Updated: Glimpses from the Archive : Slides for the Panama Silver, Asian Gold : Migration, Money, and the Making of the ...

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Material Information

Title:
Updated: Glimpses from the Archive : Slides for the Panama Silver, Asian Gold : Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean Digital Humanities Course
Physical Description:
Presentation slides
Language:
English
Creator:
Phillips, Richard F.
McClure El Neil, Michelle
Losch, Paul
Rosenberg, Leah
Thorat, Dhanashree
Publisher:
Latin American Collection, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Department of English, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Ganja
Coolie labor
Trinidad
French Guiana
Jamaica
British Guiana
Palisadoes Plantation
East Asians
Chinese
Gold mining
Vagrancy

Notes

General Note:
Source: University of Florida Latin American Collection, Gainesville, FL. Resources: Microfilm of The Creole, Port of Spain Gazette, and Royal Gazette of British Guiana

Record Information

Source Institution:
UF Latin American Collections
Holding Location:
UF Latin American Collections
Rights Management:

This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this work non-commercially, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.
System ID:
AA00016150:00003

Full Text

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Glimpses from the Archive The University of Florida Latin American Collection www.uflib.ufl.edu/lac Richard F. Phillips, ricphil@uflib.ufl.edu Michelle McClure El Neil, michelleelneil@uflib.ufl.edu Paul Losch plosch@ufl.edu Leah Rosenberg, rosenber@ufl.edu

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Online from LAC Webpage : www.uflib.ufl.edu/lac The Caribbean history reader (edited by Nicola Foote): call# LAC F2175.C326 2012 Indentured labor and the integration of Trinidad into the world economy (dissertation by Karen S. Dhanda; Syracuse 2000): call# LAC HD4875.T7 D42 2000; Full text on PROQUEST Royal Gazette of British Guiana [microfilm]: (most years 1804 1883) call# LAC 079.881 R88 The Creole [microfilm]: call# LAC 079.881 C916 (most years 1856 1882, 1905) Port of Spain Gazette [microfilm]: call# LAC 079.7298 P839 (most years 1828 1956) Selected Materials on the Indentured in the Caribbean from the UF Latin American Collection

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Map of Caribbean Basin

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Notice Royal Gazette (Jan. 3, 1830) feel thankful to any person who will lodge the Negro Boy WILLIAM, her property, in the County Jail, or deliver him to his

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Lots & buildings, slaves, household furniture Royal Gazette (Jan. 5, 1830) known prime Carpenter Negroes: Phillander, Joe, Richard, Harry. Also, the woman Kitty a good huckstress and servant of all work.

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for sale Royal Gazette (Jan. 7, 1830) Also the following slaves cooper (?); Cubbah and Angel washers and domestics

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Palisadoes Plantation 1875 Jamaican Gazette supplement (Mar. 25, 1875) 10,000 cocoa nuts planted last year Plantation is worked by penitentiary prisoners Donkeys have carried hundreds of tons of manure applied to trees

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Surinaamsche Courant ( Jan 20, 1876)

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Guiana. The Rush to their Famed Gold Fields Port of Spain Gazette (Aug. 19, 1876) A once dead and antiquated town is rejuvenated and crowded due to gold rush people coming from all over the globe.

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Mr. Quintin Hogg voyage in private steam yacht Royal Gazette (Jan. 7, 1877) his whole family household with him wife, children, and

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Royal Gazette (Jan. 9, 1877) Authorize the detention of infirm vagrants in an Alms House.

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Royal Gazette (Jan. 13, 1877) Notice: IMMIGRATION OFFICE, Saturday, 13 th Jany 1877 The Ship Artist, 1,371 Tons from Calcutta Date of Indenture, 30 th Novt 1876 The Year is 1879, and the women have been brought by train from Benares to the port city of Calcutta. Small boats ferry them to a ship, the Artist, anchored in the mighty Hooghly River. ( Ramabai Espinet The Swinging Bridge, p 3)

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Royal Gazette (Jan. 2, 1877) from the house of her skin black girl of eight years

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Gold Mining Titles The Creole (Mar. 31, 1882) Governor, in the name of Her Majesty, has power to grant licenses authorizing persons to occupy and extract gold and precious stones from Crown

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L ands allotted to them are useless and even fatal with no drinking water The Creole (May 12, 1882)

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Loss of Gold The Creole (Mar. 31, 1882) a hing left Georgetown with eight men to

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The Creole (March 31, 1882)

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Feast of the Assumption The Creole (Aug. 11, 1882) The Feast of the Assumptions will be held on Sunday the 27 th with a special train to transport.

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A Festa Do Espirito Sancto The Creole (Mar. 12, 1882)

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Post Office Wanted up the Demerara The Creole (Mar. 31, 1882) at Soodyke is urgently difficult to get letters on board of the river steamer.

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She is Determined to Live in Gaol Port of Spain Gazette (Oct. 1, 1896) Coolie woman charged again 7 days in gaol for vagrancy. Zaban is an indentured immigrant to Woodford Lodge estate.

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The Ganja Evil introduced by East Indian coolies Port of Spain Gazette (Oct. 13, 1896) Topic of interest in Jamaica: the coolie use of ganja. Talks of the need for Government to take measures to prevent the smoking habit taking a firm hold on people.

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Jamaica Cigars form a line Port of Spain Gazette ( July 18, 1896 ) Cigars ran out disappointing a constant stream of customers.

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Another leper run in Coolie man found begging in the street emitting an offensive smell sufficient to warrant his isolation. Port of Spain Gazette (Sept. 16, 1896)

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Port of Spain Gazette (July 2, 1903) Indian found sleeping on a footpath and not giving a good account sent to jail for 14 days hard labor.

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The Barbados Advocate (Jan. 23, 1926) Great Britain desires to send its surplus population to settle in Australia and Canada. Must ensure that settlers are no emigrants from Southern Europe nor India or any races of a darker hue. Emigration in the Empire

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Selected Materials on Afro Caribbeans in Panama Online from LAC Webpage Panama and the Canal http://dloc.com/pcm (includes photographs, books, newspapers, and yearbooks.) Coniff Michael. Black labor on a white canal: Panama, 1904 1981 (on E reserve) Isthmian Historical Society competition for the best true stories of life and work on the Isthmus of Panama during the construction of the Panama Canal (dLOC.com)

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Location of the Canal Map from Wikicommons http:// upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/Pm map.png

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The Canal Facilitated the Expansion of US Military and Economic Power Prior to the Building of the Panama Canal, ships traveling between the east and west coasts of the United States had to go around the southern tip of the South America. This map shows the route of the USS Oregon, an war ship that took 67 days to arrive in the Havana Harbor in order to fight in the Spanish American War because it was stationed on the West Coast. Website, http://ussoregon.tripod.com/OregonVoyage.html

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The US considered both Nicaragua and Panama as sites for an interoceanic Canal http ://3.bp.blogspot.com/ yqaByw44BWI/UBZ5S7wLf8I/AAAAAAAACCY/usY9NkfxFTo/s1600/Nicaragua Canal23oct03a.gif

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to assess Nicaragua as site for the canal. 1870 1871 All Stereographs and photographs are courtesy of the Panama Canal Museum Collection and Rebecca Fitzsimmons unless otherwise stated.

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to assess Nicaragua as site for the canal. 1870 1871

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The Panama Canal augmented the expansion of US power and territory following the Spanish American War and the acquisitions of Hawaii and Texas Wiki commons. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:10kMiles.JPG

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The Daily Gleaner, 2 December 1884, p.2 Misleading promises made by the French Panama Canal Project accommodations of every description have been erected along the entire line and the wages hitherto liberal have been Approximately 20,000 West Indians died working on the French Canal.

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French Canal Project recruits; Jamaican warns of the probability of Cholera in the Canal Zone The Daily Gleaner, 29 January 1887, p. 2 It would be a terrible thing should it be found necessary to refuse landing to a ship of Jamaica labourers fleeing to the island from the horrors of Pestilence.

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Many Afro Caribbean workers were employed in the fight against the mosquito and Yellow Fever Abbott Willis J. Panama and the canal in Picture and Prose New York, 1913. NYPL digital collection.

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The Daily Gleaner, 8 June 1940, p 31 labour was going its swashbuckling way to the little republic and coming back cockier than ever to swagger before the eyes of the

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Casa Mueller: a Symbol of Afro Caribbean Living Conditions and Housing The Silver People : http :// thesilverpeoplechronicle.com/2008/10/casa muller.html and Melva Lowe de Goodin Afrodescendientes en el Istmo de Panam 1501 2012, p. 59 Many Afro Caribbean families lived in this building and many businesses occupied the ground floor, the Casa Mueller, in the Caledonia section of Panama City. It was torn down in 1970.

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the Canal Zone, many West Indians lived in Coln and Panam City

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Housing for Gold Employees with families Was significantly more comfortable and was provided by the Canal.

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Separate entrances at the Commissary for black (silver) and white (gold) employees

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Matching the captions with the image can be a challenge with historical photographs and stereographs as is knowing why the three (black) men in this photo have been marked with an X.

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contrasted with U.S. Officers part of frontier guard, Bayamo Courtesy of the Panama Canal Museum Collection and Rebecca Fitzsimmons

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Naos Island which is Courtesy of the Panama Canal Museum Collection and Rebecca Fitzsimmons

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Courtesy of the Panama Canal Museum Collection and Rebecca Fitzsimmons

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Laborers Rafting Spiles for Cofferdams, Balboa, Canal Zone.

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Helping to Solve the Great Canal Problem Drilling, Blasting and Shoveling Through the Rock at Paraiso Panama, Canal Zone.

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Who Built the Panama Railroad? This Railroad was built across the Isthmus of Panama by American Engineers and American Capital 5,000 Jamaicans emigrated to Panama to work on the Railroad between 1850 and 1855

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Who Built the Panama Canal? This machine is one of the giants that have come into existence during the last ten years. It is the result of American thought, push, and enterprise. Keystone View Company #20852 The American Steam Shovel

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The American Steam Shovel It would take a half dozen men with shovels 15 minutes to fill the wagon. The steam shovel does it in 15 seconds # Solve the Great Canal

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Negroes at Work Near Cristobal

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Many Caribbean people did not work directly on the Canal Over 150,000 Afro Antillians immigrated to Panama during the US Canal Project. The United States only officially contracted 31,000