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Culebra Cut at Its Most Interesting Point, Cucaratcha Slide on the Left, Panama Canal

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Material Information

Title:
Culebra Cut at Its Most Interesting Point, Cucaratcha Slide on the Left, Panama Canal
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Copyright Date:
1913

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.130
System ID:
AA00015282:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Culebra Cut at Its Most Interesting Point, Cucaratcha Slide on the Left, Panama Canal
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Copyright Date:
1913

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.130
System ID:
AA00015282:00001

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21757-Culebra Cut at its Most Interesting Point, Cucaracha Slide on the Left, Panama Canal.


The portion of the Culebra Cut here
shown is just a short distance southeast of
its deepest point at Gold Hiill (see view
21759). The hill to the left, i. e. on the east
side of the canal, is where the so-called Cu-
caracha slide occurred, when as large a
space as 47 acres moved down the slope.
Ever since, even, there has been some
gradual sliding continually going on. In
fact, this slide gave the French much trouble
during the latter years of their operations.
The Americans were first annoyed by it in
1905, and from that date to the middle of


1912, it necessitated the removal of some
3,000,000 extra cabic yards of material.
The Americans, profiting by the expe-
rience of their i'rench predecessors with this
Cucaracha slide, made the excavation much
wider at this point, and with a far milder
slope than was first deemed necessary. The
Cucaracha slide commenced to break some
1,900 feet back from the Canal's axis. This
variety of slide is due to the slipping of the
surface dirt and clay over the firm and
smooth rocky stratum of material beneath.


Copyright 1913, by The Keystone View Company.


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