UFDC Home  |  Search all Groups  |  Digital Library of the Caribbean  |  dLOC  |  Caribbean Newspaper Digital Library  

Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00340


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


I


rr


THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER


Port au Prince Republique d'Haiti


Sunday, Niovemoer i13tn


1955 Telephone 2061 No. 8


DUNDEE OFFERS AID


TO HAITIAN BOXING,


I don't mi;.d making a 6am-
Miami Promn'oteir ble> said the broad-shouldered
S s B ex-boxer But to gamble when
Sees Bright Future you know ,.uiire gonna lose
For Boxing Here WlSuport a Programe
But. if H-itian sports enthu-
Support of a programme to siasts pro.e i terested enough to
rEsurrect boxing in Haiti was of- start a boxing programme, and
fered Thursday by Chris Dundee, sponsor it trom this end, he will
Miami's foremost promoter give the support necessary from
Dundee (no relation to the form the U.S side.
er World champion of the same Dundee .ugested that business
er Wol chmino he same men be approached and asked to
name) stopped over in Port au men he approached and asked to
Prince o his Wav to Caracas sponsor amateur boxi,,g tourna-
where one of his boxers, elteracas ments which may result in the
where o~mo hi boxers, welter- discovery of \World class talent.
weight Jimmy Beacham, is sche- discoveclare of World he could ar-lent.
duled to meet" the Venezuela Hn declared that he could ar-
champion Ismael Espagna tomor- range tor n former champion or
row night. orexperienced coach to come do\Qn
Hent a buyd -,to Haiti and train the more pro-
He spent a busy day here con- rising boxers revealed by such
acting local Sports officials and aung b revealed by such
sponsors, investigating the feasa- .,You might have future World
ability of staging a bout between Championis right here on the
an imported champion (perhaps streets!, the life- long boxiig en-
.:even 'Rocky MarciaMo) ,ad al- tl-o. siastsair. -Boxing would of-
cal boxer. The Mii-mi boxing pro- fer the young kids an opportunity
moter said he was thinking of -to achieve recognition. Give
organizing -a progr mme here them healthy sport and aspira-
which woul-l pit the best boxers tions. and not only will boxing
in Cuba and the U.S. 'against 10- benefi., but the country will be
cal talent in regular matlhes, .iive-n te'mrndous, help.t
The Poor Kids
Dundee, representative in the
U:S. of-all Cuban bdxers said he ,.All the great boxers were


could easily promote bouts bet-
ween Cuban and U.S. boxers, Cu-
ban and local boxers, and Haitian
and U.S. boxers.

But his nrief survey of the lo-
cal scene convinced him that po-
pular interest was at too low an
ebb to make such a programme
possible.


poor kids.., he continued. OIt's the
hungry boy, the boy with little
opportunity 'who usually finds
ion outlet in boxing. Now, most
of' the good fighters in the U.S.
are poor -ons ot foreign immi-
grants. Look what boxing brought
iLhem-famq fortune, internatio-
n al recognition. o
I' The former, manager of Bob Ba-


SUPPLIES, tools and self-help equipment are being shipped to
Haitian villages by American women through CARE See Page 3)


ker, .who fights Nino Valdez De-
cember 7 for the right to take a
crack at Marciano's little, sug-
gested that small prizes, or pur-
ses, be given to the winners in
amateur tournaments. But this
would not be the main incentive.
He pointed out that with the road
to international fame open to
good, hard-working boxers, inte-
rest would sky-rocket
Dundee is offering to open the
road to U.S. rings.
,And rernember, he says
every kid wants to be a fighter.-

Sources of Help
Chris Dundee declared that he
thought the U.S State Depart-
ment might be willing to help,
and that big industrialists here
and abroad should be a source
of financial support: He also sug-
gested approaching the Govern-
nterit for aid-in the project, which

(Continted on page 2)


FOR BRIEF VISIT


EUGENE LYONS at right 'one of the foremost authorities on Russia in
U.S. seen at a cocktail party in his honour given by U.S. Ambassador
mnd Mrs. Roy Tasco Davis Tuesday. Mrs. Lyons is third from left.

Leading U. S. Authority On Soviets

Spends 2-Weeks Holiday In Haiti
Haiti has the happiest proleta- nist ,Russia -..V.ho -edo ,o
-riat t-ti .vd-rld, aitcoatling- to' week visit to this- rey.lie Fri-
Eugene Lyons, one of the world's day....
foremost authorities on Commu- -The prominent anti-Communist
author apd his wife, af.er ho-li.
Saying here, declared tWltselves
entirely captivated by ,-aiti. They
left the country' with little
of everything-rest, weight, plea-
sant experiences; and even money,


Former Haitian Resident Returns

After Making Fortune In Germany

German multi-millionaire Will Mrs. George Rode, Mr. and Mrs.
H. Schlieker and his chic, charm- Max Theophile, Mr. .and Mrs.
ing wife arrived iq Port au Prince Hans Hackenbruch Major : and
from New York lasi Friday for a Mrs. Francis Etienne, Mr./ and
brief visit. Mrs. Theodore Donner, Mr. and
Mrs. Erich Bondel and Mr. and
It was the internationally-known Mrs. Willy Koehler.
industrialist's first visit to Haiti The couple, who maivelled t
in eighteen years. Haiti's progress'in the years
since 1937, were seen off at Bowen
Mr. Schlieker, who is today Field Wednesday when they
one of the top steel producers of Fied a ane fo Nen t
Germany ard owner of diesel en- here they vill oard the Queen
gine works and shipping lines, Elizabeth [or Earope Thursday.
left Haiti in December 1937 after _______Eief_________-__Ts
two years here with the 0.3J.
Brandt firm. 3.000-DOLLARS
During their visit, the 42-year-
nld millionaire and his wife were FOUN SH
entertained by old friends, includ- OU Vi" O R)
ing Mr. and Mrs. Oswald J.
Brandt, Mr. and Mrs. Max H. The- AT TAX OFFICE
ophile, Mr. and Mrs Erich Bon-
del, and Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Donner. The tycoon of Haitian in- dustry professed pride in Mr. tributionsv. which aroused wides-
Schlieker- his -former pupil who pread rumour and speculation
has climbed to the top and captur- this week, was clarified by Di-
ed an enviable place among the rector General Georges Eugene
world's steel kings.- Roy in a statement to the Press.

Friends recall Mr. Schlieker The story of the deficit in the
having constant trouble with his Tax Office was reported, and the
ebogota on \t.he streets of Port sum involvh'ed increased with each
au Prince in the gay 30 s. repetition. The story also named
On the eve of their departure, an employee of the office as the
the industrialist and his wife re- accountant concerned, and stated
ceived friends at their hotel, the he had resigned two months be-
Ibo Lele. to dinner Tuesday night, fore the discovery of the shorta-
Among the guests were: Mr. and ge.


as Mr. Lyons made a point of des-
cending on the Casino almost eve-
ry night and winning with pheno-
menal regularity.
On only one occasion did Mr.
Lyons' capitalistic tendences fail
to prove profitabLe when he
broke even after a night at the
tables.


The President
Lyons. a senior editor of the'
leaders Digest* and formerly
among America's greatest foreign
.correspondents, also had highL
praise for the Chief of State. The'
first correspondent ever to in-
terview Joseph Stalin. Mr. Lyons'
described the Haitian President
as obviously a very able mans.
He said he was impressed with
General Magloire's directness and
sense of humour and enjoyed the
interview granted him TuesdaV
very much.
Commenting on the difference
between a' totalitarian dictator
and a democratic president, the
writer said thqE Joseph Stalin
made him sit down ii the'Krenf-
]in and compose his United Press
story for his censorship. His in-
terview with President Magloire
was more like anii informal con-
versation, he said. 0
The Experiment Turned Sour
.The Russian born author of
eAssignment In Utopia., Stalin
Czar Of All The Russias, eThe
Red Decade,. *Six Soviet Plays,
and tOur Secret Allies) proved
himself an. entrenched foe of
Communism to everyone who dis-
J(Continued on Page 20)
(Continued on Page 20)


I


VOL V


19616


JL


HM





Pag 2 HAITI SU Su riy No e b r 13 h l


C H R 0 N 1 QUE CREOLE 0 Chris Dundee Offers To Support
I L


Fer a chaud, qui mioune qu'a quimb6'l?

Moron; dimuanche 4 heures du matin. P& Arnoux pe di lan
inesse, vicaire a, Pe Marius, ap con-
duit chant. Pendant ce temps, bal
Ian presbit6.
Ite missa est, cur6 a fil6 sous cha-
pelle Chambellan. Oun I'aute messe,
BY EMILE sans doute baptAmes. ,
.'"" ~ Lor li entree Ian chamnbre pou d6-
poser 1'argent, c6 quand ou prend
ou connin. Vo6le t6. d6ja enlev6 cofre-
ROLMER, fort'l ac routes cobs qui la dans'l.
A peine quelques jours dans I'E-
glise J6remie, d6vots, d6dds qui en-
Stred bonne heure 1'6glise prend r616.
Malpropret6 partout, croix lan t6te
tableau chemin de croix cass6s, brassds lan milan force
ftroncs. losties sitin, tabernacles trois autels forces.

Pi tard, tronc St-Michel, c6 lan cimeti6 yo al join'n Ii.
Ville la en bouleverse, toute moune lan chuichuichui. P6
P6ron, cur6 6file aux Cayes pou pot' nouvelle baille Monsei-
gneur.

Quant a profane, yo conn' profan6 I'Eglise. C6 toujours au
mois de novembre qa faite. Min fois qa, ce pas tiatia, ca grave
en pile. C6 I'abomination de la desolation.

Npus crou6 va finn. Lan nuit suivant oun vingtaine d'hom-
Smes envahi presbyte. Chiens bari yo. Bataille. Neg couri. Lor
joijr faite yo join'n de traces sang lan toute all6e a.
Fer a chaud, qui moune qu'a quimbd'l?

EMILE ROUMER


A Boxing Programme in Haiti
(Continued from page 1)


he pointed out, would be so bene-
ficial to lhc Republic. .
He gave the (Nat Fleisher) and address of the
editor of 9Ringi magazine, who,
he thinks would be willing to help
furnish equiipment for training
and competition.
The promoter, whose headquar-
ters is the famous Miami Behch
auditorium, described cNat as a
close friend and an ardent lover
of boxing.

The Way ?u Win


te
ta
wi

in,
all
bi

'a I
ga
mi
i~ll
in
at
Je
Ph


Boxing sprang into life here
with the coming of Cuban boxer
Omelho Ag -amonte in 1949 flam- cIr
ro
ed intermittently for little over
a year, pet.erel off into wrestling- .
boxing contests, fourth rate bouts.
and women wrestling, finally
sank into oblivion.

National interest, briefly but
feverishly aroused, was quick to
die when the standard of boxing
fell, and a resultant scepticism
will have to be combated by
would-be promoters in this count-
ry. -
Nevertheless, as the saga of
Sylvio Cator shows. Haitians are
quick to recognize and honour a
true sportsman.

Therefore, indications are that
a clean, well-organized amateur
boxing programme would -win
public support within a relative-
ly short time. Honest operators
and well-trained contestants are
the essential factors to reawaken
the love of boxing here.
And today, with football flapp-
ing in the doldrums, basketball
all but forgotten, athletics -even
in the schools- almost deserted
and no sports contests of any
kind on anywhere, the time has
come for a resurgence of boxing.
cThis is the psychological mo-
ment to act, a sports fan com-
mented to the cSunm..If the ama-


"ur bouts are started now, eiter-
inment-hungry Port au Prince
l11 flock to attend.-
The only essential lack is box-
g fans who will step forward
d offer their services to help
lild the sport into popularity.
*The Haiti' Sun is willing to do
I in its power towards the or-
anization of a boxing program-
e, and all sportsmen interested
joining the movement may call
This newspaper. Ave Marie
eanne. Citt* de I'Exnosition. or
tone 2061:
OR SALE
GIANT crct ric rentillator, spe-
ally mide to order for large
om ... Going for only $120...See
now at

LAHAM'S

HAITI'S LARGEST

JEWELRY STORE

FOR THE WORLD'S
FINEST WATCHES
Guaranteed In 67 Countries
-Vacheron & Constantin
-Movado Jaeger
-Le CoulrWe
-Universal Geneve
-Mido Juvenia
-Audemars Piguel
--Cyma
Rue Bonne Foi,
Port au Prince

FREE

PORT
PRICES


G. GILG Rue Bonne Foi


COLPANIA DOMINICANA DE AVIACION C POR A

- Port au'Prince Miami San Juan Ciudad Trujillo


" ,- .-" ,. : ".,- ..- ,- --.-"- .-

., .,,. ,'. \ .. .
Al.*.4,

IWI
4 ,- '.,mow. ..
,. g:. b=,, .,i., ".:,.: .-r.7 '; .. 4.. .


Everybody's Favourite i


HAITI TRADING Co. Chamber of Commerce bldg.


p ,,,: ". w :. ,^ IH ^^
. 3 .', .' '. ".,
.. '*' .. -:: .. .* .. ..

Saturday And Wedi

D6part CIUDAD TRUJILLO
Arrive PORT AU PRINCE
Depart PORT AU PRINCE
Arrive MIAMI (Direct)

FARES
PORT Ali PRINCE MIAMI .
PORT AUI PRINCE CIUDAU


The World-Famous Beau.tB Products Are
OnS"atre et

Ca naode V t rt


Cancapeo rt t&& Q fT.I


I PORT


AU PRINCE .- SAN JU


r..iesday Sunday And Thursday..'
lesday Sunday And Thursday


- 8:00 a.m.
- 9:00 a.m.
- 9:30 a.nm.
- 1:00 '.an.


Depart -'MIAMI 8:00 a.m.
Arrive PORT AU PRINCE 11:30 a.m.
Depart PORT AU PRINCE-12:00 noon
Arrive Ciulad TRUJILLO 1:00 p.m.


- ONE WAY RETURN
$55: one way $99 return ((plus tax)
3 TRUJILLO $15: one way $27 return (plus tax)
AN $38: one way S68.40 return (plus tax)
FREIGHT


Page 2


HAITI SUN


Sunday, November 13th 1955


I


6'"!)


Less than 100 lb. More Over 3.300 ih.
FORT AUM PRINCE CIUDAD TRUJILLO $ :06 :04 :03
PORT AUT PRINCE SAN JUAN. :10 :08 :07
PORT AIU PRINCE MIAMI :12 :10 :08
SPECIAL CHARGE ON CERTAIN ARTICLES PORT AU PRINCE MIAMI
Feb- all informations and reservations see your Tour Agent or the

COMPANIA DOMINICAN A DE AVIACION, C POR A,
90 Rue PaWe -- Tel. 3725
ANDRE T. THEZAN, Agent






SudyIoebr13h15 AT U PAGE3


At The Luce Turnier Art Show...


TWO SCENES from the opening of the Luce Turnier exhibition at the French Institute last week..-
(Left) Minister Franck Dew.e. Secy. of S:a.-e for f.;t,.fo>. Mrs. Roger del Bercegole de Lille. wife of
the French Ambissador. A;irs Frntz \Vusso:c. rafe'of ,e, GeOm- a Charge d'Affaires.- (At right) the
artist with the :.;.n;ster of E urcatiou.


New Flagship For Haitian Fleet -. (Black Rock,
Arrived In Port Fr6m America Yesterday


The latest additio-i to the Hai- Guard and American Govern-
inan Coast Guqrd fleet, the 114- meit officials.
foot boy tender Black Rock, ar- /
rived at Port au Prince noon yes- For its voyage, the ship is
terday after a 10-day voyage nman-ned by five. officers and a
from the United States, where it ciew of 12, all of whom have un-
was purchasedand outfitted with dergone intensive training :i in
the cooperation of the U.S. Coast their future duties in the main-


THEATRIE POPULAIRE


tenance of floating aids to naviga-
tion as a means of eliminating
shipping hazards in Haitian ports.
Known s the *Black Rock
during its service in the U.S
Coast Guard, the ship was ori-
ginally selected following an ins-
pection visit by Colonel Georges
Bayard and Commander Robert
Charles of the U.S Naval mission
to Coast Guard installations at
Cape May, Virginia, and Curtis
Bry, Marnyland. Although origi-
nally built at a cost of $150.000,
U.S. Government officials by spe-
cial arrangement agreed on a
price of $10.000 for acquisition
by the Haitian Government.
Personnel aboard the ship on
its maidefi voyage include the fol-
lowing: Sous-Lieutenans de Vais-
seau Gasto i Mangones and Raoul
"Daguilh; Enseignes de Vaisseau
Astrel' Surena and Gdrard Dau-
phin; Premier-Maitres Pati -Ba-
zile, Jn-Fraunqois Joachim and Ra-
oul Caidor; Second-Mait-es Murat
Gustave and -Victor Losier;
Quartier-Miitres Jn "Baptiste
,Guillaume and Jn-Joseph Thea-
Oene" Matelot,'Iere Classe C6dor
Cl6sidor, Jeannot Virgile, Antony
St. Due, Jun-Baptiste Metayer and
Arsene Bourdeau. WIth them is
. Commander Mathieu.


Haitian Villages Receive Aid

From Fairy Godmothers In U. S.


On Friday, October 7, ak the it was in fact this spirit which
Washington head-quarters of clinched the decision in favor of
CARE, in the presence of the Gatineau by the CARE Mission
Haitian Ambassador Jacques L6- Chief in Haiti, who recently vi-
ger, the American national wo- sited the habitation with Mine
men's sorority Delta Sigma The- Sophy Coutsis, United Nations
ta presented the first installment expert in community development
on its pledge to support a CARE and members of the J6r6mie
village project in Haiti. Mrs Pa- committee. The pledge of Delta
tricia Roberts Harris, executive Sigma Theta. it is felt, will encou-
director of the sorority, in behalf rage the people of Gatineau and
of Delta Sigma Theta president, aid them materially in achieving
Miss Dorothy Height, handed their goals.
Mrs. Raymond Clapper, director Gatinesa nowa' becomes thb
of CARE' Washington, D.C., of- third village project in Haiti spon
lice a check for4-$1.000.00. scored through CARE, following
The site ot _his project in corn- those at Savzne Zombi and Ma-,
munity development is to be at thieu. As visuall there will be cdo-'.
GATINEAU. an habitation, si- se collaboration among govern-
tuated in the commune of Jr&- ment bureaus, whose technicians
mi.e. One bf the member-commu- can help in \be' advancement' of
cities of the Jdr6mie -Regional the project, Unit?d Nations and
Committee for Community Ac- Point-4 experts, and the Bureau
tio,, headd'i by Memnbre du Con- of Commuinit.:, Development of
seil Mme Lise Paret Cave, Gati-' the Department ol Labor,, which
neau has already indicated its will serve as a coordinating force
willingi;ess to help itself achieve with the JMremi.-1 committee.
a higher standard of living by Local members of Delta Sigma
a higher work on a road connecting Theta include MIles Jacqueline
it with the main highway as well Coiczu and Mat-,e Francoise Ber-
as the construction of school. ger.


Mrs Patricia Roberts Harris (left) Natibnal Executive Director of
Delta Signma Theta -sorority, 'and -Mrs. Raymond'. Clapper of 'CAREj.
show Ambassador Jacques Leger of Haiti the cheque SI.00 dona-
tion to CARE which will buy tools for his countrymen. They include
picks, s4 vels, small. wheelbarrows and machetes.


Cote ous passez nan ville-la,
ous tender Morisseau-Leroy pr,
alle fai oun theatre populaire.
Tout pa tout, y'ap paler parole
theatre. Can mroune qul dit c'6
en france seulement li pr'alle
jouer. Can l'autre-'mimme qui
dit c'6 creole seulement yo pr'
nalc ijnuer -tutn fhat"e gN, parce
que MNori.%seau-Lcroy 6cri Anti-
gone en creole. Nous contrer
Morisseau matin-a, nous man-
der si'l vicr di-nous ca 1'pr'alle
fai.
Min ca 1 rdponnc nous:
M'di d6j., nan point raison
pou Haitiens pa'; gan theatre
pa nous, Dan laugue pa nous.
M'di id6jh nan point otun bagail-
le Haitien vler di nan langue pa
pa yo nous pas capab di. Si n'ap
fai oun theatre pou toute peu-
pie Haitien'a, oun theatre pou
toute moune vini pou yo com-
prenne Va qui di sou scnime-la,
pou toute mounc centent ca
qui joucr-a. c6 pou' nus tfai 1'en
creole.
Te gan mount quli t6 com-
prenne cr.ol' pas langue pou
6cri belle bagnifle. A 'heu
q 6'ii c. toute minoune contain
r--'s capah ecri toute belle ba-
gaille en creole.
Nous va jouer piece en fran-
c6 tou. En Arn6mrique, cot6 yo


paler angel. yo jouer piece eni Jermiv ChurC
franc temps en temps. EnI
France, vo jouer pi&e en la- Sacrilege, committed under
tin, en grec, en angl6. Nous pr' c-over of dirk in t1le Jeremie Pa-
aiM jotter com6die en francs, rish Church, last weekend, has
en angl1 ton. Min creole, c'6 not yet been traced to its author
langue tons les jous nous, Fran- or authors but intense investiga-
c6, c'6 langue dimianche. An- lions are underwc.
g16, c'e langue, anous paler Breaking into the church, the
oun o0 dues fois par mois. 0-Cr6- evil-doers -ut off an ear of the
ole, c'6 tous les jous. statue of :'e Virgin Mary, snapp-
-Th6atre d'Haiti anirme, mn' ed the arm from a statue of St.
pr'alle organiseri cou oun Louis. Roi de France, patron
bande Raia. Nous exercer P&- saint of ilie town. smashed the
tionville pou n'soti. Soti onus Communion Table, took away
soti-a, nous pr'ale salanguer, the altar cross, overturned the
toute pays-a. toutes villes pro- altar, breaking the sacred stone
vinccs, toutes ti co 'n nous ca- forcing the door of the Taberna-
pab sembler people-la pou cle and disrobing the Ciboriumn
n'jouer pou li oun bagaiffle qui and the Saints. .On the altar rail
fait'l plaisi. a huge cross was smeared in
Theatre dTaHaiti a c'6 oun blood or a red liquid.
pied a t6 seulement li gan P&- Daily newspapers in reporting
tionville, c'e' nan toute pays the sacrilege, commented on the
li pr'alle bouler- consternation created in the
Et m'ap' pren acteurs nan Grand Ans.' ,already troubled by
people la tou. N'a jouer Rara the suffering left by Hazel,.
sou scene n'a tirer batons sou Great anguish had been caused
scene, in the region,n the newspapers
Outis a oue cot6 moune ap said.
soti I'aute ho lan m6 pou yo One dail-,' commented: vine oue thatre d'Haiti. veritable atmosphere of RcU-
ca qui vlOr continue lr nan i 'gous War which seems to be
imiter qa qu'yo pas ja in2,-. ca- :;,", ;-il .'i, on f roct cdin-cI
pab fai hien cou maitre bagail- incidents...'
le-la minme. oun iou, yo tio No such incident has been re-
y'a tomber ri t6te vo. ported in tihe area since 1902, and


Bh rekn, Statues. Mutilated

this is-comn-rable only to the in- the sanctuary is closed to the
dent of ,the Delmas Church in cult until the special rites- and
1942.- secrets of purification are corn-'
The Chu*zeh has been placed pleted. The ceremonies will be
out of bounds to the puabic, and conducted behind closed doors
no-one rna.y enter. The clack will with the colours of mourning and-'
conlitr.-, to -chime the hour, but without public atCeidance.

IOLFJX WATCH ROLEX WATCH


See a masterpiece at "RUSSO FRERES,
Rue Bouie Foi Today


Sunday, November 13th 1955


PAGE 3


HAITI SUN






1' fiII T U S Novmbe 13th-l----- -


i Joseph report


(





S.. -HAITI'S Consul 'o Havana, Mr. Gustave Borno flew back to, his
post by Deltat last week after a short furlough with the family...
I uReynolds. has given $30.000 to help combat hurricane caused misery
I n Abricots, through the Red Cross...
Nearly 1000 attendance -was -registered at the French Institute
STuesday night for the inauguration of the season's cycle of'aMardis...
-. The U.S. Embassy and, Pavillion closed their doors Friday in honour
;' of the Armistice (Veteranks Day), and a red letter day for Americans
everywhere will be the 24th turkeys go to .the block to celebrate
:- Thanksgiving Day...
















d.
.: .. .o







i; '* : ,
I.;:'.;; ,' '
-, Monique (Leys) Severe, lucky winner of the mellow golden-rich
bottle of 'Grant's. Scotch, wasn't around after the drawing of birth-
Sdays Tuesday... Ti Tosh, the luckier (JUST MARRIED) husband, was,
t.so he received the prize... Surprised Ti Tosh is shown above under the
:. Nobbe' Bondel new sign after taking time out from adding up receipts
;' to welcome the 'Sun- delegation' with the whisky.:: All friends' of
i Grant's. who have birthd;Ys this week should send in their names
-and .the dates they may be lucky!, .
X ,,, X x x

-Q Nj' (Le' Grand) GRISWOLD's long', residence in Haiti is
R rumouredd to bb drawing to a close... Word is that the Hotel Interna-
'cional of VerrAfeTres, 75 miles South of Havana, is going to conscript
the ex-White Panda hunter as public relations manager... A member
.i, f one of New York's First Families, a graduate of Oxford and an in-
comparable raconteur, Sonny (formerly of. Grisworld's Bar) should
have what it takes to punch the Internpcional out of obscurity to
fame... Parting date is set for the 8th, wife Ann follows in the Spring...
... -Perceval Thoby, Grand Old Man of Haitian Economics, is still
: straightening out the monetary problems of the Republic... His 'Etude
-: de Nos Crises Economiques et Financitres' (covering, the period 1882:
.J.: 1888) is fresh off the press....
'I xxx
X x

'--Cheur Michel Dejean is staying home. The trip to Colombia's
Fair scheduled for Monday wal postponed *on ne salt pas pour-
-,. quoin...
,- -Five days and five nights, Mr. Le Bel, UNO Permanent represent-
alite here spent roaming the Northwest... His information hunt which
y;. also took in the Artibonite started last Saturday-morning... Lawrence
SAlmont Lee, technical director of the ODVA arrived in Port Wednes-
day after a trip to New York... Lieut. Max Bouchereau flew to Miami
W 'ednesday...
X X x
.- -The TI Ouap. Heraux home on Ruelle Villemenay in Bdis Verna
was invaded by a revengeful family Monday 6:00 a.m... Carlos Papil-
Ion was operated on at the General -ospital for a broken nose... The
.o slidnd uauaegaapu!lp uaaiiaq 1qJ. ai, ll aaAo pamaeis eiapua^
two families....
.---Jose Gomez Siere, Art specialist of t -e Pan American Union is
exepcted to visit Haiti shortly to -look over the painting field.
-The Centre d'Art Winter season 4ill open December 9 with, an
.. Antonio Joseph show, declares director De Witt Peters who returned
'. Monday on the Ancon from Summer in New York... De Witt was, oper-
..: ated on for peritonitis, is now back on form...
x. XXX .
-, Miss Josette B. Thevenot and Mr. Pierre Remain were chosen by
y- the 3-member Haitian-American Institute jury as winners of the Mrs.
Charles Fequikre scholarship.... The Haitian American Artists Society
held their big festival at New York City -Center last Saturday evening,
.and Languichatte provided the laughter with his incomparable act...

VILLA TROPICANA


MORNE CALVAIRE (Close to Place) PET1ON-VILLE
Offers the solution for those who prefer the personalized
comforts of a modern guest-house.
'. REASONABLE RATES
Prop. Margareth D. Cameron


-,Zamis. of Mahotieres received Ambassador Alberto Perez Saez JUST
of Peru to luncheon Tuesday... He looked good in the place of hon-
our... I
-A short iefrcuit in Ave. Jose, Marti brought pyjamaa clad neigh-
bours early Monday morning alarmed by the noise apd flame... The
Electric Company put an end to the scene by cutting the current... A
There were some neat figures to be seen while it lasted...
-Stock Car Racing is coming to Haiti, according to Chris Dundee, Per
boxing promoter from Miami who called in Port this week... 'Arrange-
ments for regular meets in Stade Magloire are underway... WA
-Mrs. Mary Seyffert, of East Lansing, Michigan, down for a brief
stay at the Beau Rivage met the Chief of State at the National Palace From
Thursday and presented him with a picture taken (of the President)
while on a'trip down here last year...
-Mikaelle Mercier, ala gentille fille' of Captain and Mrs. Edwig Price
Mercier, (nee Agla6e Leys) celebrated her birthday .last Tuesday.. SEE
Mrs. Rend Sevre's lucky birthday was Sunday... Max J. Andre feted 76 Ru
a ,nouveau printemps, Monday... Mrs. Felix Jean Louis observes her
anniversary tomorow... Bernard Nicolas was -a year older Monday. En fa


Fire-Chief's Guest
( Carries Torch))
For Haiti

'Living in a fire station is fun
-especially if it happens to be
the headquarters of the Port au
Prince "pompiers', and Captain
and Mrs. Georges Elie are the
hosts, according to Mrs. Loris
Hamilton, the blonde, beautiful
wife of AID's executive secretary.

Mrs. Hamilton's warm, friendly
smile appeared on the local scene
last Saturday when she hopped
across'from Miami after attending'
an American Institute of Decorat-
ors (AID) Regional convention in
Miami.

At the convention with her hus-
band, who was prevented from Yi-
siting Haiti by business engage-
ments, she recalls the wonderful
masquerade ball on Vizcaya Estate
which hJiighlighted the occasion.
The Miami Beach masked ball was
fabulous enough to attract, photo-
graphers from ,Life,, but Mrs.
Hamilton declares her Haitian ex-
periences have equalled it for en-
joyment.

- There may be a tendency for
bias towards Haiti, however, as
s4e admits she 'has been a Haiti-
an for twelve years.
The friendly Fire Chief met the
Hamilton family twelve years ago
while studying fire-fighting in N.
Y., and since then they have re-
ceived mapy Haitians .visiting (he
U.S. Metropolis. Mrs. Hamilton's
hospitality is being returned by
'Ti Pouce, and his charming wife
Yanik who have taken her to all
he high-shots on the nightclub
circuit, conducted tours of the ho-
'.els and scenid highlights.

- Though professing only to have
married a decorator, the -chic'
looking visitor,, has been photo-
graphing the Haitian hotels, and
show a lot of interest in their
decor and architecture.

She declares that they are very
individualistic architectural examr-
pies, and worthy of further study.
Mrs. Hamilton, commissioned
by an AID member to buy a L-
zard painting, enthused over Haiti
an Art, also confessed she 'flip-
oed. on Haitian fabrics at -La
Belle Cr6ole..

-I'll certainly be over.reight on
the return flight., she predicts.
A volunteer social worker who
puts in time at Bellevue Hospital
helping mentally retarded children,
Mrs. Hamnilton visited Sister Jo-
an's School'for Handicapped Chil-
dren in Port au Prince.
"When I leave next week,
I shall certainly have seen Haiti!.
she ramarks.

FOR RENT

Small, furnished, unique, mo-
dern house, modern bath' and
kitchen, $70 rental including elec
tricity. Contact De Witt Peters,
Centre d'Art.


ARRIVED

THE BEST


s 0. SMITH
maglas Electric

LTER HEATER

n 6 to 40 Gallons

es range from $65
MAX DUVIVIER
ue Pave
ce SHASA


--'Mt.
2'.
--~- U


A cau's de. son fort indice do viscosite, Esso
Extra Motor Oil garde sa "consistance?
Sen depit de la temperature eleveeq du moteur1
Elle vous protege d'une facon Iermanente
et continue,; .ontre I'oxydatiov, Ip poussiere
et I'usure,.

.sso Extra Motor Oil a un detergent ex-:
clusif qui garde en suspension tous les depots
4e carbon et de gomme.C'est la raison pour
'laqOelle Esso Extra Motor Oil est si sale
, au moment du vidange du moteur.


Ai r -- 7
Paur 'Te' -
Pr; T a ftm 11t1e
remplissez .
votre resz-voir. S.-
d'essenrce
avec" la azolint ". '

carter avec Esso
Extra Motor Oil


Sunday, November 13th 1955


aHAITI SUN*


PAG 4





_ *-. .k-- 9 1 6 0 9r


HAITI SUN


Sunday, iNovemnuer 111m 1iO5 ..- ,


KEEP UP WITH THE JET AGE
SBowen Field is shrinking rapidly that is in comparison
to the airliners landing on the airstrip built by Pan Amercan
several years ago.
Over the past five years, tourist travel to Haiti has increase
ed at a rate which has left transportation agents, travel agents
and officials gasping in amazement. To match this' rapid
growth, and to keep pace with the trend in the rest of the
world, airlines serving Haiti have been using bigger and fast-
er planes.
Convairs and DC 3s are now 411 but obsolete, and the DC
4s are giving way to DC ,6s. Space is becoming a precious
commodity qn our lone landing field.
Now most of the major airlines in the world.have ordered
jets which will be delivered in the next few years, and most
countries -especially tourist resorts- are far sighted enough
to see the writing 'on the wall. I
Our neighbours, Puerto Rico, Jamaica and the Dominican
Republic are rolling out welcome mats for the jets in the
form of more, longer landing strips.
Haiti's only effort in this direction has been the planning,
and siting of a new airport by an imported expert Who report",,
edly gave the nod to Croix des Bouquets as the most practic-
2 able place.
A leading tourist authority warned: *If Haiti doesn't look
out, it will' be by-passed. Perish the thought that planes will
lanu in Cludact i'rujiiio and passengers will be transferred to
smaller craft for the flight to Port au Prince... But that's
; what will happen if we don't prepare for the coming of the
Jet Age in tourism,.

REGULAR SHIPPING SERVICE
NEW YORK HAITI

WARD LINE

General Agent; Allen and Baussan
S Cite de l'Exposition. Tel: 2387
Weekly Sailings; New iurk Port-au-Prince
Fortnightly Sailings; New York Cap Haitien


..HAII.SU Aims And Ideals
.e ~eeHAITI SUN
STfIE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER Of The I. A. P. A.
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDIIOR-PUBLISHER BEINARDI DIEDERICH Freedom of the Press
GERANT-RESPONSABLE PAUL E. NAJAC is b e i g given more ef-
= -.:t;. : i na t a t :; ::.::** -. .. : fort and a t t e nt ion than
ever before by' the Interamerican
SIGNPOSTS WOULD INCREASE TOURIST PLEASURE Press AsSociation, an exciting or-
i ganization of individualistic jour-
Signposts -the kind that tells how many miles to the near- nalists from all1 sections of this
est town, and in what direction it lies- are one of the things Hemisphere.
the tourist most misses on a drive through Haiti. An enlarged and revitalied free-
The uninitiated traveller is quite likely to end up in Morne dom of the press committee was
a Cabrits or at a Dominican border station in his efforts to appointed by the IAPA in its last
reach Cap Haitien, as no signposts tell where Le Cap lies at meeting. Twenty-two members are
the cross-roads along the way. now included instead of six and,
Not even popular tourist resorts like Kenscoff and Furcy according to a. member, dictators
are indicated by signs. everywhere in the hemisphere
One of the delights about a European tour is the impossi- should know now that press rest-
btty of losing the way. It is possible to travel the length and rictions will be fought relentles-
breadth of Europe without knowing a single word of a foreign ly..
language. Signposts plot your route for you, stating the mile- The organization, which met in
age and direction at each cross-roads, and even. at short in- New Orleans last week, includes
tervals along the straight stretches, two delegates from Haiti, Max
Also, tourists are constantly on the hunt for authentic back- Chauvet, Managing editor of *Le
grounds for their snapshots to prove they have visited this Nouvelliste., and Franck Magloire,
or that town. Only a really .scenic backdrop can out-poll a director of 'Le Matin..
good, clear sign for tourist popularity. After all, what can be Roughly speaking, the IAPA is
more authentic than a highway sign declaring xX miles to an organization of newspapermen
Fermathes, Furcy or Kenscoff? 0 within the Western Hemisphere
Tourists hardly ever remember then ames of the towns they which is fighting for the freedom
visit in this country, because they have never seen them in of expression. It was the first
writing and the difficulty of memorising the pronunciation group of journalists to protest the
of an entirely foreign w6rd is too much to expect of a plea- siezure of La Prensa of Buenos
sure traveller. Aires by Peron.
Most countries belong to the International Road Congress, The IAPA has'fought the silen
and Haitian delegates attended one in Caracas not so long cing of newspapers in Quito, Ecua
Sago. But so far no visible results have appeared in the way dor, the expulsion of editors fror
of road signs. Nicaragua, and mst recently, thi
Another pressing need out-strips the touristic field and closing of El Tiempo of Bogota
enters the sphere of business is that of'name plates on theI Colombia.
/ streets of the capital. Ca ,Haitien's streets are numbered, bliut A bulwark of protection whicl
Port au Prince baffles even people born in the city with its has, often saved the life of a Lathi
labyrinth of un-named roads. kmerican piewsman, IAPA is thi
Of course, the roads all have names, sometimes as many as one voice within the union whiel
three names for one street., But these names are, only useful is never silent when constitution
to people living in the immediate neighbourhood, or'someone nally guatanted rights and free
equipped with a pocket compass and a map of the city. doms are endangered.
Taxi drivers, veterans in the business of finding obscure Even the U.SA. is not immune
addresses, are often lost hi the maze of streets and are sound- to YAPA criticism. The'America
ly berated by passengers.
The houses on the streets should also be numbered. It is
rather difficult to keep an appointment at No. 1 rue des Fronts .'
Forts when the numbers are not written on the buildings.
It is a very laborious method to ask at each, house what num- .li-______
ber it is. And' then, often the occupants of the house don't M
even know, so this method cannot. be depended on. -


A Monterrey, Mexico.
s Ricardo Castro Beeche, editor
and publisher-La Nacion, San Jose,
- Costa Rica; Jose. Dutriz Jr., editor
- and publisher, La Prensa Grafica,
m San Salvador, El Salvador; David
i Vela, editor, El Imparcial, Guate-
a, main; Dr. Fernando Gomez Marti-
I nez, editor of El Colombiano' Me-
i dellin, Colombia; Joaquin Secco,
In editor of El Bien Publico, Molte-
e video, Uruguay; Max Ch-auvet, edit-
b or and publisher of Le Nouvellis-
>- te, Port au Prince, Haiti; Stuart
e- Keate, editor of' Victoria Daily
News, Victoria, B. C., Canada; Leo
e G. Permuy, pulbisher of the Trini-
p dad Guardian,, Port-hf-Spain, Trini-


dad; Ismael Perez Castro, El Uni-
verso, Gutyaquil, Ecuador; Julio E.
Briceno, editor of La Hora, Pana-
ma. r


attitude to Peron was stingingly
denounced by their spokesmen as
too gentle, and a lot of diplomats
learned the wisdom of this opinion
when Peron toppled.
Another big contribution to in-
teramerican relations is the IA-
PA's fostering of friendship and
goodwill between editors and pu-
Ibishers of North, Central and
South America.
It has been said that the Inter.
American Press Association has
done more towards betterment of
hemispheric relations than all the
diplomats combined.
The new committee includes: Dr.
Demetrio Canelas, David Michel
Torino, editor and pulbisher of El
Intransigente, Salta, Argentinia;
Dr. Raoul Alfonso Gonse, editor of
El Mundo, Havana, Cuba; Agustin
E. Edwards, assistant editor of El
Mercurio, Santiago, Chile; Daniel
Morales, editor and pulbisher ot
Manana, Mexico City, Mex.; Dr.
Pedro' Beltr'an, editor and publish-
er, La Prensa, Lima, Peru; Msgr.
SJesus Maria Pellin, editor anid pu.
blisher La Religion, Caracas, Ven
ezuela; Rodolfo Junco de La Vega,
Editor -and publisher of El Norte


William NAARR, P-an-Prinee
'BOUCARD & CO., 'Jacmrel
Raymond LAROCHE,
SCap-Haitien
MaiAgn Jean BOURGEOIS,.
Aux Cayes
Michel DESQUIRON
SpCCRS., Jdremie


- -


rthe most


powerful gasoline


you can buy



.4 a,." K


...Gives you bigger mileage, cheaper motoring.
Do you know what weakens your car's power
and wastes fuel more than anything? It's the de-
posits from combustion that form in cylinders and,
getting red-hot, ignite the air/fuel mixture too
early. That's pre-ignition and it's robbing you
of both power and money. The same deposits foul


;nds major causes of po,'er los.
I fuel waste pre-ignition and
rk plug fouling.
spark plugs, causing misfiring and further loss
of power. SHELL has now conquered these prob-
lems. Shell gasoline has ICA, incorporating tric-
resyl phosphate, an exclusive Shell additive which
makes these deposits %armless. You'll notice the
difference almost at once such an upsurge of
power: such smooth running; sucn zip on hills i'id
in traffic.


New York Port-de-Paix
New York Miragoane
New York Jer6mie ,
New York Aux Cayes


Give YOUR car this top-performance gasoline.
Always fill up at a Shell Station.- for only Shell has
I. C. A.
FEEL the difference riZ1 T. 2..


P4GE 5


9
]
]


TRUCK OWNERS

If you want the most
for your money, use

B. F. Goodrich
TRUCK TIRES
They're made with
NYLON'
SHQCK SHIELD
for Heavy Servjce


; *





PAGE &
' P A G E ________


Sunday, November 13th 1955s


TRANSLATED FROM 6PTIQL'E


ccPOUR CELEBRER LA TERRE DISCUSSED


BY HAITI'S LEADING LITERARY FIGURES


(POUR CELEBRER LA TERRE, the poem by Roger Dor-
sinville was read to a select group of Haitian intellectuals at
the home of Felix Morisseau-Leroy, in Petionville last month.
Lucien Montas, editor of Le Nouvellisten and a leading
member of the OptiqueD committee, harvested the following
comments which were pulbished in ((Optique)) No. 20, issued
November 1st.

The reading of Mr. Dorsinvil-
le's poem was followed by a dis- Someone asked the author why
cussion in which-the author join- no means 6t improving the life of
ed answering a volley of ques- the peasant had been suggested
tions from the group seated in He pointed out that at the end
Morisseau-Leroy's drawing room of the poem he stated:
sipping rum-sodas and munching eThe time of Promise will
delicious sandwiches prepared by come.
Mrs. Ren6e Morisseau Leroy. It will come for those freed
trom their bonds
Lucien Montas opened the fu- The Time I
sillade of questions with a de- For singing
Sand for a precis of the poem's For the harvest
message. In the heart of knowledge
Yo an-I and you
You ana I
Through the doors of survival
x x x
S The toiloof my hands
I For my life and your life
7 lre t The work, of our hands
VY No longer despised
t a. at s .a'a In the haggling
ed "%townsa ." S4,e mAgainst the exploiter
*,,, a a eBut amply rewarded .
i*" tIn the life of the morning
..e. I s en sT he factory and workshop
*'.I* .And the joy of the gardens
S- And the rhops with sweet faces.





of tha shck'o that dthec coo- .f the gardens-,-
xxx
The atthor signing his work A village of peace,
The school and the plough
iI have written very little in The morning and the hospital
verses declared thd author of And the gift of -the roads
ePour Cilvbrer La Terres Man to man
&I am a tor;nsman'and I have lis-" House to House
Sed a townsman. Thinree months The village to the verse
ago, I happened to go- to Ferma- This is a picture of what is
the and there saw hbw the pea- proposed, Dorginville added. Evi-
sants live. I, lived an veW dently. he.iommented, in a poem
.-This waslomething of a h6ck to* one can only suggest. The emill
"rre. I fe t something swelling for -istance is a symbol of all
within me This poem was born transfornin" g forces.
of -that shock,' of that direct con- At this 'neht Jacques Ale-









independent ~ ~ A thi tomeet Jacde Axle-^K,^; j~^ ^
tact with the country-folk

-%I dare hope, Dorsinville add-
ed, that the sense of this messa-
ge will be clear. What I wished
to show was not only the frus-
tratioi, of the peasant but also
that we are so dependent upon 'w
him, that. upon his life and his
income depends our way of life...
cWhen our civilization offers him .
only tricks and personal risk. I
am inclined to think that 'the .
san~thing must be true in the,
towns... .:

eft is then necessary to offers 4
something or other to tile yea- ,
santss, -Roger Dorsinville -con-""
e luded: eThere is no life for us '.
independent of them and, expif-
citly, we depend on what they
are,. Mr. Felix Morisseau-Leroy


RAI

Exchanging different points of view during the discussion, Mr. Robert
Theard, Mr. F. Morisseau-Leroy and Mr. Jacques Large. In the .back-
ground is seen Mr. Roger Dorsinville.


xis interrupted to declare:
eSince the ,rRevue Indig&ne", the
question under discussion has
been that of poetic art. I would
like to ask if in this poem ;he
author wished to give a poetic
art? I would like to know if in
our poetic art we should not have
passed the stage of wishes.
Roger Dorsinville
aIt would be a question their
of knoowhig if. in short to write a
poem should be to reply to some-
thing. I would say that the poet
of the twentieth century obeys
what others have called the 'so-
cial dernmaid. If the hand-book
may be followed, poetry on the
contrary enters a man through his
emotion. Here in this poem a so-
cial problem has been presented.
Jacques Alexis
(Clarifying the question)


.;'. : ;
.- .: ; ..,_


Mr. Jacques S. Alexis

eI felt that in aDiacoutes much
more than wishes was presented
I felt that here problems of re-
action in the face of certain si-
tuations were presented ...
c I'wished to ask Dorsinville if
he has defined a poetic art which
the young people may borrow for
their songs. Should one hold to
the descriptive aspect or the as-
pect of solving problems ?s

Felix Morisseau-Leroy
'Pour celebrer ]a Terre is
written, in the same veini as eNa-
tif-NatalI A very long poem is
always poetic art. It immediate-
ly presents the following pro-
blem: why have I left the form
employed in oNatif-Natali. The
problem of message as well as
that of language must be faced.
Is the poet the. scribe of the
masses, or does he try to speak
for the masses ?
In ocPour celebrer la terrem,
there is one thing that is quite
curious 'that- the author, while
using modern French poetic tech-
nique, feels embarrassed some-
times. He'bas tried to give to this
modern form, a fort which will
utter the thought of a man of the
Haitian people. He feels a need'
not to speak for himself, not to be
the orator that he is but to be
an orator of 'the peolpje. It is a
very rhetorical poem. My conclu-
sion is that Dorsinville, also, has
arrived at a dead end and cannot
get out.
Jacques Alexis
Lorca sung of Spain which was
very near to his flesh. Neruda
ung of Chile, and Nazim Hirch-
met of his Turkey. In this song
present problems intervene. Does
Dorsinville think that our poetic
art should express the reality of
our country? You have spoken of
the problem of the peasant, of
his production. But is this all?
Should our young poets orient
themselves to this descriptive me-
dium?


Deep thought is shown by audience at reading of the poem. In the
backgrouZ.nd, Mr. Lucien Montas, at the left, Mr. Daniel Arty sxid at
the right Miss'aoumer beside Mr. Jacques Alexis.


Roger Dorsinville
The poet has greater liberty
than the economist or the sdciolo-
gisf He .has the liberty of the
choice of the method which he
will employ It is understood that
in this noem. much is descriptive.
But I have wished also to pre.-
sent the problem of the peasant,
of his life in the niidst of a given
form of ci'vlisatlon. Instead .of so-
lutions I have proposed a picture
of the future, that is to say an
ordering of .the .life of the pea-
sants.
6 coLruS. one may criticise the
choice of the poet and the choice
of method. That is why I do not
present this.poem as the quintes-
sence of poetic art.,
Jacques Alexis
*I noted one passage in ,the
poem which went like this: k.
And then a'thousand smokes
A thousand steps
A thousand cries
In the paths'
In-a thousand clear rays
Hope on! the way. of the beasts
towards the cistern '
The hope of the smoke of the
morning
Hope in thousands.
Marching along the paths.)
I would like the author 'to ex-
plain the meaning of this.
Roger Dorsinville
In this passage, ift is not at all
necessary to see more than that
the author has wished to put
there. It is not a symbolic passa-
ge. It is a description of the pas-
sage of the state of night.and the
state of light. There is nothing
but the purely descriptive there.


When morning comes there will
be none timid, a puff o.. r-moke
then .. etc...
Jacques Alexis
At the same time there k1the
problem of the language of the
people, that of the popular pu2'
blic. This should be able to read
it. I do not think that .Diacoute-
had been -ible to attain to our
peasant classes. Then the pro-
blem of the language is a pro-
blem of -,.ant'gardes. A pro-
blem is presented, whether in'
French or Creole, we address it
to the purchasing public. -The
question is deeper, it is the ques-
tion of a poetic art: where should
Haitian Poetry turn ?
Dorsinville shows us',the pro-
blem in a moving form, certainly,
but at de;1h with little life. I
have the iunpression that we do
not see the perspective of our
people marchingiinto the future.
It is a matter, now, of surpassing
this descriptive stage, this stage
of wishing for the solution of our
prdblemi. This position should
be adopted. Roger has suggested
that dispe-,saries are necessary,
and schools,, but he doesn't say
how. We should go forward on
what has already been written.
Should each one propose his solu-
tion, his methods, the problems
will be faced. This will b6 sim-
ply a competition-a peaceful
competition ...

Roger Dorsinville
I recall that a poem is not a so-
ciological study. I could have des-
troyad this poem. I published it.
This is to arouse comment.


JAEGER


Cement Mixer

Self-Loaded: Models Available from
3 Cubic feet per load up to 16 Cubic feet


Distributor:-CHARLES FEQUIERE & CO.
44 Rue Roux & 77 Rue du Quai
TEL: 2245 3084 3270


HAITI SUN





Sunday, November 13th 1955

IMPROVED TECHNIQUE

SSPENCER DEPAS

AFTER FOURTE
M-
Bearded. pipe-
7ntoking and. de-
Sbogaair. -Spencer
StDepass is back at
tie Foyer des
Arts Plastiques
with f o u rt e e n
Pcina: ot StateAide
Art study which
he inteds to pass
oil to students
The slightly-
S built, high-rheek -boiioed artist has
gained in confidence as well as
''. technique froam his sojourn at
Cranbrook Academy of Arts.
Bloomfield Hill, Michigan. Al-
ways expetiniental in hLs art, he
has ndw acquired a personal as-
surance wh1S ch is mirrored in his
work.
Success awaited the struggl.ig,
young painter, when he answer-
ed a magazine advertisement last
August. His painting was judged
-the best in a scholarship compe-
tition for Craiibrook. and on Sep-
tember 11, Spencer wa on his
way to the United States.
He studied painting, ceramics


aand metalcraft and in one year
made such great progress that
two of his engravings were se-
lected for.an all-Academy exhi-
bition which toured the Universi-
sity of Missouri, Stephens Colle-


TI/11T1 SUN PACE ,~l


SS RETURNS FROM MICHIGAN

'EN MONTHS ART STUDIES


:ge, Kansas State College, Univer- hi New York, tLough hlie did
sii.y ot Kansas, and the Universi- iot exhibit there, Spencer De-
ty or Ohio I pass iec-ived enthusiastic press
At an exhibition in Chicago, the comments.
Depa. teehniqcue was so highly His professors at Cranbrook,
lauded that the Chicago Museum where he spent eight months,
of Modir, Art acquired a paint- WVayne University, and the De-
!;.a tor it.- ermaiient exhibition. troit Arts & Crafis (to which he
No paiwtiiins were offered for also won a scholarship) all prais-
sale at the exhibition, but five ed his work, marvelling at his
orderJs r-.ulted from it. progress.


Studies above show confidence and articulatioh U.S. -Sejour,
has given Deppss..


I,'






IL
'I'



1~






I..
* r


/1
I'




to crown that perfect moment whea
friends get together. One of many
casions fir drinAinA Henn&C





JOSEPH NADAL & CO


Spencer studied ceramics un-
der Maia Grotell, painting under
Wayne Universily's Piney, and
metalcraft under Dick Thomas.
His last Haitian exhibition was
at the FrenrhN[nstitute in August
1954.


Desir Confirme
As Director
N.Y. Tourist 0O


ad

office


Mr. Hermann Desir was con-
firmed %by Presidential appoint-
ment this week as Director of the
Haftian Tourist Office in New'
York. Mr. Desir has been acting
director since the resignation of
Mr. Gerard de Catalogne last
year.


c(Fo), Holds Army, Crowd At Bay,

In Desperate Shoreline Struggle


A lone lunatic resisted the camn-
bpid C.fort.s of the Coasiguard,
the Fire Brigade and the Police
to rcscu2 him trom the Port au
Price harbour last Friday night.
SThe foif's stubborn defiance
attracted *a huge crowd packing
the Exposition Boulevard from
the Geodetic Service headquar-
ters to the Beau Rivage. Volun-
teers took ;o the sea in canoes to
throw'thle growing., man a life-
line.
Mired in tie. marshy water of
the shore-lie. tlih ? fou screamed
continually -for help, but every
time a rope was thrown to him
be slashed it in two with his
knife.
Finiially, the aging man discard-
ed the knife, and allowed him-
self to be picked up by a canoe
and taken into shore where, black
with mud and completely exhaust
ed, he was rushed to the General
Hospital for treatment.
The man reportedly threw him-
self into the sea whtn a detective
hailed him. He was standing with
:an 'air of intense concentration by
the sea about 8:00 p.m and a
passing detective became suspi-
cious and demanded an explana-


IT'S THE FILTER TBAT COUNTS


IT'S THE FILTER TIAT (C.tJM$
L & M HAS THE BEM3




mM
RE



c KING SIZE m* '1.


S1E AT

L

VT H
~f I 'y IL*TER4
.,. p UGGETT MVERS TOBACCO CO.
T


"Trlls IS IT! AMERICA'S
1 FILTERR CIGARETTE MUCH 'MORE
-. I FLAVOR MUCH LESS NICOTINE,
- ^* = :=
I 'I.'I U' "&


Ul


4elt o ~Al SjU4t $S toW t4? >l t
'3'taqon 9anicM~~cAfj^it Mornt ewiCt ^t
^oo$ko-3ewiw&u 4peeiolie co, J

PO RC[tAIN ru XO aL I NA ,
R INb Y R oAAL COPENHAF. RYAL VIC -A,
RIN6 & GROEMOAHI "owy -Pf~i M~\ir;


PAE I


HAITI SUN


tion of his presence. The -foun-
im diatel:. pulled out a tlnife
I p i.t'i the sea-wall ajid
'into the harbour, where
h -S ied all efforts to rescue
him until -eirly mid-night.

FHF Committee
Changed
The stalemate in which the
FHF and the Football clubs have
been Iocked for the past two,
months was broken this week
with the nomination of a new
committee to replace Lieutenant
Aix Pasquet, Messrs William
Mc Intosh vnd Albert Liautaud
Ol'the new committee are:
Lt. Frank Bayard, president;
Dr. Andre Roy,,Secretary;
Augustin Viau, auditor of re-
ceipts for the clubs.;,
Felix Garescher, auditor of re-
ceipts for the BNBH.
The football clubs' had pre-
viously suggested a com-
mittee made ,up of.. mem-
bers of the principal chbs.
Andre Pierre (Violette), Andre.
Rousseau tBacardi), Morel Stac-
co (Etoile), Augustin. Viau (Vic-
tory) were named4 /
..o.'.' ... ,


, I





'PAGE 8.HAITI.Sunday, November 13th 1955


CANADIAN ORDER OF NUNS TO
FOR PERPETUAL DEVOTION TO


Prayer aisi consta-it reverence
to the Holy Sacrement are the
aims of the'Community of' Mis-
sionary Nuns of Jdsus-Marie, a
young Canadian Order which is
soon to open a Convent in Cap
Haitien.
The Holy Eucharist will be'
constantly on exhibition day and
night and the nuns of the order
will make their devotions before
it. These Religious Sisters will
also extend spiritual and mate.'
rial assistance to the underprivi-
leged and unfortunate families
of the region; but the number of
nuns occupied in purely religious
and contemplative work will ex-
ceed that of the missionaries.
The convent which will be open-
ed in the nenr future will be nam-
ed after the Patro, Saint of Hal,
ti, Notre DIime de Perpetuel Se-
cours and s to be established at
Puylboreau, Plaisance, in the Mo-
nastery already occupied by the
Reverend Pcres Redemtoristes.
There are already three Hai-
tian nuns in th Mother Mission


LE5 PllS BELLS MOSIIQUES
** HAITIIENNE5


.tBACE GEYFRARD I


for greater


yields...at



lower cost


at 'Montreal, and local girls will
be accepted to the Cap Haitien
branch of the order.
The foundation of the mission
in the North is a direct result


OPEN CONVENT Solanges Dominique
EUCHARIST To Use New Method
In Teaching English
o'is Solaiges Dominique, who
recently returned to take up En-
gUsh teaching posts at the Lycees
Petioii and Cinquantenaire after
twp years Pt Columbia Universi-
ty, has brought an entirely new
approach to the teaching of En-
glish in Haiti.
The talented young <,profes-
seuri who obtained her Bache-
lor of Arts (in English) at Michi-
gan In 1947. won her Master's de-
gree in February 1955 at Colum-
bia, then later went on to take a
degree in teaching English.
She has specialistL In phone-
ties, and is therefore able to com-
pare the different sounds and
structure of the spoken language
with the language which the pu-
pil already knows.
of the Eucharistic Coress Miss Dominique believes iii as-
siiato ofhethecawordscCongres
which took place last weekend srnilation of the words of the
It iOas arranged for by Mgr. Al- new language by repetilion-but
bert Coiisineau, bishop of" Cap above all in reconstructing for
Haitien. her students the atmosphere of
the text.


HAIT IAN-BORN ARTIST RETURNS
For Vacation From Work In Canada
Robert Wilson, a Port-au-Prince Bob' is gla'l to perform is that
,local sonp who has made good of showing around any Haitians
in the big Dominioh of Canada, that may ws- within a considera-
returned to the home-town last ble radius of Chicoutimi, the
week for a two month vacation, town where he liyes.
The artist-radio commentator and A membetp of the Junior Chain-
writer was preceded by his wife ber of Commerce of Chicoutimi,
Lorraine and their children Me- Robert Wilson has been charged
linda, Roberto and Josd. by the branchh with organizing an
Bob, who has also put in time exchange- of lecturers between
on the stage, recently wrote an Haiti and the Canadian' town. He,
adventure story, cLa Caverne au himself will lecture in Canada
Tresors, which was snapped up next May. .illustrating his talk
by the French-Canadian magazi- on Haiti with colour film shot
nes.' The novelette was set in during the current vacation.
Haiti arc! accomplishedd a great liHe, is ali-o gathering material
deal towards publicising the Re- for Ihis radio programmed of Ail-
public in Canada. tian Music over Radio Chicouti-
Another service to Haiti which mi.
muss"


116-20-0


Ik,


"TiiJ


PERENNITE DU BATIMENT


ETANCHEMENT ABSOLU


YOU CAN GET AGAIN
PLASTIMENT
AND ALL OTHER
SIKA PRODUCTS
SERVICE: HAUSER
Box 1326
Tel. 2372


SALE:


REINBOLD S.A,


TIPCO

SIKA HAITI
WALTER HAUSER
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
P.O. BOX 1326 P-au-P.

For
QUALITY
MEAT

And
SAUSAGES


en, WE'RE FLYING

m9LM TO.,EUROPE
1,.000
and saving '
over 1 0


0-2014 -R
Two grattes of Ainu.-r..u. .aflable loeall:
apply to the Agent, V. A. Wynne, P.O. Box
Distributor: Haiti Seed Stores, Port au Prince


12-24-12


For every rop and wob
'condition, then'. a
pH ?Mathieson high aqabmg
11 (pelletized ferlinz to gtw
m you greater Yield. low
cost. You get quls~aiaUB
IIESON mon-leching nitroaS h
4vsailable phosphate. ad
-PHOSIO otasb to fit sol
analyis rpqulremntt The pe~sBi
I hforam spread esay and evenly
"r' suie & be~rdstw ot
lot povh aumenta
1I0-30-;l 0 tt1gt mcty0"mwM1ad,
y j LAe pound, uag or, ton. For quantity prices
694, Port au Prince,
and Kenseoff.. '


I LA PLUS ANCIENNE FAMILLE. DE DISTILrATEURS DiHAIT tl





eA'aw cu/r4/ 4/.'a r d ,

S4,wAe/a i 6i

o PORT-AU-PRINCE HAITI WEST INDIES


' PAGE 8


HAITI SUN


I


II




HAITI SUN


*1 rTHE WORLD'S
,SAFEST DESK. SETI


SSAEGUARD
Hlds about a year's ink suppf
pil-proof, can't leak
Self-lIfingpon
PERFECT FOR
HOME OR OFFICE
Complete with base,
pen, ink
'12-


MAISON GILG I
Rue Bonne Foi










o


MAC, RAOY


I(A'r.conditioned)
Our local cuts (from our own cattle)


OS() BLANCO0
Imported fresh meat every Thursday
(from Smith & Richardson, Miami)
Phone 3961. f

i~i


II


A Good Hotel
With Reasonale Rates
"* ;* *< .* _


HOTEL PLAZA
Ideally Situated Off
,he. Champ de Mars
Ir U Z-0:1 .i


DEAD ENDS' ..EVERYWHERE! "
WHAT KIND OF HOCUS-POCUS IS
THIS,? I'LL TRY ONE MORE TRAIL!
"^-s /IF IT DOESN'T -
LEAD TO HER....


SAND W PERFECT..,THEIR SUPPLIES
\SOAN I CAME IN HANDY/FROM A DISTANCE
\AFAR, YOU'LL PAGG FOR RUGT7 ANPD
AT'LLTULA EAEILYN.O S-4
I= WE, CAN
JUST LURE HIM AWAY
/ FROM THE SHIP...
T-AT'LL BE ENOUGH,/!,


/


I




.. __-_ HAITI SUN, ,


time


& money


shipthrough Miami Via


COINMAR LINE


q07- 7ME /PANL


M/OR M/NA/-IM.1/4 GT7 4AFTr4R 7"AT 1
AfAS$E'O AN! 1, ypvwF TOO MucSj


COME CW S/I/_R./ /,, -
MtS 7-7- AI ZLP BEFO,'E-
/r7 TO0 i/A / B J


Save
/


'I




















, j


I




.________HAIITI SUN _________________ _________ _____

Enrn. VILLEDROUIN
HONEST RELIABLE SERVICE /s




: H E F CTCI R. r. *.. '
More.Than 10 ears Experience
FREE ESTIMATE IN SHOP

GENERAL RADIO SERVICE
ACCURATE TUBE TEST IN HOME I ''
MOST MODERN TEST EQUIPMENT ? VISIT CITADELLE AND SANS-S;OUCI PALACE
Rue Dants Destoiches No. 120 .. CONTACT RAY'S TRANSPORTATION
Nfr P A E offe | THE PERFECT COURIER
N6ar PAA office .A DALU BOUQU ET ONLY $25 TO CAP AITIiEN
i Ave. Magry Petit-Fog. by DELUIE Limousine Sexvike

CANYON. I5 Pr YOIJZ nt. NO MSA.,1NETMRLANIO
UP JU-STAS .UMM. AN WHAWR tYOUR NAME15 ....:
ZAR; ABOUT To "M








S14

Mi_5rVE, I HAVEN'4t B~iEL1m Mr=. THN WENT TOVA LOCAL. WY?14 ON N7N
HEARP FMOM YOU FOR SUMMEI., I CWLRCYMAN FOP-.. WHY.UT LOVE4M NOW! [)5ERVP- ,
A YEAP-.! WHY PDPD A1SD THAT ADVICE -AND He WHy? CAN'T I NAVESOME 'IT MOREA w..
i YoU COME BACKs POINT" WIrH ASRaeWa"THAT I 4AD KIN6 OF .AAPPINiESS?.
NOW ? ,. ... -.



Ar,
II;



rwTHNW wwl 5oo SYEL- WHAT EdNv oF CAT AND MOjSE IEBN DSUMMrI D1PNY '

YOU CoME?. WHAT op W ULD tr TALK. I THAT?. YOUJ'RE9 .AJN. /INS To FIND KNOW UNTIL WE. r
DO YOU THINK I'M, RAVE LEFT ATMM T PJc-- 6 "T 7 T T"E COURAGE oT HERE THAT
Dr MA F THl OiEt PINT-IF Th o is TSI6 Dib)O US? YOU WERE ABOUTI

y,6 r95 THATL. T!T MAJUW




uHAITI SUN___________

for the motorist who demands the most from a battery










* Jii~L-~^ ^J^ S W rKT
D HEAVY- DUTY DE LUXE BATTERY
You S those lunupasssed extras .... WILLARD Heavy-Dur De Luxe Bat- "
25% orestar ng power, longer life, tery. Exclusive improvements. Visit
-. better perform~ncee... when you buy your WXillard dealer today !"
61" nPr1@r MMUT0Mm MI*S l 135, I.17.d 19plates... for ma~j aubm.Uve and Qmtm Nb
KENEL 'P.IERRE Exclusive distributor in Haiti
Rue Pavee Rue du Centre
__Phone 2268






".,--- GNAWIFOINSOUT HE/- V~ RE so ^hJ N / OTING T U H
CAN PHONE FM NOT GOINO
TO GIVE A ROY Hl !A TIM BANK
ATEN D OLLR .... R6T,,,
RAISE


I> _



1I'9 GOIN TOPTT4
\N WHEN A WIFE FINDS OUT IGH I'M
HER TIUSBAND GETS A RAISE, RGIBY RAISE IN T1-4E BANK
SHE IMMEDIATELY HAS THE 1 ( ACH WEEK-ILLTELL
HOUSE PAINTED, 1IRES A MAID, 1HERNEATYEAR 'WHEN
BUYS A FUR COAT AND IT'S GRONNTO
GOES ONAFRENZIEDE A SMALL FORTUNE
S .SPENDING SPREE. -

I'DII



-* NTHE eNiDES'A SMARr N /- A WAN IS BOUNO D N 1
tEG EwI TAN TIE M_ Mo. LEARN.LPE A FEWNX ,
WOIAEI OPERATON A HESENEENDMARRIED (
0J E DN S'EE I FO T N




"... --MiS'A"SHARP LITTLE TRICKS AFTER ,
WM SH ATORP H ESBEEN MARRIEDk
II HA'iLk
OPERATE AS V%: G AS ..,-








JDAGWOOD- 5/CI KNOW WHAT IT IS---

r '~ 'IA YB D V/ MT M E L EM BB B -V N E NOR R T' \\ ~? -- ".Jr l
WIHEE' WON" (*-D'ERE'S SOMEHN I CAN TELL BY THE LOOK
MiO4OU KISS *.,' DI FFER-NT AON YOUR FACE---
YOUER KIS got ABOUT YOU r O O


.a











*' *:; .... ; .' *. ., : -. ; .*.
I.AREA .RAISE




IFANYBODY WANTS ME, TELL T-iErM\WEEBN REktfiKGSW
I'LL BE IN THE FUR COAT DEPArTMENTi"V PAINT THE WN TO'LE: I.mR.BEmSOEAD
S TA E Y' S' INSrDE AND OUT
OF STALEY SRE ,







I' DONTLTHINK-IT S ,AI
I K MAI THAT THEY SHOULD M AKI=
,,.'- RAESO *~WIVES SMARTER THAN ,- .







19:55 K 5FeursS dca, n o- .
Wo-d;rigjnsrese-ved -,






Sunday, November 13th 1955 ~HAITI SUND PAGE 13


Haitian Shops, Markets, Hotels

HaiLi was well represented in the 1955 Winter Vacation Preview of
the -New York Times., published Novrember 6.
Leading off an article that takes in every aspect of Haitian life from
the Iron Market to the "El Rancho., Mary R. Johnson breaks 'the
biggest news in the Haitian tourist picture. the introduction of free
port prices on favourite tourist purchases.
aDespite the fact that the small Caribbean Republic depends upon
import duties for fifty percent of its annual revenue, the Haitian Le-
gislature courageously slashed its tariff on a long list of items', Miss
Johnson said, and thereby cut retail prices approximately one-third,.
She lists the affected items as 'German cameras, Swiss watches,
Swedish crystal ware, British cashmere and bone china, and Scotob
whisky.
aThe in-bond system,, the writer adds, -will be used for hard
liquor, which will be delivered to the purchaser at bis plane or ship.
Merchants wvho relied mainly on French perfumes and wines for
tourist profits are now planning to branch out in the line of European
imports, the feature-writer reports.
Bit for all that, the local products remain the best buys, and Miss
Johnson lists mahogany, sisal products and Barbancourt rum as the
top bargains in this category.
No Price Rise In Native Products
Pointing out that Haiti has 'held the price line- on its handicraft
in spite of the phenomenal 500% increase in tourists during the past
five years. Miss Johnson writes:
-You can still find a hand finished set of mahogany salad bowls...
for around $10. The excellent three-star Rum Barbancourt is a dollar
a bottle. -he five-star has been temporarily taken off the market.
Monsieur Paul Gardere, the conscientious manufacturer, says the new
supply must age for several years until it reaches the brandy-rich
mellowness appreciated by connoisseurs,.
I
Other Branches Of Commerce
Suddenly switching from the elegant shopping centers where ,brow-
sing customers are served rum punch., and the ever-increasing number
of modern gift shops with fixed-price policies and English speaking
clerks., Mary Johnson plunges into the midst of the ,teeming, odorous
iron market, where you may bargain for everything from tin-can chan-
deliers to beach hats.
Then back again to the streamlined facet of Haiti's capital city, and
the original theme o4 Free Port Prices. ,La Belle Creole., she reports
for the benefit of prospective tourists, -is now devoting store number
1 to .elegant displays of the European luxury items- brought in under
the new duty slashing legislation. Its proprietor is a long-time free
port crusader....
All in all, Miss Johason finds that 'shopping in Haiti has become a
much happier experience than ever before -and a much more pro-
fitable experience tQo.
Accommodation
From bargains, Missi Johnson leads the tourist on to bedrooms Wehich
she says are on a rapid production up-curve.
aMajor hotels are adding new wings and annexes to provide a total
of 600 first-class rooms for the fall and winter season., she encourages,


DIRECT LINE

PORT AUlT PRINCE -NEW YORK


Rue Abraham Lincoln, Telephone 3062

American flag, all rooms with bath air-conditioned dining-
room, famous cuisine, swimming-pool.
Accurate information at office of Panama Line ONLY,


Every Monday at 6:00 P.M.
The deluxe 200-passenger

cruise-ships of Panama Line

sail from Port au Prince

direct to midtown N.Y. City.


Pm



2ie.


STAR PENSION-
IDEALLY LOCATED AT PETIONVILLE
(Opposite El Rancho)
AT VERY MODERATE RATES
FBENCH CUISINE


but a warning note must be aded: -Prices have gone up about 10%,.
' A lbreak-down of current hotel rates, American plan, and a mention /
of the Mfarabou's European plan innovation, are followed by reports ;'0 /0
on the expansion of aPetionville's breezy Ibo Lele, 'Riviera., 'El .'
Rancho., and 'Villa Creole.. / '
Also included in the Johnson survey are transportation lines, Pan
American, with the new direct flight to New York, Delta C & S, KLM,
Compania Cubana de Aviacion and the Dominican Airline.
For the 'less frenetic traveller' the Panama Line luxury cruisers
are recommended.
Accompanying the article is a Tourist Office photograph, of the Ci-
tadelle, looking down on impressive heaps of cannon balls, and a
mountain peak way off in the distance.
More On The Free Port
But the tonal change evident in this talk of luxury hotels and cita- .
dellbs does not mean that economy is forgotten. Though Miss John-- :'.
son,'s article ends on a luxury liner note, shrewd 'Belle Creole, pro -
prietor Elias Noustas brings home a reminder with a large, well-placed ......... i
ad on the Jamaica page, depicting a Haitian marchande, cheekily I' g C '
screaming across the Caribbean towards Miami: 'Pardon Us Mr. ng iir]
Girpble! Nobody but Nobody undersells Haiti in the Caribbean, r lT s
and Nobody in Haiti undersells aLa Belle Creole-. ours J IU


Three convenient weekly flights to take
you into the gay, romantic atmosphere
of the Pearl nof the'Antilles!
Only 90 minules from Port-au-Prince
to Santiago de Cuba by CUBANAI

For information and reservations see your
Travel Agent or call Pan American World
Airways, Rue Dantes Destouches. Phone 3451


istophe's
e Best!


DEPARTURES FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE:
Monday, Wednesdays,' Fridays, at 1:25 p. m.


CA -*4


* Sunday, November 13th 1955







PAGE 14 HAITI SUN Sunday, November 13th 1955 -- ---------- p ______________________________________________________________________________


Ren3 Victor's Population Talks
Make An Attractive Booklet


CCONFIGURATIONS tULTU-
RELLESv and PROCREATION
EN aHAlTfr; -the -two lectures gi-
ven by Rene Victor at the Hemis-
phere Population Conference in
San Juan last May, have been put
together in ir neat, attractive book
'let which left the" Henri Des-
champs presses last week.
The lectures, highly praised in-
ternationally at the time of the
conference, make' good? deep
,. reading, showing -a careful study
of the "population problems con-
fronting Haiti, and a constructive
approach to'sheir solution.
RenA Victor's theme is one of
hope:. I.f Man understands the.
Econpmy of Nature, the Earth
will easi..y bear the weight of his
Cu4 ..; .. ... .. .. .. ..
B-i. his method of enlarging on
thitlemie is far from technical.
Looal-colbur, folldore customs,
legids are hitroduced to illustra-
te 41s ar-trment, and the reader's
interest is sustained throughout
,)y .fi'llvely, concise style.
9@en6 yictor, though still a
young mnan, is already known in
the World of letters. eEssais de
SSocioligie et de Pscholbgie Hal-
tieiie (1937) V.ues S.ociolog-
quea'(1940), iRecensement et De-
morlphie., (.I ) and eLes Voix


i de nos Rues-' (1949), have esta-
blished his claim to considera-
tion as a serious essayist.
He is currently engaged in the
production of another work: *Les
Relations de Travail au Service
de la Paix Sociale.

Windpower Expert
Ends Survey
In Haiti
World Meteorological expert
Edward R. Miller ended Novem-
ber 2 nd. n brief'mission to Hai-
ti studying the possibilities of uti-
lising wind-power for industrial
and irrigational purposes.
Mr. Miller-accompanied by La-
bour Department- engineer An-
dr6 Cauvin, visited the wind stu-
dy stations established by the
United Nations in Kenscoff and
Furcy.
He also visited the United Na-
tions Permanent Representative,
Mr. Albert Le Bel, and conferred
with officials of the Labour De-
partment.
,Mr. Miller will allocate the
amount -of technical aid to be fur-
nished to Haiti during 1956 in
the field of wind-power exploi-
tation.


,,.~~~... -..,7.-/ C." !
- (EL RANCHO,

Ptionvilte


ngs...

adeleine MARCEL


Every

onday Thursday

Evening-

Dinner-Dancing


4


, Tuesday and Fridays Dinner Dancing


i


A treat at
tea-time!


LI PTON'S
PURE FRUIT


HAITI TRADING CO. Ph. 2069
Citi de I'Exposition



AUX COSAQUES
\
Haiti's famous ahomard flam-
me has' been enthusiastically
acclaimed by visiting epicures,
and featured by dImperial Li
nen..
But foreigners aren't the only
connoisseurs of food. Haltians
know where the meat is done
Just right, where wines are of a
perfect vintage and flavour to
mellow their mood and form the
perfect foil for each delifghtf
course.
That's why special occasions
art observed at cAux Cosaques.u


The Aux Cosaques Bar


TOPS "EM ALL"


RADIO STATION
TO BE BUILT
BY G. E. C.

'General Electric thle Britich
company currently engaged in
overhauling the telephone system
of the Reonublic, plans to cons-
truct a mr.dern radio station in
Port an Prii-re, costing an estimat-
ed $6,000.
This station will not be used


Every Thursday and Sunday night Special folklore
Show... and dancing
Saturday Night its Always CABANE CHOUCOUNE


W I l D11CA ILQiILt


C AQrete o




JOSEPH NADAL & Co.


FAMOUS FOR ITS FRENCH COOKING


Specialities


-ONION SOUP
-PEPPER STEAK
-ESCALLOPPE DE VEAU


-FILET MIGNON
-SNAILS
-PICARDIE


FOR RESERVATIONS Tel: 7416
LOCATED IN' COOL TETE-DE-L'EAU, PETION-VILLE


ML


PAGE 14


HAITI SUN


- ISunday, November 13th 1955


for commr-ruai exo'adcasts, ho-FOR RENT
weaver bir. .ir jr.-: re-lransmis-
I'6,I of chf I0,,I L talis, through- Unfurnished 3-room hoin E (La-
oru -11 ut c ei. :11lt Jirg-distlance net boule) private, abundant supply
work tiki..-' the prc''inicial towns of water, electric light, good pro-
*to the ca'ijiJ ,uri :ihe cities of perty. See Georges Elie. TcJepho-
the world, ne 3079.

HOTEL DAMBALA

THE COOLEST IN HAi ,
VERY
VERY

VERY
LOW SUMMER RATES

SWIMMING POO1
ALSO FREE TRANSPORTAII. ;







CobaneChuco










"LITTLE BLACK


A short story by less Zarate
M orenol
Illustrated by Luce Carpi
Turnier


We never knew whether Pock
was a nickname or his real name.
In any case. we always called
him little black Pock.) He was
about thirteen in those days,
though so serioutn that he seem-
ed older: When we told him what
he was to do, he stood straight
and stiff like a soldier, while the
whites of hlis eyes-oh, so white
-danced merrily in the darkness
of his face. ,
Little.black Pock was Very de-
voted to us We were working in
the laboratory, and, thanks.to'us,
he had been assigned to our sec-
tion as messenger. His father had
also worked for the same com-
pany. The old man was rather an
an odd Negro, a mystifier, a bit
crazy, so they said. One day he
asked for retirement and disap-
peared, and it wasn't until much
later that we heard of him again.
The boy never spoke of his fath.
er.
Every morning the little Negro
arrived on the dot. He dusted the
tables and chairs, then settled
himself comfortably and began
to sing. His voice, had an exotic
quality, and the tune-1always the
same one-mighfit have 'been beau-
tiful if Pock hadn't accompanied
his singing by beating his belly
like a drum. That seemed to amu-
se him greatly. His hands pro-


oucee an unpleasant sound, as if
they were striking an inflated
ball. -
Then all at once 9ook stopped
singing. He became timid, with-
drawn. We could tell from every-
t411:-5 h,. UaU Illd it --d W hoL_.n


POCK"
little black boy like Pock. But
you may be sure he was embar-
rassed. His eyes-showing whiter
than ever-rolled, and his hand
darted into his pocket like a
small frightened animal.
What do you have on your
finger, Pock?v I persisted.
<,Nothing.*
'Don't P!e. Tell me what's
happened..
',When?*
c "It's no good trying to fool
me. I've been watching you for
several fays. You never take
your hands out of your pockets.*
- At that he broke down. His eyes
filled with ears. lFhis after-
noon.-, he whispered, I'll tell
you-only you-all about it.:
He was waiting for me at five.
I had forgotten his promise, but
when I saw him I quickly took
leave of my companion. Pock
tagged along with me. He was
excited and seemed ready to bare
his soul.
",,What's going on, Pock?v
My "finger has turned white..
eWhat do you mean?:
,Just that. My finger has turn-
ed white. It's awful. Completely
white!:
aI don't understand.:
Then he explained: Ever since
my fathfer retired from' the labo-
ratory, he's been carrying on the
strangest experiments. He sqys
he's discovered the formula to
turn Negroes'. skin white. He says
when he gets a paterft, he'll be-
come a millionaires
That's marvelous, Pock!.
vit's madness, sir. Last week
he made the first test on me. He
spent the whole night rubbing
ointments into my finger, and be-
fore that he inoculated me with
I don't know what kind of pre-
ventive drugs. Twenty-four hours
later my finger was white. I
didn't want people to see it, so
I wore the mtetal-tube. :
I discovered that -Pock had
been to r m e noted not by
the miraculous color chan-
ge blut-by the fact that
he couldn't tell anyone about it
Children's capacity for indiscre-
tion is 'unimaginable. When he
came to the end of his story, he
seemed to be rid of an enormous
weight. HI'e walked with his head
high, and I think if we hadn't
been in the street, he'd have
shouted at the top of his lungs.
We talked for a longtime. Ie
told me his father had sworn him
to secrecy. He vowed it was only.
out of friendship and gratitude
that he had decided to break his
filial promise. When we parted,
he offered to keep me posted on
the latest developments.


tLiig ne didU TnaitL lIe was woied-. ,
He no longer stood at attention or Once more Pock began to sing
rolled his eyes when receiving or- 'and drum oh his little belly every
ders. He seemed to be trying to morning. He continued to wear
hide something. Upset by the the lead bandage. One day he told
change, we asked him one day: me his father had repeated the
,What's the matter. Pock?., experiment on one of his kness,
,Nothing s with the same -result. Another
,?Is someone sick at home?, time he said the old man was be-
"No., coming more and more obsessed
Pock wa-u't usually very talk- with the idea and that he was
active, but his mono-syllabic re- about to make the final test. Lat-
plies aroused our suspicions-even er, the boy again became moody
,more. Nevertheless, we couldn't and evasive. It was like pulling
get another word .out of him. Lat- teeth to get the most superficial
er we tried again, but in vain. information out of him., On one
Getting nowhere, we forgot the occasion he took me aside with a
whole thing, until finally we hard- very conspiratorial air and whis-
ly even noticed his presence. His pered: *r need your help, sir.i
reputation had plummeted. <,All right, Pock.
One day he brought me a lett-
er, and when he put it on my desk, 'Oh, 'it's a shame! The poor
I noticed that one of his fingers little Negro was trembling and
was encased in a lead tube, much his young voice cracked, rasping
like an ugly, oversized thimble, against the sharp edge of his ma-
cWhat's that on your finger, gnificent teeth. oDon't tell anyone,
Pock?* I asked, sir. I want you to come with me
I can't say that he blushed, sir. I want you to come with me
That would be too much for a to see my father.)


S PAGE


HAITI SUN


tHe won't want me there.:.
However, I promised to go, and
we agreed on a time. Pock's house
was on the outskirts of town. He
.lived alone with his father, since
his mother had died some years
before and there were no other
children. The old man did 'the
washing and Pock the cooking, if
it can be called cooking when
they consumed nothing but cc(fee
and, on rare occasions, boiled
eggs.
As al w a y s, Pock was
right on time. His was
a small house, happy ailid
s u b u r b an insignificance. The
neighborhood was deserted at
that hour. Anyone could have
committed a murder with impu-
nity. We went through a small
garden. At the threshold of the
house I asked: eWhere is your
father?a
tDownstairs, in the cellar.
The living room was gloomy
and dirty. It had probably been
a long time since the place had
been swept. There were glassed,
tubes, and all sorts of laboratory
equipment on the tables and
chairs. The basement stairway
was.in the inner courtyard. We
'went down and came upon a clos-
ed door.
eWho's with you, Pock? ,call-
ed a man's voice.
The little Negro said my name,
and thb door was opened- not
by a human hand but by an elec-
tric mechanism somewhere inside.
The room was in almost total
darkness. I confess that at first
I was seared. I felt alone and in-
quired trem-ulniisly: cWhere are
you, Pmck?> ,

The 1'oy had disappeared. or,
at least, fallen silent. A distafit,
,cavernous voice answered: cWel-
etime to my house, sins
Good afternoon,v I said, some-
what relieved.


Just then a cold hard object
touched my !egs. If I didn't yell,
it was because I couldn't. But I
stopped worrying when the boy
told me to have a seat, and I re-
alized it was a chair that had
brushed my legs. I fell into it.
Once I was seated, my eyes grew
accustomed to the shadows. At
first I saw a misty blob floating
inr the darkness. Then, something
still very undefiribd, yet more
solid. Finally it took human shape
and was just a few feet from me.
,Arb you Pock's father?.
At your service.:
& I've come at your son's sugges-
tion.*

eThank you you very much. I
wanted to talk with someone.:
*All right, go ahead.)
T,, thof Ai.J: c 4tUd% anem!* c 6


15 ':!i
:.'-


York. That'. w;-.er I intend% to1 .":l
make public my discovery. Here,' .]
i,, Calombki,. there are very few, ^
Negroes, and alrriost .all of them '^
poor. On the other hand, I couiat:"-.
be a milioiuaire with what I'd".:
earn in Harlem alone. And you'll";:1;
be my partner. ..
We talked a long time, and ..:^
promised tu come back the follow '""-;
ing week. However, the old fellow. ...
wouldn't show. himself in daylight. 2
There was (cone details to be iron-. :-.''
ed out. Still, the truth of" his 11-
-.












claim was obvious, and the. ven- .
ture had me all agog. Pock's fath-, ..-J
A










er could turn Negroes white. ^
What t didn't know was whether' t
the Negroes wanted to he white.
i knew some, a b ery fewa 'and all
Negros, aid aldost all o the







qf them Were quote content IWth c '
their blackness. c b'k f
i n w H t f


il LItI j i lt CI WUIIC L5nu on S 4 *:
lence was orief. The voice again Again I returned to the out- .
resounded through the cellar: skirts, and the old man received' :
cAs ybu know, I've made a sensa- me in the same strange way'e e
tional discovery. I've succeeded -harf th7TRtsttMe. ... ';
in concocting something that can #I must see you in-the light: *.
bring about changes-I don't yet .I insisted. Y6u'l1 'have the mno
know whether temporary or per- ney just as soon as I see you.)' "
manent-in the pigmentatiob of f've struck a snag,b he said o
Negroes' skin.) dejectedly. '
l've already seen Pock's fing- What is it? -..
er. It's remarfkaible!: c *You'll see; My skin is now *
' I've teste-d it on my own skin. white, -so white that it's dazzling.
I, Pock's father, am now a white But I can't wear clothes. -Ever '
man.) since I stopped being black, I've
hid to go around naked. From '
At that moment, everything; a chemical deficiency or some
seemed very mysterious, rather technical fault there's a new in-.-'
incredible. But the man talking flammable substance that stays
to me iias definitely white. His on the skin after the color change
face, hi, skin. everything-I say and burns off clothing. When I
it all unmistakably, try to dress, my shirt falls at my
feet in ashes. It's as if my. ski .nt
CEftraordinary!. How could distintegreted the- cloth. The on-..,
you..-? 'ly thing I can wear is metal, but:
,We'll talk about that later. I think, for now at least, Negroes
rve called on you because I need won-t want to wear medieval ar-
yoe- help. First, I want you to mor. They'd rather stay black...}. ;
verify what has happened. Once cThat's odd!* I thought
convinced, you must lend' me
enTamgh money to get to New Continued on Page 16.


^ NOW TWO FLIGHTS DAILY TO.


, > MIAMI )





ON 4-MOTORED

S SUPER6LPPERS*
^ ~ FOR ONLY $13500 (U.S.) ROUND TRIP '
See your Travel Agent or t


WORLD'S MOST EXPEUENCED AIRLINE 9




Rue Dantes Destouches-Port au Prince-Tel: 3451

OR2M Reg PAA. bi PAP.55Q.-MIA


C!..-AQT7 MAWOmhor 1-qth IG55


~ I






II
*, ,* ', .. ** *. *




'ipves dentiaf Decree Regulates Traffic...I
' ?' (Contffurd From Our Last Issue)


".4
,." .



-;,&


HAITI SUN*


((LITTLE BLACK POCK,
Continued from Page 15


I fel
him ai
of third
technii
power]
men ri
paradi
that w
like e
and th
Adam
on. Wi
collect
study


S' ed nut
1Settion V (Cycles, Bicycle or Motor Cycle, Tricycles
and similar Vehicles) Poec
their %v
i'.,A ticle 36.-There is no age limit or driver's license needed for ill, wi
fusing a bicycle. S
SArticle '37.---a) All cycles should carry a metal plaque bearing a --ay a
3.aumber which the police will give, after its inspection, and its licensing born i
and payment at the Tax Office of the tax demanded by the Law. sheets
b) Violators of the article will be liable to a fine of 10 gourdes or cover
...mprisonment for three days. .U,(
r Article 38.--a) All cycles should be furnished with an apparel to Jtere
K..warn other vehicles and pedestrians, distinguished by a sharp note portal
.:r a horn which may be heard at twenty-five meters or more. Employ- white
it meant of all 'other sounds is forbidden. Also, they should be equipped -coul
I".with brakes in gbod condition, a signal lamp with white'light which the stI
..1wfll be turned on after nightfall andN until the break of day and a red men?
--phosphorescent plaque, The signal light should be fixed in front of provir
h--e cycle. The use of electric torches known as flash lights held in stay c
i.;h e- hand is forbidden. four
V. 'b) Anyone who violates this article will be punished by a fine of could
.-lfive gourdes and in case of non-piayment, imprisonment for three days. the w
%" Article 39.-i-a) No bicycle constructed for-the use of one person Negro
should carry more thhn one person on the roads or public highways, pies I
R'b)' Transporting parcels of abnormal dimensions, which may adver- ed an
lCaeiy affect the stability and direction of the cycle, is forbidden, autho
,. ic)_Violation of the dispositions of this article will incur a fine of man i
4..,ifteen gourdes and in case of non-payment imprisonment for 5 days. Thi
'.'Article 0.-a) Cyclists are forbidden to be towed by another vehicle til on
4t dr to hang on to. a vehicle. other h
,.. Ii) Cyclists, are forbidden' to ride on the sidewalk or'on a path re-
;serveed for pedestrians or in a children's park.
.. CyLclisl are forbidden to give any public exhibition on the
streets without a special permit and in the determined circumstances.
i"'.j 'd) Cyclists must not hold any form of competition on the road or
V:,::go so fast that they lose complete control of the vehicle.
1. e) Cyclists are forbidden to ride through a procession or disturb
Wja\procession in any way.
i V V violation of one of the paragraphs of this article will be punished
iiy a fine .of fifteen gourdes, and in case of pon-payment imprisonment
i f 'five days.
f. tlce 1,-a) Cyclists must not lay their vehicles down on the
k"l road. They may leave the cycle upright supported by its pedal against
itt..the sidewalk. No other vehicle may pari beside it.
CP'. b) Anyone guilty of violation of this article will be liable to a fine
| .oE ten gourdes and in case of non-payment, imprisonment for three

t; :Article 42.-a) The cyclist will always keep to the right side of the
road.
*y b) Besides what the present chapter specially rules, the cyclist is
'|, submitted to ihe general obligations of the present rules.
S'.- Article 43.-a) In case of a breach of the Law, the bicycle will be
B" co.miseated and taken to the nearest police station. A fiche de con-
i' ,travention" bearing the number of the license plate, tle 'serial number,
"a:. the mark of bicycle and the list of its accessories, if there are any,
*'b--ill be given to the infractor who will present himself at Police Head-
'l quarters within 24 hours.
1' b) 'If at.the expiration of the '24 hours, no effort is made to reclaim
-i .he vehicle, a notice will be published by the Police, inviting the
;'.e 'owner to come to reclaim it in the three months following the' notice.
S."l .After this period, the bicycle will be taken to the Tax Office to be
.r'. sold at' public auction, .in accordance with the Law.
rf Bicycles with Motors and Motorcycles
:.. Article 44.-a) The above rules and those which follow are applicable
t'-, to bicycles with motors and motorcycles which should be equipped
.with a horn or bell, brakes in perfect condition, a signal lamp. with
.i: white light shining before and a red light behind. These lamps will be
B illuminated at nightfall.
b) Motorcycles equipped with side-cars, as well as the lights des-
(' cribed above will carry a white light without a beam on the mud-guard
, : of the side-car.
.c.. c) The license plate should be illuminated by a white light.
d) In no case will the use of a dazzling light be permitted.
Article 45.-Drivers of motor-cycles whether equipped with side-cars
or not, whill be ruled by the laws pertaining to chauffeurs in general
.' .-.and in ccse an infraction will be liable to the same punishment.
UP Article 46.-The rider pf a bicycle propelled by a motor or of a
motorcycle should have'.a driver's license which will be given by the
rlc' Bureau de la Police:
Artile 47.-The motorcycle should be equipped with an exhaust
." permitting the escape of gas without too much noise.
S '.N.B.-NEXT WEEK: Section VII: For automobiles, camio-
-. nettes and trucks...
/

p' Jacques Lafleur i
M- medical and Corrective Gymnastics Baths Physiotherapy,
?. Ultra-Violet Infra Rouge Lamps Rehabilitation.
Physiotherapist-Masseur, Graduate Swedish Massage School, Chicago,
I111. Post-Graduate Kellberg Health Institute, Chicago, Podiatrist.
Associated with Dr. Maurice P. Lafleur
.. 179 Avenue Magloire Ambroise Phone 2981
1. -'


It sorry for the man. I told
Afterward that, to my way
king, what he considered a
eal defect could become a
Ful instrumentt for making
eturn to an uncomplicated,
siacal way of life. He said
',as obvious, but that men
everything but simplicity,
at [here was a theory that
was a Negro, and so on and
e agreed that while I was
Ling'the money, he would
how to escape this enfore-
dismt.

k told me later that his fa-
was stymied. He had fallen
th pneumonia, I think. He
;ot worse, since he had to
s naked as the day he was
On contact with his skin, the
s with which he tried to
himself fell apart.
der the circumstances, I lost
st in the project. How im-
it was it after all if the
man-or rather the Negro
ldn't walk freely through
streetss like all other decent
There was 'no merit in im-
ig the.skin, only to have to
out of sight, trapped within
walls. Besides, from what I
observe, the old man with
hit6 skin still thought like a
o. Moreover, religious scru-
kept me from getting involv-
py further, since God never
prized anyone to change hmu
nature.
ngs were at a standstill un-
.e day Pock told me his a.-
hiad died. I asked the details,


and he explained that he had
died in a rather grotesque way,
completely naked. An hour after
death the old man's skin had be-
gut to darken, wntil it was once
again completely black. Only
then could they cover him with
a shroud like a decent corp.e.
cWe could. ,v I suggested to
Pock, tempted by greed. ?Now
we surely could reveal the secret
and make ourselves rich.*
- .partial results. I
*What's tlie difference? I don't
think it'd be necessary to change
the whole body. It'd be enough
to whiten the visible parts, that
is, the hands, face..."
aThai's not enough. Negroes, if
they wanted it ,at all. would want
a real change, riot just a disguise.
Besides, my father didn't write
down a single word. Even if he
had, I wouldn't reveal it.
Why?i

trous-for the Negroes. They
would lose in the end. That's the
truth.,
ed, trying to change tl4e subject,
which was a 'bit hard on my ra-
cial pride.
,What about your finger?
He stuck out his hand. The
finger that had been encasedin
the metal tube was now dark,
just like the rest of his skin.
cYos didn't have to die to have
your finger return to its norminal
color. I'm glad, and I congratula-
te you, Pock. This means your


Sunday, November 13th 1955


father failed in the experiment.j
MA Negro never fails,* said
Pock proudly.
Your father was white, I
countered.


(The same management
for 30 years)

Clean, airy rooms, beautiful'
view. Good food.

Single $4.00 $5.00


including meals

Until December 14th.
Special Rates by week,
month or year.

S Telephone 5170


HIGH SPEED


EARTHMOVYLK


A C'.iir'"i'nr DW10 Tractor with a
No. 10( Smraier pr'.virles dependable, high
peed ih-iiuing. 'hViwse matched units have
pn available trip speech of 24.5 MPH.
Tbe No. I, SLcaper hag a capacity of
'.7 cuL. yds. sLruck and 11 cu. yds.
hcapud. WiLh this tractor-scraper, cycle
time is cut to a minimum. The No. 10
Scraper provides positive ejection of the
stilckiest materials.
The DW10 is powered by a 115 HP
Caterpillar Diesel Engine. This engine


lowers operating costs 'by using low cost.
non-premium fuels, without fouling. The
brakes on the trailing unit take hold an
instant before the brakes on the tractor,
thereby preventing jackknifing and assur-
ing safe operation. Mechanical steering is
aided by an hydraulic mechanism, giving
the driver complete control and a "feel
of the road."
This machine has a place on nearly
every earthmoving project. Come in and
let us explain more about the DW10
Tractor and the No. 10 Scraper-


CATERPILLAR



HAITIAN TRACTOR S.A. CHANCERELLES


I


11
-He was olack!v he shouted.
He lived black, but he died
white. It's the last that counts.
He was white.v
\
He rolled his eyes, just as he
did when lhe was about to sing.
,my father did not fail. My fing-
er is. stiL 'white. If it doesn't look
it, that's just because I painted
it. See.,'-

He stared at me scornfully,
took out a handkerchief, and
rubbed. There on Pock's hanid
among four black fingers was. a
little white one.


Hotel Excelsior

CHAMP DE MARS





Sunday. November 13th 1955


SAFETY THE '56 WVAT( HWORD
The 1956 models are here!
Take a look at those sleek lines, notice the super-powered upenda-
bility with that new, new, NEW supersonic drive and floatamatie gear-
shift. Lower than ever this year, the new cars are looking more and
more like high-powered atom-mobiles of the next century. They are
the fastest yet, the sleekest yet and the safest yet.
The safety of course is for the driver and his passengers. Pedest-
rians and worse drivers of out-dated chariots, had better not delude
themselves that the designers were worried about their welfare.
'Some of the new powerhouses even have safety belts to keep the
occupants from being battered to death against the shatter-proof wind-
shield when the new stop-on-a-dime power-brakes are applied at 120
m.p.h. (cruising speed of the auto).
But can you see any rubber foam cushioning, electronic obstacle-
clearers, or automatic hands to reach out with super-automobile speed
and whisk the pedestrian from the path of the plumetting comet?
What you can see, (if the car doesn't happen to be breaking the
light barrier at the moment) is a pair of streamlined, functional-de-
signed horns shielding the headlights and projecting aggressively be
yond the front of the radiator.
Talk about safety! If these things hit you they won't break an arm
or a leg but slice you in half or mince you up into streamlined, small-
er-than-the-atom flakes.
SBut, of course, this doesn't affect the validity of the safety claims
of the new autos. In this day and age, we should all be wise enough
to see the qualities of the 1956 models, and then we should all be
safe and speedy within their sleek, NEW hulls.
That is the way the designers must have reasoned. And it's a sure
thing nobody is going to risk taking to the road in a bogota or ,a
pied, when they are around. So, sales are sure to rise. Another ex-
ample of American go-ahead sales methods. You gotta have drive
buddy...


HAITI SUN


3.000-DOLLARS
(Continued from page 1)
*
Mr. Roy told a cLe Nouivellis-
te reporter Monday that there
had indeed been a shortage in
the accounts of Mr. Bertrand
Prepetit, but that ca deficit in
any administration need not mean
anything extrordinaryv.
This statement indicates that
investigation is still underway,
though it is confirmed that Mr.
Prepetit nnd other Tax Office
.employees have- been placed
under arrest.
A later release stated that the
shortage so far traced was close
to $30.000. The discrepancy was
discovered in an attempt to ad-
iust a shortage of 48 cents.
1^^ 0oo ooo


DON'T MISS

THESE L. P.

RECORDS

OF HAITIAN

FOLKLORE

MUSIC


CORRECTION FOR SALE
The Haiti Sun apologises to its Several Building lots at ARCA- O Y U
readers CorL our error in last CHON. F Oti 1 Y UlR
week's story of the (Coles Super- Magiiificient viaw of the city, the
market theft. We erroniously mountain and the sea. Reasona- COLLECn T TI N
named the shop-boy held in con- ble prices. tCtLsEA11lLii
necion with the crime as tPIER- Apply at office of Haiti Sun. Cite
RE SERGE B R I S S 0 N .. This de l'Exposition or at Mr. E.N. -
should have been cPIERRE SER- Bailey, Exposition Building 236
GE BESSON. '.Rue du Magasin de l'Etat


PAGE


BAMBOCHE ROOM

$2.00 minimum

Saturday 8:00 P.M. to 3:00 AM.
During the Week
8:00 P.M. to 1:30 P. M.

((BOFUF SUR LE TOI0tD

the cabaret the most in timate in town
Open every day from 11:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M."
SOFT MUSIC AIR CONDITIONED '


HOTEL RIVIE4A
^oo^oo ooooooot^ wSoo,


10" Haitian Folk Songs, sung in traditional style.
Text in Creole uad English
10?' Creole Songs of Haiti, sung by Emerante de
Pradines and the Michel Dejean chorus
10" Caribbean Dances. Folk dances recorded by
Lisa and Walter Lekis
10" 'Calypso and Meringues. Meringues recorded
in Haiti by Harold Courlander
12" Drums of Haiti, recorded in Haiti by Harold
Courlaxnder. Thirteen examples of the drum
and other percussion instruments of Haiti
12" Folk Music of Haiti, r6c o r d e d in Haiti by
Harold Courlander 'I
12" Song and Dances of Haiti, recorded in Haiti
by Harold Courlander and Marshall Stearns,
I Secular nd r Mligious songs and dances by the
Ayida Group

CURACAO TRADING CO.


$ 4.00

4.00
*'X


4.00
.,


4.00

5.50i




5.50
5.50 -%*
5.50" ;i

',




5.50 -,.


-P.
17 ;s

-i





nnrr ~o ________________________ Sunday, November 13th 1955
mon zo _________________________________________________________


HAITI SUN


Robinson Mystified By Discharge
AsPublic Relations Agent
Irwin Robinson, ,Hiti's public who discussed the matter with
Relations representative in the US -the HAITI SUN pointed out that
and Cnada- for the Past two years, the' services rendered to Haiti by
this week told the -Sun, he was the New York publicity agent
as surprised as members of the were among the important factors
local tourist industry at the Go- affecting the rapid growth of Hait-
vetrnment decision -to discard his ian tourism in recent years.
services. "h, nR nrd


AlthQugh no. official annoupce-
ment has thus fir been made, in-
dicatidni. are that the intensive
and-far flung public relations
activities which he directed during
the past two years have been aban
done in favor of a Miami public
relations firm.
Mr. Robins6n' commented that,
to' the best of his knowledge, no
member of the Miami firm had
Visited Haiti until last week when
one of the principals was summon-
ed here lby' the Minister -of Com-
merce to sign an agreement for the
coming year. Robinson added that
he has been a frequent visitor to
Haiti for more than seven years.
Observes close to thei industry


L UVt MUWA U*
Before accepting, the Haitian
tourist assignment,' Robinson was
for over five years public relations
director of ASTA (American So-
ciety of Travel' Agents), and pu-
blisher of -the ASTA Travel News.
He has also directed public rela-
tions for such organizations as
Cunard Steamship Co., British
TraveliAssociation, Mexican As-o-
ciation of Travel Agencies, several
hotels and cruise lines. He has
been confidante ana public rela-
tions advisor to a number of other
private and government agencies
in the caribbean area. Currently
he is also publisher of the Carib-
bean and Latin-American'Travel
Courier.


ONLY


42


DAYS LEFT BEFORE CHISTMA
WHY NOT START YOUR CHRISTM/
SHOPPING EARLY?

See Tropical Gas Co Inc
RUE PAVEE


for the most appreciated gifts
STOVES, REFRIGERATORS, WATER HEATHERS
Using Propane Gas- It'fs More Economical.


ss On al ceremony 8:00 p.m. MondayPavi.llion Americain.
-ss n*1 November 21, the conference will
[capped... actually open the agenda Tuesday The official closing of the con-
.morning with the commencement ference Thursday November 24th
)en 21st of the scientific programme at thewill be followcd by a banquet.
d National Conference
bilitation of Handicap-
en gets underway at '"
Institute next Monday '' '.$' 'B '
distinguished patronage
llency President Paul4w
part programme has
d for the four dhy-s of
ice, and noted foreign
well as local dignitar-
en invited, to address

ng on the conference
e: the Departments of
culture, Education and
International Suciety
Ifare of Cripples, the
ociation for the Reha-
the Handicapped, the
ety for the Blind, the
the Protection of Chil-
e Cleveland Friends of

opened by an inaugur-



Former Peruvian Minister Al- tocol Attache. The popular am-
berto Peiez Saez presented his bassador was saluted on 'arrival
S! credentials as Plenipotentiary at the Palace by a batallion of
k and Extraordinary Ambassador the Guards, and was accompani-
4S of his Government to Haiti in ed to the Yellow Room by Pro-
a ceremony at the Palace Wed- tocol Chief Daniel Theard. There,


nesday morning at 10. the ceremony of presenting his
The distinguished diplomat credentials to the Chief of State
was promoted to the rank of took place.
Ambassador.last week after an President Magloire and Am-
exchange of notes between the bassador Perez Saez discussed
Haitian and Pergvian Chancel Haiti-Peru relations before the
ries. departure of the diplomat.
Ambassador Perez Saez arriv- An eintime, reception was
ed at the Palace at 9:55 a.rh. in given by Ambassador Alberto Pe-
a Presidential car, accompanied rez Saez at his home at /Pacot to
by Mr. Yvon Perrier, First Pro- mark the event.


Sunday, November 13th 1955


A &-L /12?


JI


i


\ f





Suda,_ovebe_3t_155HITSNPage 20


Joe Chalom streaked to New
York Friday to see his new son.
xxx
Legendary Fortun6 L. Bogat
observed his 39 th birthday ,oi
Ithe 5 th of November, the same
date as Jack Benny.
x xx
Rick-y Rafeld flew to New York
Wednesday toenter'hospital. He
is expected to return i) eight
weeks.
"XXX
Artists 'Vladeleine Marcel and
Monique Laudun are new benefi-
ciaries of a scholarship from the
National Education Department.
They g-. abroad bient6t,.
XXX
Andre Toussaint is flying Mon-
day to his new position as Secre-
tary of the Haitian Embassy in
Washington. Former Coastguard
lieutenant Andre has been with
the Ciment d'Haiti and the Fis-
cal Department since his retire-
ment two years ago
XXX
Colette Smatt is over from Ja-
maica to visit with relatives.
xxx
Loulou Alarchand flew to New
York Wedrnesday on business.
XXX
William and Helen Lattimore
arrived Friday at the El Rancho.
XXX
In Paris cn Novewaber 10 th.
Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Schenk ob
served their eighth wedding an.
niversary. 'Mrs. Schenk is the
daughter of Grolo, Carmen Jones
prima donna.
xxx
November 3rd was the birth
day andiversaY-y of Miss Adeline
Mallebranche.
X'X X
Businessmen for the second
time in 2 weeks gathered Thursda:
at the Riviera Hotel's -Bouf su
le toitj to elect a new president
of the International Commerce
Club. This time they were sue
cessful-Jack Scott was elected
president with 16 votes amn
Pierre Le Grand of the 'Shell
Company came c close sec6nc
with fourteen votes. Jean Des
quirons and Raymond D'Adesk
were elected vice presidents Lie
nel Paquin, secretary, Jules Ta.
lor, treasurer.


Rear Admiral R. E. Libby
lunched with Ambassador and
Mrs. Roy Tasco Davis at the Em-
bassy residence in Bourdon Mon-
day. The Rear-Admiral flew over
from Guantanamo Bay, was ac-
comphnied by Commander 'Ham
rmond, Comtnander H. E. Staley.
"Commander R. G. Charles, Lieut.
Cdr. R. A. Allen, Lieut. Cdr. H
W. Hiller, Lieiit-r Cdr. E. Kuvic-
ki.
x x x
New York bound today are Ro-
ger and Aidre Blanchard
XXX
The British Ambassador and
Mrs. Sidney Sinmmonds received
British friends to cocktails from
6-.7:30 Saturday evening at their
Pacot residence.
XXX
Murray Knobel is back in town,


Marie-Therbse de Vendegeis
wound up a fete at Rendez-vous
Thursday evening.


XXX
Mlarie-Madeleine Scott
Price Marot clippet'-d to
York yesterday.


(n~e
New


x x\
Mr. Alix "ansaricq flew to Cu-
ravao y e s t e r d a y afternoon
to a Ledcrle MNI e d i c a l Re:
preseintativc Convention. He
hopes to be back within a forth-
night. Also bound for the Dutch
islai.d yesterday were Therese
Bastien adwl Olga Jean-Simon.
XXX
The ,Activitd Cbrdtienne so-
ciety, comoosed of a group of
young members of the Methodist
Church is working hard. Meet-
ings are hold at the Presbitary of
tie Methodist Church at Rue de
la R6volutinn every Sunday morn-
ing from 10:30 to 11:30 A.M.
XXX
G&rard I.ger and wife Mino-
se, and -mother-in-law 'Mrs. De-
jean return to Washington after
home leave this cotning week.
xxx

Henry and Stephani Losteau re-
turned from abroad this past
week. .
x x x

Lucie L.affntantow nenr of


headquartered at the Beau Ri- Paramount. after four days in
age. the capital flew to the States
x x x WVednesday en route back to his
Simon Gros breezed into town Consul General post in. Genoa.
last week.for a short sojourn and He was accompanied by his
vacation with his family, and it daughter Moumouche.
was noticed that he had a parti-
cular air of one <.preoccupev tlie x x x
secret is out. He will be keeping
an important date at the altar Mrs. Leo Meyer is expected
with a otres jolie Americaine-.. back next week from four
x x x months in Europe. Daughter Gre-
Gaston and Ginette Mangones ta is staying at Zurich. continu-
are sporting their superb new i-g pharmaceutical studies.
green Studebaker this week.
XX .xX X X
Little Michele Kenol was two
years old' on November 5th just November 9 was the birthday
in time to pronounce happy of Eugene Lamour, El Rancho's
birthday* to lIrs. Raoul Kenol maitr d'hotel.
whose birthday followed two days x x x
later on Noveimber 7th. Don Lungwitz is back in town
x. x x after business and holidays in
The birthday anniversaries of US
the Wolff-Kenol family run in t x S,
groups and congratulations were Saturday L6on and Marie Ker-
ltorder for Sandra Kenol who .Stra tnadMreKr
in order for Sandra Kenol who nizan clippered -to the U.S. via
was one year old on October 11 S Juan.
th, cousin Karl Wolff and aunt
Gerda Wolff on October 31st.
x x x Mr. and' Mrs. Juan L. Lopez
The Fedders group arrived in of Barcelona, Spain and Uouston,
Port Thursday, accompanied by Texas. arrived this week on va-
PAA officials .Porter Morris (Sa- cation. Mr. Lopez is associated
cation.nMrerLopzais associate
les Manager-Miami and Philwith Mark Edwin Andrews, Ltd.
Siefert (Special events-LAD ich is engaged in oil drilling
Miami). Headquartered at the El a i
on Gonave Island. The couple
Rancho. the group is preparing I
for a cont'mntion in. Haiti next are stopping at Hotel Riviera.
fo r a c o n v ven tio n in H a iti ne x t A d r w o H u s o T
Mr. Andrews, of Houston. Te
year. xas and Fishers. New York. qa.


X X X X XX
A member of the Corvington
home learned not to light a ciga- Jefferson School is now located
rette while putting gasoline in a it the corner of chemin des Ddl-
camion lasi week. The camion les and ruelle Waag.
burst into flakes, the pompiers American Journalist from Me-
put it cut. xico City, John Cobb jr and his
x x x wife. are in Port stopping at Ho-
Boarditg Lhe New YorJk bound tel Mon Rave.


clipper today are Laura Roy and
Germaine Deniis, Elizabeth La-
forest.

1/j






.


X X X
Prefect of Cap Haitien. Mau-
rice G. Sam, received Pan Ame-
rican article writer Mrs. Cla-
prood and the Eugene Lyons' to
dinner at Hotel Beck Saturday
evening
X x x
3oe" Delan6y of the New York
office of the Chicago Tribune
spent a week here at the Oloff-
son in the course of of a Carib
bean vacation.


formerly Assistant Secretary of
the Navy. Mrs. Andrews, also
in *who's who, is a well-known
international architect.
x x x
Marthe Posy, of the Tourist
Office, celebrated her birthday
Friday.
x x x

Marie Irene Becker and Bar
bara Sweeney, TWA stewardess'
ses, won wolf whistles at the Ri-
viera Irst week.

XXX

AI Noustas is back from a bu'
ing tour in Europe and attendir
the ASTA congress at Lanv-n
ne, Switzerland, as an observer.
XXXx


RtG.TRADE MARK


r-.....-...u. luurtn son ot Lieutenant Lucien St. Albip and his
iec ithe former Simone Bouchereau) was held at the font Sunday
morning by Mrs. Georges Jeager and Lieutenant Lanore Augustin.

Mrs. Denise Andree Wi-on (Bu fn one of the most fashionable
reau des Sports) observed her weddings of the season, Miss An-
rftea Tuesday. nette Duncan became the bride of
x x x Ren6 Lemoine on Saturday even-
Jacqueline Castera clippered ing, November 5th. The religious
to the States Friday. ceremony was proceeded by the
x x x civil marriage and reception held
Yolande Dominique, charming' at the, Turgeau villa of the parents
Secretary of the Accounting De-'ef the bride, Attorney and Mrs.


partment at the American Em-
bassy feted her anniversary on
November 5th.
XXX
Mrs. Fritz Brun (Huguette) ob-
serves her birthday today.
XXX
Jean-Marie Simonet, wife and
son, left Thursday for France.
The young Cap Haitien couple
will take the Antilles from Puer:
to Rico and expect to be away
two years-at least. Boat builder
Jean Marie will do his compul-
sory military service as he holds
French citizenship.


'Victor Duncan.


The distinguished young couple
were accompanied to the altar by
-Marraine'. Mrs. Louis M. Noisy
and -Panain,, Mr. Alain Turnier,
Under-Secretary of Commerce.

The lovely bride wore a gown
of embroidered lace over organdy
and satin, and a long veil of illu-
sion. She carried a corsage of car-'
nations. She was dressed by Miss
Yvette Zephir of La Haute Cou-
ture. Miss Edith Jeansene and
Miss Yvonne Nader assisted the
bride as -quetteuses-.


IIWitnesses who signed for the

Mr. and Mrs Simon Saieh of couple were: Mr. and Mrs.-Duncan,
St. Marc were hosts last week- Mr. and Mrs.. Homer Lemoine, Mr.
end to holidaying Port-au-Prin- Louis M. Npisy. Mr. Victor St.
ciens in whose horror they or- Louis. Miss Rolande Jeanseine,
ganized a picnic and bathinl Miss Anne-Marie Shrtien, Berhand
beach party at Montrouis. Barbe- Duncan, Charles Noisy, Augpste
cued goat was the plat de re Turnier, Dr. Daniel Beaulieu, Dr.
distance., offered by the charm. Claude Sansaricq, Mrs. Berthand
ing Mrs. Saeih who piloted her Duncan, Mrs. dislaine Andr6 Ri-
guests toa picturesque corner of gaud, Miss Helene St. Louis, Mrs.
the, Shada sisal plantation where Gaston Turnier, Miss Madeleine
they dined. The group from tlhi, St. Louis, Roger Dorsinville. Marc
capital included: Mr. and Mr: Kefnisan, Alcide Duviella, Guy
Gerard Bazelais, Miss Violctte Barjon, Serge Turnier.


Bertrand, Mr. and Mrs. Gerard
Fils-Aimm, Mr. Maxime Rouzier,
Mr. Ren6 Colimon.
X x'x.
Claire Pressoir is going to New
York.


The groom is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Homere Lemoine, of Jacmel.
He occupies the post of Director
of Ecole, J-.B. Damier, at Port
au Prince.


XXX
Birthday'wishes flooded Mrs. The newlyweds are spending
Raoul Bailli, n6e Gisele Craan, their honeymoon at Fermathes.
yesterdayy when the charming .'
Tourist Office secretary obserc' (Picture of bride and groom
ed her *fdte at her home in Pe. ttiill be published in our next
tionville. issue).
U -|


my *Tl CW LOWKT -
*COTM HWvf DETILLERO
TO THE LATE EMS 9SEONc V1.
JOHN WALKER B BONE LTD.


It must

be good


Johnnie Walker must be good, to remain in tlh
forefront of Scotch Whiskies for over 130 yeal-s.
It must be good to piss the scrutiny of distillers
with over 130 years rxperin',:e behind them.

JOH NIE WALKER
BORN 1820-- iLL GOING STRONG
.,Try it today-you'll agree it's good 4


Sunday, November 13th, 1955


__________________HAITI SUN


*-^^TY


I "


J





-- on aH IT U unaN ve br1th 16V 'r_______ _^ -- ---- -^------ ^^- ---^-^ -^-~--~""'


Leading U. S. Authority On Soviets

Spends 2-Weeks Holiday In Haiti

(Continued front page 1)


cussed political ideals with him
during his fortnight here.
A long-time student of Soviet
Russia and Communism, Mr.
Lyons was at first sympathetic
towards the Communist experi-
ment tut turned fervently against
it while stationed in .Moscow as
United Press Correspohdent from
1928 to 34.

'As a writer and a lecturer, he
has been in the forefront of the
struggle against Communism ever
since..
Footpri-ts
' Besides wielding his pen
against Communism, Mr. Lyons
has established himself in the
literary world by .The Life and


Death of Sacco and Vanzetti,
,Our Unkiown Ex-President: \
looks out over all of Port au Prin-
ce, the visiting couple said they
had seldom seem such a view..
But even breath-taking scenery
could not keep them- tied down:
their frequent outings were high-
lighted by dinner with Minister
Joseph D. Charles .and former Fo-
reign Minister Pierre Liautaud
(now ambassador to Spain), cock-
tails with U:.- S. Ambassador and
Mrs. Roy T. Davis in their residen-
ce at Bourdon Monday night, an
an evening on the town with lo0
cal newspapermen Thursday. Ti
Roro's rhythm at El Rancho was
the ,piece de resistances of the
evening's entertainment fare.


New Valerioi Canez Store Now Open
modern in conception and daring in its execution, the new Va-
lerio Canez electrical store at the Rue Bonne Foi, Grand Rue
intersectionn will open new vistas for Haitian housewives.
Valerio Canez, who has been handling General Electric radios
md X-ray apparatus since 1938, and all G. E. Lines since 1949,
tas stocked the most modern, desirable house-hold appliances.
neatly arranged in departments are. refrigerators, cooking appli-
ances, (household and commercial),ceiling lamps and other
iouse-hold furnishings.
Mso stocked *are air conditioners, small traffic appliances, X-ray
md medical equipment, electrical building and wiring material,
fractional horse-power motors, Dupont de Neniours Company's
nedical products.
k service department has been set up under the direction of Va-
erio's son Leslie, who has -a BS in Electrical Engineering earned
in the U.S. a few years back. Leslie will also supervise the air
conditioningg and refrigeration departments.
decorationn, and modernisation of the former old-world two-story
building was done by architect Albert Mangones.


portrait of Herbert Hoovern and
cWe Cover The Worlds, a book
by leading American correspon-
-dents which Ae edited.
His literary footprints lead
through a cross-section of Ame-
rican newspapers. Among his
Writing posts was that of editor
on the -American Mercury, and
She founded and edited ePageant..
In 1945 he joined the staff of eThe
Reader's Digest'.
On Holiday
A hard worker, Mr. Lyons prov-
ed his'ability to enjoy a holiday
as well.
Lodged in the large corner
room of the Hotel Oleffson which


Our Secret Allies


The author and his wife have
been our secret allies for a long
time.

They claim many Haitian fri-
ends in New York, including Her-
mainn D6sir, director of the Hai-
tian Tourist Bureau in' the U.S.-
Metropolis. Roussan Camille, one
of the Republic's leading poets
and journalists, also reminded
the visitors that the Colonel who
accompanied him on a visit to
their home on Lexington Avenue
(NY) several year ago, was none
either than Paul Magloire, the


THE FORD 1956 IS FIRST AGAIN


SEE THE 1956 FORD a miracle of Modern production! On show
now at Luciani & Berhmann,.
The New Ford offers you sensational power, now 202 horse power
instead of 137 in the FordoMatic Fairlane and the dependable, beau-
tiful Stationwakons. The '56 Ford looks like a Thunderbird, with the
same long, low silhouette, the same distinguished appearance and in-
comparable style. Special safety features top anything else on the
market today: patented door locks can't fly open; cushioned steering
wheel; optional cushioning in dashboard and sun filters even buit-
in safety belts. And it's here. See it now at Luciani & Berhmann!


General who now occupies the Na-
tional Palace.
Mrs. Lyons, who visited Le
Cap with her husband and fell
in love with the Northern capi-
tal, picked up an astonishing Cre-
ole vocabulary in her short visit,
adding to her' linguistic accom-
publishments which now include
five languages.
Engaged in a ot&te & tete in
Russian-with her husband at the
'Ibo Lele, she was overheard by
Mrs, Robert Baussan, one of the
few people in Haiti who speak
Mr. Lyon' native language. De-
light was registered on both
sides and the Ibo Lele breezes
were treated to a conversation in
a new tongue.
Mr. Lyons was born in Russia
57 years ago. emigrated to the
U.S. in 1907 and was naturalized
American in 1919. He married
Yetta (Billy) Siegel in 1921.
xx
POSITION REQUIRED
Young Girl
English Steiograjher Fluent
English .
Also Clerical wort experience
Looking for good permanent po-
sition
Apply HAITI SUN


- made


1L


CALLING EVERYBODY'S
ATTENTION

TO A TERRFIP.' SAVING EVENT!


GRAND SALE

NEVER BEFORE OR NEVER AGAIN
SUCH DRASTIC VALUES OFFERED.
You'll find it hard to believe your eyes when you see the
reductions we are offering in every Department. You'l find'
it hard to leave without buying in our Sale. This Sale offers
you special reduction of 20% to 50%.
BUY TODAY
a." ___


for'a Life of Action


Seals out Water-Seals in Accuracy


The Seamaster wvas designed to share
with you the zest of high adventure
and the stresses and strains that 'go with
it. With unerring precision the Seamas-
ter ticks off the most exciting seconds
of your life--in -any climate... aloft,
ashore, afloat.. under the surface, too,
thanks to the thrice-sealed, waterproof


Embodied in the consummate accuracy
of the Seamaster is Omega's experience
as final arbiter of the Qlympic Games,
the world's most highly contested sports
vent. Ever since 1932, Omega split-
second precision has stood in the service
of the Olympic cause, timing the great-
est athletes of our time'and enjoying


acamaster case. its world-tamous Umega their unbounded confidence.


automatic movement makes the Scamrnas-
ter a peerless timekeeper-the kind of
engineering triumph to which Omega
owes its unequalled series of precision
records at the Geneva observatory.


S E AMA S T E R Self-winding, waterproof, rbt-
protetled, non-magnett, anti eqdpped with auto-iompeu.
sating hairspring. Avajlablr in 18 kj solid godI or
rtainles rteel.


FAMOUS THROUGHOUT


THE WORLD


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION U


OM EGAc

The watch the world has learned to trust


I


Sunday, November lWA 1955


LAITI SUjN


lr., o/it .a


PARAMOUNT TUESDAY 6:00 and 8:15 PM. Le
Gaucho
TODAY 3:00 P.M. Les Tambours WEDNESDAY 6-8:15 P.M. David
de la Mort ct Bethsabee
5-7-9:00 P.M. Le Gaucho THURSDAY 6-8:15 P.M. i-cs Horn
MONDAY 6:00 P.M. Carnaval mes Grenouilles




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E174FBJUP_BITZPL INGEST_TIME 2014-05-16T14:02:54Z PACKAGE AA00015023_00340
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


  Home | About dLOC | Collections | Governance | Digitization | Outreach | FAQ | Contact  
  Powered by SobekCM
Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement  
© All rights reserved   |   Citing dLOC