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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00333

Full Text


I


A


I


SCOTCH WHISKY


Tr


THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER


VOL VP


,C-ap,.. Police
HdM 'Iwo

In Serpian Agent
lM1arder Case
Enmnanuel Prudent and Vilert
"Juste, VER.MPAN inspectors have
been p-ac"d under arrest and
held for questioning in connec-
tion with l:te disappearance of
Demostheac Castagne whose
body. was found on September
6 n, hear he Rodeau Bassin. He
was 1.missing 32 days. The arrests
w&,e, made a- Cap- Hatien.


Port au Prince Republique d tiaiti


Sunday, September 25th 1955 Telephone 2061


DRILLING FOR GONA VE OIL


ABANDONED AT 3d58 FEE7


400 Feet of Pipe at the western end of the island
since early June are said to have
Still Underground given up on their first well, at a
depth of 31,158 feet.
DRILLERS GIVE In a telephone conversation,
UP ON FIRST WELL Tuesday, Mr. Max Dennis, Mana
ger of the Commonwealth Oil in
Haiti told the aSun he was una-
Varied reports surround the ble to make any statement or
search for oil on La Gonave. Oil to answer any questions regard-
prospectors who have been busy ing his company's activities on


the Island of La Gonave, as he
was flying the following day to
Miami. Mr. Dennis further stat-
,pd that the Commonwealth Oil
'has a contract with the Haitian
Government and is, therefore.
under obligation to submit its
formal renort to the Department
of Public Works, and thus could
not disclose the facts of which
we were in quest before making
this report.
Unofficial declare t ions from
those in the -know. disclosed that
drilling operations on the first
well had reached a depth of
3,158 ,feet .when the drill head
broke-off at 2,750 feet, leaving
400 feet of unrecovered pipe un-
derground. and the well was aban
doned. To date, all attempts to
recover the costly piping have
failed.
Although this drilling site has
been abandoned, it is expected
that the company will proceed
with further drilling operations
in other regions where their geo
logical reports indicate oil possi
bililies.
Bad Luck


N. E. Andrews, an independent
5^.oil operLior of Houston, Texas
who was entrusted with the ac-
...... bad luck. The crews were track-
Sh n Kil RESULT OF AUTO COLLISION ied by malaria, the boat trip itself
S__i__un Klls ESLTtook nine hours from P1orta u Prin
"% ce in an old L.C.I., and many
res4te's Richest U. N. Expert Boucharain And Wife Iother hatrdships were faced. It
XT is said that operational expendi
rFbi, Joseph was -ihe wealthi- c ,Stil C nd io-n- tures have already totaled $700,.
est m;-n in Pestel, a little town St 111 I I riLCai l ondltlOn. 000.QO.
on-. the northern coast of the sou .
them peninsula. His wealth came Mr a n d Mrs G,-ard Bou- them as it t-ane off the lanegue (Continued on Page 2)
from cosee speculation and charain who miraculously escap bridge at high speed and veered
planting. A fortnight ago. on the ed death on the Cabaret road, into the left lane of the highway.
eve of the departure of his chil- Sunday evening, when their SIM The occuiant of the Buick, be
dren for school in Jamaica, he CA met in sa head-onr, collision lieved to ito Dr. Papailler. disap
decided he wanted to give his very with the Buick of Dentist Papail peared from the scene of the ac-
large family a special guinea ler, are still on the critical list cident and has not yet been heard
fowl dinner. After shooting, two a3 the General Hosoital. from. The Dentist's appointment
guine;i fowls (pintardes) close to The United Nation; Cattle Ex book was found in the front seat
his homrie he &et off after a pert., Mrs. Roucharain. and their of the Buick, and it is reported
thlirri ,vh:.:i had flov-n into a sons Gerard 6, and Eric : %ere that he in:y have suffered shock
nea.rlv tree. With shotgun in driving on the CabarettSt-Mai-c and a loss of niem-ory from tihe
(Continured crn Page 20) road when the larg-. Buick hit crash.
SCIPA operator. Aridre Jason,
.J1,-BCED IN NEW YORK enroute to St Marc in a truck,
arrived on the scene shortly af-
^ ~ Pirs *I~ tterwards, and extracting the vie-
Cwikera .azile Wins First Prize >ns from the concertino-like
wr\\'eckage, diroe them directly
In Alcoa's Caribbean Ar Contrest to the Port-au-Prince hospital.
A illMultiple Injuries
Castera Bazile's painting .Car- been awarded to a grEs ar -t'tit,. Mrs. Boucharain who was driv-
ibbean Distractionsa won first the message stated, ing the SIMCA is still in a weak-
prize in Alcoa',s Carribean Art Second and Third P.-is were ened condition and doctors de- HOT ROD or DRAG CHARLOT or
Contest. ju.iged Thursday, at the warded in this contest which in- cided to pi! off her knee opera- is it's here! A Rue du Peple tNe
National Academy of Design in :luded th' best native fuze art lion. schedWl ed for Thursday, and an assistant Roland Day dren-n
New York City. of the Carribean area, a region until, next week when, it is hop. when they acquired a discarded 193
Mr. Anton Kneer, Agent of Al with twenty million people, to ed, her conduion will be improve torbike (750 cc. The oal strinned t
(.n.% .Jfan-h- t .Lin -, md I- e ~u- I (Tortesor Puerto.RIco


c-uoa Liteasip Line, made the Eduardo Cortes of Puerto Rico
news public, Thursday morning, and Joseph Gaston de Prettes of
on receipt of a cable from New St. Lucia.
York. The art coinpetlin;," rouglit
ffHaiti can be justiIfiably proud jreat response and r3used'wide.
thf tlTi:; gr-at honor which has (Continued or. page 20)


ed.
Mr-. Boncharain has been re-
ceiving continual blood transfu
sions from donors o'f the RHO
(Contrinited on Page 20)


whatever'the current name for it-,|lA
o. 67) mechanic named Emile FaIx".|
ed up the monster pictured above.
0 twin-tanked Harley-Davidson rio-.
he bike. aitached -n Austin nn h4m.F'ttt


to the engine, tied and bolted the combination onto an Austin chassis,
attached a Ford 'Prefect. steering wheel, two wheels in front andS.-:
one in the rear, even added a spare-tyre (or rather wheel). The wingtl
like contraptions at the sides are ventilators for the engine.
After two months of labour, the hot-rod is in the experimental sta-'
ges, reached 50 m.p.h. on the Exposition grounds Sunday. '1
"-4"


No. I


U.S. -CARIB

Affairs Chief

Here For Week

Haiti is playing host this week.
to Mr Henry A. Hoyt, the disti n-
guished diplomat who is Chief of.
the Office of Carribean Affairs.
in the State Department in Was:.
hingion. He arrived here, Satur-.i
day, September 24 ,th and wmll:
occupy a suite at the Bourdon re'-.
sidence ot the U.S. Ambassador
until his departure on Octobe.t!1
2nd. '"
American Embassy officials'
in cooperation with the Haitian'i:!
Government. have arranged .a|
fuU schedule for Mr. Hoyt, be..':
ginning Sunday morning, wher-n
he wivll mPet informiaUy with Am
bassador PiR)y Tasco Davis and
officers of the Embassy.
SSunday afternoon, Ambassa-j
dor and Mnrs. Davis will present
M:'. Hoyt to other officers anj,'.-
all staff members of -the Embas-Y.
sy, the Air Mission, Point Four, '
the Haitian-American Institute;"
the Geodetic Service, the Coast i
Guard, representatives df the '
Haitian Government and others,..
at a reception at the Ambassa-:
dor's residence.
The program for Monday will.
include a visit to His Exaellenc2,'.
Joseph D. Charles, Secretary ofi-
State for Foreign Affairs, and d
luncheon with high U.S. and Ha..
tian officials, offered by Mr. Cler.
mont. Secretary General of, their
Foreign Ofi"i.e,

On Tuesday, Mr. Hoyt will b-.' ..:
gin a series of tours, throughout .A
the country, with a visit to the 3
Peligre Dam and other sectors'.-.X
(Cotntinued oan Page 20)

', .' .,N
~ A0)


I


1 .J;









p,- --. .





PAGE2 HITI UN snhixyl aq' mu'DLvn 136


Foreign Minister

Joseph D. Charles

Visits (Sun

Haiti Sun had the honor of a
Stwenty-fiinute tlte-A-tete with
the new Secretary of State for
SForeign Relations, Mr. Joseph D.
Charles wnen he made a courte-
sy visit to our offices on Satur-
Sday morning. September 17th.
-., The Minister was accompanied
;.,by Protocole Chief, Mr. Daniel
'..Theard, and Mr. Maurice Cler-
*': mont,' Secretary-General of the
SForeign Relations Office.
.. Former 5-year Haitian Ambas
:'sador to Washington. Minister
: Charles is a master of the En-
glish verb, and chatted easily on
.'the general character of the exis
Stent relations of sympathy and
t. ions offriendship which is enjoy
'* ed by Haiti with foreign coun-
t, tries. Mr. Charles expressed his
Opinion as to the valuable aid that
',a good press may render to its
i.'country, and stated that he anti
'"'clpated close collaboration bet-
I'" ween members of the press and
',.his own Depertment.
' Mr. Charles who hails from the
n" orth, Limbe. noted for its im-
: 'portant production of coffee, is
a fornner Deputy, and -Minister of
.National Education, and brings
' a wealth of experience and corn
S'petence to his new post.


Miss Lafleur Sees DRILLING FOR GONAVE OIL
Home After 8 Years

Miss Rene Lafleur is spend- ABANDONED AT 3,158 FEET
ing a month's vacation with Dr.
Maurice P. Lafleur and family at otcd
Avenue Magloire Ambroise. This
s.hvenuer rlagloTrh Ambroisei Th e Commonwealth Oil of Hai ce-Pdlt ii Haiti, !a-t Ma:
years. Miss Lafleur, a graduate ti, a branch of the U.S. Firm is the Sizn that La Gonave
nurse is a member of the staff headed by geological expert G. enily w:s a promising
SBeihel Hospital, Brooklyn, as L. McCord and has Byron Rans- but added what he terme'
*at Bethel Hospital, Brooklyn, as.,
special assistant in obstetrics. ing, one of the directors of Mia prospect ors' adage -
She spent three years in Cana- ni's First National Bank, as ad- heree ,':,, fnd it.'
da, before going to New York viser. The Haitian Government -- --.--.
to further specialization. She reportedly has given the compa-
will return to her post on Sep- ny a three-year permit to explore Roger Loubeau
member 28th. for minerals throughout Haiti. Off To England
___________ '.. ,Petty,) Geophysical Engineers i iau
in San Antonio, Texas, surveyed r ,
Southwest the Republic and handed the Corn Roger Loubeau, scholar:
ichwe~ were rho most ncr of the British Council
To Hav Fishpuny sites which were the mostI
To Have Fish likely to contain oil deposits. At dlon lef. Monday, via
that time La Gonave was on the I New York, enroute to Lon
A new project for the large list. Mr. Max Dennis, Company Vi I itldles at the Exetcr Uni


scale cultivation 01 isn in mne
Grand'Anse and Tiburon regions
has gotten underway, and Mr.
Emmanuel Gamier of the Depart
ment of National Economy is in
charge ofits execution. The project
was met with wide enthusiasm
by the people of Grand'Arnse, and
200,000 carps and tilapia will be
plantedv in the waters of Grand
Anse, Voldrogue, Guinaudee and
the tang Grand 1F'eu]le.
In the meantime, the Govern-
ment has dispatched 1,200 lbs. of
salt fish to Jeremie aboard the
,Sirene obtained from the Pi-
siculture Station of Damien, and
will have them placed in the va-
rious Centers for distribution to
the needy.


y', told
e, appar-
prospect,
d an all
Soil is


ship win
of Lon-
'AA for
don and
versity.


Momance

To Have Dami


At d crF t o0f 1'., OL''..r,, a dam
will be construe:cdc aLro,,i. the
Momance HRie:- .- .r :c'tr to irri
gate appron:ima:.]:, 4,D00 0 ecta-
res of land in tfL plain of Leoga-
ne. The Public W%.rks Service ot
Irrigation will zegLn -..'ecution
shortly on the da-.n v.h rw till be
77 meters long ar. 3r-i S igh.
Plans for ithe corsl,-cLion were
examined by SCIPA engineers
and it is stated tinat 4he system
will insure normal irrigation re-
gardless of the season and will
avoid the c'ata.stroFphi's revoked
v'hii tile riverr i -wrl'i J during
the rainy season.


oil Derrick over La Gonave.


BEST MEAT!


'V
I -


.OSO BLANCO

(Air-conditioned)


Our local cuts -- (from our own cattle)

Imported fresh meat every Thursday
a
(from Smith & Richardson, Miami)

S Phone 3963 for Home Delivery


^ VISIT CITADELLE AND SANS-SOUCI PALACE
..pr" ^ ?^ '"<. l

",r. ** .jgTf ^ B l^
,[ -I~ _-.,.


96-24, 24


q 10-2


I12-24-12 )


For every erop amiMal
Condition, there's a
)Mathieson high aabvl
I pelletixed fertile to
you greater yi" M ka&
L You get q ,fdo-..k
pofn-jleaing -iu aailable phosphate .a
O potah to fit sol,
I qulmremt. Tb 6pU-B
k | spread easily and Aw nlj
am -.a better dibtulrdui
growth deumenw
.30i. itreughealtym&


ONLY $25 TO CAP HAITIEN
by DELUXE Limousine Service


CONTACT RAY'S TRANSPORTATION


t
Tmo grades of Ammophos available Focally. by the pound, bag, or iOn. For quantity prices

S apply to the Agent. V. A. Wynne. P.O. Box 6.94, Port au Prince,

Distributor: Haiti Seed Stores, Port au Priice and Kenseoff.


S The hopeful


FRESH MEAT!


I -


PAGE 2


HAITI SUN .,ndan .9 i ,Tptn.tp .h p lr l. gllrr.


3M I a-13-





Sunday, September 25th 1955uATISN


GIANT DISPLAY WINDOWS WITHOUT SHUTTERS A FEATURE


BELLAS HESS; A MODERN A ADDITION

TO THE MAIN STREET 0 F PORT-AU-PRINCE


Bellas Hese, the new ultra-mo
dern Women's and Children's
Store which shows off the tardi-
ess of its less enterprising neigh
ors on Pirt-aau-Prince's Grand'
Rue, opened its doors to the pu-
blic with a bang on Saturday
morning, September 17th, with
Haitian Manager Michel-Augus-


MAYOR OF CAMAJ

Senor Emeterio Gonzales Ji-
menez, Mavorrof Camajuani, Cu-
ba (Population 26.000) paid a two
day visit to Port-au-Prince last
week. Senor Gonzales who call-
ed at the Sun office Saturday
with Senor Vicente d'Amato Lau
rio and Hotel Capri Owner Jean
Mlarra described Haiti as tOur
brother> and an interesting coun
try.
Received by Dr. Nelaton Camil
le and members of the Municipa-
lity at the Hotel de Ville early


te B mission at the helm. There is no steel encasing to
I Twvelve thouar.d people rush- shutter up the store after shopp-
ed in during, t'-.c first day,* the ing hours, and it is an even guess
?nereetic and aim.able Mr. Bris- that the new Bellas Hess store
son st-ted, .And hundreds of has set the pace for edify-
"people crowded outside the huge ing strollers who may *window-
plate-gla;s display windows until shop:> a la New Yorkaise.
1:00 AM. to watch the Manager Clean airy and comfortable,
dress the wares. the six thousand five hundred
square feet of store space is cool
ed by four Frigidaire air-condi-
tioners of seven-and-a-half tons
each. Effective lighting is pro-
cured with myriads of fluores-
cent lamps.
So a Featuring everything for mila-
dy's wardrobe with the excep-
tion of shoes and hats, dress pri-
ces range from $3.50 to $22.60.
Curtained stalls for trying on
dresses are equipped with large
mirrors.
Forty eager girls and young
women assure customers of ra-
pid and courteous service. Al-
most everything for the kiddies
is attractively displayed.
With the -ccent placed on fe-
minine personnel, Di-ector Bris
son is the only permanent male
employee. For the opening, Mr.
rGeorge Strasser, who is the Dis
trict Manager of Puerto Rico
where Bellas Hess has six stores,
IUANI CUBA travelled to Haiti to lend his as-
sistance.
As to the reaction of the pu-
Saturday, he stressed his visit blie everyone is emerveille,
'as of fici al and added that bi vroei enrele
hewas d o ciallapon daddedthatand simply enchanted with the
he would call upon Cuidad Tur- contribution towards Haitian pro
jillo and San Junan before return gress of this new modern enter-
ing to his city, which is noted for ise.
the manufacture of Fireworks prise.
and Shoes.


During Camajuani
week-long carnival (St
19th ) the ,Alcalde
demonstrated how 40.
finest quality firewor
night.


's annual
tarts March
Municipal
.000 of the
ks fill the


HAITI SUN))


I


I


Registration For Classes At H. A. 1.
Begins Tomorrow (Monday 26th)

Registration for classes in En'se which they desire and which
glish and French will begin at is most convenient for their
the Haitian-American Institute on needs. For optimum teaching ef-'
Monday morning, September 26 fectiveness ard full student par-
th, at 8:30. The fee is five dollars ticipation, the Institute plans to
per semester per course, which limit enrollment in each class
of course includes an automatic to 20 persons Students who regis
student membership in the Ins- ter after the first week of clas-
titute. Classes will begin on Tues ses will be required to pay one
day, betoher 4th. Registration gourde extra to defray the expen
will continue throughout the ses of additional cJerical work.
week of September 26th and Come early ard join the class
through the following week, for which meets ,our needs; heavy
the convenience of the students registration ic, anticipated in a
Prospective students should try number of courses. Where de-
to register as early ag possible, mand warrants it, the Institute is
in order to avoid the disappoint- prepared and. equipped to tfer
ment of not getting into the cour additional courses at all le-vels.


The Mayor ,.it friend and Hotel Capri's Jean AMarra.


- This sovereign WLisky
possesses that distinction
of flaVour which will claim
your allegiance from the first sip.


HIGHLAND


QUEEN
SCOTCH WHISKY

MACDONALD & MUIR LTD
')istiliers [ .ith "- Scotland


Three convenient weekly flights to take
you into the gay, romantic atmosphere
ol Ihe Pearl of the Antilles!
Only 90 minutes from Port-au-Prince
to Sontiago de Cuba by CUBANA!

For information and reservations see your
Travel Agent or call Pan American World
Airways, Rue Oantes Destouches. Phone 3451


DEPARTURES FROM PORT-&UI.PRINC:
Monday, Wednesdays, Fridays, c l':25 p. m.


OTr ONLY $25


V Cgf'fA 4A, AVAT.


C-A.40


___________Page 3

Professor John F. Buckley To Direct

Newly Opened Jefferson School


m


f


JEFFERSON SCHOOL is the
new Haitian-American School
directed by Professor John F.
Buckley S T.B presently located
at 8 Avenue N, in the Sacre
Coeur section.
, Professor" John F. Buckley is
well known for his back-ground
in thle teaching field. Matriculat-
ed at Columbia University, De-
partment of Oriental Languages,
former member -of the Amerian
Council of Learned Societies, for
thirteen years Director of the
Automem School Corporation
Fifth Avene, N.Y. for the teach-
ing of foreign languages, he has
taught also in Haiti at the Union
School and the Haitian Amer4can
Institute. His special methods in
teaching are marked by techni-


ques that trE -.:i, aapid and ori
ginal.
Courses wi'jd be avaiJabhe at
Jefferson School in both English
and French -for adults anti chil
dren -at beginning, intermedia-
te and advanced leveJs. Fees for
courses are generally very reaso
nable.
In addition, special attention
will be given American School
children from the 1st through the
9th grade, either for full instruc
lion following the Calvert Cour-
se or extra help that may be
needed for ihoc,. already in
school.
For further information
apply At Jef',.]i ,on School, B Ave
nue N, from P. c 10 am, cr 3 to
5 p.m.





uHAITI-SUN~ Sunday. September 25th 1955


A, new manner in which to fly a kite was ably demonstrated Tues-
day afternoon on tUe Exposition by Mr. America. Wife, Two children,
fishinrtg rod 2nd :.eeel and a blue Stateside eagle.
King Arthur O'Neil is finding the -road back. long and painfully
Sdry. Arthur received severe shoulder injuries when he fell off his
round bar stool several months ago and has been within screaming
distance of a ho'-ital and doctor ever'-since.
Ti Tosh S.vre is steadying himself for forthcoming competition.
Nobbe-Bondel has blossomed out into a spacious restaurant. Rumoured
moving "in on the two remaining corners.of the Bond Point to make
it a regular cGou.-nand's Row. are Madame Marini and Buteau.

Headline:, across ; the world this past week were full of KOs. Number
one; Rocky lit-ciaao knocked-out Archie Moore in the Ninth round
in New York. Number two; Argentine Rebels knocked Peron out of
ten year old Presidential seat. Number three; lone carried more punch
than either Connie and Diane Combined and knocked off $100,000,000
damage in North Carolina and Virginia.
Less than a dozen Jewish families that reside in Haiti observed their
New Year last Saturday and Sunday. Tomorrow is the most gruelling
day known in the Jewish religion, the day of Atonement and all must
fast for 24 hour.

First prize for thoughtfulness and courtesy must go to a citizen who
-" recently, because of a despondent spell, decided to leave this world
to his *z'amies. Not only did he make his will in public but he went
out of his way to invite friends to his funeral who were so touched
they foiled hiL attempt to leave them behind.

Youth-Mover Theodore Baker clarified a point this week: *Person-
nally, E haLve never been behind this banner (red) and I challenge
anyone to prove me' the contrary, for I have never in my writings
preconised any popular or scientific socialism.
*That I have been in favor of free discussion and free expression
of Ideas, my public life is there to bear witness to it.,
*My political connections are born from the last war; they are ins-
i piLred from the democratic ideal such as defined by Franltin D. Roose-
velt, Harry Truman and very recently Adlai Stevenson; my experience
.of American life has confirmed and strenghtened them..
Camion cAgramonte, driven by Lucien St. Juste received some de-
molishing body blow this past week when it crashed off the Port au
YPrince-Aux Cayes highway. Six of its passengers were severely injured.
EXTRA' EXTRA' EXTRA'...
Those in the know around Magic Cine'confirm that. Gina Lollabriga
is coming here in December... The Palace Band plays,in a wonderful
setting every Thursday evening on the Petion-Ville square.. Haiti's
Greate'st Histoire, Nobody Every Dies A Natural Death. -...
,The Northwest suffered from excessive rain last week when Hilda
passed through'the Canal du Vent enroute to Mexico where it claimed
166 victims and did untold damage... Maestro Desgrottes of the Ri-
viera who claims to be the author of the 'Trois Bebes., celebrated his
birthday Wednesday... People are decrying the massacre des acajous
(mahogany) on Rue Mgr. Guilloux.... The Electric Light Company is
doing the massacreeing pruning the branches that tend to interfere
with the currentfull wires... Our new Honorary Vice-Consul in Boston
is Mr. Lawrence Bill Schumann... Mayor of rCoix des Bouquets Etzer
Racine is preparing the Fete of the Rosary, October 2nd... Maison de
Construction cG&rard Theard. will build the Military City near Fort
National... There are no golf balls in Haiti owing to the New York
dockers' strike...-GCrard Denis had his little blue -Prefect, smashed
by a big ford Camionrette Friday night in Lalue.
LE MATIN CALLS THE ATTENTION OF THE IMMIGRATION
The really intolerable conduct of a 'fille de joie. known as Gra-
ziella Ortola, of Costa-Rican nationality, has been called to our atten-
tion. She lodges at the *Chez Fernandel Club. establishment at Ar-
cachon. Ef the facts revealed are exact, the Immigratibn Service should
take drastic steps against this undesirable person...
BAD MONTH .FOR UN EXPERTS SAYS -LE NOUVELL'ISTE-...
Fishing expert Martin Routh, UN technician, was the second UN
expert to fall foul of an accident this week. Fortunately'no serious in-
juries were sustained by Mr. Routh when he received a slight fracture
on the head while exploring off the coast of Lully. He now wears a
small sticking-plaster scull cap.

REFRESHING, WONDERFUL, PIQUE IS NEW AS
TOMORROW'S NEWS IN WHITE, PINK AND BLUE.

KEEP COOL IN COTTONS IT'S THE SMART THING.
TO DO! HERE IS THE FINEST QUALITY

: AT AMAZINGLY LOW PRICE

ONLY $0.50 AN AUNE

COTTON PIQUE

MAISON ORIENTALE


The Dejean Choir returned this weekend from a triumphant tour
of Jamaica.



^A APPAR


PERENNITE DU BATIMENT


ETANCHEMENT ABSOLU

YOU CAN GET AGAIN
PLASTIMENT
AND ALL OTHER
SIKA PRODUCTS
SERVICE: HAUSER
Box 1326
Tel. 2372
SALE: REINBOLD S.A.
TIPCO
SIKA HAITI
WALTER HAUSER
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
P.O. BOX 1326 P-au-P.


MAGIC CINE
Sunday 25tli. 5:00, 7:00 and 9:00
P.M., Wednesday 28th. and Fri-
day 30th at 6:00 and 8:00 P.M.
BATTLE ZONE
A Walter Wanger production, an
allied artists picture.
With John Hodiak, Stephen
Mc. Nally. Linda Christian
With the United States Marines
from their base at Camp Pendle-
Ston to the Shore of'Inchon in
Korea.


V eve


Achetez au meilleur prix
SOULIERS
SACS D'ECOLIERS
CHAUSSETTES
PANTALONS
CHEMISES
CHEMISETTES
LINGERIE
BAS
et
Jolis berets de fabrication francaise

TOUT POUR LA RENTREE DES CLASSES
A





fa %e


((HAITI-SUN


. Sunday. September 25th 1955


I





HAITI SUN PAGE


Sunday, September 25th 1955


MIRAGOANE:.A BOOMFOWN

WITHOUT ANY BOOMERS

Miragoane, nestling on the coast two-and-4-half hours drive
from the' capital is a picturesque town forming a cuvette*
(wash basin) in the Caribbean.
This town could be a boom town if the Miragoanians could
only see the hand-writing on the wall.
area, and when-mining operations get underway next year,1
much more money is expected to circulate in the little town.
The bauxite company laid out one of the prettiest camps
in the world at Paillant, near the Plateau Ste. Croix, comp-
lete with modern bungalows, swimming pool, and all the mpst
modern comforts.
Six U. S. families are presently living in the Paillant
camp. A dozen skilled workers from Cuba, employed on the
million-dollar pier, are lodged in a private home near the
Police Station, not to mention the Haitian'Engineers and fore-
men who have moved to this area.
Salesmen and business representatives agre constantly visit-
ing the growing Southern town, tourists occasionally journey
down to look at the mines and the road leading up to it the
widest in the Republic.
Picknicking on the Ste. Croix Plateau rivals Furcy, and has
the best pigeon-shooting in the Republic. But this was only
taken advantage of during the Colonial Period.
The progressive-minded Prefect has seen to the paving
Sof roads, and there are now two leading in and out of
town. gReynolds cooperated as fully as possible, lendifig
equipment whenever it was needed.
Miragoane is definitely throwing off the old fashioned tor-
por and- bustline forward to a front seat among the Republ-
ic's towns.
But, in all the town, there is nowhere for a visitor to sit
down and have a drink, or to sleep overnight.
Even the General Store is usually .to0 crowded to offer an
opportunity of a pleasant drink. -
Miragoane desperately needs a hotel, placed a little up the
hillside, or out along the coast away from any stray mosquit-
oes. Good Haitiani food, bar service, and- a swimming pqol
sliould be featured, and the hotel would add to thWe town's
prosperity with a corresponding increase in its own business
operations.


"GOLF COURSED: A NEED

IN OUR TOURIST INDUSTRY

One of the tourist needs in Haiti is a golf course. And this
facility is not only a leading item for tourism. Many locals
also have been pressuring for links.
t
American sportsmen, frozen out of their favourite golf-,
courses back in the U. S., bear the heavy burden manfully
and pack up for a Caribbean vacation. Though they may not
consciously expect to see rolling links and strolling golfers
in these emerald isles, the subconscious craving of the true
follower of the little white ball keeps him constantly ill at
ease when; he. is not swatting drives, or hunting for balls
among the butishes.'

In Detroit, we hear; some fanatics staged a snow tourn-
ament to relieve the boredom of the long winter months. But
this was more of a festival than a game, and sportsmen were -
not satisfied.

The popularity of golf in the USA is hard to judge from
this distance and in this foot-ball-steeped atmosphere.
But a measure of enlightenment may be gained from a re-
cent article in xSports Illustrated:, which described Brook- I
lyn's only golf course. A
On those eighteen holes, over-300,000 golfers trek each I
year, players have to wvait sometimes as long as five hours for A
their turn after registering.
Four-somes, or sometimes six-somes. tee off in rapid suc-
cession behind each other, and woe betide the player who
holds up the procession.
Anyone unwise enough to stoop to tie a shoe-lace is hurried p
/ up by a golf ball whizzing'past his head, and a hail of invect- p
ive singing his ears.
Haiti's only golf-course is the diminutive Petionville links,
which is for members of the private club.
An enterprising young businessman could make himself a p
fortune, and add to Haiti's appeal to tourists simply by drill- p
ingholes on a bit of spare common not too far from town, and P
propping uif a few flags in them. Then, he could give em- S]
ploymient to a host of little caddies who may one day become F
world class golfers, as most greai golfers started out caddy- A
ing. H
He could also develop a remuneraiive enterprise selling K
drinks ,to thirsty players. Or


HAITI SUN

THE HAiTIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER
Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning
EDITOR-PUBLISHER BEPNARD DIEDERICH


SOTCH ZHl.i&y OISTlflS / h*
TOj THE LATE KING GEORGE V1.
JOHN WALKER & SE O. LTQ,


- must,,
be. _-o ;.


Johnnie Walker musPFcjood, to remain in the
forefront of Scotch Whiskies for over 130 years
It must by good to pass the scrutiny of distiller"
with over 130 years experience behind therq '

JOHNNIE WALKER 44
ORN 1820-S rTILL GOING STRONG f" .',
Try it today-you'll agree it's good. ,6
-t- ~ ^T ". :.
: ;* ':


I- ~_.Ui*


COMPANIA DOMINICANA DE AVIACION C POR" A
Port au Prince'- Miami San Juan Ciudad Trujil !




A .. :4,54 (%*-~f T.T.


Saturday And Wednesday


Sunday And T


Part CIUDAD TRUJILLO -, 8:00 a.m. Depart MIAMI
Lrrive PORT AU PRINCE 9:00 a.nL Arrive PORT AU PRI
partt PORT AU PRINCE 9:30 a.m. Depart PORT AU PR]
Lrrive MIAMI (Direct) 1:00 D.m. Arrive Ciudad TRUJI
I
FARES ONE WAY RETURN
PORT AU PRINCE MIAMI $55: one way $99 return ((plus taxi
PORT AU PRINCE CIUDAD TRUJILLO $15: one way $27 return
'ORT AU PRINCE SAN JUAN $38: one way $68.40 return (plus t

FREIGHT
Less than 100 lb. Mon
ORT AU PRINCE CIUDAD TRUJILLO) $ :06 :04
ORT AU PRINCE SAN JUAN :10 :08
ORT AU PRINCE MIAMI :12 :10
SPECIAL CHARGE ON CERTAIN ARTICLES PORT AU'PRINCE -
or all information and reservations see the following Tour Agents:
GENCE CITADELLE SOUTHERLAND TOURS
[ERAUX TOURS & VOYAGES MAGIC ISLAND TOURS
ING CHRISTOPHE TOURS
r the CIA Dominicana de AVIACION Maison Matteis. Placer pffr


1--S
*~" "'-"'.l

thursday' 'r

8:00 a.m.
NCE 11:30 am.Y
INCE-12:00 nooiln|
LLO 1:00 p.m.
(direct flight). .


(plus tax) ';!
ax)

I..-
e Over 3.300 Lil
:03 .
:07 .
:08
MIAMI :



ard, Phone 2766 I


ONE-NOTE PIERPONT HAS
FANS
September 14tb, 1955.
Dear Editor.
The article in your September
11th edition by One Note Pier-
pont, entitled CR3AZY TALES
FROM THE HAITIAN HILLS
is the greatest. My friends and
I who are hep to American slang
and be-bop talk went insane over
the article. I hope you intend to
run a series by Pierpont be-
cause he has already h large fol-
lowing of fans.
Thanking you in. advance for
interesting Sunday reading.
Yours faithfully,
iPetion-Ville-ite.s,

A PROPOS: HAITI SUN'S
POLEMIC WITH THE
MIAMI HERALD
OVER SHORTS
September 19th, 1955
Dear Editor:
I read with interest your reply
to Columnist Lawrence. Thomp-
son's article in the Miami He-
rald, but I am afraid that. last
week-end Mr. Thomson got you.
He devoted a full column in. re-
ply to your article but although
his reply is well-put, I still
think that he is definitely on the
wrong tiTack in condemning shorts
wearers.
I do hone you will reply to
him. and in your reply ask, why
he does not face his readers as
do other columnists in their pic-
tures. Perhaps Mr. Thompson is
looking cown his nose at bis legs.
Ydurs sincerely,
Shorty.b (Port-au-Prince) .

CAPITAL TO INVESTv
.' $20,000.00 available for specula
tiol inactively in any profitabTe
business. Write details to Box M.
c/b Haiti Sun.


[l^^& CU 'adtcKP&tun~y






to~ItheLn p 1ti









The Ajyuist- oSSiiit /SfctowM 'Nin i.
9$aojan 9 Voodoo-J]wut 4pecft j rcoted 4t ijoU hIOU
4f'M



PORlLAIN k RpYALCOP[NHABENR,0YAL VIIWINA ,
SIN& & GROENDAHLI tU l"a6itua EMBROIDERIES


0


-W.W.


-":^


- .4


6i


A ..K; %.JCAILCI





A'.'PAGE '6 ,


HAITI SUN


Sunday." Sete he 25t 1955--------- -


t6. :.'-~l^^^^ ^^
.P;




T.*" :, *]'v ,jA w'
S.TRAFFIC CONGESTION; NO PROBLEM
Traffic congestion in Port au Prince has reached the stage when
l.all public-spirited men and women are frankly worried about the next
..iten yeats.
':'Haudted by -'mental pictures of winding columns of double-deckec
Jiger-than-ever-powered autos honking continuously from Kenscofi
f^ 'ogane and overflowing in a solid bumper-to-bumper stream into
-tWte b$-wayS of the capital, this correspondent sent out an urgent
-OS.,to all the possible sources of aid in the world.
,;i,'Onex of our.top listed problem solvers was the high-flying British.
!.tFrOm, them ca6ue the most feasible answer to date: a flying mattress.
q Wha. could be simpler, or more convenient?'
.Ei:iready famed for the Plying Bedsted, a jet-powered platform that
_went straight up .(still one'of the country's jealously guarded seereis),
-the .practicaLBritons have produced a plane with inflatable wings you
rdahkblew up at the corner gas station.






AlI -,
6 :-.. 3 *


T..4.











yGUMATTRESS THE ANSWER 1
B^'Thrs nothintk secret about It can 9tay airbone at only 25
iFlyg Matress. It.was de- mph. ,
L 'Ilej by a private firm wliik Landing space is no problem
:'to put it on the market either. It can take off in 50 yards
t; ,;.o. I I





r s than $3.00. and land on. a.dime-
TeBritish Ministry 4f 'Sup- The designer is Marcel Lo-
V-ply'.as'asso ilmprissed it ordered belle, 62 who designed the Krit-
Nihi' the.' machines for testing ish navy's Fairey swordfish anti
#6 a^hziited it &ay become the submarine patrol. bomber in
Srittsh army'ss flying motor- World War I.
., The fuselage, with cpnvas deck
e-,cairs for two, looks li:e .an en-






i pae is no problem. try in the Soap Box Deby. The
Javt, lt the'q7 qpLt of the 40- wing looks like a barrage bal-
-oott miet del:t' ipg;', -folds- it .up loon, and the wholetbhiiij"ldoks
a.d s.ho#,it 'into the fpselage.. like. a ero.s 'between a dirigible







i'uel is, no problem. The Fly- and a filyver plane. i
7,g.Mltres gets seor se-mtles It is powered a by a 65-horse-
lt oi: galon white putirwii& power engine with a pusher pro-
.q 'ti .ipR e oe 45jnph. *eer. l t e tak f yt
t;: ie's .ooo. and -an o. a"------- e.-'















AWAbO R SIMOMS
1 it toD HeAND OVER
.:..MAUPPL S 'F0M JAMAICA
," .i .. "ch irsfortw lok J, e'.n .n-


...handing vitamins to a Patient
Great Britain's Ambassador, Sydney Simmons, delivering a shipmnent
aof vitamins and medical supplies, another gift from the Jamaican
Government to Haiti, and designated for hazel victims at Grand'Anse
in the south where the people are suffering from malnutrition brought
about by the-drought and subsequent famine following the cyclone.
Consisting of 105 cases, a total of 3,500 pounds, the much needed
supplies were handed over personally by Ambassador Simmons, to Dr.
Bouchette, Administrator of,' the St. Antoine Hospital in Jernmie.


.AMBASSADOR SIMMONS AT. JEREMIE

....... W. .... ..," ,M'.. ...t..r.,.ih- I
.T W 4.. '
F,; .. ..
,' ,' 1. ,o ,, .r .'i ,:, 4"" :


Accompaying Ambassador Simmons (Above handing over the sup-
plies) on the trip south was Mr. Edouard Bellemare, Canadian Char-
ge d'Affairep, Capt. Robert Bazile, Coordinator of Operations and
Aid, Mr. Yvon Perrier of Service du Protocole, Mr. Ren6 Tassy of the
Finance Department, and Mr. Louis Doret, official photographer.

The list of medical supplies needed was prepared by the Department
of Public Health at the request of the Ambassador who submitted it
to 'London. It was afterwards sent to Jamaica, and the Executive Coun-
sel of the Government voted the purchase of medicines amounting to
1,000 pounds sterling.
This new manifestation of sympathy and friendship by the neigh-
boring isle is'due to the initiative,of the distinguished English diplo-
mat. ,

_s___________________- -


TRUCK TIRES
They're made with

NYLON
SHOCK SHIEtDR
for Heavy Service
WiLam NARR, P-au-Prince
BOUCAID & CO., Jacmel
Raymond LAROCHE,
CapHafletien
Malson Jean BOURGEOIS,
' AusCakys
uchel DESQUIRON
S.UCCW&, Jgrtmie


powerful gasoline


you can buy
a ili


Ends major causes of power
and fuel waste pre-ignition
spark plug fouling.


...Gives you bigger mileage, cheaper motoring.
Do you know what weakens your car's power
and wastes fuel more than anything? It's the de-
posits from combustion that form in cylinders and,
Getting red'hot, ignite the air/fuel mixture too
early. That's pre-ignitlon and it's robbing you
of both power and money. The same deposits foul


lOSP
and


spark plugs, causing misfiring and further loss
of power. SHELL has now conquered these probe.
lems. Shell gasoline has ICA, incorporating trie-
resyl phosphate, an exclusive Shell additive which
makes these deposits harmless. You'll notice the
difference almost at. once such an upsurge bf
power; such smooth running; such zip on hills ane
in traffic..


V
Give YOUR car this top-performance gasoline.

Always fill up at a Shell Station for only Shell has

I. C. A.

FEEL the difference with 1. C. A.


'I


Sunday. September 25th 1955


. 0


*





Sunday, September 25th 1955 HAITI SUN


National Brahman To Be Special Feature


PAN AMERICAN LIVESTOCK EXPOSITION HAS HIGH AIM

TO BE HELD IN DALLAS TEXAS OCTOBER 8 TO 16th


Cattle raisers throughout the State Fair of Texas, Dallas, Octo
Western Hemisphere and the ber 8th to 16th. This, the most
world over are looking forward widely patronized of all festivals
to assembling at.the Pan-Ameri- and fairs, has added emphasis
can Livestock Exposition, which this year for it will feature the
is held in connection with the National Brahman Show.


JTDH Aristocrat Manso, two year-old American Brahman bull
owned by the J. D. Hudgins'Ranch of Hungerford, Texas, shown here,
was champion Brahman bull of the Pan-American Livestock Exposit-
ion in 1954.


j HPS Lady Burma Manso Emperor, 900, heifer calf owned by
Henry 0. Partin and Sons of Kissimmee, Florida, arid reserve champion
-at the Louisiana State University Spring Show of Baton Rouge, Louj
siana, in. March, is typical of the entries in the National Brahman
Show to be held ,at the Pan-Americen Livestock Exposition in Dallas,
Texas, October 8-16th.


to crown that perfect moment wLen
friends get together. One of many
occasions Eor drinking Hennessy.





JOSEPH NADAL & Co.


In 1954 the combined State
Fair and Livestock Exposition re
ceived 2.504.000 patrons during
its total run. During one day, Oc-
tober 16th, there was an atten-
dance of 296,00 persons.
The National Brahman Show,
the first to be held since 1952,
will feature the greatest assem-
bly of the very best American
Brahman cattle ever gathered,
according to a spokesman from
the American Brahman Breeders
'Association's Houston, Texas of-
fice. Herds are entered from Te
xas, Florida, -Louisiana, and Ar-
kansas. Entries are expected
from Kentucky, Ohio, and India
na as well. The ABBA office said
their breeders have been prepare
ing for this show -since early in
1952. It will be the only national
breed show held in connection
with the Pan-American Lives-
tock Exposition.
This occasion will mark one
of the greatest assemblies of cat-
tle raisers ever brought together
in the Western Hemisphere. Ray
W. Wilson, Manager of the Ex-
position, states that he expects
1000 persons from Central Ame-
rica, South America and the Ca-
ribbean Region. The purpose of
the Pan American is to bring
cattlemen together, Mr. Wilson
say, stating:
eThe purpose is to bring the
cattlemen of the Americas to-
gether to deal with each other.
Ours is a job of bringing about
a relationship that cannot be pro-
duced between two countries in
any other way-that of bringing
cowmen of many countries to-
gether on common grounds. The
Scowman's language is universal
It is our, aim to make the Pan
.American Livestoctk E.position
Sithe mod attractive, most in-
influential show window for pure
bred in the United States.)
There is currently a keen in-
terest among cattle raisers
throughout the world int he Ame
rican Brahman breed. This is es-
pecially true in Central and
South American Countries and in
'he Caribbean. Interest is strong
"n other regions of the world,
ilso, but dollar shortages curtail
trading. The American Brahman
breed was developed in the Sou-
'hern part of the United States
luring the past fifty years by the
y s t e m a t i c mating and
selection from less than 300
Bos Indicus cattle of six diffe-
rent types which were imported
from India and Brazil. It was de-
veloped specifically to thrive and
n-1roduv been hocf eennorn-nm !nlit fromAAI


Nature's grass in warm tropical
and sub-tropical climates, where
other types of cattle had failed.
American Brahmans are known
for their long, productive lives,
according to the association regis
try office.
*Brahmans. as did their ances-
tors, posses very high resistance
to piroplasmosis, or tick fever,
and anaplasmosis, another infec-
tuous blood disease which causes
great losses among range cattle
Brahmans are less effected *by
ticks, mosquitos and flies. The
infection by the cattle grub i5
nrmlv mild, never fatal, and th(
Brahman's resistance to this pes
increases with maturity of the
cattle.
The finetexiured skin and
short, thick hair coat. a natural
skin secretion and the ability to
move the skin minimizes the har
rassment by insects, the Associa
lion office revealed.
It has been concluded by scien
tists that the hope for increased
meat production in the tropical


and sub-tropical regions of the
world lies in the American Brah
man. Besides the Criollo, in the
tropical regions, only the Brah
man thrives. As it is the Criollo
is worth little, and this small but
sturdy animal may be most effec
tively improved by the Brahman,
it is said.
It is commonly observed that
calves out of Criollo cows and by
American Brahman bulls weigh
almost as much as their dams by
weaning time. Some of this phe-
nominal improvement is credited
to stimulated growth induced by
hybrid vigor. Much of the im-
provement is credited to the in-
creased heat tolerance, improved
adaptability and inherent massive
beefiness of the American Brah-
man, however.
Latin-American ranchers have
found that Brahman and Brah-
man-Criollo hybrid steers pro-
duce carcasses of the desired
market "weight of 250 to 275 kilo-
grams in about half the time re-
quired by Criollo type when both
are finished on the same rage.
For this 'reason and because
Brahmans and (Brahman hybrids
yiead a much higher dressing per
centage, they bring greater re-
turns to the cattle raisers, it was
pointed out. Purebred and high-
grade Brahmans usually reach
a higher degree of finish at an
earlier age than do even Brah-
man-Criollo hybrid steers, observ
ers report. Both types of steers
are very efficient in converting
grass to beef, it has been proven.
Their freedom from sunscald,
eye disorders and digestive trou-
bles increases their feeding effi-
ciency. These traits and others
mentioned reduce the mortality
rate among them.
Of 15,000 cattle exported from


PAGE 7'

the United Staile last year over
10,000 were American Brahmans.
Of this number 4000 were regis
tered on the Am.erican Brahman
Breeders Association books and
6.000 were grade cattle which
were used to stock ranges in Ve&
nezuela and other countries.
Patrons of the Pan-American
Livestock Expos.tion of 1955 will
witness one of .tbe great dairy
shows of the world, also, as, the
State of Texas leads all others
in numbers of Jersey cattle. Fine
Holsteins, Guernseys and Milk-
ing Shorthorns will also be seen.
Another top attraction of the
Pan-American i its Quarter
Horse show is also an American
breed developed for ranch use.
One of the most interesting at.
tractions at this Exposition is
is great farm equipment display..
Every farm and ranch equipment j
manufacturer in the United
States will have on display the
very latest and most" modern':
pieces of farm ecnuipment. Cattle
raisers say they like the equip-
ment display as miech as the
cattle exposition.
The American Brahmnan Breed-'
ers Association plt.ns a special re-';.
ception for all -ho come from.
Central, South-and Caribbean-
American countries, Their offi-
cials say that they appreciate
the Sincere fellowship Which
they enjoy with the cattlemen of
these regions, and that it is their ,:
desire that their guests share'%-
this great festival! with them..

HOUSE FOR RENT

Completely furnished house;:
on Place Boyer in cool Petion-i.
Vilule. Two bedrooms, 2 b'ath-
rooms, hot 'and cold water in '
kitchen and both bathrooms.
Electric sewing machine. Kit-""
chen furnished with electric and,.'l
gas stoves, Bendix waslhing ma-
chine, electric water pump, .re-.
frigerator, ete. Venetian binds..
and screens on al windows.;.
screened porch, large, grounds...,
Call 5539 any time of day.


The Show Spirit. Herdsman Jack King of Texas Tecbvologicat..
College" Lubbock, Texas, proudly displays the Colleges e6ntry4i'.In the..;
Senior Yearling class of the Pan-American Livestock Expesition.of '54. -,

THE MARABOU HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 4
(elevation 1500 feet)
Petionville (On Park). Phone: 7232
The management is pleased to announce the opening of the
Marabou Hotel, Bar, and Restaurant.
Rooms will be rented on the basis of the European plan -
room ami breakfast. Rates: from $6 per day for single occu-
pation, and from $10 per day for two persons. 10% service
charge will be added to the bill, eliminating all rips. 'Special
arrangements can be made if the American plan is desired.
First class accommodations. All rooms with private bath, tubs
and showers. Hot and cold water.
The Restaurant will serve principally Haitian dishes such
as grillot, turkey tassot, filet tassot, Langouste cflambee'. Grain
fed chickens and imported pork chops will be served. The
service will be on aht a la carte basis. Breakfast: 7-10 A.M.
Lunch: 12-3. Dinner 710-30. Closed Tuesdays. Tea or choco-.
late 4-6.

We u'ill welcome all visitors.

E. F. ROOSEVELT, Manager
Formerly Manager of Le Refuge,
the mountain inn above Renscoff.





h PAGE 8

SHAITI IS SUN IN YOUR GLASS
irr


..the picturesque sight of the oxen carts load-
ed with cane from a strip of land which is the
most famous not only in Haiti but in the
Hole world for the highest quality Rum...

COCKFIGHT DAIQUIRI
2 Oz. xxx Barbancourt
1 teaspoonful Marraschino
1 teaspoonful grapefruit juice
the juice of 2 lime
1 dash of sugar cane syrup
shake well with,cracked ice.

CORAL REEF NOG
2 Oz. xxxxx Barbancourt
1 egg
4 Oz. milk
several dashes of grenadine syrup
shake well with cracked ice:
strain; sprinkle
with nutmeg and paprika.


,GIMME FAY CENNS COCKTAIL
S2 Oz. xxx Barbancourt
several dashes Curacao
dash :sugar cane syrup
1 dash Angostura Bitters
a well squeezed lime peel
shake slightly with cracked
ice; strain.
/


HAITI SUN


Dominican Republic competes with ancient Egyptians

TEN MILLION DOLLARS GO
INTO MEMORIAL FOR COLUMBUS

The Dominican Republic is reported going head with plans to build
the Christopher Columbus Memorial lighthouse. Reputedly the largest
monument to be erected in honour of one man since the ancient
Egyptians built the Great Pyramid at Gizeh as a tribute to Cheops the
construction costs will set the Dominican Government back $10,000,000.
The Memorial Lighthouse, which is being built under the sponsor-
ship of the organization of the American States, will overlook the Car-
ibbean sea from the East bank of the Ozama river in Ciudad Trujillo.
It will be in the form of a huge recumbent cross, a mile long,
with arms a tenth of a mile long. It will cover 2,500 acres, with a great
Chapel, octagonal in shape at its heart.
They are planning to move Columbus's bones from the ancient cath-
edral where they are said to be resting, to the Memorial's chapel.
FAIR OF FREE NATIONS
On a 125-acre lot within the city limits of the Capital the Dominic-
ans are busy erecting a $25,000,000,000 'Dominican International Fair
of Free Nations in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the begin-
ing of the Era of Generalissime Trujillo.

The Wall Clock with

SWestmOinister Chimes

QuarterH o u rIl


Reliable and

D e c or -a t iv e*



AT RUSSO FRERES


Sunday. September 25th 1955


DALU MAKES THE HEART
GROW FONDER
Dalu's Flowers Are
The Freshest

A Good Hotel
With Reasonale Rates


HOTEL PLAZA
Ideally Situated Off
the Champ de" Mars


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Distributor:


HAITI TRADING Co. Chamber of Commerce bldg.


A Cn!-erpillar DW10 Tractor with a
No. 1,". S,:,aper provides dependable, high
:.pcer hir-mg. These matched units have
ai a' ; .;ble top speed of 24.5 MPH.
The No. 10 Scraper has a capacity of
8.7 cu. yds. struck and 11 cu. yds.
heaped. With this, tractor-scraper, cycle
time is cut to a minimum. The No. 10
Scraper provides positive ejection of the
stickiest materials.
The DW10 is powered by a 115 HP
Caterpillar Diesel Engine. This engine


lowers operating costs by using low cost,
non-premium fuels, without fouling. The
brakes on the trailing unit take hold an
instant before the brakes on the tractor,
thereby preventing jackknifing and assur-
ing safe operation. Mechanical steering is
aided by an hydraulic mechanism, giving'
the driver complete control and a "feel
of the road."
This machine has a place on nearly
every earthmoving project. Come in and
let us explain more about the DW10
Tractor and the No. 10 Scraper.


CATERPILLAR
RECIBTEL7O TrUA MARK





Sunday, September 25th 1955 HAITI SUN


PAGE


REX PUMPS AND MIXERS FOR FASTER OPERATION, LOWER MAINTENANCE
AND BIGGER PROFITS!

aAlf

.. : ...-4- --'.k, ';---1


Rex 3-!.2 S-'. Bag


Rex self-priming centrifugal pump Rex 3.':, S-, Bag Cement mixers
Cemlent mixers -all capacities (automatic)


Rex 6S-1 Bag Cement Mixer


Rex US- 2 Bags 16S-3 Bags
Cement mixer


REX MACHINES AVAILABLE AT ,SONACOm (Sole distributors for Haiti), Tel: 3872 -On the Exposition, next .to La Dowme, PO Box 397'


MEANWHILE =gCAK IN THE 'TATEG
PIoFey, WHO ISV WELWLONE OP THES
TWAT PAR MA'N CUSTOMERS FINAL'
N THE OOTH CAUGHT YOUR EYS,
HUM, eUMMCEZ. -.


4ZELAXCLARKE, OR. SHOULD I -
I JU5T CAAAE CALL YOU JAME-
TO TAKE -YOU-. IZOLFMEISTE.2
oIp-E-Z <"------- -"


YOU COULD CALL.AFTER WHAT I"
MEG IX KINPCOF PiP TO YQU---.,
PIP-TY NAMES ANP I'LL TAKE MW'M
I'P STJLL HAVE MICKEY FINN.
TO AN5WEP-.. WITH LEMON-
F7 NO CREAM!

01 Ai

Bai\ 2 r~is 1t


YOU MAY NOT REMEMBER TOO To
I;WELL, BUT YOU TOLP ME HOW "J
COPPER. CAL-HOON HIREIC YOU
TO /MAKE LOVE TO ME SO
WOULDN'T MARRY STEVE CANYON0


Sunday, September 25th 1955


HAITI SUN




HAITI SUN


Sunday, September 2 th 355.


A


PAGE 10


for the motorist who demands the most from a battery











I'*9Itl*^ MReT^^^**^^ EV E~DDi^^ S AS LATE AS r'4
___ WEVEI- DECIDEDEM YOUWOTO) ^ TG^lNU ^dl^WANT l
B HEAVY- DUTY DE LUXEBATTERYT








P~vN~ i =w^ -^ MAGAZI
You ga dthoseummpmsued eatm ... WILIAID HeatT-Dut De Luxe Bat-
25% more startin power, longer life, ey.lExdusive improvements. Visit
better performance ... when you buy your 'Willard dealer today!











SKENEL PIER LE ExCANT G dO HOMEstributor in Haiti CAN KILL
--" B Rue Payee -- Rue du Cenhre
} iim illim miPhone 22968










AWB LOKS0T WPENSIE SOM TME A
HAS BEE M TO.IVMEMOVIENT -0
SOSEr-ON A NIGHT OUIT '













+! ; --..
~AL WOKE___ ___ ___
HiT TNEESATE : H BOG )


ISN'T THIS Y -''EH, BUT WE GEE, I COLDhI(""y LETS TRYW .._ ...









WHORB?_TOREADABARN V41TH ELSE~
=-_MAGAZINE_ AW ILET MOP ,






_1P EB-NAW, COM01 E CANTG-H"E E CNKL
riV. TOO. EARLY--TE. SOETM
IJ8T 0 OO EXP=ENS:IVE )._w O'GIRLS WILLTWINK IN "rTHIS.
HOW TO ENTERTAIN


.OURSELVES






COURTESY OF ,LA BELLE CREOLE)) AND aHAITI SUNik


SI PT



O~tt"


Bureau: Stand 29
Ave. Marie-Jeanne
Cite de I'Exposition


SPort-au-Prince, Haiti
Phone: 2061
P. O. Box: 433


THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER

.....................................................C O U P O N ............... ......... ...............................

EVERY WEEK PLEASE SEND ME d((HAITI SUN))

FOR A MONTH ( 4 issues) ......................................$0.50

FOR A YEAR (52 issues) ......................................... (overseas $10)

Remittance enclose.

Please Bill me.

Name .................. .. .......... .... ...... .......... ....

A address ............................................... ......................


On this beautiful


aJ asenz e a b



day (the days are always beautiful in


Haiti) we wish to extend to you our heartiest welcome.
We, as well as everyone in Haiti, want you to have a very
pleasant and enjoyable stay in this lovely and hospitable
Island.
Haiti Sun (your newspaper) in collaboration with La
Belle Creole (your shopping center) have put out this
section of the newspaper in order to give you information
that will help you to make your stay not only pleasant but
profitable.
We are always at your Service, for any information you
may need.
HAITI SUN
LA BELLE CREOLE


SUGGESTIONS FOR THIS WEEK IN PORT-AU-PRINCE


U ".;


NATIONAL PALACE






Champ de Mars
Ojen dally except Sunday from 8-2 -
Raising Lowering of Flag, 8 a. m.-5 p. m.

NATIONAL MUSEUM


ChamBp de Mars
Open daily except Sundays

PALAIS DES BEAUX ARTS







Aux Palmlstes, Exposition Grounds
Open daily from 9 5
Art Exhibitions

MUSEE DU PEOPLE HAITIEN






Auxm Palmistes, Exposition Grounds
Open daily from 9 5
For further Information
sec your Travel Agent


FOYER DES ARTS PLASTIQUES


Aux Palmistes, Exposition Grounds
Open daily [rom 9 5
Permanent Anr Exhibitions


ART CENTER


Rue de la
J a.,, Revolution


Phone: 2055


Open daily except Sunday from 9 5
Current Art Shows


IRON MARKET


'I


Grand'Rue
Open dally from 6 4
Special Market days on Saturdays


METROPOLITAN CATHEDRAL


BASILIQUE
de Notre-Dame
(Catholic)


Petion Plaza
Open daily from 4 -6

COLONIAL CATHEDRAL


JOldest Church
in Port au Prince
For visit hours see
Your Travel Agent


Petion Plaza
" Open daily

ESPISCOPAL CATHEDRAL







Rue Pa,'ee (Near PAA Offices)
Open daily
Famous for its beautiful Haitian Moral


THEATRE IDE VERDURE


Aux Palmistes, Exposition Grounds
Open Tue-days and Thursdays
Evening for folklore shows


STADIUM PAUL E. MAGLOIRE


Rue Diarand
Boxing and Track lField events.
Football (Soccer) Matches
Thrice a ueek at night
For urLIher information Phone: 3015


COCK-FIGHT ARENA


Aux Palmiste:, Exposition Grounds
Eight Saturdays afternoons
and Sundays morning


UNDERSEA GARDENS


Iroquois


raLili. -.


Port-au-Prince Bay
flss t':nrom t'oat leaves
Dally Casino Pier 9:30 a.m.


La Belle Cr6ole




Rue Roux

The Caribbean's Most
Unique Shopping Center
Open daily from 8 5 Phone: 3177

MUSICAL FOUNTAIN






Cite de I'Expolsition, Exposition Grounds
Classical Concerts
a'l Wednesday and Sunday nights
from 7 10 p. m.

PLACE DES HEROS


Champ de Mars
Open Auditorium
Sunday Concerts from 7-9 p.m.
For further information
see your Travel Agent

PETION DESSALINS



UFARue
Mgr. Gufllons



Open daily except Sunday


FISH BOWL


5 3 IMartissant
Flili specialities
Restaurant

A short drive from Capital-on-sea-shore





K! PI (CAPT. ACE'S)






Martissant


Sea-shore Re.taurant
Sea-food pecialilies

RENDEZ VOUS


Cite de l'Expo:ltion
Air-conditioned Bar-dancing
Open from sunset to sunrising /


Le Perchoir


ft


'ouitllers
World-renowned


Mountain-top Res!aurant,
Dancing and Gift Shop
Phone: 2105

CASINO INTERNATIONAL






Cite de 1'Exposition
Gamllink and Dancing
Open every night
Floorshow on Wednesdays Phone: 3076


OABANE CHOUCOUNE


up^^Couun



Petionvile
Famous Nightclub
Open on Saturday Nights


Phone:


Phone: 7890


HOTEL RIVIERA


1RWmERA
a HQTEL


Phone: 3151
Martissant
Air-conditioned Bar Dancing
Excellent orchestra, folklore floorshows .

EL RANCHO HOTEL







Petionville
Dinner dances on Mondays, Wednesdays


and Fridays


HOTEL IBO LE

H HOTEL I I
k IIOlLEL





PttionvUle
Dinner dances on
Tuesday and Fridays

THIORLAND CL




c"03
CNN


Carrefour Road
Swim cocktails
Tennis


NAL. BANK OF THE REPUBLIC






Geffrard Square
Open daily except
Saturday and Sundays from 9 1
Phone: 2263

* ROYAL BANK OF CANIADA


Geffrard Square
Open dally except
Saturday and Sundys
from 9 I Phone! 2263


AM LINES
'' ,'


I-


PAA Phone: 3451
KLM- Phone: 2352
DELTA Phone: 3313
CUBANA- Phone: 3M
AVIATION ADH Phone: 2613

SHIPPiNG LINES


Panama .....................Telephone: 3451
Coinmar ....................................... 2082
rrani-Atlantic ................................ 2691
Wastley ........................................ 3867
'ia:nburg American.............. .....2238 3488
Alcoa S S................................ 2766
Royal Netherlands Navigation......... 3455


CATHOLIC SERVICES
Phone: 7888 Cathedra : 4, 6, 7:30 and 8:30 a.m.
Sacre-Cueur: 5:30, 7. 8:30 a.m.
St. Anne: 4, 7 and 8 a.m.
LE St Gerard: 4, 5:30 and 8:30 a.m.
S? Louis de France: 8 and 9 a.m.
Sixtine Chapel (Citd de I'Expositionj
10 a.m
St. Pierre (PEtionville): 4, 6, 8
and 9:30 am.
Ste. Thdrkse (Pdtionville): 6 a.m.
EPfSCOPAL
Cathedral: French 6 and English 7 ainm.
French 8 a.m
Baptist Church: 9 and 10 am.
Preshvlerna: 9 and 10 a.m.
Phone: 7886 METHODIST
ST. PAUL A.M.E.
4-6 a.m.
UB 9-11 a.m
11:30 12:30 English
7-9 n m. Evening
METHODIST CHURCH:
Rue de la REvolution:
7:00 Engli.h
9:00 French
6:'10 Evangelistic service in creole
BUREAU DU TOU.ISME
Avenue Marie- eanne.
Cite de lEIposIltion
Phone: 2618
Office hours: 8-1 pm.
Phone: 2465 _________________


..'m Immmomn


t


I -


il-i G2-A






COURTESY OF -LA BELLE CREOLE,) AND--HAITI SUN-)

--- -- --- --- --- -_.. ... ..


.Haytian Handwoven Fabrics.
Haytian Handwoven Rugs
Cameras & Films
French Ohantilly Laces
Swiss Embroideries
Irish Linens


OMEGA & Tissot Watches
French Perfumes:
Guerlain, Dana,
Lanvin, Worth,
Patou, Le Gallion,
Caron, Milot,
Carven, Fath
Christian Dior,
Rochas, Chanel,
Schiaparelli,
Nini Rici, Corday,
Raphael, Piquet,
Coty & Houbigant.
Liqueurs:
Courvoisier, Otard,
Bisquit, Hennessey,
Napdleon, JYaIrteUl,
Domecq, 'Drambuie,
Cheery Heering,
Marie Brizard,
Harveys Bristol Cream
Armagnac, Chaitreuse,
Cointreau,
Haytian Rhum:
Rhlum Barbancourt
SHaytian Music:
The Most Complete
Assortment of the
Various Rythms.
Haytian Voodoo Inspired
Jewelky
Haytian Mahoganyware
Handpainted Tissues


Haytian Sculptored Mahogany
Heads
Haytian Turtle-shell Jewelry
Jewelry from all over the
World
Exquisitely Beautiful
Beaded Bags
Hand-embroidered Blouses,
Skirts, etc.
Hand-painted, Skirts,
Kerchiefs, Stoles, etc.
Haytian Paintings
Haytian Ceramics
Haytian Postcards
(we mail them for you).
Dunlop Golf Balls
(great savings)
Dunlop Tennis Balls
(great savings)


In Port-au-Prince
everybody meets at
cThe Fountalin in
La Belle Creole for
Fruit and Fruit Juices
Eggs and Omelettes
Waffles and Hot Cakes
Beverages
Crisp and Cold Salads
Chef's Special.
Sandwiches
Ice Creams
Sundaes erd Beer
Cigars and Cigarettes



IYC. ^C3 ^


Spearfishing Equipment
Bathing Trunks
Native Polos for Men


e em Cb^gif t skop


Unusual among Gift Shops of
the world, is the branch of LA
BELLE CREOLE located on
the terrace of the LE PER-
CHOIR, the famous restaurant
on top of BOUTILLIERS
MOUNTAIN, overlooking Port
&u Prince.
Through the wide windows
of Le Perchoir Gift Shop the
S"shopper's eyes are drawn from
the attractive show cases, to the
breath-taking beauty or nearly
two thousand square miles of
Hispaniola's plains, mountains
and sea, lying 3.300 feet below.
Spacious, and always cool.
Le Perchoir Gift Shop offers
the same high quality French
perfumes. Haitian jewelry, dan-
Sdicraft, books, paintings and
hundreds of other gift items,
assembled from the far corners
of the earth, as in the mother
.store, La Belle Creole, in town.


The prices, the fixed price po-
licy, the sales slip with every
purchase, wit ,the guarantee of
the firm's name, are identical.


Located in the shop is a bar
where one can sip Haitian rum
punch, tea, coffee, soft drinks-
"or where one can have a'tween
meal snack of sandwiches, ca-
ke, ice cream, whble shopping.
The combination of cool com-
fort, spectacular view, excel-
lent merchandise, and refresh-
ment, make a shopping trip to
LE PERCHOIR GIFT SHOP
a pleasant and profitable ex-
periernce a high spot indeed
in your travels.


jfqHAITMN $SATURPAV NIONT...

it AN UNJferGEfTTAIRLE UXPURIUNCE
,\1^ A uwf~~ fpnse


^mFt


By Mary Johnson
Gaiety the keynote of night
life in Port-iau-Prince the
gay sophistication of a New
World Paris underlined by the
hypnotic beat of African tam-
bours.
And in keeping with its
French tradition the accent is
on good food in a romantic at-
mosphere. Few places in the
world can offer 'a more enticing
blend of these two elements
than Le Pierchoir, Haiti's smart-
est restaurant that hovers 3,000


above Port-au-Prince and its
emerald ba,. Guests during tea
and cocktail hour have a front
row seat at one of the most
bewitching settings ever pro-
vided for a tropical sunset.
Then the lights go on and the
curving bayshore is outlined in
a necklace of shimmering
pearls. On .the breezeswept
terrace, guests can watch cars
stop at the Dominican border
20 miles away.
Whether it's a thick state-
side steak or an ethereal Rum
Gouffl6, Le Perchoir food is
superbly prepared and elegant-
ly served. Flix Guignard and
his orchestra provides music for
dancing.
The International Casino, a
swank establishment run by a
staff imported from Monte-
Carlo, is one of the major
points of interest during the
summer 'and winter tourist sea
sons. There one can dine on
excellent Italian food and later
visit the gaming tables which
are meticulously run under the
supervision of the Haitian Go-
vernment. On the bay side,
an orchestra beats out rhum-
bas,; mambos and romantic Hai-
tian meringues for dancing -un-
der the twinkling stars.
Near the Casino in the bree-
ziswept Exposition Grounds
is the Open Air Theatre de
Verdure where visitors csn
attend the bi-weekly shows put
on by the talented National
Folklore Troupe.
Around the curve of the bay
is the newly remodeled Hotel
Riviera with its huge air-con-
ditioned Bamboche Room and
circular bar. The bar's revol-
ving center serves as the stage
for Guy Durosier's tri-lingual
crooning and a n'ghtly floor
show (The white-if-ced Banda
dancer is Minsky's in reverse,
a comedian par excellence).


Ot fa(ad& oWe


Among the world travelers
there is a saying that good shop-
pers, when they idie, go to Hai-ti.
In Haiti there is the widest
possible variety of gifts, souve-
nirs, jewelry, clothes, extraor-
dinarily fine rum and liqueurs
native handicraft and imported
luxuries from many ports of
the world.., all the way from
Paris to Pakistan.
Haiti's richy hand-varnished
mahogany bowls trays and
sculpture are well known. So
is the famous Rhum Barban-


nelles* to the pulsing beat of
the voodoo drums. It's an UN-
FORGETTABLE experience.
For late stayer-uppeLs any
night of the week, Dan Allen's
Rendez-vous across form the'
internationall Casino goes strong
until all hours. And along
about 1 a. m., the joint is usual-
ly hopping with oldtitne Ame-


Other leading hotels have
special dinner dansants once or
twice a. week. Visitors should
not miss an opportunity to hear
Haiti's internationally known
male Dejean Choir which per-
forms at Hotel Ibo Lele on Fri-
day evenings. The El Rancho
features Ti Ro Ro, Haiti's num-
ber one drummer, and mem-
bers of the Natidnal Folklore
Troupe on Friday evening and
other special dance nights
which vary according to the
season. Hotel Dambala has a
Saturday night chicken barbe-
que beside its illuminated pool,
with an orchestra providing
music for outdoor dancing on
its marble patio. The Villa
Creole's Big Night is Thursday
evening with a Haitian Buffet
served beside its pool in a gala
tropical garden decor and, of
course, danciAg. The roof gar-
den at Hotel Choucoune is open
for dinner dancing Monday and
Wednesday nights during the
season.
On Saturday evening Petion-
ville's thatched-roofed night
club, Cabane Choucoune, is the
mecca of the Capital Elite and
visitors. Alternating orchestras
thrdb with the rhythm of the
Haitian Meringue, a dance so
simple that visitors need spend
no time on the side 'lines just
looking on. Though this has
long been the society gathering
spot of the Haitian Capital,
rum and sodas are still served
for .20 a glass. There is an en-
trabce fee which varies depen-
dcling upon the entertainment
for the evening. The Cabane
Choucoune often features lea-
ding foreign entertainers.
Saturday night is also the
night for taking trips into the
nearby hills to attend the pea-
sant gious dances held in open cton-


court. Particularly prized by
gourmets is Five Star, Rhum
Barbancourt... so mellow that
it is often served with all the
ceremony accorded a grand, old
cognac. This is one of the few
rums in the world which is
distilled not from the pure
pressed juice of the sugar cane.
Only a few cases are ex-
ported from Haiti each year.
For this reason people who-
really-know take their full quo-
ta of non-taxable liquor 5
bottles of Rhum Barban-
court 'back to the States. The
price in Port-au-Prince is amea
zingly moderate.

SELL iT THROUGH
CLASS FE DEPARTMENT


rican favorites, such as Alexan-
der's Ragtime Band.
For seafood and such spe-
cialties as Fried Frogs Legs,:
there is .the ,bayshore restau-
rant known as Ki Pi or Cap-
tain Ace's. The food is excel-
lent, the view interesting and
the dancing fun.
For dinner minus dancing,
there is Petionville's Le Picar-.
di a French-run Pension fea-
turing Escargot, pepper steak
and the sort of food rarely seen
or tasted off the Midi. In Port-
au-iPrin'ce, Auix Cosaques is
known for its tasty flaming
lobster and other typical]:ly Hai-
tian dishes. The savoy, just
off the Champs de Mars, offers
either Haitian or American
foods and if you are really ho-
mesick for southern fried chic-
ken that is just where you'll
find it a block from the Na-
tional Palace.





COURTESY OF ((LA BELLE CREOLE)) AND ((HAITI SUNn


Most of these tLips can be
made un conventional automo-
biles, others require the more
versatile jeep to navigate the
rough spots and river crossings.
All of 'them can be made in sa-
fety.


There is a Hertz-Drive-,it
Yourself Agency in town where
you can renrt a car or a jeep at
reasonable rate; or you can
rent cars, with or without
chauffers, elsewhere. The Hai-
tian Air Force provides safe
and efficient air transport to
most important points in Haiti
at very reasonrnable rates. Ask
your hotel manager or your
travel agent for details.
Each of .these trips has its
special attraction. From the
longer trips you will return
with a grand thirst, a hearty
appetite, a delicious fatigue,
.quickly banished by a hot bath


TRAVEL SilO E? TIONS


(for which you will have a new
respect). You will have a new
test for the attractions of the
city. You will fell a great pity
-for the jaded characters who
have not strayed from the bar
since you left... And, of course,
you will have a good reserve of
conversational ammunition to
last you for many months.
So, starting width 'the shortest
trips first, here are a few boiled
down suggestions for travel in
Haiti:

BOUTILLIERS MOUNTAIN
AND LE PERCHOIR
(Ler Pcrshawh) The Perch)
The most spectacular view in
Haiti: 2,000 square miles of
Haiti spread out before you -
a miracle of color, form, sun-
light and shadow! Port-au-Prin-
ce lies at your feet (3.000 feet
below) like a giant map. To get
to this breath-taking, unibelie-
eable and unforgettable view
)u ride 10 miles from Port-au-
Prince, through the pretty little


_L


town of Petionville, then up a
winding mountain road, borde-
red by flaming giant pointsetta
plants. You p-ass the tratched


:'.o" habitations of peasants and
arrive in rural Haiti, where life
goes on as it has for centuries
as if the city below did not
pxist. LE PERCHOIR, modern
oasis on the mountain, offers
the facilities of its restaurant
'and night club, its Terrace Bar,
and its branch of La Belle'Cre-
ole Gift Shop loo make the tnip
even more enjoyable andprofi-
table. After sundown light
wraps advisable, and gentlemen
are asked to wear coats in the
restaurant after 7 p. m. Allow
two hours for this trip plus
time to eat.

CAP-HAITIEN
AND LA CITADELLE
This trip is an experience in
history and geography. It is an
adventure and a pilgrimage
which you 'must not miss.



~~.i -...




If you have the time, we re-
cormnend that you take three
.days an'd go to Cap-Haitien by
car. Its about 170 miles and a
minimum of 5 or 6 hours, but
you should take about 8 hours
to enjoy it most. So to one of
Cap Haitien's comfortable ho-
tels. For the night, go to the
Citadelle the next day, retur-
ning to Port-au-4Prince the third
day. Eevry mile. and every


hour of this trip will be full of
unforgettable impressions.
If you are pressed for time,
you can fly to ithe Cape in 45
minutes, and can make the en-
tire pilgrimage in a single day.







JACMEL.-
If you want another trip off-
the-beaten t-ack go to Jacmel,
on Haiti's south coast. Jacmel,
once -a flourishing town, stiI
has a considerable export bu-
siness, but is typical of many
I M(t_


Haitian provincial sea-coast
towns waiting for better days
to c'om. Jaa:mel has a flavor
of its own. To get there you
can take the easy way by air,
or the adventurous way by
road, about 60 miles, practical-
ly every mile of whith has a
river crossing. Near Jacmel is


.&ae &fi& SPECIAUTIEJ


For
MAHOGANY SCULPTURES
fLa Belle Creole


^6

one of Haiti's most beautiful
beaches, Raymond les Bains :'
Two hotels. there, clean and.,i
comfortable. Plan.to stay over-,; :
night at least.
FORET DES PINS
(Pine Forest)
In south-east Haiti, a drive of.
s-me 60 miles from Port-au-'"?,,:
Prince is a beautiful pine forest 4.:
at an elevation of bout 7,000 '?
feet. To arrive at this 150,000;".
acre forest, one drives through '".':
the rich sugar cane lands o,'&
the Cul de Sac plain, then"
through and arid region of eac--(.
tus to the edge of Lake Btang.."
Sumatre, famous salt lake, m-.11
fested with crocodiles, lying on.
the frontier of the Dominican 1
Republic. There the climb com-
mences to the cool Pine Forest'i
This trip wll take all, day1
returning to your .hotel, for
cocktails and dinner. Passingd?
through a numriber of small Hai-
tian towns and villages, it af.,
fords a variety of impressionsii.
of Haitian life and geographf.t
Take a wrap for your vismt -:
its cool up here. 'A




.ll.i.
." "!,

,' : :' ,i

."..
... 't


For
OMEGA WATCHES
iLa Belle Creole


For
FRENCH PERFUMES
LLa Belle Creole


For
LIQUORS
La Belle Creole


I For
HAITIAN RYTHMS
AND
HA1tDWOVEN FABRICS
ULa Belle Creole


For
GLASSWARE
AND CERAMICS
La Belle Creolf


For
VOODOO JEWELRY
La BeLe Creole


ONE PRICE POLICY PRICES VISIBLY MARKED ON EACH ITEM FULLY ITEMISED SALES SLIP FURNISHED
u|rL13 11a U Ir


E;.- .


* I




SUNn


COURTESY OF ,LA BELLE CREOLE) AND ((HAITI


a


WELCOMES YOU

TO PORT-AU-PRINCEa


MEMBERS


.1* *.tr*
+ +++ 46*


t.-lL4
k-=A1.


Customs "foMf S
City Hall f l
Frm Marke'il
Bureau of To2burism
Bank of Haiti
Royal Bank of Catuda


2I Bown Airporlt
13. Trinity Cntedrni
14. national Palaoe
15. Foit NatimoaF
.MAOGLOIIE Stadium
Cameli *a qe Hall S...


CARLOS: -
CARIBCRAFT: -
CHAMPANA'S: -
GEO. DESLANDES:-
HAITIAN GIFT SHOP: -
JACQUELINE'S: -
JEANNE'S:-
ILA BELLE CREOLE:
LA PERLE DES ANTILLES: -
MAISON ORIENTALE: -
MAXIM'S: -
MEIMBERG BROS: -
OUANGA DOLL: -
OUVROIR NATIONAL: -
SAMBA: -
SI-LA SHOP:-
THE SOUVENIR SHOP:-
RHUM BARBANCOURT: -

All One Price Policy Pies
Visibly Marked on Each
Item Fully Itemised Sales Slip
is Furnished without Request.
It's a LA BELLE CREOLE
Publicity Creation
Cliches made by Cie. Lith crHaiti
Printed by IM1PRIMERIE DE L'ETAT
Copyright and all rights reserved
Designed 4 Alfredo Garcia-Gdramendi and
by Rosario Franco de la Rosa


I.*


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Patek P~tdieife

p9art"


0atoj,
Onee


,44L



CURACAO
%,Wdyw


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_____Setme_5t_95HATUPAGE 11


DUPONT PAINTS
fo." ei -r purpose




Charles Dejean & Co



Agent In Haiti
OOD! YOU'V- STOPPED HIM!
S 1 NOW RIN( THEM BOTH TO THEIR
4 FEET FOR THEIR COWARDICE
-V THEY WILL BE PUT TO DEATH..
SRIGHTHERE

4,1RS


k
I II


ff0',PW---S',eA'0A-r 7AWW
^AsfAWAVESN LEAA-1,VC7,
OXYGEN/N A ....
elV-YES..IYINO LOKTAR..
TO THEIR FEET...(YAWN)..
TO THEIR...FEE...





















.... A 77F/ 8REEZE
I6 BEEN WA-/PP/N' T//E
'*EN 70VWAAW THE ARENA. .

H1T, PRINCE CHARMING,
AVE YOU TO THE TENDER
ES OF"

KING!


THERE SHE BLOWS,
DALE/ IT WILL TAKE THEM
100 YEARS TO DI THEIR WAY
TO THE SURFACE AGAIN! BUT,
AFTER THIS ENCOUNTER, I HAVE
A FEELING THEY'D JUST AS GOON
STAY PUT/


NEXDT WEE) <: zP^
LY. T4E DAR PLANET6-C


F.C ulpO


Snndav. September 25th 1955


HAITI SUN




PAGE 12 HAITI SUN Sunday. Senteinh~r 2fQh Ifl~


Save


time


& money


ship through Miami Via


COINMAR LINE


THE LONE
RANGER
3y PFRAN STRIKER


GLA 1L )-/ T(OSE-
INT#6/ t9A7Y PZXL7.
TWW 7"A;47 T AAC
&ST7- WM^W
A,^


P I93 5l.MwLoneR g.[w I
rS -r1eIs Kfn1G rntuBdACar

TCOA/. TMEN CO M /MaW&.


PAGE 12


HAITI SUN


Sunday. Sentemiber 25th 1l955;


p





-uia~ Setme,2t 95 AT U p" i.uJl J~l


NEW CS 'ULCANIA DUE CHRIST'%IAS DAY


13 'CRJ!SE SHIPS TO CALL AT PORT AU PRINCE
DUR, \, COMING WINTER SEASON 1955-1956


Ir-win al i'.on, President of
the Travel Development Corpo-
ration haindlk,; public relations
for the Republic in the United
States and Car:ada. On a visit to
the offices c' the Sunz this
week. Mr Raoinson stated that
*the winter c'.uise picture looks
better this ?.=3,on. Approximate-
ly 43 cruise .ihipes are expected
to call in' Hst'i. and in several
cases the ships are scheduled to
remain overnight in Port. The
new Swedist, Lloyd Liner S.S
VULCANrA-, _s the pride of the
schedule anti will drop anchor in
Haitian water; on Christmas day.
HOLLAND A-r.ERICA LINE
SS. New Amsterdam
Arrivals in Port an Prince:
.Wedne.,d: December 28, 1:00
a.m.
Departs- Tt =rt-day Dec. 29, 1.00
a.m.
Sunday Jar. .zaiy 29 (1956) 7:00
a.m.
Departs S.a-.day 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, January 14, 7:00 a.m
Departs Saturday 5:00 p.m.


Friday Jan 27, 2:00 p.m..
parts Sat. 5:00 p.m.
SWEDISH LLOYD
SS. Patricia
Arrivals in Port au Prince:
Thursday Jan. 5 7:00 a.m
Departs 11:00 p.m
Saturday Jan 14 8:00 p.m
Departs Jan. 15 3:00 p.ni.
Monday Feb. 6, 7:00 a.m
Departs 11:00 p.m
Tuesday Feb. 14. 8:00 p.m.
Departs Feb. 15. 5-00 p.m.
Oruu 'b
Saturday March 3. 8:00 p.m.
Departs March 4, 1:00 p.m
Monday Mlarch 26, 7:00 a.m
Departs 11:30 p.m
Tuesday April 3, 8:00 p.m
Departs April 4, 5:00 p m.
CUNARD WHITE STAR Ltd
SS Mauretania
Arrivals in Port au Prince:
Feb. 9,'7:00 a.m I
Departs 6:00 p.m
Ma-rch 19, 7:00 a.m
Departs 6:00 p.m
April 5. 7:00 a.m
Departs 6:00 p.m


Monday February 27 9:00 p.m
Departs 6:00 p.m SS Caronia
Thursday March 15, 9:00 p.m Saturday Nov. 19., 8:00 a.m
Departs: 9.0-. p.m Departs 5:00 p.m.
SCANADIAN PACIFIC STE,
SS Maasdar.i SHIP
Arrivals in Port au Prince SS. Empress of Scotland
Friday December 30, 11:30 a.m Arrivals Port au Prince:
Departs 6:00 p.m. Thursday Feb. 2. 11:00 am
Monday -Tanuarv 9, 8:00 a.m Departs 7:00 p.mn
Departs 5:00 p.m Friday Feb. 24 11:00 a.m.


De-


AM-.
:LAI-


Mr. Irwin Robinson, who handles Haiti's Public Relation in U.S. and
Canada seen above with IMrs. Robinson sampling El Rancho luxury.


Departs 7:00 p.mi
Satit:-day Match 17. 11:00 a.m.
Departs 7:00 p.m.
(Continued on Page 14)


SCIENTIFIC SWEDISH MASSAGE
Medical and Corrective Gymnastics Baths Physiotherapyj.
Ultra-V:olet Infra Rouge Lamps Rehabilitation.
Phy.siotherapist -Masseur, Graduate Swedish Massage School, Chicago,
111. FuPost-Graduate Kellberg Health Institute, Chicago. Podiatrist.
Jacques Lafleur
Associated with Dr. Maurice P. Lafleur
179 Avenue Magloire Ambroise Phone 2981


0 00 NOW TWO FLIGHTS DALY TO
NOW TWO FLIGHTS DAILY. TO


>MIA


I0


IMI


A '

:e to


ANS

Sot.
Mon., .1urs"
S tcs .30 am I
.ics f -&- n ni 0 16


"' ', .v Rew u ,--- ..l l .-uuW I.- ,
.. t 10-5 o ,* onU s... .04 pm

ae IuiO^ i:EOt*5So ,m Ar. 5--^ pm
Aad ^f .. 12-1,5 pm I '"i ,.tjO lu'dta 1 .. .2 $ p
^-^ ;.. ^ -^ vffi :son Juan ..-^
lw "" S Ar
l **.C"


SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP EXCURSION FARES
HAVANA $105*

NEW ORLEANS $19100**
30-day limit, round-trip excursion fare good all year.
"16-day limit, round-trip excursion good until Dec. 15.


ReservatIon?
Phone: 3313
Ticket Office: Jos. Nadal & Co.
Jos. Nadal & Co. General Agen
or see your Travel Agent


>)


4-MOTORED \

SUPER= CLIPPERS*
FOR ONLY $135.OO u.s.) ROUND TRIP
|
See your Travel Agent or


S WORLD'S MOST EXPERIENCEb AIRLINE



Rue Dantes Deslouches-Port au Prince-Tel: 3451


1T M.RKg.PAA. I e PAP-56-M A


I Ad


Defta Offers

The Only .

Non-Stop Service

to


HAVANA
and thru-plane service


NEW ORLE



. Mu.,U MSuL


f oim lt, Op rolfn9 a, 0elta CBS


--- | I[ I I


JV


Sunday?, September 25th 1955


HAITI SUN


PAfGE I.


nF





PAG 14HAT SN uda, etebe AtM15


Makes First Flight To Celebrate 100th Birthday
. \,.......,$*... *.*.,- s '.. *. T -. l


Mrs. Mary MeCay, pioneer Miami (Fla.) resident, celebrates her
100th birthday by making her first airplane flight, a trip to Nassau
aboard a Pan-American World Airways' Clipper. She was born on
August 15, 1855, in Pittsburgh, Pa. In honor of the special occasion
PAA provides a special birthday cake which the centenarian cut and
distributed to passengers on the flight. Barbara Davey, PAA steward-
ess is shown presenting the cake to Mrs. McCay.


TUESDAY AND FRIDAYS
DINNER DANCING


43 CRUISE SHIPS

TO CALL HERE

(Continued fromni Page 13)

GREEK LINE
SS. Olympia
Arrivals Port au Prince: "
February 21., 8:00 a.m
Departs 6:00 p.m
March 5, 9:00 a.m
Departs 5:00 p.m
xxx
CLIPPER LINE
SS. Stella Polaris
Arrivals Cap Haitien
Thursday Jan. 12, in the morning
Departs evening.
Sunday March 18 (a.m.)
Departs evening.
xxx
Arrivals Port-au-Prince:
Monday Dec. 26, (1955) in morn-
ing.
Departs evening.
Sunday Jan. 29, morning.
Departs evening.
Wednesday Feb. 22, in morning.
Departs evening.
I .- XXX
NORVEGIAN-AMERICAN LINE
SS Oslofjord
Arrivals Port au Prince:
Saturday Nov. 6, 7:00 a.m.
Departs 10:00 p.m
SWEDISH AMERICAN LINE
SS. Stockholm
Arrivals Port au Prince:
Saturday Nov. 6, 6:00 a.m.
Departs 10:00 p.m.
SWEDISH LLOYD
SS. Vulcania
Arrives Port-au-Prince Christmas
Day (Dec 25) leaves noon Dec. 26
HOME LINES
SS. Homeric
Arrivals Port au Prince
31 Dec. 8:00 a.m
Departs 5:00 p.m
Jan. 17, 8:30 a.m.


AUX COSAQUES

Haiti's famous ahomard flam.
mes has been enthusiastically
acclaimed by visiting epicures,
and featured by Jmperial Li-
nen.s
But foreigners aren't the only
connoisseurs of food. Haitieas
know where the meat is done
just right, where wines are of a
perfect vintage and flavour to
mellow their mood and form the
perfect foil for each delightfl
course.
That's why special occasions
are observed at cAux Cosaques.o


ThEd Aux Cosaques Bar


TOPS "EM ALL"


JOSEPH NADAL & Co.


Departs 5:00 p.min
Feb. 1, 8'00 a.m
Departs 10 p.m
Feb 11, 8:00 a.m
Departs Midnight
March 3, 8:00 a.m
Departs Midnight
xxx
FRENCH LINE
SS. Ile de France
Arrivals Port au Prince:
Februariy 21, 5:00 p.m.
Departs 8:00 p.m. Jan 22.
SS. F-landres
Jan. 20, 7:00 a.m.
Departs Jan 21, 1:00 p.m.
xxx
F-RNESS LINE
SS. Ocean Monarch
Arrivals Port au Prince:
Monday August 1, 8:00 a.m.
Departs same day
Tuesday October 25, 7:00 a.m
Departs 6:00 p.m.


LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES

SHPLACE GERARp-DT T
-PLACE GEFFRORP @I ,


AT CABANE CHOUCOUNE
Every Thursday and Sunday night Special folklore
Show... and dancing

HOTEL CHOUCOUNE
Phone 7890


Continuous music and dancing every nite
To The RIVIERA ORCHESTRA
From 6:30 p.m.-l:30 a.m.
Every Saturday night $1.00 adm. per person
DINNER TIME 7-9: P.M.




ULt 'iPICAJI2IrIEt

FAMOUS FOR ITS FRENCH COOKING

Specialities


-ONION SOUP
-PEPPER STEAK
-ESCALLOPPE DE VEAU


-FILET MIGNON
-SNAILS
-PI1CARDIE


FOR RESERVATIONS Tel: 7416
LOCATED IN COOL TETE-DE-L'EAU, PETION-VILIE


* -1QUA7T 8lBOfJP
.BPUo UET, ..BO uEu _. "




LA PLUS ANCIENNE FAMILLE DE 0ISTILCATEURS.O',4AITIl











PORT-AU-PRINCE HAITI WEST INDIES


Sunday, September 2.5th 1956


HAITI SUN


PAGE 14








ANOTHER BY THE FAMOUS STORYTELLER FORTUNE BOGAT



DOUCEE" (GENTLE) HAH IANIZA 10iN

By Fortune L. Bogat


It is ,:epeated to us constantly
and we read it in. our newspapers:
let us think' faitian, le; us speak
Haitian. let us3 manufacture Hai-
tian, let us h1'.y Haitian, let us
employ Haitia-.:, oh well ... bou-
lons (let us struggle to make
everything Haitian.) It would be
ideal to be able to Tollow tq the
letter this ex.e'lent advice which
.surely pleases all who live, feel,
act and love r- the Haitian way.
I think, however, that among
these activities which we so ar-
dently desire to Haitianize, there
are certain pleasant and agreable
things whici deserve our imme-
diate attention, we are going
to examine th-em together, dear
reader, and see if. their Haitiani-
zation is a matter of the near, or
more distant future.

I am in -?rfect accord with
those who clamor for jaitian.
nusl''and EHaitian dancing in' our
private clubs, in our dance halls,
in our cbamacHhes, etc... I have,
.more than p.once had'the plesture
of hearing a beautiful foreigner
say:,tI just' adore Haitian music,'
the trouble ".-'that you do not
-give us enough of it.,. You will
agree with me that, even without
the, kind observation of this ra-
vishing person. this is obvious.
Indeed, who among us has not
had, the occasion of admiring our
sweet .visitors in the act of s'Voon
ing in the arms of a Haitian dan
cer striving, with frenzy, to insi-
tate more-or-Tess, by unbridled
movements of the hips, the insi
nuating undulations of a -Macho,
whose imagination is going fast-
er than his feet. cMeringneur
rm&rite., he is not content to
give .verbal instructions to his
exciting partner, but aids her
manually to execute the most
erotic movements of our tempt-
ing .,emerfgue,. I do not' -doubt
that our musicians who discreet-
ly ;eny. .-this marvelous specta-
cle .wbuld hesitate a single mo-
ment to go on playing -,Haitian
music, .

But the touristid. gentry is not
umnisely composed of members
of the, weaker sex. There is also
"Modsieurie Tourist, kwho dan-
tea (with difficulty) only to Ameri
can' i usic," 'or again who only
sketches in a few steps of a
'Sotth'Amenricani danse which he
bqs not-completely mastered in
the. Arthur Murray Studios. '

,Foria"to remain at his table
when the orchestra is playing
Haitian airs, while his lovely corn
panion allows herself to be loving
1Y wrinkled up by a too enterprise
ing Macho, he becomes bored,
unnerved, and finally seizes the
first occasion to demand in an
irritated voice: can't your peo-
pie play soine American music
'or a mambo?, It is understanda-
ble that the poor guy has got to
defend himself, also, This Hai-
tianization, will be, 'one day not
too far distant, a reality. Our
music is becoming more and
more popular abroad, and soon
kMonsieur le Tourist. in imita-
lion of his beautiful companion
' will also throw himself, unhesi-
tatingly, into the turbulent con-
test of the cgouyades> (,bumps
'and grinds).

Because we are asking that
our dance music be Haitianized,
and we are all agreed on this
point, it is certain that our Natio-
nal danse, the aMeringue', needs
to become a little more Haitian
again.


We, the Seniors, can still recall
with pleasure, mixed with re-
gret, the time of our childhood
when, in our homes, the true
Haitian meringue was danced.
Contrary to the carnavalistic
meringue Of the Streets, it was1
more of a slow dance. This did
not prevent its being captivating,
amorous and of a discreet ero-
tism. Today, in contemplating our
dancers, we ask ourselves if the
carnavalistic meringue has not,
dethroned in our salons the dance*
which I am trying to describe.
They wish to make a real amal-
gamation of dances out of our
meringue, or seem to have diffi-
crlty in recognizing that the
West Indian, South-American
and American Boogie-woogie
steps from the Haitian meringue.
However; it must not be be-
lieved that our meringue of old
did 'not have its eccentricities.
But, they were -more moderate
and were interpreted by what was
then called the eti-pas- (tiny
steps), a figure of danse which
was executed by able play of the
feet ...' A .good dancer would
brag about his own cti-pas.z In
public dancing places, vulgarly
referred to as edouze et demie
- (twelve-and-a-half) '-because
'you paid twenty-five centimes
(5 cts Americ'an)Afor two dances-
the dustorhers excelled' in .the
epas pigeon, (pigeon step), a ra.
pid movement of the legs which'
obliged thei.artner. to make a
'courbetteD (a certain leaping
bowJ 'which resembled that of
this burd. There was also the eba
lancer en place, (swing in place)
and the dodinerv (rocking) as
much as the meringue figures
whose evocative names are self-
edxplanatory.

The excellent dancer was he
who could evolve with ease in
the smallest possible space, at
the same. time respecting the dis
tance which Ahust. exist between
himself and his partner. Ladies
were very' prudish In those
day!...

To Haitianize, or if your. pre-
fer it, to rehabilitate our merin
gue and dancing as in the past,
is not an easy thing to do. fAn its
n.'w form, this dance is a sort of
evasiota for many, and constitute
for othejs tb6he only kind of physi
cal culture which they feel capa--
ble of practising with love, and
desire. Let us say, in fact, that
the' renewed and increased infa-
tuation of foreigners for this Hal
tian meringue leaves no doubt'
of its importance from the tou-
ristic point of yew.

I was speaking recently with
a friend who was seriously wor
ried over the fact that our young
sters seem to be disinterested in
the fine Haitian beauties and are
only interested in the beautiful
foreigners who visit Haiti's
shores more and more. Hardly
have they set foot on our shores,
this friend declared, but that our
young men accost them, prome-
nade them about in automobiles.
accompany them everywhere not
leaving them up to the very mo-
ment of their departure. 'And,.
added my pretty interlocutor., we
Haitian women ask ourselves: what
will become of our young women,
if our young men persist along
this line." Iadmit that the se-
rious tone of this friend, the an-
xiet' with which she viewed this
problem, with a contrite air, fi-
nally afflicted me also. I am,
without' a doubt, very sensitive


to these types of questions. I im
mediately decided that here was
a delicate Haitianization pro-
blem which must be investigated.
To teUl the truth, I do not be-
lieve that our young men are im
moderately attracted to our pret
ty visito's. I do not believe that
the predominately European edu
cation-which they have received
causes them to unknowingly
prefer the Caucasian beauty to
that of our enchanting creoles...
I am fi -frther convinced that the
,sexe-ampilet (sex appeal) of our
adorable Haitian girls is unbea-
tabe. Therefore, it is certainly not
along this line that is to be found
the seasons for this other attract
tion which seems to be irresisti-
ble. I concluded that our young
men must have other far more
subtle reasons, and I decided to
iegin my research immediately.


Our presence did not make II
any great impression upon the C
epensionnairesv of this ill-famedj h
house. We had been at the bar it
a good half hour when one of the n
'CHIQUITAS* concerned her-
seLf with our presence, w
The music box went on with- o0
out stopping, blaring out Cuban, H
Dominican, and South American e'
pieces, and rarely played Hai-
tian meringue. My companion no
ticed it, and L:-.thought I could -
tell by the tone of his voice that .
he would have liked to hold me J
responsible for this contradic-
tion. However, this did not undu- I
ly trouble my friend who told
me jovially: I hope I'll be able
to practice my french here.) He J
hadn't finished speaking 'before
one of the belles de nuit: (ladies
of the night) came up to us, smile ]
ing, and said: Y Uds. son de
aat1ii?3i> 0frPQr-fi n.q*a al c /__I_ -_


A couple of days later, I met ,- ,-, t CifJam IagU.P were
are you from? Offer me someth-
a friend whose popularity among lug). And without waiting for an
the foreign visitors to the coun- aswer, she continued to bor n-
try is no longer to be questioned. arrrwh c ind o o
I quickly exposed my problem to, Spanish, w almost aind of umrehensicoth
him. 4tMon vieux,:D he told me, Spanish, almost incmprhensi-
him. eMonwvieuXor the toldme, ble. My frend eperdit ]a carton
miling, with our little friends (os the th d ta
Prom across the sea, epas de pro (lost ad) momentarily
bleme.% (there is no problem), and looked at me in'astonishment,
I would very much like to Thee, recalling several Spanishb
and I should certainly prefer to phrases Dicked up in South Ame
ricahebknabrn nvr.
go. out. with a epayse: (HI{itian ic, he began a .bring converse.
tion with~ the t~emsistant tcluk4i.
girl) from time to time; I can even ton wt the stant Dui
assure you that nothing .would 7ev'. -
make me happier. But, what do Is this sti, another problem
you expect, I cannot afford the f gentl Haltianization? I ask-
luxury of taking with me the d myself. You can bet I quick-
four or five members of the fa- h, idea out of my mind
mily who will surely go along
to chaperon us.a 'And that isn't UA PiIT fl-
all either,: he added, r must ex- ."TEflfS .fl
pect the parents to question me .
as to emes intentionsA (are my THE COOLEST
inritentions honorable).' 'Avoiding .- :" -
any commentary on this, I was TI
just about to leave when there ri
arrived a mutal friend a..great .
dancing fan, a cavalier servant TJ
(a willing escort) who is surpris-
ed' at not yet haviing been declar VEJ
ed a public utility. We hurried to
draw him 6ut on the subject. He
sighed, looked at his watch, and
told us: -'I am in a big hurry, LOW SUMMER RATES...
I've. got a doll waiting for, me
up at Ibo-tele, but I will tell you,
in passing that cndgaisse pdreil-S- SWIMMING
Ie moin y trop pintade., (girls ALSO FPEE-- TRA
of my own country-make it tough
for me). Too many complications,
my dear.: And after making.
this statement, without waiting
for oqr answer, our friend rushed Direct Passenger Ship Service
away 'en vitesse,.


t
)

1


f




[:


I


S.1 .' 'i : .r
W .. : ..', ". *





.R y '..


W Y


-. .' "


I POOL '
iSPORTATTi: I


To New'York -3W 'Days


I must..say, frankly, to the wo-
man friend who pointed 'out this
delicate andl agreeable problem
of Haitianizatiot that she still has
a long time to'wait. The solution
of it is rendered more difficult
still by the need for reconciling -e
the interests of one party with ''...' -
that of the other, and also... and ,
do not forget it... the interests of f 1 i
our touristic industry.
In spite of myself, these pro-
blems of gentle haitianization
have begun to. haunt me. I am -
even making considerable efforts AS
to forget them. I thought I had
succeeded, when one evening I .
found it necessary to show
a representative of an Ame- Evv Mpnda at 6:00 P.M.
rican firm around the town. Our -Every M nday at6:00 P.M. ,
promenade was just about over The deluxe 200-passenger cruise-ships of the PANAMA
when the multicolored illumina- LINE sail from Port au Prince, direct to roidtown
tion of the trees which are to be
found at the entrance of certain New York City.
houses along the road to Bizoton
attracted the attention of the A- American flag. all rooms with bath! air-conditioned dining-
merican. After furnishing him room, famous cuisine, swimming-pool.
with explanations as to their sub Round-trip air-sea exchange orders honored.
iect, he expressed the desire to Accurate information at office of IPanama Line ONLY,
visit 'them. Rue .Abraham Lincoln, Telephone 3062


is certainly out pf the question
1h. well, I thought to myself,
ere is a problem which should
ever become acute, would be
uch more bitter thqn sweet. '
Our cgr had hardly started
hen one of the epensionnaires
f the establisment shouted: NO
AY PROBLEMA CHICO.
You're telling me! I added.
(Translatked from Optique'
No. 18)


(our Besti Bet


n Travel'


ing Chri tophe's

tours

,*

';,:1


I .


Sunday, September 25th 1955


HAITI SUN


PAGE 15


ip





PAGE 16 HAITI SUN Sunday. Septcrnlvr 2bth .1955


HAITIAN SCOUT CONTINGENT PRAISE CANADIAN
HOSPITALITY AT 8th WORLD SCOUT JAMBOREE




.{,-.%.. .... 'Z
IRA







,' ,;? ,, ,.,,'








;'When Haiti's contingent of Scouts, the largest to ever go abroad, returned from Eighth World Jam
,bdree held at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada last week, they were loud in their praise of Canadian hospit-
'ality. Above are leaders of the Haitian delegation, and Press Attache Ernst Trouillot. Standing left to
* right': Pierre Chrisphonte, Emmanuel Lafond, Roger Mortes. Seated: Kurt A. Fisher, Andre Jeanty and
Edgard Orlando. -

.







.... .., -.







/




20-Member Troup -exhibited Haitian handicrafts and 'made a show of Haitian folk music and dancing.
Members of the group who joined the 11,000 scouts at the Jamboree were:
Andre Jeanty, Presidenit; Kurt A. Fisher, Internation'al Commissi9ner; Roger L. G. Mortks, Pierre Chris-
phonte, Edgard.: Orlando, Emmanuel Lafond, Eddy Celestin, Max rManiga Jean Max Beaug6, Lionel
and Maxim'ez-Dehoux, Jose Dalencour, Constant Pierre-Louis Jr., Reyhold Chanlatte, Frantz Ewald, Mau-
rice Charles, Lionel Cadet, Edouard Gilles, Mdnard Riviere, Gerard Tassy, Raymond Bernardin (these
three at Cap-Haitien), Pierre Eugtne (Dondon), WilfMne Pierre, Josu& B&lony, Selondieu Mondestin
(Plantation Dauphin), Max Michel and Rev. Father Mignauld.
Father'Ge6ard Bissainthe who.was a scout at P6tion-ViUlle in 1947 joined the troup in Canada and
served as their *aumonier, during the last 12 days in Canada and the U.S.
i, k I- .. ...5
A. ',.4.', ?...'.t?' ., I

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Commissioner Kurt Fisher and group of Scnut Corn missioners trom the world over.


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Sunday. September 25btih 1955


HAITI SUN


PAGE 16


e r & Or1


. I1






HAITI SUN Page 17


Sunday, September 2Sth 1955

Meet Mr, Erenpe Amnmoual


THE MAN WHO SCORNED CONVENTION
AND BUILT THE CAPITAL'S BUS LINE


When 'Iren,', ArnouaJ was 21,
he braved a storm of derision to
become a mechanic. Today, at
60, the big, good-natured social
rebel owns the auto-bus conces-
sion in Port-au-Prince.
eFriends on my own street,
whom I had known all my life,
wouldn't talk to :ie, because of
my dirty hands-, Annonal re-
calls. cfBut 1 kneA- I wanted to
learn a trade thi could' .elp me
later on,.
His was not a bad choice.
I think I'm worth arom-id $38,
000w, Annoual declared this week,
, looking fondly at the brig'j-. oran
ge. snub-nosed uses crz-vwding
Jis service station and bu- dep6t
out at ChiancereUles.
He has eight Chevrolkis. all
1946 or 1951 models, but thrree of
the earlier models have been
over hauled and Diesel engines
put in.
-They're a lot more eecn.ni-
calt, said the bluff bus-owner in
perfect, though fself-taugahbt En-'
glish. sAnd they give a ],:t less
engine trouble too.a.>
Of course, he had picked up
all he needed to know aboui Die
sel engines from reading, J.-2 told
Your Reporter casually just
as he had taught himself mnecha
nical engineering while book-
keeping with Eugene L.Eboss6's


*Mr. Annoual aor his Chanrccreiles Bus Satnln loast week.

Chevrolet agency back in 1916. minutes from his accounting job
Then. he had received a few in the spare parts department.
pointers from a Swiss-American Irenee who came from an upp-
mechanic named Jimmy Elie, and er class Port au Prince family,
had watched the expert work whe attended the Petit Seminaire,
neve- hlie would eet a few_ free won a book-keeping diploma at


the now defunct tPierre Acade-
my... Those were the days when
ho gentleman stooped to manual
labour, and nobody who could
help it ever soiled his hands.
But Annjual had enough sound
common s-nse to switch from
inatieriiathics lo machines when
he wasn't making the headway
he r.oped fur in the Electric Corn
pa:ty (1914-15' and later in Lebos
s.'s whit.,,-ollar .department
( 1915-1919 ).
He devoted his spare time to
learning all he could about cars,
read books and helped mecha-
nics whenever he had a chance.
When Lpboss6 solia out to West
Indies Trading in 1919, Annoual
moved, into position as Servicq


Manager, and stayed with the
job until 1930.
Thirteen years later, with a lot
more mechanical experience, a
wife and several kids to his cre-
dit, the mechenical minded son
of ex-Mayor (of Port au Prince)
Dr. Charles Annoual bought out
Justin Sam's half interest in the
one-bus concession then operat-
ing in the capital.
Possessed of a half-interest in
one 1932 Ford bus and the right.
to operate it, Annoual set to work
and soon took complete control.
A year and a half later, the
line had grown by two ex-Grace
Line models and a few years
later Ann.ual took over from
(Continued on Page 20)


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There


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are plenty of head aches in running a bus Line through the
narrow streets of the Capital.


mill


WE HAVE


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SHOPPING ClNTER


Petatme6 Omaa. VatcA04e,



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Page 17


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HAITI SUN





Page 18 AITI SUNSi' tida Sept trtbr2tt1


Marie-Helene Fisher, daught- will be mostly horse in the hin-
er of Mr. and Mrs Kurt Fisher, terlands. Wife Sue is expecting
left last week for studies in Mia her eDr. Livingston back in five
ml which will take in Business weeks.
Administration. Robert Vi.llard, son of Minis-


x x x ter ana Jirs. Elte VIJIULU, s UoJ
Dance instructor Lavinia Wil- his way to Madrid to continue
liams rushed home to New York his medical studies. 'He flew via
after receiving the sad news that Mexibo Ci.v, New York and Pa-
her mother had taken ill. ris.
XXX XXX
The Senoritas Anne Maria and Shirley Forrest of Rhode Is-
.Aurora Calvo lovely daughters of land enjoyed the Villa Creole to
the Guatemalan Ambassadgr are the extent that she cancelled her
leaving this week to study in the visit to the Virgin Islands.
Rosarian Academy in West Palm
Beach, Florida. They received! i x x x
their cequitations friends to cock
tails at home Wednesday even- Tipping the scales at a record
Sing. 10 Ibs., baby (rBernards made his
Sx x 6 appearance on schedule at the
Serge Laudun villa on Septem-
Jacques Alexis is returning to ber 18th. Mother, Anne Marie
the pursuit of Mechanical Scien (she's a SCIPA girl) and dad Ser
ce in Mauhattan after a month's ge (Pan American Airways) are
vacation at home in Petion-ViIle. really ,gaga, over the handsome
Jacques' departure was celebrate lad. The pretty mother and the
ed by Ti-frere Jean and Joe Ades little champion are both doing
Wednesday evening at the Rivie fine. f
ra. He flew north Saturday. x x x
X X X Attorney Gerard R. Rouzier
,definitely l'-aves the ranks of
Marcel Bertin flew west to Cu I Port-au-Prince's eligible bache-
ba and Mexico Friday to arrange lors on October 8tfh to keep a co
a group visit to those spicy sist- veted Grendez-vousv at the altar
Ser Republics, in December. The with beautiful Marie-Helene
trip will be arranged by King Brun whom he has chosen for
Christophe Tours. his life-partner. They will be mar
x x x ried at 6:45 P.M at Saint-Pierre
Dr. Dick Prindle of SCISP set de Petion-Ville.
off last Sunday on Delta for an x xx
adventurous trip into Central Serge Fourcand left Sunday
America. The young doctor his with his mother for Europe, and
- been commissioned to look over will enter Medical School in
Point IV Projects in El Salvador Switzerland. after touring Euro-
and Mexico. His mode of travel pe.


Under-Minister of Commerce, BcaaitC .s, Simone .'4,guste
,Alain Turnier, made a flying trip -Odeide was honoured by hub-
to the U.S Tuesday to take leave by Henry, .nd a large group of
of official Washington, and to friends ,.t their home in Thor
fetch the ,petite famille.> on September 16th, in celebra-
Max Castana, Assistant to Mr. lion of her birthday anniversary.
Appollon at Ecole J.B Damier, Engineer Emile Villedrouin (P4-
leaves next week on a scholar- tionville apartment house builder)
ship grant to Denmark and Fran observed his birthday anniversary
ce where he will specialize in ge September 17th.
ncral. mechanics x x x
xx x Mirs. Gerrges Wiener, Jr. is rac
Jacqueline Etienne, daughter ing home from abroad to have
of HaiLi's FBI Chief, and Marle- son Maurice on hand for the open
ne Zephyr;n, daughter of Mr ing of the schooll year.
X X x
Mauclair Zenhyrin. will be tra- '
veiling companions when they Anne-Marie Armand (Magic
yelling companions when heyI Island To si flies to Colorado
leave early next week for Fran- tsan sh ort n i
ce. Miss Etienne plans to make today on a short business-.m-
touristic discoveries in Europe, pleasure a xunt.
while Miss Zephirin is bent on L ov x x a
law studies and a career. Lovely -%nne-Marie Tribie and
la studies and a career. Pierre Deiean have set the date
x X .X for December 6th at Eglise Sa-
-cre-Coeur die Turgeau.
Ren6 Dejean and pretty Giskle
Simpson became officialJy -flan
c6,, las-i Sunday.


mor,ayv ..:th' t he b irth-
day *-. r .'elrs.", 'iof Rayimond Me
nos and, friends helped him to
celebhr',-t ti P.OtltiiJllhi'.
N X :
Edo, cjrd Mathon vwitil :ttae-
side a3jr 'veek on a husines:; trip.
Jacqu. e; 'illedlrouin .left for
the U.S on d ,hort businct,; trip.
Dar.?. Matrbon i,, b;iL'l'k in town.
Lucier. Mloiie- (t-aitian Service
of Geodesic) was awarded an.
TAGS :-:holar' nip in Laboratory
techniqw,.r and photography. He
left or. -A;i'dns tlay for the Pana
ma Ch.al Zone, for a three
month; .:outin-? .at thE Cattogra-
phical school o'f Panama.
-, X X:
Clitr'sphe'- ..'itadcJ 'ouus, and
Travel Ser\':'.:. I)peraling out
trom C:il-IHapzin, Rue "8, is un-
dertaki'- a \.!gwtou-; program in
view ii Jt attra Iir, more -toulrists
to the '' istori. ..Metropole lAu
Nord. 7.aymordl Jean Pienrre is
the Ger.-al manager of the Ser-


1 1


Portly Fred Shefflin, producer
of CThe Guides, 400 pages of
glossy advertisements of places
and things in Florida and the Ca
ribean, is at the Splendid Hotel
with his ravishing secertary,
Miss Florence Sterling (above).
Mr. Shefflin has weaved into
Port for many years on guide and
perfume business. This is the
first visit ot Miss Sterling and
not be her last, if the attention of
the Machos means anything.


SHARING PROFITS
WITH YOU
Return $50. or more in cash regit-
Ser receipts and receive a 2% refund
on all CASH receipts. Banks pay in-
terest on the money you save.
We pay you 2% on the money you
L spend with us.
George Coles Market
Telephone 2593
John Brown Avenue
Port-au-Prince, HIfaiti
VALID UNTIL DECEMBER 1st., 1955
HAITIS ONLY SELF SERVICE STORE


3cn~teeite.

A it'


A,4taLU., v

itfot xcU %0tvutcai


w9rtck


Suuda Sepln-r+her 2?tW^ 1055


. --A I tY..- T.NJ 17:11rr ic :r nn1


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e

, a


I


Page 18


HAITI SUN






Sunday. September 25th 1955 HAITI SUN PAGE_19


Patrick
fete away


Adrien Roy is home in Petion
ville after long sejour' at the Clin-
ic Roy.
xxx
Herard Roy flew to New York
to take up his post with the U.N
xxx
Ti Guy Douyon observed his
fete with the family in La Boule
Wednesday.
X X X
Colonel Timoleon Paret and
Marie are Washington bound to-
day. The distinguished soldier,
Haitian Military Attache in the
U.S. Capital received his promo
tion during Silver Annivelsary
celebration given at Choucounne
by General Levelt last Thursday
for his class 1930.
XXX
Gilberte Vieux (Boubou) is an-
chored to a plaster cast for the
next forty days and night. Bou-
bou broke her left loot in a col-
lision with chair-tripped over, it.
XX.X
Anthony ILH. Collins and Col Ber
nard Barron of New York have
been visitors in Haiti for .the past
ten days interested in lands for
Abaca and pineapple investment.
xxx

Mme Anne Kennedy of Dikini
is in New York for two weeks.
x x x
Builder Fletcher Lankton was
in town this past week. His firm
built the Bellas Hess.
xxx
Fergie Ferguson is back from
his travels.
xxx
Alfred Spillett of Esso off to
merry old England Thursday to
join his wife and sister-in-law
Evelyn Froen presently touring
Europe.
.x xx
Boarding the New York bound
clipper today are: Serge Roc. Ju
la El Saieh' Marie Jo?e Roy.
xxx -
Andre and Lunie Lahems are I
back in town.
Sx x
Laura Coster and her sons are
back at the Orloffson after a San
Juan vacation.
X X x
Lt Jacques Laroche is at home
with .Ja grippe',.
x x X
Artist MUichelle Rouzier is
home from studying business in
Rochester, New York
xxx
Gerard Elie Joseph, sister Jac
queline and cousin Antoine are
due home this week from three
months in gpy Mexique

S"


Suzanne Shrewsbury is head-
ing for Manhattan today'
xxx
Andy Andersen flew to New
work on September 16th on the
first leg of his trip to Europe
where he will represent Souther
land Tours when the ASTA Con
mention takes place in Lausanne,
Switzerland. Andy's mom Elisa-
beth who is by the way nursing
a broken arm is impatient for
his return in November bringing
news of relatives in the old coun
try.
xxx
Miss Mathilde Rigaud (Didi)
will be the object of a birthday
party on September 24th.
xxx
Malcolm Worsley is in from
England helping the farmers
crush their cane.
xxx
Miss E. Salnave, Director of
the oOuvrier NationAlh is now on
holidays.
xxx
Charming Miss Raymonde La-
mothe flew to the United States
on Saturday 17th.
xxx
Betty and Doe Taicher flew
back to second base, Miami yes
terday.
xxx
Veteran lawyer Hermann Ben
jamin of the Port au Prince Bar
whose health has been %chance-
lante-, for some time, suffered a
grave indisposition at his home
in Petion-Ville Wednesday after
noon.
Sx x
Else Tribie Hodson will see
hubby off to Italy soon where he
is going, on a scholarship, for
special studies.
xxx

Lionel Estime has returned to
the U.S. to continue his study of
Architecture at CornelL
xxx
William Bonhomme is off to
New York.
xxx
Nicole Greger is using the Ex
position to iearn to drive.
Roger Attie is preparing-to vo
yage to Africa.
Madame Pierre Hudicourt is
convalescing at the Pierre Borno
home in tete-de-l'eau. Mrs Hudi
court recently underwent an ope
ration at St Francois de Salles.
Her Ambassador husband is ex-
pected home from Bogota this
week.
Mademoiselle Evelyn Ganot is
back to thp family after three months Hotel study in
Ithaca, New York.
Ford motor VIP'S, Ernst Liau
laud. Albe:,. Roy and Carl Berh-
mann made a flying trip to San
Juan this week.
Marc Etienne, tBoulangerie St
Marc) flev to New York Thus-
day.
Businessman Eric Tippenhauer
is on an island trip.
X X x


Borno bamboched his
Tliursday.


I


x xx

Franck W Wilson clippered to
Miami Monday.

x x x

Edwig Mlrr'cier Jr. (Ti-Chou)
son of well known Cpt. Edwig
Mercier, observed his birthday an
niversary on September 22nd


Mr and Mrs Abner Esso Riddle
are back to Mont Joli from Sum
mer in States fishing and sight-
seeing.
x x x
Investor. Lawyer William Dan
ce and wife Elizabeth of Detroit
here at the El Rancho this past
week on their first visit, Mr.
Dance was looking over the lo-
cal field. Mr Gerard Allen did
the squiring around.
XXX

Simone Jumelle returned from
abroad Tuesday.
xxx
Alfred EVie Joseph enjoyed his
business triu im the United States
and Canada
xxx
Tax chief Georges Roy is on an
inspection, trip in the North, he
is due baik this morning.
XXX
This week lovely Pat Bender
celebrated her birthday with a
candle-light dinner at Hotel Dam
bala. Among the guests were U.
S. Ambassador and Mrs Davis,
Embassy attached and Mrs. Wolf,
Consul Gross. Mr. and Mrs Wig
gins, Mr. and Mrs Johnson, Mr.
and Mrs Pnwell, Count and Court
tdss Keyserling, Mr. and Mrs
Neff, and Mrs Monnin, Miss
Shrewsbury Mrs. Nugent, Mr
Kingsland and Mr. Reinbold.
xxx

Pretty Monique Celcis, daught
er of Mr and Mrs Albert (Elec-
tric Light Co) Celcis returned
this week from a vacation in
Puerto Rico Monique will pinch-
hit for mother Diane who is ac
tually in Istamboul as a one-wo-
man delegation to the Interna-
tional Congress of Women (37
countries are represented) and
making history for Ligue Femi-
nine and the Haitian Woman.
xxx
Simone Peloux Lauture pre
sented hubby Lieutenant George
with an adorable new daughter
last week. The name they have
chosen is oFabienne.
Jacques Brun, will rest up from
activities at the Congress in Ca
racas, for several days in Mexi-
co before returning home on Oc-
tober 7th.
Florence. daughter of Mr. and
Mrs Pierre-Claude Etheart (Ma-
dame n6e Nicole Sejourne) was
held at the baptimal font of Sa-
cre-Coeur de Turgeau Saturday
'by her god-parents Colette de
Lespinasse and Jean Gardere.
Ren Odleide leaves on Septem
ber 28th' to enter Lycee Henry
v' at Paris.
Miss Doris Burke, devoted
mother of Sunshine Home Orpha
nage had tHie joy of sending out
invitations this week to the corn
ing marriage of her adopted
daughter, Miss Surprise St. Gi-
les to Mr. Dieujuste Estenville on
September 22nd at Eglise St Pier
re de Petion-Ville.
Eddie Pattouf has returned
from six months in the U.S.


Mlanielle Dejoie to the U.S.
last week for studies at River
College.
xxx
Nicole Blanchet switched col-
leges this year, and will enter
Marywood, which was highly
recommended by the Scutt girls.
XXX
Robert Nadal, active executive
of the well-known commercial
house ..Nadal et Compagnieb
is matching strength with a seve-
re case of grippe at his Pttionville
home where he has been coafin
ed to bed for the past week.
xxx

Ludovie Bordes, long-time New
York resident arrived via Pgna-
ma Line on Tuesday for a visit
in the home town and a vacation
with relatives. He lives in Brook
lyn, N. Y. vwith wife Flavie, and
their daughter Louise who spent
the summer in Haiti last year.
Early sleepers were awakened
by a violent shaking of the shut-
ters and walls of their homes in
Port-auiPrince and Petion-Ville
late Tuesday night, and sure
enough the earth-square of an
intensity of II to III was regis-
tered at 11:37 P.M., fortunately
for all it lasted but a few se-
conds.
xxx
Miss Gisele Peraertz became
the bride of Carlo Anglade in a
ceremony at the Sainte Trinite
Cathedral at 7:00 P.M. Saturday,
September 24th.
Engineer Raoul Liautaud -is
home from further specialization
and studies in the U.S.A.
The S.S 'CMISTOBALs of the
Panama Line sailed into port on
Tuesday evening at 9:00 o'clock.
Delayed for two weeks by
motor trouble aid the stevedore
strikers in New York it brought
65 passengers in from the U.S.
Haiti's First Lady arrived in
Havre, France on September 14
th, accompanied by three of her
children for a sojourn in Paris
where she will reside at the Hai
tian Embassy.
XXX

A Keliesse and Fete Champe
tre will take place in the gardens
of the St Therese Chapelle at Pe
tion,-Ville on Sunday October 2nd.
It promises to be an enjoyable
day for all with goodies, ice-
cream and surprise attractions
galore.
Dr. Jacques Butterlin, Profes-
sor and attache of the French
Mission in Haiti, it is reported
will be transferred' to Colombia
where he will be Director of the
French Mission there. Dr Butter
lin who has been a devoted colla


Miss Marie-Madeleine Marcel, SATURDAY: 5, 7, and 9:00 P.M.
talented s!nger and dancer, play Ennemis de l'Univers
ed to a \','y large audience when
she made her debut as a special FOR RENT
attraction at Hotel El Rancho on
Monday ''evening. Miss Marcel F u r n is h e d house in P&-
grace and cnarm has won admi- tionville; 3 bedrooms, 2 bath
ration as she danced in the fol- rooms upstairs; downstairs
klorique niesentations of Miss large drawing room and large
Lavinia Wil!iams was cnthusias dinning room, surrounded by
tically acclaimed one of Haiti's verandah patio, swimming-
most promising young divas ... pool, spacious lawn and gard-
won congratulations for Manager en, with drawn from highway,
Max Nargil who has her under has paved private driveway.
contract for El Rancho. Tel: 7284 2069.


borator at the French Institute
here for the past several years
enjoyed great esteem among the
students and tle intelligentsia.
X X x
Mrs. Noucnti Degener, lamed
Parisian New Yorker ambulan-
ce driver (6 sears) of World War
II who arrived in Port au Prince
in January, in quest of local color
for a story to be filmed by Holly-
wood producers, received the sad
news, this week, of the death of
her step-son, George Ludwig D&-
gener Ill. The 29-year-old Social
Registerite, a Wall Street Bond
Salesman for Rand & Company
was killed, and a companion, Hen
ry Peckam, seriously injured in a
two-car crash at 59th Street and
Park Avenue on the afternoon of
September 17th. Mr. Degener was
a member of Tuxedo, one of the
most exclusive social clubs in the
U.S.
Mrs. Degener, lodged at Star
Pension at Petion-Ville since her
arrival here, was deeply grieved
over news of the tragedy, and ex-
pressed her regrets in recalling
that George was a splendid chap,
admired by his family and friends,
for his winsome character. ,He is
survived by his. wife, the former
Louise M. Hegler, and a 4-year-
old son.
xxx

In celebration of the anniversary
of. the Independance of Chili,
Charge d'Affaires and Mrs. Ramon
Sotomayor Dumas, entertained at
Chilean Embassy at Pacot, on Sun
day, September 18th from 12:00 M.
to 2:00 P.M. A large group of
guests attending the reception in-
eluded the personal emissary of
the President of the Republic,
members of the Diplomatic Corps,
Foreign Relations Minister, and
other Cabinet Members, the Apos-
tolic Nuncio, the Chief of Proto-
cole, Government officials, and a
distinguished public.
xxx
Talented artist Micheline Lau-
dun returned Sunday, after six
years study in Paris at the Con-
servatory of Music and the Mar-
guerite Long Music School. Miss
Laudun who captivated audiences ,
in her recitals at Paris and other
European capitals is home to ac-
cept a professorat in the Haitian
Conservatory of Music. The distin-
guished artist's return was met
with great enthusiasm by friends
and music lovers here.
X X X

Narri Baboun has returned
from ihe U.S. with his family.
Lumarque in Kenscoff is clos
ed and the winter establishment
.at carrefour is preparing for a
grillot season.


PARAMOUNT
TODAY:-3:30 P.M.
Le Monstre de la Stratosphere
5:30 and 8:30 P.M.
QUO VADIS
MONDAY: 6:00 P.M.
Manon des Sources
TUESDAY
5:30 and 8:30 P.M.
QUO VADIS
WEDNESDAY: 6:00 and 8:15 P.M.
La Reine Margot
THURSDAY: 6:00 and 8:15 P.M.
Les Heures Tendres
FRIDAY
5:30 and 8:30 P.M.
QUO VADIS


PAGE 19


Sunday. September 25th 1955


"


HAITI SUN





PAGE' 20


Castera Bazile Wins First Prize


Inz Alcoa's Caribbean Art Contest


spiL: -t ite, :- 'ron te time of
its a:.nouncemnct last year. A
group of 139 paintings, selected
by preliminary judging in the
Carribean, received critical judg
ment from three experts in the
fine art field ir. New York. They
were: Hyatt Mayor, Curator of
Prince, Metropolitan Museum of
Art: John J. Gordon, Curator of
the Brooklyn Museum of Art;
and Vernon C. Porter, Director
of the Nqtioar.7 Academy of De-
sign.

The first prizi. will mean cash
awards and 'borld-wide recogni-
tion for the former houseboy of
the Centre d'Art's Director, De-
witt Peters, *Ah.a discovered him.
The Alcoa Steamship Company
plans to uce .i national four color
advertising ne:it year which will
mean publicity also for Haiti.
Encouraging Signs
Caribbean Governments and
Cultural grup3 have viewed it
as a propitiouL3 and effective
means of encouraging a vast re-
gion that, w"-er. it has had the
opportunity, lia shown an ability
to produc- ftte arft of the best
character.

One of the _,ngular contribu-
tions afforded by the competf-
- tion has been i.he chance given
San entire nrea, regionally dom-
nmideB96the element of the Carib
-.AW. S&a, but ethnologically of
Ynkny moods ard cultures, to


JAEGER


show the full scope and breadth
of the nature of its fine art.
While here and there in the Car
ribean artists have been reco-
gnized for many years a compo
site of representative work has
only now been tried for the first
time.
The preliminary local judging
in the Carribean showed eviden-
ce that the artists of the Carib
bean have spread-eagled the
field of technique, mood, and me-
dia. The judges found paintings
reminiscent of the fiery tropical
coloring of Gaugin alongside
works inspired by the careful
draftsmanship of Coubert. in con
trast to other entries that are in
the untamed nature of Diego Ri-
vera.

Background

Bazile was born one of the six
children of n small farmer who
died when the boy was six. He
attended primary school at Mar-
bial from the age of 17 to 21,
then crossed the mountains in
1945 to Port-au-Prince where he
worked (his only job) with De-
witt Peters as houseboy. Always
on the lookout for new talent
the Art Center Director was
quick to'discover Bazile who has
rewarded-his discoverer* by be-
coming at age of 31 Haiti's lead-
ing mural painter and one of the
most powerful artists perhaps
-in the %orld.


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Monday Thursday. Dinner-Dancing
Presented by Lavinia Williams


HAITI SUN Sunday, September 25th 1955


Still In Critical Condition

U. N. Expert Boucharain And Wife
(Continued from Page 1)


(Continued from Page 1)


positive blood type, Father Gue-
guen. Daniel Theard, and Fortu-
ne Bogat.
Her jaw which was fractured
in seven places, and operated
upon the night of the accident by
Dr. Carlo Mevs, makes internal
feeding necessary. Both feet of
the victim were also'broken. She
is still in an extremely weak con
edition.
Mr. Boucharain
The cattle raising expert who*
lost his left eye in the crash, was
also operated on by Dr Mevs for
a fractured jaw, and Thursday
doctors operated on his broken
wrist. It was not until Wednes-
day that the UN man regained
complete consciousness. One of
his legs was also broken in the
accident.
The Children.
The Boucharain's two children,
Gerard and Eric, were in the
back seat if the SIMCA with
their nurse, Miss Dipudonne Ga-
briel, when the accident occurr-
ed Eric was the sole occupant
of the car to escape injury. Ge
rard was released from the Ge-
neral Hospital, Tuesday night,
after a head wound and broken
toe had received medical atten-


Shotgun Kills Pestel's Richest
(Continued from Page 1)


hand, as he approached the tree
through the bushes, he crouched
lower and lower in order to make
himself as inconspicuous as pos-


= sible. the guinea-hen being the
most wary bird of the Haitian
forest. Close to the tree, planter
Joseph's gun butt contacted the
ground as he made an effort to
hide, the' cartridge went off, the
shot entered his head near his
right eye, and carried off the
top of his head. Mr. Joseph had
sufficient consciousness to tell
the family to rush for a doctor,
and then died immediately after-
Swards.

WELL COVERED


Company disclosed to your re-
porter that the London & Lan-
castershire Insurance "Co. to
which he had paid only a pre-
miurm qf $20.00 (Twenty Dollars)
for an accident policy, will
pay out $5.000.00 to the fa-
mily. On a life insurance policy
with the Sun Life of Canada on
which he paid one premium of
$260.00 in November 1954, the
family received a double indem-
nity pay-out of $10.000.00 (Ten
Thousand Dollars).
The insurance people mused
over the fact that Mr. Joseph was
a good .pete de famille-' as he
was not sollicited by an;. of the
agents to take out insurance, but
one day, last November, he just


Felix Joseph, a good provider happened to walk into the Sun
in life, left his family well en- Life office on the Exposition and
dewed in death. Rony Chenet & ask for insurance.

U.S. ,(Caribbean Affairs) Chief Here
(Continued from Page 1)


of the Artiboriite Valley. The iti tary of the American Embassy,
nerary is heing arranged with Iat his residence. Guests will in-
the cooperation of ODVA., elude the directors of the prin-
The following day, on a trip cipal division of the Chancelle-
conducted by Mr. Ernest Bonhom rie.
me, Under-Secretary of State
for Finance and National Econo- While Mr Hoyt has had extensi
my, and accompanied by other ve experience in various comn-
Haitian officials, Mr. Hoyt will tries in the Latin-American area
visit Jerernie and the southern for almost 20 years, his special
peninsula by plane. His tour of interest has long been in the Car
the country also is expected to ribean.
include a trio to Cap-Haitien, ten
tatively scheduled for Saturday. During the past year he has
Thursday and Friday wiUll be been one of the prime movers in
devoted to qalls on Government delivering food and other relief
MinistLrics directly interested in supplies to Haiti following the
the tecbn:cal assistance pro- ravages of Hurricane Hazel.
grams and in other United States Before attaining his present res
organisms cooperating with the ponsible post in the Department
IHaitian Government. of State, Mr Hoyt served as a Fo
In iaddirin, Thursday evening, reign Service officer in Chihua-
a rcccnt:on will be offcrod by the hua, Tampico. Guadalajara, Valpa
Director of Economic Affairs of raiso, Asuncion and Havana, with
the State Secretariat for Foreign intermediate periods of duty in
Relation.s and Mrs. Hu'rv6 Boyer the Department.
at their residence. He is a native of Arizona. attend
Friday, Mr. Hoyt will be guest ed schools in California, and is
of honor aEL a luncheon offered a graduate of the University of
by Mr Milidn Barall, First Secre California.


tion. Nurse Dieudonne, in the
fifth month of pregnancy, had
the flesh torn away from the
bone of her left foot, and is re-
ceiving special care.

Mr.' Boucharin who has been
working here with Unitod Na-
tions'since January, 1953 travel.
ed extensively in the country and
was consistently on the road in
line with his job His mother
arrived from New York, Thurs-
day. His father who was employ
ed with the United Nations in
New York had, unfortunately;
left for France a few days prior
to the accident. Dr. Auguste De
nize, the Boucharain's family doc-
tor, rushed back from vacation
in Miragoane on receiving news
of the accident to tend to their
injuries.

The Boucharain's family is held
in high esteem by their collea-'
gues and friends here, and Mr.
Mouton, UN Resident Represen-
tative, a-i. in Haiti, told the <,Sun*
that his o'tice had received mes I
sages of sympathy all week long
from members of the Depart-
ments of Agriculture and Fo-
reign Relalinns-


AGENTS


FAMOUS THROUGHOUT


THE WORLD


SHOES


FOR EVERY OCCASION


ANNUAL BUILT

A BUS LINE
(continued from page 17)
his partner Marc Bauduy (at a
cost of S 2,500) and operated the
concession alone.
From then on the business
went into high gear and An-
noual's family prospered.
Of his nine children, eight have
lived, and done well in life. Two
daughters are nowi living in the
U.S., one recently married an A-
merican and the other is attend-
ing Commercial school. His third
daughter is a steno-typist who
puts in six mornings a week with
SCIPA doing English shorthand
and typing, and helps her Dad in
her spare time.
Annoual's five sons are also
making fine headway, and his
wife who didn't mind the dirty
hands when he proposed in 1919
-is taking it easy in her comfor-
table Port au Prince home.
The bus-man himself has
enough spare capital in the bank
to talk about gradual replace-
ment of all his engines by Die-
selp, and to speculate on the ehan
ces of operating a Greyhound
Line type concession here.
But, he sighs. [he taxis give
him too much competition.
,Where elsr. in the world can any
one ride in a cab for ten cents?%,


Mrs. Th6odore
Wiener
Passes Away

Mrs. Theodore "Wiener, noe
Pauline Ducoste. died at her
home at Avenue Ducoste. last
Sunday afternoon, Mrs. Wiener
was a revered and highly esteem
ed former society leAder and not
ed beauty of the old Port au" Prin
cc, and her passing was deeply
felt by all who knew her. She
had lived to the age of 82 years,
surrounded by her daughters,
Jacqueline. Wanda, Paulette and
son Jean. and her grandchildren.
Funeral enrvices attended by a
large number of mourning rela-
tives and friends were held for
ilhe deceased on Monday, at the
Basilique Notre Dame. She fol-
lowed in death, less than two
months after the passing of her
sister.'.Misz. Maria Ducoste, and
her cousin" Airs. Rouzier.
Haiti Sun presedts-its deepest
sympathy and condoleances to
the bereaved family, and par-
ticularly: Mr's. Jacqueline Wiener,
Mrs. Waz.1a Wiener, Miss Pau-
lette Wiener, Mr and .Mrs Jean
Wiener.


!
!


HAITI SUN


Sunday, September 25th 1955




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