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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00339


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


11


THE HAITIAN ENGLISH


Port au Prince Repubuique d'Haiti


I


LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER


Sunday, Novemoer in Lt h 1 9 leiepnone ZU61


BEAUTIES ON THE STAIRS are Cuban Senoritas Lola Alvarez and
Maria Luisa Lobo with Haitian hostesses Jacqueline Nadal and Clau-
dinette Fouchard.
The daughter of Cuban millionaire Julio Lobo .and her pal Lola
arrived Sunday for a visit with'Miss Nadal, had tea with the Fouchards
Monday afternoon. The visitors -have left .a wake of popped eyes
throughout the capital's night-spots, the scenic highlights in and
around Port au Prince, and all the way up to Cap Haitien "and the
Citadel'l .Laferriere. ,
"*:( ,*."-, "%''* *.^ .i.- i.. '" ". "" .'


RING PRICED AT 480 DOLLARS

SOLD FOR 38 AT EXHIBITION


A man who selected an exqui-
site ring from the John S. Wel-
Iby display at Fosy Laarm's jewel-
ry store on rue Bonne Foi, proved
himself an exceptionally talented
gem selector.I
Paying the $38 shown on the
price tag, he pocketed the jewel,
it was later found to be a 40 ca-rat
topaz ring worth $480. The Jewel-
ers when they discovered Uhir


Shop-Boy Held

In 350 Dollar Theft

At Coles' Market


error, decided to take the loss
hoping it will pay off in goo.d-wilL

The lucky purchaser's name
has been with-held on request of
the jewellers as he bought the
ring to give it to his tfife as a
surprise ,gift at .Christmas.


PEL1GRE HAS RECORD:



FOR WORKERS' SAFETY


zThey looked after the Hai-
tians?, said Mr. Smith. Then he
2 DEATHS added: >,And the Haitians seem to
have no fear.. .
IN 13 500 000 'Safety. Smith, as fellow work-
S 13.500. er-s have -hristeied the warm,
MAN HOURS smiling Texan, will be replaced
by 6 foot-6 incb Tom Boyd who
Haiti's famous buttress dam-- arrived from Texas this past
cPpli're:, has set a world's re- week.


... ... ., .... -
cord for safety in the 18 months
since work commenced on the
project.

Scaled to be the world's larg-
est buttress dam, the, Peligre
Dam has registered only two
fatalities among workmen in 13
% million ran hours. An average
of one fatality for each million
working hours is usually allowed.
Credit fbr this amazing safety
record goes to Walter (Safety)
Smith, wh0o.is known, locally- ,as.
the ,balac4r that swam down the
Rivibre Grise to safety last Oc-
tober when Hazelwrought floods
marooned himn at Croix des Bou-
quets.
Mr. Smith' i returning to Te-
xas next Friday, to the home of-
fide of ,Brown & Roots, the
huge. construction firm entrusted
with the building of the dam. He
declined credit for the record,
telling the Sui that nine Ame-
ricans quizzed on the job could
total 172 years of safety experien-
ce between them.


Luce Turnier's Exhibition Shows

Originalithj Independence Persist


*
Since Haitian Art first started
making headlines-about ten
'years ago--Zuce Turnier has
been getting sub-heads, all her


Pierre Serge Brisson, shop-boy I ow'. Today,, still a non-conformist
at the Georges Coles Supermar- Luce is attracting attention by her
ket since its opening a year ago nn-typical sophistication, and origi-
and an employee of the Coles fa- nal tecmhniue...
mily for a year before that, was
booked this week for the theft of Exhibition Tomorrow
$350 from his employer. Hlier exhibition which will be
opened to the public tomorrow
Mr. Coles complained to detec- at the Frenr-h Institute proves
tives Tuesday that he had. lost that she is an apt pupil and has
$350, three hundreds dollar bill absorbed the best of modern
and a fifty dollar bill, placed in a French painting technique, but
filling cabinet in his office. The ca- Haiti's little rebel has retained
binet was unlocked, he revealed. her vitality.
Investigations by police led to In a preview of the one-man
the home of the office-boy's mo- art show. the .'Sunb was given an
their where S220 and a sales slin opportunity to appreciate the


for $57:60 from ;-Maison Abra-
ham M. Leon. on Rue des Ce-
sars were discovered.
The slip showed a cash pur-
chase of flour, soap and smoked
herring which were later unco-
vered at the house.
The clerk at <-Maison Leon.>
identified Brisson as the purcha-
ser, adding that he has preferred
a $100 bill and received $42:40
change.


iremendo'lis power that Luce Tur-
,ier has developed in the past
four years.


Precocious Pupil.
Luce is a sober, more sensitive
artist, a m.dmber of another
school. There 'is no kinship .with
Benoit, Bigaud, Bazile, Obin, lit-
tle relationship to Gourgue or
Borno, more perhaps with the
frankly primitive painter St. Bri-
ce. though the Turnier technique
is anything but primitive.
Precocious Pupil
(Continued on page 20)


Boldness and Truth
Her portraits boldly and truth-
fully depict the-side of Paris that
the tourist may never see- the
side that the War left. In her
still-life paintings is none of the
vivid gaiety that distinguishes Lure's feeling for realty is 'ins-
Haitian art. trnted in this portrait.


<;Ti Boyd will have his work
cut out for him filling the vacan-
cy created by -Safety's. depar-
ture.

Peligre .,
The hiUge dam trapping the
waters of the Artihonite River,
has already become part of local
legend a year before its schedul-
ed completion date.
Carnival troubadours worked it
into a theme song for the 1955
Mardi -ras.,


Three Die
As River Floods
Camionette
Floodwaters swept three people
to their death last week as a ca-
mionette, -Pan American', was
carried away at the third Passe
Lavaille while going from the cap-
ital to Jacmel.
Thirteen passengers occupied
the vehicle which was driven by
a man known as Maxeau. All escap-
ed death except three women Y-
vonne, Ida and Idovia; the chauf-
feur was seriously injured.
The camionette was hired by
Yvonne for 'a journey to Jacmel
Thursday, and as the weather was
good, there was no hint that the
rivers bordering the road had
flooded their banks.
SSetting out for the southern
town at 7:00 p.m., the passengers
.reached the .third Passe Lavaille
when a sudden flood reportedly
covered the camionette. The three
bodies were recovered Friday.
Yvonne had hired the camion-
ette to go to Jacmel for the fun-
eral of Wer daughter who died


Wednesday.


U.St Congressman
Due in Haiti
November 13
Congressman John V. Beamer,
Indiana Republican, will, visit
Haiti November 13 accompanied
by his wife in the course of a
tour through the Caribbean.
Ot, his first Caribbean visit, the
United States Congressman will
spend two days here. The Bea-
mers will come here from Cuba,
the first stop after leaving New
Orleans November 10, then go on
to Ciudad Trutjillo and San Juan.
by Pat American World Airways,
returning tn Miami November 20.


:,v

.
i;[
[..


Aia tfis mrgnty dam is jiutva..
celebrated. Designed for flobd.
control, irrigation and eventUial,
hydro-electric' power deve4lp-
ment, the dam across the Pelir';
Canyon will be the nerve center
of the $21.000.000 Artibonite DA'
velopment Project. -4
Largest rI its kind in the world
the buttress dam will be 236 feet.
high and 825 feet long across the!
crest, 1_ times the height of th'e
Port au Prince Cathedral .'


New-born Babe .
Rescued
By Firemen;

MOTHER HELD
FOR MURDER ATTEMIf

A new-born baby girl was in.
good health Sunday afternoon,.'
hours after her rescue by .ire-
men from a Bel Air pit latRine..
Her mother is in jail. awaiting:
trial.
The cries o4 a baby attracted[.
neighbours to the aOuater 'lo-
seto on Bois Polygon Sunday.-.
morning and the door was bro-..,.
"ken in to disclose a middle-agd.:
peasant woman writhing in an-i'.-
gulsh while her newly-born baby
drowned.
Firemen were alerted and .
squad under Captain Geo i
Elie sped to the spot Both zW'.
their and child were rushed -.,
the hospital as soon as&the rescue,
was effected. "
The mother, a middIe-age&d
Kenscoff emarchande who dai-
ly treks over the road from the'
mountains to Port au Prince, de-
nied any attempt to murder her.-
sixth child.
She explained she Was mista-'
ken about the nature of the z.-d*!
-*My time wasn't utp, she said.

Giant Dump Trucks:
To Compete
For Reynolds' Order
'Two gian', 22-ton, dump trucks
will compete this month on the.".
Republic's widest road to decide .
which make' gets the mammoth
order Reynolds Mines Intends to:-
give.
Showing their paces on thel'I \
kilometer macadam highway
from the bauxite deposits on Pla- ":
teau St. Croix to the almost corn--. '
pleted million dollar pier and
processing plant on the shore-
will be the Dart and the Euclid. .
Euclid is a 22 ton powerhouse, :
represented in Haiti by FRISA
under Ekkie Lemkie's directors-.
hip, while the Dart is also a-22,
ton truck. .
(Continued on page 2)


I


VOL. V


r
.I
- I'


V*
1r .


ILT--.--U-- 0611- 1 n M W


I ensa:


A





PAGE 2 Hl UuaNe r .1


LATIN TOUCH adds to the charm of a scene in the Warner Pathe
Newsreel him being made in and around Port au Prince. Miss Clau-
dinette Fouchard is shown with U.S. Models Lionel Wiggam and Louise
Hyde. Picture above was taken in the grounds of the Vieux villa at
Phtionville.

PRIZES GIVEN FOR COSTUMES
t

Witches and Zombies Hold Sway
At Union School Haloween Ball


Ghosts, witches and even zom- comprised of Mrs .Jules Tomar,
*ies were welcomed to the Union Mrs. Maurice Dowd, Mrs. Lou
-Sdool lat Saturday evening Stokes, Mrs. Ruth Johnson, Mrs.
-while Ti Ro.Ro drummed a rhy- Kurt Fisher, and Mr. Max Nar-
thm that would have awakened gil.
?the dead .and young accordion- They have should dered :of a
-playing child-prodigy Julius Du- share, of the credit for making
;oseeu provided soulful melody, the party a big success onto Mrs.
laloween set the mood for U- David James of Caribcraft, Mrs.
iioni School parents, teachers and Esper, Mr. Kurt FiSher, Mrs.
tailren as the elaborately cos- Claude Roy, cLa Belle Creole),
turned students filed past the jud- Scott Trading Co, Transwold
ges to compete for coveted pri7 Trading Co; Peters' Bakery
-- Mr. Theophile of Pretzman Agger-
2es. "I i e' holm and Mr. Marcos Talamas
Highlight of the party, the cos- holm and Mr. Marcos Talaas
tume parade of children set the who all chipped in with their co-
jutr members a problem: two pri- operation and gifts.
zes had to be awarded in each ,eLast but certainly not least,
class and the contest was always Mr. Belmare said, everyone's
close. But the jury under the pre- thanks go to Usine a Glace Na-
sidency of Rue du Quai business- tional and Brasserie de la Cc-
man Kurt Fisher succeeded in ronne who provided the delicious
selecting the winners and handed beverages consumed at the par-
out several consolation prizes for ty".
good tries.
Among the delighted but pro- FINANCE FOR INDUSTRIA-
blem-beset jurors was American LISTS & IMPtORTERS.,.
Ambassador Roy Tasco Davis.
After the contest, a delicious As representativ0- for Mer-
buffet was attacked 4y the tier- chant Bankers & Indent mer-
ce-loidkin g scholars, from chants in United Stp?-s, England,
kindergarten through 9th grade, Germany, Switzerland, we can
their parents (Haitian and Ame- arrange financing for 6 months to
rican) -and teachers. Supplied by 3 years according to value, with
parents and generous donors in 20% deposit, on orders for com-
Port ahu Prince, the buffet was plete industrial plants, including
highly praised by the assorted installation, machinery, equip-
goblins, ghouls and witches, meant, hardware etc for firms
The organizing committee, pre- with A-I Banking references
sided over by Canadian Charge Investment Syndicate P.O
d'affaires Edonard Belmare was Box 297 Port-au-Prince.


REGULAR SHIPPING SERVICE
NEW YORK HAITI

WARD LINE'

General Agent; Allen and Baussan
Citk de i'Exposition. Tel: 2387

Weekly Sailings; New oYurl< Port-au-Prince
Fortnightly Sailings; New York Cap Haitien
New York Port-de-Paix
New York Miragoane
New York Jer6mie
New York Aux Cayes


German Sailors Flourish Guns -..
Spend Night In Jail Cell A treat at


c
c
f


lower cost


Two German sailors were add-
ed to the police line-up Thurs-
day morning for possession of
fire-arms-cap pistols.
Armed with lethal-looking pis-
tols, capable of firing blanks but
not bullets, the sailors disembark-
ed from a merchant ship Wed-
nesday night and started whoop-
ing it up in the usual haunts of
sailors who feel in a ebambochez
mood.
'Many drinks and a few shots
later, a report was turned in to
the officer on duty at the police
station that there were two mad
sailors shooting up the town.
After arresting the trigger-
happy sailors, the policemen took
a good look at the weapons and
found them harmless. But the ar-
rested sea-men proclaimed their
rights so loudly at the police
station that they were jailed for
creating a disturbance.
The following morning, Mr. J.B.
Vital, who represents their shipp-

MAX CHAUVET
DECORATED
BY NEW ORLEANS
'Max Chauvet, director of tLe
Nouvellistea was awarded New
Orleans' sDecoration for Meritv
this week.
The Haitian newsman, repre-
seinting the country at the Inter-
american Press Association meet-
ing recently held in New Orleans,
was presented with the award by
Mayor De Lesseps S. Morrison
who congratulated Mr. Chauvet
on his work in bringing the coun-
tries of the Hemisphere closer
together.
Mr. Chauvet was also named
an honourable citizen of the.
Western United States town.



for, greater




yields...al


ig conipany here went to the Bu-
reau de Police and fetched them
back to their ship. considerably
chastened but still oosscssed of
their fire-arms.
The lieutenant o' duty Thurs-
day explained that there also is
a law against making disturbing
noises in the capital after dark
and warned the offending sail-
ors to leave their weapons aboard
ship when next they come ashore.

TRUCKS... a
(Continued frmn page 1)
Originally the competition was
to include All types of earth-mov-
ing machinery, but Reynolds de-
cided-on frame dump trucks with
heated body. This eliminated Le
Tourneau Westinghouse, Caterpil-
lar, AlUice Chalmers, Internatio-
nal Harvester, leaving the Dart
and the Euclid alone in the field.


ONLY 49 DAYS LEFT

BEFORE CHRISTMAS

WHY NOT START YOUR CHRISTMAS

SHOPPING EARLY?

See TROPICAL GAS CO Inc.,

RUE PAVEE

STOVES, REFRIGERATORS,

WATER HEATERS

Using Propane Gas -- It's More Economical


"l=2--$.


0494J


S6-24-24


410-20


Fr every crop and sad
Condition, there's a
pMathieson high ana&L ,
i pelletixedferam to m
you greater yi3' m4loM
I cost. You get qu1de-k4She
IIEON on-leachintg nitrgn,
-vailable phosphate, al
FHMOS-IO otash to fit sil
amalyuis requirementa The peD-R
I Ifwigmr spread easily d even
assure a better
S th elements
110-30-10 f 0 ti hOoyJTffld


Two grades of Anunmmophos available locally by the pound, bag, or ton. For quantity prices
apply to the Agent, V. A. Wynne, P.O. Box 694, Port au Prince,
Distributor: Haiti Seed Stores, Port au Prince and Kenscoff.


HAITI SUNv


Sunday November. 6th. 1955


AGENTS
HAITI TRADING CO. Ph. 2069
Citd de I'Exposition


q12-24-112


113-'o






Sunday November, 6th. 1955 HAITI SUN PAGE 3


Heyer RASPADOR READY FOR HAITIAN MARKET

NEW PROFITS AVAILABLE TO SISAL FARMERS


New avenues of profit were
opened to the small-scale sisal
farmer in Haiti with the arrival
of the first shipment of Heyer
Raspadors from Hamburg, Ger-
many, last week.
Two years of experiment in
this country have led to a com-
pact, powerful little decorticator
capable of stripping 600 kilos of
sisal leaves in an hour and gett-
ing 24 kilos of sisal fiber from
them.
Average output is 3.5 4 per-
cent-higher than the best auto-
matic machines by nearly 1 per-
cent-Horst Von Heyer, demons-
trator of the machine and son of
its inventor declares.
Horst explains the increased
output by the size of the decorti-
cating drum it's much smaller
than other machines of the same
type. Before his Dad, Gustav Von
Heyer hit upon his ilven-
lion, all drun.s on these ma-
'chines had to scale over '60
ci1. i. diar.ieter because, if the


HORST VON HEYER


drumrn were anv smaller, the fibre
would be rolled around inside
and be tangled up in a ball.
Herr Heyer. pr.otiting from 15
years expe.:enc on a sisal farm
in the Tanganyikan jungles, pun-
ched holes in the drum in such a
'vay that the pressure of the in-
cojnii.g air would push the fibre


Foundations For (ThAtre PopulaireD


MODELED ON A SMALL ROMAN THEATRE, the building shown ab-
ove in first stages of construction will seat 400 when completed. Open-
ing date is set for December 19 by Felix Morisseau-Leroy, Creole
playwright and poet, who conceived the projectL His idea is to bring
dram: to the people of Haiti, by staging plays in the theater, written
in Creole and acted by local artists. Construction is taking place -on
MAlorisseau's own land at Morne Hercule, PNtionville.


-. -,*' -w" .~.. -.;,'i ta,, .;.<

..- :.? .. ... -*'.- ,, .*^ *y ,^ y~ a^



POET-PLAYWRIGHT MORISSEAU LEROY'S dream of a life-time
strted taking concrete form in July when the first stones were laid
for the construction of an open air theater at Morne Hercule. Moris-
seau first got the idea of using Creole zs a dramatic medium seventeen
years ago when he saw an impromptu show in Cayes-Jacmel. The show
was a good as anything he has seen anywheree before or since, said I
the extensively travelled playwright. The idea which was born then 1
sparked the Creole translation of Antigone. and Felix Morisseau Le- I
roy went on to produce ,.Diacoute. a volume of Creole pems: He is
at present putting the final touches to play based nn Ra-Ra which
vill inaugurate the theater. Any art patrons interested in lending a i
lih.:ring hind to the project may get in touch with Mr. Morisseau-
Leroy through the rSun,. :g


away from thle sides of the drum
thus preventing it from being rol-
led around.
Actually, his idea was to use
the machine for bananas, which
were decorticated in Africa by
hand. Banana fibre is used for
making sacks and similar arti-
cles usually made by jute fibre.
When he produced the first
mpdel ini his little Hamburg shop
in 1952, Gustav Von Heyer in-
formed Haitian Consul Max Bou-
chereau of his invention. Mr. Bou-
chereau was so enthusiastic about
the machine, he contacted a
group of Haitian industrialists,
and a few months later Herr He-
yer's only son Horst bid his pa-
lents and three sisters ataufwei-
dersenb aild crossed the Atlantic
to Haiti.
Horst brought with him the
first machine destined for use in
this country. The machine had
been bought by Mr. Robert Roy.
Arrivig in Haiti in March
1953, Horn- was sent to Bainlet
where hlie started to try out the
Raspador iii the banana fields.
Henri aid Dellaide Laguerre as-
sisted the young engineer. The
results wore encouraging.

Tried It On Sisal

But banana stalks contain only
2 percent fibre, and the smallest
factory Hor'st Von Heyer had
ever seen needed an average sup-
plv of 8,000 to 10,000 banana trees
per day. The plantations here
were not concentrated enough to
afford the necessary raw mate,
rial without excessive transporta-
tion.
So the young demonstrator
switched to sisal and started
pushing blades of sisal into the,
drum's whirling teeth. The sys-
tem seemed to work rather well.
but the machine proved too weak
to tangle with tough Haitian si-
sal.

Changes In The Raspador

In his regular reports to Ger-
many Horst recommended in-
creases in the power anid strength
of the machine. And the engine
was changed from a 2 cycle, 4
horse-power gasoline combustion
motor weighing a scant 200 kilos
to the present-day Diesel-engin-
Diesel engine. Re-inTorcements to
the structure brought the weight
up to 480 kilos.
An improved gasoline model,
aid an electric-powered machine.
were also put out by 'Maschinbau
Kanzler and Soehneiv, the firm
that had bought the licence for
manufacturing the Raspador.
Mr. Laguerre, who had seen the-
original decorticator in action at
Bainet was the first to order an
improved model of the machine.,
and SONACO which is now the
sole distributor in Haiti split
J-lorst over to install it and make
the final tests
*The performance of this new
machine was so amazing that
practically no changes had to be
madev, Horsr Von Heyer reports.
Mr. Laguerre's Raspador has
been working for nearly a year
row and no trouble has been re-
corded, so SONACO has gone
ahead anid ordered more of the
machines for sale to sisal far-
mners here |


The Machine

Displacing oily 1.4 cubic me-
ters, the Heyer Raspador is the
hiandiest denorticator on the Mar-
ket today. Though niot complete-
ly automniatrc it save; a tremen-
dous amouui of labour.
The d uin which is thle nain
ln.t uf tl2i machiine cu.itai':s fla-
gellati,,g.blades that tear the ve-
getahle part of the sisal from the


I







,'i












THE RASPADOR is mobile. One man (above)'can move it about. ..'


fibres. The sisal leaf is inserted
through air aperture into the
drum, held there while the
waste is cleaned off and discharg-
ed through the other enti of the
machine then the leaf is with-
drawn, turned around anid re-in-
serted for similar treatment to
the portion which remained out-
side the drum.
Nearly 200 kilos can be produc-
ed in air eight hour work-day, and
sisal is fetching nearly 10 cdnts
per pound nl, the world market
todav. The machine costs only
$1,600 and, under normal condi-
tions, will pay for itself witfir,
a few months.

Horst
The young demonstrator whose
research hPs contributed so much
towards the development of the
Raspador was born in Hamburg
in 1929. His family then lived in
Tanganyika, 15 motoring hours
from Arusha, the nearest town.


A view of the small compact
decorticator


As a ho:, Horst attended school -'.
on the plantation. only half .an I
hbur's walk, from his home. BT :
he dared come home only on" .
weekends because the walk
through the African jungle was .
tco dangerous. Snakes, lions and '
leopards were among the common .i
hazards of such a journey. "
Returning to Germany at the- "
outbreak of World War II in 1939 :
the Von Hever family made their ...
home in Hamburg where Horst .'
attended college and later spent
two and a half years learning to .
make models of machines.
New machines were sent in 7
blue-print form to the factory
where he was employed thern.
small scale-models were 'built in .
\wood or aluminum. 0
He was working with the "
,;Shell petroleum company pre- .:
vious to coming to Haiti in 1953.
i
,'

NIGHT SCHOOLS
INAUGURATED
IN CAPITAL

Education Minister Franck D6- "
vieux inaugurated five new ..
schools Thursday evening for
night studies in the capital.
The schools, -Centers of Popu- '
lar Education,>, are each compris- ,:
ed of three class-rooms and a i!-'
brary containing text and refe,
rence books and school instru-
nI3nts.
The centers will be open from
6:30 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. every day, .:
except on Saturdays, Sundays and ,.
holidays.
On his inaugural visit to- the
new centers at Lye6e Antenor -'
Firmniii, Ecole Guillaume Mani .-
gat, Lyc6e Toussaint LouvertureX.
Ecole Smith Duplessis and Lye6ee. '
AJexandre -Petion, the Minfister.
was accompanied by Assistant..
Director of Education Bertho,"'.?
Berthoumieux and the directors.
of the schoblc at which the cen-
ters have been opened.


THE FORD 1956 IS FIRST AGAIN,


SEE THE 1956 FORD a miracle of Modern productionT Oni show
nor, at 'Luciani & Berhmann..
The Nev.w Ford otters you sensational power, now 202 horse power
instead of 137 in the Fordomatic Fairlane and the dependable, bea"u-
tiful Siation-agons. The '56 Ford looks like a Thunderbird, with the
same long. low silhouette, the same distinguished appearance and in-
comparailel style. Special safety features top anything' else on the
:nar .:t t,!.: : patented door loaks can't fly open: cushioned steering
wheel: optional cushioning in dashboard and sun filters even buit-
in safety belts And it's here. See it now at Luciani & Berhmann!


"I


PAGE 3


I


HAITI SUN


Sunday November, 6th. 1955






PAGE 4 HAITI SUN Sunday November, 6th. 1955


o Boncy Opposes Quota
l Joseph report At Fedecame
Coffee Conference

A decisive stand against the al-
location of quotas to member
S*.. countries of the Coffee Federa
tion of the Americas was taken
by Haitian delegate Franck Bon-
-PUBLIC RELATIONS Specialist lrv Mandell of Miami, Fla., has cy at the Fedecame conference
been in town at the Riviera over a week familiarizing himself with concluded last weekend in Cara
cas.
his new client 'Haiti,. It is reported Mr. Mandell succeeds Irwin .The director of Haiti's Coffee
Robinson who handled the public relations of Haiti in North America Office won popular support at
for the past two years. Mr. Robinson's yearly contract was not renewed the five day conference with the
at the beginning of the fiscal year. A top man in his field, Mr. Ro- declaration that allocation of quo-
binson did a good job for Haiti... tas which ou fair to each
ONE OF OUR TOURIST authorities who recently returned from tasmber of the federation would each
member of the federation would
Europe pointed up a problem; If Haiti doesn't soon commence building 'be virtually impossible.
a new airport the jets that all the airlines are now ordering will have A delegation was formed, in-
to by-pass Haiti... cludiiig the representative of
-RADIO'S Jill Jackson and -Le Nouvelliste's. Max Chauvet met at this Republic, to work out a de-
lunch F rid a y over steak-and-microphones at Brenno's restaurant... claration deciding to maintain the
.Fifteen minutes after Jill had finished quizzing the Haitian delegate aim of the federation to seek a
to the Interamerican Press meeting, the phone was still buzzing with plain which will allow stabilisa-
congrats for Max from people who had visited Haiti and had heard ti.on of coffee prices and to con-
the broadcast... The hook-up was over WWL (Loyola University of tinue the studies undertaken by
the South, studios in the Blue Room of the Roosevelt Hotel...)... the International Coffee Office
Among the telephoners was Maurice de Young III Haiti's original towards this end.
White Hunter and Oloffson aubergiste, who now lectures at Tulane The conference members were
University... Max also made headlines in the New Orleans Estate... agreed on the following points:
-aHERAUX'S TOURS. Travel Office, keeping abreast of the times, a) The necessity of increased
is now exquisitely air-conditioned... Fouad Mourra's has a new-display consumption;
window, airconditioning is top force and new glass doors stay open b) The necessity of exchange
allowing a cool draught to issue down the Grand'Rue... of technical information.,
-DECEMBER 3rd is the reported date the Casino is going home c) Of reinforcing the represen-
Sto its birth place across the road from the Beau Rivage... Craps, tative cof-t3 organizations;
blackjack, roulette etc. have been occupying the Hotel foyer for d) Of world study of plans .to
months now... create more harmony between
-FOR A COMMERCIAL DEBT, they say, if you have more than six producers and consumers of cof-
SPhildren you are not permitted to go to jail... fec ii; view of the solution of com-
-COMMERCANTS along the bord de la mer are allowing them- mon problems;
selves a quick smile of happiness these days. Neighbouring roads e) FEDECAME sh o u I d feel
are being asphalted. Good-bye poussire'... sympathetic towards the forma-
-HAITIAN TOURISTS to Guadalvera (Mexico) can be assured of tion of an African federation of
an open arm welcome, Gerard, Antoine and Jacqueline Elie Joseph coffee growers such as that sug-
testified when they recently returned from touring Mexico... They gested at tlhe Brussels Conferen-
met Senorita Theresa Santos at her Travel Agency.. She visited Haiti ce.
and is now Haitianized... Beside the fourteen countries
-.4RINCESS MARGARET who flew over Haiti en route to Jamaica i, the FEI)ECAME, observers
- ast.year this.week renounced her love for Capt. Peter Townsend, a from Africa, Brasil and Colom-
Sdivorced commoner... bia were present at the meeting.
-IN RUE VIEUX of TEte de F'Eau, Wednesday morning, a' watch- -'
man was found under a temporary shelter built on a construction site. -
It was a little too temporary; the timbers collapsed on the watchman,
'his exposed bare feet revealed his presence... H t l
THE CHOUCOUNE orchestra is tops. Under the baton of Trouillot, Eote xcelsior
:.t boys are now being rehearsed during the week by Issa El Saieh,
kiad they certainly aren't falling asleep over their instruments... CHAMP DE MARS
ANGELITO TRUJILLO is in New York waiting for Papa Generalisi-I
mo Rafael Trujillo. The Strong Man of the Dominican Republic is on his (The same management
way to Kansas City for a dual purpose to look at cattle, his great for 30 years)
bobby and to visit with ex-President Harry Truman...
.GROLO" -soprano- will sing -Carmen Jones, here *bient6t.... clean, airy rooms, beautiful
George Reinbold has been back from Argentinia for 2 months... Bceuf view. Gool food.
sur le Toit' il the latest night-club by-product of the Riviera. Tuck-
ed away on the highest story and ceiled by stars, it's to be hoped the
elub's name has nothing to do with the quality of the dancing... Single $4.00 $5.00
A CANDIDATE
29 Club International de Commerce members met in the.aBmuf Sur
Le Toit. at Riviera Thursday evening to eat a turkey dinner and elect including meals
gnew officers, but only the eating came off as scheduled -because 39
member- were absent... Next Thursday evening, if there is no better
attendance, election anyhow. Presidential Candidate is Jack Scott... Until December 14th.
HISTORIAN DANTES BELLEGARDE'S 'Ethique Professionnelle et Special Rates by week,
Svoir Vivre International, initiated the prospective guides gathered month or year.
at the Hotel school for the first lesson in their compulsory course last
Monday evening..: Telephone 5170


DON'T MISS

THESE L. P.

RECORDS'

OF HAITIAN

FOLKLORE

MUSIC

FOR YOUR

COLLECTION!


10" Haitian Folk Songs, sung in traditional style.
Text in Creole and English $ 4.00
S10" Creole Songs of Haiti, sung by Emerante de
Pradines and the Michel Dejean chorus 4.00
10" Caribbean Dances. Folk dances recorded by
Lisa and Walter Lekis 4.00


10" Calypso and Meringues. Meringues recorded
in Haiti by Harold Courlander
12" Drums of Haiti- recorded in Haiti by Harold
Courlander. Thirteen examples of the drum


and other percussion instruments of Haiti
12" Folk Music of Haiti, rec o r d e d in Haiti by
Harold Courlandcr
12" Song and Dances of Haiti, recorded in Haiti
by Harold Courlandcr and Marshall Steams,
Secular and religious songs and dances by the
Ayida Group

CURACAO TRADING CO.


4.00


5.50

5.50


cAMERICAN WEEKLY'S- Wit Parade told about the ten year-old
who watched a. Haitian Voodoo dance on a N. Y. stage... His parents
were flustered and worried when they saw the dancers writhing
around the stage dressed in nothing but a few pieces of red and gold
satin .. Neither one dared look at their son'and both were wishing
they had chosen some other kind of entertainment when his voice
piped up enthusiastically: "Gee whaddaya know our camp colours....
ONE SCORE is the score now totted up by aOptique', Haiti's smart,
intellectual magazine... The 20th edition, published for October, is
chock-full of entertaining and educational reading matter from the
pens of Haiti's leading writers and controversialists...
FALSE ARREST is the charge facing a guard who was puzzled by
a boy visiting the Bureau de Police Friday and so jailed him... The
boy had come to complain that someone stole nine gourdes from him,
but the guard didn't get the story straight... The unlucky policeman
is to be court-martialed...



JOIN THE SMART CROWDS

SAVE NOW IN OUR

GRAND SALE

NOW IN ITS SECOND WEEK

QUALITY GOODS-AT POSSIBLE

LOWEST PRICES. BUY NOW

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS. EVENT

THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL

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REG: $1.80


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a -- ---


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


PAGE 4


d


HAITI SUN





Sunday November, 6th. 1955 HAITI SUN PACE 5


I! HAITI SUN I

STHE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER *
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning u
S BEONARD DIEDERICH EDITOR-PUBLISHER
S PAUL E. NAJAC GELRANT-RESPONSABLE


FALLING WALLS THREATEN INNOCENT LIVES


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


The Editor,
Sir,


The Presidential decree governing traffic has covered the
ground of safety in the streets as thoroughly as such a law I sat your editorial on fishihg
could be expected to do. in, the GS,,4 last week, and I am
One article even goes so far as to specify that it is a punish- pleased to say that I now have a
able offense for a pedestrian to stop and light a cigarette boat for rent (very reasonable)
while crossing from one side of the road to another. around the banks in La Gonave
Every point was clarified and there is now little room for Bay. It is a small, manageable out
doubt as to what is right and what wrong on the Republic's board-motor boat, and may be
highways. ceenc at Casino Pier
But there remains one threat to pedestrians which no traf- -Wiy Rocours (The
fie law can encompass: crumbling walls have accounted for Fishermai).
a large number of innocent people in the past few years.
Miss Edith Day, a 19-year-old school-girl, was killed in The Editor,'
Petionsville three months ago when she pressed close to a
wall to avoid a passing automobile. The wall collapsed bury- Sir,
ing her. I
From time to time, cases are reported of children being Dig me nme skin, Jackson, and
killed or injured by falling walls. Children all over the world make me help to the folklore
are constantly attracted by climbing, and it is virtually impos- ijive. Whatever became of the
sible to keep them off trees and walls. It is a grim fate for real-cool version of Haitian folk
a child always to avoid climbing walls, and it is even more tales that larted with all roe-
grimn to be killed or crippled. kets firing some time ago ? You
Many of the walls surrounding the homes in Port au Prince know, the ore about that Brise
date from the seventeenth century. Houses have been pulled Rcche cat and the gook with the
down and i-e-built, but the walls have been left untouched, seven crania.
These walls were evidently solid and strong when they were It was a real gone series but
first constructed, but time and weather have worn them down itv went to10 early after one ins-
and steel re-inforcing was unknown in those early days. tallment. We want Brise! We
The City Fathers should look upon it as their duty to have wvant the Roche!
these walls inspected, and to order all unsafe fences
demolished. Service d'Urbanisme inspectors who regularly Hep Cat Horatio.
check on the construction of new homes, to see that there are
no buildings too near to ihe road, or additions that are less
than a certain distance from the sidewalk, could be equally
eagle-eyed in their inspection of long-built walls which show
signs of crumbling.
Before a house is built in the city, the prospective builder
must first submit plans and specifications to the Communal
Council which in turn passes them on to the -Service 'd'Urba-
nisme of the Labour Department where they are checked and
re-checked for possible errors in c q I c u I a t i o n which may
threaten the safety of the inhabitants.. -'
If the least sign of weakness is spotted, the license is not
given unless alterations are made corresponding, with the ac-
knowledged safety regulations of the department.
But walls may be built at will, right alongside the road, a&m
nobody seems to care whether they are strong or weak. Most
of the barricades going up in the city' every day are made of
nothing more than adobe mud and white lime, mixed by in-
adept amateurs who do not observe any rules of ratio or pro- ---
portion. __\
These walls are as great a threat as aninsecurely construct-
ed house. They may mean death to an innocent pedestrian
who had nothing to do with their construction. The faultily- "
built house will probably collapse on its builder. ,


The Editor,
Sir,
Will rising newsprint prices
force the sales price of newspa-
pers up too ? I am very pleased
with the 10 cent value I get in the
-Sun, right now but I would have
to revise my budget if the price
were to start climbing.


But, to save my pocket and
yours, I can tip you off that in-
vestigations are being conducted
to bring in a higher grade, less
expensive newsprint from Cen-
tral or northern Europe. So, I
suggest you look into this before
acting.
Budget-Bound.


Jacques Lafleur
Medical and Corrective Gymnastics Baths Physiotherapy, ,
Ultra-Violet Infra Rouge Lamps Rehabilitation.
Physiotherapist-Masseur, Graduate Swedish Massage School, Chicago,
ill. Post-Graduate Kellberg Health Institute, Chicago, PodiatristL
Associated with Dr. Maurice P. Lafleur
179 Avenue Magloire Ambroise -- Phone 2981


The World-Famous Beauuty Products Are
Ow Sareeat

Ca dape- Vtrt

Canape tVert &6AAwea4i .


to crown that perfect moment when
friends get together. One of many
occasions For drinking Hennessy,



MI(MSSY


JOSEPH NADAL & CO


S Thet

made for


a
Seals out \Vatcr-Seals in
The Seainaster was designed to share
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and the siitcvses and str:uns 'hat'go with
i[. W\ith unerring precision the Seamas-
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of your lil'e-i anm t/;vmle. aloft,
ashore, afloat under the surface, too,
thanks to thc thricc-scalec', waterproof


a Life of Action


Accuracy
Embodied in the consummate accuracy.
of the Scamrnaster is Omega's" experience
as final, arbiter of the Olympic Games,
the world's most highly contested sports
event. Ever since 1932, Omega spliht-
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of the Olympic cause, tirnipg thet grea'-
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automatic movement makes thic Scamas-
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records at tliL Geneva observatory.


OMEGA


P
SEA MASTER ,.i-d'r.,. ,-'r, ,!'a'-
p olrr.'el, r ,;.'., .'t.. .? etlid e: il a:'f,: ar.,.i
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/itaihd redsl.


f)


-i-f


, The watch the world has I .:-at ned ti cru


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


HAITI SUN


PAGE 5


\






PAE6HIT U uniyNvebr th 15


Jane Nelson Finds


Scenery And Character Make Haiti Ideal Vacationland;

But It's Because of The People She Wants To Return


I have just returned to New
York from a near-perfect three-
week vacation in Haiti. What is
it that makes such a trip a sud-
cess? Usually it is not one single
element, bnlt rather an intricate
-combination or meshing of many,
one .barely distinguishable from
another, but all combining to
a whole.
With my trip to Haiti, it, was
the sun's rosy-golden glow bath-
ing the delicate pattern created
-by the silhouetted coconut trees
which poured through my window
earlW each morning; it was the
sea which heretofore I had never
known to be so blue and. crystal
clear; it was the elaborate out-
lay of flaming poinsettias lining
the 'Kenscoff Road which for me
\ traditionally have rested in
Christmas-time, in eight-inch
flower-pots: it was the jewel-like
glitter of midnight Port-au-Prin-
ce -from Le Perchoir and the awe-
inspiring mountain-top views on
the CapzHaitfen road: it was the
daily avocado which to New York-
ers is a rare luxury; it was the
tang of the rich heavy coffee,
brew and the new-found taste of
djondjon, mangoes and chaddeck;
it was the gaiety of the meringue"
and calypso, touched off by Ti
Roro's hands and by the Riviera
*ensemble; it was the high-reach-
ing, colorful failty of the bal-
- -conied, old-style homes; it was
my first hborse-back ride, five
hours of it lip and back from the
Citadel-it was all this and a


CHILDREN with flower garlands on heads Flowerbedecked
youngsters dance and pose for tourists on road to Le Perchoir with
its magnificent view of Port au Prince, harbor and Cud de Sac with
, majestic mountains rising beyond.


lity seldom evident in the cos-
mopolitan atmosphere of New
York, but somewhat more akin
to the small town at home a ge-
nuite friendliness and a real de-
sire to help and entertain visi-
tors. For Port-au prince with all
its urban sophistication in hotels,
night-life, art, European-educated
adults and continental restau-
rants, is a warm city which tru-
y spreads its arms in welcome
to its visitors.
Fascinated


good deal more. The people impressed me. At
first it was for superficial rea-
The People sons; I was fascinated by the cus-
It was the scenery, food, music, toms-the never-ending parade
houses and adventures-but these of straight-backed women travel-
alone do rot make the whole, ing to market along the Petion-
Most important, it was the peno ville Road or the sunbaked St-
ple offlaiti,'both natives and fo- Marc Road. heads loaded with
'reigners living there, who gave carrots and cabbage, straw hats
life and meaning to my trip it and household utensils; the Sun-
is because of the people that I day-strolling peasants conspicu-
want to come back. ous by the absence of head-loads;
the boutiques ad infinitum which
Two weeks after our company seem to grow out of every tree
newspaper carried a notice for a root; the pastry vendors with
rather unique exchange of homes rich, delicate cakes at a few cen-
-one in PWtionvilie for one in times each; the devil-may-care at-
.New York-- two of us were fly- titude Haitians flaunt when the
ing toward a country which we telephones refuse to' work; the
had known mainly as a small spot always helpful camionette driv-
on the map and which we knew ers, who wait or deviate from
less about. It almost seemed as their' route for prospective pas-
if we were flying into outer space, sengers and the 4bonjourv or
But it was adventure and we did ibonsoir: every new camionette
have the support of Rodman's passenger is greeted with by
Haiti-the Black Republic) and other passengers -- a vivid con-
a handful of letters to Haitians trast for a New Yorker accustom-
from professional and social ac-' ed to the bus driver who ignores
' quaintances in New York. a customer pounding on the door.
Through these letters and greet- Delving Beneath the Surface
ings we had had an introduction As the days went by I found
to the permanent inhabitants in what lay behind the tourist-ap-
whom we found a wonderful qua- pealing customs. The Haitians
I ,.'


Looking over Chrnstophe's Fortress: PRISCILLA DUNN AND JANE
NELSON, with guide, Louis Julle, and two men who carried a picnic
lunch and 'assisted, the group up the mountain, in front of entrance
to La Citadelle. Picture was taken by l-go Racine who went to
Cap Haztien with us, giving a running account of Haitian history
and lore en route.


have much to be proud of. Ten or
fifteen years ago, Haiti's people
were not anare of a typically Hai-
tian expression of art-t6day Hyp
polite, Rigaud, Duffaut, Obin, et
al. are a wCl1-known part of Hai-
ti. Port-au-Prince's ceramic cent-
er is by and for Haitians. Optique
regularly prints the Haitian peo-
ple's literature; tourist-consumed
-asouvenirsv made by Haitians
(mahogany, raw-cotton rugs, pot-
tery sisal products) fill La Bel-
le Cr6ole, Fisher's and Carib-
craft.
Haiti's progress undoubtedly
profits b, the country's inherent
graciousness and spirit of relaxa-
tion, which allows time to promo-
te creativeness and an apprecia-
tion of this world's natural beau-
ty; at the sanie time, neverthe-
less, this unconcern for time,
whici is not necessarilyfdue to
laxity, can be a liability; it per-
haps makes progress seem to be
the unattainable.
Spirit and Energy
Haiti's achievements in history,
chiefly her struggle for and at-
tainment of! independence and,
less important, but significant, her
participation in the U.S.'s strug-
gle for independence, are com-
mendable and not toa be forgotten.
But the spirit and energy which
produced these military achieve-
ments can now create political, ar-
tistic and economic advances.

Citizens from many countries
have recognized the obstacles
Haiti must hurdle, in the form of
disease, hurricanes, heat and arid-
ness in the central coastal region,
but recognize the inherent poten-
tial; so they have come to help
Haiti build. The list is long, but
in my short visit, I saw traces of
many: there are the British im-
proving the telephone syst-
em; the UNESCO original pilot
project near Jacmel, which
for some reason has not been en-
tirely successful; irrigation in the
central rice-growing area and the
Artibonite dam currently spring-
ing up; Texans drilling for oil
on La Gonave (here the idea is
significant though the success is
doubtful); the U.S. Reynolds Me-
tal Company is mining for baux-
ite; the U.S Gov'crnment's Point
Four program with some of its
tremei dou-, tangible progress
showing in rural medical clinics,
set-up to dispense ,shliots4 against
specific diseases awid to give ge-
neral over-all examinations: the
only wholhsalc, cut-flower busi-
tess in the Caribbean, run by the
Lees on the Kenscoff Road where
every bit of soil used is etcriliz-
ed; Catholic and Protestant mis-
sionary activity, such as Baptist


Granny Holdman who hands-out
food weekly to the hurricane
and drought-plagued south-ern-
ers; commercialization of native
dance, riot for financial profit, but
for the sake of art, by Lavinia
Williams; the small, hard-work-
ing ceramic center sparked by
Dr. Glen Lukenv and directed by
Fritz and Hugo Racine, turning
out native made arid designed
pieces; Dewitt Peters' prombfion
and organization of native art in
Le Centre d'Art; and finally a
New Zealander's publication of
the first and only English-langua-
ge weekly (note: this latter is the
only part of this article I forbid
the editor to edit). The list is
long and impressive the aid
sincere. Most important, Haiti is
r.ot too proud fo learn.
The May Laugh...
These are some of the thoughts
and observations of ai outsider
who was in Haiti only three
weeks, but was more fortunate
than many because of acquaintan-
ces. Perhaps I have been too se-.
rious in my writing, but I must
to be realistic, honest and faith-
ful to my impressions. However,
many of my Haitian friends will
have a lasting laugh at my foi-
bles in their country- the house-
boy and cook who justifiably
chuckled dalsy at Lhe textbook
French tlh'-o,:i at them; Presi-
dent A-lagloi.-e xvho listened to the
same meager linguistic attempts;
my desire to constantly snap a
picture to sho., i-he people back
home what had been seen: my
clumsy approach to meringues
ard calypsos and finally the


CERAMIST Dr. LUKENS-Dr. Glen Lukens explains ceramic center
to visitors. Girl student in background prepares meal of stewed
meat and rice and beans for pottery and sewing students. Although
students do not live at the school, they eat one ,medl together every
day.


LIFE" magazine reporter Jane Nelson (Right) author of the art-
icle -and friend Priscilla Dinn on visit here last month.
..r\


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


brash attempt to bynass a fallen
tree in Lalue by taking L jeep
over the curb and becoming
stranded on an exposed water
pipe (fortunately we were rescu-
ed by the spontaneous enthusiasm
and good-will of teen-age ?-]atian
boys).

Thank you. Haiti, for .-tting
me see what you are doing and
how you live. As do mor' coun-
tries and twople, you hold tre-
mendous room for improvement
and progress, but you have a spi-
rit, a personality and method of
expression through art, IJIeratu-
re, music and econom'rz, that
should be retained: you na'.e a
culture worth hanging o-n to and
not to bfe moderated by
foreign cultures. And ydur cul-
ture is worth preserving primari-
ly for yourselves, not foreigners.
To come back is The desire., but.
until that time, 1800 mile, from
you, as the crow flies, I havc part
of you: yo.r music in rec-.,rdings
of *Peligreo, <,Ti Roro's, TIrois
Bebes and the <,Calypso in Hai-
ti,.; your art in prints by Basile,
Duffaut, Domoid, Hyppolie and
Obiu, a pottery sculpture by the
houseboy-student of Jasmin Jo-
seph and a clay water pitcher
created by one of Dr. Lukens'
students: your earth's products
in mahogany bowls anid sisaJ bags:
your weaving in a raw-cotton Trug:
ydur tropical beauty in seashells;
your way of life in photographs;
and your Cfurrent activities: ;n the
weekly < cSunr.
Thank you, Haiti.
Jane NELSON


,=f


HAITI SUN


PAGE 6






Sunday November, 6th. 1955 __ -


((Back Htomen Feeling Gree!s Visitor

Things, People "Comfortably Famirli
I By G. R.COULTHARD
Professor of Latin American Literati
At The University College of The West

It is always instructive and inat- "
resting to revisit a country, es-
pecially when you have been ...
strongly impressed on your first
visit. One has been there before,
one knows one's way about, there
are familiar faces and scenes. The
brash bloom of novelty has worn
off and one can look more slowly,
more calmly with greater discern-
ment.
Some of one's original impress-
ions are seen to have been false
or exaggerated, others are con-
firmed.
For example, I met in Havana happy on arriving in Haiti and
a young Cuban law student who during the. subsequent weeks my
had been in Jamaica last Easter fiction g c.r the place and the
as a guest of the University Coil- people increased, due largely to
ege of the West Indies. He told the warm and open-hearted recep-
me that his stay i .Jamaica had tion given me by my Haitian
been so wonderful he could not friends. The following aire my im-
believe it was real. It could not pressions on a closer and more in-
have been so marvellous, he iex- timate knowledge of Haiti.
claimed, 4-'must go back and make First of all, I was impressed by
sure that I hve somehow deludeAd the great frankness and sincerity
myself. It was too much like a once one h-s gained their confid-
wonderful dream.. I was murmur- ence Haitians talk, and discuss
ing things about not being too without prejudice narrowminded-
worried at the excellent impression ness or constraint any subject.
Jamaica had left on him when we Their French education which of
were joined by a student of den- Curse, includes a good grounding
tistry who had the same story toin philosophy, gives them that in-
ell. Jamaica in retrospect was quirin- inquisitive and logical
like a magic dreanr. I merely men- turn of mind, which the world re-
tion this, as it is an aspect of the gards as typically French. This
psychology of travel which is fair- .Frenchness.n of the Haitian mind,
ly common. A country h visited for I think, is a great advantage. It
the first time can leave this im-is one of the main things that
pression of wonder, it can baffle gives the Haitian and his culture
or it can disappoint. And I remem- their uniqueness in America. The
ber the innumerable Latin Amer- f e w ose is wilely spoken
. icans I have met profoundly dis- should not obscure this fundam-
appointed in Paris, because they mental Frenh trend. The French
bad idealized it too much, expect- intellectual tradition is a valuable
ed and looked for the wrz.g -possession; and this fact, -eems to
things. be realized at the highest levels
When I arrived in Haiti at the in Haiti as.,evidenced by President
beginning of August, I immedia- Msgloire sending both his daugh-
tely had the -back home, feeling. ters to be educated in France this
There was a comfortable familiar- year.
ity about things and people, and Thee is also a great feeling of
I had that feeling of happiness fi-eedom in Haiti. It is the feeling
and elation people get when they of freedom that comes from a
are in i place they like. I felt people whose minds are lively and

STAK-PENSION,,

IDEALLY LOCATED AT PETIONVILLE
(Opposite El Banebo)
A. \'FRY MODERATE RATES
FRENCH CUISINE


DIRECT LINE

PORT AU PRINCE NEW YORK


Every Monday at 6:00 P.M.

The deluxe 200-passenger

cruise-ships of Panama Line

sail from Port au Prince

direct to midtown N.Y. City.


HAITI SUN

rin WV Sw6


To Hait;
ar, On 2nd Trip

ire
Indies
unprejudiced. It is one of the few
countries left in the world where
people's minds have not been
stunted aNc& straight-jacketed by
fear and suspicion. Haiti was born
a a nation from a struggle against
slavery, undor the banners of free-
dom, and the ideals of the war
of independence are still the ideals
of the Haitian people, deeply in-i
grained in the national soul.
There is no doubt that there is
an increasing atmosphere of op-'
Jimism in the country -this I felt
strongly at a year's distance, -
and which is certainly due to the
sincere efforts of President Ma-
gloire's administration. I was not
able to see the impressive deve-
lopments in the Artibonite Valley
or at P6ligre, so I cannot speak
from personal experience, but I
was told quite off the Tecord that
the work is good. The Eite Ma-
gloire No. 1 is certainly a success
and is a charming garden-city on
the outskirts of Port au Prince.
The Cite Magloire No. 2 is well
on its way to'completion and many
of the houses are already occupied.
A very serious drive to increase
Haiti's tourist trade is being made
both in publicity abroad and build-
ing rt home, and will certainly
bear fruit.
I shall return to Haiti as often
as I can for the intelligence,
charm and real kindness of its
people and for a certain unique
arid indefinable quality in Haitian
life, which makes living there a
pleasure.

CHOEURDEJEAN
TO VJSIT BOGOTA

Confirmationll was received this
week from Bogota, Colombia,
that the Deiean Chorus is ex:vct-
ed iin the i'ighbouring Latin A-
leriani .:'-edubljc tomorrow for
concert engagements.
The Haitian singers, highly
lauded by local and foreign cri-
tics for th?ir choral singing, may
remain iii Bogota fgr a fortnight.


American flag, all rooms with bath air-conditioned dining-
room. famous cuisine, swimming-pool.
Accurate information at office of Panama Line ONLY,
Rue Abraham Lincoln, Telephone 3062


PAGE 7


Confident Burglar Attracts Suspicion
By Advance Business Engagements


Career thief Etienne Fils, alias
Jacques Andre, counted his chick-
ens before they hatched and
wound up in the pen.
Hlie was arrested Friday after
police investigations pointed to
him as the man who burgled Ru-
ral Schoolteacher G6rard Const-
ant's home some time this -week
and stole three suits.
Etienne Fils attracted the atten-
tion of detectives because he had
booked orders for delivery of a
cabinet radio, a beside radio and
other articles of furniture which
were in the teacher's house at the
time of the theft.
A duplicate key to Constant's
home had been left in one of the
stolen suits, and the robber was
apparently so sure of a repeat vi-
sit that he took orders from cuSt-
omers in advance.


The teacher left his home Sat-
urday and returned Wednesday to
find the three suits missing. A
window had been prised open to
allow the thief access to the house.
I
The Key
Two suits were later uncovered
in a Bel Air -maison d'affaires,
where they had been left as bond
for an, $8 loan. Getting wind of
Etienne' Fils's quest for Customers
for house-hold "furniture, the det-
ectives checked and arrested him
in Bel Air.
Faced with the pawn-brokers
identification, he confessed to the
theft and was taken off to jail for
his 20th tetm.
His first conviction was in 1948,
when as a boy of 14, he stole
some sweet potatoes -in March&
Vallieres.


IT'S THE FILTER THAT COUNTS
L & M HAS THE BEST!

m" G
SIE

R. S






LU
E A

L
L !l~ U. ?





I v FLYERS e T
p LIGGETT & MERS TOBACCO Co. y
TRIIS IS IT! AMERICA'S

FILTER CIGARETTE -MUCH MORE
FLAVOR-MUCH LESS NICOTINE.


l P .L.', .. M I
np'T. I ^l '" *I
_ ~^tO r,,, "^3 ; I





PAGE 8 ---
Pr esi a D e Regulaes Traffic the closest control possible to SECTION VI (N.B. SECTION V b) Also, the police will desi-
Presidential ,Decree eguates raf avoid any sudden digression to- WILL BE PUBLISHED NEXT gnat.e the toads in town which are
(Continued-from last week's issue) wards the middle of the road. WEEK) to be used by this type of carria-
SArt. 34: Without affecting the For Animal Drawn Vehicles ge.
Penal Code concerning animals, it Art. 48: 'he general disposi- c) Besides the lights exacted,
is forbidden to gather them along dons of the rules in what con- the attendant going on foot or
the public highway.- cerns them are applicable to ani- mounted oi the animal furthest
mal-drawn vehicles. forward and to the left, will car-
Art. 35: All infractions of the Art 49: Al! carriages drawn by ry a light d lantern after night-
dispbsitionr of this section will one or S1a2ral draft animals, tall. Th9ea disposition, s are Unne-
-be punished by a fine of five should have a driver and an at- cessaryon parochial roads where
Sgourdes-and in the case of non-t tendant who will hold the head there is eo traffic.
payment imprisonment for five of the ahimal at the left and the d) All Cniamal-drawn vehicles
Says. furthest forward. should be equipped with two
light lanterns after night-fall.
These lanterns should be placed
road L EtoA SO as to be visible front before
SECTION Tit to light a cigarette, to walk more standd behind.
For Pedestrians thap. two abreast on a narrow e) The Chief of Police will be
Art.23: The pedestrian is one road.' Deaf, dumb, blind lame etc able to forbid in the towns or po-
who circulates a-foot on the pu- ... are advised to have someone pu ated areas, access to certain



bl I h r i rfic highway whicm an the m i dr w hile orpssing pulte bareasn access are ceroedtain aya s
bite highway accompany them while crossing. Old narrow streets, and moldy, crumbling walls, ropds by hand-carts, wheel-bar
Art 24; a) On all public high- the road. (How sad they cannot speak to tell the tale rows etc., where this appears ne-
ways haviin sidewalks, only the .. Art. 27: the .pedestrian pushing Of long-dead glories of Colonial days!) cessary.
pedestrian may and should use a wheel-barrow or any other corn- But now they tand in silence sorrowful. f) All infractions of one of the
them. He may leave the sidewalk parable contraption should keep And in the trade wind's fragrant errant breath paragraphs of this article will
only to cross from one side of the constantly to his right as far as They dream of other days, when frpm the plain incur for the guilty a fine of five
road to another. To make this possible. In no circumstatanc'es Aros the smoke from countless supper fires gourdes, tnd in case of non-pay-
crossing he ;hould: may he load the contraption On great plantations reaching to the hills. ment, imprisonment for three
1) If there is a traffic light, which he is drawing or pushing The brilliant stars are mirrored in the bay days.
stop until the green shows with a weight evidently too hea- When night, like softest velvet, comes to reign, Concerniag hand-carts and an!-
opposite him. vy or with articles too nuch high-, And on the gravel shore past Car6nage, the sea. mal drawn vehicles (See Law Au-
2) If there is a passage reserv- er than his carriage. In gentle whispers tells its love repeatedly: gust 1952) in Le Moniteur Decem-
d for pedestfians, he should fol-I Art. 28: All pedestrians should From Picoulet's.grim height, down through blue depths, her 23, 1952, art No 86) fine: Five
low this passage. remember, always, that on the The rusted cannon waver with the swells; Gourdes to Fifty Gourdes or 5
3) If there is neither a traffic roar?, they are exposed to ,cci- Onpe dominant and threatening, now they rest to 30 days imprisonment, or both
light nor a pedestrians' crossing, dents and often place drivers in Forgotten, barnacled, and lulled on Neptune's breast. at the same time.
he should look well to right and grave danger. They should obser- The lofty mornes, their heads half hid in mist,
left and make sure that the cross- ve the dispositions of the fore- Stand silent, moody, holding close -and dear
ing will be without danger to him. going chapter with the utmost The secrets of the centuries, and on their slopes
He should cross only by the short- strictness. Ajoupas cling tenaciously, as in the olden days.
eat way-i'e. in a straight line Sh
estr d way-ie in a straight lins e C IShy turtle doves send forth their plaintive notes,_- S
perpendicular to the axis ofs e thFe SECTION I r And ,lzardelles glide swiftly through the grass.
\ road, and as quickly as possible. 4FPr the Rider) Across the bay a line of white foam breaks I
b) Anyone who deliberately di- Art. 29: The rider is one who The indigo of swelling sea on hidden shoals. 1. lri-
sobeys these rules will b liable goes upon the public highway The tropic sun beats down from cloudless sky
to a fite of 5 gourdes. and in case mounted on an animal. All rid- And bakes the earth hard-packed by ceaseless beat
of non-payment, imprisonment for 6rs are bound by the general Of unshod feet, the feet uf Congos, Ibos, Capalous ." --._
three days. obligations of the present rules. Slave-men, who once were legion here. ": "
c) lii aniy case, the infractor He is exempt from licence plates, Affranchis proudly walked these streets, heads high: .=-,=
who. not having observed these forewarning equipment and lights Freed slaves, their liberty set them apart N _-
conditions, is knocked down, as the section dealing with vehi- From those less fortunate, whose only hope 4
struck or grazed by a vehicle cles exacts. Ahead; these and scores more passed on, the screen
will automatically be in the Art. 39: However, when seve- Of this embryo nation feeling deep the pangs of birth. ,..
xIwrong. ;. --, -.... ral-'iders travel it a group. at j And these same narrow Street, so silent now,
.ArLt 25: In the roa6s- without night, at least one or two among In other days knew tragic sound of cannonade, ,
r-side -valks, the pedestrian should them are obliged to carry a light- Saw Freedom stagger forth from' revolution's womb.
walk constantly on the extreme ed signal lamp and they may not Of freedom lay no more in living but in death.
.left so .as .to.be facing all vehi- travel more than two abreast on Here plot and counterplot were made by these LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
.'Ties on his side of the street on the road. By Toussaint, hAstophe, Bokman,.De nes, whose HAITIENNES
a 1.VO-way road, and should also Art. 31: All animals travelling Deeds were dyed in blood, whose eyes saw liberty h tn em
keep to the left on a one-way on the road should have a per- Deeds were dyed in blood, whose eyes sawlibertyH EU iP
street. Wlieii crossing the road, son leading, driving or riding By LEONARD THOMPSON
he should observe the rules set them. Animals in a herd shouldIBr eOArD OMS
forth it- the preceding article, be driven along the extreme left, forme" Amr Conul, 1945 FLACE GEFFRARD P "
Art. 26. Generally speaking, of the highway and should not be '_
pedestrians are forbidden to gat- more than two abreast. They O,_ D MI A I A IO
her in tlhe middle bf the road so should be kept with strong ropesCOMPANIA DOMINICANA DE AVIACION C POR A
a.- to obstruct traffic; they are for and placed in a line.
biddern to read of write while Art 32: ,La the case of unbroken jl
walking 'on the public road or tol animals, more than one at a time' Port au Prince Miami San Juan Ciudad Tru jillo
indulge in any activity which may should not be taken upon the
distract them or in all activities road.
contrary to prudence, shch as Art. 33: Thl drivel;, or rider,
stopping in the middle of the road should keep his animals under





...U E aU.... ...... .....





Saturday And Wednesday Sunday And Thursday ^

Depart CIUDAD TRUJILLO 8:00 a.m. Depart MIAMI 8:00 a.m.
uArrive PORT AU PRINCE 900 a.m. Arrive PORT AU PRINCE 11:30 a.m.

iJCj Depart PORT AU PRINCE 9:30 a.nm. Depart PORT AU PRINCE-12:00 noon
Arrive MIAMI (Direct) 1:00 Dan. Arrive Ciudad TRUJILLO 1:00 p.m.
(direct flight)
FARES ONE WAY RETURN
PORT Atr PRINCE MIAMI $55: one way $99 return ((plus tax)
PORT AU PRINCE CIUDAD TRUJILLO $15: one way $27 return (plus tax)
"; 1 y, .t *PORT AU PRINCE SAN JUAN $38: one way -$68.40 return (plus tax)
gan 9an\SFREIGHT
LesssMn tha 10 lb Mr Ov 3 lt .
,, adeo0 ewO. twew c.ea+ { ou bI, PORT AU PRINCE CIUDAD TRUJILLO 8:06 M-04 8:0
AORri POR AU PRINCE SAN JUAN OA :10 :08 :07
PORT AU PRINCE MIAMI $ :12 :10 :08
POdoJQLAIN JQtAJ eyALCOUCNHA 4W..URYAL VI{NNA S SPECIAL CARE ON CERTAIN ARTICLES -- PORT AU PRINCE C- MIAMI

BINS & GRDENOAHI e'wLCOd flatqtan EMBROIDERI.S For all information and reqprvationq qSpp the' '".,Uwing Tour Agents: "
,. NEW OFFICE RUE PAVEE


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


.IAITTI CITTM'




HAITI SUN


0IVE THE WORLD'S
SAFEST DESK SETI


SAFEGUARD
Hads about a year's ink supply
Spll-proof, can't leak
Self-filling pan
PERFECT FOR
HOME OR OFFICE
Complete ;ih base,
pen, ink
d $12 .0


MASON GILGC
'lue Bonne Foi


J


(!r- conditioned!
Our Iocal cuis (from our own cattle)


0 S G H L A NC O
Imported fre .i meat every Thursday
(from Smith &. Richardsomi, Miami)
Phone 396. ,' r Home Delivery


-iI


A Good Hotel
With Reasonale Rates


I'OTEL PLAZA
Ideally Situated Off
STiamo de Mars

I WW AIM *04ASIN0.A 9I
--- */NIJ4S)' I I"/"~ ouar OFw il-leN AR.mA.troe Itsors. or'N !
, PtA r C iI DEMONS .GHOSTSPE NEXT P
tUp "rWT .CLFF. 1 -lNC- HE'LL BE POPPING / [
THEN VANISHES! / ,11^. OUT OF THIN AIR,' Ill


NO -WAITr TRACKS! ,
PARTLY ERASED,OF= COURSE. '
HE RAN A FEW rsEPS UP THE
CLIFF, FLIPPED BACKWARDIS..
---- AND LANDED
3(' HERE!A-HA.)
.> Now rVE GOT'
%a'^-^V H'IM! --,


&tisr-' I-I. f A! A CAVE' I'VE 50T
FOLLOW' YOU CORNERED COLD COME
*A INl ''T .. OUT HERE, PRErTTY -BO.
' FA/ArTN. -- -- / -- 53
VRAACS.".
*; **** i^<~j /J^ HOWAl
.: } :,:, ; ^COMING II
," ''" A'E,
^AAER


SI'LL BLAST
THA-T GRIN
OFF Y'OU- -
OOOMPFT/


Copr. 195, King Features Syndicate, Inc.. World rightils rcisrncd


MEANkW'/LE,
STRAGAG ALON6 AT
THE ROCKET SHIP,
PLANS A DOUBLE
SCROSS.,.


SI'M NOT WArIING FOR
RUST AND rUuA FOREVER.'
IF I .FIGURE cUT HOW TO
UNLOCK THIS ROBOT-
AQ PPILOT.. -


2


:,',,qN




--..HAITI SUN


Save


time


& money


shipthrough Miami Via
S. I ...._E .... ..


I




*


SIM


9-A


COINMAR LINE


I
.-it







:-a








I'i
mpg


1-





cHAITI SUNU -- *


Emm. VILLEDROUIN
HONEST RELIABLE SERVICE

More Than 10 Years E',erience

FREE ESTIMATE IN SHOP

GENERAL RADIO SERVICE
ACCURATE TUBE TEST IN HOME
MOST MODERN TEST EQUiPMENT
Rue Dantes Dcstoiicuhes. No. 120
Near PAA office


VISIT CITADEL .E AND SANS-SOUCI PALACE
CONTACT BAY s TRANSPORTATION
THE PERFECT COURIER
,.A ,ALU BOUQUET ONLY $25 TO CAP UAITIEN
'Ave. Iuagnvy Petit-Four bv DELUXE Limno inp .rviee

As -A AsI w IcemwEpi MIM1T BUST
'0MB2.0OLS AN4JJM RDLF- OLi C01TRYN'ANIW A
MC4TM 'STe MrT IN T)415 HUER JOINT MINUTES
--SO" ICLAIM THE R 0Ie- TO CIV 'T
T112 BRIDE AWAY!
.~~~h~~ITTnm- b "l'., K


JUST T iNK./F ThUS STATE IF I PoN'T
DIDN'T HAVE A WAITING/ CKy, '1L.L
LAW THEY MIGJHTA XON START TO
OFF AN'oT HIfTCHE IIN-
WITHOUT TE.LLWJT' US!^ 0
I. ~ NO!


WWAT AS 5OON A TH-- LICENMF- E-
THE COMES, VALIP, W1'LL. IZ1VE TO
PLOT,/ SOMrE NEARI, --TWN AND r F
JIAA? ARRIEs-; HEMN TP1 TJO HAVE
A s0ar oi. -IC' I. )N BEFORo
|^.\\ A I F4V C ACr- AT.WORK-r


WH-ILE THE PtE PASANTRIES HAVE
BEEN 60JNO ON, STEVE CANYON
HA-S ARJVED AT THE LOCAL AIR.-
FI L-- i-.. -"-


HE DOES NOT A-TTAPT TO TELE-
PHONE SUMMAE- OL-SO0N... INSTEAD)
14E 1IIE.S A TAX'CAB AND 60ES
TO A LOCAL :HOTE-L... Ii


LATF-- HE;- ?E TO THF PARK
ACROSS< FgOM THE DINEg. WHERi
TA *WEPPIN& PARTY Is 1ATHEEIP


J 5TF-VE XE-S TO MAKE ,OvAE D502- OF PECKAION ... HE E-ENTEZ
-i THE TAXICAR AN O 6JVC-S E 4"DRJVE: AN OJDOPE.....


aIni Va^ ^ ^ ^ -1. ^-^


SFOP. A LONe TIME HE WATCUE5
FROM THE SHELTER OF T14 TIREES


A;

Age
so'


-41/




HAITI SUN


For the motorist who demands the most from a battery



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KENEI. PIEF~hE -- E'cluivecligh'ifutor in Haiti
Rue Pa''p -- |line (it] Centre
Phone 2268


BLONDEl'


CHIC


0


--a-








AIR TRAVEL SEEN CHALLENGING

A-BOMB'S INFLUENCE ON WORLD


Mass air tourist travel between
nations can exert a more decisive
influence on the world's fate than
atom bombs, Juan T. Trippe, pre-
sident of Pan American World
Airways. todd delegates to the
international Air Transport Asso-
ciation's 11th annual general
meeting now underway in New
York. Mr. Trippe, the new pres-
ident of IATA, said that -the
tourist 'plane and the bomber for
years have been racing each
other toward a photo finish.
,In my opinion, however, the
tourist plane, if allowed to move
forward unshackled by political
boundaries and economic restric-
tions, will win this 'race between
education and catastrophe'., he
said.
-Mass travel by air may prove
to be more significant to world
destiny than the atom bomb. For
there can be no atom bomb po-
tentially more powerful than the
air tourist, charged with curiosi-
ty, enthusiasm and good will, who
can rbam 'the four corners of the
world, meeting in friendship and
understanding the people of other
nations and races..
Paying tribute to the role IA-
TA has played in the 35-year his-
tory of scheduled air transporta-
tion, Mr. Trippe said that the
organization has worked effecti-
vdly to inaugurate low tourist
fares over a large part of the
world and to dissipate ca-popular
fear of flying,. Thus have citi-
zens of average means become
able to vacation in foreign lands.
-And the end is not yet, said
Mr. Trippe. -Our international
airlines, by their low-fare, high-
speed services, have opened new
markets and created new indus-
\


tries and have spurred the rais-
ing of income levels in the un-
developed I areas of the earth.
They have enabled tens of thou-
sands of students, scientists and
artists to journey to institutions
of higher learning and to tech-
nical conferences around the
world in the interests of wide-
spread cultural intercourse.
'Our international airlines de-
serve a high place among those
enduring institutions for peace
to which a war-weary world pins
its hopes for the future.
Mr. Trippe quoted from Pre-
s:dent Eisenhower's report on
the Geneva Conference which
s:id that the leaders of all na-


of the West and the Communist
world', he said.
'But regardless of the decision
of the Soviet leaders, we in IATA
have an unfinished job to doi,
Mr. Trippe said, -We must fight
to stamp out the bureaucratic
red tape that still delays our air-
craft in flight from country to
country. We must eliminate the
costly burden of useless docu-
ments which many countries still
impose on our travelers.
'We must focus public opinion
in various nations on their res-
pective responsibility to provide
modern airway aids, airport land
ing areas and terminal facilities
adequate to handle the airliners


V '~


lions represented agreed enthu-
siastically on the necessity for tin
creased visits by the citizens of
one country into the territory of
another, doing this in such .a way
as to give each the fullest poss-
ible opportunity to learn about
the people of the other nation,.
The international airlines are
the beat equipped instruments to
implement this 'Spirit of Gene-
var, Mr. Trippe said.
Although Czechoslovakian and
Polish airlines are members of
IATA, he added, Soviet Russia's
Airline, Aeroflot, should be also.
An application for Aeioflot mem-
bership would be 'timely and
convincing evidence on the. part
of the Soviet leaders that they
really are willing to lift, for tour-
ist travel, the Iron Curtain which
has so long separated the peoples


Colombia Is Land Of Variety

Features Tropical To Alpine Climates

Colombia, land of mighty mountain ranges and primordial forests
as well as modern cities, takes the spotlight this month as its giganti
World's Fair opens in Bogota.
More important to Haitians, however, is the fact that our income
parable Chaeur Dejean, perhaps the most highly rated male choru
in the Antilles, will visit the capital of the neighboring South Amer
ican Republic early in the month.
The Dejean singers are sure to find the right type of climate and
atmospheric qualities to suit their vocal chords as this country ha
nothing if not variety. If Bogota doesn't fill the bill, they can go tour
ing.


MANY BOOKSTORES DOT DOWNTOWN BOGOTA
Bogota prides itself in its culture and is oftentimes called 'the
Athens of Americas. Symbolizing this culture are the many bookstores


9


of today and tomorrow the
Super Constellations., the DQ04
C's, the Britannias, the Comet
IV's, the Boeing 707's, the Dou-
glas-8's, and the great jet liners
under construction by Vickers,
all of which we will be using in
the years ahead.
-Finally, we cannot forget our
responsibility as great interna-
tional airlines to help the less
developed countries which, uan-
,able to provide modern rail and
highway transportation, can, with
our technical help, jump direct-
ly froth the primitive oxcart and
river scow to modern air trans-
port.

-If we take on these tasks and
if we 6o a good job, we will
have well discharged our respon-
sibility to the traveling public,
and we will have created a finer, i
faster and less -ostly mass trans-
port service to bind our coun-
tries in a shrinking but better
wortld-.


Iii Cohnmbia, you caii change
, climate in a twinkle merely by
c flying' from the summery hot,
modern seaport of Barranquilla
i- to mild, spring-like Medellin and
s Cali, with their orchid gardens,
r- parks and boulevards, or to Bo-
gota where it's nippy autumn
i most of tha time.
s Still higher in the Andes, it's
winter year around. Snowbound,
three-mile-high Nevad0 de Huila,
100 miles west of Bogota, sports
a new ski resort nestled amid
hot mineral springs.
SColombia, whose 11,600,000 in-
habitants ar. scattered over an
area slightly larger than Texas
and California combined, is a
land of infinite variety. Pedestri-
ans on Bogota's 80-block long A-
venida Caracas include stoic' In-
dians padding al6ng in great pon-
chos and sophisticated senoritas
wearing French frocks.
Although the capitaliof Bogo-
ta, with its 'population of 650.000
naturally is the chief tourist cent-
er, Colombia offers sights aid ac-
tivities to suit almost everyone.
'Iost visitors to Colombia either
the country through Barraniiquilla,
the country's principal gateway.
and a junction on Pan American
World Airways' routes between
the Americas.
Barranquilla is a busy city of
about 300.000 inhabitants who
like to swim at nearby beaches,
go deep see fishing, and watch
soccer, cock fights and baseball.
Bogota, about an hour and a
half from Barranquilla by Aero-
vias' Nacionales de Colombia (A-
VIANCA). a PAA associate, lies
at an altitude of 8.500 feet.
Bogota has television, a Sears
store, a flock of fancy suburban
apartment houses and a new 20-
story hotel, the Tequendama,
(Continued on page 14)


TRIPPE INSTALLED AS PRESIDENT OF IATA

Juan T. Trippe, third from left, is installed as president of the In-
ternational Air Transport Association at its annual meeting in New
York. Trippe, president of Pan American World Airways, accepts the
gavel from out-going president Max Hymans, president of Air. France.
Looking on are Ross Rizley, left, U.S. Civil Aeronautics Board chair-
man, and Sir William P. Hildred, director general of IATA, right.
IATA, composed of 74 scheduled air lines in 40 countries, establishes
uniform fares and cargo rates among the world's airlines.


SyCM4ffA!


4'- DEPARTURES
FROM PORT-AU-PRINCE:
SMondays, Wednesdays,
6 Fridays at 1:25 p. m.


From Port-au-Prince to
Santiago de Cuba in only
90 minutes by Gubonao!
Three convenient weekly flights
take you into the gay,
romantic atmosphere bf the
Pearl of the Antilles!

:For inlanrmalin and reservations
see your Travel Agent or call Pan
American World Airways Rue
nDenis Deestouches, Phone 3451
/


-ONAN-A


I KLMA TO EUROPE

Sand saving er1
( over 000.1


PAGE 13


PAGE 13


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


HAITI SUN


.I





PAGE 14


ARCACHON

By NOUCHE DEGENER


A decrepit, dislocated casino
on the sea with rusted Coca-Cola
signs and tired streamers of rose
colored paper waving in the wind
on the sumptuous background of
the harbor of Port au Prince. The
sea of green and.. coral, the blue
mountain and the 'ever changing
fantastic spectacle of another
world of clouds moving into hum-
an and prehistoric animals 'forms,
fainting away hnd reforming end-
lessly as a defile of thoughts and
dreams, while the keeper of this
chaos of varied colored bricks, in-
side and outside, shaking stair-
cases seldom leading anywhere, is
a blue* tiny-eyed, skin-wrinkled
person with faded diamond earr-
ings, a very old mouth closing
tightly on just several teeth, who
voluptuously comnbs in the sun
her long dusty hair, changing her
mood with each passing moment
of the day and night. Moods punct
uated by banshee-like lamentations
in Creole, while bats fly lazily or
like flashes across the rooms,
while rain pours through the roof
and the cocoanuts lie on the ground
-moaning when the storm comes
furiously, stops and is gone.
A bevy of exiled elegant Spani-
ards, young Haitians walk or swim


and about waiting for something
or somebody to happen usually
suspicious of the water and what
is in it for them.
A retired philosopher floating
on the sea with the sun shining
on his bald philosophical head.
SAll mostly preoccupied with
thoughts of love which successful
or not will probably live on when
the tired pink streamers and the
shaky stairs and the lady with the
long dusty hair have gone in the
wind, leaving just the pliable co-
coanut trees and the tender caress
of the waves against the founda-
tions, if any, of the tired- casino
on the sea. .

DAM ON RIVIERE GRISE
TO COST $240,400
Completion of the dam on the
Riviere Grise is set for the
end of November, it Was announc-
ed this week.
Brown & Root; the big Texas
construction firm which has con-
tracted to do the job calculates
it will cost $240.000.
The 80 meter long bridge, built
to resist the frequent floods of
the turbulent river, wull be inau-
gurated early in December.


HAITI SUN


COLOMBIA...

(Continued front page 1)

here the elite meet but Bogota-
nos are proudest of their city's
label as the ,Athens of America.
Most of the upper classes would
rather discuss philosophy, poli-
tics and the fate of the world
than play canasta, do the mambo
or talk shop.

A brigh: cultural life swirls
about the modern University Ci-
ty, the 350-year-old College of
Bartholomew, the Colon and
other theatres and a half a dozen
museums lo'naded with ancient art
treasures.

The liis:,iit 16th Century Pa-
lace of Sai Carlos where Simon
Bolivar,, South America's great
Liberator, lived is a favorite tou-
rist target.

The city's 60 churches include
one of South America's oldest,
the Cathedral on Plaza Bolivar:
one of the richest, San Francisco,
in Santand"r Park, where the al-
tars are crusted with gold, and
Monterrate perched 2,000 feet'
above Bogota and reached by
funicular railroad.

The old, colonial part of Bogo-
ta keeps it; narrow streets, over-
hanging balconies and massive
carved doors much as they were
400 years ago when the Conquis-
tadores founded the city.
The cities of Cali and Medellin


JOSEPH NADAL & Co.


enjoy a pleasant climate the year
around. T'huy are both noted for
orchids, wlik'h grow wild in great
profusion, good hotels and elabo-
rate country clubs where tourists
may swim, play golf or tennis.
Cartagena, on the Caribbean
86 miles f'rom Barranquilla, is a
magnificent old walled city found-
ed by the Spaniards in 1533 to


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


protect the empire's gold and
silver treasures from pirates.
Some walls are 50 feet. thick and
contain snug hideaways for refu-
gees from pirate attack.
Contrasting with tartagena's
historic antiquity is a new tourist
resort center on Boca Crande
Lake with swimming pool, casi-
no, golf course and yacht club.


HOTEL DAMBALA

THE COOLEST IN HAIlj


VERY

VERY

VERY

LOW SUMMER RATES...


ALSOSWIMMING POO]
ALS FREE TRANSPORTATP:






Ca bane Choucoune


Every Thursday and Sunday Might Special folklore
Show... and dancing
Saturday Night its Always CABANE CHOUCOUNE


Continuous music and dancing every nite
To The (RIVIERA)) ORCHESTRA
From ,6:30 p.m.-l:30 a.m.
Every Saturday night $1.00 adm. per person
DINNER TIME 7-9: P.M.


IIE IIDICA IDIIIIz


FAMOUS FOR ITS FRENCH COOKING

Specialities


-ONION SOUP
-PEPPER STEAK
-ESCALLOPPE DE VEAU


-FILET MIGNON
-SNAILS
-PICARDIE


FOR RESERVATIONS Tel: 7416
LOCATED IN COOL TETE-DE-L'EAU, PETION-VIILE





Sunday November, 6th. 1955 HAITI SUN PAGE 15


RAINS SLOW COFFEE HARVEST; Commune


COCOA SHOWS SIGNS GOOD CROP


The Grand Anse. cruelly devas- The cocoa harvest promises to
stated last year by Hurricane Ha- be good this year, reports state.
zel is suffering from heavy rains Officials are conducting an all-
this year, iwrl the coffee harvest out campaign to combat illicit
is late. trading. It i- reported, on the
1 other hand, that heavy rains from
Coffee, principal crop of the October 2 16 have heavily af-
Republic, is the main cash crop' fected the banana crop in the
of the region. Fortunitately, coffee region. (La Phalange)
plants have not been seriously da- -
mag.d by the riins, though the
maturity of the berries has been AT GENEVA
rptart-d 491%10ILT I A Iire


I ZLCI Ut.\J.

Purchasing started last month
and prices are high. A ,bidon;> (a
kind of metal container) of ber-
ries now fetches seven gourdes.
SBeaten grains are being bought
at 24 cets to 26 cents per pound.


OURIN TALAKS
Mr. Remy Bastien, Secretary
to the Haitinn Embassy in Lon-
don, is representing the Republic
at the XVIII th. conference on
wheat which opened at Geneva
October 26.


[Everybody's Fa uiUt* I
Distributor:
HAITI TRADING Co. Chamber of Commerce bldg.

JAEGER

Cement Mixer

Self-Loaded: Models Available from

3" Cubic feet perload up to 16 Cubic feet


Distributor:-CHARLES FEQUIERE & CO.
44 Rue Roux & 77 Rue du Quai
TEL: 2245 3084 3270


Signs Contract

For New Abattoir
The contr.9ct for a new abattoir
at La Saline was given to a big
American construction firm by
Communal Council members this
week. :, 1
This modern slaughter house
will replace that erected in 1893
during the administration of Flor-
vil Hyppolite. Special planes have
been drawn up for a modern,
streamlined building meeting all
the requirements of hygiene and
sanitation.
Work, financed by the Commu-
ne of Port au Prince, will begin
November 15.

New Publicity Firm


Operating

in Port au Prince
SGetting business firms the most
i for their advertising money is the
professed aim of -Office Techni-
que de Publicit&' which opened
for business last month.
v Working in close co-operation
with local newspapers and radio
stations, the new publicity office
offers to:
,1) Co-ordinate a publicity cam-
paign (preparing texts, cliches;
translating folders into various
languages; editorial work etc...)


2) Prepare contracts;
3) Improve the ads. by proof-
reading in the newspaper offices,
4) Follow radio commercials and
suggest ways of making them
more effective;
5), Make up proofs, pamphlets
and address them to announcers*.
The new publicity agents, under
Edouard Bellande's direction, are
already huckstering ufp business
around the city.

PERENNITI DU BATIMENT


ETANCHEMENT ABSOLU


YOU CAN GET AGAIN
PLASTIMENT
AND ALL OTHER
SIKA PRODUCTS
SERVICE: HAUSER
Box 1326
Tel. 2372
SALE: REINBOLD S.A.


TIPCO


SIKA HAITI


WALTER HAUS.ER -
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
P.O. BOX 1326 P-au-P.


TRUCK OWNERS

If you want the most
for your money, use

B. F. Goodrici
TRUCK TIRES
They're made with
NYLON
SHOCK SHIELDS
for Heavy Servle4
William NARR, P-au-Prine-
BOUCARD & CO., Jacmel
Raymond LAROCHE,
Cap-Haitien
Mison Jean BOURGEOIS,
Aux Cayes -
Michel DESQUIRON 11
StJCCRS., Jerdmie


HIGH SPEED

EARTHMOVING



/




I/ .*


A Caterpillar DW10 Tractor with a
No. 10 Scraper provides dependable, high
speed hauling. These matched units have
an available top speed of 24.5' MPH.
'The No. 10 Scraper has a capacity of
8.7 cu. yds. struck and 11 cu. yds.
heaped. With this tractor-scraper, cycle
time is cut to a minimum. The No. 10
Scraper provides positive ejection of the
stickiest materials.
The DW10 is powered by a 115 HP
Caterpillar Diesel Angine. This engine


lowers operating costs by using low cost
non-premium fuels, without fouling. The
brakes on the trailing uAt take hold an
instant before the brakes on the tractor,
thereby preventing jackknifing and assur-
ing safe operation. Mechanical steering is
aided by an hydraulic mechanism, giving
the driver complete control and a "feel
of the road."
This machine has a place on nearly
every earthmoving project. Come in and
let us explain more about the DWIO
Tractor and the No. 10 Scraper.


CATERPILLAR
-Ia-, MT."am


Lr ,. HAITIAN TRACT OR S.A.- CHANCERELLES


PAGE 15


HAITI SUN


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


I





PAGE 16__TUud Nv br t.9


PAN AMERICAN ROUND TABLE DELEGATION

CALLS IN HAITI ON WAY BRAZIL CONVENTION


Goodwill ethissarics from the
United States to the rest of the '"
Anierieas, members of the Pan '. .. '' .' ...
American Union of Women pass- '...: :..' '',. ,"
ed through 'Haiti last week on '
their way to a convention of the
World Alliance of Pan American "
Round Tables to be held in Por- .' '^S-.
to Allegre, Brezil, November 8th
through 11 th.
The 35 women delegates from
the U.S. were joined in Haiti by
the representatives from the Do-
minican Republic, and in Caracas
by Mexican and Central Ameri-
can groups.-P
Led by Mrs. L.G. Waltrip, the.
womei stoped at the ''Ran-
cho.. while in,1 Haiti, where there
ceilved an hour long visit from ARRIVAL AT
United State-s Ambassador Roy
Tasco Datrip, Director Genes. lombia, and Panama, and to re-
Mrs. Waltrip, Pirector Gene- Ivisit San Splvador, Guatemala,
ral, w'& ull preside at the con- vs* a ?vdr raeaa
rai, ho sill preside at the con- aid Mexico City which they visit-
vention, las received a personal ed in November 1954 to attend an
letter fronim President Eisenhower e i utve bord meti ofte
Executive Board meeting of the
World Alliancie held i,, San Sal-
vador.
The officers and delegates on
the tour are:
Officers
Director General Mrs. L. G.
Waltrip
1st Associate Directot Sra.
Jeau de Rodriquez
2nd........... Sra. Rosa Ame-
lia Guzman de Araujo
3rd ...........Sra. Maria Ramos
4th ........... Sra. Anita Osuna
.... Carr


* .7 .,


BOWEN FIELD


C


*e Saurez
hj Recording Secretary Sra. Julia M
SZuniga Bain
Corresponding Secretary Mrs.
W.J. Knight
Treasurer Mrs. John. N. 'Harris
I HiAorian Emma E. de Gutier-
rez Saurez
,Chahiman of Flags: Mrs. Claud Parliamentarian Mrs. W. N.
f-C. Westerfeld of Dallas Texas. Hooper
Counseler sra, o0impia Varela
washing the Roa d Table conven- y Varela
ttion success. The U.S. State De-
partunent nrAified ambassadors
in countries to be visited by the .. -
group and eUrs. Waltrip has let-
ters from these ambassadors ex-
tending, an official welcome.
The Round Table will show
their appreciation of South Ame-,,..*
rican hospitality by presenting a
flag of Texas, from the days .
when it was still the Republic .', r
of Texas and had not entered the -,e.
Union, to the Governor of the W.
State of Rio Grande do Sul at a .:....
banquet given in their honour.
Also ir honour of the U.S. wo-
menq emissaries will be a tea
Tuesday at the home of Mrs.
Jcaquin Esteve, a -native of Te-
:-.as, in Sao Paulo, "
Before the delegates return to
the Ur'ited Statet they plan to
i. ii. Venezuela, Brazil, Uruguay, Mrs L G Watrtp of Dallas
the Argentine, Chili, Peru, Co- who headed group.

ROLEX WATCH ROLEX WATCH


See a masterpiece at uRUSSO FRERES)
Rue Bonne Foi Today


Committees
Resolutions Mrs. B. C. Juskins
Reports Mrs. Alfred C. Gra-
num
Year Book Mrs. Frank B. Slater
Flags Mrs. Claud C. Wester-
field
Credentials Mrs. Perry Olcott
Interchange Library Mrs. Lil-
ian Harris
La Voz magazine Sra. Irene F.
Albuerne I
Director of United States
& Round Tables Mrs. D'Arcy
rashin

State Director of Texas & No-
ninating Mrs. Albert Davis
Immediate Past State & Direc-
or Mrs. A.B. Pumphrey


REMEMBER!'
Now You Can Have Your Colour Prints Developed Here!
Geco Color, newly founded laboratories at 8 Rue Magny, will process
films in only FIVE days. Prices of films, processing, mounting: over-
all $3:75 for Kodak Ektachrome 120, 620, $5 for 35mm. (20 ex.), and
$5:75 for 35mrn. :,tereoviets 115 pairs; this includes the price of
the film!
SEE GELO LABS NOV. 8 Rue-.Magny, or telephone 7494, 5163, or
.Don N. Mohr. Tel. 2375. Rue Roux Port au Prince.


MLE-


Ends major causes of power
and fuel waste pre-ignition
spark plug fouling.


-. Gives you bigger mileage, cheaper motorinnt
Do you know what weakens your car's powcr
and wastes fuel more than anything? It's the de-
posits from combustion that form in cylinders and.
getting red-hot, ignite the air/fuel mixture too
early. That's pre-ignition and it's robbing you
n[ both power and money. The same deposits foul


IosP
and


spark plugs, causing misfiring and further loss
of power. SHELL has now conquered'these prob.
lems. Shell gasoline has ICA, incorporating tnic-
resyl phosphate, an exclusive Shell additive which
makes these deposits harmless. You'll notice the
difference almost at once such an upsure of
power; such smooth running; such zip on hills and
in traffic.


Give YOUR car this top-performance gasoline.

Always fill up at a Shell Station for only Shell has

I. C. A.


FEEL the difference with. C. A.


the most


powerful gasoline


you can buy


=.. ... .. ... ... .. ... ... .. ... ... .. ...-.. ... ... .. ....- .. ... .. .. ... ... ..


tcHAITI SUN*


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


I





SudyNvmbr t.195HIISU AE1


Every now and again, some philosophical old fellow pops up and
denounces the cinema, roundly blaming it for the decadence of folk
like you and I who had the misfortune to be born in this generation.
Though the voices are dying out now, there was a swelling chorus
a few years ago denouncing the movies as the narcotic that made us
abandon singing, dancing round the maypole, playing games on the
village green and other rewarding recreation.
These philosophers would have beamed had they visited Haiti these
two holidays gone by.
True, there wasn't much group singing, or square dancing down
on the Champ de Mars, and if there was a Maypole the attention of
the Sun- was not called to it: but there wasn't anything in the line
of real cinema either. The cinemas they had certainly couldn't pers-
uade anyone from indulging in any other kind of recreation even
listening to his own voice after a night on the town.
Two holidays, one after the other, struck with numbing impact.
Port au Princiens were suddenly aware that time hangs heavily on
their hands if they don't happen to have a business interest which
occupies all their time till late evening on week-days and absorbs the
holidays too, if they don't have a dozen hobbies, and aren't passiona-
tely fond of sports.
afterr spending the first day at the sea, the swimmers were too
roasted and too fatigued to try the salt water and sun-treatment on
Wednesday too. Those who did took sick leave on Thursday.
Anyway, after nightfall swimming loses its appeal, and even the
most fanatic of water skiers must return to the shore. Then what can
one do until bed-time?
Well, we can go to a movie. Or can we? Let's check. There are six
theaters (as they are called) in the capital, including the open-air
Theatre de Verdure where the early comers are afforded seats on
slabs of concrete, chunks of wood or the steel frame of what was
once a chair, and the Star Cine (formerly Stade Magloire) where the
screen is located across the field from the spectators and anyone
not equipped with opera classes and 100 percent vision may as well
look around for incidental plots in the crowd.
The film on at the STAR was shown at Theatre de Verdure on
Good Friday, and the one on at Theatre de Verdure was shown at
Paramount a couple of months back. Mambos from neighboring
',Joints. accompany the movies.
Paramount, Rex and Magic Cine, the top-bracket cinemas here-
abouts, are, of course, sold out and the films they are showing have
nothing \o do with their popularity.
If we do manage to buy. a scalped ticket on the black market to


wiggle into one of the shows, we are confronted with -a size nine head MIAGIC CINE
and two-meter neck in front of us. The fashion in cinema floors in
Haiti is a gradual very gradual slope so there is no chance of TODAY 3:00 p.m.
seeing over the top of the all-obscuring head. du Diable Blanc
So there is the alternative of ducking your head sideways and look- 5, 7, 9:00 p.m. Li
ing past the neck, bringing into vision some love-maker from Seville, la Chambre Jaune
or a river of no return to which it is hard to imagine anyone going ION1DAY 6:15 p.m
in the first place. The lips speak either Spanish or English the worn glantes
sound track gives forth in the most polished Parisien. The Parisien TUESDAY 6:15 a
is soon inaudible because by ducking around the neck you have Trahison
brought your head into the line of vision of somebody sitting behind WEDNESDAY 6:15
you and his admonition is far stronger than the efforts of the sound Le Mystire de la C
track. THURSDAY 6:15
So you bring your head back into line and thanks to tihe invent- THE MAZE (in En|
ion of Cinemascope the extremities of the new wide screen are The deadliest TI
visible. It's fun trying to figure out the middle. Women lost in a
Also visible are the scraps of heads and upraised arms which have trap. The 200 year
overflowed from the screen onto the roof because the new wide screen haunts Craven Cas
can't take the full length of the enlarged film. monster hurtling d
When you leave the film, it's even money you'll think more kindly Richard Carlsc
of choral singingand community entertainment. And the philosophers' Hurst. Katherine E
fear will not be realized. Pat, Hillary Brook
Gdes: 1:5
That is -of course- if you manage to get into a movie at-all. FRIDAY 6:15 andE


CUBAN AIRLINE'S 25th YEAR


SILVER ANNIVERSARY celebrations held' last Sunday to mark
Cuban .Aviation's twenty-fifth air-borne year. Center is Mr. Celso Cos-
ter. manager of the CCA in Port au Prince 'with the Spanish, Cuban
and Venezuelian Ambassadors at the Hotel Choucoune reception.


Mystbre de la Chan
SATURDAY 6:15
L'Aventurier de Si


Yvan le Fils
e Mystere de
i. Paques San-
nd 8:15 p.m
i and 8:15 p.m
hambre Jaune
and 8:15 p.m
glish)
rap on Earth!
fearful hedge
old curse that
tie. A strange
own at you.
>n, Veronica
mery. Michael
;e:
50 and 2:50
8:15 p.m. Le
mbre Jaune.
and 8:15 p.m.
eville.


NEW DISPENSARY

A dispe.isary hospital will be
constructed on La Tortue by the
Rev. Father Riou, Cure of the
Fabrique des Palmistes, on Go-
vernment granted land. A co-edu-
cational school is planned and a.
church has also been constructed.
ed.
JUST ARRIVED
THE BEST
A. 0. SMITH
Permaglas Electric
WATER HEATER
From 6 to 40 Gallons
Prices range from $65
SEE MAX DUVIVIER
76 Rue Pave
En face SHASA


_^A.VE


NOW,
-Anoy
'0.


at








SHOPPING CENTER


Cnetldin


Taftou Vaivin


' Oottegot kllav KI.oc.aj /eadeds s etc...


- ,'.


PFLs2,ae"


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


PAGE 17


fc--y
- /


if meci


eacton. nfot #01omeydatea&d


HAITI SUN


"adWae






PAGE iRa CHAITJ SUNs Sunday November, 6th. 1955


Engineer Georges Dreyfuss has Mr. Gust
enjoyed a fortnight on vaca- cretary of
Stion in Furcy away from his desk and Consul
in the Labour. Office. The engi- Havana is ii
neer heads the Service d'Urbanis-
me. Miss Ade
x x x Gaston Des
Mr. and Mrs Clovis Bonhomme at Saint Ani
became parents 'of a beautiful ha- last Saturdz
by girl 6:00 a.m. Monday. They The couple
will name her Marie-Florence. the altar b
x x x licceur and
Beautiful Ghislaine Etienne and Canttave. Ca
Claude Faquiere became cfian- ed the cerej
ces last Sunday. The engage- A fashion
ment was announced at a gay par- home of M
ty held at the home of M1r. and Thompson (
Mrs. Claude Etienne, proprietors followed thf
of the cBoulangerie St. Marc.v
x x x Emile (M
'Miss Marie-Thdrese Sterlin-and the commer
Mr. Rend Etienne were wed last leaders of t!
Saturday at St. Pierre's, Petion- ed his birti
vi]le.
x x Captain V
Mary Johnson returned Sunday Ville Distri
from spending the summer cease- to be
months in New York. eligible bac
XXXr
Carlos Pereira took a fast Delta Apollon n
flight, Tuesday, to New Orleans fete with d
to see his wife and new baby ne and the F
'girl. Mrs. Pereira, the former Sunday.
Jacqueline Epailly, and her daughl
ter are reported in good health at Colette
the Pereira homestead in Loui- daughter ot
siana. cialist was
xxx "'x-,- day.


ave Borno, First Se-
the Haitian Embassy,
I General of Haiti in
il town.
x xJA
line Compas and Dr.
touches were married
nP'S Church 6:30 p.m.
ay.
le was accompanied to
y Mrs. Ralymond Jo-
Agronomist Montdgu
anon Kdbreau perform-
uiony.
able reception at the
.r. and Mrs. Clarence
on the champ de Mars
e religious ceremony.
xxx
ilo) Hakime, one of
rcial and industrial
he community, observ-
hday last Sunday.
xxx
'ic. Blanchard Petion-
ct Commander, will
Sone of Haiti's most
chelors this month.
XXX
e Paris observed his
es amis at Choucou-
lendez-vous Saturday-


Admiral and Mrs. Wilkie Hill
Brereton hnve returned for their
fourth winter in Haiti. The Ad-
miral (U S- Navy-retired) and
his wife, natives of Eastern Con-
necticut, toured the World last
year, but this year they have
taken the Donner house in Petion-
Ville.
xxx
Jimmy King followed in the
footsteps of his brother Bob and
joined the U.S. Air Force last
month. Robert is now with the
Armed Forces iu France.
xxx
Mrs. A.T. Burke, wife of Ti
Lonnie Burke. superintendent of
the Grouting crew on the Peligre
dam returned to Texas Friday
with her two lovely daughters.
xxx
Young Roger Attie left Haiti
T'hurssay for eOuagadougou >
Haufe Vol'.a in French West Afri-
ca, where he hopes to find fame
and fortune Roger has three
brothers already established in
the African community running
a cinema, transportation, and tex-
tile 'business. The young mous-
tached adventurer was born here
and worked with his brother in
Rue des Cesars. He flew to Puer-
to Rico to take Air Fiance from
Guadaloupe to Lisbon. Paris -
French West Africa.
XXX .
Loris Hamilton arrives today
to vacation a fortnight with the
Captain Elie. fils family.
xxx
Miss' Madeleine Cassagnol of
the Tourist Office observed her
fete Thursday.
xxx
High pressuied sales around
.-.ii this wJniel kTrs Lena Assad


x x x WIV"I MIS eet -~l. -farZZV
Lafond, the second selling chances on a painting to
the Audio-visual spe- help the Foyer des Arts Plasti-
a month old yester-'ques pay their rent money.
SXXX x


FETE ST. CHARLES I PARAMOUNT


The fete of St Charles, patrol
saint of the town, was observed
lby celebrations mn Carrefour
Thursday night.
A mas. meeting, organized by
S.I.P.P. was attended by Presi-
dent Paul Magloire and attract-
ed a crowd of 10.000 from sur-
roundi:ig districts.
Speakers at the meeting were:
Deputy Gerald Roumain M. D.
Gerard Fequiere and Michel La-
forest. A cinema show followed
the meeting and souvenir gifts
were distributed.
XXX
Engineer Jacques Bruii observ-
ed his birtnday November 1st.
The third was Albert Reiher's
birthday.
XXx
FOR RENr
At Pacot, Studio Apartment,
entirely independent, with private
bath. lice view, with or without
meal;. Telephone 3259 from 10:00
A.M


TODAY
3:00 P.M. Etmemis de l'Univers
5, 7, 9:00. P.M. Les Hommes
Grenouilles
MONDAY
6:00 P.M. l'Manon, des Sources.

TUESDAY
6:00 and 815 P.M. Les Hoyines
Grenouilles

WEDNESDAY
6:00 and 8715 P.M. David 'et
Betsabee

THURSDAY
6:00 and 8:15 P.M. Quarter
Interdit
FRIDAY
6:00 and 8:15 P.M. Les Horn.-
mes Grenouilles
SADURDAY
5:00, 7:00 and 9:00 P.T. Les
Tambours de la Mort
SUNDAY
3:00 P.M. Les Tambours de la
Mort
5, 7, 9:00 P.M. Le Gancho


Dv enptw~ew
Enu ,Men TWUMtwn
TO TNE LATE Im IOnSue V1.
JOHN WALKER a ONE. LTD.


It must

be good


SJohnnie Walker must be good, to remain in the
forefront of Scotch Whiskies for over 130o years.
It must be good to pass the scrutiny of distillers
with over t30 years experience behind them I

JOHNNIE WALKER
BORN 1820-5 TILL GOING StRONG
Try it today-you'll agree it's good )
CI


-J -


-----------


r,


HAITI SUN*


Sunday November, 6th. 1955


PAGE 1M


i






*gjjgg November. 6th. 1955 HAITI SUN rage 19


iMrs. Charles Lamarque and
Mr. Max Alien held young Frantz
Cadet at the baptismal font Wed-
nesday morning. The Christening
was followed by a grandiose re-
ception at the Cit4 Magloire
home of Frantz's Dad, Mr. Fa-
yard Cadet, chef du parti des
Fils de l'Armeei.
xxx X
Miss Bertadette Hermantin be-
came the bride of Mr. Benrthony
Gaston at Sacre Coeur de Tur-
geau Saturday last at 10 a.m. The
young couple were accompanied
up the aisle by Mrs. Athemas Bel-
lerive and Mr. MIauclair Zephi-
rin.
XXX
Finance Department's Marcel
SDauminec, chief of the Service des
Ordonnances, will leave for Was-
hington ,DC soon on a scholarship
to study at the United States Bud-
get Bureau for about a year. Mr.
Daumec has already specialised
in the U.S in financial statistics
dnd helped with the census in
1950 here.
xxx
F.A.O. Coffeeman Felix Leu-
pen left for 'London Tuesday en
route to Ethiopia where he will
undertake a similar study to that
carried out in Haiti over the
past year.
xxx
Miss Alice Fethiere. charming
technician of the general Hospi
tal, observed her birthday Octc
her 30th.
xxx"
The aravissante, femme di
seienee* Dr. Lucienne Nurma fet
ed her birthday october 28th.
xxx
Chantal, Claude Fabius' lovely
daughter, is down with a seven
cold, checked with Dr. Borde
this week and learned her illness
was'nt heart trouble.
xxx
Mr. Jules Farmer, the famou
Willys Overland man will go soo
to New York. Jules who was i]
last month will spend his vace
tion in New York and Montreal.
xxx
A bottle of Grant's whiskey wi]
be awarded weekly to the birtt
day of the week commencing No
13 th.
Ponine Barratteau will tak
the Cubana Monday for Cam,
guay Ponine is on a business trir
Bustling travelman Louis L,
marre observed his birthday 0
tober 31st.
xxx

November 4th, Mr. Max Be
ton; observed his birthday. Mz
who has been working at Depa
Sweat Fiscal for 23 years was fl
te by his friends


:r'- TPprr I


Mr. Eric Tippenhauer fetes -his
birthday today. eBamboche has
been organised by his parents
and friends
XX X
Guy Blanchard ended his one
month vacation ihis week return-
ing to his job. Guy spent his va


cation with c.Tolcyov and naoui -'-B----- -- .. .
Riobd at <,Pa' de questions
xxx
Deputy .lean Kernizan is conva-
lescing after two months illness Miss Marie-Lucie Delva beca-
xxNme the bride of Ivan Roy last
Pretty Miss Thelemaque of Saturday evening in a ceremony'
British-American Life Insurance at Eglise Sacre Cceur de Turgeau,
Company "s flying today to Ja- it one of the most brilliant events
maica for training in Insurance of the social season. The religious
business. ceremony was preceded by the
Scin',in t ni oth ciil nt .and a m -.


xxx
Mrs. Louise Eustache flew yes-
terday to Kingston on a business
trip. From there, she will go to
New York returning to Haiti by
the Panama Line .
xxx
Mr. and Mrs. Alfredo Garcia
y Buch will fly to New York wed-
nesday via Ciudad Trujillo.
xxx
Pierrot Phelps of Esso Gas
took out his passport for a trip
to Philadelphia.
xxx
Eugene Lion, a. senior edi-
tor of the *Readers's Digests and
wellknown author, is at present
seeking inspiration in Cap Hai-
tien where he will visit the fa-
bulous Citadel of King Henry
Christophe. Mr. Lion, who arrlu-
ed here with his wife last 'Fri-
day, left for the Cape Friday
morning by car. He will return
today to the Hotel Oloffson
where he in. lodged. Author of
Our Secret Allies). The contro-
versial eAssignment Utopiab,
biography of Herbert 'Hoover and
other books, Mr. Lion has been
travelling the Republic Haitian
style, and is proving himself a
discriminating but enthusiastic
buyer of local paintings and
Sculpture .....
XXX

Commonwealth Oil Vice-Pre-
I sident Max Dennis returned from
Sa pow-wows in Miamil 'Thursday.
f XX X" ,'
Rosita Hyppolite clippered to
SNew York Friday.

SXXX

Lou and Sirmone Wankumn are
back to Dauphin after enjoying
their annual vacation in Cuba,
Mexico and Miami. '
Dr. Jules Thebaud, builder ol
x Haiti's grate-ciel Castelhaitit
t- returned November 1st from
*- business trip to the States.
Shoe-maker Herman Gauthier
and his wife Edith arrived home
from Europle via 'Havana on the
29 ith.

Sthe tour agent, is over from C
T. showing her young father
leorge Bliss. .Haiti., 78-year-ohl
'Ir. Bliss conquered the Citade
|riday. They are house guests o
1,'-. Anderson in Petionville.


ception held at the Petion-Ville
home of Mr. and Mrs. Oswald J.
Brandt. grandparents of the
groom.

The bride was lovely and xra-
yonnantev in her gown, of lace
and satin .a magnificent creation
of Madame Simone Mevs of La
Haute Couture. The young cou-
ple was accompanied to the alter
by Mrs. Fritz Greger, .eMarraine
and .Mr. Clifford Brandt, (rPar-


Forming a ravissante corteges
were bridesmaids: Mireille MNero-
ve Pierre, Janine Elie, Nicole
Dennis, Micheline Mallebranche,
Michele Fouchard, Patricia and
Karel Roy, Marie-Claude de Del-
va, Guilaine Jerove-Pierre, Ma-
rielle Brandt. etc...

After the ceremony the bride
and groom and relatives return-
ed to eMa-Sous-Sevilo (the resi-
dence of Mr. and Mrs. 0. J.
Brandt) and later motored to
Kenscoff where they are now
honeymooning.

The bride is the granddaughter
of Mr. and Mrs Merove Pierre,
and the groom is the son of Mrs.
Pierre Liarttaud.


rain.i, i

Young Frantz Scutt who Marri- Joseph A-sad Koury flew in
ed an American girl flew yester- from Havana last Saturday.
day to go and see his wife and Miss Adeline Mallebranehe qb-
daughters in the U.S served her birthday on Wednes-


xrx
Mr. Jeandine Mereeron goes to
New York Today
'XXX
'Miss Jacko Sassine, the dyna-
mic ,voyageuse. flew. back this
week from her trip to Dallas.
xxx
Friz Gousse.will fly soon to Ha-
vana on a business trip.
xxx
Mademoiselle ,Andrde Gilg is
flying, to the States tomorrow.
xxx
Marie-Josee Roy returned -Fri-
day. from vacationing in. Manhat-
tan with sister, Denise.
XX
Germaine Zamor clippered to
the States Friday.
xxx
-Rue Petit-Four stylist Adele
Sassine returned from a business
trip to the States Thursday.
xxx
Clara Hakime went to New
York Thursday.
xxx
Henry (Bibby Soap) Birming-
ham clippered home from a visit
to Jamaica. Wednesday.
XXX
Mr. and Mrs. John Esther Fuh-
rer were at the Beau Rivage this
week.


xx x
Patrick is the latest arrival in
the Jules Boisson household, com-
ing on the scene Tuesday after-
noon. Mlom, the former Antonine
Gentillon, and her husky son are
both fine.
xxx
Mrs. Don Mohr returned to her
Mont Jolt home Friday afternoon
front three months in the US.


T famous since 1862


day.


Paul Gentil was welcomed
home from Paris with a family
reunion at' the home of the
Edouard Gentils in Sacre Coeur.
Tuesday marked the radio per-
sponality's birthday.

Dr. Charles Chevalier celebrat-
ed his anniversary Friday the 24
th.
xxx

The National Folklore Troupe,
Andre Narcisse ,and Lavinia Wil-
liams are receiving compliments
for a top performance at Chou-
coune Thursday evening. It was
also the first appearance in six
months of Guy Celestifi, the ori-
ginal Banda who has been sick.
Chic Evelyn Eisen is in town at
the Vie Lampseis Miss Eisen who
arrived Sunday from Caracas is
accompanied by Mrs .Elizabeth
Weissberg. Also house-guest ol
the Lampsons is Mrs. Vic's sister
Leonia Sagasta, 'of Newy York's
National City Bank, here on her
fourth trip.


XXX

DECEMBER is. the month for
irmj-,rAA no-. f-O, lit, third Mnrit-


MARIE-LUCIE DELVA WVEDS IVAN ROY


Miss Marguerita Manguiya Scy.
to U.S. Ambassador Roy T. Davis
has been transferred to the U.S.
Embassy in Paris afterr 6 years
here.
XXX


aren ts-,-ine a Hn *ride L,-,bour Office Inspectors Geor-
Claire Fils-Aime and Henri de s Peli
Delva walk up the aisle-of Sacre gePi ssier Karl Herard and
CDeur. Kavanagh will leave the capital
STuesday to study Legislation at

Engineer Hubert Etheart and the Fort de France, Martinique,
lovely Nicole Greger have a Sacre Labour Bureau. On a U.N.O scho-
Cur date for the third. jlarship the officials will spend
On the sixth Anne-Marie Tribie four weeks in the French Colony.
and Pierre Dejean will exchange Meteorologist Edward Miller is
on a U.N mission here studying
wedding vows at Sacre Ceur he possibilities of using wind po-
A double wedding is scheduled i P c ia a industrially.
wer commer-cially and industrially.
fortheeighthMademoisellesMag He is being shown the currents
gie and Delia Wiener wil be mar-
ried-The grooms: Pierrot Celes- by Engineer Cauvin of the T.P.
xxx
tin and Charles Dupuy (respecti- Heavyweight champ of last
vely week's s stork deliveries is Dr. and

x x x Mrs. GUrard Beauboeuf's 9-pound-
The Carlos Etiemies have a new cr Maxime-Claude, born at Dr.
I boy. The fine young lad was born Andre Beaubceuf's cliniV 6:00 a.m.
Thursday afternoon. Saturday.


.Bnmlay November. 6th. 1955


Page 19


HAITI SUN


\


ww,wf.V iv_


In the absence of Senate Pre.
sident Charles Fombrun the ga-
vel is wielded in the upper cham-
ber by Senator Walter Sansaricq.
The Chamber of Deputies is
now presided over by Deputy Luc
Jean who replaces former presi-
dent Adelphin Telson named as
Minister of the Interior.
xxx
Miss Ulna Mathurin Saget and
Mr. Hans Luc Duvalsaint were
joined in Holy Matrimony Octo-
ber 29 in the Petite Riviere de
l'Artibonite Parish Church by
Rev. Father Joseph Saget.
Miss Yvanne Nader was Matron
of Honour and Mr. Fethitre La-
rose was Best Man. A sparkling
reception followed the marriage
at the home of Judge Mathurin
Saget, father of the bride.
xxx
Joe Yancey, American sports-
man and coach left Saturday for
Jamaica, after spending six weeks
in Haiti sponsored by the Cultu-
ral Attache's division of the U.S.
Embassy, working with the Mo-
nitors and the Federation of
Sports.
4fhe S.S. Evangeline was in on a
cruise this week.
XXX
Leonard and Juliette Thompson
moved to their new residence in
Petion-Ville this week.
Carmen Me. Cormnack Chip-
rood-, P.A.A. staff writer is doing
Haiti with. n fine pen gathering
fresh material for a series of tra-
vel stories distributed by
the airline to newspapers and ma-
gazines in the U.S. and Latin A-
merica.
Since arrival here Monday,
Mrs. Claprood has- risen five
o'clock every morning, undertaking
expeditions in every direction and
covering all phases of life which
the potential tourist would like
to know about.
She has bet n in.'r.iewing tour
operators, visiLing gh;ps, che- :
ing the entire accommodations avai-
lable in Haiti, night life etc. P.
A.'A Director David Gossett who
has been escorting the researcher
into the field, breathed a relaxed
sigh Friday morning when she
motored to the Cape.
-Mr. Gossett mentioned that the
Department of Tourism has been
very co-operative in furnishing
statistics etc...
Don Gammon, PAA veteran staff
photographer will cover the same
ground pictorially next week...
All free publicity abroad for Hai-
ti, to encourage travel here.


J!.


dIy


\


I


I I


I




HIAITI SUN


Sunday November, 6th.


'FOR RENT -
Unfurnished 3-room house (La-
boule) private; abundant supply
of water, electric light, good pro-
perty. See Georges Elie, Telepho-
ne 3079.

Your Best Bet
In Travel


King Christophe's
Tours"


-1


Leogane Plain
Irrigation Scheme
Under Construction
10.000 hectares of land will be
irrigated in the Leogane plain by
an irrigation system fed by the
Riviere Momance.
The project started before hur-
ricanea Hazel hit the Republic
October 1954, but 80 per cent da-
mage was caused by the cyclone's
passage.
Heart of the system will be a
dam 39 meters long, built on the
remainder of the former cons-
truction. Tne project is under the
supervision of the Department of
Public Works.

GEODETIC HQ.
GETS $3000 REPAIRS
Geodetic Survey Headquarters
on the Citd de l'Eiposition are
undergoing repairs and improve-
ments wVhich total $3,000.
Two new rcoms will be added,
a laboratory and a photography
studio. Equipment for the studio
is expected from the U.S. sjort-


Reservations
Phones 3313
Ticket Office: Jos. Nodal & Co.
Jos. Nodal'& Co. General Ager
or see your Travel Agent


Show Opens Tomorrow

LUCE TURNER'S EXHIBITION HIGHLIGHTS

ORIGINALITY OF HAITI'S REBEL ARTIST


Turnier's portraits show
strength's truth.
When, at 20, Luce joined the
Centre d'Art pioners in-1944, she
showed herself so talented and
precocious a pupil that she was
sooni recognized as. one of the
most clearly defined and original


Conthinwd from, Page 1
personalities among the modern,
independent artists of that era.
In 1948, she was granted a Roce
kefeller Foundation scholarship
to study at the Art Students' Lea-
gue in New York. There the Jac-
mel-born artist studied with Mor-
ris Kantor, and Harry Sternberg,
A scholarship to France in 1951
Consul Martijn
SDonates $100
To Child-care Work
Mr. Ernfisto Martijt, Haitian
Consul in Montreal, has donated
a cheque of $100 to Haitian
Health Services for Under-Nou-
rished Children.
The gift received last week by
Dr. Edner Pnux, director of the
Centre de Sante No. 1. has been
forwarded to. 'Mrs. Pretzman Ag-
gerholm, head of the Work for
Uide.'-Nourkhed Childrenb and
Mrs. Denise Haspil, treasurer of
the organization.
Mr. and Irs. Martin visited
the Health Center of the Cathe-
dral durih, their recent visit to
Haiti ,n'-d v"re greatly impressed
with t!e work being carried out
in Bel .-%;.- and St. A:ntoine.
Consul Martiij, was recently
decorated with the Haitian Or-
der of HonIon- and Merit during
a party giveli by Foreign Mlinist-
er Joseph D Charles honoring
his twenty-fifty anniversary as a
member of !he Haitian diploma-
tic corps.
Mr. Mar,.iji! is originally from
Curacao.

FOR SALE
Camel's hair Travel and Winter
coat, size 14 from Hlautes Coutu-
res de Paris, also dresses from
Paris and better 5th Avenue
Shops. Inquire Maison Captain
Elie, Canape Vert, No. 43.
FOR RENT
At Canape Vert.-American
Ranch Type house, all modern
conveniences, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
attractive terrace, constant hot
and cold water, washing machi-
ne, foam rubber mattresses. Part-
ly or unfurnished. Apply Haiti
Sun for appointment, phone 2061.


French technique is evident but'
originality is mnaintened
granted by the French govern-
ment was followed by another in.
1953 by the Haitian government.
Luce was enabled to study under
the best French artists of our
time and soon established her
claim to consideration as a lead-
ing painter in any country.
During the past two years, Luce
has travelled in- Germany exhibit.
ig her work at Hamburg Bonn
and Bremen with tremendous suc-
cess, and recently held a one-
man show in the United States.
Last year, the talented Haitian
artist married Italian painter and
stage comedian Cioni Carpia and
a mcjor creative work undertaken
by the newly-married couple will
soon be completed with the arri-
val of an heir to their cojnbined
talent.


One of the many powerful
Turnier studies


.tI


9.ral.If Ope'u'.9nl ua s la,-CIS


FAMOUS


THROUGHOUT


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION


THE WORLD


PAGE 20


951
1955*j


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-1


i




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