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Old Spanish Ruins at Old Panama, Canal Zone

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Old Spanish Ruins at Old Panama, Canal Zone
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Copyright Date:
1913

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.173
System ID:
AA00015325:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Old Spanish Ruins at Old Panama, Canal Zone
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Copyright Date:
1913

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.173
System ID:
AA00015325:00001

Full Text


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21754-Old Spanish Ruins at Old Panama, Canal Zone.


Although Christopher Columbus was arn
Italian, (and in that tongue called Cristoforo
Colombo), he sailed across the Atlantic to
discover the New World under the flag
and with the financial support of the Span-
ish. The Spaniards then followed in great
numbers and settled Mexico, Central and
South America, where a mixed breed of
their descendants and a variously changed
Spanish language still remains. The city
of Colon at the Atlantic terminal of the
Panama Canal derived its name from that
of the great discoverer, whereas forme:
Spanish enterprise is still evident in build-
ings and ruins on the Pacific side, see views
20886, 20880.


The ruin here visible must have been once
the belfry tower of some Spanish church.
A trace of the Gothic architecture is notice-
able in the ogival shape of the uppermost
tier of windows. Notwithstanding that this
tower seems to be weathering the ravages
of time, one is forced to philosophize on
the progress of events and note the advance-
ment from the old to the new order of
things. We may consider this ruin the
proper abode of some night bird in accord
with the elegiac strain,-"from yonder ivy-
mantled tower, the moping owl does to the
moon complain."


Copyright. rIgr, by The Keystone View Ctmpany.


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