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The Quaint Balcony-Hung Avenue B of Panama - Panama Canal Zone

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Quaint Balcony-Hung Avenue B of Panama - Panama Canal Zone
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Copyright Date:
1910

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.90
System ID:
AA00015210:00001

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Quaint Balcony-Hung Avenue B of Panama - Panama Canal Zone
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Keystone View Company
Copyright Date:
1910

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.90
System ID:
AA00015210:00001

Full Text

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20879-The Quaint Balcony-hung Avenue B of Panama.


Atter passing through the Canal Zone the narrow streets furnishing a welcome
with its rush of work never ceasing by shade from the tropic sun. These balconies
night or day, after looking at the steam are an important part of every Spanish-
shovels and drills and listening to the roar American house. They are built with no
of machinery and of blasting, it seems al- uniformity or regularity, but the result is
most like stepping out of the present into wonderfully picturesque and ancient looking.
a bygone century to enter Panama and walk The rude cart, the narrow sidewalks and the
-long some street of the older part such as appearance of quiet all add to this effect.
the one shown in this picture. The extremely modern looking fire plug
Panama is more than four hundred years in the foreground forcibly tells us that Pa-
old. For long it was very magnificent, en- nama is no longer the home of buccaneers.
riched by the spoils wrested from the Incas It is a rapidly growing modern city whose
by Spanish adventurers. It is essentially population already exceeds 30,000. It is the
Spanish in history and architecture. Many center of a great trade which is destined to
of its buildings are made of stucco painted be far greater. Old as Panama is, her his-
in bright colors with balconies overhanging tory lies in the future.
Capytpiaht 1910, by Kvysme VVw OonM pmy.


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