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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00418


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V9L. VIH Port-au-Prince, Raiti SUNDAY OCTOBER 27th 1957 No. 5
"" --------- -------,_ ____1_ __0__


1'


N.
.CA'iNatioaalist Chinese goodwill
isslion, hd.aded by Ambassador-
t-large Chang Huan Shen, arrived
.:'-Pbnt .Thursday afternoon, corn-
-btng an extensive tour of the
... ... -, e.itou
Oi$b6ani and South America.
4je,.ive-man group was greeted
fe airprL by Liu Ya Wan,


ti;lhst Chinese minfster.to
7C!..nd. Ambassador 'T.o Cuba,
lteeta nmiember'of the Chi-
ScIqny in Haiti some 'of
ifiiad journeyed' from A.ux
E'sad 6ap HIaitie -to., grdet,
ausslon. *A pretty Haitian-Chi-
girl presented the delegation
j "orbi 6 '4:'red r.sps they,
,.Chihese'"wete guests "of
tibassador Gerald "D.rew 'at
i ;sa. Th'ursday'night. They
'.presented' to President Du-
ir: and other government offi"
19-613 Friday by Minister Lip
i.,..--. ; ./.. .:: ,.''
^ :: '*- .* ...
* :. "" '- -
ZETAf INTERNATIONAL
-'LIMITED. '
I J.^";- -..... .- .-"


S Announces
f*^ :.. ,
e. physicians, epecialry to
itbtetri6ian- aid Pediatri;
tOvftliee capital that it is
9-' to6 give FREE SItA-
.ERErD MILK to feed du-
r. eee months all twins and
M..ho"i- between October
W November 15, 1957.
'parent' interested in that
' may contact F. G. NaudA.
:.-Pave. Port-au-Prince
Villa be require : ,
.he authoriznatri of a phy.
-hie babiers- birth certificate


CHINESE 9


I--AITI WN..S. ..BATTLE AGAINST

TEIBITY -.PAYS- OFF PIN NATION
0 ,ur Industrial an anti-inflation battle that a financial position fundamnen-
Corresp6ident) has earned thi admiration of tally stronger than it has been
Sm.idst. of ten monthIs foreign experts. for many -years and- re-orga-
1 pqlitteal fighting, This week, with the instal- nized and 'reoriented so that
ted Ii shortfalls" in its lation of a President, the coun short of some incalculably ri-
t iipoitant revenue try, while still committed to diculous fiscal policy oqr, some
pgjdusstris'-.offee: a policy of Austerity could unforeseeable natural :.disas,
.. by -ithfrd and take heart from the fact that ter, there need be tofear of
I.ch alsOt vanis- the brilliantly fought defensi-. the future. We have passed
b.1ti fought and won ve struggle was paying off'in the worst. -
a>
sic N


' ,' .* .-' ,.. ..


President


Cabinet
V I- -


And




SThe


Colorful Ceremonies -
Mark Inauguration -
Haiti had a definitive President and Congress this -week
after ten months of turmoil and confusion attempting to elet
a successor, to ex-President Paul Magloire. i -
IN a colorful ceremony, witnessed by a crowd which jam-.
med the National Palace and overflowed on to the sairs, Dr.
Francois Duvalier was on Tuesday morning sworn in as Pre-
sidept of this Republic.


1"


INFLATION;

0AL EFFORT
The quot. is from a conver
satin I had this week with Mr.
Joseph Chatelain. Research Di-
rector of the National Bank of
H a i t i. (Mr. Chatelain stu.
died Economics in France and
spent a year with the Ihternatio
nat Bank in Watliington. Recen
tly he retul-ned to Hlaiti from a
:(Continued on page 14)--.


DELEGATION Gen. Kebreau Is
Back As Head
) TO HAITI Of Haiti's Army
TO-v HAITIA AGeneral Antonio Th." KebreaU,
L T'RIP formally returned to his post as
*AL TR l Chief of Staff of the Army when
S 'President. Dr. Franogois Duvalier
Yu 'Van. Friday night minister invested him ina ceremony at the
Wan offered a reception at hotel National Palace "on Saturday
Castelhaiti where members of the morning
Chinese mission Were lodged du. The ceremony was held'in the
ing their stay. Foreign Minister Salon d'Or and was attended by
,Vilfort Beauvsir entertained the most of the Army officers in the
Visitor at Hotei Montana. Port-au-Prince and environs.
.During their swing around Laz Announcing that the appoint-
'tin' America, the Chinese; -have ment of the Chief of Staff'was six
been exploring'pbSsibllitits of years the Presideht expressed his
stepping- up" trade .bqtweei- For- confidencee in Gend6rariKebreau and.
mosa. and variods't.euntries. The paid tribute -o the steadfastn.ss
Chinese Mission left Haiti. o Sa- and loyalty of the Army, 'to ha-
uiiday,- ei .routbeck .o Taipeh. (Continue.\ on page 16).
the rmy.'t .,tta
I .' !. ,, ', ; -
4'

aUN!34&L J~SAIJE

CALL BY NEW CHEF;:
PR'ESIDFINT-.DR.:, FRANCOS .cause they knew that he would
DUVALIER, 'in- 'the, cduirs' of. '-i remain after the electoral battle,
Inaugural Address after taking the' exactly what he had always beenz--
Oath of office. referred to the fact a Haitian, a man and a believer in.
that the.Nationhad' suffered much the doctrine- of collective well-
because -it was the .irst time in' being.
political-liistory that .!Taftians had ...,I here return thanks to the Hqi
lrd hdie.1opportunity of expressing tiah people who have awaited this
I :-fr wffl freely, ,nilhou'.'distinc- day to prove. that 'they are aware
tion of sed, ia'the .ciersc of an of the political realities and
Lincst and loyal election whose sufferings have brought
It was his intention to, end the them greater maturity .
misunderstanding and isolation /
from which the' Haitian people had THE PRESIDENT DECLARED
suffered over the past one hundred-
and fifty years. The unyielding -For these people who until
termination -oi his private life. 1946 had. never .before thought
and the fierce austerity which had that they were entitled to the good
:.- ":- .. ..... ....''." ... "'." I '
bee&n:.-'qatuire of'"iis:p blic life things of life and to the pursuit
'". -, .~.'., -
would continue into the realms of of happiness- for these people/
the .high-office to nhich. he had who have now risen up and decid-
"!F ", .. -. ", t'-A :". -
hben called. ed that the drama of their isola-
If the,.-aitian.,masses who knew tion has lasted too long and have
liimi.:and "bad deemed. hiA worthy chosen to dispose of their own
so that they'ad'"proven, their fi- destiny-my .Govetnment will al-
delity at'the ballot-box, it was be- (Continued on page 3'


JOB


Get


WELCOME


BODY OF
U. S. FLASH
FLOOD VICTIM
IS FOUND
A body which the United Sta.
tes Embassy here said had been
tentatively identified as that of
American tourist Everett An-
drew Lomax, was taken from
the sea on Tuesday by Haitian
authorities of St Mare.
Mr. Lomax, 47, a 'Piliadelphi.
an,,.- w.a.p presumably drowned
when\. a flash' flood struck the al-
tom6bile in which. -he was cros-:'
sintig a dry rivet bed on the high-
way. .- -.
The taxi driver arid fellow tou
rist, Leo James -C6rmley';:'ad'
a-' Aarrow escape. The tw. vii-
tbrs had been "guests "at Hotel
Mjbn Rave. .. '.... ,


POINT IV- IS'
PAID -UP
IN FULL
Before turning ov6r the govern.
meant to civilians oh September
22nd, 4he.'Military -Government
Council had. paid up Haiti ar
.rears, $166,000 in-counterpart
funds, thus reinstated U.S. tech"
nical assistance in ,agriculture;
.health. and' education largely
suspended 'a, fortnight ago. '
The U.S. Operations Mission
in Haiti includ. SCHAER (ru-'
(Continued on page 2)

MISSING. AIRCRAFT1S iS .
FOUND 3O Ft; DCWN"
.. ., .. -........ .. '... -.. .., ...
If special equipment. is availd-',
ble at,'the U.S. Naval Base in
Guantanamo, efforts will be'
made to bring to the surface,
-,he Haitian Airiorce Unit AT6
and the -two missing Army Of-
ficerq still ini6risoned ir the
(Continued on page 2)


ON GOOD


I


----------


After the ceremony the Prie-
sident and Mrs. Duvalier at-
tenfded a solemn Te Deum, at
the Basilique of Notre Danie-
and .then. made a tour of tie
city when people lining, Ithe
street$ gave them ai, entiihu-
siastic reception. ., ,., ,>
The~ceremony at the .p 41ce.
wa- a three-foid-one. ,wi th'e
Co04cil of -Military Govern'
ment presided over by General
AntodnicThi.Kebreau,'. handingg.
over. its Execu.tive and Lesis-
lative,: powers top.the Congress..
through President, Of the Sec
nat; Huguebs Bourjiolly, w ..
then swore in 'the President ai.
the Chief ,Exeoutive, ,
'General .Kebreiu tfiee ii-
vested -the' newly sworn P4
sideit with the, red 'and blueI
cordon..ofCoffice. '
In ddchig*so-the General' who
wit othier .menibers' of thl'
,,i ucil;:had received a warm:
tribute of applause on their
arrival at tealace- spoke qf
,th- Armyts pride at havag.,
'completed, its task and 'don
its duity:" .. ..
'*- .: "-_'," '-"*
A.repbrt of, the Presidet'so
Inaugtxi-al Address appears od
thisae :ag ,
:. :. .. ." *;, "'*- : ..., ..* ', z.
SThe next da'y 'the Preaodedhf
announced .tee names of his
cabinet and th& adinistra!
Ition got down to- the..task .of
governing ,.. the country, (se,
page 14).." -
:, : ..:. -,? .. y :*. ,. ^ ^ ** -,i ,,
.- -7 "-*-"'*--.7 .'-- '--,-*--- '-.: .-*- ,,.-- .

PREStDPiRNT
DUVALIER TALKS,
With Foreign PressI
President, of the Republic,. Dr.
Prarvur.is )uvalier, in his, first
Press Conference told newsmen.
at the Palace, on Thursday mor-.
ning that most political 'priso-
nets, anui many of the persdng.
wbao went into biding following
the publishing of the national
elections results have been re.
leased, or have iome out of hid:
ing. -
As an example of thd atmols-
phere of confidence beifig crea-
ted, Dr. 'Duvalier stated that
Louis Dejole, r..J. son of defea-
ted Presidential Candidate Louis"
Dejoie, had qn the previous
night, enjoyed a game of poker
with one of the Aew Cabinet
' [(Continued oh .page'16)

'... .. ; '/ : '*


M






Page-2 .


cHAITI SUN,


SUNDAY OCTOBE


NA TIONAL CRUSADE CALL B'
1 (dntinfed from page one) ed in a torment which would have
ways be guided by the thought definitely submerged the national
that never must this hardwon interests had it not been for the
equilibrium be lost and -ehange- unconquerable resistance of the
intoo misery. ..- people and the deep psychological
;. .Inspired by my belief in the elan which characterises them..
S. total. liberation of the Haitian
people I have taken the Oath to- SIGNIFICANT DATES
day and in the .performance of that This torment, the President said,
pledge I consider my life conse- was one of the many symptoms in
.c-ated to the fulfilment of the the social, and political history of
principles embodied in that pledge. the country-which marked phases
-&: .It is my earnest hope that at in the attempts of the people to
-the end of my constitutional term align themselves with similar so-
the people f0r whom I shall have cial and political growth through-
e dr, formed. hope into progressive out the world... 1930, 1937, 1946,
realty' w1ll reward my memory 1956, 1957 were the significant
:k,. with' unfailing attachibents. dates of this continuing struggle.
tributesBUTE S Each upsurge of- the national
The President then sought leave conscience had had its effect upon
: lo.o" Lo iPay a filial tribute 'of gratitu- he system against which it revolt-
S,'d to a. man who is. among you in ed for the governments of the time
i":this room. At this moment, proba- were neither nationally basid
bl y the most moving in hip life, enough, nor were they sufficiently
:e -must be experiencing a flood flexible to adapt the system to the
..'.of moral satisfaction. The family needs and demands of the day.
.' Idgacy of honesty 'of purpose and The Haitian community was faced
':,. nobleness of character of love of with a veritable structural crisis
t',':itbStViublic' welfare whieh Judge similar to those which had brought
;. bu-alfer reciVed from his upright down great empires 'in the past.
-forefather, Th&humble tailor, my These crises of.. hunan evolution
fI'.Pncipal mentor of social history, imposed upon men the necessity
Vs.u"shiL be !mny'.constant regard., so of understanding the principle of
thatt in, my comportment in. carry- ythe perpetual draining off of
ug.ij g'.oUt the affairs vof -the State I things-.
hi4." endeavour to enrich that Haiti's crisis arose, above all,
.iIegacy and hand it over undimm- from the inadequacy of its insti-
ed, like'aii inextingulishable flame, tutiols, afid the lack of flexibility
,. ,Nr could.- I be. silent* the 'in plans for dealing with the corn-
.President went on, con the sup- plex situation created by lack of
..potft I Jhave. received from -this understanding of natural laws.
J.Z,0u0ageots 1n8urse, SimnQe Ovide The resulting disequilibrium and
.)i:valie*, the. indefatigable corn- profound discord demanded reform
'*iiaou,, my iigbts of, meditation, of the State. 'The State must re-
k .ad'who for. almost .a quartet, of form. and renew .itself. or.;it wouldd
A ',,.century has ,been a vigilant perish. The Haitian State demand-
-withess of my triumphs and defeats ed that reform and renovation
'of my hours of hope and of dis- take place on the regional as well
to encouragement. as" the national level. It was only
S :I know she will continue to thus that the logical will of the
S.lend'. me her' aid,,as she did'not' Haitian to achieve his democratic
solong ago in the hospital ward, destiny could be expres-ed.' -
'jin mynew task of pursuing with There had to be a period of
.. dignity and fraternity the orgaii- transition. Safety- and progress in
satit6n and embellishm.4nt o.6 th -Haiti could.-'come only from an
c o common. Fatherland.. elimination of ..-anachronisms, an
;,-sliuring to his.theme the Pre- understanding of the interdepen-
;: S"ldnat conetinued:;The .HXitn" po- denhce of powers and the putting
:: "itt ociet during the past six into. effect of' tested rules which
S, yf -and .n-more pariiculrlp'duir- had given 'to Western civilization
.- ". ,n the last ten months,- has liv- its high character' of equilibrium

PEtFUJME DEPARTMENT
WHEkRE YOU'LL FIND THE WORLD'S
> AMOUS BRANDS FRENCH PERFUMES
D TOILET. WATERS.
U-. LOTSS CREPE DE CHINE
LANCOMES -MAGIE, TRESOR
S[IANVINS ARPEGE
LEGAL.IONS SORTILEGE, SNOB
CORDAYS TOUJOURS MOI
CHRISTIA* DIOR MISS DIOR, DIORAMA
RAPHAEL REPULIQUE
- JEAN PATOUS JOY, MOMENT SUPREME
SAMOUR-AMOUR
CARVEN MAGRIFFE, ROBE D'UN SOIR-
CARON FLEURS DE ROCAILLE
LE TABAC BLOND, NUTT DE NOEL
AND MANY OTHERS AT REASONABLE PRICES.


Y NEW CHIEF
and order and that internal disci-
pline which keeps- the various for-
ces in balance so that a -society
could-constantly recreate itself and
mankind rise to his full dimen-
sions.
A Society was nothing more
than the achievement of Democra-
cy and Order.- Democracy was the
political, social and economic re-
gime which encouraged the dev-
elopment of individual 'effort.
Order was the harmony existing
between individual and social
needs. In this way Democracy was-
a form of dynamic life, essentially
dynamic, while Order was the sta-
bilizing factor which guaranteed
the conditiofins of birth and renais-
sance. When that was achieved
Oider was no longer. a purely
material fact but. an institutional
fact.
CIVIL RIGHT PLEDGE
'My Government,, President Du-
valier pledged, ,will seek the per-
manent accord of Democracy and
Order... my Government will scru-
pulously", 'protect honor and civil
rights which, are the prerogative
of. all free' peoples. It will gua-
rantee liberty to the Haitian peo-
pie. At the same time it will per-


tion of the Spanish colonies of
America, and Haiti's relations with-
peoples of color in their struggle
against colonialism and racial pre-
judice.
ECONOMIC TASK
Turning to the general econo-
my of the country which he said
had to be-improved if the promise
of a higher standard of life for
all was to be achieved, the Presi-
dent referreft to the weakness of
export 'products, the low volume.of
domestic investments in enter.
prises which- provided permanent
employment, the very low volume
of national 'savings and the small
average per capital income. These,
he said, indicated better than any
other interpretation the magnitude
of the task before them.
These difficulties resulted from
such problems as population pres-..
sure, stagnation of production, the
crushing weight of unemployment,
the inactivity of wealth either im-
mobim'fed or deposited abroad;
the need for foreign inestments
in activities with a high labour
content; the limitation of Haitian
investments to fields that do not
reinforce or diversify the structure
of the Haitian market, taiatiion
policies that hit necessary hold-
ings and small incomes more


mit tnem to oenen irom me pro-
tection necessary to' their well-heavily than luxury items or large
being. and unproductive incomes based
.bItg pledges itself to maintain on privileges or deductions; the
liberty for all without any govern- income of the State increased at
mental pressure. a slower rate than the social char-
eIt assures an era of Haitian- ges of the State; and all its rqs-
American-friendship for the mutual sources were concentrated in- an
of the tw peoples and economic' sector which tended to
fappiness of the two peoples and ease competon and restrict
of the two oldest Democracies in copetn and restct
the Western Hemisphere. the possibilities of. a free .redistri-
The esten -. bution of national income.
'In re-stablishing, in the new buton of national icome
The reversal of these trends
Constitution, the principles which
define evolutionary societiesand would be the first victory -indicat-
define evolutionary societier~and .
in finding the tie that binds in ing TMat a Government had indeed
e as-ano te been born of the will of the people.
the association of the manage- The political awareness of that
ment of the powers of the State -
Government had already prepared
and the technical organizations as- G had p
soeae w t G n plans for a revolution in the realm
sociated with it, the Government
.,., .. of production and cultivation and
has outlined a general directive of production and cultivation and
,. ... ., already promised a more active
along. lines which would give an already promised a more active
historical interpretation to social participation by all in the affairs
positivism, of the community.
positivism. The carrying out of -this tre-
'In the battle which the Govern- Th c o h
ment will pursue for the exten- mendous task of political and eco-
ment will pursue for the exten-
sin of the pubc we-being ins- nomic equality of effort was neces-
.4ion of the public well-being, ins-say otht rufteny
titutions" of the. State must be sary so that true, fraternity
tltuion o th- Satemus bebetween Haitians may. coincide
reformed so that henceforth their between Haitans may concede
functions will 'be based on tht with the practice of real Demo-
principle of collective responsibi- cracy.
lity. I invite the great family of
From me rural areas to, the Haitians to co-operate with me. I
cities, from, the village to the town j
'there must be generated a cons-
tant impulse for progress that
must not cease so that life over
all the country will achieve its
real meaning.
Each small community, like
every large community must form i
an integrated whole for itself so
that peasant or laborer, manual '
worker or intellectual may con-
tribute to the ideal plan of diversi-
fied and remunerative occupa-
tion ..........
Tne President. promised a new
standard of life through the im- i
provment of rural housing, health
and education.
In its international relations, the
President said, his Government
would continue along the histori-
cal lines of policy based on the
particular aspects of its culture,
its geography, economic ties and
its contribution to the emancipa- Mr. John Roosevelt with Senz


.1 -. -:* *A;B-
count on the collaborati
Congress. where the de
the people will meet- Ad
always- the great names:o-
Letters, and of Industry c
ing a great team'tof sowers,
for the harvest under ourl.-
,The task of reconstruct
be a common task. It wil
task for the Government 'is
as the governed. It will bea
for the well-to-do classes as|
of -lthe needy; tit. of'
as well as the savant, agi
.hearts and our spirits
only one -Father land .that-.
with our hearts and our soulsl
Nation- the nation that h'
right to demand every sacf
'The Government of-JUaitii;.
all Haitians to join this cr
of public well-being so that'
causes of conflict will disaij
once and for all. As in those&
during the birth of the first
public, of 4ree black meo, '"
national nuity again be th.
perishable truth. "
'Together, and all joined:ii
ideal of the Nation, we shall'
the necessary steps. My 'G6
ment will kiow how to
the traditions and to give ti
great Haitifin people the -_
-ed community which it desert

PI4ANE FOUND ,:-
(Continued from page 11
plane since it crashed int6
sea on October 16th. -;'
An'oil slick was sightedhl
day, by Major John .Croy
from the nir,' in the sea o1-1
town of tlressier on the-e
position given by the Dutch,!
sPygnialionz., this confi.:
that the ATO. of the Haitian.i
Air Force crashed into:--A
wate-r.
Further investigation bf
Coast Guard further confit
that oil is seeping to the s
from the aircraft which is 1
ved to be in 300 feet of waj
Victims of the plane erast
to the waters were the -
Lieutenant Herv4 Lemaii
andrl Captain Henriot Desroc
A combined search carried
by the Coast'Guard and the.
Airforce here, at the time of
accident, had failed, butl
the discovery of the oil slid
ihe spot where the plane.
down nohope fo- recovery qt-
aircroft victims is held.
__. *


itor Bourjolly, Morrison.


'- -I .






v nrrfuwR 977th


wet -' -a-A 0-Li u .


|Haits Vi'

W"iContinued from page 1)

.r weeks trip to the United
aes where he discussed Hai-
present financial position
Swell as her prospects with
iN.cial agencies and banking
d industrial representatives.
,.dAs -a result, *Mr. Chatelain
.m there will appear in No-
i4mber the first page ever devo
4W to Haiti in INTERNATIO-
Sl. FINANCIAL STATISTICS,
4 official organ of the Inter-
ai"onal Monetary Fund.
1lHaving reorganised our fis-
,jsystemn and set up the orga-
Pjuation fo." the purpose,., Mr.
|C.atelain said, .we are now in-
nin foreign official agen-
Wies as well as interested finan-
Cga) and industrial organisatiops
.of oui* fiscal developments, and
.iLe in a position as never befo.
oe to answer questions and pro-
ide data and satistles.
SURPRISE IN U. S.
&...-Perhaps the most interesting
1a;d heartening result of my trip
lto the United States was the
surprisee expressed by officials
jiad representatives of Wall
fyee6t that we had been able to
t.. up so fine a financial record
i.04 such sharp contrast to what
r ad been happening in the poll
I' ie.al sphere. And yet the victo-
y- y gained a deflationary victo.
;-.r;that haa brought our balance
*f payments situation back into
illibrium ofter four years ol
(tlflationary pressure, and bqlar
1.ed the budget in" spite of ad
4:,verse conditions and t w (
Jgears'of deficits was a nation
'loaeo,.'Rt was a victory by the
people as 6 whole who, on a na
tlaonat scale, accepted condition.
0 Austerity that made severe do
minands on their courage and reso
lition.
g.,f:' In effect these drastic measi
f.#t's taken to adjust the advers
gLa'J the threatening budgetar
dp.sition, meanrit a ,)rty per cer
A t iln credit for husinessme
W.o were undergoing a perio
*.:Straii when credit w,'s ire,
i.JY needed. they meant a redu
'.Oon in Government expendit
re including social services th,
..are by no means adequate. ar
plmh3ynmi-tit at a ilunel when e\
political' sector knew and f
ied what this could mean
Phe political struggle then t
n,_ng place Nevcrtlieles., eve
'.oltical atlmni~.tm atioi an
'rha,.*c had six u]I tlhe pIs[ t


ctory
cy recommended
possible.


Over
as the only one


THE STAKE
.In theiproblem of exchange,
it was recognised that what was
at stake was the national inte-
rest the parity of 5 to one,
which we have maintained since
1919. In more sophisticated count
tries rigid parity such as we en-
deavou: to maintain is not re-
garded in the same light..
They accept a fluctuating cur-
rency with a certain degree of
aplomb and, indeed, their econo
mies are more resilient than
ours. Haitians on the other hand
feel very shongly about their cur-


Inflation


Stirs


cial payments, and arranged
postponement or reduction of
foreign debt payments thus in-
creasing tho foreign exchange
inflow and restricting the out.
flow.
eThe decree of last July rai.
sed the reserve cover of the
local banks and covered the dili-
ciency of the previous private
banking of the National Bank
which moved more into the
realm of a Central Bank. The lo-
cal banks therefore used in the
country a greater proportion -of
their locally acquired assets.
Thus,4 by mobilizing all the na-
tional resources, we have been
able to keep on without re-using
-,__ V-_ -M -V -'.. -.Ma- f. tho*


rency. any iracuon of our quota to tnc
It has to be remembered, too, International Monetary fund, and
that in an economy such as ours have only now applied to draw
in which there is so large on our quota. We received
an expenditure on im po r- a loan of one million dollars to
ted. consumer goods, it is a keep our exchange in balance.
sound economic view that a flue WORST IS PAST
tuating currency c o u l d so eThis reorganization of our
disrupt our price structure that fiscal policy.,, Mr. Chatelain said,
the strain may prove too great- 1has most effi c a c i o u s. The
in other words the remedy could result has been that we can
prove more drastic than the di- now say with the greatest con-
sease. fidence that the worst has been
Our inflationary p r o b I e m passed. This has been recongni.
being due to foreign exchange, or sed by all th officials of. the
rather the temporary lack of Monetary Fund with whom I tal-
exchange, the insist e n c e o n ked during my recent visit to Was-
a rigid price structure is under- hington.
standable. It will be necessary eAs you are probably aware
to plan so that our economy be- our public debt has been much
comes more flexible and thus discussed over the past year.
modify the present policy but that Our embrasswrent in this con-
is a long term measure. nection is not that this is too
I *There wa3 another course large far from it if this count
open to us, I'Mrf Chatelain went try is to be developed -- but
on-, that was exchange control. that t0oo large a proportion
tyas contracted on ak short term
But here again it was evident vas d a short term
* that the remedy could be more asis.
drastic than the disease, spe. While ho,.ever, we are faced
- cially as we were convinced that with heavy payments this year
Sthe crisis was a temporary 6ne it follows that next year's posi
"Apart from anything else ex- tion will be easier Our problem
-change control would be very
?e [difficult to work and would hard-
ly, be the course suited for a
t country seeking foreign invest ~
ment- to which the attraction -
d of foreign investment is vital
i- *.In this sphere we had to meet -' 'q.
c- immediate escliangQ. r needs onl
i- roughly ten million dollars whple
it the Bank faced starting the fiscal "",
d year with only five million -". .
e dollars Soa", monetary system "'
e- had to be devised which would
n restrain the outflow of dollars
a and at the- same increase the
y Bank's availability short of any
d restrictions on private sectors i n. .'
*ri of credit


3t1ths -- v-hen fared v. ith thc Wve took special measure. to
its readily accepted the pOI- restrict payment abroad of offi


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Foreign


i,


4-


I


wHAITI SUNM


. T -.


therefore is that of a redistribu-
tion of our amortization. C
This is one point on which I hadt
conversations i n Washington
and we are very hopeful in4eed.
Asked what was the most criti-
c'al period during the battle
against inflation, Mr. Chatelain
replied: 'May September was
aur mqst decisive period. We had
a crop of twenty thousand in-
stead of the hoped for thirty
thousand tons of coffee. Sisal also
fell and you know what the posi-
tion was with tourism.
'We were convinced that the
situation /was only temporary and
we decided to pay the price nee-
ded to buy time. We have paid a
high price to avoid exchange con-
trol.
It represents the courage and
resolution of the nation that peo-
ple in all walks of life accepted
the sacrifices asked for and paid
that price so that today short of
some incalculably ridiculous fiscal
policy or some unforeseeable na-
tural disaster, we can look to the
future without fear.
We need further co-ordination
and there will have to be adjust-
ments as we go along but the ba-
sic structure has been laid.
This fiscal year will be one of
continued reorganization. One can-
not expect spectacular develop-
ments but we feel that so long as
we take the people into our con-
fidence, telling them what we are
doing an'i why we are doing it,
they will accept necessary sacri-
fices they have already shown
that.
-.!. VWe iapprelattv* vity ibikh'.tb
assistance that has been giVen us
by the International Monetary
Fund. They have sent representa-
tives to Haiti to advise and help
us in whatever way possible. But


Observers

it was up to us, Haitians, with
our knowledge of local conditions
to frame the policies and take de-
cisions. It was most heartening to
have these representatives at our
elbows, so to speak, advising and
checking whenever we needed
these services. This has been a
source of inspiration to us.
-I knew that the International
Monetary Bank was an internatio-
nal co-operative but never reali-
sed how personalized could be its
service, and the patent sincerity
of its personnel. Not only Mr.
Viera, our Fiscal Adviser, but
other members of the Internatio-
nal Monetary Bank's Mission in
Haiti as well as in Washington
have been most helpful so that
now our work will be consolidated
with the publication of a page in
the Bank's official statistical re-
ference work next month.
-The approval of our work by
official agencies in Washington
has set the seal on our perfor-
mance, all the more outstanding,
they tell us, because of the cexdi-
tions under which it was carried
out.
,Though it was obscured by the
smoke of political battle we Lest
that now that that smoke has .clea-
red the country has a well defi-
ned economic instrument which
will stand it In good stead in the
years ahead.
*More than that. The fact that
we have been able to win this
battle despite the political eonfu-
sion and I want to repeat that
in all the confusion none.'of'ie
political sectors lost sight Qf 'the
bbjM1itI*1P 6f S-flhaffdbnl'ceWd-
mic struggle this fact has giveW
Haiti a considerable capital -of
goodwill abroad. It must be our
policy to preserve, and enilarg thui
capital. -






Pae -* rI S~


tiJoseph report


MR. GABRIEL BRETON, Cuban Charg6 ,d'Affaires in Haiti, returned
to the Capital Monday on one of the Cubana de Aviation planes...
THE LOCAL PRESS is chafing over the manner in which the news-
men were treated at the places that they were advised would be awai-
ting them in the ,Salle des Bustes, at the National Palace failed to
show. Members of the Fourth Estate who were led to believe they
were 'important, guests are grumbling over the -step-child, treat-
ment they got...
HAITIAN ARCHITECTS will participate in a contest for the choice
of a plan for the construction of the proposed City Hall edifice of
Toronto Canada, which will.cost an estimated Eighteen Million. The
winner will receive $ 25,000 as a prize. Engineer Harry Tippenhauer,
of the Association of Haitian Engineers and -Architects announced
that applications would be received from 2:00 to 4:30 P.M. daily, ex-
cept Saturdays. The Canadian Embassy is acting as intermediary and
Haitian technicians will be given an opportunity .to match their ta-
lents in this interesting contest...
WYETH INTERNATIONAL, LTD. has caused quite a stir among
expectant mothers who are wondering if they will be able to produce
twins 'or triplets between October 15th and November 15th. They fi-
gure it would be fine to collect the prize of a three months supply of
milk for the babies, at F. G. Natide's Rue Payee store...
-'RADIO -HAMS, rushed to get back on the air following the Octo-
ber 21st lifting of the ban on Amateur stations which had imposed
silence since the July 12th order to suspend operations. They may
resume activities 'sous reserve, of paying up their tax, the Direction
of the Telegraphes, Telephones and RIadio Communikations have ad-
vised...
SSEVERAL FORMER DEPUTIES whose mandates were shortened
by several days. before expiration when the Sylvain Government dis-
solved the Chambers on March 29th are reported to be opening law-
suits against ex-President Franck Sylvain and the Haititn State, de-
manding reparation for the wrongs caused them by the Decree...


1 Three convenient weekly flights to take
you into the goy, romantic atmosphere
of the'Pearl of the Antilles!
Only 90 minutes from Port-au-Prince
to Santiago de Cuba by CUBANA!

For information and reservations see your
Travel Agent or call Pan American World
Airways, Rue Dantes Destouches, Phone 3451


,French Gvt.

Grants 10

Scholarships

To Haitien Students

Ten Haitian students have
been awarded scholarships for
specialized studies in Universi-
ties by the French. Tile subjects
include Urabanism, Mathema-
tics, Public Worke, Social Scien
ce, Journali.sm, Geology, Bota-
ny, Zoology-Chemistry, Political
Sciences and Sciences of the
Land.
The students who are expec-
ted to leave/on their respective
scholarships include Luis Pelis-
sier, Arnold -Pauld, Ifenrick
Oriol, Havniond Delorme, Ge-
rard St. Victor, Fritz Pierre.
Louis, Miss Paule Augustin,
Miss Micheline Dominique, Ge-
rard Loisean and Claude -MIichel


Little Carole Wilson, pride
and joy of JUniversal Corpora-
tion's owners, Franck and Jlia-
ne Wilson, observed her eigth
birthday anniversary on Octo-
ber 23rd. With her dad away on
a trip to Jamaica, Carole's par-
ty will take place on his return
next Sunday. Meanwhile she
was seen celebrating the event
at La Belle Creole's soda foun-
tain on Wednesday, where her
mom allowed her to indulge in
several sundaes> of her choice.


DEPARTURES FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE:
Monday, Wednesdays, Fridays, at 1:25 p. r...


ONLY $25



a' ^f a Ma


Austerity Averts

Revenue Crisis

PORT-AU-PRINCE.- Govern
ment revenues for the first six
months of the fiscal year were
down 8 per cent from last year's
first half total, but wise cuts iTi
the countr'ys spending have he]
ped offset the drop. Govern-
ment revenues during the Octo-
ber 1st, 1956, June 30, period to-
taled Gourdes 138.3 million ($27.
6 million) compared with Gdes.
150.6 million ($30.1 million) du-
ring the like period in 55-53 a
Gdes. 12.6 million decrease.


MOSTLY IMPORT DUTIES.

As usual, imports duties were Be
the main sources of revenues, .
bringing in Gdes. 54.1 million
(10.8.million) or about 38 per cent P
of the collections compared with
Gdes. 63 million ($12.6 mil .
lion) during the corres-
ponding period d of 55-56. Next S
come the so -called non fiscal
receipts contributions of lo-
cal government and receipts of -
State-owned entreprises, with "
Gdes 27.3 million ($5.40 miUllion)
these closely followed by inter- B ..
nal taxes yielding Gdes 24.5 mil '
lion ($4.0 million.)
Reflecting the slump in the
country's foreign t r a d e, e x -
port duties fell to Gdes. 24.1
million ($4.8 million) compared
with Gdes 40.5 million (TS.l mil
lion). All other revenues ac-
coimted for Gdes 6.8 million
($1.4 million). Fortunately, go-
vernment expenditures al s o
were adjusted accordingly andi
declined. The deficit financing
philosophy which is largely res
ponsible for the present finan- .f IRTHATMDIMIWA
cial difficulties has been aban- I
'doned and replaced by an ear-,
nest policy to keeu expenditu- SCHITZ BRE
res within the lifmit-; of availa-
ble resources. Accordingly, go- MILWAUKEE WIS,
vernment expenditures declined BROOKLYN N. Y.
and totaled Gdes. 132.7 million
($26.5 million) compared with LOS ANGELES CALIF.
Gdes 136.1 million ($27.2 on
Jdne 30, 1956, a Gdes 3.4 Mil-
lion decrease. The economy dri-i
ve and the austerity program -
have proved their worth and
two conclusions seem warren-
ted. First, there should be no re-
laxation of the economy measu-
res; otherwise, Haiti might di--
credit itself in the eyes of frien-
dly nations which lent their as-
sistance during the crisis. Also, =
foreign and national creditors
who, sympathetic to H{aiti's pro-
blems, granted extensions on nma i
tu.red obligations ,iniglh' revise
their stand and press Jor pay- '
ment The time has come to al-
locate available surpluses where *.'
there are most needed, to has i
pitals for instance wilh cannot
operate satisfactorily because of
lack of medical supplies. The
banana program and the revam- --
ping of the telephone system, .
both interrupted by the finan-
cial squeeze, are also bably in .
need of financial help. "-


SAT

specialists


$1'






*I


F*'' Pare 4


cHAITI SUN*





'"SUNDAY OCTOBER 27th
.' -!SUNDAY OCTOBER 27th


YA A T r T AT IV"SiUllPa.w 1 TeTT IST


HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
GERANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL E. NAJAC


VIRTUE OUT OF NECESSITY

The story, just revealed, of the successful reorganization
Sof the Fiscal Policy of the National Bank of Haiti alongmore
modern lines would have been an important national effort
at any time. Achieved as it was while the country was embroi-
led in bitter political strife it becomes a tribute to the spirit
of sacrifice which this nation has never failed.to discover in
its hour of need.
It is important that it should go on record that not one of
Sthe six interim administrations which succeeded each other
during this period but accepted the necessities of the hour
and the need for modernization. It is worthy of record, too,
That all sections of the community businessmen as well as
employees accepted the sacrifices which had to be made.
SIt has been pointed put that for businessmen it meant a tern-
Sporary restriction of credit by forty per cent. For employees
especially in social services, it meant marking time all
when this credit and these jobs were most needed.
These sacrifices have not been in vain. The policy of Aus-
terity has paid off in restored equilibrium in the dangerous
balance of payments situation. The Budget hfias been balan-
*ced and the new political regime finds at its disposal a mo-
dernised instrument of national economy all the stronger for
the difficulties overcome because it has shown itself dynamic
Sin change and has earned the respect and warm approval of
Those sectors abroad whose friendly co-operation is necessary
to the orderly development of Haiti's social And economic
resources.

PEACE... IT'S MARVELOUS!

It is back again in this beautiful, hot, mountainous" land, trium-
phant after ten months of bitter political feuding, violence and con-
fusion, and a bewildering, rapid-fire change 'of governments.
With peace has come the return of constitutional law and Haiti's
.1.
.:.',.: first elected president in seven years.
A brand new hope was born in the hearts of Haiti's 4,000,000 people
... from the moment Doctor Francois Duvalier -became the nation's chief
executive.
K. I is a hope shared by the people of the United States and 'all those
Sof1 the Free World that there will be nothing ahead for Haiti but
Shappiness-and' priority.
S Monumental tasks face the new president and his government.
; L Upon their shoulders rests the tremendous responsibility of paci-
l ying the nation, of burying political passions, and of guiding the na-
[ lion out of a financial and economic morass back into the groove of
:' stability and good government.
..: That will not be an dasy job.
:: But the chances of success will be immeasurably enhanced if the
people of Haiti work with and support their government.
SThere is no doubt but that the people of Haiti are' weary of internal
S. strife, and that they have long wanted an end to uncertainty and near
b chaos.
S They have good reason to hope for a bright future... ,
This year, to, should see a new-record harvest of tourists -_ with'
E. tfaiti's biggest revenue producer.
Thisyear, too, should see a new-record harvest of tourists with
Americans, particularly, spending millions more than ever before on
,. going places and seeing things.
S Tourism was Haiti's second biggest money producer.
; It can, and probably will be agaln,las long as there is peace in.
E '.. Haiti.
Haitians want peace. The Free World hopes they will have it.
,BY LARRY ALLEN.


At Your Service

1 HAITI'S OLDEST MOST RELIABLE

| *GARAGE

WEST INDIES GARAGE

:Services all makes of Cars and Trucks

Does all types of repair work

Automatic Transmissions Specialists

_On the Rue du Centre next to SHASA
English, Spanish and French Spoken..


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It-

iAYTIAN AMERICAN SUGAR COMPANY,
.".t '* '* "-
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Authorized Capital $ 2,000,000


Port-au-Prince, Haiti /


West Indies i


Planters and Manufacturers


', USINE HASCO ,


REFINED SUGAR HASCO CRYSTALS

SEMI REFINED SUGAR'- POPULAIRE


SUGAR... an ENERGY BUILDER"


J


GRASS GROWS
ON DELMAS ROAD
DEAR EDITOR :
The grass and even young
trees that presently flourish in
the, middle of the Delmas two
Lane highway is no joke.
A word of warning to the Pu-
blic Works Dept who no doubt
consider the middle of the road
crop blends with the scenic won
ders of Haiti -: when the grass
and weeds are pulled out the
asphalt will also come out along
with strong roots.
The first job of the new Pu-
blic Works staff should be to
weed the Delmas road the
finest highway in the Republic
- only a couple of years old.
(s) Old Weed.

N,
AUTOS FOR SALE
FOR SALE to the highest
bidders, one 1952
Ford Sedan; one 1952 Chevro.
let Sedan; one
1951 Jeep Station Wagon; one
1952 International Pick-up Truck
These vehicule3 may be seen
at the United States aEmbassy,
Champ de Mars, Monday through
Friday from 7:15 A.M. to 4:15
P.M. Submit sealed bids to the
Administrative Uffice.


(The Journal American)


HAlIllAIl TI ANUlJ I LH m.6JI
ON MENUE FOR QUEEN ELIZABETH
BANQUET FIT FOR QUEEN

A nearly all-American meal will be served. Queen Elizabeth-.
and Prince Philip tonight at a gala banquet tendered to the
royal pair at the Waldorf-Astoria.
The dinner, sponsored by the Pilgrims of the United States
and the English-Speaking Union, *ill be served to 4,000.
guests in the Grand Ballroom and in other dining rooms at
the hotel.
Here's the menu fit for a Queen:
South Carolina Green Turtle Soup.
Long Island Striped Bass with Champagne Sauce and Gol-
den Fleurons (served with Chassagne Montrachet, Morgeet
1955, a burgundy).
Filet of Beef with Truffle Sauce; Nest of Beignet Potatoes;
New String Beans Amandine (served with a Red Bordeaux,
Chateau Lascombes 1953).
Waldorf Savarin au Rhum with California Nectarines and
Oregon Cherries. Golden Sabayon Sauce. (Served with a
champagne, Besserat de Bellefon 1949).
Haitian Coffee.
No apple pies or hot dogs, of course, for such a formal
feast, but Claudius Charles Philippe, vice-president in charge
of banqueting at the hotel, was convinced the Queen would
prefer food native to the country she was visiting. '
The soup, flavored with herbs, will be served very hot.
The bass was selected because of the Queen's reported al-
lergy to shell fish.
The final course, the rum-flavored baba, is a speciality of
the house and has been served to royalty on past occasions."
It will be served in the shape of a crown bejeweled with
the fruit.
S The coffee is a special blend from Haiti and South America.
If you have aniy plans for feeding 4,000 guests, and would
like to try this menu, here are some of the needed items.
Ten 150-pound turtles, 1,200 pounds of potatoes, 4,500
pounds filet of beef, and 4,500 pounds of striped bass.


SgfgSB=iTff 7f ~:7


* '"" "* *-';.' '.'" '.''Pa g e .
Page 5 "


,HAITI SUN*


1




7;Page6


SUNDAY OCTOBER


Sportsmen's Part


FOR THE HUNTER WHO REALLY LIh
IT, THIS CARIBBEN ISLAND
THRILLING GAME FRO.
-- TO'GUINEA FOW


S The Republic of Haiti is proba
Mbly the last place in the Carib-
bean the sportsman tourist
thinks of when casting about for
- i ai. action locale. But the fish
antd game are there, and a small
group of island residents enthu-
siastically pursue them with out-
"anding success. A movement
s uinderwvay to entice the visi-
t ing hunter and angler.

Thie vislto-' would need little
enticing were he to pilot a jeep
over some of the back-counitry
Roads. In th.? thorn-bushli region
i round the little south-coast vil-
large of C6tes-de-Fer, for exam
pie, guinea fowl arc soi thick
that peasants -hunt them with
slingshots. The small back-coun-
Stry lakes are favorite stopping-
'off places for large numbers of
Migrating ducks. Doves and pi-
.. eons abound everywhere
'-There are even wild pigs, or
.pigs that have gone wild and'are
.e'ully fair and dangerous
'.I game, in the more remote dis.
=tricts.
A favorite sport is caiman hun
Sting at Hait's _rily large lake,
brackish and' weirdly beautiful
LEtang Sadimatre on the border
of the Dominican Republic, rea
ehiable in a few hours by,a a res,
pectable road from the capitMl
some of the ccroesi in Saum&a
tre run' ig," and even the smal-
ler onesP ae 6c.itin. HuAting
them through W ie like's loi f., lo
nely.'tretlbhes of. high reeds, in
a native-made boat, is a.1 thril-
ling game.
Columbus discovered Haiti on
his first voyage .to the New-
World. It remained for a Port-
-.2: *. J*.-d. *j Ei -..-* .. .


Immmtw'AIuAu..~


Strenuous duck hi untin


au-Prince businessman, Anton
*Tony) Kneer, to discover only
a couple of years ago that, the
waters of :he Mtagic.lsle' are a
potential source of tourist dol-
lars. Before Kneer acquired a
sport-fishing boat and, with his
enthusiastic wife, proceeded to
bring in sailfish and other game
fish, no one in Haiti had really
bothered. The fish were known
to be there, but boats and gear
were lacking. Kneer himself
now sells fishing equipment,
speedboats an'l outboard motors.
The visiting sportsman can try
his hand near Port-au-Prince or,
in a few nours, *:.make like Co
lumbus and be the first to wet
a line in waters which hereto.
fore have never' known the glint
'of an artificial. lure.
.PRIMITIVE PARADISE. If big
game fishing has bden dormant
until just recently, sp6ar fishing
has definitely not e4n, T'he
well-known Italian underwate;
fisherman, Gustav Dalle Valle,
hrst explore its 'possibiltjes
some nine years ago Valle was


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Voodoo-'inspired Jewelry
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*


.HAITI SUN"


ml, i... m lmmm


I possible only with the help of a floating gourds in water to whi.
dise Haitian friend, unless the tou- the birds customarily come to feed
rist happens to speak Creole. When the unsuspecting birds ha'*
Therein lies the great handi- :become used to the presenceeofi
ES TO ROUGH cap to the development of Haiti the floating gourds, the hunter slips
D OFFERS as a <,sportsman's paradise.> a gourd over his head one even
M XCROC)) The best hunting and fishing, wades out into neck-deep water,'
rL a-ie found not near the capital, and waits. Eyeholes permit himto.i
but, perversely, in the most in- watch the approaching ducks, andJi
'""1l ft. accessible parts of the country, to breathe. When a bird paddleri*
-' l^ ,-. In Haiti tne word <.inaccessi- near enough, it is taken gently by:
-,.. ,"' bic has a meaning all its own. the feet, pulled underwater 'and.$
"" It means no roads, or roads drowned. '
.w which after a hard rain become The peasant hunter takes guinea4
:.Wi. .. ~quagmires too treacherous even fowl in small but efficient snares'.
for a jeep. It means a complete made of twigs, and by stalking!
-. ..i lack of facilities for tourists them with stones or a slingshot..
-.. "J .no hotels, no restaurants, no Another method is even more in:
gas station., even no safe driu- triguing. Guinea fowl are n.t .V
king water. rious robbers of piti-min (mlle
.a" True, the .werpgc sportsman gardens). The peasant scatter
- -- has a streak of adventure in him handfuls of piti-mi, in his ya
and may delight in keeping long to lure the birds in. When thb
Son 'leai gailc distances over atrocious roads, are accustomed to finding th"
Son dleaagailhlcor even going beyond the road's free handout waiting for then
enthusiastic about the potc-ntia. end on horseback or afoot. Gran and cluck about the yard as tame
cities and remained in Port-au- ted, he may enjoy camping out ly as chickens, a handful of pi
Prince to conduct reef-cruises and cooking his own meals. He mi is soaked in raw rum before
for tourists and build up a spear till has a language 'problem. setting it out. The unwary birdi
fishing fraternity. The people to be found in these gobble up the rum-soaked mileir
The best known coral reef lies back-country areas_- he ones become too tipsy to fly, and can
in Port-au-Princ', Bay off the he must rent boats from, hire be run down and caught by hand;
coast of La Gonave Island. as guides to lead him over the These are back-country techrii
There is glass-clear water, tou- mountain trials, purchase his ques, a far cry from the sporting
rists wearing goggles float abo- food and obtain his drinking wa- sons of the Haitian elite who em"
ve a spectacular w o r I d of ter from are peasants who ploy 4he finest American, EngliUsh|
marine scene as the climax of speak no English .: even and French guns. As a matter 6f
a glassbottomed-boat trip. The French. Their languag.2 is Cre- fact, most residents of Port-au'.ZU
now veteran spear fishermen ole, the Haitian tongue with Prince even those who hunt-1
range farther afield, however, which few outsiders are even are likely to lift their eyebrows'
in search of more exciting game. remotely familiar. A guide is the in disbelief when the talk turns
Coral reefs abound off Haitian only solution and guides are to peasant methods of obtaining
shores. One of the most exciting hard to find. birds for the table. 4
but least known lies in the Ca- FOWVL PLAY. They'll be found The peasants do it, nonetheless.',.'
nal 'de la Tortue, between the soon enough, by hotel people and And these same canny peasant;H
mainland and La Tortue Island. others, when the demand for them may one day be employed as guides
Unfortunately for the tourist' increases. It will increase as more for visiting sportsmen. It should:l
it's a long way from the capital tales are told of the successes of be a relatively simple problem fdri
and there are no ,'sporting* the Tony Kneers and the spear the tourist agencies in Port-au-|
campsA or Iiotel; in the'vicinity, fishermen-and of the amusing Prince to send out with sportsmen,'
He must get himself to St Louis techniques employed by some Hai- an English-speaking Haitian to acft.i
du Nord by rented car or jeep,, tian peasants in stalking the is- as liaison agent between them an0'"
cross to the island in a native land's game. Tales tire toi4l of the peasant hunters who know."
sailboat and establish some sort peasant hunters who catch wild where the game is.
of base there all of which is ) ducks by tethering a number of (From Latin American Report)..I



ELLE CREOLE'S SAVE YOU 33-1/3 0/0 60 0/f,


CHINA

Minton, Spode
Coalport, Wedgwood
loyal Worcester
Royal Crown Derby
Royal Doulton
Royal Copenhagen
Rosenthal, Limoges --
Gustavberg


DANISH SILVER





I U... .. -* ** .....


nglti, like most of the Latin-American area needs Capital Development in order to raise The Standard of Living
In this article John H. BRADLEY discusses the:

Capital Needs oJ Underdeveloped Lands


- The standard of living is low in
the underdeveloped countries. Ac-
cording to the Rockefeller Report
1951, the average annual in-
come per person in underdevelo-
'ped areas was $ 80, or 5% per
,Went of the average iq the United

S Se Dr. Goldenberg

Petion Vile




:i c_;H. ui .ai.


-.y, for your small child
;accination of other children
A doesn't protect your child-
- Every member of your family
ulp to 40 years old should be
*.vaccinated against paralytic
*i.... :' polio
?.:. Anerican Mediccl Assocationt "
A, meficau Academy Of Pediatrics
", i' "American Academy
Of General Practice
MME NATIONAL FOUNDATION
; The Salk Vaccine is safe
*.'F.OR INFANTILE PARALYSIS
01 East 42nd Street, New York,
'. 17, N. Y.


States and 17"percent of that for
Western Europe. In Southeast
Asia, the average figure was about
$39. According 'to one estimate,
it is possible to increase the na-
tional income of the underdevelo-
ped areas from $ 87 billion in 1950
to $ 372 billion by the year 2000,
but the rise of per capital income
of 180 percent would not be near-
ly so large. Here the assumption
as made that the program would
on an adequate scale to lick the
,pulation problem. Otherwise
gains would be absorbed in a
ing population, with little or no
provement of standards, the
.alogy is with a rocket to the
oon, which must move fast en-
,gh to escape the gravitational
*II of the garth. This. increase
Super capital income would result
omr an industrialization of the
iderdeveloped areas with the
'rcentage of gainfully employed
irkers in agriculture being re-
'iced by 20 percentage points
om 1950 to 2000 (from 57 to 37
'r cent for Southern and Eastern
',rope, 73 to 53 percent for Asia,
to 50 for Africa, and 65 to 45
'r cent for Latin America). This
iy be too optimistic an estimate,
'cause it does not allow for the
'sses involved in shiftiug from
riculture to industry when the
'rms of trade are likely to impro-
e for agriculture. The shift may
Iso be excessive in view of the
-eater advantages of these coun-
,ies in agriculture and especially
Sn the face, of improved demand,
In man, instances, there is eviden-
ce of uneconomic industrialization,
that is, substitution of industry
or the wrong kind of industry for
agriculture. But it is also possible
that with these large infdows of
capital and techniques a reduction
of 27 to 35'per-.cent in the pro-
portion of .labor and agriculture
may be consistent with a large
rise in agricultural output' and
excess labor on farms and in mi-
nes, which would have to be di-
verted to other employment.


In order, to bring about a large


scale industrialiation, improe -
ment of agriculture, and a rise in
the per capital national income of
2 per cent per year, or doubling
in thirty-five years, a United Na-
tions committee has estimated
that at least $ 10 billion annually
of capital imports for underdeve-
loped countries would be required.
An earlier and more modest esti-
mate had put the amount of ex-
ternal financing required by un-
derdeveloped counties at but .$ 3.9
billion. But an estimate of the
amounts of foreign capital requi-
red to move 20 per cent of the
working population from agricul1
ture is about $7 billion annually.
Undoubtedly, the underdevelo-
ped countries' might put $ 10 bil-
lion of foreign investments an-
nually to good use and ultimately
even to the advantage of the Uni-
ted States, but-the view is widely
held that they are not as yet pre-
pared to use several billion dol-
lars of foreign capital effectively,-
They need mature plans, which,
in turn, require a highly compe-
tent administration, a large num-
ber of technicians, etc. The Inter-
national Bank has been much im-
pressed by the absence of mature
plans. Before these countries can
use billions effectively for an in-
dustrialization or development pro
gram, they need large outlays for
education, for health, for trans-
portation. For this reason, a Uni-
ted Nations group proposed a
grant program of $3 billion year-
ly to finance the 'overhead, of
an industrialization program.

SITUATION OF THE
UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRIES
Two-thirds of the Free World's
people live in economically less-
developed areas that span 'most
of Asia, the Middle East, Africa
and much of Latin America:,'Di:.
verse in race, religion and. cultu-
re, these people, with few excep-
tions, share onie common condi-
tion : their production, their" in-
come and living. standards are
low.


They produced in 1955, on the
average, only about S 100 Worth
of goods and services a year, com-
pared with $ 2000 in the United
States and with $ 1000 generally
in the better developed parts of
the Free World. soundedd figures,
based on national income estima-
tes by the United Nationis). Their
estimated life expectancy is 36
years, abqut half as long as the
life expected in the rest of the
Free World.

These figures describe poverty,
a traditional condition in the un-
derdeveloped world. But a.-new
element has entered Jhis chronic
situation-the ancient risienat'ord
of the underdeveloped areas to po-
verty is disappearing.

This changing qf old need with
new desire has created a diffi-
cult situation in the underdevelo-
ped world. In some places resi-
gnation to low standards of living.
has thus far been replaced only
by vague and general resentment
against the stated of things as they
are. In other places, the leaders.
if not the people generally, have
been fired by a growing knowled-
ge of better developed countries
to desire and demand speedy eco-
nomic growth for their countries.

OPEN EXHIBITION OF
A DESIRE ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
i
It is evident that the Delegatts
to the Economic Conference in
Buenos Aires represented this last
group of people. This Conference
was an open demonstration o the
peoples of Latin America of their
need and desire for a more speedy
economic growth., Although there
were -few positive achievements'
'as -a. result f-.dhis: meeting, I. do
not feel, as many 'do, that the
Conference should be considered
a total failure. On the contrary,*
this Conference was-an open ma-
nifestation by the Latin American
people for their right to economic


I ,
" ,.


Best- ap Haitien- Hostellerie du


:i1; -- *, =' r '




A French Quarter in the Caribbean

i:. The Hostellerie with a colonial architecture and historic baekt"i" 6s a mang-
,; nificent holiday of sun and entertainment. The only hotel in Cap Haii'tenwith swim-
n"ing pool, tennis, tropical park, night club, souvenir shop and French cuisine.
. Fascinating excursions to Sans Souci Palace and the Citadelle of King Christophe.
.Easy to reach from Port-au-Prince,40 min. by air ..
|% hrs. bycar. Write or cable for information, reservations.


te, e ', .-:- '"-! "-"*'
~ : :'?,T,'
- 4rr



.. -15PLEL.o~MJlt


" .1--
,2 .


A ,, .
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development. lven if ,nothing'else -
was gained, they made themselves
heard, and the tremendous pro
Slems involved in their economic
growth and unification were aired.
Latin Americh may be considered"
as one of the economic potentials
of the Free World. The natural
resources are enormous. These re-
sources as well as geographical
extension will permit unlimited
future economUc'development. In
today world of hot and cold w.ars,
Latin America's position is unique'
in-that it has been relatively un-'.
affected by the world political sit- .
turation.

In trying to foUlow in the foot-
steps of the more economically
advanced countries, the Latin
American people naturally feel
the urge to speed upa slow pro-
cess and achieve goals which have
taken the former decades to reach.
Obviously, these underdeveloped
countries can take advantage of
the technical and administrative .
achievements of their big brothers,
however this can only be done to
a limited extent. There is a wide
:gap between the two types of eco-
nomies which will not permit com-
-plete assimilation. Each country
has its peculiarities which limit-
its capacity of absorption.

It appears that the time has not
come for the Latin American
countriess to' think about economic
integration and billion dollar loans
froni foreign sources. Their main
'problem is to break the vicious
circle of poverty which affects
each country in a different de-..
gree.

SNaturally, the economically un- /
derdevelopqd countries should not ;
be left alone to fight' their own
battles. The developed countries .
should give them all the help pos-
sible. However, this help can only '
be used to a limited extent. Onilys
after certain stages -have been '
reached ill 'there:-be a nore em- '
plete assimilation There. n.nra.' "
pid, solution ',-orqmic:deveUop.
meant, anid nolbUntry .en sltb.l5bek' .
and expect to be puslf4e upward
by external, forces. ,

I repeat thit I do not thiinlh',0e .S
Conference in Buenos Aires wa.s a",
complete failure. Afore than-' ay-'
thing else, it broughlit ut the pom,
'bJems 'whiqh c6nfront e intVi-..
"dual' dotuntriesa ^'at.''wqll, ^rjatja s
Ame-ica as a wlQol. OSly ahter
these multiple problems 'ave been..
solved will there be a'. mPr eo-
nomically united' Latin AMnerle. '


IESPLUS-fELLES MAObVQkS.
HAITIENNES



. PLACE GEFYRARDej


kViews of the Roi Christephes' tropical garden, attrac-
Stive Fench provincial dining room, and modern pol.


Sostellerie du Qol Cristopf e
- Cap Haitien, Haiti Cable: Christophel
Repreented In U.S. by UTELLA Ansoidates, Essex House, N.Y. 19, N. Y.
CGhamnber of Cemmnerce Bdg. Miami, Fla.,55 E. Washington St. Chicago. Ili.


SWISS0WATCH


"=


; .,


,f






PAo


I I Io
SflEJi


fRT& UR-ID -O


Rffed, Qua/i


, Which has the best i"nports from all the corners of the world. You can save up to 60%
from U.S. prices with your duty free allowance of $200. over 48 hours and $500 over
12. days outside. U.S.A. Fisher's will be a real'shopper's paradise. Not only free port .prices
bdt modest mark-up, because everything isconcentrated in one large, building. Are your
biggest assets in buying at Fisher's.


4ue


o0,


9uRY;


Fisher's, the American's favorite shop w*
all prices are clearly marked on every ite,
Where a well-tiained and courteous staf-'4
help you to solve your shopping problems. '
Where checks and foreign banknotes, ar ae'
ted, and your purchases shipped.- We will e
give you free information about U.S. custom;
gulations and shipbliing costs./ '


MAIN FLOO
qV" uerlain -'Liberty of London Faberics
Boulton and P -rrin Gloves Hawick
Skotland Cashmire Sweaters, Lubin
', Oalmein Weil -. Kilze Griffe Perfumes
V''. Japoleon Godet Louis De Salignac Cognacs
'i" ?a"rquis De Montesquieu Afmagnac De, Kuyper
,'i' iueurs' Aalbor Aqupv*t Danish, Pprcer
','/. liins and Silver Spalding of England
/ Sportgoods.
' V




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JEW,





.'. Ci i, 1 ,.ii,





'. .

;,; THE- WORL D:IFAMOUS EMBROIDERY
: -COMPILETEIT AIR, CONDITIONED






Z?

,r *I -A)"L N I j


Haitian Embroidered Dresses Blouses skirts
men's shirts Cuban Guayabera Shirts -
; Italian Silk Scarves Swiss Handkerchiefs -
'able. Linens Beaded Bags Petit-point Bags
: Cashmire Sweaters PMrrin G"-ves Liber.
t. Goods.


R OF FISHER'S SHOPPING CENTER


' OI


I,..'


THE BEST NAMES 1I
FRENCH PERUME ,
COSMETICS ,
Liqueurs Brandies -'-
Champpgnes.
Art Porcelains,
Royal Copenhagen
Bing & Groendahl
Royal Vienna Augarten
Limoges
Coalport
Lalique aind Bohemian Crys-
talware %
Marcel Frank Atomizers
Swiss Watches
French Pipes


Weiccywm&


EXCLUSIVE CARV!N GS'
Painting
Native Jewelry
Sisal 'Shoes Bags
TortoiseShell Jewelrv


1-,'i
FLOOi


THE MAHOGANY AND NATIVE HANDICRAFTS FLOOR


Manogany quality goods from our own workshops
Sisal and Straw goods -- Vodoo Drums Dolls Hato
records Books Film Place Matb


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ncastrerqq~qw



2f `TOPIGS 6 ed nIe j>
1, N 11.1~
g"tme K K K


Si utt..?,aT~erus U 1~4 u~~eii4 .o ~v~eO KKKK>


4A qwv A.
~~AKK~L -A K K
K~~~~` >

  • C
    es Ki ihus c;
    100 K K Ki K
    K4K* ou s-x ~husat- Po~el iaec
    i#KK5 eretKs
    F. de ci le r q mai u s tel ci l u 'jis
    gresK
    Kou pusizKs r gage. du our
    innK





    Cr S'=' 'a.U' : r


    FARM LAND


    DISCOVERED!


    '; -- --- *-'S^^Bl
    WHERE? Right on your farm!
    S.,Ho* many extra acres would you
    ':,' bhve if yot could smooth off that
    -. >gully.. clear out the fence row... I
    . move those rocks .. 'doze off brush-
    *". and trees? What about a ditch to
    .''drain the land.. a pond for irri-
    ; ation or stock watering Figure
    i. how muchh more money you'd make
    each- year ... how much more atis-
    L: fying your farm would be ... how
    muich better you'd farm... how
    Such more valuable your farm
    k.1 wgi:uld be. -if you could do d
    a,' the things,
    It4-as good as done when you own.
    ' ^ :* !.a-hCut Diesel Farm Tractor!
    AXo' A st..... using your own farm
    , pjbwi, your.own help, and yourspare '
    ,-in... you ca, do aU these inhi,( Io
    2.' '. ". '
    iSM -Tractor Equipmen ;
    q I
    CoA MaureeeBonnefiT,

    r-ger Chancerelles

    S. (Tel. 2631)


    Yes, sir, that sameCat Diesel
    Tractor that will help you plow,'
    disk, harrow, or pick up to 60%'
    more than a wheel tractor of similar
    h6rsep6wer ... that same Cat Die- I
    sel Tractor that works through the
    slick, low spots- here wheels bog
    dwn... that "mp Cat Diesel Trac-
    tor'will do al: these extra jobs for
    you! We'll gladly prove every word
    with a demonstration on your farm.


    .---i--W-0----.---------- _-,
    -- -- I
    -F Fr fe tmta.. Clearing for Crops," mail coupon to us.
    S res of crop Land;...a.cres
    ie I b' tiM. .afoflwgtr t o.ractor-s- -I



    11 a~me '" ..I
    OOLMpk fiBIf yo want a revraintndab'toncall aidI
    jHI errapgtbfir- deoeia n obligstion.
    Q a ben ," f .... a" s a tudernL -

    * Address
    City. Stae-I
    -------- --------------
    fli zMOa-Ptsm'mba'tpeni tuNfftnmssf ascSeair


    -". ....i..lt '--T .a"- -. : .... :: .....


    u c deserves


    teB-, THE BEST ..


    -HOSTESS DISCOVERS LHAITiu


    SET IN-
    The classic set of matched
    china, complete to the last des!
    sert plate, was onge bask equip-
    .nent for the well appointed
    iouse hold. But today, entertai-
    ning is frequently impromptu
    and more imaginative. No hos-
    tess has to feel she must have
    every' single piece of china mat-
    ching, in fact, today's ho:,tess
    frequently prefers to have' odd,
    eve-catchine nieces with which


    CHINA
    what a pretty picture the whole -:
    set presents. '-"

    Then there are cups and sap.,
    cers with all-over %victorian pat,
    terns, gold-color accented. There
    are .the traditional gracefully
    wide cups with tiny floral pat-,.
    tern touched off by a beautiful .
    corn flower blue. Thes2 too have.
    golden touches t 0 highlight
    them. Then there are the Hai.-'


    to spark her table. She particu- ti' -sets which make ideal %re-
    lalry strays from the whole set; turning home gifts* for friends.
    idea when it comes to her demnii They're very sinall all-over flo-
    tassea sets for these occupy the ral patterned cups and saucers
    table to themselves and so can with Haiti written in gold in the
    afford to stand out by thiemsel- inside of the cup. Two different
    ves. pattern-; are available and
    Yes, demi tasse sets ofter the they're priced just right for
    clever hostess a .chance, to be your own table, or for gift gi-
    imaginative and bring a certain ving. one cup and saucer is
    light headed spirit into her $4.65 while another is S5.85. Ro-
    home and entertaining, senthal also has a packaged set
    STake for instance the. very of'three cups and saucerA in the'
    modern sets now available. finest china and the 'palest of
    These with. only about a quarter colors, specially priced at $ 1.
    of *the cup color-banded while 80 tor all six piec.es.
    the rest of the cup remains Why don't yott 'add something:
    china white, have saucers accen different to your table china -
    ted to match the cup, and in- almost matching or definitely
    equally appealing proportionss. contrasting sets of demini tasse
    The colors themselves are sinm- cups and saucers?
    ply lovely and whatsmore, each
    cup is entirely different' in color You'll find .they are not only
    from it's set mate. l'li whole conversation, 'pieces at your next
    picture is 'rigbt off apn artist's ps party, but they're price-wise chi
    lette with it's aqua. electric na addition:.; when you. can buy
    blue, gray mint green, and cin- them at La Belle Cr6ole at free


    namon red shades. Just imagine port prices.

    -^- j-




    ft must
    be good

    J-l Wa w (t ube good, to remain in the.,
    fa Im dof Scotch Whiskies fa over 130 yeprs.
    k mit be good tom pan the scrutiny of distiller.
    wilt oWe 130'yer= experience behind them.

    JOHNNIE WALKER
    NOR 182-STILL GOING fSTrONG
    37y It today-you'll agree it's. good

    UIST'RIBUTOR: PREETZMAN AGGERHOLM


    -w 13 D Im


    Ige_-.rn(
    ^^^^^"^^H^*^*^9* 1


    pout ajaittiit 4 delldkclawxa sed


    I


    . I





    cHAITI SUN*


    TRAVEL FROM MIAMI TO HAITI BY CAR


    SCaribbean And Florida


    :Should Work Together

    Many Florida aml Caribbean bu-' bean islands proportionately kl--s
    .anessmen and travel agencies, 1ith tourist income directly piu-
    have come to the realization tint portionate to the amount spent on
    by working together they can im- publicity and public relations.
    .ensely enrich themselves wilh These far-seeing businessmen.


    S .. ... ... .
    .,.*^ : '... "* : ..- :
    tropics" ,'| '

    tropics. I 1"i "


    tIei caribbe~n for the atmosphere Armaifdo Maribona, of the Cu-
    t,: [fuceign lands. ban Tourist Institute and travel
    Time average North American editor for the ,Diario de Ja Mari-
    v%:atiolst lo.c3 to travel as far na- newspaper in Cuba, in Con-


    niom iho!ile as possible on a limi-
    ted hudlgct and many of these
    -..n;-sx'rs wou'd love to take the
    i.ni1; y in thcir o\in auto. Witb
    I ;- L:pelleit highways in the Ur'i.
    iled StIes :nd throughout F orida
    the family can travel down the


    northern dollars and bring greater: and travel agency representativec. st o lorida, through
    .prosperity to the southern and have long felt the need to attract r t. Petersburg, cut
    general Caribbean area. the North American automobile' aro to Silver Springs by Oala
    :Florida spends millions annual- driving, bd; riding, train travelijs' t Sl v th rinh b O cald an
    addc-,.%n" throzlih Orlando and
    [ ly on publicizing their resorts and and airline flJy.ig public do' the contr to Miami an'i
    Tourist attractions, Cuba spends a through Florida and after seein Key West. The other route takcs
    lhifl-million and the other Carib I Florida's scenic wonders on to the tr lcr through Daytona
    r',;--.! e Jil and down the east coast to
    Direct Passenger and Freight Service Ili rui and Key West.
    |. PORT-AU-PRINCE- NEW- YORK l,t dd most ,,

    part ot lithe jionrney for the trave
    lor is the car ferry to Cuba and
    thence throughout the island on
    constantly improving highways.
    A250 Pounds Bagggithin a very few years tene
    FaAowa Cuisine North American autoist will be
    able to drive to the South West
    L nncrican Flag -end of Cuba, take a ferry to Mexi-
    .11]ri Y'001s witli bath co and there meet the Internatio.
    nal Highway and either turn sonth
    through Central America or re
    .'. turn to the United States through
    NMexico on a great circular route
    SThere are interested parties
    A N. working on the possibility of
    1. group of island hopping ferric
    ; from Santiago de Cuba, to Hait
    and thence to the Dominican Re
    .. public by auto and continue thl
    journey by ferry to other. of the
    Caribbean islands.
    i" Florida loses nothing by wor
    :"Only 3 Days To New York king closely with the Caribbeam
    Areas due to ihe fact that the tou
    '. Accurate information at office of Panama Line ONLY rist spends more time and money
    INQUIRE OURIBEDUCED RATE ROUND-ThI in Florida than he does in any
    SEA-A : ".... the Caribbean Islands and a trip
    : -'SAA TICKETNG ARJUItNGEMENTS
    from Florida to these lovely is
    .,ue Abrah Lino Telehone 0lori lands is another selling point is
    Ilorida's favor when she is pu-
    blicizing the wonders of her state
    At the present time there ace
    exceclent -jlane connections bet
    S.ween Florida's cities and Cuba
    -i Haiti, the Bahamas, the Dom~hi
    P;u ,16 OCr W can Republic' and the other is-
    M OU LLL1 s lands that offer so much to the
    tourist in a package arrangement
    with the lovely State of Florida.


    junction with Louis J. Bocri, of
    'Travel Cuba. magazine, has long
    felt the need of putting on a state-
    wide basis what the travel agen-
    cies and airlines have been doing
    for quite some time publici-
    zing package trips and tours to
    more than one tropical wonder-
    land.

    As travel agency and airlines
    offer package tours to more
    than one city, town, island or
    attraction it is easily possible
    for the State of Florida, wqrkin-
    together with the various islands
    desiring to build up their tou-
    rist trade, to extensively
    publicize the advantages of
    spending a few diys in sunny
    Florida and then on southward
    to visit one or more of the attrac


    Puerto Rico
    wants to see
    Haitian Folklore
    f'roupe

    Puerto Ricans are anxious to
    see Haiti's Folklore Troupe of
    which they have heard mach.
    Mr. Edmondo KIinger, owner of
    the popular %,Flambojan> night
    club in San Juan flew into-Port-
    au-Prince this week and imme-
    diately contacted Mrs Lavinia
    Williams on the possibilities of
    a visit by her Troupe.
    The Argentine-born impress.
    rio said that he had heard of
    the troupe through Puerto Ri-
    co's Director of Tourism who
    saw them here last year and-
    strongly advised that an effort ..
    should be made to have them
    in that island. -1
    After seeing se.ci'.J dances.
    at an audition at El iaIcho ho-


    tel, Impressario .linger left ior
    tive and historic Caribbean is- b
    t"-gh Jamaica this week-end with the
    lands before returiling though
    Thought expressed to Lavinia
    Florida and back home alter a t h w lik to bo a
    that he would like to book a
    pleasant and instructive vaca. t h w l t bo a
    South American tour after the
    tion. Puerto Rcan visit.
    I Puerto Rlean visit.


    1I




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    Ln
    Il-
    !y
    f

    p


    Ll-



    a.t



    ie
    t


    By the consolidation of there
    propaganda the various agencies
    throughout Florida and the Ca-
    ribbean agencies can double their
    much more interesting and educa-
    scope of publicity by offering a
    tional vacation to the warm, sunny


    CtJoseph tdal & Co.


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    DAY OCTOBER 27th


    ,oLJ rtegcn
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    PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI


    I


    .I






    uiAlTI UUNw


    DON'TP THE TOURIST

    IT WILL COST YOU MONEY


    Many times in every field her price in
    of human endeavor 7- be it item.
    on the fo6tbali field, in the The first
    business office or driving an come to your
    automobile we are sudden- ing -Let the
    ly faced with a choice bet- sibly he is le
    ween right or wrong with of- flight and yo
    tentimes only a thin line se- will never eni
    parating the two. How we de- There is a
    elde can, in many cases, in- "De Profundis
    fluence not only our own lives tisfied my de
    but the future prosperity of suited me, amn
    nations, that every ac


    You may ask, "How can I, a


    significant act
    some degree,


    exchange for the

    thought that may
    mind is the old say-
    buyer beware'. Pos-
    avring on the next
    u feel sure that he
    ter your store again.
    passage from Wilde's
    sD that.states, .I sa-
    esires whenever it
    id passed on. I forgot
    t, even the most in-
    A, of daily life, in
    makes or un-makes


    paid a decent price for the same
    article and feel quite upset over
    being taken. How do you know
    who the buyer is ? Possibly he
    may be the publisher of a power-
    ful newspaper, tfe owner of a
    corporation wishing to do busi-
    ness with your country or only an
    employee of a small company on
    his first, hard-earned vacation.
    When the buyer of your pro-
    duct or the passenger in your
    taxi realizes later that he has
    been cheated how do you know
    but what his newspaper may do
    irreparable damage to the finan-


    cia] status of your nation, or his
    corporation cancel a large con-
    tract affecting the economic con-
    dition of your country?


    responsible for the giving of a
    bad name to your country, which
    you undoubtedly 1 o v e and
    wouldn't hurt for the world, I
    when you take advantage, of or
    mistreat, a visitor interested in
    learning mor? about your land
    and its people.
    Remember this the next time
    the occasion arises to choose bet I
    ween right or wrong and think
    for a moment of the possible re
    percussions that may resultI
    from your decision.I

    Moscou Radio OpensI
    Satellite Prize
    Contest
    Moscow Radio announced
    a satellite prize contest. En-
    trants can use their eyes, ears,
    typewriters or tape recorders.
    An English language broad-


    ~1



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    simple shopkeeper injure m y Jthe character, and every occuren- I
    country by a small error in judge ce which transpires in the seclu- This may possible seem to he
    meant or momentary weakness ? sion of the chamber will someday an exaggeration of a very small
    be proclaimed from the house item but how can you judge?
    During the course of your bu- tops>). I Why is one bar a success on one
    sinesas day a tourist may visit The gentleman that buys, and side of the street yet the bar di-
    your shop to buy a small item pays extravagently for the item, rectly across the street filled
    marked for sale at $ 5.00 and the from your store may never see with customers What is the dif-
    tourist, through language difficul- you again but he may meet ano- ference between one store that
    ties or other/reasons, offer a hig- their traveller on the plane that is constantly sold out and another
    ', next door that is running into
    deby? Isn't it quite possible that.
    The Biggest and Most Luxurious the decent treatment of a visi-
    ting tourist %could be the reason
    Of Small Cars one country is getting more
    S -- .. tourist dollars than another
    h AV. ,r when all other factors are equal
    C CaribbeanL countries are spen
    .' -^ ding hundreds of thousands of
    "- 4 "-' dollars for publicity and proga-
    S ganda to attract visitors to their
    f countries. The ill treatment of
    F'},.. ^ a travelle- may easily result in
    his informing his' family and
    INS "," frtends- or the customer buy-
    .a.3, ...,.i!Iiil'r' ing a ticket in his travel agency
    WI"Ii that yours is a poor place to
    S'j... .5 .'. visit due to the dishonesty of
    :-" 6 -s t afthe people. --
    .- esT.he dishonesty of the peo
    .... ....". ple. The iasL war produced ma.
    r T b K~ ny examples.- Often a service
    as Kleine Wunder! m man got drunk and in a resul-
    T --ting fight usedsd serious dama-
    i!, .," ikv"" ge to a re, tinant. That is cer
    KW 3: 6 is the 'car for the motorist who looks for. out"I
    i g engineering, performance and design. tainly no reason to condom all
    ,heel drive;- floating axle, automatic freewheel, aerodynamic Anny persmionna! and yet that is
    tubelesss tires add the famous valveless 3 cylinder high'perfor-. exactly wviat happened. The
    e DKW 3 : 6'engine: that's why driving a DKW gives you the townspeople didn't say.. *Joe
    session of driving a real sports car! Jones did it.", What they said
    ':" .... was, oThe .oldier-. did it., and
    S nteD W3-0once 'and ofwUeprnc
    Sthe. D W 36once and you will experience a therefore all soldiers were to
    th ri- blame and not the individual
    thrill in motoringl concerned.
    "* :" /'To no ll'ssE-r deffree are you
    WU BBEAN TRADING COMPANY To no tsse degree are you
    &iii ross the street from. Banque Colonmbo Rue. Pav6) i
    Please contact Mr. W.P. Graesel

    for -more Information, also about financing possibilities. I *9
    Complete stock of genuine DKW spare parts and efficient! i ___
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    S For details see your Travel Agent or


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    cast listed tree cqmpetlr |B,
    *1. For reception of sate
    radio signals. Give place, ds
    and exact tine of such reC&.
    tion, its duration of the
    strengh, tone fading. Extir.
    marks for entries who sum
    tape recordings of the signalib,-I
    2. For most detailed and w
    curate descriptions of-visual olb
    servations of the satellite. -.
    43. Fo:' the best article, essays
    of short story about the
    red moon.
    Prominent Soviet scientists
    and writers will be the judges;
    There will be to two prizes ia'
    each section. '.:
    The broadcast 'didn't say what.
    the prizc--, would be. -Y;
    Entries must be sent to eRi'?
    dio Moscow, Moscoy, the U-.S
    S.R* .i"


    On Sale at All Better Grocery Stores





    I SUNDAY OCTOBER 27th


    HAIITI SUN,


    ve, waving gracefully trom side
    to side.
    In this seemingly impossible
    position, she inches forward, her
    bare toes gripping the fCoor.
    Around her weave the other
    dancers in intricate rhythms.
    ,Limbo,. they chant hypnotlcal-
    ly, -,-Limlho like me..>
    Surely she can't do it, but i he
    does, supple as a supple as a
    snake defying gravity gracecul-


    'PORT O?'SPArN, Trinidad-
    The dictionary says that Limbo
    is the abode of those who are
    sinless yet denied the reward of
    heaven.
    Poets have called it the outer
    most border of hell. Some peo
    pie think it it. a new sort of
    cheese others believe it's a
    vegetable.
    But to those who have visited
    Trinidad, southern-most island
    of the British West Indies, it
    .. has a new and exciting meaning.
    Limbo is a dance. A fascina.
    ting and unusual dance with a
    climax that. makes you want to
    watch it again and again. And
    Limbo is included as a f-free-
    nes. as they say in Trinida4, in
    an evening of dinner and dan-
    cing which will come to about
    $10 (US) for two with no co-
    ver charge
    In downtown Port of Spain,
    Limbo is 4Ptured at the Lotus
    Restaurant floor show. At the


    Yacht Club, to the swish of been decided. Some say that it
    waves running right up to the was a form of exercise origina-
    dance floor, Limbo is the week jted by slaves cramped between


    end attract ion. And at the Hotel
    Normandie, with its savory
    French cooking. Limbo is the
    highspot of every Friday's night
    of entertainment.
    Its regularly danced at the
    Bel A-ir too, at Piarco Airport,
    where Pan American World Air-
    ways' sWif't Clippers touch down
    from New-York or Miami, only
    nine hours away.
    S Wherever it may be, it's an
    electrifying spectacle, heralded
    by a rool of drums and the chant
    of:
    ''. Ah want a woman to Limbo
    Like me,
    S Limbo, Limbo like me....
    O"::-On to the floor show come the
    '(est Indian dancers, tleir bo-
    dies writhing 'to a jungle beat.
    SThey carry two poles and a cross
    bar, which is set only inches
    : from the 'loni, and by mime
    and gesture invite each other
    - to go underneath.
    We : ll, thaLt's simple, you think,
    Crawl or roil under It's pretty
    1n w* 1-i..t ;..i _.l. _


    I the decks of ships that brought
    them. to the West Indies.
    Others hold that it was a corn
    petitive game performed by
    young men of African tribes to
    pro\ e their physical prowess.
    In any event, it was first
    brought to Trinidad by slaves
    and practeed at wakes during
    Bongo sessions nine lively
    days of song and dance, staged
    to insure the deceased a happy
    crossing to the Other Side.
    As far back as 1940 the com-
    mander- of the U.S. Armed For-
    ces stationed at Waller' Field in
    Trinidad saw fit to include -t in
    troop exercises. But it was first
    presented theatrically in 1948.
    .and since then has gained tre-
    mendous popularity among -folk
    dancers who perform at local
    nights spots.
    The strange "part about the
    Limbo i: the first time you see
    it, you can't believe your eyes.
    Only after watching several per
    formances are you convinced
    viirvii !i e'. ln i fftrM


    Luw, UUt It sIIUUI(I Ui easy ,.yu .i.iuln isn i playing] Liitcks.
    Enough, like Trinidadrl's universe ly po
    -But wait. The way they are pular calypsos. the Limbo is now
    '--going to Ido it doesn't *seem hu- spreading to other island. Tourists
    Sfianly possiflc fnow see this gravity-defy'ing dan-
    SMaybe one of the girls does cc perroiiried in the British WVest
    !'it first. Si-"bends easily back- ITudian irlanci of Tobago. Barba
    SWards from the knees, her body dos ar.f ,amairea.
    horizonta'. She doesn't 1-ut her AnId many predict when it
    Hands n !,he floor behind her. hits ihe I'nited States the rock
    : She keeps them in front or abo- and roll rr.iaw will die fast.


    ..BEFORE BUILDING SEE
    S, SIMACO, S.A.
    (I. Society Industrielle de Math-
    Sriaux de Construction
    p" 0. Box 1273 Rue du Magasin
    de l'Etat
    .: Portail de Leogane Zone
    S( behind Union School
    Balusters of varied designs
    ar Locals materials
    SCimdrit Blocks :
    -30 x 20 x 40
    26 x 20 x 40
    S15 x 20 x 40
    .A. 10 x 20 x 40
    Solidity Economy Guaranty


    I .~ Zvu


    Calypsos and oil barrel steel bands made tihe world well aware
    of Trinidad, the vibrant Caribbean island where people compose
    catchy songs and music as easily as breatliing. Now this fun -
    loving land, which is only nine hours from the United States
    by Pan American World Airways schedules, is electrifying tou-
    rists with the limbo, a gravity-defying ,dance) that has to be
    seen several times to be believed.


    Hasco Grinded Out
    Profitable Sugar
    Crop
    PORT-AU-PRINCE.- The lHai
    tian American Suger Co. (Hiasco)
    the country's largest sugar mill
    and only refinery, finished grin
    ding operations in August.
    Compared to the 1956 tota2 of
    63,550 tons (1.000 Kilos) output
    this year showed a slight decli-
    ne down to 62.975 tons. However,


    the year remains one'of the corn
    pany's best although results
    could have been even better if
    last spring's strike has not up-
    set production schedules. Ano-
    ther unfortunate consequence
    of the strike was a lower yield
    of sugar cane.
    SHUTDOWN HURT
    The shutdown occurred in
    March, a dry month and an ide-
    al period for grinding' opera-
    tions. On the other hand, the


    Thirty five thousand tons of
    sugar have been earmarked for
    local consumption against 35.585
    tons last year; exports this sea-
    son are estimated at 27,000 tons
    compared wit'i the average an-
    nual export total of :. 100"'tons
    in previous year.
    Hasco makes an irporLant
    contribution to the' etdnomy at
    The national level, too. In 1956,
    export duties on sugar and mo-
    lasses, license fees, income taxes
    and other taxes paid by Hasco
    amounted to $1,500,000. Likewi-
    se, revenues from sugar distri-
    bution, which is a state mono-
    poly, were at the rat- of $640,
    530.

    (Sept. 27 Journal of Commerce)


    SAN JUAN



    NEW YORKairlin


    SYou're in the best of

    hands when you


    Phone: 3313 Ticket Office: Jos. Nodal & Co.
    Bldg. Jos. Nodal & Co., General Agents
    I or see your Travel Agent


    0


    Ur
    VL "


    8 B3BB


    THE LEADER IN PROGRESS AND QUALITY I Il


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    the talented work of Master-Craftsmen who have faithfully
    adapted the automobile to the ideal of modern life.

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    le comfort in keeping with the criteria of real elegance.
    Quite a number of factors will make you appreciate the
    additional advantages offered you by STUDEBAKER, the ear
    The oidy American car combining elegance and sturdiness
    that is really different for 1957.
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    Distributor in Haiti: Tipco (Place Geffrard)


    rainy season, which starts in
    April, has unfavorable effects
    on the sugar yield. rThe- so-cal-
    led independent planters of the ...
    Cul-de-Sac and Leogane plains
    this year supplied 450.000 tons
    of the total of processed sugar
    cane (643,000) compared with
    414.000 tons last year. The re-
    mainder came from the compa-
    ny's own plantations. At ain ave-
    I rage price of $4.10 per ton, Has-
    co purchases passed the $1.800,
    000 mark compared with $1.700.
    000 last year. It should be noted
    that Hasco is practically the
    Only market for sugar cane in
    the twn nlnine


    LIMBO, LIMBO LIKE ME
    DOWN IN TRINIDAD


    Pave 13


    New i-'s their mae dancer's
    tin i, one who looks all of six
    C.- t. Lower goes the bar as each
    perforrm-r tries his skill. Down
    ,and down it goe'; until it rea-
    ches an incredible nine inches.
    Each time the feat is more
    breath-taking. Each tfme the big
    question is, will they get Under?
    Wiil they fall? Will they touch
    tMe bar or tip it over, or will
    iheir backs brush the floor9
    Nonre of these happen.
    The origin of Limbo has not


    I


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    jT


    t
    I

    t
    I












    Haiti was enriched last week
    Sby the presence of two old friends
    Sof mipe, nagiely, John R o o-
    sevelt, (son of the late, great
    President of the United States,
    Franklin Delano Roosevelt) and
    his partner Clarence L. (Pete)
    Sumners.
    When I called John in Was-
    'hinlgton, to invite him to the
    inauguration of Dr. Francois Du-
    Svaier, he was dressing to 'attend
    Sthe luncheon for Queen Eliza.
    beth, of England, hosted by Vice
    President Nixon and his wife. I
    Explained that It was most im-
    portant at thin time to have his
    as well as Clarences presence
    at the inaugural.
    Reports were rampant through
    0ou4 the United States about Ame-
    rican. Citizens not only being
    unsafe in Haiti but also that as
    American Citizens the ruling Mi
    Solitary Junta. guaranteed no pro.
    Section for us Americans living
    Here.
    Considering myself a veteran
    tourist of this lovely country.
    (having visited here on and off,
    for the last 9 years) as well as
    resident correspondent for Inter
    national News Service and Inter
    national New., Photos, I knew
    .that these reports were all lies
    propagated by people hostile to
    SHaiti. aind. out for their own sel-
    na.fish gains.
    -'-


    The maligning of the good
    name of General Antonio Ke-
    breau, head of the Military Jan
    ta, was one of their aims. Here
    is the man who is directly res-
    ponsible for Haiti having an
    election, let alone an honest one
    ...YES I SAID HONEST !! In
    Haitian history in years to come
    people will first fully apprecia-
    te the honesty" and couragoub
    ness of this great patriot.
    Well, with all this malarkey
    as a background I convinced my
    friends to visit here without
    their bullet proof vests. I should
    add that I also had as house
    guests Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin
    Shindler, Pres. of the Puritan
    Beef Company who unmindful
    of U.S. Embassy reports,decided
    to take their life in their handed'
    ahid visit Haiti foe the inaugural
    tion.
    Suffice to say no* only were
    none of my friend., untouched
    by bullets, violence, or atny of
    the other signs of mayhem bu;
    they had the time of their lives.
    The evening of their arrival I
    t*rew a cocktail party at Castel
    Haiti, at whiecn I invited enough
    of a potpour.-i of Haitian cam-
    rades, from top dignitaries to
    average workers, so they could
    garner a clear picture of the ni-
    ceties of these friendly, warm, peo


    rt Lage 14


    I,


    In attendance were, my good
    trends, Colonel Pierre Paret,
    Chief of Police, of Haiti, Col.
    Paul Timotbee, Major Leon Co
    Ion, Capts. Pierre, Jacques La-
    roche, Lionel Honorat and his
    gracious wife, Daniel Beauvoir.
    The first friends I made in
    Haiti, Pres. of the Senate, (Pop
    pa) Hugue3 Bourjolly. Madame
    (Momma) Uoarjoll', accompa-
    nied by '.l:eir brood ul wonder-
    [tul children, Janine. Guy, Jocko,
    and Ginetteic accompanied by her
    husband llab rondt Roy.
    Madame Dumarsais Estimd
    accompanied by famille Lough-
    lin, including, the good Dr., his
    another wile and son Rob'rt.
    My Physician, August Denize
    And his lovely wife, Phillip La-
    fontant, foreign correspondents,
    Larry Allen, Associated Press,
    Bernard Diederich, N.Y. Times,
    George Skadding, Life Magazine
    Time, Jim Cunniigham, United
    Press. Claude Robinson, Jamaica
    News and members of the Haitian
    Pres s..

    Paulette :nd Jacqueline Ke-
    breau, charming daughters of the
    general.
    Minister of Finance, Fritz et
    Madame Thebaud, Senator Vi-e.
    tor Constant and many of his
    compatriots, Mr'. and Mrs. Wil-
    liam Vrooman and many others.


    SLAUGHTER HOUSE HAS NO BUSINESS IN CITY
    Evry morning beet cattle trot The Centralization of Slaughte- quality cattle, hogs, goats,
    'into %Port-au-Prince from the gra- ring would contribute to (1) uplif- and centralizes slaughtering
    zinglands in the Sputh, driven ting of the meat's quality by ap-. give enough- volume to pay
    over'200 kilometers by their her- propriate technics; (2) A centra-, w-ay for a by-product factory
    dersW the low cowboys, who after lized control of the herds and a that is why slaughtering must
    his trip cannot even afford to lowering of thec price of meat. centralized in the hands ol
    ride home by up the primitive beef-raising me- products which in certain cases The famous meat-packers-
    thods employed in this country, may constitute an industry more Company, Chi
    I irmour and Company, of Chic
    Efficient Beef-Cattle raising is important than the so-called main stream-lined the utilization
    not possible under present condi- industry, inedible portions in valuable
    tons. The, beef-cattle farmer is atL RELATED INDUS'IRIES Alto products of the beef steer
    the mercy.of the buyer because the need for appropriate stock forty years ago. and establi
    the buying is done by. the head. yards and fattening stations, the precedent of developing
    It is i'6raSAe that such be Near the sea not far. from the tensive by-product operations.
    done by weight may be easily ac- HASCO and a short distance from during at that time more
    complished because the State has the City is an ideal location, three thousand different prpo


    a monopoly on the enterprise of
    slaughtering cattle. ar
    * ,?: All that remains to be done is p,
    So.' empower the State monopoly
    . to purchase live cattle and sell; f
    the carcasses, j o
    That would permit the establish-
    .ment of truly modern slaughter-
    Shouses all over the country where i
    slaughter-house by-products woldN
    be utilized to the utmost That in i
    dustry would constitute for the'
    State a source of inconime much-
    more important than the present,
    Slaughter Tax because the State
    would then be the seller of car-,
    casses to the meat markets-sellers,;
    also of important by-products such-
    as hides, etc.
    By this method, the Sanitary
    control would be centralized and
    what more considerable volume
    of this industry would permit ;he
    State to put into every town within
    a slaughter house important refri-
    geration facilities, freezing room.
    cooling room, holding room, which
    wvbuld serve commerce and inidus.
    -tries.


    'Pi-,;. ..I. i cl ,1 fnn.iltnt l Ilio no I ;. n ren'u't nOf ultilizina mate


    SUNDAY OCTOBER 171


    VISIT OF JOHN ROOSEVELT TO HAITI
    By Herbert MORRISON


    The management of the Cas-'
    tel Haiti, Dr. and Mrs. Thebaud
    did a fantastic job of providing
    food and liquor for the guests
    as well as the rhythms of the
    excellent Castel Haiti band.
    As the party was drawing to
    a close, Pres. of the Senate, Hu-
    gues Bourjolly, representing
    Pres. Duvalier, raised his cham-
    pagne glass on high in a toast
    of welcome to John Roosevelt,
    thanking him for coming to Uai-
    ti praising the great liberal ani
    humanitarian deeds of his fa-
    ther, hoping that ho would re-
    turn much sooner than his last
    visit, (23 yea's ago with his fa-
    ther, at Capa Haitian) and that
    also by this gathering of wonder
    ful people was an indication of
    the sincere welcome of the Hai-
    tian people to he and all the
    Americans present that reports
    of the straining of relation ships
    between the countries was again
    nothing but untruths. John -In
    answer acknowledged the won-
    derfull hospitality of Haiti, vis--
    hed President Duvalier all the
    luck in the world, and felt that
    he would carr" back to Ameri-
    ca and all those within ear shot
    the real truth of the Haiti Story
    ...But best of all President Ei-
    senhower hiniselif would at last
    be able to garnme the true pic-
    ture of the Haitian Political
    scene.

    by Hulebert .1 Morrison.


    i IThe Cabinet
    its :
    and The hew 16-Member Cabinet is composed of 10 Secretaries of :
    t be State, and 6 Under-Secretaries.
    the
    Mr. Frederic Duvigneaud Secretary ol the InIe.-'or and Nalin-
    nal Defense.
    Ar-
    Mr.Theodore A. Nicoleau Serctcary of Justice
    Icage
    aMr. Marc Charles Secretaty of Agriculture
    of
    Mr. Andr6 Thlard Secretary of Commerce and National Ecu-'
    by-
    nom- "m
    some
    ome Mr' Lafontant Jean Secretary ot Public Healtl:
    shed Mr. Marcel V'aval Secretary ot Public Works -
    Rev. Father Jean Baptiste Georges Secretary of National Educitilon.
    pro- Vilfort Beauvoir Secretary of Foreign Relations and Cults
    th-n


    ruct-i
    ' rial-s


    11ndi u 1i11 ai of nimuU lst tansi rIe- l to away. By-- -- p r-
    ind unloading of animals dtrans- formerly thrown away. By-pro-
    aorted by sea. ti:t's too' 44- b- of the weight of
    The adviantage offered to 'the the live animal. lo-t in the pro.
    iarmer in, the sae b)y weight 1s5 cess ol dressing and non-edible,
    bviyus because it promotes eihi- and were minade unto valuable
    :cioncy : rnd nrecessarilk better items


    typical scene at the old Pot"auPrince slaughter house in La Saline
    typical scene at the old Po,-t-au-Prinee slaughter house in La Saline.


    lIr Antoine Pierre Paul Secretary of Labor -_:
    Mr PauJ Blanchet Under-Secretary of the in: rirr and Na-.
    tional Defense '
    Dr Aurele A Joseph Under-Secretary of Finaic .
    Mr. Jean A. Magiuire Under-Secretary of Natioiii Econony,.A!
    IMr Karl Bam:luduy Undci-Secretary of Agricull.r t
    Mr. Jacques Fourcand Under-Secretary, ol Labor
    -!r Lu,.-ic-n Chamct L'Undir-Scretaryr ol Comrn:;> "c-
    Mir IFrl-t2 Sr-Firm-in Th'l6iaudj Sec-retarv of th, Trc-J.ur '




    THE C ASINO 'AITI


    ;dvises Its Ahiable Clientele

    That UV Will Work

    From 4:00 P.M. To Curfew

    Every Beginning Evening

    Saturday October 5th

    Until Further Notice.

    Fort-au-Prince, October 3. 1957

    THE MANAGEMENT A


    wHAITI SUN,


    Haiti Sends

    Delegates

    to FAO Convention

    In Rome
    At the coming Convention df ;-;
    the Food Agricultur: Organiza-.:.
    tion (FAO) to open in Rome, Ita
    ly on November 4th, Haiti will-
    be represented by a three-mem- "
    ber delegation.
    Director General of Agricul.
    t u r e, Agronomist Montasse;:-!
    Chariot, will head the delegation'
    which includes Agronomist Alix "
    Large, Technical Advisor of the
    Department of Agriculture, and .,
    Professor of Agrologie at the
    National Scool f Agriculture, _
    and Mr. Rolynice Dorsainville,
    Director of the SACT Project
    in Aux Cayes.
    Mr. Chariot flew to Home, via :
    New-York by PAA clipper Mon. ,
    day afternoon and will partici-.
    pate in a preliminary meeting '-:
    of the Presidents of Delega-
    lions to the Convention. ...
    He will be joined by the other -.
    two delegates who scheduled to
    leave Port-au-Pricec early nest
    week. -
    The FAO, a dependent of Llni '
    ted Nations, has, prepared a co-
    pious program during which the '
    delegations of all the member
    countries will-deliberate on qucsa
    tions of great economic impor- -:
    tance, during the meeting in
    SRome.


    it






    S(







    d







    AY OCTOBER 27th









    10 -- M^


    .S "'* > ...1


    Mis. Anita Lauve of George-
    .,town D.C. is"the weekend guest
    '-.of Ambassado: and Mrs. Gerald
    S.Drew Miss Lauve a member ct
    lthe US. Foreign Service is pre-
    l sentlr .studying Urdu and Hin.
    'tdustani Ilnguages.
    xxx
    Mr. Benjaminu Prophete ,was
    appointed to the National Bank's
    J-Board of Directors by Decree of the
    ,-Mdilitary Government Council on

    October 21st.
    ,Z The nominee who is to serve a
    term of five years is replacing Mr.
    ERobert Bonhoinme who resigned
    9f--fromx the function, recently.
    P xxx
    1c Haitis noted contemporary poet,
    n.Jea F. Brierre made it known
    Sthi wi'ek fha:t'-'he.d wouldd be on the
    .detfese- pounsel- of -ex-General
    %, Lon Cantave in the law suit open-
    L-.:.ed against the former Chief of Ar-
    &.1 ny Staff by Provisional President

    -lFrankk Sylvaini

    -Mem.b., ,of business ano indus-
    are hostiv a s::;mptuous recep-
    io in l'>,mr. .l P.redenr.t Fran-
    rsu Dmvali-' hi 11 13 o'clfir tOb
    evening, "t the ,lila Crcele,' ih
    -eti V h"] x
    ,. *,.. XXX

    Annc Whelan of the influential
    ..iBridgeport Post was here for three
    '.days at Hotel Excelsior. Miss
    b..helan who covered polities ih
    bher home' State in the old dayt
    visitedtd Havana and CiudadTrujil
    ri'o-on her Caribbean jaunt.
    S: : .. .. -x XXX
    ie!! Agence Nationles d'Automobi-
    t'les? A. -is the new auto agency
    lstabUlished, by Philippe Charlier
    frlnd -Hary Tippenhauer.
    i..' xx

    k *Charles Willis, former assistant
    _dto.President Eisenhower (1953-55)

    .wa's prominent among the guests
    Vlfo,-packed the 'Salle. des Bus-
    1$tfes,'in the National Palace Tues-
    da.Y'ito witness Dr. Francols Duva-
    'ier takc oath of office as Presi-
    denit of Haiti.
    AM31rs Willis is married, to Eliza.-
    ,.ethK Firestone the daughter of
    "I.arvery Fireston. who controls
    Firestone operations throug-
    Plbut the world.
    41Xe was lodged here at the Ho-
    W-e Villa Creole.
    ." XXX

    -inMc Clinchy of -News Week.
    tuned to New York City and a
    W.zte desk Thursday after doing
    miAonth in the Caribbean report-
    f'.tor News Week and other U.
    b..rlpablications. Jim had a rare
    Bof humor for a former Eu-
    "nTheatre UP reporter...

    Hic Meinbera of the well-

    O a mahogany dealers team
    e Panthal edifice, -returned
    H -.the.U.S on Wednesday.


    _HAITI SUN*


    Cleveland Bryan one of the Ca-
    pital's leading photographers (Ri
    viera Hotel is his field) left town
    Tuesday for Jamaica. Cleve will
    join his wife in Kingston and va-
    cation abroad until next year.
    xx
    CS-ril Chin owner of Jamaica's
    Astoria night-club (At Mandeville)
    spent four days in the Capital this
    past week. Mr. Chin came here in
    search of ad orchestra to play the
    holiday season at his club. It is
    said- he had successful negocia-
    tions with a seven-piece orchestra.
    * Mr. Chin was a guest of the
    Biyan's at Savanne Salde.

    xxx
    XXX.
    Reynolds Mine Manager and Mrs
    Jack Ryan came to-town for the
    Presidential- inauguration. -The
    Ryans w2re the guests of Mr.
    Haas manager of the Flour Mill
    at Hotel Choucounne Wednesday
    night. The .conversation was ma-
    nagement problems. The Ryans re-
    turned fo Paillfit this ..week-end..
    :xx

    Commander Charles 'B. Henri-
    quesof the United States Air-Mis-
    sion to Haiti and his vivacious wife
    welcomed sister Mrs. Herbert
    Jahncke of New-Orleans and cou-
    sin Mrs Bland Logan here Thurs-
    day for a ten day visit at there
    Debussy house-guests.
    xxx
    Director of the Electric Compa-
    ny Burt Shrewsbury and his wife
    flew to Florida on vacation Thurs-
    day. Mr Shretsbury expects to
    Join Tony Kneer on the Gold Coast
    and do a spot of fishing.
    Xxx

    Mr and Mrs Frank Cusamano
    were the house-guests of Dr. and
    Mrs Elmer Loughlin in Moussean
    over the inauguration. Mr. Cusa-
    mano is President of a Drug Corh-
    pany. The Cusamano's divide their
    time between Baltimore and Deer-
    field Beach Florida.
    xxx
    Mrs. Luce Cajuste returned
    from four months in New-York,
    Wednesday, on the Panama Li.
    ner S.S. Ancomn. She will resu-
    me her work of embellishing the
    ccoiffures> of chic Port-au-Prin
    cien ladies, at her shop across
    from Petit Seminaire College St
    Martial, assisted by niece Julia
    Apollon
    xx x
    A Requiem Mass was sung for
    the repose of the soul of the
    late Lieutenant Herv6 Lemais-
    tre, at the Sacred Heart Church
    in Turgeau, on Wednesday mor-
    ning, October 23rd. The brilliant
    young air force pilot who lost
    his life when his plane dived
    into the sea, near Leogane, last
    week, would have observed his


    birthday anniversary
    23rd.


    Hotel Oloffson which has es-
    tablished a tradition for fine
    folklore shoevs. (no spaghetti)
    opened the winter season last.
    night with a completely new and
    exciting show.
    Added attraction was the dan
    cers and- singers are now fra.
    med in the new epatioi, an unu-
    sual piece of work that points
    up owner Coster's talent for so-
    mething different and beco-
    ming.>
    Like a misee en scene- of eLost
    Horizon,) the Patio has a green
    mountainside jutting out oiie
    side with a waterfall trickling
    down its fernery side at ano-
    ther end is a Frencn lamp post,
    a souvenir of tPigalleA, and the
    world's only primative wrought
    - iron door, primitively pain
    ted by St Brice.

    Coster was ably assisted in
    producing his show by Lina Ma-
    thon Blanchet, recognized pio.
    neer in the movement to bring
    Haitian folklore dancing toihhe
    stage.
    Witlj the fire dance, carfival
    specials, and a lovely singer, the
    show is Haitian, one hundred
    and ten percent.
    The Roger Coster Show which
    made its debute after only two
    weeks of rehearsals Will vary
    its songs and dance throughout
    'the season.
    x xx
    The Haitian Federation of
    Football announces its General
    Assembly will be held on Fri-
    day, November st and Saturday,
    November 2nd, at Pare I.econte
    at 5:00 P.M. During this meeting
    of the National Council. ques-
    tions of general interest will fol-
    low the ainuai report of the
    committee. Dr. Andr4 Roy 'is the
    Secretary General of the organi
    nation.
    x x.x
    Miss Liflane Mayds was wed
    to Engineer Guynemer Philo.
    gene yesterday morning, at 9:15
    o'clock. The young bride is the
    daugther of Mr. and Mrs. Roths-
    child Mayas. The groom is the
    son of Mrs. and the- late Michel
    Philogene.
    xC x x
    Mrs. Maurice I.eniieux, wife
    of the Canadian E m b a s s y
    F i r s t Secretary, returned
    with the f o u r -children of
    the couple, last Wednesday. The
    family had spent two months Va
    cation in Canada, returning on
    the PAA Douglas> from New-
    York. They are now established
    in the Corvington villa in Petion
    Villc.

    Mr. Joan Dauphin,, Minister-
    Counselor if Haiti Embassy in
    Washington, arrived here last
    Saturday. He was accompanied
    by Mrs Dauphin.
    x x x
    Roger Monioue and Leonie
    Boucard- left for the U.S. last


    Sunday.


    X X X


    Fritz Pierre-Louis flew to the
    US. this week.
    XXX
    F. J. Grant is back from a bout


    on OctoberI with triplesurgery inMiami Hos
    Ppitals looking .youthful as ever.
    ._.- -. ..
    -" ,. '4.-- -t..t = ':
    ;-tq -S, -z,: .. o


    SMrs. Louise Marcelin arrived
    from Cuba on Monday.
    xx XX
    Jean Henri Elie, former Haba
    nex Director, is back from seve-
    ral weeks in the U.S.A.
    x xX
    4Le Jour-'s Director, Hubert
    Carrd is home after attending
    the International Press Conven.
    tion in Washington.
    xxx
    Mr. Jos6 Martinez, UNESCO
    official arrived frori Montego
    Bay, Tuesday to preside at ithe
    Exposition of Monetary Units
    inauguration Which took place
    on Thursday morning in the
    Salle des Pas Perdus, at the
    Foreign Office.
    x x x
    Miss Fernande Lamothe is
    back at her post with UNESCO
    after spending a vacation of se-
    veral weeks in Kingston, Jamai.
    ea. --
    eR.
    xxx
    Mr. Bernard Bogdanskl, the
    new Charg6 d'Affaires of Po-
    land arrived here Theday from
    Europe.. Mr. Bogdanski, a native
    of Warsaw, will head the first
    Polish Diplomatic Mission in
    Haiti.
    xxx
    Larry Allen, Special Associa-
    ted .Prers Correspondant, left
    Friday ofter covering the Presi-
    dential Inauguration Ceremonie
    for his press syndicate. Mr. Al.
    len returned to Havana from
    which point he is expected to
    fly to Guatemala.
    xxx
    Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Doret
    and their son Robert arrived by
    plane on Monday from the U.S.
    SXXX
    Miss Marle-Therese Bissaintlhe
    flew to San Juan this week.
    Gerard Frederique took the
    Pan Americani clipper to Miami
    on Thursday.
    x.x x
    X.,X X
    Mrs. Fernande Chancy, wife
    of the well-known commercant,
    Louis Chancy, s back from
    weeks vacation in New-York.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Gourgue
    are the parents of d new baby
    daughter, born on October 18th.
    The newcomer, Patrlciai and
    her morn, the former Paula Cas-
    tor are reported to be in excel-
    ,lent form.
    xxx

    Manise Allen is back in town with
    his his lovely wife Rose. Mrs Allen
    is a former Chicagoan Mantse
    brother-in-law of the former Ba-
    nIrana King Jean Elie has been liv-
    ing in North America for the past
    three years. .


    .- ._ ","; *



    John Robevelt, youngest p o
    of the late President of United
    States, during his recent Visit
    wrote a letter to ex-President..
    Vincent.

    Mr. Roosevelt said that he a.c-
    companied his father to Haiti In
    1934 and at that time they were.
    received in Cap Haitien by the
    then President Stenio Vincent,
    As time would not permit him
    to pay his respects to the for6
    mer President he said he wrote,
    a letter.
    xxx

    Hotel Monatana was the scene
    of a banquet in honor of Mr
    J o h n F. Roosevelt Wednesday
    evening.
    i
    Hosts were Mr. and Mrs. f-eor-
    ge Kenu and Herbert Morrison.
    Among the guests were Presi-
    dent of the Senate and Mr.s HWu-
    gues Bourjolly, Roger DorsaIr,-
    vilie, Mr. and. Mrs. Raymond
    Roy Mr. and Mrs. Langreth of
    the American Embassy andt Fot'r
    reign Correspondents. Speeqh
    making followed the wines.

    XXX ",. -

    ld falionable 6:30 P.M. cere-
    moby at the Sacred ..Heart
    Church of Turgeau last Friday
    evening, Miss Denise became'
    the bride of Lieut. Yves Vole].
    The niarriage was performed
    by Father Volel, cousin.,of -the
    groom.
    Mrs. Raynmond Moyse and-En-
    gineer Qualo accompanied. the
    young couple to the altar ,
    A reception followed the rel-l..
    glous rjtes 'at'the Ruelle ,W.ag
    home of the bride's mother, M'.-.
    Alexandre Moyse,, widow of thid
    late Army Officer, Colonel Alex
    andre Moyse.
    Among those signing the re,
    sister as witnesses were : Me,
    Dieudonn4 Charles, Notary 'Pu-
    blie, Dr. Joseph Buteau, Mrs.
    Pascal Fouron, Mrs. Fortuha A.
    Gu.ry aid Dr. Anthony LIeve,
    que.


    The newlyweds are honeym6bo
    ninff at VC n.cff .


    X X X

    Celso Costa, local Manager, of
    Cubana de Aviacion returned..,
    from Havana op Monday. -
    xxx
    SX X X :;'"

    Senor Cesar Carrizuri, Mexican
    Ambassador to Port-au-Prince, is
    expected to here at the end of this
    month, to resume his post after
    two months of vacation in his
    native Mexico. -


    e LES HAITIENS MALADES DE 'LA POLITIQUEi., a 2-act co
    medy by Thedore Beaubrun was played by the Languichatte
    troup at the Theatte de Verdure, last Sunday evening...
    SAGUENAY TERMINALS, LTD. vessel, XC. Rogenaes is scbeh :
    duled to touch Haitian waters- on October 29th..
    CHRISTIAN DIOR'S death in Italy, on October 24th, cause
    regrets throughout the feminine world. In Haiti, some of til
    more elegant ladies can boast a Diort in their personal wardto- .-
    be, but all of them appreciate the dominating influence of the
    late great French designe- of women's gowns...
    MR. EMMANUEL LECONTE, uncle-of Mrs. Paul Magloire,
    was granted a special pension of $100 per month by the Haitian
    Government. Mr. Leconte had furnished 14 years of public ser--
    vice including posts of Inspector General of Haitian Consulates
    in: Europe, Haitian Minister to Brussels, and Government Coun.-
    ciIl 'Member...


    . D






    S Page 16 'HAITE SUN.

    President Duvalier Talks PRESIDENT BEING HONORED
    P- esd D a BY INDUSTRIALISTS
    (Continued from page 1) urgency, President Duvalier BUSINESSMEN AT
    .. members, said that the present Tourist Of- VILLA CREOLE
    So far as he knew, the Presi- fice is being enlarged into a Go- TONIGHT.
    .dent said, no one -who had not vernment department of Tou- The businessmen and indus-
    been specifically charged with rism. Under its aegis Public Rel trialists of the Capital will en-
    some offense had any reason to nations Offices would, be opened tertain President Francois Du.
    abstain from participating in the in the main areas from which valier at a reception this eve
    Normal life of the country, end Haiti expects to draw. -sitors. ng at Hotel Villa Creole in P6.
    that it was entirely a matter of These offices, he said, ;vtd be tion-Ville.
    personal -choice whether they regarded as containing Haitian The invitation carried, the fol.
    did so or not. Ambassafdors of Good Will.) lowing: aWe are requesting you
    The new Chief of State revea- A LETTER' to participate in this fiesta of
    led, that a new Ambassador to The President referred to the Concorl and Union, which will
    Washington would be named letter written by Henri Beflan- be our manner as businessmen
    .. shortly,' but in the meanwhile de which appeared in the NEW- and industrialists to express to
    'discussions on the full range of YORK TIMES this week. Bel- the Chief of the Nation our de-
    SGovernment policy on economic, lande signed the letter as re- sire t help in the efforts he
    political and cultural relations presenting the International Le- will have to make for the ad-
    with the -United States, had been ague For The Rights Of Man. -vancement of the" country to.
    w made with U.S. Ambassador Ge- The Presidented pointed out wards an ideal of peace, pros.
    raIld Drew. that Bellande had been a bank perity and progress'.
    INVESTMENT OFFERS clerk in Haiti who was dismis-
    veral: American business sed for embezzlement. He had tEN. KEBREAU
    ",. .R. |AU
    drgimprations had already ex- returned to the country during (Continued 'irom page 1)
    -i' eed thoelr interest In inves- the Magloir3 regime an4 tried
    ting capital In the country, he to get a job at the National tional interests.
    ; indicated, and negotiations 'with Bank here. In this he had failed, Replying the Chief of Staff
    Representatives of: others were and he had since had gone to thanked the President for the con-
    Sunder way. the United States.- fidence reposed -in him. aI realize*,
    This, he continued, was within President Duvalier emphasi- he said, 'what heavy responsibili-
    Sthe framework of the Govern- zed that the Secretary of State ty will henceforth rest on my
    z: at sen, policy to set up a statu. for Finance was'willing to place, shoulders.. It will be to preserve
    -;;.tow.Economic Planning .oard- Bellande's file at the disposal of the unity of, the Army, to maintain
    Swhch would direct overall 'agrL. press representatives. it in its traditions of chivalry, and
    'cltu tal and Industrias' develop..b In view of Bellande's record, to make it respond to its mission
    -mont. tie President said he did not bf preserving order and defend-
    -;:. peclaring'tbat- he regarded the think the other points raised in 'ing the State so that the destinies
    !. .ies #tplb6n of the free tfbw of his letter were worthy of ans- promised to the Haitian -people
    ,4o.r ii'i" .6 '"' fl" .'as 'a. .."' 'm' te". e s
    .-4touritt ,to ilaiti as a matter o wers. shall at last be fulfilled.'

    1 ... = .I i
    ?;.C.EBABi) HEADS TELLS- 'WHAT MILITARY CITY MADE OF*-
    jt j-' ,tti with pride -thit w are Government. .. trials and we;.can say without
    .r.flani4ig'lia'oe' t oday ti 'Iis't'niecesarsi to tell you, Ex- fear of being contradicted that
    -, tay Govergmnuit C6ougif'- the cellency, that 2,000 workers were most 6f..thle money pent has re-
    yI IlTAYW CIITY the erection' employed in the construction of mained in the community and
    .. .b4flh wvas entrusted to us.' .this City which consists of 100 has been largely shared among.
    : ..n SpiiE of the vicissitudes of quadruplex-type homes for sol- Haitian families.
    Sthe last ten months and the-scsp) diers, duplex-type homnies fdr sub -.
    v %i We have not hesitated, to the
    tics who thought that a Corn- officers and 20 villas for Offi- ment of our commercial in-
    .. : L I detriment of oar commercial. in-
    Spany utilizing only Haitian tech cers? '
    S. terestsi to roof the houses for
    -nicians would not be able to
    .... iry out a project of this Although built for 200 fami- sub-officers with concrete is-
    -tead of the foreign roofing pro-
    .Z pdrtaece, we .hld on and t. lies, the community center of dote f foreign roofing pro
    4' ay ate formally'giving the lie the military City has road -aid vle or
    ...The area af the City has bben
    Sto the systematic Metractors of drainage facllities and a water Te areao- th Cie ty has lee
    'he competence of the Haitian, supply for double this popula- enlarged by more than Ught
    .. ..acres ove.z specifications in
    These multicolsred villas pla- tion, tlis allowing for future ex- acres ove- specificton in
    ',' .'* .order to, improvre-the environ
    ced 4n rows on the sides of the pension. oe to imo th en
    Shills, these-blossoming gardens Approl nmately 200,000 sacks ment of the project.
    --''' .,. 'trj j In doing th.1s, we wanted to
    a.e. are the fruit of our determina- of cement were utilized and In doing this, we wanted to
    g, h tlon to do our job well and of more than 120,000 truck'.loads justify the great .confidence
    .ou 'br e6nfidence iii the futd6e of were necessary for 'the transpor- which the Army had placed in u
    ""Qur country. We-could not have tatjon of the various materials. ad have lentall our efforts and
    won this "battle without the pa- Tt was .our constant care to uti- energy towards this end, we
    Striotism, aid and solicitude four lizie the maximum of local ma- regard these efforts and energy
    .,. : as largely rewarded, Excellency,
    if you the Officerz, Sub-Offfi-






    U-.- G w m "
    cers, and Soldiers of the Arm3
    are satisfied with the- work ac-
    complisbed.



    PORT-AU-RI14LE;


    OF EXQUISITE rug
    Deslqfts
    AND SUP!?
    Gerard Theard Vice-President of the Cn: libyan Constructiofl LIE
    "company speaking at handing over of cit6 Militaire. RN


    . ft o j fe-@ w /s.f :
    C-h*/ PETION.VILLE ,.
    /o*,4 C/ut.m



    -.k l', .. ,.. :!


    HOTEL ''

    MONTANA
    PETIQN-VILLE


    mrAE Ar7 7fl7 aSer s i f.Sa.fl Sn -- "


    The fMost 6&hAe Coc&-oo
    of~cn^Tour Inxomni~Ue ^^A~s

    t ay t6 etoeC I
    te Valley 4G Canap tt anL th
    touvAatns.
    OR// den iutes A/on PoaesPRINCE
    iUNnEP'iE SAME MANAGEMENT AS HOTEL CHOUCOUN I
    I f


    THE WORLD

    -- FAMOUS
    wV
    *


    SHOES

    FOR EVERY OCCASION


    1 ry &-- 'r V mw a- %-.w f fol-V 4-WArff W iF NJ


    m




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    '6963' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile100' 'sip-files00004.txt'
    7d2c0f0cf7dcd265ced34444627d6d49
    00f79ae5a6e685d9831e62c76a344e2e7c060852
    '2014-05-23T21:01:59-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:00:21-04:00'
    virus check
    WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '8188' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile101' 'sip-files00005.txt'
    cd1a9c01c7cc2509ac2b3b672870dc90
    6c2956678a9170515ac087e9fb04d75ff8018850
    '2014-05-23T21:01:53-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:00:19-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '10134' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile102' 'sip-files00006.txt'
    e9ef944dc2957ce7622a1035e04e9449
    f85f55a767f7af6c213c0868faeca94a7ed054aa
    '2014-05-23T21:02:14-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:00:34-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '10665' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile103' 'sip-files00007.txt'
    56e959ea2b85a46ae2b5483bf22711e7
    9ead3e95c254fec8f3280817fbe25ce4e9ce2922
    '2014-05-23T21:02:43-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:01:30-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '2676' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile104' 'sip-files00008.txt'
    c1c31d4ba9b16059d2595436e348b4c9
    de2022d1863c2b822b3a1b3e5e461e1bf68cdc4a
    '2014-05-23T21:02:04-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:00:27-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '700' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile105' 'sip-files00009.txt'
    af89a66f0b587af9446a0776fa9dfab8
    8cedb28cd109df9405d75fff4de0d581d7f0ebd7
    '2014-05-23T21:02:01-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:00:22-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '5380' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile106' 'sip-files00010.txt'
    0d8ffa56556bb05c24a545f49f07720a
    859d29d637a3bc199e825317a31f801b39abed58
    '2014-05-23T21:02:40-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:01:28-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '8832' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile107' 'sip-files00011.txt'
    a50a0b88c1595467d2f229762303c16b
    cd633e5a0f92e2257d40872f2b26a02c1f294427
    '2014-05-23T21:02:49-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:01:40-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '8840' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile108' 'sip-files00012.txt'
    96bdf8accfd63e3a0e6ea470857c6c51
    5cb8e9256f141bb6be8893b769ddb8b0da3950af
    '2014-05-23T21:02:44-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '8664' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile109' 'sip-files00013.txt'
    6c8276c76cb386b61527e74f1efd583a
    83709df0b2bef83b8b0627a9335d22b0bc0c9c1a
    '2014-05-23T21:02:39-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:01:27-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '49824090' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile11' 'sip-files00011.tif'
    30b8dee67e90ef6bc2684890600d778f
    3bc31bcbe459bf84ba5f4ed701e28636c7c1abb6
    '2014-05-23T21:02:36-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:23-04:00'
    virus check
    '11718' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile110' 'sip-files00014.txt'
    4af757cdd5795500e935ba181c86fcc1
    21141227e912236f299f21b16f75690902e8a8b3
    '2014-05-23T21:02:20-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:00:41-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '13111' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile111' 'sip-files00015.txt'
    88181191b3aaab2a9024f17f8235aca5
    7ba5e878e7fc9b5ed8c44d92a2cb66d8aea8521f
    describe
    Invalid character
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '9069' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile112' 'sip-files00016.txt'
    e79b5ca45111fac478842273b086a937
    93fa401a3ff850f07087a9a83ed7be137dcbe18e
    '2014-05-23T21:01:56-04:00'
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:00:20-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '33305' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile113' 'sip-filesAA00015023_00418.mets'
    5af40cd17ff4180dcd57e1ba164226ae
    ffc585869bc9da8312f2672ddc886e15cc9b0199
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:18-04:00'
    virus check
    xml resolution
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile12' 'sip-files00012.tif'
    09908169cb4c60373087b550b288106b
    487b548b46a646ad023c4ada5ffe4f03db50088f
    '2014-05-23T21:02:51-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:44-04:00'
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile13' 'sip-files00013.tif'
    72f773ff3fe016c98ea5d7999ef6c78c
    213c5b30053122f1e0f458caa52f00859e6e5ecc
    '2014-05-23T21:02:22-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:46-04:00'
    virus check
    '49846336' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile14' 'sip-files00014.tif'
    fbbb4ddc3095b6eff8bdeaabb7d0bcad
    f89ce62c7b7f4b9d79d064af846333e3f36f144c
    '2014-05-23T21:01:51-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:17-04:00'
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile15' 'sip-files00015.tif'
    53e46cc3cd9cfdb9344783e075ccd899
    5cefdb52cd8ea8abdb988d28009df7fa2c8ec84b
    '2014-05-23T21:02:53-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:49-04:00'
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile16' 'sip-files00016.tif'
    f07b3af85ddf07f3c45ab5c54c34a3d0
    f2aa6f264127730b30ef9ed1cf31bd939b2051b4
    '2014-05-23T21:02:19-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:40-04:00'
    virus check
    '2049292' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile17' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
    38c3aa6dfe8d0b978ce9a35d533c792a
    b9ea9a1762a42d3a6e22a1587feaf5ae02463624
    describe
    virus check
    '2076096' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile18' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
    da97483ddf1802975d02922696b8d6e1
    b3200ac4ad2257e49d8a66b4cd7147a4397d4967
    '2014-05-23T21:02:48-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:39-04:00'
    virus check
    '2076102' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile19' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
    6ddf3f8ae2a19cca79b0f3fb0d31bc13
    1bfee2146e1a0341d56542175ee823252c31081c
    '2014-05-23T21:01:52-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile2' 'sip-files00002.tif'
    3fe536cb89ef9c1b76a2d2882c7e58ee
    6189bef438e0fa7ae5abcf1bf10d7f923b8f1258
    '2014-05-23T21:02:08-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:32-04:00'
    virus check
    '2076105' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile20' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
    a19099145127e10565ad96c125413ca5
    b72dc662427751d6ddde6eac758cd60e6c04169a
    describe
    virus check
    '2076097' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile21' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
    13c7efe83ddce6c0d7c09c4cc199cf69
    1484a74d22c322e583f167ab306c96eabd973a45
    describe
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile22' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
    794149746fade73fcd2bb2458b71a044
    39e9e6376f58a0e0318882ae6084430b3b835528
    describe
    virus check
    '2076071' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile23' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
    40f5388c4fa23e73424b4d226b7dc582
    c10bbab91e6d18641f0f7d66d942112eb4e81c47
    describe
    virus check
    '2076046' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile24' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
    f8bfeddf0cc31fb773c980de2e81e519
    ef8cc692dec79ef8896a711462fd36041f7f82f8
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:55-04:00'
    virus check
    '2076104' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile25' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
    4757d02da396456e7dcaa97f9388e47b
    681d9017d3c631a1b183a5973a01464abb711f06
    describe
    virus check
    '2048054' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile26' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
    b02c21cde281b67f70d53d51d09c7f07
    9fa5482d90988510196b49d8728f8163c280fffc
    '2014-05-23T21:02:26-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '2076103' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile27' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
    fe654ebf07bb8f9692d16f111ddf6b79
    b7b60d135ee7d2c5af036a11ce15c6fcbe9846d7
    describe
    virus check
    '2076106' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile28' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
    5c89ce529b49c45266b99b53566915b9
    b3edca19c1a3783a8155404f1da3ec316b601c57
    describe
    virus check
    '2076099' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile29' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
    5c513aabbeaec62e3fd9eda3f41d211d
    cd01b947658f9e552cac816723cbe4464b18e89d
    describe
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile3' 'sip-files00003.tif'
    51ebca003fd4c423172a873ed2571937
    3776cf512df89862cea4217f1722265fb77bff37
    '2014-05-23T21:02:03-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:26-04:00'
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile30' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
    2946b4c4fe70d2692cf7149fa6ee127a
    990055562f53ec106da31b2b61a6c9e90ae78727
    '2014-05-23T21:02:09-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:33-04:00'
    virus check
    '2076085' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile31' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
    8b87644f15fc04d618087762fc999490
    a2052abc8685dcf8f822f3767a49eb77ab30ed77
    '2014-05-23T21:02:29-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:01-04:00'
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile32' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
    5490e0709eb7f885f40c542533708c7a
    c1343b052efae9685023178d0fd8aba85a2842e0
    '2014-05-23T21:02:23-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:48-04:00'
    virus check
    '748765' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile33' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
    b66cf22115169e3040f10d5b4655af22
    8f3ab2fa283d7a487ec54f9d1a5c6d0ea90f310a
    '2014-05-23T21:02:15-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:35-04:00'
    virus check
    '100550' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile34' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
    cffe45643330c2404d1d841329ab173b
    2ee8a7500a13811ef9e1ce57fadf32ab48fa5ee2
    describe
    virus check
    '814204' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile35' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
    c61fbf55ae09eb7acd55b7c0b92cf43e
    fa3a4aedb2419f382cb03e6f9474180ea07c4965
    describe
    virus check
    '78433' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile36' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
    5aea1bd7376c256acae4c34a211fb783
    a0a261b8f2b22de646743a3342fc93c182e903d6
    describe
    virus check
    '755992' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile37' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
    5e0acd20a2867b50ce9f7fb04b67c566
    9aa6ba22ceb9ba4fddc322c69ba8417de0795c0f
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:47-04:00'
    virus check
    '76989' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile38' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
    9aa1cdcf893b57dae846033b69fa0a59
    fdfb8e04ac740512b22f7c39bdc3cc77eefdb5c9
    describe
    virus check
    '755982' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile39' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
    2bd09053a8cf156b631931f36861c786
    42038aa1db0f8579c7c784a284e5cf18ff0bf8cc
    '2014-05-23T21:02:00-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile4' 'sip-files00004.tif'
    6e991e873cf98fa101a92d79678852e3
    9b6af5bc303f0561fe627ee2b2dbbba71f7465e8
    '2014-05-23T21:02:28-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '77805' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile40' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
    d1e394ad67f43562f7c4900a15b3c78e
    8e9602c37bcd02c7eed52a0549377c8c2dd3286c
    describe
    virus check
    '716814' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile41' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
    0d368506d9dbe1adef0b3141c3cd247b
    9f18468ecdc7d54d9493636493fa6c45cae46562
    describe
    virus check
    '77625' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile42' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
    a95119aa0713f4e640f37c48fb78e207
    82150660cd4e931af93096663f2399c92e7f40a2
    describe
    virus check
    '734337' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile43' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
    bdc21822285bff21a38c115b17f031e1
    af27f6c3354fe005c773ffc21461a6a18c597a53
    describe
    virus check
    '73258' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile44' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
    fdf1c48b30773e7d53f82bdb27c9b4c7
    1fff743ea065a6ccc59fbda6f186bd7f28a78241
    describe
    virus check
    '765814' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile45' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
    7343bc1f310407152e6d9d84042ef8fa
    cb9c187dd5fb3aba737989570ca2fc797a4eb13c
    describe
    virus check
    '75723' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile46' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
    662d7d4a24a39356b0f6cbb8e5bd38c5
    143c8e89b185c4cc3bd21ee4f03dff8165d22f45
    '2014-05-23T21:02:21-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '672740' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile47' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
    f5d79c63616c8c8dc0ad51706f10e022
    a737ef9bd99ff9f3da75a85edeb7748d3cbe0f73
    describe
    virus check
    '69068' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile48' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
    63a9da94f9f5f6f942f8d9e8011eb572
    c1167caae2e8ac6f118d427ebad7684e83b6c85e
    describe
    virus check
    '269677' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile49' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
    6b6cec02f57476ac751035f9dad641f0
    3e1c973b5749acfa8e803286becf9c2599b477ff
    '2014-05-23T21:02:35-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:18-04:00'
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile5' 'sip-files00005.tif'
    f9436ac29c2f49bab8dfdafe5d1dcdc0
    e865d1459e5358d153731f31330c8d12a9f82c39
    '2014-05-23T21:02:34-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:16-04:00'
    virus check
    '45733' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile50' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
    fb9db6ec7455e065ea1bf9a88ec347b1
    03108003924170bdcebd4252ef17f72c71311783
    describe
    virus check
    '736816' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile51' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
    17d923320d0abba610c33e71b387baad
    44da57a7877d0b33183ab8fb7c407ec286bac14e
    describe
    virus check
    '102063' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile52' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
    cb4d9871c9f20dc3b0b8289204300f07
    e686d6f9de227eb756b666198617dc9323c1409b
    describe
    virus check
    '739837' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile53' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
    655b7278ff5948e91d2ddc3677ba9fe4
    34b8ff1e0160af7ddd0c8f2b1248914f6b10a569
    '2014-05-23T21:02:27-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:56-04:00'
    virus check
    '79562' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile54' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
    71c4dfd40809963f562056e296b8f38c
    517a2c34210a6a93414a3d36b56814a0530d963a
    describe
    virus check
    '701540' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile55' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
    cb3b390b7e346251d8ebd28578db29f8
    ccd89b470a069c5413c67f27544daa5d3ca3b088
    '2014-05-23T21:01:57-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '76061' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile56' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
    4be7405a3c100d2aa0eb02dfc0d16314
    4210cb96f20d7891821168ebdacb2f56d8d1c9ac
    describe
    virus check
    '711748' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile57' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
    13bfc42d4b6b9f7ede85e0b803c90fe2
    ed7fa28118658ff60aae434bb50f6060ee5790ba
    describe
    virus check
    '72175' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile58' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
    db2cc8171610e5e433234fe1c9214201
    ab70f6d934b08d7b66413a637bf2c6d8ac39b8d7
    describe
    virus check
    '768770' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile59' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
    f0d38b1147336064f64625582755a22c
    66c878c29eab8858e60132d05b348ed3b636b63e
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:17-04:00'
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile6' 'sip-files00006.tif'
    23de6c7305845aa887934e1641569410
    a4f3ab4e663a5212b3a59523ecce75e902db1582
    '2014-05-23T21:02:38-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '94406' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile60' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
    6eae68fc8edbef88a95b57e16a2c2ba5
    fca0f68caa183ed148b6ff3e625232ea1c5e0e8f
    describe
    virus check
    '783102' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile61' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
    3ad6ed9a29cd2323ed944beccedd6c50
    883950a9fefec617de094a7410912912dcb5b6b4
    describe
    virus check
    '77155' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile62' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
    ac4545196d96324087cfabc110db896c
    bebe06f02f187f356cf53601efad3602deba193c
    describe
    virus check
    '784194' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile63' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
    1d653c05adb97a73c0294af4f194a980
    ec888f0e001036274af4b77d042e4bea03b462ea
    '2014-05-23T21:02:42-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '80514' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile64' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
    9798901ab721c46abf4c3663b3bcf11a
    005bd26e2ab2bed4672e4e3b4a75a54746f30701
    describe
    virus check
    '41224' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile65' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
    521a6adc93684a8dbab8af27f3ee859f
    fecf20a6f9359aa2e29abca6de36253242db41a0
    describe
    virus check
    '17348' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile66' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
    c6e06b8e29e29c8270f759056d6ff62a
    e361d36e1526c87fdfa30374db91da4d95ec37c6
    '2014-05-23T21:02:02-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '17422' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile67' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
    b82ef86615459ddd70ba10cb2ec4ec40
    191d14302cae308a7770cf0599838f6e7652103c
    describe
    virus check
    '18115' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile68' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
    f302726e8e821ce1970723a00765fc2a
    6cafeb76ddfba94e30d49cca98736b69724615ea
    describe
    virus check
    '17919' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile69' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
    62c0d40661fd2e653650f10a92104d91
    ef146ac13ac8df7de0cc11e9f9008ec629e6de6b
    describe
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile7' 'sip-files00007.tif'
    56f768af4bbb15606d736081020d4cd3
    4976606783d643cb18ab097552d18838ac02df69
    '2014-05-23T21:02:46-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:34-04:00'
    virus check
    '16790' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile70' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
    de98c1c37ad4b62498c0967e49da3941
    cf5e9f34e3bcf0b0121ba39b771390f0f153235e
    describe
    virus check
    '17248' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile71' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
    85ce859e831c09ddf0a83400107bd2f6
    fd8d944c1f23efbe1947edafbc5f0e2960666615
    '2014-05-23T21:02:06-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '16554' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile72' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
    ce8a71696930fcf54a236032c5cda6e3
    c36ac5d6c9dd1e35493195607088a470a09d8aa9
    describe
    virus check
    '28225' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile73' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
    cf3b44f173c66bee2385a36175b69b5a
    6e52110fc75f6905506925003fd4f1cafebf1f43
    describe
    virus check
    '43020' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile74' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
    745cba7fb536e1e7c5de825fe1bbc937
    ef5a777261ce794db735a3d9158579269d4ab1e4
    describe
    virus check
    '18587' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile75' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
    7ad90e228a03cd8bc6df66df4c3a79c4
    e8e5e757190790cc8d016cd7765a6b4a82866cd7
    describe
    virus check
    '18355' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile76' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
    896e546084bed54fdf51011cc087b362
    41ba8d9588cb68f51b120455f30ce6908f0dcc60
    describe
    virus check
    '16904' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile77' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
    01ec9e7ba396aedfaba15c671261ef81
    53a85cc4292b162ef1940647772e298c14a01644
    describe
    virus check
    '38129' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile78' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
    41d44b0bde812ddd999126b9dc9c8db9
    10f9ef089ebbd9a26e9f9e3343bc6ce3fe626dac
    describe
    virus check
    '17060' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile79' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
    b26b8e0bbabeafdc20ee99cb07d74891
    cf8347239702e54c6237a3258870295a8485137b
    describe
    virus check
    'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile8' 'sip-files00008.tif'
    b2af1684f799d98aaf96fbae85bca003
    fd0d8b390f539cd9b35faaf408e8d1a62e114213
    describe
    virus check
    '18727' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile80' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
    45db6c8982ef716e4b1d5a607904a58c
    3b18b6cda9149bd8ca351c585888f3673553c056
    '2014-05-23T21:02:11-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '273606' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile81' 'sip-files00001.pro'
    6e55717215ecc5fa9a9bbfbe1cbaabc5
    54eca60c9f33c172c6e46a7a327557e85fc1e2e2
    describe
    virus check
    '320947' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile82' 'sip-files00002.pro'
    e32edc73202bb908d7ee7d02cb780bdb
    9ee4f010833cba10fe917c2c35e864169b65d981
    '2014-05-23T21:02:12-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '255778' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile83' 'sip-files00003.pro'
    9a4ebea70db1da4254a324da50df6ae5
    367729f008db43bcbbbeaa3c4a6bfcb4def0f9aa
    describe
    virus check
    '168225' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile84' 'sip-files00004.pro'
    43038431de0f928018bbeec8143ea7cb
    f802328cc1ac15a8dd27f5a1f13f838312426451
    describe
    virus check
    '191297' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile85' 'sip-files00005.pro'
    ff2aec945cf5799e40196847a6cfd894
    0214904d24fb4a1b2f78cd7efdc9d218b10f7ede
    describe
    virus check
    '220681' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile86' 'sip-files00006.pro'
    e8814d7ec0f0f1132de73d38b68eaebb
    eb569d8733b511efc3af312d35b6df916216e46e
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:00:28-04:00'
    virus check
    '264632' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile87' 'sip-files00007.pro'
    dfa13bb5a615dffd2dd8018c65313fa4
    1e5dc63c10032f1ed2b7604e3af86db500debecd
    describe
    virus check
    '64230' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile88' 'sip-files00008.pro'
    b291d2058b888662279644c0a1ca653a
    9ac5e4a4cfe9c1a674b02edffb90fe624876bec5
    describe
    virus check
    '16122' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile89' 'sip-files00009.pro'
    0ead0e2d75a737ed9af4e900fd205f1a
    3dd8faa2e181fc122a8e7714ba957f7ed745e0b8
    describe
    virus check
    '49846432' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile9' 'sip-files00009.tif'
    926f706beeed9e32c25f787a118b671c
    c1e236c433425be6036a4d6b565869f108045198
    '2014-05-23T21:02:30-04:00'
    describe
    '2014-05-23T21:01:07-04:00'
    virus check
    '128793' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile90' 'sip-files00010.pro'
    880f493f24dd3927d76ef2fa44d698f9
    ab46b648505dcafac4bd4ce2fe1fb99751e90362
    describe
    virus check
    '160513' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile91' 'sip-files00011.pro'
    5fb9cd460175e1b292c4586a86926abf
    181edbf94f86aa663b6ec053b0ea4518acc829c2
    describe
    virus check
    '188074' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile92' 'sip-files00012.pro'
    47135f81eaf9455a976ca1fd7ad6b201
    e3f7d0ec25845bbe05e48f8201c357f088067842
    '2014-05-23T21:01:54-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '206074' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile93' 'sip-files00013.pro'
    377d5a5dcbdb512ca7fbcdc89c351ecc
    a4293eccddb5f49c2ebf00905966b328243b04c2
    '2014-05-23T21:02:52-04:00'
    describe
    virus check
    '281785' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile94' 'sip-files00014.pro'
    a9e78f8a8f4f7d1141fa4eea2d7aff2f
    f14155304ace3490eabbda33f431d63cbf52f856
    describe
    virus check
    '312994' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile95' 'sip-files00015.pro'
    c697cf11afb17d7755a1b5dbe4372367
    fdef19e69b7596fea9a067adf8318fe916f39b26
    describe
    virus check
    '198622' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile96' 'sip-files00016.pro'
    100b5f0914db9c27ca0424c73b82c634
    7e883fad4053e740638419e58cc1b6c30b945fd6
    describe
    virus check
    '10927' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile97' 'sip-files00001.txt'
    bf47142b22ab55b3d091637a9a22d042
    59c8089deaf456d6154b886276ef8dd461edf4a9
    describe
    Invalid character
    '2014-05-23T21:01:35-04:00'
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '13226' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile98' 'sip-files00002.txt'
    e44d45ce3c179b8d2f282680a74f3e15
    7681db70b4ab714377d742cb0cc7983479d68e49
    describe
    Invalid character
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character
    '10516' 'info:fdaEEVG98TWW_XI3DNNfile99' 'sip-files00003.txt'
    fb3a8c8b3ddff44cd9576d082b15e131
    7c78dbfaf768a7bb02d6ed8f363c7c41e1035b4d
    describe
    Invalid character
    virus check
    Invalid character
    Invalid character


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