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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00368

Full Text


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hS.


THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER.


Port au Prince Republique d'Haiti


Telephone 2061


SUNDAY, MAY a27n m1ao


From the Montrosier Dejean Family Album
HAITIAN MOTHER OF NINE '


Mrs. Montrosier I. jean Ideal
Symbol Of Haitian Motherhood


Mother! The power of her love
and the ;instinct to protect her
children sets this divine creature
apart from all other beings. Mo-
ther's love is beyond all human
comprehension, impossible to
weigh or measure, too complex
to analyse, and without which
the world would cease on its
axis.
In appreciation oF mothers
everywhere, the nations of the
civilized world long ago decided
to dedicate one day out of the
year on t hich open homage
might be paid to them.

BELL BURGLAR

BEHIND BARS
Orena Montilus was seriously
wounded Friday while resisting
arrest and is now recovering
in Jail. A watchman caught him
in the yard of Mrs. Lucien The-
beaud in Lalue, at 2:00 a.m.,
breaking into a tool and cons-
truction materials warehouse.
Montilus gave the watchmafn
cdeux coups de baton and after
being wounded in the ensuing
fight escaped. He was caught
running away.

A plumber who quit his work
a year ago to enter the house-
breaking trade. Montilus has been
on the police records three times
in the past. His most tmemora-
ble) arrest followed his stealing
of the bell of the College of
Port-au-Prince on April 16, 1956.

SAILOR DROWNS

Tertulien Alexandre drowned
last week when the sailboat <.Sain
te Helene,> was wrecked off the
Ile La Tort'ze after leaving Port-
de-Paix. The 35-year old sailor's
body has not been Ifound. The
other passengers were rescued
and sent to Cap Haitien.


Haiti, land of sublime sent
ments, joined in the movemer
back in 191.9 when two of its lead
ing poets and writers, Charle
Moravia and Felix Magloire ins
pired the people with their vei
ses in favor of Mothers' Day. Tb
spirit went deep into the root
of the nation, and the last Sunda
in May became a National obsei
vance. The Government agencies
supported the movement by lowe
ing the tarif fdr special Mothers
Day greetings wired through th
Telegraphes-Terrestres Servic
throughout the Republic. Special
ceremonies became the vogue iL
our schools, churches and clubs
The Press exhorted the public
(Continued on Page 2


HAITIAN AMBA
GRFATER WORI
BALTI'TORE, MD.- eWe all
have need of one another what
ver our power,: Haitian Ambas
sador Mauelair Zephirin warned
Wednesday, May 9 as he pleaded
for a new kind of solidarity among
nations based on peace, friend-
ship and understanding.
M. Zephirin addressed an as-


AssStant Professor of English
Richard A. Long,
presided over rite meeting.


I


VOL.' VI


NO. '3O--"=


---------------- -- --------------------- --------------- ----------------------- -------- ~ ---A----------my-----_ __ IA-* -- J AW. J J~ '


11


TONiGHT

TTO LA SITUATION
HOUNFORT TO ='.

THEATRE D'HAITI Port-auPr.ince's Chief of Po- Colonel Prosper said that thei
lice, Colonel Marcaisse Prosper, had been only. one grave ac
The Theatre d'Haiti presents summed up cLa situations in an dent,, fortunately without fA:
its popular actors group in a approximately 1300-word inter- consequences, caused by a gen
folkloric tragedy by F. Morisseau view published in tLe Matin,. darme who in order to free him
Leroy tonight at 6:0 p.m The Friday morning. Bringing facts self from tne rioting student.
show is under the direction of to light, the high-ranking Army had to fire shot. A student waf
famousCongo dancer and actress Officer and cCommandant du De- injured, and immediately tak-
Madame Renaud. partmenta, came out with names to the hospital where he receive
The 18 players, including which the investigation conduct- treatment from Dr. Denize.,
drummers, singers and dancers, ed by his Department since the veral teacher, and students. r
have been recruited among the student rising of May 17th has ceived slight injury during .t
peasantsvof Frere and Soisson, been able to turn up. Stating that hubbub, and the total number,
peasants theeead oso, ,? jj ji i i-.
nearby Petionville. Moreover, the the rumors of several dead and does not exceed 14 or 15. s
actors will give an exhibition of a great number of wounded dur- Elsa Theard, a Professor at thi
fencing with batons (Tird Baton), ing the fracas at Lycee Toussaint establishment who fainted dudi.
the popular sport in rural Haiti. Louverture were absolutely false, the excitement was taken t o t
the popular sport in rural Haiti. plrd
The play, cAnatole, tells the of the Chief o P6hce. ,"
story of a voodoo temple whichOMERhitalo f-,, pe.rn or
faing topiece because LATECOMER oth utionconce
is fllin to iece bec use I~ tported dead or wounded in 4h'I
Boute, the priest has used his ELECTROCUTED rpel d A s Co
wacon to do evil to a houngan Raid: UTNot a one.,
dedicated to, good deeds since
ATrican times. Cephie, Anatole's Joanise Mean was electrocuted w
mother stood up to defend the Sunday, May 20, while passing In his opinion, there was c
i integrity of the cult and passed through the cabinet making tainly evidence of a concert
t the acon, to her son. workshop of Hemmann Beaure- movement on the part of the st
SThere are women throughout gard at 8:30. He died instantly dents with regard to going oni
-s the play. Soune, who has left her Hermann Beauregard is under strike in the various Lycees 1.
s- (Continued on Page 20) arrest on charges of involuntary the Republic. He based this -a
homicide. sertion on the esynchronization
e Police investigations revealed of the movement, proof of a pr'
S JEAN LAFONTANT that Beauregard had installed an vious understand iFton. the.
SKILLED AT DAM electrical alarm system for the of the students. Further, 1"r
-KILLED AT DAM protection of his workshop. Joa- were two frothersm the Dec ,
s Electrical Foreman Jean Lafon. nise Mean died when he came in atead the head of the movement, pon
r tant was killed on the Peligre contact with the system's power in Cayes. and the other at Po
s' Dam sometime Friday morning supply. There was no explanation au-Prince. "
when asked whether thd". in-
e when a piere of a form fell 150 for his being in the building at When asked whether th6.4 i
e feet on to h-s head. Foreman La- t vestigation would lead him tei0
il fontant's bdy was brought to _____ ____________ ___ assume as much with regard to
n Port-au-Prince Friday for burial, those already arrested or being
S. This is the.tenth death in three FINDING OF ONE BODY apprehended in connection witt,
e mdntbs on the dam and the V[the movement, Colonel Prosper.!:
Fourth this month, according to PUTS SEVEN IN JAIL replied: cAlthough I am not iffi
informed sources, possession of sufficient elemerdi
Seven people were arrested to allow me to give a"' definite&
SSAD R A in Verrettes last week when the answer, I'can say that I do notS
SSADOR PLEADS decomposed body of planter Abel believe that all the groups rer,
Noel was found. When the body presentedd by ,the persons arrest..'
LD SOLIDARITY was discovered .late Monday af- ed had reached an agreement be-'
t e r n o o r, traces of cuts and fore gbirlg intd action; Apparent-
1 sembly at Morgan State College wounds were still visible. The Ci- o t a ait,
in the concluding program of a tyunds werm still visible. The Ci- ly, as istoften the case in Haiti,
- six-day symposium sponsored by ty Administration buried the bo- they wanted to seize the occasion :
I the Humanities Division of the dy after a legal -constat had favored by the state of efferves-',
SCollege on "The Arts in Haiti been performed. cence, to work, each independent-
SToday. As a result of police investiga- ly, for the triumph of their own:
Praising the college for spon- tions the followings suspects leaders. .
scoring the symposium, the Ha- were -arrested: Marismy Telus, As to whether he has been'-
tian diplomat declared that: Now Genois Gabriel, Precia CGedson, able to determine who are the':
more than ever, it is becoming Mr. Fleurilus, Alcine Artilus, Me- members of the Haitian Revolu-
evident that, to whatever group risme and Nermous Aldus. tionary Committee responsible..:.
we belong, we cannot maintain for the distribution of numerous.'.
an attitude of indifference to tracts, the Commandant stated: .:,
the fate of others and still re- *Information obtained by the Po-.
main blameless.* lice from reliable sources points
He said that the c o01 e g e toW.indsor Laferriere, Alex Do- .
through the symposium is giv- minique; Lucien Daumec, Datoa.'
ing a "much larger audience than Daumec, Jacques- St. Lot, and:
its enrollment the lesson that .... ... Paul Blanchet. The latter two'
&the realities of the modern eco- have been apprehended, while
nomy, the staggering progress the others, to use the words of
of science, and the demands of His Excellency, the Preside4T of
an art of strategy that has had the Republic, have judged it
to revise its concepts, reveal the more courageous to go into hI- :
oneness of the world more than ing.
ever and force us to recofisider
the criteria of importance, the The Colonel further declared: .
falseness of which two world ca- "Naturally, in view of the perso
tastrophes and several years of Willcoxes ready to return to Ca- nality, let us.say mince* (slim),
cold war have shown., racas. Note Baby in Back-Park. .
(Continued on Page 13) (Story on Page 14) (Continued on PAge 20) .;
,:=.4
--4





PAGE 2 '


IMRS. MONTROSIER DEJEAN IS SYMBOLIC

OF HAITI'S PROUD MOTHERHOOD


to honor its mothers on that day,
With visits and gifts of gratitude.
The custom of wearing a red flo-
wer if we have the happiness of
enjoying her presence still, and
a white flower if our hearts were
!'heavy with her loss, was adopted.
.The 4Fete des Meresv became
mone of Haiti's most beautitiful ma-
nifestations..
S.Symbolic of Haitian Mothers
K' In observing the tradition this
nyear, we sought a personality
whichh would exemplify the Hal-
tflan mother in every sense of
Athe word. We discovered our.
"ideal in a lovely old home in
p9is Verna's Ruelle Jeanty, the
Xt epal mother embodying all the
jaquisites of the supreme role of
woman.


(Continued from page 1)
Mrs. Montrosier Dejean is the
former Maria Parisot, one of the
three daughters of Mr. and NIrs
Lherisson Parisot (Madame nee
Julie Coby). Wearing motherhood
as a soverign wears his crown,
she is the mother of nine living
children, and presides over the
home of a family that has given
the country two priests, a famed
young musician and outstanding
members of the business and
-social world.
As a student of Sainte Rose de
Lima, at Lalue in Port-au-Prince,
Maria was remarked for her
quiet beauty and distinction.
Fair of skin, and delicate of fea-
tures, class mates recall the stri-
king young woman of the abun-
dant black locks who was an hbo-


,! .HAPPINESS PILL, EQUANIL.

TAMING HARASSED HOLLYWOOD
By Kendis Rochlen Of course, use of this etran-
Mirror-News Columnist quilizerv isn't restricted to Holly-
fl Hollywood, a town where chic woodites lone. One doctor tells
littlee pillboxes are as standard me he's been prescribing it for
'accessory as a mink or a Cad, such patients as harried business
.o.1on a great new kick. men, overworked mothers and
r .Thei glamour folks are going in even a few underpaid newsmen.
ig for a little white, tablet that's The nice thing about the drug,
be hottest item to hit medical he says, is that it had n6 undesi-
4Srcles in years. rable side effects and is not ha-
SIts trade name is Equanil.'Doc- bit forming.
J'ots.describe it as a new type of
'.?anqulzing drug, effective in THE WAGS A1OUND the gla-
t.sening anxiety tension and maur circuit refervto it as ethe
uezital stress. happiness pill). I was discussing
'.nD IF THERE'S anything this current rage with an dld
this movie business needs, it's a Hollywood hand at a recent cock-
little tranquility. Once you're tail party.
.big enough to be csomebodyui in You know how it goes in this
p ifmtomwn you've just got to be town,) he shrugged.
.kbee-deep in tension and mental cThey all used to go for cup
.d enotio,7al stress. The anxie- pills or down pills).
.Erof trying to make it to the top Now it's the don't give-a-darn'
is4i elaced by the anxiety of pills.
wwonering if you're going to stay With that, the lad pulled i tiny
Ce. silver box out of his pocket. Ex-
X1,-:So, big names and little alike cuse me, he said tranquilly, ; ave'been loading their trusty time for me to take mine.
j.,pilboxes with this little wond- Another guest at the party
V -.er tablet, at the cost of appro- told me that one of our top TV
1.-xhipately 12 cents apiece. In comedians has left a standing or-
tiact the demand has been so der it Schwab's Drugstore for
..:,great that some large pharma- all the tablets they can get'.
Scies have had to ration the As any member of the pillbox
;stiiff and fill only half of a set can tell you, it's considered
K., prescription at a time. terribly chic to get your supply
'ALDRUqSTORE at the corner of from Schwab's.
SSunset Blvd and Gower St., deep OF COURSE, IT'S nice that
,bin the tension belt, has a great the ulcer crowd has found some-
'Tred sign spladshed- across its thing to ease anxieties and ten-
tfront window. *YES, we have E- sion. But I hope they don't carry
:quanillh it proudly proclaims, this tranquility a bit too far. If
.::This maker% it nice for those toil-: gals like Zsn Zsa 16ad up on the
,ing.at a nearby. Columbia, RKO'stuff, what will we have to
^snd CBS. write about? -


JUST ARRIVED
:.FOR MEN SPORT JACKETS
B.ATHING TRUNKS
RAIN COATS
NECK TIES
SPORT SHIRTS
FOR WOMEN THING SUITS
I INING COATS
1 STOCIiNGS AND
FINE QUALITY
NIGHT GOWNS
FOR CHILDREN -- SPORT JACKETS
SBA THING TRUNKS
WHITE SHIRTS
LONG LEAVES


nor graduate, and who chatrined
them with ner piano playing. Her
marriage to the young business-
man, Montrosier Dejean on
November 28th, 1923 at Eglise du
Sacre Coeur de Turgeau was a
great social event, and on the
arm of hee handsome groom,
guests pronounced them the per-
fect match.

Besides lier musik the young
housewife showed talent for fine
sewing, ani quickly established
her ability in culinary art. TIM
couple adored children and hap-
pily welcomed their first bow,
Pierre, and. the young mother
eagerly began the career which
Is after all the most satisfactory
to which a woman can aspire -
that of raising her children and
at the same time proving a pre-
cious collaborator for the efforts
of her husband to form and edu-
cate them. Tne second boy, Rene,
and a third Yves appeared to
form a turbulent trio with Pier-
re. Soon a little sister, Simone,
arrived tj cause competition
among the little men of the
household each claiming priori-
ty in protecting the precious
bundle, When Lucien, Paul, ad
Michel joined the family they
were kept waiting five years for
the, arrival of little Philippe. Cla-
moring for another little sister,
the boys were rewarded when
baby Marie-Rose brought the De-
jean clan 'ip to nine.

Meanwhile, the gentle mother
had established a principle in her
home, although she kept a numb-
er of servants, never once did she
confer one of her little ones to
the care of a nurse. She conse-
crated herself to caring for them,
personally, and took joy in the
multiple tasks which absorbed her
in filling the needs of her large
family. She flatly refused to leave
the children, and perferred to sa-
crifice the trips abroad that her
husband's situation could afford
her while the seven boys and two
girls were growing up.

Excelling in the art of being
a mother, the perfect wife,, and
practical nurse, she weathered
the difficult, days, remaining com-
petent and cool in the face of ill-
uess, tirelessly administering
their wants and comforts, and lo-
ving them the more for it.
A fervent Catholic, Mrs. Dejean
took her children to church regu-
larly. athrd procured for them the
spiritual guidance necessary to
their formation. The long years of
schooling and its problems pass-
ed agreeably in the Dejean house-
hold, and with her husband, Ma-
ria followed their children's stu-
dies closely. They wanted each


child to develop its individual per-
sonality.
Growing up with her children,
Maria was the friend and confi-
dant of each of them, and their
home became the cult of the fa-
mily. An atmosphere of culture,
end beautiful surroundings with
mother ever present drew the
children home when they might
heve erred from the fold. Mother's
quick understanding and wisdom,
her firm. hold in their lives gave
them confidence in the future and
in themselves. She was -their idol
and their home was a shrine. The
Dejean youngsters wanted to
make her proud of them.
Today, the silver-hair cropped'
close, the eyes sparkling with
pride, the beauty has not faded
from the person of Maria Parisot.
Dejean, after thirty-three years of
marriage and nine children rang-
ing in age from 30 to 15. robust
in health, the years have taken
little from her physical and mo-
ral well-being. She takes pride in
her daughter-in-law, Anne-Marie
Tribie who is Pierre's wife. The
church and the nation bless her
for giving two of her sons to pri-
esthood. Yves 28 and Paul 25 are
valued members of the Order of
Oblats, at Port-Salut and at Camp-
Perrin, respectively. Pierre 30 and
Rene. 29 hold enviable places in
the ranks of the Capital's busi-
ness lions. Simone is the charming
young collaborator in the firm
of Rene and Roger Armand, Lu-


cien at 26 is carving out a career
in the Fiscal Department of Ban-
que-Nationale. Philippe 18 is do-
ing his -Rhetorique at St. Louis
de Gonzague, and fifteen-year-old
Marie-Rose is doing her first-year
at Ecole Elie Dubois.
MICHEL DEJEAN.
At the age of 23, Michel has
already established himself among
the country's finest musicians. A
pianist and composer of 'mark,
he has, in a few short years, or-
ganized his friends into a local
choir of such powerful propor-
tions that he is winning fame. for
Haiti abroad, and is considered
one of the country's leading tou-
ristic attractions. The Michel De-
jean Choir has won favorable
attention from the leading music
critics of North and South Ameri-
ca.
On this day dedicated to mo-
thers, Mrs. Montrosier Dejean who
has always placed the education
of her children and the fireside
of the home above all else, will
be honored with two young future
prelates of the Catholic Church, a
future star in international music
circles, two future scions of the
country's business world heading
the happy group of children who
gather in the familiar surround-
ingb of the Ruelle Jeanty Villa to
try to express their gratitude. The
nation may well be proud of Ma-
ria Parisot-Dejean as it pays ho-
mage to its mothers today. She is
a symbol of Haitian motherhood!


FOR COUPLE OR SINGLE, CHILDREN WELCOMED
In beautiful surroundings, swimming pool, etc.
Reasonable Rates Impeccable Service.
Apply Mrs. Miyrto Mackenzie (Vve. A. Casimir)
Address: Maison Claude Roy in Canap4 Vert
(Near Liberian Legation)


?APSS
/07P -PW __ GI
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*; I


HAITI SUN


PAG 2HAIIUNSUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956






SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956

V(
THE PRESIDENT'S SPEECH (d

TO THE HAITIAN PEOPLE an,
uni
foi
People of Haiti: cit
an
ed
As you know, for the past several weeks, a state of confu- De
sion has been settling down over. the country which we have da
chosen to systematically ignore so long as it was merely man- HI
ifested in the columns of certain periodicals, the publication
of which we have tolerated, in spite of the. veritable appeals Co
to sedition which they contained, and this to clearly mark our by
respect for the liberty of expression. Si<

But since May 15th last, emboldened by the calm of the
agencies authorized to maintain' order, a calm which they
have perhaps taken to. mean weakness, the same politicians res
who have always watched fo. the least occasion to provoke ing
disorder-behind the veil of-which they hope' tograb the Pow- pr,
er, have judged the .nomemt opportune "to dok their deeds.
Taking up their traditional method which exists of. ]keeping be
to- the shadows, all in exposing, criminally,' f(Ew iunfortun- aI
ate or innocent people to the regrettable but just intervention
of public forces, they have caused .young school children to be
take to the streets in shouting in seditious terms, after having
broken desks, chairs, and furniture in their establishments,
while tracts. of an incendiary nature coming from an alleged th
Comite Rdvolutionnatre Haitjen*, were being s c a t t e r e dpu
throughout the city,.ineiting'tle students of the University,
the public transportation chauffeurs,the businessmen and an
the people to' support the students' strike in view of paralyz- th
ing the very life of the nation. Not content with having been e
able to create a certain state of agitation which had repercuss-
ions rather more in the minds than in the economic life of to
the country, they have dared to perpetuate veritable acts oft
terrorism: A soldier of the district of Petionville, assaulted r
during the night of May 19-20 by two unidentified individuals, or
received a bullet from a revolver in the hip; the next day, the art
sentinel on duty at the Cuban Embassy was pelted with stones ti.
causing hip to lose consciousness, while at Cap-Haitien this p
same day a minor, Thimon Innocent; along with his broth- ly
er the well-known agitator, Liie B. Innocent, entered the bull- a
ding of. the Philippe Gderrier Lycee and was apprehended ac
just as he was about to light a torch to the gasoline-soaked
corner of the .building. On the Peltionvfle road, early yester- t
day mohi'ng, 'bottles filled with kerosene were hurled against se
the camidnnettes that transport passengers between Pdtion- au
Vile and Port au Prmince for:the purpose of intimidating the
chauffeurs wh.o have refused to follow orders to go on strike. c
At Jacmel, Aux Cayes, Port an Prmce and outlying districts, ir
families 'have been threatened, the peasants, men and women, m
are disturbed by emissaries sent out everywhere to try to prey- th
ept their'coming into the cities and thereby provoke a short, t
age of food. These numerous attempts at disorder, not having d
the effect counted upon, the latest consign is to set fire to
the sugar cane fields of the Plaine du Cul de Sac, and in the D
toiir corners of Port au Prince, particularly in industrial est- ce
iabiishments. f.
it


HAITI SUN


VOTING FOR
ETAT DE SIEGE))

The Chamber of Deputies
d the Senate voted almost
animously Monday, May 21,
r a Etat de Siege in the
ies of Port au Prince, Cayes
d Jacmel. One Senator vot-
against the Presidential
ecree, dated May 19, Satur-
y, at the Legislative Palace.
ELD IN ABEYANCE
The following clauses of- the
institution are held in abeyance
the law leclaring a aEtat de
ege .,.
ARTICLE 10) Paragraphes
2-3-4
No one mqy be prosecuted, ar-
sted or detained except accord-
g to the Unw and the forms it
describes.
Arrest and detention will only
carried wut on the warrant of
legally competent magistrate.
In order t0at the warrant may
carried out it must:
1.) Formally express the reason
r detention and the article of
e law which prescribes the im-
uted fact.
2.) Be presented to the accused
id a copy of it must be left with
e accused at the time of its pre-
ntation, except in the case of
'lagrant delit.z
The use of unnecessary force
arrest or detain the accused
id the use of mental pressure
Physical brutality particularly
the time of the interrogation
re forbidden. The injured par.
es may appeal before the corn
tent courts, without previous
Srequesting permission to do so
against the authors of any suck
lt.
ARTICLE 11.) No one whom-
ie Constitution or the law pro
ecutes may be diverted from the
ithority of the judges.
A civilian may not be tried by
ourt Martial, nor may a soldier
Sa solely civilian case, be re


ioved from the jurisdi
ie civil courts except
Etat de Sieges, has beei
declared,
ARTICLE 12.) The vio
)omicile and the siezur
laments may only be car
allowing the law an tli
prescribes.


The reason advanced for justifying these subversive man- ARTICLE 23.) In those
oeuvers is that my mandate, contrary to the provision in the nal cases determined by
Constitution of 1950, the Supreme Law of the land and our trial will be by jury. Pol
supreme guide, expires May 15. 1956, instead of May 15, fenses committed in the
1957. 1 will not delay in emphasizing the fllogicism of such an any other way will be t
assertion, above all that those who have expressed it allege jury.
their respect of the Constitution. and, they say, have no other ARTICLE 24.) Haitian
fear than that of seeing me myself violate it 'at the expiration may assemble quietly
of my mandate. arms, even to discuss
matters, complying with
SConfronted with such a situation, the Government 'which regulating the use ot U
has always had at heart, the maintaining of peace and public without however previous
tranquility in order that the true people which we have al- ing to request permission
ways been happy to find with us under all circumstances, may so.
go about their business, freely, and continue to benefit from This disposition does n
the light of instruction and a constant raising of their stand- to public gatherings wh
ard of life, has judged it necessary to claim from the Legislat- main totally subject to
ive Corps., the suspension of several Constitutional guarantees lice regulations.
in order to be able to lay hands .upon.the.trouble makers who ARTICLE 25.) Haitian
have judged it courageous to-hide themselves. have the right to group
yes into political parties
This is', for me, the occasion to thank the Syndicates, the unions and cooperative
public conveyance' chauffeurs, the people of the Saline, of This right may not be
Morne-k-Tuf and of Bel-Air, the public :merchants, the busin-7 ed to any preventive mea:
essmen of the Capital and Provinces who have resisted all no one may be forced to
the pressure exercised upon them to force them to close the association or a political
doors of their stores, and in general all the live forces of the
country which have understood the meaning of union of the I a o
Haitian family which I have always preeonised and which Immigration Heminr
leads above all to the unity even of our cPatrie. My thanks To Report Foreigner
go out.also to the Legislative Corps idhich. making their own The Immigration Depari
the rights of the people, has ance again understood the sig- minded those concerned h
nificance of the patriotic steps taken bN the Executive Power, that Article 58, of the
and armed us to protect the workers, laborers and peasants September 19, 1953, perti
who turned a deaf ear to the maneruvres of the eternal mis- Immigration, is still in 1
contented. Article 58, reads as folli
nagers of hotels, family
ing houses and anyone
People of Haiti, your cause is ours. In acting against the lodging a foreigner .is bhe
seditious, no matter who they may be. with all the rigour law to advise the immigr
provided for by the law, is to safeguard the superior inter- 24 hours of the arrival c
ests of the nation which we have in view, it is your happiness, reigner. A fine of 100
the happiness of your wives and of your .children which we ($5) will be imposed by t
are preserving now on all the territory of the Republic a cli- Courts on anyone who h
mate of peace, of concord and of harmony, grossedd from the above


N.Y. PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN
PUSHING HAITI
Mr. Alain Turnier, Secretary
of Commerce, Mr. Pierre Ch-au-
vet. Director of the National Tou
rist Office, and Mr. Kurt Fisher,
President of the Souvenir Shops
Association. flew to New York


-PAGE S 3

plan. and bids on the construe- U
tion of the new American Emr-
bassy are on their way to the
United States State Department
this week for the selection of the
company to build the new Em-,
bassy. They were submitted last
Wednesday, May 23. ':


action of
w en a
n legally

lation of
e of do-
rried out BY EMILE ROUMER JEREMIE
ie forms ".
Laubacherie fait faillite min toute laubachiens Op continue
se crimi- japp6 pour l'ajan i'Etat qui lan'main yo. Christian Beaulient.
the law rer6 oun movement cote adversaires li joinde gamelle pouri
itical of- fourrer badigoinces yo. CU bizarre, people la pas janme cal'.
press or prend oun initiative sans que Gouverndment.pas voye ehaheeir;
tried by bourrique pou commander. '
Malheur education de base la, c'est que yo remette techni:-
citizens cal analphabetes moyens pour rever a oun etat que male eon-.
without 1gres yo r6l desanalphabdtisation. -. 1 -
political I .. '." '"-
the laws Chaque langue gain oun gen pou yo 6epel6T. Mthode phb:i-I
his right nitique ce oun stupidit6I lan Cereole, langue roane, langue>"
isly hay- qu'ap sonnin ac toutes racines latines liyo. : : '
)n to do Oun prosdlytisme imbecile pousser d6 vagiies blanks ecrt:
langue nous ac lettres angI6, on b tise mld.'a'"mdchancete.
ot apply Facultds M6decine t6 dou6 observer moune fou qi'ap graviter.,
ich re- F'an orbite Nations Unies.. Gain de jean-foutus,-qui r6te de-
the po- vant toute oun assistance pou traiter moune. d!nbclles, igno-;
rants devant toute puissance science yo minme gros nbgm,',.
citizens pitites baron samedi, min .qui servi oun religion yo r6l1 pla-Ki
themsel- unification. Va qui gain gros appointments, gros frais, faif-
5s, trade frais main va pas vi6 oul deux gourdes pass devant yo.., .
societies. Oun moune pas besoin gain diplome university pou distfl- :
* subject- guer regles qui ressorti naturellement lan oun langue., EZr
sure and francs yo prononc6 fame pou femme min en ereole oun 6p.l-'
join an lation syllabiaue fern, fait prononcer fanme. A, done, m&e*.
party. 6criture a bailffle d e u x prononciations difffrentes. Flemmeli,
pomme cab servi come example. ..,
ds Lan oun l'icole, ti moune r6cit6 fable sans yo pas com-:e
prende ca yap di. Oun traduction ereole qui gardt presqune i:.
rs toute mots yo va mete pluss comprehension. Grammairiensw.
tment re- yo va remarquer en mgme temps que langue angl6 influx soum
his week creole de telle sorte que all beasts nous traduit en toute bItest
Law of signe pluriel la r6t6 plutot Ian substantifs.
gaining to .A.
force. LE RENARD ET LES RAISINS i
ows: 'Ma- :.
Sboard- Certain renard gascon. d'aut' moune di 1' t0 normand .
who is tap fine mouri grangou lor 1' oue enr'haut gnou treillt "
iund by grappes raisins mur appatemment ,1 .
ation'De- et covert ac oun peau vermeille. ''
if the fo- Galant a voloutiers ta prend yo pou repas IM .
gourdes min cbmnme i pa t' capable atteinde: ,
he Police -Yo trop rorotte. li dit. ca bon seul pou goujats. '., :
as trans- Li tW fait mieux pass61 t6 plainde. ..
article. N'est-ce pas que gain travail lan crioel Wk? ..
j';


tr





I

b!



W



ri


t
61
e







th
I


Wednesday morning to spend
two weeks .in the promotion of Architect C. Nelson Went- *
Haiti's Stateside publicity. worth, State Department repre-
Haiti's Stav~sde publicity. tl^^ ^
sentative in charge of the cons- .-
truction of the new Embassy, has -
CONSTRUCTION BIDS his offices in the Information ;
ENTERED FOR NEW Service building in the old Cul-t1
EMBASSY tural Attache's office. The re-,
mainder of the Information Ser-P.2'
Brown and Root, Frederic vice building is being torn down
Snare. and Langton Company this week.







:1.J
'"U




















HOLD THAT SMILE-Issa El Saieh, photographer, snaps a photo of,
three of Cuba's itop musical stars who have been entertaining in Haitij.,1
A big name in Cuba's world of the piano, and a big man almostary|
where, is Bebo Valdes on the far right. The lovely thrush in the center^
is Cuban TV Queen Maria Luisa Chorens, a great favorite in aidtL.1,
She said the Cabane Choucoune band is muy bueno, and should sooni4f
be on top of the musical world,. Rey Diaz Calvet, next to the photow,4,
grapher, is Miss Chorens' accompanyist and one of Cuba's ..greatest .:
stars behind a.piano. It's obvious to see he is enjoying his -workv. -
Miss Chorens and Calvet performed at the Casino and last Saturday;:^'
night gave an impromptu show at the Choucoun~e. y'-
.' .



.. .. - *:1..
,..



I.. ,1-.. ,



"-
A bg nme Cua wotl of Ah p tto an ~ a lot -.
where, i BeoVle ntefrrgt h loeytruhip h cner
isCuan'V uen aiaLusaCorns gea fvrie n tt':."





gahOLD THA SMiLsCoe-nsa'E Scmaniehphtogaph oer snuaps agphotosof.
sthree ofCbeida .i.'s 'tobmuicaosas who have been enteraiing mi Hait-.i.
AMigs namre ind Cua's e perdfoeda the piaino and albig manualmost st

Sihe saidte Caa nempomt Chouun band ise hoyuenou n desoul soon
be o to of he usicl wrlds He DisCavetnex to he .hot-,





-. PAGE 4 (HAITI bUN)

TI.BONE OFFICIAL GREETER
S 7vnaf-Jm V ,.-nt WITH MARTNE ACCENT
1JOsep iNElJJW If you contemplate a trip to
'"C Haiti get in touch with Ti-Bone.
.. Supreme Court Justice Regis
S O'Brien and Mrs. O'Brien recent-
-". ly returned to Buffalo, New
1h,,A a Y ork, from Port-au-Prince where
they visited the Haitian Supre-
___..._me Court and found everyone
m friendly to the United States.
i AcCess Rita Hayworth flew past going south to Trinidad to make ,Ti-Bone is an official greeter
H.the film -Fire Down Below.... Playwright Arthur (Death of a Sales- and guide for American tou-
4man) Miller. who was down here at the Sans Souci Hotel vacationing rists,v explains Justice O'Brien in
:t
I".a couple of. years ago, is reported 'Fiance' with Marilyn Monroe... a cBuffalo Evening Newso inter-
ICabane. Choucoune is changing its -coiffure.. The replacing of the view. 1' old straw with firm new ones was necessary because the new orchest- everyone knows him. He took
r .ra is so hot the old roof was beginning to smoke... Mothers be warned us to more places of interest in
|S there is an aviator who changes the color of his -Bogota- everytime a half-day tl:an we'd have seen
[it;he changes girl friends... Engineer Toulou Gardere, who has built in a week. His address is Box 721,
"-the country's first atom shelter, observed his birthday last Saturday... Port-au-Prince.
-.Jean Coradin. Haitian Ambassador in Monrovia, Liberia, arrived here Ti-Bone.:, explained the judge,
Wednesday on his yearly vacation... Mr. Isnard Mathieu, chief of sta- ewas employed by the U.S. Ma-
...tistics in the Department of Commerce, will fly soon to Geneva on u rines some years ago when they
UNESCO scholarship... Mr. Denys Bellandes moved to First Avenue administered the Republic. He
PZBolosse, the former house of Fouchard, Moulin h vent. Tel. 2758... speaks English like a Marine -
S"Mr. Ernest J. Yancey, Liberian Minister of National Education arri- very effectively.l.
:ved Tuesday with hisi wife for a month visit... Mr. Alberto Juan de -
p;Olivereira Cez&r, Charge d'Affaires a.i. of Argentina, and his 'wife, aSquire HU In Port
i-...will leave Haiti soon... It has been suggested that drivers of publi- Enroute To Venezuela
:city .camionettes- use microphones hung around their necks rather j Teaford of St Louis
k-han ones held in their hands... safer that way.., ropes about necks M.s onTfrdfSt ui
.%would be quieter... Another sailor's body being buried... Accilien Missouri, Misse Jackey Wilkinson ar-then
in te iiand Captain George Wilkinson ar-
gi.:Arehelus drowned when the sailboat .Angellus. wrecked in the port rived in port Thursday aboard tihe
.'of Anse Rodge... Last week's heavy rains caused the west side wall $120,000 yacht "Squire II. for a
Sof the Ste. Rose de Lima School in Lalue to crumble... The same rains two week visit.
-were giving traffic headaches on the Carrefour highway... Between Mr. Teaford, manufacturer of
e".Portail Leogane and -Source Sal0e, Public Works equipment was used aluminum furniture and alumi-
11'.to clear away the mud and gravel... The electrical plant of St. Marc nium venetian blind windows in
is Rearing completion now that the new construction material has Caracas, has been to Haiti several
a:ir..ved.. times in the past by air. Having
P.x x x International to sing on Tuesday visited Port-au-Prince and Pe-
I:,Mr.-Don Hansen of the U.S.O. and Thursday nights, tionville on his previous trips,
1 M., wife Eunice, and their three x x x he plans to fly north to Cap Hai-
.children (Dorice, Edwin and Che- tian and the Citadelle. Aiss Wor-
jryl Kay) will leave via the S. S. Captain Parke Simpson, of the then is enroute to Caracas to vi-
.:Pftanama on Monday evening May United Stares Navy, arrived in sit friends.
||28, on home leave in the States. Port-au-Prince Wednesday morn- The Squire [, 52 eet long and
!..-L-. Hansen has been here for Dng for talks with members of 16 feet wide, left Miami last
..lth'e past two years working as an the U. S. Naval Mission in Haiti. month and came to Haiti via Nas-
,Irrigation Agronomist and Soil x x x sau. In two weeks, when they
'Scientist with the Department of Mrs. Jessie Lawson Webb, U. leave the well-equipped ship will
,t:!Agriculture. The Hansens will vi- S. vice consul in Caracas, arrived head for Cuidad Trujillo, San
Aslt their family and friends in Wednesday morning from Mai- Juan, Martinique Guadeloupe, St
.Wyoanng, Utah, Idaho and Call- quetia, Venezuela. She was gree- Lucia, Trinidad and La Gnaira,
pforna before reporting to Wash- ted at Bowen Field by Mr. Ted Venezuela. The lovely white yacht
ington for re-assignment to Hai- Gross, U. S. consul in Port-au- is equipped with an automatic pi-
.i or elsewhere. Prince, lot an air cond it i o n i ng
Sxxx ''," xxx system, a 10 kilowatt engine to
Mr. Felix Diambois, lawyer- run the air cooling system and
i .Varie Madeleine Marcel wife of counsellor of Agriculture Bank, a 3i ton refrigerator. It has an
?singer-comp6ei' Guy Durosier, sig- arrived here Wednesday from a excellent radio and ship to shore
"'ned a contract with the Casino special mission in Limna. telephone.

n4
4N





4 N
U ..... \ o

SITS AMERICA'S MOST POPULAR CAR




AND THIS YEAR

IS 1956 .j

IS MEMOBABIE .IN CITEVROLET'S HISTORY
AS A WiFAR OF ACHIIIEVEMENT
SFOR THE BEST CHEVROLET YET,

SSEE THE NEW MODELS
SOCIETY HATTNNE D'AUTOMOBIL
(SHASA ) A









4 M~a..--.........


___________ SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956


I/H\ -HONEST RELIABLE SERVICE
Sc Y\- AFRE ESTIMtATE INs SeHOP
| \ REE'ESTIMATE IN SHOP


Esso B'
'<_-^HE35!^^^^l1'





SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956(HTSU)AE


HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly 'Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BEVNARD DIEDERICH
G ER.ANT.RESPONSABLE PAIUL E. NAJAC


ISOLATED BY IHE-'S OF BOCK AND
I-GH WATER BiZ(YlONIAN. PLEA!


If your heard a cry of Help* this week it didn't come from
a politician or a citizen caught in the telephone cable trench
.along with the mud. The cry came loud and clear from the
people who inhabit the island south of the Capital and com-
muters by way of the Bizoton road.

They plead &we have no road when it rains! The water
gushes down the hills dragging rocks and silt which is duely
cleared amay the same evening or the following day depend-
ing on the rain and the quantity of rock and earth it brings
down. Suggest the good citizens, whom you can now distin-
guish by the way they run for home at the least provocation
of rain.. .ers.>.

Trees are the answer for keeping the hills where they be-
long and not allowing them to slip down to sea via the Bizoton
Road but cannot the Public Works Department devise a
plan of canalization. It would save the road repair bill, the
shrinking mountains and bring peace and security to the
folks of the area.

GUINEA-HENS ENDANGERED

We want to point out to the Senatorial commission in
charge of thp study of the law project regulating hunting in
Haiti .- the current paretice of setting traps for wild guinea-
hems in the regions of Port-i-Piment dui Nord, Sources Chau-
des, Plaine de I'Arbre and Anse Rouge.

This method of trapping these birds is very simple. During
the chicken corn season the boys build ealoges in a garden
and sow grains of corn in front of the door to attract these
birds. Holding a rope, attached to the door of the ucaloge*,
they hide themselves and wait for the guinea-hens. When a
group of guinea-hens arrive and enter the acalogeN they have
only Co pull the rope to imprison hundreds.

Therefore it is a method of capturing abundant guinea-
hens and a means of exterminating guinea-hens in the regi-
ons. These birds attract, many hunters from the capital and
neighboring cities and now is the time to stop this practice
in the interest of our tourism.
(From an Editorial appearing in Le Nouvelliste* last week.)


CHAUVET PROPOSES U.N. STUDY

WORLD SISAL PRICE DECLINE


Mr. Ernest G. Chauvet propos-
ed that a special study of the si-
sal market must' be undertaken,
at the third Session of the Com-
mission. on' International Com-
merce and basic products at the
United Nations in New York. The
Commission finished its third ses-
sion Friday, May 18.
Mr. Chauvet, in making his
proposal to the U.N. group, said
,'The prices on this product have
constantly declined and this has
affected Haiti's economy.s In re-


ply, Commission President Go-
pala Menori (India) pointed out
to the Hairian delegate that tbe
Organization of the United Na-
tions for Food and Agriculture
(FAO), appeared to be compe-
tent in that matter. He then ask-
ed the Secretariate of the United
Nations to obtain a list of studies
already done on the market of
sisal, and to submit it to the Com-
mission in jts next session.
(Letters of the United Na-
tions on Friday, May 18, 1956.)


k aiasterpioce of tie Swiss Watch Industry
No. 1
OQU\TIJTY WATCHES SINCE 1791




GIRARDOPERREGAUX


Dear Mir. Diederich,
I have noticed several incor-
rections in the Sun in refer-
ence to Haiti's telephone system.
The U.S. Marines did not ins-
tall Haiti's telephones. Civilian
technicians did this work under
the direction of the Haitian pu-
blic works. I was here at the time'-
and recall thils quite clearly.
Also you mention that it was
the first installation of this type
in Ehe world. These type of atto-
matic telephones were in use in
the United States and several
other countries for many years
before being installed in Haiti.
Just thought I would straigh-
ten you out.
An Interested Reader
xxx
i
Editor, Haiti Sun,
The Florida Air Pilots Asso-
ciation iA making its plans now
for a mass flight to the West End
in the Gradirl Bahamas on July
7-8. This flight is being arranged
as an all-expense project, at a
cost of $10 per person, including
lodgings, fotld and entertain-
ment.
The Miami Air Pilots Assn.,
was organized in 1987 and incor-
porated in 1942 and re-named
the Florida Air Pilots Assn, A
non-profit venture its objectives
are to promote interest in civil
aviation in South Florida and to
arrange events in which its mem-
'bers may actively participate.
How are chances of having this
group participate in flights to
Haiti. These Flight associations


are constantly making trips to
Cuba, Nassau and other islands.
What is th i matter with bringing
them to Haiti. The next time
they fly to Cuba, let's get them
to continue down to Santiago and
across to Cap Haitian and Port-
au-Prince.
It will undoubtedly cost them
more ti'an $10 a person but spe-
cial discounts can be arranged
for them at local hotels.
What do your readers think.
Signed: An admirer of Haiti.
xxx
Dear Mr. Diederich,
A suggestion was recently
made to President Batista, of Cu-
ba, by the National Collegium
of Teachers of Design, Paintingi
and Sculpture that would defi-
nately be a boost for Haitian
art and artists if followed up
here.
The idea is for the government
to devote three per-cent (or even
less here in Haiti) of the value
of all public buildings towards
their artistic decoration.
This would mean a lot to your
artists and the expense could
be overcome by doing a little at
a time. Local businesses should
be made to carry out the same
projects.
An Art i.:jver


Take these fa


when you're shopi

7- ,: 1 ....
." s .,i "*.* f-' ., i .


NO TIME TO WORK
Statistics show that for every.
three days of work in Haiti there
is one day of rest.
The facts show: 28 holidays
per year, 52 Sundays and 15 days
of paid vacation by law, equal 95
days off a year. 365 days per year
with 95 of them vacation days
comes to three days of work and
one day vacation.
The figures grow worse when
you consider that banks close
on Saturday-52 additional days
off-and when a hlioliday fails on
Thursday and Friday all commer-
ce is shut off for four days.
MORE PLANES, MORE TRADE
Miami is the second busiest
airport in the United States.
Chicago's Midway Airport is
first with Miami's International
Airport showing an ever increas-
ig flow of traffic. New York is
further down the list of busy air-,
fields.
Miami's Airport recorded 276,-:
729 landings and takeoffs during .
1955 while 1954 figures showed
268,889 landings and takeoffs.:i
This shows an ever increasing
flow of flights in a southern di--.
rection towards Haiti-plus more i.
cargo going from Latin America
through Miami.


,'

icts Along
-. 1* .- ^ ?
~ ~ . ... ** * *

ping" for spares:i
_^ - tf ^ ". .., ''" ' .. "' 7 *



There's only one reliable, source for
Genuine Cdterpillai Spares..your ''
Caterpillar Dealer. "

*


Caterpillar alone has the experience in
research, metallurgy, manufacturing tech-
niques and performance.


You can't "look under the hide" when
you buy spares. Two parts which .lo6k
alike on the .surface may be vastly
different in quality and fit.


To be sure of performance, don't go "shopping" for bargains in spares.
Buy only Genuine Caterpillar Spares ..reasonably priced and ex-
pertly made.. from your authorized Caterpillar Dealer.


CATERPILLAR
REGISTERED TRADE MARK


.5i


- I


PAGE 5


(HAITI SUN)






PAGE 6 HAITI SUN SUNDAY, MAY 27th 71956:


"GRAND FETE DIEUn SPECIAL

EVENT FOR CATHOLIC HAITI

Catholics the world over ob-side to gather flowers. Tempera-
I: 'serve Corpus Christi Day in ho- ry wayside altars are arranged,
K. nor of the Blessed Sacrament, and many prepare an altar in
the last Thursday in the month their homes, with friends spend-
: of May. Haiti, a predominantly ing the night to help while
Catholic country, celebrates this others are on hand to sample sand
c' Grand Fete Dieu with special wiches, *liqueurs* and strong
M" asses. being said in every black coffee.


church and chapel of the Repu-
blic, and a traditional procession
filing through the streets of each
of the cities and towns.


The imposing cortege at the
head of the procession, with the
Archbishop, carrying the &Osten-
soireb (Monstrance) makes a co-


In Port-au-Prince, the Pontifi- lorful picture as he moves along
cal Mass precedes the Procession, under a gold canopy, flanked by
contrary to the practice in other two deacons. Altar and choir boys
t"b: wns. With the six parishes of carrying baskets of flowers walk
!- the Capital participating, thou- just in front of the canopy, and
sands of men, women, school a battalion of soldiers march at
- children and members of the va- the rear. As the procession files
rious religious orders march down the street, the Archbishop,
b hearing their banners and'flags, and in some cases the Parish Pri-
through the streets, est bearing the Monstrance pau-
ses in front of the creposoirD to
On the eve of the' traditional bless the kneeling crowd. Babies
Fiesta, everyone helps with deco- in homes along the way are held
Rating the town. Small school- up by their mothers as the Mons-
. boys, supervised by their tea- trance appears to receive some
chers, make treks to the country- secret blessing silently willed by


:GREAT UNIVERSITY URGED

S Suggestion Offered to Bring Americans Closer Together


:' WASHINGTON (UP) -
' Sen. Mike Mansfield, Montana
i .Deqocrait, has proposed that the
U.United States establish a univer-
S-sity ..of the Americas to be located
i:,in Puerto Rico.
S .angield made his proposal
S.uii a'Sefate speech in which he-
.. the administration to take
_b.umbew r of stops to strent.wn
S.bonds among the American repu-
.blics.
.A. great university of the A-
Sl..merias, --he said, can provide
'a focal point for deepening un-
: detstanding of the shared values
:of the civilization of the Ameri-
:cas 'ad ior 'eiilargiig the inter-
.- change of ideas, skills, knowled-
ge and achievements among the
American republics.a
\ Mansfield praised the good
neighbor policy* of the past. But
-.he suggested that in recent
Months United States attention
..has been more and more divert-
l.ed from Iati- America to the
trouble points of the world.

REDS EYEING LLA.
Mansfield warned that the So-
viet Union is directing an eco-
nomic offensive toward Latin
America and that the vast reser-
voir of inter-American goodwill
'has begun to run out. -
The Montana Democrat urged
the administration to stimulate
a good pa.'.ers,', policy to pick
up where tlih'Vood pplghbor pro-
gram let off.
Personal contacts such as those
established at the recent meeting


of the Mexican, Canadian and U.
S. chiefs of state, Mansfield sug-
gested, are not enough.
He urged the administration to
take steps toward- meeting the
sound capital import needs of
Latin American i cnfries s and
their requests for-expanded sour-
ces of credit in the United States.
He, also.placed emphasis on the
need for more intimate knowled-
ge of one another among the
American republlcs.
Nothing in this connection the
desirability of greater interchan-
ges of technical knowledge, art,
-literature and the sciences, Mans-
field sad ..
I should like to urge careful
exploration of the idea of esta-
blishing a great university of the
Americas in some centrally locat-
ed area, perhaps in Puerto Rico,
which is in many ways the con-
fluence of all the cultural influ-
ences which have shaped the Ame
ricans the European, the
African and the Indian.
aI know that there are many
difficulties inherent in this conu-
cept. But if it is a sound concept
ways can be found to surmount
the difficulties.*
Mansfield is known to have
become impressed with the Puer-
to Rican role in the U.S. Point
Four program. He recently sent
an aide to the island to survey
that program, under which the
Puerto Rican government contri,
butes toward the cost of bringing
to the islands trainees from all
parts.of the world.


CHRISTOPHE'S CITADEL
TOURS AND TRAVEL SERVICE
A visit to Haiti is not complete without a trip to the Citad-
el. We specialize in the Citadel Excursion. Sightseeing Toms.
Our Experienced Guides Speak English.
P. 0. Box 312











Phone 7161
Organizer of Tours in Haiti
Cohata-tickets on Sale at
Pdtion-Ville and Cap-Haitian
Offices


the heart of the mothers. Inva-
lids are taken to the windows for
a glance at the holy procession
and to pray for the miracle of
recovery. The very atmosphere
seems alive with the mysticism
.of the moment, and faith is sti-
mulated and strengthened.

The temporary or wayside al-
tars are dismantled after the pas-
sing of the Monstrance immedia-
tely afterwards in the Capital,
but in the provinces they are left
until noon. The day or prayer
closes with extra solemn vesper
services in the Parish churches
in the,'late afternoon.
This year. for the first time,
the tPetite Fete-Dieum which in
the past has always been observ-
ed the Thursday following Corpus
Christi day, on the eve of the
Feast of the Sacred Heart, will
not be celebi ated. Rome has drop
ped the ceremony from the new
Liturgy.

HAITI'S UNIQUE
AIR-CONDITIONED
COMPLETE MODERN
EQUIPPED BEAUTY SALON

Shampooing, tinting, permanent
waving.
Facial massage, manicure and
pedicure.
Your beauty care problems di-
sappear
at the Studio of
MISS PAULE DUNCAN
(Ecole Antoine 4e Paris)
(near Petit Four)
Assisted by:
Madame Dorothy Richard, Spe-
cialist
handling every type and class
of hair
needing hot combs and pres-
sea


DICTATOR TRUIL.LO HAS FAMILY
ON TOP FOR COMING ELECTIONS


Ex-president Rafael L. Trujil-
lo, who has been the power be-
hind the dictator's chair in the
Dominican Republic since 1930,
has announced his ticket for the
Republic's coming election -r-his
brother Hector for president and
his son Rafael Jr. for vice pre-
sident.
The elder Trujillo, who has said
he will not seek office, stepped

GtODETIC St 'RVE
47,000 DOLLARS !N
The Haitian-American Geode-
tic Survey group has just receiv-
ed $47.000 worth of photographic
equipment and materials for the
completion of its program of
'-urveying the boundaries and sub
division of land in Haiti during
1956-1957. fhis program is part-
ly financed by the U.S.O.M.,
Geodetic Survey group .
which has given $160.000 to the
In the bPlaine du Cul de Sac,


aside in favor of Hecto; In 1952
after serving as President for 18
of the 22 "receding years--from
1930 to 1938 and from 1.42 to.
1954.
Vice-presidential candidate Ra-
fael Jr. (Ramfis) is a veteran of
21 years of military service. The
27 year old Lieutenant General-
has been a general since the age
of 6 years.

GROUP GETS
EQUIPMENT
the Survey group is pursuing its
tri-angulation work,. Eighteen
stations will be built, c.;ifly In
the Trou d'Eau, Crochu. Dumpr-
nay and Jumecourt ajeas. 'In
Port-au-Prince and the sTuronnd-
ing area stations de reperagec
were built in the Place du'Vene-
zuela, Delma. Martissart, Des-
prez, Beau Site and Mcrne des
Enfants Perdue.


RK-225

AGENCIES OTIS McALLISTER, S.A.

AGENTS DE MANUFACTURES


YOUR OLD TIRE HAS A


VALUE AT


Trade in this .


YW w w0w. Ujir

YOUR OLD TIRE, .a-aad'kn

NO MATTER WilT IAM R. ONNW

WOR-OUT, eaetoie AatdaoANEw

%okw roTUCR OR TURISITr TIRE....





Fires$tone -

c-mfl~


SUNDAY, MAY 27th 956:


HAITI SUN


9
y
s
k

d
t
s


D


P -. .-----


PAGE 6




SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956


HAITI SUN


________________ PAGE 7


Jd ow EoerRu4e


MACHANN ACASSAN
By Franck J. Bailey

A strenghtening nourishment
to be found here, especially dur-
ing the corn season, is ,Acassanu,
a kind of nurridge made of corn.
Beside their clients, the corn
planters are the most interesting
people to the enterprising women
who prepare the -Acassann; that
kind of porridge hcs always bern
available all over the country.
The materials needed to pre;
pare it are: an empty five gallon
cooking oil pan in which it is
boiled, corn which the preparers
either buy at the markets or re-
ceive directly from the country,
pieces of wood which they very
often use instead of charcoal, -wat-
er, matches, naturally and a large
mortar in which they beat the corn
after boiling it. The' mortar is
equipped with two pieces of, long
wood with round ends which, is
used for beating the corn.
Noelzina, the former wAcassan
furnisher at a Sunshine. Home s
where your reporter was brought
up is the one he interviewed last
week.
Every afternoon, she puts the
necessary quantity of corn on the
fire and, when it is boiled, puts
it in the mortar, has two of her


assistants beat it and then mixes
it with water and strains it. The
trash is either given to chickens
or thrown away and the water is'
put in clean recipients. In the ear-
ly morning, the water is boiled
until it gets thick (about twenty
minutes) and sometimes vanilla


essence is added to it
be improved.
The what can be called


for taste to
boiled' on
a natural


stove; three stones are placed
one beside the other in such a
way that the pan may be placed
safely on them; between the
stones are placed dry pie-es of
wood in which they. put fire; that
is usually called cdu feu bois
(wood fire).
Noelzina prepares four pans
nf ,Acassans every morning,
three of them are sent to her re-
gular clients who own groceries
and the fourth one is kept in
front of her house where neigh-
bours come and buy it. Most of
the corn she uses is sent to her by
nags from Petite Riviere de 'Ar-
tibonite, her 'home town, she
buys corn at the market only
when her people are late in send-
Sng it to her after her stock has
been used. Three girls are em-
- played by her for taking the cA-
cassan to hex clients every mor-
ning, for tarrying it they have,
,ach one, a tbarque (piece of
"lat wood with borders) in which
the pan is placed, between each
girl's head and the cbarque is
a %troquette* (piece of cloth
folded up) which makes them feel
the weight a little lighter and
each girl has her own route. The
cash sales are made to those who
come to Nuelzina's house every
morning 9nd every month she
goes to her clients at their
groceries where she gets paid
for the amo u n t of Acas-
san delivered. Acassan is not
only found at the places
where it is prepared, certain
grocers like Noelzina's regular
clients buy it from the machann
acassani, every morning, stir' it
with milk, put it in twelve
ounce bottles, put the filled bott-
les in refrigerators and sell eauh
bottle for six cents.
There are two different ways
of spelling tAcassanm: the one
which we have been. using in
this story and AXK100N, this last
spelling is the one grocers use
on their sign-board.
Your reporter wanted to find
out from Noelzina, who was call-
ed by that name because she was
born on a Christmas day, what
benefit she gets from that kind
of work but she gave no exact.
anawes to that questionn; she
does not look educated enough
.q as to have a regular account-
ant .:sysfeiti but, as she told him,
the benefit she makes in one
xftpnth is always about the half
of what she usually spends for
the materials 'and the mainte-
nance of the administration and
the reasons for which her clients
prefer her rather than some
other #machann acassansa are
the sanitary condition in which
she works and the way she is
punctual ii all that she does.


LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES

SHEDOuTFIOO
q PLACE GEFFRARD e @


THE ONE AND ONLY




ti roro


and his magic drum
FEATURED BY
EL RANCHO HOTEL
every
Monday Thursday evening
Petionville
(Dinner-Dancing EL RANCHO)



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ACCURATE INFORMATION AT OFF
RUE ABRAHAM LINCOLN,
RUE ABRAHAM LINCOLN


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-PASSENGER .

ANAMA LINE .'
f. Y. CITY.












ICE OF PANAMA LINE ONLY
, TELEPHONE 3062
,"'. '


B^- Saitrfactt eon ..


Alexandre MouWZEA
E)PEPRT TAILOR.__
::" ,SPECIRLIZINO- IN MEN'S
\ 'WOMEN'S and CHILDREN'5 WEAR.
S,> uits fporPts wear'
Sflocks ,$hir'fts.



GRRND'RuEJFW71.(Porplto;il ,Joseph.) ______
T. 3873.-





4. 8'


fl0E ACCEPTS WITH PLEASURE


,IPANAMA MEET TEMPTING FOR Cosaques

.LATIN CHIEFS OF STATE TAri
c.it. t gives me great pleasure to the army which supports him ,,ei/3
Confirm my acceptance of your will welcome him home again,
...gracious invitation to attend the also decided to think it over. Bo-
;.,.meeting of Presidents at Panama livia's President Victor Paz Es- Em'np r
y on June 25-26, President Eisen- tenssoro who, like Odria, is pres- iia cisn
bower cabled to Panama's.Presi- iding over a presidential elec-
Sdent Ricardo Arias last week. The tion, might not make it.
acceptance wiped away any lin- Dominican Dictator Rafael Le-
gering" doubts about whether one onidas Trujillo probably cannot k ..C/he l, i co/tesZO//eS_
of the world's smallest nations go, though he loves to mingle
: /(pop. 900,000) could successfully with the mighty: of late it has
Stage one of the world's most im- pleased him to let his brother -
.pressive international gather- Hector stand in as the country's
wings. Other chiefs of government, President. Uruguay, which is ru-
:. hesitating over local problems, led by a nine-man National Coun-
-K. speedily gave in to the tempta- cil, will send the council's curr- Si
Stion to be nart of a historic mee- ent chairman, Alberto Zubiria.
ting. By th' end of the week, the The only official purpose of Blrd
Leaders of 16 governments said the meeting is to commemorate E ^^ ^S ^ ,
They would go. although some the 130th anniversary of Simon -
*-must still get the approval of Bolivar's first Pan-American con- gnvfr .lU K^J1V-l
,1 their Congresses before traveling ference, but it also seems certain 1
tz.abroad. to generate a fair amount of in- .16,u PVE S .
Iip
ternational understanding. Some r o 5
SOnly two countries formally old opponents will .presumably
.declined. Peru's outgoing Pres- have to shake hands. For exam- JWj J
ident Manuel Od.-ia is fully occu- pie, Costa Rica's President Jos4
Spiel with the ticklish task of (cePepev) Figneres, who has re- ATLAS
kr running off a presidential elec- portedly called Nicaraguan
tion in good order next month; Strongman Anastasio ( eTachoo ) Kerosene Refrigerator
'.Colombia's President Gustavo Somoza a #mountebanki and a
01Rojas Pinlla has to keep the lid gangsterr, will for the first time all Kerosense or Electrical
Z on dissatisfaction at home meet Tacho, who last year chal-
S Others were doubtful. Argenti- lenged Pepe to a pistol duel at
Sna's Provisi:nal President Pedro the border. A clue as to how the
SAramburu- who might run confrontations will turn out came
across ex-Dictator Juan Peron in from Tacho in his acceptance. I
Panama-withheld his decision am sure,* said he, that we PrL-
while he weighed the perils of -idcnts will all put forth our best
:'the Peronista plots that are end- good will to make the meeting
lessly brewing. Venezuela's Pre- a success.t
Ssident MfXlos Perez Jimenez,
w .ho can never be positive..that. '( Time Magazine)'


POkSSUmI PERPETUATES

S POLITICAL PERSIFLAGE

-bKEFENOKEE SWAMP, Ga., May 56 (By Special Correspondent)-
SThe campaign hat of Pogo Possum was thrown into the presidential '
ring today by a group of political well-wishers who unfortunately
forgot to remove the candidate from his lid. The Comic Strip charact-
er, who can count on a large following of sea gulls and other scaveng- IN PETIONVILLE
era, was not notice-ably disturbed. .I've been thrown before', he
4 remarked to a cheering throng of vireos, titmice, and lesser bobolink.__ -- --- --
In 1952 Pogo was thrown so far that he wag not even in sight on
Inauguration day. From a source close to the White House, (a mouse __ ___
who wished to remain unanimous) it has been learned that the
Swamp candidate showed up in time for the Easter Egg roll and was tC r
: promptly rolled for sixteen jelly beans, one hardboiled egg, and a r
chocolate rabbit. -They are playing SOME kind of a game, there at
: the Head Manse', said-Pogo, when asked for comment, 'but they ain't AcA lnf U n up t
playing POSSUM. Not fairly anyways.' r
SPressed for ideas on his platform, the Okefenokee citizen indicated CAll fo
"' that he was for a regular old-fashinoed flat-bottomed type platform WATER SYSTE I
Sfor use at land or sea. When a reporter asked if this meant he was a WATER S S
&: wets or a 'dry, candidate, the candidate replied that he was wet i, AM IMa
When it could not be helped but was normally as dry as a martini. i PLA NIR
"* Pogo departed with a motorcycle escort to keeps a date with a small We're at your m -
Sluncheon group of prominent catfish. trained to analiw y


HOTEL IBO LELE

The Management of the Hotel Ibo Lele takes pleasure in
' presenting to you the program of its Social Activities
f or this WINTER. "

SThe Shatigo Night Club

EVERY evening' except on Fridays, from 9 P.M. to 1:30 A.M.
A FLOOR SHOW at 11:00 P.M.
Cover Charge: $2.00 per person.
Please reserve your tables. Tel: 7287 & 7886.
Every Friday Gala Night

WITfl THE
. MICHRI. DEJEAN CHORUS.
Dinner Dance from 8:30 P.M. to 1:30 A.M.
A $2.00 entrance fee will be charged EXCEPT [or Guests
having reserved their tables for DINNER.

Every Night


*0 water no "xnr=' -j
Sto aome up wit thu uhl
That's beat far vou s Wi
headquarters for Imotu
G uld Water srmnr -j
line with pumps for W
Sfarm and home ned--aj
to give you extra yease
profitabletrouble-freetS
service. Call us.
S FAMOUS
JET-O-MATIC
-the water system that con.
verts for shallow or deep wdel


0
: GOULDS PUMP CENT=

CHARLES FEQUIERE & CO.
Rue Roux


SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1966


Dalu Florist Shop, winner of 11 blue ribbons at the Damien'
May Day Fair, has just the Flowers for the most important
girl in your life Mother.

VILLA CREOLE


VILLA CREOLE Tuesday Night
ORCHESTRA BARBECUE
ORC HESTIL a HAITIAN STYLE
and hear Haitian music at its best.!.


VOODOO CLUB
The Night Club that tops them all
Every Comfort Utmost Courtesy
A place where you can enjoy yourself with the
most popular musical numbers..
Startling native dances and shows
New Program Every Night
It's a thrill to enjoy yourseiU at the VOODOO CLUB
Take all your friends with you to, VOODOO CLUB
While in Port au Prince, do not fail to
include VOODOO CLUB' in your amusement&
OPEN EVERY EVENING FROM 9 P.M. TO...
AT CARREFOUR 13 Minutes ride from City)
Telephone 2147


VOODOO CLUB

Saturday Night its Always CABANE CHOUCOUNE
Till 4:00 A.31. SUNDAY.





(abobune *.B houcoung


HAITI SUN


r
2
-


I




__HAITI SUN


_ Page 9


OSEPH NADAL aind Co. Distributors


Best Prices
at Best Meat


YrwfK5,, VbU`CAN IFryo VW WAT TO FORCE ANEADD
1.MANP-FE-;P THAT I1NTHE EI'ZVICE.,,LOOK AT FAITH"-
5ENEIZAL TOWN IF YOU., FUL OL THUMHILLTHE=N C,-OTOTHE'

SOME OTHER INTIE-E-STS G THE B-..RAS WHO WILL GET YOU
IN U FE.J.^ A PROMOTION!


'-i,*Bf 8 --B J '^ .J


f'BUT YOU KNOW MET' SHOREI.KNOW
URKI-LE. I WAS IN YOU, SON,/BUT IF
THE 79th FIGHTi J YOU AIN'T OOT THAT
GRO9P ALL THE WAY / THING YOU CAiN'T
BACK TO LIBYA! A WINO THIS DIN1N


-Il


rl SENT FOJP- MINE THEN YEW ITr
.PRKI L, BUT THE P06 YEW ANOTHER
I C4E"P IT UP! SOME WHERE,
^^- 'owl PUSHER. ?


IF THIS iETM OF SHANTY TOWN;
OLD R.ALNCH HANDS I1 IN OP.PEZTHEN
PRODUCE ANPATYAC- YOUR. SYMBOLS
h OF MEMBERSHIPi!


AT WHICH POINT EACH MAN WHIP; OUT
A WORLP WAR M, FIFTY-MISSION CRUSH-
TYPE, BROWN CAP... NOW COMPLETELY
RULE .p orOFI TE REGULATION AIt FO fRC
UNIFORM... f /7ARKMZ-ZM


THEY WERE ALL WTH THEY DON'T
SGENEAL TOWN SACK wORK DAY ANP
F,-iRE THEAI .'FORCE NIGHT--IN
SSECAAE EPARATE FACT THEY'RE
'BIRAN:H PP T1E SERVICE!) HAVING A BIG
S-'STA 0 PARTY
r RIGHT NOW !





JACQUES LAFLEUR
179 Ave. Magloire Ambroise
Phone 2981


l~ipi


The WorId-~FamouABeaatu Products Are
On a&eat



Ca nape. Vert &AJWeidut


SPA90Y


S TWO YEARS...DRIFTING
ALONE IN SPACE!/ AND THERE,
JUST AHEAD, IS A PLANET
WITH CITIES... CITIES .
FULL OF PEOPLE!,i


rwl


N ,, ITS" GO.L L ..? :.'K.
i URANIUM T KKEEP ME ..',"
^ ALIVE! YET WriAT COOD? I'M .
SDJTONN TOTI, RADIOACTIVE
SMAN. DEAD.LYA TO ,D -..- .---
"ANYONE.NEAZ ME. -- /
^^f^^^~^^k ^^^EsTS~/w^^S


I. *


PHAITI SUN________


rw-3





0 t you really
.want to beo-
.s -orne acquain-
ted with Hai-
Sti there are
many intere-
[sting trips
m j which afford
~ a close-up of
O- Haitian life
which you cannot gain if you
confine your sight-seeing to the
city.
Most of these trips can be
made in conventional automo-
Biles, others require "the more
versatile jeep to navigate the
rouligh spots and river crossings.
All of them can be made in sa-,
fety.


.There is -a Hertz-Drive-it
Yourself Agency in town where
you can rent a car or a jeep at
reasonable rate; or 'you can
rent tas, with" or without
ghauffers, elsewhere. The Hai-
tian Air Force provides iafe.
and efficient air transport to
most important points in Haiti
at very reasonnalble rates. Ask
your hotel manager or your
travel agent for details.
Eaeh of these trips has its
special attraction. From the
longer trips' you will return
with a grand thirst, a hearty
appetite, a delicious fatigue,,
quickly 'banished by a hot bath


TRAVEt SUUESTIOiS


(for which you will have a new
respect). You will have a new
test forthe attractions of the
city. You will fell a great pity
for the jaded characters who
have not strayed from the bar
since you left.:. And, of course,
.you will have a good reserve of
conversational ammunition to
Last you for many months.
So,%starting with the shortest
rtrips first, here are a few boiled
down suggestions for travel in
Haiti:

BOUTILLIDWS MOUNTAIN
AND LE PERCHOIR
(Ler Pershawh) The Perch)
The most spectacular view in
Haiti: 2,000 square miles of
Haiti spread out before you -
a miracle of .color, form, sun-
light end shadow! Port-au-Prin-
ce lies at your feet (3.000 feet
below) like a giant map. ,To get
to this breath-taking, unbelie-
eable and unforgettable view
Du ride 10 miles frogn Purt su-
Prince, through the pretty little


now of Petionville, then up a
wading mdiontain road, borde-
red-by flaming giahit pointsetta
plants. You paos the tratched


roof habitations of peasants and
arrive in rural Haiti, where life
goes on as it has for centuries
as if the city below did not
exist. LE PERCHOIR, modern
oasis on the mountain, offers
the facilities of its restaurant
and night club, its Terrace Bar,
and its branch of La Belle Cre-
ole Gift Shop to make the trip
ever more enjoyable and profi-
table. After sundown light
wraps advisable, and gentlemen
are asked to wear coats in the
restaurant after'7 p' m. Allow
two hours for this trip. plus
time to eat.

CAP-HAITIEN
AND LA CITADELLE
This trip is an experience in
history and geography. It- is an
adventure and a pilgrimage
which you must not miss.


If you have the time, we re-
commend that you take three
days. and go to Cap-Haitien by
car. Its about 170 miles and a
minimum of 5 or 6 hours, but
you should take about 8 hours
to -enjoy it most. So to one of
Cap Haitien's confortable ho-
tels. For the night, go to the
Citadelle the next day, retur-
ning to Port-au-Prince the third
day. Eevry mile and every


hour of 'this trip will be full of
unforgettal.ile ,impressions.
If yo, .: '. ,r 'ed f. Uirr.e,
you can ly to the Cape ir, -i j
minutes, and can mike :lie en-
tire pilgrinage in a single d2*,


JACMEL.-
If you want .another trip off-
the-beaten traclkgo to Jacmel,
on Haiti's south coast. Jacmel;
once a flofirishing town, still
has a considerable export bu-
siness, ,but is typical of many







HElaitiari provincial sea-coast
tov.wns waiting for better days
t3 come. Jacmel has a flavor
of its own. To get.there you'
can take the easy way by air,
or the adventurous way by.
road, about 60 miles, practical-
ly every mile of which has a
river crossing. Near Jacmel is


SSPECATIES 000


S.4



one of Haiti's most beauifut
beaches, Raymond lea Baks
Two hotels there, cleii anzt
comfortable. Plan to stay over-i
night at least. -
FORET DES PINS
(Pine Forest) .
In south-east Haiti,.a drive of.
some 60 miles from Port-adv5
Prince 4s a beautiful pine fore
at-an elevation of about' 7,0
feet. To arrive at this 150,090
acre forest, one drives throu
the rich sugar cane lands oj
the Cul de @Sao plain, theti
through and arid region of c#W
tus to the edge of Lake Etan
Sumatre1 famous salt lake, i.-
fested with crocodiles, lying on
the frontier of the Domica
Republic. There th6 climb corn.
mences to the cool Pine Fo-Mei
This trip will take aUl
returning to your hotel
cocktails and dinner. Passi
through a number of.small.
tian towns .anfd villages, iibf;
fords a variety of impressions
of Haitian life. and geography
Take a wrap for your visit -
its .cool up there. .-. -




ZT,



:'4
-..t
$ -







WARE .


4A


C. p.m


art






w\.c ou
Aik* 6A&%OVA&~ ONWO


WELCOME$ YOU

TO PORTAU-PRINC
1 i '


I
J

4.9
~4. 4.4.4.4.4
+ei. i*,.


Mi-m


VI


-L"L
I rd=?f


6.
6T.
Colwnumbus Piar 8.
Po Office Bldg 9.
Musical Fountain 10.


Oustoma fou"w
CiMy Hall
Iro, Mark' d
Bureau of Touri.m i
Bauk of Haiti
Royal Bank of Canada
Metropolitan Qilhedral


17. Colonial Cathedral
12.' BoW" Airport
13. Trinity Cnthedral
14. National Palaos
16.S. Port Natial
.16..MAGLOIRE Stadium
,r7 CamolprfR14a, Souimi'e..


HAITI TOURIST SHOPS
ASSOCIATION -


MEMBERS


ARMANDE DE PARIS
AUX CENT MILLE ARTICLES.
AUXILA, PAUL
AUX CHOSES D'HAITI
PA BELLE CREOLE
CAMERA CENTER
CANAPE VERT f
'IADAME CELESTIN
CHAMPANA
DADLANIS
DESLANDES
MADAME EWALD
FISHER'S
HAITIAN GIFT SHOP NATIVE
HANDICRAFTS
JACQUELINE
KAHN
LAHAM
MIAGUANA SHOP
MEINBERG BROS
MEVS F.
G. -& F. A. MOURRA
OUVROIR NATIONAL
PERCHOIR
PAQUIN & GAETJENS
RARA SHOP -
RUDY CAMERAS & GIFTS
SAMBA SHOP
ADELE SASSINE
SILA SHOP
SCHADAC
STORE CLUB
TABOU PERFUMES
TAMTAM GIETS
TOUSAINT
VODOO SHOP ,i
Mme FRED WOOLLEY


^&^-~5..
to o AIQ
B :'


: .',.:" .4.' .
', ,%,, :, . .T h

* ; J ..-. '***,' ....
.. ,, -. 4 ,, '


I


in


SHOPPING CrMTER


9~


''S


Patjmesi amw a WatcA.e, 2anish ,Si4'et.


at


-n. .


ZT7,


..ri !


nSqrde2




Page 11


HAITI SUN


* .


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"1


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HAITI SUN ________


fiRT& CURID








Which has. ihe best imports from all the corners of the world. You can save up to 60%
from U.S. prices with your duty free allowance of $200. over 48 hours and $500 over
12 days outside U.S.A. Fisher's ,w!l be a real shopper's paradise. Not only free port prices
' but modest mark-up, because everything is concentrated in one large building. Are your
biggest aiseli in buying at. Fisher's.


Fisher's, the American's favorite shop where
all price'i are clearly marked on every item.
Where a weUll-trained and courteous staff will
help you to solve your shopping problems.
Where checks and foreign banknotes are accep-
ted, and your purchases shipped. We will gladly
give yoa 'ree information about U.S. customs re-
gulatBif)I and shipping costs.


MAIN FLOOR, OF FISHER'S SHOPPING CENTER


THE BEST NAMES iN
FRENCH PERFUMES
COSMETICS
Liqueurs- Brandies ..
Champagnes
Art Porcelains
Royal Copenhagen
Bing & Groendahl
Royal Vienna Augarten
Limoges
CoJport
Lalique and bohemian Crys-
talware
Marcel Fi-ank Atomizers
.Swviss Watches
Trench Pipes


PISTRIBUTORS FOR:
Guerlain Liberty of London Fabrics
Boulton and Perrin Gloves Hawick
Scotland Cashmire Swe.Aters Lubin
Balmei WVeil Knizc Griffe Perfumes
Napoleon .- iodet Louis De Saliguac Cognacs
Warquis De Montesquieu Armagnac -- De Kuypcr
Liqueurs 'Nalbor'Anuavit Dnu-li Po'cc-
lains andi Silver Spalding of England
Sportgoods.
THE WORLD FAXIOUS EMBROIDERlY FLOOR
COWIPE[TTLY AIR CONDITIONED


EXCLUSIVE CARVINGS
Pari'uiag
Native Jewelry
Sisal Shoes Bags
Tortoise-Shell Jewelry


THE MAHOGANY AND LINATIVE HANDI)CRAFTS FLOOR


iaitia n Embroidered Dresses Blouses skirts
- ime.'s shirts Cuban Guayabcra Shirts -
It.Jiaij Silk Scarves Swiss Handkerchiefs -
Table LUnens Beaded Bags Petit-point Bags
- Casmi'nr? Sweaters Perrin Gloves Liber-
ty Goods.


Mahogany quality goods srom our own worhshops
Sisal and Straw goods Vodoo Drums Dolls Hats
Records Books Films Place Mats


SPage 12








Bureau: Stand 29
Ave. Marie-Jeanne
Cit6 de I'Exposition


I A I T



^Uttu


, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Phone: 2061,
P. 0. Box: 433
.4


THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER

...................................................... C O U P O N ...... .. ......... ...... ... .........

EVERY WEEK PLEASE SEND ME JHAITI SUN))

FOR A MONTH ( 4 issues)...................... ...... ..... $0.50

FOR A YEAR (52 issues)...........................................(overseas $10)

Remittance enclose.

Please Bill me.

N am e...... .....................................................................

Address .............. .....................


^/ea^ ~ ~ Icof, /



On this beautiful day (the days are always beautiful ia&
Haiti) ve wish to extend to you our heartiest welcome.
We, as well as everyone in Haiti;, want you to haveX\a ve"
pleasant and enjoyable 'tay in this lovely and hospitablO
Island., .''.
Haiti 'Sun (your newspaper) in collaboration- withj, 1.
Belle Creole (your shopping, center) have `put oui lthlf
section of the newspaper in order to give you infornmtion,.'
that will help you to.make your stay not only pleasant..h0.1
profitable. '.1
We are always at your Service, for any inTformation yAi
may need. : -


SUGGESTIONS FOR THIS WEEK IN PORT-AU-PRINCE


S NATIONAL PALACE


i



S. Champ de Mars
SOnen daily except Sunday from 8-2
SRaising Lowering of Flag, 8 a. m.-5 p. m.

S NATIONAL MUSEUM








Champ de Mars
Open dally except Sundays

PALAIS DES BEAUX ARTS

I -


Aux Palmlstes, Exposition Grounds
Open .dally from 95 s
Art Exhibitilons

MUSEE DU PEUPLEHAITEN






Aux Palnlstes, Expositon Grounds
Open daUly from 9 5
For further Information
see your'Travel Agent


.4.


V FOyM DES ARTS PLASTIQUES







Aux Palmises, Expositon Grounds
SOpen daly from 9 5 -
SPerman Art Exhibitions
erm'


.ART CENTER


Rue dea |
Revolution I


Phone: 2055


Open dally except Sunday trom S I
Current Art Shows


IRON MARKET


- ~) a


GrAind'Rue
.QOen dally from 6 4
A Special Market days on Saturdays


METROPO.iTAN CATHEDRAL,

BASILQUE
A de Notre-Dame
(Catholic)


Petilon Plaza' "
6pen dally from 4- 6

COLONIAL CATHEDRAL


e Oldest Church,
in Port - Prince
For visit hours see
Your.- Travel Agent


Petion Plaza
Open dally


ESPISCOPAL


CATHEDRAL


< -^





Rue Pavee (Near PAA Offices)
Open dal y
Famous for Its beautldl Haitian Mn l*


THEATRE DE VERDURE .



*4


-Aux Palmistes, Exposition Grounds
Open Tuesdays and Tbursdays
Evening for folklore shaews

STADIUM PAUL E. MAGLOIRE






Rue Durand
Boxingafnd Track Field events.
Football (Soccer) Maichen
ThrI'.a week at night 0
For further I atormation Fh l MI


COCK-FIGHT ARENA


''4


Aux Palmlsles, Exposition Grounds
Eight Saturdays afternoons
and Sundays morning --


UNDERSEA GARD


)ENS


Iroquois.


Port-au-Prince Bay
Class bottom boal leaves
Daily Casino Pier 9:30 a m


La Belle CrAole







The Caribbean's Most
Unique Shopping CentW
Open daily from 8 5 Phonea 317T

MUSICAL FOUNTAIN






Cit6 de I'Exposltion, Exposition Grounds
Classical Concerts
all Wednesday and Sunday nights
from 7 10 p.m.
i
PLACE DES HERMOS






Champ de Mars
Open Auditorium ::
Sunday Concerts from 7-9 pj.m .
For further Information
see your Travel Agent .

PETION IESSAuINES


Rue *
Mgr. OGuIloux


Open dally except Smunda




HOTEL
(VILLA
CREOLE

Buffet Creole Muaie
Sepclalitles and
Barbecue Dancing

Monday & Thursdays

y*




^I i ~Bois Verna
Open 24 Hours





RENDEZ VOUS


CIte de I'Exposition
Air-conditioned Bar-dancing
Open from sunset lo'sunrlsting


r .


I.!


I.




IM :;:Yi
* -. -. .-.-, .., '.-, .f ,
,'t "' -'. .' .. :.' T .. ...'*** ,. .,: ,,..: .


.S .. -. -'
,"-. ; .< "a" .







iras andwlm. :' ," /s
^Luppe-J''';f .
Sc.6 t "" "
gchp umes:. P
sS eli, a a; ...
ann' / -






ou, Le Gi on, -
ar06n, Milot,.
reen,.Fath'
nan Dior, g
eras, Chaneln .




4 pareui, ,
Ricj, Covday,
"*, _1hlpeA1




ap & Piquet,
l~t'Houlbigan't.
h~aeurs: .
urvois&er, Otal d,
eruit, Aennessey, :
If leon, arte, -

.:.... He." r.i.g .

Eaey s Br6o4 Cream
Atouqgnac, Cliartrieuse, -
I--ayriai M hum:









W~itu Barbaimofirt
|:-.HaytlanuMusic :
h. M'o'st Complete -
sortment of the
_.vpariqus Rythmm.
k ,-Jaytim Voodoo Ipired
,Jew'eL-y
Atiai Mahognywiare '
Saynd oubgat
.dpaintedyTs ,
aytian Sculptored Mahony

h.ayian Turtle-shell Jewelry
*ewelry frHm all overthe

iqumstely Beautiful
*,Beaded Bags
'gncd-embroidered Blouses,
igSdietc.
Htmd-piinted, Skirts,
JRetchiefs, Stoles, etc.
ytian Paintiugs -"
faytian Ceramics -
Haytian Postcards
-we. J ail them for you).














-6.nIstial among Gift Shops of
'.e world, is the branch of LA
dLaE REOLE-.located on
t aseterrace of the LE PER-
iaHOIR, lthe famous restaurant
,ona. top -of B.OUTILLIERS












M.OUNTAIN, overlooking Port
,"i Prmie..
*_-. hrogo the wade windows
6f le P&&otr Gift Shop the
.*hoppe'r's eyes are drawn from
,.te attra-tive show cases, to the
bire&tih-taking beauty or nearly
tfo thousand' square ffilues of
IHTadpibla's plains, mountains
KIer-ch..ing, 3.3Qo,0 feet beow.
F.-Saaous, and always cooL
ie a Perahoir" Gift'. Shop offers
131e same high quality Fech

ediwralt, books, Painnino and
thndretr of other gift itemsR
CHOseRbtedfaom othe fre starners






2f. theeoaith, a in the mother
bi&tiaetxe^ shoaes, to the


In Port-au-Prince
everybody meets at
rThe. Fountain) in
La Belle'Creole for
fruitt and Fruit Juicee
ggs and Omelettes
Vaffles and Hot Cakes
Soft Drinks, Beer
:.risp-and Colo Salads. ,
Clef's Special "
nndwirhes
Ice Creams,-Sundaes .
Cigars and Cigarettes


A. 3 p .""



Spcarfishing Bqulpmet
thingg Trunks
"-*fi- Pnlns for Men
Dunhill pipes
Borsalino Hats -
Rolls Razors


7
The prices, the fixed price po-
.licy-.-the sales slip with every
purchase, Vith the guarantee of
the firm's name, are identical.
.o*


Located in the shop is a bar-
where one can sip Haitian. rum -
punch, tea, coffee, soft drinks-
or where one can have a'tween
meal snack of sandwiches, ca-
jkp, ice cream, while shopping.
The coaibination of cool com-
fort, .spectacular view, excel-
lent merchandise, and refresh-
ment, make a shopping trip to
LE PERCHOER GIFT SHOP
a pleasant and profitable ex-
perience a high spol indeed"
in vuor travel.


#AIT.M SAUtV-W NWTo...

AN ufro rMTTARL Le WXMICE


IHW

feet above Port-au-Prince and
it* emerald bay. Guests during
tea and cocktail hour' have a
Eront row seat at one'of the most
bewitching settings ever pro-
vided for a tropical sunset.
Then the lights go on and the
curving bayshore is outlined In
.a- necklace of shimmering
pearls. On .the breezeswept
terrace, guests can .watch cars
stop -at the Dominican border
20 .miles away.
Whether it's a thick-state-
side steak or an- ethereal Rumn
Souffl6, Le Perchoir food is
superbly prepared and elegant-
ly served. F6lix (Quignird and
his'orchestra provides music foi
dancing. .
The International Casino, a
swank establishment run by a
staff- imported from' Monte-
Carlo, is one of the major
points of interest during the
summer and winter tourist sea
sons. There one can dine on
excellent Italian'lood end aster
visit the 'gaming tables which
are meticulousl, rin under the
supervision of the Haitian Go-
vernment. On the 'bay side;
an orchestra beats out rhum-
bas, mamnbos and romantic Hai-
tian meringues for deincing un-
der the twinkling stars.

Near the Casino in the bree-
zeswept Exposition- Grounds
is the Open Air Theatre de
Verdure where: visitors can
attend the bi-weekly shows pul
on by the talented National
Folklore Troupe.
Around the curve of the bay
is the newly remodeled Hotel
Rivieri with its huge air-con-
ditioned Bamboche Room and
circular bar. The bar's revol.
ving center serves as the stage
',.li-hel Deggrottes tri-lin-
-uial crooning and a nightly
Inn show The white-faced Ban-
'a dancer is Minsky's in rever-
e.. a comedian par. excellence,


Other leading hotels have
special dinner dansants once or
twice a week. .Visitors should
not miss an opportunity to hear
Haiti's internationally known
male Dejean Choir which per-
forms- at Hotel Ibp Lele on Fri-
day evenings during the Sea-
son. The El Rancho features Ti
Ro Ro, Haiti's number one dru-
mmner, and members of the Na-
tional Folklore Troupe on
Friday evening and other spe-
cial dance nights which" vary
according to the season. Hotel
Dambala has a Saturday night
chicken barbeque beside its illu-
minated pool, with and orches-
tra providing music for outdoor
dancing on its marble patio. The
Villa Creole's Big Night is
Thursday evening with a"Hai-
tian Buffet served beside its
pool in a-gala tropical garden
decor and, 'of course, dancing.
The roof garden at Hotel Chou-
coune is open" for dinner dan-
cing Monday arid Wednesday
nights during the season. 4
On Saturday evening Petioh-
villeas ,thatchedrroofed night
club, Cabane Choucoune, is the
meqca- of the Capital Elite and
visitors.. Alternating orchestras
thrdb with the rhythm of the
Haitian Meringue', a dance so
simple that visitors need spend
no timn on the side 'lines just
looking on". Though this has
long been the society gathering
spot of the Haitian Capital,
ru and sodas are still' served
for-.2G.a lass. There is .n 'en-"
trance fee which varies depen-
ding upon the entertainment,
for the evening. The Cabane
Ch'oucoune often features lea-
ding- foreign entertainers.

Saturday night is also the
night for taking trips into the
nearby hills to attend the pea-
sant ?bambochess or non-reli-
gious 'dances held in open don-
nelles to thse'pulsing beat of
the voodoo drums. It's an UN-
FORGET-ABLE expnrience...
For late Stayer uppers any


night of the week, Dan Allen's
Rendez-vous 'across form the
internationall Casino goes strong,
until all hours. And along
about 1 a. m., the joint is usual-
ly hopping with -oldtime Ame-


rican favorites, such as Alexan-,
der's Ragtime Band.
For dinner minus, dancing,
there is Petionville's Le Picar-
di a French-run Pension fea-
turing Esoargot, pepper steak
and the sort of food -rarely seen
or tasted off the Midi. In Lort-
au-iPrin-ce, Aux Cosaques is
known for its tasty flaming
lobster and other typically HaL
tian dishes. The Savoy, just
off the Champs de Mars, offers
either Haitian or American
foods and if you are really ho-
mesick for southern fried cuiac-
ken that is just where you'll
find it a block from the Na-
.tional Palace &Chanticle'er,
tucked away in' Bois Verna, is
'the latest- addition to the swart,
eating houses in Port-au-Prince
Open all Aight.

It's a LA BELLE CREOLE
AND HAITI SUN
Publicity Creation
Cliches made by Ed. PELOUX
Printed by Imprimerie de l'Etat
Copyright and. rights reserved
Designed j Alfredo Garcia-Gara..
Sby 1 mend! and Rosano
I Franco de la Rosa





SUNDAY, 3MAY 27th 195


AMBASSADOR ADDRESSES MOe)D (N


COLLEGE SYMPOSIUNI


ZEPWIIIN PLEADS FOR WORLD SOLIDARITY


(Co-tfinued from page 1)
t3ruLi .-d by the disasters that
have ac:umulated from 1939 to
1945, :;Xt! quivering from all the
dangerr, it has only narrowly es-
,caped .;-rce, international socie-
ty i-. fin-mally embarking 6n a
course of mutual respect, the pri-
3nacy of law, and desinterested
mutual assistance, which are the
essentUal conditions for true
friendshLp among peoples..
MCit n Mlans.ce of Dependence
To UiLL-trdle his belief that na-
'tion& are dependent upon one an-
,other, Mr. ZVphirin demonstrated
that cl50 years ago the fate of
the Uniud States of America de-
-pendered. for the space of an ins-
tant, or; the decision to be taken


by
Nsl


j


(
.]
1


History, he said, offers a
striking parallel between the Re-
public of Haiti and its powerful
neighbor, !he United States of
America.))
4:Both our peoples have entrus-
ted the conduct of their destinies
to soldiers '.rained at the school
of discipline, devotedness to the
task to be performed, and ho-
nour that constitutes the Army
and its tradrlitions.z
<,...In our small but striving
country, school enrollment has
doubled in five years, the road
system, of vital importance to the
development of the country, has
expanded five-fold, irrigation has
been extended, social justice for
the working class has been in-
creased \o the fullest extent, sa-
nitation works have been under-


y- a Negro of Haiti, a former les from the nearest American taken which already have made
ave. w'io lived hundreds of mi- coast. Haiti's population one of the
He referred here to Toussaint healthiest in the hemisphere.v
------------- Louverture in his fight for Hal- Praising the United States for
tian freedom and cited authori- its aid to Haiti, he predicted that
ties to demonstrate that Louver- (America will perhaps be still
P'T. INITE DU BATIMENT ture was the indirect cause Of stronger when it fully lives its
the expansion of the United Sta- conviction that the hemisphere
tes. is a block that no sacrifice is
Napoleon Bonaparte himself too great to preserve.
declared, M. Zephirin said, that :United strong, with justice
had it not been for the resistan- on its side. it can and ought to be
ce of the precursor of Haitian in- in the world a factor for real
S dependence, .France would have peace, equitable peace, based on C
at its disposal an army which mutual respect, mutual assistanceC
would permit it to undertake any- and reciprocal understanding.v,
i B L thing it might wish with res-
b pect to Jamaica, Canada, the He also said that the time has
ErINCHEMENTI ABSOLU Spanish Colonies, or the United long since past when either na-
States itself.., an army (that tions or individuals can give mereF
would make all America trem- liD service to their beliefs. We
ble.:, must. he declared, clive out ourI
PLAS'ITMENT Also to illustrate the solidari- beliefs.,
ty of the United States and Hat- eThe time is gone when the 1
Concrete Densifier give: ti, the Ambassador said that the good could content itself with
resistance w ater-tighltess nations have similarly pursued being and could leave the fields
neace and security through de- for action to the forces of error.z
Hardness mocratic forms of government. Monsieur Zephirin was intro-


duced as ca statesman, former
professor, lawyer and internatio-
nally honored diplomat and lea-
deri, by Mergan President, Dr.
Martin D. Jenkins. Presiding at
the program was Richard A Long,
assistant 'i,,ofessor of English,
and autho.- of the idea of the
symposium which was under the
direct supervision of the seminar
committee of the ,humanities di-
vision. Mr. Long, who has travel-
ed in Haiti and studied its life
and literature, is chairman of-the
seminar committee.


Other participants during the.
six-day symposium were: Doctor
Naomi Garrett, professor of ro-
mance languages at West Virgi-
nia State C'Ilege; Emmanual Le-
dan and Jules Blanchet, both of,
the Pan American Union, and.
Kermit K. Keith, instructor in.
architecture at Howard Univer-
sity.
An exhibition on Haitian art-
opened the .rymposium on Ma
4, and was viewed daily from 10..
a.m. through 5 p.m. in the Mi-
morlal Refectory through May 11. i


WINSTON (F I L T E R)


FIRST IN SALES


Em


Winston
II LTER-. "IGARETi


TruKjA cFDOMZSi
BLEND.
CIGARETTES

1955
PC===-- -==I

1 9 55


CIGARETTE OUTPUT BY BRANDS
CAMEL R. J. Reynolds
Brand-B
Brand-C
Brand-D
FILTER BRANDS
WINSTON R. J. Reynolds
Brand-B
Brand-C
Brand-D
1.-SENSATION BAZAR
Emile Maxhnilien 77 Rue
2.-MAGASINS DE L'ETAT
3.-ALL GROCERY STORES


79,900,000,000
62,700,000,000,
58,000,000,000
54,200,000,000,

23,000,000,000
20,100,000,000,
12,40o,0o0,000,;
6,600,000,000

des Miracles


We proudly present the FACTS:,



SHOPPING AT LA BELLE CREOLE FREE PORT SHOPS
MEANS GREAT SAVINGS FOR YOU


New York \ La Belle Creole
Price "" Price

Omega 18K gold Semaster 400.00 175.00

STissot 18K gold 225.00 99.00
Georg Jensen (setting of 6) 72.00 49.06
Hans Hansen (setting of 6) 52.00 29.95
Kislav Gloves 9.00 6.00
Orianes Royal Bee Gream 16.50 3.00
Cashmere Cardigans 29.50 18.50


ALSO SAVINGS OF 331/3 TO 60o/o ON BONE CHINA, FRENCH PERFUMES, FRENCH '
BRANDIES & LIQUORS, BEADED BAGS, SWEDISH CRYSTAL ETC.. E"C... ETC...













|HAITI'S ONE PRICE STORE


............... ....., ,


P ,A


6


HAITI SUN




,- ...

R-TAGE 14


ENGLISH-NOR

r Mr.and Mrs. B. M. Wilcox re-
&ur-red to Caracas, Venezuela,
Thursday morning after elevien
ays of artistic sightseeing, disap-
iplnted because there are no con-
*"znienit beaches or beach houses;
frth6ey had to cut short their va-
ia'tiqn due to the high hotel rates
Vtd the lack of available houses
cafrd the beach they couldn't
-:.",n locate the beach.
`, .hbe young couple found plenty
1.f interesting art and enough
iXtf-s to rekute the bad press exist-
ilng in Venezuela in regards to
Haiti. The Englishman and his
,.Nor.egian wife were told they
S"w.4azy to come to Haiti. Two
,oa44hezr American Friends said
tfl streets were dirtj, stinking
.ai"Ihatthe people spit .at you.
Thgeeral consensus of opi-
.n'n namongst the people' they

4aked was that Haiti is mo good..
*i Apart from their knowledge of
:Hai*ian art and the presence of
,a, folklore movement in Caracas,
they found little encouragement
i'in Venezuela itself. The Haitian
',Consul in Caracas cwas difficult
itoee and said, through his se-
.. that all information as to
,ht.els, beaches etc., is available

d-F Portau-.rince.a Purt4er-
more'they said there were no bro-
-chures or pamphlets of any kind
'to be found at the consul or in
.the travel agencies they visited.
". SHOULDUD VISIT HAITI

:The man and wife architect
teamn declared that had found the
.people here among the happiest
and friendliest we've met any-
where and we see no reason why
people in Venezuela go to Grena.


HAITI SUN


SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956


WEGIAN COUPLE EXPLAIN HAITI HAS BAD NAME IN CARACAS


da and Barbados for vacations
instead of coming to Haiti, which
is much more interesting and
exotic. Distances by air from Ca-
racas to Haiti are very short and
Haiti should be able to draw
many tourists from Venezuela..
Bares Willcox, as a painter in
water colors, and the Mrs., as a
sculpturist, were especially in-
terested in the art movement in
Haitt As architects their field
is closely r-lated to art and they
found the work of many of the
Haitian artists very interesting.
On the whole they were rather
disappointed with the Centre
d'Art and the atmosphere of corn
mercialism. They considered that
the paintings should carry price
tags in order not to give the im-
pression that the prices varied
according tn the dress, speech
and general appearance of the
art lover.
At the Duperier Sculpture Stu


Ciarete


Dine and dance nightly from 7:30 to
-11:00. Our conjunto plays as long as you
wisb in the air-conditioned Mardigras Bar
only one of its kind in Haiti. A gala
i dinner d a n c e is held Wednesday night
With R a o u I Guillaume. Highly trained
staff gives you Transatlantic Liner Serv-
ice with. Continental cuisine.

AT YOUR SERVICE
CASTELHAITI HOTEL


WE'RE FLYING

KLMA TO EUROPE

-and savinger $1t000
f ~~over 1OU /


dios they met and watched art
student Roger Francois, 17,
whom they consider has a great
future inr sculpture, and later
were deeply impressed with the
Lazar Studio at Carrefour.
The young architects were par.
ticularly impressed by the new
art group being formed by
Ulrick Ambroise, Pierre Juste,
Gerard Monies and Spencer De-
pas. These enterprising young -ar-
tists, lacking an art instructor,
were so grateful for the cons-
tructive criticism offered by the
Willcoxes that they made them
a gift of a painting which they
praised highly.
In observing the work of the
Haitian artists they stated that
Instead of paintings for the tou-
rists they should delve mote dee-
ply into their country by attemp-
ting to catch the wealth of feel-
ing behind the expressive face of
an old hag squatting on a street
corner and show her many year's
of suffering and the wrinkles for
each of her 15 or 20 children.
The English branch of the fa-
mily stated that, ethe artist can-
not remain primitive. With ex-
perience and practice he is bound
to develop. If he stays primitive
he is being tfalse.v He should
remain primitive only in the
sense that his art comes from the
heart and is inspired by his very
strong local tradition in heritage.
and ancestry. This can be preju-
diced by too much outside in-
fluence. They appear to cater too
Much to tourists by overdoing
the primitive element, or by do-
ing imitation abstract paintings
as seen elsewhere in the world.
Haitian Artists should avoid this
for they have no foundation for
the sophisticated style of the
other artists. They lose their in-
d ividuality.a

BIG JEWELRY FUTURE

The Caracas couplegreatly ad-
mired the Haitian jewelry at
Spencer Depas' Studio, which cis
powerful artistry of silver and
enamel, copper and wood. -De-
pass' Work was exhibited in the
States and the Willcoxes felt
that there xs a big future. for
this type 'uf jewelry in Haiti.
They said that little are1 found in
the shops and those lack the ar-
tistic feeling they should possess.
cA small silver trinklet consist-
ing of a sick looking donkey or
of a women with a basket on her I
head Is rot enough,* they added.
The outdoor Theatre de Verdu-
re was a tremendous attraction
for the visitors. During their 10
day stay they never failed to see
a performance of the folklore
shows. Sunday morning they at-
tended an informal discussion
group (Literary Goat on the
Green at Petionville) headed by
Morisseau Leroy and Dr. Price
Mars, at the Theatre d'Haiti, on
the use- of the Creole or French
language in Haitian literature
and the proper writing of Creole.
They found very admirable and
inspiring the enthusiasm display-
ed in discussing the various
branches of Lrt-from poetry to


sculpture, music, dancing and
literature-and the way the pro-
blems are seriously debated. The
artistic couple stated that. they
gathered the impression that Hai-
ti is a very talented country, and
very rich in heritage but its art
is badly in need of criticism and
guidance. Mr. Willcox added,
*The country is at the crossing
of the roads at present, which is
the danger point. They have to
be careful not to lower their
standards of art just to make a
few dollars from the tourists..
WELL TRAVELLn.I COUPLE
Beres Wullcox met his charm-
ing wife while spending two
years in Norway. One advantage
of having a Norwegian wkife, he
cays, is that the kids speak fluent
Norwegian, English, spanish and
a few other languages-due to
the Scandinavian gift for foreign
tongues.
The Willcoxes moved to Stock-
holm in 1949 and worked in the
architect trade until they depart-
ed for Venezuela, with $100 in
their pockets, in one of their
weaker moments.' Luckly, Pop
got a job after only one week in
Caracas but he said he would
never take the same chance
again.


Having traveled through most
of Europe, from 200 mile-- north
of the Arctic Circle to Ita 3, with
Daughter Trina in a rucksack on
father's back, they are &E1 on
taking a long look at Latin Ame-
rica before locating a homne and
settling down.
The Kids nre hiternational In
character: Trina, the oldest, is
five years old (her birthday was
May 11) and was born in Stock-
holm; Neil is two years old (his
birthday was May 13th and Pop
won a bottle of Grant's Whiskey
which he swears he will save for
his son) and was born in -Cara-
cas; the youngest boy. Colhn, was
born in Nrrway last Augst and
lacks a few years of being a year
old.
All in all they are a tra.eling
family. Berc-s Willcox is now in
charge of the office of Oficina
Sanabria-the architectural firm
building a new $2,000,000 comple-
tely heated, 24 floor hotel in Ca-
racas, which sits on top of a 2,000
meter mountain overlooking the
Caribbean and the modern city
of Caracas.

When asked -to commextt on
Haiti, before his departure, he
said, ccWe are coming back.,
a


Caracas Architect Bares Wilcox, a typical camera equipped tourid
swears on his camera that the bottle of Grant's Whiskey is 5-year old
daughter. Trina's and 2-year old son Neil's birthday present. He won
it from the weekly Haiti Trading Co. draw.



{~8 JiKa


Aila ftwtt erQ St V


0


a\




I L2ta








CHAUVET PREDklJS. NORTH COAST WILL BE ON CARIBBEAN TOURIST MAP SOON


Mr. Pierre Chauvet, director
of the National Tourist Office,
was quite excited about what he
found during his two day look
sees, along the North Coast of
Haiti, he reported, in an inter-
view this week with the Sun.
Mr. Chauvet stated that (with
all due respect to the South
coast,* which he will inspect
,dientot, the stretch of coast
from Anse-a-Foleur to Port-de-
Paix is like nothing he has seen
in the entire Caribbean from the
scenery standpoint. And Mr.
Chauvet has seen all the Carib-
bean.
During hi' two day tour May
13th, the director of tourism
found lthe beaches are wonder-
ful- cooled by a constant bree-
ze-and the fishing the best in
the world. The bluefin tuna
found off these beaches are tre-
mendous.D
The Port de Paix to Mole St.
Nicolas area is loaded with his-
tory. Columbus made his first
landing in the New World at Mo-
le St. Nicolas in December 1492
and just outside the small sea-
port are located the strategic
bunkers that French, General
Maitland ur-rendered to Tous-
saint in 1797. There are ruins
galore of ihe days of the bucca-
beers who raged up and down the
Spanish Main.


Mr. Chauvet said that with the
help ef a good road and the pro-
jected ear ferry from Cuba, this
qrea could be a tremendous tou-
rist draw for the country
before long. The car ferry would
cross the 70 mile wide windward
passage from Santiago de Cuba
to Haiti's north coast.


'4 . .... .... 4


The tourist director inspected
the lovely crystal clear spring
that will furnish the city of
Mote St. Nicolas with fresh drink-
ing water qnd found that over
50 yachts had anchored in these
waters, during the last tourist
season, to view the scenery, or
ganize fishing parties and reple-


.~j. :4

r

.4 ,-
S~5' .'f.~' v- CtA
""4.


Deputy Jean Kernizan, of Port de Pair, standing on the fortress
which once guarded Mole Sti Nicolas Bay and made the city the ,Gi
braltar of the Caribbean.' Since Colombus visited the bay on Santa
Maria as the areas first tourist; the touristic turnover has been mostly
yachts.


nish their water supply.

He told the Sun that the
whole north coast will be on the
Caribbean Tourist niap before
the next five years are past. 3
The Tourist Head regretted not
being able to visit Bombardopo-
lis, which he said people inform-
ed him ehas a cool and refresh-
ing climate similar to that of
Kenscoff.,


DISTINGUISHED SIGHT-

SEERS

Mr. Chauvet, accompanied by
by Charles Georges, chief of the
photographic section of the Tou-
rist Office, travelled to the north
over the new highway and was
greeted in Port-de-Paix by Con-
*gressman Jean Kernizan who
went along with him on his tour.
Port-de-Paix lies opposite the Ile
de la Tortue. separated by a 10-
mile wide channel. The tourist
group visited the beautiful black
sand beach and continued on to
the lovely beach at Mayence,
near Anse-a-Foleur.

In Mole St. Nicolas, he was
shown the tow n by Judge Roche
and Mr. Morange Elyse, brother
of Senator Elyse.


Haiti's Swim Suits
Feature In cHolidby"
The latest issue of .Holiday.
magazine published a photo of
Adrienne Dejoie, wearing .a
swimming stit designed by-'Mrs.
Simone Mews. Mr. 'Roger Costei,
Oloffson Hotel photographer, bal
sent the photographs in for Holi-
day, to use in its recent series
on swimming suit styles through-
out the world.
cPresenteJ by the Grand Oloff-
son of Port-au-Prince.s wrote Ho-
liday, this stylish two-piece
swimming suit shows the delica-
hands atid the ingenuity qt
Haiti's dressmakers. One can.
appreciate its originality in the
part which girdles the breast and ,'
which is retained by a simple
strip passing over the shoulder.
In the lower part of this suit, the
cloth wraps comfortably around '
the hip and is tightened by a
belt of the same material.

FOR RENT
A BARGAIN. Lovely house lo-
cated in the new residential zone,
southwest of Simbie Palace Ho-
tel: 3 bedrooms with all comfort,
2 bathrooms, rest room, office
with sink, hall garage, patio, set-
vant's quarters with all comfort.
Nice view on sea, well located for
people who work at' LAGS Sec-
tion, Point IV, Coast Guard ...
For more information telephone
2774, or apply to owner, Lt. Lu-
cien Lespinasse, after 1:15 P.M.
at Ruelle Waag, No. 57.

FOR SALE
A nice little two-story house,
situated in the residential section"
of Tuirgau, comprised of 3 bed-
rooms, Qithroob, dining and li-.
ying rfodm, kitchen, garage and
servants.. quarters...
For information go to Haiti
Sun office or:
Address. Etrnest Veuthey '
Impasse Vital '
Quarter de Bussy
Behind tk French Embas-


TRUCK OWNER!

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r eavty oervvim
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Maison Jean Bourgeois, Aux Ca-
yes
Michel Desquiron, Sucessors, Je-
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HAITI TRAl1WN; COMPANY



Chamber Of Commerce Bldg.


;--Map


SUNDAY. MAY 27th 1956


PAGE 15


(HAITI SUN)





S PAGE. 16

; ... .


(HAITI SUN)


____ ______ ~SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956


Why is it that our secret agents are 'Patriots., while their secret
Agents are nothing but 'spies'?
When I have one over the limit, I become 'the life of the party';
When you have one over the limit, you become a 'loudmouth'.
I am 'strong-minded, but you are opinionatedd,.
My candidate's plan for the future shows he has 'vision,, but your
candidate's plan for the future makes him a 'wild-eyed dreamer,.
I am- about the only capable and careful driver on the rood; all other
motorists are either 'stick-in-the-muds' or 'reckless maniacs,.
S My failure to laugh at your dirty joke shows my 'good breeding,
Sbut your failure to laugh at my dirty joke shows 'stuffiness,.
S THA BRITISH are too 'reserved., and the French are too 'effusive';
the Italians are too 'impulsive., and the Scandinavians are too 'cold*;
; the Germans are too 'arrogant., and the Japanese are too 'diffident,-
Ssurely God must be an American.
Mg new two4one car is 'gay., but your new two-tone car is just
'loud,.
SI give an inexpensive present because 'it's the spirit behind it that
Countss, but you give an inexpensive present because you're SMy son hit yours over the head with a block because he is playfull,
Sbut yours hit mine over the head because he is 'vicious,.
A 'sound' man is a man who sounds like me.
S Whexl I spread gossip, it is always a 'harmless tidbit,, but when
you spread gossip, it is 'malicious rumor-mongering*.
My family, which is poor, lost its tremendous fortune during 'the
depression; but your family, which is rich, made all its money pro-
fiteering during the war.
A 'REALISTIC,. novel is a novel that agrees with the Idea of realty
.I held before I even opened the book.
Why is it that 'modern, is an approving adjective for plumbing,
but a disapproving, adjective for art?
My wife's dress is 'simple., but your wife's dress is 'dowdy.
Likewise, my summer wardrobe is 'casual., but yours is 'sloppy*.
Our relatives may 'get into trouble', but your relatives have ile-
gitimate babies, go to jail, and take up dope. (Ours are, of course,
-unfortunate., but yours are ,bad.).-Guest Columnist Sydney Harris


INTERESTING


if TRUE.


HAVANA, CUBA...'

LAST WEEK I HAD THE FULLEST INTENTION of commenting
further on the Woman's Club's Forum on International Affairs, but a
bug put the slug on me and I took a brief count for a couple of
days. One of the questions discussed was: What are the basic remsont
behind the fact that some of the countries of Latin America have-
authoritarian governments, despite the fact that there is rsch a Herm-
isphere-wide clamor for democratic liberty.-
Juan de Dibs Tejada, scion of an old Spanish family and descendant
of the man who designed the Morro Fortress to protect the Port of
Havana, from -sea marauders, made an eloquent presentation of his
views1 The Havana Post's sugar expert said that the Spaniards who,
came to the New World were inspired by a desire for plunder and
booty.
On the other hand, Tejada said, the United States was colonized ori-
- ginally by people seeking a new home. They were not plunderers, but
persons who had been denied religious and other liberties in their home-
lands and sought to establish themselves permanently in North Amer-
ica. That bad been done, for themselves and for their descendants.
One ha' to look to these origins, Tejada contended in order to un-
derstand the psychology of the people of -the Western Hemisphere and
appraise their points of view uwith respect to dictatorships and demn-
ocracy.
It will be recalled, of course, that one of the principal members of
the panel was the eminent corporation lawyer, Dr. Carlos Paraga, Lap-
sing into my old habit of talking when I should have been listening
I reminded my distinguished colleagues that prominent among the
names of the great Spaniards who came to the New World were those
of Parraga and Tejada.
Carlos Parraga was at my throat immediately with a fine stiletto.
Recalling nmy British origin, he scid that it was true that the Spani-
ards were perhaps plunderers to some degree, and then, he added.
'The BritisJz, however, did not have the grace to find their own booty
in the New World. They waited until the Spaniards had it loaded
aboard their galleons, opened fire on the vessels and highjacked the
loot. And for their skill in that particular department, some of them
even were knighted.'
No comment...


I VILLA TROPICANA

MORNE CALVAIRE (Close to Place) PETION-VILLE
Offers' the solution for those who prefer the personalized
comforts of a modern guest-house.
REASONABLE RATES
Proprietor: Mrs. Margareth Cameron Phone 7439


DearMaryDoogoode,


I am sure my problem is shar-
red by many of my country-wo-
men today.

My boyfriend works in the tou-
rist business. He says that be has
a great future in the business,
which according to him wBll be
the. only business of important
in our country soon.

It isn t that I don't see himr
much. He drops around home
quite often but he can seldom'
take me out. Saturday nights he
has to sacrifice himself
and go out with the tourist busi-
ness. I hate the thought that he
is out dancing with some'tourist
although he assures me few are
young ani beautiful.

What the ache in my head, and
heart is if I marry the boy I
love would it mean I would have
to share my husband with the
tourist business. I am afraid any
time we have a quarrel he may
go out and enjoy the tourist bu-
siness.

Do you think I should encoura-
ge him to enter the coffee busi-
ness, which I hear is the rival
of tourism. Please help me in
my tournament

Signed: A victim of tourism


AL


M.W,1 -


Three convenient weekly Flights to take
you into the gay, romantic atmosphere
of the Pearl of the Antilles!
Only 90 minutes from Port-au-Prince
to Santiago de Cuba by CUBANA'

For information, and reservations see your
Travel Agent or call Pan American World
Airways, Rue Dontes Destouches, Phone 3451


ch-140


Dear Victim,
If the business of your boy
friend is so important to him
then go along with him, espe-
cially on the Saturday night out-
ings. I'm sure his sacrifice would
be made easier by your obvious-
Il charming company and tou-
rists, even the' female species,
enjoy meeting a Haitian girL
Get married by all means but
hold onto your man. (if he's
worth It.) Mary.


COLUMNIST SUFFERS
FROM NOSTALGIA
SUMMERTIME IS just around
the corner with vacations in
sight. I got itchy feet and a great
big dose of nostalgia last week
with. two brief notes from friend'
in two of my best loved vacation
spots Jamaica and Haiti.


DEPARTURES FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE:
/ Moodays, Wednesdays, Fridays, at 1:25 p. m.


t.ar f


qq I- ONLY


op a, I


BOUQUET BUT


.- :.


.' ;LA PLUS ANCieNNEFAMILLE DE DISTILLATEURS DIHAITIJ




49; "--=- n ,mn,


mr-m-rwcE HAITI WEST INDIES


One was from the extraordina-
ry unofficial Jamaican ambassa-
dor to the world at large, Abe Is-
sa, chairman of the island's Tou-
rist Board. Issa reports that Ja-
maica's tourist industry soared to
new heights during the first three
months of the year, with a total
of 42,732 visitors for the period.

The other note was from Mr
and Mrs. Dominique Marini, own-
ers of the Hotel Choucoune at
Petlonville, 1,200 feet up the
mountainside from Port-au-Prijp
ce, Haiti.
The iarnmis enclosed some
views of the hotel grads. They
stirred up memories of many
happy days we spent in this beau-
tiful sewtin of Hispanioa.
(This article was written by
Arthur Gnttfith in the Mianm He-
rald.)


1 14


86PROOF


0 ,q uirr





SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956


HAITI SUN MGE 17


MISS COLIMUN DESCRIBES HER

STUDIES IN EUROPE'S CAPITALS

Mm. Merie-Therese Colimon,
one of the pillars of Ligue Femi- .. ...
nine d'Action Sociale, is back '"
from Europe after eight months, ,.
with a Certificate in Psychology,
and another in Pedagogy. She
atter-led the International Cent-
er of Infanby in Paris. She also
visited schools, hospitals and A
rehabilitation centers in Loncwn,
i-amburg and Brussels.
Miss Colimon, a graduate of
the Teachers Normal School in
Port-au-Prince. and who will fur-
ther h.er studies in Psycho-Peda-
gogy through correspondence
courses from the University of
Lyon, France summed up, for the
Haiti Sun. the highlights of her
interesting trip abroad, which
we.have the pleasure of present- iMSS COLIMON
jug below:'
For my studies, and for my It is difficult to enumerate the
pleasure, I visited France, En- number of infancy establish-
gland, Germany, -Belgium Swit- ments of every type such as ma-
,zerland and Italy. ternities, hospitals. nurseries,
f was invited to Paris to the homes, and special schools which
International Center of Infancy I visited and where I was able
the principal branch of which is to gather valuable information.
at Bois de Boulogne. There I fol- In Belgium. I worked at one
lowed special courses d g of the most important establish-
with the medico-socio-pedagogic ments *Ecoles dAssistance So-
problems of children. All the pro- ciale de Bruxelles..
fes.ors of this important institu-
tion who are working in coflabo- I later visited the cities of art
ration with UNESCO and the in Italy. and was particularly de-
Sorbonne, are podiatrists and lighted with Venise and FPn-
educators of world renown. rencez-

---75 WW -- M 0


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..AGENCES OTIS McALLISTER,

S AGENTS DE MANUFACTURES


S.A.


TURNER DISCUSSING
TOURISTIC CRUISES
Undersecretary of State Alain
Tw-u'nier is in the process of hold-
ing important conferences with
representatives of the Maritime
Lines which work in Central Am-
erica and the Antilles, in New
York this week. The conferences,
ending May 30, are principally for
the purpose of increasing the tour-
istic cruises to Haiti.
Commerce Secretary Turnier
emphasized the progress realized
in Haiti in the domain of tourism,
at a luncheon Friday offered in
honor of the managers and agents
of the shipping companies. Mr.
Pierre Chauvet, director of the
National Tourist Office, Mr. Her-
mann L. DNsir, director of the
Haitian Tourist Bureau of New
York, and Mr. Kurt Fisher, presid-
ent of the Tourist Shops Associat-
ion, attended the luncheon.


6 HAITIANS TO STUDY
AT IAGS SCHOOL
Six young Haitian members
of the technical and administra-
tive staff of the Haitian Ameri-
can Geodetic Survey are flying
to Central America soon on a
scholarship to study *photogame-
try.7
Four men and two girls will
take specialization courses, for
six to eight weeks, at' the Inter
American Geodetic Survey trai-
ning center in the Canal Zone,
Panama.
Messrs. Auguste, Cassetana and
Dietz are expected to return to
Haiti next month from Switzer-
land. They were granted scholar-
ships by the International Bureau
of Labor (0IT) to study automo-
bile mechanics, adjusting and e-
lectricity.

LINE TO CUT MIAMI-CUBA
FLYING TIME

Flying timh between Miami and
Havana will be cut to 48 minutes
late this month when Cubana Air-
lines places the first of a fleet
of, Vickers Viscount turbo-prop
airliners in service.
Eight flights dailywill be op-
erated between -Miami, Varadero
Beach and the Cuban capital, the
airline reported.
These will be the first jet-po-
wered aircraft ever to fly between
Florida and Cuba.
The Viscounts are powered by
four Rolls-Royce Dart, turbine en-
gines, geared to drive propellers.
The aircraft have. large panoram-
ic windows, and special luxury
interiors.,


Cuban Crew Of Santonia
Feted At Le Perchoir

The Cuban crew of the *Santo-
nia fishing boat was entertain-
ed at a cocktail party Monday af-
ternoon at cLe Perchoir.- The
party was given by Mr. Martin
Routh, U.N. Fisheries represen-
tative. Guests at the cocktail par-
ty were: Cuban Captain Ceferino
Gonzales and his two crew mem-
bers, Director of the U.N Bureau
in Haiti Mr. Albert le Bel, Direc-
tor of the Fisheries Service Cito
Bonnefil, General Secretary of
the Economic Department Mr.
Guy Laforest, Mr. Gerard Philip-
peaux and Mr. Jacques Large.
After the cocktail party the
guests were shown slides by Mr.
Routh taken during the tuna
fishing experiments undertaken
by the cSantoniav off Haiti's
coast. The boat was leased by the
Haitian government, under the
auspices of the United Nations.
to investigate the possibilities of
setting up a tuna fishing indus-
try in Haiti. Reports have shown
favorable signs of sufficient tuna
for commer-ial fishing on a lar-
ger scale.


Young Calypso Singer Student

Of Haitian Drum Beat, Rhythm


That huge baritone now holding
forth at the Casino is Bob Ridge-
ly of West Englewood, New Jer-
sey.
Ranging from a low tenor to a
high bass he takes the customers
through a Calypso, replete with-
guitar and a petro-drum, and al-
though he doesn't have the vib-
r.nt sexy movements of Enid Mo-
sier,, his original rhiythmical folk-
singing shows excellent talent.
Bob, traveling throughout the
Caribbean searching for new mu-
sical styles, claims to be the only
rion -West Indian to ever sing
or even enter a Calypso War-.it
takes place in a Calypso tent and
there is no bloodshed. He is after
an illusive drum beat in Haiti to
add to his act.
The broad shouldered New Jer-
sey boy has been on Television in
Cuba many times --Teleniiundo.
His most memorable experience
on Cuban TV was when his photo
was flashed over TV sets as a
* Lost, Please Find' affair. His


friends were worried when he.
didn't come home and spent a day
and a night in the 'wild' hills of
Marianao (outside Havana) study-
ing the 'Nango, and 'Santos -
semi-religious, secret and some-
times dangerous society.
Traveling to the out of the way
spots, in search of better and bet-
ter-music, Bob had a highly sue- -
cessful appearance in the 'Patio,
club in St. Thomas, in Puerto Ri- '.
co on, the TV Coca Cola show and !'
in the Post House in Southampton,
Long Island.
Returning to Cuba for another '
TV appearance (Not the Lost and- '"
Found Department) !soon, Bob -
points out .he is trying to stress -.
the 'Ethnological importance .of -N
the Calypso, and West Indian mu- '
sic,. He is trying to popularize it
In the States.. -
If he keeps/'up his interest in
Caribbean, -j and" United States, -
folksongs -it wont be. long before
we, will be hearing; and- seeing j
more 'bf this young singer. ,


ANIMAL FEEDS PROMISE MARKET
FOR HAITIAN SUGAR BI-PRODUCTS


Thorough surveys by the Sugar
Research Foundation of New York,
and subsequently by the United
States Department of Agriculture,
show that the potential market
for sugar, black strap and invert
molasses Ifor animal feedings in
the United States alone is rough-
ly the equivalent of ten thousand
million gallons of blackstrap per
year. This figure is so fantastic-
ally large that one might be in-
clined to doubt it, were it not for
the reliability of-the sources that
offer it.
Here then, is a new potential
market for Haitian sugar that over-
shadows all others and which is
ready and waiting to be tapped.
Next to it disputes over quota per
centages and worries over internal,
tional sugar agreements are real-
ly small and petty things.
It has been proved that the feed
ing of farm animals can utilize
sugar in refined, raw or mixed
form; blackstrap or final molas-
ses; and invert or high test mol-
asses. As blackstrap iL a by-pro-
duct whose production depends
on the actual amount of crystaliz-
ed sugar produced, it appears lo-
gical to believe that the sugar in-
dustry can find its greatest expan
sion by promoting the wide use
of refined, raw or -green, sugars
and of invert molasses in the vast
potential markets of the farm
and slaughterhouse markets that
today have barely been tapped.

Numerous experiments and act-
ual 'use have proven beyond doubt
that sugar, and its by-products are
healthy for cattle both meat
steers and milk cows. It adds
weight tenderizes the meat, impro
yes the hair, helps to TIDE OVER
BAD DROUGHT PERIODS., When
fed to horses and mules, it impro-
ves the appearance of the animals
and gives a slightly increased ca-
pacity for work. Fed to sheep it
shows similar good results In hogs
it not onTy tends to save a high
per cent of the initial "litter, but
also increase the rate of growth
of the surviving sucklings -and
thus effects a double gain: less
animals are lost between birth and
Et and around, the weaning stage
and the survivors are bigger and
heavier. The feeding of sugar and
invert dr high 'test molasses to
birds (such as chickens and turk-
o,'s) is an accomplished and. prac-
tical procedure and all of the pre-
s.nt studies and large scale expe-
riments show the advantages of
such feeding. Csreful tests in Den-
mark and in the United States


show that the use of sugar in pre-
slaughter rations for cattle and
hogs promotes tenderness and col-
or of meat, improves the appear-
ance and tastiness of the livers
and cuts down the loss or reduct-
ion in weight of carcasses.

Animal feeds is one of the-great
est potential field! for the use of
Haitian sugar, not only in this
country but in the United States.
Now is the time for Haitian sugar
producers to get busy and assists ,
in the opening .up of this' new
market in,. the United States.' Oqr
sugar output is on the increase :,
and this may be.. the-' opportunity .
to dispose of the surplus.


WHO OFFICIAL 1)RE

" Doctor Samane, World Health i
Organization official, arrived ,in'!
Port-at-Prince-Tiiuesday to 'direct
the diverse sanitary campaigns
undertaken by WHO in Haiti
and to prepare a campaign -
against malaria; using' dhyhel-
drine. -...
Mr. Albert le Bel; permanent
U.N. representative- in Haiti,
gave a party in his honor Wed-..
nesday evening.


SHAITIANS OFF. Tf6 MEXCO
,<- ; '
The Haitian. delegation- to the
Congress of FEDECAME, headed
by Under Secretary Andr6 Du-
mesle, flew to Mexico Thursday
morning. Other members of thq.
delegation attending the Con-
gress in Mexico are: Mr. St Louis
Jeanty, Franck Boncy and ktoger
Boucard.


PARAMOUNT

Today 3:00 P.M. Contrebandiers
de la Mer de Chine
5-7-9:00 P.M. La Lance Briste
Monday 6:00 P.M. Coiffeur pour
Dames
Tuesday 6:00 and 8:15 P.M. La
Lance Brise 6 -
Wednesday 6-8:15 P.M. Le Sac de
Rome
Thursday 6-8:15 P.M. La Lance
Brisde
Friday 6-8:15 P.M. La Lance Bri-
sde
Saturday 5-7-9:00 P.M. La Ter-
reur des Espions
Sunday 3:00 P.M. La Terreur des
Espions .....
5-7-9:00 PM. Niagapa ,, .
: '....- ^ : .: < ,


HAITI SUN


PAGE 17





. PAGE 1k8

THURSDAY IMTISHERS CELEBRATE
BIRTHDAYDY OF GRACIOUS QUEEN
ii1 "

".4.


mi "t.' --*, ', ,

i. May 31 is celebratedt'ihroughiout the world by members of the Brit-
.-'-sh "1obnwea bit Nations, as the birthday. of Queen Elizabeth of
,'.4.England and'ofh te Unted'Kingdon. This lovely portrait of the daught-
.' "emr. of King George VI was: commissioned by the Fishmongers' Corn-
S.pany in the City of LondoniN-Born in 1926, Her Majesty was crowned
l;i.l- 1952.upon the death of her father.' The Queen's birthday is to be
."- observed here with. a reception by Her Britannic Majesty's Ambassad-
S or and Mrs. Sydney'Simmons from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Thursday.

N. 18 TEACIHEmS DECOBAIED AT THEATRE
Si Newton Ricot, ..teacher at the special ceremony held in the The-
S Lycee Firmin school, and 47 ot- atre de Verdure Friday afternoon
S her educators received the di- Mdy 18. Mr. Ricot has been tea-
'A.i ploma and insignia of the Na- chihg mathematics for 10 years
tiorialn Order of Education at 'a in private schools and 13 years

'in public schools.
,I T ,


(HAITI SUN)


AMBASSADOR DAVIS IN GOOD
AFTER 3 WEEKS IN HOSPITAL

Ambassador Roy Tasco Davis, the difficult medical
back from three weeks in the said that he had his dc
Bethesda Hospital, Maryland, a diagram charting J
was in excellent form when the in the hospital. He ref
eSun) called on him at the Em- ever, to draw a diagr&
bassy, Friday morning. Looking xSun.> Somewhat ma
extremely fit in a light brown complete happiness of
suit, with contrasting white ar diplomat was the e
waist coat beneath which parture of his grani
he admitted was secreted a cast. playmatess,) Toda a
The Ambassador's face showed no Lowe who with their n
signs of strain from his recent leaving the same *afte
ordeal, to the contrary he looked their Silver Springs,
well rested, home, after an exten
The doctors up north, he said, tion here with Amrbas
congratulated the Haitian doe- Mrs. Davis.
tors on the diagnosis they made
following his accident on the
grounds of his Bourdon residence
last month. He opinions that in .
falling backwards, a ligament |f N C
must have pulled and chipped a
vertebra.
Happy to be back on the job, R$ BEAU
the Ambassador joked about all BEFORE CLOS
BEFORE CLOSI
SHOPPING, BE
Dr. Mars Forms Group TAKE A SUPPL
r TAKE A SUPPL]

To Go To Paris Meet MOUS FRENCH

Dr. Price Mars, rector of the BEAUTY PRODU
University, convened a group of FREE PORT* PR
nrtictc and writeror 14 lastrida ,f-I


ternoon, May 18, at the Institut
d'Ethnology to discuss the parti-
cipation of Haiti at the Congress
of Artists and Writers of the
Black Race on September 20 in
Paris.
The magazine *Presence Afri-
caine,v sponsor of the Congress,
asked Dr. Price Mars to form
a committee to represent Haiti
at the Paris meet.
Dr Mars is flying to Mexico
-this weekend.


SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956


FORM


terms, and
actors make
his trouble
fused, how-
am for the
nrring the
I the popul-
eminen4 de-
dsons and
and Roger
other were
mrnoon for
Maryland
ended vaca-
sador and


Prizes Still Await
Lucky Lotery Winners
Paul Arthur E. Labossiere, 'cas-
hier at the Clermont workshop,
won a beautiful blue 1956 Ford
on the afternoon of Thursday, May
17, in the lottery organized by.the
Federation Haitienne de F.ot,.
ball.
The holders of ticket No 19101,
winner of a refrigerator, and tic-
ket No. f2545, winner of a radi,-
have not picked up their ises
as yet from the office of the Fe.
deration Haitienne de Football.
Luckes Pierre, Domingo Gqjesj
and a school boy of the Jn ltiie
Lamenais School won 100 goin
des apiece.


.OME

Tt FRANQP

ING YOUR

SURE TO

SOF FA- .A

LANCOME

JCTS AT
ICES:


U.. / ~Irce


C


?Jutrix treatment cream, loz. ,.. 't.
Bien-Aise, cleansing cream, I 2oz.
Souplesse foundation cream, I oz. ,1
Eau azure No. 16, skin freshener, 7 oz. c.:'u
Lancome face powder, 2 oz. .
L A N C 0 M E Beauty preparations

on Sale'at

JEAN FOSY LAHJAM
exclusive distributor


lur Price
$2.50
2.00
2.50
3.00
3.00






4..


I





HAITI SUN PAGE 19


Vie Lampson was in the hospit-
al Wednesday after a green man-
go banquet. He returned to Fire-
stone this weekend to help win
Uie Indiahapolis 500 auto race.


The City is losing an attractive
tenager and model, Melle Michou
Fouchard, on June 5. Their lovely
charmer is going to the States to
study interior decorating. The
Daughter of Judge and Mrs. Da-
niel Fouchard has been the object
of many fetes the last couple of
weeks.

Alfred Smatt and wife Colette
w-e o'er from Jamaica visiting
with relatives and friends.

SIrs. Gustave Borno flew over
i-om Havana Thursday on Delta.

Nicole Duthiers flew off this
week for a fortnight vacation in
tiavana with her mother and Aun-
tie, Viola Mitambeau.

Carol Haspil left hqme on the
"2ad and flew via'HaVana to the
States where she will continue her
studies. Carol .as accompanied by
her' mother, Mrs. Lise, Haspil. '
Guy Durosier visited Ciudad
Trujillo this past week.
Fa.duard Esper returned on ;he
'.it from Havana.

.,'Clibve .Corneos wed lovely 18-
i6r'old Miss Rochlielle Pick in
P illadelphia last evening. Twenty-
'. two year- old' .Cliye, the son of Mr.
.Ad Mrs Byron Corneos of Port
at:Prince, is studying. civil engi-
eering in Haverfdtd College, Phi-
lcd~phia,' where Miss Pick is atse-
c.tary to the treasurer of the
College. A .reception at'the home
of,Mr. and Irs: Coull followed the
cJurch we dfig.
;. 'f'I!, .. ..
"Readers are reminded that the
.Handicapped Bail will be held at
a. bane Choucoune on the 30th.
1,^xe following .day is a holiday, so
ibrk"ir no excuse for missing the
.'ialL.
,', ... , . ,

". '-Iotel Choucoune played Cupid
S. week-. .Tuesday two guests
-'Wpt- beore-the Justice, of the
'ein Lalue and were wed. The
.aewyeds, Mr. and 'Mrs. Jacques
.Lucas of Medellin; Colonibia, were
giyien a intimee," cup of champ-
.,4i- bithq Marinis of Choucoune
rL, : dzi"t g' t'-" h'e
Inowmg the Civil ceremony
ch-was pe .ormed by Jacques
o -Wl itnesss were Lucienne
A-Mik. 'Bob.' Koehler, Victor
S.eger F.ils 'and Fritz Cyril.




N.,
4*afc ---- ^
'1 .t^ ***' ,) /^


UN Mining Expert Stephen
Werter is living at Tropicana
Guest House at Petion-Ville.

Clinton Sweazea, Delta Air Line
regional manager for the Caribb-
ean, arrived today from San Juan.
He was accompanied by the Delta
loc.,l Manager for Haiti Hank Pe-
rea. Mr. Sweazea, with offices in
Havana, will be in Port au Prince
for two days on business sojourn.

Miss Monique Villedrouin and
Pierre Francis Salgado are to be
wed on Saturday June 9th at 6:30
P.M. at Eglise St. Pierre De P6-
tion-Ville.

The Fra.nck Laraque family in
Bois Verna is having a double cel-
ebration today. Michaelle Merce-
ron, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Pierre Merceron (Madame ne
Yolande Laraque) will receive her
first communion at Eglise Sacre
Cceur. Her new baby cousin, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Laraque, is
being held before the baptismal
fount of the same church.

Jack and Priscilla Schwarzscih-
ld of New York are consecrating
their two weeks holiday here to
roving all over the island. Oper:
ating out from their suite at Ibo
Lele, the couple struck obt Friday
for a visit to the north and the
Citadelle. Engineer Jack and at-
ist-painter-teacher Priscilla rented
a Hillman Minx with which to do
the country.

Two Pennsylvania lovelies, Mi-
riam A. Schuefer and Mary Nan-
asko, secretaries, arrived Friday
for three days at the Riviera.


Mr. Saxton Barrett, industrialist Deputy Raymond Roy married
from Altadena, California, arrived lovely Ginette Bourjolly Tuesday
today for talks with the propriet- morning. The Civil Ceremony took
ors of the souvenir- shops of the pIlace in the office of the Justice


14,


Marie-T.ihdrse Boucard is shown walking down the Aisle with Ed-
gard Danies. The charming young couple were married Saturday, AMailo
19, ct the Eglise du Sacre Cmeur de Turgeau:


*/ /'Ilwv \


I Lz 9; Tamous since 186, j


I ... ..., .... UU01AUC


Are you a working girl or a bachelor? With Mthe urge to enitertain
a few friends home informally but with rea,11j, eitwO' -foodi

You probably haven't the time, 6r energy, or'..q4tipmeit, to whip
up one of your own s'iecial dishes when you get hohme from work.

And your cook looks absolutely 'blank when -you announce: 'I'm
having a few people for lunch" just make a.,tefrlly good Italian
spagetti with garlic bread; or a Crab Mornay and'csed saled.L
.- ,^ .
Or aSeveral people are dropping in.for tea an3 cocktair- just
have some superlative 'sandwiches, and an old. fashioned date it .bread,
and a few dozen assorted cookies .. ' .

OR cl've invited some friends for dinner. Give us a good spicy
curry and rice with four or five relishes -or a. chicken d la king
with some tomato aspic.

Don't lose your temper don't lose yourt ook don't lose your
friends.
a:- .. l.-- 4
Order from is ( i advance, please) these or other main; dishes you
need. Take 'them home and serve them when you wish:
AU CHANTECLAIR
2 Rue Rigaud Bois Verna

.NARION DE YOUNG GRISWOLD (Formerly of Hotel Oloffson)
1' -. ? ;


I


, SUNDAY, MAY 27th 1956


Capital. He is on a combination
business-pleasure trip.
Mr. Burt Jackson, travel agent
and representative of the 'North
Travel Services of Miami, arrived
in. Port au Prince Friday for dis-
cussions with local businessmen.
Mr. Jackson is interested in the
development of commercial relat-
ions between Haiti and the U.S.
Lovely Nicole Rigaud gave a
dancing party at her Bizoton home
last Saturday night.

Mr. and Mrs. Marcel Gentil clip-
pered off to New York Wednesday
enroute to three months in Eur-
ope.

Ann Tomar is leaving to join
New Jersey's Luscious tomatoes.
Mi's. Tomar, accompanied by her
son Paul and daughter Babu, a
real cute tomato, are off to their
northern Summer Villa. Papa will
join them in July.
On the subject of vegetables,
Leon Hagerty, a real lemon, is re-
turning to Canada by way of Mia-
mi and Washipgton after a short
visit to port.
Mr. George Policy of the Elec-
tric Company flew to the States
Wednesday to arrange his gener-
ators. Wife Ruth is in San Juan
visiting with daughter, Cynthia.
Leslie Chenet returned to Mont-
real Wednesday by PAA. Leslie
spent a two months sejomr with his
family and renewed old acquaint-
ances, after an nbsense of six
years in North America.
Jim' and Margory Lee and
daughter Susan are back tb P.Ntion
ville after three months' in Jam-
aica on Kaiser Aluminum business.
Colonel .IcAllister, L. Frank
Roter .and 'Roger Sm4h. flipped
into town this. week 'on a VBnanza.

iMadame Ti- 7-eorg4-Ager "deli-
vered her lawyer. h"i sbii 'T0 and
one-fialf pound baby 'rl' Thurk-
day' morning at Clinic 'Castera. A
coincidence all the five Lger
children were born on Thursdays.
Dr. Christian Va&lm6 leaves soon
for a scientific coigree in the
United States


of the Peace, in Lalue. The De-
puty and his new bride are mak-
ing their home in PNtionville.
Haitian fabric maker Ren6 Ar-
mand and daughter, Martine, are
leaving for holidays in France
'Bientota.

Haiti's Ambassador to Guatema-
la and Mrs. Durc6 Armand return-
ed to the Capital this past week
with granddaughter Chantal Deetr
jens.

Edith Siegel Theile arrived from
Caracas last 'weekend with daught-
er Monica. Edith is stopping with
her family in Pacot and will fly
off early next month to make a
motor tour of Europe with he&
husband, who is still in Venezue-
la.
Colonel Marcel Maillard, form-
er U.N. observer in Korea, gave
a highly informative lecture on
the land of the aMorning Calms
'at the French Institute Tuesday
night. Colonel Maillard, now a re-
sident in Haiti and one of the few
to survive imprisonment if -the
infamous Nazi concentration camp
Buchenwall during World War
1, accompanied his talk with col-
or slides which helped him tell
the story of the country. The lec-
turer compared Haiti and Korea
and showed the outstanding char-
acte-istics of the country and the
people. There was very little men-
tion of the 1950-53 'Police Actions
in his lecture.
- XXX -
Mr. and Mrs. William Narr sai-
led to New York, via Panama 'Li.
ne, Monday at 7:00 P. M. for at
look at Broadwhy, before flyig
to Switzerland for several months
vacation. They expect to -rettzc
in October. .-
-* .. A X X ,.
Agronomists Jores eve'
and H. Hilaire returned tbis'eek
from extension. course :stfidiejkin
Honduras, Guatemala, Costa Rl-
ca, Nicaragua. They will resume
t h e i r Agricultural Extension
work in the 'districts of Cayes
and Jacmel.
XXX -
Miss Ginette Mee. daughter of
1Mr. and Mrs. Michel Mee. and
Mr Gerard Vaugues, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Pierre Juvigny Vai-
gues, will be married at the Sg-
cre Coeur'Church next Saturday,
-June "2, at 6:30 p. m.
-'' xx
Robert Wychd who is an ICA
technician with the Department
of Agriculture out at Dawmiens-is
a Tropicona Guest Houser. ,"
Mr. Carl Herbeit Borgenstier-
na, Swedish minister to Haiti,
left for tfi Dutch Antilles Wed-
"nesday after a short stay in HAl
ti.' 6


Mr. and Mrs. Abe Birembaum,
proprietor of the 'Miami Colonial
Hotel., arrived in Port au Prince
Thursday from. New York. They
are staying at the El Rancho,.

Regular boosters for the 'weak-
er 'sex, visited our fair city in the
course of a world tour this past
week. 'They were Adele R:acheti
in Domemgheth, an engineer from -
Milan, Italy, who is treasurer of
the International Federation of
University Women; and engineer
Maria Luisa Rastelli de Baj and
her lawyer daughter. The distin-
guished professional women Stop-
ped at Castelhaiti and were shown
the town by Mrs. Marie Lucie Ma-
nigat, president of the University
women in Haiti, and Dir. Edith Hu-
dicourt, the Association's vice
president.
.XXX '

Mr. John M. Young, known here-
abouts as the 'mustache', is re-
gretfully leaving Haiti because of
urgent commitments in the United
States. He is writing a book on
the hospitality of Caribbean coun-
tries. Mr. Young will write a week-'
ly article for the "Sun. as he mov
es around the world, on hospitality.

It paint no reflection on the
management but by popular de-
hand the Magic Cine didnt show
'Cell Block 13- and the Param-
ount showed a choice ,film than
'Viva Zapafa, this week.'
xxx
Mr. Hess, U.N. cooperative ex-
pert, will arrive soon to organize
the cooperatives in the south. He
will live in Cayes... The uninhab-
iJd. house belonging tc- Mrs Leys'
on .thib Petionville highway, across
froim the 'Petit St. Pierre. sta-
'tue. Ambled last week*... Hai- .
S. dtdlegation, to the ,39 .'ssion
. _'. "Internat"nal Org tion
fabr in Geneva is4 ded
fMr Sorel /ftaud
^^ elle t Hie H .-mbas-
btin Pansjq.r$elegation members
to the aIntrn'ational Conferenceof
Labor inr-.'teyva art Mr. GCrard
Basfie emXioyee .representative,
and Joe Piorgeo4iis, employer re-
presentative...". .
,

Mr Axir4 it-. Meteorolog-
ist Engipee, q;qid.7to Haiti last
week aT-'sp e0$g fbur months
at theJSl.e*obog ic-a I Service .'
School ofu' ert5. Rtco as assistant
professor a Pd technical' translator
in a sp t&rsebf aeronogy.
;. The pios,' of this course is to. .
pripare-technicianiis capable'aof as-
sumingM Y ii'o J.he n .t-
work. of r uadbvsoundi.k stations
that the Ai Mtorbgical
$ervicb is bui l.'int.he,Antilles..
These statios'-tffl study th&ehigil
atmo*here ahLthe pre-visiop of
hiU rricanes,. shion ,of this 'kind
willUprolibly' le -.bilt i. : Haiti
before the endi',.the. year'r.







AE i0 HAITI SUN-I-'L


?AGE 20L,.. .


"I
it 4
'"'I,
'C'

S
I ''




V
I'. "'~


The songs and dances. a .fnge.:
by Mine. R.naud give the atmos-
phere'of a peasant's fete to the
play. Tickets are on sale for only
twenty '($.20) cents.
NO. CABRITE LIITTERAIRE
SThere i& no. Cabrite Litteraire
this Sunday at the amphitheatre,
but the Regular guests who at-
.tend the weekly meetings are
,Invited to watch a final rehear-
gsal and discuss the piaywith the
producer, choregrapher, author
and actors.,"


W^*




























|7 SHOES
.M
ik.,r


of these individuals, I do not be-
lieve that they could have been
the ones inspiring this move-
ment. Certain of them are known
for their attachment to Doctor
.(Francois) Duvalier who, in pa-
renthesis, happens to be still
living under cover for more
than a year, afraid' to show him-
self, notwithstanding the Presi-
dential clemency, but who is try-
ing to--make people 'believe that
with t1. support of the Amer-
ican personnel of SCISP, he is
( certain to accede to the Presi-
dency, as if that was admissible.
He.(Duvalier) also maintains that
She is the esuceesseur de la poll-
tique de feu le Prdsident Dumar-
sais Estime c(successor of the po-
litical doctrine of the late Pre-
. sident Etime) and that in this
capacity' all the partisans and
friends of the ex-Chief of State
are duty-bound' to support his
candidacy.
SThe Colonel said that so far,
the' Police have not been, able
to exactly determine the politic-
al background of Windsor Lafer-
Iriere and Alex Dominique. Whe-
1'ther or not.they are sponsored by

.THEATRE D' AITI
(Continued from Page. 1).

parents' home to live in the
streets is never out of troq)1e1
But, she is innocent and unqWite
,i.:of the' role shetwas suoed .to
-4lay. spite of t'fer ivieation,
she' falls in love with the *appren-
tice houaga and is not very dee-
y ved'In learning of' :#
?a r'sth death. In the last' acts
~t%te^.'aake^'kgive way to )eq
m..,..v. uBii*-g. ga.... .:.-. .-ne.,trotk he

', ,"" ',"','k,,'' ." -^"^ ' ". ^ A '" ,..
,.,.. s ... ,. . .-.. ,. , ,
at :.l _r.... ~~~~~1:3 :,, "= = .... . .. ... ....


meq~n^aiuziamua
lifg *platW;.aI]
wafihls s u*i i
rcatianettrs.- 'tb
spAdarfnmas Si
reill ID reVl~t
kept$%eafy &o E
tbemQ \vbo mui
*inrf^r

onlm mW.
h.ut -
aIcewfl awa


prqnopflt~t~eW'bytM .ottireei: ci
almost forgot to tell you, my
dear Magloire that I iad the oc-
casion of finding out that you
doubtless know the hiding-place
of Stephen Alexis for whom the
O,61.Ir ......
qobce.s spqfohWn9; sdrlft
yestefl ;^,?on" published -
ticle entitiei,'.Franges
less t Ai a;'ln, not going t6'ask
you to'rev-al shis hiding '-iee,
but I, ,,o just like yo q,?,o
know tlm he is not a. sli*gr
to i s 0ovem ent. 3.:.


0*











U


B_ -





e


candidate Louis Dejoie, or are
inked with Eddy Sylvain who
has taken refuge in the Costa-
Rican Embassy, and 'whose ac-
tion on th' students of the Uni-
versity is constant; is not yet
known. Referring to Eddy Syl-
vain he said: -With regard to the
latter, It is to be noted that pu-
blic opinion considers him as
one of the rare H'aitians, capable
of serving Rs intermediary .bet-
ween a foreign power and the
opposition 'movement.,
Colonel Prosper said that in
the case of the students and
school children, they had been
contacted by several groups. It
has been proved that prior to
the strike, a tract was circulated
at Lycee Petion Yith the text:
eNous sommes fatigues de Gloire,
donnez-nous Des joies.' (We are
tired of glory give us some joys.)
He again referred here' to the
case of the two Decastro bro-
thers who are natives of Cayes.
eThe Lycee Toussaint-Louverture
students seem to have been dri-
ven to white heat by the parti-
sans of candidate Duvalier,z the
Colonel mused.
He further declared: cWith.-erL-
gard tothe pressure exerci.d.w^n
the chauffeurs. apd,*,,,A %.


7Jtan T Tri;pe, prdaident of
an' Amierican has declared that
Iis1 -l tiiat-obfective wol.d, be,,t
a are'.f $1i00 one way t'.&"" ^
don; :'Thee tourist' ft ...
,by.
i--mmo i '*Lj~W~~ "Wer-
~f. Ame" inne.
"tflca. I i' and
ts oft 20 per cent
euced to. promote va-..
1. ''. ''
W.S.f th0 e overseas aiiw j
t potential supports.;
Ikflcted results from .even,
lower tourist fares. As the U.S.,.
standard of liVi1ng rse, .forg .'
travel in the years 1950-55 grew .
twice as fast as disposable income
of individuals
rIn 195-theie were alproinim- ,
sly 12 mllio- famrni-.
lies wfii'itif s ,000. The
num. i4ig incomes
above .$745W0ta totriple
from. 21'mioil $'.to 6.6 mil-
tMoobm^ui Ustated.
travAl~ntaflesjfsro*th ctadening
trav6l:T4 e4wlow tou-
rist ta ih6 idiat U.S. citizens
4ieparpt % iS ope by air in
1955, -with' Ttour st class
fhres,' to&~tftrj344$ Whe pralect-.
*ediiaet. t we iew. low fare

iThes~ ', tr a would be ip
E oni .tqbe number which
Ste PIslantic .route as
it claFs cabin clais passen-.

6, VeWq'.to Latin,- America
M ebon is-Iexpected to
.'ncrqe",.- Roit 4y. '.!
.tul v' 't '
-JFbr, Sale..Pay pen. with sun-. i
i'iadre, exqeient condition. Apply
Blanchiseserle Jimmy or Maison
(Ptnton, Rue Pan Americaine
.,efon-Ville.) '
Wanted
Young'Haitianm woman well edu
cated, formerly French teacher,
wishes to ir unigrate to United
States to work as nurse in
private home. nursery, school,
for etc. Holding degree,' prepared
for higher job. Please write to "
Haiti Sun, Cite de l'Exposition,
Port-au-Prince. ,Haiti.


I FOR EVERY OCCASION


a


HAITI SUN


(LA SITUATIONS
S(Continued from Page 1)


At this point, Director Franck
C. Magloire of %Le Matinp gotl
out of the spot with the follow- j
:ng remarks.
.After assuring"'O 1onel Pros-7,.
per that we never thought for a..,
moment that he would ask UV'A
such a thing and we. fdlt anyhow'
that we should tell'-him that, we,
were already in pogAession .0 the r
article in question ind thit We..
were glad to seize this occasion
of assuring' him how happy we -
would b' it ip the'case o., our
confreres Alexis, Jolibois afidOc- '
cenad, the Police should soon ar-
rive at the conclusion that they
had committed no reprehensible
acts.


*PAA WANTS

LOWER FARES

Pan American Airways recent-
ly announced a proposed third
category of fares, matching the
ocean shipping lines' three clas-
ses of service first class, cabin
and tourist. I
The new concept of low fare
air service would be 15 to 20 per
100 less than present tourist fates,
and 40 to 50 per cent below pr&-
senpfist class fares. These fares,
sWjeict to approvall by govern-
ni'ieptfs c ceTi,.ed would offer
imnort n'&:,, gs to air passen-
.g~~iers Aeaortiveled routes
mAs< P.u^ttq Rico-NtW Y-rk,.
.Pubt*6~f eti~ na1i or over the


I




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