Pacifico

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Pacifico The Panama Canal: 1935 Graduates of La Boca Public School
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Spanish
Publisher:
Escuela Superior de Paraiso
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )

Notes

General Note:
A few names listed for the 1935 La Boca Canal Zone Public School: Lilian Burgess, Fredy Bushnell, Evelyn Chanvas, Dorothy Clarke, Eltyn Clarke, Rose Clarke, Edna Edhill, Doris Forbes, Marcus Granum, Mym Gooden, Enid Hall, Louise Holligan, Doris Hunt, Edna Jordan, George Jordan, Myrtle Mendez, Clara Robinson, Dorothy Small, Ismay Straung.

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
System ID:
AA00015058:00024


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text











I





































































































6


















s;rrr ;










L
B
0
H
S


ElL PACIIFCO
1954


















PUBLISHED AND PRINTED BY STUDENTS OF THE
LA BOCA OCCUPATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL





















PREFACE

As we come to the close of each school year, it is customary that
this school, La Boca Occupational High, publish a yearbook, in which
the trend of different activities carried on during the year is recorded.
These books are found to be excellent memoirs to those students
who graduate in the year of publication. These books serve as remind-
ers to students of the rich and happy years they spent in school. To
our faculty, they serve as records of the progress that has been achiev-
ed over the years;and to the public, they build up an increasing inter-
est in the school.
Attention must be given to the fact that this volume was com-
pletely edited and printed by the students of our school. Thus it
is highly cherished by them despite the numerous problems encount-
ered prior to its completion.
To all those persons who contributed in the making of this vol-
ume, we express our deep appreciation.
Hector Markland

































La Boca Occupational High School



In 1946, a high school and a well Vocational courses taught in our High
equipped shop for vocational purposes was School include: Music, Home Economics
opened in the town of La Boca. This build- Tailoring, Commerce, Upholstery, Book-
ing was constructed at the cost of a large sum binding, Photography, Carpentry, Mechan-
of money. ics, and Printing. It is significant that while
the school system has lengthened at the top,
This school includes: two study halls, a its base has broadened and deepened to bear
library located in a large and airy space on the additional load.
the lower floor, besides the numerous class-
rooms, storerooms, and all other necessary The La Boca Occupational I-igh School
space for executive purposes. All this in- represents one of the strongest links in the
eluding landscaping was of great financial relation of the Canal Zone Government to
expenditure. its local rate employees. The C. Z. Govern-
ment has helped in providing us with these
The addition of a senior high school advanced educational facilities for which
system marred a long awaited step forward several of our parents and community lead-
in the development of native youth. ers have been clamoring for more than a
The academic and vocational offerings are generation.
designed to meet the needs, interests, and
abilities of the student. They also intend to Just as there have been notable gains in
meet the social and industrial needs of the the line of plants, equipment, and the like
community. Considerable attention is being in our schools. the-re have also been im-
given to the vocational and personal guid- provement in relationship between teachers
ance of the student, and the administration.

Jean Best





Homo doctus in semper divitas habetL
A learned-man has richies in himself
School! school! The old memory b'ooms freshly in the core of my-
mind. School days good old ru!e days: though those days were
sometimes days of distress and sorrow, they aided us in preparing for
W themorrow; yet today it is swee: Ecrrow as t0h me.l:oryof youth lives
onward--onward-on.




































Then there were the mornings when out-of-town students would come
rushing up the prado in "horsejess carriages," busses of course, then
rushing out to discuss tickling problems or "run over" the previous
day's assignments. It is all chatting till some "bird" mentions it's a few
minutes to eight, and we're off to classes.











!Al
'~~~lr4

~",Ei~--*r-: 4

Ad;"I FI~ li







Thn hrewreth origswhnou-f-ow tuetswol cm
he







Then it was upstairs to our lockers to get our books hefore the last
bell rang. "Hey didn't you see-the shnw las night? Boy it was ereat.
Say, aren't you going to the dancei'i.Yes vaw l~ chattin'-s at
the lockers till the list bell was about to,ring therf We'd scamper off
to our classes. But someone was alw ys late. Someone who had to
see the principal 'o as to be admitted. Ho6wever, with everyone else
at work the day would get underway.




































B2low we soe students taking part in observances ce'ebratirg
Panama's fiftieth year as a sovereign natin. Numerous prograrrs
are held during the course of the Ec'.ool year in celebration cf memo-
rable dates.











































Some students start the day by going to the library to prepare themselves for some report or
for some important examination, while othes would be '














.... in the study hall preparing their homework, studying assigrn-
ments, and discusiing world eventq. In these stndy classes, stu-
denits learn the correct manner to study. And who wouldn't be
gl -d to leave the rigid rules of studyirg to go to .
j rkI
*rt~s9




'~~Q99




~~i ~: ~- i/



Some stdetsstrtte day bygigt h irryt rpr hmeve o oneoto



























9 nnp n icsil ol vnt.T hs td lsesu
Aelslantecrcc anrt td. .n h olntb

:~~~i~~gl~ to eav th rigd rlesof sudyrp o goto 9"
9 99B


























!i~i
%,























Recreation to exercise our aching necks and backs. As is
known, recreation of some sort is needed by each human being. J
In our school recreation is offered in many different ways.
During our recreational period some of us play volleyball to re-
lax the mind from the strenous work which we have throuhgout
the day, others find many different ways to relax as is illus-
trated below.




4Ci

7
W. EA






























I-- ----




























S...........





This glorious moment is strongly anticipated by OUT student.,
I1"
























11:35-....off to the lockers---across, the volleyball' court, then
,swiftly into the clubhouse to satisfy their biting tumnmies."l I
>3 r lrr::, ngr
3Ir~:8~ 9
99- V~~I
-999-9'- 9): 4 lb' l
"9 9l9) 9










9>9 9` 1~
94..)*~
::::c7'



: :9'
-,~e r' '
9 9 3

ri





Ths loios omn :-;;is stonly anticipated b3 our student

11:3----of otelcesars h olyalcutte
swifly ntothecluhoue t saisf thir 'b:it-ing tumies."~~~R










Qjedication































A. G. COCKBURN

With profound gratitude and high respect for the many years of
true devotion which he has shown in the course of his service with-
in this school. we the Class of '54 dedicate this yearbook to Mr.
Alden G. Cockburn.
-^~d Q1 bk











OUR

A
C

'LU



I


































FRANCIS A. CASTLES ROBERT T EILIS
PRINCIPAL VICE-PRINCIP/ L


















CALMER A. BATALDEN CHRISTINE L. TULL I)EWITT E. MYEllRS
Supervisor of Shops Supervisor of Home Supervisor of Sciences
Mechanical Drawing Economics
K
U>'






















CALME A. BAADNcIsrx .umD\IlE YrS


Suevio ofSosSprior(f101i uerio fSine

Mechnica Draing co~ouuic
























CLARA 0. WATTLEY CHARLES L. BARTON SYLVIA S. DOIG
Civics, Economic Geography Mathematics, Geometry Office Practice



















VICTOR E. BROWN LURLENE JOHNSON PETER S. MARTIN
Upholstery Librarian English



















EVELINA W. PRINGLE ALDEN G. COCKBURN 'TIIKOI'HILUS GRIFFITIH
Conomeree Biology, English Wood Fabricatici.























S.9 .MAE L. MALCOLM

LAURA DE PERZ WILFRED A. WASCN Hlomle Economics
LAUR'A E PERKEZ
Related Science,
panish Bookbinding,
Photography

















EINESTO A. Ml'RIlIAY
E'JLOl IA E. IIANSENA
ROBERT C. BUSIIELL PL A rinting
,Professional Groonming
Body and Fender



















E V. I MILE BENJAMIN
II.ENE1 J. (COEY Wood Fabrication
in Clrk Motor MAlclanics
lypiing. Cl~rlk






























GILBER10 PEREZ IDA SCARLETT ALFRED BLAKE
Instrumental Music Spanish Tailoring

















ALEJANDRO LUISON ROBERT H. BEECHER
Metal Fabrication English






ASTON PARCHMENT
Physical Director






ANNUAL STAFF





Agin%












Officers, left to right: Clifton Henry, Business Manager; Hector Markland, Editor-in-
Chief; Joscelyn Thompson, Assistant Editor-in-Chief.
SPONSORS MEMOIR ADS
Joscelyn Thompson Wilda Cajelis
Cynthia Francis, Eleanor Ford Glendora Robinson
Violet Williams, Jean Alleyne ART Glendora Robinson
Kenneth Hogan, Sybil Thomas Pallu Jarvis Janet Moore
Jean Best, Audriana Jamieson SCHOOL HISTORY Carlyle Clark
Eleanor Oscar, Edith Alleyne Jean Best
Advisors: Messrs C. L. Barton, P. S. Martin, E. A. Murray, W. A. Wason
Mesdames Sylvia S. Doig, Laura de Perez

Senior Class Officers

















From left to right :2Cynthia Francis, Secretary; Carlyle Clark,
President: Clifton Henry, Vice-President;





























BIOLOGY CLUB

Judith Van Horn . . ........ President
Florence Bailey . .. . . ....... .Secretary-Treasurer
Robert Millett Dorothy Dandrade Lester Allen
Leslie Maynard Richard Holder Hazel Rodney
Violet Tait Dorothy Lowe Dora Pal'lil'','t .:
Hector Hampson Keith Green Joselyn Thompscn
Sponsor: A. G. (ockburn






















SPANISH CLUB

Manuel Guerrero ........................... ........President
Jean Alleyne ............................................ ........ Secr tary
Cecilia Parchm ent .......... ..... ........ ............ ...... Treasurer
Janet Williams Dorothy Lowe HIildred Jarvis
Lillian Maynard Jovita Sinchez Germain McAllister
Alexander Gibbs







MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS
























A fraction of our school orchestra is shown in one of its many rehearsals, as during the course of the
school year many i'iter.ting observances are held. As the "maestro" directs, sweet strains of music
fill the air. The entira orahestra participates in most of our year-round assemblies and other musical
festivals.
























From low C to high C, on any of the cleffs, the high school glee club resounds her brilliant tones far
and wide. Our Glee Club has always played an important part in many of our assembly programs.
Throughout the years our students have shown deep interest in vocal music. Mr. Robert Joseph directs
the gr )np.
































Science! explorer of Nature's secrets! Science! companion
of Civilization And who doesn't like scince? From the
tiny world of the atom to the titanic realm of the heavens
we learn about the laws of nature and man's evolutionary in-
heritance from the past. Marvelous thing, science. A student
learns in these classes, above all, the cmnstitution of the body
Sand its care Though science in most schools is found to be
disliked by a great many students, the subject in this school,
X ,, over the past years, has had an appreciable attendance.





d1AMU&
-glV





.00k





















































History, Economic Geography, Government


A citizen should always be acquainted with the history of hi
country, its government, and also its economic status; unless h
is a man without acountry. Now, these subjects are held to be o
primary importance in our school. The teacher employs th
best methods in which the interest of the students can b
held. Through these means, students are thoroughly informe
of the world's position and the status os their country within it
These classes are a very great step in showing the students th
important role of a good citizen in his relation to the country.

** *



























i

















In order to maintain the comforts in this modern age, the men who do
the "dirty work" are found to ve an indispensable JiK In tne CnaMt ut cir-
cumstances. Here in our school is taught tne essentials o0 macninery in tne
i,,utor mechanics shop. btudents are eager to taKe up tnis course since there
. always a great demnand ail around tor mechanimcs.
... ... ..... . ...... . .. .











P,,






















tP:




















Year after year. a marked improvement is shown in the work put
by the Metal Fabrication and Body and Fender shoos. The studrnts
greatly aided by the imp~rovement in machinery and also recent tech
advances in these fields. Workers here in theseshops show great into
...in their work and are ever-cautious to do better.
f 0/
.9
999~

4i i









/99I
99li "


999,'9 Yaraferyer.a aredimroemntisshwninth wrkpu
by~ th etlFbrctonadBoyad edr hp. h toct
gral aided byteipoeeti ahieyadas eettc
adanesinthsefild. oker heeI .s hp hwgetm










inteir wotrk yand ar evr-autedimous en to do ow better.rkp








<9' /2 ea arcto n oy n edrsos h ttm
9,al ie yte mrvmn nmcinr n lorcn
99ane 9n 99s ils okeshr ntcchos so r~t
9n 9hi 9999d r ve-atou odobe.9
''9 9i

9999 9 99
9j~~ 999999. *, *,9 99 .



































S"j 'Hold it! There, very good." That was the often-said cry
of the photographer throughout the year. Then we'd take the
film to be developed in dark secrecy, printed or enlarged. Fasci-
Snating how a small negative can be made to produce such a
large photo; or probably not so strange when you know how.
: Yes sir, photography is a wonderful thing. Though not a ma-
jor subject within our school, it is very important in the produc-
tion of our yearbook.
Efficiency in this course depcnds hihly on the interest of the
u r student.




V











Music, sweet balm of the soul! Magic solace o
the mind! Stimulator of the heart!
Yes, just as any other school, students here
show a deep appreciation for music and endeavor
to participate in most activities in which they may
exhibit their musical talents.


























4 Pupils of the Professional Grooming and Home Econ(on
classes aredoing their best in classes in o der to make themsel
better women of tommorrow.
All women should know the regulations of good house-keep
and keep a good appearance at all times. 'Th'se subjee'"
tOught by competent instuctors in our school,.






A .. I>
~e ;W























77





















With T-squares and tape measures in hand, student-
tailors, show-off their skills as they were caught y the

camera while drafting and cutting shirts and trouses.























Sthe lower phots Mr Brown's upholsters swing- 4

t.o hammners and jump machine pedals as they recon-y
,I .
stra t >.i hion seats and couch covers. -'














































Printing is a very important factor or trade in our school. H, re in the L.B.O.HI.S printing shop, the "Canal Zone
School Bulletin" is madie. Printing has always had an appreciable attend: nee in our school. Work is plentiful and stu-
,dents nmut be hard-working in order to live up to the standard set. However in the course of its history within this
school, printing has been observed to be done with much skill and improvements are attained annually.
Bookbinding is clos:ly related to printing and has shown improvements. The printers print the bocks and the bind-
ers sew them. One of the major wcrks of the bookbinding shop is the "El Pacifico" yearbook.











55




















































Geometry, Shop and Commercial Mathematics
Mechanical Drawing

Within the "barriers of time," our students atten-
tively heed the instructions imparted to them in the
three classes shown; namely, commercial and shop math,
mechanical draw ing and geometry. In these classes, each
individual is given an opportunity to "hold his own."
As they "toil upward through the night," their future
j. may be bright.












































Offce Pr ie one of te trainings o fered in the con-
DI rce coir e is highly appreeiated by most of our prosl e(,-
ti' hueins. ein. As students of the typing caH I"slam a-
wA 01ono te t y-ewriters, Mr. Nlartin's and Mr. ('ekburn '
Enrlish e' .sri rei'vi quickly for a quiz. Below, some of thie
students lr Mr. ]N W I .hi' English clss are shiw -t an in-
Ster-vi,,l witlh Mr. Gaskin.






Ci7 ;ji 7 7



















































construction o- an extesiion to the .igh .ch.. ointru n .4


chin exper detio n trate their hig in ( oN int rt-ii4ak gng-
"-)NA L
Z-77-


4 42k"i







I~T~""a

s~i;i ~M r--OW



It's ricklayin andcemeting s sen inthe uper [ re























is ~:73W














4































Ninth Graders (Freshmen)

Dr. Lawrence Johnson, as director of Local Rate schools,
added a ninth grade to the curriculum, which meant one more
year of schooling. Today we find that the gain was well worth
the action. Ninth graders over the years have shown a marked
increase in improvements all around. The capability of the
student here is much more improved and fuller recognized. Aft-
er passing this grade the pupils seem to be quite ready or the
great demands of high school. Teachers here as well as students
endeavor to make greater advanc mnients each year with eyes
focused on the fature.


- Learn today; for the morrow shall bring endless sorrow to
him who fails to borrow opportunities of the day. ... ti." a






"CINCUENTENARIO" ACTIVITIES

Wow, wow, what legs! What's this, a femalle review o so:ce-
a thing? No, it's only a scene from our ''Cincuentenario'' Ir'gram'
commemorating Panama's 50th anniversary as a ,o\ver(ign Ia-
tion. The Panamanian Indep,'ndenc D)ay is a much C(eICn'ated
event within our school There are iumllerous progranms witlI ,o-
dent, illustrating the gloriesof the Republic and its Indcpeieiincc.





God Save tile Queen l ier most gricion-, Ma:ljesty Queen Win ni-
fred presided over the acntivitiis of the h a\. I.1 ch \vcua (1 lc(llo 11 -
tess aqre held during this I)(pliod. 'The (1nei is 'lainkud I1, sto-
dents garbed in pollira and monttilo co-tuleCs i.1 incCh magni-
fi(( ,nee.























'..
R W,











~I"F 171










































OIrin and share it. Oh, Oh, someone is eating more than the others. What's up "doe," want to get sick or something? Yes si
it 'vai all mirrymaking when our teachers had their owvn field d.ty at the Nicolas Solano Hospital in the vicinity of Chorrern
IJ. ublic of Panama.






.k,,
























"For your long and devoted service, we pay you this honor." This was the program held for Mr. Headley, who
after srving as a uti ity worker for a groat many years with the school, was finally retired with honors.
KKV~"

/ V.'

~I : F il~t/









I ......


















'WP'
~~r *








ft r
4R 4' '
77-$4
























The field day held about the middle of February each year takes place at
Far Fan Beach. From morning till evening the beach is a voluptous scelle
4 '. ~ with students swimming, running races, playing games, eating etc.



$4 44-171

4'>". r


-~~~ 4 : ,$444V44 H 444<~

































This school, all thru the years, has produced outstanding ath-
letes. To name two, Charlotte Gooden, and David Roberts, who
is shown in the upper left hand corner. Our stellar athletes have j
always surpassed our old rivals from Rainbow City in the many
sports field. Some of these scenes show important moments in
the course of games played against Rainbow City High. Also
shown are members of our baseball and softball teams after anoth-
er triumnph.





,II ,




77- '







t3:9 ~~~W- Er L-7:













4.1

















7.7
-i I"C!; i ; -~



.. . ":2: ::::;::




1 4 4,1 6 : ,: ; ri














..... ... ..
idB !> :-
VI; - 7






















wung on and missed! He struck Ihim out with ae uev ball. N(
no hits, no errors, no one left on the ba,e paths. And th-
e after 6 innings, La Boca 7, Rainbow City 1.
es, our athletes were always winning. From track meets to
eybdl and basebafl, we wan every title, and in so doing-
ed the All Sp~rts Champions'iip for the third atrai,,'t yir.




I o








Class of '54













Alleyne. Edith
"Eda" Barrow, Beatrice
"BR"
Chiva Chiva, C. Z.
Commerce Paraiso, C. Z.
Commerce










7,:.


Atherley, Byrn Best, Jean
"Junk"
Paraiso, C. Z. La Boca, C. Z.
Tailoring
Upholstery Commerce














Atherton, Elaine Blacklman, Elisha
"Half-i int" "Jack" '
La Boca, C. Z. Paraiso, C. Z.
Home Economics Bookbinding
Professional Grooming














Baker, Rudolph Broin, Carmen
"Valentino" "Ceci"
Panama, R. P. Panama, R. P.
Wood Fabric,. tion Printing













Bullen, Alvin C. Chase, Mela n.
"Bazac" "Margie"
Panama, R. P. Panama, R, P.
Bookbinding Commerce














Caelis, WildChristian, George
Cajelis, Wilda "Kitoval"
"Will" Gamboa, C. Z.
Panama, R. P. Motor Mechanics
CLmm-rce















Campbell, Ay Clark, Carlyle D.
Campbell, Amy
Bors "Carl"
"Bops" La Boca, C. Z.
Gamboa, C, Z. La Boca, C Z
Home Economics Printin
Professional Grooming













Colona, Victor R.
Caton, Ethlyn Colona, Victor R.
"L"Lao"
PParaiso, C.Z.
Panama, R.P.... Commerce
Home Economics Cm c
Professional Groomine


il~lA












Couloute, Cecil Edwards, Wilford
"Cess" "Ow"
Gamboa, C. Z. Gamboa, C. 7.
Body & Fender Wood Fabrication






-ii






Felix, Patrick
Cummings, Jeanette "Belix, Patrick
"Butch""Beito"
Gamboa, C.Z. La Boca, C. 7.
Gamboa, C. Z. Bookbinding
Commerce













Daniels, Beryl Francis, Cynthia
"B" "Munge"
Gamboa, C. Z. La Boca, C. Z.
Home Economics Commerce
Professional Grooming













Davis, Marylyn Gittens, Rose
"Mari". "Pearl"
La Boca, C. Z. Paraiso, C' Z.
Commerce HIome Economics










a Gustave, George
Gor zalez, Jose usta
"Cheffy" "Gorgi"
Gamboa, C. Z. Panama, R. P
Bookbinding Metal Fabrication
Body & Fender











Gordon, Clarence Headley, Bernard
"Choco" "Buddy"
I a Boca, C. Z.'wo Para so, R. I'.
Wood Fabrication Moto -Mechar.i s










Griffith, Alfred enry, fton
"Jack" Mapes"
Panama, R. P. Paraiso, C. Z.
Commner. e Commerc












(G:errero, Manuel A. Henry, Clinton
"Guerrerillo" Frijoles, C. Z.
Arraijan, R. P. Wood Fabrication
Commerce.
......
X @

000 i!











Henry, Mavis Howard, Ida
"Mayo" "May"
Paraiso, C. Z. La Boca, C. Z.
Home Economics Professinnal Grooming
Professional Grooming






coo coo






Ilerbert, Theophilugs Husband, Pauline
"Tuffy" La Boca, C. Z.
PanI'ama, R. P. Home Fcc nom:cs
Hookbinding P'rofessiona! Grooming













Hogan, Kenneth Jarvi, dred
"Paques" C.
Para':o, C. Z; I-r.io, C. Z.
Body & Fender Home Economics













Hooker, Jurlo Jarvis, PaIlu
"Boots" "Pal"
La Boca, C. Z. Ga mboa "C. 7.
Printing Tailoring, Upholslery













Jones; Jeida E. Joseph, Hector
"Edvetta" "Papito"
Paraiso, C. Z. La Boca, C.Z.
Commere Wood Fabrication














Jones. Mary
La Boca, C. Z
Upholstery Josiah, John
Home Economics Gamboa, C.Z.
Wood Fabrication







fiQ





Jones, May Laguna, Luciano
La Boca, C. Z "Lubski"
Home Economics Gamboa, C. Z.
Professional Grooming Motor Mechanics















Jordan, Winston Lawrenc, Violet
Panama, R. P. 1GmoCo
Wood Fabrication Gamboa, C. Z.
Home Economics
Upholstery












Lowe, Ivan
"Eyes" Maynard, Lillian
Paraiso, C. Z. Paraiso, C. Z.
Wood Fabrication Upholstery














) Lyder, Theodore McAllister, Germaine
"Dan" "Rene"
XfP. raiso, C. Z Panama, R. P.
Tailoring Tailoring














Malcolm, Wilford McClure, Clebert B.
"Choco" "Mac"
Paraiso, C. Z. Paraiso, C. Z.
Body & Fender Commerce














Markland, Hector McKindo, Frank
"Bull" "Mac"
La Boca, C. Z. La Boca, C. Z.
Printing Tailoring














Moore, Janet P. Parchment, Marva
"Pat" p "Marvls"
Panama, R P. Paraiso, C. Z.
Commerce Commerce















Mullings, Charles Payne, Carlos
"Bala" "Toddy"
Gamboa,C. Z. La Boca, C. Z.
Motor Mechanics Commerce














Oscar, Eleanor M.
'Lana" Polanco, Etelvina
Panan a R.P. "Mufieca"
Commerce. P. Paraiso, C.Z.mrce
ComeCommerce














Palmer, Dora Pollard,j Enid
Panama R. P. La Boca, C.Z.
College Preparatory Home Economics
Professional (:rooming












Proverbs, Carol
"Jean, Robinson, Glendora
F"Jean" "FOto"
Paraiso, C.Z. "Foto"
Commerce Panama, R.P.
Commerce














Reyes, Carlos Seales, Jonathan
"Calin" "Termite"
Paraiso, C.Z. Paraiso, C. Z.
Tailoring Commerce













Roberts, David Shaw, Nancy
"Rene" "Lonps"
Panama, R.P. Paraiso, C. Z.
Wood Fabrication Home Economic
Professional Grooming


1;d









Robertson. Vivian Small, Rupert
"Allergy" "Smalley"
Panama, R.P. Paraiso, C.Z.
Commerce Tailoring
x~~~a~~i;a6i;












Smith, Mavis
"Mavo" Trotman, Ralph
Gamboa, C. Z. "Skins"
Home Economics Paraiso, C. Z.
Professional Grooming Printing

































Stewart, Gloria S Walters, Byron
Gamrioa, C.Z. Chiva Chiva, C Z.

















"Satan" "Dick"
Paraiso, C. Z. Chiva Chiva, C. Z.
Commerce ; Body & Fender














Straughn, Lolita Weeks, George
"Dick"
Panama, R. P. Gamboa, C. Z.
Panama, R. P Wood Fabrication
Tailoring


























Wickham, George Williams, Violet
"Mombo" "Vio"
Panama, R. P. La Boca, C. Z.
Tailoring Commerce





OLASS SONG


TO LA BOCA HIGH
Goodbye our dear La Boca Hi:
Our Love for you'll remain.
We leave our footprints on your grounds.
With honor, joy, and pain.
We think of all your teachings clear;
We know you did your best.
La Boca Hi, we thank thee, dear,
On you our dreams will rest.
CHORUS
Goodbye Alma Mater, (Gsoodbye, goodbye.
May you be in the years a greater Hi.
Our teachers too, our thanks shall share;
For counsels they have giv'n
Their patience calm we do admire,
'Tis like the grace of heaxv'n.
And now we come to bid adieu;
To friends and Alma Mater.
We go forth hence with courage true,
And praise to our creator.
Lyrics...... Sylvia Sylvester
Music... r. -r R. T. Prescatt






Hall *

of

Fame **e


MOST SUCCESSFUL
IN CLASSES


CYNTHIA FRANCIS
'10 CLIFTON HENRY 7 '








MOST
ALL AROUND

JANET MOORE
CARLYLE CLARK
#
























xxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx axxx:
CE
7S














WILDA ES GERMAINE McALLISTER





















GLENDORA ROBINSON
CECIL COLOUTE
xxX~ XXXXXXXXX xxX x xxxxxxxxxxxORD MALCOLM
WILDA CAJELS x, GERMAINEL MALLISTER-







FRIENDLIEST
















xxxxxx xxx xxx xxxxxxxx xxxxxxx T

PALLU JARVIS x A i
sxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxax


L

MOST AMUSING E






ei E'xxxxx xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx x
S CAROL PROVERBS
GEORGE WEEKS






XXXXXX XXX ; XXXXXXXXXX XXXxxX
x VIVIAN ROBERTSON
IVAN LOWE
'XXXXXXX XXXXX XXXXXXXXXXX XXx






















AWARDS


Year by year six students from the Senior High School are selected for distinction in Citizenship
and six others for distinction in Scholarship. The names of these students are inscribed on wooden
plaques which are kept in the school and are occasionally displayed.
Following are the names of the students who distinguished themselves during the year,
1953-54.

CITIZENSHIP

Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12

George Jemmott Charles Carr Carlos Payne
Corene Spencer Carmen Welch Edith Alleyne


SCHOLARSHIP

Felton Gill Norman Harris Carlyle Clark
Sislyn Trotman Jacinta Meldford Cynthia Francis

Our sincerest congratulations and best wishes go to these students. The Honor Students
for 1955 will be selected toward the end of next school year and will be featured in next year's
"El Pacifico."















Junior College











Corner


In September, 1950, the La Boca Junior College opened its doors on the right
wing of the La Boca Occupational High School with an enrollment of 49 students.
After operating for one school year as a separate institution, this junior college
became officially the La Boca Branch of the Canal Zone Junior College on
July 1, 1951.
The La Boca Branch of the Canal Zone Junior College offers two curricula:
general education and teacher training. The purpose of the former is to provide
a liberal arts course which may prepare students for further college studies or for
life in general. The latter course is a basic teacher training program for prospective
teachers.
The La Boca Branch operates an Extension Division, which offers evening and
Saturday morning classes for properly qualified students in both La Boca and Rain-
bow City. It also indirectly sponsors a four-weeks Summer Institute for teachers in
the Canal Zone Colored Schools in which courses accepted for credit in the junior
college are given.
The Canal Zone Junior College is accredited by the Middle States Association
of Colleges and Secondary Schools.






GRADUATES


Class of '54














Top row (Left to right):
Carlyle N. Atherley Jocelyn Barrowes Vilma E. Best Harold Brown Roy .S. Bryce
Paraiso, C.Z. Rainbow City, C.Z. Paraiso, C. Z. Rainbow City, C. Z. La Boca, C.Z.

2nd. row (Left to right):
Pablo E. Burke Silvia Carter Dolores Chambers Erlin Conliffe Doris Cox
Rainlow City, C.Z Rainbow C:ty, C.Z. Gimboa, C. Z. Panama. R. de P. La Boca C. Z.






















































1st. row (Left to right):

Eldeka Daniels Gilbert H. Denny Herbert Y. Denny Alicia M. Down William Elllngton
La Boca, C. Z. Rainbow City, C.Z. Rainbow City, C. Z. La Boca, C. Z. Colon, R. de P.


2n'. row (Left to right):

Celia Forte Ferdinand Gibbs Joycelyn Gooden Gloria Greene Vivienne Headley
Rainbow City, C. Z. Panama, R. de P. La Boca, C. Z. La Boca, C. Z. Panama R. de P.

3rd. row (Left to right):

Arthur H. Holder Dorothy Joseph Edmund Joseph Northon E. Joseph Cynthia Josephs
Gamboa, C. Z. Gamboa, C. Z. Gamboa, C. Z. Paraiso, C. Z. Rainbow City, C. Z.






















































up row (Left to right;:

Byron Lee Norma Lee Iris M. Markland Noel D. Mulgrave Frederick M. Myrie
Panama, R. de P. Panama. R. de P. La Boca, C. Z. Colon, R. de P. Gamboa, C.Z.



Id. row (Left to right):

E genia Nelon Frederick Parnther David Phlatts Iris Quinlan William A. Reid
P.iraiso, C. Z Rainbow City, C.Z. Frijoles, C. Z P.ainbow City, C. Z. Colon, R. de P.


d. row (Left toright):

Malcolm Sandiford Junie Scott Esther 0. Stewart Hazel Thompson David A. Williams
La Boca,C.Z. Rainbow City C. Z. Rainbow Citv, C. Z. La Boca, C. Z. Rainbow City, C. Z.


















David G. Williams Lorna J. Williams Mathilde Yearwood
Rainbow City, C. Z. Gamboa, C. Z. La Boca, C. Z.

Students not pictured

itandolph D. Barber Hazel Brown Ruth M. Springer
Gamboa, C. Z. Panama, R. de P. Panama R. de P.



JUNIOR

COLLEGE

FACULTY













st row (Left to right): Dean R. C. Hackett Mr. R. Beecher Miss E. Butcher

2nd. row (Left to right):
Mr. R. Johns Mr. D. Myers Mr. A. Parchment Miss S. Springer Mr. C. R. Voaburgh










Chronicle of the Second Junior College Class at La Boca


September 4, 1952 Registration

October 6, 1952 Interim committee formed

October 31, 1952 Acquaintance-Halloween party

November 14, 1952 Talk on "Etiquette" by Dr. Dorothv Moody

December 23, 1952 Christmas program

March 16, 1953 Election of class officers

March 27, 1953 Field day at Far Fan beach

April 18, 1953 Community Service Committe began its children's
story hour activity
April 22, 1953 Speech & Dramatics Club program

May 13, 1953 Mother's Day tea

September 3, 1953 Beginning of second school year

September 18, 1953 Election of class officers

October 30, 1953 Honorable Alfredo Cragwell, guest speaker at Cin-
cuentenario program
October 30, 1953 Halloween party

November 13, 1953 Dr. William Campbell, guest speaker at the Educa-
tion Week program
November 18, 1953 Speech & Dramatics Club activity

December 11, 1953 Friendship tea

January 6, 1954 Talk on "The Teaching of Reading" by Miss Elkins

January 13 and 14, 1954 Visits to Diablo; Heights Elementary School

February 26, 1954 Visit to the Administration Building and the Gover-
nor's Office
March 5, 1954 Discussion Group with Alfred Leventon of the U.S.
Embassy
March 12, 1954 Visit to the Presidencia

March 29, 1954 Student teaching conference

May 30, 1954 Baccalaureate Service

May 31, 1954 Graduation










THE EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHILD


Education today does not primarily mean the daily attendance at some estab-
lished institution. The word embraces much more. In a broad sense it represents
the life long experiences of the individual.

The child begins to learn from his birth. The pre-school years prepare him for
the wider experiences of school and community. His first years in school are in-
tended to develop the ability to get along with other children; to cooperate with
his teachers, and to arouse in him the joys of learning to read and write. As the
child grows older, new interests begin to claim his attention and further respon-
sibilities challenge his courage. At this stage he becomes interested in games, pro-
grams, and other activities which help to broaden his ideas and develop skills. He
is given the opportunities through which he improves this sense of responsibility.
For example, the teacher may assign him to distribute books and collect books. He
may be asked to introduce and direct a game at recess. His sense of responsibility
may further be strenghtened by assignments to be prepared without supervision. By
this time the child has probably reached the end of his elementary education and
is now ready to enter the junior high school.

In Jr. high school the child seems to step upon a higher rung on the ladder of
education. He begins to associate with several teachers, and a larger student group.
This becomes a challenge to his social attitudes and should tend to promote fuller
respect and appreciation for other people. He comes into contact with a greater
number of books and with a greater variety of subjects which require more careful
study and general preparation. It is here that character should begin to take a de-
finite form. Reliability on the student's part becomes manifest. His positive atti-
tude toward study should be clearly marked. Skills in his subject matter should
show steady development. Here also, the student should begin to have a definite out-
look upon life and to decide what his goal is to be.

The student's next step is in the senior high school. At this stage of approach-
ing adulthood the youth is held, to a large extent, more responsible for his work
and his behavior. He is assigned work to be prepared on his own initiative. He
selects the subjects that he likes and those which will prepare him for his chosen vo-
cation. His skills should now be fully developed. As he nears the end of his sec-
condary education, he should be prepared to go out into the world on his own.

Today, wo who have passed through this series of development say Farewell to
our Alma Mater. This in no way signifies an end to our education, since this is
not possible, but is intended to bid a simple adieu to the school and campus. As we
go out into the world to seek our places, may we endeavor to increase our education,
with the idea of assisting the students that we left behind to Ibtter appreciate this
excellent acquisition--- Education.


Vivian Robcrtson








IN MEMORIAM
By Joselyn H. Thompson

We pay this tribute to Dr. Lawrence Johnson who devoted twenty years of his
life towards the progress of the Canal Zone Schools. Dr. Johnson was a native
of Grafton, North Dakota, and a graduate with honors from North Dakota State
leachers' College in 1926, with a degree as Bachelor of Education. He did grad-
uate work at the University of Washington, where he obtained a degree as Mas-
ter of Education. He was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa, an honorary educa-
tional fraternity. He served as Superintendent of Schools at Hamilton and Turtle
Lake, North Dakota.
Dr. Johnson came to the Canal Zone in 1930, and was appointed instructor of
shopwork and mathematics at Cristobal High School. In 1931, he became director
of vocational education; in 1933, he was made principal of Balboa Junior High
School and in 1935 he moved up to director of colored schools. Still advancing,
Dr. Johnson was made assistant superintendent of School in 1936, and ultimately,
superintenuent of schools in 1948..
As director of colored schools, Dr. Johnson became aware of the needs of the
young people. Under this awareness, he set himself to improve the offerings of the
group. His first effort was to establish a normal training school to furnish a supply
of trained teachers for position in the school. Further, he added the ninth grade to
thecurriculm, which up to then, provided only eight years of education for the
children. A marked advancement came when two occupational high schools were
established, one at La Boca and the other at Silver City, which is now Rainbow
City. A further step was taken in 1950, by Dr. Johnson, as Superintendent of
Schools, in bringing into being the La Boca Branch of the Canal Zone Junior
College. To this series of construction we must mention the establishment of the
latest model elementary school building in Paraiso, aud the remoldeling of the for-
mer building to accommodate the junior high school students of that community.
For the benefit of teachers; Dr. Johnson established the Summer Institute. He
projected the type of program, which was intended to help teachers meet the
needs of modern school students.
Throughout Dr. Johnson's administrative years on the Canal Zone, he proved
himself to be a man of great vision towards the upliftment of youth. He was sincere,
energetic, and sympathetic. These characteristics served to endear him to all
those with whom he came in contact. His friendly disposition and noble ideals
are continously eulogized by the faculties and students of all the schools that came
under his superintendency .
Though what we:might call an untimely death overtook this great benefactor,
the results of his labor will remain for many years.




Thank Heaven the crisis
the danger is passed
And the lingering illness
is over at last-
And the fever called "living"
is conquered at last.
(Edgar A. Poe)





Dr. L. Johnson
July 4, 1901--June 5, 1953








Advertisements










SPONSORS


Miss M. Sealey Mr. & Mrs. C. V. Atherton
Wilbert G. Hall, F. Mr. Allan Roy Tomlin
Vivian E. Hall Mr. & Mrs. H. Shaw and Family
Judith Van Horn Mr. Alfred C. Bushell
Mr. & Mrs. Higgs and Son Sra. Ligia R. de Icaza
William E. Sullivan Manuel MorAn y Sra.
Gregorio Barrias y Sra. Mr. Richard Blake
Mr. & Mrs. F. Bryan Mr. & Mrs. H. Callender
Sr. Andrds Dixon Mr. & Mrs. Frederick A. Lawrence
Mr. & Mrs. Frank 0. Eastmond Mr. & Mrs. C. B. Prescott
and Family Mr. & Mrs. Fred A. Burns
Mr. & Mrs. C. Hooker Mr. & Mrs. Juan R. Griffin
Mr. Rudolph Mitchell Mr. & Mrs. J. M. Adonican
Mr. & Mrs. Irvin Clarke Mr. Robert H. Beecher
Mr. & Mrs. John R. Small Mr. Albert E. Bell
Mr. & Mrs. Elvin I. Butcher Mr. & Mrs. Hugh M. Best and Family
Mr. & Mrs. James U. Henry & Family Mr. Felix E. Blandford
Mr. Robert Joseph Miss Emily E. Butcher
Mrs. H. Jarvis Mr. John Evans
Mr. & Mrs. M. Jones A Friend
Mr. & Mrs. H. W. McKenzie Mrs. L. Gibson
Mr. & Mrs. R. D. Bayley Mr. Walton Greene and Family
Mr. & Mrs. Carlos Brown Mr. & Mrs. Karl L. Harris
Mr. Frank A. Thompson Mr. & Mrs. P. Hinds
Mr. Stanley Griffith Mrs. Louise Ifill
Zoila R. de Guerrero International Girl Scouts Local Council
I. J. Coley Miss Egla M. Gooden, President
Mr. Tommy Gordon R. Jovand y Sefiora
Mrs. M. Johnson Mr. & Mrs, L. F. La Motte
Mr. & Mrs. Fearon Donald Gittens
Alcides Morene V. Mr. J. E. Hogan & Family
Mrs. L. A. Eastman Miss Bernice Alder
Miss Melida Watler St. Clair A. Husband & Family
A. A. Bonnick Mr. & Mrs. J. Wright
Mr. Dennis Josiah Zemerta Dawkin








SPONSORS

Miss Elaine Elliott Mrs. L. Mairs and Family
Mr. & Mrs. Harvey L. Jones Mr. & Mrs. C. E. Markland
Mr. L. Harris Mr. & Mrs. T. E. Martin
Mr. & Mrs. A. Herbert Carlos Arturo Joya y Sra.
Mr. & Mrs. Clemente Ara Mr. & Mrs. Edgar V. Petit
Mr. & Mrs. Emilio Archer Mr. & Mrs. E. Roper and Family
Rafael Femenias y Sra. Mr. & Mrs. B. N. Springer
Mr. & Mrs. J. Gordon Miss Esther Stewart
Mr. & Mrs. Jose French Mr. Ronald R. Livingston
Mr. & Mrs. A. Nelson Mr. F. Wynter
Mr. & Mrs. G. Grant Mr. & Mrs. W. Stewart
Mr. & Mrs. B. S. Thompson Mr. & Mrs. Rosa Robinson
Mr. & Mrs. C. Leo Walker Mr. Arthur A. Maug6
Mr. & Mrs. G. Williams Mr. & Mrs. DeWitt E. Myers
Mr. Marcelo Oscar Mr. & Mrs. E. Gooding
Mr. & Mrs. Leonel Oscar & Family Cyril Prince
Mr. George Springer





Compliments of


Justice Lodge of Elks

No. 832
I.B.P.O.E. of W.
La Boca, C. Z.

H. G. STEVENS C. D. CLARK
Exalted Ruler Secretary








Compliments



of




COMPANIA PANAMENA DE



FUERZA Y LUZ






Gas





Electricity Telephones






Centro Artistico
COMPLIMENTS OF

Foto Farrier
Trott the Cleaner

Ave. Central, 179
Tel. 2-0120
Panamai Tel. 2-2132


BEST WISHES AND Compliments
COMPLIMENTS of
of
R. L. DEHLINGER HERFF-JONES COMPANY
Automobile Financing
Manufacturers of the 1954 Class Rings
&
E. A. LEWIS
Auto Insurance Representative






Compliments KODAK...
of
For BETTER Pictures


VICE ROY


KODAK PANAMA LTD.

(Filter Tip)
Cigarettes


Panama Colon












SEARS ROEBUCK & 00.


(REPRES EN T ATI V ,ES)







TIVOLI AVENUE







PANAMA, R.P.





AUTOGRAPHS





AUTOGRAPHS

















































































































































a~l
f,







Full Text