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Site of the Gatun Lock, Looking South from the Lowest Lock Towards Lake Gatun - Panama Canal Route

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Site of the Gatun Lock, Looking South from the Lowest Lock Towards Lake Gatun - Panama Canal Route
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Publication Date:

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.136
System ID:
AA00015288:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Site of the Gatun Lock, Looking South from the Lowest Lock Towards Lake Gatun - Panama Canal Route
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Publication Date:

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.136
System ID:
AA00015288:00001

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%^ T1{E GATUN LOCKS, PANAMA
CANAL
: The picture shows the way the Panama Canal
was dug. Drills run by machinery, dynamite,
steam shovels, and cars loosened, dug, and car-
ried away most of the dirt.
In the view a steam shovel is dropping a dip-
per full of dirt on a car. These shovels dipped
from 5 to 10 tons of earth and rock at one lift.
They loaded a train of 30 cars in from 7 to J5
minutes. One shovel loaded in one day 8,395
tons of earth. There were about Ioo of these
shovels used on the Canal.
In addition to the shovels, 560 drills were used.
Nearly 400 engines were needed to pull the 6,000
cars. There were 30 dredges, 30 unloaders, 12
tugs, and 70 barges used. And to operate these
tools 35,000 to 40,000 men were employed.
To unload the cars you see n the view, one of
the tools used was a spreader. It is a big iron
L affair pulled by steel ropeq or cables. It was


Lat. 9 N.; Long. 80 W.
started at one end of the train, and it pushed all
the dirt off the entire train as the ropes pulled it
forward. Of course the ropes were hitched to
engines. In this way the earth was spread on
each side of the tracks in the dumping grounds.
Much dirt and stone had to be taken out of the
place pictured in the view. Here now stand the
largest locks in the world-the Gatun Locks.
Here vessels are lifted, in three flights, 85 feet.
The total length, of the locks is almost two-thirds
of a mile, and their walls are 81 feet high. Gail-
lard Cut and the Gatun Locks were the two large
problems in building the Canal.
Who supervised the building of the Panama
Canal? Who owns the Panama Canal Zone?
IVhy wc'as the canal built? Name and locate an-
other large canal.
Copyright by The Keystone View Company.


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