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Haiti sun ( October 29, 1950 )

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr. ( Port-au-Prince, Haiti )
Publication Date:

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
System ID:
AA00015023:00356

Full Text


11


An


V


THE HAITIAN ENGLISH..


LANGUAGE


NEWSPAPER-


Port au Prince Republique d'Haiti


Telephone 2061


SUNDAY, MARCH. 4th 1956 No. 24


President Lays Diquini Resort Cornerstone


iN .JiPLY TO GERARD ALLEN

TR. GRANT EXPLAINS WHY


FLOIJR 'MILL IS
()t' Monday, February 27,
3959, .in the office of the Haiti
Sun, I 'met Gerard Allen for the
first. time. He is a brilliant
y .wag man whose star was just
begiaing to rise above the bu-
asins horizon at the time mine
descended into the Limhb re-
served f9r, retired minor functio-

SHe. asked me what ] thought .of
the article, .'Gerard Allen Ex-
plair:ns'. Why Flour Hill Not P.ac-

I was sur;prij;sed and
grateful. Surprised became
few p e o p'i1 e now ask me'
for my opinion, on matters of im-
portnee Qltefu] -'because if

qoi T dan say. proudlyi ,Ge-.


aA~bf \etbtrdie.anhdl
al:~ ~~~~n -is~oimise .T ^f~ ....eaQ an
rrua t- 'I fl'e 'is sincere
is .4s"' 449 16fid uciellon.
Eu6 "bis ."f*gduir ents kpdt cdndu-
slonS.", ..,qbe estiohe&. This I
,rbpot d._. do '
i Aie ,'PhA'lodked nnly -at
the imazate, minor perturba-
tos -igt restdlt from the
S 6StabEshsent 'of a flour mill .and
Shas' entirely oirerlooked the imn-
"medie,, Amasjor and long term
benefits which Would accrue to
the .laitian ieonomy and people.
His argiiumenis may be summed
Slip-as follows:
I.: If no flour is imported, he
Suniderstands, shipping lines will
no' longer call at QOtporte as :'the
only cM-rgo Utey'carry. -fo tWiee
.I -i. '. me.
ports is flour. Thie shfll amount
of coffeee available for- Pxport is
mnot' worth bothering. wit h
Thie 'statistics of the. Fiscal De-
jartment,.'show many ottbd class-
es k merchandise earried to ouit
ports. A mn.ment's thought should
St'Invince aijyone that people in
'the outpors'-will not stop using
flour just bec-ause it is milled in
HaitL


PRACTICAL
The steamship lines will be gl'ad
'to'carry it to them and to pick up
a few sacks of coffee for the re-
turn. trip. It is surprising ohow
hard 'these steamship lines will
work to earn a dollar.
2. Mr. Allen states tbha't bread
wilt be snatched from tae 'mouths
of thousands of stevedores in the
ten export ports. The stevedores
in the outports will lose noth-
ing.. They will be paid for flour
-coming from Port-au-Prince just
'as 'they are paid for flour coming
from abroad.
Stevedores in Port-au-Prince are
not 'paid 156,000 dollars a year
for unloading and handling 30,000
tons of flour a year. They are
paid hlr the'day and b y: the
hour. 'f,':they average twentyjcen.ts
.a ck .f th_,: -
," b a 6 0',0Ot:d l "'~a
sny k. tb*' ; '. . 'd :4 t:

(Contifinned dn page 16):

Pastor Harris
Ousted -Froni
St. Marc Temiple
Reverend Boaz Alexander
Harris, pastor of the Eglise Bap-
tiste Temple at St. Mare since
1921 was ousted from his tem-
ple last "Friday when represen-
tatives of a court of justice en-
tered the -church and took over
the building -and grounds in the
.name of the owners, the Lott
Carey Mission of Washington
D.C.

(Continued on page 2)


Dumout Bellande is shown with
pion of the Diquini Resort Track
from Italy.

AT-MORNE- HERCULE
Wandha As cMEDEE
Success At Opening o

Haiti takes its place at the
side of the Greeks and Romans
with the opening of MoriSheadi-
Leroy's new amphitheater at
Morne Hercule in Petion-Ville.
Th2 inauguration of the 400-ca-
pacity g Theatre d'Haiti, on Tues
day evening, set on the side of
a hill near the playwright's
home, in the tranquil new resi-
dential section of PetionDville
hao a view of the Bay of Port-au-
Prince. appearing over the flam-
boyant tree-fringed stage- It is


the realization of
dream.


cherished
I 6LI


Poet journalist actor-play-


Cardinal Spellman
Enjoys Delay
Cardinal Francis SpelTman,
the Archbirlho. of 'Newo Ydrk
and a world figure in the Ca-
tholic Cnurch. arrived here at
9:30 Wedn-tsriay morning, accomn-
paried by Monseigneur Francis
McCarthy.
The Cari6u'-al. enroute home
to New York after delivering
the. inaugural address at the
3-day Peace Cornerence in Ciu-
dad Trujillo, called on Presi- -I rare s-:ght at the Casnio TPhr -- La Siesta. needs no Ie boats
dent and Als;isme Magloire at wit-it/ithis -Hil/er helhcopter. The pilot flew the "copter of f hIe yacht,
the.Nat:cnal Palace. prayed at Monday. and: landed it on pontoons at Bowen Field. ,La Siesta., out
the Cathedral Basilique Notre. of Galvc-'ton. Texas belongs lo Texas oilman John lecoin who has
Dame, iited" Archbishop of interests :a the drilling for oil on La Gonave, and also owns the big v
Port au Print-a Monseigneur Gousse amphibzous airplane that conmuteio back -atwl forth between
(Continued on page 20) the island and-Port.


Dumont Bellande
Plunges Into Tourism,'
With 3' Million Dollar
iftesott Project ..

'-Dutitt ellande, wi'h .the of-
filal'lay'i'f the inu cotinerstone
Friday eveplng by the Presalent
P Tof'r 'itTe Republic at Diquin,
plunged vigorously 'Into-the lar-
Sgest tourist venture undertaken
in the Republic to date. Bellan-
de estimates he will spendi in
the next there to four years,
over three and one-halt" mi, ion'
Jidollars on a tourist t esot u idich
Wvilt""ave all the trimmingss.
President bugloir, *efitrale
frgtA .Inthe laimei up of go-
veptEn, b social figures
a ending thde4unction,' laid the
tle future greyhoundaczn nam rnestorte in the iaondsoapeil
. The pup was specially intportdd uare which Bellande1:'as de-
ed-"o" Sylvio C.r l' e g iA-.
es-t.. I..k ",- -n d of ..u.ism...btti.f .ntody-i









wh ad ou a o'calvI scpe acresi ~onog'i 'tbe fotirlls ixif
sco' e H f rf.the industry to aek owledge
te ut Bterrific t. the woireot .aipr dssoro:ehidr
f Tsaheati e d'Haitigs for the inaugeuiadfbh hi$t f.:..
"e a itr 'ae o PesQd neral Cator, tbi, fath .,
wright-proiPleer, Ieoy waited le sot 6 I -
wright bgoh~an frofh Cavillnon for. ?"U &.
almost 20 years ebefoPeahe ..as "tssr .Mon"t .. -- '
0eP rorn o r a n o te gilt..
'able to e rt bonse tion of his ecommissfned to do.'a'.bb, '-
theater At..&August. He has de-bu.t of' Sylvio Catolv..:4y' .
icatedr'" too the fostering of a
*,legitimate stage and to the The resort, o? more.tio-
development of local talent. hundred bungalows, a n.. 11-story
An eager audience of 350 per- -main apartment building,.-tlree,
(Co'n.tiuued on Page 179... .
(______ ____o___ae___large swimming pools, golf'eouz-
7 se, horse 'and greyhound racing
LeavIh. night club -and restaurant, cock
cGovernor Leave fight stadium, Jai Alai and ten-
After 4-Day Visit nis courts, ,hyground -and a
The Governor of the Dutdli' .shopping center; will be settled'
West Indies and Mrs. Straycken, .on hundrerds bofheauifrlyllvlaud-
who made a four day official' vi-> scaped acres on: the foothills of
sit'to Haiti, left Saturday aboard Maorne ffopItal,'.. nine, %iinutes
the 'Dutch 'Battleship F-824. from the eablutil, on,'".ro1erty
During their stay the distinguish once owned by. the Dej;=4d1n fa-'
ed visitors called on President m'ily,-Of old-banking fk*1&
and Mrs. Paul E. Magloire and
high government officials: (Continupd' GUiqe.-,2)
On arrival Wednesday the'
Governor and Mrs. Struycken
vers welcomed at Bowen Field NOMURDER
by Dutch Consul Hermann Bur-
gers and .Ar ,Roger Savain, in- JUST FIGHT
producer nf Ambassadors. ,That-..'
afternoon they jiald a courtesy The murder story of a Petion-
visit to Foreign Relations Minis- Ville woman given prominence by
ter and MrIs. Joseph D. Charles a daily mprning newspaper, this
at their Pacot residence, and at week drew 'a blank. The fight bet-
6 p.m. were greeted by Minister ween Lochard and his Christiana
of the Interior Adelphin Tel. which- took place last' Sunday mor-
~n.ning near the ('nnietr nfa'-.-


The distinguished couple were
received by President and Mrs.
Magloire at-the Palace on Thurs
day morning. In the evening
tpey were guests of honor at a
reception given by Consul and
Mrs. Burgers at the Petion-Ville
Club, attended by official and
social Port-au-Prince.
On Friday the visitors were
honored it a luncheon it Hotel
Ibo Lel: by Minister Telson,
with Cabinet members anra Ge-
neral and Mrs. Antoine Levelt
attending... .


Ar


L141 _retr on --*iii-j U cm;e
Delrias road definitely did not
end up in murder. In a telephone
call to the Petion-Ville Police the
-Sun. learned that there had
been a street fight between the
two. Both received blows and
wounds, but there was no ques-
tibn of assassination said the Po-
lice.

Tuesday evening at Stade
Magloire the opener of the
Venezuela Panama Hai-
ti Tournament will be played.


I


VOL. VI


I





Page 2"


HAITI SUN


SUNDAY. MARCH 4th' 1956'


PASTOR HARtIS

FROM ST. MARC
(Continued
The ousting was the result of
a long legal battle between the
American organization, repre-
sented by Cabinet Leger of
Port-au-Prince, and Reverend
Harris. According to informed sour-
ces, Pastor Harris had originally
brought suit for $8,000 which he
claimed was the amount due him
from the Washington Mission
due to a cut in his allocation
during war time.

- The Lott Carey Mission filed
a counter suit establishing that
the decrease in allocation had
been accepted by Pastor Harris
and demanded an accounting of
the large sums he had received
from them. They stated that
the school and church had been
built with Lott 'Carey funds and
that since its completion Harris
thought he could exploit It for
his personal profit.

Pastor Harris won the first
round of the fight in the St.,
SMarc courts and Lott Carey ap-
pealed the-case in the Tribunal
de Cassation. The Tribunal de
Cassation broke St. Marc's court
judgement and sent'the case to
the civil court of Port-auPrin-
ce foi re-examination of the do-
cuments -and supporting eviden-
ce.

The civil court of Port-Au-
Prince renderMd judgement in
favor of Lott Carey and the
Haitian Court of Justice order-
ed the property, of the American
organization restored to them,
including the church, school and
reimbursement of $1000-for-land
which was never bought by )as'
tor Harris.
1
'Thn ar." al of tlhe court oi
justice re,1r,.cntIatlves at the
temple last wnc. .Lound thle past-
-or absent. He lid gone tn the
island of I, Gonave to preside
-at the annual get-together at
tho island's mission. The large
school, built by Reverend Harris
for the Lott Carey organization,
was taken over -by their legal re-
presentatives in the presence of
Attorney En'ile Cauvin, a memb-
er of Cabivet Leger.
According to these same in
formed sources Pastor Harri,
was already residing in Hait
when Lott Carey chose him to
represent them. Lott Careygavy
Pastor Harris a contract allow
ing for an allocation for himn
self and for his wife, who wa
his assistant.
Lott' Carey sent the Pasto


OUSTED

TEMPLE
1 on page I)
large sums of money for the
construction of a church and a
school at St. Marc and an addi-
ional sum for the purchase of
and. During -the war Lott Ca-
ey was forced to decrease the
allocation and advised Harris
who accepted the decrease. Aft-
er the close of the war Pastor
Harris claimed $8,000 which he
says Lott Carey owed him for
these years and had not paid.
In protest against the action
ther-Silo Baptist Church of St.
Mate,- another congregation te-
presented by Reverend Harris,
filed a complaint in Court. Ho-
wever, the attorneys for the Lott
Carey Mission stated that this
had nothing to do with the Silo
Baptist Church, for the action
was carried out strictly against
Reverend Harris.

Members of the Reverend's
congregation, faithful to the
)astor who had shepherded them
wver the past 35 years, and in
:he majority at the St. Marc
-'emple, held a touching mani-
'estatlon of sympathy at the pri-
tate residence of Reverend and
Mrs. Harris last Sunday. Now
they are awaiting the arrival of
the new clergyman who is to re-
, place Reverend Harris.


THE CHARITY BALL FOR

a LA GOUTTE DE LAITi

The Committee of Direction
of the .Goutte de Laitb, has
chosen March 7th, -Mid-Lent for
the4 Charity Ball which will
tale place et Cabane Choucou-
ne, under the high patronage of
ts President of Honor, Madame
Paul Maglolrc.
The proceeds of the ball will
4h used for furthering the work
on the pavillion which was start-
ed in January, near the Cathe-
dral's ftealth Center. The group
has accomplished much in pro-
viding milk and food for under-
nourished babies taken under
Its care.
An appeal has been launched
to the public to attend the ball
where at the same time one can
have a good time, an important
contribution towards charity
wilt be accomplished.
-*Mrs. Preetzmann-Aggerholm
is President of the Committee.
Otler members are Mrs. Cle-
ment Magloire. Vice-President,
Mr. Fernani Crepsac, Vice-Pre-
sident, Mi-ss Denise Borno, Se-
&retary and Miss Denise Haspil,
Treasurer.


WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED

REAL FRENCH AND ENGLISH

-PIPES-

ALSO AN ASSORTMENT OF REAL

TOP-QUALITY WALLETS

AT SUCH REASONABLE PRICES THAT YOU CAN

HARDLY AFFORD TO MISS.

COME AND SELECT YOURS FROM OUR

WIDE RANGE OF PIPES.

BILL FOLDS AND CHANGE PURSES.

MAISON ORIENTALE


Dmifnnt Bellande pointing out second completed bungalow from
the sundeck of the first.

President Lays Diquini Resort Cornerstone
(Continued on page 1)


During the President's ins-
pectron of the project he visited
two modernistic style bungalows
already completed, one in tas-
teful colours with a large room-
walled in on three sides by glass
jalousy windows-containing a
combination stove-refrigerator.
two bedrooms with an adjoining
bathroom. The roof is a sundeck
with a magnificent view of the
bay of La Gonave and Port-au-
Prince. The other completed
house is a duplex with two se-
parate apartments. There are
25 houses in the process of build-
ing and a total of 60 will be
completed by December 1 of
this year.
The top-flight engineers and
architects on the resort project
are Pierre Baussan, Daniel Mal-
branche, Jean Millet and Max
Vilmenay.

In conjunction with the Di-
quini city a modern pier will be
built, on property near the
Coast Guard, with shopping ar-
cades, bars and mooring facili-
ties. From the pier the visitor
will be transported to the manr
made island of Iroquois, on the
reef in the middle of the bay.
The island, already one-half
completed, will have- a: Large
sandy beach with swimming fa-
r!1ftiac- ArehitUfa Tvllax Twldtrof


At the present time the far
seeing Bellande has 111 acres
and holds options on 250 more
acres of land. In preparation for
landscaping the area he has a
nursery of 1,000 coconut trees.
At the site of the present Ludec-
ke house the main Building,
with 11 stories of apartments
will be erected. On the knoll
overlooking the cottages will
rise the night club, and restau-
rant. Bellande guarantees that
the tourist will have everything
for his own comfort and conve-
nience. Taxis are prohibited to
enter the resort. They will stop
at the parking area and their


ciities. Arcitect max iEwata The 25 nei' bungalows can be se
and Engineer August Boisson M e Hapil.
are doing the building and de- !r
signing of the pier and island
project. NEW CAPE HAITIAN GUIDE-
Theie is no shortage of water BOOK COMING
as the resort is close by a na-. The Haitian Department of
tural waterfall, where in the Commerve is to buy 10,100 co-
olden days the whole of Port- pies of an English language gui-
au-Prince cam_ for a swim on de to Cape Haitian. and the Ci-
Sundays. Diquini, future source tadelle that will be off the press
of Port-au-Prince's water supply, in April, author Gerard de Ca-
which is presently be i n g talogne announced last week at
piped from a man made his Roi Christophe Hotel in
tunnel in the m o u n t'a in, Cape Haitian.
will also feed the resort's The guide will be distributed
three swimming pools. F10,000 in travel agencies throughout
filter units will keep the water the United States and will con-
in the pool so pure that the ton- 'ain 70 pages.
rist may drink it. -AN EVERLASTING



r -^s^^~^


LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES

SH A EouFF-,.
PLACE GEFFRARD ._


I


passengers- transferred to the
resort's special silent car' ser-
vice.
One interesting aspect on the
property is the small family cha-
pel, dated from post colonial
times, with an all marble alter
and statues. The chapel is over-
grown with weeds and Mr. Bel-
lande plans to restore it for use
The American Legation was ori-
ginally on this property and on
the corner of the chapel is ins-
cribed: Henry Terres Furniss,
Born March 1908 died 1909.
Bellande came to the
rugged area in 194Z and
had to wait six years for
the first telephone call and
electric power. He stated that
now the tourist may have air
conditioning in his house but
thinks few will want it due to its
cool position, at an average 350
feet elevation.
Dumont Bellande, w hose
drive and energy and keen bu-
siness insight made .him a man.
to be reckoned with even in
Belgium, where he founded an
import-export business before
the last war; while still in His
early twenties' has with the A*op
of sisal, ventured wholeheart-
edly into the tourist industa.
With typical thoroughness he
has made a complete studt of
tourism and after a few minutes
In conversation with himi kt is
obvious that he really -kiows
the problems and answers of
Tourism. With becoming modes-
ty he stated, eAlthongh I -have
gone Into ',the study of tot- m
thoroughly and know what is
needed I am always open for
suggestions and helpful ideis. a


*en on the crest of the foothills of

Mr. Gerard de Catalogne add.
ed that be will coon publish a
Cape Haitian news magazine
carrying information no what i%
taking place m t:-:c surr.-tinding
area. The magazine will come
out every three months.
The former Director of the
Tourist Office in NeW York said
that at the present time he is
working in a book of the life
of 'King Christophe from beginn-
ing to end. The book. to be pu-
blished in both English and
French, is expected to he out in
about a year.

GIFT


/)


c ^STERLING


DRESSER WARE SETS
BON DON DISHES
CANDLE-STICKS
SALAD SERVING SETS
AND A VARIETY OF OTHiER CHERISIHABLE ITEMS
ON DISPLAY NOW
At Don Mohr

Sales Corpration S. A,
4SRue Roua Tel: 2375


---.






SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956 HAITI SUN PAGE 3


,fHoliday In laitih: Composer Fields

On Melody Cruise To Port au Prince
Lrving Fields, famed North A- recent composition cHoliday in
merican pianist and composer, Haiti,, a recording of which the
spent the day in Port-au-Prince musician hid brought along, was
when the S.S. New Amsterdam played throughout the inter-
docked here last Monday. He view. Mr. Fields stated that the
was accompanied by his lovely Haitian Meringue is making a
wife, Jane. sensation in the States with
Mr. Fields was invited to vi- Fred Astaire and Arthur Mur-
sit Radio Commerce and was ray caught up in the movement.
received c enthusiastically by Di- A seasoned traveller, the
recteur M. Fdouard Gentil and great composer loves to write
the other staff members who as- music of the countries he visits.
sured 'Mr. Fields that his works Some of his compositions in-
were well known in Haiti. He dlude OrMelody Cruise to Paris,'h
was interviewed over the air Melody Cruise to Italy, -b and
by Oswald Douyon, who translate he has written Melody Cruise
ed his statements into French. music for Vienna. Israel, Spain,
The visitor expressed his plea- Mexico, Latin America and
sure at being able to visit, if Havana. Irving Fields and his
only briefly, the country whose Trio arn well-known throughout
music he greatly admires. His the world, It consists of a piano.


Noontime meringuers at El Ianclo Mr. an4d,Mrs, Irving Fields


Seven White Angels Return Home
Via Port de Paix After Hectic Flight


Seven planes of the White
Angel Missionary gi'oup depart-
ed Friday at 10:30 a.m. for Port
de PaLx,' -wvhere they expect to
spend the night before continu-
ing on To Camaguey, Cuba.
They had cancelled their plann-
ed tour o' Puerto Rico and SL
Thomas when one of their pla-
nes, piloted by Nelson Johnson
of North Dakota, for no known
reason suddenly spun around in
a ci-cle while taxiing along the
Ciudad Trujillo runaway and in-
jured its landing gear. It will be


shipped back to the States.
The Pastors, rigged out in
black uniforms whla silver braid
aud carrying ranking 'general's
stars on their shoulders hid
created quite a stir Monday
when they first landed at Bowem
Field.
Bowen Field's bewildered air-
port officials refused permission
Monday for the staging of a
scene from the Bible by visiting
White Angel Missionaries of the
Church of God. At the height of


the busy tourist season a harass-


'4
a'


himself, a drummer and a bass Jim Herringson Supervises Landing
player.
Fields' Trio has appeared at 6,000 pounds of V.O.A. Donated Clothing
the Roxy Theatre, in N.Y., Thun-
derbird Hotel in Las Vegas, Ver-
saillas in Miami Beach, Traymore \..\\..7
Hotel in Atlantic City, Park She-
raton in N. Y., Gray's Inn in g tt
New Hampshire and many others t l
of the nation's top night spots. o t Fr
The versatile Fields has also ndty "a
been vocal coach and arranger
for Carol Bruce, Nancy Walker
and Mary Jane Walsh. He was
musical director for ABC and
at one time conducted his own
large orchestra.
During World War II Wte Ar-
my beckoned and Fields' won-
derful talents were put to use
in the Medical Corps. He capa- '---
bly demonstrated on the Radio 5cs
Commerce piano that his me-
dical training didn't hurt his -
piano playing in the least.
Ir'ving Fields, born in New
York, began to play the piano
at the age of nine and gave his
first Carnegie Hall recital at the
age of 12. He was awarded a
scholarship at the _,Eastman
School of Music and attended
the Master's Institute of New ,'..-
York on another scholarship.
His first professional job was Jim Herrington handed the documents of the 6,000 pounds of cloth-
in a night club in the Adiron- ing to Madame Magloire at the National Palace, last Friday, and
dacks and from there he con- supervised the unloading of the assorted garments which are destined
tracted to play aboard a cruise for the Mlad cme Magloire Frnndation. Mr. Herrington, Detroit Ca6tain
ship to South America. This of Industry and amn d'Haitis here oniinridl tiip with Mrs. Her.rn-
furnished him the opportunity ton at Hotel Choucounte, acted on behalf of the ,Volutteers of Arer-
to become familiar with Latin ica)).
American Music. Above: Herrington, accompanied by Henry Berminghan&, at unload-
In 1951 he married Jane, the ing from the Coinnzar Merchant. The transportation fr'oMt Miami was
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Mau- sponsored by MAr. Clarence B. Moody'.
rice Ferdinand and the couple
have two children, Mark aged
three and Diane, who is one.
His cHoliday in Haitib record-
ing was made by ABC Para-
mount and upon leaving at 5:30
for his ship, Mr. Fields declared EMILE ROUMER --- JEREMIE.
that he intends to give -the Hai-
tian meringue a major spot on Neg Port-au-Prince toujou erou? que province C6 oun pa-
his Trio's musical program. En- quete fatras, oun magma ignorants ac anafabhtes, dd demeu-
chanted with their visit the res en veste alpaga noir, gilet blanc, ac oun coco macaque,
Fields-plan to return for a two tete d'argent.
weeks 'holiday in Haiti in the Done, plusse oun n'hom bWte, plusse li gain change ujoUn'
near future with the children. oun position Ian gouvernement la C6te.


Oun Chef d'Etat, en visit pr6sidentielle uan on cltoyen
qu'ap vin' sou li. Malh&r6 a tU sot' lan jardin'l, ac otin rade
d6fraichi.
ed airport official said: a I don't -Oh! oh! dit president a, A la n'hom laide, a la n'hom sot-
want to be quoted but they are te. Figu'l portr6 ac oun pot'd chambre...
not going to use my airport for -Min uion Excellence, c6 oun m'sie.u capable, li pas mal
such a demonstration. Not even lan zaf'l.
if they were the original cast.t -Mon che, ou pas comprende. Caument yo r616'l? A la
The fleet of eight white pla- n'hom -laide, a ia n'bom sotte. Map nonmin'l d6put6; C6 mou-
nes, of different makes, came ne con ga m'besoin. Yo pap ban'm tracas!...
swooping down over the field Ce oun explication coument yo prend toute ancien archives
before circling for a landing, greffe J6r6mie peu yo boul6, jet6 lan fumier.
The leader of the group flew in Lan autodaf6 ca-a, gain oun morceau journal dat6 1785. C6
by Pan American and met his nla oun historien 'ta suive crise 6eonomique p6riode ga-a. Yo
flock of 24 missionaries at the mine parl6 de demarches Louis XVI cot6 la Russie pour
airport. Tsar-a infludenc6 gouvernement Yankee de telle sorte que St--
Six of these planes were Domingue ta respire pi libre.
feared lost over Cuba when one Ca expliqu6 que sous i'gne Borno, oun professeur l'6cole
of them made a forced landing te vine touched oun cheque la Banque Nationale, oun cheque
at a tiny airstrip near Niquero do-uze gourdes et demie. Comme li pa't cab endossa:
on Cape Cruz. Five planes appa- -Coument, on c6 professeur i'6cole et ou pa con'n 6erit?
rently had followed down the -Min oui, m'We professes lecti, m'pa prof6sse d'6critl.
sixth when it made a forced Naturellemeat, pon douze gourdes et demie par mois yo'
landing. United States, Cuban 1pa't en droit eaand6 oun malheureux pou li capab 6cri.
and Jamaican rescue units had Ca expliqu6, qne Ian oun ecole rurale, directeur a mounftr
begun a frantic search late t 1&ves yo jon6 commerce ac poker. Classes la t6 consists en
Thursday when the planes'were jeunes garqons'qui ta'p jou6 cares pendant que direeteur a
refforted overdue on a 200 mile tap ranniasse prine.
overwater light from Cama- a expliqu6 onn hebronozor que d6put6 Piou t6 fait noamini
guey, Cuba. to Kingston, Jamai- Bariad~le.
ca, until Havana's Rancho Ba- --Coument, Un Tel, on pas con'n li, ou direeteur l'eole?
yeros airport learned Friday -Min oui, m'pa cab fait classes, min m'cW oun bon admi-
morning that the planes were nis(rat&.
all safe.


The eight planes were part
of a formation of nine craft
owned by the Church of God
Prophecy of Cleveland,, Tennes-
see, on a Christian Fellowship
tour. This religious organization
ha.c 12- temples in the Republic
of Haiti.


French Institute
Director S. B. Lando
Leaving
French Institute Director Si-


uM SettucrtnMa y.I.2 oj ftie t .s rorresta. snrprisea :;i s;hecicnat They hell services Monday mon B. Lando and his wi e Ma-
of the ganr tairc ft corner and cr'cated' a bit of laIun-hltr last Sunozday. night at the Grand'Rue Temple ry are soon to leave for Bogota,
He uwas o boarL. Arltur nai Doimla Borden [all Siring Ii i. zn coin- of .,The Church of God,' under Colambcia. Mr. Lando will take
patny wit;: t!.c owner.,. Capta'n Frank Howiarj and oirnahlist Autelin the auFpices of the local Bishop up the dir'rztion of the French
JoltcaPur of Lc .LVoeuellhse. going for- a r:de in a circle a:oi,,,d I:.e Hearn. They sang hymns to the Institute at Bogota after ten
Forrestal. Whchr '. c f'rrt:.,p's qu.rcr rn:nter challeniiged the bojt encd accompaniment of syncopated years of fruitful work in the de-
asked her course Bud Setterlund ansivwered him. The carrier person. music, and had the church rock- 'elopment of closer cultural and
net on watch were surprised to find that their bs wicas o, the yacht. ingt o the rhythm. The meeting intellectual cooperation between
Bud Setterlund, chief of the Forrestal's QAI's (helmnsmen), is froin was attended by hundreds with Haiti and France. He will be re-
Portland, Oregon, and has been nine years in the U.S. Navy. Setter- the crowd overflowing into the placed here by Mr. Frederic
lund saw service in the Korean war and joined the Forrestal in 1955. street. Martin, cultural counsellor of


the French Embassy at Bogota.
With Director Lando at the
helm the ,mall modest house
at Avenue Charles Summer ib
Turgeau became one of the prin-
cipal culture seats of the Repu-
blic and for several years has
occupied 'ts own modern buil-
ding, with classrooms, a large
auditorium and stage, built in
the Cite de l'Exposition at
",,Rond-Point de la Libertk. P
MIr and Mrs Lando's transfer
is greatly regretted by their
friends who are holding a se-
ries of fare well receptions in
their honor.


PAGE 3


1956


SUNDAY, MARCH 4th.


I-


R,,A 1-.179 .f #I,- I'CQ li- I


HAITI. SUN





PAGE 4 HAITI SUN SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956


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Commercial Francisco OLIVER
Phone 3193


1i Joseph report


Eleven Canadian businessmen who are tripping through Latin Am-
erica on an Amusement trip are expected here March 11th... Mr.
Weatzel is here at the Geodetic Office installing a big copy camera...
PFC. Archer is home on leave from the U.S. Army. The young soldier
used to command the dance floor at Cabane Choucoune a few years
rego. He returns with *Tacte codine... Gerald Brierre ,bamboched his
fete awry Saturday night... Mr. and lMr. Lee Hills, top brass in the
US newspaper field are arriving here at the El Rancho March 20th.
from Montego Bay and continuing their Carib tour on 29th. Mr. Hill
is Vice President, Executive Editor of Detroit Free Press, Executive
Editor of Miami Herald, Vice President of Knight Newspaper chain
and Director of Charlotte (North Carolina) Observer... Bonaparte
leaves the Ue to re-ihvade Europe this coming week. Citoyen Bona-
parte told the ,Sun. he would fly back to Belgium via New York to
join his family and children. Bonaparte Auguste calls himself a news-
man and chemical engineer... Mr. Leo Mayer the Pharmacist stepped
out on the town last Friday night with Mrs. Mayer. It was Mr. Mayer's
birthday... Nijmen Chamier left Wednesday for New York to Study
Child Care... A brazen robber was caught in the act of stealing Hcnri
Ceruli's fighting cocks from his yard in Petionvfllb. The cocks called
their master who has the P-au-P Cockfight stadium when the robber
entered the yard in the dead of night... Not so lucky Raymond Chan-
cy in La Boule lost his laying hens to a chicken thief the next night...
Dr. Paul Moise is 0. K. after having his nose operated on.. 1st March
was the day of the Banco Colombia so well portrayed during Mardi
Gras, started counting cash here... Dr. Maurice Armand and daughter
Ceramicst Jeanette enjoyed their visit to Central America and the
French West Indies... Leslie Chenet is expected to visit Port for a few
days this month. The young accountant is living in Canada and likes
it... SOUR GRAPES they call it. 'Who,, states a lone voice, this I
past week, aro the two leading FLOUR IMPORTERS who each attemp-
ted to get a concession from the government last year for a highly
protected flour mill, which according to each of them would have
brought an era of prosperity such as Haiti has never known. Could
they be the same two who are today amongst the wailing who cry
ruin and fibafiial Collapse to Haiti if a flour Mill that asks no prot-
eceion Is established...- Major Bill Osborne after falling an unrecorded
distance from the Liberty II has been classed still in Al condition
by the Gitmo Medics. Bill fell from the USAF Mission yacht while


A NIGHT IN THE CITADELLE
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Canrruth
and Miss Grace Randall, of Dal-
las, Texas, spent last Monday
night sleeping on cots in the Ci-
Ladelle.
This is tneir fifth visit to the t
Cap Haitian area and they plan .. .
to spend a lull week visiting the
Citadelle, :lhe Indian caves at
Dondon and other historic spots
in the north. .
Later they are going to visit r.,-" ."r. N:
the Indian caves at le Borgne .',.;
and anothtrr fall week in the (i,..,. '::
south at. Raiymond les Bain (Jac- "'- A"' .,
meli, les Cayes and Jeremie. .. .',1 ",


LIBERIA'S DENNIS
LEAVES FOR U.S.
The past fortnight could be
rightly called cLiberia Month:
in Haiti. with all the. festivities
that surrounded the two-weeks
visit of Liberian Deputy-Journa-
list and Mrs. Charles C. Dennis.
The distinguished couple left
Haiti Wednesday to visit their
children in the United .' States
before-continuing to their." home.
The "Hpitian Journalist Associa-
tion became pf age, and the 7-
month-old organization went
overboard in entertaining the
visitors.

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it was in Dry Dock Coast Guard have not reported any damage to
their dock... Former US Ambassador to Cuba and owner 6f the
Miami Transit Bus Line, Bill Pawley called on old friend Fortune
Bogat intransit in the Capital Wednesday. Bill's father had the Gro-
cery store on the Rue Pavee opposite KIneer, in the old days. It was
a favorite place in days gone by for ice-cream... Joel Marks is down
from New York visiting with his grandma, Mrs. Goldenberg of P6tion-
viile... Time Magazine correspondent in Central America Harvey Ro-
senhouse said that Le Perchoir had the Tour de L'Argent beat... It
was drinks on the house yesterday at the Rex Cafe Humanitarian-
proprietor Andr6 Blanchard observed his birthday.. A Port an Prince
to Jacmel Camionette h as -an unusual fender sign. in English 'Dog
with bone has no friends....
The Trans-Canada Air Lines are soon to be installed in Haiti, in
accord with the new trade convention between Haiti and Canada...
Topsy Goldenberg gave birth to 6 wee puppies Thursday A.M.... Char-
les P., Blanks is on his way to Rio. The Point IV man is expected
back... Clint Sweazea, Regional Manager of Caribbean Stations of Del-
ta was here at Villa Creole last week.. Edward Precker, Columbus.
Ohio business man and party arrived here last week in their Beech-
craft Bonanza after being reported missing on their flight to Haiti.
They were later found in Matanzas, Cuba... Harold Rosen. Point IV's
Economy Chief has received word of his transfer to Washington.
effective in June..
I




SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956


'N


HAITI SUN


. HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
GERANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL E. NAJAC


OUR SUGAR QUOTA ON
We recently published sever-
al articles in connection with
the action of the American Se-
r.ate tending to reduce by more
than 2,000 tons the quota figure
for our sugar which had been
granted Haiti by the lower
chamber of the United States
Congress. W'e believe it useful
to once again point out the im-
portance of T..- (iuot tfo,- Hai-
tian economy.
It is true that Haiti, up
to the present, has not
been able to fulfill integrally
the quota of 40,000 metric
tons stipulated by the
International Council of Su-
gar on the world, but this in no
way affects the question which
we are bringing up. The import-
ant point is the difference in
the price which Haitian sugar
brings on the American market
in comparison with the prices
obtained on the world market.
This difference exceeds 2c,
U.S. currency, per pound.
The current on the world mar-
ket is something lihg $3.30 per
100 lbs. f.o.b. On this figure of
$3.30 per 100 lbs. the Haitian
Government levies an exporta-
tion tax of '$0.44, U.S. currency,
leaving a gross price of $2.86 per
100 lbs. to the exporter. This
price of $2986 is below the re-
tail price of sugar and
as a consequence the Had.
tian, exporter stands a
'oss on each quantity of sugar
exported ol the world market.
On the American market, the
current price is $5.35 per 100


U. S. MARKET


- o, aL


lbs. Of this price the exportation Dear Mr. Eiederich,
duty ainounts to $1.03 per 100
Ibs., leaving a gross price of I have just completed a short
$4.32 thus allowing the exporter visit at Cap Haitian and al-
to make a profit, though I will soon be leaving
Consequently, it is evident for the United States I wanted
that the Haitian Government to get some information.
would profit directly from an in- The Care Haitian, Citadelle,
crease of $0.59 per 100 lb3. on Fort Picolet and Sans Souci
the ex part duty for sugar sold area is one of the loveliest in
in the Lnit.d States, and 'that! the world. I have travelled ex-
the exporter woald benefit from tensively and find this to be
an incic,". in p.iice of $1.46 per true.
100 Ibs. Furthermore, on all pro- Th? houses are spotlessly
fits gained rvy the exporter ,after clean and Iet why is the picnic
zleduc-t.i-n .f lii, retail price, the garbage dumped into one of the
Haitian Grvernment would col- spare rooms at the Citadelle -
leet income tae. which would th2 smell is awful? Why are mo-
constitute a direct gain for the ironic visitors permitted to write
Haitian economy. their names on the hallowed
Swells of the Citadelle and Sans
TheCic'o e it is ob vious that Souci ?
the general economy of Haiti is The guides ase charming and
directly affected by the volume perfect gentlemen but why does
of sugar which it is allowed to each one tell a different story
sell on the American market. and oftentimes fiction at that?
The argument that Haiti has Is it true that Christophe
not been able to fulfill its world brought a giant cannon to the
quota and that any increase in top of the Citadelle? A cannon
the quantity of sugar -which she capable of shelling Cape HIai-
would sell on the American mar- tian and yet when this cannon
ket would reduce in proportion was first fired it went back-
the volume available on the wards, over the ramparts and
world market assumes, then, no down into the valley ?
importance. Under actual con- Who was the owner of the
editions there is no doubt that it Winchester rifle that now recli-
is of interest to Haiti to sell nes in the Cape Haitian mu-
more sugar on the American seum ? This repeating rifle
market which is the only foreign came out after the war between
market allowing the -Haitian the states and yet it is displayed
economy to make a profit on its amongst relics of Haiti's war
export sales of this product, with the French.
(Translated from c Le Nouvel- I believe that Fort Picolet is
lisle. a) one of the scenic wonders of


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the world and rates second to such a wonderful location tor
the Citadeile and yet no one observe the valley far below.
takes care of it. The walls are, Signed: A viti 'lirist
overgrown with grass and the ----.. -.'.i."'-'--
-path has never been repaired O .
since a landslide carried it away
On Fort Magny the monument
to General Etienne Magny is
cracked and in bad condition
and swrrounded with sugarcane
chewings dropped by a passer-
by. This monument bears the
Mason's insignia and possibly
they would be interested. in re-
pairing it..
One item that I found utterly
fascinating is the bathroom fa-
Cidties at tha Citadelle. Sanita-
ry conditions are excellent and I RTEL PLAZA
the view hreathtaking. It has Champ de arts




-$ 1sF






PAGE 6 HAITI SUN SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956


FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT
JANE NELSON
THE pBEAT DECISION
New York Feb 27th...
.aiti and the United States both face presidential election ; in the
months to come and for each there exists a peculiar problem.
A sense of frustration must certainly be evident among supporters
orf President Paul Magloire. For this man has been tremendously po-
pliar and has contributed substantially to the economic and social
development of Haiti, burt at the same time, "the constitution of his
cdtintry forbids him to run for a second term.
S- The United States, however, faces
a completely different problem. In
America a president can be elected
i. tfor a second, third or fourth term,
tor, for that matter, for as many
terms as the people desire to keep
him in office. Franklin Delano Roo-
sevelt. it will be remembered, was
elected for a fourth term. go, Hai-
ti's problem is not ours.
Our problem is one of a man's
health a factor which can not be
amended or changed by the vote of
the people -as a constitution can be.
And it just so happens that the man
.whose health we Americans are pon-
derin is the current president of
the country, Dwight D. Eisenhower.
This is not news in itself, for last
.September 25 headlines around the
world, including Haiti's, announced
.that he had offered a heart attack. What may be of interest, however,
is the turmoil that the state of his health is causing in the United
S&atea today. 0
Four year ago aike, then a neophyte in the political arena, buta
a geniu:s on the battlefield and the kind of genuine, huiable and un- t
sophisticated man that most Ajmericans found themselves endeared
to, was elected President of the U.S. He was elected by more votes
than any president before him had been able to amass. And he wasu
,the man who was able to break the twenty-years of Democratic rule. i
Four year ILatter his political honeymoon g has not dimmed; he ist
still the idol of millions and generally considered to be the only mant
who can keep the Republicans in control of the Presidency for the
next four years. .
In the years to come President Eisenhower may be criticized for S
such details as not outwardly condemning Republican Senator Josephr t
McCarthy two years ago when a Senate committee was investigating t
-het metho( with which the Senator rooted out Communists in this o
.,coittry; not rebuking Secretary of State John Foster Dulles who has
.,on several occasions given the world the impression that the U.S. is
..on the wariath; not advancing such popular causes as foreign trade.
And, it i5 t o n vxPKevtd thql hie will be continually criticized by De-
.WO t f ./l',ering farm pjrices to halt huge surpluses and for slight-
ly reducing our e,:penditures on defense. But this is largely the result
of party stile; cven some members of his own party violently cfisa-
gree with Ws distaste for isolationism, among other things.
On the other s!de of the ledger, Ike's reputation will long be re-
membered for a lot more that is far greater in scope. Peoples around
'the world !rae been influenced by iiis peace overtures. He himself
said before leaving for the meeting at the summit in Geneva last July,
c...now, for the first time (in the U.S.), a President goes to engage
i-n a confererce with heads of other governments in order to prevent
war, in order to see whether in this time of stress and strain we
(Continued on Page 15)


President's Great Great Aunty
Invites All To 100th Birthday


Mine Grandisson Moise, the
great, great aunt of President
Paul Magloire, announced last
week that she hopes the Pre-
sident, her many friends and
just everybody will be able to
help her celebrate her 100th
birthday next February.
Her comfortable home, at the
attractive little town of Quar-
tier Morin, is always open to vi-
sitors and during August's fes-
tival of St. Louis the doors are
opened w'de and people come
from miles around to join in
the festivities. The town of Quar
tier Morin is the home-town of
President Paul Magloire who
had the lovely Chapel St. Louis
de Morin r.hbuilt at his own ex-
pense last, year.
The grand old lady, who bro-
ke her leg three years ago but
who said the Port-au-Prinee
doctors fixed me up very well,,
is up and around every morning
when she attends Mass, joins
in the singing of hymns and
tries to attend all local wed-
dings.

Smiling and spry at 99 years
)f age she readily answered
questions on a variety of ques-
tions ranging from the Americ-
an occupation to her opinion of
modern dancing.
When asked about the many
neidents in her past that come
to mind, she replied, (as the na-
tural protector of my people I
always tried to stop the violen-
ce and killing of innocent per-
sons that took place during the
uprisings and insurrections that
took place before the American
occupation I always tried to


teach the values of human life
to generals on both sides of the
conflicts.
e I found the American occu-
pation very hard in the beginn-
ing but like all Haitian people
I feel that it brought peace to
my country. v
Supervising the opening of a
bottle of ch.munpagne, with stern
insistence that the glasses be
spotlessly clean, Mine Moise, in
answer to questioning as to
whether she liked champagne,
spread wide her arms and said,
e but of course. I like every-
thing. '
Constantly inter-rupted by vi-


sitors that flowed through her
house she stated that she-
thought irodern conveniences
were wonderful and that call of
these things are helpful and
am glad to see my country im-
proving and advancing.- We had
asked her what she thought of
electric lights, radio, automobi-
les, etc.
There was general laughter
amongst her relatives when we
inquired as to whether we were
tiring her. e You can not tire
here She always tires us and
will do the same for you. She
is constantly on the go and mov-
ing about,; the onlookers re-
plied.
Modern dancing entered the
conversation and the smiling
old lady, over her bubbling glas,
(Continued on page 15)


President Magloire is shown with a group of government officials
in conversation with Mine. Moise. "-


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vs restone

0e~ft~


HAITI SUN


SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956


PAGE 6




D
S Y "'U MR 'R-H.41T
SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956 HAITI SUN. .."'


THE FRESCO MAN
Owner-of a home-made push-
cart fitted out with a fifty pound
block of ice and a dozen quart
bottles of variously coloured sy-
rop which he pours onto cubes
of shaved i-te to make a kind of
water-ice, t' e 'fresco man v is
to Haitian children one of the
most int'rpsting people in the
world.
He is -o be found almost every-
where in hront of schools,
pushing through the crowd at a
football game, weaving through
the stalls in the market place,
wherever there' are people and
especially where there are chil-
dren.
Chief item among the fresco
man's> tdols is a small metal
box, oddly shaped, with a slit at
the bottom containing a flat,
- sharp blade. He passes it over
the, block -of ice in a smooth
swishing motion, like a carpent-
er planing wood, and the ice is
shaved into the box which when
it is filled produces a 4 fresco
of the shape of the interior of.
the box.
The o fresco man t then takes
it out of the box, pours syrop
&ver it from one of the vaxious-
Jy coloured bottles ranging from
traxlsparent to deep red or
bright yellow, and hands it to
the c-astomer who ordered it. He
receives e cinq cob in exchan-
ge one cent in American cur-
rency.
The p-usn-tart which the fr0e-
co man; uses to take his mate-
rials about i s made of wood,
with three metal wheels one
in front rnd two at the back.
Two iron bars of different
lengths are used as axles and
the total cost of the cart may be
as much 3s six dollars while
each bottle of syroo costs 15
cents to make.
Raymnond is such a fresco
man,. Every morning he leaves
his house al half past six, so as
to be early at the place where
they sell ice, and where he will
buy twenty-five pounds to start
the clay.
Then be hurries to one of the
capital's lycees to wait for the
tchoo] children who come to
ichoonl at eight'o'clock, and he
slops on his way only if he is
called by nr, early customer.
At eight o'clock when all' the
children are in school, Raymond
pushes his push-cart through
the streets, far and wide, but at
tenr, thirty hie returns to the sell-
ers of ice for another block.,
then ret-rns to the school.
The ice i- covered with a piece
of thick sacking which prevents
it from melting quickly.
At eleven o'clock when the
children rush out of school, you
may sec Ihejn cluster around -


SRaymond, -.tretching out their evenings, specially during Car-
arms, chattering all at once, nival time, days on which reli-
quarelling and fighting in a gious or any other kind of great
desperate hurry to get their manifestations are held and the
fresco, evenings of the football games.
The fre,.o man is a master of Raymond was born at Bainet
his art a.il is so active that he en 1919 came to Port-au-Prince
c, prnparc seven ,frescosin at the age of seventeen with a
five minutes ... and hlie loves the couple of people with whom he
hustle and excitement of the was supposed to work as a yard
rush hour. boy.
He remcains there until two ,.. .r r* c
He re ins there until two Motivated by his ambition of
o'clock and when ever' child having an independent position
is back in shl, h goe hom having an hndependant position
is back in school, he goes home i in life. bitt courage by no
n life. but encouraged by no
for lunch, r ien starts his jour-
te. oe until quart- one, he became a fresco man t
ney o%,-,- .'ie streets until quaIll- ,
Sba I at thie age of twenty five, and
er to fou when he goes back 'w he lives in a house which
to the same school to make somehrentsr nine dollars a month
.. 'hv rents fnr" nine dollars a month
more rapid sales. h
,,, , 'and has a ,,'ife and two children.
He knows in advance all that ife and two children.
will be going on in the city, His cost of living is a little
higher than a shoe shine's cost
I 'tg because instead or being satisfi-
. ed with what is given to him

I 1 ff' he can afford for himself, his
SP lh- wife and his children.
'livi He also saves more than the
I 449" shoe shin? because while the
shine is at the cock fight or
S at any 6ther gambling place
I wasting money, he is at the
." (same place with his materials
.. l selling fresco for money.


where ever it may be and is
among the first *fresco men -#
to be there if it looks like a way
for him to Wtke money: When
things worvz lut well he can
make Up to "three dollars a day.
Beside the regular sales he
makes during school time, the
best time for him is on Sunday


SHis special attraction is in his
work, Raymond told your report-
er, when there is any amusing
thing to be seen, he sees and
makes money at the same time
while other spectators only see.
He also likes to'go to the town
where he was born with his wife
and children to visit his relati-
ves.
He says that his progress has
been quite rewarding from a
crest6 avec> he became a yard
'roy then a *fresco hian' *. Now,
his ambition is' to see his chil-
dren keep going up the social
ladder and, in the future, be
able to help their father to be
what he would like to be.


THE ONE AND ONLY


Down roe/y Ruei


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and his magic drum
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Pktionville
every
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(Dinner-Dancing EL RANCHO)



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1





PAGE 8 HAITI SUN SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956


ENOUGH OF THIS HAP

:j 7 .77 '"""K"J' :'


Bayard M. Mallery, Wyeth International Limited. Inc. Field Mana
ger, shown -with Gbrard Menos. Mr. Mallery handles Company affairs
for Haiti -and the Dominican Republic. On his first trip to our Repub
lie he declared he was very happy to discover, Haiti, and was charm
ed with the-beauty of the country and the hospitality of its people
Wyeth's big seller here is the specially prepared milk for babies
Sma., and the Maison George Naud& is the firm handling local dis
tribution of the company's p products.


Saturday Night its Always CABANE CHOUCOUNE
Till 4:00 A.M. SUNDAY.


Iboucn


Every Thursdoy 9 P.M. to 1 AM
DANCING WITH FOLKLORE SHOW
- Sunday Folklore Show
ADMISSION 60 CENTS


PINESS


Everybody is glad that new
chemicals provide marked re-
lief for the mentally ill (LIFE,
July 11). But now there are
signs that the ingenious che-
mists may be going a bit too
far Wyeth Laboratories, for
example, tith its new drug E-
quanil, which is claimed to do
for people who are merely neu-
rotic what other drugs do for
the psychotic.
Consider the implications of
such claims- as these from a Wall
Street Journal story: s Equanil
brings quick, safe, non-habit-
forming relief to people who
suffer from tenseness and an-
xiety, and to those tried by the
strains of fastpaced modern liv-
ing... also to psychosomatic
- pains associated with stomach
s distress, often a painful indica'-
- tion of tension ...b This sort of
. thing could just about disrupt
. the whole tenor of American
, ife.
SThere would be no more ex-
cuse for that shaker of martinis
to a trying day. No more excuse
for ulcers for high-powered exe-
cutives; instead of a -badge of
honor, a sort of wound stripe,
ulcers would become a badge of
ignorance ( i Good Lord, Hotch
Kiss, you mean to say you hav-
en't heard about Equanil ? ;)).
In fact, all those who take a
sort of secret pride in being
just a little bit crazy would no
longer have the slightest ex-
cuse for otherwise pardonable
eccentricities, such as flipping
cigaret ashes into trouser cuffs,
forgetting to pay bills, failing to'
remember appointments, writ-
ing on tablecloths and all nervous
mannerisms such as eye-twitches
ear-wiggling,, cheek-tugging and
unconscious hair-plucking. From
newspapers, magazines, bill-.
V boards, and blaring across the
airwaves, Everyman would con-
front the horrifying slogan RE-
TURN TO NORMALCY OR
IT'S N BODY'S FAULT
BUT YOUR OWN GET
RIGHT, GET EQUANIL !
What a dull world that's
going to be. Perhaps Wyeth
ought to suppress this latest *ad-
vance) before it's too late. Neu-
rotics of the world, unite You
have everything to lose but
your pains !
-.


VILLA CREOLE


HIIEAR THE FIVE PWECE
VILLA CREOLE
ORCHESTRA


Tuesday Night
BARBECUE
HAITIAN STYLE


.ind hear Haitian music at its best!!!


* 4QUADT 8. RP POOP
BOUQUET b6li4UETi'



.rWA__'1 .' I4^*" ^ afr ^ ~* .' 4 ..-
LA PLUS ANICIEINE-FAMILL'E DE DISTILL'ATEURS 014AITI








"// ( o/w/awf/" "
^ ';;', fw / )^ L
1 PORr-AU-PRINCE HAITI WEST INDIES
- - - - -


The ok5V t it a*ija 5tne ftg )I ttt-
9oqtin 2Xm diaatton- out Owt {I attn

Voodoo-jeWe4q 4peci4 czeatcd 4 tton

PORC[IAIN ..u.un OrALCOPENHAEN. ROYAL VIE NN --
BiN, & GROENDAHIi m UJ 9fat~t EMBRUIE.:


SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956


PAGE 8


HAITI SUN


c





HAITM SUN


for the motorist wo dermaMis ie inst frm a atte"r


* ,, ,


HEAVY-DUTY DE LUXE iATTERY>t }
YOU gW mu u a. WiA eayy- y &. .lue ... ,..
..... ped-. wen ym bay -o-,, --. 'tud.
2 5 ~ e i m z m g p w h o s h f~ i ~ u v .+ .;

KENEL PIERhE Exclusive distriltdtor k H
, .. , -, .' . .
2J.6A
SPhone 226 . .. ... .
Rue Payee.- Rue du Centre. ".,. -'
.4 .. 4 ,. : :


AIR DEFENSE IDENTIFICATION F -


,-,WELL, NOW I I(NOW WHY OL' IAPPY'
EASTER BID ME GOOPDBY.E 5 CASUALLY!
-HE HAP PDLPLEPD STRINGS TO HAVE ME
As;IG NEP To THE SAVANNAH GAY
COMPANY. SHOOTING: A MOVIE ON H11j
'l-^ <.LAND .-


5INCE THE AREA I WITHIN THE ALSlU
,.RQUE .AIR t:FENE IPENTiFICATION
ZONE IAM SUPPOSEDD TO. ACAS. ULAISON
IPLMAN FO R THE A19 FOkCE....
VI \_. An


DON'T KNOW WHICH WILL. MNE-PE T
MOST PROTECTION -TH..E AJ. O" 1!
SGECE-T--O THE MOVIq ccwyY. :.
WHEN SOME OF THE HOTR oC "CM
ENT, IIP-TLANPWILLIAW,4 .&'.UX6
AIM FOZCE BASE SEE -;55 J.T.rr E i -LLY-
oo pWOOD -o!.-...


*. I-^. '*
42"


. .. *, *. : ,
;, : 3 ',** *..,



+ ,.. "* .;

:, -', ,,
1




-,+ -.,.
l' .^.







1 I1 l"** ,
-' "

'" +;;i + .$
'. 4.%.,



l/++ ,


THEN AGAIN I MAY BE HOLDING BACK
BECAUSE I'LL SEE SAVANNAH 6AY. IN
IHER OWN ELEMENT-.. IN W1IC. STEVE
L CANYON WILL BE JOE NOPLACE...


^tI'M GOING TO WArTH 14GOiEBW PLAY.
SOLP1ER.-ANP 1'PA oesjor 'T$iaWAN ;
WHEN IE BEEN ON MY MW 1O0 A REAL.

H N T I-


HAPPY ONCE AVE ME A MAP SHOWN E
HOW TO ET TO HIS ,PLACE... I'LL L W

NEWP A iSWRO ANP A PROSPECTOR
TO REN-^. OUTFIT A O L MAY^E


4



-


~L6V. tg7u
Truu~-r


''-.4'









t


. .


mi


i


SI'M APPRIEHENSIVE ABOUT'T9I; WHOLE:
T141NG! .'...AAAysrIT' A PPREMONITIONE
OR MAYBE I'M PLAIN C14ICKE-N BEC-AUSE
.T 17ONT KNOW THE -MOTION PICTURE T
**SK^^JD'5 N-55 P^tl^




~ -'
p~., I
Wage 16



~ I





L


_HAITI SUN


pv = ,, * ,, , ^-
,' .W~ '. ',- J' ,-,.J -




"f *,' ,- "' "- f :c
....

A ;.. : a :. f

a I

S '
R, .";*' i 7" '



'
... .. .


IT'S HILDY, WALSH--AND I'M
SURE WE'LL NEVER SEE HER AA\N!'
S BUT THIS CHILO'G WANPERINo IS
OVER!SHE'S COMING HOME WITH ME--
E3- THAT IS, IF SHE'D LIk.E TO/__


I


Fesiura S~ndiae. rw~


/DONIT LOOK Llk-E YOU'VE-JUST BEEN'
(STON& BY YOUR BEST FRIEND! TH4AT
HOMESPUN MASQUERADE WAS JUSr
\FOR BUSGINES5/ CORNY/. WASN IT IT? T.




, Page 11


HAITI SUN


Save


time


& money


shipthrough Miami



TOTHEMAH
IN THE BACK
ROW

'> '^^ I
aBLOII E ^gm^AiJTIOI%
CI.I A)P~'


Via


COINMAR LNE


WHERE'S (WHENARE MAMA WENT DOWN
SMAMA? fi WE GOIG TOWN TO SHOP FOR
T 'EAT SOME NEW DRAPES





SJ U' ,


I A
. ..
; ',I


' -
* -
. ,



I't


?misrWHIL

kNg,


*-1.


yI


,
', I "' .



; ,' ,.


. ." . ,
f
.i = '^


I ""WEVE NEEDED A N ".
"i /*^^;THti-m2J^ t^"^CRPT FORA iLONG -
/ ? '/Y^^TIME AT MATCH$ THE ,
C -E.JAT. '** *

'' BE::ITI"UL'Y
trz '---.

. /'


LOOKS Pe IT" SHOuL,
E MATCH THE' AX
,THNG-THT,-. ,.PERFECTLY
A..WF,.ULJVASE I ca :r-.- , ,- '-
HAS6cWTO GO IN,-






,,7."96 W" o -Wm -


STHE COLOR CLASHES 'I -.
\IWITH THE DPAPES, BUT I
THAT DOESN'T MATTER, U '
S'CAUSE WE NEED NEW '',
DRAPE ANYWAY ''




i7


THE DRAPES -flTHER OF THESE GO WITH IT
WILL HAVE'TO ERFCTL -ll"
" ATH THIS . .


WHY DOESN'T t i. "
. M. MA COME J T TAV,
HOMEADDy? .


.~


* f WUR6GOING -I
- LOV THEM "-
DAGOOD- 1'

; ,


. /^'. !f:i^ ^ ,-- ...
~ 9 ( _I "HAT'


"r.


V


L


r


I




Page 12


HAITI SUN


(ART&cuRID OjIP

fAue^ Quai
AV&P ga__l

1K4AIT~ARGESTa FaEE P];T .Ma


I

*1


I


I4


^ J.




SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956 HAITI SUN PAGE 13


INTERESTING j

if TRUE&


nrl afVrn otncsultatinnc s.,


well be that Generalisimo Tru- the message came over the tele-
jillo, who is known to be having type and I kidded him about the
his troubles at home, has been slackness of the British Navy.
devoting a certain amount of He then disappeared so fast it
time of reading English history, i made my head swim.


Days later we received word
through the U.P. from London
that a British cruiser had in-
tercepted this German tanker
and that the latter had been
scuttled by its crew. And sever-
al days after that, the Briton
came round with a case of Scots
whisky as a token of the gratitu-
de of George Rex.
.These irrelevancies are cited
merely to show that sometimes
news gathering agencies receive
white hot information.. Maybe
there is nothing to the rumor
about the Dominican conspiracy
against Cuba, but it has not
been officially denied.


SEE HAITI WITH
Christophe's CITADEL
Tour & Travel Service
Tel: 7761
P.O. Box 312






I. .f'



Organizer of Tours in
Haiti.
Cobhata-tiekets on Sale at
Petionville Office


It would be sad if there were
to be a repetition of something
which occurred in Costa Rica,
towards the end of 1948. At that
time I was the correspondent of
the United Press in San Jose,
and on Dec. 9, I received a ca-
ble from the United Press in
New York, saying that its office
in Mexico reported that rebels
had crossed the Nicaraguan
border into Costa Rica and that
fighting was taking place in the
frontier town of La Cruz.

When I asked President Fi-
gueres of Costa Rica for a state-
ment on the situation, he said
that he had no information of
anything imnsual having occurr-
ed. He immediately communi-
cated by radio with La Cruz,
and the situation was reported
to be normal. That night at 10
ofelock, however, the rebels
swarmed over the frontier and
occupied La Cruz.

Later I learned tham the coup
had been planned for Dec. 8,
and when ihe information was
given to Lh.- U.P. in Mexico by
allied conspirators in that ca-
pital, it was in the assurance
that the blow already had fallen.
A delay in the attack was nes-
cessary, however but the beaver
informants did not know about
the change in plans.

On another occasion in Pana-
ma City, during the early days
of World War II, I received a
news dispatch from Mexico say-
ing that a German tanker had
left Verz Cruz. There happened
to be a Briton in the office when


We proudly present the FACTS:



SHOPPING AT LA BELLE CREOLE FREE PORT SHOPS
MEANS GREAT SAVINGS FOR YOU

New York La Belle Creole
Price Price

Omega 18K gold Seinastmer 400.00 175.00
Tissot 18K gold 225.00 99.00
Georg Jensen (setting of 6) 72.00 49.00
Hans Hansen (setting of 6) 52.00 29.95
Kislav Gloves 9.00 6.00
Ortanes Royal Bee Gream 16.50 3.00
Cashmere Cardigans 29.50 18.50

ALSO SAVINGS OF 331/3 TO 60o/o ON BONE CHINA, FRENCH PERFUMES, FRENCH
BRANDIES & LIQUORS, BEADED BAGS, SWEDISH CRYSTAL ETC... ETC... ETC...


HAITI'S ONE PRICE STORE


DAME RUiAMOR. ONCE MOREi


11


II


PAGE1


SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956


HAITI SUN


A LYING JADE ? Let us accept, for the purpose
One of thp world's greatest of this discussion, that there is
organizations, engaged in the ga- absolutely nothing whatever toI
thering and dissemination of the report. Nevertheless, it gives
news, yesterday sent me the one the opportunity of review-
fqllowing radiogram: ( We have ing relations between the two
tip Trujillo may be planning countries.
coup against Cuba. This messa- Towards the end of 1947, in
ge to alert you ... )) the regime of President Oraa
Since I represent the organic. San Martin, an army of approxi-
zation in question, it is only na- mately 2,500 men, with ten corn-
tural that it should advise me of bat planes and millions of dol-
information of this character lars worth of modern weapons,
which comes within its ken. And was assembled on Cayo Confi-
since the message. was sent to tes, off the coast of Cuba, for
me en clair through normal corn- the purpose of invading the Do.
mercial channels, it is undoub- min"ie IRepublic.
tedly something of which the As I stated in a previous re-
authorities already are advised, ference to this situation, a pow-
All of the well-infornmed per- er interested in the maintenance
sons to' whom I talked regarding of peace in the Caribbean, tilted-
this report brushed it off as an official eyebrow, and the
having no importance. It is force was disbanded. Neverthe-
known that the relations bet- less, Trujillo has not forgotten
vween Cuba and the. Dominican the plot, and he and his spokes-
men recently have made refe-
Republic, .af which the perma- men recently have made refe
neni proprietor is cellent Generalisimo Rafael Leo- 1Three and four hundred years
nidas Trujilo, Benefactor of the ago, on occasions when the En.
Patria, have at other times glUsh kings were having their
been on 3 more cordial basis. troubles at home, what with am-
Recently c'iarges were made bitious nobles, grumbling tax-
in the Dominican Republic payers and the exigent clergy,
that _high Cuban officials -they frequently solved their in-
ing Domninican revolutionists. eternal problems by declaring
The allegations were denied of- warpn France. This united En-
ficially, but the Dominican Am- gland against what then became
bassador to Cuba was the recall- the common enemy. It could


LANCOME

MR'S BEAUTt PRANC
BEFORE CLOSING YOUR, '
SHOPPING, BE SURE TO 6 /
TAKE A SUPPLY OF FA-

MOUS FRENCH LANCOME
BEAUTY PRODUCTS AT
FREEE PORT* PRICES:
U.S. Price Our Price
Nutrix treatment cream, loz. $5.00 $2.50
Bien-Aise, cleansing cream, 1' oz 4.00 2.00
Souplesse foundation cream, 1 oz. 5.00 2.50
Eau azuree No. 16, skin freshener, 7 oz. 6.00 3.00
Lancome face powder, 2 oz. 6.00 3.00
L A N C O MIE Beauty preparations
on Sale at exclusive distributor

JEAN F. LAHAM





SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 195&


PAGE 14 HAITI SUN


.... M7F .7'.'7,.,- .dw,



One of the most exciting facets of the cultural upsurge in Haiti a
its folklore dances which will be feared this winter by top hotel
and nightclubs in Port au Prince.


E. SEPE


Maiteriaux de Construction

28, Rue Abrahatm lincoln Phone 2152

Planches, Cartclages, Fer, Ciment, Clous.

Toles, Plywood, Hardboard




SWE'RE FLYING

KLM TO EUROPE \


HAIT1'S DEATH DANCE .pound headdress is worn. So
AITIS E T1 DANCE difficult is this dance that usual-
OPPOSITE OF TRAGIC ly it is performed' only by men.
OPP OSI E O TA G C No show is complete without
San exhibition of the virtuosity of
PORT AU PRINCE In most nian's Rainbow.. to her ere- Haitian drummers. Conversa-
places, death is a dis- dit. But -he demand for this en- lion of the Drums,* a pulse-rac-
tasteful subject. But in the tertainment grew tosnch an ex- ing duet, spotlights the fact that
believe-it-or-not land of Hal- tent that Miss Williams formed since the diverse African slaves,
ti, it's the theme of a hilarious her own troupes to fill engage- in Haiti spoke different langua-
dance. ments at top hotels, ges, they communicated with
Outstanding among Haitian Voodoo ceremonial dances, each other through drums.
folklore dances, which now head carnival aperss and the Haitian As pure entertainment, Hal-
Port au Prince's nightlife fare by habit of mixing toil with frivoli- ti's folklore dances are in a
popular tourist demand, the im- ty are all portrayed in the folk- class by themselves. At the same
pudent cavortings of Banda, clown lore dances- time, they impart the Qnique
ing agent of Father Death, often The Yanvalu dance, one of se- and turbulent history of a slave
shock but invariably produce guf- veral ,that marks the Canzo cere- land that won freedom from Na-
faws. mony a rite that qualifies poleonic France to emerge as
Decked out in a top hat and full voodoo adherents to become the only Negro republic in the-
dress white silk suit minus tie, priests and priestesses requi- Western Hemisphere..
shirt and shoes, Banda is a frivo- res total undulation of the body,
lous fellow and his dance mocks from knees to head. Depicted
everyone just as death does. iare the ceremony's purification
He pokes fun at life and at sex b fire, symbolizing mastery
with mnovanents that leave little over nature's elements, and -the i'
to the imagination. Somehow he conferring of sacred beads to
adroitly manages to avoid outright protect the wearers from all
vulgarity. harn.
One of the most exciting facets The Coumbite vividily pictures
of the cultural upsurge in Haiti, the Haitian peasant's custom of
the folklore dances of this Carib- recruiting his neighbors for har-
bean country, which blends vesting his crop, building his
French refinements with African hut or for any other project that
primitivism, are now featured at calls for many hands. After the
re top hotels as well as in Port au job is done, feasting and danc-
Is Prince's leading nightclub, ing follows.
Although Haiian peasants had The dance begins with a pea-
- always danced at voodoo cere- sant calling his neighbors by
monies,-social get-togethers and blowing on a conch shell.
during carnival no sustained Men and women with baskets
attempt to organize and stage and tools appear and the work
their dances was made until Hai- is danced in pantomime. TRUCK OWNERSI
ti's Bicentennial Exposition in From a pleasing spectacle the j f
1949. Coumbite becomes a rousing
The exposition proved an eye- one as the purely social aspect If you want the most
opener to American tourists. of this custom takes over. or o O U
They discovered that Haiti is The Congo, a joyous dance our ioey, Use
easily the most exotic of all Ca- symbolizing youth and love, F o d i
ribbean countries and that it is dates back to the 18th Century Goodrich
quick to reach-three hours from when the frst African slaves
Miami by Pan American World set foot in Haiti during Frebllch TRUCK TIRiS
Airways. As a result, visitors colonial rule. Under French in-
swelled from 7,810 in 1949 to 55,- fluence the primitive exuberan- They're mad with
000 in 1955, and air service was ce of the Congo as still seen in NYLON
increased by PAA's new seven- Cuba's- version, the conga, sof- N L N
and-a-half hour direct flights tened in Haiti into a charming, SHOCK SHIILDS
between New York and Port au coquettish, and graceful dance. S O 9 r
Prince. 1Roundina out the repertoire fin a ..,..a
P of most shows are carnival dan- _ruW .vy erw "
At firs folklore shows were ces. Most popular is the Mazou- .
limited to the national troupe ne, a ground dance with a king WILLIAM NARR ,Port-au-Prince
which performed three times a performing solo as a climax. The Boucard & Cie., Jacmel
week in winter under the direc- Mazoune blends the difficult Michel Desquiron, Sucessors, Je-
tion of Lavinia Williams, an A- combination of ballet footwork remie
merican Negro dancer with such with bent knees, stiff shoulders Raymond Laroche, Cap-Haitien
Broaawvay hits as v Show Boat,%, and statue-till head although, Mlaison Jean Bourgeois, Aux Ca-
,-Cabin in the Sky,) and <- Fi- in the cas- of thle king, a ten yes


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Every Wednesday Eve.itg at 7:30

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W A R D L I N E

Fortnightly S:iliugs; New York Cap Haitien

New York Port-de-Paix

New York J6r6mie

New York MNiragoane
New York Aux Cayes
Weekly Sailings; New lurk Port-au-Prince
General Agent; Allen and Baussan
Cit6 de I'Exposition. Tel: 2387


-W


IN PETIONVILLE


m


PAGE 14


HAITI SUN





IT.TlnAV7 MAx'u. l A4th O19 H6lAITI SUN


.** ~~~.. ".', .- ..? ^ :.:-..... ^
A E, 1- K
PAGE ,Ig


*t' ll IA S LUfl* E"* %aS. __---____________________________________________________________________


FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT

JANE NELSON

(Continued from Page 61

cannot devise mess.ures that will keep from us this terrible scourge
that afflicts :mankind-...
He has brought the issues at hand, political and economic, closer
t o the American people, partly through his weekly presi conferences,
a unique practice among American presidents. The country is witnes-
sing an unprecedented economic prosperity. Soial security benefits
have been extended to cover more people. Ever since the historic de-
,cision of the Supreme Court almost two years age, segregation bars
-are being slowly lifted.
But most important, Eisenhower faithfully believes that wider adop-
;tion and practice of the basic truths of life will go a long way toward
-settling domestic and global problems. In that same speech quoted
above, given prior to his leaving for Geneva, the President asked the
following of the American people: 'Suppose on the next Sabbath Day
observed by each of our religions, Americans -165,000,000 people
of us- went to our accustomed places of worship and. crowding those
places, asked for help and by so doing demonstrated to all the world
the sincerity and depth of our aspirations for peace.
-This would be a mighty force. None could then say that we pre-
serve Armaments because we want them. We preserve them because
we must..
These are the words of a man whose health is now a serious obst-
acle to his decision of whether to run for a second term as President
of .the United States.
For weeks everyone, the press, politicians, the American public, has
been discussing the pros and cons, predicting, but mostly simply won-
dering what he will do. And strangely enough, in a country where
.just about everyone knows everything that is going on. no one yet
.knows what the President will do.

Already machinery for election year has begun to move. Democratic
candidates have, for weeks, been speech-making across the country.
Several state primaries, have already closed their registrations. And
President Eisenhower has promised his decision by March 1.
He will he won't he will he won't. This kind of talk was of
the nature of a parlor game until February 14 when the President's
physicians reported to the nation on the state of the President's
health. 'Fully aware of the hazards and uncertainties that lie ahead.,
they said, 'we believe that medically the chances are that the Presid-
ent should be able to carry on an active life satisfactorily for another
live to ten years... But the choice -is his, not ours... What we have
-seen of the job and the way he has carried on during the last five
weeks are the reasons for the answer (we) have just given:
Thus the doctors seemed to think that Ike could do it and for
all practical purposes, they were endorsing a ayes- answer from the
President. But several weeks before, Eisenhower had said to the na-
tion, -I think probably I will trust my own feelings (in regard to the
decision to run) more than I will the doctors' reports.,
With the medical report made public the President flew to Georgia
last week for a rest-period and some serious soul-searching before he
gives his answer to the nation about Mtarch 1.
Eisenhower has said that he would like to remain in the White
House for at least eight years in order to carry out his program. Dom-
estically, the demands on his party are 'not so great. It is in the inter-
national field that the tremendous weight or responsibility challenges
Eisenhower. With threats of Soviet -aggression in the Middle East and
the tinder-box created by Arabs and Israelis posing the most danger-
ous problems at the present time, he knows all too well how import-
ant it will continue to be to have a strong and consistent policy eman-
ating from the"United States. Having brought his party into the
White House qnd realizing that undoubtedly cnly he ean keep it there,
he is torn between a sense of duty and a knowledge that his health
'may not hold out.


President's Great
Great Aunty...
(Continued from page 6)
of champagne, stated, e When
I was young I loved to dance
and attend all the parties. I
have always danced the Merin-
gue and the older French ball-
room steps and even now I like
to do a step or two and enjoy
watching others dancing.
When the time came for de-
parture and a camera appeared
on the scene the charming young
lady of 99 sat up in bed and re-
plied 4 Okay* when asked for
her photo.
Slightly taken back at hear-


ing her say cOkay> we asked
her, through the interpreter
able Eric Etienne of the Cap
Haitien Tourist Commission,
where she picked up such an ex-
pression. She answered, g I do
not know exactly but for many
years 'Okay' has been a Creole
expression. I enjoy listening to
other languages and love talk-
ing to people from other coun-
tries. I ho'e your country and
mine will become even better
friends in the future. My house
is always open if you should
care to visit me again. s
In closing she added, cl had
a wonderful birthday this Fe-
bruary but I want the President,


all of my friends and just eve-
rybody to come and help me ce-
lebrate my 100th birthday next
year. You people must come
also. 0
After leaving her house and
while driving through the co-
lorful little town, only a few
miles from Cap Haltien, Mr.
Etienne said:

Mime Moise is a wonderful old
lady and is one of our links with
the historic past. She not only
watched history being made but
assisted in the making. She is
greatly respected by h&r follow'
townspeople and has always
been a force for the good. x


Here Dr. Lindeman arriving in St. Croix after 65day crossing of Atlantic. He will soon give a lect-
ure here in Port au Prince and show the color photos he made of the historic Atlantic crossing. Later he
expects to go on tour of the United States and give a series of lectures before buying another boat and
crossing the Pacific. This next trip is to be a grand surprise. He is stopping at the Majestic Hoteli
The 29 inch wide African dugout arrived here from Jacmel by truck this week.


The -question then is whether he can physically assume the day-to-
rIay routine of the White House, in addition to the more important
policy-making decisions of international, and domestic, scope that
must be made, frequently .in a short time. Or assuming that he feels
he can not physically do this job without being a .-part-time, president,
as so many are now saying he will be if elected, perhaps he feels
he can wield a strong hand internationally as a kind of elder statesman,
not as a president.

The arguments go back and forth. One poll among reporters two
weeks ago predicted 16 to 4 that he would run (a similar poll January
8 indicated and ll-to-3 opinion against his running. Tu-wo days after
the physicians' report and the -day after the President's brother pre-
dicted that he would run, ,the New York Stock Market registered the
best day's rise since 1939.
But the decision is Ike's and at this moment only he knows what
it will be Whatever he announces to the U.S.. and Io the world, it
must be respected as a decision made as a result of considerable
thought and sincerely made with the best interests of the American
people, the peoples of the world and himself in mind.

Ed. Note- Eisenhower Said YES Wednesday.


THE FARMER'S GIANT


r


A Caterpillar D2 Tractor, operamuna ii,
3rd gear, at 3 MPH. will pull four L-1-.ich
moldboard plows 6 inches deep in ,ery
heavy soil.
It will plow I acres per hour, uruvg
less than 2 gallons of low-cost Diesel fuel.
Unlike wheel-type tractors, this ma-
thine can operate on steep slopes or over
marshy ground without excessive slip-
page. Yet, the broad steel tracks exertL..ss
ground pressure per square inch than the
weight of a man's foot. Ccnsequer.t"
with this type of tractor, your -.
remains more porous, easier to till hi..'
more productive. r
Equipped with a bulldozer, this t, -
tor can build roads, remove m tr.es s ..il
stumps, build drainage ditches aMd st',.k
watering ponds, level land or fill i. erzt- J
fields.
It can also be equipped Vilh 1 l., .-r
rear power take-off or P ,. J., .
tool bar.
Let us tell you more a
agricultural giant. It :-
than and can out-.v-
tractor of compa-l !'
combination of ?..


I




i A0
PAGE 1I
ST. J. GRANT EXPLAINS WHY


I FLOUR MILL IS PRACTICAL
(Continued from page 1)


Mr. Allen has overlooked the
-fact that, to use his own figures,
the anill would have to ship 30-
000 tons of flour to Port-au-Prin-
ce each. year. That is roughly 300,-
000 sacks. These stevedores
would have to unload it, whether
it came by sea or by train. At
$0.10 per sack this would net
them $30.000. Them 30 or 40
thousand tons will be shipped to
.the oudotp s. This should yield
some stevedores either at the
mill or Port-au-Prince another 30
or 40 thousad dollars.
If Mr. Aktn will give these
facts due consideration I am sure
he will stow worrying about the
'fete of the stevedores.
' 3. Mr. Alien fears that the/ go-
.vArnment will give up its plans
for a new wjharf if the flour mill
is authorized, because it I11 not
be able to work at a profit. For
him., this is the end of a beauti-
ful dream.

I can't speak for the govern-
ment, of course, but I can speak
for myself .nd I take it upon my-,
self to -assure Mr. Alien that ifj
the government plans to build a
new wharf because it is needed,
the new wharf will be built.
The profit motive will not ent-
er except as an abstraction.
Does the Public Works 'pay a
profit, does the 'Public Health
Service pay a profit, do the
schools pay a profit? Yes, they
do, Mr. Allen, in better working
and living conditions, in a heal-
thier population, in a more in-'
telligent citizenry. The wharf
will pay a profit also, even
though it is not in cash. The
dream is not ended.

S4. Mr. Allen states flatly, with-
out qualification, that if no flour
is imported freight charges on
other imports will be increased.
Is he certain of this? If any res-
ponsible steamship official has
so threatened the government,
the matter should be investigat-
ed. This sort of thing is blaclf'-
mail. Chantage the French call
it, .,

5. Mr. Allen fears that if the
flour mill is authorized the fo
reign-Tnills will cut flour im-
porter's credit to the tune of 3
Million dollars. He implies that
the manager of the principal
mill supplying Haiti told him this
and that this was one of the rea-
sons for his lecture. Mr. Allen
should come out in the open and
tell us this man's name.
Now, this also could be term-


the American Congress, I am
sure.


All the furor -over sugar quo-
tas is because the American
Congress i5 considering a reduc-
tion in the Cuban quota to in-
crease the quotas of other sugar
producing countries. Haiti will
get her fair share of increase,
don't worry. But the increase
will not be so great in tonnage
as that granted to countries pro-
ducing three to four times as
much sugar as Haiti. Their per-
centage will be the same but
the tonnage greater. If you
don't believe this, write to the
American Congress or ask Max
Chauvet. He has looked into the
matter.

It is just as reasonable to be-
lieve that tle American Con-
gress woulrl boycott Cuban su-
gar because of an insignificant
flour mill in Santiago, as it
would be to believe that the A-
merican Congress would boy-
cott Haitian coffee because Mai-
tre Alexandre Dominique open-


At the Neuchaiei State Observatory



ZENITHd

HAS HELD*
THE PRECISION RECORD
FOR WRIST WATCHES

SINCE 1950
AND FOR POCKET WATCHES
SINCE 1923
Study these facts before buying a watch.


HAITI SUN


SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 195g


ed a butcher shop in Port-au- Prince can be milled in Haiti for made and can be made against
Prince. about $10.00. This is a saving of the establishment of a flour mill
So, if there will be no boycott S2.60 per sack. in Haiti.
because of Maitre Dominique Don't let any interested per-
rest assurcd-that there will be Ths.' '.'it 13 ;.'ie answer to all sons coniiiCl you. that this is
none because of the flour milL the argu-ments which have been not true.
6. Mr. Gordon P. Boals, direct ...
or of the export programs of the H -0 -
American Mills, is quoted by HOTEL 1110 LELE
Mr. Allen. Mr. Boals came up
from a moment of euphoria with The Management of the Hotel Ibo Lele takes pleasure in
the startling announcement that presenting to you the program of its Social Activities
flour mills in non-wheat produc- for this WINTER.A vitis
ing regions are not viable be- f s WNT
cause a supply of wheat is un-
certain in case of war. Were it Th Sha iot Nigh
not that Mr. Alien has apparent- Ce angO N gh lub
ly taken this extraordinary pro-
nunciamento seriously I would EVERY evening except on Fridays, from 9 P.M. to 1:30 A.M.1
can't cline-I to ridicule it. But I A FLOOR SHOW at 11:00 P.M.
can't because he did. Cover Charge: $2.00 per person.
Instead, I suggest that we all Please reserve your tables. Tel: 7287 & 7886.
sell or get rid of our automobi-
les because in case of war the Every Friday Gala Night
supply of gasoline is uncertain.
Bring back the buggies of old, WITH THE
the scraggly mules and the de-
crepit horses that dragged us MICHET. !EJEAN CHORUS.
through the streets of Avalon. Dinner Dance from 8:30 P.M. to 1:30 A.M.


Sed blackmail, but businessmen
in another: (nameless) country
have a euphemism for it. bring
ing pressure to bear.a Black-
mail is too harsh a word.
Call it what you will, this'
threat is an empty one. Full of
sound and fury, yet without
substance.

If the foreign millers have
three million dollars credit loo-
se in Haiti (I doubt it) and sud-
denly cut off further credits on-
ly the Supreme Being (another
euphemism) could get it back
for them, after the crash. Hap-
pily they know that in matters
of this kind his services cannot
be invoked.
The men who Intend to build
this mill are not fools wetting
their feet for .the first time in
international commercial and
industrial seas. They know that
credit will have to be extended
if they expect to sell flour in
Haiti. And they are probably
ready to extend it on better
terms than firms with no mate-
rial investments on Haitian soiL
Apparently Mr. Allen never
thought of that.
5. Mr. Alien states
that the American Con-
gress is considering boy-
cotting Cuban Sugar because a
second flour mill will be built
in Santiago de Cuba. I wonder
what disordered brain thought
1p that phantasmagoria and told
him about it. Not a member of


REMEMBER!

Now You Can Have Your Colour Prints Developed Here!
SEE GELO LABS NOW, 8 Rue Magny, or telephone: 7494,
5163 or Don N. Mohr, Tel. 2375, Rue Roux Port au Prince.
Gelo Color, newly founded laboratories at 8 Rue Magny, will process-
[ims in onlN FIVE days... Prices of films, processing, minounting; over-
all $3:75 for Kodak Ektachrome 120, 620, $5 ior 35mm. (20 ex.), ancd.
$5:75 for 35mm. stereoviews (15 pairs) this includes Film price.


Let us all lay in a two year
supply of candles. Remember
the blackouts of the last war.
They are going to be more or
less permanent in the next. But
don't worry. When they drop
that hyydrogen bomb you wont
realize It.

Let us forget the horrors. It
just occurred to me that an un-
certain supply of flour in, oase
of war would be just as bad as
an uncertain supply of wheat;
Just think of that Mr. Gordon
P. Boals, D. E. P. A. M. and
then if you still want to be chil-
dish, go home and play with
your children.
7. Mr. Alien opens a parenthe-
sis and states that the proposed
four and one half million doll-
ar mill announces that it will
employ about 500 persons, while
(he states) a similar mill any-
where else in the world would
employ not more, than 35 per-
sons.

That Parenthesis must have
come from Mr. Boals as Mr. Al-
len continues that Mr.
Boals continues The greater
part of the laborers employed
in a mill are specialized in their
trade and consequently the
greater part of the laborers em-
ployed in a mill are specialized
in their trade and consequently
the greater part of the positions
are filled by an imported per-
sonnel.
Let us look at all this obscu-
rantism objectively: Nuts! It
It would take 35 employees to
sweep up the dust and rubbish
from such a mill. And not one of
them would have to be import-
ed. It would take another 35
employees just to handle and
stick 1,700 sacks of flour every
day, not to mention the mecha-
Uics, the chemists, the clerical
workers and the supervisory per-
sonnel necessary for such a mill.
If Mr. Allen had ever seen a lar-
ge flour mill in operation he
would realize that an estimate
of 500 persons employed is rea-
sonable.

8. Mr. Allen worries about the
by-products. All of the wheat
berry is edible and nourishing.
Have you ever heard of Kellog's
All Bran? Have you ever eaten
bran muffins or whole wheat
b cad.

This mill will spend -money
to educate bakers and the pu-
blic in the u!e of the by pro-
ducts. Nothing is going to be
wasted.


9. Mr. Allen fears that the go- L UN G NI t
verrunent will lose revenues. t .X
The government will not lose a -
one cent.
Think )f this.74 4 A 7& t34uwa 7o 4
The sack of 200 lbs of flour
costing S12.60 C.I.F., Port-au- Maison GILG R-re Bonne Foi CARLOS Cite de r'Exposition


i


7-,, /F





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r-0 kT r% r IL 1rr9


A $2.00 entrance fee will be charged EXCEPT for Guests
having reserved their tables for DINNER.
Every Night


Dancing Cocktail Hour





SUNDAY, MARCH 4th. 1956

Wandha As IMIEDEE Scores Success
At Opening Of Theatre d'Haiti
(Continued from Page 1
sorns,. with President Paul Ma- perfect harmony during the 90
gloire among the distinguished minute performance that almost
spectators, were on hand for the from the start the audience was
.Premiere'> and Morisseau had assured that this was something
chosen Jean Anouilh's tragedy far from the standard of ama-
<,Medee as his first presenta- teurs Miss Wiener handled
lion. her role with the ability of a ve-
in a short speech. Mr. Leroy teran professional actress. Mr.
expressed his thanks to the Pre- Balmir's ,.Jason'o. though some-
sident and the audience for their what indecisive, stuck a respon-
presence, and read the list of sive chord. ,That's the way I
the names of friends and sym- act with my wife., said a promi-
pathizers who had helped him nent writer in commenting on
to build the theater which al- Balmir's handling of the role.
though is inachieved, it is now MAr. Gerard Dusseck was entire-
ready to begin its mission, ly at ease in his interpretation


Wandha Wiener played the
title role of cMdde.v, with sup-
pdtih.g actors Lucien BRlmir as
*JasOhf> and Gerard Dusseck in
the role of tCreon. Wanda's in--
terpretation was done with great
perfection, end her gestures,
tone and attitude were in such


of ,Creon:, and his deep base
voice is really admirable.
The audience was enthusias-
tic in its acclaim of the splendid
performance of 0M1d6ev,. and
Wanda was presented with a ma-
gnificent basket of flowers of-
fered her by President Magloire.


Wandha receiving flowers from the President after the opening...
I/ performance at Thiatre d'Haiti


.PAGE 17* .. .;".., .
PAGE 17


HAITI SUN


Ta. u .-e. legth iate MICHELINE LAlDUN ACCLAIMED
d'Haiti is assured. the legitimate
;,e,,willnow become anin AFTER SECOND PIANO RECITAL
tegri.l part of thie cultural -e
of the cotuitryv. Morisseau Leroy
assures the .Sun' that he is now
scouting fjr talent that he is
sure is to be discovered among
the people io the differentwalks
of life.
There was a repeat perfor-
mance of ,1fddee,, Friday night
of this week and ,Antigone
in creole ill be played.


LADIES PLEASE NOTE:
Adele Sassine, dress-maker
(speciality: hand embroidery
linen and coton dresses) advises
that her shop is still located at
Avenue Magny and Adele Sas-
sine states she has no other
branch of business in Port-au-
Prince or the Provinces.



S.tAr


ONLY THE BEST FLOWERS
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The young Haitian artist, Miss ovations of the satisfied public,
Mlicheline Laudun, in her se- to be embraced by the First La-
cond piano recital since she re- dy. She was also presented with
turned with laurels from the Pa- flowers from Conservatory Di-
ris Conservatory of Music, drew rector Marcel Van Thienen and
a large number of music lovers Mr. Marat Chenet.
to Lycee Cent Cinquantenaire The gracious Micheline sat again
ast Thursday evening. Heading at the piano and gratified her lis,-.
tie enthusiastic 'audience was voters by playing the .Mouvey._.t.i
Madame Paul Magloire, and from Debussy bringing 4he ao
Madame Prophete and the First dienee to its tot in dlW ofi,.
Lady's Aide de Camp. applause and appreciation, .j
Wearing a stunning, low-cut ...-. .. .-
black and white creation, Miss
Laudun wM the essence of IN- -
charm and elegance as she bow- -. '
ed to the thunderous applause., "-" fl'' *
that ,greeted. her as she. toow her .,
place at the new .baby grand -' -
piano, a gift from her brother-
in-law. Robert Denis. H '
The rich programme of corn- .
positions from Bach, Chopin, //.
Paganini. etc. was executed with -\
the easy grace and technique -
which won mention for Miss Lau- .UI
dun in Europe. At tie end of -
the concert, she had once again |
captivated her listeners, and rZ4
stood smiling to receive the ma- -
gnificent bouquet offered,- her
by Madame Magloire, then step-. ,
ped from the stage, admist the -- .


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PAGIs 18 HAITI SUN SUNDAY, MARCH 4th 1956


The British Ambassador and
Mrs. Simmonds entertained at
dinner on Tuesday evening at
their residence at Debussy, in hon'
or of the Haitian Ambassador to
London and Mrs. Joseph L. De-
jean. Among the guests were the
Spanish Ambassador, Cuban Am-
bawador and Senora. de Arce,
French Ambassador end Mrs. Ber.
cegol de Lle, Peruvian. Ambassa-
dor and Mrs. Perez-Saez, Mr. Da-
niel .Thdard, Chief of Protocole,
British Embassy Secretary and
Mhs: C"ruan
The British Ambassador offered
a toast to Presldent .Magloire, dur-
ing the evening, and Ambassador.
Dejean responded a toast to the
health of Her Majesty, the Queen.
xxx

Mr. Lucas Ortiz Benitez arrived
in Port au Prince last Saturday.
The Director of the Regional Cent-
er of Fundamental Education of
Latin America is here in connect-
tion with the choice of Haitian
educators who will be granted
scholarships by this organization,
including 5 for the Department of
National Edudation and one for
the Department of Labor.
XXX
Florence is the new girl in
the Jean Bolte family


The Ministery of Public Health
of the Republic of Guatemala has
just granted two scholarships to
Haiti in the field of nursing. A
contest will be held, shortly, and
the beneficiaries who must be at
least 19 years of age will be chos-
en for the six-month perfection
in Guatemalan hospitals


xxx
Italian artist Cioni Carpi de Res
mini commencing tomorrow will
give painting lessons each Monday
and Thursday afternoons at his
home in Avenue Christophe No.
48. The husband of Luce Turnier
speaks English, French and Itali-
an-

xxx

Col. Bayard Commander-in-chief
of the Coast Guard returned Thurs
day from visiting U.S. Naval Ins-
tallations on the West and East
Coast of the U.S. In Norfolk Vir-
ginia Col. Bayard officiated at the
handing over ceremony of the
USCG Patrol Boat to the Haitian
GC.
Mrs. Alix .Lafontant (nee Rou-
zier) down from Rochester, N.
Y. vacationing with relatives
here.


Denise Kreigh of St. Louis, Mo. on her second visit to Haiti spent
three weeks here at Hotel Riviera. Her greatest interest is in the
'Mferingue and other Haitian dances. She is shown with son Stephen,
4 enjoying the punch of Barbancourt.


With the arrival of 8-1/2 poun-
der Joel, the Jean Verna and
Albert Etheart households are
on the receiving end of miles
felicitations, being, offered to
the parents and grand parents
of the newcomer. Get your cigar
at once at Bazar du Champ-de-
Mars.

With the announcement of the
departure of Engineer and Mrs.
Raymond Baker for their resi-
dence in the Dominican Repu-
blic, Haiti Sun seizes the occa-
sion to mnke its excuses to the


distinguished couple for the
switch of names which appear-
ed in our last Sunday's edition.
The Bakers were here with their
children for a vacation with
Mrs. Baker's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Milo Rouzier, of Petion-
Ville.
Here for a week's get-acquaint
ed-withdHaiti, is Mrs. Mildred
Thompson of New York. The
distinguished Occupational The-
rapist who recently went into
retirement arrived on the S.S.
&ANCON2, and is lodged at Ho-
tel Mon Reve.


peut apatci4ets delNdaax canas

4e 0u iac


PAGE 18


1rUME333


HAITI SUN


SUNDAY, MARCH 4th 1956





SUNDAY, MARCH 4th 1956 HAITI TQr%


The afiangailles. of Miss Mi-
-chele Bouillon to Claude P. Ma-
gloire was announced this week
during a reception at the Bouillon
home in Chemin des Dalles, and
they are expected to wed this
year. .
xxx
Mr. Bernard Fein, Head-Chair-
man of the Security Bank Note
Company of Philadelphia, and his
wife left yesterday after a short
stay here at Hotel Choucoune. Mr.
Fein's firm which printed. the
Haitian Government Bonds is
printing- the currency .for more
than 20 countries. The couple
were entertained by Mr. "Armand
Malbranche.
xxx


Engineer
back from
maica.


Leslie Canez (G:E.) is
Xray business in Ja-


xxX

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Boucard
honoured the Jim Herringtons and
friends at a cocktail .and buffet
at their Pacot home on Monday
evening.
XXX
PAA Director and Mrs. David
Gossett observed their silver wed-
dingi anniversary Friday, marking
25 years of wedded bliss.
XXX
Colonel Roche Laroche, Haiti's
Ambassador to Mexico. is-in 'town.
xxx

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Knecht
are expected on the S.S. -Olym-
pia, arriving tomorrow. Mr.
Knecht is Executive Vice-Presid-
ent of the Trade Bank & Trust
Company of New York. Mrs.
Knecht is the daughter of Dr.
,Maurice Ferdinand and siste-: of
Mrs. Jane Fields, wife of the
great Americajn pianist and com-
poser.
x xx
William D. Miller, Remington
Rand's Caribbean Sales Supervis-
*c: was in town for a short stay
this week, from New Yo-k. He en-
deared himself by bringing over
a bottle of special Scotch Whisky
the compliments of Ted Scott of
the Havana Post. At this rate
friends are becoming bona fide
bootleggers.
xxx

J. E. Wheeler, Vice-President
* of the, First National City Bank
left Wednesday, after visiting old
friends, the Abner Riddles of Esso.


Miss Ghislaine Lafable.left Sun
day foe a two-year sojourn in Ja-
maica where she will attend clas-
ses in a commercial school., Ghis-
laine is 'the daughter of the well-
known proprietor of Epicenrie No-
tre Dame du Perpetuel Secours,
and Mrs. Phaeton Lafable.
XXX
Art classes for children between
the ages of 5 and 15 have Been
started -by artist Pierre D. Juste
and Emm. Jolicceur. Classes are
held every Saturday morning from
8:00 to 1200, at College Jean-Ma-
rie Robert de La Mennais at Ruel-
le Jer6mie, at the nominal charge
-of $1'.50 per month.
X XX .

The Legation of, Guatemala mo-
ved from the mountainside cha-
teau overlooking the park at P&-
tion-Ville, on' Wednesday. M* di-
plomatic mission -and the' -official
residence of the Minister are now
located in the magnificent new
.residential section if Musseau, in
the Deputy RaymApd Roy cha-
teau. The beatuiiu gardens cohtt
ain some of the finest plants and
Flowers nJ.aiti.., -
xx
Former Ambassador to the Vati
can, Mr. Leon Th6bauduwho has
just finished a 10 months sojourn
here with the family cleared up his
busipeis affairs this week and left
for Paris Thursday. Mr. Th6baud sta
ted that he-.would make frequent


crossings to Port au Prince in con
nection with his business interests
here, and to keep an eye on his
aging mother.

The Hank Perea family (Delta
Air Lines) are moving over to the
Dominican Republic. The home of
Mrs. Perea. They tlew, over Thurs-
day, and friends here are delight-
cd that they are still close enough
to be neighbors.


Mr. and Mrs V\%dimir Ihanovio,
cotLSins of Gorda:ia Ashton have
be-n visiting *Villarosa,. As meni
be:'.; of the ,International Bird
Watchers. they- made trips to Fur'
cy and the Plaine du Cul-de-Sac
.c:- studying Haitian bird species.
The couple have travelled extens-


A hundred guests attended the
5th birthday of Mile Chantale
Brisson in Lalue.
xxx
Totsie Jones has gone back to
CT to school.
xxx
Mrs. Freddy Martin observed


ively in Europe and the Western her birthday in Au Cap Friday.


Hemisphere making notes. Mr.
Ivanovic is an official of .Com-
bined Argosies, Ltd. an important
steamship company, with offices
in New York, Londbn and B'enos
Aires.
xxx

Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Theisen of
St. Paul, Minnesota, relatives of
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Riddles, left
Monday on the Panama Line, aft-
er a two weeks visit' here. This
is their first' trip out of the States,
and they swear it will not be their
last.
xxx

.Josianne. is the name of the
precious cargo delivered tp Dr.
and Mrs. Gustave Simpson of Cli-
nique Roy. The little miss weigh-
ed'in -at 8-,. pounds on Feoruary
15th'at Maternit6 Bourand. Her
momr is.Pe former A n*e e.ere-



a-.iobt VZ" '', ..,ow


a- studentt it C"ege Sai Jpseph
de 3'les fadtstiu hs B-a-t'e yhome,
wc t"itih b u s stu"'ediAes



Jf~t tlie'h baccalaureate ^Accornpa-1I
-yohis1.runtle _.Ge._ rdo.yaldi.
an Varonawho -visid 'with the

Calvo family here for mire than
a' week in ,January of this year,
Roberto left Haiti on January 24.

xxx
Today in St. Marc Radio Hams
will have a bamboche Chez ham
Pupuy.
SXXX
Madeline Archer lew to Kings-
ton yesterday.
x kx- "
Pleasant Gay former VP .of the
.Jacksonville Florida Jr. Chamber
of Commerce arrived in town
Thursday.
xx x
Mrs. Chuck Wiggins is visiting
her parents in New Jersey. The
little Wiggins are' lodged here
with friends.


XXX..
Nouche Degener flew to Ciu-
.dad Trujillo Friday for a long
week-end and visit the Fair in
the neighboring republic. "-----
.- *- The star singer in the successful Broadway musical, 'Pajama Game,
John Raitt and wife Marjorie shown here at Villa Creole Hotel. He
a A heard Jacques Gabriel sing ,La Vie En Rose, and eSarientQ. in Crd-
ole at Villa Creole, Thursday night, and thinks that Gabriel. Haitian
'/ r \ painter anid inm-ember of Michel Dejean Choir has an excellent voice,
4 / 'and offered him important advice. Mrs. Raitt is extremely interested
in the country, and the artistic movement. The couple left by car
]BJor a visit to the Cap on Friday, returning Sarturday. Today they clip-
*- > 5pered hJioe to Broadway. (Above: with Mrs. Lena Assad of Hotel
-~ VdIll Cr-eole.


REG.TRADE MARK


TFacmous since 1862


xxx
Dr. Alphonse Waag is holding
a stag party' in La. Boule today'
Roast pig and the trimmings.
XXX
Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Eth6art
have moved into their Morne Her-
cute 'residence next to associate
Kiki Villard.
xxx
The Vinton Burns are expected
home at Diquini from India' in
April.
XXX
Mr. Pierre Lambert terminated
a six week sejour in town yester-
day and few to New York.
XXX
Legrand Griswold went back to
New York -to. help his first wife
with her second divorce Wednes-
day., ,
*x x x *
Edith Blanc became the wife of
Dr. Lafontant at the Sacr Cmoeur
Thursday evening.
XXXX
Fabienne 'Vieux wed Francois
Milerka ht the Sacre Cceur of Tur
geau last 'night at five. The newly
weds will honeymoon in Ferma-
the "1'efore making their tempor-
ary home in Gonaives.
xxx
I Geo. Baussad is New York
bound.


Artist Alice Fethiere motor-
ed to Les Cayes last Saturday
to spend the week end
xxx
Sgt. William D. Weber of the
U.S. Air Mission to Haiti left for
a new assignment in Lubbock Tex-
as (Reece Airforce Base) Wednes-
day ending -thre and a half years
of service here. Sgt. Weber who
was accompanied by his wife and
three childfen- has been replaced
by Sgt. John Johns 'his wife and
four children.
xxx
L
Mrs. Meyers and lovely Miss
Katherine Willinger dKitsa stop-
ped at Thorland this past week
and say they will come again.
Kits is crazy about Haiti.
xxx

Bob George left wife Libby to
the warm weather here and clip-
pered off to work p near the
North Pol6e. Tule base in Green-
land.


.Rigaud .Magloire of Finance
Department iN back from New
Yoik where he was graduated
in-. higher accountancy after -two
years 'study.


XXX


Georges Perry eToldkiow flew
yesterday to -Jamaica to assist a
meeting of Managers of British
American Life Insurance Co.
xxx
Well known dress maker A-
dele Sassine will fly abroad on
a business trip cbient6t


It's Thiree o'clock in the morning,
You've danced the whole night through,.
Dont plan on raiding your ice box
When you get home.
Your children will have emptied it hours before.
They will have had their fill.
Have yours at
uAL CHANTECLAWR
TPLi o i '


A et.l FOJOU
MARION DE YOUNG GRISWI
(Formerly of Hotel OIlffson)


XXx
Friday Tony Forbin of
left for Jamaica where
improve his English.
Mxx


Gonaives
he will


VOLD
-.-,--- '
o

Mrs. M-ary Roger Victor of;Li-.
berian? Embassy will soon fly to
Havana on Ia health trip.
X-Xx X
Jean Roc, former employee at
Hotel Splendid is the nes-ules


Mrs. Forgham flew to Jamaica man of Studebaker.
Wednesday to visit 3-days with x rx--
her mother and father.
x x x Mrs. Gorden H. King has gone,
off to join her husband in Trinid-
Mr. and Mrs. Adrien Bonne- ad.
fil will motor up to Ciudad Tru- xx x .
jillo for the week end in com-
pany of the lovely Beatrice 'Josephine Theodore and DuI-
Theard cie St. Vil are 'going to -New
York today. They will stay /.in
Mrs. Maryse Buteau of Aux Havana for about iwo days.
Cosaques is driving a new An- x x x
glia, gift of her husband for her Miss Simone Olivier, men-
birthday (February 24th. ) chant, flew to New York yester-
x x x day via Miami.

Dr. Alfredo Scala and wife Mil- x x x'
dred clippered home to Suffern
New York Wednesday after a Mrs. Valentine Bonnefil Cas-
month here at the Zephirin- resid- sagnol is confined to bed at her
ence in Pacot. home in Petion-Ville.
xxx Young Lloyd Bertin clipper-
ed from Jbmaica to meet his pa-
Tom Bernard a General Motors rents in Haiti last Monday.
Jr. Executive returned to New
York Friday by way of Montego x. x x
Bay after livin in the Sun for
three weeks. I Archie Thompson well known
xxx jx in television in New York City
is in -Port-au-Prince for a few
Comedian Bobby Ramsen and months. Archie brought herehis
his wife Gloria arrived'in Port- 3 ecaniches but Jacky the old-
au-Prince on board the New est dog got lost last Sunday
Amsterdam on a honeymoon FOR RENT
cruise. Bobby Ramsen, star of House for rent at Canape
the Ed Sullivan Show, featured Vert. 3 large rooms, 2-story
at Las Vegas and on the New house 2 bedhroomr, all modern
York Stage and Broadway, and convenien.eS. Telephone 3527
his enchanting blonde wife Glo-'oor apply Haiti Sun. phone 2061.
ria. model and actress, were x x x
lunching at the El Rancho and Heavy English winter overcoat
enjoyed the place, cost $100 selling, for $50 .contact
Bobby and Gloria were mar- Valerio Canez store down town.
tried February 19. Gloria is a x x x
well-known dancer and has ap- Mr. Hopwood of Shell Company
peared with Milton Berle, Ken in Puerto Rico visited company
Murray and Kate Smith. installations here this past week.


I-.


* N' -


PAGE 19


It=


I .






PAGE 20 RAIn SUN SUNDAY, MARCH 4th 1956


CARDINAL SPELLMAN ENJOYS

DELAY HERE
(Continued from Page 1)


Poirier and the Nonce Apostoli-
que Luis G. Raymondi before
returning to the airport at 11:30
to continue his voyage.

The dapper and very soft-
voiced Cardinal told the c Sun 2
that this was his second visit
to Haiti. He had visited the
country between 1934-39 as a
simple priest in transit. He stat-
ed that he was very happy to pay
his respects. to President and
Madame Magloire who were his
guests in New York during their
official visit to the United States
last year.

The Cardinal, who only last
week received the annual Geor-
ge Washington Carver award for
the American who has done
more to better the understand-
ing in racial relations during
the past year, had a warm 'and
cordial word for the number of
people that surrounded him at
the airport, many %of whom
kneeled and kissed his ring the-
reby gaining 600 days of indul-
gence.

When asked whether he could
possibly come back for a longer
visit, His Eminence said that he
is always happy to visit Haiti,
but cited that his invitatLon to
talk at the Peace Conference
was extended six months before,
so if Haiti can find any good
reason to invite the Cardinal,
the invitation should be sent ear-
ly.


Informed that the plane
that would take hun to Vene-
zuela was delayed in Caracas
and that a special plane was fly-
ing from M..mi to pick up the
late passengers, he told the dis-
tressed PAA Manager David
Gossett that he never worries
about plane travel, that it was
unavailable and he is complete-
ly resigned and this is the
man who went around the
world in ?9 days to visit Korea.
'The American Ambassador,
who accompanied the Cardinal
invited"him to lunch at the Em-
bassy Residence asked whether
steak and eggs would be okay
the Cardinal replied: e Why
that's my Christmas dinner. i
Calling Ambassador Davis the
to the Embassy to dine.


SEE THE"
Exquisite Venician
Mirrors Today


Marfranc Bechtel

Off To Africa
Former managerr of the U.S.
Rubber Experimental Station
ct M.arftanc near Jr&umie)
and Mrs. Arthur Bechtel depart-
ed from Btowen field Friday
after 14 years in Haiti. They
take up their new post in Addis
Abbaba, Ethiopia, before the
end of the month.
Adelaide Bechtel distinguish-
ed herself during cHazel* when
the hurricane ragged about her
home.- For the first three days
she kept radio contact with
SCIPA chief Edwin Astle at
Damien. While her husband was
absent in Port-au-Prince she
kept up a blow by blow commen-
tary on the havoc wrecking
storm. Until her evacuation by
Helicopter to the. city she had
her house open to the fleeing
populace and fed and cared for
them.
.Mr. Bechtel's flew assignment
means switching from rubber to
coffee production.
C
DOUBLE ANNIVERSARY
The Jimmy Uranos and Geor-
ge Jennings of Point Four com-
bined their wedding, anniversa-
ries, taking place on February
15 and 27, with a .typical bambo-
che celebration'at Ibo Lele.
The small fry were favored
with a Wviener-roast at the Pla-
ce Berthe residence of the Ura-
nos. The Uranos, with four
!years in Haiti, have now chalk-
ed up ten- years of wedded
bliss.


SHOES


THE WORLD


Y FOR EVERY OCCASION


PAGE 20


SUNDAY, MARCH 4th 1956


HAITI SUN


m




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