Bas Obispo Cut, Showing Battery of Rock Drills at Work, Panama Canal Route

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Bas Obispo Cut, Showing Battery of Rock Drills at Work, Panama Canal Route
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1909

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Rock-drills   ( fast )
Labor   ( fast )
Genre:
stereograph

Notes

Abstract:
Nine West Indian laborers working with rock drills in the Bas Obispo Cut.
Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.134
System ID:
AA00015286:00001

Full Text










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20887-Bas Obispo Cut, Showing Battery of Rock Drills at Work, Panama Canal Route


This view shows the Canal at the point
where the Culebra Cut practically begins.
The digging of this cut has been the most
taxing and labor-consuming feat of the
whole project. The cut itself is over eight
miles long and the canal is narrowed in
width from 500 feet, which width it has up
to 'Obispo, to 300 feet throughout the ex-
tent of the Culebra Cut. At Obispo there
is an abrupt elevation of 150 feet for the
major portion of a mile, and then, after a
sudden drop, the elevation is more gradual
until Culebra itself is passed.
We see here five or six drills in a row and
in great proximity to one another, which


are operated more or less in unison. Thus
a great amount of blasting can be done at
one time, and the resultant debris can oc-
cupy quite a large number of workmen in
removing it while the battery of drills re-
i.eats its boring or moves forward for simi-
lar simultaneous drilling.
The machinery is considerably improved
and also completed to what it was in our
forefathers' days, when one man was con-
tinually turning the drill with his hands
while his partner kept up a continual ham-
mering on the head of the drill. Two men,
however, are still required in the operation
of each drill.


Copyright 1913, by Keystone View Company,