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Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC ) Comprehensive Sustainability Plan (2012-2015)

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015400/00001

Material Information

Title: Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC ) Comprehensive Sustainability Plan (2012-2015)
Alternate Title: Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC ) Comprehensive Sustainability Plan, July 1, 2012 To June 30, 2015
Physical Description: Sustainability plan
Language: English
Creator: Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC )
Wooldridge, Brooke
Taylor, Laurie N.
Vargas-Betancourt, Margarita
Rogers, Judith
Mendoza, Ana
Silvera, Vicki
Williams, Gayle
Rickmann, Jennifer
Barradas, Efraín
Widmer, Lois
Publisher: Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC )
Place of Publication: Miami, FL
Publication Date: 2011

Notes

General Note: Prepared by the dLOC Sustainability Committee for July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2015, implemented early in 2011. Sustainability plan for sustained, ongoing stable growth in parallel with certain costs being institutionalization as core to institutional programmatic needs and mission.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
System ID: AA00015400:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015400/00001

Material Information

Title: Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC ) Comprehensive Sustainability Plan (2012-2015)
Alternate Title: Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC ) Comprehensive Sustainability Plan, July 1, 2012 To June 30, 2015
Physical Description: Sustainability plan
Language: English
Creator: Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC )
Wooldridge, Brooke
Taylor, Laurie N.
Vargas-Betancourt, Margarita
Rogers, Judith
Mendoza, Ana
Silvera, Vicki
Williams, Gayle
Rickmann, Jennifer
Barradas, Efraín
Widmer, Lois
Publisher: Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC )
Place of Publication: Miami, FL
Publication Date: 2011

Notes

General Note: Prepared by the dLOC Sustainability Committee for July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2015, implemented early in 2011. Sustainability plan for sustained, ongoing stable growth in parallel with certain costs being institutionalization as core to institutional programmatic needs and mission.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Applicable rights reserved.
System ID: AA00015400:00001


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! D IGITAL L IBRARY OF THE C ARIBBEAN (DLOC) C OMPREHENSIVE S USTAINABILITY P LAN P REPARED BY THE D LOC S USTAINABILITY C OMMITTEE J ULY 1, 2012 TO J UNE 30, 2015

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! The Digital Library of the Caribbean's diverse partners serve an international community of scholars, students, and citizens by working together to preserve and to provide enhanced electronic access to cultural, historical, legal, governmental, and resear ch materials in a common web space with a multilingual interface. The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is a cooperative of partners within the Caribbean and circum Caribbean that provide s users with access to Caribbean cultural, historical and research materials held in archives, libraries, and private collections. dLOC comprises collections that speak to the similarities and differences in histories, cultures, languages and governmental s ystems. Archives Nationales d'Haiti Aruba National Library Association for Cultural Equity Bibliothque Ha•tienne de St Louis de Gonzagu Bibliothque Ha•tienne des Pres du St Esprit Bibliot eca Nacional de Cuba JosŽ Mart’ Biblioteca Rafael Herrera Cabral Belize National Library Br own University John Hay Library Caribbean Community Secretariat Caribbean Information Resource Network The College of The Bahamas T he Cuban Genealogy Club Educa Vision Inc. Duke University Libraries Florida International University Florida State University Fundaci—n Global Democracia y Desarrollo HistoryMiami KITLV National Library of Jamaica University of Central Florida University of Florida University of Miami University of the Netherlands Antilles Universidad de Oriente M ISSION P URPOSE AND V ISION P ARTNER I NSTITUTIONS

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! University of South Florida T he University of the Virgin Islands WIDECAST Executive dLOC Members: The College of the Bahamas Library Florida International University Libraries Florida State University Libraries University of Central Florida Libraries University of Florida Libraries The University of Virgin Islands Library Sustaining dLOC Member: University of Miami Libraries Supporting dLOC Members: Florida International University Latin American and Caribbean Center (LACC) Contributing dLOC Members: Brown University John Hay Library Caribbean Community Secretariat Princeton University Library University of Florida: Efra’n Barradas, Laurie Taylor, Margarita Vargas Betancourt, Lois Widmer Florida International University: Ana Mendoza, Jennifer Rickmann Vicki Silvera, Gayle Williams dLOC Executive Board : Judith Rogers dLOC Director : Brooke Wooldridge DLOC S USTAINABILITY C OMMITTEE M EMBERS M EMBER I NSTITUTIONS

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! Section O ne addresses the current environment for dLOC including the current products and services, organization and governance structure, and a value proposition and market placement. Section Two outlines key strategies for dLOC's continued growth and the management plan for the next three years. Key Point s Section One Current products and services o dLOC provides free access to more than 1.5 million pages of Caribbean content in multiple languages from more than 30 partners. o dLOC partners gain access to the already operating dLOC website with online web presence, digital preservation and archiving, digitization and digital curation tools and training. o Scholars collaborate in the dLOC environment building upon the shared collections to create collaborative research projects and exhibits o Primary and second ary schools, universities and the community learn about the Caribbean and have access to research resources through targeted outreach events. Organization and Governance o Partners, publishers and members all have defined roles and contribute to the success of the collaboration. o The Executive and Academic Advisory Boards provide leadership and governance for the project. o The Administrative and Technical hosts provide support and sustainability for the program. Value Proposition and Market Placement o dLOC is uniquely positioned as the largest and most well known open access repository of Caribbean research materials supporting preservation and access for Caribbean Studies. o dLOC represents the most cost effective and efficient solution for access to Caribbean r esearch resources based on research of the existing commercial and open access resources; especially in an environment where open access repositories are increasing ly understood and operated as viable solution s Key Points Section Two Partners and Members Increase the number of Partners (currently 32) by 2 5 partners per year o The number of dLOC partners has grown steadily since the inception of the project; we currently support 32 partners. With the current staffing levels of the Executive Summary

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! project, the addi tion of between two and five partners per year is sustainable. Increase the number of Institutional Members (currently 11) to 25 by June 2013 o Currently, dLOC has 11 institutional members. The goal is to increase membership to 25 institutional members b y June 2013. A list of potential institutional members will be encouraged to join dLOC through letters, phone calls and personal meetings Increase promotion to new Partners and Members by adding several methods: o Rotating the new iterations of the success ful, existing Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Conferences through the member institutions o Create a calendar or other promotional piece sent to Partners and Members o As funding permits, create a t raveling e xhibit and offer to Partners and Members o As funding permits, award small seed funding to support local digitization Donor Development Over the next 3 years we will aim to have 1 2 meetings with possible donors per month and submit 3 4 proposals to potential funders per year. Release and promote a donor sponsored digitization program o Donations can be used to support the creation of specific resources, exhibits or to digitize entire collections. Specific scholars or other individuals have research or personal interests that can be channele d to support the ongoing development of dLOC. Whether it is a specific book or microfilm reel, an exhibit or an entire collection, these special projects, when housed in a collaborative repository such as dLOC, allow users to discover and utilize resource s in a very efficient manner. Rather than continuing to develop small, isolated collections or websites, or inter library loan one digital copy of a resource, dLOC allows the resources to be shared and searched along with other Caribbean resources. The a dministrative team will promote the availability of these opportunities for collaboration through its website, promotional materials, at conferences and with targeted individuals. Digitize a Resource $100 and up : Contribute to the growing body of books, periodicals, photographs, manuscripts, etc. available freely via dLOC. Create an Exhibit $10,000 and up (varies according to the scope of the project) : S upport the development of an online exhibit to showcase the materials and facilitate their use in teaching and research. Sponsor a Collection $25,000 and up (varies according to the scope of the project) : H elp to preserve and make accessible new content not currently available online to the millions of dLOC users every year. This funding will support the selection, digitization, electronic preservation and distribution of new resources. Grants The dLOC t eam will develop at least one proposal for a project of more than $100,000 and two proposals for projects less than $100,000 each year from 2012 2015.

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! Section I: dLOC Overview A. Products and Services A.1: Caribbean Co n tent dLOC provides access to more than 1.5 million pages of Caribbean cultural, historical and research materials currently held in archives, libraries, and private collections. Materials include multiple formats including manuscripts, books, articles, audio, vide o, and photography and languages including English, Dutch, French, Haitian Creole, Papiamento, Papiamentu, Portuguese, and Spanish. More than 30 partners from the Caribbean, the United States and Europe provide access to their collections. The newspaper collection provides access to more than 30,000 issues from 150 titles across the region. Significant collections of literature from the English, French and Spanish speaking Caribbean provide valuable resources for research and teaching. Archival document s range from the records of Cuban sugar plantations and early Haitian government correspondence to the records of the struggle of the Gay Freedom movement in Jamaica. Photographs include public works during the US occupation of Haiti, V odou ceremonies from the travels funded by the William L. Bryant Foundation, Ke n neth Treister's historical architecture photographs, among others. Audio and video are a new resource for dLOC, but key collections include the Maya Deren recordings and the b udding Haitian Digital Art Archive. This brief summary is not comprehensive, but rather provides a snapshot of the type of content available in the collection. A.2: Technical Infrastructure for Part n ers dLOC partners gain access to the already opera ting dLOC website built upon the University of Florida Digital Collections technologies which includes four core components: 1) Online web presence, sophisticated online presence powered by the robust SobekCM digital library and asset management system; 2) Digital preservation and archiving, with integrated processing support wherein all materials loaded online are also archived for long term digital preservation with the Florida Digital Archive); 3) Fully featured digitization and digital curation tools, with integrated processing support so that all materials and collections see maximum benefit from the technologies including high ly advanced optical character recognition ( OCR ) text conversion software and zoom image technologies ; and, 4) Training. Online Web Presence The SobekCM digital library technology employed by dLOC is open source, freeware developed

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! and maintained by the University of Florida Libraries by two programmers at a cost of $150,000 USD annually, on more than $60,000 USD of computer and networ k hardware. This cost is extremely affordable compared to the open marketplace because UF leverages the same resources to power dLOC, the Florida Digital Newspaper Library, and other large collaborative digital libraries to take advantage of benefits of sc ale. The UF programmers also collaboratively engage with dLOC for usability and feature enhancements with improvements for a dLOC partner also benefitting UF. Enhancements to SobekCM specifically driven by UF for UF have also always benefited dLOC. This c an be seen with the "Map View" which was added to support another UF project and, becaus e this addition was made to the core SobekCM software, it was also automatically added for dL O C. dLOC is optimized for maximum interoperability with library and archival systems as well as optimized for search engine findability. This ensures that patrons can easily access materials from traditional library catalogs as well as easily finding materials thr ough simple web searches like with using Google. 1 Of critical importance, dLOC presents a centralized portal for accessing all materials while simultaneously supporting the ability to search individual partner collections and thematic collections. Further the technology is capable of displaying content under alternate pages. These elements are essential requirements for scholarly cyberinfrastructure and of paramount interest to scholars because it allows materials to be preserved, accessed, and placed in context which is a requirement for new and developing forms of digital scholarshi p. Digital Preservation and Archiving As the Technical Host, the University of Florida Libr a ries are committed to long term digital preservation of all materials in the UF D igital Collections and in UF supported collaborati ve projects as with dLOC Redundant digital archives, adherence to proven standards, and rigorous quality control methods protect digital objects. The UF Libraries provide a comprehensive approach to digital preservation, including technical supports, reference services for both online and offline archived files, and support services by providing training and consultation for digitization standards for long term dig ital preservation. Fully Featured Digitization and Digital Curation Tools The SobekCM digitization and digital curation tools developed and maintained by the UF Libraries are fully featured for integration with the existing technologies and workflows in ga lleries, libraries, archives, and museums. The SobekCM digitization and digital curation tools are available in desktop and online versions and have extensive, user friendly documentation. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 1 In April 2012, thanks to the SobekCM system support for search engine optimization, a collection in the UF Digital Collections was awarded the Center for Research Libraries' Primary Source Award for Access.

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! These tools are employed by all partners, with new features and sup ports added regularly. Importantly, the tools have been developed specifically with user needs in mind for ease of use and the lowest possible demands on resources. For instance, dLOC technology includes tools that automatically create records using all of the existing information from traditional library catalog records ( MARC based catalog records ) traditional archival findi ng guides (EAD based), and spreadsheets. This integrates with existing workflows and resources, preventing duplicative wo rk. Similarly, the same tools for conducting digitization and digital curation also track the status of that work, with "Admin" views and reporting tools for conducting, tracking, and managing production. These tools have been successfully tested at small scale, with a single person at a single institution, and large scale, with 10 full time staff and 20 30 part time workers conducting digitization and digital curation at the UF Libraries. In addition to the UF developed and maintained tools, UF supports se veral proprietary software packages, leveraging the support from UF at no cost to dLOC. This includes t he optical character recognition ( OCR ) technology that enables full text searching which has a cost of $60,000 USD if the partner were to buil d out the same technology. The Aware zoom image technology has a cost of $25,000 USD. Trai n ing dLOC offers extensive support and training for its partners in digital preservation and training to contribute content to the dLOC Content Management System. The tri lingual digitization training manual, online videos and other supports provide partners with the skills to build local digitization programs. Extensive documentation of both the technology and funding proposals are prov ided freely via the dLOC website for partners and other projects to research. Since 2005, dLOC has delivered on site training to more than 400 people during 30 in country trainings. Annual meetings and training usually takes place at the Caribbean Library Association (ACURIL ) conference through workshops, presentations and posters. A.3: Collaborative Research Comm u nity dLOC is the only digital library that provides access to a broad representation of Caribbean resources. Through its Academic Advisory Board, dLOC is working to strengthen digital scholarship and in turn build thematic collections. The sheer amount of content accessible makes dLOC an obvious partner in digital scholarship in the region. In 2009, dLOC hosted its first Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age conference and a second is planned for the summer 2 0 12. dLOC is embedded into both the academic and li brary academic communities and regularly presents at the: Latin American Studies Associatio n Caribbean Studies Association

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! Haitian Studies Association Asso ciation of Caribbean Libraries Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin Ame rican Library Materials American Library Association In addition, partnerships with the Center for Research Libraries and the Global Research Network through its subgroup CIFNAL provide a venue for broad collaboration. dLOC was also invited to partner with the f irst THATCamp C aribe (The Humanities and Technology Camp) based on wide recognition of dLOC as a singular and unique digital humanities project. Collaborative research projects on Haiti and Jamaica demonstrate the power of bringing the resources and the scholars into con versation in a digital space. A.4: Education and Community Outreach F ree access to these resources in the community and the primary and secondary schools enables users who are often excluded in the current model of academic resources, providing the general public with the same access to resources for Caribbean Studies As such, dLOC focuses on creating awareness and support for schools and the general community users of the resource. R esources created for these trainings become available on dL OC for others to study. Teacher training workshops provide teachers with the knowledge and skills to incorporate the dLOC into the classroom. Co llaboration with one teacher from Miami, Florida, led to the First Annual Caribbean Challenge where Miami Dade County high school students came to Florida International University to learn about researching primary and secondary sources using the content available in dLOC. Community exhibits, film screenings and lectures also support community interest in Caribbe an history, culture, science and politics. B. dLOC Organization and Governance Structure The collaborative, inclusive structure of the program serves as one of its greatest strengths. Librarians, academics, digital technic ians, educators and many others are able come together in a community to serve Caribbean Stud i es. dLOC's organization ref lects its international mission dedicated to promoting and supporting the field, providing improved access to Caribbean resources, and fostering a collaborative digital library community in the Caribbean region. The key groups supporting the structure of the project are the Partners, the Members, the Executive Board, the Academic Advisory Board, and the Administrative and Technical Hosts. B.1 Partners Institutional Partners are the cornerstone of the dLOC collaboration. The commitment of partners to dig itize and make materials from their collections accessible online serves to further

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! Caribbean Studies and provides a layer of electronic preservation for their collections. The power of aggregating these collections in one place, maki ng many fully text se archable across collections, serves to create new possibilities for rese a rch. dLOC is open to libraries, archives, museums, research centers, associations, publishers, and vendors that meet the eligibility criteria. Partners in the project may: 1) contribu te digital content to a centralized repository; 2) make their digital collections available to dLOC through compliance with the Open Archives Initiative (OAI); and/or 3) contribute metadata and contextual resources to support materials in dLOC. Associate Partnership is open to individuals, organizations or institutions that have appropriate collections of Caribbean content but do not have the resources or expertise to digitize the collections. Associate Partners may submit their content into dLOC through c urrent institutional partners who will make provide representation on their behalf at governance meetings. B.2: Publishers Publishers also partner with dLOC and increase the access to their holdings. Some publishers make out of print content accessibl e via dLOC while others digitize from partner collections and provide access to those resources in the dLOC collection as well as in their databases. Both of these collaborations provide valuable content to the dLOC collections. B.3: Members The members are the newest category supporting the dLOC mission. Members provide annual dues to support the ongoing development and outreach of the program. This development includes supporting the technical infrastructure costs, partner training and the development and promotion of the collections. Membership dues have both Caribbean and non Caribbean rates and are managed by the administrative host institution with approval by the Executive Committee. A percentage of membership dues may also support a n endowment to ensure long term sustainability. An elected representative of the Institutional Members may represent the group at the annual Executive Committee meeting. B.4: Executive Committee The Executive Committee is the governing body of dLOC. The partners and members maintain the leadership of the program through this body. Committee members oversee the governance, create the policies for the collaborative and provide financial oversight. The Committee consists of nine partner representatives el ected from the institutional representatives by the partners, one institutional representative from one of the host institutions, and a representative of the Institutional Members and the Chair of the Scholarly Advisory Board, non voting, for a total of 12 members. At the annual meeting, the partners vote to elect members of the committee with

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! expiring terms. B.5 Academic Advisory Board The Scholarly Advisory Board consists of seven representatives appointed by the Executive Committee. The representativ es of the Board provide leadership in relevant academic disciplines, in curriculum development, and/or in technical issues. It reviews proposals for collections, nominates collections for inclusion, reviews standards developed by subcommittees and assists with securing funding. B.6 Administrative and Technical Hosts The host institutions provide vital support and sustainability for the program. One institutional representative from one of the host institutions (technical and administrative) serves on the Executive Committee. The Administrative Host Institution provides support for the administration of the program, including all processing and distribution of membership dues. The Technical Host Institution provides support for the online access, system, to ols, and long term digital preservation of all materials. C. Value Proposition and Market Placement In the field of Caribbean Studies and librarianship, the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is uniquely positioned as the largest and most well known open access reposition of Caribbean research materials. Caribbean Studies has traditionally presented obstacles for researchers due to the inaccessibility of research materials. These are held in libraries and archives in the country of origin, neighboring countries, and other libraries in the United States and Europe. The costs to travel to this region are high due to th e tourist economy; furthermore, the funding for libraries, archives, and preservation is limi t ed. dLOC was created in 2004 to serve librarians and archivists as they worked to provide digital access to their collections. The program's shared governance structure, diverse collections, effective technology, partner training, and community outreach allows it to provide valuable ser vices to both researchers and librarians. Due to the recent budget cuts from the US Department of Education program for international technology projects (TICFIA), currently the program depends on significant funding from the host institutions Complete r eliance on a small number of institutions to support the actively growing research collection and collaborative research and teaching tool is not sustainable Therefore, dLOC is working to develop a collaborative funding model which will rely on membersh ips and donations in addition to grants and institutional funding to continue To date, the program has received pledges of more the $50,000 annually from 2012 2015 which covers 1/3 of the basic operating costs.

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! This first section provide s an overview of the general field of Caribbean Studies Open Access Repositories and the organization and activities of dLOC. C.1: Caribbean Studies The lack of online access to Caribbean Research Resources in any signif icant format, especially in the case of the Early Caribbean greatly hinders research on the region One of the dLOC's strengths is that it provides access to documents that represent the form a tion of Caribbean History and to popular media formats that are out of print. In particular, it is very d ifficult to research anything relating to the early Caribbean (1600 1800) and popular print media published prior to independence, if one is not actually at the archives. This creates a lack of access to materials published, printed or produced, prior to any of the islands' independence. Often the resources are embedded in a colonial or religious archive that has limited access and funding to preserve, provide physical access, or to support the full infrastructure needed to digitize materials for preserv ation and access C.2: Online Access to Caribbean Research Resources Caribbean research materials are increasingly available online through both commercial databases and open access digital libraries. Commercial Databases With many commercial products, the Caribbean resources are incorporated into a larger Latin American and the Caribbean regional collection with the Caribbean resources representing a very small portion of the collection. In such instances, the Caribbean c ontent also usually focuses on the Spanish speaking Caribbean. Some collections with a limited focus, for example political correspondence or newspapers, are also available for purchase. More recently, exclusively Caribbean products have been developed. Presently, these are dominated by secondary sources and focus on the English speaking Caribbean. Pricing for these products varies from consistent annual access fees to large upfront fees with periodic hosting or maintenance fees. Open Access Resou rces There are several institutional digitization programs and a few collaborative digital library resources focused on the region. In addition, digitization programs in the United States and Europe have also included a large number of Caribbean titles. Renwick (2012) provides a comprehensive overview of Caribbean digital library projects led by various entities including universities in the Caribbean and abroad, government and international organizations. Renwick

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! highlights the challenges of developing these resources and notes that many of the digital initiatives in the region are "mostly popula r among niche groups of scholars and researchers and, often, within a single language group ( 9 ) ." dLOC is one of the pri ncipal resources with content from across the region and that is recognized by librarians in most Caribbean countries and linguistic groups. C.3: Increase of Collaborative Library Open Access Projects As an increasing number of collaborative open access l ibrary projects are developing collaborative models for long term sustainability. Created in 1991 by Cornell University, arXiv.org operated as one of the first open access repositories of Physics research. In 2010, Cornell University implemented a collaborative funding model which shares the operating costs across member institutions worldwide. Another successful collaboration the Hathi Trust, began in 2008 for US university libraries to share their digital collections. Partners pay to contrib ute conte n t to Hathi based on the amount of content they provide to the resource. These are two of the most well known collaborative open access projects, but the Strategic Content Allian c e at Ithaka provides a clearinghouse of research about the developm ent of several projects and guidelines for sustainable open access repositories with case studies and other information relevant to important open access repositories.

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! Section II: Future Market Strategies Potential Market The potential market strategies for dLOC should be targeted to three main audiences: the partners, members and users. Each audience has a different relationship with the project and must be served differently. At its core, dLOC exists to serve its const ituencies by creating the environment to: 1) Preserve and provide access to important Caribbean materials for research and teaching; and, 2) Serve as the scholarly cyberinfrastructure for Caribbean scholarship in all forms, including new forms of scholarly pub lishing with the social and technical supports necessary for critical interventions in scholarly work and broader impacts. Partners Partnership is open to libraries, archives, museums, research centers, as sociations, publishers, and vendors that meet the eligibility criteria stated in the dLOC byl a ws. dLOC depends on its partners to build the content available in the resource and in t urn provides support, training and the technical infrastructure to share partner resources in a collaborative digital library interface. Members There are categories for both institutional and personal members. Institutional members are expected to come from academic libraries and education institutions which support Caribbean Studies, corporate donors, foundations and other entities which support t he project's mission. Personal memberships come from the general users of the resource. U sers dLOC is an open access digital library; no institutional affiliations or subscriptions are required to access the materials available in dLOC. Potential users include faculty, students, policy makers, community leaders, and the general public with an inte rest in the Caribbean. Promotion Plan Partners The number of dLOC partners has grown steadily since the inception of the project; we currently

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! support 32 partners. Promotion for new partners occurs through information on the dLOC website, conferences, and word of mouth. With the current staffing lev els of the project, the addition of between two and five partners per year is sustainable. Current Partner Outreach Annual dLOC Member Meeting at the ACURIL conference dLOC Newsletter and Social Marketing (in person and media) to promote activities Consistent communication with technology updates Automated usage statistics sent in monthly emails Training and outreach to library staff Planned Future Partner Outreach Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age Conferences which will rotate through the member institutions An annual calendar or other promotional piece As funding permits, a t raveling e xhibit will be developed and offered to Partners 2 As funding permits, seed funding to support local digitization Members The members provide valuable financial support to ensure the continued success of the project. Currently, dLOC has 11 institutional members. The goal is to increase membership to 25 institutional members by June 2013. A list of potential institutional members will be encouraged to join dLOC through letters, phone calls and personal meetings Member Outreach Members will be recognized on the dLOC website and in the brochure that will be distributed at dLOC conferences, events, etc. Caribbean Scholarshi p in the Digital Age Conferences will rotate th rough the member institutions dLOC Newsletter and Social Marketing will promote activities As funding permits, a t raveling e xhibit wil l be developed and offered to the members !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 2 The UF Libraries are currently developing seve ral exhibits for the Panama Canal anniversary. These will initially be installed at UF in 2014, but may be available in some form, including online exhibits, as traveling exhibits. Similarly, other partners may have appropriate exhibits to share, if fundin g is available to support the transport of materials or for the creation and shipping of facsimile materials.

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! An annual calendar or other promotional piece U sers dLOC exists to support the preservation and access of Caribbean research resources for its users. As content available in dLOC and awareness of the resource has grown, the u sage has increased steadily from an average of 3,500 hits per month in 2007 to over 600,000 hits per month in 2011. Continuing to provide excellent content, search ability and outreach to university faculty, K 12 educators, librarians and the community should continue to develop the user base. Funding Strategies The fundraising plan for dLOC will include a combination of : 1) donations, 2) grants 3) institutional funding and 4 ) memberships. A diversified funding pool from these 4 sources will allow the project to support ongoing operations while continuing to grow new content and technology. The project began with grant funding. In the current interim period, it is relying heavily on institutional funding. Over time, as endowments are established, the reliance on institutional funding will decrease and the program will rely mainly on endowme nts and grant funding for new initiatives. Donations Donations from individuals and foundations are a vital component for continued sustainability. The membership structure allows for many of the institutions and individuals that benefit from dLOC to support its growth and development. However, special don ations outside of the membership structure will support special projects and long terms sustainability through the creation of endowments. Special Project Funding Levels Donations can be used to support the creation of specific resources, exhibits or to digitize entire collections. Specific scholars or other individuals have research or personal interests that can be channeled to support the ongoing development of dLOC. Whether it is a specific book or microfilm reel, an exhibit or an entire collect ion, these special projects, when housed in a collaborative repository such as dLOC, allow users to discover and utilize resources in a very efficient manner. Rather than continuing to develop small, isolated collections or websites, or inter library loan one digital copy of a resource, dLOC allows the resources to be shared and searched along with other Caribbean resources. The administrative team will promote the availability of these opportunities for collaboration through its website,

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! promotional mate rials, at conferences and with targeted individuals. Digitize a Resource $100 and up Contribute to the growing body of books, periodicals, photographs, manuscripts, etc. available freely via dLOC. Create an Exhibit $10,000 and up (varies according to the scope of the project) Support the development of an online exhibit to showcase the materials and facilitate their use in teaching and research. Sponsor a Collection $25,000 and up (varies according to the scope of the project) Help to preserve and make accessible new content not currently available online to the millions of dLOC users every year. This funding will support the selection, digitization, electronic preservation and distribution of new resources. Corporations, foundatio ns, government ministries and other organizations can support dLOC at the same annual levels as the institutional members. Executive Sustaining Membership $10,000 / $2,500 (Caribbean) Sustaining Membership $5,000 / $1,250 (Caribbean) Supporting Membership $2,500 / $750 (Caribbean) Contributing Membership $1,000 / $250 (Caribbean) Endowment The development of one or more endowments will ensure the ongoing stability of the program. Over the next 3 years we will aim to have 1 2 meetings with possible donors per month and submit 3 4 proposals to potential funders per year. The structure for the endowments will depend on the donor, but possible opportunities include: dLOC Endowment for Training a nd Educational Outreach $1,000,000 K 12 Education Outreach ; University Outreach for Caribbean Studies ; Technical Training for dLOC Partners to Contribute Content dLOC Endowment for Technology $1,000,000

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! Online Hosting and Digital Preservation of dLOC Resources ; Maintenance and Development of Technical Infrastructure ; Equipment and Resources for dLOC Partners dLOC "Program" Endowment $3,000,000 Fund full time staff dedicated to the development and management of dLOC ; Ensure program development and pa rtner coordination ; Assess partner needs and develop solutions to ensure digital preservation and access Country or topic specific endowments possible. Minimum $ 100,000 Grants Grant based funding from government and private sources will enable the project to continue to develop new technologies, new collaborations and new content. The dLOC team will develop at least one proposal for a project of more than $100,000 and two prop osals for projects less than $100,000 each year from 2012 2015. Memberships Institutional and individual members allow those institutions and individuals who recognize and benefit from the open access of these resources to support the project. Contributions to the diverse funding base for the project and allow dLOC to continue to be responsive to new, time sensitive opportunities. In addition, a portion of these membership dues will be held as reserves for unexpected future costs or funding gap s. Institutional members Potential institutional members include libraries, academic or cultural associations, institutions, foundations or others with an interest in supporting the dLOC mission. These members will have the opportunity to identify content for digitization in addition to supporting the general operating expenses of the program. Institutional Members Current Members 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 Executive Sustaining Membership $10,000 / $2,500 (Caribbean) 4 2* 4 2* 5 2* 5 2* Sustaining Membership $5,000 / $1,250 (Caribbean) 1 2 1* 2 2* 4 2* Supporting Membership $2,500 / $750 (Caribbean) 1 2 2* 3 2* 4 2* Contributing Membership $1,000 / $250 (Caribbean) 2 1* 5 3* 7 4* 10 5*

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! Total 11 21 27 34 Annual Support $54,750 $68,500 $79,500 $100,250 Caribbean Membership Individual members Individual members come from the dLOC user base and others interested in supporting free access to Caribbean research materials. Individual Members Current Members 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 Ex ecutive Sustaining Membership $1,000 and above 1 2 3 3 Sustaining Membership $500 / $250 Caribbean) 3 4 5 Supporting Membership $250 / $100 (Caribbean) 5 6 7 Contributi ng Membership $100 / $50 (Caribbean) 4 10 15 20 Scholar Membership $50 / $25 (Caribbean) 1 70 85 95 Student Membership $25 / $10 (Caribbean) 10 12 20 Total 6 100 125 150 Annual Support $1,450 $9,500 $11,300 $13,000 Institutional Funding Institutional Funding from the host and partner institutions constitute an important source of support the administration, technical infrastructure, digitization and cu rating of collection s Currently, the administrative host institution supports the salary and housing of the Program Director and administrative sta ff as well as cost share for the Library Collection Development Coordinator. The technical host provides as cost share between 5 10% for key program staff including the Technical Director, Application Engineer and Digital Curation Director, Product ion Sup ervisor, Programmer, Archives Collection Development Coordinator and Exhibits Coordina t or. dLOC partners provide access to their resources created with local funding to the shared dLOC repository.

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! Management Plan Administration The Executive Committee is the governing body of dLOC. This group meets annually at the ACURIL conference and periodically throughout the year to provide direction and insight to the program administrative team. The project has an administrative and a technical host institutio n that provide financial and in kind support to the project. The Academic Advisory Board provides support to the Administrative Team (see Appendix 1) and the Executive Committee. Technology As the technical host, the UF Libraries have done an exemplary job in selecting, implementing, and leveraging shared technologies for maximum return on investment with the fiscally shrewd allocation of resources. The UF Libraries ensure all technologies are robust for optimal performance, open source whenever possible for fiscal sustainability, and adhere to standards for ease of interoperability and for validation of performance and digital preservation. All technologies are selected for this technical "fit ness" for purpose and for proper social support in terms of being informed by partners and scholars. While dLOC is a technical ly rich program, dLOC is policy and not technology driven where technologie s support the needs as dictated by policies and goals and technology does not drive polic y During the initial development phase (2004 2011), SobekCM required support from: 2 programmers, 1 system administrator, and 1 database administrator. The UF Libra ries wisely developed SobekCM as an integrated digital collection system and suite of tools SobekCM has undergone a series of technical enhancements with ea ch implemented to better serve patrons, partners in production and digital curation, partners in managing the materials, and UF's needs as the technical host to best ensure sustainability. SobekCM saw a major milestone i n 2011 with the full integration of the production tools into SobekCM Following that integration, UF's internal needs and dLOC's support are met through 2 programmers who handle all programming as well as all database and system administration In addition to reducing the staff required fro m 4 to 2, the remaining 2 require a smaller percentage of time now than during the development phase. In looking towards the future, the UF Libraries continue to select, develop, and implement technologies from a critically informed technical and fiscal perspective. The UF Libraries continue to maintain SobekCM for internal and partner needs and to develop SobekCM for digital scholarship. For instance, the UF Libraries have been awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for 201 2 2014 to digitize materials and add enhanced features into SobekCM with an additional programmer completely funded from the NEH grant. The NEH grant will also

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! establish a model for setting up remote digitization labs with purchased equipment, as dLOC has done, and with loaned equipment. The loan of expensive equipment, in this c a se a CopiBook (valued at $50,000 USD) allows UF to further extent the dLOC model of a "hub" for the technical host and many "spokes" or partners. This model also resembles the UF L ibraries' 1951 microfilming tour of the Caribbean where a librarian from UF traveled with a microfilm camera, microfilming materials with a copy going to UF and a copy to each partner. Loan i ng a CopiBook may present an updated version of this model for the digital age; where partners use the equipment themselves for digitization of materials and the equipment travels from partner to partner for the purposes of local digitization. The UF Libraries are also actively pursuing partnerships with UF Research Com puting. UF Research Computing is particularly interested in supporting dLOC as part of scholarly cyberinfrastructure for research computing generally and for the specific complexity that dLOC presents. For instance, dLOC presents an excellent research case for UF Research Computing to develop and refine optical character recognition (OCR) tools, which UF Research Computing has noted is an excellent potential project for funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Budget The b asic o perating b udget represents the minimum necessary for the program to meet its obligations to its partners and researchers. This includes the salary of the director and a part time administrative assistant as well as funding to cover the hosting and processing costs and n ecessary program related travel. Currently the host institutions are covering the majority of these costs; however in the current economic environment sustainability depends on reducing this dependence on institutional resources. Administration oversight is performed by the administrative host institution and reviewed by the dLOC Executive Board at annual meetings. Personnel Salary and Fringe Director and Part Time Assistant $110,000 Travel Meetings, Training, Conferences $15,000 Technology Hosting and Processing $15,000 Other Shipping, Printing, Event Support $5,000 Indirect Costs $10,000 The money generated from institutional membership will support both current and future program costs. The goal for dLOC is to earmark 25% of the institutional membership payments to support the development of the dLOC reserve to ensure long term project f unding. As such, if the project can raise at least $50,000 annually in membership payments it can devote $37,500 to

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! general operating costs and $12,500 to the reserves The personal memberships will generate in excess of $10,000 annually if member targe ts are reached. At least 75% of this funding will support the reserves and 25% will be available to the project administration for current operational needs such as partner training, equipment, digitization, conferences or outreach. Fundraising The fund raising plan for dLOC will include a combination of institutional funding, donations, grants and memberships.

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! Appendix 1 Administrative Team Program Director : Provide leadership in all aspects of developing and administering linkages with outside organizations and institutions in support of dLOC's mission; Develop and manage dLOC member/partner collaborative structure; Promote the activities of dLOC; Seek sustainability through active grant writing and fundraising efforts and solicitations of gifts from individuals; Liaise with legal counsel to clarify and resolve issues of jurisprudence; Supervise project staff in support of dLOC mission; Ensure budget oversight and financial reporting; Be located at a host institution that is a partner of the orga nization; Serve as an ex officio member of the Executive Committee and the Advisory Board; (ex officio members are non voting members). Technical Director : Provide leadership in all aspects on the technical develop ment, focusing on the socio technical requirements and supports, and manage collaborations inside the technical host institution; Promote the activities of dLOC; Seek continued development of the program through active grant writing; Liaise with legal counsel to clarify and resolve issues of j urisprudence; Be located at a host institution that is a partner of the organization; Serve as an ex officio member of the Executive Committee and the Advisory Board; (ex officio members are non voting members). Application Engineer and Digital Curation Director : Provide leadership in all aspects of the system and tools including database, architecture, engineering, and interoperability with other technologies in a web scale environment rely ing on proven technologies to creatively address pragmatic issues ( reliability, maintainability, and changing needs ) and on future needs and technical opportunities; Promote the technical activities and resources employed by dLOC; Develop and implement new tools and processes for digital curation; Deliver training and c reate documentation in for digitization and digital curation technical and workflow needs. Assistant Programmer : Provide programming maintenance and writes technical documentation for the SobekCM system, SobekCM tools, and related software. Strategic Advisor : Provide advice to the Administrative Team and Boards in areas of dLOC's history, current operations and future planning; Serve as an ex officio member of the Executive Committee and the Advisory Board; (ex officio members are non voting members). Library Collection Development Coordinator : Recommend or contact libraries and others with eligible collections to introduce dLOC Archives Collection Development Coordinator : Recommend or contact archives and others with eligible collections to introduce dLOC

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! CIFNAL Project Coordinator: Serve as the liaison between dLOC and CIFNAL to facilitate the objective of collaboration between the two groups. Exhibits Coordinator : Create online and physical exhibits for dLOC and provide documentation a nd training for dLOC partners. Educational and Community Outreach Coordinator : Develop educational and community outreach projects to increase awareness and build support materials for the materials available online. Metadata Coordinator : Develop metada ta training materials in collaboration with the Technical Director and assist in the review of existing metadata. Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library Coordinator : Identify possible newspapers for inclusion in CNDL in collaboration with the Program Direct or and Collection Managers from the paper's countries of origin. Social Media Coordinator : Recommend strategies to increase the presence of dLOC in Social Media and help create content to share via the various medium. Administrative Assistant : Ma intain the dLOC listservs; Facilitate updates of partners webpages and contact information; Track members and accounting for new collaborative membership structure; Translate website and correspondence into Spanish; Coordinate travel, accounting, grant rec ordkeeping and event logistics.

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! Appendix 2 Possible Government Granting Agencies IMLS NEH Possible Private Foundations The G l adys Krieble Delmas Foundation ( http://www.delmas.org ) manages a Humanities Program that funds projects in higher education and the humanities. The program accepts a two page letter of inquiry from potential grantees and funding ranges from $10,000 $100,000. Sherman Fairchild Foundation provides very littl e public information. It has funded a variety of education and arts projects and it seems like dLOC could be a good match. The receptionist provided little insight and suggested the program send a one page proposal to the office. They usually do not acc ept unsolicited proposals so if there are any pers onal connections to the project it could be very helpful. Address: 5454 Wisconsin Avenue, S uite 1205 Chevy Chase, MD 20815 Phone: 301 913 5990 Green Family Foundation (http://www.greenff.org) funds education programs for young people with a special interest in Haiti. No grant funding range specified and the foundation does not accept unsolicited proposals. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation ( http://www.h ewlett.org/ ) Education Program supports an Open Educational Resources Program that could support the development of K 12 educational outreach materials for dLOC in conjunction with the College of Education. Grants start at $100,000. The Henry Luce Foundat ion ( http://www.hluce.org ) funds an Initiative on Religion and International Affairs which could be a possible funder for the proposed Liberation Theology Project in the Caribbean. The foundation accepts one to three pag es letters of inquiry. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation ( http://www.mellon.org ) Scholarly Communications and Information Technology program would support programs like dLOC. Mellon does not advertise funding ranges and r equests short email inquiries. H. W. Wilson Foundation ( http://thwwf.org/ ) generally funds library initiatives and could possibly fund a newspaper project given the founder's interest in periodicals. No grant fu nding range specified. Grants are not made for buildings, operating funds or endowments.

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