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Haiti sun

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Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00324


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Full Text



I


SCOTCH WHISKY


STHE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGU,


VOL. V


7U. S. Caj


welcome f(
WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 21-
Extensivp preparations are under-
way for the three-day state visit
of the President of Haiti and Mine.
Paul Magloire to the U. S. Capital
Wednesday.
Military honours will' be present-
ed to President Magloire and the
Haitian First Lady on their arrival
at the military airport of Washing-
ton in the special Air Force plane
designated to'transport them from
MiamL Richard M. Nixon, vice Irre
sident of the United States, Secre-
tary of State Jon Foester Dulles,
and Under Secretary of State for
Inter-Amercan Relatioens, Henry F.
Holland, will be included on a re-
ception committee. A twenty-one
gun salute will greet the Presid-
entCs landing from the aircraft, and
the National Anthems of Haiti and
the United .,States will be played
by the Band 'of the American Ar-
mray, following which the President
will inspect a parade of the Ame-
rican Armed Forces.


Port au Prince Republique d'Haiti


Sunday, January


)ital prepares gala


or President Magloire
A press conference is planned The President and Mme. Magloi-
at the airport before the departure re, on their first state visit to the
of the President and Mine. Magloi- United States in his four years as
re in an impressive procession head of the Haitian state, will be
winding through the flag-decked welcomed at the White House by
main streets of the capital to the President and Mrs. Eisenhower.
District of Columbia building and They will remain at the White
the White House. House until Thursday when they
A delegation of prominent burg- will remove to the Historic Blair
hers will present the symbolic key House, official residence in Was-
of the city' to President Magloire. hington of visiting dignitaries.
, From the Lincoln Memorial to President and Mine. Magloire
the White House a military escort will be guests of the President and
will accompany the processiOn. Mi- First Lady of the United States at
litary and students' bands will be a banquet Wednesday night.
placed at various points along the Among the guests will be Se-
route, and the orchestra of Naval cretary of State Dulles and Under-
Gamners will be stationed at the secretary of State Holland.
entrance to the White House.


'The procession is routed along
Constitution Avenue, one of the
widest and most beautiful roads of
the capital, which passes by the
Capitol and the Colombia building;
then along Pennsylvania Avenue to
the White House. A ,Flying SquadD
of motorcycles will clear the way.


HOUSE BREAKER FOILED IN
RADIO THEFT BY HALL


Louis D. Hall, proprietor of
Librairie HaIl, reached his ho
me in Turgean, after work Wed-
nesday afternoon, in time to me
et head-on a strange .man ma-
king a hurried exit with the hou
se-hold Telefunken radio tucked
under his arm.
Recovering! from momentary
surprise, Mr. Hall grappled with
the interloper, attracting police-
men with his shouts.
Taken tol the Bureau de Poli-
ce, the stranger was identified
as Lucien Phanor, alias Rodol-
phe Lucien, noted for mambo
dancing, procuring and an im-
pressive list of convictions.
The tri-lingual (Creole, En-
glish, Spanish), slender youngs-
ter was on the verge of tears as
he answered charges of larceny
brought against him by Recher-
ches Criminellev.Detectives, and
heard his dossier read.
The most recent mile-post in
the 21-year-old Port-au-Princien's
career is his conviction and 2-
month sentence in Nassau, Au-
gust 1952, for lifting an Ameri-
can girl's purse. The girl, Miss
Frances Jarvis stated at the time
she had over $24:00 in her purse.
Before leaving to spend a ye-
ar in the Bahamas, Phanor had
twice faced the court in Haiti

COMMUNAL COUNSEL
SWORN IN

Mayor Nelaton Camille and
Couzncillors Andre Rousseau and
Joseph Volcy, returned as Con-
sell Communal: of Port-au-Prin-
ce by the elections of January 9,
were sworn in for their new term
of office Thursday at the City
Hall.


for housebreaking, 1946 and 1950.
and in 1951 he served a sentence
for the theft of a revolver from
Titus Janet.
Even as a boy of twelve, whi-
le at the Reform School (Centre
de Reeducation) Phanor was
booked for stealing books belon-
ging to the institution and sel-
ling them to outside contacts.
Phanor listed his occupation
asmechanicien%.

PUBLISHER OF,
(Chicago Defender))
Here to do Articles

John H. Sengstacke, Publisher
of the (.Chicago Defendern>, a
large-circulation weekly that
will celebrate, in May its 50th an-
niversary of nation-wide service
in the United States. will end
Tuesday a week-long visit to Hai-
ti, gathering material for a se-
ries of articles.
Mr. Sengstacke, in an inter-
view with the Haiti Sun, Friday
morning, stated that his newspa-
per has for a long time been in-
terested in the people of Haiti,
following with interest the evo-
lution through which the coun-
try is now passing. Through the
columns of the Chicago Defender,
the distinguished nephew of the
late Robert S. Abbott, the foun-
der of the publication sponsored
a contest for three years offe-
ring prize trips to Haiti.
iMrs. Sengstacke accompanied
the 1951 winner and was so im-
pressed with the Republic that
she has been urging her husband
ever 'ince to make a trip here.

(Continued on page 16)


Six Injured
in Jeep Plunge

All six occupants of an Agricul
tural Department jeep were in
jured in an accident at Boulaille-
Voleur, between Baptiste and
Belladere, last Thursday.
District Agronomist Max Ber
nier, local Department Secreta-
ry Ducla Perard, Belladere Pri-
mary Boy's School Teacher Ge-
rard Celestin, Agricultural Agent
Eugene Ambroise, and two labou
'rers Premiss Baucicot and A-
talis Nicolas were travelling
from Baptiste to Belladere when,
on a steep hill the jeep left
the. road aind plunged over a cliff.
The accident is blamed on fai
lu-e of brakes and gear-shift.
Most seriously injured of the
jeep's passeugres were Agrono-
mist Bernier, who received seve-
re back injuries, Eugene Ambroi
se whose head was damaged, and
Gerard Celestin, who received a
broken collar bone. Other passen
gers escaped with deep cuts and
contusions.
They are responding well to
treatment, it is reported.


Red Cross Officials
Look at Southwest

.VERTIERES. GOES ON SAND
BAR.
After twenty-four hours delay
due to reports' of extremely bad
weather in the Southwest, a group
of Red Cross officials set obt for
an inspection tour of the hurricane
damaged areas.
Mr. Howard Ross, Caribbean Zo-
ne Chief of the U.S. Red Cross.
.accomp -nied by Chief of the Ju-
nior Red Cross, Mr: Andre Schus-
s6le, Dr. Louis Roy, head of the
Society in Haiti, Mr. Emmanuel
Racine, secretary-general, Miss Ur-
sula Kohn of radio Hamburg and
Mr. Carl Wall of the Reader's Di-
gest, formed the party that flew
to Jrenmie Friday morning then

(Continued on page 16)


Maya Deren, Russian-born
writer, poet and artist who won
high praise for her recently pu-
blished book on Haitian vau-
dun% (voodoo) eDivine Horse-
menb, will show four of her
.avant-gardeP films at the Hai-
tian American Institute 8:00 p.m.
February 4.
The film-programme, produced
under the auspices of the Centre
d'Art, will include, also, two pro
ductions by Japanese composer
Teiji Ito who helped Maya with
the music of several of her
films. Tokyo-born Ito, .now a New


Yorker, has titled his selections
((Constant Geisha, and ePassage
to Nirvana'.
In addition to being the
World Premier of Maya's Eye
of Night which she completed
a day before leaving New York
for Haiti December 12, the esean
cep will consist of: oAt Land&,
iPas de Deux., ' figured Time,.
The 4Saturday Riview of Li-
terature3 in reviewing Miss De
ren's work says: *fUnquestiona-

(Continued on page 161


. .


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AGE NEWSPAPER
23rd 1955 Telephone 2061 No. 18

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Morales' Pontiac after plunge through concrete wall.
.--------,----..------:--* ;.,.^,,

Dominican diplomat receives speciall.
treatment after Car-Accident -
A delicate eye-operation, per- Ear, Nose and Eye Specialist, .
formed in CiudadTrujillo noon Dr. Georges Hudicourt and Dr. *i
Sunday by Haitian and.Domini- Rene Weiss, Physician on dwU ..;
can doctors, is expected to save ty, Mr. Morales was given emqi&,
the sight of Edouardo. A. Mora- agency treatment before."e'Wi-i ,-..
les, consular minister of the Do- flown to Ciudad Trujillo in"-,%::
minican Republic in Haiti, who Haitian army plane plIed at his'..
was gravely injured in a car ac- disposal by President*Magloire. "
cident at Bourdon shortly after The aircraft was piloted by Capt.
mid-night Saturday. Albert Maignant..;
Mr. Morales stated in -hospi- (Continued on page 16) ."
tal Sunday morning that he lost r ia rlf
control of his 1953 model ePon- Hurricane relief.
tiace when he swerved to avoid supplies hi-jacked '
a abourrique. The car struck a
culvert on the left side of the Twenty-two bags of rice, des-
road jolted across to plunge th- tined for. the victims of hurrica-7"I
rough a concrete-block wall and ne Hazel, were hi-jacked from..i 4a ?
fall thirty feet into the garden camionette on the road from C
of the French Ambassador's re- rydon to Sources Chaudes, last..'0.
sidence. Landing nose-first, it so week, according to La Phalan- .
mersaulted onto its roof before geA. The chauffeur, Sylvestr ":
coming to rest. Duplay, reported that a large ,-
Dr. Louis Roy wds summoned numrber of attackers swarmed :
by witnesses and rushed to the aboard and overpowered him,
site of the accident from Cercle carrying off his load. He never-
Bellevue. He quickly extricated theless escaped with'his life.
the injured man and delivered Police have been alerted and ,'
first aid for severe facial contu- investigations are underway for .
sions and shock. Morales'left eye the discovery of the perpetra- ,'
was so seriously damaged there tors of the crime. Authortlrties
was danger of loss of sight, say it is the first time, tatt a
The diplomat was taken to the crime of this nature ias been're
General Hospital by Prefect ported in the Republc. '
Marc Nahoum and Dr Roy. Re- Further information wasV '"not "
ceived by Dr. Edmond Laleau, available, when the $Suini went,
AdrTinistrator of the hospital, to press. -.

Author of "Divine Horsemen" to.
Show 'Avant Garde" Films Jtre


H%


JL


e N.


I j





PAGE 2 HAITI SUN


SU.N. FINANCE EXPERT EXPLAINS PLAN FOR
COMPLETE REFORM OF HAITIAN CURRENCY


Mr. Ernest Moore, United Na-
tions Financial Expert, explained
his plan for the complete monetary
reform of the republic in a speech
to International Club de Commerce
members at their weekly Riviera
luncheon Wednesday January 12.
After making it clear that ne
Swas not speaking for either the Go
vernment or the National Bank,
Mr. Moore enumerated and discus-
sed the essential qualities of a
sound currency, described briefly
the principal monetary systems of
modern times, characterized the
present money and banking system
of Haiti, and then summarized the
recommendations which he h.ad
made to the Haitian Government
for improving the present system.
The essential qualities of a good
modern currency, he said, were li-
quidity, elasticity, and stability of
purchasing power. Liquidity re-
quired that the currency be con-
vertible, within the country or a-
broad, or both, into a readily ac-
ceptable and easily usable asset
such as gold, dollars, etc. )Elastici-
ty meant that the volume of mo-
ey in circulation, including bank
Deposits, had to be able to stretch
or contract to meet the changing
requirements of the economy. Sta-
bility of purchasing power might
be. obstructed by a variety of spe-
qial factors influencing the natio-
nal :.economy. It could be ensured
only .through the existence of an
Organism 'charged with constant
study of all phases of the natiofial
Economy and possessing extensive
Powers to control the repercussions
of.economics and other events and
conditions on the purchasing po-
wer of the currency. Nearly all mo
Sdern nations possess such an ins-
Stitution in the form of a central
Bank.

-; LEARN TO DANCE
(( -: :'Learn to dance at home in q
Y./;?ew hours, Became the life of
the ball. by possessing a perfect
technique. Whether it be the
Meringue. the Tango, the Waltz,
the Manbo or Folkloric Danses,
you will always be considered"
%among the best dancers, by tak-
S.ing dancing courses at the ((Stu-
Sdio or at home.
; DO o not wait, make a visit to
ouroir ccSTUDIO located at Pe-
. tion-Ville, Rue Magloire, No. 10,
Below El Rancho Hotel.
.I


The principal monetary systems without power to contract the vo-
of modern times, said Mr. Moore, lume of money in circulation in
were the gold coin standard, the case of need.
gold exchange standard, the gold In nearly all countries, said the
bullion standard, and inconvertiblespeae. the ability to expand and
paper money. The gold coin stan- contract te monetary circulation
dard was no longer practiced any- was ensured by the existence of a
where. In the gold exchange stan- central bank. The National Bank,
dar.d, the value of the local current although a bank of issue, was not
cy was assured by maintaining a a central bank.
stock of foreign currencies, or of
a single foreign currency suck as
the dollar or the pound sterling,
and selling such currencies as need -
ed. In the gold bullion standard,
the monetary reserve consisted of .',
gold bars, and the local currency
was convertible into such bars
upon demand. The monetary re-
serve of gold, dollars etc. which
countries kept on hand was usual- a"- ,
ly between 25% and 40% of their -FA''V
note circulation, or of the total .'
liabilities (notes and deposits) of
their central bank. In many coun- A
tries, however, no legal reserve
requirement exists any longer.
Discussing Haiti's monetary sys-
temr, Mr. Moore found that, while


the gourde possessed internal uqui
dity and, in general, stability oa
purchasing power, it was lacking
in external liquidity and in elas-
ticity. Foreign holders of gourde
notes and gourde claims on Hai-
tian debtors had no firm assurance
of being able to convert such notes
and claims into their local curren-
cies. As long as the Haitian eco-
nomy remained stagnant as in the
past, the lack of elasticity present-
ed no particular problem, but now
that economic development had
gotten under way, tis defect of
the currency system could be a
serious brake on the country's pro-
gress. Under the present-system.
issues of gourde notes depended
almost exclusively-on the amount
of dollars received by t" banking
system, or in other words on the
surplus in Haiti's trade andlother
international transactions. There
was no way of supplying gourdes
to cover the Peeds of a growing in-
ternal economy. The National
Bank, being a bank of issue as well
as a commercial bank, had to fol-
low a stringent credit policy, for
otherwise it would endanger the
liquidity of the currency. More-
over, its legal reserve requirements
were such as to leave it very little
latitude, since its stock of gold and
dollars was in large part frozen as
cover for its notes. It was also


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


I


Mr. Moore is seen here with Chamber of Commerce President


Mr. Moore enumerated briefly
the main recommendations he had
made to the Government with a
view to modernizing the Haitian
monetary and banking system. He
had recommended: (1) Creation
of ain autonomous Monetary De-
partment within the National
Bank. with its own balance sheet,
Zo take over ine issuance of both
notes and coins, it would be su-
pervised by a Monetary Board un-
der the chairmanship of the Gene-
ral Ma-lager of the Monetary De-


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apartment, who would likewise be
chairman of the Board of Direc-
tors of the National Bank (2)
Clothing the Monetary Department
with all of the duties and powers
of a central bank and making it
responsible in particular for main-
taning the international stability
of the goulrde, its free convertibi-
lity in gold or dollars, and the
soundness and liquidity of the
banking system. The Department
would be prohibited from making
loans to the Government, and loans
to the Government by the Commer
cial Department of the National
Bank would be subjected to clear
and precise rules and limited to
short-term transactions not exceed
ing 10% of the State's average re-
venues in the three preceding
years. (3), Creation in the National
Bank of a Savings Department,
with its own balance sheet, for the
purpose of segregating savings
funds from the Bank's other ope-
rations and actively stimulating
thle savings habit throughout Hai-
ti. (4) Ending. the legal tender pri-
vilege of the dollar in Haiti, except
for tourists, and requiring all con-
tracts and all accounts to be in
gourdes. Residents could continue
to get dollar notes freely in ex-
change for gourde notes at the fix-
ed rate of 5 gourdes to the dollar,
but dollar notes presented for con-
version in to gourdes would be sub
ject to a commission charge, as is
(Continued on page 13)


I I




SHA- SU
HAIT SUN


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


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9. ...t*~4~fJ~4*L.-

p


Thrills, TO(bulations -'PMrhaps Roast Duck
Await Hunters on New Inland Lake


A new sheet of silvery water at
the foot of Nforne A Cabrit was a
pleasant surprise for immigrating
ducks from Noith America as they
winged their way South this Octo-
ber.
Various species of tourist-fticlin-
ed ducks choose Haiti each year
as their favourite resort for the
winter, and the localJ 'canards'
are out-quacked and out-ghone for
the six months till Spring u-kes
their rivals back to the Norili The
invading ducks over Troa Caiman.
popular known as -de L'e-u gall-
Ic' saw last Fall a great transfor-
mation. After a ten year spell as
drained, shrivelled-up acres of
farmland, Trou Caiman has retur-
ned to its status as a shallow lake
(never reaching a depth of more
than 5 feet).
Hazel's visit in October filled
the basin with its record rainfall
just in time to receive the feathe
red immigrants.
Local hunters soon were also
migrating to the lake to give the
incoming ducks a warm welcome
from twelve, sixteen or twenty
guage shotguns.
The keener sportsment who guard
theirhanting spots jealously found
that de l'eau gaille, had gained so
much water that a squad of gun-
men was needed to round up the-
ir quarry which excelled at hide-
and-seek games with- the 'chas
seurse on the spreading surface of
the lake.

OPERATION cCANARD'.
Rising before dawn last Sunday,
Your Hunter promptly returned
to bed, snuggled ipto the covers
and reset the alarm for the reaso-
nable hour of 4:00 a.m.
At 4:30 a.m. the intrepid adven-
turer sallied forth to the lake of
his choice, snorting through the
refreshing Cul de Sac valley com-
menting to fellow-hunters that
those foolish -bambocheurs' sel-
dom see this glorious sight -.the
sun rising over Pont Beudet, flush-
ing the eastern skies with pink and
gold. He was reminded by irate
companions that a (veek before he
saw the kame sight from the Harry
Truman Boulevard and sniffed the
pure morning air stepping out of
the 'last link in the night-club
chain' 'Rendezvous'.

SHADES OF -AFRICAN QUEEN.
At the small village of Trou Cai-
man, 30 minutes drive from Port
au Prince, famed for its pre-revo-
lutionary voodoo ceremony at
which the slave-leaders swore in
blood to be faithful to the cause,
the few farmers that once wrested
a living, from the soil now do a
much more lucrative business hir-
ing canots to hunters and poling
them in pursuit of the ducks.
Such sterling guides ais Tonton


and Daniel who enjoy the 'chasse"1
as much as the hunter, and feel
responsible that the bag be filled
are indispensible, to the -hunt'.
Your Hunter took up his position
in the "prow of a veteran canoe
that boasted an even five inched
of clearance when TQntori stepped
into the stern and, with a giant
pole pushed the giant (6 foot)
craft out into the lake, leaving the
squabbling guides and beaters be-
hind.
Palms and other trees rose. bush
like, from the lake, their trunks
completely submerged.
The lake is clive with bids
known in Haiti only to the hunter
---gorgeous egrets, moor hens and
a galaxy of other exotic species.
Youi Hunter felt as if he were
cruising down one of the larger
rivers of Africa and automatically
tensed to meet an imagined rhino-
ceroAs charge.
In the deep solitude of the lake,
increased by the neccessity of keep
ifig silence, thereis opportunity
to reflect on the insistence of those
who say duck hunting is cruel and
ask -Why kill the poor innocent
creatures?'
Shades of Humphrey Bogart in
'African Queen, are conjured up
as Your Hunter's stomach -growls
in memory of the cup of coffee
left to grow cold on the kitchen
table: and the obvious reason for
shooting the 'innocent little crea-
tures, suggests to his slavering pa-
late the flavour of tender wild
duck roasted -to a turns.
But there is also the hunter with
no flair for sportsmanship only
-the brute desire to kill once a gun
is placed in his hands. This hunter
if he does not practice dietary con-
trol may massacre an abundance
of *poul e de l'eau, (belonging to
the family of birds from wnich the
expression 'Crazy as a coot' was
derived) which he must then eat-
other wise the killer should have
his license revoked as a public
menace.)
THE ATTACK
After gliding over the surface
of the lake, Your Hunter, compie-
tely camouflaged by an evergreen
branch, got close enough to watch
the surface of the lake lift into the
sky as hundreds of ducks 'beat
it-.
With no luck in the first hour,
in the second hour a new strategy
is introduced. In the midst of .pi-
quon, thorn-bushes that leave fin-
ger-nail-like scratches requiring de-
tailed explanations to an ever-lov-
ing wife, the hunter awaits his
prey.
S -Ti Tonlon" gives the word: ,e-
i re Canard whbich brings the gun-
barrel] up drawing a bead" on the
disappearing tails of a zooming
squadron. 'Trop loin' (Too far)
:sighs the boatman, and Your Hun-


ter holds his fire (but releases a As the sun climbs higher, and the~Society forthe Prevention of
curse). .4 the stubble becomes damp with Cruelty to Animals, may have to
A spider from the evergreen has sweat, clothes are shed and Your say, the joy of a quick sight add
time to spin a web between his Hunter is left to the mercy of the accurate shot on the wing is a prize
ears before the next V-shaped thorns.. Disgusted and dishevelled, that seals the ducks' doom If
flight of generals (the biggest va- he turns to order a retreat to the they are not bagged here, they
riety) wings majestically into view friendly coastline when a stray will provide spott in North Ame-
- but out of range." duck glides into range and suc- rica n.xt Spring.
During the- next five or ten mi- combs to a reckless blast. The lag
nutes some 5000 years "drag by, has been started, thoughts of re-the i
and a barrage from comrades turn fade like the mist, and life For t Ideal
across the lake conjures up men- becomes worth living once more. Gift n S ou e i
tal pictures of them knocking down In the glorious minutes of re- G if, Uo Souv r
record bags of juicy roast duck on flection after the shot, Your Hun- T Take HomeV
the wing. ter realizes that no matter what n n
Wi h Wih You,

S- -S Step into the
Mine. Rossini
Pierre-Louis
s t oo of Shop on RueN Roux
(beside Maison
Orientale)
.......... .... We stock:
SISAL GOODS:
HAITIAN HANDI-
"'-,0.. ...CRAFT:
MAHOGANY
WARE: GIFTS:
Those not too fond of solitude many take compaious... SOUVENIRS.


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Start of the Safari-Gunmen and Guides Embark.


PAGE 3


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41

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..PAGE 4

SFamily a-Flutter
as "Zou-Zounne"
Chooses Mate
<..
:''


Saturday has been a day of an
xiety for many a family awai-
St'ing the approachi of altar time
for a son or daughter.
There has been no home con-
| erned over the imminent knot-
-. tying of a beloved member of

the family tf'an chez Jeanne.
'Brousse in Bourdon last Satur-
day. Climaxing weeks of feuding,
i a decision had at last been rea-
ched that petite' 'Zou-Zounne
Should .marry, i Zou-Zounne, a
Fickle: s0poied4 child, born on the
Cul de Sac neir Pbnt- Beudet,
.. was -adopted last year into the
ritzy bourgeois section 'of Port-
i:. au-Prince's Sugar Hill.
S Zou-Zounne, of French ances
" try traceable as far as the days
I,-..of the Revolution when the pe-
digree was lost, was dutifully
,prepared for the big occasion.
j'* Hereparrain,, Mr. Samuel Zis
-.'kind polished his. green sta-
Itionrvaggon, adjusted his *cra-
5'vatb and, accompanied by seve-
yral witnesses, escorted the bride-,
:| to-be to Damien where the union
was to be consummated.
ZoZouou.ne's capricious natu-
.re anost ruined the proceedings.
She refused point-blank the ma-
-" te her family had chosen. But fi-
Sv.nally, she deigned to give her
approvall to an elegant Nubian
b.illy-goat from North Carolina
P.whose pedigree had been chec-
v"'ked by leifier project investjga-
Stors., The couple honeymooned
., during the weekend on the beau-
!: tiful Damlen campus.
Now the Bourdoners await a
Nubian-Haitian 'heir (expected in
'April) to brighten the green
...pastures encircling their home.








'~ ,


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SMax DuviVier

Rue Pav.e (opposite SHASA)


iis now Distributor of


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KEROSENE APPLIANCES

Refrigerators

Stoves

.. Water Heaters

Hi' Duvivier is a Treasure House

S of Household Appliances


HA4IT I SUN


ti Joseph .report


LAND MAIDENS SHOW MERMAID TENDENCY

Four daring damsels who sallied forth to the stricken region as Red
Cross volunteers this weekend went through the adventure of their
young lives when the good ship aVerticres-. pride of the Coast Guuid
fleet, was grounded off Jeremie during heavy weather 10 p.m. Thurs.
day. Catapulted from their buitks by the shock Jacqueline Godefroy,
Odette Bayard, MIarie-Ghislaine Scutt and Gaby Rousseau were bundl-
ed over the side of the leaking vessel into a senoll lifeboat. For-
tunately the accident occurred close to the beach, as two waves alter
leaving the ship, the lifeboat split at the seamnis and the non-swimminig
young ladies landed in the bay. Panic-was stilled when it was disco
vered that the sea -as only wading depth even if the waves were
mountain high. Most of the Jderemie population congregated on the
wharf to cheer the passengers' progress, and many helping hands
reached in to pull the battered, bedraggled but still game adventvrers
from the sea.
xxx
MORE BRAINS THAN MEN?
Girls swept the board in the recent Law School Second Year exams:
Nicole Georges, Fernande Laroche and Giselle Toussaint placed 1, 2, 3,
while Adeline Magloire (of the Leger Cabinet) bore off the'honours
in the Judicial section...
xxx
Charity Birdiley, who taught English at the Union School for a year
(while studying folk rythms) is winning laurels in New York for. lhr
kiddie show 'Sing a Song- which was featured by the New York Times
last Sunday as rA Lesson From Charity.... The Programme, seen on
WRCA-TV 10-10:30"- a.fa. each Sunday, has a cast consisting of Miss
Bailey at the pianvand'.a grotp of youngsters ranging from 5 to 10,
who sing dance dnc.ipajy tisidal instruirients under her direction...
X: .
A recent letter Afro Melvin bD.' Hildreth one of Washington's
better-known attorneys suggests the President. might like to see
the historic sites of the American War of Indepegtrence during his
State visit this week:.. Mr. Hildreth cites the .efer..nces in ,Stoirm
over Savannah, (A. ,A. Lawrence) to the assistancei"giben U. S. inde-
.pendence troops by Haitian forces... -.*. '
xX -- xC. *
Ernest Ganrs, author of "The "1igh and-The Mighty., revealed uver
a rum-soda. at9Riviera Monday night he was on hisway to Alartinibue
in search of:a'liaven to write, but after a night in'Haiti, (which :n-
cluded d 'L. 'Perchoir. la carte) he. was sold on the republic. and
is seriously thinking of sinking roots here... At the aPerchoir. dinner.
iMr. Giranns,-accompanied by Captain Max Baielais. commander of the
prison, and his wife, Mrs. Eve,4yj Eisen of Uew York, Dave Talanmas
and Mrs. Al Seitz, was guest of MTr. Elias Noustas...
xxx
Here for two weeks of enjoynent are Lloyd C. Johnson, president
of Glynn Johnson Corporation, and his wife... Lodged at the Jbo Lcic,
the'Johnsons make regular sallies into the surrounding countryside
in a hired car .. Mr. Johnson's mother-flew over from Miami yesterday
to spend a weekend with the couple... The Chicagoan hopes his business
(which includes manufacturing Building hardware) will bring himz
back to Haiti "bientot.... *
x X X
Walter H. Graff. Vice-Piesident of 'Cuba Transatlantic Corp.. end
General Manager of RCA in the Caribbean was in port this week visit-
ing this end of the wire... Resident in Havana, Mr. Graft is a small-cao
enthusiast but he couldn't -fan back, in Claude Manuel's Morris...
xxx
-Caribe Hilton- executive, Forest A. Betts arrived in Port Monday...
New temporary committee for Racing football club: Me. Claude D.
Hyppolite, Pres.; Dr. Claude G. Lafeontant, Sec.; Andre Thiard, Tieas....
Lottery officials estimate 500 new clients in the North...
xxx
The Trou Caiman population was disturbed this week by the visit
of Jacqueline Laraque. A keen sportswoman and sharpshooter, she
bagged several generals on -the wing.


d XXX

Shapely, blonde actress Glo-
ria Mosolino arn6 petite artist
Cecile Gray of New York are pre-
sently occupying Haiti, sta-
ying at the Thorland Internatio-
nal Club. This week's visiting
list scheduled-' ,Le 'Capz, and a
duck-shoot on eDe l'eau Gaillei. -


THE WORLD'S AT YOUR FEET!

WHEN YOU SIP A TROPICAL
eef
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


MAle. J. Laroche invested $50 ip. a new (almost) type-writer Tuesday,
to keep his first-bought (cost: $10) from being lonely... The Bumps-
leads- (alias the Arthur Lakes) and Matty Kemp clippered Stateside
Thursday after two weeks here filming 'Meet the Family in Haiti....
Carl Fombrun, Tourist Office Public Relations Attache. accompanied
them to the airport...
xxx
xr x x
Eddie Cqrboiel, 18 month.old apple of his daddys pye had ,o b.
-sh-sh-ed- down by his mommy wvhile visiting his young friends at
Petion-Ville on Sunday when he starred making loud noises like a
buzz-saw... It had. explained sonny, something to do with papa Jacques
taking his afternoon siesta.
Sx xx
'La Caravelle" staff was busy all last week marking down the prices
on the extensive selection of English books stocked. The price-slashcrs
inform its prices are down by as much as 60% from Monday through
Saturday. The bookstore's phone number: 3495...


J W.




I-.r


PRETTY ARTIST, Mrs. Mffredo Garcia Garamendi (Rosario Franco)
other'halj of Haqlti's best-known commercial-art team is back at her
easel again alter a double operation at -Hopital Francoais,. Born in
the Canary Islands, Mrs. Garcia is now a long-time resident in thie
Port au Prince Cortmmunity. I



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IN HISTORY'!


.46b e


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Spring Air's eozcluuve cover de*al
ainm OBI the firmer id-etd.ion...
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*
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-WN*eer POOMelt.





SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd
sUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd____________


I ", P' :... .. ': '"... ",.". ".:.'.
-. . S :...
HAITI SUN -. .PAGE. 5*."


HAITI SUN

STHE HAITIAN ENGLISH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPER

S Community Weekly Published Sunday Morning

SEDITOR-PUBLISHER BERNARD DIEDERICH
tjERANr RZSPONSABLE PONY CHENET FILS

I
N Founded 1950 t

., PITY THE CHILD SERVANTS
Our speeches are n6t enough. In order
that the conception of social justice 'may
become a reality in our customs, action
must be taken.
Recently, Mr. Elie Vernet, Mr. Carlo E-
tienne and still others as well qualified,
through the columns of an interesting dai-
ly, demanded a law for the protection of
Animals. It is only just that our lack ot
love and of respect should be made up in
Spity toward these lower animals that Na-
ture has given us., What then are you wait-
ing for, ladies and gentlemen, to organize a Society for pru-
tecting animals, like the League for the Protection of Chil-
dren. It is surely time it was done.'
What can be said of those poor children, the misery of who-
se parents result in their being given over the care of persons
better off than themselves!
Do you want a picture of their unfortunate existence?
In the mornings, before dawn, they are awakened by the
.growlings of a with the cruel switch,,and saddled
off to work. No measures of hygiene guarantee their health.
All day long they trudge, dirty, hideous, covered with dust.
At night < sun.> (thus Villor. saw the carcasses which hung from the gal-
lows of Montfau'con). These children go about their intermi-
nable cruises which would break the hIardest-hoofed mules
with the most solid of hind legs. Panting, they cross the streets,
haunted and. fearful of cat-o-nine tails, their steps dragging.
Labour harasses them, cruelty shatters their nerves, and they
are not even fed.
SSee them pass, these little emaciated oneg, under-fed and
tracked by tuberculosis. Left-overs from the plates are thrown
to them and they fall gluttonously opon the crumbs from tle
royal banquet. What is to become of them later, these disin-
herited little ones? They are the blackguards of the future.the
thieves, the criminals, the plunderers of the slums, the pros-
titutes of forbid(len streets, the outcasts of society.
Oh! pity... pity! Do we turn our faces away? But no, that
would be infamy! It would be decadence! It would be better
to cry.out to these shameless masters that these children are
human beings, and wheresoever they are to be found, they
have a right to our respect and to our compassion.
Alas! They do not listen to us. Hear the sharp blows.. Is it
the switch of the commander? He had been tempted, the poor
child. He stole a piece of bread... he was hungry. But , nie's, son caught him in the act. Why is it that stealing is a
vice tolerated only from the children of the rich? When one
already overwhelmed by the greatest if all the vices po-
,.erty respects oneself, Madame's anger breaks forth, rises,
swells and culminates in a hail of blows th?.t cut the fragile
body of the little delinquent to the raw flesh. It is enough to
melt your heart.
*Is it really a matter of correcting the child, or might it not
be that Madame is possessed by some form of sadism such as
that seen and observed by the Countess of Segur which she
analyzed in one of.her psychological studies? Oh if you knzw
all the kinds of torture unknown of all times in China, being
inflicted upon these unfortunate children whose greatest sin
is having been born like the Christ child, in a stable, or
better still if you like, in the very streets or market places of
the town! One day, perhaps, I would like to enumerate then
all for you. Today, however, this is enough of blackening the
blackboard.
What are we going to do about it? Are we just going to fold
our arms, look on impassively or rejoice as observers of this
every-day drama? Shall not a voice be lifted? Verti6res'is no
longer possible against these demoniac crews which are being
recruited, above all, in the slum sections and the shady quar-
ters.
But the public powers are watching. Already, the Govein-
ment has considered these unfortunate little ones by creating
homes where, through instruction and apprenticeship, it is
attempting tojift the dignity of the man of tomorrow. Even a
law has been passed to relieve the misery of the children in
service, but the wisdom of our elders had long ago foreseen
that any law would remain ineffective if no punishment is
provided for, against its offenders. There is no punishment
without law, but there is no law effective without punishment.
It is only from a restricted minority that we can obtain res-
pect for the laws for the honour of the human conscience.
Laws must be enforced. In all countries, there must be courts
and prisons, if only to amend these who have deserted 'the
straight and narrow.
It is due to having forgotten this that we have allowed for
so long the mistreatment of children in service. Cruel dilem-
ma! the fields in the countryside are merciless for them, the
towns and cities, inexorable. In this century so cruel to the
weaker ones, there must be light and hope implanted in their
young minds.
In finishing this brief expose, we sollicit the valuable sup-
port of the official power, that it to say, the enforcing of the
laws which protect the children in service meting out heavy
punishment to these who sidetrack them. And this, ladies and
gentlement, shall be Justice!
by Jacqueline Wiener, Licencie-en-Droit, Founder & President
of La Ligue pour la Protection de I'Enfance.


_Bible, Columbia University, Gene-
ral George S. Patton. Jr. and The
States of Arkansas and Kansas. I
'would like to send many of these
items, also others from my dupti-
cates, to a new correspondent or
two in your City in exchange. on
; a friendly quantity by quantity b.-
Dear Sir: iis, for the cancelled stamps of
I have obtained your name from :,our territory, especially the air-
a Trade or Shipping Directory or mails, commemoratives, semi-post-
a Newspaper. als (these are charity stamps
M,.y I ask a little favour? issued in many European and some
I am a stamp collector anxious African asuntries), and large size
to make the acquaintance of one pictorials... recent, current and
or two collectors in your locality new issues... much of this mate-
for the purpose of exchanging can- rial comes through your daily
called postage stamps from tnime mails.
to time. If you know such persons,
,plase show them this letter and ff this inquiry is directed to an
ask ihem to send me a packet ul address in a'British Crown Colony,
.'heir duplicates, whereupon I will Dominion or Protectorate, then for
-or'.vard at once an excellent pac- siuc: Areas I am very much inLe-
:cet of United States stamps. rested in the PEACE, SILVER
Perhaps there is an employee in WEDDINGS and U. P. U. issues of
your organization, sflch as a clerk a few years ago, as well as the
or a sttnogr:pher, who collects recent CORONATION and the new
;tamps andwould like to exchange QUEEN ELIZABETH II postage
vith me as I am suggesting. series.
I am not a DEALER. Just a COL- Appreciating your courtesy. in
LECTOR, interested in an EX- 'he matter and trusting to obtain
CHANGE only. I do not BUY or -a favorable response through this
SELL stamps, inquiry, I am
Special stamps were issued lieie
recently to commemorate the An- Yours very truly
niversaries of Historical or import. H. C. BLANKSTEN
'ant events, or in honor of ce:taini
lainos Am175 West 93rd Street
famous Americans, such as the175 est 93rd treet
Louisiana Purchase, The Gutenberg New-York 25, N. Y. U.S.A.


It


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TRADING COMPANY

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PAGE 6 HAITI SUN SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


Haiti's First Woman Doctor:

({her work is her life)).

The following article on the dedicated life of Haiti's first woman
doctor, Yvoqne Sylvain, was published in the aWORLD OF WO-
MEN) series of aHoliday Magazine). The magazine, carrying many
excellent illustrations is obtainable at ((La Caravelle.


S DR. YVONNE SYLVAIN

She is a solid, quiet, softly
moving woman, light tan in color.
She is gentle in every sense.
SShe looks at you with large dark
k. eyes set in an intelligent, rather
heavy face. You notice her
:-* hands broad, highly trained,
.. 'hdrd-working hands. She is .a
'. doctor, a gynecologist and obs-
: tetrieian, and has the reserved,
..tired appearance of all-knowing
n.; ad allseeing which all doctors
seem to, wear (or which laymen
Seem to find in their faces). She
Sis a pioneer the first woman to
St^become a doctor in her native
".'Haiti. Sheis an esthete and an
. aristocrat, a daughter of an eli-
I :te, extraordinarily educated and
accomplished family whose roots
.go back deep into Haiti's violent
j-5' a9tit1;ezx-----------------------


and stubbornly independent his-
tory. She is the best-known wo-
man in Haiti today. Shb is Dr.
Yvonne Sylvain.
She tives in a big, airy Victo-
rian house in Port-au-Prince, alo
ne except for three servants.
Across the bright garden is the
attractive five-room clinic whe-
re she sees her patients in the
mornings and afternoons. Two
days a week she spends at a dis-
pensary, treating charity cases.
But, like most doctors, her sche-
dule is erratic and overcrowded.
She buzzes off in her Renault
to see outlying patients, hurries
away to a medical lecture, rises
at night toaeliver a baby, holds
consultations with other doctors.
And since Yvonne is a complica-
ted, many directioned person,
she is equally occupied even
when she' isn't actually at work.
She is a Catholic and deeply re-
ligious, and attends church often.
She loves the art of Haiti, part
cularly the marvelous works of
painting which have emerged
.there in the past ten years or so;
she attends exhibitions and buys,
at considerable sacrifice, pain-
tings and sculpture which she
then lends to the local art cen-
ter.Along with other scientists,'
she is working on the first com-
prehensive survey of voodoo
-its origins, practices and true
meaning. And she is an actively
member of the feminist group
which has just won suffrage-lor


Haitian women for the first ti-
me.
All of Yvonne Sylvain's works
and interests have one thing in
common service to the peo-
pie. -Medicine permits, me to do
more good for more people than
any othcr wo-I: I might have
done She says. Her deepest pas-
sion in medicine concerns very
human, very immediate health
problems among today's Hai-
tians: sterility, overpopulation,
cancer. Her strongest plea-
sure is the treatment
of sterile women. At-
.the same time, she knows Haiti's
shocking overpopulation, and tea
ches feminine hygiene to those
of her patients who request it.
Most disturbing to her is Haiti's
hopelessly inadequate means of
cancer treatment. <-It breaks my
heart': she says.
cWe must have deep,.X ray
and radium. We must niot'let the
se people die for lack of treat-
ment. This is my dream. This
must come to Haiti!*
Pioneers-don't just happen. A
dedicated, passionate, complex
woman like Yvonne Sylvain
must have a wellspring. In Yvon-
nc's case, it is her family. Her
father, Georges Sylvain, was a
lawyer, a poet (who wrote in na-
tive Creole), a Haitian Ambas-
sador to France, a leader of the
resistance movement that bat-
ltied the Anmerican occupation of
Haiti thirty years ago. He taught
his children Latin and expected
'them "to speak it at home. All
six children worshiped him, Y-
vonne perhaps most of all. Yvon
ne'&4 grandmother on her mo-
th6ir's side 'as a heroic figure,
who fought beside her father
in a battle'fOr liberation in the
18RO's. Dkiring the American oc
cupation, she mourned liberty


by sleeping for ten years on a
pallet on the floor. Her grind-
father was a signer of Haiti's
Declaration of Independence, in
1804.
Today, Yvonne's three sisters
all have Ph.D. degrees and are
working in various parts of the
world; one brother is an archi-
tect, the other a plant physiolo-
gist. At one time Yvonne wanted
to be'a nun. It was not until her
beloved parents died& that she
began, almost in their memory,
the incredibly difficult task of
fighting her way, against preju-
dice and precedent, toward the
position of becoming Haiti's
first woman doctor.
,(My life is my work and vi-
ce versa, i Yvonne says now, and
this is no cliche but rather the
whole key to her existence. Yvon
ne Sylvain has no real private
life. Twice she was deeply in lo-
ve and each time drove the man
away for reasons she herself do-
es not quite understand. She
claims she didn't have time*
for them. Because she has stayed


home and alone, her family calls
her ,The Vestal,, and she is e-
ven laughed at a bit by her neigh
bors for her devoted, intellectual
(different), ways. Never in con-
versation does she talk about-
herself; often she speaks of her
father: often she speaks of ,hel-
ping, and ,serving-.
This doctor, tlis totally educa-
ted. totally capable woman, is
almost a nun. Love for her work
is matched, with her, only by her
love for her father, and perhaps
the two loves are somehow the
same. Always with her are the
tales of her family's great past,
the ghost of grandmere, the me
mories of her happy childhood.
A woman who feels the terrible-
responsibility of education and
tradition, she is totally admira-
ble and, somehow, tragic.
Yvonne Sylvain fulfills her du-
ties, serves her country and her
conscience, repays her debts of
aristocracy and education, and
somewhere in the secret places'
of her person, pays the lonely
price of greatness.


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: Haitian handicraft. French-
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PAGE 6


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


HAITI SUN






SUDY AUAY2r ATISNPG


LIGNITE DEPOSIT
DISCOVERED
AT MAISSADE

A valuable lignite deposit was
discovered recently at Maissade by
the Canadian-American group of
prospectors (HAMCO) currently
probihg the mineral resources of
the republic, the daily press re-
ported Monday.
Specimens of the deposit already
h.ve.been despatched to North A-
merican laboratories for grading,
and work is underway on a mining-
camp.
Lignite, a kind of soft, brown
coal, is used as fuel in industrial
works.


INTRODUCES TELECOM-
MUNICATIONS COURSE
Tying fn with the complete over-
haul being given our telephone
system, a clause authorizing the
instruction of students at the po-
lytechnical school in telecommu-
nications, has beeh added to the
law passed last October giving a
Government monopoly to telepho-
Fie, telegraph and radioqommuflica-
tion services.


WORLD HEALTH, SPECIA-
LIST TO ASSIST GOVT.
The World Health Organization
has recently chosen a syphillis and
yaws specialist, Dr. Morales, to as-
sist the Haitian Government in the
battle against these diseases.


CHIEF OF PROTOCOL BACK RODMAN AUTHOR OF "HAITI
BLACK REPUBLIC,. WRITES


SProtocol Chief Daniel Theard re-
turned last Sunday from his visit
to Kingston and Washington whe-
re he made, arrangements for the
forthcoming Presidential trip to
the Umited States and Jamaica. Mr.
Theard was'accompanied on his
return by the Chief of Chancelry,
Minister Mauclair Zephiriri, who
met him in Washington.


COMMUNIQUE


Our attention and interest has
been aroused. by the announce-
ment in the principal dailies of
thb Capital concerning the co-
ming visit to Haiti of His Excel-
iency, Mr. Richard NIXON, Vice-
President of the United States..'
.. Admirers'of the beautiful Re-
publio.n conception which is in-
tegrated in a real Democracy
land all for the well-being of the
collectivity, we are -happy over
the visit of so eminent a 'persona-
lity to our dear country.
Our preparations are, being ma-
de. in advance in order .to render
to this distinguished Representa
tive of the Great 'Republic', of
the Slars and Stripes, the homa-
Sge which be deserves.' \
THE ADbMINISTRATIVE COM-
MITTEE "OF THE REPUBLI-
CAN CONCEPTION OFtTH,
UNITED STATES:

Henri H. Fortune, President.
#Odtlon S. Casismir, Vice-Pre-
sident "
Gilbert C. Gilles,. Secretary-
.. ,-


LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES

SHEIE OuTiPR
PLACE GEFFRARD


Agent General: TIPCO
Place Geffrard
Telephone 3216


AGENTS

SDistributor:
HAITI TRADING Co.
Chamber of Commerce
C(it de l'Exposition -
ID1- -2-*nrfi


Bldg.


Phone uuJ *

~ ~ ~ ~ .... -. ,* ..{... ..,..[ ... :*.: ,:, ^ ;, S iie i fe f ,.' \^k.


Selden Rodman, 'ranking writ-
er on the subject of Haiti, dropp-
ed us a line last week with an
enclosed review from the N. Y.
Herald'Tribune which was duly
Impressed with his very fine
work'
, Since the book came out* Mr.
Rodrrnan reports JI have msde
eight, radio and television ad-
dresses on. it (aid the neccessity
of every American making a
p 'k
trip to Haiti before even thin'k-
ing of a visit to Europe) and 1


estimate # have reached sbme
12,000,000 potential tourists.>'
The famous author, art-critic
*and poet 'is planning another vi-
sit to his favourite republic pro'b
chainement.

AIGLE NOIR PLAYER.GETS
I(DIPLOME SOUVENIRa
After the heroic Victory-Aigle
Noir tussle last Friday evening
(won by the eEaglesa), the FHFA
council presented AigIl Noir
-star Luders Saintk' with a dJli.
piome-souveniro for 15 years' ser
vice to Haitian football.


Let the Insurance Company do the worrying.
. See Immediately: NORWICH UNION)) Insurance
S.. Joseph NADAL and Co. Agents. Tel: 3486


Co.


The-WorId .Famous Beatu.t3 Products Are

On saTeat at

Canap e trt


|Ca nape" VTr &f~eti^


CHATELET DES FLEURS

In the Pines and Poinsettas

Of Cool Kenscoff

Unexcelled cuisine

Winter weather .and Blazing Fireplaces .


Reserve your boat for an exeirsjon on
the blue tripical Bay of La Gonave
Inquire at your hotel or Travel Agent.
Mr. Willy Roncour and Mr. Gaston Baussan at the pier
of the International Casino.



((Tile) & ((Life)

The Leading American

MAGAZINES

Are Now On Sale At All

BOOK STORES


.1


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^ta~tjtui 2'^cuuhcifitm cut oum kt {tqt.

^odobo-]t~efwci ^jice~cuzCj c<'!ctcd {e ljou
Aal -d[
PORNtLAIN 5 l. 1 RIN & GROEND/hl .,l ,' faj qt',f EMPROIDERIE5


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


PAGE 7


I I


l


1,


HAITI SUN






PAGES HAITISUN-SUNDAY JANUARY---2.r


HAITI'S EDEN


SEGUIN


Seguin, a verdant, little-known,
area, in the mountainous South-
land of the Republic, that inclu-
des parts of Marigot and Saltrou
in its fertile hundreds of'-hecta-
res, will be tapped within the
Next few months by a primary
Road leading through the area
from Obleon to Jacmel.
For the first time, merchants
and sightseers, tourists and spe-
Sculators will be able to purr th-
!rough the country side by mo-
tor transport without writing off
as expenses a new shock absor-
ber, set of springs or, perhaps,
a new car.
Visitors to Haiti's Garden of
Eden will-be able to stock up on
such fruit as apples, pears, pea-
ches and plums, or if their tas-
tes run to the more practical,
bargain for corn, peas, coffee
and fresh vegetables. The Agri-
Scultural bulletin sums up the
Situation in a few scholarly phra
Sses: eThe altitude, the cool ci-
, mate and the relative fertility


of the land renders it suitable to
the cultivation of exceptional
products.
,An Experimental Farm esta-
blished by the Government at
Seguin has turned in results
that make officials think the 'a-
rea c is one of the .... regions of
the country most suitable to a ra
tional development from an eco-
nomic and social point of view.
But the great Set-back to this
fertile' paradise is the absence
of a few permanent Adam-and-
Eve combinations.
*Any center the Agricultural
bulletin informs us resentfully,
is supposed to have the perma-
nent presence of peasants, upon
whom may be exercised the in-
fluence of social agents: agro
nomists, teachers, doctors, pri-
ests and .pastbrs.3
But Seguin doesn't have much
of a permanent population of
any kind of folk, peasants of
otherwise. 'The floating popula-


YYou can do


All THESE THINGS


tion of nesters from the lowlands
who migrate to the district du-
ring certain seasons, stays just
long enough to harvest its crops.
crops.
The barreness of population,
in spite of the fertility of the
soil and wonderful climate, is bla
med on shortage of water for do-
Smestic purposes. When water is
piped in for-use in the caille,
Sand the new road opened up
from Obleon, a mass migration
is expected that will make exci-
ting text for future history
books.
#The pace of growth of the conm
munity is unforseeable" those
,in the know* declare.
The water problem is one that
will vanish at the touch of a pi-
pe-line, as some 6 kilometers
from the agricultural station a
natural spring, attaining almost
to the pretensions of a river;
courses'down the mountainside.'
Named the Riviere Blanche
(White River) this potential sour
of domestic water rises from ana
tural grotte and tumbles th-
rough,'the lower part of the ba-
sin-shaped little valley in splas-
hing, white cataracts (origin of
its name). Long ago, the pure and
limpid water of the. spring was
harnessed and led t6 the center
by a little canal. But a fault de-
veloped in the canal-bed and since
then the Agriculturists have had
to hike 6 kilometers for their
water.
Nevertheless, the Governmet
has kept a paternal eye on the lo
cal Eden and the President per-
sonally is putting through a
plan for the piping of the spring


into the homes of the people of
Seguin.
As the bulk of the land in the
area belongs to the State, the sc
condaryi problem of a population.
once the $40.000 scheme starts
producing ,domestic water, is
an easy one to solve. First the
men-in-charge propose to make
a complete topographical sur-
vey, then with the area clearly
mapped and charted, parcels
will be allotted to social institu-
tions and homes of local offi-
cials.
Small merchants, artisans and
social agents will be set up-in
the projected town, forming the
core that is expected to grow in
to one of our major towns. Fea-
tured on the plans for the new
community are: schools, dispen-
saries, a church, police station,
club. marketplace, public park,
playground and cemetery.
Forestry zones, to be marked
off until the Government deci-
des what tb do with surplus land,
also are suggested. Other areas
are to be handed out in five-acre
lots, if the Agricultural Depart-
ment's plan Is followed.
The Agricultural Department
has worked out p sound plan for
the development of the area. pu-
blished in their Bulletin this
month.
cIn the distribution of this
land, it should first be taken in-
to consideration the situation of
the present occupants. And the
best plan for this is a complete
census, the department first
recommends.
The suggested plarA continues:
tAs to the conditions of the
occupation of this land, it should
be determined by the for-
ming of a commission consis-
ting of the Prefect of Jac-
mel, the District Agronqmist,
the Military Commander, the Col
lector of. Revenue, and three no
tables. It goes without saying
that the morality, the practical
knowledge of agriculture, the
ardor of labor should be the
first factors of eligibility.
In case there should be an ex
cess of land. after the needs of
the peasants of the -region are
satisfied, a transfer of the popu-
lation of Marbial, and particu-
larly of the Valley of Jacmel
would be desirable. For the de-
mography and the erosion of the
soil leaves bat little hope of li-

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K PAGE.8


ve lihood to the rising young ge-
neration of the mountains of
Marbial and La Vallee.
But an agrarian policy, any
policy of agricultural coloriza-'
tion would be cut short if it but
places the land at the disposal
of the peasant without bothering
about his integral establishment.
The land is, without doubt
the chief factor of agricul-
tural production, but the capital,
joined to the ability of the enter
priser, is no less essential: .there
must be money for the preduc-
*tion operations and for subsis-
ting until harvesting time. Now
the peasant who since the begin
ning of our nation has had the
heavy task of creating wealth,
has not been in a position to meet
his obligations. There is no ques
tion of making free gifts, whe-
ther it concerns the land sr the
capital: in this case, the object
given is never appreciated for
its real value by him who recei-
ves it. Though the Depl-tment
of Agriculture, according to the
resources of its budget, may, in
exceptional cases give plants or
other products and, currently
seeds, tools, material, the eco-
nomic instrument indispensable
to a policy of rural well-being, is
the recently founded Institut de
Credit Agricole et Industrfel.
SAppled willingly, in-the plan
of well organized social services
and continued technical and so
cia! assistance, rural credit is
cafled upon to transform the
peasant economy and to help the
small farmer
Seguin is a land with a great
future a future of laden fruit
trees, abundant crops, paved
streets, shops and houses. There
is trade and prosperity in store
for the inhabitants of the dis-
trict, when water is provided for
their own needs and for those
of their crops and animals, if a
substantial credit is procured for
them, to help them to get star-
ted. and the other citizens of
Haiti co-operate in every way to
set the promising new, venture
afoot.
Any of our readers who think
that they know more about Se-
guin, or who have suggestions
for its development not included
in the article above, are asked
to send in their contributions
for publication.
ED.


HAITI SUN


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd





HAITI SUN


-" SCHEDULED VISITS FROM TOURIST SHIPS IN '55
JANUARY 1955 Company Date of arrival
Ship's Name
I PATRICIA Swedish Lloyd 9
OCEAN MONARCH Furness Line 12
STELLA POLARIS Clipper Line 12
EVANGELINE Eastern Shipping Corp. 18
The oloiir'fj oTrureller's Noteboo1 a report i.il gire our reaas MAURETANIA Cunard Line 21
an idea of the U.S. capital which w'ill be ris'ted by His Excellency f're GUEEFN OF BERMUDA Furness Line 21
szdemt Magloirc this week. NEW AMSTERDAM Holland America Line 24
WASHINGTON, D.C:-Any'l time is d acud time to visit VWashington. EMPRESS OF SCOTLAND Canadian Pacific 24
the U.S. Capital > / PATRICIA Swedish Lloydf 24
As a key center of world affairs, Washington hurms witH activity. MAASDAM Holland America Line 25
twelve month. a ,year, nut is not always; concerned with law-miking, BERLIN Swedish America 25
politics or diplomacy. STELLA POLARIS Clipper Line 31
Springtime, for instance, is Cherry Blossom Time -generally in A- TRADE WIND Caribbean Atlantic Line 31
pril- when tourists from everywhere crowd the Tidal Basin to see FEBRUARY 1955
the delicate pink flowers blossoming on trees presented to the U.S.A. PATRICIA Swedish Lloyd 8
by the Japanese people. EVANGELINE Eastern Shipping Corp. 8
In spring, the weather is mild and along the miles ot broad bou'e- MAURETANIA Cunard Line 10
yards the arching elms wear their freshest green. The mammoth flower MAASDAM Holland America 12
beds en the White House lawn are budding and people tarry in the ITALIA Home Lines 13
parks to feed the friendly squirrels .and pigeons. OCEAN MONARCH Furness Line 14
Free concerts abound in Washington in summer. Three nights a TRADE WIND Caribbean Atlantic Line 14
week the Marine Corps, Army and Navy bands play from the U. S. NEW AMSTERDAM Hollanfl America 18
Capitol steps. Sunday music is presented by the National Gallery of SILVER STAR Arnold Berstein 18
Art. And drawing throngs of rhusic lovers are the National Symphony STELLA POLARIS Clipper Line 21
concerts at the Waterga'e, a band shell anchored on the Potomac. Spec- PATRICIA Swedish Lloyd 23
tators sit on a semi-circle of stone steps. Many'a Washingtonian. how- HOMEWJC Home Lines 24
ever, enjoys these open air concerts from his own pleasure craft. NEW AMSTERDAM Holland America 28
Canoeing on the Potomac is a popular pastime. So are'the afternoon ANTILLES French Line 28
and evening cruises on luxurious riverboats which provide music .or TRADE WIND Caribbean Atlantic Lines 28
dancing. Cruising down the river to Mount Vernon is a "must- for 'MARCH 1955
every summer visitor. The 18th century plantation hone of George ITALIA Home Lines .1
Washing'on- contains many original furnishings anrd the spacious EVANGELINE Eastern Shipping Corp. '2
grounds are a delight to everyone who loves artistically landscaped RYNDAM Holland America Line 4
gardens. 9
.gardens. MAURETANIA Cunard Line 5
As a rule the U.S. Congress doesn't adjourn until 'mid-summer. Vi- SILVER STAR Arnold Berstein 8
sitors who want to see the lawmakers at work should call at their cm- EMPRESS OF SCOTLAND Canadian-Pacific 8
bassies for cards admitting them to-the diplomats' gallery. PATRICIA Swedish Lloyd 9
One of the best sources of information abopt accommodations, res- HOMERIC Home Lines 12
taurants and sightseeing is Pan American World Airways, which links TRADEWIND Caribbean Atlantic Line 14
all of Latin America to the United States and which maintains well STELLA POLARIS Clipper Line 18
posted personnel in its ticket offices in the U. S. capital. PATRICIA Swedish Lloyd 23
The Library of Congress, near the Capitol, draws students and sight- TRADEWIND Caribbean Atlantic Line 28
seers with its 414 miles of shelves containing 6,000.000 books and pam- HOMERIC Home Lines 29
phlets.
Across the street is the Folger Shakespeare Library with precious HOMERIC Home Lines 8
Shakespearean documents on display and a unique relic one of PATRICIA Swedish Lloyd 9
Queen Elizabeth's corsets. CAP-HAITIEN '
In this part of Washington is the stately marble Supreme Court, a STELLA POLARIS Clipper Line Jan. 30
building where visitors may hear the greatest legal minds in the land
dispense justice.
Perhaps your ambassador or minister in Washington could arrange a
visit to the public rooms of the President. where the annual Easter U.S. EASES RESTRICTIONS
Egg rolling on the grounds is open to all. ON TRAVEL BY ALIENS
To absorb the real spirit of the United States, drink in the classic
beauty of the Lincoln Memorial, the equally beautiful one to Thomas In another move to encourage-
Jefferson. See the Washington Monument, the famous National and travel throughout the hemisphere,
Corcoran Art Galleries, the .Arlington mansion of the States, and Ihe United States immigration authori-
Smithsonian Institution with its exhibits of American art, history and ties have abolished passport, visa
science, and reentry permit requirements
Washington is, of course, a cosmopolitan city of SOO.000 persons with for alien residents returning to the
fine hotels theatres, night clubs and restaurants featuring Arabian, U.S. from visits to Mexico, Cuba, FLY EKI
Chinese, French, Greek, Italian, Swedish and many other foreign cui- Dom:njcan Republic, Haiti, Bermu-
sines. da and Canada. -l
'There are major league baseball, regattas, football games and other The only limitation is in dura- P A
s ports. tion of the visits which must be
The fall concert season offers Metropolitan Opera stars and Wvorld- kept within 30 days, Pan Ameri- Low Thrift Seas
renowned musicians. The great ot Broadway and Hollywood perform can World Airways has been in- De Luxe flights
on the city's legitimate stages formed. Economical Tour
SFormerly, aliens residing iq the Four flights per
Fer
U.S. could return from visits to S.A.E.
thosecountries only with $10 re- CO. Tel.l
T Tlt. 3591
entry permits or proof that their 3 4931 M
travel abroad was for an emergen- WORM
Alien residents of the. U.S. are
.^ 1 still obliged, however, to meet en-'
,il try regulations of the countries vi. A- .


U.S. CAPITOL, sedt of Congress. iy Washington D.C. The House of
Representatives occupies the South wing (left) and the Senate
occupies the North w'ing (right).


*^


Fastest Freight LInd Passen-
gers service between New
York Port au Prince and Cris-
, :.. tobal, and vice-versa, accept-
*'n,,- ing cargo both ways, including
cargo to and from Europe via
New York and via Cristobal;
6v -oh' ,also from the West Coast of
Central/South America, and
the Far East via Cristobal CZ.


sited.


A




;I-






tion
lay
Form
il &
ral A
nt


. Sailings from New York every Thursday; a r r i v a ls at Port- -" W_,
a-Prince every Monday, except when a holiday falls on Thurs w '-
day in New York, sailing then y ill be on Friday, arrival Port-au- ,, tns
Prince Tuesday. 9l I
Saihngs from Port-au-Prince to New York every Monday. [.

.:..".. ,,.,,,:. /.


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


3g..:: ." k; 'p


PAGE 9 'I




A .
/ 4*



M




















bmi 'te:m. i inainA:
I hr thne man wha. oot IIJJ
'IT













\ t- New .a.. :





Distributor: ;.

MASON G. GILG|l1


Rue Bonne Fof i

A.


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with SleepAir accommodations i.
ist Class service 2 ",:
week from the Caribbean ';
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1. 2352, Soulherland Tours,
1/9 378; Heraoux Tounrs, Tel.
%gic Island Tour,, Tel. 2078.
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Special rates for long stays.
PHONE 7291
Situation 4 blocks East of St. Pierre's Church


I SPECIAL SERVICES AT PT--
SEMINAIRE MARK ((NOTRE
DAME DES VICTOIRES
Notre Dame des Victoires was
*celebrated last Sunday at the Pe-
tit Seminaire College St-Martial.
The Superior of the Seminaire,
the Rev. Father Grienenberger, ga-
ve particular importance to the
occasion organizing a solemn and
magnificent religious programme.
Mass was said at 8:00 a.m. by the
Rev. Father Le Floch, almoner of
the Asile Frangais, and was follow
ed by an address from the Supe-
rior of the Fathers of St. Esprit in
Haiti. The Rev. Father Gousse, for-
mer teacher at St. Martial sung a
chant to the glory of Mary, the ins-
piration of the Order.
His Excellency Mgr. Augustin at-
tended the ceremony, Mgr. Le Bel-
lec and Canon Le Guen assisted
in the service.

MGR. LE BRETON RETIRES
After 49 years spiritual service
to Haiti, Mgr. Le Brefon has gone
into retirement.
The Former Prelate of His Holi-
ness the Pope and Vicar-General
of the diocese of Cap-Haitien, Mgr.
Le Breton will long be remember-
ed by the people of his community
for his devoted and selfless servi-
ce.


IAUX COSAQUES
Haiti's famous ((homard flam-
me)) has been enthusiastically
acclaimed by visiting epicures,
and featured by cImperial Li-
nen.))
But foreigners aren't the only
Connoisseurs of food. Haitians
know where the meat is done
just right, where wines are of a
perfect vintage and flavour to
mellow their mood and form the
perfect foil for each delightful
course.
That's why special occasions
are observed at

,,, ';. .: ,,"
- .AUX COSAQUES BAR

CLINIQUE DOCTOR
-1I. GOLDENBERG
PEDIATRICIAN
Child Sepecialist
Consultation, Ave. Christophe
Clinic Dr. SYLVAIN
Hours
8-11 a. m.
Clinic at Petion-Ville Ave. Pan-
amirican
except Tuesday and Saturday
.4-6 p.m


DINNER DANCING

Tuesday & Friday Night

To the Ibo Lele Orchestra


TOPS "EM AlL"
r -y


Cigoa-ttca


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Distributor:
Joseph Nadal & Co.


THE RIVIERA
SH6tet d'Haiti -


3' :~m .T' ? i.?i zsu.- _-_i- -? -: ..m:...sia'sM 3 M
GUY DEROSIER AND HIS OR CHESTRA
Continuous music and dancing every nije
S from 6:30 p m to 1:00 a m
E\ery Saturday night S1:50 minimum- per person
Sunday 8:Q0 p m in Dining room
CHOIR-MICHECt QESQROTTES
-35--member choral group-


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PHONE 7894


', :*


SUNDAY. JANUARY


23rd


HAITI SITN





SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd "


HAITI SUN


$150.000 VOTED The six-month prog
.LLEL include the worst s1
DEVASTATED of the damaged areas ar
AREAS cover 12.000 hectares 32
president Magloire, acting on tares at Cayes, 4.800 at J<
recommendations submitted b. 20,) al Miragoane. and
agronomist of the Agricultu- Jemel.
ral Departmrrent. ordered com-
mnefncement this week of a vast Followinmg a report by tI
proG7amme tor replanting the cultural Regeneration Cc
hurricane-devastated areas of the tee ,.o Agricultural Minist
Southwest .vith coconuts and on Laleau and Under Sei
coffee. Andre Duniesle, it was c
A bill 6t $150.000 has been pas tor suspend theory courn
sed to finance the project. $100. the Agricultural School f
000 of the bill will be given di- nt'xi term and to give tl
reetly to the .workers irn the form deh's some practical expel
of bonuses for clearing, ploug- in. the replanting of the
liIng and sowing. t.'t.ed regions.


ramme
stricken
nd will
1200 bee
eremie.
1000


ie Agri
ammit-
ter Le-
cretary
decided
ses at
for the
he stu-
erience
devas-


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INSTEAD OF A t1EAT ,W


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drop noticeably when your employees are "inned"
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office efficiency and employee morale, enhance
office appearance invest now in the new, im-
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The G/W Desk is designed to insure warter com-
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Whatever your needs, we have a Streamliner Desk
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equipment. No obligations!
TRADING Co. S. A. Chamber of Commerce BI


Jts. I i


PUZZLED PpMPIERS

Friday evening last the brave
firemen of the capital were sum
moned to the neighbburhood of
the Cathedral where their infor
mant reported a four-alarm fire.
Arriving near the spot, the Pom
piers: in their new high speed
engines were urged to greater
"efforts by the sight of a bright red
light in the western sky. Led by
Lieutenant George Elie (Fils),
the intrepid flame-fighters for-
ged on to Drouillard where they
were greeted by a pile of cane
trash being beirned by HASCO
employees.


SIX HAITIAN FILM STRIPS
CHOSEN FOR AUDIO-VISUAL
LIBRARY

Six Haitian films were inclu-
ded in the (itinerant cinema li-
brary* which has been organized
by UNESCO to promote the use
of Audio-visual methods in Pri-
mary Educqtion, following a con
ference held recently in Sicily.
This was the largest number
of film-strips chosen from any
one country except India which
contributed 8.
The Haitian strips, made by
Georges Ramponeau, Emmanuel
Lafond, Alix Roy and Dieudon-
ne Duclair, deal with topics such
as Animal Raising, Agriculiture,
Hygiene and Teaching. These
subjects are knbwn to be the
most popular in the countries
where Unesco operates.
Further, reports' from Austra-
lia indicate great satisfaction
with the films. --.:


aA


The acumberland was not named for the ingenious engineer
who invented it as reported- by Selden Rodman in his new book
Haiti: the Black RenublicD. The device, which is used to detour
current around an electric meter thus enabling householders to
balance the family budget at the expense of the Electric Company,
is so Aimple it probably was developed three' seconds after the
appearance of the meter. It consists of a simple piece of copper
wire making a connection between the wires that feed the ietr.
The gangs that initiated the selling of this little household te-"
cessity named it acumberlandb, in loving dedicationto Dr. 'W.''.
Cumberland, Financial Advisor and General Receiver of Cnstou
in Haiti in the 20 s. The U.S. expert instituted many reforms bidt'
said very strong things about Haitians which were reported by.an
irate local press (e.g. aHaitians have a diarrhea of words and a cons
tipation of ideas).
One of the top men in the racket, which still survives, was a late
Electric Company engineer.
Also, contrary to Mr. Rodman's account, the jangs do not cut
your electric wires if you refuse to have thi gadgets installed.

Our much-criticised telephone (soon to be completely overhaul-
ed) was the first automatic system installed In any country outSide
the ,4.S. ...

The U.S: Wisconsin, the World's
.i'" .. '. :., eches), that dropped anchor In Port
a .^' "?^ : "i last weekend for a few days look-
ing around, carries complete print
'ing equipment including litho-
graphy' apparatus to compare
: with any the local press can boast.
'The well-trained printing technl-
h f l l clans on the Wisconsin get out a
i dally paper, a bi-monthly, pay
forms, scripture readings for the
padre, -and instructions for manning battle stations. There Ni also
a fine band as 1000s learned at the 7:60-8:00 p. m. concert In the


I hamp de Mars Kiosk last Saturday.


H U U f f U h htglf*l l f h t l l lf i j f hi l j f tj j jt1f hj-- I -7 ii-ai nnnn`uut -8 ......


I '1





if






















-PAUL AUXIL-A

-AUX CHOSES D'HAITI
U













J:rCANAPE VERT
CITADELLE SHOP
I



I
U

















- -Mrs. .IONTREITM
I-MADAME CEUS L'STIN

I -FISHER
1 0
















-FRESCO BAR
-JEAN FOSY LA-LM

THES
. WHICH ADH]


~..nnnn.n.nnnmflfl.n..n..


5-


WIEILCCAII 1 II411

THE MEMBERS OF


SYou In Your Own Interest To Visit


Haiti's Oldest Perfume Store

Haiti's Best Sisal 'Rug' Factory

: Haiti's Newest Department Store

: Cap-Haitien Souvenirs

SHaitian Handicraft

: Haiti's Leading Embroidery) Workshop

SHaiti's Largest Art & Curio Shop

: Bar and Grillroom Airconditioned
: Haiti's Largest Jewerly Store


-FRITZ MEVS

-BOUTIQUE D. REMAIN

-SANCHEZ TRAVEL
SERVICE
-SOHADAC (KENOL
BROTH)
-STORE CLUB

-TABOU
-LOUIS TOUSSAINT


: Haiti's Largest Mahogany ..
Factor7 .*,. .
: Paris .- Pdrt-au-Prince' .
idute Couture

: Cap-Haitian Mahogany
S- Ceramics
Haitian Handicraft .
: Haiti's Only Air-Conditioned, .:
Shop
Flowers and Perfrnes
: Haiti's Largest Mahogany
Furniture Factory


E STORES ARE DISTRIBUTORS OR DIRECT IMPORTERS OR MANUFACTURERS -
ERE TO A ONE PRICE POLICY AND CARRY SELECTED ITEMS WITH PRICES MARKED


;.-... .. .. "


Z l Vit .2
................. ..... -LI-'M A im" i :'. ; "a


",-i '* ,".. -" .. *,-*

. .A '


PAGE 11


- 'eq 2MI11111-1 11


is -- __


-- --------------------------





PAGE 12


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


L- ). 4I

Magazine feature-writer Jack
Long (whose article, 4In Haiti
I heard the Haunting Jungle
Drums*, recently appeared in
Holiday Magazineb) flew home
to the U.S. last Sunday accom-
panied by this wife.
The Longs admitted they spent the
first part of their month-long va
cation celebrating their arrival
and the last part drowning their
sorrow at having to leave. But
in between they managed a look-
see at the Citadel and the Nor-
thern Capital, and a visit to Doe
Reser at Pont Beudet.
Doe Reser reports the ace-scri-
be may be collaborating on a li-
fe of the Doe, and has already
carried off a sheaflof manus-
cript written by Reser recoun-
lting his experiences as the only
white "houngan* hereabouts.
The word is "expected from Jack's
pubUlishers soon, Doc tells us.
Writer Loig is working on a
character sketch of Doc Reser
as an entry for the Reader's
Digest'sp Most Unforgettable
Character column. He will be
back with his charming wife as so-
on as their packed schedule per-
Smits
xxx *


U,-.
al









U.S. Embassy Second Secreta-
ry John. W. Black has been trans
ferred to the home country, and
expects to leave soon. Mr. Black
has spent eighteen months here
and leaves many friends.
X.r x. X
Dr. Athemas Bellerive, Viee-
President of the American Asso
ciation of Public Hygiene was in
kited this week to preside over
the Public Hygiene Congress to
take place soon at Puerto Rico.
X X X
U.S. Winsconsin ,brass* in
Port when the battleship called
Inst week-m.nd were: Captain G.
S Patrick (comrpander). Conm-
manders T.D. Cilnningham and
L. J. WVren (assisting the Cap-
tainm, Captain R. E Westholmn,
and the ship's priest Father
Bradford. Rear Admiral G. R.
Cooper also was aboard.
.T .r .r -
Mrs. Love Leger, wife of the
Haitian Ambassador to London
flew to England this past week.
Sxxx
SDr. Binga Desmond, celebra-
ted New-York surgeon, arrived
Monday with his wife on his se-
venth visit to the republic.


,Colonel Roger Villedrouin has I x xX
been transferred to Gonaives General Electric Engir
as Commander of the Military alexanderr D. Mac Ewan,
Department of the Artibonite. liam Dempsey and C.S.
He will replace Colon,el Germain ira down from London ]a
Duchein2 who has been appoin- the foundations for the tel(
ted Director of the Transport ne'overhaul so anxiously
Department of the Public works, ted in the capital. Thirteen
a post formerly occupied by Mr. electricians are expected to
Andre Jeanty, now Deputy of ]the present crew in March.
Port-au-Prince.


P e rI uir/q I








a a n
6e.m


neers
Wil-
Price
lying
epho
awai-
new
join


Californians Charles Kuns- The Mexican Ambassador (De- General Marcel Jean Penette
man and Charles Bell Rubin are an of the Diplomatic Corps) and was on last Saturday's plane
spending a short vacation in Mrs. de Torres Talavera enter- from C.T.
Port staying at the Park Hotel. tained at a sumptuous dinner r x .
Mr. Kunsman, a professor at the last Sunday evening, at the Me-
University of California, is on xican Embassy. in honour of the Deputies Philippe Jocel.Nn and
a year-long mission in Jamaica Haitian Ambassador to Paris and Joseph Damas recently elected
studying the politics of the is- Mrs. Rene Jeanty. to the seats of Aux Cayes (st and
land, and Mr. Rubin is a Los An- .:'i?:g th2 gvc-st present we- 2 nd circumcription) visited Port-
geles attorney who has practised re: Argentine Ambassador Mr. au-Prince, this week accompanied
Law for forty years. Jorge Benjamin Aquino, French by Deputy Milien Conde.
x X Ambassador and iMrs. Roger de
Former Director of %Le Nou- Bercegol de Lile, Minister of
\elliste,. Senator Desinor leit C o m m e r c e and Mrs. Mar-
the ,Hospital of St Francis des :el Fon,brun, Haitian Ambassa-
Sales* this past week after a gra 'or and Mrs. Jean Francois, Di-
ve and protracted illness rector of the Institute and tMr.
Simon Lando, Mr. and M-rs. Qe-
.rd Hs, orges Heraux, Mr. and Mrs. Pier
Mr Fernand Hulse, Vice Pre-
re Ro. w.:N.Jor and I-rs. Franc.,
sident of PAEC, the industrial reRo M.j Sorian rsF .
Et:c-nie. Senorita Beatrice, D:"
firm that does the accounting ,.... S ad M acqu.
for COINMAR's work here. re. I' CA. Salgdo, Mrs tacque
line Laraque (daughter of Am.
cently arrived in port. bnaador Gustav Laraque;, The -
Dr. Felix Bute:nu has returned Secretary of th Argentine Em-
to his post at the head of the s M-. and Mrs. Theodor
Health Department Jn Aux Ca- ^ ^ ^ ^
Health Department in Aux Ca- JDonner. iTIr. and Mrs. Robert Na
'yes after six months specialist !. Mr and Mrs. Leon Cassa-
tion study [n Europe. gnol, Mrs Muriel Thebaud, Chief
X X X of Protocole. Mr. Daniel Theard.
Statistic Office tabulation X X
rlerk John Philippe Thomas left A\fter a brief stay here. Mr
last Thursday for Chile where he RWchard. R Powell. Professor or w|ItE 1
.!ill study economics [or a vear o7 Law at Columbia University left ,E
a Statistic; Insitil-e Scholarsn,. Powtau-Prince recently bound' ',
x Xx tor Kingston. He was cordially I -
Mr Werner -Limberg, a very welcomed heve by His Excellent.. ,c3, i
important German Coffee mer the President of the Republic ar.O
chant, has recently returned to the Secretary of State of Natio-I
Hamburg after a week in Haiti nal Education, Minister Leon La. T '
contacting Haitian coffee expor- leau.' During his stay here Pro I
ters He represents the Ham- fesor Powell delivered a Yectu- -. ".SCOYCH
burg firm %Ubersee Kaffeea, re at the Haitian American Ins- 1 ,it -the ,
i big establishment for coffee titute at the invitation of Mr PROOF .
roasting which has obout 50 cof- Ralph Brown. inr-ih lhottle -
fee retail shops in' Hamburg and x .X X-
Western Germany. Mr Limberg Austrian Minister Karl Gru
his made a special mixture of Bra ber, after presenting his ,letters
silian and Haitian coffee which de creances, as'"Envoy6 Exti-aor.
finds, more and more buyers in dinaire. and wMinistre PI6nmpo -
Germany. He hopes that Germa tentaire, here and inthe Domi-.1 M I I mi"
ny wili soon buy more coffee nican Rpourblic, returned lost IM AWi 'll-dl
from Haiti so that commerce week to Washington where he '- r ^. ^
between the two countries will so represents, his country as Ambas Raed'
on be better balanced, sador, extraordinary and pleni- MA;,11a#ttkt
x a" 1potentiary.
Henock. Trouillot, our distin- o o o 0,0 P,.
guished econfrere/, celebrated Mr. Clarence (COINMAR) Moa -- "
his birthday Wednesday. dy set out for Havana Tuesday
on business.
... P7


F0O EXCLUSIVE MAHOGANY WARE


IBUY DIRECT FROM THE FACTORY


FRITZ MEVS

-HAITI'S MAHOGANY PIONEERS-

Former Bellevue Club, Sacr&-Cweur
Phone 5448, P. 0. Box 1204


Our motto is: From the factory to your hands


em.
Sy l' TT


''rCT>)





S*s v'y-


____________ HAITI SUN





.NDAY, JANUARY 23rd
$UNTDAY, JANUARY 23rd


SHAITI SUN


U. N. Expert
..Exp-lains Plain for.
Currency Reform

Continued frontpage 2)
"' "now the case for dollar checks and
.drafts. (5) Supervision ofbak
banks
including # the Commercial and
.-. Savings Department and the Hai-
Iion Institute of Agriuhlt.inral and
Industrial Creditn by the Monetary
Board, acting through a Controller
of Vlnks. (6) Requiring thg Mo-
netary Department to keep a gold
and dollar reserve of 40% of its
VI note, coin and deposit liabilities,
instead of the present requirement
of a 33 1/3% reserve against notes
only, but providing for.some elas-
ticity by calculating the reserve
as an average percentage over a
12 month period, kstead of taking
the percentage for a single month.
-(7) Providing that the Monetary
FAMOUS FILM STAR Claudette Colbert with equally famous Britlsil Department may' make rediscounts
playwright Ndel Coward are met at the airport by Director of T'u- for and loans to the banks to help
rism Pierre Chauvet and -El Rancho. owner Albert Silverd on aryi- them meet seasonal needs or emer-
I,& las week Saturday. The gromp which included Dr. and .Mir4..P.-. agencies.
Seidman of Paris,. came over from Jamaica: ended the visit here At the end of his-remarks, Mr.
Wednesday. (Clich& 'Le Nouvelliste.) M,'oore emphasized that his reeom-
m mAdations had not yet received
the Government's final approval,
although. they. had, been formulat-
(d after long discussions with the
.4..'Management of the Nafibnal Bank
and with the Finance.Minister in
several successive cabinets. He ex-
pressed the hope that business
-"* ,, men, who would be the principal.
users and beneficiaries of the new
system, would study and discuss
it in detail.


CELEBRITIES IN PORT this week are Russian-born. American com-
poser Irving Berlin, responsible for a large proportion of'Tin Pan Al-
lefs best sellers, and his wife. His reputation reportedly started.
picking up velocity wi;h Alexander Ragti ie Band in 1912, was safely
assured after dWhite Christmnas,. -Easter Parade., "God Bless Ame-
rica-. Mr. Berlin decided on luxury resort -El Rahcho. for his two
week stay here. The above photograph shonis the couple being met
on arrival by Tourism Director Pierre Cliauvet.
(Cliche -Le Nouvelliste'

-^ ^ 'K ssi^ fi U^^^ei~
I~WM'' i~~sqr~2 ~


-A

LOCAL'PHILIPS RADIO DEALERS at their second convention,held last
Friday 'in the Curacao Trading Company showroom on Rue Pavee.
Picture in the background, one of the new advertising signs issued'
to Philips Agents this year, represents the 'Philips.works at night.
It was lighLted by specially concealed bulbs -to Five a realistif effect,
Curagao Trading Manager Dick Leegstra read the data on progress,
during 1954 NO% of Haiti's imported 5.615 radios were nPhilips;
67% solo by Curacao Tirading itself). A demonstration of the new.
model, followed, including detailed explanation by the company's,
chief technician.'


^'yairsif rearchan development

V 72,000.000 miles of road testing


S


/ Spectacular success iLn more than 4u countiru


IN 1955



IT'S.


FORD


I A


The -Greatest Gasoline De-
velopment in 32 Years.
Millions of motorists all over the world have
taken up theu challenge that two tankfuls of
Shell Gasoline with LC.A. abolish PRE-IGNI-
TION and MISFIRING. Those same motorists
have found. once again. that pleasure which
they have not experienced since their engines
were newly run-in and gave eager response
to the throttAe. Shell with I.C.A. brings back
New-engine"' Performance and Smooth Run-
ning.

* Two tankfuls will convince
you .
Wait until your tank is almost empty before
you first fill up on Shell with I.G.A. After
your second tankful you will be pleasantly
amazed by the increase of power and heller
performance. Remember, improved 'cnr'f3-n-
ance can mean more miles per gallon. Re-
mi-bher, too, that I.C.A. is exclusive to SHELL!

First and Finest
SHELL With I.C.A.


gives you


"New-engine" Smoothi
and Best Performance


PRE-IGNITION _- Combustion chamber
deposits from gasoline without L.CA. can
become red hot and tire the fuel.'air m.x-
ture in the combustion chamber before the
piston is ready for the power stroke IIc-It
hand diagram). That Is PRE-IGCNITION it
can damage your engine, and it al.-
causes rough running and po.-;r I s S-
with I.C.A. "fireproofs" the depnj," q -
hand diagram): that is why you til s I
running nndI im'nroPd irerformnante Uv
using Shell with I C.A.


less


" ..,.
. . . . . ..,.... ..*,.. .


PAGE 13 .
_____PAGE 13 -


lob





Only 180 pairs left
FINEST QUALITY
SHOES
Former Price $
Liquidation Pr.

AsAorted Lot
SILK GOODS
Former Price $
to
Liquidation Pr.


q









I


For Women
Bras


14.00
5.00


1.20
1.60
0.80


SILK LACE


TnPr


~Li

I

I
if
ii
if
if
I
I
if
if
if
C.
if



if

if
if
if
II


rmer Price
uidation Pr.


$ 3.00
1.00


Famous FLEXEES
Former Price $ 2.00
Liquidation Pr. 1.00

CRETONNE Reinlets


Superior Quality
Former Price
Liquidation Pr.


$ 1.20
. 0.80


Large Lot of Assorted
COTTON GOODS
Former Price $ 0.60
to 0.80
Liquidation Pr. 0.40


SUITS
Garbardine-Spring-
weave Shantung
Former Price $35 t
Liquidation Pr.


For Men
SHOES for Children


o $50
20


TROUSERS Garbardine


Former Price
Liquidation Pr.


$8.50
5.00


One Lot ot
SHOES FREEMANAA


Form, Pr. $14.75
Liquidation Pr.


to $19.75
14.00


cHOLLYWELT)
Former Price
Liquidation Pr.

PAJAMAS in silk

Former Price
Liquidation Pr.


SHIRTS for Children


(American made)
Former Price
Liquidation Pr.


TIES (French) POLOS SPORT
Former Price $2.50 Former Price
Liquidation Pr. 1.00 Liquidation Pr.
AND A THOUSAND
OTHER ARTICLES


LA BELLE


CREOLE


NEVER


even at these unbelievable prices, the purchaseof articles provided for in the rales of the contest
will give you the right to participate in the raffle of 3 big prizes:
*


1st PRIZE: A VESPA

2nd PRIZE: AN OMEGA WATCH

3rd PRIZE: A TISSOT WATCH


For "LA BELLE


$54.0-0
40.*


$7.00
4.00


$2.50
1.60


$7.00
3.00


GOES BACK ON ITS WORD...


ITS PROMISES.


HAITI SUN '


SUNDAY, JANUARY


.PAGE 14


1 0H!@1o161,1I M M U U "UM 09IM H ----------
4: 1 -----W.Un n m


6th January Liquidation at
/Q
S- S



ott








Each year at the same time LA BELLE CREOLE makes a semi-annual inventory and liquidates
the balance of its merchandise imported for the end of the year.
There is a Christmas every year, but all the Christmases are -not followed by any liquidation as
advantageous to the public. For three years, no similar occasion has been presented. It will not hap-
pen again for several years. This is then an occasion to seize while it 'is passing.
From January 24th to February 10th, you may purchase at LA BELLE CREOLE, at below the
wholesale price, the following articles :


CREOLE"


KEEPS






sUNDAY, JANUARY 2:Ird RAI4TI SUN


SUNDAY, JANUARY 23rd


Mrs. Sheilah Burns will return'
Jhome to Diquini with her son
.and new daughter Sheilah Kat-
hy. on the 27th.

iEugene Carrie leaves for the
U.5. on business, soon.


Herman Pape returned from
the States last Sunday.

E-.ene Laroche celebrated his
birthday on the 19 th at Hotel
Beck in Cap Haitian where he
heads the food supply project of
the Agricultural Bapk.
I I
Simone Rigaud, short-hand-ty-
pist wizard, observed her birth-
day on the 18 th.

FOA Chief Raymond Smith
wa, in bed with a cold Tuesday.

Mrs. Homer Shrewsbury wife
of the Architect observed her
fez." Tuesday, at the Riviera.


I
Colonel York, in charge of the
Air Mission in this area was he-
re last week with General Dou-
glass, The Colonel will be re-
membered as operational Chief
on the famous Doolittle Tokyo
'Raid.

Mr. and Mrs, Henry Shece
man of Brooklyn are house guests
of the Fosy Lahams n Petion-
Vile with Jane Gans of Chicago.
Mrs. Sheceman is Lila Laham's
sister.

Dr. Daniel Russell and Bill
Obsment returned with evidence
of a good day's fishing, at the
mouth of the Artibonite last Sun
day. The 15 boucheesb -(snooks)
and Jacks most 25 pounders
were served at a formal fish din
ner at the Riviera Wednesday
evening.

Last Sunday Hotel Riviera ope
ned its new 22-room annex with
Father Smith handling the ,ablu
Lion> ceremony and the Tl'eau
benite.* The celebration and fe-
te-ing lasted from 4:00 to 8:00
P.M.

' Mrs. Lilyan Amsterdam of At-


Fred and Marie-Therese Tal-
lender are Haiti's foremost sea-
gulls. Taking out a week ago in
their sail boat for a tow, around
tire isle. they are expected to
touch Jamaican shores before pul
ling in at their cottage4by4he
.;ea at Arcachon.

Winter guests at El Rancho'
are MrIs. Tany% Roberts and
daughter Susan a candidate
for chairman at the table of the
famous Quiz Kids. The Roberts
are from Caracas.


Cross Legion of Honour of the
French Government January 12.

Carl Wall, a widelyknown
American Journalist who writes
for the Readers Digest*, (circu-
lation 20.000.900) arrived in Hai-
ti the beginning of this week to
gather data for an article on the
country. He was presented to
the Secretary of State for
the Presidency, Mr. Marcel Fom
brun, Wednesday morning by
SIPP Director Denys 'Bellan'de.

Mr. R. Lacombe will ar-
rive in Port to morrow
t o take over the post
on the French University Mission
(Credit and Banking) vacated
by Mr. Jean Boreau de Roince
who recently returned to France.

Marie-Denise, fourth flower
of the ojardinz formed by the
Maurice FilsAime girls recei-
ved congratulations and wishes
for many happy returns,), when
she celebrated her birthday an-
niversary on January 20th. The
charming Denisedoes a stint at
,tOuvrbir National.*


Fos.y Laham and his lovely wi- Georgette Laurent (Mrs. Se-
fe Lila won a bottle of Champa- Jour) exhibited her latest designs
gne at El Rancho on Monday ni- and creations of embroidered
ght for their expert meringuing blue denim peasant style skirts
It was a night for 'celebrating and ."basket- handbags at her
being Lila's birthday anniversa. Petion-Ville shoppe this- week,


Lovely Ehiamnne .Craan will be-
come the bride of Richard Wo-


oul on inursaay evening, Janua-
ry 27th. at l'Eglise de Sacre Coe
ur de Turgeau.


British Columbians Kenneth
Payne and William Doig are hi-
bernating this winter in Haiti at
the Majestic. The two young
Vancouverites said: last winter
in Hawaiian islands they enjo-
yed the beaches and the scenery,
but the iarne commercialism
that prevails in North America
prevails there. In Haiti it is dif-
ferent everyone is very friend
ly and they are getting used to
the ,give-me-fiv'-centers. ,They
promise to write a < historia.>
on their 191/2 hour Camion
trip -Du Cap a Port-au-Prin-
ce. Ken Payne is a nephew of
Philipp'Payne, resident Witness
cult head.

Mr. and Amrs Frantz Seigel and
daughter Joanna. and Mr. and
Mrs. Jacques Carbonel left by
car Wednesday on a three-day
pilgrimage to Higuey (Domini-
can Republic) to attend the an-
nual Fete de Notre Dame d'Al-
tagracc. The party will be joi-
ned byA Mrs. Laroche of Cap-Hal
lien.


lantic Beach, L. I: arrived here The Gerard Bazelais entertai-
on the S/S Ancon and took up ned friends last night at their
dancing and lodgings at the Ibo Pction-Ville home, where guests
Lele. participated jn the preparation
of the delicious barbecued ,ipor.
Mrs. Jean Fouchard returned '-id '.Geba;,: clWhew! did I ha-
tL'is past week from San Juan %e a hard time getting Lise to
tChere daughters Claudette, Ed- agiee to slaughter that pig-
wNige and niece .Marie Florence .Snortles, was her favorite pet.,
Roy are pursuing their studies.
Gerard Fil-Aimi, (Alaison Geor
ges Naude) chalked up another
printemps. on Jan. 23rd with
sons .Chewpie>, and eTi-Chris
guarding the .gateau and de-
inanding to be allowed to take
a putf at the candles.


N>


C


General Franck Lavaud, for-
miner Haitian ambassador to Paris
was honoured with the Grand


and they promise new pleasure
to the artistic-minded and visi-
ting ladies this season.

Miss Alice Nau returned last
Tuesday from a five-week, vaca-
tion in Kingston, Jamaica. visi-
tiyg friends and enriching her
English vocabulary.


Ronald Barwell, the British
Engineer, ex-wing Commander
of the R.A.F. presently residing
here, announced his engagement
to Maud Montas in champagne
at the Ki Pi last week.

Mr. Jack Ryan, Director of
Reynolds Mining at Miragjane,
returned on Thursday from big
talks with Company officials in
Little Rock, Arkansas.

Widely-Known commercan.t
Roger Boucard was in Jacmel
last week on business and fa-
mily affairs.

The Lombards of Cite Maglpi-
re If dined the Costellos, R1eds,
Hollubecks, Roland Wiener, and
Jeanne Brousse at Picardie Thurs-
day night.
.1 p ,
Mrs. Georges Naude is in Mia-
mi this week on a shopping mis-
sion.

Racing's Lucien Lafontant clip
pered to the States last Sunday.

Robert (Mellon Hospital) and
Ada Laws returned from Flori-
da Sunday.


Carol Madsen is observing her
birthday today.

Leonard Lungwitz was off to
Chicago on the 20 tb.

Daniel Theard, Chief of Proto-
col, was New York bound Friday.

Helen Me Cord is over again
From Kansas City visiting with'
Jeanne Brousse.

The Cite Magloire Duffs left
last week for Chicago to attend
the funeral of Bill's mother.

Zjzi Riviera has the mumps.

Chief Fitzgerald of Seattle,'
Washington, First Vice President
of the Association of Fire Chi-
efs, and George Richardson, Se-
cretary General of the Associa-
tion of Fire Fighters dropped In
to town this week to
visit with old friend Lt Georges
Elie (tils) and Capt. Georges Elle
-n route home to the U.S. after at-
tending a Fire Fighters confe-
rence in San Juan.

eEl Rancho- proprietor Albert
Silvera flew to Paris Friday..


"Mr.Jacques Lafleur has just
Christianne Barros is home returned -from a three months
from her European travels Ii- trip in Canada And Chicago.' He
ving with her husband Ln Petion- returned -wilh three Certificates
,ille. from the Kelberg Health InstiU-
tute of Chicago in the advanced
Marie-Thzese Sajous, Miche principle and special technique
le and Marie Carrie flew to Was of massage, remedial exercices,
hingtpn on the 20 th. hydrotheraphy and electrothera
py, 'Foot Technique, and
Jane Eddy is retuFning to her Sceqtific Swedish Massage. Mr.
Laf1eut made the acquisition :of
post in Rio this weekend after a Lafl made the acquisition o
happy furlough in Port. complete new equipment WOr
installation at the clinic where
Pen Aboudi vacated his 'El he will continue to collaborate
-Fen with his father.
n _._..... -.... .... .. w ith his father.


* Rancino suite yesieraay ana re-
.turned to his New York business.

-The tres joli bogota transpor
tng debonair Hubert Etheart
and Claude Gentil around town
is a 1929 Buick.


Kalim Hage grand commer-
cant de la place threw him-
self a birthday party last week


- Word is going round that U.S.
Consul Lawrence's next post
will be Venice.
BRIGADIER F. X- HINTON,
M.C.,E.D. Maison Constant Elie-Josephl,
accountant. Me. Georges Dabbas

Haitian Consul in Sydney Aus wed the secretary Miss Gaby Fa-
tralia who is presently in Haiti ro at Sacre Coeur 5:30 p.m. yes-
on a world tour. The brigadier, terday. ,Parraini was Gerard
nrho met the Chief of State of Elie Joseph, and eMarrain, Mrs
the Haitian Army shortly after Marie Therese Faro. .
arrival, was received by His Ex-
cellency the President of the Miss Rene Francillon has ente
Republic thispast week and pre. red school in Kingston, Jamaica.
sented a letter of personal fri.
andly greeting) from the Prime The first guests to check into
Minister of Australia (H.G. Men. 'the luxurious, new, 22-room Hotel
zies) to President Magloire. Riviera annex were Traffic Chief
and Deputy Police Commissioner
,Haiti Journalb, on, of the ma Jim Hoye and Mrs. Hoye, with In-
jor dailies of the capital, marked dustrialist-philanthropist Charl e s
its Silver Jubilee Thursday with Cherry and Mrs. Cherry of Detroit,
an office, party attended by a lar Michigan, Member's of the exclu-
ge group of oconfreresn. Foun- sive 'Crisis Club. The distinguish-
ded by President Vincent 25 ye- ed visitors from the 'auto hub of
ars ago, 4Haiti Journals has be- the word, arrived Thursday and
en unremitting in its service to checked into the week-old annex
the public a tradition well main for-five days sightseeing in the
trained under its present editor, republic.
IMarel Salnave.


Al Stahl, Service Engineer of
P and H Harnischfeger Corpbra-
lion (Engine Makers) is. over
from Miami conferring with SO
NACO distributors.


Jacqueline Etheart who has been
using up her accrued annual leave
during the past several months is
expected back at her desk on Mun-
day at SCISP where she is Secret-
ary to the Chief of Party.

Miss Raymonde Leveille becamjn


Mrs. Sidney Marks (former
Fahimi Goldenberg) atrjved Fri-
day morning-with her big son
Joel to vacation' with the family
in Petion-Ville after 2 years ab-


sense.


Joe Defaille is back at his Ave-.
nue Ducoste residence from a two-
year sojourn in New York. Hail-
ing from Jerfmie, Joe spent 20
years in New York, before return-
ing six years ago and establishing
hVs American wife and family in
Port au Prince. While ih the U. S.
on this trip Joe submitted to an
operation and returned in excell-
ent form.

The Petion-Ville Branch of Li-
gue Feminine d'Action Soclale
issued invitations to a reception


P


n honor of Mrs. Adrien Massa
nee Denise Etheart) on Sunday .
morning January 23rd from 10:00 ,
:o 12:00. The sumptuous Pelerin '
villa of the President of the au-
xiliary, Mrs Arsene Pompee, was -
chosen for the occasion hono- .
ring Mrs. Massa recently elected "",
to the Council of Petion-Ville.

44






The Carl Bondels are parents
of a hefty son, Carl Junior, who
arrived last Sunday. Mom is for-
mer Georgette Labrousse.

cSheilat. is the name of the
new lovelyy, delivered by the
stork on January 15th to the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Max Bolte of Jac-
mel. The girl and her mother
are both in splendid form.


the bride of Mr. Denis Chlaries yeF Mrs. Roger Armand, charming
terday at 5:00 p.m. in St. Franvoise .directrice. of .Magic Island Trs,
J Church at Grand Goave. presented her husband with their
f, fourth -*a girli- this week.
Agronomist and Mrs. Raoul Do3' Mr. and Mrs. Fritz Greger check-,
;ous are parents of a bealtlv son ed in son Frantz this week. Mom,
named Lucien, delivered Saturday the former Ghislaine M6rovde and
P.8- 9th ~. her hefty son are fine. :, '.;.
....j..:.../ ^ ,. .. ^ .== ..:: t .. =.4 '.... &. .
'~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~z b ..,.:.. .' !"r"". : ."'. :.: -..1 ... I.t :. @. ," ." '. "., "


REG.TRADE MARK


SL.H


HATI -SUN


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tr


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I


PAGE 15







PAGE 16 HAITI SUN SUNDAY, JANuARY 23rd


AUTHOR OF "DIVINE HORSEMEN"
(Continued from page 1)
ly, the real spark of this Ame- Red-haired Maya first came here
ican (avant garde) movement in 1947 on a Guggenheim scholars
as been the tireless Maya De- hip to make a film and was side-
en.... no one has seen her films tracked into writing the book.
without being stimulated by the She hopes to finish the film
freshness of its imagery and its on this visit, as the companion
heer technical virtuosity. ics of most of the informed pu- MNaya Deren, who has recor-
lications in the United States ded music in ,houmforts- throu-
ilso have been lavish in their ghout the country, re-
raise of her films, the haunting cently released her recordings
poetic images, unorthodox fil- under the collective title VOI-
iic concept aid techniques of CES OF HAITIP which were ac-
'hich make the films *superbly claimed by critics as the best
dramatic and heroically tragic. recordings of drum music in
Even more extraordinary, per- existence.


haps, is the fact that Maya De-
ren is all things to her films:
writer, producer, director, ac-
tress, light man, editor and distri
butor.
It was her interest in films
that, led to her extensive study
of vaudun which resulted in Di
vine Horsemen:.


Her chef d'ceuvrev Eye of
Nights was produced by John La
touche, author of %Cabin in the
Skys and, more recently, the hit
oGolden Apple,, working in co-
operation with Anthony Tudor
and the Metropolitan Opera bal-


I HOTEL BEAU RIVAGE

SFor The Best Food in Town
And Unrivalled Service


IN THE

HEART OF

EXPOSITION

...AREA

OPPOSITE


AIR-CONDI

TIONNED

MARBLE TILED

FAVOURITE OF

HAITIANS AND

TOURISTS


CASINO
INTERNATIONAL


Now Featuring A Sensational
Series of Tea-Dances by
The BEAU-RIVAGE POOL
The Only Hotel Offering a
Choice of BOTH EUROPEAN and AMERICAN PLANS


l. l.. .a ,_ -.. ...

Luncheon Dinner Dancinfg Daily

; Special Dinner Dance

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Evenings
i" Shows by

NATIONAL FOLKLORE TROUPE
DANCING NIGHTLY FRIDAYS 9:30 P.M.


b
ri
h
re



p
fn
s'
ti
b
a
PI
P(
n

di


Dominican Diplomat

(Continued from page 1)

Chief of Protocol Daniel The-
ard and Mr. Roger Savain visi-
ted the injured man ,early Sun-
day to present the sympathy of
the Government and the Chancel
ry. President Magloire, immedia-
tely on being informed of the
accident, delegated his personal
physician Dr. Antenor Miot who
accompanied by Dr. Constant
Hollant, hurried to-the hospital.
Mr. Morales was accompanied
to the air-port by the Dominican
Ambassador, Mr. Legrono Co-
hen, Mr. Roger Savain and Capt.
Max Tassy, representative of the
President.
Drs. Andre Cuvilly, Georges
Hudicourt and Rena Wiss flew
with Mr. Morales to Ciudad
Trujillo.
The Haitian Ambassador to
Ciudad Trujillo, Mr Albert Ethe-
art, Mr. Paul Verna, Louis Noi-
sin, Secretaries to the Embassy,
and Dominican officials met the

The Best Quality Cement at
the Lowest possible cost)

ALLEN & BAUSSAN
OFFER THEIR


In Bags of 42 1/2 Portland
Cement Standard Hydraulick
gs Net 6 Ply
Distributors: SONACO
Office: MTTC Bldg. Exposition
Port-au-Prince Tel: 2387


ed e
in f(


[5
-, -~


Publisher of --"
(Chicago Defender))
Here to do Articles
(Continued from page 1)

ADefender Correspondents Mrs.
Spragg and Mr. Waters also ha-
been h(re publishing articles i
that made many trends for Hai-
ti.
Mr. Sengstacke who directs a
channel of eight newspaper in
the major cities of the United
States declared: <'We are most i
concerned with what we can do
to help Haiti. I am here to find
out about the present industries
and the potentialities of invest-
ment.)
The Chicago Publisher inclu-
ded a Sunday morning pilgrima-
ge to the Citadel, and a visit to'
the Artibonite Valley and the Pe-
ligre Dam, the previous day. He
expects to return to Haiti on ano
their trip to the West Indies a- G
bout February 18th when he Aut
will be accompanied by his wi- dore
?e, and probably his three sons. rob.


progressistea. Mr. Fabius is seen at left.

plane at the airport, and arran- PH
ged for immediate transporta-
tion to the Alberto Gomez Clinic Treati
where Dominican surgeon, Dr.
Battle and .Haitian doctors, Wiss ment
and Hudicourt performed the
difficult, hour-long operation to AVE
save the damaged eye. Results (Che
are extremely satisfactory and 7:
the surgeons say complete reco- JA(
very is expected in three mon-(Gradua
ths. ad s
Mr. Morales, who' arrived in "assa!
Haiti January 4 from New Or- ostitute
leans where he .was Consul Ge- a.ute
neral, is married and has four Health.
children two at school in Ciu et
dad Trujillo and the others in soIn C
New Orleans. InCha


CARIB ZONE CHIEF OF US RED
CROSS TOURING HAZEL DALMA
GED AREAS.
(Continued from page 1)
drove further along the coast over-
land.
Original plans to meet the Coast-
guard ship 4Vertieress for the' trip
ed when the craft ran aground
ed wheYn the craft ran aground
coming in too close to the shore
at Jtrtmie to'escape the dangerous
seas Thursday night. The boat was
reportedly not seriously damaged
but passengers had to be evacuat-
ed to the near-by beach. Captain
Lafontant showed great coolness
and effecieticy in quieting panic
and ensuring an orderly departure
from the vesse stuck high up on
a sand bar in the bay.

DANIEL ROUMAIN SON OF
WRITER -- DIES SUDDENLY
IN PARIS.

The family of -the late (great)
writer Jacques Roumain were
shocked and saddened Thursday
by news of the death of his son
24-year-old Daniel Roumain, who
left Port au Prince recently to
continue dress-designing studies in
Paris.
OVER FROM P. R.

Dr. Lydia J. Roberts, Chief of
the Domestic Science section of
Puerto Rico University, arrived in
Haiti January 13 for a three-day
visit.


IYSIOTHERAPIST
& MASSEUR
ents at home by appoint-

Clinic at No 179,
IAGLOIRE AMBROISE
z Dr Maurice Lafleur)
00 a.m to 2:00 p.m
CQUES LAFLEUR '

te: College of Suwedish
ge Chicago Ill.
ad:-Kellberg Health Zns-
Chicago.
Pediatrician Kelberg
i Inst.)
studied in Canada.-
go Student of Dr. Chanzon.
*^


in!1U't~lU1*.rAW2*' I


fltttqqflnataatK;!;n.. f::l;fl.C:f;l.S.4 *.n.^^ ;;^


FAMOUS THROUGHOUT S H 0 E S


THE WORLD_ FOR EVERY OCCASION
**'***t*w*u*: 2- ^^- ^. .. .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..iB, ... .


GEST AND BEST in the country's print-shops is this cMiller,
omatic SY 27/41 press installed this week in (Imprimerie Tiea-.
e) by the representative of the company in Haiti, Mr. Auguste
ius. The slick-runnin press turns out 4,250 copies per hour, tax.
ven Fabius' skill to install. Congratualations have been poling
)r Noroy A. Theodore, proprietor of the printer for his esprit


PAGE 16


SUNDAY, -JANUARY 230rd


Iant


HAITI SUN




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