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Haiti sun

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Haiti sun
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 46-47 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
R. Cheney, Jr.
Place of Publication:
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Creation Date:
October 29, 1950

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Haiti -- Port-au-Prince

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Sept. 1950.
General Note:
"The Haitian English language newspaper."

Record Information

Source Institution:
Duke University Libraries
Holding Location:
Duke University Libraries
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 32441147
lccn - sn 95058138
ocm32441147
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper 2117
System ID:
AA00015023:00320


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Full Text









SCOTCH WHISKY


THE HAITIAN


ENGLISH


LANGUAGE


NEWSPAPER


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"I us'S Diairti.
1,
i Led by dignitaries arrayed
in cocked haLS, pl-uines and' s'il-
ver swords, the procession
will-weave across the back-bo-
Sneof Judea, its long lines ma-
Ide up o" pilgrims from throu-
jghoul the world: On this nigh.,
Soldiers will guard the cara-:
I van along the five miles from
Calvary to the site, of the
'irist Chid's birt4.

The route makes the Bible co-
I e"real. It looks down on the fa-
ibed waIls of Jerusalem Re-
Is of Old Testament times,
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miidnight the pilgrims will rai


aIs.t.one m-iiuntansi aLC t mLU Lof
safnd stone mountains of Wadi


se their voices, in the words -Ru~n; the narrow, old streets
heard round the world: -. are filled with bearded men in
flowing robes, donkey carts
eGlory be to God on high, and and peasants wend their way


earth peace, good will towatc's over the cobblestones where fabled names and places,
amen. Christ carried the Cross. caught in memory since child-
i hood, come to life.
Worshipers file into the sa Within the walls of Old Je- ,--
cred c a v e r n beneath the rusalem, the pilgrims visit the Here is the green oasis called
Church of the Nativity to. pay Holy Sepulchre, the church the Garden of. Gethsemane,
*homage at a sliver star, belie- 'built over the traditional site scene of Christ's agony; the
ved to mark'the exact spot of the empty 'tm rb, the .mo3t tomb odf'the Vigin Mary in
where the new-born Childs]ay revered site in Christendom. the Ohbrch of ilhe Assumption
on the first Christanes mor Mount Zion, scene of the Last
nine. Everywhere in the area, the Supper, and the Mount of Oli-
According to Pan American story of the Bible unfolds, and yes. A short drive from Jeru'


/
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salem is Bethany, home of Ma:
ry, Martha and Lazarus; Je-. ;.
richo where the famous walls: "'-
came tumblin'.down,s before
the Israelites 4000 years ago;- ,1
Hebron, the burial place of. ,':
Abrhlam; and Samaria with.1,':".
the remains of the palace of,' ,
Herod, where Salome danced" ..;
and John the Baptist was be-'.'"
heade d ,
headed. -' '.": ::.^
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The amazi
pough which
11iAtting is p
ed. in the e
canvases ope
anter Decen
nileding s(
%Orks, the o
Ps gaffery-g
ty to study
I one of Ha
shed artist
1 the most v
of eoery
4 artist'
j ash. And h
e perimerit ir
Ses eliminal
it usually
#i an exhibit
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eouo t-" TLE.. .T cit, is difficult to say
ng evolution th- HAS .,ALL HIS OWN '? ".e i,
I3IGAuD HAS ISTYLE-ALL HIS OWN- IVhe is a genius the.-I Center
Wilson Bigaud's AND TALENT THAT MAY BE GENIUS or says.,but the quality
.9."iretorBsaysENIUStshown bythis'ladwhose
passing is mirro- S
Among his experiments is the roses arotnt 'a floating .compa- ved of the Virgin ground offers an explanation "i
exhibition of' his particular vibrant March& in nion tbihat seems on the point of 16-year-old's untrained /talent, them, .eem to quality hii .for
ned at the Art which he has employed teross- f I o acting off the,,canvas. Soft the master sought him out and his title. One of the attributes
e 16 patch brush technique to inten- colours' and a swinging line- took him to the Art Ceter. His of a genius is his defiance a3:"III
ber 16.Y sify the effect of light, and a-- treatment combine ,.to pirod qe first 'attempts were wooden, logi; ..
ome of his early tion. ai enchanted.- but"'.- certainly with stiff-jointed figures and he- n1St ,tabec .
ne-man-how of From th esseniailj ivn not nmdrbid --.ata~osphib're. sitting lines. There was talent'W- o' tln ecm v
>he-man-show of From the essentialJy7 living dentatlan earlyage.h While. a
ners an opp--;u- eMarchbl, Bigaud's' fertile 'ia- i lifethoI un- there, all right, but -nothing to -d.tentiataerarlya.h leat-
aU-complicated ,eyes. Hits paradis' the genius that was to be revea- refour Feruiles, n a E ha f,.
gination flickers to 'La Ronde %%Ij
t vn at Mo t whic e is as far (one;:ofhis greatest earlier pain- led in later years.,St.Ger d .h e aroy dgd.. rem
the development des Morts, which" is as far remo ting) showsis h disarming, Without following any special St. Gerard, the boy did a rema '
tis most 'acm- ved from the' hustling, thrusting child-li., conception Pure co.- art course,.the artist has become kable drawing which impressed
lie f Hitanmake a ps-- cn the teacher of his clas to such', 1.
life of a Haitian market as. pos- loers ana sightforward line- at twenty-three a powerful, corn- t son..
ersatile. No sub work capture the atmosphere of petent painter -with a style all an extent that he made Wisoz:'t.l k
th atophr and crtai- sibe..l
versatile. No su in the treatment of ae Garden before the serpent .his qwn. 'He has never had his present of some images relie.
eRonde des Mo'rtsz%-.Bigaud areoeeepn,-l. 5 e giensesD' which he cherishedW'-
od e dayo life escapes ^ Bigaudre (seen tempting Eve in the .pain- conception rfluienced by study ghe subsequently disapped I. :
study ~which' subsequently disappeared.'"i:
day life escapes veals himself lacking the sinis- of the Italian masters, never .li
ting..)Along with ,another' sighl :".
s always-active tre self-torment that motivates in hard w- drawn a e nventional. texerci- soon a-
IsawasatieanatstlkeGugu.Catr Wilson Bigaud it, a hard wor- rw. onetoa cxri ldrboyn g awith wanohfslightly K
is willingness to an artist like Gourgue. Captu- ke. Director De Witt Peters, of se,,Lbut there i a lot in his work .detheBrtistgf the school...
is willingness to ring the movement of his spi- the Art Center says 'Wilson li- that' many an old masftrv cept inevitablyrtist called t the ':.
n aios tcn-rtadipriga prgigteAtCnesase.io 1-and *1as inevitably called to the.
Various techni- rits, and imparting an intriguing yes by his painting,, and the would have fbund bf benefit. board to make chalk drawings.. '.
Sth sameness other-worldly, effect, Bigaud ne- in his Even Hyppolitt, whom Bigaud or t the tchly. drowis. :
tes the sameness eteessueeeedsndpr young artist, smiling in his u-fothohesocpy I
vertheless s u c c e e d-s in depr f t hs calls his sinspiratid has exer-
bsul habfibashifpi way, admits a his inspiration v has exer long thd other boy left school.
.edvl Orr(, \,ing death of its < be devils o ion.His ghos ts are' joyous that 'if a study does not please ted no influence on the boy's and Wilson was left in supreme.,'
in scion. His ghosts are-. joyou'him, h6 'destroys it and tries *work. Mr. Peters, declares he is
'ions. omm and. He 'was soon doing li.
tions. ie, spols, dancing ring'- again' until he achieves just the one'of- the. most orig al'. f Hal-., :con^rli. H wso Pdig q
'",..,iiiiiii effect h& wislihes. ti's :painters..,; .. ,, .... e d' o P ',
p's ",c Poisetsed of an ex t ensive co- .t .'
*\ ] /''. i '. *S OElour range, Bigaud- shows no
'" ': _.' .. ( .. special predelections, using the
o" o' u l "-S se e ye6rs (instainctively):Fthat't con- a
e'"- ,.' v iey se'right. tpne d aAtmosy o
phere. -see the. entire picture $it
so a in my., mi nd "before I put a ldne.
on .t*cnvas he sajs : '
'! nt- .... .... is-. ..,.:..
The' landmtiark painting' o7this..
exhibition is cSiestep a mar-
vel in perspective and' figure
drawing. A visiting French wri-
ter (Mnme. qejeqa r) exclaimed
on seeing 4: "
.. thiiik-that's theperson.faio-
cation of human dignity lI' 3_
Tbis, his latest work, shows 4
an almost severe ecOnomy ini i-
nA 'and colour,. with enough dis
.torton .to clinch, the. effect.
Another, land4a. k'zp ca d ""'
/I"recent. montlsf) is, tgide h
";i'r st a lbs-a
ready labelling $ pt- a' powel -- .
littlee -.com`pdsition.' President Magloire and the First Lad' are not forgetting the poor
STEPS OF THE MASTER and needy, and at this time of the year are k be seen maki.g.
Wilson' Bigaud was discovered personal visits to the orplanagir and chart, institutions of the. J.
seven years ago by Hyppolite, Capital. The lovely First Lady presided at mass distributions
who visited a cousin Of the boy of food, clothing and toys to bring Christmas Cheer to the
Wilson Bigaud and Wife HO1 and saw a statuette he had car- kiddies who look to her. with confidence.,
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A Merry Chrisfmas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSun -December25_LO5 ,.


C II IIflS.MA.. IN-1

[I1tIE IIU[CILY ILANE >ID

JERUSALEM, Jordan On such as the Tomb of Rachel, World Airways visitors to _j .:"..i
ChAistmas Fve, over the whi- lie along the historic high\w;'-y Jerusalem during the Yulptid-v i:';
te ribbon that is the road' from Near the fields where she- season will find much of the Al B__ '.
Jerusal mssto Bethlehem a sta- pherds'watch their.flocks 'by atmosphere. as Christ must'
Ypl Oill wend ifs night, the route overlooks the have known if Sheperds tend
slow way through the star- Church of the Na'tiity,,sit o,f their flocks in the ring hills
lit night to the place of Je- the manger where Christ was of Judea; nomads.qitoh their
born. Within the hrin'n at tents irilr, +1n n,-..n... ,l-




al6 1 'w "". ",U., ..er'. IT<.. Pec uh.er 25 "184"
: '::.i.i .: '.. 'A ma'sand ala Ne 'fear from RafifiSu ,Demer2"'.
3F7 MLdQomn 3g.uvow
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I Season's Greens


Vj. TO OUR MANY CUSTOMERS 4 'i

IA- .t* *.
S;-FROM FRANCK WILSON (UNIVE RSAL SALES CORPORATION) *
NY THE BUDA COPN 'OAIT~NTOA
;'*.o* ., RU O .U','Z,
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FROM FRANCK WILSON (UNIVE RSAL SALES CORPORATION) SI I
t *1 ; **- .
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V*. .* Distributor for the following SEARS ROEBUCK & COMPA- A. S. ALOE COMPANY CORPORATION
,.-' "n N THE B[UDA COMPANY NOMA INTERNATIONAL i
CHRYSLER EXPORT CORPO HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTOR THE ENGELBERG HULLER [ CORP. :*
HASTI EONTo CO. O Co., INC. THE RUDOLPH WURLITZE.
S-DE SOTO -- -DODGE DENMAN TIRES ELJER COMPANY COMPANY
IP4Ar I"ENll CaS MOTOR EXIDE BATTERIES MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY
RUCS, ETC..: SrPARON PkODUCTS THE JITTER COMPANY RAY-O-VAC LEAK PROOF '
w..... WINO.mESP]R- REPEATING WILMOT CASTLE COMPANY BATTERIES
SAUSTIN MOTOR CARS ARMS .FREEZERS OF ALL 'SIZES UIDERWVOOD CORP.
I .. FUR WHEELS DRIVE- SIMMONDS BEDS PHILLIPS BICYCLES PATTER ON ,.RGiNT COM- ,
,!.- / .VTON" BALDOR"ELtOTRIC CO. & PARTS PA.Y :
U -'---,-

:._... ..:."
I FOR YOUR GREATER CHRISTMAS ENJOYMENT ,
.T"I '""I
WE TAKE 'PLEASURE IN NFORMIiG( YOU ,
"i^ W E '* '.


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pThe Al New DODG 9 Is Makings








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A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HMitl Si


UNION S OL' L .-r'r,'"' "" tA Ai ny of the spacious club to' dan- Publicity' r J!'S i "OF RAFF
UNION SCHO A ce or to enjoy the rhythmic me WINNERS OFRFFES
nT'l A V A L RECORD S( ladies of the orchestra from da' i-Tri u.. ---
.IUt1L J iii1J~~UL Jodies of. e ho dalllriail- Trip-- E.00Niustas -
BREWAKS ALL RECORDS ^ ^ ^y ^-,
the. 'at lectric F19914 BA -. ,'..pa .
the National Palace. The hun-
: -* _dreds of happy youngsters re- Te. Wa& '" i M. oqtirtgil.
gained below to concentrate
.~ ~ '~ on the raffles and door prizes :' .
screaming their delighted, 41.,
havd itD, when the number cal-
led matched.one of the stubs
he tfct with them by nMama and
SPapa, or imparting their di- i
appointment to the nearest ,
harmed>> colleague, in liquid
form from a plastic water pis
h 'nnuto]. (The innocent but temp- t
a .ce i" o btingly-placed Master of Celre- ,,
mo-es suffered niany a wet
wound and a completely de-
,, i",,- starched collar.)
'P.art of Reco id-Breaking Bazadr co 1e7,d 'The Union School Bazaaxr !,
.i w h '. 'c
Early in the ,ening of Sa- mias shopping' the pleasant Committee, which, pacen by
turday, December 4, the well- way. Within a hour of ope- Chairman Mrs, Horace Ash- '
founded concern which clouded ning, some of the booths to, Co-Chats'man Wiltiam
Vioomati, un Union School Cr-teteafi andipts H ~inp-CnyTy .r.S I1 I"
the farces of numerus.pretty which had been cover, floe V'* omai,. and Union School 1. a
Pi-inc1 1 arao -Blar- CSmagderH. Charge- s_'<.S<
attenntes nat their attractive and aft, with attractively dis- Printipad Mirian Sagers ch.ne
],,eavy-ten be- irthe Hazel hBoth nted ga-r.ble into a '04,
and heavyladen booths, chan-' played 'gift possibilities, be- teHzlh.ne abeit
real success reaids n~ follows
ged into bright and busy smiles gan to show ,the b-e boards
asthe annual Udnion School Ba of the shelves. c M .H. son
Chairman -MFS. H. Ashton
zmar packed em in ',o breik Cocllairmat. Mr. W. Vrooman
Secretary Mi. G. Hargreaves .
all previous records socially 'WAhich the arrival of" the gra- Treasurer- 1,. J. Scott
ic The Decdrating Mr. W. Vrooman







'/ ., .*",,
and ec1 m a I I cious First Lady of the Repu- Art- Mrs. M. BarallC
crowd, eager to help loth the biric of Haiti; M.n'Ie Pa'ul E. Sewing Mrs. R.. Charles Chrstmas'Eve
Tickets & .-Rattles Mrs. M. Sager,
Haitian Red Cross and the in- aagloire," the social phase of Mrs. W. Shaw
-. White Elephant -. Mrs. G. Smith', Mrs L L o f o
dustrious Union School Coin- the the affair gained impetus H. ..rigqp Candy. Toys -. Mrs. S.
i BaraInson Bar- Commander R. Char- P
Lmittee opened wide their pur- an.d the crowd surged up to les Food Mrs. D. James Chil- -5
ses and did their early 'Christ- ihe [fesltively-detora-ted balco- dren's Booth Mrs. J. Black G- am- .
blng Mr. D. James, Mr M. Ferguson








TO THE SUCCESS rF YOUR CHRISTMAS PARTIES


6






Offers The Finest QualifyIn

R.B
,. '."' 'CAKES, PASTRIES,. BUNS,. BREAD (WHI-TE,. RYE,


>.,' ,, ..:. : '.]'
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D Special Daunce '"'. A-.' I
-Usual gay lefe",r:.w,
ise and uni '''
,r'head 1- ." '. '. .,


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.WHOLE,.WHEAT etc), and,



MEAT PIES & FRUIT CAKES


made the delicious Peter's way- 1
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. IT'S A HAPPY CHRISTMAS AND A FESTIVE NEW YEAR ,
WITH PETERS'r- ..' .
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so I'!''Ili''''!'' 1 I.
111,1111 MI iiiiiiii I I jim smiffiffimmomil




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8? A MerryChristmas and a Happy Mew Yedar from Haiti Sun
,y ". -^.. .' ,- .' ___
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Chai
latest
gaisI
Adult
-ses ar
| tratia
Repu
.a5 Da

.Int







: ;,The Gaorges -Coles' Supermarket will, present on December 23, 24, 30 and 31,. t h r
V.. pe,
an.. EXTRAORDINAIIYJURPlSE $ALE. de, til
*.' Duri th aesysoir all clients who made puead Francois at the GEORGES CS. deeatisf



AR .wil be able to 'pCharticipate Antdin this surprise sale ass.. book



'^ .. FOU,.W.NG ARE THE CONDITIONS show
f^'^ *Ti ill clients who make purchases of p0O, a numbered ticket will he present-e ween
ad at the: m age and should be kept by the clients who will then be included in tile. v




S 1.. P'to the di
:m m) {mW m a -radi at COLEISLI
T r Co Supermarket willpresent n December 23, 24, 30 and 31,December 31, 1954. h r



S The mere times you make a 10 purchase. the mere chances you will have.




1^.1 The winwngnenumber wili'receive a .Phuilips. 1955 model 7-tube receiving set!' Creol
"_`J:' --an 69AORDINAMY SURPRISE 4ALE. .6 6 thl
S During thiosaie periodays clients who made purchawiles at the GEORGES COunterS deel
'-m Mi : will be able to ,pqrtcipate in this surprise .sale.. book
NIOWN ARE THE CONDITIONS ,",. '. showir

k(j`: =d at the: cage, and- should be kept by the clients who will then be included In the. oa

t m he di


of1fli th arnous PLUMROSE products. ,
Sdrawin. YOURHSE1 ITEMS FROM GEORGES COLES, on December 23, 2194. o re
i ae m31. EVERYBODY MAYke a 10 purchase, the more chances y and will have. ust
Amlm': Th.UPi1e winning- nuffibir will'receive a .Philips. 1955 model 7-tube receiving set.. e l


DuWit I A CHANCE th F WINNING A PHILIPS RADIO OFFERED BY COpen a sample dunterT. wor


j^ ;^. ^^^^^^^^.._^ 9..^^.- thor
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e FR T S Womous PLUMPnOSE products.

.YOUR.',HISE1OLP 'ITEMS FROM GEORGE COLE, on December 23, 24 .
yA. rrt fO rW elySeil: ;fi|s
30;m0d: 'OVERODY" MAY FREELY SAMME THE PLOOOSt rPonUCTS, and YOU.r1
: &.E A'ANCE OF WINNI A PHILPS RADOO OFERED BY 'CS S T w
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*8 FOR TO WOA R I S W R then














Coi tinenfal Cuisin At ItsnBest f- H
Should

i; C from
to wol
diffi Specials ,
tons









D i p lang:
nezule
aead
eotdd
the le






/ & File is out Srindergn
speak:
teachE
Mr
xk, ce L E. .E PE RCH O IR,,.iioe'





THU OR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE oer:
CCon kineneal Cuisine At Ins Bdiesn
S-0 .- ''H"mm: a e fOur Wee`kly Specials:





S RMONDAY s TE'alope do Veau C ordon Boung
;."..10ESD AY : P

; 7 Filet de Boeuf Strindberg
WEDNESDAY:.
THURSDAY: ,, '
S & Chicken Curry Di eIrndinne
--FRYOAY
tj ":' :SAUDY Tournedos -tc rdon Roug),,
["in iSUNDAY :Poulet rdfi i la Bdurpigponne .
m;mmma mmCOMPET Menus starling from $2.75




'Mu:'" sic and Dancinq EveryNih
:)',:',,%.'- ,


'RESSOIR'S BOOK
FOR ADULT
EDUCATION
xrles Fernand Pressoir's
t work aMethode de Fran
Orab was adopted for
t Education Night Clas-
fter a dramatic demons-
on at ((The School ofThe
blic of Venezuela, Thurs
December 9
produced to, the class 'by
-amme Head Francois Del
dr. Pressoir rocketed
gh the first two courses
o hours, achieving such
factory results that 313
were immediately sold
e programme.
*suing his French-
o u g h-C r e o l e crusa
he anti-illiteracy. battler
hopes in his latest text-
the conversational angle
ing the similarity bet-
the French and'. Creole
iulaiies but underlining
differences in grammati-
onstruction (He says
e grammar 'is based on
an dialect).
system is basically one
petition. The teacher
first pronounce the
and pbrases, the au-
says in his introduction,
,afterwards (the pupil)
d pronounce them him-
In question and answer
the book is arranged
)rk up through the more
:ult phrases'and construe
,by 'ay, of more simp!3
iage forms. -
pils in the ela* class had learned to
and write Creole, but
not speak French' before


lesson. After the two pre-
aty courses they were
king French with their
ers, the Creole expert
rts.
Prpqoir is the author of
en.Mountain Poems and
Creole works.


December 25 1954 '..

ous Cuisine -
houcoune -
yMLE


Luncheon Dinner Dancing Daily

Special Dinner Dance

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Evenings -
Shows by National Folklore Troupe
DANCING NIGHTLY FRIDAY 9.30 P.. -


RARE BUT WELCOME SIGHT
today is an overnfull of home-baked bread -. This view "
shows graphically the oven capacity of KELVINATOR'S neu ,
Es1 electric range a model Only 30" wide with bu.iLt-in L
EDUCATOR PRESSOIR (C) automatic clock a.nd oven con trot. SEE MAISON ANTON KNEER
i-:






Ik ery Chrishmas and a Happy', Now Year from Ha


The Canadian Embassy's new (1400 miles) Bel Air Station Wagon, afterI
chadflfeur successfully wrapped it around a poteau electrique; avoiding a j
wlki' on the Rue Pavee. Back-seat occupant, Embassy Secretary MauriceI
mieux suffered a swollen thumb.


Back in cottons and, nylons, minus Gustav I their beloved bourrique, 1
two staunch Rocky-Mountain hikers, Ja -t Bonett. and Jean Merrill are se
above as they clipper home to Canada for refreshments. The photo-writing tea;
were to walk around the Republic. But because of an act of Malice and Bouqi
they stumbled no father than Croix des Bouquets. They will return and leI
Gustav I off on a safari after Mardi Gras.


HOTEL BEAU RIVAGE
.announces that the 24th Dece mber 1954 a -GRAND DINERF
DE NOEL. will be held in the elegant Beau Rivage dining
room, with bhe M ENU
Jaimnbon dQ Pa4ne, Consomrnme au Ravioli, Chapon A l R4-
gence, SaLde A la printaniere Cassata Sicilienne, Coffee.
I xxx
TI'he management of the Hotel will be pleased to offer its
diners a free [ass to the big Casino International 'Reveil-
lon"to he hIold that evening.
Price $5 lease reserve y.iu r tables.
Phone 3817, 3818. 3829, 4151.
,.-"t...- ,- ." ..N.-.'N .* N.*. *N.',.."N,.."'N,".t ."* ., '.'N-

CASINO INTERNATIONAL
December 24, 1954
GRAiND REVEILLON, DE NOEL
On this occasion the NEW CASINO ORCHESTRA will
make its debut under the inspired direction of Maestro Issa
El Saieh. The Jazz des Casernes Band led -by Charles Paul
also Wil provide ,festive music.
--.e-ftrance $1 Phone 3817, 3818.
CHRISTMAS NIGHT
GALA DE NOEL
With the Casino
Orchestra, the. Caser-
nes ,Jazz'boys, and
the Cercle de Dance.
: Entrance $1


HOTEL DANMBALA
THIS CHRISTM AS SEASON '
S. Offers A vFun-Pack -d Programme
S DECEMBER 23rd GAL. 4 PRE-NOEL BAMABOCHE
DECEMBER 24th CHRISTMAS 'TREE. NIGHT
with GIFTS distributed to
Clients by Damnbala's
j .AUTHENTIC SANTA CLAUS


f.",.1,

i s' m'"s" -" '"K

HAITI NOT CITED IN VOODOO prersttlotinsaLcoeptio%
their acts 'of. ma'c 'and ''.o
I EXPOSEE AT CONFERENCE doosm which is a mixture of
.... dooisniwy mayh i a miasure Otr" '-tod
Converts to hristianity may meant has contributed to' forma- the ritual of the Catholic chiur h .
be widbtspread' in the Caribbean tion of a .middle class because and of African ceremonies iand ..:
Dut inaivicuals.still hang on to religion teaches man the ways chants. ) i '
magic and voodooism. the fifth to raise his standards as it plao--
conference on the Caribbean ces emphasis on progress. a -"- A
at Gainesville Florida was M Dr. Adirien Recinos, (Guate-
told last week. malan writer, diplomat and
DIplomats, eicat'rs ,nd leOturer, said in pra tica
u~oCL~zLIbr, W4YS LU i prccal
.,. .... aLJ UUL was ajl Caribbean areas the 'Ne- '
CLUU L-. wuu s iuier -umaer- m^'l 'i
'^ .. ,o".n -groes have been converted *o i
.". a it.... ,Lween tiLe ar2a a1a the Christian -faith but like il. ,
., u.0Leu ,,iaies were olW ,f b k v -1".,
A '..I L e o Indians of Mexico and Guate-.
^. j L i -ar ....4. ,ristzah .iomeO a mala 'they cling to. their su-
b' 'uJJ uwarK x agatl-,, corn-
.. LiUllfl-; na LhaL We co ,-
LtIOl 01O Lhe church can be i
the viciouU or Deilugn circle, de- .
Jay pew ng on po'erny or st. ei bte-
Cinago i the people.
Saiks/ oy region wound upI '
final a.zscussions of the conjer
enct which was arranged ob y
cjie University of Flouida School a .
oj inter-American studies un-
der'Director A Curtis ilgus
in co-opeation with the Almi. i *
Paul S. L.eio z professor of" ABOVE Willie Rocours in -o




^ S .CELY LABORATORIES : ..:^
history at l oyolaUn varsity chae of the Casino Pier-whitre
n h-I srate ola, U ers-, the yachts tie-up- informed us- .
Chicago, said 1 the pay that the that he supports our ,recent ", .. ms...'
ciergy receives depends on how editorial on yachting re.gula- ",'"
t .iM ,] -tiors and hopes he authorities r- "..-. ." I ."
much te people of a church concerned will make this co- 'el fm, : .





















j~~~~b M~l VACITU t
can give and ,hus conditions ing.ear a boom yea,-. for [ dmm A.i gi m-
u .... v ... .. yachtingiin H~aJit.., u ". '
under which the priest !lnst
jive all of which h as an-influ-
ence on the number of people AE YOU UNDERWEIGHT?. '
who w enter the chergy a:.d/E.OR :
the quality of the men whoE LRI '
will study for the priesthood, S ., O.,
inaraneeesar bbean.
in ha guarantees You Attractive Pounds
,en 'In Guatemala, for example,
ami there are 183 priests for appro-i .: .
Bad ximately 18.000 persons. The, Speially tested formula fast-working, maximum three weeks .1 i
United States has one for each?
.. thousands atholics or less., .
tW. Stanley Rycroft, secreta- .
4y for Latin Ameriaa board of?
? foreign-mission. P r ,, s1 ?j t crt.
g zon church, New York City,".
said that although protesta-,.
t'is87f was introduced in the /
Caribbean olly in. the mid-
1800s. the .Protesta-at mnove-'

MAX U. DUVIVIER / ;
76 RUE PAVEE
(opposite SHASA)





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AND FOR THE .)ODDIE-AG
ModernCScience HamDOve ed A R....
a m Atr:


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A';'a Happy New Year from Haiti Sun
A Jan^Frsffi a Happy Hew Year from Haiti Sun -


December 25 1954., -A


Wni
I -,N


$500.00oo


ENNAR THE GRAND LOTTERY AT


SAYMCID IIFILAMCEII-IrIf


-FOR4ERILY CHARLES DEJEAN & CO RUE DES FRONTS-FORTS-


FROM DECEMBER 6 19514


I '


-I-T. a_.l purchisers of merchandise worth 10 9 a numbered ticket will Oe given.


+ I' "' ,- "
.2--itzes will be drawn: $200, 01,.$40 .60 -in 3 lots of 20---;lOO-in 10 lois bf10O-...... a!l prizes
. ; i '
...- .. / ; ." ; .,' -. -
in merchandise., i i
*. t .

3-WAT!H YOUR NEWASPPER and LISTEN ON YOUR FAVORITE STATION, (or the closing date..

4- NOTESITAt TO TAKE ADVANTEq THE QUALITY MERCHANDISE OFFERED YOU FREE. .
""* ":* "1' """ ""' "+ "" R* n
': 4 -DO. NOT HESTA'E TO TAKE. ADVANTAGE OF THE QUALITY MERCANISE OFFERED. YOU FREE.
k


I

a)-Complete bathroom appliances
b)-Have your house re-painted.
c)-Fix your roof.
d).-iHave your ceiling repaired


'I


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W


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3.


. ,- ,

IT IS ALWAYS IN YOUR INTEREST TO'BUY FROM RAYMOND
FLAM+BERT. IN STOCK: CARPENTERS' TOOLS, PLUMBING
EQUIPMENT,' WELDERS, MECHANICAL TOOLS ETC.

Matiriel Efectrique Appareils "Hjienique, Accessoires 'pur sales do 'bain Tuyaux Articles de ferronerie Piices de tuyauterie Fers A bton -
Peinture-- Tissus pour cipitonnae- T1oile iA voile Ugpe de. police Serirun, cadenai do toutes series, Mtal Ddploy Treillis et Toiles Mitalliques Class,
Vis et Biulons de touts dimensions Toles Galvanisdes, Toles Aluminium Fibre-ciment pour torture PlyWood Bardboard Instruments aratoires Wallboards,
.Servicebeirds Planches Baie Ciment Vernis Cepal f Hlle de Lin -Tiribentim etc etc etc...


"'AION A I" N lND FLA RBERT


RUE DES FRONTS. FORTS


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HA]

AND




PORT A
fro the
drencbe
heavenly
all pleas
This inc
S:nas, gra
sweet an
can said
used for
cados (\
green ski
breadtfrui
goes.

But frL
has to of
The eui
partly. H
invest iga

One m
of the H
Reve, a
tel cent
city. The


ter, is Eri
can and
The fo
Mrs. Iter
dified ,to
palate.

Son

For' a
seemed u
den "onc-
delicious
table. T
boils rh
seasons
in the s
cans son
tatoes.
with- cri
fresh he
urncooke4
Gromui
arrive cc
tain or
might b(
egg, mill
Probaibl
influence
dessert a
custard
sweet H
typical I
ding to N
baked in
Ohristopl
used as
in his 1fa
, Not so


Chdisimas and a RHappy New Year from HaiiSa i t, Decembern 25 1194 K
--------'- -------.- -----------------------., .. ".'v

"expert fronm theUnited Na-' tian cookng wL continue .
[TI OFFERS A VARIETY OFFRUITS
.11 OFFER S- A WIDE VAR IE Y OF F I T 11tions technical Administration, be served, The sister of .r. '
SUISINES OF TWO OR ThREE NATIONS 'A French chef is on haMnd at dent Paul Mag'oire, Mm*e. FrA.'.
WI S N OFu i T1W OR THREE~ N I ONS. ihe school to instruct pupils.. zulie Magloire Prophbte. goes '
SBut visitors to Haiti who ha. to 'the school to instruct -in the ..".
pensioner's mouth. Jts ingre- steaming it ait the end in. a co- ve enrjoyed Haitian food 'will preparation of Haitian dishes. :I.
By Elizabeth Halsted dients, as listed by Hugh Cave v'ered pan in a little of Its owm be pleased to know that Hai- Reprinted from aN.Y. Timesa. .
in his book -Haiti, Highroad to juice. ''"s- .-'s s"-"""" ""' 'i""'".
U PRINCE, Haiti, Advemure- (Holt, 1952) are-77
thred tourist, sun- sour orange juice,e 'ime juice, Whe resutant fish is good.
d'HaLti teems like -a garlic, tiny red onions, hot Unusual and exceedingly pep- :.
paradise... wherein peppers and salt. ery. Mmne Mevs serves conch W .
ant fruits do grow: Ime. Laura Mevs, a Haitian with bland plantain fritters and .. k :r .-
ludes, of course, bana resta-urant proprietor, has an. fresh slices of tomato. /. "'' ,t" :
pefruit, oranges Xboth other version. She cuts up car- The tourist business in this ..._
.d so sour, one Amxneri- rots, turnips, string *beans, hot-littue country, which won its $ 'T".
L the juice could be peppers and onions ard lets t-ie independence from the French : "
laundry bleach), avo- mixture stand in vinegar for just 150 years ago, is growing
'ith both purple and days.- fast. Recently the Haitian Go'- "
ins), coconuts, almonds "veirnmen.t set up a hotel school. ......... ....
it, papayas and man- The more it stands the mo Its director, Fabien Perret di- f Special rates far long stays. ....
it, papayas and man- aThe more it stands the moo- ', ...
re it burns., says Mme. Mevs rested similar schools in Fran- 9 PHONE 7291 ... :
with satisfaction. ce, and came to Haiti as an 9 Situation 4 blocks East of St1 Pier's. Church. ;'

fer inthe way of food. Amnerican ring. Haitian-iborn and *, .... I .,. :,,
isine, partly French, raised, she cooked so well that .
[aitinn, is also worth family ahd friends always lir- \ "'/V,
titg. .f gd her re o go into the restau. o
rant business. When it became
ay taste-a-good many necessary for 'her to earn her'4.
aitiann dishes a4. Mon own, living, she did, 4 7 .
smalL pension-like ho Her small restaurant, longer
rally locatedinthis on food and atmosphere than /':
rally located ie s u'
proprietor, Joel Ken-. o r spit and polish, is rather ,
english, hiswife Ameri- unfortunately called The Fish "
their cook Haitian. Bowl. It hangs over the Bail 9 ,. a,=.










>o e in ....p of' plan- / i r *m r *" Wi M N if'fl
ood at M oncRove, sao n di Po, P prince, and the diner .. /











--- ana uoui% r_.. suga.. ." Cr,. "v ? ^ ,/ :- "^ ^ Vi nG OC E GA S N9411 ==.'
r, M qag'ha -jnJoVing Mme-v Mea_"e.godofood. "
please the AFnenican the"roh.t porch cap" see the'
S flickering lights of the city .*B
around the curving waterfront. r -' .
-e of the Dishes S e.-Me's *.-.. C, er. ".
Sr A an. her huspil idNorwe.an f I
first course art lunch, and she -learned to cook Hal- $CI
inder a tree in Lthe gar- tian style by going out into the .l.
eight eat m hirliton, -a kitchen, and standing overs the. '
green squash like vege cook. .-- ... .
'he cook at Mou Ro4ve
ie flesh, meashes and She wUi describe to the in- A .
It. tLhen stuffs it back terested visitor the mnak ings of9
skin, much as A-meri. di-ri et djon djon,'the delicious A CNSATION
nletlines stuf baked po- Haitian ,mixture of rica and 'U DE COL0 N-E
Half avocados filled .madl dark nmushroonms, or Co- DE BIEN-ETRE
nut I 1o, ""'" 7 1`
sp, nutty slivers 'of chon gri ll, atypioalily H'ai tbi.n Gelques gouttesde "4711, -
nart of palm are- good Fried pork to which ti mala.e sur cos tempers ou .... .
d appetizers. Is a customary accompaniment.
Or she will talk in moufh- a respir6es de votre rmoucho1r,
womea in neriould xvatering terms of a desserts VOUS aideront asurmonter
soked in strips of plan- made from grated sweet pota- a fatigue et I'dnervemert. "
sliced, left-ov'er roast au
e 'fried Irn a batter of toes. coconut. coconut milk, -
butter, n.utneg, raisins and 'a bud. ...a"na aParlma,.Fabit 9
k and flour. iitlesga, r- K mrENGASSENMII
1 reflecting the French little sugar'...GLOCKENGASSE N9471l"
in Haitian cooking, X P4'1'. A
it Mon R~e might be HOW CONCH IS SERVED .
flavorfully..laced with
laitlan runi. Another But her specialty is'sea food, $
Ha~it'd dessert, accor- and she is particularly proud
trs. Kenter, is bananas of her conch a marine a.ni- a t EA U OCOLOGNE
the 'molasses Henry ral better known for Its Shel Etiquette Bleu-Or
he is said to have than its flesh. Mine. Mevs boils .
a building ingredient the flesh &till you can ,put a '
ntastic Citadeile. fork into it, this may take .. -t
gentle is -ti malice, a whole day then gently] ..


common Haitian sauce that is sau-6es it In butter garlic, o- r
,enough to scald the unwitting nions, salt pepper and paprika-
tO O S ~ ee e c oc--mop- 0 fle-Ma


T FAMOUS TEWOUGHOUTR


THE WORLD K


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SHOES

FO EVERY OCCASli1


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A Merry Ctkisimas and a Happy New Year from Haiti


LATINS LACK FREE PRESS

WRITER TELLS CONFERENCE


A magazine writer and lecture
rer told the fifth Conference of
the Caribbean at Gainesvillle
Florida that the press is no, free
in that area nor to some
extent in the Undted States, ei-
ther. /

Scott Seegers of McLean, Va.,
who has traveled extensively in
South America and who now
freelances 'in this country, said
in. the United States we are
particularly vulnerable to the
economic factors of publishing
and there have -been innumera-
ble instances of pressure en
newspapers to knuckle down
Not all have had happy eh-
dings.

Seegmrs said 'freedom of the
press is complex and tenuous.
It cannot exist without editors
of courage and integrity, but
these quajtle.is are no gupran-
tee that freedom of expression
wll survive.

'The so-cailed strong govern
ment backed at least by an-
knplucalion, of force is a tra-
dition in Latin America. Even


in Costa Rica. one of the most
liberal and democratic coun-
tries of the western hemisphe-
re, mayors and provincial go-
vernors are not elected, they
are appointed by the national
government.

-A dictatorial or corrupt gov-
ernment's best hope of staying
in power Is to keep the people
from knowing what is going
on, It Is a nTewspapernman's job
to tell the people honestly how
they are being governed. This
to the government whvbich has
rmuchnto hide, is akin to trea-
sOin

'cAs jan example of what can
be dome' to keep the press in
line, MAexico has a government
monopoly on newsprint but
it hts *ot tried to use this po-
-war.

'*Another familiar form of
coercion is .on advertisers. Most
Latin and South American pu-
blishers"- ev n as some in the
United States operate on. a
fairly slim margin.
eIt takes a brave and sturdy


iSun


man tb withstand the hint that
he ,migh have a fire, or labor
trouble, or tax trouble if he
continues to advertise in such
and such a newspaper.

'Here is a quick rundown on
the status of freedom of the
press in the Caribbean Today;

-IN MEXICO the press is
free to criticize, ridicule of
even condemn 'he government.
*IN GUATEMALA i; is too
early to say what one may find
since the Communist were
ousted. I i

-HONDURAS enjoys a free-
dom of the press surprising In
view of the years of one-nman.
rule imposed' by Carias Andino.

.EL SALVADOR'S papers
-" 7 ,' "' "
operate wit- normal freedom.
-COSTA RJCRA "has a press
that is free, literate outponken
and *widely re&i.

,PAiNAMlA'S press' is tradi-
Stiona-lly free and remains so.

-COLOMBIA offers one of
the saddest eases. .'Since 1.949
the country has been under a
stat- of siege. Press censor-
ship has been off and on.


Deceber 25 1954


THE .VENEZUELAN press ?IN CUBA the press is fiee
may criticize up to a point and exuberant.
deemed convenient by 'the gov- 'IN HAITI press freedom
ernmnent. seems to exist'.


_ _


P4T* -..4 'AIjIT
PHOtO ^Jff b4A T I


SSpecial For iLAtAiN iJil"
e /



Ohrist"ia Shoppers

j______________i
., e


" J. FOR THE SPORTS*Al FOR THE HOUSEHOLD




S- FISHING RODS AND REELS ELECTRIC E4I0iGERATORS
I Es
{'- bPIN FISHING EQUIPMENT HOME FREEZERS
.e' f
E "^ FISHING LINES, LURES, HOOKS, ETC. ELECTRIC STOVES

"* REMINGTON SHOTGUM SHELLS "' PRIMUS KEROSENE LAMPS
) SHOTGUNS AND AIR RIFLES PRIMUS KEROSENE STOVES


THERMOS JUGS ICE BUCKETS

PICNIC SETS LAWNMOWERS.
*




AT MAISON ANTON KNEE



RUE PAVEE
% t t t.^% ,%. .%. %.
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-.. .. t N : ,. A Merry Christmas and a Happy New' Year from Haiti Son ___ -'" u December. .1514s ..?
^ '* -' .. .. ?'.'

bnents, the RHt. RevA~red d-uring the painting -and nevprj:g.
Christ Reborn In Haiti V0er. aur
-Voegeli com am issioned. a group GaW the m ural u tlaer .1t% ...

-'TH E STORY- B E$W IN f TH E H O LY T R IN ITY M U RAL.S 'separated the sheep from the .C p' ":Z.t.Ii. ..I. ,
in his new book .Haiti the all of the former group .lea- goats, the author declares. f t .itiv do te nw yT i n ity C: '"'." o t
ned heavily on Calfee for tech of the new Holy Trinity Ca- ....
Black Rfp.Wic- (Devin-Adair nical advice and rioral support tedral. Among enterting t
$5) Selden Rodman jcords primitives, once coaxed into In the face of bitter opposi. Ton ettal accounts.
l. fr an initial effort, attacked their lion, the Bishop of the smau he ourse of the world Rod
Bishop Voegell's. first remak l spaces with abandon..
Protstan IEpiscosaithMov e. -I was 8awy :f. -Haiti-
on seeing the completed Holy Talent not trial and error Protestant Episcopal Move- e ay Hati *
Trinity murals as. Thank God Continued Overleaf .
they pain t ed H aitian s. I .

















y~~~~ m -)aibm.i^
^ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ -. ** '*-"'. "" .S~jm /, '* *..
That remark, the author vs Yo r wi___
.revealed how much wisdom
lay behind his apparent marl- ---- -----
ness. "

Rodmnan tells a vivid and in-
Steresting story of the orig'.n




















ALUIAHIISODS EEM TOE *FIZES 'HI^ ~MltT .^'.
of the murals; spiced vihrh
wea ilth of intim ate dBta '.I ]




















^*- ". A A E V B AT' EET EATMN TR *,NH Z T W L '^ ^ .i. '^,.:-1.,- ..
which he gathered a director





















-'~~ ~ "' ". ',MN RE I ""IIA "'?DI.tFT O A A ., ^ ; ^r ^ ./ ":,.
of the project during the winter 9!r
of 1949. r "'.
E' -pla ln in g h o w .C h r is t Awa s ;
reborn in Haiti?, he recalls the
triumph of te primitives over,




















i. = .. J E A .,S L A:f HAI I. LA G S'EE RY S O E* L U,OS A N ^ gE T r A O A, U N T
the sophisticated painters,
when mural work Wvas first A.
introduced to the centre d'Arr.
(r ben Cg-DiireCLor with Die
W i'tt 'Peters) ot the Centre. ,.
d'ArL, todman InvitedWflliaam
Califee to teach teinperd techiL
que to the budding hopes of the
krr movement.
Advanced p enterss w ere ,. ,.
headquartered upstairs were .
the primitives were lloted IAN T EQUIP NT C, S.A.
wall space in the basement: --- Ave. Dessalines
-: -M M E S O "_ ..
f .. ,,. 2631 "


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lnvtell In. -u ~
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*nPAUL AUH i YHAITI'S OLDEST PERFUME STORE *S FRTSE "my. :.
..... 'U Z FR T .E ..': 4'. ', 'i


::I lS D HAITI'S BEST SISAL RUG FACTORY BOUTIO RMN PA PTURE
;H DRM SANCHEZL7t .
-AR HAITI' NEWEST DEPAIRTEM ENT STORE O U TIQ E._CL .'
*CA .E.LE SHOP CAP-HAITIEN SOUVENIRS 'SERVICE CAAIAR. MAHKAIy. CE#CS
-* M s. N O ITRE IJIL .,.,HAITIAN HANDICRAFT: ,, : ,- F.* A .
':i '*" MADAME CELESTIN : 'HAITI'S LEADING EMBROIDERY WORKSHOP U IOL BROTH ) : IIAN HICRAFT
"" TI M ER HAITI'S LARGEST' ART & CURIO SHOP STO1%E CLUB HANTI.S ONLY AIR-CONDITIORED SHOP "
F R E S C O AA R A N D G R i tLR O O M A IR C O N D IT W N ED T A B OQ C L U B r A N Dr P E P, tU R T U .1"
t_* JEAN FOSY LAHA M : HAITI'S-LAGS JEWL R ST E LOU~il TOU SSA "iT : FAIITORY --I
... T H E S E S T O R E S A R E D IS T R IB U T O R S -O R D IR E S T IN V I ~ i tE h S O R M -A R U P A T U R tI $S ,. '
WHICH ADEETQ A ONE PRICE POLICY ANDLCARIIY SELECTED ITEMS WITH PRICES MARKSD/,
I,-

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... '.","" 7 ,...,,.

... r A Merry Christmas and a Happy Iew Year from HaitiSan December 25 1954 *

rHBm D D D I 'nHATI genius Look more interest in ked on the painting of Christ)
-'RaEBa a"uAI ,A "l S what the Virgin would wear and Leveque'l piety.
S.(Cotnttued from o(wreaf) ginning to paint. converttio. Bigauds immense Miracle
man says: Benoit alone would than in her face, a coaverttio Bigaud's immensee .Mlracle at
notkneel inp'rayer before0 *His' essentially' decoptive nal Byzantine mask. He would Carna is. according -to Seklen>'
devote more time to the con- Radmani, his first, successful..
theal con-s~tn heee-
centric eyes of the animals. uraL PynthesizinP -the ele-
and the veining of exotki 'ea- ments of (his) most successful
yes than to the perfunctory easel pictures. The charcoal
*image of taie drawing took twenty-eigh't Dr.' and Mrs. Villard .. ... '
















v^^^^~~ ~~ ,. :4^^ ^ ,' -.' '4"o^y t/
.srchil...days, and the atual painting,,
en the auIO asked v DR. VILLARD RETURNi'
no.'. wiy, he wasthor dkegt B....In spite of interruption by sa-
.e.nol 9h. Le was de\'o .ng So FROM h. N. ASSEMBLY'::!'.
... -.much tume to a 'rainpipe o n tews who broke into the .t'
small caile high in. th, roof, he Cathedral and plastered it with 'lDr. and Mrs. Elie llard



















;" C^^ teti yas;, ., yo":... :..
r...plied to leranily. -How iong lack oil, took twenty five. turned last Monday aboard::.
wul: t\atchin .ast in thal e the SS unoon- fromS w.
'f the Gasting i thCA MORE TOURIST SHIPS York, where the head. spei,.
X y season without a diran?.
Commenting on. theocher sa- AFTER CHRISTMA- fist represented Hait. .atrthe
s p i R Haiti's increasing popularity General Assembly of the 1j
,j, td s's W vh o p a 't i cip ate c L R o d -,
... .'. '" ocgs aiwtourist resortt is indicated after a ttending a Ophtalrold.
man describes Bazil as 4a na- by a Winter increase in the gie conferencein the:. ee ,Wd6t rv.
Stu ural mural pa inter,, and ,v number, of liners to visit the Astora Hotel 'e;a .
vil roes some interesting "i.de capital From Do. em5'Lbr April. IA. 4..oi ,.,
gt .on bis"5.det h six t'ourist ships a.'e exet- At ,thd .TN Assemblyr .*PD .
on t .bs eed to drop.ancn., i Port ,t,, iarcdlsat on the 5 th commis.- %
would sing a hymm as he wor- Prince. sion which re viewied finAb'8ifil.
*u land budgdtax.. question) ..... ,'

pWorld fribu en .


to ei 'w k'A 4.

,y..'' :. ..A '., ,J ,j T. C .?77:,5 ., WK.m ..
Me. Nitivity Mqraliin the-Holy Trinity Cathedral painted by Rigaud Benoit and phu
~to' to"ra..



by r C ,'. BitiSn % C Pov C s 9 .i
'6
*16
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(4 I)
"' I "





.e" j in,'. 32.. : ,. .











li"n -of motoraists Wy over' thenos worl hav .... unantn Su= Coaer Issta almost ., ..
I,,&.AP". nc 'oc agin tha plasr whc the have "rap ad an bete per










Am!., experence sic thei .ngne .ee sice k. ....m er imroe :: -
'Firs an'd...' FesA


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e aso..=. ,. L a l C
"e c;per..lenced' .:. sieteregnswr"'ne RmmeIpoe effn
.A e..'irtnd ies :-- -. .tj






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.'.g .
/ "- PAT...ENT-" :
Ciid l-zp.lis. ,Pgn 2069 -,-. '" No. ,8

:I "/ K* %.,"::.%ntt%,32 -e.s-....** yo .... &






I


'I don't know what. has hap-
pened to my maria, Mime. Bou


.utw Cra.qc ul was complaining 'He isn't
Once, d Lbg ago, when chazac eating at-all lately., The rest
ters .like Bouqui a n d Malnce of the tale about going to thea
live in the mountains or Hal. .hounga. for a special .'vodou.
w
tiL cogs ao not have the lal eating-hanm fell on Matice's It
ventures (stomachs) for which ears without being heard w
they are notorious today.
And it was all because of that Bouiqui not eating The wo
azh-eviilldoer Malice that poor man must be mad, Malice t
*compere. Chien lost all his thought. There Wvas oily one fr
stuffing,.. At least that is what thing -the stupid Bouqui could
my grandifaither always told us do better that Malice (besides
whdn we gathered 'round the work -of course) and that was
gn
kitrhen: fire' during the lonely eat. So Malice set out' to inves- hi
mountain ights... tiga'te, ad sure enough Bouqui h
\ I P- 'L y ln
AccorLdtg,t.go.the odd man. was fibt 'eating at home at-alL e'
MalIce.,was very angry; in .ff mSa ,mnmm.... said Malice. And er
'jusqu'li enrage, because corn. anyone who knot4fs alcee could
pere Chien had almost kil-led, telM he wasn't satiaiea. Bouqui.
him (ianqtbi tu6 l1') whih he was -in th6 pink.f condition.
tried to steal his chickens one. He bad never looked so big and H
night. And Malice wasn't the so fat -- better than the ly
type to forget a grudge. biggest ebo.is, cochon. Malice te
had -ver seen .
.N o w getting on towards The'next day, Malice hid und- t
Ohristmas, Bouqui was'wander er the thatch trees in Bauqui's bi
ing through the Foret des Pins back yard before -compere so-
when he was suddenly bought eil', had even lightened the
to a halt by a strange sightARight sky "over towards ,tht.'pagr.; cl"
in front of the ever-hungry Bou border, 'Sure enougE as 'the
.qui was the strangest, most. cocks began to crow and Mine
wonderful .tree in all the world: Bouqui stayed shuff 1 r..n g
a 'ducquobnoo. tree. -':-. about he;6 ,itusahold choresres, -
SDuoquoonoo is (as alt. BouuLstretched h!s uI r.
'know) the.delicacy ot the niouh 'body daned nuhced':
Stalfi peopJe. Generally speaking aWelJ, 'femrnme, I am going
it's made at sweetened cmaiZe- into the forest to cut wood.,
moullin. (corn meal)" which is -and without a backward glance
'boiled' in a banana leaf and padded .off- at a brisk trot ..-
p:. coodecdin an icy spring. wards the Pine Fo'est. "
.. Ducquoonoos are Bou- Mtflice slunk along behind
\--qt's favourite sight, and he Bouqui. slipping from tree to '.
'-'. "'as soon recovered suffi-:ient- tree.- FinaQlv Bouqui stopped
y .' from his -first shock to scuttl. under the.duocq.uoonoo-tree-and
. "up the tree and start right .i smiled, .rubbing his hands,
t'6 h the lucious fruitt. When he cSo that's what he is',up 'to.. ,
.' had eaten Lill he fell from the thought' Malice and slip p e a
-- b "-
'. braflches and lay in a torpor
a. ufiderneath. Bouqul decided he
h .1 ad- had enough and belched ."'
:'. way home. ,
.." So. it went on : evS'-y day ,5
1Bouqui would ,manger, all the ,
duoquoonoos he; oould andl ni-
Sturaly hie appetite was poor JN '
at the family meals.
.' One day. Malice heard Mada -1I1
Sine Maiaice and Madame -Bouqui
\' down at the river swapping Ci4CMtt
*' triipotage. over 'the wasning. I -_ ,#
q.Somnething Mine. Bouqui said
.- .m0ade Malice 'saisi. and Ma-
-4ce is seldom even slightly sur Distributor:
Joseph Nadal and so.


oi -.-


By Til Tontion,


* Simple compere Chlen .was
'flattered

Then, having established a
warm' feeling.of friendship, Ma
lice dropped his voice to a
whisper :
*Coampre Chien., I have a
great secret to tell you, as you
are such a good friend of mine.,
'What, what is it ?, asked


aV


cAh c.-n pire,, aid fl.aic- vKU."ML'La1'L
Haven't seen you forlso longg' *. I.
ow Is the wife and the faml.a T W Ba t 4*ts A
'y Then he showed great in t t ..
'rest in Chien's personal :io, "
itening syanpa.heciAly while .. "I :
e n zpg r1"
ie latter told all his little ir .u a neio e'" "'m
les. '
; i '' t. ,' '* .


., *" i : -- *. ,, .- ..; ;,.:;- s .:
". .. :/ "
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from Haiti Sun Decembet 25 1954



rBouqui and Malice hisoireI t a I I N % C Il 1 4 N T
4iisfofret, but ecodnaway to think. o IS E l i i
A Bouqui and Malice)) Malice thought Lill his head 1i-

hurt, but he could not find a


ay to get the ducquoonoos'
way from Bouqui. The big
rochon, never left the tree
nr a minute during the day.
nd at night the ducquoonoos
'ere a'-l fast asleep wrapped in
horny pods that only opened
Ith tihe sunm.

But Malice was not the kind
o fail to get' some satisfaction
eom'his work.

So Malice tried his most in-
ratiatin'g s&ile and approached
is enemy compere Chien who
ad forgotten all about the incid
it of Malice and his chick-
iS.


poor compere Chien eargeriy.
Then Malice confided about
Bouqul's tree. R-e knew Bou-
qui's appetkite was matched on-
ly by his anger dt b.Lngdlsturb-
ed while he was eating and he,
hoped ccomrpre ,Chien would .
walk into death when he disturb '
ed Bouqui. ,


Continnued Uvairu :''*





Wi i _-W





December 25 1954


A Merry Christmas and a Happy. New Year from Haiti Sun


Compare Chien's Christmas Present
...... A Bouqui and Malice ,(Histoire, ......


SContinued from Overleaf
So he said : -Bouqau eats so
much, he falls alseep long be-
lore nbdn, and it is easy to raid
the tree,.
The next day was Christmas,
but Bouqul was at his tree ear-
lier than ever. There was jus'
one ducquoonoo left and he
could not rest until he had
eaten it.
He climbed the tree to pluck
the sole remaining ducquoonoo,
and as he closed his eyes .2nd
. f. ips Is n..i.ti= ofi,
hi.,tiands closed ,oi elJp'ptness.
Tm4. ducquoonoo hlt' jti t
i.*.)..... .. "* '- ..** .' y
th ---.f ot 6 the .tree -,
^4u~ui- ilid' .d~qwn$9 o-,.b1^fe~ot
as"- f,:a%; could 'f.:tIt: up
~. floci g* ,,
AS so~ iteomhinu~eO up t wn,
4.. ". : I _. A ,. .
^4;~ ~ -l ^ fi, -6~ dliittahU
in the heavens and sweat pour-
edfrom .the frusttated but deter.
mined Bouqui
FromipUy.-at nooi Malice ca me
--lpgtI tbn ugh 'the trees, follo-
wed by eintt e Chien, pointed
out thed-dit tree ind hid


nearty- to wa-th.


Praise Fri
HH3W's P
Three l, %,ring letter was re-


Compere Chlen loped right -
ceitved this month by Herbie
under the tree and looked uip,
(lV'oice of Gold) lW'idmnaier heir
expecting to see a mass of, s,.c- *
to Station HH3W .and Haiti's
culent ducquoonoos. He saw
sole disk jockey.
Bouqui When he saw Bouqui he
was so saisi that his :noutn Radio Haiti
dropped open and he stood froz- Etige Crystal arke
en 'looking up into the tree. Rue Bonne Fu
Just then Bouqui made a gra'i Por.,u-Prince, Haiti
for the ducquoonoo and it shot DearSirs
Dear Sirs :
earthw'ards-right intocor'.p6e I heard your station on the
Chien's mouth. 25th of November from 02:35
Bouqui's rage was so terrifying
to 0"-30 6. M. T. on 6.200 kes.
that the surprised dog could nit T
... .. The strength had a slight QSB
run.. Jinmin.g t earth, Boaqui
'.".- .: .. .1 and' was QSAS- with some
gr.B-bea .m.cnp.ehlen arto ,n' -
the mddlea',.ezed o 1QRN and CWQRM.
.the .*." ;.'-'. ,. My receiver is a Zenith with
the dzctquooOQ .popped right,
ou o.' h .Ot., .. seven tubes.
oUti. h., -a I bt. L ... .
M al.' 'w ho : b. w at' ch 7 My antenna is a five ft. teles-
Malice,, who .Mad .bee n ._watch,.
-.. ,.. ,.i.. -,.. .... .- cope antenna attached on the
irng 'e, enfiS w i:t h -gteat r..e n~iy :,
ment.,iuddenly pounced: out' 0% radio.
hidinR o46 tte &'-u6rofl andc The program was named the
streaked oyvr the hill calling ,Music Caravan, which was
out.-Merry (.r.istma.s smpere; .made up of popular songs, sung
and thtianks for a lovely pre- and played by popular singers
sent.', and bands. .wrote down a few
As for compere ChWen he went ot the songs that I knew: Mus-
sadly away with his ..cadeau de krat Raxnble, Jumbo, Woman's
Noel, a flat stotiach he has World, Answer Me. Here and


worn tO this day


om Illinois for

lusic Caravan
* fin&. program and I enjoyed it
very much. This was the first
rtime that I listened to your En-
glish program and I will conti-
nue to do so.
I would like very much to
receive your QSL verification


card and program schedule.
My address : Ernest Huland
R No. 1.
Greenville, Illinois

U. S. A.
P. S. I am not sure about the
frequency you were transmitt-
ing on, so I put it dc-wn appro-
ximately.


PRESIDENT MAGLOIRE REGISTERS
President Paul Magloire makes sure of his vote in the January
9 elections. He was cheered by a large crowd when he drove to
the Rond Point Registration Byreau on the Exposition last month,
accompanied by Under Secretary of State for the Interior Roland


Dream Rapsody. It was a very Lataillade.


I THE MANAGEMENT & STAFF OF
9 *.




S Mison Orientale
\ ^ ; ; ,<. ".. .




SFor .The- 5th Christmas S


SAExtend their Sincere Tihanks to their many Friends Customers and

M Well-wishers for their wholehearted and generous support given

i throughout these past years.



i With deep affection, our Very Best Wishes to Everyone for a




HAPPY XMAS, A BRIGHTER AND MORE PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR

May peace and Greater Understanding Develope Amongst Our People for
\ 1A Better Haiti.




WHERE THE LOWEST, PRICE, IS "He ONL. "P"
e S pi B






A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from Haiti Sun


((Gros Lotb Doubled For December 28

Other Lottery Prizes Also Increased


This w ill be ;n espeeia!.,'
happy New Yeari- for lucky tirk
et.holderi in the December 2.3
,tirage of the ,Loterie de F'E-
lat Haitien o, for w h e n
the GROS LOT-, n u m b e r
roll-. out of the lottery d-cluni
.at 7 p mi it will bring, it.s hold-
er $4i.000-cdouble the usual
uirmn and other prizes also have
been scaled to malch this
special increase.


The Nationa'l Lottery C)u-
miti-ee, headed by energei,2
Attorney Franck Legendre, an
rinouncrced the speciaJ tirage th's
Sumrnmer, .stating that the in-
cre.-.ed populariiv of the lotto
ry had enabled a jackpoti
-ros lot.
The steady increase in the
profits of the National Lottcry
has brought a corresponding
rise in the prizes offered while


the price of a -billet, has re-
mained the same.
As the fortunes of the Lotte-
r% improve. the charitable
v.orks which it finances bent-
fit.

Since it.- inception 13 VPyears
ago, the receipts from the sale
of tickets have supported a wi.de


December 25 1954

variety o-f social welfare pro-
jcts. MIl1icns of old men and
,. nmEr ,. c'iplg1es and other undi
gents depend entirely on the
LCttri',' for subsistence. A care
1tull (hoel crmIttee is charge
e, v.%th ltetecrnirjing the char1
7iEs to be helped, and distrilbU-
lion 'is cairi-JEd out w-ith the ut-
ricost care.


On this honey cormbed board the lucky rio- .-s will be placed.
PANAMA LINE PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
Arrivals and departures during
the month November and December

Fastest Freight and Passengers service between Ne'w-York
Port-au-Prince and Cristc.bal. 'nd viceversa, accepting ra!
go both ways including cargo to(0 and from Europe via New
York and via Cristobal: alsu from the West Coa.t uf -'Ce-
tral/South America., arnd the Far East via Crislobal CZ.
Sailing. from Nev.' Yorl' e\ery Thursday; arrivals at Port
au-Prince every Monday, except when a holiday falls on
Thursday in New York, sailing then will be on Friday, arri-
val Port-au-Prince Tuesday.
Sailings from Port-au-Prince to New York every Moni.iv.

-. -~ 2 a ,"


A phase in the. operations of the Iott
cally-turned drums.



"Time"


The Leadin


MAGA


s-Are Now On

BOOK S1
;*-J *^*^ ^ -,.S. .o.


ery-numburs are chosen by electr-.


& "Life", ,




Lg American


LZINES


Sale At All Fine linen cocktail-lenght dress-covered
by hand-done emhroiiery-i'oay
OuRESbe ord'red J-rom nBOUT'OL,,'
LO S / ~ADELE .SASSINE, A.4c. ,f,
jy "7Y Petit Four.
ALSO uN STOCK ARE: Hi-
"' tian souvenirs & jcu-elri, haty
from Paris, Frerirlh-des,.mdl
skirts (ready rmador frt mje to
measure) Frenchl perfitme., orz
ginal designs by Ade'le 3Sussine
^^ Haut Coutur-e
-M& --o


. -// "I-, :
./The Globe-Wernicke Streaiii neMetal Desk gives you a maximum return
L -on your investment. Herr are some of the advantages. 4-
i 1. Pedestals are interchangeable and pro- new Nylon glides; deep file drawer has /
vide the specific facilities required by progressive -oef suspension.
each worker. 4. Inside surfaces are sound insulated
i for the maximum in noiseless operation.
S. Drawers are designed to be equipped Adjustable height insures complete .
with a wide range of functional aids ,S. b. ,. ght in e c
including letter or legal files, card file sz .. m- e have new, wo t
aive Arc Swing Mechanism for 41111%
{ 3. Drawers ride smoothly and quietly on '. -peed and convenience. -1, 1
Visit our showroom and see this modern G/W Streamliner Sted Desk "In the flt .Z
Or phone us for a demonstration and complete mlat an. mt me obligatlon.

DISTRIBUTORS: HAITI iRA1.4 \G I.IPA.NY
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Bldg. CITE DE L'EXPOS1TIO%' PHO.'E 2069


to crown It'I .' pcrfcct moment of
pleasant ccmni:ntrionship. Oneofmany
occasions for drinking Hennessy.


losejh Nadal and" Co., Dislribuiors








A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSi


Progres Notables

Dans le Domaine l'Architecture


By LOUPA
Ption ViHe
eF;t a-:tuelle-
menit "iL'a

daim6 led o -



mi q ai ,A 11 e
t:nH~iti au
P CI I- ii1 t de
J}.. v U e d. e
Id (I LI a I t

elt des iinn', ation-. at ,:hictt
turales. A c6t6 de-.s bhclle- vill.i
claJssiquI2;. d'ii siemflt"' i LPII[U
partout. -u ll i')in.1::2- e C '"_tli
que cn.stirue le c:;lie natur i
de la [raiche cil4, cormm.encent
&A aipparaitre des real:LtiaiO,
pratiq.ues., des fo:'rlea3 nio-
velles en Haiti. Tou. I-.; S:-
gers .de la IouLI'Le qui s'arretent
au terminus de la Place Vin-
cent El plus nencore leis rsi.
dents die Pktion-Ville ont re.
mar"i'.u, le 11ou'.&1 iinimeuhiLe
a .pp-rteinenIts (ui atteint '.i
jA trois 6taoes. C'et-- piIrme
re fois enr Haiti qu'une expe-
rience de ce genre eat lent6e.
c'est I'Ineni'eur Emnile Ville.
drouin qui en e~t ie cnstrtici.
teur e.t plroprietaire aussi dit-
on. Quelques rare-, amis de?;
]EgiVne paisibles et harmonieu-
cc:,' dp 1I Place croient que la
tlaille (I building nuilra 'a I'ea-
thI.tIque .iLu cadre. Pour notre


part nous n'en croyoln; ren o
lnoub savons gr au pionniti
de son effort meritoire. Son ac
lion serd bentfique 'pourI les
locataires qui trouveront d
confortaibles appar'tc-ments E
leur dlispoKsiLon eL app'ortera
tn11e tiiilon partiele au man.
que de logemnLiit mi,'yen c din.-
la region. Ailleurs s'6erigL- une
grLinlde ei orit i-i i? 3 1?ii-i. i.t .i

l'aspect oriental do tyle .l)lu.
t6,'t mau'resque. Le cu6t, extra.
ordiiTaire de cette mabLon est
cj.l se pl.:ip.i J til- r lm.ar',,.i.I
bles et l'utdit de sa co.jia.
,ti'on ext6reieure. II est bin re-.


un


confortant, dans Ic-s Tmnomenits
difficile; d'apr&-s cyclone, qu'
OLlts Vl'Vonls. de voir la confian
ce des batisseurs im.mobiliers
qui travaillent a augmenter le
confort et le charme de P6-
tion-Ville.


Touz ie- 1iT1S d .-3 l' indroir.
don't je sui,, pour av,.'jr long

temps .ecui, ne %L&hjiiteti pinL
Iqujine chose, que I'e:hillLt oi
l'Etat, mette la m,.iin djns le
pavage des rue.;, car il n'v a
[,i tique -ren-t 1que lei tr'oi grlln I
de-- xvoies prarallele3 qui. sort
asph:,ite; etc quatre ou six
rule; tron-ve-rsales a ces voles.
On attend, cela du gouvelneI
meni piogres.i:ie acttel.


December 25 1954


CHATELET DES FLEURS
Takes Great Pleasure in Announcing that
its fresh, newly cut flowers of long life
and unsurpassed quality
will noaz be sold at the Flowershop af

Mine. Alice Villard
No. 78 Turgeau, Telephone 5523
When you buy Haitian flowers you give employment
to Haitians and revenue to Haitian merchants



JOSEPH LOISEAU
RI-LAL L-STA'lIE BROKER
Houses For rei[ dmd For Sale
Furnished or Unfurnished.
Long and Short Term Leases Obtainable
At Port au Prince, Petion-vile, Kenscoff and Vicinit.e..-.
Apply Office 'at Bourdon
(On main road to Petion-Vile)


DISTRIBUTORS:
WILLIAM NARR, -,
7, Rue des Fronts-Forts, Port-au-Prince
JEAN BOURGEOIS,
Aux Cayes.
MI. DESQUIRON. SUCCRS.,
Jdrdmie.
lacmel.
ALPHONSE ARTEAGA,
Gonaives.
BOUCAP. & Co.
RAYMOND LAROCHE,
Caji-Haitien.




A Merry Chrisimas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSun 95

... ',' 1fu f/
















in departl I

nstanton~e imil"es
A v e c ,, .A v eM / S i
I.






S- -*- Awi---- *ifj~ ^-^--^ --^R
'Sq





*d ep W- --'- -a rf. -1 h .is$

^ ^^- -_ -- .^ '^__^.^1 _-j". "_ '--^^ -'^^B-' t.^ ^
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AeTwrnLA summ&IUbwdW




i: t q ^iis. RL nlPfe S AJ t IMat- I,>S- r B t j'l lEST'' O* ~fi~i-fiNOi3 '

.-' -p -... A "
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-tKqui procure ljoAie de conduireI AN 5Av t
b i~ / hI

mm .__ ,. -
Vt^(-^ -c 4'S -* mm' m- 'r ^

I S.^^ ^k_ ^^"..^i( ^^
I I66^ osotne aatq or tto ss (I^..^




...,.Yor "SO" Service Man "
..:. ishes You A HAPPY ChRIS7MA$ ,AndA Prosperou e Ya /
.. ., v .- .. .. .,, .. ., ..., ., .. .,. .. ,. .,. .- .. -, .. ... ,, ..,. .. v ... .. ., .. .. v .. v v .. ,. .. ... ,, ..,S





,

A Merry Christmas and aHappyNew Year Irom Haiti Sun


HAITIANS MUST CO-OPERATE HoN

TO WOO TOURIST DOLLAR Any Haiti
U. :' imcr0ica should io 1 ;." rder fjr fl.- a to y
S1t: I .S. Dolllar-tourist variely. Samucl pillow on C
It'. Andersont, U.S. assistant Secretary of (or into his
Comr.erce said at the recent Inter Amercwan whiat part o
Economic Confetrenvce. *6 lives in), or
He poinlred out that tourism is an important i
poteidtil source of foreign exchange, and tol-
risls .stirnltlle economic activity in various to close his
Ways-. dhinyl cinq
inilcd laotos citizens last year spent wore than will be able
a billion dollars in tourist travel, ana 'voughout cane from.
the Americas, -new hotels and industries pave
S.', rnizi up. and transport facilities intmproved. -Papa Noe
l'q Haiti ue have had,'in recent months several ed ti-Jesu) .
new tourist Igift shops, (two associations have and left it a
been ornmed to ensure top quality at reasona- having well
ble prices for all products), our road syterm is
and as an
forging aolead with, the throttle wide open, two
gionl-si.e luxury hotels are to start operation better *cond
this winter, a -ne'w airfield has ben built at Cap knows just
Haftien, and the 'business isgerests are begin- originated in
ning to yealise 'the value of the tourist trade, tornm, though
improving the appearawne of the city (such -as mise the pra
aSabot ',Or' which hIs installed new sifewuiiks).
ge of the Fix
Signs hoae been stripped from the sides of roads
where they grew like a li-ght during the past The tradii
few seasons. s tarted in th
But As Mr. Anderson has pointed out, more Manhattan I
work is syet to be done to'gCtract our full quota with the D u
of tourists. ___
"1'hc giiur. neccessity is jor co-operatwon'bet-
Wev';i u ti phases of ine tourist mausnr, aia uJ A tre
/'(*K ii ,u. o t O aireclty conce'rnI... & ,) i.wn'e
-iant attractive to visit and to stay in. i,th tea-
mt'tt i',IrCIne ] il ofji vh -ttwnt, sched ie, life s a
lot i more .,oyabe vin -orf, au rr..n. nuio inI P 1
felepho7ie v-fornimation has to be carried out as L
quickly 'a; possible. Hotel ownLers art, 'on-s- P U R E
tantly eeicpinrg on Tourism. Director Pierre
Chtucv'eL's shoulder because of the inconvernen-
ce our ttinperamemtal telephones cause guests.
And, they, .cornm)plaiu, hotels arc. not given' .the I
prw ority ieuinmen ,tey deserve. As -Mr. .Ge.eges.
Het7aux, head of the Hotel Association- brought
to Mi. Chaatet's attention at a recent meeting M0
in the Cihamber of Commnerce, if the telephone
Sdoinqt finiiction Iij t'a;ek '"the A npa1ciy trea ts t Pl"
tltb kJ. f tWe thti a y p*ite suabst.-
ftg if h *QL W-Se ; owut nukl 'ep6Air. -1
s' S te s ,, e" ae f: h"o to -otmv' i. -',
1i # t "-."y k 'v ""r i "4Ji"e'* d' -
"tiodc 'eV o O`Wt make the effort Th*ei/ p'"
to help "make Haiti the tourist paradise that its Haiti Traa
natural scenic beauty, balmy clirlate anld -fas- Chamber o
cinatinrg character have given it the right to be. Bldg: Cite (


December 25 1954


v Santa Claus Came West


an -petit, w h o
tucked under his
hristnias morning.
shoe depending rOn
of the'country he
thrusts an eager
,poche. of ,his suit
fingers around a
uante cob. piece
e to tell where it


el. (otherwise call-
came personally
s a reward for be-
through the year
incentive to even
uct. But no-one
where Papa Noel
Haitian folk'cus-
its is safe to sur-
ictlse is a herita-
ench.
on of Santa Cl1us
his hemisphere on
hand coming in
t c h Immigrants
I


eat at

time!


rON'S
FRUIT

JAM


ding Co. S '.
if Commerce
de l'Exposition'


who knev. him as Sintiierklaac
(Dutch for St. Nicholas). They
expected him not on Chlrist-
mas Day but on his Saint';
Day, December 6, and in Hol-
land to this day he still ap-
pears then. Lucky, German
tots receive cookies and fruit
from Sankt Nikolaus on De-
cernber 6 and another round
of gifts on Christmas from
Kriiss i.ringfle (Ithe Ohrist
Child)-
Saint .Nicholas was original-
.13y a 4th Century Bishop of
Asia Minor who became the
patron saint of maidens, school
boys, sailors and especially
little children. Because in life
he had been a bishop, he ap-
peared on Saint's Day in his
red robes carrying the jewel-
ed mitre of his office, which is
probably how the universal
conception of Santa Claus (or


Father Christmas, St Nicho.
las,--even -Papa Noel.) was
foruaned. In those days he had -
a white horse to help cr-iy
the gifts, and today he spJrts
a reindeer team and sleign in
most parts of the world, .but
in Haiti he gets along fine
-A pied-.
Haitian children are li.cky
to escape the German 'versicu
which has a an alter ego (alo6
appearing on Decembar 6)
Bedsnickle, who visits L h .'
naughty children armed wit:l1
switches. Mischievous Dut.h
children are likely to firp.d
Saint Nicholas accompanied by
Black Peter, a Moorish dwarf
who .beats them wi-thl birch
rods, naughty little Czecoslo.
yaks get a whipping from the
blackihooded devli Cert ani.
Hungarians must rckon with
Krampusz.


., -.a...

ONE OF THE YEAR'S MOST CONTENTED MEN
Sviccessful Co. tr is not a vend6r of newspaper as h.''ppears in
Sthe dbovepicture but a happy photographer turnd. iflershow-
p., 0Phr Nb'k, ,, shal
i ng.d elighi with an .Irmf.ul ,of .H.aiti Suns, that announced tihe
:opqiqng of his re-co~mLditiovted '.Otoffso'a .Jot.lr..,
S'obger Ooster, fo-md photoorapher .fOir Wofdibd'.- M-other top.
SrankinW magazines is rushing ho''ne from Nei i'6O' to spend i
Christmas i-n the old-fashioned cheer, and relaxing yule-hid
Atmosphere of his Hotel, before dashing off to Istaminbul to talir


___ ".- i o, ,,,o I, ,, _
p ctur s of the ne Hilton Hotel.
~Ike
.M 'SA'


IN PETION-VILLE
PHONE : 7394
O






A Merry Christmas and aHappy New Year from HaitiSun December 25 1954



In IAITI[II I Heard The, Haunting Jungle Drums


By Jack LONG


Haiti -inspired its discove-
rers with wonder ever since
Columbus was bowled over at
sight of its fantastic moun-
tains and wifti jungle valleys.
a
TAiay. although it lies in the
Caribbean only 50 miles east
of Cuba, and just 3 hours
flying time from Miami, Fla,-
it Is still a land oR mystery to
most Americans. Climate, lan-
guage, landscape, In4 customs
in the 'Black Republic' all be.
long to another world.

Arriving from the' show.-
north in the dead of winter, I
dropped into the middle of a
sun-warmed tumult. It was as
if I'd Jlanded thousands of ml-
lea away on the shores of Afri-
ca although I'd breakfasted
'. that morning 'at New York's
'= International Airport. Th e
streets 'of Port au Prince, -ai-
ti's -capital, swarmed with
straight backed women toting
*, huge baskets, sacks,. oil tins,
and odd-shaped bundles on
their-heads. There'were mo-
dern station-wagon taxis, ano
ancient open-sided busses pain
ted red and gold like circus
wagons and stuffed with pas
sengers, luggage, trussed chic-
kens, and protesting piglets.
Shop' fronts were decorated
with tinsel and colored lights,
and a loud-speaker blared ,Jin
gle- B'elis, fot I 'had arrived a'
week before Chtistmas. Hap-
P pilly stripping off the coat, tie,
and jacket I'd shivered in a
few hours before, I rolled up
_my sleeves in the sun.

Looking up a bit of Haitian
history before my departure, I
had learned that Haiti's third
of- the island of Hi.paniola
(the eastern two-thirds is oc-
cu.pied bly the Dominican Re-
public) had for three centu-
ries been a rich slave colony


9f Ffance. French rule ended
in a slave revolt 150 years ago;
making Haiti the second free
nation of the New World iid
-the fin's independent Negrore
public. Haiti's population if
African and mulatto, her cul-
ture an exotic mixture of Pa-
risian sophistication and jun-
gle superstition. Her language
is French among the educated
class- who also speak E.i.
glish- and a Creole dialect a-
mong the masses. Nowhere
else in the world has such a
mixture jelled into a nation.
In the middle of the tumult
of ,Port au prince I discovered
the main public market. Be-
neath an eccentric red-and-
green .structure of steel mina-
rets and lacy tin. ornaments -I
found a mass of vendors crou-
ched haunch to haunch ovpr
an incredible assortment of
merchandise tiny oil lamps
made from condensed- mmilk
cans, sandals made fron o'd
tire casings, Tlour sacking .or
dress goods, utensils carved
from odds and ends of meal,
straw baskets and hats, bright-
red scarves. In the food de-
partment of this primitive su-
permarket a seller's wares so-
metimes consisted of a cup. or
two of beans. Fragrant roots,
twigs, and herbs suggested na-
tive witch doctors, brewing
magic potions


Leaving the'city, I taxied up
the winding road that 'leads to
Petlonville, the suburb -where
the best hotels ajid the homS
of the well-to-do are located.
Within ten minutes the heat
of Port au Prince was left be-
hind, and 'I realized that once
in Haiti's hills and moun-
tains, you are no longer in the
tropics.

At Hotel El Rancho, where
SI had rbservatIons, I found a
different world from the bare
poverty of the Port au Prince
market. Here was a Spanish-
modern chateau, new and glea-
ming in the sun. with a fl-i-
ming .flower garden and a
swwimming pool surrounded by
*brigh-colored umbrellas. All
at once I found myself in the
social whirl of Haitian society,
with its dazzle of dlamon:ls,
lace gowns, and whi-te linen
suits. Although the comple-
xions of the guests varied in
hue from the merest suntan to


deep brown, I felt as far frain
Africa as if I had been sud-
denly transported by magic
carpet to a Parisian drawing
room.


It was hard to believe I was
in a country where the primi-
tive African religious soicerv
known as voodoo was still
practiced, and I said so tomy
new-found -friends. A -slender
young Haitian girl in an ele.
gant dress looked shocked.
'But that all died out years
ago,, shbe said.
A moment later a'handsome
young Haitian teacher named
Max Wilson.,who had studied
at Rale, took me aside. cMany
-upper-class Haitians 't *h i n k
voodoo is crude and uncivili-
zed., he said .so they pretend
it doesn't exist. But come here
for a minutes.

AMax led me to the edge of
the terrace; which looked a-
cross a valley to mountains
now growing dim in the ga-
thering darkness. -Listen., hE
said. I heard a rumblqgI mum-
ble in the distance. It was like
no sound I had ever heard be-
fore the haunting, prehis.
toric rhythm of drums. 'Whe-
re you hear drams, that's voo-
doov. Max said, 'even though
the elite Haitians never lis-
ten.
-Every night thereafter while
I was in Haiti, when I could
get. away to some silent bal-
cony or stop along a country
road at night. the drums were
tall&ing sqmnewhere. .Most of
the educated Haitians you're
likely to meet have never seen
a voodoo ceremony., Max told
me, 'even though most Hal.
tian peasants still believe in
its magic. Wre live in two dif-
ferent worlds here the up-
per-class mulattos and the
black peasants don't e v e n
speak the same language*.


-Haven't you ever attended
voodoo rituals?' I asked.
.Once.. Max said.
.Then I don't suppose you
could arrange.... I suggested.

.aI think I might'. Max said.
,I have a friend on the police
force who always 6nows what's
going on. because police per-
mission is necessary to hold a
voodoo ceremony'.
That was how I found my-


self transported, the n e x t
night, from the elegant atmos-
phere of a Parisian soiree to a
tiny village of mud huts that
might have stood on the banks
of the sources of the myste-
rious drum music. The drums
were playing in an open-sided
thatched pavilion lit by kero-
sene lamps.

A glittery-eyed old lady in a
patch-work skirt and bright-
red head scarf showed Os to
seats along one side of the
room. Max whispered .that she
was the voodoo priestess, cal-
led the 'mambo., who was
second in command to the,
houngan or priest. Some 30
members of the local voodoo
society sat oq benches or mo-
ved about, 'laughing and tal-
king. In the rear were three
drummers, and behind them
a half-dozen black- skin n e d
girls hummed and chanted-
a kind of voodoo cho1r. The


women were dressed in sack-
like dresses, the men in taite-
red shirts and denim pants.
barefooted as they might have
co m s I ro m the
cane field or the market place,
or from some jungle hidea-
way.
Gradually, in response to
the almost melodious voices
of the drums, the congregation
began itb shuffle in a lazy, tran
celike way around the center
pole of the pavt'lon.

This relaxed scene was shat
tered by a volley of explosions
as loud as pistof shots, and the
palace was Invaded by a hahd-
some, fierce-looking N e g r o
brandishing an immense swbrl
and followed by several men
carrying bundles of leaves and
branches. After splitting the
air with wild slashes of thq
swvord, the leader took up a,'
bottle of sulphurous-smelling
(Continue over leaf)


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A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSun


THE HAUNTING JUNGLE DRUMS there, was range
111LTE HUNTIG JUGLE RUMSter range of mountains,, ji


I Contin ued from overe
water and splashed it aroi
the room.
That's Houngan Isna
the boss', Max whisper
'He's performing a purifi
tion rite, scaring awqy e
spiritss.
The party was nov. in an
roar. The dancers jumped a
shouted, and the drums be
faster and louder. A sl
youth threw back his he:
eyes glazed, and went into
trance. Other dancers put the
arms around him as be te
,bed Insnely. One woman cli
bed the center pole. Anoth
*leaped up and hung from
crossbeam.


We were witnessing a kir
of religious frenzy, trigger
red by the drums, the shri
repetitive chant of the chl
risters, and the antics c
the Ahoungani.. I was coin
vinced that it wasn't a sho'
staged'for visitors.
cIn fact)>, said Max, Athe
Don't. even know we're he
re. The ones in a tranc
have been possessed by
\cloas', one of the spirits
Getting the spirits to ap
pear in that way is the put
pose of voodoo.
It was tkie liveliest jan
session I ever attended...
While Haiti abounds in
primitive mystery, I found
'that a highly civilized re
sort life also goes on there
After my evening of voodo'
I spent a luxurious day re
laxing beside the h ot e
-swimming pool, taking an
occasional dip, and acqui-
Sring a tan to excite the envy
of nmy winiter-time stay- at
home friends.
After dinner a group of
dancers appeared on t he
outdoor terrace and perfor-
med a series of spectacles
based on voodoo ceremo -
nies, 'but improved with ma-
gnificent costumes and mu-
sic.
I finished off the evening
with a visit to the National
Casino, a plush tropical out-
door night club, dining and
gambling place as fancy as
anything I've seen on the
French Riviera. It was 'hard
to believe I was still in the
Icouinttry of ,wangas. (cur-
ses) and witch doctors as I


eaf joined the whirl of
ind ning gowns and d i n n
clothes.
1rd, One of the few bits of H
ed. tian history I'd known Ibe
ca- re visiting the country v
vil the story of Henry Chris
phe, the fabulous -< Bla
up Napoleon> who was born
no slave and made hi mrse
eat king, ruling half the cot
iim" try for a time after t
ad, French were driven o r
a Christophe's rise to pow
eir and dramatic suicide wv
as. a silver bullet inspired F
Im veral popular histories a
er romances of Haiti. Of all 1
a accomplishments the mi
incredible was the build
of an immense stone f(
id tress known as the Citad
which still stands on a ru
n ged mountain peak in t1
north of Haiti. This cast'
A big enough to houAse 10,0(
a- troops, has been describe
as the greatest .piece of m
litary architecture in tl
Western Hemisphere. Ye
when I spoke of it to Ha
tians I met in Port au Prii
e
ce, I discovered to my am:
zement that none had ev
S.
visited the Citadel

(cOnly foreigners take th
trouble to make the trip
n one Haitian official tol
me. We Haitians are tc
n. busy today trying to Ibuil
d up our poor country to wo]
Sry about past glories-.
SThus, under the noses c
Sthe indifferent natives,
Discovered what is probabi
I the most interesting man
made marvel in th6 Chrih
Sbean.
r
SThe 160-mile trip to thi
Citadel turnedout to be a
adventure in itself. It invol
ved a 40-minute airplane
hop from Port au Prince tc
the north coast town of Cap
Haitien, 'followed by a half-
hour auto drive and a 2-
hour horseback trek up a
mountain traiI

The flight to Cap Haitien
was a lesson in the country's
geography. Near the coast
we skimmed over
fertile green plains and clus-
tered villages, then rose
over bare hills, reddish and
scrubby, where isolated huts
stood and wisps of smoke
rose from charcoal fires.


eve- gJe-covered on their low
e r slopes, pine- studded at
then barren above. I nc
lai- understood why, when t
to- bellious slaves took to tl
Vas interior of the country, 1E
ito- years ago,. Napoleon's a
.ck nmies gave up trying to hui
a them and.left Haiti.
I f On the plane I nit si
un- other Americans on the
he way to explore the Citade
St. Landing outside the sleep:
rer town of Cap Haitien, \,
ith drove to a tiny village calle
se- Milot, where our trans.po.
nd became a set of runty hoi
his ses, each accompanied by
ost small boy whose job was t
ng walk 'behind with a switc
Dr' and keep the animal in mc
el, tion up a murderously steep
g- rocky trail.
he This path was a jungle
le, fantasy of strange plants
o} shiny green breadfruit oT
ed tall trees,-bananas-and plan
Ii- tains, cashew and almond
he trees, coffee 'bushes, cran
et, ges, grapefruit, l em, on s
i- mangoes, bamboo, and enor
n- mous old banyan trees.
a-
er Although we had glimpse
the profile of the Citadel
from'the air and from many
e miles away on the md'to:
)' road, it was hidden from
d -
S view when we started ou.
Climb on horseback. 0 ur
d next sight of it, about half-

way up the trail, brought
the caravan to a sudden
If
stop. We stared upward.'A
great, triangular stone to-
y wer pointed toward us like
the proiv of a ship' sailing
in the sky. Behind it stret-
ched a mass of masonry -
huge pierced walls, terraced
setbacks, 'penthouse apart-
ments. At an elevation of
nearly 3,000 feet,, the for-
tress wore a scarf ,of wind-
whipped clouds which made
it appear to be float in g
through the air. I.1 see it,
but I can't believe it! one
'of our party exclaimed.
We entered an iron-stud-
ded door in the main tower
wall, 130 feet high, and ex-
plored dungeons and store-
houses that once held e-
nough supplies to, maintain
an army. .Twelve-foot-long
[bronze cannon pointed out
at the peaceful jungle, and
it was almost impossible to
believe that human strength


December 25 1954


atf- had hauled them up the trail
un we had climbed. Our guide
er led us to a roofed apace
d where Christophe is said to
>w have drilled his troops, and
!e- where, to impress a foreign
ie diplomat with their discipli-
50 ne, he once gave a company
r- ,Forward march,, and ne-
it 'gilected to order xHalt> un-
til they had marched into
:x space. Seeing what Christo-
ir phe had accomplished with
1. brick and granite on top of
)y a mountain made even this
'e fantastic story believable.
'Ii
,t On one of my last days on
r- the island I made a pilgi-
a mage to a church which is
o beginning to be famous out-
h side Haiti. This is the Holy
3- Trinity Episcopal Cathe -
). dral, a simple stone building
with a white interior, ex-
e cept at the altar end, where
: a burst of color floods the
n place with warmth. Here I
found native mural pain-
i tings depicting BilhIe sto-
ries the Temptation of
Adam and Eve, the Nativi-
ty, the Flight into Egypt,
the Casting Out of the Mo-
ney Changers, the Las t
d Supper, the Crucifixion, and.
I the Ascension. b
'1 a
r The stories, themse 1 v e s.
i were familiar, but the pain- g
tings were like nothing I've ]
r ever seen "before. Painted by g
nine native artists, they were
Sthe Bible in Haitian dress. A- i
dam and Eve in the Garden, I ,
noticed, were a naive, lun-
pidy shaped, brown-skin n e d <
pair, and 'the fruit with which l
the serpent tempted them was T
an orange -obviously much .c
more familiar and enticing to v
a Haitan than an apple. At v
the Last Supper, the disciples
were a mixed group of all com rn
plexions from white to black a
a reflection of the nation's ca
racial mixture. At the birth of ai
Jesus, an innocent, reund'faced t'
brown 'Virgin was surrounded er
by happy, cheering Haitians,
bearing gifts of pineapples. R]
The church began to fill M.


with people coming .for a ser-
vice. A samning, athletic-loo-
king white'clergyman walked
up and welcomed me, introdu-
cing himself as the Right Re-
verend Charles Al'ro'l Voege-
.li, Bishop of Haiti. I learned-
that Bishop Voegeli came
from Morristown, N. J., and
had spent 11 years at his pre-
|
sent post. With the help of De
WVitit Peters, director of Haiti's
Art Center, he ordered the mu-
rals begun in 1949 as a contri-
bution to an Internatioal Ex-
posiIO3n held that year.
I asked Bishop Voegeli how
he had found courage to let
trained artists make utip their
own interpretations of the Bi-
ble for his church. The natu-
ral religious feeling of the Hai-
tian Is very strong., he said.
.1 trusted that tfeeAng. In fact,
the greatest reward of ''rg
work in Haiti has been the
chance 'to get to know these
wonderful people.,
I questioned the Bishop a-
bout the problem of voodoo
superstition ?n his congrega-
tion.' We don't try to stamp
out voodoo.. he said. ,but to
educatet, instead. We've gone
into the -mountains and conv-
erted whole voodoo societies,
baptizing the .houngan- and
all his followers. Voodoo will
survive as dancing, music, sin
ging-part of Haiti's folk.bre.
3ut as religion it's losing its
nip.,'
Looking at the simple paint-
ngs before me, with their
varm, beautiful colors, I realize
d that there was probably no
s
theirr place in this fearful in
HAbom'b-thrpgtened w o r I d
where such art could still be
related. Here was a country
where childlike religious faith
ras still being born.
With its coamblnation of igno
ant qnd educated, prianiive
nd modern. jungle and lands-
A)ed swiniming pool, voodoo
id Christianity, T decid e d
tat there was, in fact, no oth-
r' place on earth like Haiti.

ROM 'AMERICAN.
MAGAZINE


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A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSun


December 25 1954


Baptist Church Commemorates 25th

Anniversary Pastor Reuben Marc
SuiluJy November 28 the
Congregation of Lh! LJa,'Kst
Church of Hai, a.omn'n"L-f 'ra-
ted at -the capital, and En dg-
bout the provinces, the aifl-
versary of 25 years of -,.,'",e
by its Bishop, the Rewercnd
Pastor Reubl)en MAli'c. Th, a,-
tinguished man of letters. ti,.',!

son of a French missionary
Rev. Rlie Merc, who ..ettlei 'in
Haiti in 1.91, and his Haitian


wife, Lorena Salvant. was hor-n
at Trou du Nord on Deceiener
1, 1903. He began his education
in the Evangelist School o.
Trou Founded by his father,
continued at the Primary
School of Mirabel Gratia at
Cap-Haitian andl I.'.': Plhlmir.
Guer"ier at Cap lItV,;in., and in
1923 finished' his studies here
at Lvc4 Pelion. A.\tit'r ,'cr. i
year- of teachiiz -nit TcouJ, h
left in 1925 for further .stles
in the UnIte-l States. at Nev.-
Ion Theologaical Seminary'. nd
later at Harvard Univer-i;v n
Boston. He obtained the i'le,2re
of Master of Sacred Theo'nr-v,
at Harvard -in 1929.
While a 3t1 lent in the 1U S


lie wa, g 3 "
.. Li c -', IIucti
t,'-. 1reich i.,
'-..-111'. sn aidu'
AJtfl' igh Lc- \
i
S:. L : iL t i' 'I rs 1.1
C:l'.'.,ch f Woo
'- ,i ..I il .
IiA:d to: Haiti ir
,..,'' ,'= ;. t 'l, 'l.r ; tlr .
B'.iliste c'f Poi
-. w. i .t t '.', y eV ja
of Rev'. Lucius
years later he


S i .


(9tflnWeE


e n the chor-
ig .erV,'ices 11ii
i SUag-'d 11-, PI.-vi
Jl .-;1, oi i..l.l LF,
Ia Yel,.,uU a Ma
'.a3s ot'fteLd a
-1 '/ .,: !'i


Cheraquit who gave him two
daughters, and a son.
After a quarter or a century
and a remarkable career. the
Church has a membership of
more than 3.000 and some 50
branches in the provinces and
mountains of Haiti. The pre-
sent new Temple which he
constructed is one of the lar-
gest Protestant edifices in Hali-
lti.

PortLouiiPrinice paid lhimma-
ge to Pastor M ,i-c in a gra,,-
.iise r'ebi ,icus manifestation oft
.t ittldd a rind esteem, in the
new temn.ple. A mi o n g lIe
j'-eICLh-s prio'ouncei was that
of his former teacher at Ly-
by his former teacher at Ly-
ce Petion. Dr. P. C. De;m.-,-.
gles \lio traced the career of
tilis mnoderri evangelist i-, a
powerfull o r a t i o n which
brought enthusiastic applause
from the thousands of specta-
tors .


n-oocket, Rhode CLINIQUE POCTMP I. GOtOENBERG .' ... .. ,
-.... .. Pours: ED TRICIAN
S1929. taking 3-11 a. m.
i. Egt Cini Consultation. Ave. Christophe fC IlC/lttIt lS wpne/
'., iL z, g'- Clinic at Petian-ville Ave. Pan-amerir 1 7
rt-au-Pilnce left Child Sepecialist it' *JJ rJ.
i bp pl,.Te:.ath Clinic Dr. SYLVAIN "- PORTTAU-PRINCE HAJTI WEST INDIES
H ippol yte. T w o %. .. .
,inairieei MIell. except Tuesday and Saturday
4-G6p m
















FOR EXCLUSIVE MAHOGANY i

WARE

BUY DIRECT FROM THE FACTORY



FRITZ NEVS,



-Haili's Mahogany PFbneers-

Former'Bellevue Club, Sacre-Coeur
Phone 5448, P. 0. Box 1204

Our motto is : From the factory to your hands
^^^^ p



___ _____N fhIJ^^^^^^^^^e


0 tiQUART *86"PROOP
BpUQUET ;BrUQE71 ,u .


L A P L S r gA M.I .E E 'L *' .
| LA PLUS ANCIENNE FAMILLE CE ,DISTILLATEURSID%,AIT,.I)


6 iSfmr


C


e rl c^
Perfu^e5







A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSun


December 25 1954


WINTER -F011, FASHIONS SHOWN AT E, RANCHO.


Dior's Fashion Show Captures

Soiree Parisienne" Atmosphere


*For some hours at i-iha,.-
cho. it %%as an unforgettable
vision of a night of Parisian
eltegance in one of the -Grands
Palaces, where adl Is luxury,
charm, order and beauty.
This presenra.Lion from tie
collection .CHRISTIAN D:OH.
one of the great prince; ct Pa-


.neastirement, piop.-'tioi.. tou:
de main, conception cOf fines. ,
which is revealed Wb'v-- .all ii;
the plas'i'' draperips :hat fltw
or iundlilate ilke .. iijd on a
n.Ola W3ti's body.
They were all -'p' .idid.i, d u
I.I es%.-, thce mnoiudel 'mi n .. i
cudarly ic Icp.-:tatorc '1cre sptl


One. oj the tic ylcs thot won admiration at the Dior Fashion
Showu held at *El Ranrho. Hotel, Monday December 6 : an
A utinmn. f \itnter dress -modeled on Dior's famous H Line-
Shoes by Christian Dior-Delman.


risian culture obtainedl one of
those triumphs which w-iill
mark an epoch in the memory
of anyone with the good fortu
ne to have seen the unrolling
of this pageant of beauty in
feminine clothing, as if rene-
wed from the Tales of a Thou-
sand and One Nights.

8'lender, Supple with queen
ly air, tempered by a clas2._
measure the modtls zippeared
on the pclateau with this piquant
and glowing bearing, so that
they seemed to match pertec.
tly the de luXe clotFh cut in
stylish fines that covered them,
The spectators, the better te
admire, were silent for some
seconds then applauded en-
thusiastically as e,-ich Image of
alfluring grace filed past under
the spotlights.


Forty three dresses., f--,
three masterpieces. true art
reveals itself In all human ac-
tivities. Everything comliined
to make of a feminine 'toile'-
te, a thing of b .-'itv the


bound by Melles. France and
Maie Helene wno ,' image-,:
wiil long live In dhe charmed
memory of their adrri'er- h who


i e legion.
'e would not know how to
,i,--e this rapid note, which can
not give even a feeble idea of the
inarvellout- night, without con
gra.tulating the chaimung and
highly regarded proprietor ut
-El Ranch:o., Mr. Albert Silve-
i, wh.,,i presided with sove-
reign art over the orgajisaition
of ,this night of dcei.,u.s ,and
magic, the finale of which was
a ball which His Excellency the
President and Mine. Magloire
deigned to open. heightened by
their presence orn this night of
beauty.

Andi congratulations for Mai
son Dior were more deserved
as the receipts of "is evening
of elegance went to the Foun-
dation of Mme. Magloire whose
devotion to the under.privale-
,ged is so well known.


W\e must comment agjin on
the success of this nighl and
further of the artistes who
pleaded u so much, and who
left 1,his morning (Friday, by
IAM which has organised the
voyage bearing the beautiful
.voyageuses' in complete c.')Tn.
.fort.2

The DIOR jashion show ,in'tji
lha. left us speechless, but Pir
-Le Matinm reporter wias any-
thing but As the above er.
tract front hi. eulogy ( Le Ma-
tin Oct. 10) shows, he had qui-
te a lot of words at hl.s com-
mand. Nevertheless it is ot-
vious he was ii-pressed.


4W

,-J r .':_ .i~,_

Among the famous Dior Ore iois that held ((El Rancho,
-sp-clatotOs spijll-bo nni-hlcl, tnoIoi d ,it front tlhei Au-
t'irn-Winter collection,- Hat styled ,n rayon by Dhor, shoes
al->o by Dior.


Ji
--- Ill -I .cw ',- a, ., .. ,____ -^ ___ .--".



4

..*"'.'. 1'"1




I,"

-.




LetI the Insurance Comrpuny o the worrying. See i-mmediat-
ly : A'NORI'ICH UNIONJ Isuranee Co. Joseph Nadal and
Co. Agents. Tel : 3486





-1A



>47


Everybody's Favourite



IIAITI TRADING Co. S. A. Chamber of Co i..Ircce Bidg.
CITE DE L'EXPOS ITION, PHONE 2069


.. ............
........ ,. .,.......
X". .. .. ../..

(Ii DAILY SERVICE TO


......Ji x -2...







CONVAIR-TYPE CLIPPERS* DEPART 10:10 A.M.

7 0 FIR-ST CLASS

(U.S.) ROUND TRIP

See your Travel Agent or



Rue Dantls Destouches Port-ou-Prince
T61lphones: 3451 et 2822
....-.. .'. REG....
' T'M' 'REG FAA'n.
.... a W W-:Wiv;;:::^ ^^






SA Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from Haiti Sun
mop


Circuit' Outlined
for Highway-!erry Links
Bulletin Gives Mexican Plan
Mexican government l)roposed Caracas by way of-San Juan,
highway oce.in ferry sy.temn PLIuerto Rico.
girdling the Cafibblean s:-d r.d The IRF article is a digest of
the Gulf of Mexico, are dt.-.i i) an official 300 page report pu)b-
ed and mapped in the cu,'E:'t lished by the Mexican secretary
bulletin of the Internaioir.-I at of cnommtmicitions and pub
Road Federation.. lie works.
Stops along- the socalled .Ca. The coml)rehen5-ive Mexican
ribbean Gulf circuit'- as. prcpo booklet, which furnishes de-
sed by the Mexicanns would tails on nearly every phase of
include ports in the Unit.-I tj related Caribbean*Gulf activity,
tes, Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, Domi- is expected to be helpful to Pan
nican Republic, Puerto Rico, American highway congres-'s
Virgin Islands, British and and other supporters of the
French Antilles, Venezuela. Co- idea.
lumbia, Panama, Costa Rica, Ni- The Mexicans .have attempt-
caragua, Honduras, Guatemala ed to co-ordinale sea, land and
and Mexico. air routes and to relate the
The combination of port-to- effect of such co-ordination to
port. road or barge service the potential economic, politi-
would make it possible, for in- cal and cultural progress of the
stance., to drive from Miami to area. The Impact of the high-


Haitian Love Of Dancing Has

Roots in By-Gone Years


Haiti is perhaps the world's
most dance-loving country.
Prom the cultured elite to the
Poorest peasant, the people of
Haiti spend a greater propor-
tion of their time shuffling
and swaying to the tambour
and the flute than do thuce
of any other country.
Meringue a la Dominicaine
li a dish they appreciate,
while no aversion is recorded
from boleros, tangos, mambos,
and the rest of the torrid fami-
ly. But it's the Haitian merin-
gue that draws them.
The soft beated insinuating
rythm.that has you in its
throes before you know it,
spinning you, shaking your
shoulders, and wiggling your


toes in the most uninhibited
way imaginable, draws adhe-
rents from all countries, all ra-
ces, without distinctions of any
sort. (Even Communists have
been reputed to leave the Par-
ty to join the less reasonable
but more enjoyable cult of the
bamboche,)

The above picture shows
the dances that started it all :
the folklore dances. (Perform-
ed by the National Troupe al
the Theatre de Verdure eacTi
Sunday evening.)

Critics rave over it, choreo
graphers copy it, tourists are
left breathless by it. Haitians
just do it and keep on doing
it.


__December 25 1954


'aribbean-Gulf


way-ferry linkage on Caribbean
Gulf tourism received special
attention.
A recent university of Mijrnl
survey, which claimed that the
Caribbean has scarcely begun
to tap its tourism potential,
reported that vIsitors to Puert)
Rico, Bahamas, Cuba, Curacao.
Dominican Republic, Haiti, .Jia-
maica nnd the Virgin Isl.'incis
numbered 5SO.000 last year com-
pared to 20-4.000 in 1937.
i
The Mexican government Said
according to the IRF buLleti'.
that the international highway
which joins the countries of the
Americas together, including
the Gulf and Caribbean circuit,
must be completed for the ecro.
nomic and social progress ol
all. Proposed is an internatJoial
agreement among the countries
forming the Gulf and Caribbean
circuit, to carry forward the
communications develop r- n t
and improvement of tourist ser-
vice


~ Mrand Mrs.MURRBAYKNOBEL .

Send Christmas and New Year

\ Greetings to Their Many

i Friends in Haiti
---... ..... ... "* "
*. .-.~. e


"\ ; -
t






9














7
SSanta Claus, or Sit.Nicholas, is a jolly person who flies with Its
sleigh and rcilnlccr through the night, slides down chiin.eys on
C Christmas ev and fills the children's stockings with toys Par-
*cnts and older children joi, in the genial conspiracy of keeping
{ this myth alive far the little children. One of the first letters a
Child writes begins : Dear Santa, for Christmnas, please bring
,. e '* M


Um


Nagm Xont&,wUo4t' 'de3-jeW&4Cjt 4j20C4M Sj cU i~t~? jU~
'Vood1o-le-N~t 4pe PORCfILAIN -IN u R L
DrL YAL COP[NHAbEN. ROYAL Vt N NA
RI& [ROENDAHI ^M V ?f* itan EMBRC'IUE IiL






December 25 1954


A Merry Chrisimas and a Happy New Year from Haiti Sun


Do you have one of those
back yards where it seems inm
possible to raise vegetables and
flowers ? Is it becu-e the soil
is semriarid.and of limestone for
mation with less than thirty
inches of rainfall a year? If so,
then you have an ideal place'
for growing sisal. B u t for
several good reasons the Unit-
ed States does not want to plant
sisal in its own back yard : La-
bor is cheaper elsewhere, sisal
Is ,m o r e adapted to tropical
countries and it impovrishes
the soil to such an extent that
even obnoxious weeds fail to
thrive where it has been. By
the way, the term 'sisal, ap-
plies to either the plant or the
hard fibers that It produces.
Though the plant may grow
in ground that appears to be
of no value, please do not scoff
at it, for hard fibers play a very
important role in time of peace
or war. Without hard fibers to
make rope, fishing nets and
binder twine, one would be de-
prived of many things. If all
hard fiber would suddenly di-
sappear from the earth, think
what would happen The vast
majority of ships would be
stranded at sea, for they could
neither operate nor be tied to
docks. Shipping and packing
would be impeded, ports and
railroads: considerably parlayz-
ed With no binder twine or
.qther cords for the farm the
entire work would suffer. So
vital' is hard fiber that it is
rated about sixth in order of.
iflportance of ra-w material for
wars
Early in World War II a se-
vere Shortage of hard fiber de-
veloped. The United States felt
it harder than most countries
She used to import great quari-
tities of the best hard fiber cal-
led 'abacA'- or Manila hemp.
native to the Philippines. Howe-
ver, the impact of war cut off
this supply and forced the -in-
creased using of substitutes cal-
led ,agaves., These are native
to Mexico but have been trans-
planted into many other coun-
tries
Foremost of the agave plants
are sisal -Agave sisalina- and
henequen -Agave fouscsoydes
-.'Agave sisalina, is the only
true isal. though thenecluen,
Mexico's vital export, is somneti-
me. called .uch. British East
Africa, the world's greatest pro
ducer of s.ial, supplies Bri-
tain's needs. The United States'
principal supply of true sisal
comes from the Caribbean repu
blic of Haiti.


GROWING SISAL IN HAITI


Though quantities of sisal ae then used as new plants, itf ed .tow- and are use.ftl tr


grown on farms and scattered
over the countrivside of this re-
public, by far t h e greatest
amounts are grown on planta-
tions that cover thousands of
acres in northern Haiti. Ti-.ese
are American interests. Their
position on the sea coast prov-
ides c h e a p transportation
abroad with a convenient place
to dump bagasse, the waste mcr.
trial.


Three Years to Maturity

A grown sisal plant sends out
runners that start new plants.
When new .plants are about
eighteen inches high they are
dug up and cut from the mo
their plants and placed in new
plantations The smooth, dull-
green, bladelike leaves shoot
straight up at first, then later
bow toward the ground while
new leaves grow up from the
center core. They point Qut in
all directions, giving the plant
an impregnable appear n c e,
each leaf being tipped with a
sharp, woody needle, Indeed, a
sisal plantation would be a so'-
ry place for a parachute troop-
er to -land. One acre holds 2.000
plants and yields an average
of about 1.500 pounds of fiber.
After three years of growth
a plant is ready for its first
profitable cutting. -Heneiuen
takes seven years-. The cutter
carefully approaches the plant
with a huge machete in his
hand. iHls first operation is to
clip off the needles of the 'leaves'
to be removed, therl1y disarm-
ing the plant. THe then st ,:ps
closer to the plant and with'
his machete reaches under ,to
cut the leaves at their base
;n the.center core. He removes
up to forty, leaves that are close
ito the ground leaving as many
as twenty younger ones stand-
i ng a lmo s 't v e r t i-
cally at the center of the
plant. Lesser yields can be
taken every ten months for the
next five years, the plant by
then having produced ab5ut
'150 good cleaves. About this
time a pole grows straight up
from the center core, sometimes
reaching a height of fifteen
feet or more. At the top of
this slim pole sma.Il flowers,
after pollination, produce little
stalks or shoots These shoots
can ibe cut and panted in a nur-
X .


there are not enough ground
runners to start new planta-
tions. When half the plants in
a field -bear poles, the plants
are uprooted and the cycle
starts over again


Decortication and Salvaging

In the field the cutter bundles
up the leaves and they are 1" d
ed on miniature railway cars
and drawn by diesel engineLs
to the mill or factory for decor
tication. This process removes
the green pulp from the long,
hard white fibers that run the
length of the leaves. The form
dable machine driven by two
motors that strips the fibers
clean is called a decorticator.
The clean, wet fibers are
received at the end of the ma.
chine where they are tied into
bundles six inches 1ihick. These
are then thrown into a perforat
ed tank ,that spins at 600 revo
lutions a minute to throw off
the excess water, and after
being graded according to color
and 'length they go to the me-
chanical driers. One machine
handles 800 ponds of fiber an
hour, making it soft. It is then
bound by a hydraulic press into
560,pound bales.
Now back to the decorticatirng
machine to learn something. F,'
membering that si-,al needrl
little water to10 grow. \ve aie
indeed surprised to know that
each leaf contains 89 per cent
water Five per cent i.- fihE'
and six per cent bagasse. 'The
"bagasse is the pulpy gr,'en ma-
terial that is cleaned oft the
leaves during dcortica ion. 't his
also contains a quantity *.'
short leaves and fibers that are
cleaned and shredded1 by : r-c
cently invented machine The-.?
short salvaged fibers arc call-'


stuffing mattresses and uhiol-
stery. They are sun-drled- on
cloudless days and machine-
dried on rainy days after which
they are compressed into 280
pound bales for export.
Experiments have bec'ie made
to find some use for th(? est
of the bagasse. The juice is
acidy and ferments in ten hours,
having good detergent qualities
Fromn sisal bagasse it is po.:i-
ble to extract an element. uspd
in making cortisone, a drug
used In the treatment of arthri-
tis. Just in passing we note that
In Mexico the Indians make in-
toxicating drinks from the juice
of certain agave-family plants.
Haiti also has a local Indus.ry
for making souvenirs out 'f the
better grades of sisal.
Plight of the Haitian Worker
'Haiti has produced as much
as sixty to seventy million
pounds of fiber a year. More
than 50.000 acres of its land are
covered with sisal plantations,
and this estimate does not-inciu
de private farms. As early as
1947 Haiti held fourth place
in world production of hard
fibers. Her output of sisal is
usually second only to British
East Africa. -Among Haiti's ex-
p6rts, only coffee is more mi-
portant than her sisal. The
prewar price of sisal was eight
cents a pound, but at one time
after the war the price soared
to over thirty cents a pourd.


Extract from an article
in .AWAKE. magazine


LES PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES


SHEiouira t8&


sery for several months ana PLACE GEFFKAIKD


Since then it has taken a big
drop.
What the Haitian cannot un.
derstand is why the sisal in his
back yard at one time was worth
a fortune, later, hardly worth
cutting and sometimes impose
ble to sell. Those more inform.
ed wonder if it is due to the
restoration of plantations in the
Philippines that were neglect.
ed and destroyed during thi Ja.
panese occupation. Or is it th.a-
Brazil's increased production
was the straw that broke the
camnel's back.? Or are synthetic
fibers replacing the use of na.
tural fiber ? Surely if the wcrli
needs 1,500,000,000 tons a year
then it ought to have a market
for Haiti's hard fiber-so a Hai.
tian reasons. Little does he
knojv that the wage paid in Ame
rica to those that wind up his
sisal in the cordage industry
would average over $2,G600
year, while the Haitian labors
in a hot sisal field for a tenth
of that. Now, with a terrific
drop in sisal prices, he is not
even guaranteed room a n d
board, as are those in six Unit-
ed States' penal institutions
who spend their -time winding
his sisal into binder twine.

The unfortunate part about it
is that several years ago when
America's hard fiber needs were
so urgent the Haitian dpg up
his banana plans and bedde&
down his yard with stringy sisal
Now when his babies cry foi
bahanas,all that he can offer are
the stalks of tough sisal plants.





IA o: ;
rA riy Christmas and a Happy New Year from Haiti Sun

WOMAN ASSURED ELECTION
MALE CANDIDATES WITHDRAW
The recent withdrawal of all their women Mrs Constance Ar
opposing candidates for the naud Zanmor, who has been in-
post of Mayor in the locality of terested in the political evolu-
Mt,-O r g a n i s 6, leaves Lhe tion of her mountain city (In
field uncontested and in the the north of Haiti, two hdurs '
competent hands of one of -from Ouanaminthe) for twenty
DeskQualty (zueu atr


aThe Best Quality Cement at Ii
the Lowest possible cost),
ALLEN & BAUSSAN
offer their

____ .1
tI





chi
aO ', c:el


'-" I t ies
.ep


th
gTOr


tia

IN BAGS OF 42 1/2 PORTLAND CEM sh
STANDARD HYDRAULICKgs NET 6 PLY ch
OFFICE: MTTC BLDG. EXPOSITION th
Port-au-Prince Tel : /2387 tg



.CAI

WAIT
-i


S. .... [ 1

Mrs Cotistance Zamior

:-irs. The significant forecast
rIters Dbliout the ?troli-g per-
'i ltv cof a pleasant 43.-:.ea
d \x ife, and mother o two
ildren, Mrs Zamor's idtiivi-
s date father back tli.-i the
och when the HaiMan we
in became aware of the fact
at she should fight for a place
local politics. She ha? had
e last word in sendin, ML.
ganise meii to a seat in Con-
ess for many years, for she is
e of the town's most influen.
.1 citizens.


December 25 1954


sending each of his children to
school at Cap-Haitien. It ".as a
family code that after reca.v-
ing their schooling :he chil-
dren would return, marry and
settle in Mt-Organis6.
Constance attended the esta-
blishment of -Les Filles de la
Sagesse. at Cap-Haitien. Show
ing special adaptation to cour-
ses in first aid, she was .scept
ed upon finishing school, for
i 1.
tri-dining in the HIospital :t Cap
Haitien, under Amnerican orga-
nization at the time, whred she
remaiined for three years. True
to the family ruling, she retuI:'
ned to her home in Mt-Organi-
se and brought profe.siornnl
conimpetence and understanding
to the suffering of her commin-i
nity, as a nurse for the next'
i


Born of good peasant -tr,:Ik I,' 01,
e is one of a family of sevc-n FRi
il:lren-six girls anid ,oe J"HOISAQUES
*v, Her father a Cultivator of aEMIL E tRA .-
e region, planted and raise. A .,^Q.7
affee over 25 carreaux o' Inc,


five years.
Twelve years ago the Mt-
Organise belle discovered other
talents which were to prepare
her for the role she is to play
today. She was a born business
woman, and opened her local
houtique, attracting custom-
ers throughout 'he region. Hier
store became a veritqole insti-
Cotinued Overleaf

AUX COSAQUES -
Haiti's famous homard flam-
me has been enthusiastically
acclaimed by visiting' epicures,
and featured by -rmpelial
Linen.,
But foreigners' areti't the only
connoisseurs of food. Haitians
know where the meat is done
just right, where wines are of a
perfect vintage and flavour to
mellow their mood and form the
perfect foil for each delightful
course.
That's why special occasions
are observed at Aux Cosaques.s


~--..*... AUX COSAQUES BAR


LOVERS!!

UNTIL YOU SEE


"I:LYMC-IiF II &C119(I L II
IiPILY MC1IiJTH & ,1i1ti1 3v$1_11=1


THEY ARE SELLING IN THE STATES LIKE


CAKES


RESERVE YOURS NOW'!! ... 7hEN ENJOY


A Merry Christmas


AND A 1955 OF JOYFUL RIDING


CIE. HAITIENNE DE MOTEURS S.
PLACE GEFFRARD
TEL 3302


'I

A.


I I


HOT


ft





Ak errya Christ W .u a Happy New Year from Haiti Sun Decemb r 25 154
WOMAN ASSURED ELECTION HEAVY DUTY AIR-
Continued fro Overleaf men w urge her to run io- offi- CO LED POW ER UNITS
.'tution, and with its c'.pp;';y ce. Her ariswer was :.I'l! do it, P U
grew the esteem of her e'-.,)w provided Lhe ticnet carries two
townsmen for the s31Mpati.-IiL of our men ai Asseisois.-
and attractive dealer *.vho Knew From then on, It was -in the For Pumps, Conipressors, Concret
how to smile when o customer bag.. Last week Constanc? Ar- F Ps Cpr rs on rt
timidly explained 'haz he was naud Zamor had 65S ul her / -d Mortar Mixers Electric Generat-
embarassedand unable to pay townswomen registered, ing Sets, Vibrators Hlisting
his bil. Her domipaio, reach- 1.253 men. Opposing male can S e i,. V ibrat or, Hisaig
eo into the local mr..-le-'nlnce didates placed their homnVe at
were many a struggling pea- her feet, and withdrew frr l qupmenI, r S c.
sant- knew where to find funds the campaign, assuring her Spray r Etc.
to s',ock his stand for markct- that It was no longer nece.tsa- O 1 1 o 35 HP
day sales. Constapc-. practiced ry to hold political meeting-. -
discreet charity and every poor VWith her two sons, ages ;0 ad -
*famnily in Mt-OrganisO at some 12, and her husband who is in i
time, came utinder her watchful charge of the OD.VA CIicken h
could not bear to see or hear Zarhor calmly awaits th:, 10(th
eye anoeeoufd Sh e xFtrm anuteartiboeniMr.
of a. hungry child, nor could of next .January when. the / jI
she suppress her urge to care Mayorsmhip of Mt-Organis6 will '
for the sick, -and the aged, or be handed to her on a silver I L
dress a diseased leg or foot for platter. Then she will officially j --,
her peasants. do something about construct HB
ing better roads to make b.er _It|
When the Constitution .f 'town more accessible. She naso
dreaa fact
Haiti was revised in 1950, pro- ears of a ity park 'with # Wn Uor Po M l a W
viding for feminine part-ipa trees and flowers to ndd beau- Wisconsin Motor Corp, Milwaukee, Wis.
tion in the city council elec- ty to the city. An irrc.'oved '
tions of 1955, citizen Constance market place and local hygie. Local Distributor : .
took It in her stride. The men nic facilities are also on her CHARLES FEQUIEBE & CE .
of h town joined with the wu program. 7 44 Hue Roux & 77 Rue du Quai -
7 Tel. 2245 3084 3270




r f :




A 1 G'-T0" /


S..E PI B, -ALL NEW FROM HE GROUND Upf
This is the one! Tis istBE c wit ithe




Fnrpm ofickreaisponse carbugetor othe
or ou dge apA in every





enc#onomys ainedfrto rowsyt
in its plus-poweaedoV-8so pF Put.l.,.te
ufc r ta -in its years-ahead ccassiseenegieering-a





a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e andderudrivecnveiethsisre ssiggrsraki!Recrclltngbal seerng
o ntStrato-StreaksPoweredWsPontiac-rtodayL


// WolAc'S ALL-NEW STRATO=STREAK V-8
ofis SIMI t.morrow. Agaf.weogris.in Vtak There's action-ein packed into thisen
mighty 180-horsepower Strato-Streak v-8.
..ecotu-h'sh.otafo.5patothudrtecrdacs YFOom quick-response carbuPetor to the
S~f stwarm-up intake manifold, it's an al-
i ~new .engine--
thoroulghly proved
for outstanding
ALL-EW PNORMIC ODYeconomy and
ALLNEWPANRAMC BDY ALL-NEW SHOCK-PROOF CHASSIS dependability by
Thr' atygetrvso rmispn, Iell over three
Ther shesvsly greaterviosioon ro tpao For '55, Pontiac gives you the newest and million test miles!
{ winshild.Intrios, olo-keyed to' finest in riding comfort, driving ease, all-
,,ue Two-Tone body hues, pXrtsent the around safety. Loglk at these futuretenfi-
ilor bicsprsmr po n- Reefed chassis features: Heavier "'X" frame!
,, wonderful ncw conveniences! Here is Bigger brakes! Recirculating ball steering!
...-.:-rpiece of styling wirh a clear touch Tbls ie!Wdrsae aallra OLRFRDLA
Of tomorrow. A gacfL swTuofgerilssprns etires! kider-pinaced that' o
ne ono rs-tat'ulswte PonticfoAr'5I pr o heude-h-cadaceD OLLARNFORBDOLLA ORA







i Merry Chrisimas and a Happy New Year from Haiti Sun


December 25 1954


No Set-Backs Can Weaken


People's Love for ((BIDDBY, Cinema
One of Haiti's most poptilar tor again, the commentary i-an
entertainers these days is Hen- on against a background ol
ry tBi.bbY., Beir'iLnghaml- who Caribbean music, and the
although is fans among th., Ca- crowd kept on growing. Or
bane Choucotule or Casino CLi- the right a very old womar
entele are adu-rttedly m-Itc,.., .
entele are adTlrrittety limit'. stalked into view bearing a
can daim a large l)loc ot .;cvo-
ctn dainM th .e Croi c s Bot chubbyuby baby girl. and set up
,tees i,n t~he Croix des Boh~cale~s
area and the provinces headquarters a few feet frorr
area and the province.
Henry has but to show a Henry's active elbow.
sparkling shoe ouu4side his Rue The technicians, after cons
Tirflma-sse shop.Iwarehouse-of- dernble minech:nIca.l experimer
fice and an eager sea of faces Tation, finally announced tha
suddenly appLarS to encircle the machine en panne- and
the li-t-tie yellow monsters (a no movies could be shown.
cFla,'lyibuilt English jeep But Henry's gallery showe<
With colorful Bibby Soap mu- their faith could not be she
rals) that is the root of Hen- ken by such set-backs. The:
ray's new found popularity, knew their hero would fihd
On night last week, 'he way, so they sat and gazed
smartly attired Blibby Soap intently at the shadowy squad
feprqsenaative wis as usual re of cloth suspended fromr
tihe center of a gaping crowd, two up-ended baggage trucks
The little monster (jeep) was Henry and a select grou
prinmed and a strange engine retired to the fastnesses of hi
within its depths obliged den, after circumventing bale
with a 'throaty imitation of me- of paper, straw, and sundry
chine' gun fire. Then Henry material (also empty quarts
,descendent of a long line of pints and flasks). There th
Cockney-Hlatians) bustled a- problem was discussed over
bout pulling forth miles of in- stimulating Haig & Hail
slated wire. The 'truck, pro- with an aria from Henry'
ved to be parked too fFr from extensive record ooilection
the pavement bordering the throttling down pensively o
vacant lot beside the Bermin- the radiophone.
gham establishment representn After a couple of opera si
tatives of everything from ledtions and lighter choices
BotWbh to motor cycles to life Henry and Co. reformed an
Insurance and of course the made a fronta] attack on th
famous .Bibby, soap), so Bib- Plrojec'tor.
byman Henry shuttled her into The crowd had doubled di
PDosition. A blue-enameled pro- ring the absence of the sia
SJeetor then rewarded the won Facing the problem with re
der- lmed gallery already set- need vigour, Henry locate
ling between the Improvised the difficuJlty without more
treen and the moving-picture than half an hour's seird
trick. ,Seems I forgot to take th

Arter a perhorance at the cap off the lenses. he annou
Attar a perhorinmanie at the
ced.
projector worthy of a more ex-
lerienced show-man, Henry With the cap removed th
squared off and flicked a movie began to take form o
wityitch. The voice of Pierre the screen and the encirclin
; MLa9ard could be heard sa ing crowd tossed( in ecstac
,lrs. Leger was 'bien conitrteft
about something. but the -'
tfen remained unshadowed.
SHenry and his assistant Lech
.Mician hastily switched off the
4fiunfld then further tinkering
(attracting more attention ,from
the crowd than many a Para- / .''
mount movie) was carried out. J* .
'nd a fresh start made. 818E B
The sound track rambled a
"lile further on in the story
i- J the president of the Bibby
rorporatlon (Percy C. Bibby)
-Was holding forth to the -rea
ler pleasure of Amba -_sa .lor H:
RD1 Mrs Leger who apparen- "| B
ty should have appeared on '
J tlM blank screen. |
Le Henr and hi, Chief
iPtgineer attacked the projec-


11









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showing when an old man with shadows hitting across
stated chasing a pair of -ti- the panorama of Liverpo,>l and
mocuns- .who had been putting the National AnLhen intersper
.i.niEs doctn the back of his sed by skrieks as the entire.
shiit. The 'film drew to an end crowd joined in the game.


tO'u conn? 'bagaille Ia?a
know what that is?j asked
the picture..
Ou besoin eraser toute ma-
chine lh? (you want to smash
the machine ) asked Henry.
No reply was noted fihorn the
crowd.
.I
A game of tag got. underway
in the wings and the screen
was blotted out by the shadows
of speeding "ti-moun. Henry
divided his .time between hol
ding the Eastern front against
the encroaching nass, andi
trying to avoid a law-suit by
keeping various heads, from
inviting a smack -eraser,
from' the propped up back door
of the little jeep monster.
*Si bagaille ]a tombe sur ou
d'ab tuer ou ouit (if that door
falls on your head you are
finished) Henry) warned for
the fifteeth time in five mi-
nutes.
*Oh! quittez yo mourri. (Lei
them die) a weary voice advi-
sed from the reserved section.
The end of the film was rea-
ched and 'the audience drewv
itself up to attention, as a pic-
ture of the President appeared
on the screen accompanied by
our National authem. A few
older boys saluted respectfully.
Hl-enry briskly prepared to
pack up. but -the crowd stood
mutely by in postures of sup-
plication, a few pleading voi-
ces asking to see the savon
reclame, again.

oo Henry stiartea from tne
beginninLg this tine and a lit-
tle closer attention was 'remar
ked among the older people.
It was obvious that they
were paying close attention 10to
the process by which Bibpy
soap attained such peaks of
perfecitIon, as comments such
as gadez blanc ab fai savon,
(look at the white man making
soap) plainly showed.
Henry was spared a third


t


elder Bermningham. Then, via
what the hams call a fone.
patch, the relay went from Dr.
Horace's home via telephone
to Dr. Earl's short wave radio
to Henry's home In Haiti, whe-
re his doctor waited. The air
lanes around them were clear-
ed via a special emergency -
gnal as the doctors talked back
and forth along the circuit.
X X X
DR. HORACE suggested a
brand new treatment In vita-
min K, then 'barely on the
maq'ket.There wasn't one on the
island. Then another mi-racle
of hamming. An airline pilot
friend of Henry's, about to take
off on 'he Haitian run, heard
the conversation, found some
of the precious medicine and
flew it there. The senior Ber-
minghamn lost his sight but
there seems general argeement
that,,hammlng saved his life.
x xx
AND ON THE LIGHTER
SIDE, hamming also has its
advantages. BenminghamT was
driving out Woodvward when a
motorcycle patrolman prilled
'him over. Henry lapsed into
Cr6ole, a maneuver he finds
helpful in situations like that.
The policeman cocked an ear.
-I know that voice,' he said...
then : *Hienry Berminpgham-
H'H 1 H-B,. Another hanm... and
no ticket.
Ix X x
THE PRESIDENT OF HAI-
TI, Paul Magloire, will be t- he
guest of President EisenhoEl',
Jan, 26-30, Hopes to visit New-
York and Detroit before he re-
turns to Haiti. ,


S\ I "
Henry's ,Hamming, Saves Life,


From The Detroit Free Press.
No-'ember 11

By Mark Beltaire :
Sport and science and socia-
bility of radio .ham-ming' bring
these amateur radio operators
into a c.iose, worldwide fraterni
ny. There are some 300000 of
therm. even several stations
working out of Russia, l11 free
to talk with each other as 'they
please under Government licen
se. The Russians. of course, are
all highly certified members
who can be trusted not to dev-
iate from the line when they
talk with their ham, counter-
parts in, say, the United Sates
or South Americ..
xXxx
DRAMATIC TALE of how
hamming can be more than
helpful is told by Henry Ber-
mingham. of Port-au-Prince,
Haiti, now In Detroit to visit
his brother Roger. who 'lives in
Royal Oak and carries the call
letters WSCVD. Their father,
Lionel. retired British Consul'
to Haii. live on the i.Ianf
He hrd been treated in Detroit
for eye trouble bv Dr. Hor-'ce
WeVtorn, whose brthprt lDr.
Earl. is another of the hamn fra
ternity.
x x x
EARLY ONE MORNING Ro-
ger received a frantic message
from his brother's station HH
1 HB in Port-au-Prince. Their
father was suffering from he-
morrhages of the retinas of both
eyes. Roger immediately call
ed Dr. Bar), who contacted his
brother who had treated the





December 25 1954


A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSun


Can You Answer These



Questions




About Life Insurance P


QUESTIONS :


1--Whai. thee v..)rld's most, widely u'sd f:,n1l of
tijhrift ? ...............

2-Houv m.any life lnsuraLi.e om,.pafltla ''re' there
in the U. S. A. only "


ANSWERS :


Life Lr bnc.e -:.vn' by 132 nllichn ,men,
women did children.
,Ov.er G00', ac LiVely CjMInl Vting with eachd other.


3-Does a man ha.e to die to Wn wi.'h Life in- No! M..ie han half 'Pf all payments go to liv-
surance ? ...... ..... ling poli,. homers.


I


4-Who lI:)ptd yOr nieigt)OLI'S bLIV their nt .)rnI .

5-,- i, have mari, faIy miliez help&l y.o:muiT
pe,-,ple get ci n'.r. ,dti':atrn'

3-W\hy ,ri the _erv'.,v your life jil.urance
,,ii;iiL -,, im portant? ;

7-H-v. liaz life ii1-3Lirn.e leel'p)eJ 'ive e-eryone
:i br.,-- ci-,r .conce-pt .:fi family respon-)sibility?

&-\Who hi-: the l.r0ge.-. S.Iki? in life insurance,


The people who putIL money into ;ife in-u'ar-
vce 3qnil avhwgs.

"hriju.ah the tLe .-,ft life iniuran,:e.

To mike .oure youI life insurance plan-.- con-
ti!!uLz- to I'.t y,,our neels a-ind' dlesires.

By enabling the breadwinner to extend liis
support beyond Ilis lihfeLLinie

\Vo'nien jnd children "ur* they nlj&iefit most
ft'riai It-S pli',ec'tiOl-.


It1 II-IQYA,$
CIEII Q1 RI4


Health


e


8Happiness


SAnd Th(


And

For 1955'

Years


To Come.




L W
i.

/ ~SECURIT& l ^^^



SUN LIFE

OF CANADA

HEAD OFFICE.,


-SUN LIFE. STAFF
A Griffin, Branch Secretary lies. PorIto Rico); Cilber'
Brandt Ron Chernt ..I ; .1 ony Chenet Sr. (D-.t Supr.
'_-;ori Marc Lebo n- (. Gietrens. -- uLr.


During 1954 the busine, Of
life insurance has hown a
most sat.isfct:iry g r u ,' t h .
In all countries where the Sun
Life operates, inen and women
have increasingly provided .for
their own .eottritv and for
the security of those dependent
upon them. This is a :lernons.
ration of self-reliance by three
out of every- four families. It
mean-, thn i., ,pdouection apd
people with consequently great
security for more and more
er peace of mind fu.- io,? and


more families. \\'ih kindest
though's for Christmas and the
New Year, the Sun Life Assu-
rance Company of Canada
wishes to its policyholders a
Merry Chrlsthmas and a Happy
New Year.
RONY (H.ENET.
CPORGES GAETJENS
MARC LEBON
GASTON SAM
RONY CHENET Jr.
,Representatives





A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from Hail
CLAUDETTE SOLAGES BRIDE
OF REYNOLD FABIUS


,,j 1 f7




Bride ind groom s;uroun-dl by marraoie, Mrs. Elias Cassis
and Parrain Alanrice Fabius.


itiSun


sumptuous villa of the parents Andre Roy, Alfred Joseph,
of the bride, Mr and Mrs Georges Khawly, Jr,. Nessim
Leon Solages Mladame nee Moura, Guy Fouchard, Roger
Cassis) at Nerettes. Biamby and Miss Mina G.
Cassis. On the side of the
Given in marriage'by Mauri- groom: Messieurs Jamil Han-
ce Fabius (Parrain), the lo- da!, Artoine Cassis, Miguel
vely bride wore a gown crea- Cassis, Amador I. Mourra,
ted in guipure, tulle and nylon -
the bodice and billowing skirt ...-
were trimmed with seeded '' .
pearls and sequins. Her fin-
geritip veil was caught to a se-
quinecd crown, and she carried
a cascade of orange blossom sB
on a brocaded satin muff.
Mrs. Elias Cassis was the
Mation of Honor (Marraine).
Bridesmaids were: The Mis-
ses Marie-Therese, Monique
and Yolande Solages, Dania
Beliard, Marlene Kahliara Cla E D L s
d(lie Maximilien, Evelyne Luc-N HEADS OF WI1
chessi, and Nicole Magloir. EATE GO
Their ,cavaliers> : Messieurs CE LEE
Umberto Brousse, Jack Kaha- Three generations composed
ra,'Alix Leys, Edouard Fils- the representative family
Aime, Michel Saieh, Bernard group which assembled in the
Lucchessi, Anselmo Martino, luxurious villa of Mr. and Mrs
and Elie Joseph. Jr. orn-o,, Winer Nnvebmihr 9nrl


I


ENER. FAMILY
LDEN WEDDING
wife (nee Villejoint) made a
handsome couple as they recei
ved affectionate congratula-
tions .from' their children and
grndcQhildrelin.'o Tlio scnra off


In a 6:30 p.m. service at double-ring ceremony was per s| I 4 -
I'Eglise St. Pierre, Pftion-Vil- formed by the Reverend Fa- Witnesses signing the acte to celebrate the le, on December 11th. Miss their Alfred Monteil, Cure of de marriage, were: On the si- of one. of haiti's leading fami- cally makes this large family
Claudette Solages became the Petion-Ville. de of the bride: Messieurs lies. an institution in Port-au-Prin
bride of Reynold Fabius. The The reception followed ot h3 Elias Cassis, Adrien Fabius The coffee tycoon and his Continum.d over Leaf



SFor CompleteS

\ BUY FBOM MEMBERS OF
I.,

W rf "0 v c^ ^' ..\


The Tourist and Gift shop Association




G o" Freirch Perfumes -- rental n-ties "
.Aux cent mile Articles : its of all kinds Maison Orienlale Fresfh Pers oriental lti/
Carlos : Haitian handicraft. French Perfumes Ounga Doli Dresses Souvenis
Caribcrafit : Mahogany Sisal Ouvroir Nalionale : Embroidery Handicraft
) Caibcrft ^gan Ssal l"-"0""Handicraft Tortoise shell
SChampagna's : Petfumes Mahogany Maxim's Han dicraft -- TSrtoisal e shellraws
Geo Deslandes : Mahogany. Factory Meinberg Br os. Mahony Sisal & strawde ds
Haitian Iift Shop : Mahogany Handicraft Samba : Embroidered dresses
Jacquelli'pe: Embroidered dresse souvenirs Rhum Barbancourt : Haiti's finest rum
Jeawe'nes : Dresses Souvenirs Si Lp Shop : Sisal & Mahogany goods
SLa erle des Antilles : Perfumes Sisal, shoes, bags Si-Jou-La : Dresses Haitian hudicrof
La Belle Creole Tourist shopping center Tam Tam : Mahogany Souvenirs .
Le Perchoir : Shop in the Mountains_ The Souvenir Shop : Perfumes Jewelry
-1. One Price Policy
2. Prices plainly marked on each item
3. Fully itemized sales slip given without request
Rhum Barbancourt available at these shops
,J~,. .94 .,,,* ,., *+, ,.*.., ,., ,, ... ,. ,%*t*,*..,,%,, ,e,,e .,,l,."e ."*"e. .%'*." +ek, ."h,," J, tq q'%".q*%.l'''l'n te' 'e' '' '' q q 'q ~ ,e 'q '


December 25 1954
Marcel Beliard, Zeekie Moura
Salim Attie, Georges Khawly
and Jamil Assail.

'The groom is the son of Mr
and Mrs Charles Fabius. The
couple are honeymooning at
Kenskoff:





A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSun December 25 1954

HEADS OF WIENER FAMILY FOR REN

fully furnished, in Bourdon
CELEBRATE GOLDEN WEDDING Charming room cottage,fui unse,, oro The B biggest
Contined from over Leaf blishing branches in many of Suitable for bachelor or couple.
the provi[nces. Mrs. Wiener Apply Georhe REINBOLD
Pthe provinces. Mrs. Wieneris ne 2240 and 384. i
one of Port au Prince's favour P, i B I-
ce. It has drawn daughters- ef
ite society matrons. hit a at
and-sons-in law from such fa ite rociPty matrons. __rta__t_
mnilles as the Theard's. the Hib-
berts the Gardere's and the The traditional family din- FOR RENT
Etheard's. ner was attended by their life- F N
The distinguished founder long friend, Mr. Joseph Du- Banhtiful. newly.decorated large this year
house in Bouidon, former Brazilian Emy' e
and head of one of Haiti's lar- fort. quarters for corporation
h h bassy.
gest export houses has devo- Suitable also fop guest-house or head
ted his life to building uip the 'Seen m picture with Lhe We- iApply George REINBOI
Phoae 2240 and 3841.
coffee industry of Haiti, esta- rer clan.'
7f ORD 1955 --- wilibeheeldal t



BAR ITALIA



Customllne Tudor
... roomy, two-door sedan with years ahead styling. Go automate ...
with full-time power steering, brakes, windo,._a.nd seats- Cit6 de I'Exposiion
/) MHere's the gf-t-Ab r news of iwMyearl-e'ver Be're -nave -.
S, you had so much choice in a car ..4 brilliant Ford -ine.iil
St16 different models! A rainbow of colors! And in-
) every model the exciting performance of Foro's ll new Everybody Is Talking About It !
I '^NSTANT ACTION POWER... new, higher horsepower! T
-- _
SEE YOUR DEALER LUCIANI BEHRMANN & Co

Compagnie d'Eclairage Electrique



i WITH THE SEASONS' GREETINGS WE WISH

S' OUR COURAGEOUS AND LOYAL CUSTOMERS
> ,,A BRIGHTER NEW YEAR AND MORE POWER TO THEN


I '
\ DREAM COME TRUE....


'4 That's what the unwinking brightness of the city's lights means to the management /
~of Cie. Eclairage Electrique. The hope expressed in an interview with the .Sun. some \ .
.weeks ago that Port-au-Prinft would have lights for the Holiday Season has been
realized.


It meant round the clock labour, and a crop of grey hairs for Man in Charge George W i
S Polley, as well as emergency shifts for the engineering and maintenance staff. But
the Company was glad to do its share, even if it meant the most gruelling hardship '4
~because, the Director says, the customers showed such .patience and courage.. f,^


SNow the lights are on again, due to the completion of repairs to the 2000 kw Ye.
/ generator and the installation of two new units. It seems safe to say .ADIEU TO THE *A
BLACK-OUT REIGN., and to wish everyone a Happy Christmas and a Prosperous '4-
/Nw Year. -






A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HailiSun


CENTENARIAN DIES


Four generations of descendants flock around Mrs. MAainevhilie
on Me oczsIOn. cOf her 100 th birthday lasti January. Mrs. Maine-
ville d.ed last month a fei.', weeks before I-er 101 st anniversary.


Mrs. P. Maineville died Mon
day at the home of her great-
grand children. Mr and Mrs.
Francklyn Brierre, at Babiole
- almost a month to the day
that she would have observed
her' 101st birthday. The spri-
ghtly > who brave
ly withstood the fury of the
hurricane when it struck her
home town in Jeremnie ripp lg
the roof from her house, was
in good health Hntil recently.
Her family had brought her in
for an extended visit wtvh re-
latives in Port-au-Prince seven
ral weeks ago.

The defunct is survived by a
large family, and leaves a
hos of rind inth.sut


S.ahost of friends in the south
THE WALL CLOCK WVITHf
as Well as in the capital to
mourn her loss.
,IESTMINISTER C H I U E S"
2e
3I

QUARTER HOURLY. L eHaiti Sun> offers its dee-
,755r pest sympathy atld heart felt
RELIABLE AND DECORA-' condolences to the be,,-aved
family which includes Mr.
fll TIVE and Mrs, Francklyn Brierre,
Ulrick Duvivier, Mr'.and Mrs
*Me-^^^^^l'^l~j'ST~f JMiss Jeanne Maineville, Mrs.
CARI_ M, LLOA N S WE s'r-iN-a MrTs.
vTr IIE FeLLx Maine-ilhle, Mr and lM's.


December 25 1954
Maine,,ille. family was talfen last January
The above picture showing on the occasion of Mrs. Maine
'he four generations of the vile's 100th anniversary.



The RIVIERA
Hotel d'Haiti

* ^-4


/
/
r?


.. .ws .. Hs '!<,. .o ,,, .3B'c,_/,,


GUY DEROSIER AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Continuous music and dancing every nite
from 6:30 p m to 1:00 a m
Every Saturday night $1:50 -minimum- per person
Sunday 8:00 p m in Dining room
CHOIR MICHELt, DESGROTrES


-35-member choral group-


At Russo Freres / Leo Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. RPbert /. TRADITIONAL NEW YEARS' EVE DANCE
A R so F AMainevile. Mr. 'and Mrs: Max -a New Year gadget for aall-


B[ rasserie I)e La Couronne


)PRESENTS ITS SINCEREST WISHES
',TO CUSTOMERS THROUGHOUT THE REPUBLIC
FOR A GAY YULETIDE SEASON & A PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR....


AND REMINDS THEM THAT
\THE BRASSERIE DE LA COURONNE CAN
/ .

\PROVIDE THE CHEER TO MAKE e
/ /

\ THIS A TRULY MEMORABLE CHRISTMAS .

/ TUBORG The world-famous beer from Denmark /

-*-Specially brewed for Export-. /

/ SCHLITZ (The beer that made Milwaukee famous,,


SCOCA CQLA For (The Pause That Refreshes-. I

< SODAS Ideal for blending with the ,Noelo spirit.

KOLAS of all flavours but of only the finest qua lily. /



S.CRUSHED ICE, AND BLOCKS, ALSO AVAILABLE
IL





A merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from Haiti Son _______


Best Wishes At Christmas

To The People Of Haiti
FROM

7 HE PRESIDENT Of UNIVERSAL
TRADE INC.


December 25 1951 :

8'.



In IN


"Vrc'.i5c o) ] ."c. !lo:Qie ;s Scarcbed. fo;" .io.'c.


To the people of Haiti who
?re sit.'ggling for recovery tiron
thie d(evostating effects of htUi-
u'ne Hizel. I wkih to ext-nd
my sincerest wishes for a nappy
SChrtitm;-is. and a New Yeon" of
peace and Plenty.

07ORC- LARIS
PF'I/ifT UNIVERSAl.
TRAUE INC .

31 r' Lnis, oiel uo F/olrd,i (I l' r,
dkig busitzisiiienl, ce 1,c J 1 I
tie's pid during the dayb, fi,
wing, the hurricane, lendn ,',
ship the Josie jJr triInSJLi.it',
tion oj elefe su'pplt,.s to. 1'.
Southwest and a truck cad
bulldo/xer- to help with *'od
E1Latling work.


The Cyclone's Path


.- Jetici r ppj.,-,,i L,.i1bco oatr with Gaps
of Hotscs and rooujs Sdatteied About.


A se '.' P,''i.c, i! .'i'rr t(.? ; ;,i.; e S,-cpt Tt'ouzgh leav',tg only one Building Standing.


Mapou A once High!y pro.fatcti'e nlia,. wml take a long time to recover. It 1ws left Aftermath of -Hazel, The village Barrmere Roche stood on
a natural lake by the cyclone, the spot marked now by bare earth and giant boulders.
'r -* "- ~ ~ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


U
in its row.'






A Menry Chrislmas and a jappy New Year from Haiti Sun


December 25 1954


Selden Rodman's Haiti Guide
Wins Laurels from Reviewers


I
Selden Rodman, nine-times a
visitor to Haiti, recently pu-
.blished his Book and Comple
te Guide to Haiti> (HAITI
THE BLACK REPUBLIC:
Devin Adair 5 dol.)
a
The -book provides valuable
publicity for the republic etpe-
cially now at the opening of
the tourist season; and is also
a welcome addition to the se-
rious writing on Haiti.

J
Its appearance was greeted
enthusiastically by the Ameri-
can Press. In the New York
Times, Sunday December 12,
Ivan Sanderson, a zoologist
and author of many travel
books (including aCaribbean
Treasure* which describes his
experiences in Haiti), was es-
pecially favourable in his re-
view of the work.


Mr. Sanderson's opinion is
published below.'

HAITI: The Black Republic. By
Selden Rodman. Illustrated. 168
pp. New York: The Devln-Adair
Company. $5.


By IVAN SANDERSON
There have probably been mo-
re monsense and outright false-
hood written about Haiti than
about any other country, and
there may well have been more
writing about it in proportion to
its size than about any other area
Ln the world. But without decry-
ing all the literature of the past
we may none the less breathe
a sigh of relief for Selden Rod-
man's book. At last Haiti has
been treated with Insight, digni-
ty, considerable penetration and
not a little humor-or, rather,
wit, which is something different
and of higher worth in French
culture. -Haitians are probably
unique in that they too can ap-
preciate their own incongruities.
At last they should find in "Hai-
ti: The Black Republic" an ac-
count of their country that they
will not want to fling out of the
nearest window.

Tils rather slim work may at
first give..the impression that it
is heavy-going; It is packed with
facts, including facts on such
minutiae As nightclub rates and
the order of named streets in
Jacmel-a sore subject even with
Haitians. But once you start to
read it you will probably not put
it down.
This is a sort of super guide.
book-and more, It gives dll
that an outsider wants to know
about the history, the people,
the land, the' religion and, above
p11, the arts of Haiti. It also
includes a detailed tourist rou-
tine with costs that is so good
it brings to light all kinds of


items worth seeing in small
towns which this reviewer in-
habited but about which he had
never before heard. Mr. Rodman
is a poet and an artist in the
true senses of those titles, and
while this well fits him to inves-
tigate Haiti, he has, as we feel
Haitians must admit, proved a
very real influence in the cul-
tural development of that coun-
try since he went to work there.
The great thing about Mr.
Rodman is that he is not preju-
diced in any sense, and particu-
larly not in the restricted sense
regarding race. He actually has
the audacity to state that the
African or "black", or whatever
we should call the Negro peoples
ex Africa, have profound abili-
ties of their own. Even more
amazing to those who know
Haiti, he dares to say that those
of mixed racial stock, or "the
Polite" as he.calls them, also have
a great deal to offer. This may
sound Incomprehensible to an
outsider, but the so-called black
has so long been regarded as
inferior and the Creole of mixed
rqce has taken such a beating
from the blacks and whites for
so long that tife true qualities
and contributions of both, not
only to Haitian but to general
culture, have' been overlooked.
Both in their own way are out-
standing people, though in Haiti
they are isolated on half a small,
overpopulated island. And Mr.
Rodman explains why.

We have no criticisms of this
book, though we personally pre-
fer vaudum to vaudou, and we
are doubtful of some of the ref-
erences to Africa; also, the title
is a bit unfortunate. Haiti is
not the "Black Republic", though
nearly 90 per cent of the popu-
lace may be these so-called


blacks. An enormous contribu-
tion to its structure has been
and still is being made by the
"lights" or lite, their greatest
probably being the recognition
of the blacks not only as their
equals but also as their leaders
-as occasion and great talent
has ariseCi among them.

It is a very hard thing to live
down a colonial heritage, a class
and money consciousness, a
scuttling by a Napoleon, mas-
sacre and racial hatreds engen-
dered by others. The Haitians
have succeeded in living it down
to an inspiring extent. Despite
wars, revolutions and dictators,
Haitians are true democrats and
extraordinarily tolerant. They
have also made real friends out-
side: such a friend is Selden
Rodman.


.Author Selden Rodman, Wife Mala and daughter.


it CHARLES FEQUIERE Co.





AGRICULTURAL & INDUSTRIAL REPRESENTATIVES
( ;.



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"' (Construction Material)


p t

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(44 Rue RIux)
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WISHES THEIR MANY CUSTOMERS




THE VERY BEST FOR CHRISTMAS AND THE NEW YEAR
S'* !.


/ /. 3


LIS PLUS BELLES MOSAIQUES
HAITIENNES

PLACE EFFRAOU
PLACE GEFFKAIKD





A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from HaitiSun____ ___December 25 1954
: CONTINENTAL SOCIETY FOR photographer, of Le Nouveniste,
CONTINENTAL SOCIETYwas among the guests at theBGAUD
VIRGIN ISLANDS FORMS meeting, and offered many use- (Con-ifued fro, Page 1) finally, siezed his hand and for.
VIRGIN ISLANDS FORMSfl suggestions to the ladies of (ontinued from ced him to do a rough drawng
te Committee all drawings in the class a o i od og rwn
AUXILB ARY UNIT IN HAITI te Committee.1 all drawings in the class of a few crude lines. Shamefa.
Bu oedach.w ced he crept back to his seat
But one day he was sent to among the snickering students.
S On Sunday. morning, Decem- well as two cases of toys and the board to do a drawing for WIson explains this by saying
S her 19th,. Mrs:DdetteMartineau- clothing from Mr. and Mrs Wil- CHRISTMAS MIRAU.E FOR SUNSHINERS the class to copy, and no idea he was searching for a really
M r... detteacame.cFno idmaienthanpan oour
Rey, well-known for her nume- liam Rowe (old friends of Haiti) came Fo r moie than an hour magnificent idea and kept cons.
: rous activities in the domaine of were sent in care of Mrs. Paul .Sunshine Home. Miss Burke's sun- he stood before the blank board. m t iea a t cn
i" social service and charity orga- E. Magloire. less orphanage (.Sun. December 19( The exasperated teacher dealt tantl rejecting each that pr
ni nations, received a group of Mrs. Stanford asked that the hasbeen transferred to new quarters him a ,coup de canne, which sented itself.
friends at' her home in Petlon- ladies present be considered as .a sunny RIlle O1erveau hr;:.. further disorganized him then
,!' Ville for the' purpose of intrb- the first members of the new u- Miracle worker wphanage recently andire
Vilefor he prpos ofwho visited the orphanage recently and
S during to them, Mrs Olivia Stan- rit, beginning to function im. immediately decided to move the 85 ...: ,
ford, of Naw-York. mediatelv in order to take charge children out of the mud hole in which .
The: distinguished representa-' of the distribution of the Xmas they swarmed. CMN4
tive of the Continental Society gifts expected to arrive during
for. the Children of the Virgin the week. This met with an en- ; .
Islands, Inc, arrived with her thusiastic response with mem- WANTED lo w
husband, -two months ago. They bers of the Committee as follows:
have rented a house at Petion- Mrs. Paul Rey, Mrs. Charles Z
!P Ville, and their plans call for an Fombrun, Mrs. Paul Con'ington, Would like to find a coinfort.a ., ,
'.extended sojourn in Port-au- Mrs. Arsine Magloire, Mrs. Chris e, U .u he hue, '
; Prince. The organization which tian Laporte, Mrs. Nelaton Ca- le, nfuinied house, iot. less V .
A,, ,lrs. "Stanford represents is a mille, Mrs. Harry Tippenhauer, than two bedrcloomns, all modern .. '.
'*,.- philanthropic society' founded Mrs. Arthur Vincent, M rs. B. con venien. es, p, oh, g den, etc i "
by Mrs. Marie B. Poston, seven Koudim, Mrs. Madeline Lagazy- ^""*en pOrch, garden, etc
y' ears ago for the purpose of Maival, Miss Gina Cdlestin. Mrs. write Box A or c/o Haiti Sun.
': bringing aid to the under-privi- Francois Russo, Mrs. "George
leged children of the Virgin Is- Wiener, Jr., and Mrs. Olivia
lands.. The headquarters of the Stanford.
Society is located in Brooklyn,
N. Y. The shipment of an estimated .:
*r" Upon the initiative of Mrs.' 1,233 articles from the Continen- ,"
Stanfoird whose heart goes out tal Society, plus the two cases RSS T F N C
H*' to the needy children of Haiti, of toys and clothing from Mr. S.'HRISTIAS TOYS FOR NEEDY CHILDREN
: the hbme office has authorized and Mrs. Rowe will be offered Mrs. Edna Barrie and her daughter, Mrs. Elaine Barrmunore present
:.the .formation of a Haitian Au- to the children of the following .- the First Lady with a box of toys for the children of the
Xiliary Branch, in view of expan establishments: M is s Burke's Mmne Magloire Foundation.
Sding its program to the children Sunshine Home, Mrs. Walker's
;. of this country. Orphelinat de 1'Enfant Jesus, the
A!:. With Mrs. Ray graciously ser- Orphelinat de la Madeleine, the
'.'' ving as translator, Mrs Stanford private initiative establishment 1``
.. communicated to the group, a of Miss Yvana Duvivier, and the
,,letter announcing the expedition Madame Magloire Foundation's
of nine cases of toys on Decem- La Saline. The distribution will ., 45
ber 14th, via the S. S. Hornum, include a Xmas party for the RE6.TRADE MARK i oTamOU $ihCG 18k
of. the new SOHANA Steam- kiddies of each institution.
ship Company. This shipment, as Mr. Aublin Jolicoeur, Reporter-


S-Merry Christ mas



SAND 1

;' t

A Happy New Year



I FROM .



'.1$ .- j
SCompania De Industrias Maritimas

<:. -;,, <-*
SCOINMAR

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.CITE DE L'EXPOSITION
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5?*' 2 ---


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GARDNER-DENVER COMPANY


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POWERi7


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LAUNDROMAT
BOUCARD & C9


BUY YOUR GIFTS AT:
* PAUL AUXILA
SAUX CHOSES D'HAITI
* CANAPE VERT
* CITADELLE SHOP
(Mrs. MONTREUILI
* MADAME CELESTIN
* FISHER
* FRESCO BAR
'JEAN FOSY LAHAM


BUJY YOUR GIFTS AT:
SFRITZ MEVS
* BOUTIQUE D ROUMAIN
*SANCHEZ TRAVEL
SERVICE
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[-4":


56
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