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William Gorgas, the Sanitary Officer of the Canal

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Material Information

Title:
William Gorgas, the Sanitary Officer of the Canal
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Publication Date:

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.95
System ID:
AA00015216:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
William Gorgas, the Sanitary Officer of the Canal
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Publication Date:

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.95
System ID:
AA00015216:00001

Full Text




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H201-(V28009)
COLONEL WILLIAM C. GORGAS
The first fight the Americans made in Pan-
ama was against disease.
Colonel W. C. Gorgas was the man who look-
ed after the health of the Canal Zone. In the
Spanish-American War it was learned that mos-
quitoes of certain kinds carry the germs of
yellow fever and malaria. From 1898 to 1902
Col. Gorgas was in Havana, Cuba, and suc-
ceeded in freeing that city of the disease. By a
special Act of Congress he was made assistant
surgeon-general with the rank of colonel. In
1904 he was sent to the Canal Zone where he
waged a war against mosquitoes, rats and mice.
Buildings were screened, houses and streets
were cleaned. Food offered for sale was pro-
tected from flies. Every person who entered
the Canal Zone was examined and all ships
were held until it was certain that no one had
any contagious disease. The Canal Zone had a


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lower death rate than any other place in the
world. The work which Colonel Gorgas did
was as great as that of the engineers and this
was recognized by the United States. In 1914
he was made surgeon-general in the United
States army with the rank of a brigadier-
general.
General Gorgas and his associates did more
than take care of the health of the people of the
Canal Zone. They proved absolutely that san-
itary conditions are possible in a tropical cli-
mate and that men can do both mental and
manual labor in the tropics. In 1913, Gen.
Gorgas went to South Africa at the request of
the British Government, where thousands of
Kaffirs were dying of pneumonia. After two
years there he eradicated yellow fever from
Guayaquil, Ecuador.
Copyright by The Keystone View Company


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