipped for
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condition, well maintained and loaded with options.
Powered byT-8.1L Mercruiser inboards.
Asking $-44- 0 $98,900. Call Ray Mason
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35 1997 Cruisers 3570: Unique inleiior layoul, privale
mid-cabin stateroom w/walkaround queen berth,
generator, C120 Raymarine chartplotter, FWC Mercs,
V drives, lift kept. Asking $69,999. $49,900.
Call Ray Mason (941) 505-7269
details seaamericayachtsales.com


I
Ire F. \


35' 1998 Mainship
Great Live Aboard for $19,000
Twin 454 Crusaders with 400 hrs.
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S Photr .: pr.:.' 13:l,
Wolves can be
savage preda-
tors, but they
have their
Stnder mnments


as well.


Call 941-429- 10
to list your boat





*-~tT~ REDUCED


alesel, wneel. >z4,99o
Call Mike 941-412-6430 or
the office at 941-833-0099
Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers


9 IVIAINSI lR I MAVVLM 1999 AIM,
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36' 1998 CARVER Mariner 350,
Twin Merc Cruisers, All Electronics,
Shows Like New!
$85,000. 941-255-5311


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U.S. seeks



to remove



protections



for gray wolves


36' DORAL 2008 ELECTRONICS, AIR, GEN,
CAMPER CANVAS, WELL BUILT BOAT.
$4;0,000 $149,900.
REDFISH YACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
www.redfishyacht.com


Call Richard Rosano For Details 941-315-6989
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G A sPA R I LA
Located at BEAUTIFUL


40' 1967 Chris Craft Constellation
Dual 427 Ford 300 hp Engines
Has all the comforts of home! $24,900
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40' DEFEVER DOWNEASTTRAWLER 1980,
twin diesel, new fiberglass decks,
fuel tanks, water tanks,
$49,000
231-218-9920


ByJulie Cart
Los Angeles Times

Saying that gray wolves are no longer
in danger of extinction, the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service on Friday announced plans to
remove federal protections for the often-
reviled animals nationwide and turn wolf
management over to the states.
Fish and Wildlife Service Director Daniel
Ashe called the species'comeback"one of
the most successful recoveries in the history
of wildlife conservation;'a characterization
that some conservation groups called overly
optimistic given the eagerness of hunters and
ranchers to kill wolves.
Wolves, once hunted and poisoned to
near-extinction, have now rebounded "from
a century-long campaign of human persecu-
tion'" Ashe said. About 6,100 wolves exist in
established packs in the western Great Lakes
and northern Rockies.
But Jamie Rappaport Clark, the former
director of the Fish and Wildlife Service and
now the president of Defenders of Wildlife,
said she feared that removing protections will
lead to open season on wolves.
"We believe strongly that the social intoler-
ance to wolves would obligate the Fish and
Wildlife Service to give them cover for a while
longer,' Clark said.
The agency said it will continue protec-
tions for the small group of Mexican gray
wolves in New Mexico and Arizona, which are
considered a distinct subspecies. About 75 of
those animals are part of a captive breeding
program that has struggled, releasing few
animals to the wild.
Removing animals from endangered


species protection is not common, and is
generally a cause for celebration among
conservationists as the move signifies that a
species has been pulled back from the brink
of extinction. Only two dozen species have
ever been removed from the list.
Despite modern-day resistance from
ranchers and hunters, wolves have flourished
since being reintroduced near Yellowstone
National Park 18 years ago. The government
ended endangered status for gray wolves in
the northern Rockies and Great Lakes regions
last year.
The species is only beginning to recover in
other areas, such as Oregon and Washington.
Friday's blanket decision would strand those
animals, critics say, making them less likely to
establish a strong foothold.
The decision "is like kicking a patient out of
the hospital when they're still attached to life
support' said Noah Greenwald of the Center
for Biological Diversity.
States that manage wolves can now apply
their own hunting rules, or extend state
protections, as they see fit.
Wolves are now legally hunted in Montana,
Idaho and Wyoming. State and federal
biologists monitor pack populations and can
reinstate protections if numbers reach levels
that officials consider dangerously low.
California is considering imposing its own
protections after the discovery of a lone male
that wandered into the state's northern coun-
ties from Oregon two years ago. Ashe said he
expected to see breeding pairs in Northern
California in coming years.
The delisting rule is subject to a 90-day
public comment period and will be finalized
within a year, officials said.


Of UUlvI vv:-L-FnrlI I VlnllI1u.C lf l,V40UU iU EMC LEI inHVV LCn I/L -
Cakk Dick Horst For Details 941-548-6070 Totally Refurbished with Rebuilt Diesel
McCall Marine Sales, LLC Ford Lehman, Fiberglass Hull.
LicensedYacht Broker R IL L Full NewTanks. Asking $75,000
Located at BEAUTIFUL SAMO s& -i Call 941-408-9572


37' SEA RAY SUNDANCER 1997 T-CAT DIESELS,
AIR, GEN, NEW CANVAS & BOTTOM PAINT,
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REDFISHYACHT BROKERS 941-639-9400
www.redfishyacht.com






37' SeaRay 270 aft cabin, Twin diesel,
Genset and much more!
Call Ed at 941-628-0167
or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS


-LL
38' Power Tri-Trawler, Home Made
Twin 9.9 Yamahas, Elec tilt & trim, 40hrs
Alum 3 axel trlr. Super Clean! $19,900
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC
941-286-5855 pedersonmarine.com


41' 1985 Egg Harbor Sport Fish
Twin 3126 Cat Diesels, 840hp, 250 hrs
Re-powered in 2004, 2 Staterooms,
$99,900
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC


.s Q
42' Pearson 424, Westerbeke diesel, davits,
solar, ready to cruise 1980 at $81,500
Please call Tod at 941-457-0131
or the office at 941-833-0099
PUNTA GORDA YACHT BROKERS

wl .


call ilcnara Mosano -or ueialls y41-~1-ab-a
McCall Marine Sales, LLC
Licensed Yacht Broker G ASPA R I LL
Located at BEAUTIFUL


.1





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Iuuumr*ai-u- mTI--B-.u. uu


A,(pur, a Page 31 June 13,2013


By Trevor Graff
McClatchy Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON Hollywood director James
Cameron told a Senate panel on Tuesday that
federal partnerships in oceanic research are
vital to understanding the oceans'role in
climate change, trade and education.
Cameron's Hollywood appeal he
directed "Titanic,'"The Terminator,""The
Abyss" and "Aliens' among others drew
a large crowd to the hearing of the Senate
Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere,
Fisheries and Coast Guard, but his work in
deep sea exploration and research is what
brought him before Congress.
In 2012, Cameron voyaged to the deepest
part of the Marianas Trench aboard the Deepsea
Challenger for the sake of research not as
a stunt. The solo dive to 35,787 feet made him
one of just three men to reach the bottom of the
trench, which is in the Pacific Ocean.
"This is a critical time in oceanographic
research;'" Cameron said. "The ocean is an
energy that drives weather, including the
higher precipitation in extreme weather events
like superstorm Sandy, the severe droughts
and so on associated with climate change. To


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VENICE SAIL & POWER SQUADRON 941-485-7245


30 to 7:45 p.m. July 18


Call for upcoming courses.

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Call for upcoming courses.

CAPE CORAL POWER SQUADRON 239-549-9754
ABC Boating Course......................................................... 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 17, 19, 24, 26
How to Use a Chart .................................. ......................... .................. 7 to 9 p.m June 27
Provided by Greg Scotten





PROGRAM DATES LOCATION CONTACT
About Boating Safely ...................................... June 13,19, 20.................... North Port...............941-426-5523
About Boating Safely ....................................... June 15, July 20, Aug. 17...... Sarasota .................941-758-5954
About Boating Safely....................................... Aug. 3................................... Punta Gorda ............941-639-3811
Provided by Dave Nielsen


RiTi1 TTTMT


THURSDAY
Sunrise: 6:33 a.m.
Sunset: 8:23 p.m.
Moonrise: 10:49 a.m.
)O O~ Moonset: 11:52 p.m.
Moon Phase
21% Waxing crescent
Major Times
5:02 a.m. 7:02 a.m.
5:24 p.m. 7:24 p.m.
Minor Times
O 10:49 a.m. 11:49 a.m.
11-52 pm -12-52 am
Prediction: Average


SUNDAY
uJr iinr 11 ?4 j li,
.unj ie : 24 p n,
M,:,:,nrlrie 1 30 p ni
Moonset: 1:03 p.m.
Moon Phase
50% First quarter
Major Times
7:15 a.m. -9:15 a.m.
7:38 p.m. 9:38 p.m.
Minor Times
1:03 a.m.-2:03 a.m.
1:30 p.m. -2:30 p.m.
Prediction: Average+


MONDAY
Surnniev 1. ?4 j n,
Surie, :.- '4 p n,
M,::nr,,e I-7 p ni
Moonset: 1:39 a.m.
Moon Phase
60% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
8:02 a.m.- 10:02 a.m.
8:26 p.m.- 10:26 p.m.
Minor Times
1:39 a.m.- 2:39 a.m.
2:27 p.m. 3:27 p.m.
Prediction: Average


FRIDAY
Sunrise: 6:33 a.m.
Sunset: 8:23 p.m.
Moonrise: 11:42 a.m.
Moonset: --:--
Moon Phase
30% Waxing crescent
Major Times
5:46 a.m. 7:46 a.m.
6:08 p.m. 8:08 p.m.
Minor Times
--:-- -----
1142 am -12-42 pm
Prediction: Average

TUESDAY

uneri :; : 2 4 p ni
Mi:i:.nr,- e ?. 2i p ni
Moonset: 2:18 a.m.
Moon Phase
70% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
8:51 a.m.- 10:51 a.m.
9:17 p.m.- 11:17 p.m.
Minor Times
2:18 a.m.- 3:18 a.m.
3:27 p.m. 4:27 p.m.
Prediction: Average+


SATURDAY
Sunrise: 6:33 a.m.
Sunset: 8:23 p.m.
Moonrise: 12:35 p.m.
Moonset: 12:27 a.m.
Moon Phase
39% Waxing crescent
Major Times
6:30 a.m. 8:30 a.m.
6:52 p.m. 8:52 p.m.
Minor Times
12:27 a.m.- 1:27 a.m.
12-35 pm -1-35pm
Prediction: Best

WEDNESDAY
SJr ,rie i: ?.4 a n,
.une :i : '5 p ni
M i:,:,nrie 4 2'9 p n,
Moonset: 3:00 a.m.
Moon Phase
90% Waxing gibbous
Major Times
9:43 a.m.- 11:43 a.m.
10:11 p.m.- 12:11 a.m.
Minor Times
3:00 a.m. 4:00 a.m.
4:29 p.m. 5:29 p.m.
Prediction: Average


Using our solunar tables: Wild creatures are more in tune with the natural world than we are. The
sun and moon even when they are out of sight exert forces they can feel. Weather and tide will
also play a role, but expect fish and game to be more active during the major and minor solunar times.


to list your boa-t yi -
FI II
r I y

wcPU I.. 0


understand weather and climate, we must
understand the oceans."
Jan Newton, senior principle oceanographer
at the University of Washington, is on the front
lines of oceanic research. In her work on the
coast of the Pacific Northwest, Newton said
that data, ranging from water temperatures
to acid levels, were critical to the local fishing
industry and to Coast Guard units.
The economics of the ocean is a topic that
witnesses said is left largely unstudied.
"What we need to do is look at the major
economic drivers;' Cameron said."I'll give you
an example: Food prices rising because crop
yields are down because ocean precipitation
isn't there. We need to look at the ocean as a
driver to our economy."
The opportunity for expansion and explo-
ration in the ocean are immense, but the
witnesses agreed that without funding they
would go largely untapped.
"If there is more funding directed toward
our oceans, there will be more activity around
that;' Newton said. "From my experience in
academia, I can tell you there's a perceived
lack of opportunity in oceanic jobs. With more
people looking at the oceans, more people will
be inspired to explore them."


48' 1984 Albin Palm Beach MY
Twin Cat Diesel 3208T Engines, Genera-
tor, 2 State rooms, 2 A/C's $84,900
PEDERSON MARINE SALES LLC
941-286-5855 pedersonmarine.com

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Cameron urges research c,11941-429


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li~





t4MZie Page 32 June 13,2013


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By Todd Masson
The Times-Picayune


NEW ORLEANS (AP) After a full career
working as a medical oncologist at East
Jefferson General Hospital, Dr. Will Stein
decided to change gears and enroll at the
University of New Orleans to earn a second
doctorate, this one studying the true love of
his life tarpon.
What he discovered has forever altered how
scientists view the tarpon population off the
Louisiana coast.
Tarpon, aka silver kings, used to live up to
their colloquial name in the southern reaches
of the Bayou State. The fish was indeed
enthroned at the pinnacle of popularity. Not
every Louisiana saltwater angler had the
means to fish for them, but not one didn't
dream about it.
Local high schools honored the fish as their
mascot, and more local watering holes than you
could count on both hands had the large-scaled,
bucket-mouthed fish mounted over their bars.
Entire rodeos were organized to honor and
target these fish, and are still contested today.
"It was a big deal in New Orleans" Stein
said."The tarpon was the symbol of our
Sportsman's Paradise, but in the 1960s or'70s
or so, the tarpon along our coast began to
disappear, and no one really knew why. No one
still knows why.
"It had always been assumed that tarpon
migrate here in late summer and early fall to
eat Gulf menhaden that were common along
our shore, but no one ever thought that tarpon
spawned here in Louisiana:'
Until Stein decided, in his'60s, to become a
graduate student.
"What I wanted to find out was whether
tarpon could complete their entire life cycle off
the Louisiana coast' he said.
Not only did he discover they could he
found that they do.
For years, scientists had known that a few


young-of-the-year tarpon resided along the
Louisiana coast, but the assumption had
always been that the fish -- in larval or
post-larval stages were pushed here by the
big river of water in the Gulf of Mexico called
the Loop Current. Stein started his research
with these tiny tots, the tarpon offspring that
measured less than 12 inches and spent their
days in some unusual places.
"The baby tarpon grow up in coastal nursery
habitat, in the spartina marsh, far inland' he
said."In fact, we found them
in Bayou Black, 60 kilometers
from the Gulf of Mexico. I
found them for three succes-
sive years in a ditch near Port
Sulphur. I found hundreds of
them; they're everywhere.
People don't encounter them
because no one really goes
fishing in the waters where
these animals are found
- little ditches and dark, i
stagnant water. Terrible
places. People aren't going to
go fishing there:'
Though the numbers of
really small tarpon Stein h
found gave a strong hint that
the fish were spawning off
Louisiana's coast, it wasn't a smoking gun. The
fish could have drifted here with the currents
after the spring spawn, enjoyed Louisiana's
warm, vibrant, bait-rich marshes throughout
the summer and perished after the first winter
cold front.
"When the water temperature gets to 50
degrees, these fish die' Stein said."We wanted
to know whether they could survive (the
winter). I did a study in that little ditch where I
found them, and when the water temperature
got to 50 degrees, the tarpon were gone. We
didn't find any tarpon, but we didn't find any
dead ones."
Since there weren't tarpon carcasses every-


where, the probability was that the fish were
able to evacuate before water temperatures
got dangerously low.
But where did they go?
To find out, Stein enlisted the help of one
of Louisiana's most colorful communities -
spearfishermen. The evidence they provided
was overwhelming.
"We had the Hell Divers go out in the Bara-
taria Bight west of the Mississippi River," Stein
said."They found scores of juvenile tarpon.
We discovered we have
very, very large numbers of
juvenile tarpon in our coastal
waters, which means this
fish is capable of leaving the
nursery habitat in the marsh
and migrating to nearshore
waters in the Gulf of Mexico
to mature:'
Stein was closing the circle,
but he still lacked the proof
that tarpon spawn along Loui-
siana's seasonally chilly coast.
That would come in 2011.
"We started looking for
spawning tarpon, and the
l first summer we looked,
we only got like eight or
nine fish, and three of them
were spawning-capable' he said. "One of the
females had just spawned on our coast in the
previous 24 hours. It was caught by a member
of the Louisiana Tarpon Club.
"Then we got another tarpon on July 9
that was spent. In other words, she had just
spawned. We couldn't tell how recently, but we
suspect along our coast."
Stein and his researchers also found two
spawning-capable males.
"These fish hadn't swum a thousand miles
to get up here to spawn;' Stein said.
Stein was pleased but not surprised. As a
lifelong tarpon angler, he always had a hunch
that the fish stayed here year-round. A good


friend of his hooked several fish one year
during a mild January, and the spearfishing
record books show eight of the 10 largest
fish ever taken off the Louisiana coast were
speared in February and March, he said.
So why is it that tarpon anglers never seem
to catch the fish until the true dog days of
summer arrive? Stein said there are a couple of
factors limiting anglers'interaction with the
overwintering large tarpon.
"Look at what's happening in the Gulf of
Mexico now'" he said. "It's very rough. In the
winter, it's worse. The water's very rough, it's
cold, it's miserable. There are not that many
good fishing days. So it's rare for fishermen to
get out. Besides, sportfishermen are not going
to go comb the entire Gulf of Mexico looking
for these fish.
"The other issue is that the tarpon don't like
cold water. The surface water from the Missis-
sippi River plume is much colder than the
deeper waters, so the tarpon are not on the
surface; they're down 75 to 150 feet. The only
time you see them is when divers go down and
look for them."
Stein said it's unknown whether there is a
unique population of tarpon that are born, live
and die along the Louisiana coast, or if some
of the fish migrate to Florida and Mexico and
others stay behind. The fish live for 50 years and
take eight to 10 years to sexually mature, so it's
possible that many spend large chunks of that
time enjoying the bounty of the northern Gulf.
Clearly, though, Louisiana's coastal land loss,
as well as other factors, are being felt by the
tarpon population, Stein said.
"There's been a lot of development along
coastal areas of the Yucatan Peninsula and
South Florida, not to mention the tremendous
loss of marsh habitat in Louisiana' he said.
"A lot of the area that could have been tarpon
nursery is gone."
Stein said Gulf-wide, tarpon spawn from
April through July, but off the Louisiana coast,
he suspects the fish spawn in May and June.


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Mercruiser


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Wanted To Rent
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BUSINESS
1600 Business For Sale
1610 Business Rentals
1615 Income Property
1620 Commercial/
Industrial Prop.
1640 Warehouse & Storage
1650 Farm/Ranches

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OPEN HOUSE
6/13 1010

6/13/13


Gated Community
Open Sun. 1-4
5261 Sabal Trace Dr.
North Port
3/2/2 Heated Pool
Home Beautiful Modern,
located in a Beautiful Gated
community with low HOA fees!
$239,901 Price Negotiable
Owner/Agent, Steven Bailey
@ 941-786-4632 for gate
code. Special private show-
ings any day of the week!
Horizon Realty
International


ill~ll; -------

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your yard the Classifieds!

sale! .$$ QUICK CASH $$


BAY INDIES
RESORT
COMMUNITY


COME SEE
WHAT OUR
LIFESTYLE
HAS To OFFER!
HOMES FOR SALE
FROM $3995.00
FURNISHED HOMES AVAILABLE
HURRY ONLY I LEFT!
NEW HOMES STARTING
@ $54,995.00
NEW GOLF CART INCL.
950 RIDGEWOOD AVE
VENICE FL. 34285
941 485-5444 .
"AGED QUALIFIED" f


Any price or condition!
Cash for your house/mobile.
941-356-5308


WE'SII YourSunnc


HOMES FOR SALE
1020







SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
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Charlotte Sarasota, &
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Realtors Welcome!


GATED 5 PRIVATE ACRE PRAIRIE
CREEK WEST 2003 SPACIOUS
HOME WITH 3-4 BDRMS ,
CUSTOM FEATURES GALORE, 3
STALL GARAGE+DETACHED 1200
SF CUSTOM GARAGE W FULL BATH
EVERY MAN'S DREAM.BLACK TOP
ROADS & PRIVATE DRIVE.
PLENTY OF PARKING, MINUTES TO
PUNTA GORDA.WAS $48a9,00
Now $429,000
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALUSON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304


a--Uria~--r


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


PRAIRIE CREEK PARK!
5-30 ACRES Starting @
$39,900
Punta Gordas's
BEST KEPT SECRET!
Minutes to town, beaches,
harbor! Deed restricted
Horses welcome,black
top roads. "A Very Special
Ranch Community"!
JUDY K PETKEWICZ
GRI CRS
ALLISON JAMES Estates
& Homes 941-456-8304
www.PuntaGorda
Propertiesforsale.com


6 ACRE PUNTA GORDA
PRAIRIE CREEK
PARK BEAUTY!
MANY CUSTOM FEATURES
LIKE NEW 3400SF 3 BDRM,
SPACIOUS MASTER STE & BATH
+ OFFICE, 4 FULL BATHS,
FORMAL DINING RM, LIVING RM,
GREAT RM, LANAI AND OVER-
SIZED 2 STALL ATT GARAGE
$459,000 Now $449K
CALL JUDY PETKEWICZ
ALLISON JAMES ESTATES & HOMES
941-456-8304


NEED CASH


Real Estate 1000
Employment 2000
Notices 3000
Financial 4000
Business Service 5000
Merchandise/Garage Sales 6000
Transportation/Boats 7000


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


ARCADIA-: l.ltr ,L Livi' o:1
acreage w/easy access to PC.
NEWER 3/3/2 w/pool home.
Large 4000 S F insulated metal
building man cave; ideal for
collectors. $289,000.
REMAX EXCEL Peggy Mardis
863-990-1877


ENGLEWOOD ISLES,
3/2/2, with heated Pool,
Prof. remodeled, 2250 sq ft,
new tile roof, kitchen and
bath. Diagonal tile floor,
extensive landscape.
Corner Lot. $259,500
Sarasota Realty & Assoc.
Dane Hahn 941-681-0312

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OPEN HOUSE
THURSDAY
11AM-2PM
13511 Santa Rosa Ave P.C.
$64,900
Just Listed!
Bank Foreclosure.
3Br/2Ba very nice.
(S on 776 cross causway R
on Coliseum, R on Muriel, L
on Lori, R on Santa Rosa,
House on R)


1010
1015
1020
1030
1031
1035
1040
1060
1070
1075
1080
1090
1100
1100
1115
1120

1205
1210
1240
1280
1300
1320
1330
1340
1345
1350
1360
1370
1390
1420

1500
1515
1520
1530
1540


7-Lr- rrfft
aI~ Cfn
F! CtTY'I 'l


j





The Sun Classified Page 2 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2013


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


POOL HOME ON 1/4 ACRE
LOT WITH SPECTACULAR
LAKE VIEWS.
HOME FEATURES SOARING CATH.
CEILINGS, SLIDERS IN LIVING & MAS-
TER TO LET THE OUTSIDE IN, NEW
ROOF 2012 POOL, CAGE, EQUIP-
MENT & HEATER INSTALLED IN 2010
NEW PAINT INSIDE & OUT.
$189,900. TARPON COAST REALTY
CALL RON MCGURE 941-2234781






HARBOUR OAKS
GATEDCOMMUNITY
(Adjacent to Deep Creek)
3Bdrm/2Ba/2CG.
Pool Home! $279,900.
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty




Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
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and click on Classifieds
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USE CLASSIFIED!


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


PORT CHARLOTTE,
24458 Pine Ridge PI.
Located in Gated Comm. of
Suncoast Lakes! 3Bed/2Ba/2CG
MUST SEE! MLS#C7043725
$189,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-2764459
Jill Brouwer Realty


Remodeled 2/2/2 pool home
with dockage for 65' plus
sailboat, depth maintained by
city. Dead end street in
restricted neighborhood.
REDUCED! $189,900
By Owner 941-276-3581
rfrog@hotmail.com
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!


ROTONDA LAKES, 3 Bed-
room, 2 Bath, 2.5 Car Garage,
X-Large Lanai, Pool, Fenced.
EXTRAS! Located on Green
Belt! Low $200.'s 941-855-
1167


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


ROTONDA
Like new 3 Bedroom, 2 bath 2
car garage pool home on over-
sized lot. Lots of upgrades
including granite, step & tray
ceilings, Large pavered
pool/patio area with a master
bath to die for! Only 269,900
Tarpon Coast Realty
Call Ron McGurie 941-2234781
"-I.


157 Cougar Way. Beautiful
completely remodeled.
3/2/2 Pool Home. Peaceful
setting on a double lot.
$229,000
941-626-8200
BAY BRIDGE HOMES LLC
#CBC1254261


YOU WANT ME
to List Your Home

SHELLEE GUINTA
22 YEARS OF
AWARD WINNING EXPERIENCE




ALMAR & ASSOCIATES
941-426-4534


HOMES FOR SALE
1020


226 Jennifer Dr., 2523 total
SF, Immac. 3/2/2.5 w/Pool,
Granite, S/S Appl. Near
Beaches. Asking $285,000
941-698-9179 941-380-0295


-
VENICE, Pine Brook, By
Owner. 3/2/2, pool, on cul de
sac, partially fenced, ideal for
several cars/boat. 5 mins to
beach/41/1-75. 941-497-6655
WHY RENT?
Custom built starting at 125K.
Low down closing cost included.
Gardner Bldg. & Construction, Inc.
941-623-6307, Lic.CRC 1327298

WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


PUNTA GORDA ISLES
3517 WHIPPOORWILL BLVD
3/2/2, Updated Kitchen -
Granite Countertops. Heated
Pool, Large Lanai, 30'
Dock, Boatlift &
Hurricane Shutters!
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty


WATERFRONT
HOMES 1030


UNI IA LOUKUA ISLES
3 /2/2 Pool Home. All Tile
Floors Updated Kitchen -
Stainless Appliances -
Granite Countertops. Well
maintained-Ready to Move In!!
Deb Sestilio 941-391-1873
Fisherman's Village Realty


m .mm u m n .1 1 '. i r
250+' of frontage. 1+ acre
house, garage, marina, pavil-
lion $225,000. 941-639-6269

SCONDOSNILLAS
FOR SALE
1040


72I7


LAKE SUZY, 11335 SW
Essex Dr. Located in
Kingsway Golf Course Area.
2+Bed/Den, 2 Bath, 2CG
Single Unit Meticulas!
MLS#C7043538 $195,950.
Linda 941-457-7245 or
Jill Brouwer 941-276-4459
Jill Brouwer Realty
PORT CHARLOTTE Oak For-
est, 55+ 2nd Flr, 1/1 Newer
tile, appl., W/D. Pool $625/mo
+sec. 941-235-2379


CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR SALE
1040


THE LANDINGS
Beautiful 4/3/3 Condo, with
private elevator. 2000+ SqFt.
Granite countertops, wood
cabinets, custom tile and car-
pet. 10'-12' ceilings. Minutes
from Boca Grande.
Priced to sell $269,900
Surfside Realty & Co.
Jim Brasse 941-662-5604
To Advertise in
The Showcase
of Homes
Please Call
866-463-1638
or Email;
special@sunnewspapers.net

MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
1090

Palm Harbor Homes
Check us out at:
http://www.palmharbor.com
/model-center/plantcity/
New Modular Homes are
here! Call: John Lyons
800-622-2832 ext 210


Riverside Drive WATERFRONT,
Water-views,Gulf access! Pri-
vate Dock & Lift. Call or text
$69,900 941-451-6996


FUK I LHAKLU I I
22284 Laramore Ave.
RENTING? WHY? When you
can own this totally
remodeled, light, bright,
open 1100 SF 2/2 on lushly
landscaped corner lot
Public water & sewer. No
deed restrictions. NOT in
flood zone. $78,000.
PATTY GILLESPIE
RE/MAX Anchor
941-875-2755




mED
PORT CHARLOTTE
OPEN SAT & SUN 1-3
Your search is over. Well
maintained custom home in
quiet neighborhood
3/2/2 LR/DR/FR/Lrg Kit.
1171 Richter St. $149,000
Bill Norris,
Bob Melvin Properties
941-380-2400


t, 1






Thursday, June 13, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 3


MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
1090


ESgiDENT Uf NEu
5+ COMM ITY
PUNTA GORDA
8320 RIVERSIDE DR. #64,
55+ RESIDENTIAL OWNED
PARK, 60X14 TURNKEY, 2/2,
W/D, BOAT RAMP, GULF
ACCESS, ASKING $59,000
CONTACT ED RUSSELL
941-380-8879
GATEWAY REAL ESTATE


VENICE MOBILE HOME
FOR SALE IN AGE
QUALIFIED COMMUNITY.
$14,995 OBO
CALL BARBARA PRICE AT
941-485-5444

VENICE RANCH M.H.E.
Community is being Renovat-
ed! Lot rental community
12x46 2BR/1BA, furnished,
asking $3,500
24x32 2BR/1BA, unfurnished,
new appliances,
asking $5,300.
Others to choose from.
WALKING DISTANCE TO
PUBLIC & CVS
55+ comm. No pets
Call Jane
941-488-5672
www.VeniceRanch.com


VENICE, 2BR/2BA
DBL WIDE MOBILE HOME,
CLOSE TO BEACH
FULLY FURN, IN BEAUTIFUL
BAY INDIES $10,000
OR RENT FOR $900/MO
516-728-2991

MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
1095


ARCADIA, 1473 S. E. Plum
Nearly New 3BR/2BA Home
on 1/2 Acre. Fenced in
Rear Yard. Appliances Stay.
Available Now!
Financing Available.
P & I Payments as
Low as $450.00. Mo. WAC.
Ready Now!
Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda
941-637-1122





MOVE IN TODAY!
OWNER RELOCATING, MUST SELL!
Spacious 2/2 Double Better Hurry!
Harbor View Park. Huge Lanai.
Fishing Pier. Squeeky clean,
all newer A/C, laminate floors.
$29,995
Call Mike 941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


Frd your Best
Friend in te
Classifeds!






PUNTA GORDA
Owner Must Sell!
Immaculate 2/2 double.
Lots of extras and updates.
Newer air and roof.
$29,995
BETTER HURRY!
Call Joe 941-628-8751


MANUFACTURED
HOMES FOR SALE
1095


I VaL3-Ge I
PUNTA GORDA- CLEAN
2 BDR/1.5BATH, Large
Screen Room, Car Port.
Set Up! Quiet Lot
& Park! $10,900. obo
Call Greg 941-626-7829
! aY


Knrvr) Un I
That's what you see when you
look out your window of this
rare beautiful spacious larger
double wide 2bed w/retreat
room in beautiful Riverside
Oaks. $59,995. Visit us at
www.riversideoaksflorida.com
Call Mike to see it today!
941-356-5308
www.riversideoaksflorida.com


THE ARBORS
55+ Community in Osprey
2 Bd/2Ba + carport.
Top of the line Jacobson
Mfg. Home. Like new, neu-
tral colors, all appliances
stay. You own your own lot.
No pets. Community pool.
Really Great Location.
FSBO, 79,909 $69,000!!
Partly owner finance
941-918-1667


HOMES


ILC IVIOUNTAINS
2.75 ACRES W/MTN VIEWS,
DRIVEWAY, AND
EASY FINANCING $9,500.
ALSO HAVE CABIN
ON 1.53 ACRES W/NEW WELL
AND SEPTIC $62,500
EZ TO FINISH. 828-286-1666


WANTED TO BUY
1120




CHARLOTTE CTY, Owner
selling, to rent for July-Aug,
then purchase by Aug 15th.
1700+ SF in price range of
$129K -$139K. Must be 2 or
3 bdrms, w/2 baths, garage,
heated Pool & handicap
accessible. Canal pref. Call
Caroline at 941-916-4675

HOMES FOR RENT
1210





2/2/1 Walk to Shopping, NP....$700
2/2/crpt, screened lanai, PC.....$775
2/2/1 wAg Pool & Lanai, PC.$1000
3/2/2 w/Lawn Care, Lk Suzy..$1100
3/2/2 w/pool in Deep Creek...$1500
Full property list available online
www.almar-rentals.com
941-627-1465
800-964-3095
LET US MANAGE
YOUR PROPERTY


n alP o

Call 8

R EeA


HOMES FOR RENT
1210


CALUSA SPRINGS
NORTH PORT
4BR/2BA/2CAR GARAGE
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Starting at $1050/mo
-AABring your pets!AA
Now Open Mon Fri 8-4
Evenings and Saturdays
By appt only (941) 613-1469
SECTION 8 WELCOME
ENGLEWOOD Isles, 2/2/2,
with association heated Pool.
Private dock with boat lift
$1,250/mo 941-374-2562
ANNUAL & SEASONAL
RENTALS
Call The Pineapple Girls
941-473-U333
Pineapple Gulf Prop. Mgmt. Inc.
www.RentEnglewood.com

A c


I..unrI r
For a Complete List Go To
eraportcharlotte.com
$1200...3/2/2 Pool, Pool Srv incl..PC
$1200..3/2/2 2096 SqFt...........NP
$1050....3+/2/2 1733 SqFt.....NP
$800.....3/2/11176 SqFt.............NP
$775..2/1/CP All Tile, 840SqFt.PC
LET US RENT YOUR HOME
Agent Available On Weekends
We Forgive Foreclosures For Renters




For Rent

312/1 pool screen lanai all
tile fresh paint on golf course
Rotonda $1100
/l1cp DUPLEX N. Eng.
water, sewer & lawn inc
quiet on bus route $525

West Coast Property
Mgmt 941-473-07 18
www.rentalsflorida.net

*NEED A RENTAL*
Paradise Properties &
Rentals,lnc941-625-RENT


InvestorsChoice Real Estate
A Fafl-Based Business






VENICE
3/2.5 WOODBRIDGE CONDO $2100


PORT CHARLOTTE
2/2 WARE


$750


2014 SEASONAL RENTALS
Englewood, N. Port, Pt.Char
Rotonda and S. Venice
2/2 Homes from ... $1600
3/2 Homes from ... $1800
3/2 Pool Homes from..$2200
Diana Legg
Your Rental Expert
941-681-2053
941-681-1189
Website: www.icre.us
Call us for all of your
Real Estate Needs.
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2, FL
rm + ex room, W/D, DW, CHA,
$750 mo.+sec. 2521 Warne.
941-474-0395/941-629-7601
Port Charlotte 2/2/1 w/
lanai, very clean, nice lay-
out, vaulted ceiling, laundry
$750+sec. 941-743-8339

I NEED CASH?
PORT CHARLOTTE 3/2/2,
on a saltwater canal, hottub
$995/MO. 781-321-1234
francis@askaction.com
PORT CHARLOTTE
Furnished, 2/2/1 Canal Home
w/ Utilities Included. Rent
Varies w/ Length of Lease.
Call 941-628-9016
Available July 1st.


HOMES FOR RENT
1210


PUNTA GORDA 2/2/1 PGI,
Greenbelt, beautiful, space all
tile,NP/NS,incl.lawncare, Must
See!! $895 941-423-2643
PUNTA GORDA Beautiful
3/2/2 ranch, canal off Peace
River, 2170 SF, Ig lanai, newer
appliances. $1200 mo. Call
Joe 719-687-4750


WE NEED RENTALS
Reduced Mgmt Fees
www.allfloridarealty.com
(41)629-1121
SOUTH VENICE 2/2/1
No smoking, no pets. $800
Call for more!
941-493-1342

CONDOS/VILLAS
FOR RENT
1240


AWARD WINNING
SUNBELT MGT.
SERVICES
RENTALS *
3/2/2 Fence,
Syracuse St., P.C.
$775/mo
3/2/2 Lanai,
Lavilla Ave., N.P.
$900/mo

*we welcome new listings*
COMPLETE LISTINGS
(941) 764-7777
sunbeltmgtservices.com
Seize the sales
with Classified!
DEEP CREEK 2/2 or 3/2, tile
cath. ceil, wood cab. granite,
W/D, lanai $725+ up, pets ok
(941)-626-1514 or 661-4539
EL JOBEAN 2BR/2BA
ON MYAKKA RIVER. W/D,
COVERED PARKING, POOL
FISHING PIER,. ANNUAL UNFUR-
NISHED $725/MO INCLDS.
WATER, SEWER & BASIC CABLE
No PETS. 941-766-
0504
HERITAGE OAK PARK
BRIGHT, SPACIOUS 2/2, W/D,
TILED LANAI, COV PARKING
$750 941-286-0296
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/2 off
Kings Hwy, Pool, Tennis, close to
shopping, water incl. Furn avail
$725/mo 941-286-5003
VENICE ISLAND 55+
2BR/2BA, Pool, 2 Blocks
to beach, shopping, No
pets, smoking $900/ mth
941-493-1036


DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
1300

DEEP CREEK 2/2
w/2 car Garage & Lanai.
Close to 1-75, Exit 170.
$750/Mo. 941-737-7037
ENGLEWOOD EAST-
VERY UNIQUE! 2 Bdrm plus
Pets on approval. $775/mo
+ security. 941-460-0506
PORT CHARLOTTE 2/1
off Midway & Harbor.
Sec 8 or VASH ok.
New Bath,Updated & clean.
$750 248-933-0713


Finmd it in the

assimieds!
~th e

L9*J


CHARLOTTE HARBOR 2/1
Furn'd, Scr Lanai, Cov
Parking, No Pets, Clean,
$600/ Mo, 1st/Last, 941-
875-9425
ENGLEWOOD EAST-
VERY UNIQUE! 2 Bdrm plus
Pets on approval. $775/mo
+ security. 941-460-0506



12 mnns rom Vemce
2br w/ den 2 ba 1300sf,
Swimming pool
941-473-0450

NORTH PORT
Victoria Point Apts at
Sumter & Appomattox
Between US 41 & 1-75.
Accepting Applications
for 1Br & 2Br
SConveniently "'
located close to schools
shopping, entertainment,
& beaches
941-423-8720
STUDIO APTSV
Income-Based Housing
for those 62+ or HCA
Requirements. 941-624-
2266. Limited availability.
Restrictions Apply.
TTY: 1-800-955-8771


PUNTA GORDA, 2/1 Com-
pletely tiled, window treat-
ment, on Fairway Dr oppo-
site school, monthly $650,
Call Owner (718)-465-
6388 or (718) 864-6482


FOR RENT
1320

PUNTA GORDA, 2/1 Com-
pletely tiled, window treat-
ment, on Fairway Dr oppo-
site school, monthly $650,
Call Owner (718)-465-
6388 or (718) 864-6482


VENICE CLUBSIDE APTS.
1 Bedrooms Available.
$375 Move-in Fee.
Call 941-488-7766.
VENICE ISLAND Efficiency
Clean & neat! Walk to
beaches & downtown. Start
$535 Annual 941-567-6098
Advertise Today!
1 VENICE STUDIO
S & 1 Bedroom
Accepting Section 8 Vouchers
941-488-7766
VENICE: 2/1 2 miles
to Beach, walk to Publix,
Shops & bus.
Immaculate, partially fur-
nished, tile/carpet.
$750/mo. Annual. No
pets.
(941)-374-3401
VILLA SAN CARLOS 2550
Easy Street Income based
62+ or needing features
of accessible unit. Restric-
tions Apply. 941-624-2266
TTY-1800-9558771

OPpORTUNITU
VILLA SAN CARLOS II
22250 Vick St.
Affordable-Income based
One bedroom apartments
for 62 or older
Income Limits Apply
Call 941-624-4404
TTY-1-800-955-8771


WARM MINERAL SPRINGS,
North Port. 1/1, furn. Walk-in
closets, Tile, water incl. Near
lake $600mo 305-206-3058
WILLOW CREEK
Affordable 55+ community
tucked away in North Port.
Pool, Activity Room, Fitness
Center, Restricted Access
Entries. Great Specials on 1BR
& 2BR Apartments. Small Pet
Friendly. Call us Today for a
Tour of our Community!
EHO 941-429-2402

MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
1340

EL JOBEAN 1BR 1BA, CANAL
LOT, $500. 2BR2 BA FURN.
$600. Call 863-491-0587.


980 ACRES Ranch or Farm Land 13 Wells

Offered in 5 Parcels 2786 SR 29 S, LaBelle, FL
-. Auction will be held at
The Flora & Ella Restaurant
550 W SR 80, LaBelle, FL
Preview: 11am-2pm
I 6Saturday, June 22nd
S~I ONLINE BIDDING
.-'_ AVAILABLE


IntGENBOTHAM
AUCTIONEERS
o4VAI.o, LTID., NC
analliance partner of NAIGlobal'
1666 Williamsburg Square, Lakeland, FL 33803


_


Broker
Participation
Welcome


800-257-4161
Higgenbotham.com
auction@higgenbotham.com
M.E. Higgenbotham, AARE FL Lic.# AU305 AB158






The Sun Classified Page 4 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2013


MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
1340


rENGL 55+ park 1/1 part-
I ly furn. End lanai Clean I
Quiet safe park. $600 mo I
L ann. 941-786-7777
PUNTA GORDA "RV Resort,"
single-wide, year-round/annu-
al, $600/mo, lst+Sec, No
Pets, Refs. Req. 941-875-
3958, 941-639-7758
ROOMS FOR RENT
1360


PORT CHARLOTTE, Clean &
Quiet Furn. Room. Working Man
Only $125wk+Dep 941-626-2832
ENGLEWOOD $95/wk, no
lease/sec., working person only,
close to Venice. 305-747-8701
GARDENS OF GULF COVE,
Looking for roommate all
house privileges and private
bath. 941-916-4058
PORT CHARLOTTE Huge pri-
vate room w/separate entrance.
Utility and cable included. Smok-
er OK. $120/wk. 941-624-3436
PORT CHARLOTTE ROOM-in-
HOME smoke/alcohol free
$400 mo. or $125 weekly
941-268-2160
PT.CHARLOTTE, Clean, Quiet,
$125wk/$450mo, incl Util, Furn'd,
Refs. 941-743-3070, 941-740-2565
PUNTA GORDA, Clean, Furn.
Room, Free Wi-Fi, $85/Week,
All Inclusive, 941-763-9171
( GET RESULTS --
USE CLASSIFIED! )

RENTALS TO SHARE
1370


PUNTA GORDA Spacious
master suite, furn, Ig priv bath,
wlk-incloset, w/d, $125/wk,
avail July 1st 781-724-6643
LOTS & ACREAGE
1500


SELLING YOUR
HOME, CONDO,
OR LOT?
We can help you.
Advertise your home,
condo or lot with us
and reach over
150000 readers in
Charlotte Sarasota, &
DeSoto Counties and
online everyday.
Ask about our 90
day special.
Call one of our
classified experts for
all the details at
866-463-1638
Realtors Welcome!


NORTH PORT Sumter
Blvd. Great location. New
home area. $6,900 941-
457-6811


21093 Tucker Ave., Two
Beautiful Lots (both buildable).
PUBLIC WATER and NON-
DEED RESTRICTED. Easy
access to 1-75. Not in flood
zone. THE TIME TO BUY
IS N-O-W!!!
Patty Gillespie Remax Anchor
941-875-2755


LOTS & ACREAGE
1500


PORT CHARLOTTE
Several lots $5,000-
$15,000 941-628-0251

WATERFRONT
Z 1 1515 ^^


PUNTA GORDA ISLES cul-de-
sac, Sailboat 105' Seawall, may
finance, $189K, 941-629-6329

BUSINESS RENTALS
1610


ENGLEWOOD
FREE STANDING BUILDINGS
ON SR 776
300 sq. ft. $400
600 sq. ft. $800
1,000 sq. ft. $1,200
828-524-4977

PAULSON CENTRE
EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITES
Suites start at $299/mo
Virtuals start at $100/mo
Info call (941)-206-2200
PORT CHARLOTTE OFFICES:
3 Offices & Reception Area
on Paulson. $700./mo.
941-628-9016
VENICE Office/Warehouse
Space. 2300SqFt,
2600SqFt, 4800SqFt.
$6.50 a sq ft. 941-484-4316

S COMMERCIAL/
INDUSTRIAL PROP
1620


mnnvn n -r.-, +du D vvinn.
House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy
17 Frontage, Zoned Comm.
Info. 863-494-5540 or
863-244-3585
PORT CHARLOTTE- Prime office
space, 3 units 1,000sf. ea. Brand
new. Sandhill Blvd. Turnkey/Fully
built out. (941)-624-5992

& STORAGE
1640

NORTH PORT 800SF Ware-
house $400/mo+tax. 400SF
$210/mo+Tax 941-661-6720

2000






EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT
2005 Services
2010 Professional
2015 Banking
2020 Clerical
2025 Computer
2030 Medical
2035 Musical
2040 Restaurant/Hotel
2050 SkilledTrades
2060 Management
2070 Sales
2090 Child/Adult
Care Needed
2100 General
2110 Part-time/ Temp
2115 Home Based
Business
2120 Seeking Employment

PROFESSIONAL
2010


CERTIFIED TEACHERS
Open Lang Arts
Open Class Ass't.
Cover & resume to
businessoffice@
charlotteacademy.com


PROFESSIONAL
S2010


HAIR STYLISTS for Busy dwn-
twn PG salon Comm. or booth
rental. Call (941)-457-6806
"0nilIIH
NOU


nIIN
HAIRSTYLIST, HIRING hair-
stylist p/t or f/t 474-6355
Surfside Styling Salon
REAL ESTATE CLOSER -
Charlotte County law firm
seeks an experienced Real
Estate Closer with a
minimum of 5 years
experience in all aspects of
residential and commercial
closings. Excellent computer
and communication skills are
required. Please forward
resume with salary history to
info@bigwlaw.com.

CLERICAL/OFFICE
2020


RECEPTIONIST F/T
PORT CHARLOTTE
Multi-Line & Excellent Computer
Skills. Email Resume to:
GoResume@yahoo.com
SECRETARY
FT Monday-Friday 8-4:30pm
Computer experience &
reliable with a pleasant
personality. 941-575-4446

MEDICAL
2030



ACTIVITY ASSISTANT

FT ACTIVITY ASSISTANT
WANTED FOR UPSCALE SENIOR
LIVING COMMUNITY.
$10.00/HOUR PLUS
DEPENDING ON EXPERIENCE.
APPLY IN PERSON AT
ASTON GARDENS
1000 ASTON GARDENS DR.
VENICE, FL 34292
OR FAX RESUME TO
941-240-1007







CARE MANAGERS
FT/PT
ARE YOU A HHA, PRIVATE
CAREGIVER OR NEWLY
LICENSED CNA LOOKING
FOR A CHANGE OR
THAT 1ST OPPORTUNITY.

HARBORCHASE OFFERS
ON THE JOB TRAINING FOR
NEW CARE MANAGERS,
COMPETITIVE WAGES AND AN
EXCELLENT BENEFITS PACK-
AGE SUCH AS MEDICAL,
DENTAL, VISION & 401K

PART-TIME TEAM MEMBERS
RECEIVE BENEFITS
AT 20+ HOURS.

FOR CONSIDERATION PLEASE
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
HARBORCHASE OF
VENICE
ASSISTED LIVING AND
SKILLED NURSING
950 PINEBROOK ROAD
VENICE, FL 34285
(941) 484-8801 PH
(941) 484-3450 FAX
EOE M/F/D/V


Have A Garage
Sale!


MEDICAL
2030



COME JOIN OUR TEAM
We currently have
RN, PT, OT, ST and HHA
positions available.
For more
information call:
Janine in Sarasota
941-806-0850,
Michelle in
Pt Charlotte 941-743-4004
COMPREHENSIVE
Home Care

DENTAL HYGIENIST
Needed three days per week
in Englewood office. Fax
resume to: 941-624-6998
DENTAL/CHAIRSIDE ASST.
Part Time, 29 hrs per wk. Exp.
Preferred, established prac-
tice. Call 941-639-1124

DeSoto
Health & Rehab
has the following job
opportunities available:
*COTA, OT & PT
PT/FT/PRN for
*LPN & RN
PRN/FT/PT all shifts
Fax resume to:
(863)-494-9470
For questions call:
(863)-494-5766

LPN Monday thru Friday
2pm to 10:30pm
Mark Manor Assisted Living
Email Resume to:
mjacobs@villageontheisle.com
or Fax 941-486-5460
or Call 941-486-5462
EOE Drug FreeWorkplace
VILLAGE ON THE ISLE


RN's 11-7
and
LPN'S Needed

Signature Heathcare
LLC is seeking a depend-
able & compassionate
person to join our team.
PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON:
SIGNATURE
HEALTHCARE LLC
4033 Beaver Lane,
Port Charlotte.
EOE/DFWP

Urology medical practice
looking for LPN part-time in
Englewood office.
Please fax your resume to
(863) 494-0233 or email:
jblackmon.ama@gmail.com

HORIZON
H HEALTHCARE
4 INSTITUTE
www.HorizonTechlnstitute.Com
"ADVANCE YOUR CAREER"
Licensed & Accredited School
Murdock Town Center on 41
1032 Tamiami Tr Unit 3
YOU can become a LPN
within 11 months
Enrollment ongoing
Call for Class Dates
PHLEBOTOMY, EKG, CNA,
Classes Start July 1 '13
LPN-next class starts
June 24th '13
Start Working In 2-5 wks!
Classes StartEach Month
Call For Class Dates
* Nursing Assistant (120hrs)
* Home Health Aide (75hrs)
* Phlebotomy Tech (165hrs)
* EKG Tech (165hrs)
* Patient Care Tech (600hrs)
* Job Assist. & Pymt. Plans
Call Now to Register!
941-889-7506

/'NEED A JOB? )
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!


MUSICAL
LO 2035





Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN-':


your credit car


HOUSEKEEPER, PART-TIME
for Longboat Key resort.
Schedule to include Saturdays.
Must be reliable with a positive
attitude and good people skills.
Experience preferred.
Call 941-383-5511

Great Deals in
the Classifieds!


--IN
RIVER CITY
GRILL
Seeks motivated and
experienced Day
time PREP PERSON
and LINE COOK.
Apply in Person:
2-4pm Only
131 W Marion Ave
Punta Gorda, FL

SKILLED TRADES
2050


ACTIVE DOOR and Window,
is seeking Entry Door/
Garage Door Installer.
Service Tech experience
required. Pay based on exp.
Apply 26521 Mallard Way,
Punta Gorda 941-505-0764
CUSTOMER
SCHEDULING
ENGLEWOOD CO SEEKING
CUSTOMER SCHEDULING POSI-
TION FULL TIME $10 PER HR
PLUS BENEFITS PACKAGE
PLEASANT PHONE VOICE
SEND RESUME' TO:
CHSERVICES254@GMAIL.COM
DIESEL MECHANIC,
Looking for an Exp. Diesel
Mechanic. Must be Hard
Working. Duties Incl., but not
Limited to, Tires, Brakes and
PM's. Must have Own Tools,
Class A Lic. a Plus.
Apply in Person to:
Young Trucking
12164 Tamiami Trail PG


Excavator Operators Exp in
storm, water and sewer instal.
Excavator/Dozer Operators
Exp in earth moving and lake
excavation req. Positions are
for well established local con-
struction company, benefits
included. Apply in person to:
3801 N Orange Ave.
Sarasota, FL 34230
EOE, DFWP


SKILLED TRADES
2050


AUTO MECHANIC, Apply by
appt only. 23212 Freedom Av
PC 33980 941-276-5777
Must have own tools!



EXPERIENCED
PLUMBERS
BusY Co. SEEKS WELL
GROOMED PLUMBERS WITH
A GOOD DRIVING RECORD.
THIS DRUG FREE COMPANY
OFFERS A BENEFIT PACKAGE.
CALL 941-473-2344

GRANITE
FABRICATOR NEEDED
Experience a must!
Valid FL Driver's License.
Call 941-628-5628
MASONS/CONCRETE FINISH-
ERS NEEDED Must have exp. &
transportation, no pansies/cry
babies. 941-628-1541
OIL CHANGE TECHNICIAN,
Apply by appt only
23212 Freedom Ave,
PC, 33980 941-276-5777
IADVERTISE:I


PLUMBERS IMMEDIATE
Must be qualified and
experienced in all areas of
Plumbing! 941-613-6785
Betweem 9am-lpm
Monday- Friday Only
ROOFER Experienced Must
have DL, transportation &
tools. No drugs! Call (941)-
473-7781
S SALES




ADVERTISING
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE

SUN NEWSPAPERS IS LOOKING
FOR MOTIVATED SALES PROFES-
SIONALS WITH A COMMUNITY
SPIRIT WHO ARE READY TO
COMMIT TO A LONG-TERM
CAREER WITH AN ESTABLISHED
SUCCESSFUL MEDIA COMPANY.
DOES THIS DESCRIBE
YOU?
AGGRESSIVE
COLD CALLING PRO
DEAL CLOSER
STRONG WORK ETHICS
MONEY MOTIVATED
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
PEOPLE PERSON
COMPUTER LITERATE
*EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER
SERVICE SKILLS
*MARKETING FLARE
*ABILITY TO WORK
INDEPENDENTLY

WE OFFER:
*COMPETITIVE SALARY PLUS
COMMISSIONS
*VACATION
*HEALTH INSURANCE
*SICK AND SHORT TERM
DISABILITY
*401(K)
*TRAINING
*ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNI
TIES
WE ARE AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER & A
DRUG AND NICOTINE FREE
DIVERSIFIED WORKPLACE.
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG AND
NICOTINE TESTING REQUIRED.
IF WE DESCRIBED YOU, SEND
OR EMAIL YOUR RESUME TO:
ENGLEWOOD SUN
ATTENTION: CAROL MOORE
120 W DEARBORN
ENGLEWOOD, FLORIDA
34223
FAX: 941-681-3008
EMAIL:
CYMOORE@SUN-HERALD.COM





Thursday, June 13, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 5


SALES
Lw 2070






The Green Sheet
a 20 year old
Weekly Shopper
has an opening
for an
Advertising
Executive
in the
PORT CHARLOTTE
PUNTA GORDA
market.
Applicants must have
at least three year's
successful sales
experience.
Base salary, commissions
and expense allowance.









Advertising Sales
Executive
The Charlotte Sun is
looking for "Winners" to
join our team of
professional Advertising
Sales Executives.
If you are never satisfied
with average successes,
are self-motivated, goal
oriented, confident,
enthusiastic and believe
that the customer is all
important, we would like
to talk to you.
The successful
candidates must possess
good oral and written
communication skills, be
organized and a team
player. Sales experience
a plus but we will train
the right persons.
We offer:
Competitive salary plus
commission
Vacation
*Health insurance
Sick and short term
disability
*Training
*Stable company that is
very Community minded
and involved.
Please send resume to:
Advertising Director,
Leslee Peth
Charlotte Sun
23170 Harborview Road
Charlotte Harbor, FL
33980
Email:
Lpeth@sun-herald.com
We are an Equal
Opportunity Employer &
a Drugand nicotine Free
Diversified Workplace.

Turn your

trash into

cash!

Advertise

your yard

sale!


1111'?
I!B .,-, ..


.............................
IS IT TIME FOR A
NEW CAREER?
Come work with the Sun
newspaper classified team,
:located in North Port Florida.:
SWe are America's Best
Community Daily newspaper,:
with the largest classified
section in Florida. This is an
outstanding opportunity to
join a company where you
make the difference. We are
looking for a Part-Time
person, with computer skills
and with a positive,
energetic, can-do approach
to join our classified team.
We are looking for a highly
motivated individual who
thrives on challenges, loves
learning new skills and
enjoys working in a positive
team environment.
"We offer:
:* Training
i* Stable company that is:
very Community minded and:
:involved.
*. Opportunity to expand your.
:business skills

:Please email your resume to::
:Email: Jobs@sunletter.com

Equal Opportunity
Employer/Drug & Nicotine
Free Diversified Workplace.
Pre-Employment Drug &
Nicotine Testing Required.
SALES/NEW BUSINESS
DEVELOPER
Telephone Sales opportunities
building new business are avail-
able in North Port Florida.
Successful candidates will be
experienced, self-motivated
sales professionals who have
excellent communication, lis-
tening, and customer service
skills. You must be results dri-
ven, energetic, positive and
able to work in a busy environ-
ment.
We are a successful media
company with a proven track
record of customer success-
es; and extremely well-regard-
ed in the marketplace we
serve as well as throughout
our industry. Your role will
offer viable solutions to keep
all types of businesses top of
mind and to help grow their
business. If you are goal ori-
ented, confident, and believe
the customer is all important,
we want you to contact us!
We Offer:
*Competitive salary plus
commissions
*Vacation
*Health Insurance
*Sick and short term
disability.
*401(k)
*Training
*Advancement opportuni-
ties
If you are looking to build a
sales career in an
environment that allows
growth and success, contact:
sunsales062@gmail.com
We are a drug & nicotine
free workplace.
Pre-employment drug & nico-
tine testing required.

ASK US

HOW
you can place a
PICTURE
of your item
for sale
in your
classified ad!


THE FURNITURE
WAREHOUSE a top 100
retailer is seeking highly pro-
fessional and engaging sales
associates for our Port
Charlotte and Venice location.
Income from $25,000 to
$50,000 per year in commis-
sions with a guaranteed base
salary and comprehensive
benefits. Send resume to
jhughes@furnwarehouse.com
or call 941-780-7895 or apply
online FurnWarehouse.com

CARE NEEDED
2090


CHILD CARE WORKER
EXPERIENCED!! NEEDED
FOR PRESCHOOL IN
PUNTA GORDA
CALL 941-626-4884

GENERAL
2100


ACTIVE DOOR & Window is
cooking for Installation
trainee. Will train on Doors,
Windows, Shutters. Mus
have Clean drivers licence.
Apply 26521 Mallard Way
Punta Gorda 941-505-0764

SiINI
CALL CENTER OPERATORS
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
FOR OVERNIGHT SHIFTS
APPLY @ SECURITY
ALARM CORPORATION.
17776 TOLEDO BLADE
BLVD. PORT CHARLOTTE


TV Diary
Editor
Postions


INTERESTED IN
WORKING 6 WEEKS
FOUR TIMES YEAR?

Nielsen (the TV ratings
people) is looking for quali-
ty focused individuals to
interpert and input TV
Diaries four TV sweeps
each year. Basic computer
skills required.
No selling or
telephoning involved.
Apply on line at:
Nielsen.com
Click on "Careers"
Click on "Search All
Careers"
Search Job numbers:
Day shift 1303474
Night Shift 1303473
Short Shift 1303502

Day Shift
7:45AM 4:OOPM
Night Shift
4:30PM-12:45 AM
6:00pm-12:0OAM

$8.50 per hour


Paid Training begins
Wed. June 26th
/ Savings Plan
SRetirement Plan
4 The office where
employees ARE appreci-
ated!


nielsen

1080 Knights Trail
Nokomis, FL 34275
941-488-9658
EOE 0 AA/M/F/D/V

CLASSIFIE


SALES SALES
2070 L 2070


GENERAL
2100



THE SMART
SHOPPER GROUP
has openings for
Full or Part Time
"Events Coordinator's"
DUTIES INCLUDE:
Contacting social event
planners, such as car shows,
ports events, gun shows,
etc. and securing permission
or display space for booth,
table or kiosks.
Contracting Part Time
"Ambassadors" to secure
"Complementary Free
Subscriptions" to our weekly
Smart Shoppers at the event.
Setting-up and supplying
he event display.
*Coordinating the Ambas
sador activities.
The ideal candidate would
be a semi-retired
executive with excellent
organizational skills.
Please email resume to:
rknight@smartshopg.com
OR CONTACT:
Robert Knight, CEO
Smart Shopper Group, LLC
941-205-2340

PART TIME/
TEMPORARY
L 12110

PART TIME Funeral Home
Transport Assist. Perfect
for Local Active Police, Fire,
or EMT Retiree. Professional
Appearance, Physically
Healthy, Clean Driving
Record. N/S. Englewood
Community. 941-475-9800
Call Don M-F 10-4 ONLY.
NEED CASH?
Have A Garage
Sale!

3000








NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS
S3010


MY ATTORNEY STEPHEN
H. SCHWARZ II MOVED
Anyone who knows his new
address or phone number
please send it to PO Box
494192, Port Charlotte, FL
33949. I need to ask him
some questions about my trust
fund. Thank you.
HAPPY ADS
3015





Place your Happy
Ad for only
$10.75
3 lines 1 day.

Add a photo for
only $10.00!

Please call
(866)-463-1638




PERSONALS
3020


ADORABLE TASHA.
Stretch & Relax Therapy
941-497-1307
FEMALE Hairstylist, 46 look-
ing for Single Male, 44-60 for
relationship 941-201-9853
MASSAGE & Body Scrubs
Relax & Rejuvenate!
941-626-2641 Lic. MA59041
RELAX & UNWIND
WITH STACEY
941-681-6096
SENSATIONS
STRESS RELEASE
941- 766-7995
3860 RT. 41, 2 MI. NORTH
OF PUNTA GORDA BRIDGE.
W/M Widow, 53, good looking
w/new home; paid-for. Looking
for friendship/companionship
P.C. Mike 941-380-3055

I SCHOOLS
& INSTRUCTION
3060



CNA, HHA, MED ASST, CPR.
Onsite testing/finance avail
941-429-3320 IMAGINE
ED KLOPFER SCHOOLS OF
CNA TRAINING 1 wk class $250.
Locations: Sarasota Port Char-
lotte, Ft. Myers. 1-800-370-1570

F LACNA.COM
RN/LPN 0 CNA 0
HHA MA I
CEU'S/CPR *Med
Tech Phlebotomy
State testing onsite.
941-727-2273
FREE EASTERN WISDOM &
Spiritual Healing Classes
utilizing Tai Chi & Qui-Gong
with Yi-Jin-Jing applications &
mediations. Popular instructor.
Call for info 941-204-2826
BORED WITH TAE KWON
DO & MIXED MARTIAL
ARTS? Try Somthing New.
FREE Classes Available in
Tradional Shaolin Kung Fu
More Info Call 941- 204-2826

A Bargain Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds First!
A Whole
Marketplace of
Shopping is right at
your
Fingertips!
NEED A NEW CAREER??
CNA CLASS: Days, Eves,
Weekends. $449. Small Class!
CPR/First Aid Incl. 941-966-
2600 www.SunCoastCNA.com
UNEMPLOYED? Earn Your
Commercial Driver's License
(CDL) in Just 3 Wks. & Join the
Ranks of Employed Truck Dri-
vers Nationwide. Located Punta
Gorda FL SunCoast Trucking
Academy. 941-855-0193 or
941-347-7445

BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
L 3065

CALVARY BIBLE CHURCH
1936 E. Venice Ave. Venice
Friday at 9am.
Study features video teachings
of noted Bible Scholars on
various subjects.
For more info. Call Rev. Jones
at: 941-485-7070 or visit
www.CBCVenice.com
COMMUNITY CENTER
4PM 7PM each Wednesday.
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
PC, Open to All Ages.
For more info 941-766-9357
FAITH BUILDERS
A Basic Study to Build your
Christian Faith. Call Pastor
Parsons at Christ the King
Lutheran Church for times.
941-766-9357 Port Charlotte


BIBLE STUDY
& CHURCHES
3065

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
278 S. Mango St. Englewood
Monday & Thursdays
at 9am. Offering chair exer-
cise classes For moreinfo.
Call 941-474-2473
LIC. CHRISTIAN COUNSELING
941-876-4416
Liberty Community
Church
North Port Charlotte


CRYPTS
3070

CRYPTS, SIDE-X-SIDE
$5,750 Royal Palm Memorial
Gardens. (941)-639-2591
VENICE MEMORIAL GARDENS
Garden of the Cross,
Desirable location. 2 side by
side spaces, 2 opening &
closings, 44x13 Bronze Mark-
er w/Granite Base, includes
installation. Directly from the
cemetery price would be
$11,000; Asking $7,000 Call
Jeannette: (941) 488-5016

LG K
VENICE MEMORIAL GAR-
DENS, 2 Person Niche for
Cremation. Wall of Matthew.
$3,800. (941)-662-1707
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!

LOST & FOUND
S3090


FOUND TAME RABBIT, Found
around Edgewater And Pellam
area, or free to good home.
941-235-1839
LOST DOG, Black & White,
Female, Friendly in the Vacinity
of Collingswood & Pellam in
P.C. Call 941-740-0209
LOST: MINI SCHNAUZER,
Black, male answers to
"Rocky". Vacinity of Sumter &
Heron Creek Country Club.
941-423-8483
LOST: TOY POODLE
Female, white w/black mask
on face & black spash on back.
Closely shaved hair cut.
Missing since 5/17/13.
Elderly owner heartbroken!
REWARD! 941-426-2909
ARTS CLASSES
S3091


MAGIC OF MOSAICS
Classes & Workshops
Rosemary, Artist/instr
941-697-7888/941-258-6873
www.FlamingoFanny.com
WATERCOLOR PAINTING
On yupo, classes start Monday
Aug 5, at 1-5pm. Some sup-
plies provided Creative classes
in Venice. Call Barb Raymond
@ 941-961-9723.
COMPUTER CLASSES
S3092



Courses & Private Lessons
GoodHands 941-375-8126
EXERCISE CLASSES
S3095


GULF COAST ACUPUNCTURE
151 Center Rd.
Wednesday 5:30pm
Thursday 9:00 am
Saturday 8:30am
YOGA FOR BEGINNERS
Proceeds to
Venice Wildlife Center
Call Rick or Mary
941-488-1769





The Sun Classified Page 6 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2013


RELIGION CLASSES
3096


BEGIN YOUR DAY IN
DEVOTIONAL STUDY
Christ the King Lutheran
Church, 23456 Olean Blvd.
TUES & FRI 9:00-9:30 am.
For more info 941-766-9357
Port Charlotte
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH
4005 Palm Drive, Punta Gorda
Various Days & Times
CONFIRMATION/BIBLE STUDY
Adult Infomational Class
941-639-6309
OTHER CLASSES
3097


CONCENTRATIVE MEDITA-
TION with Linda Weser, 4 p.m.
every Monday at Unity Church
of Peace, 1250 Rutledge
Street, off Veterans Boulevard
between Orlando Boulevard
and Torrington Street, Port
Charlotte/North Port line.
Free; open to the public.
941-276-0124

4000







FINANCIAL


OPPORTUNITIES
4010

HOW TO OWN A BUSINESS PARTNER
W SUCCESS LOCAL CO NO RISK. MORGAN
CR MON 7PM 941-626-1298

5000






BUSINESS SERVICES
AN OCCUPATIONAL LIC.
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational
licensing bureau to verify.
ALUMINUM
5006U


Edward Ross Construction
Services, Inc. 941-408-8500
pool cages, Scr. lanais, etc...
APPLIANCE
SERVICE/REPAIR
Z 5020

DRYER VENT CLEANING -
Clean your dryer before it
catches on fire. Call Roger
941-321-7571
Lie 990010103532/Ins
DRYER VENT CLEANING &
INSPECTION. $49
30 yrs. exp. (941)-889-7596



CABINETRY
5030


KENT'S CABINETRY &
HANDYMAN SERVICE by Shof
Inc. Counter tops, crownmold-
ing, more. licAns 941468-1469
CARPET SERVICES
5040


CARPET & UPHOLSTERY
Cleaning, Free Estimates
Carpets Dry in 1-3 hours.
Call John 941-883-1381


ADULT CARE
5050


LOOKING FOR COMPANION?
Cheerful 63 year young female
to care for female. Errands,
cooking & personal care for or
with you! Call 941-916-8034.
PRIVATE DUTY CNA, +20
years experience, provides total
in home care. 941-416-8239
SENIORS HELPING SENIORS
Light Housekeeping, Meals,
Errands and Companionship
Licensed & Bonded
941-257-8483
ADVERTISE
In
The Classifieds!

CHILD CARE
5051


ALL CHILDCARE
FACILITIES MUST INCLUDE,
WITH ADVERTISEMENT,
STATE OR LOCAL AGENCY
LICENSE NUMBER.
FLORIDA STATE LAW
requires all child care centers
and day care businesses to
register with the State of Flori-
da. The Sun Newspapers will
not knowingly accept advertis-
ing which is in
violation of the law


COMPUTER SERVICE
5053

COMPUTER TUTOR
(Your home or mine)
ONLY $25.00 an hour!
Please call Steve at:
941-445-4285
1A+ COMPUTER REPAIR,
TUTOR IN YOUR HOME
Reasonable & Prompt!
Sr. Disc. Ask for Stacy
941-451-3186
EXPRESS COMPUTER
REPAIR
Low Flat Rate. 7 Days!
Tech 10 Yrs. Exp!
(941)-830-3656 Lic./lns.


Repair and Virus Removal
Free Saturday Class 10:30
Courses & Private Lessons
635 Tamiami Trl N, Nokomis
goodhandscomputers.com


FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!
JDS COMPUTERS
Affordable Repair!
FREE Computer Check!
GOING MOBILE IN JUNE!
941-764-3400


L CONCRETE
5057


A-1 ROOF CLEANING
& COATINGS
Decorative Curbing,
Pool Deck, Lanai & Driveway
Coating, Epoxy Flake Garage
Floors, Poly Pebble Removal.
(941)-485-0037
CONCRETE
Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks,
House Slabs, Etc..
Decorative Options Available
Free Estimates
941-286-6415

Need a new
Home?
Look in the
Classifieds!
HIGH QUALITY LOW cost
Concrete Driveways, side-
walks and patios! We also do
Residential cleaning. (941)-
815-3451
RICH LANDERS
STUCCO, INC.
Honest, Reliable work!
LIC/INS New Const &
Remodels. Rusted bands
& wire lathe repair.
spraycrete & dry-wall
repair (941)-497-4553


CLEANING
SERVICES
4 5060

A CLEAN SWEEP Residen-
tial & Commercial Honest &
Reliable. Serving Sarsota
County. 941-223-0303
A&R PRO WINDOW
CLEANERS
In/Out, Tracks & Screens,
Also Vinyls, Clean & Polish,
H/W Team. Lic#25014 & Ins.
941-441-8658
Need a
new Ride?
Find it
in the
Classifieds!
MRS. CLEANING UP!
1st class cleaning Service!
Specials Now!
$10 off Window Cleaning
941-204-8057
www.mrscleaningup.com
Lic & Insured
QUALITY CLEANING, Sr
caregiver & organizer
comm. & res. 941-421-9232
RELIABLE CLEANING
Service, Husband/Wife team.
Homes, Condos, Mobiles,
941-286-5920 941-276-4935
Lic./ns.


CLEANING
SERVICES
5060

RESCENIAL &OFFICE CLEAI'WG
Consistent, Thorough, Affordable.
Sarasota-CharlotteLee County
Cal for Free Esmate: Clean Sveep
941-391-6645/941-380-0502
ELECTRICAL
5070


DRM ELECTRICAL
SERVICE,
"Plug Into Personalized Service"
Electrical Maintenance *
Repairs Troubleshooting *
941-480-0761 941-366-3646
INTEGRITY ELECTRIC
of Charlotte County.
FULLService Electical.
26 Yrs. Exp! Comm./Res.
(941)-628-1993
Lic# L06000046464
| Classified = Sales |

EXCAVATING/
BUSH HOG
5080

BUSH BUSTERS INC. Brush
Mowing, Bush Hogging, ALL
Mulching, Selective Clearing,
Tree & Stump Removal &
MORE! 941-456-6332 or
941-204-1665


............... .....
A A* *
































NEWSPAPERS






Thursday, June 13, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 7


HEATING & AIR
5090


AC/DC AIR CONDITIONING.
Free Service Call with repair.
$39 Maintenance Special.
941-716-1476 Lic#CAC1814367
HONEST AIR CONDITION-
ING & HEATING. Comm. &
Res. Serving Sarasota & Char-
lotte County. 941-423-1746
Lic. CA C056738
PLAY IT SAFE, CALL SAFE
HARBOR AIR for all your
cooling needs. 941-639-2665
lic#CAC1817356
S.O.S. Air
Conditioning
& Heating L.L.C
(941)-468-4956
L HOME / COMM.
IMPROVEMENT
5100

ABBEE PAVERS Driveways,
Pool Decks, Patio. Serving PG
& PC 941-639-5209 Lic. & Ins.
ALUMASERV INC Guaranteed!
Best prices in town
941-627-9244
BOB'S CABINET SOLU-
TIONS 35 yrs exp. All your
cabinet/counter top needs.
(941)-276-0599 Lic22535
CARPENTER, INC. Handyman
Rotten wood, doors, soffit, facia,
etc. Phil 941-626-9021 lic. & ins.
CARPENTER/HANDYMAN
BBB member/lic AAA 1200080
Call Bob at 941-204-4407
COASTAL KITCHENS
countertops/door & cab refacing
Call Victor (941)716-0917
COMPLETE DRYWALL
Hang, Finish, Patchwork, All
Textures, Paint. Matt Potter
941-232-8667Lic.& Ins CRC1328482
CUSTOM RESCREENING &
Repair and Pressure Washing.
Visa/MC (941)-979-0922
DAN THE HANDYMAN
Bath rm & kitchen remodels
Painting, Carpentry, Anything?
941-697-1642
DAVE'S HANDYMAN
Honest, Knowledgeable & Reli-
able. Call for all your needs,
Sm/Lg 941-628-8326 Lic/Ins


DAVID J. SHEPARD JR.,
OVER 20YRS IN CHARLOTTE
COUNTY Lic./INs.
Li #RR282811062
941-627-6954
941-456-6953
GUTTERS, 6" Seamless.
Ken Violette, Inc. (941)-
240-6699 Lic.CGC#60662/Ins.

( GET RESULTS
SUSE CLASSIFIED! )

GUTTERTOWN
Specializing in
5" & 6" gutters, Fascias,
Sofits, Seamless runs.
Call for FREE estimates!
Serving Sarasota County
941-525-3227
John's Rescreening &
Handyman Service. No Job
To Small, Free Estimates
Lic9341./Ins. 941-883-1381
PAYING TOO much to keep
your house COOL? Call
Hammer for all your Insulation
needs. Henry 941-268-5615
cell or office 941-423-7478
SELL'S ALUMINUM L.L.C.-
6" Seamless Gutters.
*Rescreens*Front Entries*36
Yrs. Exp! Greg 941-234-8056
or 941-497-4450 Lic. & Ins.
Servicing Sarasota County


SLIDING GLASS DOOR
Wheel repairs. Free
Estimates Lic/Ins. Bob @
941-706-6445

TILE (Ceramic), Wood Floor-
ing, Installation. Robert Jones
Ceramic Tile (941)-204-2444
Lic. #AAA006338/Ins.


HANDYMAN
Home repairs. 30+ yrs Exp.
Call 941- 539-1694
TILE remodel, baths, floors.
your tile or mine. (941)-625-
5186,628-0442Lic.#AAA006387
TOM'S HOME IMPROVEMENT
& HANDYMAN SERVICE.
No JOB to BIG or small!
941-408-3954
WE SELL & INSTALL Pavers,
Curbing,Concrete,Rock,Mulch,
DISCOUNT ROCKS
941-623-6192 Lic. 1100002010
WILLY D'S HOME Improve-
ments, Inc. for all your Building
needs. (941)-716-3351


& TREE
5110

AN OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE
may be required by the City
and/or County. Please call the
appropriate occupational licens-
ing bureau to verify
A COMPLETE TREE CARE CO.
TREMENDOUS TREE
Trust your lawn to an
ISA Certified Arborist
John Cannon FL-6444A
Tree sales, prune, install,
design, removal, stump grind-
ing
Free Estimates, 10% Sr. Discount
South Sarasota & Charlotte Co.
941-426-8983
www.northporttree.com

A JAMISON TREE SERVICE
Complete & Professional
15% Sr Discount!
FREE EST. LIC. & INSURED
ENGL 941-475-6611
OR N. PORT 941-423-0020


LAWN & ORDER
Lawn Service! Free
Estimates & Landscaping!
Free Yard of Mulch with
any service! 941-257-8606
Baldwin Tree Service -
Quality work @ fair
pricing! Owner operated!
Free Est. 941-786-6099
EXPERIENCED LANDSCAPER
Pruning & transplanting
plants, Pressure Washing &
TRUCK FOR HIRE
941-876-3097
FAMILY TREE SERVICE Tree
Trimming, Free Estimates. Call
Today 941-237-8122. Lic/Ins.
FLORIDA TREE &
GROUND LAWN CARE
*Weekly Monthly *Yearly
*Commercial/Residential *
*Serving Charlotte Co. 12+ Yrs! *
941-613-3613
pctfltree.com Lic./Ins.
FLORIDA TREE INC.
Tree Trimming & Removal .
*Stump Grinding *
*Lawn Service .
*Bucket Service .
941-613-3613
pctfltree.com Lic./Ins.
GENERAL LAWN, landscape
services. (941)-426-7844
Wright & Son Landscaping Inc
HILLBILLY HANDYMAN'S
LAWN MOWIN' &
HOME FIXIN '
REAL HONEST WORK WITH
OLD FASHION INTEGRITY!
LIC/INs
CALL BILLY 941-979-7458
HOOPS LAWN SERVICE
Full Lawncare & Landscaping
941-258-8175
JIM BLAIS LAWN MAINT
OVER 15 YRS EXP. NOW
ACCEPTING NEW ACCTS.
941-9154677
LAWN REPLACEMENT
No Job Too BIG or Too small
Maloney's Sod
941-637-1333
PROFESSIONAL Tree Ser-
vice. Stump Removal, Palm &
Hedge Trimming. Free Esti-
mates! 941-624-4204 Lic
#001053


& TREE
5110


REMOVE THAT LUMP!
CALL J&J STUMP
GRINDING!
*REASONABLE PRICING*
Veterans & Senior
Discounts
941-626-4283 or
941-223-7515
SANDEFURS-HOME & TREE
Maintenance Tree trimming,
removal. We do it all!
License/Insured941-484-6042
SHARKS TOOTH
CONSTRUCTION &
LANDSCAPE SERVICES
*Pavers* *Lawn Mowing*
Best rates in area!
941-219-8741
www.sharkstoothservices.com
TJ MILAZO SR. 941-475-
0058 LAWN CUTTING
MOST LAWNS. $25-$30.
EXPERTLY DONE IN ENGLEWOOD ,
ROTONDA & CAPE HAZE
TJ MILAZZO JR.
941-830-1005
LAND CLEARING, LANDSCAPE
ALL KINDS OF CONCRETE WORK.
BOAT DOCK & SEAWALL REPAIR
Tommy's Tree & Property
Service *Trim & remove
*Complete lawn care.
Lic/ins. (941)-809-9035
VETERANS AFFORDABLE
LAWN & landscaping Com-
mercial & Residential. All
aspects. 941-447-2428

MASSAGE THERAPY
5119


PAIN MANAGEMENT
by Massage Therapy
3746 Tamiami Trail, Port Charlotte
Just South of Post Office,
near Conway Blvd.
NEW PHONE: 941-258-0714

MARINE REPAIR
5121




MOBILE MARINE
MECHANIC INC.
Inboards & Outboards
& PWCs.
GM EFI Engine Sales & Serv.
941-625-5329

MASONRY
5129


AST MASONRY, 941-5252435
OVER 20 YRS EXP. IN PAVERS, BRCKWORK,
CONCRETE, STUCCO, STONE & DECORATIVE
CONCRETE. NO JOB TOO SMALL!
LICENSED, INSURED & BONDED

MOVING/HAULING
5130


ALL TYPES OF CLEAN-UPS!
Same Day Service! 24 Hrs. a
Day! 941-764-0982 or 941-
883-1231
MOVING HELP
Save $$
Packing Loading Driving
30 yrs exp. 941-223-6870
SKIP'S MOVING
Local & Long Distance.
1 Item or Whole House!
941-766-1740
Reg.# IM1142 Lic/Ins

PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
LZ 5140

r ------------------- |

BEST PRICES -- QUALITY JOB
Best Coast Painting
Residential/Commercial
Handyman services also!
100/% Off With Ad!
941-815-8184
AAA00101254
L---------------------J


PAINTING/
WALLPAPERING
11Z 5140

STEVEN'S CUSTOM PAINT-
ING Res/Comm. IntExt
FREE EST.
Lic. & Ins. 941-255-3834


50% OFF
Call Now to Lock in an
Amazing Bang For Your Buck
From a Seasoned Painter
941-468-2660
AAA00101266
FORMER FIREFIGHTER
A-1 ROOF CLEANING &
COATINGS-
Ext. & Int., Comm., & Res.,
Warranties! Free Estimates!
(941)-485-0037
CT LANE PAINTING
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
FREE ESTIMATES VETERANS &
SENIOR DISCOUNT
941-255-0045 OR
941-628-5297
CUSTOM PAINTING
Wallpaper Removals
FREE ESTIMATES
35 Years Experience
Call Daniel
941-323-5074
Licensed & Insured
LALOR PAINTING, Res. &
Comm. Also floors, Ref. Lic &
Inc. Free Estm. 941-270-1338
LARRY ESPOSITO PAINTING
INC "It's Not What We Do, It's
How We Do It!"Free Estimates,
10% off Senior & Veterans
941-764-1171 lic & insured
AAA007825
MIKE DYMOND
Quality Painting
941-544-0764

Nathan Dewey Painting Co
Commercial & Residental
Interior & Exterior
Pressure washing
Handyman Services
Free Estimates Prompt Service
941-484-4576
PAINTING UNLIMITED
Where Quality & Value Meet
Call Now for a FREE Estimate
941-979-7947
Lic. & Ins. AAA-12-00015
SHAWN CHRISTIE PAINTING &
PRESSURE WASHING
FREE ESTIMATES ~ MENTION THIS
AD TO RECEIVE $10 OFF EVERY
$100 SPENT! LIC/INS
941-321-3573
SUPERIOR PAINTING, INC.
941-474-9091
Full Spray Shop Lie # AAA009837
WAYNE PATTON PAINTING
PRESSURE WASHING & REMOD-
ELING. WE DO IT ALL. 30 YRS
EXP. LIC/INS. 941-380-0728

PET CARE
L 5155


DOG CARE- by day/week,
exercise, fenced, loving home
environment. 941-625-0853

FIND YOUR
BEST FRIEND
IN THE
CLASSIFIED!

PLUMBING
S5160


ALL PRO WATER HEATERS
Residential-Commercial
QUALITY SERVICE
Affordable Pricing
(941) 463439, (239) 5490340
Licensed & Insured
www.allprowaterheaters.com
LARRY'S PLUMBING, Re-
Pipes (Most in 1 Day) Beat Any
Estimate Complete Service
941-484-5796 Lic.#CFC1425943
THINK PLUMBERS
are too high? Give me a try!
Retired Master Plumber.
Ross (941) 204-4286
Lic. RF11067393


POOL SERVICES
5165


ALL'S PARADISE
POOL SERVICE
Preventative Maintenance
Saves You Money & Avoids
Long Term Problems.
941-426-6500
AZTECH POOLS
Personalized
Complete Pool Serv. & Repair
Lic/Ins. 941-585-1711
GLENS POOL SERVICE
*Repairs* Chlorine Generators
*Pumps & Motors Heat Pumps .
*Weekly Maintenance .
941-809-5121 Lic./Ins
Strong Pool Services
REPAIRS & SERVICE
motors, filters, leaks, tile,
decks, heat pump
Insured & Licensed
Res. & Comm. 941-697-8580
RP0067268

L PRESSURE
CLEANING
5180

BAILEY'S PRESSURE
CLEANING Tile roof Clean-
ings starting at @$150.
Call 941-497-1736
BENSON'S SOFT WASH
CLEANING. Pool Cages,
Lanais, Driveways, Window
Washing..ETC! 941-697-1749
or 941-587-5007
BensonsSoftRoofWash.com

SCREENING
L 5184


ALL ABOUT ALUMINUM &
SCREEN: Rescreen & new.
941-876-4779 wescreenflori-
da.com Lic# SA37, AL0511993X
RANDY HASKETT SCREENING
POOL CAGES, LANAI'S, ENTRY
WAYS, LIC. & INSURED 25YRS.
EXP 941-809-1171
RESCREENING by NORTH-
STAR Free Estimates. 941-
460-8500 or 863-221-9037
Lic# CC20597
RESCREENING Special
$55 Tops, $30 Sides.
Complete $1295 (to 1500SF)
941-879-3136 Lic.
22454/Ins.
THE SCREEN GAL & FRIENDS
Quality Rescreening. Guaran-
teed. VISA & M/C accepted.
#CBC1256778
941-626-7282
WRIGHT'S RESCREENING
QUALITY WORK AT GREAT PRICES!
FAST SERVICE! FREE ESTIMATES!
LIC/INS 941-916-2512 OR
941-575-7446

ROOFING
5185


A+ HOME TOWN ROOFER
Repairs, Roofing Replacement
30 Years Experience
Discounts to Seniors & Veterans
FREE Inspections & Estimates
Call Hugh, 941-662-0555
RM COATS CONSTRUCTION, INC.
LICENSE CCC #1325731& INSURED

PAUL DEAO ROOFING
PROTECTING YOUR BIGGEST
INVESTMENT. 22 YRS EXP. -
941-441-8943 Lc#1329187
R.L. TEEL ROOFING Reroofs
& repairs. insurance inspec-
tions Veterns Disc. Lic & insu.
941-473-7781 RC29027453
Roof Repairs Done Quickly
CW Haber,lnc,lic# CRC057413
Replacement avail.941-764-1418

ind your Best
Friend in the
Classifeds
STEVE'S ROOFING &
REPAIRS
Call Steve & See What
He Can Do For You!
Free Est. 941-625-1894
Lic. CCC1326838


WINDOW CLEANING
S5225


CLEAN WINDOWS
Over 30 Years doing
Windows, Pressure Washing
& Painting
Also available Wallpaper
Removal
941-493-6426 or
941-321-4845
WES' WINDOW WASHING,
INC. & Wes' Home watch
service Owned by the
Myers Family since 1982
941-625-1783

WINDOW REPAIR
S5226


Window & Sliding Glass
Door Repair & Replacement.
Rollers, Locks & Handles
U.S. Window 941-628-8579

6000
IN 1D<


MERCHANDISE

GARAGE SALES


6001 Arcadia
6002 Englewood
6003 Lake Suzy
6004 Nokomis
6005 North Port
6006 Port Charlotte
Deep Creek
6007 Punta Gorda
6008 Rotonda
6009 Sarasota
6010 South Venice
6011 Venice
6012 Out Of Area
6015 Flea Market
6020 Auctions

MERCHANDISE

6013 Moving Sales
6025 Arts & Crafts
6027 Dolls
6030 Household Goods
6035 Furniture
6038 Electronics
6040 TV/Stereo/Radio
6060 Computer Equip
6065 Clothing/Jewelry/
Accessories
6070 Antiques &
Collectibles
6075 Fruits/Veges
6090 Musical
6095 Medical
6100 Health/Beauty
6110 Trees & Plants
6120 Baby Items
6125 Golf Accessories
6128 Exercise/Fitness
6130 Sporting Goods
6131 Firearms
6132 Firearm Access.
6135 Bikes/Trikes
6138 Toys
6140 Photography/Video
6145 Pool/ Spa & Supplies
6160 Lawn & Garden
6165 Storage Sheds/
Buildings
6170 Building Supplies
6180 Heavy Constr.
Equipment
6190 Tools/Machinery
6220 Office/Business Equip
& Supplies
6225 Restaurant Supplies
6250 Appliances
6260 Misc. Merchandise
6270 Wanted to Buy/T rade

L ENGLEWOOD
GARAGE SALES
6002


OFRI.-SAT. 8-1 7162
Rosemont Dr. Moving.
Furniture, lots of misc. items.


Fnd it in the

lassiieds!






The Sun Classified Page 8 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2013


LOOK
FRI.-SAT., 6/14 & 6/15,
7:00 AM 5:00 PM
5848 TROPICAIRE BLVD

HUGE CHURCH
YARD SALE!!
WITH KIDS FAIR INCL.
FOOD, BAKE SALE,
LIVE MUSIC, GAMES
WITH PRIZES WITH FREE
BOUNCE HOUSES &
WATER SLIDE.

BRING THE KIDS,
SHOP AROUND, AND
HAVE A GREAT TIME!!

|.Estate t Sca
SAT. 8-5 1610 Goshen Rd.
household and garage con-
tents. Everything must go!
PT. CHARLOTTE/DEEP
CREEK GARAGE SALES
6006



FRI-SAT 9-3, SUN 9-1
22259 Priscilla Ave, 2 Homes
into 1 Sale: Furniture, Rugs,
kitchenware, pictures, linens &
ladies clothes, quilting & nee-
dle work material.
[FRI.-SAT. 8-12 361
Fairmont Terr.(off Peach-
land) Air compressor, table
saw, sandblaster, & lots more.
-FRI.-SAT. 8-3 1588
Abscott St. Fishing, house-
ware, hunting, guitar, love
seat, desks, and clothing.


FRI.-SAT. 8-4 732 Hartford
Dr. NW. Tools, Household,
Electronics, Lawn, Knick-
Knacks & MUCH...MUCH...MORE!!


FRI.-SUN. 8-? -: ll:s .
Deep Creek. Furniture,
Electronics, Decor & MUCH
MORE!! Everything Must Go!!


FRI.-SUN. 8AM-4PM 17535
Wing Ave. Household items,
furniture, tools, appliances,
TV's, EVERYTHING MUST GO!!!!
-]FRI.-SUN. 9-2 17105
Seashore Ave Port
Charlotte. Large variety of
all kinds of items


FRI.-SUN. 9-3 2":.L2'4 Hnil-
ton Av. BIG Estate sale!! Furni-
ture & household, LR, DR,
BDR, & much more!


Great Deals in

the Classifieds!



FRI.-SAT. 8-4 Corner
of Midway & Edgewater.
Something for everyone !


GARAGE SALES
6007


HOLD FOR SALE. ALL
MUST GO! Bedroom suites,
sofa & chair $25, Dining
able, etc. Call for Appt
941-637-8476

MOWSiNG SALE
FRI.-SAT. 8-4 downsizing, fur-
niture, kitchenware, pictures,
collectibles, lots of misc. stuff
1368 Jacana Ct. PGI


--SAT.-SUN. 8-1 25037
Airport Rd. Punta Gorda,
FL 33950. MOVING SALE!
STAND ALONE FREEZER AND
DINING ROOM SET MUST GO!
GREAT ASSORTMENT OF
TOOLS!

VENICE AREA
GARAGE SALES
6011


4JWgiGSAf
FRI-SAT 8:30-2 241 Wood-
ingham Tr. Chestnut Creek,
Household,tools,furniture,col-
lectibles, electronics & more!
ARTS AND CRAFTS
S6025


MOLDS + XTRAS, 15 lollipop
and candy. Most are Wilton $6
941-485-4662

DOLLS
6027


DOLL FRKLN.MINT 19"
DOLL/SCOOTER EXCOND
$65, OBO 941-426-4151
HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


2 RUBBER BACKED carpet
blue shag roll up can use any-
where $135 941-822-1429
4-LIGHT FIXTURE for bath,
brushed alum, 28"wx8"hx5"d,
excellent $15 941-743-2656
AIR PURIFIER Hunter
Permalife Like New $65
941-257-8489
AIR PURIFIER Ionic Pro, Mod
CA500B. Ex. condition. 2
available $40 941-763-9730
ARM CHAIR,LIGHT
colors, new, $85.00,
941-624-0928
BATH:TOWELS, S.CURTAIN,
soapdish, rug, etc. Brown,11
pcs/ $45 941-276-1881
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED PILLOWS: Ralph Lauren,
100% cotton cover, washable,
std. pr/ $10 941-276-1881
CARPET REMNANT:6'X6',
padding 6'x11'. Med blue
shag. Pr/ $25 941-276-1881
CHANDELIER PINEAPPLE
Chand, 4 light w/design. $75
941-429-8507
CHANDELIER,BRASS-CRYS-
TAL, 8 lights, chain, 15wx30h
$55, OBO 941-697-1110
COMFORTER SET TWIN
NEW. Blues, grays, white
5 Piece. $30 941-426-0760
COMFORTER, KING Very
Good condition $20 can send
picture 941-629-8955
COO COO CLOCK Made in
Germany. Needs work $30
941-257-8489
COOLER FOR bottled water,
hot & cold. $25 941-204-
1277
DECOR (ELEPHANTS,ETC)
conwaypoe@embarqmail.com
for photos $5 941-624-0364
DEHUMIDIFIER FRIGIDAIRE
70 Pints Excellent condition
$200 941-257-8489
(* clNEED A JOB?H )
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
DISHES NORITAKE
Bone China Service for 12
Lenore #6676
include. serv. pieces
$995 941-639-0661
ELEPHANT HEAD, Wood,
Hand carved, taxidermy style.
$150 941-429-8507
END TABLE beautiful walnut
w/drawer $45 941-928-5590


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


FLUORESCENT LIGHTS 4 ft
New in box $40, OBO 941-
697-111010
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
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and place your ad.
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(LOCAL) then click on
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At the end...you will NOT be
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ADVERTISE!
LAMP PERSIAN Marble base
with brass, ceramic, paisley
inlay. $30 239-204-1473
LAMPS MIRRORED W/PALM
TREES Nice $100, OBO 941-
347-8825
LIGHT FIXTURE,Wall,48" long
chrome, work area or mirror. 8
lights. $25 941-740-3286
MATTRESS, QUEEN & BOX.
Brand New Will Sell $175.
Also Have KING.
941-629-5550
MICROWAVE, LARGE
counter top still in box... $125,
OBO 941-258-2175
MIRROR, 36wx50h Light
maple frame, brass trim, bevel
edges $25 941-743-2656



Enter your classified ad online
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SUNMfe




NIGHT LIGHT: Large, heavy
coral/seashell/starfish. Very
Florida. $25 941-276-1881
ORIENTAL MINIATURE Silk
Bonsai Tree in black rectangu-
lar dish. $12 941-276-1881
PANTRY, ALMOND color
80"x24" wide $65
941-204-1277
PATIO TABLE 4 chairs(iron)
$25 941-204-1277
PLASTIC SHELVING (2)4 tier,
24 x 36 shelving, good garage
storage. $35 941-766-0780
POT RACK 36 Inch Ceiling
Model, One in Box. Two
opened. $20 941-497-7175
REFRIGERATOR GE, CREAM,
SIDE by SIDE, $300, OBO
941-302-9444
SEWING MACH.,Singer Slant-
o-matic,Cabinet,chair & attach.
EC, $250 941-451-8383
SEWING MACHINE Singer,
Portable. $25 941-697-8373
SOFA 7' Rustic Orange CIr
Exc Cond Seldom used $225
941-697-8733
STEAM CLEANER SHARK
floor cleaner other part. $35,
OBO 941-822-3837
STOVE SMOOTH TOP GE,
cream, good condition $175,
OBO 941-302-9444


HOUSEHOLD GOODS
S6030


TABLE DARK PINE 2 leaves,
60"x43" $75, OBO 941-961-
7095
TABLE LAMP 36" brown solid
wood, tan shade, brass base,
nice $25, OBO 941-743-2656
TABLE, DINING ROOM wood,
48x36, 4 chairs $150, OBO
941-961-7095
TROPICAL ART (pr) Coastal
Breeze/SummerBreeze very
pretty $59 941-276-1881
TUNER, DIGITAL TV get
more channels free $45, OBO
941-822-3837
VACUM CLEANER DYSON
JUG NEW IN BOX $20 941-
624-6617
VACUUM CLEANER Filter
Queen, very good condition.
$150 941-204-1697
VACUUM CLEANER, Filter,
attachments, very good cond.
$150 941-204-1697
VACUUM, Kirby Sentra, All
attachments Pd. 2150, $500
828-777-5610 (cell)
WALL CLOCK 27HX14W
WALHAM 31-DAY CHIME CHER-
RY. $50 941-875-6271
WASHER WHIRLPOOL white
ex/c $200 941-661-8670
WHITE WICKER-LOOK Patio
Chairs. NEW (in orig.wrapping)
4/ $220 941-276-1881
WINE GLASSES (8) Waterford
Brookside new in box nice gift
$70 214-906-1585
WINE RACK, commercial,
chrome plate hold 168 botls
$60 941-255-0874
S HOLIDAY ITEMS
S6031


COMFORTER SET King. New.
Holiday Snowmen/snowflakes
$30 941-426-0760
COUCH 80" good condition
$25 941-585-1040
FURNITURE
4 6035


A FURNITURE SHOPPE
LIQUIDATION SALE!
941-473-1986
ACCENT TABLE Glass top
$35 941-833-8314
ARMOIR- LIGHTLY USED
48"WX28"DX7'5"T wood
rain. Holds 42" flat screen TV
250, OBO 941-488-4920
ARMOIRE TV/CABINET dark
oak 42w72h22d $25 941-
626-6827
BARSTOOLS 3, French Coun-
try design w/backs, 30" high.
$75 for all. 941-697-3988
BDROOM SET Qn headbrd, 2
bedsd tables,dresser,lt.yellow,
bamboo $100 859-466-9572
BEAUTIFUL FRENCH provin-
cial sofa, $250. Table, chairs
& buffet $650 863-494-4546
BED MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
BED ROOM SET 6 PC Mir-
rored headboard w/large triple
mirrored dresser large armoire
2 night stands solid wood
Stanley Furniture blonde stain
$400, OBO 941-624-3931
BED, King, Vanity Dresser, 2
Night Stands & Comforter.
$200. obo 941-426-3494
BEDROOM SET 6 piece,
queen, oak set $450. Also 5
piece Kitchen set $125
941-661-5860
BEDROOM SET Dresser+mir-
ror, chest, end tables, double
bed $300 941-769-1163
BEDROOM SET, Queen, 5
Piece. Broyhill, Light Oak $250
941-629-1216
BEDROOM SUITE Full bed
mat & box.incl dresser (blonde
colored) $125 540-622-4414


i FURNITURE
4 6035


BED TWIN Excellent condi-
tion $50 941-769-1163
BEDROOM SUITE Queen
4-piece w/mattress $150
941-637-8476
BISTRO SET 3-piece set. EC.
Charcoal. T-26"Rd. $75 941-
875-6271
BLACK GLASS/METAL TV
STAND 58Lx20Dx24H $100
630-664-8860
BOOK CASE 4 shelves
30"x60"cherry $75 941-766-
7466
BOOK CASES (2), Lit, pine
wood, 77x32, $200/both OBO
941-474-6752
BROWN LOVESEAT and
couch needs cleaned $80
941-769-1275
BUNK BED single over double
frame, great shape may deliv-
er $200, OBO 941-830-4830
CABINET, DISPLAY Med. Oak
w/glass shelves. 29x60x12.
$65 941-875-6271
CAPTAINS BEDROOM SET
New, twin, white wicker/rattan,
$495 828-777-5610 (cell)
CHAIR, LLOYD/FLANDERS
Ex. Cond. Ash Wicker. $300
OBO 941-575-4364
CHEST WITH 5 drawers
54x36x17 light birch finish. Ex
condition. $45 214-906-1585
CHINA CABINET 79x43x18
light color with interior light
$99 214-906-1585
CHINA CABINET washed
oak, mirrored back $300, OBO
941-882-3139
CHINA CLOSET very good
condition $325 941-408-
4409
CHINA CLOSET walnut
w/glass doors and shelves.
$150 941-429-8507
COFFEE & 2 END TABLES
Beautiful BIk w/grey $50 941-
426-7598
COFFEE & End Tables &
Chest Mirrored w/Gold wd trim
$490, OBO 941-347-8825
COFFEE & End Tables 4'X2'
(2) 2'X2' $150, OBO 941-624-
3512
COFFEE & END Tables,
beveled glass w/brushed
metal. $250 941-876-4303
COFFEE TABLE and 2 End
Tables $25 941-637-8476
COFFEE TABLE and sofa
table set. Oak w/beveled
glass. very nice. $110
941-639-0468
COFFEE TABLE Broyhill
Oval Glass on Metal Base
$150 941-833-8314
COFFEE TABLE Dolphin
base, 38" round glass top
$55 941-484-7208
COFFEE TABLE vintage rat-
tan w/inset glass top $75
214-906-1585
COMPUTER DESK with file
drawer & hutch $25 941-769-
1163
COUCH AND love seat Light
tan. Like new $350, OBO 941-
875-2505
CURIO CABINET Cherry
56x73x12.Gls Shivs. Mint
Con. $499 941-875-6271
CURIO w/Lite $225; Sm coffee
table w/draw, matching 2-end
tables w/draws $65, 941681-1002
DESK, Ethan Allen, dark wood
very nice $150 941-474-
1036
DINING ROOM SET light
wood (Blonde) Glass top 4
chairs 80"x46", matching buf-
fet 49Lx17D 6 draw 2 deep 4
regular Englewood area $200
941-475-2533
DINING ROOM 42x64 baeuti-
ful glass table w/6 chairs
$125, OBO 941-473-2173
DISPLAY CABINET nice size
72x24x9.5 light color interior
light $69 214-906-1585


FURNITURE
6035


COUCH LIME green 80" nice
clean $60 941-769-1275
ELECTRIC LIFT recliner. like
new, hardly used. $400 OBO
914-659-0908
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Dk wood, Italian, new, Pd
5000 $295 828-777-5610 (Cell)
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Lited Glass Top Whitewash
$150 941-766-1198
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Solid oak, rollers & 2 glass
doors. New 1200, sell $200
exc. cond. 941-483-0702
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Solid Pine. 2 towers/adj.
bridge $200 941-457-6588
FOLDING 2 A-Frame bookcas-
es Very good condition $45
941-625-2311
FUTON QUALITY with thick
mattress may deliver $100,
OBO 941-830-4830
FUTON, RATTAN, Custom
Tan Cover with pineapples.Like
New $250 941-451-8383
GLASS TABLE Dining Room 6
Parsons Chairs Excellent Con-
dition $450 941-255-7813
GLASS TABLE, Dining Room
with dark green, padded chairs
$150, OBO 941-391-4628
GLASS TOPPED stone tables.
very decorative $100 ea. or
$250 for 3. 914-659-0908
GLASS/BRASS COFFEE
Table 12 sides Ex Cond $300
OBO 941-575-4363
HUTCH ALL wood $50 941-
306-7004
I BUY FURNITURE
Or anything of value!
941-485-4964
KING SIZE mattress white
cottage style headboard, foun-
dation. $165 941-625-2311
KITCHEN SET 5 piece
on casters. Oak, $175
941-697-8373
LANAI Set 9-pc $125; Stor-
age rack $20; File Cabinet
$20, Cedar shoe rack $18;
941-235-9600
LANAI SET creamy tan, faux
wicker, oval glass top, 4 swivel
chairs, $350 941-625-7135
LIVING ROOM Set couch,
chair, end tables, lamps
$495, OBO 941-391-4628
LOUNGE CHAIR Choc. Brown
Micro Fiber Like New $200,
OBO 941-639-4936
LOVE SEAT Choc.Brown Miro
Fiber,Very Comfortable $200,
OBO 941-639-4936
LOVE SEAT, Very Good Condi-
tion. Off white fabric, $75,
OBO 941-961-7095
LOVE SET & Matching Chair
Traditional Floral stripe. Mint
cond. $300 941-875-6271
LOVESEATS MATCHING 2
Fabric Great Conditon $300
941-255-7813
MATTRESS & BOX.
New Will Sell $100.
941-629-5550
MATTRESS QUEEN Pillow-
top, Like new, Port Charlotte
$200 207-745-9176
MIRROR carolina ornate
4'x2'.beveled glass.new. $75,
OBO 941-235-2203
PARSON CHAIRS 4 excel.
cond $200 941-979-6974
PATIO CHAIRS Hampton Bay
6 straight back 2 swivel back
$120 941-815-2387
PATIO SET Rattan wicker,
Loveseat, 2 chairs coffee &
end table $450 941-423-6075
PATIO SET Wicker Luvseat 2
chrs coffee & end tble $100
618-910-2262
PATIO TABLE and 4 Chairs
Sling Blue/Wht stripe, glass
table. $100 941-627-1973
PILLOWTOP QUEEN, MAT-
TRESS SET "NEW" $350
941-894-9337





Thursday, June 13, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 9


Challenger

DIRECTIONS: ?/
Fill each square with a number, one through nine. /tc'Al-
* Horizontal squares should add to totals on right.
* Vertical squares should add to totals on bottom.
* Diagonal squares through center should add to u
total in upper and lower right. 1


THERE MAY BE MORE
THAN ONE SOLUTION.
Today's Challenge
Time 7 Minutes
O Seconds
Your Working
Time Minutes
Seconds


3 21
2 19

2 13
6 27

18 26 20 16 21


2013 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.
.oiution t-1i- 23

Yesterday's / 1 13
/ 97 1 S 24
Challenger 17
Answers 7 17 27 14 17


Cryptoquip 2011 by King Features Syndicate

6-13


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TMU QFD PDCQISYUQF FDDVF

RU EPBL RMD FMDPP CBID

BZD RZBE-EDBF BZRSFRF.
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: BECAUSE I WANTED
TO KNOW HOW MUCH BEEF THE DINER DISH
HAD, I ASKED "WHAT'S IN IT FOR MEAT?"
Today's Cryptoquip Clue: R equals T

MARMADUKE By Brad Anderson


I /F
7,


BEETLE BAILEY By Mort Walker
I KNOW YOU'RE
A NEAT FREAK,
JULIUS










HAGAR THE HORRIBLE By Chris Browne


THE WIZARD OF ID By Brant Parker and Jo
I Nf A-R
TRF KINO /MAY BF
TREFPEATING THA
INSTITUTINOG WANTA- I
A\AORE CUTBA-K \ AAir, l


MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM By Mike Peters
ruommm -ml,mw-.-....--


"I can tell you're interested in
my sandwich."


SPORTS
SLEUTH
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NKA


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NMY E

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OU.S. OPEN (GOLF)
CHAMPIONS


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SYWTRO

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E OIPIM U V K E


B WI S H A L


R Y P Y 0 R L I


WU R S D S B MG

N L L N S TAW


D KG Q P

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CEAYOONCCXV IMUS

QPNMWKG J HFE NC B Z
Wednesday's unlisted clue: FARMER
Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions -
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally.
Thursday's unlisted clue hint: SOUTH AFRICAN ERNIE
Cabrera Goosen Mcllroy Simpson
Campbell Hogan Nicklaus Watson
Furyk Kite Ogilvy Woods
Glover McDowell Palmer


2013 King Features, Inc.


6/13


PICKLES By Brian-- -Cran
PICKLES By Brian Crane


B.C. By Mastroianni & Hart


I F HE COME OVE9
H HERE, VL CI)Vf HIM /
/MINE




M4
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Ie"e --





The Sun Classified Page 10 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2C:0 13


You can find every business and service under the

sun in the Business & Service Directory!

Make your business a part of it! Call 866.463.1638


SUAN NEWSPAPERS


There is help for those

with parkinson's disease


DEAR DR. ROACH:
A friend of mine has
Parkinson's disease. She
is 90 years old and has
been very active for her
age, but recently she has
not enjoyed life as much
as she had. What do you
know about Parkinson's?
Are there any cures or
relief? -WW.
ANSWER: Parkinson's
disease is caused by loss
of dopamine in cells in
a deep area of the brain.
The cells are responsible
for smooth, coordinated
movement. As a con-
sequence, people with
Parkinson's usually have a
tremor, a rhythmic shak-
ing of the hands while
at rest, often worse on
one side. "Pillrolling" is a
characteristic movement
of the forefinger and
thumb. Muscles become
rigid, and as the disease
progresses, the muscle
rigidity causes people
with Parkinson's to get
"frozen," unable to move
at all for a few seconds or
longer.
Slow movement is
common. The gait can
become shuffling, which
can predispose the
patient to falls.
Parkinson's disease
affects more than a
million North Americans
and usually is diagnosed
in people over 60. Those
diagnosed younger than
age 60 frequently have a
more rapidly progressive
form, but the disease is
variable.
Often, the face shows
less emotion than before
the diagnosis, but it's
predominately an effect
of Parkinson's on the
muscles of the face, not
a lack of emotion. I have
had patients become very
frustrated with the inabil-
ity to show their feelings
- or perhaps I should say
with others' inabilities to
read their emotions.
There are many treat-
ments for Parkinson's
disease, and they can
bring dramatic relief
even if there isn't a cure.
Sinemet is one medicine
that helps by restoring
dopamine to the brain,
but there are now many
others. In my opinion,
Parkinson's disease
should always be evalu-
ated and treated by an
expert, usually a neurolo-
gist with special expertise


Dr. Roach
Readers may
write Dr
Roach at
PO. Box
536475,
Orlando,
FL 32853-6475
in movement disorders.
DEAR DR. ROACH:
My granddaughter was
recently diagnosed with
Von Willebrand's disease.
Do you have any infor-
mation on this disease or
its treatment? R.G.
ANSWER: Von
Willebrand disease
(vWD) is bleeding
disorder. About 1 per-
cent of the population
has the condition, but
only about 1 percent of
those who have it get
appreciable symptoms.
Von Willebrand disease
is caused by the lack of
a blood clotting protein
(von Willebrand factor),
and shows up as easily
bruised skin or mucosa
bleeding (bleeding in
areas such as the gums,
stomach or uterus).
There are several
subtypes of vWD, and
because the range of
severity is so large, it's im-
possible to say just how
much any one person will
be affected. Most often,
people with vWD don't
need treatment unless
they have significant
bleeding or are planning
surgery. Treatment is usu-
ally with dDAVP which
can be given as a nasal
spray or by injection.
VWD is related to
hemophilia, but usually
isn't as severe. Both are
treated by hematologists.
The National Hemophilia
Foundation has much
more information. You
can find it on the Internet
at www.hemophilia.org.
Dr Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer
individual letters, but
will incorporate them
in the column when-
ever possil,:' Readers
may e-mail questions to
ToYourGoodHealthmed.
cornell.edu or request an
order form of available
health newsletters at PO.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. Health news-
letters may be ordered
from www.rbmamall.com.


~pkivng-fw th~e
defectct

.0Pi7,rc Iim j7Z tlze


ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman


MANKS FOR
WATCHINGME
PO YOGA,
JF-IF- IMI(


GARFIELD By Jim Davis
HELLO. I'M THE AGE 1
NIGHTMARE SCHEPULEP I
FOR THIS EVENING r


FRESHLY SQUEEZED By Ed Stein
MY COMIC BOOKS! SUPIGZMAN
I WONPCRCIP MXYZPTI
WHE0E THEY WIEZE! IMP Fi

1 THINK YOU WANT THE
GUO IN THE 6EPROOM
POWN THE HALL

0 THANK YOUJ
S VERY MUCH


MARY WORTH By Karen Moy and Joe Giella
A HORRIFIEP EL.INOR HAS |r
PREAMT THAT BETH TURNS
INTO A BITTER CREATURE
LIKE HERSELF! *

.AwA it 4<0"


EA-IM--- AV -C- v 1- -
DILBERT By Scott Adams

THE SOFTWARE YOU
SOLD US STOPPED
WORKING AFTER A
WEEK. WHAT'S UP
WITH THAT?


PRETTY
POLITE,
FOR A
8ALP \ \
SPOT


U


WE USE A THIRD-
PARTY LIBRARY, AND
IT ISNT COMPATIBLE
WITH THE NEW VER-
SION OF WINDOWS.


BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY ~ I;Y I~


s 1 u r',,,- -A M-. ,






Thursday, June 13, 2013 ads .you rsun net EINIC The Sun Classified Page 11


Look for the g

Directory pul

Saturday ii



SUNNEWSPAPERS
NEWSPAPERS


t aer deals in the Business & Ser e


blishing Sundays, Wednesdays, and

n the Classified Section of the Sun!


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


BORN LOSER By Art and Chip Sansom

7 51G T...hOTEI. N0
7SEEAS TO .GY 601
PR iGiT tFDRO t
TR~Seb5S! y


i E i Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A: IIIXI
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: VISOR CIVIL DRAGON RELENT
Answer: The gold mine turned out to be a bust, but
thankfully, there was a SILVER LINING

Baking soda might need help


Dear Heloise: My
freezer and fridge smell!
I do have boxes of baking
soda in both, yet they still
smell moldy. What do I
do? E. Reed, via fax
Simply putting a box
of baking soda in the
fridge probably won't do
it. There are many other
causes for such a smell.
Start by checking for
leaky containers and old
leftovers, and clean out
the veggie bins!
Then, using equal parts
white (or apple cider)
vinegar and water, wipe
down the inside of your
refrigerator. Wash the
walls, bins and shelves.
Go ahead and put a
new box of baking soda
(or a bowl of baking soda
on a shelf) in to help
absorb future odors. For
more great timesaving
and money-saving hints
using vinegar and baking
soda, order my two pam-
phlets by sending $8 and
a long, self-addressed,
stamped (86 cents)
envelope to: Heloise/
Baking Soda/Vinegar, PO.
Box 795001, San Antonio,
TX 78279-5001. Keep in
mind that the baking soda
in the refrigerator should
be replaced often, and
do not use it for cooking
afterward! The odors it
absorbed could transfer
into your food! Heloise

Corner helper
Dear Heloise: I have
a hint for if you have an
area rug where one of the
comers starts to curl up.
Find a circular metal washer


BABY BLUES By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
I PUPPi WJOU'tl'T OUMWL? \T JUST T P\TIE.c, LOOE- HO
E TUART 14 MR TO Wi E- Bh69lE D OOP ypS au,
TIzMN,U ND, I I.-), ,---


Hints from Heloise

the size of that comer of
the rug. Sew the washer to
the rug. The weight of the
washer will relax that comer.
- Diane W in Kentucky

Cleaning caps
Dear Heloise: Please,
please reprint the instruc-
tions on how to wash my
caps to remove the sweat
stains. I cut the column
out of the paper but lost
it. I have to save my caps!
- Esther M. in Texas
Just be sure the caps are
not old or valuable and
are washable.
You can wash them by
hand with gentle soap
and water, scrubbing
the inside stains with a
toothbrush. Rinse well
under running water,
then hang to dry or place
on an upside-down metal
bowl.
You also can use the top
rack of the dishwasher.
Take a clothespin to
secure each cap to the
top rack. Use the normal
amount of dishwasher
detergent, stop the
dishwasher after the
rinse cycle, remove the
caps and hang to dry.
- Heloise


FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE By Lynn Johnston
IM iT-LWLG-'VoO, RNNE... EFOR IGCT M
Afl4 LIZZIE STiLLSICK, DON" KNOU) oiWH
I FIlD STAYVlING HOME. To PrESF-,RV M
R RtAL CHORE.






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T





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Thursday, June i.3 20i.13


Learn signs of elder abuse to

prevent it from happening


DEAR ABBY: Thank you
for all you do to keep our
seniors safe. Saturday,
June 15, is World Elder
Abuse Awareness Day. On
that day, communities in
the USA and all over the
world will sponsor events
to highlight the growing
tragic issue of elder abuse.
Your readers young
and old should
know that the U.S.
Administration on Aging
estimates that as many as
5 million seniors are
abused or neglected each
year in the United States.
Elder abuse can be
physical, emotional,
financial and sexual. It also
includes people who are
neglected. Elders who are
abused are twice as likely to
be hospitalized, four times
as likely to go into nursing
homes and three times as
likely to die.
Elder abuse can be pre-
vented if everyone would
learn the warning signs and
report it to Adult Protective
Services or the police if
they suspect it is happen-
ing. MARY TWOMEY,
MSW UNIVERSITY OF
CALIFORNIA-IRVINE
DEAR READERS: I was
dismayed to learn that
90 percent of elder abuse
happens at the hands
of a family member or a
caregiver. The descriptions
of the kinds of treatment
these elderly adults experi-
ence are frightening, and
frankly, not suitable for
readers of all ages. That is
why I am urging readers to
get more information on
this important subject by
visiting www.ncea.aoa.gov.
We can all stop this
scourge if we know what to
look for and are willing to
speak up when we see the
warning signs. There, but
for the grace of God, go you
and I.
DEAR ABBY: I was mar-
ried to a wonderful man,
"Ted," who was 20 years my
senior. In social situations
his adult children would
introduce me as "Dad's
wife" or "Ted's wife." Sadly,
my husband passed away,
and his children no longer
know how to refer to me
socially.
I was recently asked by
Ted's children how I wished
to be introduced, but I'm


Dear Abby

not sure. I don't think
"stepmother" is appropri-
ate because I'm only four to
seven years older than they
are. Do you have any ideas
as to what might be ap-
propriate? "MARILYN"
IN NEW JERSEY
DEAR "MARILYN": You
could be introduced as
"Dad's widow," "my late
father's wife" or simply by
your name.
DEAR ABBY: Some
friends are in the process of
adopting two children in-
ternationally. Early on, they
had a garage sale with the
proceeds going toward the
adoption. I was excited for
them and wanted to help.
However, this was soon
followed by more requests
- for yard sale donations,
two more garage sales,
the "opportunity" to buy
expensive coffee online,
a fundraising dinner, and
then a solicitation for me
and others to provide a
"virtual shower" of plane
ticket money.
Each time I am notified
about another fundraiser, I
feel less and less charitable.
I have never been asked for
money for the same thing
in so many different ways
in such a short time. While
I'm thrilled with their desire
to adopt, I am increasingly
disgusted and put off by
their continued pleas for
money. Am I wrong to be
so upset about this? A
LITTLE TICKED OFF
DEAR TICKED OFF: It
appears your "friends" are
taking advantage of your
generosity. It will continue
for only as long as you per-
mit it. Because the requests
for help are continuous,
are you absolutely sure
this couple is really in the
middle of the adoption
process and not using the
money for some other
purpose? Before donating
anything else, you should
find out.


"Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whoso-
ever is deceived thereby is not wise."-- Proverbs 20:1.
Alcohol specializes in making fools. Be wise and
keep your life pure from this mocker that destroys
homes, jobs and lives.


PEANUTS By Charles Schulz
50 9ERE I Y I'LL PROBALY'NO SOONER STEP
AM ON THE Bl I OFF THE BUB (rHEN I'LL GET
EALE FC. CROMPED BY A QUEEN NAKE.
." I ICP -A-P


CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers


JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and 3x3 block. Use logic and process elimination to solve the puzzle The difficulty
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).

2 1 4 8 9 Rating: BRONZE
5 Solution 1. t. 1. 1


4 8 3 2 3 6 52 7 4 19 8
2 1 6 4816 1 93
215 I 4 8 2 6 1 9 3 7 5

8 2 6 5 5293 8 74 6
674192583
6 9 1 3 8 1 3 4 5 6 7 2 9
S5 6 9 2 3 8 432
8 5 7 3 75692384
93 1748652
7 6 5 248561937

45 872 2
6/13/13

Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Tov 11 i I i 11


I HOROSCOPE I
ARIES (March 21-April 19).You specialize in what
others would call "tough situations." What they
don't know is that you find this work fun and easy.
You'll be praised foryour talent.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You're adaptable, but
you don't stray from your principles.This gives you a
confident footing on this uphill climb ofa day.These
are the kinds of challenges that keep you in shape.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Most of the boundaries
of the world are unseen, but those who own the ter-


foreign land in some sense. Ask where the lines are
drawn to avoid crossing the wrong boundaries.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).You will be compelled to
think carefully through your upcoming schedule. As
you picture each thing you will tend to, you will get
ideas as to what would make the experience better.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). How do you know whether
you've made a difference? Simple. Are things differ-
ent because you are there? If not, you need to speak
up, touch people, do something, change something.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Being a novice is fun.The


let it seduce you. It's important to be a master, too,
which you never get to be if you're always starting
something new.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You're feeling free and
a little rebellious. You inspire people to try and
encourage them to make mistakes, knowing that
eventually they'll come up with something good.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Act on the impulse to
make something out of nothing. Don't hesitate
because people around you aren't moving; they
can't see the opportunity. You see the potential in


ritory know where the lines are.You'll be exploring possibilities are endless. Enjoy that phase, but don't things that others are blind to.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).Your emotions will
warp the space-time continuum. A few minutes can
seem like an eternity if those minutes are spent in
fear. Minutes spent in joy, however, rush by.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.19).You'll improve on
your last outcome. Sure, you'd like to know what it's
like to be the winner over all. But the winner over
"self' is by far the most satisfying victory.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Enjoy the pride of
ownership you experience today. As you work on
this project, you know it's yours. But the minute it's
finished, it will belong to the world.


PISCES W I-,I l- I1jrl th in i j .- [, r..& i r. ,,I.h t,
y o u w e r i a h l, l ,i i i .ri i I ,, i iI, h j i U I
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Cancer a ird 'i j, ] r r I j.pl i.- r ..j ..ii r I i I
number. r, *i I\1s I






Thursday, June 13, 2013


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E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 13


Thursday Television


VEN-VENICE E-N-ENGLEWOOD SAR-SARASOTA PC-PORTCHARLOTTE ARC-ARCADIA SPG-SOUTH PUNTAGORDA


JUN.13EEf __E PRIME TIME
SJUN.3 7PI B M : 0IM I :P II ES3Be[M9l .0 0 M 10M3 1 PJ>*IE1
ABC7News World News To Be a To Be a Jimmy (31) NBA 2013 NBA Finals: Game 4: Miami Heat at San Antonio Spurs ABC7 News
ABC B 7 7 7 10 7 7 at6(N) Diane Sawyer Millionaire?Millionaire? Kimmel Live Countdown from AT&T Center (WLe) (HD) at 11 (N)
(N) (R) (R) Jack Black. (HD)
ABC7News World News The7 O'Clock Entertainent Jimmy (:31) NBA 2013 NBA Finals: Game 4: Miami Heat at San Antonio Spurs ABC7News
ABC 7 11 7 @6:00pm(N) Diane Sawyer News(N)(HD) Tonight(N)(HD) KimelLive Countdown from AT&T Center (Le) (HD) @11:00pm
(____N) Jack Black. (HD) (N)
WINKNews CBS Evening WINKNews Inside Edition The Big Bang 21/2 Men Person of Interest: Shadow (1) Elementary: Details WINK News Late Show
CBS 1 213213 5 5 5 at 6pm (N) (HD) News (N) (HD) at7pm(N) (HD)(N)(HD) Valentne's Walden's Box Reese's personal crusade Sherlock's open-and-shut at11pm(N) HarryConnick
Day. identties. for POI. (R case. (R) (HD) (HD) Jr.
10 News, CBS Evening Wheel: Jeopardy! (N) The Big Bang 21/2 Men Person of Interest: Shadow (01) Elementary: Details 10 News, Late Show
CBS 1010 lo6pm(N) News(N)(HD) America's (HD) Valentne's Waldens BoxReese'spersonalcrusade Sherlock'sopen-and-shut 11pm(N) HarryConnick
Game (N) Day. identies. for POI. (R case. (R) (HD) Jr.
NBC2News NBCNightly Wheel: Jeopardy! (N) Save Me SaveMe Save TheOffice Parks&Rec. (l0) Hannibal: Releves Abigail NBC2 News (:35)The
NBC 2232232 2 2 2 @6pm(N)(HD)News (N)(HD) America's (HD) Elder hospital.(N) plane Ron'stemper. islinkedtovictims.(N)(HD) @11pm(N) TonightShow
Game (N) neighbor. (R) contest.(R) (R) (HD) (N) (HD)
NewsChannel NBC Nightly NewsChannel Entertainment Save Me Save Me Save The Office Parks& Rec. (l0) Hannibal: Releves Abigail NewsChannel (35) The
NBC 8 8 8 8 8 at 6:0(N) News (N) (HD) 8at7:00 (N) Tonight (N)(HD) Eldery hospital.(N) Arplane Ron'stemper. is linkedto victims. (N) (HD) 8at 11:00(N) TonightShow
neighbor. (R) contest. (R) (R) (N)(HD)
FOX 4 News at Six Judge Judy Simpsons Hell's Kitchen: 6 Chefs Does Someone Have to Go?: FOX 4 News at Ten Local FOX 4 News Friends Joey
FOX 3222222 4 4 4 Community news; weather; (R) Compete Relay race amongst DFX, Part 2 Bottom three beg news report and weather at Eleven (N) uninsured.
traffic; more. (N) final sk. (N) (HD) for safety. update. (N)
FOX136:00 NewNews TMZ(N) omg!Insider Hell'sKitchen:6 Chefs DoesSomeone HavetoGo?: FOX1310:00 NewsThe FOX13News Access
FOX 13N 13 13 13 13 events of the day are reported. (N) (HD) Compete Relay race amongst DFX, Part 2 Bottom three beg top news stories are Edge(N) (HD) Hollywood(N)
__(N) (HD) __final sk. (N) (HD) for safety. updated. (N)(HD) )(HD)
BBCWodld Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) Great Performances: Broadway Musicals: A Jewish Carole King & James Taylor: Live at the My Music
PBS 3 3 3 3 News Business Legacy A look at why many Jewish artists have found Troubadour "It's Too Late" and "Sweet 1960s music
America Report(N) success with Broadway musicals. (R) Baby James." (R) (HD) groups.
BBCWold Nightly The PBS NewsHour (N) (HD) WEDU Arts Gulf Coast My Music: Country Pop Legends Country hits from the Celtic Thunder Mythology
WEDUI 3 3 3 3 News Business Plus (R) (HD) Journal 1950's, 1960's and 1970's performed by legends. (R) (HD) Historyand legends told
____ America Report (N) through songs. (R)
21/2 Men 21/2 Men The Big Bang Big Bang The Vampire Diaries The FWe Beauty and the Beast: WINK News @lOpm (N) (HD) How I Met How Met
CW M 1121 6 Waitress' Judith's Boyfriend Awkward Whitmore College; frat costume Basic Instinct Left for dead. Mystery Mother Zoey
affection. boyfriend. advice, hookup. party. (R) (HD) woman. enrolls.
Queens King of 21/2 Men Engagement The Vampire Diaries The Fie Beauty and the Beast: 21/2 Men Rules Friends Joey Friends
CW 9 9 9 4 Arthur's Queens White Wairess' Group road trip. Whitmore College; frat costume Basic Instinct Left for dead. Judith's Promotional uninsured. Rachel's
brother. (HD) Collar affection. party. ( (HD) boyfriend. video. (H) interview.
Raymond SeinfeldSusar Family Feud Family Feud White Collar Forging Bonds White Collar: What Happens Seinfeld The ScrubsJ.D.'s Baggage(HD) ExcusedCute
MYN S 11 11 11 14 Robert's foundation. (VPG) (R) (1VPG) (R) Nealand Peter explore their in Burma... Diplomat framed. "Jerry" pilot, day off. (1VPG) go-getter. (R
sessions. pasts. (HD) (HD)
Access Seinfeld Susar Family Guy American White Collar Forging Bonds White Collar: What Happens Family Guy Ameican Seinfeld The It's Always
MYN D 8 9 8 Hollywood (N) foundation. Schoolboard Dad!Body Neal and Peter explore their in Burma... Diplomat framed. Chicken fight. Dad!Steve "Jerry" pilot. Sunny Lost
(H)D) race. swa. ast.(HD) (HID) drunk. cat.(HID)
Family Guy Family Guy The Big Bang Big Bang Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order Criminal Intent How I Met How Met The Office The Office:
IND 2 12112 4 38 12Schoolboard Chicken fight. Boyfriend Awkward Grow Murder of city health Tomorrow Children murdered. Mystery MotherZoey Michael in debt Trivia Double
race. advice, hookup. inspector. (HD) woman. enrolls. sales.
Without a Trace: Win Today Without a Trace: Watch Over Criminal Minds The Criminal Minds: The Criminal Minds: North House: The Fix Boxing
ION 2 2 2 13261817 Jack is held hostage; poker Me Social worker takes Aftermath Serial rapist returns Boogeyman Murdered Mammon Killer forces girs to match; new addiction. (HD)
club. (HD) 7-year-old gir. after hiatus. (HD) children. (HI) choosevictim.
A&E 262626 263950181 48 Backseat shooter. 48 Multiple motives. (R) Intervention: Kimberly Intervention: Jessica Beyond Defiant teen. Beyond Deputy Lyle.
(5:45) Sixteen Candles ('84) **1 A girl's (:45) The Breakfast Club ('85, Drama) -***/ Five very different students Showville: Athens, Ohio (N) SmallTown: SmallTown
AMC 55656 66 3053231 16th birthday gets overlooked. learn about each other during a weekend detention. (1HD) Inipi (N) (R) (HD)
APL 4444 4443668 130 River Unseen predator. Super Squid (TVPG) River Monsters Modern "Jaws." (R) (HD) Eating Giants: (R) (HD) River Modern "Jaws."
BET 3535 33 5 40 22 270106 & Park Top music videos. (N) Video Girl (11) ** A woman enters the music video industry. (:05) Next Day Air ('09) r**1/ Mistaken delivery. (R)
BRAVO 68 68 68 51 185 Princesses (:49) Housewife (R) (:49) Housewives (R) (:49) Housewives (R) Housewives Tabatha: Studio 157 Tabatha: Studio 157
(:54) South Prk (:25) Tosh.0 Colbert Repo (:27) Daily Chappelle's Chappelle's (59) Tosh.O (R) Tosh.O (R) (HI) Sunny (HD) Sunny (VMA) Daily Show (N) Colbert
COM 66666666 152719(R (1( (HD) (R) Show (R) Show Show (HI) (HID) (HID) Report (N)
DISC 40 40 40402543120 Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property
E! 46 46 46462726196 Kardashian (R) (HD) E! News (N)(HD) )Kardashian (R) (HD) Rihanna 777 (HD) )Police () Police (N) C. Lately News (R)
FAM 55 55 55551046 199Alice in Wonderland A young woman returns to Wonderland. |Twilight('08) **12A A female student is hunted by vampires. The 700 Club (TVG)
FOOD 3737 37 37 76 164 Chopped (R) (HID) Chopped (R (HI) Chopped (R) (HI) |Chopped (R) (HI) Giving You Giving You Star Burger Bash (1R
FX 51 3 Anger (R) (HD)) The A-Team (10, Adventure) *** Liam Neeson, Bradley Cooper. A group of Anger (N)(HD) 2 1/2 Men 2 1/2 Men Totally Biased Totally Biased
FX 51 51 51 51 5849soldiers tries to clear their names after being convicted of a crime. (HD) (HI) (HD) (N) (R)
GSN 17917917917934179184 Fam.Feud Fam Feud Fam. Feud Fam.Feud Newlywed |Newlywed Newlywed Newlywed Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud Fam.Feud
HALL 5 5 5 17 73240 Little House: Castoffs Prairie (TVG) Little House: My Ellen Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier
HGTV 41 41 4141 5342165Hunters Hunters unters HHunters Addict Addict Raiders(N) Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters
HIST 81 81 81 81 33 65128 PawnStars PawnStars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars PawnStars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Swamp (N) (HD) Mountain: Into the Wild
LIFE 36 36 36365241140 Trading Trading Swap Bounty hunter. Swap: Cooper; Kukta Wife Swap Workaholic. Pretty Wicked Moms
NICK 22525 252444 252SponSpo Sponge Sam&Cat Drake Big Time |Wendell Full Hse Full Hse Nanny |Nanny Friends |Friends
OWN 5858 55847 103161 Dateline (HD) D) Dateline (D) Dateline (HD) Dateline Missing boy. Small Town (N) Dateline (H1D)
QVC 114 12 9 14 13150 Spanx Slimming Tignanello Handbags Discover Diamonique Diamonique showcase. WEN by Chaz Dean Hair & Body Care
SPIKE 57 5757 57 296354 Police Videos (R) (HD) Police Videos (R) (HD) Police Videos (1R (HD) Impact Wrestling (N) (HD) Universal Soldier (10)
SYFY 67 67 6767 64 180Warehouse: Runaway Bigfoot (12)% Two rivals try to capture Bigfoot. Axe Giant Boot camp terrorized by lumberjack. Snow Beast Angry yeti.
TBS 55 59 59 32 62 52 Queens Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Family |Family Big Bang Big Bang Sullivan & IBig Bang Conan Usher. (N)(HD)
The Mark of Zorro (40) The champion of the oppressed Bathing Beauty ('44) *4'/2 A songwriter enrolls in an Neptune's Daughter ('49, Musical) A $Million
TCM 6565 65 6 169 falls in love with an evil governor's niece. all-female college, hoping to win back his wife. masseur woos a businesswoman. Mennd. (52)
TLC 44545 45455772 139Tiaras Familiar faces. Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Four Wedd (N)(HD) Weddings (IVPG) (N) Four Wedd (R) (HD)
TT 1 1 1 1 Castle: Once Upon A Crime Castle Reality star murder. The Hero: Teamwork (N)(HI) 72 Hours New Zealand. (N) The Hero: Teamwork (1R (HD) 72 Hours New Zealand. (R)
TNT 61 61 61 1 28 55 51 Fairytale murders. (HD) ______() (1HD)
TOON 124801241244620 257 Adventure Regular Regular Orange Crew (R) Regular Kng King Dad (HD) Dad (HD) Family |Family
TRAV 6969 69 69 66170 Bizarre Boiling chili. (R) v Food (1 v Food (R) Mysteries (R) Mysteries (N) Mysteries (R) Mysteries (R)
TRUTV 633 66350 30 183 Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Dumbest (R) Dumbest (R) Top 20 Funniest (N) Dumbest (N) (:01) Top 20 (R
TVL 6262 6623154244M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H The Exes |Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Queens |Queens
USA 344 34 34 22 52 50 NCIS Escaped patient. NCIS: Tribes (HD)) NCIS DiNozzo's father. Notice: Forget Me Not (:0) Graceland (N)(HD) (:02) Necessary (R)
WE 117117117 117 l149 Charmed (1VPG) (HD) Charmed: Brain Drain L.A. Hair (R) L.A.Hair (N) Curves Fashion show. L.A. Hair (R)
WGN 16 161 1941 119 Home Videos (1VPG) Home Videos (1VPG) How I Met How IMet How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine (N) Home Videos (1VPG)
CNBC 3939 3839 37102 Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Fugitives Bail jumpers. Greed (1 Greed (R) Mad Money (R)
CNN 3232 3 3321838 100 Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett (N) Cooper 360 (N) (HD) Piers Morgan LIVE (N) Cooper 3600 (R) (HD) Erin Burnett (R)
CSPAN 18 18 18183712109 U.S. House of Representatives (N) Tonight from Washington Public policy. (N) Washington (N) Capital News Today
FNC 644664 644871 118 Special Report (N) (HD) The FOX Report (N) The O'Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N) (HD) On the Record (N) (HD) The O'Reilly Factor (R)
MSNBC 8883 83 83 40 103 PoliticsNation(N) (HD) Hardball with Chris (R) Chris Hayes (N) (HD) Rachel Maddow (N) Last Word (N) (HD) Chris Hayes (R) (HPD)
CSS 22 28 284970 Rome Brave Made SEC Talk Ftbl MLL Lacrosse: Hamilton vs New York (aped) Dantanna's SEC
ESPN 29 29 29212 58 70 U.S. Open: First Round SportsCenter (HD) Best of the U.S. Open: First Round Encore Presentation (aped) (HD) )SportsCenter (HD)
ESPN2 3030 30 6 59 74 SportsCenter (HD) SportsNation (HD) Sport Cntr |30 for 30: Broke (HD) Baseball Tonight (HD) SportsNation (HD)
FSN 7272 72 72 56 77 Stuntbust. Insider Bull Riding (Repay) West Coast (R) (HI) iGameTime Insider UFC Unleashed (R) Dolphins (HID)
GOLF 4949 44 9 5560 304 Feherty: Curtis Strange Live from the U.S. Open (HD)) Live from the U.S. Open (HD)) Live U.S. Open (HID)
NBCS 71 71 71 71 54 61 90 ro ver Crossover PL World Mobil 1 The Color of Money ('86, Drama) **1r Aging pool hustler mentors hotshot. Crossover |Pro
SPEED 4848 4848442 69 83 NASCAR (HD)) PassTime Pass Time Off Road Racing: General Tire Mint 400 Lucas Oil: Las Vegas Car:'00 Crown Vics
SUN 38 384014014557 76 Florida (N) RaysLIVE! MLB Baseball: Kansas City Royals at Tampa Bay Rays (HD) Rays LIVE! Florida Insider Fishing Report (1R
Good Luck Jessie Austin&Ally GoodLuck Jessie Ms. 16 Wishes('10, Family) ** Ayoung girl (10) Jessie Gravity Falls Good Luck Jessie Man at
DISN 1361361361369945 250 Charlie's play. Personality Chili Aumni Kiplings babies gets her secret wish list granted, but not Chess contest. Secret room. Someone new. the fair. (R) (HD)
(R) swap. (R) competition, interview. (R) everything works out. (G) (R) (R) (R)
(:20) Blazing Saddles ('74, Comedy) -***1/ Cleavon Little, Best in Show ('00, Comedy) Bizarre (35) Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle (:05) National Lampoon's
ENC 150150150 15035 Gene Wilder. A black sheriff struggles to save his town from a contestants and their spoiled canines vie for (04, Comedy) John Cho. Stoners search Animal House ('78) **r
pair of corrupt politicians. top honors at a dog show. endlessly for burgers. College misfits. (R)
(5:15) Moonrise Kingdom Fast Five ('11, Action) ***1/2 Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. 2 Days Game ofThrones Mhysa Veep Real Sex ErotiTrue Blood
HBO 30230230230217 302400(12) Love causes young Former cop and ex-con team up on the wrong side of the Gennady Tywin challenged; Dany's fate. Unexpected videohow-to. Showrecap. (R)
couple to run away. law for one last job. (PG-13)( (HD) Golovn (R)(H1D) queries. (R)
(:15) Death Becomes Her ('92, Comedy) **1/ Meryl Dark Shadows (12, Comedy) **1'/ Johnny Depp, True Blood Avampire meets Game of Thrones: Mhysa
HBO2 303303303303 303402 Streep, Bruce Willis. Aging actress and novelist battle over an Michelle Pfeiffer. A vampire imprisoned for 200 years a telepathic waitress. (HD) Tywin challenged; Dany's
elixir that provides eternal youth, wakes up in 1972. (PG-13) (HD) fate. (HID)
(:15) Being Flynn (12, Drama) ** % Robert De Niro, Paul The Sopranos: Eloise Real Time with Bill Maher The Kids Are Alright ('79) ***1/2 The Prometheus
HBO3 304304304304 304404 Dano. Ayoung man encounters his eccentric and long-absent Carmela is frustrated over Scheduled: George Packer. musical career of the famous British rock Space
___ father. (R) (HD) )Furio. (HD) (V) (HD) group, The Who, is chronicled.expedition.
(10) Superman II('81, Action) **1r Gene Hackman, :. The Campaign (12, Comedy) **1/2 Will Ferrell, Zach Safe House (12, Action) *** Denzel Washington,
MAX 320320320320 63 320420 Christopher Reeve. The Man of Steel battles three Kryptonian : An unlikely candidate challenges a long-time Ryan Reynolds. In South Africa, a CIA rookie and a rogue
villains imprisoned by his father. congressman in North Carolina. agent are attacked by mercenaries.
(5:30) Lany Crowne ('11, (:10) Varsity Blues ('99, Drama) *-k*J James Van Der Beek Collateral ('04, Drama) *** Tom Cruise, Jamie Foxx. Wandelust (12, Comedy)
MAX2 321321321321 321422 Comedy) Middle-aged man Jon Voight. A high school coach and quarterback have Cab driver becomes the hostage of a contract killer with Urban couple embrace
returns to college. conflicting game plans. (R) (HD) five hits scheduled. (R) (HD) alternative living. (R)
(5:30) John Mellencamp: It's Rock 'N' Roll Exposed: The Photography of Bob Gruen Drive Angry (11, Action) **1/2 Nicolas Cage, Amber Gigolos: The Borgias
SHO 34034034034019 340365 About You Musical journey. Don Letts provides a profile of rock'n' roll music Heard. A man escapes hell to seek revenge against his Moaning Usa Italian sulphur.
__(H1D) )photographer Bob Gruen. (N)(HD) daughter's attackers. (R) (HD) (N) (HD) (R)
(4:55) Blues Brothers 2000 The Third Wheel ('02, Comedy) Halloween: Resurrection ('02) A contest The Darkest Hour (11) ** In Moscow, The Ninth
TMC 35035035035020350385 (98) Elwood Blues tries to Hapless bachelor works up the nerve to ask to spend the night in Michael Myers' two Americans discover aliens harvesting Gate An occult
reunite the band. his dream girl for a date. (1HD) childhood home turns deadly. energy to hunt humans. plot.
6PMa6:0 7PM :3 8 M 830 -9,. PM 9:0 0 M 0:0 1Pa a a a a. ar-


Today's Live Sports

9 a.m. ESPN 2013 U.S. Open
Championship First Round
from Merion Golf Club in Ard-
more, Pa. (L)
3 p.m. NBC 2013 U.S. Open
Championship First Round
from Merion Golf Club in Ard-
more, Pa. (L)
5 p.m. ESPN 2013 U.S. Open
Championship First Round
from Merion Golf Club in Ard-
more, Pa. (L)
9 p.m. ABC 2013 NBA Finals
Game 4 Miami Heat at San
Antonio Spurs. (L)

Today's Talk Shows

7:00 a.m. NBC Today Scheduled:
eliminated "The Voice" contestant;
Harry Connick Jr. performs. (N)
9:00 a.m. CBS LIVE! with Kelly
and Michael Scheduled: Jerry
Seinfeld co-hosts; Kevin Costner;
Matchbox Twenty; Leo Howard. (N)
9:00 a.m. CW Rachael Ray From
Nov. 2012: Carson Daly cohosts;
five unique guacamole recipes.
9:00 a.m. IND Jerry Springer Feb.
2010: women reveal to the men in
their lives that they too were born
men.
10:00 a.m. CW The Ricki Lake
Show From January: controversial
medical issues, including medical
marijuana.
10:00 a.m. FOX Maury December
2011: woman thinks her man is
cheating with her sister; lie detec-
tors.
10:00 a.m. IND The Steve Wilkos
Show Nov. 2011: child claims that
mother's boyfriend touched him in
a sexual manner.
11:00 a.m. ABC The View Sched-
uled: four mothers of victims from
the Sandy Hook shooting. (N)
11:00 a.m. CW Dr. Phil From Jan.:
Dr. Phil tries to help a dysfunctional
mother/daughter relationship.
11:00 a.m. IND Jerry Springer Octo-
ber 2011: man has shocking secret;
lesbian love triangle turns ugly.
12:00 p.m. CW The Jeff Probst
Show From January: a man who
created a career with Legos; suc-
cess stories.
1:00 p.m. ABC The Chew Sched-
uled: Clinton Kelly and Carla Hall
visit the C&C Factory. (N)
2:00 p.m. CBS The Talk Scheduled:
Kunal Nayyar guest co-hosts;
Matthew Morrison; "Who's Your
Daddy?". (N)
2:00 p.m. CW The Wendy Williams
Show Scheduled: Megan Alexan-
der and Isha Sesay join Wendy for
this week's Hot Talk. (N)
2:00 p.m. IND Jerry Springer
Scheduled: a woman asked her
friend to spy on her fiance. (N)
2:00 p.m. NBC The Doctors From
March: Joan and Melissa Rivers;
at-home remedies; Joan's bucket
list items.
4:00 p.m. ABC Access Hollywood
Live Scheduled: Denise Richards;
Dean Cain; men's swimwear fash-
ion show. (N)
5:00 p.m. CW Dr. Phil From October
2012: mother comes face-to-face
with the parents of bullies.
8:00 p.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel
Live Scheduled: actor Jack Black;
Clash of the Titus. (N)
11:00 p.m. TBS Conan Scheduled:
Usher; Eesha Khare; She & Him
performs. (N)
11:35 p.m. CBS Late Show with
David Letterman Scheduled: Harry
Connick Jr.; U.S. Army Top Ten List;
Dylan Moran. (N)
11:35 p.m. NBC The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno Scheduled: actor
Carson Daly; Betty White; Timeflies
performs live. (N)

Convenient Complete Satellite
ONLINE TV Listings
www.sun-herald.com/tv






The Sun Classified Page 14 EINIC ads yoursu n net Thursday, June 13, 2013


L FURNITURE
OO 6035


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SWIVEL ROCKER perfect
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TABLE & CHAIRS Table with
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828-777-5610 (cell)


GOREN BRIDGE

WITH TANNAH HIRSCH
@2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
THE VANISHING TRICK


North-South vulnerable. South deals.


WEST
aQ4
0AJ6
J 106
*KJ7


NORTH
4 10 7 2
,Q98543
0 Q3
S108
EAST
SJ83
S K 102
09542


1A52


EAST
Pass
Pass


63 4
SOUTH
*AK965
27
OAK87
4Q94


The bidding:
SOUTH WEST
1a Pass
20 Pass
Pass Pass


NORTH
1NT
24


Opening lead: Four of A
Sometimes a simple approach to
the play is best. South looked for
trouble on this deal from the
European Championship, and found
more than he could handle.
North's one no trump was forcing
and the correction to two spades
denied a hand that was good enough
to raise to two spades directly. That
dashed any thoughts South might
have had of getting to game.
West found the devilish lead of a
low spade away from the queen. That


could easily have given away the
contract, but here it seemed to have
awoken demons in declarer's mind.
The easy way to land the contract is
to play for a 3-2 trump break win
the lead, cash a second spade and
then play on diamonds, scoring four
trump tricks, three diamonds and a
diamond ruff.
Instead, declarer opted to take
insurance against a bad trump break
-virtually impossible after the play
to trick three as the play developed.
The jack of spades was taken with the
king and the queen of clubs was led
from hand. East won with ace and
returned a low spade. Declarer
finessed and was surprised to find
that West won the trick with the
queen.
Now West found the killing
defense of underleading the ace of
hearts! East's king won and another
spade left declarer without resource.
Declarer still had to lose two more
club tricks and a diamond for down
one.
Would West really have led a
singleton trump on this auction? In
the words of Eliza Doolittle: "Not
bloody likely."

(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers'
responses sent in care of this newspaper
or to Tribune Media Services Inc., 2010
Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 75038.
E-mail responses may be sent to
gorenhridge @aol.comr.)


7 Little Words
Find the 7 words to match the 7 clues. The numbers in parentheses
represent the number of letters in each solution. Each letter
combination can be used only once, but all letter combinations
will be necessary to complete the puzzle.

CLUES SOLUTIONS >

1 nobody (9) _

2 heavenly display (7)

3 groom (7) _

4 taken to the cleaners (7) _

5 deprive of a right (10) _
-2
6 Swedish musical foursome (4)
7 put in a nutshell (10)
7 put in a nutshell (10) C


RIZ


FLE


NO


AB


NT


HOS


SUM RAIN ITLE


BOW


ED


ECED


ENT


MA


NE


ER


TL


ITY


DIS


BA


Wednesday's Answers: 1. BENUMBED 2. EGGTIMER 3. HARDFISTED
4. OXFAM 5. ADJOINED 6. OVERACT 7. GARBAGE 6/13


ACROSS
1 It's the pits
6 Sand, silt and
clay
10 Latch onto
14 Sharp
15 Vogue rival
16 Gamblers'
mecca
17 Closet nicety
18 Fundraiser,
often
19 Pie baker
20 Conversation
starters
22 Mist-enclosed
24 "Vive le -!"
26 Abounded
27 Most favorable
31 "Kidnapped"
monogram
32 Bristles
33 Like a hunk
36 Opp. of pos.
39 Marseilles Ms.
40 "Tumbling
Tumbleweeds"
singer
41 Skiing mecca
42 RSVP word
43 Like some
accidents
44 Astrologer's
scales
45 On, as a lamp
46 Passed by
48 Stage whispers
51 Winter mo.


52 Adventurer
54 Garage squirter
59 Inoculants
60 Borodin prince
62 In good time
63 Obi-Wan
portrayer
64 Cut some slack
65 Wineglass parts
66 Treats shabbily
67 Marble block
68 The ones here
DOWN
1 Ogden or old
car
2 Throb
3 Fencing match
4 "- have to do!"
5 Improves
drastically
6 Chicken piece
7 Viking name
8 Dispense
9 Not lavishly
10 Stable
employees
11 Variety show
12 Means to -
13 Financial asset
21 Worthless coin
23 Pulley part
25 Suffuse
27 Units of
resistance
28 Sanskrit dialect
29 Work the land
30 Spleen


PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED
ROTC RASP B IMP
ECRU I R O VER
ATOM I CO AWARE
LOTUSES W I TNE|Y
L H A S A SI
ISSUE E D FI RED OGS
SOUSAiO GRE PEE
ALS FAITH o IS EON
A AHS T ANCONDO
CRI CHTON TERSER
E A Y E SHONE
ANTLE IRS ELE GANT
ROBIN ORAL AGAR
A MA NAPAVE NOPE
BER GSH EEDr O GEEF
6-13-13 @2013 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Actress -
Hagen
Peeved
Captures
Blarney Stone
locale
Very pleased
Vein opposites
Honcho
Bowser's pal
Most frilly
Fragrant shrubs
Sign before
Virgo
Lutz alternatives


Shopping -
George of
"Blume in Love"
Hairy twin
Sub -
(secretly)
Trellis unit
Subarctic tribe
Mendicant's cry
AMEX rival
CSA defender


Want more puzzles?
"Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Venice Gondolier readers: Look for the puzzle solution in the Our Town section.


TODAY'S

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


The Sun Classified Page 14 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2013






Thursday, June 13, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 15


L FURNITURE
OO 6035


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TABLE VINTAGE rattan din-
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SUN 2



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MUSICAL
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MEDICAL
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Condition $50, OBO 941-497-
7175


TREES & PLANTS
S6110


BUTTERFLY PLANTS Purple
Passionflower, few left. $12
941-416-6567
DESERT ROSE Flowering
Now Very Beautiful Heat Toler-
ant Plant $15 941-204-9100
FIG TREE Sweet Fruiting Plant
For Sale 1 Gallon Pot $15
941-204-9100
MEXICAN PETUNIAS rainlily,
bromeliad, oyster, liriope,
snake ea $3 941-882-3139
ORANGE CITRUS Tree Valen-
cia Orange Tree in a 5 Gallon
Pot $45 941-204-9100
ORCHID LARGE Plants
Purple Flowers $25
941-698-9798
PAPAYA PLANT
1 gallon pot
$4 941-697-0794
RARE PLANTS Bromliads,
Bamboo & others. $10 & up
941-625-8935
RED AMARYLLIS croton,
frangipani, hibiscus, pencil
cactus ea $10 941-882-3139
BABY ITEMS
6120


BABY MONITOR, 8" Color
Video, Incl. 3" as well NEW!
$170 OBO 941-661-7677
BASSINET WHITE. In good
condition $25, OBO 941-423-
9888
BOUNCING CRADLE Fisher
Price $8 941-830-1934
CHANGING PAD, Contour,
temperpedic, waterproof w/
cover $30 941-876-4303
CRIB BEDDING(GIRL) Purple
& Pink w/accessoris. NEW!
$100 941-876-4303
CRIB LIKE new, converts to
toddler bed, with all bedding.
$125, OBO 941-426-0204
CRIB WOODEN framed crib
and mattress $40 941-830-
1934
HIGH CHAIR GRACO Excellent
condition $35 941-830-1934
HIGH CHAIR GRAYCO nice
cond. $30. 941-484-2116
MOBILE FISHER Price NEW!
Precious Planet w/ remote
$35 941-661-7677
PAK N play Grayco Navy Blue
good cond. $25; Greyco High
Chair nice cond. $40. 941-
484-2116
PLAYMAT FISHER PRICE $5
941-830-1934

GOLF ACCESSORIES
S6125


6 V GOLF CART
BATTERIES
SET/6 LEADING BRANDS
STARTING AT $399!
US MADE W/12MO WARR.
EXCHANGE/CASH&CARRY
941-769-1431

CART BAG ADAMS $45
941-624-4110
CLUB CAR Golf Cart
4 Passenger, lyr old batteries.
Good Condition! $1850 941-
716-6792
DRIVER ADAMS SPEEDLINE
10.5 GRAPHITE $75 941-624-
4110
GOLF CART good tires
green easy go needs batter-
ies $395 941-822-1429
ARE YOU ONLINE?
INCREASE YOUR
EXPOSURE!
Add your internet address
to your ad for a little extra!
GOLF CLUBS LADIES Full set
Tommy Armour New bag+put-
ter $125, OBO 941-473-8379
IRONS WILSON D-ll 4-PW
Graphite $95 941-624-4110






The Sun Classified Page 16 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2013


GOLF ACCESSORIES
S6125


LADIES GOLF SHOES 7M
NEW FOOTJOY WHITE/TAN
SADDLE $20 941-492-3659


Totally Refurbished
Club Car
48 Volt 4 Seat Golf Cart
New (2013) Batteries, Paint,
Interior, Suspension &
SS Caps. Hi Speed Motor.
Lights, Windshield and
Excellent Tires
Like New- $2995
Local Delivery Included
941-830-2415

EXERCISE/
FITNESS
44 6128

AB LOUNGE SPORT
Good Condition Works Great!
$20 941-766-1198
EXERCISE BIKE -Gold's Gym
Power Spin 2104 $70 941-
268-5227
GYM ACCES. Step box, 51b,
yoga block, videos, Gym bar,
$18 941-286-1170
KEYS FITNESS Roller Good
condition great for ABS $10
941-766-1198
TOTAL WEIGHT System
$300 941-255-7813
TREADMILL PRO-FORM
crosswalk fold up $300 941-
766-7466
TREADMILL Sportcraft tx-400
2hp motor, incline, 10mph
$150, OBO 941-743-7115
SSPORTING GOODS
S6130


2 GUYS GUN
SHOW

June 15th & 16th
Port Charlotte
Charlotte County
Fairgrounds
2333 El Jobean Rd
Buy-Sell-Trade
New-Used
FREE Parking
CWP Classes Avail.
Sat 9-5 and Sun 9-4
727-776-3442
www.nextgunshow.com
BOGA GRIP model 130
new cost 125.00 $85
941-759-0013
FIREWOOD No camping
trip is complete without it!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus
Split, Bundled, and ready for
the firepit!
941-468-4372
JUMBO & standard-size can-
vas folding chairs w/carry
case Pr/. $20 941-276-1881
PENN ROD and reels penn
4.0 on penn 630rod 165.00
set $165 941-759-0013
PING PUTTERS $50 941-
624-4110
PUNCHING BAG GLOVES
NEW, L/XL $11, OBO 941-
627-6780
IADVERTISE!W
REEL, SHIMANO CORSAIR
300A L/W $35
714-599-2137
ROD+REEL Combo, Quantum
K.V.D. 20, NEW-UNUSED
$65 813-508-9713
RODS & Reels Offshore
Ex. cond. From $80
941-266-4731
ROLLER SKATES "Europa"
RD track control Size 11 $40
941-697-0794
ROLLERSKATES pacer ata
500 purple&black sz 10 like
new $80, OBO 941-735-1709


SPORTING GOODS
6130


REEL PENN Tarpon Rod BG
60 $90 941-266-4731
SHUFFLEBOARD TABLE
12 FT Berner deluxe.
Oak cabinet with blk carpet.
$475 941-257-8148
TROLLING MOTOR Minn
Kota 24V 801b bow mount.
$50, OBO 812-614-1366
WET SUIT all in one & shorts
sm. no tears $20 941-286-
1170
FIREARMS
6131


1000 ROUNDS 7.62X39
AMMO AND LIKE NEW RIFLE
$1100 CASH 941-214-0889




GUN & KNIFE SHOW
VFW Post #10178
550 N. McCall Rd
Englewood, FL.
Sat 06/15 9-5pm and
Sun 06/16 9-4pm.
Admission $5.00 under 12
FREE & FREE PARKING CWP
Classes $49.95 11am & 1pm
daily. Lee County Gun
Collectors LLC.
(239)-223-3370
BUY-SELL-TRADE
www.gunshowsflorida.com


HIGHER POWER OUTFITTERS
GUNS-AMMO-CCW
Financing Available!!
BUY-SELL-TRADE
1826 Tamiami Trail in PG
941-347-8445
-- ---



'I
MORE GUNS,
TOO MANY TO LIST!
SELL, TRADE, BUY*
CALL 941-564-8778
RUSSIAN SKS EXCELLENT,
$750 WW II SS HELMET $475.
CIVIL WAR SWORD, $750.
941-475-1379

L FIREARMS
ACCESSORIES
11 6132

NEW MAGPUL 223/556
MAGAZINES AR15 30RD
(HAVE 7) PRICE FOR EA: $35,
OBO 941-979-2071

BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
1 6135

16" GIRL'S "princess" bike
for sale. Good condition.
$10 941-416-8290
26" WOMAN'S Huffy Venice
Area $45 941-929-8115
3 WHEEL bike front/back bas-
kets /big seat good tires good
shape $225 941-626-3102
3 WHEELER Trike One Speed
Venice Area $125 941-929-
8115
70'S SCHWINN LADIES PINK
Suburban 10 sp with lites!
CLEAN!! $95 941-544-0042
BICYCLE New Woman's Huffy
Bike, $75, 941-681-1002
BICYCLE RACK fits 1" or 2"
hitch. $50 941-743-0582
BICYCLE, Trek Navigator
2.0, 24 Spd drivetrain, Like-
New! $450 941-587-5162
BIKE 26 Inch Boys Dirt Bike
New Shocker 2G Plush Next
$125 941-306-7004
CRUISER COOLER ELECTRIC
BATTERY OPERATED WITH COVER
$125. 941-626-3102
Folding Bike DOHAN3, 3
speed, Venice area $75 941-
929-8115


BICYCLES/
TRICYCLES
Sl 6135

GREY TREK 531 27" w/drop
handlebars and access.. Good
shape $125 941-698-1753
TREK 720 Men's 21sp.
$150 941-743-0582
TRICYCLES (2) Sun Recum-
bent Trikes, 21' $550 each,
Like new, 941-564-8575

PHOTOGRAPHY/
VIDEO
LZ 6140

35MM OLYMPUS IS-1
With case/manual $35
941-624-0364
B&W DARK Room complete
professional darm room equip,
everything one would need.
Brand new condition. $7,500
941-697-4342
CAMERA, DIGITAL NEW Fuji-
film AX560 16mp, 5Xzoom,
mem card $60 941-894-4115
DIGITAL CAMERA, NIKON,
Coolpix, batteries use freq.
charging $25 941-697-0794
FRAME 9-4X6 Pics.
Wood&Glass $10
941-585-4470
TRIPOD CAMERA Slik U112
Deluxe. Quick release post.
$15 941-426-0760
TRIPOD VANGUARD VT-558
new in box. $80, OBO Cost
$150 941-697-1110

SPOOL/SPA
& SUPPLIES
LW 6145


HOT TUB Seats 5 with
lounger maint. free cabi-
net 110 or 220 volt
Never used Sacrifice $1895
Local: 941-421-0395






**SPAS & MORE**
TRADE-IN'S WELCOME
WE BUY USED &
MOVE HOTTUBS.
****NEW WEBSITE***
www.spasandmoreflorida.com
941-625-6600
ABOVE GROUND pool 18 ft
round U-move p/m/f/c+extras
$425 941-625-0833
POOL CLEANER Baracuda
G3. Brand new never used
$200 941-214-8402
LAWN & GARDEN
6160


21" LAWN Mower Yard
Machine, Self Propelled, bag
or mulch. $75 941-766-0780
BBQ GRIILL Char-Broil Grill
Stainless Steel w/side burner
$125 904-955-4525
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be
placed online by you.
One item per ad and the
price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


LAWN & GARDEN
6160


BLADES 42X2 Star Center
Hole NOS New Old Stock $10
941-497-3702
BLADES SNAPPER KEES
Bobcat 48x3 NOS List $72
$25 941-497-3702
Cuddle up by the fire!
Firewood Split, Bundled and
ready for the firepit!
Pine, Oak, or Citrus,
941-468-4372
FORD 1120 DIESEL, 2WD,
HYDRO, 446 HRS, WITH
REAR MOWER $4800.
CALL 941-812-0809
GARDEN ACCESSORIES
clay pots, bird bath $20
941-286-1170
JOHN DEERE
Rider '06 20 HP Motor $400
941-575-2183
LAWN BLOWER Billy-Goat
5hp lawn/leaf blower. VGC
$250 941-505-4242
LAWN MOWER $550 As
new, 17 HP, Troy built, and a
rider. 941-421-2601
LAWN MOWER Electric,
Task Force 1.8HP $75, OBO
941-445-7489
LAWN MOWER MURRAY 12.5
hp,30 cut ride on $225 941-
662-5514
LAWN TRACTOR, 2005,
Craftsman, 42" Cut, 18HP.
$350 obo. 941-587-6273
LAWNMOWER JOHN DEERE
Riding, L-lll1 Automatic, 42".
$495 941-460-0506
MOWER BLADES New many
to choose from, $3 to $9 each
941-497-3702
PATIO TABLE, Small Ornate,
black iron base w/oval glass
top. $30, OBO 941-626-2832
PICNIC TABLE Hex Shape
Very Good Cond. $300 941-
456-5184
RIDING MOWER John Deere
STX 38 with rear bagger.nice
$499 941-625-7678
RIDING MOWER Weed eater
30' 10hp b/s el/s $499 941-
342-6573


RIDING MOWER, '12 Hustler,
24 HP, 48" Cut, Zero Turn.
Just Like New...Only 6 Hours!
$7,900 OBO 989-233-1203
SOD PLUGGER HEAVY DUTY
$20 941-488-8844
STAGHORN FERN 4' in diam-
eter $50 941-587-4422
TIRE, 18x6.50-8 4-ply
TubeLess Traction tread
New $25 941-497-3702
TRANSMISSION FOR TORO
20332 w/b s/p mower.New
$35, OBO 207-319-6141
TRIMMER, CRAFTSMAN 4
stroke, uses ind. trimming
lines $125 941-538-1803

BUILDING
SUPPLIES
ra 6170

AC BLOWER SQUIRREL CAGE
& MOTOR 220AC brand new
$95 941-626-3102
DOOR FULL GLASS INSURT
70X30X1.75 GREAT COND
$75 941-488-8844
FAUCET FOR BATHROOM
new single handle $25 941-
228-1745
HURRICANE SHUTTERS all
sizes never used. $490, OBO
941-822-3837
HURRICANE SUPPORTS 2
Aluminum f/dbl garage door.
$150, OBO 941-497-7175
MICA WILSON ART 4X10
WHITE NEW $35 941-488-
8844
NAILS, BOSTICH, 12 unused
coils, N80C, all for $12
941-474-7387
ROOF TILES concrete white
500 all new surplus $2.00ea.
941-625-7678


TILE decorative trim imported
lass & ceramic. BEAUTIFUL!
.50-$4 ea 941-637-9735
VANITY TOP New white
w/oval sink no faucet 31"x19".
$25 941-204-4553
WOOD PALLETS Free some
oak you pick up Venice
941-488-0667

S HEAVY/CONST.
EQUIPMENT
6180

GENERATOR 4400 watts
push button electric start nice
or trade $325 941-626-3102
SCAFFOLD WHEELS 4 Noelt-
ing Faultless 8x1 1/2
$100, OBO 941-473-3271
TOOLS/ MACHINERY
S6190


AIR COMPRESSOR crafts-
man 26 GAL BRAND NEW VER-
TICAL $200 941-268-9029
DRILL CORDLESS Makita 9.6
& 2 batteries and charger $15
941-488-9592
FLOOR JACK Craftsman,
New, 3 TON, NICE, EASY TO
USE $80 941-268-9029
GENERATOR 2,800 watts
rate 6.5 H.P. as new and
unused. $200 obo
PRESSURE WID ASHERC, powr,
"KarCher" as now and n@4 vocr
u"Cd $ 85 941-423-5733
GENERATOR COLEMAN
6250 Watt like new $225,
OBO 941-456-5184
GENERATOR CORD 35ft
generator ext. cord, New
$75 941-828-0028
GENERATOR ENDRESS 5KW
9HP B & S gas $375 941-
258-1118
GENERATOR HONDA 6500
13HP ON WHEELS, NEVER
USED $499 941-828-0028
GENERATOR PRAMAC 5000
Honda 9HP, on wheels. ex.
cond. $400 obo 941-876-4275
GRIZZLE, SHOP dust collec-
tor on wheels. $75 941-639-
5775
IMPACT WRENCH CRAFTS-
MAN Battery Operated New-In-
Box $80 941-268-9029
LADDER 10' ALUMINUM
$75 941-743-0582
LADDER 6' ALUMINUM
$22 941-743-0582
LADDERS, 2- 24' Fiberglass,
HD, L.ville, aluminum jacks.
$150 Firm 954-628-7770
MAGLITE 4 cell like new $12
941-587-4422
MASONRY TOOLS Hod &
more $7 941-766-7466
NAILER AIR BRAD C.H.NIB
18 Ga.1 1/4 in. $35 941-624-
4089
PAINTING SUPPLIES Brush-
es, grids, caulk & MORE $10
941-766-7466
PORTER CABLE Router and
Base Used twice, R #6902 B
#1001 $100 941-815-2387

NEED CASH? I
ROUTER TABLE & Router
Craftsman with extensions.
$75 941-473-1330
RYOBI 18-VOLT C/L COMBO
KIT BNIB $75 714-599-2137
SHOP SMITH Vintage, Multi
Tool, Lathe and Table Saw
$125 239-425-7961
SPRAY RIG Graco
Ultra Max II hi-boy
like new in box w/gun & hose
$650 941-766-7466
STAPLER AIR Crown C.H.NIB
18 Ga. 1 1/4 in. $35 941-
624-4089
TEXTURE GUN & hopper $50
941-766-7466


TOOLS/ MACHINERY
6190


TOOL BOX metal 3 drawer flip
open top. Assorted wrenches .
$75 941-585-1040
TOOL BOX, Craftsman 41"
stainless. New cost 850. Sell
$400 941-268-9029
TOOL CABINET Craftsman
Brand new.5 drawers $100,
OBO 941-600-2423
FARM EQUIPMENT
6195


FAN/SHUTTER GREEN-
HOUSE 1HP, 48" PROPELLER
$499, OBO 941-275-5837


EQUIP./SUPLIES
S6220

OFFICE OUTFITTERS
Pre-owned & new office furniture.
VENICE 941-485-7015
CHAIR DYRERS 5, Black, 5
Styling chairs, Black $100
Each OBO 941-223-7993


SUPPLIES
6225

BONCHEF COFFEE urn 5gal.
$250, OBO 941-743-2328
CATERER EQUIPMENT &
Party supplies, various items
Call for appt. 941-488-5949
COFFEE URN BONCHEF 5gal.
Was $1600, Now $250, OBO
941-743-2328
JUICER HB96500 CALL FOR
PRICES FOR MIXER & SLICER
$250, OBO 941-275-5837
PRESS JUICER & GRINDER
NORWALK $125, OBO
941-743-2328
TABLE/(4)CHAIRS SET(S)
ALSO CAFE CHAIRS FOR $60
EA $250, OBO 941-275-5837
CATS
6232


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
DOGS
6233


NOTICE: Statute 585.195
states that all dogs and cats
sold in Florida must be at least
eight weeks old, have an offi-
cial health certificate and prop-
er shots, and be free of intesti-
nal and external parasites.
BORDER COLLIES,
4 Year Old Male & Female.
$600. ABC Reg.
941-624-0355 / 875-5253
Female 15-wk Puppy, ACA Reg
Mini Schnauzer 904-955-4525

PET SUPPLIES
& SERVICES
oa 6236

45 GAL fish tank stand includ-
ed all supplies,fish,plants, dec-
orations $85 941-624-0376
A & R Aqua Pros Inc
Aquarium Services
Installation-Maintenance
Fresh & Saltwater
Reef Aquariums
Livestock Delivery
941-441-8658 Lic/Ins
BIRD CAGE, Large King Cor-
ner. Exc. Cond! $225, obo
BIRD CAGE, w/ Stand $75.
obo 941-743-4007
BIRD PERCH Lg. Stainless
steel tray. On wheels. $100,
OBO 941-268-5423






Thursday, June 13, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 17


PET SUPPLIES
& SERVICES
S6236

CAT CONDO Go Pet Club.
Multi their. 78" High. $125,
OBO 941-268-5423
E COLLAR The SportDog SD-
800 Sport Hunter training col-
lar. $120 941-815-2387
PET CARRIER New, cloth w/
wheels + pull handle. $30
941-484-3804
S APPLIANCES
6250


A/C 5200 BTU 9.7 EER,
used only once, in box,
18"x13" $85 941-625-0340
BELGIAN WAFFLE MAKER by
OSTER Works well. $4 941-
485-4662
DEHUMIDIFIER, LG,
45 PTS, unused
$85 941-474-7387
DISHWASHER KITCHENAID
bisk ss inside quiet series
$110, OBO 941-769-5723
DISHWASHER WHIRLPOOL,
good condition $50 941-488-
1522
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register when
you get to the
sign in page)**
FREEZER CHEST GE 7 cu ft
white VGC $100 941-505-
4242
FRIDGE, WHIRLPOOL, side
by side, Good Cond., $75
941-488-1522
GE STOVE/OVEN
Self cleaning. $125
941-626-1859
IRON GE Lightweight, self-
cleaning, steam. excellent $40
717-659-0146
MAJIC CHEF refrigerator 2
door.mini.4 cu ft. $85, OBO
941-235-2203
MICROHOOD NEW CALL FOR
PRICE FOR NEW KITCHEN SET
$300, OBO 941-275-5837
MICROWAVE GE o/stove
Black Spacesaver XL $75,
OBO 941-451-0107
OVEN FRIGIDAIRE bisque
conv. built in good condition
$95, OBO 941-769-5723
PRESSURE COOKER DIGITAL
NEW IN BOX $75 941-624-
6617
RANGE STAINLESS steel
smooth top, elec., 1-1/2
yrs.old $425 941-697-3979
REFRIGERATOR WHITE,
Frigidaire, side by side, ice &
water on door. 26 CU FT,
brand new $750 941-697-2800
REFRIGERATOR 26 cu.ft
white $299, OBO 941-408-
4409
REFRIGERATOR, G.E. 25 cu.
Side x Side. Smart Water Fil-
tration. Only 6 Mos. New. War-
ranty! $850. 941-662-0117
SEWING MACHINE singer
Excellent. many stitches, fea-
tures $100 717-659-0146
STOVE TOP kitchenaid 4
burner elec glass top built in
$75, OBO 941-769-5723


APPLIANCES
6250


STOVE WHIRLPOOL with
oven below, good condition
$75 941-488-1522
TUB KENMORE ELITE white,
stainless $165 941-408-4409
WARMING DRAWER ther-
madoor ss built in v.g c $125,
OBO 941-769-5723
WASHER & Dryer Both are
working and operable. $125
941-766-0780
WASHER & DRYER REPAIR.
BILLS HANDYMAN SERVICE
941-661-8585
WASHER AND ELITE dryer
Kenmore 80 series good con-
dition $270 214-906-1585
WASHER KELVINATOR,
white, works well $75 941-
493-0674
DRYER Great deal!!
$100, OBO 941-276-5667
WASHER/DRYER MAYTAG
Neptune front loading wash-
er/dryer $400 904-955-4525
WASHING MACHINE LG
Tromm, White, front load, refur-
bished with 1 yr warranty. $400
941-697-2800
MISCELLANEOUS
S6260


46 JAZZ-BLUES CD's per-
fect $60 941-496-9252
AFFORDABLE SMOKES
$1.30/PACK $13./CARTON
ROLL YOUR OWN AT HOME!
TOP BRAND TOBACCOS, TUBES,
CASES, RYO MACHINES & PARTS
VAPOR E-CIGS
E-LIQUID MADE IN USA
LOW PRICES!
ROLL A PACK TOBACCO
2739 Taylor Rd. P.G.
941-505-2233
AQUARIUM 55GALLON, with
Stand and Accessories $150,
OBO 239-425-7961
BASEBALL CARDS YANKS
02-Team-26 cards-Clemens-
Torre $10 941-445-5619
BBQ GRILL PRO-XL,
Good Cond, No Tank. $50,
941-626-2832
BEACH UMBRELLA 6 ft. with
SAND AUGER, very nice $23,
OBO 941-627-6780
BIMINI TOP blue in color
$100 941-408-4409
Seize the sales
with Classified!
COFFEE TABLE round glass
top, chrome stand 35x16
gd.cond. $40 941-740-3286
COMPLETE AC unit 2.5 ton
trane condenser&airhandler
$300, OBO 941-391-3766
CORNHOLE GAMES, start-
ing at $120 941-979-6307
FIREWOOD Split, Bundled,
and ready for the firepit!
Perfect for these cooler nights!
Pine, Oak, Citrus
941-468-4372
FLOWER POT 2, RACKS 3
SHELFS @ HEAVY MEDAL
$150, OBO 941-627-6780
FREE MULCH
Venice Englewood North Porth
Port Charlotte 941-475-6611
GATE, HALLWAY Like new
white adj. child/dog gate $50,
OBO 941-661-1061
GLASS DOORS for Bathtub
59"W X 58"H, Good Condition
$75 941-445-0409
GLASS DOORS for Bathtub.
59" W X 58" H, good condition
$75 941-445-0409
GRILL BRINKMAN 4 burner
with side burner,like new $75
941-258-0654
GRILL NEWER Char Broil
Infaredno tank $75, OBO
941-661-4389
GROWLIGHT KIT 1000w con-
version, fan filter, halige sodi-
um $425 239-204-1473


MISCELLANEOUS
Z6260


CART-4-WHEEL FOLDING-
LITE $16 941-496-9252
INK CARTRIDGES HP.Off.Pro
8500 940 XL 7+ BIk & Color
$45 732-433-3577
KITCHEN FAUCET Moen with
spray separate. New, chrome.
$40 941-740-3286
MAH JONGG Set New, never
used. $40 941-575-6332
MICKEY MANTLE-CARD-
COPY $29 941-496-9252
MOWER push $50. Ryoby
new wacker $120. AC 18,000
BTU $300. Call 941-875-7467
MOWER S/P Scott as-is
$45 941-496-9252 1
NAUTICAL FLAGS Nice set in
organizer with extra flags
$175 941-575-0970
PAINT ROLLER covers Lamb-
swool new in plastic wrapper
$4 941-766-7466
PAINTERS PLASTIC Rolls
some in boxes $10 941-766-
7466
PENNZOIL 11 qt
10w40, $25
941-759-0013
POULON CHAINSAW Used
once. need Carb work $25
941-979-6974
REFLECTORS FOR 4'or 8'
florescent light fixtures $5
941-629-8955
RUBBER WATER HOSE Com-
mercial HD 100'. Good Cond.
$65 941-255-0874
SEAT COVERS Zebra seat
covers(2), wheelcover & seat
belt NEW $15 941-286-1170
SHOES US ARMY Black-dress-
never used-still in box-Size 9R
$10 941-445-5619
SHOP CRANE Excl. cond.
foldable $125 941-426-7598
SINK KOHLER wall
mount,new in box,biscuit color.
$50, OBO 941-258-0654
TOW BAR $20 941-575-
0970
TRANSMISSION GMC 454
chevy 1984 sunsport rv $300
941-815-8906
VANITY SINK off white
31"x22" w/faucet shell shape
$65 941-493-3851
VANITY SINK white 31"x19"
w faucet Nice! $65 941-493-
3851

WANTED TO
BUY/TRADE
6270



Cash paid FOR WWI WWII
Korean Vietnam,German,
Japanese, etc Military items
(941)416-3280


7000






TRANSPORTATION

AUTOMOTIVE
L ^ 7005T'


AUTO TECH OF
VENICE 941-214-0889
'04 Grand Marquis $3995
S'00 Toyota Rav 4 $5995
0 98 Toyota Camry $3900
*'01 Chevy Cavalier $2500
S'00 Toyota Corolla $4900
S'06Toyota Camry $6995
A'99 Ford Windstar $2900
*'01 Frontier Pick Up $5995
'97 Chevy Convt. $1295
@ 06 Suzuki $3995
'03 Buick Park Av $2995


AUTOMOTIVE
7005


2012 TOYOTA Tundra Double
Cab-V6 Bed Liner Towing Pkg
6000 miles $25,301,0BO
941-626-7229/941-249-3199
1970 CHEVROLET Chevelle
SS 454, original, $9000 OBO,
red/black, rothwe8@juno.com
863-578-3237.

7000


TRANSPORTATION

BUICK
7020


2002 BUICK LESABRE
81,230 mi, $5,874
877-219-9139 DIr
( GET RESULTS -
USE CLASSIFIED!
2008 BUICK LUCERNE
$16,184 with 26,621 miles.
Silver w/ tan interior. Local
Mom & Pop trade in. Stock #3-
161144C. dir Call Billy G 863-
263-8144
2011 BUICK REGAL
$20,684 with 20,350 miles.
Great savings over new. Stock
#9-107883. dir Call Billy G.
863-263-8144
2012 BUICK REGAL turbo
$22,484 with 10,236 miles.
Pearl white, turbo charged 4
cyl. Luxury. Stock #9-156498
Call now, won't last long! dir
Billy G. 863-263-8144
2012 BUICK VERANO
$20,984 with 12,692 miles.
White w/tan interior 4 cyl. Lux-
ury and 36 mpg Stock #5-
166083. dir Call Billy G 863-
263-8144

2 CADILLAC
S7030


2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE
90,870 mi, $6,455 DIr
877-219-9139
2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE,
70K Miles, Leather, All Power!!
$5,988 941-639-1601 DIr
2003 CADILLAC DTS
37,885 mi, $17,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 CADILLAC DEVILLE
1 Owner, $9439 Sale $8495!
941-916-9222 DIr.
2005 CADILLAC DEVILLE
1 Owner, $939 Sale $8495!
941-916-9222 DIr.
2012 CADILLAC CTS
$32,984. 24 like new miles,
yes 24. Crystal red metallic w/
light grey interior. Luxury with
a bargain price. Stock #3-
140618 dir. Call Billy G 863-
263-8144

A Bargain
Hunters
Delight
Check the
Classifieds
first!
A Whole
Marketplace
of shopping
is right at
your
fingertips!
97 CADILLAC DEVILLE
66,800 mi, new tires, batt & brks,
burg Ithr, $4100 941-6270688


CHEVY
7040


2001 CHEVY CAVALIER Z24,
Ony 50K Miles! $4,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2004 CHEVROLET CAVALIER
LS 94,100 mi, very good cond,
$4,250 obo, 941-391-5789
2004 CHEW BLAZER
81,310 mi, $6,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 CHEW CAVALIER, 2 Dr.
Coupe LS! Great on Gas! $4,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2005 CHEW MALIBU Grey.
Auto, 4 Dr., Power Windows,
Cold A/C! Great Condition!
$3900. obo 941-626-3860
2006 CHEVROLET 2500 HD
Crew Cab. 6.66 Duramax w/
Allison Trans. Matching topper!
Beautiful truck. Just 69,658
miles. Only $25,684 dir Call
Paul 863-832-9732
^-NEED A JOB? -
CHECK THE
CLASSIFIED!
2009 CHEVY IMPALA LT
Loaded up and only 51k miles!
Rides like a dream! Only
$14,484. dir Call Paul 863-
832-9732
2009 CHEW SUBURBAN
LTE White Diamond, leather,
loaded! Rear entertainment,
absolutely stunning! Just
60,409 miles. Only $32,884
dir Call Paul 863-832-9732
2010 CHEW EQUINOX
36,858 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 CHEW EQUINOX
46,635 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CHEW HHR, 22K Mi.,
White. AM/FM/CD. Exc. Cond-
tion! $16,900. 612-308-5787
2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA
Loaded, 16k mi., Fact. Warr
5yr/100k, all pwr. List New
$29,600 Buy now $18,600
will trade. Justin 941-350-7544
2012 CHEVY CAPTIVA LTE
AWD loaded, loaded, loaded!
Roof, leather, V6. Rare find,
only 12,768 miles! Just
$22,584 dir Call Paul 863-
832-9732
2012 CHEW CRUZE, 19K
Mi! Factory Warr! Great on Gas!
$13,988. 9416391601,D1
2013 CHEVY SILVERADO
One owner clean carfax. Crew
cab, 4x4 LT. Only $26,848
with $10,380 miles. dir Call or
see Kristina 863-990-5787
L CHRYSLER
L 7050


1984 CHRYSLER LEBARON
Black, Convertible, $2000
OBO 941-496-7505
2001 CHRYSL. PT CRUISER
LTD, 60K Mi., Auto, Lthr., PW,
PL $5,988. 941-639-1601 DIr.
2002 CHRYSLER SEBRING,
Alloy Wheels! Spoiler! $4,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2003 CHRYSLER 300M
V6, AUTO, White, 4 door
$7695 941-916-9222 DIr.
2003 CHRYSLER 300M
V6, AUTO, White, 4 door
$7695 941-916-9222 DIr.
2003 CHRYSLER PT
Cruiser Gold, Auto, $5995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
Gold 103k mi., $5395
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 CHRYSLER SEBRING LXI
CONV., Only 80K Miles! Full Power!
$6,988. 941-639-1601 P.G.
2004 SEBRINGCONVERBLE
Tan, sporty! $7995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 SEBRINGCONVERBLE
Tan, sporty! $7995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2006 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE
Lthr, 18,500 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr


L CHRYSLER
7050


2007 CHRYSLER 300,
Ony 50K Miles! Loaded!
$13,988. 941-639-1601 PG.
2007 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY Silver, 63,803k
mi., $12,000 941-497-6725

S DODGE
S7060


2002 DODGE INTREPID SE, All
Pwr. Opt! Only 89K Mi! $4,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2003 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN 90,554 mi,
$7,587 877-219-9139 DIr
2004 DODGE INTREPID
89k, 1 owner, Clean! Clean!
Clean! $5964 941-639-1155
2012 DODGE
CHALLENGER 13,044 mi,
$40,877 877-219-9139 DIr
FORD
7070


1999 FORD MARK III CONV
Van 47k mi., $7995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
1999 FORD MARK III CONV
Van 47k mi., $7995 Mattas
Motors 941-916-9222 DIr.
I Classified = Sales
2000 FORD MUSTANG
CONV Summer Fun $4966
941-639-1155 ext. 5500 DIr.
2003 FORD TAURUS
4DR Wagon, brown $6995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2003 FORD TAURUS
4DR Wagon, brown $6995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2004 FORD EXCURSION
Clean carfax. VIO Diesel 4x4.
Tan exterior and interior. Only
$8,984 with 192,175 miles.
dir Call or see Kristina
863-990-5787
2004 FORD TAURUS SE
Just under 96K mi, great car!
$2900 Firm 941-889-8886
2006 FORD F-150
XL 5.4, 91,440 mi, $9,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 FORD ESCAPE
89,600 mi, $10,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 FORD FUSION
57,061 mi, $11,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 FORD MUSTANG GT
59,667 mi, $17,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 FORD EXPLORER LS
91,657 mi, $14,544
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 FORD MUSTANG Flori-
da vehicle, clean carfax! Auto-
matic muscle! Amazing after-
market rims! Dark tint and
black racing stripes. Come
drive this Amercan beauty!
Only 59,699 miles at the low
price of $12,984. dir Call or
see Kristina 863-990-5787
2010 FORD EDGE AWD
67,067 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 FORD EDGE SEL,
23,642 mi, $24,577
877-219-9139 DIr



Enter your classified ad online
and pay with your credit card.
It's fast, easy, and convenient.
Go to:
yoursun.com
and click on Classifieds
*Fast Easy *
Convenient *
(Visa or Mastercard)

SUN 'LT






The Sun Classified Page 18 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2013


S SATURN HONDA
L ^ 7135 L L 7160


FORD
7070


2011 FORD FOCUS One
owner vehicle! Gas sipper! Blue
exterior with tan leather and
heated seats! Looks and
smells like new! Save big
today! Only 57,690 miles at
the low price of $12,984! dir
Call or see Kristina 863-990-
5787
2011 FORD MUSTANG
36,277 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD ESCAPE
42,379 mi, $17,587
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 FORD FOCUS 4DR
20,290 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr

GMC
7075


2011 GMC YUKON
50,330 mi, $31,475
877-219-9139 DIr

S LINCOLN
7090


1997 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
,174.5 mi, Cold Air, $1,500,
OBO 941-258-2964
2001 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
69,087 mi, $5,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
Signature, 29k mi., Loaded,
Carribean Metallic/Vanilla Lther,
Senior Owned, garaged, car
fax, & new Michelin's $13,995
828-777-5610 (cell)

L MERCURY
4a 7100


1996 MERCURY COUGAR
XR7, 105K, Loaded!!, Leather,
$2,500 OBO 941-727-60891m
1999 MERCURY GR. MAR-
QUIS LS, 80K Mi! Lthr., Power!
$5,488 941-639-1601, DIr.
2000 MERCURY MYSTIQUE
4 DR Sedan, 54 mi, 6 cyl.,
FWD, automatic, 5 seat,
AM/FM cassette/CD player, All
season tires, silver, auto, a/c,
alarm, pwr brakes, pwr locks,
pwr seats, pwr steering, pwr
win, cruise, keyless, air bag,
ABS, leather, alloy wheels, tilt,
sunroof, rear defogger, fog
lights, !TRUE LOW MILES!
RUNS/DRIVES GREAT. JUST
SERVICED., $3,650, OBO
941-979-2071
2001 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS 91,000 mi, Ithr, Exc.
Con. $5000 941-625-6202
PONTIAC
7130


2001 PONTIAC GRAND AM
GTV6, loaded, sun roof
$4896 941-639-1155 DIr.
2004 PONTIAC GRAND AM Ice
cold A/C, Sun roof, Exc. Cond,
$4500 OBO, 941-575-0962
2007 PONTIAC G6 Nicely
equipped w/ Power and Sun-
roof. Very affordable, great
2nd car!! Only $7,994 dir Call
Paul 863-832-9732
SATURN
L7135


2001 SATURN SW tow
pkg, $2,800 941-223-5159
2002 SATURN L100, All Power
Opt! Great on Gas! $4,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
|USED SATURN Sedans &
Wagons $2,150 & UP.
SUV'S $3,695 & UP.
"The Saturn Guys"
Pro Power Auto Sales
4140 Whidden Blvd PC, 33980
941-627-8822


2008 SATURN OUTLOOK
68,779 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr

USED CAR DEALERS
7137


Mattas Motors
941-916-9222
Buy Here Pay Here

BMW
7148


1997 BMW 328i, CON-
VERTIBLE, 140K Mi. Good
Cond! $3,500. 941-882-3200
2004 BMW 325i, Auto,
Leather, Loaded, Moonroof!
$6,988 941-639-1601 P.G.
2006 BMW Z4
CONV, 51,715 mi, $19,785
877-219-9139 DIr

HONDA
7160


2000 HONDA PRELUDE
Only 79k, VTEC engine $6859
941-639-1155 ext. 5500 DIr.
2001 HONDA ACCORD
111,873 mi, V6, $6,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2002 HONDA CIVIC LX
4DR, 89,390 mi, $8,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 HONDA CR-V
86,724 mi, $9,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 HONDA ACCORD EXL
46,392 mi, $15,740
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD
78,564 mi, $13,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2006 HONDA ACCORD LX
85,760 mi, $10,975
877-219-9139 DIr
Employ Classified!
2007 HONDA ACCORD
83,618 mi, $11,324
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 HONDA CR-V EXL
47,093 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA CIVIC LX
4DR, 87,491 mi, $11,748
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 HONDA PILOT
67,160 mi, $15,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $20,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

LEiS O6F 5AR^%ISOT
1-877-211-8054
2009 HONDA ACCORD
45,132 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD
47,739 mi, $18,975
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA ACCORD EXL
44,114 mi, $18,455
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA CIVIC
42,790 mi, $13,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HONDA FIT
61,208 mi, $12,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
18,403 mi, $16,788
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD
28,056 mi, $19,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ACCORD LXP
CERT., 14,630 mi, $18,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
28,216 mi, $14,245
877-219-9139 DIr


2010 HONDA CIVIC 4 DR
18,065 mi, $14,450
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC 4 DR
78,047 mi, $11,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC 4DR
35,999 mi, $14,354
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC
4DR, 35,885 mi, $14,354
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CIVIC LX
4DR, 30,433 mi, $14,352
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
32,573 mi, $21,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V
AWD, 3,959 mi, $17,845
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V EX,
31,358 mi, $18,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V EXL,
Black, 51,262 mi, $21,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V LX,
35,060 mi, $17,487
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA CR-V LX,
40,419 mi, $16,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
29,533 mi, $15,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA FIT
32,121 mi, $14,245
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA INSIGHT
39,822 mi, $17,895
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 22,347 mi, $24,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 46,563 mi, $24,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, BIk, 39,941 mi,
$24,877877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
17,670 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
42,872 mi, $16,787
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
52,066 mi, $15,478
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT. 20,675 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
CERT., 34,452 mi,
$19,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD EXL
20,361 mi, $18,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ACCORD
EXL, Black, 26,176 mi,
$22,457 877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC 4DR
31,905 mi, $15,877
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC 4DR
47,512 mi, $14,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC
6,735 mi, $15,748
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CIVIC LX
24,976 mi, $16,877
877-219-9139 DIr
I Advertise Today! I
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
2WD, 24,410 mi, $22,451
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EX,
32,673 mi, $18,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V EXL,
CERT. 18,045 mi, $22,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V LX,
17,635 mi, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-V
NAVI, 36,214 mi, $23,457
877-219-9139 DIr


HONDA
7160


2011 HONDA CR-Z
16,005 mi, $18,759
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CR-Z EX
81,055 mi, $11,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA CRZ EX
40,253 mi, $14,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA FIT
16,291 mi, $16,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 LEXUs ES 350s
STARTING @ $27,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC

LEwKUS OF wA "SOTA
1-877-211-8054
2012 HONDA ACCORD
2 DR, Black, 15,589 mi,
$23,478 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
Cert., 16,771 mi, $21,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT, 21,051 mi, $20,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
CERT., 21,903 mi, $20,784
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ACCORD
EX, CERT., 12,874 mi,
$19,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
4 DR, CERT., 15,700 mi,
$19,875 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC
4 DR, CERT., 24,355 mi,
$18,754 877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CIVIC EXL,
CERT. 10,861 mi, $20,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
15,858 mi, $26,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA CR-V
CERT., 18,981 mi, $25,897
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
42,658 mi, $25,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA CIVIC
CERT. 1,774 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA PILOT
4,900 mi, $37,458
877-219-9139 DLR
2013 HONDA PILOT EXL
CERT. 5,417 mi, $33,875
877-219-9139 DLR

L HYUNDAI
W04:7163


2004 HYUNDAI SANTA FE ,
6 cyl., 110k mi, exc condition,
white, $5,250 941-637-8181
2004 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
64k miles, 6 cyl., very clean, new
tires, $5,500 ***SOLD***
2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
76,214 mi $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HYUNDAI SONATA
59,743 mi, $11,477
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HYUNDAI SONATA
LMTD, 27,654, $19,950
877-219-9139 DIr

KIA
L a 7177


2008 KIA SORENTO
60,753 mi, $13,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 KIA SORENTO EX AWD
Beautiful black cherry. All the
buttons, very clean vehicle.
Just 27,404 miles. Only
$22,984 dir Call Paul 863-
832-9732
2012 KIA SOUL Georgeous
black Kia! All power, great
sound! Only 19,243 miles! Just
$16,584 dir Call Paul 863-
832-9732


LEXUS
Less 7178S


2002 LEXUS ES300,
Leather, Moonroof, Navi!
$7,988 941-639-1601, DIr
2006 LEXUS IS 350
90,724 mi, $14,587
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $26,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
EIF91llAMA30E

1-877-211-8054

2012 LEXUS ES 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WIAL"
IOF 5ORA-SO1T
1-877-211-8054
2012 LEXUS HS 250H Sun-
roof, 7,042 mi, $27,950
877-219-9139 DIr

MAZDA
L 7180


I 2003 MAZDA 6 I
4 door sedan $6995
941-916-9222 DIr.
2007 MAZDA CX-7
Lthr, 70,798 mi, $12,987
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 MAZDA MIATA Florida
vehicle! Clean carfax and low
miles! Automatic transmission
with a soft top convertible.
Gray exterior with black cloth
interior. Only 43,581 miles at
the low price of $13,984! dir
Call or see Kristina
863-990-5787
2012 MAZDA MX-5
5Spd, 3,598 mi, $22,457
877-219-9139 DIr

L MERCEDES
44 7190


1988 MERCEDES 300SEL
Blk ext, Tan int, exc cond, 78k
mi, $5,000 941-615-7760
2005 MERCEDES C240,
Leather, Moonroof, PW, PL!
$13,988 941-639-1601 DIr.

NISSAN
7200


2006 NISSAN MAXIMA, Low Mi!
Loaded! Immaculate! $13,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2008 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5SL
Loaded with leather and sun-
roof. Beautiful car Just 66k
miles! Only $12,584 dir Call
Paul 863-832-9732
2010 NISSAN CUBE, Auto, All
Power Options! Unique! $13,988.
941-625-2141 Gorman Family

SAAB
7206


2006 SAAB 93 WAGON,
Ony 40K Mi! Leather, All Power!
$11,488 941-639-1601 DIr.
iAvr IF.
SUBARU
L4 7207


2010 SUBARU IMPREZA
AWD, 27,480 mi, $16,457
877-219-9139 DIr

TOYOTA
7210


1996 TOYOTA CAMRY LE,
4 Dr., 4 cyl., sunrf, auto, a/c,
all power. 98K orig, Sr owned,
garaged, like new inside/out.
$4800 941-451-8092


TOYOTA
7210


2001 TOYOTA AVALON
XLS, 1 owner, leather, sun
roof. $6975 941-639-1155
2004 TOYOTA CAMRY
37,293 mi, $11,854
877-219-9139 DIr
2004 TOYOTA SCION XB
88,354 mi, $7,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2005 TOYOTA COROLLA 4
Dr., 1.8 F.I., 5 Spd., Stickshift,
Silver, 132K Mi., Exc. Cond!
$5,400. 941-380-7289 No
Time Wasters Please. Punta Gorda
2005 TOYOTA HIGH-
LANDER 110,454 mi
$11,243 877-219-9139 DIr
2005 TOYOTA RAV4
67,906 mi, $12,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 TOYOTA AVALON
LTD, Lthr., Loaded, Moonroof!
$15,988 941-639-1601, DIr.
2007 TOYOTA CAMRY
75,379 mi, $13,475
877-219-9139 DIr
2007 TOYOTA PRIUS
50 mpg, 90k MI, Gray
$14,650 941-426-7844



2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
White, auto, 52k mi.,
$25,900 941- 916-9222 DIr.
2008 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER
White, auto, 52k mi.,
$25,900 941- 916-9222 DIr.
2010 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
Full power, nice tight car!
Excellent gas sipper w/ only
35k miles. Only $ 14,984. dir
Call Paul 863-832-9732
2010 TOYOTA YARIS, 30K
Mi! Auto, PW, PL! Gas Saver!
$12,988 941-639-1601, DIr
2012 TOYOTA CAMRY
25,820 mi, $19,875
877-219-9139 DIr


GUARANTEED
AUTOMOTIVE FINANCING
RATES AS LOW AS 1.9%!
941-625-2141

VOLKSWAGEN
7220


2005 VW JETTA SE Leather,
sunroof, auto, power! Great
gas saver! Only 35,912 miles!!
Just $12,284 dir Call Paul
863-832-9732
2007 VOLKSWAGEN RABBIT
75,435 mi, $11,245
877-219-9139 DIr
2008 VW R32, Low Miles!
Loaded! RARE! $19,988.
941-625-2141 GormanFaly
2012 VOLKSWAGEN TIGUAN
Black, 25,391 mi, $17,950
877-219-9139 DIr

L MISC. IMPORTS
:7240


2011 LEXUs RX 350s
STARTING @ $34,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WSLCE
L aE Ws .F 5HS6T.0
1-877-211-8054

ANTIQUES/
COLLECTIBLES
S7250


1963 CHEVY BISCAYNE
2Dr Sedan, stock, V8, 3 Spd
$13,500 Excellent condition
941-681-2296 After 4pm


1987 MUSTANG GT, Con-
vertible, 5 Speed, 113k Miles
$4900 941-766-8987






Bonus Puzzle!
Our readers have told us they love our Sun Newspaper puzzles.
From now on, when space allows, we'll give you some extras to help you keep your brain in
shape! Check your Sun Classified section for FREE EXTRA puzzles.
I I I


0 t+aX 0 C X + 0- A C o*0^0
ABCDEFGHiJKLMNOPQRSTOVWXYZ


CRYPTO FON
57 ( a 7 +*
>DeEerviLe Eke code Eo reveaL Eke alsKer!

Solve the code to discover words related to summertime.
Each number corresponds to a different letter.
(Hint: 5 = a)


14 9 7 14 25 13 7 8
Clue: 5Natural eight

17 5 18 19 23


10 26 26 18


3 5 24 5 2 13 26 7


SUMMER LIVING WORD SEARCH


EWLYMLA
OCEANLB
GTVSNAN
INHESBM
UUEIEEP

RIIFTAU
0 CSER A N L BN
G T V S N A N







E CM I P X X
C LA F L A W
TECNTAN
I G H I L F E
0 G 0 K IG N
NNWRGRE
NYE YAAM
H F Y C C E C
BFSHRRI
VALI K 0 S
NTV K N 0 T


H W T E L
E N T R H
HWTEL
ENTRH
A W 0 F P
TYIIE
K LB D T
WVARB
W V A R B
XCEON
R LA FR
ARNOB
A R N 0 B
DBULT
0 NADX
D V D N L
I HSLC
BU 0 RI
MVEMI
PA M LS
TIBIX
WON BM
A G C D S
T S E S S


OIVARTLU
DEN VOATB
SRFT O PS O
FIAV K W P W
X I I Y II Y R
A N S M K L B P
GRSHLCEL
WUDAIBAL
I 0 B Y U N D B
A YDNH O G E
E R 0 LT E T E
EGBC O ADP
NSREU O I D
AURDCRCI
IXAETURV
R R L D T I E I
GAAXIAK N
POEVASWG
SURFING
A L G NU S H R


Find the words hidden vertically, horizontally & diagonally throughout the puzzle.


ARCADE
BACKYARD
BARBECUE
BASEBALL
BEACH
BICYCLE
BOARDWALK
BONFIRE
CAMPSITE
CARNIVAL
COOL DOWN
CRUISING
DEHYDRATION
DIVING
FIREFLIES
FISHING
GRADUATE
HEAT


INGROUND
OCEAN
PARTIES
PROTECTION
RECREATION
RELAXATION
ROAD TRIP
SAILBOAT
SPF
SUMMER
SUNGLASSES
SURFING
SWIMMING
SWIMSUIT
TAFFY
ULTRAVIOLET
VOLLEYBALL
WATER


WORD SCRAMBLE
Rearrange the letters to spell
something pertaining to hot weather.


SEPPIRRE




al.dslad :Jasuy


I am a country recording artist
born on June 18, 1976. I have
mentored young singers on
a popular reality show.



uo0p1z$y d9VlU :jANSuy


WORDS


Thursday, June 13, 2013


ads.yoursun.net


E/N/C The Sun Classified Page 19





The Sun Classified Page 20 E/N/C


ads.yoursun.net


Thursday, June 13, 2013


COLLECTIBLES
7250

1970 CHEVROLET C10 250
cubic in. 3Spd, 63K miles,
VGC. $5400 775-870-3218

L BUDGET BUYS
l 7252


1993 HONDA ACCORD,
Auto, Power Windows & Locks!
$988 941-639-1601 DIr. P.G.
1998 DODGE CARAVAN,
165,000 mi, automatic,
7 Passenger seat, $900
941-257-8148
AUTOS WANTED
7260


CASH FOR JUNKERS
Available 24/7
941-286-3122, 623-5550
$$ TOP CASH $$
FOR CARS & TRUCKS.
DEAD OR ALIVE.
941-485-7515
WE BUY CARS
$400 CASH + UP
Frank 941-276-0204

F-0tA F


ACCESSORIES
7270

AUTO SCANNER OBD 11 for
vehicles '94 & newer $45
315-406-5402
BATTERY EVERSTART Maxx
65S top term. new w/receipt
$90, OBO 941-626-5099
BMW ROOF RACKS, Fits 3
Series. Complete with Hard-
ware. $125 802-343-5430
BRUSH GUARD Brand new,
blk, fits full size chevy trucks
$400 OBO 941-650-1246
DIESEL TRUCK Power Chip
Tple Dog Power Pup Down-
loader GM Dodge Ford $250,
OBO 941-488-4920
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online, you
will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**


ACCESSORIES
7270

GRILLE 1978 DODGE Truck-
Fits other years, good shape.
$25 941-286-5275
HARD TOP for 1998 Porsche
Boxter, silver arctic, just like new,
stored inside, in pristine cond.
$1,500, OBO 941-255-1174
HEADACHE RACK rear win-
dow rack fits full size truck
$300 941-628-2875
HUB CAPS SET OF (4) GMC 8-
NUT WHEEL CTR $50 714-
599-2137
HUBCAPS 3 Toyota 16" hub-
caps. $35 each. $105 941-
473-2418
MIRROR RIGHT Side for
1995-2002 Cavalier. New in
box. $35 941-764-0312


NITROUS TANK For Racing,
Includes Mount, No Hoses
$75, OBO 239-425-7961
POWER MIRROR new,Dr.
side,for 01-08 Chrys. minivan
$90, OBO 941-626-5099
TIRES- New take offs starting
@ $39.95 Installed & Balanced
Call for Inventory 941-639-5681
TOOL BOX diamond plate
fleet side fits full size truck
$150 941-628-2875
TRUCK BOX, Wanted, Cross
Bed, Plastic for full size truck
$50, OBO 941-637-1399
VANS
L7290


1996 DODGE CARAVAN high
mileage, work van, runs good,
$1200 OBO, 941-639-2239
2000 FORD MARK III
Conversion Van Raised Roof
$6995 941- 916-9222 DIr.
2002 CHRYSLER LX 7
pass.looks and runs excellent
priced to sell $3995.
941-626-7682
2005 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY 51,481 mi,
$18,950 877-219-9139 DIr
2010 DODGE Grand Caravan
WHEELCHAIR van, 10" lowered
floor & ramp. 941-8704325
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
47,529 mi, $26,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 51,264 mi $23,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2010 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL, 52,012 mi $24,754
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY Gray, 42,710 mi,
$22,874 877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
40,748 mi, $27,458
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
53,694 mi, $26,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT, 29,323 mi, $32,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA ODYSSEY
Lt Blue, 37,779 mi, $33,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 12,926 mi, $25,875
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
CERT., 14,112 mi, $30,457
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA ODYSSEY
Touring, 32,164 mi, $35,785
877-219-9139 DIr
2013 HONDA ODYSSEY
Touring, CERT, 4,761 mi,
$37,950 877-219-9139 DIr

TRUCKS/ PICK-UPS
7300


1996 TOYOTA Tacoma 4x4,
+200k mi., missing fr. bumper
$1600 OBO 941-249-1824


TRUCKS/ PICK-UPS
7300


1999 FORD F150 XLT Sup
Cab V8 151K mi tow pkg A/C,
$5,650, OBO 941-323-6078
2001 FORD RANGER,
A/C, Bedliner, CD! $4,988.
941-639-1601 DIr.
2004 DODGE RAM, Diesel Lar-
iat, 4x4, Must See! $22,988
941-625-2141 Gorman Family
2005 FORD F-250, Diesel,
Ext. Cab, Auto, AC, Bedliner!
$11,488 941-639-1601, DIr.
2010 TOYOTA TACOMA
SRS, 50,907 mi, $24,877
877-219-9139 DIr


VEHICLES
: 7305

2005 BUICK RAINIER SUV
36K ORIGINAL OWNER MILES,
FULLY EQUIPPED!
$10,900 941-743-8339
1 POR rcW I=
2005 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRACK XLT 50k mi
exc. cond. $11,900 obo
941-661-1861
2005 HUMMER H2 Leather,
sunroof, Navi, 88,105 mi,
$24,578 877-219-9139 DIr
2009 HUMMER H3
LTHR, NAVI, SNRF, 72,786 mi,
$21,845 877-219-9139 DIr
2010 LEXUS RX 350s
STARTING @ $30,990
0.9% FOR 48 MONTHS
1.9% FOR 60 MONTHS WAC
WIfILDE
i. -ru a .r-I N N Y;
1-877-211-8054
2011 HONDA PILOT
29,754 mi, $28,745
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT
31,771 mi, $27,844
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 HONDA PILOT EXL,
24,057 mi, $28,759
877-219-9139 DIr
2011 TOYOTA 4 RUNNER
SR5, 22,024 mi, $29,874
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
10,030 mi, $35,950
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
EXL, 21,954 mi, $29,744
877-219-9139 DIr
2012 HONDA PILOT
EXL, CERT, 19,899 mi,
$27,950 877-219-9139 DIr
BOATS-POWERED
7330


19' BAJA 1978 Ski &
fishing, 175 V6 Johnson
engine. Good shape, runs
great, new steering, car-
pet, fuel lines & seats.
$1,400/obo
941-286-6142
FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your boat
in our indoor showroom!
Sales Service Body
Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-244-5288
CharlotteMarine.com

NEED CASH?


Loaded, full canvas & screen-
ing, new engine 2009. Two
biminis, galley, enclosed head,
sleeps 4, fridge, inside stor-
age, galvanized trailer.
$18,500. (941)-493-8320


BOATS-POWERED
7330


20' 1994 BAYLINER Needs
Starter. Make Reasonable
Offer. 5262 Lovett. NP 941-
268-2121
20' PENN YAN Boat, Motor,
Trailer, Clean Title $250 239-
425-7961
8' PLASTIC FLAT BOTTOM
self bailing fold seats trolling
motor $495 941-822-1429
SMISC. BOATS
7333


12' JON BOAT w/2trolling
motors & batteries & a charg-
er. $250, OBO 941-623-3442

S OUTBOARD/
MARINE ENGINES
7334

IGNITION SWITCH Honda
and wiring harness. $35. 239-
204-1473

MARINE SUPPLY
& EQUIP.
L7338

54 INCH gaff 54 in. afco blk
and gold $40 941-759-0013
| Classified = Sales I
ANCHOR TRADITIONAL
w/100'x3/8" PGI $44, OBO
863-517-2496
CLIMBING LADDER mast-
mate 42', tool belt & carry
bag. $195 239-204-1473
FLOAT STYROFOAM 4' X 4' X
10" USED TWICE. $100 941-
575-8881
FREE MERCHANDISE
ADS!!
To place a FREE
merchandise ad go to:
yoursun.com
and place your ad.
Click on Classifieds
(LOCAL) then click on
SELL SOMETHING
and follow the prompts.
At the end...you will NOT be
asked for your credit card at
all. FREE ads are for
merchandise UNDER $500.
and the ad must be placed
online by you. One item per
ad, the ad must be 3 lines or
less, price must appear
in the ad. Your ad will appear
online & in print for 7 days!
Some restrictions do apply.
LIMIT 4 FREE ADS
PER WEEK
**lf you have never
placed an ad online,
you will need to register
when you get to the
sign in page)**
TOWABLE TUBE Inflatable,54
inch, with pump $50 941-637-
3801
CANOES/KAYAKS
L 7339


12' SEA EAGLE inflatable
370 sport wt. 26# PGI $150,
OBO 863-517-2496
16' CANOE Old Town
w/paddles very clean
$475, OBO 941-416-7777

TRAILER
& ACCESSORIES
7341

I 2003 5 X 8 I
UTILITY TRAILER $495
Mattas Motors 941-916-9222
I JUST ARRIVED!!
Triple Crown Utility Trailers
Mattas Motors 941-916-9222
ROY'S TRAILER COUNTRY
New- Pre-Owned Cargo- Utility
Trailers Parts Repairs-Tires
Welding 941-575-2214.
4760 Taylor Rd P.G.
TRAILER 4 X 8 WITH RAMPS
$235 941-460-0506


SCOOTERS
7360

1984 YAMAHA VIRAGO
500cc, Red, 7,500 mi. always
Garaged, Great cond., $1,700
Englewood 704-223-0927
1996 CARGA 49cc pedal
type $495 941-822-1429
1997 HONDA VALKYRIE, low
mileage, custom paint, a rare
beauty. $6000 941-623-9750
1999 HONDA CR125 rolling
chassis, no motor $500. 2002
CR125 motor, new crank &
cycldr. $600 941-475-2695
2002 H-D CVO WIDE GLIDE
Showrm cond, 13K mi, med-
ical cond forces sale, prof
svc'd always, needs nothing,
$10,900 OBO, 941-204-0445
2005 HONDA VTX 1300,
hard bags, windshield, tack,
cobra pipes, custom paint etc.
$3500 OBO 941-625-4950
2006 500CC Kawasaki Vulcan
Cruiser, 4K mi, Exc.cond. garage-
kept, $3,800, 941-769-0730
2008 HONDA VTX 1300T
14,650 mi, Loaded!! W/Extras
Must See! $6,700 941-474-5771
2009 SUZUKI GS500F
Black/grey colors 487cc 4-
stroke w/6 speed trans. 3k
miles Just serviced. 1 owner.
$3550 obo 941-979-2071
2011 GMW EX150, Only 46
Miles! Health Forces Sale!
$1,300. obo 941-587-6273

ADVERTISE

In

The Classifieds!
2011 H-D SUPERGLIDE,
Apple Green/Vivid Black.
$4000 Extras, transferrable
service plan. 27,500 mi. Exc.
ond. $8000 OBO 941-204-3742
GMW 150
2011 Orange $800
941-764-7621
SCOOTER brand new, only
half mile on it! 49cc. beautiful
$499 call 9414830779
STAT CARRIER w/ramp Blue-
ox Mtrcycle & remove tie-
down arms $100 717451-2019
UTV
Lwa 7366


2010 BMX UTV 500C
4 seat, 4WD, Must See!!
$4995 941-916-9222
2010 BMX UTV 500C
4 seat, 4WD, Must See!!
$4995 941-916-9222


TRAVEL TRAILERS
S7370

WANTED All TT's, Motor
Homes, 5th whls, Pop-Ups,
Van conversion & passenger
vans. Cash paid on the spot.
for quick sale. Parts &
Service Avail 941-347-7171

MOTOR HOMES/
RVs
7380

19' GREAT WEST ELITE,
2006 Ford V8, Class B,
23,000 mi, excellent condition
$32,000 941-575-6690
1986 PACE AERO 94K
miles, Onan Generator.
Clean. $3250/obo (941)-
275-4848

2013 WINNEBAGOS
2012 Model CLEARANCE!
NO.1 SELLING RV
RVWorld of Nokomis Inc.
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com


MOTOR HOMES/
RVs
: 7380

2000 FORREST RIVER
GEORGIE BOY 24 FT. RV.
Exc COND. VERY RELIABLE
FORD V-10/ EVERYTHING
WORKS PERFECTLY. $15,900.
PUNTA GORDA 941-639-2236
DIESEL MECHANIC
ON DUTY
RV World of Nokomis, Inc
2110 US 41, Nokomis
1-75 Exit 195
1-800-262-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

FREE CONSIGNMENT!
No fees to sell your RV
on our lot!
Sales Service
Body Shop Upholstery
Charlotte RV & Marine
4628 Tamiami Trail at
Kings Hwy., Port Charlotte
941-225-2712
CharlotteRV.com


e--








LUXURY MOTOR HOMES
2013 MODELS UP TO 45
COME SEE........LETs TADE!
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
www.rvworldinc.com

RV Collision Repairs
Customer and Insurance
Modern shop, quality work!
FREE ESTIMATES.
RV WORLD Inc. of Nokomis
2110 US 41- Nokomis
941-966-2182

RV SERVICE SPECIALS
Lg. Parts Showroom
RV Wash
New tires & balance
RV propane & bottles
Wash & Hand Wax
Water leak test
Roof Reseal
Brake Flush
Factory Warrnaty
ALL models
RV World Inc of Nokomis
2110 US 41 Nokomis,
941-966-2182
Employ Classified!

RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/TRADE
CALL: MARK
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182

RVs WANTED
CASH/CONSIGN/TRADE
CALL: MARK
RVWORLD INC OF NOKOMIS
2110 US 41 NOKOMIS
941-966-2182
SATURN TOW-CARS
Starting at $2,150. Blue-Ox
Tow hitches sold & installed.
THE SATURN GUYS
PRO-POWER AUTO SALES
4140 Whidden Blvd PC 33980
(941) 627-8822.
RV/CAMPER PARTS
S7382


5TH WHEEL ADCO Cover Fits
37-40 ft $100 717-451-2019
FIFTH WHEEL curt slide hitch
like new with rails $325 941-
662-5514
STABILIZER JACK 5th wheel
Tri-pod $75 717-451-2019
TIRE LOCKING Chocks
adjustable for RVs $40 717-
451-2019




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