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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00325


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



I


!0No


SCOTCH WHISKY


THE. HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGU


VOL. V


Port au Prince Republique d'Haiti


TENNIS, TRACK,
LIFTING TEAMS
TO REPRESENT,
HAITI AT GAMES
Haitian athletes will compete
in the Second Panamerican Ga-
mes, to be held March 12-26 in
Mexico City, if they prove up to
the required standard.
Haitian Olympic Committee
members, after three meetings
January 22, 24 and 26, decided
.to select representatives from
three sports, Tennis, Track, and
Weightlifting. In the two last-
named, Contests will be held and
teams named on the results. Of-
ficials will judge Track and, Fi-
eld contestants in a competition
at Stade Magloire February 12
and if the times and distances
achieved by winners compare fa
v'ourably with those set by par-
ticipants in the previous Pana-
merican Games, a representati-
ve team will be selected.
Similar conditions will apply
in the weightlifting *trials* to
be held February 6 in the wei-
ghtlifters' club opposite Phar-
't.,'nary Valme. on Rue des Mira-
"l'es (Mr, Maret Victor's residen-
ce).
(Conrtnued on page 14)


Sunday, Januar


U. S. gives President


Open-arm Welt


President Paul Magloire and his
official party ended their three-
day goodwill' visit to the U. S. cap-
ital yesterday motoring South to
West Point Military Academy then
to New York where they will rem-
ain until Thursday.

The Presidential party Whienc
lelt Haiti early Wednesday anim.
idst great public manifestations,
arrived in Washington a. few hours
later, pausing in Miami to change
from PAA clipper-to a specially-
provided plane, -Columbine I,,
President Eisenhower's" personal
plane before he bought the Colum-
bine II in October.

Vice President Richard M. Nixon
and Mrs. Nixon and the Assistpnt
Secretary of State for Inter Amer-
ican Affairs, Henry F. Holland
were at the airport to welcome the
Haitian leaders. A guard of hon-
our there stood at attention and a
twenty-one gun salute boomed in


,Vertieres Fast Aground at JHremie
MAY BE TOTAL. LOSS
Haiti's largest ship, the 258- their has remained stormy, it is
ton xVe ieres, which was groun feared that great damage "has be-
ded on a sand bar during rough en done. The bottom was punctu
weather last Thursday night red when the ship struck aind the
will be a total loss if she is not wooden hull will need extensive
refloated immediately, repairs after the water and sand
Officials of the Coast Guard is pumped out. It may be useless
and Naval Mission left on an ins to salvage anything but the en-
pectioin trip Friday to see the gine, a spokesman said.
boat and decide what is to be do No one wss.injti'ed when the
ne. There is hope of saving the ship ran agroulid within sight
S103-foot former U.S. Navy .Coas- of the Jeremie wharf last, week,
tal Transport only if the usually out she was abandoned high on a
heavy seas at Jeremie ha\e aba- sandbar where the waves dealt
ted. her a tremendous beating.
The World War II Pacificcam The Vertieres was scheduled
paigner has a 25 degree starbo- ito pick up ain official Red Cross
ard list and had filled with wa- inspecting party at Jeremie for
ter, Commander Charles of the a trip to the hurricane-hit ports.
Naval Mission reported after stormy weather caught the craft
inspecting the ship early this' o seek the shelter of the shore.
week. The superstructure then Lc,,rced to seek the shelter of the
was almost gone aindif the wea-. shore.

Dominican Rerublic Not Included
On Presidential Tour:' Magloire
I^ k PT .u. -__*- -


uarlies romnt i
aThere has never been any
agreement, officially, concerning
my visiting the Dominican Repu-
blic, the Chief of State told a
delegation of the Press shortly
before his departure Wednesday
morning on a three-week-tour
of the U.S., Canada, and Jamai-
ca,

Marcel Salnave, editor of "Hai
ti Journal#, spoke for the assem
bled newspapermen, wishing
President Magloire a pleasant
L, and fruitful trip. He then posed
the question of whether a presi-


Seifore departure
dential visit to the Dominican
Republic was planned.
Thanking the Press in well-
chosen words, and commenting
on his continuous respect for the
public opinion reflected in the
newspapers of the republic, Pre
sident Magloire levelly approa-
ched the subject of a Dominican
visit.
aNow.-, he said finally I put
myself at ease to answer your
question concerning the visit to
the Dominican Republic. It is
Tdelvle hlievpd that it was can-


the background. 'Mrs. Dulles rep-
:esented the Secretary of State
John Dulles who was unable to be
present.
go
Speaking to the welcoming de-
legation, President Magloire said:
"To the happiness of meeting
old friends and of shaking once
again hands of familiar warmth, is
-dded the happiness all men of my
country feel on bfing in a country
which is making one of the great-
est efforts ever undertaken for the
liberty* of man,.
From the National Airport, Mr.
Nixon accompanied President Ma-
gloire and the First Lady to the
White House where President and
Mrs. Eisenhower met them on the
steps of thetNorth Portico.
The Haitian party was entertain-
ed at a State dinner and the Pres.
idqnt and Mine. Magloire spent the
night at the White House. In acc-
ordance with protocol, they remov
ed Thursday morning to the hist-
oric Blair House where they stayed
during the rest of their official
visit.
On the way to the White House
through streets be-decked with
crossed Haitian and(U. S. flags, the
party halted at the District of Co-
lumbia Building where President
Magloire received the traditional
key to the city.
At noon Thursday the Presidecnt
addressed a joint meeting of tne
U. S. Congress and Senate, and la-
ter signed a Military Assistance A-


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AGE NEWSPAPER_
ry 30th 1955 Telephone 2061 No. 19

Mao ir TEXT OF PRES.
Maloire MAGLOIRE'S
SPEECH TO

,Om U.S. CONGRESS
Followivig is the English tezt of :.:
agreement between the United Sta- the address in Frcich by tresid-..':
tes and Haiti under'the terms of ent Magloire to a joit session of .
the Mutual Security'Act. Congress Thursday. .
SMr. President:
General Magloire addressed the Mr. Speaker: S
Council of the Organization of A- Members of te enate ad
merican States Friday before dep- House of Representatives: .".
a:ture for West Point and New Ladies and Gentlemen:
York. On February 3 he will go on I am deeply grant. vul fior the:::
to Nashville, Tennessee, then emb- PPtuty to st Waington,
ark on a weeklong- tour of U. S. as a guest of President Eiseiho-.
cities. The presidential suite wUl wer and for the privilegee of ad-i
leave the U. S. for Canada Februa- dressing the Congress of the Uni..
tld States. It has. been an ha/nor'!0
ry 9, going on to Jamaica February for me and for Mine. Mailo.e
for me and for Mme. Magoire .,y
14.
_to come here and we are looking
forward to visiting some of the
forward to visiting some ofthe -"
BOY ABDUCTED cities and institutions which :I
symbolize the historical, polit-.;;
Beaten Say Reports cal and economic traditions of s ,
the United States and its perple.'7
Unconfirmed reports state that As one enters the magnificent.'
a young schoolboy was kidna- harbor of New York toward eve-,A
ped near his father's home in ning, when the beauty of the.,.i
Port-au.Prince this week, and American coastline reveals.itself-.
taken to a remote part o the in the most fairy-like o-' setu:i1
suburbs where he was cruelly tWigs, one is filled with an admixO
beaten before managing to esca- ration which no words can exv.
pe. press. Overcome by the intensity' .
of emotion aroused by the beau'
The lad, son of Mr. and Mrs. ty of the scene, each detail Aof'
Leandre Daniel ,proprietors of which is multiplied an eyery 'siI
Magic Cine was reportedly folo de, creating a panorama of irre-'
wed by a large, black sedai when sistible charm, one is left speech7i'
he set out for school one mor- less. The newcomer half-closes "
ning this week. He is said to ha his eyes, seeking refuge in his,.i
ve been compelled to enter the i thoughts. But a majestic light'
car, blindfolded and gagged and suddenly blazes forth, dazzling "
taken to a strange area. him. Bartholdi's colossal statue,,
Details will be published next the generous gift of France, stan .
week, if confirmation is received ds out against the dark back-
from the boy's parents. Continued on page 2)',








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SUNDAY, JANUARY 30th


TEXT '

r" ground of the sky, holding the
Sbeacon light that shines, like a
great star, above the vast har-
!t bor! Liberty, lighting the world.
': This is how the United States
=.first appeared to one of our gre-
i.. atest' writers and thinkers, An-
tenor Firmlln, who in his remar-
|.kble book c.Mr Roosevelt, Pre-
I silent of the United States, 'and
I the Republic of Haiti,h publis-
h bed in 1905, considered it his pa-
. triotic duty to make the Ameri-
Scans lpown to the Haitians and
'...the Haitians to the citizens of
-your great country. His bound-
i;.less admiration for all those pio-
v..neers who as your history unfol-
0,ded, built, stone by stone, the
1"solid structure that was to be co-
.me in the twentieth century the
citadel of all free peoples, ins-
Ipired those immjortal pages in

D. R. NOT IN
': (Continued from page 1)
..celled following the posthumous
c irculation in Port-au-Prince of
a book by Mr. Pena Battle.which
-'is intended to humiliate the Hai
I'tian people. Mr. Pena Battle is
d ead; it is hardly just to take up
;. an issue with the dead.
I P elf this book were somewhat
,amntizmely, it still is not the rea-
I:,Ison that the Dominican Republic
b is not included in my itinerary.
T.For officially there never has
>."beeh an 'agreement between that
;..government and mine),
SPrbsident Magloire assured
.tlVe pressmen there was not the
I.-faintest cloud on the horizons,
1,and pointed out that he would
have; forbidden the current re-
Scruiting of agricultural labou-
)r.ers'for Dominican cane-fields
a there had been.
He. H.also cited the warm welco-
,irme given his sisters when they
mad"t'a pilgrimage to Higuey
1.4ha.1y' fotr'days ago'.
). cPlaced as 'we are: said the
pChiet of State ',l.can be only par
1sah o, co-operation between
he. two nations that share the so
iBreignty of the island. But this
,V -operation can evolve only
'from mutual respect and digni-
{' ty. -
:'In a further statement concern
t' ning his visit to the U.S. Presi-
:.dent Magloire' promised: *The
l'!isoldier of a little country will
-speak the language of truth to
.the soldier of a big country.:


OF PRESIDENT MAGLOIRE'S SPEECH TO U.S. CONGRESS
(Continued front page 1) J


which he exalted the heroic vir-
tues that enabled our two na-
tions to become the first indepen
dent states iln the New World,
In that great book Firmin pro-
claimed his faith in the destiny
of an Americg where all the Mna-
tions of the hemisphere, united
in brotherhood, would work si-
de by side as good friends to-
ward the establishment on this
earth of the gospel of the univer
sal peace and concord, so beauti
fully expressed in the Declara-
tion of Independence of 1776,
the immortally humane precepts
of which, rather than the valiant
captains, led the American sol-
diers to final victory on the bat-
tle-fields of Saratoga and York-
towa.

Haitian Heroes Mentioned

These self-evident truths,'
which established the inalienable
rights of all men to life, liberty
and the pursuit of happiness,
brought from .Savatnah to our
land by such men as Beauvais,
Lambert, Pinchinat and Henri
Christophe, puttIng weapons into
the hands of Bookman, Biassou
and Jean-Frangois, produced he-
roes of the stature of Toussaint
Louverture, Jean-Jacques Dessa
lines and Alexandre Petion, who
passed the sacred torch on to
'Franscisco -de Miranda, Simon'
Bolivar, O'Higgins and San Mar-
tin for the greater glory of man-
kind.
However, despite the identity
of views and thoughts that for-
med the basis of all the efforts
of the men of good will of our
hemisphere, it was with a cer:
tain reserve that, for more than
'a century, the eldest of the Ame
rican nations looked upon its
younger sisters. Even the famous
declaration of Dec 2, 1823, better
known as the Monroe Doctrine,
which was' intended to serve as
a bulwark to the new South Ame
rican slates and to safeguard
their independence, tended to
arouse suspicion and did not evo
ke sentiments of confidence
among our various peoples. Not-
withstanding the individual ma-
nifestations of sympathy an the
part of 'certain American philan-
thropists toward our great Tous-
saint L'Ouverture, Ind the pro-
ofs of friendship shown by. the


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Boston and New York merchants
toward the young Haiti, we have
riot always been regarded with
the warm feelings of friendship
which have been so evident to us
here today.
Haiti's struggle for indepen-
dence was a long and arduous
one. During that struggle it was
necceisary to destroy its entire
economy, build the Citadelle La
;ferriere, and affirm by the use
of arms its unshakable will to
obtain its freedom. Later, the
necessity of paying heavy indtm
nities to France further retarded
development. A great step for-
ward w'as taken when your great
President Abraham Lincolm be
came the first to recognize Hai-
tian independence. Since that
time Haiti has continued to stri-
de forward and has endeavored
by every means at its disposal
to force a political and econorhic
future wortly of its proud peo.
ple.

Roosevelt Policy Cited

Although world leaders such as
Charles Sumner, William King, Se-
nator Borah and many others have
shown an active interest in Haiti,
it was not until Franklin Delano
Roosevelt took office that the rel-
ations of cordialty and fraternity
which alone can make our hemis-
phere strong, really came into be-
ing. The good neighbor policy, put
into practice in 1934 by the with-
drawal of the Marines from Haiti
inspired great confidence of the
Haitians and all peoples of the A-
mericas in the United States. It is
this policy, happily continued by
President Dwight D.t Eisenhower,
which enabled the Americas to
present a united front against ag-
gression during the last war, a unit
ed front which is maintained in
:he United Nations andat all int-
ernational conferences for the de-
fense of the free world. In San
Francisco and Chapultepec the
greatness of soul and altruistic spi
rit that have always characterized
the" Amencan people, who have a
deep respect for individual liberty.
were fully revealed. Haiti takes
pride in having been one of the
Iirst links in this unbroken chain
of the union that now comprises
the American states. She placed all
the resources of her soil at the dis-
posal of her good friend, substitut-
ing for regular crops those urgent


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ly needed for the war effort. Haiti
will never regret these sacrifices,
which it voluntarily undertook in
order that there might be more
brotherhood, solidarity and under-
standing in the relations between
the nations. In the face of the
threat of international communism,
the Republic of Haiti, at 'the side
of your country, has taken active
steps to eliminate all traces of
communism within its country, be-
cause it is firmly convinced that
democracy is the only form of go-
vernment that favors the full ex-
pression of the individual.
Since the United States has de-
monst'ated its will to cooperate
closely with the American repub-
lics and has.taken numerous steps
toward that end (establishment of
the Export-Import Bank, initiation
of the Point Four program, etc) a
great hope is becoming a reality,
and that era is beginning to dawn
when all our nations will uhite
their efforts toward putting into
practice the humanitarian princi-
ples set forth in the Constitution
of the United States. No doubt,
from time to time clouds darken
this atmosphere of confidence. We
often complain of insufficient aid
while distant countries receive con
siderable benefits. But we believe
that, our destiny is closely linked
to that of the great American de-
mocracy for better or for worse.
Like various members of the same
family living in different cities, we
feel the joys and sorrows that come
to each of us, and we are obligated
to help one another. Therefore, we
believe strongly that despite the
divergent views expres-ed at the
Rio conference, the agreements
reached there will result in bene-
fits to all the countries of the he-
misphere.

Visit Held Proof of Unity

Our visit to the United Stat's,
which has afforded us the privi-
lege of being welcomed by one of
the most brilliant soldiers of the
twentieth century and at the same
time gives us the honor of being
the guest of the Senate and the
House of Representatives in joint
session, is a new proof of the clo-
seness of the relations between our
two nations. The people of Haiti,
who follow with interest President
Eisenhower's personal efforts to
eliminate prejudices of all sorts
which constitute handicaps to the


mutual understanding which is our
common objective in this hemis-
phere, are very optimistic with res
pect to the future of these relat-
ions. In his merciless fight against
tlje netarious ideology wiich the
forces of evil try by every means
to establish on earth, President Ei-
senhower has shown tha i he is of
the lineage of those emiuen't Am-
.ericans, true citizens of the univ-
erse, whose acts throughout the
history of this marvelous country
aimed less at the greatness of the
United States than at the triumph
of those fundamental truths with-
out which man cannot attain his
goals. His efforts to arrive at inter-
national control and utilization of
atomic energy for peaceful lurpo-
ses have already won him the gra-
titude of all those who are concern-
ed about the.future of the human
race. The understanding he has
found both on the part of memb-
ers of Congress and of his fellow
citizens and the unreserved approve
al of his efforts by all free peoples
and by all those whox apire' to be
free, makes him the most authori-
tative spokesman ot a. civilization
which refuses to fall into the cha-
os- into which a degrading mater-
ialism is trying to drag it, which
denies to man any rights. as -an
individual.
His past achievements- on- the
field of battle preserved the inde-
pendence odf the great and suiall
nations of Europe, of Asia; and of
the- Americas. As chief of state of
a nation which' has from the- day
of its birth been' the most perfect
example of the value-of a. democra-
tic Government, hlie seeks- to gutmran
tee the right ti, life of those states
whose every existence is threaten-
ed today. In. this tribute of grati-
tude which the Americas owe Pre-
sident Eisenhower for his fruitful
efforts, I am happy to join my
voice to that of all the countries
of this hemisphere, particularly
'he under-developed countries in
which poverty constitutes a fertile
field for the development of the
noxious germs of communism.
Thanks to the assistance which has
been intensified since the beginn-
ing of the present Administration,
these small republics to a certain
extent are seeing the handicaps to
their evolution in the American
community disappear. Such pro-
jects as those under way ir. my
country in the Artibonite Valley,
(Continued on pagel6)


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HAITI SUN


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 30th___


HAITI SUN


GALA CELEBR

PRESIDENT'S S
SPECIAL TO (H
MMIAMI, Fla. : President Paul
Magloire and his pert, smartly-
dressed wife received their first
welcome on American soil w.ien
they disembarked at Miami air-
port Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to be
warmly greeted by a reception
committee of U.S. and Haitian
diplomats.
Included in the group were Chief
of Protocol John F. Simmonds. Bri
gadier General Creswell. Eisen-
hower military aide assigned to
the President's trip, Haitian Am-
bassador Jacques Leger, and Col.
Philippe Chain, Haitian Consul
General in Miami.
Before thle President and First La
dy departed, about an hour after
their arrival, 'for dinner at the
White House with President Ei-
senhower, they were honoured
guests at a reception in the pala-
tial residence of Consul General
-Ind Mrs. Chain, 966 Hunting Lod
ge dr. Miami Springs.
After President Magloire had
met and greeted some 200 guests,
many of whom he knew 'perso-
nally, the Mayor of Miami Beach,
Harold Shapiro presented him
with a golden key to the cityd
and extended an invitation for a
future date.
Then operation were ope-.
ned oan the heavy spread
of ham, hors d'oeuvres
and champagne accompa
nied by the whirring and flas-
hing of Newsreel and TV came-
ras. It seemed the Presidential
party greatly enjoyed the procee
dings.
In a prepared statement, the
tall, soberly-dressed Haitian Chi-
ef of State declared: eI come see
king only an opportunity to ex-
press the appreciation of the peo
pie ef Haiti for the help and sup
port they have had from the Uni
ted States for more than a cen-
tury and a half>.
eHaiti, second oldest nation
among the Americas, has a re-
cord of closer and closer co-ope-


ATION MARKS

5TOP IN MIAMI
AITM SUN
ration with the United States),
he continued. "It is my hope to
itengthen this co-operation and
bring back to the people of Hai-
L: c'cw-:: ':c- cp f your great-
ness.z,
A nod from Protocol Chief
Simmonds to.General Leveltbro
ke the sad news that the bine Io, the personal plane of
President Eisenhower until Fhe
MColumbine II replaced it last
October, was ready to leave for
Washington.
The guests pouied out to wish
President and Mnme. Magloire
.,bon vo.vage> and the police-es
corted caravan of.Cadillacs was
on its way.
Among thel many distinguish,
hed guests that tilled the esa-
lons.> of Colonel and Mrg. Chain
were:

Dr. Howard. C. Mc. Devitt Jr.,
representing the Mayor of Co-
ral Gables.
Mr. and Mrs. George Schultz,
representing the Mayor of Mia-
mi Springs
The British Consul and Mrs.
Denis Hannessy.
The Consul General of Cuba
and Mrs Eduardo Hernandez.
U.S. Congressman and Mrs.
Bill Lantaff
Dominican Consul General
and Mrs. Herara.
Miami Springs Police Chief
H.V. Yokum
Haitian Vice Consul and Mrs.
David WaIers.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas. P. Horn
burger,
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Martin,
Dr. and Mrs Leonard Taicher,
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Miller,
Mr. and Mrs. BiM Fahrner,
Mrs. Walton J. Montegut,
Miss Carol Aronowitz,
Mr. Hans Gerard Kalmar,
Mr. Ed Mercer,
Mr. and Mrs. Bill Wilcox,
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sansa-
ricq,


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Arriving at Washington, D. C., to begin his official, visit to the United
States, President-Malagloire was greeted by United States Vice-Pres-
ident Richard Nixon and other high United States Govt Officials.
The photograph shows the motorcade bearing the President moving
down Constitution Avenue en route to the District of Columbia Bids.
where President Malagloire received the traditional -key to the city-.
More than 250.000 people and an honor guard of units of the United
States Armed Forces lined the streets of the city to greet the visiting
Chief Executive.


Mr. and Mrs. George Richard-
son,
Mrs: N. Stern,
Miss Mihina Widmajer,
Miss Nicole Greger,
Mr. Eugene Carrie,
Mines. Bella and Lillian Des-
rue,
Mr. Christian 1ermain (P.A.A.)
Mr. Arthur Clark.
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Knobel

by Hans Gerard KALMAR

MIAMI MAYOR LATE

,Miami Heraldr Thursday re-
ports that Mayor Ale Aro-
nowitz, scheduled to extend the
greetings of Greater Miami to
the Haitian Chief of State, arri-
ved'at the Consulate about 11:30
a.m. 15 minutes after the pre
sident had left.
The oonly hitch was caused
by the advanced departure time,


by about 45 minutes, of the cCo
lumbine I% after reports
that headwinds woulQ slow the
trip to Washington.
,The mayor's adsence caused
some back-of-the-hand whispering
amld nervgps glances among the
diplumatso the newspaper report
led. ,But the genial President
never seemed to notice,
Aronowitz later wired the
airborne presidential party that
he had been informed the recep-
tion would last until noon. ,
el was detained the mayor's
wire said,b and arrived there to
be disappointed. Please convey
my profound regrets.
Mayor Aronowitz said he was
informed the visiting President
may pass through Miami on his
return trip and added that he
would extend his city,s greetings
then.
,It is a very important matters I
the Mayor concluded


'3'



":3





Ti


*1


S PHILIPS- super radio

'CUTACAO TRADING COMPANY et ses agents


'-,. 3.

I.


PAGE 3


r-7


PHYSIOTHERAPIST -
0 & MASSEUR :
Treatments at home by appoila-,.
Clinic at No 179, 4tr'-
AVE MAGLOIRE AMBROISE
(Chez Dr Maurice Lafleur)
7:00 a.m to 2:00 p.m
PHONE 2981
JACQUES LAFLEUR
(Gradutate: Col!ege of Swicedish
,Massage Chicago III!
Post Grad:-Kellbcrg Health Ins-
titute Chicago.
Grad.: Podiarrint Kerberg ;
also studied in Canada.- -.
it Chicago Stuident of Dr. Swanson >
i -






t' PAE IISU UNAJAURY 3t


THUMBNAIL
IMPRESSION

S", Hearing the beat of the bongo
$ drum containing the vibrant ryhm
'" "of the daily life, feeling the good
'-n oess and love exuding from the
faces of ihe people, seeing groups
of people chatting, their bodies so
relaxed that they form abstact pat
terns i contrapuntal design again-
st nature, watching the beauty of
-the tropics framing the architect-
ure of the simple painted allies
to the elaborate villas these are
the initial impressions of Haiti.
Used tot he pace and tempo of
the U.S: when first confronted
"with the intoxicating qualities of
the island cbau-n, we drank it in
i, like a gulp of strong rum. But soon
we realized that here the joy oi
life is steady: we could slowly abs-
'. orb ia and it won't desert 'us.
'. But there is an elusive mystic
mm" sis ajout Haiti. From the fin-de-
...siecle veranda of the Hotel OoIfs-
o.." 6n a!l the intangible mystery of

Cecile Gray, of Tem-
i'po Magazlhie, author of
'. the following Sketch, is
presently Spending a va-
cation at Hotel OIoffson
\ aeompjnled by her fri-
end, actress Gloria Mus-
solino. Iaitlans have vo-
ted the charming New
Y.orkers uvrainent sym-
pathiquen


Rp Haiti that underlies the island
i. seeps 'into the very being. We
could look down at the charm of
;; the street, listen to. the reverber-
i.:.ating laughter of the people ano
,:', watch the intricate shapes of the
^': wonderfully, designed structure
ef easttng shadows against the fol-
:. Jiage. We felt at peace with our-
selves.

j,. In our two weeks in Port-au-Prin
A ce the people have given us an
indescribable happiness. Their hos
:- .pitait>. sincerity and ability to
Unmake and want us to feel at home
y-.is Verbally inexpressible. For the
'.:..Haitian, whose heritage is all of
1; 'mankind. is a many faceted person.
.. He is beautiful because he is good;
he in peaceful because he is cont-
:, ent "vith the knowledge that life
,;:i is basically a wonderful gift, he is
5. creative because he is wise with
> the ;,.'dom of nature.

;: It ia truly with a renewed joy
t." of living and with a humble thank
you to everyone who has made our


stay so wonderful
;'.' but only in body.
1I'. the Haitians we 1
some small part a
.t' us wimar, more
.; ever grateful wit]
(' That an earthly pa
U; re-turn.

^For the
PY, !.:4
|ii'ff. or
t~?Take

kWith Yo


Step into \
SMine. RosE
Pierre-Lou

Shop on R
(beside M;

K Orientale)
We stock:
|SISAL GO

E HAITIAN
CRAFT:

V MAHOGA
WARE:
SOUVENIR


that we leave -
For the spirit of
hope we have, in
absorbed. to make
content and for-
h tle knowledge
iradise awaits our



Ideal
Souvenir
Home
u,

the
1ini
.is
rue Roux
aison



ODS:
HANDI-

NY
GIFTS:
[RS.


tiJoseph report


FETE IN cA FLAT
Maya Deren, author of 'Divine Horsemen' noi engaged in the pro-
duction of "avant garde' films here, threw a party last weekend in
her Petionville residence to celebrate the birthday of her guest and
co-worker Teiji Ito, the famous Japanese composer... A varied anid
accomplished assortment of local and foreign writers, painters, dilett-
antes and unclassed bohemes' were on hand to listen to exotic record-
ings of nose-flutes and other out-of-the-ordinary instruments, and to
watch Miss Deren's interpretation of primitive rhythms with the em-
phasis on the midriff (and downwards)... Divers other forms of en-
tertainment were enjoyed...
Percy Powell ended up with a double joy on his hands last week
when he repaired an Army d'Haiti camionette took it out for a trial
run and met Mr. Antoine Paul's car head-on along Rue des Casernes .
p xxx
MATRIMONIAL MURDERS
At Plaisance, a man named Dieuveut Regis was arrested recently
for the murder of his wife whom he buried in a two-foot deep grave...
And at Bananiers, Amalia Durant (nee Vital) is charged with the pois-
oning of her husband Prechenal Durant...
Airforce pilots are flying high since the recent acquisition of a new
DC 4 for service in the Provinces... Holds about 20 passengers...
After 75 years of service; the 'Maison Simon Vieux' withdrew from
the world of business with a liquidation sale last week..
A new addition to the family at Hotel Riviera is a giant, gaudily'
plumed Macaw. The jacquot boasts a predominantly red and grean
color scheme... Tourists will soon hear the familiar: "Jacquot To lo-
leo-tot'...
A HASCO train jumped the rails, out of Carrefour. on Sunday even-
ing...
SHASA (General Motors distributors) moved into their almost-com-
pleted Rue Pavee building Tuesday... Flames destroyed the original
offices Summer '53...
xxx
MALLOU JONES EXHIBITS
Lois "Mallou Jones, American wife of Haitian painter Vergnia'ud
Piejre Noel, is currently receiving bouquets from gallery-goers for her
exhibition in Washington of Haitian scenes painted during her Summer
visit here... The exhibition opened Friday in the Panamerican Union
building... Artist Lois presented eight pictures to the Presidential cou-
ple during their visit, explained I have found Haiti both exotic and
enchanting, her scenery and her peasants inspired me.... Her husband
is noted for audio visual work and post card designing...
xxx
(LA REBELLED
Montparnasse Cinema's prize movie, 'La Rebelle', ran true to its
name Wednesday evening Flames and smoke started gushing from
the projector and the Fire Brigade had to be summoned... Movie-goers
who already have seen the show diagnose spontaneous combustion...
xxx
MARDI GRAS MASK MAKER HURT
One of the favourite Mardi Gras mask makers, Huberman Charles
was seriously injured coming home from a Stade Magloire football
match early this week... The hit-and-run victim is making progress in
the General Hospital..,
xxx
NEW BROWNETTE IN TOWN
Eminent British writer T. J. Grant Esq. was on the receiving end of
a surprise when he submitted to a haircut last week. The snow-white
crest that had captivated our maidens had insiduously grown brown at
the roots... Squire Grant reports this is npt the first such double-cross.
His hair did exactly the same thing a decade or so ago...
VISITING YACHTS
The Edmar', belonging to brothers of the former president of Pa-
nama Arias, tied up at C a s i n o Pier this week... The ll2ft yacht
reportedly had a honeymooning couple aboard and crewmembers Be-
drich Sruta, Enrique Fernajndez, Ramire Cartos, Enrique Espenal, Da-
niel Cartos... Sailing out of Panama City, the 'Edmar. went on to
Miami early Friday morning. Panama registered, the boat was listed
as belonging to Roberto E. Arias and Antonio M. Arias... Sharing the
pier was the 67ft. 'Gallant Lady V. bearing Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Casten-
dyck (he makes "Ready-Mix" cement trucks) and guests Mr. and Mrs.
Jim Henderson, which arrived Wednesday and stayed till Saturday...
The Las Vegas industrialists have been wave-borne since November 4,
picking up the sparkling new yacht in Chicago and sailing South...
Ports of call included Miksi',sippi. Nev' Orle..ns, Mikmi. Pecrh, Fort
Lauderdale, Nasshu, Great Inagua, before Port-au-Prince... Next on the
schedule is Kingston after which they will tackle the Panama Canal
and head for California... Pilots responsible for all this navigating,
Stan Duncan and Nick Cognito, place the end of the tour around the
end of March...
PARLEZ-VOUS
PAA, with ty pical zeal. put themselves out to arrange the President-
ial flight to Miami Wednesday. Even had a large banner to cover the
steps. It was intended to show th:,t this was a special flight for the
President... Unfortunately the inscription was in Spanish a souvenir
from his Central American tour Memo to L A. D.: All 'Latin Amer-
ican, Countrtes don't speak Spanikh



YILLLA CREOLE "p

i^&r^A^.^a ^^


OH! (LIFE)
Haiti's Grand Hotel Oloifson, resounded with clicking shutters Fri-
day afternoon as Life photographer Leonard Me Combe went to work
on the ,fin de sieele, building. Attention centered around Centre
d'Art "bests. (and their "chef d'oeuvres") including Gourgue, Bazile,
Bigaud, Antonio Joseph, Benoit. Helping the reluctant sunshine were
glamorous: Jacqueline Godefroy, Paule Duncan, Jacqueline Laraque,
Mrs. Adrien Boucard. Gloria Mussolino and Cecile Gray. Art Center
Chief Dewitt Peters was on hand to direct painting operations assisted
by an_ le-.man Hotel proprietor Roger Coster and Arts Patron Bishop
Voegeli who donned a purple gown for the occasion. This glorious
scenery may appear in life if Mac succeeds in putting the story over.
Resort shuttled into Bowen Field with 31 tourists Thursday for a
3*day stop-over at Riviera Hotel...
COMING!
20th Century Fox Executive Alan Silverbach wrote Paramount's Da-
niel Lafontant this month congratulating him on various things...
among them the fact that Paramount is soon to be prepared for Cina-
mascope 'The Robe", 'How to Marry a Millionaire', 'Beneath the
Twelve Mile Reef', 'King of the Khyber Rifles.,lHell and High Water",
'Night People,, ',Prince Valliant', River of No Return., Demetrius and
the Gladiators ....
GREAT DAYS...
In an editorial thus entitled, Jamaica's veteran .'Daily Gleaner.
commented- that this was the most wonderful time to be alive in the
little island... "What with the visit of Princess Margaret and Presid-
ent Magloire next month, the record of 1955 will glitter like a golden
page in the history of Jamaica' the newspaper enthused...
Marie Wallingford has moved into the pretty rose cottage of Bour-
don Village...


MAYA DEPREN' Teiji Ito clicked at tlye "Sun" offices by Aubelhn
Jolhcceur. Miss Deren's "avant-garde" productions musical back-
ground by Ito) will be shown at the Haitian American )nstituate Feb.
4 and 5.


TIE SOIJU D SiEEP IDEA


IN IISTRY'!


?1~fl4L1~


Ut,


Tlhr hcalth Center Mt.itress is a fin'?, f'in:n
mattress s.. t lhat's firmer in the CElNTER r';wrc .tw
11th1:i/r. No sagging back. But no nagging neck, cii"cr.
Or cricks in your morning legs. This iiiattress relra-w,
just enough, where your head and feet come to rest.
You've never known such heavenly sleeping!
Come in today ... the whole Spring Air line is new and
fresh and very much worth seeing. Spring Air mattrN.'es
priced from $00.00. "/C, -
H I, TRATN C'OMPANYChambe-rComerc Bld

HAITI TRADING COMPANY, Chamber Commerce Bldg.


a .


HAITI SUN






sUNDAY, JANUARY 30th


HAITI SUN


HAITI SUN

THE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER

Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning


EDITOR-PUBLISHER
GERANT RESPONSIBLE


BERNARD DIEDERICH
RONY CHENET FILS


S Founded 1950i_

PRESIDENT'S TRIP GOOD FOR HAITI
Millions of Americans are being told the story of President
Magloire's U.S. state visit as it is flashed across the nation on
TV and cinema, screens, over the radio, or on the front pages
of the powerful U. S. press.
The name of Haiti is being mentioned in despatches to tne
cities of the United States and across the Atlantic by Press
Services to Europe as the pageantry and pomp of the occasion
is passed on to listeners, viewers and readers throughout the
-world. The people of America and other countries who before
may have known next to nothing about our fascinating repub-
lic some have been known to be mixed up about the
distinction between Haiti and Tahiti -t are being given precise
and detailed accounts of the position and nature of the coun-1
try-
Haiti's glorious history is thrown into relief as her presid-
ent and his suite take the spotlight. President Magloire will
speak at dinners, receptions, public functions in the major
cities and his words will be relayed to millions who were not
there in person. And he will be' speaking about Haiti.
The U. S. visit of President Magloire will do more for the
republic's Tourist Trade and her prestige than a million dol-
lars worth of ads in the largest newspapers. With publicity
handled expertly by F9rest Finley of Washington, the trip
will be assured even more prominence, in the columns of the
press, in news or telecasts, than it ordinarily would be.
The ailded income that will be attracted to Haiti as a result
in the form of investments, tourists and commerce will
certainly prove to greatly outweigh the expenditure of time
and effort.
JOURNALISTS' CLUB MEANS MORE WEIGHT
We're happy to see that the dailies have picked up the ball
and are agitating for a journalists' club.
Numerous times we have mentioned the need for A club
most recently on January 16, shortly after a group of 20 North
American journalists arrived in Port and the local press did
not get a chance to meet then.
It is almost certain that this created a poor impression of
our newspapers among the representatives of the influential
outside press.
But there are many more reasons for the formation of such
a club.
Alone,. Haitian journalists are straws against the wind of
current affairs. They exert very little influence upon the tour-
se of things.
Together, the journalists of the capital or of the repub-
lic would be a major force exerting much more influence
and enjoying much more prestige. 6
There also would be the benefit of meeting and interchang-
ing ideas. We have much to learn from each other, and we
should all be enriched by such friendly informal association.
Joe Thevenin writing for Haiti Jourijal.> told of the Journ-
alists' Club boasted by Havana which he recently visited on
a trip on the Aviacion Cubano.
He gave some excellent reasons for such an institution and
ended by saying: &And our club, which would be our temple,
would have the majesty characteristic of a beautiful building,
reflecting the vital and virile nature of Haitian journalism.*,
We would settle for a little less than that, but it is always
worthwhile to',hitch your wagon to a star,>, according to an
age-old saying.
.CLe Jourb said they would vote agreement if everyoie is
serious*, and suggested the club be limited to 44jourMlists
by professions. cLe Nouvelliste-.promplty entered the arena,
demanding how it was to be decided who is and who is not
a journalist by profession;>.
But in spite of quibbling about minor points, it appears that
everyone is united in the desire for a club.
All we need now is someone to step forward and start list-
ing members. /

7e' ...' .. .7F


j4 '. :.'


Cabaret ce 18 Janvier 1955

A MONSIEUR BERNARD DIE-
DERICH
DIRECTEUR DE eHAITI SUNs,

Bien cher Monsieur,
II nous est infiniment agrda-
ble de vous remercier de vos cha
leureux compliments a l'occasion
de notre election A la Magistratu-
re de la Commune de Cabaret.
Les notes bien trop flatteuses
A notre dgard continues dans vo
tre interessant journal que nous
avons revu, nous sont allIes
droit au coeur.
Nous sommes egalemeht trhs
sensibles aux vceux d'heureuse
annae que vous nous avez for-
mulds. Nous vous lea retournonp
stnc&rement tout en souhaltant
un plus grand rayonnement de vo
tre Journal.,
Recevez, bien cher Monsieur,
l'expression de nos salutations
distingukes.
Mine ULYSSE PIERRE RAY.
MOND
Magistrate


Haitian Professinal
Women Form
Association
Nearly forty intellectual young
ladies met Monday afternoon to
form the 'Association des Femmes
Haitiennes dipl6mees des Facultes
et des Ecoles Sup6rieures', a local
branch of the ,International Fede-
ration of Women -University Gra-
duates'.
The Association's first meeting
was concerned with the election of
officers and the reading of the
rules.
The following committee was
chosen:
Mrs. Leslie Manigat (Pres); Miss
Edith Hudicourt (V. Pres); Mrs.
Andre Monchaux (Secy. Gen.);
Miss Denise Roy (International
Secy.); Miss Elsa Carrie (Treasur-
er); Miss Bayard, Mrs. Lucien Mon
tas, Miss Romulus, Miss Chatelain
(Advisors).


For rent (Bellevue Pacot Sec-
tion) I
Apartment in home of nice fa-
mily '- bath, dining-living room,
gallery completely independent;
with neals, rate $100.00 per
month.
For arrangements, telephone
5076.


SPECIAL EDITION
HERALDO D'HAITI
The current copy of *Heraldo
d'Haiti, specially published in
English includes many articles
of cultural and political interest.
Among them is a penetrating study
of the present administration by
the widely-read columnist, T. J.
GranL The 'appreciation and pre-
diction' by Mr. Grant is only one
of many edifying articles in the
review which is soon to be on sale
in Haiti.


Course


you want the
moat for your
church organ dollars
Dollar fordollar, the Hammond
Organ provides more fSr your
organ fund. Only the Hammond
Organ brings you thousands of
lovely rich tone ecxauJie
Averberatlon control which
bring cathedral-like tonee into
the smallest church ... nervesP
your church for a lifetime at
minimare coat became Inever
needs tuning.
Them. re a few o the rea-
son@ why the Hammond Organ
is the lergsst-aclling church
organ In the world.
HAMMOND ORGAN
Prkw mn at
$128e t fo Obo-
1Th85 "xt
tinerdlin Fedatn tarrebated to ehuush


Church odel
Churchds ds
Whenpyou happen to go to Mass ,
at the attractive little Chapel o'.
Saint Jean de Boaco, allow youfr.-
self to be transported by' th i-
harmonious strains of the Ha.
mond Organ there6 GENERAL.FN
A GENT TIPCO. 3s

I.


PRESIDENT MAGLOIRE DEPARTS .


-* i. 1. : '. LJ r '. .
,,*- '-.'.Ji '. / a^ ^ i~e M *-...*":..^,. :;/
.. ., .'..-, -
..... : ,.'.. ., :, .: I.o/ ::._. ..,,4 ; g .:...L ..: :. ." ,,:


(


PAGE 5


,maw





S TRANS-WORLD

TRADING COMPANY





WALK6RVILLE CANADA
ESTABLISHED 1858





PAGE 6

7 Of 10 Caribbean Nations
p Headed By Militqry Men
SThe United Press published a ted government of Jacobo Ar-
potical survey of the Caribbean bentz Guzman.
area this week from its Washing HONDURAS Vice President
ton office' showing that a large Julio Lozana Diaz proclaimed
*?'majority df the independent sta himself chief of state last Decem
: tes are governed by former sol- ber after no candidate received
Sdier. a clear majority of the total votes
i eSeven of the 10 nations in the cast in the October presidential
Caribbean, now torn by Costa elections. At the time, he was ac
.I' Rican fighting and the assassi- ting as president because' Presi-
i:/' nation of the President of Pana- dent Juan Manuel Galvez was'
i-.1 ha, have. governments headed out of the country for medical
4 yy mlitai.! men. U.P. Stated. treatment.
SThe survey continued:, EL SALVADOR: Lt. Col. Oscar
SIn several of the nations the Osorio was elected president in
"same "di ii"deal. has occupied 1950. He served two years on a
the. :jre'H1eiecy at intervals government junta which had go-
i. ove"r a long period of years, and verned the country after depo-
in pme cases has controlled the sing President Salvador Castane
i. government even when not' hol- da Castro.
',dini the top executive position NICARAGUA Gen. Anastasia
'-himself. Somoza has been the strong man
Bt the United States has fol- and occupied the presidency at
=lowid'a good neighbort policy various intervals since United
an4Vis keeping its hands strictly States Marines were withdrawn
0outVof the intermnul affairs of the .from the country in .the. early
7: various nations. 9 1930's. He received his military
.': The United States govern- training in the Marines.. He was
Smeret did not intervene in, any elected to his present six-year
'.way: in last year's Guatemalan term in 1950.
revolution or the aftermath of COSTA RICA President Jose
Sthe:,. assassination of President Figueres. educated in America,
Jose. A. Remon of Panama. The was elected to a four-year term
S "sale of the four P-51 Mustang in 1953. In 1948, he led
R fighter planes to Costa Rica was a successful revolution
ld e o with"'the approval of the to assure the installation
; OrganizatioU of American Sta- ao? Otillio Ulate as president. Ula
Sites. te had won earlier popular elec-
Toe OAS i- composed of the lions which the existing govern-
". 24American republicss and is meant sought'to amnnull.
ga regional' grouping .under the Figures and President Somoza
Scharker of the'United Nations, of Nicaragua long have been at
V0 PolWm9ing is a summary of the odds. Somoza accused Figueres
'exLht'ng'1rAibean governments, of sponsoring an attempted assas
Pi JGUkDfAhiA 'Carlos Castil- sination against him early in 19-
S:1o .A.rfii- -became -president of 54 and Figueres, in turn, accu-
[,- the"o'hntry last year after lea- sed Somoza of supporting -moves
.'ding a, military revolt which over to overthrow the Figueres govern
threwthe Cormmunist dominao ment.

**... U *IU .I


I For Como


I




':'*

I-


BuY FROM

S /







I THE TOURIST AND


I"'

I
I

I.
I
2

2


AUX CENT MILLE
CARLOS

CARIBCRAFT
CHAMPAGNE'S ,
GEO DESLANDES
HAITI GIFT SHOP
JACQUELLINE

JEANNE'S
LA PERLE DES Al
-LA BELLE CREOL
LE PERCHOIR


E


HAITI SUN
HAMI SUN


SUNDAY, JANUARY Itit:


EX-IM BANK POLICY OUT LINED AT CIC LUNCH


The financial policy of the Exled in a brief history of the orga
The financial policy of the Ex led in a brief history of the orga


port-Import Bank wes outined
to Club "International du Com-
merce members at the'weekly
,Riviera. luncheon last Wednes
day by Leonard Koser, a mem-
ber of the delegation to Haiti.
Briefly explaining that the
Exim Bank is-a FederarAgency
of the U.S.A. which enjoys self-
governing status, Mr Koser fil-

PANAMA Ricardo Arias Es-
pinosa became president a few
days ago after the assassination
of President Remon and the ar-
rest for complicity of First Vice
President Jose Ramon Guizado.
Espinosa previously was second
v'ice president.
CUBA Gen. Fulgencio Batis-
ta took office in 1952 after hlie di
reacted a bloodless coup which
ousted the elected president, Car
los Prio Socarras. Batista ruled
as strong man in 'Cuba after he
rose to power in the sergeants
revolution in the early 1930's.
HAITI Gen. Paul E. Magloire,
who is now on an official visit
to the United States
became president in .elec-
tions in 1950. The elections follow
cd the resignation earlier that
year of President Dumarsais Es-
time, who yielded to military
pressure after a series of crises
disturbed the funclonipg of his
gcvcrnment.
DOMNIL'NICAN REPUBLIC.- A.
though Gen. Hector B. Trujil-
lio is president, the government
is dominated by his brother, Gen.
Raphael TPrujillo who lHas been
the dominant figure since a revo
lution' in 1930 and when not. oc-
cupying the post of -president
himself, has filled it with a rela-
tive or close adherent.


lete Sat


MASON ORIENTAL

OUNGA DOLL
OUVROIR NATION
MAXIM'S
MEINBERG BROS.

SAMBA
RHUM BARBANC(
SI LA SHOP
SI-JOU-LA
TAM TAM
THE SOUVENIR


1. ONE PRICE POLICY

2. Prices Plainly Marked On Eacl

...-3. FULLY ITEMIZED SALES SLIP GIVEN W
--- S i--19ot-


nization.
The bank, which is voted funds by
Congress, was formed in 1934,
the speaker stated, because It
that time, the depression caused
private banks to limit greatly
their credit to foreign custo-
mers.
Mr. Koser stressed that the
Bank was much more inclined
towards favouring exportation
than importation. Less than 5%
interest is charged exporters, he
continued; and both government
tal and private projects are'eli-
gible for credit. Public utilities
and heavy industry are the
fields specially favoured, the
speaker said.
Estimates are accepted in U.S
currency, based on the cost of
living of the country in which
a project is to be carried oat.
Though Mr. Koser made it qui
te clear that the Export Import
Bank is not a philanthropic orga
nization, and that it demands in


terest jus. like a private enter-
prise, he showed hob advanta-
geous the organization was to
the ?Good Neighbour, policy of
the United States.
-A High-Finance organization un-
der the supervision of Washing-
ton, the bank takes over worth-
while projects that private cre-
dit institutions are afraid of be-
cause they are not within the
scope of a strictly commercial
policy. The bank therefore enga
ges in international assistance
to neighboring countries, in eco
nomic ways, giving such gene-
rous terms that goodwill is won
for the, American Government.
If the Export Import Bank
helps and stimulates the expor-
tation of U.S. products, Mr Ko-
ser pointed out, it must not be
forgotten that the choise of pro-
jects and of work is planned to
further the econonmicde advance-
ment that the U.S.A. is promo-
ting 'in under-developed coun-
tries.


he' Wall Clock with

Westminister, Chimes

.'6Quarter H au r I y

Reeliabre and

D e c or a ti v e
-AIYILLONS WESTMINSTEM


AT RUSSO FRERES
S



-isfaction I





MEMBERS OF

I







GIFT SHOP ASSOCIATION



ILE : French Perfumes Oriental
Novelties
I ;Dresesk- Souvenirs
VAL : Embroidery'-'Handicraft
S Handicraft Tortoise shell
SMahogany Sisal
& Strawgoods
SEmbroidered dresses
)URT : Haiti's Finest Bum
:Sisal & Mahogany Goods
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( '




-MErN'.1. .i'r. *'-


SUNDAY, JANUARY 30th


HAITI SUN


VA



Wise & Otherwise
by T. J. Grant -
Editor's Note: T.J. Grant now claims to be an anthropologist.
Be made a study of the Desquiron family. Last week his report
reached the point where Mr. Desquiron taught Grant how to
tell time on a sundial at night by using a flashlight
When I read -Haiti Sun last Sunday, I was pained to see that the
Editor had once more exercised his feeble wit at my expense. He is
like a fly trying to destroy an elephant.
The Desquirons did not invite me to enter their house. I suppose
they thought that I was just passing by, and had stopped to say 'Hel-
lo'. Apparently, it was difficult for them to realize that a distinguish
ed and celebrated man like me was actually paying them a formal visit.
So, I decided to put them at their ease and said -to both of them-
dI have come to call on you. but I had no idea you lived in such a lone
ly and desolate place. I
Mrs. Desquiron smiled: -It is rather lonely, Mr. Grant', she said
*But it has certain advantages. It keeps people from coming up heie
and bothering us when we have work to do.'
I hadn't thought of that, but I could see -she was right. It was an
advantage for me also. No-one to bother me while I was making my
study.
So I put them at their ease again by saying: ,It must be uncomfort-
able for you out here in the sun. Why don't we go indoors?',
Mrs. Desquiron looked at me and appeared to be thinking deeply.
Something seemed to be troubling her. After about two minutes, she
spoke. SAll right, Jean "she said" Take him inside. I have to feed the
hens.'
Mr. Desquiron led me into the living room of their house. It was
quietly and tastefully furnished. A modest room, of course, but suit-
able for a young couple just starting out in life.
He handed me an old copy of 'Haiti Sun, and said: Sit down, make
yourself at home. I have to go out for a minute.' Then he left.
The minute stretched into an hour. I read 'Wise and Otherwise', ny
T. J. Grant, five times,' and had done some thinking in between the
intervals of reading.
Then I decided that I would take advantage of Mr. Desquiron's offer
to-nake myself at home. So I wandered out to the kitchen where I
found a bottle of 'Ballantine's, whisky. With the bottle and a glass, I
vent,.back into the living room .
Twilight came; it was getting dark, night had fallen (so had the
level of the whisky in the bottle almost to the bottom). But my
spirits were high. I felt a tremendous compulsion to continue with my
study, even if it took all night.
Whisky makes my hearing acute. I heard a whisper outside the living
room windo4: -His car is there. He hasn't gone yet.'
I knew they were glad I had waited for them. Otherwise, they
wouldn't have bothered to see if my car was still there. They were still
busy, however, probably putting the hens to bed, as they did not come
in. I ......... ........
SBefore I go any'further, I want you all to understand that this report
of my anthropological study is not going to be anything like Kinsey's
report of the things he reported on. If that is what you are waiting
Sfor, you can quit reading right here. All of you, with no exceptions.
Finally, they came in. I was glad, because I was tired of sitting there
in the dark. When the lights were turned on, I said to them: It. is
quiet up here at night, I see.- -
'Yes, Mr. Grant.' replied Mrs Desquiron.. Even if it rains in the
daytime, it is. quiet at night, and no matter what the temperature may
be, there is absolutely nowhere to go or anything to do around here
in the evening. So we go to bed very early, as we have to get up early
in the morning.'
I didn't quite understand her references to ram and temperature, but,
later, I decided she was talking in what they call -non sequiturso
They both looked tired, and I was about to mention this, when Mr.
Desquiron said: -You must excuse us, Mr. Grant, we must get cleaned
up and dressed, as we have to go and get the children at their grand-
mother's..
This was a. blow to me. but I took it in my stride. That's all right,
Jean,' I, said -I'll wait for you.'
They disappeared into the bedroom. I started to think of the futility
of human life. Here were two charming young people spending their.
lives from dawn till nightfall, nursing sick chickens back to health, kil-
ling the lice they are infested with, feeding them and putting them
to hed at night. And to what end? So they might slaughter them and
sell them for money. They were wasting the best years of their lives
just for money.
Suddenly, they appeared all dressed up. Mr. Desquiron said: -Let's
go, Mr. Grant, the children are waiting.-
'Just a minute,. I replied .1 have a question to ask you. How did
You two happen to get marr-ed?
Mrs. Desquiron looked at the bottle, then she looked at me with a
smile. -Well, "she said" Marcos Talamas and Tato Phipps told us that
tw'o could 'live as cheaply as one, so we decided to see if it was true..
'What did you find out?' I asked
'We found that two can live as cheaply as one, only it costs them
twice as much. Isn't thet true, Jean?'
%Yes,-in a way, but it i's also true that two can live as cheaply as onec
when both are working. Come on, Mr. Grant.,
I was slightly dazed. -Never mind, Jean,. .1 said, -I'll wail for you
They went out the door. I sat down in' an arm-chair, finished the
bottle and went to sleep.
This essay will be continued next week.)


((Time>) &


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The huge tlIcfcric, being cor.s
tructed for transportation of tim
her and workmen in the Pine Fo
rest by the 'Swiss firm tCable
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#


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mao/had fallen into the pit whi-
, Pacer- le drunk and had been killed by
i a state the fall
at the


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PAGE 8 HAITI SUN SUNDAY, JANUARY 301h


port us back to Port-au-Prince, we accomplished the driver and help-
".' .::. --.. bid -au revoir. to Cap Haitien, or er headed back to a gas station on
:,. -,. .-.-- -' -- -' J.-- so we thought. But it was only af- foot lugging the spare tire with
....E FO N 'con a j e f Cap ter twao or three more scenic tours them and leaving us to the mercy
i.bi o o so around the picturesque town, up of the blazing sun. The Haitiens
and down dim and not too sweet- in the eamionette then scattered
Sly- scented streets looking for pas- for shade and curled up for a sies-
scngers, before we finally, at 7 ta. We, in turn, went in search of
S.nc!, turnicd south .on the high- some ciconuts to quench our thirst.
way and headed for Port-au-Prin- Finding none, we settled for dix
cc cobs, worth of sugar cane.
About twenty minutes from the In five hours we had travelled
S Cap the Camionette slammed to a just fifteen miles from Cap Haitien.
Stop. The driver then sadly broke After another hour't wait we
Sbthe news to us that he had left his heard the heavy rumbling of a lar.
n driver's licence back at the Cap. ge truck coming around the bend,
SWe agreed to wait at the side of We flagged the driver and asked
-... ..... s. 50 ... .......-. the road until he returned. Within him if he was going to Port-au-
a half-hour he rejoined us not emp Prince, if so, could we climb a-
THE FOLLOWING account of a journey from Cap Haitien to Port au ty but with three more passengers. board. As the truck was Ioaded
Prince by HCamion. is related by two Canadian tourists hiberwrang All aboard we again headed south. with oranges, we were obliged to
tn the warm republic. The moral of the storyi s, the lads inform us. We had travelled about three :pde on top of them Once three
that anything can happen in Haiti and adventure i3 alhay waiting lometres ,vhen the driver's bun we found we weren't alone. There
around the bend... helper) began blowing frantically w'as a goat hog-tied at the feet. sev-
,w ,.on his police whistle. Upon stopp- eral chickens and one turkey, along
9y AN ROM trupetg ing, h iwe discovered -that the right with miscellaneous bags, boxesand
N O FRd CAP of bf g rear tire was flat. With much laugh sacks of oranges.
By K. G. P. and W. G. D. ter and joking we had the tire Under way once more, we spent
changed in twenty minutes. Once the .neit few hours climbing throu
W wednesday evening was spent in call back for us around 5 o'clock, more in motion'we headed over gh the beautiful and picturesque
downtown Cair Haitien arranging as he had some other passengers the potholed and washboard road, mountains, with breath-taking see-
our transportation back to Port-au- to gather together first, only to stop at a farm about five nary at every turn. The trip throu-
Prince. After many cups of coffee the miles up the road. There 'we took gh the mountains was uneventful,
time was now about 5:30 there on twelve sacks of oranges, which but very relaxing after our hectic
:The camion driver said 5:00 a.m. again came the incessant blare of vere hurriedly flung on top of the 'beginning.
sharp. Being new to Haiti and used horns. To our surprise we were cuamionette. Many of the oranges
to the Promptness of the North A- greeted by a new camion and driv- must have been over-ripe as once SEGUIN
merican -transit systems, we were er, who told us that he was to take under way the juice from them
uj, 4y 4:00 a.m.. having breakfast us to the depot to meet the other began to drip from the roof onto We are still receiving replies to
.with our hosts. About 4:30 there camion. Needless to say, twenty our clothes, our request last week that readers
came a loud trumpeting of horns minutes more were spent attempt- Wi,1i:': i three miles we were jarr- send in further information, or
and screeching of brakes in front ing to round up a full load of P_,- ed by an explosion the right suggestions for the development of
m =, t o r o u d p f u l o a o f p r,- tl i r ea e x p l o S e g i n ah v e r d a n t f e rt le.. ..i
of the house. Our host, upon ans- sengers, but being unsuccessful the re:-r tire had blown this time. The .eg a verdant, ferte area tn
wearing the door. greeted the driv- driver deposited us -at the depot to other passengers and driver, after Ha.ti.Co iun
er with well-chose.n words in Cre- board the. original truck. After a many minutes of heated discussion for publicatin next isse wil be
ole. We were informed that the much-hegted argument between and head-scratching, decided the accepted until "onday 5:00 p.m.
d ,y.e lduid pck up-ouT 'bags aid the dr-iv~rs as to who would trans Lwheel would have to come off. This


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Manager Ave. Dessalincs Chancerelles Phone 2631


battle and dropped below the west
ern hills in a blaze of glory, giv-
ing us a sunset Beyond the paint-
er's brush. At the. outskirts of St.
Marc the driver said that since it
was now dark he would puU the
heavy canvas top over us and save
us the walk through town. Curled
up under the canvas, with a nerv-
oil; gatL and clucking chickens, we
I'.ughed oar way through this co-
ourfLiil but now slumbering sea
village.
Alter nineteen and a half-hours
on the road we finally pulled into
Port-au-Prince. With the usual bar-
gaining we finally settled on a
$5.00 fare for the three of us. Tir-
ed, dusty and very hungry, we hir-
ed -. taxi to drop us off at our
hotel. Now sitting in our room,
well rested and reminiscine. we
can forget the arduous, and at ti-
mes, discouraging episodes of our
journey. To be sure, it was an ad-
venture that will not soon be for-
gotten and one that will be recount
ed many 'times by all of us.


B.Goodritek


Once out of the mountains and i
after travelling a few.miles of dus-
ty road, we tound ourselves on the
outskirts of Gonaives. Here the
truck pulled to a stop, the driver
stepped out and with sad eyes and
in broken English explained to us !
Ahit we would have to walk th;on-
gh Gonaives as the police would
not allow passengers on top of his E
truck. With our bags in tow we TIR
trudged what seemed like five mi- YOU A
les to the limits of the town. On- OUR CA
ce there the driver met 'us withir Y U
smiles and apologies. i
Heading south again the trip
went relatively smoothly. By now DISTRIBUTORS:
the sun had long given up the WVILLIAM NARR.


Everybody's Favourite


AVAILABLE AT ALL GROCERY STORES.


Totu cdo


1- -


I


PAGE 8


HAITI SUN


SUNDAY. JANUARY 30tlh






SUJN.lAY. J.ANUARY 31lt









CHICAGO :e i'andy- ciyg, ane of the towns on President ,lagloirc's
tinerarg for i is U.S. state visit, whwch commenced in W\ashington
Wednesday. 'has a reputation as one of the most hospitable of Amc-
rcc touws...


CHICAGO.-Chicago is different.
Instead of the loofness that often
mars a visit to a strange city, sin-
cere friendliness is evident every-
where. That's why each year Chi-
cago plays host to millions of visi-
tors and holib undisputed'title as
the leading convention city.of the
United Statem.
Its central location makes it the
busiest air, rail and highway hub
in the nation, and it also is a ma-
jor manufacturing city. Chicago is
only a few hours from the gateway
cities of New York, Miami, New
Orleans, Houston and Los Ange-
les, terminals of Pan American
WoriA Airways flights from Latin
America.
There's no need to worry about
what to do in Chicago. Few places
offer more attractions for a real
holiday.
Whether it is a spot for *hot'
musiceor more high-browed enter-
taillont, C.icago has it. Thie night
clubs' seem to be going constantly,
and 4he days are few when a head-
line sports event isn't on the sche
dule. Not many cities can boast
the top-rated group of museums,
g.-leries and cultural institutions
found in Chicago.
In the summertime the visitor
can hear concerts in Grant Park,
see a play at one of the many
summer theatres, a big league ba-
sebail game, or horse and harness
racing. In winter there is the Ope-
ra, the Christmas flower show
Hollywood ice show, international
-ki meet, the Golden Gloves box-
ing tournament, the national boat
show, and professional hockey ga-
mes.
The Adler Planetarium realisti-
cally portrays the mysterious work
ings of the universe. The Chica2o
Art Institute is famous the world
over for its collection of paintings,
prints and sculpture. Brookfield
Zoo offers a chance to see 2,b00
animals irom nearly all parts of
the world.
Another of the citi's best known
lures is its stores, famous the world
over. Millions oi persons are at-
tracted to the city each year for
the sole purpose of shopping in
the wondrous mercantile palaces
on State Street. fittingly referred
to as the -Main Street of the Na-
tion.,
State Street, which even has a
song written about it, also affords
a dazzling variety of specialty
shops. Michigan, Boulevard. one ol
the world's most beautiful thorough
fares, shirts the shore of Lake Mi-
chigan. ,


With its city population of more
than -three and a half million. and
a metropolitan family of more than
five and a hlialf million, Chicago is
the second largest metropolis in
America.
Industrially, Chicago bows to no
other city in the range and volu-
me of its products.
The 'Windy City. long has been
the greatest food market of the
universe. The meat processed in a
single year at the Chicago Union
Stockyards could feed the entire
United States for two months. The
Chicago Board of Trade; largest
grain market in the world, hand-
les 18 billion dollars in grain con-
tracts yearly.
Chicago also does 90 per cent
of the nation's mail order business.
Here are the home offices of Sears
Roebuck, Montgomery Ward, Spie
gels and AUdens.
One of the city's proudest assets
is its leadership in higher educat-
ion. as well as its accomplishments-
in research. Thousands of schol-
ars from all over the globe study
at Northwestern, DePaul and Lo:
yola Universities, Illinois Institute
of Technology and other institut-
ioins of higher learning.
It was at the University of Chi-
cago that the first successful ex-
perimnients in atomic reaction were
r-chieved. And, qhicago also gave
mankind its first steel girder.skys.
craper.
Among more recent Chicago con
tributionb to civilization have been
its outstanding'leadership in medi-
cine and surgery, and the almost
overnight creation of the specta-
cular mile-square Medical Center
with its scores of tnoer ig hospi-
tal-,. medic:.l! chonols anrd res.:icli
laboratories.
Chicago's acknowledged preemi-
nence as the busiest convention ci-
ty on the map. dates back a century.
Since that day when Abraham Lin-
coln won his first nomination in
Chicago's historic Wigwam, more
presidential candidates of all ma-
jor political faiths have been no-
minated in Chicago than in all o-
ther cities combined.
The secret of it all is Chicago's
unparalleled ability to provide the
visitor with the utmost in comfotls,
hospitality and other essential acc-
ommodations. In the downtown a-
rea alone, there are more than
17,000 first class hotel roorms,
enough to handle any convention.
And. throughout the city there are
more than 1.300 hotels to accom-
modate nearly 300,000 persons.


ON HIS VISIT TO CHICAGO. President Magloire
handise Mart, the largest commercial building in
Displaying more- than 5,600 -types df merchandise
. sourooms., the mart covers 93 acres, boasts 6 mie


k:'. X'


M n-nSUN


Tourist Invasion
'- t Peak Monday

Taxi-drivers scorned local fa-
res. Souvenir-shop owners bUis-
tered their fingers on cash regis-
ters. Sisal goods, rejects from
the mahogany factories, knick-
knacks of all kinds mushroomed
in Place d'Italie. Sailors relaxed
in thie shade of the bars.
That was the situation in Port-
au-Prince Monday as 1500 came-
ra-festooned tourists frolicked as
hore like S p r i n g lambs,
and hied them selves to the
.c-arest souvenir vendor.
Port-au-Prince came to life
with the blast of fog-horns, toot-
ing of ship's whistles, honks of
taxis and delighted cries as the
straw hatted tropicatly-garbed
(Ne\v York's conception) horde
discovered each new delight.
But it was just for a day, as
Tuesday dawned (with our usual
brilliant sunshine) on a leisure-
ly-paced, tropical-toned Port-au
Prince. The six visiting cruise-
ships were gone.
The <,New Amsterdamx had ga
there its 700 passengers, the
Empress of'Scdtland's, 4Q00 we-
re once more tossing on the deep
blue Ibriney, low in the water
with acquired souvenirs, and the
o!:cirt bay showed no trace of
th; IPtricias, the tlh. &'Trade Wind or the Cris-
tnbil>. *-
It was something to remember
while it lasted, however a re-
cord day in a record season.,


to Congress this week by Sena-
tor George Smathers of Florida.
The senator, who-long waged
a battle against the discrimina-
tory tax imposed only on Latins
and 'Canadians. recently retur-
ned to the United States from a
six-week tour of South ,American
republics.
His bill includes also a student
exchange programme between
the U.S. and her neighbour repu
blics, establishment of a credit
system for Latin American de-
velopmnient, a uniform ta.xation
system throughouV the -Western
hemisphere to encourage invest-
ment in South and Central Ame-
rica and the Caribbean.
The senator's year-long agita-
tion for student exchange was


rewarded by an I"ncrea
1954 to 132 students fr
the preceding year. In
mand for additional L
rican credit'Senator
said that the $500.000.01
sed by the Export-Imi
is infinitely too small
1 Smathers declared hi
stabilisation of the Oc
strengthening the ties
the U.S.A.. and her ne

FOR RENT
Furnished house in
Je 3 bedrooms m&
cimen (gas stove refriger
PlE asant situation,
climate.
For information call
gu'.tfe Phone 7845 o


SMATHERS PROPOSES ABOLI. LI
TION OF TRAVEL TAX IN ,,o
BILL BEFORE SENATE. ROYAL DUI
Proposed abolition of the 10%7R
tax on Latin American travel-
lers to the United States is one
of four points in a bill presented .







Super Convair 340 Service to


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Leave 1:45 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Saturday
Connections in San Juan for NEW YORK

Phone: 3313 For Reservations and information
f.l Ticket Office: Jos Nadal & Co. Bldg.
Jot Nodal & Co. General Agents V
see your Travel Agent


.. -= n s


PAGE 9
/!:
se during
rom 13 in ":
n his de- :
atin Ame
Smather
00 authoi
port Bank
* '.: ."
s'aim was6
accident by
between
2ighbours. '
-44;
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Petion-Vil
>demn
rather etc,). -
wonderful :i


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may see the Meic iFqe. --
mI4F- l
m the United States? --Rue Dantes Destouides -- Portau-Prince Telephone 3451

e in its streamlined r
es of store frontage.
M 56


i





I;: PAGE 10

rIPG 1 THE RIVIERA

.Hotel d'Haiti









4 S
r ,r
N".





















GUY DEROSIER AND HIS OR-CHESTRA
Continuous music and dancing every nite
y.4
:: from 6:30 p m to 1:00 a m
SEvery Saturday night $1:50 minimum- per person
..'. unday 8:00 p m in Dining room
CHOIR MICHEL DESGROTTES
.. -35-member choral group-


I.A QUART PIOOr
S, BOQUWET.. BOUQUET

r o. JR( .4j 0 -


I LA PLUS ANCIENNE FAMILLE DE DISTILLATEURS D04AITI










-PORT-AU-PRINCE HAITI WEST INDIES





ruL~t irI cAIIQIrIII[
" FAMOUS FOR ITS FRENCH COOKING


S:Specialities
--ONION SOUP -FILET MIGNON
-PEPPER STEAK -SNAILS
I -IESCALLOPPE DE VEAU -PICARDIE

"LOCATED IN: COOL TETE-DE-L'EAU, PETION-VILLE
FOR RESERVATIONS Tel: 7416


HOTEL SAN MICHELE


IN PETION-VILLE
PHONE: 7894


HAITI SUN


SUNDAY, JANUARY 30th


DOMINICAN REPUBLIC TO
HIRE 3.850 LABOURERS'FOR
WORK IN SUGAR FIELDS.

3.850 labourers will be recrui-
ted by February 5 for work in
the Dominican Republic during
the current sugar-cane harvest,
at *Centres d'Embauchage; in J t
Jacmel and at Croix des Bou-
quets, the dailies said Monday.t t
Under the agreement made Ja
nuary 5, 1952, measures are be-
ing taken to assure satisfaction
for both workers and employers.
850 laborers were selected at
Croix des Bouquets, before Ja- 1,
nuary 22, for work on the Oza- HA
ma "Factory Estates, and 3.000 ,t~w)
will be enlisted from stations in
Jacmel.
1000 workers for Angelina,- -.... --
Cristobal Colon, and Caei were
signed up this week in Jacmel.

NEW MACHINERY FOR NATIO
NAL TANNERY

New machines, worth in the
neighbourhood of 76.000 gour-
des, are being installed at the Na
tional Tannery. The factory has
been closed temporarily for the
installation, officials announced
this week. I i


AUX COSAQUES
Haiti's famous chomard flam-
me has been enthusiastically
acclaimed by visiting epicures,
and featured by Imperial LI-
nen.
But foreigners aren't the only
connoisseurs of food. Haitians
know where the meat is done
just right, where wines are of a
perfect vintage and flavour to
mellow their mood and form the
perfect foil for each delightful
course.
That's why special occasions
are observed at cAux Cosaques


AUX COSAQUES BAR

CLINIQUE DOCTOR
I. GOLDENBERG
PEDIATRICIAN
Child Sepecialist
Consultation, Ave. Christophe

Clinic Dr. SYLVAIN
Houts


8-11 a. m.
Clinic at etion-Ville
amirican -
except Tuesday und
4-6 p.m


Ave. Pan-

.Saturday


TOPS "EM AlL"


ci.ct4te .


S Distributor:
Joseph Nadal &


Co.


Special rates for long stays.
PHONE 7291
Situation 4 blocks East of St. Pierre's Church


DINNER DANCING

Tuesday & Friday Night
To the Ibo Lele Orchestra


&


I





'sUNDAY, JANUARY 30th


HAITI SUN1


trAE1


THE WORLD'S AT YOUR FEET!

WHEN YOU SIP A TROPICAL

rU
COCKTAIL ON THE TERRACE OFU

Cool DAMBALA
-T'HE HOTEL I.- THE HILLS.
2.000 ft high
PHONE 7887. 7237
-- __:= ......


ra


iFOR


A TREAT "\
INSTEAD OF A TREATmEE'
*Hir -- ^Miiiin 1


"Desk fatigue" comes quickly, efficiency aia" morale
drop noticeably when your employees are pennedd"
t old, outmoded desks.
SBe smart give them a real treat! Increase
office efficiency, and employee morale, enhance
office appearance h invest now in the new, im-
pr6ved Globe-Wernicke Streamliner Metal Desk.
The G/W Desk is designed to insure worker com-
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Whatever your' needs, we have a Stireamliner Deslk,
for you. Visit our showroom today and see the com-
plete line of high quality Globe-Wemrnicke office
equipment. No obligations!' ..
TRADING Co. S. A. Chamber of Commerce B& g.
-- -- -- ------------"


500 TONS SISAL EXPORTED
FROM OCTOBER TO JANUARY

SHADA exported 500 tons of
sisdl fibre to New York and An-
vers during the last three mon-
ths of 1954, it was revealed this
week.
"La Phalange, in reporting the
total commented that, in spite of
the price drop, production still
is high.
The newspaper also foretold
an up-curve in the future price
of the commodity, stating that
high grade fibre is expected to
rise from its present rate of 13
cents per lb. and the Grade X
fiber from $8:85 per hundred Ib.
SHASA and other sisal expor-
ters are reportedly highly opti-
mistic about the future of the
product, as the sisal mar-
ket is up 5 points.
100 tons will be exported to
Europe towards the end of Fe-
bruary, La Phalange> further
noted.

TOURISM COUNCIL DUE FOR
REORGANIZATION.
Reorganization of the Conseil
Technique du Tourisme was fea-
tured on the agenda of a 5:30
p.m. meeting in the Bureau .du
Tourisme Monday.
Chief of the problems confron
ting the council is the relation of
taxis, tour agents and hotels.
'Mr: Robert Baussan was na-
med Iresident of the council.


REV. FATHER JAMIER
SEN TO ASSIST BISHOP


CHO-


The. Rev. Father Jamier has
been chosen to fill the post of
Vicar General ,in Mgr. Le Bre-
ton's suite, Bishop Cousineau an
nounced recently.


't




T e '* I -
The turtle-shaped island of Tortnga off the North Coast of
Haiti was the headquarters of the ((Brotherhood -- the band of
pirates (mainly from France, England and Holland) who -allied
against Spain and me rc i I e s s y plundered all the
shipping of the-Spanish Main during the seventeenth centu- '
ry. It was on- the beach of La Tortue (Tortuga) that Hem'nr Mor- '.
gan; tia Welsh buccaneer who later became Governor of Jamai-
ca, first von recognition by defeating a French pirate noted for '
his swordsmanship. Fabulous treasure is believed to lie buried .S'
on the' small, backward island ot 14.000 neglected inhabitant. .*:"'
Portau-Prince 's Champs de Mars was named after a sq.a"i i ,z
in Paris where the massacre was perpetrated that led eventual-
ly to the French Revolution. On July 17 1791, a petition was "'
drawn up. to Louis XVI asking him to accept a limited 'nona zt,-.
chy. It was placed on a table of the Cordeliers Club for signala- .
res and the authorities feared disorder. The Mayor of Earls, 1
Bailly, called out the National Guard and a volley was Ared.to /
the crowd killing many innocent persons. ...
xxx
When the slaves rose in Haiti during the Napoleonic Wars, V
the revolt spread to the. other islands French, and English '
alike and there. was great danger of Britain losing her West
Indian possessions. Because of this Prime Minister of Britain WXI-
liam Pitt, the younger, lost 80.000 men fighting in Haiti, Jamaica and
other islands most of them from tropical diseases.
XXX :>*"
The little Spanish ucal'virni-
(crucifix) by the rbad at the 3
West edd of Petit Goave was
stolen at Carthagena by the buc- i-
caneers who pillaged the town
and afterwards came to Petit
Goave to spUt the booty.


'The new assistant to the Bis-
hop -of Cap Haitien has served
in Haiti for the past 31 years,
starting as vicar .o Plaisance in
October 1923.


iffl~tttt~tH Iffnull@utzi::nunnnn---------------it44tn44M#iti64.444.444.4664i.niii6iliIiaitTT~siTTnTTryTTT1un1lh"


WIIILCC4I MEli IAIIOrII

THE MEMBERS OF


Invite You In Your Own Interest To Visit


-P.AUL AUXILA

-AUX CHOSES D'HAITI

-CANAPE VERT

-CITADELLE SHOP

-Mrs. MONTREUIL
-MADAM.E CELESTIN

-FISHER
-FRESCO BAR
-JEAN FOSY LANAM


: Haiti's Oldest Perfume Store

SHaiti's Best Sisal Bug Factory

: Haiti's Newest Department Store

: Cap-Haitien Souvenirs

: Haitian Handicraft

: Haiti's Leading Embroidery Workshop

: Haiti's Largest Art & Curio Shop
: Bar and Grillroom Airconditioned

: Maitis Largest Jewerly Store


-FRITZ MEVS

-BOUTIOUE Dh REMAIN

-SANCHEZ TRAVEL'
SERVICE
-SOHADAC (KENOL
BROTH)
-STORE CLUB


-TABOU
-LOWIS TOUSSMANT
f


: Haiti's Largest: Mahogany
Factory -
: Paris Port-au-Prince
Haut4te Couture -

SCap-Haitian .ahogahy
Ceramics
: Haitian Handicraft
: Haiti's Only Air-Copaditipned..: v
Shop
: Flowers and 4fnPefes
SHaiti's L.gest Mahogany
Furnmitue Factbry


THESE STORES ARE IW&STRIBUTORS OR DIRECT IMPORTEBS OR MAbWA IMIWI S
WUECH AHERE TO A ONE PRICE POLiCY AND CARR SELECTED fEMS W ES MABED


'. I


.11




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11 P
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--------------
Ifts= r-M M OM : ---------------- P


PAGE. 11.
'PAGB 1i :


v





PAGE 12







,' ,


Le Grand Griswold:, formerly
proprietor of the famous Rue du
'.Qual American Bar, regretfully
': threw on a top-coat and woollens
/. and left for New York on a busi
n ess peut4tre -pleasure tripFri-
Sday.

Linda (Mrs. Dan) Allen threw
K* a party 6 to 8 p.m. Monday for
poet Roussan. Camille who left
-'. Wednesday for journalistic du-
ties in the Presidential suite du-
ring President Magloire's tour of
-the. p..'

S Dr. Israel Sylvain, member of
': the Port-au-Prince cEdilite and
, Captain Alfred Bemrnateau retur
ned to Ha~ti Monday after'atten-
ding a dental conference in Gua-
deloupe.

Here for three days last week
Swas British Ambassado.r
Bernard Garpette who passed th
'rough On his way from Miami o
Havana.

,. The Bishop of Glasgow, Scot-t
Island, Mgr. Richard Cuilly spent
- Sunday and Monday with the
Nonce Apostolique. .

Albert Silvera left eEl Raneho
this week for business in New-
York.

Carl Durocher clippered to Me
xico Wednesday to continue his
Study of the good .earthbi and
What sprouts therefrom. Carl
Srill learn the science of agrono-
:my at a Mexican military agri-
cultural school.


go ,


Mr and Mrs Daniel B.rui have
returned to Petion-Vfle.'after a
three ,nonth Grand'Tdur of Eu-
rope.

Max Wilson, one-time ace re-
porter and tourist publicist who
has retired to the shade of the
class room (as professor), feted
his 31 st birthday at the Casino
Sunday with a warm circle of
friends.

Dr. and Mrs Louis Roy recei-
ved Mr. Howard Ross and Red
Cross personal at a ecabritardi
at Kenscoff Sunday.

-Mr. and Mrs. Michael Marigo-
lis of Cleveland, Ohio, merin-
gued their way into a bottle of
champagne at 'EL RANCHO.
Monday night cfiestap. The Marl
golis confessed .that after one ins
truction from Lavinia Williams
they obtained such proficiency.
/
-Suzanne Aplpollon, looking Ve.
ry echicl in winter costume clip
pered to New York Tuesday.


Leohard Me Comb, onb of Li
fev Magazine's top photographers
is here at the Oloffson looking
the country over. Roger Costa ra
tes friend Leonard as one of the
World's best shutter snappers.


The photographer also beats
the distinction of being, one of
Haiti's first tourists originally
from the Isle of Man.


HAITI SUN


Dr. Herv4 Boyer Director of
the Economics Division of the
Foreign Relations Department
flew to Washington Monday on
a special mission.

Mr Albert Etheart, Haitian
Ambassador to Ciudad Trujillo,
was over for a day'last Monday.

Cuban Ambassador and Mrs
Francisco de. Arce returned to
Port last Friday.

Spanish Ambassador to Port-
au-Prince and Mrs Fernando
Canthal y Giron returned to Hal
ti last Thursday.

Haitian Consul in Caracas Mr.
Moris Bunimov spent four days
at Hotel El Rancho* this past
week arriving from Maiquetia
last Friday.

Miss Ym6ne Caillot became Mrs.
Samuel Dominique in a Holy Trini-
ty ceremony last Saturday.

Mr. and Mrs. Pierre D. Sam
received an addition to the fa-
mily this past, week a cgros
gargonD named Pierre Richard.
Mrs. Charlie Legget .is flying
to her home-town, Caracas for
a visit, bientot6

Patrick de Verteuil left Mon-
day for San Juan on, the first leg
of his trip around the West In-
dies as representative for ePfei
zert drugs

Mr. Vincente Domninguez, foun
der of the Haitiano-Cuban sugar
factory at Cayes flew over, last
weekend to check up on the
works and make alterations.
With him were three technicians
Messrs Reinato, Carlos Garcia,
Avelino Fernandez.

UN Permanent Representative
Raoul Aglion is back in Port af-'
ter a fortnight In New York.

, Mr. and Mrs Andre Thezan
greeted their second 12:15 p.m.
last Thursday a girl named
Myrtle. '


SUNDAY. JANUARY 36tI


Mr Leon Pearson, wearer of a
Haitian iHonneur et M6ritei ar-
rived in Port-au-Prince last wee-
kend for a brief sejour,.

Fouad Moura is receiving corn
pliments for the beautifully air-
conditioned, re-conditioned inte-
rior of his Grand'Rue store. It
spells clean, cool character. Car
rier Weathermnaker provides the
temperature.

Roland Dorcely and Andre Ro
osevelt have buried the hatchet.
Dorsely in his strong, mature sty
le, is working mornings 'at the
Ibo -Lele oh a long outside wall
mural inspired by peasants. It
provides a foil for the
more cosmopolitan murals of An
tonio Joseph,

MIt+. Charles B. Salisbury, one of
Hartford's best-known architects,
arrived in Port au Prince Sathrday
accompanied by his wife Edith.
The Connecticut couple are on a
3-week local tour that will take in
Jacmel, Cayes, Cap Haitien, and
other important provincial towns.
Their visit is inspired by the Cits-
del which they saw once before
whilc on a cruise-ship' that called
here in 1936.

The Conservatory of Music was
inaugurated Monday evening by
Minister of Education Leon Laleau,
who in his address stressed the im-
portance of art in culture.

Lina Andre, Contributions Chief!


0 G G I --- -
Fastest Freight and Passen-
gers service between New
-York Port au Prince and Cris-
tobal, and vice-versa, accept-
ing cargo both ways including
B-cargo to and from Europe via
New York and via Cristobal;
-- also from the West Coast or
Central/South Ameria, and
the Far East via Cristobal CZ.
Sailings fromin New York every Thursday; arrivals at Port
au Prince every Monday, except when a holiday falls on Thurs-
day in New York, sailing then will be on Friday, arrival Port
au Prince Tuesday.
Sailings from Port au Prince to New York every Monday.


FOR EXCLUSIVE MAHOGANY WARE

BUF.YDIRECTF:ROM THE FACTORY


S FRITZ MEVS


-HAITI'S MAHOGANY PIONEERS-

Former Bellevue Club, Sacr6-Cou-r
Phone 5448, P. 0. Box 1204


Our motto is: From the factory to your hands


ahS ai n1


a 2


Pie.


uLJ6

HiJ


in Cayesj and his family threw. a.
party last Sunday afternoon in ho-
nour of the son-and-heir's birthday:
Robert-now six played host to.
a froliscome group of young -a-
mis'.

Mr. and Mrs. Jn. Claude de Van-
dcrgies observed their third icdd-
ing anniversary on Wednesday.

John W. (American Embassy):
Black and family leave today, via
Panama Line, for the United Sta-
tes and Venice.

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Bornmo and'
Mrs. Irving Berlin spent last Sun-
day at Cap Haitien.

Bea Spaun (American Ernmbassy)
left on Tuesday for a 15-day vacat-
ion in the States.

Patricia O'Connor and Joan Kee-
nan are two charming new girls
on the, staff of the American Em-
bassy.

Claire Cameau %as off to New
York on Tuesday.

Lili Benis (Mrs. Roger) observed!
her birthday anniversary on Thurs-
day, chez Otto Madsen.

Sacha Th6baud ended his winter
holidays here and flew back to,
Miami University classes early this-'
month. '.He will be back in February
to resume supervision of construct-
ion on his Dad'd 'Tower of EBbels
Hotel on St. Gerard's Heights.


'tom e n
Perfu^^e^





sUNDAY, JANUARY 30thHATSUPGE1


Charles Adamms, one of New
York's:; top artists whose name is
a by-word in malevolent humour,
spent the week at the 'Oloffson.
accompanied by his beautiful la%%-
yer wife. Mr. Adammo, a *New
YoRker' favourite and cartoonist
Jor many leading U. S. publicat-
ions, immortalized the skiing strip
showing ski tracks passing one on
eidier side of a tree.
XXX
Vice-Presidehit Michael Lombard
of L Z. M. flew home to the States
Thursday after two weeks here.

Chicago Contractor and Mrs.
John Costello spent their first
Hait vacation at El Rancho:,.
They give Mike Lombard credit
for lu-jacking them from a'Ha-
vyam vacation.


XXX
Mrs. Sidney (Fahrimi)
is flying home to New
Tuesday with son Joel
XXX


Marks
York


Miss Yolande Chenet, daugh-
ter of 4Sun Life* representative
and Mrs. Rony Chetret, leaves
this morning for a tour of New-
York, Montreal and France.

Mrs. Olga Larrieux and son
Lionel Estinme clipper to San Ju-
an'this morning en route to
New York where Lionel will ta-
ke up his studies where he left
off 4n Paris this Fall. Architec-
ture is his calling. Big sister Ray
maonde will join Mom in Havana
soon.
xxx
'.XXX
Songsmitl: Irving Berlia and
his wife clipper home to New
York tomorrow after a long, hap
py vacation at cE1 Ranchos.
XXX
PAA Manager David Gossett
welcomed .Mrs. Gossett, family
and furniture (including the
Grand piano and son David Jr.)
from Miami Thursday. The Gos-
settLs have moved into the Du-
mont Bellande house out at Di-
kini.
XXX
The Georges N. Legers, Senior
observed their 38th anniversary
of wedded bliss on Tuesday, Ja-
nuary 25th. The <.Maitrek is the
head of one of Haiti's leading
law firms, and is also HASCO's
V.P. Wife, Germaine presides
gracefully over their beautiful
Peton-Ville Chateau, and the
weekly family reunion of their
ten grandchildren, contributed
to the distinguished family clan
by the small fry of daughter, Mrs
Louis Roy (flickie), and two law
persons, George; Jr. and Jean-
Claude.



l \


Historian Dantes Bellegarde
will be New York-bound tomor-
row.
XXX,
Among our one-day visitors
from the S/S 4Queen of Berfnu-
da was Mr. C. W. Welch, Aspis
taut Business Manager of the
Washington, D. C. newspapers,
MThe Evening Star,, and tThe
Sunday Star.' The newsman vi-
sited Haiti Sun offices and the
modern, well-organized ate-
liers,- of cLe NationaL,
XXX
Charles and Bernice Gottlib
flew to Miami via Kingston Fri-
day.
XXX
Export-Import Bank officials
Franck Kimball, Leonard Koser
and John Carl Schuler returned
to the U.S. Wednesday after a
fortnight in Haiti conferring
with ODVA heads.
xXX
Georges and Berthe Moutog
arrived from Kingston on the
27 th.
XXX
Rodolplie Baboun returned
Thursday from Rochester,. Rho-
de Island, an engaged man. Wed
ding bells ring (,bientot he pro-
mises.
XXX
Sportsman Contractor Jo-
celynne Me Calla flew into 10
degree (F) weather in New York
yesterday.

Among Oloffson celebrities
this week: David Seymour, big-na
me photographer with Magnum
Studios. and Henry Margolis,
proprietor of the fashionable NY
restaurant '.
xx;
Mr. Valerio Canez flies Febru-
ary 1 st. to Caracas to participa-
te in the current General Elec-
tric Convention of the Latin Ame
rican and Caribbean areas.
XXX
Mr John Kortals Altes, direc-
tor of the ,Klaver Holland Bre-
wery> of Amersfoort Holland
(brewers of ,MiUl beer) flew in
yesterday via New York for th-
ree days visiting with local
Agent Andre Khawly.
XXX
Among the visitors to 'Haiti
Sun on Thursday morning was
Miss Nerhva Oliver who has
just returned from an extended
sojourn in the United States.
The charming Jacmelian who
had travelled to care for an inva
lid relative residing in New York
was happy to return for a visit
with her family here. She stated
1i she finds a suitable job here,
she would like to remain, as she
often had from her beloved Haiti.
XXX


S Celesltno Fernandez Suar
\1 \ presenting Dr. Leeder, own
4; /.1/ the DessaliMes Sugar Facto
Sin Cayes, arrived Friday from I
v..ni on his second visit. He
^ r,'.aiting the arrival of Dr Let









S REG.TRADE MARK T'amous si


ez,
er
ry
H-a
is
ee-


der (due this week) to open the
factory.
The Rev. Father Hubert Pa-
pailler who has ministered to The
commu(Bity of Cartier for the
past six years returned to the
country last week on receipt of
news that his mother was grave-
ly ill. The Haitian-born priest
who won great esteem for his
work in the Canadian clergy, arri-
ved a day after the death of his
mother. He returned to his cure
after spending a few with his fami
ly here.

Leaving via plane last Sunday,
after 10 days vacation in Port,
were Richard H. Blanding and


HURRICANE HARRY AND BILL I
with their wives.
At left, Captain Bill McKeown
who made the momentous sur
ablishing the first contact with
village Berly, flying in food am
Pastor Tuhnbull and his wife. Th
tops. His wife, second from left
Ciudad Trujillo with her young fa
Geodette Survey Chief has accom

Ralph J. Hartman who were stopI
ping at Hotel Sans-Souci. Mr.
Blanding, the head of a large.
drug store in Providence, Rhode
Island, speaks French' fluently,
and has read the numerous bo-
oks on Haiti from the pens of
Pierre and Philippe Thoby Mar-
celin. Mr. Hartman is a well-
known Landscape Architect.
xxx
Elias Noustas clippered to
New York on business Thursday.
XXX
Marshall Barer, Tin Pan Alley
lyricist, a+d TV actor-crooner
Kenneth Nelson are presently
staying at the Oloffson. They
came to Haiti on the recommen-
datiojn of Noel Coward, British
playwright, call this a reconnais-
.ance trip.


Carl Bondel, Jr. was christe-
ned in the Sacre Coeur Church,
Sunday. His marraimke and" par
rain* were Denys Bellande and
Jacqueline' Labroussiere.
XXX
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Freulad.
(He is Vice-President of the Ohe
mical Bank in New York), Mr. and
Mh-Ir. Henry Prauc at the head of
one of New York's largest. CPA
firms) were here in the New.
Amsterdam.. T h e y spent tile
day visiting thle sights with pu-
blisher Henri Desehamps.
XXX
Franck Bailcy celebrated his
birthday anniversary onJa nuary
2t-ith and what's more, he ad-
mits to being all of 20 years old.
XXX
Rony Chenet flew to Ciudad
Trujillo, Thursday, .a ila recher
die" of his mother-in-laws (M,.
Burton. Williams) auto left in cust-







ce 46

ce 486


oms there on her recent return
from Europe via Ciudad Trujillo.

Marine Liutenant Ajbert Nel-
son arrived on a special mission
Tuesday. He was accompanied
by his wife and two children.
xxX
Max Pinchinat's paintings, ex-
hibited in absentia at the Palais
des Beaux Arts, drew a large nu-
mber of viewers and an equal
number of comments. Opening
night guests last Thursday packed
the large hail and duly. admired
:.he fifty four highly advanced
works that covered the walls. A-
minong the g.llery-goers was the
artist's father Leo Pinchinat, glow-


val. The author of 4Voice of the
Turtle cand& I'm a Camera. de
cleared Haiti and the Hebredies
have a particular quality he has
found nowhere else He hopes
to be able to swing the -pendu-
lum between the two.

Authoress Nouches Degener
is over from the States collec-
ting legends for publication iu
a forthcoming book. Headqnar-
tered at *Star: Pension she also
is collecting folk music.
Contributions Director and Mrs
Georges Eugene Roy had New
York artist Cecile Gray and ac-
Lress Gloria Mossolino to lunch
Thursday. Mr. and Mrs Roy met
the young ladies while travelling
in France last year.


XXX
The Charge d'Affaires
of the Federal German
Republic and Mrs.- Fritz
Wtussow were hosts Wedneday
at a sumptuous dinner aboard
the SS oBerling of the North Ger
man Lloyd Lines which called in
Port-au-Prince 6n a tourist crul
se out of New York.
xxx
The. Cap Haitian branch of
Paule Duncan's beauty saion
headquarters Chemin des Dalles)
has'beeb kept -busy by the beau-
ity-conscitous ladies of the North.
Jamaica specialist Gloria Bur-
jnett, and two local lily-gilders
Yolande Derougemond and
Arlette Joseph have been han-
taking time out for a social evening ding out icoiffuresr, maiecures,
pedicures a nd facials by the un
L Geodi:err Bell helicopter pilot dred since the December 19
rvey during Hurricane Hazel est- grand opening*, of the Rue 17
SMapou and avalanche mountain salon. f..
d medical supplies, and flying out Among opening day customersk
e air ace can land his craft on tree were President Magloire' sisters.
is presently making her home in Proceedings were enlivened by
niily. Capt. Harry Burchett popular a fashion show by Edith -nd Mo
%panied Bill on most mercy flights. nique Chauyet (against a back-
ground of Army Band music) and
ing with justifiable pride. Laymen generous champagne libations.
in the artworld commented that aXXX l
they prefered the 1949-50 works to Dr. Gerard Philippe 'Charlier,-
the more extreme production of sqn of former deputy Philippe,
his study in Paris. CharLier who now manages eRexa
XXX Theater, recently commenced
his internship at a Paris Hospi-
Miss Lucette Massillon Lafon- taL Dr Charlier, who already
trUjnt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. has spent eight years as a medi-
Andre Massillon Lafontant, ex-. cal student in Paris recently pla
changed wedding vows with At- red among 200 ,pupils, from so-
torney Jean Jacques Ambroise me 3000 entrants, in the written
in Jacmel Parish Church Wed- examination for admission to the
nesday morning. hospital.
Sn I


Mrs. Lily Moody, wife of the
road-builder and shipping ma-
miate Clarence B. Moody, after
concalescing in Port from a gra
ve illness, flew home to the U.S.
this past week Mrs. Moody pro-
mises to return for Mardi Gras
festivities.
xxx
Major General Trudeau of the
U.S. Army was guest of honour
at two fashionable receptions
during his brief sojourn here. A
'.Simbie luncheon party was of
fered by Haitian Army Chief of
State General Antoine Levelt
Tuesday noon, followed by a
cocktail party given at the Ame-
rican Ambassador's residence
Tuctd.,' evening by US Military
Attache Colotiel Vincent 1M. El-
Imore.
XXX
Rollo Peters. veteran -stage ac
tor, 'as guest of' honour at a sui
rise nartv at the Art Center
Thursday before his return to
Monterey California. Rollo. who
is the brother of Art Center Fo-
i4nder-Director De witt Peters.
was given a coveted -Gourgue,- I
by the artists.
XXX
Airline circles are buzzing
w.vith news of the engagement of
Miss Delia Wiener, PAA's Clip-
.r Cargo bellele, to Charles
utuy of Delta C & S.
XXX
John Van Druten. the famous
nglish-born playwright (now a
S. citizen), re-visited Haiti
last week after a 7 year inter-


A.




















7~4I


HAITI SUN


PAGE 13






pjr~F14HATISN UNAY ANARllt


FATHER

RETURN
Pupils of Lesson
ol, made homeless
cane Hazel swept thi
left their temporary
Cit6 Magloire II in I
ce and returned thi
the hills near Dame
re sturdy, metal-roof
ries and class rooms
thatched buildings d
the cyclone.
Work has been ri
fresh impetus is to b
school when SONA
farm machinery is sh
later this month jay
barge to Jeremie ar
to Lesson, seven miles
Marie.
Jacques Durocher
SONACO engineer w
ny the plough, track
deep-well pump and
mjng equipment and
the school for a fey
instruct 'teachers in
Father Raoul Lafi
master of the school,
the machinery with G
granted funds.
FOR UNDERPRIV
CHILDREN

The big-hearted Hai
founded the farm scll(
ar shortly after his nr
Oki, Quebec Provinc
where he took a course
ced agronomy. Former
of La Gonave, he aff
opportunity of self-imr
to the unierprivilegec
of that desolate, forgo
and of the coasted sett
ong the mainland.
THE STOR2V

Assisted by a sever
tors and a Governinme
the aimiable but comp


LAFEVRE'S ORPHANS m i
TO REBUILT SCHOOL -____
Farm Scho- lar priest built up his little scho-s a R
when Hurri- ol into an institution of seventy
e Southwest, pupils all boarders. Orphans ...
quarters at and children from wretchedly ..
Port-au-Prin- poor families found at Lesson a S ...
is month to home, Christian instructionuAnd a 'V SO NAAC0
Marie whe- profitable way of making a It- c D .OHMipC
fed dormito- ving.
replace the when Hazel's fury sent the ..... .
Destroyed by eight frail buildings crashing on
to the sleeping occupants, many
estmed and of the priest's little boys and
be given the girls were injured. Five girls .
CO-supplied were killed.
whipped down The two most seriously inju.
Coast Guard red children both girls we- U
id over-land re carried over the hills to Dame
from Dame Marie and from there helicopte-
red to Jeremie where they em-
a top-flight barked on a plane for Port-au-
'ill accompa Prince. It was feared one of the The Shappard Diesel Tractor and accessories at Sonaco head quar.
tor, wagon, 12-year-old children would lose ters awaiting shipment to LESSON.
other far- her left leg, and the hard-tal- TRACK,
remain at king, husky Marines whom she TENNIS, .LIFTING TEAM
w weeks to had won over by her courage and(- (Continued from page 1)


their use.
Mvre, Head-
Spurchased
overnment-

TILEGED
q I

itian priest
ool last ye-
eturn from
ce Canada,
;e in advan
early curate
Forded an
provement
I children
tten island
elements i3-



ral instruc-
nt subsidy,
etent secu-


charm accompanied her to Jere-
mie with heavy hearts. But after
a fortnight in the Port-au-Prince
General Hospital, .she was wal-
king around and showing off her
first pair of shoes a gift from
in admirer met during her jour-
ney.
The other students were eva-
cuated to Jeremie by sailors
from the H.M.S. Vidal who
trekked over, the mountains to
yisit the school. From Jeremie,
they were flown to Port-au.Prih
ce and temporarily lodged at
Cite Magloire II.

THE LEGEND.
The tall, 'broad-shouldered
priest (in early middle-age) has
become a legendary figure in the
Southwest, and people turn to
him for assistance whenever
they find the going difficult.
They are never disappointed.


Only one representative will The committee's choice will be
be chosen for tertnis, the <,Sun* influenced not only by the per-
was told Thursday. The commit- formances of competitors, com-
tee already has decided to name mitteemeh said, but also by the
Jean-Claude Armand, current future benefit the athletes cho-
champion of Port-au-Prince. sen may derive from participa-
Mr. Mc Intosh also picked, as tion in the Olympics.
near-certainties* for the Hai-
tian team, 16-year-old Gerald Explaining the conspicuous
Brisson, holder of the local Open omission of Football from the
high-jump record with 1:875 sports entered, the Secretary
metres; Georges Seres, who won General William Me Inlosh re-
high praise from Harrisson Dil- called the ,humfliating showing
lard when he ran against him in in the Caribbean Trophy compe
an exhibition race at the recent titions in Guadeloupe some ye-
I n'te'r-Secson daiy Schools ars ago, the equally spiritless
meet and Weightlifter performance in the 1950 Central
Charlot wh-o placed je- American and Caribbean Games
cond in his class in the 1950 Ga and the surprise defeat in last
mes in Buenos Aires earning spe year's World Cup tourney at the
cial recommendation from world- hands of the 'U.S.A.
famed bod9-builder (Work) Bob -We already know our stan-
Hoffman for his uncoached per- ding in football, and it is time to
formance. see what we can do in. other


fields* he concluded.
Clovis Bonhomme. president
of the Track and Field AssociaW
rion, Lieut. George Elie, presi.
dent of the St. Louis Old Boys
Association and St. Louis Bro.
others Eudes and Michel werecon
suited by the Olympic Commi.
ttee in the meeting on the 24 tb
and declared our Athletes ready
for competition in Mexico.
The President of the Lawn Ten.
nis Association, William Ludieke,'
and Weightlifters Club Presi.
dent AXdre Enos also decided for
participation when consulted by
the Committee.
Though Volley Ball A-s-ocia-
tion officials also were prepared'
to offer a team. the funds at the-
disposal of the committee are
too limited to allow the entry
of a team.
The able and efficient Commit
tee charged with selection of re.
presentative teams by His. Excel
lency President Magloire. con-
sists of:
President: Minister Roiand
Lataillade (Under Secretary of
State for the Interior)
Vice President: Lieut. Alix
Pasquet( President o the FIF).
Secretary General: Mr. Wil-
liam Mc Intosh IV.Pres. of FFHF)
Treasurer: Mr Charles Feqnie
re (Chamber of Commerce Pres.)
Members: Messrs. Andre Lano,
cent, Clovis Bonhomme, Felix
Baker, Gerard Allen, Rony Che-
net.
Twenty five countries so far
ha{'e confirmed entry in the Ga-
mes. They are:
Dutch West Indies, Argentina,
Bolivia, Brasil, Canada, Colom-
bia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Chile,
Ecuador, El Salvador, United
States, Guatemala, Haiti Hondu-
ras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua,
Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto,
Rico, Dominican Republic, Tri-
nidad, Uruguay, Venezuela.


<^d t


u4Vo' ehezAksa fuw,


-4 q,1 ectruta nsfr

--fimt uvqxf la, trxM~tzCw~e/


THE WATCH THE WORLD HAS LEARNED TO TRUST


.&dd&4z4w&


SUNDAY, JANUARY 30th


HAITI SUN


.PAGE 4d






/ ... --- rAGE 15
SUDA, ANAR_30h AI U


* r

F-54-
1** I:


Thie agreement for founding of a branch of the Bogota Co.operative
Bank is signed Thursday at the Finmance Department by Mr. Cl1ment
Juanelle, Minister of National Economy, and the representative of
the Colombian Bank, Mr. Ignacio de G.:miran Nogiuera.


'See


Let the Insurance Company do the worrying.
Immediately: cNORWICH UNION Insurance
Joseuh NADAL and Co. Agents. Tel: 3486


SWIMMING POOLS NEED NOT
WASTE WATER: SPECIALIST
TELLS WHY.

Swimming pools need not be-
a drain on Port-au-Prince's wa-
ter supply, yet they may be kept
constantly fresh and sanitary, ac
cording .to John. M. Kurtz of
iSuperior Swimming Pool, Incs.
2618 N.W. 103 rd. Street, Miami
47 Fla., who called at Port-au-
Prince this week in the course of
a tour through the Caribbean.

Mr. Kurtz explained that a fil
ter device he developed 6 yeai"s
ago, after 9 years experimenta-
tion and research, constantly cir
culates and cleans every drop
of water in the pools. Water ne-
ed only be changed once each
year, he said. The Swimming-popi l
company President added that he
distributed also a special vac-
cum-cleaner and flocr-brush
that keep the floor of the pool
free of fungi.

In a statement -to the cSun',a
Wednesday, IMr Kurtz stated:
t :cWVe feel that properly sanitized,
filtered swimming pools assure
bathers protection, save water
and cut operational costs.
His filtering unit is cleaned
once weekly by turning a few
valves, Mr. Kurtz continued.

Accompanied by his wife (and
businesspartner for 24 years)
Colombian-born Alicia, Mr. Kurtz
came here from Jamaica Tues-
day and spent two days at the
Riviera Hotel before going on to
Ciudad Trujillo.


HARD-HUNTING TRAFFIC
BALKED BY COWARDLY
Veteran Traffic Chief and De- paign against the
puty Commissioner of Police Lac Sumatre (it
for Detroit, Jim Hoye, spent a Word is going ro
restful 4-day stay' at the Rivie- two invaders had t
ra Hotel last weekend, acompa- ecaiman at gun-p
nied by his wife and Mr. and on the point of bla
Mrs. Charlie Cherry showed his cowar
'Hoye, strictly an out-door ty. retreating across t
pe, delegated Industrialist-phi- Seeking Sanctuary
lanthropist Cherry to the less- nican Republic.
dangerous task of wiping out the Cherry, Hoye &
duck-life on eDe l'eau Gaille a legedly stated the
Hazelswollen lake thirty-minu- tully' wounded an
tes North of the capital. The to die before their
hard-boiled Detroit tcops pro- scene.
mised to take care of the crocs, Highly trusted g
personally at a future date. en posted to repo
To the surprise and delight of gress of the crc
dinner guests, the fabulous Cher wounds and mater
ry bagged a choise assortment prepared for a
of the duck family and served a job the minute hc
repast greatly enjoyed by Mr. Before departui
Hoye and others. Hoyes and Cherr
that in the winter
Quack-shot Mr. Cherry, noted troit is having, a
in Haiti for his sobriety, later gator skin duck-feE
accompanied Mr Hoye on a *cam would be especially:


CHIEF
CROC
Crocodiles of
is reported).
und that the
he chief of the
point and were
sting when be
dly nature by
he border and
, in the Domi
Associates al-
croc was mor
d is expected
x return to the

;uards have be.
ort on the pro-
ocodile chief's
rials are being
luick tanning
e expires.
re Monday the
ies explained
y weather De-
giant-size alli-
ither lined coat
y welcome.


IN 19


IT'S


FORD


5.5


* The Greatest Gasoline
velopment in 32 Years.


De-


Millions of motorists all over the world have
taken up the challenge that two tankfuls of
Shell Gasoline with IC.A. abolish PRE-IGNI-
TION and MISFIRING. Those Same motorists
have found, once again, that pleasure which
they have not experienced since their engines
were newly run-in and gave eager response
to the throttle. Shell with I.C.A. brings back
"New-engine" Perfomnance and Smooth Run-
ning.

* Two tankfuls will convince
you .
Wait until your tank is almost empty before
you first fill up on Shell with I.C.A. After
your second tankful you will be pleasantly
amazed by the increase of power ani better
performance. Remember, improved perform-
ance can mean more miles pei gallon. Re-
vnrber, too, that I.C.A. is exclusive to SHELL!-


PRE-IGNITION Comftustion cl.jm'j.-r
deposits from gasoline without L.CA t:.-i
become red hot and fire the iuelair n. <-
lure in the combh.stian chamber before I-
pi:ton is ready for the power stroi,- .it
hand diagram). That is PRE-ICNITIO:. it
can damage your engine, andl i .11 ..,,%
causes rough running and po.:;r lo" : .
K i.h I C.A. "firepr,:ofs'" t'ie rlcp's;1-- .
aun-l d agram1: itit i; %v OLP gel S i
runni-.7, n'- irT.ro ed rcrfor:n.in:u uv
using Shell with 1 C A.


First and Finest
SHELL With I.C.A.
gives you In
"New-engine" Smoothness
_ and Best Performance
4 lo I..S ".. -0 ; : '.. .. :': ..


6 yam or research and development

, 72000.000 miles of road testing

V Spectacular success in more than 40 countries


Ii
I
01


-I


m g-.-.VA.


'SUNDAY, JANUARY 30lh


HAM SU1N4


IMAAM" .-





PAGE 16 HAITI SUNSUNDAY, JANUARY 31
PAGE 16 HAITI SUN SUDY 'AU ARY 3tr


Text of President Magloire's Speech
(Continued from page 2)


which have been made possible by
loans from the Export-Import Bank
and which will reclaim thousands
and thousands of hectares of land
and raise the standard of living of
the whole population of those re-
gions, represent for us the most
efficient weapon fdr fighting com-
munism. To be sure, we have ta-
ken legal measures to prevent not
merely the extension but the very
manifestation among us of this per-
nicious doctrine. We believe, how-
. ever, that only the establishment
in Haiti of decent conditions of life
for oup masses will make them
immune to these theories. Since I
took office as President, we have
undertaken an extensive program
for the liberation of the Haitians;
we have, with oar limited means,
constructed schools, clinics, and
worker's housing projects. Althou-
gh the recent' hurricane which


HO'

For 1

An




IN THE

HEART OF

EXPOSITION

i...AREA

OPPOSITE





CASINO
INTFE



ChoI e of BO

at Choice of BO


'struck our country has forced us to
limit our efforts considerably, we
are determined to continue the
t:zk,, trusting in the great solidar-
ity which the United States demon-
strated on that occasion. We are
assured of being able to do so for
the competent agencies of your
country have already favorably re-
ceived the steps we have taken to
the end that satisfactory solutions
might be found for all our vital
problems. We are also confident of
the members of this Congress whi-
ch has always shown much inter-
est in the cause of my country. I
hope my presence among you in
this memorable session will stren-
gthen the spirit of goodwill which
has existed here for so long.
Aid After Storm Noted.
,The numerous expressions of
sympathy which have been gzven
us tAtify to your desire to conti-


TEL BEAU RIVAGE |

'he Best Food in Town

d Unrivalled Service I


AIR-CONDIW


MARBLE TILEI

FAVOURITE 01O


PLANS


nue this good neighbor policy
through which the American na-
tions, more and more united, will'
cons'itutepa living example of the
possibility, of the establishment
throughout the world of that peace
which the United States has been
seeking for decades.
During the past fete months tic
have seen many eviderWes of your
concern for Haiti's welfare. The
dramatic arrival of the aircraft
carrier Saipan on the day after a
disastrous hurricane struck, our
southern coast was instrumental in
relieving the suffering of hundreds
of our people. Subsequent aid in
the form of food and medical sup
plies from the American Govern-
ment. front the Red Cross and
other public and private agencies
will long be remembered. It will
soon be my pleasure, as a token
of Haiti's appreciation, to decorate
members of the United States arin-
ed forces and tha aircraft carrier
Saipan in recognition of their ser-
vices.'
In thanking you, Mr. President,
Mr. Speaker, members of the Sen-
ate and House of Representatives,
for your special attention, we beg
you to accept with all the gratitude
of the people and the Government
of Haiti, our sincere wishes for the
ever-increasing greatness of the
United States and the triumnph.oF
the ideals for which so nlany of
her sons have died.
PAR AMOUNT
Today 3:00 pm. LES AVENTU-
RES DU CAPITAINE MARVEL
5& 7 & 9 p.m. DAVID ET BETH
SABEE
Monday 6 &8-15 p.m SERENA-
TA EN ACAPULCO
Tuesday 6 & 8:15 pmn. DAVID
ET BETHSABEE
Wednesday 6 & 8:15 pm. DA
VI-'D ET BETH-ISABJEE
I Thursday 6 & 8:15 pmn. SERE
NATO EN ACAPULCO
Friday 6 & 8:15 p.mn, DAVID
ET BETHSABEE
Saturday 5, 7, 9:00 p.m. LES
VENTURES DU CAPIrAINE
MARVEL and another fim
Sunday 3:00 p.m. LES AVEN-
TURES DU CAPITAINE MAR-
VEL
5, 7, 9 pm GUERILLAS.


1 ((The Best Quality Cement at
the Lowest possible costa

FALLEN &BAUSSAN
OFFER THEIR


IlI




In Bags of 42 1/2 Portland
Cement Standard Hydraulick
gs Net 6 Ply
E Distributors: SONACO
Office: MTTC Bldg. Exposition
,1. Port-au-Prince Tel: 2387


THE PRESIDENTIAL SUITE:

The President's suite is comnipo-
ed of: The Foreign Minister and
Mrs. Mauclair Z-phirin, Minister
Marcel Fombrun. Chief of the Ar-
my, Gen. Antoine Levelt; MaM:.
F.Uncvs Eliene: Chief of ProGcol
ja)3neJ Thcr:-.: Mr. A.i-ne Maglui-
re; Licut. Charles Turnier, Aide de
Camp to the President.
The part\ was joined at \\'ash-
ingtun by Ambassador Jacques Le-
ger and Lieut. Col. TimothM Paret;
and the following members flew
to Washina:on after the President
left: Capt. Gui;l:umnie Pean, Lieut.
Henri Pc'rpignand; Lieut. Maurice
Prophlite: M. Denys Bellande, Di-
rector of SIPP: Dr. Antenor Mint:
RoLisan Camille, representing the
National. ; 2 Stenographers. MCL"'
Jeanne Etienne et Mine Marcelle
Civil Arnoux;


Cripple Held As
Thief Impressive
RECORD
A lame boy, booked Tuesday
on a charge of stealing a trowel
from his employer, was identi-
field as a housebreaker hunted
by police for nearly two weeks.
The lad, Demosthe Dival, is
accused of stealing January 14
2 pairs of shoes and 3 Arrow
shirts, worth approximately $7
each, from Dr Jacques Lecorps,
with whom he was employed.
Duval had beeni working less
than a rnonth when he disap-
peared, said the doctor, along
with the shirts and shoes. The
lame boy then apparently sought
employment, with a mason, Dor
Joseph, who accused him of theft
shortly afterwaYrds.
Picked up at St Gerard, Duval
was taken to the Bureau de Po-
lice for questioning. Though
hampered in his movements by
uneven legs, the boy -proved to
have amassed 4 convictions for
larceny and housebreaking. In
each case his flight was success-
ful and he was not captured for
some time.
STROLLING ROBBER CAUGHT
A Jacmel-born thief wanted
in Petit Riviere was arrested for
attempted theft of a trunk at the
bus station in Port-au-Prince
this week.
Louis Jules, who, police say,
is in the habit of prowling from
town to town and living by theft
is sought by Petite RiviBre de
A'Artibonite police for larceny.
He is allegedly a habitual pre
dator'of the bus station.


TYPICAL SASS)NE STYLE
is shown by the gay floral Sat-
ine dress modeled above.
SASSINPE wilLtailor by order,
or supply Paris-made &reations
SEE THEM NOW!
at Vve Magny Petit-Four.


S,


NATIONAL
low Featuring A Sensational
Series of Tea-Dances by
The BEAU-RIVAGE POOL

The Only Hotel Offering a
)TH EUROPEAN and AMERICAN


Luncheon Dinner Dancing Dai

Special Dinner Dance

Monday, Wednesday, Friday


Evenings

Shows by


NATIONAL FOLKLORE TROUI
DANCING NIGHTLY FRIDAYS 9:30 P.I


... ...............~l~l~l~
.................
-S I

FAMOUS THROUGHOUT S H 0 E S


THE WORLD .- 0 FOR EVERY OCCASION

t~~~~~moiplol mmrnpjnmu mm umm mr wrnmmunmmfl


LA ROUTE DU SUBD
Owing to a last-minaute
alIeration Loupa's colvmnn
La Route do Sud ..has
been held over till ]ts.-
week.


Stta if ------------- ---------::a--------aa ui~it


,7I- -- -


I.


. I /o


I


r*. ..r-




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