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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00334


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Full Text


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BCTHI


SCOTCH WHISKY


TLJC LJAITIAKIM" C1_ Cl -I AI(1"I IAzi' IlrWWPAPFR


SI I I--/-1 I 1/--I N I-IN L-I.J/


VOL. VI


Speedy Recovery


Wishes Sent


To Eisenhower
President Paul E. Magloire
sent a special message on Sunday
to President Eisenhower express
ing his wishes for a prompt reco-
very from the illness which has
affected the health of the distin
guished American Chief of State.


Port au Prince Republique d' Haiti


Sunday, October 2nd 1955 Telephone2061 No. 2


COMMUNIST JUNTA EXISTS Commerce Law


IN HAI1I: SAYS EL CARIBE


He S blt a, Iepli e I read in the September 20 th
a ia e 1955 issue of the Dominican news
To Trumped up Lies paper ,El Caribe,,> that, the Se-
cret Service of the Dominican
(Thou sha! cause to disappear Army, according to corresponden-
from the tace of the earth their ce which it seized signals the
fruit and their race among the existence in Haiti of a Commu-
children of man Psalms XXI, nist Junta of which I am a-mem-
I)l ber.


There was no question as to who was wrong when this accident occurred Sunday.


ESSO Tanker

Burns 1,000 Gals.

On Morne a Cabri
The atomic-like cloud of black
smoke that mushroomed over
Morne A Cabri, Sunday, was
identified this week as a burn-
ing Esso fuel carrier. A short dis
tanee from the summit of Mor-
ne b Cabri, Sunday the giant
Esso fuel carrier had gone out
of control ind tumbled down the
road onto a mountain slope
where? it r-eploded into flames.
The motor of the lumbering, 6-
ton Ford trucks enroute to Peli
gre with ?,000 gallons of diesel
oil conked out on the steep grade
of the mountain 'road, and in
(Continued on Page- 2)


SPEEDING NON-LICENCED DRIVE RESPONSIBLE

SUNDAY AUTO ACCIDENT

CLAIMS GERMAN GIRL'S LIFE


A speeding Chevrolet crashed
into a small Opel car, Sunday af-
ternoon, on the Port au 'Prince -
Cabaret highway, causing the
death of a young German woman,
and injuries to her companion.
This brought the week-end auto
mobile road accident toll in the
Port-an-Prince area to the alarm-
ing total of ten.
The vci-nc Miss Ursula Kleins
chtmidt. Secretary at the ierman
Enmbas;y, died on the way to the
hospital from head injuries. The
tliirtv-,-ie-yea:--old native of
Frank-fiu tr'. Germany was seated


ON LATIN PE\CE MISSION

lndonesiao Ambassador Declares

2 Reoublics,liare Common Problems


Mr Mockarto Notowidigdo, In
donesian Ambassador to Was-
hington, carrying a message of
peace from the Bandoeng Confe
rence to Latin America, with the
aim of strengthening relationship
with the new-Indonesian Repu-
blic visited Haiti ihis past
week. A m b a s a o r Notoes idigdo


% ho '.-.'as ar-companied by Mr. Is.
hak Zahir and Rusian. respec-
tively 3rd Secretary and Attache
of the Embassy,, presented his
credentials to President Magloi-
re at the National Palace of the
re at the National Palace Wednes-
lJa. morning.
Couti-nued on Page 20)


next to the driver of the Opel
when the Chevrolet bore down
on them at high speed on a curve
ci6ise to *Source Puante.j
The driver of the Opel, Mr.
Detters, of German nationality
and a business associate of Mr.
Dumont. Bellande, received lace
rations of the face, injuries to
the leg and abdomen. He was
discharged earlier in the week
fiom the General Hospital, but
was in a poor condition at week's
end, still suffering from shock.
The couple was returning from
a swim on the beautiful beach at
Mlontrouis, and as may be seen
from the above picture, was on
the right side of the road when
the accident occurred. Passen-
gers in the Chevrolet, including
a Mr. Delphin Mercier, received
minor injuries.
SRoger Fish who was at the
wheel of the Chevrolet. Licence
Plate. No. 4055, did not have a
drivers license, nor a permit to
drive. The speeding road hog
was arrested and held by the Ca
baret police. Up to press time,
the (.Sun* was unable to 4.tain
information as to whether this
(Continucd on Page 20?


I am not a Communist.


The object of this publication,
which I declare to be iniquitous
and slanderous, is to try to as-
sail my honor and to injure my
reputation. Recently the Domi-
nican Government produced a
formal .demand before the Hai-
tian Government for extraditioni
of the Dominican citizens Ulis-
ses Sanchez Hinojosa, and Rafael
Andujar Graffe.

The Dominican Republic has
no laws governing extradition.
It has no Treaty of Extradition
with the Republic of Haiti.
Haiti, however ever thought-
ful of its international engage-
ments, has often attempted to
make an Extradition Treaty with
the Dominican Republic. .but in
Svain.
I In conformitywith nthe princi-.
Sitesiof. international jaw, the
i Dpminican demand was turned
over to the Haitian Courts of
Justice.
From the moment that I first
talked with the two men, I was
struck by !hei reflections on the
situation in the Dominican Re-
public. cIf we, return to Santo-Do
mingo, we are certain to be as-
sassinated. Yet, we have commit
ed no crime other than that of
desiring to live as free men. Ac
tually, in our country, it is a
grave crime punishable by death,
to wish to be free. One has only
to be an ndorator of the Benefac
tor in order to have the right to
exist.
I listened to my clients speak,
in recalling the tragic history of
my thirty thousand cowardly
assassinatcd-compatriots !!!
I strove to defend principles,
those of the International Insti-
f(Continued on Page 20)


Goes. Into Effect:


20 Inspectors


Appointed

With the ind'action of the new
Law governing Commerce, a spe
cial ceremony took place at the
Palace of J'.stice under the Pre
sidence of Judge Roger Char-
mant when twenty newly appoint
ed inspectors of the Department
of Commerce were' sworn in,
this week. Judge Charmant ad-
dressed the graup and impressed
upon them the serious characte-
ristics 6f their duties as inspec-
tors in charge co making the law
respected.

Mle. Andre ChErilus, represent
ing the Parquet, aJso spoke giv-
ing special consEil to the. inspec-
tors in connection with the heavy
'task before.them.
Mr. Gerard Laforest, of.
the Section forf the CO :'. of
Prices of the Department oeCom
merce also attended the eaezno-
nly.
In next is-ne,', Haiti" Sun
will offer for the edification of
its readers, the importfiit as-
pects of the new la ahidAits ap-
plication which will affect Hai-
tian commerce in the IJiture.


Minister Franois -..
Dines Press

-Mr Jacq'tes A. Fiangois, Secre
tary for the Presidency and for
Labor was host at a sumptiUour
7 course dinner or. Friday even-
ing, at Aux Cosaques. The dyna-
mic young Minister offered the
banquet in honor (c' the members
of the Haitian press


Jane Nelson and Priscilla Dunn, -Life's gift to Haiti thes" past three
weeks., are caught above as they paused in their busy schedule to see
and learn as much of Hazjti as is humanly t(not touristically) possible
in 22 days time. Headquartered in New York with LiWen magazine,
the doung explorers covered Au Cap to Jacmel by week's end, and
completely captured the Capital City. Jane sadly hopped homewards
by \ay nl Havana, Friday, and Priscilla remains on t?'e scene a little
loringer.


I


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. ........e....2 ..----u _---__ _---__--______ ____uue II______ -UlO Y tLUU1 IlU f195


ESSO TANKER I BOY SCOUTS ELECT NEW


BURNS...Pg
.:crifnied from Page 1)
spitc- cf all .!E rts of driver Lu-
ca heawrt, gears and brakes
were of no use.
The giant fire-red truck slids
backwards and when driver
Eth6art turned the wheel sharp-
ly in an effort t) force the vehi-
cle into the mountain-side it turn
ed over and rolled off the road.
A thousand gallons of fuel, re-
portedly, burned before the
bomb4like fire extinguished it-
self.
Driver Etheaxt who had been
driving- for the Company more
than five years, managed to jump
clear of the falling truck and es-
caped injury.
Fuel carriers seldom take this
'route over the mountains to the
Artibonite dam site because of
the danger incurred. It is report
ed the Deschapelles Peligre
road was out due to the rains and
forced this truck to take the high
road.

ROGER DORSINVILLE
POEM PRESENTED
cPour C16elebrer la Terre, a
poem from the talented pen of
Roger Dorsinville was presented
to literary lovers on Friday even
ing, at the'home of Mr and Mrs
F. Morissean Leroy, at Petion-
Ville. by the Groupe Culture.


COUNCIL OF DIRECTORS


The Association of Scouts ol
Haiti held an important General
Assembly of its members on Tues-
day evening at Lycoe Pction, for
the election of its new Council of
Chief Scout; GUrard Martineau,
were elected:

Dr. Constant Pierre-Louis, Pre-
sident. Captain Georges Elie, Jr.,
Directors. The following officers
Commissioner General; D e p u t y
Andr6 Jeanty, President of the
Court of National Honor: Christian
Bertrand, Treasurer General; Ro-
ger Mortls, Commissioner Natio-
nal ot Training; Kurt Fisher, Com-
missioner International; Gerard
Gateau, Crew Commissioner; An-
dre M. Side, Troup Commissary;
Consellors, Dr. Louis Roy, Me. Ed-
ner Saint Victor, Dr. Raoul Pierre-
Louis, Major Louis Roumain, Lt.
Maurice Martin, Max Chancy, Em-
manuel Lafond, Pierre Chrisphon-


MONTREAL CARDINAL
TO VISIT HAITI
His Eminence, Paul Emile LU-
ger, Cardinal of Montreal and
Chancellor of the University of
Montreal is expected to visit Haiti
in the near future. The visit of
the eminent prelate will coincide
with the Eucharistic Congress to
be held at Cap-Haitien this month.


ROLEX WATCHES

i GOES EVERYWHERE


See RUSSO FRERES,
Rue Bonne Foi


.-. .n.n..*94q94!


n*-.--------------------- -DITT 1 flL'DU


. .


NOTICE! CONTRACTORS,
HOME OWNERS
BUY HAITI'S 1955 LEADING
S ALL ALUMINUM, WEATHERSTRIPPED I

S J A L 0 U SIE E
K1 MASS- -u- --.-.- I
SPRODUCTION -Curved dripcap
PRICES. -Heavy extruded

--Tightest closing aluminum es ra
jalousie #ever r
Developed -Worm gear o-
'"-, operator for freely
-Buy direct trnm i opening andt
z inventory o 3 closing
s- k o ,or -Choice of clear
12 -Br ing your
bl,-prints and or obscure glass
dimensions to m m
U oitr office iist- -Aluminum re-
Sedt below or L cessed screen
;[ phone --- -

FREE ESTIMATE NO OBLIGATION
ALL STANDARD SIZES CARRIED IN STOCK

ROYAL
CHARLES DEJEAN & CO
PHONE: 3226-2325


ie, Jacques. Dorismond, Marceau
Louis.
A special Commission for the
modification of the Constitution
and By-Laws was appointed, com-
posed of Messieurs Jeanty, Martin,
Wolf and Manigat. The project
will be submitted at the next Ge-
ner.-l Assembly in January, 1956.


DAM MEN
OFF TO ORIENTED

A delegation of Haitian techni.
cians left on Wednesday for a 3-
day inspection trip to Santiago de
Cuba (Province d'Oriente). They
will visit the dam constructions- of
the Province of Oriente and other
engineering projects, and hold con
fabs with the members of the Cu-
ban Association of Engineers and
Architects. The delegation compo-
sed of Engieers Eugene Limousin,
Asst. Engineer of SCISP, Camille
Tesserot and Frantz Jerome of the
DEROT and Eugene Carrie, is ex-
pected back by the end of the
week.

INDEPENDENCEE,,
OBSERVES FETE
Bi-wceklv ,confrerc indepen-
dance, observed its anniversary
Friday. Compliments to Direc-
tor Georges Petit and his colla-
borators.


for greater


yields


lower cost


j6-2424


ITALIANS HAVE "SHANGRILA,, RECEPTION
The Ambassador of Italy and thle occasion of the departure for
his distinguished wife. Donna Ce- Italy of two Officers of the Haitian
cilia Spalazzi were hosts at a re- Marine. Among the guests were
ception from 6:30 to 8:30 P.M. on iltticals ol the Government, Offi-
Wednesday evening, at their rest- cer, ot the Haitian Army, memb.
dence "Villa Shangri La-, at La er. ol the Haitian -Press, and ma-
Botle The evening was consecrated n'. friends of the handsome diplo-
to Haitian-Itahlian friendship on minatic couple.


((STAR PENSION,)
IDEALLY LOCATED AT PETIONVILLE
(Opposite El Rancho)
CONVENIENT TO TRANSPORTATION
AIRY ROOMS ON THE MOUNTAINS,
HOMELIKE ATMOSPHERE
AT VFRY MODERATE BATES
FRENCH CUISINE


4 16-2001


4jj-2n1


'3.13-u


For every crop and M
condition, thenu a
Mablothies high an
pelletized fetolAm a
you poealr yields a Ie
ta- You plqu~uk.Sa
,kvlhabln pq)u Mi .
pmtamh to otmiV
rqlownt. hpdB
*prud a aanvu4
easre a ber ar nr
-*f yaowthsue


Two grades of Ammophos available locally by the pound, bag, or ton. For quantity prices


apply to the Agent, V. A. Wynne, P.O. Box 694, Port au Prince,

Distributor: Haiti Seed Stores, Port au Prince and Kenscoff.


; "i4t -


Page 2


tHAITI SUN


SunjdnT' rf"pinhortl/* O-l inewK


5


...at


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U0- 39-01






Sunday, October 2nd 1955 HAlTI SUN


SUPPLIES DISTRIBUTED BY HAITIAN 'GOV.

900 MOUNTAIN HAZEL-DROUGHT VICTIMS

RECEIVE FOOD WEEKLY AT FERMATHE


Long before sunrise, every vernment supply distributed
Saturday morning, 14 miles above through centers like Fermathe by
Port-au-Prince a motley group a Haitian government Committee
of men, women and children num headed by Captain Bazile.
being close to a thousand huddle Last Saturday when Your Re
together in the cold before the porter visited the distribution and
neat little fieldstone schoolhouse wvitnesed Pastor Wallace Turn-
of the Baptist Mission in Fermina- bull, wife Eleanor and 67-year
the, waiting impatiently for its old Mission founder Granny Hol
doors to open. demen ration-out beans rice and
Each clutches a small piece of oil to nine hundred (900) he was
note-paper. For the moment this told by Rural Policeman Victor
is their most precious possession, Felix that many of these people
it entitles them to a cmarmiteh had walked nine hours overrugger
(gallon measure) of beans, rice ed mountain terrain to receive
and every other week a third of this food.. Consulting his note-
a gallon of dried milk and a pint book Policeman Felix recieted
of.cooking oil. the names of three children who
had died of starvation the pre-
They are the most hard-up cases vious week in his section, Nou-
from the neighboring mountains, v.elle Terrain. But he added con
where gardens, livestock and editions would definitely be bett-
even homes disappeared with Ha er by December with the harvest-
zei, and seven months of drought, ing of the coffee crop.
Rural Policemen in the various The majority of farmers in
sections hand out the slips of the food line were from the erod
paper certifying the bearer is in ed mountains of Nouvelle Ter-
need of food and qualified to re- rain, Quat:!emrne section de Jac-
ceive rations from the US' Gg-mel, Cad.?et Berly and Bonga.


At Saturday morning Food distribution. Pastor Turnbull and Granny
Holdemen supervise the rationing.

David Bonn After Mother Made 9 Hour Trek For Food


Mother with Drvid a few hours after the blessed event.


IlDUCHEKIE _For

SI QUALITY

^ ^\A 4iWMEAT

And

SAUSAGES


Illustrating the stamina of
these mountain poeple, the mis-
sionaries introduced your report
er to a young woman who had
given birth that evening under
the stars with her mother acting
as midwife after walking from
sunrise to sundown the previous
day to be on hand to receive her
food supplies. Pastor Turnbull
when informed of the birth, as
he opened the doors at dawn
to commence the distributions,
gave the child care, clothing and
the name of David.


Dejean and Choir at St. Georges.


DAILY GLEANER REVIEWER JUVENTAS FI'

HAITIAN CHOIR UNUSUALLY STIMULATING

Kingston Jamaica..... must have put his whole youth, brought over fr.yj-n A
No Follower of Musical Trends talent and hard work into the minded on. in an as
could have failed to notice that training and inspiration of his manner )t the, i;wis
in the last few years there has group, for as he mounted the made popular by Al J
been a renewed and tremendous platform ho seemed to create an though in the Hztian
interest in choral singing. atmosphere of vitality and verve second half becomes'a]
The film-making moguls, sensi (and absolute and strict atten- copated in rhythm.
tive to the ever-moving needle tion) among the singers.' It may be said .Lbat.
on the graph of artistic and HANDEL IN FRENCH pattern of Haitian life
changing reactions, have been THIE KYRIE ELEISON was many of these songs,
quick to register this trend most delicately rendered with two which illustrate th
which perhaps has contributed fine shading and simplicity. The the comrades to work
to the interest and success of re- full strength of the voices with coffee plantation song
cent religious films, the powerful basso section was closely akin to our c
IN 'ROMAN USE the Choral heard to best advantage in the tunes and digging sonr
represented the .concentus bas Hallelujah chorus from Handel's The charm of the
distinguished from the eaccen- cMessiahv. play song and deep
tus' or intonation of the Collect. They sang this in French, and in the prayer to ,dahm!
Epistle, Gospel, prayers and anyone who has heard the fa- both highlights of an
other portions of the devotional. mous Long Island New York sing stimulating musical ev
Atfir-st these sung y the cler ing in Cinerama will recognize I am sure we weYe all
gy were, tiFittlhese suintelligiblegy to theler the extraordinary similarity of ing more when the A]
mass of thte passive congregation. the Haiti3ns to what is consider- speaks English vej- wE
mass of the passive congregation. thefe
But soon, in Germany, short ver ed the finest performance of the announced that ibe I
nacular hymns were early admit Long Island Choir. would be an Haitian
ted into public worship and after- The alto voices in the Haitian ;Dor, P'titi" which the
their refrain were called Kirlei-' cher- ^-ouncjd a little student at a most delightful and
r refin wer, ecaed times during the singing of the manner.
son., Leison or Leichen..... .. .. ... .


I ;vola Boatman: ann i wnnflI


I I congrarulate r... St


'.s !1



frica, re-- .
stonishing
ih Chant
Jolson, al- .
song, the
Imosr syn- ,

the whole .
is told by
and the .
e calls of
Sand the
Seemed
own, Soly"
gs.
children's
invocation :
bala,. were" -
unurxafly
ening and .'
left want- .
I.C. (who
ell indeed) ,.
last item l"
lullaby,
ey sxpg in
cQhvincing

Ciopnrge's


These might be classed as prefer not to see the over-an- College Old Boys Association and
the earliest kind of congrega xious breathing of the two te- -Mr. Pancho Rank.ne for their
tional hymns and often consis-- nors on the left centre, of the presentation of the Haitian Choir
ed of a stanza prefixed to the choir. There are small details, it in Jamaica
Kyrie Eleison or Christe Elei- is true, but can often either de-
son. crease or improve 'the general PARAMOUNT
So it is that Man, from his ear- effect and voice ensemble. Today
Best music consciousness has I congratulate the choir on TODAY 3.00 P.M. Enhemis, de
been influenced and moved by their skill at correct pronounced L'Univers
the unision of voices in a choir, tion in about four different lan- 5.00, 7.00 and 9.00: P.M. Le De
He is one kind of musical present guages. It must have been a sur- mon des Paux Troubles
station that everyone can under- prising and real treat for the Cu- MONDAY 6.00 P.M. Mlanon des
stand and enjoy. bans present to hear their own Sources
There is no need to be fami- eComparsav so well sung, and TUESDAY/6.00 and 8.15 P.M. Le.
liar with the themes and counter the Boys scored another hit when Ddmon des eaux Troubles
themes of fugues, symphonies, they sang %Nobody Knows,, an Wednesday 5.00 and 830 P.M"
the mysteries of statement and American Negro spiritual. Quo Vadis
development of sonatas and con- However, 1o me their finest THURSDAY 6.00 and 8.15 P.M.
certos; there is only the com- evocation was the lovely ePrie- Le Demon des eaux troubles
mon basic capacity to appreciate re....1ihe contrast in tone of eJe FRIDAY 6.00 and 8.15 P.M Le
and be delighted by a mass of Vous sake, Marie being quite Demon des eaux Troubles
voices that are melodious and beautiful and moving ...even di SATURDAY 5.00, 7.00 and 9.00
beautiful, one did not understand French. P.M. Ennemis de l'univers
THE HAITIAN CHOIR compos THE SECOND OF THE_ PRO- SUNDAY 3.00 P.M Ennemis- de
ed of 40 voices was indeed full GRAMME was taken up with ]'Univers
of melodious charm and attract Haitian Folk songs. The first 5.00, 7.00 and 9.00 P.M. Viva
ve original rhythmic patterns, one, the song of the slaves being Zapata
And there is absolutely no doubt
about the seriousness of their
training and their own very real
devotion and understanding of
their art.
Although I had never heard
of this particular choir before.
I learned a great deal about
them in the few days before
their arrival. Mrs. Stephen
Hill, who had heard them in
Haiti spoke with appreciation .
of their fine,singing and I was
happy to bear from our own .:"
Mapletoft Poulle (who had
heard them in Puerto Rico) S,
that the Haitians had made a
great impression there.
So that when I went to listen
to them on Sunday night at Em-
met Hall, I was already prepared
to hear a Choir of accepted re-
nown and excellence. Listeinig to the Choir- Left to Right: Mr. Winston 3Mrcks, President
MR. MICHEL DEJEAN, 22- of St. Gcorge's College Old Boys Club and Football A,--., Consul Rey-
-year old leader of the choir, nold" St Cyr. Melle Clarisse Rameau and Mrs. St. C.ir.


HAITI SUN


Sunday, October 2nd 1955





.-," Page 4 ________


Joseph report


10*
,',,:*-.. ^f ** ^. f *^



.,'> i .^' ,



.- ,- Li",4 the'Caspian sea, we don'T -communicate., said a PAA em-
ployee Thursday when' he explained that' discussion of salary and
8. 'vacation aftr a.year of negotiation, had ended in a stalemate between
SCompany' and -employees. Mr. John Brown arrived in town Wednesday
i- as a PAA-Representative of Industrial Relations Manager in Miami,
A'to discuss the matter. -
si" --Yves Lauture- Jed his Ski-boom orchestra to a gala evening at
Cercle Port-aw.Piincien, last night.: A Petionville group will picnic
,today at the Diuini ,Estate of Dumont Bellande.
f -Colonel Mareaistie Prosper the Capital's Police Chief was seen
;=in".the company of five Police Officers inspecting the Fort National
l.and St. Grard area Monday morning.., neighbours are still dying of
"--uiniriotbaity as ;o the reason of their visit.
l-Y'-Brother Babrelli arrived from France Friday. He has been trans-
,.,-i.erred back to Haiti and will take-over the coaching of the St. Louis
'"."y Boys for their meeting with St. George's in Jamaica January 2nd.

MACKENZIE
TO PREPARE ST. JOE'S

'Jesuit Father Roy Campbell in
charge of coaching the St. Geoar-
ge's team oor the big rioal meet.e
He has -been replaced by MacKen-
zie the werlknown Jamaicean Coach
7 and football star of the old Haiti-
Jamaica games.
xxx

Serge Roude returned with his
mother and Uttle sitter, Tania,
from an educational look-see at
Cuba, Mexico and Jamaica. The
4.Roudes' wore away for' two
Y months.
N A Dr Serge Roc left Sunday to
r-:. "work -in the Harlem Hospital,
father Roy Carpbell' New York City.

i? -The sky 'Ls no longer the limit for the U.S. Air Mission to'Haiti.
ivmgl4opknded beyond. the !pky to the illimitable night of space they
h ave. ti'thi'Bay of Goae. L astes Weekend thle fly-boys 'repaired the
S'lastrib of-Iheir crash-boat .Libbrtd IU, crushed enroute here from
j'Aiam ahebeloap .nrasinea ciaeiy neeti ageowsmd
L'.' .Aiami ajb d a small ,cargo, .feifghter- and sailed forth for the Island
of .a Gonave. Astronomer Lou -Stokes was. near the wleel. The Naval
Mission stin'ding by..,1
-w 7-Mrs Marqretn A. Cameron hasd opened, what she proudly calls
andioti'le'sg Mosty.Laxurhionus Guest-House'. The' Villa Tropicana is
(:just ouTt-e nyeitionville of the road to Kenscoff.
--i a ,arl Siegel has not been out on the town for four long months
Potirquoi? '
"AcQ6oding-td President Max Severe the annual (But very tradi-
,tional) Bal b asqu- -at the Cerele du Commnerce in CGonaives was its
usuull.,belle bagal'.
t' --' eletc bell, the first to hbe made in aiti, was discovered at
tfi he.TeanMarieRoberL de Lamenais School of lwhIch Mr. Andrw Mom-
pla-isa'vrtoefrgtn isepmnoiaL.
The bell, ot.nrplnal, size,, activated by an electric magneto was made
by Albert Jeanty,, proprietor 6f the' shop known as R Me Revoiiat, Con-
";aside. ad as the work of a master, the bell which will begin functioning
\.when'scoot opent will be used 'to signal thehour of-classes, recess
and celosig. ML- Jeanty fashibted the' bell in'his own workshop, and
*Olffered' it, as a gIift to Air. Momplaisir.
,Twenty-eight v ladis of the NCO WIVES CLUB (Puerto-Rico) are
c n expected lieo- ow.October 4th via Caribair plane. The plane will bring
Pa group every week during the coming season. During their visit here
ethey"wl e be piloted by-Rayniond Jean-Pierre of Christophe's Citadel
V: Tours.
Haiti breathed a sigh of relief this week, as ,Janet breezed by.,.
..she was reported ap capricious as ,Hazel, of last October whose visit
., s a' never4toberforgotten memory.
' Jack Schileri; Lorraine and the youngsters have gone to Santiago
de Cuba where the former Chief Engineer of Reynolds Mines at Pla-
teau Ste. Cr6ix ha accepted a post on the big works of htle .50-million-
.dollr Nickle Mines.
Jlacques Maitin, Reynolds Purchasing Agent and SONACO Manager,
Sfarewelled the popular mining family at his Turgeau residence Sunday
..:..night.
Old Boysa, of College Davieux gave the young director, Minister;
SFranck D6vieux. of the Departments of Commerce and National Edu-
cation, a testimonial dinner Thursday evening at Hotel Choucoune.
:Pupil Placide S&v~re spoke on behalf of the Alumni among whom
were noted Dr. Charles Chevallier, Deputy Woolley, Engineer Malle-
branche.
Antigone. translated into creole by playwright Morisseau-Leroy
Shas been translated also into English and French. Morrisseau muses
that some industrious Greek may put it back into Greek from the
original creole.
A 6:00 to 9:00 party marked the opening of an all.-night Cafe =Chan-
teckair. in Bois-Verna last night. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Griswold intend
to keep the kitchen and bar open 24 hours a day. Located at No. 2,
Rue Rigaud, it features a .rtonnel:, gardens, muralled cocktail lounge
and bar, and classical music.


cHAITI SUNS Sunday, October 2nd 1955


PRIZE WINNER CASTERA BAZILE


The Haitian, thirty-two-year-old Castera Bazile, who was awarded
the first grand prize with his oil, 'Caribbean Distraction, in the AL-
COA contest when one hundred and thirty-eight works of art from
.he Caribbean were exhibited at the National Academy' of Design in
New York o0 September 20th. This work also won the regional first
prize for Haiti, earning the artist the largest single share of the
$10,000 Alcoa awards. Mr. Bazile, who has been painting in oils for
nine years, declares himself a self-taught realist. -His work has pre-
viously been exhibited at the UNESCO contest in Paris (1948); and
in recent years in Cuba, Venezuela, and Germany.
Mr. Bazile's -Caribbean Distractions. has now earned him $650.00
- a $500 first grand prize award, a $100 regional first prize award,
and a $50 award in the preliminary judging in the Caribbean.


r*"


PERENNITE DU BATIMENT


ETANCHEMENT ABSOLU

YOU CAN GET AGAIN
PLASTIMENT
AND. ALL OTHER
SIKA PRODUCTS
SERVICE: HAUSER
Box 1326
TeL 2372
SALE: REINBOLD S.A.
TIPCO

SIKA HAITI.
WALTER HAUSER
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
P.O. BOX 1326 P-au-P.

FOR SALE

1. Mahogany table wirh seven
(7) chairs $40.00
2 small tables for $5.00
1 Small chest of drawers $ 3.00
M.A Gunmelerdorff
Scot ts Garage
or Mon Reve Hotel


e eee


Achetez au meilleur prixr


SSOULIERS
SACS D'ECOLIERS
CHAUSSETTES
SPANTALONS
CHEMISES
CHEMISETTES
LINGERIE
BAS
et
Jolis berets de fabrication frangaise


TOUT POUR LA RENTREE DES CLASSES
A


cHAITI SUN


Sunday, October 2nd 1955


I






COURTESY OF aLA BELLE CREOLE- AND uHAITI SUN-s


Bureau: Stand 29
Ave. Marie-Jeanne
Cite de lExpositioa


S A I t



,$an


SPort-au-Prince, Haiti
Phone: 2061
P. O. Box: 433


THE 'HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER

... ...............................................C O U P O N .:...................... ... ........ ..... ...... ....

EVERY WEEK PLEASE SEND ME d-IAITI SUN))

FOR A MONTH ( 4 issues). .......... ....................:............$0.50

FOR A YEAR (52 issues)...................................... (overseas $10)

Remittance enclose.

Please ill me.
i

N am e ...................... ............ ... .. .. .......... ....................*

Address .........................


'Ii _____________________________________________________________


I
.0


HAITI SUN
LA BELLE CREOLE


SUGGESTIONS FOR THIS WEEK IN PORT-AU-PRINCE

SUGGESTIONS FOR THIS WEEK IN PORT-AU-PRINCE


NATIONAL PALACE







Chomp do Mas
Open daugr except Sunday from 8-2
Raising Lowering of Flag, 9a. m.-5 p. m.

NATIONAL MUSEUM

0'






Champ do Mars
Open daily except Sundays

PALIMS DES 'BEAUX ARTS







Anx Faidlstes, Exposition Grounds
Open daily from 9-5
Art Rishibitflons

MSEI E DU PEOPLE HAITIEN






Aux PalmistLes, Exposition Grounds
Open daily from 9-5
For further Information
see yeur Travel Agent


FOYER DES ARTS PLASTIQUES





PLIM


Aux Palmlstes, Exposition Grounds
Open daily from 9 5
Permanent Art Exhibitions


ART CENTER

Rue de sla
SRivolution


Phone: 2055


Open daily except Sunday from 9 5
Current Art Shows


IRON MARKET









Grand'Rue
Open daily from 6 4
Special blarkel days on Saturdays


METROPOLITAN CATHEDRAL

S BASILIQUE
de Notre-Dame
(Catholic)




Peotion Plaza
Open dally from 4-6

COLONIAL CATHEDRAL


Oldest Church
in Port au Prince
For visit hours spe
Your Travel Agent


Petion Plaza
Open daily

ESPISCOPAL CATHEDRAL







Rue Pavst (Near PFAA Offices)
Open daily
Famous for Its beautiful Halan Ual


THEATRE DE VERDURE







Aux Palmlstes, Exposition Grounds
Open Tuesdays and Thursdays
Evening for folklore shows


STADIUM PAUL E. MAGLOIRE






Rue Durand
Boxing and Track Field events.
Football (Soccer) Matches
Thrice a week at night
For further Information Phone: 3015

COCK-FIGHT ARENA


Aux Palmltes, Exposition G
Eight Saturdays afternoons
and Sundays morning


UNDERSEA GAKI


rounds




)ENS



Iroquois


Port-au-Prince Bay
Class bolttnom hnat leaves
Dally Casino Pier 9:30 a.m.


La Belle Cr6ole


Aii p|l Bue Rome

The Caribbean's Most
Unique Shopping Center
Open dally from 8'- 5 Phone: 3177

MUSICAL FOUNTAIN






Cite de I'Exposltlon, Exposition Grounds
Classical Concerts
all Wednesday and Sunday nights
from 7- 10 p. m.

PLACE DES HERDS






Champ de Mars
Open 'Auditorium
Sunday Concerts from 7-9 p.m.
For further Information
see your Travel Agent

POTION DESSALDNS






A O R gr. Guta-*,

Open daily except Sunday


FISH BOWL


S Martissant
<|C S Fli5 specialities
WL Restarant

A short drive from Capital-on-Bea-shore


KI PI (CAPT. ACE'S)






MAT n Martlssamt
I

Sea-shore Restaurant
Sea-food specialities

RENDEZ VOUS


Cite de I'Expo.ltlon
Air-conditioned Bar-dancing
Open from sunset to sunrising


Le Perchoir




ioWoUUers
World-renowned
Mountain-top Restaurant,
Dancing and Gift Shop
Phone: 2105

CASINO INTERNATIONAL






CiUe de 'Exposdtion
Gambling and Dancing
Open every night
Floorshow an Wednqsdays Phone: 2076


NAL. BANK OF THE R1UBUIC






Geffrard Square
Open daily except
Saturday and Sundays from 9 1
Phone: 2282

ROYAL BANK OF CANADA






Ge d Square
Open BAUj except
Saturday and Sundays
from 9 1 Phone: 283


OABANI E;HOUGOUNE ,i -..


1B riz W.
IChour une




PetiovUile
Famous Nightclub
Open on Saturday Nights Phone: 18

HOTEL RIVIERA



~RIVIERA



Phone: 3151
Martlssant
Air-conditioned ar Dancing
Excellent orchestra, folklore floorshows

EL RANNCHHO HOTEL







Pdtlonville
Dinner dances oa Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays
Phone: 7888


HOTEL IBO LELE

S HOT L a
nA o LELE


Pktionville
Dinner dances on
Tuesday and Fridays


Phone: 7880


THORLAND CLUB


Carrefour Road
Suim cocklails
Tennis


Phone: 2465


PAA-
KLM- S
DELTA-
CUBANA-
AVIATION ADH-


Phone: 3451
Phone: 2352
Phone: 3312
Phone: 320
Phone: 2613


SHIPPING LINES


Panamha ...................... Teliphone: 3451
Coinm ar ....................................2... 82
Trans-Atlantlc ................................ 2M1 :
W astley .................. ....................1 3867 .
Camburg American....................2238 3486
Alcoa S S....................................... 276
Royal Netherlands Navigation. ....... 3456








CATHOLIC SERVICES
Cathedra': 4, 6, 7:30 and 8:30 ami.,
Sacre-Coeur: 5:30, 7. 8:30 a.m.
St. Anne: 4, 7 and 8 a.m.
St Girard: 4, 5:30 and 8:30 a.m.
St Louis de France: 8 and 9 a.m.
Sixtine Chapel (Citi e ,de Expostioj
10 a.m.
SL Pierre (PIlonvile): 4, 6, 8
and 9:30 a.m.
Ste. Thirise (PItionvilUe): 6 am.
EPISCOPAL
Cathedral: French 6 and English 7 am.
French 8 a.m.
Baptist Church: 9 and 10 am.
Prcsbvlerian: 9 and 10 a.m.
METHODIST
ST. PAUL A.M.E.
4-6' a.m.
9-11 a.m
11:30 12:30'Engilsh
T-Q pn m. Evening
METHODIST CHURCH:
Rue de la Revolutlon:
7:00 English
9:00 French
6:'0 Evangelistic service In Creole
BUREAU DU TOInYSM E
Avenue Marie- eanne.
Citd de I'EXposition
Phone: 2618
Office hours: 8-1 p.m.


mm


/ 2}jegZ^^


On this beautiful day (the days are always beautiful in
Haiti) we wish to extend to you our heartiest welcome.
We, as well as everyone in Haiti, want you to have a very
pleasant and enjoyable stay in this lovely and hospitable
Island.
Haiti Sun (your newspaper) in collaboration with La
Belle Creole (your shopping center) have put out this
-section of the newspaper in order to give you information
that will help you to make your stay not only pleasant but
profitable.
We are always at your Service, for any information you
may need. I


I





COURTESY OF ((LA BELLE CREOLE, AND uHAITI SUN.


-fU9A ad& -O&

otfa.et~&We


Haytian Handwoven Fabrics.
Haytian Handwoven Rugs
Cameras & Films
French Chantilly Laces
Swiss Embroideries
Irish Linens


OMEGA & Tissot Watches
French Perfumes:.
Guerlain, Dana,
Lanvin, Worth,
P atou, Le Gallion,
Caron, Milot,
- Chrven, Fath
Christian Dior,
Rochas, Chanel,
Schiaparelli,
Nini Ridci, Corday,
Raphael, Piquet,
Coty & Hdubigant.
Liqueurs:
Courvoisier, Otard,
.Bisquit, Hennessey,
Napoleon, Matell, .
Domecq, Drambuie,
Cheery Heering,-
Marie Brizard,.
Harvey's Bristol Cream
Armagnec, Chartreuse,
Cointreau,
Haytian Rhum:
Rhum Barbancourt
Haytian Music:
The Most Complete
Assortment of the
.Various Rythms.
Haytian Voodoo Inspired
Jewelry
Haytian Mahosanyware
Handpainted Tissues


Haytian Sculptored Mahogany
Heads
Haytian Turtle-shell Jewelry
Jewelry from all over the
World
Exquisitely Beautiful
Behded Bags
Hand-embroidered Blouses,
SSkirts, etc.
Hand-painted, Skirts,
Kerchiefs, Stoles, etc.
Haytian Paintings
Haytian Ceramics
Faytian Postcards
(we mail them for you).
Dunlop Golf Balls
(great savings)
Dunlop Tennis Balls
(great savings)


In Port-au-Prince
everybody meets at
Che Fountainz in
La Beffle Creole for
Fruit and Fruit Juices
Eggs and Omelettes
Waffles ahd Hot Cakes
Beverages
Crisp and Cold Salads
Chef's Special
Sandwiches
Twice Creams
Surdaes and Beer
Cigars and Cigarettes






Spearfishing Equipment
Bathing Trunks
Native Polos for Men


Unusual among Gift Shops of
the world, is the branch of LA
BELLE CREOLE located on
the terrace 1of the LE PER-
CHOIR, the famous restaurant
om top. of BOUTILLIERS
MOUNTAIN, overlooking Port
a Prince.
Through the wide windows
of Le Perchoir Gift Shop the
shopper's eyes are drawn from-
the attractive show cases, to the
breath-taking beauty or nearly
two thousand square miles of
Hispaniola's plains, mountains
and sea, lying 3.300 feet below.
Spacious, and always cool.
Le Peichoir Gift Shop offers
the same high quality French
perfumes. Haitian jewelry, dan-
dicraft, books, paintings and
hundreds of other gift items,
assembled from the far corners
of the earth, as in the mother
store, La Belle Creole, in town.



Mneet 1,.


The prices, the fixed price po-
licy, the sales slip with every
purchase, with the guarantee of
the firm's name, are identical.


Located in the shop is a bar
where one can sip Haitian rum
punch, tea, coffee, soft drinks-
or where one can have a'tween
meal snack of sandwViches, ca-
ke, ice cream, while shopping.
The combination of cool com-
fort, spectacular view, excel-
lent merchandise, and refresh-
ment, make a shopping trip to
LE PERCHOIR GIFT SHOP
a pleasant and profitable ex-
perience a high spot indeed
in your travels.


f'HAITIAN IATUi AY NIG T...
ANL UNFGRGETTARLE fXPWUNMCU
/10 MM~s~f w m


By Mary Johnson
Gaiety the keynote of night
life in Port-au-Prince the
gay sophistication of a New
World Paris underlined by the
hypnotic beat of African tam-
bours.
And in keeping with its
French tradition the accent is
on good food in a romantic at-
mosphere. Few places in the
world can offer a more enticing
blend of these two elements
than Le Perchoir, HIaiti's smart-
est restaurant that hovers 3,000


above Port-au-Prince and its
emerald 'bay. Guests during tea
and cocktail hour have a front
row seat at one of the most
bewitching settings ever pro-
vided for a tropical sunset.
Then the flights go on and the
curving bayshore is outlined in
a necklace of shimmering
pearls. On .the breezeswept
terrace, guests can watch cars
stop at the Dominican border
20 miles away.
Whether it's a thick state-
side steak or an ethereal Rum
Gouffl6, Le Perchoir food is
superbly prepared and elegant-
ly served. F61ix Guignard and
his orchestra provides music for
dancing.
The International Casino, a
swank establishment run by a
staff imported from Monte-
Carlo, is one of the major
points of interest during the
summer -and winter tourist sea
sons. There one can dine on
excellent Italian food and later
visit the gaming tables which
are meticulously run under the
supervision of the Haitian Go-
vernment. On the bay side,
an orchestra heats out rhum-
bas, mamrlbos and romantic Hai-
tian meringues for dancing un-
der the twinkling stars.
Near the Casino in the bree-
ziswept Exposition Grounds
is the Open Air Theatre de
Verdure where visitors can
attend the bi-weekly shows put
on by the talented National
Folklore Troupe.
Around the curve of the bay
is the newly remodeled Hotel
Riviera with its huge air-con-
ditioned Bamnboche Room and
circular bar. The bar's revol-
ving center serves as the stage
for Guy Durosier's tri-lingual
crooning and a nightly floor
show (The white-faced Banda
dancer is Minsky's in reverse,
a comedian par excellence).


Other leading hotels have
special dinner dansants once or
twice a week. Visitors should
not miss an opportunity to hear
Haiti's internationally known
male Dejean Choir which per-
forms at Hotel Ibo Lele on Fri-
day evenings. The El Rancho
features Ti Ro Ro, Haiti's num-
ber one drummer, and mem-
bers of the National Folklore
Troupe on Friday evening and
other special dance nights
which vary according to the
season. Hotel Dambala has a
Saturday night chicken barbe-
que beside its illuminated pool,
with an orchestra providing
music for outdoor dancing on
its marble patio. The Villa
Creole's Big Night is Thursday
.evening with a Haitian Buffet
served beside its pool in a gala
tropical garden decor and, of
course, dancing. The roof gar-
den at Hotel Choucoune is open
for dinner dancing Monday and
Wednesday nights during the
season. I
On Saturday evening Petion-
Yille's thatched-roofed night
Mlub, Cabane Choucoune, is the
mecca of the Capital Elite and
visitors. Alternating orchestras
throb with the rhythm of the
Haitian Meringue, a dance so
simple that visitors need spend
no time on the side 'lines just
looking on. Though this has
long been the society gathering
spot of the Haitian Capital,
rum and sodas are still served
for .20 a hlass. There is an en-
trance fee which varies depen-
ding upon the entertainment
for the evening. The Cabane
Choucoune often features lea-
ding foreign entertainers.
Saturday night is also the
night for taking trips into the
nearby hills to attend the pea-
sant obambochesk or non-reli-
gious dances held in open ton-


iv'
Among the world travelers
there is a saying that good shop-
pers, when they die, go to'Haiti.
In Haiti there is the widest
possible variety of gifts, souve-
nirs, jewelry, clothes, extraor-
dinarily fine rum and liqueurs
native handicraft and imported
luxuries from many ports of
the world... all the way from
Paris to Pakistan.
Haiti's richy hand-varnished
mahogany bowls trays and
sculpture are well known. So
is the famous Rhum Baiban-


A.,.


nelles, to the pulsing beat of
the voodoo drums. It's an UN-
FORGETITABLE experience.
For late stayer-uppells any
night of the week, Dan Allen's
Rendez-vous across form the
internationall Casino goes strong
until all hours. And along
about 1 a. mn., the'joint is usual-
ly hopping with oldtime Ame-


rican favorites, such as Aleomn-
der's Ragtime Band.
For seafood and such spe-
cialties as Fried Frogs Legs,
there is .the 'bayshore restau-
rant known as Ki Pi or Cap-
tain Ace's. The food is excel-
lent, the view interesting and
the dancing fun.
For dinner minus dancing,
there is Petionville's Le Picar-
di a French-run Pension fea-
turing Escargot, pepper steak
and the sort of food rarely seen
or tasted off the Midi. In Port-
auiPrince, Aux Cosaques is
known for its tasty flaming
lobster and other typically Hai-
tian dishes. The savoy, just
off the Champs de Mars, offers
either Haitian or American
foods and if you are really ho-
mesick for southern fried chic-
ken that is just where you'll
find it a block from the Na-
tional Palace.


court. Particularly prized by
gourmets is Five Star, Rbum
Barbancourt... so mellow that
it is often served with all the
ceremony accorded a grand, old
cognac. This is one of the few
rums in the world which is
distilled not from the pure
pressed juice of the sugar cane.
Only a few cases are ex-
ported from Haiti each year.
For this reason people who-
really-know take their full quo-
ta of non-taxable liquor 5
bottles of Rhum Barban-
court back 'to the States. The
price in Port-au-Prince is ama-
zingly moderate.

SELL IT THROUGH
HAITI SUN'S>
CLASSIFIED DEPARTNTh


f r4Leu.yesg m &f&4ede


IL 0 C bs gqft skop f








THE uSUNa DISCOVERED IN SANTIAGO DE CUBA


(TUIMBA FRANCESA BARELY SURVIVES IN CUBA

Descendants of Those Who Fled Haiti 150 Years Ago Keep it Alive


At the height of the Santiago de
Cuba Carnival last July, when
juke boxes were blaring and feet
were shuffling through the streets
to the rythm of the cha-cha-cha
and the meringue, another, more
subtle beat echoed among the flak-
ing, whitewashed walls of one of
the city's ancient buildings.
In the old *La Trocha quarter,
one of Cuba's rare ,Tumba fran-
cesa dances was taking place.

((Came From Haitib
The dance, brought to Cuba 150
years ago when 50,000 French Co-
lonists fled Santo Domingo with
their slaves to seek safety in the
neighboring Republic, is very si-
milar to the Haitian ritual rythms
of today. Though the pro-
ponents of the dance are.disappea-
ring, there are still four societies
giving performances in Cuba -
two in Santiago and two others in
Guantanamo, according to Dr. Max
Figuroa and Dr. Padro Canas
Abril of Oriente University who in
vited your reporter to this perfor-
mance.

((Performer Veterans Of
Independence Warn
Beneath the photographs that
decorated the walls represent-
ing Jose Marti, the Cuban hero
who roused the Cubans with his
verse and contributed greatly to
Cuban Independance, and memb-
ers of the dancing troupe, a group
of old drummers, all in their
eighties, straddled, larger than
Haitian-type tambours, that are
hollowed out tree trunks capped
at one end with pegged goat-skin.
The drummers all proudly wore
decorations from the Cuban War
of Independence, and smart Pana
ma hats.
In onpe corner stood a wooden
altar watched over by the Virgin
of Charity (Cuba's patron Saint)
with the Holy Child in her arms.

Not Catching
Facing the drummers across the
earth-floored room were chiefs of
the group an elderly couple who
watched the dancers with little
emotion.
None of the onlookers many
of whom were young appeared
to feel the rythm of the drum-
beats: they did not beat time or
shuffle as they would have done
at a merengue performance. This
seems to support the theory -Tom i


Among the visitors to the tradit-
ional dance were Lisa Leken of
Florida University who was busily
taping Caribbean folk music and
Professor Q. R. Coulthard, who
teaches Latin American Literat-
ure at University College of the
West Indies and who was giving
a lecture series at Oriente Univer-
sity.
Professor Coulthard, who has
written several books on Latin
American culture, had this to say
about the unique dance:
-Tumnba francesa' is a very cur
ious survival of Haitian dancing in
Cuba. The French refugees, after
the Haitian war of Independance,
came to Cuba, establishing them-
selves on coffee plantations, parti-
cularly in the East of Cuba, in the
province of Oriente. These French
families, who had brought with
them their Haitian slaves, contin-
ued to speak French, and their
slaves spoke creole. Even today,
there are a number of very evi-
dent galicisms in the Spanish of
Oriente province.
The creole-speaking slaves kept
to themselves, spoke their langu-.
age danced their own dances and
sung their own songs, until the
I ruin of the French coffee estates
during the American Civil War.
After that, most of the plantations
were il arn-lioned. The ruins of the
elegant great-houses can be seen
today around Santiago and Guan-
tanamo.
The slaves of French-Haitian
origin continued, after the abolit-
ion of slaveryin Cuba in 1880, to
maintain contact with each other
and founded societies in which
they 'met and danced their own
dances. '
The Sociedad de la Virgen de
la Caridad de Cobre, where, during
the carnival we saw the -tumba
f rancesa' is one of the few remain-
ing societies of this sort. No new
members are admitted, and conse-
quently only very old people are
found taking part in the dances.
Because of this exclusiveness, the
'tumba francesa. must die out
and disappear as the already very
old members of the society die.
Although the members no longer
speak or understand' creole they
sing songs in a sort of jargon
"which certainly sounds like creole,
but in which the words are not
recognizable. As often happens, the
music has preserved or mumified
the words. The singers state


ba francesa" is a doomed ance. i that what they


are singing is


francsos. They naturally do not
understand the words they art
singing. I have found African
songs similarly preserved in Ja-
maica.
The history of the Haitian
Franch in the Province of Oriente
has not yet been written. Their
influence was considerable and
wide-spread, however, in politics,
customs, manners, cooking etc.
During this years's Carnaval de
Oriente, we were privileged to see
one of the more picturesque sur-
vivals of Haitian French presence
in Cuba. It will soon be gone.


LES PLUS BELLES MOSA10UES
HAITIENNES


-.ou PLACE GEFFARD
PLACE GErFRARD e


-3..... .... "a-c '," tmm ..'- ... ...4wgL o.,L

A ,
-.4,, .. ,
... -_. ---- .. ... J *:-..: __ ..._. '" ..

The Sociedad de la Virgen de La Carzdad de Cobre, in Santiago
during Carnival dancing the 'Tumba Franceza'.


HOTEL DAMBALA

THE COOLEST IN HAJ j

VERY
VERY
VERY
B

LOW SUMMER RATES...'
SWIMMING P0oi
ALSO FREE TRANSPORI A I!.


No ne mei berdr are admitted to these Old Societies so the
-Tunkba Francesao is doorted.


Three convenient weekly flights to take
you into the gay, romantic atmosphere
of the Pearl of the Antilles!
Only 90 minutes from Port-au-Prince
O10 Sonliaogo de Cuba by CUBANA'

For information and reservations see your
Travel Agent or call Pan American World
Airways, Rue Dontes Destouches. Phone 3451


Ch-t'.14


DEPARTURES FROM PORT-AU.PRINCE:
Monday, Wednesdays, Fridays, at 1:25 p. m.


r 7 ONY $s25
owE-F


fl 71 .,I '


Sunday. October 2nd 1955


HAITI SUN





*CHAITi-IS SUNSHINE IN YOUR GLASS))
-T--.


...and you will be tempted, anyhow,
by this wonderful drink a sample
of which will be most graciously
offered to you.


DAMBALA PUNCH
Oz. xxx Barbancourt
1 dash Grenadine
S1 dash. Curacao
Triple-Sec
the juice of lime
1 dash sugar cane syrup
1 slice baniana
1 slice pineapple
1 slice orange
till with cracked ice;. top
with a Marraschino cherry:
S sprinkle with nutmeg
(or more)


HAYTIAN "TODDY
2 Oz. xxx Barbancourt
the juice of lime
a well squeezed 'lime peel
a (ouch of nutmeg.
cinnamon, clover:
sweeten to taste with
sugar cane syrup:
fill the tall glass with
boiling water.

BEACHCOMBER'S DREAM
2 Oz. .xxx Barbancourt
1 teaspoonful Curacao-
Triple-Sec
I dash Angostura Bitters
the jice of .-t lime
shoke and strain, serve
with a cherry on
a toothpick.


Foreign Minister Joseph Charles in conversation with Ambassador
Calvo of Guatemala. (See Story Page 14)l
-- "- -,.

Emm. VILLEDROUIN
HONEST RELIABLE SERVICE
More Than 10 Years Experience
FREE ESTIMATE IN SHOP

GENERAL RADIO SERVICE


ACCURATE TUBE TEST IN HOME
MOST MODERN TEST EQUIPMENT
Rue Dantes Destouches No. 120
New PAA office
ila=0,aa a|a al a a | 0 Ua U ma0Ilia Kra 0 a


DALU MAKES THE HEART
GROW FONDER
Dalu's Flowers Are
The Freshest


A Good Hotel

With Reasonale Rates


HOTEL PLAZA
Ideally Situated Off
the. Champ de Mars
S*UN Em n NE ,ainI


HIGH SPEED

EARTHMOVING










/ -V


Everybody's Favourite
Distributor:
HAITI TRADING Co. Chamber of Commerce bldg.


A Cz:ter')illar DW10 Tractor with a
No. 10) St tuper provides dependable, high
specrl liauling. These matched units have
an available top speed of 24.5 MPH.
The No. 10 Scraper has a capacity of
8.7 cu. yds. struck and LI cu. yds.
heaped. With this tractor-scraper, cycle
time is cut to a minimum. The No. 10
Scrhper provides positive ejection of the
stickiest materials.'
The DW10 is powered by a 115 HP.
Caterpillar Diesel Engine. This engine


lowers operating costs by using low cost,
non-premium fuels, without fouling. The
brakes on the trailing unit take hold an
instant before the brakes on the tractor,
thereby preventing jackknifing and assur-
ing safe operation. Mechanical steering is
aided by an hydraulic mechanism, giving
the driver complete control and a "feel
of the road."
This machine has a place on nearly
every earthmoving project. Come in and
let us explain more about the DW10
Tractor and the No. 10 Scraper.


CATERPILLAR
REGIST-RER TRADe MAmK


Sunday, October 2nd 1955


aflAITI SUN






Sunday, October 2nd 1955HATSU IR


REX PUMPS AND MIXERS FOR FASTER OPERATION, LOWER MAINTENANCE
AND BIGGER PROFITS!


.74T w, 1-, W


Rex Celf-przming centrifugal
Rex 3.-4 S-',2 Bag Cement mixers -all capacities


Pump'Rex 3.'2 S-'!.2 Bag Cement mnixers
(automatic) Rex 6S-.1 Bag Cement Mixer


Rex IuS- 2 Bags 1&S-3 Bags
Cement mixer


REX MACHINES AVAILABLE AT -SONACO,, (Sole distributors for Haiti), Tel: 3872 -On the Exposition, next to La Douane, PO Box 397


W'-LL, CANYON/yoU. I. H4AVE SOME LEAVES
AC=PT" THE AMAZING COMING ...WHAT ELSE
STOXY... WHAT ARE SCAN I O
YOU COINO TO 170
I ABOuT, IT? 3 _


MEANWHILE = BACK IN THE STATES...
OME I4EAPLINE= 'BE WITH YOU AS ScON
"t FUcITIVES FROM AS I CI4ECK OUT-
COPPERHEAP MEET -WHOOPS-I ALMOST
IN LOCAL .NER'P CALLED YOU CLARKE
__ B N E TH E RLA N D...


SHE HAS A MAN FOLLOWIN' OKP SCARES
ME WHO NOTIFIES HE4 WHEN THE SMALL
I AETA JOB-THEN SHE- ONES INTO
EITHEr BOYCOTTS THE FIRIN6 ME AS
Be COMPANIES... .-- A SUSPECTED
CRIMINAL,
OP- SOME


THAT WHAT THE AGENT NO WONPE&
CALLED ME WP'N ^= COPPER
COPPER CALHOON 4AP NME HASN'T BEEN
FLACKLISTEP IN HOLLYWOOP ABLE TO
I WENTAFTER A AD10 IO GET You
ANNOUNCEt'S JOB UNPER\ FIREP I
MY REAL NAME --JAME- !
js7 OLFMEITEZIj^ji^i~
I^^W'T'iTBI '1


THERE'S THE Wq V U M MST Bel:
WHO NOTIFIES T1 SLIPPING-I'
COPPERNEAV' M X J CILL WOICKN.6
START ON A NEW AT THE P7NDR.N
PO SjITION ... l."' -.
WMN I N6


BUT THIS I SURE;,JIM hBUTNON_
FAMTA9TIC- ONE MOLESTS ME INNj
HAVEN'T YOU PERSON... IT' ALL
ONNE T"O THE / PONE UNPDEP TH-E
POLICE ?y TABLE JUST AS YOU
CrOT BLACK.LISTEP IN
HOLLYWOOPl!


I.,


HAITI SUN


PAGE 9






HAITI SUN


Sunday, October 2nd


MARC HOLLYS "Agriculture IN BAITI""


rcu..t-ir' -- -Haiti- by Marc written source material. Beginn-
Aurele H'ull,, member of the ing wit i an analysis of
Board 0of Adrrni-stration of the t I e Agricultural possibilities
ODVA, is the outcome of a life- of the islands and its topographi
time study of the subject, cal conditions, he carefully and
The 300-!,3ge work published astutely studies such problems
by Vantag-, Press New York as land tenure, the character of
which wil go on sale October the peasant, the production of
17th is one of the Sequicenten- the export and food crops, ani-
nial Collection. mal husbandry, agricultural eco
In this book, Mr. Holly has ex- nomics, credit, education, the
haustively surveyed the entire marketing system and the action
field of Haitian agriculture, this of the government upon agricul-
despite inadequate statistics or ture.


nu
fo
a
a
to
h
k
C
cc
N

h
t


'Throughout, Mr. Holly offers ir
umerous valuable suggestions ii
Dr improvement His criticisms
re always constructive, always b
accompanied with a plan for bet t(
crment, always advanced from t
is vast practical and technical g
knowledge of the modern scien- s
!s of economics and agronomy. e
Vor does lihe speak in any wild-
!yed fashion. Reform is needed, c
ic says, a program that is an equi t
nble and judicious solution tak j
--a
i/I~lie


Votre Distrlbuteur ESSO.
en a o votre dispQsTion.


~- 9~I~ -~ -~ -


- ------a-


PAGE 10


1955


ng the welfare of all citizens He later was graduated with
nto consideration, highest honors and then occu-
Whether Haiti will fulfill the pied a variety of positions in the
rillant promise of its early his- Department of Agriculture: Coun
ory depends upon the strides ty Agent. Assistant in Hortlcultu-
hat can be made to overcome re and Agronomy, teacher
reed and ignorance. The pre- of agriculture and vocational
emn government is doing its best School of Chartard, Super-'
Lo develop the country. It has visor of Agricultural Edu-
.mbarked upon a bold economic cation, Assistant Director
program which includes road of the Normal School of Agricul
constructions and soil reclama- ture, Chief of the Bureau of Agri
ion, irrigation and drainage pro- cultural Economics. The fact
ects, construction of hospitals that he had a chance to live for
and schools, as well as increas- several years in country dis-
ed general and technical educa- tricrs and that he held such a
tion. diversity of functions enables
him to have a clear understand-
ing of the rural and agricultural
problems of Haiti. He also stu-
Stdied for a year at the Hampton
Institute, in Virgihla obtaining
advanced tr-ining in agricultural
Economics. He lived again in the
United States from 1948 to 1951,
holding consular and diplomatic
posts.
The studies made in foreign
countries and the time spent
abroad prevent Holly from hav-
ing a provincial approach to the
Haitian problem and enable him
Stonestablish points of eomparal
son between the situation in his
country and in some other lands.
i(This is one of the reasons which
make this study so valuable not
only' to the poeple interested in
Ithe developpement of Haiti, but
also to many engaged in techno
cal assistance. The story told
in this book is not altogether uni
Truly, the problem is a ioral quec. Other underdeveloped
and educational one, as the an- countries are going through more
thor stiresae3 time and again, andi or less the same growing crises
agronomists. educator, adminis and the experiences of the na-
trative officials, politicians-in- t lion studied may be quite worth-
deed all who cherish Haiti-willl while in devising programs of as
do so well to study and ponder instance or wol-king out policies
this book. for the betterment of the rural
Intresuction by: conditions of all of them.
Pierre G. Sylvaln T The timing of this publication
Port-au-Princien Pierre Syl- seems perfect for at least two rea
vain, an agronomist specialist in I.ons. First. this is the year when
Coffee culture working in Ethio Haiti Celebrates the sesquicen-
pia wrote from Addis Ababa tennial of her independence and
(Ethiopia) the introduction to should cogitate on the successes
eAgriculture o i Haiti. and failteres of the past years in
A People WHICH AROSE BY order to adopt policies to bring
ITSELF FROM SLAVERY TO our poeple a new century of grea-
FREEDOM and succeeded in ter happiness, greater produc-
building a nation in spite of the tion, and greater achievements.
indifference or antagonism of the Secondly, this is ilso the tkne
foreign powers at a time when when the most ambitious rural
g the very existence of this nation project ever undertaken in the
was a challenge to the then-exist country is being initiated: thece
ing social order; a land, impove- Clamation of soils of the Artibo'
rished by overcropping and er- nite Valley and the social uphea.
sion through centuries of misuse val of the poeple Inhabiting the
from greed, ignorance and the area. ThoHe in charge of the pro-
pressure of population-this is the ject should meditate on this book.
background of the story that this Luckily enough the author is at
book endeavors to tell! These the helm of the enterprise, being
facts have to be under stood now a member of its Council of
and medicated upon in order Administration. It is sincerely
to appreciate at their full va- hoped that this book will be of'
lue the pages which will follow, help to the success of this im-
Marc A. Holly has frankly ex- portaut project arfd also to the
posed the problems of the agri betterment of Haitian agriculture
culture of Haiti as he sees them, as a whole.
covering all their various aspects:
economic as well as botanic or Your Best Bet
zoologic; social as well as ecolo-
gic. There may be differences In Travel
of opinion as to some of his con-
clusions. but everybody. ,vwill be King Christophe's
impressed I[y the obvious since
rity of the author. Tours
Few are qualified as Marc Hol
ly to write such a book. He was r
born and raised in Cap-Haitien,
among the great historical re-
minders of this city which seem
to corner upon her sons an indo
mitable patriotism. This may ex-
plain the great anger bhown by
the author in presence of what
lie considers as unforgivable
blunders in agricultural policies.
At the end of his secondary
school years. he moved to Port-.
au-Prince where he studied at
the Coliege of Agriculture, at .-
Damiens. This College had just
been reorganized and turned '-'- "" ""
over to a Haitian Staff after se- .?L,:: .
vera 1 years of foreign tutoring.,





Sunday, October 2nd 1955


.*L ~


HAITI SUN ____

DUPONT PAINTS
fo, ei -ry purpose




Charles Dejean & Co



Agent In Haiti


AU'(w,^REMoVwE
I A m ra E
;A? PWt Im -ec.os f WBH


NOT A 4UMAN SOUL.!
mar A LIVING PLANTj NOTg
A SOUND BUT THE
HOWI.WO WIN PJ, T
SHUTUPT ULA!
THIS PLACE IS 1AD
ENOUGH WITHOUT
i^/^^^YOUR YAPPINGO!:t


WHILE, ACROSS MANY 4/MILES OF SPACE....
WEVE MAPPEP 600 WE'RE HITTING THE
PLANETS IN THIS STAR OUTER FRINGES, ZARKDV.
CLUSTER, PALE, AND DEAD PLANETS WANT
SIT'S JUST THE TO RECORD THEM TOOP
/L BEE6NNINS.' J i_


- BAGE 11


Fo pOW




EASunday. il.tobEr 2nd 1955


Save


time


& money


ship through Miami Via


COINMAR LINE


,dg-~ G/-fA8$~A
A%4A#/ ~ 'C.
Fl ii 11 I ~ 1J~


'WS OaS1 aF YOIUR YY./I
IOVP !C,,f- 7-0
AOP VI /IW COUFE 70-A
BYA HAGsxYA 7TL Afh
AM4 A&&vrW

I4L


V


PAGE 1,


HAITI SUN


1HE10 69 O)E OF 70-T E 3
7IE TW/N RWQAl ./NS/ B
7mez Fl^vv WStrWo51
aH~110100.,v





Suitdaj, ],1.obe.r 2nd 1955 ___


MEMBERS OF TRAVEL FRATERNITY TO
PA ('.CtiPA'TE IN WORD CONGRESS OF TOURISM

T11 L.k, Geneva region of Switzerland. which earlier thi
year :;ered -_ site for the summit meeting of the Big Fou
and whicot". Irt October will play host to their foreign minis
ers, ia.s aW-. ieen selected as the locale for the 25th Annua
Converdiua -,c'.d Wbrld Travel Congress of the American So
city o:. Tra,,el Agents.
In Ia .e,--[ong series of assemblies, seminars and.busines
nmeeturtgi ..nning on October 10, over 1800 members c
the ti-a,.'ef. industryy from all over the world will gather at th
Compl'.o&r :1--isse in Lausanne to discuss problems pertainin
to tl[e in,,Ltry. Among the many social events schedule
wilt be a sightseeing excursion, followed by an official recepi
ion. it the Palace of the Nations in Geneva.
Mtny ift c e attending delegates.will have concluded th
lirst stagee izz-a series of survey tours which have taken there
to most of the free countries of Europe, Africa and the Mid
die Ejst.
Representing Haiti' at the Congress will be Webb Franci
iDambala -Hotel), Georges Hraux (Heraux Tours). Albert Sil
vera (El Rancho Hotel). Conseiller du Gouvernement. Marce
Forniinr .%-'?stant Director ONT, Guy Laraque. and Mr
Elia. Nforj3a':3.





According to ASTA president Thomas J. Donovan of- Chi
cage, over 75 such pre-and-post-converftion tours have been
designed to provide first-hand information for the travel ad
visors to tli.e American public whose spending on travel a
home acid abroad has reached a multi-billion dollar figure.
Ex,.erm' ou .?pecial aspects of travel will be heard at various
meetings thic-ughout the week in a program which will be
concluded -October 15 with addresses by Charles E. Beard
president, Braniff International Airways, and Siegfried Bittel
director, S,,'is. National Tourist Office.
ASTA, -tli::iz convened in San Francisco last vear and ir
Rome in. 1953. traditionally alternates its conventions bet
weer. hle U : and foreign cities The 1956 meeting will be
hela rl Clhuca-) and in 1957 ASTA will meet in Madrid.


~4 ~mpuf


(obalne


Lhoucotiin


E'-, 'r 'Thursday and Sunday night SpeciaP folklore

Show... and dancing

Sai..rda;. Night -its Always CABANE CHOUCOUNE


is
ir
t-
al
0-
3S
If
e
g
d


TOURISM 7'____

PROMOTION P. .

FIRM OPENS
IN MIA M. 1I


Organized to promote tourist
travel to The Bahamas, West In-
dies. Central America, Mexico and


northern South


America, Miami's
first office with
this kind of serv-
ice %&'as n on d on


COX Saturday under
e WAS the name-of Syl-
n van G. Cox.Asso-
M- I iIAMI cites, Biscayne
Herald)) Terrace Hotel
s Travel bldg., 340 Bikca-
1- yran ye blvd.
fl Writer .We are relat-
ed geographical-
1 y, economically
and spiritually to these neighbor-
ing, friendly countries., said Cox.
and so, it is appropriate that the
experience 'and talents in all
phases of tourist travel promotion
.of our organization should be used
- in the promotion and protection
n of tourism in such countries.,
- Sylvan G. Cox Associates is an
Organization of travel writers, ad-
vertising specialists, photograph-
s ers. hotel sales engineers and au-
e authorities on all phases of public
relations as they affect the tourist
Industry. It offers a scientific sys-
tem of tourist promotion to govern
l ments, resorts and hotels..
Having traveled extensively dur-
Sing the last 24 years in resort ar-
eas of southern United States and
Latin America and on numerous
-occasion's to Haiti, Cox is recogn-
ized as a writer and authority on
resorts and travel in this part of
the world. During the last eight
ye-jrs he was travel editor and

o; The Miami Herald.
Cox .has received medals and
ce:.iificates,of hondr from several
countries in Latin America be-
cauZie of his editorial contributions
in behalf of tourism.
Among them are the Mexicahi
Huesped de Honor, bestowed in
Jan. 1951; *de la Orden del Meri-
to Juan P,,'io Duarte*, bestowed
by Gen. Hector B. Trujillo Molina,
M.M. of the Dominican Republic,
in August, 1951; the City of Anti-
gu., Guatemala, ,Disitante Distin-
guido, bestowed in August, 1954;
and on March 30, 1953, Cox be-
came -honorary member,.. of the
Cuban Tourist Commission.
Memrberships are held by Cox in
the American Society of Travel
Agents, the Skal Club, Rotary In-
ternational aind the college frater-
nity of Phi.,Kappa Psi.
Also active in thlia new organiz-
ation of Latin American tourist
promotion is Mrs. Ida A. Jones.


HAITI HAS MOST ATMOSPHERE
Broadway Public Relations Officer, Helen Kauffman, writing from
New York City to Correspondent Aublin Jolicoeur, sights Haiti as the
island of the Caribbean with the most atmosphere. Miss Kauffman who'
visited Haiti two months ago, (seen above on departure) says that she
recommends the country to friends who wish more than a comfortable
hotel room and a swimming pool. She also declared: -Oloffson Hotel.
has the thickest atmosphere.,
Direct Passenger Ship service To New York 3V Days


Eiery Monday at 6:00 P.M.

A. The deluxe .20-pass.eger

cruise-ships of Panama Line

sail from Port'-au Prince-

direct to midtown N.Y. City.

American flag, all rooms with bath air-conditioned dining-
room, famous cuisine, swimming-pool.
Accurate information at office of Panama Line ONLY.
Rue Abraham Lincoln, Telephone 3062


A -


FRESH MEAT!


BEST' MEAT!


0 SO BLANCO

(Ahr-conditioned)
Our local cuts -- (from our own cattle)

Imported fresh meat every Thursday
(from Smith & Richardson, Miami)
Phone 3963 for Home Delivery


PAGE 13


aHAITI SUN





PA__4_HIISNSunday, OctObe 2nd 1956,


Mr. Frank Devieux, Secretary
Ambassador Calvo Celebrates of National Education and Agri
culture;
Guatemalan Independance ay Mr. and Mrs Jacques Frangois,
nnepenance Secretary of the Presidency and
Commerce
Mr. Raoul St-Lot, Secretary of
In a setting of flowers in bloom ties which bind them will become Public Works; e
.. in the spacious gardens, and with ever stronger. Mr. and Mrs Elie Villard and
the halls and terraces bedecked In a short response. His Excel son, Secretary of Public Health
with the superb baskets and bou lency, Mr. Joseph D. Charles, Se and Labor.
quets received from friends and cretary of State for Foreign Re- Mr and Mrs Charles Fombrun,
admirers of the Centrai American lations, spoke in the name of the Presisent of the Senate.
Republic the anniversary of the Haitian Government. offering Mr. and Mrs Maurice Clermont,
Independence of Guatemala was congratulations to President Cas General Secretary of Dept of Fo
marked by a brilliant reception tillo Armas, and best wishes for reign Relations
at the Legation on Thursday. the continued progress of the no Mr. Daniel Theard. Minister
evening, September 15th. ble people of Guatemala. In Plenipotentiary and Chief of De
More than 350 guests were la- speaking of te friendship of the apartment of Protocole;
vishly entertained by His Excel two countries. M. Charles brought Mr. Yvon Perrier, Protocole
lency and Mrs. Roberto H. Valle out the point that even in inter Attache and Introductor of Am-
Calvo, E.E. and Minister Plenipo national sessions, Haiti is always bassadors and Ministers, a.i.:
tentiary of Guatemala, at their to be found side by side with Gua Mr. Edouard Laleau, Protoco
palatial residence, first of the temala. le Attache;
architectural gems overlooking Minister and Mrs. Calvo were Mr. Martial Celestin, Protocole
the Petion-Ville park. Respond- ably assisted by their gracious Attache-
ihg to the cordial invitation of daughters who moved about Mgr Luigi' Raimondi, Aposto-
the distinguished diplomatic oou among the guests spoiling them lic Nuncio;
pie were members of the Presi- with a thousand delicatess atten Ambassador of Cuba and Mrs
dential Cabinet, the Diplomatic tions& making the evening one of Francisco de Arce;
Corps, Prelates of the Clergy, re- pleasure and charm for their Ambassador of Great Britain,
presentatives of the Legislative guests. Thr-oughout the evening, Mr. Sidney Simmons-
and Judicial Corps, and leading could be heard enthusiastic feli- u.S Ambassador and Mrs Roy
members of Port-au-Prince's so- citations and good wishes for Tasco Davis;
cial circles, tihe happiness and prosperity of Italian Ambassador and Mrs
The reception took place bet- the Guatemalan people. Giorgio Spalazzi, and daughters:
-ween 6:00 and 8:00 P.M., and as Among the distinguished guests Argentine Ambassador and
,guests were invited to assemble who attended the reception were rs. Jlorge Benjamin Aquino, and
about the sumptuous buffet ta- Mr. Joseph D. Charles, Secreta son;
bles Minister Calvo toasted, in ry of Foreign Relations and Cul- Venezuelan Ambassador and
champagne, the friendship which tes: Mrs. Luis Arroyo Perejo;
has always existed between his Mr. Adelphin Telson, Secreta- Mr Ferdinand Falton, E.E. &
country and the Republic of Hal ry of the Interior, National De- M.P of the Soverign Order of
ti, expressing his wishes that the fense and Justice: Malte;
Ambassador of Peru and Mrs.
Alberto Perez Saez;
I, Colombian Ambassador and
Mrs Luis Humberto Salamanca,
and daughters;
Ambassador of Chile and Mrs.
"'. Ramon Sotnmayor Dumas;
German Charge d'Affaires and
:. ,.",. .. Mrs Fritz Wussow;
Canadian Charge d'Affaires
1: ..... ,and Mrs Edouard Ritchie Belle-


Ambassador Calvo and Senora with the Apostolic Ntawpio.


Mrs Emilio Ochoterena; Mr. and Mrs Rog r Denis;
Mr. Carlos de la Presllla, Char Mr and Mrs Willy Frisch.,
ge d'Affaires, a.i. of Spain; Major Paul Corvingtor;
Mr. Sidney Watkins, Charge Mr. Victor Coicou.
d'Affaires, a.i of France; Mr Franck Magloire;
Liberian Charge d'Affaires and Mr. Gerard Corav;n, antI :,hiter;
Mrs WiUiam B. Fernandez: Mr. an-d 'Mrs Ldc-vico Pace,,
Madame Ruth de Brewer, wife and daughter;
of the. Liberian Ambassador; Engineer Roger Haspil;
Mr. and Mrs Nicolas J. de Oli Mr. and Mrs. Ernile Garecher;.
veira Cezar, 1st Secretary Argen Mr. Victor Greger
tine Embassy; Miss. M. Etheard:
Brazilian Charge d'Affaires and Mr. Johny Khawly;
Mrs Jose Maria Bello-Filho; Captain and Mrs Jacque. .l;tien
Mr. and Mrs Luis E. Hernandez ne. and sons;
Diaz, 1st Secretary, Dominican Mr. and Mrs. Gerard E-oucha-
Embassy; rain;
Reverend Father Edourado Ro Captain and Mr- Edouard De-
vida, Secretary of the Apostolic nis;
Nonce: Mr and MArs. Pa.. Rey;
MMr. Carlos Alberto Stegman, Mr. Emile Domond, and :Iter;
Attache of Argentine Embassy; er;
U.S Cultural Attache and Mrs Lieutenant and Mrs. M.a: Deet
Jean A. Graffis, and daughters; jen;
Reverend Father Gaston le Mrs. Pierre-Louis:
Houillier, Attache of the Aposto Supreme Court Justice nd
lie Nonciature; Mrs Christian Laporte;
Th. A. Burgers, Consul Gen&- Mrs. Alire Wiener;
rat of tVie Netherlands; Mrs. Olga Weiner;
Mr. George Naude, Consul Ge Mrs Mireille Bastierr,
neral of Belgium. Mrs. Jean Fiouchard and
Mr. Fernand A. Crepsac, and daughters;
son. Honorary Consul of G4ate- Miss Auwora \'alle Vaiw-:.1-;,
mala; Miss An- Maria \'alle ildi-
Mr. and Mrs Raymond Brisson, zan;
Honorary Vice-Consul of Guate Joven Roberto Vaile \'VdL..an;
mala: Mr and MAirs Manuel E-che-ver-
Nicaraguan Consul General and ria Barrutia; 1st Secreta.-.,, CGua
Mrs. Joe Pierre-Louis: temalan Legation:
"Mr. Lyonel Paquin. Consul of Mr. and Mrs James Mc. 0 Ro-
Costa Rica: binson British Commercial'J Atta-
Mr. and Mrs Max L. Etheart, ch2.
Vice-Cunsul of El Salvador; Mr. Ern'est Bonhor-nimre. .'inan-
lMiss Maria Caruana4 ce and National E-onomy,' ]ub-
Mr. Marcel Fombrun. and Secretary;
daughter. Haitian Govt. Council Mr. and MArs. Dmald A'olt
Member: .iAmenrir in Commercial A:tadie,
Dr and Mir Henri Domond; Lieutenant Henri Claude Pr-r'i-
Doctor and Mrs Raymond ra.
Poux. Mr. Victor Cauvin
Dr Coniant Pierre-Louis. Mr Edonard Blanchard
Dr. Anterior Miot,, Mr. Gerard Rouzier
Dr. Paul Telemaque; FR E
Dr. Ren" Salomon FOR RENT
Dr. and Mrs Jules Thebaud, F u r n is h e d house En P&


mare; and sons:
Mexican Charge d'Affaires and I Dr and irs. Gerard Domini-


AUX COSAQUES
Haiti's famous homard flam-
me* has been enthusiastically
acclaimed by visiting epicures,
and featured by uImperial Li-
nen.x
But foreigners aren't the only
connoisseurs of food. Haitianas
know where the meat is done
just right, where wines are of a
perfect vintage and flavour to
mellow their mood and form the
perfect foil for each delUghtdl
Course.
That's why special occasions
are observed at (Aux Cosaques.s


.. .. S i J
Tuesday and Fridays Dinner Dancing


que:
Dr LuciL'n Lescot:
Dr.and M:!r Serge Mercesron;
Captain Victor Blanehet;
Lieutenant and Mrs. Philippe
Dominique;
Mr. Fred Madsen;


tionvUle; 3 bedrooms, 2 bath
rooms upstairs: downstairs
large drawing room and large
dinning room, surrounded by
veranIah patio. swimainmg-
pool, spacious lawn and gard-
en, with drawn from highway.
has paved private driveway.
Tel: 7284 2069.


Continuous music and dancing every nile
To The ccRIVIERA ORCHESTRA
From 6:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.
Every Saturday night '1.00 adm. per person
DINNER TIME 7-9: P.M.


LII. IDIiCAIIQIIZIt

F 1101 5S FOR ITS FRENCH COOKING

Specialities

-ONION'SOUP -FILET MIGNON
-PEPPER STEAK -SNAILS
-ESCALLOPPE DE VEAU -PICARDIE
FOR RESERVATIONS Tel: 7416
LOCATED IN COOL TETE-DE-L'EAU, PETION-VILLE


JL-za~w~d A


HAITI SUN


PAGE 14







fX you really
want to bec-
g- ome acquain-
ted with Hai-
i there are
many intere-
sting trips
which afford
S a close-up of
A-' Haitian life
which you cannot gain if you
confine your sight-seeing to the
city.
Most of these trips can be
made in conventional automo-
biles, others -require the more
versatile jeep to navigate the
rough spots and river crossings.
AJll of them can be made in sa-
fety.

a


There is a Hertz-Drive-dit
Yourself Agency in town where
you can rent a car or a jeep at
reasonable rate; or you can
rent ears, with or without
chauffers, elsewhere. The Hai-
iian Air Force provides safe
.and efficient air transport to
most important points in 'Haiti
at very reasonable rates. Ask
your hotel manager or your
travel agent for details.
Each of 'these trips has its
special attraction. From the
longer trips you will return
with a grand thirst, a hearty
appetite, a delicious fatigue,
quickly banished by a hot bath


COURTESY OF aLA BELLE CREOLE AND aHAITI SUN"
a III I


TRAVEL sueGEn TIONS


(for which you will have a new
respect). You will have a new
test for the attractions of the
city. You will fell a great pily
for the jaded characters who
have not strayed from the bar
since you left... And, of course,
you will have a good reserve of
conversational ammunition to
last you for many months.
So, starting with the shortest
trips first, here are a few boiled
Jown suggestions for travel in
Haiti:

BOUTILLIERS MOUNTAIN
AND LE PERCHOIR
(Ler Pershawh) The Perch)
The most spectacular view in
Haiti: 2,000 square miles of
Halti spread out before you -
a miracle of color, form, sun-
light and shadow! Port-au-Prin-
ce lies at your feet (3.000 feet
below) like a giant map. To get
to this 'breath-taking, unboelie-
eable and unforgettable view
)u ride 10 miles from Port-au-
Prince, through the pretty little


SAT-7L&


town of Petionville, then up a
winding mountain road, borde-
red by 'flaming giant pointsetta
plants. You pass the tratched


roof habitations of peasants and
arrive in rural Haiti, where life
goes on as it has for centuries
as if the city below did not
exist. LE PERCHOIR, modern
oasis on the mountain, offers
the facilities of its restaurant
end night club, its Terrace Bar,
and ils branch of La Belle Cre-
ole Gift Shop to make the trip
even more enjoyable and profi-
table. After sundown light
wraps advisable, and gentlemen
are asked to wear coats in the
restaurant efdter 7 p. m. Allow
two hours for this trip plus
time to eat. \

CAP-HAITIEN
AND LA CITADELLE
This trip is an experience in
history and geography. It is an
adventure and a pilgrimage
which you must not miss.








If you have the time, we re-
commend that you take three
days aind go to Cap-Heitien by
car. Its about 170 mdle's and a
minimum of 5 or 6 hours, but
you should take about 8 hours
to enjoy it most. So to one of
Cap Hai'tien's comfortable ho-
tels. For the night, go to the
Citadelle the next day, retur-
ning to Port-au-Prince the third
day. Eevry mile and every


hour of this trip will be full of
unforgettable impressions.
If you are pressedfor time,
you can fly to the Cape in 45
minutes, and can make the en-
tire pilgrimage in a single day


JACMEL.-
If you want another trip off-
the-beaten tPack go to Jacmel,
on Haiti's south coast. Jacmel,
once a flourishing town, still
has a considerable export bu-
siness, but is typical of many


Wa
J-


Haitian provincial sea-coast
towns waiting for better days
to come. Jacmedl has a flavor
of its own'. To get there you
can take the easy way by air,
or the adventurous way by
road, about 60 miles, practical-
ly every mile of which has a
river crossing. Near Jacmel is


A


j &ffi4MSPMCIAUTIS


For
MAHOGANY SCULPTURES
(La Belle Creole
v


For
LIQUORS
La Belle Creole


For
OMEGA WATCHES
iLa Belle Creole


For
HAITIAN RYTHMS
AND
HANDWOVEN FABRICS
La Belle Creole


For.
GLASSWARE
AND CERAMICS
fLa Belle Creole


For
VOODOO JEWELRY
La Belle Creole


I
.,c.


*0*


ONE PRICE POLICY PRICEJ5 YiS3JY I!ARKIp jIA4 ITE --j FULLY ITEMISED SALES SLIP FURNISHED


'*~ q
I, '~J


r$~~': ~ A'-
;4*~ ,*


'I



For
FRENCH PERFUMES
(La Belle Creole


I


LI


I'


L.


4"









t i


one of Haiti's most beautiful )
beaches, Raymond les Bains. .:.
Two hotels there, clean end."
comfortable. Plan to stay over-' .
night at least.' '.
FORiET DES PINS .
(Pine Forest)
In south-east Haiti, a drive of '
sc-ne 60 miles from Port-au-.' "!
Prince is a beautiful pine forest .
at an elevation of about 7,000 ;-.
feet. To arrive at this 150,000 .
acre fore-t, one drives through' .
the rich sugar cane lands of
the Cul de Sac plain, then I
through and arid region of cac- A
tuhis to the edge of Lake Mtang .
Sumatre, 'famous salt lake, in'-: -
fested with crocodiles, lying on; "
the frontier of the Dominican- i
Republic. There the climb corn- A
mences to the cool Pine Forest.
This trip will take all day,
returning to your hotel for :
cocktails and dinner. Passing
through a number of small Hai-
tian towns and villages, it af- :
fords a variety of impressions,.
of Haitian life and geography. .
Take a wrap for your v]&t .
its cool up there.
atkel ,


- 4..: L


.*
...




COURTESY OF uLA BELLE CREOLEm AND ((HAITI SUNM


qeve-v r OP A S
.7-" CJ-




WELCOM WU


TO PORT-AU-IAPRINC4N
--* MEMBERS

CARLOS: -
CARIBCRAFT: -
CHAMPANA'S: -
GEO. DESLANDES: -
HAITIAN GIFT SHOP: -
JACQUELINE'S: -
JEANNE'S: -
.LA BELLE CREOLE: -
LA PERLE IDES ANTILLES: -
.-- MAISON OIIENTALE: -
.F MEIMBERG BROS:-
OIUANGA DOLL:
hip OUVROIR NATIONAL: -
@4.4.4SAMBA: -
1dp-0 1 '- SI-IA SHOP: -
THE SOUVENIR SHOP:-
RHUM BARBANCOURT:-

6l n rc Policy Prices,
Visibly Marked on 'Each
Item Fully. Iteed Sales Slip
is Furnished without Ruest.
2 It's a LA BELLE CREOLE
tsl11. Calonint Cathedral"
Cu" Publicity Creation
i6,. m Mrh,4 13. Trinit eirporl Clicheis made by Cie. Lith Hfaiuti
Ch"n Printed by IMPRIMERIE DE L'ET.47F
"7. Bureau Of 7'rism Z4. National Palaae
r 8. Bank of Hnili 4.' Fort National Copyright and all rights reserved
........ Pad orris# DBg. V. Royal Bank of Canada: .M'AOLIF tl'm "ei!J rd ri.aaed
.......Design~d .4freda~darcha-Garamendi and
J(&WC.J10. Met G V. Camplr Haiti Sun by Rosario Franco de la Rosa






Sunday, October 2nd 1955 HAITI SUN~ Page 13


Mrs Martin Honored at PAL Miami Lunch
Gr-iup Arriving For 3-Day Celebration Oct. 15th.


Tne Miami sojourn of ten days
'from which she has just return-
ed, was highlightedd by a gala lun-
checit or t'.e occasion of her de-
parture to Haiti, last week, when
Mr.\ Franir'k J. (Julie) Martin was
gu -,; of honor of the Miami
Beach Branch of the Pan Ameri
.can League.
The pcrpular wife of the Vene-
zuetan Consul to Haiti and vete-
ran busir.ei man of Port-au-Prin


ca %as entertained by the League
members at Burdir.? Tea Room.
Following the luncheon members
Oizited the Centro Latino Ame-
ricano Lounge, to work out plans
for their trip to Haiti for the 50th
Anniversary of the Bellevue Club
Celebration to be held on Octo-
ber 15 th.
Mrs. Martin addressed the
group on fashions worn by socie-
ty women in Haiti, and the prac


.i C


I,. .-



Mrs. -Martrn (seated second from right), being interview in t~e Centro
Larino Americano Lounge in Miami.


tical wardrobe for the visiting
tourists.
Among those attending the lun
cheon were: Mrs. Addison Hall,
Mrs. S.F. Daniels, Mrs. A A Ar-
dell, Mrs Helene Wigman, Mrs
Henry Fisman, Mrs Pauline
White, Mrs Edgerton Mason, Mrs
Edna Van Acker, and Mrs Peter
Driben.
Mrs. Martin, Haitian goodwill-
ambassador-at-large made the
trip to Miami to accompany a
party of 10 houseguests who had
spent two weeks vacation with
her and Mr. Martin at their villa
in Petion-Ville.


WELCOME

AMERICAN

LEGION

Before attending the Ameri-
can Legion Convention, to be
held in Florida October 10th to
13th, a group of Chicago Delega-
tes is spending a week in Haiti
on a Pre-Convention Tour.
This is the first time that we
have the opportunity, and the
great pleasure, to play host \ to
distinguished members of this
famous and heroic organi-
zation, as a group.
Leading our most welcome vi-
sitors on this trip are Chicago
City Counselor John J:-. Viggiano
and his charming 'wife. The
group, which is staying at Hotel
Dambala, also includes (in the
Department of Grace and Pul-
chritude) Miss Bernice Ostell;
Miss Augusta M. Clettenberg;
Ann Kocyon: Miss Ruth Gronkie.
Amorng their escorts are Bernard
J. Conlon; Elmer E. Erhardt; Har
ry Peters; Joseph D. Rapp, and
Roy Hemphill.


-4*
JUST RECEIVED

A NEW ASSORTMENT OF

CARPETS

ADD UNBELIEVABLE CHARM TO YOUR
HOME WITH THESE CARPETS OF
BEAUTIFUL PATTERNS ON ASSORTED
BACKGROUNDS. THESE CARPETS ARE
JUST RIGHT AND YOUR HAPPY CHARM.
THEY COME IN ALL SIZES.

SEE THEM NOW.


VISIT CITADELLE AND SANS-SOUCI PALACE


. O ,


ONLY $25 TO CAP HAI IEN'
by DELUXE Limousine Service
CONTACT RAY'S TRANSPORTATION


____________ ____ Page 17


Page 1,7


HAITI SUN)


I






b














|


Sunday, October 2nd 1955


N




















~
.7,-

4'



'4









'4.


q*.


*rt\^j-r






Page 18 HAITI SUN Sunday, 'October 2nd 31955


A big fiesta in Cap-Haitien
last Wednsday was held at the
home of Mr and Mrs Dou-dou
Laroche'. It was Mrs. Dou-dou's
birthday anniversary.
XXX
Tootsie Jones returned to
school in tie D. R Sunday.

xxx
Mrs. Graciela Molina de Cos-
ta and her two lovely daughters
Ivette and Graciela, are due
home Monday from Havana to


join papa, Cubana Superinten-
dant here.
xxx
Mademoiselle Catherine Cassis
and Mr. Nasr Halloun, a Rue de
Quai General merchant, have an
nounced their engagement. The
big day is set for Saturday, the
3rd of December.
xxx
Insurance Broker. Delmar
Phipps, and Madame have re-
turned home from a &grand se-
jour en France.-s


Robert J. Fatten pictured above with his flock of domestic ducks,
:daughter Elizabeth (Fou-Fouille) and pensionnaire Claudinette Fou-
chard, on the lawn of his 'attractive La Boule estate. Mr. Fatton re-
turned toiPetionville last week after two months commuting to the city
-recommends that La Boule have a resident doctor during the season.

II


Dentist Claude Stephen is
off on a business-cure-pleasure
trip to the D.R. and Puerto Rico
Any shortage of ,gouttes d'or,
in the city this week-end is be-
cause Ti-Tosh Severe and Ge-
rard Rouzier have had their ba-
chelorhood (eenterrement de vie
de gargonm) well interred by
their numerous buddies. Thurs-
day night cSon-Sonb Habib open
ed his home to the undertakers
of Ti-Tosh's bachelorhood. Ge-
rard Rouzier weds October the
8th at 6.45 P.M. at St Pierre's
Church in Petion-Ville, and Ti-
Tosh walks up the aisle of Sa-
cre-Coeur at 6.30 P.M. Motorists
should be warned forehand about
friends who hope to attend both
weddings.
xxx
Atherton Lee extolling the beau
ties and advantages of Kenscoff,
tells us that they now have five I
telephone connections with Port-
au-Prince. He says he has tele-
phoned from Kenscoff to Was-
hington and New York, as readi
ly as is possible from Miami to
New Work. *This is progress
cried Farmer Lee.
xxx
Senor Oicar Bustillo, General
Traffic Manager of the Cubana
Airline passed through Thurs-
day enroute to Ciudad Trujillo'
and is expected to return- here
today for a short stop-over.
xxx
Rue Payee Beauty Salon pro-
prietress, Mr. Maurice Naude,
Sis back from visiting with the fa
Smily in la belle France.
xxx
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brutus
Sand their little daughter, Carol-
Marie are feeling much better
this week. Mrs. Brutus, the for-
mer Marie-Denise Destouches, re
ceived the visit of the Stork, Sep'
tembet 13 th three months ahead
I of schedule
xxx
Cap-Haitien business tycoon,
and coffee planter, Otto Schutt,
arrived here Thursday, with his
family from a three months va-
cation in Germany. Maurice and
,Maude Laroche welcomed the
Schutts here drove them to Au
Cap, Thursday night.


xxx
-Lina Chauvet flew home to re
sume her studies in Boklyn, N.Y,
Thursday af'.cr three months
with the Marcel Gentil family.
xxx

Samuel Ziskind, CARE Mis-
sion Chief in Haiti, returned to
Port au P.i'nec on Monday, after
a mnonth's leave in the U.S. Mr.


Ziskind visited with family and
friends in New York, Boston and
Brockton, Mass. During his trip,
the active Mission Chief lectured.
to Cooperative representatives
in Maynard and Natick, Mawa in
connection with the village pro-
jects they are sponsoring -,n Hai
ti. ,Prospects for further ,CARE
activities. I'ere look goor'. .Mr-
Ziskind informed.


Marie Jos.e Roy as .she boarded the Newr York bound Cli-ppcr this
week. Melle Rfog ill spend 2 months with s'?.r Denise in 3Manhattan.


I This sovereign Whiky
S possesses that distinction
of lavour which will claim
your allegiance from the first mip.


HIGHLAND


QUEEN
SCOTCH WHISKY

MACDONALD & MUIR LTD
Oistillers I Leigh Scotland


-.


213 c~^1eonte. Qitor CJte~~kjek a4-n'4


xoodcoi %tO^tQ-tE xvKtdt

"tte.-wctcC 'w^ctr^^MtC. uate










I..


_aoe 18


. k


Sunday. ,October 2nd S55


HAITI SUN






CrznayrqYCrtnhCLr 2n 155 AII UN agu1


^wli






-* P



'Pon.igtt anid tomorrow is the
big day in Croix des Bouquets;
A reportage of the fete will ap-
pear nw.xt weak.
.xxx
SheeL.g: Burns is off to India
Friday' to join husband Vinton
on his FAO assignment.
XXX
Francoise Frantz, arrived from
Paris for a three months holiday.
She is hous.;e guest at the home
of Dr. Maurice Armand, at Pe-
tion-Ville.
xxx
Mrs. Sidney Simmons. wife of
the BritLh Ambassador, has re-
turned from the Naval Hospital
at Guantanamo Bay, and is con
valescing in Kenscoff.
K X X
Dr. taymr -.d Dupuy returned
to the ttate; last week-end. Dr.
Dapuy N an Orthopedic Specia-
list.
XxX
Jacques Filion returned to his
radio service business in Verdun.
Montreal, with his gorgeous wife,
Sunday, alter two weeks sejour
at the Riviera and Plaza Hotel.
Mrs. Edouard Denis, wife of
the Dentist, left for New York
Wednesday.
Mrs. Albert Reiher and son
Claude returned from Ciudad
Trujilo where they visited with
Mr. and Mnr Paul Verna at the
Embassy.
Little Mi 3 Mlarie-Maude Fd-
quinre who had roasting fever
during the past week is in
good health now.
Charming school-marm Rolan
de Bercy tT.i-Soeur) observed her
birthday anniversary on Septem
ber 22nd. .1
IMrs. G&rai-rd Miot, Secretary
of the *'Sun Life Insurance Co:
welcomed her second daughter
on Sunday 25th.
xxx

Mr. and M1ri. Raymond Barau,
*(Mme. nde Marie-Therese Lac)
lbo Lele clerical team, welcomed
their first horn on Tuesday, a
beautiful little daughter.

Mr and Mrs. Andre Gation we]
*corned a new son, their thirty
child, on Friday, September 23rd
xxx
Septembre 26th was the birth
day anniversary of chahnini
Miss Marie-Carmen Philippe.
xxx

Mr and Mrs O.J Brandt return
ed from Europe this past week
xxx
Mrs Crepsac. wife of Port-au
Princien President is at the Hos
pice St Franpois de Salles


Bishop Vogeli is back from the
States.
xxx

Miss Luc- Turnier. celebrated
Hattiz n winterr. returned from
Paris Sunday where she had spent
four years. During her sojourn
on the Cotireni she made seve-
ral exhibitti'ns of her works at
Paris. Breme, Hambourg and
Bonn with great success and
praises from art critics.
Miss Turnier will expose her
\\orks at Port-au-Prince shortly
at Institute FranCais d'Haiti. The
talented artist will organize
painting courses for children, at
her studio on Avenue Christo-
phe, from 9:00 to 11:30 beginning
October 1st.
Miss Tumnier's Italian husband.
Eugenio Corpi de Rsmini is ex
pected to join his wife here
within the next three weeks.

xxx

The Robert Leger are back
from their tour of North Ameri-
ca
X x x

December 15th is a big day in
the lives of Colette Liautaud and
Gerard Sansaricq -they wil
wed.
XXX

Tomorrow Maggy Duchatellie
will turn nineteen.
XXX
Lt and Mrs Jo Etienne wen
to Kingston Saturday to observe
the Tennis Tournament.
xxx

Mrs Gladys Monnier (Bogat
is coming over from France fo
holidays with her hubby an
two year old daughter Sybille.
xxx
It was ijanielle Liegois wh
, went to River College in Nev
SEngland last week. not Maniell
i Dejoie


Salomon Baboun returned
irom abroad Thursday.
xxx
Ti-Lou Regnier celebrated his
fete last Friday.
xxx
Lovely Mile Beatrice Mobeleur
and Yvon Perrier of the Protocol
Service %alked up the aisle of
the St Pierre Church last Thurs
day ind received the Sacrement
uf Hol. Matrimony. Parrain and
Marraine were Mr. Arsdne Ma-
gloire and Mrs. Andree St. Victor.
A reception preceded the reli-
gious ceremony at the Home of
itn. Roger St. Victors.
xxx
Saturday night there was a
grande f6te chez Tonton Daniel,
the Auto Scientist in Bizoton.
xxx
The Bill Dults had a great ho-
liday in tht States.
xxx
Edith d'Adesky returned from
the US Thirsday. ,
xxx
Serge, Rudy and Germaine Po
lynice went to New York Friday
by PAA Clipper.
xxx
Minister Alain Turnier return-
ed from Washington Thursday
with his y.jung family.
xxx

Marie Jdose R'oumain flew to
Manhattan Thursday.

xxx

Back from the States are Thi-
moleon.' Marie Lucia and Lucia
Tassy.
k xxx
Ti-Son Me. Intosh back from
a trip to Kingston. Miami and
Caracas announces that foot-ball
teams will be here soon.
n xxx
d Lison Madsen observed her
I birthday Tuesday evening with
a fdte at her home in Pacot.
xIx x


r


t
e



t)
)r
d


o

e


Mr and Mrs Daniel Vital are
home visiting the States.
xxx

Dr. Saymour Day took the
plane to San Juan, last Friday,
to care for his year old broken
leg.
xxx
Robert Nadal who is in bed is
planning to go to Kingston Wbien
to' for a rest.
xxx
Condeleance to the Leandre
Daniels (Magic Cind) on the ber-
eavement in the family.


The Talented young Peitonville Pianist Guy Scott is bid "bon voyage'
by his family (Captain and Mrs. Lucien Scott) as he leaves to further
his piano studies mn France.


Denise Laraque .went to New
'ork Wednesday.
xxx
Adrien Castera is spending hisj
actions in Kenscoff.
Henri Bermingham had an ac-
ident last Wednesday with
taoul Riohe of S'HASA, at the
corner of Avenue N, near Splen-
lid Hotel. Henri stepped down
ncd gave tihe key of his car to
Raoul offering him his car. Raoul
hook his head. Nervousness may
be due to the fact -that his wife
presented him with a daughter
.12 months before her time this
week.
Gros Georges Perry (Tokio)
s on vacation He will spend se-
veral days in SPas de Question*
with his big shot friends: Guy
Blanchard, Jean Buteau, Eddy
Castera, Raoul Riobe, Tone Dou-
yon playing ping-pong
Andrd G.Ition is very disapoint
ed on the arrival of a son. Their
reason is the following: first
time he had twins, one boy and
one girl, and this time he swore
it would be tripulates.,
Talented pianist Carmen *Brou-
ard flew to the United States
last Wednesday enroute to Fran
ce. Carmen Brouard is going
to follow her musical studies in,
Paris where she hopes to spend
a number of years. On the same
plane were Mr. Raphael Brouard,
Miss Nadine Magloire and Mrs.
Denise Carrie.
After wonderful holiday with
her family, Miss Marie-Evelyn
Cardichon returned to Kingston
where she will finish her studies
at Alpha College.
Mr Arthur Herres is back tI
his Vice-Presidential desk at
B.N.R.H. Herres was delegated
by the Government to the gene-
ral assembly of the International
Reconstruction Bank at Istanbul,
Turkey.
Miss Ginette Mayard, of Go-
naives will soon fly to the States.
Dr. Jacques Bataille took the
plane for New York yesterday
morning off to cbntintie riedical
studies.
Miss Ghislaine Zamor is back
from two years in Europe.
On Saturday 15th of October
Miss Mar'e-Carmel Vilmenay
and Rend Bouchereau will wed
at the Sacred Hearth Church at
Turgeau.
Miss Gisile Coriolan and Dr.
Gerard Dhaiti were married at
the Sacred Heart Church at Tur
geau last Tuesday at 5:30 P.M.
The couple was led to the altar
by Miss Carmen Mourra and Mr.
Antoine Dhaiti. The wedding was
celebrated hy the Rev. Father
Nantin, rector of the Parish who
was assisted by Father Gueger
and Father Pinchinat.
A reception prior tQ the reli
gious ceremony was held in thi
Murat's drawing room at Ruelli
Angibeaud.
xxx
Industrialist Otto Madsen anc
son Patrick arrived home fron
Europe Saturday.
The distinguished cChef di
'Etat-Major de l'Armde d'Haitiv
Brigadier General Antoine Level
observed his birthday anniversary
Friday.


Mr. and Mrs Georges Heraux
of Heraux Tours & Travel Ser-
vice, Port au Prince, are touring
.n a drive yourself car to Ma-
drid, Rome. Vienna, Lausanne
and back to Paris. It is Mr He-
raux's first Irip to Europe and
the first time his wife has been
back since she left Vienna for
Haiti in 1938. Me. Heraux is pre-
sident of the Haiti Hotel Asso-
ciation. He and his wife operate
the Sans Souci Hotel in Port au
Prince.
Mr. Eric Tippenhauer and Se-
nator Rend Roy spent last week
end in San Juan on business.
Fergie Ferguson leaves today
for San Juan on business.
Bob Roy and Micheline Fil-
Aime will be eahusband and
ewife December the 10th.
Maurice Lemieux of the Cana
dian Embassy celebrated his
birthday last week.
Mr. Jules Farmer is in better
health this weekend. The man
responsible fqr the new modern
building on true Pav6ee, has
been in bed for three weeks.
Mrs. Raymodide Maguet who
spent the past two years in Eu-
rope and Canada is now taking
care of her business on Rue
Pavde.
Miss Jacqueline Turian's Kin-
dergarden will inaugurate one of
the firsts school Bus services in
will charperon the children from
the school to the door step. A corn
mendable idea.

Arriving Tomorrow on
the SS Panama From
New York Are:
Mr. & Mrs. Arnold Agree
Mr. & Mrs Christian Aime
Miss Hilda Boigris
Miss Doris Chambers'
Mr Jn. Clauide 'Chancy
Miss Aline Dasque
Capt. & Mrs. E.J. Erickson
Miss Margiret Flanagan
Miss Gabrielle Georges
Mr..& Mrs Paul Halaby_...
Miss Kelly Hamilton
Miss Jane Kuebler
Miss' Marie Talamas
Miss Dorothy Madison
Mr & Mrs Alphonse Maguet
Mr & Mrs Edner Marius
Mr. & Mrs. Gdrarl Martino &
3 chdn. 17, 15, and 10yrs.
Rev Jean L. Morin
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Nadal and
daughter Jacqueline.
Mr. Virginaud Pierre-Noel
Mr. Bertrand Prepetit
Mr. Raphael V. Riccardi
Mr. Louis N. Sanon
Mrs Rend Sterlin
SMiss Marie-Rose Sterlin

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y Write details to Box SM, c/o. Hai
ti Sun.


A reception and typical bamboche' was organized by Colonel and
Mrs. Constant Poitevien at their home on Avenue John Brown on
Wednesday evening from 7:00 o'clock on... in honor of their daughter
Marie-Jose, and their son Yves on the occasion of their return from
studies -abroad. The party was attended by the greater part of the
young strata of the capital.
Pretty Marie-Jose spent two years in Europe. attenriding schools in
Paris and London where she specialized in 'la haute couture', and
travelled in Belgium, Spain, Italy and Germany.
Yves, the elder of -the Poitevien sons, studied Business Administra-
tion in New York and Canada.
Marie-Josd, elegant and ravissante, in a Parisian -toilette. of her
own design, explained her projects. She has already begun work on
creations for her coming fashion show. After which she intends to -
launch her new @atelier,.

The other youngsters of the Poitevien clan who hold diplomas from
foreign studies are Ghislaine (SCIPA-ite) and Huguette (pastry art-
ist).


Page 19


C.r....%v- Odnehpr 2nd 1955


HAITI SUN






Page 20 HAITI SUN Sunday, October 2nd '1985


INDONESIAN

AMBASSADOR

DECLARES...

(Contiued from Page 1)

tials to President Magloire at
the National Palace Wednesday
morning. 'hursday, the distin-
guished East Indian received the
daily press at the Hotel San Sou
ci. The asiastic diplomat stated
during his press .conference that
he is not in Haiti as a simple
visitor. He came in the spirit of
brotherhood, for the Indonesians
also fought and won their inde-
pendence.
Mr. Notowidigdo pointed out
-during a talk *ith the President
and Government officials that
his country and Haiti have many
problems in common, both are
struggling agaifist colonialism
and economic problems which con
front them. In order to remedy
the situation the stabilization of
the princes of export product such'
as cotton, coffee and sugar must
be made in the near future.


Haiti Recognizes

New Argentine Gov.

The Department of Foreign Re
nations, by cable dated Septem
her 28th, authorized the Haitian
Ambassador to Buenos Aires to
inform the new Government of
Argentina of its recognition by
the Haitian Government.


AHJ TO MEET
WEDNESDAY
The Association of Haitian
Journalists" will hold a meeting
on Wednesday October 5th at
Lycee Anterior Firmin, at 5:00
P.M.


SABALAT REPLIES


!


tute of Rights, those of the
ed Nations those of the
national League of the Righ
Man, in brief, those of the
From the very documnen
Dominican Justice which a
panied the demand for ex
tion, I drew precise facts 1
tablish with evidence that
clients were victims o, pol
persecution. In all of these
cuments there was to be f
only the subjects of the Bet
tor. and of the XXV Year o
Era of the Benefactor. Thes
pressions were repeated thrc
four times in the simples n
tes recording the interrogz
of the witness. The comp
lodged by the pretended vi
of an abuse of confidence
been drawn up long after
flight of my clients...
The complaint was made
the President of the Fabi
Fadoc who is the Benefac
own brother-in-law....
The clauses of the corpor
articles of the Fadoc Fac
were not given in communion
to the Haitian Court of Justi
Did the President of the F
que- Fadoc have the right to
pear before a court?
There is one better...
AccordiLng to the said P
dent, the amount of the funds
bezzled wvajs given, sometime
$865.00 sometimes at $1,500.
And the Dominican Exa
ing Magistrate declared; CTo
must be added $10,000.00 or
000.00, suspected of being
bezzled, but not yet verified
the FADOC...
This lack ot precision cone


, SUNDAY AUTO ACCIDENT

CLAIMS GERMAN GIRL'S LIFE


(Contiued from Page 1)
man will stand trial' on charges
of manslaughter.
A camionette driver, enroute
to Gonaives, (the name of whom
we have been unable to obtain)
stopped at the scene of the acci-
dent, and with remarkable pre-
sence of mind, deposited his pas-
sengers and drove quickly back
with the victims to .tbe hospital in
Port-au-Prince. General Hospi-
tal records show-the victims were
*receivedtat 3:00 P.M.


Funeral Services
Funeral services were t
for Miss Kleinschmidt on Ti
day. September 27th, at the
thodist Wesleyan Church. I
young woman who had been
Haiti four months was a memi
of the Protestant Lutheran
Reform Church.
The body was shipped to G
many at 12:30 P.M., the sa
day,, for burial in her home to
in the old Province of Hesse-N
sau.


a-..
I-


iS C SCOICi WHImk yOIS,?I -.B
GjC70 THE LATE ENU0 GEORGE VI.
SJOHn WALKER M Seis LTE.


t must.,g

be^.g


Unit
Inter-
its of
Law.
ts of
ccom
tradi-
:o es-
my
itical
e do-
found
nefac
f the
e ex-
ee or
minu-


ing the amount of the money,
would raise doubts as to the pre
tended embezzlement...
Futhermore, Hinojosa had not
been a collector of funds. He
handled the salesmanship, plac-
ing orders which were executed
by the FADOC. the latter col-
lecting the money directly.
The fugitives crossed the bord-
er without money.
Their identification by the
different committees of Domini-
can Refugees in foreign coun-
tries clearly establishes their po-
litical status.


atory The newspaper, vEI Caribet, in
plaint its issues nf April 13th and 18th,
ictim 1955, under the heading c'Foro
had Publico> (where delation, denun
the cialion are encouraged, with no
risk or responsabiliiy,y published,
by during the course of the extradi
rique tion process, letters signed by re
*tor's latives of the fugitives, accusing
them of being worthless delin
quents who were passing as poli
action tical refugees. They terminated
2tory the letters by an -apology to the
ition Benefactor ?nd a solemn decla-
ce... ration of faith and devotion to
'abri the Dominican Government.
Sap- If the fugitives' own relatives
were forced to treat them'in this
Manner, vwhit defense could they
'resi- present in Dominican territory,
S eM and what would be their fate if
s as ever they were given over to theI
00... Dominican authorities'?
min- The demand of extradition, it
this will be remembered, was normal
$12, ly rejected by the Haitian Court
em- of Justice. !
by The same newspaper <,El Cari-
be, published, several weeks
ern- later, that Hinojosa had return-
ed to Santo-D6mingo from a se-1
cret mission and had been rei-fi
tegrated in his post in the Domi-
mnocan Army.
The decision of the Haitian
Court was jiust, since even the
Dominican press admits that the
demand of extradition had no ba-
leld sis.
ues- The Dominican Governnyent,
Me- then, was, lying all the time.
rhe All the documents emanating
in from the Dominican Justice, in
ber support of the demand of extradi
ian tion were thus submitted under
false pretenses.
;er- __ _-._
nme

s A treat at


Johnnie Walker inusw ,' good, to remain in the S
forefront of Scotch Whiskies for over 730 years. g
It must be good to pass the scrutiny of distiller; .....
with over 130 years experience behi.ij therrm I g"

JOHNNIE WALKER AWB
BORN 1820-STILL GOING STRONG ,'J NS
Try it today-you'li agree it's good AGENTS
_____________________________ Agents: HAITI TRADING CO


Everything in the whole a!-
faire then was false and nothing
but lies.

For having done my duty as
a lawyer, I am today being de-
nounced through the columns of
this same journal as being a mem
her of a Communist Junta, which
is still more false Revealing it-
self as being unintelligent, the
,Service d'lntelligence,> of the
Dominican Army is signalling a
serious fact concerning itself,
that of the violation of ihe secret
which surruunds all correspon-
dence, and which overreaches
the principles of international


According to the Do&mtinican Ar
my Secret Service-, J am .-uppos
ed to be in correioondence with
communists whot.e names they
have cited.
They are all the names of Do-
minican exiles, fleeing froih the
system in their country.
All those who are- agai Lt the
Dominican Govc:r-.me-nt are conr-
sidered conmunic:s., then.
Among them Pipi Hl.RNAN-
DEZ.
Pipi Herr.-indez.vas one of the
Dominicans exiled .ja Coba whose
crapulous assassination there
where he ind ta:En refuge was
recently "qnnounccd by the news
....... .F ( -t- _


..-.. papers 01o '.uoa.
Is that a mean; ci warning me
But this again is another lie, that thle same fate has bccn re-
because such corresp o n dI e n c e served for r.ie?.
does rniot exist. If I arn to cl:E. _-i.a-,inated
like Pipi Hernandce, i should die
Per-o-il'y, I defy anybody, satisfied, for then I wu d die with
no matter who, to prove that I the hope that my own b]od, added
am affiliated with a Communist to the blood of so many others,
group, that I have ever been in- would rise into an c.ean of blood
evolved in any conummunistic acti- which one day is -ure to de rtroy
vity whatsoever during my ife. the monsters.
I amn Catholic, Apostolic and Ro- And them there .hall be F<-acc!
man, and I im proud of it. (s Ernst Sabalal.


JAEGER


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THE WORLD


Page 20


HAITI SUN


Sunday, October 2md 1955


COMMUNIST JUNTA EXISTS

IN HAITI; SAY ,,EL CARIBE
(Contiued from Page 1)




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