Indian "dug-outs" on the Chagres River, bringing bananas to Gaton

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Material Information

Title:
Indian "dug-outs" on the Chagres River, bringing bananas to Gaton
Physical Description:
Photograph
Donor:
Angrick, Bill ( donor )
Publisher:
Underwood & Underwood, Publishers
Publication Date:

Notes

Donation:
Gifted on behalf of William P. and Barbara L. Angrick

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved on the material.
Resource Identifier:
2013.2.61
System ID:
AA00015180:00001


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S8471 We are facing down-stream, i. e., towards Colon,
near its Atlantic outlet seven miles away. 'The Canal
we do not see now, but it is at our left Ibeyond a low,
wooded ridge. Behind us the Canal is being dug along
a line approximating that of the river, (it intersects tlhe
river at half a dozen points); then the artificial channel is
to cut through high hills between this river and the Rio
Grande, following the other stream approximatelyl) down
to its Pacific outlet near Panama.
The Istlimian railway runs along the bank above at our
right, where we see the telegraph poles. The station here
is a point of local importance, as trains stop to take on
bananas for shipment to Colon. The bunches of fruit
we see here now have been brought by Indians and \Vest
Indian negroes who get their hying out of small banana
plantations. The fruit is of fair though not hest quality.
These small planters have neither the capital nor the intel-
ligent energy necessary to secure the very best conditions
and so the best grade of fruit. M\lost of the fruit now in,
sight will cross the Atlantic to European markets.
A banana plant bears but one bunch of fruit, each ban-
ana being the enlarged ovary (t a blossom formed earlier
in tie season. The parent plant is destroyed by the cutting
.A. ... eso .T e aetln id sro ,.b icutn


by Underwood &*


Indian canoes loaded with bananas, Panama.

Canots Indiens, charlgs de bananes, Panama.

)lit 13aninenc beclabeie inbianicide Skanoeao, 'anama.

Canoas indias cargadas de plitanos, Panamid.

Indianska kanoter lastade med hananer-Panama.

IIHAniiKia jiOAxi (rrHporn), Harpy OHHilH 56aHaaMw,
HIIanaa.


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From Notes of Travel No. 40. copyright
Underwood


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of the fruit, but it reproduces itself by "suckers", so that
the life of a grove is practically continuous.
A large part of the daily food of people in this vicinity
consists of bananas; tlh'y are eaten raw, boiled, fried or
dried and pulverized nd made into a palatable sort of
bread.
Those boats are hollowed out of single tree trunks.




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