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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00341


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

AL


I


THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER --
Port an Prince RMpublique d' Haiti Sunday, November 20th 1955 Telephone 2061 ---- -._
-


OIL STRIKE REPORT


COMPLETE Y FALS E


(Commonwealth Oil)) Common,,eaith Oil in Haiti, said
LOimOnWealtthat the resumed drilling on West-
Deinies ern La Gonave has reached 4,500
((L Jour's )Story i ft. but no traces of oil have been
S try seen. Nineteen American techni-
uiticials of the Commonwealth -. .... -. .... ...,In the .nrot


)il Company told the Sun* in an
nterv'iew Friday that no sign of
)il had'as yet been discovered on
he island of La Gonave where the
companyy has been conducting
drilling operations, off and on,
since early June.
The interview followed a front-
page report in aLe Joura Tuesday
evening that the company had
struck oil. The article pointed out
the economic benefits to be deriv-
ed. by Haiti from this discovery
nd added that the Government
shouldd take immediate steps to en-
sure Haiti a fair share of the for-
tune which would come frnm the


Cizns ar em Clployea onA wine pru et..*
It is probable that if no oil is
found before drilling reaches 7,000
ft. work will be abandoned on
the present site, the -Sun, learn
ed.
The First Well
'The oil prospectors gave up
NATIONAL
REHABILITATION
CONGRESS
The second National Congress
on Rehabillitatibpi of tihe han-
dicapped will 'open Monday
evening at 8:00 in the Lyche de
TJmiU-L E i11p


drilling on their first well mid-.
September after reaching 3,158 IL
without success..
Bad luck tracked the oil compa-
ny in its maiden attempt. The drill ':
head broke off at 2,750 ft. leaving
400 ft. of unrecovered pipe-line
underground. The crews were "
stricken by malaria, the boat trip' .
from Port au Prince dragged out
over nine hours in an old L.C.I-
and many other hardships -were
faced.
Expenditure at the date when i
the first well was abandoned was
said to have totalled $700,00( .
(Continued on page 20)..

THREE CASES


OF FRAUD


i. wells on La Gonave: tThe four-day congress, will beAT N i
I can't imagine wherethe under the patron of Excel- Three s o attempted i
underhree patrong..of His, Excelfreu-J-Y
*. *- -^paper got its information, a corn- lency the President of the Repu- werinver at the Banque Na-
BEGlNNE?'$..)LEK?r1-Amos.. when you consider that ian a ,sher- any executivejd the ,Suni It blic. e- ovr. t.tha to the .:
9 O. e tis .'. t
ma -takes' lifetinet6' Sa"d opeTi"fh-e e1eotflvdoe,0M.' :t..a ... .dal'."'i nal"' ",
.. ..... BrtShe we,- k a ,zo~ .I. W .. .. -- ig" .syste n t -'.ebeekin anru
above was Bert Shresbul'secld'L,;&t wekof anglig off iami' MT fax.enis, Manager of the ed to the public. nployed by the
., ...., .. .,. -. .. ... ... counter & ig-ch 4ng played by the :
The iq.'iW o&'etEleeriqzwOper-aztiot Superini dient, a fishermanI institutionn. ""
for only 2 years, was ihtervieiKaed by'the Afima"er&ald on his. catc".. CLE A N -D I I In an interview Wednesday, the
He declared, on his return to Port an Prance this week, that he- CLAUuDE. ARtMAND ICTIM Direct of the Bank Mr Christ-
told stateside reporters the fishing was aod here .too, .(See editorial Directol- of the Bank, Mr. Christ-
Pae .).. oung Businessman Loses Life nAilaid not reVeal he names
Pe 5) .Y .o nL ss ie -ta Ai',-e guilty ntpersons,e a but con-
". irpiA n A aui vague le -


CASIMIR'S ,,(AIA DE COIFFUREs

SHOWS WHY HE WON FAME IN U.S
S u a v e mephistophelian Car- side the Villa Creole pool Thurs-
melo Casimir led a bevy of beau- dwiv evening into a burst of thun-
tiful models from the stage be-'der uTs applause proclaiming the
-------- -- success of his aGala de Coiffure*.
This was a great moment in the
CARE cMilkmanfln life of Casimir, one-time struggl-
ing Port aa Prince ecoiffeur
Leaves Haiti who today is one of Manhattan's
Tmost laude-1 hair stylists. Not on-
For New Post ly was it the Grand Finale of a
show which had piled success on
Sam Ziskind, CARE ftission success with the entrance of each
Chief in Haiti for the past two model, but it was the moment
years, has been transferred to I1'o- which every hometown boy
Laos. Indo-China. to head the Mis- dreams as he sets out to seek
sion theree. fare :nd fortune abroad.
Mr. Ziskind left Haiti yesterday,
for New York. where he will con- Carmelo Cisimnir set out on his
fer with members of the CARE travels in 1946, following a grim
head office, going on to Boston ; st uggle to lunch himself as a
for a brief visit with his family hairdresser in Port au Prince.
before leaving to take up his ap-The Gonaves-born boy had come
pointment in the East. i to Port au Prince at the age of
He will be replaced here by Mr. sixteen, matter leaving school in
Leonard Mades, a former College his native town. He never knew
friend. i his parcn's. Casimir revealed to
I Yaur Reporter in a post exhibi-
The lanky, New England mission tion interview at the Villa Creo-
chief who taught French at mias- le Hotel. His grand-aunt, Mrs.
Faustin, had been responsible
sachussetts University previous to
his appointment here, achieved for his upbringing, he said.
tremendous success in carrying In Port au Prince, the young
out CARE programmes in Haiti. 'hair-dresser made a precarious
Energetic and friendly, Sam living setting his clients' hair by
Ziskind was known to thousands appointment at their homes.


In Automobile-ClCle Accident ort carried by .Le Nouvelliste .
Monday evening.
Claude Armand, victim of a He returned in May from the. He also disclosed that no finan-
tragic- motor accident on Ruelle United States where he had spent cial loss to the bank has resulted
Chrtien Monday afternoon, was two years in Chicago studying bu- from 'these incidents.
laid to rest Tuesday after funeral siness administration., Mr. Aim6 said that an employ*.
services at Sacre Coeur de Tur- of the .Service des Portefeuillesr,
gecu. He would have been 22 (Continued on page 20
years old next Monday. ---------------------
The youngest son of National ,
Education Acco.ntant and Mrs.
Georges L. Armand, Claude' was
killed instantly when the cycle
he was riding collided with a car
driven by young Albert Ambroise.
He was thrown from the bike
and struck his head against the
front of the car.
Claude Armand was a popular,
hard-working boy who had recent-
ly become director of his father's
store at the Rue du Centre-Rue
des Cdsars intersection.
A.
Admiral Cooper

On Visit To Port
Admiral William Cooper, Com-
m.-nder of the U.S. Naval Base at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, who arriv-
ed in Port au Prince Friday aboard
his private plane, was guest of
honour at a dinner given by
America.n Ambassador and Mrs. THIS TRUCK OVERTURNED Sunday 10:30 a.m. on the same place on,
Roy Tasco Davis Friday evening. I the Cabaret road gshere the German Embassy secretary was killed its`:'
Accompanied on his visit by his a road accident late September. The truck onerturnied while speeding
wife and three American Army back to Port au Prince with a child injured in an earlier accident-
ofricers, Admiral Cooper returns (involving the same truck) in Cabaret -No Injuries Occurred in the :
to Cmba today. Second Accidea.


VOL. V


(Continged on page 20)


(Continued on page 2) I


I .


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Pae2HIISU udy oeme 0h15


CASIMIR'S ,GALA DE COIFFURE"
. 'SHOWS WHY HE WON FAME IN U.S


: (Contihued from page 1)
But he managed to save enough
SIto pay his passage to the United
States.
Arriving in the Metropolis, the
yotmg Haitian found that he
'could not land a hair-dressing
'job without a diploma, so he
sought another job, attending
night school for three hours each
.day after work.
: A last he woq. his diploma from
-the Apex Hair-dressing School,
Sand got himself a full-time job
in a New York salon. There, his
innate taste and ,sens de coiffu-
r6 soon sent .hhn rocketing to
popularity and by 1948, he could
afford a 'trip to Paris where he


spent a year perfecting his tech-
nique.
Tn 51 after a second trip to Pa-
ris he opened the %Casdulan*
studio at 210 West 125 th Street,
Manhattap and today employs
twenty-five hair-dressers to cope
with the flood of customers. Of
thore twerity-five only four are
mnen, Casimir said.
He has not yet married, Casi-
mir told your Reporter, because
he ch'.sn't had the.timev.
Haitians learned why the young
hair-dresser has won such popu-
larity abroad, when the twelve
models appeared, each dressed
and ecoiff'ee to suit her indivi-
dual type.


'G. GILG Rue Bonne. Foi

Cia. DOMINICANA DE AVIACION
-Port au Prince Miami
San Juan-Ciudad Trujillo
Saturday And Wednesday
Depart CIUDAD TRUJILLO 8:00 a.m.
Arrive PORT AU PRINCE 9:00 a.m.
Depart PORT AU PRINCE 9:30 a.i.
Arrive MIAMI (Direct) 1:00 m.f.
Sunday And Thursday
Depart MIAMI 8:00 a.m.
Arrive PORT AU PRINCE 11:30 a.m.
Depart PORT AUtJ PRINCE-12:00 noon
S* 'Arrive Ciudad TRUJILLO -- 1:00 p.m.
(direct flight)

S FARES"1.ONE WAY RETURN

PORT AU PRIINCE MIAMI $55:,one way
" $99 return ((plus tax)
PORT AU PRINCE CIUDAD TRUJILLO
4-15: one way $27 return (plus tax)
PORT AU PRINCE SAN JUAN $38: one
way $68.40 return (plus tax)
FREIGHT
FREIGHT


PORT AU PRINCE C IUDAD TRUJILLO
Less than 100 lb. More Over 3
$ :06 :04
PORT AU PRINCE SAN JUAN
r .Less than 100 lb. More Over 3
:10 :08
PORT ALI PRINCE MIAMI
Less than 100 lb. More Over 3
:12 : ,10
-SPECIAL CHARGE ON CERTAIN ARTICLES
PORT AU PRINCE MIAMI


,300 lb.
:03
,300 lb.
:07
,300 lb.
:08


For, all information and reservations see your Tour Ageni oa, the

COMPANIA DOMINICANA
SDE AVIACION, C POR A,
90 Rue Payee Tel. 3725
ANDRE T. THEZAN, Agent


Eatlih model was introduced by
a lyrical description by MC Jac-
ques Large, then appeared on
stage before gracefully making
her way around the pool follow-
ed by a spotlight illuminating her
coiffure.
Applause greeted the models
as they glided past the crowds
of spectators lining the swimm-
ing pool. The setting was ideal,
the atmosphere perfect, the Ca-
simir creations superb.
Mrs. Lena Assad, one of the
clients of Casimir before 'his vo-
yage to the U.S. who owns
was among the young ladies to
model his latest styles.
Others were: Miss Evelyn d'Ades
ky, 'blonde tropicales; Miss Mireil
le Remain, ,l'Italienne; Miss Ni-
cole Rouchon, cQue de Canard*;
Miss Monique Laudun, Crin de
Cheval; Miss Lucienne Romain,
dl'Haitienne; Miss Marie-Josie
Gentil, rChignon Romantiqueo;
Miss Anna Annoual, Little Boys;
Mrs. perard (Odette), Wiener,
Coup de Soleil; Miss Karine Rou-
main, dette ArmandnAffranchie>.
Mrs. Roland Lataillade, patro-
ness of the exhibition, occupied
the table of honour, wearing her
usual, elegantly-styled hair-do.
Receipts from the exhibition
($1:00 cover) went towards the
rehabilitation of Haiti's handicap-
ped children.

MISS MANGUIA
TRANSFERRED
FROM U.S. EMBASSY
Miss Marguerita Manguia, one of
the U.S. Embassy busy bees,
will leave Haiti tomorrow via Pa-
namxa Line for New York on her
way to a new .post in Paris.
The distinguished Secretary to
the American Ambassador who,
ws transferred to Port-au-Prince
six years ago from her post in
Mexico City. is a native of Spain,
and has many years in the fo-
reign service to her credit. She
came to Haiti as Secretary to U.
S. Ambassador William de Cour.
cy who hfas since retired. When
the.present Ambassador, Mr. Roy
^k ^. ^. ^^ ^^ A'. ^. a s a s .a a a -


Tasco Davis arrived in Haiti in to the Ambassador where she
September 1953, Miss Manguia has given her valued collabora-
conserved, her post as Secretary 'tion for the past three years.

JAEGER
Cement Mixer
Self-Loaded: Models Available from
3^ Cubic feet per load up to 16 Cubic feet
'


Distributor:-CHARLES FEQUIERE
44 Rue Roux & 77 Rue du Quai
TEL: 2245 3084 3270


The World-Famous BeaLutq Products Are
OnSaTeat t

ICanape. /Vrt

CamnpeTi~rt g&J iiuweif PT.


_4I, -. -11 m a C -, ^. '. a a a ,*a


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Direct


S FROM MRS HELENA. RUBINSTEIN

I BE4FTY PX4RLOUR


I'











4


WILL BE AT

CANAPE VERT

FROM THE 21st-26th

OF NOVEMBER

TO GIVE DEMONSTRATIONS '




HEILENA,




SRUBINSTEINA


BEAUTY PRODUCTS
^ ^ ^ ,,.oo oo^ooooooo


' Page 2


HAITI SUN


Sunday, November 20th 1955




HAITI SUN


+,OOD-aNVA+


,,..,,- .. '7'. ^" f *; rv
:.' L q'" ':
., 1 ,


S I p I
S I^^


t' par


CHARLES DEJEAN & Coj
RUE DU MAGASIN DE L'ETAT
PHONES: 3226 2,3525


IvANbICr7COOK-


I'1


.i-
- .
'A .
v; *S I


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p.a ,. : .: .. .. ,, .-- r r ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
.___________________HAITI SUN)

Emm. VILLEDROUIN

HONEST RELIABLE SERVICE

Mare Than 10 Years Experience

FREE ESTIMATE IN SHOP

'GENERAL RADIO SERVICE
ACCURATE TUBE 'TEST IN HOME

MOST MODERN TEST EQUIPMENT VISIT CITADELLE AND SANS-SOUCI PALACE
Rue Dantis Destouches No. 120 CONTACT RAY"S TRANSPORTATION
STHE PERFECT COURIER
Near PAA office A DALU BOUQUET ONLY $25 TO CAP HAITIEN
Ave. lVAagny Petit-Four by DELUXE Limousine Service .

Wrx KNEW r WAS'LYTON OLWN
WHEN W% CII6CKe V4N07RPRINTS,
B'EThMAiK.S ANI 5O ON, BUT HE
CAN NEITHER HMAR NOW 6P5AK!


HE WEARS A 5IMAL.L TATTOO OF OLLIEl
THE PRA6ON WHICH HGE HAP DoNe
WHEN WE WERE BOTH IN ANOLUTFIT '
CALLED THE DiA6ONFLI:S- S0 THERE
IS NO QUEST TIO A HE I1 OL-SON...


OLSON WAS 7ECLAREP LEGALLY PEAPD
ON THE TESTIMONY OF MISSIONARIES WHO
HAP SEEN A PILOT ANSWERIN6 HIS PE-
SCRPTdN BURIED BY THE RES BEFORE
iKOREA...


BUT SUMMER. IS, THE SORTOF WOMAN
WHO WOULD CONSI E- HIM .E.6EANP
ANb H-- ES.P.oIBIyN .PITE OFA.A
C6ulzrcm"0PE...

* I PIP NOT SET OUT TO BREAK UP ouN
WEDDING -ANP ONLY THE APVICE OF A
MINSTEU CAUSED ME TO 01 OU&H
WIT4 IT... -


r BZOUVHT HIM BACK,INTENPINC TO PUT
HIM IN A CIVILiAN HOSPITAL, SINCE HE
HAS NO MNLrTA YSTATUs... BUT IF L
WERE K1LLE HE WOLD BE A CHARITY
ta---7 PATIENT...




Snundav November 20th 1955


'~~~~~.1------ --


mrmnu::nun:::unmnnra~nn:....r-".-a 4:K
HAITI SUN
THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
SEDITOR-PUBLISHER BEINARP DIEDERICH
C ERANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL E. NAJAI;
..........;:::::: ::.;::;tta ....:. : .3 n n _a.ta...a:tn:r:nr!


HAITI SUN


NO.
'LETERS


I


;ACRE COEUR F:fRISHIONERS PROTEST AGAINST Casila Postal s52, frei a mea e against dproprglaig
FATHER PINCHINAT'S TREATMENT OF VISITORS Montevideo, Ur ay, tors who allow their walls to fall
I November 9, 1955. into disrepair causing such re-
Last year we reported that two ladies attending the ASTA Dear Editor grettable accidents as that re-
:onference here were refused Cormunion by Father Pinchi- corded hardly three months ago
-at of Sacr6 Coeur because they failed to conform to his ideas I miss the Haitian sun involving the death of Edith Day
)f full dress. miss H at Petiorville.
On that occasion, the ladies dressed in short-sleeved dres- lch. However, since it Is po t I-
-es were helped by an understanding dentist and his wife sUNble to delegate the HAITI-o Our cconfr6re'- proposes that
who lent them a jacket and a shawl to cover their bare arms. why don't you send me a copy the Service d'Urbanisme attempt
This past week parishioners complained to the cSun* of tim sn e taken to prevent these accidents when .
a similar incident and an interview with the couple involved six-month subscription (air mail), building pits are being issu-
produced the fotlowing story.- i-otsusrpon(rmal'ed.I
produced the following story. effective September 18th, but re- I 'TRUCK OWNERI
Carl Schweinler and his bride of three weeks arrived in gret to say that I have not receive To grant our most complete *_ _- ** _
Haiti Sunday morning on their honeymoon. They went edone copy so far ...... agreement to this proposal of our
straight to Sacr6 Cceur without pausing to change their Yours faithfully, confrere, we have only to correct If you want the most
clothes because as good Catholics they did not wish to miss Aline Sarrazin two well-meant errors that it has for your money us
Mass on a Sunday. Mrs. Schweinler's dress was high-necked committed: 1) Port au Prince was yur n n
but had short-sleeves. -- founded in the 18 th century and G o r
A.S they has fasted, thie young American couple kneeled At not the sevEnteenth: 2)The Setr- 3 F. Goodrich
the altar rail with other communicants. But Father Pinchinat, The Editor, 'vice d'Urbanisme depends not on '
tu r n i n g from the altar to count how mah, there Sir, the Labour Department but on TRUCK TIRES
were for Communion, gestured to Mrs. Schweinler to go the Department of Public Works. w
away. The petitee> bride had her head bowed, as most people I admired the presentation and They're made wlih
usually do at Communion, and did notsee the Priest, style of .Optique's. report on (INDEPENDANCE, Nov. 10) NYLON
An understanding member of tfle congregation left her the Dorsinville poetry .reading, NYLON
seat and approaching the visitor placed a mantilla' over her translated in your newspaper last SHOCK SHIEDI
bare arms. But the Father moved along the rail, serving the week. 'C S I S
Holy Sacrament, and 'by-passed Mrs. .Schweinler. I EX-IM BANK President t Heavy ;evl ,'
The young bride was stunned and shocked. She later told But. is it that I am just not in- '
the Sun thet she was brought up in a convent in the United tellectuai, or were the principal On Official Visit To Haiti William NARR; P-au-Prince
States and this was the way. she had often been dressed at debaters (Morisseau.Lerot, Ale-
Communion. xis, Dorsinville) talking at cross- One of the presidents of the BOUCARD & CO., Jaemel
Her husband said: 4r was afraid that I wouldn't receive purposes? Nobody seemed to Expen-Import Bank, Mr Vane. I
Communion because I hadn't shaved that morning. answer the other speaker. -They Brand arrived in Haiti last week Raymond LAROCHE,
A complainant from Father Pinchinat's parish pointed out just gave vent to their critical on an official visit.
that if this ruling of long -sleeves were applied in the U. S. opinions, regardless of the ques- p.Haitien '
there would be times when the entire female congregation lion left hanging by the previous Mr. Brand conferred with OD-
would Ite disqualified from. Holy Commuiion. speaker. VA officials and executives of Maison Jean BOURGEOIS,
Another parishioner suggested that Father Pinchinat be Anyway. ePour c6ldbrer La the Banque Natioriale de la Re-
transferred to the 4:00 a.m. Mass, while yet a third comment- Terre had some very literary publqIe dHaiti, also visiting the Aut Cayes
ed: cIsn't tliere something in the Bible about rendering your and learned-sounding comments work underway on the construe-
hearts and -not your garments?:. made about it. lion of the Peligre Dam by Michel DESQUIRON
A Poetry Lover. "Brown & Rootz. SUCCRS., Jdr6mie
B C I r--m--


ITUURIM ISHLULI) Bf lBUBOOT ,lJ
BY ENCOURAGEMENT OF FISHING
Fishing may be the answer to odur off-season tourist Oac-
cuum, as well as proving a source of healthy exercise and en-
tertainrrent for Winter-season tourists.
Though locally regarded with a listless eye, th* sport is a
top-ranker in popularity in the United Sta*s and may prove
to be an inexhausitble means of increasing our already climb-
ing tourist figures.
Off the island of La Gonave, the U.S. Air Mission boat re-'
cently battled a sail-fish out of the harbour, while Anton
Kneer, local version of Heningway's Old Man Of the Sea,
also added a magnificent sail-fish to his recent record.
Drifting as far away as Miami, Bert Shrewsbury, Operat-
ions Superintendant of the Electric Light Company, pulled in
two seven-foot sailfish in two years, and as' he pointed out to
Your Reporter it's not every day you hook a game, war-mind-'
ed sail-fish weighing 147 lb.
Some people spend their lives trying to land a sailfish -
without success.
This proves that local talent is at a high level and it
hasn't been tapped yet!
Everything seems to indicate the next step in boosting
our touristic appeal is the organization of a few fishing tourn-
aments, maybe even a fishing club, and the establishment of
Facilities for visiting fishermen.

ROIEX WAT( H ROLEX WATCH


S;e a masterpiece at uRUSSO FRERES-


Rue Bonne Foi Today


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> most


powerful gasoline


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SEnds major causes of power ,losp'
and fuel waste pre-ignition and
spark plug fouling.
spark plugs, causing misfiring and further Iss
.. Gives you bigger mileage, cheaper motoring, of power. SHELL has now conquered these praho
Do you know what. weakens your car's power lems. Shell gasoline has ICA, incorporating trInc.
and wastes fuel more than anything? It's the de- resyl phosphate, an exclusive Shell additive which
posits from combustion that form in cylinders and, makes these deposits Varmless. You'll notice the
getting red-hot, ignite the air/fuel mixture too difference almost at once such an upsurge of
early. That's pre-ignition and it's robbing you power; such smooth running: such zip on hills and
of both power and money. The same deposits foul in traffic.
Give YOUR car this top-performance gasoline.
Always fill up at a Shell Station for only Shell has
I. C. A.
FEEL the difference with 1. C. .4.


PAGE 5

Haiti Sun Claims
Translation from Independance. V
In an editorial published in its
issue of November 6, cHaiti Sun., 43% .,
demands as complement to the






~PACE! ~t HAiTI SUN Sunday, November 20th 1955


Presidential Decree Regulates...


(Continued from Our Last Issue)

CHAPTER VII


MOTOR VEHICLES AUTOMOBILES,
PICK-UPS, TRUCKS:

Article 50.-The term -car. employed in these laws signifies all
motor vehicles powered by mechanical means allowing them to funct-
ion by themselves: automobiles, trucks, motorcycles; all vehicles pulled
..by animals: buggies, busses, carts. It is applicable as well to bicycles,
tricycles, wheelbarrows and all transportation vehicles on the public
highway. (Art.. 1 Traffic Law).
Article 51.-All cars should have wheels which are well protected
so that the public road may not be damaged. The wheels of cars,
trucks and generally of all vehicles being used for transport of persons
or merchandise as well as the wheels of their trailers must be fur-
nished with pneumatic coverings. The wheels of all cars should pre-
sent no hindrance or projection along the surface of contact with the
road which may be able to deteriorate the road surface.
b) All carriages which do not fall into the above category will not
be avowed to circulate on the roads unless it is equipped with some
form of protection for the road. This applies especially to tractors,
bulldozers and all other vehicles destined to work on roads or. plan-
tations. :v
c) Ordinary chains, can be used on muddy roads to prevent skidding.
d) All infractions of one of the paragraphs of this article will incur
a fine of 75 gourdes and in the case of non-payment imprisonment for
fifteen days.
Lights and Signals
Artiscle 52. a).-All cars should have a lighting system activating 1)
two signal lamps with white rays placed as far as possible to the ex-
tremities of the two sides of the front left and right; .2) A glowing
Sredl ight placed behind and tot he left, without rays but with a bright
Enough light to be seen at over 100 meters in clear weather; 3) a white
light placed at the back in such a fashion as to illuminate the license
plate and to render it visible-at a distance of about twenty-five meters
in clear weather. -
b) From nightfall all cars in motion should have all its lights illu-
minated permitting the road ahead 'to be lighted for a distance of
.about 100 meters. Stationary cars on the highway should have at the
left extremity of the front end a glowing white light, and a red light
in the back; these lights will be designated as parking lights. In an
exceptional case, when the car is parked beneath a light which illu-
minates it to oncoming traffic the parking lights are not compulsory.
c) Trucks and other heavy vehicles should be equipped with the
two lights required above and two little lamps giving an orange light
at the extremities and the highest points of the body of the truck and
two red lamps at the back and at the lowest parts of the body of the
truck. These lights should 6e clearly visible so as to permit acom-
plete appreciation of the dimensions of the vehicle while passing it or
crossing by it. They should be maintained in a state of perfect order.
d) Trailers should be equipped with a red light in the back and on
the left side.
e) This lighting system should allow the driver to use three differ-
'ent kinds of lights: big,.little and parking lights.
f) The little lights should be arranged so that none of the-rays strike
the earth at more than twenty meters before the vehicle,

"* .-.ts7 7, -.' ? "

.4



%:~

*' ,/,, .,J
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g) All infractions of one of the clauses of this article will incur
a ftine of 25 gourdes and in the case of non-payment imprisonment
for 8 days.
Article 53. a).-The use of big lights is forbidden within city limits
and suburbs. On the roads, the drivers may use the big lights but
must use the little lights when passing another car.
b) Infractors of this article will be liable to a fine of fifty gourdes,
and in the case of non-payment imprisonment for ten days.,

Brakes

Article 54. a).-All vehicles should have a system of two brakes acting
independently of each other: the one operated manually designated
as the emergency brake, the other operated by foot.
b) The foot brakes should act simultaneously on the four wheels;
the two systems should be rapid in action and strong enough to bring
bhe vehicle to rest on the steepest slopes. These brakes should always
be in excellent working order.
c) The chauffeur or conductor surprised driving a car with brakes
in a poor condition will be fined 75 gourdes and in the case of non-
payment, imprisonment for fifteen days.

Sound Equipment
Article 55.a ).-All cars should be equipped with a sound system
which may be heard at twenty five meters and which will serve to
warn others.
b) Use of this in towns, villages or simply in populated areas should
be quite moderate so as not to inconvenience the inhabitants, nor
frighten animals.
c) Chauffeurs are forbidden to blow their horns in commercial sect-
orft in silent zones, (Public Offices, Schools, Hospitals, Clinics etc...)
and at night in residential areas.
d) Horns with varied sounds and whistles are not allowed as warn-
ings. The use of sirens is exclusively reserved to Police cars, ambu-
lances and fire engines.
e) Chauffeurs of vehicles equipped with loud-speakers for announ-
cements, advertisements etc, cannot use their equipment to play music
or make announcements while the vehicle is stationary, except in cases
specially permitted by police. They must not use their loud speaker
any more. when they have to go and come along the same road. It is
formally forbidden to. use the loud speaker near silent zones. Also
they will abstain from increasing the volume to an excessive noise.
f) All infractions of one of the articles of this law will incur for
their authors a fine of 25 gourdes and in the case of non-payment im-
prisonment for eight days.
(TO BE CONTINUED)


Fritz Paillere
Tells Architects
Rotival's Ideas
Memireri ot the Associatiun of
Engineers znd Architects ieard
Wednesday what their cof'league
Fritz Paillr." learned ai Lhe re-
cent Pan Anmerican Congress of
Architects in Caracas.
The you-i'. engineer lectured
at the Ass,.ciation headquarters
on cIntegral Planning. theory
and practice discussed at the
conference by celebrated French
architect Rotival, head of the
Venezuelan delegation.
Rotival has been for many
years the Urban Planning Coun-
cillor rb tlh Venezuelan Govern-
ment.
Though his theory is yet untri-
ed in prar-.ical designs Rotival's
theory sounded extremely plausi-
ble as Paill&ie explained it to
the fifty members and guests who
attended the meeting.
His talk was a step in ihe di-
rection of popularising pre-cons-
truction planning for buildings
and towns which is becoming in-
creasingly necessary to all com-
munities which desire to keep
pace with modern times.
The lecture was followed by
questions from Messrs. Albert
'Mangones and G6rard Philippe-
aux.

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The No. 10 Scraper has a capacity of
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heaped. With this tractor-scraper, cycle
time is cut to a minimum. The No. 10
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stickiest materials.
The DW10 is powered by a 115 HP
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brakes on the trailing uwit take hold an
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HAITIAN TRACTOR S.A. CHANCERELLES


Sunday, November 20th 1955


HAITI SUN


-PACE G


J




Sunday, November 20th 1955 HAITI SUN PAGE e
* k -- -




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HAITI SUN


Sunday, November 20th 1955


- RA YMOND



LES BAINS


to you in welcome.
Amongst the shiny leaves of
the bread-fruit tree arc rustic
S By 'nuch7e De.ener and romantic thatched huts, may
The spot. is a tropical .jewel a t-2 for honeymooners!
.few' miles from Jacmel. There between the transparent
A fe-ztooned beach of the finest sea and the nearby jungle of
S.sand, -tre'-n with 'pale pink flowers and brilliant green vege-
-shells. where swimming is ideal, station. Where all the clouds be-
being ccnmpletely protected by a long to you-and all the sounds
natural- formation of rocks. No around you are the birds and
rough ';aves no undertow. the restful waves caressing the
SVery gcod fishing and sailing, shore.
The .epcoanut trees seem to bow There, I imagine a small hotel


of twenty or thirty rooms, with
all the modern comfortsawaiting
you-freezers for the variety of
foods you could wish for (be-
sides the fresh fish, lobsters,
shrimps, turtles, delicious
small oysters and the sweet
meat of the Iambi, or conque).
Such arc the offerings of the sea.
A well-stocked bar and a xpis-
tcon for dancing Haitian merin-
guc-s to the music of a good or-
chestra-a few machines install-
ed to temnt Lady Luck and to
whdle away the langurous hours.
All this overlooking the Edei -
like scenery with oh! so many
moonlight nights! Spring is there
all the year round-and very
much a cu;e for asthma and si-
nus.
No mosquitoes or malaria and
(as everywhere else in Haiti) no
snakes or venomous beast of


magnificent harbor. Several
quaint stair-case-like narrow
little streets. Flowers overhang-
ing the terraces, aand the bright
blue of the sky as you look up-
wards create a most romantic
setting.
When you want it a car will
take you to Raymond's -thirty'
minutes of enchanting road.
scented with the fragrance of
the H-ilan-Hilans-trees of coco-
anuts, bananas, avocadoes, man-
goes, oranges, limes, grapefruit-
also sugareane-and gardenias.
Three months of the year-the
flamboyantnt, 'large. graceful
trees whose green leaves turn to
a brilliant red, light up the way
Raymond-les-Bains- is a haven
which I, for one. wha have been
blessed to see such famous beau-
ty spots as Capri, Palm Beach,
Key West, Portofind. Jamaica,


with you the zest of high adventure
and the stiCesses and strains that go with
Sit. With unerring precision the Seamas-
teE'ticl'- o0 t in. mo st L::cirinf i -LCul.
of youir life-i//, fim, rlin,, e ... aloft,
ashore, afloatr. under the surface, too,
thanks to the thrice-sealed, waterproof


ne workmen are being recruited
in droves for the harvesting.
Cleaning and polishing of the
Sugar Mills at Chancerelles and
tuning up ot machines are keep-
ing the workers hopping.
Zero hnur is December 28,
company ntlicials have announc-
ed.

PERENNITE DU BATIMENT


ETANCHEMENT ABSOLU


S.....u.u:.t......MUM ..,...MUM: *tttttttttttttttnany kind. the Azdres and others, have nev-
t One can ride or go by car to or found another like this unique
THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE INTERIOR ftcayes-Jacmel. a few miles away Haitian gem. YOU CAN GET AGAIN
ADVISES: :,-most interesting village formed WithoUt doubt, Raymond-les PLASTIMENT
ike the prow otf a ship sailing Bauis will be a tremendous sue- AND ALL OTHER
Since in its third number, November 12 1955, the weeklyinto the waters, where you can cess with ihe ever increasing SIKA PRODUCTS
newspaper k.Le Peuple*, violently and irreverently attacked drink, and dream, and play, rate of tourists and visitors to the SERVICE: HAUSER
the person of a former Chief of State and that of the Chiefjfwhile to cool winds from the sea island of HIaiti.
:of State of two countries with which Haiti enjoys amicable. sng to you. It will be the realization of a Box 1326
relations,-the political director, author of one of the articles,'I Raymond-les-Bains and all -its dream come true. SALE: REINBOLD S.A.
and the G&rant responsible> of the newspaper have been call- wild beauty is actually but a few ..- SALE REINOLD S.p
ed into court and advised that, under the Press Law, legal hours from New York. The SUGAR CANE HARVESTTIPCO
proceedings were being instituted against them. jjplane from Port-au-Prince to UNDERWAY SIK A HAITI
Port au Prince, 11-11-55. IJacmel takes only twelve minu- UNDERWAY KA HA
ttes. You must visit Jacmel which Preparations for the coming su-
Ed. Note.- Self-styled IBonaparte., the is a most unusual little town- gar season .re underway at HAS- WALTER H-AUSER
Bonaparte Auguste, founder 31-year-old journalist recentlY f oldest in Hii --. once a .great CQand on the plantations in the CONSULTING ENGINEERS
and leader of the Haitian La- returned to Hait, after many coffee production center with its Cul de Sac and Plaine de Leoga- P.O. BOX 1326 P-au-P.
.bour Party,.'which so far has .years in Belgium. g--
-attractad little attention after .Citizen Bonaparte) (as hisi|g geo o @o @@@o o S@o 00o 00OOO @SSO @SOOO @SO SSSOO @O
3 w:-ek.s in existence, founded newspaper persisted in naming lb
'and directed <-Le Peuple dur- him) visited some 30 countries l I
ing fts ephemereal existence during his voyaging, claims to: :
He signed one of the articles have met all the great Labour i
again-. Franco and TrnjiUo Leaders in the World.
- which incurTed, the displeasure Author, poet and sociologist,= 1X -tSs--,
Sof tie State. he has published several books. 4 _--,i.. '--


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Pages
Missing
or
Unavailable






gonday. November 20th 1955 HAITI SUN PAGE 13


%ve left Port-au-Prince three
ve-lc- izo with the moist
br,:'sth lof Hurricane Janet on
ou- r'.e' :k s, flying Delta's direct
3 hoLr flight to Havana for an
intc-?st:n3l ove night's round of
Cuban night-clubs. reaching San
Salvadour the next day via PA-
NAM'S two hour. non-stop
flight.
San Sal.ador at an altitude
of 2.237 h'!et above sea level si-
tuatedr at the foot of the Volca-
no off San Salvador is undoub-
ted'.:y -..e of the prettiest cities
in Ce-r:l America.
During a week's stay here, one
can see a surprisingly large num-
ber of points of interest. A
short twenty minute ride from
San Salvador is a residential
section called PLANES DE


but a few colorful Indian villa-
ges, may yet be found scattered
throughout the country.
The headquarters of the 0-
DECA (Organization of Central
A nerican States) was recently
installed in San Salvador with
Guillermo Trabanino, San Sal-
vador's former AMinister of Fo-
reign Relations at its head. Mr.
Trabanino was elected as Secre-
tanry General for a four year
term, and instead of a split up
of five bickering republics, Mr.
Trabanino hopes to translate
the dream of a Central Ameri-
can unity into political reality.
Among the interesting perso-
nalities met while in San Sal-
vador, we might make special
mUiLt:n of tall, handsome, must
ached Robert (Bobi Canessa, presi


U


RENDEROS. From this moun-
taipous region, one gets a
breathtaking view of the city
with the Volcano to the left, and
in front one can see the deep val-
ley dotted with villages with the
mountain of San Jacinto as a
backgrounJ. To the right, there
is a magnificent view of Lake
Illopango, and beyond, the Co-
astal Plain and the cool waters
of the Pacific.
The National Park of Ateco-
zol should, be a :must. before
leaving San Salvador. This syl-
van retreat is 'situated in a
green valley almost on the slo-
pe of the Volcano of Izalco.
Here one can sip a refreshing
drink or cat a delicious native
dish and watch the Volcano
erupt almost every ten or fif-
teen minutes in spectacular
bursts of frve, smoke and lava,
followed by thunderous rum-
blings.
San Salvador's history dates
back to the Nahoa race of In-
dians called Pipiles, whose ci-
vilization was similar to that of
their Aztec cousins in Mexico-
The pure Indian strain has di-
sappeared almost completely,


dent of the coffee association
who visited Haiti last year dur-
ing the coffee convention, Mr.
Canessa ii the only civilian can-
didate for president of El Sal-
vador, and I was recent invit-
ed by him to accompany his
party on one of his usual week-
end campaign tours into the In-
terior. Although the son of .a
millionaire coffee planter, lie
has the knack of making, the
masses feel he is one of them.
He is a graduate of the N.Y Mi-
litary Academy, speaks 5 lan-
guages, holds a master's degree
from the University of Genoa,
and v'was formerly the 'Minister
of Foreign Relations from
which position he resigned in
order to campaign for priesiden-
tial election.

We might also make mention
of the opposition party, the dy-
namic military presidential can-
didate, Colonel Jose Maria Le-
mus, President Osorio's right-
hand man, whom I met at a spe-
cial session of the Sociedad Bo-
livariana de El Salvador The
coming elections promise to be
interesting to say the least-re-


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Letter From San Salvador
By Linda Alleni


PORT-AU-PRINCE. Haiti '
Santa ClaOis has a new annex and
it's located in a group of ware-
houses here under the tropical
sun. Thanks to a law recently 0
passed by the Haitian legislature,
tourists shopping in this Carib-b
bean republic now enjoy free-
port pieces on imported luxury
goods.
And the way tourists are. stock-
ing up for Christmas makes it
look as itf Santa will have an
easier job when he makes his
rounds this year
It's not strange as it seems
for such an annex to be set up
in Haiti for-it was here that the
first Christmas celebration took
place in the New World when
Christopher Columbus wrecked
the Santa Maria off the tip of'
Haiti's northern1 peninsula in
1492. With the wreckage of the
ship, he built Fort La Nativite
on Haitian soil, and it was there
that his crew celebrated the first
American Noel.
Translated into dollars and
cents, the free port means sav-
ings of up to 1-4 the retail U.S.
price on many luxury articles.
Previously, customs duties and
other taxes added approximately
30 per cent onto the price of imp-
orts.
For a number of years, French
wines, liqueurs and champagnes,
as well as French perfumes, have
been aVailable at bargain prices
in Haiti, thanks to only a 5.per
cent duty. Now, this same low'


fh ",I.--*T ....



King Christophe's

Tours The Best!


LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES'

SHEIK oFTFRRD
PLACE GEFFRARD 0


gently the five opposition pre-
sidential parties banded toget-
her in a united front against
PRUD, th.? party Colonel Lamus
represents.
El Salvador is the land of
v.-riters, poets and painters. We
had the pleasure of meeting
Mr. Jose Jorge Lainez. editor
of LA PRIENSA GRAFICA, San


Salvador's largest newspaper,
and the country's only detecti-
tive short story writer, and Mr.
Raoul Reyes, chief of propagan-
da of the Government Tourist
Bureau who is one of Salvador's
most noted painters.

We cannot close this report
without also mentioning the af-


duty extends to a long list of for French beaded bags, $50, is
other items, such as imported approximately half what the
photographic equipment. A ca- same little number brings in New
niera which cost $100 aow costs York.
only $65 or $70. British cashmere sweaters will
Swiss watches are also affected be available for about $14.50.
by the new law. An' 18karat The new law not only permits
gold Seamaster, formerly $250 Haitian stores to reduce by about
in Port-au-Prince and as high as 1/3 the price of luxury items they
$400 in the United States, now now carry, but it also enables ,
sells in Haiti for only $180. Vases them to handle goods they never
of Swedish crystal have come had in the past.
down fronm $50 to $35. In the U.S., 'Haiti's shopkeepers take pride
the same item is priced at around in their modern, air-conditioned
$100. establishments, many ,of which
French gloves, with a retail U. offer rumn punches on the house
S. value of 315, are now $9 in to shopping tourists. %
Haiti. The new free-port price From.cThe Miami Herald))


I ''N ** "

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CA-141_______


fable, charming Dr. Braulio Pe-
rez Marchand, well-known Con-
sul-General of Haiti in San Sal-
vador, who made our short stay
here a 'most unforgettable one.
Our next, port of call will be
Tegucigalpa, Honduras a
short, forty minute flight' from
San Salvador, HASTA LA VIS-
TA!


HAITI AS FREE PORT IS ANNEX
TO SANTA CLAUS' STORE-ROOMS


PAGE 13


HAITI :SUN


uMndav. November 20th 1955





PAGE 14HT Nd o r 1


Dr.
TO


Dr.


Seven
dy inr t
this Su
Aim6,
Prince
1947), w
to start
Dr. F
the Issw
at Char
p.m) p
cialisini
tries.
Two
State
is&a&


ROGER FILS-AIME RETURNS Rum Not For
1 1 A lcoholicsF,
OPEN PRACTICE IN HAITI A
Backus Says
Q ,,Moderate drinking is just as
healthy, and' beneficial, as ex-
cessiv .e indulging is detrimentaIz,
wisely observed pretty, blonde
Lucile Backus after refusing a
third Dambala Puncfl at the Dam-
bala bar last week.
The youthful psychologist M
.A, New York School of Social
WVork -- ,ne of the graduate
schools of Columbia) had j ust
attended the U.S. National Sta-
tes Conference on Alcoholism in
lMiami. With delegates from 29
States which have a State pro-
gram on Alcoholism, plus repre-
sentatives from Canada which
copes with the same problem on
a national level, the meeting had
studied medical and psychiatric
FILSIAE(R.) and cousin poet Paul Na1jac who is also aspects of the causes and results
Haiti Suan's 'Gerant Responsablex. of the social plague.
e It was generally admitted
years post graduate situ- were devoted to these shlbjects,said Miss Backus, that the idea
the United States ended followed by three more years of of c'hereditaryi alcoholism was
tMnler for Dr. Roger Fils- the same type of study at 1ar- outdated ,.pd unfounded. The
graduate of the Port au lem Hospital.. most serious factor is now con-
Medical Faculty (Class of For a year'at the Bronx Hos- sidered as being in environment:
vho has returned to Haiti iital, hoger Fils-Aim6 concen- jan alcoholic is very often the vic-
a practice. rated on geneology, with'lTss 'tim of either bad example in his
intense study of obstetrics. Final- -own family, or on the contrary of
'ils-Aimi, now working in Jy satisfied that he was prepared a reaction to excessive tyranny
a'Jeanty maternity clinic to face probable problems aris- in his own home,
ncerelles (9.00 a.m. to 1:00 ing in the maternity field, Roger From an altruistic point f
)ent his time abroad spe- married American Doris.Ramson .view, the smiling visitor said
g in genealogy and obste- who presented him with a son, she was glad that somee of the pa-
a Roger Jr., three weeks ago.
post-grad, years at Penn. Dr. Fils Aimi opened his of- tients she deals with have never
University and hospital fice at 129 rue Capois this week. beensubmitted to the strong
aaaaaaaaaaaaa .aaaa-- ... tempation of

('EL RANCHO,
Pgtionville


Every

Monday Thursday I

Evening

< Dinner-Dancing


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Tuesday and Fridays Dinner Dancg


AUX COSAQUES

Haiti's famous (chomard flam-
meD has been enthusiastically
acclaimed by visiting epicures,
and featured by clmperial Li-
nen. '
But foreigners aren't the only
connoisseurs of food. HaitfAas
know where the meat is done
just right, where wines are of a
perfect vintage and flavour to
mellow their mood and form the
perfect foil for each delightful
course.
That's why special occasions
are observed at .Aux Cosaques..











The Aux Cosaques Bar


TOPS "EM ALL"


iJOSEPH NADAL & Co.rtte


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'Funeral Services Of Cap Haitien Cathedral ic mark
Luia S. Zrvhirn I hts passing.
Louis S. Zephirin Mr. Zephirin, who died Satur-
Held In Le Cap day morning. was a former mem-
ber of tlhe Cap Haitien Bar and,
Funeral services held last Sa- Senator of the Republic.
turday afternoon for Mr. Louis The *Haiti Sun joins Li:- press
S. Zephirin one of the great lite- and public of Haiti in expressing
rary and political figures' of the its deepest sympathy to the wi-
North, were attended by a large dow of the deceased, his -son Mr.
number of mourners from all stra Mauclair Zephirin and his wife,
ta of Cap Haitien society. Dr. Adrien Zephirin, Mr. and
A State Funeral was giv2n the Mrs. Henriot Zephirin adl Mr.
father of lrmer Cabinet memb- and Mrs Albert Westerband, as
er 3Mauclair Zephirin and impres- well as oiher relative_ and
bivc ceremonies were held at the friends.


Every Thursday and Sunday night Special folklore
Show... and dancing
Saturday Night its Always CABANE CHOUCOUNE


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a. PORT-AU-PRINCE HAITI WEST INDIES


HAITI SUN*


Sunday, November 20th 1955


I






Sunday, November 20th 1955 HAITI SUN PAGE 15


More Important Aspects of The Haitian Nation


A review by

C. R. Coulthliard


HAITI: TIHE BLACK REPUBLIC

Complete Story and Guide by
Selden Rodman. New-York, 1954.
Price: Five Dollars ($5.-)

This book was clearly written
as a guide to the intelligent tou-
rist visiting Haiti. It manages, as
the same time. to be a pretty com-
prehensive account of the more
important aspects of the Haitian


Hotel Excelsior

CHAMP DE MARS

(The same management
for 30 years)

Clean, airy rooms, beautiful
view. Good food.

Single $4.00 $5.00

including meals

Until December 14th.-
Special Rates by week,
month or year.

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nation, including history (up to
the presidency of Paul Magloire),
literature, music, economic de-
velopment social set-up, and,
of course, the sine qua non, vou-
dou.

Haiti is beyond doubt a country
that fascinates foreigners, parti-
cularly European and North A-
merican foreigners. The explana-
tions as to why this should be so
are perhaps obvious, but may be
worthwhile mentioning in brief.

In the first place, Haiti came
into being as an independent
state in the most dramatic and
impressive of circumstances. In-
deed. the period of 1791, when
the. slave-'-evolt took place, to
1804, when formal independence
was declared, is one of the most
Sspectacular zind astounding per-
iods in modern history.

The pe'-ird of independence
also threw ap a number of strik-
ing personaiities-Toussaint, Hen
ri Christophe. Dessalines who,
like the great men of indepen-
dence of Latin America,-Miran-
da, San Martin and Bolivar-fas-
cinate an I baffle biographers,
and arouse strange fires in the
imagination.; of poets and novel-
ists. Yet. however great the gla-
mour with which Haiti was he-
ralded onto the stage of the


JACQUES LAFLEUR


.vorld, today there is no doubt
that the foreigner'is drawn by
certain elements in Haitian cul-
ture whicn are so exotic and
strange that which are so-
strange thit they awaken an in-
surmountab'e curiosity.
Haiti is the territory of the
Caribbean which has preserved
most intact and pure its
African heritage, and whereas,
in varying degrees, traces of Afri-
can influence in language, .cus-
toms, superstitions, folklore, etc.,
have remained in most of the Ca-
ribbean islands, in Haiti, the life
of a large section of the popula-
tion is moulded to a considera-
ble extent by customs stemming
from Africa. All this is very well
explained znd demonstrated by
Mr. Rodman.
One of the most apparent Afri-
canisms in Haiti is, of course,
voudou. There is no use in Hai-
tians protesting about the exces-
sive interest taken by the foreign-


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er in voudou. It is new, strange
and exciting to him. One must
also take into account the ever-
recurring European fashions for
the primitive, which is often nai-
vely equated with lack of inhibi-
tions, with the orgiastic and dio-
nisiac elements of man, which
European .ivilisation has been
at pains for centuries to keep in
check.
Primitivism is a vicarious es-
cape, a tibet ation, even if only in
imagination. A man like Mr. Rod-
marn, poet, art-critic and littera-
teur, does not escape this fascina-
tion for the primitive, and that
is probably why, although he
gives fair sp-ce to such questions
as the economic development and
social structure of the country,'
he comes down heavily precisely
in fayour of the more primitive
and picturesque aspects of Hai-
ti. I say this as no stricture on
Mr. Rodman. As an artist, a poet,
an intel'?ctu:l, I think it was
:':ct:table.

One of the most interest-
ing chapters in the book is Mr.
Rodman's account of the school
of primitivist painting which
sprung up in 1944 around the
Centre d'Art. The Centre
d'Art did not startz pri-
mitivist painting in Haiti; it was
there already. It only encourag-
el artists by supplying them
with paints and a little advice
and made !t possible for the
painters, most of them peasants
and artisans (one, IHector Hyppo-
lite, a voudou priest), to sell their
works.


The work of Dewitt Peters, the
director of the Centred'Art, as
well as of Mr. Rodman himself,
did an invaluable service to Hai-
tian art. One wonders whether
there may not be, hidden away
in the country parts in Jamaica,
some of these primitive, self-tutor-
ed pictorial geniuses who are be-
ing left to rot on the branch. One
should apparently, keep a keen
look out for paintings on the
doors of roadside bars, as this
was the way in which HyppoUte
was discovered.
ANYBODY going to Haiti
with lMr. Rodman's book 'in his
hand is sure to enjoy himself in
a way differing f-om that of the
average tourist. It will supply
him with a depth and perspective
which are normally not easily ac-
quired without considerable read-
ing and actual experience of a
people at -li'fering Ic els of so-
ciety.
Interesting as are the more in-
tellectual sections of the book-
on art, history, voudou, etc-the
illustrated tours on which the
author takes the reader to such
provincial towns as Jacmel, Cap
Haitien and Jeremie are fascinat-
ing. In these 'guided tours%, he
not only describes scenery and
'atmosphere most alluringly, but
also supplies extremely useful in-
dications as to how to get to.
places.
The book is completed with-
lists of hotels and pensions (with.
prices), a vocabulary of essential
creole words, a reading list of
books about Haiti, and such in-


N vaiuaDle sections as. Fooo, En-
The movement gathered tre- tertainments, Bargains, Trans-
mendous momentum and culmi- port, etc...
nated in the decoration with mu- One can only hope, with Mr.
rals of the Protestant Episcopal Rodnian, that Haiti will continue,
Cathedral of the Sainte-Trinite. under the able presidency of Paul
Mr. Rodman's book is well illust- Magloire, towards greater mate-
rated with reproductions of the rial prosperity without any of its
work of some of these primitive charm and inimitable flavour be-
painters. ing lost.


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Distributor: Haiti Seed Stores, Port au Prince and Kenscoff.


]AC~tES In EL


PAGE 15


Sunday, November 20th 1955


HAITI SUN


1 12-24-12 >




PAGE 16 "AITI SU '." '"
'PAGE---- 16 ___ _________ .HAITI SUN


OUIIUnMJ, nuNvcmbjer SU21h 1955


ON A 42-FOOT YACHT


"Lone Voyager) Backtracks Youthful Travels

Through Haiti, Cuba And Dminican Republic
Through Haiti, Cuba And Dominican Republic


On a sentimental journey
which may pay purely down-to
earth dividends both to the voya-
ger and the countries visited,
hefty, ham-handed Don Smith
dropped anchor in La Gonave
Bay Monday aboard his 42-foot
motor yacht.
The 50-year-old ex-mariie,
dubbed eThe Lone] Voyagers
by an imaginative Cuban jour-
nalist,- has been making news
around the Caribbean for the
past couple of years ever since
he bought and outfitted the eVir-
ginia III. in Panama,City, Flo-
rida.
Sailing with no company but
his memories of forty sea-roving
years, the former banana boat
skipper has been poking in and
out of West Indian ports back-
tracking the course of his earlier
years, renewing old friendships
anda cquantainces:>.
Reporter Too
He is also on an assignment
for the Perry chain of newspap
ers---18 small publications spread
like a cast net over Florida.'
What Mr. Smith aims to tell
these newspapers is so volumi-
nous that he plans to put into,
a North Cu-ban port after touch-
ing off from Port au Prince via
St. Marc and Le Mole (he doesn't
know when) and there get him-
self a brace of secretaries to
take it all down.


ISea-rover Smith


nptels..Not me. I get to know the
people. And the only way to get
to know the people is by talking
to them. And I don't mean the
upper class. They have it too
soft to know about the peasants.
I spend my mornings in the
market place, talking to the
emarchandes asking questions,
assessing the situation prices.
cost of living, conditions and so
on ...


CThat's the way to get to kno'.v
As "ar as Haiti is concerned a country. You don't want jult
it boils dowli t0 this: 'tI've been to see the crust. You want t
here off and on for more than know what goes on underneath..
forty years nov/w'. I spent 27 To know what goes on under-
months here in the Marines neath, Don Smith plunges into
'was among the first batch to set the interior and brings out the
'oat on the Cabotage wharf when true facts behind the face of Latin
the old Connecticut (poor old America. After five days roving
-ship she's been gone a long the South coast, he judges th-
taUtS now. ...) docked on August the poeple were pretty hard hit
4, 1917. Y'know I used to- have the poeple'were pretty hard hit by
to buy 500 eggs a week for the Hazel also touched by Kitty.
Marines. Lawd, what a job that *Trees there still are bare an,
was We would haggle ,and hagg- stripped of branches*, he reports.
le. I'd offer the mnrchande a cent .People are poor.. Don't have as
and she would call me fon, she'd much to sell as they did in the
ask ifiv?. cents and I'd walk away old days. Even the fish aren't as
in' di:,.;iv.t. Finally she would call plentiful.
me back and we'd work out a
compromise ... Siesta
.''.1know most writers corned But all is not duty with aqr
eown here and stay in the posh Smith. He occasionally allow..


Himself the company of such fa
miles as the Mevs and the Gar
d6res, and every afternoon is
siesta time a time he speaks
of with obvious' tenderness.
Nevertheless, the explorer
thinks, the 'investigations he has
carried out should yield big di-
vidends for the Latin American
countries in the way of publici-
ty, American sympathy and help
Change Of Face
Obviously esympathiques t(.
this republic, the retired sea-cap.
tain exclaimed over the changes
in the water-front. Here in the
forties when he used to haul ba-
nanas out of provincial ports
and Port au Prince, Captain
Smith had no inkling of the vast
change in the La Gonave Bay
shoreline. When he cruised in
1:00 a'm. Monday he was piloted
to the Casino wharf and turned
in for some sleep--Zafter haggl-
ing the docking fee down to
$1.50 a day in the traditional
Haitian manner (Mais bui, momin
parli Creole-qaoa compren ?)
On awakening next day,. the
Lone Voyager almost panicked
when he took in his surround-
ings. Rushing for compass, maps,.
charts etc.: .he soon set his fears
at rest when he real4ised he was
not lost after-all but was actually
in Port au Prince-bpt an errti
rely new Port au Prihne.


However, .there. was plentyj of
atmosphere lurking around from
the days of the Marines when
Mr. Smith set out for the Iron
Market. The .marchandess were
the same the smells turmoil Uan
dust .had not changed. BUt prier
were up a nit-

eThe cost of living, is highi, the'
investigator surmised gravely.
Scattering coins and" amazing
the hawkers with his $90 Polar-
old camera that produces a finish
ed print in 1 minute, -Mi. Smith
has been having the time of his-
life.
You ought to see their faces-
when I snap their picture then'
show Them' the result's!. r he,
chuckled.
A useful feature of the camera-
is its ability to make a subject
light or dark according to the pho-
tographer's whim.
Not only emarchandes! i.'3
into the camera's iiew-finder as


the Mont Jli a few weeks back.
Contrast To D.R.
Sea-rover Smith, whose twin-
engined Diesel powered yacht has
streaked from port to port across
3,000 miles of Caribbean in the
past five months, came here
from the Dominican Republic
after an extensive survey of con-
ditions there.
His results are amazing if noth-
ing else.

Prices over there have sky-
rocketed, he said: shoes are $25
per pair; ham $5 per pound; eggs
10 cents each; pork unobtainable:
beef beyond the reach of the
average sea-captain's budget
Taxes are exorbitant, Florida
newspaper-readrers are going to
learn. Though the Dominicans
have no income tax, the writer
said, this is only because there
is generally no income to ta- .But
a farmer pays $5 per year taxes
per cow, 1 cent per pound taxes
to butcher his hog (the 'alcar-
de's permission must also be ob-
tained for this. everyone is flee-
ing from the farms to the city to
escape the tax.
But, in the city, says Smith..


they come up against another
form of hardship: the Benefactor
recently passed a law, hlie says,
hlie says, commanding the citizens
A.o tear down all wooden fronts of
houses and replace ihem with
cement. Trujillo owns the cement
block factory, the roving report-
er added in an interview with
the 4Sun this week.
Furthermore, he intends to
warn all sea-dogs away from Do-
ininicani's shores because reams
a.nd reams of haper have to be
tilled out before a yachtsman is
allowed to enter. Sea-captains,
notoriously conte.nptious of book-
work, cannot fairly be expected
to fill out 50-60 sheets of ques-
tionnaire as he had to do in Cap
Hlaitien before they would let
him cross the border to the' Do-
minican Republic.

No Fun
Even the sentimental memo-
ries aren't as savoury over the
line, said Captain Smith who
spent three ard a half years
there in the twenties. The old
Santo Domingo is gone for ever,
and a sentimental journey is no
fun in the new country.


Everybody's Favourite


a picture of Harold Bausseniis .- -
And his brother in lA shws STHE FILTER THAT COUNTS
The snmp was made in Le Cap' T H IL THT UTSI
when Captain Smith was visiting : L & M HAS THE B, EST! A
- -- ,, I ': H '
'I' I I

A treat at*
j 1 M G
tea-time? M
ll lE Ui








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Sunday, November 20th 1955


uHAITI SUNs


.. alr. -~w
6 tEL U'UJ~fC~ A'
* ti. r~ av -~
S~t~ ,aO St% eva


Burdette Ashton, former Bas-
iketball star of Port au Prince, re-
cently wed lovely, 19-year-old Ja-
natha-Robey in Indianopolis, In-
.diana.
Burdette, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Horace. Ashton, of Villa Rosa, is
now a psychiatric assistant at the
lindianopolis, Indiana, State Hos-
pital. His bride is the hospital's
recreational supervisor. They
were wed in the hospital chapel,
and, writes Burdette, they will
be down in Haiti for the next
Mardi Gras.

General Mcotors'Represerjtative
Marcel Gentil is flying North to
New York today on a business-
health trip. He will be accom-
panied by son Claude.

The Pa-il Cassagnol family is
excited over the two charming
new members of the family who
arrived last week in the persons
of twin ;ons Jean-Pierre and
Jean-Robert bringing the number
of the Cassagnol kiddies up to
nine. 'Mama, the former Cy-
La Bonnefil, and her strapping
sons. are doing splendidly, and
the birthday anniversary of Mrs.
Cassagnol November 16th, gave
special reasons for celebnatipn
this year.

The Ro'bert Castena's welcomed
their second child,-" ;c.Reginald .
who was born on Monday. Mrs."
Castera is-the former Genevieve
Peloux, and mother and son are
both doing nicely.

Mrs. Loris Hamilton received.
a reprieve from the States this
week. The wife of the Secretary
of Anerica's Association of Jnter-
ior Decorators, Mrs. Hamilton is
staying down with the Georges
(Fire ChiefI Elie family until Wed
nesday.

Clever (B A.) and attractive Mo-
nique Villedrouin is engaged to
Dr. Pierre Salgado.

Evelyn Fisen and .Elizabeth
Weisberg returned home to Man-
hattan Friday after .a fortnight's
stay in Pacot with the Lampsons.
Miss Anne Marie Tribie and
Mr. Pierre D6jean will exchange
wedding vows in the Sacre Cceur
Church Tuesday December 6,
6:30 p.m.
Riviera's Paul Weesner came
to town Thursday.

SAmbassador and Mrs. Pierre
Liautaud are leaving today for
Madrid whrhre Mr. Liautaud is
accredited.


S I //


Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Stanley.
of Kansas City, Missouri, arrived
Sunday on the PAA clipper from
New York for their eighth an-
nual visit with the Horace Ash-
tons of Vill., Rosa, ten haut Ca-
nape Vert The Stanleys are
amcng Haiti's truest friends and
have guided many influential
Kansas Citizens to spend their
vacation in the Republic.

In time for the festive season's
round of parties. Miss Kay Ze-
gri will arrive in Haiti with
the know-bow% on lily-gilding
which she will pass on to the
bellesez of Port au Prince.
Miss Zegri is an expert in beau-
ty questions sent down by He'le-
na Rubin3tcin to give demonstra-
tions at Sabot d'Or and Canape
Vert. the Talamas'. Grand' Rue
sttre. On a demonstration tour
through the Caribbean she will
visit Puerto Rico, Dominican Re-
public. Virgin Islands, Curacao
and Cuba.
Headquartered in New York,
the beauty expert has spent two
years with Helena Rubinstein,
one of the largest beauty pro-
ducts firms in the States.


U.S. Embassy Vice Consul Jo-
seph Klaus headed for Calypsos,
Hummingbirds and pther Trinida-
Aldian specialities Manday-.s bhe
got .set to start a nlonth's vaca-
tion. In.the absence ot M9r. Klaus,
Cleveland Johnson tap cambe
pou li.

Sun Life Assurafnce Compa-
ny's Director and .-Mrs. Rony
Ohenet Sr. aie leaving today by
plane for New York, and Cana-
da. They will visit their doctor
son Paul in New York and their
oExpert Comptables son Leslie
in Canada. Mrs. Chenet will
then continue on to Switzerland
for a six months, vacation and
visit with daughter, Yolande, a
student there. Mr. Chenet who
is combining a business-curm-
pleasure jaunt in the U.S and
Canada is expected to return
to Port-au-Prince in time for
Christmas, and the mild weath-
er of his Petion-Ville villa. -,
Jeariette D'Adesky and her
mother returned from a Florida
esejourn Thursday.
Co-director of 4Le Nationabl the
energetic Mr. Sejour Laurent
returned home Thursdaiv from at-
tending the French Language
Journalists' conference in Cana-
da.

Cecile Reiher and Yanik Gau-
thier are leaving for Paris Sun-
day next. Cecile will pick up
Charles and Irve who -are attend-
ing school in the States, and take
them to France.

Mr. *and Mrs. Louis Molinas
and Mr. and'Mrs Max Orlinsky
were among one-day tourists in
Port Friday.


Byron and Germaine Coroneos
are back from their European
tour. The. HASCO official and
his charming wife visited their
son who is perfecting his singing
in Milan I:aly.

The Jacques Faubert residence
in Petionville rang with festivity
Sunday morning as the Baptism
of young Frangoise, their new
daughter, was celebrated.

Walter Wilson, of the Philadel-
phia Bulletin, largest 'afternoon
newspaper in the U.S., left Haiti
Saturday morning after three
days here in the course of an in-
formation tour of the Carib-
bean. He was accompanied by
his wife.
The c million copies, employs some
2000 workers. Mr. Wilson told lo-
cal reporters.

The engagement of Edwige
Fouchard. beautiful daughter of
Mr. and Mrg. Jean Fouchard, is
to be announced in December
. He is husky Hungarian
George Kenn.


Yanne and Carlo (US.l.S) Etien
new's lives center about the figu-
re seven. The couple wel-
comed their first son seven years
after their, marriage; last week
exactly seven years after the
birth of their first child, their
second boy arrived on the fami-
ly scene. Carlo is passing out ci-
gars this week.

Henry Delva is tflancde to
Carine Rounain, the beautiful'
aMannequin of Maison Roumain.
Henry is seen with bis cFiancde.
driving a blue Pontiac.

Carlos and J-acqueline Pereira
are back from New Orleans with
their lovely daughter Michele.
'Mr. and Mrs. Frantz Gardere
(Madame nee Ghislaine Augus-
te) are the proud parents of a
daughter, eRegine,D who was
b-orn Tuesday. and now the cou-
ple have the ideal pair.

Engineer Maurice Latortue,
Doyen .of Ecole Polytechnique
and Rector a.i. of the University
feted another printemps on No-
vember 16 th, and was showered
with egateriesD by friends and
the family, with young son Phi-
lippe and wife Alida to smile a
greeting to visitors who dropped
in to wish the Doyen <.many hap-
py returns of the day.v

Mr. Clement .Jumelle, Minister
of Finance and National Econo-
my, was toasted by friends and
colleagues Wednesday on the oc-
casion of his birthday. The finan-
cial expert who received his train
ing in the United States is "now
in his second consecutive term
of office in the Presidential Ca-
binet and time and again has
proven the wisdom of his selec-
tion.
Mr. Joseph D. Charles, Minist-
er of Foreign Affairs and Reli-
gion. was f6ted, bv friends and offi


I Lebert Jean'"Pierre, laureate cial associates Tuesday on the
"of the LawtFaculty in '54, who is occasion of the aniVersary of his
now studying, on'a Paul Magloire bi.th.
scholarship .in 'PaPis, took second The efficient and popular care-
'iace int'.h first exams in his er statesman was toasted as one
course for-Doctorate. One. of 500 of the leading members of the
candidates, rhe former lieutenant Haitian intelligentsla,
was tolped-by a German.
Mrs. Gerty Pressior, ,Riviera's-
.'David Holden, zepresentalive in Washington, is birthday celebrations Wednesday
ddwn on a visit.to Haiti. Guided evening at Aux 'Cosaques with a
by. .SrPP chief Denys Bellande, group* of azamis,, later saw the
.the" newsman saw the Peligre day die on the Riviera Rooftop.
dilm site And visited Cap Hai-
lien. He broke the record for Roger Rigaud is in Havana.
speed in' becoming a real merin- Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Man-
gue dancer, this week. gones returned. Wednesday from
City businessman and Mrs. L. visiting the neighboring repu-
Preetzman Aggerholm returned blic.
to Port aboard last week's AN- Due to fly to Miandi this wpek
CON after six months on their are: Emile Prezeau, Lys Talley-
estate at Vesinet, France. They rand and Genmaine Dennis.
were welcomed at the pier by Dr. (Mrs) Hudicourt is due
'Mrs Clement Magloire, Mr. Max back this %wek from a 6-month re-
Theophile and Mr. Henri Reiher. fresher at the famous Mount Si-
Rnn6 Dorsaint, of the Foreign nai hospital in New York.
Office, flew Sunday to Montreal,
Canada, on an International Ci- Mrs. Camille Pincherle, Bou-
vii Aviation scholarship. Mr. Dor- cherie de champ de Mars, cele-
saint. Secretary of the Haitian brated her birthday November 17.
Commission of Civil Aviation,
will spend two years in Montreal
studying Aviation Law. .
Miss Marie-Therese Saint Pier- *
re of Gonaives will wed Engineer To THUA_ m" uR umN G %
Metellus Charles in the modern JOHN WALKEE* mor. LTD.
Gonaives Cathedral 7:00 a.m.
Saturday December 3...-


Ghislaine and Lieutenant Fritz
Leon welcomed their fourth
child on Thursday, a. bouncing
.8-1/2 lb. *garqon.,.


RE.BD MAR Trnn


It must
be good


Charming Alta Pierre will soon
fly to Puerto Rico.
Mr. Lideric Carrie, former ac-
countant of Chalon & Co. has
opened his own store on the main
street.
Mrs. 'Victor Saliba and her bro-
ther in law Andre flew to New
York last Monday.

Mrs. Erie Tippenhauer will
soon fly to Detroit to see her
daughter Gerda who is in school
there.
'Mrs. Nina AMilien will fly to
New York next Tuesday.
Mr. Edner Kavanagh, account
ant of Mr. Harry Tippenhauer
sets out on his vacation in San
Juan, Puerto Rico today.

November 6th was the birthday
anniversary of Raymond 'Moise.

Augusta Pressoir Marcbhand
flew to New York with her son
this week to board a steamer for
Europe.

Jean Lumarque, proprietor of
the famous cAux Calabassesv res-
taurant, at Carrefour, received
Minister Roland Lataillade Tues-
day evening.
Simone Jumelle flew to New
York Friday..
New York bound today is the ,
director of Tourism, Mr. Pierre
Chauvet.
Josette 'Flambert flew to the
States Wcdnesday.

Guy Lardque, tall, suave as-
sistant Chief of the Tourist Bu-
reau rolled into town last week
after a spell in Lausanne, Swit-
zerland, here he represented Hai-
ti at the ASTA conference.

Captain Lucien Scott returned
from New York last week looking
fit and well in spite of his long
illness wWich caused an emergen-
cy operation at Mount Sinai Hos-
pital-September 28 and will keep
him confined to quarters for a
few months yet.
Deputy Andr6 Jeanty will fly to'
New York today. Mr. Jeanty.says
*he doesn't yet know what towns he
will visit besides New York.

L'ldash apnd the Department of
Labor issued invitations to a
*Soiree R6creative' to be held
Wednesday evening, November "
23rd at 6:30, at the Theatre de
Verdure tMassillon'"Coiotr. The
occasion designated .cLoisirs Ou-
vriers is being given for workers
of all categories.

Travelman Louis Lamarre, laid
up for the past week with chills,
fever, grippe etc... etc... is click-
ing ofi all 6 cylinders again.

A special service next Sunday
10:00 a-m will mark the first an-
niversary of the dedication of the
Methodist Church on Rue de la
Revolution. The Reverend Marco
Depestre will deliver the sermon.
Stepping into Jules Farmer's
old headquarters on Rue Pav6e
this week will be Andre. Gerdes.-
._


SJohnnie Walker must be good, to remain tin in:
forefront of Scotch WXhiskies for over r3o years. c
It must be good to pass the scrutiny of distill.r--s
with over 130 years experience behind them. A,

JOHNNIE WALKER
BORN 1820-S riLL GrOICNG SrRONGc
Try it today-you'll agree it's good u t


Page 19


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CARE "Milkman",
Leaves Haiti
For New Post
(Continued front page 1)
of schoolchildren as the Milk Man
- the provider of their daily rat-!
ion of milk- because of an agree-
ment between the Haitian Govern-
ment and CARE whereby the Am-
erican organization supplied 500.
000 lb. of'powderd milk and the
Government took charge of its
transportation.
At the close of the highly suc-
cessful milk dist r i b u t i o n pro-
grr.mme, Ziskind flew up to the
head office in New York, returned
with another plan -distribution
of Self-Help" agricultural, mechan-
ical and artisan kits to commun-
ities througliout the Republic.
Also, during Mr. Ziskind's term
of office, the system of adoption
of Haitian villages, through CARE,
by societies in the United States,
was institued. This has led to in-
valuable assistance in the way of
tools, equipment and material to
many under-developed communi-
ties.


A round of farewell parties at
the homes of the many friends
made here was topped by a Pu
blic Health Department reception
noon Friday during which he was
decorated with the Order of Hon-
our and Merit (rank of Knight)
by the grateful Haitian Govern-
ment.

THREE CASES
OF FRAUD
AT BNRH
(Continued from page 1)
of the BNRH falsified accounts of
the sale of travellers' cheques in
three instances showing a false
total of $1,150. This was discover-
ed the same day when the accounts
were balanced, and the employee
involved has refunded $550. The
ease has been submitted to the
Police. '
He also stated that during the
regular check on the deteriorated
bank-notes turned in by the Cash-
iers, a deficit of G. 2,128 was
found in the books of one of the
clerks. This employee, Mr. Airm
said, was discharged after reim-
bursing the amount.


It is also exact,' he stated, that


COMMONWEALTH OIL DENIES
REPORTED STRIKE ON GONAVE


(Continued from pag
Drilling was entrusted to N. E. vernn
Andrews, an independent oil oper- to se
ator of Houston, Texas by the perts
Commonwealth Oil Company' of yield
Haiti, a branch of the U.S. firm. Gona
The Haitian branch is headed by It
geological expert G. L. Me Cord, of pe
and has" Biron Ransing, one of the but
directors of Miami's First National costly
Bank, as advisor. The Haitian Go- howe
vernment reportedly has given 'Thez
the Company a three-year contract -
for oil prospecting in the Re-
public.
'Petty' Geophysical engineers
from San Antonio, Texas, surveyed
the Republic and pointed out the
sites which were most likely to'
contain petroleum deposits.
They picked La Gonave as one
of the most promising spots in
Haiti. .


,LE JOUR'SD
STORY OF
THE cOIL STRIKE))
This is in effect an event of
major importance that of the dis-
covery of oil deposits 6n La Go-
nave after months of drilling and
patient investigation by the big
English oil company: Common-
wealth Refinihg Company.
Equally. important, 'let us say,
because petrol, like gold or, dia-
monds is a source of enormous
wealth capabe of revolutionising
the economy of the country.
From now on, as well as allu-
minium, manganese cement etc...
of which we are producers, petrol
will, take its place in our economy.
We hope -that all our country-
men will agree with us that such
a discovery will have for its ul-
timate end the revigoration of our
national wealth, and that the' Go-
8 HELD'IN
ST. LOUIS -DU NORD
MURDER CASE
Eight arrests were made this
past week in connection with the
murder of Eleazer Noel, of St.
L6uis du Nord, whose mutilated
body was found recently in the
district of eNan Bois Neuf.
The persons held for question-
ing in the affair are Fortune Al-
tilus, Dorvilus and Ssucllia Jo-
seph, Douvas Felix Marcelin De-
battre, Livie Compere, Agila Se-
neque and Relcina Petit-Comp-


ge 1)
nent on its side will not fail
nd on the spot its own ex-
to evaluate the capacity for
of the petrol deposit on La
ve.,
is true that the exploitation
petroleum requires not only
also a complicated and very
Organization. Let us sing
ver with the optimists
re is hope,.


Sain Ziskind. (L) ivth Francis X. Mayers, Director of CARE Overseas
Division, who recently visited Haiti.

an employee who is not an author- employee was also discharged, the
ised otficer of the Bank, put Director said.
through cheques as being against This triple fraud attempt at the
an established account in the name Bank follows close on the heels
of one of his relatives when there' of the Tax Office embezzlement
was no money to cover them. The case in which an employee, Mir.
cheques were cashed by business- Bertrand Prepetit, was involved.
men in the City, but the Bank The amount cited then exceeded
lost nothing in the incident. The i $30,000.


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Da.& 9


HAITI SUN


Sunday, November 20th 1955


i


-- .1


-1 ,




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